(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Message of the President of the United States and ..., Volume 1, Part 11"

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at http : //books . google . com/| 



r- 



te. « . -:CiJl 



Annual reports 

of the secretary of war 

United States War Dept 



'■J'i.i\f^'' 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OP THE 









WAK DEPAKTMENT 



FOB THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



PABT H. 
REPORT OF THE 

MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA ON CIVIL AFFAIRS. 

IN TW^O VOLUMES. 

VOL. I-IN FOUR- PARTS. 

Part 3. 



XJIVTSION OF INSTTLAB J^JF'FA.IRS. 

WAB DEPARTMENT. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVBaiNMBNT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1901. 



Digitized byCjOOQlC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^^ 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



i 



OP THB 



WAE DEPARTMENT 



FOB TBB 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 80, 1900. 



PART 11. 

REPORT OF THE 

MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA ON CIVIL AFFAIRS. 

IN TWO VOLUMES. 

VOL. I— IN FOUR PARTS. 

Part 3. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PBINTINO OFFICE. 
1901. 



Digitized byCjOOQlC 













oJU- 



X 



\ 



:^ 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



ARRANGEMENT OF THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



\ 



YOLUMS I. Parti 1-13. — Boport of the Seeretary of War and all other report! exoept 

those of the Chief of Engineen and the Chief of Ordnanoe. 
yOLUMB IL Parti 1-8. — Beport of the Chief of Bngineers. 
YOLUMB in. Beport of the Chief of Ordnance. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME I. 

Part 1. — BeportB, as follows: 
Secretary of War. 

Board of Ordnance and Fortification. 
Ck)mmi88ioner8 of National Military Parks: 

Chickamauga and Chattanooga. 

Crettysburg. 

ShUoh. 

Vicksburg. 
United States Military Academy, West Point, N. Y. : 

Board of Visitors. 

Superintendent. 
Soldiers' Home, District of Columbia: 

Board of Commissioners. 

Inspector-General United States Army. 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. 
Part 2. — Reports of Bureau Ohiefs: 
Adjutant-General. 
Inspector-GeneraL 
Ju(j^Advocate-(jleneraL 
Quartermaster-General. 
Acting Commissary-Greneral of Subsistence. 
Surgeon-Getieral. 
Paymaster-Greneral. 
Chief Signal Officer. 
Record and Pension Office. 



Digitized by VjQOQlC 



IV CONTENTS OF VOLUME I. 

• 
Part 8.— Beport of the laeutenant-Oeneral Oonunandinsr the Army, and 
Department Commanders: 
lieutenant-General. 
Adjutant-General. 
Inspector-General . 
Department of the East 
Department of the Lakes. 
Department of the Miasoori. 
Department of Texas. 
Department of Dakota. 
Department of the Colorado. 
Department of California. 
Department of the Columbia. 
Department of Alaska. 
Division of Cuba: 

Department of Matanzas and Santa Clara. 
Department of Western Cuba. 
Department of Santiago and Puerto Principe. 
Department of Porto Rico. 
Infantry and Cavalry School. 
Cavalry and Light Artillery School. 
Part 4. — ^ReiK>rt of the Ideutenant-Oeneral Oommanding the Army, and 
Department OommanderB — Continued. 
Department of Habana and military governor city of Habana. 
Division of the Philippines (Major^Greneral Otis). 
Part 5. — Beport of the laeutenant-Oeneral Oommanding* the Army, and 
Department Oommanders — Continued. 
Division of the Philippines (Major-General MacArthur): 
Department of Northern Luzon. 
Department of Southern Luzon. 
Department of Y isayas. 
Department of Mindanao and Jolo. 
Part 6. — Heport of the Ijieutenant-Qeneral Oommanding the Army — Con- 
tinued. 
Military operations in the Philippine Islands. 
Part 7. — Heport of the Ijieutenant-Qeneral Commanding the Army — Con- 
tinued. 
Military operations in the Philippine Islands — Continued. 
Part 8. — Beport of the laeutenant-Oeneral Commanding the Army — Con- 
tinued. 
Military operations in the Philippine Islands — Continued. 
Part 9. — ItexK>rt of the Ideutenant-Oeneral Commanding the Army — Con- 
tinued. 
Military operations in China. 
Part 10. — ^Report of the Military Governor of the Philippine lalands, on 

civil affiedrs. 
Part 11. — Beport of the Military (Governor of Cuba, on civil affairs. 
Part 12.— Beport of the Military Governor of Cuba, on civil aflldrs— Con- 
tinued. 
Part 18. — Beport of the Military (Governor of Porto Bico, on civil afllBdrs. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF THE MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA ON CIVIL AFFAIRS. 

IN TWO VOLUMES. 



ARRANGEMENT OF CONTENTS. 



PART 11. 

VOLUME I— IN FOUR PARTS. 
Part 1. 

Personal report of Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, U. S. V., military governor of the 

island of Caba. 
Report of First Lieut. Frank R. McCoy, Tenth U. S. Cavalry, aide-de-camp, on 

financial affairs. 
Civil orders and circulars issued from Headquarters Division of Cuba during the year. 

Part 2. 

Report of Sefior Diego Tamayo, secretary of state and government. 

Report of Seftor Guillermo Dolz, civil governor of the province of Pinar del Rio. 

Report of Sefior Emilio Nufiez, civil governor of the province of Habana. 

Report of Sefior P. G. Betancourt, civil governor of the province of Matanzas. 

Report of Sefior Jos^ Miguel Gomez, civil governor of the province of Santa Clara. 

Report of Sefior Lope Recio Loynaz, civil governor of the province of Puerto Principe. 

Report of Sefior Demetrio Castillo, civil governor of the province of Santiago de 
Cuba. 

Report of Maj. William C. Gorgas, suigeon, U. 8. A., chief sanitary oflScer of the city 
of Habana. 

Report of Maj. Valery Havard, suigeon, U. S. A., chief surgeon. Division of Cuba. 

Report of Maj. Edwin St. J. Greble, assistant adjutant-general, U. S. V., superintend- 
ent of the department of charities of the island of Cuba. 

Part 3. 

Report of Sefior Leopoldo Cancio, secretary of finance of the island of Cuba. 

Report of Maj. Eugene F. Ladd, quartermaster, U. S. V., treasurer of the island of 

Cuba. 
Report of Maj. Edward C. Brooks, quartermaster, U. S. V., auditor for the island 

of Cuba. 
Report of Maj. Tasker H. Bliss, commissary, U. S. A., collector of customs for the 

island of Cuba. 
Report of Mr. M. C. Fosnes, director-general of posts for the island of Cuba. 
Report of Sefior Miguel Gener y Rincon, secretary of justice of the island of Cuba. 
Report of Sefior Carlos Revilla, fiscal of the supreme court of the island of Cuba. 
Report of Maj. Edgar S. Dudley, judge-advocate, U. S. V., judge-advocate of the 

Division of Cuba. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



VX ASBANGEMENT OF CONTENTS, 

Pabt 4. 

Report of Sefior Perfecto Lacoste, secretary of agricaltare, commerce, and industries 
of the island of Cuba. 

Report of Sefior Enrique Joe6 Varona, secretary of public instruction of the island of 
Cuba. 

Report of First Lieut Matthew E. Hanna, Second U. S. Cavalry, acting commis- 
sioner of public schools for the island of Cuba. 

Report of Sefior Alejandro Maria L6pez, acting superintendent of schools of the 
island of Cuba. 

PART 12. 

VOLUME II— IN FOUR PARTS. 
Part 1. 

Report of Sefior Jos^ R. Villal6n, secretary of public works of the island of Cuba, Jime 

30, 1900. 
Report of Sefior Est^ban Duque de Estrada, chief engineer, province of Pinar del Rio, 

June 30, 1900. 
Report of Sefior R. V. Molina, chief engineer, province of Habana, June 30, 1900. 
Report of Sefior Cosme de la Torriente, chief engineer, province of Matanzas, June 

30, 1900. 
Report of Sefior I). Lombillo Clark, chief engineer, province of »Santa Clara, June 

30, 1900. 
Report of Sefior Pompeyo Sariol, chief engineer, province of Puerto F*rincipe, June 

30,1900. 
Report of Sefior J. M. Portuondo, chief engineer, province of Santiago de Cuba, June 

30, 1900. 

Report of Sefior Jos6 R. Villal6h, secretary of public works of the island of. Cuba, 

December 31, 1900. 
Report of Sefior Est^ban Duque de Estrada, chief engineer, province of Pinar lei Rio, 

December 31, 1900. 
Report of Sefior R. V. Molina, chief engineer, province of Habana, December 31, 

1900. 
Report of Sefior D. Ix)mbillo Clark, chief engineer, province of Matanzas, December 

31, 1900. 

Report of Sefior Juan G. Peoli, chief engineer, province of Santa Clara, December 
31, 1900. 

Report of Sefior Pompeyo Sariol, chief engineer, province of Puerto Principe, Decem- 
ber 31, 1900. 

Report of Sefior J. M. Portuondo, chief engineer, province of Santiago de Cuba, 
December 31, 1900. 

Part 2. 

Report of Mr. William H. Carlson, special commissioner of railroads for the island 

of Cuba. 
Report of Mr. E. J. Balbin, chief of the light-house board for the island of Cuba. 
Report of Lieut Commander Lucien Young, U. S. N., captain of the port of Habana. 

Part 3. 

Report of Maj. William M. Black, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., chief engineer, 
Division of Cuba. 

Part 4. 

Report of Maj. William M. Black, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., chief engineer, 
Division of Cuba. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



VOLUME I— PART 3. 

Page. 
Eteport of Sefior Leopoldo Cancio, secretary of finance of the island of Caba. . . 1 

Report of Maj. Engene F. Ladd, quartermaster, U. S. V., treasurer of the 

island of Cuba .'. 59 

Report of Maj. Edward 0. Brooks, quartermaster, U. S. V., auditor for the 

island of Cuba 83 

Report of Maj. Tasker H. Bliss, commissary, U. 8. A., collector of customs 

for the island of Cuba 135 

Report of Mr. M. 0. Fosnes, director-general of posts for the island of Cuba . . 259 
Report of Sefior Miguel Crener y Rincon, secretary of justice of the island of 

Cuba 327 

Report of Sefior Carlos Revilla, fiscal of the supreme court of the island of Cuba . 352 
Report of Maj. Edgar 8. Dudley, judge-advocate, U. 8. V., judge-advocate of 

the Division of Cuba 425 

VII 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LEOPOLOO CANCIO, SECRERARY OF FINANCE. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EEPORT 

OP 

LEOPOLDO CANCIO, SECRETARY OF FINANCE. 



Sir: This office has had three incumbents during the fiscal year from 
July 1, 1899. to June 30, 1900. They were Sefiores Desvernine, 
Varona, and the undersigned. However, the writer, having served the 
office of subsecretary with the two former ones, he is in a condition 
to give inmiediate and direct information of the transactions of this 
demrtment. 

The principal event was the application of the order issued by the 
President of the United States, in which, by virtue of the authority 
vested in him as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy, he directed 
that during the maintenance of the military government of the United 
States in the island of Cuba and all islands west of the seventy -fourth 
degree west longitude, evacuated by Spain, there be created and main- 
tained the offices of auditor of the island, one assistant auditor for 
auditing the accounts of the department of customs, and one assistant 
auditor for auditing the accounts of the department of posts, whose 
duties were to audit all the accounts of the island. Later on, at the 
request of this office, the assistant auditorship of the department of 
internal revenues was created. By the same order the office of treas- 
urer of the island was created, which should be filled by the appoint- 
ment thereto of an officer of tne Regular Army of the United States, 
whose duties were to receive and keep all moneys arising from the 
revenues of the island, and to disburse or transfer the same only upon 
warrants issued by the general auditor and countersigned by the mili- 
tary governor. 

The appointment of those officials and the rules and instructions 
necessary to carry into effect the provisions of the order were to be 
issued by the Seci-etary of War, in Washington. 

Pursuant to those provisions the Department of War issued the so- 
called rules and instructions of May 11, 1899, which, with slight devia- 
tions, are the ones that now rule the management of public moneys 
here. 

Said order of the 8th of May, which was enforced the 1st of July, 
1899, again unified the treasury of this island, which had been divided 
since the 1st of January, when, by consequence of the cessation of 
Spanish sovereignty and consequent military occupation of Cuba by 
the United States, three special administrations were created — that of 
customs and of posts, direct dependencies of the Department of War, 
and the department of finance, which since its creation on the 11th of 

1 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



2 BEPOBT OF KILITABT GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

January, 1899, had charge of the ftdndinLstration of internal revenues, 
besides the payments of the office of the civil administration while it 
was extending its action through the subordinate organisms to all the 
territory of tne island. 

Therefore the order of the 8th of May was an advanced step, wherein 
it unified the treasury and the fiscalization of the receipts and public 
expenditures over the three treasuries of customs, posts, and internal 
revenues, which were independent the one from the other, and a cen- 
tral treasury, representative of our fiscal unity, was established with 
so much more reason when two of those special ones were supplied 
principally by the other, or that of customs, which was the only one 
whose receipts could serve as a basis for the support of public services. 

But the order introduced a radical modification in the organism of 
our public treasury prior to the 1st of January, 1899, and not expressly 
derogated until the enactment of the new rules and instructions. By 
virtue of these the department of finance, if considered successor and 
a continuance of the one created by the autonomic r^ffime, as the latter 
was that of the ancient intendencia, became a purely administrative 
department, without other faculties than those delegated to it W the 
military governor, or those purely technical of consulting office in 
matters of a general character where its opinion was requested and 
those of directing and controlling internal revenues, much reduced 
already by the necessary abolition and reduction of grievous, prejudicial, 
and excessive imposts and taxes. 

I do not mean to say that since the 1st of January this office was 
ever de facto in charge of our treasury; that would make me contradict 
the assertion made before that the order of the 8th of May had the 
advantage of unifying the treasury, divided since that historic date in 
three different branches with their respective administrations, treas- 
uries, and auditors. However, it is indubitable that by the form given 
to the new organization the importance of this department was dimin- 
ished, and a permanent character was given for all the duration of the 
military government in this island to what was only deemed to be transi- 
tory, and aiming to restore the civil institutions that already assured the 
country the intervention in its rule and government in what it might 
be allowed by the extraordinary circumstances under which we labored, 
so rare in history. 

My honorable predecessors, Messrs. Desvemine and Varona, with a 
great abundance of reasons, very forcibly remarked the effects of that 
anomalous organization of our public finances and both always had 
favorable reception in the respective military governors. General 
Brooke and yourself. The former said in his report of October 1, 3L899 : 

In the report of the secretary of finance there will be found an exhaustive review 
of the condition of this department, which it is recommended be most carefully con- 
sidered. It KJves a clear msight into the operations of the department under the 
existing conditions and the restrictions placed upon it without any change being 
made in the law. 

In the proclamation of January 1, 1899, the laws in effect on December 31, 
1898, were continued in force until they should be abolished or changed. The order 
of the President establishing the customs service in Cuba was issued December 9, 
1898, and the laws regarding the collection and control of the customs revenues, in 
so far as this branch of the finance department was concerned, were therefore 
changed by the President The same order fixed and regulated the coasting trade. 
Notwithstanding these facts I would ask for the remarks of the secretary of finance 
that consideration, from their being undoubtedly an expression of the views on this 
subject of a s^reat many prominent and able residents and natives of Cuba, the grav* 
ity of the matter demands. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEPOBT OP MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 8 

That prudent and cautious language, at the same tifne that it laid 
open all the alterations that had been made already in the financial 
administration since December, 1898, also acknowledged the current 
of the enlightened public opinion of Cuba in behalf of the maintenance 
of the former organization in whatever it might be compatible with the 
situation created by the military occupation of the country, much more 
so when the new organization given by the order of the 8th of May 
did not introduce any essential alteration in the administrative finan- 
cial mechanism, but limited its action to reconcentrate directly in the 
military government the three indispensable branches of the service, 
namely, uie acknowledgment, definite liquidation, and payment of the 
obligations; the deposit, distribution and location of funds, and the 
fisciuization of public accounts. 

Under the Spanish regime, though the administration was central- 
ized in Madrid or the supremacy of the metropolis was issued in the 
autonomic institutions oi 1898, there was onlj^ one treasury in Cuba, 
with only one financial action within the more or less ample sphere of 
its powers. The department of finance having been deprived of those, 
its characteristic and important functions, what was left to it that 
might have a political importance? 

As a consequence of the order in question the so-called general 
auditor's ofiSce of the State, which was organized in January, 1899, and 
equivalent to the general auditor of the island, disappeared; the central 
treasury of our ancient regulations was converted into a special treas- 
ury of the department charged with its payments, and in the lack of 
budgets the payment-ordering powers were exclusively an3 directly 
of tne militarv^ governor, and not once is the department of finance 
mentioned in the regulations and instructions of May 11. In a word, 
and in order to adjust our judgment to the realitv of facts, the order 
and the consequent instructions gave form and rules to the provisional 
military regime existing from the Ist of January and created centers 
in this city, capital of Sie island, for the management and the fiscal- 
ization of funds that were collected by the mfferent and separate 
administrations of customs, posts, and internal revenues, adjusted to 
the universal model of those services. 

So that when Seiior Varona wrote to you at the commencement of 
this year and shortly after assuming the direction of this department, 
insisting in the efforts of his predecessor to have this oflice restored to 
the fuUness of its functions, he had the pleasure of hearing from your 
lips that his aspirations would be fulfilled, and when the undersigned 
has had the honor to speak with you on the matter, he has heard 
the same answer, namely, that the unity of the treasury would corre- 
spond to the unity of the financial action at the cessation of the military 
regime that now rules, as soon as the stable and definite government 
that is to replace the provisional and transitory one is constituted. 

The development of events in the course of this year shows that we 
are steadily advancing toward the establishment of the new govern- 
ment, the first truly civil one that Cuba will have had in the course of 
its history. In fact, the elections of ay untaraientos took place in June, 
monicipal life being constituted again on elective basis that has been 
suspended since 1893. The ayunt^mientos elected are operating since 
July 1 with the radical novelty that the mayors and treasurers were 
elected directly by the people, and the elections have been held already 
for the representatives of the convention that is to endow the country 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



4 BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

with a final constitution conformably to the order issued by the Presi- 
dent of the United States. In it the foundations of our ultimate finan- 
cial system will be laid and then we will undoubtedly have a department 
of finance that will give unity to all the service that iv<? now divided, and 
that will consequently be a aepartment of the executive branch of the 
central government, with the fullness of power corresponding to it by 
proper nature. When the present auditor's office, the treasury of the 
island, and the ordering and delegated powers that the budgets and 
laws of accountability will determine are comprised in it, uien the 
object aimed at in the efforts of this department will have been attained. 

^Notwithstanding the enforcement of the order of May 8, the organ- 
ization given to this department at the date of its creation still subsisted, 
as none of the bureaus that formed it were for that reason deprived of 
constant occupation as defined in the former report of the dejmrtment. 
The subsecretary assisting the secretary and directing the interior man- 
agement of the branch; the consulting office intervening in all legal 
questions that arose; the bureau of taxes and imposts dealing on me 
system of taxation in general; the bureau of state property that has 
charge of all mattei-s relating to the titles and management of proper- 
ties that constitute the public patrimony; the section of statistics com- 
piling and classifying all data it has been able to ^ther; the ordenacion 
de pagos (office ordering payments) acknowledging and liquidating the 
authorized allowances; the general auditor, now with the character of 
auditor of internal revenues, also aiding this office in the fiscalization 
of accounts that should be rendered to it, and the treasuries effecting 
payments conformably to the new forms and proceedings, I now 
proceed to give a brief account of those services. 

It is obvious that the consulting department is one of the most busv 
dependencies of this department. All questions versing on the intel- 
ligence and application of the laws and regulations must pass through 
it; and they are veiy numerous, not only by reason of tne itiultitude 
of persons with whom finance has been contracting relations in its 
character of manager of the public patrimony, but also because^ it 
must be especially heard in the appeals veri^ng on the tax on convey- 
ance of property, inheritances, the constitution of mortgages, etc., 
known as conveyance and inheritance tax. In the fiscal year to which 
we refer those resources were numerous, because the taxpayer wished 
to put the fiscal spirit of the new r%ime to the test, always hoping 
that greater laxity would be added to the reductions and remitments 
already granted in the application of the regulations. However, the 
criterion of the administi-ation having been known, the appeals inspired 
in that tendency have diminished ana now only those having their ori- 
gin in the different manner of understanding things, and above all 
when personal interest mediates, are the remaining ones. 

The bureau of state property with the annexed general inspection, 
called to intervene in the general interventory and in the righting of the 
titles of state properties, could not ^ive the results expected from its 
creation in the year. The only positive results obtained from it was 
in the acknowledgment that the state patrimony in Cuba was always 
in most blameworthy neglect, as no data worthy of credit and which 
might impart a satisfactory knowledge of the number, class, and value 
of state property were found in this office. The Washington Govern- 
ment, upon the request of this office, forwarded a copy of the general 
inventory made by the Spanish commission of evacuation of the island 
for the American commission; but the document is in every sense defi 

Digitized by VjVJ^^V LC 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF OITBA. 5 

cient. Some properties that are the indisputable proj)erty of the State 
are not found in it, and in exchange, as of its exclusive property are 
inventoried estates seized from delinquent taxpayers for the collec- 
tion of their liabilities. The bureau is now included in that of the 
consulting department. In order to depurate the true importance of 
that patrimony it will be necessary to recur to the registries of prop- 
erty and to other departments, principally that of agriculture, indus- 
try, and commerce, which may supply information that may serve to 
verify the data existing in this department and to classify and com- 
plete the inventory. 

The public lands dealt with in the previous report of this oflBce 
should be the object of demarcation, and though they may not be con- 
siderable, they may be turned to account by taking advantage of them 
to extend small property, which is the basis of all true democracy in 
Cuba. To that end, the idea I have heard you utter of forming small 
tracts to be apportioned to laborers from the Cuban army womd con- 
tribute in a great measure. With that idea 1 believe that at present 
and until a plan to that end is resolved upon, the suspension of public 
acts for the sale or leasing of the rural properties or the State for a 
long term should be maintained. 

I do not think in the same manner of what respects urban properties 
that are not used by the State in its own services. Their administra- 
tion is troublesome and their products do not compensate the sacrifices 
that the State would be compelled to make to attend to their preserva- 
tion, for which reason it would be more judicious to alienate them 
through public sales or to cede them to the ayuntamientos for schools 
and hospitals when they can be utilized therefor, and, likewise, the dis- 
tribution of lots belonging to the State on reservative annuities for the 
increase of towns in the lands located in or on adjacent parts of them. 
1 prefer that foim of alienation because it places the acquisition of 
property within the reach of the poor classes through an annual pen- 
sion of the 6 per cent of the imposed principal, which rarely if ever 
exceeds $200. The colored population particularly has thus a means 
of establishing itself on the soil, as is shown by experience in rural 
municipalities. Unfortunately, those lands are not very numerous, 
but there are some in certain towns of the littoral, like Isabela de 
Sagua, Caibarien, and other places. 

The final disposal of the so-called lots of the city walls of this city 
should also be the object of a resolution. Their alienation was sus- 
pended from the first half of 1899 to prevent their sale at a miserable 
price, and in order to accord which were to be preserved by the State 
or ceded to the municipalities and the occasion to give a definite decision 
to the matter. Many of them have been occupied by the Quarternias- 
ter's Department of the United States Army and by the engineering 
department of this city, and the others are being leased at a very low 
price for deposits of building materials and simflar things. I believe 
that a study and classification of those lots should be made, with the 
intervention of competent pei'sons, in order to decide in a definite man- 
ner which of them should be sold, which of them preserved, and which 
may be ceded to the municipality for uses of general interest to the 
community. 

By order No. 77, of June 14, 1899, the decree of February 10 of 
the same year, whereby all taxes due before January 1, 1899, and pend- 
ing payment at the date of its enactment were remitted, was extended 
to those taxes for the collection of which the State or the municipality 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



6 BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 

should have seized urban or rural property. By virtue of that remit- 
ment, ail those properties that the State or the municipjalities might 
have seized to collect the obligations deteimined by article 49 of the 
instruction of May 16, 1885, for the proceedings against debtors to 
the public treasury — that is, the costs and expenmtures of the compul- 
sory proceedings besides the quotas of taxation — should be returnea to 
owners or their heirs. 

Those properties were in their greater part urban estates, almost all 
of them located in the provinces of Habana, Pinar del Rio, and Matan- 
zasj principally in Guanabacoa, Regla, Marianao, and Guanajav, in 
which places they amounted to more than 700 houses, generally of 
very small value and belonging to our poorest classes. It was to be 
hoped that bv this time the greater part of them would have been 
returned to tneir owners, yet the greater part of them are still in the 
possession of the treasury, either from the ignorance or the apathy of 
the owners (though the greatest possible publicity has been constantly 
given to the remitment) or, as experts believe, because they are 
unowned properties, as thev belonged to i)arties that died without 
leaving testamentary or lawful heii-s. The inclosed statement shows 
the number of estates returned during the year with the most impor- 
tant details thereof. Ultimately it wil be necessary to adopt a measure 
of a general character with those seized estates, wmch bring no benefit 
to the State and may serve for purposes of charity or of instruction or 
any other proper one. 

Another service of this office has been the release bonds constituted 
under the Spanish domination by public officials to guarantee services 
that ceased to be rendered before the 1st of January, 1899, conform- 
ably to order No. 62, of May 25, 1899. As a result of the latter, bur- 
dens, encumbrances, and mortgages that encumbered real property, 
both upban and rural, for great amounts have been canceled and the 
stock, valuables, or bonds that were found in the public treasuries, 
according to the inclosed statement, have been returned or released. 
The released securities amount to $968,378.25, which is divided as 
follows: 

In stock 1323,150.00 

Mortgage bonds 559,463.25 

Bonds of the debt 85,775.00 

Total 968,378.25 

The carrying out of paragraph third, article eighth of the Ti-eaty of 
Paris has been attended to by this office and its dependencies in what 
respects the preservation of its special archives, classifying them in 
the best possible manner, and a great number of certificates liave been 
issued to the parties that requested them, either directly or through 
the medium of the Spanish consul in this capital, who has applied &r 
them at the department of state and government, as those applications 
in their greater part were filed by old employees and creditors of the 
Spanish state for other items and who have required the copies on 
wnich to base their claims to the government of their country. 

The cx)llection of internal revenues and taxes held by the central 
government has always been the object of diligent attention, and 
with satisfactory results, to judge by the statements of the receipts, 
which have had the increase that was to be expected from the pacifi- 
cation of the country, and which demanded as an indispensable condi- 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BBPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF OITBA. 7 

tion that the service should not be neglected. Among all those taxes 
the first one in importance is the so-called conveyance and inheritance 
tax, that burdens transactions on real or personal property and the con- 
veyances by '' mortis causa." During the first half year the liquida- 
tion of the tax continued separated as before from its collection, the 
former in charge of the registrars of property, who were remunerated 
bv the same taxpayer with a surcharge on the quotas, the latter in 
charge of the administrators of finance which fiscalized, besides, the 
operations of the liquidators. The proceeding was not only onerous 
for the taxpayer, who thus paid directly to a public oflBcial for a serv- 
ice of the State, but it also caused troubles, deiavs, and even vexations, 
giving origin not a few times to grounded complaints against the regis- 
trars, who as such, not being subordinates oi this department, even 
when they were such as liquidators of a fiscal burden, found in their 
double character the means of eluding responsibilities and of raising 
difficulties in the way of the fiscalization or the tax. 

Thence it was that with the acquired experience this office proposed 
order No. 21, series of 1900, dated January 16, wherein it was directed 
that from that date the registrars of property should cease in their 
character of liquidators of the conveyance and inheritance tax and that 
the liquidations be performed by the provincial and branch adminis- 
trations of finance and by the mayors, according to localities and cases 
in said order specified. In that order it was intended to conciliate the 
convenience of the taxpayer with the interest of the treasury, placing 
a collecting office within his reach wherever there was one before, 
facilitating the means of making the payments through registered 
postal money orders when he should desire to use them, and the zeal 
of the mayors was appealed to so that they should lend their coopera- 
tion to the service that devolved upon them for the benefit of their 
neighbors, and in this case leaving in force the quota of liquidation 
to attend to the expenditures of the collection. 

The result has been satisfactory in general. In the second half of 
the fiscal year, from January 1 to June 30, more than in the previous 
one was collected, and yet the transactions were not greater. 

The tax of 3 and 10 per cent charge on the schedules of passenger 
fares and freight rates, which was abolished from the 1st of July of 
the current fiscal year, was the object of a special fiscalization, and its 
yield corresponded to the efforts made. That tax has been suppressed 
on important reasons of social convenience, and as a pledge of the 
interest of the administration in the reconstruction and encourage- 
ment of the country; but the railroad companies up to this date have 
not corresponded to the legitimate hopes that were harbored that a re- 
duction of the schedules of fares and rates, which would increase facil- 
ities of locomotion and transportation in the island so chastised by so 
many disasters, would correspond to the liberality and generosity of 
the administration. The tax now belongs to history^ and it is not 
admissible that the Government should be charged with any direct 
responsibility in the scarcity of transportation and travel by rail- 
roads and on the coasts of the island. 

The department of finance collected some taxes less, such as matricu- 
lation fees in the establishments of superior instruction; like the 
licenses for hunting and carrying arms, and some in remuneration of 
services; others as police measures, but none of them merit spedid 
mention in this report 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



8 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 

The collection of the fee on mining claims has continued in suspend 
and this office believes it should continue so, as by express concessiou 
of the Spanish Government enterprises already producing like the be^ 
known of the Santiago mines enjoy an exemption for a certain numlx.. 
of years, and only new enterprises and claims filed would be subject to 
the tax. Mining is in its state of infancy in this island; many hope^^ 
are set upon it, as it is a generally accredited opinion among competent 
parties that it is called to occupy an important place in the wealth of the 
country; and it is hardly burdensome to the State to abstain from 
troubling those starting in the business as long as it is not consolidate^ 
or may be a chapter of some importance in our receipts. 

Finally, after the conveyance and inheritance tax and the tax of tr 
3 and 10 per cent on the schedules of passenger fares and freight rates 
the most important chapter of internal revenues is that of theproduct^^ 
of State properties. In the best times of the Spanish domination it^ 
products never reached $150,000; now the receipts are relatively more 
than it was to be expected. 

It should be borne in mind that the greater part of the State patri- 
mony in Cuba consists in rent charges on rural and urban estates, the 
former almost all destroyed by the war, even now unproductive in their 
greater part or in the mere state of reconstruction; that urban estates 
have also suffered much in many towns of the islandj that the decrees 
of April 24 and June 5, 1899, extending and modifying the delays 

E an ted to debtors by the Spanish Government from 1896 to 1898, have 
d the collection of rent charges on urban estates suspended until tb 
1st of May last and those of rural estates destroyed during war abso- 
lutely, the collection being almost wholly limited to voluntary pay- 
ments. The State also has credits proceeding from the sale of properties, 
redemptions of rent charges, and of other obligations. Their collection 
meets the same difficulties encountered in that of the interest on rent 
charges, but as almost all of them are guaranteed by mortgages it has 
suited tne interests of the proprietors to release their estates and they 
have satisfied their debts. 

The inclosed statement marked No. 1 contains the receipts of internal 
revenues for all items. 

But in the matter of taxation, the principal occupation of this office 
during the first half of the fiscal year was the application of the order 
of March 25 reforming municipal finances. It was published under 
extraordinary circumstances. No elections had been held since 1893 
for the biennial renewal of the ayuntamientos; the municipalities were 
administered by ayuntamientos appointed by the governor-general 
from among the political parties dominant at the time, and the evacu- 
ation of the territory by Spain had introduced a new disturbance in 
their functions. All municipal services were disorganized in the 

freater part of the territory since 1895, and in all the island since 
anuary, 1896, except in three or four of the greater towns, and even 
in them thev were not performed as before; the regular system of 
taxes created by the municipal law was succeeded by another arbitrarj 
one, as it occurred to the ruler in each locality, the so-called '* dona- 
tions and patriotic subscriptions'' and tuxes on consumption occupied 
a prominent place in the receipts and they were forming a maze of 
municipal tariffs; the products being expended in the militery exigen- 
cies of the civil contest which had converted the Spanish military 
commanders into the veritable directors of municipal pryments. After 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 9 

^e historic 1st of January, a military situation of another kind grav- 
^ted on the ayuntamientos. It was constituted by the camps oi the 
THiban forces, which approached the towns seeking the food that they 
lib longer found in the exhausted fields and in the satisfaction of the 
triumph. It was another period of moi*e or less voluntary donations 
and subscriptions which did not supply the pressing demands of the 
moment. The administrators of municipal finances saw themselves 
dragged to resort to the extremes of collection, pressing on all the 
Manifestations of economic activity which commenced to appear in 
*^roportion to the advance of the pacification in order to nourish the 
'^cfiJ treasury. To the tariffs on consumptions and others were added 
ne special assessments with their quotas of the period previous to the 
-^ar, provoking the clamors of taxpayers. 

^ Therefore, to reestablish the noimal state of municipal finances, in 
^hat it was feasible, was a pressing need; to put an end to the dis- 
order, and above all that there might be budgets of receipts and expend- 
itures. The department of finance took a principal part in that work, 
maintaining the sense of the order with great pains, in order tiiat the 
suppressed taxes should not reappear in a disguised form, sometimes 
supporting the ayuntamientos in the exercise of their powers, and at 
other times supporting the taxpavers who appealed to the department 
claiming their rights. It would be superfluous to state the number of 
claims received and decided upon during the vear; they were numer- 
ous in the first half, or, namely, in the period oi formation and revision 
'^ the new budgets. 

At the commencement of the year the Government placed the 
amount of $360,000 in the treasury, with the object of distributing 
them among the municipalities, to cover deficits in the measure and 
amount that should be aetermined by the military government, the 
mayors being bound to give this office an account or the outlay of the 
sums delivered to them. When General Brooke ceased in the govern- 
ment of the island, in December, the outstanding amount was returned 
to the treasury of the island and the accounts were being revised until 
the month of July last, and undoubtedly you must be aware of their 
result, because they were collated and centralized by the auditor-gen- 
eral. A part of those funds was spent in donations, like those made 
to Cardenas to finish a market, to myamo for the supply of water, and 
to some municipalities for school material before the reorganization of 
primary instruction. The statements on the movement of population 
taken from the most authentic sources, or namely, the civil registries, 
and according to forms adjusted in all their parts to the legislation in 
force, are now being periodically published m the Gazette by the sec- 
tion of statistics of tnis department. All possible data respecting con- 
sumption of meat, on the course of exchange on foreign markets, on 
quotation of bonds, stocks and specie in the private exchange, the only 
center of public transactions that we have, are gathered, and the great- 
<*^t publicity is given to them by means of printed sheets whicn are 
Torwarded to the military governor when issued. 

But the most important statistics of those published this year was 
that of the incumbrances, rent charges and mortgages which affect 
real estate in this island, their amount showing how onerous is the 
debt that weights our economic activity at present, principally when 
those capitals Jiave been in their greater part devoured by tne monster 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, PT 3 2 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



10 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

of civil war, which left the land bare and an indigent population, or 
little less, to raise the burden. The principal of the mortgage debt 
only amounts to some $250,000,000; add to that the interests and pen- 
sions of the years of war at an average of 8 per cent, and we have as 
a result that debt alone exceeding ¥300,000,000. That service was 
requested by the War Department, accorded at the end of November, 
and the statements where the results of the investigation were noted 
down were already circulating in the month of March. 

Other important statistics are being prepared and they will soon be 
published. One of them, proposed by you, on rural property, its 
condition and residence of the proprietors; another one, tnat is already 
in press, with the municipal budgets approved and revised by the civil 
governors for the fiscal year of 1899 to 1900. 

It is not possible that in the short period of its existence, the section 
should have given mature benefits. To organize the service of statis- 
tics is always an arduous enterprise, and the difficulties must be greater 
where there has been none truly worthy of that name; but perseverance 
will overcome all obstacles, and ultimatelv produce some system that 
will realize in the service the efforta that have been rendered only by 
the true specialists in other countries better prepared than Cuba. For 
example, it has been difficult to succeed in gathering vital statistics. 
The civil registers are in charge of municipal courts that are dispersed 
in great numbers in our country without easy channels of communica- 
tion and without postal franchise for their correspondence. It needed 
great efforts at first to have them forward the data, but having formed 
simple statements that they only have to fill out, making them remark 
on and rectify all the errors and errata, so that they might be persuaded 
of the fact that their part of the task was for a serious work and not 
an ostentatious one, and paying the postal fines which the insufficiency 
of franking incurs, this aepartment has succeeded in having the serv- 
ice go on with sufficient regularity. 

It is obvious that the payment of the State obligations figures among 
the most important services of the department, rendered through its 
dependencies of the treasury. I will not tax your attention with 
numerical statements showing the amount of the payments, because the 
general service of the accountability of the island is centralized in the 
auditor's office, created by the order of May 8, and you are fully cog- 
nizant of those details. However, I beg to state that this departoaent, 
through the office delegated for ordering payments, has olwavs kept 
an account of all the credits acknowledgea by the State; of the loca- 
tion and distribution of funds and of the payments made by its treas- 
urers, which course has permitted it to assist the other departments, 
and even the General Government, in many cases supplying them with 
data and information they have required. 

The order of May 8, and its instructions of the 11th of the same 
month, have not been de facto rigorously applied in some of their parts. 
Thus, for example, the disbursing officers or treasurei's of finance have 
not dealt directly with the auditor-general for their estimates of funds, 
but they have addressed them to this office, which has reviewed and 
examined their items and adjusted them to the forms of i*egulation 
through the ordering office, including or directly requesting the neces- 
sary funds for the payment of recently acknowledged obligations, or 
of authorized expenditures, which were unknown to the subordinates. 
Such a course was self-imposed, because we live without a budget, the 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 11 

payments subject to the changeable and transitorj^ demands of services 
that are not organized with that regularity that is only the product of 
the firmness and stability of govemmente. The directing centers of 
tlie public administration being located in this capital, the department 
of nnance had to collect all the ordei-s for the payment of obligations 
to distribute them throughout the island, to circulate them to its 
dependencies with all the necessarv instructions; for, besides, a con- 
siderable number of the personnel being inexperienced, greater draw- 
backs would have been occasioned had the auditor-general dealt directly 
with the disbursing officers. 

On the other hand, the amount of the payments made through the 
channel of this depaiiment has been increasing. In the first half 
of 1899, from January to June, which was the period of organization 
of this department, tney hardly exceeded ^00,000; the greater part 
of the disbursements are made throug'h the channel of the command- 
ing officers; in the first half of the fiscal year to which this report 
refers they already amounted to $1,427,628.89, in the second half to 
$3,043,205.86, and in the month of this report estimates to the value 
of $596,000 oad dollars have been forwarded, notwithstanding the fact 
that the department of public works is now independent from this 
department, upon the request of its secretary, since the 1st of July. 

The inspection of the administration of finance carried out by the 
officers of the United States Army and by officials of this department 
have given the most satisfactory results, as the former have at least 
shown zeal in behalf of public interests and the desire to excel. The 
deficiencies noted in the administrative branch of the service have been 
corrected, and the least diligent parties have been warned that they 
would be removed if they did not correct the defects, object of the 
reproof. The treasurers have rendered their accounts, and until 
now no substantial objection has occurred, though in some cases where 
the inspection has noted or even suspected some anomaly or obscurity 
the verification of the objections or remarks has been directed, with the 
hearing of the parties concerned, and now those recently made to the 
administration of Santiago de Cuba are yet pending. 

As a general rule it (»n be asserted that the State creditors have 
punctually received their pay in the services that have had duly author 
ized allotments of a permanent character; and that the delays have 
mainly occurred in services that are administered by, or are burdens 
of the municipalities, such as jails, primary instruction, police and 
charities, and to which the central administrative action has not been 
extended with that regularity that belongs te all complete organiza- 
tions. For example, such important changes in the details of execu- 
tion have occurred in the lapse of the year in public instruction and 
since the orders issued at the end of 1899, that they entirely transform 
it; they have necessarily affected the regularity of payments and until 
now have precluded the possibility of a budget. Thus we see that first 
it was directed that for every fifty children enrolled a schoolroom 
should be formed with its teacher and for each fraction of less than 
thirty -five children an ajssistant; a large amount of $50 was assigned to 
every schoolroom for material and no quota was specified for rentals. 
Conformably to that plan the creation of schools commenced with 
astonishing rapidity; the importance of the funds needed for the pay- 
ments varied every month and in the greater part of those instances 
the estimate of the authorities who entered into those obligations did 

Digitized by KJJ^KJW LC 



12 BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

not reach the hand of the administrators of finance in time to include 
them in the regular estimates of the month; and it occurred, b^esides, 
that in the fp*eatest number of instances the mayors did not draw up 
their requisitions in the form directed by the laws of accountability in 
which, as a general rule, they were not versed. Subsequently it was 
decided to suppress the amount allotted for material to each school- 
room, the superintendents of schools taking charge of the attention of 
that service, conformably to what is proviaed in Article VII of Order 
No. 226, series of 1899, which already introduced an alteration in the 
allowances, and was the cause of complaints and clamors, owin^ to the 
fact that the order was not known by the towns and authorities in 
time to prevent them from entering into obligations charged to the 
previous authorization and in every case it was necessary to investi- 
gate the validity of the obligation. 

The creation of schoolrooms was suspended in the month of March 
by a resolution that was not published in the Gazette or the promul- 

Sition of which was deficient, and the regular application or Order 
o. 226 continued in the more distant l(K»lities and in others that 
could claim the ignorance of the provision, and new obligations that 
the State did not acknowledge and liquidate were entered into, though 
the schoolrooms existed with their teachers and rents and therefore 
with interested parties who did not remain silent and continued their 
claims until they obtained the acknowledgment of the same. I 
remember as a remarkable one the case of Holguin, which until that 
date in March created schools whose monthly budget did not amount 
to $1,600, that were punctually tmnsf erred there by the treasury; and 
yet it happened that the payments were not paid in three or four 
months because the school authorities continued creating schoolrooms 
and they had run into and maintained obligations which amounted to 
the quadruple of those entered into within the legislated provisions. 

To refer the diflSculties met with at times in some localities in the 
payment of jail and police or charity attentions would be to repeat, 
with the natural deviations, what I have just said regarding the pay- 
ment of primary instruction. The military government is well aware 
of those details, as by its orders investigations have been carried out 
and information has been supplied showing the reasons for those par- 
tial delays in many cases. This department is not the judge but the 
justifier of its acts; but it can assert the fac^t that it has made stren- 
uous efforts to second the praiseworthy purposes of the military 
government, aimed at the most punctual execution of the general 
obligations, so that each creditor, and particularly those who are such 
for pei*sonal services, will receive what corresponds to him when his 
credit is due. 

The result has been satisfactory in general. There are no available 
terms of comparison between what happens at present and what occurred 
under the Spanish domination. The delay witn which the State emploj^ - 
ees and creditors received their pay even in normal periods is prover- 
bial; the school teachers seldom received their salaries and with delays 
to such an extreme that their penury became a by- word; the munic- 
ipal police did not live with less uncertainty respecting the receipt of 
tjbeir salaries, and no establishment of charity was up to date in its 
relation with the State or the municipality. Now large sums are 
monthly scattered throughout the island in the form or salaries for 
the payment of services which in their turn demand others, thus effi- 

Digitized by VjV^^^V LC 



REPORT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOE OF CUBA. 18 

ciently contributing to stimulate the producing activity of the country. 
The State creditor claims with energy because his rights are respected, 
evincing the impatience of the citizen who knows that now the admin- 
istration is a debtor zealous in the performance of its duties. 

Financial services will not progress with freedom as long as there is 
DO general budget of the State, and there will be no budget while 
municipalities and the island in general do not return to the social, 
political, and economic stability to which the efforts of the administra- 
tion aim.. The budget is but the economic expression of the life of 
the administration, be it either municipal, provincial, or central. 
While the constitution does not define their respective spheres, reg- 
ulate its exercise, ordain their revenues and rents, and the means 
wherewith to attend to such varied necessities, all of us, the governors 
and the governed, have to be resigned to undergo difficulties and 
anxieties that spring from the unavoidable conseq^uences of the events 
that have occurred m this island during the last six years. 

One of the consequences of the definite constitution of the country 
will be the restoration of the unity of its financial services. Then the 

feneral auditor's and general treasurer's offices will be coordinate 
ranches of this office, and the difficulties created by the successive 
stages through which any estimate or request for funds has to pass 
will have been obviated. 

Lastly, I should not omit to mention a true progress attained in the 
financial administration of the country. I particularly refer to the 
rendering of accounts by the functionaries who manage State funds. 
Public accounts were never liquidated during the Spanish regime. 
When the recently called general intervention of the State (formerly 
central accounting office), after long stages, rendered still longer by 
the apathy, the negligence, and the* corruption of officials, came to the 
liquioation of accounts of any direct party having to render them, the 
proceedings were sent to IViadrid, where they were the object of not 
less complicated, costly, and protracted revisions. In a word, accounts 
were in a very bad way^ and thence the number and amount of bonds 
returned, and of which I give an account in this report, some of which 
were constituted as far as thirty years back, and there was no notice 
that the responsibilities they guaranteed had ever been the object of 
a final settlement. 

To-day the accounts are examined three or four months after the 
delivery of funds by the treasury, or of their collection by the col- 
lectors; and though the present proceedings are liable to some defects, 
consisting mainly in fiscalizing tne transactions of the treasury — that 
is, tJie sums of money that are received and paid out before penetrat- 
ing to the innermost, so to say, of expenditures and receipts, which, 
after all, has to be the consequence or good budgets grounded on a 
solid organization of the services. The fact is that there are public 
accounts, and activity and energy in the settling of responsibilities. 

The legislative work of this office, always animated by a conserva- 
tive spirit in matters of its competency, was not considerable during 
the year. Really, it has done nothing more than verify the fiscal con- 
sequences of the Treaty of Paris, and to invariably keep itself within 
that function. Cuba was already released from the public debt and 
from the so-called burdens of sovereignty, which even under the 
autonomist regime, established before 3ie ultimatum of the United 
States and as a supreme recourse to disai'm tbo revolution, absorbed 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



14 REPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOE OF CUBA, 

on paper more than four-fifths of the receipts of the budget and de 
facto more than it had been possible to collect in the years of peace. 
The State was enabled to transfer to the municipalities the taxes it 
had reserved to itself in exchange for many others that constituted the 
nerve of municipal finances, which were more grievous, arbitrary, and 
unjust to the masses of our population. In the order of March 25, 
that regulated the matter, the taxes levied on banks and stock compa- 
nies were included in the transfer; but hardly had the order been pub- 
lished when frictions commenced to occur between some municipalities 
and that class of taxpayers because ayuntamientos attempted to take 
all available advantage of the taxpaying capacity of the former. In 
conseouence of the claims presented to the military governor and to 
this omce antecedents were sought for and found in tne archives, and 
they reflected the conclusion that those diflSculties and troubles were 
inevitable as railroads of a public nature particularly, that traversed 
many municipalities, provoked the fiscal spirit of each one. In view of 
that the publication of Order No. 106, civil series of 1899, dated July 
11, was decided upon, and by virtue of the same and from the date of 
its publication the banks andi companies comprised in Nos. 5, 6, 7, and 
8 oi tariff second would only contribute to the State and not to the 
municipalities by reason of the industrial tax, the municipalities being* 
enablea to collect separately the territorial tax for the rural and urban 
estates that each company or corporation might have assessed in the 
district. In such wise, properties that trespass the limits of municipal 
territories and of a general interest contribute to the public treasury 
and what is strictly local to the treasury of the municipality. 

This oflSce also prepared Order No. 181, series of 1899, dated Sep- 
tember 27, 1899, modifying the class of bonds that national and foreign 
insurance companies and similarly named ones are obliged to give 
according to laws in force, and in it were included surety companies, 
those of risks, and accidents, and of guaranty, which were forms 
unused in the country and introduced and practiced since the military 
occupation by the United States. By the former legislation all insur- 
ance companies and coiporations subject to the payment of the tax 
were compelled to invest fe(K),000 in bonds of the Spanish Government 
or in titles or mortgage obli^tions of banks, railroad commnies, 
industrial concerns of any kina, or in real estate in Spain or aajacent 
islands, or of the provinces of Cuba and Porto Rico. If the three- 
fourths of the technical reserves of the insurances effected in any of 
these latter islands by any company did not amount to $200,000, those 
found in that case coula limit the deposit to 75 per cent of those 
reserves. Corporations whose statutes did not specify the amount of 
the technical reseiTes or the provisions to attend to current risks 
should deposit the 20 per cent of the premiums to be collected during 
the year, a sum that W the regulation was declared to be equivalent 
to 75 per cent or three-iourths of the mentioned reserves or provisions. 
Lastly, the guaranty constituted in Spain capacitated the company to 
transact business on this island. 

In view of this last circumstance, and of the financial state of the 
country, bearing in mind the different nature of the companies and 
the propriety of attiucting the forms of insurance not used heretofore, 
mentioned above. Order No. 181 diminished them, reducing those of 
fire insurance companies to $75,000, and to $25,000 those of the other 
ones, enabling them to give them either by depositing their amount 

Digitized byVjQOQlC 



RSFOBT OF MIUTABY GOVSBNOB OF CUBA. 15 

in cash in the general treasury of the island, or by investing the same 
in mortgi^ bonds of corporations or companies doing business in the 
island or m real estate mortgages and bonds of the United States 
Government. 

As it is seen in the report of this department for last year, this office, 
proposed, in conformity with that of state and ^ovei*nment, that while 
the anomalous condition of municipal treasuries lasted, tiie general 
treasury of the island should defray the expenses of police, primary 
instruction, jails, and charities, in the amount that might be considered 
sufficient and without prejudice to the consideration that, as soon as 
municipal receipts would allow it or the matter were definitively 
resolved upon, the ayuntamientos would assume those obligations 
which should in a definite inanner be exclusively of their jurisdiction. 
It was thus resolved in what respects municipal police and public 
instruction bv Order No. 220 of November 17, 1899, in which it was 
enacted (in wnat respects hospitals and asylumsj, that the State would 
aid them to such extent as should be determined necessary; jail atten- 
tions were also aided in the measure counseled by circumstances. 

To facilitate those payments Order No. 26, current series, was issued 
with the intervention of this office, and in the same it was recom- 
mended that hereafter all funds allotted to municipalities for the pay- 
ment of police and instruction should be delivered to the respective 
mayors by the provincial treasurers, directing that in case the depart- 
ment of posts had a money-order office in the locality, the funds should 
be remitted to the mayors by postal money orders; and that where 
there was none, the mayor should go in person to receive the funds or 
conmiit the charge to a responsible person. So that the department 
of posts should supply the necessary funds to redeem the money orders 
promptiy to the treasurer of each province, except Habana, each one 
woula notify the postmaster several days in advance stating the post- 
offices where he wished to send money orders, giving the amount in 
each case. All the payments were to be made by the mayor in person, 
and it was directed that each salary or account was to be paid without 
any deduction whatever. 

Order No. 26 dealt with now contains other details that it would be 
tedious to enumerate. All aim to conciliate the rapidity and punctu- 
ality of the payments with laws of accountability in force. Excelling 
amon^ them, and therefore I will specially mention it, is the one 
directing that treasurers will forward their estimates not later than 
the 16th of the month next preceding the one for which the estimate 
is made, and that the mayors shall make their requisitions with suffi- 
cient promptness, adjusting them necessarily, in what respects police, to 
the types fixed in Order No. 220, and in what respects primary instruc- 
tion to the rules established in Order No. 226, both of the series of 
1899. 

For the reasons mentioned in another part of this report some delays 
used to occur in the payments, and the Government being always desir- 
ous of improving the service, without prejudice to oemanding the 
most rigorous accountability, Order No. 229, in force since June 4, was 
issued, whereby payments tiirough money orders were suppressed and 
rules were enacted so that the mayors and treasurers should dmw up 
estimates with due anticipation and the payments be made with all 
punctuality. The two months that have elapsed since the new instruc- 
tions were enforced do not suffice to permit a thorough judgment of 



Digitized by ^ 



ioogle 



16 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

the same, for during said term the voyage of the teachers to Harvard, 
the creation of the summer schools and the installation of new school 
boards have occurred, events that have prevent^ the regulation from 
promptly taking effect. Schools will nave their special disbursing 
officers hereafter, but this is a matter that does not correspond to the 
year dealt with in this report 

By Order No. 185, of April 3, issued upon the proposal of this office, 
the provision of the Ley de Mostrencos ^law of unknown ownership 
of properties) of May 2, 1835, of the ordmance of December 9, 1882, 
and of such others as referred to the denouncements by special inves- 
tigators of all kinds of properties and rights of the State, were revoked, 
and the service of investigation was specially committed to the func- 
tionaries of the administration and the officers of public prosecution. 

Said revocation was grounded in the fact that, tnrough corruptions 
that were deeply rooted in the administration, denouncers and special 
investigators oecame the terror of proprietors, whom they worried in 
the tranauil and peaceable possession of their properties, through the 
disregard of civil laws and of those of procedures that protect citi- 
zens, demanding titles and threatening the loss of property unless 
bought to silence. Another circumstantial cause counseled the pro- 
mulgation of the order, the fact that during the final confusion of the 
Spanish administration, from the offices were withdrawn a multitude 
of documents belonging to the State and which could be turned to 
account by the denouncers as if they had attained the knowledge of 
the facts contained in them through tneir own efforts. 

Not less imperious was the necessity of suppressing the service of 
inspection of taxes compensated witli part of the tines or penalties 
imposed on defrauding taxpayers. The clamor against inspectors, 
who, without true responsibilities, exhausted the rigors of regulation, 
moved thereto only by personal interest, was general in all the island. 
Hence Order No. 138, current series, dated April 5. In all measures 
of a final character dictated by the military governor the invariable 
criterion has been that nothing should come out of the taxpayer's purse 
unless it were to attend to public burdens, and to that rule said order 
was adjusted when it directed that the product of the fines or penalties 
should thereafter be paid into the municipal treasuries and that the 
inspectors should be paid in the same manner as municipal employees 
ana directly responsible agents. 

Another order proposed by this office was that marked No. 180, of 
April 30, relative to tne conventional redemptions of annuities (censos) 
belonging to the State, which was the last act of Senor Varona, as secre- 
tary of this branch. Those redemptions were suspended since the com- 
mencement of the military occupation of the United States, in order to 
Srevent abuses and frauds that were easy in the midst of the general 
isorder that prevailed in the services at the cessation of the Spanish 
dominaMon ; and the occasion had arrived for the continuance of that 
practice that was deeply rooted in the country and was convenient to 
the State. The greater pai-t of the productive property of the State 
consists in reserved annuities (censos reservativos^, that is, in payments 
imposed on real estate the full conti*ol of whicn has been ceded to 
another party, the grantee reserving to himself the right to receive an 
annual pension in money that is to be paid by the acquirer, named 
the annuity holder (censatario), the same estate remaining bound, with 
its improvements, to the security of the payment. That amount, as a 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF lOLITAEY OOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 17 

general rule, is the 5 per cent annually of the imposed payment; that 
18, for example, the control of 10 caballerias of land is ceded, leaving 
$500 imposed on each one at 5 per cent pension; the purchaser assumes 
the possession of the land, bound over to pay to the seller, while the 
annuity lasts, the sum of $250 per annum. It belongs to the nature 
of the annuity that the cession of the estate be pei-petual and conse- 
quently the payment of the pension, but the annuity holder can, accord- 
ing to law, redeem the annuity at his will, even when the contrary 
should have been stipulated, by producing the imposed amount, a pro- 
vision that is applicable to all the annuities now possessed by the State, 
as this office has no notice that any annuity has oeeu constituted since 
the civil code was enforced, in which the limitations contained in para- 
graph 2 of article 1608 of that legal body have been specified. 

Now, then, as the interest of money in Cuba is douole or triple the 
one accraed by the capital imposed on annuities and the immense 
majority of the annuity nolders regard the question from a mercantile 
standpoint, the redemptions made conformably to law, or, namely, for 
the nominal value of the imposed capital, are uncommon; the annui- 
tants and annuity holders generally stipulate a price of redemption 
based on the current interest of the money and in the greater or lesser 
facilities for the collection of the pensions, on urban estates being held 
in more value than that on rural estates. Hence, that the name of 
conventional redemption is given in the nominal capital, and that there 
should have been a necessity of provision of a general character to 
regulate it, as it could not be at the discretion of the agents of the 
administration. 

It was a proper measure to acknowledge and sanction that imme- 
morial custom, but it was counseled besides b}' a principle of agri- 
cultural police. A great part of the cultivated area of the island of 
Cuba is encumbered with annuities, as, in lieu of capitals, it was the 
only manner of distributing the great territorial properties that with 
the name of mercedes (grants) the ayuntamientos gave to the first set- 
tlers in the name of the King. 

Therefore, that form of transaction rendered a very important service 
in our social economy, constituting the origin of the moderate sized 
and small property, above all in the regions where, through the excel- 
lence and great estimation of their products, like tobacco in Vueita 
Abajo, it soon came to have a great value. Besides, many proprietors 
constituted annuities on their properties in behalf of convents and 
monasteries, for specified worships, and for the ordination of priests 
and other analogous objects. A great number of those annuities have 
come into the possession of the State, and, added to those constituted 
on lots for the encouragement of towns, they have come in time to 
encumber territorial property with a multitude of hindrances that 
vitiate titles, fetter circulation, and obstruct the cultivation of less 
productive lands. Order No. 180 seeks to facilitate the removal of 
those obstacles, fixing the clear and precise rules it contains wherein 
it is attempted to conciliate the legitimate interests of the State with 
those exigencies of public weal. 

Surpassing among all the orders that were issued from this office is 
that marked with No. 254, dated the 28th of June last, which has 
attained such notoriety, ana which has been the object of so many and 
such varied judgments and comments. 

At the commencement of the current year, shortly after you took 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



18 BEPOBT OF MILITARY OOVBBNOB OP CUBA. 

charge of the military government of the island, you were pleased to 
appoint a commission composed of Messrs. Enrique Jos^ de Varona, 
rMo Desvernine, Horatio Rubens, James E. Runcie, and the under- 
signed, for the study of a financial system for the island of Cuba in all 
its aspects. The first (juestion submitted to its examination was the 
reconstruction of municipal finances, the commission being informed 
by you that the Government of the United States was to undertake 
presently the work of endowing this country with a civil r^me and 
with a stable government, commencing with municipalities, not only 
because naturally they are the primary administrative or^ns, but also 
because they are the ones called to constitute the basis of the political 
edifice that is to be erected on the ruins of the past. The problem has, 
therefore, a double aspect — the political aspect and the fiscal aspect; 
and it was understood thus by the commission, which was of the unani- 
mous opinion that municipal life could not be reconstituted in Cuba 
without endowing it with resources of its own, different from those of 
the State, as it was not meet that, in a liberal and decentralizing regime, 
which was to acknowledge the personality of municipalities as one of 
the organs of the State, the municipal corporations should become 
agents of the central administration, even when they were of popular 
and elective origin; and such they had to be if the resources to attend 
to their burdens were supplied to them by the treasury of the island. 
The central administration in making tne payments had to fiscalize 
them; and as there is no possible fiscauzation without intervention in 
the services, that would ultimately end in the tutelary government of 
the people, which, depriving them of the feeling and of the exercise of 
self-responsibility, never educates them for self-government. The 
commission believed that they were going to legislate for a free coun- 
try, where the necessary scope should be left to the civicism, intelli- 
gence, and judgment of local administrators, representatives of the 
towns, for the regulation of their expenditures and revenues, according 
to their necessities and resources; leaving to their rational judgment 
within the orbit marked by the constitutive law the fixing of the 
quotas of taxation conformably to the circumstances of each locality. 
There is no constitutional barrier in any nation to the exercise of sov- 
ereignty for fixing the taxes, it being enacted, at most (in terms too 
abstract and general to be effective in practice), that they should be 
proportioned to the resources of each one; but the municipalities do 
not exercise sovereignty, but administer local interests within the limits 
marked by their organic law, and though they should have all possi- 
ble latitude in the exercise of their functions in countries liberally 
ruled, the kind and maximum of their responsibility before the coun- 
try and before history to exercise their discretional powers in financial 
matters so that the national patrimony, consisting in the fruits of the 
acquiring and producing activity of the country, may not be lessened; 
in the same manner the managers of the municipal wealth should appre- 
ciate and understand to what extent they should go and what are the 
sacrifices that they can reasonably demand from taxpayers within that 
maximum. 

To those lofty considerations in the political order should be subor- 
dinated not a few of the fiscal order, and the commission believed that 
it was its duty to do so, assured that the Cuban people would ultimately 
appreciate and understand the exigencies and tne responsibilities thaA, 
liberty carries along in all their fullness and that it would not curtail 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF MILITABY OOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 19 

the necessary sacrifices even in their present condition. The commis- 
sioners, far from ignoring the difficalties arising to all financial prob- 
lems by the situation of tne country, considered them from all points 
of view, and without entering into disquisitions that did not belong to 
their charge, on the definitive municipal r^^me, and consequently on 
what should be understood as local and national interests, or on what 
should be comprised within the exclusive jurisdiction of municipalities 
or within that of the central government, or that being of common 
interest they may be administered by the municipality as a guaranty of 
success, even though it were defrayed by the State, they fully agreed and 
were of opinion that orders Nos. 220 and 226, on payment to munici- 
pal police, jails, subsidies to asylums and hospitals, and organization 
of primary instruction, to which I have referred in the course of this 
report, were already a powerful contingent brought in by the treasury 
of the island to burdens that always had a municipal character in the 
history of Cuba. Truly, the State contributions to those services would 
have to amount to millions of dollars, and even when the municipal 
police, for example, should ultimately return to weigh exclusively on 
the municipal treasuries the other e^)enditures would yet have to be 
large ones for the insular treasury. On the other hand, the State itself 
has to attend to abundant obligations to compromise its treasury in 
local services organized by others, and as it almost exclusively depends 
on customs revenues in Cuba it would have been to compromise tariff 
freedom to encumber those revenues to the degree of exhausting their 
product in circumstances when it is more necessary than ever to pre- 
serve them to conform the tariffs to industrial demands. The excessive 
amount of the budgets of expenditures that the ayuntamientos were 
forming with the hope of subsidies from the treasury was a decisive 
ground to bring about a final judgment on the question. 

The commission, being of one opinion on that criterion, it entered 
into the examination of the order of March 25, and after some delib- 
eration came to the conclusion that it would be proper to maintain the 
revocation of all duties and resources authorized by municipal law on 
articles of prime necessity, and the special assessments of painful rec- 
ollection in our financial annals, for they had become formidable 
instruments of fiscal oppression. 

Among the taxes on articles of prime necessity, that on the con- 
sumption of meats, abolished b^ the order of March 25, occupied a 
principal place. Many ayuntamientos demanded it, above all those of 
great towns where, in spite of the effects of the war, there is a suffi- 
cient consumption to produce consideral)le receipts, and part of the 
press, the partisans of the tax, repeated that clamor, grounding their 
claims in the assertion that there was no reason to deprive the munici- 
pal treasury of a clear, sure resource, of easy collection and abundant 
yields, that affects the price of meat little or nothing, because in spite 
of the suppression and considerable reduction of the import duties on 
foreign cattle the consumer had not received any relief yet. 

Those arguments o^uld not make any impression on the minds of the 
commission, as they can make none in the minds of all who have solid 
economic principles and who desire order and regularity in the manage- 
ment of public funds. The reestablishment of the tax could still have 
fiscal importance in populous centers like Habana, Matanzas, Cardenas. 
Cienfuegos, Santiago ae Cuba, and other places, but its product would 
never be at present the one proclaimed by its defenders and what 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



20 BEPOBT OF MILITABY OOVBBNOB OF CUBA. 

appears in the municipal budg^ets previous to the abolition, because it 
is not many years since the estimate of the budget was not collected in 
HalMtna by reason of the war and the consequent lack of fresh meat, 
and the decrease in other cities was still greater. The picture is less 
encouraging in rural munici^lities, towns, villages, and hamlets; 
the consumption in them is insignificant where it has not actually 
disappeared. 

On the other hand, the tax on the consumption of meat has always 
been among us and is by its nature a source of abuses and frauds, as 
the basis cnanges with all the fluctuations and circumstances of the 
market; it is unstable by its esseni^e, and consequently it is not sus- 
ceptible of a regular and uniform collection; it demands numerous 
agents and intermediate parties who are in intimate contact with the 
nearest taxpayer, not to mention the special police it requires for the 
inspection and prosecution of def rauders, hindering with its fetters 
the freedom of the circulation and of competition of the products of 
one of the principal branches of agriculture, the cattle inaustry. In 
Cuba, through its duration and numerous exactions, it created special 
centers of meat dealers who have always laid down the law to cattle 
breeders and fatteners, besides having served in other times as con- 
scious or unconscious instruments of Spanish merchants and shipown- 
ers of Barcelona, Bilbao, and Santander to exploit the products of this 
island and to prohibit the development of such a necessary industry. 

In fact, all who have studied our cattle industry with sufficient infor- 
mation have set forth in relief the craft by virtue of which the Spanish 
ministers obtained tariff advantages or administrative favors for the 
products of their nation in the markets of the Argentine Republic and 
Uruguay, in exchange for compensations in the markets of the Antilles 
for the salt meats of those republics. Through that policy some mer- 
chants and shipowners of the metropolis bargained the business of 
salt meats with firms of Buenos A vres, Montevideo, and Habana to 
control the market as merchants and as ship owners securinff freight 
for their vessels to maintain a commercial route that could only be 
artificially kept up. They exported wines and liquors to Buenos Ay res 
and Montevideo m ancient sailing vessels and there took in salt meat 
for Cuba, thus realizing a freight that was otherwise impossible, and 
then went in ballast to the United States or Centi-al America in quest 
of raw materials for Spanish industries. 

Thus was brought to Cuba the meat of four or five hundred thousand 
head of bovine cattle, acquired at prices that allowed the importers 
to compete with and undersell the Cuban cattle raiser, compelling him 
to limit production. In 1894 and 1895, though all our pastures were 
not under exploitation, the sales of bovine cattle suffered frequent 
paralyzations or were realized at the lowest prices; as the minister of 
the colonies cooperated in the work of exploitation of the metropolis, 
first by i-aising the amount of the tax of consumption of cattle and 
then by delivering it as a source of revenue to the municipal ti*easury, 
that by the system of taxation was deprived of flexible resources and 
least burdensome for the masses. The Cuban breeders, who in no 
way could produce at such low price as that of the pampas of the 
La Plata River, had to sell at the low prices of the latter. 

To restore that tax of consumption of meat when it is a sure fact 
that the commercial relations of Cuba and the United States are mora 
intimate and closer and when duties on American salt meat have been 
considerably reduced by the tariff reforms would be to place a serious 

Digitized by VjVJ^^V IC 



REPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBWOB OF CUBA. 21 

and almost insunnountable obstacle to the i*ecoDstruction of our valu- 
able cattle industry, the third one of them, as it closely follows that 
of the manufacturing of su^r and cultivation of tobacco in our finan- 
cial history; the first of all if we bear in mind that its products circu- 
lated exclusively^ in our interior markets, giving stren^h and vigor 
against the continual drain of cash created by the industries for expor- 
tation when ai-ticles of prime necessity are imported. Were the tax 
reestablished we would return to the old mechanism, as the meat 
imported from the Argentine Republic, Uruguay, and the United States 
would be exempt from the local taxes after bein^ nationalized in the 
custom-house; its traders would only pay tariff duties greatly inferior to 
that tax, and the industrial tax. The stock raiser would have the burden 
of another special and high exaction when his products went out to 
the market, besides the territorial tax that is common to all our agri- 
cultural production. Some years ago in view of such anomalies Senor 
Fernando Escobar, of Cienfuegos, a distinguished Cuban economist, 
exclaimed in the name of the Cienfuegos stock raisers: " We want 
equality before the tax." 

By reason of the unpleasantness of the task I will not insist on the 
interest that an overbearing municipal bureaucracy may have in the 
reestablishment of a tax that lends itself to filtrations and mismanage- 
ments with the uncertainties of its production. When a tax has not 
fixed any stable basis in assessments and records and rests upon articles 
of variable consumption, it is easy to believe that all that leaves or 
ought to leave the taxpayer's x)ocket may not go into the public treas- 
uries; very appreciable differences are wont to occur from one day to 
another, and under the cover of those alternatives amounts or earn- 
ings of consideration for an individual or for domestic economy may 
be diverted to the hands of functionaries. 

But in appearance the principal argument of the friends of the tax 
is that in pi*actice it has not produced the results hoped for of cheap- 
ening meat. The observation is groundless, in the first place, because 
it is not reasonable to suppose that the time elapsed from the abolition 
of the tax would be sufficient, even under normal circumstances, for a 
fiscal provision to have all its economic effects, as the complexity of 
phenomena relative to the incidence, diffusion, and repercussion of taxes 
18 so vast that their consequences disapp^r with the same slowness 
with which they manifest themselves; and, in the second place, because 
the prices of merchandise are principally in a direct relation with the 
offer, the order, the extent of the market and commercial habits. 
Hiere is no special cattle market in Cuba, the suburban commerce of 
milk and its derivates has not even been completely restored yet; 
importation is the provider of the necessities of consumption, not only 
of meat, but also of draft cattle and for working purposes, thus 
creating a relatively enormous demand that leaves a wide margin to 
the importer to impose his conditions, and after him to the commis- 
sioner and to the retailer and to all kinds of intermediate parties to 
press exactions. All economists, and particularly Adam Smith, the 
immortal founder of economic science, have shown in a c^onclusive 
manner that the market regulating the prices of articles of general 
consumption in every country is the interior market, not the interna- 
tional one, whence spring the fallacies of the exaggerated doctrines of 
free trade. If an article of prime necessity and of general consump- 
tion is not produced in the countiy, if there is no natural offer to 
destroy the combinations of speculators and traders, the importing 

Digitized by KJJS^JKJW LC 



22 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

trade with its resources, its relations, and its special knowledge can 
raise the prices without any other limitations than the capacity of 
resistance of the known consumer, i. e., that he is already an economic 
factor in the market. Their proceedings are very simple: To have the 
market insufficiently provided, tmderstocked^ says Adam Smith, and 
if, as it happens in Cuba, capitals are insufficient for all the branches 
of industry that demand it, the domination of the capitalist is absolute^ 
profit is exaggerated, and the people are the victims of speculators. 

Consequently, what is necessary in Cuba so that meat can be cheap- 
ened and all our social classes may consume it, is that our savannas 
and stock farms be restocked with cattle, and a powerful aid for it will 
be that no hindrances be opposed to our stock rmers, that they may 
also have the immediate and direct sensation that a new era of protec- 
tion to work has commenced in the country, and that against them no 
combinations of alien interests or bureaucrats and schemers will prevail. 

The conunission remained firm in its purpose of counseling that the 
suppression of the taxes on consumption, except those of alcohols, 
should be maintained; bearing in mind^ besides, the reasons that have 
been indicated, that, on account of their peculiar nature, they mostly 
weigh on the poor classes that need, in this country as much or more 
than in any other, that their welfare should be attended to. 

The commission by a majority decided to make no substantial alter- 
ation in our tributary system oi direct taxation, on the grounds that 
circumstances that the country is traversing, reconstruction having 
hardly commenced, were not in any sense favorable to such changes 
that always provoke disturbances in the collection and displeasure 
among taxpavers, so much the more so when the territorial tax and 
the industrial tax were b}^ themselves sufficient to supply the munici- 
pal treasury with plentiful revenues, as they had supplied them to 
the State even during the war. With new assessments and records 
made by ayuntamientos themselves, though under the inspection of 
the central administration, agriculture, industry, and commerce would 
pay conformably to their present importance, and the municipalities 
would have, along with the other authorized receipts, resources where- 
with to attend their necessities in the measure allowed by the ruin and 
depopulation of the country. 

The commission accorded the maximum that the ayuntamientos 
could impose on urban and rural real estate according to the impor- 
tance of the localities, fixing different types of imposition on the differ- 
ent classes of agricultural exploitation, attending to the greater 
production and the paying possibilities of taxpayers, marking 8 per 
cent to sugar manufacturing plantations, to the vegas and colonies of 
cane the 6 per cent, and 2 per cent to the other kinds of farms, except- 
ing among the latter those that are located in specified zones, having 
the markets near, that would pay the 4 per cent and up to the 6 per 
cent, all of the assessed net rent. Temporarily, and until furtner 
decision, the estates destroyed in consequence of the war, and while 
the new assessments were not made, the ones in force could be recti- 
fied so that estates that were not destroyed should contribute conform- 
ably to their actual production. The same proceeding was adopted in 
the industrial tax, leaving ample powers to the municipalities to 
impose the quotas on the consumption of wines, alcohols, and spirit- 
uous and fermented drinks in general, on professions, arts, and trades 
comprised in tariffs fourth and fifth, and to regulate the other gabels. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 28 

Being persuaded that the ayuntamientos have to be autonomic cor- 
porations, the commissiou left them a wide margin to unfold their dis- 
cretional laculties. It was incumbent upon them to bear in mind that 
for a long time nothing more has been heard in Cuba but impreca- 
tions, insults, and battle and death cries of the ones against the others, 
that the fields were wasted, towns, villages, and hamlets burnt, and 
the inhabitants and the cultivators of the soil, the survivors of the 
war of extermination, even reduced to the most dreadful poverty. 

Now, it is actually held as a remarkable progress, and it is indeed, 
that life and movement conunence to be seen in our rural estates, that 
economic activity should be springing up again and settling^ down on 
farms and towns and that work comes again to be the exclusive source 
of subsistence after the long domination of depredation and marauding, 
begging and vices in which the more fortunate ones have lived, devour- 
ing their saving their capital, and their credits. 

The Commission adopted other decisions on surcharges for delays in 
payment and compulsory proceedings against tardy taxpayers, all aim- 
ing at the safeguard of municipal finances without vexation to the tax- 
payer. In the matter of surcharges it discriminated between the 
taxpayer for territorial tax and the one for industries, grounding said 
course on the radical difference on the taxable matter of the one and 
the other tax. The exercise of commerce and industry is subject to 
accidents that can not occur in landed property. The taxpayer for 
the industrial tax can easily elude the payment of his obligations with 
the treasury, either by varying the nature of his business, or by 
transferring the property of his establishment or factory, changing 
the location and giving it another form, or selling out precipitately 
and before an embargo can be attached on the merchandise, which are 
fungible things on which no real credit with proper guaranties is pos- 
sible; and hence that it is necessary to secure the interests of municipal 
finances, shortening the terms for collection without surcharge, increas- 
ing the penalties for tardiness in order to diminish the numl^r of cases 
of impossible collection, that according to advices and information 
received by this department has been very considerable, to the detri- 
ment of the revenues and the even progress of the collection. This 
does not injure commerce nor any serious enterprise which pay their 
taxes punctually and without any necessity of being comminated. 

Taxpayers for territorial tax are in a different case. They can not 
defraud with similar proceedings if there is activity and the State holds 
a legal mortgage on real estate for due and unpaid quotas of taxation, 
and that incumbrance affects them in the two years to which its dura- 
tion has been extended, whosoever may be the proprietor. For those 
properties no other uncollectible receipts can exist than those errone- 
ously filled by collectors, because if the estates disappear through 
unexpected causes, demolitions, etc., dulv verified, what proceeds is 
their cancellation or being struck out of the assessment 

The undersigned wao tne exponent of the commission, and having 
drawn up the records of its transactions, when it dissolved thej^ were 
reported to you. The project was the object of deliberation in the 
council of secretaries in May and it was referred to me for making 
the final modifications. The latter were of detail and at last Order 
No. 254, dated the 28th of June, was enacted. 

Besides the precepts explained above, it contains others of impor- 
tance aiming at the correction of abuses and coriniptness and to secure 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



24 REPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

the inspection of municipal finances. It is directed that receipts and 
expenditures have to be balanced and specified in an annual budget; 
that no payment can be made but for obligations authorized in flmt 
budget except in extraordinary cases, and even then by express pro- 
vision of the military governor of the island; revenues are divided 
into obligatory and voluntary, the one and the other being enumemted 
to ^iye uniformity and stability to the system of taxation, and munici- 
palities are obliged to forward a copy of the budgets to the depart- 
ment of finance, which can examine municipal accounts and officially 
suspend at the request of a party concerned the collection of taxes or 
of Illegal (quotas of taxation. Greater publicity in ihe announcements 
for collection is directed and rules are dictated for the observance of 
the order granting resources to the taxpayers that they never had here- 
tofore, sucn as the right to claim against unduly aemanded quotas, 
proceedings wrongfuUjr instituted and unjust, compulsory ones, com- 
missions wherein the interests of taxpayers are represented being 
constituted to that effect, to decide in first mstance, witn appeals against 
their decisions to be heard before the secretary of finance, and in its 
case the '* contencioso administrative " recourse. All tributary arrange- 
ments that even render possible any aggravation of the taxpayers' 
burden, however moderate they may be, provoke disgust and opposi- 
tion. Order No. 254 was not to be an exception to the rule, and it 
was even said that the new r^ime, far from alleviating public burdens, 
made them more onerous. However, the assertion does not withstand 
the slightest analysis when the recollection of all the duties and impo- 
sitions that assailed all the manifestations of human activity with double 
and triple exactions are yet vivid in the memory. The salai*ies with 
the lottery and taxes on consumption of articles of prime necessity, 
the exercise of any right with stamped paper and document of identi- 
fications and with the sign tax, that of cnairs in parks and drives, that 
on the opening of establishments, the special assessments, the quotas 
for collection of fines in behalf of investigatoi*s and inspectors, and 
many other things harassed the purse of the taxpayer and personal 
liberty. 

Order No. 254 is a real progress in our fiscal system, even if it were 
for nothing more than for the simplification of tne system and destruc- 
tion of that tangle. 

It will thus be proclaimed by all before long. At present, from an 
investigation carried out by the Circulo de Hacendados, it is seen that 
the average of taxation on rural estates by the former regime amounted 
to the eleventh per cent of the net taxable income, almost double the 
average authorized by the new legislation, and in a convention of rep- 
resentatives of the municipalities of the province, held in the city of 
Santa Clara the month of July last, a motion for the reestablish men t 
of the tax on the consumption of meat was almost unanimously rejected. 

Order marked with No. 270 was complementary to Order No. 254. 
It was published after July 1, yet I will make a slight mention of it. 
Its object was to give rules on the proceeding that should be followed 
to justify the exemption of taxes granted to rural estates destroyed 
during the war and to determine the period of the collection of the tax 
on the same estates so that it would coincide with the gathering and 
sale of the crops in the benefit of our husbandmen from whom the 
collection was made during the Spanish r^ime without bearing in 
mind that consideration, and it happened from such a coui*se that wnen 

Digitized byVjQOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 25 

the quotas were paid they were always surcharged to the exclusive 
profit of the collector. 

Several projects prepared by this office and submitted to you during 
the incumbency oi Seiior Varona are yet pending definite arrange- 
ment They deal on the reform of the general regubtion that contams 
the compulsory procedure to collect the debts to insular or municipal 
treasuries from tardy taxpayers, that of the regulation and tariffs 
of the industrial tax, and that of the regulation of the conveyance 
and inheritance tax, besides the revision of Order No. 306 on the tax- 
ation on banks and stock companies, not concluded yet by reason of 
the multitude of attentions that weigh on this department and the 
necessity of giving mature study to the resolutions. 

At the end of the fiscal year the undersigned had the honor to pre- 
sent the project of the bud^t of this department based on a new 
territorial division of the island for fiscal services, and you were 
pleased to give your approbation to it. Important economies have 
been realized in tne new roll and services are oetter attended by hav- 
ing been decentmlized. 

The reorganization of this department was a self-imposed necessity 
with the establishment of the offices of the general auditor and treas- 
urer of the island with the changes introduced in the tributary system 
by Order No. 254. Therefore, the offices of the genei-al auditor of 
the State and the ordenaci6n delegada de pagos Office for ordering 
payments) were suppressed, being both mcluded in an auxiliary 
accounting office for the acknowledgment and liquidation of allow- 
ances, to Keep accounts and fiscalize uiose that should be rendered to 
this center; tne inspection and section of State property was included 
in the consulting office; the old section of taxes and imposts in another 
one that, under the name of revenues and iaxes, assists in the inspec- 
tion of municipal finances and of internal revenues, the office of the 
subsecretary has not been provided with an incumbent, the section of 
statistics, though with a reduced personnel, and the treasury are 
maintained. 

For the execution of the services in the rest of the island, the terri- 
tory has been divided in eleven fiscal zones, a map of which is inclosed 
with this repoi*t, designated with the names of the cities where the 
offices have been located, namely: 

1. Zone of Pinar del Rio, that comprises the judicial districts of 
Guane and Pinar del Bio, with the exception of the municipal district 
of Consolacion del Norte. 

2. Zone of Guanajay, that comprises the judicial districts of Guana- 
jay and San Cristobal and the district of Consolacion del Norte. 

3. Zone of Habana, that comprises the present territory of the 
province of Habana. 

4. 2k)ne of Matanzas, that compiises the present judicial districts of 
Matanzas and Alacranes. 

5. Zone of Cardenas, that comprises the provincial districts of Car- 
denas and Colon. 

6. Zone of Santa Clara, that comprises the judicial districts of Santa 
Clara, Sagua la Grande, and Remedios. 

7. Zone of Cienfuegos, that comprises the judicial districts of Cien- 
fuegos, Trinidad, Sancti Spiritus, and Moron. 

8. Zone of Puerto Principe, that comprises the municipal districts 
of Puerto Principe and Nuevitas. 



CUBA 1900— VOL I, PT 3 3 

Digitized by 



Google 



26 REPORT OF MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

9. Zone of Holrain, that comprises the municipal district of Puerto 
Padre and Sagua de Tanamo ana the provincial (fistrict of Holgiiin. 

10. Zone of Manzanillo,^ that comprises the municipal district of 
Santa Cruz del Sur and the judicial districts of Manzanillo and Bayamo, 
excepting the old district of Las Tunas. 

11. Zone of Santiago de Cuba^ that comprises the judicial districts 
of Santiago de Cuba, Baracoa, and Guantanamo, except Sagua de 
Tanamo. 

The provincial and branch administrations of finance were suppressed 
by that new division. An office was organized in each zone, naving 
two sections, one for the administration and collection of internal 
revenues and the other a treasury and disbursing office, the chief 
being the administrator without prejudice to the proper powers of 
the treasurer. • 

With that division, collection and payments were facilitated, as was 
its proposed object. Hence, that in forming the zones the facility of 
communications and the commercial currents were borne in mind 
rather than the connections with purely administrative centei-s. For 
example, Trinidad, Sancti Spiritus, and Moron were grouped together 
with Cienfuegos, because those three towns have communication by 
steamship ana railroad twice a week with the latter, that besides is the 
business center of that part of the southern coast of the island and it is 
easier for all the State creditors to cash the checks delivered to them 
for the payment of their credits. Moron, that in the ^bernative 
order belongs to Puerto Principe, is 30 or more leagues distant from 
the capital of the province and nas no trade with the latter, while it is 
connected with Cienfuegos by easy and rapid communication by the 
old Trocha railroad and the Menendez steamship line. 

Santa Cruz del Sur also belongs to the province of Puerto Principe 
in the gubernative order, but there is an expanse of 20 leagues of 
pastures and woods between it and the capital, and all its easy connec- 
tions and communications are with Manzanillo, situated at a short 
distance on the coast, and the same occurs in regard to Sagua de 
Tanamo and Pueilx) Padre with Holguin. 

The definite budget approved by you amounts to $216,580, of which 
$66. 940 belong to the expenditures of collection and inspection ; $42,600 
to tnose of treasuries and disbursing offices; $78,600 for this office; and 
$28,440 for common expenditures of material, inferior personnel, and 
rentals. Consequently, it is seen that the cost is exiguous when the 
payments of the department for the year that now commences are 
estimated as $6,000,000 and the collection as $800,000. 

The budget of the previous year was for $261,278.44, and it already 
representea an economy of 40 per cent on the corresponding services 
under the old regime. 

When the offices and centers enumerated above were suppressed, and 
the economies were put in execution, there remained a certain number 
of excessive employees, arid their removal from the service was rendered 
necessary: but the general rule that guided the writer was that of 
utilizing tne service of the most capable ones as far as possible. 

Whenever this office has proposed any modification in the laws and 
regulations referring to taxes and imposts or public expenditures it has 
especially inserted some precept aiming at the unification of our mone- 
tsiiry system. Thus it has extended the order of the President of the 
United States dated December 28, 1898, that regulates the legal coui-se 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 27 

of money in this island to the municipal treasury, Order No. 254, 
directing that the roll of the industrial tax and the record.^ of the terri- 
torial tax be reduced to American money, so that the authorized rates 
be fixed upon that basis and that the other revenues and expenditures 
be determmed in that same specie. But experience shows that those 
provisions do not suffice to put an end to the confusion that prevails in 
our circulating medium, and consequently in transactions. We have 
three monetary values in the marketr—Spanish silver, Spanish or French 
gold, and American currency — with the peculiarity that in a part of the 
island, like the province of l^ntiago de Cuba, only American money cir- 
culates. The disturbances occasioned b^ such anomaly, the damage it 
causes to the poorer classes, to our small industries, to retail commerce, 
and to the cultivation of lesser products are so notorious that it is not 
necessary to dwell a great deal on the matter. In ther most usual deal- 
ings of life which, through their repetition and recurrence, come ulti- 
mately to be those of greater import for the social mass, in the wages, 
and even in the greater operations, it is necessary before all to inquire 
in what class of money is the price to be paid, because one is in Spanish 
silver, the other in Spanish gold, and another one in currency; and, as 
the money that circulates from hand to hand is Spanish silver, a simple 
merchandise, subject to all the fluctuations of tne market, the party 

e)ing to receive it guards himself a^inst the contingencies of specu- 
tion, surcharging the price of services and of merchandise. 
The disturbance introduced in public accounting by the course of 
the variety of money of different systems and conditions, authorized 
by the order of December 28, is also considerable, and the losses suf- 
fered by public revenues are none the less so. The director-general 
of posts of this island, in a letter dated the 14th instant, rightly says to 
these headquarters: 

The relations to the public of the department of posts are mainly in the form 
of numerous small transactions from a 1-cent stamp upward, multiplied by daily 
repetition at the various post-offices; and the inconvenience and embarrassment of 
various coinage, expressing different relative values, are more strongly and constantly 
felt by this department tl^ in any other branch of governmental service. 

The official and commercial values of Spanish and French gold fluctuate, but are 
generally in close proximity, with tendency below the official par of 4.82 and 3.86, 
however, involving in the average a loss to the department. The established Spanish 
silver coin rate of 60 per cent, on the other hand, is much below the commercial 
value, and there is a loss and hardship to the public on every sing^le piece of Spanish 
silver coin that passes in through a post-office window. And while the department 
itself reaps no advantage from the premium on coin so received, it does constitute 
a constant temptation to surreptitious manipulation by postmasters and clerks. A 
stamp clerk in the Habana post-office, for example, who takes in ten Spanish dollars 
for $6 face value of postage stamps may slip out to some near-by exchange office and 
set $7.63 American money for the ten Spanish dollars, pocket $1.63, and nobody 
the wiser. It is an insidious and demoralizing temptation. It has been my personal 
belief, repeatedly expressed, that the colossal peculations of Neely probably com- 
menced with covert turns in exchange of Spanish coin, somewhat after the manner of 
a hank cashier speculating in wheat margins. 

There is thus a palpable double injury flowing from the use of Spanish silver at 
poet-offices, a material loss to the public, and an unwholesome temptation to officials. 

The one practicable and effective cure for the evils of a complex currency is to 
make the money of the United States the only legal tender in Cuba. I recommend 
that this be done. With a margin of time for adjustment this change would steady 
values, simplify trade, and harm no legitimate business. 

The observations of Mr. Fosnes are conclusive and the undersigned 
has the pleasure to support them. Large payments, the prices of 
crops and more valuable merchandise, the collection of rentals and 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



28 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

large fees and speculation suffer or receive no damages in the present 
confusion; but salaries^ wages, minor products, small trade, the most 
modest industries, and families in their daily transactions feel the 
damages that are carried along by such a monetary situation, and the 
result of it is social classes exploited — privileges in economic life in 
which gradations corresponding to the aifferent v^ues of money are 
perceptible. 

It behooves the Government to procure the prevalence of the prin- 
ciples that tend to give each one his own, so that all in the remunera- 
tion of their work or of their services should obtain, not depreciated 
money but effective specie withdrawn in what depends on the legisla- 
tor from the combinations of speculation and the practices of exchange. 
Whenever those principles have been submitted to the resolution of 
the people of the United States they have rendered a verdict in their 
behalf, and the circumstances are propitious for their establishment in 
Cuba also. 

Of course, it would be proper to hear competent persons and corpo- 
rations when a definitive provision is to be adopted in the matter, in 
order to avoid a monetary crisis that would be another disaster for the 
country. It must be borne in mind that considerable amounts belong- 
ing to the Cuban treasurv have been forwarded to Washington, and 
that, in consequence of the war, large sums of money have been sta- 
tioned and fixed in the soil by expenses of reconstruction; and, besides, 
that important remittances have .been made abroad to cover our con- 
sumption of articles of prime necessity that were produced by our 
fields in normal times, as is shown by the statistics published by the 
adminstration of customs. 

Very respectfully, Leopoldo Cancio, 

Secretary ofFmcmoe. 

Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, 

Military Governor of Ouha. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EEPORT 



OF 



MAJ. E. F. LADD, TREASURER OF THE ISLAND 

OF CUBA. 



Hkadquabtebs Division op Cuba, 
Office op the Treasurer of the Island op Cuba, 

HabaTUi^ Cvba^ September J?, 1900. 
Sir: In compliance with instructions from your office, I have the 
honor to submit herewith a report of the operations of this Depart- 
ment for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, as follows: The ]l)egin- 
ning of the year found the work of the office divided into the folfow- 
ing departments: Treasurer of customs, auditor for the fiscal year 
1899, treasurer of Cuba, disbursing department, transportation depart- 
ment. Each department will be separately treated or in brief. 

In carrying into effect the regulations of the War Department, 
dated May 11, 1899, I was instructed by the military jpovemor to 
continue the duties of treasurer of customs and auditor tor the fiscal 
year 1899, until the business of the fiscal year could be closed. 

TREASURER OF CUSTOMS. 

As treasurer of customs there was deposited with me only the col- 
lections of the port of Habana, the collections of all other ports being 
held by the collectors and transferred directly to disbursing officers, as 
ordered by the military governor. At the close of business on June 
30. 1899, the cash on hand amounted to $312,600.50; amount received 
subsequently, $140.58; total to be accounted for, $312,741,08; which 
has been applied as follows: 

Deooettedto the credit of the treftsurer of Cuba 12,586.67 

Dwraned and tiansferied to dLsboising offlcera pursuant to order of military governor 310, 154. 41 

Total 812,741.08 

From the opening of the office of the treasurer of customs on Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899, until the close of its business, its financial statement is 
as follows: 

CMhreoefved 14,996,150.96 

Gaah disboised $602,709.22 

Oaah tntnsferred to diabundng officers 3,789,866.07 

Gaah deposited to credit of the treasurer of Cuba 702,586.67 

4,995,160.96 

The accounts of this office were inspected by certified accountants 
on May 26, 1900. A copy of their report is hereto affixed, marked 
Exhibftl. 

20 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



80 REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

AUDITOB FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1899. 

As auditor for the island of Cuba for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1899, this office was charged with the audit of the disbursements made 
by the army, having no connection with or authority over the accounts 
of collectors or disbursmg officers outside the military establishment 
There was an independent auditor charged with the audit of all 
accounts of collections and disbursement of the customs service, 
another in the department of finance to audit the accounts of collec- 
tions and disbursements of that department, and one to audit all the 
postal accounts, while telegraph-line receipts were accounted for to 
the chief signal officer of the division. 

At the close of the fiscal year many disbursing officers had outstand- 
ing obligations and contracts which kept their accounts open for several 
months, but as far as possible these accounts were included in those 
of that fiscal vear, in order to determine more accurately the actual 
expenses of the same. 

As this office was not organized until about April 1, 1899, and was 
only well in operation when the Executive order of May 8, 1899, was 
issued completely changing the whole finance department, it was 
thought best not to attempt to make monthly settlements with dis- 
bursing officers, man^ of whom were leaving the island, but to put 
under process of adjustment all the account^ o*f the fiscal year and 
make but one settlement of each account for the year. 

As a rule officers had rendered monthly accounts, but several months 
had elapsed before any instructions reached them; mail and telegraph 
facilities were poor; most of the officers were inexperienced and many 
of the problems were new to those of experience, and it has been 
impracticable to apply the methods in practice in the departments of 
our government. 

It lias also been impossible to give as accurate a classification of dis- 
bursements as was desired, as no classification was given as a guide 
during the first few months, but ample evidence of the proper appli- 
cation of funds for the needs and interest of public demands has been 
secured, except in the cases hereinafter to be mentioned, and on June 
30, 1900, the state of the accounts covering disbursements by officers 
of the United States Army of Cuban funds collected from January 1, 
1899, to June 30, 1899, is shown in attached Exhibits 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
8, 9, and 10. 

Exhibit 2 shows the funds received by disbursing officers from the treasurer of customs . 12, 934, 866. 62 
Exhibit S shows the funds received by disbursing officers from collectors of customs ... 1, 338, 338. 51 

Exhibit 4 shows miscellaneous funds received by disbursing officers 39, 673. 38 

ExhibitSshows the balances due disbursing officers 15.85 

Giving a total of 4,812. 7»4,36 

Which is accounted for as follows: 

Exhibit 6, balances certified to the new auditor $719, 506. 42 

Exhibit 7, balances deposited in the treasury 126, 696. 70 

Exhibit 8, amounts due from disbursing officers 1, 971. 88 

Exhibit 9, expenditures audited 3,464,719.36 

Total 4,312,7^.36 

Exhibit 10 shows the disbursements classified under the proper 
heading or appropriation. 

The balances due from disbursing officers, as reported in Exhibit 8, 
are outstanding from the fact that this office has been unable to reach 
these officers, Colonel Ray being in Alaska, Captain Kickard in the 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY OOVfiKNOR OF CUBA. 31 

Philippines, and Captain Wooten* and Lieutenant Dillon having been 
mustered out of the service before the auditor's office was organized: 
but there is no reason to suppose any difficulty will be experienced 
in settling these outstanding accounts as soon as the officers can be 
reached and have an opportunity to consult their retained papers. 

As a loile, in the settlement of these accounts this office has received 
the hearty cooperation of disbursing officers, and considering the inex- 
perience of many of these officers and the difficulties encountered by 
them all, the result entitles them to much credit and confirms the gen- 
eral belief that public funds are never safer than when intrusted to 
officers of the army for safe keeping and disbursement. 

Under the direction of the military governor, this department under- 
took the work of instructing all civil departments of the insular and 
municipal governments in the methods of accounting in use in the 
United States, the Spanish methods being so elaborate as to be burden- 
some and beyond comprehension. Understanding that it would be use- 
less to force into use any system which the authorities were not ready 
to receive, as it would surely be discarded upon the withdrawal of our 
authority, I first carefully demonstrated to the auditor of the civil 
government, Mr. Ernesto Fonts, the advantages of the proposed sys- 
tem. I found in Mr. Fonts both an apt and progressive student, and 
his department very soon adopted our methods. It was more difficult 
to reach the municipal authorities^ as their accounts were not under 
the direct authority of any of the departments of the civil govern- 
ment, the accounting being made to the municipal council, making it 
necessary to thoroughly instruct Cubans in the principles of our sys- 
tem and send them with sample forms and accounts to every munici- 
pality in the island. Several months were consumed in this missionary 
work, but the entire territory was covered, and a report was received 
from every municipality to the effect that our system had been made 
clear and had been adopted. 

In this work I am inaebted to Mr. Fonts, assistant auditor, for val- 
uable assistance and hearty cooperation. In fact, in all my official 
relations with the Cuban people I have found them eager to adopt 
new methods when shown their advantages, and to force our ideas 
upon them under other conditions would be a mistake and only result 
in greater confusion, unless our authority were to remain peimanent. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

The treasury of the island of Cuba began operation on July 1, 1899, 
under the regulation from the War Department of May 11 of the 
same year. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, the cash 
receipts have been 119,276,394.07, as shown by months and under the 
proper fund accounts in Exhibit 11. During the same period the pay- 
ments were $16^574,340.32, as shown by months and under the proper 
fund accounts m Exhibit 12, leaving a cash balance of $2,702,053.75. 
During the year transfer warrants to increase any fund found insuffi- 
cient to meet the demands were executed, as shown in Exhibit 13. Com- 
bining these exhibits shows the balances under the different funds as 
found in Exhibit 14. Until January 1, 1900, the old headings of 

'The accounts of Captain Wooten have since been received, audited and closed.— 
E.F.L. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



32 BEPOBT OF mtlTABT OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

appropriations remained in force, and for the first six monUis of 
tne fiscal year the allotments made bv the military governor were 
$7,962,890.44, as shown by months and headings in E^ibit 15. The 
allotments for the last six months of the fiscal year were $8,611,449.88, 
as shown by months and under the new headings in Exhibit 16. 

While the above shows the actual cash receipts and allotments made 
during the year, it does not show the actual revenues and expenses of 
the ismnd during that period. These items can only be given with accu- 
racy when the auditor has completed audit of the accounts of the year 
just closed; but a close approximation to the revenues can be obtained 
from the monthly reports of collections made by collectors. This is 
shown by months ana under the proper funds m Exhibit 17.* The 
postal revenues as given in this exhibit are probably much too small, 
but can not be given more accurately until the completion of the inves- 
tigation of the alleged defalcation in that department. 

Likewise the allotments given in Exhibits 15 and 16 may be consid- 
ered as the approximate expenses of the periods covered by the same. 
On January 1, 1900, and July ,1, 1900, disbursing officers had on hand 
several hundred thousand dollars in unexpended balances, but there 
were at these times several hundred thousand dollars in outstanding 
obligations against the island. 

DEPOSIT OP FUNDS AND USE OF CHECKS. 

Under the orders of the War Department, beginning July 1, 1899, all 
revenues of the island were deposited with the North American Trust 
C!ompany, of New York, and its branch offices maintained at Habana, 
Santiago, Matanzas, and Cienfuegos, Cuba, and all funds drawn from 
the treasury were placed with these banks to the credit of disbursing 
officers. 

At the outset much difficulty was experienced in putting disbursing 
officers' checks into general circulation, this mode of payment being 
unknown here; and business people, while recognizing the advantages 
resulting from their use, were inclined to combine to depreciate their 
value. 

In order to help maintain these checks at par all collectors were 
authorized and encouraged to cash them. This authority was later 
extended to postmasters, and the result is shown by the fact that at 
the present time, with two exceptions, all disbursing officers in the 
island are required to issue a check in payment of every account except 
salaries and payments less than $20. 

The North American Trust Company through its branches has fur- 
nished the Government facilities equal to those secured from national 
depositories in the United States, and from frequent inspections of their 
Habana branch I have been satisfied that the company nas never failed 
to have on hand sufficient cash to meet at a moment's notice every 
dollar of its liability to the insular government. 

Until April 26, 1900, the funds on deposit with this company were 
secured by bonds of surety companies to the amount of $2,000,000, but 
in March, 1900, it was thought advisable to adopt another form of 
security which would more nearly coincide with that given by United 

*The excess of cash receipts over revenues as shown by comparing Exhibits Nos, 
11 and 17 is due to the fact that Exhibit No. 11 includes the balances left from the 
pievioufl year, and all deposits of unexpended balances of disbursing officerB.~£. F. L. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REFOBT OF MILTFABY OOVBBNOB OF CUBA. 88 

States depositories, and, under direction of the honorable Secretary of 
War, 1 submitted to the military governor the proposition as ^iven in 
Eixhibit 18. General Orders, No. 127, c. s., H^quarters Division of 
Cuba, was issued embracing the more essential features of the above 
recommendation. 

Under the terms of this order the North American Trust Company 
qualified for $1,500,000, but so far as I know no other bank has made 
application for any of this business. This is accounted for partly by the 
fact that most of the banks here are private institutions, whicn do not 
favor the investment necessary to qualify as a depository, and are not 
in favor of submitting their business to the examination required. 

I still believe the business interests of the island could best be served 
by depositing all the treasury funds with depositories giving the 
required security. At present there is locked up in the treasury nearly 
$8,000,000, and this amount withdrawn from circulation has resulted 
in an advance of 1 to 2 per cent in the loaning rate. 

FOBEION GOLD. 

According to Executive orders the revenues of the island are payable 
in United States money, Spanish and French gold, at the rate of $4.82 
for the centen and $8.86 for the louis, and Spanish silver at 60 per cent 
of its face value. The value given the foreign gold coins is tne same 
as that adopted by the United States Treasury for the appraisement of 
imports, and is supposed to be their assay value. The value of these 
coins in their native country is $5 and $1, respectively; but experience 
proved that the constant flow of gold toward the mother country drained 
the insular possessions to such an extent as to retard business, and in 
order to prevent this these coins were given an inflation of 6 per cent 
in the colonies, making their value in Cuba $5.80 and $4:. 24, respec- 
tively. The value adopted by the military government, as stated above, 
places the rate of exchange of United States currenc]^ and Spanish and 
French gold at 1.10. as nearly as can well be approximated. 

During the calendar year of 1899 the commercial rate of exchange 
ran from 1.085 to 1.11, giving corresponding values of $4,774 to $4,885 
and $8.82 to $8,908 to mese foreign coins when used for the payment 
of revenues. 

The natural result followed, revenues being largely paid in these 
foreign coins whenever this mode of payment was advantageous to the 
importer. As a result, earljr in the fiscal year 1900 this department 
found itself being flooded with this foreign gold, and it became neces- 
sary to decide upon some line of action as to its disposition; so on 
August 19, 1899, a letter on this subject was addressed to the adjutant- 
^neral, Division of Cuba. (This letter, with indorsements, is shown 
m Elxhibit 19.) Acting under these instructions, this foreign gold to 
the amount of $5,478,846.99 in United States currency has been sent 
to the United States assay office, New York City, for recoinage. The 
proc^^s of this recoinage was $5,444,814.85, as shown by certified 
statements of the assay office, which shows a loss of $29,082.14. In 
view of this loss, on April 16, 1900, 1 again wrote the War Department 
on this subject (a copy of the letter is shown in Exhibit 20), but no 
reply has as yet been received. Acting under the above instructions 
of gteptember 15, 1899, I have continued to ship all this gold to the 
assay office, and the effect upon the money market continues as stated 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



84 REPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

in my letter of April 16, the rate of exchange i*emaining almost sta- 
tionary at from 1.10 to l.lOi. 

This department keeps separate accounts of the different kinds of 
money received by depositories, who pay out only the United States 
funds, delivering to the treasurer in kind all other deposits. 

TBANSPOBTATION OF FUNDS. 

The question of transportation of funds has required no little con- 
sideration. Beginning July 1, 1899, the department had a contract 
with the Cuban and Fan-American Express Company. Under the 
terms of this contract the company was to transport funds for one-half 
of 1 per cent, this contract being revokable. It was revoked at the 
request of the company on December 31, 1899. Thereafter all ship- 
ments for a time were made by post-office money order or through 
the medium of the North American Trust Company. In the latter 
case the rate paid was the same as paid the express company, untO 
some time in April, 1900, when an insurance policy was obtained to 
cover shipments by registered mail. Thereafter the trust company 
was paid only the actual cost of postage and insurance on all transfers 
of funds. 

The shipments of foreign gold to the assay office were with one 
exception made by the North American Trust Company, the company 
being reimbursed for the cost of insurance, as well as the loss due to 
recoinage, as certified by the assay office. 

Several millions of dollars have been shipped throughout the island 
and between the island and the United States without tne loss of a dol- 
lar, the risk in every case having been reduced to a minimum by the 
advantages afforded by banks in making transfers whenever the cost 
did not exceed the cost of shipment by express. 

OOMPABISON OF BEVENUES AND EXPENSES. 

This office has just checked out the funds received since July 1, 1899, 
which pertained to the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899, and find they 
amount to $1,430,389.37. 

The outstanding indebtedness on June 30, 1899, was met from funds 
retained for this purpose by the treasurer of^ customs, so that the 
above amount shows the actual surplus of receipts over expenditures 
on account of the first six months of military occupation. This infor- 
mation can not be given relative to any other period, but on December 
31, 1899, the treasury had a c«^h balance of |l,685,958.46; collectors 
had undeposited collections amounting to $330,681.39, and disbursing 
officers had to their credit $1,547,316.02, $3,563,965.87; but this does 
not take into consideration the cash in the hands of disbursing officers 
or their outstanding obligations, and is only given as a rough estimate 
of resources at that time. On June 30, 1900, a similar calculation 

fives the total resources of the island as follows: Cash in the treasury, 
2,762,053.75; undeposited collections, $202,548.77; on dep^it to 
credit of disbursing officers, $1,113,203.59, $4,116,806.11, which is a 
rough way of showing that the revenues have exceeded the expenses 
of tne island for each of these three periods. 

The accounts of the treasurer of the island of Cuba were inspected 
by certified public accountants to include May 26, 1900. A copy of 
their report is hereto appended as Exhibit 21. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



RKPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 85 

DISBUBSING DEPABTMENT. 

Upon this department has devolved the payment of all accounts per- 
taining to the Habana customs-house and customs service, all accounts 
orderSi paid bv the military governor, the expenses of the treasury 
and auditing aepartments, and all transportation accounts. The 
disbursements of the department during the year amounted to 
$1,437,998.80. All accounts were inspected to include May 26, 1900, 
by the acting inspector-general. Division of Cuba, and pronounced 
correct. 

TRANSPOBTATION DEPABTMENT. 

Early last year the military governor decided it advisable to put 
into use official transportation requests and bills of lading, to cover all 
transportation services of the insular goveimment, both civil and mili- 
tary, and to separate the same from the business of the United States 
Quartermaster Department. 1 was directed to take charge of this 
work in connection with my other duties. The proper forms were 
gotten out and distributed, also rules for their use. They are intended 
to cover all such official service of every department of the insular 
government, and are found to be of great value, particularly in the 
department of justice, being used to cover transportation of prisoners, 
witnesses, etc. During the year this department has received and 
settled 7,702 claims for such service, and has about 6,000 other claims 
under adjustment. 

It has been my intention to touch on the questions of currency, 
revenues and taxation, subjects intimately connected with the work of 
this department, and of vital interest to the island, but they having 
been under consideration by commissions appointed for that purpose, 
their reports will probably cover the ground more fully than can well 
be done here, so they will be passed with only a few comments. 

CURRENCY. 

Previous to our military occupation the currency of the island con- 
sisted of Spanish and French gold, Spanish silver and Spanish bank 
bills. The latter, not being accepted in payment of customs and taxes, 
disappeared from circulation as soon as the United States assumed 
control. American currency at the same time came into circulation 
and at once became the standard. But while our money circulates and 
is the standard, a large proportion of all business is conducted on the 
basis of the Spanish ana French money, previously mentioned, whose 
value, especially that of silver, is subjected to wide fluctuations at the 
expense of the producers and consumer, as. is always the case with a 
fluctuating currency, the banking interests being masters of the situa- 
tion. So that whatever reform may be taken should look toward the 
establishment of some fixed value, and the great difficulty will be to 

f^et rid of the Spanish silver. We have made repeated attempts to 
orce American silver into circulation, but without avail, its return to 
the bank vaults, either through the custom- house or the cambios being 
assured within forty-eight hours. By some authorities a special cur- 
rency for the island is deemed essential to the dignity of its independ- 
ence, but this can hardly be considered seriously. In fact, I am told 
one prominent authority evolved a plan for immediate coinage, but 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



36 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

failed tc make any provision for obtaining the necessary bullion. It 
is hard to conceive of any plan which could e^ual in advantage the 
adoption of American currency. Cuba can not m many ^ears, if ever, 
maintain the value of a silver or paper issue, and it will be a long 
time before her finances will warrant the coinage of gold. 

The island does not suffer much from the fluctuations of the gold, 
its range seldom being more than 3 per cent, and our present course 
in recoining it has, I think, resulted m the rate of exchange remaining 
almost constant for the last year; but 1 hardly think a complete change 
in the currency of the island can be effected without some decided move 
in that direction. 

At times the demand for Spanish and French gold is so great that it 
can be imported with profit, even at the rate established by us at which 
it will be accepted in payment of customs, etc. , and as long as we accept 
it at this i*ate, the supply will prove inexhaustible. In my opinion a 
change can not be eflfected except by some radical method, such as the 
following: Nearly two years ago some suggested that this foreign gold 
be no longer accepted in payment of customs, etc., and that a decree 
should be issued making all future obligations payable onlv in United 
States currency, and all outstanding ones pajrable in Spanish gold, pay- 
able in currency at a rate of 1.10. Such action would practically have 
demonetized Spanish gold, and entailed a loss on the holders of it. 
besides paralyzing business. Such a course would not have worked 
great injustice provided the Government had stood readv to redeem 
all this gold at its bullion value or a little better, but there was no 
authority for such redemption, and the advantages of our cuiTency 
were not then apparent to the public. But 1 believe the time has now 
arrived for some such move, and I would suggest the following in 
detail: 

As previously stated in this report, the cun*ent lute of exchange 
between United States currency and Spanish and French gold for the 
last year has varied but little from 1. 10, which rate gives the value of the 
centen and louis at 4.82 and 3.86, respectively — the value fixed by cir- 
cular No. 2, division of customs and insular affairs, series of 1899. The 
bullion value of these coins, as shown by the reports of the assay 
oflBce, New York, is $4:. 795 and $3.84, respectively, or at an exchange 
rate of l.lOi, and adding the cost of insurance on shipments, we find 
that this gold, when accepted here at the i*ate of l.lOf, can be recoined 
without loss. Now, if at a time when exchange business was auiet, 
just after the movement of the sugar crop, about April, it should be 
decided that, after December 31 following, castoms, etc., should be 
payable only in United States currencv, that all public and private 
obligations conti-acted thereafter should, be payable in United States 
currency, that all existing obligations payable m Spanish gold should 
be payable in that coin or in currency at the rate of 1.10, and that the 
treasurer of Cuba should accept and i-edeem in United States currency 
at the rate of I.IOJ all Spanish and French gold presented to him prior 
to January 1, 1901 (the treasurer, of course, bemg provided with the 
necessaiy currency by a temporary loan from the United States), I 
believe the question would be solved as regards the foreign gold. Of 
course, this gold would not wholly disappear, but it would soon disap- 
pear from circulation. The government would lose nothing, and the 
loss to the holdci*s of the gold would be insignificant, the time given 
being ample for all trade conditions to adjust themselves to the new 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BBPOBT OP MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 87 

conditions. The estimates of the amount of this gold in the island can 
not be reliable, as most of it is held by private individuals, very little 
being on deposit in banks. These estimates vary from $15,000,000 to 
$30,000,000. As this department has recoined over $10,000,000 of it 
in the last year, the smaller estimate is thought to be excessive, i*ather 
than otherwise, at the present time. While the rate of exchange 
between United States currency and this foreign gold has remained 

5 Tactically constant during the last year, it is anticipated that the 
emand for the movement of the coming sugar crop will carry 
exchange as low as 1.08i, and result in large importations of the coin. 
The question of getting rid of the Spanish silver is one more impor- 
tant, as its fluctuations are wider and inflation greater, but the Quantity 
of this money in CnhsL is comparatively small, though it is tne only 
fractional currency in circulation, except in the provmce of Santiago. 
Many anticipated that the Executive order of December 28, 1899, 
directing that after January 1, 1899, Spanish silver should be accepted 
at 60 per cent of its face value in payment of customs, etc., would tend 
to force this silver from circulation, but such has not been the case. 
The demand keeps up the supply. Large importations have even been 
made from Spain. It is essentially the money of the rural districts, 
the louis (value $4.24 Spanish gold) bein^ the smallest gold coin in 
circulation, our paper money not yet bemg familiar, ana our silver 
circulating but little, and it seems evident that some other method 
must be devised if we wish to get rid of this silver. The silver of 
Porto Rico, being a special coinage not acceptable in Spain or other 
insular possessions, there remained nothing to do but to purchase the 
coin. .To have demonetized it in Porto Rico would have entailed 
heavy loss on the holders of it, but this is not the case with the Spanish 
silver here, for it is the coin of Spain; its value here is regulated by 
its value there; if it can be demonetized here it can be sent to Spain 
without serious loss or inconvenience to the holder, and a decree that 
after a certain date all such silver found here would be subject to seiz- 
ure by the authorities and redemption at its bullion value would, I 
think, produce the desired effect, and commercial relations would so 
adjust themselves as to cause no great inconvenience or loss to anyone, 
provided the decree were issued several months in advance of the date 
when it would take effect. The amount of Spanish silver at present in 
the island is estimated to be well within one and a half million dollai*s, 
taken at its face value. During our early occupation of the eastern 
end of the island, previous to January 1, 1899, botn Spanish and French 
gold and Spanish silver were forced out of general circulation by 
establishing a value less than that at other pai*ts of the island, and United 
States currency and silver still continue the general money of that sec- 
tion, showing that it is only necessary to get rid of this foreign coin, 
when the advantages of United States currency become apparent. At 
present there is no apparent scarcity of money for circulation, but I 
anticipate such a conaition will arise during the movement of the next 
sugar crop. While the amount of money on the island, probably 
unounting to $10 or $12 per capita, would seem ample for all commer- 
cial puiposes, it must be remembered that a large percentage of this 
money is held in private safes, not being on deposit with banks, as is 
the general custom in the United States. Consequently, the circula- 
tion is reduced much below the amount of actual money. This, how- 
ever, is increased by the general circulation of insular treasury checks. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



38 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

If the money held by private parties could be brought into circulation 
and use by being deposited in banks, to be used by them instead of 
lying idle as now, the commercial advantages would be great, but the 
experience of the past has taught people to largely distrust banking 
institutions, and their confidence can be restored only by the organiza- 
tion of some institution similar to a national bank, me same being 
required to deposit with the government sufficient approved security 
to guarantee depositors. I believe some such arrangement to be prac- 
ticable in connection with the handling of insular funds, which should 
by some means be available for circulation, instead of being held in 
the treasury. 

During the last year the North American Trust CompKany , of Habana, 
has organized a savings bank in connection with their genei'al bank- 
ing business. They pay 3 per cent interest on deposits, and are grad- 
ually overcoming" the public prejudice caused by the sad experiences 
of the past. This is the only institution, public or private, in the 
island where interest is paid on deposits. 

It is true that there is a scarcity of money for loaning, as is shown 
by the fact that loans on prime bonds and stocks can be readily made 
at 8 per cent, but the chief demand of the island is for capital. There 
is no place in the world which offers such inducements lor investors, 
and once the political future of the island is assured the economic 
question will solve itself. 

Great hardship will result from the readjustment of obligations as 
soon as (creditors are allowed to foreclose their claims, but it seems to 
be the consensus of opinion among business men that nothing is to be 
gained by a further postponement of the evil day. The sooner the 
questions between debtors and creditors can be adjusted, the sooner 
will all agricultural and commercial interests of the island be estab- 
lished on a safe and stable basis. 

REVENUES AND TAXATION. 

From a reference to Exhibit 11, hereto appended, it will be seen 
that about 95 per cent of the revenues of the island come from duties 
on imports, the same not being levied for protection, but for revenue 
only. By a reference to Exhibit 16, it will be seen that in the six 
months ending June 30, 1900, the insular government contributed 
$3,706,294.87 for the maintenance of municipal governments. Every 
article of food or clothing is subject to duty, and as the island produces 
only a very small percentage of these articles, it follows that the poor 
people of the islana are not only the main supporters of the insular gov- 
ernment, but also large contributors to the support of municipalities. 

It is a fact that from January 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900, the city of 
Habana received more than $5,000,000 from the insular treasury, and 
little work was done which did not strictly pei*tain to the municipal 
government, benefiting" only the people and property of the city, and 
the burden of which snould have been largely borne by the property 
of the municipality. But due to the faulty system of taxation, the 
city revenues were insufficient, and it became necessary to contribute 
State funds to the amount stated above, the conditions had to be met 
as best they could with the means at hand. 

The case in Habana is but an exaggerated example of the operation 
in every municipality of the island of the present system of taxation. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



EEPOBT OP MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 39 

Under the present system, property is not taxed according to its 
value, but aexjordinp to the income received from it, or rather accord- 
ing to the income chimed to be received; even when honestly admin- 
istered, the system permits the holding of large estates in an unpro- 
ductive condition without taxation. This is especially detrimental, as 
most of the land in Cuba is held in large tracts at present unproduc- 
tive, and it is the policy of these landed proprietors not to sell an acre 
of land until forced to do so. Their financial condition at present will 
not enable them to improve the property, and the pernicious system 
of taxation encourages them to maintain it in idleness, while the reve- 
nues it should pav must be met hy the poor people, who in turn are 
prevented from tnemselves acquiring and improving land. 

The remedy would be to adopt the modern system of taxation, assess- 
ing all property according to its value. If holders of unproductive 
property could not meet the assessment, they would be forced to sell 
part of their holdings to those who would cultivate and improve the 
soil. Thus the expenses of the Government of the island would be 
largely met by the property it protects, and the resources of the island 
developed. But such a revision can not wisely be made until public 
sentiment is educated to demand it. To enforce it by our temporary 
authority would be prejudicial to its ultimate adoption. All such 
reforms inaugurated m advance of popular education and demands can 
easily and will as surely be overthrown upon the withdrawal of our 
authority. 

In closing this report I desire to express my appreciation of the 
efficient assistance and support rendered me by (jen. Alejandro Rodri- 
guez, assistant treasurer of Cuba. As a thorough gentleman and patri- 
otic soldier he has served his country faithfully in both civil and military 
capacities. He resigned his position as assistant treasurer to accept 
that of mayor of the city of Habana, to which he was elected by popular 
vote at the municipal election June 16, 1900. 

I also wish to commend the employees of the department for their 
efficient services and the willingness with which they have at all times 
met the demands of the department without regard to hours. 
Very respectfully, 

E. F. Ladd, 
Treasurer of the hlamd of Cvha. 

Adjutant-General, Division of Cuba, 

Habana^ Cuba. 



Exhibit 1. 

[Haskins & Sells, certified public accountants, 80 Broad street, New York.] 

Habana, Cuba, June 18, 1900. 
8ib: In compliance with instructions of the military governor, we have made an 
examination and aadit of the accounts of Eu^ne F. liadd, major and quartermaster, 
United States Volunteers, as treasurer and disbursing officer of customs, from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899, to June 30, 1899 (both dates inclusive), and as treasurer of the island 
of Cuba from July 1, 1899, to May 26, 1900 (both dates inclusive), and submit here- 
with in relation thereto four exhibits, as follows: Exhibit A, receipts and disburse- 
ments as treasurer and disbursing officer of customs; B, receipts and disbursements 
•8 treasurer of the island of Cuba, and balance on hand May 26, 1900; O, securitiee 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



40 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



on deposit for account of varioas insorance oompaniee; D, secaritiee on deposit for 
account of the North American Trust Company. 

We have verified the cash and securities on nand by actual count and the balances 
on deposit in bank by proper certificates from the different depositories. We have 
traced all receipts back to their original sources and checked aU expenditures shown 
by the treasurer's cashbook. 

We hereby certify that all receipts have been properly accounted for and that all 
disbursements have been made on properly approved warrants and vouchers and that 
the balance on hand Ma^ 26, 1900, agreed with the auditor's records. 
Respectfully submitted. 

H ASK INS & Sella, 
Certified Public AccourUants, 

Adjutant-General, Division op Cuba, United States Army, 

Habanay Cuba. 



Receipts and disbursements of Eugene F. Ladd, major and quartermaster^ United Slates Vol- 
unteers, as treasurer and disbursing officer of auiomSj from February i, 1899 j to June 
30, 1899, including all transactions to May t6, 1900, appertaining to the period prior 
to June SO, 1899, 



Iteceipts: 

February. 18W $1,224,317.32 

March, 1899 968,083.57 

April, 1899 887,602.26 

May, 1899 927,258. U 

June, 1899 1,012,899.18 

July, 1899 12.46 

December, 1899 87.28 

March,1900 90.90 



Total 4,996,150.96 



Biflbursements: 

February, 1899 $168,381.01 

March, 1899 788,835.84 

ADril,18»9 831.W0.45 

May, 1899 726,739.70 

June, 1899 2,221,692.88 



July. 1899. 

August. 1899 

September, 189U . 
October, 1899.... 
November, 1899. . 
December, 1899 . . 

January, 1900 

February, 1900. . . 

March, 1900 

April, 1900 

May, 1900 



239,334.87 

26,196.65 

2,580.60 

22,339.77 

15.600.88 

164.55 

3,376.64 

1,315.90 

2,691.64 

190.28 

150.00 



Total 4,996,150.96 



Includes $700,000, $2,246.39, $190.28, $150 transferred to tbe treasurer of the island 
of Cuba. 

It was stated on the bills attached to the following vouchers that they were pay- 
able in Spanish gold, but the same were paid and cluirged out in Amencan money: 
Voucher No. 47, March, 1899, $17.35; No. 49, $12; No. 103, $3.57; No. 105, $12.50; 
total, $45.42. Voucher No. 69, March, 1899, covering a pay roll for $193.77 was paid 
and charged out as $193.71. 



Exhibit 2. — Funds received by various disbursing offijcersfrom Maj. E. F. Ladd, treas- 
urer of customs. 



Date. 



Mar. 14 

May 24 

June 6 

6 

19 

19 

24 

27 

27 

July 25 

Feb. 5 

Mar. 21 

Apr. 4 



29 
May 27 

28 
Mar, 80 



Received by— 



Lieut. Victor Shepherd. . . 

Maj. 8. D. Sturgls 

.do 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Capt. Jno. Landstreet, jr . . 

do 

Maj. J. L. Wilson, quarter- 
master 

do 

....do 

Lieut. F. A. Wilcox 

Bri^.Qen, C. F, Humphrey. 



Amount. 



97,500.00 

660.00 

260.00 

23,820.57 

8,874.43 

250.00 

3,991.40 

481.00 

47,693.20 

224.36 

5,600.00 

5,000.00 

3,253.71 

1,500.00 
3,954.98 
2,750.00 
5,000.00 



Date. 



Apr. 
May 

June 



17 



July 
May 
June 24 
24 
May 23 
Apr. 11 

July 24 

Apr. 21 

24 



Received by — 



Brig. Gen. C. F. Humphrey. 

do 

do 

do 

.....do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

Col. G.M. Randall 

....do 

do 

Lieut. F. E. Lacey 

Geo. A. Bartlett, disbursing 

clerk 

Maj. F. H. Edmunds 

Lieut. H. W. Stamford 

.....do 



Amount. 



950,000.00 

60,000.00 

50,000.00 

52,156.78 

3, 616. OS 

2,119.00 

600.00 

4*355.90 

60,000.00 

500.00 

250.00 

227.00 

4,050.00 

12,500.00 

370.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MJLITART GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



41 



Exhibit 2. — Funds received by variauB di^mrmng officers from Maj, E. F. Ladd, treas- 
urer of customs — Continued. 



Date. 



1889. 

JU7 2 

20 

June 1 

29 

Feb. 16 

Apr. 11 

June 21 

Uaj 30 

Apr. 7 

20 

28 

July 10 

Mar. 8 

Aug. 28 

Oct 20 

Dec 1 

June 9 

Feb. 3 

16 

28 

Uar. 30 

3 
22 
27 

n 

29 

June 17 

21 

21 



BeceiTed by- 



Amount 



Lient H. W. Stamford 

do I 

do ' 

do ' 

Haj.W.C.Goivas 

Maj.J.H.Heatirole 

Brig. Gen. A. R. Chaffee. .. . 
GaptO.M.LLnak 

1 Mi^.J.B.A]eahire 

do 

! do 

: Lieut Col. W. A. Rafferty . . 

Capt C. J. Symmonds 

CoLEdwardMoale \ 

Capt Elias Chandler 

....do I 

Ueut Col. W. H. Biiibee ... 

Maj. M.C.Butler 

do ' 



.*...do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

MaJ.H. 
do. 



L. Scott. 



16,000.00 

7,863.88 

14,100.00 

U, 809. 08 

161.20 

9,000.00 

6,000.00 

2,668.50 

65,000.00 

624.99 

6,016.66 

- 707.00 

21,750.00 

2,095.13 

5.00 

5.00 

500.00 

2,780.29 

217.16 

8,806.36 

8,501.12 

262.50 

8,982.51 

785.00 

890.00 

250.00 

3,686.87 

8,663.89 

109.33 

153,420.99 

1,718.00 



Date. 



1889. 

June 21 

21 

21 

23 

24 

24 

24 

Sept 14 

Aug. 9 

Mar. 21 

29 

Feb. 14 

Mar.1-81 

1-81 

May 1 

June 6 
8 

28 

July 21 

21 

1900. 

Mar. 1 

Jan. 6 

13 

4 



Received by— 



Maj. H.L. Scott. 
.....do 



....do 
....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Capt. J. T.French 

Ueut. L. W. Oliver 

Maj. Noble H. Creager 

do 

Maj. C. 8. Walton. U. S. C. 

and A , 

....do 

....do 

....do 

.-..do 

F. P. Ferris, disbursing 

clerk 

....do 

Maj. W.H.Miller 

do 



Amount 



Lieut P. D. Lockridge . 

CaptH.J.Slocum 

do 

Maj.Ja8.L.Wilflon 



1207.75 

9,628.84 

4,200.00 

22,280.00 

2,070.10 

1,006.00 

10,000.00 

46.60 

60.00 

6,000.00 

6,000.00 

113,004.06 
645,862.66 
428.117.93 
617,007.69 
499,469.22 

12,600.00 

12,500.00 

438.43 

2,376.60 



240.00 

2,2».64 

89.00 

46.00 



Total 2,984,] 



6.62 



Exhibit 3. — Funds received by various disbursing officers from collectors of customs. 



Date. 


Disbursing officers. 


Collectors. 


Amount 


1809. 
June 27 


Capt M. R Peterson 


Capt W. H. Hay 


$6,150.00 


Mar. 27 


Lieut Col. H. Y. Orubbs 


Lieut J. W.Smith ! 


4,000.00 


SI 


.....d6 


do 


4.000.00 


July 11 


Capt. F. P. Fremont 


Cant, W, Y. St^^mne*" r 


1,796.04 


Feb. 2 


Lieut Victor Shepherd 


Col.T.H.BlIw 


11,969.04 


11 


Oocar 8. Durfee 


Maj. J. J. Brereton 


1,000.00 


Mar. 17 


do 


do 


1,000.00 


81 


do 


do.. 


1,500.00 


Apr. 15 


do 


do 


1,500.00 


20 


do 


do 


1.000.00 
2,000.00 
6,000.00 

10,000.00 
7,000.00 
2,000.00 
6,000.00 
6,500.00 
5.000.00 
9,000.00 

10,000.00 
1,000.00 

10,000.00 
6,000.00 
275.00 
2,819.51 
812.67 
2,073.92 

16,225.00 
2.800.00 
4,467.00 
8.091. 24 


June 2 


do 


Capt W. Y. Stamper 


Mar. 25 


Col. H. H. Saigent 


Collector of customs at Ouantanamo. . . 
Lieut J. W.Smith 


Feb. — 


Col. Duncan Hood 


Mar. — 


do 


do 


19 


Capt G. A. Cornish 


Maj. J. J. Brereton 


Jan. 81 


Col.Jas.8.i^ttit 


Capt W.Y. Stamper 

do 


Mar. 4 


do 


27 


do 


do 


Feb. 10 




Capt. C. A. Williams 


Mar. 6 


MaJ.J.B.Ale«hire 


Capt W.H. Hay 

do 


15 


do 


u 


do 


Tjint- W. P. RvnnH 


28 
28 


do ."[do 

do ' do 


Z'l 


do 


do 


do 


do 


6 


do 


do 


16 


do 


do 


16 


do 


Capt W.H. Hay 

Capt. W. Y. Stamper 


Junes? 


do 


28 


... .do 


Capt. W. H. Hay ' 


18 


do 


Capt W.P.Evans , 9,821.06 

Capt W.Y. Stamper 2,160.98 

CaptW.H.Hay 600.00 

Capt W. P. Evans ' 6.000.00 


10 


do 


6 


Col. W. A. Rafferty 


Mar. 16 


UeutW.E. Welsh 


22 


do 


do 


6.000.00 
1.290.00 
8,000.00 


Jane 22 


do 

OaptCJ.Symmonds 


do 


Mi is 


Capt C.A.Williams 



CUBA 1900 — VOX. I, PT 3- 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



42 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVBBNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 3. — Funds received by various disbursing officers from coUedors of customs — Ct*<L 



Date. 



Disbursing officers. 



CoUecton. 



Amount. 



1899. 

Apr. 14 
14 

May 16 
17 
24 
24 

June 80 
30 

May 23 

June 15 

July 8 
8 

Apr. 1 

Mar. 81 

June 3 

8 

Jan. 29 

Mar. 28 

23 

May 5 

June 5 

29 

29 

May 9 

June 10 

Feb. 11 

May 1 

15 

6 

23 

June 6 

28 

Mar. 14 

June 13 

80 

Mar. 29 

25 

29 

Apr. 14 

14 

May 22 

24 

31 

June 27 

2 

2 

2 

30 

Feb. 

28 
Mar. 8 
16 
16 
23 
27 
8 
19 
24 
24 
21 
26 
May 6 
11 
26 
22 
23 
23 
June 



13 
July 26 
Jan. 14 
Feb. 1 
Jan. 21 
Mar. 23 
Jan. 6 



Apr. 



Capt. C. J. Symmonds. . . 

do 

.....do 

....do 

....do 

.....do 

....do 

do 

Capt. Abner Pickering. . 

do 

....do 

....do 

Col.H.D.Money 

do 

Lieut. F. E. Bamford 

do 

....do 

Capt. G. 8. Cartwright. . . 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

Capt H. B. Chamberlln . 

....do 

Capt 8. A. Smoke 

do 

....do 

....do 

Lieut P. D. Lochridge . . 

do 

....do 

Capt John Biddlc 

do 

Capt W.M.Wright 

Maj. W.H.Miller 

do 

....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

do 

do 

....do 

do 

....do 

do 

....do 

Brig. Gen. L. Wood 

do 



..do. 
-do. 
.do. 
.do. 
..do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do- 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
-do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Lieut Col. W. M. Black . 

do 

Col. P. H.Ray 

do 

CoLT.8. Wylly 



Total. 



Capt C. A. Williams . . 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Lieut. John Conklin . . 

do 

do 

do 

Capt W.Y. Stamper.. 
Lieut H. C. Schumm . . 

Maj.J.J.Brereton 

Capt W. Y. Stamper . . 

do 

CaptW.H.Hay 

do 

do 

do : 

do 

do 

do 

Capt W. P. Evans 

.....do 

Maj .J.J. Brereton 

.....do 

do 

do 

Capt W.Y. Stamper.. 

do 

do 

CaptW.H.Hay 

Capt W. P. Evans 

Capte Ellas Chandler . 

do 

Maj. J.J. Brereton 

Capt Ellas Chandler. . 
Maj.J.J.Brereton.... 

do 

Capt W.Y. Stamper .. 

do 

do 

do 

-...do 

do 

do 

do 

Capt T. P. Davis 

do 

do 

do 

do 

....do 

Capt. W. Y. Stamper . . 

Capt. T. F. Davis 

do 

Capt E. A. Ellis 

do 

LieutJ.W. Smith .... 
Capt. W. Y. Stamper . . 

Capt F. G. Irwin 

CaptT.F.Davla 

do 

Lieut J.W.Smith.... 

Capt. F. O. Irwin 

Capt E.A.Ellis....... 

Lieut H. C. Schumm . 

....do 

Capt E. A. Ellis 

Lieut J. W. Smith .... 

Capt P. G. Irwin 

Capt T.F.Davis 

do 

Col.T.H. Bliss 

....do 

Capt E. A. Ellis 

....do 

Lieut H. C. Schumm . 



S12,496.20 

2,500.00 

16,830.00 

6,209.45 

21,800.00 

1,600.00 

12,000.00 

3,860.00 

64.95 

196.33 

1,882.22 

24.00 

8,000.00 

1,600.00 

1,200.00 

1,242.00 

5,115.00 

12,000.00 

15,000.00 

10,000.00 

6,000.00 

18,750.00 

200.00 

1,000.00 

10.000.00 

1,608.00 

10.000.00 

10.000.00 

10.000.00 

20,000.00 

1,160.00 

1,920.50 

7,802.21 

4,000.00 

20,000.00 

135.00 

5.000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

46,494.06 

35.16 

45,000.00 

63.783.44 

25,000.00 

21.000.00 

800.00 

25,000.00 

19.500.00 

12,402.83 

60.000.00 

80,000.00 

lO.OOO.OO 

80.000.00 

10,000.00 

80.000.00 

2.0OO.00 

22.000.00 

50,000.00 

5,000.00 

9,000.00 

lO.OOO.OO 

7,500.00 

7,500.00 

50,000.00 

21,000.00 

10,706.46 

6. 000.00 

5,000.00 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

7,500.00 

10,000.00 

7,500.00 

60,000.00 

26,880.00 

18,000.00 

188,888.80 

8,000.00 

8,000.00 

8,000.00 

1,838,883.51 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



BBPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 43 

KiHiBiT 4. — Funds received from miscellaneous sources by disbursing officers. 



Date. 



DiBbmsiiig officer. 



Source of receipts. 



Amoant. 



1899. 

Jane 30 

90 

Apr. 5 

Feb. 5 

20 

20 

Mar. 31 

Apr. 12 

Jane 7 

30 

Apr. 29 

May 18 

AuiT. 81 

Feb. 28 

Maj 22 

Jane 30 

30 

30 

May 1 

Mar. 20 

31 

31 

Sept. 1 

Mar. 23 

Apr. 1 

1 
18 

27 
27 

29 
May U 

20 
Feb. 28 



Jane 80 



Oscar 8. Dnrfee 

do 

Lieut. C.C.Smith 

Capt. Samael Beber 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Maj.J.B.Aleshire 

Capt Abner Pickering . 

do 

Ideot. F. E. Lyman 

Capt 0. 8. Cartwright . . 

do 

do 

do 

Maj.H.L, Scott 

Capt H. B. Chamberlin . 

Capt S. A. Smoke 

Capt Jno. Biddle 

Mnj.W.H.MlUer 

do 

LieatCoLW.M. Black. 
do 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.....do 

.....do 

....do 

Col.P.H.Bay 

MaJ.J.G.Davls... 
MaJ.C. a Walton. 

Cor.P.H.Bay 

MaJ.W.H.l(Uller. 



Garter and Ftiwcett 

Railroad earnings for Jane 

Capt M. H. Porter 

June, telegraph receipts 

February, teleffraph receipts 

January, telephone receipts 

BCarch. telegraph and telephone receipts 

April, tel^rapn and telephone receipts 

Lieut H.W.Stamford 

Lunatic asylum 

F.de la Ponce, tax collector 

do 

Telegraph office rent 

Gained in exchange 

do .TT!?. 

CoUector for cleaning cesspools 

Gained in exchange 

C. de la Torriente 

Asunto Casleo. alcalde 

Gained in exchange 

do V7. 

do 

Treasurer citv of Colon, refund from municipalities. 

R. TrufBn & Co. , for d redging 

Jose Pu jalo, residue sum unexpended by late Junta 

deObras. 

Jose Pujalo, discount of payment employees 

Herederos de Pablo Gomez, rent of dredge Porto 

Rico. 

Jose Palalo, rent of pile driver 

Jose Pa}alo, proceeds sale of hard wood,Obras de 

Puerto. 

R. Griffin, payment for dredging 

P. D. Cunningham, sale of scrap iron 

P. D. Cunningham, street work, 187 Obispo 

Municipality 

Gained in exchange 

do .TT!?. 

Receired from customs 

Trinidad Sugar Go 



Total. 



$1,000.00 

2,109.17 

1,194.06 

623.11 

676.42 

10.63 

686.60 

28.68 

1,000.00 

27.78 

681.62 

196.66 

12.60 

26.62 

8.00 

172.00 

19.00 

190.86 

9,596.19 

161.82 

83.16 

11.60 

88.24 

1,000.00 

1.828.65 

292.67 
60.00 

200.00 
672.57 

898.14 

24.37 

4.87 

807.88 

6.20 

17,181.64 

87.57 

85.23 



89,578.88 



Exhibit 6. — Amount due disbursing officers. 



Date. 


Name. 


Amount 


1900. 
Jane 90 


C4pt Chaff. J, fiymmondfl, Quarterro aster 


18.61 


30 


Gof. Duncan Hood. Second United States Yoiunteers 


6.17 


ao 


GoLJas. 8. Pettit, Fourth United States Volonteers 


1.07 




Total '. 






16.86 









Exhibit 6. — Balances due from disbursing officers certified to new auditor. 



1899. 

Dec. 81 
July 81 
Dec 81 
Nov. 24 
July 19 
19 

1900. 
Feb. 9 
Mar. 9 
Apr. 24 
June 5 



Capt F. P. Ftemont, Second Inftotry 

Walter F. Etanith, paymaster, Engineer Department . . . 

Capt F.S.F0IU, Second Cavalry 

Brig. Gen. Wm. Ludlow 

MaJ.W.H. Miller, quartermaster, U.S.y 

...TTdo 

Capt Geo. L. Goodale, assistant quartermaster, U. 8. Y 

O. S.Durfee, military director J. and 8. P. R.R 

F. P. Ferris, special disbursing clerk 

GaptG.H.Macdonald, Tenth Cavalry 

Total 



$2,059.09 

680,706.00 

4,184.76 

7.69 

14,438.12 

809.47 



2.45 

156.22 

17,581.62 

61.00 



719,606.42 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



44 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



Exhibit 7. — Unexpended balances deposiUd with the treasurer by disbursing officers. 



Date. 



Name. 



No. of I 
I receipt. , 



Amount. 



1809. 
Aug. 12 
Dec. 13 
July 17 

12 
Aug. 2 
Sept. 9 
Aug. 24 
Sept. 8 
July 11 

18 
Sept. 28 
Nov. 10 
July 28 

20 
Oct. 18 
Sept. 4 
Aug. 22 
Sept. 6 
July 22 
Sept. 19 
July 24 

18 

Sept. 20 

6 

26 
Aug. 24 
Sepl 27 
July 20 
Sept 6 

26 
Dec U 

11 
July 18 
Aug. 28 
July 17 
Dec. 18 
July 14 
Sept. 16 
July 26 
Sept 16 
Aug. 2 
Dec. 9 
Aug. 2 
Sept 23 

23 
Nov. 29 

1900. 
May 17 
Jan. 5 
May 31 
Jan. 10 
Apr. 27 

10 

May 22 

4 

31 
Jan. 10 
Mar. 17 

1899. 
July 17 



CaptM.R.Petere(m,U.S.V 

Lieut V. Shepherd, Signal GoTpe 

Walter F. Smith, pajrmaster, Engineer Department . 

Maj. 8. D. Sturgis, assistant adjutant-general 

Capt C. J. Stevens, Second Cavalry 

Capt J no. H.Gardner, Second Cavalry 

Maj. James L. Wilson, quartermaster, U. S. V 

Capt. Saml. Reber, Signal Corps 

Lieut F.A.Wilcox, First Infantry 

do. 



Lieut H. M. Powell, First Infantry 

Brig. Gen. C.F Humphrey, Quartermastcr'n Department. 

Col. G. M . Randall , ffighth Infantry 

Lieut F. E. Lacey, First Infantry 

Lieut A. E.Williams, Third Cavalry 

Capt W.H.Chatfleld, Fifth Infantry 

Lieut F. A. Vincent, Sixth Ohio Volunteers 

Capt Arthur Murray, First Artillery 

Lieut W. E. Welsh, Tenth Infantry 

Lieut. R. G. Paxton, Tenth Cavalry 

Capt C. J. Symmonds, assistant quartermaster, U. S. V 

Capt Abner Pickering, Second Infantry 

do. 



Col. Edward Moale, Fifteenth Infantry 

Lieut. F. E. Lyman, Signal Corps 

Col. H. D. Money, Fifth United States Volunteers . 

Lieut. S. Burkhardt. Tenth Infantry 

Lieut. F. E. Bamford, Fifteenth Infantry 

Lieut F. E. Bamford, Fifteenth Infantry 

lieut Jas. R. Ch urch, U. S. A 

do 



do 

Capt. G. 8. CartWTight, quartermaster, U. 8. V 

Capt F. J . Keman, Second Infantry 

Lieut P. D. Loch ridge, Second Cavalry 

Capt 8. V. Ham, assistant quartermaster, U. S. V . 

Capt E. B.Ives, Signal Corps 

do 

Maj. W. H. MUler, quartermaster, U. 8. V 

do 

Maj. J. F. Stretch, Eighth Infantry 

do 

Lieut. F. A. Wilcox, First Infantry 

Maj. W. M. Black, Corps of Engineers 

do 

do 



Lieut. P. D. Lochridge, Second Cavalry 

Maj. Noble H. Creager, quartermaster, U. S. V . 

Capt. E. B. Ives, Signal Corps 

Maj.Jno.G. Davis, surgeon, U.S.V 

Lieut. Wm. Mitchell, Signal Corps 

Lieut. James B. McLaughlin, Signal Corps 

Capt H. J. Slocum. Seventh Cavalry 

Brig. Gen. Leonard Wood, U. 8. V 

...do. 



Maj. W. M. Black, Corps of Engin 
Brig. Gen. A R. Chaffee, U. S. V . . 



Maj. Jno. G. Davis, surgeon, U. 8. V . 
Total 



148 
687 

45 

21 
112 
261 
197 
2M 

20 

49 
344 
523 

94 

58 
402 
235 
192 
249 

66 
296 

70 

63 
312 
243 
333 
198 
337 

67 
251 
326 
671 
670 

51 
216 

48 
723 

28 



249 
111 
666 
109 
320 
821 
604 



1817 
822 
1952 
860 
1632 
1610 
1872 
1698 
1986 
858 
1312 



47 



$3,486.27 
5.33 

14,323.27 
119.50 
960.64 

Lao 

743.15 

1.00 

9,8M.52 

&24.24 

820.01 

20,525.80 

145.00 

17,175.76 

5,180.56 

1.34 

35.89 

8S.24 

1,055.92 

7S.47 

903.08 

6.33 

.88 

8.66 

12.50 

5.50 

1,056.22 

887.06 

1,000.00 

17.89 

31.98 

2a 00 

421.64 

56.73 

9,434.85 

.02 

182.33 

.96 

6,U6.02 

S3. 24 

16.793.50 

2,081.21 

.20 

.84 

S.O0 

.06 



40.34 
50.04 

2,653.15 

7,280.48- 

.82 

160.00 

1,072.81 

1.64 

1.12 

5.00 

408.12 



1,963.58 



126,596.70 



Exhibit 8. — Amounts due treasury by disbursing officers. 



1900. 
June 80 
80 
30 



Uent A. J. Dillon, D. S. V., Signal Corp* 

Capt.J.P.Wooton.U.S v., Signal Corps 

Col. P. H. Ray, Third United States Volunteers 
Capt R. O. Rickard, D. S. V., Signal Corps 

Total 



tl.lOLOf 

834.00 

7.25 

29.60 



1,97L88 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPpBT OF MILITARY OOVERNOB OF CUBA. 



45 



Exhibit 9. — Amount expended by disbursing officers. 



qm 
CoLi 



OupL M. R. Petenon, oommiBwry of 
8ulMl8tenoe,U.S.V $1,668.78 

Seigt. Chaa. V. Russell, U. 8. V. Sig- 
nal Corps 401.77 

OapC Thomas H. Wilsou, Second In- 
iantPT 5,000.00 

Ueat Col. H. Y. Grabbs, Second U. S. 
Volunteers 18,720.62 

Oapt F. P. Fremont, Second Infan- 
try 5,086.27 

Ueat. Victor Shepherd, U. S. V. Sig- 
nal Cora 10,222.06 

Oscar 8. Dnrfee, military director 
J.andS-F.R.R 10,952.95 

Oapt. S. F. Dutton, commissary of 
8Dbsbitence,U.B.V 2,090.19 

Lieut. W. F. Martin, Fifth Infantry. 406. 41 

Oapt J. Y. Mason Blunt, assistant 

Jnartennaster,U.8.V 88,244.77 
.Cornelius Qardener, Two hun- 
dred and second New York Vol- 
unteers 2,488.84 

Capt Logan Feland, Third Ken- 
tucky Volunteers 814.86 

Maj. 8. D.Stnrgis, assistantadjntant- 
general,U.8.V 48,989.47 

Capt. John Stafford, Eighth Infan- 
try 202.80 

Col. H. H. Sargent, Fifth U. S. Volun- 
teer§ 8,702.12 

GH>t. EU Helmick, Tenth U. 8. In- 
fantry 664.87 

Oapt C. J. Steyens, Second Cavalry. 42, 067. 87 

Cipt John H.Qaraner, Second Cay- 
dry 2,881.59 

Ueat. C. C. Smith, Second Cavalry. . 10. 64 

Capt John Landstreet commissary 
olsuteistence.U.S.V 4,660.52 

MaJ. James L. Wilson, assistant quar- 
termaster, U. 8. V 9,861.27 

Capt. Duncan Henderson, Thirty- 
fint Michigan Volunteers 80. 27 

Maj. Orlando Dncker, surgeon, U. 
8.V 16,870.42 

Capt Ambrose Ulggins, U. 8. V. Sig- 
nal Corps 2,084.36 

Capt Noel Gaines, Third Kentucky 
Volunteers 1,848.13 

Oapt Samuel Reber, U. S. V. Signal 
Corps 6,987.24 

Ool. Duncan Hood, Second U. S. Vol- 
unteere 16,757.14 

Ueat F. A. Wilcox, First Infantry.. 7,970.91 

Ueat H. M. Powell, First Infantry. 1. 840. '24 

Brig. Gen. C.F.Humphrey, U.S. v.. 208,977.14 

Col. G.M. Randal], ^hth Infantry. 812.00 

Oupt Ross Granger, Thirty-first 
Michigan Volunteers 907.88 

Ueat P. W. Rowell. Second Infantry 1 , 714. 77 

Capt F. B. McCoy. Second Infantry. 920. 09 

Ueat F. J. Rice, Fourth Tennessee 
Volunteers 2,600.00 

Ueat F. E. Lacey, Jr., First Infantry 10,084. 37 

Ueat W. M. Talbott, U. 8. V. Signal 
Com 8,086.12 

MaJ. T. Bently Mott, assistant adju- 
tant-general, U. 8. V 562.09 

Maj.G€OigeA.Bartlett 8,802.78 

Ueat D. J. Carr, U. 8. V. Signal 

Corps 2,801.22 

Ueat W. G. Sills, Eighth Cavalry ... 9. 88 
Maj. Frank H. Edmunds, First In- 
fantry 870.00 

Capt W. H. Chatfleld, Fifth Infan- 
try 7,181.51 

Ueat H. W. Stamford, U.S. V. Sig- 

nalCorps 11,569.87 

Col. Jas. 8. Pettit, Fourth U. 8. 

Volunteers 28,176.06 

U«at Col. M. Hooton. Fifth Infan- 
try 28,247.80 

Ueat F. A. Vincent, Sixth Ohio 

Volunteers 6,017.19 

Wf.Gen. L.H. Carpenter. U.S. V. 7,622.88 

MaJ. W. C. Qoxgas, suiveon, U. 8. V. 26, 946. 97 
Ueat John J. Ryan, U. 8. V. Signal 
Oocpt 731.60 



Capt Carl. F. Hartman, U. 8. V. 
fflgnal Corps r,560.77 

Capt Geo. P. Griffin. Thirty-first 
Michigan Volunteers 90.29 

Capt Arthur Murray, First Artil- 
lery 64,966.76 

Maj. Jos. H. Heatwole, U. 8. V 2, 987. 90 

Brig. Gen. A. R. Chaffee, chief of 
staff 4,106.26 

Lieut Preston Brown, Second U. 8. 
Infantry 5,878.90 

Capt O. M. Lissak, chief ordnance 
offlcer.U.S.V 2,568.50 

MaJ. J. B. Aleshire, quartermaster, 
U.S. V 49,424.71 

Lieut Col. W. A. Rafferty, Second 
Cavaliy 1,207.00 

Ueut W. E. Welsh, Tenth Infan- 
try 5,284.08 

Ueut R. G. Paxton, Tenth Cavalry. 19, 452. 94 

Capt Chas. J. Symmonds, assistant 
quartermaster, U. 8. V 97,852.45 

Capt Abner Pickering, Second In- 
fantry 11,463.94 

Col. Edward Moale, Fifteenth In- 
fantry 2,09L47 

Lieut Frank £. Lyman, jr., U. 8. V. 
Signal Corps 4,745.19 

Ueut Col. H: D. Money, Fifth U. 8. 
Volunteem 4,31L65 

Ueut. Samuel Burkhaidt Tenth 
Infantry 1,015.70 

Ueut Sedwick Rice, Seventh Cav- 
alry 6,798.51 

Capt Ellas Chandler, First Infantry, 
collector of cuHtom8 10.00 

Brig. Gen. W. M. Ludlow U. 8. V .. 492.81 

Ueut. F. E. Bamford, Fifteenth In- 
fantry 12,778.94 

Ueut. Jas. G. Harbord, Tenth Cav- 
alry 17,817.85 

Maj. M. C. Butler, chief ordnance 
officer 28,381.01 

Capt. W. B. Barker, assistant quar- 
termaster, U. 8. V 6,000.00 

Ueut Jas. R. Church, U. 8. A 111,579.54 

Capt. Geo. 8. Cartwright quarter- 
master, U. 8. V 68,134.88 

MaJ. H. L. Scott, assistant adjutant- 
general, U. 8. V 146,404.67 

Capt J. T. French, assistant quar- 
termaster, U. 8. V 1,026.49 

Col. T. 8. Wylly, Third United States 
Volunteers 3,000.00 

Ueut L. W. Oliver, Second Infantry 1, 660. 00 

Capt. E. W. Rydman, Sixth Ohio 
Volunteers 1,890.00 

Capt F. J. Keman. Second U.S. In- 
fantry 62,94Le7 

Capt. H. B. Chamberlin, quarter- 
master, U. 8. V 26,296.84 

Capt Samuel A. Smoke, Fifth In- 
fantry 28,696.60 

Lieut. P. D. Lochridge, Second Cav- 
alry 11,778.06 

Maj. Noble H. Creager, quartermas- 
ter, U. S. V 14,941.86 

Capt 8. V. Ham, assistant quarter- 
master, U. S. V 3,209.43 

Col. Geo. Le Roy Brown, Fourth 
Tennessee Volunteers 4,800.68 

Capt E. B. Ives, U. 8. V. Signal 
Corps 2,732.80 

Maj. C. 8. Walton, additional pay- 
master. U.S. V 428,73L82 

Maj. C. S.Walton, additional pay- 
master U. 8. V. (Spanish gold) . ... 168, 761. 72 

Capt John Biddle, Engineer Corps. 29, 104. 58 

Capt W. M. Wright Second Infan- 
try 1,714.91 

Mr. F. P. Ferris, special disbursing 
clerk 16,116.60 

Maj. Jno. G. Davis, surgeon, U. 8. V., 
chief sanitary officer 88,978.94 

Maj. Jno. G. Davis, surgeon, U. 8. V., 
chief sanitary officer (Spanish 

gold) :. ..!7Trrrr 60,954.82 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



46 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



Exhibit 9. — Amount expended by disbursing officers — Continued. 

Capt. A. W. Yancey, U. 8. V. Signal 



Capt. Chas. B. Hepburn, U. 8. V. 
Signal Corps $1,894.52 

MaJ. W. H. Miller, quartermaster, 
U.8.V 125,875.69 

Lieut. Wm. Mitchell, U. 8. V. Sig- 
nal Corps 799.18 

Ueut. W. B. Burtt, Eighth Infan- 
try 20.00 

Maj. J. F. Stretch, Eighth Infan- 
try 33,256.54 

Capt. H. J. Slocum, Seventh Cav- 
alry 1,275.78 

Maj. Jno. Gary Evans, inspector- 
general, U. 8. V 4,648.63 



Brig. Gen. Leonard Wood, U. 8. V . . 

Lieut Col. W. M. Black, chief engi- 
neer 

Col. P. H. Ray, Third United States 
Volunteers 

Lieut R. O. Rickard, U. 8. V. Signal 
Corps 

Lieut W. C. Short, Tenth Cavalry. 

Maj. Jas. L. Wilson, assistant quar- 
termaster, U. 8. V 



tl60.00 
260,943.46 

783,312.26 

5,479.87 

4,670.41 
89.00 

45.00 



Total 8,464,719.86 



Exhibit 10. 



Barracks and qnarteiB S445, 474.14 

SanltaUon...- 1,062,573.09 

Rural guard and administration 383, 974. 63 

Public works, ports, and harbors 167, 425. 54 

Charities and hospitals 172,964.88 

Miscellaneous 29,421.64 



Civil government 75,845.85 

Municipalities 1,063.606.5» 

Aid to destitute 68,615.62 

Quarantine 19,918.88 

Total 3,464,674.36 



Exhibit 11. — Cash receipts for the fiscal year 1900. 



Month. 



Juljr 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 
January . . . 
February . . 

March 

AprU 

May 

June 

Total 



Customs. 



11,983,065.15 
1,391,406.71 
1,348,205.53 
1,382,297.56 
1,269,416.09 
1,562,840.01 
1,548,378.80 
1,219,86L78 
1,472,990.14 
1,304,941.71 
1.846.128.80 
1,388,957.34 



17,168,508.62 



Postal. 



$12,000.00 
18,000.00 
16,000.00 
12,000.00 
20,000.00 
16,514.28 
22,854.55 
21.359.68 
13,729.28 
24,662.46 
29,009.38 
29,724.68 



235,854.26 



Internal rev- 
enue. 



164,834.31 
98,215.76 
78,938.70 
67,186.96 
59,590.26 
60,488.07 
82,511.28 
61,368.96 
94,380.29 
84,561.14 
76,793.67 
70,942.20 



899,256.54 



Miscellane- 
ous. 



r6,120.22 
50,348.79 
46,377.06 
12,166.26 
26,604.41 
93,879.00 
81,159.85 
19,293.40 
97,619.68 
69,586.06 
165,857.69 
289,262.21 



977,774.65 



Total. 



12,185.539.68 
1,557,970.26 
1.489,516.31 
1,423,650.77 
1,375,610.76 
1,733,221.36 
1,679.904.43 
1,821,883.82 
1,678,669.84 
1,483,751.37 
1,617,789.54 
1,778,886,43 



19,276,894.07 



Exhibit 12. — Warrants paid during the fiscal year 1900. 



Month. 



July 

August 

September 
October ... 
November 
December. 
January. . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Customs. 



1,273, 
557, 
990, 
K12, 

1,149, 
873, 

1,045, 

1,515, 
765, 
619, 
661, 



877.58 
866.05 
128.45 
660.72 
592.35 
620.45 
766.35 
501.09 
526.63 
250.02 
631.79 
939.27 



11,146,850.75 



Postal. 



151,000.00 
48,880.00 
57.067.20 
76,418.87 
52,719.20 
85,929.61 
94,958.88 



49, OIL 95 
47,467.30 
8,920.12 
37,855.82 



610,228.95 



Internal reve- 



988,000.00 
315,400.23 
818,162.69 
199,636.68 
675,85L11 
212,739.49 
455,218.75 
851,557.58 
809,I&'>.46 
80,496.09 
878,002.83 
488,509.71 



4,817,760.^ 



Total. 



91,029, 
1,638, 

927, 
1,266, 
1,&4], 
1.448, 
1,423, 
1,397, 
2,378, 

833, 
1,506, 
1,188, 



877.58 
146.28 
358.34 
716.27 
162.66 
289.65 
933.96 
058.67 
724.04 
213.41 
554.74 
301.80 



16,574,340.82 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOET OK HILITABY OOVBBNOB OF CUBA. 



47 



Exhibit 13. — AbgtrcuA of tnjoMfer tDarranUfor iheJUtcal year 1900, 



MontlL 



Customs. 



Postal. 



Internal reve- 
nue. 



Mucellano- 
ous. 



July 

August 

September. 
October.... 
November . 
December.. 
January ... 
February .. 
March 

'^:::-::. 

June 



-$155,000.00 

- 825.000.00 

- 200,000.00 

- 70,960.10 

- 600,000.00 

- 600,000.00 



$65,000.00 
25.000.00 
100,000.00 



60,000.00 
182,654.80 



- 600,000.00 

- 452,415.00 



100,000.00 



$100,000.00 
800,000.00 
100,000.00 
260.000.00 
460.000.00 
500.000.00 
100,000.00 
500.000.00 
500.000.00 



-$179,040.90 



82.554.80 
100.000.00 



47,685.00 
'i77,*96i.*46 



922,068.54 
200,000.00 



Total. 



-4,025,412.64 



1,100,000.00 
200,000.00 



462,654.80 



4,100,000.00 



- 687,141.66 



NoTK.— The minus sign Is given to items transferred from fund. 
Exhibit lA.'-RecajnivlaJtion, 





Customs. 


PostaL 


Internal reve- 
nue. 

$899, 256. M 
4.817.760.62 


Miscellane- 
ous. 


Total. 


Exhibitl 


$17,168,606.02 
U, 146,860. 75 


$235,854.26 
610.228.96 


$977,774.65 


$19,276,394.07 


RrhlWt 5 


16,574,840.32 






Exhibits 


6,017,157.87 
-4,025,412.64 


-874,874.69 
462.554.80 


-3.918,504.08 
4,100.000.00 


977,774.65 
-537,141.66 


2.702.053.76 






Balanf^ 


1,991,745.28 


88,179.61 


181,496.92 


440,682.99 


2,702,068.75 





Exhibit 18. 

Hbadquabtebs Division op Cuba, 

Office of the Treasurer of Cuba, 
Hahcmaj Cuha^ March 16^ 1900. 
Sib: As directed by the honorable Secretary of War, I have the honor to submit 
the following outline of a proposition for the reorganization of our financial system 
in Oaba, with a view of securing greater safety for the funds and limiting the deposits 
held by any one institution: 

1. All banks qualifying as hereinafter provided to be known as depositories for 
Cuban funds. 

2. Collections to be deposited and disbursements made as at present, these deposi- 
tories for Cuban funds to be utilized for this purpose according to rules approved by 
the military governor. 

3. To qualify as a depository for Cuban funds any bank or financial institution 
will be required to furnish security in an amount equal to the maximum deposit 
which it will be allowed to have at any one time. 

4. Not lees than 50 per cent of this security shall be in bonds of the United States, 
tak^i at their market value, these bonds to be deposited with the United States 
Treasury Department, or with the treasurer of Cuba. The balance of the security will 
be in the form of a bond by some surety company or companies, and subject to the 
i^proval of the War Department. 

5. The North American Trust Company, fiscal aeents of the War Department in 
Cuba, will be given thirty days in which to qualify tor continuing the business at the 
points they have offices now located. If they fail to so qualify, or do not qualify in 
sufficient amount to, in the judgment of the Department, meet the business require- 
ments at any of these places, part or all of the Dusiness will be given to some other 
bank or financial institution^ provided there be one desirous of qualifying to do the 
business, in which case it will make written application to the military governor, 
statii^ the amount for which it desires to qualify. 

6. n any bank or financial institution desires to qualify as a depository and transact 
the business at any point where the North American Trust Company is not now 
operatinff, it will make application in writing to the military governor, stating the 
•mount lor which it wishes to qualify. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



48 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

« 

7. These depositories will be established as in the judgment of the Department the 
interest of the service requires. Should more than one depository be established in 
any city or municipality, the deposits and disbursements will be divided among them 
in proportion to the amount of security furnished by each. 

8. If at any time the deposits in any depository exceed the security given by it, it 
shall be the duty of the treasurer of Cuba to promptly obtain sufficient additional 
security of the kind above required to cover the whole amount on deposit or reduce 
the deposits so that they shall fall within the limit of the security alr^uly given. 

9. Ii at any time the monthly deposit of collections at any place is found to exceed 
the requirements for disbursements at that point, the treasurer of Cuba will, once in 
ten days, or oftener if in his judgment the interest of the service demand, reduce his 
oalance with the depository or depositories at this point by withdrawing hrom the 
same all funds to his credit in excess of the current requirements. 

10. Funds so withdrawn shall be kept by the treasurer in such place or places as 
are provided, and only used by him to meet the payments of warrants approvcKi by 
the governor-general, or to increase the treasurer's balance with an authorized depos- 
itory, so as to enable the treasurer to meet such payments at the desired points. 

11. All depositories will receive deposits and make payments in accordance with 
the rules approved from time to time by the military governor; and for the faithful 
performance of these duties they shall lie compensated at the rate of one-fourth of 1 
per cent for all funds disbursed m Habana or New York City, and one-half of 1 per 
cent for disbursements at all other points, the same to be paid quJui;erly from the 
funds of the revenues of Cuba. 

12. Depositories for Cuban funds shall be at all times open to a thorough inspec- 
tion and examination by any person or persons authorized by the military governor 
to make the same. Such examination shall be made as often as the military gov- 
ernor may think for the interest of the service. 

13. All persons^ except officers of the United States Army, acting in the capacity of 
collectors, custodians, or disbursing officers of Cuban funds shall be required to fur- 
nish a bond for the security of the same, the amount of such bond to be fixed by the 
secretary of finance. When the bond is properly executed and approved by the sec- 
retary of finance it will be filed with the treasurer of Cuba. 

As the North American Trust Company came to Cuba as the fiscal agents of the' 
War Department in Cuba, and has, under the terms of their contract, adfforded us 
valuable facilities at several points on the island, it is thought proper that this com- 
pany be given the privilege accorded them by paragraph 5. 

The compensation is fixed as above, as it is believed to be better to insist upon the 
form of security specified, and pay for the service, rather than accept a lower class of 
security and, perhaps, secure the service at a lower compensation. 

I am satisfied that the class of service we require and the kind of security herein 
specified can not be obtained without compensation. The total disbursements of the 
island will approximate $1,500,000 a month, of which probably $1,000,000 will be dis- 
bursed in Habana and New York, in which case the total cost of disbursements would 
be about $50,000 a year; But the service we will receive will save us the cost and 
risk incident to shipping large amounts of money throughout the island; be of inval- 
uable assistance in educating the i)eople in the way of modem business methods, and 
give the officers and government the great security afforded in making disbursements 
by checks; advantages which we could not secure for the same amount of money 
under any system we might establish and operate ourselves. 

The object of paragraph 9 is to enable the treasurer to carry a portion of his balance 
in cash in his own possession instead of on deposit, but I am personally not in Ulyot 
of its adoption; while in theory it seems practicable and very simple, in practice it 
entails great responsibilty and considerable labor with additional cost, besides laying 
the treasurer, in its execution, liable to unjust criticism by the very parties whose 
demands the provision is intended to satisfy. 

Paragraph 3 provides security for the maximum amount of deposits, and it is a poor 
system which accepts a class of security for $1,000,000 which can not with confidence 
be extended to a larger amount 

Any modem system which might be adopted will certainly meet with more or less 
criticism from some suspicious and inexperienced, if not jealous, parties in Cuba, but 
I think the greatest service is done by building up a system that can not suffer from 
the severest criticism or comparison made by the practical business men of our own 
country to whom we are responsible for our administration of affairs in Cuba. 
Very respectfully, 

E. F. Ladd, Treamrer of Cuba. 

Adjutant-General, Division of Cuba, 

Habanay OuIhj. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 49 

Exhibit 19. 

Hbadquarteks Division op Cuba, 
Ofpicb of thb Trbasurbr op Cuba, 

Habana^ Cuba, Augud 19, 1899, 

Sm: I have the honor to report that I have on deposit with the North American 
Trust Company about |600,0(X) in Spanish and French gold, and lai^ deposits com- 
ing in every day. This gold is taken by collectors at the value fixed by Circular No. 
2, Division of Customs and Insular Affairs, Washington, D. C, or at the rate of 
exchange of about $1.10; the rate of exchange is now fl.lO}, making the gold men- 
tioned worth about $4,500 leas than the value at which it was taken. Moreover, the 
market value of Spanish and French gold beinj^ now less than established by the 
above-named circular, this gold will again be paid into the treasury, if sold on this 
market and it can not with credit be paid out at any advance over its market value. 

The business men of the island are very anxious to abolish the use of foreign 
money and do all business on the basis of United States currency. This can only be 
accomplished by getting rid of this foreign gold when it is depreciated as at present. 

I therefore have the honor to recommend that authority be obtained for the ship- 
ment to New York mint of the foreign gpld on hand and any that may accumulate, 
the same there to be converted into United States currency at its bullion value and 
returned to lis. By this method we would probably obtain more than the present 
market value for the foreign gold; prevent its return to us— causing us further loss — 
and aid in the banishment ofthis ever-fluctuatinff medium. I also believe the with- 
drawal of the foreign gold will in time result in the banishment of Spanish silver by 
reducing the amount and thereby the profit of the exchange business. 

The shipment of this coin can be made on the United states transports, with no 
expense except that of insurance. Upon instructions the North American Trust 
Company is prepared to attend to all details, the shipment to be made by them to 
Uieir New York house, with whom the proceeds of the sale will be deposited. 
Very respectfully, 

E. F. Ladd, Treaeurer of Cuba, 

Adjutant-General, Division of Cuba, 

HabanOy Culta, 

[Pint iiidontement.] 

Headquarters Division of Cuba, 

Hnbanaj Cuba, Augu;8t ^2, 1899, 
Bespectfully forwarded to the honorable the Assistant Secretary of War, recom- 
mending the loreign gold herein referred to by Major Ladd be disposed of in the 
manner stated by him, the order as'to shipment by commercial lines be suspended, 
and the gold to be sent to the United States by transports. 

I agree with Major Ladd as to the necessity of reducing the amount of such gold in 
Cuba and replacing it by United States currency. As matters now stand, the revenues 
of the island are being diminished by the payment of customs in this gold, which is 
now worth about $4.78 instead of $4.82. 

John R. Brooke, 
Mc^or-Qcneral, Commanding. 
[Second indorsement.] 

War Department, 
Washington, D, C, September f , 1899, 
Be8pectfnll}r referred to the honorable the Secretary of the Treasury, with request 
for an expression of his views hereon. The return of this paper is desired. 

G. D. Mbiklbjohn, 

Acting Secretary of War, 
[Thlid indorsement] 

Treasury Department, 

Office op the Secretary, 

September 6, 1S99, 

Bespectfully returned to the honorable the Secretarv of War, with notations as 

follows: The value of the Alphonso, if full weight, is $4.82 American gold at the 

United States Mint The value of the Louis is $3,858. This Department concurs in 

thinking it wise to make the disposition of foreign gold contemplated in the within 

communication. 

L. J. Gage, Secretary, 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



50 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

[Fourth indorsement.] 

Wak Depabtment, 
Washingtm, D. C, September 9, 1899. 
Respectfully returned to MaJ. Gen. John R. Brooke, governor-general of Cuba, 
inviting attention to the preoedmg indorsement, which is approved. 

Elihu Root, 
Secretary of Wear, 
[Fifth Indorsement.] 

Headquaktebs DrvisioN of Cuba, 

Habana, Cuba, September 15, 1899. 
Respectfully referred to the treasurer of the island of Cuba for compliance. 
By command of Major-Grenerai Brooke. 

W. V. RiCHABDB, 

AdjxiJUmt- General, 

ExHiBrr 20. 

Hbadquabtebs Division of Cuba, 
Office of the Treasuree of Cuba, 

Habana, Cuba, April 16, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to report that this department is confronted with the follow- 
ing conditions: 

By Circular No. 2, Division of Customs and Insular Af&iirs, series of 1899, the value 
at which Spanish and French gold shall be accepted in pavment of customs is fixed 
as $4.82 for the centen (25-peseta piece) and $3.86 for tne Louis (20-franc piece) 
which is a close approximation to a rate of exchange of $1.10, being at the rates of 
$1.0995 and $1.0984, respectively. 

During the last year this rate of exchange has varied from $1.11 to as low as $1,085, 
making the value of the centen in United States currency vary from $4,774 to $4,884, 
with a corresponding fluctuation in French gold. Ai is to be expected, when 
exchange is about $1.10. part of the revenues are paid in Spanish and French gold, 
and as me rate gets higner our receipts of these corns is quite lai^. 

Early last June it became apparent to me that some definiteplan should be adopted 
resardmg the disposition of these coins and I addressed the War Department on this 
subject, the letter with indorsements being as follows: 

Headquarters Division of Cuba, 
Office of the Treasurer of Cuba, 

Habana, Cuba, April 19, 1899. 
L. S. 607 "C." 

Sir: I have the honor to report that I have on deposit with the North American 
Trust Company about $600,000 in Spanish and French gold, and lai^ deposits 
eomingin every day. This gold is taken by collectors at the value fixed by Circular 
No. 2, Division of Customs and Insular Afudrs, Washington, D. C, or at the rate of 
exchange of about $1.10, the rate of exchange is now $1.10f , making the gold men- 
tioned worth about $4,500 less than the value at which it was taken. Moreover, the 
market value of Spanish and French gold bein^ now less than established by the 
above-named circular, this gold will again be paid into the Treasury, if sold on this 
market, and it can not with credit be paid out at any advance over its market value. 

The business men of the island are very anxious to abolish the use of foreign money 
and do all business on the basis of United States currency. This can only be accom- 
plished by getting rid of this foreign gold when it is depreciated as at present 

I therefore have the honor to recommend that authority be obtained for the ship- 
ment to New York mint of the foreign ^old on hand and any that may accumulatk 
the same there to be converted into United States currency at its bullion value and 
returned to us. By this method we would probably obtam more than the present 
market value for the foreign gold; prevent its return to us — causing us further loss — 
and aid in the banishment of this ever-fluctuating medium. I also believe the with- 
drawal of the foreign gold will in time result in the banishment of Spanish silver by 
reducing the amount and thereby the profit of the exchange business. 

The shipment of this coin can be made on the United States transporta with no 
expense except that of insurance. Upon instructions the North American Trust 
Company is prepared to attend to all details, the shipment to be made by them to 
their New York house, with whom the proceeds of the sale will be deposited. 
Very respectfully, 

E. F. Ladd, Treamrer of Cuba. 

Adjutant-General, Division of Cuba, 

Habana, ChiUi. 



Digitized by 



Google 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 51 

[Firat indorsement] 

Hbadquabtebs Division op Cuba, 

ffahana, August SfS^ 1899. 
Respectfally forwarded to the honorable the AssiBtant Secretary of War, recom- 
mending that the foreign gold herein referred to by Major Ladd be disposed of in 
the manner stated by him; the order aa to shipment by commercial lines be sus- 
pended and the gold to be sent to the United States by transports. 

I agree with luajor Ladd as to the necessity of reducing the amount of such gold 
in OuDa and replacing it hy United States currency. As matters now stand, the 
revenues of the island are being diminished by the payment of customs in this gold 
which is now worth about $4.78 instead of $4.82. 

John R. Brooke, 
Major- Oeneraly Commanding. 

[Second indorsement.] 

War Department, 
Washington, D. C, September 2, 1899. 
Respectfully referred to the honorable the Secretary of the Treasury, with 
request for an expression of his views hereon. The return of this paper is desired. 

G. D. Mbiklejohn, 

Acting Secretary of War. 
[Third indorsement.] 

Treasury Department, 

Office of the Secretary, 

September 6, 1899. 
Respectfullv returned to the honorable the Secretary of War with notation as fol- 
lows: The value of the Alphonso, if full weight, is $4.82 American gold at the United 
States mint. The value of the louis is $3,858. 

This Department concurs in thinking it wise to make the disposition of foreign gold 
contemplated in the within communication. 

L. J. Gage, Secretary. 
[Fonrtii indorsement.] 

War Department, 

Washington, D. C, September 9, 1899. 
Respectfully returned to Maj. Gen. John R. Brooke, governor-general of Cuba, 
inviting attention to the preceding indorsement, which is approved. 

EuHu Root, 

Secretary of War. 
[Fiftti indorsement] 

Headquarters Division of Cuba, 

Habana, September 16, 1899. 
Respectfully referred to the treasurer of the island of Cuba for compliance. 
By command of Major-General Brooke: 

W. V. Richards, Adjutant- Getieral. 

Last year exchange remained below $1.10 until about July, when our receipts of 
this gold made it necessary to dispose of it, and between September 15 and Decem- 
ber 31 1 shipped to the United States assay oflSce, New York, the following: 464,340 
centenes, established value $2,238,118.80; 393,841 J louises, established value 
$1,520,228.19. The result of the assay was as follows: 464,340 centenes netted us 
$2,226,779.32 or $4.795579 per centen; 393,841J louises netted us $1,512,440.08 or 
$3.8400225 per louis, entailing a loss of $19,127.59. 

My views remain as represented in the letter quoted above, and our action in 
recoininff this foreign coin has evidently had its effect on the market; it has caused 
United States currency to circulate more generally, so that the banks have been 
unable to maintain exchange below $1.10, thus confining the fluctuation of this 
money within a narrow range. The value of Spanish silver has remained compara- 
tivelv steady, though gradually falling from 85 to 77 cents in United States currency. 

While the course pursued has probably had much to do with limiting the range 
of exchange, it has kei>t that rate so high, and the consequent value of the foreign 
gold so low, taking United States currency as the unit, that the merchants find it to 
thdr advantage to use this gold for the payment of customs and about 60 per cent of 
the receipts at the Habana custom-house for the past month has been in these coins. 

Digitized by VjV^^^V l^ 



52 BBPOBT OF MHJTAKY GOVEBNOK OF CUBA. 

The important question seems to be, What shall we do with this gold? (1) We can 
continue to recoin it; (2) sell it on the market here or in New York; (3) or use it 
for disbursements at the established value. To carry out the first proposition, which 
has been the policy for the last year, will probably entail a loss of two or three thou- 
sand dollars a month, including the shrinkage of recoinage and the insurance; if we 
sell it here or in New York, our loss will probably be more, as we would be more or 
less at the mercy of the bankers; the gold would come into our hands again promptly 
and it would be possible for the bankers to so control the market as to keep exchange 
as high as $1.11, at which point the gold can be recoined without loss. It must be 
borne in mind that the conditions here and in New York are quite different Here 
the circulation is quite limited, and most of the money is held in private safes; that 
in banks can readily be manipulated by two or three banking houses. 

If the last plan is adopted, the Government would often be meeting its obligations 
with depreciated money; disbursing officers would find ^eat difficulty in making 
change, as the smallest gold coin in geiieral use is the louis, $3.86; the cost and risk 
of money shipments would be greatly increased, and unless all parties handling the 
money went to the great trouble of keeping two separate accounts, one in United 
States currency and one in foreign gold, they would surely be accused of paying in 
the money most advantageous to them, and even with separate accounts much gold 
would need be converted into Spanish silver or United States currency for change, 
which might cause some suspicion. At present all funds are converted into 
United States currency by the treasurer, simplifying accounts and precluding the 
possibility of any suspicion of manipulation either by the bank or by disburmng 
officers. 

In my opinion the objections to either one of the three plans is sufficiently serious 
to warrant careful investigation with a view of developing some further plan or dis- 
covering the means of lessening the objections to those already suggested. 

Begarding the third proposition above, it has been suggested that matters could 
be simplified here by a decree that all government obligations be met in United 
States currency or in foreign gold at a fixed rate, say $1.10. It is true this would 
insure the State against loss and probably do much to maintain these values at this 
fixed rate, but it would remove none of the objections to this plan which are cited 
above. 

The only objection to the first plan is the resulting loss; the same with slight 
modification is true of the second method, but a continuation of the first results in 
the advantages originally enumerated in my letter quoted above, and I believe is 
by far the b^ one to pursue provided the element of loss can be eliminated or 
materially reduced. 

As shown by the above results of recoinage, it seems evident that the value placed 
on the Spanisn and French gold by circular No. 2, Insular Affairs, series of 1899, is 
in excess of the bullion value of these coins, and I believe a reduction of 2 cents 
in the value of both the centen and louis would materially aid in solving the ques- 
tion. At that rate very little of this money would reach us, and our loss on recoin- 
ing what we might get would be small. I am aware that the value of these coins as at 
present established is the value fixed by the United States Treasury Department 
m appraising imported merchandise, ana it may not be practicable to establish a 
different value here, or practicable for the Treasury Department to reduce the value 
of these coins in their computations, in which event the situation must be met by 
this department in some other wav. 

Whatever the political future of Cuba may be, her commercial relations with the 
United States will become closer and closer, and after a time I feel confident it will 
be difficult to keep sufficient money' here for commercial purposes, unless the circu- 
lation of United States currency is encouraged. At best it will be many years before 
Cuba will be able to issue and maintain a currency of her own; in the meantime the 
advantages of the use of United States currency will appeal to the people and their 
education in this direction keep pace with their general advancement 

It is a wise provision which requires all island accounts to be stated in United 
States currency, and it should not be changed until it shall be found impracticable 
to meet the conditions in any other way. Hence, if it be found impracticable to 
establish a lower value for these coins, I would recommend a continuance of the 
present approved course of recoinage, unless the question of international courtesy is 
involved, believing the ultimate r^ult will warrant the loss and expense. 
Very respectfully, 

E. F. Ladd, 

Treasurer of Cuba. 

Adjittant-General, U. S. A., 

Washingtoriy D. C 
(Through Military Governor. ) 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



53 



Exhibit 21. 
[Haakins <Se SeUs, certified public aoooontants, 80 Broad street, New York.] 

Habana, Ot6a, June 18, 1900, 

8m: In compliance with instractions of the military governor, we have made an 
examination and audit of the accounts of Eugene F. Laod, major and quartermaster, 
United States Volunteers, as treasurer and disDursing ofiBcer of customs, from February 
1, 1899, to June 30, 1899 (both dates inclusive), and as treasurer of the island of Culm 
from July 1, 1899, to May 26, 1900 (both dates inclusive), and submit herewith in 
relation thereto four exhibits, as follows: Exhibit A, receipts and disbursements as 
treasurer and disbursing officer of customs; B, receipts and disbursements as treasurer 
of the island of Cuba and balance on hand May 26, 1900; C, securities on deposit for 
account of various insurance companies; D, securities on deposit for account of the 
North American Trust Company. 

We have verified the cash ana securities on hand by actual count and the balances 
on deposit in bank by proper certificates hrom the different depositories. We have 
traced all receipts back to original sources, and checked all expenditures shown by 
the treasurer's cash book. 

We hereby certify that all receipts have been properly accounted for and that all 
disbursements have been made on properly approved warrants and vouchers, and 
that the balance on hand May 26, 1900, agreed with the auditor's records. 

Respectfully submitted. 

-Haskins & Sblls, Certified Public AccaurUanls, 

Ajxtdtant-Genkral, Division of Cuba, Hahamiy Cuba. 



RecekUs and disburaemerUs of Eugene F. Ladd, major and quarternuister. United States 
VoUmteerSy as treasurer of the idand of Cubay from July i, 1899, to May £6, 1900 (both 
dates indusive), and balance on hand on latter date. 



ReoeiptB: 

Jifly,1899 12,185,689.68 

Angurt.1899 1,567,970.26 

September, 1899 1,489,616.81 

O(^ober,1809 1,428,650.77 

November, 1899 1,875,610.76 

December, 1899 1,788,221.86 

January. 1900 1,679,904.43 

February, 1900 1,821,888.82 

March, 1900 1,678,609.84 

Apiil,i900 1,488,751.87 

llay, 1900 (to 26th) 1,804,106.19 

Total 17,183,824.29 

Balance, May 26, 1900: 

Cash 

North American Tmst Company, New York . . 

Santia^ 

Clenfuegoa 

Matanraw 



Dlsbunements: 

July, 1899 $1,029,877.58 

AugU8t,1899 1,688,146.28 

Beptember,1899 927,358.34 

October, 1899 1,266,716.27 

November,1899 1,541,162.66 

December,1899 1,448,289.56 

January, 1900 1,423,933.98 

February, 1900 1,897,068.67 

March, 1900 2,878,724.01 

AprU,1900 833,213.41 

May,1900 1,476,210.72 

Total 15,854,691.51 



801,569.61 


840,094.27 


131,464.45 


29,619.36 


26,385.10 



Total: 1,829,182.78 

The above balance includes the following amounts of foreign gold and silver at the 
prices fixed thereon by the President's order of December 28, 1899, viz: 

AlioDsinoe (25-peeeta piece) $4.82 

Louie (aO-£ranc piece) 3.86 

Spanian silver percent.. 60 

Fbreigngold $812,810.40 

Spanish rilver 244.48 

$214,054.68 

North American Trust Company: 
Santiago- 
Foreign gold 84,117.62 

Cienfnegofr— 

Foreign gold 69,282.07 

MatauTun 

Foreign gold $46,494.49 

SpanShdlver 187.88 

46,681.87 

Total: 



Gold 413,704.58 

Mlver 481.86 



414,136.44 



Fall reooids are kept by the treasurer of all foreign gold and silver remitted to him 
or to the North American Trust Company. The latter company repays in like coin 
>11 deposits with it, ^ 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 RBPOBT OF MILITABY GOVKBNOB OF CUBA. 

Securities on depatU May f tf , 1900^ wUh the ireamrer of the island of CubOy for account of 
various insurance companies, as per the records of the secretary of finance, under order 
No. 181, Headquarters Division of Cuba, date September fH, 1899, 

Achen and Munich Fire Insurance Company, of Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany: 750 dtv 
of Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent f 100 bonds; par value, $75,000 Spanish gola. 

Atlas Assurance Company, of London, England: 120 Cuban Central Railway, Lim- 
ited, 4 J per cent debenture bonds, £100 each; 30 Western Railway of Habana, 
Limited, 6 per cent mortgage bonds, £100 each; par value, £75,000. 

Commercial Union Assurance Company, Limited, of London, England: 1,000 city of 
Habana first-mortoage 6 i>er cent $100 bonds; par value, $100,000 Spanish gold; 
$75,000 deposited K>r fire risks; $25,000 deposited for marine risks. 

Equitable Lite Assurance Society of the United States: Three 4 per cent United States 
consols: 1 of $10,000; 1 of $10,000; 1 of $5,000: total par value, $25,000. 

The Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland, United States: 250 city of Habana 
first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonds; par value, $25,000 Spanish gold. 

Hamburg[-Bremen Fire Insurance Company of Germany: 50 Cubui Central Rail- 
way, Lmiited, 4 J per cent debenture bonds. £100 each; 25 United States 4 percent 
bonds (1895-1925), $1,000 each; 250 city of Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 
bonds, Spanish gold; par value, £5,000 and $25,000 American money and $25,000 
Spanish gold. 

Imperial Insurance Comi)anv, Limited, of London, England: 750 city of Habuia fiist- 
mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonds; par value, $75,000 Spanish gold. 

Law Union and Crown Insurance Company of London, England: 750 city of Habana 
first-mortage 6 per cent $100 bonds; par value, $75,000 Spanish gold. 

Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Company of Loncfon, England: 750 city of 
Habana first-mortoage 6 per cent $100 bonds; par value, $75,000 Spanish gold. 

London Assurance Corporation of London, England: Six 4 per cent United States con- 
sols (1877), $10,000 each; 150 city of Habana first-mort^^ 6 per cent $100 bonds; 
par value, $60,(XX) American money and $15,000 Spanish gold. 

London Guardian Fire and Life Insurance Company, Limited, of London, Eiu^land: 
Four 4 per cent United States consols, 1 of $50,000; 1 of $10,000; 1 of $10,000; 1 of 
$5,000; total par value, $75,000. 

London and Lsmcashire Fire Insurance Company of London, England: 750 city of 
Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonos, par value $75,000 Spanish gold. 

Manchester Assurance Company of Manchester, England: Seven 3 per cent United 
States bonds, registered, of $10,000 each; 50 city of Habana, first-mortgase 6 per 
cent $100 bonds, par value $70,000 American money and $5,000 Spanish gold. 

Mannheimer Versicnerungs G^Uschaft of Mannheim, Germany: 250 city of Habana 
first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $25,000 Spanish gold. 

Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York: Three 4 per cent United States con- 
sols, 1 of $10,000, 1 of $10,000, 1 of $5,000; total par value $25,000. 

New York Life Insurance Company of New York: 250 city of Habana first-mortgage 
6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $25,000 Spanish gold. 

North British and Mercantile Insurance Company of London and Edinbuivh: 167 
citv of Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 Donds, par value $16,700 Spanish 
gold; also first mortgage on No. 76 and 78 Cuba street, Habana, Cuba. 

Northern AsBiprance (5)mpany of London, England: 275 city of Habana first-mort- 
gage 6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $27,5^ Spanish gold; 1 certificate No. 2126 
for £10,000; 5 per cent consolidated irredeemable debenture stock of United Rail- 
ways of Habana and R^la Warehouses, limited, par value £10,000. 

Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society of Norwicn, England: 750 city of Habana 
first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $75,000 Spanish gold. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England: 20 Western Railway of Habana, 
Limited, 6 per cent mortgage bonds, £100 each; 133 Cuban Central Railway, lim- 
ited, 4} per cent debenture Donds, £100 each; total par value £15,300. 

Preussische National Versicherungs Gesellschaft of Stettin, Germany: 250 city (A 
Hab»[ia first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $25,000 Spanish gold. 

Royal Insurance Company of Liverpool, England: 750 city of Habima first-mortgage 
6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $75^000 Spanish gold. 

Roval Exchange Assurance Corporation of London, England: 750 city of Habana 
first^mort^e 6 per cent $100 bonds, par value $75,000 Hpanish sold. 

Scottish Union and National Insurance Companv of London and Edinbui^h: 750 city 
of Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonos, par value $75,000 Spanish gold. 

Sun Insurance Company of London, England: 750 city of Habana first-mortgage 6 
per cent $100 bonds, par value $75,000 Spanish gold. 

Union Assurance Society of London, England: 75 United States 4 per cent bonds of 
$1,000 each, par value $75,000. 

United States Lloyd of New York: 250 city of Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 
bonds, par value $25,000 Spanish gold. 

Digitized by VjV^^^V IC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVBBNOB OF CUBA. 



55 



RBCAPmrLATION. 

10,642 first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 city of Habana bonds, with all coupons (from 

No. 45, due July 1, 1900, to and including No. 200, due April 1, 1939) belonging 

thereto. 
123 United States bonds, par value $355,000, $255,000 registered and $100,000 coupon 

bonds, all coupons attached. 
303 Cuban Central Railway, Limited, 4} per cent £100 debenture bonds, with all 

coupons (from No. 2, due August 1, 1944) belonging thereto. 
50 Western Railway of Habana, Limited, 6 per cent £100 bonds, with all coupons 

(from No. 15, due September 1, 1900, to and including No. 75, due September 1, 

19302 belonging thereto. 
£10,000, 5 per cent consolidated irredeemable debenture stock of the United Railways 

of .Habana and Regla Warehouses, Limited. 
First mortgage on property at 76 and 78 Cuba street, Habana. 



Securities on deposit May 26, 1900, wUh the treasurer of the island of Cuba for account of 
the North American Trust Cornpany, as per the records of the AdjuUmirUenmd, under 
Order No. 1^, Headquarters Division of Cuba, dated March £6, 1900. 

7,500 dty of Habana first-mortgage 6 per cent $100 bonds, with all coupons (from 
No. 45, due July 1, 1900, to and including No. 200, due April 1, 1939) belonging 
thereto, par value $750,000 Spanish gold. 



Statement of allotments. 
Exhibit No. l5.^rULY TO DECEMBER, 1899. 



1899. 


Barracks and 
qnarteiB. 


SanitaUon. 


Rural guard 
and adminis- 
tration. 


Public works, 
ports and 
harbors. 


Charities and 


Miscellane- 
ous. 


MIUTABT. 

July 


re, 097. 17 
184,820.42 
188,678.88 
111,186.17 
102,494.60 
83,126.80 


1156,812.16 
480,067.66 
78,789.89 
286.018.19 
248,210.18 
241.606.17 


$138,630.04 
168,241.54 
102,583.14 
89,288.20 
120,167.83 
488,761.48 


$57,860.42 
108,884.90 
46,194.97 
62,531.13 
70,218.75 
27,800.00 


$62,575.82 
64,751.80 
83,462.14 
22,189.74 
47,534.19 
88,854.89 


$82,769.00 
68,816.53 
42,850.00 
25,471.98 
1,516.00 
21,200.00 




September 

October 


KoTember 

December 


Total 


760,747.54 


1,886,619.19 


1,042,657.18 


867,440.17 


804.867.58 


187,613.61 


1899. 


Civil govern- 
ment. 


MunlcipaU- 
tiesT 


Aid to desti- 
tute. 


Quarantine. 


Customs serv- 
ice. 


Total. 


MILITABY. 
July 


18,562.49 
17,262.49 
12,866.00 
18,106.83 
19,260.98 
6,090.00 


8269,368.81 
16,104.41 
8,653.03 
16,464.98 
28,500.00 
82.906.60 


•9,110.99 

94,262.47 

23,851. 50 

7,060.00 

1,650.00 

1,446.78 




$175,086.21 
66,294.14 
91,503.93 
69,196.26 
83,171.82 
64,041.98 


$976,811.61 

1,227,634.35 

636,027.07 

665,190.97 


August 


$28,658.00 
18,200.00 
12,750.00 
12,500.00 
47,500.00 


September 

October 


Noyember 

December 


790,204.30 
992,333.05 


Total 


75,686.29 


871,997.78 


187,870.83 


114,606.00 


549,243.83 


5,288,201.85 


1899. 


State and 
government 


Justice and 
public in- 
struction. 


Finance. 


Agriculture, 

public works, 

etc 


Postal serv- 
ice. 


Census. 


CITIL. 

July 


t37 181.06 > t112.97S.74 


829,012.79 
80,406.68 
28,478.12 
19,296.12 
19,311.86 
19,742.58 


$40,514.91 
29,975.29 
42,288.73 
86,921.69 
74,311.20 
68,884.78 


$61,000.00 
48,880.00 
67,067.20 
76.418.87 
52,719.20 
85,929.61 




Augoflt 


87,079.62 
66,667.68 
64,410.42 
878,860.98 
126,066.13 


119,616.81 
161,919.24 
188,227.42 
144,792.00 
148,779.74 




September 

October 


$209,820.00 


November 

December 


115,172.60 
32.984.87 


Total 


609,794.60 


806,808.45 


146,247.10 


292,846.60 


872,014.88 


857,977.37 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



56 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OK CUBA. 



StaUmerU of aUoimenin — Continue*!. 
Exhibit No. 16.— JULY TO DECEMBER, 189»-Contlnued. 



1899. 1 Total. 


Total civil. 


Total military. 


Grand total. 


CIVIL. 

July 1270,682.60 

August 266,556.75 

September 646,090.87 

October ' 880,274.52 

November 785.176.69 

December 475,907.76 


$270,682.50 
266,566.75 
646,090.87 
830,274.62 
785,176.69 
475,907.76 


1976,811.61 
1,227,684.85 
636.027.07 
666,190.97 
790,204.30 
992.833.05 


$1,247,4^.11 
1,494,191.10 
1,182.117.91 
996,465.49 
1,576.380.99 
1,468,240.81 


Total 2,674,689.09 


2,674,689.09 


5,288,201.86 | 7,962,89a 44 



Exhibit No. 16.— JANUARY TO JUNE. 1900. 






January. 


February. 


March. 


State and government: 

Central office 

Provinces 

Hospitals and charities 


$9,454.57 
23,426.79 
99.535.58 
8,275.99 
8,738.68 


$41,978.37 
16.608.54 
60, 707. 79 
18,385.70 
10,095.00 


$12,982.73 
18,140.72 

19,478.88 


Jails 

Public buildings 


35,970.90 
2SO.00 






Total 


144,431.61 


147,775.40 


86,823.2$ 


Justice: 

Central office 


8,144.25 

6,349.92 

44,250.12 

200.00 


4,272.99 

7,249.92 

88,379.36 

15,000.00 




Sunreme court 


3,599.90 


Courts of provinces 

Public buildings 


49,287.61 




Total 


68,944.29 


64,902.27 


52,887.61 


Public instruction: 

Central office 


2,224.94 
20,131.96 


2,681.66 
84,610.52 


2,156.66 


University and State schools 


146,487.86 


Public buildings 












Total 


22,366.92 


87,192.18 


148,644 52 






Finance: 

Central office 


83,477.96 
11,917.62 
94,968.88 
70,426.94 
10,213.61 
45.62 


29,784.13 
10,866.12 


21,597.53 


Provinces 

Postal service 


14.537.09 
49,011.95 


Customs-service expense 


95.081.87 

4,790.96 

80,040.00 

40,000.00 

1,363.40 


97,463.33 


Refundments 

Money orders and registered mail 

Quarantine 


10,919.77 
15,225.81 


Public buildings 


2.005.00 


12,034.05 






Total 


223.046.63 


211,375.98 


220.789.58 


Agriculture, industry, and commerce: 

Central office 


6,826.72 
2,820.48 


4,247.65 
1,409.09 


4 196.65 


Provinces 


3.414.45 


Total 


8,646.20 


5,656.74 


7,611.10 


Public works: 

Central office 


7,021.30 
6,534.78 
99,811.28 


6,721.90 

9,892.61 

210,369.01 


11,024 51 


Provinces 

Public works 


31,800.96 
139.285.33 






Total 


118,367.36 


226,983.52 


182,110.80 






Municipalities: 

Police 


75,194.94 
82,810.49 
306,544.90 
1,431.00 
63,283.61 


83,717.97 
237,399.48 
388,297.50 
129,706.42 

22,308.79 


74,337.00 
181,079.08 


Instruction 


Sanitation 


440.»<68.M 


Hospitals and charities 

Miscellaneous 


122,737.44 
34,805.65 


Total 


629,264.84 


861,430.11 


853,827.61 


Military department: 

Banacks and quarters 


71,396.58 
143,492.68 


113,975.04 
158.832.07 
52,945.80 


361,379.80 


Administration and rural guard 


139,906.49 
62,347 00 


M1flo(*1lantH>us . . , , , r 








Total 


214,889.21 


325,752.91 


543 632.29 






G rand total 


1.309,946.06 


1.881,069.11 


2,096,326.69 





Digitized by ^ 



oogk 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



57 



Statement of aUotmeni* — Continued. 
Exhibit No. 16-JANUARY TO JUNE, 1900-ConUnued. 





April. 


May. 


June. 


Total. 


SUte and ffovemment: 

Centnil office 


f31,062.00 
10,606.40 
70,492.79 
56,081.44 
8,289.62 


•30,967.00 

4,663.91 

21,406.80 

18,086.62 

6,000.00 


1666.66 

6,328.69 

27,966.18 

7,444.84 

5,450.00 


$127,011.88 

79,674.96 

299,587.02 

144,244.49 

88,773.20 


Provinces 


Ho^ltals and charities 


Jails 


Public bnildlngR 




Total 


176,382.16 


81,122.83 


47,766.27 


684,290.99 




JusUce: 

Central office 


8,314.99 
6,708.26 
39,469.07 


3.314.99 
5,624.99 
28,636.96 




1 

14,M7.22 

28,432.99 

280,073.76 

16,200.00 


Supreme court 




GooilB of provinces 


80,060.65 


Public hnlldingii 










Total 


48,492.82 


87,476.93 


30,050.65 


287,763.97 




Public instniction: 

Central office 


2,066.66 
86,831.07 


2,066.66 
30,341.62 
2,816.00 




11,096.68 

282,099.88 

2,824.12 


Universitv and State scliools 


13,696.93 
8.12 


Pnblio. hiilldlrigii , , 






Total 


88,897.73 


35.224.18 


13.705.05 


296,020.58 




Finance: 

Central office 


19,431.63 
13,429.87 
47,490.11 
68,766.72 
8,074.94 
15,488.46 
20,300.00 
13,404.11 


6,576.00 

7,783.59 

8,920.12 

20,752.63 

726.94 

528.30 

29,737.00 

615.00 


44, 539. W 
8,385.40 
87,855.82 
76,909.47 
10,332.63 
128.00 
16,000.00 
2,610.00 


166,865.19 
66,869.19 
238 236 88 


Provinces 


Postal service 


Cn*tomi^}»prvif<^ ex p^fise 


428,390.36 
40,068.86 
61,456.19 

106,067.00 


Refundments 


Money orders and registered mail 

Qnarantine 


Public buildings 


•81, 931. 56 






ToUl 


201,876.24 


75,688.48 


194,660.86 


1,126,836.22 




Agriculture, industry, and commerce: 

Central office 


4,646.66 
3,011.84 


4,191.65 
2,083.19 




23,008.32 
14,021.19 


Provinces 


1,282.14 




Total 


7,668.49 


6,274.84 


1,282.14 


37,029.51 




Public works: 

Central office 


14,316.68 
11,139.78 
121,698.16 


5.819.01 
6, 192. 96 
42,791.80 


17,679.72 
88,864.13 
97,073.09 


62. 483. 02 


Provinces 


153, 925. 22 


Public works 


710.928.67 




Total 


147,064.62 


M, 803. 77 


203,016.91 


927.836 91 






MunicipaliUes: 

Poll^ 


63,302.00 
188,688.26 
106,210.33 

67,663.20 
168,597.86 


35,297.00 
115,641.34 
155,931.11 

70,214.77 
743.66 


51,803.69 
288,514.29 
92,037.70 
40,596.22 
16,529.00 


3S3, 652.ro 


Instruction 


1,094,13.T >8 


Sanitation 

Hoflpitals and charities 


1,489,890.18 
4.32, 348. (16 


Miscellaneous 


306, 149. 70 


Total 


694,461.63 


377,830.88 | 


489.479.80 


3,706,294.87 


MiUtary department: 

BanacKS and quarters 


62,811.28 

141,742.71 

3,193.89 


1 
29,702.88 
48,243.43 
20.00 


48,493.52 

140,396.71 

2,010.00 


662, 759. 06 


Administraticm and rural guard 


772,012.09 


Miscellaneous 


110,516.69 


Total 


197,747.88 


77,966.31 1 


185,899.23 | 


l,&15,.s.s7.83 



Grand total... 



1,411,969.96 



746, 287. 72 1, 166, 850. 44 8, 6x1, 4 19. ^8 



CUBA 1900 — ^VOL I, PT 3- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAJ. E. F. LADD, TREASURER OF THE ISLAND OF CUBA. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPORT 

OF 



E. F. LADD, MAJOR AND QUARTERMASTER, U. S. V., TREASURER 
OF THE ISLAND OF CUBA, FOR FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE 
FISCAL YEAR 1901. 



Habana, Cuba, January i, 1901, 
Sm: In compliance with the instructions of the military governor, 
please find below a report showing the operations of this oflSce during 
the period from July 1, 1900, to December 31, 1900. During this 
period the work of the office has been divided under the following 
departments: Auditor for the fiscal year 1899; treasurer of Cuba; dis- 
bursing department; transportation department. Each department 
will be separately treated of in brief. 

AUDrrOB FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1899. 

The annual report of this departmentforthefiscalvear 1900 showed 
the balances still due from disbursing officers to be $1,971.88. Since 
then two of these outstanding accounts have been settled, and the bal- 
ances due from the other two accounts have been certified to the new 
auditor, thus closing the work of this office. Reference is made to my 
annual report for the fiscal year 1900, showing the manner of balancing 
the records of the office. 

During the period covered by the present report the office has been 
occupied compiling detailed statements of various kinds for the infor- 
mation of the United States Senate, called for by the resolution of that 
body of May 26, 1900. The expenses of the office during this period 
have been 14,058.94, divided as follows: 

Salaries $3,436.05 

Stationery and printing 100. 37 

Rent 320.00 

Pomiture 80.60 

Incidental expenses 121.92 

Total 4,068.94 

This closes the work of the office of the auditor of the island of 
Cuba, as limited by general orders. Headquarters Division of Cuba, 
March 14, 1899. During this period of confusion the aimy received 
for disbursements about $5,000,000. The purchases covered every 
article of commerce, and under conditions never before encountered 
by agents of the tJnited States Government. That these agents, 
officers of the United States Army, have been able to present their 

59 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



60 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEENOB OF CUBA. 

accounts in such shape as to pass the scrutiny of rigid investigation 
and leave in no insto.nce a breath of suspicion to mar the enviable 
name of the Army, should be a source of congratulation. The trying 
circumstances under which this work has been done are fully appreci- 
ated by this oflSce, and it has been the source of great satisfaction that, 
as the representative of these oflScers, many of whom have left the serv- 
ice or gone to foreign parts, I have been able to lay their records 
before the War Department in such shape as to leave no inquiry of 
the Congressional committee unanswered. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

On Jane 30, 1900, this department had on hand a balance of $2, 702, 053. 75 

(As shown under the proper fund accounts in Exhibit No. 1. ) 
From July 1 to December 31, 1900, the cash receipts have been 9,381,961.42 

As shown by months and fiscal years under the proper fund accounts 

in Exhibits Nos. 2 and 2a, making a total of 12,084,015.17 

During the same period the payments were 10, 236, 562. 89 

As shown by months, fiscal years, and under the proper fund accounts 

in Exhibits Nos. 3 and 3a, leaving a cash balance of 1, 847, 452. 28 

(Shown under the proper funds in Exhibit No. 1.) 
During this period transfer warrants from one fund to another were 
issued as shown in Exhibit No. 4. Combining these exhibits, Noe. • 
3 and 4^ shows the balances under the different funds to be, as found 
in Exhibit No. 1: 

Customs $4,695,248.63 

Internal revenue 4,023,091.60 

Postal 50,152.20 

Miscellaneous 1,234,447.45 

Total 1,847,452.28 

Exhibit No. 11 to my annual report for the fiscal year 1900 shows the 
total cash receipts during the year to have been as follows 19, 276, 394. 07 

Exhibit No. 2a above shows that from July 1 to December 31, 1900, 
the receipts pertaining to the fiscal year 1900 were 925,388.19 

Making a total of 20,201,782.26 

(Credited to that fiscal year.) 

But to arrive at the true revenue we must deduct the 
funds shown in Exhibit No. 5 (deposits credited in 
the fiscal year 1900, but which properly belonged to 
the fiscal year 1899) $1,430,580.82 

And Exhibit 6 (repayments, or redeposit of unex- 
pended balances of appropriations received during 
this fiscal year, but which should not be included as 

revenues) 606,140.33 

2,036,721.15 

Leaving for the correct revenue for the fiscal year 1900 18, 165, 061. 11 

Exhibit No. 12 to my annual report for the fiscal year 1900 shows the 
total payments during tlie year to have been 16, 574, 340. 32 

Exhibit No. 3a above shows the payments made from July 1 to Decem- 
ber 31, 1900, which were on account of the fiscal year 1900, to be. . 1, 238, 388. 35 

Making the total allotments on account of the fiscal year 1900 17, 812, 728. 67 

Exhibit No. 7 herewith shows that unexpended balances of these 
allotments have been repaid into the treasury, amounting to 1, 315, 824. 03 

I^eaving as the total expenditures or expenses of the fiscal year 1900. . 16, 496, 904. 64 
Showing a credit balance during that fiscal year of 1,668, 156.47 

18,165,061.11 

Digitized byVjOOviC 



EEPOBT OP MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 61 

I deem it essential that the records be so kept as to show the actual 
revenues and expenses of annual periods, whetner the same correspond 
with the calendar year or an annual period called the "fiscal year," 
but as general order from Headquarters Division of Cuba of March 
14, 1899, defines the "fiscal year" as from July 1 to the following June 
30, corresponding to the fiscal year in the United States, the accounts 
of this office are kept to conform to such fiscal-year period. The value 
of this method will become apparent when the question of tariff revision 
comes up, as the first point to be determined would naturally be the 
relation of the revenues under the present tariff to the expenses of the 
government. This could not be aetermined unless the records show 
not only what was actually paid out during a certain period, but also 
what unpaid obligations were contracted during the period and paid 
thereafter. 

But to follow out such a system some definite time should be given 
for the settlement of all accounts incident to any yearly period. One 
year from the expiration of said yearly period woulo, I think, be 
ample for insular affairs, and at the close or this time the accounting 
departments should close the records of the annual period, all claims 
for that annual period then outstanding or thereafter made being 
referred to the auditor for settlement through the mediudi of a settle- 
ment warrant. 

But under the present system as practiced by the auditor's office, 
whereby allotments are made and accounts kept and rendered without 
regard to fiscal or calendar years, it is impossible to arrive at the true 
net legitimate expenses of the insular government for any stated 
period. Hence the results as determined by the above calculation 
regarding the expenses of fiscal years are only approximate, but as 
accurate as it is possible for this department to arrive at without the 
cooperation of the auditing department. 

Exhibit No. 8 shows the allotments paid during the six months end- 
ing December 31, 1900, same being given bv months and under the 
proper appropriations, being the same total as shown on Exhibits 
Kos. 3 and 3a, $10,236,562.89. 

For the purpose of making comparison of revenues and expenditures 
during the calendar year 1900: 
Exhibit No. 9 herewith shows the total revenues to have been. . . $17,405,393.11 
Exhibit No. 10 shows the net allotments under all headings or 
appropriations to have been 17,797,602.86 

After giving credit for all repayments or deposits of unexpended bal- 
ances under each heading, showing the allotments to have exceeded 
the revenues by 392, 209. 75 

Exhibit No. 10 shows the total allotments, whether for expenses 
incurred prior to January 1, 1900, or thereafter. The records of this 
office are so kept as to separate revenues and expenses of fiscal-year 
priods, as far as possible with the information obtainable, but it is abso- 
lutely impossible to make anything more than a very rough approxi- 
mation in attempting to compare the revenues and expenses of any other 
period. 

Exhibit No. 11 shows the revenues by months and funds for the six 
months ending December 31, 1900, as reported by collectors. 

Exhibit No. 12 shows under the proper appropriations the monthly 
payments made during the six months ending December 31, 1900, but 
which were on account of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, being 
the same total as shown in the first half of Exhibit No. 3a, $1,238,388.35. 

Digitized by VjV^^^V IC 



62 BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit No. 12a shows, under the proper appropriations, the monthly 
payments made during the six months enmng December 31, 1900, 
which were on account of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1901, being 
the same total as shown in the last half of Exhibit No. 3a, $8,998,174.54. 

The work of the oflSce has been greatly increased by throwing upon 
it the work of the former department of finance of the department of 
posts; so that now all postmasters buy their supplies througn this ofiice, 
and make all remittances direct to the treasurer. Officiak using pen- 
alty enyelopes are also required to obtain the same through this office. 

The expenses of this office during the six months haye been as 
follows: 

Salaries $12,672.51 

Rent, gas, ice, etc 940. 39 

Stationery and printing* 2, 113. M 

OflSce furniture 291.05 

Cab hire 139.35 

DISBURSING DEPARTMENT. 

The disbursements of this department during the six months haye 
been $579,2^9. 20. 

The accounts of the disbursing clerk were inspected by the inspector- 
general's department to include November 24, 1900, ana found correct 

The expenses of the department during this period were as follows: 

Salaries $3,011.00 

Rent, gas, ice, etc 964. 73 

Stationery and printing 73. 11 

Office furniture 8, 00 

Cab hire 16.90 

Bepair of counter 1. 30 

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT. 

During this period of six months this de]^rtment has audited and 
settled 5,839 claims for transportation sendees, and has about 10,000 
others under adjustment. 

The expenses of the department haye been: 

Salaries 11,390.38 

Rent, ice, gaa, etc 343.81 

Stationery and printing^ 407. 31 

Office furniture 57.70 

Cab hire 4.64 

Bepairs to counters 41. 66 

CURRENCY. 

As anticipated in my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1900, the demand for Spanish gold for the moyement of the sugar 
crop has already brought exchange to 109, putting this gold at practi- 
cally 1 per cent premium oyer the yalue giyen it Dy executiye orders. 
When, about December 1, 1900, exchange dropped to 109i, indicating 
a scarcity of this gold, it was thought adyisable to put into circulation 
the gold held in the Treasury, in order to, for a time, giye relief to 

'The chief item of this expense has been the cost of official check books for use of 
disbursing officers. 
^ The cmef item of this expense has been the cost of books of transportation requests. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEHNOB OF CUBA. 68 

the dtuatioD. So, under the approval of the military governor, sub- 
scriptions for $750,000 of this gold were invited at the current rate of 
109i, payment for the same to be made in United States currency. 
In r^ponse, subscriptions for over $2,000,000 were received. These 
were reduced pro rata, and onljr the $760,000 sold. This action met 
with the approval of commercial interests and steadied the money 
market for a time. But due to the present high price of sugar, the 
crop is being marketed as rapidly 'as possible, and the consequent 
demand for gold to meet the New York exchange is very heavy. 1 
believe much good could be done by changing the currency of the 
island, and again suggest the plan outlined in my annual report for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. The recent unsettled conditions of 
the Madrid money market, which controls the value of Spanish silver, 
has complicated things not a little, and worked to the detriment of 
commercial interests outside of a small circle of bankers. 

Under Greneral Order 127, Headquarters Division of Cuba, series 
of 1900, the disbursement of insular funds has been done through 
qualified depositories; The service of these institutions has been 
highly satisfactory, the agents of the Government being relieved from 
much responsibiht^ and greater security being furnished the Govern- 
ment. But these institutions have performed a still greater service 
by giving this department the facilities of extending- the use of checks, 
thereby acquainting the people with this method of Dusiness, by which 
commercial transactions are facilitated and the circulating medium 
augmented. These checks reach every municipality in the island and 
circulate everywhere without discount or prejudice. The benefits of 
our arrangements with these depositories are undoubtedly mutual, 
but are curtailed by our withholding from circulation a large sum of 
money badly needed to carry on the business of the country. The 
treasurer is required to carry in his vault a cash balance usually 
approximating $2,000,000. This amount taken from circulation has 
undoubtedly &d its influence, and recently it has been impossible to 
secure money on fine collateral for 10 per cent. 

The form of security required under General Order 127 referred to 
•above would seem ample to warrant the government in placing with 
these authorized depositories all, or a large percentage, of the insular 
funds now held in idleness; but in justice to all parties I would recom- 
mend that the total amount of security reauired from these various 
depositories be fixed to correspond as nearly as practicable with the 
total amount of insular funds, both appropriated and unappropriated, 
and that the treasurer be required to withdraw or increase the deposits 
in these institutions so as to, as far as practicable, keep the deposits up 
to, but not above, the amount of security furnished by each deposi- 
tory. It is only by such an arrangement that the public can be 
benefited by a maximum circulation without requiring the depositories 
to my for security at times greatly in excess of the funds on deposit 
with them. Judging from the experience of the last two years, the 
state of the insular treasury would justify the opinion that all inter- 
ests could best be subserved bj fixing the total of such security at 
three or three and a half million doflars. If the present form of 
security is not deemed sufiicient, other security to warrant such an 
arrangement should be demanded from the depositories. 

From the organization of this department, July 1, 1900, it has been 
my aim to prepare it for delivery to the Cuban government. The very 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



64 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



first step was my Feoommendation to the military governor that the 
office of assistant treasurer be created, and filled oy a Cuban, who 
should be qualified and fitted by experience in the department to con- 
tinue the work under the Culmn government. For several months 
the entire work of the department has been carried on under the 
direction of the assistant treasurer, with a mere supervision on my 
part, until I feel satisfied the work would run smoothlv under his sole 
management as long as the preseiit system is continued. The system, 
while entirely new and foreign to the original ideas prevailing here, 
has worked so smoothly that I believe its merits are recognized, and 
that it will be continued when the United States relinquisnes control. 
The scores of Cuban officials doing busineas under it nave become so 
familiar with its workings that a question seldom arises, and in its 
establishment this office has appreciated the hearty support and 
cooperation of every officer of tne United States Army or civil gov- 
ernment with whom it has had business relations. There is no record 
of a single protest or objection, however slight, against the methods 
adopted m establishing and carrying out this work. This has made 
the work exceedingly agreeable. 

In closing this report, I can not refrain from calling attention to the 
faithful and efficient services of the employees of this department 
The last six months has been a very trying period in Habana, on 
account of the prevalence of the yellow fever. The regular employees 
of this office have been particularly unfortunate, all except two of 
them having had the disease, but fortunately there were no fatalities 
among them. During the prevalence of the fever much additional 
work fell upon these men, but every man was equal to the emergency. 
Not one ever expressed a desire to leave the service when the apparent 
dangers of the situation far exceeded those of the battlefield. 
Very respectfuUy, 

E. F. Ladd, 
Major and Qtiartenna^ter'^ U. S.V., 

Treasurer of Ouba. 

Adjutant-General, Department of Cuba, 

Ifabana^ Ouba. 



ExHiBrr 1. — Balance at the dose of business December SI, J 900. 



Balance, clo^e of biudness June 
30,1900 

Receiptfl from July 1, 1900. to 
Dec. 31, 1900 

Total 

Pavmentfl from July 1, 1900, to 
Dec. 31, 1900 

Balance 

Transfer warrants executed 

Correct balance under dif- 
ferent funds Doc. 31, 1900. 



Customs. 



11,991,745.23 
8,085,686.98 



10,027,431.21 
5,332,245.58 



4,095,186.63 
63.00 



4.695,248.63 



Postal. 



988,179.61 
185,624.19 



273,703.80 
332,856.00 



59,152.20 



59,152.20 



Internal 
revenue. 



1181,495.92 
832,726.61 



514,222.63 
4,537,314.13 



4,023,091.66 



4,023,091.1 



Miscellane- 
ous. 



$440,632.99 
828,024.64 



1,268,657.63 
34,147.18 



1,234,510.45 
63.00 



1,234,447.45 



Total. 



$2.702, 068. 'iS 
9,381.961.42 



12,084,015.17 
10,236.662.89 



1,847, 462, 'A 



1,847,452.28 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BKPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 65 

Exhibit 2.— Om/i receipts from July 1, i^OO, to December Sl^ 1900, 



Total by months. 


July. 


August. 


September. 


Ffscal year 1899: 

Costonifl 








Postal : 








Ifitema) r^venup . , ,,,.,...,, ^ ^ ., ^ 








Miicellaneooa 








BeDavmentB 


$1,515.72 






$367.46 








Total 


1.515.72 






367.46 








Ftecal year 1900: 

Ciurtotnii 


149,674.11 
16,474.40 
12,158.82 
22.507.34 

642,180.57 


$4,947.64 
1,557.10 
1,084.16 




Foetal 




157.50 


iDtemal revenue 


12.15 


MiiPwllan€y>M«» .„,,,.-, 




Repajrmentfi 


88.476.97 




7.968.95 






Total 


842,995.25 


41,025.87 




8, 138. 60 






Pi8oal year 1901: 

Cnstonui 


1,093.139.54 
21,356.43 
49,967.25 
10,072.48 


1,344,271.19 

29.769.55 

69,526.83 

9.548.04 

565.02 




1,155.283.20 


Postal 


23,926.80 


Internal revenue 


45,100.66 
15,546.68 


Miscellaneoas 


Repayments 


1.962.06 








Total 


1.174,624.70 


1,458,675.68 




1,241.819.30 






Grand total 


2,019,035.67 


1,494.701.50 


1,250,825.36 




Total by months. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


Total. 


Flwal year 1899: 

c^iintoms , 










Postal 








Internal revenue 










Btiscellaneoufl 










Repayments ..t ^^^..^.^- 


$7.25 






$1,890.43 










Total 


7.25 






1.890.43 








Ffflcal year 1900: 

Customs „... , r- ,., 


170. 10 
6,809.82 


$3.05 


$188.80 


154,993.70 
24,998.32 


Postal 


Internal revenue 






13,205.13 
22,507.34 


MlsoellaneouB 






Renavments 


2,892.56 


115. 10 


23,549.64 


709, 683. 70 






Total 


9,371.98 


118. 15 


23,738.34 


925,388 19 






Fiscal year 1901: 


1,880,548.82 
27,630.18 
41,407.40 
9,810.59 
10,148.50 


1,858,267.87 

28,029.22 

42,320.46 

10,187.88 

5,327.18 


1,549,186.66 
29,814.74 
71,208.99 
18,209.11 
7,570.63 


7,880,692.28 
160, 525. 87 


Postal 


Internal revenue 


319,521.48 
68.369.78 
25,573.39 


Miscellaneous 


Repayments 




Total 


1,469,540.44 


1,444,132.60 


1,670,990.13 


8, 4M. 682. 80 


Grand total 


1,478,919.67 


1.444 *2fin 7ft 


1 694 7'^ 47 


9,381,961.42 




' 









Exhibit 2a. — Cash receipts from July /, 1900, to December SI, 1901. 



Total under different 
funds. 


Customs. 


Postal. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Miscella- 
neous. 


Repay- 
ments. 


Total. 


^j^^vm-. 










$1,615.72 


$1,515.72 


August 










September 




; 




367.46 
7.25 


367.46 


October 




1 




7.25 


November 




1 






December 




1 












! 








Total 








1,890.43 


1.890.43 

















Digitized byVjOOQlC 



66 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVBENOB OF CUBA. 



Exhibit 2a. — Cash receipts from July i, 1900 ^ to December SI, 1901 — Continued. 



Total un^rdlfferent 1 q,^^^^ 


Postal. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Miscella- 
neous. 


Repay- 
ments. 


TotaL 


FiJical year 1900: 

July 


9149,674.11 
4,967.64 


916,474.40 

1,557.10 

157.60 

6,809.82 


912,168.82 

1,034.16 

12.16 


922,507.84 


9642,180.68 
88,476.97 
7,968.95 
2,392.66 
115.10 
28,549.54 


9842,996.25 




41,025.87 

8,138.60 

9.871.98 

118. 15 


SeDtember 




October 


170.10 

8.06 

188.80 




November 






December 








28,738.34 












Total 


154.998.70 


24,996.32 


18,206.13 


22,507.34 


709,683.70 


925,388.19 






PIflcal year 1901: 

July 


1,093,189.54 
1,344,271.19 
1,155.283.20 
1,880,543.82 
1.358,267.87 
1,549,186.66 


21,866.43 
29,769.55 
23,926.80 
27,630.13 
28,029.22 
29,814.74 


49,967.26 
69,626.83 
45,100.66 
41,407.40 
42,320.45 
71,208.99 


10,072.48 
9,543.04 

15,546.68 
9,810.50 

10,187.88 

13,209.11 




1,174,524.70 
1,458,675.63 


August 


565.02 

1,962.06 

10, 148. 60 

5,327.18 

7,570.63 


September 


1,241,819.30 
1,469, 54a 44 


October 


November 


1,444,182.60 


December 


1,670,990.13 






Total 


7,880,692.28 


160,625.87 


319,521.48 


68,369.78 


26,573.39 


8,454,682.80 






Grand total 


8,035,686.96 


185,524.19 1 332,726.61 


90,877.12 


737,147.62 


9,381,96L42 



Exhibit 3. — Payments from July i, 1900, to December SI, 1900. 



Total by montbs. 


July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


Ffflcal year 1900: 

rhiKtom« 


9490,506.01 
71,807.00 
415,272.27 


9157,084.01 


928,148.43 




P0St€U 




Internal revenue 


61,177.42 
1,726.77 


12,350.16 




Miscellaneous 












Total 


977.587.28 


219,967.20 


40,498.59 








Fiscal year 1901: 

Customs 


666,291.61 
89,637.12 

188,093.02 
18,399.90 


699,864.21 

46,292.60 

674,169.66 

5,688.64 


948,544.02 

55,879.36 

942,734.10 

272.91 


9787.309.66 


Postal 


39,880.10 


Internal revenue 


781,773.08 


Miscellaneous.......... 


9,099.53 






Total 


897.421.56 


1,426,015.00 


1,947,430.39 


1,618,012.36 






Qrand total 


1,876,006.83 


1,645,962.20 


1,987,928.98 


1,618,012.96 






Total by months. 


November. 


December. 


Total. 


Fiscal year 1900: 

Customs 


9866.28 






9676,066.78 
71,807.00 


Postal 




Internal revenue 






488,799.86 


Miscellaneous 






1,725.77 








Total 


366.28 






1,238 888.36 








Fiscal year 1901: 

Customs ^..-,,- 


660,730.15 
89,268.99 
172,055.91 


9913,450.81 

40,140.98 

1,289,688.52 

3,960.43 




4,656,189.86 
261,049.00 


Postal 


Internal revenue 


4, 048, 514. 2S 




32,421.41 






Total 


862,065.06 


2,247,240.19 




8,998,174.54 






Grand total 


862,420.83 


2,247-240.19 


10,236,662.89 













Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OK MIUTABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



67 



Exhibit 3a. — Payments from JtUyl, 1900, to December SU 1900. 



Total under dlffezent fnnds. 


Customs. 


Postal. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Miscella- 
neous. 


Total. 


FiacaU year 1900: 

July 


$109,606.01 
167,084.01 
28,148.43 


$71,807.00 


$415,272.27 
61,177.42 
12,350.16 




$977,687.28 


AO^St ...r-T T 


$1,725.77 


219,987.20 


flimteintM^r 




40,498.59 


October 








NnvAtnlM>r 


365.28 








865.28 


Pooembf^r 






















Tolal 


676,065.73 


71,807.00 


488,799.85 


1,725.77 


1,238,888.36 






Fiscal year 1901: 

July 


656,291.61 
699.864.21 
948,544.02 
987,309.65 
650,780.15 
913,450.31 


39,637.12 
46,292.50 
55,879.36 
89,830.10 
39.268.99 
40,140.98 


188,098.02 
674,169.65 
942,734.10 
781,773.08 
172,065.91 
1,289,688.52 


13,399.90 

6,688.64 

272.91 

9,099.53 


897,421.55 


Augfust 


1,426,015.00 


September 

Ck!tober 


1,947,430.39 
1,618,012.36 


November . - . . 


862,055.05 


December 


3,960.48 


2,247,240.19 






Total 


4,666,189.85 


261,049.00 


4,048,514.28 


82,421.41 


8,998,174.54 






Omnd total 


5,382,245.58 


832,856.00 


4,587,814.18 


84,147.18 


10,286,562.89 











Exhibit 4. — Abstract of transfer warrants executed from July i, 1900 , to December SI, 1900, 



Warrant 


Dr. 


Cb. 


Mo. 


Date. 


Customs. 


Miscellane- 
ous. 


Customs. 


Miscellane- 
ous. 


1M> 


December 21 


$5.00 






$6.00 


3? 


December 21 


$68.00 


$68.00 






Total 








5.00 


68.00 


68.00 


6.00 









NoTK.— Total on debit side carried to Exhibit 1 with the - sign. 



Exhibit 5. — Funds deposUed after Jvht i, 1899y which were on account of the fiscal year 
1899 f showing what funds received the credit. 



Receipts. 


From whom received. 


Customs. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Miscellane- 


No. 


Date. 


ous. 




July 1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

11 
12 
12 
14 
15 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
18 
18 
18 
20 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 
22 


MAjF, F.T^<1 , 


$100,000.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 
100,000.00 
76,499.35 








Ido 








do 








do 








do 




.. .. 




do 








CaptW.H.Hay 






20 


Lieut. F. A. Wilcox 




$9,894.62 
119.50 


21 


Maj.S.D.Sturgis 






24 


Ricardo Martinez 




$50.00 




28 


CaptB. B.Ives 




182.38 


34 


Ricardo Martinez 




15,123.37 




89 


Maj.E.F.Ladd 


100,000.00 
4,300.14 
5,790.07 




41 


Ueut. J. W.Smith 






42 


Capt. E. A. Ellis 






45 


Walter F. Smith 




14,323.27 


47 


Maj. J. Q.Davis 






1,953.58 

9,434.85 

524.24 


48 


Lieut. P D. Lochridge 






49 


Ueut, F. A. Wilcox 






51 


CapLQ.S.Cartwrigbt 






421.64 


SS 


Capt A. Pickering 






6.33 


55 


Ricardo Martinez 




2,103.00 




57 


Ueut F. E. Bamford 




837.06 


56 


Ueut. F. E. Lacey 






17,175.76 


61 


Capt W. Y. Stamper 


167,3(M.89 
40,065.96 




64 


Capt Ellas Chandler 






66 


J. A , PedroiFft , 


2,191.04 




66 


Ueut W.E. Welsh 




1,066.92 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



68 



BBPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 



Exhibit b.— Funds deposited after July 1, 2889, vMch were on (uxouni of the fiscal year 
1899, showing whcU funds received the credit — Ck>ntiiiued. 



Receipts. 


Prom whom reoeived. 


Customs. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Misoellane- 


No. 


Date. 


ous. 


70 


July 24 
24 
24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
26 
26 
27 
28 
28 
81 
81 
81 

Aug. 2 
2 
2 
9 
11 
11 
12 
12 
18 
18 
21 
21 
22 
23 
24 
24 
28 
80 

Sept. 4 

16 
19 
19 
20 
28 
22 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
Oct. 4 

5 
13 
16 
25 
27 
27 
Nov. 3 

6 

8 
10 
16 
29 
Dec. 7 

9 
11 
11 
13 
13 
15 
18 
23 
23 
Jan. 4 

5 
10 


Capt. C. J. Sjmmonds 






$908.08 


71 


Ricardo Martines 




»,256.25 
3,845.73 




76 


Emllio Bacaidi 






79 


Lieut John Ck>nklin 


16.542.70 
2,285.78 
18,839.98 
69.839.60 




80 


Lieat. L. 8. Upton .'. 






82 


Pjipt n. A. wTlllf|in« 






83 


Lient.M.B. Stokes 






86 


MaJ. W.H.Miller 




6»116.02 


88 


Capt. F. Q. Irwin 


16,089.73 






89 


Fernando Calvo 




447.62 


92 


M.S.Tielles 




6,109.48 




94 


Col. Q.M.Randall 




145.00 


101 


Rafoel Montalvo 






1,168.80 


106 


R.M.CanaB 


22.28 






108 


Ricaido Martinec 


200.00 




109 


Lieut. F. A. Wilcox 




.20 


lU 


Maj. J. F. Stretch 






16,798.60 


112 


Capt. C. J. Stevens .'- . 






860.54 


188 


CaptW.H.Hay 


125.52 






136 


Lieut. H. W. Stamford 




8,120.^ 


188 


A. Q. Osuna 






5,047.89 


142 


Rafael Montalvo 






4.18 


148 


Capt. M.R. Peterson 






8,486.27 


168 


Capt. W. Y. Stamper 


7.00 

57,179.55 

1,699.20 

6,084.65 






173 


CaptJ.F.R.Landis 






188 


LieutJ. W.Smith 






184 


Lieut. H. C. Schumm 






192 


Lieut. F. 0. Vincent 




85.89 


193 


Capt. T.F.Davis 


5,622.58 






197 


Maj. J. L.Wilson 




74S.15 


196 


Lieut. Col. H. D. Money 






5.50 


216 


rjipt. V. J. KpniATI 






66.73 


224 


Capt. Elias Chandler 


6.27 






230 


M.M.RepiflO ] 


48.23 




235 


Capt.W.H.Chatfleld 




1.34 


241 


Lieut. L. S. Upton 


191.02 






243 


Col.E.Moale. 




8.66 


249 


MaJ. W. H. Miller 






33.24 


251 


Lieut. F. E. Bamford 






1,000.00 


254 


Capt. Samuel Reber 






1.00 


261 


Capt. J. H. Gardner 






L20 


288 


Capt. E. B. Ives 






.96 


296 


Lieut. A. Q. Paxton 






75.47 


805 


Lieut. M. B. Stokes 


18.68 






812 


Capt. A. Pickering 




.88 


320 


Maj. W.M. Black 






.84 


321 


do 






8.00 


326 


Lieut. Jas. R. Church 






17.89 


888 


Lieut F. E. Lyman 






12.50 


337 


Lieut. S. Burkhardt 






1,068.22 


344 


Ueut H. M. Powell 






820.01 


348 


FelIpeV.de Oca 






586.98 


865 


Federico Alvarez 






34.51 


370 


Jose Q. de Peralta 






667.75 


40? 


I.lPiit A,R WilUf^mR 






5,180.55 


417 


Capt C. A. Williams 


400.00 






450 


JoseCastUlo 




8.51 


455 


Thos. A. Etchanty 






12.11 


456 


Leopoldo Dulzaides 






15.00 


479 


J.A.Pedraza " 




1,285.57 


488 


RicardoPaz ' 




21380.21 


499 


A. Q. Osuna j 




.84 


528 


Lieut-Col. C. F. Humph rev ' 




20,525.80 


552 


A.Villiere :..... 1 




336.44 


604 


Maj. W.M. Black 






.06 


645 


M.S.Trelles 






828.75 


666 


Maj. J. F. Stretch 






2,081.21 
20.00 


670 


Lieut Jas. R. Church 






671 


do 






31.98 


687 


Lieut. Victor Shepherd 






5.38 


690 


Porflrio Valiente 






13.17 


704 


Ricardo Martinez 






13,279.86 
.02 


723 


CaptS. V.Ham 






756 


Ricardo Martinez 






60,826.92 


758 


-T.Bolaflcw 






31.77 


817 


Jose Castillo 






.04 


822 


Maj.N.H.Creager 






50.04 


858 


Mai.W.M.^^ 






5.00 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEENOB OF OOBA. 



69 



Exhibit 5. — ISinds deposited after July 1, 1899, which were on account of the fiscal year 
1899, snomng what funds received the credit — Continued. 



Recdpte. 


From whom received. 


Customs. 


Internal 
revenue. 


Miscellane- 


Na 


Dale. 


ous. 


Am 


Jan. 10 

22 

22 

25 

Ffeb. 6 

7 

8 

9 

9 

9 

16 

19 

21 

Mar. 17 

17 

24 

Apr. 4 

10 

11 

19 

23 

27 

7 
9 
9 
11 
17 
22 
26 
29 
29 
81 
31 


Maj.J.G.Dayls 






87,280.48 

869.00 

617.98 

10.02 

5.6e 

88.00 


«iO 


Clemente Dantin 






951 








9m 


Clemente uantin 






HM6 


Joee Silverstein 






IflM 


Pranctoco Collftdn... . ...... 






Iflfift 


Capt.C.A.William8 


fi8i.96 






1077 


Jose nominee 






54.99 


1078 


E.Quintana ! 




8.74 


1079 


Jose A. Sanches 1 




.07 


11?6 


Ricardo Martines 




9146.74 




I1M 


Miguel Llaneras 




250.25 


1170 


Ricardo Martinex 




42.24 




181? 


Briff.-Gen. A. R. Chaffee 




408.12 


181ft 


Manuel Paisat 






98.38 


1879 


Claudio Fuentes 






54.96 


14110 


R. Perez 






15.00 


1510 


Lieut. J. B. McLaughlin 






150.00 


1518 


Capt F.G.Irwin.." 


11.60 






}fm 


MaJ.E.F.Ladd 




2,246.89 
90.90 


im\ 


....Ido 






1A8? 


Lieut Wm. Mitchell 






.82 


IflW 


Brig. -Gen. Leonard Wood 






1.64 


17nR 


Bf aj. E. F. Ladd 




99.88 


1777 


Amador de Rojas.. rr, 






192.06 


1746 


B[aj.E.F.Ladd 






848.58 


1747 


liOODoldo Ramos 






1,428.09 


17(» 


R. Torriente 






24.25 


1817 


Ueut. P. D. Lochridge 




40.84 


187? 


Capt. H. S. Slocum 




1,072.81 


18W 


ICaj. E. F. Ladd 


::::::::::::::i::;:::::::;: 


150.00 


1«3!5 


Brig. -Gen. Leonaid Wood 




195.00 


1976 


. ...Tdo 


1 


1,311.78 


1985 


do 


1 


1.12 


19f^ 


Cant. KB. Ives 




2,668.15 




Total 








1,167,867.69 ' 39.118.08 


223, 606. 10 













Exhibit 6. — Repayments for the fiscal year 1900, received during the fiscal year 1900, 



State and Boverment: 

Central office 899,009.12 

Hospitals and charities 22,564.72 

Jaite 42,849.88 

Public buildings 2,680.24 

Total 166,663.41 

Finance: 

PosUlservice 48,670.63 

Customs service expense 20,472.17 

Public works 4,000.00 

Total 78,142.80 

Public works: 

Provinces 66,819.51 

Public works 60,931.56 

Total 127,751.07 



Justice: 

Courts of provinces 422.66 

Agriculture, commerce, and industries: • 

Provinces 758. 15 

Municipalities: 

Police 612.69 

Instruction 26,951.72 

Sanitation 43,891.67 

Hospitalsand charities 60,909.44 

Miscellaneous 68, 219. 99 

Total 190,585.61 

Military department: 

Barracks and quarters 24,065.92 

Administration and rural guard . . 22, 819. 19 

Miscellaneous 31.62 

Total 46.916.73 

Grand total 606,140.33 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 6a. — Repayments for ihefisccd year 1900 y received during the fiscal year 1901. 



Fiscal year 1900. 


July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


State and «)vernment: 

Central o(B<% 


17,269.09 
18,817.20 
6,275.40 
15,866.01 
40,354.57 








Provinces 


$5,360.96 
6.49 






Hospitals and charities 


$28.00 
184.64 


$0.68 


Jails 


.18 


Public buildings 














Total 


87,682.27 


6.367.46 


167.64 


.86 






Justice: 

Central office 


4,792,10 

.77 

10,425.37 








SuDreme court 








Courts of provinces 


129.42 








1 


Total 


15,218.24 


129.42 


1 






Public instruction: 

Central office . 


6,178.65 

11,446.66 

74.47 




1 


Univenrity and State schools - , r . , - - - 


1.143.20 




634.40 


Public buildlnirs 














Total . i 


16,694.78 


1,143.20 




634.40 








Finance: 

Central office ..••. 


62,334.45 

7,882.21 

10,735.18 

29,979.88 

18,809.56 

113.92 

611.52 

9,118.94 








Provinces . .. ................... 


2,182.37 






Postal service 


21.04 


66S.14 


Customs-service exnense 






Refundments 








Money orders and registered mail 

Quarantine 












88.45 


Public buildings 
















Total 


129^685.66 


2,182.37 


21.04 


751.59 






Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 
Central officio 


1,752.65 
811.50 








Provinces ... .. ... .......... ... 


2,578.68 












Total 


2,664.06 


2,578.68 












Public works: 

Central office 


15.800.26 
19,476.42 
46,317.64 








Provinces 


2,017.17 
16.64 


1 


Public works 


846.60 


64.00 






Total 


80,893.21 


2,032.81 


846.60 


64.00 






Municipalities: 

Police 


15.833.91 
106.109.50 
28,280.85 
46,550.73 
29,887.80 


145.53 
4,937.45 
1,286.37 

480.88 
12,677.66 


119.33 

746.57 

2,907.07 

1,770.71 

22.88 


2.01 


Instruction 


788.34 


Sanitation 


62.45 


Hospitals and charities 


160.91 


Miscellaneous 








Total 


226,162.29 


19,527.84 


5,566.56 


948.71 






Military department: 

Barracks and quarters 


88,174.14 
43,559.66 
2.086.39 


87.97 
873.20 
64.63 


474.11 
903.00 


8.00 


Administration and rural guard 




Miscellaneous 










Total 


88.780.06 


616.70 


1,877.11 


3.00 






Grand total • 


642.180.68 


83.476.97 


7,968.96 


2,392.56 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEFOBT OF XILITABT OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



71 



Exhibit 6a. — Repayments for the fiscal year 1900, received during the fiscal year 1901 — 

Ck>ntmued. 



FiRcal year 1900. 


November. 


December. 


Total. 


8tate and sovemment: 

Central office 


10.92 




97,270.01 
24,178.16 
20,746.34 
16,000.88 
40,354.57 


Provincee 




Hmpft^lii Mid charitlPR 




915,489.77 


Juiifi., 




PablicboUdings 












Total 


0.92 


15,439.77 


108,548.91 




Justice: 

Central office 






4,792.10 

77 


ftaprenie court 






Courts of provlncefl 






10,554.79 








Total 






15,347.66 








PDblic instraction: 

Central office 






6,178.65 

13,224.26 

74.47 


University and State schools 






Public bulldlngB.... 














Total 






18,472.38 










Finance: 

Central office 






62,844.45 
10,064.58 


PiOTlnces 7. 






Postal service 






11,419.36 








29,979.88 


Refnndments '. 






18,809.56 


Money orders and res^Istered mail 






113.92 


Quarantine 




12.79 


712.76 


PnhHc bnildingST r . . r 




9, 118. 94 










Total 




12.79 


132,558.45 








Agricolture, commerce, and indostries: 
Central office 






1,762.66 
8,890.18 


Provinces 














Total 


i 


5,142.73 








Pablic works: 

Central office 






15.800 25 


Provlncefl 






21,492.59 


Pnblic works 


.64 


1.10 


46, 236. 52 






Total 


.64 


1.10 


83,528.36 




Municipalities: 

Police 




27.69 


15, 628. 47 


Instmctiira 


10.40 

1.50 

100.70 


112,637.26 


Sanitation 


2.00 
8,033.24 


82,680.24 


HosDitals and charities 


67,096.62 


Miscellaneous 


42.687.84 










Totol 


112.60 


8,062.93 


260,880.48 






Military department: 

Rii.rTiu*ks and qnartera 




32.95 


38, 772. 17 


Administration and rural jniard 


.94 


44,846.69 


Miscellaneous 




2,090.92 










ly^tal 


.94 


32.95 


85, 709. 78 






Grand total 


115. 10 


23,649.54 


709,683.70 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



Exhibit 7. — IbUU repayments for the fiscal year 1900. 





Deposited during— 






Fiscal year 
1900. 

199,069.12 


Fiscal year 
1901. 


Total. 


State and government: 

Centnu office 


f7.270.01 
24.178.16 
20.745.84 
16.000.88 
40,854.67 


$106,339.18 


Provinces 


24, 178. 16 


Hom>itaUi and charities 


22,564.72 
42,349.38 
2,580.24 


48,310.06 


Jails 


66,850.16 


Public buildinn 


42,994.81 






Total 


166,563.41 


108,548.91 


275. 112. S2 






Justice: , _ 

Central omce 




4,792.10 

.77 

10,554.79 


4,792.10 
.77 


Supreme court 




Ck>urtB of provinces 


422.66 


10,977.45 


Public buUdings 










Total 


422.66 


15,347.66 


15,770.32 






Public instruction: 

Central office 




5,178.65 

13,224.26 

74.47 


5,173.65 


University and State schools 




13,224.26 


Public buildings 




74.47 








Total 




18,472.38 


18,472.88 








Finance: 

Central office . 




62,88145 
10,064.66 
11,419.96 
29,979.88 
18,809.56 
118.92 
712,76 
9,118.94 


52,834.45 


Provinces 




10,061.58 


Postal service 


4M.670.68 
20,472.17 


60 069 99 


Customs-service expense 


50,452.05 


Refundments 


18,809.56 


Money orders and registered mail ' 


113.92 


Onarantine '-- -- 


712.76 


Public buildings 


4,000.00 


13,118.94 






Total 


78,142.80 


182,658.46 


205,696.25 


Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 

Central office 




1,762.55 
8,890.18 


1,782.55 
4,148.33 


Province 


758.16 






Total 


758.16 


5,142.73 


5,900.8» 






Public works: 

Cen tral office 




15,800.25 
21,492.69 
46,286.52 


15,800.25 


Provinces 


66,819.51 
60,981.56 


88,312.10 


Public workfl 


107,167.08 






Total 


127,761.07 


88, 628. 86 


211,279.43 






Municipalities: 


612.69 
26,951.72 
48,891.67 
50,909.44 
68,219.99 


16,628.47 
112,537.26 
32,630.24 
57.096.62 
42,587.84 


16,24L16 


Instructions 


189.488.98 


Sanitation 


76,421 91 


Hospitals and charities 


108,006.06 


Miscellaneous 


110.807.83 






Total 


190,585.51 


260,880.48 


460,965.94 






Military department: 

BarracKs and ouarters 


24,065.92 

22,819.19 

81.62 


88,771.17 
44,846.69 
2,090.92 


62,838.09 
67,665.88 


Administration and rural guard 


Miscel laneous 7. 


2,122.54 






Total 


46,916.78 


as, 709. 78 


182,626.51 




Grand total 


606,140.88 


709,683.70 


1,815,834.06 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 8. — IbtcU allotments irrespective of fiscal years. 



73 





July. 


August 


September. 


State ftnd ffOTenunent: 

Centnu of&oe. 


98,869.88 
9,085.78 
62,189.88 
25,949.11 
88,684.89 


$16,896.83 
28,060.66 
64,668.04 
41,460.66 
5,078.45 


$44,202.11 


ProTinoes 


21,817.79 
60,866.48 


ITnmitii.1fi itnA charltlfW ... 


juiS 


54,021.46 


Pablic buildings 


41,877.34 






Total 


189,228.94 


156,151.64 


211,285.18 




jQsUce: 

Central office 


8,839.99 

6,961.78 

29,582.99 

11,217.47 


6,766.56 

18,436.24 

46,724.42 

62.60 


4,116.82 




6,874.90 


OooitB of provinces 


71,106.82 
887.50 


Pnhllc hnlldf ngii , . , , 






Total 


51,072.28 


66,969.82 


82,965.54 






Public instraction: 

Central office 


2,206.68 
84,918.22 


4,296.82 
73,685.69 


2,680.66 


UniTenity and State schools 


54,807.17 


Public boildingB 












Total 


87,119.85 


77,982.01 


66,967.83 






Finance: 

Central office. 


48,981.06 
12,818.79 
111,444.12 
91,771.01 
15,060.00 

366.97 
10,000.00 

988.86 


70,248.69 
18,616.10 
46,292.50 
29,861.52 

7,823.90 

48.00 

85,060.49 

6,714.12 


58,467.27 
20, 180. bO 


Provincea 


Postal-fiervice expense 


55,879.86 

150,818.96 

4,859.96 

81.16 

42,965.89 


Co^toms-sMTrfce exDcniw ...,r^^.r-.r^x--.r 


Refundments. ....... ....... ^^TT^rrxr^-rr-- 


Money orders and registered mails 

Qnaiantine 


Public bandings 


1,843.00 






Total 


291,895.28 


206,650.82 


335,116.20 






Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 

Central office. -. 


4,171.65 
4,786.16 


9,711.47 
2,851.02 


4,664.68 
5,055.06 








Total . ...4 


8,957.80 


12.562.49 


9,719.64 




Public works: 

Central office 


12,258.82 
90,461.28 
90,819.51 


15.588.56 

8,715.88 

189,486.61 


8,974.90 


PiOTinces 


8,428.80 


Public works 


174,152.70 






Total 


193,584.06 


208,686.49 


186,546.40 






"Tr;!-: 


68,800.82 
407,428.50 
845,966.44 
100,892.20 

89,520.79 


81,660.51 
221,859.82 
270,887.42 
122,003.69 

15,611.19 


115,626.85 


Instruction 


471, 164. 96 


Annitatfon . 


241,579.67 


Hmmftikiii And charities. ...... r r , 


129,011.17 




9,076.02 






Total 


961,608.75 


7U,022.18 


966,478.67 






Military department: 

Ba^M^ks and quarte"! r , . , . . , r . . . . r . r . . . . . 


49,811.94 

188,887.28 

8.447.75 


59,576.06 

148,062.92 

1,289.82 


28,239.13 


Administratton and rural guard 


110,005.81 


Miscellaneous 


554.58 






Total 


192,096.92 


208,928.80 


188,799.52 






Offmd total 


1,875,008.88 


1,645,962.20 


1,987,928.96 





CUBA 1900— VOL I, PT 3 6 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



74 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 8. — Toted aUotmenUt irrespective of fiscal years — Continued. 





October. 


November. 


December. 


Total, 


State and Koverament: 

Central office 


$21,175.88 
46,458.06 
58,703.85 
36,948.23 
18,108.00 


«8,963.41 
918.23 

26,372.72 
8,296.31 
9,434.00 


$50,022.38 
24,680.67 
93,413.06 
63,240.98 
20,957.70 


$149,636.94 


Provinces 


130,461.14 


Hospitals and charities 


365,663.53 


Jkiis 


224.912.76 


Public buildings 


128,640..% 






Total 1 


181,389.52 


48,984.67 


252,264.79 


989,904.74 






Justice: 

Central office 


6,856.60 

9,219.40 

68,390.30 

1,202.00 


183.83 


8,833.18 
14,688.25 
73,745.81 

3,000.00 


29,58S.9S 


Supreme court 


51,145.57 


Courts of provinces 


13,511.82 


298,012.16 


Public buildings 


16,3&9.b7 








Total 


80,168.30 


18,695.15 


100,212.24 


395,103.28 






Public instraction: 

Central office 


1,966.66 
39,004.07 




6,006.87 
77,323.82 
11,422.25 


17,15^64 


University and State schools 


11,909.52 
6,300.00 


291, 143. 49 


Public buildings 


T7,7?? ?5 








Total 


40,970.78 


18,209.52 


94,751.44 


326,021.38 






Finance: 

Central office 


36,902.94 
15,321.43 
39,830.10 
80.288.22 
3,322.50 

154.63 
17,593.87 

625.00 


11,841.52 
995.00 
80,268.99 
72,416.79 
8,776.95 


104,477.32 
18,270.07 
40,140.93 
73,316.71 
9,179.51 
52.81 
64,561.81 
826.44 


380,918,77 


Provinces 


81,201.99 
382,856.00 
498,473.21 


Postal-service ex|)ense 


Customfrservice expense 


Refundments T '. 


44,042.82 


Money orders and registered mail 


698.57 


Quarantine 




170,191.56 


Public buildings 


892.50 


10,833.42 






Total 


194,039.69 


129,190.75 


810,824.10 


1,469,216.34 






Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 

Central offices 


9,174.99 
4,364.95 


1,249.23 


8,449.34 
115,523.17 


37,421.26 


Provinces 


132, 58a 85 






Total 


13,589.94 


1,249.28 


123,972.51 


170,001.61 






Public works: 

Central office 


9,268.00 

8,067.73 

118,958.21 


3,443.32 

8,063.98 

164,959.94 


20,826.29 

8,088.98 

147,818.13 


69,799.38 


Provinces 


106,826.05 
885,645.10 


Public works 






Total 


181,293.94 


171,467.24 


170,738.40 


1,062,270.68 






MunicipaUties: 

Police 


107,458.00 
321,422.80 
253,399.94 
92,262.40 
13,810.24 


7,185.00 

66,294.40 

221,W8.25 

34,220.77 

11,383.52 


115,789.00 
491,071.73 
256,072.17 
127,864.83 
9, 722.00 


496,020.18 


instruction 


1,978,726.71 


Sanitation 


1,589,353.89 


Hospitals and charities 


605,785.06 


Miscellaneous 


99, 128. 76 






Total 


788,353.38 


»U,031.94 


1,000,519.73 


4,769,009.60 






Military department: 

Barracks and quarters 


62,394.67 

124,642.19 

1,220.00 


41,375.16 

95,472.60 

1,744.07 


51,882.49 

139,987.47 

2,142.02 


293,279.45 


Administration and rural guard 


751,958.22 


Miscellaneous 


10,397.74 






Total 


188,256.86 


138.591.83 


193,961.98 


1,065,635.41 




Grand total 


1,618,012.86 


862,420.38 


2,247,240.19 


10,236,562.89 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY QOVEBNOB OP CUBA. 



75 



Exhibit 9. — Revenuafor the calendar year 1900, as reported by collectors. 



January to 
June. 



July to De- 
cember. 



Total. 



Customs receipts: 

Baracoa 

Batab&no 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 

Cienluegos 

Gibara 

Gnantanamo 

Habana 

Manzanillo 

Matansas 

Nueyitas 

Sagua la Grande ... 
Santa Cruz del 8ur . 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Tanas deZaza 



118,028.87 

2,064.85 

»7,646.69 

159,894.96 

558,682.82 

84,177.16 

57,248.80 

), 145, 222. 11 

76,890.07 

241,027.85 

85,028.81 

109,139.27 

2,646.25 

468,102.00 

15,016.85 

697.10 



10 
14 
60 
15 

7 
5,92 

9 
21 

9 

9 

48 



•27, 

3, 

201, 

901, 

1,168, 

237, 

127, 

12,068, 

175, 

456, 

180, 

204, 

4, 

951 

22, 

4, 



707.81 
139.92 
596.58 
463.73 
473.54 
716.81 
543.87 
399.05 
741.05 
928.30 
363.69 
617.53 
547.38 
914.82 
128.00 
244.25 



Total. 



8,121,412.48 



8,015,110.80 



16,136,523.28 



Postal receipts from all sources . 

Internal-revenue receipts: 

Cardenas... V 

Cienfnegos 

Goanajay 

Habana 

Holquin 

Mansanillo 

Matanras 

Pinar del Rio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santia^ 



136,015.43 



185,524.19 



321.539.62 



279,899.86 



79,727.87 
15,133.22 
16,588.90 
48,469.84 
33,767.14 



17,937.96 
11,934.28 
5,061.57 
218,876.75 
5,399.43 
3,651.20 
11,836.98 
7,189.55 
9,334.35 
11,348.18 
22,481.31 



17,937.96 

11.934.28 

5,061.57 

498,776.61 

5,399.43 

3,651.20 

91,564.85 

22,322.87 

25,923.25 

69,817.97 

56.248.45 



Total. 



473,586.83 



325,051.51 



798,688.34 



Miscellaneous receipts: 

Siirnal Corps 

Captains oi the port — 
Not othervrise reported . 



32,115.79 
'48,'266."36" 



34,718.40 

183.62 

33,467.76 



66,884.19 

183.62 

81,674.06 



Total 

Grand total. 



80,822.09 



68,369.78 



148,691.87 



8,811,386.83 



8,594,066.28 



17,405,396.11 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



Exhibit 10. — Allotments for the calendar year 1900, 





Allotments. 




January to 
June. 


July to 
December. 


Total. 


State and flrovernment: 

Central office 


$185,468.16 

104,264.66 

819,744.28 

179, 77a 08 

86,660.60 


$146,969.10 
112,964.69 
885,606.27 
200,281.81 
125,662.98 


$282,457.26 


Provinces 


217,229.25 


HosDitala and charitiefl 


666,290.56 


Jails 


380,009.89 


Public buildinn 


162,413.68 






Total 


776,106.68 


921,264.85 


1,697,869.68 






Justice: 

Central office .............................. 


17,426.46 

84.255.02 

262,741.12 

16,200.00 


26,492.89 

45,392.18 

282.829.40 

16,859.67 


43,918.85 


flunreme courtJ^r ^.^^t^t 


79,647.20 


Courts of nrovlnces 


545,070.62 


Public buudines 


31,669.67 






Total 


829,621.60 


870,674.04 


700,196.64 






Public instruction: 

Central office 


18,808.21 
319,518.15 


15,244.01 

264,074.29 

17,722.25 


28,547.22 


University and State schools 


583,587.44 


Public buildinffB 


2,824.12 


20,646.37 








Total 


835,640.48 


297,040.56 


632,681.08 






Finance: 

Central office 


218,416.24 
80,417.96 

810,043.88 

428,997.70 
40,088.85 
61,669.82 

105,037.00 
82,931.56 


272,857.72 
71,996.84 

261,049.00 

497,866,87 

44,137.06 

527.44 

170,191.66 
10,234.42 


486,273.06 


Provinces 


152,414.79 


Postal service 


571,092.88 


Customs-service expense 


926,963.57 


Refundments 


84,226.91 


Monev orders and reiristered mail 


62, 196. 76 


Quarantine 


276,228.56 


Public buildimra 


43,166.96 






Total 


1,272,602.60 


1,328,969.91 


601,562.41 






A^culture, commerce, and industries: 

Central office 


27,179.97 


36,762.21 
130,204.83 


63,942.18 


Provinces 


17,258.83 


147,463.66 






Total 


44,488.80 


166,967.04 


211,405.84 






Public works: 

Central office 


65,804.82 
154,591.85 

772,830.08 


66,477.68 
106,209.92 

888,806.88 


182,282.40 


Provinces 


260,891.27 


Public works, including construction and 
renairs lifirhthouses 


1,610,636.*91 






Total 


992,726.25 


1,010,994.83 


2,008,720.58 






Municipalities: 

Police 


459,602.83 

1,466,220.91 

1,652,118.62 

583,029.69 

329,279.27 


455,113.95 
1,746,422.88 
1,428,729.51 

685,849.52 
76,112.85 


914,616.78 


Instruction 


3,201,643.29 


Sanitation 


8,080,843.13 


Hospitals and chairitles 


1,068,879.21 


Miscellaneous 


406.302.12 






Total 


4,429,151.32 


4.241,728.21 


8,670,879.58 






Military department: 

Barrackif <»-nd quiirter*- r-T-rr-r-,.,,^-,.^-- 


208,488.89 

855,258.68 
110,804.68 


252,550.11 
671,900.75 
10,109.90 


966,088.60 
1,527,189.48 


Adminlstration and rural guard 


Miscellaneous 


120,014.48 






Total 


1,669,651.60 


934,660.76 


2,604,112.86 






Grand total 


9,849,838.23 


9,272,079.69 

J 


19,121,917.92 





Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF iraJTABY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 
Exhibit 10. — AUotmentifor the calendar year 1900 — Oontinaed. 



77 





Repayments. 


Net allot- 
ments. 




January to 
June. 


July to 
December. 


Total. 


Total. 


SUte and Kovemment: 

Central office 


1106,339.10 
24,178.16 
48,310.06 
95,633.43 
42,984.81 


10.08 


1106,389.18 
24,178.16 
48,310.06 
97,624.80 
42,934.81 


$176,118.06 


Provinces 


193,061.09 


HoifpitAifi and nNirlti*^ 




611,040.49 


Jfdls 


1,990.87 


282,386.69 




119, 478. 77 








Total 


812,395.56 


1,990.96 


314,386.61 


1,382,974.02 




Justice: 


4,792.10 

.77 

10,t77.45 




4,792.10 

.77 

11,112.71 


89,126.25 






79,646.48 


Oourts of provinces 


135.26 


538.957.81 


Pnhli^ h^fldlnpi 


81,660.67 












Total 


15,770.32 


135.26 


16,906.68 


684,290.06 






Public instraction: 

Central office 


5,178.65 

13,224.26 

74.47 




6.178.66 

16,492.70 

74.47 


28,878.67 
567,094.74 


University and State schoola 


3,268.44 


Vnhllf^ hnlldinga 


20,471.90 






Total 


18.472.88 


8,268.44 


21,740.82 


610,940.21 






Finance: 

Central office 


52,334.45 
10,064.58 
60,060.99 
48,812.96 
18,809.66 
118.92 
712.76 
18,118.94 




62,344.45 
10,065.14 
60,117.54 
48,312.98 
18,809.56 
113.92 
712.76 
13,118.94 


433,939.51 


Provinces 


.56 
27.55 


142, 349. 65 


Postal service 


610,975.34 




878,650.59 


Refundment* , . r ^ * r . , 




65,416.35 


Honey orders and roistered mail 




62,082.84 


Quarantine ........ .7. 




274,515.80 


^^hltO hliildinga 




30,047.04 








Total 


208,567.18 


28.11 


203,585.29 


2,397,977.12 




Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 
Central office 


1,762.56 
4,148.33 




1,762.65 
4,148.34 


62,189.63 


Ppovlnc€>* .... . . - T , ^ ^ 


.01 


143, 315. 32 






Total 


6,900.88 


.01 


6,900.89 


206,604.96 






Public works: 

Central office 


15,800.26 
88,312.10 

107,167.02 




16,800.26 
88,312.10 

112,908.24 


116,482.16 
172,489.17 

1,497,788.67 


Provlnoee '. 




Public works, including construction and 
repairs lighthnnses 


5,736.22 






Total 


211,279.87 


5,736.22 


217,015.69 


1,786,704.99 






MunicipaUtles: 

Police 


16,289.19 
189,488.98 

48,607.80 
108,006.06 
110,714.46 


19.00 
1,254.32 
7,764.64 
3,864.98 


16,258.19 
140,743.30 

61,372.84 
111,871.04 
110,714.46 


898,358.69 
8,060,899.99 


Instruction 


Sanitation . ... 


3,029,476.79 


Hospitals and charities 


956,506.17 


Mis^ilaneous 


294,677.67 








Total 


418,066.48 


12,902.84 


430,969.82 


8,239,920.21 






Military department: 

Barracki« and quarters 


44,283.09 
66,908.87 
2,122.64 


1,054.56 
457.00 


45,337.65 
67,360.87 
2,122.54 


910, 700. 85 


Adn\<nifftration and rural guard 


1,459,798.66 


Miflcellaneous 


118,791.89 








Total 


113,309.60 


1,511.66 


114,821.06 


2.489,291.80 




Orand total 


1,298,741.67 


25,673.89 


1,824,815.06 


17, 797, 602. 86 







Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



78 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 11. — Revenues as reported by collectors, fiscal year 1901. 





July. 


August 


September. 




12,108.63 

116.89 

12,284.39 

26,566.66 

89,158.39 

19,118.90 

13,973.53 

909,769.96 

12,162.74 

49,990.17 

19,860.13 

21,363.94 

1.94 

78,977.99 

676.90 

81. 18 


91,446.61 
239.46 
21,387.98 
28,832.10 
97,970.91 
20,663.17 

9,164.38 
991,926.06 
17,443.20 
40,280.09 
10,768.99 
17,022.94 

1,610.66 
84,078.92 

1,740.06 
143.70 


91,414.U 
14L75 






11,675.28 
11,088.74 






90,846.36 




26,178.77 




9,674.51 
868,179.99 






18,284.12 




23,626.79 

7,590.45 

14,509.91 

102.44 






iir 




76,968.23 
68.80 






25.71 








1,250,201.24 


1,344,708.63 


1,145,016.46 




all sources 


37,829.83 


31,326.66 


24,084.80 




selpta: 


4,771.83 
2,611.78 

188.77 
40,787.61 

873.17 

666.43 
3,896.04 

907.08 
2,612.68 
1,715.34 
9.636.76 


6,638.49 
2,277.21 

496.34 
39,689.41 
1,724.66 

476.78 
2,346.13 
1,102.66 
2,274.07 

931.79 
1,676.78 


1,005.46 




1,994.20 
1.405.48 






81,014.38 
662.79 






1,898.49 




1,863.57 




809.79 




S63.Q2 




967.60 




1,176.65 






Total 


68,367.44 


69,432.16 


42,160.42 




Miscellanevus receipts: 

Signal corps 


6,206.00 

67.60 

3,798.98 


4,946.23 

14.46 

4,582.36 


5. 977. 74 


" ' * 01 the port 


2.50 


rwlse reported 


9,566.44 








10,072.48 


9, 613. 04 


16,546.68 






total 


1,366,460.99 


1,445,010.48 


1,226,806.86 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 79 

Exhibit 11. — Bevenues as reported by collectors, fiscal year 1901 — CJontinaed. 



October. 


November. 


December. 


Total. 


$1,583.11 


91,563.59 


SI, 622. 89 


$9,678.94 


108.99 


99.05 


368.93 


1,075.07 


20,628.68 


22,271.69 


15,904.82 


101,062.84 


19,390.39 


25,916.70 


80,874.26 


141,668.75 


91,665.44 


110,800.40 


129,849.22 


609,790.72 


27,720.97 


28,712.28 


81,150.56 


163,639.66 


8,354.84 


17.533.06 


11,594.75 


70,295.07 


1,075,242.99 


978,762.16 


1,114,295.78 


5,932,176.94 


16,606.77 


15,099.91 


19,254.24 


98,850.98 


35,707.79 


81,309.84 


34,881.27 


215,896.96 


14,182.80 


15,637.78 


27,304.73 


95,334.88 


18,217.69 


9,021.88 


15,281.90 


96,478.26 


93.92 


58.72 


57.05 


1.901.18 


69,382.44 


75,719.82 


108,735.42 


483,812.82 


3,238.79 


1,322.77 


80.88 


7,111.66 


70.55 


8,015.45 


210.56 


8,547.15 


1,401,896.16 


1,836,822.10 


1,586,467.21 


8,015,110.80 


34.439.45, 


28,029.22 


29,814.74 


185,624.19 


1,688.77 


8,148.42 


785.00 


17,937.96 


1,341.94 


1,818.85 


1,990.80 


11,984.27 


1,321.30 


1,054.99 


595.69 


6,061.57 


26,259.57 


26,454.96 


64,770.82 


218,876.75 


494.64 


785.08 


910.24 


5,399.43 


822.13 


656.16 


241.21 


8,651.20 


1,983.45 


1,609.08 


788.71 


11,836.98 


1,790.16 


1,864.40 


1,215.62 


7,189.65 


2,004.88 


1,128.49 


961.21 


9,834.35 


4,662,11 


1,689.77 


1,381.52 


11,348.13 


1,845.36 


2,366.59 


5,871.22 


22,481.31 


48,663.31 


41,986.74 


69,601.44 


325,051.51 


6, 679. 31 


6,593.10 


6,816.02 


34,718.40 


20.00 


27.50 


51.66 


173.62 


4,111.28 


4,567.28 


6,841.48 


33,467.76 


9,810.59 


10,187.88 


13,209.11 


68,369.78 


1,489,809.51 


1,416,975.94 


1,648,992.60 


8,694,056.28 



Costoms receipts: 

Baracoa 

Batabano 

Caibarlen 

Cardenaa 

Cienfaegoa 

Gibafa 

Giiantaiuuxio. . 



anillo 

Ttff^fMTt^ft 

Nneyitaa 

Sagna la Grande . . . 
Santa Cruz del Sur. 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Tnnaa de Za^a 



Total. 



Foetal receipts from all sources. 

Internal-revenue receipts: 

Cardenas 

Cienfuegos 

Guanajay 

Habana 

Holguin 

Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Plnar del Rio 

Puerto Principe 

Santa Clara 

Santiago 



Total. 



Miscellaneous receipts: 

Signal corps 

Captains of the port 

Not otherwise reported . 



TWal 

Grand total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 12.— AUotmenis for the fiscal year 1900 made during fiscal year 1901, 





July. 


August. 


September. 


November. 


Total. 


State and eovemment: 

Central ofDce 


18,292,83 

9.065.78 

15,4U.54 

24,582.11 

2,902.40 


»164.50 

13,693.38 

4,072.07 

7,342.48 

175.00 






9S,4Sfi.8S 
24,589.61 
20.157.26 


Provinces 


91,810.65 

673.65 

3,609.00 




Hospitals and charities 




Jails 




85,633.69 


Public buildings 




8,077.40 








Total 


60,274.11 


25,447.88 


6,093.20 




91,814.6» 








Justice: 

€!entral ofDce 


3,339.99 

5,820.78 

29,682.99 


38.25 

1.25 

2,911.22 






3,378.24 
5,822.08 


Supreme court 






CJourts of provinces 


223.16 




32,G67.a6 


Public buUdinira 
















Total 


38,693.76 


2,960.72 


228.16 




41,867.63 








Public instruction: 

€!entral office 


2,206.63 
34,913.22 








2,206.68 
37,41S.27 


University and State schools 


2,500.06 






Public buildingH 














' 




Total 


87,119.85 


2,500.05 






39,619.90 










Finance: 

Central office 


8,575.89 
12,818.79 
71,807.00 


29,485.66 
1,028.07 


20,000.00 
201.90 




58,061.06 


Provinces 




14,04&76 


Postal service 




71,807.00 
607. S4 


CuRtoniiM*ervice expense 


562.53 


44.81 




Refundments 


80.00 
201.97 




30.00 


Money orders and registered mail . . . 
Quaran tine 




11.16 




2U.1S 








Public buildings 






1,000.00 




1,000.00 












Total 


98,433.15 


31,076.26 


21,257.87 




146, 767. 28 








Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 
Central office 


4,171.65 
2,786.15 








4,171.65 
3,287.64 


Provinces 


281.49 


170.00 










Total 


6,957.80 


281.49 


170.00 




7, 409). 29 








Public works: 

Central office 


2,550.00 


713.05 

666.13 

48,777.65 


68.76 




8,821.80 


Provinces . 




666.18 


Public works 


17,628.76 






61,40L41 










Total 


20,178.76 


45,156.83 


58.75 




65,889.S4 








Municipalities: 

Police. 


68,300.82 
346,798.50 
142,207.17 
69,896.22 
17,831.28 


6,819.51 

9,424.53 

14,918.88 

29,417.29 

5,179.63 


730.00 
4,862.00 
5,102.49 
1,287.00 




75,860.88 


Instruction 




86ii085.08 


Sanitation 




162,228.54 


Hospitals and charities 


881.18 


100,681.64 


Miscellaneous 


28,Qia91 










l\)tal 


645,038.99 


65,759.84 


11,981.49 


81.18 


722.856.45 






Military department: 

Barracks and quarters 


9,580.66 

66,293.95 

26.25 


80,796.86 

16,788.31 

182.46 


144.80 
669. 8d 


205.02 


40,729.84 


Administration and rural guard 

Miscellaneous 


82,646.59 


79.18 


287.84 








Total 


75,900.86 


46,764.68 


714.18 


284.15 


123,663.77 






Grand total 


977,587.28 


219,987.20 


40,498.69 


365.28 


1,288,888.35 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 
Exhibit 12a. — Allotments for the fiscal year 1901. 



81 





July. 


August 


September. 


State and soveniment: 

Ccntnu offioo 


177.50 


116,729.88 
14,357.33 
60,695.97 
34,118.18 
4,903.45 


142,202.11 
19,507.24 
49,692.83 
50,412.46 
41,377.34 


Provinces 


HoapitalB and charities 


46,727.84 

1,867.00 

30,782.49 


JailB 


Public buildings 




Total 


78,954.83 


130,704.26 


206,191.96 






Justice: 

Central office 




6,718.81 

13,434.99 

43,813.20 

52.60 


4,116.32 

6,874.90 

70,883.67 

887 60 


Supreme coort 


1.161.00 


Court of proYinces 


Poblicb^dings 


11,217.47 






Total 


12,878.47 


64,019.10 


82,762.39 




Public instrnctlon: 

Central office 




4,296.32 
71,185.64 


2,680.66 
64,307.17 


UniTendty and State schools 




Public buildings 












Total . r . 




75,481.96 


56,987.83 








Finance: 

Central office 


40,405.64 


40,768.03 
12,588.03 
46,292.50 
29,298.99 

7,823.90 

43.00 

35,060.49 

6,714.12 


38,467.27 
19,978.70 
56,879.36 
150,774.16 


Provinces 


Postal service 


89,637.12 
91,711.01 
15,050.00 

165.00 
10,000.00 

938.36 


Cnfftoip*-penr1<^ e^fpen^e -r...-r-. 


Refundmei^t* . ". , t , 


4,869.96 


Money orders and registered mail 

Quarantine r 


70.00 
42,986.89 


Public buildings 


834.00 






Total 


197,962.18 


177,574.06 


813.868.38 






A^culture, commerce, and industries: 

Central office 




9,711.47 
2,569.53 


4,664.58 


Provinces 


2,000.00 


4,885.06 






Total 


2,000.00 


12,281.00 


9,649.64 






Public works: 

Central office 


9,708.32 
90,461.23 
78,191.75 


14,820.60 

8,019.20 

146,658.96 


8,916.15 


Provinces 


3, 428. 80 


Public works 


174, 152. 70 






Total 


178,360.30 


168,528.66 


186,497.65 






Municipalities: 

Poli^ 




74,841.00 

211,984.79 

255,468.54 

92,586.40 

10,381.66 


114,896.85 


Instruction 


60,625.00 

208,769.27 

30,496.98 

21,689.51 


466,292.96 


Sanitation ...*...........,-, 


236,477.18 


Hospitals and charities 


127,754.17 


Miscellaneous 


9,076.02 






iy>Cal 


316,569.76 


645,262.29 


954,497.18 






Military department: 

Barrac^ks and quarters 


40,231.28 
72,543.28 
8,421.50 


28,777.20 

127,279.61 

1,106.86 


28,094.88 


AffminiatTAtinn nnd mral guard 


109,436.48 


Miffc^llanf^ons .7. 


554.68 






Total 


116,196.06 


167,163.67 


188,085.89 






Grand total 


897.421.55 


1,426,015.00 


1,947,480.89 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Exhibit 12a. — AUotmenUfor the fiscal year 1901 — Contiiiaed. 





October. 


November. 


December. 


Total. 


State and government: 

Central office 


$21,175.38 
46,458.06 
58,703.85 
39,944.23 
18,108.00 


$8,963.41 
918.28 

26,872.72 
8,296.31 
9,434.00 


$60,022.88 
24,630.67 
98.418.06 
68,240.98 
20,957.70 


$141,180.11 


Provinces 


106,871,58 


Hospitals and charities 


836,506.27 


Jails 


189,379.16 


Public boildings 


126,562.98 






Total 


181,389.60 


48,984.67 


252.264.79 


897,490.05 






Justice: 

Central office 


6,356.60 

9,219.40 

68,890.30 

1,202.00 


183.33 


8,383.18 
14,688.26 
78,745.81 

8.000.00 


26,207.74 


Supreme court 


45,S23.M 

265,844.80 


Court of provinces 


13,611.82 


Public buildings 


16.869.57 








Total 


80,168.80 


13,696.16 


100.212.24 


368,2^.66 




Public instruction: 

Central office 


1,966.66 
89,004.07 




6,006.87 
77,828.82 
11,422.25 


14.M9.01 

263,730.22 
17,722.1© 


University and State schools 


11,909.62 
6,800.00 


Public buildings 






Total 


40,970.78 


18,209.52 


94,751.44 


286,401.48 






Finance: 

Central office 


86,902.94 
16,821.43 
89.830.10 
80,288.22 
3,323.60 

154.63 
17,593.87 

626.00 


11,841.62 
996.00 
89,268.99 
72,416.79 
8,775.95 


104.477.82 
18,270.07 
40,140.98 
78,316.71 
9,179.61 
62.81 
64,561.31 
826.44 


272,857.72 


Provinces 


67,158.23 


Postal service 


261,049.00 




497,865.87 


Refundments 


44,012.82 




485.44 


Quarantine T 




170, 191. 56 


Public buildings 


892.60 


9,838.42 






Total 


194,039.69 


129,190.76 


310,824.10 


1,823.440.06 




Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 
Central office 


9,174.99 
4,364.95 


1,249.28 


8,449.34 
115,523.17 


83.249 61 


Provinces 


129.812.71 








Total 


13,639.94 


1,249.28 


128,972.51 


162,592.32 






Public works: 

Central office 


9,268.00 

8,067.78 

118,958.21 


8,448.82 

8.068.96 

164,969.94 


20.326.29 

3.088.98 

147.818.13 


66,477.58 


Provinces 


106. 169. 92 


Public works 


824,243.69 






Total 


131,293.94 


171,467.24 


170.788.40 


996.881.19 






Municipalitiefl: 

Police 


107,458.00 
821,422.80 
253,899.94 
92,262.40 
13,810.24 


7,185.00 

66,294.40 

221,948.26 

84,139.64 

11.383.52 


115,879.00 
491,071.78 
286,072.17 
127.864.83 
9,722.00 


420.169.85 


Instruction 


1.617.641 68 


Sanitation 


1,427.125.35 


Hospitals and charities 


605.103.42 


MiscellaJieous 


76.112.85 






Total 


788,353.88 


840,960.81 


1,000,619.78 


4,046.15S. 15 






Military department: 

Barracks and quarters 


62,894.67 

124,642.19 

1,220.00 


41,170.14 
96,472.60 
1.664.94 


61,882.49 

189,937.47 

2,142.02 


262.560,11 

669,811.63 


Ad??i^nl«tmtion and rural guari 


Miscellaneous T 


10. 109. 90 






Total 


188,256.86 


188,307.68 


198.961.98 


931,971 64 






Grand total 


1,618,012.86 


862,066.06 


2,247,240.19 


8,998,174.54 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT 



MAJ. E. C. BROOKS, QUARTERMASTER, U. S. V., AUDITOR FOR 
THE ISLAND OF CUBA, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 
30, 1900. 



Office of Auditor for the Island of Cuba, 

Habana, Ouha^ Ma/rch 12^ 1901. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the opera- 
tions of the office of the auditor for the island of Cuba during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1900: 

On March 14, 1899, the military governor of the island of Cuba, in 
civil order bearing that date, provided for an auditor of the island of 
CalN^ to have charge of the examination and scrutiny of all accounts 
arising from the msbursement of funds obtained from the customs 
receipts of the island of Cuba^xcept those then audited by the auditor 
of the customs service, Mr. W. r, Watson, who had been auditing 
accounts of customs revenues and disbursements of officers of the cus- 
toms service since the date of military occupation. Under this order, 
and on March 18, 1899, Maj. E. F. Ladd, quartermaster, U. S. V., 
treasurer of the customs service, was appointed auditor for Cuba. In 
addition to the foregoing officers and by order of March 14, 1899, con- 
current powers were given to the auditor of the finance depjartment, 
Mr. Ernesto Fonts y Sterling, who had already been exercising the 
functions since January 27 of that year, in the auditing of accounts 
pertaining to internal revenues. The department of poste had likewise 
made provision for an accounting system, and a bureau of accounts 
had been established as a part of that department. 

No. 12. 

[General Order, Original No. 10.] 

Habana, January £6, 1899. 

A bureau of postal accoonts is hereby created in the office of the director of posts 
until oUierwise ordered, to be in charge of a designated chief. 

The chief of the bureau of postal accounts shall receive all accounts arising in con- 
nection with the postal service of Cuba or relative thereto, with all the vouchers 
necessary to a correct adjustment thereof, and shall audit and settle the same, and 
shall certify the balances arisine thereon to the director of posts. 

He shall keep and preserve all accounts and vouchers after settlement. 

He shall dose the postal account of the department quarterly and submit to the 
director of posts quarterly statements of its receipts and expenditures. 

He shall report to the director of posts, when required to do so, the manner and 
form of keeping and adjusting the accounts of the department, and the official form 
of the papers to be usea in connection with its receipts and disbursements. 

S3 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



84 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEENOB OF CUBA. 

He shall report to the director of posts all the delinc^uencies of poetmasterB and 
postal officials in rendering the accounts and returns, or in paying over, as required, 
the receipts of their respective offices. 

He shall roister, chaive, and countersign all warrants upon the designated deposi- 
tory of postal revenues for this department, for payments issued by the director of 
posts, as warranted by law or regulations. 

He shall perform such other duties in relation to the financial concerns of the 
department as may be aasigned to him by the director of posts, and make such reports 
concerning the same as the director of posts may require. 

The laws, rules, and regulations of the United States of America concerning the 
settlement and adjustment of postal accounts are hereby declared in force so mr as 
the same may be applicable to the service as organized or recognized by the dii^ector 
of posts. 

E. G. Rathbons, 
Director of Potts of Cuba, 

Under the afore-cited order Mr. W. H. Reeves was appointed chief 
of the bureau of postal accounts, department of posts, on February 8, 
1900. The functions of this bureau were not disturbed by the provi- 
sions of civil order of March 14, 1899. 

Mr. W. W. Barr6, assistant auditor for the island of Porto Rico, 
was designated by the Secretaiy of War to proceed to Santiago and 
there audit all accounts pertaining to the funds of the island of Cuba 
and included in the period from July 17, 1898, up to and embracing 
December 31 of that year. 

There were then, during that period from July 17, 1898, to June 30, 
1899, five auditors exercising distinct and independent jurisdiction over 
accounts pertaining to the moneys of the island, namely: Mr. W. W. 
Barr^, special auditor for accounts pertaining to the period of American 
occupancy of the island prior to January 1, 1899; Mr. W. P. Wat- 
son, auditor for customs accounts; Mr. Ernesto Fonts y Sterling, audi- 
tor for the department of finance; Mr. W. H. Reeves, chief of the 
bureau of postal accounts, department of posts, and Maj. E. F. Ladd, 

?[uartermaster, U. S. Vols., treasurer of tne customs service, auditor 
or Cuba, and under whose jurisdiction came all accounts of collec- 
tions and disbursements not subject to the audit of any of the afore- 
named officers. 

On May 11, 1899, the following order of the War Departanent 
promulgating an order from the President of the United States was 
published: 

[Circular No. 18, Division of Customs and Insular Affairs.] 

Wah Dkpabtmbnt, 
Washington^ May 11, 1S99, 

The following order of the President is published for the information and guidance 
of all concerned: 

Executive Mansion, 

Washington, May 8, 1899. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me as the Commander in Chief of the Army 
and Navy of the United States, I hereby order and direct that during the maintenance 
of the military government by the United States in the island of Cuba and all islands 
in the West Inmes west of the seventy -fourth degree, west longitude, evacuated by 
Spain, there are hereby created and shall be maintained the offices of auditor of the 
islands; one assistant auditor for auditing the accounts of the department of customs, 
and one assistant auditor for auditing the accounts of the department of post-offices, 
who shall be appointed by the Secretary of War, and whose duties shall be to audit 
all accounts of the islands. 

There is hereby created and shall be maintained the office of treasurer of the islands, 
which shall be filled by the appointment thereto of an officer of the Regular Army of 
the United States. The treasurer of the islands shall receive and keep all moneys 
arising from tlie revenues of the islands, and shall disburse or transfer the same only 
upon warrants issued by the auditor of the islands and countersigned by the governor- 
general. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 85 

All rules and instnictions necessary to carry into effect the provisions of Executive 
orders relating to said islands shall lie issued by the Secretary of War. 

William McKinley. 

This order will be duly proclaimed and enforced in the island of Cuba and all 
islands in the West Indies west of the seventy-fourth degree, west longitude, evacu- 
ated by Spain. 

G. D. Mbiklejohn, 
Assistant Secretary of War, 

The foregoing order was limited in its operation by the following 
order: 

No. 85. 

Headquabtbrs Division of Cuba, 

Habanay June £0^ 1899. 

The military governor of Cuba directs the publication of the following order for 
the information and guidance of all concerned: 

I. The fiscal year shall end on June 30. 

All money collected prior to July 1, 1899, shall be considered and accounted for a 
pertaining to the fiscal year 1899, ending June 30, 1899. 

All insular funds in the hands of collectors or disbursing officers at the close of a 
fiscal year, except those required to pay outstanding liabilities incurred during such 
year, will be deposited to the credit of the treasurer of the island of Cuba. 

Balances retained after the close of the fiscal year for the purpose of paying out- 
standing liabilities will be carried to a supplementary account current for the fiscal 
year to which the funds pertain; no account current will contain accounts of different 
fiscal years. 

Accounts current, and supplementary accounts current, covering the disbursement 
of cuBtoms funds pertaining to the fiscal year 1899, will be rendered to the treasurer 
of the isluid of Cuba, recent auditor for the island of Cuba. Thereafter accounts will 
be rendered as provided in the rules and regulations published from the office of the 
Secretary of War, May 11, 1899. 

Adna R. Chaffee, 
Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff . 

Mr. William P. Watson, then auditor for customs, was appointed 
auditor for the island of Cuba, and Mr. W. H. Emery, who nad suc- 
ceeded him as auditor for customs, was appointed assistant auditor for 
the island of Cuba and assigned to the duty of auditing the accounts 
of the department of customs. Mr. W. H. Keeves, chiei of the bureau 
of postal accounts, department of posts, was appointed assistant audi- 
tor for the island of Cuba and assigned to the duty of auditing accounts 
of the department of post-offices. Under this arrangement Mr. Wat- 
son, the auditor, seems to have succeeded to the duties of the auditor 
for the fiscal year 1899, Maj. E. F. Ladd, quartermaster, United 
States Volunt^rs, appointed auditor March 18, 1899, and operating 
under civil order of March 14, 1899, above referred to. The two 
assistant auditors practically continued their former duties under the 
new title and designation. 

No explicit provision had been made under Executive order of May 
8 for the auditing of accounts of internal revenues, and under date of 
July 27, 1899, the following order was promulgated: 

[drcQlar No. 27, Division of Customs and Insular AfTaira.] 

War Department, Washington, July gj, 1899. 
Thefollowinff order of the President is published for the information and guidance 
ofallooncemea: 

Executive Mansion, Washingion, June 27, 1899. 
By yirtne of the authority vested in me as Commander in Chief of the Army and 
HaVy, I hereby order and direct that during the maintenance of the military govern- 
lae&t of the United States in the island of Cuba and all islands in the West Indies 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



86 REPORT OF MILITABY QOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

west of the seventy-fourth de^^ree west lonffitade, evacuated by Spain, there ve 
hereby created and shall be maintained, in addition to the offices created by Execu- 
tive order of May 8^ 1899, the office of assistant auditor for auditing the accormtso^ 
the department of mtemal revenue, and one assistant treasurer in the office of the 
treasurer of the island, who shall be appointed by the Secretary of War. 

William McKinlbt. 

This order will be duly proclaimed and enforced in the island of Cuba and all 
islands in the West Indies west of the seventy-fourth degree west longitude, evac- 
uated by Spain. 

G. D. Mbiklbjohn, 
Acting Secretary of War. 

Mr. Ernesto Fonts y Sterling, auditor for the department of finance, 
was appointed assistant auditor for internal revenue under this order 
on August 4, 1899. 

All classes of accounts provided for in War Department instructions 
of May 11, namely, customs, postal, internal revenue, and miscella- 
neous, had now been brought within one jurisdictioB, save those 
accounts pertaining to the fiscal year 1899, which Major Ladd, by vir- 
tue of Civil Order, No. 85, Headquai*ters Division of Cuba, dated 
June 20, 1899, continued to examine and settle, and those for the period 
from July 17, 1898, up to and including December 31 of that year, 
coming within the jurisdiction of Mr. Barr^ as special auditor. 

Centralization and unity of power and purpose, evidently desired in 
the aforequoted ordei^s, were not, however, entirely accomplished. 
The auditor had and maintained a separate office from that of any one 
of his assistants, none of whom were proximate to or in touch with 
the others. 

Mr. John C. Martin was appointed December 18, 1899, as assistant 
auditor for the island of Cuba, unassigned to any particular class of 
accounts. 

On January 17, 1900, Mr. Watson tendered his resignation as audi- 
tor for the island of Cuba, and Mr. W. H. Emery, the assistant auditor 
for customs, was appointed to his vacancy. Mr. W. W. Barr^ was 
appointed assistant auditor and assigned to the vacancy created by 
Mr. EmeiT's promotion February 21, 1900. Mr. Emery in turn 
resigned March 18, 1900, and Mr. W. H. Reeves, assbtant auditor for 
posts, was designated acting auditor. 

By paragraph 13, Special Orders, No. 85, Headquarters of the 
Army, Adjutant Genemrs Office, April 11, 1900, the present incumbent 
was appointed auditor for the islana of Cuba and directed to report to 
the commanding general, Division of Cuba. I assumed charge April 17, 
1900. On assuming the duties of auditor I examined some of the 
accounts of the director-general of posts, as there was then a suspicion of 
irreguarities in the department of posts. In several verbal interviews I 
reported to the military governor that many of the vochers submitted, 
and for large amounts, were simply statements of expenditures by 
officials of the department of posts, and were in no sense acceptable 
and should not have been passed by any auditor. All other classes of 
accounts except those for the department of posts were rendered in 
the manner prescribed by Executive order of May 8, 1899. 

The system of accountability in use by that department was allowed 
to continue as before through the determined opposition of the direc- 
tor-general of posts to any change. 

It was my desire to centralize the offices of the assistant auditors, 
and on May 5, 1900, the offices of the auditor and assistant auditors, 






Digitized byVjOOQlC_ 



BEPOKT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 87 

for internal revenues and customs were moved to their present loca- 
tion^ Prado HOB. The contemplated removal of the offices of the 
assistant auditor of the department of posts met with the most stren- 
uous objection by the director-general of posts. He claimed that the 
system as then operating was the same as that in use in the United 
States^ and that a removal of the assistant auditor from the building 
occupied by the department o^ posts would seriously interfere with 
the administration of his department, and stated further that if any 
attempt was made in that direction he would immediately cable the 
Postmaster-General, and that the question had arisen several times 
before and he regarded it as definitely settled. In the face of these 
statements I naturally exercised some little caution before proceeding 
further. 

In this connection I beg to call your attention to the following dor- 
respondence: 

Office of the Dirbctor-Gensral, 

Habana, May 2^ 1900. 
Sib: By the direction of the director-general I am sending you to-day, under sep- 
arate cover, a copy of an extract from a letter written by the director-general to 
Maj. Gren. Leonard Wood, dat^ March 12, 1900, concerning the contemplated 
removal of the records in the office of the assistant auditor of the department of 
posts. 

Very respectfully, Wilson E. Wilmot, 

Private Secretary, 
Lieut. E. C. Brooks, 

Auditor for the Island of Cuba, Hahanay Cuba. 

Department of Posts of Cuba, Office of Director-General, 

Habana, March 1£, 1900. 

General: Another matter which you called my attention to at a previous con- 
versation was the fact that it had been reported to you that the assistant auditor for 
the department of posts is the disbursing officer of the department of posts. This is 
an error, and is a matter of record, of which I-have furnished you copies. ^ 

The system of disbursements and audits in practice in the department of posts 
is exactly like that which obtains in the United States, and is copied after it. In the 
United States the Sixth Auditor of the Treasury is the officer who audits the accounts 
of the Post-O^ce Department. To him the vouchers and pay rolls are sent, and he 
draws the warrants upon the pay rolls and properly executed vouchers which are 
before him. The Sixth Auditor, or some person representing him, countersigns the 
warrants, which certifies to their correctness as to form and amount. The office of 
the Sixth Auditor of the Treasury is in the Post-Office Department building, and of 
easy access to the Post-Office Department. The records of the Sixth Auditor's office 
are the records of the Post-Office Department, and are in the custody and control of 
the Sixth Auditor. 

The system in vogue in the department of posts and in the office of the assistant 
auditor for the department of posts is the same. The records of the assistant auditor 
for the department of poets are the records of the department of posts, and are in the 
custody and control of the auditor of the island, comprising properly executed vouch- 
ers, authenticated pay rolls, paid money orders, etc., and it is very essential that they 
be within easy reach of the department of posts, as they are consulted almost hourly. 

The present assistant auditors office is the outgrowth of a system inaugurated over 
a year ago bv a corps of men sent from the Sixth Auditor's office at Washington, 
headed by the Deputy Sixth Auditor, who assisted me in creating what was then 
known as the bureau of postal accounts, and was organized on the exact lines of the 
office of the Sixth Auditor of the Treasury, who audits the postal accounts of the 
United States. We adopted the system in its entirety, feeling perfectly secure that 
it was correct and proper, and we know of no reason why the system is not as good 
in Cuba as m the United States. This system is the result of the best thought and 
experience of former Secretaries of the Treasury, Postmasters-General, and Sixth 
Auditors. 

The present assistant auditor. Dr. W. H. Reeves, was one of the men sent here 
Jith the Deputy Sixth Auditor. He was employed for a number of years in the 
Sixth Auditor's office in Washington, is skilled in postal auditing, and, upon the 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



88 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

retirement of the Deputy Sixth Auditor, after he had completed his work in creating 
the bureau and in getting the system into operation, he recommended to me the 
Appointment of Doctor R^ves as chief of the bureau, which appointment was made. 
1 make this detailed statement as to the connection between the assistant auditor 
and the department of posts, as the question of removing the assistant auditor and 
the records of his office trom the department of poets building has been discussed, or 
perhaps contemplated. 

Very respectfully, E. G. Rathbonb, 

• Director-GeneraL 

Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, 

Military Oovemor, Habana, Cuba. 



No. 2. 



Office of the DiRBcroR-GENBRAii, 

Habana^ May 9, 190O, 
Sir: Referring to our conversation of this morning, I request that you continue, for 
the present at least, the present system of accounting and audits which now obtains 
in the department of poeta and the office of the assistant auditor for the department 
of posts, which system, I assume, is the same as that in vo^e in the United States 
pertaining to the accounts of the Post-Office Department, which are kept and audited 
in the office of the Sixth Auditor of the Treasury. 

Very respectfully, E. G. Rathbonb, 

I^vttxim-QeMTaL 
Lieut E. C. Brooks, 

Auditor for the Island of Cuba, Habana, Cuba, 

To the foregoing letter I replied as follows: 

Office of Auditor for the Island of Cuba, 

Habanay May 9, 1900, 
Sir: Your letter of this date, requesting me to ** continue, for the present at least, 
the present system of accounting and audits which now obtains in the department of 
poste, in the office of the assistant auditor in the department of posts,'' etc., has been 
^received. In reply thereto I have to say that the orders from the War Department of 
May 11, 1899, state that— 

disbursing accounts. 

Accounts of disbursement shall be rendered monthly and transmitted to the aud- 
itor within twenty days after the expiration of the month to which they pertain by 
the officers and agents authorized to make disbursements, in which such officers or 
agents shall charee themselves with all moneys advanced to them, respectively, by 
the treasurer, and take credit for the disbursements made by them, supported by 
proper vouchers. An abstract of the disbursements, accompanied by the vouchers 
therefor consecutively numbered, shall be transmitted with each account. Accounts 
for disbursements shall be rendered separately imder each appropriate fund or head 
of account from which the moneys are advanced and paid. 

revenue accounts. 

Tlie officers or agents authorized to receive and collect moneys arising from the 
revenues of the islands, of whatsoever kind, shall be required to pay the fml amounts 
received and collected by them, respectively, to the treasurer of the islands, and to 
render to the auditor monthly accounts therefor within twenty days after the expi- 
ration of the month to which they pertain, accompanied with properly itemized and 
certified statements and returns of the revenues collected, showing when, by whom, 
and on what account paid. 

In the rendition of such revenue accounts the officers or agents will chai^ro them- 
selves with all revenues received and collected during the period covered by the 
account and take credit for the amounts paid to the treasurer, as evidenced by 
his receipts, countersigned by the auditor, which shall be filed with the respective 
accounts as the proper vouchers for the credits claimed, the number and date of such 
receipts being noted in the entries of amounts paid to the treasurer. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



EKPOBT OF MILITAKY OOVEBNOR OF OIJBA. 89 

In the aadit of such revenue accounts the auditor shall compare and check the 
treasurer's receipts filed therewith with the corresponding receipts retained by the 
auditor and filea in his office. 

My orders to the assistant auditor, who has charge of the postal accounts, are in 
consonance with that quoted above, from which I have no authority to deviate. 
Very respectfully, 

£. C. Brooks, 
First lAeutenanty Sixth Cavalry , 
Auditor for the Island of Cuba, 
The Dirbctor-General of Poerrs, 

Hahana, Cuba. 
(Through office of adjutant-general. Division of Cuba.) 

This had occurred after the exposure of the alleged peculations, 
frauds, and embezzlements of Mr. C. F. W. Neely, chief of the bureau 
of finance, department of posts, and the consequent suspension from 
duty of Mr. W. H. Reeves, assistant auditor for posts, and one of the 
clerks of his department, who were believed to oe implicated in or 
cognizant of, if not directly concerned in, the operations of Mr. 
Neely. On May 21, without further ado, I moved the assistant audi- 
tor for posts to Pi-ado HOB, the location of the other departments of 
the office of the auditor. On May 24, Mr. Reeves was discharged, by 
order of the War Department, as assistant auditor for the isbnd of 
Cuba, to take eflfect May 7, 1900. 

Mr. A. L«. Lawshe, deputy auditor for the United States Post-Office 
Department, was directed to report to the military governor for 
assignment to duty as assistant auaitor for the island of Cuba in con- 
nection with a complete reaudit of the postal accounts of the island 
from the beginning of the American occuimtion until the then present 
time. Mr. Lawshe was given every facility for the carrying out of 
the instructions of the S^retary of War imparted to him before his 
departure for Cuba and communicated to the military governor in a 
letter addressed to Mr. Lawshe through the military governor by the 
Secretaiy of War under date of May 23. Mr. Lawshe's complete 
report of this reaudit is now in the hands of the Secretary of War and 
bwirs my indorsement. 

Other matters than the postal accounts demanded serious and 
immediate attention, and efforts were directed toward the adoption of 
a uniform and equitable system of accounting, and particularly with 
regard to disbursements. 

While returns of insular property had been provided for in civil 
order. Division of Cuba, of May 14, 1899, and such reports, of vary- 
ing completeness and correctness, had been rendered spasmodically, 
yet none of my predecessors had given anjr particular attention to the 
matter, nor did they attempt an examination or settlement of any of 
the same. The comparatively few returns rendered were found filed 
away unexamined and without regard to their contents, date, or man- 
ner of receipt. • 

Having in mind the proper relation between the disbursement of 
moneys and accountability for property purchased therewith, a new 
svstem of blanks, adapted from those in use by the officers of the 
Quartermaster's Department of the A rmy in rendering their money 
and property accounts and returns respectively to the Auditor for the 
War Departinent and to the Quartermaster-Greneral, was put under 
process of construction for distribution to disbursing officers. This 
syjtem, that of the Quartermaster's Depai-tment, which has withstood 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, PT 3 7 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



90 BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

the tests of time and the stmin of extraordinary conditions, and which 
had been applied to conditions more nearly similar to those existing 
on this island than had any other, was adopted only after the due 
deliberation which its importance accorded it. The vouchers for the 
disbursement of moneys used prior to this time had allowed the 
expenditure of property on the money voucher itself on certificate of 
an officer that 'Hhe articles have been expended and applied to the 
purpose for which purchased." This provision gave general and nat- 
ural rise to an abuse demanding correction — that of the expenditure 
of articles which, by their very nature, were unexpendable and cer- 
tainly intended to be accounted for under any known system of prop- 
erty accountability. These extraordinary expenditures of property 
included such items as steam launches, road rollers, carts, wt^fons, 
horses, and all kinds of transportation, valuable tools, and mechanical 
instruments. Payments for both supplies and services were reported 
on a single abstract, and the rendition of monthly accounts of pur- 
chases, m addition to the money account, was the exception rather 
than the rule. The delay necessitated by a proper consideration of the 
points involved and by tne printing of the blanKS themselves extended 
beyond the period of this report and into the next fiscal year. 

Every effort was made while attempting to thus modify this system 
of accountability to bring up to date the current work of the office, 
and the various assistant auditors and clerks contributed collectively 
and individually to the best of their several powers and abilities to the 
end desired to be accomplished. It is but fair to state that the several 
departments when brought together in their present relation, while 
with notable exception nad displayed a commendable desire in the 
right direction, were at variance in their methods and behind in their 
work. 

The assistant auditors had been required by the War Department 
instructions of May 11, 1900, to certify to the audit of accounts coming 
within their several jurisdictions. These certificates were and are 
subject to the approval of the auditor before they become authentic 
and are finally entered on the books of the office provided for by the 
before-quoted order, and abstracts of these certificates rendered the 
military governor and the War Department. This had been the only 
check exercised by the auditor over the various branches of his office, 
and while he was made the general custodian of records pertaining to 
his office, they had been so scattered as to be difficult of access. No 
general record of correspondence or precedents had been kept, and the 
absence of specific instructions had given birth to multifarious practices 
and the greatest laxity in the preparation and audit of accounts. 

An immediate effort toward the organization of a proper system was 
made, and this course comprehended the instruction and education of 
not only the officers rendering accounts, but of the personnel of the 
auditor's office. 

In the disallowances of expenditures and suspensions of accounts for 
error a free correspondence and interchange of opinions between the 
accountable officers and this office have been encouraged, not only for 
the settlement of specific items or points under discussion, but as a 
means to the general dissemination or a knowledge of the principles of 
accountability. The progress of reorganization, retarded as it was by 
the accumulation of work and the reports called for by the War Depart- 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BBPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOK OF CUBA. 91 

ment, and in connection with the Senate inquiiy, and in many instances 
the unfamiliarity cf the oflBce force with their duties, was necesarily 
slow. 

The division in charge of the assistant auditor for ^sts was busily 
engaged in the reaudit of accounts under the instructions of the Sec- 
retary of War, before referred to, and in the urgency of such i-eaudit, 
current work, save that which by its nature could not even be momen- 
tarily neglected, was discontinued temporarily. The reaudit was con- 
ducted with all dispatch permitted by its serious and extraordinary 
nature. 

The system of disbursements pertaining in the department of posts 
in brief was as follows: All bills were rendered to the director-general 
of posts, who referred them m turn to the chiefs of bureaus cognizant 
of the subject-matter. Upon the approval of the director-general they 
were sent to the assistant auditor tor the department of -posts, who 
thereupon drew up certificates for his files, stating the accounts, and 
drew warrants for the payment of the same. These warrants were sent 
to the director-general, who signed and returned them to the assistant 
auditor for poste for countersignature. The system was a survival of 
that pursued before the organization of this office, and the relation 
between the director-general and the assistant auditor for posts was 
precisely that of the director-general to his former subordmate and 
appointee, the chief of the bureau of postal accounts, department of 
posts. 

War Department instructions . of May 11, 1900, prescribed that 
accounts or revenue receipts derived from the island should be ren- 
dei-ed to the auditor and his assistants. It provided further that such 
receipts were and should be designated customs receipts, postal receipts, 
internal-revenue receipts, and miscellaneous receipts. In view of the 
foregoing, then, there seems to be no doubt that reports of postal 
receipts, as well as of all others, were required to be rendered directly 
to this office. Such was not the case, however. This office received 
no reports from postmasters and was entirely dependent on the depart- 
ment of posts for a statement of its receipts. These statements were 
rendered by the bureau of finance, department of posts, f I'om time to 
time, generally monthly, frequently in round numbered thousands only, 
and comprehended a general statement of receipts of the whole poste.1 
service, designating the source of receipts, whether from the sale of 
stamps, money orders, etc., but failing to set out the post-offices where 
such sales occurred. They were generally rendered in memorandum 
form, and instances are on record where they are in pencil and without 
signature. It will be readily seen that there was practically no check 
exercised over the collection of postal receipts by this office and that 
the bureau of the department of posts having charge of its moneys 
was alone informed of the source from which they were derived and 
obtained. When this condition had been fully ascertained, and with 
the beginning of the succeeding fiscal year, reports from postmasters 
of the receipts of their offices were reauired to be rendered direct to 
this office. These reports are renderea on form No, 220, department 
of posts. 

the check maintained on the issue and payment of money orders is 
essentially the sanie as that in use in the United States. The forms as 
well as the methods closely conform. The loss of funds in transit is 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



92 KEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

only proportionate to that elsewhere, and but few frauds have been 
attempted; these have been promptly discovered and made good. The 
system as a whole seems to oe sausractory and to answer all demands 
made on it 

Previous to January, 1900, a settlement of the international exchange 
account between the depaiiment of posts of Cuba and the United 
States postal service was had at the end of each quailer. Owing* to 
the lack of facilities for making remittances, a iiinning account of 
exchanges was opened at that time and no complete settlement has 
since been made. Some more satisfactory arrangement for the remit- 
tance of money-order funds between the department of posts and the 
United States should be made, but as such matter is without the 
jurisdiction of this oflBce it is not deemed necessary to make further 
conmient. 

With the beginning of this fiscal year the mode of aoeounting for 
collections and disbursements of internal revenue underwent a com- 
plete revulsion. While Spanish supremacy was at an end on January 
1, 1899, by orders of the military governor her laws still remained in 
force and effect, and her accounting systems permeated the entire 
internal-revenue department of the island. Those in charge of the 
department of finance had no better example than that of their Spanish 
predecessors, .and necessarily accepted it as the most available. 

There were throughout the island disbursing officers called adminis- 
tradores provinciales de hacienda who collected internal revenues and 
taxes and made payment out of such, collections according to instruc- 
tions, either genei*al or spe<ual, from the secretary of hacienda. When- 
ever these collections railed to meet the expenses of the internal 
government, requisition was made on the treasurer of the island for 
the amounts necessary to cover the deficits. Payments were often and 
generally made by the administrador through the agency of an habili- 
tedo, a substitute who represented the disbursing officer. This official 
received a certain sum of money, for which amount he left with the 
admin istiudor a voucher properly signed. He then paid all bills, 
receiving a per centum thereon from the payees for his services, on 
receipt of wnich bills he forwarded them to the administrador to be 
attached to the voucher, signed by himself, as a subvoucher showing 
his disposition of the money with which he has already charged him- 
self. This condition grew out of the difficulties of communication and 
the fact that the emplovees of the internal government could not be 
expected to travel, at the end of each month, to the provincial capitals 
for payment of their salaries, nor could the disbursing officer or 
admmistrador close his office and proceed from place to place to make 
the necessary payments. 

These were the conditions pertaining at the time when this office was 
established, and the change from this generally outlined system to that 
pertaining at the present time was a matter of ^reat tedium and one 
that has oeen finally accomplished. The habihtado, or middleman, 
although he fought hard to keep his place, is now a matter of history, 
and a general use of checks has been substituted for his services. 

The provisions of Civil Order No. 245, Headquarters Division of 
Cuba, December 19, 1899, have been the result of a very practical 
economy in the expenses of officials trav^eling on public business. Up 
to the time of its publication those departments of the military govern- 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 93 

ment depeDdent upon internal revenues had governed themselves in 
matters of the kind according to the customs and usages of the service 
during the Spanish regime, which afforded a very considerable latitude. 
This order, as here cited, provides for a daily allowance for officials of 
the government when traveling, which is based on their mte of salary, 
and can in no case exceed a maximum of $4.50. Overcoming the diffi- 
culties that always attend the starting up of a new system, this office has 
even succeeded in reducing the $4.50 allowance by demanding receipts 
that shall cover every expense incurred, save those of a trifling nature 
involving a small amount of money, such as cab hire, etc. A positive 
saving has been the result. 

No. 245. 

Headquarters Division of Cuba, 

llaJmna, December J9j 1899. 
The military governor of Cnba directs the publication of the following order: 
Except as specified in Paragraph IX travel allowances will be paid by the disburs- 
iM officer indicated in this paragraph, as follows: For the civil service, by the 
administrador erf the hacienda of the province in which the joumev is completed; for 
military officials chained with the execution of civil duties, by the chief disbursing 
officer of the insular rands at headquarters of the military department of the officer. 
Form 012, finance department, shall be used for statement of travel allowances. 

II. To entitle a civil or military official to refundment of the cost of transportation 
and allowances in connection therewith, at the expense of the State, the journey must 
be specifically authorized bjr a proper superior previous to its commencement Such 
authority will state the special duty enjoined, recite that the travel is necessary for 
the public service, and direct the official to return to his proper station on completion 
of the assigned duty, if such return is contemplated. 

The original order (written authority) and indorsements thereon, or true copy of 
the same, will be filed with the vouchers (form 012, finance department) beiore 
payment will be made. 

III. Whenever practicable to do so, transportation request will be issued to cover 
travel by rail and water, and when so issued allowance for transportation will not be 
refunded. 

When transportation requests are issued to cover travel, the fact shall be noted on 
the order, or other written authority for the journey, by the official issuing the 
request 

IV. Transportation by water usually includes subsistence. The cost of the ticket 
only will be refunded or paid in such cases. 

V. First class: Civil officials (also military when on civil duties) whose annual 
salary is $1,200 or more will be reimbursed for first-class transportation and other 
traveling expenses, as follows, viz: 

a. Charge for cab to and from stations, but not to exceed 50 cents each way. 
6. Charge for trsmsfer of baggage to and from stations not to exceed 50 cents each 
way. 

c. Actual cost of transportation of baggage, where the same is not allowed free on 
the ticket, not to exceed 100 pounds in weight 

d. Actual expenses for subsistence, not to exceed in any case $4.50 per diem, while 
traveling and for the time absolutely necessary for a prompt transaction of the busi- 
nesB directed to be performed. 

VI. Second class: Civil officials whose salary is $800 and less than $1,200 shall be 
reimbursed for expenses, when traveling unaer orders, as for first class, except for 
transportation, which shall be at second-class rates, and for subsistence, which is 
limited to $3 per day. 

VII. All other persons traveling under orders at the expense of the State shall be 
reunbursed for travel expenses as for first class, except for transportation, which shall 
be at third-class rates, and for expenses of subsistence, which is limited to $1.50 per 
day. 

VUI. Travel fare and allowances, at the rates specified in paragraphs V, VI, and 
VIL due to employees of the departments of agriculture, industry, commerce, and 
poblic works who may be ordered on duty in connection with any specially author- 
ixed public works will be paid from the special appropriation and by the disbursing 
officer of the special fund. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



94 REPOET OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

IX. An appropriation of $16,800 per annum, or so much thereof as may be necee- 
sary, is hereby made for travel expenses of the civil service and allotted as folio wfa, 
to be available on monthly estimates in due proportions: 

To province of Habana $3,600.00 

To province of Matanzas .' 3, OOO. 00 

Toprovinceof Santa Clara 3,000.00 

To province of Santiago de Cuba 3, OOO. 00 

Toprovinceof Pinardel Rio 2,400.00 

To province of Puerto Principe 1, 80O. 00 

Adna R. Chaffer, 
Brigadier-Generalj Chief of Stqffi 

The task which fell to the internal -revenue division of this office 
was one of the most difficult. The establishing of a system of accoants 
hitherto unknown and so little understood that at first, before affairs 
settled into running order, the erroi's in the accounts submitted made it 
necessary to correct and reform nearly every document received, and 
caused a great amount of correspondence. 

The customs division underwent so many vicissitudes in the change 
of chiefs that but little progress had been made in the way of improve- 
ment. The system of auditing was practically that established while 
the division was a part of the customs service of the island, and while 
the system there adopted may have been all that could have been 
desired, its administration was lax in the extreme. Conditions improved, 
however, toward the latter part of the year, and it is expected that 
this division will be one of the most efficient, as it is one of the most 
important. 

The duties of the bookkeeping division are so well defined in War 
Department instructions of May 11, 1899, that it is unnecessary to out- 
line them here. A copy of those instructions is herewith appended, 
marked ^'Exhibit A." 

It is intended to establish a division of property returns, and with 
this end in view I have obtained the services of a War Depaitment 
clerk, who, when the necessary forms have been prepared and issued, 
will examine all those returns now rendered, as well as those to be 
hereafter rendered, as it is intended to enforce the provisions of Civil 
Order, Division of Cuba, March 14, 1899, relating to the rendition of 
property returns. 

E. C. Bbooks, 
Mqjm* and Quartermaster. U. S. FI, 

Auditor for the Island of Ouha, 

The Military Governor, Island of Cuba, 

Habana^ Cuba. 



Exhibit A. — Rules and iruUrudiorm to carry into effect the Executive Orders rekUing to the 
militaT^ aovemTnerU by the United Stales in the island of Ctiha, and all islands iti the 
Wed Indies west of the seventy-fourth degree^ west lonyiittde, evacuated by Spain, during 
the maintenance of sucJi military government, 

, Promulgating Order. 

War Department, 

W(u^hingtonj May 11, 1899. 
The following order of the President is published for the information and guidance 
of ail concerned: 

Executive Mansion, 

Washington, May 8, 1899. 
By virtue of the authority vested in me as the Commander in Chief of the Army 
and Navy of the United States, I hereby order and direct that during the maint^iancje 

Digitized by VjV^*^ V IC 



EEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 95 

of the military govemmeiit by the United States in the island of Cnba and all islands 
in the West Indies west of the seventy-fourth degree, west longitude, evacuated by 
Spain, there are hereby created and shall be maintained the offices of auditor of the 
islands; one assistant auditor for auditing the accounts of the department of customs, 
and one assistant auditor for auditing the accounts of the department of poet-offices, 
who shall be appointed by the Secretary of War, and whose duties shall be to audit 
all accounts of the islands. 

There is hereby created and shall be maintained the office of treasurer of the 
islands, which shall be filled by the appointment thereto of an officer of the Regular 
Aimy of the United States. Tne treasurer of the islands shall receive and keep all 
moneys arising from the revenues of the islands, and shall disburse or transfer the 
same only upon warrants issued by the auditor of the islands and countersigned by 

aB rules and instructions necessary to carry into effect the provisions of Executive 
orders relating to said islands shall he issued by the Secretary of War. 

William McKinley. 

The above order and the following rules and regulations will be duly proclaimed 
and enforced in the island of Cuba and all islands in the West Indies west of the 
seventy-fourth degree, west longitude, evacuated by Spain, as therein provided, and 
all regulations and orders heretofore issued inconsistent therewith are hereby 
repealed. 

G. D. Mbiklejohn, 

Assistant Secretary of Wat, 

STATION OF OFFICEBS. 

The governor-general of the said islands shall be stationed in the city of Habana, 
and the officers provided for in Executive order of May 8, 1899, shall be stationed 
at and have their offices in said city. 

TIIK AUDITOR AND ASSISTANT AUDITORS OP THE ISLANDS. 

The auditor and the two assistant auditors of the islands, appointed under Execu- 
tive order of May 8, 1899^ shall examine and settle all accounts pertaining to the 
revenues and receipts derived from the islands and expenditures paid therefrom, and 
certify the balances thereon. 

The assistant auditors shall be subject to the direction and general supervision of 
the auditor, and the balances of accounts examined and certified by them shall be 
subject to the approval of the auditor, and when so approved shall be as final and 
conclusive as if examined and certified by the auditor. 

All acooants pertaining to the department of customs shall be assigned to one of 
the assistant auditors, and all accounts relating to the department of post-offices 
shall be assigned to the other assistant auditor. 

The auditor shall issue and personally sign all warrants for the payment of monevs 
by the treasurer, which warrants shall be transmitted to the governor-general to oe 
countersigned by him. No warrant shall be drawn for the advance of moneys except 
upon requisition therefor made by the proper officer, approved by the governor- 
general, and allowed by the auditor; and no warrant shall be issued for the payment 
of the balance found due on any account, except upon the certificate of the auditor, 
or the certificate of one of the assistant auditors approved by the auditor, upon the 
settiement of such accounts. 

Warrants may be issued for the necessary transfer of funds from one fund to 
another, on the books of the treasurer and auditor, upon the approval and request of 
the governor-general, upon proper showinj^ made to him, where the funds on the 
treamirer's books to the creait of any particular fund are not sufficient to pay the 
necessary expenses on that particular account Such transfer warrants shall be issued 
by the auditor and countersigned by the governor-general. 

Warrants drawn for making advances of money from funds in the treasurer's hands 
shall be denominated "accountable warrants," and shall be numbered consecutively, 
a separate series being preserved. 

Warrants drawn for the payment of balances due on accounts settled and certified 
by the auditor shall be denominated "settlement warrants," and shall be numbered 
consecutively, in a separate series. 

And warrants drawn for the transfer of moneys from one fimd to another shall be 
denominated "transfer warrants," and shall be numbered consecutively » in a sepa- 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



96 KEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

The title or name of the fund or head of account from which each warrant is paya- 
ble must be stated thereon, and the official seal of the auditor impressed thereon. 

All receipts issued by the treasurer for moneys paid to him shall be in duplicate, 
and shall be countersigned by the auditor, unless some error therein shall be found, 
in which case they shall be returned to the treasurer for correction. When so coun- 
tersigned, one receipt in every case shall be retained in the office of the auditcr and 
the other shall be delivered or transmitted by the auditor to the person by whom 
thepayment was made. 

The receipts retained by the auditor will constitute the necessarv check and 
voucher, in his examination and settlement of the treasurer's account of receipts and 
expenditures, as the authority for charging the treasurer with moneys received^ and 
after the settlement of the accounts to which they pertain such re<^ipta will be 
filed therewith in the office of the auditor. 

And the warrants jMiid by the treasurer, accompanied with the proper evidence of 
payment, shall constitute the vouchers on which the treasurer shall receive credit 
for payments made by him, and after the settlement of his accounts by the auditor 
such warrants shall be filed therewith. 

The certificates on the settlement of accounts made by the auditor 5*nd by the assistant 
auditors shall be numbered consecutively and filed with the respective accounts and 
vouchers in the office of the auditor, who shall pre8er\'e the same. 

The auditor shall prescribe the forms for keeping and rendering all accounts sub- 
ject to his examination and settlement, which forms shall conform substantially 
with those used by officers rendering accounts to the Treasury Department of the 
United States, and issue all necessary instructions to the officers and agents rendering 
such accounts. 

And in case any officer or agent whose duty it is to collect and receive moneys 
arising from the revenues of the islands of whatever kind, and to make disburse- 
ments of such moneys for any purpose, shall fail to render true and correct accounts 
of such re(>eipts and disburBements to the auditor, or to transmit the same within 
twenty days after the expiration of the month to which they pertain, or shall neglect 
to render the same when requested so to do, it shall be tne duty of the auditor 
forthwith to report such case to the governor-general for proper action. 

There shall be in the office of the auditor a division of bookkeeping, in which shall 
be kept proper books of entry and ledgers for recording the general accounts of 
receipts and expenditures pertaining to the revenues of the islands and the personal 
accounts of the agents and officers authorized to collect the same and to disburse mon- 
eys advanced by the treasurer upon warrants, as herein provided, and of all other 
accounts or claims allowed and certified by the auditor. 

ACCOUNTS OF OBNERAL RBCKIPT8 AND EXPENDITURE. 

The receipts issue<i by the treasurer for moneys paid to him. after being counter- 
signed by the auditor, shall be credited in the proper ledgers ol general receipts and 
expenditures to the appropriate funds arising from revenue accounts, namely: Cus- 
toms receipts, postal receipts, internal-revenue receipts, and miscellaneous receipts; 
and in making such credit entries from the treasurer's receipts the number and oate 
of the receipt and the name of the person by whom the payment was made shall be 
noted. 

All warrants drawn by the auditor, after being countersigned by the governor-gen- 
eral, shall be charged in the ledgers of general receipts and expenditures to the api)rD- 
priate funds or h^ds of account from which the same are payable, and in making 
such debit entries the number and date of the warrant and the person to whom paid 
shall be noted. 

PERSONAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS. 

In the ledgers for personal accounts all advances of moneys made upon requisitions 
and warrants to officers and agents authorized to disburse the same snail be chaiiged 
to such officers, respectively, under the appropriate funds or heads of account at the 
time of issuing the warrants for such advances of money, the numbers and dates of 
the respective warrants being noted in making such deoit entries, and for the dis- 
bursements made by such officers or agents which may be allowed by the auditor or 
by the assistant auditors in the settlement of the monthly accounts of such disburse- 
ments proper credits shall be entered to the respective i>er8onal accounts from the 
certificates of the settlements made by the auditor and assistant auditors, the number 
and dates of the respective certificates being noted in making the credit entries. 

And in like manner the certificates of settlement of individual accounts of all kinds 
made by the auditor and by the assistant auditors shall be entered in the ledgers of 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OP MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 97 

personal aoconnts to the proper individaal acootmt under the appropriate fund or head, 
the number and date of the auditor's certificate being noted; and all warrants issued 
upon certificates of settlement of accounts made by the auditor shall be charged to 
the proper individual account under the appropriate head in the ledgers of personal 
accounts, the number and date of the warrant being noted. 

In marking the settlement of each account, and before certifying the same, the 
auditor and assistant auditors shall require a statement or certificate from the divi- 
sion of bookkeeping in his office, setting forth the last certified balance on the 
particular account, and the debits or credits since entered thereon, in the personal 
ledgers, which statement or certificate shall be used as the basis of the auditor's 
statement of the account before him. 

DISBURSING ACCOUNTS. 

Accounts of disbursement shall be rendered monthly and transmitted to the audi- 
tor within twenty days after the expiration of the month to which they pertain, by 
the officers and agents authorized to make disbursements, in which such officers or 
agents shall charge themselves with all moneys advanced to them, respectively, by 
the treasurer, and take credit for the disbursements made by them, supported by 
proper vouchers. An abstract of the disbursements, accompanied by the vouchers 
therefor, consecatively numbered, shall be transmitted with each account. Accounts 
for disbursements shall be rendered separately under each appropriate fund or head 
of account from which the moneys are advanced and paid. 

REVENUK ACCOUNTS. 

The officers or agents authorized to receive and collect moneys arising from the 
revenues of the ishuids, of whatsoever kind, shall be required to pav the full amounts 
received and collected by them, respectively, to the treasurer of the islands, and to 
r^derto the auditor monthly accounts therefor within twenty days after the expi- 
ration of the month to which they pertain, accompanied with properly itemized and 
certified statements and returns of the revenues collected, showing when, by whom, 
and on what account paid. 

In the rendition of such revenue accounts the officers or agents will charge them- 
selves with all revenues received and collected during the period covered by the ac- 
count, and take credit for the amounts paid to the treasurer, as evidenced by his 
receipts countersigned by the auditor, which shall be filed with the respective accounts 
as the proper vouchers for the credits claimed, the number and date of such receipts 
being noted in the entries of amounts paid to the treasurer. 

In the audit of such revenue accounts the auditor shall compare and check the 
treasurer's receipts filed therewith with the corresponding receipts retained by the 
auditor and filea in his office. 

All revenue accounts shall be rendered and kept separatel^r under the appropriate 
funds or heads of accounts to which they respectively pertain; that is, all revenues 
arising ui the department of customs shall be entered and accounted for under the 
bead of customs receipts; those arising in the department of post-offices, under the 
head of postal receipts; all revenues derived from internal taxes and duties, as dis- 
tinct from customs receipts and postal receipts, shall be entered and accounted for 
under the head of internal-revenue receipts, and all revenues from other sources 
under the head of miscellaneous receipts. 

REQUISITIONS. 

Requisitions for advances from funds in the hands of the treasurer for paying neces- 
sary and proper expenses chargeable to the revenues of the islands shall be made by 
the respective officers or agents authorized to disburse the same, in such form as shall 
be needed to defray the necessary expenses for one month, and shall be accompanied 
with itemized estimates of the amounts required. 

Each requisition shall state upon its face the particular fund or head of account 
under whicn the money is to be disbursed, and shall be forwarded to the auditor, who 
shall cause to be indorsed thereon the balance due to or from the officer or agent making 
the requisition, as shown by the books of the auditor's office, and the amount of credits 
shown by any unsettled accounts of such officer or agent remaining in the auditor's 
office. Thereupon such requisition, with the estimates, shall be transmitted to the 
govemor-^neral for his approval, and when his approval shall be indorsed thereon 
the requisition shall be returned to the auditor for allowance, and when allowed by 
him and so indorsed upon the requisition, over his official si^ature, the proper war- 
nataball be issued foi the amount allowed, to which the requisition shall be attached. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



98 REPORT OF MILITARY G0V:ERN0R OF CUBA. 

In the matter of the allowance of reouisitions and the issuing of warrants for the 
advances of money therein requested, tne approval of the governor-general shall be 
final and conclusive upon the auditor. If at the time of the reference of a requi»tion 
to the govemor-^neral for his approval, or at any time before the warrant tho^eon 
shall have been issued, any facts shall come to the knowledge of the auditor which, 
in his judgment, afford sufficient grounds for refusing the advance of money asked 
for, he shall forthwith communicate the same in writing to the govemor^general, 
whose decision shall be final. 

OFFICIAL TITLE OF THE AUDITOR AND ASSISTANT AUDITOR — AUDITOR'S SEAL. 

The official title of the auditor, to be affixed to his official signature, shall be auditor 
for the island of Cuba, and the official title of the assistant auditor shall be aaaifltant 
auditor for the island of Cuba. 

The auditor shall have and keep an official seal, upon which shall be engraved the 
following design: ** Office Auditor, Island of Cubfl^— Official Seal." 

The auditor shall affix his official seal to each warrant issued by him before the 
same shall be countersigned by the governor-general and to all copies or tranacripts 
of papers in his office wnich he may be required to certify officially- 

RETURNS TO BE MADE BY THE AUDITOR. 

The auditor shall transmit to the governor-general a copy, duly certified, of each 
certificate on the settlement of accoimte made by himself and by the assistant auditors. 

The auditor and assistant auditors shall, at the time of settlement, send an offi- 
cial notification in writing to each person whose accounts have been settled in the 
auditor's office, stating the balances tound due thereon and certified and the diffei^ 
ences arising on such settlement by reason of disallowances or suspension made by 
the auditor, or from other causes, which statements of differences shall be properly 
itemized. 

The auditor shall forward to the Secretary of War, not later than ten days after 
the expiration of each month, a full and complete report of all moneys received 
by the treasurer during the preceding month, as shown by the entries made from 
the treasurer's receipts retained in the auditor's office, a statement of all advances 
of moneys made on warrants during the preceding month, and an itemized statement 
of all disbursements and expenditures audited during the preceding month. 

PROVISION FOR AN ACTING AUDITOR. 

In case of the death, resignation, absence, or sickness of the auditor the governor- 
general shall, by writing under his hand designate one of the assistant auditor? to act 
as auditor and perform the duties of such officer until a successor is appointed or soch 
absence or sickness shall cease. 

TREASURER OP THE ISLANDS. 

The treasurer of the islands, appointed under Executive order of May 8, 1899, shall 
receive and safely keep all money arising from the revenues of the islands, from 
whatever source derived, and shall keep a properly detailed account thereof in per- 
manent books of record, in which such revenues and all receipt^) shall be entered 
under appropriate heads, with the names of the agents, officers, and persons from 
whom received and the dates of receipt. 

All moneys received on account of the department of customs shall be credited to 
the account of customs receipts; all moneys received from the department of post- 
offices shall be credited to the account of postal receipts; all moneys received irom 
internal taxes and duties, as distinct from customs receipts and postal receipts, shall 
be credited to the account of internal-revenue receipts; and all moneys received 
from other sources shall be credited to the account of miscellaneous receipts. 

The accounts of the treasurer shall be kept in the money of the United States, and 
all payments made to him in any foreign coin or currency shall be reduced to money 
of the United States at the true and proper valuation. 

The treasurer shall issue receipts in duplicate for all monevs received by him, 
which shall be numbered consecutively, and shall state when, from whom, and on 
what account received, and the amounts in money of the United States, and also, when 
paid in any foreign coin or currency, the amounts and kind of foreign money in which 
payments were made shall be stated upon the receipts, and the rates at which the 
same are reduced to money of the United States. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



B£PORT OF MILITARY GOVfiBNOR OF CUBA. 99 

Ail reodpte, original and duplicate, iaeaed by the treasurer shall be countersigned 
by the auditor of the islands, without which they shall be invalid, and for this pur- 
pose the treasurer shall, immediately upon issuing each receipt in duplicate, transmit 
Doth receipts to the auditor. 

All moneys derived from revenues of the islands and receipts from all sources shall 
be paid to the treasurer in full without any deduction. 

Needful advances from the moneys in the hands of the treasurer shall be made 
monthly to the proper officers authorized to disburse the same for the purpose of 
paying the necessary and proper expenses of collecting the revenues, auditing the 
accounts, and such other l%itimate expenses connected with the military government 
of the islands as are not specifically appropriated for by the Congress of the United 
States. 

Such advances of moneys in the hands of the treasurer shall be made upon warrants 
based upon requisitions with proper estimates, showing under what particular fund 
or head of account the money is to be expended. Upon the approval of such requisi- 
tions by the governor-general and the allowance of the same by the auditor the 
inoper warrants thereon shall be issued by the auditor and countersigned by the 
governor-general. 

No pajrment shall be made by the treasurer except upon warrants issued by the 
auditor and countersigned by the governor-general, ana such warrants, when paid 
and accompanied with the proper evidence of payment, shall be the vouchers upon 
which the treasurer shall receive credit in the settlement of his accounts. 

All warrants drawn upon the treasurer shall be debited on the books of his office to 
the proper fund or heaa of account from which the same is made payable, after such 
warrants shall have been countersigned by the governor-general. 

In the pa3anentof warrants the treasurer shall remit the amount by draft or check, 
payable to the order of the person in whose favor the warrant is drawn, retaining the 
warrant in h is office, and noting upon such draft or check the number and date of 
the warrant ^hich it represents and the fund from which payable; and when such 
draft or check shall have been paid, properly indorsed, and attached to the warrant 
it shall constitute the proper evidence of^pay ment. 

The treasurer shall render monthly accounts of the receipts and expenditures of 
his office and submit the same to the auditor for examination and settlement not 
later than ten davs after the expiration of each month. In rendering such accounts 
the treasurer shall charge himself with all moneys received during the period cov- 
ered by the account, under the appropriate funds or heads of account, and furnish 
therewith abstracts showing in detail the amounts received under each head, from 
whom received, and giving the numbers and dates of the receipts issued therefor. 

And he shall credit himself with all moneys paid, under the appropriate funds or 
heads of account, and file with his account abstracts showing in detail the amounts 
paid under each head, to whom paid, and giving the numbers and dates of the war- 
rants issued in pavment, which warrants shall he filed with his account. 

The treasurer shall forward to the Secretary of War, not later than ten days after 
the expiration of each month, a full and complete report, duly certified, of all 
monevs received by him, tc^ther with an itemized statement of all disbursements, 
and shall also transmit a duly certified copy of the same to the governor-general. 

OFFICIAL TITLE OF THE TREASURER, AND OFFICIAL BOND. 

The official title of the treasurer to be affixed to his official signature shall be 
treasurer of the island of Cuba. 

He shall give bond with sufficient sureties, to be approved by the Secretary of 
War, for the faithful performance of the duties of his office, in such amount as snail 
from time to time be fixed by the Secretary of War. 

POWBBS AND DUTIES OF THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL IN THE ACCOUNTING SVffFEM OP THE 

ISLANDS. 

Examination of accounis. 

The governor-general shall make quarterly, and oftener if deemed expedient, an 
examination of we books and accounts of the auditor and treasurer, and a compari- 
son of the results shown by the same, and also an examination and count of the 
OMmeya in the hands of the treasurer, and submit his report thereon to the Secretary 
olWar. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



100 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Approval of reqtUsitiorL 

All requisitions for advances of money from funds in the hands of the treasarer 
to officers or agents authorized to disburse the same shall be approved by the gov- 
ernor-general when submitted in proper form and the advances of money a^iked for 
appear reasonable and necessary. 

Such recjuisitions shall be made monthly by the proper officers or agents and be 
accompanied with itemized estimates of the funds required for defraying necessary 
expenses for one month, specifying the character of the expenditures anof the funds 
or n^wi of account from wnich payable. 

Such requisitions shall be forwarde<l by the officer or agent making the same to 
the auditor, who shall indorse thereon the condition of the account of the officer or 
agent asking for the advance of money as disclosed by the books of his office, and 
also the amount of cre<lits shown by any unsettled account of such officer or agent 
remaining in the auditor's office. The requisition shall then be submitted to the 
governor-general for approval. 

Should the govemor^neral find in any case that good and valid objections exist 
to making the advance of money asked for, he may decline to approve the requisi- 
tion and return it to the auditor with a written statement of his objections. 

The auditor shall thereupon at once advise the officer or agent making the requi- 
sition of the objections thereto and specify what is required to remove such objec- 
tions in onier that his requisition may be honored. 

Should the governor-general regard the amount of any requisition as excessive or 
any item thereof as improper, he may approve the requisition in such sum as shall 
appear to him to be reasonable and jxist. 

Countersigning of VKtrrants. 

The governor-general shall ci>untersign all warrants issued in due form by the 
uditor, uix>n proper ai 
hands of tne treasurer. 



auditor, uix>n proper authority, for the payment of moneys from the funds in the 

" I of tn< 



Accountable warrants. 

The proper authority for the issue of an accountable warrant for the advance of 
moneys to authorized disbursing officers or agents for the purpose of defraying 
necessary and legitimate expenses shall be the requisition of such officer, accompa- 
nied with itemized estimates of the funds needed, which requisition must, prior to 
the issuing of the warrant, be approved by the governor-general and allowea by the 
auditor, and shall be attached to the warrant when presented to the governor-general. 

Setilemenl ivarrants. 

The proper authority for the issue of a settlement warrant in payment of a bal- 
ance found due by the auditor upon an account settled and certified by him shall be 
a duly certified copy of the auditor's certificate on such settlement, which shall be 
attached to the warrant when presented to the governor-general. 

Should the governor-general require further information before countersigning any 
settlement warrant he may make written request for the same of the auditor, who 
shall without delay furnish the governor-general a written statement of the case, with 
the reasons and authority for the allowance of the account and the payment of the 
certified balance. 

Should the governor-general be dissatisfied with the auditor's explanations, and 
have good and sufficient grounds for holding that the action of the auditor is unwar- 
ranted and open to grave' objections, he may in such case decline to countersign the 
settlement warrant, and shall forthwith report the case to the Secretary of War for 
instructions, submitting the reasons for his action, together with the papers in the case. 

Transfer ivarrants. 

The proper authority for the issue of a transfer warrant for the transfer of an amount 
from one fund or head of account to another upon the books of the treasurer and 
auditor shall be the approval and request of the governor-general, made upon proper 
showing to him, and indorsed upon the papers, which shall be attached to the war- 
rant when presented to the governor-general. 

The showing to the govemor-generalnecessary to his approval and request for t3wi»- 
fer of funds on the treasurer's books shall be a certificate from the treasarer showing 
the condition of the funds on his books and an official statement from the auditor 
setting forth the reasons and necessity for such transfer and the contemplated expend- 
itures or payments which require it 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OP MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. lOf 

Dedgnaiion of an acting auditor. 

In case of the death, reeienationj absence, or sickness of the auditor of the island, 
the governor-general shall by writing, under his hand, designate one of the assistant 
auditors to act and perform the duties of the auditor until a successor is appointed or 
soch absence or sickness shall cease. 

Appeals from the a4tion of the auditor. 

Any person aggrieved by the action or decision of the auditor in the settlement of 
his account or cQm by that officer may, within one year, take an appeal in writing 
to the governor-general, which shall specially set forth the particular action of the 
auditor to which exception is taken, with the reasons and authorities relied on for 
reversing such action. 

If the governor-general shall confirm the action of the auditor he shall so indorse 
the appeal and transmit it to the auditor, and the action of the auditor shall there- 
upon be final and conclusive. 

Should the governor-general fail to sustain the action of the auditor, he shall 
forthwith report his grounds of disapproval to the Secretary of War, together with 
the appeal and the papers necessary to a proper understanding of the matter. The 
instructions of the Secretary of War in such case shall be final and conclusive. 

TSile to be observed in the renditixm and certification of accounts. 

All accounts of the treasurer of the islands, and of the various officers and agents 
authorized to collect the revenues, receive moneys, and make disbursements, and all 
other accounts subject to examination and settlement by the auditor and assistant 
auditors, shall be with 'Hhe military government of the island of Cuba and all 
islands in the West Indies west of the seventy-fourth degree, west longitude, evacu- 
ated b^ Spain," and all balances certified by the auditor and assistant auditors shall 
be certified as due to or from said military government, as the case may be. 



ExHiBrr B. 



Headquarters Division of Cctba, 

Habanoy March i^, 1899. 
The military governor of Cuba directs the publication of the following order: 

1. The auditor of the island of Cuba will have charge of the examination and 
scrutiny of all accounts arising from the disbursement of funds obtained from ihe 
customs receipts in the island of Cuba except those now audited by the auditor of 
the customs service. 

2. He will prescribe the forms of keeping and rendering all public accounts arising 
from the disbursement of said funds, and all officers disbursing the same or any part 
thereof shall make due return to him, as herein, prescribed. 

3. As soon as possible after receiving any account or return the auditor will cause 
it to be examincKi in his office, and he is authorized and directed to notify disbursing 
officers of all errors or irregularities in their accounts, and when so notined disburs- 
ing officers will take immediate steps to correct such errors or irregularities. 

4. Whenever the errors have been corrected or payment has been made for 
deficient articles, and the action of the auditor is sustained or modified by the mili- 
tary governor, a return will be r^arded as settled and the officer who rendered it 
will be notified accordingly. 

5. If the necessary correction in a return be not made within two months from the 
date of notification by the auditor the facts will be reported to the chief of staff of 
the Division of Cuba. 

6. Balances which may from time to time be certified by the auditor upon settle- 
ment of public accounts shall be final and conclusive upon the executive branch of 
the government, except that any person whose accounts may have been settled, the 
head of a department or of any establishments not under the jurisdiction of a depart- 
ment to which the account pertains may, on presentation of new evidence, obtain a 
revision of the military governor, whose decision upon such revision shall be final 
and conclusive upon the executive branch of the government. 

7. The auditor will preserve, with their vouchers and certificates, all accounts that 
have been finally adjusted. He will also superintend the recovery of all debts finally 
certified by him to be due to the government. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



102 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

8. The auditor of the finance department will, under the regulations prescribed in 
this order and concurrently with the auditor of the island, examine and scrutinize 
all accounts and returns rendered by civilian officers of the military government of 
Cuba. 

9. The head of a department to which accounts pertain will caose each aceoant 
current or property return, with accompanying pai>er8, to be examined and trans- 
mitted to the auditor of the finance department within twenty daysfrom the date on 
which such account was received at his office. When a suspension or disallowance 
is made the department will notify the accountable officer, that he may have an 
opportunity to submit explanations. 

10. All officers requiring funds will submit to the chief of staff of the divi«on 
approved estimates of the same, which shall utate the purposes for which the funds 
are to be used. These estimates should be submitted not later than the 20th day of 
the month preceding that for which the estimate is made. Special requisitioiis will 
be made for sums nee<ied for unforeseen contingencies. 

11. All transfers of funds or property will be accompanied by invoices and receipts 
in duplicate, but no transfer of funds shall be made except on the order of the head 
of an executive dei)artment or in case of a United States Army officer, on the order 
of his proper superior officer. 

12. The use oi funds for purposes other than those for which specifically appropri- 
ated is prohibited. Heads of departments, in notifying officers of remittances, will 
inform tnem of the amount remitted under each appropriation. 

13. Funds in the personal possession of a disbumng officer are so kept at his own 
risk. 

14. No officer disbursing money or directing its disbursement shall be concerned 
individually, directljr or indirectly, in the purchase or sale of any articles intended 
for use by or pertaining to the public service. 

15. No officer or clerk of a disbursing officer shall be interested in the porchase 
of any employee's certificate of pay due or any other clidm against the government. 

16. Officers will not purchase supplies for tne government from any other person 
in its service, nor contract with any such person to furnish sui)plies or service to the 
government, or make any government purchase or contract in which such person 
shall be permitted to share or receive benefit. 

17. Accounts current will be rendered monthlv and will be made in duplicate, each 
accompanied by the proper abstracts and vouchers; one copy will be forwarded to 
the auditor of the island, the other will be retained by the officer. Should the dis- 
bursing officer be a civilian under the military government of Cuba, the accounts will 
be made in triplicate, two being sent to the head of the department under whose 
direction the disbursement is made and one retained by the officer. On receipt erf 
these the head of such department will immediately transmit one of the accoonts to 
the auditor of the island. 

18. Accounts current must be made out in time to reach the auditor not later than 
the 20th day of the month following that covered by the account. 

19. With the accounts will be forwarded all orders and other papers upon which 
the accountable officer relies to relieve himself from responsibility, including abstracts 
of purchases made during the month. 

20. All disbursements must be covered by vouchers, in duplicate, accompanied by 
duplicate itemized and receipted bills. 

21. When an officer is relieved from duty he will certify outstanding debts, if any, 
to his successor, and transmit a list of the same to the head of his departm^it. 
Unless otherwise ordered, he will turn over to his successor all public money, prop- 
erty, books, and papers pertaining to the service from which he is relieved. 

22. The correctness of the facts stated on a voucher and the justness of the account 
must be certitied by the officer. 

23. The giving or taking of receipts in blank for public money is prohibited. 

24. Vouchers for funds disbursed will, before being signed by a public creditor, be 
made out in full, with the place of payment and name of paying officer entered in 
the receipt, and the exact amount of^money clearly stated in the receipt. 

25. The signature to a receipt and the name of the person entered at the head of 
an account must be literally alike. When a signature is not written by the hand of 
the party, it must be witnessed by an officer of the Government, when practicable. 

26. An officer will have credit for an expenditure of money made in ob^ence to 
an order by competent authority, which order must be in writinj^. If the expendi- 
ture be disallowed, it will be charged to the officer who ordered it 

27. If payment be made on a certificate of any officer as to fact, and afterwards 
disallowed for error of fact in the certificate, it will pass to the credit of the disburs- 
ing officer, and be charged to the officer who gave the certificate. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OP MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 108 

28. Retams of all property purchased with funds derived from the customs service 
will he made quarterly. 

29. OflScera responsible for public property of any description are charged with 
its preservation from loss or damage. Every officer accountable for public property 
will keep himself accurately informed, by personal examination, of the quantity and 
condition of the property on hand, ana will be held strictly respol^M^le that it is 
accurately reported on his return. At each transfer of such property both the 
invoicing and receipting officer will attend in j^rson, and each will satisfy himself, 
by personal examination, that all property invoiced is on hand in condition as stated 
in the invoice. 

30. Property worn out in the service will not be destroyed, but will be kept for 
the action of an inspector, detailed by the commander of a military department. 
The accountable officer will submit an inventory thereof and ask for an inspector's 
action, for which application should be made to the headquarters of the department 
in which the officer is serving, and the property will be disposed of as oniered b^ 
him. If sold at auction, the money receivea therefor will be turned in to the credit 
of the treasurer of the customs service. 

31. Accounts current for January and February will be forwarded with the least 
practicable delay. 

32. Property returns will be rendered to cover the first quarter of this calendar 
year. 

33. All accounts and returns will be made out on forms furnished by the auditor 
of the island, who will supplv the same on application. 

34. All decrees, orders, or laws, or parts tnereof, in conflict with the provisions of 
this order, are hereby revoked. 

Adna R. Chaffee, 
Major- General of Volunteers j Chief of Staff . 



Office of Auditor for the Island of Cuba, 

Habana, Cuba, March W, 1901. 

Sir: In continuation of my report for the fiscal year 1900, I have 
the honor to submit herewith, as requested, an additional and supple- 
mentary report covering the period from July 1 to December 31, 1900. 

The work of reorganization and systemization instituted in the latter 
part of the previous vear was continued with wider, better, and more 
apparent results. The activitv in the examination and settlement of 
the accumulation of unaudited accounts was continued and the work 
was pushed forward with the greatest celerity consistent with accuracy. 
A closer supervision of the work of individual clerks in the examina- 
tion of accounts was found necessary and was accomplished through 
the agencv of reviewing clerks who were selected from among those 
better informed and more capable. Itemized statements of audited 
accounts have by direction or the War Department been substituted 
for the copies of certificates of audit forwaraed heretofore. 

In some instances lack of regulation has operated to the disadvan- 
tage of a proper rendition and an intelligent audit of accounts. When- 
ever pK>ssible, the principles underlying the system of accounting 
prescribed for the United States Army have been followed, and the 
Army Regulations on this subject are now of constant and daily office 
reference. The published decisions, too, of the Comptroller of the 
Treasury, whenever the principles therein laid down could be applied 
to the conditions existing here, have been followed. When the law 
and regulations in force on this island have been silent, the Revised 
Statutes of the United States have been followed in intent and purpose 
so far as possible. Often, however, the technical application of the 
rules of accountability have worked a hardship to officers who, in good 
faith, have failed to literally comply with them; not because of the 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



104 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

severity of such rules, but for reason of lack of information concern- 
ing them and the inaccessibility of the documents to most of the 
officers concerned. There is at this time, however, under course of 
preparation a compilation of these principles. 

Tne blalttr forms for the disbursement of moneys and ac<;ountability 
for property, referred to as under course of construction in my pre- 
vious report, were finally completed and distributed to disbursing 
officers and others concerned on August 24, 1900. These forms have 
been used from that time until now with results that have been all that 
was anticipated for them. They seem to have met every requirement, 
and while there are those who have found them not to be precisely 
what they desired, the blanks have, nevertheless, supplied flie need- 
of the situation. The accounts rendered since the time of their adop- 
tion have fully justified their use and retention. . With the property 
returns and abstracts and vouchers adopted, full and complete returns 
of insular property may be made; and, while the examination of such 
returns has not extended to the time when these forms were adopted, 
observation shows conclusively that their completeness and detafl are 
sufficient. 

In my former rejwrt I had occasion to speak of the lack of office 
unity. This condition had been contributed to by several sources, 
prominent amon^ which is the fact that at the inauguration of the 
system under which we are working the assistant aumtors had been 
in a measure independent of the auditor. 

On August 10, 1900, Mr. John C. Martin, assistant auditor for the 
island of Cuba, tendered his resignation as such, and on December 14 
Mr. A. L. Lawshe, assistant auditor assigned to the department of 
posts, having completed the special work for which he was appointed, 
m turn tendered his resignation. Mr.Lawshe has since been appointed 
auditor for the Philippines. 

Mr. W. W. Barr^, assistant auditor for the department of customs, 
is now absent on le>ave, and has signified his intention of resigning in 
the near future to accept a position with the auditor for the Philip- 
pines. This resignation will leave but one assistant auditor, Mj. 
Ernesto Fonts v Sterling. 

The work or the office is systematically distributed among seven 
divisions, namely: Customs division, Mr. W. H. Lancashire, acting 
chief, and 11 clerks; postal division, Mr. Arthur J. Bowie, acting chief, 
and 8 clerks; internal-revenue division. Assistant Auditor Ernesto 
Fonts y Sterling, chief of division, and 14 clerks; miscellaneous divi- 
sion, Mr. James L. Slaughter, chief of division, and 7 clerks; property- 
returns division, Mr. Leonard H. Mattingly, chief of division, and" 9 
clerks; bookkeeping and warrants division, Mr. Nathaniel Nathan, 
chief of division, and 3 clerks; mail and record division, Mr. Leonard 
H. Mattingly, acting chief of division, and 11 clerks. 

The salaries of the office are as follows: One auditor, army officer, 
receiving his army salary only; 1 assistant auditor, at $3,000 per 
annum; 1 chief bookkeeper, at $2,400 per annum; 1 chief of division, 
at $2j400 per annum; 1 chief clerk, at $2,200 per annum; 2 chiefs of 
division, at $2,000 per annum each; 9clerks, at $1,800 per annum each; 
7 clerks, at $1,600 per annum each; 1 clerk, at $1,500 per annum; 14 
clerks, at $1,400 per annum each; 21 clerks, at $1,200 per annum each; 
14 clerks, at $1,000 per annum each; 1 clerk, at $720 per annum; 1 mes- 
senger, at $900 per annum; 1 messenger, at $600 per annum; 1 janitor, 
at $360 per annum; 1 messenger, at $360 per annum. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MHiITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 105 

The divisions of the oflBce each operate under a chief of division, 
with the exception of the mail and record division just organized, 
which, for tiie time being, at least, is under the supervision of the 
chief of one of the other divisions. 

This arrangement has been found eminently satisfactory in compar- 
ison with the system under which each division, or then so-called 
department, had its own assistant auditor. Formerly each assistant 
aaaitor received his own mail and conducted a series of correspondence 
of which the auditor had no information. This condition nas been 
corrected by instructions that all accounts and correspondence be for- 
warded to the auditor. 

The work of the reikudit of accounts in connection with the depart- 
ment of posts continued along the lines indicated by the Secretary of 
War, ana referred to in my previous report, without interruption until 
October 10, 1900, when all important details of that reaudit having 
been completed and a report made thereof, Mr. Lawsbe, the assistant 
auditor wno had been designated bv the Secretary of War particularly 
for the work, sailed for the United States. A few details were left to 
be completed, and these proceeded under the direction of Mr. H. O. 
NetUeton, expert accountant, who had accompanied Mr. Lawshe. Upon 
the entire completion of the work, Mr. Nettleton in turn returned to 
Washington, and Mr. Bowie was put in charge, and the undivided 
attention of the division was then oirected to the current work. The 
system of disbursements pertaining in the department of posts, and 
referred to in my previous report, was discontinued, and instead 
thereof the same system prescribed for all disbursing officers on the 
island was inaugurated in that department. 

Postmasters are now renderiuj^ this office accounts of their collections 
and receipts. Some of these from the larger post-offices are accept- 
able, but m many instances the^ are incomplete and often unintelli^ble 
and at total variance not only with the printed instructions on the Dlank 
forms on which the accounts are rendered, but with the instructions 
famished from time to time by circular orders from the director- 
general of posts. These conditions necessitate a large amount of 
correspondence in Spanish, and often considerable delay in the adjust- 
ing of accounts, in spite of which facts, however, they enable this office 
to exercise a check on the receipts of tne department of posts and will, 
with the conscientious work now being done in that division under 
Mr. Bowie, prevent a recurrence of that most deplorable condition of 
affairs i>ertaming in that departnient during the previous fiscal vear. 

There was some difficulty in the introduction of the new blanks for 
disbursements in connection with the accounts rendered by Cuban 
officials, ^ents of the department of finance and department of public 
works. TSiese difficulties have been overcome through the agency of 
prolific correspondence and advice to disbursing officers, all of which 
correspondence has been necessarily conducted m Spanish through the 
Assistant Auditor, Mr. Fonts, whose labors and enorts have been to 
have the accounts coming to his division made in the best form and 
to have his division the best. Correspondence with the heads of depart- 
ments has had the beneficial effect of removing some of the objectionable 
officers, so that some of the best accounts received in the office are in 
Spanisn from the department of finance. 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, FT 3 8 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



106 



BEPOBT OP MILITABY GOVBRNOB OF CUBA. 



Receipts from internal revenues during the first six months of the 
fiscal year 1901 amounted to $827,427.56, derived as follows: 



Province. 


Amount 


Percent 


Province. 


Amount 


Perc^it 


Habana 


1218,876.86 
22,626.97 
17,932.13 
12,686.90 
U, 916. 62 
11,470.61 
9,860.06 


66.847 
6.880 
6.477 
8.829 
3.689 
8.608 
2.868 


PlnardelRio 


18,914.69 
6,161.97 
6,081.67 
8,661.72 


2.713 


SftntiasfO 


Holguin 


1.577 


OmtIciim 


GuanajAV 


1.562 


CienfueffOB 




1-115 




Total 




RfLMtJi. niRm. . - - 


827,427.66 


100.00 


Puerto PrlnciDe 











On May 26, 1900, the Senate of the United States directed its Com- 
mittee on Relations with Cuba to investigate and report at as early a 
date as practicable regarding the moneys received and expended in 
the island of Cuba from the date of the occupation thereof by the mil- 
itBLTj forces of the United States until and including the SOth day of 
April, 1900, as well as to report a statement of all public works of 
every kind, including building, wharves, railroads, and all other 
structures built or constructed, improved, repaired, or decorated; and 
a statement of the personal property whicn was purchased or procured 
and intrusted to any officer of the military government within the 
said time. This report contemplated a statement of the amounts, 
necessity, and propriety, the autnority and purpose of expenditures; 
a statement of the cost, value^ and necessity for the construction of 
public works, their repair and improvement, and, in cases where such 
work was done under contract, a copy of the same, and a statement of 
the cost, value, use, and disposition of property purchased. 

On account of the difficulty encountered in the reorganization of the 
office work on these statements was delaved for the time being, and 
on September 16 the divisions of the office in charge of and miving 
cognizance of disbursements began a preparation of the first class of 
statements herein enumerated. It was found necessary to discontinue 
current work, and at first but a small number of temporary clerks was 
employed in connection with the preparation of statements, chiefly on 
account of the necessary time spent m the instruction of such a class 
of clerks in order that they mignt be enabled to intelligently proceed 
with the work. The work on this statement occupied the balance of 
the month of September. The rate at which current work accumu- 
lated and the necessity for a prompt settlement of money accounts 
required the return of a greater number of the regular employees to 
their former duties. This measure necessitated the employment of a 
larger number of temporary clerks, and the whole work in connection 
witn the compilation of these statements was then turned over to the 
but recently organized division of property returns. The necessity 
for this was deplored, but it was considered that the work of that 
division could better wait than that of anv other. This division, under 
Mr. Mattingly, then entirely handled the remaining two classes of 
statements — ^tnat of personal property purchased, and of public works 
constructed, repaired, etc. A large force of temporary clerks had to 
be employed, and these were selected from among many applicants as 
being the most likely to fill the requirements and demands oi the work 
to be performed. The best material obtainable was but indifferent, few 
having any knowledge of accounts at all, and none having ever handled 
a class of accounts similar to those on which they were to be employed. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



B^POBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OP CUBA. 107 

As a matter of administration their instruction was an arduous task. 
The difficulties encountered in the preparation of these statements 
were accentuated by the incomplete information afforded by many of 
the early vouchers submitted to this office and audited without that 
close attention to detail and particularity that should have obtained. 
Vouchers were not properly itemized, and statements of accounts were 
in many instances so vague as to leave a grave and considerable doubt 
as to the nature of the account, whether for services or supplies 
famished or what not The work of translation, too, formed a very 
salient feature in that of the general preparation, and the difficulty of 
obtaining translators who were familiar with the technical terms in 
both languages applied to machinery, tools, surgical instruments, etc., 
was of no little importance and concern. The information rendered 
was in every instance as complete as the records of the office would 
allow, but in many instances it fell far short of what had been re(}uired 
and of what it was desired to furnish. The lack of system in the 
record of correspondence, etc., was another obstacle in the way of a 
prompt and complete answer to the queries propounded. 

The report required by the War Department in compliance with the 
Senate resolution of May 26 was not entirely completed until Decem- 
ber 31. 

The mail and record division, under process of organization, has 
been designed for the preservation of a proper record of coiTespond- 
ence and for the fixing of a line of precedents and decisions which 
under the system heretofore obtaining had been impracticable. The 
record system being introduced is one adapted and modeled after that 
in use by the Government departments at Washington, and the work 
of collecting and entering correspondence and all other records and 
data is now well under way. The great bulk of papers now on file in 
this office under the most propitious circumstances would make the 
task a difficult one. The previous variety as well as lack of systems in 
some instances has materially contributed to the difficulties in estab- 
lishing a logical connection between accounts and correspondence and 
data relative thereto. 

The work in connection with the examination of property returns 
has been unfortunately deferred by the preparation of statements in 
compliance with Senate resolution of May 26, 1900, the preparation 
of which statements has already been referred to. During the course 
of this work an abstract of property purchased was compiled for 
retention and use in connection with the examination of property 
returns. This compilation was rendered necessary by the fact that 
monthly abstracts oi purchases paid for were but irregularly rendered, 
and when so renderea were in almost every instance incomplete. This 
condition has been due largely to the tact that expenditures were 
allowed on the money vouchers. Expenditures of this nature properly 
made are allowed on theaostractof purchases paid for, and disallowances 
are made of all property so expended which is of an unexpendable 
nature. A statement of the latter class of property will be rendered 
to each accountable officer, and he will be required to render returns 
accounting for the disposition of the same. It is earnestly hoped that 
tiiere will l)e no necessity for further interruption in the work along 
this line and that in the near future it will be current. 

It will be readily seen that the diversity of the systems of property 
accountability obtaining during the early occupancy of the island and 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



108 BKPOBT OP MILITABY OOVBBNOB OF CUBA. 

that now in use, as well as the inconsistency of the money accoanting 
and property accounting system of that early penod, has obliged not 
only an examination and settlement of property returns by this office, 
but has also in the interest of a speedy settlement forced this office to 
furnish officers with data from which they might make property 
returns. 

In many instances officers accountable for insular property are no 
longer in the public service. Officers of the Volunteer Army, from 
whom no bona was re<iuired, have been mustered out of the service, 
no certificates of non-indebtedness having been required in connection 
with property accountability. In some instances these officers have 
been conmiunicated with, and they have taken the necessary st&pa to 
comply with the instructions of this office; in others reluctancy has 
been shown to burden themselves further with re^onsibilities incurred 
in a service in which they are no longer a part. Many officers of the 
regular establishment who still remam charged with insular property 
are now serving in the United States, the Philippines, Porto Kico, and 
China, and a very considerable time is consumed in correspondence 
with tJiem. A number of officers through force of circumstances have 
either been compelled or have allowed themselves to become separated 
from their official records, and consequently many replies to queries 
from this office are of an unsatisfactory and incomplete nature. 

The work of making the report called for by the War Department 
instructions under Senate resolution of May 26, 1900, the collection 
and recording of accounts and correspondence, and the inauguration 
of a card record system, and the establishing of a division of property 
returns have all been under the direct charge of Mr. Mattingly. They 
have required a great deal of patience, perseverance, and ability. 

The provisions of War Department mstructions of May 11, 1899, 
under Executive order of May 8, have been found to meet every 
requirement made of them save in a few particulars. The division of 
the receipts of the island into four kinds, namely, customs receipts, 
postal receipts, internal-revenue receipts, and miscellaneous receipts, 
nas been found to be of practical value, but the segregation and the 
keeping separate of these moneys in the hands of the treasurer, and in 
the disbursement of moneys have been found to be vexatious ia the 
extreme and conducive to no practical results. Why four balances 
should be maintained rather than a single balance is not understood. 
If the disbursements which are charged against these funds (as they hap- 

Sen to be in the department of posts charged against the receipts of that 
epartment) represented the running ex|>enses of the machine which 
earns the receipts, and the balance or deficit represented the total earn- 
ings and losses of any one given service, the value of such segregation 
of funds might be readily appreciated; but the exi>enses incidental to 
government and now charged to the several funds in many instances, 
and indeed in most instances, have no logical connection with the 
funds themselves and are arbitrarily charged to one fund or another. 
If for statistical purposes it is desirable to ascertain the net earnings 
of the customs service it can not now, as it would were the system of 
segregation discontinued, be ascertained without actual research and 
compilation. An abandonment of this system would curtail the amount 
of work both for this office and for the officers I'endering accounts. 
As it is, in order that the funds may be kept distinct, separate accounts 
current, abstracts and vouchers thereto for different funds must be 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



EEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OP CUBA. 109 

rendered by a single officer, oftentimes when those funds are spent 
actnallj in the prosecution of the same work. As it is, all moneys of 
the island after collection are required to be covered into the treasury, 
and it is earnestly reconmiended that while their collection be reported 
under the four funds existing, when they come into the hands of the 
treasurer of the island they be covered into a general fund, from which 
allotments under general headings of appropriation may be made 
without regard to 9ie source from which uie funds are derived. 

War Department instructions failed to specifically provide for returns 
of property, although the War Department in various letters to this 
office has evidenced its desire that returns of property should be made 
to the auditor for the island and be examined by him. Yet for juris- 
diction of this class of accounts the present auditor must revert to civil 
order dated March 14, 1889, Headquarters Division of Cuba, as the 
only authoritative j^eneral publication of such jurisdiction* It is 
recommended that this apparent oversight be remedied. 

Under regulations now m force, requisition for advances of funds in 
the hands or the treasurer are forwarded to the auditor, who indorses 
thereon the balance due to or from the officer or agent making the 
requisition and the amount of credit shown bj unsettled accounts. 
These requisitions are then forwarded to the military governor for his 
approval, and when such approval has been indorsee tnereon they are 
returned to the auditor, who thereupon draws a warrant for the 
amounts approved, and such warrant is sent to the military governor 
for his counter signature. Requisitions are drawn each month and for 
such sums only as are necessary to meet the expenses of the month for 
which drawn. The carrying out of this system necessitates the employ- 
ment of a considerable clerical force evidently to no practical purpose. 
Were these requisitions to be drawn bimonthly and forwarded to the 
military governor direct, and should the military governor be author- 
ized to draw the proper warrants on his approval of requisitions, a 
very considerable time and labor might be saved and a more thorough 
examination of items of allotment could be had, as under the present 
system in operation such a strict examination is impracticable on 
account of the fact that the requisitions are urgent and almost invari- 
ably include salaries of employees to whom it would be an undoubted 
hardship to delay payment. Kequisitions for funds for two months 
could be made out sufficiently in advance of the time when the funds 
should be available, to permit of returning them for corrections, etc., 
and yet not have two requisitions from the same party for consecutive 
periods awaiting action, as would be the case were rigidity oracticed 
m the present monthly system. The bimonthly system without the 
necessity of present transmission back and forth from the auditor to 
the mihtary governor would save much time and labor which seems 
unnecessary. 

The services of assistant auditors for the auditing of different classes 
of accounts is deemed to be unnecessary, and the present substitution 
for such offices of chiefs of division has been found to be a decided 
improvement. There should be retained, however, the services of the 
assistant auditor, for the reason that the present incumbent of that 
porition, Mr. Ernesto Fonts y SterUng, is weU acquainted ^th han- 
dling collections of internal revenue and other accounts rendered m 
Spanish, notably those from the departments of finance and pubUc 
works; and he is familiar not only with the system obtaining Deiore 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



110 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF OUBA. 

I 

the establishment of this office, as well as of the old Spanish system 
which had preceded it, but has perfected himself in the theories and 
operation of the present system. His knowledge, too, of the people, 
and the fact that all such accounts and necessarUy the correspondence 
are in Spanish, make his retention necessaiy for the best public inter- 
ests, and demand that his position should have accordea it a proper 
dignity. 

The auditors for the various Executive Departments of the United 
States Government have each what is- termed a deputy auditor, and it 
is recommended that such an officer be provided for in connection 
with this office. With the discontinuance of the offices of the two 
assistant auditors, now vacant, has come to the auditor all the mail, 
which they had previously handled, for signature, in connection with 
warrants, requisitions, certificates of audit, itemized statements, treas- 
urer's receipts, and the general correspondence of the office. It is an 
onerous task that ia imposed on the auditor in the consideration and 
signature of routine work, the volume of which is often so great that 
the auditor is compelled to spend time thereon to the detriment of ad- 
ministrative details. Provision for a deputy auditor who could sign 
for and by the auditor and who could relieve and assist him in his 
various executive duties would be a decided improvement in the direc- 
tion of the efficiency of the office. 

The work engendered by the needs of a thorough accountings^ system 
is voluminous and has been steadilv increasing since the estabiisaiiient 
of this office. During the fiscal year 19W there were but 1,408 
accounts audited in this office, a much greater number of these, pro- 
portionately, being audited after April 17, 1900, on which date I 
assumed charge of the office. Of these accounts 368 were revenue 
accounts, of wnich 192 were of customs receipts, 60 of internal-revenue 
receipts, and 16 receipts from miscellaneous sources. I have hereto- 
fore called attention to the fact that no regular and periodical accounts 
of postal receipts were rendered this office during the period in ques- 
tion. There were audited during this fiscal year 1,04:0 accounts of 
disbursements, 943 from customs receipts, 11 from postal receipts, 70 
from internal-revenue receipts, and 16 from miscellaneous receipts. 

During the six months following June 30, 1900 (the perioa cov- 
ered by this report), 1,520 accounts we re audited, 692 of which ivere 
revenue accounts, 66 of which were customs receipts, 441 postal 
receipts, 62 internal-revenue receipts, and 34 receipts from miscella- 
neous sources; 928 accounts of disbursements were audited, 688 of 
which were from customs receipts, 6 from postal receipts, and 336 from 
internal-revenue receipts. There were then over 100 more accounts 
audited during the six months covered by this report than had been 
audited in the preceding year. Many of these accounts, and cited 
here as audited during these six months, were of funds pertaining to 
the fiscal year 1900 remaining unaudited at the conclusion of that year. 
This fact, however, does not offset the increase in the number of 
accounts rendered to this office. 

During the fiscal year 1900 there were 1,236 warrants, of which 1,209 
were accountable, 26 transfer, and 2 settlement wan-ants. During the 
six months following there were drawn 917 warrants, of which 909 
were accountable, 7 transfer, and 1 settlement warrants. The 1,209 
accoimtable warrants drawn during the fiscal year 1900 represented 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OP MILITABT GOVERNOR OF CUBA. Ill 

116,666,233.34; the 909 warrants drawn during the six months follow- 
mg represented $10,209,785.29. 

At the conclusion of this report there remained unaudited 299 
accounts of revenues and 363 of disbursements. Of the unaudited 
accounts of revenues 229 were of postal receipts, which in the ordi- 
nary routine were audited during tne month following. Of the 863 
accounts of disbursements 196 were from internal-revenue funds, and 
the greater part of these accounts rendered by hospitals which had 
previously oeen delinouent. They are all small accounts and the 
work throughout the omce may genei'ally be stated to be current. 

Itemizations and sununaries of receipts and expenditures of the 
island would have been made had it not oeen deemed unnecessary by 
the War Department, which, under date of October 3 last, advised 
this ofSce, through the military governor, that itemized statements of 
individual accounts would be continued to be rendered to that Depart- 
ment and that it would prepare the necessary sununaries and itemiza- 
tions necessary for statistical purposes. 

E. C. Brooks, 
Mcyor amd Qmrtermaster. U, o. K, 

Aumtor for the islcmd of (hiba. 

The Military Governor, Island op Cuba, 

Haba/na, Ouba. 



FOBMS IN AUTHORIZSD USB IN THB ACOOUNTINO STSTKM OP THK ISLAND OP CUBA. 
LIST OP FORMS APPBNDBD. 

Form No. L Bequidtion and estimate for insular funds; extra leaf to form No. 1. 

FomiNo. 2. Account current of disbursements. 

Form No. 8. Invoice of funds transferred. 

FMm No. 4. Abstract of purchases paid for. 

Fonn No. 6. Voucher to abstract of purchases paid for. 

FonnNo. 6. Abstract of expenditures. 

Form No. 7. Receipt roll. 

FbrmNo. 8. Voucher to abstract of expenditures. 

Foim Na 9. Travel voucher. 

Fofrn No. 10. Abstract of transfers. 

FonnNo. 11. Receipt for funds. 

Fbnn No. 12. Quarterly return of insular property; extra leaf to form No. 12. 

Fonn No. 18. Abstract of insular property purchaned. 

FMm No. 14. Abstract of insular proper^ received. 

Form Na 15. Abstract of insul&r property received from various sources. 

Form No. 16. Abstractof insular property transferred. 

Form Na 17. Abstractof insular property expended, lost, destroyed, and sold; extra leaf to forms 

No. 18 to No. 17, Inclusive. 
Form Na 18. Invoice of insular property transferred. 

Form No. 19. Receipt for insular property transferred. 

Form Na 20. Account of sales at auction. 

Form No. 21. Monthly list of insular property expended. 

Fbrm No. 22. Articles lost or destroyed. 

Form No. 28. Inventory and inspection report; extra leaf to form No. 28. 

Form No. 24. Witne« voucher. 

Form Na 26. Account current of internal revenue receipts. 

Form No. 26. Report of consular fees. 

Fonn No. 27. Abstract of moneys received. (Collectors of customs.) 

Form No. 28. Account current of miscellaneous revenues. 

Form No. 29. Monthly report of collections. ((Jollectors of customs.) 

Fbim No. 80. Account current of custom receipts; report of collections of tonnage dues; abstract of 

„ tonnaffe dues refunded; voucher for refund of tonnage dues. 

Fonn No. 220. Monthly postal aooount. Department of posts. 
NOTB.— Forms Nos. 1 to 28, inclusive, are printed in both English and Spanish; forms Nob. 24 and 26 

tn Spsnish (mly ; and forms Nos. 26 to 80, inclusive, in English only. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 



BBPOBT OP MIUTABY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 



[FOrml.] 
Requisition and estimate for insuiar funds. 



Number of eztnt sheets - 



Recapitulatioii. 



Estimate. 



DoUan. Cts. 



Allowed. 



Dollan. CtL 



State and ffovemment: 

Central ofBce 

Office of the province of 

Hospitals ana charitiefl 

Jails 

Public bolldings 

Total $. 

Justice: 

Central office 

Supreme court 

Courts of the province of 

Public buildings 

Total $. 

Public instruction: 

Central office 

University and State schools 

Public buildings 

Total $, 

Finance: 

Central office 

Office of the fiscal sone of 

Postal service 

Customs service expense 

Refundments 

Money orders and roistered mail 

Quarantine 

Public buUdings 

Total $. 

Agriculture, commerce, and industries: 

Central office 

Offioe of the province of 

Total $. 

Public works: 

Central office 

Office of the province of 

Construction and repairs 

Lighthouses 

Total $. 

Municipalities: 

Police. 

Instruction 

Saniution 

Hospitals and charities 

Miscellaneous 

Total $. 

Military department: 

Banacks and quarters 

Administratic» and rural guard 

Miscellaneous 

Total $ 

Grand total 



Office of - 



7b tkeAmdUor(^ the T9landftf Cuba, HaJbatuuCtiba, 
Sia: Please cause accountable warrant to be issued on the treasurer of the island of Coba, in ny 

bvor. for dollars, payable from receipts, being the amount required by this office tot 

the month of , 190—, as oer itemised estimate hereto attached. 

My accounts have been reuaered to * 

Signature , 

Official title . 



OFFICK of THK ArDROB FOB THB ISLJkND OF CUIIA^ 

H<Aama, C^Aa, . «►-. 

Balance due from the above-named officer, per auditor's books, I . Unsettled aooounti iB 

the auditor's t>ffice show $ . 

Bflspectfully transmitted to the military governor for his action. 



ilwitfor/M- tte /jloKi </ (W 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEFOBT OP mLITABr OOVESNOB OF CUBA. 



118 



HKADQUABTIB8 DBPARTMKMT OP CUBA, 

Habana, Cubct, , 190—. 

tar the ram of $ , and retnmed to the auditor for the island of Cuba for allowance 

iflBoe of an aoooontable warrant f6r laid amount 



Major-QeHerol, U. 8. V.^JOUary Qovenwr. 



Onrci OF THS Auditor op trk Island of Cuba, 

Habana, Cuba, , IW— . 

Allowed pnnoant to the foregoing approval of the military goyemor and accountable warrant 
Ko. —^ ianed hereon for $ 



Atiditor/or the Ittand qf (W. 





[Bztra sheet f , form L] 








Page 


eenendhead , 


Estimate. 


Allowed. 








8nM>f«a . 


Dollars. 


Cts. 


Dollars. 


Cts. 























Total carried. 



Page- 





Estimate. 




Allowed. 










ftn»>twa-1 , 


Dollars. 


Cts. 


Dollars. 


Cts. 






Aimmnt brought forward 



















Total carried. 



[Indorsement.] 
[Form No. 1.] 
Bequisition and estimate for insular funds. 



OfBce of - 



Brtimateof- 



Funds required by - 



-, treasurer of the island of Cuba. 
in the month of , 190—. 



8im: Plesae place funds to my credit as follows: 



N. A T. Co., Habana ... 
N. A. T. Cou, Santiago... 
M. A T. Co., Cienfuegos. 
K. A T. Co.. Matanxas. . . 
H. at; Co., New York. 



Total. 



Dollars. 



Cts. 



NoTB.— The aboTe should be filled out by the disbursing officer making the estimate. 
The within estimate is approred. 



Kont L— The amount ** allowed '* should be left blank. 

son 2.— The number of extra sheets and the number of each page should be filled In to guard 
tninstlQv. 

NoTB a.— This form of estimate of funds will be used for all moneys required. ^ , 

Moni—This estimate should reach the auditor for the island of Cuba by the20lhof the month 
■Attpceoeding that for which the funds ore required. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



114 



REPORT OP MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



[Fonn No. 2.— Aoooont corrent] 

The UnUed ISkUes miUUxry gwerrm^ in account current wiih' 
, at , during the month of , 190 — . 





General head 




































TOCal. 


Date. 


Subhead 
































190-. 


CBKDIT. 

acooant 
































By cash received from 

DIBIT. 

To amount of purchases per 
abstract A 


























\ 1 




























t 
1 


1 






To amount of expenditures 
per abstiact B 






To amount of transfers per 
abstractC 






To balance due the United 
States military govern- 
ment of the island of Cuba 
carried to new account 

Total 








1 










1 
i 
















1 


1 





I certifv that the above is a true account of all the monevs that have oome into my hands dariBg 

the month of , 190^, on account of the United States military government of the island of Cuba, 

and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. The balance due the United States miUtaiy 
government of the island of Cuba is I— — , and is deposited as follows: 

Deposited in the f- 



Deposited in the - 
Deposited in the - 
In office safe $- 



Total. 



Account current for the month of 
t— -. — .190—. 



[Indorsement] 
[Form No. 2.] 
, 190-, of 



DUtmnIng 0i^t»' 



at • 



To be made in duplicate. One copy, accompanied by abstracts and vouchers, will be forwarded 
to the auditor for the island of Cuba and the other retained by the officer. 

The account, with abstracts and vouchers complete, will be deposited In the post-office, addieaed 
to the auditor for the island of Cuba, on or before the twentieth day of each month. 

Receipts of money must state distinctly from what source the fund was derived. If received on 
account of correction of overpayments, it should be stated by whom and to whom the overpayments 
were made, and on what vouchers. All moneys received from sales should be deposited at once to 
the credit of the treasurer of the island of Cuba. 

The accounts of disbursing officers are kept in the office of the auditor f6r the island of Cuba by 
fiscal years; therefore no account current should contain mixed accounts, and no item should be 
entered thereon unless it pertains to the fiscal year to which the funds are chaigeable, and all accounts 
current, abstracts, and vouchers, including transfers, on abstract C, and refundments, should have 
noted in red ink on the ftice, as well as indorsed in the brief on the back, the fiscal year to which the 
funds pertain. 



[Form No. 8.] 
Invoice of insular funds transferred to 



-,a<- 



Date: 190-. 




Dollars. 


Cents. 





















































I hereby certify that on this day of , 190—, I have transferred to the mm 

of — dollars and cents, in full of the above invoice, to the correctness of which I also oeitiiy. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC: 



BEFOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



115 



[Indonement.] 

[Form No. 3.] 

Voucher No. to the account current. 



Invoice of funds transferred to - 
Authority: ■ 



, at- 



, on the , day of - 



-.190-. 



Offioere transferring funds will furnish invoices in duplicate to the receiving offioera, who will 
retain one and forward the other to the auditor for the island of Cuba with his account current 



[Form No. 4.— Abstract A.] 



Abstract of purchases paid for at 



by- 



-, in the morUh of - 



-,190-, 





1 
i 


General head 






































Subhead 






190—. 






Date of 
payment. 


From whom purchased. 


a 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


i 


1 
1 


1 
1 


s 


1 


1 






Total 































































I certify that the above abstract is correct. 



Abstract of purchases paid for at • 



[Indorsement] 
[Form No. 4.] 
ABSTRACT A. 
in the month of ■ 



-, 190-, by - 



The original copy of this form to be forwarded with the account current to the auditor for the 
island of Cuba; a press copy to be retained by the officer. 

This abstract is supported by vouchers (form 6), and embraces all articles paid for in the month, 
whether purchased within or prior to the month. 



[Form No. 6.— Voucher to Abstract A.) 

The United Slates military government of the island of Cuba to - 

at . 



-, Dr.y located 



Date of 

purchase, 

1»— . 



Articles. 



Appropria- 
tion, general 
and subhead. 



Amount. 



Dollars. Cts. 



Under 

Authority filed . .> 

Copy of public notice filed 

Accepted proposal filed 

Copy of letter accepting proposal filed . 



Total. 



I certify that the above account is correct and Just; that the articles purchased will be accounted 

lOT on my return of insular property for the quarter ending , 190—; and that , 

wlK> signed the receipt below, is authorised to do so. 



^Received at - 
Ooilars and - 



• this- 



-day of- 



(Slgned in duplicate) 



- cents in full of the above account. 



-,190— ,of- 



- the sum of - 



NoT£.-When a firm is the payee the firm name should be signed by one of its members followed 
by his own signature and the words " by . member of the firm," or words of like import 



Digitized by Vj\^\^V IC 



116 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT OOVSRNOB OF CUBA. 



[IndomemenU] 
[Fonn No. bJ] 



Voucher No.- 



- to Abstract A, month of - 



ApproprUtioiis 

raid by check No. • 



, account of • 



-,date- 



-, paid to 



, 190— . for$- 



-,190-. 

-. Amount, $- 
on • 



To be made in duplicate, one copy to be retained by the officer, one to be forwarded to the auditor 
for the island of Cuba with Abstract A. 
Vouchers for purchases will show on their face the mode of agreement, i. e.: 

1. Under contract dated , 190—. 

2. Under public notice dated , 190—. 

8. Under oral agreement without adyertiang. 



The authority for making a purchase and a statement of the object and necessity for same most 
accompany the voucoer. If such authority has already been filed, it should be referred to in ail sob- 
sequent Youchers for purchases under it. 

when purchases are made under an accepted bid after public notice a copy of the letter accepting 
the bid must be filed with Uie voucher and a reference made thereto on subsequent yoochers for put- 
chases made under the accepted bid. 

No reference should be made to any agreement not in writing and not transmitted to the aodltor 
for the island of Cuba for file. 



[Form No. «.— Abstract B.] 



Abetrad of expenditures of funds by - 



-,at' 



-,190—. 



-, during the month of 



Date of 
payment, 



M 



Oeneralhead... 



Subhead. 



To whom paid . 



Total. 



TOUlL 



I certify that the above abstract is correct. 



Abstract of expenditures of funds by • 



[Indorsement] 
[Form No. «.] 
ABSTRACT B. 
-, at 



190—. $- 



-, during the month of - 



The original copy of this form to be forwarded to the auditor for the island of Cuba with the 
account current within twenty days after the end of the month, a press copy to be retained by the 
officer. 

Thi8 abstract contains all payments in the account current except purchases (Abstract A) and 
transfere of funds (Abstract C), and will include services, rent, light, water, freightage, traveling 
expenses of authorized persons under orders, etc 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



117 



[Fonn No. 7.~Voacher to Abstract B.] 



We. the 8ubecribez8,do herebjacknowledgeto have received of - 



.at- 



-, the Bom 



set opposite oar names, respectively, being in full of our pay for the period herein expressed, hav- 
ing rigned duplicates hereof. Month of 1 , 190—. Office of . 



190-. 
Date. 



i 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



B ' B 



Period of B 
ice. 



Rate of 
pay. 









1^ 



III 






* When a payee on this roll can not write, he will receipt by his mark, which will be witnessed sepa- 
rately in each Instance by a disinterested person. 



1 certify on honor that the above receipt roll is correct and Jnst 



Voucher No. - 



[Indorsement.] 

[Form No. 7.] 

, Abstract B, month of - 



.190-. 



Receipt roll 



paid by 
ia by ch< 



Paid by check No. - 



Date, - 



-, department of 



, 190—. Depository, - 



Amount, $- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118 



BEPOBT OF MILITAiaY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



[Form No. 8.— Voucher to Abstract B.] 
The United SUUes military government of the island of Cuba to - 



-, Dr.ylocated 





I re. 








Date. 


Items. 


Appropria- 
tion, general 
and subhead. 


Dollars. 


Cla. 




Under 

Authority filed 

Copy of public notice filed 

Accepted proposal filed 

Copy of letter accepting proposal filed 

Total 





















I certify that the above account is correct and Just, that the services were rendered as stated, 

that thev were necessary for the public service, and that , who signed the receipt hereto 

annexed, is authorized to do so. 



Received at - 
dollars and - 



-this- 



-day- 



-,190-,of 



, the sum of 



(Signed in duplicate. ) 



cents, in full of above account, to the correctness of which I also certify. 



Note.— When a firm is the payee, the firm name should be signed by one of its members, followed 
by his own signature and the words " by , member of the firm," or words of like import. 



Voucher No. - 



Appropriation 



[Indorsement.] 

[Form No. 8.] 

- to Abstract B, month of - 



.. . account of • 

paid by check No. , date — 



— , paid to — 
-, 190—, for $- 



-,190-. 

-. Amount, $- 
-, on 



To be in duplicate: one copy to be retained by the officer, the other to be forwarded to the auditor 
for the island of Cuba with Abstract B. 

This form is used for payment of services not entered on the receipt rolls, for rent of buildings, and 
for other miscellaneous disbursements. 

When a man is discharged without being paid, his account will be stated on this form, certified, 
and given to him. 

Vouchers for services other than personal will show on their face the mode of engagement, i.e.: 

1. Under contract dated , 190—. 

2. Under public notice dated , 190—. 

8. Under oral agreement without advertising. 

The authority for engaging a service, a statement of the object, and the necessity for the same must 
accompany each voucher. If such authority has already been filed, it should be referred to in subse- 
quent vouchers for services rendered under it. 

When services other than personal are engaged under an accepted bid after public notice, the 
accepted bid and a copy of the letter accepting the bid must be filed with voucher, and a reference 
made thereto on subsequent vouchers for services performed under the accepted bid. 

No reference should be made to any agreement not in writing and not transmitted to the office of 
the auditor for the island of Cuba for file. 



[Form No. 9.— Voucher to Abstract B.] 
The United States milUary government of the island of Cuba to ■ 



•,Dr, 



From- 



, 190—, to - 



-.190-. 



For actual cost of claw transportation from — , to , being 

mile 

For transportation of baggage not free on ticket 

For cab hire 

For transfer of baggage 

For subsistence as per statement, — day, at I— per day 

Total 



I certify that the travel charged for was actually performed by me on duty, under the authority 
hereto annexed, and the entire cost of transportation and subsistence was as above stated, and thaiu 
per year. 




my salary is . 

Received the 
check No. 



dollars, in full of the above account. 
(Signed in duplicate.) 



day of • 

, the sum of • 



•, 190—, from , disbursing officer, by his 

100; by cash the sum of 100 



NoTB 1.— The cost of subsistence must be itemized. 

NoTB 2.— In case of a public official or employee the annual salary received must be stated. 



Digitized by 



vjvjogle 



BEFOBT OF MILITABT GOVEHNOB OF CUBA. 



119 



TteveUpald 



[Indonement.] 

[Fonn No. 9.] 

Voucher No. , Abstract B. 

, check No. -, date , amoant 

depository , to the order of . f 



[Form Na 10.— Abstract C] 



Ab9tra<i of transfers of funds by • 



-,01 

-, 190—, 



-, during the month of 



Date, 






General head. 



Subhead. 



To whom transferred 



Totol. 



Total. 



I certify that the above abstract is correct. 



Abstract of transfers of funds by - 



[Indonement] 

[Form No. 10.] 

ABSTRACT C. 

— ,at 



-, during the month of - 



-.190—, 



The original copy of this form to be forwarded with the account current to the auditor for the 
Island of Coba within twenty days after the end of the month. A press copy to be retained by the 
officer. 



[Form No. 11.— Voucher to Abstract C] 
Receipt for funds received from , at - 



Date: 190-. 



Appropriation. 



Dollant. Cents. 



For . 
For . 
For . 
For . 
For . 
For . 
For . 
For . 
For 
For . 
For . 



I hereby certify that I received this 



<iollanand 



cents, in full of the above 



day of - 



-day o 
receipt, 



, 190-, of - 



which I also certify is correct. 



Non.— Appropriations should be given under their several headings and subheadings. 

[Indorsement.] 

[Form No. 11.] 

Voucher No. . Abstract C. 

Beocipt for funds received from at , on the day of 190—. 

Anthority: . 9 . 

To be made In duplicate, one copy to be forwarded to the auditor for the island of Cuba, with 
Abstract C, by the officer transferring the funds and the other to be retained by him. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



120 BEPORT OP MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

[Ponn No. 12.] 



Quarterly return of insular property on hand, received, transferred, etc, of 

ai , Cuba, for the quarter ending , 190 — . 



Date. 
190-. 



Abstracts, etc. 



Number or quantity. 



Per last return . 
Per Abstract D.. 
Per Abstract E.. 
Per Abstract P.. 



On hand 

Received by purchase 

Received by transfers 

Fabricated, taken up. etc.. 



Per Abstract G.. 
Per Abstract H.. 



Condition 1., 
2. 
8.. 



Total to be accounted for.. 



Transferred 

Expended, sold, etc. . 



Total transferred, expended, etc . 
Total remaining on hand 



In ffood order 

Unfit for service but repairable. , 
Totally unfit for service 



Made in duplicate. 



nVBTBUCnONB. 



[Erasures and alterations of entries on a voucher should be explained on the maigin.] 

When public property becomes damaged, except by fair wear and tear, or otherwise unsuitable fot 
use, or a deficiency is found in it, the officer accountable for the same shall report the case to hit 
superior officer, who shall, if necessary, appoint a board of survey. 

In all cases of deficiency or damage of any article, the officer accountable for the property ii 
reouired to show by one or more afndavlts, setting forth the circumstances of the case, tbat the 
denciency was by unavoidable accident or loss in actual service, without any fault on his part, and 
in case of damage, that due care and attention were exerted on his part, and that the damage did 
not result from neglect. 

An Inspection report, filed as authority for disposing of damaged property that has become unserv- 
iceable from causes other than ordinary wear or use in the service, will not relieve an officer fro«i 
liabilitv on account of their condition, if there is no evidence that they have been examined bj 
a board of survey. Certificate is required as evidence that articles ordered to be dropped from retoto 
and destroved were destroyed, as ordered. 

When it becomes necessary for officers to pay for deficiencies, the money should be deposited, to the 
credit of the proper appropriation, with the treasurer of the island of Cuba. 

In case of one officer relieving another, the transferring officer need not enter the receipt for 
property upon the abstract, but directly on the return as " transferred to successor." 

The receiving officer, in such case, may enter the invoice upon the return as *'on hand, receivad 
from predecessor." 

The order of entry of articles on this return should be followed on abstracts and vouchers, and such 
entries should be made alphabetically under two headings, vis, unexpendable and expendable. 

The condition of the articles on hand should be noted in red ink on the lines provided for that 
purpose. 

[Extra loaf to Form No. 12.] 






Made in duplicate. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILXTABY OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



121 



[Indonement.] 

[Fonn No. 12.] 

at 



Quarterly retom of insular property on hand, received, transferred, etc., in the quarter ending on 

the day of , 190—. 



Acknowledged - 
Bxamined ^— - 

Settled 

Notified .- 



—,190-. 



-,190-. 



To be made in duplicate, one copy to be forwarded to the auditor for the island of Cuba within 
twenty days after the expiration of the quarter, the other to be retained by the officer. 
This entire fold to be left blank. 
Eztia leayea will be furnished when required. 

I certify on honor that the foregoing return exhibits a true and correct statement of all the insular 
pcoperty which has come into my pooeesion during the quarter ending on the of , 190—. 



Signed in duplicate. 



Place, 
Date, • 



— , Cuba. 
-,190-. 



VFoim No. 18.— Abstract D.J 

Abitract of arUdes of inmlar property pttrchased at — 
of , 190— y by , at- 



during (he mordk 



Date. 


Number 

of 
Youcber. 


Frcmi whom pur- 
chased. 


Totol 
amount of 

each 
voucher. 




























Dollars. 


Cts. 


— 


























Aiticlee pnichased 
and not paid for.. 






























Total purchased 
during the 
month 



































I certify that the above abstract is correct 



-, 190—, by - 



(Sgned in duplicate.) 

[IndoFsement.] 

[Form No. 18.— Abstract D.] 

Abstract of insular property purchased during the month of - 

at . 

Tb be in duplicate and rendered monthly; one copy to be retained, one to be sent to the auditor 
lor the island of Cuba. 

This abstract appertains to the return of insular property, and is designed to show all the supplies 
porcliaaed, whetner paid for or not. No vouchers of the purchases paid for accompany this abstract. 
Tbey acccnnpany the monev accounts. Extra leaves will be furnished when required. 

All property will be dassmed alphabetically under two headings, viz, unexpendable and expend- 



[Form No. 14.— Abstract E.] 

Abstract of insular property received during the quarter ending on the — 
of , 190—, by , at , Cuba. 



day 



Date. 
190-. 


No. of 
voucher. 


Frcwn whom received. 
























































Totol 




































1 
1 

































I certify that the above abstract is correct. 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, FT 3 9 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



122 



BEPOET OF MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



[IndoTsement] 
[Form No. 14.] 
ABSTRACT E. 



Insular property reoeiyed during the quarter ending - 



-.190— ,by- 



-,at- 



To be in duplicate; one copy to be retained by the officer and one to be sent to the auditor for the 
island of Cuba with the quarterly return. 

All property receiyed from other officers will be entered on this abstract, whether receipted for or 
not It will be supported by youchers, Form No. 18. Extra leayes will be furnished when requiied. 

All property will oe claasmed alphabetically under two headings, ylz, unexpendable and expend- 
able. 



[Form No. 16.— Abstract F.l 

Ahgtrad of articles received from various sources during the quarter endifig on the • 
day of , 190 — , hy , ai . 



Date. 



No. of 
youcher. 



How receiyed. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEFOBT OP MILITABY OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



123 



Quarter ending - 



[Indonement] 

[Fbnn No. 16.J 

ABSTRACT O. 

, 190—, inimlar property transferred by - 



,at- 



The original copy of this form to be forwarded to the auditor for the island of Cuba with the quar- 
terly return. 

A press copy to be retained by the officer. 

This abstract contains all transfers of insular property to other officers, to be accounted for bv them; 
the voucheis to accompany this abstract are their receipts. When these are not received in tune the 
officer will substitute his own certified list of the stores sent and the bill of lading. The receipts he 
will afterwards transmit when he receives them. 

Extra leaves will be famished when required. 



[Form No. 17.— Abstract H.i 

Ahshrad ofirmdar property expended, lod, and destroyed in the public service during the 

quarter ending on the day of , 190 — , by , at 

, at , Cuba, 



Date, 
190-. 


No. of 
voucher. 


By whom made. 






















































































































1 





I certify that the above abstract is correct 
(Signed in duplicate.) 



[Bxtra leaf to Forms ia-17, inclusive.] 



[Indorsement] 

[Form No. 17.] 

ABSTRACT H. 

, 190—, insular property expended, lost, destroyed, and sold, 

by , at . 

To be in duplicate: one copy retained by the officers, one sent with the quarterly return to the 
auditor for the island of Cuba. The vouchers to this abstract are forms Nos. 2D, 21, and 22. 
Extra leaves will be furnished when required. 



Quarter ending - 



[Form No. 18.— Voucher to Abstract E.] 



Imoice of insular property transferred by - 
at , on the 



day of - 



-,to 

-, J90—. 



Number or quantity. 


Articles. 


Cost when new. 


Condition 

when 
delivered. 


Remarks. 


In figures. 


In words. 


Dollars. 


Cts. 





























I oerUfy that I have this day transferred to the officer named above the articles specified In the 
for^folng list pursuant to , copy of which is furnished herewith. 

(Signed in duplicate.) 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



124 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOR O^ CUBA. 



[Indoraement.] 
[Fonn No. 18.] 

Voucher No. to Abetrmct E, quarter ending - 

Invoice of insular property traniif erred by , at 



. 190-. 



-, to- 



-,at- 



To be made in duplicate: both to be forwarded or delivered to the officer to whom the articles are 
transferred. He will retain one and forward the other, with his Abstract E, to the auditor for the 
island of Cuba. Authority for making transfers of property will accompany this voucher. 

Cost price when new should be given when known or ascertainable; when unknown an estimated 
value should be placed on each article of property, followed by the words, " Estimated value; coet 
when new not known/' or words of like import 



[Fbrm No. 19.— Voucher to Abstract O.] 



Received at 

named articles: 


, this 


day of 




-, 190-, from 


, the following- 


Number or quantity. 


Articles. 


Cost when new. 


Condition 

when 
delivered. 


Remarks. 


In figures. 


In words. 


Dollars. 


Cts. 





























(Signed in duplicate.) 



Voucher No. 



[Indorsement.] 

[Form No. 19.] 

- to Abstract O, quarter ending - 



Receipt for insular property transferred to - 
day of 



— , at- 
,190-. 



-.190-. 
, on the - 



To be in duplicate; one copv to be retained by the officer who transfers the property, one to be sent 
to the auditor for the island of Cuba, with Abstract 0, at end of quarter. 

Cost price when new should be given when known or asoertainaule; when unknown an estimated 
value should be placed on each article of property, followed by the words, " Estimated value; cost 
when new not known," or words of like import 



[Form No. 20.— Voucher to Abstract H.] 



Accowni of tales of ariides of insular property sold at public auction at 

Uie direction of , on the day of- 

190—, 



■ under 



Number or quantity. 



Articles. 



Purchaser. 



Amount 



I certify that the above account of sales is accurate and Just 



AucUtmcer. 
I certify that the above-enumerated articles were sold at public auction, as above stated, pursuant 

to , and that the amount received therefrom has been taken up on my account current 

for the month of , 190—. 



Voucher No. 



[Indorsement] 

[Form No. 50.] 

- to Abstract H, quarter ending - 



-.190—. 



Account of sales at auction. Dollars - 



-at- 



- on the • 



- day of - 



-. 190-, 



The original copy of this form to be forwarded by next mail to the auditor fw the island of Cuba 
for file with the quarterly return to which it pertains; a press copv to be retained bv the officer. 

An account in this form should be prepared at every sale of public property. AU money received 
from sales, after deducting expenses of sale, should be immediately deposited in the nearest United 
States depository to the credit of the treasurer of the island of Cuba. 

The necessary expenses of all sales of public property will be paid out of the total receipts from 
such sales. Expenses of sales will be supported by vouchers to be filed with this account Where 
no expense is incurred it will be so stated. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEPOKT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

[Form No. 21.~Voaclier to Abstract H.] 



Ua of msular property expended m the public service at 
direction of , in the month of 



190—, 



125 



under ihe 



Number or quantity. 



Artloles. 



Application. 



I certify, on honor, that the seyeral articles of insular prc^wrty above enumerated haye been neo- 
€BBarily expended in the public service at this place, as indicated by the marginal remarks annexed 
to them, req>ectively. 

Approved. , 



Voucher No. 



[Indorsement] 

[Form No. 21.] 

- to Abstract H, quarter ending - 



-.190-. 



Monthly Ust of insular property expended by • 



-.190-. 



,at • 



during the month of 



To be in duplicate; one copy to be retained by the officer, one to be sent to the auditor for the 
island of Cuba with the quarterly Abstract H. 

NoTK.— This list should be made out monthly, to enable the officer to know the exact state of his 
supplies. The abstract when forwarded will be accompanied by all the monthly lists. 



[Form No. 22.— Voucher to Abstract H.] 

Lid of ineuiar property lost or destroyed tn the public service at • 
possession and charge of , tn the month of 



-, while in 



-, 190—. 



Number or quantity. 



Articles. 



Ciroumstances and cause. 



I certify that the several articles of insular property above enumerated have been unavoidably lost 
or destroyed while in the public service, as inoicatea by the remarks annexed to them, respectively. 



Approved: 



Voucher No. 



[Indorsement] 

[Form No. 22.] 

- to Abstract H, quarter ending - 



Articles lost or destroyed during the month of - 



-.190-. 



-.190-. 



The original copy of this form to be forwarded to the auditor for the island of Cuba with the quar- 
ts Abstract H; a press copy to be retained by the officer. , ^ , 

Tills list should be made out monthly to enable the officer to know the exact state of his suppUes. 
The abstract, when forwarded, will be accompanied by all the monthly lists. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



126 



BBPOBT OF MILITAST GOVEBNOR OP CUBA. 



Inventory and inspection report of inrndar pro 
and which has been inspected and re^ 



J for which ■ 
on by 



' is accountable 



-, inspecting officer. 



Inventory. 



1 


2 


8 




4 
Date of 

flTBtiBSUe 

foruae. 


Received by officer responsible. 


9 


Artidea. 


Total yaine 
as per in- 
voice or 

official 006t 
price.! 


5 
When. 


6 
Where. 


7 

From 
whom. 


8 

Condi- 

tionwhen 

received. 


How rendered on- 
serviceable. 


1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 Total.. 












1 






1 
2 

to 

U 
12 
13 
14 
15 
Ifi 
17 




f 





1 See directions. 

I certify that this is a correct inventorv. in every particular, of insular j>n^>erty for which I am 
responsible, each and every article of which I have personally examined; and believe requires the 
action of an inspector, and nas never been previously condemned, and is now unsuitable for service 
here. 

Place. . , 

Date, . 



Inspection report. 





10 

Mature and extent of 
damage. 


Disposition recommended. 


16 


1 


11 

To be 
continued 


To be dropped. 


14 
To be sold. 


15 

To be 
turned into 


Remarks. 




12 


18 






in service. 


To be 
destroyed. 


To be 
broken up. 




depot 




1 


Brought forward . . 














2 
















8 
















4 
















5 
















6 
















7 
















8 
















9 
















10 
















11 














U 


12 














12 


L3 














U 


14 














14 


15 














16 


16 
17 














15 


Total 












17 









I certify that I have, this - 



-da: 



IV of . 190—, carefullv examined each and every 

mventory; that their condition is as stated above; that the 



article enumerated in the accompanying i 

articles recommended to be destroyed have no money value; and that disposition reoommiended !■, 
in my Judgment, the best for the public interest I also certify that artides found to be ptteily 
worthless have, as far as practicable, been destroyed in my presence. 



DfBBCnONB. 



/tupedor. 



1. This form will be used for the inventory and inspection of all insular property for condemnation. 
When the form is too small for enumeration of all the articles, extra leaf to form 28 will be inserted. 
All the Inside pages, Including extra leaves, should always be numbered consecutively before signa^ 
ture by the responsible officer. 

2. In stating the money value of articles, in column 8, the purchase price should be given. 



8. mibllc animals will not be inventoried with other proi 

4. Unserviceable property before bcine submitted to an inspector will be examined by the officer 



>perty. 
inspec 



re«i>on8ible for it, and the information ciuled for in the inventory will be fully stated, 
win ascertain whether the condition of the property is as Htated in the inventory. 



The inspector 



Digitized by ^ 



ioogk 



KEFOBT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



127 



[Indorsement.] 

[Fonn No. 28.] 

mTentorjaad Inspection report of insular property for which- 
at on the day oi 



-,190-. 

The within-named articles will be disposed of as recommended by 
. For directions see other side. 



- is acooontable. Inspected 



By order of 



[Form No. 26.— Voucher to the account current of customs reyenue.] 



Report of consular fees collected by 

of , Cuba^durmgihevfumthof 



, coUedor of customs for ihe port 
, 190—. 



Date. 



Name of the party 
paying the fee. 



Amounts 
paid. 



Nature of serrioe 
rendered. 



Name of 
yesMl. 



Place of 
destina- 
tion. 



Remarks. 



I hereby certify that the aboye report of consular fees is a full and perfect transcript of the register 
which by law I am required to keep: that the same is true and correct and contains a full and accurate 

statement of all fees received by me as collector of customs at , Cuba, during the month 

of . 190— .while acting under authority conferred by circular Na 16, Division of Customs 

and Insular Attain, War Department, May 11, 1899. 



OoOector qf CusiomB. 
[Indorsement] 
[Form No. 26.— Voucher to the account current of customs revenues.] 
Beport of oonsolar fees collected by — — , collector of customs at , Cuba, during 



he month of - 



-,190—. 



Bach month collectors of customs, acting under instructions contained in Circular No. 16, Division 
of Customs and Insular Affairs, War Deputment, May 11, 1899, will forward to the auditor for the 
island of Cuba, as a voucher to their accounts current of receipts, a full report of consular fees 
collected. 



[Form No. 27.— Abstract No.—. ] 
TO THE ACCOUNT CURRENT OF CUSTOMS REVENUES. 



Ahstrad of moneys received on account of*' 

customs for the port of , CubOf during ihe mordh of 



-, coUedor oj 
,190—. 



Date. 



From whom received. 



Remarks. 



Amount 



Total. 



I certify the above abstract is correct 



OoUector qf OuttofM. 



[Indorsement] 

[Form No. 27.— Abstract No. 7—.] 

To the account current of customs revenues. 



Alatiact of moneys received on account of 

port of — , Cuba, during the month of 



.by- 



— , collector of customs for the 
,190-. $ . 



This form is intended for all receipts, to be accounted for on the account current of customs reve- 
nosL rendered the auditor for the island of Cuba monthly, for which other forms have not been 
■PedfleaUy prescribed. Each class of such receipts will be entered on a separate abstract under its 
{Hffopriate number and heading, the style of which will sgree with the entry of the number and 
liCMing of the abstract on the account current 



•Here state source from which receipts are derived. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



128 REPOBT OF iCtLtTABT GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

[Fonn No. 28.] 
MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS. 



The United States military government of Cuhaj in accourU current wUh - 
for the month of , 190—, 



Debit 

To balance from aocoant ending 

, 190—, 

Deposited with the treasurer of the 
island of Cuba: 

To receipt No. , dated 

190— , I 

To receipt No. , dated 

190—,$ 

To receipt No. , dated 

190—,^ 

To receipt No. , dated 

190-,$ 

To receipt No. , dated 

190-,$ 



To balance. 
Total 



Credit. 

By balance from aooomit ending 

, 190-. 

Items:* 



By balance. 
Total 



• State the source from which, and the nature of each item collected. This aoooont eorreot it 
intended for the accounting of mone3r8 received from miscellaneous sources only. Deposits of onez- 
pended balances from funds allotted from the treasury of the island, in the hands of disbuningofllen, 
should be taken up in the regular account current of disbuisements. 

I certify the above reported collections to be all the moneys which have come Into my 
from miscellaneous sources during the period for which this account is rendered. 
, Cuba, , 190-. 



[Indorsement] 
[Form No. 28.] 
Account current of miscellaneous revenues, month of - 



(Name and tlUe of officer.) 



,190-. 



To be made in duplicate; one copy, accompanied by abstracts, will be forwarded to the auditor lor 
the island of Cuba and the other retained by the officer. 



[Form 29.— Office of the auditor for the island of Cuba.] 
CUBAN CUSTOMS SERNTICE. 



Monthly statement of collections at the subporl of - 



190—. 



-for the month of- 



[This statement will be sent in duplicate to the auditor for the island of Cuba, at Habana, on the W 

of every month.] 



Date. 



[Indorsement] 
[Form 29.] 
Monthly report of coUectionR, port of , for the month of - 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BBFOBT OF ULITABT OOVEBNOB OF ODBA. 



129 



[Fcxrm 80.~OiBoe of the «adltor of castoms.] 
CUBAN CUSTOMS SERVICE. 

The United States tmHtary government of Cuba in account current toith 
collector of customs at the port of ,for the month of 



-,190—, 



(ThiB report in duplicate wiU be forwarded to the auditor of curtoma for Cuba, at Habana, 

flrst of erery month.] 


OI 


ithe 








Receipts. 




Debit. 

1900: 
To expendltorefl: 

Absteactl 










Credit 
By balanoejjrom account ending 

By duties on merchandise imported for 
immediate consumption 










Abstract 2 


By duties on merchandise withdrawn 
from warehouse 






AbstzactS 






To refund of tonnage duties 

To refund of duties on reUquidation . . . 

To transfer of funds, order of , 

abstract No 


By duties on merchandise transferred 






By increase duties ascertained on liqui- 
dation (consumption entries) 

By increase duties ascertained on liqui- 
dation (warehouse withdrawal en- 
tries)... 






abstract No 






By duties receiyed from sale of un- 
claimed goods, f 

Surplus on same , 

By duties received from sale of goods 
remaining in warehouse more than 

Surplus on same , 

By tonnage duden 






To transfer of funds, order of , 

abstract No 






To toansfer of funds, order of , 

abstract No 






To balance 












By flnes and penalties 





































Port of - 



OoUecton ofOoe, - 



-,1»-. 



Collector. 



[IndoiBement.] 
[Form 80.] 



Account current, month of - 



-,190-, port of - 



[Fdrm 6.— Office of the auditor of customs.] 
CUBAN CUSTOBCS SERVICB. 



Report of the collection of 



dues at the port of • 
, 190—, 



during the month 



[Thia report in duplicate to accompany the account current to the auditor on the 1st of every 

month.] 


Bate. 


No. of 
entry. 


Name of vessel. 


Register 
tons. 


Rate. 


coUected. 


Remarks. 



















Beport of collection of tonnage dues by 



[Indorsement.] 
[Form 5.] 



of- 



, collector of customs, port of - 
—,190-. 



, month 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



130 BBPOBT OF MILITABT GOYESKOB OF CUBA. 

[Form 0.— Offloe of the aodltor of castoma.] 



CUBAN CUSTOMS SERVICB. 

Abstract of tonnage dues refunded at the part of 

7-, 190—. 



• during the month of 



[This abstmct in duplicate to aooompany the account current, to the auditor, on the 1st of even- 
month.] 



Date. 



Nameofyeasel. 



Master. 



No. of 
voucher. 



Amount. 



Remarks. 



Voucher No. - 



[IndorsementJ 
-, abstract No. , port of - 



-, month of - 



-m- 



REFUND OF TONNAGE DUES. 

Thin voucher in duplicate to be forwarded, with the abstract of tonnage dues refunded, to the audi- 
tor of customs on the 1st of every month. 



Abstract of tonnage dues refunded by- 
of , 190-. 



[Form 6.] 
, collector of customs, port of - 



-, month 



[Form Na 7.— Office of auditor of customs.] 
CUBAN CUSTOMS SERVICB-RBCEIPT OF TONNAGE DUES REFUNDED. 
The customs service of C^6a, to ^ Dr. 



-, master of the - 



the collector of customs, at the port of 

( ) on this day of - 



, hereby acknowledge payment of the above account, by 
,inthe8umor ' ~^ 



-, 190-. 



-dollars and - 



-centi, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

[Blank form No. 220.] 



181 



MONTHLY POSTAL ACCOUNT— FOR ALL OFFICES. 



-, postmaster at - 



'post-ofuse- 



, CubcL, in account wiJth the United States mdiiary government oj 

of pottSy for the month of , 1900. 



of- 



TMAt. 



A.— Amoimt of postage stamps, poet- 
tgenlne stamps, spedal-deUvery 
stamps, stamped envelopes, news- 

Kper wrappen, and postal cards on 
nd at close of last month 

B.— Amoimt of postage stamps, post- 
age-due stamps, special-aeiiVery 
stamps, stamped envelopes, news- 
paper wrappers, and postal cards 
received from the Department this 
month..... 

Total to be accounted for 

C—Deductamountof postage stamps, 
postage-due stamps, special-deliv- 
ery stamps, stamped envelopes, 
newspaper wrappers, and postal 
cards now on hand 

D.— Deduct damaged stamps and 
stamped envelopes, etc., returned to 
Department 

L— To amount of postage stamps, 
postage^ne stamps, special-deliv- 
ery namps, stamped envelopes, 
newspaper wrappers, and postal 
cards sold during the month 



I. 
■sS. 



Can boxes rented for 

full quarter 

O&U boxes rented for 

part quarter , 

Lock boxes rented 

for foil quarter 

Lock boxes rented 

for part quarter ... 
Lock drawers rented 

for full quarter 

Lock drawers rented 

for part quarter ... 



2.— To whole amount of t)0X rents 
eotteetaf during the month 

*.— To corrections of former accounts 
as per auditor's statement dated 
,11»- 

Total 






Credit. 



4.— By corrections of former ac- 
counts as per auditor's statement 
dated , 190-. 

5.— By transfer to money-order ac- 
count as follows: 

Date $- 



£nter total 
amount of 
transfers for 
the month 
in column 
for postmas- 
ter. 




6.— By deposit at- 
thlsaocount. 



-to balance 



Total. 



il 

s 



Box rents must be collected in advance. Account must be rendered for them in the month for 
which they are collected. Postmasters will be required to report the entire amount of box rents 
collected monthly. A failure to do so will be consiaered cause for removal. 

1, • , postmaster at , province of .Cuba, do certify on my honor 

and official oath we accounts which I have rendered to the Post-Offlce Department for the month 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



132 BBPOBT OB* MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

endlnff •. 190—, exhibit truly and i&ithfally the entire receipts of my post-office, which 

have been by due diligence collected thereat, during the period above stated, and that the credit 
claimed in the said accounts are lust and true, as I verily believe; and, furthermore, that during the 
said period I have not knowinffly delivered, or permitted to be delivered, to any person any man 
matter on which the postage had not been paid at the time of such delivery by affixing and canceling 
postage-due stamps, in accordance with regulations. And, furthermore, that the amount of postage 
stamps, stamped envelopes, postal cards, stamps canceled as postage on matter actually mailed dnxiiig 
the month and of postage-due stamps canceled in payment of undercharged and unpaid postage 
upon matter delivered during the month is truly and accurately stated in the tranacr^t aocompan jing 
tills account. 



(The postmaster's salary is I per annum.) 

[Indorsement.] 

CUBAN POSTAL SERVICE. 

[Issue of June, 1900.] 

Post-office at , province of , Cuba, from to . 190-w 



DlPABTmENT OP POSTS. 

Balancedue 1 ^w Balance due P. M. $ j^. Faaed 

and entered -^ 190—. , clerk. 

(To be mailed to assistant auditor for the island of Cuba.) 

nreTBUcrioNB. 

The special attention of postmasters is directed to the following instructions, and a strict oompU- 
ance with same will be required: 

Article A. Enter the exact face value of all postage^ue stamps, special-delivery stamps, and postal 
cards, and the value, at the price charged by the Government, of all stamped envelopes and news- 
paper wrappers on hand at the close of the preceding month. 

Where a change of postmasters occurs, the value of stamps, postal cards, envelopes, etc.. received 
from the outgoing postmaster should be entered in this article. 

Art. B. Enter the exact face value of all postage stamps, postage-due stamps, special-delivery 
stamps, and postal cards, and the value, at the price charged hy the Qovemment, of all stamped 
envelopes and newspaper wrappers received from the Department during the month. Then add 
together Articles "A" and " B,*' placing their sum directly underneath the line opposite the words 
*' Total to be accounted for." 

Art. C. Enter the exact face value of all postage stamps, postage-due stamps, special-deUvery 
stamps, and postal cards, and the value, at the price charged by the Qovemment. of all stamped 
envelopes and newspaper wrappers that remained on hand at close of business on the last day of the 
month for which this account is rendered, and deduct this amount from the " Total to be accounted 
for." 

Art. D. Enter the exact face value of all damaged stamps and postal c^rds, and the value, at the 
price charged by the Qovemment, of all stamped envelopes and newspaper wrappers returned to the 
Department during the month, but not until notice of allowance shall be received from the bureau 
of stamps and supplies. This amount, added to the amount remaining on hand, should be deducted 
from the ** Total to be accounted for," and the remainder will show the amount of stamps sold. 

Art. 1. Enter the exact face value of all postage stamps, special-delivery stamps, and postal cards, 
and the value, at the price charged by the Qovemment, of all stamped envelopes and newspaper 
wrapperssold during the month, and of postage-due stamps affixed upon Insufficiently prepaid matter. 
Thl« Item is ascertained by adding to the amount on hand (Article C) the amount acknowledged b? 
the bureau of stamps and supplies as returned to the Department (Article D). and subtracting thtt 
total from the "Total to be accounted for," the difference being the amount sold during the month. 

Art. 2. Enter the amount of box rents collected during the month. Postmasters are prohibited 
from collecting or receiving the box rents for more than one quarter in advance. 

Art. 8. When the sum of auditor's corrections of a prior month's account shows a balance due the 
United States, enter this balance In Article 3. but if the sum of such corrections shows a balance due 
the postmaster, it should be taken up as a credit in Article 4. 

Art. 4. When the sum of auditor's corrections of a prior month's account shows a balance due the 
postmaster, enter this balance as Article 4, but if the sum of such corrections shows a balancedue the 
United Stat«), it should be taken up as a debit in Article 3. 

Art. 5. Enter amount transferred from postal to money-order account. Transfers should only be 
made when actually necessary. Credit must be claimed only for transfers made in the month for 
which the account is rendered. 

Art. 6. Enter amount deposited to close account for the month. No balance must appear as due on 
the account, as the postmaster is required to deposit all po«t4U funds in his hands at the end of each 
month. The amount entered as the total of the debits must be exactly the total of the credits. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOET OF mLITABY GOVERNOB OB" CUBA. 



133 



Daily transcript of amount of postage damp$, stamped envelopes, and postal cards sold and 
of same canceled as postages on matter actually mailed, and of postage-due stamps canr 
ceUd in payment of undercharges and unpaid postages upon matter delivered during the 
mofUhm • 







Amount. 






Amount. 


Sold— ^nonth. 


Day. 


1 


Canceled— moDth. 


Day. 






Dolls. 


CtB. 




Dolls. 


CtB. 




1 








1 








2 








2 








3 








8 








4 








4 








5 








5 








6 








6 








7 








7 








8 








8 








9 








9 








10 








10 








Tl 








11 








12 








12 








18 








13 








14 








14 








16 








15 








16 








16 








17 








17 








18 








18 








19 








19 








20 








20 








21 








21 








22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
81 






Total 


22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
31 






Total 

















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



MAJ. TA8KER H. BLISS, COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS FOR CUBA. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT 



OF 



MAJ. TASKER H. BLISS, COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS FOR 

CUBA. 



Headquabtebs Division op Cuba, 
Opwce op the CoLLEcrroB op Customs pob Cuba, 

Habcmaj Cvba^ AiLgust 6, 1900. 

Sib: I have the honor to submit the following report of the opera- 
tions of the Cuban customs service during the fiscal year ended June 
30^900: 

Daring the year the personnel of the collectors of customs has been 
as follows: 

Habana: Maj. Ta^er H. Bliss, collector of the port of Habana and 
chief of the customs service of Cuba, appointed collector for port of 
Habana and for the island of CulM^ December 20, 1898. 

Baracoa: Lieut. H. C. Schumm, collector, appointed January 15, 
1899, relieved March 29, 1900; Lieut J. W. Wnght, collector, from 
March 29, 1900, to June 30, 1900. 

Batabano: Bamon M. Cknas, acting deputy collector in charge, 
appointed February 14, 1899, relieve January 10, 1900; Agustin 
Agaero, acting deputy collector in charge, from January 10, 1900, to 
June 30, 1900. 

Oaibanen: Capt J. F. B. Landis, collector, appointed December 
19, 1898, relieved June 30, 1900; P. B. Anderson, deputy collector, 
aroointed acting collector June 30, 1900. 

Cardenas: Lieut M. B. Stokes, collector, appointed May 19, 1899. 

*Cienfu^o8: Capt W. Y. Stamper, collector, appointed April 19, 

1899, relieved February 14, 1900; Maj. George Le Boy Brown, collector, 
appointed February 14, 1900. 

Gibara: Lieut J. W. Smith, collector, appointed January 1, 1899, 
died from a gunshot wound January 19, 1900; Boy H. Chamberlain, 
acting collector, appointed January 10, 1900, relieved January 27, 
1900; Bamon Bivero, deputy collector, appointed acting collector 
January 27, 1900, relieved February 24, 1900; Will E. Bace, acting 
collector, appointed February 24, 1900, relieved March 29, 1900; Lieut 
Herman C. Schumm, collector, appointed March 29, 1900, relieved 
May 14, 1900; Will E. Bace, actmg collector, apoointed May 14, 

1900, relieved June 7, 1900; Capt E. £. Benjamin, collector, appointed 
Jttne 7, 1900. 

Guantanamo: Capt E. A. Ellis, collector, appointed December 19, 
°"8, on leave of absence from July 16, 1899, to October 17, 1899; 

135 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



136 BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVKKNOB OP CUBA. 

J. Waldo Floyd, deputy collector, acting collector from July 15, 1899, 
to October 17, 1899; D. H. Schumann, special agent, temporarily act- 
ing as collector from July 25, 1899, to September 1, 1899. 

Manzaniilo: Capt F. G. Irwin, collector, appointed April 19, 1899. 
relieved March 29, 1900; Lieut ije Roy S. Upton, collector, appointea 
March 29, 1900. 

Matanzas: Capt W. H. Hay, collector, appointed December 19, 
1899. 

Nuevltas: Maj. C. A. Williams, collector, appointed January 5, 1899. 
relieved October 8, 1899; Henry Page, deputy collector, appointea 
acting collector October 8, 1899. 

Sagua la Grande: Capt Elias Chandler, collector, appointed January 
21, 1899, on leave of absence from February 18, 1900, to March 81, 
1900; A. Y. Casanova, deputy collector, acting collector from February 

18, 1900, to March 31, 1900. 

Santa Cruz del Sur : M. E. E^strada, acting deputy collector in charge, 
appointed April 27, 1899. 
Santiago ae Cuba: Capt T. F. Davis, collector, appointed December 

19, 1898, relieved October 8, 1899, D. H. Schumann, special agent, 
appointed acting collector October 9, 1899, relieved Octooer 25, 1899; 
Oapt. S. D. Freeman, collector, appointed October 25, 1899, relieved 
AOTil 19, 1900; Capt F. G. Irwin, collector, appointed April 19, 1900. 

Trinidad: Capt. John Conklin, collector, appointed Deceml^r 20, 
1898, relieved May 18, 1900; Lieut F. V. S. Chamberlain, collector, 
appointed May 18, 1900. 

Tunas de Zaza: Lieut. Le Roy S. Upton, collector, appointed April 
22, 1899, relieved March 29, 1900; Andres Orsini, acting deputy col- 
lector in charge, appointed March 29, 1900. 

From this statement there will appear an amount of change daring 
the past twelve months in the man^ement of some of the custom- 
houses which is very detrimental to efficient service. Notwithstanding 
the ^t that so long as the present government of Cuba is a military 
government, the so-called civil duties performed by officers in tlie 
administration of the various^ departments of this (xovemment is in 
reality a military dut^ of the highest kind. Many commanding officers 
are unwilling to admit this, ana urge the return of officers on duty in 
the customs service to their conmiands. This office has never opposed 
the relief of an officer to go on active field service, but, with that excep- 
tion, it has held that there can be no more important duty for a mili- 
tary officer than that connected with the organization of a ^vern- 
ment with which the credit of the War Department is so intunately 
associated. 

It needs no argument to show the anarchy that would result in the 
government as a whole were changes to be made in the office of gover- 
nor-general every two or three months. The same is true to a leas, 
but still very important, degree in the customs service. The sudden 
change of collectors at a port can but have an embarrassing effect upon 
the local commerce. It results in that shifting, irregular, uncertain 
administration which, in the customs service, involves the very essence 
of injustice to those who have to deal with tnat department It must 
be remembered that the custom-houses of Cuba are not like those of 
the United States, which latter are organized with an old, reliable per- 
sonnel, and which therefore continue to operate with little variation in 
smoothness, no matter how often the collector may be changed. In 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVBBNOB OF CUBA. 137 

Cuba it is a very different matter. The class of employees who fill the 
bureans of the public service, although a most meritorious, faithful, 
hardworking class, show a lack of initiative — of willingness to assume 
responsibility — ^that would appear strange were it not that the expla- 
nation is readily found in the existing situation. They feel that the 
government of intervention is not their government, and that they are 
merely the instruments to execute the will of a temporary and alien, 
although supreme, authority. They will faithfully execute orders, 
whether wisely or unwisely given, but, from lon^ previous training, 
they look up)on the collector as absolute, whose will is not to be ques- 
tioned without danger to themselves. 

Under existing conditions in Cuba an efficient administration of the 
customs requires either a personnel so well trained, reliable, and 
hedged-in by its knowledge of law and precedent as to guarantee the 
rmilar and orderlv operation of each custom-house, or also that each 
collector himself should have such a thorough, practical knowledge of 
his business as to be able to direct, without error, all its branches. 
The first of these conditions, for the reason given above, does not yet 
exist; the second condition has barely begun to exist when a military 
exigency intervenes to put things in the backward state of many months 
ago. Ihis oflSce recognizes that the military exigency is paramount, 
and under no circumstances would it interpose an objection to the 
relief of a collector whose services were neeoed with the troops in the 
field. But it believes it not unreasonable to suggest that, in the case 
of an officer whose services in the field are not necessary, duty in the 
administration of an important branch of the military government 
should be placed upon a par with other routine duty which may be 
required of military officers. The position of a collector of customs, 
even in small porte, requires business knowledge and good, sound 
business sense, as well as knowledge of customs laws and regulations. 
Under the military government of Cuba collectors have had to acquire 
these qualifications by hard work and daily experience; and after they 
have acquired it at the expense^ to a certain extent, of the community 
m which they are, the community should have the benefit of it as long 
as it is practicable. It is therefore very much to be hoped that every 
effort will be made to secure a well-selected personnel for the manage- 
ment of theC'uban custom-houses, and which can be expected to remain 
on this duty during the continuance of the administration by the War 
Department. 

It has been suggested by some that the military officers in charge 
of subports should be relieved and their places filled by civilians. In 
my juagment it is entirely too late to do this. Native civilians would 
take these offices in the certainty that the first act of a Cuban adminis- 
tration would be to displace them. American civilians would take the 
position with the knowledge that in this service there is no career open 
to them, and that in a few months their positions must be given up. 
Prom neither of these classes would it be possible, under the circum- 
stances, to secure men of the best qualifications, and I should 
therefore apprehend that the service would ^in no credit by such 
appointments. The customs service of Cuba is a military customs 
service of the United States, administered under the War Department 
of that country. Its tariff is made there, as well as the laws and regu- 
lations govering its administration. The responsibility for the good 
or bad administration of this service can not be shifted until it is turned 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, FT 3 10 ^ j 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 BEPOBT OF MLITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

over to a new government. In view of the general impression that 
this new government may assume control within a comparatively few 
months, it seems to me most unwise for the War Department to now, 
at this late date, begin to meet this responsibility through any other 
agents than its own officers. Personally, I see nothing but unmixed 
evil in a mixed military and civilian customs service. It such a change 
should be made, it should be thorough, including the position of tEe 
collector at Habana and the chief of the customs service. 

I again take pleasure in inviting the attention of the militarv gov- 
ernor and of the War Department to the services of the subcoUectors 
named above. Whatever success has attended the operations of the 
customs service throughout the island is due without reservation to 
their faithful, zealous, and efficient labor. Many things have combined 
to make their service one of sacrifice to themselves, and they have 
performed it not only as loyal Americans but as loyally to the best 
interests of Cuba as if they were themselves Cubans. 

I regret to have to record the death of Acting Collector J. W. 
Smith on January 19 of this year at the port of Gibara. Mr. Smitii 
had been appointed military collector at Gibara in November, 1898, 
at the time of the military occupation of the eastern provinces. He 
was then an officer of the Second United States Volunteer Infantry. 
Upon the muster-out of his regiment he was, as the result of his 
efficient services, appointed acting collector at that port, where he 
remained upon duty until, as the result of the disturbed political con- 
dition and consequent bitter feeling in that vicinitv, he was shot and 
mortally wounded on the streets of that town by the editor of a local 
newspaper. The murderer, Ricardo Hidalgo, was tried by the civil 
courts in Santiago de Cuba, convicted, and sentenced to six years and 
one day imprisonment. 

Under instructions from superior authority a reorganization of 
the personnel of the customs service of Cuba was submitted to the 
governor-general and approved by him on Mav 3, 1900, and with 
some slight modifications, also formally approved, went into effect on 
Julvl. 

The bureau of special agents has been somewhat increased, and a 
still further increase will doubtless be required in the near future. 
For the purpose of this bureau, the island nas been divided into four 
districts with headquarters respectively at Habana, Cienfuegos, San- 
tiago, and at or near Caibarien. The officer for the latter district has 
heretofore been required for service in the customs district of Gibara, 
but will probably be assigned to duty at Caibarien on return from 
the leave of absence which has been granted him. During the year 
two important captures of counterfeiters, with their illegal parapher- 
nalia, were made by the officers of this bureau under the immraiate 
direction of Chief Cairns. Report has just been received, without 
details as yet, of a capture made in Santiago de Cuba by Special 
Agent Metcalf, chief of that district. I commend to the favorable 
consideration of the Government Mr. F. S. Cairns, the chief of the 
bureau, whose zealous and efficient work and that of his subordinates 
has been of the greatest assistance to me during the year. 

EveiT effort has been made to secure Cubans or natives of this 
island tor the personnel of the custom-houses. The total number of 
employees is 757, of which number 698 are native Cubans, while 83 
were born in the peninsula. All of the latter have lived tne greater 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



KEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 189 

part of their lives in Cuba, and married here, and have all renounced 
their Spanish citizenship, thereby becoming entitled to all the rights 
and privileges of natives of the island. Of the 70 Americans, 13 are 
officers of the United States Army; of the remaining 67, 33 are 
employees of the American correspondence division, of the bureau of 
statistics, and of the special agents bureau, performing services which 
no other than Americans can render. Of tne 48 American employees 
of the Habana custom-house, only 7 occupy positions which are in any 
way connected with the collection of the revenue. The comptroller 
and assistant comptroller of the Habana custom-houses are Americans. 
These positions must necessarily be filled by Americans until the 
changes in the methods of business which have been introduced become 
fully accepted. The officer in charge of the appraiser's division is an 
American, as well as the chief appraiser of tissues. The officer in 
charge of bonded warehouses is also an American, as well as the one 
acting as deputy commissioner of immigration and in charge of the 
passenger and baggage department. It is believed that the American 
personnel at the custom-house of Habana and other ports is as small as 
it should be so long as American authorities are in any degree respon- 
sible for the administration of the service. 

Reports from the various subcoUectors indicate a pressing and 
OTowmg need of improvement in the material facilities for custom- 
noose work. A liberal allotment of money could well be made for the 
repair and construction of government docks, wharves, warehouses, 
improvement of channels, and in some cases for custom-house build- 
ings. In many cases, including even Habana, the facilities for the 
receipt and safe custody of merchandise and its quick dispatch through 
the custom-house are very inadequate. 

The gi*eatest drawback consists in lack of modern facilities for land- 
ing cargo. Even in the great port of Habana, the configuration of 
whose harbor would permit at comparatively small expense the most 
perfect conditions, merchandise must be landed by lighters, at an 
expense to the commerce of the port per ton equal to the cost of trans- 
porting that ton from Liverpool. During the large part of the rainy 
season the work of loading and discharging vessels has to cease, or 
can be carried on only at risk of great injury to the merchandise. 
Furthermore, this system results in greatly increased cost to the Gov- 
ernment, since it requires a greatly increased force of inspectors to 
supervise the loading and discharge of lighters, to guard the property 
in the lighters, and to prevent the smuggling for wnich the lighterage 
system offers every facilitv. 

More than a year ago plans were prepared, which received general 
anproval, for the construction of a modern system of docks at Habana. 
Tne commerce of this port is unanimous in urging their construction. 
Nor do I know of any work of material improvement which would 
more redound to the credit of the intervening government than the 
inauguration of this reform. At other ports, in proportion to their 
commerce, conditions are even worse, cargoes in some cases having to 
be discharged in lighters 16 miles from the wharves. In this connec- 
tion attention is invited to the detailed statement in my report for the 
second half of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1899, rendered to the 
military governor. 

On the 16th of June, 1900, went into operation by order of the 
President dated March 31, 1900, the new customs tariff. This tariff 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



140 BBPOBT OF KHiITABT GOVSBNOB OF CUBA. 

is a modification of the one promulgated to go into effect on the 1st 
day of January, 1899, and differs in no way from the latter as concerns 
the principles of its construction. For the most part the changes 
introduced were for the purpose of obviating difficulties which had 
arisen in the application of the previous tariff, removing ambiguities, 
etc. 

The tariff which was prepared to go into operation at the beginning of 
the military occupation of Cuba was, naturally and properly under the 
circumstances, a translation of the preexisting Spanish tariff, with 
such modifications in the rates of duty as were su(2^gested and demanded 
by the existing conditions in the island. The pnncipal change, there- 
fore, consisted in a general reduction of duties, combined with the 
abolition of the previous differential in favor of Spanish trade. The 
classification which prevailed under the Spanish r^ime was, in general, 
adhered to under the American administration of the customs service. 
This course was the more proper, since the power to classify is really 
the power to make a tariff, ana were any other course pursued it 
could be justly charged against the customs administration that it was 
assuming the power which had been intrusted alone to those who pre- 
pared the tariff. But it re(][uired very little experience to show that 
the original tariff, from which the one of July 1, 1899, was derived, 
was devised to meet conditions and to facilitate practices and methods 
of business which were not supposed to be allowed under the new 
administration; that the tariff, of which its successor was a literal trans- 
lation, was so constructed — perhaps inadvertently — as to enable cus- 
toms officials to defraud and plunder importers on the one side and the 
Government on the other. It is difficult to conceive of an engine for 
fraud more ingeniously constructed, and such was its use, whatever 
may have been the motives which originally inspired it. It was so 
devised as to permit and encourage fraud in varying degrees by the 
various officials of the custom-house, from the highest to the lowest 
This machinery, with all its possibilities of crime, was placed in the 
hands of an American administration composed of an extremely lim- 
ited personnel, and upon which was imposed the responsibility that the 
engine should no longer be worked as one of crime and oppi*ession, 
while at the same time many of its complicated parts had to be oper- 
ated by those who could so use it, and who could not be altogether 
prevented if they so desired. 

The tax levied by a custom-house is essentially a tax upon the value 
of property, and, if a just tax, it should bear a definite and readily 
ascertamed relation to that value. Therefore that tariff of duties 
which is constructed on the ad valorem principle is theoretically the 
best. In practice, however, even in the United States, such difficul- 
ties are found in the application of such a tariff that the growing 
tendency is either to substitute for it or to combine with it a specific 
tariff. In Cuba the difficulties in the way of the application of an 
ad valorem tariff are vastly greater. I believe that in practice, espe- 
cially under existing conditions here, a specific tariff is essentially far 
more just than any other, but the difficulties in the way of its construc- 
tion are far greater. In such a tariff articles which are subject to 
taxation should, as far as practicable, be specifically named; and there 
should be the greatest possible discrimination between varieties of the 
same article which are of different value. Such a tariff would become 
theoretically perfect (though this, of course, is not practicable) if 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OP MIUTART GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 141 

ever3" article of importation could be spjecificalljr named, and a specific 
duty imposed bearing a just proportion to its well-known average 
value in the markets of the world. 

But in the Spanish tariff and its successors scarcely an attempt was 
made to accomplish this. Those who have had occasion to apply it know 
the large proportion of cases in which the subdivisions of a paragraph 
and the paragraph itself, as well as one paragraph with another, merge 
into each other by imperceptible degrees. Articles are not specin- 
cally named, but are vaguely described. In the case of many articles, 
two men of the highest ana equally expert knowledge and of perfect 
honesty may differ in opinion as to whether the article should be 
classified under this or that paragraph, or under this or that subdivi- 
sion of one paragraph. According as the one or the other opinion 
prevails, the article pays a duty of $1,000 or $10,000. Throughout, 
the distinctions of the tariff are based upon vaguely described physical 
appearances and characteristics. The result of this is that it has always 
been within the power of the custom-house to classify an article under 
a paragraph just to the importer and the Government, or under a para- 
graph unjust to the importer, or under a paragraph equally unjust to 
the Government. All of these classifications would be equally defen- 
sible under the terms of the tariff. 

Where such latitude of classification prevails an honest administra- 
tion would be guided in its decision by the ad valorem principle, set- 
tling all cases where honest doubt could exist in such a way as to make 
the duty the proper proportion of the value. But the power was always 
there to oppress an obnoxious importer by taxing his merchandise 
many times its value, or to defraud the merchant by forcing him to 
advance a consideration to secure an unjustly low classification or to 
defraud the Grovemment by permitting him to secure a lower classifi- 
cation for a consideration. It would seem as though the original tariff 
had been deliberately constructed to lead to such conclusions; as though 
it deliberately created such injustices in order to enable the ofiScials to 
correct them, with the consequent temptation to correct them only for 
a consideration. 

So this terrible fact has always confronted this office — that, however 
honest customs employees might be, the power to defraud was still 
there. It is true that this power could be exercised over the merchant 
alone, leaving the just revenues of the Government undiminished. 
But, under this all-nervading temptation, with the unusual chances to 
escape detection anorded by the vagueness of the tariff, men are 
almost always certain to yield here in Cuba, as they would anywhere 
else under tne same circumstances, and from defrauding the merchant 
are liable to pass to defrauding the Government. 

I have said enough to show that the essential weakness of the origi- 
nal and present Cuban tariff is the excessive latitude of interpretation 
which it permits in the classification of merchandise, combined with 
the fact that under a specific tariff it is really the appraiser (except in 
case of dispute, which has to be referred to the collector) who makes the 
classification. Thus an appraiser of tissues, of furniture, of shoes, of 
tools and instruments, etc., has it in his power to so apply the law that 
a merchant may escape the payment of a large p«rt of what is undoubt- 
edly his just duty. In such a case, of course, the im j)orter makes no pro- 
test and the fact mav not be brought to the attention of the collector. 
If it should reach his attention the most that he can charge against 

Digitized by VjV^^^V IC 



142 BEPOBT OF MILITABY QOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

the appraiser, in the absence of other evidence, is an error in judg- 
ment, which, if sufficiently grave, warrants his dismissal. Experience 
quickly showed that no such latitude of classification should to left to 
subordLinate officials. The only safe course lay in the enforcement of 
a rule bv which, in all cases where there could be any doubt, classifi- 
cation should be made under the higher paragraph. Unfortunately, 
however, this latitude of interpretation must exist somewhere, for if 
it did not the tariff, which was originally capable of being used as an 
instrument of fraud for the gain of officials, would become an instru- 
ment of oppression whereby, without any fraud being committed, 
without any customs official becoming a penny the richer it, the mer- 
chant in many cases would be exorbitantly taxed, while in other cases 
the just revenues of the Government might equally suffer. Therefore, 
so long as the tariff remains in its present form, there is but one course 
to follow — that is, to require all customs officials to apply the letter of 
the law in its full severity, knowing that the mercnant will protest 
when he believes his interests to be unjustly treated, and taking all 
possible precautions, by reexaminations and appraisals and by the sus- 
picious scrutiny of every document in the various bureaus through 
which it passes, to see that the interests of the Government are not 
unjustly treated. In this way no subordinate official can depart 
widely from the law without at least probability of detection. Unfor- 
tunately this throws a burden of responsibility upon the collector 
greater than he should be required to bear. Even though inspired by 
the highest sentiments of justice, any decision given by him m favor 
of an importer might be open to the wanton charge of corruption. 
His honor and reputation would have little protection. In such cases 
he can act with safety only after they have been passed upon by tie 
board of appeals. To this board the protest or every dissatisfied 
importer is referred, passing from the board to the collector and firom 
the collector to the military governor. 

These essential defects of tne tariff have long been apparent to every 
American who has had anything to do with its application. I do not 
believe that the complete purification of the customs service can be 
effected until the tariff is entirely recast; and, as I have frequently 
insisted, this recasting can be done only by a commission of thoroughly 
disinterested experts. The officials of the customs service should not 
be expected to attend to it, because, even had they the necessary qualifi- 
cations, they have not the time to devote to it. It is essentially a work 
to be undertaken by the General Government, inasmuch as it involves 
many important questions of public policy. I recommend that a tariff 
commission be appointed by the Government to study this question 
and report its recommendations by the 1st of March, 1901. 

In order to secure greater uniformity in the action of the various 
custom-houses throughout the island the plan has been adopted dur- 
ing the past year of having samples of all tissues passed at any custom- 
house submitted each week to a board of appraisers in Habana, which 
board confirms or corrects, as the case may be, the appraisal and clas- 
sification of the appraiser at the subport. It is founa that this plan 
is doubly advantageous, because the final board of appraisers has 
neither temptation nor opportunity to find otherwise than in accord- 
ance with facts and the samples presented to it. Again, these disin- 
terested findings constitute a body of decisions from which it is diffi- 
cult for the appraisers of the Habana custom-house to materially 
depart 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEFOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 148 

Daring the year the old protest board was remodeled into the present 
board of appeals. This board consists of five men, three of whom are 
native Cubans, and two at the present moment are Americans. All of 
them are trained in the operations of the various bureaus of the custom- 
house, but none have anv connection, direct or indirect, with the classi- 
fication and appraisal which may be the subiect of protest. The board 
sits as a court and hears the evidence of all interested parties. The 
person making a protest is notified by the clerk of the board of the 
date and hour fixed for the hearing in his case, and is requested to be 

S resent in person or by counsel and submit whatever evidence he 
esires. Record of the proceedings is made and the case finally pre- 
sented to the collector by the board with its findings. The collector 
submits the case with, his action to the military governor, by whom 
the final decision of the custom-house may be sustamed and confirmed 
or disapproved, as the case may be. 

During the year 675 protests were filed against the decision of the 
collector of customs for Habana. Of these, on June 30, 380 were 
overruled, 156 sustained, 22 were rejected as not complying with the 
requirements of law, 6 were sustained in part, and 115 were pending 
final action. Of the latter number, the greater part have been decided 
since July 1. The total number of entries coursed at this custom- 
house during the last fiscal year was 53,055. 

During the fiscal year 566 protests were filed from the various 
subports; of which number 136 were overruled, 106 sustained, 24 
sustained in part, while 20 were still pending on June 30. 

From various communications received at this oflSce from commer- 
cial organizations in the city of Habana, it would appear that there is 
a feeling with many of the merchants (mostly Spanish) that there 
should be practically no protests in a well-regulated custom-house. 
As a matter of fact, within reasonable limits, tne number of protests 
may be accepted as an indication that the custom-house is well regu- 
lated. Even if its appraisers and other officials were infallible in . 
tiieir judgment, the number of protests would scarcely diminish, since 
a verv considerable part of the protests originate not in the belief 
that the classification and appraisal are wrong, but in the hope that 
through some technicality more favorable classification and appraisal, 
regardless of right, can be secured. 

A very considerable number of protests originate in the action of 
the custom-house in increasing the aeclared valuation of merchandise. 
This action is never taken except upon the most conclusive evidence 
of its propriety, and I have no doubt that it would be taken much 
oftener than it has been had this service at its disposal better facilities 
for determining foreign market values. 

Upon this subject of undervaluations I note that in his annual 
report of the "State of the Finances" for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1899, the honorable Secretary of the Treasury says: 

The sabject of undervaluation of imported merchandise still requires constant 
attention. Many complaints upon the subject are received and investigated, and 
large sums, representing increased and penal duties on account of undervaluations, 
have been collected during the past year. As the result of the inquiries conducted 
in Europe by a special agent, the increased duties on one line of merchandise alone, 
aocroin^ on advances made by appraising oflScers, amounted to nearly |150,000, and 
it is estimated that by reason of incres^ed valuations made by importers in their 
invoices, the direct result of such investigation, the customs revenue has been 
increased over 1800,000 per annum on this one class of merchandise. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



144 BEFOBT OF MILITABY GOVESNOB OF CUBA. 

Again, referring to the number of protests pending at the close of 
the above-mentioned fiscal year, he rurther states that the board of 
general appraisers — 

• * * calls attention to the fact that at the close of the year there were 41,514 pro- 
tests suspended awaiting the decision of courts on analogous issues. About nme- 
tenths of these protests are against the decisions of the collector at the port of New 
York. For the purpose of reaching a speedy disposition of these cases the board 
suggests that the appointment of an additional circuit judge be authorized, who shall 
sit at the port of New York, and decide customs cases. 

In proportion to the number of entries received I think that the 
number of protests made here is very moderate. I also think that 
to anyone acquainted with the character of the protests filed at a Cuban 
custom-house, the proportion, as shown above, decided in favor of the 
claimant, of itself indicates the spirit of justice with which all such cases 
are handled. 

Reports received from special agents indicate that a certain amount 
of smuggling continues, but it is believed that it ha^ been reduced to 
the minimum which the present facilities at the disposal of the Gov- 
ernment can accomplish. 

On February 17, 1900, authority was given by the government of 
Cuba for the construction of five small revenue boats of not more than 
3-foot draft, which will be able to cruise in the waters inside the keys 
on both coasts of the island. The boats were cx)ntracted for at the 
price of $7,000 each, exclusive of equipment. A sum not exceeding 
f 2,000 a vessel was also allowed for the equipment, making the total 
maximum cost $45,000. These vessels are being built at the shipyards 
of Lewis Nixon (Crescent Shipyards), at Elizabethport. N. J., and will 
be ready for service early in the month of Septemoer. They will 
give a much-needed assistance in the prevention of irregular and illegal 
trade. 

As stated in my report of last year, the closing of the custom-houses 
to illegal trade on any considerable scale has largely checked the 
smuggling of articles, except those like tobacco and opium, on which 
the duties are practically prohibitive. Even in respect to them there 
is no reason to believe that smuggling on a large scale is carried on. 

Since October 9, 1899, when the privilege was granted to Porto 
Rican coffee of importation from Porto Rico directly into the island 
of Cuba at a greatly reduced duty as compared with coffee from other 
countries, complaint has been made by certain coffee importers of 
Habana tnat other coffees than those of Porto Rico gained admission 
into Cuba from the former island at this low rate. This subject was 
carefully investigated here, and also, at the request of this office, in 
New York and in Porto Rico, and it is shown that thus far there have 
been no irregularities in this trade. 

By tariff circulars Nos. 83 and 84 from the War Department, privi- 
lege of free entry was granted to cattle imported for breeding pur- 
poses, provided they fulfilled certain conditions set forth in those cir- 
culars. Previous to the issue of these circulars this office, in response 
to a request for its opinion on the subject, stated that it did not believe 
that this concession would prove oi material benefit to the island. 
There has never been any importation of expensive, high-grade cattle, 
nor is it likely that there will be for a long time to come. Many cattle 
importers in the United States urged this measure in the belief that it 
would increase importations into this island from that country. It is 
evident, however, that the low duty of $1 per head could not have 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



BBPOBT OF MnJTAEY GOVEBNOE OF CUBA. 145 

deterred any Cuban importer who was otherwise willing and ready to 
import graded cattle for breeding. The reason was to be sought else- 
where. The fact is that no attention has ever been paid to the breed- 
ing of cattle in Cuba except for work purposes and consumption for 
food. In Cuba, as in all Spanish countries, working oxen are yoked 
by the horns. These animals, therefore, are bred to secure two special 
conditions, the first being the suitable conformation of the horns, and 
the second, weight and strength, especially in the fore part of the body. 
Texas cattle have the desir^ qualification as to the horns, but not as 
to weight and strength. These two are found combined only in cattle 
from Mexico and various states of Central and South America. More- 
over, experience has shown that the cattle from these latter countries 
suffer less on transportation to Cuba. During the three years imme- 
diately following the ten-years' war (1868-1878) large importations of 
cattle were made from the United States, among which tne mortality 
due to climatic change proved to be about 40 per cent. For these 
reasons the larger part of cattle impK>rtations has been from countries 
sonch of the Rio Grande River, and is likely to continue to come from 
there. The concession granted during the past year to cattle imported 
for breeding purposes has produced no material effect on the cnarac- 
ter of the animals brought into the island. 

The total number reported to this office as having been allowed 
entry under this privilege during the year is 364, a considerable part 
of which would have been denied free entry by a strict interpretation 
of the law. 

In view of the past and probable future importance of the cattle 
industry in Cuba, the question of diseases affecting imported animals 
hajs received careful attention at the custom-house, upon which at 
present the duty of sanitary inspection is imposed. At Uabana, where 
the greater part of the importation of animals takes place, this serv- 
ice has been very efficiently managed under the superintendence of the 
chief veterinary inspector. Dr. Honor^ F. Lain^. 

On three occasions suspicious ca.^es were detected immediateljr upon 
the arrival of the cattle snips, which upon bacteriological examination 
of the blood proved to be undoubted cases of anthi'ax. These, with 
still more numerous cases of hog cholera, brought forth from various 
quarters suggestions of radical, though, in the opinion of this office, 
insufficient and improper methods for stamping out the disease. It 
being said to be the intention of the secretary of apiculture of the 
Cuban government to enforce a system of quarantine of imported 
cattle for the purpose of preventing the spread of anthrax, this office 
made a report to the military governor, calling attention to certain 
serious objections that would result from the enforcement of such a 
measure. It was pointed out that in the first plact such a measure 
would be verjr costly, and that its first effecl would be to raise the 
price of working cattle and of meat; that this evil would be further 
enhanced by the material reduction in the importation of cattle, as a 
large part of these imported animals could not bear the expense; and 
finally, and worst of all, it would be a useless measure as a means of 
stamping out the disease. 

Without entering into the history of how or when the disease was 
first introduced into Cuba, it is sufficient to note that it has existed in 
different parts of the island for many years. Anthrax is a specific 
disease whose baciUar germ b capable of living in the soil for an mdef- 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



146 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

inite period of time. The places or localities in which diseased animals 
have died become contaminated, and healthy animals grazing in sach 
places are liable to contract the disease a long time afterwards. Two 
notable illustrations of this have come under the observation of this 
office during the past year. 

A gentleman owning a plantation at Bolondron began recently to 
extract manure from a dried-up pond into which some five years ago 
the cachaza (waste of sugar mills), manure, and offal of the plantation 
had been dumped. He now remembers that a few oxen which had 
died suddenlv on the plantation from some apparently mysterious dis- 
ease about five years ago were also thrown into this dumping place. 
The six oxen which were recently employed in the work of extracting 
the manure died from undoubted anthrax; their carcasses were cre- 
mated, the work of extracting the manure was stopped, and the owner 
has lost no more oxen out of about one hundred that he has on his 
plantation. 

Again, a firm of cattle importers of this city received about eight 
months ago some 500 head of Mexican cattie, which were sent oat 
to pasture. E^rly in May the cattle, which were all fat and healthy 
looking, were sold to a planter living near one of the north ports 
of CulSt. The cattle were brought from their pasture, some 20 miles 
from Habana, kept for two days in the stock yards of El Lucero, 
thence driven to the Regla wharves, and there embarked in lighters. 
The dav after their arrival at the port of destination 1 aninuu died, 
on the following day 8, the next day 20, and so on until 82 had died 
in six days. Dr. Lain£ made a microscopical examination of the 
blood of these animals, discovering the germs of anthrax. In both 
of these cases these animals might have passed the test of quarantine, 
but on subsequent exposure to infected looilities would have contracted 
the disease just as they did. 

I do not wish to be understood as holding that a quarantine system, 
in the absence of a better one, could not be properly adopted, but it is 
exceedingly likely that the very ri^d precautions which should be con- 
stantly taken in a properly admimstered quarantine system, would not 
always be maintained, ana the places of quarantine themselves would 
become sources of infection. 

It seems to me, therefore, that the system of vaccination should he 
adoDted and strictly enforced, which is a sure and cheap preventive, 
renaering animals immune to the disease even though exposed to 
infected localities. Previous to the discovery by Pasteur of the anti- 
anthrax vaccine there were thousands of acres of land in France on 
which neither sheep nor cattle could graze with impunity. With Pas- 
teur's discovery, animals were, by vaccination, rendered inmiune to 
that disease, and it is said that this discovery alone was worth more to 
France than the war debt which that nation paid to Germany. 

Few people realize the importance that the cattle industry has had 
in Cuba, to restore which every effort should be made. Previous to 
the devastation wrought by the late war, the cattle industry, in the 
amount of capital invested m it, and in its sure, speedy, and profitable 
returns, ranked with the tobacco and the sugar industries. As yet 
this industry can scarcely be said to have begun to revive, but with 
the continuance of peace and order the time must come when the rich 
pastures of Cuba will again be covered with herds representing a very 
large investment of capital. Means should at once be taken, not 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 147 

merely to protect this capital against the loss certain to result from 
the importation of disease (for which all reasonable and practicable 

Srecautions are now being taken), but also from loss resulting from 
isease contracted by previously healthy animals in already infected 
localities in Cuba. 

The question of Texas fever is one which demands attention with 
special reference to rendering imported Northern cattle immune to the 
effect of the fever tick, which is done under properly conducted tick- 
infestation, or blood inoculation, and not serum inoculation. This 
fever is due to a microparasite and not, as in the case of anthrax, 
tuberculosis, etc., to bacteria. The disease is transmitted from South- 
em to Nortnem cattle^ or to nonimmune Northern cattle grazing in 
a Southern infected district, through the medium of a parasite known 
aa tick, or the American cattle tick {Boophilvs bovts)^ and the destruc- 
tion of this parasite is the onl^ safeguard against tne communication 
of the disease. But, as this tick h^ become domiciled in the island 
of Cuba since its introduction by cattle from ttie southern part of the 
United States immediately after the ten years' war, Cuban cattle have 
become immune to the Texas fever, and this island should be classified 
as being within the ''Southern infected belt," as described by the 
Agricultural Department of the United States. In respect to Northern 
imported cattle, it is one of the many diseases with which the live 
stock industry of this island has to contend, such as anthrax, black 
1^, tuberculosis, hog cholera, swine plague, glanders, farcy, and other 
enzootic diseases. Fortunately, the island is as yet free from many 
pernicious continental diseases of domestic animals, such as contagious 
pleuropneumonia, foot and mouth disease, maladie de coit, scabies, 
and rinderpest. NevertJieless, Cuba being a purely agricultural coun- 
try, the live-stock interest demands the full benefit of the advanced 
knowledge of veterinary science^ as well as that to be derived from 
farther scientific researches and investigation. 

Hog cholera, known in different parts of this island under the names 
of pintadilla, salto, ahogo, guararey, sahumaya, acceso, rasquilla, 
culebrilla. ete., has existed throughout Cuba for more than fifty 
years, altnough the disease was not scientifically investigated or bac- 
teriologically proved until the year 1889. The Spanish Government 
never took any measures to suppress the disease, and had it not been 
for the wild condition in which nogs are raised in this island the species 
would have been extinguished long ago. 

So widely disseminated is the disease that no matter where hogs 
are landed, nor how healthy the condition in which they come from 
the States, they are soon contaminated with it, as, due to the effects 
of the voyage and the change of climate, they seem to become much 
more susceptible to the contagion. The supply of hogs for consump- 
tion, as wefi as those destined to replace the breeds exhausted by the 
late war, comes from the United States. Not infrequently cargoes 
come contaminated, due to the fact that the disease is prevalent in 
naany parts of the United States. To prohibit the importation of hogs 
wooJd be equivalent to the prohibition of the consumption of pork in 
the island, and would seriously affect American interests, since 95 per 
cent of these animals slaughtered in Habana and 80 per cent of those 
slaughtered in other cities are imported from the United States. A 
long quarantine imposed upon all imported animals would be imprac- 
ticable and ineffective as a measure of disease suppression, and would 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



148 REPORT OF MILITARY OOVERNOR OF OITBA. 

be so costly as to deter American importers from bringing their stock 
here. 

On page 45 of the Fourteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ani- 
mal Industry the United States Secretary of Agriculture says in 
reference to the diseases of swine as follows: 

While most prevalent in the great corn-producing states, the diseases have been 
carried to all parts of the country, and, tnerefore, any relations to be effective 
must be enforced over a wide extent of territory, and would be correspondingly 
expensive. The losses have, however, been tremendous, being placed by some as 
high as $100,000,000 in a year^ an estimate which does not appear to be exaggerated 
in the light of the careful mqmries in the State of Iowa, from which it was concluded 
that this one State lost from $12,000,000 to $15,000,000 worth of swine in a single 
year. 

• ••*•• • 

There are but two methods of control which, from our present knowledge of 
conta^ous diseases of swine, appear to promise adequate results. The one is the old 
stampmg-out method, the slaughter of diseased and exposed animals, the quarantine 
of injected farms, the regulation of transportation, the disinfection of stock care, 
stock pens, infected farms, and all other places harboring the contagion. The other 
is the treatment of diseased and exposed animals with antitoxic serum. Both o! 
these methods have been tried, to a limited extent, during the past year. The 
stampin^-out method is attended by many difficulties and limitations. Farmers 
often object to the slaughter of exposed animals which are still healthy, unless paid 
more than the animals are worth, and they are unwillinjg to have their oreeding stock 
killed so long as there is a chance of saving part of it. On the other hand, it is 
embarrassing, if not impossible, for the Grovemment officials to utilize in an^' way 
the carcasses of exposed animals which have not yet developed symptoms of disease, 
and to destroy these adds lai^lv to the expense. Again, it is next to impoesible to 
control transportation and disinfection of cars so as to prevent constant reinfection. 
The disinfection of farms is also a troublesome matter, as the germ of hog cholem has 
great vitality, and is able to maintain its existence and virulence in the soil, in moiM 
organic matter, and even in water, for several months. Finally, the wide distribu- 
tion of the disease, the ease with which the contagion is carried, the numerooe 
agencies which contribute to its spread, are all elements which increase the gravity 
of the problem and militate against the success of the stamping-out method. 

The use of antitoxic serum appears at present to be a much more promising 
method of diminishing the losses. 

In his annual report for the year 1899, the Secretary of Agriculture 
states as follows in regard to the result of the serum treatment: 

The preparation of serum for treating hog cholera and swine pla^e has been on a 
very much lai^r scale than last year, and the results are exceedingly satisfactory. 
The diseased herds in four counties of Iowa have been under treatment, the resdlt 
showing a saving of from 75 to 80 per cent of the animals injected, though the final 
reports are not all received at this writing. It is evident, however, that this method 
of treatment is far in advan'ce of any other heretofore tried. 

Taking all these facts into consideration — the wide distribution of 
the disease over the island, the necessity of continuing importation of 
animals for consumption and breeding^ purposes, the impracticability 
and the ineflSciency of the long and strict quarantine of animals whicli, 
almost immediately after being released, would enter infected localities, 
leads me to urge tnat every effort be made to provide without dela^^ a 
suflScient supply of hog-cholera serum to enable all imported animals, 
and especialljr those intended for breeding purposes, to be subjected 
to the antitoxic treatment. 

In reply to a request from this office for a supply of the serum 
from the Bureau of Animal Industry in Washington, the honorable 
Secretary of Agriculture wrote, under date of January 29, 1900: 

I regret that I am unable to comply with this request, as this Department has only 
been able to manu^ture sufficient serum for its own experiments. There are 
demands for the remedy from all portions of the United States which I am unable 
to comply wlfli. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEFOBT OF MILITABY GOYSENOB OF CUBA. 149 

During the past year a number of cases of glanders have been 
reported in Habana. It is not to be assumed that these cases were 
imported, escaping the vigilance of the veterinary inspectors. In 
fact, there is every reason to believe that this was not the case. Stables 
and other places in Hr.bana where are kept animals subject to this 
disease are notoriously infected. Owners of horses make every effort 
to conceal not only suspicious, but well-identified, cases of the disease 
from the sanitary inspectors. In one case this office reported to the 
chief sanitary officer, from information which had come to it indi- 
rectly, a stable where at least one case of glanders was being con- 
cealed, and which, with additional cases, was verified on inspection. 
During the Spanish administration attention was repeatedly called in 
the press to tne bad sanitary condition of the stables of Habana. and 
to tne criminal neglect of the Government in allowing glanaered 
horses to work in the streets of the citj. But as the owners of the 
lan^ stables and omnibus lines were bpaniards, some of them very 
influential in local politics, it was impossible to accomplish anything 
against their wishes. In 1888 a young lady belon^ng to one of the 
best families in Cuba died of glanders, and the Spanish authorities 
were compelled by the clamor oi the press to act m the matter. A 
committee was appointed 1^ the board of health to examine the 
stables of the city, and Dr. Lain^, at present chief veterinary 
inspector of the customs service, was appointed the veterinary sur- 
^n of the committee. As soon as this commission began its labors 
it met with great opposition from the owners of the stables, who 
refused to allow their diseased animals to be killed. In the omnibus 
stable of a rich and influential Spaniard, and member of the city 
council, two horses were found with unmistakable signs of the disease. 
The owner refused to allow the horses to be killed, and obtained a cer- 
tificate from a Spanish veterinary surjgeon to the effect that the horses 
were not ^landered, but were suffering with chronic nasal catarrh. 
The commission thereupon caused two other animals to be inoculated 
with the nasal secretions of the diseased horses; both the animals con- 
tracted glanders and died before the fifteenth day, as well as one of 
the members of the commission, who became infected while assisting 
in the work of inoculation. Notwithstanding such conclusive proof, 
the horses were not allowed to be killed, and the commission there- 
upon declined to continue its useless labors. There could be but one 
result of such gross indifference and neglect; during the period from 
the year 1880 to September of 1898, 100 people died of glanders in 
the city of Habana alone, as is shown by the records of the hospitals. 
Farcy, which is the cutaneous manifestation of glanders, and is com- 
patible with work, was the most frequent form of the disease in 
Habana; therefore a large number of sick animals were to be seen on 
the streets spreading the disease to human beings, even those whose 
occupations did not bring them in contact with these animals. Among 
the 100 persons stated above to have died of the disease are found on 
the records doctors, lawyers, notaries, ladies of high families, and 
men of varied occupations in no way connected with flie care of these 
animals. The records of the past year will show that the precautions 
taken since the American occupation to prevent the importation of 
the disease and to remove the cause of contagion from infected local- 
ities have met with marked success. 

In view of the great importance of this subject in its bearing upon 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



150 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

the revival of the immensely valuable animal industry of Cuha^ I 
recommend that a nucleus of an experimental station, such as is main- 
tained in most of the live-stock raising states, be established at 
Habana, where every outbreak of disease among domestic animals can 
be properly investigated, which can determine the best methods of 
eradication or suppression, and which can recommend and supervise 
the enforcement oi proper quarantine rules whenever this measure of 
precaution should seem desirable. 

The economic situation of Cuba, as indicated by the statistics of the 
customs service during the past year, can not be regarded as favor- 
able. The returns of imports and exports, excluding the movement of 
specie, show an excess of the former over the latter, or a balance 
against the island of $26,260,065. This condition of course is entirely 
due to the terrible devastation of the recent war, which resulted in 
almost complete destruction of the facilities for producing articles for 
home consumption and for e^poi*tation. Cuba is an agiicultund 
country of great fertility, yet a great part of its food supply now 
comes from abroad. Its power to produce for exportation has been 
reduced almost to a minimum, and its necessities for importation for 
immediate consumption have been increased almost to the maximum. 

The three great enterprises of Cuba in former times were sugar, 
tobacco, and cattle. The maximum crop of sugar in any one year was 
that of the year 1894, amounting to 1,054,214 tons; the crop of the 
year 1895 was 1,204,264 tons; in 1896, as a result of the war, this 
dropped to 225,221 tons, and in 1897 to 212,051 tons, inci*easing in 
1898 to about 300,000 tons. These figures alone show the material 
destruction wrought by the recent successful insurrection in Cuba, as 
compared with that of the ten-years' war, the lowest production of 
sugar during the former war (in the year 1877) being 520,000 tons, or 
more than double the annual aveiuge production during the recent war. 
The crop of the year 1899-1900 is a little over 300,000 tons. There 
are many enthusiastic believers in the future of Cuban sugar who 
maintain that the island is capable of producing, with the development 
of as yet unworked cane land, and with improved methods m the 
cultivation of cane and in the manufacture of sugar, an annual crop 
of 5,000,000 tons. 

On 2,000,000 of her 28,000,000 acres of land Cuba produces nearly 
one-half of the entire cane-sugar crop of the world, and there is 
undoubtedly a great quantity remaining of the richest cane land in 
the world, as yet untouched by the plow, under a climate unsurpassed 
for the growth and development of the cane. Therefore, however 
wild may be the dream of the enthusiast, it is cei"tain that the island 
is capable of producing, under favorable conditions, a very great 
increase over tne largest crop that it has thus far yielded. Thus it 
will appear to what e:S;remity this industry has been reduced as com- 
pared with the past production, and what a great field there is for 
profitable investment of capital. 

From this point of view, the figures which show so small an impor- 
tation of machinery and equipment for the production of sugar would 
be very depressing were it not that there is much reason to believe 
that the machinery already in the island, and able to work, were suf- 
ficient capital available, is enough to grind any crop of cane to be 
anticipatea in the next couple of years. The crop for next year is 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT GOYEBNOB OF CUBA. 151 

expected to reach the figure of 600,000 tons, but there can be no cer- 
tainty of this until after the hurricane season has passed, the storms 
which then prevail frequently causing immense damage to the cane. 

For obvious reasons the tobacco crop has much more nearly reached 
its normal than is the case with that or sugar. The highest estimate 
of the production in former times which 1 have seen is 660,000 bales. 
The estimates of this year's crop vary from 430,000 to 460,000 bales, 
distributed as foUows: 

Vaelta Al)ajo district 150,000 to 160,000 bales 

Semivnelta and Partido district 100,000 to 130,000 bales 

Laa Villas district 150,000 to 200,000 boles 

No accurate figures for the province of Santiago are yet available, 
but its production will materially increase the above figures. 

Tobacco, being very largely raised by small tobacco farmers, or 
veneres, requiring no complicated, expensive machinery, either in 
rBising* or manufacturing the crop, and there being a steady demand 
for the product at, until recently, unusually high prices, has been the 
first of Cuban industries to revive. The vitelity of this industry 
becomes apparent when we consider the great revenues which are 
derived by various countries, especially the United States, from import 
taxes on the manufactures of the Cuban tobacco. The principal ground 
of complaint by planters and manufacturers is the high import duty 
in the United States upon these manufactures, combined with the 
export duty in this island. This will appear from the following 
illustration: 

To manufacture in the United States 1,000 cigars weighing 12 pounds 
from 25 pounds of filler and 5 pounds of wrapper, bought in Habana, 
unstemmed, there would be the following charges for outy: 

Export duty in Cuba on SO potmds leaf at $6.30 per 100 kilos $0.85 

Import duty in the United States on 25 pounds o! filler at 35 cents per pound. 8. 75 
Import duty in the United States on 5 pounds of wrapper at 11.85 per pound . 9. 25 



Total 18.85 

Upon the same 1,000 cigai^, weighing 12 pounds, manufactured in 
Habaua and imported into the United States, there would be the fol- 
lowing charges: 

Import duty in United States at $4.50 per pound $54. 00 

Plus 25 per cent ad valorem on value at $60 per thousand 15. 00 

Export duty from Cuba at $1.35 per thousand 1.35 

Total 70.00 

or a difference of $61.50 against Cuban tobacco. For these reasons 
manufacturers of tobacco in Habana demand the retention of the pres- 
ent export duty on leaf tobacco, or even its restoration to its former 
&^re, together with the abolition of the export duty on manufactured 
cigars ana cigarettes. W hen the Cuban tarin comes to be made by Cuba, 
this will doubtless be done, and there will no longer be the anomaly of 
a civilized country placing an export duty upon one of its principal 
manufactures. 
To show the condition of the cattle industry in the island, I submit 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



152 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 



two tables taken from a recently pablished report to his government 
by the Hon. Lionel E. G. Garden, consul-general of Great Britain: 



ClfUM. 


Value per 
head. 


December 31. 1891. 


December SI, 1892. 


Number. 


Value. 


Number. \ Value. 


Horses 


£ i. 

10 

30 

4 

4 

1 4 

7 

7 


581,416 
43,309 
1,889 
2,455,788 
570, 194 
8,980 
78,492 


£5,314,160 

1,299,270 

7,856 

9.823,162 

684.282 

8,125 

27.472 


695.805 

49,645 

1,910 

2,585,309 

585,862 

7,378 

89.793 


£8,966,060 

1,489,350 

7, WO 

10,841,» 

642.434 

2.6ffi 

31.427 


Mules 


ASBQB 


Cattle 


Hogs 


QoatB 


SheeD 




Total '. 






17,158,767 




18,472,711 











(Or In the money of the United States.) 

Complete returns of the stock in the whole island at the end of 1898, 
are not obtainable, but the following ofiBcial data of the horned cattle 
remaining in three of the provinces are sufficient to serve as a basis for 
estimating the remainder, and it is not, I think, too much to assume 
that other live stock suffered in more or less the same proportion: 

Per cent of the number of homed cattle in the island of Cuba at the end of the years IS9i 

and 1898. 



Provinces. 


Number. 


Remarks. 


1892. 


1898. 


Habana 


858,678 
272,169 
770, 911 

1,188,566 


29,486 
8,800 
66,000 

88,057 


Civil governor's report, 1899. 
Military governor's report, 1899. 
Do. 


Mfttanzft*? ..,..-,,-,,,--. r--. 


Santa Clara 


Plnar del Rio 




Puerto Principe 


/Estimate based on the returns of tbe 
\ other three provinces. 


Santiago de Cuba 






Total 


2,585,309 


192,843 









Note.— Falling off between the years 1892 and 1898 approximately 92| per cent 

According to this table, at the end of the recent war there remained 
in the island of Cuba only 7^ per cent of the number of cattle therein 
at the beginning of the war. At the present rate of importation it 
will be a good many years before this industry can be restored to its 
former prosperity, as the statistics show that a very large proportion 
of the total importations are for immediate food consumption. 

I submit witnout further analysis, which is prevent^ by the haste 
with which this report has had to be prepared, the following statistical 
statements: 

(IJ List of collectors of customs. 

S2) Statement of personnel at all ports. 
3) Statement of personnel of Habana custom-house by months, with salaries. 
4) Statement of navi^tion, with r^sum^. 

(5) Statement of itnmigrantfl arriving at tbe port of Habana during the fiscal year 
1900. 
(6 J Statement of Chinese arrivine at Habana during the fiscal year 1900. 

(7) Passenger statement, port of Habana: (a) Arrivals, by months and countries; 
(6) departures, by months and countries. 

(8) Passenger statement, arrivals and departures, of all ports, during the fiscal 
year 1900. 

(9) Passenger statement for the island of Cuba, from January 1 to June 30, 1900, 
showing arrivals and departures, men, women, and children. 

nO} Customs collections, at all ports in the island, during the fiscal year 190O. 
(11) Customs collections, island of Cuba, by months and headings, fiscal year 190a 

Digitized by VjV^^^V IC 



REPOBT OF MILITABY GOYEBNOB OF CUBA. 



168 



(12) Collections, port of Habena, fiscal year 1900. 

(13 ) Cnstoms disbursements, all port& fiscal year 1900. 

(14) Gostoms disbursements, island of Cuba, by months and headings, fiscal year 

(15) Disbursements, port of Habana, fiscal year 1900. 

(16) Comparative statement of receipts and disbursements, with cost of collection, 
at all ports, during fiscal year 1900. 

(17) Customs receipts and expenditures, with balances, showing relative impor- 
tance of the ports. 

ns) Importation of live stock, by ports, island of Cuba, during fiscal year 1900. 

(19) Importation of live stock, port of Habana, during fiscal year 1900. 

(20) Importation of live stock — r^sum^. 

21) Statement of exportation of tobacco, island of Cuba, during fiscal year 1900. 

22) Statement of value of exportation of sugar, molasses, and confectionery, 
islana of Cuba, during fiscal year 1900. 

(23) Statement of exportation, by articles and countries, with value and duty, 
islana of Cuba, fiscal year 1900. 

(24) Statement of exportation, port of Habana, by articles and countries, with 
valae and duty, fiscal year 1900. 

(26) Statement of exportation, island of Cuba, by ports. 

(26) Statement of importation, by articles and countries, with ^'alue and duty, 
island of Cuba, fiscal year 1900. 

(27) Statement of importation, port of Habana, by articles and countries, with 
valae and duty, fiscal year 1900. 

I also beg to inclose annual report of the chief of the bureau of 
special agents, dated October 8, 1900, also report of the chief of the 
revenue-cutter service, dated September 22, 1900. 
Very respectfully, 

Taskeb H. Bliss, 
Major^ Collector of Customs for Cvba. 

Maj-Gren. Leonakd Wood, 

Commcmdirw Dividon of Cvba^ 

Military Governor of Cvba^ Haba/na. 



No. l,—CoUeclor$ of customs at all the ports of the island of Cuba during the fiscal year 

1900. 



Forts. 


TlUe. 


Name. 


Appointed. 


ReUeved. 


H<Vb4l7UI 


Collector 


Maj.TMkerH.BliflBt.. 
Lieut. H. C. Schumm . . 
Lieut. J. W. Wright.... 
fiamonM.Canas 

Agustln Afuero 

Capt.J.F.B.Landl8... 

P.B. Anderson 

Lieut. M.B. Stokes.... 
Capt.W.Y. Stamper ... 
Maj. G. Le Roy Brown. 
Lieut. J.W.Smith 

Roy H. Chamberlain. . 

William E. Race 

Lieut. H.C. Schumm.. 

William B. Race 

CaptE.E, Benjamin.. 


Dec. 20,1896 
Jan. 16,1899 
Mar. 29,1900 
Feb. 14,1899 

Jan. 10,1900 
Dec. 19,1898 

June 30,1900 
May 19,1899 
Apr. 19,1899 
Feb. 14,1900 
Jan. 1, 1899 

Jan. 10,1900 
Jan. 27,1900 
Feb. 24,1900 
Mar. 29,1900 
May 14,1900 
June 7,1900 




Bftnooa 


do 


Mar. 29, 1900. 


BtUbcno 


do 

Acting deputy 

collector. 
do 


Jan. 10, 1900. 






Ctibctien 




June 30, 1900, or- 


Ckfrienni 


Acting collector.. 
Collector 


dered to report for 
duty at West Point 
Aug. 21, 1900. 


denfoegoe 


do 


Feb. 14, 1900. 


Qtt*» 


do 

do 

Acting collector.. 
do 


Died Jan. 19, 1900. 

from a gunshot 

wonnd. 
Jan. 27, 1900. 
Feb. 24, 1900. 




do 

Collector 

Acting collector.. 
Collector 


Mar. 29, 1900. 
May 14, 1900. 
June 7, 1900, 



»Chief of the customs service of the island; appointed collector of customs for Cuba on Dec 20, 1^96. 



CUBA 1900— VOL I, PT 3 11 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



154 RBPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

No. I.— Collectors of customs at the ports of the island of Cuba, dc.— Continued. 



Ports. 



Title. 



Name. 



Appointed. 



Rejected. 



Guantanamo . 



Collector . 



Manzanillo. 
Matanzas... 



Acting collector. 

do 

Collector 

do 

do 



Nuevitas 

Sagiia la Grande... 

Santa Cruz del Sur. 
6antia«:o 



do 

Acting collector. 
Collector 



Acting collector.. 

Acting deputy 

collector. 
Collector 



Trinidad 

Tunas dc Zaza . 



Acting collector. 

Collector , 

do 

do 

do 



....do 

Acting deputy 
collector. 



Capt. E. A. Ellis 

J.Waldo Floyd 

D.H.Schumann 

Capt. F. G. Irwin 

LieutLe Roy S.Upton. 
Capt. W.H. Hay 

MaJ.C. A. Williams.... 

Henry Page 

CaptElias Chandler.. 

A. I. Casanova 

M.E. Estrada 

CaptT.F.Davis 

D. H. Schumann 

Capt. 8. D. Freeman . . . 

Capt. F.G.Irwin 

Capt. John Conklin ... 
Lieut.F.V.8,Cliamber- 

lain. 
LieutLe Roy 8.Upton. 
Andres Orsini 



Dec. 19,1898 



July 15,1899 

Apr. 19,1899 
Mar. 29,1900 
Dec. 19,1898 



Jan. 5,1899 
Oct. 8, 1899 
Jan. 21,1899 



Feb. 18 to 

Mar.31,1900 

Apr. 27,1899 

Dec. 19,1898 



Oct. 9,1899 

Oct. 25,1899 

Apr. 19,1900 

Dec. 20,1898 

May 18,1900 

Apr. 22,1899 

Mar. 29,1900 



Leave of absence 
July 15 to Oct. 17, 
1899. 

Oct. 17, 1899. 

Mar. 29. 1900. 

Leave of absence 
July 4 to Sept i 
1900. 

Oct 8, 1899. 

Leave of absence 
Feb. 18 to Mar. SI, 
1900. 



Taken ill with yel- 
low fever Oct & 
officially rdiered 
Oct. 21. 1899. 

Oct 25. 1899. 

Apr. 19. 1900. 

May 18. 1900. 
Mar. 29, 1900. 



1 Serving temporarily from Joly 25 to Sept 1, 1899. 



No. 2. — Statement of personnel at all ports in the island of Cuba on June SO, 19O0. 



Ports. 


NationaUty. 


Total 


American. 


Cuban. 


Spanish. 


Others. 


Bamcao 


1 


7 

5 

11 

20 

51 

10 

15 

14 

28 

18 

12 

4 

57 

7 

5 

884 






8 


Batabano 






h 


Caibarien 


2 

1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 


U 
18 
18 
»3 




17 


Cardenas 




29 


Cienfu^:o8 '. 


1 


61 


Guantanamo 


15 


Gibara 




16 


Manzanillo 


n 




16 


Matanzas 




81 


Nuevitas 




20 


Sagua 




1 


15 


Santa Cruz 




4 


Santiago 


3 

1 


- 




60 


Trinidad 


u 




9 


Tunas dc Zaza 




5 


Habana* 


M8 


157 


4 


413 






Total 


*70 


598 


83 


6 


<757 






Havana custom-house* 


15 
633 


277 

57 


45 
12 


3 
1 


MO 


Cuban customs service 


108 







1 Unregistered Spaniards, now citizens of Cuba. 

'Of this number, 33 are engaged in the Cuban customs service, but being employed at Habooa are 
enrolled and paid at that custom-house. 

*Of this number, 13 are officers of the United States Army. 

6 These 83 Americans are engaged as follows: Nineteen, bureau of correspondence; 7, bureau of q>e- 
cial agents; 1, bureau of statistics; 5, revenue-cutter service; 1, property clerk. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 



155 



No, 



Z.SUstemerU of employees at the port of Hdbanay Cuhay during the fiscal year 1900, 



Months. 



Jnly.... 

Augwt 

September. . 
October .... 
November.. 
December.. 



1899. 



JaniiUT. 
February. 
March.... 
April 

^1 

Jane 



1900. 



Total. 



Habana custom-hoose. Cnban customs service. 



Number 
of em- 
ployees. 



311 
320 
381 
334 



837 
357 



365 
360 
860 



Salary. 



123.196.20 
23,809.90 
23,689.59 
24.987.84 
25,156.66 
25,823.13 



25,875.28 
24,558.72 
28,012.61 
28,042.19 
27,583.78 
27,840.76 



306,076.66 



Number 
of em- 
ployees. 



Salary. 



»T12 
Hz 
«88 
96 
101 
108 



S3, 820. 90 
4,729.24 
6,429.33 
6,a4.e9 
i, 478. 34 
7,706.01 



7,404.77 
7,856.62 
9,216.40 
7,648.90 
9,676.80 
9,428.42 



83.970.32 



Total 
nomber 

of em- 
ployees. 



Total amomii 
of salaries. 



853 
861 



398 
?99 



4^*9 
469 
4M 
461 
461 
463 



$27, or. 10 
28,539.14 
29,118.92 
8), 6^2. 53 
29,685.00 
83,029.14 



88,280.05 
82,415.24 
87,229.01 
85,691.09 
8^260.58 
87,269.18 

392,0*6.98 



Rate of cost of collection for salaries, fiscal year 1900 Percent.. 3.24 

Bate,dedactingsalariesof employees of Cuban customs service do.... 2 55 

1 Increase in personnel caused by addition of revenue-cutter service. 

'Decrease in personnel caused by revenue cutter Kanawha being transferred to quartermaster's 
department 



No. 4. — Number of vesselSj vnih gross tonnage^ by ports, entered and cleared^ island of 

Cuba, fiscal year 1900. 



BARACOA. 



Months. 



Coastwise. 



Entered. 



Vessels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



Cleared. 



Vessels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



Foreign. 



Entered. 



Vessels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



Cleared. 



Vessels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



1899. 

Jnly 

Angmt 

September.. 

October 

November .. 
December... 

1900. 

Jannary 

February ... 
March....... 

is?!:::::::: 

June 

Total.. 



99 
92 
101 
86 
81 
67 



6,729 
10.581 

9,886 
10,587 
11,168 
10,277 



12,842 
8,500 
12,742 
12,088 
10,941 
10,595 



101 
94 

101 
89 
77 
68 



6,791 
10,496 

9,628 
10,491 
11,196 
10,275 



12,919 
8,660 
12,728 
11,933 
10,776 
10.774 



2,981 
6,1M 
8,982 
4,911 
4,428 
8,591 



6,600 
6,760 
4,209 

4,788 
4.738 
10,825 



998 



126,781 



1,003 



126,647 



78 



61,967 



77 



2,832 
6,315 
4,203 
4,843 
4,278 
8,779 



6,564 
f,378 
4,523 
4,791 
4,469 
10,600 



61,675 



BATABANO. 



Jnly 

Angnst 

September.. 

October 

Koycm ber .. 
December... 

1900. 

JiDoary 

Ffebniary ... 
March...... 

fS5!:::::::; 

Jnae 

Total.. 



181 
132 
102 
120 
125 
155 



142 
186 
181 
158 
148 
138 



1,668 



8,747 
6,648 
5,421 
9,679 
8,749 
12,840 



15,426 
15,962 
18,079 
18,526 
16,312 
12,073 



180 
180 
111 
125 
130 
144 



145 
189 
169 
152 
150 
141 



148,462 I 1,< 



8,740 
6,602 
7,841 
9,710 
9,956 
11,960 



16,495 
15,495 
16,991 
17,870 
19,300 
16,346 



156,806 



12 



44 
111 



180 
186 
135 
116 



922 



14 



12 



44 
111 



45 
181 



116 
138 



Digitized by VjH^^^V LC 



166 



BBPORT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



No. 4.— Number ofv€88els,tmih gross Umnage^ byports, entered and dearedy e<c.— Oontinaei 

GAIBARIEN. 



Months. 



July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November .. 
December. . . 

1900. 

January 

February ... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total.. 



Coastwise. 



Entered. 



Vessels 



871 



Gross 
tonnsge. 



4,888 
8,878 
2,968 
8,725 
8,682 
6,168 



4,079 
4,884 
7,867 
6,667 
7,066 
7,064 



61,821 



Cleared. 



Vessels. 



877 



Gross 
tonnage. 



4,859 
8,881 
5,656 
8,885 
8.514 
5,182 



5,028 
4,888 
7,711 
6,879 
7,151 
6,911 



68,485 



Foreign. 



Entered. 



Vessels. 



100 



Gross 
tonnage. 



12,068 
18,756 
9,268 
7,980 
7,285 
8,099 



15,721 
14,009 
16,582 
25,626 
18,718 
18,068 



167,095 



Cleared. 



Vessels. 



Gran 
tonns^e. 



9 

6 

10 • 
121 

9 

9 



11,917 
18.M 
9,4M 

7.8tt 

7.sa 



15.721 
12, «• 
17,01 
22,fi9 

21. sn 

18,307 



108 ' 168,924 



CARDENAS. 



July 

August 

September . 

October 

November . 
December... 

1900. 

January 

February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total. 



126 
181 
99 
71 
123 
281 



140 
101 
151 
140 
186 
132 



1,601 



4,276 
3,987 
8,784 
8,914 
8,979 
4,616 



4,191 
8,044 
8,829 
8,383 
8,611 
7,827 



64,891 



100 
79 
83 
70 
82 
87 



84 
86 
125 
129 
111 
102 



1,138 



4,433 
8,999 
4,206 
8,920 
8,848 
4,456 



4,406 
8,478 
8,884 
8,697 
8,866 
7,746 



66,989 



224 



16,961 
17,864 
16,656 
10.664 
10,968 
12,599 



27,204 
31,866 
27.894 
83,749 
41,480 
83,261 



280,021 



223 



18,687 

lisa 

20,412 
10,912 
U,»7 
13,027 



26.440 
26,717 
81. 152 
84, e» 
42.102 
29.165 



279,778 



GIBARA. 



1899. 
July 


85 
82 
87 
34 
49 
42 

40 
28 
48 
65 
72 
78 


12,899 
6,756 
6,664 
6,007 
7,968 
7,976 

10,968 
8,194 

11,887 

11,968 
9,999 

11,471 


25 
23 
28 
23 
83 
39 

37 
27 
46 
66 
71 
79 


12,059 
6,659 
7,849 
5,769 
7,564 
7,986 

10,865 
8,165 

10,767 

11,991 
9,883 

12,669 


13 
15 

6 
7 
9 
8 

6 
8 
11 
12 
18 
15 


12,811 
15,689 
6,641 
9,930 
12,880 
6,607 

9,482 
11,622 
17,689 
16,048 
12,768 
14,964 


18 
15 
6 

7 
9 

7 

6 
7 
12 
10 
13 
IS 


13,167 


August , T , , 


15,69 


Sentember 


6,541 


October 


9.9» 


November 


12,880 


^eoeniber 


6;47» 


1900. 
January 


9,480 


February 


U,474 


March 


18.711 


April 


14.277 


MSy.:.:::::::.:::::: 


12,860 


June 


12,784 






Total 


555 


112,737 


485 


111,606 


122 


146,616 


118 


144,216 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 157 

No. 4.—Numbnofves8els,withgro88tofm(^fe,byparUyerUereda^ 

MANZANILLO. 



Montlis. 



1809. 

Jnly 

August 

September.. 

October 

Novmiber .. 
IXecember... 

1900. 

January 

Febraary ... 
March 

r:::;:::: 

June 

Total.. 



OoastwlBe. 



Entered. 



VesBels. 



25 



19 



Oroes 
tonnage. 



8,068 
7,484 
9,570 
7,680 
8,814 
8,517 



11,978 
12,008 
15,706 
12,292 
13,659 
12,412 



810 127,666 



Cleared. 



Veeeela. 



296 



OroflB 
tonnage. 



128,090 



Foreign. 



Entered. 



VesBels. 



8,012 


9 


8,108 


12 


9,899 


10 


7,794 


17 


8,280 


10 


8,407 


9 


11,860 


11 


12,287 


9 


15,466 


10 


12,450 


10 


1S.6(» 


7 


12,549 


8 



122 



Gross 
tonnage. 



6,168 
8,417 
8,254 
11,692 
10,281 
7,847 



14,074 
11,598 
15,687 
9,474 
11,487 
11,867 



126,226 



Cleared. 



Vessels. 



123 



Gross 
tonnage. 



6,219 
7,770 
8,048 
12,242 
10,562 
7,847 



18,061 
10,845 
18,819 
11,988 
18,087 
11,857 



126,295 



CIBNFUBG08. 



1899. 

Jnly , 

Angnst 

September., 

October 

November . . 
December... 

1900. 

Jannary 

Febmary .., 

March 

April 

}fiy 

June 

Total. 



618 



11,968 
9,748 

12,787 
9,082 

12,111 

18,678 



26,496 
24,148 
27,800 
25,921 
25,026 
24,842 



228,^4 



611 



10,817 
10,588 
18,727 
12,304 
13,545 
19,769 



26,100 
24,381 
28,028 
25,918 
26.090 
24,641 



284,888 



821 



28,111 
86,830 
87,689 
39,191 
33,065 
26,655 



60,469 
48.562 
53,631 
62,738 
39,109 
40,565 



606,060 



28,442 
83,669 

88,827 
89,578 
88,582 
27,075 



60.572 
46,828 
50.456 
61,471 
44.220 
86,775 



601,495 



GUANTANAMO. 



1899. 
Jnly , 

AttgOBt... 

September. 

October 

Norember . 
Deoember.. 

1900. 

January 

February .. 
March ..... 

r.::::::: 

Jnne 

Total. 



19 
14 
15 
9 
19 
12 



5,W7 
8,400 
4,764 
7,196 
4,365 
6,855 



9,816 
8,080 
6,781 
4,682 
6,428 
5,868 

72,218 



17 
14 
18 
11 
17 
18 



5,822 
3,400 
4,764 
4,960 
4,610 
5,857 



6,447 
6,440 
9,662 
7,441 
6.886 
5.895 

71,204 



9 
10 
11 
12 

4 
6 

111 



7,174 
5,860 
9,367 
6,970 
11.005 
14,723 



12,704 
14,069 
14,073 
14,523 
9,240 
9,740 

129,428 



9 
9 
8 

10 
6 
6 

~m 



7,174 
5,774 
9.231 
8.948 
11,005 
14,587 



14,817 
14,164 
11,768 
11.587 
11.673 
9.558 

129.629 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



158 REPOET OF MILITARY GOVEBNOE OF CUBA. 

No. 4. — Number of vessels j with gross tonnagey by ports, entered and deared, eic. — Gontiniied. 

MATANZA». 





CJoastwlue. 


Foreign. 


Montha. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 




Vessels. 


GroflB 
tonnage. 


Vessels. 


Qroas 
tonnage. 


Vessels. 


Oron 
tonnage. 


Veasela. 


GrosB 
Umnage. 


1899. 
July 


87 
62 
74 
37 
45 
44 

48 
41 
43 

48 
48 
65 


1,005 
1,280 
1,261 
283 
1,191 
1,030 

1,842 

988 

914 

874 

1,867 

1,959 


44 

66 
66 
33 
48 
51 

52 
41 
42 
48 
49 
55 


1,011 
i;348 
1,162 
649 
1,233 
1,160 

1,835 
1,109 
760 
862 
1,365 
4,116 


16 
20 
14 
11 
13 
20 

15 
20 
24 
21 
80 
29 


24,223 
48,750 
19,646 
15,889 
18,174 
27,016 

32,947 
48,164 
60,271 
68,181 
63,234 
62,349 


17 
20 
16 
10 
14 
18 

14 

18 
28 
26 
81 
29 


24.951 


August 


4&ae 


September 


^980 


October 


14,00 


November 


2o;mo 


December 


24,99 


1900. 
January 


81, 2» 


February 


48«ae 


March 


66, 4» 


April 


66, SM 


May 


66, n 


June 


68,00 






Total 


582 


18,889 


595 


16,105 


286 


483.843 


286 


48iW 







NUEVITAS. 



1899. 

July 

August 

September . 
October...., 
November , . 
December.., 

1900. 

January 

February... 

March , 

April 

Blay 

June 

Total. 



783 



11,861 
8,595 
7,779 
6,588 
8,942 

10,489 



10,658 
7,599 
14,534 
11,834 
14,072 
19,632 



131,433 



843 



10,922 
8,907 
7,788 
7,016 
8,965 

10,078 



11,147 
7,670 
14,651 
10,937 
14,075 
19,400 



131.546 



111 



9,482 
9,146 
18,317 
14,741 
20,836 
20,709 



20,746 
16,294 
18,266 
19,686 
18,907 
12,160 



188,638 



I 

10 
8 
10 
18 



108 



9,717 
7.806 
14,60 
14.168 
17,911 
21,8GS 



19,414 
17,(» 
12.S9 
19,831 
16.667 
12. UO 



182.872 



8AGUA LA GRANDE. 



1899. 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November . , 
December.., 

1900. 

January 

February ... 

March , 

April 

May 

June , 

Total.. 



125 
95 
76 
65 
68 
71 



65 
69 
93 
103 
96 
90 



1,006 



11,367 
11,184 
12,226 
11,952 
10,316 
13,619 



10,895 
8,786 
14,562 
15,963 
15,918 
15,725 



152,613 



113 

87 
60 
61 
83 



67 
88 
104 
89 
94 



11,038 
10,768 
12,605 
11,608 
10,072 
13,998 



11,150 
8,4«) 
14,292 
15,932 
15,920 
15,682 



151,445 



131 



U,624 
19,678 
17,016 
16,226 
14,264 
18,140 



11,876 
14.262 
20,147 
82,766 
19,060 
14,240 



206,196 



182 



12,68 
90, 968 
16,6ie 
16,690 
18,480 
18,607 



U,835 
12,885 
21.881 
81.906 
18,688 
18.S78 



206,781 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 159 

5a 4.— iVfim&er of vessels, wUh gross tonnage, by ports, entered and cleared, «tc.— Continued. 

SAIO'A CBUZ. 





CJoastwlse. 


Foreign. 


Months. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 




YesKls. 


Gross 
tonna^. 


Vessels. 


Gross 
tonna^. 


Vessels. 


Gross 
tonnage. 


Vessels. 


Gross 
tonnage. 


1889. 
July 


i? 

81 
26 
24 
25 

25 
26 
29 
85 
29 
27 


7,936 
7,666 
9,894 
8,091 
7,734 
9,237 

11,887 
12.466 
14,420 
16,261 
13,719 
13,876 


21 
27 
82 
26 
28 
27 

24 
26 
28 
86 
80 
24 


7,976 
7,662 
9,910 
8,091 
7,719 
9,272 

11,862 
12,468 
14.394 
16,271 
18,786 
18,786 


1 
1 


962 
59 


1 

1 


962 


Angnst 


69 


Septembi^ 




October 


8 
2 


2,047 
1,249 


3 
1 

1 

8 

1 
2 
8 

4 

1 


2,047 

1,189 

110 


I)«ceiDber 


1900. 
Jtnnuy 


8 
1 
8 
2 
4 
2 


2,696 

UO 

998 

890 

8,297 

8,958 


2,696 
110 
684 


February t — 

Maicb 


April 


764 


Say^ ;;;;: 


8,297 
3,611 


JSw.;;;::::;;;::;;: 




Total 


824 


188,055 


824 


182,986 


22 


15,666 


21 


15,319 





SANTIAGO. 



1099. 
July 


26 
29 
28 
26 
28 
28 

81 
26 
88 
82 
42 
89 


10,585 
9;467 
9,460 
8,019 
10,566 
11,181 

14,484 
13,018 
14,851 
16,892 
16,221 
14,662 


27 
28 
26 
29 
27 
27 

80 
26 
86 
80 
42 
42 


10,875 
9,400 
8,926 
8,370 

10,297 
9,498 

16,119 
13,676 
16,032 
14,206 
16,699 
18,167 


40 
49 
68 
48 
86 
89 

84 
88 
41 
42 
49 
87 


34,966 
68,290 
61,644 
40,468 
82,629 
47,425 

62,476 
66,772 
70,074 
76,112 
92,664 
68,127 


89 
47 
61 
44 
88 
40 

87 
84 
40 
48 

47 
40 


84,169 
60,639 
53,042 
89,026 
87,711 
44,134 


August 


Seirtember 


Oclbber 


November 


December 


1900. 
Jannary............. 


67,712 




69,418 


Mftrrh 


70, 193 


AwU 


77,852 


1^.:.:....:::.:." 


92,073 


June 


71,153 






Total 


868 


146,789 


360 


146,249 


606 


696,682 


605 


697,022 







TBINIDAD. 



Joly...!^: 


43 
46 
46 
45 
50 
66 

69 
60 
68 
58 

47 
48 


9,888 
12,408 
11,046 

9.244 
12,629 
19,188 

26,968 
23,818 
27,466 
24,488 
23,954 
24,276 


46 
44 
47 
46 
49 
67 

58 
51 
60 
49 
49 
49 


9,942 
12,841 
U.089 

9,206 
12,612 
19,805 

25,859 
22.794 
26,256 
28.297 
28.978 
24,801 


2 
2 


974 
1,002 


2 
2 


974 


Angait : 


1,002 


a^lbi.. : ; ; 


ocESrT.:;:::::::: 


1 
1 
1 

2 
2 
2 
4 

1 
1 


1,209 
1,202 
1,209 

8,824 
8,824 
2,615 
6,849 
1,921 
1.920 


1 
1 

1 

3 
3 
3 
6 
1 
1 


1,209 


l^'wember . . 


1,202 


December 


1,209 


1900. 

j^Tmary... .. .*.... 


4,936 


*rt»niarT ... ..... 


4.986 


March!:.:;::::::::: 


8.627 


AnU 


6,961 


Mi^.::::::;::::::;:: 


1,921 


Jime 


1,920 






Total 


694 


226,162 


594 


220,879 


19 


26,449 


28 


29,897 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



160 



BBPOBT OF inUTABT OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



No. 4. — Number of vessels, vnth gross tonnage^ by ports, entered and cleared, etc — ContiiiQed. 

TUNAS DE ZAZA. 





CoaBtwtoe. 


Foreign. 


Mentha. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 




VewelB. 


Grow 
tonnage. 


VenBels. 


Qroas 
tonnage. 


Veasels. 


Qro8B 
tonnage. 


VeflKla. 


Qroa 
UHuiage. 


1899. 
July 


89 
44 

88 
36 
40 
47 

45 
46 
89 
48 
47 
85 


8,067 
U,174 
10,122 

8,820 
10,177 
18.861 

20,422 
19,192 
20,445 
21,040 
20,788 
18,917 


87 
44 
89 
85 
40 
47 

46 
47 
40 
46 
44 
86 


8,150 
U,209 
10,080 

8,901 
10,185 
18,220 

20,642 
19,222 
20,447 
21,061 
20,769 
18,920 






1 


1.761 


A.n^n9t ^-^r ...m,-,-r-r 








September 










October 


1 
1 
1 

1 


894 
1,882 
i;888 

300 


1 
1 
1 


m 


November 


1.3S2 


December 


1,386 


1900. 
jAnnary 




Febmimr 


1 


SOO 


March .1 


8 


1,766 




April 






MAy.:::::::::::::::: 


4 
2 


5,729 
2,709 


5 
8 


6,816 


June 


2,S78 






Total 


499 


182,620 


500 


182,696 


18 


14,118 


13 


15, 9M 







HABANA. 



1899. 

July 

August 

September . 
October.... 
November . 
December. . 

1900. 

January 

February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total. 



167 
145 
125 
103 
U9 
150 



144 
114 
154 
181 
178 
154 



1,724 



27,518 
21,572 
19,692 
17,682 
28,102 
28,227 



21,114 
17,080 
26,149 
28,871 
27,851 
28,890 



275,643 



146 
129 
127 
119 
UO 
142 



131 
128 
164 
173 
172 
161 



24,996 
19,694 
20,178 
18,640 
21,977 
22,480 



20,606 
19,329 
27,368 
26,950 
27,680 
24,163 



273,992 



189 
126 
135 
125 
121 
138 



147 
110 
160 
131 
134 
129 



1,685 



278,811 
262,205 
267,869 
257.571 
285,889 
259,966 



259,187 
201,214 
272,814 
280,690 
258,818 
256,802 



8,010,276 



133 
181 
128 
125 
114 
184 



133 
115 
144 
188 
124 
184 



1,548 



278,807 

25iae» 

265,02» 
266, «B 
283. S96 
268,686 



245, 9S1 
210,625 
264, 78S 
241,298 
246,971 
264,144 



3,010,4n 



RESUME 



Porta. 



Baracoa... 

Batabano . 

Caibarien . 

Cardenas. . 

Cienfuegos 

Quan tana- 
mo 

Gibara 

Manzanlllo 

Matanzas 

Nuevitas.. 

Sagua la 
Grande . 

Santa Cruz 

Santiago.. 

Trinidad.. 

Tunas de 
Zaza 

Habana... 



Coastwise. 



Entered. 



Ve^ 
sels. 



Qrom 
tonnage. 



998 
1.663 

371 
1,691 

618 

174 
555 
310 

582 
788 

1,006 



499 
1,724 



Total.. 12,1602,208,664 



128,781 
148,462 
61,821 
64,891 
228,474 

72,218 
112,737 
127,666 

13,889 
181,433 

162,513 
183,066 
146,789 
226,162 

182,620 
276,643 



Cleared. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



1,003 
1,6G6 

877 
1,138 

611 

177 
485 
296 
696 
843 



824 
869 
594 

500 



126,647 
156,806 
63,485 
66,939 
284,338 

71,204 
111,606 
128,090 

16,105 
181,546 

151,445 
132,986 
145,249 
220,879 

182,696 
273,992 



Foreign. 



Entered. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



78 
15 
100 
224 
321 

111 
122 
122 
236 
111 

131 
22 

506 
19 

18 
1,685 



61,967 
922 
167,095 
280.021 
506,080 

129,428 
146,616 
126,226 
483,843 
183,638 

208,196 
15,666 

695,532 
25,449 

14,118 
3,010,276 



Cleared. 



Ves- Gross 
sels. tonnage. 



77 
14 
103 
223 
325 

106 
118 
123 
236 
108 

182 
21 

505 
28 

13 
1,543 



168,924 
279,778 
501,495 

129,629 
144,216 
126,295 
484,984 
182,872 



Total. 



Entered. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



61,575 1,076 
" " 1,678 
471 
1,815 



285 
677 
482 
818 
894 



206,784 1,187 
15,319, 846 

697,022 874 
29,897 618 



15,364 
8,010,491 



11,659 2, 218, 913 3, 7166, 055, 073 3, 670 6, 055, 631 16, 876 8, 266, 627 16, 32918, 209, 444 



188,748 
149,384 
228,916 
344,912 
734,654 

201,646 
250,853 



497,232 
816,071 

360,709 
148,721 
842,821 
250,611 



512 196,688 
3,809 8,286,919 



Cleared. 



Ves- Gross 
sels. tonnage. 



1,080 
1,< 

480 
1,861 

936 



608 
419 
831 
961 

1,121 
846 
874 
617 

618 



188,232 
157,692 
232,409 
846,717 
735,881 

aoo,8S3 

255.722 
2&4,3SS 
501.089 
814,418 



148,306 
842,271 
250,776 

196,060 
3, 28618, 284, 488 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BBPOBT OF HILITABY OOVEBKOB OP CUBA. 



161 



No. 6,SUUemeni of immigrants that arrived at the port of Habana, Cuba^ during the 

fiscal year 1900, 





Origin. 


Total. 


Month. 


Origin. 




Monttu 




1 


S 


u S 

^1 




1 


a 


M ^ 


Total. 


1399. 
July 


264 
178 
150 
225 
SGO 
109 


525 
831 
1,139 
1,960 
2,387 
8.389 
1,451 


99 
101 
112 
186 

87 
126 

41 


80 
85 
54 
13 
9 
11 
221 


918 
1,145 
1,455 
2,881 
2,848 
8,635 
1,718 


1900. 
Febm&ry 




1,099 
i;862 
1,263 
1,078 
984 


16 
26 
80 
33 
24 


111 

193 
102 
97 
96 


1,226 
2,081 


KMgoA 


March 




September 


April 




1,895 


October 


May.;:.:.....:. 




1,208 


NofTember 


June 




1,104 


December 

Jf^Doary 


' Total 






1,286 


17,968 


881 


972 


21,107 









No. 6,— Statement of Chinese that arrived at the part of Habana^ Qaba^ during the fiscal 
year ending June SO, 1900, 





Origin. 


Total. 


Month. 


Origin. 




Month. 


China 

(via 

United 

States). 


China 

(via 

Spain). 


Mez- 

ico. 


China 

(via 

United 

States). 


China 

(via 

Spain). 


Mex- 
ico. 


Total. 


July 


87 
46 
14 
23 
111 
29 
18 




12 


99 
46 
26 
88 
118 
40 
17 


February 

March 


10 
4 

45 
85 
89 


2 


6 

1 

1 


16 




5 


Sept^nber 


2 
4* 


10 
10 

8 
11 

4 


April 


47 


October 


M^ty 

June 


42 


November 


89 


December 


Total 








JAf\qaiy ..... 


506 


8 


64 


578 







No, 1,— Passenger statement, port of HaJbana, Cuba, from July 1, 1899, to June SO, 1900 

ARRIVALS. 





United States. 


Spain. 


Mexico. 


Other coun- 
tries. 


Total arrivals. 










^ 






d 






d 






1 






P 


Grand 




s 


1 


1 


g 


1 


1 


§ 


1 


S 


g 


d 


s 


i 


=3 


total. 




s 


i* 


Q 


^ 


^ 


6 


^ 


^ 


o 


S 


if 


O 


s 


it 


o 




July 


934 
1,268 


169 
884 


90 
298 


526 
859 


79 
106 


55 
93 


878 
875 


102 
89 


77 
55 


25 

48 


5 
2 


12 
3 


1,858 
2,550 


355 

583 


234 
444 


2,447 


August 


J'SS 


September.. 


728 


145 


82 


1,165 


192 


155 


278 


52 


41 


50 


10 


9 


2,216 


399 


287 


2,902 


October 


905 


228 


141 


1,790 


27C 


9S 


275 


81 


43 


17 


1 




2,987 


576 


283 


?'?S 


November.. 


1,288 


874 


126 


2,492 


2oe 


182 


206 


40 


41 


31 


2 


2 


3,967 


622 


300 


4,889 


December... 


1,165 


871 


99 


3,704 


461 


861 


286 


47 


14 


65 


24 


6 


5,170 


903 


480 


6,563 


Jamiaiy 


i,8ia 


347 


80 


962 


185 


69 


289 


IOC 


80 


115 


16 


16 


2,678 


598 


196 


8,466 


Pebniary... 


1,822 


491 


63 


1,074 


143 


79 


208 


66 


8 


16 


6 


.... 


2,616 


706 


150 


8,472 


March 


1,187 


418 


65 


1,490 


222 


211 


286 


57 


16 


83 


14 


6 


2,895 


706 


298 


8,899 


^ :: 


597 


120 


8(^ 


1,169 


180 


74 


219 


55 


87 


148 


34 


22 


2,133 


339 


163 


2'?S 


507 
492 


185 
104 


41 
81 


1,038 
893 


204 
166 


123 
75 


267 
158 


76 
44 


65 
27 


29 
43 


10 
19 


2 


1,841 
1,586 


424 
333 


231 
133 


2,496 


June 


2,052 


Total.. 


11,007 


8,276 


1,140 


17,162 


2,816 


1,526 


3,108 


806 


454 


620 


148 


78 


32,492 


6,543 


3,198 


42,283 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



162 



BEPOBT OF MILITAB7 GOVSBNOB OF CUBA. 



No, l.—Panenger statement, port of Habana, Cuba, etc— Continaed. 
DEPABTURBB. 





United States. 


Spain. 


Mexico. 


Other coun- 
tries. 


Total departures. 






1 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


j 


Quad 
tottl 


julv 


749 

703 

844 

674 

811 

1,162 

1,877 

1,669 

1,923 

1,431 

680 

767 


141 
U8 
181 
62 
226 
826 
262 
431 
639 
228 
114 
206 


46 

19 

16 

6 

102 

285 

183 

128 

161 

67 

50 

40 


728 
1,815 
998 
262 
228 
287 
229 
828 
516 
562 
969 
890 


164 
64 
81 
61 
48 
89 
17 
29 
116 
148 
144 
146 


118 
40 
21 
48 
85 
28 
11 
15 
21 
15 
141 
U5 








257 
866 

162 
277 
889 
196 
82 
57 
66 
48 
78 
86 


88 

27 
69 
58 
77 
48 
6 
1 
8 
19 
10 
22 


47 
21 
8 
22 
63 
12 
1 
1 
.... 

8 
8 


1,999 
1,118 
1878 
1585 
1,809 
2,191 
2,686 
2,288 
1,866 
1,867 


828 
209 
221 
171 
861 
418 
846 
498 
786 
422 
828 
416 


210 
80 
45 
71 
200 
826 

m 

160 
189 
80 
221 
19^ 


r»7 










?f» 








im 








;^s 


Novembf^r 








Dec6inb6r. . . 








ta 


January 

February... 
March 


261 
237 
191 
262 
164 
185 


61 
82 
23 
82 
60 
48 


21 

6 

7 

4 

22 

86 


11 


June 


%» 


Total.. 


12,670 


2,879 


1,042 


7,222 


986 


608 


1,240 


261 


96 


1,942 


868 


19022,974 


4,484 1,980 


29,» 



No. 8. — Passenger statement, arrivals and departures at all ports in the island of Cuba 

during the fiscal year 1900. 



Ports. 



July. 



August 



September. 



October. 



November. 



DOOdUbCL 



1899. 

Bamcoa 

Batabano 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 

Clenfuegos 

Guantanamo 

Glbara 

MansaniUo 

Matancas 

Nuevitas 

Sagua la Grande . 

Santa Cms 

Santiago 

Trinidad 



4 

69 
22 

1 
2 
11 
28 
2 



89 

1 
80 
28 



48 

18 
20 
15 



6 
4 

10 
10 
26 
61 



807 



62 



4 
249 



2,447 



2,267 



8,577 



146 



Total. 



14 



10 

7 

17 

78 



10 
44 

12 
26 
18 
26 
26 



80 
8 
9 
7 

16 
101 



4 

154 



21 



188 
2*902 



135 



2 
297 



2,266 



8,845 



1,855 



12 

749 

2 

4,889 



188| 



2,888 2,416 4,026 2,966 8.245 2,628 4,806 1,461 5,824 2,269 7,715 2,446 



2 

1 

S 
IC 



894 



1,929| 6,658 



*2;s 



January. 



Forts. 



1900. 

Baracoa 

Batabano 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 

Cienfuegos 

Guantanilmo 

Glbara 

Mansanillo 

Matanzas 

Nuevitas 

Sagua la Grande . 

Santa Gnu 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Habana 



76 

10 

8 

20 

14 

444 

2 

1 

284 



Total. 



81 



February. 



8 
6 
20| 48 



8,4662,4118,4722,834 



10 
4 

17 
93 

2 

1 
800 97 



6 
62 



March. 



264 
'"28 



582 



80 
*i89 



8,8993,660 



April. 



9 

1 

46 

"i4i 



480 



88 



26 



4, 272|2, 627 8. 9e2|8, Oil 4, 862,3, 984 3, 293 8, 141 8, 061 2, 746 2, 492J8, 096|49, 90OJS2, 6» 



May. 



8 
2 

27 
2 
8 
2 

99 
8 
9 

21 



180 854 



80 



4 

2 

86 

118 

8 



June. 



2 
16 

8 
134 

1 

18 
19 

2 



140 249 



2,6352,7902,4962,4052,0622,47642,28329,386 



I 



16 



112 
16 



8 
54 

187 
84 

189 



56 




Digit! 



zed by Google 



BBPOBT OF MILITAJftY GOVEENOB OF CUBA. 168 

No. 9. — Fastenger datement, island of Cuba, January 1 to June SO^ 1900, 





Jannarj. 


Febroary. 




Airiyala. 


Departures. 


ArziTalB. 


Departures. 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


O 


1 


1 


i 
1 


a 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


BftrM^Oft..^^^^ 


2 






2 


2 






2 


8 


8 
3 

1 
15 




11 
8 
6 

48 


2 






2 


Oftibarffn .. ^ 
















Ovimftif , . 


















5 
28 










denfoegofl 

OnintiiTiATno , 


67 

'I 

13 

10 

384 

2 

1 

201 

2,078 


19 


.... 


76 

10 

3 

20 

H 

444 

2 

1 

234 

8,466 


16 


8 


1 


20 


7 
6 


2 
2 


2 
1 


11 
9 


Gfbsm . 






11 


2 


1 


14 


10 
4 

1 
72 

1 






10 
4 

17 
98 
2 
1 
800 
8.472 




M^nnnlllo 


4 
4 

47 


3 

is* 














Matanmn , . , 


4 
92 






4 
96 


16 
16 
1 


**6" 
.... 

6 
150 


5 
44 


1 
8 




6 


Nnevltafi 


8 


.... 


52 


Sagna la Gnnde . 




SaotaCruz. 


*28* 
696 


io* 

196 


















iWn^*p> 


63 
1,899 


21 
346 


7 
166 


81 
2,411 


260 
2,616 


25 
706 


79 
2,191 


16 
498 


2 
150 


97 


H«baiiA 


2,834 






Ty)tal 


3,866 


096 


221 


4,272 


2, on 


875 


175 


2,62t 


8,014 


786 


162 


3,962 


2,334 


522 


155 


8,0U 




MaidL 


April. 




I. 




Anlvmla. 


Departaras. 


Arrivals. 


Departure! 




1 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


•0 


1 




1 


1 


i 


Banooa 


























28 


6 


4 


38 


Odbarien 


















6 
1 

39 
187 


2 


2 


9 

1 

46 

141 




^"Vnuw. .... . 


























goiftwgos 

QOiara 


236 
28 


27 




264 
28 


18 
2 


2 




15 
2 


6 
3 




20 

2 

2 

35 

40 


5 


1 


26 
2 












2 
9 
13 


"4* 


4 


v^tannfl 


6 
20 


28 
19 


*ii* 


29 
50 


12 
67 


26 
11 


1 
2 


88 
80 


2 

369 

2,188 






9 

17 

5 

4JU) 


44 


Noeritas 


2 
1 

36 
339 


2 

26 


67 


flBffmi^ )a Granule . 




flantlaeo 


486 
2,896 


65 
706 


82 
296 


682 
8.899 


185 
2,686 


45 
786 


9 
189 


189 
8,660 


122 
2,288 


38 


9n 


180 


HHhana 


163 2,685 


422 80 


2,790 






Total 


8,670 


840 


342 


4,862 


2,914 


869 


201 


3,964 


2,709 


389 


196 3,293 


2,537 


496 109 


3,141 




May. 


June. 




Aniyala. 


Depaitorea. 


Arrivals. 


Departures. 




1 


^ 


1 


H 


8 


1 




1 


s 


^ 


U 


1 




1 


d 

1 


1 


Buacoa 


6 
2 
15 
2 

I 

06 
2 
7 

16 


1 


1 


8 
2 

27 
2 
8 
2 

99 
3 
9 

21 


2 






2 


1 






1 


12 


4 




16 


Bttabano 












CUbarien 




9 


8 


2 


1 


6 


















CaMenas 


1 

14 

3 

124 

1 

10 

11 

2 

191 

1,586 


1 
2 


.... 


2 

16 

3 

184 

1 

13 

19 

2 

249 

2,052 


49 
14 


63 
2 


112 


CUmfoegos 




.... 


15 


12 


8 


30 




16 


Gibara!^::::: 




1 
.... 


4 
2 
19 
85 
3 
107 
1,856 






4 

2 

36 

118 

8 

140 

2,405 


4 


6 


3 
27 
115 
29 
59 
85 
1,867 






3 


MananiUo 






27 
71 
5 
80 
16 
416 




54 


MUamas.... .: 
Knetltaa 


17 
26 
4 

28 
828 


"2* 
1 
5 

221 


8 
3 


"5' 


187 
34 


8iCaa la Qimnde. 


.... 189 


SuitStfo 


284 
1.841 


80 
424 


40 
231 


854 

2,496 


54 
333 


4 
133 


5 1 56 


Hah^...:;;;;;: 


193 |2,476 






Total 


2,229 


519 


288 


8,081 


2,096 


417 


283 


2,746 


1,944 


400 


148 


2,492 


2,210 


684 


199 |3,093 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



164 



BEPOBT OF HILITABY GOVEBNOB OP CUBA. 



No. 10. — Cu8tom8 coUecliona at aU parts in the idand of Cuba, duriing the Jwcal year cf 

1900. 



Ports. 



1899. 



July. 



August September. October. November. December, 



Baracoa 

Batabano 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 

Cienfuegos 

Guantanamo. . 

Qibara 

Manzanillo ... 

Matanxas 

Nuevltas 

Sagua la Grande 

Santa Cruz 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Tunas deZaza 
' uia 

Total.... 



11,888.04 

180.41 

14,194.96 

80,648.48 

118,858.24 

18,660.28 

14,806.26 

11,626.26 

29,674.10 

18,460.68 

6,788.81 

19.18 

46,876.18 

4,002.16 

86.46 

890,118.84 



92,669.61 

88.92 

16,724.94 

16,280.12 

120,719.16 

6,921.78 

16,889.66 

16,612.07 

44,086.88 

14,627.09 

10,068.81 

128.80 

100,1U.12 

1,687.02 

64.21 

1,029,808.74 



14,210.61 

66.84 

16,706.87 

29,826.06 

100,29L67 

12,886.67 

18,674.06 

I7,60L76 

87,891.76 

16,269.67 

12,669.81 

15.21 

88,166.67 

968.87 

16.87 

960,646.28 



14,246.72 
48.62 
11,879.42 
20,98L19 
80,064.42 
9,681.89 
18,969.19 
18,634.00 
82,797.66 
14,688.79 
12,187.96 
126.24 
84,246.29 
2,069.78 
1,097.26 
1,028,645.17 



11,648.67 

125.67 

18,801.71 

19.641.78 

68,900.82 

10,161.87 

18,872.14 

18,469.80 

28,130.67 

19.246.49 

8,686.28 

191.21 

109,822.14 

2,487.45 

1.367.56 

989,252.67 



fl,iG9.2S 

2KI.96 

18,I».S 

96,114.« 

106,982.71 

16,1SBlS 

16,21<.« 

14,006.0 

66,201 11 

15,1S1I« 

26,621. U 

lU 

104,5;3.a 

999.ff 

as 

1,106, iaQ.fi 



1,199,767.28 



1,898,968.27 



1,816,297.91 1,884,696.68 1,264,706.78 1,621,868.2; 



Ports. 



1900. 



January. February. March. 



ApriL 



May. 



June. 



TotaL 



Baraooa 

Batabano.... 
Caibarien.... 

Cardenas 

Cienfuegos . . 
Guantanamo 

Glbara 

Manzanillo.. 

Matanzas 

Nueyitas — 
Sagua la Grande 
Santa Cruz . . 

Santiago 

Trinidad.... 
Tunas deZaza.. 
Habana 



81,724.60 

688.79 

14,069.46 

88,850.28 

109,830.74 

12,810.89 

10,774.81 

14,860.84 

32,886.54 

18,626.70 

8,111.42 

1,269.21 

98,291.88 

8,889.14 

201.65 

1,162,618.48 



16,756.06 

856.97 

15,682.68 

86,793.71 

66,689.97 

10,891.26 

14,782.40 

10,289.82 

40,816.91 

12,690.26 

19,046.65 

118.84 

68,769.77 

2,417.68 

85.64 

967,682.11 



84,724.17 

276.21 

17,086.01 

20,119.21 

125,947.58 

7,414.84 

20,012.62 

12,271.64 

66,475.18 

16,829.89 

11,788.77 

107.85 

84,021.41 

2,580.51 

194.87 

006,269.16 



82,207.00 

256.80 

28,112.68 

24,781.68 

90,288.58 

11,497.84 

18,907.49 

11,069.46 

60,617.23 

18,091.71 

86,417.87 

80.19 

71,278.96 

8,867.78 

18.21 

900,867.41 



81,291.82 
626.02 
14,817.78 
29,062.73 
70,628.06 

6,462.91 

7,078.48 
11,969.81 
80,726.00 
10,048.41 
18,603.63 

1,024.02 
84,211.66 

1,702.50 

218.83 

006,262.80 



82,828.21 

166.06 

13,866.66 

16,887.87 

96,862.87 

9,181.66 

12,622.01 

16.983.10 

30,385.26 

14,841.85 

15,221.68 

62.16 

71,621.90 

1,611,^ 

28.40 

118,187.70 



83S,9U.a 

2,797.9 

192,422.ffi 

818.2&9S 

1,156,906.% 

126. 090. 6( 

186,454.« 

178.756w« 

468,996.8 

188.2aiS? 

181986lM 

8,121.56 

1,001,387.75 

27,U3w« 

3,2B8lS 

12,096,214.16 



Total 1,611,094.87 



1,261, 116. 14 1,885,618. 72 1,257,264. 86 1,293, 114. 48 1,413, 682. 04 16, 153, 0(0.60 



NoTB.— The above statement of collections was collated from the statistical reports of the coUecton 
of customs at all ports in the island, and may vary slightly from the report of the treasurer upon tbe 
same Items, owing td the differences created by the auditor's corrections, etc. 

No. 11. — CfuOonu coUecHcma by monUu and Jieadings, island of CuhOy fiscal year 1900, 



Months. 



Import 
duties. 



Export 
duties. 



Tonnage 
dues. 



Harbor- 
improve- 
ment tax. 



Capitation 
tax. 



Fines, 
conflstt- 
tionB,etc. 



1899. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

190a 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



81,099,428.68 
1,283,829.93 
1,186,935.90 
1,206,141.84 
1,144,043.62 
1,868,220.06 



1,867,686.66 
1,121,553.88 
1,249,587.43 
1,143,891.86 
1,179,823.62 
1,299,168.42 



840,846.32 
60,988.11 
67,729.88 
62,209.25 
66,930.40 
87,589.86 



79,614.80 
76,611.82 
68,893.02 
41,888.50 
39,610.34 
47,949.68 



831,762.68 
29,126.64 
29,195.91 
27,924.45 
22,067.78 
25,701.23 



26,994.00 
81,466.54 
89,737.96 
87,162.60 
37,126.66 
38,839.90 



•20,047.08 
21,039.17 
20,514.08 
22,414.62 
20,892.32 
23,716.64 



22,128.42 
20,062.48 
24,296.80 
26,159.78 
24,440.86 
21,174.99 



81,428.00 
1,266.00 
1,243.00 
2,787.00 
3,016.00 
3,446.00 



1,899.00 
1,766.00 
8,098.00 
1,685.00 
2,026.00 
1,756.00 



14,642,761.22 | 719,769.38 



872,066.08 



266,886.60 



26,414.00 



I8SL85 

277.44 

4,278.35 

8,774.» 

7W.46 

41S.lft 



672.» 
683.S 
TOaTJ 
438.^ 
861» 
96S.96 



14,502.72 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT OOYSBNOB OF CUBA. 



165 



No. 11. — Qu8t4mis coUectioM and headmgSy island of Cuba, etc. — Contmned. 



Months. 


Consular 
fees. 


Storue 

and cartage 

charges. 


Cattle-in- 

spection 

fees. 


Overtime 
work. 


Misoellane- 

OQS. 


Total collec- 
tions. 


1899. 
July 










$5,422.67 
8,009.06 
7,405.84 
9,847.12 
8,511.86 

17,776.61 

8,468.00 
1,818.65 
2,146.62 
2,046.61 
8,015.62 
811.19 


$1,199,767.23 
1,898,963.27 
1,816,297.91 
1,834,596.58 
1,264,706.78 
1,521,868.27 

1,511,094.87 
1,261,116.14 
1,885,518.72 
1,257,264.86 
1,298,114.48 
1,418,682.04 


AWQSt 




















October 










KoTPinb<»r ,,.,,- 










HflOffinhpr 










1900. 

Jaxniaiy 


1200.00 
186.50 
288.00 
178.00 
207.00 
162.00 


•8,789.69 
8,185.66 
2,296.49 
1,628.72 
2,064.46 
2,662.00 


18,460.70 
2,091.41 
2,766.28 
2,884.72 
2,892.99 
2,868.69 


91,181.41 
1,247.64 
1,809.66 
1,410.47 
1.644.06 
2,461.29 


F^bnmry 


M"Th , . 


April 


mSt.:::::::::::::::::::::;: 


Jane 




Total 


1.155.60 


15,511.01 


17,008.74 


9,664.40 


69,778.96 


16,158,00L6O 





NoTi.— PreTioos to January 1, 1900. no separation was made by collectors of customs, outside of the 
port of Habana, of the amounts received for consular fees, storage and cartage charges, cattle-inspec- 
tion fees, and overtime work. All such receipts were reported as miscellaneous and are included 
under that huiding In the above report, prior to January 1. 

No. 12. — ColUcHonSf pari of HahanOf Cuba, fiscal year of 1900, 



Month& 



Import 
duties. 



Export 
duties. 



Tonnage 
dues. 



Special 
harbor-im- 
provement 
tax. 



Cattie-in- 

spection 

fees. 



Storage 
and cart- 
age 
charges. 



Joly..... 

August 

September. 
October.... 
Norember. 
December.. 



1899. 



January... 
Februaiy , 
March .... 

June 



1900. 



I 



$800,588.86 
935,215.91 
867,547.00 
916,758.16 
888,298.67 
969,174.64 



Total. 



10,860,641.61 706,897.94 289,046.96 178,860.68 



1,068,811.58 
849,944.60 
895,421.82 
818,408.64 
917,015.81 

1,019,966.88 



$88,900.21 
49,181.67 
68,669.54 
61,789.62 

66,478.87 
87,874.84 



77,797.82 
75,878.40 
68,768.46 
41,789.62 
89,812.61 
47,161.80 



$21,841.22 
18,969.62 
18,624.27 
17,884.14 
18.152.89 
16,226.06 



16,069.11 
19,921.07 
26.881.47 
23, 999. U 
28,164.68 
28,814.00 



$18,816.06 
18,919.85 
12,846.76 
14.790.25 
18,007.87 
16,492.11 



15,068.99 
18,116.97 
16.638.64 
14,805.86 
16.285.88 
14,091.42 



$2,687.76 
4,090.96 
3,779.64 
8.775.10 
8,467.66 
8.626.82 



2,812.25 
2,129.60 
2,248.35 
1,919.90 
2,887.46 
2,205.16 



$1,086.85 
1,159.86 
1,064.88 
1,841.83 
1,876.21 
2,277.22 



8,748.57 
3,144.20 
2,126.85 
1,460.18 
1,766.14 
2,866.42 



86,025.11 



28,830.71 



Months. 



Capiti 

Cax( 



itation 



Fines, con- 

flscanons, 

etc. 



Overtime 
work. 



Ck>nsular 
fees. 



Miscella- 
neous. 



Total. 



1809. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Kovember 

December 

1900. 

January 

February 

March.. 

r::::::::::: 

June 

. Total 



$1,109.00 
1,202.00 
1,047.00 
2,625.00 
2,608.00 
2,666.00 



1,688.00 
1,566.00 
2,294.00 
1,196.00 
1,811.00 
1,418.00 



$557.88 

122.98 

1,269.14 

8,667.67 

873.51 

261.46 



502.99 
461.62 
464.08 
291.70 
760.87 
859.41 



$480.00 
470.00 
760.00 
885.00 
985.00 
1,163.61 



715.12 
838.65 

1,152.00 
849.00 
999.00 

1,649.18 



$U6.50 
98.60 

139.00 
79.00 
67.60 

101.00 



96.00 
104.60 
120.50 
91.00 
81.00 
82.60 



$621.60 
922.60 
689.00 



542.00 
8,767.18 



641.50 
626.50 
669.00 
697.60 
2,238.96 
89.40 



$890,118.84 
1,029,803.74 

960,646.23 
1,023,546.17 

939,252.67 
1,106,180.40 

1.152,513.43 
967,682.11 

1,006,269.16 
900,357.41 

1,005,262.80 

1,113,187.70 



20,674.00 



9,672.70 



10,886.66 



1,178.00 



16,064.99 



12,096,214.16 



Non.— These figures are taken from the statistical reports of the collector of customs at the port of 
H*l>ana. There may be slight variations from the report of the treasurer upon the same items, owing 
to tte differences created by the auditor's corrections, etc. ^ ^ . „ „ ^^.^ 

The amounts reported under the headings •• Consular fees," " Storage and <»rtaffe charges, 2i21Si 
fa»Pectl«i fees," £td •• Overtime work " prior to January 1, 1900, are included in the amount reported 
noder the heading ** MlsoellaneouB " in ttie report of ooUections for the island. 



Digitized by 



Google 



166 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERI^OR OF OIDBA. 



No. 13. — CwOoms disbursementa ai aU porta in the idand of Cuba during thefiacdyear 

of 1900. 



Ports. 


1899. 


July. 


August 


September. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


Baracoa.... 


$838.40 

140.50 

788.28 

1,844.13 

6,220.00 

826.67 

2,862.16 

975.14 

1,969.91 

1,099.79 

787.14 

74.84 

3,860.97 

559.09 

318.88 

80,781.39 


$690.62 

138.60 

779.66 

1,512.32 

18,511.47 

1,993.66 

1,479.39 

1,547.24 

3,115.40 

1,905.80 

956.36 

101.08 

6,994.17 

543.10 

364.13 

85,502.01 


$654.76 

189.27 

830.82 

1,976.66 

12,028.02 

1,090.99 

1,098.83 

1,193.00 

4,529.31 

1,502.06 

920.21 

120.90 

8,418.33 

536.92 

312.29 

40,186.89 


$697.17 

188.80 

818.58 

2,010.18 

11,212.59 

988.28 

1,848.84 

1,261.98 

8,672.28 

1,499.00 

791.16 

156.90 

4,197.18 

634.03 

808.09 

47,004.01 


$1,160.82 

158.42 

913.02 

2,053.94 

10,015.13 

1,424.42 

1,051.87 

1,080.68 

2,290.67 

1,798.47 

1,408.80 

228.60 

3,442.36 

532.62 

854.19 

88,105.50 


|«D.e 


Batabano 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 


U7.1& 

me 
i.mas 


Clenfuegos 

Guantanamo 

Gibara 


79&» 
l,MiM 


Man«anillo 

Matanzas 

Nnevitas 


i,mi2 

5,«8.fl 
l,4S2.iD 


Sagua la Grande . 

Santa Cruz 

8antiaA:o 


1^268.9 
7.W.M 


Trinidad 


XLS 


Tunas de Zaza . . . 
Habana 


40,19^S6 






Total 


63,426.49 


70,088.91 


70,583.75 


76,622.96 


66,968.25 


71,46e>.Sl 


Ports. 


1890. 


Total 


January. 


F 


ebruary. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June, 


Baracoa 


$328. 8(> 
187.06 
1,163.88 
1.897.27 
6,918.48 
1,048.59 


M77.R5 


$316.08 

223.34 

1,887.22 

1,860.50 

6,980.87 

961.87 

8,837.94 

1,103.59 

2,632.28 

1,846.45 

1,307.17 

214.61 

4,192.31 

606.88 

266.06 

60,264.10 


$686.05 

184.48 

1,111.86 

2,087.08 

9,851.95 

1,003.57 

1,497.67 

1,890.17 

4,250.15 

1,459.97 

1,100.25 

178.41 

1,410.48 

638.98 

266.92 

49,447.85 


$808.00 

218.84 

970.58 

2,114.28 

8,825.10 

2,602.21 

1,275.17 

1,122.86 

8,611.06 

1,867.25 

1,184.68 

182.15 

9,204.41 

612.85 

240.54 

18,116.65 


$617.60 

214.65 

1,771.68 

2,188.40 

15,891.46 

1,246.18 

1,546.74 

997.97 

2.879.01 

2,484.22 

1,735.96 

182.67 

6,501.88 

549.71 

222.66 

100,741.76 


16, 886.90 


Batabano 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 

Cienfuegos 

Gibara 


180.68 
1,087.81 
1,879.22 
6.848.86 
1,212.06 
2,767.79 
1,801.26 
18,220.70 
1,806.91 
1,011.83 

196.50 
4,262.76 
4,088.80 

253.80 
54,968.98 


2,0«L« 
12,91176 
28, m« 
m,m.'n 

15,(»a28 
19,80iM 


Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Nuevitas 

Sagua la Grande. 

Santa Cruz 

Santiago 


1,209.27 

12,640.74 

1,928.20 

1,085.90 

846.10 

4,861.46 

656.88 

441.53 

38,678.58 


14,422.17 

6§,m9i 
19. mn 

18, MO. 72 
2,21160 
57,621.« 


Trinidad 

Tunas de Zaza... 
Habana , , . 


10,819.M 

8, 607.19 

647!96S.» 






Total 


78,381.23 


99,168.49 


87,480.67 


76,866.78 


46,856.60 


188,140.80 


928.7M.74 



It is to be observed that these reports are made up from the monthly statistical reports which an 
rendered by collectors of customs to the collector of customs for Cuba, and are not to be accepted « 
indicating with absolute exactness the amounts reported to the Measurer of the island. 

No. 14. — Cuetama diaburaementat by movUha and headvnga, ialandof Cuba, fiacalyearof 1900 



Months. 


Refunds. 


Salaries. 


Repairs, 

rents, 
supgies. 


Perma- 
nent 
improve- 
ments. 


Cattle 
inspec- 
tion. 


Overtime 
work. 


Mifloella- 
neooa. 


Total 


1899. 
July 


$5,720.68 
16,239.78 
10,576.78 
11,065.00 
7,306.11 
6,731.96 

2,760.88 
4,128.49 
11,026.41 
3,762.60 
6,064.57 
9,707.17 


$42,841.59 
44,663.15 
46.605.70 
49,676.84 
47,496.23 
51,928.73 

60,308.09 
61,936.08 
66,176.77 
51,448.57 
26,279.24 
91,636.28 


$4,783.24 
8,606.42 
12,968.78 
15,190.47 
10,677,90 
12,118.84 

7,829.23 
21,980.27 
6,986.96 
5,881.15 
6,879.64 
15,821.60 








$180.96 
625.66 
482,>49 
690.66 
481.01 
691.28 

172.94 
1,281.90 
8,838.66 
6,696.85 
2.849.31 
11,175.60 


$»,42&49 


August 








7D^08S.» 


September 

October . . . 








70^588.75 








76^822.96 


November 








65^961.^ 


December . . 








n; 465.81 


1900. 

January 

February 

March 


$11,976.22 
19,604.66 
4,014.63 
8,676.38 
6,752.84 
9,120.53 


$71.80 
88.85 
28.00 
73.05 
37.20 

168.48 


$216.87 
192.64 
864.25 
828.18 
498.80 
612.14 


78,8210 
99 16H0 
87,480.67 


April 


75,866.78 


May .:::::....: 


46,896.60 


June 


iS 140.80 






Total 


94,082.43 


1609,891.87 


129,069.19 


60,145.26 


466.88 


2,107.88 


82,961.28 


928,72174 



» Rate of cost of collection for salaries for fiscal year of 1900, 3.77 per cent. 

The above statement of disbursements was collated from the monthly statistical reports of the «»• 
lectors of customs at all ports in the island, and may vary slightly from the report of the treasoxet 
upon the same items, owing to the differences created by the auditor's correctloiis, etc. 

Digitized by VjVJ^^V LC 



BEPOBT OF HILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 167 

No. l5.^Di^mr8emerU8f port of Habana, QuJba, fiscal year of 1900, 



Months. 


Refunds. 


Salaries. 


Sanita- 
tion. 


Perma- 
nent 
improTe- 
ments 
and re- 
pairs. 


Station- 
ery and 
printing. 


Contin- 
gent 
expenses. 


MlsoeUsr 
neons. 


TOtHl. 


1899. 
jnhr 


$064.79 
8,214.05 
2.760.04 
8,819.60 
2,267.80 
1,496.80 

1.066.85 
2,862.41 
7,828.51 
1,942.71 
1,070.08 
6,401.11 


$27,017.10 
28,638.14 
29,U8.92 
81,562.58 
29,685.00 
83,029.14 

88,280.06 
82,415.24 
87,229.01 
85,691.09 
2,797.65 
n,TB2.11 


$89.78 

'i,'4i9.'84' 
4,990.88 


$482.74 
1,092.94 

280.02 
1,995.48 
4,881.24 

161.25 

1,250.00 
5,884.68 
2,655.63 
4,026.87 
8,967.11 
766.60 


$24.25 

729.79 

1,488.62 

2.868.80 

480.10 

1,066.25 

788.92 

288.25 

1,279.25 

2,599.66 

609.80 

4,515.86 


$212.78 
1,926.09 
8,099.67 
2,267.78 
1,841.96 
4,447.14 

2,806.26 
12,919.61 
2,854.42 
2,844.19 
2,147.27 
8,166.71 


$2,000.00 
■ '2,'6i8."28* 


$80,781.89 
85,502.01 


AlWDSt 


September 

Oetober 


40,185.89 
47,004.01 
88, 105. 60 


November 




December 

1900. 
Jannarr 




40,192.58 

88,678.68 
68,968.98 
60,264.10 
49,447.85 
18,116.65 
100,741.76 


Ffebraarr 




648.84 
8,422.2a 
2,848.88 
2,685.29 
14,170.97 


Mareh 




April 




M^.... 


■ 


im :.,:,......:. 








Total 


84,670.60 


392,046.96 


6,600.00 


26,424.41 


16,578.05 


89,029.77 


32,788.99 


547,983.89 



The abore statement of disbursements was collated from the monthly statistical reports of the ool- 
ketor of customa at the port of Habana, and it may vary slightly from the report of the treasorer 
upon the nme items, owing to the differences created by the auditor's oonections. 



No Id.— Cbnmafaiiof ttaiement of receipts and disbursemerUSt with rate of cost ofcoUectUm, 
at aU ports of the island of CubOf from July 1, 1899, to June SO, 1900, 





Expenditures. 








Rate Of 














cost of 


















collection 
















Rate Of 


for all 
disbune- 
















collection 
for 


ments 
except 


Ports. 


Refunds. 


Pennar 

nent 

repairs 

and 
improve- 
ments. 


Salaries. 


Rents. 

andmia- 

cellane- 

ous. 


Total. 


Total 
collections. 


salaries.^ 


lllfi 






1 
1 




t 
















1 


1 


I 


Habana 


$34. 67a 69 


$82,924.41 


$892,046.96 


$68,841.81 


$547,968.89 


$12,096,214.16 


1 


3.24 


1 


8.97 


Oenfaegos... 


88.985.22 


15,896.89 


52,861.18 


18,255.98 


114,948.77 


1,166,969.76 


8 


4.53 


8 


6.68 


SfOttagD 


7,228.02 


924.99 


41,090.21 


8,888.78 


57,621.95 


1,001,887.75 


2 


4.10 


2 


4.94 


Ipjtonaa..... 


4,294.44 


22.177.91 


28,707.14 


16,020.42 


65,199.91 


468,996.88 


6 


5.05 


9 


8.26 


Gudenas 


1,025.74 


25.01 


17,692.72 


4,630.17 


28,278.64 


818,285.98 


7 


5.66 


6 


7.09 


Oittarien.... 


960.67 


6.00 


8,758.60 


8,191.60 


12,914.76 


192,422.66 


4 


4.65 


5 


6.21 


6ib«a 


8,776.7(1 


298.88 


18,001.27 


2,228.96 


19.304.84 


186,454.98 


9 


6.97 


8 


8.17 


Sagoa la 






















jis^ 


2,718.81 


25.00 


9,074.94 


1,786.97 


18,550.72 


184,965.04 


5 


4.90 


4 


6.84 


Noeritas^..... 


1« 339.66 


429.45 


15,776.84 


1,785.88 


19,880.71 


188,292.57 


11 


8.60 


10 


9.58 


MMiiuiaio... 


800.22 


188.60 


10,176.70 


8,266.66 


14,422.17 


178,766.08 


8 


5.85 


7 


7.73 


QoanUnamo. 


2. 575. 21 




9,569.19 


2,935.88 


15,080.28 


126,080.64 


10 


7.59 


11 


9.92 


Btncoa 


817.91 


22.00 


4,676.00 


1,870.59 


6,886.50 


88,911.65 


12 


18.8 


12 


19.8 


Trinidad 


86.9fl 


8,662.50 


6,199.92 


469.63 


10,819.04 


27,183.48 


18 


22.9 


18 


24.5 


TozMsdeZasa 


5.52 


142.70 


2,514.00 


944.97 


3,607.19 


8,289.82 


16 


76.6 


16 


106.2 


fiMtaCntt... 


299.90 




1,669.60 


244.29 


2,213.69 


8.128.56 


14 


58.4 


15 


61.2 


Bfttabano.... 


58.80 


82.70 


1,577.28 


897.87 


2,066.68 


2,797.29 


16 


56.4 


14 


70.6 


Total... 


94,062.48 


76,166.58 


609,891.87 


148.594.86 


928,724.74 


16,158,001.60 


.... 


8.77 


.... 


4.69 



^TUs includes salaries of employees of the Cuban customs service, including the rerenue-cutter serr- 
lee^hlch can not be fairly chargeable to the Habana custom-house. 

mils includes all expenses of the special agents of the Cuban customs service, all expenses of maln- 
tgpyce of the rerenue-cutter service, board of statistics of Cuban customs service, etc, which are not 
Bnly chargeable against the Habana custom-house. 

Mocting tbeie, the cost of collection for the Habana custom-house would be about 2.56 per cent. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



168 



BEPOET OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



No. 17. — Customs receipts and expenditures^ vnth bcUanceSf shawvug relative rank ofporli, 

1899, 



Ports. 


Receipts. 


Expenditures. 


Balances. 


Habana 


$12,096,214.16 

1,155,969.76 

1,001,887.76 

468,996.83 

813,235.96 

192,422.66 

186,454.96 

184,985.04 

183,292.57 

■ 173,756.08 

126,030.64 

88,911.55 

27,183.48 

8,289.32 

8,128.56 

2,797.29 


$547,963.89 

114,948.77 

57,621.95 

65,199.91 

23,278.64 

12,914.76 

19,301.81 

18,560.72 

19,830.71 

14,422.17 

15,080.28 

6,886.60 

10,319.04 

3,607.19 

2,21H.e9 

2,066.68 


$11 548,230.27 


Cienfuegos 


1,041,Q2«.» 
943,76^180 


Santia^ 


Matanzas 


408, 796. SS 


Cardftnas ..... 


289, 962.$! 
179,U7.tO 


Caibarlen 


Gibara 


167,180l14 


Sagua la Grande 


17L4M.S 


Nuevltas 


168,9n.» 
150,SS18S 
110.960.11 


Manzanillo ; 


Guantanamo 


Baracoa 


27,0&fl6 

16, 814.44 

*J17.S 


Trinidad 


Tunas de Zara 


Santa Cruz 


909L87 




730.61 






Total < 


16,168,001.60 


928,724.74 


15, 224, 276.86 





1 Deficit 
No. 18.— Jmportofum of live stock, by ports, during the fiscal year 1900, island of Cuba. 

1899. 





July. 


August 


September. 


Ports. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattie. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animftlw. 


ToUL 


Caibaricn 








646 
786 

2,717 
161 
204 
361 
261 
564 
65 

1,880 
80.866 




645 
813 

3,280 
163 
206 
866 
261 
664 
66 

1,685 
35,836 


296 

1,077 

4,326 

998 

239 

777 

459 

1,368 




296 


Cardenas 


692 
3,233 
82 
972 
826 


1 

200 

51 

2 

15 


698 
3,433 
188 
974 
341 


78 
618 
2 
2 
4 


4 

95 
24 


1,QS1 

4,421 
1,092 

299 


Cienfuegos 


Guantanamo 


Manzanillo 


Matanzas 


18 


795 


Nuevitas 


458 


Sagua la Grande 




99 


99 




149 


1,K7 


Rantft OtM7' .». r ...... . 






Santiago 


1,727 

17,889 


79 
4,989 


1,806 
22,878 


205 
4,970 


3,206 
27,681 


240 
2,088 


8,446 
29,719 


Habana . . r 




Total 


24,921 


5,486 


80,867 


87,949 


6,774 


48,723 


40,427 


2,568 


42,986 






October. 


November. 


December. 


Ports. 


Bovine 
catUe. 


Other 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Totel. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
anfmAlji, 


Total 








Baracoa 


57 




67 


82 

6 

919 

476 

5,621 

134 

486 

995 

1,144 




32 
19 
938 
522 
6,066 
175 
610 
995 
1,207 


109 

61 

860 

1,447 

4,449 

68 

820 

60 

471 

2,874 

718 


5 
10 

1 

16 

224 

18 

41 


114 


Batabano 




18 
19 
46 
646 
41 
25 


61 


Caibarien 








8S1 


Cardenas 


809 
8,887 

244 

200 
2,404 

687 
1,182 

280 

50 

2,938 


1 

85 
22 

2 
68 
10 
62 


810 
8,922 

266 

202 
2,472 

697 
1,244 

280 

50 

3,198 


1.46S 


Cienfuegos 


Guantanamo 


Gibara 


361 


Manzanillo 


60 


Matanzas 


68 


149 
3 


<ao 


Nuevitas 


2,877 
718 


Sagua la Grande 

Santa Cruz 


1,842 

49 

2,702 

8 

990 

21,667 


6 


1.848 
49 

2,880 
16 

1,046 
27,332 








Santiago 


260 


178. 
7 

56 
5,765 


1,940 


176 
81 


2,116 
81 


Trinidad 


Tunas de Zaza 


918 
80,482 




918 
34,280 




Habana 


8,828 


28,606 


6,109 


29,614 




Total 


49,038 


4,838 


63,376 


36,870 


6,764 


48,134 


36,862 


6,778 


43,140 





Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEENOB OF CUBA. 169 

No. 18. — ImporUUvm of live stock, by ports, during the fiscal year of 1900, «(c— Contmued. 



1900. 





January. 


February. 


March. 


Porta. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
Rnimalin. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
catUe. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Banooa 








184 
15 


19 
99 


168 
114 


106 
29 


43 
15 


149 
44 


Ratebano 


21 

10 

1,321 

8,389 

128 


68 


79' 

10 
1,842 

230 


CWbarien 


Gaidoias 


21 
448 
102 


414 
6,856 

*"*427* 

696 

116 

28 

66 

2,077 


10 

906 

6 

7 

13 
8 
1 


424 
6,261 
6 
484 
609 
119 
29 
66 


891 
2,867 


'44 


436 
2,867 


Clenfnegoa 


Ouah tAiuLinn 




Gibum 


321 




321 


Mannnillo 


167 




167 

1 

6 

656 

8,429 

1 

20,894 






Matanxan . . 


1 
6 

1 
416 

8,908 


174 
378 


6 
10 


180 
888 


Nnevitas 


1 
656 

8,014 


Santa Cniz 


Santiago 

Trinidad 


808 


2,886 


l.«7 


173 


2,110 


Habana 


16,486 


18.929 


4,268 


18,182 14,124 


4,731 


18,866 




Total 


25,182 


4,960 


30,142 


28,]56 


6,624 


28,782 20,827 


5,022 


26,349 






April. 


May. 




June. 




Ports. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Baiaooa 


186 
64 
502 
3,852 
470 


22 
21 
86 
188 
4 


206 

85 

838 

3,990 

474 


47 
69 
744 
618 


15 

228 

2 

368 


62 
282 
746 
971 


64 


11 


66 






Cardenas 


453 
2,474 
1,179 

743 
1,061 
2,351 
1,608 


60 

283 

3 

3 


618 


Ctenf Q^goe 


2,767 
1 182 


Gibara 


Manzanillo 


651 
468 
976 
2 
778 
1,268 




661 

468 

994 

4 

778 

1,406 

23 

20.638 


746 


MiLtimiM( 


9 


10 


19 




1,061 
2,367 
1,608 


Noeritas 


18 
2 


6 


Sagua la Grande 

fiMita CTOI5 , 


259 




259 






JWntifwo 


982 


228 


1,210 


143 

23 

8,048 


430 


166 


696 


Trinidad 






11,680 


2,686 


14,216 


17,690 


12,620 


3,686 


16,206 




Total 


17.964 


3,045 


20,999 


28,191 


8,827 


27,018 


22,878 


4,217 


27,091 





No. 19. — Importation of live stock at port of Habana, Cuba, during the fiscal year of 1900 



Months. 



Bulls. Cows. 



1899. 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November .. 
December... 

1900. 

January 

February ... 
March 

r-.::::::: 

June 

Total.. 



41 
18 
133 
269 
384 
441 



72 
35 
2 
6 
18 
269 



1,018 
1.601 
2,621 
8,688 
1,787 
2,647 



660 
616 
952 
812 
657 



1,612 19,332 



Calves. 



550 
676 
988 
1,804 
1,031 
699 



744 
809 
167 
280 
288 
106 



Steers. 



16,286 
28,672 
24.089 
24,836 
18,466 
19,718 



12,777 
13.036 
13,449 
10,893 
16,482 
11,496 



209,647 



Horses. 



810 
644 
293 
627 
924 
666 



1,399 
246 
371 
286 
253 



6,660 



Mules. 



226 
496 
480 
621 
886 
444 



447 
91 
438 
446 



4,661 



Donkeys. 



122 



Sheep. 



131 
226 
181 
91 
821 



227 
19 



1,197 



CUBA 1900 — VOL I, PT 3- 



-12 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



170 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

No. 19. — Importation of live stock at port of Habana, Cubay dc, — Continued. 



Months. 



July 

August , 

September . 

October 

November . 
December. . 

1900. 
January ... 
February... 

March 

Apiil 

Blay 

June 

Total. 



8wine. 



4.454 
8,767 
1,085 
2,349 
4,360 
4,762 



2,024 
8,668 
8,863 
1,903 
2,501 
2,491 



87,177 



Goats. 



Others. 



2 

1 

143 



Bovine cattle. 



From ' From 
United I other 
States, countries. 



3 I 
21 
6 
2 

1 ' 
6 



5,826 I 
8,046 ' 
8,570 
9,768 I 
8.450 
7,966 I 



8,936 
3,440 I 
8,342 
2,115 1 
8,739 I 
958 



12.063 
22,820 
19, 111 
20,664 
13, 117 
15,549 



12,660 
10,489 
10,782 
9,515 
13,851 
11,562 



66,146 172, OTO 



Total. 



animals, "-^"^k 
animals, j^pj^ed. 



17,889 
30,866 
27,681 
30.432 
21,567 
23,505 



16,486 
13,929 
14,124 
11.630 
17,590 , 
12,520 I 



4.989 
4.970 
2.038 
3.828 
5.765 
6.109 



3,908 
4,258 
4.781 
2.586 
3.043 
3.685 



238,219 49,906 



22, W8 

29,711 
34,20 
27, a 
29,614 



20. 3M 
1M« 
18,Sfi 
11216 
20, 6S 
16,205 



2K8,124 



No. 20.— R^UM^L 



Ports. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Ports. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


TotoL 


Baracoa 


725 
246 
2,220 
9,061 
47,634 
1,815 
3,402 
7,021 
5,594 


115 

439 
20 

319 
3,794 

261 
82 
88 

279 


840 j 
684 < 
2,240 ; 
9.380 i 
5.428 : 
2,076 i 
3,484 1 
7,109 , 
5,873 


Nuevitas 


8,510 

6,141 

1.663 

23,596 


106 8,616 


Batabano 


Sa^a la Grande . . 

8antaCruz 

Santiago 


266 * 6,39? 


Caibarien 


1 1.6H 


Cardenas 


•> f>71 ' 26.10 


Cienfuegos 

Guantanamo 

Gibara 


Trinidad 


8 62 


TO 


Tunis de Zaxa 

Habana 


1,908 
238,219 


66 
49,905 


1.9R4 
2«fi,l'.H 


Manzanillo 

Matanzas 


Total 




857,762 


58,353 416.106 









No. 21. — StcUement of exportation of tobacco from all port* m tlie island of Cuba during thi 

fiscal year 1900. 



Ports. 


Leaf. 


Cigars. 
Value. Duty. 


Cigar* 
Value. 


'ttes. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Dutj. 


Baracoa 


•666.00 


$16.00 


$17.00 ' $2.00 ! 
106.00 4.00 
167.00 6.00 
46.00 1.00 






(^barien 






(Ucnfuegos 


66,156.00 
16,844.00 
149,067.00 


2,850.00 
1,534.00 
6,089.00 


$92.00 


SSL 00 


Uibara 




Manzanillo 






Matanzas 


16.00 1 .48 , 
1,169.00 ! 58.00 
11,698,494.00 | 282,781.00 






Santiago 


71,666.00 
9,417,633.00 


8,227.00 
410,808.00 






Uabana 


306,525.00 


9 590.00 






Total 


9,721,031.00 


423,624.00 


11,699,992.00 


282,802,48 ' 


306,617.00 


9,622.00 



Stems and fumms. 



All other. 



Total. 



Porte. 



Value. Duty. Value. 



Baracoa 

Caibarien 

Cienfuegos 

Gibara 

Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Sagua la Grande . 

Santiago 

Habana 



$181.00 



Total. 



191.00 



$16.00 



8,00 



$23.00 



252.00 
86,670.00 



23.00 86,846.00 



Duty. 



$1.00 



11.00 
8,709.00 



3,721.48 



, Value. 


Duty. 


$682.00 


$1800 


120.00 


5.00 


66.406.00 


2,888.» 


16.897.00 


1,585.00 


149,067.00 


5.08».» 


16.00 


.48 


181.00 


23.00 


78,077.00 


8,296.00 


21,407,222.00 


7O6.8S8.00 



21,712,666.00 



719,692.48 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF HILITABT OOVEBNOB 01iv ODBA. 



171 



No. 22.— Total value of mgar, molasseSy and confectionery exported from all ports in the 
idand of Cuba during thefUccd year 1900. 



Porte. 


Sugar. 


Molasses 
and 
sirup. 


Confection- 
ery. 


Total. 


Raw. 


Refined. 


CUtMrien 


91,668,944 

8.866.192 

8,689,816 

1,888,766 

464,906 

688,144 

2,916,870 

296,887 

1,888,840 

129.798 

284,861 

1,848,620 








$1,668,944 
3.891,202 


CiRnImM 




926,000 
11,309 


SIO 
89 


(SaifoegoB 




8,601,164 


Gntntiiiuuno 




1,888,766 
464,906 


Oiban 








Mftnmnfllo 






20 


688,164 


MiUnmff 




21,860 


2,987,730 

296,887 

1,883,840 


NwYltas 






Siffoa 1ft Grande 








fltniiaco 


$18 






129,811 


TrIiiMiMl ,,. 






284,361 


Htbuift.. 


2,680 


684,716 


16,864 


1,902,729 






Total 


17,894,96a 


2,648 


698,884 


16,988 


18,608,468 







No. 23. — Statement of articles exported from all ports in the island of Cuba from July i, 

1899, to July U 1900, 



Articles. 


United States. Spain. 


France. 


Germa 


ny. 
Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Puty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


AtiitiMlff ....,,,. . , , 


$2,826 
14,648 
186,827 
48,297 
2,120 
19,816 

44,276 

179,610 

108,989 

1,677 

609 

222,123 

9,886 

626 

86,679 

42,264 

807,602 
74,667 
42,114 
26,748 
113 

40 




$1,647 












Asphaltum 










$5,960 

18,715 

10 








16,886 

862 

1,104 




$8,746 
214 
430 






Coffee 






Chemicals, drugs, and dyes. . 

Copper, and manufactures of 

FIben, Tegetable textiles, 

and manufactures of 
















100 




33,879 




20,834 




Fniitsandnuto: 

Bananas ... . 






Cocoanuts 




447 












Copra 














Oranges.. . . . 
















All other 




183 




89 




37 




Olaas and glassware 

Grease 




















Hides and skins 




987 




26,913 
42,824 




124.982 
22,139 




Honey 






Iron and steel, and manu- 
factures of: 
Irtmore 










Manufacturer of 












17,516 




Oils 














Paraffin, stearin, and wax .. . 








49,107 


ii.ioso 




Perfomery and cofonetics... 














8piiiti,di8tUled, and wines: 
Cordials 
















Rum 




8,645 
2,681 

2 
4,816 
2,633 
1,821 

196 




17.586 
250 




56 




Other distilled 


110 

600,484 
18,144,944 






Sugar and molasses: 

Molasses and sirups 

Sngar, raw . ^ . » . ^ . . . 






478 








19 






Rgesr n^flnfKl 










Confectionery 


9,760 

8,896,070 
180 

4,608,924 
27,804 
84,122 

882,689 
698 




$13 


3,352 
126,296 


$4,181 


580 
959,149 




of: 
Leaf 


$346,611 

28 

106,452 

1.409 

1,810 


$58,323 


Stems and trimmings. . . 
Cigars. .7..... 




668,616 
113.486 
137,166 

4,415 


12,661 
8,801 
4,872 


604,203 
6,197 
9,619 

45,284 


11,587 
106 
198 


889,231 
3,716 
3,840 

45,994 


20,604 


Cigarettes 


71 


AU other 


75 


Unmanufactured 




Manufactured 






Gold and sUver: 

Silver 








460 

289,049 

1,542,000 

298,187 




100 




Coin 


6,000 

2,787,760 

962,460 




i78,296 
2,661 
69,686 






Gold coin.. 










Another articles..*.'. '.'.*.*.... 






119,096 




Total 


87,227,892 


464,896 


993,427 


16,946 


2.944,607 


15,966 


2,292,963 


79,002 







Digiti 



zed by Google 



172 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA 



No. 23. — Statement of arliclfs exported from all ports in the idand of Cuba, rfr.— Cont'd. 



Aiticlefj. 


United Kingdom. 


Other cou 
Value. 


n tries. 
Duty. 


Total. 




Value. i Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 








•378 
7,092 




•4,751 

27,700 

161 

288,509 

49,378 

9,079 

19.816 

112,873 

179,530 

110,259 

1,677 

609 

222,607 

9,386 

626 

237,551 

121,698 

307.602 
106,392 

60 

42,114 

192,428 

528 

133 
188,424 
69,979 

593.884 

18,152,051 

2,648 

16,933 

9,721,081 

180 

11,509,992 

305,632 

891,462 

596,683 
698 

560 
422,345 

4,382,301 
1,646.214 






$10 

161 

13,541 




















295 














B.. 






5,425 






of 










K, 


33 




13,752 

20 

878 
















































161 




14 
































90 
14,201 








165 








li- 














12,709 






es 


60 




















3,311 




237 
415 

93 
42,444 
82,916 

2,925 

2,265 

15 

109 

178,722 














s: 












119,793 
34,022 


























8 


















361 
60,598 








es 
of: 
Leaf 


•2,640 


•11,756 


1423. ."iM 


Stems and trinunlDgM. . . 


S 


CigarR 


4,372,426 
15,130 
16,999 

105,385 


113,585 
391 
468 


821,592 
140,299 
189,716 

18.066 


18,013 
4,346 
6,420 


282, »8 


Cigarettes 


9,621 


All other 


13. ao 


Wood, and manufactures of: 
Unmanufactured 




Manufactured 








Gold and silver: 
Silver- 

Bullion . . 












CJoin 












Gold- 
Coin 












All other articles . 


87,325 




119,562 














Total 


4,814,359 


116,698 


1,450,926 


86,189 


49.732,594 


719, fi« 







No. 24. — StateinerU of articles exported from the port of Haharva, Cuba, during thf^seal 

year enaing June SO^ 1900. 



















Spain, 








Value. 


1 




r2,728 
3,210 




•1,547 


















•5,960 








8,540 

776 

1,104 




•460 
194 
480 

88,879 








io 

2,120 
17.691 






10 




Band dyes.. 
)\e textiles, 
ures of 










20,400 










445 








669 
221,412 


















182 
987 




89* 

23,550 
37,054 




30 

118,891 

2,860 




; 


65,675 
960 

















Digiti 



zed by Google 



RKPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 173 

No. 24. — SUOemenl ofarHdes exported from the port qf Habana, CtUfOj etc, — Cont'd. 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Germany. 


Value. ' Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


ParalBii. stearin, and wax .. . 


19.728 
113 








145,699 




161,141 




Perfumery and cosmetics. . . 










Spirits, distilled, and wines: 
Rum 




»,517 
2,S26 

2 
4,788 
2.616 
1.801 

174 
668,489 
137,166 

814 




16,986 
260 




48 




OUier distilled 


110 






Sugar and molasses: 

MoUuKs and simps 


581,788 
1,343.618 










Sugar, raw ' 






19 








Sugar, refined 










Confectionery 


9,736 
8,301,888 




Ill 
12,667 
4,372 


8,352 

126,296 

504,019 

9,619 


$4,181 

11,575 

198 


680 

750,708 

839,086 

8,840 

20 

100 




Tobacco, and manufactures 
of: 
Leaf 


fiUI A77 


160,598 

20,598 

75 


CigarB 


4,608 362 1 iflA 42ft 


Aflotiier 

Wood, unmanufactured 


84,028 
12,068 


1,777 


Qold and silver: 
Silver- 
Bullion 






460 

281,600 

1,542,000 

294,364 






Coin 






178,296 

1,636 

60,074 






Gold coin 


2,787,760 
709.884 










All other articles 






81,816 










Total 


18,666,367 


449,877 


970,878 


16,940 


2,870,310 


16,954 


1,824,916 


71,271 



Articles. 


United Kingdom. 


Other countries. 


Total. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Aniffinlfi 




1280 




$4,565 

9,170 

9,900 

990 

9,079 

86,732 

466 

669 

221,886 

208,693 

46,249 

60 

108,699 

628 

142,966 
61,296 

584,715 

1,348,620 

2,630 

16,864 

9,417,633 

11,598,494 

391,095 

20,261 

660 
409,896 

4.881,286 
1.230.969 




Aiphaltum 


$10 
910 


















Coffee 










Cbcmicals, drugs, and dyes: i 

AlloSer.^.. 




5,426 

13,752 

20 







Flber^ vegetable textiles, i 
and manufactures of 10 








Fruits and nuts: 1 

Cocoanuts 1 








Oranges ' 








AlloUier 


U9 




4 

90 
5,220 






Hides and skins 








Honey 


165 

60 

1,864 








Lieatber,and manofacturesof 








Pvaffln', fitearin, and wax . . . 




237 
416 

32,970 
26,471 

2,925 

100 

15 

1,085 

178, 114 
821,272 
189,700 

2,412 






Perfumery and cosmetics . . . 








Spirits, distilled, and wines: 
Rum 


84,445 








Other distilled 


31,9()9 








Sugar and molasses: 

Molasses and sirups 










Sugar, raw 








Sugar, refin^ 








Confectionery » afii 








Tobacco, and manufacturef* 
of: 
Leaf 


60,458 


$2,630 

113,577 

457 


$11,711 
18,001 
6,420 

76,846 


$410,808 


Cigars 


4,372,276 
16,747 

4,967 


282. 731 


Another 


13,299 


Wood, and manufactures of: 
Other unmanufactured . 




Qold and silver— 
SUver: 

Bullion 






Coin 












Gold: 

Coin 












All other articles 


68,035 




















Total 


4,682,356 


116,664 


1,867,363 


36,182 


30,218.679 


706,888 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



174 



RfiPOEt OB* MILITARY OOVERNOE OF CUBA. 



No. 25. — Statement of exportation I 



• porlSf idand of Cuba, during the fiscal year ending 
June SO, 1900, 



Ports. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France 






Germany. 


Value. 

•218,468 

1,668.385 

3,M3,618 

3,740,842 

1,444,296 

684,666 

679,238 

3,008,334 

391.699 

1,641,919 

40,512 

899,888 

304,758 

7,402 

18,568,367 




Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Baracoa 


tlfi 














Gaibarien.. 


"6 


1 








Cardenas 




•600 

2,868 




22,776 




Cienfueiros 


2,838 










(luantAnfl-inn. . , 




•69 








Qibara 


'■^ 










Manzanillo 


8,966 




18,766 
U,000 
2,620 




271.171 
21,616 
45,707 


•6,012 


Matanzas 




•-V — 


Nuevita^ , , 




8,478 








Sa^ala Gmnde.... 
Santa Cruz 


23 











82,329 
U,629 




11,606 
79,673 




Santiago 


566 


10,546 


•6 


•12 


2,681 


Trinadad 




Tunas de Zaza 












18,481 
1.824,915 




Hnbana 


449,877 


470,378 1 16,940 | 


2,870,310 


16,964 


71,2n 






Total 


37,227,392 


454,896 1 998,427 16,946 


2.944,507 


15,966 


2,292.983 


79,002 






Porta. 


United Kingdom. 


Other countries. 


Total. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Baracoa 






•1,060 

90 

1,450 

6.600 

48,344 

900 

63 

2,770 

12, 614 

12,229 

9,172 

515 

1,341 


•2 


•214,528 
90 
1,669,835 
3,962,M6 
3,817,835 
1,445.426 
684,719 




US 


Batabano 








Calbarien 










6 


Cardenas 










CienfuegOH 


•3,000 
161 




50 




2,88B 


Ouantanamo 






Gibara 




1 




LSft 


Mansanf llo 


28,962 
7,760 




1,004,843 


5,00 


Matanms 






8,061,214 
467.406 

1,677,692 
106,878 






Nuevitas 


11,672 
26.501 
20,916 

28,588 








Sagua la Grande .... 









2S 


Santa Cruz 








Santiago 


t2» 


4 


1.081,665 

804,758 

80,781 

30,218,679 




3,2% 


Trinidad 


.....I :.:. 




Tunas de Zaza . . . 


64,463 
4,682,356 




6,486 
1,867.868 










11fi.6A4 


86,182 




706.80 










Total 


4.814,860 ! 116.093 


1.4M.9M 


* 36,189 


49,7S2.M4 ' 


719, 6S 





























No. 26. — Statement of articles imported into the island of Cuba during the fiscal year end- 
ing June SO, 1900. 



Articles. 



FBKB or DUTY. 

Gold and silver: 

Gold coin 

Silver coin 

Agricultural implements ... 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters and 

other, not alcoholic 

beverages 

Quinine, and allcaloids 

of cinchona baric 

Fertilizers, natural 

Fibers, vegetable, and man- 
ufactures of: 
Flax, hemp, and other 

flbers, raw or tow 

Trees, plants, and mof« 

All other free articles 

DUTIABLE. 

Animals: 

Cattle 

Mules 

Pigs 

Sheep 

All other, including 
fowl 



United SUtes. 


Spain. 


France. Germany. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


M, 249, 398 




•302.243 

77,556 

275 

25,391 




•580,000 








13, 514 












296,879 






4,294 

10,960 
24,816 




•37,701 

8,434 
5,284 




12,288 








6,227 








1,500 










36.394 




744 

5 

30,874 

219 
752 








832 

41 

4,946 




7,766 






176 
88,665 






3,132,402 








3,144,706 


•126,828 

20,609 

43,474 

1,743 

70,495 


§ 




294,652 










361,856 










7,090 


68 
285 


22 
61 


18 

246 


•3 
15 






389,683 


4 


•1 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



BEPORT OP MILITARY OOVEENOB OF CUBA. 



175 



No. 26. — Staiemeni of articles imported into the island of Cuba^ etc. — Continued. 



APtlclCH. 


United States. 


Spal 


n. 


France. 


Germany. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Vadue. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


DCTiABL»-«ontinued. 


S8,466 

56,406 

4,827 

104, 181 

637.983 

10,435 

86,663 

721 

142 

912 

2,1(M.53V 

57,960 

19.499 

4,727 

58.318 

12,395 

1,584 

191 

385,824 

18,977 
6,680 
17,787 
1,277,068 
37,804 

36,700 
294,739 

4,673 

212 
18,937 
30,918 
759,465 

26,707 

753,738 

1,897 

7,248 

• 1,679 

26,137 

2,753 

62,769 

216,739 

109,561 
24,719 

202,944 

46,922 

157 

10,794 
36,908 
11,172 


9623 

6,555 

560 

24,636 

102,788 

1,766 

15,108 

314 

17 

151 

741,969 

13,376 

2,034 

1,791 

10,620 

14,437 

239 

49 

44,526 

7,878 
2,607 
6,126 
546,972 
10,472 

5,128 
61,705 

436 

27 

1,769 

18,867 

258,462 

6,923 

144,962 

31 

1,178 
346 

4,930 
334 

8,127 
28,196 

12,155 
5.709 
60,276 
12,364 
42 

1,466 
4,919 
2,930 


•1 

68,294 

4 
91 












Books, music. map0,e]igTiiv- 
inga,etc 


99,168 

1 
28 


922,849 


91.482 


975,847 
21,215 


914,898 


Breadfltuffis: 

Barley 


1,706 


Bran and fodder 








Com 










Com meal 


79 

ll,27i 

47 

99 


14 

862 

6 

8 










Oata 


150 


10 






Oatmeal 


' 




Rye 










Wheat 


1 






Wheat flour 


4,086 
17.294 
2,594 

682 

532 


729 

4.275 

597 

222 

77 








Preparations, food 

Another 


1,879 

71 

9,021 

,J 

151 1 

201 

206 

219,085 

2,608 

10,944 

552 

2 

9,771 

180 
33,846 

1,327 


464 

2 

3,496 

15 

267 

52 

52 

22,895 

1,003 

4,377 

115 

1 

2,443 

76 

5,498 

80 


11,906 

815 

4,908 

197 
59 
231 


2,987 
106 


Brlitlea 


1,964 


Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Gums and resins 

Opium 


19 
89 


Dyes 


327 


76 


21 


Vfiniiia beftns 




All other 


109,902 

53 

78 


42,411 

21 
32 


52,681 

1,717 

17.651 

333 

8,060 

91 

870 
28,174 

77 


6,942 


Clocks, watches, and parts of: 

Clocks, and parts of 

Watches, and parts of . . . 

Cocoa 


693 

6,995 

75 


Coffee 


16 
51,405 

98 
3,822 

18, 748 


2 
12,849 

32 
449 

1,461 


164 


Omfectionery 


23 


Copper.aDd manufactures of: 
Ingots, bars, and sheets. 
Manuuctnres of 

Cork, and manufactures of: 
Cork bark 


69 

4,886 

5 


Cotton, and manufactures of : 
Raw 




Waste 


26,495 

46,220 

1,953,984 

12,496 


1,443 

14, 191 

549,919 

8,252 


340 
28.891 
627,054 

85,189 
24 


13 

7.758 
150,529 

8,762 
5 


11 

4,538 

276,876 

31,523 


6 


Yam and thread 

Another 


1,461 
88,660 


Eanhera, stone, and china 
ware 


11,035 


EggT::::;::;::;:::: ;:::::: 




FertilizeiB 










Fibers, vegetable, and man- 
ufactures of: 

Bags (for sngar) 

Carpets 


1,792 

812 

85,846 

10,909 

261.454 

11,695 

162,409 

45,733 

60,096 

646 

7 

7,789 
10,109 
5,619 

78 


253 

16 

14,452 

2,023 

42, 152 

8,036 

19,919 

11,070 

11,310 

374 

1 

1,338 

1,265 

1,209 

7 


139 

498 

669 

1,676 

104,691 

39 

1,773 

5,734 

102,221 

2,957 

236 

7,489 
7,807 
5,208 




16 
44 

85 

282 

18,024 

10 

105 

1,418 

20,386 

1,715 

67 

1,182 
713 
684 


27,880 

178 

2,754 

1,444 

87,743 
3,734 


5,868 
12 


Cordage and rope 

Yams 


498 
245 


Another 

Fiflb. including shellfish .... 
Fruits: 

Preflh or ilrr 


6,575 
*16 


Preserved ^M. ! I .'..!.! .. 


416 

100.263 

9,778 


104 


GlasB and glassware 


27,640 


Gunpowder and explosives. 

Hair, and manufactures of. . 

Hides and aldns, other than 

fur skins: 

Goatskins 


3,539 


892 
567 

66 


101 


Hides of cattle 


77 


Another 


17 


Honey 




Iron and sieeY, and maJau-* 
lactures of: 
Pig iron. 


9,761 

678,441 

36,314 

4,979 

13,736 

8,769 

1.048 

776 

473.217 

61,439 


2,23^1 

89,702 

9,553 

1.225 

1,155 

1,315 

214 

156 

93,392 

14,471 


232 

6,010 

22,034 

' 75i 

52,271 

3,895 

6 

4.397 

37,741 

28,640 


23 

452 

5,139 

370 

3,710 

578 

2 

775 

5,760 

4.238 


34 

12,847 

20,441 

136 

105,681 
364 


7 


Ingots, bieirs. sheets, etc. . 
Cutlery and side arms.. 
Firearms 


897 
1,197 
4,827 

2,927 

66,425 

7,491 

218 

1,760,363 

26,014 


107 

373 

1,864 

403 

9,78a 

2,262 

36 

367,901 

4,652 


1,666 

5,280 

63 


Jewelry, and manufactures 
of gold and silver 


9.570 


Leather, and manufactures 
of: 

Leather 

Boots 


• 49 


Gloves 

Shoes and sandals 

All other manufactures 
of 


■""•i.'iis 

16,726 


396 

2.601 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



176 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

No. 26. — SuUement of articles imported into the island of Cubay etc — ContinoecL 



Articles. 



DUTiABLE^-continued. 

Machinery, and parts of: 

Africoltaral 

raectrical 

Locomotives, engines, 

and parts of 

Scales and balances 

Sewing machines, and 

parts of 



Sugas and brandy ma- 
chinery 

All other 

Malt liquors and cider 

Marble, stone, and manu- 
factures of: 

Building stone 

Bricks 

Another 

Matches 

Metal composition, and 
manufactures of: 

Tin 

Another 

Musical instruments: 

Pianos 

Another 

Oils: 

Animal 

Mineral-- 

Crude 

Refined 

Vegetable — 

Olive 

All other vegetable 
Paints and colors 



Paper, and manufactures of 
Plated ware 



ProvlsionsCcomprisingmeat 
and dairy products): 
Meat- 
Fresh 

Salt or pickled 

Lard and tallow 

Butter and oleomar- 
garine 

Cheese 

Another 

Rice 

Seeds 

Silk, and manufactures of: 

Raw 

Manufactures of 

Spices 

Spirits, distilled: 

Alcohol 

Brandy , and other com- 
pounded 

Starch 

Sugar and molasses: 

Molasses and sirup 

Sugar, raw 

Sugar, refined 

Tools and implements 

Tobacco: 

Cigars and cigarettes — 

Another 

Varnish 

Vegetables: 

Potatoes 

Another 

Wines and cordials 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Firewood , 

Lumber and timber .... 
All other unmanufac- 
tured 

Cabinetwarc and house 

furniture 

Ail other manufactured 



United States. 



'Value. Duty. 



$36,429 
101,636 

85,924! 
24,099| 



13,667 
20,306 

14,952 
4,664 



96,192 19,173 

220,950 27.150 

l,131,06q 219,244 

680,616 176,567 



18,470 

109,663 

64,790 

1,484 



75,649 
815,610 

12,431 
6,063 

100,796 

216,271 
64,430 

10,216 
36,037 
96,171 
216,693 
14,727 



60,149 
1.418,663 
2,516,630 

118,776 
92,829 
1,638,618 
18,687 
18,783 

173 
34,640 
14,667 

166 

28,074 
108,497 



18 

9,424 

80,289 

9 
116,678 
84,676 

636,807 

481,576 

12,890 

346 
246,678 

69,663 

92,275 
441,809 



2,488 
12,914 
12,090 



21,606 
51,836 

4,977 
1,991 

7,006 

89,981 
44,453 

2,108 
7,973 
19,365 
62,772 
4,000 



Spain. 



Value. 



11,257 
300,294 
491,262 

30,097 

14,772 

298.208 

6.671 

1.813 

87 
17,357 
3,641 

31 

10,214 
28,897 

H 

6 

6,047 

8,629 

87 
41,263 
9,447 

91,467 
76,421 
6,622 

13 
18,995 

8,096 

26,844 
89,296i 



1813 



8,580 
87,827 



3,291 

6,867 

97,129 

2,174 



8,686 
24,127 

7,066 
2,696 

6,190 



732,645 
16,451 
17,770 

290,972 
499 



11,684 
26,728 

64,642 
13,856 
608,828 
66,957 
14,406 

128 
46,634 
106,674 

92 

26,686 
100 



1,450 



778 



Duty. 



163 



1,714 
4,647 



1,677 

496 

17,219 

962 



1,692 
8,100 

2,818 
994 

749 



France. 



Value. Duty. 



86,527 
8,571 
4,049 

56,345 
169 



94,430 

990 
1,648 

467 

6.966 

27,261 

900 



746 

153 

48,627 

496 



4.696 
19,944 

10,849 
2,886 

801 

46 
168 

10,872 
8,644 
11,181 
118.992 
2,829 



8 ' 
8', 876 

12.127 
2,8»1 
146,684 
11.459 
1,499 

64 
22,773 
26,848 

66 

16,866 
5 



10 



77 



249 



40.007, 6,117 

606,374 64,217 

2,232,9601,449,685 



4,7411 

6,648' 

24.100 
18,533 



880 

1,659 

5.466 
8,660 



8,160 

3,148 

'63.539 

12,406 

21 

637 
306,691 



122 

104,298 
160 



2 
19,909 



360 
1,294 



2,717 
81,788 

2 
1,861 

596 

20.805 
U,218 



$881 

198 
806 

92 

675 

6,462 

136 



28 

26,623 

246 



488 
3,102 

4.141 
1,152 

58 

19. 
40 

1,257 
514 

2.956 

34,425 

724 



Germany. 



Value. Duty. 



S32 

46 

859 

18 

16.489 
80.026 
87, ( 



1.8H2 

& 

490 

1,757 



4.667 
61,601 

3.360 
14,060 

2.981 



506 

148 

597 

22.649 

140. 5Q0 

3.488 



629' 

12,705, 

3,668 

1 

318 
150.169 



39 
44 

4,807 

6.066 

6,014 

740. S48 



9 
172 



1.M4 

16.006 

7.641 



21S 
*2i4 



9. a 



1,S4S 
6,404 



17» 

16 

124 

6,164 

42.348 

679 



1 
2 

664 

99S 

1.2H0 

16K,S74 



114 



t.638 
24 



1 
8.057 



16 
261 



406 
88.856 



257 

175 

4,861 
2,031 



139 

27,446 

133 



1.627 
4,588 



13,721 

as 

101 

1.355 
1.049 



82 

1- 
18.606 



l,a?7 



1.387 
4,296 



7S6 

1T7 

13>870 
18,280 



130 



1.506 



254 

50 

3.467 
1,209 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY OOVERNOR OF CUBA. l77 

No. 26.—StcUemenl of arlicUs imported into the island of Cubay etc. — Continued. 



Articles. 



United States. 



Value. Duty. 



Spain. 



Value. Duty, 



France. 



Value. Duty, 



Oeimany. 



Value. Duty, 



DmABLB— continued. 

Wool, and manufactures of : 

Raw 

Blankets and counter- 
panes: 

Carpets 

Flannels 

Knitted goods 

Yams 

All other manufactured . 
All other dutiable articles. . 

Total 



•97 

1,< 

1,462 

768 

25,752 

47 

7,828 

2,246,236 



•87 

796 

565 

808 

9,895 

18 

2,886 

876,967 



•15 

10,617 

788 

1,371 

81,390 

529 

1,445 

968,126 



4,873 

270 

548 

32,608 

. 211 

688 

188,000 



•42 

2.64S 
8,689 
8.291 

216.878 
2.769 
18,486 

967,470 



•17 

1,067 
1,476 
8,318 
86,664 
1,121 
7,299 
148,782 



1, 
11, 

2, 

14, 

480, 



700 

826 

680 

4,430 

1,179 

5,740 

80,669 



84,928,1966,458,183 



11,898.2418,314,744 



4,180,969 



889,1662,633,066 



688,660 



Articles. 


United Kingdom. 


Other countries. 


Total. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


FBK OF DUTY. 

Oold and silyer: 

Gold coin 






•18,416 




•5,100,066 

91,070 

440,015 

67,766 

37,686 
36,100 

156,402 

8,389 

3,311,550 

9,891,177 

452,052 

364,768 

8,708 

504,288 
3,467 

223,683 

26,046 

118,555 

689,289 

10,748 

99,035 

768 

241 

912 

2,113.773 

102.032 

23.067 

22,461 

61,546 

42,024 

3,151 

818 

882,574 

24,093 
51,357 
21,263 
1,765,183 
104,116 

85,774 
409,903 




SilTcr coin 










Agricultural implements . . . 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters and 

other, not alcoholic 

bereiaffes 

Quinine, and alkaloids 
of cinchona bark 


•102,278 

8,564 
1,106 




88 

2,129 

1.256 
38,600 

118,371 

402 

5,444 

6,729,762 

156,458 

10,380 

1,409 

112,826 



























Fibera, vegetable, and man- 
ufactures of: 
Flax, hemp, and other 
fibers, raw or tow 


4,672 








Trw9, plants, and mosR 








All other free articles 


104,219 

16,490 

190 

3,032 

128 

1,294 








DUTIABLE. 

Animals: 

Cattle 


•478 

30 

253 

54 

254 


•263,619 

11,402 

1,140 

475 

20,776 


•380,983 


Mules 


32.062 


Figs 


44.867 


Sheep 


2,297 


All other, including 
fowl 


91,602 


Bark, tanning 


623 


Books, music, maps, engrav- 
ings, etc 

Breadstufb: 

Barley 


7,382 


459 


3,855 


648 


33,206 
2,257 


Bran and fodder 

Com 


14,276 
145 
213 
551 


3,597 
17 
117 
96 


7 

1,161 

21 

899 


2 

132 

4 

25 


28,258 
102.937 


Com meal 


1,901 


Oats 


16,101 


Oatmeal 


320 


Rye 










25 


Wheat 










151 


Wheat flour 


6,138 

12,030 

516 

1.366 

2.359 

14,439 

802 

422 

89,253 

388 
97 

162 
4.796 
3,821 

47.866 
46,817 


783 

3,024 

60 

439 

250 

15,454 

187 

106 

11.402 

110 

89 

27 

2,865 

952 

10,718 
7.374 


10 

898 

72 

1,772 




743.431 


Preparations, food 

All other 


223 
25 
710 


24,349 

2.824 


Bristles 


8,622 


Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 
Gums and mdns ... 


10.981 


Ontnin . 


14,980 
6 


16,805 

1 


47,002 


Dyes 


576 


Vanilla beans 


207 


Another 


25,979 

450 

16,957 

2,429 

470,251 

1,224 

60 
8,506i 


2,602 

181 

6,338 

1,251 

80,443 

299 

9 

477 


180,778 


Clocks, watches,and partsof : 

Clocks, and oarts of 

^ Watches, and parts of . . . 

Cocoa rrr. 


9.386 

20.388 

7,594 


Coffee 


629,447 


Confectionery 


27,088 


Copper.and manufacturesof : 
Ingots, bare and sheets. . 
Manufactures oi 


16,021 
70.389 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



178 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 26. — Statement of artides imported into the island of Cuba^ etc, — Continaed. 



Aitidea. 


United Kingdom. 


Other countries. 


Total. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


DUTi A B LB— continued . 

Cork, and manufactures oi: 
Cork bark 


16 

715 

4.870 

217,062 

3.069,9^7 

25,741 
20 
590 

251,947 

1,718 

2,012 

5.812 

2,327,162 

62.fl«7 

4,810 

690 

16,576 

840 


n 

286 

1,006 

62,635 

938,891 

11,661 

3 

97 

53.022 

269 

419 

949 

347,831 

4,266 

698 

173 

7,487 

236 


$816 

4,902 

902 

3,861 

40,012 

7,677 

8,817 
80 

12,724 
861 
7,648 
7,766 
5,358 

42,275 

16,016 
i;066 

57,238 
1.606 


$15 

2,825 

66 

1,095 

10,116 

2,125 
1,612 

1 

^^ 

1,332 

1,449 

733 

6,162 

3,647 

246 

11,434 

1,013 


$25,146 

5,829 

51,066 

880,980 

6,726,318 

189,238 

7«2,699 

2,667 

301,230 

4,746 

124,556 

80.358 

2,789,172 

327,469 

294,569 
78,368 

528,322 

62,544 

400 

28,150 
58.002 
23,044 

78 

14,098 

1,022,082 

102,894 

11,091 

179.436 

72,656 

8,576 

5,584 

2,282,803 

156,852 

36,719 
106.917 

87,035 
26,883 

97,688 

249,483 

1,302,660 

947,260 

21,265 
122,089 
213.951 

14,436 

136,921 
539,291 

33,893 
25.683 

113, 3?2 

216.317 
71,662 

759,471 
124,043 


$L»S 


Cotton,and manufacturesof : 
Raw 


S,137 


Waste 


4, SB 


Yam and thread 

All other 


91,007 
l,991.4tt 


Earthen, stone, and china 
waie 


4S,6IS 


Eggs 


14I^4S& 


Fertilizers 


19 


Fibers, vegetable, and man- 
ulactures of: 
Bafrs (for wwar) 


62,897 


Carpets 


73D 


Cordage and rope 

Yams 


21. 7W 
5,20 


All other 


42S.4e 


Fish, Including shellfish .... 
Fruits: 

Fresh or dry 


42,«K 
36, t» 


Preserved 


18.730 


Glass and glassware 

Gunpowder and explosives. 
Hair and manufactures of. . 


138,50 

19.20 

lOD 


Hides and skins, other than 
fur skins: 
Goatskins 


956 

2,001 

586 


313 
273 
102 


280 
610 
866 


32 
61 
76 


4,422 


Hides of. cattle 


7,33& 


All other 


5.017 


Honey 




Iron and steel, and manu- 
factures of: 
Pig iron .... 


4,671 

318,103 

21,683 

321 

314 

3,914 

31 

143 

5,045 

21,032 

290 
344 

75 
382 

683 

4,129 
42,467 
189.030 

1.839 
5,363 
2,301 
8,240 

41,101 
83,562 

406 
162 

2,470 


928 

63,415 

4,118 

247 

47 

644 

2 

22 

987 

3,441 

29 
69 

15 
69 

138 

414 

8,627 
32,310 

689 
1,690 

849 
2,870 

7,242 
13,790 

162 
64 

181 






3.1SS 


Ingots, bars, sheets, etc . . 
Cutlery and side arms . . 
Firearms 


6,784 

1,225 

76 

4,507 
289 


357 
172 
13 

454 
83 


155,698 
24,6» 
3,782 


Jewelry, and manufactures 
of gold and silver 


15. S» 


Leather, and mantifactures 
of: 
Leather 


12,407 


Boots 


%« 


Gloves 






988 


Shoes and sandals 

All other manufactures 
of 


4,218 
3,001 


1,230 
541 


458, 61« 
26,944 


Machinery, and parts of: 
Agricultural 


%m 


Electrical 


575 


115 


21.37 


Locomotives, engines, 
and parts of 


15. 17^ 


Scales and balances 






5,t» 


Sewing machines, and 
parts of 


15 

2,999 

13,261 

1,?25 

38 


3 

300 

2,633 

240 

4 


19,47 


Sugar and brandy ma- 
chinery 


30,08; 


Another 


263,5^ 


Malt liquors and cider 

Marble, stone, and manu- 
factures of: 
Building stone 


•221,44] 
5,1ft 


Bricks 


15,19 


All other 


10,714 
286 

2,124 
34,557 

313 
926 

1,184 


4,683 
107 

168 
3,791 

125 
812 

85 


61,475 


Matches 


5,1» 


MeUl composition, and 
manufactures of: 
Tin 


31.67? 


All other 


84. as 


Musical instruments: 

Pianos 


1S.W 


All other 


9,91' 


Oils: 

Animal 


8,3IK 


Mineral- 
Crude 


90,00( 


Refined 


6,439 

4 

63,466 


3,478 

1 
14,461 


20 

6.186 
3,848 


3 

773 
546 


48. IM 


Vegetable - 

Olive 


90,681 


All other vegetable. 


•27; 17^ 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITART GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



179 



No. 26. — StaUmeni of arMe$ imported into the island of Cuba^ etc. — Continaed. 



Articles. 


United Kingdom. 


Other countries. 


To! 
Value. 


tal. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


• Duty. 


Duty. 


DLTiABLA— continued. 
P^infi And colon 


«1U,685 

10,437 

602 


133,440 

2,647 

117 


! 

16,819 

11,302. 

622' 


12,046 
3,022 

68 


$264,475 
782,916 
22,697 

60,149 
2,968,836 
2,542.811 

227,918 

677,227 

8,066,626 

3,416.824 

28,160 

1,077 
490,306 
121,393 

544 

200,496 
183,028 

33 

60 

9,473 

138,667 

9 
118,716 
40,066 

878,896 
1,296,789 
2,347,162 

674 
257,495 

71,651 

164,540 
491,723 

156 

22,346 
12,032 
18,018 
721,209 
6,805 
66,389 
6.747,578 


167,000 

201,469 

6,747 

11,287 
797,566 
496,142 


Paper, and manufactures of. 
Plated ware 


ProTi8ionB(oompri8lng meat 
and dairy products) : 
Ifeat- 

Freah 


Salted or pickled.... 
Lard and tallow 


16,160 
9 

9,975 

65,106 

604,040 

2,417,016 


4,35i 
2 

1,406 

9,902 

66,401 

542,582 


1,622,340 


489,072 


Batter and oleomarga- 
rine 


31,568 
397,221 
340,187 
160,016 


4,569 
68,973 
33,802 
41,969 


49,322 


Cheese 


97,606 


Another 


648,066 


Rice , 

Seeds 


774,113 
8,313 


Silk, and manufactures of: 










638 


Spieet 


46,566^ 
918 


20,290 

229 




36.431 
201 


18,616 
66 


242,918 
29,216 


Spirits, distUled. 

Alcohol 


811 


Brandy and other com- 
poonded 


12,601 
62,761 


8,671 
11,225 


28,318 
11,982 


29,124 
2,310 


128,668 


StarehTTTTf 


38,510 


Sugar and molasses: 

IfolasBes and sirup 


8 


Sugar raw 










12 


Sogar, refined 






46 
169 


5 

18 


5,063 


Toob and implemeniB 

Tobacco: 

Cigars and cigarettes . . . 


18,251 


3,329 


16,137 
87 


AU other 


963 
2,286 

187,918 
14,482 
5,150 

54 
4.021 

5,150 

1,767 
2,982 


660 
306 

18,781 
3,477 
2,106 

2 
1.412 

249 

406 
1,013 


1,800 
689 

9,166 

340,908 

10,074 

273 
64 

517 

11,723 
8,841 


1,611 
93 

8,294 

80,244 

3,806 

22 
13 

147 

• 3,691 

728 


43,449 


VsmWi 


10,486 


Vegetables: 

Potatoes 


149,659 


All other 


223,984 


Wines and cordials 

Wo»d,and manufactures of: 
Firewood 


1,500,982 
37 


Lumber and timber 

All other unmanufac- 
tored 


21,811 
10,375 


Oabinetware and house 
furniture 


43,177 


All other manufactured . 
Wool, and manufactures of: 
Raw . 


97,937 
61 


Blankets and counter- 
panes 


2,622 

6,828 

1,218 

884,779 

613 

23,837 

702,494 


1,060 

> 2,066 

487 

154,949 

209 

9,894 

120,342 


111 


45 


8,520 


Gupets 


4,722 


Flannels 


48 
1,811 


i9 
724 


6,205 


Knitted goods 


289,270 


Yams 


2,738 


All other manufactured . 
All other dutiable articles . . 


830 
448,016 


332 
125,724 


26,739 
1,085.484 


Total 


11,922,277 


2,681,061 


11,421,368 


1,374,758 


76,429,139 


14,806,442 







No. 21.—Stalement of articles imported into the port of Habana, Cuba, during the fiscal 
year ending June SO, 1900. 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Germany. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


FEIB or DOTY. 

GoM and Silver 
Gold coin 


•4,212,107 

600 

180,197 

9,016 
8,721 




1302,243 

77,566 
275 

24,188 




$590,000 








SilTerooln 










Apicultural implements .... 

(iemteals. drugs, and dya: 

Mineral waters and other 

nonalcoholic beverages 

Quinine, and alkaloids of 

dochona bark 






4,294 

9.086 
23,581 




$28,262 

8,003 
5,284 




















Digitized byVjOOQlC 



180 BEPOHT OF MILITABY OOVKEKOR OF CUBA. 

No. 27. — Statement of articles imported into the port of Habana, Cuba, etc— ContinDed 



Articlefl. 



United States. 



Vahie. Duty, 



Spain. 



Value. Duty. 



France. 



Value. Duty. 



GermADj. 



Value. Dotj. 



PRBB OF DUTY—continued. 



Fertllizen, natural 

Fibers, vegetable, and manu- 
factures of: 
Flax, hemp, and other 

fibers, raw or tow 

Trees, plants, and moss 

All other free articles 



DUTIABLE. 

Animals: 

Cattle 

Mules 

Pigs 

Sheep 

All other, including fowl . 

Bark, tanning 

Books, music, maps, engrav- 
ings, etc 

Breadstuffs: 

Barley 

Bran and fodder 

Com 

Com meal 

.Oata 

Oatmeal 

Rye 

Wheat 

Wheat flour 

Preparations, food 

AU other 

BrlsUes 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Gums and resins 

Opium 

Dyes 

Vanilla beans 

Another 

Clocks, watches, andpartsof: 

Clocks, and parts of 

Watches, and parts of 

Cocoa 

Coffee 

Confectionery 

Copper, and manufactures of : 

Ingots, bars, and sheets. . 

Manuftictures of 

Cork, and manufactures of: 

Cork bark 

Cotton, and manufactures 
of: 

Waste 

Yam and thread 

Another 

Barthen, stone, and china 

ware 

Eggs 

FertiUzers 

Fibers, vegetable, and man- 
ufactures of: 

Bags (for sugar) 

Carpets 

Cordage and rope 

Yams 

Another 

Fish, including shellfish 

Fruits: 

Fresh or dry 

Preserved 

Glass and glassware 

Gunpowder and explosives.. 
Hair, and manufactures of. . . 
Hides and skins, other than 
fur skins: 

Goatskins 

Hides of cattle 

Allotner 

Honey 



184 



96,833 

7,807 

2,167,092 



2,082,791 

261,844 

322,566 

6,678 

380,909 



15 

29,149 



$175 
31,415 



t80,918 

16,660 

40,164 

1,446 

60,806 



51,124 

4,827 

89,810 

574,816 

7,729 

78,934 

658 

92 

631 

1,088,361 

6,546 

266 

4,241 

46.166 

10,428 

706 

184 

284,968 

17,149 
5,254 
14,724 
1,079,386 
31,404 

2,143 
284,542 

4,310 



12,863 

1,786 

572,166 

2,297 

699,406 

1.524 



27 
683 
15,528 
2,082 
12,887 
3,583 

101,089 
15,188 

154,528 

11,970 

109 



8,864 
82,215 
7,728 



6,104 

660 

22, 

92,913 

1,896 

13,960 

302 

8 

107 

384,046 

1,636 

85 

1,708 

8,866 

12,250 

62 

47 

38,184 

6,730 
2,080 
5.311 
410,417 
8,102 

241 
49,588 

419 



68 



50,472 

4 
20 



13 
246 



8,861 



20,865 



19 
11,272 

47 
99 



14 

862 

6 



150 



4,000 

12,298 

743 

562 

163 



710 

8,072 

222 

221 



191 



48 



98,578 



37,379 



16 
50,879 

1 
3,732 

18,624 



2 
12,698 



1,849 

37 

8,368 

67 

151 

34 

205 

201,328 

2,606 

10,719 

562 

2 

9,472 



849 

614 

192,761 

687 

184,768 

27 



24,997 

5,263 

1,623,138 

1,226 



439 
1,434 



1,117 

1,410 

442,606 

172 



33,319 
738 



840 
26,208 



23.966 
24 



2 

67 

2,792 

185 

1,968 

476 

11,060 
3,785 

29,581 

2,648 

28 



1,002 
4,083 
2,361 



312 

71,746 

9,713 

227,371 

621 

150,380 

37,280 

44,285 

546 

7 



5,870 

9,892 

2,060 

781 



134 

16 

12,244 

1,797 

35,927 

47 

17,977 

9,297 

9,103 

374 

1 



1,287 
688 

7 



139 

498 

546 

1,507 

88,000 



1,674 

6,466 

94,888 

2,818 

286 



7,188 
4,946 



"2':; 

4,640. 



402 



3,867 

8 

267 

17 

52 

19,867 

1, 

4,287 

116 

1 

2,368 



5,371 
47 



18 

7,080 

138,581 

5,850 



16 
44 

65 

208 

13,005 



92 

1,867 

18,578 

1,686 

57 



1,101 
097 
612 



75,674 
21,215 



14,CT 
1,7» 



11,^ 2,985 

315 1» 

4,739 1,W 



164 
32 
215 

'46*176 

1,717 

16,518 

833 

3,050 

91 

734 
26,645 

77 



2,487 
226.279 

7,781 



7,253 

178 

2,657 

1,296 

22,680 



808 
88,487 
9,481 



71 
567 
41 



U 

D 
1£ 

ess 

75 
164 
2S 

S 
4,516 



m 

71,»I 
2.388 



1,5U 
12 
466 

214 



76 
22, 8P 
5,40 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 181 

No. V.—^aUment of articles imported into the port of Habana, Cuba, «<c— ContinuecL 



Articlefl. 



iKrriABLB— oontintied. 

Iron and steel, and manufac- 
toresof: 

Pigiion 

Ingots, banL8heet8,eto ... 

Cutlery and side anns 

• FlieannB 

Jewelry, and manafacturesof 

goldandflUTer 

Leatber,and manofactures of: 

Leather 

Boots 

Glores 

Shoes and sandals 

All other man uiactiiresof 
Madiinery.and parts of: 

AfTicaltaral 

nectrical 

LooomotiTOB, engines, 
and parts of 

Scalesand balances 

Sewing machines, and 
parts of 

Sosar and brandy ma- 
chinery 

AlloOier 

Halt liqnors and cider 

Marble, itone, and manofac- 
toresof: 

Bonding stone 

Bricks 

Another 

Matches 

Metal composition, and man- 
ufactures of : 

Tin 

AU other 

Mwical instraments: 

Pianos 

Another 

Oils: 



United States. 



Value. Duty. 



Mineral— 

Crude 

Refined 

Vegetable- 
Olive 

All other vegetable . 

PaintB and colors 

Pyper. and manufactures of. 

PUiedware 

PioTjfiions (comprising meat 

Meat- 
Fresh 

, Salted or pickled ... I 

Lard and tallow 

Butter and oleomugarine 
Cheese .... 

^^ Another 

Rice 

Seeds i!!!!!.'!!!;! 

^and manuf^ures of: 



^. Manufactures of !!! I! !!! ! 
Spices 

Spirits, distnied: 

Alcohol 

^WMly and other com- 
- nded 



***'»nd_^._^ 

M^uns and simp 

^gar, raw 

-. 8«i«r, refined 

ropteand implements 

Twjscco: 

9^ and cigarettes ... . 

_^ Ail other.... TT. 

Vsmiih I 



•26 

361,405 

31,290 

4,279 

12,065 

5.162 

287 

766 

482,068 

15,766 

9,429 
88.509 

3,604 
16,672 

86,744 

14,096 
882,800 
394,204 



12,480 

101,840 

86,180 

789 



66,689 
67,848 

9,946 
8,061 

97,848 

197.844 
82,828 

4,964 
18,142 
70,820 
168,486 
12,466 



58,108 

662,649 

1,622,490 

57,407 

66,260 

1,066,868 

66 

1.660 

178 

27, 
12,166 

24 

24,001 
88, C 

6 

16 

6,627 

54,261 

5 
48,172 
28,469 



n 

86,466 

8,094 

812 

868 

674 

46 

158 

81,062 

8,656 

948 

17,702 

719 
8,884 

17,849 

1,410 
171,892 
107,177 



2,190 

11,880 

4,688 

454 



18,968 
12,847 

8,978 
1,228 

6,678 

88,840 
17,804 

667 
2,468 
18,699 
48,625 
8,180 



10,686 

122,586 

294,470 

14,782 

7,681 

179,182 

6 

67 

87 
14,098 
2,966 



19,697 



6 
8,609 
4,488 

20 
14,689 
6,869 



Spain. 



Value. Duty. 



830 

994 

8,692 

2,150 

58,588 



218 

1,561,166 

17,796 



818 



7,905 
82,918 



8,291 
6,854 
90,; 
2,174 



8,685 
16,888 

5,269 
1,992 

8,566 



617,885 

6,961 

16,126 

266,206 

299 



8,689 

8,996 

68,900 

13,867 

471,588 

69,426 

1,107 

128 
48,668 
101,487 

92 

6,480 
77 



1,294 



16l 



1184 
1. 

369 

9,196 



86 

809,479 

2,787 



1,680 
2,547 



1,677 

840 

14, 

962 



1, 
1,759 

2,106 
787 

255 



68,869 
1,060 
8,648 

48.041 
72 



1,796 

796 

11,069 

2,826 

112,408 

9,460 

160 



France. 



Value. Duty. 



406 

18,888 

677 

51,247 

8,896 



4,289 
86,214 
25,977 



3,496 



1,607 
467 



•21 

28 

4,688 

231 

3,864 

678 



748 
5,261 
8,811 



606 



801 
92 
471 



4,709, 

26,641 6, 
1741 181 



741 
168 
26,058 11,554 

495 246 



88 1,882 



4,568 
14,117 

10,849 
2.818 

771 



464 
2,087 

4,141 
1,126 



71 

8,966 
8,549 
8,680 
106,822 
2,766 



18 

1,090 
497 

2,266 

31,051 

678 



10 



2,669 
63.496 
12,248 



64 627 

21,748 282,998 
24,407 



65 



4,217 
4 



22 



99,518 
148 



62 



2 
6,799 



860 
1,2941 



434 

481 

10,891 

8,548 



813 
141,360 



61.369 
24 



1 
412 



15 
261 



Germany. 
Value. Duty. 



•4611 866 

16.192 8,999 

136 68 



102,456 

I 
46! 



2,141 
18,623 



9,289 
6 



32 



733 
18 



66 2,901 



148 

269 

19,211 

121,760 

8,110 



44 
8.076 
2,172 

4,1 
866.219 



24.635 
133 

174' 

880 

4,538 



32 

1 

11,156 



874 
1,942 



146 
8 



8,043 804 

78,789 16,749 
27,799| 5.586 



218 



1,757 



8,986 
28,792, 

2,834' 
12,385, 



788 



3,002 

1,182 
4,956 

226 



174 

15 

24 

4,891 

86,601 

609 



2 

484 

402 

884 

71,953 



69 

12,318 

82 

101 

1,187 
1,049 



7 
*»7 



434' 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



182 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 27. — SUUemerU of articU* tmporied into the port of HabanOy Cuba, etr, — Continwd. 



Articles. 



UnJted StatM. 



Vmlae. Duty. 



Spaio. 



Valae. Duty. 



France. 



Value. Duty. 



Gennany. 



Value, Duty. 



DCTiABLB— continued. 

Vegetables: 

Potatoes 

AU other 

Wines and cordiala 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Firewood 

Lumber and timber 

All other unmanufac- 
tured 

Cabinetware and house 
furniture 

All other manufactured. . 
Wool, and manufactures ot: 

Raw 

Blankets and counter- 
panes 

Carpets 

Flannels 

Knitted goods 

Yams 

All other manufactured . . 
All other dutiable articles... 



1684,412 

280.117 

8,691 

346 
135,518 

7,380 

46,122 
352,101 

88 

821 

1.824 

702 

24,661 

44 

1,646 

1.908,739 



169.689 
41.584 
8.914 

13 
7.627 

1.478 

11.701 
68.573 

I 
84 

826 

519 

279 

9,513 

67l' 
298.816 



$80,381 
449.742 
.924,409 



84.796 

66.689 

1,281.667 



2.S04 

10 

20.776 
9.121 

16 

4.687 

668 

1.870 

78.835 

629 

981 

821,727 



42 

2 

4.604 
1,862 



1,856 
267 
548 
81,636 
211 
392 
145,821 



12.649 
70,343 



478 

1 

20.42S 
9,889 



2.648 
3,648 
8.291 

214,671 
2.222 
8,729 

899.688 



1876, 
88,109, 



11,837 tZ2D 
4,22d l.» 



27 



4.807, 13.161 
1,699, 17,r 



S.l» 



1,067 
1,468 
8,318 



3.489 
182,176 



Total |25, 229, 487 3, 569. 077 9. 751, 236 2, 742, 496 3, 809. 416 795.283 1. 942, OWj -IliTII 



816^ 

1,827^ » 

io,9M ian 

2.891 LIS 

12.18K im 

398.77S 7L\% 



Articles. 



FREl OF DUTY. 

Gold and silver: 

Gold coin 

Silver coin 

Agricultural implements — 

CnemicaN.d nigs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters and other 

nonalcoholic beverages 

Quinine, and alkaloids of 

cinchona bark 

Fertilizers, natural 

Fibers, vegetable, and manu- 
factures of: 
Flax, hemp, and other 

fibers, raw or tow 

Trees, plants, and moss 

All other free articles 



DUTIABLE. 

Animals: 

Cattle 

Mules 

Pigs 

Sheep 

All other, including fowl . 

Bark, tanning 

Books, music, maps, engrav- 
ings, etc 

Breadstufls: 

Barley 

Bran and fodder 

Com 

Commeal 

Gate 

Oatmeal 

Rye 

Wheat 

Wheat flour 

Preparations, food 

Another 

Bristles 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Gums and resins 

Opium 

Dyes 

Vanil la beana 

Another 



United Kingdom. 



Value. 



182,444 

7,' 
1,015 



4,572 



90,863 



11,650 



91 

ieo 



14,245 



43 
471 



75 

11.320 

11 

922 



14,356 

69 

870 

77,828l 



Duty. 



1266 



430 



3.590 



19 

2,830 

5 



76 

16,407 

29 

93 

8.872 



Other countries. 



Value. 



Duty. 



$18,415 



2,100 

1,256 
38,600 



113.355 

380 

3,895 



4,657,177 

74,666 

6,495 

1,196 

97,149 



3.845 



10 

782 

72 

1,772 



14,980 



24,826 



Total. 



Value. 



85,062.765 

78,066 

296,560 



69,882 



Dnty. 



$184,190 

8,249 

588 

899 

18,227 



648 



194 
25 
710 



16,806 



2,6161 



84.857 
83,634 



164.681 

7,908 

2,827.164 



6,751,686 

326.680 

829,144 

6.850 

428,808 

1 

215,215 

26,046 

104,062 

574.868 

7.851 

91,226 

706 

191 

631 

1,092.446 

44.781 

1,444 

20.594 

47.148 

89,947 

1,215 

760 

783,179! 



24,ffl4 
40. 7$ 
l.W 
78,101 



S2,0« 

2,2)7 
26, 3» 
fle.9IT 

l.ai 

RSSl 

SOS 

1« 

107 

384.775 

11,179 

44S 

8,2» 

8,975 

44,739 

172 

1« 

106,750 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 183 

No. 27. —Statement of articles imporled irUo the port of Habana, CubOy <rfc.— Continued. 



Articles. 



United Kingdom. 



Value. 



DUTIABLB— continued. 

Clocks, watches, and parts of: 

docks, and parts of 

Watches, and parts of .. . 

Cocoa.. 

Coffee , 

Confectionery 

Copper, and manufacturesof i 

iDgots, bars, and sheets.. 

Manufiu;tures of 

Cork, and manufactures of: 

Cork bark 

Cotton, and manufactures of : 

Raw 

Waste , 

Yam and thread , 

AlloUier 

Earthen, 8t6ne, and china 

ware 

iRgi 

FertlUxers 

FlbeiB, Tegetable, and man- 
Q&cturesof: 

Ba«8( for sugar) 

Carpets 

Goroage and rope 

Yams 

Another 

Fteti, including shell fish 

Prnitu: 

Fresh ordry 

Preserved 

GUn and glassware I 

<innpowderand explosives . .' 
Hair, and manufactures of . . i 
Hides and skins, other than 
fur skins: 

Goatskins 

Hidesof cattle 

Another 

Honey 

Iron and steel, and man«fac- 
tares of: 

Pig iron 

Ingots, bars, sheets, etc . . . 

Cutlery and side arms . . . 

Firearms 

Jewelrv and manufactures 

of gold and silver 

Leather.and mannfacturesof : 

Leather 



Duty. 



1218 

60 

162 

280! 

8,242| 

28,584 



185 
28 
27 
112 
808 

4,000 
6,257 



2,481' 

160,259 

2,567,952, 

249 



167 
35,714 
778,829 

100 



590 



78,926 

1,190 

697 

8,085 

1,918,515 

187 

4,496 
641 

7,565 
705 



Gloves 

Bboesand aandals 

All other mannfacturesof 
Machinery, and parts of: 

Agncul tural 

Electrical 

Locomotives, engines, 
dud parts oi 

Scales and balances 

Sewing machines, and 
parts of 

Sugar and bmndy ma- 
chinery 

^ Another 

Malt liquors and cider 

Marble, stone, and manufac- 
tures of: 

Building stone 

BricksT. 

Another 

Matches 

Metal compoeltion,and man- 
nfacturesof: 

Tin 

„ Another 

Moiical instruments: 

Pianos 

Ail other 



185* 

2,001 

132 



97 



13,416| 

121 

119 

375 

267,596 

15 

474 

160 

2,862 

206 



33 

273 

29 



128.092 
17,047| 

8 

SHJ 
8,506 



22,507 
2,473 

7 

47 
558 



143 
5,029 
18,558 



22 

934 

2,910 



203 



2,147 
26,927 
139,0201 



1,817 

8,685 

156 

7,991 



84,752 
12,310 

405 
74 



28 

138 

215 

5,885 

21,114 



687 

500 

27 

2,772 



1,588 
162 



Other countries. 



Value. 



$460 

15,745 

2,429 

387,719 

1,177 



3,505 

316 

1,620 

902 

3,861 



6.741 

8,796 

80 



864 
861 
5,644 
7,764 
4,222 
1,173 

11,880 

228 

56,004 



215 
549 
186 



4,708 

1,098 

75 

4,507 



4.209 
2,977 



575 



15 



13,261 
1.258 



38 



10,434 
286 



2,119 
83,066 



813 
702 



Duty. 



$181 

6,254 

1,251 

58,757 

208 

9 
474 

774 

66 

1,095 

9,488 

1,906 
1,505 



43 

981 

1.441 

525 

67 

2.628 

56 

11.082 

980 



233 
162 
13 

454 



1,227 
585 



115 



2,633' 
218 



4,455 
107 



166 
8,558 

125 
281 



Total. 
Value. Duty. 



122,000 

48.383 

18,200 

1,470,406 

95,765 

81,522 
890,431 

28,960 

1,620 

41,074 

199,258 

5,627,199 

42,202 

708,225 

2,194 



83,031 
3,222 
96,818 
25,899 
2,278,626 
5,564 

268,871 
59,006 

440.157 

26,906 

852 



22,489 
52,913 
15,098 

78 



232 

485,094 

85,459 

8,766 

172,759 

66,476 

287 

5,416 

2,039.827 

124,681 

9,429 
92.618 

8,594 
19, 115 

88,240 

28,994 

1,066.278 

695,868 



20,249 
111.482 
162.199 

18,492 



110,684 
171,466 

29,ii5 
21,082 



68,718 

19,289 

6,779 

469,468 

24,187 

4,289 
66,645 

1,920 

774 

2,212 

46,709 

1,684,156 

10,968 

136,268 

126 



15.252 

293 

16,667 

4,215 

822.318 

605 

82,251 

14,741 

94,093 

9,195 

81 



8,089 

6,417 

8,695 

7 



22 
69,285 
19,450 
2,506 

14,631 

11,045 

46 

954 

896,317 

20,498 

943 
18,522 

719 
8,806 

17,648 

2,900 
202,567 
136,604 



4,814 
12,748 
85.828 

5,329 



27,480 
24,286 



11,646 
8.400 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



184 



REPORT OF MILITARY OOVERKOR OF CUBA. 



No. 27. — Statement of articles imported into the port of HabancL, Cuba, etc— OontiiiQed. 



Articles. 



DiTTi ABLi— continued. 

Oils: 

Animal 

Mineral- 

Crnde 

Refined , 

Vegetable- 
Olive 

All other vegetable . . 

Paints and colors 

Paper, and manufactures of. . 

Plated ware 

Provisions (comprising meat 
and dairy proaucts): 

Meat- 
Fresh 

Salted or pickled — 

Lard and tallow 

Butter and oleomargarine 

Cheese 

Another 

Rice 

Seeds 

Silk, and manufactures of: 

Raw , 

Manufactures of 

Spices , 

Spirits. disUlled: 

Alcohol , 

Brandy and other com- 
pounded 

Starch 

Sugar and molasses: 

Molasses and sirup 

Sugar, raw 

Sugar, refined 

Tools and implements 

Tobacco: 

Cigars and cigarettes ... 

All other 

Varnish , 

Vegetables: 

Potatoes 

Another , 

Wines and cordials 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Firewood , 

Lumber and timber 

All other unmanufac- 
tured 

Cabl netware and houxe 
furniture , 

All other manufactured . . 
Wool, and manufactures of: 

Raw 

Blankets and counter- 
panes 

Carpets 

Flannels 

Knitted goods 

Yams 

All other manufactured . . 
All other dutiable articles 



Total. 



United Kingdom. 



Value. 



12,460 



6,247 



61,155 
85,966 
6.686 



8,960 

9 

6,668 

82,780 

408,446 

1,290.784 



88,091 
916 



12.082 
60,368 



11,286 



951 
1,966 

162.255 
7,610 
4,662 

54 
1,092 



1,452 
1,145 



2.622 
5,039 
1,218 

383,188 

476 

1,487 

628,398 



8,785,191 



Duty. 



$179 



8,426 



10,834 

24,042 

1,478 

89 



2.485 

2 

897 

4,081 

42,020 

257,673 



Other cotmtries. 



Value. 



$1,184 



ao 

6.186 
8.848 
5,414 
10,488 
277 



1.292.862 411.025 



19,037 
228 



8,879 
10,715 



1,595 



557 
224 

42,899 
1.M6 
1,945 

2 
45 



802 
201 



1,050 

2,016 

487 

154,073 

194 

595 

101,619 



1,906,284 



25,945 

866,799 

290,840 

6,872 



85.794 
111 



28,818 
9,815 



46 
156 



1,091 
859 

624 

337,216 

9,878 

278 
4 



11,709 
8.440 



111 



48 
1,811 



598 
448,046 



8,594,621 



Duty. 



185 $106,718 



197,844 
30,782, 



778 

546 

1,862 

2,788 

82 



8,707 
68.168 
22,888 

1.221 



18,295 
28 



29,124 
1,884 



1.584 
82 

47 
79.681 
8,645 

22 



8,675 
880 



45 



19 
724 



237 
125,724 



1,120.211 



Total 



Value. 



Doty. 



688,066 

78,924 

206.167 

672,844 

19.155 



727,672) 
1,028,571 
2,021,609 

674 
199,781 

7,396 

118,652 
898,064 

111 

10,900 

U.439 

12,966 

714,062 

6.162 

25,619 

5,100,377 



58.111,959 



r.4;s 

8S.SII 
21,510 

71,401 
15,414 
49,808 
168.484 
iOO 



58.106 


10.01 


1.968.170 


537.8n 


1.631.586 


2».2R 


154,994 


3i,sa 


474,037 


78,» 


2,261,072 


967, m 


1,724,600 


343, 8S8 


2,667 


a: 


1.067 


» 


453,00^ 


2»,8M 


114.812 


27.«a 


812 


1ft 


171,174 


112.8M 


168.064 


SS,» 


5 




48 


12 


6.576 


^2 


64.962 


7,(WB 


5 


20 


46,174 


16.7» 


27.512 


7,016 



U6,781 

179,888 

1,275,7* 

17 
7,744 

l,f!6 

2&,145 

Tim 



4,»l 
IW 

5,181 

2»,189 

2.48B 

10, 2M 

876.282 



10,588.109 



Customs Service op Cuba, 
Office of the Bureau of Special Agents, 

Habcmoy Cuba, October 8, 1900. 
Sir: In accordance with yonr reqnest, I have the honor to submit the followiw 
report of the bureau of special agents, customs service of Cuba, for the period of 
Jujy 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900, inclusive. 

'Diis bureau was formallv orj?anized July I, 1899, but the office had been created 
two months prior to that aate, and the personnel of four agents, acting at that time 
under your direct orders, formed the nucleus of wi organisation which to-day is rec- 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 185 

Qgnized as an important adjunct to the castoms service and an invaluable factor in 
ihe succesBfol progress of this essential branch of the United States Government in 
Caba. 

During the first four months of actual service, viz, July to November, 1899, success 
did not seem to attend to any marked degree the combined efforts of the bureau and 
itB agents, which may be accounted for partly by the fact that several of the agents 
were totally ignorant of the Sjmnish lan^uage^ and partly because of the more impor- 
tant isLct that it required considerable time and perseverance to fall in line with the 
subtle methods employed by the Spamards, whose proclivities forsmu^ling, etc., had 
been asBiduoosly nurtured for generations past, until it had developed into not merely 
an acquired habit, but into a science and an art of which they are absolute masters 
and defiantly proud. 

During the above period innumerable minor investi^tions were conducted by the 
bureau, and agents were traveling continuously, familianzing themselves with the island 
in general, reporting on the conditions of the various porto of entry, thus furnishing 
data regaining the different localities and possible danger to the revenues, and in 
many other ways preparing for a more eflScient service. 

On November 1, 1899, bv order of the collector of customs for Cuba, I was ap- 
pointed, temporarily, chief of the bureau, which appointment was made permanent 
under diate of January 1, 1900. 

Upon assuming control it was my first duty to report the innovations which I 
believed necessary for the successful operation ol the bureau, prominent amonc which 
was the recommendation of appointment of Spanish-speaking agents and the division 
of the island into special-agent districts, each of which was to be in char^ of a local 
resident a^ent, who should have control of all investigations within his territory, 
reporting m detail to headquarters, and pending instructions for definite action, in 
addition to daily general reports. 

As far as practicable, my suggestions in this line were approved and followed, with 
the result that to-day the island is divided into four established districts, as above, 
viz, Habana, Cienfue^, Gibara, and Santiago de Cuba, with headquarters at the 
first district, in addition to an agient detailed to each of the ports of Matanzas and 
Cardenas, and to the subport oi Banes. 

Several agents have been appointed, all of whom have an intimate knowledge of 
Spanish, nart of them being natives of Cuba, and all chosen for their special adapta- 
bility to the requirements of the service. 

The personnel of the bureau consists of sixteen, including the chief and two oflSce 
clerks, leaving, according to the reorganization of the customs service July 1, 
1900, one vacancy in the capacity of agent. 

The duties of tnis bureau have not been confined solely to customs matters, but in 
its capacity as a confidential branch to the Government m general it has, on various 
occasions, been called upon to investigate matters of general interest. In fact, each 
aeent is instructed to report on anything of apx)arent value to the Government m its 
administration of the idlairs of the island. 

This report would be unnecessarily lengthened were I to enter into the details of 
the innumerable minor investigations which have been conducted by this bureau; 
consequently I will only endeavor to recall for quotation several of the most notable 

achievements since its organization. .. 

On December 18,1899, after several weeks of hard and intricate work, we wrestea 
Counterfeiter Luis Millan at No. 14 Inquisidor street, Habana, and found in his pos- 
session eight photo-etched copper plates which were to have been used in the manu- 
fwture of counterfeit United States bank notes of the $5, $10, and $20 denominations, 
•Iso various necatives of the same, all of which are to be returned as per order ol ine 
Secretary of War, to the Hon. John E. Wilkie, chief of the United States secret 

service. Treasury Department. , ^ „ , . . x^. . 

This capture was made before any bills had been ^^shoved,'* and owing to tne 
ftei% of passing counterfeit United States notes among » P?J^Pl« J^?^^ ^fP?*^^ 
of our money isbnly exceeded by their confidence in its stability, I <i®e°^,7i® ^P^ 
twe to be perhaps the most important service rendered by the »^«*^^ .^"^"5* Vn 
comparatively short career. Millan was tried, convicted, and is now serving a len- 
yeare* sentence in the presidio of Habana. , i ^^rftfiil 

In connection with t>iis case I wish to mention that after five ^"^^^^l^"^™^ 
work on the part of this bureau, acting jointly with the Hab^a f^ret poliw^ 
wsted the l^mplice of MillaA-Ananlas Leon-in whose poss^ion we fojind one 
ofthemisBingplat^ This prisoner was subee<mently rel«ised by t^^ 
iMtance, court of Belen, for W of evidence. This is but another instance oi 
^rtter incapacity of the corrupt judiciary of this island. ^^^. ._. customs officials 
On December 20, 1899, the memorable arrest of several promment custom 

CUBA 1900 — VOL I, FT 3 13 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



186 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

in Habana was made, whose subsequent prosecution and acquittal by the courts of 
Habana has been a "cause celebre*' for the past eight months, attracting universal 
attention throughout the island and the United States. 

In the detection of these dishonest officials the bureau took a very prominent part 
and was charged with the details of their prosecution. Comments on their trial and 
release are unnecessary, as it is unanimously pronounced by the American officials 
conversant with the case a gross miscarriage of justice, only possible in i country 
where the judicial system has but one distinctive feature, namely, corruptness. 

A creditable performance was the detection of an old-time fraud extensively prac- 
ticed during the Spanish regime. I refer to the successful attempt of Juste Taladrid, 
the most celebrated smuggler in Cuba, to withdraw four cases of merchandise from 
the custom-house of Habana without payment of duties by substituting, preparatory 
to the withdrawal, the same number of cases l)earing the same marks and weighs 
and containing merchandise of little value. This daring and successful act had Seen 
effecteil by the use of assumed names and by apparently shutting every avenue likely 
to afford us means of detection. By persistent labor intelligently ap^ied the agents 
of this bureau finally located the smuggler in the person of Tafadrid, accumalatii^ 
evidence which is surprisingly overwhelming and absolutely incontestable. He is 
now awaiting trial, together with his accomplice, Ignacio Cuervo, and if the trial is 
honestly conducted I nave no doubt of their final conviction. 

These are the only cases now pending in the courts. 

Several more cases of importance can be cited as evidence that the bureau is alive 
to the situation and active m its operations, but as 1 do not deem it advisable to write 
a lengthy report I will close by inviting your attention to the extreme difficulty of 
performfng creditable service m this country owing to the lack of facilities for gain- 
mg information from the natives, whose sympathies are, as a rule, against the Gov- 
ernment's administration in matters pertaining to the prosecution of smugglers. 
This difliculty is generally intensified when the investigator is an American, and 
actually becomes a serious handicap. 

In view of these ol)stacles 1 look oack with pleasure on the record of the bnrean 
for the first year of its existence, and I truly believe that its value to the (Tovemment 
will increase in proportion as the months go by, and the varied experience gained 
and data compiled from fragmentary evidence, etc., will soon represent a valuable 
collection of precedents, establishing' a method of handling skilfully and exiKnliently 
the multifarious problems constantly arising. 

RESUME. 

Sinc^e the writing of the foregoing several cases of importance have come under 
the observation of the bureau, one of which merits some mention. 

I refer to the capture of several large cases of opium, which were landed at the 
Habana custom-house wharf on September 21, 1900, and which were promptly seized 
by the bureau of special agents. 

This capture deserves special mention as it clears up the mystery which sur- 
rounded tne importation of this drug, and over which we have becai puzzling ever 
since the or^nization of this bureau. 

The culprits are old timers in the business, having enjoyed immunity from detec- 
tion for over fourteen years. Their system was a very elalxjrate one, and was carried 
on by the use of an unlimited capital. They purchased the opium in large quantities 
in Liverpool, England, from which point it was shipped, in such quantities as oca- 
sion required, to the port of Santander,. Spain, and there transferred to **chorizo** or 
sausage cans, and, after being duly labeled, reshipped, by the same vessel, for Cuba 

It would arrive here, and by collusion with employees on the wharf, whose han<l? 
had previously been greased by Spanish gold, its passage as ** sausage" was made 
comparatively easy. 

One of the best results of this achievement was the detection of the custom-house 
official whose aid ha<l been enlisted by these intrepid smugglers, and being an offi- 
cer of considerable importance, viz, inspector in charge of wharves, his prompt dis- 
missal has had a moHt beneficial effect. 

Very respectfully, F. S. Cairns, 

Chief of Special AgenU. 

Maj. Tasker H. Buss, 

Collector of Customs for Cuba. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 187 

Customs Sbrvicb op Cuba, 
Office of the Revenue-Cutter Division, 

EUxabethpoH, N. /., September 2Sy 1900. 

Sir: Complying with your telegraphic orders of September 18, 1 have the honor to 
make the following report: 

At the time I took charge of the revenne-cntter service (February 8, 1900), aside 
from the harbor laonches, bat two vessels were transferred to my department, namely, 
the U. S. a Kanawha and the U. 8. S. VHdng, 

Owing to the great first cost of these vessels and their equipments (almost $150,000), 
their large monthly pav rolls, their great coal consumption, and their deep draft, I 
recommended that lx>th be turned over to the Quartermaster's Department, and in 
their stead small vessels, suitable to the shallow waters surrounding the island of Cuba, 
be purchased. 

My recommendations being approved, the Kanawha was at once turned over to the 
Quartermaster's Department The V^nq was temporarilv continued in the service of 
patrolling the southern coast until the middle of June, wnen she too was transferred. 

During the few months' cruise of the Viking she was continuously at sea, with the 
exception of such times as she was compelled to put in for coal and provisions. 

Every harbor was carefuUv sounded, and reports regarding various shoals were 
made by her commanding officer. All vessels sighted were bcMirded, and where vio- 
lations of existing laws were discovered the captains were warned. All reports of 
illicit traffic were inveeti^ted and proven groundless. One schooner was seized and 
tamed over to the captam of the port of Cienfuegos. On various occasions she car- 
ried military and customs service officers to such points as could not be readily or 
promptly reached bv the usual transportation facilities. 

The captured gunboat Baracoa was added to my department in June. During the 
brief penod she has served under me she has been constantly employed assisting 
various collectors, and has therefore not had an opportunity to act independently. 
She will in time prove a valuable acquisition. 

With such limited means the service can not prove effective. At the present time 
bnt one lx»t is actively employed to patrol a coast of almost 2,000 miles, surrounded 
with countless small islimds, behind any one of which sailing craft can readily disap- 
pear. Not until the five vessels now building can have the opportunity to investigate 
the inland waters will it be possible to prove or disprove the necessity for this coast 
patrol. 

The five vessels now completed at the Crescent Shipyard are of the following dimen- 
sions: No. 7, 70 feet long, 10 feet beam, 2i feet draft; Nos. 8, 9, 10, and 11, 60 feet 
long, 10 feet beam, 2i feet draft All the hulls are built of galvanized steel through- 
oat, of the same weight and construction as is used in the Umted States torpedo boats. 
Each is divided into five compartments. The engines are compound, of 6 by 12 by 8 
inches dimensions. Roberts tubular boilers. Bunker capacity, 6 tons; with esti- 
mated steaming radius of six days. Maximum speed, 10 miles. Water-tank capacity 
on Nos. 8, 9, 10, and 11 is 600 gallons; on No. 7, 800 gallons. Keel condenser. Accom- 
modations for two officers and five men. The galley has an oil stove, large ice chest, 
and large locker space. Water-closet and wash room are provided on each boat. The 
amiament consists of one 1-pounder Hotchkiss R. F. gun on hydraulic carriage and 
cage stand, and six S. and W. .44-caliber revolvers. Fifty shells and forty blanks, 
together with 1,000 rounds of revolver ammunition, are supplied to each boat The 
equipment is complete and should be ample for twelve months. 

Expoidible supplies, such as paints, oils, etc., are sufficient for from three to six 
months. 

******* 

In conclusion, I call your attention to the fact that for the amount allotted I prom- 
ised to build five vessels of 60 feet length, in place of which I have procured four of 
60 feet length and one of 70 feet ,^ . , * xu «<. # f k^ 

The whole cost of these vessels and equipments is just one-third of the cost oi tne 
Kanaitha and Viking. The coal consumption of the five is one-half of that of tne 
two. The pay rolls of the five two-thirds that of the two. . 

Owing to the fact that all my papers are in Habana I can not give you the m^ 
items of the expenses of the launch service which I have reduced during the tnree 

months 1 have actually spent in Habana. These figures I will submit at some future 

F. H. HUNICKE, 

Chief of Revenue-CuUer Service f(rr Cuba. 



^^ D ,^c 11 F. H. HUNICKE, 

Respectfully, ^^^^ ^^ u^^.^.An^ Service for C 



TbeCoLLEcroB of Customs for Cuba, 

Habana, Cuba. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPOKT OF MAJ. TASKEB H. BUSS, COLLSCTOB OF CUSTOMS 

FOB CTTBA. 



Office op the Collector of Customs for Cuba, 

Habcma^ Cvba^ February 7, 1901, 

Sib: In compliance with the instructions of the military governor, 
dated December 22, 1900, 1 have the honor to submit the inclosed sta- 
tistical statements relating to the customs service of the island of Cuba 
during the last six months of the jear 1900, together. with the follow- 
ing brief report. This report, with the thirty-six tabular statements, 
is in form supplementary to the annual report rendered by me for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, and the customs statistics for the suc- 
cessive periods are presented literally alike. Several additional tables 
have been inserted into the series of the latter report, but they in no 
way detract from its absolute identity with the former. 

There is a broad distinction, however, to be made between the two 
reports, which is due to the changes in the customs tariff. The 
revised tariff of March 31, 1900, was put into effect on the 15th of 
June following. Consequently the repoi-t inclosed is practically based 
upon the results under the new tariff. But whatever differences this 
may have produced will hardly be evident upon the face of the state- 
ments. 

A conspicuous difference, produced by the change in the schedules 
of classification of commodities, both of import and export, which 
was made July 1, 1900, will be found upon the respective statements 
of importation and exportation by articles, the new schedules very 
largely increasing the number of heads or articles. This increase in 
the number or classes does not affect the totals, but it makes instruct- 
ive comparison between the customs service of the last six months and 
that of any preceding similar period almost impossible. 

A full comparative statement of the transactions of the two years, 
1899 and 1900, would be very desirable, but it was found to be imprac- 
ticable in view of the aforesaid changes in the classification of com- 
modities. However, to meet the probable demand of some comparison 
between the results of the two years, I have the honor to add a few 
tables, with some explanatory comment upon the more salient points 
in the business of the respective years. 

Similar tables are given to emphasize the overwhelming importance 
which Habana bears to the trade of the island, and others of the same 
character to show the vast trade relations which the United States 
sustains to Cuba. 

COMPARISONS BETWEEN 1899 AND 1900. 

The importations into the island of Cuba during the year 1900, 
approximated $70,000,000, and the exportations from the island 
exceeds! $61,000,000, leaving a balance against the island of a little 

1S9 



Digitized by 



Google 



190 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



more than $18,000,000. During 1899 the total importations into the 
island aggregated $75,000,000; the total exportations $50,000,000, 
with a trance of nearly $25,000,000 against the island. The exact 
figures for the respective years are as follows: 



Years. 


Importa- 
tions. 


Ezporta* 
tfons. 


Balance. 


1899 


875,672,008 
09,898,660 


150,968,868 
51,376,687 


t2i6S8^64S 


1900 


ia,4tt.725 






Difference 


- 5,678,448 


+ 442,174 


— 6.1973S> 







The balance shows a slight increase in the value of exportations in 
1900 over 1899, but in importations there is a considerable f allinjr off 
in 1900, amounting to $5,678,448, or about 7i i)er cent. This falling 
oflf is, however, only an apparent decrease, for if the gold and silver 
coin imported, which should not be reckoned among the articles of 
consumption and construction, is deducted from the totals of importa- 
tions, it will show a slight increase for 1900 on the part of the proper 
articles of import, as well as of export: 

Importations: 
1899— 

Total $75,572,008 

Coin 9,515,9S7 

All other articles $66,066,021 

1900— 

TotAl 69,893,560 

Coin 3,373,021 

All other articles 66,520,539 

Increase in 1900 464,518 

Any increase of imports in 1900, however small, becomes remark- 
able when considered in the light of the bereft and poverty-stricken 
condition of the island at the beginning of 1899. There was an extra- 
ordinary demand during the first year for the necessaries of life— for 
articles of food, clothing, and shelter. 

TRADE BETWEEN CUBA AND THE UNITED STATES. 

The place which the United States holds in the commerce of Cuba 
fully justifies that special mention be made of it. Of imports, the 
United States furnished 47. 8 per cent in 1899, and 46 per cent in 1900. 
Of exports that country absorbed a still larger proportion, taking 80 
per cent in 1899 and 65 per cent in 1900. 

The statement of it follows: 





Importations. 


Percent. 

100 

47.8 


Exportations. 

$50,988,868 
40,942.549 


Percent 


1899. 
Total 


$75,572,008 
36,099,848 


100 


United states - 


sas 






All other countries 


39,472,160 


62.2 


9.990.814 


19.7 






1900. 
Total 


69,893,560 
32.169,033 


100 
46 


51,452,885 
83,615,627 


100 


UnlUHi States 


65.S 






All other countries 


37,724,627 


54 


17,887.208 


Si? 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEENOB OF CUBA. 
United SUUes — Imports to and exports from Cuba, 



191 





Importations. 


ExportationH. 


Balance. 


1839 


936,099,848 
32,109,083 


940,942,549 
38,615,627 


S4, 842, 701 


1900 


1,446,594 






Decrease 


4,930,815 


7,326,922 


8,396,107 







Deducting the gold and silver coin imported from the total imports 
of the respective years leaves an excess of actual importations of 
1420,489 for the year 1899. 

Importations: 

1QQQ 

Total $36,099,848 

Coin 7,581,298 

All other articleti $29,518,550 

1900— 

Total 32,169,033 

Coin 3,070,972 

All other articles 29, 098, 061 

Decreaae in 1900 420,489 

This decrease will probably bt» found in tho importation of articles 
of food, of which upward of $3,IMJ(),()00 worth more were imported 
from the United States in 1899 than in i9W. 



RELATIONS OF IIABANA TO THE ISLAND. 

The best index to the commerce of the island of Cuba is afforded by 
the traasactions at the port of Habana. During 1899 this port 
received 76 per cent of the total importations of the island, and during 
1900, 72 per cent. Of expoi-tations there were loaded at this poil 60 
per cent m 1899 and 61 per cent in 1900. The transactions have been 
remarkably uniform, as the following table will show: 



Year. 


Importatioiis. 


Exportatlons. 


1899. 


857,316,184 


$30,601,025 


1900 


50,550,173 


31,335,363 







The difference- between the totals of importation may be almost 
accounted for by the difference in the importation of coin during the 
respective years. 

The merchants of Habana buy extensively in foreign markets for 
redistribution throughout the island. For example, there were entered 
at this port during 1900 more than 75 per cent of the total of olive oil; 
85 per cent of shoes and sandals; 90 per cent of beer; 90 per cent of 
paper; 90 per cent of silk goods; 80 per cent of wines; 95 per cent of 
lumber; 90 per cent of woolen goods, etc. Habana almost exclusively 
among the ports of the island imports mw material, or material partly 
raw, for use in manufactures or construction of buildings. Very little 
of this class of articles is entered at the other ix)rts. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



192 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



TRADE OF HABANA WITH THE UNITED STATES. 

A comparative statement of the impoi-tations at Habana gives the 
following results: 



Total, island 

Habana 

All other ports 



1899. 



975,572,008 
57,316,184 



18,256,824 



Percent. 



1900. 



100 969.898,560 
76 I 50,650,178 



19,843,886 



PeroenL 



ImporUdioiiB into Habana from the United States and all other countries. 





1899. 


Percent. 


1900. ' Percent 


Total 


957,318,184 
28,139,002 


100 
49.95 


950,560,178 100 


United States 


21,865.651 413 






All other countries 


29,177,182 


50.06 


28,684,522 K7 







The decrease in importations from the United States during 1900 is 
accounted for in the decrease in coin and articles of food importations. 
The following table gives in detail the leading classes of articles entered 
at this port during the two years from the United States: 



1900. 



1899. 



i9oa 



Articles of food 

Metals and manufactures 

Fibers and manufactures. . 

Wood and manufactures.. 

Hides, leather, and manu- 
factures 

Paper and manufactures 
and books 

Chemicals, drugs, dyes, 
paints, etc 



911,753,948 

2,696,814 

1,300,954 

867,324 

781,150 

286,024 

507,633 



90,396,759 

1,932,472 

378,921 

577,824 

898,107 

207,218 

419,161 



Oils, animal and mineral 

Glass and glassware 

Horses ana mules 

Miscellaneous 

Articles free of duty 

Gold coin 

Totel 



9427.679 
141.372 
360,178 
975,024 
655.652 
7,436.255 



S306.28i 
1S2,»I 
419,911 
2,600.285 
2, 189, IS 
2.082,082 



28.139,002 



21.865.fia 



It will be noted that, according to the above table, there was a 
decrease of $6,273,351 in the amount of importations from the Unit^l 
States during 1900; but it must also be observed that this decrease is 
accounted for by the excess of coin and articles of fooc', $4:, 504,173 and 
$2,357,184, respectively, which were entered here in 1899 more than in 
1900. The above columns are an eloquent and unquestionable state- 
ment of the wide difference between the conditions m Habana during 
1899 and 1900. The column of 1899 is composed of necessities almost 
altogether. Very little is found in the item of *' miscellaneous", which 
is made up of those innumerable and unclassifiable articles, very impor- 
tant and useful, as a rule, but not essentially necessary. On the other 
band, in the column for 1900, while giving substantial representation 
to the articles necessary for food, health, clothing, shelter, and gen- 
eral construction or rehabilitation, the *' miscellaneous" item, embrac- 
ing the luxuries of life, exceeds $2,600,000, or nearly three times as 
much as in 1899. 



EXPORT TRADE OF HABANA. 



The regularity of Habana's trade, which is so definitely disclosed bj 
the foregoing table of importations from the United States, is even 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



193 



better illastrated by its exportation figures when placed side bv side 
witti the value of the exports from the other ports oi the island, during 
periods of six months each, as follows: 



Period. 



Jan. ltoJiineSO.1899 
Jii]7ltoDec81,1899. 
Jin. 1 to June 30, 1900 
July 1 to Dec. 31, 1900. 

Yarl899 

Year 1900 

Both yean 



Habana. 



$14,975,565 
15,625,460 
14,460,966 
16,874.405 



80,601,025 
31,885,863 



61,986,888 



All other 
ports. 



115,618,047 
3,833,027 
15,611,073 
4,429,101 



19,451,074 
20,040,174 



39,491,248 



Total. 



130,598,612 
19,458,487 
30,072,031 
21,808,506 



60,052,099 
61,875,687 



101,472,686 



The total exports from the island for the last two years exceed 
1100,000,000, of which Habana handled nearly $62,000,000. The lead- 
ing exports, surar and tobacco, do not pass out side by side. Habana 
ships tne great bulk of tobacco. The sugar is mostly shipped from the 
other porte. Tobacco is a steady exporter, going out month by month, 
while the bulk of the sugar is exported dunn^ the first six months of 
the year. This explains why the ports outside of Habana exported 
practically four times as much in value during the first six months of 
the respective years as during the last six months. 

The exports from Habana were distributed by countries and classes 
as follows: 





1899. 


1900. 




United States. 


Ali other coun- 
tries. 


United States. 


All other coun- 
tries. 


Tobacco: 

Leaf 


•8.066.558 

10,186,850 

196,291 


$581,557 

1,532,540 

286,692 


$9,446,148 

2,424,755 

21,288 


$3,388,284 


CigaiB 


9,487,354 


AJl others 


67,340 






Total tobacco 


18,401,699 
1,494,187 
2,771,884 
1,230,711 


2,400,789 

24,851 

2,826,568 

1,951,851 


11,892,131 

1,661,943 

268,738 

1,008,161 


12,942,978 


Sugar 


16,519 


Cdta 


2, 165, 157 


Ail other articles 


1,389,786 






Grand total 


28,897,981 


6,706,044 


14,820,973 


16,514,490 







There is apparently a large falling off in the exportations to the 
United States during the second year, and an even larger gain in the 
exportations to the rest of the world. But the explanation will 
probablv be found in the items of cigars. The greater part of the 
cigars shipped to Europe go by way of New York, and during the first 
nine months of 1899, when heavjr shipments of cigars were made, no 
account was kept of the final destination of the article. It is not pos- 
sible now to determine the exact amount that should be credited to the 
United States and to the rest of the world, Europe almost exclusively, 
but judging the exportations of 1899 bv those or 1900, it is reasonable 
to assume that at least $7,000,000 worth of cigars destined for Europe 
were credited to the United States. The transposition of this sum 
would reduce the exports to the United States to $16,897,981, and 
those to the rest of the world would be increased to $13,703,044. The 
remaining differences may be accounted for by the difference in coin 
eicportations to the United States, and by that of increased purchase of 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



194 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



leaf tobacco by the countries of Europe. On this basis is presented 
the following revised table of exportations from Habana: 





1899. 


Percent. 


1900. 


Percent 


United States 


$16,897,961 
18,708,044 


56 

45 


114,820,973 
16,514,490 


47.2 


All other countries 


52.7 






Grand total 


80,601,025 


100 


81,385,463 


100 







In these two years the United States received slightly more than 
one-half of all that was exported from Habana^^ and if the exporta- 
tions of coin are deducted that country received more than one-half 
during each year. Deducting the coin, the account stands as follows: 





1899. 


Per cent 


1900. 


Percent 


United States 


$14,126,597 
11,876,491 


55.4 
44.6 


$14,562,236 
14,849,843 


5a4 


All other countries 


4a6 






Total 


25.508,088 


100 


28,911,578 


100 







In conclusion, there are presented herewith extracts from the statis- 
tics of the Habana custoin-nouse of fifty classes of articles of im[)orta- 
tion for the year 1900, the bulk of which come from markets other 
than the United States. These extracts give the quantity wherever 
possible. They give the values in each case. The United States is 
given the first place, and totals the last place. Between, in order from 
the highest to the lowest, are placed all those c(»untries whose ship- 
ments to this TX)rt exceed the shipments of the United States. The 
countries supplying less than the tJnited States are not mentioned. 

Comparative sUUement of imp<}rt<Uions l)y leading countries. 



Country. 



Mineral water and nonalcoholic bevera^s: 
United States. 
Sp 



Spain 
Franc 



ance 

United Kingdom 

All countries • 

Flax, hemp, and other vegetable flbers, raw or tow: 

United States tons. 

Other American countri«s do. . 

United Kingdom do. . 

All eountrio* do. . 

Cattle: 

United States 

Other American countries 

All countries 

Books and other printed matter: 

United States • 



Spain. 



Quantity. 



Germany ' . 

All countries {. 

Barley: 

United States bushels..! 

Germany do 

All countries do 

Preparations (grain) for food: 1 

United stales -. I, 

United Kingdom ' . 

Spain :, 

Germany i . 

All countries I, 



159 
1.019 

268 
1,448 

45,532 
128,521 
174,067 



2,542 
24,387 
26,929 



Value. 



$4,164 
37,827 
9.842 
8,621 
64,101 



100,533 
39,750 
167,501 

1,002,117 
3,260,530 
4,262,747 

38.907 
84,198 
68,198 
213,888 

2,068 
39.480 
41,548 

3,9(B 
8,980 
7,609 
5,787 
29.151 



Percent 



&5 
69 
15 
13 
100 

16 
» 
23 
100 

23.5 
76 
100 

17.9 
S».3 
32 
100 

5 
95 
100 

13-4 
30.9 
25.9 
1».7 
100 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



REPORT OF laLITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 195 

OomparaHve gtatemerU of importations by leading countries — Continued. 



Country. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Per cent. 


BrfeUes: 










United States 


pounds.. 


12,086 


•3,671 


20 


Fkance 


....rr.do.... 


9,728 


7,366 


40 


Qennany 


do.... 


8,298 


4,687 


26 


AUooontries 


do.... 


88,601 


18,321 


100 


Broiliee: 










United Stales 






6,418 
9,017 
18,997 


28.6 


Frtnce ... . . « .... . . 


47.3 


Allconntriee 


100 


Opium: 








United States 


pounds.. 


4,818 


10,246 


16 


Other cotmtries, including China 


....r.do.... 


15,068 


88,173 


69.7 


United Kingdom 


do.... 


6,196 


13,624 


21.1 


AU countries 

Dyes: 

United SteteB 


do.... 


26,886 


63,919 


100 






872 
968 


46.2 


Oennany 




60 


All countries - 




1,930 


100 


Watches: 








United States 






10,967 
24,412 


16.2 






86.2 


Germany 




18,166 


26.9 


France 




13,663 
67,367 


20.8 


All countries - - 




100 


CoDiiectionery: 








United States 


pounds.. 


812,126 


29.146 


80 


Spain 

All countries 


do.... 


466,680 


50,902 


63 


do.... 


903,619 


96,423 


100 


"^tJl^S't^"'"^''^'"*'^ 










pounds.. 


64,648 


7.263 


22.8 


United Kingdom 


do.... 


148,831 


24,476 


71 


AU countries 


do.... 


203,919 


31,867 


100 


Cork manufacturen: 










United States 






4,742 
19,212 
26,497 


18.6 


Spain 




76 


All countries - 




100 


Cotton waste: 








United States 


pounds.. 


169,306 


9,564 


81 


jffcountries"!*!!!!!.'*.*.!.'!'.'.!!!!*.!!!]'.!".'.'.'.!!!!! 


do.... 


181,882 


17,948 


68 


do.... 


402,408 


3l,0gl 


100 


Cotton yam and thread: 

United States 










— pounds.. 


3,196 


746 


.44 


United Kingdom 


.-..^.do.... 


221,611 


131,769 


77.6 


France 


do.... 


63,342 


23,623 


13.8 


Spain 


do.... 


16,014 


6,344 


8.1 


Germany 


do.... 


10,669 


5,099 


3 


Other European countries 


do.... 


7,254 
311,082 


3,321 


2 


All countries 


do.... 


169,833 


100 


All other cotton goods: 










United States 






287,897 
2,329,716 
1,2W,247 

566,667 
4,822,122 

4,273 
29,294 
17,803 


6 


United Kingdom 




48.3 


Spain 


* 


26.8 


nance 




11.5 


All countries 




100 


Earthen, stone, and china ware: 

United States 




5 


Germany . ... 


35 


United kingdom 1 


20.2 






16,466 
8,619 


19.5 


Other European countries 




12 


Spain \V.. 




6,W8 
83,361 


7 


All countries 


100 


B««8 for sugar: 








United States 


bags.. 


63 


23 


.02 


United Kingdom 


Ad... 


7(M,877 


77,279 


74.7 


Germany 


do... 


200,206 


23,218 


22.6 


Spain 


do... 


13,515 


2,120 


2.05 


Other European countries 


do... 


8.460 


864 


.83 


All countries 


do... 


927,110 


103,504 


100 


Cordage and rope: 










United States 


pounds.. 


81,999 


10,410 


15.2 


Snain 

All countries 


....r.do.... 


262,719 


41,?25 


60.6 


do.... 


460,497 


68,839 


100 


Unen and all other producto of vegetable fibers: 










United States 






4,782 
1,251,102 


.3 


United Kingdom 




79.6 


8toain. .!:"?_ ; ; ....;: :........;:..........;......... 


198, 769 


12 


France ' 


76,402 

17, 9W 

13,4-28 

1,564,036 


4.2 




1.1 


Other European countries ' 


.86 


All countries . - - 


100 


Frail, Irenh or dry: 








United SUtes 







84,538 
208,987 
305.642 


27.6 


Soain 







68.3 


AJl countries 






100 



Digitized by ^ 



ioogle 



196 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

Comparative statement of importations by leading cowntriea — Continued. 



Country. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Percent 



Fruits, preserved: 
United States.. 



Spain, 
ill cot 



Jl countries 

Cutlery and side arms: 

United States 

France 

All countries 

Firearms: 

United States 



8] 



Spain. 
All coi 



Jl countries : 

Jewelry and manufactures of gold and silver: 

United States 

Germany 

France 

All countries 

Leather: 

United States 

ain. 



8] 



ipai] 
01 c 



All countries 

Shoes and sandals: 

United States pairs. 

Spain do... 

All countries do... 

Sugar and brandy machinery: 

United States 

Germany 

All countries 

Marble and stone, excepting building stone and brlcluc 

United States 

Spain 

Irance 

All countries 

Matches: 

United States gross.. 

United Kingdom do . . . 

Spain do. . . 

Other European countries do. . . 

All countries do. . . 

Pianos: 

United States 

France 

Spain .-w 

All countries 

All other musical instruments: 

United States 

Germany 

France 

Spain 

All countries 

Olive oil: 

United States gallons.. 

Spain do — 

France do — 

Other European countries do. 

All countries do — 

All other vegetable oils: 

United States gallons. . 

United Kingdom do. 

All countries .• do . 

Paper and manufactures of: 

United States 

Spain 

All countries 

Meat, salted or pickled: 

United States pounds. . 

Other American countries do — 

All countries do — 

Cheese: 

United States do.... 

Holland and other European countries do. . . 

United Kingdom do... 

All countries do. . . 

Rice: 

United States do... 

United Kingdom do — 

Germany do — 

Spain ^ do . . 

France do 

All countries do, 

Silk, manufactures of: 

United States 

France 



294,209 
1,760,442 
2,062,499 



3,974 
5,906 
1,888 
2,824 
16,076 

89 

88 
60 
171 



1.626 

678,700 

9,828 

1.241 

690,924 

80,691 
61,695 
104,326 



7,448,489 
26,331,218 
83,828,978 

266,817 
2,460.468 

292,176 
8,167,258 

57,686 

60.858,606 

19,289,848 

1,254,880 

194,920 

71,666,812 



$18,414 
89,976 
60,491 

18,683 
21,721 
71,621 

3,380 
7,218 
U,901 

14,215 

89,374 

44,701 

155,816 

7,686 
22,191 
88,787 

299,209 
1,245,876 
1,661.946 

9,183 

9,444 

23,296 

18,896 
82,607 
22,806 
182.861 

1,607 
6,906 
2.654 
2.428 
15.149 

4.8U 
8,866 
6,822 
23.080 

2,877 
15.239 
3.180 
2,968 
24.916 

927 

603,370 

7,541 

1,212 

603,218 

16,966 
81,067 
57,714 

169,011 
257,440 
717,014 

588,425 
1,449,278 
2,088,tn9 

88,875 
802,749 

87,660 
399,696 

1,476 

1,061,962 

387,290 

88,622 

8,887 

1,492,718 

16,396 
806.323 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



S.8 
61.6 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 197 

Comparative sUUement of imporUUions by leading countries — Continaed. 



Country. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Percent 


Silk, mAimlacturee of— Continued. 










Of>niiAny 






$48,929 


10.1 


Chin* *n4 Jftpun 




46,964 
85,319 


9.5 


United Kinjrdom 




7.1 


8Mln :.. ... 




84,964 
496,919 

11,841 


7 


Allconnfiies 




100 


Spices: 

United SUtee 


pounds.. 


74,692 


10.2 


8ndn *... 

Alt countries 


rr.do.... 


» 11, 912 


197,727 


88.2 


do.... 


96,117 


110,851 


100 


Brendy and other compounded spirits: 










United 8Utes 


gallons.. 


8.968 


y.r<6 


6 


France 


do.... 


66,026 


105.946 


64.5 


Other European countries 


do.... 


35.027 


24, «6 


15.2 


Spain 

Ali countries ^ 


do.... 


7,617 


12,180 


7.8 


do.... 


126,188 


163.112 


100 


Whie in barrel or cask: 






United States 


do.... 


14,864 


6.964 


.40 


^Mdn 

France 


do.... 


8,274,012 


1,648,883 


96.60 


do.... 


«48,706 


87.789 


2.20 


Other European countries 


do.... 


18,995 


7,564 


.44 


All countries 


do.... 


8,868,827 


1,705,675 


100 


Wine hi half bottles: 










United States 


doian.. 


108 


1.284 


8.06 


toato 

France 


do.... 

do.... 


18,286 
858 


87,183 
1,153 


92.1 
2.86 


AU countries 


do.... 


14,586 


40,806 


100 


Wine, champagne, and cordials: 

United sStes 










liters.. 


i,9n 


1,128 


12.1 


France 


do.... 


4,699 


7.259 


78.4 


All countries 


do.... 


7,881 


9,258 


100 


Starch: 










United States 


pounds.. 


996,487 


16,990 


18 


UnitedKlngdmn 


do.... 


2,006,462 


56,806 


60 


All countries 


do.... 


3,789,482 


94.410 


100 


All other v^etables, except potatoes: 






238,262 
375,254 


26.7 


Spain 




40.5 


Other American countries 




292,213 


81.6 


AU countries - 




924,392 


100 


Woolen blankets: 








United States 






755 
5,942 
3,380 


5.5 


toain 




43 


United Kingdom 




24.5 


Fnmce...T: 




8,368 
13,807 

387 


24 


All countries 




100 


Woolen carpets: 

United States 


yards.. 


345 


3.2 


United Kingdom 


.do.... 


8,875 


6,264 


51.2 


France 


do.... 


6,484 


3,997 


82.7 


Germany 


do.... 


i;334 


1,069 


8.7 


Spain 

All countries 


do.... 


446 


401 


3.3 


do.... 


18, 101 


12,209 


100 


Woolen yams: 










United States 


pounds.. 


5 


7 


.12 


France 


do.... 


4,920 


2,833 


48.9 


Germany 


do.... 


8.148 


2,302 


39.8 


toain... 

United Kingdom 


do.... 


643 


572 


9.5 


do.... 


42 


43 


.76 


Other European countries 


do.... 


44 


38 


.65 


All countries 


do.... 


8,802 


5.795 


100 


FUuinels: 










United States 






6.543 


18.2 


G*nnany 




13.585 


87.9 


Spain.... 




9,145 


25.5 


All countries - - , - r , , , . , , - - - 




35,891 


100 


All other manufactured woolens: 








United States 






11.962 


1.7 


United Kingdom 




372.856 


53.9 


France 




280,952 
49,840 
22,681 

690,768 


88.4 


Spain 




7.2 


UfTmnny 




3.2 


All countries 




100 



1 Includes saffron and hence the great import value. * Includes champagne. 

Very respectfully, 

Tasker H. Bliss, 
Major ^ Collector of Cmtomsfor Cuba, 
The Adjutant-General, Department of Cuba. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



198 report of military governor of cuba. 

Statistics of Cuban Custobis Service, July 1 to December 31, 1900. 

Office of Collector of Customs for Cuba, 

Habana^ Cvba^ F^bnmry 7, 190L 
Sir: In compliance with the instructions of the military governor, 
dated December 22, 1900, I have the honor to transmit herewith the 
following tables relating to the statistics of the Cuban customs service 
from July 1 to December 31, 1900: 

1. List of collectors of customs. 

2. Personnel at all ports. 

3. ( Extra) comparative statement of personnel at all ports. 

4. Number of vessels entered and cleared, with r^um^ of the same. 

5. (£xtra) foreign entries and clearances by flags at all ports. 

6. Immigration at the port of Habana. 

7. Chinese immigration. 

8. Passengers, arrivals and departures, port of Habana. 

9. Passengers, arrivals and departures, all ports. 

10. Passenger statement by sex and by ports. 

11. (Extra) comparative statement of passenger arrivals and departures during 1899 

and 1900. 

12. ( Extra) total arrivals and departures of passengers at port of Habana during 1899 

and 1900. 

13. (Extra) immigration at port of Habana, by nationalities. 

14. Customs receipts at all ports. 

15. Customs collections by months, both imports and exports. 

16 Customs collections, both import and export, at port of Habana. 

17. (Extra) comparative statement of collections dunng 1899 and 1900 at all ports. 

18. (Extra) comparative statement of collections during 1899 and 1900 at port of 

Habana. 

19. Customs expenditures by ports and by months. 

20. Customs disbursements at all ports by classes and by months. 

21. Customs disbursements at port of Habana by classes and by months. 

22. Comparative statement of receipts and expenditures, with cost of collection, at all 

ports. 

23. Relative rank of all ports according to the collections. 

24. Importation of live stock at all ports. 

25. Importation of live stock at port of Habana. 

26. (Extra) importation of live stock at all ports by countries. 

27. Exportation of tobacco at all ports. 

28. (Extra) exportation of tol)acco to leading countries. 

29. Exportation of sugar, molasses, sirup, and confectionery at all ports. 

30. (Extra) exportation of sugar, etc., to leading countries. 

31. Total exportation by articles and by leading countries from all ports. 

32. (Extra) total exportation by articles and by leading countries from portof Habana. 

33. Total impoi-tations by articles and by leading countries from all |K>rts. 

34. (Extra) value of merchandise imported at port of Habana, by months, during 

year 1900. 

35. ( Extra) total imjwrtations by articles and by leading countries at port of Habana. 

36. (Extra) importations by sources of production from leading countries at all ports. 

Very respectfully, 

Tasker H. Bliss, 

Major ^ Collector of Cmtoinafor Oaba. 

The Adjutant-Oeneral, Department of Cuba. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



199 



No. 1. — CoUedon of customs at all peris of the idand of OjAa during the sit: months^ 

July 1 to December 31, 1900, 



Porta. 



HabuiA . 



Baracoa .. 
Baubano. 



O&ibarien 

Caideiuui 

Ctenfuegos 



GIbara 

Goaotanamo . 
Manianillo... 
Matanaas 



Title. 



Collector . 



Naeritas 

Sa^iia la Grande . . . 
Santa Cruz del Sur . 



Santiago.. 
Trinidad . 



Tunas de Zaza. 



Acting col- 
lector. 

Collector 

Acting dep- 
uty collector. 

do 

Collector 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Acting c o 1 - 
lector. 

Collector 

do 

Acting dep- 
uty collector. 

do 

Collector 

....do 



....do 

Acting dep- 
uty collector. 



Name. 



M«j.TaskerH.Blii8i 



Capt-W.H.Hay.... 

Ueut. J. W.Wright. 
Aguntin Aguero 



Appointed. 



Dec. 20,1898 



Oct. 10,1900 

Mar. 29.1900 
Jan. 10,1900 



P. B. Anderson 

Lieut M.B.Stokes 

MaJ. O. Le Roy Brown . 

Capt. James Baylies 

Capt. E. E. Benjamin . . . 

CaptE.A.Elli8..; 

Lieut. La Roy 8. Upton. 
Gapt.W.H.Hay 



Henry Page 

Capt Elias Chandler.. 

Lieut J. T. Crabbs 

M.E.E8trada 



JoeeRos 

Captr.G.Irwin 

Lieut. F. V. S. Chamber- 
lain. 
Lieut. Wm. B. Pol well . . 
Andres Ordnl 



June 
May 
Feb. 
July 
June 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Dec. 



80,1900 
19.1899 
14,1900 
14,1900 
7,1900 
19,1896 
29,1900 
19,1898 



Oct 8,1809 

Jan. 21,1899 

Apr. 27,1899 

Oct 19,1900 

Apr. 19,1900 

May 18,1900 



Relieved. 



Oct 10 to Nov. 13, 1900. 
absent on detached 
service under orders 
from the Secretajy 
of War. 

Nov. 17, 1900. 



July 14, 1900. 



Oct. 10 to Nov. 17, 1900, 
Ueut. J. T. Crabbs 
served as assistant to 
the collector. 



Dec. 17, 1900. 
Oct 19, 1900. 



Nov. 8, 1900. 



Oct 20,1900 
Mar. 29,1900 



» Chief of the customs service of the island; appointed collector of customs for Cuba on December 
20.1898. 
s Acting coUectorDec. 12, 1900, and collector Jan. 18,1901. 

No. 2.—StaUmerU of personnel at all ports in the island of Cuba on December SI, 1900, 





Nationality. 




1 

9 
5 
17 
28 
65 
15 
18 
17 
33 
21 
15 
3 


Ports. 


Nationality 






P«.rt-. 


1 


1 

S ; 

8 , 

5 
11 
19 
62 
10 
16 
16 
80 
18 
IS 

8 


QQ 


O 


1 

< 


d 

1 

o 

56 

7 

5 

389 

607 


! 

CO 


g 




Baracoa 

Batabano 


Santiago de Cuba 

Trinidad 


3 
1 




59 
9 

6 
476 






1 




Caibarien 

Cardenas 

(^enfnegos 


1 
1 
4 

1 I 

1 
2 
3 

; 2 

1 


5 
8 
9 
8 




Tunas deZa«a 

Habanai 


"86* 
M08 


"49' 

■77 


"'3* 


Total 


~ 


795 


(tibara 






ManxanUlo 

Httcanzas . 


1 
1 




» Habana custom-house . 
Cuban custom service. . . 
Revenue-cutter service . 


15 
29 
41 

1 


296 ' 42 1 3 

41 1 4 1.... 


356 
74 
46 


Naevitas 


Sagna.. 






Santa Cruz 










1 
















«Of this number, 11 are officers of the United States Army. 
* Unregistered; now oitixens of Cuba. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



200 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 3. — Statement of peraonnel at all ports in the isUmd of Cuba on December SI, 1900, <s$ 
compared with December Sly 1899. 





Amer 




NaUonality. 


Total 


Porte. 


leans. 


Cubans. 


Spaniards. 


All other. 




1899. 
1 


1900. 


1809. 


1900. 


1899. 


1900. 


1899. 


1900. 


1899. !im 


BftracoA 


1 


6 
3 
7 
14 
63 
7 
10 
16 
24 
18 
9 
3 
42 
7 
4 
297 


8 
5 
11 
19 
52 
10 
16 
15 
80 
18 
13 
8 
56 
7 
5 
380 






7 1 t 












s' I 


Caibarien 


2 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 
2 
2 


1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 


3 
10 
11 

3 


5 
8 
9 
3 






12 17 


C&rdcnM 






25 2S 


CientuegOB 






96 fi 


Guantanamo 






11 U 


Gibara 






11 U 


Mansanillo , 


1 
8 
2 
2 


1 
1 






18 n 


Matanmff . 






28 S 


Nuevitas 






17 fl 


Bag;ua la Grand© 




1 




14 U 


Santa Cm* '. 


8 1 


Santliwo ,.,,.,,,. ^ , , , , 


3 

1 

1 

39 


8 

1 

'**85' 


4 

1 

1 

58 








49 SI 


Trinidad 


1 






9 f 


Tunas de Zaza 






6 i 




49 


3 


8 


397 n 






Total 


58 


>108 


516 


607 


99 


«77 


4 


3 


676 7K 






Habana cnfftom-b^nHe 


12 

27 


16 
29 
41 


260 
37 


296 
41 
2 


58 
/ 


42 

4 
8 


3 


3 


8S3 3» 


Cuban customs service 


64 74 


Revenue-cutter service 






, n 










1 



1 Of thlB number, 11 are officera of the United States Army, 
s Unregistered Spaniards; now citizens of Cuba. 

No. 4. — Number of vessels, with gross tonnage, by portSy entered and cleared in the itiand q^ 
(Mba, for sioc months ending December Sly 1900, 





Ves- 
sels. 


Coastwise. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


Foreign. 


Months. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


Ves- 
seUi. 


Ves- 
selfl. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


Ves- 
sels. 


GrosBtOD- 
nsge. 


Baracoa: 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


81 
20 
13 
17 
17 
16 


13,701 
11,526 
10,018 
9,013 
9,272 
11,890 


82 
17 
14 
20 
13 
16 


18,726 
11,427 
10.025 
9,076 
9,108 
11,952 


9 
9 

8 
9 
12 

4 


9.782 
10,421 
8,917 
6,069 
8,559 
6,724 


11 

7 

8 
7 
13 
6 


10.» 

icsa 

5.01 
6,W 


Total 


163 


65,419 


162 


65,814 


51 


50,422 


52 


».« 




Batabano: 

July 


128 
125 
124 
131 
123 
120 


9,500 
9,721 
10,195 
10,463 
11,613 
9,767 


124 
121 
126 
126 
126 
126 


12,879 
10,286 
11,279 
10,582 
11.947 
11,786 


1 

1 


46 

75 






August 

September 

October 


1 


7S 










November ' 










December 


3 


193 


2 


7f 


Total 


751 


61.259 


748 


68,728 


5 


314 


3 


la 


Caibarien: 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 


37 
34 
22 
80 
39 
34 


5,899 
6,652 
5,866 
5,573 
6,816 
18,013 


38 
29 
83 
29 
35 
39 


5,848 
5,709 
6,899 
5,457 
5,289 
13,890 


6 
11 

6 
13 

I 


10,607 
17,769 
15,939 
14,463 
17,788 
12,088 


6 
11 

6 
13 

8 

6 


10, »7 
17.W> 
15, »» 
14.463 

17,671 


December 


12,068 






Total 


196 


48,816 


203 


43,092 


51 


88,554 


50 


88,« 




Cardenas: 

July 


92 
96 
81 
94 
75 
^ 74 


5,749 
7,815 
6,003 
5,943 
5,709 
6,286 


97 
100 
89 

84 
81 
71 


5,869 
7,902 
6,496 
5,007 
5,939 
6,260 


26 
16 
5 
10 
26 
10 


88,540 
16,212 
33,455 
10,302 
27, m 
13,184 


28 

15 

7 

7 

23 


41.846 


August 


16,241 
4,045 
8.flW 
28.915 
15. 6» 


September 


October 


November 

December 


Total 


u^ 


37,606 


522 


37,473 


93 


106,886 


Lii 


iia3» 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



201 



No. 4. — Number ofvessdSf with ffron tonnage, by ports, entered cmd deared, etc, — Cont'd. 





Ckwstwise. 


Foreign. 


Montlia. 


Ves- 
sels. 


Grose ton- 
nage. 


Ves- 
sels. 


Grosi ton- 
nage. 


Ves- 
sels. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


Ves- 
sels. 


Grosi ton- 
nage. 


CtenfneigtM: 

July 


85 
S8 
87 
88 
45 
47 


16,899 
12,851 
18,868 
11,601 
18,884 
14,929 


87 
86 
86 
86 
42 
48 


16,265 
12,804 
12,877 
11,806 
18,782 
14,991 


26 
19 
18 
21 
26 
28 


49,166 
40,501 
81,448 
88,870 
51,457 
48,257 


26 
22 
20 
19 
28 
24 


51,611 
41,118 


August 


September 


84,874 


October 


88,404 


Norember 


48,141 


December 


46,068 






Total 


285 


88,122 


285 


82.464 


188 


254,686 


184 


265,201 






GiuuDtanamo: 

July 


12 
16 
10 
15 
12 
14 


5,828 
6,888 
4,278 
6,947 
7.941 
6,688 


11 
16 
11 
15 
11 
14 


5,462 
6,888 
4,649 
6,947 
5,582 
6.688 


6 
6 
5 
6 
8 
5 


7,778 
8,406 
11,919 
11,267 
12,479 
9,374 


6 
5 
5 
6 
9 
7 


7,497 


August 


8,863 


September 


11.919 


October 


11,267 


Norember 


14,023 


December 


10,223 






Total 


79 


87,910 


78 


86.551 


85 


61,217 


38 


68,792 






Qlbaia: 

July 


S4 
69 
68 
78 
62 
65 


14,680 
12,659 

9,962 
12,050 

9.919 
12,655 


88 
78 
68 
71 
68 
66 


14,581 
12,862 
10,026 
11,791 
9,786 
12,861 


20 
17 
5 
6 
9 
9 


25,858 
22,919 
10,485 
10,975 
14,897 
18,694 


19 

17 
4 
6 

10 
8 


25,063 


AugvtMt 


'22,919 




9,765 


October 


9,038 
16,712 




12,715 






Total 


421 


71,87{> 


424 


71,907 


66 


98,278 


64 


96,232 


Manzanlllo: 

July 


24 
25 
20 
24 
27 
83 


10,990 
11.801 
11,166 
10,144 
11.825 
12,828 


23 
24 
28 
22 
26 
80 


10,960 
11,804 
11,808 
10,076 
11,799 
12,806 


10 
12 

8 
11 

7 
18 


10,979 
12,160 
11,066 
11,454 
12,934 
28,609 


7 
12 

9 
11 

7 
14 


10.202 


August 


12,240 
9,890 


October 


12,702 


November 


12,966 


December 


21.921 






Total.'. 


158 


68,694 


147 


68,209 


66 


82,122 


60 


79,921 






Matazuas: 

July 


62 
64 
55 
54 
42 
41 


4,844 
4,704 
6,409 
6,563 
1,928 
4,254 


50 
68 
61 
56 
40 
86 


6,886 
6,829 
7,636 
2,270 
1,715 
1,448 


27 
22 
16 
18 
17 
17 


66,800 
49.652 
88,954 
47,068 
42,988 
45,276 


25 
21 
20 
19 
15 
18 


60,567 


August 


42,887 


8eptemb<^ 


48.655 


October 


48.531 


Norember 


89.584 


f>^M^!inY>er 


46,817 






Total 


818 


27,887 


315 


26,784 


117 


290.106 


118 


286,541 






Kaeiitas: 

July 


78 
84 
86 
88 
82 
89 


25,280 
. 20,899 
21,125 
22,777 
21,655 
27,231 


86 
98 
90 
83 
96 
94 


27,675 
20,963 
21,165 
22,751 
21,706 
26,560 


11 
11 
9 
12 
10 
19 


14.006 
16.149 
14,667 
21,106 
15,686 
21,941 


11 
12 
8 
11 
11 
14 


14,919 


August 


16,606 


September 


14,162 


October 


21,155 


Norember 


14,064 


December 


20,518 






Total 


502 


188,967 


549 


140,780 


72 


102,406 


67 


101.419 


Ssgua: 

July 


85 
74 
09 
87 
72 
98 


12,699 
18,581 
12,560 
14,691 
15,908 
28,678 


81 
80 
69 
86 
75 
92 


12.688 
18,608 
12,721 
14,717 
15,929 
28,600 


13 
14 
10 
6 
5 
8 


20,825 
17,105 
11,367 
9,686 
6,152 
11,847 


15 
12 
U 
5 
5 
7 


23.416 


August 


16.283 


September 


10,657 


October 


10,687 


November 


5.596 


i^ewmber. , . . . . 


10,869 






Total 


480 


97,976 


488 


96,258 


66 


75,982 


56 


77,858 


Santa Crus: 
JnlT 


15 
18 
19 
21 
28 
22 


10,427 
11,531 
11,401 
10,287 
11,980 
12,890 


16 
19 
19 
21 
25 
22 


10,529 
11,543 
11,874 
10,381 
12,006 
12,846 




• 


1 
4 

3 
2 

1 
1 


847 


August 


6 
2 
2 
. 1 
2 


6,295 
998 

951 

811 

1,068 


^^ 


September 


1,491 


October 

November 


1,018 
601 


December 


811 


Total 


118 


68,016 


122 


68,128 


13 


9,618 


12 


8,902 



CUBA 1900— VOL I. FT 3 14 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



202 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 4. — Number of vessels^ vrith grou tonnage, by portSf entered and dearedf rfc— Confd. 



Months. 



Ooastwlse. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Gross ton- 
nage. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Gross ton- 
nage. 



Foreign. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Gross ton- 
nage. 



Ves- 
sels. 



Grew ton- 
Dsge. 



Santiago: 

July 

August 

September 
October... 
November 
December. 

Total.... 

Trinidad: 

July 

August 

September 
October... 
November 
December. 

Total.... 

Tunas de Zaza: 

July 

August 

September 
October... 
November 
December. 

Total.... 

Habana: 

July 

August 

September 
October . . . 
November 
December. 

Total.-.. 



199 



280 



184 



147 
145 
140 
189 
147 
160 



878 



15,196 
15.423 
12,495 
14,902 
12,567 
17,758 



14,678 
16,306 
13,784 
15,880 
13,865 
13,299 



78,602 
77,091 
59,130 
63,198 
72,865 
99,331 



88,336 



200 



86,812 



248 



445,217 



241 



16,648 
12,472 
12,460 
11,638 
12,029 
15,219 



16,618 
12,408 
12,469 
U,583 
12,094 
15,209 



80,470 



281 



80,471 



18,479 
13,459 
10,757 
10,905 
12,972 
13,207 



13,874 
13,587 
10,689 
11,035 
12,913 
13,184 



174 
1,920 



1,748 
879 



4,221 



551 
3,253 
4,566 

418 
2,906 
2,144 



74,779 



184 



74,682 



10 



13,830 



25,516 
24,219 
25,149 
21,812 
28,169 
80,871 



140 
160 
138 
146 
136 
161 



21,076 
25,049 
21,656 
21,788 
22,465 
82,868 



118 
95 
103 
105 
U4 
132 



224.193 
194,811 
201,915 
225,048 
255,676 
252,677 



119 
99 
95 
UO 
106 
123 



7B,CK 
72, 0» 

65,lta 
7S,!* 

9^5» 



438, 7W 



174 



1,7« 



S,M2 



».« 
4.13 
430 
S.W 
1,» 



is,ei 



226,470 
l»,2!f6 
1«.4>0 

280, Ntf 

248, i* 



150,786 



866 



144,362 



667 



1,354,820 



652 



1,887.M« 



jLtssmit. 





Coastwise. 


Foreign. 


Total. 


Ports. 


En- 
tered. 


Cleared. 


En- 
tered. 


Cleared. 


Entered. 


Cleared. 




Vessels. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


VesKls. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


Vessels. 


Gross ton- 
nage. 


Vessels. 


Gross ton- 
nage 


Baracoa 


163 
751 
196 
512 
285 
79 
421 
153 
318 
502 
480 
118 
199 
280 
184 
887 


65,419 
61,259 
43,816 
87,505 
88,122 
37,910 
71,875 
68,694 
27,837 

138,967 
97,976 
68,016 
88,886 
80,470 
74,779 

150,786 


162 
748 
208 
522 
235 
78 
424 
147 
315 
549 
488 
122 
200 
281 
184 
866 


65,814 
68,728 
48,092 
87,478 
82,464 
35.551 
71,907 
68,209 
26,784 

140,780 
98,258 
68,128 
86,812 
80,471 
74,682 

144,352 


51 
5 
51 
93 

138 
85 
66 
66 

117 
72 
56 
13 

243 
4 
10 

667 


50,422 

814 

88,654 

108,886 

254,686 

61,267 

98,278 

82,122 

290.108 

102,406 

75,932 

9.618 

445.217 

4.221 

13,830 

1,854,320 


62 
3 
50 
94 

134 
38 
64 
60 

118 
67 
65 
12 

341 
8 
9 

652 


50,886 
151 


Batabano 


Caibarien 


88,4S9 
110 d3 


Cardenas 


CienfuegoH 


965,301 


Oibara 


96,2B 

79,921 

286, Ml 

101. 41» 

77, SK 

8,902 

489:780 

3,SC 

13,321 

1,837,510 


Mausanillo 


Matanzas 


Nuevitas 


Sagua la Grande 

Santa Cruz 


Santiago 


Trinidad 


Tunas de Zaza 




Total 


5,419 


1,196,217 


5,469 


1,198,005 


1,682 


8,040,121 


1.662 


8. 018,666 





Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



203 



Na 5.—Statement of foreign erUriei and dearanceSf by fiags, at aU port$ in the island of 
Cuba, during tht year 1900. 



ENTRIES. 



MODtlW. 



American. 



English. 



French. 



Qerman. 



Ital- 
ian. 



Norwe- 
gian. 



%"• 



OtheiB. 



Total. 



January.. 
Febmary. 
March.... 

Z\z:: 

Jtme 

July 

August.... 
September. 
October ... 
Norember. 
December. 

Total.. 



88 



35 



284 
208 
256 
244 
233 
280 
288 
217 
185 
191 
208 
226 



756 



476 



414 



207 



24 



802 



508 28 



414 



46 



254 



131 



72 
72 
79 
88 
88 
78 
85 
64 
45 
64 
76 
88 



804 



CLEARANCES. 



Montba. 



Ameri- 



Eng- 
lish. 



French. 



Ger- 



Ital- jNorwe- 
ian. gian. 



'C- 



Others. 



Total. 



January... 
Vebraary . 
JIareh .... 

r:::;:: 

June 

JuJy 

August 

September 
October... 
Norember 
December. 

Total.. 



748 



442 



406 



199 



24 



295 



282 
204 
246 
261 
287 
228 
236 
219 
180 
201 
206 
216 



306 
280 
384 
832 
821 
308 
828 
281 
280 
256 
284 
809 



264 
829 
381 
8J2 
309 
821 
288 
227 
254 
278 
293 



509 



12 



40 



181 



2,667 



887 3,563 



3,494 



No. e,—St€Uemenl of immigrants arrived at the port of Habana, Cuba, during the six 
months ending December Sl^ 1900. 





Origin. 


Total. 


Months. 


Origin. 




Months. 


Spain. 


Mexico. 


Other 
coun- 
tries. 


Spain. 


Mexico. 


Other 
coun- 
tries. 


Total. 


July 


874 

960 

879 

3,784 


21 
81 
14 
26 


190 
118 
176 
290 


1,085 
1,109 
1,069 
4,060 


November 

December 

Total 


2,720 
3,768 


14 
119 


825 
819 


3,059 
4,206 


August 


September 

October 


12,986 


226 


1,418 


14,578 







Digitized byVjOOQlC^ 



204 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 



No. 7.^SUUemenl of Chmese Ihal arrived at the port of Habana, Cuba, during themx 
months ending December SI, 1900, 





Origin. 


Total. 


Months. 


Origin. 




Months. 


China 

(via 

United 

States). 


Mexioo. 


Colom- 
bia. 


China 

(via 

United 

States). 


Mexico. 


Colom- 
bia. 


Tool 


July 


66 
10 
16 
18 


i 

2 

1 

28 


2* 


60 
12 
17 

48 


November 

December 

Total 


46 
8 


IS 
15 


7* 


9i 


Au^^ust 


ao 


September 

October 




154 


68 


9 


2tt 







No. 8. — Passenger statement, port of Habana, Cuba, from July 1 to December SI, 1900. 

AKBIVAUR. 





United States. 


Spain. 


Mexioo. 


Other 
ooontiies. 


Total arrivals. 




Months. 




a 
if 


i 

2 


1 


^ 


j 


1 


^ 


j 




! 


j 


d 
1 


1 


1 





July 


488 
486 
609 

637 

728 

1,009 


87 
155 
162 
281 
218 
480 


21 
29 
26 
91 
52 
72 


677 

710 

689 

8,886 

2,204 

8,811 


182 
i75 
119 
447 
285 
416 


75 
161 

61 
214 
182 
238 


202 
160 
211 
205 
2C4 
880 


40 
48 
46 
60 
84 
102 


20 
18 
9 
2 
16 
17 


28 
16 
81 
86 
86 
41 


7 
6 
6 
17 
27 
18 


*6 

4 
7 
9 


1,296 
1,872 
1.440 
4,264 
8,172 
4,750 


825 
879 
883 
796 
664 
966 


209 

100 
S14 
290 

S27 


It^S 


August 

September.. 

October 

November . . 
December. . . 


1,99 
1,83 

6,06 


Total.. 


8,857 


1,833 


291 


10,877 


1,624 


981 


1,871 


824 


77 


188 


81 


26 


16,298 


8.862 1,825 


ao.fto 



DEPABTURBS. 





United States. 


Spain. 


Mexioo. 


Other 
countries. 


Total departures. 




Months. 


d 


J 


•o 

s 

o 


^ 
S 


1 


d 
1 


1 


1 


j 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


1 




July 


761 
560 
558 
408 
862 
1.063 


154 
79 
78 
63 
49 

309 


22 
5 
14 
14 
16 
199 


781 
698 
228 
457 
169 
195 


66 
41 
46 
45 
20 
35 


87 
60 
17 
56 
9 
29 


206 
201 
188 
182 
165 
167 


64 
35 
48 
28 
41 
62 


17 
6 
26 
10 
15 
45 


84 
24 
22 
87 
28 
12 


18 
16 
18 

6 
11 

8 


8 

"6 
2 


1,721 
1.368 

946 
1,064 

724 
1,487 


287 
171 
185 
186 
121 
899 


79 

70 
66 
86 
41 
271 


los; 


August 

September . . 

October 

November .. 
December... 


m 

2,1» 


Total.. 


3,692 


732 


269 


2,873 


263 


208 


1.068 


268 


117 


167 


61 


10 


7,280 


1.299 


6M 


9.188 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



205 



No. 9,— Passenger statement — arrivals and departures at ail parts in the island of Cubfi 
during the six months ending December SI, 1900, 



Fonts. 



July. 



August. 



Septem- 



October. 



Novem- 
ber. 



Decem- 
ber. 



Total. 



BanuxMi 

Cdbarien 

Oudenss 

(^enfoegoe.... 
OoaoUuisiiio. . 

GIban 

nfUo... 



Nneritas 

8igQa Is Grande. 

StntaCmz 

Santiago 



Total. 



16 



84 



45 
10 



2 

2 

120 

36 

1 



11 

7 

140 

18 



806 



82 



1,7362,087 



241 
1,960 



67 
6 
8 
6 
48 
22 
82 
188 



1 18 

1 12 

46 51 

24 66 

,...1 7 



6 
246 



87 



16 



70 



1 
1 

12 
11 



25 
5 
106 
191 
46 
91 
65 



151 



247 
1,878 



85 183 
1,1875,873 



67 
1,805 



340 206 
3,995 



1,661 
8866,04812,10920,980 



844 



114 



99 



264 

14 

871 

305^ 128 



1 

2 

604 

9,188 



2,1782,3652,8911,8662,4491,8465,7091,4424,5721,8776,5802,26428,88410,660 

I 



No. 10. — Passenger statement, island of Cuba, July 1 to December SI, 1900, 





July. 


August 




Arriyals. 


Departures. 


Arrivals. 


Departures. 


Porta. 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


Baiaooa 


2 


.... 


1 


8 


1 






1 


8 
44 

9 






3 
45 
10 










Oudenaa 






1 

1 


'.'!! 










Cienfuegoa 

^<¥U)tanAino 


20 

4 
16 


11 


2 


88 

4 
25 


25 


5 


4 


84 


16 


6 


18 


89 


Gibata 


9 


.... 


2 

2 

77 

29 

1 






2 

2 

120 

86 

1 


10 
7 
52 
11 
2 


4 




14 

7 

98 
11 

2 


6 

5 

100 

17 


8 

2 

83 

1 


8 
"7" 


11 


ManzaiilUo.. 


82* 
6 


'ii* 

1 


7 


Mataniaa 

Noerltas... 


18 
84 

1 


2 
9 


"2 


20 

45 

1 


45 


1 


140 

18 


Sagua la Grande. 








Santa Gnu.. 














1 

81 
1,868 


1 

6 

171 


's' 

70 


2 


Santiago 

Habami 


223 
1,295 


68 
325 


15 
116 


806 
1,736 


53 
1,721 


21 
287 


8 
79 


82 
2,087 


178 
1,872 


54 
879 


14 

209 


241 
1,960 


40 
1,609 


"' 




TOtol 


1,613 


424 


186 


2,173 


1,911 


851 


103 


2,866 


1,683 


484 


224 


2,891 


1,542 


223 


101 


1,866 




September. 


October. 




Arrivals. 


Departures. 


Arrivals. 


Departures. 


Ports. 


1 


1 


1 


1 




^ 
^ 


2 






1 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


Baracoa 


12 






16 










2 

4 

2 

25 






2 
5 
2 
50 


4 






4 


Oailitrien.... 










i ' 








Cardenas 








57 

6 

8 

6 

48 

22 

82 

189 

247 

1,873 










"io' 


"lb 










Cienfoegos 


6 
4 

5 
19 
12 
18 
50 
162 
1,440 


1 


1 




2 


2 






2 


Gnaotanamo 


383 


"5* 
7 

"ii* 
100 








Glbaia!^;"': 


1 
1 
37 
19 


.... 




1 

1 

46 

24 


... .. 

7 
13 
31 

4 

94 
4,264 


7 
5 

38 
20 
2 
63 
795 


4 

"lb 

1 

26 
314 


18 
12 
51 
66 
7 
188 
5,878 


8 
8 
18 
19 






8 


MantaniUo 










8 


Jf»«»nMs 

Noerttas 

^MualaOrande 


7 
4 


2 
1 


18 

4 


8 
1 


84 
24 


S£r.:::;::;: 


65 
946 


14 
186 


6 
56 


85 
1,187 


46 
1,084 


11 
186 


10 
85 


67 
1,805 


TMal 


1,728 


596 


128 


2,449 


1,070 


211 


66 


1,846 


4,453 


941 


875 


5,769 


1,174 


109 


99 


1,442 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



206 



REPORT OF MILITARY QOVBRNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 10. — Passenger stcUemerUf island of Ctiba, July 1 to December SI, /9a>— Continoei 





November. 


December. 




Arrivals. 


Departures. 


Arrivals. 


Departaia. 


Porta. 


!9 


1 


i 

•0 


H 


g 


i 


i 


1 


g 


1 


1 


s 


i 


1 


J5 


-| 


BaracoA 


1 

2 

41 

82 

9 






1 
2 
66 
84 
20 


1 


2 


1 


4 
















Cardenas 


















1 


Cienfuegofi 

Guantanamo .... 


13 

1 
8 


1 
1 

3 


4 






6 


80 


6 


2 


87 


14 


2 


....; Ifi 


Gibara .' 


240 






246 


8 
2 
16 
62 






8 
8 
26 
70 


10 






1 


Manzaoillo 


1 
7 
18 


'2' 
5 






1 


Matansaa 

NnevttiM* 


16 

38 

1 

206 

3,172 


20 

28 

'95' 
664 


6 
15 

1 
39 
269 


42 

81 

2 

340 

3,996 


14 
10 




... 


19 
10 


S 
1 


.... 


12 
11 


Sagua la Grande. 

Santiago 

Habona 








149 
724 


86 
121 


22 

41 


206 

886 


279 
4,760 


87 
966 


28 
827 


844 
6,048 


94 
1.437 


18 
999 


7 U4 
273 3.1A 






Total 


3,618 


?29 


326 


4,672 


1,142 


168 


67 


1,377 


6,187 


1,029 


864 


6,630 


1,566 


418'280^W 

1 



No. 11. — Statement of total arrivals into and departures from the idand of Cuba dttmj 
the year 1900, as compared with the year 1899, 





Arrivals. 


of 

1 
1 

I 


i 
1 

1 


Departures. 


f- 


I 


Porta. 


1 

1 



P 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 




8 
S 


i 


1 


5 


Baracoa 


40 








7 
2 
9 


47 
2 
44 

117 
644 

61 
606 

93 
349 
949 
162 
2 
3,810 


88 

22 

99 

49 

1,664 

116 

189 

271 

179 

876 

11 

18 

4,604 

23 

46,086 


29 








40 


m 


m 


Batabano 
















Caibarien 


8 
117 
288 
40 
95 
63 

IM 


27 






6 
112 
196 










6 

112 

217 

9 

2» 

74 

686 

561 

148 

2 

1.887 




Cardenas 
















Clenfuegos 

GiiiintftnAniO 


141 


1 


***8 


214 
18 

408 
86 




1 




21 

9 

276 

2 

8 

12 


4 


Gibara 


3 
6 
2 




14 
72 
680 
642 
148 








IK 


Manzanillo 












m 


MatantaH 








8 




m 


NnevitiM* 






44 


9ft 


Sagua la Grande. 


8 

1 

671 












1 


Santa Crux. 






1 
1,682 








2 
706 


6 


Santiago 


1,449 




8 


626 


6 




1 


1S« 


Trinidad 




Habana 


12,770 


21,689 


3,717 


206 


6i9 


39.666 


14,874 


7,216 


8,014 


211 


446 


25,759 


S7,flO 


Total 


16,266 


22,647 


8,718 


221 


8,034 


46,786 


68,726 


17,298 


7,220 


8,018 


212 


1,614 


29,282 


sa.sii 



No. 12. — Total arrivals and departures at the port of Habana^ Cuba, during the yean 

1899 and 1900, 





January. 


February. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


Origin. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


^'.E 


United States: 

1899 

1900 

Spain: 

1899 

1900 

Otber countries: 

1899 

1900 


8,618 
1,740 

369 
1,166 

1,074 
560 


1,428 
1,772 

769 
267 

281 
382 


8.486 
1,877 

446 
1.296 

1,023 
299 


2,215 
2,128 

677 
372 

236 
884 


2.634 
1,616 

1,106 
1,928 

609 
861 


6.248 
2,723 

1,081 
653 

256 
284 


1,676 
747 

842 
1,873 

689 
616 


2,492 
1,711 

1,757 
726 

869 
864 


1,829 
688 

746 
1.866 

716 
448 


2,124 
844 

2,084 
i;224 

248 
8S7 


951 
637 

m 

1.184 

464 

291 


996 
1.003 

1.749 
l.lfiO 

IS 
8S 


Total: 

1899 

1900 


6,061 
3,466 


2,423 
2,411 


4.955 
3.472 


3,027 
2,834 


4.849 
8,899 


6.530 
8.660 


2,706 
2; 636 


6,118 
2,790 


2.790 
2,496 


4,461 
2.406 


2.018 
2.062 


IS 



Digitized by VjVJ^^V LC 



BEPOBT OP MILITARY OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



207 



No. 12.— Tbto/ arrivaU and departures ai the port of Habana, Cuba, etc. — Continued. 





July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


Origin. 


Arri- 
vala. 


De- 

tQies. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
turee. 


Arri- 
yals. 


De- 
turei. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
tures. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


Arri- 
vals. 


De- 
par- 
tures. 


United States: 

UM 

1900 

3p«in: 

1899 

1900 

Other countries: 

IflOO 

1900 


1.191 
696 

553 

708 
906 


929 

927 

1,048 
884 

295 
326 


1,918 
670 

992 
1,046 

642 
244 


859 
684 

1.392 
694 

422 
281 


968 
697 

1,855 
860 

694 
807 


946 
650 

1,045 
291 

274 
246 


1,162 
1,009 

2,248 
4,047 

485 
817 


705 
485 

880 
566 

320 
262 


1,698 
906 

2,857 
2,671 

829 
826 


1,895 
426 

275 
198 

269 
262 


1,666 
1,511 

4,684 
8,965 

258 
667 


1,761 
1,571 

804 
260 

266 
279 


WW 


2,447 
1.796 


2,267 
2,067 


8,577 
1,960 


2,673 
1,609 


2,902 
1,878 


2,265 
1,187 


3,845 
5,373 


1,855 
1,905 


4,879 
8,995 


1,929 
886 


6,558 
6,048 


2.828 
2.109 



KECAPITULATION. 



Origin. 


Arrivals. 


Depar- 
tures. 


United States: 

um 


22,801 
12,770 

16,260 
21,689 

7,521 
4.641 


21,090 
14,874 

12,856 
7,215 

8,784 
3,670 


1900 


Spain: 

1899 


1900 


Other countries: 

189^ • 


1900 






Total: 

1899 


46,062 
39,000 


87,280 


1900 


25,760 





No. lZ.—Slalement of immigraiion ai the port of Habana, Cuba, fov six monlhe ending 

December SI, 1900, 





July. 


August 


September. 


Nationality. 


1 


1 


2 
S 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


l. 


Arabs 










10 


1 


4 


15 










Awtrians 


1 
60 






1 
60 


2 
17 

1 

15 
19 

5 
59 

8 
18 

1 






2 


Chinese .:::.: 






12 






12 






17 


Dutch 














1 


I£n«li8h 


22 

9 

9 
80' 


1 
2 
1 
2 


...... 


28 
14 
10 
82 


5 
9 
6 
14 


2 
6 
1 


...... 


7 
16 

7 
14 


3 
5 

1 
1 


...... 


18 


Preoch 


24 


Gennans 


6 


IiAllana 


62 


Koreans . . . 






8 


Mexicans '. ! 


17 
1 

1 


4 




21 
1 

1 
1 


16 


IS 


2 


81 


1 




14 


Norwegians 


1 


FiHpimw.. ..:::.:: : 






2 




4 


6 








I\>rtoRlcans 


1 




4 

1 

8 

701 

6* 

9 






4 


Rusians 














1 


South Americans.... 


18 

604 


2 
174 


'""96* 


16 

874 


12 

749 

2 

13 


5 
160 

1 
5 


2 

61 

...... 


19 

960 

8 

19 






8 


Spaniaids ..r!v. :: 


128 
1 
4 
2 


65 

...... 

2 


879 


Santo Dominicans... 


1 


Turks 


21 


8 


8 


82 


15 


Other races 


18 






















Total 


788 


195 


102 


1,065 


860 


184 


75 


1,109 


864 


141 


64 


1,069 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



208 BEPO&f OJ* ItlLlTABT GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

No. 13. — Statement of immigration at the port of Habana^ Cuba, etc — Continued. 





October. 


November. 


December. 


Nationality. 




^ 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 

'J 


1 


Arabs 


4 
2 
48 
80 
80 
17 
82 






4 

2 
48 
88 
49 
21 
89 










6 
1 

80 
23 
87 
22 
68 


2 
8 




f) 








8 

58 

28 

18 

17 

70 

5 

11 

1 

2 

2 

1 

8 

2,266 

"'44' 

1 


1 

'***6' 
14 
9 
2 

...... 

1 


1 
1 

...... 

...... 

1 


5 

69 

28 

S2 

28 

72 

6 

14 

2 

2 

2 

1 

18 

2,720 

5 

09 

1 


4 


Chinese 






Id 


English 


4 
18 
4 
8 


4 
1 

•••4* 


8 
28 

4 
22 


3 


S4 


French 


60 


Q^nnans . , 


21 


Italians 


tt 


Japanese 




Mexicans 


22 
2 
2 

1 


4 
8 

1 


...... 

6 


26 
6 
9 
1 


76 


80 


18 


m 


Norwegians 




Porto Ricans ... 


1 
2 
1 

17 
2,978 






1 


Portuguese 










} 


RuMiians . . 














1 


South Americans 

Spaniards 


8 
8,129 

1 
37 


2 
409 


"m 


10 
8,784 

1 
62 


8 

267 

2 

17 


2 

187 

8 

8 


2 
419 


2 
376 


t,7B 


Ran to Dominicans . . . 




Syrians 


17 


8 


24 

1 
5 


10 


6 


» 


'rtirks 


1 


Other races 














1 




1 
















. .... 






Total 


8,865 


465 


220 


4,060 


2,580 


828 


206 


8,060 


8,282 


604 


400 


4ax 







RBCAPITULATION. 



Nationality. 




^ 


1 


1 


NatlonaUty. 


1 


e 

1 


1 


1 


Arabs 


20 

9 

225 

n\ 

122 
76 

268 
5 
3 

155 
5 


8 
4 




27 

14 

226 

1 

148 

195 

99 

804 

6 

3 

225 

10 


Filipinos 


8 

9 

5 

8 

66 

10,422 

8 

106 

42 

14 


...... 


4 

6 


7 


Austriana 


Porto Ricans 

Portuguese 


n 


Chinese 


s 


Dutch 


Russians. . 






t 


English 


28 
68 
20 
80 




South Americans... 

Spaniards 

Santo Dominicans.. 
Syrians 


14 
1,542 

4 
44 
17 

8 


6 
971 
8 
21 
9 
2 


m 


French 


12,« 


Germans 


'it 


Italians 


170 


Japanese 


turks 


ft 


Koreans 


Other races 


19 


Mexicans 


54 
4 


16 


Grand total... 




Norwegians 


11,679 


1,883 


1,066 


11578 




' 



No. 14. — Customs receipts at aU ports in the island of Cuba, July 1 to December SI, 1900. 





July. 


August 


September. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


Total 


Baracoa 


92,108.68 

116.89 

12,284.39 

25,666.56 

89,158.89 

18.973.53 

19.118.90 

12,162.74 

49.990.17 

19.850.18 

21,363.94 

1.94 

73,977.99 

675.90 

81.18 

909,769.96 


91,436.61 
289.46 
21,887.98 
28,832.10 
97,970.91 

9,164.38 
20,663.17 
17,443.20 
40,280.09 
10,768.99 
17.022.94 

1,610.06 
84.078.92 

1.740.06 

143.70 

991.926.06 


91,414.11 

141.76 

11.676.28 

11,088.74 

90,846.36 

9,674.51 

26,173.77 

18.284.12 

28,726.79 

7,590.45 

14,569.91 

102.44 

76,968.28 

53.80 

25.71 

853,179.99 


91.588.11 

108.99 

20.491.68 

19.290.39 

91.665.44 

8.354.84 

27,720.97 

16,606.77 

35,707.79 

14,182.80 

18,217.69 

93.92 

69.382.44 

3,238.79 

70.65 

1.076.242.99 


91.5$. 59 

99.06 

22,271.09 

26.916.70 

110,800.40 

17.588.06 

28,712.28 

15.099.91 

31,309.84 

15,687.78 

9,021.88 

85.72 

75,719.82 

1.322.77 

8.015.45 

978.762.16 


91.622.89 

868.93 

16,904.82 

80,874.26 

129,894.22 

11,594.75 

81»150.56 

19,254.24 

84,940.92 

27,804.78 

15,281.90 

57.06 

108,785.42 

8a83 

210.56 

1.114,296.78 


99.678.M 


Butabano 

Caibarien 

Cardenas 

Cienfuegos 

Guantanamo 

Gibara 


1075.07 
104.015.84 
141.668.75 
609,7».72 
70,2«.07 
15168l.6!> 


Manzanillo 

Matanzas 

Nuevitas 

Sagua 

Santa Cms 

Santiago 

Trinidad 

Tunas 

Habana 


^9S;Stg 

5.928,176.91 


Total 


1.260.191.24 


1.844,708.68 


1,145,015.46 


1.401,869.18 


1.386.822.10 


1.536.526.86 


8, 015. m. 45 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEFOBT OF 1CILITAB7 OOVBBKOB OF CUBA. 



209 



No. 15. — CSiMoms cdUctionSf by months and head%ng$f island of CubOj July 1 to December 

SI, 1900. 



Months. 


Import du- 


Export du- 


Tonnage 
dues. 


Harbor im- 

proTement 

tax. 


Capitation 
tax. 


Fines, oonfls- 
caticms, etc. 


July 


$1,129,668.01 
1,191,068.62 
999,933.32 
1,200,115.07 
1,112,501.34 
1,297,675.99 


$57,176.28 
96,283.29 
100,400.87 
186,340.66 
156,926.16 
172,802.39 


$80,668.18 
24.471.56 
19,629.95 
28,020.90 
27,128.72 
24,412.78 


$21,199.42 
21.840.85 
14,975.68 
18,098.61 
21,446.08 
24,442.84 


$1,844.00 
979.00 
1,838.00 
8,064.00 
4,048.00 
4.066.00 


$2,179.06 


Aognst 


610. 74 


September 

October 


682.97 
1,469.69 
8,714.72 
1,261.01 


November 

December 


Total 


6.980,892.85 


721,878.67 


149,412.04 


121,49«56 


14,80100 


9,868.19 


Months. 


Consular 
fees. 


Storage and 
cartage 
charges. 


Cattle Inspec- 
tion fees. 


Overtime 
work. 


MiscelUne- 
ous. 


Total. 


July 


$172.00 
166.00 
95.00 
141.00 
144.60 
129.60 


$2,128.33 
1,916.75 
1,879.66 
4,035.77 
2,161.60 
2,211.27 


$2,436.65 
3,049.91 
3,972.79 
8,092.81 
8,464.29 
2,676.46 


$1,922.17 
1,606.79 
1,876.10 
1,904.55 
2.587.01 
8,102.89 


$1,197.99 

3,046.12 

879.28 

10,610.88 

789.58 

4,247.28 


$1,250,191.24 
1,344,706.68 
1,145,016.46 
1,401,659.16 
1,386,822.10 
1,586,626.66 


August 


September 

October 


MoTember 

December 


Total 


646.00 


18,888.47 


18,712.11 


13,168.01 


20,728.08 


8,015,128.46 



No. 16. — Customs coQedions, port of Habanay Cubat July 1 to December SI, 1900, 



Months. 


Import du- 
ties. 


Export du- 


Tonnage 
dues. 


Harbor im- 
provement 
tax. 


Cattle inspec- 
tion fees. 


Storage and 
cartage 
charges. 


July 


$614,073.25 
667,669.41 
731,706.19 
905,664.69 
785,458.29 
914,638.13 


$68,826.21 
66,664.94 
91,167.25 
121,323.86 
146,064.25 
154,041.65 


$19,081.73 
13,676.37 
12,663.15 
14,595.74 
16,094.19 
15,913.66 


$14,200.61 
13,002.43 
9,367.06 
11,654.19 
13,744.07 
14,710.79 


$1,749.85 
2,164.65 
8,835.60 
2,243.65 
2,532.66 
1,943.10 


$2,005.09 
1,639.65 


August 


September 

October 


1,259.61 
8,905.57 


NoTember 

December 


2, 101. 76 
2,140.37 


Total 


6,019,404.96 


666,606.06 


94,367.00 


76,699.14 


13,969.41 


13,062.46 


Months. 


CapitaUon 
tax. 


Pines, confis- 
cations, etc. 


Overtime 
work. 


Consular 
fees. 


Miscellane- 
ous. 


Total. 


July 


$1,213.00 
664.00 
1,263.00 
2,962.00 
3,821.00 
3,631.00 


$2,103.72 

620.16 

566.64 

1,309.27 

2.908.94 

1,269.41 


$076.00 
867.83 
1,054.10 
1,127.00 
1,402.00 
1,731.82 


$100.60 
101.00 
62.60 
66.00 
70.60 
90.00 


$988.60 
2,653.20 

464.60 
9,979.02 

609.60 
3,996.23 


$909,769.96 


August 


991,926.06 


September 

October 


653,179.99 
1,075,242.99 


Norember 

December 


976,762.16 
1,114,295.76 


Total 


13,964.00 


8,666.16 


7,160.25 


512.50 


18,670.95 


5,928,176.94 



No. 16 A.— RIGSUMA. 



Porta. 


Bovine 
cattie. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Ports. 


Bovine 
catUe. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Rancoa 


72 

109 

2.806 

5,494 

19,090 

198 

8,642 

4,166 

1,620 


66 


126 

109 

2,615 

5,626 

20,643 

217 

3,589 

4,167 

1,621 


Nuevitas 


11,306 

6,355 

762 

12,453 


37 
67 

""2.826' 


11,345 


Batabano. 


f^Agrift . . . . T 


6,422 


Ctibarien 


9 
84 
1,658 
19 
47 
12 

1 


Santa Cms 

Santiago 


762 


Oudenas.. 


14,778 


Cienfuegos 


Trinidad 




Oiaaitaiiamo!;!!!!! 
Gibwa 


Tunas de Zasa .... 
Habana 


1,252 
66,413 


126 
16,131 


1,377 
102,544 


Msnatnlllo 


Total 


155,629 


20,416 


176,045 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



210 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 17. — Ccnnparalive gUitement of coUecHons at aU parts in the idand of Cuba during the 

years 1899 and 1900. 



Porto. 


Importation duties. 


Exportation duties. 


Tonnage dues. 


1809. 


1900. 


1899. 


1900. 


1899. 


1900. 


Baracoa 


$82,825.68 

804.97 

168,634.46 

268,135.88 

1,095,676.27 

105,888.46 

154,851.89 

149,462.29 

899,478.98 

205,192.11 

>88,681.28 

263.83 

912,938.20 

21,740.06 

5,065.61 

9,867,930.87 


$24,968.47 

1,000.12 

194,006.48 

281,028.86 

1,100,638.46 

115,848.42 

199,648.16 

144,840.62 

432.161.38 

169.874.81 

188,702.27 

2,760.60 

865,997.36 

20.129.44 

2,480.58 

10,648,463.74 


K87 


$80.76 


$1,400.46 
1,288.46 
8,781.46 
7,946.86 
87,979.07 
10.306.49 
7.314.48 


$1,33174 


Batabano 


lltfilV 


Caibarlen 


4.69 


168.60 


1,828.S1 


Cardf^naji 


8,011.8 


CienfuegtM 


1,891.78 


16,660.16 


22.21161 


Giiantanamo 


8,414.9 


Gibara 


1.884.77 

4,970.66 

.07 

1.42 

14.87 


21,148.60 

21,209.96 

38.67 

18.13 

886.65 


fi^^M 


Manzanillo 


4,726.74 1 4.110.0! 


Mfttannui . . , . . 


16.256.98 

9,147.76 

7,601.86 

1,000.66 

39.226.11 

999.84 

999.88 

260.967.09 


11.42La 


Nuevltafl 


6.682.8 


8a«wi la Grande.... 
Santa Cm* 


6;7W.tt 
1,317.18 


^Tftlft^O . 


8,070.02 


9,767.66 


44,87L17 


Trinidad 


721» 


Tunas deZaza 


***762,'869.'i9* 


886.19 
997.161.26 


9I179 
2Z7.211« 






Total 


13,512,004.83 


14,291,648.62 


764,201.64 


1,066,896.28 


400,828.06 1 856,729.58 






TncreaBO 




779,638.79 




801,094.69 


L. 


Decrease 








45,(».« 














Porto. 


Harbor improvement tax. 


Capitation tax. 


Fines, Beimres, etc 


1899. 


i960. 


1899. 


1900. 


1899. 


1901 


Baraooa 


1611.12 

84.54 

3,843.76 

7,184.88 

17,629.19 

2.486.48 

8.075.80 

8.914.33 

9.345.74 

3,046.19 

5,141.70 

72.66 

16,828.23 

409.18 

811.53 

129,646.71 


$040.17 

60.42 

4,748.71 

10,017.96 

21.942.46 

2,740.90 

6,636.36 

8,514.39 

11.586.78 

8,541.82 

7,748.20 

245.88 

18,600.66 

491.68 

165.19 

166,886.90 


$42.00 
22.00 
96.00 
14.00 

402.00 
96.00 
28.00 

178.00 
10.00 
88.00 

171.10 

27.00 

8,028.00 

21.00 

3.00 

28,709.00 


$7.00 
2.00 
1.00 




$160 


Batabano 


$56.66 
228.21 
870.48 
187.91 
607.06 
261.60 

60.16 
106.02 

26.00 
689.08 



4,224.30 


67.«) 


Caibarlen 


S2.00 


Cardenas 


m.» 


CienfuegOB 


469.00 
66.00 

406.00 
18.00 


17.60 


Quantanamo 

Gibara 


2118! 
77.44 


Mancanillo 


n.fl 


Matanzas 


111106 


NiieyitAS 


60.00 

6.00 

4.00 

2,692.00 


11.30 


Sagua la Grande 

Santa Cruz 




51 It 


Santiago 


1,07160 


Trinidad 




Tunas deZaza 

Habana 


■ *28,*4a6.'66* 


190.06 
3.600.66 


""*i2."«lB 






Totol 


208,480,89 


258,761.36 


27,878.10 


27,082.00 


10.998.99 


HOUff 






Increase 




56,280.47 








S,(H1C7 


Decrease 






846.10 


















Porto. 


Miscellaneous. 


Total collections. 


Decrease in 
1900. 


IncieaseiD 


1899. 


1900. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901 


Baracoa 


$200.87 

214. 19 

293.11 

13.858.63 

8,387.80 

176.75 

2.093.69 

1,049.34 

765.29 

857.76 

988.69 

836.08 

2,163.11 

65.06 

152.00 

68,942.89 


$879.07 

716.99 

740.99 

2,217.01 

7,546.26 

778.93 

1,489.39 

1,942.78 

1.951.58 

1,701.91 

1,067.86 

166.05 

9,006.58 

826.28 

268.50 

98.165.93 


$86,084.49 

2,867.16 

161.826.57 

298.010.18 

1,157,008.02 

119.495.21 

169.006.08 

164.860.41 

425,962.63 

218,308.28 

158.237.98 

1.699.0^ 

981,466.97 

28,234.64 

6,711.57 

11.097.164.41 


$27,707.81 

8,188.92 

201,600.03 

801,463.78 

1,168.478.64 

127.613.87 

287.716,81 

175.746.65 

467,813.82 

180,868.69 

204,617.53 

4.647.89 

951.907.82 

22,170.70 

4.244.26 

12.068.399.06 


$7,876.68 




Batabano 


$82L77 


Caibarlen 




89.67146 


Cardenas 




8.45156 


Cienf uegos 




11.47158 


Guantanamo 




8;048.66 


Gibara 




68,7117! 


Manzanillo 




11,886.14 


Matansas 


*"87,'944.'64* 

"*29,'659.i6 
1,063.94 
2,467.82 


81,351 69 


Nnevitas 





Bagua la Grande 

Santa Cruz 


51.879.56 
2, 841 SI 


Santiago 




Trinidad 




Habana 


"gTi.aiiw 








Totol 


95,684.11 


128,900.56 


15.014.926.62 


16,136.904.01 


78.411.68 


1, 200,389.(8 




Increase 




28,866.45 




1.121,977.89 






Decrease 

























Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



211 



No. IB.—Qm^fMraHve OalemerU of coUecHons at the port of Habana, Cuba, for the years 

1899 and 1900, 



January. 



1889. 



1900. 



February. 



1889. 



1900. 



March. 



1899. 



1900. 



Import duties 

Export duties 

Fines, seizures, etc 

TooDsse dues: 

Foreign 

Coastwise 

HtrbwimproTement taxes 

Coosolar fees , 

Veterinary inspection fees. 
Wharfage: 

Foreign 

Cosstwise 

Stonge and cartage charges 
CoaUnn-house certificate 

fees 

Anctian sales 

Overtime work 

Interpretation fees 

Badges 

FasKoger taxes 



$654,426.75 

65,805.26 

1.28 

20,299.26 
137.79 



1,814.32 



11,088,811.58 

77,797.82 

592.99 

14,649.10 

126 81 

15,053.99 

98.00 

2,812.25 

426.00 

867.20 

8,748.57 

68.00 



8805,114.64 
72,818.12 



23,562.50 
155.26 



8849,944.60 

75,878.40 

461.62 

18,048.86 

245.71 

18,116.97 

104.50 

2,129.60 

526.00 
1,10L00 
8,144.20 

64.00 



1776,791.88 
85,280.51 



25,626.14 

858.55 

5,455.60 



1,906.45 



140.78 



$895,421.82 

58,763.45 

464.06 

24,268.19 
261.18 

16,633.64 

120.50 

2,248.35 

734.00 
1,118.10 
2,125.85 

100.00 



715.12 

571.00 

2.60 

1,688.00 



5,258.00 



460.00 

2.50 

1,666.00 



1,152.00 
569.00 



1,416.00 2,294.00 



Total. 



741,984.66 1,152,518.48 706,906.52 



967,682.11 



896,925.81 



1,006,260.16 



April. 



1399. 



1900. 



May. 



1889. 



1900. 



June. 



1899. 



1900. 



Import duties 

Export duties 

Fines, sekures, etc 

Tonnage dues: 

Foreign 

Coastwise 

Harbor improrement taxes 

CooBOlar fees , 

Veterinary inqiection fees, 
Wharfage: 

Fraeign 

Coastwise 

Storage and cartage charges 
Custom-house ceiUflcate 

fees 

Overtime work , 

Interpretation fees 

Badges 

Iwenger taxes 



$752,927.18 
64,817.01 



22,671.87 

222.44 

18,847.55 



2,626.86 



524.84 



1,955.48 



1,180.00 



$818,406.64 

41,789.52 

291.70 

22,241.56 

221.75 

14,805.86 

91.00 

1,919.90 

447.50 
1,068.30 
1,460.18 

84.00 
849.00 
601.00 

12.60 
1,195.00 



$880,066.28 
47,858,83 



25,928.81 

225.52 

14,185.25 



2,978.88 

890.50 

281.70 

1,154.84 



1,200.00 



2,989.00 



$917,015.81 

89,312.61 

750.87 

21,648.24 

207.84 

16,285.88 

81.00 

2,887.45 

488.00 

870.50 

8,840.60 

44.00 
999.00 
518.60 
106.00 
1,811.00 



$918, 002. 96 $1, 
60,085.21 
100.00 

28,20L54 
247.69 

12,784.49 

100.00 

2,962.14 

740.00 

760.40 

1,875.70 



835.00 



019,966.88 

47,161.89 

859.41 

21,782.90 

100.50 

14,091.42 

82.50 

2,205.15 

464.00 

966.60 

2,865.42 

72.00 
1,649.18 



1,704.00 



17.40 
1,413.00 



Total 860,221.68 



900,857.41 



927,228.06 



1,006,262.30 



1,012,899.13 



1,U3,187.70 



July. 



August. 



1899. 



1900. 



1899. 



1900. 



September. 



1900. 



Import duties 

Export duties 

Fmes, seizures, etc . 
Ton nage dues: 

Foreign... 

Coastwise. 



Harbor improvement taxes 
Oooaular fees 



Veterinary iniqpection fees. 
Wharfage: 

Foreign.. 

Coastwise 



^onge and cartage charges 
(^tttom-bouse certificate 



$809,588.85 

88,900.21 

557.88 

19.650.15 
182.74 

18,316.06 

115.50 

2,687.75 

919.00 
1,069.83 
1,086.85 



Aoction sales 

Overtime work 

Interpretation fees. 
Badges.. 



$814,078.25 
53,826.21 
2,106.72 

17,489.48 
183.75 

14,200.61 

100.50 

1,749.85 

555.00 

908.50 

2,005.09 

44.00 



$989,215,91 

49,181.67 

122.98 

17,452.84 

127.88 

13,919.85 

98.50 

4,090.96 

488.50 

900.80 

1,159.86 



480.00 
521.50 



1,169.00 



978.00 

942.00 

2.50 

1,218.00 



Total. 



890,U8.84 



909.769.96 



470.00 

609.00 

832.50 

1,202.00 



$867,669.41 

88,564.94 

520.18 

12,276.87 
185.10 

13,002.43 

101.00 

2,164.85 

139.00 
1,827.40 
1,639.85 

20.00 
2,171.60 
867.83 
455.00 
6.60 
864.00 



$857,547.00 

68,569.54 

1,269.14 

17,090.78 
110.53 

12,846.76 

189.00 

3,779.64 

291.50 
1,131.46 
1,034.88 

8.00 



$731,706.19 

91,187.25 

566.64 

11,741.89 
91.36 

9,387.05 
62.50 

3,885.80 

103.50 

916.40 

1,259.81 

28.00 



750.00 

523.50 

7.50 

1,047.00 



1,054.10 

454.00 

2.50 

1,283.00 



1,029,308.74 



991,926.06 960,646.28 868,179.99 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



212 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEENOB OF CUBA. 



No. 18. — ComparatwestaiemmtofcoUeciums(Ui^ Culxi,etc — Contmned. 



Import duties 

Export dntiee 

Fines, seicores, etc 

Tonnage dues: 

Foreign 

Coastwise 

Harbor improTement taxes 

Consular fees .* 

Veterinary inspection fees. 
Wharfage: 

Foreign 

Coastwise 

Storage and cartage charges 
Custom-house certificate 

fees , 

Auction sales 

Overtime work 

Interpretation fees 

Badges 

Passenger taxes 



Total. 



October. 



1899. 



•916.768.16 

61.789.62 

928.92 

15,729.68 

170.71 

14,790.26 

79.00 

8,775.10 

814.00 
1,169.86 
1,8a. 88 

24.00 
2,068.89 
835.00 
606.00 
123.26 
2,625.00 



1,023.545.17 



1900. 



•906,864.69 

121,328.86 

1.800.27 

18,168.76 

90.68 

U, 864. 19 

88.00 

2,248.66 

279.60 
1.066.80 
8,906.67 

60.00 

9,465.62 

1,127.00 

441.00 

12.50 
2,962.00 



1,075,242.99 



November. 



1899. 



•888,296.67 

65.478.87 

878.61 

U, 877. 64 

107.87 

13,007.87 

67.60 

3.467.66 

110.00 
1,067.48 
1.876.21 

84.00 



986.00 

500.60 

7.60 

2.503.00 



939.262.67 



1900. 



•786.458.29 

148,064.26 

2,906.94 

16,914.66 
46.34 

18,744.0? 

70.60 

2,582.66 

268.00 

870.80 

2,101.76 

44.00 



1,402.00 
626.60 



8,82L00 



978,762.16 



December. 



1890. 



19001 



•969,174.64 •914,6n.]S 
87,374.81 164.04L» 
26L46) 1,»«.41 



14.566.80 
118.01 

16.«2.11 

lOL 
8,626. 

S88.fi 
1,13S.C 
10.409.8 

44.0 



1,168.61 
528.60^ 

2.60' 

2,606.00; 8,8SL0I 



lS,8n.M 
g?.M 

14,71fl.7l 

9e.«l 

1.9a.]# 

18LO 
l,75i» 
2,140.97 

40.09 
S,48B.a 
l.TSLS 

40&0I 



1,106, ISO. 40]1, 114, 296k 78 



Total collection. 



1899. 



1900. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



1900. 



1900. 



Import duties 

Export duties 

Fines, seizures, etc 

Tonnage dues: 

Foreign 

Coastwise 

Harbor inmrovement taxes 

Consular fees 

Veterinary inspection fees. 
Wharfage: 

Foreign 

Coastwise 

Storage and cartage charges 
Custom-house certificate 

fees 

Auction sales 

Overtime work 

Interpretation fees 

Badges 

Passenger taxes 



•9,867,980.87 

762,869.19 

3,609.66 

287,676.40 

2,164.49 

129,646.71 

700.50 

81,846.19 

8,478.40 
7,687.80 
12,422.01 

110.00 
12,623.34 
8,124.09 
2,648.50 
478.26 
23,709.00 



•10,648,468.74 

997,161.26 

12,068.88 

206.069.14 
1.748.36 

166,886.90 

1.066.00 

27.617.11 

4.^99.90 
12,999.00 
21,040.14 

668.00 
23,846.96 
18,368.20 
6,871.50 

165.00 
28,426.00 



•680,682.87 

244.802.06 

8,479.17 



87,24L19 
884.50 



•29,607.* 

416.13 



4.229.08 



921.60 
5,861.20 
8,618.18 

666.00 
U. 222. 64, 
6,239.11 
2,728.00 



2S100 



Total. 



11,097,164.41 



12,068,899.06 



1,006,068.37 
34,848.78 



34,84173 



Net increase . 



971,244.64 



No. 19. — Outtoms expenditures al all ports in the island of Cuba, July 1 to December Sly 

1900. 



Ports. 


July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


November. 




TotaL 


Baracoa 




•766.26 

887.65 

1,150.17 

1,838.87 

6,157.97 

1,034.54 

1,251.03 

1,079.73 

2,413.64 

1,862.67 

247.60 

143.00 

5,583.42 

527.66 

242.60 

11,633.98 


•86.44 

326.88 

1,100.07 

1,861.82 

5,032.14 

1,104.64 

1,269.19 

1,120.88 

2,278.12 

1,559.74 

2,154.60 

222.00 

6,282.40 

618.56 

242.60 

91,291.00 


•422.50 

856.67 

1,360.98 

1,909.78 

6,042.24 

1.173.88 

1,847.38 

1,517.93 

2,406.83 

1,768.06 

1,188.28 

143.65 

5,116.51 

566.16 

474.00 

49,715.75 


•771.86 

333.26 

1,174.42 

2,016.92 

6,992.89 

1.006.46 

1,484.49 

1,091.76 

2.294.60 

1,428.81 

1.157.44 

148.00 

6,127.71 

704.80 

256.66 

44,688.82 


•530.95 

820.79 

1.068.29 

2.406.66 

6.466.40 

1.279.22 

1.482.98 

1,239.84 

8,164.40 

2,127.68 

1,270.06 

148.00 

6,188.91 

1,260.68 

252.60 

68,oiaoo 


•2,586.00 
1^961. SO 
6.989.15 

u,m.n 

84,606.&i 
6, SOL 78 

7.997.88 
7.021.70 
14,862.21 


Batabano 


•276.25 
1.065.22 
1,813.70 
5,916.41 

991.54 
1,162.86 

971.57 
2,309.62 
1,739.13 
1,810.11 

143.00 
5,009.78 

545.16 

217.00 
44,603.13 


Caibarien 

Cardenas 


Cicnfuegos 

Guantanamo 

Oibara 

Manzanillo 

Matanzas 


Nuevitas 


10,480.56 
7^828. M 
987.66 
82.908.7$ 
4,222.97 
l,68t45 
309, 78a 18 


Sagua la Grande.. 

Santa Cruz 

Santiago 


Trinidad 

Tunas deZaza 


ToUl 


68,186.48 1 86,170.88 


116,497.58 


75,609.99 


69.510.87 1 96,170.85 


40.046.65 



Digitized by ^ 



jQOglt 



REPORT OF MILITART GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 218 

No. 20.^Cugtom8 disbursements, island of Cuba, July 1 to December SI, 1900. 



Months. 


Refonds. 


Salaries. 


Bents, 
sappUes, 


Repairs 
and per- 
manent 
improre- 
ments. 


GatUe 
inspec- 
tionlfees. 


Orertime 
work. 


Miscel- 
laneoos. 


Total. 


July 


11,280.76 
4,711.80 
1,804.31 
2,600.93 
2,673.16 
1,797.87 


865,876.19 'tS-AiA 39 


•8,844.57 
3,433.44 

12.575.87 
1,818.26 
2,953.62 

17,400.17 


•61.19 
215.86 

29.90 
208.80 
116.68 

25.26 


•280.45 
560.85 
588.01 
428.26 
580.81 
701.76 


•8.00 
406.10 
862.U 

3,722.63 
316.86 

1,786.02 


•68,186.48 
36.170.88 

U6,497.58 
75,509.99 
69,510.37 
96,170.35 


Aogost 


22,178.50 
96,508.45 
60 708.08 


4,677.88 
5,183.91 
6,038.08 
5,251.34 
10,137.79 


September 

October 


Norember 

December 


67,668.47 
63,821.48 


IWal 


14,868.82 


385,751.17 


88,629.22 


47,026.98 


652.14 


3,025.14 1 6,508.28 


461,046.65 



No. 2l.—CugUjms disbursements, port of HaJbana, Cuba, from July 1 to December SI, 1900, 



Months. 


Refunds. 


Salaries. 


Bents, sup- 
plies, and 

contingent 
expenses. 


Repairsand 
permanent 
improve- 
ments. 


Stationery 

and 
printing. 


Miscella- 
neous. 


Total. 


July 




•86,184.48 
8,121.64 
76,480.88 
40,629.09 
87,888.51 
42,929.90 


'•i,'4i6.'48* 
1,666.61 
1,825.00 
1,402.76 
6,866.87 


•8,506.66 
2,672.48 

11,273.87 
1,186.82 
2,219.14 

16,323.98 






•44,698.13 
11,533.98 
91,294.00 
49,715.75 
44,683.32 
68,010.00 


Al«118t 


•8,001.75 

767.68 

1,246.06 

1,898.00 

649.58 


•1,062.20 

748.66 

1,119.51 

1,355.60 

50.76 


•869.48 
367.01 

8,709.27 
279.31 

1,688.92 


September 

October 


NoTemben 

December 


Total 


7,568.02 


286,729.45 


12,677.57 


42,084.44 


4,386.71 


6,806.99 


809,780.18 



No. 22. — OmapoToixoe statement of receipts and expenditures, with rate of cost of collection 
(U <Ul ports tn the island of Cuba, durvng the six rnonths, July 1 to r 



» December SI, 1900. 



Ports. 



Expenditures. 



Be- 
funds. 



Repairs 
and 

perma- 
nent 
im- 

proTe- 

ments. 



Salaries. 



Rents, 

supplies, 

and 

miscel- 
laneous. 



Total. 



Ty>tal 
collections. 



Rate of 
cost of 
collec- 
tion for 
salaries. 



Per 
cent 



Rate of 
cost, cdl- 
lection for 
all dis- 
burse- 
ments ex- 
cept re- 
funds and 
perma- 
nent im- 
proye- 
ments. 



Per 
cent. 



Cienfuegos... 

Santlsgo 

BUtsnas .... 

GIbars 

Cardenas 

Gtibarien... 
ManssniUo .. 
Sftgua la 

Grinde 

Nneritss..... 
Gntntanamo. 
BuBcoa. 

Trinidad 

TonssdeZasa 



r7,568.02'942,064. 

2,882.33 * " 

1,606.81 

1,224.77 

66.00 

14.32 

206.58 



Total. 




44 •286, 729. 
88 27,261.21 
28,581.66 
12,168.07 
6,640.46 
9,648.21 
5,460.96 
5,550.00 

5,502.98 
8,965.61 
6,848.65 
2,080.00 
8,094.96 
1,879.00 
810.00 
1,509.96 



45 923, 



!, 408.27 
2,520.18 
6,018.26 
1,287.67 
1,277.41 
2,176.71 
1,281.61 
1,146.60 



•809, 780. 18 95, 
84,606.66 
82,208.73 
14,862.21 
7,997.88 
11,846.24 
6,969.15 
7,021.70 



678.02 

1,503.80 

1,134.88 

415.11 

871.77 

805.45 

62.55 

821.54 



7,828.18 
10,480.58 
6,691.78 
2,586.00 
4,222.97 
1,684.45 
987.55 
1,951.60 



928,176.94 
609,790.72 
488,812.82 
215,966.60 
168,539.66 
141,668.75 
104,015.84 
98,840.98 

95,478.26 
96,884.88 
70,296.07 
9,678.94 
7,111.66 
8,647.15 
1,901.13 
•1,075.07 



3.99 
4.47 
4.87 
6.63 
4.82 
6.81 
5.24 
5.62 

5.76 
9.40 
7.60 
20.97 
48.62 



8 
11 
10 
12 
15 
18 
14 
16148.88 



42.61 



14,868.82 



47,025.9H 865,751.17 



48,899.73 



461,045.65 



8,015,128.45 



4.44 



4.89 

4.88 

6.12 

6.23 

6.16 

8.35 

6.472 

6.77 

6.473 
10.98 

9.22 
26.26 
48.74 
47.49 
46.37 
178.74 



4.99 



^Habsna cus- 
tom-boose. 
Cuban cns- 
^tom service 
Berenue-cut- 
ter service 



7,566.02 



6,296.07 178,788.96 

1,606.801 47,089.21 

84,181.571 10,856.28 



18,831.76 
2,470.40 
7,606.11 



206,969.81 
61,166.41 
52,648.96 



\ 



>, 928, 176. 94 



Digiti 



8.018 
.791 
.188 



3.242 
.836 
.812 



zed by Google 



214 



REPORT or MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 23. — Customs receipts and expenditureSf with balances, shouHng relative rank of jwrto, 

year of 1900. 



Bank. 



Porti. 



Receipts. 



EzpenditareB. 



Habana 

Cienfuegos 

Santia^ 

Matanzas 

Cardenas 

Qibara 

SaRua la Grande 

Calbarien 

Nuevitas 

Mansanillo 

Guantanamo 

Baracoa 

Trinidad 

Santa Gniz 

TunasdeZaza... 
Batabano 

Total 



$12,068,899.05 

1.168,478.54 

951,907.82 

457.818.82 

801,468.78 

237,716.81 

204,617.58 

201.500.03 

180,868.69 

175,745.55 

127,548.87 

27,707.81 

22,170.70 

4,547.89 

4,244.25 

8,188.92 



16,186,904.01 



1625,998.10 

88,872.46 

61.64L4S 

50,006.12 

28.792.99 

18,422.19 

14.753.49 

14,932.07 

20.573.58 

14,146.81 

14,551.20 

5,070.88 

11,276.02 

2,286.89 

8,355.95 

3,U0.54 



961,824.22 



111,412, 106.95 

l,079,(iOL(]S 

8B0,268l» 

898,217.30 

277.670.74 

219.2M.62 

l»,86i(H 

186,567.91 

1M,7».11 

16U5K.74 

112,992.17 

22,€87.fl 

10,n6.68 

2,SiadO 

7138 



15,166,679.79 



No. 24. — Importation of live stock into the island of Cuba from July 1 to December Sly 1900. 





July. 


August 


September. 


Ports. 


Bovine 
catUe. 


Otber 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
catUe. 


Other 
animals. 


TottL 


Baracoa 


17 

828 

588 

2.«6 


11 


28 

328 

591 

2,928 

80 








25 


43 


n 


Calbarien 


815 
1,890 
3,345 




815 
1,420 
8,521 




Cardenas 


3 

521 

9 


80 
176 


44S 

2,879 




443 


Cienfuegos 


37 


2,916 


G uantananio 




Gibara , 


882 

112 

197 

2,84f 

1,828 

762 

2,164 

9,825 


20 


902 

112 

197 

2,845 

1,828 

762 

2,644 

13,296 


568 
847 
441 

""i,'467* 


16 

4 


M 


MAnxATiilln 








m 


Matanzas 


886 
1,623 
2,127 




886 
1,641 
2,127 




«ii 


Nuevitas 


18 


4 


8 
28 


8 


Sagua la Grande 

Santa Cruz 


1.496 








Santiago 


2,352 
9.963 


348 
2,650 


2,700 
12,618 


480 
8,471 


2,162 
18.396 


316 
3.834 


2.478 




n,23 






Total 


20,256 


3,561 


28,817 


23,661 


4,181 


27,842 


27,227 


4.286 


».51S 








October. 


] 


November. 


December. 


Ports. 


Bovine 
cattie. 


Otber 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other 
animals. 


Total. 


Bovine 
cattle. 


Other i.j^^ 
animals. 1 *"*^ 


Baracoa 














80 
109 


2 


32 


Batabano 














109 


Calbarien 


1,870 

932 

4,605 


8 


1,878 

992 

4,807 


296 
1,900 
8,906 

162 
1,186 


1 
1 
547 
4 
11 


299 
1,901 
4,455 

156 
1,196 






Cardenas 


241 

1,947 

25 

907 
1,678 

' 2,187' 

734 

8,798 

612 

12,667 




241 


Cienfuegos 


202 


69 
6 


2,016 


Guantanamo 


a 


Gibara 








907 


Manzanillo 


1,618 


8 


1,626 




1,678 


Matanzas 


146 
2,885 
199 
499 
640 
16,958 




146 
2,885 

199 
1,074 

700 
17,030 


1 

7 

39 

450 

65 

2,078 


1 


Nuevitas . . ....... 


2,322 




2,822 




2,144 


Sagua la Grande 






m 


Santiago 


1,488 


147 


1,680 


576 

60 

1,077 


*.« 


Tunas de 2<aza 


677 


Habana 


19,610 


3,021 


22,631 


14,745 






Total 


82,840, 


8,386 


85,726 


27,265 


2,176 


29,541 


24.580 


2,726 


27,06 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



215 



l!fo.2b.'—Ii9^>oriaiimofKve8tock<apoHofHabanc^ Cuba^fimr^Jidy 1 to December SI ^ 1900. 



MonthB. 


Bolls. 


Ck>W8. 


Calves. 


Steers. 


Horses. 


Moles. 


Don- 
keys. 


Sheep. 


Swine. 


Ooats. 


Others. 


July 




1.196 
1.468 
2.560 
2.628 
2,476 
2,196 


381 
1,625 
2,049 
2,074 
1,611 
1,091 


8,496 
6,762 
18,871 
14,364 
10,836 
9.868 


694 
1,290 
1,645 
660 
496 
457 


225 
898 
487 
198 

no 

216 


1 
2 
18 
14 


25 
91 
2 
82 


1.805 
1,688 
1,783 
2,031 
469 
1,385 






Anmt 


86 

416 

644 

1.080 

28 


2 


5 


Smember 


4 


October 




2 


NoTember 




2 


December 




9 




12 










Total 


2,1«8 


12,417 


8,681 


68,117 


5,081 


1,028 


80 


209 


9.161 


2 


25 




Bovine catUe. 


Total other 
animals. 


Total live 


MonthB. 


States. 


Prom other 
ooontries. 


Total. 


stock im- 
ported. 


July 


5,862 
8.762 
5,812 
4,402 
1,960 
8,006 


4,111 
6.063 
12,688 
16,206 
14.008 
9,661 


9.968 
9.826 
18,396 
19,610 
15.953 
12,667 


2.660 
8.471 
8.884 
8.021 
1,077 
2,078 


12,618 
13.296 
22.229 
22,631 


Aognst 


September 


October 




17.080 
14.745 


December » 






Total 


TA.ItU 


in.i»o 


M.41S 


16,181 


lfleL544 





























Na 2fi. — ImportaHon of live stock, by countrieSy at all ports of the island of Cuba during 
the six months July 1 to December SI, 1900, 





1 


1 


t 


1 


s 


1 


1 


1 


OQ 


1 


1 


Total. 




Country. 


Bovine 
cattie. 


Other 
ani- 
mals. 


Grand 
total. 


United SUtes.... 
Mexico 


^947 
4.788 
1.025 


18.760 
8.006 

3.502 


7,674 

6.724 

609 

925 

813 


23,084 

35,848 

22,965 

6,849 

2,571 

4,941 

628 

277 

642 

89 

4 


8,085 
8,044 


1,496 
525 


1 
30 


219 


9,621 
63 




24 
8 


47,405 

54.363 

28,071 

11,484 

6,706 

5,112 

2,124 

617 

642 

91 

11 

1 


14,446 
3,670 

'**'94 

1,616 

18 

516 

111 

1 

4 

85 

4 

2 


61,860 
58,083 


Venezuela 


28,071 


Cdombia 


^■t^V^ 


10 

927 

16 

1 
1 
1 


i2 

675 

3 

\ 






66 




6 
9 


11,578 


Porto Rico 




6 


7 999 


HoDdunu 


171 

1.601 

17 


^ 






5,130 


Haiti 






1 
16 


234 
5^ 


•"25 


20 


.... 


2,640 


J»"»fti^^ 


272 


51 


728 


GostaRica 






643 


Bsnto Domingo.. 
ORymi^ri Islandfl 




1 
7 
1 


1 


3 




.... 








95 






28 




6 
3 


46 


Sptln 








5 


CuisrieB 
















2 


2 


England.. . 


" 2 





















2 


2 


























Tbtal 


12,84729.777 


15,797 


97,206 


7,851 


2,620 


47 


617 


9,803 


22 


56 


156,629 


20,416 


176,045 



No. 27.— Statement of exportation of tobacco from all ports in the island of Cuba during 
the six months JtUy 1 to December SI, 1900. 



Ports. 


Leaf. 


Cigars. 


Duty. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Banooa 


Pmmdt. 
692 


1268 


$17 


Number. 


1 


Batabanot 




1 


ctihsrien:::;::::::::::::;:;:; 

Caidenas 


6,362 


1.988 


(54 










Ctenfueroe 


466,008 
2,089,066 


183,638 
169.060 


13,331 
20,823 






gSiii 








^nsntansmo 








Muutnillo .]!]^mi!^^!I^II!^ 


2,067,673 
1,337 


882,178 
345 


20,564 
38 


2,000 


$75 


$8 


juiaiuBS 

Noevitia 


10.000 


388 


13 


isr^™^^ 


10,986 


2.768 


sis 








I^juj^deciii::::::::::::: 


928,398 


140,156 


9,157 


53,125 


1,130 


72 


S»MsdeZa» 

HshMia 


17,097 
17,898.286 


8.560 
7,901,564 


495 
498.051 


**iii'622,'238' 


' 6*667,' 646' 


"iw.'aoo 


Gnmd total 


22,964.614 


8,785,518 


657,948 


116,687,858 


6.669,289 


167,888 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



216 



BEPOBT OF MLIITABY GOVBBNOR OP CUBA. 



No. 27. — SUUement of exportation of tobacco from cUl ports in the idand of Cuba during 
the nx months July 1 to December Sly iPa>— Continued. 



Porte. 


Cigarettes. 


All other. 


TotaL 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value, 


Duty. 




Padcaget. 






Pmmd9, 






8268 


&7 


BftUtbADO 
















Caibarien 














1.988 


IM 


Cardf^iiM 
















CienfaeKOS 














188.688 
109,060 


iin 


GibaraT. 














m;ia 


GiiATitaniirno 































882,258 
858 
888 

2.786 


20lII7 


Matansan 


440 


818 










tt 


Nuevltaa 










IS 


fifuniR 1a Grande 














tu 


8Anta CroE ,-,,.,,,. 
















flantiaffo de Cnba 














141,288 


9,29 


Trinidad 
















TunaA do Zaasa 














8.560 
14,788.885 


tt 


Habana 


5,086,724 


155,680 


$4,529 


78,168 188,605 


81,299 


fisfi^m 






Total 


5,066,164 


165,543 


4,529 


78,168 


88,605 


1,299 


15,648,905 i ™.1B 






■ 



No. 28. — Exportation of tobacco to leading countries from the island of Cuba during tk 
six months July 1 to December SI, 1900, 



Countries. 



Leaf. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Per 
cent. 



Duty. 



Cigars. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Per 



Dntj. 



United States... 

Spain , 

France 

Germany 

United Kingdom 

Other American 
countries 

Other European 
countries , 

All other coun- 
tries 

General total 



Pounds. 

11,778,787 

633 

7,019 

10,085,664 

26,598 

376,560 

706,015 

88.453 



$5,400,861 

816 

2,560 

2,978,268 

7.827 

166,048 

216,019 

13,680 



61.47 



.08 

88.90 

.09 

1.89 

2.46 

.16 



$292,228 

18 

198 

223,129 

617 

10,676 

20,016 

1,061 



Number. 

20,814.611 
5,017,400 
2,897,875 

24,048,866 

61,058,619 

6,828,476 
8.166,910 
4,266,102 



$1,281,812 

819.090 

157,049 

1,865,688 

2,767,097 

862,772 

180,639 

235,092 



19.20, $27,43 
4.78 6,774 



2.86 
20.48 
41.60 



5.44 
2.71 



22,964,614 



8,785,518 



100 



657,948 116.587,858 



6,669,289 



100 



8,W 

4,» 



8.58 5.196 



IS7.S 



Cigarettes. 



Countries. 



Quantity. Value. ^^J\ Duty. 



United States.. 

Spain 

Irance 

Germany 

United Kingdom. 

Other American 
countries 

Other European 
countries 

All other coun- 
tries 



Package*. 
289,417 

1,514,601 
19,076 
48,021 
66,070 

2,980,518 

44,462 

124,106 



General total. 



5,086,164 



$8,671 5.67 
62.938 34.03 
624 .40 



Per 



2,210 
2, 

83,994 

1,276 

8,498 



166,543100 



1.43 
1.60 

54.00 

.82 

2.25 



$260 

1,363 

17 

44 

60 

2,382 

40 

118 



All other. 



<^S^; value. ^S; Duty. 



Lb9. 

10,699 

16,800 

2,6701 
230 

3,526 



$4,814 12.47 
9.606' 24.63 



1.167 

99 

1,645 



43,270 20,635 
219 



439 
1,630 



4.629 78,163 



620 



88,005 



8.02 

.25 

4.26 

58.45 

.67 

1.85 



100 



$166 

267 

44 

4 

60 

736 

7 

26 



1,299 



TotaL 



Value. J^S. ^^ 



$6,696,158 

881,849 

161,390 

4,846,265 

2,778,902 

633,449 

898.162 

262.740 



2.44 
1.08 



42. 791320. 00 



8.ia 

8,496 

27.78,265.60 
17.76 ».«8I 

4.02; 22.S77 

SLm! 24.338 

1.61 6,966 



15,648,905100 721.U9 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



217 



No. 29. — QuantUy and value of sugar y moUuseSt smtp, and confectionery exported from ail 
ports in the island of Cuba during the six months July 1 to December Sly 1900, 





Sngar. 












Ports. 


Raw. 


Refined. 


olrup. 


Confectkuuery. 


Total 




Quantity. 


Valne. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Value. 


*SS°' 


Value. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Value. 




Bumooft ........... 


Amndf. 




Pmukdt. 




QoUs. 




Pounds, 






BfttabAno 




















C^barien 


1,152,868 
27,326,285 
12,802,071 
5,479,424 
2.608.707 


132,500 
724,001 
338,168 
148,887 
79,834 










1,250 


1120 


982.620 
724,001 
888.184 
148,887 
79,884 


Otid^nM .......... 










Ctenfuegoe 

Giban 










86 


16 










OwintinAino 














Hftiimnlllo 














Mttannfl 


13,101.582 
1,911,209 
4,044,657 


870,977 
65,828 
112.298 










625 


60 


871,027 
65.828 
112.296 


Nnf TitM 










Si^iui 1a Ozande. . . 














Santa Cms . . 














Santiago de Cuba . 
Trinidad 


1,817,208 


88,574 














38,574 










15 


6 


Tunas deZasa 


801,775 
8,224.881 


28,220 
284,691 










23,220 


Habana 


14,488 


1787 


851 


9163 


141,855 


10,787 


246,328 






Goieral total.. 


78,800,682 


2,188,378 


14,488 


787 


851 


168 


148,801 


10.979 


2,170,807 



Na 30. — Expcrtaium ofsugary molasses, sirup, and confectionery to leading countries from 
the island of Cuba during the six months July 1 to December SI, 1900, 





United States. 


Spain. 1 


France. 


Germany. 


ClasMS. 


QuanUty. 


Value. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Value. 


Quan- 
Uty. 


Value. 


V 


Value. 


Sogar. 

Raw pounds.. 

R^ned do.... 


78.766,5891 


|2,187,28( 


16,998 
14,488 


1600 

787 






855 


915 








Sirup gallons.. 

CoofectkMiery pounds. . 


882 
112,014 


185 
6.931 












7,261 


958 


19,864 


r2, 187 


1,818 


882 


General total 




2,164,861 




2,845 




2,187 




397 















Classes. 


United 
Kingdom. 


American 
countries. 


European 
countries. 


Other coun- 
tries. 


Total. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Val- 
ue. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Val- 
ue. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Val- 
ue. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Val- 
ue. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Sngar 

Raw.... x.w. pounds . 






16,746 


$483 










78,800,632 

14 483 

351 

143,801 


12,158,878 

787 


Refined T..do 














Strop gallons.. 














19 
406 


Sll 
74 


163 


Oonfectionery . . . .pounds. . 


1,827 


•24- 


J 1,455 


170 


166 


98C 


10.979 


General total 




24' 


J 


658 




80 





85 




2-170 an7 















CUBA 1900 — VOL I, FT 3 16 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



218 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 31. — SUUemerU of aiUdei exported from all ports^ of the idand of Cuba during the ik 
morUhSf July 1 to December SI, 1900, 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 




United Kiiig 

d<BIL 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


AnixDftlB 


915 

408 

2,987 

122,614 

76 

1,360 
796 


















Animal products 


















Aspbaltuxn 


















Cocoa 




18,250 






$4,909 




t25;511 




Cottee 








Ck>pper, and manufactures 


















Fibers, vegetable, textile 
fntMses. and manulao- 

Hemp (Manila) 










12,192 
4,210 














•2,546 




ISO 




Yaffna... . .' '. 


145 
3,063 

167,068 
516 
290 

117,850 
4; 184 

125 

669 

16 

22,744 

886 

161,697 

127,966 

4,674 

110 

3,760 

50 
17,125 

19,179 

2,587 

100 

49,186 










Yarey 








4,865 


6,383 








Fruits and nuts: 














Oranges and lemons.. 


















Pineapples 


















Qocoanuts 


















Copra 


















Other green, dried, or 

preserved fruits 

Hides and skins, other 
than fur skins: 
Hides and cattle 


































All other 


















Honey 










18,587 
50 

8 




672 




Horns, bones, and hoof. . . . 
Iron and steel, and manu- 
factures of: 
Iron ore 


























Manganese ore or oxide 
















Scrap iron 


















Manufactures of iron 
and steel 


















Metal compositions, 
and manu factures of . 


















Oils: 

Animal oils. ........... 


















Cocoanut oils 


















ParafiBn. stearin, and 
wax 










58,489 
13,289 




3.02S 
979 




Tortoise shell 












Sponges 








1,105 




Spirits distilled: 

Rum 












s.m 




All other distilled 
















Sugar.. . . 


1,923,804 
176 

387.412 

620 

18 

8 

6 

105.766 
15,779 

218,879 
44,865 

831 
27,082 
















Candy and confectionery. . 
Tobacco, and manufac- 
tures of: 
Leaf, suitable for 
wraDoers 


















«36,716 
87 


* 






493,775 
462 


128,951 
32 


2.100 


|l» 


Cigars 


75 


S3 






Cigarettoi 






Vegetables 


















Wood.andmanufacturesof: 

Cabinet ware and 

house furniture 


















Unmanufactured: 
Mahosanv 




1,500 
1,144 

3,938 
800 




19,160 


5,799 
23,381 

51,417 




87,774 
215 

28,660 
158 




Sapan(Cedro) 

All other unmanu- 
factured 










All other articles (e. s. ) . .. 
Reexportation: 
Proviiiionfi 


















All other articles 




2,132 










2,000 














. 


General total 


3,546,167 


85,758 


17,889 


3 


27,175 


687,911 


28,988 


106. 0S9 


W 



1 Habana excepted. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



219 



No. Sl.—SUiUmeiU ofcarticUs exported from all porU^ of the island of Cuba during the six 
months, July 1 to December SI, 1900 — Continaed. 



Artidci. 


American countries. 


European 
countries 


Total. 


Grand total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Antmulf , 












2,987 

162,484 

76 

1,850 



















Asphaltom 














OoboA 


11,200 












Coffee 












Copper, and mmnafBCtaies 














Plben, regeUble, textile 
miieL and mannfac- 

Hemp (Manila) 








812,988 

10,814 

145 

13.881 

167,068 
516 
290 

117,850 
4,184 

125 

669 
16 






AJeolSSer (Quaiia) 






•8,409 









Tagua .' '. 












Taiey 










87,268 




FraltaaiMlnutB: 

BtnanM.. ............. 












Oiangee and lemons. . . 














PIneapplea 














Ooeoanota 














CoMa 














Otber green, dried, or 
preserved fruits..... 










289,483 




Bidet and skins, other 
thanfor iklns: 
Hides and cattle 












Another 








685 

56,813 

886 




Hooejr 


1 


14,860 






HofUL bones, and hoof. . . . 












Iron and steel, and mann- 
£Mtoresof: 
Iron ore 








151,705 

127.966 

4,674 

110 

8,750 

50 
17,125 






Manganese ore or oxide 
Scrap iron... .... 


























ManoJactnres of iron 
and steel 














Metal compositions, 
and mannlactnree of . 










288,205 




OUc 

Anfmal f>i1s 












Coooannt oils 










17,175 

75,691 
18.618 
3,146 




Piuaffln, stearin, and 
wax 












Tortoise shell 


1,813 












sponges 




1,941 








t^>irtte distilled: 

r\iMfals 


89 
270 




89 

53,247 

11 






Rnm 












AH other distilled 








58,297 
1,923,787 

192 




Sugar. 


488 
16 

677 
436 










Otndy and -confec- 
tionery 












Tobacco, and" manufac- 
tures of: 
Leaf, suitable for 
wraDners 


842 
• 16 




883.964 

1,593 

13 


$64,892 
88 






Wl»p|fVI« 

CIgan 








(^mrettes 




885,570 

8 

6 


864,980 


VegetSles 












Wood.andmanafam'reeof: 
Cabhiet ware and 














Unmanufactured: 
Mahogany 








169,999 
50,159 

802,884 






Bapan (Cedro) — 
All other unmanu- 
factured 






9,540 




522,942 
45,898 




All other articles (^'i)\\\\ 
Reexportation: 

Pmrislons 


100 

5 

161 
10,000 














886 
81,825 
10.000 






AH otiier articles 

Q^rfdincoln 








42.'i6i* 




General total 


15,200 


58 


29,750 






4.429.101 


64.980 











1 Habana excepted. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



220 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 32. — Statement of merchandise erported from the port of Habana, Cuba^ during the 
nr months, July 1 to December SI, 1900. 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Germany. 


United Khig- 
dom. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. Duty. 


Anlmnlfl 


11,865 

14,786 

1,898 

240 

280 

814 




J 

1,800 




$8 










Animal pxodacts 










Asphalttun 




200 




$720 
490 




$660 ... 


Cocoa 


.... .... 


78,776 
301 

700 




80O 


Coffee 










dyefl 














Fibers, vegetoble, tex- 
tile grasses, and 
manmactures of: 
Hemp (Manila)... 




2.000 
14,996 












Aleo fiber (Guana) 
Yagxia 


15,888 

40 
1,188 










7,227 


















Ma ajnia 




















Tw ne 




















FmitB and nuts: 

Guava 




















Oranges and 
lemons 




















Pineapples 

Cocoanuts 


20,970 

























340 

80 
2,200 
















Other green, dried, 
or preserved 
fruits 


4,6U 


















Grease 
















Hides of cattle 


27,700 
7,690 

11,862 

12,700 






26,200 
8,696 




80,800 
8,400 








Honey 














Horns, bones, and 














Paraffin, stearin, and 
wax 




66 
875 




80,720 




1,000 








Perfumery and cos- 
metics, etc 








Cheese 


488 

74 
189 


















Seeds: 

Ajonjoli 




















All other 




















Shells: 

Tortoise shell... 








18,088 

20 

126,229 




2.886 








Another 
















Sponges 


87,238 




7,822 

86 
2,082 






2,800 




18,400 




Spirits, distilled: 
Cordials 




Rum 


18 
125 

162 

238,976 






16 








48.607 




All other distilled 










Sugar and molasses: 
Sirups. . . . 




















Sugar, raw or 
brown ... 




600 

787 

"968 

815 

319.015 

52,938 

9,606 

38 
106 








16 








Sugar, refined 














Candy and con- 
fectionery 

Tobacco and manu- 
factures of: 
Leaf, suitable for 

wrappers 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Another 


6,755 

5,018,449 

1,281.192 

8,658 

4,814 

177 
6,069 


$256,512 

27,888 

260 

156 


$18 
6.771 
1,868 

267 


2,187 

2.650 

157,049 

624 

1,167 


$198 

8,287 

17 

44 


882 

2,484.498 

1,865,226 

2.210 

90 


$204,178 

4 


247 

5,727 

2,767.097 

2.8SS 

l.«5 


I4M 

m 


Vegetables: 

Beans and dried 
pease 




Another.!! 
















tures of: 
All other manu- 
factured ........ 




860 












Mahoffany 

AH other nnman> 
nfactured 


8,418 














8,640 

1,058 

151 






26 
817 














All other articles 
(n s ) 


1,850 

19,087 
142,229 
250,988 
















Reexportation.* 

Provisions ....... 














All other 


148 


11,704 




16.795 
714,100 




1.199 




1.142 




Gold In coin 






















General total.... 


7,182,009 


284,464 


419,331 


8.419 


1.114,889 


8,496 


8,916,997 


286.669 


2,861.897 


mM 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CITBA. 



221 



No. ^.—Statement of merchandise exported from the port of Habanciy Cuba, etc. — CJont'd. 



Articles. 


American 
countries. 


Bnropean 
countries. 


Other coun- 
tries. 


Total. 


Grand total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value, 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


AnlnuLlB 


















81,868 
16,586 




Animft] products 




















AanhftltQin 


















8.868 


Coco* 


















9300 
581 

4.868 




Coffee 




















Chemicals, drugs, and 
dyes 


13,349 


















nben, Tegetable, tex- 
tile naases, and 
mannfactniesof: 
Hemp (Manila)... 












$2,000 

42,545 

62 

26 

18 

40 

1,188 

20,970 

840 

4,641 






Aleofil)er(Guana) 
Ysffoa 


60 




S4.880 



























ICaagna 




















Twne 
















44,646 




Fluits and nuts: 
QosTa 
















Oranges and lem- 
ons 




















Pineapples 





















Coeoanuts 




















Other green, 
dried, or pre- 














y 


27,179 
2,200 
98,200 
81.638 

11,362 

44,626 

675 

488 




c^y?*m 
















Hides of cattle 




















Hooey 






6,402 




1550 










Horna bones, and 














Puaffin, stearin, and 
wax 










150 










Perfamery, cocmetics, 
etc 


800 
















Cheese 


















Seeds: 

Ajonjoli 















74 
496 

15,474 
20 






AUother 


806 














569 




Shells: 

Tortoise shell 














AUother 

















15,494 
247,885 




Sponges 


3,519 




2,827 










Spirits, d^led: 
fVdtals 








86 

67,968 

125 

163 

284,601 
787 






Hum. ..::::::::... 


11,714 








5,581 










All other distilled. 










68,129 




Sinipe 










11 






Sugar, raw or 
















Sugar, refined 

















285,541 
10,787 




Osndy and con- 
fectionery 

Tttbacoo and manu- 
fscturesof: 
Leaf, suitable for 

^wrappers 

dgars 


154 

166,871 
862,886 
88,994 
20,685 


810,684 

8,617 

2,632 

736 


80 

216,019 

180,689 

1,275 

219 


820,016 

4,276 

40 

7 


74 

18,680 

285,092 

8,496 

620 






81,061 

5,756 

118 

26 


7,901,654 

6,667,646 

165,580 

88,605 

215 

96 

6,325 

850 
7,586 

1,486 


1498,061 

157,800 

4,529 

1,299 








Cisarettes 






SrSJeT;:::::.:: 


14,763,835 


$666, i79 


Vegetables: 

Beans and dried 
Pfiaae 




Pbtatoes 


98 
126 


















Another.. 




25 










6,688 
.......... 




Wood and manufac- 
toresof: 
All other manu- 
factured 










Mshoeany 










488 
278 
805 










All ouer nnman- 
nfactttred 


76 

1,410 

497 
61,161 










9,822 
4,048 




AU other articles 
(n.s.) . . 




10 




4,048 


Reexportation: 
Prorisions . 




19,584 
236,460 






Another 




260 




2,970 




148 


266,044 
966,088 


148 


Gold in coin 




General total.... 


715,104 


22,519 


412,586 


24,888 


263,092 


6,956 






16,874,406| 656,827 


' 







Digit! 



zed by Google 



222 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 33. — Statement of the articles imported at all ports of the island of Cuba during the az 
mantliSj July 1 to December Sly 1900, 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Doty. 


FBBB OF DUTY. 

Agricultnial implements: 

Mowers, reapers, and parts of 


16,096 
46,461 
101,276 








$182 




Plows and cultivators, and parts of. 
All other, and parts of 












«160 




2.144 
7,077 










Books, music, maps, engravings, and 
other printed matter: 
Books, maps, and scienttflc instru- 
ments for use in schools 


12,296 
16,864 
2,969 

182,607 
342,686 
82,118 

1,828 

244 

166 

11,441 

67 

317 

6,807 

620,745 

4,741 
87,900 
9,650 

71,448 

8,897 
3,013 

923,841 
140,964 
124,292 
106,886 
2,887 
1,416 




8,848 

1,280 

186 






Another 
















Coke and coal: 
Coal- 
Anthracite 








Bituminous 








98 




Coke 










Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters, and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 




26,607 




4,442 
«19 




Quinine and all alkaloids, and cin- 








Fertllizers: Natural 










Fibers, vegetable: Flax, hemp, etc., raw. 




213 
















FishT Freefi, other than salmon 
























Wood, and manufactures of: Pine wood, 
unplaned 












Manufactures of: Furniture, not 
elsewhere specified 




4,066 








Gold: Coin 










Silver: Coin 




9,796 
1,298 








All other articles, not elsewhere enu- 
merated 






1.268 




SUBJECT TO DUTY. 

Agricultural implements: All other, 
and parts of 


1899 

688 

94,221 

19,618 

7,601 

10,179 

889 

129 

1,064 
203 

85 

81 
526 

1.989 
4,665 

8,020 

50 

5,803 

42,553 

896 

8,696 

45 

968 

41 

29 

262,111 

721 

489 

285 

6,091 

100 

443 






Aiiiminiim, And manufactures of 






48 


fu 


Animals: 

Cattle 


82 
886 


12 
10 




Horses 






Mules 






Hogs 


12 

10 

511 


1 
2 

79 

661 
247 






gbeep 






All other 


82 


7 


Articles brought in baggage, having no 
commercial values, but dutiable 


32 


Art works, painting, and statuary 

Bones, hoofs, horns, and horn tips, 
strips, and waste 


1,402 

. 156 

93 
6,190 

20,141 
20,188 

16,802 

896 

28,211 

296.489 

2,091 

47,785 

178 

3,801 

847 

180 

1,128,929 

2,878 

1,966 

2.483 

60,776 

924 

8,069 


1,846 


1,640 
147 


MS 

7( 


Blacking: 

fitove polish , , . ; . 


863 

86 

44,110 
12,200 

4,943 


81 
17 

5,466 
2,474 

675 




Another.. 


1,802 

8.606 
8:998 

1.866 


M 


other printed matter: All other 

Brass, and manufactures of 


*s 


Bieadstuffs: 

Bread and biscuit 


1»1 


Barley 




Bran, mfddVings,'and mill feed 

Com 










1,820 
11 
26 


260 






Com meal 






Oats 


2 






Oatmeal 






Macaroni and vermicelli 


2,465 


614 


189 


tf 


Rye .. .. . . 




Wheat ' 










Wheat flour . 


543 

2,212 

846 

2.859 
1,148 


67 
558 
196 

811 
180 


.... 




Another 


548 
1,664 

2,181 


iS7 


Bricks, glased or unglased: 

BulRUng 


2,096 


Fire 




Bristles 


90 


» 


Broom com.... 









Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 223 

No. 2S.^StatemerU of the arHcles imported at all ports of the island of Cuba, etc. — Ck)nt'd. 



Articles. 



SUBJECT TO DUTT—Kxmtiniied. 



Brooms and brushes 

Oder 

CfeDdles 

Can, caniages. and other yehlcles, and 
parts of: 

For steam railways 

For other railways 

Crdea, and parts of 

All other carriages, and parts of 

Oelloloid, and manufactures of 



Crockery 

docks, watches, and parts of: 

Clocks, and parts of 

Watches, ana parts of 

Cocoa 

Coffee 

Copoer, and manufactures of: 

Iiigot& bars, and sheets 

Manouctures of 

Cork, and manufactures of cork bark: 

Cork stoppers 

Allother.V. 

Cotton, and manufactures of: 

Cotton,raw 

Mannlactures of cloths— 

Closely woven 

Loosely woven, muslins, etc 

Wearing apparel 

Osrpets 

Yam and thKadl'!*!!. !!!!!!*.. .!!!! 

Qolltings and piques 

VelTcteens, corduroys, etc 

Tulles and laces 

Knit fabrics 

Waste, o^is, and mill 

All other manufactures of 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Adds 

Ashes, pot and pearl 

Copper, sulphate of 

Dyes 

Mineral waters and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 

Medicines, patent and proprietary.. 

Opium 

Roots. herbs, and bark,n.e.s 

Quinine and all alkaloids and cin- 
chona 

Vanilla beans. 

Another 

larthen, stone, and china ware: 

Earthen and stone ware 

Qilnaware 

£88" • 



IptUizers, manufactured 

Firewcwks 

Fans 

Kbei^ vegetable: 

Eaparto, rushes, vegetable hair, 
cane osiers, fine straw, palm, and 

genista 

Manufactures of— 

Bagsforsugar 

Carpets 

Oordage and rope 

Twine 

.^ All other 

'hMicludlng shellfish: 
Wed, smoked, or cured— 

God, haddock, hake, and pollock 

Herring 

^ AUother 

Pickled- 

Mackeiel 

^ , Another 

Sahnon— 

Canned 

All other, fresh or cured 



United States. 



Value. Duty. 



$10, 4M 

90 

1,147 



114, M7 
91,786 

8,692 
77,324 

1.987 
54,541 

8,104 

7,106 

7,688 

6,171 

718,908 

9,707 
88,881 

1,740 
1,078 

8,663 

49,719 

82,732 

18,740 

91 

670 

1,425 

1,154 

1,312 

6,697 

6,498 

26,106 

14,206 

8,897 

1,725 

582 



84,062 
6,166 
1,060 

28 
196 

77,460 

8,468 
2,515 
351,473 
4,026 
69 
1,172 



6,135 

7,006 

848 

15,547 

958 

5,945 



107,097 
6,112 
17,636 

463 



578 
1.540 



t8,0»4 

21 

260 



11,683 
9,460 
1,764 

16,023 
701 

14,460 
1,778 

1,779 

1,906 

2,467 

417,564 

1,667 
15,635 

77 
96 

610 

20,665 

25,952 

6,862 

11 

479 

684 

466 

481 

2,365 

645 

7,680 

1,680 
860 
181 

80 



9,768 

. 6,720 

116 

1 

60 

8,882 

1,189 

682 

57,254 



851 



1,882 

1,428 

60 

4,068 

139 

1,725 



13,340 

820 

2,978 

104 



154 
224 



Spain. 



Value. Duty. 



1241 
40,580 
123,046 



1,178 

732 

29,728 

17 



1 
407 

11,967 
84 

2,465 

88,609 

208,190 

25,082 

26 

8,860 

649 

8,073 

24,839 

208,968 

2,450 

284,698 



16 
17 

719 
8,428 
1,696 
8,084 



11,107 
7,372 



67 
"'i6,'398 

246 

1,600 

9 

7,608 

14,093 

119,963 

85 



2,519 



4,000 

242 
13,512 



183 

8,894 
22,760 



18 



424 
93 



78 

768 
8 

171 

22,625 

49,412 

8,329 

12 

1,429 

89 

3,962 

8,761 

79,510 

241 

77,457 



281 

1,827 

575 



1,800 

1,488 
257 



1 
"8,'i26 

35 

152 

1 

1,187 

2,159 

28,618 



442 



118 

60 
8,898 



France. 



Value. Duty. 



•9,786 



1,277 



12 
245 
11,696 
7,196 
4,362 
8,163 



7,916 
90 



18 
6,406 

221 
88 

179 

61,876 
71,867 
88,183 



10,736 
1,894 
1.859 

26,249 

90,962 
89 

38,878 

1,274 
60 



6,177 

57,904 

10 

844 



24 
88,698 

8,234 , 
8,289 I 



2,639 



8 

587 

33,473 

2,887 



•3,885 
"*"88i 



8 

49 

2,929 

2,449 

1,249 

877 

168 

1,980 

33 



8 
1,348 



36 

4 



18,359 
10,551 
4,710 



3,424 

859 

592 

6,090 

29,041 

6 

9,802 

29 



2 

8 

1,196 

6,022 

17 

25 



6 
4,400 

1,026 
6,876 



715 



25 



2 

113 

8,124 

185 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



224 



REPOBT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



No. 33. — tStatemerU of the articles imported at aU ports of the idand of Cuba, etc— Conf 4. 



Articles. 


United Stotes. 


Spain. 


France. 


Value, 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— continued. 

Fish, inclndinf shellflsh— Continued. 
Canned fish, other than salmon and 
shellflsh- 
Caviar 


1128 

1,594 

1,185 

178 

488 

55 

27,028 

1,542 

2,945 

88,824 

8,770 

2,966 

68 

8,276 
3,828 
6,729 
28,060 
186 

48,898 
1,091 

55,486 

776 

4,266 

23,146 

14,235 

8,879 

9,759 

55 

29,184 

8,577 
15,639 
18,991 


SS2 

420 

191 

26 

99 

7 

8,562 

103 

858 

3,292 

2,198 

788 

7 

1.084 
1,824 
1,650 
4,979 
11 

12,441 
878 

14,895 

268 

721 

1,448 

4,488 
1,679 
1,864 
24 
6,558 

546 
2,842 
2,296 


$456 

61,481 


«U4 
12,867 






All Other 


11.764 


$410 


Shellflsh, oysters 




AU Other sliellflsh '. .... 


248 
12,789 


17 
8,186 






All other fish and fish products 

Fruits and nuts: 
Fruits— 

Annies, dried 


1,229 


807 


Apples, green or ripe 


75 


18 


1 


1 


Prunes 






33,861 
116,896 

28,818 
14,387 
82,428 


2,976 
19,466 

5,952 
8,598 
4,184 


175 
687 

2,627 

2,466 

2 


11 


All other, green, ripe, or dried.. 
Preserved fruits- 
Canned 


6S 


All other 


02 


Nuts 


1 


Gums and resins: 

Rosin 




Tar . 











Turpentine and pitch 


150 


9 


13 
5 


j 


Turpentine, spirits of 


1 


Caoutchouc and gutta-percha 

Glass and glassware: 

Glass packages, paying duty sepa- 
rate from their contents 








16,129 


8,106 


4,860 

i;883 

21.106 

10 

899 


9i4 


Window glass 


m 


Another 


25,300 


6,776 


5,m 


Glucose and gTai)c sugar 


^ 2 


Glue 


438 
633 


80 
84 


19 


Grease and grease scraps and soap stock . 
Gunpowder and explosives: 

Gunpowder 








All other exnlosives 










Games and toys . . 


8,922 
18 


1,235 
5 


8,102 
8S6 


1,257 




1» 


Hay 




Hides and skins other than fur skins: 
Goat skins 


8,806 

4,988 

21,214 

5 


493 

785 

8,178 

2 


2,221 
2.074 
6,060 


»7 


Hides of cattle 


SU 


All other 


•a& 


Honey 




Hops 


1,520 

10,960 

•16 

1,365 
2,861 

45,240 
2,083 

6,313 

22,159 

65 


105 

2,203 

4 

287 
249 

9,212 
816 

2,218 

8,878 

6 






Hats and caps 


8,016 


1,608 


56,463 


11,290 


Ice 




Ink: 

Printers'...... 






1 
663 

1,284 
800 

6,475 
6,071 




Another 


642 

47 
50 

811 
78 


180 

12 
10 

81 
11 


141 


tific purposes, telegraph, telephone, 
and other electrical. 


S5 


Incandescent electric lamps 


130 


Iron and steel, and mandactures of: 
Needles, pins, pens, hooks, hairpins, 
and surgical instruments 


9H 


All other 'fine articles 


911 


Pig iron 




Scran and old 






16 




Bar iron 


36,569 
68,535 
12,832 

76,761 
104,714 

10,155 

6,433 

182,994 

62,282 

20,434 
6,419 

68,189 
6,634 

96,338 


6,674 
10,843 
3,161 

7,710 
10,473 

1,110 

1,744 

32,853 

9,767 

2,312 

627 

10,840 

637 

9,991 









Bars and rnda of flteel 




*•• 






HooDB bands and scroll 






3 




Ralls for rail ways- 
Iron 








Steel 










Sheets and plates- 
Iron 


181 


17 


Wl 


86 


Steel 




Structural iron and steel 

Wire and wire cables 










268 
544 


44 

116 


248 

1,141 

86 

5,610 


7 


Builders' hardware, saws, and 
tools- 
Locks, hinges, and other build- 
ers' nardware 


m 


Saws 


s 


Tools not elsewhere specified. . . 
Car wheels 


440 


83 


50 


Castings not elsewhere specified. . . . 


9 




2,759 


iii 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BBPOBT OF MILITAST OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



225 



No. S^— Statement of the artides imported at 


aU ports of the island of Cubay dc.— Cont'd. 


Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


8UBJ1CT TO DUTY—oontixiaed. 

Iron and rteel, etc.— Continned. 
CuUenr— 

Tible 


f\046 
5,281 
2,758 

1,888 
28,828 

9,921 
65,487 

8,602 
46,494 
67,808 

1,212 

111,676 
26,098 

164,427 
21,158 

812,702 

9,646 

8,926 
68,147 
67.601 

7,762 
16,188 

2,782 

165,621 

2,846 
29 


91,672 

1,607 

697 

4,869 
1,986 
11,686 
T20 
8,984 
13,448 
248 

11,372 
5,110 

21,776 
4,231 

32,486 

2,488 
1,998 
9,761 
11,251 
2,467 
8,149 
416 

25,008 

427 
14 


986 

896 

7,644 


97 

78 

2,186 


94,296 

6,478 

496 

660 

770 


91,181 

1,012 

186 


All other 


Flrwrm* , » , . . 


Mtchinery and machines, and parts 
Owh rpglstere ..... ^ 


110 


E)e<?tT*fflil miwhinery 






164 


Lanndry machinery'. 








Metal-working ' 






89 

141 

2,075 

21 

6 


18 


Printing presses, and parts of.. . 
Pomps and pump machinery . . . 
Rewing machines, and parts of. . 


195 
800 


89 
60 


28 

416 

4 


Shoe machinery .' '. 


69 


12 


1 


Steam engines, an<f parts of— 
Looomotiyes 




Stationary 


35 


7 


897 
822 


180 


Boilers arid parts of engines .... 
Typewriter macnlnes 


166 








Socar and brandy machinery 

Ndbandspikeft— 

Cat....: 






2.842 


286 


22 
18 
79 


1 
2 
6 




Wire 


23 
5,167 


4 


All Other, including tacks 

Pipes and fittings 


792 


8a^ ^ 






116 

1,167 

88 

10,812 
8,728 


6 


Scales and bidances ? 






288 


Stores and ranges, and parts of 

steel 








3,607 
151 


882 
38 


1,745 
648 


Jewehy, and other manufactures of 
gold and sUver: 
Jewelry 


lAHipS .... 




Chariddlers and ail oiher deyices 
for Illuminating purposes 






62 
8.602 


8 


All other manufactures of gold and 
sUver 


1,740 

1,668 
4,272 
10,941 

8,727 
616 

18 
3,848 

169,788 
11,760 

1,386 

17,806 

425 

1,156 

19,167 

174,063 

89 

800 
1,642 
6.560 
2,135 

178 
46,978 

396 
1,446 

1,247 

18 
20.996 

282 

80 

2 

9.894 


812 

178 

T71 

2,197 

667 
78 

4 

688 

83,824 
1,124 

294 

3,606 

69 

184 

13,180 

44,926 

16 

31 

840 

1,696 

1,048 

16 
767 

167 
579 

484 

1 
2,947 

36 
8 


1,624 

268 
1,025 
3,848 

480 
1,700 

90 
1,416 

620,096 
10 

248 
7,706 


289 

37 
183 
603 

80 
256 

28 
810 

139,802 
8 

119 
1,996 


664 


Lead, and manufactures of: 

PijES. bara. and old 










Another manufactures of 


1,018 


182 


Leather and manufactures of : 

Sole leather 




Uroer leather 






SpUnts, buff, grain, and all other 
uiH)er 


889 
2,766 

787 
2,064 

648 

9,861 

16 


222 


All other leather 


536 


Manufactures of— 

Boots and shoes 


246 


Hamesi and saddles 

Trunks, valises, and traveling 
bags 


116 
88 


All^ber .' 


2,281 


Line 


' 4 


^i»it....^V//////"/"V////////./,.V.V, 








Mart liquors: 

B<^r in wood • • > 










Beer In bottles 


6,014 
821 

290 
1.406 
2.682 

480 


439 

28 

241 
458 
734 
197 






All other malt liauora 






Marble and 8tone,and manufactures of: 






Bniidlmr stone 


18 

1,080 

129 


2 


AUother..?. 


34 


Hitches 


66 


Metal and metal compositions, tin: 
Inaheets 




Manufactured articles 


3,462 


622 


4,064 


740 


Modcal Instruments: 

Organs ... 




?iȣotoTteB ............ 


8,929 
2,766 


1,672 
1,108 


2,176 

1,776 

36 
800 


871 


All other musical instruments and 
parts of 


710 


OildoEs!^ 

For floors .. 


4 


AUother 


880 
286 


6 
26 


78 


ODs: 

AnhnaloU»- 

Fish oil 

lATdoil 




Whale oU 

All other aninuU oils 


6i2' 


» 


2' 


618* 


82 



Digitized by ^ 



oogle 



226 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 



No. 33. — SUUement of the articles imported at ail ports of tlie island of Cuba, «<r,— Ooot'd 



ArUcles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


Fiance. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


8UBJ1CT TO DUTY— oontiniied. 

Olls-ContinQed. 
Mineral oils- 

Petrolenm, crude 


182,156 
85,054 

5,484 
56,157 

2,012 

1,981 

11,837 

2,967 

248 

6 
1,074 
1,780 

40 

757 

44,879 

46,810 
55,906 

761 
1,641 

182 
7,887 
16,756 

2,751 

142,507 

49,580 

706 

28 

5,679 

849,180 

831 

17,888 

487.097 

1,452,784 

8,175 
5,447 
2,696 
76 
77,040 
89,191 

17,278 

28,199 

187,873 

1,448 

4,728 

904 

23,701 

2,881 

8 

841 

596 

224 

8,737 


•48,298 
11,854 

2,569 
47,295 

8,519 

695 

2,330 
526 
42 

3 
207 
860 

8 

245 

11,848 

16,206 
14,810 

140 

421 

21 

8,197 

4,205 

645 

19,960 

8,896 

192 

2 

1,418 

87,067 

84 

858 

84.689 

272,817 

601 
1,086 

MS. 

16,248 
19.283 

4.842 

4.536 

18,781 

259 

408 
267 
4,522 
285 
1 
124 

87 
27 
326 










All other natural oils without 

regard tograyity 

Mineral, refined or manufactured— 

Naphtha, including the lighter 
producte of distuTation 

Ilfnininating oils 














fUO 


tn 








Lubricatinglmd heavy paraffin 
oil 






9 


i 


Residuum, including tar and all 
other from which light 
pitches have been distilled ... 
Vegetable oils- 

Cotton-seed oil 












192 
1,306 
4,608 


11 


Linseed oil 


$190 
251,228 


138 

26.061 


111 


Oliveoil 


m 


VoUtUe or essential oils- 

Peppermint 




All other 


448 
2,512 


149 
800 






All other vegetable oils 


880 


us 


Paints, pigments, and colors: 

Carbon black, gas black, and lamp- 
black . 




Zinc and oxide of 


2 
4,449 

87,188 
96,427 

00 
2,100 

21 
275 
40S 




60 
3,210 

26.851 
30.261 

89 

soo 

87 
69,217 
6,423 


1 


All other 


799 

9,761 
16,796 

17 

526 

2 

78 
101 


m 


Paper, and manufactures of: 
Paper pulp- 
In sheets 


%,& 


All other 


9.00 


Manufactures of— 

Paste and carton pierre 


1 


Wrought /. 


60 


Paraffin and wax 




Perfumery and cosmetics 


3(1,812 


Plated ware 


Tjo 


Provisions, comprising meat and dairy 
products: 
Meat products- 
Beef products- 
Beef, canned 




Bwf, f rwh 











Beef, salted or pickled 

Beef. Jerked ..:. 


2 


1 










Beef, tallow 










Hogpioduct»— 

Bacon... < 


2 

18,878 

698 

2 

85 

4,941 

471 








Hams and shoulders 

Pork, canned 


2,786 
160 


17 


S 


Pork, fresh 






Fork, salted or pickled 

lA^rd . . r ....,, , 


6 
364 

46 






5 


1 


Lard products and substi- 
tutes for (cottolene, lard- 
Ine. etc.) 




Mutton 






Oleomanrarine 










TmttAtinn hntti^r 










Poultry and game ... 


24 

78,641 

22,496 
3,526 


6 
19,661 

8.848 
463 






All other meat products 

Dairy product*— 

Butter 


8,881 

478 
2,889 

416 
8,887 

24 




Cheese 


50 


Condensed milk 


41 


Rice 


16,175 
89 


2,484 

4 


m 


Rubber, and manufactures of: 

Beltinir. how. and YtMtitinK .... ^ ... , 




Boots ftiid shoes 




All other 


10,055 


1,608 


2»799 
t88 


m 


India rubber scrap and old 


8 


Samples, with commercial value 

Salt 








19,789 

611 
2,284 
12.608 


18,672 

8 

S24 

1,425 






Seeds. 

Clover seed • 






Flax and timothy seed 


120 

8se 


— i 


All other 


us 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



227 



No. S3.— Statement of the artides imported at aU ports of the i^and of Cuba, etc. — Cont'd. 



Articles. 


United states. 


Spain. 


France. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


tUBnct TO DOTT— continued. 
SheUi 


11,574 

460 

1,8»7 


•728 
202 
629 






1812 

188 

588 

788 

8,822 

241 

161,860 


•680 


SUk. and manalACtiires of: 






89 


lUnafActureBof— 

Yftm Mid thread 


8150 


168 


265 


Velvet and plushes 


880 


Tulles and laces 


212 

82 

6,847 

8,968 
2,747 

18,686 
4,901 




96 

14 

2,406 

988 
687 

5,229 
1,862 


124 


66 


8.796 


Knit fabrics 


112 


Another 


19,129 

142 
21,791 

111,776 
82 
720 

885 


8.622 

86 
5,448 

40,830 

12 

108 

428 


72,929 


^tos: 

PeDper 




SoSi:::::;;::::::::;:::::::::::: 


52 

2,967 
6,991 


13 


fiwninn man. ........ 


975 


AiToto!^::::::::::::;;::;::::;; 


1,168 






Spirit^ distilled: 

Bnudy 






466 
288 


278 


Whisky- 

Bourbon 


627 

414 

1,648 

11,548 

267 

2,696 

18 

1 

444 

12,400 

16,912 

90 

1,078 
2,417 

2 

19,641 

608 

8,069 
2,882 
12,796 

289,068 
6,891 

286,684 
6,892 
5,662 

88,488 
62 

86,400 

68,166 

45 

6,182 

1,861 
2,761 
1,279 

26,684 
1,618 

5,189 
750 
688 

16,528 
12,668 
4.782 
4,624 
11,089 


196 
191 
790 
8,760 
67 

448 

4 


222 


Rye 








All other dIsUlled 


8,707 
00 


4,472 
2 


87,981 
24 


21,632 


Starch 


Stereotype and electrotype plates 

Stiaw and palm leaf, and manufac- 
tmesof 




8 


1 


986 


219 


Sugar and molasses: 

Molaaws 




Simp 








9 


Sogi^, raw 


227 

6.894 

8,951 

26 

809 
760 

5 
7,860 
224 
2,116 
1,071 
4,698 

36,406 
2.010 

62,120 

1,598 

861 

7,822 
46 

814 

2.466 

19 

1..289 

686 

1.628 

620 

2,044 
214 

278 
58 
57 

1,029 

98 

292 

852 

916 










Sugar, refined 






83 

3,687 

73 


48 


Candy and confectionery 


42,547 


10,636 


911 


Tea 


19 


Tobacco, and mannfactnrea of: 
Cnmannfactnred — 

Leaf 








Allother 










Manufactoreis of ~ 

dsan 










wS?!::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 










Powder and snuff , 










In cakes 










Allother 








1 


vamisiK!.^!::;:;::;::;:::::::::::::: 


1 

27,270 
182,221 
5,539 
28,405 
68.482 

47,155 




1,242 


161 


Vegetables: 

R^nt a>w1 pease 


2,942 

31,446 

878 

7,101 

4,731 

11,116 




Onions..... 






Potatoes 






Vegetables, canned 


2,860 
16 

8,184 
531 


716 


dSf»S!^ 


1 


All other (including pickles and 
aaooe) 


2,048 


Vtaegar.....::": 


897 


vS^ 








fMlinv 
















806 

8,098 

1,740 
6,660 
13,666 


258 


Waiting sticks, umbrellas, and para- 
noli 


10,748 

42,406 

856.017 

908 

1 


2,687 

16,898 

636,341 

522 


1,938 


Wines: 

In bottles 


674 


in other coverings 


3,262 


Sparkling liquors and cordials 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Tlfflber,andunmannfactured wood- 
Sawed 


6,751 


Loffsand nthpr 








Ijombei^ 

Boards, deals, and planks 

JoiattumnA M*AntlinffM 


















Shingles r . . , 






4 

88 
30 


1 


flhoSKl!?^ 

Box 


157 
867 


8 
82 


5 


Allother 


11 


Stares 




HpikA\na 










2S^::::::::::;;::::;:::::::::: 


i.666 


i28 


i5 


4 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



228 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 33. — SUUemerU of the artides imported at aU ports of the idand of Cuba, rfc.— Confd. 



ArUcles. , 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— continued. 

Wood, and manufacturers of— Cont'd. 
Manufactures of— 

Wood, ordinary, composing 
cases wherein imported goods 
are packed 


$49,648 
4,788 

118,204 
106,001 

8,929 

26,774 

820 

15,886 

144 

481 

841 

6,568 

2 

144 

8,146 

4,880 

666,297 


$8,594 
1,210 

82,477 
18,121 

1,108 

7,322 

88 

8,900 

28 

191 

886 

2,625 

68 
1,220 
1,170 

104,020 


$14,587 
104 

1,248 
102,129 

1,188 

2,729 

231 

2,880 

8 

228 
2.191 
9,278 

464 

849 

24,964 

514 

62,155 


$1,960 
50 

298 
11,662 

209 

449 

18 

793 

1 

92 

877 

8,712 

210 

139 

9,672 

51 

18,971 


$8,006 

310 

3,110 
798 

710 
2,264 


tS,912 


Doors, sashes, and blinds. 

Furniture not elsewhere speci- 
fied !77 . 


n 

79 


Hogsheads and barrels, empty.. 
Trimmings and moldings and 

honne nnishingg 


112 

m 


Wooden ware 


SS5 


Wood pulp 




All other 


3,256 

114 

1,883 
2,486 
4,927 
2,041 
36 
141,383 
1,806 

106,828 


1,19 


Wool, and manufactures of: 

Raw 


6 


Manufactures of— 

Oarpets. 


m 


Flannels and blankets 


99S 


Wearing apparel 


l,9fiS 


Woolen yam 


917 


CHoth, spun or twilled 


IS 


All other manufactures of 

Zinc, and manufactures of 


^^ 


All other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated 


S3,1S0 






Total 


14,665,819 


2,708,279 


4,704,867 


1,491,617 


1,486,782 


483,148 






Articles. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


American coon- 
tries. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Doty. 


FRBB OF DUTY. 

Agricultural implements: 

Mowers, reapers, and parts of 

Plows and cultivators, and parts of. 
All other, and parts of 


$255 
1.096 
6,674 

284 
8,876 




$8,628 
5,511 
19,406 












$10 
2 










Books, music, maps, engravings, and 
other printed matter: 
Books, maps, and scientific instru- 
ments for use in schools 








All other... 




458 
2,840. 

6,159 




30 




Coke 








Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters, and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 


1,841 
261 






16 




Quinine and sll alksJoldB and cin- 
chona . . ...... ..... 








Fertilizers: Natural 








■*282,*725 

59,709 

182 

21,462 




Fibers, vegetable: Flax, hemp, etc., raw. 


560 




85,178 













Wood, and manufactures of : Pine wood, 
unplan^d .... 












Manufactures of: Furniture, not 
elsewhere sDecifled . 


• 1,750 
5,870 










All other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated • 




3,180 




757 
5 




SUBJBCT TO DUTY. 

Agricultural implements: Allotherand 
parts of 






e. 


Aluminum, and manufactures of 

Animals: 

Cattle 


485 


$122 


8 

8,236 
880 
107 
889 






$120 
85 
80 
50 


2,902,232 
IS 511 
37,418 

626 


197,196 


Horses 






25,172 


Hules 






5^472 


Hogs 






2»7 


Sheep 






l» 


All other 










m 


Articles broughtin baggage, having no 
commercial values, out dutiable 










2» 


Art works, painting, and statuary 


6,ii6 


i.226 


4i8 


ioi 







Digitfzed byVjOOQlC 



B£POBT OF UILITABY GOVJSBNOB OF CUBA. 



229 



No. S^—SUUement of the articles imparted at 


aU parts of the island of Cuba, ete.— Cont'd. 


AitlcleB. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


American coun- 
tries. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


FRn OF DUTY— conttnned. 

Bones, hoofs, horns, and horn tips, 
itilw. and wante. 


1174 

80 
940 

31,518 
5,482 

860 
24,695 


104 

2 
184 

7,816 
670 

111 
1,621 


12 


91 






BKSngT^^^ 

StoTe polish 






All other 


607 

1.481 
1,660 

9,798 


76 

338 

328 

1,259 






Books, mnaic, maps, engrarlngi}, and 
other printed matter: All other 


•7 




Bnm vnA mannfactnrc^of 




BreadstnilB: 

Bread and hiaeuit 






Barley 






Com 'meal 


i97 
2,576 
1,700 

8,116 

138 

964 

2,804 

i;446 

420 


49 
644 

456 

6,130 
48 
339 
570 
379 

84 






Preparationa of, for table food 










Another 


864 

185 
890 
2,372 
11 
387 

297 

602 

4,061 

1,144 

438 

1,719 

9,548 

216 


814 

24 

110 

785 

2 

96 

60 

in 

1,849 
316 
205 

488 

2,389 

46 






Bilcks, glased or nnglaxed: 

Fire 






Briitks 






Bfooma and braxhea 






Cider 






Ckodles 






0us,eaiTia«e8,and other vehicles, and 
parts of: 
Cycles, and parts of 


10 
49 


12 


All other carriages and parts of .... 


12 


Cei)ploi<1, and mannfactnteii of 


232 

12,846 

482 

640 

48 

258 

6,910 

5,968 
10,671 

1 


68 

2,772 

162 

198 

17 

78 

3,687 

808 
1,828 

1 




Cement.'. 






Crockery 


6 


2 


Clocks, watches, and parts of: 

Clocks, and partd of 




Watches, and parts of 


66 

6,325 

286,031 


16 


Cocoa 1 


2,967 
49,114 


Coffee 


Copper, and manofactures of: 

Ingots, bars, and sheets 


875 
8,177 

254 
5 


121 
1,906 

28 


Manniactnres of 


2 




Cork, and manufactures of cork bark: 
Cork stoppers 




AU other!/. 






Cotton, and manufactures of: 

Cotton, raw 






29,062 

822,675 

654,178 

2,235 

85,418 

6,783 

13,656 

96,494 

6,192 

1,786 

186,902 

1,854 

10.214 

2,007 

45 

89 
6,663 
1,942 
1,092 

2,863 

120 

28,684 

30,389 
1,760 


8,319 

116,824 

209,752 

1,187 

20,112 

2,992 

8,770 

29,758 

2,333 

126 

57,864 

73 

570 

234 

9 

16 

718 

2,039 

82 

469 

30 

2,412 

9,062 
545 






Manufactures of cloths— 

CloselT woven 


26,913 

28.696 

8,849 

3,148 

609 

485 

13,979 

66,630 


6,974 

5,202 

844 

885 

166 

160 

6,096 

22,177 






Loosely woven, muslins, etc 

Wearing apparel 


11 


3 


Y*ni ana thread 






Qoiltingsand piques 






Velveteens, corduroys, etc 






Tolles and laces 






Knit fabrics 


26 


11 


Waste, cope, and mill 




All ot£ier manufactures of 


55,846 

1,164 
626 
145 
800 


13,060 

57 

17 

12 

108 


18 


6 


Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Adds 




Aifhes, pot and pearl 






Copper, sulphate of 






Dyes 







luneral waters and other nonalco- 
lu>llc beverages 


10 
2,860 


1 


Medicines, patent and proprietary. . 
Opium 


5,078 

60 

1,714 

884 

45 

10,288 

22,629 
18,122 


710 
58 
90 

26 
11 
667 

7,097 
4.441 


374 


Roots, herbs, and bark, n.e.s 

Quinine and all alkaloids and cin- 
chona •• 










Vanilla beana 


1 
544 

161 
18 
65 




Another 


110 


Earthen, stone, and china ware: 

Earthen and stone ware 


174 


China ware 


4 


Ecgi 


22 


Fireworks 


2 
1,155 

501 

26,121 

159 

17 

4,755 

10.902 










Fans 


847 

42 

4,929 

44 

3 

1 034 

2,238 


286 

115 

117,907 
240 
309 
697 

434.983 


87 

2 

28,485 
35 
109 
160 

97,662 


50 


16 


Flbtts, vegetable: 

Bq>aito, rushes, vegetable hair, 
cane osiers, fine straw, palm, and 
genista 




Minnfactares of— 

Bags for sugar 


12 


8 


Garnets 










Twine 






AU other 


i.698 


824 



Digitized by 



Google 



230 



REPOBT OF MILITABT GOYSBITOB OF CUBA. 



No. SS.—Slaiementofthe arMaimporUd at ail ports of the idand of CnbOj elc— Ooofd. 



Articles. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


Bnropeto oooii- 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Doty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— continned. 

Fish. incladlnR shellfish: 
Dried, smoked, or cured— 

Cod, haddock, hake, and pollock 
HerrinR 


11,011 


166 


8190,046 
49 
179 

662 

114 
67 


12 

150 

28 
17 


183.470 
20 


H« 


Another 








Pickled- 
Mackerel 






707 


US 


Canned fish, other than salmon and 
shellfish— 
Caviar 


42 

1 


10 




Another 






All other shellfish 




292 


s 


All other fish and fish products 






268 

1,431 

626 

1,089 

96 
104 


66 

172 
124 
191 

24 
26 




Fruits: 

Apples, dried 










Apples, >gTeen or ripe 






16 
2,074 


s 


All other, ereen, ripe, or dried 






614 


Preserved fruita— 

Canned , _ 


9 
9 

2 
152 


2 
2 




All other 


4 


1 


Gums and resins: 

Roein 




Tar 


16 










Turpentine, spirits of 


736 
6 

13,182 

827 

2,842 

280 

288 

6 


81 
1 

4,4g, 

65 

664 

09 

28 






Caoutchouc and gutta-pereha 










Glass and glassware: 

Glass packages, paying duty sepa- 
rate irom their contents 


6.887 

8,260 

51,782 

126 

1,904 


1,849 

2,716 

18.428 

27 

484 


27 


1 


Window glass 




All other 


2 
180 


2 


Glucose and grape sugar 


S 


Glue "...' ." 




G rease and grease scraps and soap stock . 






Explosives other than gunpowder 

Games and toys 


190 

22,517 

141 


126 

6,227 

67 








667 


199 






Hair, and manufactures of 






Hay.' 


9,090 

86 
140 
466 


2,278 
6 


17 


4 


Hides and skins other than fur skins: 
Goat skins 








Hides of cattle 






650 
661 


66 


Another 


149 
1,022 
2,237 

60 
912 

1,802 
17 

6,442 
21,768 


22 
50 
447 

11 
127 

362 
8 

2,671 
8,531 


100 


Hops ,. 




Hats and caps 


26,034 


5.206 


77,289 


I i6,'4tf 


Ink: *^ 

Printers' 




All other 


2,599 

941 
201 

6,872 
21,546 
868 
16,625 
29,848 
24,041 


688 

188 
18 

840 
3,948 
68 
2.768 
4,518 
4,508 


4 




Instruments and apparatus for scien- 
tific purposes, telegraph, telephone, 
and other electrical. 




Incandescent electric lamps 






Iron and steel, and manufactures of: 
Needles, pins, pens, hooks, hairpins, 
and surgical instruments 






All other one articles 


8 




Pig iron 




Bar iron 










Bars and rods of steel 


450 


84 






Hoops, bands, and scroll 






Rail for railways- 
Iron 


49 


3 






Steel 


46,054 

8,098 
1,981 
5,824 

11,060 
644 

22,520 
808 

16,871 

2.156 

7,866 

106 


4,606 

1,501 
883 
6U 

1,982 

120 

4,621 

12 

2,021 

433 
916 
27 






Sheets and plates- 
Iron 


630 


68 






Steel . . . 






Wire and wlrp cables 


736 

6,318 
. 674 
16,766 


67 

502 

74 

1,932 






Builders' hardware, saws, and 
tools- 
Locks, hinges, and other build- 
ers' hardware 






Saws . 






Tools not elsewhere specified... 
Car wheels 










Castings not elsew here specified .... 
Cutlery- 
Table 


6,374 

2,708 

8,061 

667 


766 

693 

1,654 

166 










All other 






Firearms 


26 


e 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BSPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



231 



No. dS.—SUUemaU of the carUda imported at aU ports of the island of CubOy etc. — Cont'd. 



Articles. 



Gennany. 



Valae. Duty. 



United Kingdom. 



Value. Duty. 



European coun- 
tries. 



Value. Duty. 



suBjiCT TO nmr— continued. 

Iron ftDd Bteel, etc— Continued. 

Hftdiinery and machines, and parts 
of— 

Slectiica] machinery 

Metal-working 

Printing presses, and parts of .. . 

Pnmps and pump machinery . . . 

Sewing machines, and parts of. . 
Stesm engmes, and parts of— 

LocomotiTes 

Stationary 

Bailers and parts of engines . . . . 

Typewriter machines 

Sosarand brandy machinery 

Ksusandroikes— 

Cut...!:. 

wire 

All other. Including tacks 

PfDes and fittings 

8etleBsndba]iinces.l"!I!!!'.'I!I!!! 

Stores and ranges, and parts of 

All other manufactures of iron and 



Jewelry, and other manufactures of 
gold and silTer: 

Jewelry 

All other manufactures of gold and 

aflyer 

Lead, and manufactures of: 

PlgB, ban, and old 



AU other manufactures of 

leather, and manufactures of: 

Sole leather 

Splints, buff, grain, and all other 

upper 

An other leather 

Manufactures of— 

Boots and shoes 

Harness and saddles 

Trunks, yalises, and traveling 

bags 

,_ AUother 

lime. 



Malt liquors: 

Beer hi wood 

Beer in botUes 

All other malt liquors 

Marbleand stone, and manufactures of: 

Building stone 

AUother 

Matches 

Metal and metal composittons, tin: 

In sheets 

,. Manufactured articles 

Mosieal histruments: 

Oigans 

Pianofortes 

AU other musical instruments and 

Ollcloffi?"*^ 

For floors 

_ AUother 

Oils: 

Animal oils- 
Fish oU 

Whale oil 

AU other animal oils 

Mhieraloihi- 

AU other natural oils without 

Mhieral, reflnedor mantjactured— ' 
Naphtha, including the lighter 

products of distillation 

Lubricating and heavy paraffin 

ofl 

Besiduum, including tar and 

aU other from which light 

pitches have been distilled. . . 



•71 
8,909 

878 
1,594 
1,404 



506 
885 

257 
5,456 

2,449 
842 
15,289 
15 
109 
545 
131 

29,259 



28,720 

9,281 

794 

"h'm 



207 



657 
25 

108 
9.418 



27,894 



21 

1,072 

5 

84 
5,025 

88 
2,799 

9.420 

251 
1,546 



50 

9 

299 



440 



114 
785 
174 
319 
281 



102 
1T7 
51 
546 

404 

181 

2.108 



~ 9 
108 
11 

4,894 



4,889 

1,158 

104 

'"254* 



120 
1 

80 
2,301 



6,898 



1 

67 

1 

27 
602 

13 
1,119 

3,776 

83 
147 



18 



125 



8,549 
'2*7i4 



690 
247 
984 
45 
9.768 

1,564 
861 
17.168 
8,086 
526 
115 
733 

75,819 



27 

850 

118 
90 
331 

140 

159 
456 

18 
289 

1,136 

9,435 

158 

147 

97,638 

676 

28 
1,338 
2,499 

8,697 
5,642 



40 
212 



16 
1,746 



•20 



543 
6 

80 

49 

197 

9 

1,143 

268 
84 
2,461 
1,811 
87 
22 
116 

13,002 



2 

80 

13 
14 
60 

21 

40 
102 

6 
10 

287 

2,530 

27 

104 

18,061 

98 

14 
434 
947 

1,562 
918 



10 



1,600 



240 



15 
196 



1,291 



674 



53 



25 
2 



940 
120 



1,013 
20 



406 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



232 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA, 



No. 33. — SUxiement of the articles imparted at oil ports of the iMand of Cuba, dc— CJonf d. 



Articles. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


American ooon- 
trien. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Doty. 


8UBJSCT TO DUTT— oontinned. 

Oils-OontinDed. 
Vegetable ollfl- 

Ck>tton-seed oil 


12 

68 












linseed oil 


114 


$16,981 
20 

1.618 
857 

356 

1,103 

84,283 

1,992 
1,925 


•3,774 

555 

251 

103 

269 

U,588 

444 

634 






Olive oil 






VolatUe or eaeential oils- 
All other 


227 

209 

5 

47 
8,376 

51,834 
49,525 

99 

61 

882 

1,809 

9,226 


106 
21 






All other vegetable oils 






Paints, pigments, and colors: 

Carbon black, gas black, and lamp- 
black r.. 






Zinc and oxide of 


15 
1,946 

20,680 
15,267 

31 

22 

141 

642 

2,288 






Another 






Paper, and manufactures of: 
Paper pulp- 
In sheets 






Another 


•9,658 


m 


Manufactures of— 

Paste and carton nierre 




Wrought 


15 

6 

2,473 

2,216 

11,029 
86 


2 

1 

949 

554 

2,831 
12 


. 




Paraflto and wax 






Perfumery and cosmetics 


8 
5.860 

700,249 

94 
20 


I 


Plated ware.<.. 


m 


Provisions, comprising meat and dairy 
products: 
Meat products- 
Beef products- 
Beef. Jerked 


22,29 


Hogproducts— 

Hams and shoulders 

Pork, salted or pickled . . . 


548 


65 


5 


Oleomargarine 


67 


44 


390 
109 
854 

8,110 

37,047- 

28,476 

890,867 


48 

46 

864 

417 

6,935 

2,846 

204,702 




Poultry and game '.'.'. 


912 
100 


IM 


All otfier m^t products 

Dairy products- 
Butter 


318 

16 

3,642 

13 

580,946 

818 
7,022 


79 

8 

617 

1 

131,406 

18 
890 


25 


Cheese 


210 


19 


Condensed milk 




Rice 


73 


W 


Rubber, and manufactures of: 
Beltinir. hose and bamrlnir 




An other. ...'......VT:... :!."!!!!;!; 


12,655 

50 

1,970 

147 
1,929 


1.768 

82 

1,810 

15 
96 


5 


1 


India rubber, scran and old 




Salt 


1,199 


760 






Seeds: 

FifLT njxA timotby seed 






Another '. '.. 


57d 
1,272 


49 
687 


260 


S3 


Shells 




Silk, and manufactures of: 
Raw 


82 

955 
504 
519 


14 

480 
227 
288 






Manufactures of— 

Yam and thread . . . 


60 

59 

584 

60 

39,835 


27 
27 
262 
27 
17,988 






Velvet and nl ashes 






Tulles and laces. 






Knit fabrics 






Another 


18,782 

83 
1,171 

750 
207 
65 

18 

754 

78 

1,112 

H643 

982 

2,451 

628 

1,783 

10,856 


8,413 

9 
293 

851 
101 
14 

7 

871 

.^7 
7,742 

106 

615 
224 
175 

2,901 


40 


IS 


Spices: 

Pepper .. 




Another '.'. 


15 

800 
209 


4 

72 
84 






Soap: 

Common soap 






Another 


4 


1 


Spermaceti and spermaceti wax 




Spirits, distilled: 

Brandy ••.... 


15 


4 


125 


56 


Whisky- 

Bourbon 




Rye 


200 
2,677 
11,819 


17 

499 

2,612 






An other distilled 


2 
6,660 

1,466 

14 


8 


Starch 


900 


Straw and palm leaf, and manufac- 
tures of..... 


196 


Sugar and molasses: Candy and con- 
fectionery 


748 


186 


S 


Tea 




Varnish 

Vegetebles: ^ 

Beans and nease 


i,4ii 

592 


343 
110 


114,312 
4,414 


30.1» 


Onions 


W4 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 



233 



No. 2S.—StcUemeni of the articles imported ai all ports of the island of Cuba, cte.-— Cont'd. 



Articles. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


American coun- 
tries. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


STBJicr TO DUTY— continned. 

Vegetables-Contlnaed. 

PMatoea 


S106 
716 


•18 
178 


1122,928 

86 

805 

1,431 
40 

3,000 
72 

2,261 

411 


•85,016 

9 

196 

411 
55 

605 
14 

567 

175 


111,555 

63 

62,917 

187 


•2,884 
16 


VegrtRMfp, canned 


Difed pulse 


6,880 
57 


All other (inclodlng pickles and 
BSQCe) 


583 


145 


VinMtr 




V«M?U: Sailing 










Whalebone 


820 
896 

282 
6 
20 


229 
224 

92' 
5 
13 






Walking sticks, umbiellast and parasols. 
Wines: 

In bottles 


70 

100 
28 


18 
44 


In other coverinigs 


7 


Wood, and manufactures of: 

Timber,and unmanufactured wood- 
Logs and other 


1,423 


485 




11 


2 


Lumber- 
Shingles. 


86 


6 


18 

28 
24 


3 

3 

8 




Sbooks- 

Box 


4 

115 




All other 


38 


8 


36 


StaTee 




Headings 














Another 






437 

15,100 
82 

78 
12,514 

120 
207 
491 

2,510 

2,713 

1,231 

314 

96 

191,506 

40 

88,431 


88 

2,839 
3 

15 
1,541 

48 

44 

223 

1,006 

1,067 

494 

141 

39 

76,606 

12 

14,349 






Manufactures of— 

Wood, ordinary, composing 
cases, wherein imported goods 
are packed 


7,473 


3,378 


198 
10 

49 
304 


28 


Doors, sashes, and blinds 


2 


Furniture, not elsewhere speci- 
Ited 


7, Ml 
2,146 

2,288 

^^ 
787 

391 
195 

13,898 
995 
451 

17,927 
3,349 

75,015 


2,369 
342 

984 
536 
214 

166 

78 

5,359 

436 

180 

7,133 

601 

17.113 




Hogsheads and barrels, empty.. 
Trimmings and moldings and 
honse nniflhinini. 


200 








All other 






Wool, and manufactures of : 
Manuiactures of— 

Carpets. 






Flannels and blanket". ...... r ^ ^ 






Wearinsr apnarel t--. 






Woolen 7am. 






Cloth, spun or twilled 







All other mannfactures of 

Zinc, and mannfactures of 


46 


19 


All other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated 


2,623 


464 






Total 


1,669,336 


402,699 


4,499,212 


1,132,250 


4,742,969 


566,006 






Articles. 


Europea 
tri« 


n coun- 
ts. 


Other countries. 


General total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


FRSE OF DUTY. 
Mow^m K^nPTii. fl.nd Tmrtn of 










•9,113 

52,078 

129,665 

85 

18,021 

32, 112 

3,121 

182,607 

342,679 

34,458 




All other and narts oi 






















Art wor^, painting, fl^nd iit4i.tiiA.ry 












other prfaited matter. 
Books, maps, and scientific instru- 
ments for use in schools . . 












Another 


$4,063 




m 






BricW.ff1asm1 or nnflrlafsiMl' Buildlnnr. . . 








Coke and coal: 
Coal— 

Anthracite .....^..rr.TTr 












Bituminous . ....... .... 












Coke 













CUBA 1900 — VOL I, FT 



-16 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



284 



RBPOBT OF KIUTABY GOVEBNOB OF GUBA. 



No. 33. — Statement of the artides imporied at all parts of the island of Cuba, «tc— Cofnfd. 



ArticlM. 


European coun- 
toiei. 


Other countries. 


General totsL 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Doty. 


FBKK OF DUTY— contlnaed. 

Chemicals, drags, and dyes: 

Mineral waters, and other nonalco- 
holic beveraifes 


fll8 
79 








WO, 006 

1.503 
282.890 
107,101 

67 

817 

7,002 

642,207 

10,566 
87.900 
19.454 

87.869 

3,902 
8.549 

3,829,341 

240.191 

161,817 

111.108 

2,886 

2.689 




chona 










Fertilixers: Nataial 










Fibers, v^etable: Flax, hemp, etc., raw. 










Manu/actoies: Single yams' for sugar 
bags only ,,.......,..-.., r . ,,,r 












Fish : Fresh, other than salmon 










Trpfw, plants, and moss 


r* * ' 


IS 


* 




Woo((.'and manufacture.^ of: 

Pine wood, unplaned 












Manufactures of: Furniture, not 
elsewhere specified 












Oold : Coin 












Silver* Coin. . ... 












All other articles not elsewhere enu- 


8,546 










SUBJBCr TO DUTY. 

parts of 








m 


AmmiT^nin and manufacture of 










m 


Animals: 

Cattle 










291, S9t 


Horses 










9,» 


Mules 










)im 


Hogs 










w,ss 


Sheep 










m 


All other 


4 


fl 






sso 


Articles brought in baggage, having no 
commercial values, but dutiable 






1,166 


Art works, painting, and statuary 

Bones, hoofs, horns, and horn tips, 
strips, and waste 


785 
160 


219 
80 






10,706 

6fi 

486 
9,625 

106,170 
48,117 

33,758 

25,090 

28,211 

297,260 

2,299 

47,810 

178 

6,491 

847 

180 

1,129.472 

8,584 

9,827 

7.028 
70,178 
8,042 
8,069 
25,528 
43,494 
128,177 

114.947 
91,797 
9.752 
90.461 
15. U9 
77,989 
42,061 

10,178 

40,968 

18»9eO 

1,012,006 


2,ff( 


4 


«2 


2S$ 


Blacking: 

Stove polish 


U4 


Allot&er 










M7 


Books, music, maps, engravings, and 

other printed matter: All other 

Brass, and manufactures of 


2.369 
324 


220 
167 


98 

30 


86 
4 


18.» 

9,» 


BreadstufEs: 

Bread and bisooit 


6,» 


Barley 










i,fn 


Bran, middlings, and mill feed 










5.M 


Com' r. 










42, «3 


Com meal 










445 


Oats 










$,«n 


Oatmeal 










6 


Macaroni and vermicelli 




86 


9 






iSli 


Rye 







a 


Wheat 










a 


Wheat flour 










aeii^ 


Preparations of, for table food 






875 

77 


98 
.19 


2,1« 


All other 






2,W 


Bricks, glazed or nnglazed: 

Btmding 






8.1S2 


Fire 











12,J75 


Bristles 










3« 


Broom com 










4C 


Brooms and brushes. . . , 


1,286 


816 


483 


218 


8,219 


Cider 


19C 


Candles 


874 


261 






M,0J7 


Cars, carriages, and other vehicles, and 
parts of: 
For steam railwavs 






11,6S! 


For other railways 










••fS 


Cycles and parts of 










'•E 


All other carriages and parts of 

Celluloid, and manufactures of 


701 

446 

4,874 

146 

28 

16,828 

920 

1,154 


176 

66 

1,647 

21 

6 

8,967 

808 

814 






"•g 






5,5£ 


Cement 






%,» 


Crockery 






7.10 


Clocks, watches, and parts of: 

Clocks, and parts of 






%» 


Watches, and parts of 






10.JM 


Cocoa 






5.MM 


Coffee 






4W,«» 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEFOKT OF MILITABT OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



285 



No. Si.SUUement of the articles imparled at aU ports of the island of Cuba, etc, — Cont'd. 



Artidea. 


European coun- 
tries. 


Other countries. 


General total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


8UBJBCT TO DUTY— continued. 
Copper.and manufactares ol: 

IfigntiL hftn, mid 8h66tR 










$16,564 
118,829 

14,188 
1,520 

35,269 

548,604 
1,075,707 

86,732 

126 

103,332 

11,211 

25,621 
161, 165 
379,280 

10,772 
604,716 

19,808 
14,367 
8,956 
1,473 

6,995 

165,906 

83,882 

8,091 

3,275 

385 

163,543 

75,278 

31,580 

351,540 

4,093 

667 

36,693 

7,549 

151,645 

759 

23,904 

24,813 

613,814 

490,152 
6,181 
20,438 

1,832 
4,021 

815 
15,058 

740 

55,628 

1,252 

1,011 

15,463 

1,486 
27,745 

1,542 
86,481 
160,176 

35,387 
19,929 
82,493 


12,489 
20,728 

899 


Maha^ActnreB of 


1282 


•27 


«61 


117 


Coik, and manufactures of cork bark: 
Owk stamen 


Another 


870 


16 






116 


GoCtoD,and manufactures of: 


' 




9,104 

188,778 

304,984 

22,862 

25 


Mannlactures of cIoth»— 

Closely woTen 


14,001 

80,265 

8.582 


4,381 

3,909 

847 


11 
383 
111 

10 


5 

203 

88 

2 


Loosely woven, muslins, etc 

Wearing apparel 


OarpetB 


Yam and thread 






26,329 
4,204 
14,247 
46,426 
137,701 


Quiltings and piques 


61 

891 

792 

5,776 


14 

296 

210 

2,264 






"^elTeteens, corduroys, etc 


3 


1 


Tulles and laces 


Knit fabrics 






Waste, cops, and mill 






1,017 
170,358 

1,825 
942 




12,110 
227 


4,554 

30 
5 


1,169 


491 


Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 


Ashes, Dot and nearl 






Gof^r, sulphate of 


13 


1 


385 


Dyes 






209 


Mmeral waters and other nonalco- 
hniic- bevprage*! ^ . . . r . , , - . 










1,280 

18,164 

37,660 

986 

487 


Medicines, patent and proprietary. . 

Opinni 


1,854 

19 

595 

5 


186 
19 
46 

1 


72 

28,969 

253 


45 

26,980 

52 


Boots, herbs. and bark,n.e.s 

Quinine and all alkaloids and cin- 
choua 


Vanillabeans 






97 


All other 


1,641 

8,066 
4,142 


259 

1,040 
1,464 


136 

69 

1,120 

2 


42 

19 

MO 

2 


18,072 


Earthen, stone, and china ware: 

Earthen and stone ware 


21,090 


China ware -. 


18,159 


Eggs 


67,278 


Fertilixenf, manufactonMi 






70 


Fireworks 






596 
19,386 

76 


1,055 
5,741 

45 


1,078 


ftna 


1,607 


483 


10,869 

1,631 
29,997 


Fibers, vegetable: 

Esparto, rushes, vegetable hair, 
cane osters, fine straw, palm, and 
genista 


Uanufactures of— 






Carpets ...T 






3 


2 


142 




420 
8,773 
7;856 

156,520 


113 

940 

1,918 

11,838 


6.482 


Twinel .* 






4;545 


All other 


95 
36 


83 
2 


140,637 


Fish, including shellfish: 
Dried, smoked, or cured— 

Cod, haddock,hake.and pollock 
Ffprring ,-,,..,,, , 


50,366 
835 


Another 






104 


3 


8,435 


nckled- 

MfwkpTpl 






390 


All other 






21 




113 


Safanon— 

Canned 








204 


All other, fresh or cured 










8,619 


Canned fteh, otljer than salmon and 
shellfishr- 
Caviar 










184 


All other 


710 


177 


61 
67 
298 


i5 

2 
11 


13.926 


Shellfish, oysters 


m 


All other shellflsh 






74 


All other fish and fish products 


794 


198 


3,856 


Pndte and nuts: 
Fruits— 

Apples, dried , . 






179 


Apples, neen or rine 










8,708 












103 












8,345 


All other, green, ripe, or dried . 
Preserved fruits— 

Canned 


278 


90 


931 

72 
4 


122 
18 


23,810 
8,K>2 


Allotiier 






4,978 


Nuts 






4,192 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



236 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 33. — SUstemeni of the articUs imported at all parts of the idand of Cuba, rfc.— Cont'd- 



Articles. 


European coun- 
tries. 


Other countries. 


General total 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value, 


Duty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTT—contiiiaed. 
Oiims and resins: 

POKfll ..,- 


12 








•8.280 
8,980 
6.892 

29,400 
192 

80,122 

12,770 

1^,699 

1.381 

7,995 

28,784 

14,285 

8,649 

51,024 

564 

38,291 

9,138 

23,341 

41,561 

5 

2,542 

219,542 

16 

1.428 
7,204 

49,314 
3.151 

26.851 
74,401 
4» 
16 
51,214 
98,338 
36,876 

76.810 
150,768 

19,955 

8,414 

182,994 

69,832 

39,381 
7.673 

112,407 
6,937 

128,288 

14.262 
27,187 
U,688. 

2,883 
24,738 

9,921 
78,846 

4.816 
62,177 
68,786 

i;277 

112,865 
27.780 

157,282 
21,460 

330,758 


n.otM 


Tar 




1 


1.U0 


Turpentine and pitch 








1.5fiO 


Turpentine, spirits of •. . . . 








6,Qa 


Caoutchouc and gutta-percha 








12 


Glass and glawware: 

QlasB packages, paying duty sepa- 
rate from their contents 


1,732 

1,209 

19.677 


1295 

399 

4,542 


112 ' 12 


2S.C8 


Window glass 


i,VB 


Another 


4 


1 


4ifiS 


Glucose and grape sugar 


m 


Glue 


200 


19 






1.414 


Grease and g^rease scraps and soap stock. 






lis 


Gunpowder and explodyes: 

Gunpowder 










A,m 


All other explodves 






80 . 150 
358 79 


i,e4 


Games and toys 


699 


213 


icort 


Hair, and manufactures of 


ffi 


Hay-' 








s,w 


Hiaes and skins other than fur skins: 
Goatskins 








l.W 


Hides of cattle 








s,«^ 


All other 








6.449 


Honey 









2 


Hops 










il5 


Hats and caps 


38. 60S 


7.721 






4S,fl$ 


Ice 






t 


Ink: 

Printers' 






2 




W 


All other 


19 




4 





1,76 


Instruments and apparatus for scien- 
tific purposes, tel^raph, telephone, 
and other electrical. 








10,(B» 


Incandescent electric lamps 










m 


Iron and steel, and manufactures of: 
Needles, pins, pens, hooks, hairpins, 
j^nd HHFK'cftl instruments ......... 


438 
2,781 


124 
212 






6. as 


All other fine articles 






ii.sn 


Pig iron 






69 


Scrap and old 












Bar iron 


80 


2 






9.49 


Ban and rods of steel 







1&,445 


Hoops, bands, and scroll 










7,« 


Rail for railways- 
Iron 










7.713 


Steel 










1S,0» 


Sheets and plates— 

Iron 










2.866 


Steel 










112: 


Structural iron and steel 










32,89 


Wire and wire cables 


479 
882 


10 
128 






10,496 


Builders' hardware, saws, and 
tools- 
Locks, hinges, and other build- 
ers' hardware 


2 


1 


&,aP7 


Saws 


« 


Tools not elsewhere specified . . . 
Car wheels. . - 


1 




2 




17,l« 






(49 


Castings not elsewhere specified 

Cutlery- 
Table 


986 


84 






13.02 


6 
4 


9 
8 


8.MS 


Another 


66 


11 


6,SV 


Firearms 


^ -8,16 


Machinery and machines, and parts 
of— 
Cash reiristers 










482 


Electrical machinery 


35 


7 






^W0 


Laundry machinery 






h9» 


Metal-working 


342 


69 






14,»7 


Printing presses, and parts of.. 






9a 


Pumps and pump mAchinery. .. 










10. ta 


Sewlh{< machinal and parts of . . 










18. 7» 


Shoe machinery 










» 


Steam engines, and parts of— 










11.458 


Stationary 










t4« 


Boilers and parts of engines . . . . 
Typewriter machines 


114 


23 






i,tsi 






i« 


Sugar and brandy machinery 










84;4» 



Digitized by Vj^^^^V IC 



BEFOBT OF KILITABT OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



237 



No. 2!^.—SUjieiMnt of the articles imported at all ports of the island of Cuba, etc, — Cont'd. 



Articles. 


European coun- 
tries. 


Other countries. 


General total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— continued. 

Inm and steeL etc.— Continued. 
Nails and spikes- 

Cni 


•412 


f7 






$13,998 
10.666 
95,863 
76,702 

8,513 
18,011 

3,634 

284,710 

41,068 

29 

62 

16,699 

2,838 
8,387 
17,763 

5,897 
2,216 

1,858 
8,569 

792,863 
14,787 

3,606 

5,958 

693 

1,166 

19,304 

305,664 

1,036 

1,090 
7,292 
11,821 
7,390 

9,091 
65,776 

429 
10,412 

15,678 

846 
23,439 

668 

80 

11 

12,667 

82,166 

35,174 

6,049 
66,167 

28,684 

2,001 

11,581 
21,462 
266,077 


$3,228 


Wire 






2,214 
16,418 


All other, including tacks 

Pipes and flttinin 


6,078 


1,296 










12.662 


SiS.!?!:...:!^.^:-::::::::::::.:::.: 










2^668 




9 


2 


12 




8,614 
548 


BtoTes and ranges, and parts of 




All other manufactures of iron and 
steel 


184 
596 


31 
86 


8 


13 


44,560 

5.«; 


Jewelry, and other manufactures of 
gold and sllTer— 
Jewelry 


Lamps 






Ghandeliers and all other devices 
for illuminating purposes 










8 


All other manufactures of gold 
and flilyer 


96 








2,427 


Lead, and manufactures of: 

Pigs, bars^ and old 








882 


Pipe 










918 


Au Other manufactures of 


60 


82 


129 


126 


8,854 

896 


Leather, and manufactures of: 

Sole leather 


Upper leather 


:::::::::::::::::::: 






838 


SpUnts, bufi, grain, and all other 
upper 











840 


All otiier leather 










1,728 
173,529 


Manufactures of— 

Boots and shofw 


1,265 


284 


296 


233 


Harness and saddles 


1,460 


bags ., ,. 










818 


Another 


944 


236 


3 


1 


18,472 


lime ^.: ::...:.:.......:.: 


100 


Malt 










184 


MaltUquors: 

Beer in wood 











13,284 


Beer in bottles 


1,017 


821 






70,&19 


All other malt liquors 






141 


Maibleand stone, and manufactures of : 
8*one. nyins'. unwrouffht 










272 


S^^rtone 


4,178 

10 

2,142 

182 
613 


•2,872 

1 

1,275 

16 
74 






8,182 


All other .7. 






2,861 


Matches 






8,683 


Metal and metal compositions, tin: 
In sheets 






1,619 


lfanu&u;tured articles 


1 




10,528 


Musical instruments: 

Ofgans ..»...^x ...XX ............. 




170 


Pianofortes 










4,166 


All other musical instruments and 

OUCoK?" -• 

For floors 


466 


187 


8 


1 


6,263 
60 


All other 


3 








8,201 


Oils: 

Anhnalollfi- 

Fishoil 








69 


Laid oil 










8 


Wbftlftoll 












All other animal oils 


887 


69 






817 


Mineral oils- 
Petroleum, crude 






48,298 


All other natural oils without 
regard to gravity 










U,901 


Mineral, refined or manufactured— 
Naphtha, including the lighter 

products of distiOation 

TliTrminAtinw oils 


65 


15 






2,780 






47,296 


Lubricating and heavy paraffin 
oil ^ 










8,927 


Beslduum," including* tar and 
all other from which light 
mtchM have been distUlea 










G96 


Vegetable ons- 
Cotton-wed oil 










2.341 


TJn^ePdoil 










4,670 


Olive ou. .::..... 


78 


9 


1 


26,817 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



238 



REPORT OF KILITART OOVEBNOB OK CUBA. 



No. SS.Statement of the articles im 


\porUdai all ports of the iMand of Cuba, «<c.— Cont'd. 


Articlee. 


European coun- 
tries. 


Other countries. 


Oeneral total 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Dotj. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— conttnaed. 

Oils-Continaed. 

VolatUe or eiBentlAl oa»- 

Peppermlnt 










$6 
8,424 
7; 185 

400 

1,969 

97,708 

168,027 
260,209 

959 

4,263 

1,127 

71,732 

89,918 

2,751 

142,507 

49,582 

720,984 

28 

5,668 

368.309 

929 

17,885 

487,215 

1,457,780 

3,646 
6,447 

28,284 
To 

78.101 
173,500 

58,678 

230,578 

228,829 

1,558,700 

5,154 

904 

66,406 

8,268 

8 

23,767 

1,219 
2 775 
20,777 
8,905 

681 

8,150 

1,296 

9,761 

885 

278,519 

4.180 
25.801 

129,696 

"'^ 

1,009 

1,619 

687 

68,678 


n 


Another 


$44 

858 


114 
160 


fl8 
39 


$22 
9 


1,068 


'All other vegetable oils 


1,2M 


Paints, pigments, and colors: 

black 


111 


Zinc and oxide of 









■ 


W 


All other 


2,909 

4.227 
15,999 


856 

1,671 
1,982 


87 

200 
520 


19 

82 
182 


27,W 


Paper, and mannfactmee of: 
Paper pulp- 
In sheets 


All other 


69,90 


Manufactures of— 

Paste and carton pierre 


U> 


Wrought ; 


26 


8 


1 




LW 


Pfti^ffln *nd wax 




m 


Perfumery and cosmetics 


36 
59 


14 
127 


82 
26 


64 
6 


%,'Si 


Plated ware 


10,Stf 


Provisions, comprising meat and dairy 
productB: 

Beef productB— 

Beef, canned 


6ft 


Beef, fresh 










lf,W 


Beef, salted or pickled 










K,a97 


Beef, Jerked .. 










m,m 


Beef, tallow 










^ i 


Hogproducts— 

Bacon 






12 


3 
2 


L4U 


Hams and shoulders 






m,m 


Pork, canned 









'« 


Porki fresh 










%9» 


Pork, salted or pickled 






18 


2 


84% 


IatA ... 


. 




^03 


Lard products, and substi- 
tutes for (cottolene, lard- 
ine, etc.) 


• 








M7 


Mutton 










1.M 


Oleomargarine 


876 


119 






iw 


Imitation butter 






'11 


Poultry and game 






16 
862 


2 
91 


16.491 


All otHer meat products 

Dalrv products- 


653 

10,810 
156,065 
12,051 
24,570 


163 

1,898 

80,164 

1,206 

8,092 


40,512 
10, » 


Cheese 






4szn 


Condensed milk 






n,fSi 


Rice 


41,284 


8,262 


f^ioa 


Rubber, and manufactures of: 

Belting, hose, and bagging 


48 


Boots and shoes 










^ 


All other 


166 
99 


22 

7 






9.00 


India rubber, scrap and old 






» 


Samples, with commercial value 






1 


Salt..... 


18 


1 






ma 


Seeds: 

Clover seed 


12 


6 


71 


Flax and timothy seed 






» 


All other 


715 
247 

11 


126 
208 

5 


95 


14 
t... 


2.aoe 


Shells 


2,14! 


Silk, and manufactures of: 

Raw 






su 


Mann facturee of— 

Yam and thread 






!,4« 


Velvet and nlushes 










b6i 


Tulles and laces 










4.44 


Knit fabrics 


52 
3,105 


24 

1,896 






IT 


All other 


8,097 

2 
16 


'' i8,969 

1 
4 


125,11 


Spices: 

Pepper 


l.OSi 


All other 


9 

163 
422 


2 

84 
46 


6.41 


Soap: 

Common soap... .••..•.... 


47,491 


Another 


6 




1,711 


Spermaceti and spermaceti wax 




12 


Spirits, dUtlUed: " 

Brandy 










7« 


Whisky- 
Bourbon 










791 


Rye 










« 


All other distilled 


ii.eoe 


ii.756 






8B,M 



Digitized by 



Goo> 



LC 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVtftNOft OF CUBA. 



239 



No. 2S.^SUaemefit of the artides imported at aU ports of the idand of Ouba^ etc. — Cont'd. 



Articles. 


European coun- 
telea. 


Other countries. 


General total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


KTBjKrr TO DCTY— continuecl. 
Starch 










•64.644 
287 

6,827 

18 

10 

444 

12,488 

67,450 

8,691 

1,078 
2,417 

2 
19,541 
1,060 
8,050 
8,476 
17,344 

391,795 
194.079 
876,664 
38,980 
118,280 

9,165 
627 

86,400 

56.165 

1,805 

28,468 

49.077 

868.958 

18,482 

26,685 
1,684 

6,189 
765 
595 

16,847 
13,232 
4,782 
4,624 
181,794 

101,662 
6,192 

181,794 
224,825 

9.282 

86,051 

651 

28,401 

261 

5,584 
8,426 
85,728 
3 854 
1,096 
881,682 
18,828 

1,005,587 


•15.019 












67 


Stnw tnd palm leaf, and manufac- 
turesof 


1846 


$14 


«» 


•91 


1.015 


SogarandmolaaBee: 
Vnlann 


4 


81nip 






::::::::::l:' ' ■ ■ 1 


2 


Sogar, raw 










227 


Boiari refined 










6,442 




2,101 


525 


45 
8,000 


11 
749 


16,889 


Tea 


1,017 
809 


Tobacco, and mannfactures of : 
Umnanofactnied— 

Leaf 






All other 










700 


Mannfiacturefl of— 






1 




5 


Plug 








356 


7,860 


IH)wd(v ii.n<i annff 






452 


580 


In cakes 








2,126 


All other 






1,0m 


1.100 


2,172 


vamiih. ....:.!............. :....::.::. 


160 


37 


5,804 


VegeUbles: 

B«Mi« tnd peaue 


212 
568 

8 
229 

2 

580 
4 


45 
178 


72,568 


Onloni 






84.158 


Potatoes 






90,916 


Vesetables. canned 


230 
457 

657 


68 
114 

141 


58 


9,784 


DriedpoS .^r..:::. :::::. .::::: 


12,788 


AU other (incitiding pickles and 
noce) 


138 
11 


21.868 


VlnettT 


609 


V«Ssl 

Steam 






814 


Sailing 










8,060 


Whalebone 






2 


1 


521 


Walking sticks, mnbrellas, and parasols 
Wines: 

In bottles 


218 

2,266 
8 555 
i;i86 


64 

867 

1.687 

682 


6,777 


11 
84 


16 
106 


17,787 


In ottier corerings 


642,928 


etoarklingUqaors and cordials 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Ttmberandonmanafactured wood- 
Sawed 


8,978 






2,044 


Lo^ and other 






10 


1 


217 


Lumber— 

Rn>.r«1ii rlAftln und nlA.n1rfl 






278 


Jdflia and M^JitllnffR 


15 
4 


1 
1 






54 


ffhfnvl^ . . ^ 






68 


Shooks- 

Box 


42 


2 


1,042 


All other 






1,108 


Stayes 










292 


Heading 










852 


AUoth^ '.'"*\"!'"!! 










1,186 


Manofactores of— 

Wood, ordinary, composing 
cases wherein Imported goods 
are packed 


6,110 


614 


440 


656 


21,981 




1,296 


Pnmitare not elsewhere speci- 
fied rrr... 


1,206 
983 

648 
90 


494 
100 

267 
40 


806 
4 

454 
692 


222 


86,599 


Hogsheads and barrels, empty. . 

Trlmmmgs and moldings and 

hflf^u^ llnisbingif , . , 


27,078 


840 
294 


3,269 


Wooden ware.. 7. 


9,050 
46 


All other.. 


125 


48 


578 


281 


6,542 


Wool, and manufactures of: 
Raw 


74 


Manufactures of— 

Gaipeta 


88 


85 


8 


1 


2,218 
8,871 




881 

88 

20 

2.642 

4,211 

14,221 


182 

17 

8 

1.057 

580 

3.542 






14,289 


Woolen yam 






489 


Cloth, spun or twilled 

^ All other manufactures of 

Zinc, and manuAtctnrea of 


27' 

28 

1,117 


ii' 

82 
482 


.162,255 
2,641 


All other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated 


187.061 


Total 


662,500 


128,421 


184,696 


64,888 


82,666,181 


6,926,768 







Digiti 



zed by Google 



240 KEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOK OF CCTBA. 

No. 34. — Value of merchandise imported ai the port of HaJbana, Cuba, during the 

year 1900, 



Months. 


United 
States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Ger- 
many. 


United 
King- 
dom. 


Ameri- 
can coun- 
tries. 


Euro- 
pean 
coun- 
tries. 


Other 
tries. 


T^ital. 


1900. 

January 

February 

March 

April 


•2,127,944 
3,950,179 
1,770,764 
1,690,428 
1,787,869 
1,639,706 
1,567,437 
1,545,825 
1,224,680 
1,478,189 
1,638.294 
1,745,346 


1788,810 
685,364 
781,997 
846,161 
765,471 
832.641 
576,324 
693,452 
632,032 
714,876 
655,886 
786,286 


•294,793 
220,473 
270.170 
263,989 
293,766 
272,679 
187,400 
236, n2 
227,372 
245,349 
214,828 
207,467 


•176,057 
125,718 
176,086 
147,984 

184, en 

106,117 
184,814 
168,878 
144,257 
227,602 
172,826 
228,810 


•689,089 
728,817 
697,516 
729,766 
626,902 
922,468 
547,637 
554, 3U 
549,912 
648,145 
428,944 
888,034 


•470,199 
454,767 
611.990 
488,844 
640,382 
649,196 
368,738 
614,738 
491,693 
625,379 
529,687 
666,862 


•90,885 
138,264 
114,248 
105 736 


•10.887!|l.5ffi,5M 
11.238j6,30B,M 

1 omv i iWAfi 


May 


109,' 476 ib\4e»\im,m 

83,686 13,802 4.4».K8 
87,18&: 21,149 8,M8,(itt 
114,917 9,638 8,904.6» 
106,353 U,988 8.287,M 
72.706 17,029 3,S29,K5 
95,176 16,278 8,M6,ai 
96,872 15,396 4,OI4,Sn 


June 


July 


August 

September.... 

October 

November 

December 


Total... 


21,866,661 


8,608,2892,924,898 


2,028,656 


7,360,886 


6,402,374 


1,213,893 160,68250,560.17} 

1 



No. 36. — Statement of artides imported ai the port of Habana, Cuba, during the m 
months, July 1 to December SI, 1900. 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duly. 


FREE OP DUTY. 

Agricultural implements: 

Mowers, reapers, and parts of 

Plows and cultivators, and parts of . . 
All other, and parts or 


•3,482 
25,698 
14,368 
























•169 




•2,137 
35 

2,133 
7,063 




Art works, painting, and Ftatuary^ 








Books, music, maps, engravings, and 
other printed matter: 
Books, maps, and scientific instru- 
ments, for use in schools . 


11,096 
9,608 
2,624 

111,464 
199.042 
84,926 

1,439 

18 

28 

11,389 

57 

817 

6,728 

336,929 

2,717 




2,963 

1,230 

135 






Another 








Bricks, glazed or unglazed, building 

Coal and coke: 
Coal- 
Anthracite 
















Bltuniinons r 








96 




Coke 










Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 




25,106 




4,170 
780 




Quinine and fUl alkaloids and cin- 
chona 








Fertilizers, natural 










Fibers, vegetable: 

Flax, hemp, etc., raw 












Manufactures, single yams for sugar 
bags only 












Fifth, fr^^Si,oth'erth ATI Hftimon ...... 












Trees, planta, and moas 












Wood, and manufactures of: 

Pine wood, unplaned 












Manufactures of— 
Furniture not elsewhere specified. 
Silver coin 




4,066 
9,796 

1,298 
















All other articles not elsewhere enumer- 
ated 


62,209 

1,640 
2,882 

493.897 
117,300 
yb 426 







1,266 




SUBJECT TO DUTY. 

Agricultural implements, all other and 
parts of 


•164 
646 

49,148 
16,018 






Amminum, and manufactures of 






48 


lU 


Animals: 

Cattle 


32 


•2 




Horses 






Mules .. . . 










Hogs 


10l!240 9; 689 

1,781 222 

78C <iH 


12 

10 

610 


1 
2 
78 

651 






Sheep ... . 






All other!..'!! 


82 


• •• ^ 


Articles brought in baggage, having no 
commercial values, but dutiable 




831 


22 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



KEFOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF OtTBA. 



241 



No. 35.—8uaemerdofarticle$ imported at the port of Habana, Cuba, etc. — Continued. 



Articles 


United States. 


Spain. 


France. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value, 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


suBjacT TO DUTT— continued. 

Art works, inlnttncr and statoary 

Bones, hoofs, horns, and horn tips, strips, 
and waste 


$1,297 

140 

93 
5,621 

17,539 
18,798 

2,308 

391 

22,424 

258,149 

1,835 

41,306 

121 

288 

40 

118 

561,402 

766 

523 

86 

56,299 

828 

6,440 

4,846 

90 

666 

47,275 
90,289 

5,604 
58,402 

i;695 
38.685 

6,678 

5,610 

6,849 

4,816 

492,509 

6,701 
78,577 

1,716 
1,078 

1,753 

27,986 

61,405 

17,166 

56 

262 

631 

1,064 

367 

3,877 

4,273 

6,811 

6,657 

2,272 

1,484 

548 


$169 

80 

31 
417 

1,700 
3,578 

858 

49 

5,606 

37,513 

358 

7,789 

32 

71 

7 

11 

182,799 

192 

126 

4 

4,920 

32 

128 

4,728 
9,230 
1,139 

11,318 
615 

10,360 
1.536 

1,405 

1,720 

1,989 

292,179 

1,174 
13,924 

74 
98 

125 

12,677 
19,149 
6.814 

159 
276 
448 
120 

1,869 
476 

2,143 

874 
805 
99 
75 


$1,282 


$244 


$1,639 


$348 


Bladdng: 

Store poUah. 


863 
86 

43.070 
12,196 

4,498 


81 
17 

6,875 
2,474 

626 






Allot&er 


1,802 

8,462 
8,309 

1,740 


94 


Books, music, maps, enfrayings, and 

oCherprinted matter: All other 

Bran and mannfactnres of 


2,485 
894 


BreadstuHK 

Bread and biscuit 


188 


Bariey 




Bian,'middlingB, and mill f^ 










Com 


1,820 
11 
1 


260 






Gorameal 






Oats 








Oatmeal 








Nacamni and Tcrmicelli 


2,026 


605 


157 


40 


Rye 




i^v. ::..:.:::.:.::..::..: 










Wheat flour 


543 

1,663 

433 

2,859 
1,148 


67 
415 
122 

811 
130 






Preparations of, for table food 

AllSher 


543 
1,498 

2,181 


187 
876 


Bricks, glased or unbiased: 


2,096 


Fire 


BrMes 


47 


16 










B'ooms and brushes , 


194 
87,619 
99,685 


67 

3,080 

18,700 


9,017 


8,166 


Oder 


(^ndlfs 


1,178 


318 


Oais, carriages, and other vehicles, and 
parte of: 
For steam railways r 




Vor other xailwasrs 










Cycles and parts of 


88 


18 


245 
11,357 
6,494 
4,362 
3,163 

597 

7,428 
90 


49 


All other carriages and parts of 

^Ink>id and mannfactureii of . . 


2,840 


1,178 


424 


2,200 


Cement 


1,249 


Crockery - 


29,497 
17 


4,296 

4 


877 


Clocks, watches, and parts of: 


160 


Watches, an^ narts of 


1,858 
33 


Cocoa 






Coffee 








Copper, and manufactures of: 

incots. bars, and sheets 






8 
5,061 

171 
25 

179 

46,252 
65,202 
33.024 


1 


Manc&ctures of 


381 

11,797 
12 

2,465 

68,123 
176, 122 
24,668 


75 
74C 


1,273 


Cork, and manufactures of cork bark: 
Cork stoppers 


28 


All other 


1 


Cotton, and manufactures of: 


171 

19,202 
42,652 
8.149 


4 


Manufactures of cloths— 

Closely woven 


11,823 


Loosely woven, muslins, etc 

WearinsT annarel 


9,618 
4,682 


Carpets ^....... 




Yam and thread 


2,624 

245 

8,073 

24,199 

187,468 

1,984 

190,598 

46 


1,302 
76 
3,962 
3,712 
71,991 
165 
61,444 

6 


10,566 
1,843 
1,859 

25,813 

87,092 
24 

21,476 

1,082 
4 


3,391 


OnfltiTiirn and Dioues r , 


336 


Velveteens, corduroys, etc 

Tnlles and laces .. x 


592 
6,010 


Knit fabrics 


27,872 


Wajite COM and mill . . . . . . r 


3 


All other manufactures of 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Adds 


6,089 
23 


Ashes, not and oearl 




CoBMkr KtilnhAtA of . 








Dyes 


17 


4 


27 

6,177 

60,722 

10 

282 


7 


Mmeral waters and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 


1,195 


Medicines, patent and proprietary . . 

Oplinn r r . - - - 


74,195 

2,985 

899 

1 

86 
49.021 


8,776 

3,8g 

97 


8.000 
1,696 
2,827 




5,243 


1,827 
551 


17 


Boots, herba and bark. n.e.s 

Qidnine and all alkaloids and chin- 
chona 


20 




47 
5,485 






24 
30,706 


6 


All other 


9,62i 


807 


3,302 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



242 



REPORT OF MILITARr GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 35. — Staiemeni of articles imported cU the port of Habana, Cubay eic. — ConUnned. 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


Fnace. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Doty. 


8UBJRCT TO DUTY— continued. 

Earthen, stone, and china ware: 

EartheTi wnd stone ware 


12,272 

1.448 

327,729 

1,839 

12 

1,048 

3,581 


«356 

314 

63,576 

23 

12 

341 

709 


•6,031 
661 


•s 


T,S10 


KT) 


China ware 


4,9QS 


Eggs 




Fertilizers, manufactured 


67 


1 






Fireworks , . r , . . 






Fans 


9,899 

2U 

1,600 
9 

2,996 
10.872 
96,757 

69 


2,969 

27 

152 

1 

683 

1,710 

23,687 

2 


2.809 
76 


sn 


Fibers, vegetable: 

Esparto, rushes, vegetable hair, cane 
oders, flnestraw.palm, and genista. 
Manufactures of— 

Bags for sugar 


4 


Carpets 


886 

4,621 

96 

8,335 

22,894 

783 

16,714 

26 


69 

1.133 

6 

988 

2,671 

106 

2,869 

4 






Cordage and rope 


8 

601 

29,627 

1,845 


2 


Twine 


10 


All other 


7,0I& 


Fish, Including shell fish: 
Dried, smoked, or cured— 

Cod, haddock, hake, and pollock. 
Herring 


IB 


All other 


1,669 


206 






Pickled- 
Mackerel 






All other 


4,000 

146 
13.612 


lis 

36 
3,898 






Salmon- 
Canned 


119 
26 

124 
688 
882 
173 
294 

49 

23,206 

1,431 

2,861 

34,399 

6,251 

1,197 

66 

2,768 
8.630 
4,419 
24,239 
2 

32,149 
121 

*•??? 

3,867 
22,746 

2,016 

1.417 

8,292 

26 

23,879 

2,202 
10,606 
8,074 


30 

8 

31 
166 
149 
26 
78 

361 
2,802 

1,663 

300 

6 

881 
1,«1 
1,282 
4,216 






All other, fresh or cured 


6 


2 


Canned fish, other than salmon and 
shellfish- 
Caviare 




Another 


45,602 


11,876 


1,358 


80 


Shellfish, oysters 




All other sliellflsh 


248 
10,314 


17 
2,679 






All other fish and fish products 

Fruits and nuts: 
Fruits- 

ADDles. dried ... 


1,187 


2M 


Apples, green or ripe 


76 


13 






Prunes 






Rftlirinif . 


82.091 
108,760 

22,699 

903 

29,973 


2,804 
18,149 

5,673 

225 

3.866 


175 
511 

2.421 
2.128 


U 


All other, green, ripe, or dried.. 
Preserved fruits- 
Canned 


86 
601 


All other 


m 


Nuts 




Gums and resins: . 

Boidn 






Tar 










Turpentine and pitch 


160 


9 


18 
5 


1 


Tumentine snints of 


1 


Caoutchouc and gutta-percha 

Glass and glassware: 

Glass packages, pa3ring duty sepa- 
rate from their contents 








4,831 

18 

10,110 

268 

664 

1,418 

627 
172 

1,668 
18 

6,228 

830 
1,678 
1,862 


16,211 


2,728 


3,«9 
1,888 
18,168 


m 


Window glass 


571 


All other 


21,437 


4,686 


4.» 


Glucose and sraDe su^ar 




Glue 


166 
683 


29 
34 


859 


m 


Grease and grease scraps and soap stock . 
Gunpowder and explosives: 
Gunnowder 








All other ex nlosives 








Games and toys 


8,601 
13 


1,183 
6 


6,0« 
856 


m 




136 


Hay' 




Hides and skins other than fur skins: 


3,124 

8,817 

1,987 

5 


466 

491 

2,926 

2 


2,221 
2,074 

41828 


)C7 


Hides of cattle 


SM 


All other 


76 


Honey 




Hops 


1,489 
..86. 

1,819 
1,928 

80,209 
1,469 


162 

1,376 

4 

229 
150 

6,058 
218 







Hatsand caps 


7,686 


1,687 


68,983 


10.W 


Ic© 




Ink: 

Printers' 






1 
621 

296 
746 




All other 


642 


146 


*** ifli 


Instruments and apparatus forscientlflc 
purpoBos, telegraph, telephone, and 
other electrical 


91 


Incandescent electric lamps 


60" 


io* 


U4 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



BEPORT OF MILITABY GK)VERNOB OF CUBA. 



243 



Na 35,—SUiUmerU of artides imported at the port of ffabanaf Cuba, etc. — Continued. 





United States. 


Spain. 


Prance. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


8UBJICT TO DUTY— continaed. 

Iron tnd steel, and mannfactureA of : 
Needles, pins, peim, hooka, hairpins, 
and sui^cal Instmments 


$4,786 

10,406 

46 


11,8^ 

1,338 

2 


t311 

78 


931 
11 


16,021 
5,668 


9870 


All otherline lurticles 


845 


Pig iron 




ficrap and old 






16 




Baruon 


26,180 
16,601 
7,578 

15,029 
67,564 

3,198 
106,110 
87,046 

6,488 

960 

58,960 

4,170 
84,166 

8.522 

1.789 
11,895 

4,123 
18.264 

2.684 

8,756 

61,776 

48 

32,098 

19.192 

1,118 

5.147 
7,679 
81,663 
62,232 
5,266 
9,873 
2,460 
52,590 

2,618 

1,166 

570 
1,674 
9.042 

2.620 
296 

13 
2,694 

148,349 
6,049 

1,828 

10,968 

2 

1,156 

18,096 

67,888 

3 

787 
1,057 
2,183 


4,928 
8,320 
2,175 

1,608 
6,758 

488 

25,095 

5,508 

697 
109 

9,091 
414 

9,085 

1,248 
678 
213 

349 

2.280 

825 

2,654 

586 

1,751 

12,354 

10 

6,418 

8,838 

111 

1,881 
1,762 
5,088 
8.402 
1,729 
1,935 
385 
8,917 

373 

176 

68 

205 

1,744 

398 
45 

4 

519 

28,980 
547 

278 
2,248 








Ban and rods of steel 










Hocqps bandF, and scroll 






8 




Rafl'f6rrailw'ay»— 

Iron 








Steel * 










Iron 










StracUual iron and steel*. 










Wire and wire cables 


16 
544 


2 
116 


243 

455 

86 

5.205 


7 


Builders' hardware, saws, and tools- 
Locks. hinge8,and otherbuilders' 
harnware . 


85 


Saws 


8 


Tools not elsewhere specifled 

Ou wheels 


437 


32 


510 


OutlngB, not elsewhere specified .... 
Cutlery- 
Table 


9 

36 

396 

4,902 




2,727 

4,081 

4,1(M 

496 


168 


7 

78 
1,396 


1,066 


AU other 


715 


nrpftrms , . ... , 


185 


Ibchinery and machines, and parts of: 
Cash registers 




Ri^tri<^] machinery ..... 






770 


154 


T^nndrr manhinery'. ... 








Met^wnrWnj.. .. 






76 
141 

1,748 

21 

6 

822 


15 


Printing prenea. and parts of 

Pnmpaand pmnp machinery 

Sewing machinea. and parts of 

flhne fPflchinery 






28 


300 


ffS 


950 

4 


59 


12 


1 


Steam engines, and parts of— Boilers 
and parts of engines 


165 


Typewriter machines 

Sugar and brandy machinery 

KtOsandapikeK 

cut...T7. 












245 


25 


22 
13 


1 
2 




Wire 


28 
4,610 


4 


All other, indndinff tacks 


687 


Ptoes And flttinffr 














2 

1,101 

88 

6,446 

7.490 
2.602 




Scales and balances '.W 






222 


Stores and ranges, and parts of 

All other manufactures of iron and steel . 

anddlver: 
Jewelry 








1,731 

23 

851 

30 

634 

1,907 


209 

6 

158 

12 

75 

216 


986 
455 


All other manufactures of gold and 
sQver 


427 


Lead and manufactures of: 
PisiB. bATK. And old 




Pipe 






AlTother mauufoctures of 


1,014 


182 


Lesther and manufactures of: 
Sole leather 




Upper leather 


1,019 

90 
1,073 

549,280 
10 

118 
7,108 


153 

23 
241 

128,217 
8 

48 
1,848 






Splints, buff, grain.' and ail ' other' 
upper 


889 

2,684 

787 
2,029 

548 

9,344 

15 


222 


All oUier leather 


509 


Miurafactnresof— 


245 


Hameas and saddles 


111 


bags. 


88 


AU other 


2.124 


Umc 


4 


Malt 

Malt llquofB, beer 

In wood 

In bottles 

All other malt liquon? . . . . ^ 


134 

12,484 

17,266 

2 

29 
134 
616 


■*"6,'6i4 

10 

290 
1,804 
2,870 


489" 

1 

241 
442 
706 






Marble and stone, and nuinufactures of: 




SSSiffSSSe"""^"*^*':.:::::: 
AUoSS :::::::; 


18 
1,077 


2 
84 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



244 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVIEENOB OF CUBA. 



No. 35. — Statement of articles imported at the port of Habana, Cuba, etc. — Contmoed. 



Articles. 


United States. 


Spain. 


Frtnce. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


BUBJKCT TO DUTY— continued. 
Matches 


1854 

34 
41,946 

62 
705 

652 

18 
18,968 


$482 

2 
6,828 

24 
283 

260 

1 
2,696 


$480 


$197 


$129 


tfi 


Metal and metal compoeitions. tin: 
In sheets 




Manufactured articles 


3,427 


61N 


4.009 


736 


Musical instruments: 

Organs 




Pianofortes 


3,483 
1,815 


1,3»4 
727 


2,175 

1,578 

86 
800 


sn 


All other musical instruments and 
parts of 


681 


Oilcloths: 

For floors 


4 


All other 


380 
286 


6 
26 


78 


Oils: 

Animal oils— 

Plgh oil 




Lard oil 


30 

2 

8,804 

74,356 

31,777 

2,896 
9,672 

6,920 

761 

8,878 
927 
141 

6 

26 

1,468 

29 
28,151 

48,966 
38,090 

102 

181 

154 

5.315 

13,166 

1,970 

120,440 

3,301 

17 

635 
209,489 

226 

17, 152 

228,983 

965,191 

3,176 
4,574 
19,708 
76 
73,300 
58,767 

18.268 

17.929 

1 164,227 


3 






Whaleoil 




:: 




All other animal f»il« 


540 
42,560 
11,007 

641 
8,468 

8,846 

370 

1,784 
178 
22 

3 

9 

804 

8 
6,987 

15,764 
10,254 

11 

54 

18 

2,213 

3,306 

479 

15,814 

536 

1 

111 

50,653 

57 

2,830 

39,150 

176,991 

601 

971 

6,338 

11 

15,416 

12,782 

3,604 

2,532 

i 16,417 


29 


2 


467 


9 


Mineral oil»- 

Petroleum, crude 




All other natural oils without 
regard to gravity 




i 




Mineral, refined or manufactured— 
Naphtha, including the lighter 

products of distillation 

TIlninlnRtinflrnilfl 










r *'::::* 




Lubricating and heayy paraffin 
oil 








Residuum, including tar and all 
other from which tight 
pitches have been distilled.. 
Vegetable oils— 

Cotton-seed oil 




1 








192 
1,306 
3,898 


11 


Linseed oil..-. 


190 
198,048 


88* 

19,649 


SU 


Olive oil 


«& 


Volatile or essential oils— 
PeDDerm in t 




Alfother.... '!""!. **!.!I.*!!!! .. 


448 
2,452 

2 
4,142 

. 83,198 
87,004 

86 
678 

2L 
271 
891 


149 

281 






All other vegetable oils 


728 

60 
3.008 

26,449 
24,118 

39 

847 

17 

49.890 

5,158 


Iffi 


Paints, pigments, and colors: 

Zinc and oxide of 


t 


All other 


721 

8,542 
1,398 

7 
147 

2 
71 
98 


60 


Paper, and manufactures of: 
Paper pulp- 
In sheets 


9.681 


All other 


7.810 


Manufactures of— 

Paste and carton pieree 


1 


Wrought 


a6 


Paraffin and wax 


s 


Perfumery and cosmetics 


16, 6M 


Plated ware 


12S 


Provisions, comprising meat and dairy 
products: 
Meat products- 
Beef product*: 




Beef fresh 










Beefi salted' or pickYed. /...'.'. 
Bfipf tallow 


















Hogproducts: 
Bacon 


2 

18,365 

317 

2 

86 

4,941 

471 








Hamfiand shonidera. 


2,735 
87 


8 


i 


Pnrk n&nned 




Pork fresh 






Pork, salted or pickled 

Lard 


6 
364 

46 






5 


i 


Lard products, and substi- 
tutes for (cottolene, lard- 




Mutton 




.•• 










TmltAtinn hnttpr 








24 
77,024 

21,057 
8,476 


6 
19,256 

3,597 
454 


i 


All other meat products 


2,303 

441 

2,188 

416 


s» 


Dairy products- 
Butter 


« 


Cheese 

Oondenaed milk 


"i 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OP MILITARY OOVEBNOE OF CUBA. 



245 



No. 35. — Statement of articles imported at the port of Habana, Cuba, etc. — Continued. 



Articles, 


United States. 


Spain. 


Prance. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— continaed. 
Bke ... 


$1,448 

1,266 

628 

18,169 

2,447 

888 

578 

217 

3,160 

1,232 

450 

1,188 


1259 

96 
190 
3,600 
174 
123 

83 

26 

810 

565 

202 

535 


$11,868 
80 


$1,699 

4 


$8,387 
24 


$886 


Robber, and nuurafactarei of: 

Belting, hose, and baggring 


Boots and shoes ." 




All other 


8,794 


1,324 


2,118 

288 


298 


India rubber, scrap and old 


S 


Salt 


11,998 

6U 
1,723 
11,433 


13,162 

28 

247 

1,284 




Seeds: 

Clover seed 






Flax and titpotby w^ 


120 
854 
812 

188 

585 

788 

6,820 

241 

151,506 


21 


All other ' 


118 


ghf llf 


690 


Slllr tnd manofactares of: 






89 


Mannfactnres of— 

Yam and thread 


136 


62 


264 


Velvet and nlnahes 


830 


Tulles and lacea 


212 

3 

4,126 

3,444 
1,988 

6,910 
4,272 


96 

1 

1,857 

861 
482 

2,229 
1,183 


115 


52 


8,120 
112 


Knit fabrics 


All other 


17,167 


7,738 


68,806 


Spices: 


AlloSer 


21,464 

57,170 
14 

845 


5.855 

22,126 
6 

362 


52 

1.980 
4,764 

5 

238 


13 


Oonunon soap. . . . » , , . . , ^ ^ , , , , 


524 


AU other 


960 


SpliltB, distilled: 

Brandy 


4 


Whisky- 

Boorbon 


459 

261 

1.258 

7,824 

205 

2,158 

1 

444 

10,720 

18,062 

24 

2 

9,718 

889 

2,826 

8,8n 

136,607 
4.451 

177,749 

598 

5,522 

30,416 
12 

14,500 

42,500 

45 

5,745 

1,284 
2,210 
1.123 

26,264 
1,817 

1,677 
75 

11,060 
2,273 
1,986 
9,181 


164 
113 
707 
2,960 
51 
366 


222 


Rye 








All other distilled 


8,473 
60 


4,266 
2 


37,232 
24 


21,237 
8 


Starch 


Stereotype and electrotype plates 

Straw and palm leaf, and manufactures of 
Sugar and molaases: 

Molasses 




8 


1 


804 


i66 


Sugar, raw 


227 

5,756 

3,242 

6 

5 

3,380 

108 

1,046 

8,826 

21,492 
1,519 

39,348 
149 
854 

7,140 
22 

148 

1,990 

19 

1,179 

181 

1,200 

578 

2,022 
159 

80 
7 

639 
203 
205 
660 










Sogar, refined 






83 

2,884 

78 


48 


Ouidy and confectionery 


40,047 


10.012 


722 


Tea '. '. 


19 


Tobacco, and manufactures of: 
Manufactures of>— 

Cisars. 








Plug ..,,.. .x^r. ........ 










Powder and ennB 










All other 








1 


Vamifb 


1 

17,242 
151,686 
4,419 
26.205 
58,442 

41,502 





1,216 


142 


Tegetables: 

Beans and pcAflC 


2,074 

26,143 

686 

6,550 

4,725 

10,025 




Onions 






Potatoes 






Vegetables, canned ......,,. 


2,638 
15 

7,696 
387 


636 


Dneid pulse 


1 


All other (including pickels and 
sauced ^ ..-.,.. ...........X. 


1,925 


Vinegar^.. : 


291 


vSSsf 

fl^m 








Sailing 










Whalebone 






366 
8,019 

1,153 
4,220 
7,259 


258 


Walking sticks, umbrellas, and parasols. 
Wines: 

In bottles 


10,420 

37,133 

706,119 

93 

1 


2,606 

14,097 

526,865 

88 


1,918 
388 


In othfT covflring" ....,,.,-.,,.,--,-- 


1,973 


Sparkling liquoii and cordials 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Timber and unmanufactured wood- 
Sawed 


3,993 


\aw% and oth4*r 








Lombei^ 

Boards, deals, and planks 

Rhimrlm 


















Sbooka— 

Box 


157 
114 


3 
10 


88 


5 


Allother 




Heading 






AUothS;:;;;:;:::::;:::!.! 


i,222 


89 


is 


4 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



246 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 36. — Stalement of articles imported at the port of Habana, Cuba, etc — Continaed. 



Articles. 



BUBJKCT TO DUTY— continued. 

Wood, and manufactures of— <k)nt'd. 
Manufactures ot— 

Wood, ordinary, composing cases 
wherein importedf goods are 

packed 

Doors, sashes, and blinds 

Furniture, not elsewherespecified 
Hogsheads and barrels empty . . . 
Trimm ngs and moldings and 

house finishings 

Woodenware 

Wood pulp 

- All other 

Wool, and manufactures of: 

Raw 

Manufactures of — 

Carpets 

Flannels and blankets 

Wearing apparel 

Woolen yam 

Cloth, spun or twilled 

All other manufactures of 

Zinc, and manufactures of 

All other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated 



United States. 



Value. Duty. 



I- 



$34,861 
4,627 
81,912 
96,280 

3,661 

17,246 

820 

9,676 

78 



2 

6,336 

2 

6 

1,816 

2,704 

520,714 



Total 9,099,271 



16,625 
1,180 

22,806 
8,056 



4,826 

83 

2,466 

14 

120 

1 

2,533 

2 
629 
707 

79,770 



1,719,013 



Spain. 



Value. Duty, 



$18,516 
104 
768 

'99,238 

1,114 

2!, 532 

231 

1,228 



22S 
2,191 
9,082 

321 

306 
20,893 I 

417 

39,066 



$1,555 

50 

177 

10,355 

266 

387 

13 

361 

1 

92 

877 

3,613 

145 

122 

8,358 

40 

8,785 



France, 



Value. 



$7,687 
810 

2,519 
700 

706 
2,172 



Duty. 



$8,8e$ 

2S7 
SIS 



3,957,855 11,237,918 



3,084 

114 

1,888 

715 

8,966 

1,439 

86| 

131,864 ' 

1,806 

f»,2]6 



1.115 

45 

733 
2» 
l^Stt 
64A 
1& 
52.512 
245 

26.973 



1,319,123 3M,mi 



Articles. 



FREE OP DUTY. 



Agricultural implements : 

Mowers, reapers, and parts of 

Plows and cultivators, and purts of. . 

All other,and parts of 

Books, music, maps, engravings, and 
other printed matter: 
Books, maps, and scientific instru- 
ments for use in schools 

Another 

Coal and coke, coke 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineral waters and other nonalco- 
holic beverages , 

Quinine and all alkaloids and cin- 
chona 

Fertilizers, natural 

Fibers, vegetable, flax, hemp, etc., raw. . . 

Tiwe, plants, and moss 

Wood, and manufactures of: Manufac- 
turesof furniture, not elsewhere specri- 

fied 

All other articles not elsewhere enumer- 
ated 



8CBJECT TO DUTY. 



Aluminum, and manufactures of 

Animals: 

Cattle 

Horses , 

Mules 

Hogs 

Sheep 

Another. 

Articles brought in baggage, having no 

commercial values, but dutiable 

Art works, painting, and statuary 

Bones, hoofs, horns, and horn tips, strips, 

and waste 

Blacking. 

Stove polish 

All other 



Germany. 



Value. Duty. 



$255 



2,915 



234 
3,376 



774 
261 



1,750 
5,870 



4,586 

174 

80 
716 



United Kingdom. 



Value. Duty. 



$409 
2,712 
U,808 



458 
2,840 



5,583 



35,178 



8,024 



1,111 
94 



2 
116 



413 
2 



160 
1 



Other American 
countries. 



Value. • Doty. 



$80 



16 



282,725 

59,709 

18 



757 



1,544,296 

49,704 

18,861 

1,096 

8 

578 



117.026 

12,fiJ7 

2,787 

140 

1 

162 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



247 



No. 35,— Statement ofartides imported at the port of JIabanay Cuba, etc. — Continued. 



Articles. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


Other American 
countries. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


8UBJKT TO DUTY— continued. 

Books, music nuuM, enfiravlngs. and 
other printed matter: All other 


181,850 
4,706 

156 
24,280 


*7,808 
588 

88 
1,612 


11,431 
865 

9,210 


. $888 

191 

l,l»t 


17 




BrtflfF Affd mannfactnrefl of ... 




BreadatoffiK 

Bread and biscuit 






Barley 


' 


Prepejattona of. Ux table food 


2,511 
1,619 
8,888 
188 
771 
1,664 
1,221 

420 


628 
435 
2,960 
48 
269 
384 

8r 

84 


1 


Another 


8,164 
185 
806 

1,879 

11 

857 

297 

660 

8,708 

188 

925 

7,971 

166 


814 
24 
81 

648 
2 
88 

60 

162 

1,256 

28 

238 

1,996 

36 


1 






Brirtii..... f...^.:...^... ...::: 




Broomsand hmahefi . . 


1 


Oder 






OuMUes 






Qui. cairia^res, and other yehicles, and 
parts of. 
Crdes and parts of 


10 


12 


Ail other carriafres and partfl of 

OeUoloid, and manufactures of 












Cement.'. 


10,895 

307 
43 

258 
40 

3,487 
8.852 

1 


2,299 

77 

17 

78 

. 29 

420 
1.550 

1 






Clocki, watches, and parts of: 






Watches and parts of 


65 

6,325 

257,986 


16 


Cocoa .*. 


2,967 


Coffee 


44,317 


Copper, and manufactures of: 

Ingots, bars, and sheets 


111 
6,260 

254 
5 

19.064 
26,708 
8,817 
8,148 
168 
485 
U,124 
60,458 


10 
1,484 

23 


Mfum^actuies of 


2 




Cork, and manufactures of cork bark: 
Cork stoDDers 




AiioSe^.?. . : 






tores of cloths— 
Closely woven 


4,824 

4,408 

884 

885 

48 

162 

6,319 

20,200 


260,829 

590,459 

1,957 

85,418 

6,060 

12,685 

80,881 

5,868 

1,594 

113,875 

1,786 
9,668 
1,825 
10 
5,847 
1,942 
1,017 

120 

120 

28,684 

16,982 
294 


98.952 
198,758 

1,094 
20,112 

2,810 

8,261 
24,728 

1,745 

105 

86,169 

72 

522 

217 

2 

683 

2,039 

73 

19 

30 

2,412 

4,477 
311 






Loosely woven, muslins, etc 


11 


8 






Tarn and ffir^d 






Quilttngs and piques 






Velveteens, corduroys, etc 






Tulles and laces 






Knit fabrics 


26 


11 


Waste, oops and mill 




All other manufactures of 


86,771 

1,164 
827 
142 
800 

4,804 
60 

1,714 

884 


7,986 

67 
7 

11 
106 
604 

58 

90 

26 


8 


8 


Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 




Aihes, pot and pearl 






CoppCT. sulphaie of 






IWes 






Medicines, patent and proprietary .. 
Opium 


2,747 


850 








(^linine and aU alkaloids and cin- 
chona 






Vanilla beans .' 






Another 


8,156 

16,825 
9,046 


446 

6,066 
8,165 


375 

156 
13 
66 


81 


Earthen, stone, and china ware: 

Esrthen and stone ware 


178 


China ware 


4 


&g8 


22 




2 
797 

196 

16,605 
159 










Ftas :::::::;:::::**: vv.\"" 


240 

17 

3,090 
44 


261 

115 

18,197 

221 

175 

319 

338,587 

146,459 

9 

24 

119 

114 
67 


79 

2 

3,519 

32 

61 

51 

76,735 

16,364 

1 

4 

29 

28 
17 


50 


15 


Wbers. vegetable: 

Esparto, rushes, vegetable hair, cane 
Qsien, fine straw.palm , and genista. 
Manufactures of ~ 

Bags for sugar ... 








Oupets ...T \\...\,^...V..... 






Cordage and rope. , ...... . 






Twinel .'. 


4,416 
10,877 


966 
2,098 






All other 


1,012 
34 


289 


FWUpcIudinff shellfish: 
Dried, smoked, or cured— 

Cod, haddock, hake, and pollock. 


1 


Herring 








All other 










Pickled mackerel 










CkODed Iteh, other than salmon and 
ibellflsh— 
Caviare 


42 
1 


10 







All other 






All other sheltflsh 




292 


20 


AU other flsh and fish products 




239 


60 





Digit! 



zed by Google 



248 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 



No. 35. — Statement of articles imported al the port of Hdhana, CubOj etc. — CJontinned. 



Articles. 



Gennany. 



Value. Duty. 



United Kingdom. 



Value. Duty. 



Other Ameiian 
countries. 



Value. Doty. 



SUBJECT TO DUTY— continued. 

Fruits and nuts: 
Fruito— 

Apples, dried 



Apples, green or ripe . 
jl other, sreen, ; 
Preserved fruits: 



Air other, sreen, ripe, or dried. 



Canned .. 

All other 

Gums and resins: 

Rosin 

Tar 

Turpentine, spirits of 

Glass and glassware: 

Glass packages, paying duty sepa- 
rate from tneir contents 

Window glaiis 

All other 

Glucose and grape sugar 

Glue 

Grease and grease scraps and soap stock . 

Games and toys 

Hair, and manufactures of 

Hay 

Hides and skins other than fur skins: 

Goatskins , 

Hides of cattle 

All others 

Hops 

Hats and caps 

iDk: 

Printers' 

All other 

Instruments and apparatus for scientific 
purposes, telegraph, telephone, and 

other electrical 

Incandescent electric lamps 

Iron and steel, and manufactures of: 
Needles, pins, pens, hooks, hairpins, 

and sumoal instruments 

All other fine articles 

Bar iron 

Bars and rods of steel ' 

Hoops, bands, and scroll ' 

Rail for railways- 
Iron 

Sheets and plates- 
Wire and w i re cables 

Builders' hardware, saws, and tools- 
Locks, hinges, and other build- 
ers' hardware 

Saws 

Tools, not elsewhere specified . . . 

Castings not elsewhere specified 

Cutlery- 
Table 

All othen 

Firearms 

Mftcbinery and machines, and parts of: 

Electrical machinery 

Metal working 

Printing presses, and parts of 

Pumps and pump machinery 

Sewing machines, and parts of 

Steam engines, and parts of— boilers 

and parts of engines 

Typewriter machines 

Sugar and brandy machinery 

Nails and spikes: 

Cut 

Wire 

All Other, including tacks 

Pipes and fittings 

Safes 

Scales and balances 

Stovesand ranges, and parts of 

All other manufactures of iron and steel . 
Jewelry, and other manufactures of gold 
and silver: 

All other manufactures of gold and 
silver 



3,297 

7,923 

39,103 

126 

1,686 



17,760 
47 



149 

868 

1,124 

60 



1,511 
17 



5,782 
10,840 



49 
363 



1,805 

1 

14,448 

4,498 

966 

4,282 

101 

71 

3,709 

878 

752 

1,404 



257 
5,456 

505 

842 

10,575 

15 

98 

328 

181 

14,856 

26,418 
7,702 



16 



1,105 

2,559 

10,068 

27 

872 



4,187 
19 



22 

34 

225 

11 
123 



302 
3 



2,434 
1,687 



1,773 
520 

196 
772 
26 

14 

745 
174 
151 
281 

177 

51 

546 

92 

131 

1,406 



6 

64 

11 

1,566 



4,106 
941 



11,481 
621 
922 

96 
18 



tl72 
122 
126 

24 
5 



$15 
1,727 






735 

11,241 

699 

1,025 



9,090 

85 
140 
466 



24,654 
"2,*i47 



244 
201 



2,074 
17,787 

2,574 
18,717 
18,311 



4,486 



3,678 

67 

16,662 

9,379 

1,222 
6,216 



29 
3,098 



228 
28 



3,058 
540 



14.306 

5;868 

801 

62 

551 

89,275 



27 
850 



3,558 
50 
412 



2 
189 



2,278 

5 
21 
71 



550 
661 



IflO 



4,982 



74,291 



14, S7 



491 



281 
8,886 

433 
2.832 
8,360 



457 



524 

18 

3,815 

1,096 

195 



6 
655 



806 
72 



2,015 

845 

48 

12 

89 

5,881 



25 



20 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



BEFOBT OF MILITARY GK>V£BNOB OF CUBA. 



249 



No. 35,-SUUement of ariides imparted at the port ofHabana, 


Cuha^ etc, — Contmued. 


Articles. 


Germany. 


United Kingdom. 


Other American 
countries. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— condnaed. 

Lead and ZDAnufactoreB of: 

Pig'i, bftrs, ftTid old 






•89 
28 
175 

140 

159 
110 

18 
289 

1,186 
6,077 

147 

67,155 

476 

5 

747 

2,189 

7,057 
4,735 


1 

88 

21 

40 
22 

6 
10 

287 
1,693 

104 

11,379 

67 

4 

223 

888 

1,225 

789 






Pipe .' 










All other manufactures of 


«672 


$119 






Leather and manufactures of: 

Sole leather 


$1,600 


$240 


Splints, bujl. grain, and all other 
apper 


199 
882 

667 


49 
61 

120 




AllothArlpf^tber. . , . , , . 


12 

54 
589 


5 


Manufactures of — 

Boots and shoes 


15 


Harness and saddles 


196 


Trunks, valises, and traveling 
bags 








All other 


4,209 


1,090 


1,291 


574 


Malt liquors, beer: 

In wood 




In bottles 


18,630 


4,873 


53 


9 


All other malt liquors 




Marble and stone, and manufactures of: 
Building stone 










Allother 


974 
5 


45 

1 


89 


5 


Matches 




Metal and metal compositions, tin: 
In sheets 






Manufacture articles 


4,441 

33 
1,676 

8,066 

94 
1,646 

9 
299 


402 

13 
629 

3,242 

18 
147 


1 




Musical instruments: 

Organs 




Wa^wfortes 







68 
6 


25 


All other musical instruments and 
parts of 






2 


Oilcloths: 

For floors 








Allother 


87 


9 






Oil«: 

Animal oils— 

Whale oU 






All other animal oils 


13 


940 
120 


99 
47 






Mineral oila-All other natural oils 
without regard to gravity 






Mineral, refined or manufactured— 
Naphtha, including the lighter 


440 


126 






Lubricating and heavy parafHn 
oil 


1,009 


405 






Vegetable oll»- 

Gotton-seed oil 


2 
2 








Unseed oil 


i 


12,707 
20 

1,463 
48 

106 

170 

25,582 

1,826 
1,833 


2,853 
3 

524 
6 

51 

21 

8,908 

898 
493 






OUveoil 






VoUtUe or enential oils- 

AU other 


197 
124 


96 
5 






All other ve^^etable oils 






Paints, pigments, and colors: 

Carbon black, gas black, and lamp- 
black 






Zinc and oxide of 










Allother 


6,765 

48,169 
43,616 

44 

90 

816 

1,754 

6,447 


1,245 

19,821 
18,693 

19 

4 

124 

621 

1,616 






Paper, and manufactures of: 
Paper pulp- 
In sheets 






Allother 


9,650 


363 


Manufactures of— 




Wrought : 


13 

5 

2,478 

2,074 


1 

1 

949 

519 






Paraflln and wax 






Perftuneiy and oosmetlcs 






Plated ware 


40 

592,080 
94 


10 


products: 
Meat products* 
Beef products: 

Beef Jerked 


187,742 


Hogproducts: 

Hams and shoulders 


548 
57 


66 
44 


82 
390 


10 

48 


16 


. Oleomaisarine 




Poultry and game 


40 
100 


13 


All otlier m«it products 


197 


49 


892 

2,482 
23,236 
14,160 


- 248 

326 
4,231 
1,416 


25 


Dai^products— 




Cheese 


2,944 
13 


496 

1 






Condensed milk 







CUBA 1900 — VOL 



-17 



Digitized by 



Google 



250 KEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA, 

No. 35. — SUUemerU of articles imported at the port of Habana, Caha, etc. — Contiiined. 



Articles. 



8UBJBCT TO DUTY— continued. 



Rice 

Rubber, and manufactures of: all other . 

Salt 



Flax and timothy seed. . 

All other 

Shells 

Silk, and manufactures of: 

Raw 

Manufactures of— 

Yam and thread — 
Velvet and plushes . 

Tulles and laces 

Knit fabrics 

All other 

Spices: 



Pepper, 
ifo* 



Another 

Soap: 

Common soap 

Another 

Spirits, distilled: 

Brandy 

Whisky 

Bourbon 

Rye 

All other distUled 

Starch 

Straw and palm leaf, and manufactures 



of. 



Suffar and molasses: Candy and confec- 
tionery 

Tea 

Varnish 

Vegetables: 

Beans and pease 

Onions , 

Potatoes 

Vm tables, canned 

Dried pulse 

All other (including pickles and 

sauce) 

Vinegar 

Vessels: Sailing 

Whalebone r. 

Walking sticks, umbrellas, and paiasols. 
Wines: 

In bottles 

In other coverings 



Sparkling liquors and cordials 

Wooa, and manufactures of: 

Shook8,box 

Wood, ordinary, composing cases 
wherein imported goods are packed 

Doors, sashes, and blinds 

Furniture, not elsewhere specified . . 

Hogsheads and barrels empty 

Trimmings and moldings and house 
finishings 

Wooden ware , 

Another 

Wool, and manufactures of: 

Carpets 

Flannels and blankets 

Wearing apparel 

Woolen yam 

Cloth, spun or twilled 

All other manufactures of 

Zinc, and manufactures of 

All other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated 



ToUl. 



Germany. 



Value. Duty. 



$259,762 

6,895 

860 



679 
1.188 



44 

59 

86 

60 

84,711 



16 



800 
164 



16 



200 
2,5»4 
11,819 



748 

'i*4ii 

294 



105 
716 



583 



820 
872 

260 
6 
20 



6,590 



3,948 
1,887 

2,104 
2,607 



344 
196 

13,898 
697 
451 

13,136 
1,896 

48,594 



1,112,117 



168,155 
878 
619 



49 
627 



20 
27 
38 
27 
15,630 



17 

484 

2,612 



186 

848 

66 



18 
178 



146 



229 
218 

86 
6 
13 



3,207 



1,319 
268 



967 
388 
192 



187 
78 



180 

5,243 

814 

9,996 



272,318 



United Kingdom. 



Value. Duty, 



$375,822 

11,288 

306 

147 
1,929 



82 

965 
504 
443 



15,481 



7 
1,171 



271 
207 



18 
754 



1,018 
83,037 

932 

2,258 

428 

1,706 

7,406 



121,839 
86 
725 

409 
40 

8,000 
72 

2,283 

200 



439 



13,704 
82 
64 

11,600 

120 
128 
284 

2,872 

1,680 

965 

80 



179,496 
40 

77,890 



3.111,963 



880,823 

1,644 

184 

16 
96 



430 
227 
196 



1,951 
2 



145 
101 



594 
7,426 

106 

19^ 
172 

2,234 



84,726 

9 

170 

97 
66 

606 
14 

660 



206 



2,658 

3 

14 

1.135 

48 
29 
122 

961 

674 

384 

14 



71,799 
12 

11,771 



811,711 



Other American 
countries. 



Value. Duly. 



«0.73 
5 



2G0 



2 
1,781 

1,455 

14 



114,812 
4,118 



11 
52,917 



10 



70 



100 
24 



123 
10 



1,915 



8,066,997 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



251 



No. 36,^Slatemenl ofartides imparled al the port of Habana, Cubay etc. — Ck>ntinue4l . 



# 

Articles. 


Other European 
countries. 


All other countries. 


Grand total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


FRCX OP DUTY. 

Asrieoltnial implements: 

Mowen, reapers, and parts of 










$4,146 

28,405 

81.897 

36 

16,445 
25,842 
2,959 

111,454 
199.185 
84,266 

37,087 

1,088 
282,753 

106,276 

57 

817 

6,754 

836,929 

8.432 
9,795 

77,964 

1,640 
8,241 

2,087,725 

167,001 

118,787 

102,348 

1,794 

1,906 




Mows and cnltiTators, and itarts of . . 












All other, and parts of 












Art vnrkii, panting, and statuary 












Boob^ maps, and scientific instru- 
ments, for ose in schools 




• 








All other 


$4,063 




$14 






Bricks, glazed or unirlased. building 








CosI ana coke: 
Coal— 

Anthracite i 












Bltiiminons . . 












Coke 












Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Mineial waters and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 


7» 










Quinine and all alkakiids and cin- 
chona 










Fertflizen, natural 












Fibers T»etabie: 

Flax, hemp, etc., raw 












Manufactures-Single yamsforsugar 
bags only 












Fish, fresh, other than salmon 












Tree*, plants, and moss 






13 






Wood, and manufactmes of: 

Pine wood, unplaned 










Manufscturea of furniture not else- 
where specified 












SIlTercoin 












All other articles not elsewhere enumer- 
ated 


3,645 










SUBJECT TO DUTY. 

A«ricnlmral implements, all other and 
iiansof !?.. ... 


' 






$164 


Alominumand manu^tures of 










706 


Animals: 

OatUe 










166, 176 


Horsea 










28,835 


Mnles 










8,548 


Hogs 










9.680 


Sheep 










'm5 


All<5her 










816 


Articles brought in baggage, having no 
commerdaT values, but dutiable 










1,566 


ArtwoAs,painUng. and statuary 

«»«, hoofs, horns, and horn tips, strips, 


786 
160 


9219 
80 






10,002 

480 

•186 
8,584 

104,311 
40,222 

17,937 

24,971 

22.424 

260,969 

1,846 

41,307 

121 

2,502 

40 

118 

561,946 

6,868 

7,814 

4,62t 
61,470 
1,821 
6,440 
18,426 


2,251 


4 


tz 


167 


BlacUngf* 

Stove polish 


114 


Aiiotfier!^::::;::::::::::::::::::::: 










712 


^onkB, music, maps. engravingH, and 

other printed matter: All other 

iWMB and manufactures of 


2.369 
824 


220 
167 


93 
80 




36 
4 


17,955 

7,847 


Breadstuffa: 

Bread and biscuit 


2,898 


Barley 










1,661 


Bran, middlings, and mill feed 










5,606 


Corn r. 










87,773 


Com meal '.. 










353 


Oats 










7,789 


Oatmeal 










32 


Macaroni and vermicelli 


36 


9 






625 


Rre 






7 


Wheat::::::::::::::::::::::;:::::::: 










11 


Wheat flour 










182,866 


I'Kparation of , for table food 






875 
77 


93 
19 


1,466 


^Alloiher 






1,892 


Brt<2jgj«dorungla«d: 






2,911 


,, StT^::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 




** 






8,024 


Brirties.:::: :::::::::::::::: 








227 


?*»n» com. .::***'::: -. 








348 


Brooms and brushes 


1.286 


sid 


488 


2i8 


5,861 



Digitized by ^ 



ioogle 



252 



REPORT OF MILITARY OOVEfiNOR OF CUBA. 



No. 36. — SUUenxent of ariidea imporied at the part of Habcmei, CSihOy Oc — Continued. 



Articles. 



SUBJBCT TO DUTY— continued. 



Cider 

Candles 

Can, carriages, and other vehicles, and 
parts of: 

For steam railways 

For other railways 

Cycles and parts of 

All other carriages and parts of 

Celluloid, and manufactures of 

Cement 

Crockery 

Clocks, watches, and parts of: 

Clocks and parts of 

Watches and parts of 

Cocoa 

Coffee 

Copper and manufactures of: 

Ingots, bars, and sheets 

Manufactures of 

Cork, and manufactures of cork bark: 

Cork stoppers 

All other 

Cotton, and manufactures of: 

Cotton, raw 

Manufactures of cloths— 

Closelv woven 

Loosely woven, muslins, etc 

Wearing apparel 

Carpets , 

Yam and thread 

Ouiltings and piques 

Velveteens, corduroys, etc 

Tulles and laces 

Knit fabrics 

Waste, cops and mill 

All other manufactures of 

Chemicals, drugs, and dyes: 

Acids 

Ashes, pot and pearl 

Copper, sulphate of 

Dyes 

Mineral waters and other nonalco- 
holic beverages 

Medicines, patent and proprietary . . 

Opium 

Roots, herbs, and bark, n. e. s 

Quinine and all alkaloids and cin 

chona 

Vanilla beans 

Another 

Earthen, stone and china ware: 

Earthen and stone ware 

China ware 



Eggs. 

Fertilizers, manufactured 

Fireworks 

Fans 

Fibers, vegetable: 

Esparto, rushes, vegetable hair, cane 
osiers, fine straw, palm, and genista 
Manufactures of— 

Bags for sugar 

Carpets 

Cordage and rope 

Twine 

Another 

Fish, including shellfish: 
Dried, smoked or cured— 

Cod, haddock, hake, and pollock. 

Herring 

Another 

Pickled- 
Mackerel 

Another 

Salmon — 

Canned 

All other, fresh or cured 

Canned flsh, other than salmon and 
shellfish- 
Caviare 

Another 



Other European 
countries. 



Value. Duty. 



IR74 



TDl 
445 

4,874 
146 

23 

15,828 

920 

1,154 



232 



370 



9,282 

21,917 

8,582 



51 

391 

782 

6,775 



8,014 



1,264 
227 



1,854 

19 

595 



1,517 

2,887 
8,964 



1,607 



420 
8,778 
4,881 



154,063 



1261 



176 

56 

1,647 

21 

6 

8,967 

806 

814 



3,058 

2,719 

847 



14 

296 

207 

2,264 



3,872 

80 
5 



286 
19 
46 



249 



1,417 



113 

940 

1,219 



11,633 



All other countries. Grand total. 



Value. Duty. , Value. Duly 



f51 



111 
10 



1,169 



18 



72 

23,969 

288 



186 

59 

1,106 

2 



560 
19,844 



76 



104 

"n 



$17 



5 
208 



491 



45 

26,980 

49 



42 

19 

538 

2 



1,018 
5,728 



45 



$39,284 
108,881 



47,275 
90,289 
6,664 
71,110 
18,50) 
68,480 
39,474 

7,479 
38,184 
12,676 

751,680 

10,257 
99,416 

13, «9 
1.485 

4.887 

430,016 

941,15fi 

84,214 

66 

102,018 

8,998 

24,480 

148,116 

350,049 

7,875 

378,722 

11,999 
12,488 
3,464 
1.397 

6,177 

147,741 

80,651 

7,572 

510 
830 

122,616 

46,929 

23,844 

327,796 

1,906 

664 

36,816 



4,255 

86,402 

728 

8.120 

19,977 

484,671 



826,800 

792 

17, 4U 

144 
4,021 

264 
13,644 



710 1T7 67 16 48,287 

Digitized byVjOOVLC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF COBA. 



253 



No. Sb.^Siaieinent of artides imported at the port of HaJbana^ Cuba^ etc. — Continued. 



Articles. 


Other European 
countries. 


All other countries. 


Grand total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


suBjscT TO DUTT— conttnued. 

Fish, Indadiiig ahellflsh— ContinQed. 
Shell fish, oysters 






•161 
296 


92 
11 


•MO 
1,011 
12,778 

1,480 
23,914 

1,431 
86,127 
147,628 

31,548 
4,254 
30,028 

2,762 
3,682 
4,582 
24,979 
2 

67,668 

11,120 

139,088 

1,091 

7,046 

28,888 

2,016 
1,482 

41,687 
440 

82,978 

7,682 

16,687 

88,716 

5 

2,357 

203,624 

16 

1,382 
6,059 

32,322 
2,483 

19,412 
47,508 
47 
16 
28,784 
35.321 
25,892 

15,078 
67,564 

8,198 
106, UO 
42,582 

13,704 
1,064 

90,706 

4,170 

101,706 

9,778 
17,504 
6,419 

1,730 
12,800 


•161 


All other 'shellflsh 






74 


All other iteh and fish products 

Fruits ftnd nuts: 
Pralte- 

ADDles. dried . . 


9794 


$198 


8,194 






178 


Apples, green or ripe 










3,204 


Prones . 










96 


Raisins 










3,166 


Preserred miits— 

Canned 


278 


90 


981 

72 
4 


122 

18 

1 


21,866 
7,886 


All other 






1,062 


Nuts 






3,871 


Gums and resins: 

Rosin 


2 








881 


Tfcr 








1,277 


Tnrpentf ne and pitch 










1,292 


Turpentine, spirits of 










4,297 


Caoutchouc and gutta-percha 












Glass and glassi^are: 

Glass packsiges. paying duty sepa- 
rate uom their contents 


1,732 

994 

18,863 


267 

284 

4,814 


12 


2 


13,328 


Window glass 


8,481 


Another 


4 


1 


33,807 
828 


Glucose and KraDe sosrar 


Glue 


200 


19 






1,236 


Giesse and grease scraps and soap stock. 






1,462 
627 


Gunpowder and ezpio&ves: 










All ikher exploeiyes 






65 
868 


142 
79 


314 


Games and toys ' 


678 




208 


7,992 


Hair, and manufactures of 


^72 


Hay 










7,503 

1,048 
2,479 
5,215 


Hides and skins other than fiir skins: 
Goatskins... 








• 


Hides of caUle 










All other 











Honey 










Hops 










196 


Hats and cam 


35,078 


7,016 







40,730 


I«s. ^ 






4 


Ink: 

Prlnteis' 






2 

4 





240 


Another 


19 






1,017 
6,468 


Instruments and apparatus for scientific 
purposes, telegraph, telephone, and 






Incandescent electric lamps 










358 


Iron and steel, and manufactures of: 
Needles, pins, pens, hooks, hairpins, 
and snmcal instruments 


438 
2,781 


124 
212 






5,627 


All other "fine articles 






7,429 


Pig iron 






2 


Scrap and old 












Baruon 


80 


2 






5,368 


Bars and rods of steel 






6,152 


Hoops, hands, and scroll 










5,535 

1,506 
6,758 

488 


Rail for railways— 

Iron 










Steel 










Sheets and platea— 

Iron 










Btractural iron and steel 










25,095 


Wireand wire cables 


479 
882 


10 
128 






5,999 

1,661 
130 


BQildersr hardware, saws, and tools- 
Locks, hlnges^and other builders' 
hardware ..^.* 


2 


1 


8aw8 


Tools, not elsewhere specified 


1 




2 




14,721 
414 






Ctetings, not elsewhere specified 


936 


84 






10,903 


CuUeiy— 

Table : 


e\ . 


2,706 


Another 


4 


1 


4 


3 


2,892 


Firearms. 


1,776 


Machinery and machines, and parts of: 
Oash registers 










849 


Bectiical machinery !!!!!.*!]!'.'.!.*.'.. 


35 


7 






2,461 



Digitized by 



Google 



254 



BEPOET OF MILITARY GOVEENOB OF OOBA. 



No. 36.SUUement of aHides imporUd at the paH of Habana, Cuba, ete.— Continued. 


Articles. 


''''SSJSr" All other countries. 


Grand total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value, 


I>at7. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— contlnaed. 

MachlneiT and machines, etc.— Cont'd. 
Laundry machinery 










$4,128 
20.600 
8.708 
11. 7M 
68,229 
US 

88, 9U 
19,449 
9,877 

6,626 

8,557 
67,281 
57,615 

5,667 
11,870 

8,180 
115,090 

87,162 

12,773 

689 
2,836 
12.899 

4,860 
1,816 

1,860 
6,866 

700,460 
8,966 

3.115 

39,944 

17 

1,156 

18,242 

169,877 

489 

1,077 
6.562 
7,450 
5,749 

7,228 
59,178 

95 
8,002 

12,606 

148 
21,284 

286 

80 

11 

11,426 

74,356 

31,897 

2,901 
9,672 

7,929 
751 


IBS 


Metal working - 

Printinsr Dresses, and Darts of . 


«342| 


•69 






4,142 






7» 


Pumps and pump machinery r 


:::::::::::::::::::: 






2,86 


Sewing macnlnes, and parts of 










1^6tf 


8ho© machinery 










S 


Steam engines, and parts of boilers 
and parts of engines. ........ r , r - 


114 


28 






€,Ta 


TvDewrller machines .... 






^8» 


Sugar and hrandy machinery 










98S 


Nails and spikes: 

Cut 


412 


72 






1,613. 


Wire 






Zm 


All nthnr frinlndinir tii/>1cii 


6,078 


1,296 






10.412 


Pipes and fittings 






9,UJ 


Sales .T 










1,78 


Scales and balances 


9 


2 


•2 




tf» 


Stoves and ranges, and parts of 




485 


All other manulfactures'bf iron and steel. 
Jewelry, and other manufactures of gold 
and silTer: 
Jewelry 


184 

586 
98 


81 

81 
24 


8 


IS 


16.998 
6, OS 


All other manufactures of gold and 
gilver 






1,SU 


Lead and manufactures of: 

Pim. bars, and old 






m 


Pipe 










aft 


All other manufactures of 


60 


82 


129 


126 


2,467 


Leather and manufactures of: 

Sole leather 


651 


Upper leather. . . 










196 


Splints, buff, grain, and all other 
upper 










3S8 


All other leather 










i,3s; 


Manufactures of— 

Boots and shoes 


1,265 


284 


150 


180 


151,017 


Harness and saddles 


SB 


Trunks, valises, and traveling 
bags 










•m 


Another 


944 


236 


8 


1 


9,7M 


Lime 


4 


Malt .*! 










184 


Malt liquors, beer: 

In wood - 










12. »8 


In bottles 


742 


236 






S,7U 


All other malt licjoors 






70 


Marble and stone, and manufactures of: 
Stone. DaviniF. unwrouirht 










239 


Building stone 


4,178 

10 

2,142 

132 
618 


2,872 

1,275 

15 
74 






2,961 


Another 






tfiV 


Matches 






2,SB 


Metal and metal compositions, tin: 
In sheets 






1.2tt 


Manuftu!tured articles 


1 




9.4(7 


Musical instruments: 

Organs 




37 


Piajiof ortes 










8,203 


All other musical instruments and 
parts of 


466 


187 


3 


1 


6,069 


Oilcloths: 

For floors 


9 


All other 


3 








2,995 


Oils: 

Animal oils- 
Fish oil 






... 


9 


Lardoil 










S 


Whale oil 












All Other animal oils 


887 


69 






712 


Mineral oils- 
Petroleum crude 






i2,ao 


All other natural oils without 










n,fl6i 


Mineral, refined or manufactured— 
Naphtha, including the lighter 

products of distillation 

Illuminating oils 


65 


15 






m 






8.«S 


Lubricatiing^and heavy paraffin 
oil 










S.751 


Kesiduum, ineludine tar and all 
other from which light pitches 
have been dlutilled..... 










s» 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



255 



No. 35.— «Sbitem«i/ of articles imporied cU the pari of HaJbana^ Cuba, dc. — Continued. 



Articles. 


Other European 
countries. 


All other countries. 


Grand total. 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


WJBJiCT TO DUTY— continaed. 

Oito-^kHitiiiiied. 
Vegetable oils- 

COttoD-fleed oil 










19,072 

16,132 

202,180 

6 
2,196 
6,712 

106 

261 

69,445 

158,034 
219,834 

221 

1,275 

1,012 

69,755 

27,810 

1,970 
120,440 

3,301 

592,080 

17 

649 
228,597 

673 

17,164 

224,381 

970,137 

3,646 
4,574 
21,030 
76 
73,380 
139,788 

41,602 
189,009 
179,016 

66,187 

1,368 

628 

47,430 

2,784 
14,016 

1,201 
2,207 
19,026 
3.469 

681 

2,908 

1,296 

7,676 

366 

256,045 

8,453 
24,660 

66,798 

9,848 

383 


11.795 

8,888 

20,811 

8 


rJlUMMlAll 










OliTeoU 


»78 


«9 






VolatUe or essential oils— 

PeppermiDt 






All other 


44 

858 


14 
160 


"^ 


122 
9 


816 


All other vegetable oils 


927 


Paints, pigments, and colors: 

Carbon black, gas blaclc, and lamp- 
black 


51 


2inc and oxide of 










85 


Allother 


2,810 

4,227 
15,603 


849 

1,671 
1,917 


37 

200 
520 


19 

82 
182 


19,378 
65,969 


Paper, and manniactures of: 
Paper pulp- 
In sheets 


Allother 


48,144 


Manuiacturea of — 

Paste and carton pierre 


88 


Wrought 


25 


8 


1 




272 


Paraflin and wax 




148 


PfffnniCTy and <wmnetiw 


22 
509 


9 
127 


32 
25 


64 
6 


20,661 


Plated ware 


6,966 
479 


Provisions, compriaiDg meat and dairy 
products: 
MeatprodoctB- 
Beef products: 
Beef, canned 


Beef, fresh 










15, 8U 


Beef! s^ted or pickled 










586 


Beef! jerked ..'. 










187,742 


Beef, tallow 












Hogproducts: 

Bacon 






12 
16 


3 
2 


114 


Hams and shonldenf 






63,483 








'144 


Pork; freah 










2,830 


Pork saltcMl or nickled 




13 


2 


89,158 


\^T^\ ...... .... 






177,856 


Lard products, and substi- 
tutes for (cottolene, lard- 
ine, etc) 










647 


Mutton 










971 


Oleomargarine 


876 


119 






6,649 


Imitation butter 






11 


Poultrv and ffame 






16 
862 


2 
91 


16,487 


All other meat products 


658 

4,254 

139,286 

200 


163 

580 

27,860 

20 


83,139 


DiJ^products— 


8,185 


Cheese 






85,491 


CondenfiMl milk . 






17,896 


Biee 


12 


6 


141,838 


Rubber, and manufactures of: 

Belting, hoffe. and bafrsr^nflr. 






102 


Boots and sho^ 










190 


Allother 


166 
99 
18 


22 
7 
1 






7,662 








189 








13,989 


Seeds: 

CIoTerseed 


12 


6 


67 


Flax and timothy seed 






309 


Allother 


715 
217 

11 


125 
203 

5 


96 


14 


2,048 


Shells 


1,915 


HUk, and manufactures of: 

Raw 






810 


Manufactures of— 

Yam and thread 






1,811 


Velvet and nluahes 










584 


Tnllfifl And Iacps 










8.504 


Knitfobrics 


52 
8,081 


24 
1,387 






164 


Allother 


29,984 

2 
16 

4 

6 


18,608 

1 
4 


115,392 




864 


A^oSier.. 


9 

163 
422 


2 

34 
46 


6,153 


Soap: 

Common aoan 


25,130 


Allother 




2,268 


Spirits, distHled: 

BrandT 




377 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



256 BEPORT OP MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

No. 36. — StalemerU of articles imported at the port of Habaruiy Cuba, <<r.— Oontinoed. 



Articles. 


Other European 
countries. 


All other countries. 


Grand total 




Value. 


Duty. 


Value. 


Duty. 


Value. ' 


Daty. 


SUBJECT TO DUTY— continued. 

Spirits, distilled-Continued. 
Whisky- 

Bourbon 










11.461 

451 

62,183 

64.496 

206 

5,758 

1 

444 

10,803! 

61,154 , 

3,520 1 

2 

9.713 

821 

3,420 

18.371 

276,070 
160,255 
904,115 
30.562 
113,080 

81.7SS 
393 

14,600 

45.500 

1.306 

27,572 

40,306 

716.166 

9,258 

26,266 
1,827 

1,577 
15 
76 

11.899 
2,887 
1.966 

10,868 

82.731 

5.063 

90,706 

209.684 

8.801 

25,150 

551 

15.418 

190 

6,171 
4.788 
34,007 
2.627 
818 
347.891 
10,602 

790,019 


ffS; 


Rye 










uo 


All other distilled 


$11,606 


Ill, 766 






39,oa 


Starch 






is,a6 


Stereotype and electrotype plates 










a 


Straw and palm leaf, and manufactures of 
Suffar and molasses: 

MOlfUmPff r , r 


846 


14 


•65 


191 


880 


Sugar, raw 










227 


Sugar, refined 










5,9m 


Candy and confectionery 


2,101 


626 


45 
8,000 


11 
749 


15,38 


Tea 


972 


Tobacco, and manufactures of : 
Manufactures of— 

Cigars 






% 


Plug 










s,ai 


Powder and snuff 






452 
1,094 


856 
1,100 


« 


Another 






2.147 


Varnish 


160 


87 


ioa 


Vegetables: 

Beans and pease 


212 


45 


».069 


Onions. .,^ ".-,-.,- r ,-,^--,-- 






2S,12I 


Potatoes 






3 

229 

2 

680 
4 




74.718 


Veflretables. canned 


280 
467 

657 


68 
114 

141 


68 


7,641 


Dried pulse 


12.744 


All other (including pickles and 
sauce) 


138 
11 


19,614 


Vinegar 


379 


Vessels: 

Steam 






14S 


Sailing 










%m 


Whalebone 






2 


1 


521 


Walking sticks, umbrellas and parasols.. 
Wines: 

In bottles 


218 

215 

8,602 

W4 


64 

169 

1,687 

263 


6,S» 


11 
34 


16 
108 


15,(fil 


In other coverings 


581,S44 


Sparkling liquors and cordials 

Wood, and manufactures of: 

Timber and unmanufactured wood- 
Sawed 


5,18 






2,022 


Logs and other 






10 


1 


MO 


Lumber- 
Boards, deals, and planks 






» 


Joists and scantlings 


16 


1 






1 


Shingles 






7 


Shooks- 

Box 






42 


2 


65S 


All other 






213 


Heading 










2» 


Another 










705 


Maniifar^tures of— 

Wood, ordinary, composinsf cases 
wherein imported goodiB are 
paoked 


6.860 


696 


440 


666 


18,967 


Doors, sashes, and blinds. 


t3« 


Furniture, notelsewberespecified 

Hogsheads and barrels empty ... 

Trimmings and moldings and 

house nnishings 


1.203 
926 

648 
90 


491 
94 

267 
40 


806 
4 

464 
676 


222 


25, ea 

19,90 


840 
290 


S,12S 


Wooden ware 


6,902 


Wood pulp 


^46 


All other 


109 


40 


678 


281 


4,530 


Raw 


m 


Manufactures of— 

Carpets 


88 


86 


8 


1 


2,00 


Flannels and blankets 


tns 


Wearinur annarel 


831 

88 

20 

1,619 

4,211 

13,127 


182 
17 
8 
648 
680 

8,268 






is^m 


Woolen vftrn • . * •. 






1^125 


Cloth, spun or twilled 






S27 


All other manufactures of 

/tine, and manufactures of 


27 
28 

997 


11 
82 

443 


138,147 
1.8* 

141,2S7 


AU other articles not elsewhere enu- 
merated 




Total 


671,709 


118,862 


91,470 


65,279 


22,360,525 


5,019,50? 





Digiti 



zed by Google 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY OOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 



257 



Na ^-Importations irUo the island of CSiha,from leading countries, by sources of pro- 
ducHon, during the six months, July 1 to December SI, 1900. 



United States. 



Spain. 



Prance. 



Qermany. 



Artkholhod, and ani- 

mk 

Mtnnhctored articles 

Artkte in a crude condl- 

tloD or partly 80 

AiticlM of Tolnntary use, 

^huraites,etc , 

MkellaMoos , 

Total 

ClaaKS. 

Aittdee of food, and ani- 

mala 

MaDofutored articles 

Articles in a crude condi- 
tion or partlv so , 

Artidea of Tolnntary nse, 

Joiiirie«,etc 

MiaeeUaneoas 

TWal 



•7,641,707 
4,321,681 

1,480.083 

801.512 
920,986 



14,665,819 



Per 
cent 
50.4 
37.7 

71.4 

12.8 
60 



1818,112 
2,829.551 

76,964 

1,816,515 
163,725 



45 



4.704,867 



Per 

cent. 

5 

20.8 

8.6 

55.9 
10.7 



187,142 
925,817 

20,179 

887.055 
166,589 



147 



1,486,782 



Per 

cent. 

2 

8.1 



14.4 
10.9 



$617,562 
769,005 

12,286 

142,896 
128,147 



4.6 



Per 
cent. 

4 

6.7 



6 
8.8 



5.1 



United 
Kingdom. 



11,838.845 
2,776,957 



Per 
cent, 

8.8 114.268, 718128 
24.2 



118,615 5.6 



148.967 
121,808 



4,499,212 



13.8 



American 
countries. 



108,677 

365,897 

5,874 
4.803 



Per 
cent. 



9 
17.5 



4,742,96914.5 



European 
countries. 



8368,894 
230,811 

11,465 

29.235 
27,595 



662,500 



Per 
cent 
2 
2 

.5 

1.2 
1.8 



Other 
countries. 



$48,302 
8,451 

415 

76,048 
1,480 



134,606 



Per 

cent. 

.8 

.1 

.02 

3.3 
.1 



Total. 



$15,128,272 
11,465,900 

2,065,804 

2,352,622 
1,534,083 



32,566,181 



Per 

cent. 

100 

100 

100 

100 
100 



100 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



M. C. FOSNES, DIRECTOR GENERAL OF POSTS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OP 

THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF POSTS, HABANA, FISCAL YEAR 1900. 



Department op Posts of Cuba, 

Office of the Director-General, 

Hdbana^ Ouba^ Jarmary 29^ 1901. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith a report covering in a 
formal manner the operations of the department of posts for the fiscal ^ 
year ended June 30, 1900. It would hardly be necessary to even sug- 
gest the difficulties encountered in the rendition of such a repo^, 
growing out of the unfortunate history of the department the past 
year, rising to the proportions and character of a public catastrophe. 
The special report upon those distressing events and discoveries by 
the Hon. J. L. Bristow, Fourth Assistant Postmaster-General of the 
United States and for a time acting director-general of Cuban posts, 
submitted July 19, 1900. is a material part of the departmental record 
for the year, and should be so considered in connection herewith. 

By authority of the Postmaster-General, and with your own con- 
currence, Mr. Estes G. Rathbone was superseded as head of the 
department by Mr. Bristow May 20, 1900, whom in turn 1 succeeded 
June 23. Mv own occupancy of the position covered only the last 
week of the fiscal year, therefore the midst of a period of stress and 
many embarrassments. 

It is particularly in respect to the financial affairs of the department 
that the untoward conditions preclude satisfactory and intelligent 
treatment. Of the $130,000 misappropriated revenues, as conserva- 
tively computed in the cited report of General Bristow, probably at 
least $100,000 pertains to the fiscal year 1900. The disbursements for 
the first nine months of the year have also been revised and pruned 
by a reaudit of accounts, the final result of which is not at my present 
command. Any attempt at regular analysis of revenues and expendi- 
tures would be inconclusive, under the circumstances, and might be 
misleading. A brief general survey must therefore suffice. 

The foflowing figures are taken from the original certificates of 
audit for the first nine months of the year: 



Month. 


RevenueB. 


DiBbuTse- 
ments. 


Deficit. 


Month. 


Revenues. 


Disburse- 
ments. 


Deficit. 


July 


$15. 000. 00 
16,000.00 
16,000.00 
17,000.00 
18,116.00 
18,723.88 


•47,067.26 
68,808.79 
56,156.77 
49,047.81 
87,582.27 
50,891.78 


882,067.26 
38,308.79 
39.166.77 
82,047.81 
69.417.27 
32,167.95 


January .... 
February ... 
March 

Total.. 


$17,630.00 
24,365.06 
21,781.91 


$49,371.16 
46,843.36 
49,478.16 


$31,841.16 


August 

September... 

October 

Norember... 
Doccmber.... 


22,478.31 
27.696.26 


163,515.79 


488,697.36 


825,181.66 



259 



Digitized by 



vj^ogle 



260 BEPOBT OF MILITAB7 GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

For the last three months the figures are not available in the same 
consolidated f omi. The revenues are reported as follows by the treas- 
urer of the island: 

April $24,662.48 

May 29,009.38 

June 29,724.68 

Total 83,396.52 

making a total for the year of $246,912.31. It will be observed that 
for Afoy and June, under honest accounting, the revenues average 
$29,000 "a month, round figures. On this normal basis, the total for 
the year should have been about $360,000, which tends to confirm my 
estimate of at least $100,000 fraudulent depletion of the revenues 
during the year, or, more strictly, during the first nine or ten months 
of the year. 

The disbursements of April, May, and June were made irregularly 
and by piecemeal, owing to the then-existing complications. The 
audit total of disbursements during the three months is $45,150.01, 
which, added to the $488,397.35 for the preceding nine months, the 
sum in fact expended and approved in the original audit, nmkes 
$533,547.36. But to these actual expenditures must be added the 
further sum of $64,750.33 paid during the present fiscal year to date, 
on account of the j^earendea June 30, a totalof $698,497.69for theyear, 
and there remain still considerable deficiencies for that year to be met, 
among them an item of $5,163.13 on international transit account so 
that the expenditures for the year will overrun $600,000. The pn^nt 
totals for the year thus stand: Revenues, $246,912.31; expenditures, 
$598,497.69; deficit, $352,585.38. 

The revenues were to the expenditures as less than 5 to 12 — approxi- 
mately 41 per cent — for the wnole year; for the first nine months still 
less — approximately 33 per cent. 

During the administration of General Bristow. from May 20 to June 
22, the department was reorganized into the following bureaus for 
the remainder of the fiscal year: Bureau of finance, bureau of appoint- 
ments, bureau of transportation, bureau of special agents, bureau of 
money orders and registration, bureau of tmnslation, bureau of dead 
letters, law clerk, disbursing officer. 

Reports in further detail follow from the several chiefs of these sub- 
divisions of the department, excepting the bureau of finance, which 
was abolished June 30. For ten months of the year that bureau was 
in the immediate control of Charles F. W. Neely, who fled the island 
April 28, and who is just returning to Cuba in custody of the law, 
after long and exhaustive resistance to such return; and for reasons 
already indicated, and well understood, a regular report covering its 
operation is impracticable, beyond tne preceding general survey. 
Moreover, the officer in charge of the bureau during the closing weeks 
of its existence, Mr. Charles L. Benjamin, has ^n absent in the 
United States, an invalid, for many months. 

APPOINTMENTS AND BONDS. 

On June 30, 1899, there were 239 post-offices in operation on the 
island, at which 26 Americans were serving as acting postmasters, 
and at the remainder, 213 offices, Cubans were serving as postmasters. 
On June 30, 1900, the number of offices had increased to 295, at which 



Digitized by ^ 



ioogk 



BEFOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 261 

there were 278 Cuban postmasters and 17 American acting postmasters. 
The increase in post-offices was 56, and the decrease was 9 in Americans 
in charge of offices. The increase in offices is in a measure an index 
to the rehabilitation of the island. The several bureau reports which 
follow indicate that the establishment of the postal system upon Ameri- 
can lines is received with favor, and that the effect has been generally 
beneficial. 

During the year the policy was continued of bonding employees who 
held positions of responsibility. At the beginiyng of the fiscal year 
but 67 employees were under bond, while at the close of the year there 
were 214. Tliese were mostly commercial bonds on which the depart- 
ment paid the premiums. A large number of employees in the Haoana 
poet-office were carried on what is known as a schedule bond, which 
admits of one employee retiring, for any cause whatever, and another 
being substituted, tne bond continuing in force. The penalties on 
bonds in force at the end of the fiscal year agfgregated $569,000. 

The total number of employees in the service on the island on June 
30 was 788, of whom 703 were Cubans and 85 Americans. For obvious 
reasons there are more American employees than Cubans in the 
department proper. In post-offices on the island there were 362 
employees, of wnom 338 were Cubans and 24 Americans. Of the 46 
railway postal clerks and 63 star-route contractors, all are Cubans. 

TBANSPOBTATION. 

Attention is respectfully invited to the report of the transportation 
bureau, which goes very much into the detail of the work in providing 
for the receipt and delivery of the mail into all parts of the islano. 
The expense tor transportation was comparatively small for the fiscal 
year, owing to the fact that a number of the steamship companies had 
agreed to carry the mails free of expense to the department up to June 
30, 1900; and most of the railroad companies were, by their charters, 
required to carry the mails without compensation. The cost of the 
st^UDship service for mail transportation for the fiscal year was 
$27,808. A great proportion of this, however, was the amount which 
this department was called upon to assume for carrying the mails 
between Habana and Miami, Fla. On June 30 there were 13 steam- 
ship routes with a total mileage of 3,184.26, an increase during the 
year of 621.26 miles. There were 31 railroad routes, with a mueage 
of 1,088.16, and 63 star routes, covering 1,383.50 miles. This makes 
a total of all classes of routes of 5,760.56 miles. The total number of 
miles traveled during the year was 1,636,296. 

The railway mail service, under the immediate supervision of the 
transportation bureau, shows a marked improvement during the year. 
The clerks have shown greater interest in their work, and^ have 
increased in efficiency, as snown by the records made. The accidents 
on railroads were few, and no deaths or injuries occurred to postal 
clerks. 

SPECIAL AGENTS. 

Tlie special agents' bureau corresponds to the office of chief post- 
office inspector in the United States, and has charge of the investiga- 
tion of all complaints of whatever character against the postal service. 
The special agents, under the immediate supervision of the chief, 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



262 BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

whose headquarters is in Habana, are tmveling continuously over the 
island, making inquiry concerning complaints, checking up post- 
masters' accounts, giving special instruction to postmasters, investi- 
gating all charges of fraud, ti*acing losses in the mails and locating Uie 
causes of the same. They represent the director-general, and their 
reports to the department keep the officials advised of the condition of 
the service in all its branches. The report appended gives in detail 
the number and the class of cases handled during the year. The total 
number of cases for the year, of all classes, was 5,068. Many of these 
cases are worked by correspondence from the main office. A krge 
volume of the business is the tracing of registered letters and packages 
alleged lost. These inquiries are from the island as well as from 
foreign countries, a great many coming from the United States. There 
were 37 arrests made during tne year and 26 convictions secured. Of 
these, 2 were for robbery, 1 for forgery and rifling the mails, and 3 
for misappropriation of postal funds. 

REGISTRY AND MONEY-ORDER WDRK. 

The work of these two bureaus was very large during the year, 
especially that of the money -order branch. 

Patrons of the offices availed themselves very largely of the registry 
system. This was true more especially of foreign matter. Of letters 
and parcels for foreign destination there were 78,146, and there were 
49,368 domestic pieces, on which fees were charged. There were 
28,911 pieces registered free of charge, under the laws and refla- 
tions governing the service. This makes a total of 156,625 pieces 
handled during the year. 

The money -order business during the year was exceptionally large. 
The total number of orders issued was 113,978, aggregating in amount 
$5,753,796.25 (American money), and the total number paid was 50,714, 
aggregating $2,726,197.28. This volume of business was due very 
largely to tne fact that no limit was placed on the number of orders 
sold to any one person or firm. Later in the year, however, this prac- 
tice was discontinued and a limit fixed. The business was furUier 
increased by the transfer of all the government funds on the island 
by money order. This practice was also discontinued, by order of tiie 
military governor, during the year. For the details of the work, 
attention is invited to the tabulated report. 

DEAD LETTERS. 

The details of the work in the dead-letter bureau form an interest- 
ing part of the report of the service. The nature of this work is too 
well known to need special mention. It is to receive, examine, and 
dispose of unclaimed and otherwise undeliverable mail matter. The 
amount of work done was large in the number of pieces handled. 
The total of these was 193,569. Of this number 113,647 originated 
in foreign countries, of which 2,370 were registei^ed pieces. Or letters 
and packages coming from foreign countries, bv far the greater 
number came from the United States. These numbered 66,755. The 
next highest number, 20,692, came from Spain. France was third, 
with 9,871; Gei-many followed with 8,662, and Great Britain with 
2,508. Seventy-eight countries and provinces were represented in 
mail received in the dead-letter bureau. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVERNOB OF CUBA. 263 

TRANSLATIONS. 

There are no statistics to report concerning the work of the trans- 
lation bureau, nor that of the legal branch of the department. In the 
work of the department, which has to do very largely with the people 
of the island, nearly all communications going out must be translated, 
and it is of importance, of course, that such work should be done in 
the very best possible manner in order to convey to postmasters and 
other employees the true meaning of orders and instructions. 

It may be proper to add, in closing, that this report was delayed, 
first, through general pressure of work, and then by personal sickness 
which befell me when about to undertake its completion. 
Very respectfully, 

M. C. FosNES, Director- General. 
Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, 

MUita/ry Oovemor of Ouba^ Halxma. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS (BONDS, SALARIES, AND 
ALLOWANCES) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



Department op Poerre op Cuba, 

Bureau op Appointments, 
Habana, September 17, 1900. 

Sir: In eabmitting my report on the operations of the bureau of appointmente (or 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, it is perhaps propter to add to the statistics given 
a few remarks explaining their beanng upon the policies pursued and carried oat by 
the department in so far as they affected or were related to the different branches U 
the service coming within the scope of its duties. 

The report for the fiscal year ending June 30^ 1899, shows the existence of 239 
I)Ost-oflice8, 213 Cuban postmasters, and 26 American postmasters. Of the 26 Ameri- 
cans mentioned, the great majority were stationed at the more important offices ol 
the island, a number having been located in offices in the province of Santiago de 
Cuba, which were of comparatively small importance, but which, on account of the 
presence of lar^ bodies of troops and the consequent increase of the postal buanen 
and the operation of the money-order system, made the employment of efficient and 
skilled Americans in the service at these points an absolute necessity. It was the 
policy of the department from the outset to replace American postmasters with 
Cuban officials as soon as the latter would be capable and trustworthy of tnDfi- 
acling the business of the several offices. This mav seem to those nninitiated in 
the conditions, political and social, existing on the island to have presented a prob- 
lem easily solved and a program that could be carried to its conclusion witboat 
fear of disturbance. As a matter of fact, however, the situation was one snrroanded 
with difficulties — so many different points of opposition would have to be met, » 
many clashing interests harmonized, and so many unjust and captious critidsnu 
explained away, that the task, even from its most pleasant point of view, was ooe 
to make even the most courageous shrink from its undertasing. Thus, while this 
policy wab an oi)enly avowed one, no systematic efforts were made to carry it oat 
until the beginning of the calendar year 1900. At this time the director-general, 
having given much of his time and attention to a full investigation and consiaeratioo 
of the proposition, availing himself of all data obtainable, decided upon a coorwto 
be Dursued in the matter and at once entered upon it 

Up to thifl time, in the greater number of instances, very few representative 
Culmns had heQii employees of the postal service of the island. This was especially 
the case in the laiyer post-offices, and was due, no doubt, to the fact that as a role the 
better paid positions were held by Spaniards or Spainish sympathizers. It wis 
therefore necessary to depend almost entirely on **raw material, so to say, for the 
personnel of these candidates for future honors in the postal service. To attempt a 
aescription here of the methods pursued, the conflicts avoided, and discouragements 
met with, and the disappointments, and in a few instances failures, which had to be 
contended with, would be an unprofitable and probably uninteresting relation of 
details. Suffice it to say that the results so far attained nave demonstrated the wis- 
dom, practicability, and success of the plan adopted, and judging from the progress 
already made the hour is not far distant when the name of the bst American poet- 
master in Cuba will have disappeared from the rolls of its postal service. 

The figures given in this report show a decrease of but nine in the number of 
American postmasters during the fiscal year; at this moment, however, bat flx 
remain on the island, and it is confidently expected that before the end of the caleo* 
dar year these will also have given wav to Cuban successors. 

What is true in this showing in so far as postmasters are concerned is alsoafict 

in the case of departmental and post-office employees, but perhaps in not so great 

a measure. In some instances where Cubans have been appointed postmasters to 

succeed Americans it was found advisable to retain the services of an American 

264 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 265 

clerk, esDecially so when troops were stationed in or near the locality. It was 
also found ad\ni»bleto retain a number of American clerks in the Habana post-office, 
those "remaining, as a rule, being placed in charge of the different branches of the 
work in the office. A showing made, in so far as the departmental employees are con- 
cerned, is no leas an evidence of the change that is bemg wrought The fact must 
necei«arily remain true, however, that so long as the business of the department is 
carrie<l on in the English language the preponderance of the clerks must be Ameri- 
(ans. In all instances, however, in every branch of the service a gradual reduc- 
tion is being made in the force of American employees, as is demonstrated by the 
statistics shown — the percentage of Americans in the service now l)eing alK)Ut 10 
per cent, whereas, in the report of June 30, 1899, the showing nuule wa** 16 percent 
All things being considered, it may certainly be said that the department can not be 
aiviised of inconsistency in this particular line of i>olicy. In fact, there is no reason 
to believe that the showing made will not coin imre' favorably with that of other 
branches of the public service in this respect 

INCREASB IN NUMBEB OF OFPICIB. 

The records of the bureau show 295 offices in operation on June 30, 1900, as against 
239 at the end of the fiscal year 1899. The increase is almost 25 i)er cent, and was 
confined almost entirely to three of the six provinces — Pinar del Kio, Santa Clara, 
and Santiago de Cuba. The explanation for this seeming inconsequence will readily 
be found by those well acouainted with the existing conditions in the island. 

If we take a glance at the map of Cuba and consult the figures furnished in the 
report on the census of Cuba, it will be found that Habana Province, covering an 
area of 2,772 square miles, contains a population of 451,928, 77.4 per cent of its inhabit- 
ants living in cities of more than 1,000 population, and 63.4 per cent in cities of more 
than 8,000 population, the number of mhabitants per square mile being 153, includ- 
ing cities, and exclusive of the latter, 55.30. It thus appears that tnis province, 
altnough having the smallest area, is the most densely populated and contains a 
laiger number of inhabitants than any of the other provinces of Cuba. It has suffered 
leas, comparatively, from the results of the late war than the other provinces, and, 
being poaseesed of ample means of communication, its lines of transportation not 
having been molested to any extent, its postal system did not share the demoraliza- 
tion and interruption which was general in the other provinces, with perhaps the 
exception of Matanzas Province. 

The province of Matanzas covers an area of 3,700 square miles and has a popula- 
tion of 202,444, 51.8 per cent of its inhabitants living in cities of more than 1,000 
inhabitants, and 28.9 per cent in cities of more than 8,000 inhabitants, the number 
per square mile, including cities, being 55, and excluding cities, 39. 

This province, while containing a less number of inhabitants than Santa Clara and 
Santiago provinces, covers but a small area in comparison with these, and as a con- 
sequence is more densely populated. What has been said in regard to the situation 
in the province of Habana in the matter of the conditions affecting the service may 
be accepted as describing the state of affairs in this province, only perhaps to a less 
degree. 

Under these circmnstances it is hardly surprising that the growth of the service in 
these two provinces did not keep pace with that shown in the remaininj^ provinces 
of the island. In fact, a compans<m with the records of the former Spanish admin- 
istration shows that nearly all, if not all, of the offices formerly in existence under 
its control are in operation at the present time. 

The province of Pinar del Rio covers an area of 5,000 square miles and contains a 
population of 173,064, 12.9 per cent of its inhabitants living in cities of 1,000 or more 
population, and 5.1 per cent in cities of 8,000 or more. Including the cities, the 
number of its inhabitants to the square mile is 35, while excluding cities of 8,000 or 
more the number decreases to 32.8 per square mile. 

This shows that, although the percentage of urban inhabitants is nearly one-sixth 
less than the average in Matanzas Province, the density of its rural population is 
almost as great as in the case of the latter. It must \ye remembered that there is but 
one city deserving that name in the province — Pinar del Rio — its population being, 
in round numbers, 9,000. 

The ravages of the late conflict, which, during its ultimate years, was responsible 
for untold damage in this province, affecterl its postal service disastrously, many 
villages having been entirely destroyed, the discontinuance of their offices being a 
natural result, and the transportation' of mail seriously interrupted in some localities 
and entirely done away with in others. This being, however, the renowned tol)acco 
district of the island, and the influence of the immense capital invested in that prov- 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, FT 3 18 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



266 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

ince being almost immediately felt, its return to more flourishinj? conditions was per- 
haps more rapid and facile than could be expected of the remaining provinces which 
had suffered the same misfortunes. The increase of officios in the province amounted 
to nearly 25 per cent for the year, and this result may properly be ascribed to the 
effects of the reestablishment of peace and prosperity in that section, and may be 
accepted as an apt illustration of the faculty of the postal service to keep pace with 
the progress of its surroundings. 

The province of Santa Clara has an area of 9,500 square miles and a populadon of 
356,536. Its urban population living in cities of more than 1,000 inhabitants is 40 
per centof the total, and that living in cities of more than 8,000, 22.5 percent; while 
it has, including cities, 36 inhabitants to the square mile, and excluding cities of more 
than 8,000, 25.5 per square mile. While the western and central portions of thi? 
province have in the railwa}r8 traversing these sections a fairly extensive s^-stem and 
frequent means of communication, its eastern se<*tion is almost entirely at fault in 
this particular and is sparselv inhabited. This province has also suffered severely 
in the late war, but the fielas devastated by fire are l)eing replanted with cane and 
tobacco, the abandoned plantations are teeming again with life and energy, the 
ruined sugar mills are Ijeing rebuilt, and many villagen and tx)wns, of which hardly 
a vestige remained, are rapidly becoming rehabilitiitetl, so that the general air «>f 
improvement prevailing throughout the island ha8i)erhai)s its most off t»ctivect>unter- 
part here. Under theat* conditions the increase of nearly 30 per (*ent in the number 
of offices in this province is not worthy of particular comment; it is simply one of 
the factors in the situation. 

Santiago Province, covering an area of 12,468 square miles, has a population i«( 
327,714, of which 33.2 per cent inhabit cities of more than 1,000 i)opulati«m, and 17."> 
per cent cities of more than 8,000 |>opulation, the <len.*»ity of the populaticm l)eiug % 
mhabitants per square mile including cities, and 21.7 per scpiare mile exclusive of 
cities of 8,000 population or more. This province is the iargt*st in area on the isUn<L 
Its population is scattered and the people possess but limite<l means of communica- 
tion with each other, the mileage of its railways being less than that of any other 
Krovinceof the island. Notwithstanding this obstacle the growth of the service hen* 
as been more marketl than in any other part of the island, the increase in the num- 
ber of offices bein^ over 30 per cent. This can only be ascrilKHl to (conditions similar 
to those existing m the provinces of Santa Clara and Pinar del Rio, and a further 
observation on the subject at this point would only be repetition of what has been 
stated hereinbefore. 

Puerto Principe Province has an area of 10,500 square miles, its population being 
88,234 — the ponulation in cities of 1,000 inhabitants or more being 40.1 per cent of 
the total, and tnat in cities of 8,000 or more 28.4 per cent of the total — there being 
onljr 8 inhabitants to the square mile, including cities, and 6 per square mile outside 
of cities of 8,000 or more inhabitants. This province, although of so great an area, 
has the smallest population of all the provinces of the island, and outside of the few 
localities in which tK)st-offices now exist, the population is widely distributed over a 
fertile and practically unimproved territorv. The limited means of communication 
has, no douot, been a factor in the poor exhibition heretofore made by the service in 
this province, although, as a fact, tne percentage of increase in the numl)er of post- 
offices in the past year, amounting to 22 per cent, shows that the local situation i^ 
improving to a creditable and satisfactory degree. 

With the advent of the Cuban Central Railway j now under course of construction, 
an increase of population and prosperity may confidently be expected in the province? 
of Puerto Principe, Santa Clara, and Santiago de Cuba, and it may be statea v^nthoui 
question that when the greatest obstacle in the path of the progress of the L'land has 
been removed bv the completion and operation of this new line of communication, 
with the gradual resumption by the people of their commercial and agricultural par- 
suits throughout the island, a new era of expansion and advance will have beeo 
inaugurated in the postal service of Cuba. 

SEPARATIONS AND ADDITIONS IN THK SERVICE. 

The number of departmental employees appearing on the roll at the end of the 
fiscal year shows no increase as comparal witn the number of those appearing upon 
last year's roll, the separations and additions having been e<}ual. 

The seemingly large numl^er of separations of postmasters from the service during 
the year may oe easily accounted for when one considers the fact that i)08tma8ter8 in 
the smaller offices, serving for but little compensation, and in many cases ignorant 
of their duties and failing to have a sense of the responsibilities of their positions, 
resign or desert their offices on the smallest provocation and the flimsiest pretexts, 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 267 

never giving a thought to conditions and reetrictionfl imposed upon them in emer- 
gencies of this nature by the regulations of the department under which they accepted 
appointment It is to be expected that the new regulations made effective at the 
Atise of the fiscal year, relative to the question of swaries and allowances of post^ 
niastere, and as to their being placed under bond, will have a tendency to gradually 
tiiminish these abuses, if not entirely wipe them out. When this has been accom- 
plished a more normal showing can, no doubt, be made in this particular. 

The apparently abnormal increase in the number of additions to the ranks of postal 
employees in the island is simply a result of the establishment of free delivery in 26 
additional poet-offices during tne past year, this having necessitated the employment 
of 53 atlditional carriers, there bemg at the close of the year 49 free delivery offices, 
with 149 carriers. 

8AL-\RIE8 AND ALLOWANCES. 

The records on file in the bureau show that on June 30, 1900, annual allowances 
were being paid to 104 post-offices at the rate, per annum, of $12,431.55, these allow- 
ances being, in moet cases, for rent and light. 

Separate allowances for miscellaneous expenditures to the number of 499, and 
amounting to $11,462.29, were made during tne year to 80 offices. 

The total of salaries paid in the postal service, exclusive of the railway mail 
service and star-route contractors, on June 30, 1900, is $366,579. 

We find thus that the average of annual salaries paid per employee of the service 
is a fraction under $540 each. This is certainly not an extravagant showing, and if 
we deduct from the amount mentioned above the salaries paid in the department, 
which are necessarily high, this is further reduced to an average of about $450 per 
employee. These figures, with the gradual separation from the service of American 
postmasters and clerks, will undoubtedly show a further material reduction during 
the current year. 



For a small beginning, ostensibly unimportant, this item in the list of operations 
a.Hgigned to the bureau has become one of the prominent features of its work, re(]uir- 
ing the utmost care and attention on the part of those concerned in the clerical 
duties involved and entailing a heavy responsibility on the chief of the bureau. 

As the figures show, the number of bonded employees has risen from 67 to 214, 
and the total amount of penalties from $149,000 to $569,000, the increase being in 
jwth instances almost fourfold. Under the regulations of the department, introduc- 
ing and encouraging the use of personal bonds in the service, and taking into con- 
sideration the proposition that the bonding of all postmasters on the island is 
probably a question of but a short time, it may be anticipated that this section of the 
work of the bureau will materially increase both in importance and volume. 

JOUBNAL. 

In accordance with the rwilations of the department, all orders issued by the 
director-general of posts must oe entered in chronological order in the journal of the 
department, which thus became an important and valuable record. This task is one 
of the varied duties assigned to this bureau, and requires clerical work of the highest 
order. The entries made must generally appear in condensed form, and as the vital 
points in each order have to be sifted out and clearly set forth in the briefest fonn 
possible the journal clerk must necessarily possess qualifications that the average 
clerk can not, as a rule, lay claim to. I take great pleasure in testifying to the faith- 
fulness and efficiency of Mr. H. W. Hazzard, a clerk of this bureau, who has had 
charge of this important and trying work during the past year. 

SPBHAL AGBNTS' REPORTS DISPOSED OP AND CASES SUBMITTED TO BUREAU OF SPECIAL 

AGENTS. 

In comparison with the number of special agents' reports acted upon in this bureau 
dnring the fiscal vear ending June 30, 1899, amounting to 233, the number considered 
and acted upon during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, amounting to 579, indi- 
cates that the work of the bureau in this direction has not fallen off. It is interesting 
to know that the number of cases submitted by this bureau to the bureau of special 
a|?enta for investigation and report amount to about three- fourths of the number of 
reports acted upon. Thia i^howing illustrate.*! the probable fact that most of the work 
done in this direction was a result of original action in this bureau. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



268 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



APPLICATIONS FOR POSITIONS IN THE 8ERVICB. 

The number of applications received, answered, and placed on file during the fiaal 
year 1900 shows a marked decrease from the number appearing; in my last report- 
more especially so in the number of applications made by Americans. This is prob- 
ably due to the policy of the department, established during the vear and widely 
published, to confine appointments in the service as nearly as possible to Cubans. 

In closing my report I desire to publicly express my appreciation of the loyal aid 
and intelligent support given me during the year by the clerical force of the l>ureaQ, 
and to testify to the prompt and willing manner in which the several duties aligned 
to them were attended to. 

I can not fail to add that the courteous and considerate attentions shown me by the 
several bureau chiefs and the superior officers of the department in the disposal of 
the various questions arising and the solution of the many problems entering into the 
daily transactions of the department, in so far as this bureau was concerned, have not 
only been most gratifying, but have lightened the burden of responsibility and made 
existence under novel climatic and social conditions, in spite of its many'drawliacb, 
fancied or real, more pleasant. 

Very respectfully, - Albert J. Fantkn, 

Chief Bitrpciu of AppointmenU, 

Mr. M. C. FosNES, 

Director-General of Posts, Hahana, Cuba. 



Number of post-offices in operation. 
Province of— 

Habana » 

Matanzas 51 

Pinardel Rio 57 

Puerto Principt' 9 

Santa Clara vl 

Santiago de Cuba ft 

Total ^ 

Number of offices in operation June 80. 1899 239 

Net gain « 

Po6t-office8 established during the year 6* 

Poet-offices dijicontinucd 12 

Of the number now in op)eration 49 are free-delivery offices, employing 144 carrierB. 
Number of employees in the service. 





Cuban. 


American. Toul 


ICmployed as— 

PoBtmasters 


278 
292 
24 


17 35 


Employees post-office 


24 316 


Employees department of posts 


44 e^ 






Total 


594 


85 ^ 


RnilwRV pofftal clerks . 


« 


Star-route contractors 




::::::::::::i » 


Grand total of all employees 




t 

1 :^ 






1 



Additions to and separations from the service. 





Additions. 

88 
176 
221 


Separation*^ 


Departmental employees . . ... 


$» 


Postmasters ^. .. ... . . . 


130 


Other employees 


1» 


Total 


485 


m 







Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 269 

Salaries and allowances. 

Salaries: 

Department of poets 189,420.00 

Poetmasteis 89,400.00 

Clerks in po6t-offic«< 109. 2M. 00 

Letter carriers 70. 310. 00 

Mail messengers 4,175.00 

Janiton, laborers, etc 4, 040. 00 

Total 366,679.00 

Allowances: 

Stated, annual— 

104 offices 12,431.66 

Miscellaneous purposes — 

499 11,462.29 

Bonds, 



Employees. 



Departmental 

Po8Una.sters and acting postmasters . 

Po«t-offieo« 

Assistant postmasters 



Total. 



Number. 



21 

82 



214 



Amount. 



$114,000 

267.000 

177,000 

21,000 



569,000 



Special agents* reports and cases. 



Xamber of reports acted upon by appointment bureau 

Number of cases submitted to special agents' bureau by the bureau of appointments. 



579 



Applications /or positions in the service. 



Americans 92 

Cubans 680 

Total 622 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF OPERATIONS OF THE BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1900. 



Bureau of Traxsportation, 

Habaruiy ^September 5, 1900. 
Sir: I have the honor to present herewith for your consideration a report of that 
portion of the Cuban postal service coming under the immediate direction of the 
bureau of transportation during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900. 
Verv respectfully, 

M. H. BuNN, 
Chief Bureau of TVangporiatum. 
Mr. M. C. FosNES, 

Director- General of Posts of Cuba. 

Since the date of the last annual report of the department of posts of Cuba, that 
portion of the Cuban postal service coming under the direct supervision of the bureau 
ol transportation shows an increase in mail-carryin|j routes of 29. The increase in 
the length of these routes is 1,366.86 miles, and the mcrease in the cost per annnm 
is $37,623. The increase \n the cost per mile is $6.33. 

There were on June 30, 1900, 63 star routes, w^ith a total of 1,388.60 miles costing 
per annum $23,999; steamboat routes 13, with 3,184.26 miles, at $27,808 per annain; 
railroad routes 31, total mileage 1,088.16, the railroad service costing $5,244 per 
annum. Of wagon transfer routes there were 3, covering a distance of 14. 64 miles 
paid for at the rate of $4,690 per annum. 

In addition to the above enumeration there come under the supervision of the 
bureau of transportation 30 railway post-offices, operated over 1 ,877.76 miles of railway 
and steamship lines, employing 46 railway postal clerks, who are paid $19,400 per 
annum. 

The amount due for foreign mail sennce is $10,393.58. 

The following table presents the above facta in a more comprehensible form: 



Mail service in general. 










Number. 


Length. 


.\nnua! 
cost 


Star routes 


63 
31 
13 
3 
30 
46 


Miles. 
1,883.50 
1.088.16 
8,1W.26 
14.64 
1.877.76 


$23,999.00 


Railway routes 


5.244.0U 


Steamboat routos 


27,808.00 


Wagon transfer routes 


4,690100 


Railway post -*)ffice lines 




Hai 1 wav postal clerks 


19,4O0lOO 








Total for domestic service 






81»141.rt> 


Foreign mail service 






10,SS8.^ 










Total per annum 






91.984.fiti 











Viewed from another standpoint the following table is given: 
Summary of all classes of mail senices. 

Number of all routes UO 

Length of all routes (miles) 5, 7W.5£ 

Annual rate of expenditure 161,741 

Number of miles traveled per annum ... 1,636,296 

Rateofcoetper mile of length tia» 

Rate ©f cost per mile traveled .' I0.08J 

270 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 27 1 

Compared with the report of June 30, 1899, the following changes appear: Increase 
innamberof routes, 29; increase in length of routes, 1,356.86 mites; increase in 
annual rate oi expenditure, 137,623; increase in cost per mile of length, $6.33. 

It is hardly ^r to state the cost of transportation over the routes as $10.89 per mile 
of length without calling attention to the conditions that cause the very low rate as 
shown in this general statement. By observation of the rate of cost per mile of 
length for the star-route service it is found to be $17.35, which is nearer an ordinary 
rate for that class of service. But in the cost of steamboat service, with the exception 
of one or two routes, the pay is almost inconsiderable, while on the railroad routes 
it is even too small to include in an estimate per mile, there being only 171.75 miles 
of railroad service paid for out of a total of 1,088.16 miles on the island. 

It is quite generally known that all of the railways in Cuba constructed since the 
year 1858 have been chartered with a requirement to carry the mails without pay 
therefor. There are so chartered 826.97 kilometers, or 516.75 miles. The remaining 
mileage of the island, those lines chartered previous to the above date, with the 
exception of the 171.75 miles referred to, make no charge for carrying the mails. On 
nearly all of these lines some ^rtion of each has been chartered requiring free car- 
riage. This, taken in connection with the privilege of using ** penalty" envelopes 
for dispatching their oflScial correspondence, had caused a precedent to be established 
during the sovereignty of Spain, which has been adhered to since the occupation by 
the United States, of making no charge for carrying the mails. 

While explaining the cause of so low a rate per mile of length during the preced- 
ing twelve months, it may apjpear proper to state why the rate for that period, $10.89, 
18 80 much higher than for the perioa from January 1 to June 30, 1899, viz, $4.56. 
The greatest cause of that increase is the fact that during the latter period the steam- 
boat service cost $27,808, and during the former, $2,200, with an increase in mileage 
amounting to only 621.26 miles, or an increase of 1,250 per cent in pay, and only 125 
per cent in mileage. Then, too, there has been a slight increase per mile in star- 
route service as well as more pay to the railway lines. In the rate per mile stated 
a year ago was not included tne mail-messenger service. Thit fact alone explains, 
to a degree, the reason of the increase this year per mile of length, as it is now 
inclmied in the estimate. 

CONTRACT LETTINGS. 

During the past fiscal year there have been 108 contracts for carrying the mail exe- 
cuted, divided as follows: 

Total number of contracts 108 

For etar-roate service 91 

For Hteftmboat service 13 

For wa^on-transfer service 8 

For railroad service 1 

FOR STAR-ROUTE SERVICE. 

One of the most interesting feature.8 in connection with the work of this bureau 
during the past year has been the contract service, and especially the letting of con- 
tracts after due form of advertisement asking for proposals accompanied by bond. 
This was, indeed, an innovation in Cuba, and it was not well taken to, especially by 
the star-route service. During the Spanish sovereignty <^f the island the people who 
carried the mail on what are now called star routes were employed by salary. It has 
l)een a difficult thing to impress upon people who hold contracts for carrying the 
mail that they are not employees but under contract tt) perform the service ana are 
compensated as such, and that they must fulfill the terms of their contract. They 
execute a con tra<*t in due form and are furnished a copy of it in the Spanish language. 
.\fter apparently understanding; the transaction it is a frequent occurrence, after a 
few weeks* service, for a contractor to reque^ that his ** salary" be increased, and 
w)raetimes this request is even at^companied by a polite but unmistakable threat that 
imless it is done by the first of the next month he will resign. In fact, a number 
have gone so far as to send in their resignations in due form. One contractor, since 
July I, abandoned his route and so notified the deimrtment, saying he could not live 
on the pay received, He holds a Ci^mtract for carrying the mail 10 miles twice a 
week, ana submitted a proposition, at^companied by a bond, to do it for $60 per 
annum. It apparently did not occur to him to seek any other means of livelihood 
during the five days when not engageil in carrying the mail. When he and his 
bondsmen were notified that the service must lx» kept up or a forfeiture of the bond 
would follow, he was very quick to inform the department that he was sick when 
the failures were made, and had hi.** sureties to testify to it. 

There are only two contractors on the island who have contracted for more than 



Digitized by VjOOvIC 



272 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



one route; they have two each. One of these carries the mail himself over both 
routes; the other employs his own carrier on one, and carries it himself on the other. 
In almost all the other cases the contractors carry the mails themselvee over the 
routes upon which they hold contracts; and it is believed to l)e better so, although 
in the advertisement it was stated that a bidder could submit bids for two or more 
routes if desired, and carriers not under 16 years of age, of good character, could be 
employed. 

Contracts that had been let during the early part of the American occupation on 
star routes had not been advertised for, and were not accompanied bv bond. Ar- 
rangements were made with a prospective cx)ntractor on the spot, and he signed the 
contract and oath without further detail and began service. XJpon the expiration of 
these contracts, drawn up for the emergency, it was decided to renew service on the 
routes by advertisement and bonded contractors. There were 38 routes, contracts 
upon which expired June 30, 1900, or some few weeks earlier. 

The following list shows the number of routes in each province advertised and the 
number of bids received: 



Province. 


Routes. 


Bids 
received. 


Habana 


7 
7 
2 
9 

1 
12 


9 


Plnar del Rio 


A 


Mataii74)^ , . , . . r 


J 


Santa Clara 


19 


Puerto Principe 


4 


Santiago 


21 








Total 


38 


75 







It should be understood that all the bids remved were notreceive<l in respond to 
the advertisements, but quite a number were rei-eived in answer to corresi)ondenoe 
and other agencies. As shown elsewhere, it often happened that the only Iwd 
received on a route was too high to be considered, and afterwards another bid, at a 
reasonable price, would be accepted, the record showing two proposals received on 
that route. 

It was not without a feeling of anxiety, and some distrust of the success of it, that 
the system of advertising and requiring bonds to accompany each proposal wasundei^ 
taken, excused by a knowledge of the manner in which the service was viewed by 
the people who might be reasonably expected to offer propositions. Bulletin adveiv 
tisements in both Spanish and English were posted in each office on the route adver- 
tised. Letters of explanation to the ixjstmasters were sent, together with printed 
blank proposals with bonds and certificates attached. In addition, lists of the routes 
to be let were printed in circular form by provinces and widely distributed over the 
island, every post-office being supplied with copies, with instructions to post them. 

The bulletins were posted usually from thirty to sixty da>rs, according to the d»- 
tance from Habana, before the date of award. About one-third of the routes adver- 
tised were let under the advertisements, and more than one-half of these were let 
under a single bid to the former contractor. For the remainder there were either 
no bids received or else the ones received were out of all reason in price. In such 
cases the matter was taken up by correspondence with the postmasters on the routes 
and the former contractors. When correspondence also failed to develop a reason- 
able bidder, a special agent of the department was requested to visit the localit>' and 
find a bidder. 

In almost all the cases the cause of failure to bid was a fear of the bond. Often a 
prospective bidder would claim to be able to secure many indorsements of his good 
character, and certificates even that he "owned a good horse." But, however will- 
ing the endorsers were to recommend him to the good graces of the Department, 
asking that he be "appointed" contractor, they were not willing to be liable in dol- 
lars and cents for his good standing in the community. Several desiring to bid 
asked if the bond required was an actual deposit of cash. ' By the means enumerated, 
by June 30 all the routes were contracted for save two. Since then arrangements 
have been made for these. 

The amounts named as bonds on star routes were about what it was thought the 
route should be contracted for per annum. In case of doubt, however, it was pre- 
ferred to make it lower rather than higher, as it was thought best to name an amount 
that would not frighten a timid prospective bidder. As about all the routes are con- 
tracted for by persons living in the locality, the best service the bond performs is to 
secure an interest in the localities dependent upon the routes for mail service. The 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 273 

contractors, of course, securing their sureties at their own residences, the service is 
less liable to go by default than if the sureties lived in a locality not dependent upon 
the route. 

The advertisement of the star-route service, from the points of view just enumer- 
ated, can not be considered a success this time, although it is believed that when 
the matter is understood, with the benefit of experience it will become more success- 
ful, and will be more satisfactory to the people who are connected with this kind of 
eervice. 

For convenience in the future, the island has been divided into four contract sec- 
tions for the star-route service, the term of the contract expiring by sectiuUM, one 
each year. The first section, composed of the provinces of nabana and Matanzas, 
expires June 30, 1901; the second section, Pinardel Rio, expires in 1902; the third 
section, Santa Clara, in 1903; the fourth section, comprising the provinces of Puerto 
Principe and Santiago, in 1904; and every fourth year thereafter. 

FOR STEAMBOAT SERVICE. 

If the advertisement for proposals in the star-route contract lettings can not be 
called a success, the advertisement for steaml)<>at contract lettings must be called a 
straight-out failure. With the exception of two contracts, the pay on which was 
inoonsiderable and can almost be called gratuitous ser\ace, so small are the amounts, 
there were no lettings under advertisement. However, there was a response on all 
routes advertised except one, but the rate of pay was considered excessive and the 
proposals rejected, after which the matter was taken up by private negotiations. 
There was no trouble about the bonds accompanying the proposals. The bidder 
furnished the bond without question. 

The advertisements for steamboat service were given wide publicity. Each route 
coneeming a locality was advertised in the newspapers in that locality during thirty 
days, besides copies of the advertisement being posted in each post-office concerned, 
and printed copies in each lanjjuage being sent direct to every person known to be 
interested in snipping, propositions in blank, with bond attached, accompanying 
the circulars, as well as copies of the blank contract in both languages. 

It is not believed that all the advertisements developed a single bidder; neither 
was there a single route upon which was a competitive bid. 

The conclusion drawn is this: The time and money spent in the advertisement was 
a useless expenditure; also, that far better results can be secured by taking the matter 
up with the operators of boats by private negotiations. This latter conclusion is 
strengthened when it is considerea that by employing every steamer doing a coast- 
wise trade, the service is then meager enough. Consequently there can he no such 
thmg as competitive bidding. Every steamer must be employed. By using an 
expensive advertisement you simply say, "For how much will you carry the mail 
over your regjilar route?" That could be just as easily said by letter or in person. 

The advertisements for steamboat service were dated February 24, 1900, the con- 
tracts to take effect July 1, following, and April 9 was set as the date for closing the 
bids. It is quite fortunate this date was set so far ahead, or negotiations could not 
have been conducted in person and by correspondence, successfully, as it had to be 
done, after all, before July 1. 

There was no amount named as the bond on the steamboat routes to accompany 
the proposals. It was provided that the bond should be of the same amount as the 
annual compensation. The contracts on steamboat routes were made for a tenn of 
one year from July 1, 1900. There have been eight contracts executed for steam- 
boat service, taking effect July 1, 1900. 

FINES. 

Contractors were fined daring the past year for failures and delinquencies $2,395.90, 
and no remittances were allowed. (Dontractors for steamboat service were fined 
12,377, and on star routes $18.90. 

A laige decree of liberality is indulged in the star-route service regarding failures 
and late amvals. The roads in Culm are rarely good. Often the mail routes are 
Pimply trails through the mountainous country, and small creeks are numerous and 
can quickly become impassable on account of a hard rain, which in Cuba is abundant 
at certain seasons. It would therefore be unfair to hold carriers on such routes 
strictly to a schedule of arrivals. Even in cases where the trip is not made, if there 
ifi any evidence that the carrier was prepared to make it and was prevented by rains 
or swollen streams, no deductions are made. It is only in aggravated cas€« that fines 
are assessed, and during the past year there has been little cause for it. Of the 
amount named only three contractors participated. One had his pay reduced the 

Digitized by VjV^^^V IC 



274 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

value of two trips because he failed to make them for the reason that he was not 
satisfied with the amount of pay received; another, because he failed to see theoae 
in making the trip when a connection was missed. The third had employed a car- 
rier who proved irresponsible and did not feel like making a trip at a certain time 
one was due to have been made. 

On the coastwise steamboat service there ia also much latitude allowed in making 
a schedule. Most of the lines must face the open sea, and are therefore subject to 
storms that are frequent in these waters. 

FOREIGN MAlia. 

Cuba's share for maritime and territorial transit charges during the past vear has 
been $10,393.58, the maritime charge being $4,974.96, and the temtorial transit 
charge $5,418.62. Being an island and situated as it is, there is no conveyance of 
foreign mail through its territory, and it receives no credit for transit charges. A 
large per cent of all mail originating here is destined for foreign countries, andmu^ 
ne^is he subject more or less to temtorial transit charges. As there are no foreien 
mail ves8el8 under contract with the island, we are also subject to a comparatively 
heavy maritime charge. 

Foreign dispatches are made from Habana once a month to ports of Central America, 
viz, La Guaira, Colon, Cartagena, Barranquilla, and Port Limon; to Mexico by the 
Ward Line once a week, by the French Line once a month, and by the Spanfeb 
Trans- Atlantic Line twice a month; to Spain three times a month by the Spaniah 
Trans- Atlantic Line, making the ports of Cadiz, on the southern coast, and Barcelona, 
and by the French Line once a month that calls at the ports of Santander and C-oninna; 
to France once a month by the French Line going to the port of San Nazaire. The 
larger portion of the correspondence for France, and a large quantity of mail for 
Spain, 18 dispatched via New York. 

CARRYING MONEY IN THE MAIL. 

There has been considerable objection on the part of railway companies and steam- 
boat lines to the carrying of money in the mails. It was something almont unknown 
formerly. Tlie introduction of the money-order system has of course made it necee 
sary to ship as registered mail large quantities of money. 

There seems to be no part of the postal service that has been appreciated as ranch 
as the money-order feature. Heretofore the debtors in the small towns remitted to 
their creditors in the larger cities almost exclusively by railway or steamboat Quite 
a sum of earnings was thus realized by the transportation companies. Now, when 
possible, the remittance is made by money order; but it becomes necessary to remit 
almost the entire amount to Habana, the depository, by registered mail as official 
matter. Thus the railway and steamship lines carry it just the same, but receive no 
compensation for doin^ so. It is a net loss to them of the revenue formerly obtained 
from this source. During the months of August, September, and October of 1899, just 
after the payment of the Cuban soldiers in American silver dollars, it seemed that 
the whole amount paid in the provinces of Santiago, Puerto Principe, and Santa Clara 
was sent to Habana by money order, and of course the postmaster nad to remit, prac- 
tically, the identical dollars to Habana by registered mail, requiring a long haul d 
the money by the steamboat and railway companies. There was a vehement protest 
made. 

This, however, belonji^ to the postal system, and is mentioned as merely an incident 
in the process of o|)erating it. But it api>ear8, at first thought, unjust to the trans- 
portation comimnies who have shown so much liberality toward the service, and it 
IS by no means strange that they have protested. 

MAIL-MESSENGER SERVICE. 

There has been no mail-messenger service recognized as such heretofore. There 
are about 32 places on the island where it may be employed. That is, that the mail 
messenger Ikj employed by competitive bidding, and not as a regular employee of 
the post-office service. Heretofore the person who carried the mail between the 
post-office and railway station has been an employee of the office, even when he 
performeil no other duties. There are some advantages in this method in Cuba. In 
the first place it has been possible to avoid entirely the card registry receipt system 
in dispatching registered mail between the railway |>ost-office and post-offices. The 
messenger, being an employee of the office, has authority to handle the registers 
hand to hand, thus doing away with the most i^ernicious system of using canl 
receipts and inclosing registers in a pouch. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



ftEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 275 

In the second place, it is believed that the service can be performed more econom- 
ically. The experience had in advertising star-route service strengthens this belief. 
There will be little competitive bidding. The bidder, irrespective of the amount of 
service to be performed or the time consumed on account of it, will name an amount 
that he thinks he can live upon. This amount, it is useless to add, will always be 
more than the service is worth. He will expect that to be his employment and will 
not seek other sources of income. 

Except at places where it is necessary to use wagons, it appears best that this 
service remain as it is. Where wagons are employed by the messenger it is usually 
the case that he derives other income by employing his wagon for various purposes. 

NEWSPAPEBS IN THE MAIL. 

The most persistent subject of complaint against the postal service, and the easiest 
explained, is the dispatch of newspapers. The fact that complaints of newspapers 
oot reaching their destination are more numerous than any other class or mail 
matter, is likelv to cause one to ask whether the diflBculty may not rest with the 
papers themselves. The complaints regarding first, third, and fourth class matter 
are not abundant Why is this so in the case of newspaper mail? It is handled by 
the rame people who handle the other classes of matter and in the same way. 

It is believed that if the packages of papers were prepared for mailing with more 
care there would be a great reduction in complaints oi nondelivery. Tlie improve- 
ment should begin with the placing of the addresses on the packages from the mail- 
mg lists. It has occurred that publishers have complained that a large quantity of 
I»per8 was not received by an agent at a certain point. Upon investigation at the 
office of mailing it was on several occasions ascertained that the weight of papers 
receivefl from that particular publisher for mailing on the date in question was 
much under the average, the presumption being, especially as the packages would 
never be found at any place, that they were never received for mailing, having never 
left the publisher, presumably having been inadvertently left off the list for that date. 
In tracing complaints of loss of lai^e packages of papers it is very easy to tell if 
aboat the average weight was received on a given date, but it is not so m the case 
of a "single wrapper. '° However, if there is great carelessness in mailing a large 
handle it is natural to believe that even as much carelessness prevails in mailing 
the smaller ones. 

There has been one instance where the publisher was very vehement in his com- 
plaints that a check was kept on the papers received from a mailing list prepared 
from the papers received each morning, and it was found that some of the names of 
subscribers whom the manager claimed could not receive their papers were not 
being mailed at all. 

Another cause of serious irregularity in receipt of newspapers is the manner in 
which the pac^kagee s^e prepared for mailing. Several papers are placed in one 
bundle, then wrapped with a narrow paper oand. Even were the band of good 
material it would not hold the package together if much pressure and abrasion were 
brought to bear upon it, as is likely to occur in transit. But the band UHually 
employed is of a very inferior qualfty of paper, and not strong enough to stand 
much handling. The address is marked on the band in ink or pencil. 

If the publishers would use a better class of paper for wrapping, and would use 
wider bands to inclose packages, they would find that their papers would reach their 
destinations more regularly. Eipecially is it necessary to wrap their packages more 
securely when they must pass over a long horseback route. There have been com- 
plaints received from postmasters receiving mail over a horseback route that the 
papers usually reached the ofiice so badly worn and mixed up that they could not 
be delivered. This, of course, is not the fault of the service, but of the manner in 
which the packages were prepared for mailing. The bands had burst and the address 
was lost 

POST-ROUTE MAP OF CUBA. 

A post-route map of Cuba has been prepared by the topographer of the Post-Office 
Department of the United States. The map is now in its third edition. It has been 
corrected from information furnished through this bureau. A copy is also kept in 
this bureau, and the correlations becoming necessary by reason of changes and addi- 
tional information are made upon it and periodically lurnished the topographer at 
Washington. 

It is Ixjlieved that there is no better map of Cuba in existence, viewed from an 
internal standpoint. Its coast line, however, <»an not be judged. Although it is on 
a small scale, viz, 12 miles to the inch, it is believed to be suflaciently large at the 
present stage of the postal service. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



276 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF Ct?BA. 



Railroad Service. 

Since the report of last year the mileage of the railway servic*e has been changed 
very little. There have been constructed no new lines of railway. The mileage 
then given was 1,045.71; that given now is 1,088.16. 

The lines over which new service has been employed are: Route No. 128, from 
Santiago to Firmeza, 19 miles, and route No. 127, from Sagua la Grande to Cagua- 
gua.M, 9.69 miles. The extensions of lines, because of service being employed, are: 
Route No. 130, Caimanera to Guantanamo, extended to Jamaica, increase in distance 
12.41 miles; route No. 122, Navajas to Jaguey Grande, extended to Murga, increase 
in distance 8 miles. The length of the whole extension of new service is 49.10 miles. 

With more reliable basis for estimating the railway milea^, it has been foond 
that the estimate of last year was 6.65 miles too much. This amount subtracted 
from the mileage reported last year would make the correct mileage last year 
1,039.06. . Adding the extension reported this year, 49.10 miles, gives the total mile- 
age of railroad service as 1,088.16. 

The following is a summary of the railroad service: Number of railroad rootes, 
31; length of railroad routes (miles), 1,088.16; annual travel (miles), 952,771; 
annual pay, $5,244. There is no estimate of cost per mile, as the amount paid for 
railroad service is too small, there being only two railway companies compensated. 
It may be of interest to state that the agreement had with the United Railways d 
Hal)ana is on a basis of pay at the rate of $20 per kilometer, or $32 }>er mile per 
annum. That company has 229.20 kilometers, chartered before the effect of the 
royal decree of Spain of 1858, requiring free carriage of the mails, making a total 
annual compensation of $4,584. The Nuevitas and Puerto Principe Railway, char- 
teretl in 1837, having 71.35 kilometers (44.37 miles) , is paid $660 per annum, or $9.25 
per kilometer, which is $14.88 per mile. 

Following is a list of the railroad routes in operation June 30, 1900: 



Railroad routes in operation June SOj 1900. 






From— 



101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
10<) 
107 
108 
109 

no 

111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 



San Felipe 

Caibarien 

do 

Canlenas 

do 

Rodas 

Cienfuegos 

Palmim 

(iibam 

Habana 

Regla 

Rincon 

Habana 

do 

do 

Isabela de Ha^ua 

Altamisal 



I 



To- 


1 
Length. 




Miles. 


Batabano — 


J 9.38 


Plaeetafl 


.' 32.73 


do 


.1 22.31 


Esperanza ... 


.1 96.47 


\ aguaramaM . 


.1 71.98 


Cartagena . . . 


.' 20 


Santa Clara . . 


.! 42.81 


Congoias 

Holgnln 


., 15.63 


•1 '^ 


Alacranes 


.1 81.25 


Quanabaeoa . 


•1 8 


Guanajay — 


., 21.25 


Jovellanos . . . 


J 88.75 


Marianao — 


. 10 


Plnar del Rio 


.1 no 


Graces 


J 49.31 


Maeagua 


. 20.20 

1 



3 C 



118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
126 
126 
127 
128 
129 
I'M 
131 



From— 



Empalme 

Matanza.M 

Maximo Gomez. 

Jucaro 

Navaias 

Nue\itas 

Ranchuelo 



Tunas de Zaza 

Santiago de Cuba . I 
Sagua la Grande.. 
Santiago de Cuba . 

SItiecito 

Caimanera 

Cristo I 



To— 



Gulnes 

(>)lon 

Itabo 

Moron 

Murga 

PuertoPrincipe 
San Juan de 

lo8 Yeras 

SanctiSpirltus 

San Luis 

Caguagua^ 

Firmeza 

Camaiuani 

Jamaica 

Songo 



Total ; « L088.K 



Lengtk 



•5.88 

70 

llffi 

41 » 

») 

4.^63 

5 
24. T4 

a».o 

19 
31. e 



Steamboat Service. 

Railroads are employed in maintaining communication between the capital of the 
island and the tfjwns and cities of the provinces of Habana, Plnar del Rio, Matanzas, 
and Santa Clara; but outside of these provinces the greatest factor is the Hteamboat 
Even the eastern end of the province of Santa Clara is dependent upon the steam- 
boat. It is not a surprising statement to say that the steamboat service is the one 
that causes the greatest concern and is the most expensive to maintain. By employ- 
ing everv line with which arrangements can be made, the service is then ver>' poor, 
a tact which is much regretted, but which is beyond the control of the department 
of posts. 

Some of the steamship lines have been very liberal heretofore, and some of them 
that have given the best and most important service have surrendered any claim for 
compensation. The two most important lines doing a coastwise trade have carried 
the mails gratuitously for eighteen months, and still others have been liberal in 
their charges. 

Service to the Isle of Pines has been completely suspended since May 1 on account 
of no steamers being available for carrying the mails. The only means of dispatch- 
ing mail to and from that island is by an occasional schooner. This is a case in 
point, showing how dependent we are upon conditions that permit of the operation 
of steamboat lines. There were two steamers that made trips, each once a week, 

Digitized by VjH^^^V LC 



REPOET OF MILITABY GOVEBNOE OF CUBA. 



277 



between Batabano and the Isle of Pines. Both steamers were condemned by the 
inspector of boilers and hulls, and of course came out of service. But that has 
not prevented unthinking people from censuring the department of posts for not 
providing postal service in place of the condemned boats. 

The inland navigation is on a small scale. There are three rivers upon which serv- 
ice is employed by steamers: One from Cienfuegos to Rodas, 1^0 miles on the Damuji 
River (there is railway mail service on this line) , one from CitMifuegos to Belmonte, 
15 miles on the Arimao River, and another on the Mayari Kiver from the city of 
Mayari to the Bay of Nipe, 15 miles. 

Steamboat service extends all around the whole island, except a pmall portion on 
either side of Cape San Antonio, from Cortes to La Fe, in the province of Pinar del Rio. 

The following is a summary of the steamboat service in operation during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1900: 

Steamboat service; Steamboat routes, 13; length of steamboat routes (miles), 
3,184.26; annual travel (miles), 339,455; rate of annual pay, $27,808. 

Comparison with previous year: Increase in number of rout«^, 6; increase in length 
of routes (miles), 621.26; increase in cost per annum, 125,608. 

As some of the lines with the greatest mileage are not compensated, it would l^e 
useless to give the rate of cost per mile, as it would be of no value. 

The following is a list of the service by steamboat during the past fiscal year: 



a 
£ 



d 
I 

I 


Steamboat service in operation 


during the fiscal year ending June SO, 


WOO. 


Termini. 


An- 

Name of contractor, nual 

pay. 


Length, 
miles. 


No. 
trips 

per 
week. 




From— 


To- 


To— 


Habana 


SontiagodeCuba. 
do 


Sobrinoflde Hcrrera 
Menendez & Co 




840 
614.46 

92 

46 
409 

82.08 
227.50 

"^ 

425.22 

15 

51 
242 


14 

! 

2 


June 30, 1900. 


Batabano 


Do. 


An 


Jucaro. . . 


Rafael de Arazoza.. 
Gallego.MessuiVCo. 
AlonBO Jauma «fe Co. 
Antonio AigtifUes. . 


1600 

'"-ioo 


June 9.1900. 
June 30, 1900. 
Do 


4 ! Santiago de Cuba. 
6 ' Habana 


Caimanera 

Nuevitfts . 


6 Cienfuegoft 

7 Habana (N.t.),.. 
9 Batabano 


TunaadeZazu 

LaFe 


Apr. 5,1900. 
June 30, 1900. 


A.Collado&Co 

LuiB Gutierrez . 


1,200 


Cortas 




10 Cienfuegos 

H Batabano 


Rodas 


Boullon & Co 






Manzanlllo 

Bay of Nipe 

Niquero 


S.Castro 


200 
240 


Mar. 16, 1900. 


12 Mayari 

13 , Mftn2ftTi!llo_ 


Carlota Grau 

Jaime Roca . ... 




14 


Miami •. 

Total 


Hanana 


FloridaEaatCoaatCo ^ ifiH 


June 30, 1900. 












27,808 


3,184.26 








1 







A report of the work of this bureau for the past year would not he complete with- 
out showing the steamship 8er\ice for the following year. 

Steamboat service provided for after July 1, 1900: Number of routes, 12; length 
of routes (miles) , 2,845.26; rate of cost per annum, |24,750. 

Comparison with June 30, 1900: Decrease in number of routes, 1; decrease in 
mileage, 339; decrease in cost, $3,068. 

The following is an itemized statement of the service arranged for the year follow- 
ing June 30, 1900: 



2 

s 


Termini. 


Contractor. 


Pay. 

112.000 
9,000 


Length. 


Trips 




d 


From— 


To- 


per 
week. 


, 


Habana 


Santiago 


Sobrinoa de Herrera 


Miles. 
810 
614. 46 

92 

45 
409 

82.08 
•J27. 50 

30 
42f». 22 

15 

51 

14 




2 


BaUbano 

do 

Santiago 

Habana 


do 


Menendez «fe Co 






Isle of Pines 

Caimanera 

Nuevitas 


v\.G. Ceballos 






Gallego, Messa & Co 


1,000 
300 
300 

1,200 






Alonso Jauma & Co 






Cienfuegos 

Habana 


Tunas deZaza — 

LaFe 

Rodas 

Manzanillo 

Bay of Nipe 

Niauero 


Jose Castro Monje 






A. Collado & Co 




10 


Cienfuegos 

Batabano 


Boullon & Co 




11 


AloiLso Jauma & Co 


200 
600 


i 


12 


Mayari 


Carlota Grau 

Jaime Roca 


3 


13 


ManaanUlo 

Cienfuegos 

Total 


6 


IS 


Belmonte 


E. Atkins & Co 


160 


2 












24,750 


2,846.26 















Digit! 



zed by Google 



278 REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

STAR-RoutE Service. 

The star-route service has shown the greatest increase in figures of any of the m^l- 
carrying agencies. The numl)er of routes has increased 110 per cent and the mileage :_ 
96 per cent, while the cost has increased 54 per cent in comparison with the report 
of a year ago. 

There was more ground tor improvement in thit service than in the others. The i 
haste in organization previous to June 30, 1899, caused more attention to be given to j 
other services that appeared to require more urgency than this, consetiuently the ' 
matter was not taken up except in so much as it was necessary until the expiration 1 
of the last fiscal year. The routes that were in actual operation were for the most , 
part those that were left in operation by the former sovereignty of the island. There- j 
fore the increase reported tliis year is mostly new service, ^rvice not in operation i 
when the present administration a^jsumed charge. | 

A large portion of the new service reported is in the province of Santiago. On j 
June 30 of last vear no star-route service was reported in that province. The military ] 
authorities had put on and maintained several courier routes, while that province j 
alone was under the control of the United States, and they were so continued until i 
Noveml)er 1, 1899, when, by recjuest of the militarv governor, the s<^»nice was taken j! 
charge of by the department of posts and thoroughly reorganized ami placed under ^ 
contract. There were 13 routes established in the province at a U)tal cost of $5,7S4 
per annum, consisting of 516 miles, or more than tlie combined mileage of any other 
two provinces. But while the distances arc great (the province of Santiago contain- 
ing little less than one-third of the area of the whole island) , the frequency of service 
is small, and the annual travel is much less than in either the province of Santa 
Clara or Pinar del Rio. 

The cost per mile of length is only $12.09, while that for the whole island is $17.35, 
accounted lor by the infrequency of service, the average number of trips over the 
routes l)eing only one and one-half a week. 

» The longt^t single route on the island is the one from Santa Cruz del Sur to Puerto 
Principe in the province of that name, 72 miles. The route from Ci^o d^ Avila Id 
Puerto Princims while carried on the record as two routes, is virtually one, as there 
is no intermediate post-office. The distance is 90 miles and the service is twice a 
week. This route is for the purpose of connecting Puerto Principe and Nuevitas with 
the southwestern, and that to Santa Cruz del Sur to connect them with the south- 
eastern portion of the island. 

A great deal of attention has been given to operating the star-route service. Even- 
thing for the purpose of obtaining records has had to be dug out of it by hard work. 
The carriers had oeen accustomed to do as it pleased them, and it has been hard to 
hold them to any form of discipline. The work of obtaining and establishing satis- 
factory schedules of running time has been very great, and much more effort will be 
necessary before it becomes satisfactory. 

An effort is bein^ made to collect a geography of each route. In estimating the 
worth of a route it is quite necessary to know that feature. On some routes of the 
same length one will require more than double the energy to traverse it than is 
required bv another. Such routes should be known and Kept distinct from those 
leas difficult to travel. 

There has l>een an effort made to ascertain correct distances by sending out ci^ 
culara calling for that kind of information. From these circulars has been compiled 
information that appears about as accurate as can be expected in absence of suneys. 
Often the mail routes are merely trails through mountainous and swampv country, 
and of course have not been surveyed. The distances presented for the 8er\ice 
beginning July 1^ 1900, are reasonably accurate. 

The following is a summary of the star-route service in operation July 30, 1900: 

Star-route service: Number of routes, 63; length of routes (miles), 1,363.50; annual 
travel (miles), 321,703; rate of annual expenditure, $23,999; average number of trips 
per week, 3i; rate of cost per mile of length, $17.35; rate of cost per mile traveled, 
$0.07o. 

Comparison with June 30, 1899: Increase in number of routes 33, 110 per cent; 
increase in length of routes (miles), 678.50, 96 per cent; increase in annual coet, 
$8,435, 54 per cent. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



EEPOBT OF UILITABY OOVEENOB OF CUBA. 



279 



The following table shows the service by provinces: 

Slar-route service by provinces. 



Province. 


Number 

of 
routes. 


Length. 


Cost. 


Annual 
travel. 


Average 

weekly 

trip. 


HaNitip , 


8 
16 

4 
18 

4 
13 


MUes. 
113 
284 
82.5 
225 
213 
516 


t2,840 
6,680 
940 
4.856 
3,000 
5,784 


50,818 
80,881 
10,400 
92,140 
26,208 
61,256 


5 


PinirdelRio 


s 




4 


aanta Clara 


6 


Paerto Principe 


2 


SftnlJAgo de Cuba 


1| 






Total 


63 


1,383.5 


23,999 


321,703 


84 









Contracts expired about June 30 of the present year on 38 routes. This occasion 
waa taken advantage of to somewhat reorganize the service for tlie incoming fist^al 
year, to change the termini and consolidate, as far as possible, for the purpose of 
making better mail connections on long distances. 

The changes have caused a redaction of two routes for the term of service begin- 
ning July 1. Bv reason of securing better accuracy in distances, and some changes 
in the routes referred to, there is shown a re<luction of 72.50 miles. 

The increase in cost per annum Is $676, or 2.8 per cent. There were, on some of the 
routes, contracts with very small pay, much below the average, made when the routes 
were new. Upon the next letting it was impossible to continue the service at the 
very small cost But the pay became nearer that of the average. This accounts, in 
a jfreat measure, for the increase in pay for the service beginning July 1. 

Star-route service in operation beginning July 1 , 1900: Numl>er of routes, 61; length 
of routes (miles), 1,311; rate of cost per annum, $24,675; decrease in number of 
routes, 2; decrease in mileage, 72.50; increase in annual cost, $676. 

Wagon-Transfer Service. 

There ia little to be said regarding this service. There are only three cities employ- 
ing it under contract: Habana, Matanzas, and Cienfuegos. At Habana the contract 
pnce is $3,750; at Matanzas, $540, and at Cienfuegos $400 per annum. The summary 
of this 8er\'ice now under contract is as follows: Number of routes, 3; length of routes 
(miles), 14.64; miles traveled per annum, 22,367; rate of annual cost, $4,690. 

There are several towns where it is necessary to employ wagons for carrying the 
mails from the city post-office to railway stations or steamboat wharves, but the per- 
sons employed are paid salaries. It is believed that more reasonable prices are 
obtained than could be by competitive bidding. There is no particular reason, how- 
ever, why the persons so emploved should not be under contract at the pame rate of 
compensation, provided a bondf could be given. It is likely that when a bond is 
asked more compjensation will be demand^. The places where such service now 
exists are Caibarien, Cardenas, Guanajay, Holguin, Nuevitas, Pinar del Rio, Puerto 
Principe, Sagua la Grande and Santa Clara. 

In the city of Santiago the mail-transfer equipment is owned by the department of 
poets. An attempt has been made, however, to let the service by contract by adver- 
tising for proposals for performing it. But the proposals received called for com^wn- 
sation fkr oeyond what was considered reasonable, and it was decided to allow it to 
remain as it was. 

Railway Mail Service. 

The ndlway mail service during the past year has shown a marked improvement 
in efficiency, especially in distributing mail in transit. The work performed by the 
service a year ago was of quite a different nature from that performed at present. 
Then the employees were just bemnning to grasp the new duties expected of them, 
and had barely grasped them sufficiently to make an extensive showing, although 
the work performed at that time was a marked improvement over the work being 
perfonned January 1, 1899, at which time the clerks employed in what is now termed 
the railway mail service, did very little of the duties that distinguish that service. 

This is all changed now. Each apartment car is a railway post-office sure enough, 
where mail is distributed, letters are mailed and postmarked, and other essential 



Digitiz.ed byVjOOQlC 



280 BEPOBT OF MILITAEY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

work is performed. As a rule the clerks take much interest in their work, amonnt- 
ing to an enthusiasm, which has resulted in an improvement that is commendable and 
is a matter of much satisfaction to those who are in inmiediate charge of this into- 
esting branch of the postal service. 

The pay of the employees of this service is very small, the average pay p» derk 
being only $461.90. The highest salary paid is $600 per annum, and the lowest to a 
regular clerk is $300. There are some clerks whose duties are exceedingly small, 
they being assigned to lines that under ordinary circumstances would reouire no 
clerk. But it has been a custom of the railway companies to handle no mail by ther 
own employees, and it is necessary for the department to have an employe of its own 
to accomjmny the mail. In some cases the clerk could be easily dispensed with if 
the railway companies would permit of the handling of mail by its own employees. 
It is Buch clerks who receive the very small salaries. It is almost nnfair to indnde 
them in an estimate of the average salary paid. 

The following is a general statement of the railway mail service at the close of the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1900: Number of clerks, 46; miles of railway mail serviee, 
1,877.76; annual mileage of clerks, 1,270,434.62; total pay of clerks, $19,400; avenge 
pay per clerk, $461.90. 

There is shown an increase over the mileage of 1899, amounting to 49.51 inilea 
Some slight changes in some of the lines and the securing of more accuracj' in the 
railway and steamboat mileage accounts for the increase. There is only one line 
where the service has been extended — the Navajas and Jagiiey Grande railway poet- 
office, extending to Murga, increasing the distance 8 miles. 

The following shows the above information classified as between railway aud 
steamship lines: Clerks on railway lines, 39; clerks on steamship lines, 7; total num- .i 
ber of clerks, 46; miles of service on railways, 1,100.22; miles of service on steam- ' 
ships, 777.54; total mileage, 1,877.76. ,| 

Among the clerks enumerated are three who, in addition to performing duties as * 
railway postal clerks, do service in post-offices. There is one who is paid a nominaJ = 
amount ($120) . He is employed jointly by the postal service and a steamship vm- 
pany. There is also one receiving no compensation, but is designated as such in 
order that he may handle the large amount of drop letters received by the steam- 
boat on which he is purser. The average pay of clerks is exclusive of the five 
referred to. The following is a classified hst of the salaries of employees: 

Cldssijicd list of sataries of railwai/ postal clerks. 





Number. 








i Total 
S*iJan'- ! Janes. 


5 










S600 ' 13,000.00 


22 










500 n.ooan 


1 










420 420.06 


8 










400 3,200.00 


2 










360 mw 


2 


320 i 6ia» 


I 


aoo 1 softi** 


1 


120 lio.® 


3 


(1) 


i:: ;:::::::;..:: ::: ■■ .......... ...... ... 


(S) 














Total 


i%mM 


Average pay ikt clerk. 


4a»' 








1 Post-office clerks. 

APARTMENT 


CARS. 


2 No 


pay. 





Eflficiency in distributing mail in transit depends largely ui>on the equipment fnr- 
nished for that purpose. The etjuipment furnished by the railway companies is not 
what it would l)e best to have. The railway passenger trains are not provided with 
many cars, and actually carry a gn»at deal of cargo. For this reason the lines fur- 
nish mg mail apartments have built them in the second-class cars usually, the car 
being divided by the mail apartment nituated in the center. There is no door con- 
necting the apartment with the exterior, ronseouently the exchange of mails with 
ofiices is ordinarily made through a window. The apartments are about 6 feet wide 
and from 5 to 8 feet in length. In them are letter-distributing cases containing: from 
30 to 60 boxen, paper causes along the wall, each having a counter in front of it, »»1 
hooks screwed into the sides of the cars to hang sacks and pouches by. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITAKT OOVEENOE OF CUBA. 



281 



On acooont of the envelopes used in correspondence in this country, averaging 
somewhat wider than the ordinary, it is necessary to construct the letter boxes so as 
to conform to their size. The size of the boxes accepted as regulation is 5} inches 
wide and 4^ inches high. 

There are 27 apartment cars in use in railwav trains by 17 railway postal lines. 
There are nine lines that have none, the clerks doing the little distributing required 
OD the seats in the train. These lines without apartment cars are very unimportant, 
and have, besides their termini, only one or two offices on them. 

There are four railway post-offices on steamboat lines, the clerk having a room :n 
wliich to do his work. One of these lines, the Habana, Batabano and Ssmtiago rail- 
way poet-office, is one of the most important on the island. Heretofore the clerks 
have been assigned a r^ular cabin stateroom in which to do their work. The state- 
rooms, however, are far too small to permit of the proper work being done. How- 
ever, the steamboat company, Menendez Company, are constructing on their steam- 
ers large and commodious rooms for the accommodation of the work of the service. 
The rooms will contain ample appliances for the work. When com Dieted, there is no 
reason why there should not be an excellent railway postal service along the southern 
coast from Batabano to Santiago. 



MAIL DISTRIBUTION. 

As previously remarked, the distribution of mail in transit by the railway postal 
clerks has materially improved. It not only has improved in accuracy, but largely 
in volome. 

The mail received on the large lines, made up into packages of letters and bags of 
papers, is distributed in the apartment cars ana properly dispatched. The distribu- 
tion, except at the larger offices, is now done almost entirely by clerks of the service. 
Instead of turning in at the larger offices the mail received on the trip in bulk pack- 
s', the letters are distributed to towns and routes, and labeled with printed facing 
^Op^, postmarked with the name of the line, and bearing the name of the clerk. 

The following shows the amount of distribution reported during the past year: 

Mail handled by railway postal clerks: Letters, 18,089,660; papers, 6,989,250; reg- 
istered packages, 82,879; registered pouches, 10,141; registered cases, 780; inner 
iwistered sacks, 499. 

While the distribution has undoubtedly improved much in quantity and quality, 
one feature in improving its efficiency is hard to impress upon the clerks — that of 
checking errors. It is difficult to convince them oi the necessity for doing it. A 
table is here furnished of the errors in distribution during the past year, as reported 
both against railway postal clerks and post-offices. 

There is no intention, however, of submitting it as reliable data of the actual 
errors made in the distribution of mail. It is simplv given as the account of errors 
reported. There is no percentage given of the number of correct, to the number of 
incorrect, pieces of mail forwarded, as it would be of no real value for statistical pur- 
poses. 

Errors in distribution. 



Pieces of ordinary mail 

MisKDt letter packages . . . 
Uiasent sacks of papers . . . 
Mislabeled letter packages 





Rail- 




Total. 


wav 
postal 
clerjcs. 


Post- 
offices. 


4,816 


194 


4,622 


88 


15 


73 


12 


4 


8 


52 


4 


48 



Mislabeled sacks of papers. 

Missent pouches 

Mislabeled pouches 

Missent registered pouches 



Total. 



Rail- 
way 
postal 
clerks. 



Post- 
offices. 



CASE EXAMINATIONS. 

Daring the past year has been introduced case examination of railway postal clerks 
and mailing clerks in post-offices. An examination of the scheme of Cuba by United 
States clerks would app^r trivial, it is conceded, but not so to the clerks of Cuba. 
The clerks there expect it; here they do not. The whole foundation of the system 
of distribution is contrary to their training. To distribute from a railway-mail- 
aervice standpoint is something never before conceived of, and to be examined in a 
practical manner upon what they know about it appeared almost as a paradox. 

However, the examinations have been held and with some degree of success. 
Daring the year 68 were made of railway postal clerks, 10 of which were 100 per cent. 



CUBA 1900 — VOL I, FT 3- 



-19 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



282 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



38 were 95 per cent and over, the whole averaging 83.03 per cent. One hundred and 
twenty-five were made of post-office mailing clerks, with an average of 85.92 per 
cent. 

An accounting of examinations of railway p>o8tal clerks and post-office mailing 
clerks during the year preceding June 30, 1900, is herewith provided in two tablea: 

Case examinations of railway postal clerks. 

Examinations 68 

Total number of cards handled 18,687 

Number correct 15, 175 

Percentage correct 85-08 

Average number of cards in each examination 274 

Examinations 108 per cent 10 

Examinations 99 per cent 8 

Examinations 98 per cent 7 

Examinations 96 to 98 per cent U 

Total examinations above 95 per cent K 

Case examinations of post-office clerks. 



Post-offices. 


Number. 


Cards han- 
dled. 


Cards cor- 
rect. 


Per cent 
correct. 


numbn 

cards OD 

eachexMh 

inatioQ. 


Habana 


101 

10 

6 

4 

4 


28,061 
2,778 
1,653 
1,092 
1,104 


26,806 

2,439 

1,349 

946 

861 


95.56 
87.83 
81.60 
86.63 
77. «8 


27; 


Matanzas 


zn 


Cardenas 


275 


Cienf uegos 


29 


Santiago de Cuba 


2?S 


Total 






126 


S4,678 


32,401 


85.92 


•/?6 



CASUALTIES. 

There has been kept a record of the accidents that have happened to trains and 
steamboats carrying mail, which is herewith given. No severe accidents have liap- 
pened during the past year, and none of our employees were hurt nor mail lost or 
destroyed on account of them. The accidents have l)een numerous for the railway 
mileage, taking also into consideration the speed of the trains, but none have been 
particularly disastrous. The matter is here given, for it is not known that any sta- 
tistics of this nature are kept by anyone on the island. It may prove of some 
interest. 

Casualties year ending June 30 ^ 1900. — 1899. — August 14, Cienf uegos and Santa Clara 
railway post-office, train No. 8 (freight), was wrecked, causing abandonment of the 
train at Cruces for that trip, delaying the mail 7 hours. September 3, Habana and 
Guanajay railway post-office, train No. 2, engine left the track, resulting in no dam- 
aj^e to mail or clerk. Delayed IJ hours, necessitating transfer of mail. October 22, 
Cienf uegos and Rodas railway post-office, steam l)oat was unable to make the trip (m 
account of the severe gale. Too dangerous to venture out. November 29, Cardenas 
and Santa Clara railway post-office, train No. 2, delayed 3 hours by derailment of 
train between Macagua and Aguica. No mail lost or damaged nor clerk injured. 
November 10, Cienfuegos and Santa Clara railway post-office, train No. 7, ran off the 
track at San Juan de las Yeras, causing a delay of 2i hours, resulting in no damage 
to mail or clerk. November 29, Habana and Jovellanos railway post-office, train Na 
7, delayed at Minas de (Tuanftbacoa 21 houfson account of derailment of engine. No 
damage to mail nor injury to clerk. November 30, Habana and Jovellanos railway 
post-office, train No. 5, was derailed southeast of Bainoa, causing delay of 4 hours 15 
minutes. No damage to mail or clerk. December 8, Matanzas and Colon railway 
post-office, train No. 1, collided with Habana and Alacranes railway poet-office, train 
No. 1, at Union de Reyes, causing a delay of 1 hour. No mail was damaged nor 
clerks injured. December 8, Habana and Alacrranes railway post-office, train No. 1, 
collided with Matanzas and Colon railway post-offi(^, train No. 1, at Union de Reyes, 
causing abandonment of Habana and Alat^ranes railway post-office for that day. No 
mail damaged nor clerks injured. November 29, Habana and Jovellanos railway 
poet-office, train No. 14, encountered a V)a(l freight wreck between Minas de Gnana- 
bacoa and Campo Florido on a high embankment, necessitating a transfer of all mail 
around the wreckj it being after dark; the transfer was made whout accident orloee 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY OOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



283 



of a single piece of mail. Train was 3 hours 30 minutes late in arriving at Habana. 
December 6, Habana and Jovellanos railway post-office, train No. 6, was delayed at 
Minas de Guanabacoa for 5 hours on account of a freight wreck . December 7, Habana 
and Jovellanos railway poet-office, train No. 6, was derailed at Jovellanos. No mail 
damaged nor clerk injured. Caused a delay of 1 hour. December 25, Habana and 
Jovellanos railway poet-office, train No 14, delayed at Guanabacoa 3} hours on 
aocomit of wreck of tost freight No. 39. 

1900.— 3larch 31, Isabela and Caibarien railway poet-office, train No. 9, was wrecked 
by nmning into cattle. No injury to mail or clerk. Train delayed 2 hours. April 
5, Caibarien, Camajuani, and Placetas railwav post-office, train No. 11, derailed near 
Placetas, resulting m no damage to mail or clerk. Delayed 1^ hours. ' April 12, Isa- 
bela and Caibarien railway post-office, train No. 10, disabled near Sagua la Grande by 
the breaking of a wheel under private car, resulting in no dama^ to mail nor injury 
to clerk. Train delayed almost 1 hour. April 24, Isabela and Caibarien railway post- 
office, train No. 9, was wreckeil between Isabela de Sagua and Sagua la Grande, result- 
ing in a number of passengers being injured, but no damage to mail or clerk. Train 
arrived at Caibarien 6 hours late. M^y 4, Habana and Alacranee railway post-office, 
train No. 6, encountered a broken rail when nearing Union de Reyes, throwing 
engine off the track. No casualties other than delay of 1^ hours to train. June 7, 
Habana and Alacranes railway post-office, train No. 1, collision, running into the train 
of the Madruga, Empalme, and Gmnes railway post-office, resulting in no injury to 
the clerks nor damage to mail, although conductor was missed from train No. 1, 
3iatanzas and (^lon. Train delayed 2 hours. 

List of railway post-offices on railroads. 



Nam- 
berof 
clerks. 



Line. 



Length. 



Railroad company. 



Oaibarien.CamaJuani.and Placetas. 

Caibarien and Placetas 

Cardenai) and Santa Clara 



1 Cardenas and Yagnammas , 

1 Cartagena and Rodas 

1 Cienf uegoe and Congo jaM 

2 Cienfnegos and Santa Clara 

1 Gibara and Holguin , 

8 Habana and Alacranes 

2 Habana and Guanajay 

4 Habana and JovellanoM 

1 Habana and Guanabacoa 

1 Habana and Marianao 

8 Habana and Pinar del Rio 

2 Isabela and Caibarien 

2 Isabela and Cienfuegos 

1 Jucaro and Moron 

1 Macagiiaand Altamisnl 

I BCadruga, Empalme, and Guines. 

1 ; Matanzas and Colon 

1 Maximo Gomez and Itabo 

1 i Kavaias and Murga 

1 ' Nnevitas and Puerto Principe 

1 Sancti Spiritus and Tunas 

1 San Felipe and Batabano 

1 , Santiago and San Luis 



39 



MOes. 
82.60 
21.89 

106 



72 

20 

24.37 

42.81 

20 

81.25 

82.<K2 

88.75 

6.25 
10 . 
110 
68.74 
68.74 
86.87 
20.20 
28.74 
70.62 
13.25 
81 

44.37 
24.38 

9.87 
21.50 



Cuban Central. 

Do. 
Cardenas ana Jucaro (Cardenas to 

Esperanza) . 
Cuban Central (Esperanza to San- 
ta Clara). 
Cardenas and Jucaro. 
Rodas, Turquino and Cartagena. 
Cuban Central. 

Do. 
Gibara and Holguin. 
United Railways of Habana. 
•Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Habana and Marianao, Limited. 
Western Railway of Habana. 
Cuban Central. 

Do. 
Jucaro and San Fernando. 
Cardenas and Jucaro. 
United Railways of Habana. 
Matanzas Railway Co. 
Cardenas and Jucaro. 
MatanzaM Railway Co. 
Puerto Principe and Nue vitas. 
Sancti Spiritus and Tunas. 
United Railwav of Habana. 
Sabanllla and Maroto. 



Total 1,100.22 



List of railway post-offices on steamship lines. 




Clenfnegosand Rodas 

Cienfuegos and Tunas 

Habana, Batabano. and Santiago 
" ~ ainillo and Niquero 

Total 




Owners. 



Boullon & Co. 
Jose Castro Monio. 
A. Mcnendez &, Go. 
Jaime Roca. 



777.54 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF SPECIAL AGENTS DEPARTMENT OF 
POSTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



Depabtment op Postb op Cuba, 

Bureau of Special Agents, 

Habana, Jamtary e9, 1901. 
Sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith a report covering the work of this iKuean 
for Uie fiscal year ended June 30, 1900. Your attention is respectfully called to the 
fact that the bureau was not put under my charge until after the cloee of the year, 
and I therefore submit the statistics as shown by the records of the office without 
comment of my own. I believe this gives the work in detail sufficiently w^ to 
show its character and extent. 

Respectfully, F. M. Hamilton, 

Acting Chiefs Sjtecial AQcnU. 
Mr. M. C. FosNBs, Director-General. 

Exhibit A. — Number of cases of all classes on hand and received during the fiscal ym 

ending June SO, 1900. 





A. 


B. 


C. 


F. 


Total 


Cases on hand Julv 1, 1899 


61 


13 
247 


147' 
2,224 


539' Toe 


Cases received during the fiscal year ended June 80, 1900 


2,536 5,0© 


Total 


68 


260 


2.871 


8,075 i 5,774 









Exhibit B. — Number of cxises of Class C made up on the post-offices in the several protiMU 

and department of posts. 



For the 

fiscal year 

ending 

June 80, 

1899. 



For the 

fiscal year 

ending 

June 90, 

1900. 



TottL 



Department of posts 

Island of Cuba 

Isle of Pines 

Habana, province 

Matanzas, province 

Pinar del Kio, province . . 
Puerto Principe, province 

Santa Clara, province 

Santiago, province 

Total 



68 
2 

10 
244 
148 
106 

43 
266 
113 



154 



4 

481 
819 
210 
100 
624 



212 
2 
14 

72& 
4S? 

m 

46 



992 



2,224 



8,2M 



Exhibit C. — Number of cases received by months during the fiscal year ending June SO, 1900. 



July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November . . 
December . . 

January 

February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total . 
284 



A. 



61 



B. 



C. 



45 

88 
149 
104 

60 
2M 
484 
110 
181 

63 
169 
527 



2,244 



SSO 
190 
118 
176 
280 
150 
196 
201 
187 
240 
212 
261 



2,586 



Total. 



106 

2» 
W 

a« 

S?6 

w 

S3 
409 
329 
4» 

ai 



5,066 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



EEPOBT OF MILITABT GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



285 



Exhibit D. 
**.-!" Cases relating to registered domestic mail. 

All complaints received referring to depredations upon or irre^alarities in the i^egis- 
tered domestic mails are included m Exhibit A. The recapitulation shows the total 
nnmber of complaints on hand July 1, 1899, and those received during the fiso&l year 
ended Jane 30, 1900; the number of complaints investigated and cl(^ed during the 
year ended June 30, 1900, and the number of cases on hand in an incompleted con- 
dition July 1, 1900. It will be observed that the total number of cases treated during 
the fiscal year aggregated 68, of which 59 relate to first-class matter and 9 to third 
and fourth class matter. Of these, 53 cases were investigate and closed on report by 
special agents and by correspondence. 

A comprehensive idea of the result of the work which has been accomplished 
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900, can be gained by glancing at the recapit- 
ulation of A cases. 

RecapitulaHon of A cases. 



OMesontstandingJaly 1,18W 7 

Ca«i received during the fiscal year ended 
June 80, 1900 61 



Total. 



Cloeed by report of special agents 20 

Closed by corresponaence 33 

Total 53 



Exhibit E. — Cases^ Class B. 

Complaints affecting the ordinary — that is, unr^istered — domestic mail are in- 
clode*! in the general classification of B cases. 

Of the 247 cases received, 177 related to first-class matter and 70 to third and 
fourth class matter. 

Statistics in Exhibit A show the total numl^er of B cases on hand and received 
during the fiscal year. Of the 260 cases treated, 182 were closed by correwpondence 
and 58 were closed on report of special agents, leaving 20 cases on hand July 1, 1900. 



Exhibit F. — Number and nature of cases. Class C, rderred to this bureau for im^estigation 
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900. 

Inspection of port-offices 358 

Inspection money-order and postal account 423 

Instructing postmasters in registry work 338 

Inspection of railway mail service and examination of railway ]>ostAl clerks 127 

Section 85, Cnban postal code (canceled stamps) 152 

ApplicaUons and appointments of assistant postmasters 93 

Appointment of po«tmasters 71 

Complaints and chargf>8 against postmasters and employees 69 

Evtablishment of post-offices and stations CA 

Inspection and establishment of star-route mall service 38 

Ef^abli^hment and discontinuance of free-delivery service 33 

Lease of poKt-office premises 26 

Allowance and supplies for post-offices 19 

Location, change of name, etc., of post-offices 17 

EstabliAment and discontinuance of moncv-order svstem 15 

Robteries, etc '. 8 

Poowies cut or stolen 2 

I>i»»Qtinuance of post-office ; 1 

Mail-messenger service 2 

gwtrges against star-route contractors 1 

rinng payment of money orders 2 

Section 16, portal code 1 

Asaalting carriers, contractors, etc. (section 19) 5 

Section 22. 1 

Section 26 8 

Sectional 2 

J»j8e returns to increase compensation (section 3(> ) 1 

rsilnre to attach and cancel stamps on short-paid mutter (section 38) 2 

Section 89, matter nnmailable, obscene, etc 4 

Section 40, libelous and indecent envelopes and other mail matter 8 

S€Ctlon41, lottery, gift enterprises, circulars, etc.. unmailable 5 

Section fi, bringing lottery tickets Into the country 8 

Se^on 44, use of mails to promote frauds 8 

Section 46, delivery of mafl matter for fraudulent concerns 2 

action E, 62, inclosing higher in lower class matter 4 

^abeulement 8 

notocks on lock-boxes broken 2 

IfiiceUaiieoufl 826 

Total 2,2M 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



286 BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 

Exhibit F. — Class C cases. 

Cases of claas C are of a miscellaneous and general character, the nature of whick 
is best understood bv a reference to the tabulated statement of C cases. Exhibit A 
shows the total number of cases of this class on hand July 1, 1899, and those received 
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900; Elxhibit B shows the number made up 
on the various provinces of the island of Cuba since the organization of the postu 
service. It will be observed that 358 cases of the total number of the 2,224 caaes 
made up related to a general inspection of the post-offices of the island; 423 relate 
to inspection of money order and postal accounts; 338 on instruction of postmasteis 
in registry work; 127 cases on the railway-mail service and examination of railway 
postal clerks; 93 cases on application and appointment of assistant postmasters; 64 
cases on establishment of post-offices and substations; 38 on inspection and establisfa- 
ment of star-route service; 33 cases made up on the establishment of free-delivery 
offices; 273 cases of complaints against postmasters, clerks, violations of the postal 
code, and 425 of a miscellaneous character. 

ExHiBFT G. — Class F cases. 

Complaints relating to international mail matter forwarded to and from fordgn 
countnes and in transit across the island of Cuba are defined F cases. For the most 
part they are only inquiries relative to the delivery of foreign mail matter. Few 
need personal investigation by a special agent, although considerable correspondence 
is necessarv. 

During the fiscal year 2,536 cases of this class were received, of which 2,004 related 
to registered mail, 469 to ordinary mail, and 63 were of a miscellaneous nature. To 
the 2,536 cases received there should be added 537 cases which were on hand at the 
beginning of the fiscal year, making a total of 3,075 cases handled during the fiscal 

J ear ended June 30, 1900. Of this number 2,508 were closed, leaving 565 on hand 
uly 1, 1900. Investigation shows that $20 loss occurred in the registered mails and 
$407.18 (estimated in dollars and cents) in the ordinary mails. There being no 
indemnity, nothing was collected. 

Many of the complaints or inquiries received in this class of cases relate to soldiere* 
mail, which was more exposed to depredations than mail handled through the reg- 
ular postal channels, and occurred during the period when the postal service was 
being organized on the island. 

Of such mail as was received at post-offices in existence durinj^ the Spaniab- 
American war there remained no records in the post-offices by which it could be 
traced, though ascertained that it had reached its destination. Registry records 
were not to be found at many of the post-offices when possession was taken bj 
regular appointees of the newljr established service. 

The number of pieces of registered mail received and dispatched during the fiscal 
year is approximately 65,000. This does not include pieces handled in transit The 
percentage of loss is therefore insignificant Three registered cases were closed in 
which the loss was admitted by foreign countries; three were closed relating to 
lotteries. 

The complete summary of foreign cases shows the number of cases on hand, the 
number received and disposed of, and the number on hand at the close of the fiscal 
year June 30, 1900: 

CaAcson hand July 1,1899 ^ SB 

Number of F cases received from July 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900, Inclusive * 511 

Total number of cases handled ?. (W5 

Of the 2,536 cases received, 2,004 related to registered mail, 469 to the ordinary 
mail, and 63 were of a miscellaneous character. 

Registered F cases closed. 

Closed O. K. or without loss l.TJJ 

Loss admitted by foreign countries ^ 

Received or dispatched prior to January 1, 1899 " 

Total l.W 

Ordinary F cases closed. 

Closed without loss 201 

Closed, no discovery S71 

Received or dispatcned prior to January 1, 1899 10 

Total ~ 582 

Miscellaneous cases closed 58 

Total number of cases closed 2,80S 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPOBT OP MILITABY QOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 



287 



Afl showing the way in which the 2,508 foreign cases have been closed, it is inter- 
esting to know that 2,439 were closed by correspondence and 69 cases on report of 
special agents. 

Exhibit H. — Number of cases dosed each month by report of special agents during the fiscal 

year ending June SOy 1900, 



Special agents. 


Jnly. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 

1 
18 
16 


Jan. 

"ii 
22 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May June 


Total. 


Supple- 
men- 
tal 
reports. 


Barbour, F. A 












17 
17 
21 


45 
21 
49 


36 
22 
20 


36 
6 
19 


32 
9 

14 
9 
4 
2 

30 


167 

192 

265 

9 

4 

2 

117 

188 

16 

22 

1 

170 

120 

92 

12 

290 

62 


7 


Benjamin, Chas.L 

PoUn.D. F 


4 

12 


23 
21 


39 
11 


15 
23 


4 
27 


4 
17 


Fletcher, W.T 




Gregonr,W.T 
























HAmilfon, F. M . 
























H^rnajMlez, Cha?. L . . ' 








1 


1 
32 


21 


31 


17 


17 




Kempncr. Louis 


14 


6 


25 


41 


20 


44 




Key»,W.R 










16 




Maynard.G.C 


2 


A 


7 


4 


::::: 


1 
"2 






:::::i:: ::: 






Moye.H.T.B 

Neal.W.T.G 

Park, Le Roy 





1 


"ie' 
2 


"32' 
85 


'47' 

23 


'33' 
19 


"26' 
20 


1 

14 
21 




FarseHF-S 


38 27 


1 


12 


15 




Sevbolt,Geo.L 








2 
39 
12 


8 
49 
9 


6 
2 
9 


1 

"if 




Sullivan, D 

Thomas, Rhys H 


23 1 42 


15 13 


24 


25 


33 
2 


25 
13 


12 
1 


Watere,C.M 












Welch, A.J 


16 1 


20 6 
59 11 


27 
9 


9 
80 


34 
20 


26 
18 


33 
39 


33 
39 


20 
10 


15 
6 


240 
290 


5 


Williams, H.H 


37 


12 


9 


Total 


146 


140 


176 1 Hit 1 129 


161 


176 


225 


341 


280 


171 


191 


2,249 


66 















Exhibit I. — Arrests for offenses against the postal laws. 

The total number of arrests made since the establishment of the postal service on 
the island is 38; of this number 37 were arrested during the fiscal year ended June 
'^), 1900. Four of them were postmasters, 1 a clerk in charge of a branch station, 3 
clerks employed in post-offices, 1 was a railway postal clerk, 1 department employee, 
and 28 were persons in nowise connected with the postal service. Two cases were 
discharged, 10 were pending in the courts July 1, 1900. Twenty-six convictions were 
secured. 

Of the 37 arrests made, 26 were violations of the Cuban postal code, 2 for robbery, 
1 for forgery and rifling the mails, 3 for misappropriation of postal funds, 1 for assault 
on a postal clerk, and 1 for forgery of a money order. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE MONEY ORDER AND REGISTRY BUREAU, DEPAKT- 
MENT OF POSTS, FOR THE FISCAX, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



Depabthbnt of Posts op Cuba, 

Money Order and Registry Bubeau, 

September 17, 1900, 
Sir: In compliance with your request, I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the operations of the money-order bureau and of the r^istry bureau durin? 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900. 

Previous to June 1, 1900, the work of these two branches of the service was con- 
ducted in two separate bureaus, namely, the money-order bureau and the regifltry 
bureau. On this date, by order of the Hon. J. L. Bristow, acting director-general 
of posts, they were consolidated into one bureau, to be known thereafter as the 
money order and registry bureau. 

Owmg to the facts as above stated, and also as the money-order work is so entirely 
different from the registry work, it becomes necessary to render two separate iikI 
distinct reports. 

registry report. 

Previous to July 1, 1899, the r^stry forms in use were either those printed in 
English, which had been supplied partly by the New York post-oflSce and partly by 
the department of posts of Cuba, or tne old forms of the Spanish administration 
printed in the Spanish language. 

During the latter part of the month of Jime, 1899. a complete set of recistry sop- 
plies, the forms printed in both the English and Spanish languages, was dispatched 
to each postmaster, with instnictions prmted in the Spanish laugua^ explaining in 
detail the use of each article. The postmasters were directed to carefully study tfiew 
instructions and to put the new supplier in use on the Ist of July, 1899, in accoitlance 
therewith. They were also instructed to return to the department of posts of Cuba, 
after July 1, 1899, all unused United States registry forms which they had on hand, 
but to retain in their offices such books and forms as had been usea and contained 
registry records. All these instructions were duly complied with. 

The greater part of the United States registry forms, such as were on hand at the 
department of posts after July 1, 1899, including those which were returned by the 
various post-offices, were returned to the United States. 

The following is a list of the forms which were adopted from those used in the 
United States and reprinted in both the English and Spanish langua^: R^istration 
book, showing all matter that is registered; desk delivery book, showing all registered 
matter received for delivery; transit book, giving a full description of all registered 
packages, through registered pouches and inner r^stered sacks addressed to some 
other office; registry bill, registry return receipt, registered package receipt, registry 
notice, re^stry circular of inquiry, registry quarterly report, registry statii«tical 
report, r^istry tracer, registered package envelope, and tag and carrier's deliverr 
book. The repstration lx>ok is in two forms, manifold carlwn and stub, the mani- 
fold carbon being in the English language alone. 

Through registered pouch bill books, which are printed in the English language 
alone, tc^ther with the manifold carbon registration books, are furnished for use at 
all post-offices exchanging through registered pouches or inner registered sacks. 
There is also a station bill book, prmted in the English language alone, which is 
used at all post-office stations. 

THROUGH REGISTERED POUCH EXCHANGES. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Matanzas and Habana established 
April 13, 1899; exchange twice daily, exttept Sunday. In compliance with an order 

288 



Digitized by 



vjv^ogle 



EEPOBT OF MIUTABY OOVEKNOR OF CUBA. 289 

iasoed b^ the department, this exchange of through roistered pouches was made 
twice daily and once on Sunday. This order took effect April 1, 1900. 

Throogn roistered pouch exchange between Cienluegos and Habana established 
April 14, 1899; exchange daily. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Santiago and Habana established 
Bfarch 2, 1899; exchange weekly. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Cardenas and Habana established 
June 1, 1899; exchange daily, except Scmday. In compliance with an order issued 
by the department, this exchange of through registered pouches was made daily. 
This order took effect April 1, 1900. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Pinar del Rio and Habana estab- 
lished August 14, 1899; exchange dSly, except Sunday. In compliance with an 
order iaeued by the department, this exchange of through registered pouches was 
made daily. This order took effect April 1» 1900. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Santa Clara and Habana, established 
September 22, 1899; exchange daily. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Caibarien and Habana, established 
October 16, 1899; exchange dailv. 

Through registered pouch exchange between Sagua la Grande and Habana, estab- 
lished April 1, 1900; exchange daily. 

INNEB REOI8TERBD SACK EXCHANGES. 

Inner registered sack exchange between Marianao (formerly Buena Vista) and 
Habana, established January 13, 1899; exchange daily, except Sunday. In compli- 
ance with an order issued by the Department, dated March 20, 1900, this exchanj^ 
of inner registered sacks was made daily, instead of daily except Sunday. This 
order took effect April 1, 1900. 

Inner registered sack exchange between Puerto Principe and Habana, established 
April 11, 1899; exchange irr^ular. 

Inner registered sack exchsmge between Gibara and Habana, established August 8, 
1899; exclmnge irr^jular. 

Inner registered sack exchange between Nuevitas and Habana, established August 
H, 1899; exchange irr^ular. 

FOREIGN EXCHANGES OP REGISTERED MAIL. 

The following exchanges are made with the Habana post-office: 

hUmatUmal through registered pouch exchanges wiih New Yorky JackmnnUey and Port 
Tampa; dispatches made Monday, Weanesdayf and Saturday of each u^eek. 

Sealed de-sack exchangee, via New York, with Irunand Madrid, Spain; Ver-Colojrne, 
Germany; London, England; Paris, France; Ponce and San Juan, Porto Kico. 
(Dispatches made Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays.) 

Sealed tie-sack exchanges direct with Madrid, Cadiz, Corufia, and Santander. (Dis- 
patches made irregular twice monthly.) 

Sealed tie-sack exchanges direct with Mexico, Vera Cruz, and Progreso. (Dispatches 
made irregular, five or six times monthly. ) 

Sealed tie-sack exchangeswith San Juan and Ponce. (Dispatches made twice monthly 
direct.) 

Sealed tie-sack exchanges with Colombia, Puerto Cabello, La Guaira, Barranquilla, 
Colon, Cartagena, Port Limon, St. Thomas, and Santo Domingo. (Dispatcht^s 
direct monthly; dispatches via New York, three times weekly. ) 

Sealed tie-sacK exchange with Key West. (Dispatches made three times weekly. ) 

REGISTRY STATISTICS. 

Statistics of the registry business transacted at all post-offices during the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1900, are given in the following statement: 

letters for foreign destination registered 69.486 

jycels for foreign destination registered 8,660 

Wfflestic lettere registered 44,177 

Dwwrtlc parcels registered 6,391 

Total paid registiaUons 127,714 

Pieces of mail matter registered free ^8.911 

Total registrations, paid and free If^,e2b 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



290 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OP CUBA. 



SUUitHcs showing the registry Imsiness transacted each quarter during the fiscal year esided 

Jnne SO, 1900, 



Domes- 
tic let- 
ters. 



Quarter ended— 

SeptemberSO, 1899 9,782 

December 31, 1899 , 10,466 



Total for first two quarters . 



Quarter ended— 

March 31, 1900 10,865 

June30,1900 13,084 



Total for last two quarters. 



Increase of last two quarters over first two ! . 

Increase of third and fourth quarters of fiscal year | 
ended June 30, 1900, over corresponding period 
for previous year 



Domes- 
tic par- 
cels. 



1,006 
1,082 



1-532 
1,769 



For- I For- 
eign eign 
letters, 'parcels. 



16,986 
18,406 



2,036 
2,464 



17,884 
17,261 



2,279 
1,892 



Official 
matter. 



5,694 



ToUl 



34,456 

40. 9» 



6.140 

8,479 



42,4rf6 



81.175 
6,7» 

, fl9,0f5e 



MONEY-ORDER REPORT. 



Number and amount of money orders issued in Cuba for each quarter during fgral ymr 

ended June SO, 1900. 



Number 
issued. 



Amount is- 
soed. ! 



Quarter ended — 

September 30, 1899 34,392 $2,238,625.91 

December 31, 1899 , 23,662 , 942.627.?: 

March31J900 ! 26,466 1,178,5«15« 

June30,1900 1 29,468 1,893,956.79 



Total 113,978 ! 6,758,796.25 



Number and amount of money orders paid in Cuba for each quarter during fiscal year 

ended June SO, 1900. 



Number | AmooBt 
ptiid. ' paid. 



Quarter ended— 

September 30, 1809. 
December 31, 1»99. 

March 31, 1900 

June 30, 1900 



7,944 
8,976 
16,621 
18.174 



|395,87S.fl 
885,tt9.40 
880.0»Lft 

1,065,172.82 



Total 50,714 I 2,726,177.» 



From these tables it can be seen that 63,264 more money orders were issued in 
Cuba than the total number paid, the amount of those issued being $3,027,5^.67 in 
ex(!ehs of the amount of money orders paid. 

The cause of tills difference becomes apparent upon comparing the table of inte^ 
national money orders isHued in the United States and payable in Cuba, as per the 
Tampa exchange listi^, with the tables of international orders issued in Cuba and 
payable in the United States as certified by the Habana exchange oflSce. 

International orders issued in the Uniied States and payable in Cuba, as per Tampa exchange 

lists. 





Number 
issued. 

1,037 
1,166 
1,340 
1,289 


AmooDt 
issued. 


Quarter ended— 

September 30, 1899 


»4,0J5.e5 
89.119.S 


Deeeraber 31, 1899 


March81,1900 


June30,1900 


18,«37.6S 




Total 


4,7»2 


Ul 946.3 





Digitized by ^ 



lOOglt 



BEPOBT OF MILITABY GOVEBNOE OF CUBA. 



291 



hUmational orders issued in Cuba and payable in the United States^ as per the Habana 

exchange lists. 



Quarter ending September 30, 1899. ' 


Quarter ending December 31 


.1899. 


Ko, of list. Date. 


Number 
of orders. 


Amount. 


No. of list i Date. 

1 


Number 
of orders. 


Amount. 


' 1899. 

1 July 8 

2 15 


1,027 
838 
1.059 
1,386 
1,061 
968 
1,448 
2,203 
2,439 
4,230 
6,629 
1,887 


1 

t34,774.29 
29,966.06 
88,566.98 
67,795.75 
41,751.06 
45,977.84 
77,690.49 
157,607.48 
1TA232.60 
36.5,147.64 
686,467.43 
122.019. l.^t 


14 


1899. 

Oct. 7 
14 
21 
28 

Nov. 4 
11 
18 
25 

Dec. 2 
9 


1,200 
1,487 
1,316 
1,009 


$62,809.86 


15 


73,646.62 


S 22 


16 


68,248.54 


4 29 


17 


47-847.59 


5 Aug. 5 


18 


1,157 1 49,089.07 


6 12 


19 


1,128 ' 40.776.88 


7 19 


20 


1,328 

1,121 

974 

1.425 


50,779.09 


8 26 


21 ... 


40, 714. 40 


9 Sept. 2 


22 


84,661.61 


10 9 


23 


44,977.07 


11 16 


24 


16 1.343 


86,781.71 


12 23 


•25 


23 


1,245 

838 


88,602.09 


13 30 


1,480 98,405.11 


26 


30 


81,268.60 


Total 


26,655 1 1.8'28.4.<11.»5 


Total 


15,571 


699, 061. Ct) 






' ' 









Quarter ended March 31, 1900. 


1 Quarter ended June 30, 1'JOO. 


No. of ILst. 


Date. 


Number 
of orders. 


Amount. 


No. of list. 


Date. 


Number 
of orders. 


Amount. 


27 


1900. 

Jan. 6 
13 
20 
27 
Feb. 3 
10 
17 
24 

Mar. 3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


846 

1,087 

931 

649 

920 

1.014 

1,172 

767 

908 

1,027 

W4 

942 

764 


129,363.83 
81,029.11 
26,276.42 
19,267.20 
22.701.68 
25,622.47 
30,151.87 
18,819.39 
23,953.75 
26,669.91 
22,382.83 
25,517.89 
22,306.63 


40 


1900. 

Apr. 7 
14 
21 
28 

May 5 
12 
19 
26 

June 2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


1,007 
960 

1,147 
696 

1,045 
918 

1,011 
646 
664 

1,046 
848 
900 
689 

11,597 


$80,157.26 


■s< 


1 41 


25,356.83 


29 ... . 


' 12 


32, 698. 87 


30 


43 


21,439.92 


SI 


, 44 


83,392.41 


32 


1 45 


26, 750. 99 


^ 


46 


25,670.49 


54 


47 


15,034.81 


a^ 


48 


18,443.92 


36 


49 


29, 443. 60 


37 


50 


22,977.08 


38 


51 


26,136.03 


39 


52 


20,101.06 




Total 




Total 


11,966 


323,961.98 


327,502.16 






Grand total. 








65, 789 


3, U78, 937. 15 









In connection with the above tables attention is called to the extraordinary increase 

in money orders issued on the United States as certified by the Habana office for the 

quarter ende<l September 30, 1899. During the previous fiscal year for the quarter 

ended June 30, 1898, 11,402 international orders were issued, payable in the United 

States and amounting to $340,724.06, while in the (quarter ended September 30, 18^)9, 

referred to above, 26,655 international orders were issuetl, amounting to $1,828,431.35. 

At this time the fee charged for the issue of an international money onler was the 

aame as that chaiiged for the issue of a domestic money order and it was much less 

than the rate of exchange charged by the banks. In conseouence of these facts, 

many of the business houses and even banking houses used tnis system as a means 

for sending lai^ sums of money to the United States. Under these conditions the 

money-order business expandecl to such an extent that the matter of transferring the 

funds from Cuba to the United States became a difficult problem. As it ia not the 

object of the money-order sytem to supersede the usual channels of financial exchange 

in general business transactions, the following orders were issued to check such an 

increase in the volmne of business. On September 12, 1899, an order was issued that 

'on and after September J8, 1899, the sale of foreign money orders on the island of 

Cuba will be limited to five orders in one day by one remitter to one i>ayee,'* and 

on September 19, 1899, announcement was made in the weekly bulletin that the 

rates of feee on international money orders to the United States and Porto Rico had 

been changed from 30 cents to 50 cents on each $100, as follows: 

Cents. 

For orders for sums of $20 or less 10 

Otw 120 and not exceeding $40 20 

OrerHOand not exceeding $60 ?g 

Over fw and not exceeding $80 S 

Orer $90 and not exceeding $100 ^ 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



292 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



Another queetion which arose about this time was the handlinji: of French and Speu- 
ish gold witnout a loss to this department Gold was being accepted by the depart- 
ment in payment lor orders at an established ratej but the Government of the United 
8tates would only accept it in exchange at bullion value. Much of the gold thiki 
received by the department was of old coinage; the shrinkage invariably was con- 
siderable fiind caused constant loss to the department. To curtail this loss, the follow- 
ing order was issued in the Weekly Bulletin of September 12, 1899: 

No. 67. 

" Ordered J That on and after Tuesday, September 19, 1899, all foreign money order? 
drawn on the island of Cuba and payable in the United States must be paid iu 
American money." 

On June 17, 1899, arrangements were made and articles signed by the diretlor- 
general of posts of Cuba and the director-general of posts of Porto Rico for the 
exchange of money orders between the islands of Cuba and Porto Rico on and after 
July 1, 1899. 

These arrangements were continued as separate from those of the United States^ 
until April 30, 1900, when, under the act of Congress approved April 12, TMHi, 
"providing a government for the territory of Porto Rico," the postal money-ordiT 
system of 9ie United States was extended to that territory on May 1, 1900, and all 
of the post-offices in Porto Rico, with the exception of four, were made domestic 
money-order oflSces of the United States. 

After May 1, 1900^ all money-order accounts between Cuba and the United StaU^ 
territory of Porto Rico were opened and adjusted with the United States instead of 
directly with Porto Rico as heretofore. 

The exchange of money orders previous to May 1, 1900, did not amount to as mnch 
as had been expected, though more orders were issued in Porto Rico, causing a bal- 
ance due Cuba, which was remitted and accounts closed May 1, 1900. 

After this date, when the number of oflSces in Porto Rico which were allowed 
to issue and pay international orders was reduced to four, the issue of money orden^ 
on Cuba decreased, but as more international offices are established in Porto Rico it 
is expected that the business will regain its former standing. 

International orders issued in Cuba and payable in Porto Rico for the year ended June SO, 
J900t as per II(wana exchange lists. 



Quarter ended— 

Sept. 80,1899 

Dec. 80,1899 

Mar. 31,1900 

Period to Mav 1,1900, which closed the business beiween Porto Rico and Cuba 
Period to June 30, 1900, as a territory of the United States 

Total 



S'umbcr 

issue*!. 


Amount 


34 


«sn.82 


61 


1.12fi.« 


33 


675.(2 


12 


lfCl5 


G5 


2,91112 



195 I 5. "A 00 



Intemationaf orders issued in Porto Rico and payable in Cuba for the year ended Junt SO, 
1900 f as per San Juan exchange lists. 



Quarter ended— 

Sept. 80.1899 

Dec. 31.1899 

Mar. 31 1900 

Period to May 1, 1900, which closed the business between Porto Rico and Cuba 
Period to June 80, 1900, as a territory of the United States 

Total 



Number 
issued. 



14 . 

28 ' 
62 

13 ; 

16 i 



Amount. 



I25&36 

931.58 

2,40S.» 

•.69.16 



123 . 



4,221.79 



Under the act of Congress above mentioned, the island of Hawaii was also made a 
United States territory and similar money -order provisions were made for that island, 
though as yet no money orders have been issued or paid with Hawaii. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOB OF CUBA. 

The number of international orders paid is as follows: 



293 



Number 
paid. 



Qoarter ended— 
Sept 90,1899 
Dec.31,U99. 
Mar. 31, 1900. 
Jime30.19UO. 

Total 




Amount 



$24,154.96 
28,124.79 
41,483.23 
80,683.% 



124,346.94 



Daring the last half of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1900, the number of domestic 
orders issued was materially increased by the system being made the means of trans- 
mitting the insular funds. Tbe use of the money-order system by the Government 
caused at many times unavoidable delay to payees, as larger offices were constantly 
ilrawing big amounts on the smaller offices, whose issues were far from being able to 
ineet such payments. Funds were dispatched from Habana in such cases as soon as 
possible, but on account of the limited means of transportation delays were at times 
unavoidable. 

A recent order of the governor-general has caused the most of these funds to be 
transmitted by other means, thereby causing a decrease at present in the total issue. 

Money-order offices In operation June 30, 1899 87 

Xew offices established 48 

Offices reestablished 2 

Total 87 

Discontinued during year ended June 30, 1900 2 

Total in operation June 80, 1900 85 

Of the above offices, ten are stations of the Habana office which have been estab- 
Ibihed at different times during the year. 
These stations have in some instances transacted considerable business. 
Very respectfully, 

C. L. Marine, 
Chief Money-Order and Eegislry Bureau. 
Dibbctor-General of Posrrs, Habana, Cuba. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF TRANSLATION FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF 
POSTS, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



Department op Posts op Cuba, Bureau op Translatiok, 

Hnhiiua, Sqttemher ^4, 1900. 
Sir: According to custom and regulations I have the honor to submit the aceom- 
panying, my report of the bureau of translation for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1900, and avail myself of the opportunity to thank you for the unfailing courtesy that 
I and my coworkers have received at your hands. 

Respectfully, Robert M. Vence, 

Chi^ Bureau of Trandaiian. 
The Director-General op Posts, Habana, Cuba, 

Sir: Though the submitting of a report of a subordinate oflScer is apparently a mu:- 
ter eminently practical and devoid of sentiment, the present chief can not allow the 
occasion to pass without recording his sense of the loss that the bureau and the 
department have suffered in the sudden and early demise of its first and lamented 
chief, to whom is due the credit of its organization. Professor Farwell, a linguist of 
no mean abilities, had that rare gift, acquired by few foreigners, of knowing how the 
Spanish -American mind expressed itself, and this, in conne(»tion with an expe-ience 
of years with the postal service of Guatemala, made him a model chief of the bureao, 
ana had it not been for his frail health and his ambition to second the efforts of the 
postal commission and its successors to implant a senice that would not only worthily 
succeed that of the late sovereign but show that the intervening power was a decade 
or two in advance as to pa«^tal affairs, he to-day would have been the honored chief 
of the bureau whose unworthy head I am. 

Repeating the sense, if not the language, of his report of last year, to the effect 
that one of the greatest obstacles that the bureau had to contena with is the fact 
that in many cases the terms of the nomenclature of the new postal system tliatsob- 
stituted that of Spain had absolutely no equivalent in Spanish, and vice versa, I would 
state that it was found necessary to paraphrase or define them in order that thor 
meaning might be conveyed from one language to the other. 

This was remedieil in some degree by forcing somewhat the signification of words 
or bv coining new ones whose orthography resembled that of the word to be trans- 
lated, rendering office by *'oficina," conductor by ** conductor,** dead letters by 
** cartas muertas," finance by "finanza," etc.; but this was made necessary by tl« 
ini]K)rtance of conciseness and brevity, even at the apparent exi>en8e of correctneas, 
ai)parent only, for these words, taken in the light oi the context, were sufiScientlj 
comprehensive. 

The writer despairs of making known to anyone who possesses no other langoaffe 
than his own the difficulties that l>eset the translator when the question is of tech- 
nical terms. It must be remembered that to the bureau come letters containing 
questions of legal, mechanical, geographical, even of moral import, not only in the 
Sj)anish language, but in the French, the language of the Universal Postal Union, in 
Italian and (lerman; and the bureau prides itself on the fact that until the date of 
this report it has not refused any translation referred to it. 

Each chief sends his communications from the postmasters of the island to this 
bureau, that they may be put into English, briefed, and returned, and in turn sends 
his English letters to be translatexl into the language of the island and returned to 
the bureau of origin. 

The bureau frequently receives papers for translation indorsed by chiefs of bureau 
**a literal translation requested," under the mistaken impression that it will make 
more intelligible English— an impression the writer wishes to remove. The Spanish 
language when written correctly requires the use of many more words than wouW 
be used in English when expressing the same idea, and therefore a Spanish letter 
294 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF MILITARY GOVEBNOR OF CUBA. 295 

of 200 wonls may easily be briefed in 76 English ones without any sacrifice of sense. 

Beeideis the standard of scholarship of the country postmasters of the island is not 
very high. They repeat and use redundant words and expressions, so that a requi- 
aition for pens, ink, and paper is strung out into a letter of 50 words. Like all lan- 
guages of Latin origin, the Spanish is very courteous, and even in business relations 
it is de rigueur to use many highnsounding and polite phrases, all of which are sup- 
pressed in translation into English. 

It will readily be understood that the birth of the translation bureau was coeval 
with that of the department of posts, for the reasons set forth in the report of director- 
general for last fiscal year, as follows: 

"As nearly all correspondence with native employees had to be conducted in the 
Spanish language, it was necessary from the first to have an oi^ganized translation 
barean, so that the department could understand conmiunications received, and be 
able to answer them and give instructions intelligently. As the volume of corre- 
spondence increased the work of the translation bureau grew, and there are now 
employed in this branch of the service five clerks and two tjrpewriters, in change of 
a chief, who is held responsible for the correct translation of all matter sent to him. 
The importance of this work is great, as the consequence attending an error in the 
translation of an order, or of the rules and regulations governing the department, 
might be serious and far reaching. It has been my purpose there to employ skilled 
men in this part of the service and avoid as far as |)08sibie all errors, to tne end that 
we might get a correct version of correspondence in connection with orders issued 
and instructions given. There is no statistical report to make in connection with the 
work of the translation bureau.'' 

Bat the work for which the bureau claims most credit is that of having correctly 
interpreted and translated the instructions of the United States postal authorities rela- 
tive to the implanting in this island of a new and, to the people thereof, apparently 
complicated system, and making it so plain to them that in a few months it was 
working so smoothly that the bureau may appropriate with justice much of the lan- 
guage of the report of the chief of the bureau of appointments for last fiscal year. 

The personnel of the bureau consists of a chief, six translators, and three type- 
writers, rated as such, but who are also translators. 

Reference was made above of the kind and amount of knowledge required in this 
bureau. Of course, universal or encyclopedic knowledge is not possessed by any one 
man in his own language, much less in two or three; therefore the bureau was organ- 
ized with the idea of speciahzing or confiding each kind of work to him who was the 
more expert thereat. Thus we have men who translate legal work into English, 
others are better at translation into Spanish, while others make smoother reading of 
postal-union literature than those who are familiar with trade and commercial terms. 
Thus is insured an exact and intelligible idea in one language of what the writer 
meant in his own, for, as words are but the signs of ideas, the latter, not the former, 
are what is to be conveyed from one language to another. 

Not long ago over 100 foolscap pages of auditor's report in English was translated 
at this bureau for use of one of the courts of Cuba. That there might be no mistake 
in so important a document, a delegate of said court who possesses a literary knowl- 
edge of both languages conferred with the undersigned for several days on the cor- 
rectness of the translation, and after a critical analysis by both of every sentence and 
members thereof, complimented the translator. 

Although the work of the bureau is purely literary;, it has no works of reference 
except one or two Spanish-English dictionaries, which, together with its copy of 
Webster, are at the disposal of ifi neighbors. I would respectfully urge the purchase 
of a grammar of the Spanish Academy, an atlas, and Goold-Brown s Grammar of 
Grammars. 

The work of the bureau was somewhat hampered Rome months ago by the attach- 
ment of a department whose duty was to file, translating, if necessary, clippings from 
the newspapers of the island and elsewhere. Of this burden the bureau has happily 
since been relieved, affording thus more time to be devoted to the duties proper 
thereto. 

The writer, in closing, gladly bears witness to the painstaking industry of his fellow- 
members of the bureau, who have ably seconded his efforts to make it the efiicient 
mouthpiece of the depsirtment 

Respectfully, Robert M. Vence, 

Chief Bureau of Translation^ 

Dirbctob-Gbnbral, Dbpabtbcent of PofiTs OP Cuba. 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



REPORT OF THE DEAD-LETTER BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF POSTS, 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



I have the honor to submit a report ehowmg the volume of business transacted by 
this bureau from July 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900. 

Daily experience shows that the operations of the dead-letter bureau have an 
interest for the public beyond that ^hich their magnitude would naturally occa«on. 
The aggregate of money and other valuable inclosures found in letters, the quantity 
and variety of merchandize either restored to owners or disposed of, and the thou- 
sands of letters with no tangible evidences of value, which pass through the hands <<( 
the employees, are naturally of interest because of the large totals, and aleo becai^v 
of the varied treatment which the different classes of matter require. There are no 
possible means of estimating the real or apparent value of the thousands of letters with- 
out inclosures which are annually returned to senders, nor the disappointment which 
follows the failure to trace and recover letters of this character for the want of pn>per 
signature and address of the sender. In many cases the bureau is able to restore 
fugitive articles of mail matter even before the senders have learned of their failure 
to reach their destination. 

The work of the dead-letter bureau varies but little in its volume at different 
periods. The statements which follow exhibit the work of the bureau in greater 
detail. 

Clamficaiion of mail matter received in the deadrletter bureau from JtUy 7, ISSB^ to 

June SO, 1900, 

Ordinary unclaimed letters 29.408 

Unclaimed letters returned from foreign countries 10,2» 

Held for postage (domestic addresses) aO.S21 

Ordinary misdirected matter 215 

Refused matter 4,077 

Fictitious addresses 13 

Blank matter S3» 

Unclaimed registered letters and parcels (domestic) 797 

Unclaimed registered letters returned from foreign countries 387 

I.ISI 

Miscellaneous letters SW 

Parcels: 

Unmailable 58 

Unclaimed 7M 

Unclaimed, containing photographs 45 

m 

Unclaimed domestic printed matter 1 ]2,SB 

Originating in foreign countries: 

Ordinary letters 36,665 

I*arcels and printed matter 74, 612 

Registered articles 2, 870 

113,M7 

Total 1«.M» 

DISPOSITION OP MAIL MATTER UNOPENED. 

Card and request matter returned to senders 4. 296 

Foreign matter: 

Returned to countries of origin US, 576 

• Delivered to applicants 71 

113. M7 

Total delivered unopened 117,913 

296 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



BEPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 297 

CLASSIFICATION OP MAIL MATTER OPENED. 

Ordinary ODcIamled letters 26,111 

rDclAimed letten returned from foreign countries 10,288 

Refined matter 4,077 

Miidirected letters 216 

Held-for-postage letters (domestic) 20,»21 

Letters without address 889 

FictlUoos letters 18 

Registered letters 1,184 

Miicellaneoas letters 810 

rarreb 897 

Unclaimed domestic printed matter 12,822 

Total 76,827 

DISPOSITION OF MAIL MATTER OPENED. 

Dellrered: 

Letters containing— 

Money , 22 

Money orders 66 

Miacellaneoos papers 64 

Postage Btampis 11 

Photographs 46 

Manuacripts 6 

Nothing of yalae 4,946 

Letters regtetered 428 

Letters containing property 62 

6,624 

Opened and filed: 

Letters containing— 

Money 18 

Moner orders and drafts 72 

Miscellaneous papers 178 

Postage 24 

Photographs 146 

Property 162 

Manuscripts 2 

Pictures 28 

Letters registered 208 

812 

Opened and awaiting evidences of delivery: 
Letters containii^— 

Money orders ." 4 

Miscellaneous papers 4 

Photographs 5 

Property 8 

Letters registered 84 

"66 

Destroyed: 

Ordinary letters and circulars without inclosure^ which could not be returned to 

writers 69,186 



Total 198,669 

RECAPITULATION SHOWING AMOUNT OP MATTER HANDLED RECEIVED. 

I>onte8tic: 

Original dead matter 79,922 

VMgn dead matter 113,647 

Total domestic and foreign 193,669 

Dl^wiition: 
Domestio— 

Delivered 9,919 

FUed 812 

Awaiting evidence of delivery 66 

Destroyed 69,186 

79,922 

Foreign— 

Returned to countries of origin 113,576 

Delivered to applicants 71 

118,647 

ToUl 198.569 

CUBA 1900— VOL I, FT 8 20 

Digitized byVjO.OQlC 



298 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



Bfatter returned from foreign countries: 

Registered articles W 

Ordinary letters, including postal cards 10,20 

Parcels and printed matter, etc 6M 

Of the 1,184 unclaimed registered letters and parcels of domestic origin received, there were: 

Delivered to addresses or restored to senders 9C 

Filed to discover ownership 2Sff 

1,1M 



Valiw jf indosures in maU maUer opened. 



Description. 



Letters containing morev returned to owners. 

Letters delivered to bureau of finance 

Letters containing raoncy on file 



Total. 



Number. 



Vahw. 



22 fRfi 
21 iLU 

13 2».9e 



56 



Ufi.« 



Parcels filed In dead-letter bureau: 

Addressed » 

Unaddressed C 

HI 

iStatement showing number of pieces of dead mail matter treated in dead-leUer bureau 
from July JJ J899, to June SO, 1900, 

RECEIVED. 



Domestic mailable letters received 43, 734 

Domestic unmallable — 

Held for postage 20,921 

Misdirected 215 

Unaddressed 839 

Miscellaneous 810 

Domestic third and fourth class 

matter 18,219 



Foreign matter: 

Letters 36,686 

Printed matter and packages 74,612 

Registered matter: 

Domestic 1,184 

Foreign 2,3» 

Total m^m 



DISPOSITION. 





Deliv- 
ered un- 
opened. 


Deliv- 
ered 
opened. 




Deliv- 
ered un- 
opened. 


DeliT- 
opened. 


Domestic mailable letters .... 
Domestic unmallable letters: 


4,295 


39,439 

20,921 
215 
310 
339 

4 


Foreign matter: 

Ordinary letters. .. 


96,665 
74.612 




Held for postage 


Printed matter 




Misdirected " 




Total 




Miscellaneous 




U9,122 i 74. «7 


Without address 

Registered letters: 


1,180 
2,870 


Grand total 


19S,fi69 


Domestic mail 






Foreign mail 




Domestic third and fourth 
class matter 


18.219 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



RBPOBT OF MILITABy GOVEBNOB OP COB A. 



299 



TbbUthowm^dass and number of undelivered matter returned to and received from foreign 

coimtries. 





Betnmed. 


Received. 


OoanlzleBL 


tered. 


Ordi- 
nary. 


Pack- 
ages. 


Total. 


Regis- 
tered. 


Ordi- 
nary. 


Pack- 
ages. 


Total. 


Antigua 




2 
178 

62 

84 
8 

40 
1 
8 

40 

2 

6 

7 

178 


74 

4* 

74 

7' 

85* 


2 

897 

149 

85 

18 

U8 

1 

8 

59 

2 

5 

8 

«J 

42 

167 

76 

14 

27 

2 

7 

28 

9,871 

22 

8,662 

10 

2,608 

10 

10 

82 

5 

25 

21 

U 

400 

880 

4 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1,467 

1 

1 

86 

17 

4 

1 

22 

88 

2 

1 

89 

79 

88 

447 

8 

3 

28 

8 

4 

2 

16 

202 

1 

20,692 

14 
55 

1 

14 
87 

8 

48 
181 

2 
66,755 










AigeotiiieBeimblic 


36 
23 

1 
1 

4 


4 

1 


65 




69 


AiYPtrff^HnnffiirT 


1 


i^^ '^ 


12 




12 


Bariwdm 




Belgium 










H^rmv^99 , 










BoHtI* 












JiT^r^ 


12 


2 


27 




29 


»wt*ih GnlftnA 




BritMi Hm>dTiniff , 












IWtiih India 


1 
1 
1 
8 
8 
5 
1 
1 
1 










<^ni»^ . 


1 


21 


1 


28 


Oerkm 




cuu 


84 

96 

61 

18 

24 

1 

4 

19 

604 

15 

789 

8 

471 

7 

10 

23 

8 

24 

20 

10 

158 

828 

2 


5 
71 
20 

2* 

s' 

2 
9.150 

*7,"887' 

* 2,007* 
2 

55* 

i' 

**2ii' 

2 
2 










Ookxnbla 




14 
8 




14 


CteteRica 


8 


Dtnish West Indies 




Offlmark . . 










Dominica, West Indies 










Ecuador.' 




1 




1 


&ypt 


7 
117 

7 
86 

2 
30 

1 




Fmnee 




104 

4 


60 


. .. 
163 


FreDch West Indies 


4 


(rprmanv 




Gibialtar 










threat Britain . 


10 


171 


10 


191 






Grenada, West Indies 










Onatraiala 


4 
2 




2 
5 





2 


Hawaii 


5 


Haiti 




HfHidaiasBepublic 


1 
1 

86 
5 




2 




2 


Homrkomr .' 




Italy 










Jamaica, West Indies 


6 


252 




258 


Japan 




Jara,Ketberland Indies 


4 
1 










Kongo Free State 














Luxembourg 




1 

""m 

57* 

1 

6* 

1 










Malta 




1 
960 

1 
1 

22 
14 
4 
1 
21 
28 
1 










Mexico 


64 


58 


951 


201 


1,210 


Monserrat 




Mtnritlns 












Netberlanda 


7 
2 










Netherlands Wttt Indies 










Kc?l8.. 










Nevfoondland 












NIcaragoa 


1 

4 


1 


1 




2 


Norway 




P&iagaay 










IVrS^^ 


1 
4 
1 
4 
24 


1 






1 




22 

72 

29 

882 

8 

8 

21 

8 

4 

2 

8 

159 

1 

11.288 

1 

12 

26 

1 

12 

27 

8 

28 

102 

1 

20,194 

1 


18 
6 
6 

41 

4" 

7* 

19 

*7,*9a6* 

i' 

24 

u 

10 
'46,'248" 


6 
12 




6 




12 


Di^w^!2-i' * * * " * * 




PttrtnHfw a 


11 


158 


6 


170 


QumMVnd 




Ronmania 












Ri»i^ 


8 


2 






2 


8tKitt8, West Indies 








St Loda, West Indies 












8t Vinc^te.' West Indies 












Salvador Republie 


1 
24 










D«nlniran fiemiblic . 


9 


197 




206 


Foath African kepublic 




Spain 


1,828 


72 


1,601 


177 


1,860 






Sweden 


1 
5 










Switnfffuvi 


1 






I 


Tasmania 








Trinidad, West Indies 


2 
10 


i* 


6 




6 


Tnrltey 


1 


Turku Wnds. 










8 

19 

1 

818 










Venesnela 


10 


80 




40 


Victoria . 




Cnited States 


197 


6,598 


156 


6,946 


Western Anstralia 




Total 


2,870 


36,665 


74,612 


1 113,647 


887 


10,238 


610 


11,2S5 








Digitized by ^ 



ioogle 



300 



REPORT OF MILITARY GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 



Statement showing dead matter of foreign origin received and disposed of from July i, 18S$, 

to June SO, 1900. 



Received: 

Registered articles— 

Resristered letters 2,870 

Ordinary letters 86,665 

Parcels and printed matter 74,612 



Total 118,647 



Disposition: 

Registered articles- 
Returned to country of origlii 2,39 

Delivered to addressees 71 

Ordinary letters returned to coon- 

triesoforigin K,«d 

Delivered to addressees 50 

Parcels and printed matt» re- 
turned to country of origin 71,612 

Total 113,617 



Respectfully submitted. 

A. Abtbaoa, Chief Dead Letter Bureau. 
Mr. M. C. FosNBS, 

Director-Oenerai of Posts, Hahana, Cuba, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF LAW CLERK FOR THE DEPAKTMENT OF POSTS FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



DSPABTMBNT OP POOTS OP CUBA, OpFICE OP LaW ClBRK, 

Habana, September IfS, 1900, 

Sm: In sabmitting a report of the work of this bureau for the fiscal year ended 
Jane 30, 1900, it is perhaps proper to state that prior to March, 1900, no general order 
had been issued by the director-general defining the duties of the office of advisory 
counsel for the department of poets of Cuba. In oiganizing the postal system of Cuba, 
however, this office, by reason of its promulgation of many of the new rules and regu- 
lations governing tne service, was brought into close contact with the work of the 
director-general and the different bureaus of the department; and the multifarious 
duties which necessarily devolved upon it under the circumstances can not be specif- 
ically set forth in this report 

However, it may not be inappropriate to state in this connection that some of the 
bosinesB performed by this office was: The preparation of fraud orders; the passinj^ 
on all questions arising as to the use of penalty envelopes; the examination of appli- 
cations for the admission of periodicals to the mails as second-class matter; the pre- 
paring of special contracts for the department of posts; the preparation of orders for 
the weekly bulletin of the department, and the editing of the same; the giving of 
opinionfl as to the advisability of instituting prosecutions; the giving of opinions to 
the director-general and the chiefs of bureaus on various questions which arose from 
time to time, and the assisting of the director-general in the preparation of important 
letters. 

On March 5, an order was issued bv the director-general discontinuing the office of 
advisory counsel and creating that of solicitor for the department of posts. The act- 
ing advisory counsel was appointed solicitor, and I had the honor to be appointed 
aeeistant The solicitor was chaiged with the following duties, to wit: 

"The giving of opinions to the director-general or the heads of the several bureaus 
(a^ officers) of the department upon questions of law arising upon the construction 
of the postal laws and regulations, or otherwise, in the course of business in the postal 
Bervice, with the consideration and submission (with advice) to the director-general 
of all daims of poetniasters for losses by fire, burglary, or other unavoidable casualty ; 
and of all certincations bjr the auditor for the department of posts of cases of pro- 
posed compromise or liabilities to the department of posts, and of the remission 
of fines, penalties, and forfeitures under the law; the keeping and preparing of all 
correspondence with the department of justice, relating to prosecutions and suits 
affecting or arising out of the postal service, and with the consiaeration of applications 
for pardons for crmies conmiitted ajgainst the postal laws, which may be referred to 
this department; with the preparation and submission (with advice) to the director- 
^neral of all appeals to him from the heads of the offices of the department depend- 
uifcupon questions of law; with the hearing and preparation of cases relating to 
lotteries and the misuse of mails in furtherance of schemes to defraud the public; with 
the examination and, when necessary, drafting of all contracts of the department; 
and with such other duties as may from time to time be required by the director- 
general." 

On May 24 an order was promulgated by the acting director-general discontinuing 
the office of solicitor and creating that of law clerk for the department of posts. 
And, inasmuch as the office was created only about five weeks pnor to June 30, it is 
**ardly necessary and perhaps not proper to discuss the duties of it to any great extent 

However, the law clerk has charge of the admission of periodicals to the mails as 
iecond-class matter (up to June 30 there had been admitted 236 domestic and 111 
foreijm publications to the mails as second-class matter) ; the answering of questions 
of different postmasters relative to postal rates, interpretation of orders, etc. ; the 
giving of opinions to the director-general and chiefs of bureau when called upon to 

801 



Digitized byVjOOQlC 



302 BEPOBT OF MILITABr GOVERNOR OF CUBA. 

do so; the examination of all personal bonds given by postmasters and other 
employees of the department; preparation of orders for the Weekly Bolletin, the 
editing of the same, and the performance of such other duties as may be required by 
the director-^neral. 

This, in bnef, is a statement of the duties performed by this office; and, while in 
my opinion a clearer and fuller statement could have been submitted if the dotiei 
and operations of the office had been clearly defined, still the faucto herein set foith 
may be accepted as showing that something has been accomplished, and that the work 
done has proved of value to the department 

Respectfully submitted. 

R E. HOLLINGSWOBTH, 

Law Clerk f Department of PotU, 
Mr. M. C. FosNBs, 

DirectOT'Oeneral of PotU. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPOBT OF THE DISBURSING OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF POSTS, FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900. 



Dbpabtment op Pootb op Cuba, 

D18BUR8INQ Oppicb, 
Habana^ September 16^ 1900. 
Sib: In compliance with yoar verbal instnictioiiB of the 14th instant, I have the 
honor to submit the following report: 

I was appointed disbursing officer for the department of posts on May 23 last 
Previous to that time there is no record of the receipts and expenditures of the depart- 
ment or of any bosinesB transacted by this office other than a small book contaming 
entries showing the total amount received by warrant to have been $120,580.44, the 
di^Husements oeing as follows: 

For department of posts pay roll $115,022.28 

Mechanics' pay roll. 8,768.21 

Pwdiein 1,790.00 

Total 120,580.44 

There are no retained papers or any means of ascertaining the correctness of the 
figores given. 

It appears, however, that the du