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FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLES OLMSTED. CHARLES ELIOT. 

OLMSTED, OLMSTED& ELIOT, 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 



EDWARD D.BOLTON, 



WARREN H. MANNING. 



Superintendent of Constructs . _ Super.ntenoent of Plant.ng. 

Brookline, Mass. 







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FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLES OLMSTED. CHARLES ELIOT. 



OLMSTED, OLMSTED & ELIOT, 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 

EDWARD D.BOLTON, WARREN H. MANNING. 

Superintendent of Construction . Superintendent OF Planting. 



Brookline, Mass. 3rfi# M!i y f J.894, 






Dear Sir:- By direction of Messrs. Olmsted, Olmsted A 

Iliot, landscape Architects to the Metropolitan Park Commission, I 
am collecting the material for a forest survey, flora and fauna of 
the Blue Hills, Middlesex .Fells, Stony Brook and Beaver B rook reser- 
vations. You have kindly offered to assist in the preparation of 
the flora and I am sending with this a set of maps of the above 
reservations and a permit to collect. 

To secure uniformity, brevity and economy of spaee, abbreviations 
indicating the fallowing terms are recommended to be used;- 

c. common; f. frequent; o. occasional ;r. rare. 

It is to be understood that the terms are to have the follow- 
ing meaning when used in referring to plants. 

of a sW^lLS**?* 8 • n !?f ly 0VQn Retribution over all surfaces 
or a similar character, within the area specified. 

Frequent (f) found frequently in masses or as individual c u„t« 

b J^°\r enXy **«*ributsd °ver surfaces of a similar character 

within the area specified. •*hi*ak* enaractar 

Occasional (o) found only occasionally in different narta of 
the reservation ..here the conditions are favorable. P f 

tion. Rare (r) fOUnd ° nly ln ° n ° 0r a f9w P lafi9s ^^hin the reserva- 

If a plant is common ( c ), frequent (f) or occasional (o) 
through the area referred to.where the conditions are favorable 
nothing more than the abbreviation and an indication of the looali- 
ty will be required. 



8. 

If it is common in ©me locality and mot in another this should be 
specified, the locality for rare plants should b© apeeified. ( not 
necessarily for publication ). 

The maps are marked with 500 foot squares and reference letters 
and numbers which can be used to loeate the position of or the area 
occupied by a plant approximately if it eannot be indieated briefly 
by reference to the topographical features. 

Usually localities and areas can be indieated by referring to 
well known features whieh are indicated on the plan ( or whieh ahould 
be added to it ), together with the abbreviations for the points of 
the compass, N. S. f £., *., ete. For example, "throughout val- 
ley between certain hills, or aleftg a eertain streak, or on the 
W. slope of a certain hill, etc. 

It will be the aim to include in the flora all plants that are 
now growing, or that are known to have been found growing, within 
the reservations, including adventives. The history of exterminated 
and adventive plants with authorities for the same, and a reference 
to an existing plant in soma herbarium should be given if possible. 

It desirable that herbarium specimens shall be preserved of all 
the plants found growing in the reservations, and it is deemed essen- 
tial that specimens of rare plants or those that run any chance of 
being exterminated shall be preserved. 

Mr. if, T. Kidder of Milton, Mass., has very kindly offered to 
preserve the identity of specimens from the Blue Hills and Stony 
Brook reservations, and to care for them in his herbarium, which will 
ultimately be deposited with some well established society. 



3. 

tir* frank S, Collins of Maiden, Mass., who is the custodian of the 
Middlesex Institute herbarium, on whieh the Middlesex Flora is based 
has kindly consented t© preserve the identity of species from the 
Fells and Beaver Brook Reservations and to place thaw in this her- 
barium* 

She importance and value of the flora which it is proposed to 
prepare will be recognized when it is understood that it is to be 
made in connection with a study of the soil end rock formation and 
geological history of the areas included as well as the forest con- 
ditions and the fauna. 

In the forest study the distribution, character and condition 
of the forest trees and the ground cover, and the natural and arti- 
ficial influences and conditions that are responsible for this dis- 
tribution and condition are to be considered and from the information 
thus gained it is to be determined how best to manage the material 
on the grounds so that Nature will be assisted in the restoration 
of a permanently good and attractive forest and ground cover. 
Any information as to the flora will have a direct bearing upon this 
study. Iz should be distinctly the purpose in all theae observa- 
tions and notes on whatever lines directed, to determine as accurate- 
ly as possible the present condition of and the present life and its 
distribution on the reservations, and the reasons for this condition 
and distribution so that a comparison may be made in the years to 
come to determine how far an intelligent effort to prevent the des- 
truction of Nature's work will have changed the character and pres- 
ent distribution, and added to the life upon these areas, and also 



ft. 
study the directions and the reasons for any such changes that may 
may take place* 

With all this in view it will be desirable that particulars 
like the following shall be noted in connection with the preparation 
o£ the flora. Is a plant increasing or decreasing in numbers f If 
so, why ? If a plant known to have been growing in previous years 
has bat^n exterminated, state year *»f extermination and cause of same. 

How and in what year were a&ventive ° r introduced plants brought 
in t 

I' site note of plants found in unnatural conditions as to soil 
or situation with apparent reason for same. 

Bo certain plants appear periodically with an interval of more 
than one year. 

II© te abnormal forms of any plants and their constancy. 

Bote year and season of any fires, cuttings ©r clearings in 
any part of reservations and the dates whan any cultivated or pas- 
ture lands were abandoned; also when and where home settlements 

i 
were made and when they were abandoned, etc. ete. 

fhe value ©f tha proposed flora and fauna of the Metropolitan 
Fark Reservations will be much enhanced if reports, notes and lists 
pertaining to the various branches are prepared by specialists and 

if there is at the same time an understanding among the naturalists 

who assist in the undertaking that specimens and notes pertaining 

to such special work are to be sent to the individual in charge of tt 

i 
By such an arrangement the work can be better organized for 

those assisting will be more likely to concentrate their efforts upon 

the lines of work that they were best prepared to undertake. They 

can, at the same time colleet and forward specimens and notes per- 



o • 

taining to the work of the specialists which would not otherwise be 
collected if they could not bs thus definately disposed of to ad- 
vantage. This would give general collectors an opportunity to add 

to their knowledge and they would thus secure credit for the eollee- 

i 

tion of specimens which they would not ordinarily secure, and the 
specialists would be able to secure more assistance, more material 
and better results. Such an arrangement would also permit of the 
separation and publication ©f sueh special reports for distribution 
independently of the Park Commissioner's reports if it was deemed to 
fee advisable. 

Shere will be sent to all who are to collect specimens and 
notes the names of those who are willing to undertake sueh special 
work, and these specialists will be asked to prepare brief instruc- 
tions for collecting specimens to guide those who ©re to assist them. 

Before the season is far advanced a meeting ©f those who are 
directly connected with the work will be called for reports of pro- 
gress, for discussion and for exchange of specimens and notes and 
to arrange for further meetings, if it seems advisable. 

I shall be much pleased to receive any suggestions that will 
facilitate, or in any way improve the work proposed. 

It is hoped that it will be possible to bring together enough 
information within a year to prepare a preliminary list of plants. 

Any assistance will be fully appreciated and every effort will 
be made to so conduct the work and to secure such results that those 
taking part will secure an adequate return for the time devoted to 



FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLES OLMSTED. CHARLES ELIOT 



EDWARD D.BOLTON, 
Superintendent of Construction. 



OLMSTED, OLMSTED & ELIOT, 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 



Brookline, Mass. 



WARREN H. MANNING. 
Superintendent of Planting. 



24th September, 1894 

Mr. Merritt Lyndon .Fernald, 

Gray Herbarium, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dear Sir:- Prom a note received from the Gray Herbarium 
some time ago I understand you are expected back about this time, 
so I am sending you a package of Compositae which I and those with 
me in the office have collected in the different reservations up to 
this time. Before very long I shall send you a set of cards upon 
which to make notes of the plants received and such others as you 
may have observed in the reservations. As soon as the collecting 
season closes We shall begin bringing together the material for a 
preliminary list. 



Yours truly, 



\YftrV\U~ {,Q Jl\. 



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FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLES OLMSTED. CHARLES ELIOT. 

OLMSTED, OLMSTED & ELIOT, 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 



EDWARD D.BOLTON, 

Superintendent of Construction. 



WARREN H. MANNING, 
Superintendent of Planting 



Brookline, Mass. 

Dec. 29, 1894. 
Mr. Meritt Lyndon Fernald, 

Gray Herbarium, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dear Sir!--I think I have not acknowledged the receipt 
of a compositae, which came during my absence in the South, I 
hope you will pardon me for not having done so. 

I am beginning te receive notes from the different 
collectors engaged upon the Metropolitan Flora work, and shall 
soon begin the preparation of a preliminary list. Can you tell 
me the best check-list of North American plants? I enclose .25 
for which I would like three copies of the Check-List of the Plants 
of Gray 1 s Manual. 

I hope you are well, and have enjoyed your Christmas, 
and that you will have a happy and prosperous New Year. 

Yours very truly, 



Tkw^ /sT^uww"- 



FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLES OLMSTED- CHARLES ELIOT. 



edward d.bolton, 
Superintendent of Construction. 



OLMSTED, OLMSTED & ELIOT, 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 



Brookline, Mass. 



WARREN H. MANNING. 
Superintendent of Planting. 



May 28th, 1885' 



Dr. B. L. Robinson, 

Gray's Herbarium, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dear Sir;- Mr. M. L. Female! informs me that you would 
probably be willing to assist in the preparation of the Metropoli- 
tan flora. I had not addressee you before with reference to this 
work, because I thought that you oould hardly spare the time from 
more important work to give attention to work of this character. 
I take the liberty of sending you, under separate cover, one of 
the preliminary lists, which has been recently published, together 
with a permit for collection within the limits of the Reservation. 

If you will allow me, I should like to inform those who are 
connected with this work that you are ready to join with them in 
furnishing information to make the final list more complete. 



Yours truly, 



TlT^wJU /( h ^ H ^ uy 



u 



FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLES OLMSTED. CHARLES ELIOT. 



edward d.bolton. 
Superintendent of Construction. 



OLMSTED, OLMSTED& ELIOT, 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. 



Brookline, Mass. 



WARREN H. MANNING. 
Superintendent of Planting. 



June 6th, 1895. 



Dr. B. L. Robinson, 

Gray's Herbarium, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dear Sir;- Your letter of June 3rd, acknowledging the 
Metropolitan flora notes and preliminary list, is before me. 
I am very much obliged to you for your willingness to assist in 
the work in hand so far as you may be able. Ranunculus Alleghanen- 
sis (Britain) is an interesting find. I am very glad it happened 
to come into our Reservation. I presume that it is the plant that 
I collected under the largest of the Great Oaks, and took to be 
R. Arbortiv/us. 



Yours truly, 



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FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLE5 OLMSTED- CHARLES ELIOT. 

OLMSTEQ, OLMSTED & ELIOT, 

LANDSQAPE ARCHITECTS. 

EDWARD D.BOLTON, WARREN H. MANNING. 

Superintendent of Construction. Superintendent of Planting. 

Brookline, Mass. 



METROPOLITAN RESERVATIONS FLORA , 

o 

October 8th 1895 « 

Will you please send in at an early date any plants that you may 
have collected for the Metropolitan Reservations Bl-or© so that I nay dis- 
tribute them, when necessary to those who are to be responsible for the 
determination of the different families . Will yojft also make your notes 
in the Preliminary List which you have and return the list as soon as you 
are able,, so that a compilation may be mads for the forthcoming Annual 
Report of the Metropolitan Commissioners . In making your notes kindly s.5; 
supply omissions and correct errors in the present list . 

Yours truly, 

Warren H . Manning, 
by ,K . 



FREDERICK LAW OLMSTED. JOHN CHARLE5 OLMSTED. CHARLES ELIOT. 



OLMSTED, OLMSTED & ELIOT, 



N 



LANDSCAPE A R C H I T'E;CTS\. 



EDWARD D.BOLTON, 
Superintendent of Construction. 



WARREN H. MANNING. 
Superintendent of Planting. 



Bfroo kline, Mass. 



November 21st, 1895. 



Mr. Merritt L. Fernald, 

Gray • s Herb arium, anbr idge , Mas s . 

Bear Sir;- I am interested to know the names of the 
weeds that are referred to in your letter of the 14-th. If it is 
worth while to make a record of them in the Botanical Gazette 
or any other publication, I will give you the data, if you wish to 
publish it, or I will do it myself s4 'd**** <^— ~-^c, 

Probably Aster infermis in the preliminary list is a mis- 
take. At any rate, it will be omitted from the revised list until 

it is verfied. I have been away about all the time this Fall, 
and have not been able to take up the revised list, but I expect 
to do so very soon now. When I do, you will hear from me. 



Yours truly, 



■yi^i^yy) 



METROPOLITAN RESERVATIONS FLORA. 

A S^.T>t*s**4£fC Brookline,Mass. Dec 4th. 1895. 

Dear Sir;- Mr. Walter Dean will take charge of the preparation of tie. 

the manuscript for the preli^iary list of plants to be found within 



the limits of the Metropolitan Reservations. It is necessary that this 

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work be completed within a limftedE tfme&^All specimens and materials 

are now at Room 20, 125 Tremont St. ahd you are^r%quejsted to call there 

week days between 10 and 1 A.M. and2 and 5P.M^\before Ded<14th to look 

over with Mr. Dean the specimens that you have not already examined in the 



families assigned to you. Please also return within thistime the nre~ 
liminary list that you now have, with your notes and corrections and ^ 
specimens from the reservations that you may have. Mr. E. L. Rand will \ 

assist Mr. Dean in this work. 

Yours truly, 

Warren H. Manning. 




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