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THE DUBOIS PRESS 

CATALOGUE SERVICE 
ROCHESTER, N. Y, 



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NOTE TO THE READER 

The paper in this volume is brittle or the 
inner mai^ns are extremely narrow. 

We have bound or rebound the volume 
utilizing the best means posfiible. 

PLEASE HANDLE WITH CARE 

Gensrai. BooKBiNDiNa Co- Chesterlano, Ohio 



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UniversilyofMicmqan 



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Copyrighted 1916 by 
Louis M. Brlch 



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Unweisitv life lias be«i Jtaiwi ' 

nspited as tha life is W 

histofV trailition and aistom. 

then the 11 6 Mickiganen. in 

has well fiilf lied tspu pose 




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i DEDICATIONS. 



]n grateful Iritule to 
Albert AStaiJey who ka 
gcven so willingly of Kis 
tme am! talent iWweof 
Mldiigan might Ww tlie 
inspiration ana enjcynient 
of gfljij muse .VB deoicale 
the 1916Mkhiganensiiui. 





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In College Days 

(The Fna,-'5 Song) 
Harold M. Howman. *00- 



Where no one asks the "who" or "why"; 
Where no one doth the sinner ply 
With his embarrassments of guile; 
Where's ne'er a frown but brings a smile, 
And cares are crimes, — 'tis sin to sigh, 
'Tis wrong to let a jest go by. 
And hope is truth, and life is nigh. 
The bourns of the Enchanted Isle 
In College Days. 

Then raise the rosy goblet high, — 
The singer's chalice,^and belie 
The tongues that trouble and defile; 
For we have yet a little while 
To linger,— You and Youth and I, 
In Michigan. 



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Jameg Purrill ^ngell 

;(1829-1916) 

Although the sad event had been anticipated, the bare ai 
ment of President Angell's death must prove of peculiar significance 
lo every educated American, poignantly significant to Michigan alumni 
the world over. A chasm yawns t>etween the present and the past of 
our education and of our University; an entire order of associations 
departs. The commanding figure of President Eliot Is still spared to 
us, indeed. But, even so, the children of all American state universities 
will feel that they have lost their most venerable and venerated leader. 
It is the end of a complete life, rarely ordered, dignified yet touched 
with the veritable savor of democracy, simple albeit stately — an em- 
bodiment of the sterling qualities native to old New England. And, for 
the thousands wlio owe allegiance to the great institution at Ann Arbor 
— Dr. Angeil's monument — something has gone from the order of the 
universe, never to be replaced. With them the first of April, 1916. will 
always remain a day of sorrowful but elevating memories. ■ • * 

What was his secret? Not intellectual adroitness, with its restless 
experimenting; not "energy", with its t>ane of "new" departures; em- 
phatically not ambition, with Its itch for "results" and consplcuous- 
ness. Rather It reposed in a character, that served as a sounding board for 
moral acoustics; an ability, that Is, to let the right men alone, never 
harrying them In their work; an ability, moreover, to set the insignifi- 
cant in its place, and to let It take its own meaningless course. Dr. An- 
gell knew that the human mind can face actual Issues, even If they be 
hostile; but he also knew that, to provoke this courage, the issue must 
be real and definite; and he permitted It to shape itself ere he met it. 
He could use prompt decision when necessary: but he had learned, what 
so few ever learn, that quick decisions are proper In exceptional cases 
only ; while for the rest, even blunderers may be counted on to correct 
themselves under kindly persuasion. The charm of his public speech 
was an index of the man here. It bespoke his temperament. His tran- 
quil unaltered humanity was the clue to much that others did not 
understand, or even misinterpreted. For his ripe wisdom tent him in- 
sight to see that great results come very gradually, and thanks only to 
the co-operation of niany whose gifts, as is Inevitable, are most various. 
Hecouldablde the defects of qualities. HIscharmof address was Indic- 
ative of that rarest of all faculties In an executive, the power [to wait 
on "glances that stand agreed". By this principally he won to his 
unique place. Now that he is gone, many of us must think of him as of 
one who sowed the harvest we shall reap — and was content to have sown. 

Keenly as we must feel the absence of his accustomed gracious pres- 
ence, we cannot grieve as for a career cut short In Its prime, with prom- 
ise half fulfilled. Nay, remembering his mature performance, which 
so evades our feeble words, we would rather say, with Madame de 
Stael, "When a noble life has prepared old age, it Is not the decline that 
It reveals, but the first days of immortality". 

R. M. WENLEY. 
—The Michigan DaUy. April 2. 1916 



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The University of Michigan 

THE University of Michigan was organized under an act of the Legislature in 1837 a: 
part of the educational system of the State. At that time there were no s 
learning that were worthy of the name of University. Higher education was confined to private 
corporations, wholly independent of state control. Between these institutions and the few Scat- 
tered common schools there were practically no public high schools to be found in a large majority of 
states as late as 1831. The educational revival of the eady decades of the nineteenth century expressed 
an insistent demand that the government should assume the responsibility for the instruction of its citi- 
zens. In response to this pubhc demand for better educational facilities the State of Michigan adopted 
the "Prussian idea", a system of public instruction embracing the three divisions of schools — primary 
schools, secondary schools, and university. "Branch" schools, numbering five the first year, were im- 
mediately established for the purpose of preparing students for the University, which opened its doors 
in September, 1811, with a faculty of two professors and a student body numbering six freshmen. The 
branch schools were soon absorbed by the public high schools, thus relieving the University of their sup- 
port and affording opportunity for further development. The first equipment of the University of Mich- 
igan consisted of six buildings: two dormitories, which included class rooms, and four houses for pro- 
fessors. Subsequently the dormicories became the wings of the present University Hall. The president's 
house, extensively altered, still occupies its original site on the campus. Such was the modest begin- 
ning of the great institution of learning which is now widely recognized as a national university of 

PHYSICAL EQUIPMENT 

The campus proper of the University of Michigan comprises forty acres of land and twenty build- 
ings. Thirty-chree other buildings occupy sites adjacent to the campus. Among the other properties 
of the University are the following; Ferry Field, the men's athletic grounds; Palmer Field, the women's 
athletic grounds; a ninety-acre arboretum and garden along the Huron river; the Saginaw Forestry 
Farm, eighty acres of land one mile west of Ann Arbor; and the Bogardus Engineering Camp and Bio- 
logical Station, a tract of land including 2,200 acres, in Cheboygan County, seventeen miles south of 
the Straits of Mackinac. 

Ferry Field is one of the best equipped athletic grounds in the country. It contains forty acres of 
land and is surrounded by a high brick wall, with an ornamental gate at the northeast corner. Besides 
numerous football and baseball fields for varsity and class teams, it includes 32 tennis courts, a running 
track, with a 220-yard "straight-away", a stadium, and stands. The football stands seat 22,656 persons, 
while the baseball stand seats 1,632. One secrion of the football stadium was built two years ago, with 
a seating capacity of 13,200. When completed the stadium will accommodate 52,000 spectators. A 
commodious club house, containing lockers, baths and rubbing and lodging rooms, is situated near 
the entrance to the field. An annual "blanket" tax of five dollars admits the student to all athleric 
events and affords him the privilege of using the facilities of the field for recreation purposes. 

Palmer Field, the women's athletic grounds, contains tennis courts, hockey and baseball fields, 
a basketball court, a club house, and an expansive green for physical recreation. This field, encircled 
by hills, furnishes an amphitheater for open-air celebrations. It is here that the annual cap-night cele- 
bration is held. May-day and other pageants presented by the women are also given in this picturesque 

uildings recently erected on the University of Michigan campus are Hill 
nee Building, the Chemistry and Pharmacy Building, and the two dor- 
Hill Auditorium, one of the finest music halls in the world, was erected at a cost of 3300,000, the 
major portion of which was bequeathed by the late Hon. Arthur Hill, of Saginaw, an alumnus of the 



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University and for many years a member of the Board of Regents, It has a seating capacity of 5,000 
and is used for all the occasions which assemble the university public, such as the Choral Union and May 
Festival concerts, convocation, lectures, pageants, mass meetings, and the like. This building contains 
the famous Frieze Memorial organ, originally constructed for the Columbian Exposition in 1S93, and 
for many s^ars located in University Hail. The large exhibition room on the second floor is devoted 
to the Steams collection of musical instruments, presented to the University several years ago by the 
late Frederick Stearns, of Detroit. 

The Natural Science Building was completed last fall at the beginning of the academic year. This 
splendid structure contains over 270 rooms and cost 8450,000. It includes the departments of Botany, 
Forestry, Geology, Mineralogy, Zoology, and Psychology. Though constructed primarily to serve util- 
itarian purposes, the building conforms in architectural design to Hill Auditorium, which faces it directly 
across North University Avenue. 

The Chemistry Building, a four-story structure, rectangular in shape, includes 125 rooms and 
104,500 square feet of floor space. All the chemistry of the various departments of the University, ex- 
cept the technical chemistry of the College of Medicine and Surgery, is taught in this building. 

From an architectural point of view the most interesting building in the University group is the 
Martha CooJ: dormitory for women. It is the gift of the Cook family of Hillsdale and New York. Its 
estimated value is approximately half a million dollars. It is Tudor-Gothic in design, and quite gener- 
ally conceded to be one of the most artistic structures of its kind in the country. It contains all the mod- 
em conveniences to be found in club homes and accommodations for 125 women. The other dormitory, 
Kewberry Residence Hail, while less pretentious in architectural appointments than the Martha Cook 
building, is a strictly modern building, pleasing to the sight and comfortably and artistically furnished. 
It aflbrds living quarters for sixty women. It is the gift of the Newberry family, of Detroit, 



LIVING CONDITIONS 

Students at the University of Michigan live in the private homes of the city or in fraternity and 
club houses, of which latter there are over sixty in number. The wide choice afforded the student in 
the selection of his rooming house enables him to adjust his living expenses to his allowance. The women 
who do not live in either of the two dormitories or in sorority houses are assigned by the dean of women 
to the various approved "League Houses", private homes conducted under the supervision of the Wo- 
men's League, a student organization which exercises general supervision over the university activities 
of the women. By supervising the rooming houses that are open to women the League is able to stand- 
ardize living conditions and at the same time give direction to the social life of the women. The same 
kind of supervision is being instituted for the rooming houses devoted to men. It Is quite generally de- 
sired, . however, that dormitories under the direction of the University shall be available to both men 



UNiyERSITY ACTIVITIES 

Not the least important part of a university student's training is acquired through his ai 
outside the class room, A great cosmopolitan student body, with opportunity for intimate social con- 
tact among its individual members, affords opportunities of inestimable value to the future citizen. To 
exchange opinions with men and women from foreign lands, as well as with those from the various states 
in the Union, to share their pleasures and responsibilities, to work with them in the laboratory, the li- 
brary, or the class room, to compete with them for athletic or academic preferment — it is this experi- 
ence alone which can crush out the narrow provincialism of the average student and make him tolerant 
and broad-minded. Contact with his fellows affords the only means whereby the vulgarian or the prig 
can be rendered good company for intelligent men and women. True culture, which evinces a prefer- 
ence for what is superior amid all the accidents of life, can be acquired in no other way. 



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THE MICHIGAN UNION 

Foremost among the student organizations which foster this cosmopolitan spirit is the University 
of Michigan Union, whose membership embraces more than three thousand undergraduates and many 
thousand alumni. A million dollar campaign for funds with which to erect and maintain a new club 
house is nearing its completion. It is confidently expected that the last dollar will soon be subscribed, 
so that building operations may he started during commencement week of the present year. This cam- 
paign for a new Union home is the most ambitious project ever undertaken by the alumni of any uni- 
versity, and the success of the movement speaks well for the loyalty aod enterprise of Michigan gradu- 
ates and former students. When completed the new Union will serve as a common social center for 
students, faculty, and alumni of the University. It is a significant fact that the Union has been able, 
even with its present inadequate facilities, to give general direction to student activities. It produces 
the annual student opera, conducts student, class, and university affairs, and serves as the social center 
of university undtrgraduate life. It is obvious that an increase in the facilities of the Union will multiply 
its opportunities for serving the interests of the student body. 

Besides the Union, whose activities cover every day of the academic year, there are a great variety 
of organizations devoted to special social and academic interests. Honor and departmental societies, 
literary and foreign language associations, dramatic, musical, debating, and social clubs, and the like, 
present ample opportunity for the development of the student's aptitudes. Nor are the women of the 
University less active than the men in fostering the interests of their group life. And permeating all 
these activities is a wholesome spirit of democracy, which means open opportunity for all and special 

LIFING EXPENSES 

Michigan has long heen known as the "poor man's college". It is estimated that forty percent of 
the student body is at least partially self-supporting. Student employment bureaus, conducted by the 
University Y. M. C. A. and the Michigan Union, afford help to needy students throughout the year. 
More than 4,000 "jobs" are opened to students annually through the activity of these employment 
agencies. There are also available to deserving students more than seventy-five scholarships, loan funds, 
and prizes. These funds have been provided by the Board of Regents, graduating classes, alumni associ- 
ations, and individuals. 

The annual expenses of students, including clothing and incidentals, are, on an average, about fout 
DC five hundred dollars. Actual living expenses will average less than 8300 a year, while incidental items, 
such as clothing and railroad fare, will fall below 81^0 a year. The annual fee, which is less for residents 
of the state than for outsiders, is distributed among the various schools and colleges of the University 
as follows: 

Science and the Arts — 842; Engineerine^8S7; Medical (including laboratory fees) — 8100; Law 
—867; Pharmacy— 857; Homeopathic— 8100; Dental Surgery— 8107; Graduate School— 842. 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

The total number of students enrolled in the University of Michigan during the past year, inclusive 
of the summer session, is 7,214. This enrollment is distributed among the several schools and colleges 
as follows-; Literature, Science, and the Arts — 3,225; Engineering and Architecture — 1,571; Medical — 
323; Law^452; Pharmacy — 126; Homeopathic— S4; Dental Surgery^ — 353; Graduate — 357; — Summer 
Session — 1,578, The net total eliminates all double registrations. 

ffHAT THE UNirERSlTY STANDS FOR 

The ideal of the University of Michigan is enlightened citizenship. To this end it fosters all those 
educational interests and influences which are effectual in producing the cultivated man and women. 



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Its relation (o the nation is that of a trustee who has assumed a sacred obligation. It recognizes the 
fact that the professional man or woman must always be something more than a technically trained in- 
dividual. He or she must also be equipped to meet the responsibilities of citizenship. The university, 
therefore, besides preparing men and women for their life work, also seeks to broaden their sympathies, 
strengthen their loyalties, enrich their sense of what is superior, so that their personahties may con- 
tribute to life a benefit which does not often find a place in bookkeeping accounts, but which neverthe- 
less possesses an inestimable value to society in general. The public support of a state university is just- 
ified by the good it confers upon those who enjoy its privileges and by the influence it exerts, through its 
graduates and as an intellectual center, upon the commonwealth. This purpose is being achieved by the 
University of Michigan through the thirty-five thousand graduates and former students whom it has 
trained for citizenship. But the University of Michigan is reaching the people of the state even more 
directly fay placing within their reach the resources of a great educational institution. Besides the ser- 
vices rendered by the hospitals and laboratories, by the libraries and reference bureaus, more than three 
hundred and fifty free lectures are presented annually throughout the state. Through this direct service 
over one hundred thousand people of the commonwealth are reached annually, without extra expense 
to the taxpayers. 

It may truly be said that the splendid ideal of President Henry P. Tappan, who more than any 
other manwas the founder of the University of Michigan, has been fully reahzed — "A University worthy 
of the name; with a capacity adequate to our wanes, receiving a development commensurate with the 
growth of all things around us, doing a work which shall be heartily acknowledged by the present genera- 
tion, and reaching with increasing power through the generations to come ... A great work, it will 
require great means; faut when once accomplished, it vnli constitute the glory of our state and give us 
an indisputable pre-eminence." 

J. R. B. 



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The New Dormitories 



THE openinR last fall of the two residence halls for women inaugurates a new epoch in housing 
conditions for students in the University, They mark the way for a return to the earlier days 
of the University, when all the students were housed in donnitories. The present system of al- 
lowing students to find accommodations for themselves in the homes of the citizens of Ann Arbor was 
instituted as far hack as the time when President Tappan saw no way of increasing the facilities of the 
University except by utilizing the rooms in what are now the two wings of University Hall which, fae- 



fis marked sympathy with German educational methods 

hich was customary in Germany. 

'e changed and for any one who has made a study of stu- 



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fore his time had been used a 

also predisposed him to'follow this practice, wl 

Since those days, however, conditions hai 
dent life the need of better housing conditions is apparent. The obvious •■ 
erection of residence halls, or dormitories, particularly for those people w 
fraternities or clubhouses. For the men, the Michigan Union Clubhouse will have a marked effecc. For 
the women, the erection of the Helen Handy Newberry Hall and Martha Cook Building has probably 
been the greatest step towards ameliotating conditions. As is evidenced by their names, each of these 
Halls is a memorial to a mother on the part of her children. The Martha Cook Building was erected 
by the Cook family of Hillsdale, while Newberry Hall was erected by the children of Mrs. John S. 
Newberry, whose husband was a graduate of the University in the class of 1847. 

Few college buildings, to say nothing of dormitories or halls of residence, surpass the new Martha 
Cool: Building in architectural beauty or in perfection of furnishings and decorations. Every detail bears 



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the evidence of careful thought for the comfort of its oc- 
cupants on the part of the designees and donors. In gen- 
eral it is an exceptionally fine adaptation of the Tudor- 
Gothic, always a favorite style for college architecture, 
though this is the first example of this type at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, While in Its main lines it is simple 
it shows an unusual perfection in detail which makes it 
unquestionably the finest building in Ann Arbor. Few 
buildings in the country can be found so perfect in their 
architecture and appointments. 

The main entrance is upon South University. The 
building in general is Tapestry brick, relieved by a simple 
pattern in darker brick. All the trimmings are of cue stone 
in which the Gothic details are accentuated even Co rows 
of Gargoyles in the stone cornice near the top of the build- 
ing. The entrance has become an emblem of the building 
and is reproduced in numerous details throughout, upon 

_. ~ ,, . „ . several of the mantels, upon the china service desiened for 

The Corridor— Mortia Cooi ■■■,,. , ■ , .. 

the buildmg and even m the hnen. 

Upon entering one stands at the end of a long cloistered hall with flag paving and a groined ceiling 
of white stone upon the blue of the vault. This hallway is flanked by a long series of tall windows which 
take up the whole side of the passage way and open upon a terrace overlooking the lawn. At either side 
of the main entrance are short hallways, the one on the right leading to the teception room furnished 
in crimson and gold. One of the features of the room is an open fireplace of Botticino marble. At the 
left of the main entrance another passageway leads to the apartments of the social director and the 

Immediately beyond the reception hall and con- 
nected with it by a paneled anteroom is the second and 
larger of the two parlors, which serves as a living and music 
room. This room is elaborately paneled in teak wood 
from the Philippines. The plaster ceiling is a replica of 
one in the South Kensington Museum in London. Several 
doors at the side open into the long Gothic corridors at 
the left. In the blue room is the fire-place dedicated by 
the late President Angell. 

Beyond the living room is the dining room, in its turn 
opening on to the corridor, with seats for one hundred 
and sixteen girls in groups around small round tables. 
The room is paneled in rich brown oak to which the fur- 
niture of the room corresponds. Beyond on the first floor 



The Fireplace — Martha Cook 



are the serving roon 


s and quarters for the servants. 


These central 


ooms occupy the equivalent of two 


full stories with a 


nezzanine floor at either end, each of 


which furnish a spa 


e for a group of seven or eight rooms. 


Most of the rooms a 


e on the second and third floors, each 




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of which has accommodations for approximately forty girls. There are also about Bfteen rooms on the 
fourth floor in addition to three reserved as rest rooms to be used by any of those in the building who 
feel it desirable to have absolute quiet. All but a few of the rooms are single, in accordance with the 
desire expressed by a ballot of University women, though there are a few double rooms. The furnishings 
of the rooms are simple but of the very best quality. 

In the basement are the kitchen and kitchen equipment and the laundry as well as the coat room 
for men who may possibly be guests of the girls in the building. The building is equipped with an ele- 



Equally attractive though less elaborate in details is the Newberry Hall on State Street. Quite 
unlike the Martha Cook building in its general appearance it Furnishes the same character of accommo- 
dations for its residents. It is more simple in architectural design and smaller, but it embodies every 
essential found in the larger building. It is of hollow tile construction with a stucco exterior, relieved 
by white trimmings and green shutters. There are four floors and a basement. 

On entering one finds a reception room on either side, that on the right opening through wide doors 
into a second room which can, if necessary, be made part of the main room, so that the two can be used 
for receptions and dances. The color scheme of these reception rooms is in general deep ivory and old 
blue with paneled walls in ivory and brown. Various articles of old furniture, davenports and a carved 
chest, the gift of the Newberry family, find places in these rooms. 

At the left behind the reception room is the main stairway. Beyond are several single rooms, in- 
cluding the apartments of the social director, on either side of the hallway leading into the dining room, 
which is exceedingly simple, but particularly attractive because of its terraces on each side which may 
be made a part of the room in favorable weather. There are nine tables with a capacity of ninety places 
in all. Behind the dining room are the serving room and the offices of the director of the building. 




The DlNLNG Hall— MarlAii Cook Dormitory 



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In the basement are the kitchen, laundry, storage, a baking room and other portions of the kitchen 
equipment as well as a completely arranged sewing room for the girls. 

Affairs in the dormitory are handled hy the girls themselves. Rules are made by a body of repre- 
sentatives elected in class meetings. The officers are elected by the house at large. Faculty dinners 
are given one Sunday in each month. 

Both the buildings are under the direction of Governing Boards. Mrs. Chauncey F. Cook, of Hills- 
dale, Miss Grace G. Millard, '97, of Detroit, and Mrs. Frederic B. Stevens, of Detroit, are in charge of 
the Martha Cook Building of which Miss Frances C. Mack, formerly of Ferry Hall, Chicago, is business 
manager, while Miss Gertrude H, Biggs, who comes from a school in Chicago, is the social director. 

TheBoardofGovemorsoftheNewberry Hall of Residence consists of Mrs. Myra B.Jordan, Dean 
of Women, Mrs. Henry B. Joy, of Detroit. Mrs. A. C. Angcll, of Detroit, Miss Q aire M. Sanders, '04, 
of Detroit, and Mrs. Henry W. Douglas, ■97-'01, of Ann Arbor. Miss Clara Hunt, who comes from the 
Michigan Agricultural College, is the business manager, while Mrs. F.rie Lavcon Gates, '98, is the social 
director. ' J. A. H. 




Drawjng Room — Martha Cook 



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November 20, 1915 



The Michigan Union Campaign 

THE University of Michigan has nevtr been advertised so much as ic was during che summer of 
nineteen hundred and fifteen, at which time was caking place the organizing of Michigan 
alumni fot the purpose of raising funds with which to build a new clubhouse »t Ann Arbor. 
The story of that publicity is best made known by telling the plans for organisation and the means 
by which they were carried out. 

It is not untruthful to state that the campaign which is just coming to a successful close dales back 
to nineteen hundred and nine. Ac that time the first active work was begun among the alumni. How- 
ever that served only as a preliminary step,^t resulted in the collection of many bits of information 
needed and used by those who had the task of actually organizing the older classes. 



We generally think of the three r 
as the time when the most importat 
idea, " Let the alumni themselves rais 
All of which meant that some two h 
the lime allotted these working bodi 



onthsof July, August and September, ni 
t work was done. The whole campaigi 
the money by personal solicitatmn amoi 
indred committees had to be chosen in 



The first step was to divide the whole United States into ten sections, each one having as its center 
a city containing a very laige number of graduates and former students of the University. For example, 
Chicago was chosen the center of a district composed of Wisconsin, northern Illinois and northern In- 
diana. Cleveland was the center of the district composed of Ohio and other surrounding territory. Ten 
men were chosen to select committees in the ten districts above mentioned, each man having charge 
of one district and each district having alumni which would need about twenty committees to properly 
solicit them. Then came the task of getting the men who would do the actual work of raising money. 



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The New Union Building: The Plunge 



The organizer when he went [nco a town, had certain infotmat 

perhaps he knew beforehand just what person was best suited 

again, the information might consist only of the names of the a 

association was found In a fairly live condition, it was used as 

But as they were not very numerous, other means were resorted to. Alumni meetings 

for where possible and at these a chairman was selected. Then with his help, a local comn- 



ors was picked out. In many plar 
perfected only after several visits ti 



:oncerning the men he was to visit — 
lead in that particular locality— and 
ii living there. Wherever an alumni 
1 means of getting to the individual, 
arranged 
ofsolidt- 



their 



■e Michi 



o arrange meetings and the organi 



gan n 



At the end of three months two hundred committees with a total of over three thousand men had 
signified their intentions of raising one million dollars during the month of October. On the second day 
of October, nineteen hundred and fifteen, alumni dinners were held in all places where numbers were 
large enough to warrant them. They can be appreciated only by being present. One can hardly imagine 
old men who finished college thirty years ago waving their hands and yelling when there is flashed on 
the "movie" screen a picture of Bill Day leading a Michigan yell. The alumni have not lost their voices. 
And their conversational qualities are just as efl^ective. No salesman ever took a greater interest in his 
line of goods than some of the old boys when they were "hitting" a man for a thousand dollars or more. 
All through October the men were working among those of their classmates assigned to tliem. In many 
places celebrations were held on the last day of October, and because the whole amount was not sub- 
scribed by that time, new ideas as to the proper way of getting the balance were than advanced. 



ng its close and there is no doubt chat the 
the first active work began there has been 
!y newspapers in the larger cities, the Out- 



Since that time the campaign has been gradually nea 
whole million dollars will be ultimately subscribed. Since 
no small amount of publicity given to the project. The d; 

look, Leslie's Weekly, the Metropolitan and the Saturday Evening Post, all have carried articles on 
different phases of the Union and its activities. It is quite safe to say that no college or University has 
ever received such fair treatment at the hands of the American Press. This is true in spite of the fact 
that one newspaper requested payment for so much advertising space. 



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Several incidents of the past summer might give one an idea of some of the situacions really met 
by those who did the actual oreanizing. It takes the exception to prove the rule so far as Michigan 
spirit is concerned. One alumnus, holding an important position on the Faculty of a well known uni- 
versity, characterized the whole campaign as a farce, at the same time stating that he would rather give 
his spare money to the nations engaged in the present war. However, no one was abk' to find out that 
he had given anything even to that cause. Another "grad" was troubled so much by the literature 
sent him that he threatened to get an injunction restraining the chairman of his locality from sending 
him more of its kind. Happenings like the above served to make the great majority work all the more 
earnestly. When the editor of a small town newspaper asked for a list of all of the alumni in that lo- 
cality so that he could print their names in the next issue, the unpleasantness of some of the happenings 
faded away. One of the most encouraging sights was that of watching a prominent alumnus gather 



his cl^ 
In I 



md his 



able a) 






d dollar 



nthe. 






idwinter the San Francisco and New York alumni held banquets on the same night and by means 
trans-continental telephone system, held a mutual one-hour program. At that time the New York 
rman informed an Ann Arbor listener that he had already raised fourteen hundred dollars that 



The campaign now being brought to a close has served more than one useful purpose. The million 
dollars subscribed may be deemed only a small part of the beneficial results. Michigan's alumni body 
has been organized Into a gteat and useful association of associations; and thereby, our alumni have been 
brought into closer relationship with the University. Our Alma Mater has been placed befote the whole 
United States in a way hard to be appreciated and only the future can tell the good to be derived from 
such wholesome publicity. Michigan men have been caught to give money and it is to be sincerely hoped 
that they will not shut down on theit generosity after having made such an enterprising beginning in 
providing for needed University buildings. H. G, G, 




The New Union Building; The South Pavil 



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J' 


\MEs Burr 


ILL AncELL 




President 


1871-1909 


Pres 


lident Emer 


itus 1909-1916 



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Board of Regents 



Harry B. HutchlnS, LI.. D.. President 


. . . Ann Arbor 


Hon. JiiNFLS K. Beal 


, . . . Ann Arbor 


Hon. Frank B. Leland 


, . . . Detroit 


Hon. WiLLCAM L. Clements 


.... Bay City 


Hon. H.^rrv C Bulkley 


. . . . Detroit 


Shirley W. Smfth. Secretary .... 


. . . . ■ Ann Arbor 



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Hubbard 






Keeler 



Board of Regents 



Hon. Benjamjn S. Hanchetl- 

Hon. Lucius L. Hubbard 

Hon. Waiter H. Sawyer 

Hon. Victor M. Gore 

Hon. Fred E. Keei.ee, Siiperintendenr of Public Insimct: 
Robert A. Campbell. Treasurer 



Grand Rapids 

Hillsdale 
Bemon Harbor 
Lansing 
Ann Arbor 



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ff ^SS^^* Ji 

![ A L U M N \J„ 

Alumni Association of the University of Michigan 

WE BOJRD Of D! HECTORS 

Vector Hugo Lane, 74E. 78L, Ann Arbor, Michigan . . . President 

Junius E. Beal, '82, Am Arbor, Michigan Vice-President 

Louis Parker JocElYn, '87, Ann Arbor, Michigan , . . . Secretary 

GOTTHELF Cari, Hubkr, '87M, Ann Arbor, Michiean .... Treasurer 
Henry Woolsey Douglas, '90E, Ann Arbor, Michigan 
David Emil Heineman, 'S7, Dctroir, Michigan 
Elsie Seelye Pratt '(MM. Ann Arbor. Michigan 

GENERAL SECRETARY 
WiLVBEii !)yeon Shaw, '04, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

THE MICHIGAN ALUMNUS 

Wilfred B. Shaw, '04 Editor 

Harriet Lawrence, 'U Assistant Editor 

Isaac Newton Demmon, '68 Necrology 

T. Hawley Tapping, 'iCJ Athletics 



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Members of the Faculties and Other Officers* 

THE UNII'ERSITY SENATE 

Harry Burns Hltchins, I.L.D,, Ptesidenc, 

James Burrill Angell, LL.D., President Emeritus. 

JMartin Luther D'Ooce, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Lict., Professor Emeritus of Greek. 

Isaac Newton Demmon, A.M., LL.D., Professor of English. 

Mortimer Elwvn Coolev, M.E., LL.D., Eng.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Dean 
of (he Colleges of Engineering and Architecture. 

Wooster Woodruff Bbman, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Mathemarics. 

Victor Clarence Vaughan, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Hygiene and Physiological 
Chemistry, and Dean of the Medical School. 

Henry Smith Carhart, A.M., LL.D., Sc.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Raymond Caiallis Davis, A.M., Librarian Emeritus, Beneficiary of the Professor George P. Williams 
Emeritus Professorship Fund. 

Henrv Carter Adams, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 

Bradley Martin Thompson, M.S„ LL.B., Professor Emeritus of Law. 

Albert Augustus Stanley, A.M., Professor of Music. 

Francis Will^y Kelsev, Ph.D., LL.D, Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

Jerome Cvril KnoWLton, A.B., LL.B., Marshall Professor of Law. 

Charles Beylarq Guerard de Nancrede, A.M., M.D.. LL.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
Surgery, and Director of Surgical Clinics in the Medical School. 

Nelville Soule Hoff, D.D.S., Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry and Dean of the College of Denta 
Surgery, 

Joseph Baker Davis, A.M., C.E., Professor Emeritus of Geodesy and Surveying. 

Warren Pumpton Lombard, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Jacob Ellsworth Reighard, Ph.B., Professor of Zoology and Director of the Zoological Laboratory 
and the Biological Station, 

Thomas Clarkson Trueblood, A.M., Professor of Oratory. 

Thomas Ashford Bogle, LL.B., Professor of Law. 

WiLBERT B. Hinsdale, M.S., A.M., M.D., Professor of the Theory and Pracrice of Medicine and 
Qinical Medicine, Dean of the Homoeopathic Medical School, and Director of the University Homoe- 
opathic Hospital. 

Robert Mark Wenley, D.Phil., Sc.D., Litt.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Professor of Philosophy. 

Willis Alonzo Dewey, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeurics and Acting Professor 
of Mental and Nervous Diseases, and Secretary of the Faculty in the Homoeopathic Medical SchooL 
Victor Hugo Lane, C.E., LL.B., Fletcher Professor of Law and Law Librarian. 

Horace Lafayette Wilgus, M.S., Professor of Law. 

Claudius Bligh Kinyon, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Homoeopathic Med- 
ical SchooL 
Arthur Graves Canfieli), A.M., Professor of the Romance Languages and Literatures, 

Reuben Peterson, A.B., M.D., Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children in the Med- 
ical School, and Medical Director of the University Hospital. 
Robert Emmet Bunker, A.M., LL.B., Professor of Law. 
Fred Newton Scott, Ph.D., Professor of Rhetoric. 

Max Winkler, Ph.D., Professor of the German Languages and Literatures. 
Frederick George Novy, M.D,, Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology, and Director of the Hygienic Lab- 

Edward DeMille Campbell, B.S.,Professorof Chemistry, and DiiectoroftheChemical Laboratory. 
Allen Sisson Whitney, A.B.. Professor of Education. 
FiiiEERT Roth, B.S,, Professor of Forestry. 

G. Carl Huber, M.D., Professor of Anatomy, and Director of the Anatomical Laboratories. 
Henry Moore Bates, Ph.B., LL.B., Tappan Professor of Law, and Dean of the Law School. 
Edwin Charles Goddard, Ph.B., LL.B,, Professor of Law, and Secretary of the Faculty of the Law 
School. 

*The names of PTDfesfou (includiEg Librarian), Aeeodatc Ptofe»ore, AsaisCsnt Fiofeuoti, and other imaet* 



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AldRed Scott Wahthin, M.D,, Ph.D., Professor of Pathology, and Director of the Pathological 

Laboratory in the Medical School. 
Louia Phillii's Hall, D.D.S,, Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 
Egbert Theodore Loeffler, B.S., D.D.S., Professor ef Dental Therapeutics. 
Fred Manville Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 
Alexander Ziwet, C.E., Professor of Mathematics. 

Herbert Charles Sadleh, Sc.D., Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. 
Moses Gomberg, Sc.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 
George Washington Patterson, Ph.D., Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 
Frederick Charles Newcombe, Ph.D., Professor of Botany, and Director of the Botanical Lahora- 

tJoHN Oren Reed, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Director of the Physical Laboratory. 

ITheodore Wesley Koch, A.M., Librarian. 

Walter Robert Parker, B.S., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology in the Medical School. 

Rov Bishop Canfield, A.B., M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology in the Medical School. 

WiiLiAM Joseph Hussey, Sc.D., Professor of Astronomy, and Director of the Observatory. 

Ehil Lorch, A.m., Professor of Architecture, 

Claude Halstead Van Tyne, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Joseph Horace Drake, LL.B., Ph.D., Professor of Law. 

John Romacn Rood, LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Edson Read Sunderland, LL.B., A.M., Professor of Law. 

Albert Moore Barrett, A.B., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Diseases of the Nervous System 

in the Medical School. 
William Herbert Hobbs, Ph.D., Professor of Geology, and Director of the Geological Laboratory 

and Geological Museum. 
Charles Wallis Edmunds, A.B., M.D., Professor of Therapeutics and Materia Medica, and Secre- 
tary of the Faculty of the Medical School. 
Alfred Henrv Lloyd, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the Graduate School. 
MoRlTz Leu, A.B., Professor of French. 

John Robins Allen, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
Joseph Lybrand Markley, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Charles Horton Coolev, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 
Dean Wentworth Myers, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, 

and Dean of the Training School for Nurses in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 
Samuel Lawrence Bigelow, Ph.D., Professor of General and Physical Chemistry. 
Junus Otto Schlotterbeck, Ph.C, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacognosy and Botany, and Dean of 

the College of Pharmacy. 
Arthur Graham Hall, Ph.D., Registrar and Professor of Mathematics. 
Edward Henry Kraus, Ph.D., Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography, and Director of the Min- 

eralogical Laboratory, and Dean of the Summer Session. 
Marcus Llewellyn Ward, D.D.Sc, Professor of Applied Physics and Chemistry and of Crown and 

Bridge Work in the College of Dental Surgery. 
Albion Walter Hewlett, B.S., M.D., Professor of Internal Medicine, and Director of the Clinical 

Laboratory in the Medical School. 
JKarl Eugen Guthe, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Dean of the Graduate School. 
Jesse Siddall Reeves, Ph.D., Professor of Pohtical Science. 
Earle Wilbur Dow, A.B,, Professor of European History. 
Walter Bowers Pillsbury, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Director of the PsychologicallLabor- 

Alviso Burdett Stevens, Ph.C, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, and Secretary of the'College of 

Pharmacy. 
Evans Holbrook, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 
Clarence Thomas Johnston, C.E., Professor of Geodesy and Surveying, and Director; of the'. Bo- 

gardus Engineering Camp. 
Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, Ph.D., Professor of American History. 
Louis A, Strauss, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Alfred Holmes White, A.B., B.S., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Arthur Lyon Cross, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 
Edward Raymond Turner, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 
IHenry Arthur Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 
James Waterman Glover, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics a ' ' 

JDied September 10, 1015 



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Henry Earle Riggs, A.B., C.E.. Professor of Civil EngineerinE. 

EwALD Augustus Boucke, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Horace Williams King, B.S., Professor of Hydraulic Engineering. 

John Robert Effinoer, Ph.D., Professor of French, and Dean of the College of Literature, Science, 
and the Arts. 

Henry Clay Anderson, B.M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Campbell Bonner, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

Ermine Cowles Case, Ph.D., Professor of Historical Geology and Paleontology, and Curator of the 
Paleontological Collection. 

Stanislaus Jan Zowski (Zwierzchowski), Dipl. Ing., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Willis Gordon Stonek, A.B„ LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Ralph William Aigler, LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Herbert Richard Cross, A.M., Professor of Fine Acts, and Curator of Alumni Memorial Hall. 

William Christian Hoad, B.S., Professor of Sanitary Engineering. 

John Barker Waite, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Lewis Merritt Gram, B.S., Professor of Structural Engineering. 

Louis Holmes Bovnton, Professor of Architecture. 

Henry Harold Higbie, E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Edward David Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Commerce and Industry. 

Benjamin Franklin Bailey, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Clarence Linton Meader, Ph.D., Professor of Latin, Sanskrit and General Linguistics. 

Edoar Noble Durfee, A.B., J.D., Professor of Law. 

Ulio Julius Wile, A.B., M.D., Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology in the Medical School. 

David Friday, A.B., Professor of Economics. 

James Bartlett Edmonson, A.M., Inspector of High Schools. 

Hugh McDowell Beebe, H.D., Professor of Surgery, Clinical Surgery, Orthopedics, Electro-Thera- 
peutics, and Roentgenology in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 

Rollo Eugene McCotteh, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Cyrenus Garritt Darling, M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in the Medical School, 
and Professor of Oral Surgery in the College of Dental Surgery. 

Isaiak Leo Sharfman, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Economics. 

Russell Welfoed Bunting, D.D.Sc, Professor of Dental Pathology and Histology, and Secretary 
of the College of Dental Surgery. 

Elmer Edwin Ware, B.S., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Hugo Paul Tbieme, Ph.D., Professor of French. 

Myra Beach Jordan, A.B., Dean of Women. 

Alexander Grant Ruthven, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Director of the Museum of Zoology. 

Chalmers J. Lyons, D.D.Sc, Professor of Oral Surgery and Consulring Dentist to the University 
Hospital. 

Leroy Waterman, Ph.D., Professor of Semitics, 

William Warner Bishop, A.M., Librarian. 

John Castlereagh Parker, A.M., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Tobias J. C. Diekhoff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German. 

Carl Dudley Camp, M.D., Associate Professor of the Diseases of the Nervous System in the Medical 

David Murray Cowie, M. D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine in the Med- 
ical School. 

William Henry Wait, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern Languages, 

Herbert Jay Gouldinc, B.S,, Associate Professor of Descriprive Geometry and Drawing. 

William Lincoln Miggett, M.E., Associate Professor of Shop Practice, and Superintendent of the 
Engineering Shops. 

William Henry Butts, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, and Assistant Dean of the Col- 
lege of Engineering. 

Ira Dean Loree, M.D., Associate Professor of Geni to-Urinary Surgery in the Medical School. 

Jonathan Augustus Charles Hildner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German. 



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^•*'<~— 



:anuali.. Ph.D. 


, Associate Professor of Physics, 




'h.D., Associate 


; Professor of Mathematics. 




s, Ph.D.,As^c 


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d Assistant Di 


, ScD., Associate Professor nf Botany, 




', B.S., Assocai 


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1, Ph.D., Absoci 


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Ph.D., Associa 


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^ctor of the Un 



Hakrison McAllister R. 

Walter Burton Ford, P 

Ralph Hamclton Cuhtiss 
Observatory. 

James Barklev Pollock, I 

Joseph Aldrich Bur; 

Morris Palmer Till 

Arthur Whitmork Si 

William D. Henders 
ten.sion Service. 

Otto Charles Glaseb, Ph.D., Associate Professor of ZooloKy, and Director of the Biological Station. 

Calvin Oun Davis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Kducation, and Vice-Chairman of the Appoint- 
ment Committee. 

Olenus I,ee Sponsleh, A.M., Associate Professor of Forestry, 

Thomas Ernest Rankin, A, M,, Associate Professor of Rhetoric, and Secretary of the Summer Session. 

Peteh Field, Ph,D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Edward Milton Bragg, B,S., Associate Professor of Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture. 

Charles Philip Wagnek, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

James Gkhrit Van Zwaluweneurg, B,S., M.D., Associate Professor of Roentgenology in the Med- 
ical School. 

Aubrey TpaLdI, Grad. Roy, Tech. Inst., Livorno, Associate Professor of Landscape Desian. 

Arthur James Decker, B.S. (C.E.), Associate Professor^ of Civil Engineering. 

Theodore Ruuolph Running, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Aaron Franklin Shull, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Lee Holt Cone, Ph.D,, Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry, 

Louis Charles Karpinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

David Martin Lichty, Ph.D., Associate Professor of General Chemistry. 

WiLLMM Jav Hale, Ph.D., Associate Professor of General Chemistry. 

Charles Kcott Berry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Walter Turner Fishleioh, A.B,, B.S,, .Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

John GAKREfr Winter, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek and Latin. 

John Frederick Shepabu, Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Samuel Moore. Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Howard B, Merrick. CE,, Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Warren Washburn Floheh, Ph,D,, Assisrant Professor of German. 

Carl Edgar Eggert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German, 

George Augustus May, M.D„ Assistant Profes,sor of Physical Traininc, and Director of the Water- 
man Gymnasium. 

John William Bradshaw, Ph,D,, Assistant Piofessor of Mathematics. 

Henry Allan Gleason, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany, Curator of the Phanerogamic Her- 
barium, and Director of the Botanical Garden. 

Albert Robinson Crittenden, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 

John Dieterle. B.D., A.M., Assistant Professor of German. 

William Gabb Smeaton, A.B,, Assistant Professor of General Chemistry, 

Frederick Stephen Breed, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Robert Wilhklm Hegner, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John Edwaro Emswileb., M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

John R. Brum«, A.M., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric, and University News Editor. 

Calvin Henry Kauffman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany, and Curator of the Cryptogamic 
Herbarium, 

George LeRov Jackson. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

HoBART HuRD WiLLARD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 



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Beverley Robinson. B.S„ Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

John Wili.iam Scroll, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German- 

Wauek Frkii Hunt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mineralogy, 

Neil Hooker Wcllcams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Richard Denncs Thall Hollistes, A.M., Assistant Professor of Oratory. 

Harry Hurd Atwell, B.S., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Joseph Raleigh Nelson, A.M., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

Charles Bruce Viebert, A.B., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

tHENRi Theodore Antoine de I.eng Hus, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Hot any. 

Alfred Ouchton Lee, M.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

WjLLLaM Alley Prayer, A.B., Assistant Professor of History-. 

WiLLARD T[Ti;3 Barbour, B. Litt., A.M.. LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Parish Storrs Lovejoy, Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Chablbs Horace Fessenden, M.K., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Harry George Raschbacher, B,S. {CE-J, Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Edward Larraeee Adams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Romance LangiiaEes. 

Irving Day Scoit, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiographieal Geology. 

Roy Wood Sellars, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Wilbur Ray Humphreys, A.M., Assistant Professoi of English. 

DEwm Henry Parkeh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Albert Easton White, A.B., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Anton Eriedrich Greiner, Dipl. Ing., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Alfked Henry Lovell, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

George William Dowrie, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 

Robert Treat Crane, LLB.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

William Frank Vehner, B..S., {M. E.), Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ferdinand Northrup Menefee, C.E., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Herbert Alden Kenyon, A.M., Assistant Professor of French and Spanish, 

Clyde Elton Love, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

George Rogers LaRue, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology and Honorary Curator of Parasitoli 

in the Museum. 
Alice Evans, A.B., Director of Physical Education in Barbour Gymnasium. 
tRENE Talamon, Licenci6-&s-Lettres, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 
Leigh Jahvis Young, A, B,, M.S. F., Assistant Professor of Forestry. 
Solomon Francis Gingerich, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
Albert Ross Bailey, A.B., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineeiing. 
tRALPH Robertson Mellon, B.S„ M.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Diagnosis, and Direc 

of the Hospital Chnical Laboratory in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 
Thomas J. Mackavanagh, B.S. (E.E.), Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Frank Richard Finch, Ph. B., Assistant Pnafessor of Descriprive Geometry and Drawing. 
George McDonald McConkey, B.A.E., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 
Frank Howard Stevens, B.S., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 
William Aloysius McLaughlin, A.B., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 
Theophil Henry Hlldebranut, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
William Daniel Moriarty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 
Hugh Brodie, C.F., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 
Clifton O'Neal Carey, C.E., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 
Charles Wilford Cook, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economic Geology. 



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John Howard Rowen, U.S.N. (Retired), Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ToMLiNSON Fort, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

William Fkederick Hauhart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

Harry Stevenson Sheppard, B.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

John Davison Rue, A.M., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Walter Francis Colby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

John J. Cox, B. S. (C.E.), Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Sidney Fiske Kimball, M. Arch,, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

John Airey, B.S., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Herbert Lester Abbott, B,S., Assistant Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. 

Walter Lucius Badger, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Arthur Edward Boak, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ancient History. 

Paul Henry DeKruif, B.S., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harley Harris Bartlett, A,B., Acting Assistant Professor of Botany, 

Felix Wladyslaw Pawlowski, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Joseph Joachim Albert Rousseau, Assistant Professor of Architecture. 



Officers of Administration 



Harry Burns Hlttchins. LL.D., President. 

Shirley Wheeler Smith, A.M., Secretary. 

Robert Alexander Campbell, Treasurer. 

Arthur Graham Hall, Ph.D., Registrar. 

MvBA Beach Jordan, A.B., Dean of Women. 

William Warner Bishop, A.M., Lihrarian. 

John Cornelius Christensen, B.S., Assistant Secretary and Purchasing Agent. 

James H. Marks, B. S. (M.E.), Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Howard Hastings Cummsngs, M.D., Chief Physician to the University Health Servia 

Elsie Seelve Pratt, B.LL., M.D., Physician to the University Health Service. 

Clyde Bruce Stouffer, M.D., Physician to the University Health Service, 

Charles Parmelee Drury, A.B., M.D., Physician to the University Health Service. 



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iGraduato 



Graduate School 

Alfred H. Lloyd, Ph.D., Dean 

THE first graduate student at the University is recorded in the catalogue of 1856. The degrees 
ofMBstetofArtsandMasterofSciencewereearliest conferred, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
being olTered for the litst time in 1876. Changes made in studies in 1877-78 had an important 
bearing on graduate work at the University. This wras due to the muitiphcation of electivea and the 
introduction of the credit system. The seminary method of instruction began rhen to assume consider- 
able proportions, and the movement was strengthened by a growing demand for better trained teachers. 
In the spring of 1892 the Graduate School was organized, but for many years it was little more than 
a bureau within the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Provision was thus made, however, 
for a more systematic and efficient administration of higher work, and, so far as possible, for the separate 
instruction of graduate students. Twenty years later in the fall of 1912 the School was reorganized, 
becoming a separate department, related on terms of equality to all the Colleges and Schools of the 
University. The management of the School is now vested in an Executive Board of nine, including 
the President of the University and the Dean of the School. 



J 



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Graduate School 



John A. Alhrick, A.B., M.S. 


Leigh G, Coopeh, A,B., A,M, 


HoRAcR J, Andrews, A.B. 


William H, Cottrille, Ph.B. 


Fi.oYD E. Armstrong, A.B. 


Arthur C. Cross. A.B. 


Margaretha Andrews. A.B., A.M. 


Lbland E, Grossman, A.B.. A.M. 


Frank H. Atkinson. A.B, 


IvanN. Cuthbert, B,E,E, 


Wavni; J. Atwell, A.B.. A.M. 


Kathleen Cutting, A.B, 


Shirley D. BABBnT, A.B. 


Harold M, Davidson, A,B. 


Walter L. Badger, B.A„ B,S., M.S. 


JamesE. D.wis.A.M., M.D. 


JohnJ. Bailey, .A.B. 


John J. De Boer, A.B. 


JohnW. Baldwin, A.B., A.M. 


PaulH. DeKruif. A.B. 


HuLDAH Bancroft, A.B. 


Elwood L. Demmon, A.B. 


Harry C. Barnett, A.B. 


George B. Denton, A.B., A.M. 


Herbert H. Bartleh-, B.C.E. 


William P. Dies, M.A. 


John W. Beach. A.B. 


Paul Dorweii er. B.S. 


Albert A. Bennett, A.B. 


Lena P. Duell. A.B. 


Wells I. Bennett, B. of Arch. 




Gordon A- Bergy, PH. C, B.S. 


Robert H. Easterbrooks, A.B. 


L-YNN S. Blakr, B.S- 


Arnold H. Eggbhth, A.B. 


Galo W. Blanco, B.S. 


GeorgeH, Ehlert, A.B. 


Gertrude V. Boouereider, B.A. 


Mary E, Elder. A.B., A.M. 


Frank L. Bolton, B.S. in C.E. 


OierbertW. Emerson. Ph.C. B.S. in M.D. 


Walter E. Bond, A.B. 


Arthur G. Erickson, A.B. 


Orlan W. Boston, B.M.E. 


Porter H. Evans, B-E.E. 


Etta A. Bowerman, A.B, 


Charles A. EvERETi, A.B. 


PeaRLK. BOWERM.AN, B.S.,A.B. 


Edwards. Everett. A.B, 


Charles W. Boyce, A.B. 


Carlotia B, Ewino, Ph,B. 


Grace M. Boyton, B.A. 




AiBEBT Bradley, B.C. 


Perry A, Fellows, B.S. in C.E. 


Reed 0. Brigham. M.S., B.S, 


Richard O. Eicken. A.M. 


Edgar C, Britton, A.B. 


Florence: E, Fielh, A.B, 


Carl R.Brown, A.B. 


Albert L, Pitch. A-B-, A.M. 


Robert E. Brown, A.B. 


Edwin H. Flkck. B, A, 


ZeltahP. Buck. A.B., M,A, 


Capen a, Fleming. A,H, 




VUE C. EONG, B.S, 


Welbur p. Calhoun, Ph.B„"A,M, 


Franklin E,EoRi>. A.B. 


Robert J, Cam ey, A.B. 


FredJ. Fricke. A,B,.A,M, 


NormanL. Carv, A.B. 


Chung C. Fu, B.M.E, 


George D. Casto, B.S. 


NoHER Furuya, A,B, 


La Che Chen, B.S. 




Le Fen Chen, B.C.E. 


FrelkbickM.Gaige, B,S, 


Ralph E. Christian, B.CE., M,S. 


Eli A. Gallup. A,B. 


Helen I- Clark, A,B. 


William V. Garhelson. B.S. 


Robert W. Clark, A.M. 


William M. German, A.B. 


Harold L. Coil, A.B. 


Cliffoni> C- Glover, Ph.C. B.S., M.S- 


George H, Colling wood, B.S. 


Emil C . Goethel, B.S„ B.CE. 


Allen C. Conger. B,S,, M.S, 


Franc's L.Goodrich. A.B. 


Pbill,pA,Coombe.A,B. 


Clarence B. Goshorn, A.B. 



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Margahrt F. Gouhi.e 



Enoch W. Hall, B.S. 

Robert W. Hamilton, A.B, 

Watson G. Harmon, B.S. 

Harry E. Hatcher, B.Pd., A.B„ B.S. 

Florence G. Haxton, A.B. 

William K. Head. B.S. 



N L. HE^ 
-EL Here 



;, A.B. 
:k, LL.B. 



Jose 


M. Hern/ 


INDB/, B.S. 


Geor 


OE W. He 


ss.A.B., A.M. 


Gark 


EiT Heyn 


s, A.B. 


How/ 


iRD H. Hicks, A.B. 


Will 


lAM C. Hi; 


RN, C.E. 


Lynne A. Hoag, A.B. 


Edw.. 


,RD M. HORRACH, A.B. 


Emil' 


t M. Hooper, Ph.B. 


Arth 


uR H. Hu 


ISKEN, B.S. 


Elme 


s S Jmes 


.A.B., A.M. 


Ray K. Immel, 


A.M. 


Walter N. Isb 


;ell. A.B. 


Will 


lAM F. ISE 


lELL, A.B. 


PaulW. Ivey, 


A.B., A.M. 


Will 


1AM H. Te 


LLEMA, A.B. 


Albert H.Jev 


^ELL, B.S. 


G/.:os 


GE H. JiL 


LSON, A.B. 


Alici 


I E. John; 


iON, A.B. 


SfAL 


E B. John 


SON, A.B. 


Walter E. Jo^ 


jiNv, B. ofCh.E. 



Jo. 
Am 



E N. Keai 
NE, A.B. 



, A.B. 



Y, A.B. 
A J. Kennedy, Jr., B.S. 
Russell D. Kilbomn, A.B. 
RachelE. King, A.B. 
Howard Kingslev, A.B. 
JohnR. Kneebone, A.B. 
Madge V. Kevels, A.B. 
William F. Koch, A.B., A.M. 
Walter N, Koelz, A.B. 
Frank F. Kolbe, A.B. 



Su C. Krook, B.S. 

Albert N. Laird, B.C.E. 
HowARP T. Lambert, B.A. 
Herbert H. Lamley, A.B. 
RobertT. Lane, A.B., M.A. 
Norman A. Lange. B.S. 
CarlD, LaRub, A.B. 
John S. Lathers, B.L. 
Edward H. Lauer, A.B. 
CarlornL. Legg,A.B., M.A. 
Charles F. Lester, B.S., B.C.S. 
Edward J. Leiber, B.S. 
Paul B. Line, B.S. 
Henry L. Low, B.Arch. E. 
Clinton A. Ludwig, B.S. A,, M.S. A. 
Alfred F. Lusky, A.M. 

Carl E. Macomber, B. of Arch. 
Ror K. McAlpine, A.B. 
Edward F. McCarthy, B.S. 
Howard McDonald, A.B., A.M. 
Frederick B. McKay, A.B. 
Cornelia H. McKnight, A.B. 
Ross H. McLean, A.B. 
LiNLEY H. McReynolds, A.B. 

Orin E, Madison, A.B. 

Edwin B. Mains, A.B. 

James H. Marks. B.S. in M.E. 

Alice L. Marsh, B.S. 

Phillip L. March, A.B. 

John E. Martin, A.B. 

Rose M. Meyer, A.B. 

Augusta Meiser, A.B. 

Lewis L.Mellor, A.B. 

Clarence L. Menser, A.B. 

Florence K. Middaugh, A.B. 

Frederick A. Middlebush, A.B., A.M. 

Harry A. Miller, A.B. 

Herman L. Miller, A.B. 

CarlMitcheltree, A.B. 

Frank C. Mock, E.E. 

Alphonse p. Momenee, A.B. 

Hortense a. Mueller, A.B. 

Floyd A. Nayler, B.S., M.S. 
JohnT. Naylon, B.Ch.E. 
Gur D. Newton, B.S. in M.E. 
Irby C. Nichols, B.S., M.A., M.S. 



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Peter O. Okkelbebg, A.B., M.A. 
Martin J. Orbeck,C.E. 

WiLMA ObLIN, B,S. 

Marguercte N. Parsons, A.B. 

Orin D. Parsons, E.E., B.A. 

Robert F. Paton, A.B. 

William A. Paton, A.B. 

Fred D. Patterson, A.B. 

Felix W. Parelowski, M.S. 

Orn B. Peake, B.Pd. 

Albert B. Peck, A.N. 

Nellce I,. Perkjns, A.B. 

Robert L. Perkins, Ph.C, B.S. 

Loujs M, Perrcn, B.S. 

James 0, Perrine, B.A. 

BenE. Perry, A.B. 

Fbedekick W, Peterson, A.B. 

Marion Peterson, A.B. 

Jessie Phelps, B.S., M.S. 

Benjamin H. Philo, A.B. 

Paul H. Pcper, A.B. 

Edward Ploenges, A.B. 

Enos H. Porter, B.Pd., A.B. 

Kick H. Porter, A.B. 

Alfred H. Povah, A.B. 

Bessie L. Priddv, Ph.B., A.M., A.B. 

RoyW. Pryer, M.S., Ph.C, B.S. 

Antonio P. Racelis, A.B., A.M. 
Theophile Raphael, A.B., A.M., 
Carl F. Raver, M.D., B.S. in Ch.E. 
William 0. Raymond, M.A., B.A. 
CoraD. Reeves. A,B. 
Florence L, Rennie, A.B. 
Alice E. Richard, M.A. 
Ura G, RicKERT, B.S., M.A. 
John P. Roberts, B.Ch.E. 
Beverly Robinson, B.S, 
Charles S. Robinson, A.B., M.S. 
Emma L. Rob son, A.B. 
Robert G. Rodkey, A.B., M.A. 
Howard D. Roelofs, A.B. 
JamesS. Rogers, A.B. 
Elcie C. Rolfe, A.B. 



Lee V. RoRiNG, A.B. 

Henrietta E. Rosenthal, A.B., A.M 

Grace A. Rotzel, A.B. 

Louis J. Rouse, A.M. 

Adolph M, Rovelstad, A.B.. A.M. 

John D. Rue, B.S„ M.A. 

SeldenRuger, B.A., M.A. 

George H. Ruhling, B.S. 

Carl P. Russell, A.B. 

Richard A, Rykenbon, B.S., M.S. 



Fi F. Sea 



■R, A.B 



Esther E. Shaw, A.B., A.M. 
Norman K. Sheppahd, B.CE. 
Porter A. Sherman, B.A. 
Earl C. Sherrard, M.S. 
Samuel J. Skinner, A.B. 
William W. Sleator, A.B., A.M. 
LeliaP. Smith, A.B. 
NedR. Smith, A.B., A.M. 
Ross H. Smith, A,B. 
AdaL. Shell, A,B.,A.M. 
Walter H. Sprac.ue, A.B., A.M. 
Bert A. Standerline, B.Ch.E. 
Ambrose H. Stang, C.E., A.M. 
Sadie G. Stoddard, A.B. 
Alvin Stickler, B.S., M.S. 
Abbie M. Sykes, B. S. 

CheeT. Tan, A.B. 
Elizabeth A. Thompson, A.B., A.P 
Cornelius Tiesenca, B.S. 
Elizabeth V. Toof, A.B., A.M. 
Lawrence J. Toomey, A.B. 
Gertrude Tenninga, A.B. 

Marguerite M. Ulrich, A.B. 

Mabel R. Van Fleck, A.B. 
Nathan E. Van Stone, M.S. 
Harry F. Vaughn, B.S., M.S. 
Frank C. Vi brans, A.B. 
Lugebrigh G. Volpen, B.S. 



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EvAtYNN H. Walker, B.A. 
Harry V. Warm, A.B., A.M. 
Clayton Ward, B.C.E. 
Carl C. Warden. I'h.B., M.D. 
Edwin O. Weaver, A.M. 
Hal C. Weaver, B.S. in M.E., E.E. 
Clakence M. Webster, A.B. 
Frederick W. Wick, A.M. 
Herman J. Weigaihd, A.B., A.M. 
Carl V. Wells, A.B.. M.D. 
Harold R, Wells, B.S. 
VolmeyH. Wells, A.B. 
Christian N. Wenger, A.B. 
Marshall A. Wheatley, A.B., A.M. 
Harold F. Whittaker, B.Ch.E, 



KaTHERINE J. WiEBER, A.B 

Albert E. Wieslander, B. 

HoRACeZ. WlLBER, A.B., A 
Arthur G. Williams, A.B. 

MiNA L. WlNSLOW, A.B. 

Ernest M. Wisdom, A.B. 
Anna L. Woessner, A.B. 
Joseph G. Wolber, A.B. 
Harold F. Wood, A.B., B.( 
Alvalyn E. Wood, Ph.B. 
Mark L. Worth, A.B. 
WiNTHRor K. Wright, A.B. 



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^"^-^r •. " ■■- - 



Holders of Fellowships 

1915-1916 

John A, Aldkich, A.B., M.S. . University Fellowship in Astronomy. 

Henry J. Bassett, A.B,, A.M. Buhl Classical Fellowship in Latin. 

Albert Bhaoiey, B.S. University Fellowship in Economics. 

Robert E. Brown, A.B. University Fellowship in Public Health. 

Zemah p. Buck, A.B., M.A. University Fellowship in Psychology. 

Ralph E. Christman, B.Ch.E., M.S. (Ens-) Acme White Lead and Color Works Fellowship. 

Philup a. Coombe, A.B. State College Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Leland E. Grossman, A,B., A.M. University Fellowship in History. 

John J. DeBoer, A.B. State College Fellowship in Philosophy. 

Lena P. Duell, A.B. University Fellowship in Psychology. 

Florence Field, A.B. State College Fellowship in Mathematics, 

Albert Fitch, A.B., A.M. State College Fellowship in Physics. 

F. Edwcn Ford, A.B. Paper Manufactures Fellowship in Chemical Engineering. 

Marguerite T. Gourley, A.B, Buhl Classical Fellowship in Latin. 

Howard H. Hicks, A.B. State College Fellowship in Rhetoric. 

William H. Jellema, A.B. Uniyersity Fellowship in Philosophy. 

Howard L. Kingsley, A.B. State College Fellowship in Education. 

Edward H. Lauer, A.B. University Fellowship in German. 

John T. Naylon, B.Ch.E. Gas Engineering Fellowship in Chemical Engineering. 

Irbv T. Nichols, B.S., M.A., M.S. University Fellowship in Mathematics, 

James O. Perrine, A.B. University Fellowship in Physics. 

Ben E, Pebby, A.B. Buhl Classical Fellowship in Greek. 

Benjamin H. Philo, A.B. State College Fellowship in History. 

Alice E. Richard, M.A, State College Fellowship in Education. 

M. Selden Ruger, A.B., M.A. University Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Bessie F. Seaver, A.B. State College Fellowship in Latin. 

Esther E. Shaw, A.B., A.M. University Fellowship in Rhetoric. 

Earl C. Sherrabd, M.S. University Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Ada L. F. Snell, A.B., A.M. University Fellowship in Rhetoric. 

Bert A. Stanuerline, B.Ch.E. Gas Engineering Fellowship in Chemical Engineering. 

Ambrose H. Stang, C.E,, M.S. University Fellowship in Physics. 

Lawrence J. Toomey, A.B. State College Fellowship in English. 

Nathan E. Van Stone, M.S. University Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Cabl C. Warden, Ph.B., M.D. Cholett C. Beach Fellowship in Bacteriolc^y. 

Harold F. Wood, A.B., B.Ch.E. Detroit Edison Company Fellowship in Chemical Engineerin 



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I T ■ 

^ LitQr ar \^ 



College of Literature, Science and Arts 

John Robert Effincek, Ph.D., Dean 

THE College has its origin in the original act passed by the Lcf^islatiirc which created the Uni- 
versity, commonly known its the "Organic Act," passed in 1837. Owing to many complications 
the University was not opened until September, 1841, with two professors, a librarian and 
sii students. The College was conducted along the conventional and traditional lines until 1852, 
which date marks the advent of Dr. Tappan and the passing of a new act by the Legislature granring 
the University much greater power. Until the year 18SS-S6, no electives were allowed and the degree 
given was A,B., but with the beginning of this year the seniors were allowed to elect one-third of their 
work. At this time the College gave three courses, Classical, Scientific and Latin-Sciencific, which 
led to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. In 1877 the College was entirely revised, and an English 
course was added, giving the degree of Bachelor of Letteis. The elective system had progressed so far 
by this time that fully one-half of the studies required for the bachelor's degree were elective. In 1901 
it was decided to give a single degree, that of Bachelor of Arts, and later this was modified so that 
students who had done a majority of their work in the sciences might receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Sciences if they so desired. In 1895 the technical work in engineering, which had hitherto been done 
in this College, was separated and the College of Engineering was created. In 1912 the work of the 
Graduate School which had been organized in 1892, was separated from this College, and the Regents 
created an independent Graduate School. In spite of these changes, the College of Literature, Science 
and the Arts has grown very rapidly and for the year 1915-1916 has an enrollment of more than 3,050 
students. 



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.'f^i 




David Friday 



W^ 



of his admirable qualitii 
the truth and nobility ■ 
senior Literary section. 



to address this last expressive effort of the Literary class of 
n who is beloved by that class. 

d confess failure did we not honor these pages with the name 
1, not only by us as an excellent teacher but by the judicious 
ty in his lield; he commands the tribute of our minds, 
ular and respected is not sufficient. It is with appreciation 
s as a man, and with gratitude that he has so borne witness to 
Fbich reside with him, that we respectfully dedicate this, the 

CO Professor David Friday. 



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^•- 







1916 Literary Class Officers 



M[R 



aHuBfi 



Howard Warner 
James Che not 

WllBER BrOTHERTO[ 

James Thomas 
Alfred Thompson 
Albert Gans 



Secretary 
Treasurer 
Football Manager 
Track Manager 
Baseball Manager 
Basketball Manager 
Oratorical Delegate 



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19 


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Ballentine Johnson 


MoriEK 


ROEHM 


Beaver 


Bastian Fox 


Wright 


Lowes 


Barrett 


1916 Literary Class Committees 


Clais Day 


Som'^nir 




Banqutt 


J. M- BARRETT 


D- R. Ballentine 




l.C Johnson 


E. D, Atwatek 


C. B. Crawfohii 




K. W. Vance 


RoBT. Bkcrge 


R. I.. Haskins 




C. C. Stone 


p. M, BOWEN 


H. L. Frost 




R. P. Stewart 


K. A. Cook 


H. W. Gaines 






A, H. Beyer 


K, C. Holmes 






H, W. PArTERSON 






A- H. Torre V 




Cap and Gown 
L. C. Relmann 




Geo. Murphy 


Memorial 




D. W. Jennings 


E. P. Wright 


J. M, Cork 




W. Broth erton 


W. A. P, John 


M. D. Ha^g 




B. G. Lambrecht 


A, R. Thompson 


E, Maguire 




H. Vanderveer 


F. 1.. Walters 


E. BOLEN 




F. E. Snyder 


L. E. RoYCE 


M.Calev 






E. M. Sahgeant 


E. L. Bury 




Auditing 


G. CCl-BARY 






M. M. Beaver 








C. E. UfER 


Sing 


C. E, Bastian 




Wm. A. Pearl 


U, S. Wilson 


E. W. BlSEEE 






H. W. Kerr 


P. V. RAMSDBI.L 






F. P. Surgenor 


M, H. Wilkinson 




Geo, B. Fox 


F. H. TiNSMAN 


J, Wenley 

A. I., VanDeusfn 




I. Hicks 


Reccplion 


R. Brown 




Socid 


P. C. LOVEJOY 






L. S. RoEHM 


A. I. Gans 
I. KiNSEY, Jr. 


FiM and Cam 

B. S. MOTTER 




B, M. COMPTON 




A- M. Bentley 


j, S. SwnzER 
S. L. Stanley 


H. M. BowcocK 




R. S. Collins 


R. M. McKean 




R. E. Krecer 


N. J. MacIntyre 
D. E. Sullivan 


W. M. Skafer 




H. Eiv 






C. B SlKES 


C. ORcurr 









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Senior Literary History 



WAY back in 1912 we opened our eyes on the University world, and proceeded to grow up in the 
peculiar way of our own which has marked us as Fortune's favorite and the chosen of the 
gods, "Sweet Sixteen" we were then, and during our four years we have not been embit- 
tered, but shall go forth with our gracious manner to make for ourselves in the world the same relative 
mark which we have established here. Our aim is not a low one, nor shall we, if supported by the same 
spirit which has been ours through our college days, fail in its achievement. 

May we characteriM our work as administrative and executive, and may we be permitted the priv- 
ilege of selecting examples to illustrate our claim from almost every activity in which a class in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan finds itself. If, in some line of work we have failed to make a worthy contribLition 
to progress, we shall readily admit our failure; but let us extenuate it by the old economic argument 
which we have all heard from Prof. Taylor, " If United States capital is more efficient economically while 
invested in manufacture, why should it be diverted into promoting the shipping industry". 

No member of our class has settled the question as to which, the Augustan or the Ciceronean age, 
excelled in its literary activity; nor has atiyone of us enlightened the world in regard to the fourth di- 
mension. We may have produced no famous scholastic lights, but that we are a steady, level-headed, 
serious, constructive set of students is attested by the fact that after several years of literary poverty, 
the University is to be enriched by the re-establishment of the Inlander. It is one of the proud achieve- 
ments of jhe class that it has been responsible for the fact that the University is again to have a literary 
magazine. 

Nor is it in the line of literary periodicals that the class has confined its efforts along constructive 
work in the pubhcations' field. From a circulation of about 1,000, The Gargoyle, edited by W. A. P. 
John, and "business managed" by Edward Maguire, has doubled its circulation. The team-work of 
these men has raised the book into the front rank of college comics, and the class of 1916 claims the credit 
for furnishing the men who did the constructive work. 

Passing from the publications' work into another field, the class of Sixteen is not without significant 
athletic figures. When the present senior lits leave college the track team will lose one of the best cap- 
tains it has ever had, and the only man who has twice captained it. For two years "Hal" Smith has 
been leading the Michigan cinder men, and has been leading the cinder men of other colleges for that 
matter. George Murphy, Joe Ufer, and George ¥ox are members of the two-mile relay team which has 
set a new mark for Michigan's runners, and which has equalled the world's indoor mark. "Stubby 
Walters on the track and cross country teams has been a man to be figured with at all times. 

In football the class has cut a significant figure with Koehm as the brains of Yost's 1916 machine. 
At quarter " Rummy" played throughout the year, and in previous years he had been with the squad. 
Lewis Reimann made one of Michigan's best players in the Harvard game in 1915, and it was only the 
hard knocks received in that year that prevented him from appearing in his senior year. Clyde Bastian 
has played in the backfield of three Yost elevens, and is the third contribution of the class to Michigan's 
football teams. 

In baseball the class has two claims to fame. Its first. Captain George Labadie, who has played 
three years in the outfield and is leading the Wolverines this year, the class must share, but full claim 
is laid upon Elmer Brandell, who is one of the most valuable men that Coach Lundgren has ever had, 
playing with ability in almost any position on the nine. 

Tennis for the past two years has been almost exclusively supported by the Sixteen Lits, who 
have had three of the four men on the team. Mack has for two years played on the team, and has 
once won the Ail-Comers tennis title. Crawford, captain of the team this year, is playing his second 
season, as well as Switzer, who was on the team in 1915. 

In the executive, no less than in the athletic and literary and scholastic lines of work, has the class 
distinguished itself. "Jack" Finkenstaedt saw the error of his ways, and turned Co the literary depart- 
ment in time to bring credit to it as manager of the track team. Boyd Compton served the football 
team in the same capacity, and if the list of managers is to be continued we may mention "Toots" Shafer, 
Ray Ballentine and "Jimmie" Thomas, who have at one time or another managed the musical clubs 
and interclass athletics. 



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Once in a while the class has turned frivolous and has managed to hold a paicy. Its greatest achieve- 
ment in this line was aiding in the reinstitution of the Junior Hop, which was again established as a re- 
suit of the activities of the classes of 1916. The good behavior enforced at this party so charmed that 
faculty that it has been allowed to remain. The Soph Prom, which was managed by W. A. P. John in 
a most able way, was one of the most successful parties ever held by the sophomores, and the usual Rood 
time was enjoyed by all. 

We haven't mentioned our women yet. It's not because we are ashamed of them. Indeed not! 
It is because they deserve a separate section all to themselves, and they shall have it. 

Of INTEREST TO WOMEN 

So many of the women in the class of 1916 stand out as one looks back over the four years just 
passed that it is hard to select the few, room for whose mention is available. From knowing the others 
well, however, we fear no jealousy and may go biavely on. 

Martha Gray, besides being one of our most proficient students, has had time to be women's editor 
of the Michigan Daily, and, among other things, to act as chairman of the Juniof Girls' play committee, 
and to write the major portion of the lyrics for the production. Ellen Sargeant has also been a busy 
woman, having directed her energies along musical lines. She has acted as president of the Glee club, 
and has written musical scores for several productions, and helped with others, among them being the 
Junior Gltls' play and the Shakespeare pageant. 

The Judiciary Council has been dignified by the presence on its roll of such names as: Grace Fletcher, 
Beatrice I-ambrechc, who was also vice-president of the Women's League, and Helen Humphreys, who 
is president of the Women's League. Besides being the most beautiful girl in the class. Gertrude Roos 
has found time to serve as class secretary, Eurnina over the honor to Miriam Hubbard, who is serving 
in that position in her senior year. 

Louise Potter has diverted enough of her attention from being popular to being senior class vice- 
president and to running high in the race for the best student job. Eleanor Stalker has written the Jun- 
ior Girls' play, and Marion Stowe has served as president of the Y.W.C.A. Grace Thomasma has been 
engaged in a worthy effort in social work, and has done much in the organization of affairs in Martha 
Cook dormitory. Her cleverness has stood her in good stead in helping her meet and solve the problems 
which she has Encountered there. 

There are others who deserve bouquets, and to whom we'd like to hand them, but they are so many 
that we can't name them. This will do for a sample. Haven't they a right to a section of their own? 

Our achievements, such as they are, and we like to flatter ourselves that they are extensive and 
beneficial, are not a mere flash in the pan. Our force is not a short, intense one. It is, we hope, a force 
which will strive for good and justice in the outside world, and if our conduct in the University be any 
criterion, we have just cause to hope that our end will be achieved. 



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Literary Seniors 

Anna O. Adair ^/nn ^rbor 

Geokge E. Adams Buchanan 

Edwin D. Alhendinger .... Comnifl 
Clus FootbHll (2| (3) (4) 

Tony E. Amtsbuechler . . . Trasirst City 
Sjgma Delta Kbikib; Alpha Nu; Commerce Club' 
■teuton" Club: Wrestling; ClaM FootbBU 

Cha9. E. Anderson Ironviood 

ChaS. W. AsDEHaoN Noncay 

James B. Ancell, II Detroit 

J. M. Arnof McCrary, Ark. 

ZeU Beta Tau 
Crarlei Cbask Ashbauoh . . . Detroit 



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Literary Seniors 

John C. Askam Findlay, 0. 

Hound Up 

Eahle D. Atwater Sketby 

Mildred A. Bacuers .... Fort Huron ' .. 
Pi Beta Phi; Cerde FtBnesie; Deutschot Voreln; OlrW 
Glee Club 

G. Roy Backus Sandusky 

Adelphi 

Arthur N. Bacon Toltdo, 0. , 

Phi Kapp* P«i; Band; Oper* 
Donald K. Bacoh . . . St. Paul, Minn. (; 
Fbi Rho aignn 

Felix S. Baer Chicaio, III. ■ 

Dniida 

Gerald V. Baker .... Union City i 
Lloyd Ross Ball . . Haaardrn, la. > 

Lambda Chi Alpha : 



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Literary Seniors 



Dffroi! 
! Clabi Daily 



David Raymond Ballentine . 
Delia Chi: Druids; Sphiui; CatniDei 
(2) ; MuBicat Clube Mtuuger (3) 14) 

Ruth G. Balsam ManisUt 

John B. Barker .... Minniapolis, Minn. 
Adelphi; CnaniDpoliliui Club; MinneBatH Club; 



RifbClub 
Julia Barksdal 



Pi Beta Pbi 



UoiooHou 



iComi 



Porlsmoulk, Fa. 
Coldwtiter 



Alice M. Barnard 
Deulacher ' 

James M. Barrett. Jr. . . Fort fVayne, Ind. 
Duly (2) (3): 



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■Clyde E. Bastian . . . tVilHamsport, Pa. 
A^ha Sigma PW; Micbigsmus; Griffiiu: Les Voy- 
MWira; Sphini; Penna. Htatt Club; Va™iy Foot- 
^i^'„">„l*)J,Va™ty T«.k,,3) |4|i.All Fr^h 



. Reid Cily 
Albxon, Ind. 



Marjorie F. Bates . 
Keith Wheeler Baughman 



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Literary Seniors 

Ruby E. Bawdeh PmnesdtUi 

Mblyin M. Beaver .... fort tVoyiK, Ind 

Delta Upidlon 

Fred H. Begole, Jr Marqtutu 

Ksppa Sigma , 

Amne L. Benjamin GranJ Raptdt 

KappH K&ppa Oomma 

MORELL BeNTLEV ...... OkBSSO 

TbsCs D«lEa Chi; CUh Trewnini {3}: ClUi Fodtball 
<3) C4) 

Bert I. Beverly Ann Arbor 

Adele H. Beyer . . , ' . . . DelroU 

Kathkvn Isabel Bierkahp . . Detroit 

DelU D«IU D^tB 
Elliot W. Bisbee . , Morttoun, Vermanl 

Pbl OuDDUt D«IU 



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Literary Seniors 


Margabet Graff Black . . 


. Induilry, III. 


S. Kexfobd Black . ... 


. . . Flint 


^•^s.^SiT^oi^aT^'-''^-^'' ^~^ 


HBI.BN V. Blaib 


. . ^nn Arbor 




Mortar Board; 


Frank L. Blood ..... Port Jtrvis, N. Y. 


Makoaret E. Boqenkiedeh 


Detroit 


I^u Delia Delta 




Ethelyn R. Bolen . . . 


BalUe Criik 


Gamsu Phi Bola 




CHAS. A. BOSWORTH . . . 


Poola, Kaujas 


PhiRh<.Si«ma 




Hakold M. Bdwcoch . . 


Springfield, lU. 


' Paul M. Bdwen , 


Detroit 


Alpha DdUFbi 





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Literary Seniors 

LvMan'C. BoVNTOM . :4rhtaiiilat0 

Herrmann E. Bozer . . Logainport, InJ 

Phi Beta Pi 

■';j MelviN' Bradker Poweri 

C. W. Brainard Battlf Critk 

.-' Phi Rho Signu; Mnlis BsdietbBll;' VftiMtf Band 

V Helen S. Bkander Kaiamaioo 

,,;" CoiioBBtH aorosis 

C. Beryl Brandstetter . . ■ Middtmlii 

,;., Huco E. Braun Sagmaw 

si Sifnu Alpha Epdlon ' 

;.:-. Rob't Bridge CkarUvotx 

;■■; EremilwClub 

' ,■ Treva E, Briggs . ■ , . ■ . Cedar Spring/ 



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Literary Seniors 

John Ror' Broken shire . . Paurttitiit, R. 1. 

Phi Gamma Dollft 
Edna E. Bromley Detroit 

Delta Delta Delta. 
Ki^x H. Bronson .... Livonia, N, Y. 
WiLtUR BrOtherton, Jr Detroit 

Ror 0. Brown DataiUe, III. 

'■ Kurtt Brown Ann Arbor 

A^ba Phi: Monac Board; Wyrern; Beflretarr of 

K. W. BuRDiCK rurin. N. Y. 

Ruth Oleas Burklev .... Ann Arbor 
EiTSER L. Bury . . . . Detroit 

Alphi Fhi; Mortar Baud 



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Geo. J. Busman Cooptrmllt 




-;V'LJ^V 


Phi Chi 


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Ronald A. Butlsr .^bb jlrbor 






ZiPifA,^ : 


Thet. DelU Chi 




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5 MAROUiRrrE Helen Calev . . . Upiir 


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Alpha Chi Odhkb: Qirl.- Oht Chib 




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Ella M. Campbell Ann Arbor 




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Wm. J. Campbell Ann Arbor 

Marjorie Carlisle Hoaeli 

Eaum Stftte Club 
Mildred Carpenter . . . Grand Rafidi 
J B^^'*** Sorods; Onwo Phii Wynmii MorUr 

1 Eber M. Carroll .... Ann Arbor 
James E. Chenot Detroit 


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Literary Seniors 

Aaron H. Chute Toledo, 0. 

Kenneth S- Clapp Albion, Ind. 

DeUs Tail Delta 
Harry B. Clawson .... Parkicood, Pa. 

Saoketl Club 
Arvilla R. Closser Cadedgnia 

MiRA Elimbeth Cobb .... Schoolcraji 
Girls' Glee Club 

Russell S. Collins Detroit 

Miohigwnua: Mimee; Sphini; Daily Staff (2); 
Oeneral Chaitman'e ConunitMc Union Owes (3) : 
Student Coundl ^ '' 

BoTO M. CoMPTON .... Daylon, O. 
Fhi Delta Theta; GriSne; DruitU; Spbiai: Vanity 
FootbiUl Manaier 

Albert D. Conkey .... Benton Harbor 

Esther A. Cook Toledo. 0. 

Kappa Alpha TbelA 



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Literary Sertidrs 

RuTGER H. CooLEY . . . . ; Ann Arbor 

Genevieve B. Corev .... Portlmd,. Mil 

Pi Beta Phi; CIbsb Baiketbill Muuuer (1); Girli' 

Glee Club {2) (3) (4) ; Gflrgoyle Stafl(Woi|wn'« Num- 

James M. COrk Ann Arbor ' 

Dmidsj M. 8. X. C. Club: CUh Basketball; BiiBebsU; 
Footbiil, CBpliun FootbaU (3) (1) , . 

Markjla Cornell .... Fdtpardaei Ind. 

Frank B. Cotner . . . ffajkingtonviUe, Ga. - 

Pi UpsloD Rho 

Glehn M. Coulter . . ChilUAangi), N. Y. 

Erenut«> . 

R. B. CowiN Mtsick 

Bertha Lees Cowley .... Calumit 

Ethel Crane St. Louis, Mo. 

Cbi OmegB 



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Literary Seniors 

(Carles B, CitAwroRD .... Fargo, N. D. 
(i^Clw Bukelbiai (3) 

G. B. Crawford Rosebush 

Margaret E, Crockett . litdianapolis, Ind. 
Kkppb Kitppm OBmma 

Wendell F. Crockett . Wdiluku, Mani, Hateaii 

Counqpolitui Club; Lyecum Club; Glee Hud Mon- 
dobn Club 

Daniel H Cronin jinn Arbor 

Rex B CuHLirFE Detroit 

Leon M. Cunningham .... Bay City 

Meroe CuRREr Detroit 

Frances Adelaide Cushing Warren, O. 



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Literary Seniors 


M. M. Day . . . 


Proexit^i, R I 


SipnaNu 




E. E. Daniels . . 


Cinilaid 


fflpnaCbi 




Bernhaiu) H. Dawson 


Miukafte, Okla 




aub 81(m> Xi 


Anna M. Deacon 


Ivaa 


Jean L. Diamond . 


Goiion, 


Linton B. Dimond 


St Jokn^ 


Siimi. Nui MhIubui Duly (4) 


A. A. DORRANCE . 


Coldaaler 


Si«m.Nu 




Helen Dow . . 


MuUand 



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Literary Seniors 

Ankabbl hf. DowLiNG .... BattU Crtek 
MuFhiEpalou 

Lancdoh E. Dovxe Ann Arbor 

UniTanity Symphony Oiduetra 
JoaBFK HoRAf^ DitAKE. Jr. . . . Ann Arbor 

Delt. ypiiJon 
Saluda C. Drenhcnc . Wathna, Kansas, 

Russell E. Driver , . . . . Racine, Wis. 

Henrv DuFFiELD Deiroil 

Harold M: Easle¥ . . . Detroit 

Union Opain (Z| (3) W: Ole« Hub (2> (3) (4) 

Gilbert S. Eeert Ga/ian, O. 

RuTM Elliott Deiroil 

DelU DelU Delta 



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Literary Seniors 

George M. Ellis Ann Jrbor 

Roberta Helen Ely . . . Tarrytount, N. Y. 

GwaiDB Phi Beta 

Pauline O. Emehson . . Alexandria, Ind. 

Comedy Club; Cknical Club 

Arvid W. Erlckson Ironaood 

PU Beu Pi 

Emma J. Erwin Oak Grme 

Anna L. Evans .... Birrien Springs 

L. S. Evans Delreit 

Alpha Phi Alptia 
Myrtle Henrietta Exley . . Hantock 
Laura Feige , ,.,■.. . Ann Arbor 

Alpha Clu Omegs; Mottar Board; Wyveni; Y. W. 

C. A. Cabinet 



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Literary Seniors 

Mark Ferrell Sedalia, Mo. 

Lambda Ctii Alpha; Vusitr Band; Oroheilia Unimi 

Paul L. Field Albion 

Pr«hiuii Baasball; Tnwk: U. of M. Band (3) (1) 

ErMINA G. FiLLINGHAM Holly 

Delta Delta Deltai DeutwibeT Vetein 

John W. Finkenstaedt Bay City 

Pn Uprilon; Micbicsmus; Triui^; Vanity Tnwk 
Manacer; Beeretary UnioD (4); Miraee 

Gertrude M. Fischer .... .^rii Arbor 

Etta Fisher Grand Rapiir 

Grace Fletcher Chelsia 

Delta Qammai Mortu Board 
William H. Fort, Jr. . . . Chicago, III. 

Geo. a. Fo33 Slurgij 

Monk^ DeutflVher Verein 



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Litl^tary Seniors 

DuKiirk, N. Y. 



John Foas 

Phi Beta Pi 

George B. Fok .... 

SiiDiB Alpha^EiHilon; Druidi: 



■r? 



--_jk Team (2)',, 

(2)(4):CiBMTraoltTBMi 

Ralph J. Frackleton 

Alfred Spauldinc Frii 

Delta Tau Delia 

Charles J. Frisbie . 

CiHmopoliUD Clu 

Edith C. Gabriel 
Helen L. B. Gage 

Alpha EpiiloD loU 

Honor W. Gaines 

Kappa Kappa Qamma 

Luella Gallmever . 

Chi Odm^ 



Wattrtoan, N. Y. 
Cram Ctnlntiy Team 



Traotni City- 



Owosso 
Wixem 

Ann Arbor 

Grand Rapids 



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Li t^fy Seniors 

Albbht K. Galloway . Washington, D. C. 

Albert J. Ganb Louisville, Ky. 

Vernice J. Garvin ' Ontonagon 

Alpha Cbi Omega 
Florence C, Gerber ..... Saginaw 

Earle W. Gibbs Sylvania, 6. 

Deborah McD. Gibson . . . Ann Arbor 

. Robert A. Gilmour ,..,.. Cdumtt 

Ralph J. Glkichauf . . RochnUr, N. Y. 

Delta Tail Delta 

Rat E. Glbichauf . . . Rocktsur. N. Y. 

Dslta Tau Delta; Union Opera (4) 



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Literary Sefttbrs 


Edward B. Ghahh . . 


Buriin^n, loua 


Harriett W. Goodrich 


Fort Atkinson, Wu. 


William H. Gordon 


. . 'Findlay, 0. 


Do[!CLAs A. Graham 


. . , Dttroit 


Martha C. Gray . . 


. . . Detroit 


Ravmond F. Grefe . 

Lm Voyage 


. Da Moinii, la. 


William A. Gressman 


. Pouuroy; Witih. 


Howard Griffith 

Sicioa Deltii Ksppa; 


.... S.«.««. 

Comnw™ Club 


William C. Griswold 


. . Akron, N, Y. 



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Literary Seniors 

RuBV Maubtt Hall DfxUr 

Sudor Sooiaty; Honors ia indoor athletia Fmb- 

Jo». M, Hamilton .... Senickliy, Pa. 
Bignu Chi; Commerce Club 

Jay Eaton Hanna Detroit 

SicmaNu 

Bernicb M. Hakkan Aan Arbor 

Daniel J. Haiuuson Adrian 

D. C. HASKELt .... Arcade, N. Y. 

' Ralfh Lincoln Haskihs Detroit 

DelU Ksppi Epnloa 
Herbbrt p. Hayden .... Detroit 

Clui Football <4) 
ALftlA Heffelbowek .... Laptif 
anon Alliba lotn: Deutslhsr Verein; QuIa' G1« 



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Literary. Seniors 

John A. Heist Chicago, 111. 

Harold E. Held Jiron, O. 

Victor H. Herbert Detroit 

Aktenaton; Mich, Daily: Union Opera (2) 

Geo. R. Herrmann .... Fort fFayni, Jnd. 

Phi Rho BigiDH 

Isabel Hicks Alpena 

GuiuiiR phi Bets; Wyvem 
Gertrude Hills .... Thret Rivers 

Wm. Hilzincer Royal Oak 

Geo. Maxwell Hoak . Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
Seth G. Hobart . . Friendshif, N. Y. 



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Literary Seniors 

Kathlyn C. Holmes _ DdroU 

WiLLARD H, Holt ,.,,.. Ironwood 
Wilson C. Homer Dttroit 

Phoenix Oub 

Jennie E. Hooper Iskpetning 

Henry S, Hosmer Jackson 

Pao H. Hsu ... . Kin-Kiang. China 

David I. Hubar Dnroii 

Miriam Huebard . East jjwora, N. Y 

CdlLsEiate Soroeia; Stylua^ Omega Phi; Masquee: 
ClsM Becretary (4) 

Jean M. Hughes .... Jnn Arbor 







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Literary Seniors 



Henry Hunderman . 
VrvA Ella Hunawill 
Waldo Russell Hum 



. fan Wirt, 0. 

. Grand Rapids 
Ann Arbor 



George F. Hurlev , 

Phi Alpha TMla; Oral 

Ruth Hutzel 

Kappa Kappa QaDinu 

Dorothy B. Inglis . 
DwiGHT W. Jennings 



Chicago, III. 

rical Delegate 

Ann Arbot 



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Literary Seniors 

W. A, P. John Ann Arbor 

SiciDB Delta CU; Griffins; Mimee; ToaatmBstEis; 
DniidBi Mioh. Duly (l); Gargoyle (2), Manngini! 
Edit™ (3) (i); Coauthor "Tree Rouge'- 

Irwin Chester Johnson . , . , Detroit 
Sienis Deltn Chi: Druidgj ToUm; Michigan Daily; 
CoemopDlitui Student; Treasurer Y, M. C. A. (31 

L. C. Johnson . - . . South Bind, Ind. 

Granville D. Jones . . Columbus Grovt, 0. 

Walter E, Jotter Monroe, 0. 

FoTMtry Club 

T. W, Kelly Cadillae 

Blanche C, Kerns Saginaw 

James A. Kerns Mason 

Makguerite Sarin Kerns , . Mason 
M, a, N. C, Club; Stylu. 






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Literary Seniprs 

Harry W. Kerr ZVlfsU 

Kgma Phi; Mimes; Dniids 

Margaret O. Kilby Marjkalt 

Isaac Kinsev, Jr 7"oWo, 0. 

Pei Upsilon 

Ethel Loucse Knights Decatur 

Emma E. Knoefp .... Piiisburg, Pa. 

Reva Koon Boulder, Colo. 

Mu Ftii Epnton 
Ruth E. Kheger .... !VyandoUe 
Beatrice G. Lambrecht Minneapolis, Minn. 
K»pp8 Alpha Thets: Mortur Board; Wyvera; 
Vice-Prendent of Women's League 

Herbert C. Lance .... Dayton, 0. 
Alpba Tau Omexa 






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Literary Seniors 








Martin F. La no worthy 




La«>dt 






Gladys Louise Laufman 




Hilhdalc 






William M. Laux 




. Riesi 






Donald E. Lawrence . 




Hudson 






Abraham Jacob Levin . 

ppoaident Michigm 


a MenorKh Soci 


Detroit 






Ida Mae Lewis . . 




ColdwaUr 


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Delta D=lU Del 


to; Wyyern 












F.^ran^h^ 


■.'>• ■ ' 


Lillian Lindner . . 


. . Abcrdien, Wash. 


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Alice C. Lloyd . . 




Ann Arbor 


Mf-l 










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Po Shue Lo 

Ralph Robert Lounsbury 



6. L. Love JOY 
Philip C. Loveji 



New EniUnd Club: ISiecutive 8«c, Biurah (Z) (3) 

(4):Y,M?^C, A. MobiUistion (3); Full Work (2) (3); 

^" ~ " ■■ C. A. (1): Employment Sec. (3) 

^oluDtwr Buid (3); DepuUUoQ 



,-l (3) 



Sec. Y. M, C. A, (4 

Chas, p. Lowes 

Harry G.LuNDGREN. - . 

Phi Beta H 

Katuerine MacBride . . 
Helen C. MacDonald 

Sadie MacFarland . . . B 



Grand Rapids 
Ironwood 



. Ann Arbor 
Bay City 



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Literary Seniors 

Nbsa MacInttre Bmilt Creek 

'KvpiA Kappa Gaiama 

Christian Mack Ann Jrbor 

. P« UpmIqq; FreahniaD TenniB Team, Vowty TeniiiB 
- Tewo (3) 

Edw. Maguire Detroit 

DeltB Kapptt EpoiLdD 

Byron W, Malfhoid Houghton 

Alpha Sigma 
Arthur G. MarkhaM Saginaw 

ClemKnt H. Marshall , . GrtenvilU, 0. 

Delta UpailoD 
Samuel W. McAllister . Conneaui, 0. 

Pearl Julia McCain .... Jnn Arbor 

Dudley McCliike . . . Fori Wayne, M. 



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Fledia Geiace McCreery . . . : Jnn Arbot 

Helen R. McDonald ..... Deirail 

Chi Omega. Girle' Glee Club 

James Hugh McKean Hartford- 



IS Chi 



Richard M. McKea 
Elda Mae McKee 



DllT 



Eahl B. McKlNLEY , 



Porter McMahon . Detroit 

Pri UpaJlon 
M. McRae .... Houghton 



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Madge F, Mead Dfiroit 

Ruth E, Meakin Detroit 

Esther MEtLENCAMP , -. Gran Laki 

Catherine Merseheau La Grange, lit. 

Kappa Kai^a Gamma 

Wm. F. Michalskie CUvdand. 0. 

Mary D. Miller Ann Arbor 

Ruth Dorothea Miller . . Ann Arbor 

Donald M. Morrill Big Rapids 

Aubrey C. Morrison SaUm, IP. Fa. 



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FcNLEY Austin Morrison . 
H. E. Morse . 



Club 



Iron RatT 
Ddhn Mont 



Ksppa Beta Fai 
Benjamin S. Motter . Lima 

George Murphv .... Harbor Beach 

SigmB Chi; Druids; Sphinn; Track Tmm (2) (4) Glee 
Club (3) (4) 

Maynard a. NoRRia Fo tona 
Hermitage. AlchemiatB 

Emily Frances Northrup Ponliac 

Alpha Chi Omeri 

Katherine Ocobock South Hasien Mtss 

William E. Olds , . Elk Rapids 

Genevieve E. O'Leaby . inn 4rbo 






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Constance Orcutt Kalamazoo 

Qsmma Phi BeU; DeuMcher Verein 

C. RuFus OsBORN Tekonsha 

Leon D. Ostrander ... St. Thomas, Ont. 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Canadian Club; Class FootbKll; 

BBsketball 

Albert B. Parfet Golden, Colo. 

SiKina Chi 

Boyd T. Park ... Salt Lake City, Utah 

Psi Up«ton 

Rodney A, Parker .... Cleveland, 0. 

^rele Ftanoais (3), Treaaurer (4| ; Acolytes: Glee 

Helen Patterson .... Portland, Me. 

Pi Beta Phi 
Marion LeRoy Payne , . , . Saginate 
Delia Oamma; Wyvern 

Maud Payne Ditroit 



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WcLLiAM A. Pearl St. Jokni 

Walter H. Pielemeier CUsfa 

Leila L. Pike Tracersi CUy 

N. Earl Pinnev Ann Arbor 

Griffins: AcDiytee; Dniids; Delta Kgma Rha; AdelpU; 
University Pen™ Oimtor (3) ; Vanity DoWte (« : Vi» 
P™. Y. M. C. a. (3); TreM. Orstoriiid An'n (4); 

Bessie Platto Iskptming 

J. Wilbur Poe Ypsilanti 

Elder A. Porter . . . Greensburg, Ind. 

Louise Potter Hastings 

ColleeiBte Soroids; Mortar^BoBrd^ Wyrsni: Viee- 

Sena Potter Lansing 



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Phvllis Seely Povah 




. . DttToil 


Collegiste ao™b 




Flohkncb H Powers 




Grand Rap,ds 


Behtka C Pulford 




Dftroit 


Alpha Ph. MortB 


J Board n 


yvtrn 


Leila Quirt 




he Rxrsr 


PaulV Ramsdell 




4lin Arbor 


Free WeaLeyan Guild (4> Adekihi H 
HOUti^es ChairmsD Busrah rtmipB 
gan Duly (« Sop Lnu Y M C 
DebatiDg Tesm (4; DeHn Bigma 1th j 


ou»e ol Repre- 
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A (2) Vsreity 


Lerov D Randall 




hfV^-iorkCM-^ 


dent &r 


mop^Ltan Mu 


Albert W Rankin 




St Clan 


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Catherine M Rega 




Ann irbor 


Lewis C Reimann 




ho-n Rxiir 


GunmB Eta GuDm. 


President ' 


■ MCA 



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Literary Seniors 

Karl Reni , ToUdo.O. 

Sigma Delia Kappa; Commerce Club 
Lewis G, Reutter Laming 

Paul H. Reynolds Dundti 

Phoeni.. ForeBtry Oub 

L. Frayne Richardson Nmbirry 

JosEPU ScHOBEB RicHTiG Iron Movittain 

Carleton Palmer Ritchie Paiadtna, Caiif, 

Glee CLubi Hawaiian QuinWtte 
Standish W. Robinson . . Grand Rapidi 

Juan Rodkiguei . Manati, Porlo RUo 

CoBinDpolitan Club 
Lawrence S. Roehm .... Diiroii 
CU Psi: GriffinB; Dnude; OwIb; Sphin»i Vanity 
Football (4) 



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Literary Seniors 

IsABELLE E. RoNAN '. Marshall 

Gertkude W. Roos Maniiiique 

Samuel E. Rosenfieid Akron, O. 

David T. Rosenthal . . E. Chicago, Ind. 
Nellie L. Rosewarnk ...... Dicaiur 

Chi Omega; Om«ga Phi; Junior Fl&y (3> 
C. Howard Ross . . Troy, O. 

Stanford J. Rothschild Baltimore, Md. 

Leola E. Rotce .... Sault Su. Marie 

Pi Beta Plii 
Leslie H, Rushbrook East Aurora, N. Y. 



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Henrv Ray Russei 
LoL\ Ryan 



Royal Oak 
inn Arbof 



EmCLIE GlEASON bARCENT f oldosui, Ga 

Senior Societt Mortar Board Q rts Glee Club Com 
edi Club 

M H Saur Ktntdly 

Herbert N Schmitt GranJ Rapids 

Grand Bapids Club Vuritj Glee Club (2) (3) (« 

Edna Lorene Schumacher Ann Arbor 

Deutmtaec Varan 

Emilie C Schwartz Detroit 

Delta DelU Delta 

Orrin G Server Ypsilenh 



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Literary Seniors 

V; Freda Siigwortb . . UckinepilU. Pa. 

ClBsiioBl Club; Deulschor Veiein 
Ruth L. Senff Detroit 

Helen Forsyth Service .... Detroit 
ColleKiate Soroaifl 

Wii-aoN M, Shafer . . . , BrockpoTt,N. Y. 
Fn UpsiloD', Sphini^ Student Council (3) (4); Clses 
FoptbHlI (8) (4): Asst. MBOager MumckI Clubs (2) 

Ora E. Smarpe ^nn Arbor 

John A. Sheidon Plaitanell 

Caleb Glen Shipley . . Peuriburg, III. 

Sign^ Ku; CoDwdy Ciub 

Charlotte Sttes .... fort Wayne, Ind. 

r>f Its GwDms ; Mortar Board 

Harold L. Smith Detroit 

Alpha E>elta Phi 



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J. Harold Smitii . . 

Mgr. Medio FootbaU Team 
Bs^ecball (I) 

Lloyd Smith .... 

Florence E. Snyder 

Ctii Omega; Omega Phi; Mf 

Jessie I. Spence .... 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Mortar 
acher Veroin; Vice-Presidt 

Mary Ethel Spencer 

Kappa Alpba Thete 
Ruth M. Spencer 
Haryey H. Sprick 



. Marqutttt 

ChMrchilU, N. Y. 



Board; Wyvem; Deut- 
W. C. A. 

Champaign, III. 






Delta 
Stalker . . Dtlroit 

Delta OammB; Comedy Clob; Btylu.; WyVem; 



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Lester C. Staudt . . , 


Nanilowoc, WU. 






ft us SELL Bangs Stearns . , 


MU«;a^kei, Wis. 


Delta KBPP3 Epailg 




Ben T. Steers 


Kdamazoo 


E. Hazel Stevens .... 


Saiill Sli. Marie 


Jane D. Stevenson 


Richmond, Ind. 


Alptu Epsloo lou 




Margaret N. Stewart . . 


. . Delroil 


Robert Pearce Stewart . 


. . Saginaw 


TheU DelU Chi 




Wm. D. Stinsoh . . . 


Ml. A'-rrnon, Ind. 


CLirroRD C. Stone . . . 


Bmon Harbor 



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Literary Seniors 

Chas. E. Stone St. Joseph 

Bessie Stonerock Atligan 

Marion Franklin Stowe .... Ann Arbor 
Delta Delta Delta; Mortoi Boaid; Wyvero; Maaquea: . 

Marjorie M. Stowell St. Johns 

Virginia Straughn Ann Arbor 

Secretary, Clerical Club 
Norma S. Strou Detroit 

LuciLK Strong Detroit 

Lyceum, Michigui Dames; OratDricBl Play 1913; 
Juoior Gills' Flay 1913 

Victor H. Sugar . . .^ .. . Detroit 
Adelphi Houie of Repreeentatives: Delta Sigma 
Rho: Varsity Debating Team (3) 

Donna E. Sullivan Jaciion 



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Mabie G. Sullivan ...... M«sl/c£on 

ThetB Phi Alpha 
Margaret L. Sufe , . , . SavU Su, Marie 
F. Porter Surcenor. . . Rochsttr, N. Y. 

ChiPsi 

John S. Switier .... Ttxaj City. Tixas 
Harold L. Tanpv .... Gtwdatr, Mass. 

James W. Thomas Detroit 

Delta Theta Phi: Spluni^ Baseball Manager (4) 

Ruth Thomas Decatur 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Grace Thdmasma Grand Rapids 

Alfred Ross Thompson Rensselaer, Ind. 

Sigma Phi; Buketball Mgr. (41 



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J William Alexander T[N9LEV BarbouriiUi, Ky. 
FitEDeHicK Homer Tinsman Jnn Arbor 

Delta Ipmlon; Uoicm Danoe ConunitM*; CIm. Foot- 

btOI (4) Musical Clubs (3) (4J 

SoT^RO ToKUYAMA Shidoioka, Japan 

CoeinopoUtan Club: Nippon Club 

Tom L Tolan Irvmoood 

Clifford M, Toohv _Leilie 



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Arthur H. Torrev . Ckicato, III. 

s;^DruidB; Daily (2) (3); Union 
eau (4): Cbairrnaa InvilAtion 



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RtLLA R. Trathgn 

EUGEHB F, TrAVB 

Ruth C. Trombley . 



Highland Park 
Duiuque, loioa 
Bay City, Mick. 



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Ehba Thvsell 



Helen Tuthill Deimit 

GBmrnaPhiBelB; Omega Phi; MoctBr Board; Wyvem 
M. Muriel Tyson .... Flora D<Ue, Pa. 

KappH Alpha Theta: Omega Phi: Stylus 
Clarence E. Ufer .... Chicago, lit. 

SiimaNu 

Mathilda Florence Ulenburo Fraier 

Junior Basketball; Deutaober Veieln 

Kenneth W. Vance Erk, Pa. 

Phi Gamma Delia 
Marie Van deh Karr .... (koasso 



.iir 



Club Flay, BuainaH Man 

Helen Vanderveer , . , Milford, l«d. 



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L. E. Vanderzalm 

Arcs Van Deusbn 
Delta Delu Delta; Miuquca: Md 
Girle' Glee Club (21 (3) ; 1^««. 'i 

Hugo Wacenseil 

Elbridgb R. Waite . 

NswEngL 

Dorothy Waiker 

Glee) 

R. V, Walker . . 

NuSp 

Mary E. Walsh . . 

Thetft I%i Alpha; 

Frank L. Walters . 
Wm. H. Wanieck 



Port //iiron 
Portland, Me. 

Schoolcraft 

. . DelToil 

. Ml. Pleasant 

Lansiif 



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Dora E. Ware Kansas City, Mo. 

Howard M. Warner . Fatminglon 

Blanche C. Washbuhne .... Ann Arbor 
Erwin W. Weber Dilroil 

Catherine D. Wenley .... Ann Arbor 
CoUepals Sorocu; MortBt Boards Wyvern; Girls' 
Gfee Club: MmqucB 

Jemima V. Wenlev Ann Arbor 



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Literary Semor.s 



Erwin K. W[ld' jinn Arbor 

Sufah, N. Y. 

Robert E. Williamson . Fott Ifayne, Ind. 



KissicK Wilson . , Ann Arbor 

U. Stanley Wilson Hanostr 

Leader of U. of M. Qiao Club (4) ; Member Vanity 
QuHitetu {i) 

LtstiE W. WiSHAKD . . . Lihiu Hau/aii 
PU Delta Thets 



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Edmund D Wood Hastings 

FRAt(K A Wood MaikcHon 

Edward Pultenei Wright Detroit 

Delta Ksppa £:p«loD 

Myrtle Young Ann Arbor 

Marie H Zeigbr Niagofa Falls, N. Y. 

Ksppa Alpha Theta 

' '"NExnE Zdble .... Butte, Mont. 



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Senior Literary Statistics 

EFORE entering upon its annual farce, time-honored through its previous patronage by si 
:he class of 1916 elected Professor David Friday the man above all others In thelitf 
'horn if wished its section of Michigan's year book dedicated. 



Having disposed of its serious business the class went ahead in the annual revel, which in previous 
year has been a burlesque of its members. The staid seniors of the class of "Sweet Sixteen," looking 
upon this task as one to be well accomplished, and no less conscientiously done than any other it had 
attempted and completed, went ahead in spite of the travesty which had formerly been made of the in- 
stitution, and cast an honest ballot on those men and women who were to be honored with the titles 
of "sportiest guy" and "prettiest girl." 

No course seemed to have done the members of the class much good, and the ballot was a close one. 
Accounting leading with a margin of but one vote over Htridily in the contest for the most beneficial 
course. Maybe so many courses had proved of such great benefit that the members of the class had 
difSculty in determining what one should receive the credit. At any rate every course, from "Dr. May's 
gym" to Calculus, ran third, there being several more courses in the tie for that place than there are 

The next two problems were more easily solved by the voters, Crcolke LhUning won the race for 
the biggest snap course in a walk-away, having a wide margin over its nearest rival, Malkematici 52. 
Fine Arts I easily took the palm in the ballot on the most enjoyable course, while Business Organizalion 
and ManagimenX ran second. Again there was a big scramble for third place, eighteen being in a dead 
lock for the position of third most popular course. Some candidate for P. B. K, even went so far as to 
affirm that he enjoyed "any philosophy course," and another man who loves hard work admitted to 
enjoying Corporations. 

Having given the faculty all its ideas on the curriculum, the class proceeded to the elecrion of its 
most popular member. Here was a clash of brains and brawn! Here was the last stand of the athlete 
against the administrator, and our class presidenr won the race by a narrow margin over the quarter- 
back of the football team. Close on the heels of this pair were George McMahon and W. A. P. John, 
arid no other man in the class was popular with anybody. In spite of the close race run between the two 
high men it is gratifying to see that they were worthy of the number of votes thpy each received, "Jim- 
mie" Angell and "Rummy" Roehm srill speak when they meet on the street!- All credit to them for 
concealing the hard feelings of jealousy which we know must be cheits. 

Our vice-president, aside from being the only woman to receive a vote for every position of honor 
open to women in the class, and a few designed for men, proved that she was worthy her title by being 
unanimously elected the most popular girl. Beggin' your pardon — unanimously except one. Dean 
Myra B, Jordan being the other giri in the race for this place. 

There was a lot of hard feeling developed in the class in the lobbying for the next candidate, 
but after three recounts of the ballots Robert Curley Bob Turner was declared to be the hand- 
somest man in the class. The ballot which won him the honor affirmed that he was the prettiest 
man, but Robert deserves all the credit for a well directed campaign just the same. W. A. P. John also 
received a vote, so did George McMahon and "Trig" Torrey, 

Chase Ashbaugh, that Paderewski of the mandola and guitar, won the distinction of being the man 
who thought he was the handsomest devil amongst all the galaxy of handsome Satans in the class of 
Lit '16. Harry Kerr was close, and "Doug" Graham, who for eight semesters has so nobly represented 
the class on the Oratorical board, was also in the race, W. A. P, John received a vote, too. 

The purely aesthetic next occupied the members of the class who were present at the memorable 



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Senior Literary Statistics — Continued 



d Gertrude Roos was elected the prettiest girl. Phyllis Povah, 
: Sites also ran. 

J The brain which had defeated the brawn ir the race for most popular man. suffered defeat at the 

I hands of more brain in the race for best student, and "Bill" Pear! beat out "Jimmie" Angcll for the job 

i of best student. This was one of the places where the vice-president invaded territory traditionally 

! reserved for men, nor was she alone on hostile ground. Martha Gray was there with her, even ahead 

'i of her. A fellow by the name of W, A. P, John received a bailor for the position. 

) Ray Gleichauf and Douglas Graham ran a dead heat in the finals in the biggest grind race, with 

5 Roebm, Cans and Duffield taking what dishonor there was left. John R. Brokenshire was looked upon 

i as a dark horse, but he failed to place in the money. 

5 By far the most prominent man in the competition for all of the positions was Mr. John, He alone 

t had the distinction of being the only man to receive a vote for every office, honor, and disgrace which 

■ it was in the power of the class to confer by ballot. To him alone goes the credit for holding two posi- 

tions of trust at the hands of his class-mates, who in one and the same day elected that gentleman to 
the office of most successful blutFer and shrewdest politician. 

Nobody except Sarah Stanley, Ruth Kreger and Ethylen Bolen argued with Honor Gaines for the 
title of joiliest girl, but even the good work of these young women in the jollying line went for naught 
before the ability which the latter seemed to possess, and the first three named had to be content with 
a tie for second place, and the distinction of being jollier than most of the class's women. The joiliest 
is Honor Gaines. 

"Pete" Surgenor just missed out on being the spottiest guy in the class, but he contented himself 
with the laurels of the biggest fusser and let Harry Kerr and Stan Robinson share the distinction of being 
that type of gentleman in the class of 1916 which most resembles the sportiest guy conceivable. The 
gentlemen appreciated the honot and let "Cap" Murphy and " Doug" Graham come in for a little of 
the credit. "Joe" Gans won the honor of being the man who thought he was the sportiest guy. No- 
body disputed his title. 

Declate the banns and sttike up Mr. Mendelssohn's tune! "Cab" Bentley and Helen Paterson each 
won first place in their own class for the first person to get married. It is prophetic! 

How did you fare? The author, although he was overlooked in the ballot, feels sure that he will 
receive sufficient attentmn after the results of the elections meet the public eye. "The pity of it!' 



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Colleges of Engineering and Architecture 

MoRTiMtR Elwvn Cooley, M.E., LL.D., D.E., Dean 

I Act of 1837 provided that Engineering should be one of the departit 

But it was not until 1853-54 that the first professorin this branch was appointed, 
s of two men being graduated with the degree of Civil Engineer in 1860. Achairof 
Military Engineeringwas established June 27, 1861, instruction being given in the springof 1862,hutwas 
abandoned in 1869. A School of Mines was established in 1865, and the degree of Mining Engineer con- 
ferred for the first time in 1867. To Professor DeVolson Wood is due largely the credit for those early 
ventures of the University into new fields of engineering. Professor Wood resigned in 1872 to accept 
3 chair in Stevens Institute of Technology, founded in 1870. The Legislature of 1875 appropriated 
money for a School of Mines; that year William H. Pettee was appointed Professor of Mining Engineer- 
ing. The same act provided for a chair of architecture and design; and Mr. W. L. B. Jenney was ap- 
pointed to that chair March 39, 1876. In 1877 the necessary appropriation for the conrinuance of the 
work in mining and in architecture was not made. Professor Pettee resigned, and was reappointed Pro- 
fessor of Geology in charge of Mining Engineering. In this way occasional degrees in mining engineer- 
ing were conferred, the last in 1896. 

Engineering was taught in the Literary College until 1895, then was made a separate department 
with Professor Charles E. Greene as Dean. Following his death in 1903, the present Dean was appointed 
in February, 1904, together with Professor Joseph B. Davis as Associate Dean. Professor Davis resigned 
his office in 1908, and Professor William H. Butts took his place as Assistant Dean. 

Architecture was reestablished in 1905, being assigned to the Department of Engineering during 
its development period. Professor Emil Lorch, head of Architecture, performs the duties of Assistant 
Dean for architectural students, but the Dean and Secretary continue to serve for both departments. In 
January, 1915, the title of the Departments was changed to the present ritle. Colleges of Engineering 
and Architecture. 

Mechanical Engineering was reestablished in 1881; followed by entirely new branches: — Electrical 
Engineering in 1889, Chemical Engineering in 1898 and Marine Engineering in 1900. 

The degrees conferred on graduation until 1881 were Civil and Mining Engineer, But since then 
the bachelor's degree has been used, the professional degree being conferred only as a higher degree. 
Beginning with and after Commencement, 1916, Bachelor of Science in Engineering will be conferred 
on all engineering graduates, and Bachelor of Science in Architecture on all graduates in Architecture. 
But the legend of the diploma will contain a reference to the course of study pursued. 



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Profe d h d f he Department of Civil Engineeiing, a civil and consult- 

ing engin 1 gn d bility, he is a man with a breadth of view, a sense of humor 

and an und and ng f m n and motives that endear him not alone to his own students 
hut to all wh m a I knew him," He has so imbued the department of which he is 
head with he p ti of mple friendliness and cooperation between faculty and students 
that he has in reality made of it a fraternal organisation. 



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1916 Engineering Class Officers 

Howard H. Phillips President 

John B. BreYMANN, Jr Vice-President 

TuoMAS C. Tkelfa Secretary 

Anson H. KeeleR Treasurer 

Edward C. Headman Football Manager 

William P. Wickham Baseball Manager 

Howard Manwaring Basketball Manager 

John K. Norton Track Manager 

Lyndall E. Hughes Oratorical Delegate 



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Watson 


Headman Warner 


Steen Co 


Mack 


BuELL H. Smith 


G. Smith W 




1916 Engineering Class Committees 


Auiitins 


Puluti 


Senior Recepti 


J. M. Brown 


L. E. WiLCOXEN 


C. P. Harris 


W. A. Reichle 


C. R. Daugherty 


C. S, Bloomshield 


J, D. Toui. 


C. BOTTJE 


H. H. Perry 




H. E. Barrett 


R. G. McAndhew 


Banquet 




G. H. Sandenburc 


H, C. BUELL 


Memorial 




p. E. Bond 


F. T. Mack 


Senior Sing 


R. E. Bement 


A. A. Burr ELL 


E. C. Headman 


J. W. Robinson 


M. A. DelValle 


E. F. Brucker 


R. A. Hall 


P. C, Wagner 


H. HUMISTON 




R. E. Gore 


E. D. Bolton 


Cane 




F. C. Wheeler 


G. B. Smith 


Finance 


H. M. K. Grylls 


J. L. Wehmever 


M. S. Reed 


W. L. Cooke 


R, A. LUNDELL 


R. A, Dodge 




J. H. SCHMIOT 


H. A. Keeler 


Social 


B. Woodbury 


H. H. Phillips 


H. D. Warner 




J. B. Breymann 


L. C. Rowley 


Cap aid Gow^ 




R. S. Archer 


H. J. Smith 


Invitation 


C. E. Stryker 


D. E. Gardner 


S. T. Steen 


H. B. Bartholf 


L. S, Monroe 


W. A. Sterling 




T. P. SODDY 


W. A. Miller 


Publicity 


A, F. Grenell 


H.H.FlKRET 


G. D. Cooke 




W. E. Reid 


W.O'B. Benders 


Promciade 




S. M. Pinkerton 


W. W. Watson 


I'ipi and Suin 




S, W. DUBEE 


H. L. Leach 


Assembly 


F. H. HOLLOWAY 


H. M. H, Corey 


T. D. Weaver 


E. K. MacAlltst 


R C. A. Everett 


A. H, Niles 


J. P.Greiner 


F. M, Sawin 


¥. VONACHEN 




P. 0. Potts 


G. Akeks 



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The Engineering Exhibit 

The ColleKSs of Engineering and Architecture hold an Engineering Exhibit every two 
years. The exhibit is for the purpose of demonstrating to all students of the University 
and to visitors at large the work which the students of the College have accomplished and 
that which they are carrying on at the present. It is a student affair pure and simple, its 
entire conception, development and management being in the hands of the students. 

The general chairman of the exhibit committee of this year was elected from the senior 
class in December. He then appointed men to represent each department of the College. 
The committeemen have already been working for some time and if we may be allowed 
to prophecy a little at the time of writing, we will say that this year's exhibit is going to 
be the " biggest and best ever," 



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History of Senior Engineers 



"A-ll a-board. Train No. 1916 on the Higher Education Route." 

"A-IU-boatd!" 

"A-lla-board!" 

"Train for Fieshville, Sophburg, Jiiniortewn, Senior City and intermediate points." 

The big jostling crowd pressed closer to the ticket windows where General Passenger Agent Dean 
Cooley, aided by Assistant Passenger Agent Dean Butts approved or rejected the passports from High 
School City or Prep School Town which every individual presented. Passing along to the nest window, 
the crowd bought tickets for the first stage of the journey from Treasurer Campbell. No one requested 
return trip tickets or special tickets with stop-over privileges for any of the points en route. It was later 
[earned that a stock of the latter variety was kept on hand. 

After seeing the last ticket purchaser on board, Conductor McAllister consulted Brakeman Hirth's 
watch, signalled fo the locomotive cab in which Fireman Haliaway was laboriously shovelling coal; then 
Engineer fiaag pulled back the throttle and started us on our long journey. 

When once we were well under way there was a general rush for the diner where we received our 
first surprise. Consultation of the menu revealed the fact that we were not to be allowed fo pick our 
own dishes. The plan was strictly American and we all swallowed the same meal composed mainly of 
heavy foods, hard to digest, a meal noticeably lacking in desserts. Besides, we were allowed no lunches. 
One food that was especially hard Co digest was listed as Descripto, It caused more than a few of us the 
sharp pangs of indigestion. 

The country was full of surprises during the first part of the journey and we were kept busy adjust- 
ing ourselves to the rapid changes in scenery and acclimating ourselves to the new country generally. 
Now we were travelling in the depths of a canyon where the steeply rising sides cut off all view of the 
surrounding country. Again we were out in the more open country, but so unused were we to great 
perspecrives and glorious distances chat we often failed to appreciate the great reaches of our Alma Mater 
which spread out about us. 

The journey passed rapidly for the majority of the passengers. One day some bandies, whom we 
afterwards found to be inhabitants of the next Province of Sophburg cried to board our train, but after 
a brief struggle were driven off with losses. This we learned from the authorities was an annual occur- 
rence named the Fresh-Soph contest. 

With the aid of the General Passenger Agent, we inaugurated the Mentor System, thereby getting 
into close touch with the officials of the road and gaining valuable advice concerning our journey. Along 
in February we stopped for water and, sad to relate, lost a number of passengers who strayed too far 
from the straight and narrow track. Among these, unfortunately, was our engineer; before contm- 
uing our journey therefore, we picked another in the person of Horace Corey. 

The trip, from this point, was rather more pleasant, as che passengers gradually became more m- 
timately acquainted with one another; with but one or two fatalities the train came to a stop at a town 
unknown to all. The sign on the station read "Sophburg," Rumor spread that there was to he a big 
celebration in rown that night, so we all got off Co attend. It was both magnificent and impressive; here 
it was that we shed the clothes and manners we had brought with us from Freshville, and extravagantly 
tossed the former into a huge fire which the Sophomores had built. 

The summer was soon upon us with its heat and dust. Most of us decided to spend the languid 
hours in Sophburg and conrinue our journey che next fall. Some, however, took a small excursion to 
a neighboring amusement park called Summer School and from all reports had an enjoyable time. 

On September 29, 1913, we bought rickets and again boarded the old train. Unfortunately several 
of those who had been our fellow passengers found the joys of Sophburg so captivaring that they had 
decided not to continue their journey. The train pulled out, manned by a new crew, consistmg of En- 
gineer Hyde, Fireman Finkenstaedc, Btakeman Milliken and Conductor Jeter. 

Under the skillful hand of our engineer, the train ran smoothly; and such harmony prevailed that 
when in February we stopped to fix a hot-box, only a few strolled too far away co hear the whistle. 

A little further along our way we became so restless that che engineer suggested that we stop at 
some suitable spot and have a "Pow-wow". The suggesrion was greeted with enthusiasm and we then 
and there inaugurated the Pow-wow custom. Our social boosters conferred with a party from a train 
which was on the next track, concerning a certain Soph Prom. This function was given, with great suc- 
cess, at the next station which was called Armory. Gradually as the spring came, we grew weary of the 
trip, and when the train at last pulled slowly in at "Junioitown," we scrambled out eagerly from every 
available door and window. 

On September 28, 1914, when we gathered at che station, we found ourselves suddenly involved 
in a heated discussion. The trouble was that we were unable to decide upon an engineer. Finally after 
much delay we decided that Don Smith knew more about a loconiorive than Fran Mack and so we gave 
him the job. Harry Buell got the job as fireman, while Howdv Phillips and Bob Hadley were made 
brakeman and conductor respectively. 



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Our train consisted now encitely of Pullnians. We read the impressive and appropriate names on 
the sides of the coaches and chose according to the way they struck our individual fancies. There were 
Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical and Marine. On entering, we found our coaches something on 
the order of bufFet cars, for meals were served us with menu cards particularly adapted to our special 
needs. The European plan was used and although we were all required to assimilate certain staples, 
we were allowed to pick out a few dishes to our own liking. The selected dishes were more or less of 
the dessert class. On the other hand, some of us were taking le-orders on certain dishes which had not 
agreed with us in Sophburg. 

The grade of the roadbed through Juniortown was level and it didn't take much effort to keep the 
train going. The surrounding Alma Mater country was pleasant to gaie upon. We were able to get 
glimpses of the end of our journey and a better perspective of the whole road and the great country 
through which we were speeding. 

Soon Johnny Lyons and Jack Benton were given passes in the form of an " M, " because of their 
prowess in football. Aside from this the trip passed uneventfully until just before our usual February 
stop. Here a great discussion arose concerning our social liberties. It seems that the officials had been 
so displeased with a few of the passengers on the train two years ahead of ours that they had forbidden 
the continuance of the Junior Hop. Through the efforts of Engineer Smith and Dick Jeter, we did our 
share together with the other Junior classes in having the higher officials repeal their decision and allow 
us to stop over and give the Hop. Thus to us belongs part of the honor of re-establishing the Hop under 
the direct management of the Junior classes. 

In the spring, the train stopped at a picturesque spot where we got out and held another Pow-wow. 
The momentary relief from the prescribed diet aboard the train was too much for our engineer and for 
one or two others. The officials accordingly ruled that they would have to wait for the next train. We 
left them standing by the side of the road, a warning to all trains that should follow, like a sign which 
read in conspicuous capitals "DANGEROUS CURVE— GO SLOW. 

From this point Fireman Buell took charge of the throttle and carried us safely on to the City of 
Seniority, Just before reaching this city. Jack Benton was presented with another pass because of 
the baseball ability he had shown en route. Many of us decided to remain in Seniority for the hot months, 
others decided that the town of Summer Session looked inviting. The rear coach, filled with very CIVIL 
young men with plumb-bobs and transits, was unhooked from the train and with an engine all its own 
started up a sandy branch hne. For further account of this side trip see description at the end of the 
list of passengers. 

On October 5, 19IS, we commenced the last stage of our journey. Several passengers who had 
missed the preceding train bought tickets for ours; and so in spite of the loss of those members who had 
left us because they were subject to car-sickness we numbered 263. The new crew answered the follow- 
ing roll-call: Engineer, Howdy PhiUips; Fireman, Johnny Breymann; Brakeman, Tom Treifa; and Con- 
ductor, Howdy Keeler. 

During the first part of the trip. Jack Norton was presented with a pass signed by Coach Yost and 
our brakeman, since he was familiar with the rural highways, was chosen to captain the cross-country 

Just before February, representatives from our train and from several of the trains in back of ours 
worked out an Honor System. It was adopted by the passengers from all of the trains and when ic was 
tried at the February stop it was found to work out excellently. As we started on again we could see that 
the idea of the system had gained a good foothold among our own passengers and among those of the 
following trains. We can only conjecture as to where the influence of the ideal upon which the system 
is founded will finally lead. But judging from our own experience it will offer many charming oppor- 
tunities to those who adopt it sincerely. 

Later in February a serious accident occurred in car "Electrical". The back E.M.F. from a recently 
installed dynamo overcame the usual constant potential and severely shocked several of the passengers. 

In this part of the journey the roadbed was very even and the riding good. The meals were well- 
served. There were numerous desserts. Indeed, some of us subsisted entirely on light lunches. We 
travelled chiefly through the momentum we had already gained. From the heights we had now reached 
we had a good view of the Country of our Alma Mater and of the mile-stones we had left by the road- 
side as we' passed. In looking back over the whole length of the Higher Education Route, we could real- 
ize what a t'elatively short distance it had after all brought us. Ahead of us, far beyond the end of the 
line, stretching awa^ to the farthest reaches of the country and even beyond that to the dim horizon, we 
could see a broad highway, which we knew we would probably have to travel. 

All that remained now for us to do was to slide down comfortably in our seats and take a well earned 
rest while the irain coasted on to the end of the line, where the conductor would wake us with the words, 
"Commencementville, everybody out!" 

G. D. C. 



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Engineering Seniors 

Edwakd R. Allan . . No. Tonaieanda, N. Y. 
A. a. M. E.: Scalp and Blade 

John L. Allison .... Canandaigia, N. V. 
Walter D. Ammerhah . Skamokin, Pa. 

KpnB Fhi Epiilon; Society Auto. Eng 
Harold O. Andrew . . Springfield Mms 

Robert S. Archer Detroit 



■^f-i Elmbr H B\bel Bufah N Y 

I*'' L E Banghaht 1 P ilani 

V^ ' ^ Maurice A Bakboir Orchard Lakt 

JJ^I M ^ H Earl Barrett Arni Ciiy 



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Engineering Seniors 



Giencoe, lit. 
ih Hud FlHDia 

. . Dttrck 



t) (31 a 



Jacob 1 

K. E. Berray . 
Leon C, Bibber 
Wesley Binty 
Eugene H. Bird 
E. E. Blomcren 



fFallon, N. Y. 

Portland, Me. 

Union Ci<y, Ind. 

. . . Uslit 

Norway 









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#09# 



Engineering Seniors 

Carl S. Blomshield ..... Bay 'City 

DekS'TBU Delu 
Edwin D. BoiTON ....... Pordand, Mi. 

Clifford BoTTjE ,, ... . .' . Grand Hastn- 

Lloyd L. Bower Fosloria, O. 

A^ 8. M. E>.: MsudoliD Club 
Albert WiLLUM Bketsch . Lafargmille, N.Y. 

John B. Breymann, Jr. . . Toledo'. 0. 

SinfcmiB; .Owla: Tau Beta Pi^ Vulcim; Web snd 
'FliAcei'Clue Vice-Pregideiit 

■ J. Marti-n Brown ,. ". . Saginaw 

AUienslon; Web ami Flange 

Norman F. Brown Kaiam/aoo 

E. F. Brucker Toledo, O. 

BicDU Alpba Epotlon; Class Bsseball (1) (2) (3) 
(4): BiHketball |l| |2); Football (4) 






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Engineering Seniors 


L. Ray Buckendale .... 


Duroii 


FhosDii 




Harby C. Buell 


Saginaw 


Arthur A. BuRRELL '. '. ". . 


Ann ArboT 


Alpha Sigma Phi; Tau B«ta Pi 




A. G. Cadwallader 


Hastinis 


ArthurB. Cartie ...*.. 


Conitantint 


gsj^^i«r^tr *"^^ ^'""'""'■"' 


Ord»«r.; 


R. D. Chatfield ■..,.. 


■ Wabtrinl 


Traeli (1) (3) (3) ' 




Harry Christiansen . .. .. 


-Mdnistfc 


John F.Clark Oitakoma Oty.Okla. 


Tbu fieu Pi; Vulsani; Oemni Chau 
gin«ria« E-liibit 


rmaoof En- 


John H. Cochran .... 


Caloma 



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Engineering Seniors 

William Eahl Code Sa^inate 

Round Up 
GoRBOH D. Cooke Detroit ~ ... 

ViwPmident Aero Club; Vio»-PrendeDt Automobile 

Sodety; EDgiDeenjiA Exhibit Committee; Michig&ii 

Daily (3) (41; MidSiaii Technie (3) (4); Michigsn- 

euiui (4) ; Editor Black F[y 

W. Lanpon Cooke Monroi j 

Harrv C. Coons Findlay, O. f\ 

Horace M. H. Corey .... Chicago, III. ^_ '<..- 

LaiBhdiiCaiiAlphB;a»SBPtwidflnt(l);Cl88sFootbaii /,".7 '- 

. (4) ■.i'^,- ■■- ' 

Dana R. Cornell Coraana f',- 

Carl H. Cotter Detroit 

Ira Stanley Crissman . . Detroit ; ; , , 

C. Whitney Crosby Irona/ood 



■fill 



142 v>.(^>.-, 



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Engineering 


Seniors 


Guy Clarence Curtiss 




Detroit 


W. W. Daliell '. . . . 




Cadmac 


Carl R. Daucherty 




Detroit 


Norman H. Davidson 


Iro 


Mountain 


Lewellyn M, Deluncer 




Kalamazoo 


Francisco A, del Valle 
Phi Chi Delta; CrafUimen: 


San Juan 
LBtin-Ameri 


Porto Rica 

CBuCtob 


Manuel A, del Valle San Juan 


Pono Rico 
rcleFTBD- 


John Dennis . . . 




Hiutingi 


Clarence C. Des Jardi 


S . . . 


Alpena 



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Engineering Seniors 

ERnEST J. DiLLMAN .... Ckeytnne, ffyo. 

Kupps Beta Pa 
Russell A. Dodce . , , . fFkiimort Lake 

N. L. DoLPH CadilUc 

AutomoUls Bociety; Trcuurer (4) 

L. J. Douglas Grayling 

D. M. Drake J«n Arbor 

B«u Theu Pi 
Harcourt Colborn Drake . , Armada 

Csnsdlsa Club; A. t. £. £.; Automabile Booiety 
Stewart W. Dubee .... Behil, fVis. 
Samuel Ewart Emmons . South Bind, Ind. 

Phi Qsmmii IMta; Tau Beta Pi 
K. EtiOSNE EuOENlDES . Constanlitioplt 



Pi 






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Engineering 'Seniors 

Charles A, Everett fFalerloan. N Y 

Sigma Alpha Epuloo 
Rudolph G. Felger . . . La Hafpt, Kan 
H. Hai.ouk Fikret . . ConstaniimpU, Ttirkey 

A. 8. M. E.; CUm Invitatbn Committw (<1 

Byron John Gaddis .... Colfax, III 

WiLLARD S. GlRVlN .... Bngalo, ^ Y 

KappB Sigma; Scalp and Blnde 

WcLLCAM G- Given . . Long Biach. Calif 

Marton L. Goldstein .... Sagmaw 

Seta Beta Tau; Quarwrdeok 
RoscoE C. Gore .... Ttcunurk, Neb 

Sigma Alpha Epsllon 
Clarence P. Green , . '. Cttieland 



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Engineering Seniors 



Morris Greenblatt Nets London, Conn. 

Meaocab 

. . La Grange. III. 



Arthur F. GREf 



Humphrey M. X. Ghylls .... Ditroii 

SiEinB Phi; Soph Proni'Committee; Clags Bssltetball 
^uuiec (2); l5u»i Football (3); BBSball <2) 

Louis J. Gurevcch Washington, D. C. 

J. N. Hadjisky .... Sophia, Bulgaria 

Robert W. Hadley Toledo, O. 

Pbi Ksppn Psi 

Russell A. Hall BHsifield 

Peter C. Hammelef .... Deiroii 
Clinton P. Harris Alpena 



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Engineering Seniors 

Edward C, Headman .... Wyandotu 
VulDBiu; Web and FlkD(e; Claa Football Muufw 
l4};C1tu9Buketb>U(3) 

K. Warren Heimkich Detroit 

W. S. Helmer Escaaaba 

William O'Brian Henderson . Satinatu 

Samuel Hersch CUveland 

H. L. Hereic Toledo, 

Harold A. Hecks .... Ann Arbor 
Tau B«U PI; CUsg BaHball Mbuc« (1) 

Harold B. Higbee Franklin, Pa 

William P. Hindhan . Grand Raftds 



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Engineering Seniors 




F, K. HiRTH Tolfdo, 0. 




Fred H. Mollowav .... Rnchistfr, N. Y. 




Gerald J. Horvlii Dttroii 




Howard Adams Hwbbell .... ManisUi 




I.VNDALL E, Hughes . , . I'hUadelpkia, Pa. 
Sigm* Phi Epsilon; Hound Up; KryBtoneClub; Mimes; 
Cis>» OiatoricBl Dn]«Bt« (4); Union Open (1| |2| 
W; OpenXtanFing Director (3) 




Wariien B, James . . Rfdla«ds, Calif. 






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William H. Jewell Kigaunir 






'^'u'-"-'-: 


Everett JuDSON Cltveland. 0. 







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Engineering Seniprs 

^NBON Howard Keeler Grand Rap^ 

ThelH Xi Web uiJ Flange Clue Treuurer (4) 

K. G. Kimball Poiiiand, Mi. 

Mahcello a. King .... IfeUsviHr, ff. Y. 

Chas. S. Klein Deitoii 

J. S. KoiACKA j4nn Arbor 

Joseph P, Krsiner . . , Bradford, Pa. 

W. W. KuR-ra Saginaa 

H, R. Leach Sagimm 

W. A. Lenski Grand Jtapidj 



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Engineering Seniors 

Leslie Lou LeVeoue Marquette 

Dempster C. Lewis Uiicn, N. Y. 

Frank A. Lewis Marquiiu 

J. E. Long Sleelton, Pa. 

RoBHET A. LuNDELL Cadillac 

Elwood K. MacAllhter . Rochnier, N. Y. 
Round Cp Club: CIus Tresaum <1) 

W, W. MacAkthur . , . . Chtboygan 

FrXnci* Test Mack .... Toledo, O. 
8iims Phi: Tau Bets Pi; MichisHmus ; TrisDEles: 
ToutniDOMn; Mimes: Junior Hop Commit<«e^ 
A»'t GenenJ Churmui Unian. Opera (3J ; Student 
Couoinl (3) (4; ; ChBimuui Clug MemorisL Com- 
mJtUM (4); Vi<»-PiaideDt MicliiEUi Union (4); 
BoHil □[ Control of Student Publigst^one (4) ; Mas- 
ter of ComuiiMB, Michigan Union Opera (4) 

Joseph Weolev MacKenzie . . . Adrian 



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Engineering Seniors 

Howard S. Manwariho . . . ^nn Atbor 
MonkeiSsc. BudTreES. A. B. M, E. (3):Cluurin«nM) 
BasketbaU MBUxer (4) 

J. C. Marble Waskiixgion, D. C 

Walter E. Maxwell . . Schenectady, N. Y 
LambdH Chi Alpha 

R. G. McAndrew Si. Thomas 

AlubCOHtOD 

T. H. McArdle .... Chauaatay, N. Y 
Arthur Branch McGee . Poiodtna, Calif 

Phi Gamnii Delia; Tau Beta R 
Clifford T. McInttre . Si. Thomas, Canada 

Canadian Club: Hoclwy (3) (4) 
Charles Arthur McKenny . . Ypsilantt 

Maodolia Club 
0, E. McMullen . ■ . . Milan 






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Engineering Seniors 

Arlecck Mead Hastings 



E. H. Merritt LockpoTi, N. Y. 

WiLBUK L. Merti Saginavi 

„.-' Elbert G. Milham Kalamazoo 

Phi Lambda UpMlon 

Hakry E. Miller Mancelona 

Herkom W. Miller . . . Dallas, Texas 
... _, Alpha Tau Omega 

fe^;,' . \ Wyatt a. Miller .... SaUm, N. J. 

i!l r-kV Tbu Beta Pi^PhL Lambda Upellon 

'-■-.-_ J. Gorton Milliken .... Bay City 
H. E. Miner Durand 






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';; ,- ' Engineering Seniors 

■ ' .' : / Lowell S. Monror Dayton, Q 

|.';.,f 'X .-. '_ SackettClub 

■■-■"■Ji ■ ' "'' '^-i' ,, • Phclip Owen Mulkev . . . . . Detroit 
■'■'■ -■■"'','"",, ChLPi.i:TaaBetaPi;Mu9icBlClul«{3) 

-■.;■■" .'•-':.; Elmer G.MuNi Detroit 

'\\; ■-' '■'■ ./... Rowland A, Nadeau Fhnt 

^■K/;/'";' '■ ".~>" ''■ ■:; S. M. Nahiklan Detroit 

Hugh Newbero .... ^ Grand Maraii 

■-' Arthur H. Niles Ann Arbor \ 

' ' ^ ■"■':ri ClttseTrsok (3| 

'''-... ■■■ '■;■ Irvino T. Norton . Northampton, Masi 

- , - . - -^ -,r7 SiBDia Alpha Epsiloa 

'. ■.,^> John K. Norton Onionagon 

; ■'■■J' Kappa Sigma: Tau Bela Pi: Varaity Football (4) 



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Engineering Seniors 

■ S. A. Oi-PEHHEIHEK Grand Rapids 

Dai Tung Pang .... Honolulu, Hawaii 
Carl H. Pehiuon .... Mitckdl, S. D. 

H. H. pBRRy Bay City 

HOWAKD H. Phillips Grand Rapid! 

TheUXi; MiolusktouBr Vulcan; Webb sod rianEe; 
Truncin; Cba SecretHTy (3); Fregident (4); Cites 
Football (3) (4): Tresiurer Boat Club (3) 

Sherwood M. Pinkerton, Jb. , . ToUdo, 0. 
Th«ta 21; Tau B«ta Pi; Phi Lambds Upeiloii 

A. G. Plankel Ptnlwaur 

W. K. PoMMEBENlNC .... Ann Arbor 
PhilII- O. Potts . . . Waikingion. D. C. 
Vanity Band <4) 

i 



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Engineering Seniors 

B. C. pRiMEAu MarqtulU 

Linn M. Rakestraw . . . , , ToUdo, 

MacDohald S. Reed Erie, Pa 

Triooo; Tau Beta Fi; MichksDiUB: Trisncbn Opera 
(3) (4) 

Walter A. Recckle Saginaw 

Wallace E, Reid Ditroii 

Delta Tau DelU 
G. G. Riddle Morenci 

Frank C. Riecks .... Alpena 

MichigBH Tsohnic (3) (4); Vice ChuirniBn Am 

Sot mTe. 

WiLLARD McFaWN RoBINSON . Dllrail 

Harold C. Roeser .... Saginaw 



4 -■"Sit'' . 



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Engineering Seniors 

J. S. Roman Deiroii 

Tau Beu Pi 

H. C. Rood, Jr ^„„ jrb- r 

Phi Kappa Psl 

L. C. RowiEV .... Lnsistown, Mow 

Kappa Beta Pai 

*>- A. RuTCERs Holland 

,. ,' Knickerbocker 

;V.': a A. RuxTON shMy 

■.^U^l . ■'. FredSacia Grand Rapids 

" ■-!■■-■%.■; : \ Chew Club 

:.>';:!,. ■.■-.. Geo. H. Sanpenburgh .... Onfkama \' 

'■;., ;'l':^',: : i ^''^'' ^' Sawin , . , Ckicopei Falls, Mass \ ^ 

■ViT.'-'' ^''i \ Jay H.Schmidt , . , . . Cleveland, O ^./^ 

.,,^1> .-v T«bju^^;»^Edit..,3)(4), Stat^Manai^r. • /. 

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Engineering Seniors 

John H. Schmidt Saginmc 

Harold Sherman .... EtUmiUe, N. Y. 

A. C. Simons Ml. Morris 

Rifle Team (3) (1|; Pne. Civil Eng. SoclBty (4) 

W. Whitney Slaght . . . Bufa/o, N. V. 

Alpha Tbu OnHM 

Clarence F. Smart Boyne Cily 

Phi LsmbdH Up^lon 
Chauncev W. Smith . , . Ilubbardston 

Dale 1... Smith Eaton Rapids 

Donald Abram Smith .... Algonac 
Acacia 1 Sivaa, Delta Chi; GriffioB: TooatmuKn; 
Tail Beu H; VulcaoB ; MaoABitie Editor. The Micb- 
ilnD Technic (3) ; Union Opera (3) ; Cla« Pr«idenl 
(3); Glee Club (3) 

G. Brick Smith Waihingtoit, D. C. 

Sigma Alpha Epeilaa; QuartcMeck^ Round-Up 



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Engineering Seniors 

Harold J. Smith Wilmtue, III. 

Una. ThstB Pi: AlrAecnials: Tsu Bets Pi; Pbi Lambda 
UndioD! Volcuu: Trisnilea; Commodore Union Boat 
Ct^(4| ; CIhs BaHtH^ Muucer (2) Claw Baaeball 
(1) <Z) (31 

Rowland D. Smith 



Uhl Mahchej 
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Balllc Creek 



Tfichnio 

Thos, Phillifb Soddv Calumi! 

AcBFia; Griffini; Vulcans Varnty Baarball Squad 

(3) (4>; Preaideat Studeat Council (4) 

L, A. Sprague Bloomfitli Htlli 

Tau Beta Pi 

William Lewis Stanton Loi ingttes Caltf 

Kappa BeM Fsi 
Henkv Dean Stecher Laknaood, 

Alpbs Sigma Fhi 
SiDNEV Tremble Steen Allegan 

Beta Theta Pi; MiftuEamuH TnangieH MimeH 
Micb. VnioD Opera rbonia <2) Asat (3) Magur 
of FrqpertieB (4): Clan Bawball (2) Chairnian 
Clan foviution Com |4) Board of Directors of 
Atbtetig Awiaciatiou Axs t (31 Vanity Baseball 
Manaa«r |4) 
Walter A. Sterling Nigaume 

Trlfon; Tau Beta Fi Web and Flange Tnantln 



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Engineering Seniors 

Earll R. Stone Attica, N. Y. 

John W. Stone Do"- 

Phi Delta Cbi 

Louis Henry Stott ManisUt 

Henry C. Stovel Ann Arbor 

Errol H. Streeteh Bit Rapids 

Carleton E. Stryker . Los Angeles, Calif. 
Kappa Bets Pn 

Edward S. Tauh Saginam 

D.W.Taylor . . . ■ Dis Moinei. la. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; A. I.E. E.;En«iii«rii« Society; 
Clam Auditor (3) 
Donald A. Thomas . . . Milbank, S. D. 



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Engineering Seniors 

Glenn p. Thomas Manumiw 

SiKina Chi 

Louis Thoms Oak Fork, Hi. 

Antmony Geurce 1 [LMa . , , Grand Rupiib 

Kni'ktrl'ocker Cluh 
MaKVIN S. TiTiJS . \ ! \ 1 

James D. Todd iturhngi l-i 

TauBewP Ih I ai bdft Ipaloti 

Tom C. Thelfa Jlpeia 

Phi Sijima Kappa 1 uleam Wei ami Hjn«F 
TnanslMi Crow-wunttj Captain (3) Clasi. Siqi 

Ernest R. Veithr Delplu I) 

Frank J. VoNACHEN in -Irb 

EramiWa; Tau Bern P B kciLnLl i 
E. Von Nostit/, ToUd O 



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Engineering -Seniors 

Paui. C. Wagner ..... Ann Arbor 

Tau Beta Pi; TriBUfln 
Harley D. Warner Farmington 

Walter Warren Saginaw 

Walter Weakley Watson . Brawnwood, Ttxas 
Sigma Chi 

Theron DeWitt Weaver .... Detroit 

AlphflSisiiiaPlii;Miohl|iamua;T»uBeWPliTri»n«l(i«; 
Mimes: Atumui Editor Tecbnia (3); Ocmwl Cbait- 
msn Micbiasn Union Opera {*); Clan Buebmll (1) 
12) 13), Mgr. (3); Serj-j- J^inior Hop (3) 

J. L. Wehmeyer Ann Arbor 

■ Wm. Wbltner ...... Dttroit 

Frank Crane Wheelbr . Cortland, N. Y. 

TftuBeUPi 
Wm. p. Wickham , , . . Nortoatk, 0. 
Beta TbeW Pi; Web lUid Fknm: Vnnitj' Foottmll 
Sqiud E4) ; M(r, Clua BM<t*il (4) 






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Engineering Seniors 

Rex E. Wilbur ColdiBour 

fiipna TJpoilon Pal 
C. V. WiLcoK .... Tkrif Mile Bay. N. Y. 
Holyakt, Mass. 
Lvdington 
Nttalon, Kans 
Ann Arbor 
HangckfU!, China 
Niagara Falls, N. 1 



Lbwis Clark Wilcox en 
H P Williamson . . 
Brucb Woodbuhv . . 

E C Wright . . ; 

D C Wu ... 

Robert Wylib . , 



1 YoKorAMA . Kalaoka, Naganokm, Japan 



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1916 Architectural Class Officers 



R. S-W 
J. A. McCoL, 

G. J. LiND 
H. L. COHSE- 

G. B. Hamm( 

L. F, VOORHI 



A, E, Bergman 

V. D. COUGHLIN 

G. L. Ric 



J. D. Preston 

C, E, HORTON 

J. H, LlNDHORST 

A. C. Irvin 

W. J. Crawford 

Cap and Gown 

D. J. GOTHOLD 

C. G. Henncnger 



COMMITTEES 



W. L. RiNDGE 

J. H. PlELEMEIER 

F. A. Brinkman 

Senior Sing 

C. F. Young 

D. E. A. Cameron 



A. C iRVLN 

G. B. Hammoni 
D. E. A, Camef 



Clan Historian 

D. J. GOTHOI.D 



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Loms Holmes Bovni 



In appreciation of his sincere interest in ou 
ample as an architect which has instilled in us ni 
profession, the 1916 Architectural Class dedic; 
to Professor Louis Holmes Boynton. 



«ork, his sympathetic teaching ai 
>nly knowledge, but also respect fi 
■s this section of the Michlgane 



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The 1915 Architectural Class History 

Back — oh, almost in the beginning of time we all had ambitions, yet all strangely alike. Our hearts 
were torn and our tninds wearied trying to solve the problem, whether we were to be engineers on rail- 
road locomotives, bandits like Jesse James, or merely Indian fighters. All three held forth seductive 
inducements. We felt somewhat the awe and dread responsibilities that attended when we leaned out 
of the cab window and felt the rush of the night wind against our face, while the hundred-ton locomo- 
tive, — if they had them then, — tore its way thru the darkness drawing hundreds of trusting passengers; 
or the thrill of glancing along the barrel of an ominous steel blue forty-five, and commanding our fright- 
.ened victims to "throw up your hands,'' while our trusty pals looted the baggage car. But man pro- 
poses and God disposes and we came to Michigan to be architects. 

But we were not architects in every sense of the word. We enrolled with the engineers, we went 
to the engineering assemblies, we attended the engineering functions, tho even at that time we rebelled 
It by having an architectural smoker or dance once in a while. Thetfe was the rush that year, 



and hnes, 
of LIS— wi 



en of course, lost and the pushball contest that we won. We drew dots 
courses, and we went to our first finals. and some of us got thru and some 
vinced than ever that we should have been bandits or something of the 

The second semester we began to realize that we were architects, though it was sometimes hard 
to convince the faculty, for wc made the acquaintance of "sketch problems," of "renderings," and 
found out that life was not all roses, though we did locate Ypsi. Then came June and we dispersed, 
some to play, some to work, and also some to summer school. 

After we had swaggered around the "home town" for a few months we were glad to come back. 
That year we elected our own class officers, and Sherwood Holt was chosen as our president. We began to 
diverge from the engineers and their ways. To be sure we attended the same classes in some courses, 
but we were more certain that we were architects. We designed, we sketched, we stayed up nights befote 
problems were due, so much so .in fact, that when some engireec contemptuously referred to the "pipe 
course" we were quite ready for war. We began to get acquainted with our faculty — distinctly ours, 
too, for tho we attended some classes in the engineering and "lit" departments, our classes were quite 
exclusively our own. We floundered helplessly in the wake of "Mac's" swiftly flowing discourse and 
lightning figures on "beams, walls, and footings." We learned the dread of "Bev's" soft pencil, 
the, "Oh! I — ah — wouldn't do it just that way," and Kimball's maze of ancient history, concerning 
what was what in Greece and Rome, Then too, thete was Prof. Lorch, the" King," to whom wewent for 
help or because we were called, and under whom we first began to see that there was something behind 
it all that we were still to get, and that four walls and a roof and some openings, haphazardly garnished 
with all the architectural ornament we could think of, was not a design. Then just as we grew used to 
the yoke we were thrown out to a summer's pleasure. Again the weeks fled; we whispered fervent prom- 
ises to write often, and came back. 

Juniors! We wondered where the Hop money was coming from, and some of us actually got it. 



"Roily" Westbrook was our , 
this coufse and fought with th; 
ish history names to emerge a 
became the College of Archit 
Our department basketball te 
among the first to wear an " ? 

Always,— the greatest year is the last, the end is in sight, thi 
the world to "do something." The joy of the prospects of the ■ 
down the real regret we must fee! at leaving. Wc are bound to n 
ing room, with its pleasant companionship and 
year, as in the Junior year, Westbrook 
Baseball tea 

The futi 



It year. It was quite a year in some ways. We toyed with 
down under the storm of "Bev's" Itahan, French, and Span- 
e finally got to England. We designed great buildings. We 
e divorce from the Engineering College was complete, 
numerals that year. Holt and Hammond of our class were 



It the helm. 



; is the possibility of getring out into 
ming freedom to some measure tone 
IS the genial atmosphere of the draft- 
" kidding" remarks. This 



On the batteries of the depanmental Indoor 

"Deek" Cameron. Moninger was our representative on the Student Council. 

always vague and indefinite, but it is safe to say that no matter where we are and under 

we will always be able to look back towhatwas a most happy substiturion for our 

ns. Besides, Jesse James is hopelessly out of style and Lol the poor Indian, has been 

his hair short, and places more stress on the pursuit of civilization than on the pursuit 

D. J. G. 



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*-t¥-:~ 




Architectural Seniors 



i i 



Alfred Behcmann Eajl Jordan 




Donald Eugene Ames Cameron . Grand Rapids 





Alpha Tau Omegas Clau Sec'y (3); Clstia Bsseball 




<1) (2) (3) (4); Indoor Ba«baU <4) 




Harold L. Corsett .... Olean, V ? 




Theta Xi; CUm Treasurer (3) (1) 




Francis D. Couchlin .... Ottan N 1 


S 


TbeUXi 

William J. Crawford, Jr. . 5«/a/o V r 


/. 

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Alpha Tail Omeca; Scalp and Blade 


H. Daliiel Davenport . . , Grand Rap,d, 






\ 


Ethan E. Edloff Dtirou 




Harold W- GoE-re Bay Cuy 




David J. Gothold .... Chuago III 


1 



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Architectural Seniors 

Geoboe B. Hammond Detroit 

Tsu asms Delta; CUh Atbletio Mir. (4); Clus 
Track (2) 

Arthur C. Irvin ..... Mi. Morris. III. 

George J. Lind Dttroii 

Alpha Rha CU; C[ua Seo'y (4> 

John Alexander McColl . . . Grand Rapids 

AlpbB Rho Cbi; Thu B\tms. Delta; ArohltMtonl 
Etfitor of Teohnio (4) : CUa Vlce-Pmidelit (4) ; Eiuii- 

JoHN D. Preston .... St. Joseph 
Warren Lester Rindob . Grand Rapids 

Alpha Rho Cbi; Orand Rspida Club: Ch^man 
PcoBTam Committee (4) 

Louis F. VORHEES ToUdo, O. 

Roland S. Westbrook . SfloannaA, A". Y. 

Alpha Eho Chi 









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Statistics of Senior Engineers 

In compiling these statistics. 
In presenting all the dope, 
I've spent many weaty hours — 
You'll be satisfied — I hope. 



But let us all n 



mber 



That in the lines below 
No offence is offered^ 
Ye reap but what ye sow 



Has white hair and a smile. 

He's known as "Whitey" Headmai 

Alcho his looks beguile. 

Alas' We have no women 
In our graduating class, 
But substituting here and there 
The masculine will pass. 

Our most popular young lady. 
From all our classmates' views. 
Unanimously elected. 
Is none other than "Lyn" Hughes 



Filtret 



Our handsomi 

With hair of raven hue. 

I thinli we did our level best 

In choosing him — -Don't you? 

But there is one who thinks he is 
'Our most handsome man. 
His name you know is Heinrich, 
Our oratory fan. 

But now, alas, the female 
Breaks in upon the scene. 
The prettiest girl is chosen. 
Ted Marble is the queen. 

But when it comes to studies 



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t^tv- 



The most successful bluffer 
Is an office of repute. 
It was handed to Ned Brucker 
And there was no dispute. 

A man who studies all the time 
Is sometimes called a grind. 
Bill Hindman seemed to be about 
The biggest we could find. 

What man among us now is called 
Our shrewdest politician? 
Two men are shrewd— we flip a coin- 
Don Smith gets the position. 

The biggest Fusser in our Class, 
Unanimous election, 
Is Harley Warner,— Don't you think 
It suits him to perfection? 



it guy within our mid.st 
Who stands l^rst in his line 
Is — But surely you've all seen him- 
Hisnameis"Cholly" Klein. 

But theVe is one who would dispute 
Our "Cholly's" seat of fame. 
He thinks he's just as sporty. 
Hick Woodbury is his name. 

The first man to get married — 
Of course, we hate to say; 
But seeing Hick is now engaged, 
Why, let him name the dayl 



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^i^ %"•—■"-" 



■ THE WOCLfys GISEATEST NEW9r^P€S?f-"^p. 

TTHE BLACK TVm 




fmeds <rf Camp Davis 

mrlrik.ca^n ivaa foKmg 
ant readings n^ar tf?c fUchigart 

hirjd as/ouJ andhis glancxc/rm 
ed tafaXr IT} the Btr&cir of the 

Catt of Chnxtt-rs. 
L <»- Wili^im, ^ Hims^f. 

/laid of thf FTa/j-ttnt Baftiing- 
F^stNyrrfil. 
f^id of y>rf Orvi^ltfv Suitj 

3scar7d t^ymph, 
rJade "a Jo i^THfs, Th/fd Nymph . 

The Plot: TcMT. 
IMt mMs oitractt.1 ra li^. 
L^moaf/tlov ai^nxted to &ors_ 
Ton afftveivd ra magnmts, 
*«r ttvFjymphs to our share. 



Tht a^icgef liitirboiit in 



Than igv/cfl^ro Ittair at/ otrSfBi^ 
lA)daLH*vd by rv/nij or by i^tsf^, 
/ikrtwa Ihri^d, tossing, ^trafl,i*t 
ISai«dthB iM orH ^n tlw-tEen. 

i^rKMKn ofauphr but rhr nrs 



l^henquitx rBt"'s UanK . 

Damn tjuicHdMm tfKpattlti t/xy 

tiaitajing Sditor _0e'd Cooke 
Sua/rjets fifffjefrr Bi/i ffgbiason 
Cartooniai tAirry Leash 

Cin»(aHon fbnifer Stfiib<i Hanleg 



rsd mice. Hfsightll^oiftati* 
f^rt is dairiff nii^/y. 

D^th UsT. 
i^^icoxaffs chipiyiurtifj st^^ryt^i* 
Jini-s' ioa izonsirvctor, esx^il 
Oors's pet snips, swiads . 
Cvrtis' c^m\y,ijctrtv //rd/psstA 




Fh>f.Jbhnstoni sor:d havn i 
srollsda^/mi^B ouff/i' iviri 
irhich they r^rc^int fhs corn 
time from/Jr/in^fonai'l/^n 
and &Pti iVhB:s:ondftions g 
ibi-zvsljif hasebali nrports t 
■BK«>»y at S Rn. 



t/jatifahira of 

of tiye pitTyofs - i^off- f^^l^ 3'7/y'i& 
ai/i7~sfihrfes tt^^s rS'^tnfd and 
//ferm^ejats yy^re nsarfy ereugh 
to p^yfo 

On Thursday ths fat defealsd 
-rf?sff-fliyoni.3iroS. Thscatr^ry 

of Pr^f. 0rodie ffatunsd. 



T/}e 



vTiy 



Le<^i^^ t/7s &oc>bs cjsfip 

ti?i? Gur/ts by tfie h/^h7 ^ 

of tfj^ 3fv!Siinj BI-/0- Jones 

r-af7 outaf papsr ■= 

ttras aios^d tttt^s impossible 

1-onssi>rd all hits and n 



IKarn 



S^LL. 
' cye^hne^ aton of 
■its, and a Coach Yc 

wtf" ^sayv /^5 i7h-i)y,pf3ntlf^, 
als /9^ameofpasshal 




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THE woeLDSGHEATtST HEWSPAPERi"'"' 

?THE BLACK FLY« 



VOL ig NO m 



MJCHtGAN . AUG. It, I9IS. PgrCE 5 CENTS 



Inlnhilfiifrh* ftochirtff liofK I \b 



v/s/roes - i^ELCon€ . 

Ths t^/ass I f/ei C'V'' £h^''esr:s of tha Lt^ymroity t^/tichigorj 
fc^ youofi CJ hs^Jrty tvslcorfya fo eau/^ camp. H^ h^p* t^^a^ ^yav 
■i// maile ^ycn^s^f of heme ttft'^ harr and -^a/ yaurMa/fonB 



ofulaf^ tri/i maHe _ 






m 



UfTB , /^o> trail as a piTci 
If iS3'ng roll call. Spring boor^ 
Be'^yman, ScsrtitciryCsmm, 
SailrBod unc^arPivf/lm-n 
^ rainy day. Doc'af/y dopa. 



llW haya tlaxerT?^ h-'I I aCfuaint 
•d and ^rio'^flj'ps foryrr *d Iwre 
vrs t^ bmlastirtg. T/v 
'taf^ jams rn* in srfinrninp nrf 



hugs' atffmmirjg. Th/s gofw*^* 
aplayrd byane man w/T 
transit arfidd glass. T^s pap 



^rther ^ha inl^rvs/3 of /ttccBmp 
and fifa i*0rK prvjcrib^d /A 

csaa in all of your Hifw^ t 
rvKi'nffs Ovr- ^realinffs an 




hirst t:ar-toonist in camp but 
5 ^7r ^ron7 hain^ the ^^^hunt 

7 ps/xtvt- TtS a ^oad firing 
?cn/& pignf-y of^ffasal/ne a^ 






• &i/nnt*^/^iatacl'* 



DOC'S STOBZ 

(A MONOPOLV^ 
THE BIG AUTOMATIC STCTRE 

ICLEAN UP SAUEf 
I O'CandyeaO*, 5*Tat<l«fs •»* 
DYM*r)ITE FBEE. Everyrhlng 



sports. Efvrything mean 

\r ^ °"*^ " r^ "*" "^" 'TJi''" 

QUB Sl>- COUISSC PINNER 
Bai^^ CRI-iCKERS BfS£/fD 
SOUP fimr 

rhvns ia nardly o rnan m 
canjp ftlro Is rvf prwnff his nwr. 
haad^0aba^ruitr axcepf^d, ^a^tv 
hair lip, 7h*ia trrv 



l^rhaps thai /a ithy Topirjatm* 
s Sfc/i a-foyorita phca jtww/T- 
irtCj. How _emxioij3 f ha lad a 




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^- 



THE WORLDS GREATEST NEWSPWPER (— -^-^ 

THE BLACK FLY^ 




^•^ i^ 



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The Law School 



HE^ 



I Moore E 



, Ph.B., LL.B., Dean 



THIS school was provided for b the Organic Act in March, 18S9. It was opened on October %, 
and included three professorships, which were later styled Marshall, Kent and Jay chairs. 
James V. Campbell, Charles Walker and Thomas M. Coolcy were elected to fill these chairs, 
with Professor Campbell acting as dean. The first class was graduated in 1860. The original home of 
the school was the old chapel, and not until October, 1863, did it have a home of its own. The building 
was reconstructed and greatly enlarged in 1893. Again in 1898 it was practically demohshed and re- 
built as it now stands. A fourth professorship was established in 1886, and named foe the Honorable 
Richard Fletcher, of Boston. This chair was first filled by Ashley Palmer. 'ITie fifth chair was the Tappan 
professorship established in 1879, first filled by Alpheus Felch. In 1871 Professor Cooley be- 
came dean of the department. The original course consisted of cwo terms, each six months long, last- 
ing from October through March, The instruction was entirely by lectures, and at che,completion of 
the course the degree of LL.B. was given. In 1877 an encrance examination in English was required. 
In 1884 the tetms were lengthened to nine months each, and in 1895 a third year was required for the 
completion of the course. The Practice Court as it now stands was established in the year 1892-1893. 
In 1912 the entrance requirements were increased to include at least one year of college work and an 
optional fourth year was added to the law course. Beginning with the academic year of 1915-1916, the 
entrance requirements were increased to include at least two years of college work. 



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appreciation of the benefits 
has been our privilege to be 



EDSON R. SUNDERLAND 

Gratitude akin to obligation demands an expression of out 
and assistance which we have received from one with whom it 
associated during the past thtee years. 

Realizing as we do that only an implicit obedience to every call of duty, and an un- 
wavering exemplification in his daily life of the highest and noblest qualities and the most 
manly principles have given to him a leader's position as a student, teacher, and writer, 
we priie the mote highly the many courtesies extended to us by him. 

Warmed by his friendliness and good fellowship, we, the members of the Senior Law 
Class of 1916, take this opportunity of expressing our high esteem forEdson R. Sunderland. 



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^^■' -" ■ 







Shef, 



Jim. 



Rowan Frary Scanlai 

1916 Law Class Officers 

Lerov Scanlan President 

M. E. PlTKCN Vice-President 

■[■. H. Westlake Seiretarv 

P- F. Thompson Treasurer 

K. R. Kerguson Basketball Manager 

C. C. Rowan Football Manager 

R. O. Brownelf Baseball Manager 

D. F, Stiver "I'rack Manager 

A. R. Sherk Oratorical Deleeace 

G. S. Fbarv Sergeanc-at-Arnis 



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ytj 




Scott Pakkrh Wheat 

[s McLLARD Thomas 

McCall Frary Brownell 



a""r, JohVson 
H. M. Recd 
A. J. Mtckelson 
P. F. Thompson 

Banquet 

tvMES Nichols 
VLE M. Clift 
Thomas McNamara 

E. W. FlNKLE 

M Law StnotfT 

Walter E. Morris 

D. F. Stiver 

Myron McLaren 
Exicutive 



W. W. Paisley 
Chester J. Morse 

WasUnHon's Birthday 

Hugh Allerton 
C. B. Marks 

Fiavre 
W. M. Brucker 
L. W. Miller 
W. M. Sklllman 



1916 Law Committees 

/luditing 
Harry D. Parker 



Finance 
¥. G. Millard 
H. D. Brown 
Geo. Cooper 
K. R, Ferouson 

Union Dinner 

c, a, swainson 
Clyde Rowan 
P. H. Stevens 
C, P. Waples 



William Essery 

E. C, WOOLF 

L. D. Cooper 

Eugene McCall 
G. D, Barnes 

F. M. McHale 



Paul Eger 

R. E. Richardson 

Promenade 
Lash Thomas 
L. D, Merger 
Herbert Potter 
Clasi Memorial 
R. 0. Brownell 
J. F. Tallman 
'. J, Pie 



Mai 



E We[ 



■Senior Sing 
P. C. Hartesveldt 
M. R, Fitts 
K. M. Stevens 

R/eepiion 
Harry Sutter 
L, M. Bruch 
W. W, Schroeder 
Dave Kennedy 

Class Day 
Harry Bell 
Rav Mills 
W. J. Goodwin 
J. A. Blackwood 



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It is the Truth that Helps 



TRUTH is stranger than fiction, so we will tell the truth. | 

The Fall of 1913 saw a motley gathering of A. B. men, erstwhile junior and soph lits as- J^ 

sembled at the call of a figurehead from the Student Council to officially launch the 1915 law i 

class. The bottle of wine which usually accompanies a launching was notably absent, but all the other 1 

features were in evidence. After a stormy session marked by the efforts of pseudo-orators and chestnut i 

politicians, Roscoe Spencer, present address unknown, was selected as the first captain. ^ 

Our maiden cruise was more or less uneventful, the faculty mid-year ambush furnishing most of J 

the excitement. Walter Morris stepped into the calcium, though, when he annexed the oratory title » 

in the State Peace contest. Also the relay team won the department championship, due more to leg J 
work in getting to the gym to accept forfeits than to that displayed on the track. 

Our second start saw Harry Bell at the helm. This was a very turbulent voyage. The football i 

3 in the race for the campus championship, hut forced to finish in that position through | 



the amateur work of the referee in the final contest. Proverbial sob! Although handicapped by the 
doughy* I, Lash Thomas as leader, the baseball team won the campus championship. An observant 
member discovered a host of campus celebrities In the class who had not as yet acquired a pin, so he or- 
ganised a campus honor society which still flourishes in our midst. It is notable also that during this 
year the class produced a great crop of office seekers and all-round candidates for campus offices. 

We weighed anchor for the final voyage with Leroy Scanlan in the pilot-house. Despite the super- 
human efforts of McCall, McNamara & Company and the loyal support of Adna Johnson's Senior Law 
Band et al. the class eleven was again forced to take the second position in campus football at the hands 
of the combined mouth-carpenters. 

The committee stole all of Ross Granger's honors when they superintended the "Crease" dance- 

. The annual sheet was a masterpiece of journahstic ability, the editors thereby acquiring more enemies 

than the umpire. As we go to press the basketball team is making strenuous efforts to keep out of the 

cellar in the campus league and from present indications bids fair to accomphsh its purpose, but will 

have plenty of company. 

As we reflect on past triumphs we find that the class roll is replete with the names of a veritable 
galaxy of campus stars. The stalwart Frank McHale won undying fame by holding the entire Crimson 
line at arms length throughout the whole of one sunny October afternoon, and F, G, Millard held down 
a Mice position on the Varsity during the past season. It has heen said that George Labadie, baseball 
captain, can judge within a few inches at what spot a baseball sent into the air in New York would land 
in Cahfornia. "Tommy" McNamata has acquired the title of the human 42 centimeter through his 
performances on the mound. 

On the publications we have F, F, McKinney as Managing Editor of The Michigan Daily and 
"Jack" Leonard as Business Manager; Louis Bruch is Editor of the Michiganensian, and Paul Eger is 
Business Manager of the book of Who's Who and Where. 

Wilbur Brucker, Harry Parker, K. M. Stevens, W, J. Goodwin, and R. S, Munter have won fame 
for Michigan on the debating teams; and A, R, Johnson, Ray Mills, T, H. Tapping, and F. G. Millard are 
officials of the Athletic Associations, 

Old man Pan with his pipe had nothing on Leroy Scanlan, our eccentric ivory artist, for the whole 
campus has swayed to his syncopated melodies. 

Having finally dropped anchor, we prepare to embark singly, each in his own little boat. It is with 
regret that wc leave the staunch old ship but each one of us has hopes that our new craft prove as safe 
and trustworthy. 

* doughty, ^Auctore Anonynio— 



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Dixie Club 
Glen Aldkich . . . '. Sckintciady, N. Y. 

Lsmbda Chi Alphs 
Hugh G Allirton inn irbor 

Phi Alpha De t» 
Harry Allan Babcoo. Sou Da o \ I 



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George A Barnes 

Harry L Bell 



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James Arnold Buc^wood 

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ViRGiL L Blanding \i 

Alpha Tau Omeia 



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bull (4) 
:'' Roberto. BROWNtLL : : . . Winfiild, Pa. 
GamniB Eta Gamma; Woolsack; Law Review; Bai- 




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Louis M. Bruch fVilmitii, lU. 

Treasurer J-Hop 13) ; Aaa't General Chairman. Union 

WiLBER M. BrucKer Sagi^tiw 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Delta SLgma Rio; PresideBt, 

Preudent Oratorical Au'd (1) 


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- Robert Butler Ann Arbor 

Sisma Delta Kappa 
Benj. F. Caffev, Jr. . Sail Lake City, Utah 
, Alpha Tau Omws 

MuRL C. Carltoh .... Early, la. 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Phi Alpha Tau 
Harry Carstar?hen . . Nnu London, Mo. 
Phi Delta K>> 

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Ltle M. Clift Bay City 

Alpha Tau Omegs 

Geo. S. Cooper Johnstown. Pa 

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L. D. Cooper, Jr. ... Hot Springs, Ark. 

Glen L. Cowing Joliei. Ill 

\\ Norman F. Cjiawforo .... Detroit 

) \ Delta Tbels Phi 

; \ Orlo R. Deahi Goshen, ltd 

\ :.. Phi Gamma Delta 

' ■'■^-— J. L. Donnelly Sedalia, Mo 

'•'■■' " Phi Alpha DbIW 

\ Glover E. Dowell . . . LaBella, Mo, 



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Louie H. Duwten .... Hunltrlouin, l«d 
Signis Delta Kappa; P™. Indiana Club: Prw, Offttori- 
cal AM'n; Commeroe Club: Phi Alpha Tau 

Paul G. Eger Bay C.ij 

Sijma Delta Kappa; BusineM Mgr. "The Offloial 
atidents' Direetory"; Claw Treamirer (1); Cta« Foot- 
ball (1) (2); Webmer Cup Team (1) (21; Premdent 
Ctaftemen (3) * 

William E. Essehy Ann Arbor 

Keith R. Fercuson . . . Twin Falls, Idaho 
Clan Baakethall M^t. (41 

E. Weaver Finkle Ann Arbor 

Maurice R. Fitts . . . Kamai City, Mo 
Carl Foiks Concord 

Gerald S. Frahy . . Gr^at Falls, Mont 
Phi Kappa Pni; Toastmaatflra; Bsmaten; Arohom 

N. B. GiLLiOM Btrnt, Ind 

Si«ma Delta Kappa 



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A. H. GotDMAN Cltsetand,0. 

Wm. J. Goodwin Louisville, Ky. 

Phi Kappa SigaiB: Delta Sigroft Hbo; PrcMdent Diiie 
Club (4) rrreMuier Kentucky Club (4) ; Class Football 
(3) ; Union Opera Cast (3) ; Varaty DebatJog Team (4> ; 
-Treasurer Oratorical AusooiaUon (4) 

DuitWARD Grinstead . . . Louiseille, Ky. 
Earl Newell Hackney . . Kansas City, Mo. 
P. A. Hartesyeldt Grand Rapids 

Track Manager (5| ; Chainoan Semor Sue; Glee Club 

(1) (2) (3) W (6) (S): Vicc-PrMident (8) 

Earl W. Hartt . . . Bloomington, Nib. 
Jebsb J. Herr .... Ckatswarih, 111. 
Stanley John Hiett .... Toledo, 0. 

PhiAlphaDellaiGleeClub (4) i Varsity Quartet (4) 
Edward W. Hoffman . . Kansas City, Mo. 



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Adna R. Johnson . . . 


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William M. Johnston . . 


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Zach Justice .... 


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David Francis Kennedy 


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Phi DeLu Phi 




Geo. V. Labadie . . . 


Caney, Kan 


Druids: Barrist™; Vsrsity BflsebsU |2> (3) (1) 
Capum (4) 


W. E. Lamoreaux . . 


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John F, Linehan . . . Nonk Troy, N. Y. 



Edward S. Martin . . . . 
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Eugene R. McCail . 

Pbi Delu. Phi 

Frank M. McHaie . 



Myron McLaren 



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Alpha Delu Phi 

J. Lelahd MecHCH SattU Critk 

Siema Chi (Alpha K) 

John C. Melaniphy Ckkap; III. 

Delu Theta Phi 

Leon Daniel Metioeb .... Idamar, Pa. 

Sigma Phi EpnlDti; Phi Delta Phi 

Albert J. Mickelson Calumet 

F. GuRNEE Millard .... Ann Arbor 
Delta Tbeta' Phi; Michigunua: Griffins; Arohaiu; 
Varsity Football <4); Wolverine Bua-Mir. U);Boanl 
of Directon, Athietie An'n (31; laMnohoiutlc 
Md(c. (3): Board in Contiol of AtUMin (1) 

Ray Jackson Mills . . Anamosa, Iowa 

Delta Chi 

Walter S. Moore Allegan 

Walter E. Morris , Gittyiburi, Pa. 

SlgmB Delu Kappsj, Dells Einia Bho; AnshMu; 
President Key»tooe Clluh M); Otm Vioa-Fnt. (31; 
Vanity Peaoe Orator (l)i PmUMt CrafUmea (S) 

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Arthur A. Morrow . . . IFeii AUxandir, Pa. 

fHcma DeJta Kappa; Michigaa Law Review 

Chester J. Morse Jasper 

Fhl Delia Phi; BBnuMn: CLi>» Buketball Mnir. (3); 
CloH FDOtbsll (3) <4); Claia BuebaU (3) 

William C. Mullendore Howard, Kan. ' 

Phi Ali^w Delta; Alpha Sigma Phi; Griffimi; Michi- 
ntnua WddUboIc; Law Review; Barriiiten; Druida; 
jb^ons Board in Control atudent Publications <3) ; 
Pna UniT. Y. M. C. A. (3) 

t Chester L. Muller . . Spoiam, Waih. 

KicHARD S. Muhter .... Spokane, Wash. 

\ ' ^ Russell H. Neilsok . . . fFist Branch 

t Alldka Kcma Phi; Phi DeluPhi; WoolaaokiLaw 

Lit Rariew 

r 1-^ h Charles S. Neithercut Clare 

hS^ T I Si«ma Delta Kappa 

ffl"S^li I -, WttUAM A. Neithercut .... Clare 

M -^ } James K. Nichols ....... Ionia 






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John Rutherford Nicholson . Philadtipkia, Pa. 

Sitmii Cbi', Fbi Delta Piii: Wootnck 
Roy Alan Nord . . . Brookinii, S. D. 

Phi Sicma Kappa; Phi Alobft Delta 
Donald W. Ogilbee . Manbou, Cola. 

Phi Sigma Kawa; Coiorado Club 

W. W. Paisley Dubuque, la. 

Phi Kappa P«i All-Fre«h Football 1911; Cl« Foot- 
baU (4) 

Harry D. Parker .... Kankakee, lU. 

Walker Peddicord . Portland, Ore. 

. Grand Rapids 

Earl L, Phillips Marlelte 

Kappa Delta Sicma 
Wans T. Pierson . . MUwi^ee, ffis. 






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M. E. Pitkin Ra:,ir,na, 0. 

Herbert J. Potter hkpemtng 

Harry Rabinowitz .... EveUlk, Minn. 

ZeU Beu Tau 

HoLLACE M. Reid . . . Oriikany, Fa. 

Phi Delta Phi; WooUsck; LaV Review 

Robeut Earl Richardson Ubly 

Kap])H Delta Sicma; Michigao Law Review 
Bekjamih Robinson Detroit 

P. H. Rogers Atlanta, 111. 

B. F. Rosenthal . , . . . . Ann Arbor 

Skfom Delta Kappa 
Clyde C. Rowam . . . Bafdo, Kan. 
I%l Delta Phi: Bartiiten; Clan rontball Met. (1), 
(t) ; Clan BaubaU, Football, Bsaketball and Tiaek 



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Henry C. Rummel ... La Porte, Ind 

Phi Alpha DsUh: ModIib; GciSns Dniida Prendent 
Student Council W: MichigHn Daily UiuT«nit> 
Symphony OrcheAtrA 

H. E, Rush Lincoln, Sd 

I Pa 

JlBM 

); Gke Club (3) (4): Umon Opora (2) (3) 
F. J. ScHHOEDER .... hustil, !Vtb 

Werner W- Schroeder kankaku, HI 

Phi Alphs Delta; Qrifflna; WoolHwk, Law Review 
Bmrrist^tfl; Lav Vice-Preodent Mictisan Udiou 
John F. Scott. ... Si Cloud, Minn 

Phi Alphs Delta; TnMtmaMen, Barruteni Prea 
dEDt MinnesoUClubO): AxMOate Editor Michi 

ClaM Omtorital Delogal* (!) CU* Football (2) 
<3)(4); Clua Buebnirca) 

Malcolm M. Scott . . Pittibtirg Pa 

Phi Delta Tb«U 

B. H. ScKAPHORST Bfoaktntf, S Dai 

Phi Sicuw Kbpp* 

Ralph G. Shelden Ann Arbor 



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Akthur R. Sherk Grand Rapidi 

W. McKav Skillman Oxford 

James Beryl Speer, A.B. . . . Montgomery 
gigmft Nu 

Lawrence M. Sprague ^n« Mor 

Oamnu Eta GamioB; Phi Bela Kappi; Woolsack 
MictufaD Law Review 

Kenneth M. Stevenb Dttrott 

Phi Gamma Delta ; Delia eigma Rio; WebeWr Boeiety 
pKHdent (4); All F™h Traoli Tsam; Vatriity Debate 

1 Perry H. Stevens .... Raointta 

\ Siama Alpha Bpmlon; Phi AlphaDelta: Bairiilcre 

a™ Baleba!l(3R3), FootbaU (3>, Hoekey (2) (3) 

Donald F. Stiver , , . . Go ken Ind 

Phi Gamma Delta 
Harry B. SuiTEti .... Indiana Pa 
■ C, A. Swainsoh . . . Cheyenne Hyo 

Bicma Delta Chi, Barriaten MichiBan Daily (3) 
H) AHoaiate Editor MIofaiganennaD 



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Warrbn E. Talcott . Livingston, Mont. 

Onaima £ta OsmiDB 

James Feiancis Tallman BeUairt, 0. 

G. Richard Tandler Ann Athor 



T. Hawley Tapping .... 
Aoacift; Signw Delta Chi^ GriSi 
CratUnen; Owls; Archolii; TresHur 
fttion <3): Michiiap Dsi'v ni lav 
Bosid to Control 3tud< 
ContTnl AtblaliiB (4) ; Si 



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; eporU Editor (3) ; 
Ltjom (4) ; Baud in 
r MicluEui AluiBDUi 

\ai I4j; AiQjeucB iLoiior |vio JuichlffaDeDflioD; Pub- 

Jjcity Manfltet Athl«tja Auociation (4) 

[URFHV 0. Tate .... Somtrsit. Ky. 

Phi Alpha Delta; Treaaunr OratoiioaJ Auocialion (1) ; 

Diiie Club Vice-Preiiidetit 13): pHvdent Kentucky 

Club (4); Vics-Fresident Oretorical Anodatioa (3) 
Oscar B. Thiel ..-...,. Pigian 

Lash Thomas Constantine 

Pbi Alpha Delta; Baninen; Claw Banball Maoa- 
ger (3); CUh BssebsU sod FooCbitll (1) (3) (4); 
ChsiriuaD Promenade Committee (4) 

Paul F. Thompson Bay City 

Pn UpriloD 

Donald A. Wallace . ... Dtiroif 



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H. J. WaFlES honwoed 

GimniB Eu GamioB; Michigan Law Review ^ 

MAbRtce Wbinherger . Kansas Ciiy, Mo. 

WooliBck ; Michigan L»w Review 

,> Leonard M. Weiss Bay City \ , 

/ Davjd.M. Wellimo Pttoskty 

{ Thomas Hall Westlake . . Clneland, 0. 

■''■ WoolttcW; MioliiRiin Law Review; Claw aecretmr , . ' 

■ C4)("Web.ter8Miely , ■ ■ ,--' :■■■:' 

Ji-;. . ■ ', Renville Wheat . Ann Arbot ■,;,•.■■.■■-'(' ■^,", 

■,-*..■■"■ ', Walter F, Whitman . . . Grand Rapid i '■'■'■\-'\i 

>^/.- " -.. , Gunmii EW Gamnm; Michigan Law Review ' ' >. 



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p. C. Wilson Clar^ 

C. Stanley Wood . . . KUiHotk FalU, (he. 
;,;■■„, Emerson C WooLF . .... AUiaMitO 

".i.j, \ ' .. Sigma Alpha EpmloQ 

",Ci -, Burr ELL Wright , . ■ Fftepori, lU. 

\-i-_ '■ .\~'. Pai Upsilon; Phi Delia Phi 

A 'i, ■;-;^' Floyd L. Young LaPorU, Itii, 

~~~-- -',' ; - ' ' "-- Phi Alpha Delio; Monks; At«hons( CnnrCBOaUrl 

-■' ',,■' ' Toaro, PrM. CrDW-Coiintry Club 

Paul W. Zerwekh Jllan, til 

Alpha Siimn Phi) lUinoii tiiib 
Clarence B. Zewadski . . . Otalel, Flit 



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Recent Important Decisions 

(Ye humble Ed. acknowledges his mental indebtedness to the Invaluable aid furnished by such 
admirable works as Paisley on Domestic Relations, Nichols on Bills and Notes (vest pocket edition) 
and McCall on The First and Last Clear Chance.) 

ADVERSE POSSESSION'" TACKING SUCCESSFUL POSITIONS— Plaintiff, one EUGENE 
R. McCALL, contested the defendant's right to the office of "Most Popular Man" as the defendant, 
Herbert J. Potter had openly and publicly conceded himself to be. The question was raised whether 
oc not this defendant could tack his prior holdings of Queen of the May held in June, 1907, and High 
School Orator, as popular positions to establish a title in himself by pubHc subscription. H. BLAIR 
SUTTER, L. DOWNEY COOPER, I. LASH THOMAS and others with catchy names interpleaded as 
Co-Defendants but were stricken out as surplusage. Held, the defendant can use the reverse English 
and draw unto his present claim any former titles he has acquired, thereby cinching his right to afore- 
said ofEce. McCALL et al v. POTTER, 1 Breeze U92. 

This ease is novel in that it reads like fiction. It is, however, in accord with the defendant's view. 
Bumpkin, J., pulled a good one in stating that after the prior honors had been admitted in evidence for 
and by the defendant, the jury could easily have been swayed to the belief that popularity was truly 
in Potter's Field. There is a conflict of authority as to whether the other defendants should be merely 
stricken out in a case like this or hanged. The court's rulings that as to the plaintiff "nil capiat", and 
as to these excess defendants "Pooh Pooh", were well rendered. 

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW— ELEVEN HOUR LAW— CLASS LEGISLATION. A statute, 
Bate's Code 666,999, provided that eleven hours of work must be successfully completed by a Senior 
Law during the second semester to entitle him to a degree. Plaintiff, L. M. SPRAGUE, suing for a class, 
seeks to restrain the enforcement of this statute on the ground of class legislation, denial of due process, 
abuse of police power and other Constitutional phrases. HELD,That Plaintiff being elected by his class 
as their biggest grind, he cannot maintain this suit In the capacity in which he appears before the court, 
as a "grind" is not in any sense representative of that class. That as the Eleven Hour Rule is only a 
question of degree, the statute can not he held unconstitutional. 

SPRAGUE V. Law School, 1 Cram. 23. 

This case is important in that it introduces a new element for future class-room definitions of police 
power. Here, where the statute was enacted by men who wore no stars or helmets nor carried clubs, 
the court expressly stated that there "wan't no abuse of perlice powahs kez they wan't no perlice." 
Hereafter, we must look behind the statute. The holding of the principal ease as to the "real party in 
interest" was controlled by the case of DUNTEN v. Everybody,! Pol. 13, where Plaintiff was denied the 
right to establish his claim as the shrewdest politician. Here the Court being called upon to decide a 
political question said they couldn't treat politicians civilly, so refused jurisdiction. To the same effect 
see FITTS v. FRARY, 6 Femme, 10 P. M., in which the court refused to decide which party was the 
biggest fusser, applying the maiim: "He who comes into Equity must come cleanshaven." 

SALES — FAILURE OF TITLE— Defendant, W. LESLIE MILLER, transferred his title of 
'■ Handsomest Man" to Plaintiff, FRANK M. McHALE. for a valuable consideration, to-wit; one pack 
of Nebos, with implied warranty of the same (i.e., the title— ^not the Nebos). At this rime there was 
an outstanding title to this honor in oneO. THIEL which was paramount to Defendant's, who had mis- 
takenly thought that he was entitled to the office. Defendant's title being quieted and having utterly 
failed — Opinion of the Justices, 24 En Masse 25, plaintiff brought suit on the warranty. HELD, he can 
recover. McHALE v. MILLER. 14 B. V. D. 92. 

It all depends upon the condition a party is in to recover. In one state he can have hopes; in another, 
he must have more upon which to successfully press his suit. The weight of authority is with the prin- 
e being followed by 3 states and one professor while only 42 states and the House of 
The court could well have followed the lead of GRINSTEAD v. Al. Comers, S Beaut. 
IS refused legal recognition of the title of "Most Popular Girl", though the court 
n O, K, There His Honor disgustedly said he was not supervising any Beauty 
rt for the day. So in the case we are considering, the court would have been 
t for a week. 



cipal ca. 

15, in which Plaintif 
conceded Plaintiff's 
Contest and adjourned c< 



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WATERS— WHAT CONSTITUTES A REAL COURSE— Plaintiff's lot was one of four parcels 
abutcing on a waterway. The lot of the Plaintiff was known as Property 4. Plaintiff tried to enjoin 
the Defendants from using the waterway as a means of passage. HELD, The waterway where it touched 
Plaintiff's realty, being incident to the ownership of the lot, should be considered a real course and be 
designated Property 4 also. And even though not a way of necessity yet as it was easy of travel by the 
Defendants, it was to be considered in law as a snap course, and therefore subject to the crowds. 

Rood V. Senior Laws, 1 Pipe 22. 

The cases are not uniform on this point, but dressy. This court seems to base its decision on the 
"40-p ages-tomorrow" rule, which is too lengthy to discuss here. However as the court held that a snap 
course is one easy of passage and further that Property 4 could be so considered, we expect a storm of 
disapproval from those western benches which have never overruled the dicta in Matthew Manning's 
case. Surely, they cannot follow the reasoning in the principal case. Neither can we. 

BOOK REVIEWS 

WHY IS A SENIOR, by Adna R. Johnson, first edition, in one volume; Neithercut Bros., 1916, 
pp. X, 192. 

The fact that the work before me is in its first edition speaks very eloquently for the originality of 
purpose, ingenuity of thought and undaunted nerve possessed by the author, who is well known for his 
admirable treatise entitled, "Once a Mortgage Always a Mortgage." 

About half of the boot is given up to a consideration of nothing In particular, and from this preface 
the author laboriously gathers his many threads together anil presents the Senior as he has found him. 
He shows him at his rooming-quarters and here draws an appeahng pen picture of his endeavors to draw 
money from home. His remarkable discovery of the Senior at his studies leads the author to dwell at 
some length on the oddities and peculiarities of his subject, A shiny, new idea is ptesented at this point 
by the learned writer when he insists that, contrary to all venerable superstition and pedagogical belief, 
the Senior is at heart, human. In closing, the query as presented by the title of this book is unanswered, 
as was expected by all those reading the finis first. 

It will be generally admitted that Blackstone's Commentaries was the most extraordinary perform- 
ance in the history of legal writing. Suffice it to say, that Mr, Johnson's notable work makes Black- 
stone's effort a one-ring affair in comparison, and places Coke under the wide-spreading palm away from 
the sun. This book will be a welcome addition to any library as the binding is very fetehy. 

THE LAW AND I, by Maxwell I. Pitkin, Some Story Professor of Law in the Tooloose Uni- 
versity. Translated by Thomas R. McNamara, Ball Professor of Law at Diamond College: Brown, 
Brownell it Company, 1916, pp. Iviii, t05. 

After a very interesting opening toast, this volume proceeds to bring out into the calcium those 
experiences of the author which had previously been cakimined. To present chronologically the epoch- 
making stages of the author's travels in the Law seems to be the purpose of this work. The scope dis- 
played is remarkable and a keen insight into the various institutions during three periods is vividly- 
portrayed. The Law is personified as an individual with whom the venerable author is ever at outs. 
But as page 464 is reached, a lukewarm friendship springs up between them, which, as the story neats its 
close, ripens into a pseudo-companionship, so to speak. 

The author humorously relates a big game hunt he enjoyed while trailing the springing and shifting 
uses, and also of his search for a perpetuity. He here asserts that while on otie of his forays {not 4 A's), 
he destroyed a so-called indestructible future estate. If such was the case, (and we hope it was), another 
enemy of the Law was vanquished. 

The chapters presenting his own brand of philosophy introduce an element heretofore unknown to 
legal philosophists. To one who appreciates trite prose and has naught else to do, it is easy to read and 

J. F. S. 



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Medical School 

Victor Clarence Vaughan, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Dean 

The School of Medicine and Surgery was brought into existence by the o 
by the University on May 15, 1850. The School formally opened the following Octoher with Abram 
Sagcr as president. The cdurse consisted of lectures which extended over a period of sis months, from 
the first of October to the last of Match. Laboratory instruction was furnished from the beginning, 
and this was one of the first medical schools to supply practical work in inorganic and physiological chem- 
istry. The need of extension in laboratory instruction became apparent early and in 1872 the laboratory 
of Histology was procured. This was followed by one for Physiology in 1884, Hygiene in 1888, and 
Oinicai Medicine in 1891, Laboratory instruction has always been thorough. In the same year the 
University Hospital was opened, accommodating about eighty patients. In 1880 the course was lengthened 
to three years, and in 1890 to four years. About the year 1890 a six-year course leading to the degrees 
of A.B. and M.D. was offered. This combined course has proven so satisfactory that it has been adopted 
by most universities in English speating countries. A valuable addition to the hospitals is the Psycho- 
pathic Ward which the Legislature some time ago provided. In this way the medical student is furnished 
with an opportunity for the study of insanity and nervous disorders. The present Medical Building was 
mpleted in 1903. It is a well designed and. complete structure. The hospital now provides more than 



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TO ROY BISHOP CANFIELD, A.B.. M.D- 

A courteous genlleman. a profound scholar, a proficient teacher, a man, who by his 
untiring efforts and unselfish zeal has heen of untold benefit to the school, has raised the 
department of Oto-Laryngology from a place of minor significance to one of prominence, 
and by his interest in the general welfare of the student body has won a lasting place in 
their hearts, and one whom we honor for what he has accomplished, this section is affection- 
ately dedicated. 



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1916 Medical Class Officers 

H. M. Lowe President 

A. C. DiiMONT ... Vice-lVesidert 

H. A, Moore - Secreury 

W. M. DuGAN .... Treasurer 

F. C. Currier Baskeibail Manai-c 

H. R. John Track Manager 

S. W. DoNALDso^ Baseball Manager 



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1916 Medical Class Committees 



Hon. 

D, H. jEf 

H. HENDt 

F. P. CURBLER 

C. W. Eberbach 
L. L, YouNGuuis 



Auditing 

F. H. Harrison 
C. L. Stealy 
E, V. Bearuslee 



C. W, Ebekbach 

H. A. I.ICHTIG 

C. A. Chrcstensei 

Pictnu 
H. L. Smallman 
W. West RATE 
J. J. 0-Learv 



L. D, Funk 
H. R. John 

C. W. Eberbach 
W. F. Watton 

D. H. Jeffers 
A. H. Lance 

E. G. Galbraith 

Invitation 
R. H. Baker 
Margery I. Lord 
F- P. Currier 

Banquet 
L. K. Merepith 
J, R. McNuTT 



W, J, ECAN 
G. J. WiLMORE 
W, M. DUGAN 

Anna G. Dumont 



Senior Reception 

W. T. Vaughan 
D. Campbell 
Effce E. Arnold 



E. V. J 

H. 0. Westerveli 

W. M. Tappan 

Cap and Covin 

J. 0. DiETERLE 
A, H. KOUMJIAN 

M. E. Brownei.l 



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History of the 1916 Medical Class 



THE various classes of all the different departments from the campus were standing in Huston's one 
dayjust after the commencement exercises in Hiil Auditorium. "Speakingoftakingan anaesthetic" 
said the Senior Medic, "I hope none of you miss anything like the dream I had. It's better than a 
Cannabis Indica party any day. Youseeit was thisway: I had to have some 'cons' removed, so was sent 
to the University Hospital and directly to the anaesthetic room. Before I had time to realize what was 
happening, an orderly placed me on the table, a stethoscope was put onto my chest by a man in a lone 
robe and a cap which came down over his face; while he listened to my heart, he said to those about hi 



's alright, nothing but "Hy" ', and walked out. Then for the first time in my career I found myself 
g Miss Davis in the eye. She put a strip of rubber and cotton over my forehead, a very bad smeli- 
« and I could hear her saying in a tone that sounded miles away, 'Take : 



deep breath now, that's good — ps-u-u-u-gh'. Then as a nurse came in out of the amphitheatre I heard 
one of the students reading a history; he paused, and I heard another voice say, 'A very common case 
in this clinic'; then 1 took another long deep breath and as the nurse went back into the other room 
she stood holding the door open long enough for me to hear what was going on in there, and between 
the splashing of the water while the surgeons were scrubbing their hands these words reached me, ' Pres- 
ent illness began four years ago, onset acute, and patient says he has suffered continuously ever since". 
Then it all came back to me; 

"We gathered at the Medical building one morning early in the Fall of 1912, to listen to 
the opening exercises and address of our dean to be, already known to us as 'Piggy'. We 
all sat high up in the amphitheatre and gazed over the heads of Seniors, Juniors and Sophomores, at the 
Faculty and others who had gone before us and made a name and reputation for themselves in what was 
to be our chosen profession. After hearing for the first time that ever welcome ' Friends and fellow trav- 
elers', and later, 'So much has been said this morning that I feel unable to say anything', we passed 
out of the building and stood waiting to get one good look at the men we were to face so often in the 
coming years. 

"The next day we again assembled in the East Lecture room and for the first time took a good 'whiff' 
of the odor of the Anatomy lab, — (the ether must have been coming thick and fast just about then). 
That same morning we bought supplies and in the afternoon returned to the building to hear Dr. Huber's 
laboratory lecture about 'skeins', 'polar bodies' 'mitosis' etc., and to draw pictures of cells from an 

"Soon class activiries really started and with, the aid of a Student Council representative, a class 
president was elected — Edgar Beardslee being chosen to lead us for the first year— but he soon joined 
the band of Benedicts and by so doing was lost to us outside of the class room. 

"Social activities were now planned and a dance was given at Packard Academy with a very large 
attendance. The nest item of interest was the meeting at which the honor system was adopted, to which 
we have adhered very strongly ever since. 

"About this time I felt strong arms take hold of me and push me back upon the table, and a whispered 
voice said 'He's in the excitement stage now". Then I felt a strong desire to get up, push aside doctors, 
students, nurses, orderlies or anyone who might chance to be in my way and run as far as I could from 
the place. The reason for this was that I had thought of the first 'spot' and Dr. Streeter had handed 
me a very misshapen piece of someone's anatomy and said, ' Show me where the Vena Cava comes off'. 
Another deep long breath and I settled down resting easier again, and seemed to be soaring up among 
the clouds, floating along carefree and irresponsible, — the first vacation had come. But in a short time 
I was back again to thoughts of Nervous Anatomy, and a little later could hear Dr. Novy saying, 'Where 
is Mo-o-o-n-e^.' Suddenly a quick flash of something, men and women hurrying hither and thither, 
little black things squirming about, small flames burning everywhere, the rattle of test tubes and above 
all a voice kept repeating, 'Your attention for a moment', and in the lull that followed I recognized the 
Bacteriology lab. 

"Dr. McCotter left us about this time, going to Vanderbilt University to take the chair of Anatomy 
there and in his place Dr. McGarry gave us a short course in art,— at vaudeville speed. 

"Our first real vacation came none too soon and ended just as fast. The Sophomore year was 
ushered in by a Tammany Hall proceeding and George Watt was the leader for that term. 

"Athletics now had their run of enthusiasm, a basketball team, a football team, and. later in the 
spring, a baseball team, each making a showing such that several members of the class appeared on the 
campus wearing caps which bore the numerals 19M16. 

"During my reveries I had been wheeled into the operating room, and as I started to think of Dr. 
Warthin, I felt a deep cut, heard a voice calling, 'haemostatsl' 'sponges!' but to me it sounded like 
—'Next!— Nextl— NEXT!' 1 next could see Dr. Vaughan dividing his class into the 'Sheep' and 
the 'Goats', and then I seemed to see him again talking to a very large audience; but above all things 
I noticed many men who seemed to be paying no attention at all to what the speaker was saying, for 
they were looking not at him but across the amphitheatre where a great array of many colors was moving 
and jostling about. And then I remembered this same group of men as they stood outside of the build- 
ing and watched a parade go by, for it was the second semester and the class in Hygiene open to 'Lit' 



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girls was in full sway. The second year was almost past but as a closing chapter, our president, who was 
intending to enter Harvard the next Fall, gave the class a Banquet at Newberry Hall, Miss DuMont 
acting as Toast mi stress. 

"The Junior year began with several members absent when the roll was called, and also for the liist 
time the class was now divided into sections so that many who had been working together were separated, 
hut new partnerships soon sprang up and new friends were found. 

"Another campus honor society, the Galens, came into prominence about this time, inaugurated and 
made up of membets from the Medical depattment, twelve men from the Junior class being initiated. 
New lockers were placed In the Hospital halls but remained unused because of the exorbitant tax imposed 
by the superintendent for the privilege of using them. 

"In the social hne an All-Medic Smoker was held at the Michigan Union, attended by practically 
every man in the Medical School and most of the Faculty. This function helped to break the monotony 
of the very uncomfortable seats in the amphitheatre or the routine work in the laboratories, and also sat- 
isfy the cravings of the inner man by indulging in doughnuts and the cider which (lowed so generously, 
but above all thete was the pleasure of smoking free cigarettes to one's heart's content. Every one pres- 
ent was put into a joyous frame of mind by the speakers, especially by Bill Funk's recital of 'That Old 
Sweetheart of Mine', and Dr. Lombard's pet story, 'I won't shoot Horace just now, but you just wait'. 

"During the vacation period berween the Junior and Senior years three members of the class answered 
'the call of the wild', faced a minister and said, 'I do,' so when school opened in the Fall there were 



ehous 






"The Senic 
64 strong, bein 
by the waysidi 

"I now seemed to be resting easy and taking the ether remarkably well, the reason fo 
for the first time in the history of the class, a whole year was to pass without written ex; 
went well, and I felt sure that the new system so adopted will be pronounced a success. ; 
we would miss a man for a week or two, but when he returned he would tell us that I 
place as interne In some Hospital in the East, or in some Middle western city. 

"I then forgot everything in detail, and the next I remember was that I heard some 
up and take this.' 1 opened my eyes and reached out my hand and this is what they ga' 

" 'Where are you going to get it framed?' asked the Fresh Lit." 



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Medical Seniors 

Cornelius J. Addison . Grand Haven 

Alpha Kappa Kappa 
EwiE Elisabeth Arnold, B.S. , Dtiroit 

Alpha EpsiloD lots 
Robert Harper Bakek, A.B. . . Bay City 

Alpha Kappa Kuppa 
Edgar V. Beakdslee, B.S. . . Poniiac 

Qalem; Claw President (1) 
Morton E. Brownell, B.S. Onfonia, N. V. 

Phi Rho Siciua; Binfuoia 
LONA Z. BULYEA, A.B., M.A. 

Lower Windsot, N. B. 
DuHCAN Campbell, B.S. . Munising 

CUh Football (2) 
C. A. Christensen, B^, . Benion Harbor 

Phi Bet» R; Oaleiu: CIbbs Traok 
HftKRY C. CowAM, B.S. Waitb ffaila, ffask. 
Phi Oil; Round Up; Nonhwait«m Club; CIbh 
PsotlMll ieil-IS14 






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Medkal Seniors 

Fred Currier, B.S YaU 

Phi B«U Pi: AlptaH Omeea Alpha 

M. K. Deirmenjian . . Divrigui, Armenia 

Mrs. Mary De Kruif, A.B. . . Ann Arbor 

Alpha Epsilon Iota; Cbi Omega 

John O, DiETERLE, B.S Ann Arbor 

Phi BetB Pi 
Sam Wright Donaldson, A.B. Knoxvillt, Tenn. 



a; Griffins; 0»la: GaU 



Editor Micbi' 

Fishkiii, N. y. 



: Alpba 



•ia: Mob 



J(lpba; CLaas Secretsry <l)i Vioe-Prea 
WiLiiAM R. Eaton . . Mvlino, Ore, 

Cabl W. EberbaCH. A.B. . . Ann Arbor 
Nu Signia I4u; Alpba Omega Alpha . 






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Medical Seniors 

William J. EoAN, B.S. . . . Hurliy, Wu. 
Phi Kho fflgma! Alpha Omeja Alpha; Medical Vice- 
President Miohigan Union (4) 

L. D. Funk, A.B Athens 

Sicma Nu; Phi Cbl; Crafumen 
E. G. Galbraith, B.S. , BrookstiilU, Ky. 

PU Rho aipna! Alpha Oroaaa Alpha; GalenB 
Julius Stanley Shourds Gardner, B.S. . 

Harbor Spring! 
Ctatlamen 

William Henry Gordon, B.S. . Findlay.O. 

Phi Chi 
Harry Clark Hackman , Hohoken, Pa. 

Phi Beta Pi 
Fred H. Harrison, A.B. . . Ditroit 

Nil 8i(mii Nu: Galena 
Harold Henderson, B.S. . . Dtlroit 

Phi BeU Pi; Alpha OntSEB Alpha; Galeus; Totem; 
Student Coimdl 
John A. Herring, A.B. . Georgetown, Ky. 
Nu aigms Nu; Ki^tpa Alpha 



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Medical Seniors 

De\n Jeffehs fFatisav, fVxs 

Alpha kappa Kbpph 
Herbert R John, B S Ann Arbor 

Galsna 
Herbert F Kenny A B IMiUh, Winn 

Nu Sigma Ku Alpha Omega Alpha 
Lyle B Kingery B S Buchanan 

NuSismaNu Alpha Omsga Alpha 
Aredis H Koumjian Dorckijtfr, Mass 

Anthony Lange, B S Detroit 

Phi Beta Pi 
Lorenzo Brown Lapsley, A B 

Portland Ore 
Alpha phi Alpha VanuU Tiwk 13 11 IS 
Henry Allen LiCHTiG BS Mt Clemeni 

Marger-i J Lord, B S Montrtat, N C 

Alpha EpMlDD Iota Cla» Ssonury <3) 



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Medical Seniors 

HotroN M. Lowe, A.B. . . . Narvialk. O. 

Lv£e D. McMillan .... Indian Rkir 
John R. McNutt , - N,u; BrlkUktm, Pa 

L. K, Meredith . , . . ' Dn Moiies, la 
RouQd Up; Galens 

Harold Miller, B.S Lansing 

Phi Rim Biims; ^nfoDia; Round Up 
. Edmund C. Mohr, B.S. . Bay City 

'" ' Pbi Bho Sigma; StnfomH 

C. A. Mooney .... CurllsvilU, Pa 

.HEjt.sN-A. Moore. A.B. . . Carthagt, III 
(.. Alpha EpsiloQ Iota j 
John J. O'Learv, B.S. . M«skfgon 



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Medical Seniors 

Roland Winfieid Riggs . BrookvUU, Pa. 

J. Bradford Sfeley, B.S. . , . Detroit 

P\a Chi; Round Up; Gulena; C1m» Football(a) ; Bsskot- 

bKU(3) 

Harold W. SHOrTER, B.S. . . Graiui Rapids 

Alpha Koppa Kappa 
Howard t. Smallman. B.S. EllicotwilU, N. Y. 

Phi Chi 
Robert J. Snider, Jr., B.S. . Wheeling, JV. fa. 



FhiChi 

Karl S. Staati 

Claik L. Stealy .... 

Alpha Kappa Kappa 

Louis D. Stehm, A.B. , . 



Tacoma, tVaik. 
Charlotte 



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Medical Seniors 

Chakles Soberts Tbomas, A.B. 

. . . . iVistminster, Md. 
PU Khpph Psi; Phi Beta Pi 

Warren T. Vaughan, A.B. , . Ann Arbor 

B«ta TbeU Pi; Phi Rho Siipna; Alpha OoHva AtpbH 

William R. Vis, B.S 7^ilar,d 

LouH E. Waish ...... St. Ignact 

Phi Chi; Roiind Up 
Damon O. Walthall, B.S. . . . Paola, Kan. 

Nu Sigida Nu; Vsraity Band (1) (!) 



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Medical Seniors ' ,- x . 

Walter F. Watton, B.S tli^ly C^ . :■ ■■ 

Cb™ TreMUret (31 ,\-;-' "■ 

Herbert O. Westervelt, B.S. . . Ann Arbor ' -■; '; 

William Westrate, A.B. . . ■ Hoiland j-';; 

Cla» Football (2) '■'■" 
Glen J. Wclmorh, B.S, . . Van fVert, 0. 

Phi Cbi; Eouad Up; GalBtis '■''''..'■' 

L. L. YouNGfiUiST, B.S. . . . Matq'ut" 
^fu Sigma Nu 






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1916 Medic Statistics 



THE last election of the Senior Medical class was held at a most opportune time, being before, 
during, and after a "Blue Book" by Dt, Parker. Dr. R. Bishop Canfield was chosen as the pro- 
fessor to -whom the medical section of the hook should be dedicated, winning this honor from 
Dr. Hewlett and Dr. Novy by a very narrow margin. 

The presence of one word alone, and that word was "think", fairly stumped the entire class when 
it came to selecting the most beneficial course, for each and every one seemed to have a choice, but after 
the ballots had been carefully counted, "Internal Medicine" had the most followers. In casting the 
ballot for the next question on the election blank, humor, satire and seriousness all took a part, humor 
finally winning by voting Pathology as the biggest snap course. Roentgenology coming next, and those 
not quite understanding fully the meaning of what was meant by "snap" voted Hygiene third. For 
the most enjoyable course, — not meaning hour, — Gen i to-Urinary quiz cook first in a walkaway, though 
Psychiatiy gained somewhat on the home stretch, with Hygiene getting an occasional and straggling 
vote from some of the members who seemed Co have ideas of grandeur and thought it was enjoyable 
that some members (!) had to be across the amphitheatre. 

The most popular man was a neck and neck race between "Hap" Galbraith and "Harold" Hen- 
derson, while Lowe showed that another married man also had a lot of ftiends. The decision finally 
rested between the first two mentioned, and by saying, "It can'c be done", che vote was called a tie. 

The vote for the most popular girl brought out a candidate who catried off " sevetial " honors, heing 
voted the most popular girl by a very large majority, running an exceptionally good race for the best 
student, winning the title of the joUiest girl by all but three votes, the prettiest gitl by as great a number 
of admirers, and lastly the first girl to get married by all but one voce, due to the fact that some one is 
keeping a secret and voted for herself. This person who was chosen so many times for so many places 
is Miss Anna Dumont, who started out being "one of the boys" and has stayed with us ever since. 

For the handsomest man "Doc" Youngquist came to the ftont with a rush and stayed thete through- 
out the race, while the two "Bills" — Funk and Gordon — were fighting it out for first under the wire 
in the "Thinks he is" class. 

White it is a known face chat many cast a vote for themselves or exchanged with a ftiend for the 
best student, one man was honest and said "Thete ain't no such animal". Vaughan, Henderson, Eber- 
bach and Miss DumtHit finished in the order named. 

"The most successful bluffer" — Addison won his place four years ago in Physiology and took a 
lead which neither Currier nor Diecerle could overcome, chough "Diet" did show real strength on two 



The biggest grind was a repetition of che best student ballot, each and every one hoping to be able 
to show the "Old Folks at Home", — but, alas, alack and woe, that can be done by only one, "Tony" 
Lange, while Kingery can say he was second. 

For the shtewdest politician only a few Tammany Hall followers started and the same number 
finished, they being "Bach" Eberbach, "Sam" Donaldson and "President" Lowe. 

The keenest competition of the day occurred when the tace for the biggest fusser started, but many 
who would have been glad to be so designated, and glad to get the honor, did not receive a single vote. 
Some of the men elected "have a reason", others have not, but that matters little and the best man won 
as usuaL Result — Christenson, first; Staatz, second; Galbraith, third; while Dugan and Meredith finished 
with the "also ran" group. 

It seems to be the opinion of two of the members of the class "that if you arc — then think you are", 
and that is the reason both Thomas and "Hank" Lichtig had an equal number of votes for " the sportiest 
guy" and "thinks he is"— "Tommy " being first in both with Lichtig a close second, but running a better 
race for "I think lam". 

Many of the unattached whom no one dreamed would ever become a benedict had it wished upon 
them to be the first man married, while some one voted "accidents will happen". If votes count for 
anything at all and one is supposed to abide by public opinion Miller, Staatz and Funk will have heard, 
"Do you take this woman foi your lawfully wedded wife?" long before they bear, ' By the virtue of 
the powct of the Board of Regents " — so if this be true then the question of who is the first girl to get 
married is settled at once. 

S. W, D. 



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College of Dental Surgery 

Nelvclle Soule Hoff, D.D.S., Dean 



The fiisc agicaiion for the creation of this department came in 1865, and in 1875 the Legislature 
appropriated S'OOO per year, for a term of two years, with which to establish a school of dentistry at 
Ann Arbor, and in May of that year the Regents took steps to provide for the department. Two pro- 
fessorships were created and lirst filled by Jonathan Taft and J. A. Watling. The department had its early 
eiistence under the general supervision of the Medical Department, The course consisted of two years' 
work, the terms being only six months long, October to March, but in the fall of 1884 the terms were 
lengthened to nine months. In 1S99 the course was finally made to consist of three years of nine months 
each. The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery has always been given. The first accommodations were 
in the west ward «f the old Homeopathic hospital building, then in the building now occupied by the 
Department of Civil Engineering, and in 1891, at the completion of rhe new University Hospital, the 
Dental Deparrment moved to the old University Hospital building. At this time the Dental Society 
of the University of Michigan was organized, and assumed charge of the publishing of the Dental Journal, 
which ceased publication in 1900. The new Dental building was erected in 1908 and is one of the best 
equipped and most complete dental buildings in the world, especially in its Technical Laboratories and 
Operating Rooms, The Taft Library is located in the Dental building and contams aim. 



n dentistry, and practically complete files of every Dental jo 
also located in the building, and the odontological collection i 
and best of its kind to be found in any Dental college. It con 
Ford and Dr. William Mitchell of London, England. The mi 
Museum. Beginning with the session of 1917-191S the course 
course. An optional four year course will be offered beginning 



published. The Dental museum is 
: especially strong— probably the largest 
ains the collections of the late Professor 
icum has been named the Ford-Mitchell 
of study will be extended to a four year 
October, 1916. 



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TO LOUIS PHILLIPS HALL 



Who gains our confidence by his kindly w^ys and pleasing personahty, and our respect 
for his high standard of professional ethics as well as his professional knowledge, we. of the 
Dental class of 1916, dedicate this section of the Michiganensian. 



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Senior Dents 



Pres 

Vice-Ptes 

Secretary 

Athletic Mgr, '-'-'.'.'. 


W. Kendall Meade 

C D, Cole 

A. H. I.OWTHER 

C. M, R[CE 

J. H. Barringer 


Social 
R. M. Kellocc 
■. t. Kane 

.. J. Decer 


Cane 
H. H. Jackson 
A. J. Bolt 
C. P. Haas 
M. E. McKenna 


Jadiling 
W. A. Dav.ds 
H. M, Lechner 
H. W. Weisel 
W, B. Klinestecher 


C. W. Woods 
R, E. Motlev 

L. P. f ISHER 

L. H. BoucuiN 


Jnnounctment 

J. R. Hawn 

D. I. Cote 
R. J. Mullen 
J, J.. Lambert 


Cap and Gown 
G. E. Chichester 

A. H. Hadley 

B. J. Moss 

F. N. I.EICHT 


Memorial 
C. H. Matson 
L. M. Globenskv 

A. L. SOUTER 

W. G. Rich 


Picture 
B. L. Grajewski 
R. D. Cummins 
G. E. Madison 
E. A. Ross 



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The 1916 Dental Class History 

FOREWORD 

While the word history is used in two senses, meaning the record of events or the events themselve 
and white all things in the universe ate continually changing, thus making hisioiy, yet in its most cor 
monly accepted meaning history deals with the more important events and their effects. Thus it 
quite impossible fur the author to make mention of those few gentlemen who have made a special r 
quest that their names appear on these pages. 



In October, 1913, there gathered at the Dental building one hundred fourteen earnest pop-eyed 
freshmen. While they admired the haughty seniors whom they saw about the campus, yet were they 
tilled with awe at their great learning, and many, gazing at these upper classmen, had serious misgivings 
when they thought of all the difficulties that must be overcome before they might attain that honorable 
and envied rank. 

After receiving the customary admonitions from various members of the faculty, (said admonitions 
were considered as personal at thai time, but since it has been learned chat they are expounded to all 
freshmen classes) these freshmen proceeded to elect Mr. Peters to the presidency. The first year was 
spent to good advantage with the usual clouds that darken the sky at times for most first year men ap- 
pearing on their horizon. But on close investigation they found that most of these clouds had a silver 
lining; and proper application to their work, on the part of those standing in the shadow, soon cleared 
them away. 

In our Junior and Senior years our numbers for various reasons were soinewhat reduced, but as a 
whole the class stood up well under the enforcement of the rules which the faculty carefully followed 
out. The second year, Mr. Moran, and the last year, Mr. Mead, were chosen to guide us thru the diffi- 
culties which confronted us; and these men, as well as Mr. Peters the first year, proved that the con- 
fidence of the class was not misplaced. 

We have supplied our quota of men to the various musical organizations, including the Glee Qub, 
the Mandolin Club, the U of M Band, etc. 

In athletics, while we have not producted any of the great men, yet we have among our numbers 
some of the near great, as evidenced by the fact that individuals are occasionally seen in our midst wear- 
ing a large " R" on their manly chests. But in class athletics we have made a very creditable showing, 
so that there are many who wear their numerals, thus proving that they prize honor among their own 
people more highly than supple fingers, even in this, their chosen profession. 

In a way the class as a whole has always been somewhat handicapped owing to the fact that the 
class role hears no names of any of the gentler sex. Some of the men, anticipating the lack of tefining 
influence in the classroom brought wives with them; and others, after being in school for a greater or 
less period of time, came to realize acutely that to he deprived longer of their association might, and 
probably would, wreck their lives, and proceeded to take unto themselves helpmates. The balance of 
the class are resolutely endeavoring to complete their course alone but the interest of many seems to 
be somewhat divided. 

During the summer intervening between the first and second years. El Said, a man who had come 
from Cairo, Egypt, to this dental School In order that he might fit himself to practice dentistry among 
his own people, fell ill and died. It was a privilege to know a man who maintained the greatest optimism 
altho continually confronted by a multitude of difficulties to which the rest of us were strangers, and 
the fact that he could not live to complete the task which he had journeyed so far to undertake and see 
the fulfillment of his ambitions, is lamented by all his associates. 

The last year is now nearing a close and the majority of us are looking forward with pleasure to the 
latter part of June when we hope to have the privilege of following the band down the diagonal walk, 
around the campus, then to the Hill auditorium where we receive our diplomas which will allow us to 
undertake the task of demonstrating to various state examining boards that we are qualified to practice 
dental surgery in our chosen communities. 

This pleasure is. however, tinctured with regret when we realize that we shall shortly be deprived 
of the counsel and assistance of the men who have labored so earnestly with us during the past three years. 
I refer to all the members of the faculty with whom we have been associated and whose influence and 
kindly interest will have such a distinct bearing on the remainder of our lives. But while most of us can 
enjoy the close associarion with these men no longer, yet by following their teachings in the main, and 
emuiaring their excellent examples we shall continue to benefit and likewise prove to them that their 
efforts to send out men who will do a real service for their fellowmen have not been in vain. 



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Dental Seniors 

John H. Barkcngek . Huniinglon, W. Va. 

Fsi Omega; Claas Athletic MHimser (41 

Arthur J. Bolt Grand Hoftn 

Lester H. Bouqucn .... Fredonia, N. Y. 
Pai OnwsH: Clan Buebatt sod BoskstboU 

George C. Bowles, Jr Dtlroit 

P. L. Brockman ,..,.... Romeo 

S. C. Broomfield Millbroak 

L. D. Bryant .... Saiquehanna, Pa. 
G. E. Chichester Gnat Falls, Mont. 

pgi OnMta; OwIb; Cliwa BBaebsU 
Charles D. Cole .... Mafle Rapids 
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Dental Seniors 


.Dona John Cote .... 


Iron Mountain 


Georce H. Cbusius . . 

Delta Sicma Dsltt 


Pavlding, 0. 


RoscoE D. Cummins .... 


HilhdaU 


Delta Sigma Delia; Hou 


ulUp 


W. A. Davids 


Dttroit 


Leon J. Decer 

Xi Pei Phi; Clam Vice-PRsd 


Dayton, 0. 
■Dt(i> 


Jacob de Liipde , , . . 

Miohisan Sncoer Tsum 


Grand Rapid, 


Will E. Dennis .... 


Oxford 


Ferdinand G. Drati . . 

Acacia: Pm OtnaEK 


. Mushgo,^ 


Henry Doig Dunlop . . 

Tkarjetnvjo, Bur 


ma. South India 






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Dental Seniors 

Leonard P. Fisher ^nn Arbor 

Xi PBi Phii Clfl« Basketbiill, Maoager (3) 

James A. Gaffney .... RochesUr, N: Y. 

Delta 8jgma Delta 

Leo M. Globensky Hillsdalt 

DelU Sigma Delta 
Jacob Goldenbuhg . . . Milwauiif, Wis. 

B. L. Grajewski Pittsburg, Pa. 

W. J. Grimes Atlanta. Ga. 

Alpha Phi Alpba 
Clifford Haas . . Sioux Fails, S. Dak. 

Psi OmeEB 
A. H. Hadlev , Holly 

J. Ray Hawn Buffalo, K. Y. 

Sculp Md Blade; Clsu BasebaU (1) (2|; Claw 
Ba^etbalKJ) (2) (3) 



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Dental Seniors 



_.. _...«. Secretary (3); Chaii- 

LvHAN L. Jones Wyaniotu 

Frank J. Kane Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Akhenatan Society: Xi I 

Clui BtuketbaU (1) (2); CIhh ^uebaU (1 
Richard M. Kellogg .... Bault Crrtk 
Zi Pn Phi: Social Committee Chwrniui (41 

E, H. KiLCHERMAN Notkport 

William B. Klinesteker .... Dorr 
P« Omen; Olee Club <2) (3> (4) : President DoMt 
Scliool yTm. C. a. 

M. Prodomus KvPRiAMiDEg Amaisia, Tarkty 
SpringfieU, lU. 



I J. Leslie Lambert 

XiPiiPhi 

C. L. Lane 



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P.entgl' Seniors 



Dunkirk, N. Y- 
Roihistfr. N. Y. 



): Glee c 



I'MBiidG 
il Club 



Harold M. Lechhe 

FraiJk N. Lfjcht 

Psi Oioega; Class Bi 
Oliver Otto Leinii 

ThptB Xi; Cliiurniai 

Baseball <l) {2)i B« 

Club (3) (4); Direc 

Alfred H, Lowtmeh Detroil 

Sigma Nu at Albion CollegE; aass Secretary (4) 
R. A, Macdonald .... Albany, N. Y. 
G. E. Madison .... Htriimtr. N. Y. 

Delta agma Delta; Kounrl Up 

Charles H. Matson fii„, 

Delta Sigma Delta 

Dttroil 



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Dental Seniois 

Mm-]HEW E. McKenna Canon City 

Pai Omega 

W. Kendall Meade Orleans 

Xi Psi Phi; CImb President («} 
Orland Alfred Mclleh .... Dttroil 
Hakrv Mogford Flini 

Eremites Club 

.... Piniktuy 
);CliwB>»lMUa) <2) 

B. J. Moss Maplf Rapids 

Pm Omegft 
Robert Emmett Motley . . Ann Arbor 

Musictl Clubs (3) (4> 
Raymond J. Mullen .... Ironwood 
Ph Ome^; CloM BwebtUI Muufar (IJ 

Harry Osbohn Chatlotu 

CIhb Secretiin' (1) ' 



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Dental Seniors 

Fred C. Peters Bay City 

R. W. Pru»T Hobarl, Tasmania, Juslralia 
CLirroN M. Rice WiUianiiioti 

Cl™ TMMUrer (4) 

W. Grover Rich Caylord 

■ C^UinCUHBtiKbaLl (41: ClsHB Ba^etball 141: Vsr- 
Bity Band (1) (3) (4) 

C. Harold R[CHAR»3nN (Jwosio 

J. E: Robertson . Btoomjonttin, S. Africa 

Soccer Football Team 
William Robertson Bhomfoniein, S. Africa 
PttMdeat Coamotwlitsn ClDb: Southern Club; Hoc- 

James Kane Robinson .... Muskegon 
Xi Pai Phi; Semar DeoUL Society; Union Fool- 
ball Smokfr Ci^ruitln '14; Olsn Ba^ctball (3) 

Ernest Ross Hanoner 



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Dental Seniors 

Wayne Roulette Frank/on 

Ralph S. Seguare . . - Hopkinlon, N. Y. 
A. V. W. Serfontein . . Boihof, South Africa 
WitLARD Bartley Sheldon . FUir, Idako 

Leonard Siev .... Nta York, N. Y. 

MfDorah Booiety; IntsTFolleiriaw Sociiilist Society! 

Glee Club (3) (4) 

Anthony Fred Sommer .... DeUait 

DetlH Sigmft Delta 

A. L. SouTER Shilby 

Xi Pai Pti 
Walter L. Spencer .... Grand Rapids 

Xi P«i Phi 
AhCHCBALD W. Sfil'lERS ...,., Otid 



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Dental Seniors 

Leightoh G. Steele .... Butler, Pa. 
Delta Sicmii DelU: Rouod Up 

F. W. StoLPe MarqvitU 

,-' F. P. SuGMET Midland 

Lykh H. TiNCAY Albion 

,;■ B. Vkxler .... A'™ York, N.Y. 

Herbert W. Weisel . . Fairbury, Neb. 
,' \ Xi Psi Phi 

i ^' 

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Dental Seniors 




Robert J. Wells 

FuOmtgA 


. Buchanan 


Herbert Roy W:l90N , . Spri' 
Aawis; Pai Omega; Student Cou 


igfiild, Mass. 


Harry T.Wood 

Delt. Sigma Delta 


Dttroit 


Carleton W. Woods . . . 


Ann Arbor 


Clarence J. Wright . . . 

Itelta Signm Delta: Clasi BmbI 


CariapoHs 


Frank A. Zastrow .... 
Xi Prf Phi 


Lapttr 



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Personalities of the 1916 Dental Seniors 

From force of habit, the faculty all ajiree that the 1916 Class is the best ever. It, the numerous 
faculty meetings held at the close of the first semester, this did not seem to hold true. 

History and Ethics rank head and shoulders above the rest as the most beneficial course, while Oper- 
ative Principles was considered the bieEest snap. In fact quite a few of the fellows were ashamed to 
take credit for the course. Orthodontia was by far the most enjoyable course. Dr. Watson's "abom- 
inable" and "heroic" phrases kept the fellows in good humor, 

Jim de Liefde was chosen to he the most popular man with " Lep" Siev a close second. 

Only having two girls in the class it was not very hard to decide the most popular one. Miss Miller 
winning by a large majority. 

We have many handsome men but "Joe" Applegaie's "rosy cheeks," ever present good natured 
smile, and the Hypertrophy on his upper lip, gave him first place. Harry Wood considered himself in 
the "handsome class"; at least, that is the impression made upon the class. 

Alice Motley was considered the prettiest girl; possibly her ever willingness to bandage up and nurs 
all ailments of the class gave her the deciding vote. 

The best student falls to the lot of "Hadlcy", his perfect recitations always inspiring us to do 
better in the future. 

When it comes to the "All American Bluffer", "Doc" Woods fills the bill heroically. "Doc" Riek- 



"Jack" Campbell was unanimously chosen 


as the biggest grind. 


"Dick" Meade proved himself to be the s 
perfect harmony. 


rewdest politician by guiding us throiigli the ye 


Our jollicst giti, "Hib" H.bler, has been 
not be all true. 


omewhat downhearted lalely; cheer up "Hib", 


Our class was mostly made up of fussers, b 


ut "Leinie" Leininger gets the belt. 


i;upied that place. 


ne on the campus, even if Lowther thouiiht tha 


"Kyp" Kyprionedes has been ariing very 
lost all interest on dinic work. "Kvp" must 
luck, old boy! 


trangelv lately, pncing furniture, etc.i he seems 
be planning on entering the field of matrimony. 



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College of Pharmacy 



:k. Ph.C. Ph.D., Dean 



The ColleRe of Phstmscy was organized in 1S68 as part of the department of I.iterani 
and the Arts. The first degree was conferred in 1869. In 1876-7 the college was reorganized 3: 
department of the University. From the first the college combined laboratory methods of ir 
with class work whenever practicable. In 1897 the Degree of B.S. in pharmacy was first conferred. The 
requirements for entrance and the number of hours required for graduation for the U.S. degree have 
always been the same as for other similar collegiate degrees given hy this University. Beginning with the 
fall of 1913. the College of Pharmacy offered three degrees, requiring two years for the degree of Ph.G., 
three years for Ph.C, and four years for B.S. The entrance requirements for these degrees are gradua- 
tion from an approved high school or its equivalent as found on examination by the university examin- 



Since the completion of the new Chemistry and Pharmacy Building in 
had (he advantages of fine commodious quarter- ■■'■'•'• -' '— '-■-- ■ 



with all modern e 
of chemistry and pharir 



. IS for regular work and cl 
I splendid library, including 



ing in 1910 the department has 
as complete working equipment as could be de- 
fine prescription 
s and periodicals 



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TO ALVISO BURDETT STEVENS 

Who has devoted his life to the advancemem of Professional Pharmacy and Pharma- 
ceutical Education, and who for more than twenty-five years has been a faithful guide and 
an inspiration to the students of Pharmacy, this section is affectionately dedicated, A 
man of the highest ideals, who, by his steadfastness of character and gentle spirit, has won 
the love and esteem of all who have been privileged to know him. 



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Senior Pharmics 

RoBI.G-Rbown I'ltsident 

Andrew E. Roedel Vice-President 

Cecil R. McMcllen Secretary 

Maurice L. Rlshmore Ireasurer 

Chas, Cosr.i Athletic M^r. 

Edcar Olson Student Counri 

Wm, D, Cochh.an CNiss Historian 

Finance Commillie .luditing 

Chas. Costa Wm. D. Cochran 

RoBT. F. S^^nH Hobart F. Shaw 
J. Dillon 

Invitation and Cants 

Earl Cummings Cap and Goa'ii 

Ray E. Shoetion Cecil R, McMilli-n 

Andrew E. Roedel Samuel Asersohn" 

^lichigan/nsiaii and Picivrf Social 

Vincent Stlmpf Mauricl L. Kushmore 

Henry Ofllrich EnnAR Olson 



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History of 1916 Pharmacy Class 

URING the last week of September 1913, the Pharmacy class of '16 arrived in the metropolis 
of Washtenaw County, hot in the pursuit of knowledge. After a hard f\fht tbey escaped with 
most of their bajjgane from a group of auto bandits employed by the Ann Arbor Taxicab Co., 
ned their steps toward Houston Hall. Their ardor had cooled somewhat, when they arrived at 
of State Street Hill; however, rememhering that beyond the Alps lay Italy, they strode onwards. 



Out of the motley mass of pill rollers came 
credit is due Bill in changing the U, S. P. reqi 
We had the splendid advice of Acting Dean Sti 
feat of A. E. Roedel in a controversy over the i 
of November we were initiated into the mvster 
able as the money put into the Y. M- C. A. wa 
to Parke Davis and Co.'s plant in Detroit was 



Bill Seibert who ruled supreme during '12 and '13. Much 
lirements so that several of our "Preps" were accepted, 
svens, and Dr. Hubbard, who won fame by his signal de- 
ments of Oscar Oldberg. About the middle of the month 
ies of the Prescott Club, which investment was as profit- 
is a very poor investment. Near the end of May a trip 
. enjoyed by the entire class. 

Class activities started our sophomore year by the election of Dick Arner as class president. Dean 
Stevens and Dr. Hnhhatd were still with us. The Prescott Club made another feeble attempt for recog- 
nition and existed through the year. During this year the members of the class, according to the length 
of their pockets and the height of their ambitions spht into the two, three, and four year classes. The 
class was entertained this year by Frederick Stearns and Co., of Detroit. 

The fall of 1914 found Ed. Olson in charge of a very small but select crowd of pill and powder ex- 
perts. In fact the class was so small that we had five officers and one private. Dr. Schlotterbeck re- 
turned after a two years' absence to resume the duties of Dean of the Dep't. He has piloted us through 
several of our courses, and though several of the passages were a little rough he has proven himself a 
very good captain, and has the respect of every Pharmic in the college. This year Dr. Hubbard left 
us to take charge of the Bureau of Organic Chemistry of the Dep't of Agriculture at Washington, D. C, 
A very feeble attempt was made to revive rhe Prescott Cub but without much success. The class was 
well represented on Varsity Athletic teams. 

With R, Ci. Brown at the helm we caughr our wind for the last lap. We were joined by several men 
enrolled in the two and three year courses and together assumed the responsibilities of Seniors. Prob- 
ably the most noteworthy event of this year was the revival of the Prescott Club, which at the present 
time is in operation with all its old time glory. In our four years of college life we have seen the College 
of Pharmacy double in numbers. The standard has been much improved and the requirements for ad- 
mission raised. The College has been very prominent in athletics. For the last two years a Pharmacy 
student has been chbsen Captain of the football team. We see many things in store for the College of 
Pharmacy and regret that the best four vears of our life have so soon come to a close. 

R. B. C, 



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Pharniical Seniors 

John A. Ankenbranut, Jr. ... Tol/do, O. 

Saml'el Asehsohn Bay City " - . 

R. G. Brown Pigeon 

jA\fES \V. Carey . . , . Syrafuj/, N. Y. 

CIbbb Track ManBger (1) ; " ■ 

William D. Cochran Uougkion ^ 

liappH Sigmiii Vsrsity Football CBptain (4) 

Charles Costa Norway ;■.'.- 

Phi Dells Chi; Claw Athletic Managpr (4) -fi - ',',■.■' 

F.AHL W. CuMMiNGS Detroit :-■ '■ 

Phi Delta Chi: Phoeuix 
Joe Dillon Benton. III. \ ,■■■, 

John A. Kerr .... Trimounl^in ' '^ ' ' "■ ■ 

Present! Club 



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Pharmical Seniors 


Cecil McMjllen . . . 


McCook. Seb. 




hi Lambda Upoilon^ Ariawlochite 


ClftM Secretary (4) 


H 


N. Oellrich .... 


Varroaisbarf, N. Y. 


Pieecott Club TreHsiirer: AriMol 


white; CiM. Michi- 




anelmiui Conimitlw 




M 


WMCr. L. RUSHMOHE . . 


. , Old Mission 


R 


V E- Shoeteon , , . 


. . . Matcitlvs 




HoBAHT Shaw , , . 


. . . . Ouosso 




PbiDe1UCbi;ClB«lDdoD 


BuebBll U) 




Robert F. Smith . . 


. , Sti/antnn, 0. 










V, H. Stumpf .... 


. . Eureka. Ill, 




Phi Df Ita Ch 






Howard K. Weaver 


. , Grifnvilli. 0. 



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Homeopathic Medical School 

WiLBERT B. HcNSMLR, A.M., M.D., Dean 

THE Homeopathic Medical School was established under act of the State Legislature as one of 
the departments of the Untvetsity in 1875. It affords the unexcelled advantages of a university 
department. Residence in a community of students pursuing a great diversity of professional 
subjects is itself of much cultural value. It aims to give the student who is prepared to register in its 
classes a thorough training in medicine and surgery and bases its therapeutics upon the idea that the 
homeopathic principle is an adequate and successful guide in the selections of medicine. The school 
places emphasis upon the objective or clinical methods of instruction; such methods can be carried 
out only in a properly equipped hospital under entire control of a stalF of competent teachers and 
demonstrators. The University Hospital (Homeopathic) is in the immediate vicinity of all university 
activities, being just across the street from the original campus, occupying a large space of ground so 
that its exposures to light and free atmosphere cannot be impeded. The hospital is conceded to be one 
of the finest structures of the University, is always the scene of practical work which is carried on pri- 
marily in the interest of instruction, and secondarily that those who are attracted to its service may re- 
ceive the most careful and skillful attention. A feature of this department is a laboratory for patho- 
genetic experimental work. There are two nurses' homes in connection with the hospital training school, 
and some small shacks for the purpose of demonstrating the "open air" methods of treating tuber- 
culosis. It also has a fully equipped clinical laboratory with a skillful director in charge. There is a 
separate building for the lying-in patients, also a building for the departmental offices. 



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DEAN WENTWORTH MYERS. '99 



Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, RhinoloEV, LaryngoloEy; Dean of Training 
School for Nurses and President of the American Homeopathic OphthalmoloEical, 
Otological and Laryngological Society 1914-1915. He is a man broad of mind and 
big at heart, with a kindly inspiring twinkle of the eye that radiates good cheer and 
warmth to all with whom he comes in contact; a surgeon of recognized ability; an 
fed by his pupils; a man honored by his colleagues; a man among men. 



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1916 Homeopathic Class Officers 

Danlel M. Clarke President 

P r FnniuM .... Vice-Presii 

I.. I.. JOHUAN ... 

Bessie N.NsivcuMB Secretary 

L. R. Clay Treasurer 

Eugene S. Thornton Historian 

Imiitaiion Committei Cap and Goan 

P. E. Havnes C. C. Thomas 

H. C Allbn . D, H. SiLSBv 

Class Day Memorial 

J, L. Gates Miss B, N. Newco 

N. D. Shaw E. S. Thornton 

C. C. JORMAN 



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Homeopathic Seniors 

H. C. Allen huiependcricc la 

AlphB Tau Omegas Phi Alpha Osiania 
Daniel M. <:larke . . . Scranlon, Pa 

Pi UpulDD Rho; KeytttoDF Club 
Lloyd R. Clav i/nn Mor 

Alpha BiEniH^ Class Treasurer (4) 

Philip E. Havnes . . Hoaell ky 

Sinu Alpha EpailoD;FiUpBibaRho Claas Preg (2) 

Caivin C. Jordan . . H r-l MonUrey Pa 

Clan Vicv-Ph^dent <4) 



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Homeopathic Seniors 

iiE N Newcomb .... CarUlon,Mich. 



Norman D bHAw 

Phi Alpha Gan 

DonH Silsby 



Sec. U) 

.... 'Uiica, N. Y. 
V, Otm TtBMurer 13) 

, . . Rackeiur, N. Y. 
WaUrford, Pa. 



Camp C Thomas 

Alpha SilmB 

Eugene Sharpe Thornton , Ltbanon, Ind. 

Slims Chi Pi Upailon Rho; AuooiaM Editor 

KUDhiganeiuiBii Clau Prendent |l|: HiatorwD 






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History of the 1916 Homeops 



THERE have been class histories, and there will be class histories; but the luckless historian who 
pens these lines seeks not to draw the eyes of ihe world from the struggle of the Triple Entente 
and the Teutonic hordes, for even a passing moment. 

The class of 1916 lays no claims to hero medals or to unusual genius. We sajf unusual, for 
genius is simply doing a thing in a way out of the ordinary and we do recall numerous occasions, when we 
have done things as they have never been done before, and we pray never will be again. But the class 
does claim to be the smallest graduating class on the campus and we are proud of it, "Little things 
make perfection, and perfection is no httle thing," says Michael Angelo, hence we have the proper 
impetus that leads to success, for success after alt is made up of the little things. 

We entered the school in 1912, at the beginning of the increased requirements for entrance, which 
accounts much for our smallness. Forty percent of the class are men with Bachelor's degrees, while 
the remaining numbers have had at least two vears of pre-medic work. 

Our history has not been unusual. We have enjoyed all the pleasures of out courses, and have also 
suffered all the agonies of a " poor medic." We have heard from one of our "learned" instructors, with 
a split-protein smile, that small doses stimulate, while large ones paralyze. That pleased us much; but, 
"tA cruel suspicion," he proceeded to make it more "particulate" and "specific" and said, "I mean 
mathemadcally small, not homeopathically." But co this day we have never been told the distmction. 
Yetwesrill^oty in thepowerofthe"little things," and in this theclass standsas a unit; there are no 

The fortunes of the class in the first year were guided by E. S. Thornton, then by P. E. Haynes 
and C. C. Thomas in the following years, in the order named. 

H. C. Allen has ably looked after our interests in the Student Council, and Miss Bessie N. New- 
comb has ihe honor of being the only woman enrolled in the department. 

The brightest spot in our otherwise uneventful career has been the "pater familia" spint of our 
Dean and the faculty. The Dean says we haven't been as bright as he expected us to he ami he never 
thought we were going to anyway. But he has ever been a father to us all, and many will be the times 
when twilight shadows lengthen across the lawn that our thoughts will revert to "Papy," and, yes, his 
inseparable friend, old " Peter." 

We will also miss hearing members of the faculty say: "Sure as preachin' ", "For all the world", 
"The indicated remedy is bound to work", "This isn't any text book, but this is my idea", '.'I Per- 
formed that operation before 1 ever read of 'India' Smith's technic", and "I want my coffee with my 
meals, not with my pie". 

There can be no sunrise without a sunset, and o 
to pass beyond the horizon to rise on the morrow eve 



Senior Homeopathic Statistics 

Recordsshow that in no department does the size of classes depreciate so rapidly as in the medical. 
If the toils of anatomy, histology and bacteriology do rot send an embryo medic into a coma from which 
he never awakens, then it can be depended upon that pathology will administer the " knock-out blow." 
The instructor himself says that he can get the entire brain of a soph medic under one small cover glass, 
hence less than 60% of the entering freshmen class ever graduate. 

In our freshman year, the class was composed of eight members. It now has eleven, an increase 
instead of a loss; an enviable record. 

We have thoroughly enjoyed the "versatility" of our professors, in telling us what we were study- 
ing. In our first two years we were told Homeopathy was "moonshine," "hot air," "pseudo-Christian 
Science," and numerous other terms less polite. But the last two years upon the other side, have been 
further enlightened by being informed it was a "grand truth," an "infallible law," a "true science," 
a"god-send," etc. 

Our chief regret has been that we could not fill more seats in the operarive pic, and act as srimuli 
to the gentle zepher of our operators. But we thank heaven for Dr. Stouffer's class in " First Aid " which 
has always been welcome on Tuesdays and Fridays to take our place and sit in the draught. 

Every member of the class has shown marked ability in some line. 

Miss Newcomb has been the life of the class; 

Haynes has taken more notes and attended more "movies" than all the class combined; 

Allen has specialized in Materia Medica and the honor system; 

Thomas has been conspicuous by his absence from classes; 

Clark is known for his essay on "Pulsarilla"; while Thornton is the pathology shark without com- 
petition. "Mayo" Gateshas had care of all major operation and seen that the hospital was run correctly. 

Silshy and Jordan have been successful in all lines, and their troubles have all been "small ones." 
Shaw is not in their class, but has hopes. "Hank" Clay rests upon his high school laurels, earned in 
eariy 90's. 

We are all happy and glad that we have lived and thankful we have had the privilege of a university 
education at a school like Michigan. E. S. T, 



r medical sun 


is now far in the west, and is 


brighter, we h 


lope. And although the old s. 


rill of the timt 


: when youth, and you and I 



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University of Michigan Training School for Nurses 

I'ANTiNf: ^EMBERTON, R.N.. Superintendent of Niiiscs 

:ablislied by the Univer 



THE University of Michi 
■sity in 1891, offers CO yo 



ing School for Nurses, which n 

n desirojs of becominj; professional nurses a course of practical 
and theoretical instruction exiendin); over a period of three years. To maintain a hij^h standard 
it has been deemed advisable to receive into the School only those having a diploma from a four-year 
high school recognized by the University or an ei]uivalent of such instruction which in all instances 
is determined by the Literary Department of the University. 



assist Miss Heinberton, rbe Sup 
has been arranged to meet the 



expected that each nurse upon eradu; 



the Hospital Staff and other members of the Medical Faculty 
ndent of the Ttaininf; School, and her corps of eighreen graduate 
I practical training of the pupil nurses. The course of instrucrion 
s of the Michigan State Board of Kegistraiion of Nurses 



U take the 



n by the Board and 



The University Hospital offers unusual advanraj,es for the education of nurses. Its size and scope 
make ii unnecesssary for the student nurse to go elsewhere for any branch of hospital work, since, in 
addition to a varied experience in the medical, surgical, gynecological and obstetrical wards, she re- 
ceives systematic instruction in the children's, eye, ear, nose and throat, contagious and psychopathic 
wards. Wide experience is received in rhe operating rooms connected with the various departments 
of the Hospital, 



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M. 



Senior Nurses 

OFFICERS 

M. RockwHLi Vice-Presiden 

BETH 1!. Hi.iNOi.li Secretary-Tre 



K['(KMB1:R 19 
experienced wor 



Class History 



under the military discipline 
other things, that an append 



raininK School of twenty-four younR and in- 
he first few horrible days of physical exami- 
tten rule of seniority, we started our careers 
ng learned by the end of three months, amongst 
peration performed, and that a request for a 
e were elected to wear the crowning insignia 



Our first year was iinet 
only variations front the ro 
out during this period. 

In the course of a year 
us by the doctors than our 
our responsibilities which v 
of the old adage that a good 






chief 



and several dropped 



d J our kerchiefs established more confidenc 

p wad r consciences justified, but we ably assm 

d ji b m n y we acted head-nurse and proved the ti 

1 se be ne probationer. Within a period of five min 

ind cleansed bab> bottles in the kitchen. 



tenuous years have sifted out those whose 
jr original number, in knowledge of life 
w serious the responsibilities of our lives 



will be. "Suaviter in modo. t 


t fortiter in re" is our motto and we have striven hard to attain thest 


virtues attach! or themselves t 


our prolession Although our course is limited to three years, we feel 


thatwehavebeengiiena woi 


iderfullv broad education through out humani/Jng relations with people. 


Face to face with actual suffei 


!ng, with sin, and with the pitiful stories we hear, instead of becoming 


hardened we have become mo 


re s\mpathetic, more tolerant of human fraililies and more anxious tc 


relieve any condition «ithm oi 


It power 


We are proud to eraduar 


e from the University of Michigan Training School for Nurses and we 


gladly take this opportunity i 


to express our appreciation to our Medical Director and Doctors, oui 


Superintendent and her Staff, 


for the keen interest they have taken in us. 



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Senior Nurses 

Grace Angel Harbor Springs 

Anna Marie Auch Sibeaiaing 

Carrie Beerbower A'o', Ohio 

Florence E. Burgette Atheni 

Nancy Frv Bidford, Ind. 

Eliiabeth Heinold , . , . HarrisviUe 

Edna Henry St. Louis 

Helen Hilton Ponliac 



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Senior Nurses 

Mary Harskner 

Florence McNamara 
Erma Mullen 

Lela Reagen 

Vera Roc*. well 

JosiE Rose 



Ann Arbor 
Houelt 

Edmou 

Hatijord, H-i! 

Frankfort 






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Senior Nurses 






GitACE Smith 


-. . .Frankfort . 






LouiiK Southard 


. Harbor Springs 






Mabel Steinmak 


. . . Rtm-us 






Monica Tarsnev 


Ditro'-l 


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HOKORA ViSK 


. BoMrbon, Ind. 






AucE Whitman 


East Ashlabvla, Ohio . '■ 






Marion H '^oing 


.. Bourbon, }«d. . ,.-n; 




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Ma»v Zeile 


East Clr^dand, Ohio / . "■ ' 




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', 


'pM 




pi! 


) 


'M '1 





#jSIT 



'-..v.tj Vl. 



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1917 Literary Class Officers 



KempS. Buk^^e 
Margaret A. Basset] 
Gladys L, Whelah . 
Yancey R, Altshelbk 
Thomas B. Oglethorpe 
hobart m. bcbmingham 
William F. Newton 
Leonard W. Nieter 
Earl E. Pardee 



Vice-President 

Football Manager 
Baseball Manager 
Track Manager 
Indoor Baseball Man^ 
Oratorical Delegate 



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1917 Engineering Class Officers 



M. W. PAlTtRS 

K, V. Walker 
W. W, Skabuhv 
M. G. RoBCNso 
H. A. Taylor 
W. C, Gkrn-1 

J. V. KUIUNEN 

E. A, Thomas 
H, L. Carroll 
K. A. Bartelmi 
R, W. Rose 



Vice-Ptesideni 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Football Manager 
Basketball ManaRer 
Track Manager 
Baseball Manager 
Student Councilman 
Social Cominitcee, Chairn 
Finance Cor 



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1917 Law Class Officers 

Louis F. DaHling President 

John E. Sanders Vice-President 

Kenneth Barnard Treasurer 

Thomas E. Atkfnson Secretary 

Grant L. Cook Oratorical Delegate 

Maurice F, Dunne Football Manager 

Ferrcs H. Fitch Track Manager 

Clarence A. Lokker Basketball Manager 

Paul R. Duntrn ... SerReant-ai-Arms 



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1917 Medical Class Officers 

Thos. M. Marks President 

Henrietta A. Calhoun Vice-President 

LvMAN A, Ferguson Treasurer 

Mary J. Erickson . Secretary 

Jack H. Hamill Football Manager 

RuiiOLPH H. RuEDEMANN Baseball Manager 

NoRRis W. Gillette Track Manager 

Jack W. Jones Basketball Manager 

Bertil T. Larson . Indoor Baseball Manager 



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1917 Dental Class Officers 



Otis L. Sutherlanh 


. . . . President 


Rosa T. GErrv 


. . , . V.ce-i'asiaent 


W, E. HiGClNS 


Secretary 


Waltkk B. Steelk .... 


. . . . Treasurer 


Harry B. Wright .... 


. . . . ISasterball Man 


Alan D. Honey .... 


. . . . Baseball Mana^ 



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Mil 

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Strauss 



1917 Architectural Class Officers 

Ernest H. Trvsull President 

Morton H. InGaLL Vice-President 

CeOrGe L. Cheffv Secretary 

Clarence L. Rothrock Treasurer 

,Kredf.r[CkG. Strauss Athletic Manager 

Charlhs W. Attwooo Sergeant-at-Arms 

Edwin M. Read Chairman Social Cc 

Harolii N. Youn<: Chairman Auditing 

CfLBRRl S- Unuerwoo], Chairman Kinan.e ( 



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Sf MuiuEirad) 



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1918 Literary Class Officers 

T. F. McAllister President 

Grace Raynsfori) Vice-President 

Margaret Cooley ........ Secretary 

0. J. Watts Treasurer 

R. M. Cleary Football Manager 

G, R. MArrE,soN Track Manager 

H. S. BoHUNG . , , Publicity Committee, Chairman 

J. C. L. Barron Social Committee, Chairman 

E. R. Golden Good -Fellowship Com., Chairman 

T. C. Arndt Arrangements Committee, Chairmat 

C. F. Boos Oratorical Delegare 





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1918 Engineering Class Officers 

W. McC. McKee President 

J. B. Brill Vice-President 

Dorothy Hall Secretary 

H, A. Khowlson Treasurer 

S. S. Attwood Football Manager 

Harrison Goodspeed Track Manager 

W. G. Johnston Basketball Manager 

J. S. WrcKwiRE Baseball Manager 

F. W. Hough Social Committee, Chairman 

O. BoNNEY, Jb Finance Committee, Chairman 



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Wm. E. Mathews 
L. H. Smith . 
R. A. Hall . 

D. I. HUBAR . 

Gerald Hacar 
A. F. Paley . 
Geo, Hurlev 

E. O. Snethen 
J. E, Ryan . 



1918 Law Class Officers 



Treasurer 

Football Manager 
Basketball Manager 
Track Manager 
Oratorical Delegate 
Baseball Manager 



COMMITTEES 



W. S. Kammerer, Chairman 
W. W. Jenkins 
G. W. Williams 

W. C. AlLEE 
C. A. KitAMEK 

Financial 
G. M. Coulter, Chairman 
C. L. Strauss 
W. E. Mathews 
L. H. Smith 
R, A. Hall 



Advisory 
W. E. Mathews, 
L. H. Smith 
R, A. Hall 

D. I. HuBAR 

G. M, Coulter 

E. M. Joj 



Auditing 
L. Greenebauw. Chaii 

J. P. COLDEN 

H. E. Morse 
H. E. Taylor 



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1918 Medical Class Officers 



T. L. I'oi 



Presiden 



Amelia T- Wood Vice-President 

Archie H. Watt Secretary 

Joseph R. Darnall , . Treasurer 

J. H, Smith Football Manager 

Paul W. Beaven Basketball Manager 

MacNauohton WiLKENSON Track Manager 

Archie H. Watt Baseball Manager 



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1918 Dental Class Officers 

C. E. Stevens President 

F. A. Gorman Secretary 

F. R- GoETZ Treasure! 

G, M. Peterson Chairmar 

F, H. TiNSMAN Chairmar 



Social Comm 
Sport Comm 



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1918 Architectural Class Officers 

Paui.0. Davis President 

Hakolii a. Brunwan Vice-EVesiilenc 

Ruby M. Miller Secretary 

Georgk H. Bukrows Treasurer 

Llovj) W. Worbpn Sergeant-at-Arms 

Rudolph Krucer Athletic Manager 

Moses M. Brundiuck , . Chairman Social Committee 

Walter J. Dixon Chairman Auditing Committee 

Ralph Kower Chairman Finance Committee 



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1919 Literary Class Officers 

C. W. Miller President 

Hazel Beckwlth Vice-President 

Marcabet Atkcnson ... Secretary 

W. y. Grefs Treasurer 

K. C. Bell Track Manager 

H. K. Smith Baseball Manager 

Harry Stocked Oratorical Delegate 



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1919 Engineering Class Officers 



Davfh p. \Vool> 
R. B, Stevens 
H. A, Barton . 
A. D, Lkwis 
S. J. Thompson 
J. Gardner 
G, B. Watkins . 
C, T. Van Dusen 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Football Manager 
Indoor Baseball Manager 
Basketball Manager 
Track Manager 



H. N- Uranu 

C. W. HORR 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE 
iicHARD D, Smith. Chairmai 



L- W. Page 
M. F. SKEino 



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Howes 
Johnston 



1919 Medical Class Officers 

E. W. Sink , . , President 

Elsce L. Bachus Vice-President 

Theodore L. Squceh Secretary 

George S. Johnston Treasurer 

T. H. CoNKLra Baseball Manager 

J. Caffey Itasketball Manager 

John McKinney Track Manager 

Horace W. Porter Chairman of Social Commitcee 

Robert L. Now Chairman of Honor Committee 

Harr* F. Becker Chairman of Finance Committee. 

WrLLIAM E. Howes Chairman of Audiiing Committee 



L 



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1919 Homeopathic Class Officers 

John D. Van ScHoicK PcEsident 

Georcr p. Wood Vice-Presirient 

LcNWOOD P. Snow Secretary 

James K, Duri.ing Treasucer 

Kmmanijfl B. Wooi.fan Athletic Manager 



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1919 Architect Class Officers 



C. H. CufiAOtK, 
H. O, FULLERTON 

Helen Ncles . 
C A. North HUP 
R. H. Ward . 
T. Y. Hewlett 
M. F, Smith 
M. E. Hammond 

H. J. BlSBEE . 



Athletic Manager 
Chaitman Finance Committee 
Chairman Social Committee 
Chaitman Auditing Comtnictee 



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Fkhkv FrELii Gates and CLUBt 



E South Stand 



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COMPTON SteEN F 

BaKTELHE MlDDLEDCTCH TAPPtNf; HoWE 

Athletic Association Officers 

Phillip G. Bartelme Directorof Outdoor Athletics 

Floyd A. Rowe Director of Intramural Athletics 

PhclLip H. M[DDLEDITCH President 

T, Hawlev Tapping Treasurer 

BoVD M. CoMPTON Football Manager 

Sidney T, Steen , . , , Baseball Manager 

John W. Finkenstaedt Track Manager 

Ray J. Mills Interscholastic Manager 

BOARD IN CONTROL OF ATHLETICS 
Faculty Members 
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, Chairman Prof. Walter T. Fishlfioh 

Dr. Reuben Peterson Prof. Lewis M- Gram 

SicrMry 
Phillip G. Bartei.me 

Alumni Mimhets 

John D. Hibbard, Chicago James E. Dukfv, Bay City 

James O. Murphin, Derroit 

Sittdeni Member! 
Frederick E. Gould, (First Semester) Adna R. Johnson 

T. Hawley Tapping, (Second Semester) Frank G. Millard 



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1916 Varsity Football Team 



Wi 



-— D. Cochran 

Fielding H, Yost 
Adolph Schulz 
Ernest J. Allmfndihci 
A. McGii 



Stephen 1. Farrkll Trai 



BoVO M. COMPT 

Lee E.JOSLTN 
John W. LANt^s 

JoHnC. ROBBIN 



L E. Pa 



Ci 



E, BastfaN, M 
Alan W. Boyd, aHa 
Hahhy L. Calvin, Jr. 
J. Bland Cati.ett, M . 
William D. Cochkan, M 
Maurice F. Dunne, M 

F.GMONT (i. HiLOTER. 3M-. 

HoYNE Howe, aMa 
John F. Maulbetsch, M 
Frank G. Millard, M 
Walter A. Niemann, M 
John K. Norton, M . 
T. R, 



Ma 



.. Ri^i 



1, M 



Lewis Rei 

Lawrence S. RoiiHM, M 
James H. Sharfe, aMa 
Cedric C. Smith, M 
Karl S. Staatz, M 
Robert W. Watson, M 
Richard F. Weske, M 
James I.. Whai.en, M . 
Harold M, Zeipfr, aMa 



PERSONNJi/. 



Captain 

Head Coach 

First Assistant Coach 

Second Assistant Coach 

Third Assistant Coach 



Graduate Director 
Manager 

Assistant Manager 
Assistant Manager 
Assistant Manager 
Assistant Manager 



Guard 
Full Back 
Guard 



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The 1915 Football Season 



Lawrence College .... 

Mount Union College ... 

Marietta College .... 6 

Case School of Applied Science , 3 

Michigan 

Michigan 7 

Michigan .,,--. 7 

Pennsylvania University ... 



RECORD 

October 6— Michigan 39 

October 9 — Michigan 3.i 

October 13— Michigan 2M 

October IS — Michigan 14 

October 23^Michigan Agricultural College . 24 

October 30 — Syracuse University ... 1 + 

November 6— Cornell Ui ' 

November 13— Michigan 

Total Points Scored— Michigan 130, Opponents 81. 
Record— Won 4, Lost 3, Tied I. 

REyiEU" 

THE season of 1915 has been dubbed "the most disastrous of the Yost regime at Michigan." 
Bare figures would seem to bear one chis statement of the critics. Of eight games on the Sched- 
ule, four were victories, three were defeats and one was a tie game. The four victories were 
scored on the weak teams which came to Ann Arbor at the opening of the season for the custom- 
ary practice tilts. The defeats were suffered at the hands of the "big" teams on the schedule, while 
'e game, that with Pennsylvania, was a battle staged between two leviathans which had suffered 



miform reverses throughout the fall. To the i 

ecord of the 1915 Varsity, the basis for pessin 

But there were many bright spots in the 

! in the future. The team which Yost 



eleven. Ther 









The glamour of the 191* 
Michigan game to serve as a goal toward which 
along the customary lines of Michigan gridiro 
mentous events and the eyes of the coilegiati 
Noneofthatglamourwaspresentin the fall of 1915. Thi 
which tbi "" 






who wishes to see naught save misfortur 
m is not hard to find. 
Eason; many features which seemed to forecast great 
into the games of 1915 was a green and inexperienced 
veterans were not of the class commonly called "stars." 
'er the playing season of 1915. There was no Harvard- 
strive. The schedule was an uneventful one, patterned 
easons. The year before had been filled with mo- 
-orld had been on Ann Arbor and her football team, 
presented nothing save a hard, gtind- 
irful elev ' ' ' 



far below the average of Michigan teams, 
of previous years around which Yost might build an eleven which 
bborn on defense. The All-American Maulbetsch of 1914 could not 
1 the Michigan total the fall before, for the line in front of him was 
<t playing in his usual form. The line coutd not be built around a 
Yost faced a problem which was no less than discouraging. 



nothing more formidable to 

There were none of the stars 
would be powerful on attack or stu 
produce the yards be bad added tc 
weak, and the star himself was no 
Raynsford or a Ponrius or a Parte 
and there was not the material present to solve the difficulty. 

The Varsity won its first four games, those with Lawrence College, Mount Union College, Marietta 
College ^d the Case School of Applied Science. In the first three instances the games were won by 
large scores, and although the Varsity did not show any startling play, these early battles did not give 
cause for gloom among the rooters. Then came the lowly Case eleven which, besides scoring on the 
Wolverines, held the big team to a scant two touchdowns. 

One week later came the Michigan Ag^es, and they administered a stinging defeat, a defeat which 
will always rankle in the hearts of the Michigan rooters who were a witness to it. The Aggies presented 
a powerful eleven, a team trained for this game and for this game alone. Experienced, determined, 
prepared to play the greatest game of their lives, these eleven athletes from East Lansing completely 
overwhelmed the Varsity and the 24 to score was the result. Then Syracuse came to Ann Arbor and 
earned a 14 to 17 victory. The Orange eleven which defeated Michigan in 1915 was one of the most 
powerful teams which Syracuse had ever sent to Ann Arbor, and its success was well-deserved. Then 
came the defeat at the hands of Cornell, followed by the tie game at Philadelphia. 

Through it all, the Michigan rooters displayed a fighting spirit and a loyalty to their eleven which 
more than compensated for the misfortunes which beset the gridiron athletes themselves. After the 
Aggies had gone back home wildly victorious, the rooters staged a wonderful mass-meeting, a tumul- 
tuous display of sincere loyalty and deep-rooted Michigan spirit which sent the players into the Syracuse 
game with a grim determinadon to prove worthy. It was not the fault of the team as individuals that 
the victory did not rest on the Maize and Blue. The same held true of the "come-back" spirit shown 
by the rooters after the Syracuse game, and of the "never-say-die" manner in which the thousands 
on thousands of Michigan rooters cheered their team to the echo in the heart-breaking Cornell battle. 

While the 1915 football team may not go down in history, the 1915 rooters will linger long in the 
memory of Michigan men. The team did its best, but that is always expected. The rooters came 
up out of the lethargy of habitual success and proved themselves worthy of the victories which have 
been earned by Michigan Varsities in the past. 



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Case Hchting for an advance in the middle of Lhe field on the day 







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Syracuse attack on the day the Oranj 



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t bnythine, eupecially football 



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Hlr DppDEL«nt« in the Une 



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Maybe thk Comellifln wriggled ra 




MllUni's favori)* trick wsa boring through 
U> dump the secondary defense 



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•g Quakitrs to stop the catapulfing Mau: 




oheWcie in Iroat ol the goal po 
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Michigan-Cornell Game 



AL I HOUCH playitii. the best game of the season, Michigan's eleven was unable to stem the ter- 
rific onslaught of the champion Cornel! eleven, and che Varsity went down to a 34 to 7 defeat in 
the closing game of the Ferry Field schedule of 1915. It was the largest score which had ever 
been totalled againsr a Yost eleven, although the margin of Cornell's victory was not as great as that 
of the 29 to win by Pennsylvania in 1908. 

In losing to Cornell, the Varsity was defeated bv perhaps the most powerful team in the countrv, 
in the fall of 1915. The eleven from' Ithaca was victorious over Harvard, which team was generally ad- 
mitted to be among the very best of the season. Although Pittsburgh University might have been ai^ 
claimed nearly the equal of the Cornell eleven, the fact that no game was played between these two teams 
made a direct comparison impossible. The type of football shown by Cornell In its game on Ferry Field 
was by far the best of the season, and equal to any ever seen on the Michigan gridiron. The team was 
led by Captain Barrett, a player universally picked for AU-American teams, and was composed of ath- 
letes of nearly the same calibre. 

Michigan was playing her biggest game when Cornell came to Ferry Field. The team had suffered 
two stinging defeats, one at the hands of the Michigan Agricultural College eleven, and the other from 
ight the fighting spirit of the rooters, and "came hack" for this im- 
im, as if no discouragin;: defeats had been administered to the inex- 
the occasion of the annual "homecoming" of the alumni, the time 
nd the annual football hohday is being celebrated. Nearly 23.000 
loth stands of Ferry Field, For a few minutes at the opening of the 
iremely. insanely, happy. For during that time Michigan scored her 
lint of a magnificent charge down from the center of the field. But 



Syracuse, But the pL 
portant game with the Big Red 
perienced players. The game « 
when Ann Arbor is in gala dre; 
people were packed into the ma 
second halfthis vast crowd was 
lone touchdown, and scored it b 



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Michigan's defense was unable to scop the terrific attack of the Cornell backfield. Captain Barrett, 
Shiverick, Collins and Mueller found but little difficulty in making ground against the breaking Mich- 
igan line, which was stampeded by the aggressive Cornell forwards. Captain Barrett was the star of 
the game. He scored two of the five Cornell touchdowns, and added four points to his team's total by 
kicking that many goals followine touchdown. He made repeated long runs, 

t eluding the Michigan tacklers with an ease which seemed to indicate rather 

a lack of ability on the pare of the Varsity players, than any unusual elu- 
siveness by the star quarterback. The Cornell backfield quartette played 
as a compact, charging machine, and not as a set of individuals, with the 
result chat it swept the futile Michigan defense before it. This backfield 
formed an interference for the man with the ball which could not be broken. 
The Michigan defenders, Watson and Benton on the one side, and Norton 
and Staati on the other, were swamped or boxed or bowled over by these 
charging Cornellians, while the man with the ball slipped by to the Var- 
sity secondary defense for a substantial gain. 
Cornell presented nearly the same type of attack that was used with 
fuch deadly effect the year before. It was a grinding, smashing, overwhelm- 
ing charge against which the individual grit and the desperation of the Var- 
sity players was unavailing. It was irresistible, the terrific onslaught of that 
compact, united attack. And after the first two touchdowns had given 
Cornell a substantial lead, the success of a Big Red charge was largely a 
matter of psychology. The sight of that determined attack, as it formed 
for the charge, was sufficient to strike terror into the heart of even the most 
^ _ ^^ staunch Wolverine. 

marlwd Norton 8 play And yet, despite the power of Cornell and the seeming weakness of 

He earasd hu lett*r Michigan before her, there was a point in the great battle at which the pen- 

dulum might have swung the other way. Had Fate smiled upon the Varsity 
colors at that time, it might have been the Maiie and Blue which waved in victory at the end, and not 
the flaunting red of Cornell. Such a Fate would have been a cruel one for the big easterners, forthey 
wereclearly the bettereleven, but the "breakof the game" has often given to the weaker team the glory 
of a final victory. 

That climax, or turning point, came in the third quarter. To start this quarter, the i 
the second half, Michigan started a brilliant rally. Straight down the field to 
a touchdown, the Varsity carried the ball through a frenzied Cornell defense. 
And in a moment after the kick-off which followed, the Varsity again obtained 
possession of the ball. Every indication pointed to another march to a 
touchdown. The dogged determination with which Yost had inspired his men 
during the intermission seemed about to materialize into a rally which would 
rival that staged several years before against the very team now attempting it, 
the time that Pennsylvania came from behind and won in the last half of 
the game. But just as this march to a seeming second touchdown was start- 
ing, Mauibetsch fumbled, a Comellian pounced on the oval, and the chance 
was gone. That play not only took the heart out of the Varsity, but it inspired 
in the Cornell eleven a fear that the unexpected might happen, and so they 
started out to make viccoty sure. This they accomplished with two more 
touchdowns. 

Tliat tally by the Yoscmen in the opening minutes of the second half was 
the inspiring feature of the whole disastrous Michigan gridiron season. Nie- 
mann recovered a fumble on the Cornell 30-yard line to start the petiod, and 
there the Varsity attack started. Smith and Mauibetsch showed, for the first 
and only time in the game, a flash of the plunging strength they were capable 
of. The Varsity line charged before these backs and Cornell was pushed back. Niemann was never 
One gf the famous Yost tricks, a "talking" play, took the ball from inside the ^om'^his' ^^ron 'm 




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10-yard line, right to the last chalk mark, 
last few inches necessary 



nd then Roehm ducked becwei 
talkini" play was much the s: 




stood from the stands, but to chi 
Michigan's Varsity played a 



n here and there, bul 
IS the Michigan Mai: 



nann's legs for the 
Yost had planned 
for the Harvard game, and which 
Quarterback HughJtt had called for 
on Soldiers' Field at a time when it 
was not needed. In the play used 
against Cornell, Roehm called his sig- 
nals as usual, and then seemed to 
change his mind, shouting "Change 
Signals." At this the Cornell players 
eased up from their charging posi- 
tions, and just at the moment when 
they were off-guard, the Wolverines 
charged, and Maulbetsch carried the 
ball through the disorganiied Cornell 
YoBt Ufces charge ol a Varfiity |j„j f^^ ^^^^ly iQ yj^ds. It was a 
play almost completely misunder- 
tampeded Cornell eleven it spelt disaster. 

lass of football far above the average of its work during the season, 
tremendous strength of the Cornell eleven. Flashes of Vost strategy 
ven Yost strategy would not overcome the handicap of inexperience 
which met defeat. 




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Michigan- Pennsylvania Game 

MICHIGAN and Pennsylvania fought to a scoreless tie on Franklin Field in Philadelphia, in 
the game which was the final appearance for the 1915 Varsity. In the face of a stubborn re- 
sistance by both teams, the attack of Quaker and Wolverine failed each time it was put to 
the final test under the enemy's goal posts. Pennsylvania failed more often in this regard than did Mich- 
igan, the Quakers losing a possible chance to score on three separate occasions, while the Michigan eleven 
had a real opportunity only once during the game. Fni this reason, if no other, the critics who saw the 
game, gave the honors Co the easterners depite the brilliant rallies and the stubborn defensive play of 
the Wolverines. 

The best chance offered to Michigan to score came in the second quarter. At this point the Wol- 
verines rushed the ball to the Penn 16-yard line before they met any determined resistance. Here a 
fake kick for goal from placement was tried, with the result chat che man who attempted to carry the 
ball was downed for a loss of ten hard-earned yards. The next play was an attempted forward pass, 
which sent the ball behind the goal lines, butinstead of a Michigan man's being there to receive the 




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ived the ball, and a Couchback was the best gained 



oval for a winning touchdown, a Pennsvlv 
by the Wolverines. 

Pennsylvania was little more successful in her attempts to score. The Quaker backs had little 
trouble in rushing the ball for long gains just so long as they were out in the center of the field, but the 
moment the play came close to the Michigan 10-yard line, the Wolverine defense invariably stiffened, 
and to go farther was an impossibility. On each of the three occasions when the Quakers reached this 
point on the field, they attempted a goal from the field. Twice Quarterback Bell tried to negotiate the 
points which would have meant victory for his team, and as many times he failed. On the third trial 
Left Tackle Mathews dropped back for the kick, but he too was unable to send the ball truly, and a 
Pennsylvania score was impossible. To take the oval over the last chalk line by rushing was a task which 
the Quakers early found to be futile. For no matter how easily the Michigan defense bent and yielded 
before attack while the play was out in the center of the field, this same defense became of the consist- 
ency of a stone wall when a victory for the enemy seemed to be a probability. Each time Captain Cochran 
rallied his defense for a last stand, and on every trial the Wolverines proved equal to the emergency. 

The battle which was staged on Krankhn Field was a clash of two elevens which had bowed before 
the superiority of their enemies during practically the whole season, preceding their meeting. Pennsyl- 
vania had been beaten by Dartmouth, Lafayette, Pittsburgh and others, and was still later defeated by 
Cornell, while Michigan had already met reversal at the hands of M. A. C, Syracuse and Cornell. The 
supporters of both elevens were confident that this battle, staged between two such traditionary rivals, 
would find their particular team of sufficient power to wring a much-desired victory. But each was 
doomed for disappointment. Their favorites were strong enough to stave olF defeat, but each lacked 
"punch" which was an essential to victory. 





tly the 


games of five years ago, when a smashing attack was emphasized more than the ptesent open s 


ityie of 


gaining. In this particular, Pennsylvania exceeded Michigan in actual number of yards gained, 1 


3ut her 


plungers were not more effective considering the fact that the ball was more often in the posses 


ision of 


the easteners than in the hands of Michigan. Maulbetsch found it more than difficult to gain i 


;round. 


but Smith was a consistent plunger until he was forced to retire because of injuries. The Quakers i 


seemed 


to have been especially coached to stop Maulbetsch, and the smashing back was unable to get av 


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gains. The Quakers had evidently been carefully trained in 
the best way to make Mauihetsch ineffective, and they surprised the 
Michigan rooters by their success in this particular. Smith, on the other 
hand, was able to reel off long gains, and was also a power on defense. 
Pennsylvania's hne plungers, Derr and Williams, tore great holes in the 
Michigan line, and were the most successful gainers on the field of play. 
They were largely instrumental in placing the Quakers within striking 
distance of the Michigan goal on the three occasions when Pennsylvania 
seemed about to score. The punting of Bell was much better than that 
of the Michigan kicker, Dunne, The Wolverine punter was performing 
this duty for the first time in a Varsity game, and for this reason his 
inability to gee his kicks away for any'distance and with any^Jdirection 
was excusable. 

Michigan was further handicapped by a veritable avalanche of 
penalties which the officials inflicted. Ofl^-side penalties were in the 



majority, a 



■e rhar 



Pennsylvania 
attack was materially 
aided hy the addition of 
a few yards of Varsity 
territory, 
moat platlorm orntors „ ■ ■-. i. 

Captam Cochran, 

Staati, Roehm and Cat- 
lett played their last game for Yost and Michigan on 
this day. Catietc and Roehm distinguished themselves 
especially, while the Michigan captain was in the chick 
of the fight on each one of those three terrible defenses 
down near the goal posts. Kehor, a substitute all dur- 
ing the season, became a regular in this game, and was 
a demon on both offense and defense. Weske, the 
rawest recruit on the Wolverine squad, stayed in his 
position at right cackle throughout the game, acquit- 
ting himself to the satisfaction of the critical Yost. 
It was. not che glorious finish to a disastrous sea- 
son, which the rooters had hoped for. But ic was a 
finish which showed the Wolverine Varsity display- 
ing a fighting spirit which was worthy of the name w 





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1916 All-Fresh Football Team 



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OFFICERS 

Clifford M. Sparks Captain 

Prentiss P. Douglas Head Coach 

James W. Raynsford Ass' t Coach 

Alvin M. Bentley Manager 

PERSONNEL 

Charles P. Beath, 1919 Center 

Clive H. Bevens, 1919 Guard 

ROCER BlRDSELL End 

R. H. Dunn, 1919 Tackle 

Russell G. Cornelius Half Back 

Sydney V. Eccert, 1919 Half Back 

Joseph A. Hanisk, 1919 Half Back 

Edward Hauser Guard 

A. W. MacLachlan, 1919 Tackle 

Donald Macrae, 3rd Half Back 

F. B. Nash, 1919 Center 

W. L. Peach, 1919 End 

Sherwood Reekie, 1919 Half Back 

Bernard L. Snyder, 1919 Full Back 

C. M. Sparks, 1919 . , Quarter Back 

C. A. Towsley, 1919 Guard 

Elton Wieman, 1919 End 

O. G. Williams, 1919 Tackle 

RECORD OF SEASON 

October 16th — Michigan Freshmen . Michigan State Normal 

October 23rd— Michigan Freshmen . 21 Heidelberg College 

November 13th — Michigan Freshmen . 80 University of Detroit 



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1915 Varsity Baseball Team 

OFFICEJiS 

Edmon 1'. McQlekn Captain 

Carl Lundgben Coach 

Phillip G. Bartef-mk Graduate Director 

Chester H. Lang Manager 

Sidney T. Steen Ass't Manager 

Cahleton E. Stkvkek Ass't Manager 

PERSONNEL 

Charle.sW. Anderson, aMa Short Stop 

Louis A. Akentz, aMa Catcher 

Leland H. Benton, M Catcher 

Elmer Brandell, M Short Stop and Outfielder 

Harrison H. Caswell, aMa Pitcher 

Wilbur S. Davidson, M Pitcher 

Charles H, Fkrcuson, M Pitcher 

George V. Labadie, M Outfielder 

Dale R. Maltry First Baseman 

Thomas R. McNamara Pitcher 

Edmon P, McQueen, M . . Second Baseman 

William K. Niemann, M . Outfielder 

Raymond E. Nichols, aMa Pitcher 

Warren G. Payette, aMa . . Pitcher 

Frank A. Sheehy Outfielder 

Ralph B. Shivel, M Third Baseman and Short Stop 

George H. Sisler, M Pitcher 

Thomas P. Sopdy, aMa Pitcher 

Walter H. Stewart, M First Baseman 

Ralph M. Waltz, M Third Baseman 






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1915 Varsity Baseball Season 

Won 16, lost 7, tied 3. 

WITH this record, che Michigan Varsity nine of 1915 went Into history on June 23rd, following 
thelastoftheCommencementWeekserieswich the Pennsylvania University team. Michigan 
won both [hose games, displaying the best brand of baseball playing of the season, a brand 
that had not been especially evident d\iring a season which had not been the success anticipated, 

Michigan's team of 1915 set up a record which has not been surpassed by many baseball nines. 

"" :s percentage would he .696, or high enough to win the average 

resented the Varsity in 19iS was generally regarded as the most 
t Michigan, and a much cleaner record of games won and lost 



]s of "big league" ratings, it 
league race. But the team which 
powerful aggregation ever produc 
had been looked for. 



Thei 






tnp, wmnmg ti 



:aking every game save one. It broke even on the eastern 
lied to win all save one of the really important series of the 
season s schedules. Michigan Agricultural College won the majority of the series between the two 
state rivals; Cornell won the odd game, while an even break ruled with Syracuse. Pennsylvania, alone, 
of the big teams opposing Michigan, fella victim to the Varsity nine. Notre Dame also was conquered 
in the series, but it has been bo long since the Catholic Varsity won a series with Michigan that it is 
no longer accounted one of the "big" teams. The ignominy of a series lost to the lowly Kalamaioo 
Normal nine was also a part of the record of the 1915 nine. 

But even this record cannot detract from the glorv of a team which, when it once hit its teal stride, 
showed a better brand of baseball than has ever been exhibited by a Michigan team. In the game 
with the Alumni and with Pennsylvania, the Wolverine Varsity was unbeatable. It was machine- 
like in its defense and unstoppable on offense. The result was three clean-cut victories over teams 
which were both strong and well-balanced. 

A batring slump which could not be shaken off, was the cause of whatever misfortune was the Jot 
of the 1915 Varsity. This slump struck the team just at the opening of the series with Syracuse, the 
first of the big Eastern nines to come to Ferry Field, and it stayed with the team until after the Notre 
Dame series. While in its grasp, the strong and aggressive Varsity nine was seemingly powerless. Ball 
players are naturally superstitious, says tradition, and the Michigan University brand of the genus 
was evidently no exception, for the players seemed unable to shake off the hoodoo. 

There were two other elements which had much to do with the poor wort of the players during 
the middle of the season. A reform campaign, catried on by several students on the campus, was aimed 
ac questioning the amateur standing of three of the leading players. Anxiety concerning the result of 
these charges interfered materially with the playing of these men, and had much to do with the morale 
of the whole nine. Conversation among the pi rs on th b n h and n he lub-house, had more to 
^0 h h a e of he form han with che playing. 

The ul wa no a on d and ff tive play. Also, an 
a 1 sea on 1 ng of he offi al ook Coach Carl Lundgten 
off h b h du ng h gam and h players were without his 
gu d n nd g n al h p Th ul wa a lack of harmony, 
t k ng n n h pi nd of n fatal mistakes on the 

d am n 1 nd n h b nf. box 




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with its percentage of .696, 

VET prodiioed by a Michigan 
hec and fielder of wonderful 
r of the 1915 team, winning 
her and proving a tower of 
In the final three games of 



Despite these handicaps the 1915 nine played through a hard schedi. 
and with batting and fielding marks far above the average. 

The 1915 nine sent to the Major Leagues perhaps the greatest playei 

baseball team, in the person of George Sisler, captain in 1914 and both a p 

ability. -He was the brightest s 

the majority of his games as p 

strength in the field and at bat 

the schedule, Sisler hit safely nme consecutive times, just 
missing finishing the season, and his college career, with a 
straight list of safe hits, when a Pennsylvania outfielder, 
playing far back of his regular post in center field, raced back 
under a terrific fly from Sisler's bat, and robbed the Michigan 
star of a safe hit. 

The 191S Michigan pitching staff was composed chiefly 
of veterans. Sisler, Ferguson, Davidson, Soddy and Mc- 
Namara were ail seasoned players, the latter alone serving his 
first year on the Varsity. The infield was made up nearly 
entirely of two-year men, while the outfield also had its quota 
of veterans. It was a team which, at the opening of the season, 
seemed destined to make a brilliant record. 

For the first time, and perhaps for the last, in Michigan 
baseball history, the spring training trip of the team was 
made along the southern Atlantic seaboard. New teams, 
such as Marshall College, Washington and Lee University, 
the University of Virginia and Stannton Military Academy, 
were on the schedule. While a distinct success in the matter 
f g m w as a training trip the tour was not satisfactory, 
d 1916 he Varsity has again returned to its old haunts 
I g h I r Mississippi River Valley for the seasoning 

K ather spoiled the close of the annual eastern 

d h games with Swarthmore College and the Uni- 

y f P nsylvania were of necessity cancelled. 

Th f ire of the season, from the standpoint 

f 1 M h gan student watching his team from the 



Ferry Field ^.randstand was the ser h h 

from Kalamazoo Normal Two g m w \ i 

between these two teams in one of h h S I d 

koob both no« stars of the St I ^m 

I eague team opposed each oth d h 

other of which Ferguson and K. b w h 

opposing moundsmen S sler was bl h Id h 

Normal nine to a tie bi t Ferg iso h m 

of a 4—' defeat 

One unfortunate mcident marked the 1915 baseball 
season. It has been before alluded to, and concerns the 
activities of the reformers who sought to attack the 
amateur standing of several of the Varsity players. 
As a result of the charges brought by these investi- 
gators, unsavory publicity was given to Michigan 
athletics in the press throughout the country, two of 
the Varsity players were dismissed from the team and 
a third deprived of his athletic insignia, won in 1915, 
and declared ineligible for further competition during 
that year, 

Michigan's team in 1915 met some of the strongesi 
teams in the college world. They were teams wliith 

any kind of competition. They possessed strong 
pitchers and a well-coached defense. Against these nines 
the Varsitv was pitted at a time when it was not at 
its best. 'The result was a record which was not as 
^orious as that of the collegiate championship nine 
of the year before, but was nevertheless as good as 
that of many Wolverine baseball teams. 




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1915 Varsity Baseball Record 

Dale Opponint Michigan Opponent 

April 10 Kentucky University 8 1 

April 13 Marshall College 6 3 

April 14 Washington and Lee University .... 19 12 

April 15 Washington and Lee University .... 14 2 

April 16 Virginia University 1 6 

April 17 Staunlon Military Academy , , . . fi 2 

April 19 Notre Dame University 4 2 

April 24 Western Reserve University .... 2 

April 28 Western State Normal of Kalamaiioo , . 

May 1 Case School of Applied Science .... 17 1 

May 6 Syracuse University 

May 8 Syracuse Unnersitv 2 2 

May 12 Michigan Agricultural College , . . , 1 3 

May 15 Cornell University 1 2 

May 17 Syracuse UniversLtv 6 1 

May 18 Syracuse Universitv 3 9 

May 19 - Cornell University 2 

May 20 Cornell Uni\ersity 2 5 

May 28 Michigan Igncultural College , . . . S ! 

May 29 Michigan Agricultural College .... 2 4 

June 1 Western State Normal of Kalamazoo ,2 4 

June 4 Notre Dame Universicy 4 2 

June 5 Notre Dame University 4 1 

June 18 Michigan Alumni 13 2 

June 22 Pennsylvania University 10 

June 23 Pennsylvania University 4 2 

Total Points 141 68 

1918 All-Fresh Baseball Record 

May 1 Michigan State Normal of Ypsilanti ... 8 

May 8 University of Detroit 5 

May IS Orchard Lake Seminary 4 

May 22 University of Detroit 6 



Placf 
Lexington, Ky. 
Hunrington, W. Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Leiington, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Staunton, W. Va. 
South Bend, Tnd. 
Ann Arbor 



Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Ann Arbor 

Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 

Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 



Ann Arbor 

Orchard Lake, ^ 
Detroit, Mich. 




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1916 Student Man 




1915 Varsity Track Team 



Stephen J. Fahhhli Coach 

Phillip C5. Bartelme Graduate Director 

Emfliett F. Connelly Manager 

|oHN W. Flnkenstaedt As s't Manager 

Melvin- M. Beaver Ass'c Manager 



PERSONNEL 



Clydi-: K. Bastian. aMa 
Kenneth E. Berray, aM 
WiLLCAM E. BuRBv, aMa 
H. Leslie Carroll, M 
J. Bland Catlett, aMa 
Cecil B. Corbin, M . 
Cecil F. Cross, M 
Edgar D. Chumpacker, : 
Watson R. DeGowan, al 
D A. Donneli 



i, M 



1, aMa 
aMa 



John H. Feb 

Stanley G. F. 
George B. Fo 
Edwin J. HuN 
Hubert R. Jo 



John V. Kuivinen, aM; 
Lorenzo B. Lapslei 
Harold E. O'Brien, 
Walter F. Perschbaci 
Max G. Robinson, aM 
Harold L. Smith, M . 
Clarence E. Ufeh, M 
Lester E. Watehblry. 
Hiaoi.i>E, Wilson, M 



Ma 



■r Mile 



. Hurdles 

id High Jump 

. Weights 

, Hurdles 

Weights 



Dist 



eRui 



Broad Jur 
Quarter Mile 
Distance Runs 
Quarter Mile 
Quarter Mile 
Pole Vault 
Distance Runs 

High Junfp 
Quarter Mile 

Distance Runs 

High Jump 

[It and Hurdles 



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Record of Year's Competition 

Indoor 
February 15, 1915. Ac Buffalo— Pennsylvania defeated Michigan in Medlev Relay. Time— 7 min. 
59 1-5 sec, 
Michigan Team — Smith, Biirby, Carroll, Lynch. 

February 20, 1915. Ac Waterman Gymnasium— Princeton defeated Michigan in Two-Mile Rclav. 
Timers min. 8 2-5 sec. 
Michigan Team— Carroll, Fos, Donnelly, Ufer. 

February 27, 1915.- At Waterman Gymnasium— Michigan vs. Notre Dame Dual Meet, 
Michigan 61, Notre Dame 16, 

March 6, 1915, At New York City-^Indoor Eastern Intercoliegiate Track Meer. Medley 

Relay Race — Pennsylvania first, Dartmouth second, Michigan third. Time — 
4 min, 22 3-S sec. 
MichiEan Team— O'Brien, Smith, Robinson, Ufer. 

March 13, 1915, At Syraciis^Michigan vs. Syracuse Dual Meet, 
Michigan 40, Syracuse 37, 



April 17, 19] J, At Des Moines, Iowa,~Drake Relay Games, Four-Mile Relay Race— Wisconsin 

first, Michigan second, Chicago third, Illinois fourth, Time^lS min, 4 2-5 sec, 
Michigan Team — Donnelly, Fox, Ufer, Carroll, 

April 24, 1915, At Franklin Field— Pennsylvania Relay Games. Four-Mile Relay Rac!^ 

Cornel] first, Michigan second, Wisconsin third, Tim^lS min. 7 3-5 sec. 
Michigan Team— Donnelly, Fox. Ufer. Carroll, Smith (M) second in 100- Yard 
Dash; Wilson (M) tied for third in Pole Vault; Cross (M) fourth in Discus Throw. 

May 1, 1915. Ac Ferry Field— Varsity Meet. 

Sophomores 56. Freshmen 32, Juniors 26, Seniors 12, 

May 8, 1915. At South Bend, Ind.— Michigan vs. Notre Dame Dual Meet. 

Michigan 75 2-3, Noire Dame 50 1-3. 

May 29, 1915. At Franklin Field, Philadelphia— Eastern Intercollegiate, 

Michigan tied with Dartmouth for sixth place, 

Michigan Team— Smith, Wilson, Carroll, O'Brien, Lapsley, Huntington. Ufer, 
Fox, Donnelly, Ferris. Corbin. Cross. 



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cither Ibe quarter mile, the 



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himself over the bar 



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The 1915 Track Season 

*T the opening of the 1915 track season, Coach Stephen J. Farrell of the Michigan Varsity, faced 
/~^ the problem of developing a strong squad with only a very small nucleus of-vecerans. That 
the season was a success was due primarily to the fact that the sophomore class presented several 
athletes who proved themselves to be real stars, and capable of going directly into collegiate competi- 
tion and producing results. 

The schedule was a heavy one, starting off with two match relay races, one with Pennsylvania 
and one with Princeton. Although the Varsity lost both of these races, the margin of the victor's 
win in each instance was a small one. and the showing of the Michigan team was such as to promise 
much for the future. In each case the Varsity team was composed largely of youngsters, and the fact 
that they were given their collegiate baptism in the grilling competition of a match relay race was the 
cause of their defeat. 

As a season of dual meets, the record of 1915 was a complete success, for the Varsity won all four 
of the contests. Two victories were earned over Syracuse and the same number against the Notre 
Dame team. The margin of the victory in the indoor encounter with Syracuse in the latter's gymnasium 
was particularly close, the meet not being decided until the relay race had finished. When the Michigan 
team started this relay, they were behind the Orange Varsity in total number of points scored. They 
won the race and took the meet by a margin of three points. To accomplish this result the Michigan 
racers were forced to beat the very men who had defeated them in the match races of the relay part of 
the event program. 

. For the first time in history, Michigan entered the Drake Relay Games at Des Moines. Stephen 
J. Farrell, the Varsity coach, acted as Referee for the meet, and the welcome accorded the 
Wolverines was a most agreeable one in that so many of the supposed Western Conference enemies 
of Michigan were entered. While the single Varsity team entered, the four-mile relay squad, did not 
win its event, it forced the Wisconsin team to clip 32 seconds off the former Drake Games record for 
the event in order to win. The showing made by the Varsity team was more than satisfactory, and 
the gritty races run by each one of the four men won the favorable comment of the Western Con- 
ference coaches and athletes. 

Michigan avenged this defeat by Wisconsin at the Drake Relay Games by thoroughly trouncing 
the Badger Varsity one week later at the Pennsylvania Relay Games. At this eastern meet the Varsity 
team was unable to win the victory, as the wonderful Cornell four could not be bested. Michigan 
took second place, however, with Wisconsin in third position. 

Three of the Varsity's individual entries in the Relay Games won places. Smith, the Michigan 
captain, ran in second place to Howard Drew in the lOlJ-yard dash. The colored whirlwind from the 
Pacific coast was hy far the best sprinter at the meet, but the Michigan man forced him to his greatest 
speed to win. Wilson of the Varsity tied with thirteen others for third place in the pole vault. Two 
athletes were tied for first place, so that a second place was not awarded. Cross of the Michigan team, 
finished fourth in the discus throw. 

The most satisfactory feature of the whole of the 1915 season was the record made by Captain 
Harold L. Smith at the annual Eastern Intercollegiate meet at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. Pitted 
against the best college sprinters in the country, he took first place in both the dashes, winning easily 
in the 100-yard dash and in the 220-yard dash. By accomplishing this feat, he tied with Meredith, 
the sensational Pennsylvania star, for the individual honors of the meet, for Meredith won both the 
quarter and the half mile races. 

The Michigan Varsity at the Eastern Intercollegiate was composed of twelve men, but only three 
of them worked their way into the scoring columns. Smith made 10 points in the sprints, Carroll 
earned three points in the mile run by taking third place, and Wilson gathered in one point in the pole 
vault when he was awarded fifth place. The pole vault was somewhat of a disappointment, as Wilson 
failed, on the second day, to make as good a record as he had on the day of the preliminary trials. 

The remainder of the Varsity men were mostly sophomores, taken to Philadelphia for the purpose 
of seasoning. O'Brien made a good showing in the lOOyard dash, finishing sixth, but the others failed 
to qualify. 



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Michigan vs. Notre Dame Dual Indoor Meet 

Waterman Gymnasium, Februarv 2S, I91J 

Score: Michigan 61, Notre Dame 16 

THE SCORE BOARD 
































































































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Third 


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Hardy (ND) 


Smith (M) 


Bergman (ND) 


04 1/5 


■10-Yard High Hurdles 


Corbiti (M) 


Catim (M) 


Kirkland (ND) 


06 


Mile Run 


Carroll (M) 


Waage (ND) 


Grauman (M) 4 


26 4/5 


44Q-Yard Dash 


Burby (M) 


John (M) 


Huntington (M) 


S3 4/S 


S»)-Yard Run 


Ufer (M) 


Fox (M) 


Donnelly (M) 2 


00 3/S 


Shot Put 


Bachman (ND) 


Cross (M) 


Keefe (ND) 


43 ft. 3/4 i 


Pole Vault 


Wilson (M) 


Cross (M) 


Kessler (M) 


11 ft, 2 in. 


High Jump 


Waterbuiy (M) 


Bercay (M) 1 
Corbin (M) 


tied 


5 ft. 8 in. 


1200-Yard Relay 


Michigan 


Notre Dame 


I :54 1/S 



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Michigan vs. Syracuse Dual Indoor Meet 

Syracuse, New York, March 13, 191S 

Score: Michigan 40, Syracuse 37 

THE SCORE BOARD 















































































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O'Bnen (M) 


l.apsley (M) 
Smith (M) 


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fl4 4/5 


45-yard Hiwh H 


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Corbin (M) 


Delhng (S) 
Kinesley(S) 


cied 


;06 1/S 


Mile Run 




Carroll (M) 


Parmale (S) 


George (S) 


4:30 


300-Yard Dash 




Foertch (S) 


Mixer (S) 


Smith (M) 


;35 2/5 


440-Yard Dash 




Donahue (S) 


Dixon (S) ■ 


Burby (M) 


:55 


880-Yard Rim 




Ufer (M) 


Ne«rkirk (S) 


Fox (M) 


2:03 2/5 


Shot Put 




Cross (M) 


Schultz (S) 


White (S) 


42 ft. 8 1/4 


Pole Vaiiii 
High Jump 




Curtis (S) \ 
Wilson (M)/ 
Curtis (S) 


ed 

Corbin (M) 


Cross (M) 12 ft. 6 in, 
Waterbury{M)Ligj 5 ft 9 in 
Herray (M) J 


1200-yard Relay 




Michigan 


Syracuse 






•Not counted fo 


rotals. 









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^•'e-:~' 



Michigan vs. Notre Dame 

South Bend, Ind., May 8, 1915 
Score: Michigan 75 2/3, Notre Dame SO 1/3 
THE SCORE BOARD 








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First 


SlCOTid 


Third 


Record 


100-Yard Dash 


Smith (M) 


O'Brien (M) 


Hardy (ND) 


:10 3/5 


120-Yard High Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Kirkland (ND) 


Catlett (M) 


:17 2/5 


Mile Run 


Carroll (M) 


Fos (M) 


Bartholomew (ND 


4:41 2/5 


220-Yard Dash 


Smith (M) 


Hardy (ND) 


O'Brien (M) 


:23 


440-Yard Dash 


Welsh (ND) 




Fontanna (M) 


:53 4/5 


Two-Mile Run 


Donnelly (M) 


Bums (ND) 


Kuivinen (M) 


10:30 3/S 


220-Yard Low Hurdles 


Crumpacker (M) Catlett (M) 


Sbaughnessy (ND) 


:28 


880-Yard Run 


Carroll (M) 


Ufer (M) 


McDonald (ND) 


2:02 3/5 


Shot Put 


Cross (M) 


Bachman (ND) 


Keefe (ND) 


41 ft. 9 


Pole Vault 


Wilson (M) 


Yaeger (ND) 
Miller (ND) 


Cross (M) 


10 ft, 6 


High Jump 


Mills (ND) 


Waterbury (M) 
Perschbacher(M), 


tied 


5 ft. 5 


Hammer*Throw 


Bachman (ND) 


DeGowan (M) 


Bastian (M) 


140 ft. 5 


Broad Jump 


Miller (ND) 


Martin (ND) 


Ferris (M) 


20 ft. 8 


Discus Throw 


Bachman (ND) 


Cross (M) 


Keefe (ND) 


130 ft, 11 



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Michigan vs. Syracuse 

Ferry Field, M^v IS, 1915 

Score: Michigan 73 2/3. Syracuse 48 1/3 

THE SCORE BOARD 















































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Second 


Third 


Record 


100-Yard Dash 


Smith (M) 


O'Brien (M) 


Kingsley (S) 


:10 1/5 


120- Yard High Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Wilson (M) 


Delling (S) 


:16 4/S 


Mile Run 


Carroll (M) 


Newkirk (S) 


Fox (M) 


4:26 1/5 


220-Yard Dash 


Smith (M) 


O'Brien (M) 


Foertch (S) 


:22 3/5 


440- Yard Dash 


Donahue (S) 


Rulison (S) 


Robinson (M) 


:51 3/5 


220-Yard Low Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Crump acker (M] 


Delling(S) 1 
Foertch (S) j"^ 


:26 3/5 


880- Yard Run 


Ufet (M) 


Carroll (M) 


Finch (S) 


im 


Shot Put 


Cross (M) 


Schultz (8) 


White (S) 


it ft, 1 


Pole Vault 


Curtis (S) 


Wilson (M) 
Berray (M) 


Kesskr (M) 


12 ft. 


High Jump 


Perschbacher (M) Steele (S) 


tied 


5 ft. 5 






Waterbury (M)i 






Hammer Throw 


White (S) 


Johnson (S) 


Basrian (M) 


138 ft. 7 


Broad Jump 


Ferris (M) 


Kingsley (S) 


Thurston (M) 


■ 21 ft, 5 


Two Mile Run 


Haskins (S) 


Donnelly (M) 


Pulling (S) 


10:05 


One Mile Relay 


Syracuse 


Michigan 




3:31 



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Eastern Intercollegiate Track and Field Meet 



Franklcn Fie 



, Pei 



, May 29, 1915 



Cornell 45 1/2, Harvard 26, Yale 25, Princeton 21, Pennsylvania 21, MichiEan U, Dartmouth 14. 
Columbia 10, Maine 9, Pennsylvania State 6, Bowdoin 2, Massachusetts Institute of Technoloey 1, 
Johns Hopkins 1/2. 
100-Yard Dash— Smith (M) first, Teschner (H) second, Ingersoll (C) third, Treadway (Y) fourth, 

■ Foley (H) fifth. Time— 10 sec, 
120-Yard High Hurdles— Ferguson (Penn.) first, Starr (C) second, Hammitt (PS) third, Grubb (C) 

fourth, Lukens (0) fifth. Tim^lS 2/5 sec. 
One Mile Run— MacKenzie (P) first, Windnagle (C) second. Carroll (M) third, Atha (P) fourth, 

Irish (C) fifth. Time— i:22 4/5. 
440- Yard Dash— Meredith (P) first, Wilcox (H) second, Wilkie (Y) third, Richardson (P) fourth, 

Riley (D) fifth. Time-48 sec. 
220-Ya.rd Dash— Smith (M) first, Teschner (H) second, Treadway (Y) third, Lockwood (Penn.) 

fourth, Patterson (Penn) fifth. Time— 22 sec. 
Two-Mile Run— Potter (C) first, Oveitson (Y) second, Hoffmire (C) third, Holden (Y) fourth. Cook 

(MIT) fifth. Time— 9-27 1/5. 
220-Yard Low Hurdles— Stewart (P) first. Smith (H) second. Brown (PS) third, Brady (Col) fourth, 

Crawford (?) fifth. Time-24 2/5 see. 
880-Yard Run— Meredith (Penn) first, Spieden (C) second, Hayes (P) third, Capper (H) fourth, 

Cooley (P) fifth. Time— I :S4 2/5, 
Shot Put— Whitney (D) first, Beatty (Col) second, McCutcheon (C) third. Spears (D) fourth, Allen 

(Maine) fifth. Distance— 17 ft, 4 7/8 in. 
Pole Vault— Carter (Y), Foss (C) and Greeley (H) tied for first. Baker (P) fourth, Wilson (M) fifth. 

HeiKht— 12 ft. 
High Jump— Oler (Y) first, Richards (C) second, Johnstone (H) third, McLaren (C) and Hallet (JH) 

tied for fourth. Height 6 ft. 4 1/2 in. 
Hammer Throw— Bailey (Me) first, McCutcheon (C) second, Murphy (Penn) third, Loughbridge (Y) 

fourth, Leadhetter (B) fifth. Distanc^l65 ft. 3/4. 
Broad Jump— Worthington (D) first, Graham (Col) second, French (Me) third, Richards (C) fourth, 

Fredericks (D) fifth. Distance— 23 ft. 9 1/4 in. 




Donnelly Murfhy Farrell Carroll Ufe 



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TENNIS 

1915 Varsity Tennis Team 

OFFICERS 

Ira H. RELNOtL Capcain 

Dr. Alfred 0. J.FF. Coach 

PERSOAXEL 

Ira H. Recndel, M Number One 

Charles B, Crawford, M Number Two 

Christian N. Mack, M Number Three 

John S. Switzer, M Number Four 

David Polasky 
Harold Eaton 
Samuel L. Cohen 




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ip-'^ 



The 1915 Tennis Season 

MICHIGAN vs. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Pittsburgh, IV, Mav 17, 1915 

Singles DaabUs 



McElroy (P) d. Reindel (M) ... . 6-4,6-2 McElroy and Gart (P) d. 
Crawford (M) d. Gant (P) . . . . 6-i, 8-6 Reindel and Crawford (M) 
Switzer(M) d. Myers (P) .... 6-4,6-1 Switzer and Mack (M) d. 
Mack (M) d. Haines (P) , . . . 6-2, 6-0 Haines and Myers (P) 
S(DK— Michigan, 4; University.of Pittsburgh, 2 


. 6-3,7-5 
6-4, 7-S 


MICHIGAN vs. CARNEGIE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 




Pettsbuhgh, Pa., May 18, 1915 




SingUs Doubles 
Reindel (M) d. Steen (T) . . . 6-3,4-6,6-0 Reindel and Crawford (M) d. 
Crawford (M) d. Davis (T) . . . 4-6.6-1,6-1 Steen and Davis (T) , . 
Mack (M) d. Bihiman (T) . . . S -7, 6-0, 6-1 Mack and Switzer (M) d. 
Switzer CM) d. English (T) , . . . 6-0, &-i Bihiman and Englisl, (T) . 
Score— Michigan, 6; Carnegie Technical Institute, 


4-6, 5-2, 6-4 

7-5, 6-4 


MICHIGAN vs. lUfERFORD COLLEGE 




Haverford, Pa., Mav 19,1915 




Singh, Doubles 
Reindei (M) d.-Carey (H) . . . 2-6, 7-S, 6-3 Crawford and Reindel (M) d. 
Allen (H) d. Crawford (M) . . . . 6-3, 6-0 Carey and Allen (H) . , 
Mack (M) d. Wellcr (H), . , . .6-2,15-13 Mack and Switzer (M) d. 
Hallet (H) d. Switier (M) .... f-2,6-4 Hallet and Wdler (H) , . 
Sforf— Michigan, 4; Haverford College, 2 


6-4, 2-6, 6-1 
5-7, 6-1, 6-2 


MICHIGAN vs. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 




PHELADELPHiA, Pa., MaY 19, 1915 




Singles Doubles 
Davis (P) d. Reindel (M) .... 6-1,6-1 Davis and Rowland (P) d. 
Rowland (P) d. Crawford (M) . . . 6-1, 6-4 Reindel and Crawford (M) 
Disston (P) d. Mack (M) . . , 6-3, 1-6, 7-5 Disston and Replegle (P) d. 
Rcplegle (P) d. Switzer (M) ... 6-3, 6-0 Mack and Switzer (M) . 
Srari— Michigan, Oi University of Pennsylvania, 6 


. 6-3, &-0 
. 6-4,6-0 


MICHIGAN vs. GEORGETOIVN UNIVERSITY 




Washington, D. C, May 20, 1915 




Singles Doubles 
Reindel (M) d. CBoyle (G) , . . 6-2, 2-6, 6-1 Crawford and Reindei (M) d. 
Crawford (M) d. McGtiire (G) . . . 6-1, 6-1 O'Boyle and McGuire (G) 
SwitTer (M) d. Hughes (G) . . . . 6-3, 6-3 Switzer and Mack (M) d. 
Mack (M) d. Cresy (G) 6-2, 6-0 Hughes and Cresy (G) 


5-7. 6-4, 7-5 
. . 6-3.6-3 



Score — Michigan, 6; Georgetown University, 
MICHIGAN vs. U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY 
Annapolis, Md., May 21, 1915 
Singles 
Reindel (M) d. Godfrey (N) ... 6-4, 6-3 Mack (M) d. Wood (N) . 
Randolph (N) d, Crawford (M) . . 6-1. 6-1 Switzer (M) led Waters (N) . 
5corf— Michigan, 2; Naval Academy, 1. Called on acco 
MICHIGAN vs. OBERLIN COLLEGE 
Ann Arbor, Mich., May 29, 1915 
Singles 
E. C. Andrus (0] d, Switzer (M) 8-6, 3-«, 6-1 Wilder (O) d. Reindel (M) 
D. W. Andrus (O) d. Polasky (M) 6-3, 6-1 Bissell (O) d. Mack (M) . 

Doubles 
Bissell and Wilder (0) d. Reindel and CrawfonJ (M) 

Sforf-Miehigan. 0; Obeclin College, 5. Called on account of darkne 



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f t i 



1918 All-Fresh Tennis Team 

PEflSONNEL 
m Manager Edward Stebbins, 1918 
George Stocking, 1918 

ALL-FRESII TENNIS RECORD OF 1915 

ALBION COLLEGE 



MICHIGAN FRESHMEN 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Fox (A) d- Steketee (M) 6-2, 6-2 

Goodrich (A) d. Stebbins (M) . . . 6-3,6-4 
Stocking (M) d. Dawe (A) , . - . 6-1,6-2 
Coons (M) d. Rood (A) . . , . 6-2. 3-6, 6-1 



May U, 1915 

DouhUs 
Coons and Stebbins (M) d. 

Rooc and Fox (A) 6-2,6-2 

Goodrich and Dasve (A) d. 

Steketee and Stocking (M) . . 6-3.6-2 
Coons and Stebbins (M) d. 

Goodrich and Fox (A) . . . 3-6, 6-i, 6-1 
Score — Michigan Freshmen, 4; Albion College, 3 
MICHIGAN FRESHMEN vs. SCOTT HIGH SCHOOL OF TOLEDO 
Ann Arbor, Mich., May 21, 1915 

Doubles 
. . . 6-3,6-1 Coons and Stebbins (M) d. 

. 6-2, 7-5 Wilson and Johns (T) , . 10-8, 7-9, 12-10 

6-3, 5-7, 6-0 Perkins and Steketee (M) d. 

fr4,6-l Southerland and Bradley (T) . . 6-3,6-3 



SirtgUs 
Johns (T) d. Coons (M) . . . 
Southerland (T) d. Stebbins (M) 
Sceketee (M) d. Wilson (T) . 
Perkins (M) d. Bradley (T) . 



Score — Michigan Freshmen, 4; Scott High School, 2 
MICHIGAN FRESHMEN vs. MICHIGAN STATE NORMAL 



Singles 
Coons (M) d. DeNancrede (N) . 
Steketee (M) d. Jefferson (N) . 
Stebbins (M) d. BrundageCN) . 
Stocking (M) d. Hutchinson (N) 



Ann Arbor, Mici 

6-0,6-3 
6-2,6-3 
6-2, 7-S 
6-3,6-2 



, May 28, 1913 

Doubles 
Steketee and Stocking (M) d. 

Jefferson and DeNancrede (N) 
Stebbins and Coons (M) d, 
Brundage and Hut 



Score — Michigan Freshmen, 6; Michigan State Normal, 



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1*1 




W. R. DeGowan R. S, Anderson J. P. Thompson J. B. Steere F. W. Wood 
M. B. Cutting J. E. Snider H. P. Nicholson I. B. Clabk W. J. Schoefle A. C. Simons 
J.R.MosER G.C.Curtis R, W. Hussev H. A, Moul F.A.Rowe L. C, Wilcoxen C. B. Marks 



Record of 1915 Rifle Team 



January 28 Michigan 

February 4 Michigan 

February 11 Michigan 

February 18 Michigan 

February 25 Michigan 

March 4 Mii:higan 

March 1 1 Michigan 

March 18 Michigan 

March 25 Yale University 



University of Washington 
University of Arizona 
Kansas State Aggies 
Rhode Island State 
University of Nebrask 
Lehigh University 
Mississippi Aggies 
University of Idaho 
Michigan 



FINAL STANDING OF CLASS C 

Total Score Per Cent. 

Yale University 82S2 91.68 

Kansas State Aggies 8246 91.62 

University of Nebraska 8230 91,44 

University of Michigan 8146 90.51 

University of Arizona 7958 88.42 

Mississippi Aggies 7601 84.45 

University of Idaho 7301 81.12 

Lehigh University 6863 76.25 

University of Washington 6789 75.43 

Rhode Island State 1618 17.97 



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'f** 



Edwin B. Palmer President 

T. Hawley Tappcng Secretary-Treasurer 



BOJRD OF DIRECTORS 



Paul L. Sahpsell 
Julius L. Beers 

E. R. BORCHERDT 

John R. Nicholson 
Harvey H. Sprick 
Edwin B. Palmer 
John A. Herring, Jr. 
Robert Turner 
Thomas R. Peirsol 
Vincent J. O'Connor 



Henry Bohling 
Standish Robinson 
J. B. Marks 
F. A, Bade 
E. M. Williams 
James D. O'Connor 
U. S. G. Cherry 
Lester F. Stearns 
Chester L. Fordney 
Glenn Howland 





T, Hawley Tapping 
Secretary- Treasurer 



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^^*^ 




ACTCON IN THE 1915 InI 



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The Michigan Interscholastic 

1915 OFFICERS 

F. GuRNEE McLLARD Incersd 

Phillip G. Bartelmk Gradiia 

RavJ. M[LL5 Assistai 

Alvin M. Bentley Assistai 

J. W. Thomas Assistai 

Harry W, Kkks Assistai 



: Manage! 
: Manager 
: Managi 



100-yard dash . . 

220-yatd dash . . 
440-yard dash . . 
Half mile run . , 
Mile run .... 

120-yard high hurdles 
220yard low hurdles 
High jump . . 

Broad jump , 
Pole vault 

12-lb, hammer throw 
12-lb. s' 



19( 



MICHIGAN INTERSCHOLASTIC RECORDS 
-HoKenson, Lewis Institute^ 1906— Cook, Chillic< 



Disc 



: thro 



Half mile relay . 



1913— Von Thorn, Oak Harbor, O. 

1914— Carter, Chicago University High, 21 2/S sec, 
1914— Shiverick, Chicago University High, 51 1/5 si 
1914 — Spink, Chicago University High. 1 min. ,56 sc 
1909— Cowley, Muskegon, 4 min. 38 1/5 sec, 
1909-Mann, Muskegon, 10 min, 10 3/5 sec. 
1915— Zoellin, Lewis Institute. 15 3/4 sec. 
1913— C. Corey, Chicago Universitv High, 24 2/5 se 
1906— Patterson, Detroit U. S. 6 ft. 1 1/4 in. 
1906— Cook, Chillicothe. 23 ft. 5 in. 
1913— Foss, Chicago University High. 12 ft. 5/8 in. 
1909— Kohler, Lansing H. S. 170 ft. 3 in. 
1907— Horner, Grand Rapids. 50 ft. 4 in. 
1908— Alderman, Lake Forest A. 120 ft. 3 in. 
1913— Chicago University High. 1 min. 33 1,^5 sec. 



TRACK CHAMPIONS AT THE INTERSCHOLASTIC MEETS 



1898— Lansing, (Mich.) High School. 
1899— Detroit, (Mich.) Central High School. 
1900— Ann Arbor, (Mich.); Grand Rapids, (Mich.) 

Central — Tie for first. 
1901— Detroit Central High School. 
1902 — Detroit Universitv School. 
1903— Lewis Institute, ('Chicago), 
1904— Detroit University School, 
1905 — Detroit University School. 
190f^Lewis Institute (Chicago). 



1907— Morgan Park Academy, (Chicago). 
1908— Detroit, (Mich.) Central High School. 
1909— Muskegon. (Mich.) High School. 
]910— Shelby, (Mich.) High SchooL 
1911— Toledo Central, (Ohio) High School. 
1912— No meet. 

1913— Chicago University High. 
191.^-Chicago University High. 
1915— LaGrange High School (III.) 



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17th Annual Inter-Scholastic Track and Field Meet 



ERRY Field, May 22, 1915 
THE SCORE BOARD 



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Universitv High 






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Detroit Eastern 






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Rockford IS, D. U. S. 13, Lowell 13, Deckerville lOH, Plymouth 7M, Croswell 7, 
St, Joseph 7, Wayne 1- 







CUSS A EVENTS 






100- Yard Dash 


Zoellin (LI) 


Floete (UH) 


Henry (DE) 


Herschman (TS) :10 1/5 


120 High H'dle 


Zoellin (LI) 


Fey (LaG) 


Smart (LaG) 


Williams (DE) 


;1S 4/5 


Mile Run 


Nott (LaG) 


Thompson (DE) 


Vandevisse (GR) Gates (BC) 


4:45 4/5 


220- Yard Dash 


Zoellin (LI) 


Fioete (UH) 


Smart (LaG) 


Henry (DE) 


:22 


440- Yard Dash 


Burke (R) 


MacKenzie (GR) 


Mueller (LI) 


Lamonde (LI) 


:52 


220 Low H'dles 


Smart (LaG) 


Fey (LaG) 


Landers (0) 


Williams (DE) 


:25 1/5 


880- Yard Run 


Mueller (LI) 


Nott (LaG) 


Wait (BCW) 


Forbes (GR) 


2:05 


12-lb. Shot Put 


Kimball (M) 


Finsel (DF.) 
Albright (UH) 


Graham (UH) 


Smith (W) 


49 ft. 3^ 


Pole Vault 


Graham (UH) 


Cross (M) tied 
Landers (0) 






10 ft- 6 


High Jump 


Smart (LaG) 


Moorehead (TS) 


Scott (DE) 1 
Haigh (DUS)J 


ied 


Sft. 7 


Hammer Throw 


Kimball (M) 


Colley (LI) 


Miller (L) 


Scott (LaG) 


152 ft. 1 


Broad Jump 


Landers (0) 


Graham (UH) 


Smart (LaG) 


Colley (LI) 


21 ft. 9 


Discus Throw 


Kimball (M) 


Breitmeyer (Mt.C) 


Belknap (GR) 


Bennett (P) 


105 ft. 



Half Mile Relay Lewis Ins 



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Underclass Contests of 1915 

SPRING 

THE freshman class of 1918 had been held scoreless in the fall contests of 1914. This was not an 
encouraging record with which to enter into the games that followed in the spring, but the event 
proved a good test for their "come-back" power. 

The big games were scheduled to come off on May 22nd and 23rd. Both classes had previously 
held large mass meetings at which the liadirional spirit of antagonism betiveen these underclasses was 
stirred to overflowing. On these occasions Egmont Hildner was chosen as captain in the push ball con- 
test for the sophomores, and Archie Walls for the freshmen. 

The tugs of war were staged as usual on Friday afternoon; but their location on the Huron was 
changed from above the Michigan Central Depot, as formerly, to the banks between the island and the 
new bridge of the River Road. This change was made in an effort to secure more even conditions for 
both sides in the pulling. The hghtweight teams burrowed into their positions first, and, on the shoot- 
ing of the gun to start, there commenced one of the fiercest tugs of war in the history of the University. 
It holds the record for time, they remaining in a deadlock for 1 hour and 18 minutes, and then it was 
discovered that the sophomores had three men on their side above the lawful number, so the decision 
was given to the freshmen as a forfeit. The two following tugs were made much shorter by a ruling that 
all had to stand up from the beginning. In the middleweight pull the freshmen dragged the sophomores 
into the chilly Huron within 9 minutes; and then the second year men came back in the heavyweight 
and doused the freshmen in 4 minutes. 

The contests were continued on Ferry Field Saturday morning, and iirst on the program were the 
obstacle relay races. There were three of these and the sophomore teams won the first two by a large 
margin, but the freshmen were victors in the third. This made the score a tie, and the big push ball 
contest had to decide the result. It was hotly fought by both sides, and despite the superior numbets 
of the freshmen they were held thruout from making a goal. However, they were allowed the winning 
point at the end for having the ball over the sophomore line; and thus carried off the spring contests 
by a score of4 to 3. 

FJLL 

The freshmen class that had been squelched in the fall a year ago returned this time and admin- 
istered the same punishment to the aspiring freshmen of 1919. In the mass meetings that preceded, 
rush captains were chosen, Archie Walls again being selected by the sophomores and Ward Peterson 
fay the freshmen. 

October 16th was the day set aside for the memorial struggle, and early in the morning the oppos- 
ing ranks began to assemble on the campus. The green paint found its way in liberal touches to the 
immature brows of the yearlings, and they followed the sophomores in a riotous march to Ferry Field. 
But their spirit was soon to be humbled. They encircled the three poles which it was their duty to de- 
fend and awaited the onslaughts of the sophomores. Those about the center pole were not kept long 
in waiting, for it was here that the sophomores concentrated their first attack. They came from opposite 
directions, and after a fierce contest which raged for S minutes a sophomore rose out of the struggling 
mass and scaled the pole for the flag. This won, the sophomores turned on the west pole and by rapid 
charges crawled over the green topped domes of the helpless freshmen and the flag was lowered within 
the small space of 3 minutes. All efforts of both sides then became centered on the east pole, but here 
again the jubilant second year men were successful within 4 minutes. 

This left the freshmen windless and at the empty end of a 4 to score, but the Cane Spree was yet 
to take place. This developed into a close and hard fight, bur the sophomores could not be defeated. 
Draws were called in the case of six canes, but out of the remaining twenty-four the sophomores wrestled 
away thirteen. This added one more point to the sophomores' total, and the freshmen had little to smile 
over when they exposed their tattered shirts to the photographer before Hill Auditorium. 






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Bast an (Football 
Benton (Baseball, Foo ball) 
Brandell (Baseball) 
Carroll (Track) 
Catlett (Football) 
Cochran (Foocball) 
Cor BIN (Track) 
Cross (Track) 
Davidson (Baseball) 
Donnelly (Track) 
Dunne (Football) 
Ferguson (Baseball) 
Ferr.s (Track) 
Fox (Track) 
Labadie (Baseball) 
Maulbetsch (Football) 
McQueen (Baseball) 
Millard (Football) 



\\ -^ N E^ANN Baeball 
U. K.Niemann (Baseball) 
Norton (Football) 
Rehor (Football) 
Reimann (Football) 
ROEHM (Football) 
Shivel (Baseball) 
SiELER (Baseball) 
Smith (Track) 
Smith (Football) 
Staatz, (Football) 
Stewart (Baseball) 
Ufer (Track) 
Walti (Basebail) 
Watson (Football) 
Weske (Football) 
Whalen (Football) 
Wilson (Track) 



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Anderson (Baseball) 
Arenti (Baseball) 
Bastian (Track) 
Berray (Track) 
Boyd (Football) 
Calvin (Football) 
Catlett (Track) 
Caswell (Baseball) 
Crumpacker (Track) 
DeGowcn (Track) 
Fontanna (Track) 
HiLDHER (Football) 
Howe (Football] 

N (Track) 



John (T ack 
Kessler T a k 
KuiviNEN (Tratk; 
Laps LEY (Track) 
Nichols (Baseball) 
O'Brien (Track) 
Pehschbacher (Track) 
Raymond (Football) 
Robinson (Track) 
Sharpe (Football) 
SoDDY (Baseball) 
Trelfa (Track) 
Waterbuby (Track) 
Zecqer (Football) 



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\d m too ball 
B am Foo ba 1 
BiRNEY (Football) 
BiXLEH. (Football) 
Braiell (Football) 
Cohen (Football) 
DiEDERs (Football) 
DoRRANCE (Football) 
EwERT (Football) 
Hendershot (Football) 
Huss (Football) 
Ingham (Football) 
Johnson (Football) 
KoHR (Football) 



I o K Foo ba 
M C Foo ba 

Newell (Baseball) 
Pavettb (Baseball) 
PoBANK (Football) 
Shutes (Football) 
Smith (Baseball) 
SoRLrNC (Football) 
Taylor (Baseball) 
Thomas (Baseball) 
Thompson (Football) 
Warner (Football) 
WicKHAM (Football) 



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Wearers 
of the 

"1 6" 








Addison (Football) 


Donaldson (Football, Baseball 


OSTRANDER (FoOtball) 


Allmendinger (Football) 


DucAN (Baseball) 


Paisley (Football) 


Amtsbeuchler (Football, 


Eger (Football) 


Pearl (Football) 


Wrestling) 


Ferguson (Football) 


Phelps (Track) 


Ankenbhandt (Indoor Baseball 


Ferris (Football) 


PopiN (Football) 


Armstrong (Tract) 


Fox (Track) 


Quail (Track) 
KiCHARDS (Track) 


Atwater (Football) 


Funk (Football, Baseball) 


Baker (Relay, Football) 


Galbraith (Baseball) 


Richardson (Football) 


Becker (Relay, Football) 


Goodwin (Football) 


W. Robertson (Soccer) 


Bell (Football) 


Gates (Football) 


J. Robertson (Soccer) 


Bennie (Track) 


Gore (Track) 


RoivAN (Football, Relay. Baseball) 


Bentley (Football) 


Hayden (Football) 


Scott (Football. Baseball) 


Berrav (Track, Basketball) 


Henderson (Football,Basketbal!)SEELEY (Basketball, Football) 


Brandell (FooAall) 


Headman (Basketball) 


Shafer (Football) 


Brotherton (Football) 


Holt (Football) 


Smallman (Football, Baseball) 


Brown (Football, Baseball) 


Hyde (Basketball) 


Smith (Track) 


Brownell (Baseball) 


AMES (Soccer, Relay) 


Smith (Relay) 


Bruch (Track) 


OHN (Relay) 


Snider (Football) 


Cameron (Football) 


ONEs(Reliy) 


STAATi (Basketball) 


Campbell (Football) 


.AMBERT (Track) 


Staley (Football) 


Catlett (Track) 


.AMOREAUX (Football) 


K, M. Stevens (Baseball, Track) 


Casev (Indoor Baseball) 


Lynch (Track) 


P.H. Stevens (Baseball. Football) 


Chenot (Football) 


Lynch (Relay) 


Stewart (Football) 


Cooper (Football) 


Lyttle (Track) 


Stone (Football) 


Cork (Football) 


Manwarring (Basketball) 


SuTOR (Football) 


Costa (Indoor Baseball) 


Martens (Football) 


Tappan (Basketball) 


Cowan (Football) 


May (Basteiball) 


Thomas (Baseball, Football) 


Cross (Track) 


Martin (Baseball) 


Trelfa (Relay) 


Coryell (Soccer) 


McCall (Football, Baseball. 


Ufer (Track, Relay) 


Cochran (Hockey) 


Soccer) 


VoNACHEN (Basketball) 


Ckristensen (Relay) 


McNamara (Football) 


Warner (Basketball) 


Curry (Basketball) 


MoNEiTA (Track) 


Watt (Football) 


Chatfield (Track) 


Morse (Baseball, Football) 


Watts (Soccer) 


Day (Track) 


Murphy (Track, Relav) 


Westrate (Football) 


DaV[s (Track) 


NlCHOls (Baseball) ' 


WlCKHAM (Relay) 


De Liefde (Soccer) 


Norton (Relay) 


WooLK (Football) 



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James W. Thomas, Iiaercollege Manager Floyd A. Rowe, 

Inter-Class Football, Season of 1915 

FINAL ROUND 
HiEh ceam in first division wins Campus Championship 
FIRST DIVISION 
Senioc Lits Ic ■ t -7 ni 

SmiorLam JStnior L.w. .... 7-0 

P"^"j . iDtnt! 6-Op'"" . . - - H-0 

Senior Engineers f"''"" 

Senior Engineers }Sf^"ior I-its . . (Isc game 0-0) 7-0 

Senior Laws Forfeit to Senior Lits 

STANDING, FIRST DIVISION 
Team Won Lost Team 

Dents 2 Senior Laws 

Senior Lits 2 1 Senior Engineers . , , . 

SECOND DIVISION 
High team plays last team in first division for fourth set of numerals 

Juni'or lIws ^''^^ ^its 6-o| 

Mrdic^"^'""'' Jsoph Engineers . . , forfeit Soph I.its . . 20-6 

Senior^Engineers Y°^^ J"'" H 

FINAL STANDING 
Team Won Lost Team 

Dents, Champions - ... 3 Semor Lawb 

Senior Lits 2 1 Soph Lits 

Indoor Baseball, 1915-1916 

FINAL STANDING 

Team Won Lost P.C. Team Won 

Pharmics , , , . 4 1,000 Fresh Lits , - . 1 

Junior Engineers , . 3 i ,750 .Architects ... 1 

Senior Engineers - . 2 2 .500 Soph Engineers , - 

Inter-Class Hockey, 1915-1916 

FINAL STANDING 
Team Won Lost P.C. Team Won 

Senior-Junior Lits , , 4 1,000 Science . . , , 

Soph Engineers . . 3 I .750 Fresh Engineers . 

Fresh Lits ... 1 2 .333 



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1916 Literary Football Team 

FUytrs Position 

R. Stewivrt Left End 

C.C.Stone Left Tackle 

T. Amtsbeuchlfk Left Guard 

W. Brotherton Center 

W. Shafer Right Guard 

W. Holt Right Tackle 

E, J. Allmendcngfh Right End 

I Cork, (Captain) Quarter 

A. M. BENTLty Left Half 

E. Brandhli Right Half 

A. C. Martons Full Back 

L. OsTRANDER Right Guaid 

H- P. Hayden Right Tackle 

W. A. Pearl Left Tackle 

J. E. Chznot Manager 



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1916 Law Baseball Team 

J, K. Nichols Out Field 

P. H. Stevens First Base 

C. J. Morse Center Field 

J. F. Scott Right Field 

L.Thomas (Captain and Manager) Catcher 

E. R. McCall Second Base ai 

C. C. Rowan Pitcher 

E. S. Martin Third Base 

H. D. Brown Left Field 

R, O. Bkownell Shortstop 



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1916 Dental Baseball Team 

Rich Captain 

Bolt Catcher 

Wright Pitcher 

MoRAN Shortstop 

Kane First 

Rich Second 

McKenna Third 

Chichester Left 

QUIGLGY Right 

BouQuiN Center 

Hawn Utility 

Barhjnoee Utility 



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1918 Dental Football Team 

A. J. Cardinal Right End 

A. H. Hadley Right Tackle 

E. G. Wilson Right Guard 

F. H. TiNSMAN Center 

F. R. GoETi Left Guard 

J. 0. GooDSELL Left Tackle 

W. J. Mason Left End 

G. J. Whitmarsh Quarter 

W, M. Taylor Rieht Half 

P. S. Simons Full Back 

B. Brown Uft Half 

E, A. Gelhaar Substitute 

H. C. Cramer Substitute 

M. C. Cameron Substitute 

Benj. Hill Substitute 



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The Persephone Fete 

The mytK of Persephone was presented in classical dancing on tht evening of May 26th, 191S, at 
Observatory Hollow. The leading characters were; 

Persephone Genevieve O'Leary Hermes M[na Winslow 

Demeter . Helen Champion Aidoneus Katherine MacBhide 

Each one acted her part with exceeding grace and presented the thought of the story clearly to the 
spectators. The group dancers were exceptionally good. There was a cast of thirty-five dancers repre- 
senting "Winter", "Summer", "Famine", and "Spring Pantomime". 

The success of the dancing was due to the careful training of Miss Alice Evans, Physical Director 
of Women, and Miss Marion Wood, assistant. The music for the " Famine Dance" and the introduction 
to the "Greek Maiden Dance" were original compositions of Ellen Sar^nt. The presenting of the 
idea of the myth was greatly aided by the artistic costuming under the direction of Helen Dow. The 
orchestrations were done by Mr, William Mills. The orchestra was composed of University students 
under the direction of Mr. Lee Parker and Mr. Frank Rummeli. The committees in charge were as 

Business Manager Alice Blodgett 

Sub-Corn mi trees M. Hanson, M. Bassett, M, Carpenter 

Adiertising M. Reynolds, E. Vail, M. Carlysle 

Costumes . . . . H. Dow, D, Probst, H. Glass, D. Haffohd, H. Kremer 




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Holmes Tubbs Shinkman 

Vandehveeh Pockman Mead 

Carpenter Irish 



Women's Athletic Depariment 

Until the year 1915-16, women's athletics at Michigan were controlled by the Physical Direcl 
and an Athletic Chairman appointed by the President of the Women's League. 

In October, 1915, the Chairman, Madge Mead, proposed to the University women the organii 
tion of a Women's Athletic Department which would arouse more interest and cooperation in womej 
sports. The suggestion was tfjrried out, and a constitution drawn up by the Athletic Committee w 
ratified by the Board of Directors of the League. 

A "tag day" announced the birth of the organization, membership pledges were signed fay hundre 
of women, and 3 Wienie Roast was celebrated at Palmer Field. During the last two weeks of the 01 
door season a wienie sale was conducted at Palmer Field, and on November 12th the Departme 
gave a Topsy Turvy Dance which was well attended and financially successful. 

At Dean Jordan's suggestion the Department has pledged itself Co raise funds for a new club hou 
at Palmer Field. This is expected to cost about gSCOO and will be planned on a rustic type. The t. 
partment hopes to raise money for this fund by various events such as the skating carnival 
January 18th, and by a pledge campaign. 



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General University 
ORGANIZATIONS 




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The Michigan Union 



THE national campaign among Michigan alumni for funds with which to build a ntw clubhouse 
served to make the Michigan Union known even to the prospective freshmen about to enter 
the University last fall. For that reason, the present small quarters were somewhat over- 
crowded during the opening days of school. The free employment bureau and rooming list 
committee were able to render assistance to a greater number of students than ever before. The climax 
came on the Friday evening of the first week of college, when the freshmen, after attending the mass 
meeting at Hill Auditorium, adjourned to the open house given primarily for them, and packed the 
assembly room to overflowing. 

The annual Football Smoker was attended by the full quota allowed, in spite of the disastrous 
football season. The Band, and Glee and Mandolin Clubs provided the music for the occasion and 
"Lyndy" with some new slides caused several laughs during the evening. Michigan's "Thanksgiving" 
was well told by Werner Schroedei, and Michigan traditions were clearly described by Professor Hildner 
of the German Department. "Tom" May of the Detroit Free Press was the only out of town speaker 
but the quality of his Speech made up for the lack of numbers. At the close of the Program Professor 
Gram of the Board of Control of Athletics presented the " M " certificates to the deserving candidates. 
It is hardly necessary to state that the tobacco supply smoked as well as ever and the doughnuts and 
cider filled the rest of the bill along that line. 

The first membership dinner held in December was attended by about one hundred fifty Union 
members. The second dinner was attended by about the same number. Short snappy programs 
characterized both. It is hoped that the last dinner of the year, to he given as an inauguration banquet 
for the officers newly elected for the coming year, will be even better in every way than the ones already 

"Ttes Rouge," the 1916 Opera, had a very successful week before Ann Arbor audiences and was 
received well by the alumni at Chicago, Detroit and Toledo, In spice of the fact that delay seemed 
to be the principal feature of the work in getting the hook and music completed, Mr. Morgan was able 
to stage a musical comedy, free from specialties and still teeming with situations that made each audi- 
ence laugh. This year's production has certainly done its share in maintaining the standard set by the 
best of previous offerings of the Mimes. 

The "Campus" hfe-memhership campaign held just before spring vacation, showed that the great 
mass of students have considerable interest in the largest organization at the University. A committee 
of men, one hundred fifty strong, raised forty thousand dollars in three nights, making the total amount 
subscribed on the campus approximately one hundred thousand dollars. In short, there are at present, 
two thousand students who have expressed a desire to become life members. 

As a "hanging out" place, the Union has been very popular this year. The Forums and Faculty 
nights have attracted their share of attention and the Sunday afternoons have been attended by an 
appreciable number. The Bridge Tournament, while not having so many participants as those had in 
e the less successful than those of previous years. The distinctly new features of the 



Saturday night dances were the long lines which formed 
and the waiting list for those who were not in time to ( 
s and the attendance at chose hardly eve 






□ck each Thursday afternoon. 






e held 



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"All That Gljiters" 
urk on the new building 



Present plans call for begi 

near at hand, and we all hope that next year at this 
present one is now located. 



[ far distant. It is ro be 

at ion of a great dream is 

iictiire standing where the 

H. G. G. 



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The Ponies of "Tres Rouce" 



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Board of Directors of the University of Michigan Union 



DEPARTMENT VICE-PRESIDENTS 



James B. Ancell, II . 
Francis T, Mack 
Werner W. Schroeoer 
William J. Ecan . . 



Frank J. Kane Combined Depts. 

John W. Finkenstaedt . Recording Secretary 

Wilfred B. Shaw . . Alumni Secretary 

Prof. Evans Holbrook Financial Secretary 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dr. Reuben Peterson 

ALUMNI MEMBERS 

Walter E. Oxtohv, Detroit 

Homer L. Heath. General Secretary and Manager Edward W. Haislip, Assistant Manager 



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The 1916 Michigan Union Opera 

Hook and Lyrics by W. A. P. John and H. R, Schradzki 
Music by A. J. G0RNET/.KY and C, S. L^wton 

COMMITTEES 
Under the .tirecrion and supervision of Charles S. Moh<;an, Jr. 

Theron D. Weavkr General Chairman 

Homer L. Heath "I'reasurer 

MacDohald S. Reed Stage Manager 

Francis T. Mack Masrer of Costumes 

Sidney Steen Master of Properties 

Benjamin S. Motter Chaimian of Music Committee 

James M, Barreit, Jh. Chairman of Publicity Committee 

Earl V. Moore Musical Director 

Assislanl! 10 Gintral Chairma-n 
Kemp S. Buri-.e Glenn Howland Arthur Schupf 

Assiiianis to Stage Manager 
Gordon Smith Dick Gardner 

Assislanis 10 Masltr of Costumes 
E. B. Palmer Thatcher Rea Tom Reid 

Assislanis lo Masitt of Proptrlies 
A. S. Hart John W. Neumann John C. B. Parker 

Assislani 10 Treasurer 
St A ATS Abhams 

Music Publishing Committee 
RoBT. Collins Cyril Talbot Karl Walker 

Publicity Committee 
I., J. BuLKLEv John Langs Leonard Nieter 

Norman T. Boli.es 



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The Student Council 1915-1916 





OFFICERS 






First Simesler 




Second S 


meiUr 


Thomas R Souuy, President 


Henrv 


C. RtMMEL, 


President 


Russell S. Collcns, Vice-President 


Kranc 


s T. Mack, \ 


ice- President 


Henrv C. Rummel, Secretan- 


H. Cl 


VENT Allen 


Secretary 


Wilson M.Shafkk, Treasurer 


HEHll^ 


RT R. WlLSOU 


, Treasurer 


Francis T. Mack, Corresponding Secret 


arv Harol 


i> Henderson 


Corresponding Secretary 


Herbfbt R. Wilson, Auditor 


Gkant 
MEMBERS 


I.. Cook. Au 


itor 


La«i School 


UUrary ColUg, 




E«gu,efr<„g Collfgr 


H. C. RUMMRL 


R. S. Collins 




T. P. Soiinv 


G. L. Cook ■ 


W. M. Shafeh 




F, T. Mack 




R. M. Carson 




H. L. Carroll 




A. S. Hast 




H. A. Tavlor 


School of Midiciiif 


D/Hlal Colligt 




Archiftclura! Coltege 


Harold Hendkrson 


H. R. Wilson 




A, V. MONINCER 


H. C. Allen 








ColUgf of Pharmacy 






Graduali School 


E. T. Olsen 






R. D. KlLBORN 



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The Student Council 



THE Presidents of the Student Council for the past year have been T. Soddy, and 
H. C, Rummel, two leaders who have done a great deal to carry out and expand 
the work of the body. The Council has tried to crystallize student sentiment 
and feehng into definite action and has endeavored to determine student sentiment. 
It has also tried to act definitely and rapidly upon a policy of merit which has been ad- 
vanced, and to govern its action by 3 standard of the greatest ultimate good to the 
student body. 

Several things of a tangible type have been carried out in the past year. The Council 
brought the city, the Eastern Michigan Edison Company, the University authorities 
and the student body together on the "Safer Huron" campaign, and then turned the 
work over to the Michigan Boat Club, though still working with the latter organization. 
It has worked with the Health Service to put rope fire-escapes in every fraternity and 
sorority house. It has taken up Packard Academy for student dancing, the proceeds 
of which go to charity. In that line, it has provided for big campus dances every Saturday 
night next year to be held In Barbour Gymnasium. It has alSo provided for co-operation 
between the men and women by establishing a joint committee of three Student Council 
members and two of the Women's Judiciary Council, which meets to decide policies of 
special interest to both. The value of each is apparent. 

The Council is now attempting to establish a closer relation between the faculty 
and students in two ways. It is attempting to have three student members on the Board 
in Control of Student Affairs. It is also working toward compulsory Freshmen assemblies 
in the literary college. 

In general it may be said that it is trying to make the Council the officially recognized 
student organization for carrying on the work that is strictly concerned with student affairs. 
It is attempting to do this by establishing closer co-operation between campus societies 
and itself, by appointing society members as the official Student Council committee, etc., 
and by asking them to send representatives to discuss campus problems, so that a thor- 
oughly representative campus opinion may be obtained. All in all, the year has been a 
good one, and the outlook is very promising. J. A. H. 



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Young Women's Christian Association 

ADVISORY HOARD 
Mrs, T. ¥.. Kankin, Presidenr 



Dean MritA B. Jordan 




Mrs. C. L. Was 


Mrs. a. E. Jennings 




Mrs- C. H. Ka 


Mrs. W. R, Humphkeys 




Mks. Hakry H 


Eva Lemert, Secretary 


CABINET 


HuLJiAH Hanck 


Marion F. Stowe, President 




Makjola Corn 


Jessie Spence, Vice-President 




K1.0HENCK Snvd 


Grace Fletcher, Secretary 




Ethel Vail 


Aris Van Deusen, Treasurer 




Beatrice Lamb 


Geta Tucker 




Dorothy Pierc 


V. Freda Seicworth 




Evelyn Moore 


Ann ETTA Wood 




Laura Fej<^e 


Grace Thomasma 




Ruth Kheorh 



L 



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RitHAKDSON HfNUERSON 'IaYLOK WoOll BrEITFIEI-D Wu 

Hunt I'lnney Reimann Lovejov Jui 

Students' Christian Association 

Judge V. H. Lane Chairman 

N. Eahi, Pinnpv President 

Dr. Carl Huber Mrs, A, K, Jennings 

Prof. W. W. Beman Mrs. T. E, Rankin 

Dr. Dean W. Myers Dean Myra B. Jordan 

Mr. Dwight Goddard Mr. G. Frank Allm£> 

Prof. T. C. Trueblood Prof. John R. Allen 

Prof. J. L. Markley W. H. Tinker, Secretary 

Young Men's Christian Association 

OFFICERS 

Lewis C. Reimann President 

Waldo R. Hunt Vice-President 

Philip C. Lovejoy Sec-Treasurer 

COLLEGE PRESIDENTS 
M. W. WtLCH, Literary W. O'B. Henderson. Eneineering 

R. K. Richardson, Law W, B. Kmnesteker, Dental 

W. R. Beeitfield, Pharmic 

CHURCH kEPRESENTATIVES 
Earl Sexton, Congregational I. C. Johnson, Episcopal 

D. W. Taylor, Baptist Stanley Wood, Methodist 

H. H. Irwin, Preshyterian 

CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES 
Rudolph Wuensch John R. Kneebone 

Everett Juhson WHrrLEY Moore 



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Women's League 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 



Beatrice Lambrecht, '16, Vice-President Ruth 
Jeanetie Armstronc;, '17, Treasurer Albei 


Bro*N, '16, Recording Secretai 
UTiNE LooMis, '17, Correspondir 




DIRECTORS 




RuthHutzel, '16 
Marcaret Reynolds, '17 




Olive Harisig, '17 
Clarissa Vyn. T8 




COMMITTEE CIUIRMAK 


Marjorie Delevan, '16, Vocational Emilie Sargent, '16. House Comr 
Martha Gray, '16, Women's Editor of the Michigan Dailv Madge Mead, '16, Athletics 
Elsie Paul, '17. Membership Geta Tucker. '17, Social 
Frances Way, '17. Point System Ruth Hutzkl, '16, Banquet 
Helen Ely, '16, Social Service Roberta Woodworth, '17, Dram. 




IIOUSE REPRESENTATIVES 


Helen Bush. '17 
Ann Chrcstenson, '18 
Winifred Davie, '18 
Dorothy Durfee, '19 
Marguerite Eness, '18 
Ilah Goroen, '16 
Frieda Garrett, '17 
Gladys Hamilton, '17 
Stella Higoins, '18 
Charlotte Kelsey, '18 


Anna Lloyd, '18 
Emily Loman, '19 
Janet McFarland, '17 
Madge Mead, '16 
Gladys Musselwhite, '19 
Florence Orwig, '18 
Elsil Paul, '17 
Betty Patchin, '18 
Abdelle Perkins, '17 
Leilla Quirt, '16 

ADVISORY BOARD 


Helen Ritchie, '17 
Beatrice Smith, '17 
Marjorie Stoll, '18 
Christina Stringer, '17 
Mildred Shankland, '19 
RuthTrombley, '16 
Marjorie Votey, '17 
Alice Woessner, '18 
Helen Webb. T6 
Marion Williams, '18 


Mrs. Aigler Mrs. Ha 
I^RE. Bishop Mrs. He 


LL Dr. Pratt 
NDtRSON Mrs. Rankin 


Mrs, Wann 



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'.■f't'l 




Judiciary Council of the Women's League 



Chairman 

M^bers Kx-Officio . 


Beatrice Lambrecht, as Vice-Ptesidetit of the Leagui 
(Helen Humphreys, as President of the League 
IFrances Way, as Point System Chairman 


Class Representatives 


Grace Fletcher, '16 
■ Frances WAV, '17 
Anna Lloyd, '18 


Advisory Member 


Mrs. M. B. Jordan 


he Judiciary Council of tht 


: Women's League has completed its third year, and is now ; 



factor of the University life. 

The Judiciary Council stands in the same relation to the girls as the Student Counci 
spect to the men. It enforces the laws which are made by the Regents, and also oversee! 
work of discipline among the girls. Then too, individual cases of conduct are brought ui 
body and are acted upon privately. The Council acts upon many cases, arid passes laws v 
of course be made public. 

In short, the Judiciary Council has interested itself in all vital points of Campus hfe, f 
in its work by Professor Lloyd and Mrs, Jordan. 



the general 
before this 



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Revno 


LDS 


Ross 


Homer 




HOAK 


Kannowsky 


JOITb-R 


Galloway 


HOBART 


GRHf 


E Tan 


Staudt 


Bradn 




SOLL 




LOVEJOY 





Senior Foresters 


S. Rezford Black 


Walter F.,Jo-,TER 


MelvenI. ISkabner 


Max B. Jannowsk 


Albert K. Galloway 


Owen L. Lovejoy 


Raymond F. Grlfe 


Pau'l H. Reynold 


Georoe M. Hoak 


C. Howard Ross 


Seth G. Hobart 


Fred J. W. Soll 


Wilson C. Homeb 


r.ESTEH C, StALDT 



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:-rt% 




K, A, Gallup . 
R. H. Easterbroo 
G, M. HoAK 

F. D. Newbrook 

K. J. W. SOLL 

G. O. White . 
C. E. Streeter 
S. R. Black 



President 
Vice-President 
RecordinE Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 

Editor of Forester 
Associate Editor of Foresti 
Business Manager of Fore.' 



E.J. Allmendlncer 
H. J. Andrews 
W. E. Bond 

C. W. BoYtE 

N. L. Cary 
. E. L. Demmon 
R. H. Easterbrooks 

E. A. Gallup 
A. P. Racelis 

A. E. WlESLANDEH 

T. F. Bartlett 
S. R. Black 
M. ]. Bradneh 
A. K. Galloway 
R. F. Grefe 
G. M. HoAK 

S. G. HOBART 

W. C. Homer 
W. E. Jotter 
M. B. Kannowski 
O. L. LOVEJOY 
P. H. Reynolds 
C. H. Ross 

F. J. W. Soll 
L. C. Staudt 
H. L. Tandy 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Olenus Lee Sponsler 
Parrish Stores Love joy 

ACTIFE MEMBERS 
S. B. Anderson 
L. D. Arnold 
S, K. Auospueoer 
L, Brown 
R. H. Dorr 
RE^ 

S. G. Fontana 
C. C, Garland 
H. W. Gbaham 
E. W, Hartwei 
R, C. Hill 
S, C. Hopkins 
R. H. Howard 
C. H. HsiA 

C. A, KUTJLEB 



s Ell 



F. T. L 
F.D.N 

C- S. S] 






C. E, Stheeter 
G. 0. White 

A. R. VORYS 

P. E. Alden 
J. C. Andrews 
H, W, Branson 
C. B. Webster 



W M Brobei 
A S Brock 
O P Blrneti 
K H Case 
F R Cla 



RU! 



lDcdi 



h C FoLE5 

E M HOERNEJ 

D R Hook 
W L Johns 

R E foHNWN 

A D [ 

t E Pardon 

1 Vk SoiTl 

F L ToBEi 

J E UOODMAN 

H B Sherman 
N A HixEoN 
E S Briant 
A W Camerjn 
J K HSK 
G R Fergi ion 
H. E. Gladhill 

C. HiLLEBOE 

H. Kerber 

H, M. LUMSDEN 

A. M. Nicholson 



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^-- 




Geneva Club of the University of Michigan 





OFFICERS 




Gladys WHELA^ , . , 




Presiileni 


Geta Tucker 




Viic-Presiden 


Josephine Ranjiali. . 




Si-rrfrarv 


Alice Burtless Treasurer 




MEMBERS 




Aris Van Delsen 




ElI/ABHH liuROFSS 


Agnes True 




Margaret Reynolds 


Ethel Vail 




Harriet Walker 


Maroakei Crockett 




Ruth Meak.n 


Eva Lemert 




RuthKrieger- 


Mrs. Bacher 




Dorothy Moban, 'U 


HuLDAH Bancroft 




Jrenk Russell 


Laura Feice 




Marian Stowk 


Marcola Cornell 




Grace Fletcher 


Beatrice Lambrecht 




Anneita Wood 


Heien Humphreys 




Hope Nichoson 



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^ 



The Michigan Dames Association 

OFFICERS 

Mrs. H. M. Lowe President 

Mrs. E. W. Sink Vice- President 

Mrs. W. C. Russel Secretary 

Mrs. S. R. Guit.d Assistant Secretary 

Mas. R. D. Chatfield Treasurer 



Mks, W, J, ArwELi. 
Mrs. H. E. Barkle 
Mrs, E. V. Beardsi 
Mrs. R. K. Brown 
Mrs, M. J. BuDOE 
Mrs. D. a. CAHhUK 
Mrs, R. D, Ch^tfii 
Mrs. H, L. Clark 
Mrs. J. S. Clahk 
Mrs. p. a. Coombe 
Mrs. J. D. Coons 
Mrs. G. It. Ci 
Mrs. S. T. Cross 
Mrs. L. E. Crossm 
Mrs. L. E. Doyle 
Mrs. G. M. Ehler 
Mrs. a. L. Fergus 
Mrs. E. W. Flnki.i 
Mrs. a, L. Fitch 



Mrs 



1. R. GuiLu 
N. C. HiRN 

^. F. J.LLSON 

^. P. Jones 
:. C. Jordan 

■.. JunSON 

-\. ¥. Kinney 
-I. M. Lowe 
., M. Lyons 
<. K. McAlpi: 
R. A. McGinn 
VI. R. MoRTor 
*V. E. Olds 
;. T. Pace 
L. L, Paige 
r. W. Peck 



Mrs, J.O. Perrine 
Mrs, R. W. Pryor 
Mrs. a. a. Rather 
Mrs, C. F. Raver 
Mrs. J. P. Roberts 
Mrs. G. H. Ruhling 
Mrs. W. C, Russel 
Mrs. F. M. Sawin 
Mrs. B. H- Sheperd 
Mrs, P, a. Sherman 
Mrs. E. C. Sherrar 
Mrs- D- H, Silsbv 
Mrs. E. W. Sfnk 
Mrs. S. J, Skinner 
Mrs. E.O. Snethen 
Mrs. a. H. Stang 
Mrs, a. J. Stordar:! 
Mrs. a, D.WiCKFTi 



The Michiean Dames is an association of si 
orsanized in the sprinj; of 1914. The meetinss : 
All wives of students are cordially asked to bi 
are now at Newberry- Hall. 



idents' wives in the University of Michigan which was 
■e held bi-monthly for social and educational purposes, 
ome members. The headquarters of the 



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University of Michigan Equal Suffrage Association 

OFFICERS 

Helen Brander President 

Miriam Hubbard Vice-President 

Edith Harvey Secretary 

SelmaLindell Treasurer 

\ PocKMAN Chairman of Membership Committee 

LER Chairman of Publicity Committee 



Dean Jobpai 
Dr. Pratt 



HONORARY Mli.HKERS 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



Pearl Smith 


AuceUovd 


Sara 


H SrANJ.EY 


Dorothy Armstronh 


Marian Wilson 


Rub 


RTA WOOUWORTH 


Miriam Heideman 


Frances Handobo 


Grta 


Tucker 


Marguerite Now 


Ann Christenson 


Hel 


N MacDonald 


Marjorie Carlisle 


Mildred Carpenter 


Nao 


] Dysert 


Dorothy Gruss 


Irene Russell 


Jean 


NEiTE Armstrong 


Mary Porter 


Zella Karrar 


Jane 


r McFarlane 


Gertrude Gann 


DoHis Porter 


Ethe 


L Jocelvn 


Louise Stahmer 


Margaretta Douci.as 


Don 


A Sullivan 


Edith Hoyle 


Blanche Covey 


Ethe 


L Gl-ANZ 


GoLDA Ginsberg 


Ruth MacLachlan 


Jose 


HINE ROSENBLUH 


Marguerite Risedorph 


Constance Orcuit 


Reat 


RICE 1.AMBRECHT 


Frances McCune 


Carmen Graves 


Hele 


N Davis 




Hazel Proctor 


Ethe 


L Hosmer 



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^tA-.-^ 





01H 



HONOR 
^SOCIETIES 
Sigma XI 
Tau Beta Pi 
Alpha Omega Alpha 
Phi Lambda Upsilon 
Order of the Coif 
Aristolochite 
Tau Sigma Delta 
Gairaiia Alpha 
Phi Alpha Taa 



gpi;?!?!^ [±^ l_6 



SSiiiiS 




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^>^ 



Society of the Sigma XI 

Michigan Chapter 
Eilabhshed 1903— Local Mtmblrskip 147 

OFFICERS 

E. C. Case President 

A. M. Barreit Vice-President 

H. A. Gleason Secretary 

A. J. Decker Treasurer 

COUNCIL 
J. R. Allen M. Gombero 

C, W. Edmunds 

ELECTIONS TO MEMBERSHIP 

FACULTY 
John Airev, B.S., EngineeriiiK 
A. H. Beifeld. M.D., Medicine 
W. F.Seelev.M.D., Medicine 
F. E. Senear, M.D., Medicine 
W. W. TUPPEH, A.M., Botany 
A. E. White, A.B., Chemical EnglneerinR 
N, H. WiLLrAHS, Ph.D., Physics 





RESIDENT GRADUATES 




J. A. Aldrich 


A. L. Ferguson 


Nellie 1.. Pe 


S, G, Baits 


W. G. Harmon 


A. H, W. Pov 


R. 0. Brigham 


E. M. HONAN 


A, T. RlCKETT 


R. E. Christman 


H. ■{-. Hood 


W. C, RuKus 


C. C. Delavan 


F. A, Naci rr 


E, A. RvKENli 


F, A, FAHHt-NWALI) 


A. B. Peck 


W. Wrbr 



UNDERGRADUATES 
Colligi of Literatiite, Scisnct, and the Arii 
Wi 



W. Allen 
J. H- Batem 
N. St, J. Flo 
K. F. Keeli 
C C. Kennj 



Thef 



iQ other, 



.. ._ M Che Umi , ,.__ 

a neighboring educatioDal, scientifiCp 
for active membership ; (c> any re«d 

Stion; (d) any undergraduBle in th 
[>wn marked ability in the prosecut 
shown evidence of ongiDBlity in Che at 
data. All (candidates must be vouehi 



. of Enginiering 
W. E. r,Ay 
R. C. McAli 
G. B. McCai 
S. P. Si 

F. R. ZUMBI 

Medical Sch, 
J. W. Sherr: 



duate who has hy artui 
I year class, or else in t 



E, J. Sh.ti 
B. A. STA^ 
W. VV. Tu 



■ship in the Michigsn cliapler: (a 
nent as an orionol inveaticator i 

iviiig a chapter, who wouldothwi 
work eibibitedmi aptitude for m 



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^<-rn 



* 



J. 


R, 


Au-EN 




E 


D 


Camp 


ELL 


M 


F 


Cool 


Y 


J. 


H. 


Davis 




V 


H 


Lane, 


74 


H 


W 


Doughs, '90 


H 


J. 


Gould 


NG, '93 


C 


T 


Johnstone, '95 


H 


W 


King 


'95 


B 


F. 


Bailei 


, '9S 


L 


M 


Gram 


'01 


A 


H 


WHrrE 


'04 


E 


E 


Ware 


'04 





Tau Beta Pi 




;a, 


oaal Honorary Engineering Society) 




Michigan Gamma Chaptkr 






EstMishid in 1906 






HONORARY MEMBERS 




W. C. HOAD 


H- C. Sadler 


E 


LORCH 


C.J.TlLDEN 


G 


W. Patterson 


G. S. Williams 


H 


E. RiGGS 


A. ZlWET 


£■5 


IDENT ALUMNI MEMBERS 


W 


T. FiSHLEIGH, '06 


W. Cook, '14 


H 


K. Holland, '08 


A. N. Laird, '14 


R 


K. Holland, '08 


C. N.Ward, 'U 


G 


E. Lewis, '08 


C. S. SCHOEFFLE, 


G 


v.. Hacgas, '08 


N. S. FiooK, '15 


W 


G. Harmon, '09 


I. H. Reindel, 'IS 


A 


H. LOVELL, '09 


J, W. Robinson. ' 


M. Osgood, '11 


B. A. Standerlin 


F 


C. Morgan, '12 


L, F. Terry, '15 


L, 


R. Floor, 'IJ 





A. J. Decker. Mich. Alpha 
J. C. Palmer, III. Alpha 
M. J. Ohbeck, Minn. Alpha 

W. W. KUESTERMAN, Ky. Alpha 

E. F.Tanghe, Wis. Alpha 

R. S. Archer 

J. B. Brevmann, Jr. 

A. A, Bubrell 

J. F. Clark 

M. DEL Valle 

S. E. Emmons 

A. F. Grenell 

H. A. Hicks 

S. Holt 

R. H. Lundell 



UNDERGRADUA TES 
F. T. Mack 
W. A. Miller 
P. O. Mulkey 
J. K. Norton 
H, H, Perry 
D. A. Smith 
S. Pinkerton 



M.S. REf 
J, S. Rom; 
j. M. Rei 



H. H. Higbie, N 


V. 


Alpha 


H. G, Raschbach 


ER 


Ind. Alpha \ 


F. A. Nagler, M 


ch 


Alpha \ 


O. D. Parsons, N. Y. Beta J 


H. A. Enos 




\ 


H. J. Smith 






L. A. Sprague 






W. A. Sterling 




j 


J. D. Todd 




i 


F. J. Vokachen 






W. A. Warrick 






H. D. Warner 






P. C. Wagner 






T. D. Weaver 






F. C. Wheeler 






e fl»l »^m«wr of their 




or Year wbo« 






^w^k'm tUs 


f th"; ,:hap«r, Burh m/ 




8re considered 



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Alpha Omega Alpha 





{Honorary 


M,dic 


■a/ Fral^ 


nily) 




CHAPTER ROLL 




University of Illinois 








University of Chicago 


Northwestern University 








Western Reserve Univek; 


Jeefbhson Medical College 








University of Pennsylvan 


Washington University 








University of California 


Johns Hofkins University 








University of Toronto 


UNiVEHSfTV OF Minnesota 








University of Michigan 


Harvard University 








Cornell University 


Syracuse University 








McGiLL Univeksiiv 


University of Nebraska 


COHIMI 


ilA Ul 


.IVERSm 


Tl'lane Univfrsity 




FACULTY SECTION 




Victor Clarence Vauchan 








Albion Walter Hewle IT 


G. Kar:. Huher 








Mark Marshall 


Charles Waltkr Edmunds 








Walter Asobel Hoyt 


James G. Vanzwaluwenburg 








Frederick Warris Loomis 


Frederick G. Now 








Carl Vernon Weller 


Alfred Scott Warthin 








Frank Norman Wilson 



UNDERGRADUATE SECTION 



of die Juoj 
to be the I 






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tk 




Phi Lambda Upsilon 



Delta Chapter 




HONORARY MEMBERS 




S. Lawrence Biohlow 


A. B. Stevens 


E. D. Campbell 


Julius Stieglitz (Chicaeo) 


W. D. Bancroft (Cornell) 


J.O. Schlotterbeck 


A. H. White 




RESIDENT JLUMM AND ASSOCIATE 


MEMBERS 


W, L- Badger 


J. S. Laird 


K. E. Bartell 


D. M- LlCHTY 


R. J. Carney 


R, A, McAlfine 


H, N, Cole 


C. C. Meloche 


L. H. Cone 


J. D. Rue 


A. L. Ferguson 


W. G- Smeaton 


W. J. Halr 


E, E. Ware 


J. E. Harris 


A. E. White 


A. H. HursKiN 


H. H. WiLLARD 


ACTIfK MEMBERS 




R. S. Archer 


S. M. PiNKERTON 


E, C, Uritton 


J. W. Robinson 


J. J. Buhbv 


E. A. Rykenboer 


R, E- Chhislman 


C. S. Schoepfle 


M. A. Del Valle 


E, C. Sherrard 


W. C, DowD 


C. F. Smart 


E. M. HONAN 


R. F, Smith 


N. A. Lange 


H. J. Smith 


0. E. Madison 


R. D. Smith 


R, M. McCoRMICK 


B. A. Standehline 


C. McMlLLKN 


J. D, -ioDD 


E. G. MiLHAM 


N. E. Van Stone 


W. A. Miller 


F. C. ViBRANS 


R. L. Now 


A. G, Williams 



y, EnEineeting, Pharm 



or Graduale Deptu-Cinents who are speciHlising in cbemistry 
oembera of th« eaap1«r, are bnaed on Hcholarahip and BOoa 



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*!-< 



# 



The Order of the Coif 



(In tkt Law School of ihe University of Michigan) 



Ralph W, Aicc.kr 

WiLLARD T. HaHBOUJ 

Henry M. Bates 
Thomas A. Boule 
Robert E. Bunker 
Joseph H. Drake 
Edgar N. Dubfek 
Edwin C. Goddard 



LvLH M. Clikt 
Eugene R. McCall 
Albert J, Mickelson 
W. Leslie Miller 
Arthur A. Morrow 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



STUDENT MEMBERS 
Clas! of 1916 



Renvzlle Wheat 



GroverC. Gri; 

KVANS HoLBHOl 

Jerome C. Kno 
Victor H. Unj 
John R. Rood 
W. GoRiio 



s R. Sun 
V B. Wah 



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— -^ 




Aristolochite Society 





HONORARY MEMBERS 






r. 0. ScHrOTTfH«EtK 

W. S. HUHBAHJ. 


A, B. STtVENS 






FACULTY MEMBERS 






G- A, IUroy 


JCTirE MEMBERS 


C, C, Gl,0VK1< 




R. G. Rrown 
W. D. Cochran 
G. K. FiNiRi. 

C. R. McMltLEN 




H.N.ORU.Rtt 

K. T. Olson 

R. E. SCHOET7.0 

R. F, Smith 


. 


on of good moral charac 


er bdns a ECudeiit iji the College 
«y, and muHt be elecled by the u 


animoiis vole of the act 


etMty of Michigan 
p, shall be cligibl 



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tl^^v."- 




Tau Sigma Delta 

(Unnorary Frulernily in JrckileHurf and Landscape Design) 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Prof, Emil Lorch Associate Prof, Aubrey Tea 

Prof, Lours H, Boynton Assistant Prof, Fcske Kimba 

AsSrSIANT PkOF, liFVEBLY KlMRALI. 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Assistant Pkof. GfoBGt M, McConkey Mr. H, O, Whittemore 



ACriVE MEMBERS 



Arthur V, Moninc 
Katherine CuriiN 
George B, Hammoi 



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% 




Gamma Alpha 





{Grad«ali Scifnlifif Ftat 


frmty) 




MICHIGJX CIIAPTf-k 


Floyd E. Bam ti.i. 




Frederick M.1.00MIS 


ReedO. Brigham 




Clyde E. Love 


RoBEKT W. Clark 




Roy K. McAlpine 


Walter F.Colby 




Lewis L. Mellor 


Charles W. Cook 




Paul W.Merrill 


WiHTRET) Cook 




Peter 0, Okkleberg 


Ralph H. Clrtiss 




Albert B. Peck 


John H. Ehlrrs 




Harry G Raschbachi 


Albert L. Fitch 




J, Speed Rogers 


Chester H, Fobsythe 




Carl P. Russell 


Frederick M.Gaice 




Alexander G Ruthv 


QuiNTER O.Gilbert 




Edward A Rykenboe 


Henry A. Gleason 




Irving D. Scorr 


Jamhs E, Harris 




John W. Sherrick 


Edward M. Honan 




A. Franklin Shull 


Walter F. Hunt 




Olenus L. Sponsler 


Walter N. Koelz 




Nathan E. Van Stone 


NORBERT A. LaNGE 




Frank C. Vibrans 


Carl D. LaRue 




CarlV. Weller 


Georgia R, LaRui: 







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^r-:- 




Phi Alpha Tau 

National Honorary Speech Jrli FraUrnily 

{Founded at the Emtrson College of Oratory in 1902) 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Emerson College of Oratory, Hoston, Massachusetts 
Untverscty of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 
Leland Stanford University, Stanford, California 
Carroll College, Waukesha, Wisconsin 
College of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington 
Northwestern College, Naperville, Illinois 
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 
University of Texas, Austin, Texas 
University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Louie H. Dunten 
Humphreys Sphingstun 
Chester L. M. Fohdnkv 
John F. Jordan 
Morrison C. Wood 
Frank W. Grover 
Wilbur M. Brucker 
MuKL C. Carlton 



XI CHAPTER 



Harrv E. Carlson 



Owen J. Wati 
Walkej 
Edward A. Sachs 
Frank H. Atlee 
Cecil W. Miller 
Fred W, Adams 
Hampton H, Uwir, 
Horace L. Davis 



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CAMPUS 
SOCIWIES 




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t**1 




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f% 




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^> 







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I 




CH 



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(jREflT-HCflRT-flMMS- 

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n^HTme-BRfll/ES: 

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PonYHERIiER-UIEflVER- 




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-J 



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Barristers 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



PsoF. Evans Holbrook 



MEMBERSHIP 



Hugh G. Allerton 
H. Donald Brown 
Robert O. Brownell 
Lewis D. Cooper, Jr. 
Gerald S. Frary 
Adna R. Johnson, Jr. 
George V. Labadie 
John S, Leonard 
Eugene R, McCall 
Thomas R. McNamara 
Frank M. McHale 
W. Leslie Miller 
Chester J, Morse 



Wm. C. Mui 
Maxwell E. Pitkin 
Clyde C. Rowan 
LeRoy J. Scanlon 
Werner. W. Schroedek 

Perry H, Stevens 
H. Blair Sutter 
Clarence A. Swainson 
L Lash Thomas 
Paul F. Thompson 



Renvi 



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W. Gordon Sioi 



HONORARY MEMBER 

Dr. Harold S. Hulbert 

RESIDENT GRADUATES 

W 
Ernest J. Allmendcnger 

ACTWE MEMBERS 



\.K 



E S. Rof 



Ray J. Mills 
George C. Chichesti 
Louis F, Voorhees 
John B. Brevmann 



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T. Hawlev Tapping 
Earl B. McKinley 
Maurice R, Fitts 
Sam W. Donaldson 



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Emilie Sargent President 

Margaret Stewart Vice-President 

Helen Vanderveeb Treasurer 

Selma LiNDELL Secretary 

ACTIFE MEMBERS 

Flohknce Gererr Bessie'Platto 

Ruby Hall Sena Potter 

Behnice Hannan Emihe Sargent 

Ruth Kreger Margaret Stewart 

Selma Lindell Donna Sullivan 

Madge Mead Grace Thomasma 

Genevieve O'Leary Ruth Trombley 



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i 





Mortar Board 




EisA Apfel 




Beatrice Lahbrecht 


Helen Blair 




Louise Potter 


Ruth Brown 




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KSTHER BORV 




Ellen Sarceant 


Mildred Carpenter 




Emilie Sargent 


Helen Dow 




Charlotte Sites 


Helen Ely 




Florence Snyder 


Laura Feige 




Jessie Spence 


Grace Fletcher 




Marion Stowe 


Helen Humphreys 




Helen Tuthill 


Ruth Hutzel 




Aris Van Deusen 


Ruth Krecer 


Katherine Wenley 


Jemima Wenley 



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'it 




1916 SPHINXES HONORARY 
Claude H. Van Tyne J. A. C. Hlldner 

Charles P. Wagner 

Pharaoh "Obie" O'Brien 

Zip-the-Zephyr, Peace,Interlocutor for the Foreign Powers . , . "I-ee"Joslyn 

Gazazok, Guardian of the Golden Shekel "Roc" Sylvester 

Pxotnasdh, Chief Scribbler of the Sahara "Hal" Fitzgerald 

Tacacply, Triumphant Tenor of the Desert "Stucky" Burge 

Jugquip, Juggler of the Mighty Boulders "Cec" Cross 

Beataklxw, Beacon Light of the Sacred Temple "Red" Donnelley 

Aqwpipljk, Chieftain of the Badge "Don" Finkbeiner 

PilUtingerik, Slugger of the Sportive Sphere "Billy" Niemann 

Calitupgy, Caretaker of the Camel Caravan "Muzi" Muzzv 

Baldihaldi, Reflector of the Sacred Sun "Duke" Arenti 

Flitflito, Frenzied Follower of the Frivolous Dance .... "Bill"Nance 

Phuklyiaw, Passer of the Phlying Pigskin "Wally" Niemann 

Philupuykkg, Manager of the Social Whirl "Jack" Pardee 

Roupolhbo, Dispenser of the Royal Rouge "Johnny" Parker 

Wopabkqlu, Trainer of the Caravan Crew " Bill" Adams 

Fghgfhdaeio, Protector of the Royal Seat "Verne" Burnett 

Hybymapor, Winder of the Desert Clock "Ted" Cox 

Nonklyup, Director of the Desert Band "Gornie" Gornetzky 

Mughithjp, Master Man of Mysteries "Tom" Reid 

Itoledooo, Docile Director of the Desert Dance "Eddie"Mack 



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RIANGLES 



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ILCHEMnTS H0N0R4R1 






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Mr W G SMbATON 




Dr 


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Dr b t LlND 




Mr 


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Dr W J HlLE 




Dr 


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Bloomy Blomschie 

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J.E Cans 
BoTHCH BoirrE 








Halknon 
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Chet Wright 








Ra.chad.tos 




"Hunger Smith 








Hippocrates 




Bill Cochran 








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RlNT- ROEUEL 








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Democntos 




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Villanovatious 




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Osiris 




Eddie Sachs 








Philapius 




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Stephanos 




Blrt Hadlei 








Leffus 




Bob Archer 








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Pat PATTER^nN 












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Members of Woolsack 



OFFICERS FOR FIRST SEMESTER 

E. B. Houseman Chancellor 

W. H. Sanfokd Vice-chancellor 

L. F. Dahling Clerk 

T. E. Atkinson K. D. Barnard 

R. L. Carpenter B. G, Cameron 

L. F. Dahl[ng G. C. Claassen 

H. G. Gault H. F. Conntne 

H. H. Hewitt R. E. Gleason 

E, B. Houseman N. B. Kbllv 

M. C. Mason H. F. Korn 

O. Phillips W. L. Owen 

W. H. Sanford D. F. Smith 
H. D. Wall 



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Wyvern 



Armstrong, J. 

BaSSETT, MARGAftf 

Champion, Helen 
LiTcHMAN, Irene 
Long, Margaret 
Keely, Anita 
LooMis. Albertini 
Reynolds, M, 
RowE, Genevieve 
Tucker, Geta 
Vail, Ethel 
Way, Frances 
Williams, Olivia 
Wood, Anetta 
Blodgett, Alice 



Carnegie, Lillian 
Grand all, Adele 
GiDDiNCS, Hazel 
GosE, Inez 
Grover, Clara 
Huff, Beatrice 
Laubenguver, Della 
McFarlane,Janette 
Paddock, Florence 
Paul, Elsie 
Randall, Josephine 
RiSEDORPH, Marguerite 

SCHINKMAN, OlGA 

Whelan, Gladys 
YocuM, Margaret 



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HONORARY FACULTY GRIFFINS 
Joseph H. Drake John B. Waite 

Henri T. A. Hus Fredehjck R. Waldron 

James P. Bird Howard H. Cummings 

ASSOCIATE GRIFFINS 
"Gee" Gault "Buzz" Cati.ett 

" Rooster" Johnson " Bill" Cochran 

"Cap" Schroeber "Mac" McKinley 

"Fat" Millard "Tommie" Thompson 

"Bill" Mullehdore "Scan" Scanlan 

"Pete" Middleditch "Hal" Smith 

"Hal" HuiBERT 

Grand Griffin "George" McM ah on 

Vice Grand Griffin "Tom" Soddv 

Griffin of Apollo, Guardian of Manuscripts "Dutch" Caron 

Griffin of Pluto, Guardian of Gold "Louie" Reimann 

Griffin of Nemesis, Guardian of Suppliants "Wap" John 

Griffin of Mercury "Jack" Leonard 

Griffin of Morpheus "Sam" Donaldson 

Griffin of Eros "Rog" Sylvester 

Griffin of Xanthos "Tap" Tapping 

Griffin of Piuvius "Squeal" Parker 

Griffin of Ares "Hank" Rummel 

Griffin of Orpheus "Lob" Bastian 

Griffin of Hephaestus "Staatz" Abrams 

Griffin of Neptune "Bovd" Compton 

Griffin of Themesis "Joe" Darnall 

Griffin of Mars "Lee" Joslyn 

Griffin of Castor "Kish " Kishlar 

Griffin of Hernos "Rummie" Roehm 

Griffin of Charon "Trio" Torrey 

Griffin of Bacchus "Maully" Maulbetscl 

Griffin of Xylos "Eddie" Carroll 

Griffin of Phycudides "Jimmy" Chenot 

Griffin of Phares "Grant" Cook 

Griffin of Thersites "Dek" Coulter 

Griffin of Nerones "Billy" Grover 

Griffin of Phylos "Eddie" Hyman 

Griffin of lactas "Pat" Smith 

Griffin of larbas "Eddie"Mack 

Griffin of Saturn "Billy" Niemann 

Griffin of Vulcan "Obie" O'Brien 

Griffin of Posidon "Nate" Pinney 



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Archons 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
loK Professor John Barker Waite 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 


William C. Achi 


Maurice F. Dunne 


Leslie L. Alexander 


Joseph H. Fee 


Chester K. Barnard 


Ferhcs H. Fitch 


Llovd E. Baitles 


Ralph F. Gates 


Julius L. Bee«s 


Lyle F. Harris 


Charles H. Breymann 


Glenn A. Howland 


George C. Caron 


Melville C. Mason 


James B. Catlett 


Thomas F. McDonald 


Grant L. Cook 


Lester S. Moll 


LouLS F. Dahling 


John E. Sanders 


Leonard?. Dcedericks 


Donald W. Sessions 



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Toastmasters 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



F. Charles B. Vibbert 


ACTIVE 


MEMBERS 


Prof 


. R. D. T. Hoi.1.1 


T. Hawlev Tapping 






Gera 


LD S. Frarv 


George P. McMahon 






Ralp, 


H E. FOLZ 


W. A. P. John 






Geor 


GE C, CaHON 


John F. Scott 






Harv 


EY H. Sphick 


John A. Heist 






JOSEP 


■H H. Fee 


Don a. Smith 






John 


C. B. Parker 


Francis T. Mack 






Harold M. Bowcock 


Eugene R. McCall 






DUAN 


E E. Bird 



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EDITORIAL STAFF 

Louis M, Bruch, Maiiaeinn Editor T. Hawlev Tapping, Aihletic Edit. 

Robert B. Frantz, Art Editor 



ASSISTANT EDITORS 



STAFF MEMBERS 



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Brown Goktan Darn all 

L ScHACHT Walsh H. Coulter 

rER Bruch Nance Tapping 



Michiganensian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

N M. Coulter, Business Manager 

[S D. Nance, '17, Assistant Business Manager 

\i W. Harbert, '17, Assistant Business Manager 



William Darnai 
Harold B. Cool 
Robert Patters 



Laurence Brown, '18 
William O'Keefe, '18 

LoOMIS KiRKPATRICK, '18 



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Michiganensian 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Irwin C. Johnson, Literary 

M. Muriel Tyson, Literary 

Edward P. Wright, Literary 

Gordon D. Cooke, Engineering 

Humphrey M. K. Ghvlls, Engineering 

John K. Scott, Law 

Clarencb a. Swainson, Law 

Sam W. Donaldson, Medicine 

EucENE S. Thornton, Combined Schools and Coll 




Thornton Donaldson 



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Francis F. McKinnei 



The Michigan Daily 

Francis F. McKinney Managing Editor 

John S. Leonard Business Manager 

E. RoDGERS Sylvester News Editor 

Tom C. Reid Telegraph Editor 

Verne Burnett Telegraph Editor 

E. P. Wright Sports Editor 

J. C. B. Parker Assignment Editor 

Conrad N. Church City Editor 

Edwin A. Hvman City Editor 

Lei Joslyn City Editor 

Gordon D. Cooke Statistical Editor 

Edward E. Mack Advertising Manager 

H. Kirk White Publication Manager 

Y. R, Althseler Circulation Manager 

C. V. Sellers Accountant 

C. T, FisHLEiGH Assistant Business Mar 





NIGHT EDITORS 




Leonard W. NiETER 








REPORTERS 


J. L. Staiieker 


H. A, FiTICEHALD 






GOLDA GiNSBURG 






Linton B. Dimond 




E. A. Baumgarth 


Bruce Swaney 




E. L. Ziegler 


W. R. Atlas 






Nat Thompson 






Phil Pack 






Allen Shoenfield 


C. W. Neumann 
BUSINESS STAFF 


D. S. Rood 


Albert E. Hohne 




RoscoE Rau 






F. M. Sutter 


K. S. McCoLL 


J. E.Campbell 


L. W. Kennedy 



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r PUBLICATCON OFFICES 



The Michigan Daily 



T 



HE changing of campus condit 
in of the campus publication; 
to something more than a r 
main addition, which has : 
eived by special service fron 
the old four-page publicatloi 
anner of handling university 



jns has brought about a change in the demand for the consiruc- 
, and acting upon this, The Michigan Daily has resolved itself 
ere chronicle of University events, 

:> changed the paper's form and appearance Is the telegraph 
The New York Sun. This has necessitated the adding of two 
, and has brought about a subsequent change in make-up and 



lused, there Is a broadening 
id the campus. It presents 
the bulletin of the students' 
but it likewise incorporates 



In addition to the technical appearance of The Daily which this has c 
of the paper's field until it now includes the news of the world, the city a 
brief and yet complete reports of the larger events of the day and adds them t 
affairs. In this way it not only provides informative reading for the campu) 
more of real newspaper principles. 

Though there are doubtless many ways in which The Daily may be improved upon, this latest 
addition has brought it to the front rank of college publications. The university in successfully taking 
this forward step, has won a great victory. It marks an epoch in the history of Michigan affairs, and 
means a broadening of campus outlook. 

The life of Tlie Michigan Dally has been marked with just such progressive steps. It was first 
printed in 1890 in an office above a fruit store. In 1895 it reached a low financial ebb, and in 1901 
another paper, The U. of M. News, sprang up in opposition. But in 1903, The Daily took over the News 
and from that time on has been going forward. The present place of publication and system of its 
management mark the highest point in the history of The Michigan Daily. — J. S., Jr. 



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Michigan Law Review 



PCBLISBED UONTHLT DUHIHG THB ACADE 


U.C YKAB. EICIDS.VB OB OCTOBBH. BT TH. 


LAW FACULTY OF THE 


UNIVERSITY OF MICHICAN 


mui*cii>moN Pni«[ (a. so ■>[■ TtAi. 


» CENT, PEN «U».<. 


Evans Holbrook. Editor 


ADVTSOl 


av EOARB. 


Hknrv m. Bates Victor 


H. Lanb Horace L. Wilgos 


Editotial Asjislmls. aFpoiMtd by 


Jfif Faculty /rem 1A( Cliiw 0/ rgi6: 


HA«,y L. Bell, of Klntutky. 


Russell H. Keilsok. of Michigan. 




HoLLACE M. Reid, of Virgiria. 


Ltle M, CLiyr, of Michigan. 




EuoEBE B. McCall, of low.. 


WeIKEB W. SCIIBOEBEII, of IlUndS. 


MnoH McLaieh, of Micbigan 




J. Lel-lnd Mechem, of Michigan. 








W. Leslie Milleu, of Ohio. 


Thomas H. Westlake, of Ohio. 


A.THUR A. Mo«ow, of Wfst Virginia. 


Renvilik Wheat, of Michigan. 






Ha-old J. W,P 


lEs, of Michigan, 



NOTE AND COMMENT. 

Recovery of the Purchase Price Before Title Has Passed.— In an action 
recently instituted by The General Electric Co. lo recover on a contract to 
manufacture certain machinery for the defendant, which machinery the de- 
fendant had refused to accept, the trial court adopted the contract price as 
the measure of damages. The upper court approved this measure of dam- 
ages, rejecting the ai^umcnt that the measure .should have been the differ- 
ence between the market value and the contract price, and dismissed, as no 
longer appropriate to modern conditions, the decisions in Bemeiit v. Smith, 
IS Wend. (N, V.> 493, and Skawhan v. l^an Neil. 25 Oh. St, 490. The court 
rec<^nized, however, that these decisions had been sound when rendered. 
As they have frequently been referred (o as anomalous rulings, it may be 
interesting to consider the effect upon them of this recent decision. Manhat- 
tan City, etc., Ry. Cn. v. General Electric Co., 226 Fed. 17,^. 

The rule is established, as a general proposition, that a vendor can not 
bring an action upon a contract of sale in indebitatus assumpsit for the pur- 
chase price until the title has passed. "The principle, concisely stated, is 
tliis— that a count for goods bargained and sold can only be maintained 
where the property in the goods has passed from the plaintiff to the defend- 
ant." Elliott V. Pybtis, 10 Bing. 510. If the goods are not in existence at 



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CONKEV JOHNST 


ON BOLLES HORKHEIMER 










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Artkur'A. Buhrkll, 1916 Eng. 



The Official Students' Directory 

of the University of Mlchigatl and State Normal College 
1915-1916 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Chas. B. Lawton, '17 Lit. A. Phillip Warriner, '17 Lit. 

C. Fred Watson, '18 Lit. 

ADFERTISING MANAGER 
Frahkun Randall, '17 Lit. 

BUSINESS STAFF 
Geo. L, Ohrsthom, '18 Lit. G. B. Krause, '1« Lit. 

Geo. B, Daniels, '18 Lit. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Wm. G. Browrigg, '17 Lit. A. Brodhead Howard, '19 Lit 

Gordon C. Mack, '18 Lit. Chester C. Peabce, '19 Eng, 

Frank J. Riley, '19 Ehe- 



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THE MICHIGAN TECHNIC 



212-214 N«w Engineerint Building 



Aan Aibor, Micliitfia 



OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 

Published quarlerly in the months of October, December, March, and May 
by the Engineering Society 



L C. Ro» 
R. S. Archer, '16, College Editor 
C. M, Burns, '17, Alumni Editor 
J. H. ScHMiuT, '16, Ed. Trans. Slams. 
F. K. HlRTH, '16, Associate Editor 

G- D. COOKB, 



Staff 



R. L. McNamee, '17, Managing Editor 



is Manager 
F. C. RiECKS, '16, Advertising Manager 
U. M. Smith, 16, Circulation Manager 
H. E. MoNTEL[us, '17, Asst. Adv. Mgr. 
F. H. Sweet, '18, Associate Editor 
(ociace Editor 




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Board in Control of Student Publications 



Professor W. G. Stoner 
Professor F. N. Scott 
Professor J. W. Glover 
Dean J. R. Eff[nger 
Francis T. Mack 
T. Hawley Tapping 
Adna R. Johnson, Jr. 



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Michigan's Year in Oratory 



THE record of the University in Oratory and debate for the year 191S-19I6 has been highly 
creditable, in that a large majority of the contests were won by her representatives. 

The quarter-centennial of the Northern Oratorical League was celebrated at Iowa City, 
May 7, 1915. The contest was one of the strongest in the quality of the speeches and in the character 
of their presentation that the League has ever had. For the first time in the history of oratory and 
debate at Michigan the University was represented by a woman. Having won the home contest and 
the Chicago Alumni Medal Miss Frances Louise Hickok became Michigan's representative in the 
League contest, at Iowa City. Her subject was "The Mission of New Womanhood." No orator who 
ever spoke for Michigan showed finer feeling or had better attention than did Miss Hickok. The race 
was close between the representatives of Michigan and Minnesota, only one point separating them. 
The judges awarded Miss Hicfcok second honor, and Mr. Carl M. Painter, of Minnesota, first. 

The seventh annual contest of the Michigan Peace Oratorical Association took place at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Friday, March 19, 191S. Six other of the State Colleges were represented, Nathan 
Earl Pinney spoke for the University and was awarded first honor, the State Normal representative 
receiving second. In the Central Group of States, in which the best college orators of Ohio, Indiana, 
Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan were pitted against one another Mr. Pinney again won first honor 
which carried with it the right to represent the Central Group in the National Contest, at Lake Mohonk, 
New York, Here Mr, Pinney met the winning orators of the other five groups, as follows: The North 
Atlantic Group, The South Atlanric Group, The Southwestern Group, The Western Group and the 
Pacific Group. Mr. Pinney was awarded third honor, being beaten by the representative of Boston 
College who won first honor, and the representative of the University of West Virginia who won second 

The question for the Central League debate for 1916 was as follows; Resolved, that Congress 
should adopt a literacy test for all European immigration. 

Michigan's affirmative team met the Northwestern University team ar Ann Arbor, January 21, 

1915. The Varsity team was composed ofWilber M. Brucker,'16 L, Joseph E, Cotton,'16,and Alex- 
ander J. Stoddard, '17 L. Dean CoC)ley of the Engineering College presided. The two thousand 
people present showed deep interest throughout the debate. There was a divided vote of the judges, 
the decision going to Michigan by a 2 to 1 vote. 

On the same evening at the University of Chicago Michigan's negative met the University of 
Chicago team. The Michigan men were as follows: William J. Goodwin, '16 L, Nathan E, Pinney, 
'16, and Paul V. Ramsdell, '16, Professor Andrew C. McLaughlan, of the University of Chicago, 
formerly of the University of Michigan, presided. There was a large audience and much enthusiasm. 
As at Ann Arbor the decision was divided, Chicago winning by a 2 to 1 vote. 

The second annual contest of the Mid-West Debating League was held March 31, 1916, The 
question chosen for debate was as follows; "Resolved, that the Federal Government should own and 
operate all public service telegraph and telephone systems in the United State?, constitutionality waived." 

Michigan's affirmarive team met Wisconsin's negative team in Hill Auditorium before a represen- 
tative and enthusiastic Ann Arbor audience, Governor Edward F. Dunne of Illinois presiding. The 
Michigan team was composed of WiUiam T. Adams, '17, Irving S. Topion, '17, and R, S, Munter, '16 L. 

The debate was full of fine spirit on both sides. The decision was unanimous in favor of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 

Michigan's negative met the Illinois team at Urbana, III,, in the University Auditorium, March 31, 

1916, Michigan's team was composed of George C. Qaassen, '17 L, William E. Olds, '16 and Kenneth 
M. Stevens, '16 L. The debate was characterized by great earnestness, keen thrusts and much humor 
and repartee. The decision of the judges was 2 to 1 in favor of the University of Michigan. Michigan 
has won all of her debates in the new Mid-West League losing only two out of twelve judges. 

The appropriation of the Regents, whereby all students are given yearly admission tickets to all 
debating and oratorical contests, toot effect this year. It has not only brought out n 
than usual but has awakened wider general interest in the public questions discusser 



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Michigan's Record in Oratory to Date 

IN the iwenty-five contests of the Northern Oratorical League, Michigan has won nine first honors, 
three seconds and six thirds, against six other western universities, as many first honors as any two 
of her competitors. Six first honors were won in succession. 
In the Peace Contest the University has represented the State of Michigan in six Interstate or 
Group contests, winning three of them, and has also appeared in three National Peace contests, winning 
two of them in succession at Lake Mohonk, N, Y., the one by Petcival Blanshard, in 1912, the other 
by his twin brother, Paul Blanshard, in 1913. 

Michigan has taken part in fifty-two intercollegiate debates, winning thirty-five of them. Her 
record is as follows: Sis of the seven with Wisconsin, nine of the sixteen with Northwestetn, thtee 
of the four with Minnesota, three of the four with Pennsylvania, twelve of the nineteen with Chicago, 
and both of the debates with Illinois. Only three of these debates have been losi 
sion, while twenty-one have been won by unanimous decision. At one time eleven debates w 
1, four in succession by unanimous decision, records nol equalled by any of the large ui 




Thomas Clarkson Trueblood, A.M., Professor of Oratory 



The large number of successful debates to Michigan's credit can be traced to the inspiration with 
which he has imbued our representatives. 



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Officers of the Oratorical Association 

WilbehM- Bhuckfr, '16L President 

Geo. C. Claassen, '16 L V.ce-P resident 

H. B, Teegarden, '17 Secretary 

N. Earl Pinney. '16 Treasurer 

FACULTY REPRESENTJTIFES 
Prof. Thos. C. Trueblood Mr. R. K. Immel 

Prof. R. D, T. Hollister Ma. Louis Eich 

SOCIETY REFRESENTATiVES 
Wm. T. Adam3, Alpha Nu L. W. Lisle, Webster 

W. A. Pearl, Adelphi S. D. Frankel, Jeffersoniar 

CLASS REPRESENTATU'ES 

Albert Gans, '16 A. R. Sherk, '16 L 

Earl E. Pardee, '17 G. L. Cook, '17 L 

C. F. Boos. '18 J. E. RvAN, '18 L 

Harry Stocker, '19 

LouieH. DuHTEN, 'leL . N. O. L. Delegate 



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The Lyceum Club 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Thomas C. Trueblood Ray K, hi 

R. D. T, HoLLisTEK Louia Y-k 



STUDENT MEMBERS 

R. J. CorroN Lucile S, Strong 

E. M. Wisdom W- C. Mullendore 

N- E. PfNNEV W, W. SCHROEDER 

W. C. Crockett S. J. Skinner 



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Central Debating League 

Unlversiiies of Chicaeo, Norihwescern and Mifhiijan 
Quijlinii: "Resolvcti chat ConKress should adopt a literacy test for all European immigratio 

CHICAGO vs. MICHfG.JN 
Held at Chicaco, Illinois, January 21, 1916 

Michigan NtgalKC Team 

N. K. PiNNEY, '16 ■ P. V. RAMSI)tl.l„ '16 

W. J. Goodwin, '16 L H. M- Iekgardkn. '17 (alternate) 

Won by Chicago, two to one. 

NORTHtVESTERN vs. MICHIGAN 
Held at Ann Arbor, January 2\, 1916 

Michigan Affitmalwe Team 
W, M. Brucker, '16 L A. J. Stobdard, '17 L 

J. R. Cotton, '16 U. S. Munter, '17 1. (alternate) 

Won by Michigan, two to one. 



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MuNTtK TOPLON 



~-~:-'*t;^ 




Midwest Debating League 



Qutslion- "Resolved, that the Federal Government should own and 
erate all public service telephone and telegraph lines in the United States, 



/i/./,\0/S vs. mClUCAK 
Hki.1) at Champafgn. Illinois, March 31, 1916 

Michigan ^egaliv, T.am 
G. C Claassen, -17 L K. M. SrKvENs, '\(, I. 

W. K. Olds, '16 H. H. Sphingstun. '17 (altern^ite) 

Won by Michigan, two to one. 



H-7SC0AS/.V z's. MICIUCAK 
Hkld at Ann Arbor, March 31. 1916 

Mkhisau A/nrmalizY Team 
■ W.T. Adams, '17 I- S. Tupliin, '17 

R, S- MuNIEK. '17L S. D. Feankfl, '17 L (alternate) 

Won b> Michigan, by unanimous decision. 



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*-;*■•' 




Adelphi House of Representatives 





OF-fiCI-RS 






First Stmeslir 




Second Semtiter 


Wallace C. Hall, Speaker 


Wii 


-LIam a. Pearl. Soeaker 


Ralph M. Carson, Clerk 


Ikvi 




, Clerk 


Edward J, Gorman, Treasu 


rer Jes! 


i R. SruPii^N. 




Irving S. Toflon, Sergeant 


-at-Arms Howard Moses, I 


Sergeant-ac-Arms 


WcLLlAM A. Pearl, Oratoric 


al Delegate Geo 
ROLL 


■KGE F. HllRLI 


■Y, Oratorical Delegat 


S. L, FiLDEW 


V. C. Mock 




K. Gtulfoil 


A. R.I.evtNE 


H. D. HoPKJNs 




R- Herman 


W, E. Olds 


C. F. Small 




L- James 


B. F. Magruder 


D. I. Sugar 




A. Bohn 


L. Pollock 


R. V, Gay 




H- B. Flarsheim 


A. T. Lehman 


J. Sherrin 




I. Leivick 


G, WiLNER 


C. P. Anderson 




J, H. Hathway 


P. E. Cholette 


P. V. Ramsdell 




W. Hall 


J. R. Cotton 


N. H, Shermer 




P, Dalev 


W. A. Pearl 


R. E. Gault 




R- Carson 


C. G. Baer 


L. B. Sable 




H. Wagensel 


G. F, Hurley 


T. J. Teare 




T. A. Hart 


J. R. Simpson 


D. J. McKoNE 




F. S, Sell 


H. F. Massnick 


N. E. PiNNEY 




D. R. Hfrti 


S.J. Skinner 


M. A. SCHLCSSEL 




D. C, Rose 


Wm. McKinley 


V. H, Sugar 






G. S. Underwood 


V. E. Blrnett 




1. S. TOPLON 


J. B, Barker 


C. Gascho 




E. J. Gorman 


R- P. Collier 






J. B. Wood 



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:.,^ti 




Alpha Nu Society 






H. B. Teegardbn. President 

C. E. Bailey, Vice-President 

Rex B. Cunliffk, Secretary 

H. H. Chapman, Treasurer 

Wm. T. Adams, Oratorical Delegate 

T. E. Amtsbuechler. Sibvl Editor 

Jacob Levin, Marshall 



Second Stmeiter 
C. E. Railev, President 
T, E. Amtsbuechler, Vice-Pr 
E. E. Dreese, Secretary 
H. H. Chapman, Treasurer 
Wh. T, Adams, Oratorical Del 
C. A. Re[d, Sibyl Editor 
H, B, Tffcarden, Marshall 



iriNKWG CUP TEAM 1915 
E. L. Carroll 



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Nei 



!■]![ 



Webster Debating Society 

ilOAORARV MEMBERS 

R- MacDon^ld 

SEMORS 

K. M- Stevens President 

K. L. Phillips Vice-President 

■C. S. Neitherciit Secretary 

M. Weinberger Treasurer 

T. H. Westlake Critic 

H, W, Waples 

A. R. Sherk Reporter 

A, J. MlcKELSON Sergeant-at- 

W. A. Neithercut R, S, Munter F. J. Schro 

P. G. EcER C. S. Wood N. K, Cra" 

B. S. Harris W. M. Skjllman H, K. Rush 
M. C. Carlton E. W. Hart 

JUMORS 
L, W. Lisle, Oratorical Delegate 
G, C, Clausshn p. Porrs H. M. Taof 

E. P. Reid J, P. Clark |. A, -loror- 

O. PhciiiI'S B.B.Gordon C. Sif.del 

A. S- LovtLAND 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 
D, V. McCoRMicK S. Cohen H. L. B, 

L. W. FORBUS G. ViLLANUAVA R. SiSTI 

A. p. BocuE E. O. Snethen Z,. B. E 

M. R. Morton 



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¥11 




Jeffei 



rsonian 



OFFICERS 

WcLBER Uruckek President 

E. li. Houseman Vice-PresLd. 

a. D. TRANKBi Secretary 

W. R. CARfENTER Treasurer 

Amms.J.Q. Hlcht.L.S. 

Brown, D. R. Houseman, E. B. 

Bruccer, Wilber Lawrence, H. D, 

Butler, E. C. Morris, Walter 

Carpenter, W, R. McCarthy, H. L. 

Cotton, J. V. McGinnis, R. A. 

DeLormer, a. J. Miller, Peter 

Donnelly, J. M. Roan. E, H. 

DUNTEN. I.OUIS OCDEN, S. G. 

Frankel, S. D. Smith, I,. H. 

FcNK. D, H. Stoddard, A. J. 

Goodwin. W. J. TATu^^, A, W, 

Grammar, A. W. Wfener, K. L. 
Haoar. G- H. 



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^"S-'V':— ■ 




Delta Sigma Rho 



founded W06 

MEMBERS 

Harry D. Pakker President 

Kenneth M. Stevens Vice-Presi 

Petkr a. MlL^BR Secreiary- 

George C. Claassen Gavd Edi 

W. W. StHBOEDER N. E, PiNNEV 

H, D. Parker R. B. Pensotti 

K. M. Stevens W. M. Brucker 

W. E. Morris A. J. Stoodard 

P. H. Miller P. V. Ramsdell 

G. C. Claassen W. J. Goodwin 

V. H, Sugar J, S. Cotton 

O. C. SaTTENGER I. S. TOPLON 

F. M. GuNTER . W. J. Adams 

A. H. Eg(;ebth K. S. Munter 

Lours EiCH W. E. Olds 

AFFILIATE MEMBERS 
Prof, Thomas C. Tkuerlood Ass't Prof. R. 

Prof. I, Leo Sharfman 



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■>-■ 



[i,« • LITERARY and - ■ 
M SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES ' 



^■■■■■■ll 



m 



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Omega Phi 

HcjNOK Gaines President 

Helen Champion Vice-President 

Winifred Roehm Secrctarv 

HelenTuthILL Treasurer 

Elizabeth Ahthur Albertine LooMts 

JeANNETTE ArM3TB0N0 WlNIFRKLI RotHM 

Mji,dred Cabpenter Nellie Rosewarren 

Helen Champion Donna Sutherland 

Helen Ely Florence Snvurr 

Golda Ginsburc Helen Tuthill 

Honor Gaines Muriel Tyson 

Marian Holden Gladvs Whelan 

Katherine Hakhingion Marian Wilson 



Mir 



«HUBB 



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-'•'f'ii' 



w 



Stylu 





ACTIl'E MEMBERS 


Martha Gr,v 


Elciabeth Arthur 


Eleanore Stalker 


Albertine Loovis 


Helen Bi.aer 


Ethel Hosmer 


Muriel Tyson 


Ruth Butler 


Maroarfte Kerns 


MeRIAM HuBflARD 




ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Esther Shaw 


Grace Boyton 


Elizabeth TooF 


KatmerineWeibeb 


Gladys Vetter 


Florence Haxton 



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■'|='"^5y 




Engineering Society 



An organization to encourage original investigation in engineering and scientific 
subjects, to acquire a knowledge of the most approved methods of engineering 
procedure, to collect material of value to engineers, to publish such information as 
may be deemed of interest to the profession and of benefit to ourselves, and to pro- 
mote a social spirit amonR smdents and members of the profession. 



General Society 

N. ¥. Brown I'residen 

H. R, Leach Vlce-Pre 

E. H. Merrjtt Secretar 

WALTEnWfKKBN Trcasur, 

BR.INCH SOCIETIES 

Civil . . , . A. C. Simons .... Prcslden 

Mechanical . , H. S. Manwarino , - PresJden 

Klectrical . . . U, M. Smith Presiden 



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American Institute of Electrical Engineers 





OFFICERS 




U. M. Smeth . . . 




. . . Chairman 


Norman F. Brown 






H, A, Mankin 




^ 


Mimbtnhip Commitlti 




Social CommiUie 


Arleigh Mead 




J- Krejner 


H. A- Manken 


MEMBF.kS 
Se«wr, 


H. C, BUELL 


J. F. Clark 




F. A. Del Valle 


S, YOHOVAMA 




D. W. Taylor 


H. W. MiLLEH 




H. C. BUELL 


G, A. Rutgers 




A. Mead 


N. F. Brown 




J. Kreiner 


U. M. Smlth 




N. F. DoLPH 


L, M. Dellincer 




C. W. Smith 


H- A. Mankin 




E. Von Nosrm 


H. D. SlttHRE, 


,..,.„ 


R. Wylie 


A, N, Clark 




J. N. Skuteckc 


R. D. Pappi; 




F. E. Richardson 



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UO.\<>KARY MEMBERS 

PFtoy, H. C. Sadlkr ?mv. V.. M. Mn, 

OFFICERS 

W, W. MacArtkuk Commodore 

L. C. Bibber \ icff-Commodore 

M. L. Goldstein Purser 

W. I.. COOKK Assistant Purser 

W. I). Warrfn Steward 

CREir 

C. W. Akeks M. a. NicHoixs 

V. Altam[rano C. H. Pkhrson 

H. K. Babhett L. M. Rakestra 

K, W. Hejnrfch N. V. Sato 

I.. R, HussA G. B. SviTH 

A. Kaufman C. D. TRiPol.ms 

K, H- Monroe T, C,Vr>uiKN 




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Prescott Club 

OfflCERS 



Charus Costa 
Joseph Mjllne 
R. G. Brown 
H. N. Oeli.ric> 
W. I. BoNcsrtR 




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University of Michigan Commerce Club 

OFFICERS 

R. R. LouNSBURV President 

F. I.. Walters Vice-President 

D. R, Ballentink Secretary 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Prok. H. C- Adams 
Pkok. V. M. Taylor 
Prof. Daviu Friday 
Prof. J. W. Glover 



T- F- AMfSBUICHLFF 

E. D. Atwatek 

D. R. IJallent(n£ 
R. C. Haknum 

F. H. Begole 

E. A. BiKKR 

A. M, Bentlei- 

L. H. DUNTKN 

G. B. Fox 

H. D. Griffith 
J. N. Hamilton 
R, I.. Haskins 

F. 1.. HOPKINSON 
H. S. HoEMt.R 



Prof. 1, L, Shahfman 
Prof. E.D.Jones 
Assr. Prof. G. W. Dowrie 
Secretarv S, W. Smith 



.■ICri/E MEMBERS 



H. C, I-ANCE 

D, F. Lawrence 

R. R. LOUNSBURY 

F. A. Morrison 
F. P. Randall 
Karl Reni 
C, V. Sellers 
B. T. Steers 

B, W. Talleen 
A. H. Torrev 
Hugo Wacenseil 
V. L. Walters 

C, F. Weissinger 
■R. E, Williamson 



„ .„~J 



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fi'r 




"The Automobile Society" 



ONE da^ last DeiL 
formed in organ u 
societj' has for its 
students and its formation 



iber 



p of engmtenng students got toeetlur and 
ion nhwh the<, tailed tht "\utomobile Societv ' The 
bject the promotion ol automobile engineering among 
but a natural sequence to the growth of the Automobile 



Department at Michigan. 

Although the society was organized under the temporary title of "Automobile 
Society" it is expected that before this book appears the society will have taken 
over the title of "University of Michigan branch of the Society of Automobile Engi- 
neers," The S, A. E, is a national organization and it is thru its interest and the 
interest of the local society that the branch will be formed. 



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MUSIC and DRAMA 




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*4^ 











..»^.,^"^^ jT^ 








-^^^^^^.^ '*'^ / , 










"IB 


■■■* 





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^4"! 



University of Michigan Glee and Mandolin Club 

OFFICERS 

Frank C.WHF.ELEK,'l(iE President 

Petes A. Hahtrsveldt, '16L Vice-Presidenc 

Frank A. Tabeb, '17 Secretary 

Davtd R. Ballentcne, '16 Manager 

MaUhjce a, NrcHOU.S, '17E Assistant Manager 

GLEE CLUn 

Theodore Harrison Director 

U. S. Wilson, '16 Leader 



R. M. Allan, 17L 
W. R.Atlas, '18 
T. S. Harnett, '16 

I. B. COMSTOCK, '181, 

H. L. Davis, '17 



C. C. Bailey. '17 
John Bloomstrom, '17 
C. H. Boos, '18 
F. W. Grover, 'IS 
H. W. Kekr, '16 

R. R. DlETERLE, '18 

H. D. Draper, 'ISE 
H. M. Easley, '16 
Arthur Heuer, 'Iti 



Fir. 



Tfnor. 



E. H. Felt, '18 

P. A. Hartesveldt, '17L 

W. S. James, '160 

H. LlEBESKIND, '!8 

C. F. Watson, '18 

Second TfKOTs 
W. Kleineetecker, '16D 
R. S. KOCHER, '18 



First Basses 
C. B. SiKEs, '16 

F. H. TlNSMAN, '16 

W. S. Westerman, '17 
H. F. Whtttaker, Gra 
F. P. Surcenor, '16 

Sicond Basses 
S. J, HlETF, *16L 

C. R. Illick, '18M 

D. W. Jesninrs, 'If. 
W. L. Kemp, '18 

MANDOLIN CLUB 



C- V. Lowes, '16 
Leman Scott, '18 

W. C. MOONEY, '17 

R, A. Parker, '16 
G. I. Murphy, '16 



F., R, SCARBOBO, '17M 
H. N. SCHMETT, '16 

L, Siev, 'I7D 
pREscoTT Smith, '18 
F. W, Sullivan, '18 



U. S. Wilson, '16 
M. C. Wood, '17 
E. L, Zeigler, '18 
J. K. Zeigler, '19M 



C. I. Myers, '18 

C, P. Ritchie, '16 
R. M. Vincent, '1 
D.W. Sessions, '1 

D. T. McKoNE, '1 



Mandda 
L.O. AiriHiCH, '17E 

Cdto 
F. C, WHfRi.ER, 'leE 



First Mandolins 

G. A. Leverenz, '16E 

C. A. McKENNEy,'16E 

Second Mandolins 

D. G. ESTABROOK, '17 

J. R. St. Clair, '18E 
Tkird Mandolins 

H. H. Whittincham, '171 
I,. L. Bower, '16E 

C, PlCKElT, -18 

E. K. Marshall, '17E 



H. B. FORSYTHE. 

Bail Viol 
H, L. Dahs, '1 



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Girls' Glee Club 



Mildred Backers 


Harriet Medes 


Alice Barnard 


Florence Mii>daugh 


Ruby Bowden 


Adelaide McAllistei 


Bernice Borden 


Katherine McBride 


Helen Bush 


Elda McKee 


Ruth Butlek 


Helen McDonald 


Vera Brown 


Genevieve Packard 


Ma ROUE RITE Calev 


Florence Paddock 


Lucy Cannon 


Marion Peterson 


Lillian Carnegie 


Josephine Randai.i. 


MvRA Cobb 


Grace Raynsford 


Laura Feice 


Ruth Robson 


Ada Fitch 


ISABELLE RONAN 


Hilda Flink 


Ellen Sargent 


Marion Galton 


Emilie Sargent 


Inez Gosb 


Hazel Stevens 


Olive Harjiig 


Christine Stringer 


EUTHYMIA HlLDNER 


Dorothy Walker 


Aura Hyatt 


Portia Walker 


Ruth Krecer 


Adelle Westbrook 


Emma Knoep 


Gladys Whelan 


Bernice Krucer 


Jemima Wenley 


Helen Krucer 


KathekineWenlrv 



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i 



That Michigan Band" 





OFFICERS 








Wm, K, MATHt»-S 




Pr 


sident 




R. H. Hai-Stkih , 




Vi 


e- Pre si dent 




A. J. Hlrr 




Se 






K. P. Mkrkili. . . 




Tr 


asiirer 




L. C. CoRTRIGin- . . 




Member Governini- Board 




1., G. K[ti.[. , . , 




M 


mber Governing Board 




H. Gray .... 




M 


mber Governine Board 




Wllkreb Wilson . . 




M 


sical Director 




S. J. HOEXTER 




Faculty Manager 
Student Manaj!er 




K. RoilCtKS SVLVESIKR 








MEMBERS 








AkiiiuR N. Bacon, 'If. 


Howard Gray, '17Arch. 




Mii.-roN A. Netitr, 'I7E 




CuffOKuW. Bha.nard, '1(;-'18M 


Merit D-Haag,'16-'18M 




MaYNARdA. NORRIS, '16 




Alfred J. Burr, 'IS 


Robert H.Halstead, '18 




Philip 0. Potts, 'iOE 




Phillip Carroll, 'ISE 


Arthur Hammond '17D 




Bruce R. Rathbun. 'ISE 




Arthur B. Castle, 'ISE 


Charles F. Hemans, '18 




W. Grover Rich, '16D 




Lisle C. Cortrlght, '17 


Ernest L. Hicks, '18 




Stephen J. Roskosky, '18E 




Donald W. Crabbs, '18E 


Herbert G.Johnson, '18 




DeAnC. SCROGOIE, '18 




Maxwell B. Cutting, -IZE 


William M. Johnston, ■16L 




Clarence W, Shea, '17E 




WiLLIAmG. EVENSON, '18 


RockwellM. Kempton, 'ISM 


Royal aiRisLEB, '17 




Mark Ferrell, '16 


Norhert a. Lange, Grad. 




StanleyJ. Whiteman. '18 




Leslie G. Field, '18 


Waldo McC McKee, 'ISE 




Elmer H-WiRTH,'18P 




PallL. Field, '16 


William E. Mathews, '15-'18L 


Charles C. Wolcot^, '17H 




RoJiBKrA, GiLMOLK, '16 


Clarence L. Menser, Grad 
E. Forrest Merrill, '18 




John Y- York. Jr., '16L 
CecilE. ZwicKEv. '17E 


i 



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"The Professor's Love Story" 

A Comdy 
Bv J. M. Bahrie 
Whitney TJieatre, Saturday Evening, Dee. IS, 1915. 
If'kitney Theatre, Saturday .Jflernoon, Feb. 12, 1916. 
The Academy, Saginaw. Mich., Friday Ei-ening, Feb. IS, 1916. 
CJST 

Effie Proctot I„j.^ M, Gosk 

Lucy White Phyllis Povah 

Dr. Cosens Leon M Clnninc 

Professor GoodwiUie Morrison C. Woe 

Lady Gilding Helen R Ely 

The Dowager Lady (Jilding Paulinr O. Emer) 

Sir George Gilding Humphrey Sprtnc 

*""« Chestrr K. Form 

Henders Akthur J Adams 

Agnes Goodwzllie Mary L.Johns' 

Margaret R. Re\ 

Ur. Yellowlees Clay W. W,lbhk 

MEMllEKS 



Kl( 



aShak 






Henryetta Brande 


LRY Eleanor Stalker 


Stanley Lamb 


Helen Ely 


Emilie Sargent 


Francis McKinney 


Pauline Emerson 


Adele Westbkook 


Walker Pehdicord 




RODEHTA WoODWORTH 


James Ryan 


Julia Heideman 


Adele Crani>all 




Mary Johns 


Walter Atlas 




R;.TH Krecer 


Arthur Adams 




Nona Meyers 


Lloyd Curbv 


Glen Shipley 


Jean MacClennan 


Robert Collins 




Vera Marsh 


Leon Cunningham 




Phyllis Povah 


Grant Cook 


Clay Wjlber 


Mildred Reese 




E. W. Sullivan 


Margaret Reynold 


Chester Fordney 





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...*>L 






Cook WiLBRR Fokdnsv Peddfcord 

GosE Springstln Ely 

Emerson Apkel S'.chs Wood Povah Swltzeb 

Cunningham Adams 

The Comedy Club 

John S, SwiraKu President 

KlsaApfel Vice-President 

Kdward a. Sachs Ditector 

Walker Peduicord Manager 

Grant I,. Cook Secreiaty-Treasurer 

E. CI. liARTKLME Property Manager 

John K, Sanjurs Costume ManaRer 

H. KfRKWifiiE Advertising Manager 

Choe. Lol'is a. Stral'ss 
Chairman Senate Committee in charge of Dramatic Organizations, 



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iri 




Deiit|cf)cr 




OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL FEREIX 

Harold J, Sherman President 

Florence Gehber Vice-President 

AlbeUT T. Lehman Treasurer 

Gertrude Secfert Secretary 

WrLLTAM T, Adams Auditor 

OFFICERS OF THE MI-:A"S SECTIOA' 

William M. Laux President 

Andrew Tiesenoa Vice-President 

Bernhard H. Dawson Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS OF THE MEN'S SECTION 

Wm. T. Adams James W. Hoce George Kobbert 

Richard Harie Harold Johnston Harold Rosenheim 

Ralph Boece William Laux Lavanche Riegeh 

Ben Clark Albert T. Lehman Henkv Ryskamf 

Chester Clark Freu Marx Harold J. Sherman 

Bernhard H. Dawson Norman Muhme Earle Schumacher 

Horace Davis Henry Massnick Andrew Tjesinc/^ 

Harold Humphreys Isadore Mehlman Alpred Thompson 

Charles L. Haas Carl Neumann 

Paul Halleb Roscoe Rau 



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■^'i% 



OFFICKRS OF VPPER SECTION 

Ruth Khrgkr President 

Adele Beveh Vice-President 

Genevieve O'I.hary , , Secretary and Treasurer 

OFFICERS OF LOWER SECTION 

EuTHVMCA Hri-UNKR President 

Della Laubengayeh Vice-President 

Marcarei Henkel Secrerary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS OF GIRLS' SECTION 



Mi].l>REi> Backers 


KUTHYMIA HiLDNER 


Jessie Spence 


Alice Barnard 


Helen Hlmphrevs 


Margaret Sure 


Margaret Baesett 


Margaret Henderson 


Anna Staeb 


Ruby Bawden 


MiLDA JOSENHAUS 


MiNA Sievert 


Adele Beyer 


Margaret Klein 


Mildred Schilling 


MaRIIARET HoGENK[EU£R 


Ruth Krecer 


Marguerite St rack an 


Ruth Bailey 


Beatrice Lambhecht 


V. Frieda Seigworth 


Ruth Balsom 


Della Laubengayer 


OlGA SCHINKMAN 


Helen Blair 


SeLMA LlNDELl. 


Grace Thomasma 


Mathila Bkaun 


Elizabeth McRae 


Ruth Trombly 


Helen Champion 


Olive McLouth 


EbbaTrysell 


Adele Cranoall 


Evelyn Moore- 


Mathilda Ulenbehc 


Lucille Colby 


Janet MacFarlane 


Ethel Vail 


Hilda Dieterle 


Genevieve O'Leary 


Marjorie Votey 


Ruth Elliott 


Constance Orcutt 


Harriet Walker 


Ermine Fh.lingham 


Bessie Platto 


Alice Wleber 


Marie Fluegel 


Florence Pov^ers 


Annie Williams 


Edith Gabriel 


Genevieve Packard 


Florence Walk 


Florence Gewber 


Bertha Robinson 


Frieda Wedemeyer 


Jrma Giduings 


Genevieve Rowe 


Alice Waessner 


Altha Heffelbowrr 


Leah Schuehen 


Marie von Walthauje 



Anna von Walthausen 




Adams Shej 



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BUREAU DU CERCLE 



James Chenot 
Adele Chanball . 
Vena Marsh 
Rodney Parker . 
Mr. H. V. Wann , 






MEMBRES JCTJfS 




Mr. H. V, Wann 


i-KLAND Thompson 


Makguerith Fnlss 


James Chcnot 


Gordon Campbell 


Harold Humphreys 


Adele Crandall 


Manuel DEL Valle 


Margaret Kkrr 


Beatrice Lambrecht 


Lloyd Curbv 


Adaline McAlli3te 


Charles Frisbie 


Vena Marsh 


Tom Reid 


Henley Hill 


Walter Atlas 


Vernon Sellers 


McLDREO Backers 


Jacob Braui.m 


Mary Walsh 


Chester Fordney 


Yancy Altshelkr 


Muriel TvsoN 


Barbara Wfld 


Paiilenk Champlin 


EfLELN HuBB^kl, 


Rodney 1'^hkkr 


Marie Cornwell 


Heryl Hlbbarii 



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'•'^^'•^ 




Cercle Francais 

DE L'UMI'ERSITE DU MICHIGAN, 191S-I9I6 

"LA RUSSIE EN 1875" M. Philcv Burslev 

Conference accompagncc de projections, 
Mardi 30 novembre. Tappan Hall. 5 heures, 

"LA IJTTERATURE AU MIDI" M, Edwahd Adams 

Mardi !4 decembre. Tappan Hall. S heures. 

"LA VIE A PARIS" M. Morcti Levi 

Mardi II Janvier. Tappan Hall. 5 heures. 
SOIREE MUSICALE, DRAMATIQUE ET DANSANTE. 

Samedi 22 Janvier. Sarah Caswell Angell Hall. S heures, 

'■AUX RALKANS" M. HarkvWann 

ConKrence accompagn6e de projections. 
Mardi 8 Kvrier. Tappan Hall. 5 heures, 

"JEANNE d'ARC DANS LES LEITRES ET DANS LES ARTS" 

M. Arthuk Canfielp 

Conference accompagnce de projections. 
Mardi 29 Kvrier. Tappan Hall, 5 heures. 

"LA CIVILISATION FRANCAISE" M. Hugo Thfeme 

Mardi 7 mars. Tappan Hall. 5 heures, 

"LES SAVANTS FRANCAIS AUX ILES PHILLIPPINES" 

M, Emerson Christie 

Mardi 21 mars, Tappan Hall, 5 heures. 
"L'ECOLE DES BEAUX ARTS DE PARIS" , . , M, J. J, Alb, Rousseau 

Mardi 4 avril. Tappan Hall. S heures. 
CONFERENCE SUR LA PIECE CHOISIE . . . , M. Robert Efunger 

Mardi 25 avril. Tappan Halt. 5 heures. 
REPRESENTATION ANNUELLE DU CERCLE FRANCAIS. 
Jeudi 27 avril. 



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The Junior Girls' Play 



THE Annual Junior Girls' Play owes ics existence to Mrs, Jordan, who suggested that the juniors 
write and produce a p)ay in honor of the graduating class. The senior girls had been in the habrt 
of selecting a play from the dramatic literature of various countries and producing it during Com- 
mencement week open to the genera! public. In contrast to this, the Junior Play is original and gives 
a chance for fun-making often at the expense of people and institutions on the campus. In 1904 an en- 
tertainment dealing with Buster Brown at Michigan was given, and from this the Junior Play developed . 

On the evening of Swing-Out in 1905 the first Junior Play was given. It was called " Everysenior", 
obviously a travesty on the old moraHty play and opened with the following prologue, " This is a treatyse 
how Everysenior is sumoned to render accounte of her ille deedes and well-ltnowne disgraceful actions. 
Her kind friend,Everyjunior,perceiveth her portendingdestructionand hereby warneth her." The Voice 
of God, or Dean Hudson, was taken by Mabel Tuomey. The rest of the characters were Dethe, or Pluck 
and Con; Felowshfp or Society; Kyndred, or Parents; Goodes, or Bank Account; Knowledge, or Do- 
mesticity; Dyscresion, or Pa Finney; Confession, or Dean Jordan; The Grave or Graduation; Strength, 
or Athletics; Five Wits, Bluff, Bolt, Brass, Jolly, and Excuse; and Everyman or Everysenior. 

The authors were Eugenia Bray, Ann Mulheron, Elizabeth Prall, Juliet Stockbridge and Etfie Arm- 

The next year "Alice in Seniorland" was given, its authors being Ruth Rizer, Louise Wicks, Mar- 
garet Dresser and Hortense Flexner. Alice, a freshman, was guided through Seniorland by the Cater- 
pillar, a sophomore, who introduced her to the Cheshire Cat representing Coach Yost, and the Right 
and Left Bowers representing- Professors Whitney and Markley. The Mock Turtle, Dodo and Griffin 
were other members of the faculty, while President Angell was the King of Hearts. A group of seniors 
came in admitting that they had become engaged during their college course, were ordered ofF to cook- 
ing school by the Duchess, otherwise Mrs. Jordan. 

The offering of 1907 was "Don Quixote, the Co-ed Knight", "Adapted from the Spanish," by 
Eleanor Demmon, Barbara McAIvay, Marjorie Fenton, and Isabella Watt. Don Quixote, the Spanish 
cavalier, came with his squire Sancho Panza to save the seniors from being overworked by their pro- 
fessors. The Knight clad in armor of boiler and kettle tops was a gallant figure and much admired by 
the girls. Curiosity had been aroused by this play as an editorial in the Daily shows: — "Now in view 
of the present anxiety to maintain a democratic spirit in contemporary affairs, why all this exclusiveness 
at the North West Corner of the Campus? The men are aggrieved at being barred from the gay little 
functions held under Mrs. Jordan's eye. It is too bad to be shunted so into the cold, cold world. Some 
day we shall have a club house of our own and then they can't 'play in our yard.' Meanwhile we hope 
the Junior Play will be mirth provoking enough to keep them oblivious enough to the envy of those out- 
side." 

A distinct advance was made, when "Miehiguse," by Margaret McLauchlan was given in 1908. 
The idea was very clever, the scene taking place on the airship "Miehiguse" where Professor Star- 
gazer's class in skyology is looking on the campus. On spring evenings various "group phenomena" 
could be seen strolling about and one girl thought she observed a snap course in the Engineering College 
but was mistaken. Both "Miehiguse" and the second part, "Coedenda" contained takeoffs on the 
Union Opera "Michigenda," the hit of the evening being the " Rah! Rah (College Girl", played by Miss 
McLauchlan, who sang of her various admirers. 

" Marriagan," by Jane Harris and Sarah Sunderland, was performed in 1909. While some of the 
girls are at a spread with certain members of the faculty the alarm comes that a company of Martians 
had landed on the Campus and is marching quickly to the banquet. The rest of the play relates the 
invasion and final conquest of the Martians who come to take the senior girls to Mars and found there 
a University of Martigan. "I Kind O Like Ann Arbor" and "The Billiken" were greatly appreciated. 

"Eds and Co-eds", by Fannie Biggs, Marian Ludington, Nellie Canrighr, Ruth Anderson and 
Josephine Rankin was played in 1910. This play abounded in local quips and allusions; Professor Thomas 
was seeking rhetorical errors in the book of the Recording Angel, and Professor Wenley Was puzzling his 
classes by discussing the "is" and the "isnotness" of the "isnot". 

In 1911 Mary Woodhill recalled to us our nursery days in a farce bearing no name, presenting many 
familiar figures from Mother Goose: — Humpty Dumpty, Bo-Peep, Peter Piper, Miss Moffat and a host 
of others. This piece was somewhat spectacular and the chorus work was good, the Dutch and Black- 
bird Choruses being especially well liked. 



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"The Come Back" 



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There were many quaint and humorous scenes " In Old Bagdad, " the libretto by Louise Conklin ai 



c by Eva Hanks. Mary Palmer was excellent as Reginald Worthingham of Oxford, travelling 
in the Orient; Marguerite Stanley made a fine caliph and Elaine Shields was amusing as Shampoo. 

A fairy tale, "In the Realm of Dreams" by Marjorie Nicholson, was enacted in 1913. We wit- 
nessed the adventures of a princess disguised as a peasant gtrl who was finally found by the prince, rep- 
resented by Isobe! Rizer. Irene Bigalke was very funny as the duenna of the princess, continually re- 
minding her of court etiquette. 

After this play a farce "Daily Life", by Emily Gilfillan, gave to outsiders a glimpse of the Daily 
Office and how that publication "might" be managed. The editor was bothered by a bevy of girls who 
came to chat with him when he was trying to get the paper ready for press. Gwendolyn Brown, a very 
popular girl, played by Phyllis Dunne, was in love with the editor and continually calling him up during 
his business hours. He tried to escape these damsels but could not, so a less attractive editor was in- 
stalled. Louise Robson was screamingly funny as Bob the reporter and Julia Anderson as the lover of 
one of the suffragettes caused that chorus to be encored again and again. 

"The Treasure of Toule", by Louise Markley, was ^iven by the Juniors of 1914. "Castles, Fairy 
Castles", .the music by Helen Malcomson and words by Vera Burridge, was very successfully sung by 
Alice Lloyd and Romaine Bramwell. It was probably the best song which had been written by any of 
the junior giils during the history of the plays. 

The eleventh play, "The Come Back", by Eleanor Stalker, appeared in 1915. The scene was laid 
in Ann Arbor in 2002, the men having left college many years before to go to the war in Europe. Act 
I takes place in the Dean's office where we discover her in an angry mood. Some girls have rushed the 
Majestic the night before and she resolves that they shall be "summarily dealt with". Gerald, a daring 
youth enters and cries to persuade the Dean to let the men return to Michigan, but she refuses. Gerald, 
however, is backed in this request by the girls, several of whom have fallen in love with him. Act II 
is on the Campus where the horrifiecl Professor Jones discovers Gerald chatting with the girls. She is so 
shocked that after reproving them for such conduct she tells Gerald to leave at once. 

The Dean has not always been the stern woman she now is. She loved once, but her lover left her, 
embittering her towards man; for this reason, she refuses to reinstate Gerald and his friends. But for- 
tunately her old sweetheart returns anil explains his defection in so touching a manner that she relents 
towards men in general and him in particular. The play ends with the promise that Gerald and his 
friends may return to Michigan. Between the acts burnr cork specialties were given by Julia Barksdalc, 
Beatrice Hannan and Nina Mclntyre. 

Much of the success of the play was due to the Committee, of which Martha Gray was Chairman, 
Helen Humphreys, Assistant Chairman, with Adele Westbrook, Mildred Bachcr, Bertha Pulford as Pro- 
perty, Publicity and Business Managers, respectively. 

The orchestra consisting of Ellen Sargeant, Piano; Marie Paulus, 1st viohn; and Amy Nelson, 2nd 
violin, was the first to be composed of University girls. The cast follows: — 
Gerald, bold enough to invade Michigan . . . Elsa Apfel 
Shirley, with whom he falls in love .... Gertrude Roos 

Jane Andrus, Dean of Women Pauline Emerson 

Louise, large and athletic Jemima Wenley 

Letty, who falls in love with Gerald , . . . Edna Toland 

Jean, affectionately inclined Leola Rovce 

Professor Jones, disciplinarian. ..... Katherine MacBride 

Stenographers Myrtle Young, Nellie Rosewaren 

College Girls Louise Potter, Helen McDonald 

Horatio Blanker, the Dean's old lover .... Elizabeth McRae 

The most popular songs were, " I Know a Secret" (which was afterwards published) words and music 
being by Martha Gray and Ellen Sargeant; "Those Peaceful Days," lyric by Eleanor Stalker, music by 
Ellen Sargeanr, sung by Emma Knoepp and a chorus of professors in academic costume; and "You 
Need A Man," by Martha Gray and Ellen Sargeant, sung by Gerald, telling the girls of the good old 
days, when men wete at Michigan and pointing out to them the many advantages man's presence 
would bring. 

The more humorous songs were, "The Poor Typewriter," by Jemima Wenley and Ellen Sargeant; 
"The Joyful Spring," by Katherine MaeBride and Ellen Sargeant, sung by Katherine and Jemima 
Wenley, and Sunbonnet Chorus; "The Downtrodden Man," by Jemima Wenley and Ellen Sargeant, 
depicting the woes endured by men through Suffragettes. 

The society dancing of Helen Ely and Ethelyn Bolen and the aesthetic dancing of Helen Ely and 
Genevieve O'Leary were the big hits of the program. 

This Junior Play was the first to make an out-of-town trip, going on May 15th, 1915, to Toledo, at 
the invitation of the Association of Collegiate Alumni, where it scored a decided success. This made a 
milestone in the history of the Junior Girls' Play; and so well were the girls received that the 1916 Junior 
Play has been invited to Detroit. 

Taking the play from the beginning we can trace its development from the first farce, " Buster 
Brown," it gradually becoming more compact and unified, though always retaining the local hits on the 
seniors. The first few plays were written by several girls but later one girl has written the play, with 
thi" music and lyiics written in competition. Many of the former plays employed men to write their 
music, as well as furnish it. Each year it has become mote of a Junior function, going outside of the class 
only for part of the orchestra and the director, Professor Brumm, Too much praise cannot be given 
him for the able manner in which he trained the cast of the 1915 play. K. M. 



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The Mimes of the University of Michigan Union 



Robert H. Baker 
Cecjl a. Brown 
Kemp S. Bubge 
Harry Carlson 
Lyle M. Clift 
Russell Collins 
Grant L. Cook 
Leon M. Cunningham 
M. F. Dunne 

J. W. FlNKENSTAEDT 

Harold Forsythe 

A. J. GoRNETZKY 
■DURWABD GrCNSTEAD 

Frank W. Grovek 
Edward W. Haislip 
Homer L. Heath 



Morrison C. Wood 



Lyndall E. Huohes 
W. A. P. John 
Harry Kerr 
John S. Leonard 
Geohce p. McMahon 
Francis T. Mack 
Earl V. Moore 
Lee N. Parker 
Lerov J. Scanlan 
Chase B. Sikes 
Seymour B. Simons 
Sidney Steen 
Theron D. Weaver 
Kenneth N. Westehman 
Fred Wheeler 
Anthony J. Whitmire 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



William C. Titcomb 



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The Classical Club 



Myhti.k Youno .... 


President 


Ben t. Perry 


. . Vire-Presiilenc 


VlRt;[NIA StRAUOHN 


Secretary 


Clarence Hlnter .... 


. . . . Treasurer 


Ella Uliss 


Emily Lo«an 


H- H. Brctton 


R. F. Mathew 


Vector Brock 


Helen McDoNAi.r) 


Ruth Brown 


Rosswell McIyer 


Ella Campbell 


Geo. Melit/. 


Ralph Carson 


Ben Perkv 


Sarah Cauohey 


RUIE P[NNEY 


Alice Colcord 


Antovnkita Poel 


Blanche Covev 


Mary Porter 


John Chase 


Bhrtha Pulkokd 


Helen Davfs 


LaVANCHE RlEGER 


Florence Do 


Gko. ROBBEIIT 


WiLLCAM DrESSLER 


Irene Russel 


Elizabeth Douchtv 


Louis Saule 


Phyllis Eoglestone 


May Sani>ers 


Pauline Emerson 


Em/.abeth Shaver 


Louise Ewfnc 


Freda Seicworth 


Howard Gellert 


Peakl Smith 


Kelsev Gllfoil 


Neloa Springer 


Margaret Gourlev 


Sadie Stoddarh 



Clarence Hunter 
JAM^s K. Ha?.ri 
Parepa Ingraham 

Charlotte Kelsey 

Ruth Kelsey 
Gladys Laughman 



Ebba Trvsell 
Clara Tubbs 
Francis Vanderi 
I^lts Waldo 
Charles Wilner 
Geo. Wilner 
John Woodmrii 



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FACCLTY AND IIO/VOMAMY MEMBERS 

Prof, Arthur Edward Boak 

Pbof. and Mrs. Campbell Bonner 

Dr. Orma Fitch Butler 

Pbof. and Mrs. Albert Robcnson Crittende 

Prof, and Mrs. Joseph Horace Drake 

PROf. AND Mrs, Francis Wcllfv Kelsev 

Prof, and Mrs. Clarence Lcnton Meader 

Mr. Ross Hamlin McLean 

Prof, and Mrs. Joseph Raleigh Nelson 

Dr. Frank Eoleston Robbjns 

Prof, and Mrs. Henry Arthur Sanders 

Dr. GiLBtRT Hawthorne Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. George Robert Swaln 

Prof. and. Mrs. John Garrett Winter 



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Masques 



Helen Ei,y President 

Jemcma Wenley Vice-Presid. 

Helen Champion Secretary 

RuBERTA WooDwORTH Treasurer 



Elsa Apfel 


Mar 


Y Palmer 


Helen Champcon 


Phyllis Povah 


Adele Crandall 


Marian Stowe 


Helen Dow 


GiTA Tucker 


Helen Ely 


Ahis Van Deusen 


Martha Gray 


Jul., 


iVanLeevwen 


Miriam Hubbard 


Jemi, 


^A Wenley 


Alice Lloyd 


Cath 


lERiNE Wenley 


Layinia McBride 


MiNr 


iA Wins LOW 


Genevieve O'Leary 


Rufli 


■HTA WoODWORTH 


ADVISORY BOARD 




Mrs. Effing er 


Mrs. 


Lombard 


Miss Ann Langley 


Mrs. 


Stoner 



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Symphonic League 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Bess M. Elliott President 

Hazel K. McCaulev Vice-President 

Marguerite Iseman Secretaiy 

Myha D. Moon Treasurer 

Grace 0. Rosser Social Chairman 

ELfzABETH B. Zerwekh Housc Committee 

Alice Blitton , , . Glee Club President 



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The University Musical Society 

Compri.lnB 
The LlNivtRSiTY School of Musjc 
The Univkksfiv Choral Union anl> May FtsTiv^L 





WAkD OF DIRECTORS 




Francis W. 


Kelsry. Ph.D., i.L.D President 


Harry B, H 


UTCHiNS. 1,1.-D Vice-President 


Levi D. Wi 


VES. C.E Treasur 




Albert A, Stanley. A,M Musics 


Director 


G- Frank A 


LLMENDINtiER, C.K. ShIRLLY W, SmITH, A.M- 


James B. Angrll, LL.D. William C. Ste 


ENS, A.B. 


Horace G. 


PRETTVMAN, A.B. VlCTOR C. Vaughan, PIi.I),. ScD,. M.D 


OlTMAR EbEHBACH JaMES H. WaDE 




DURANQ W. 


Springer, B.S-, Charles A. Sink, AM., 


Serreta 


V of the Hoard of l^ireclors Business M 


nager 




SCHOOL OF MUS!C COXCI-.RTS 




October 7. 


Faculty Concert January .^1, 


Facultv Concert 


October 14, 


Faculty Concert February 1, 


Faculty Concert 


October 2!, 


Facultv Concert February 2. 


Graduation Recital 




Faculty Concert February 3, 


Faculty Concert 


November 17, 


Students' Recital February 4, 


Faculty Concert 


November 18, 


Orchestra Concert February 7, 


Facultv Concert 


December 1, 


Students' Recital February 10. 


Students' Recital 


December 2, 


Faculty Concert February 11. 


Students' Recital 


December 10, 


Students' Recital February 12, 


Students' Recital 


December U, 


Faculty Concert February 17, 


Faculty Concert 


December 22, 


Students' Recital February 25, 


Students' Recital 


January 13, 


Faculty Concert February 28, 


Orchestra Concert 


January 14, 


Students' Recital March 2. 


Students' Recital 


January 21, 


Students' Recital March 16, 


Facultv Concert 


January 28. 


Orchestra Concert April 6, 


Orchestra Concert 



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Choral Union and May Festival Concerts 



PRE-FESTIfAL CONCERTS 

er 19. Pasquale Amaco, Baritone; Guiseppe 

Bamboschscheck, Pianist 

nber 23, Flonzaley String Quartet, Adolfo 
Betti, 1st Violin; Alfred Pochon, 2nd 
Violin; Ugp Ara. Viola; Iwan 
d' Arch am beau, Violincelln. 

,ber 13, Mischa Elman, Violinist; Walter H. 

Golde, Pianist. 

ry 20, I, J. Paderewski, Pianist. 

1 17, New York Philharmonic Orchestra; 

Josef Stransky, Conductor; Albert 
I.indquest, Tenor, Soloist. 



Twenty-third Annual May Festival 



17,— First Festival Concert 






Soprano; Albert A. Stan- 


Chicago Symphony Orches- 






ley and Frederick Stock, 


tra, Soloist: Frieda Hem- 






Conductors, 


pel, Soprano; Frederick 


tx. 


May 19. 


—Fourth Festival Concert 


Stock, Conductor. 






Chicago Symphony Orches- 


18,— Second Fesrival Concert 






tra, Soloist: John McCo:- 


Chicago Symphony Orches- 






mack. Tenor; Frederick 


tra, Umversiti Choral 






Stock. Conductor. 


Union 


\ 


May 20, 


—Fifth Festival Concert (Aft- 


' Paradise 1 ost ' S" „ 






ernoon) 


Soloist Florence Hinkk, 






Recital on the Frieze 


Soprano, Sophie Biaslau, 






Memorial Organ; Soloist: 


Contralto, Reinald Wet- 






Ralph Kinder, Organist. 


renrath, Baritone Gustaf 


XI 


May 20, 


-Sixth Festival Concert 


Holmquist, Bass, Albert 
A -itanlei, Conductor 






Chicago Syjn]i|bpn)' Orches- 


19, —1 hitd Festival Concert (aft- 
ernoon) 






"Samsonand Delilah" 
.'.'.. S^ini-Samr. 


Chicago Symphony Orches- 






Jploist: Margarete Mat- 


tra; Special Chorus of 






" ' zenauer; Morgan Kingston, 


Children. 




* 


t Tenor; Pasquale Amato. 


"The Children at Bethle- 




„.*v 


Baritone; Reinald Werren- 


hem". . . . Piirne 




*f ' 


rath. Bass; Albert A. 


Soloist: Florence Hinkk. 






Stanley, Conductor. 



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SDERVILLE R. GaU.. 

PARDEE 
HOWLAND Wha 


EH D.Gardner Heust 
HONEV Arno 
EN Mack 


ICE Smith Dieterjch 
Palmer Carlson 


The 1917 Junior Hop Committee 




Edward Mack, Cental Chair 


man 


James Whalen, Treas 


,er 


EiiwiN Palmer. Secretary 


Edwin Pai.mir 


.Ut,..i> 


H,RRY Carlson 


Glen Howland 
Robert Frant/ 


Publicity 


Lawrence Heustice 
GoRiioN Smith 


CLiPFOKll MaNOEVJLL^ 


Im-ilamn, 
Allen Honev 


Earl Pardee 


Alfred Arnold 


Rej'ishmenls 


Louis Dieterichs 


Edward Mack 
James Whalpn 


Robert Eranti 


Edwin Palmer 
Glen Howland 



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BrOWNLEB DlN' 



Sophomore Prom Committee 



Charles W. Frsi 



Phclip B. Mahei 



J. C. Barbon, General Chairm 
E. G- Dudley, Sec .-Treasure 

Arrangcmenls Commitlie 

ROLLIN R. WlNSLOW 

Publicity Commitlee 
Program CommiUre 



Wilfred V, Casgrain 



A. V. Livingston 



RffrtshmenSi Committee 



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4 


^'^ $i# ^* 


-^# 


'M 


p.-|_«tf»A^^^- ' 


s*,-.r 



Blake Heath Birdsell Myers Quini-ai 

WiNCHELL Bailey Gould Poceman Ahrens 
Pierce Paulus Cooley Brown Burtless Raynsford 



Freshman Spread Committee 

The Thirty-fifch Annual Freshman Spread, given by the Sophomores for all the 
imen of [he University, was held at Barbour Gymnasium, on Saturday evening, 
;cember4, 1915. 



!915 SPREAD COMMITTEE 



Helen Brown, General Chai, 
Helen Ahrens 
Ruth Bailey 
Margaret Birdsell 
Pansy Blake 



Pauli 



I CHA^ 



Margaret Cooley 
Marian Galton 
Louise Gould 
Mable Hall 



Katherine Harrington 
Ada Heath 
Nona Myers 
Marie Paulus 
Dorothy Pierce 
Georgianna Pockman 

VAtOHA QUINLAN 

Marian Williams 
l-ouiSE Williamson 
Constance Winchell 
Grace Raynsford 



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^t>-.-^ 




Round Up 



J, C, ASKAM 


M. Haven 


L. C, Anurewe 


B, Haltrum 


L. B, liARTLfTIt 


C Hazelv 


H. B, Bartholf 


L. C Heustis 


M. I- Bkadnf.r 


C HUMM 


C, HOITJE 


F. N, Hallowav 


J. Boucher 


L- J. HOL-IHEK 


B, F. BovD 


B. Harkins 


S. K. Black 


W. W. JPNKINS 


R. D. Cummins 


H. D. KOONSVAN 


r. CONKLIN 


R. J. Kkll 


J. H. Cochran 


F. W. KEL1.EV 


W. K, Code 


A. L. KOLPJEN 


W. C. Down 


H. Leslie 


E. K. Danihls 


A, I.ANGE 


I. Ferguson 


0. L. Love JOY 


C. L. M. FORDNEY 


Geo. LEVERE^z 


J- M. Krazier 


C. A. LOKKER 


1.. G. Foster 


K- K. McAllister 


1,. L. HUCHES 


A. J, McClellan 




J. C. Marble 



I.. K. Merelith 
J. R. McNuTT 
J. K. Madison 



CO. Wiu 
I. C, Whii 
K. K. WiLi 
J, Wheei.i-. 
\\. a. Waj 
F. R. Wai- 

(;. J, WiLM 



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OFFICERS 






Fir si Semeslfr 




Second SemtiUt 




Theodork S. Cox, Preside 




LOLJS ¥. D[ETER[CH. Pre 


sident 


Robert V. Kohr, V,ce-Pr 


si dent 


Kari. F, Walkkr, \'kc- 


resident 


Frank F, Nesrh', Secreta 


y 


Kuw[N H. Felt. Secreta 


y 


Roger Ujkdskll, Treasure 




Herman H, Schmh.t, 'I' 


easurer 


Chari.ks a, Pkiers, Histo 


aOXORJRY ROLL 






Francis F. McKinnev 


ACTIFE MEMBER. 
1916 


Woodward A. Warrick 




Joseph R. Darnall 




Jarvis C. Marble 




John M, Mt-KiNNFv 


1917 


(i, !tH[CK Smith 




Roger Bjrcjsell 




Farle R. MacLaiiuhi.in 




Theodore S. Cox 




Frank V. Nesbit 




I.OU[S K. DlETERCCH 




Charles A. Peters 




ROBEHT F. KOHH 


Karl F. Walker 
1918 


Robert F. L. Smith 




WcLLIAH M. DaRNALI, 




Paul M. Ireland 




Kdwin H. Felt 




Kaymond M. I.anclkv 




RoBJN A. Gallowav 




Ralph S. Moore 




Elmer P. Hahuell 




GiLBtRT G. Plait 




GeLBEKI F. HAUKf 


1919 


Herman H, Schmidt 




Clifford C. Buchler 




Carl W. Porter 





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'■■'^ 



M 



Scalp 


and Blade 


J. Kay Hawn 


Arthur 0, Harris 


W. WHrTNHY Slaght 


Harold C. O'Conne 


Wjlljam J. Crawford 


Harold M. Cherry 


Donald Buooit 


Edward R. Allen 


WiLLARD S. GiRVJN 


WiNFiELD C. King 


Francis D. Newbrook 


1 RoLLiN C. Smith 


JosBPH F. Meade 


Edwin F. Rapp 


Norman C, Bender 


William A. Jaeger 


Edwin F. Mri^ 


Alfred H, Cohn 



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Kentucky Club 



MuRPHV 0. Tate Prebident 

Wm. Kammerer Vice-President 

Wm. Powell Secrecary 

Milton S. Trost Treasurer 



Yancey Altshelkr 
Joe Applegate 
Harry Bell 
Wm, Benton 
Kemp Burge 
W, J. Chipman 
John D. Cotton 
Hbnry Flarshein 
Ivan G. Galerioht 
Albert Gans 
James Golden 
Norton L. Goldsmith 
W. J. Goodwin 
Ran[K)lph Gordon 

DuRWAFtl) GrINSTEAD 

RoLLiN Hargrove 
Phillip Haines 
Edwaro Hesse 
John H. Holeman 
Z. Justice 



Wm. Kammerer 
Thomas Marks 
RoBT. Mathews 
Wm. Miller 
James S. Norton 
Albert Scholl 
Paul Schmidt 
Allen Schoenfield 
Murphy O. Tate 



b'si 



: Th< 



J. W. TiNCSLEV 

Milton S. Trust 
John Woodford 

Wm, Marsteller 
Paul Moore 
John Powell 
P. Cha 



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Wm. J. Goodwin, 16L 
Y. R. Altshelter, 17 
W. L, OwEM, 17L 

Frank B, Thompson, 17 
Frank W. Wood, 16 . 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



1'rof. H. C. Anderson 
Prof. C. J, Bonner 




Prof 
Prof 


N- B. Phillips 

M. P. TlLLEY 




Prop. Jo 


HN R. Effinger 








STATE CHAIRMEN 






Arkansas 


Alex J. Rogoskc, '18 


Oklahoma 




D. T. Mosier, '18 


Florida 


Robert W. Collcns, '17E 


S. Carolina 




R. C. Jeter, '16E 


Georgia 


Arthur D. Allen, '17 


Tennessee 




C. H. Creco, •17E 


Kentucky 


Wm. S. Kammerer, '181- 


Texas 




D. R. Penniman, "18 


Louisiana 


Edward W. Brousseau, 'I7E 


Virginia 




Edward E. Keatley. 


Mississippi 


Sam Gisenberger, '17 




C. 


Karl F. Walker. '17 


Missouri 


M. M, Brundidge, 'ISA 


West Virginia 




Joseph E. Robins. '18 



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offici-;rs 

T. Hawlev Tappjhc 

Eugene A. Bartel.mr 

Thomas C, Arndt 

Edwin K. Marshall 

HONORARY MEMHERS 





ACTIVE MEMBERS 




Thomas C. Arndt 


Kelsey Guilfo[l 


S. J. Sauer 


Felix S, Baer 


D. S. HORWICH 


R. M. Schiller 


E. A. Bartelme 


E. H. Heimann 


I. W. Shand 


Roy E. Bebo 


J. A. Heist 


D. H. Shields 


R. P. Brown 


J. J. Herk 


J. W. Smart 


Louis M. Bruch 


Hoyne Howe 


F. B. Smith 


J. D. Cameron 


N. A, Hoefield 


W. J. Smith 


J. H. Cartwright 


R. P. Hummer 


H. H. Sprincstun 


H. T. COHN 


E. R. Hunt 


J. L. Stadeker 


C. H. COTTINGTON 


N, H, Ibsen 


B. A. Stenberg 


Dean J. DeBotts 


L, H. Lehle 


Cvril Talbot 


U. L. T. Broadwell 


E. K. Marshall 


T. H. Tapping 


D. C, Davimon 


E. F. Merrill 


Louis Thoms 


Joseph Dillon 


W. H- Morrow 


L. H. Tuttle 


J. A. Dougherty 


M. R. Mott 


W- H. Vail 


Alex S. Elton 


H. C. Or[s 


L. E, Watehbury 


A. C. Foley 


L. W, Pace 


F. B. Webster 


M. R. GOMBRIC 


H. D. Parker 


M. E. Webster 


Samuel Greenspahn 


J. C, Parker 


L. G. WlLHARTZ 


L. B. HAI.LEY 


Roy PATEfisoN 


0. G. Williams 


A. S. Hart 


T. C. Pierce 


R. W. WiNDMUELL 


H. S. Hatch 


C. L. Rasmussen 


P. W. Zerwekh 




M.G, ROBJNSON 


K. J. ZOELLIN 



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„;.,,^ 




Cosmopolitan Club 

OFFICERS 

W. KoBERTSON President 

J, N. Haujiekv Secretary 

Prof. J. A. C. Hii.DNER Treasurer 

BO^RD OF DIRECTORS 

■ STUDENTS 

J. N, Haujisky T, C. I.IEW 

W- C. AcH] O. Kreuser - 

FJCULTY 
I'Rot. .[- A, C, Hii.i>NEK Prof. C. P. Wagner 

BUSINESS MEN 



H. T.. Swi 



J. E.jENSIN 



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H. Lee, W. C. Kwono, S. C. Chen, F. C. Liu, Y. S, Chen, P. H. Hsu, K, T. Wong 

S. J. HuNo, Y, D. WoNC, H, T, Low, S. N. Au-Yang, C. H. Hsja, W. T. Young 
G. H. FoHC, D. C, Wu, R. S, Lo, C. F, Tang, T, C, Ut.u, C. K. Chow. L. *. Thoms 



Chinese Students' Club 

OFFICERS 

T. C. LcEU President 

C. K. Chow Vice-President 

R. S. Lo Corresponding Secretary 

D. C. Wo Recording Secretary 

C. F, Tang Treasurer 

G. H. FoNc Auditor 



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Totem 

Organized in 1911 
OFFICERS 

George M. Elus President 

Harold Wisner Vice-Presiden 

Clarence Kretzschmar Treasurer 

Marshall Troester Secretary 

1916 



Harold Henderson 




George M. Ellis 


Anthonv Lange 




Waldo R. Hunt 


George Leverenz 


Arthur S. Grinnel 
19 J 7 


Harold Wlsner 


Waltrh Grrnt 




Marshall Troester 


Robert M. Allen 




Ernest Wunsch 


John Engel 


1918 


Fred Walters 


Harold W. Burton 




John Kclwinski 


Robert H. Erlev 




Howard French 


Clarence Krekschmak 




Albert Ohlmacher 


Herbert Schumann 




Hugo Plath 


Arthur F. Boell 




Henry Massnick 


Clarence Netting 




Harold Church 


FLoyD Cone 


1919 


Gerald Gabriel 


Robert Bridge 




George Kretzschmar 


RiCHARii George 




Daniel Lindon 


Duncan Ketchum 




Arthur Lankle 


Clarence Kramer 




Eugene Osms 


William Cruse 


Edwin Snyher 


Karl Floss 




.,=-J 



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Keystone Club 

W. E. Morris President 

H. M. BiBMCNCHAM Vice-Presidsn 

T. C- Hill SecieUry 

,F. J. Beachlev Treasurer 



G. M. CRA[<i 
C. Heath 

M. FlNKELHOH 

J, Lyons 
M. A. Coon 

H. B. COHLINTI 

M. E. Garner 
C. L. Strauss 
J. M, Chase 
L. E. Hughes 
E. Hill 

E. P. FonLE 

F. W. Sevin 
J. R. Hill 

F. Layer 
C. B, Wray 
S. L. Sonne 

M. L. TOLOCHKO 

W. M. Bell 

W. W. KOHLER 

P. J., Holt 

VRj Lk,S ATTE R WH ITE 

F.-C/Bell 

G. L. NiCKLIN 

A. H. LuSE 
■ J:.:W» Irv'no 
(^E'S/Tassey 
"H. H, Irwin 



H. J. Jones 
L. D, Met 
H. D. Hut 
C. L. Haas 

G. H. RUHLINC 
A. S. BUCHMAN 

C. C. Morrison 

C, A. McCoRMICK 

L. G. Benford 

J. R. BUTTERMORE 

R. E. Sevine 
G, E. TiscHEit 
E, T, Cranch 

D. Lynch 

R, D. Kelbon 
A. A. Nebron 

A. DiEGELMAN 

L. B. Sable 
S. L Emerson 
G. E. Landis 
N. A. HiPSON 

H. C. Cramer 
J^sS.^' Bromley 
W. e 1*K&ey 
J. S, Casberger 



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Jacobs 1>T;^ten ■.../ ■■ ^Ki^peh 

Members of Indiana Club 1915-1916 

OFflCERfi ■ 

l.ouiK lJLNr>.:N ... President 

H, K. 'Iavj.cir Vice-P resilient 

Milton K. Iacojis Secretary 

J. W. KcMFKK 'IVeasurer 

JDnSORY COMMITTEI- 
K, D. CKiJMPAtKfK Pali. DLNr).:N 

//OXOMJRY MFMBLRS 

Phok S. K, CiN^.PHUH I'Roy. J. S, Rkkvks 

I'kiiF, W. G, Stoner 

J. C. liKowN K, J. Hkkrfck F, Briogs 

LhOH RuEfN O. C. SAnLNn>-R K. K. WORMAN 

EucKNE CiivKN M, W, HviiR A, K. Coleman 

A, K- I,AND<iRh:ilK O, C. AphLtCATE N. H. Sallwassf-b 

Ralph Dickie D. Rosknthal M, ¥.. Goodwin 

Hu™ Mass Chas. Welrv .|. H. Stanton 

H. MKTifiL W. D. Stinson M. Stolleh 

KrANK tiuNTHEK C, W, LEfiK«AN D. A. ScHEl]. 

I., ». HERNHKIMfR A. K. Strouse C. A. LunwiG 

F. J. Kleeman H. B, McWilliams V. H. Simmons 

J. Rush J- S. Clark. F. Levinson 

G. S. Pilgrim R, J, Cates 



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The Nippon Club 

Univebsitv of MicHrnAN 



OFFICERS 

Minsu iMAKJ President 

NoBu FuRUYA VLce-Ptcsident 

Shinmatsu Yokoyama Secretary 

SoBEl Ide Treasurer 

Kameichi SuGLYAMA Assistant Tteasiiter 

Gentok NaKaI Manager for Public: 



NoBU FURUYA, Grad. 

Sob El Ide 

MlTSUJI KlYOHAHA, '17 Lit. 

Gentok Nakai. '17 Lit. 
NisA F. Sato. '17 F.. 

SOTARO TOKUYAMA, '16 Lit. 

,'17 E. 



MiTTSU N. Imaki, '17 L 
SOTOKICHI Katsuiiumi, '17 Lit. 
MuTsu KiKsucHj, "18 Lit. 
Kameyo Sadakata, '19 Lit: 

KaMEICHI SUCIYAMA, '17 E. 

Sbinmatsu Yokoyam.a, '16 E. 



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Prof. H. E. Ktf 
Mr. J. S. BuRSL 



Club Latino Americano 

MIEMBROS HONORARIOS 
Mr. a. F. Hurlb 



Jose M. Hebnandez President 

Jose M. Blanco Vice-President 

Pedro J. Samora Secretary 

VrcENTE GuTLLERMETi Treasurer 

(ALES Vocal 



J. GUERHBRO 
S. HOHGB 

V. Lebron 

J. LUZUNARIS 

R. E. Martino 

j', S. QUIROGA 

V. Soto Garagoia 

A. VASaUEl 
E. VASfiUEI 

C. Zanelli 
L. E. Zapata 



F. S- Aliamirano 
R. A. Uenitez 

G. W. Blanco 
R. H. Bonilla 

M. G. CONSTAIH 

I,. M, deBayle 
R. S. Caneco 
F. A. DEL Vaile 
M. A. DEL Valle 
F, Dlmas 

C ESTEVES 
F. GoBNAGA 



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Barton Lake and the Dam 



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rj^aternities 



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Fraternities 

In ike order of their establishment at tkt University of Michigan 

LITERARY 

Chi Psi 1845 

Alpha Delta Pkl 1846 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 1855 

Sigma Phi 1858 

Zeta Ps[ .... 1858 

Ps[ Upsilon 1865 

Beta Theta Pi, 1845, re-established 1867 

Phi Kappa Psi 1875 

Delta Ups lon 1876 

Sigma Chi 1877 

Delta Tau Delta, 1874, ro-established . ' 1S80 

Phi Delta Theta, 1864, re-established 1887 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1888 

Theta Delta Chi 1889 

Delta Chi 1892 

Kappa Sigma, 1892, re-established 1902 

Sigma Nu 1902 

Phi Gamma Delta, 1885, re-established 1902 

SiNFONIA 1902 

Alpha Tau Omega 1904 

Acacia 1904 

Phi Kappa Sigma 1905 

Alpha Sigma Phj 1908 

Zeta Beta Tau 1912 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1912 

Kappa Beta Psi 1912 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1913 

Phi Chi Delta 19!3 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1915 

Alpha Phi Alpha 1909 



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^^ 



General Fraternity Rushing Rules | 

'Adopted by fkf InUr-Fralernity Council I 

i 

ARTICLE ONE \ 

Section I. No prospeotlve matticulate or freshman shall be pledged to '" 

any fraternity prior to the tenth day preceding the opening -day of the college ,; 
year in which he matriculates. 

Section II, All pledging must be done in Ann Arbor, 

Section III. Any pledgeman who has failed lo become a student in the 

University within thirty days after the first opening day of college following ' 

his pledge shall forfeit his pledge. i. 

ARTICLE TWO 

Sectfon I. No freshiTian shall room in a fraternity house. j- 



ARTICLE THREE 
Section 1. No student shall be initiated into a fraternity unless such student 

(A). Eleven (1 1) hours credit earned in one semester in this University with 
a grade of at least "C" in each course constituting the said eleven (11) hours 

(B). Or has received an average grade of "C" in all his courses taken during 
one semester in this University, provided the courses taken amount to thirteen 
(13) hours of work. 

ARTICLE FOUR 

Srction 1. The failure of any pledgeman to fulfill the above requirements for 
initiation, as stated in Article ill, for two semesters after his entrance in this 
University shall tender his pledge void and render him ineligible for member- 
ship in any fraternity in this Conference. 

Section II. Article III of above rules shall not apply to students holding 
degrees from any accredited University or College. 



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Chi Psi 

Alpha Efsclon Chapter 
EslablUhfd in iS45 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 
James F, Breakev, M.D„ A. E, 

FRATRES IN UREE 



rs DuFpy, A. E. 1898 

s F. HiBBAKD, Jb„ a. E. 1903 



FRATRES IN UNIFERSITATE 



Frank Porter Sub 

Charles Wallace Toles Richak 

Lawrence Stevens Roehm Richar 

Phclip Owen Mulkev Ellfot 

Standcsh Wenham RoBrNsol 

1917 
Lee Kino Richardson Eugenb 

Dwccht Cadogen Morgan, Jr. Blair 1 

LEEF.VERITTj0SLyN,jR. I^HIUP 

Rov Douglas Lamond 



Robert Wclliams Turner 
Richard Moore McKean 
Richard Hjngston Buhkhart 



OMBE Arthur MacInnfi 
IT Edward Horne, Jr. 
Y Sheffer Bohi.inc 



1918 



LiAM Hough 
J. C. Lane Barron 
James Morrcson Taylor 



John F. McManus 
Frank Weston 
Austin Caine Harmon 
Frank Newell 



Andrew Roe Gavf 



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f'tft- 




Founded at Union ColUgf in IS4I 



ROLL OF ALPHAS 



Union Collegb 
Williams College 
mlddleburv college 
Weslevan Universitv 
Hamilton College 
University of Michigan 
Amherst College 
Cornell Universitv 



Univ 



fMin 



F Wisconsin 
Rutgers College 
Stevens Institute of Technology 
University of Georgia 
Lehigh University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
Universii-v of California 
University of Chicago 
University of Illinois 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



New York, New York 
Detroit, Michigan 
Columbus, South Carolina 
middletown, connecticut 
HoBOKEN, New Jersey 
Schenectady, New York 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 
Washington, District of Columbi 
Chicago, Illinois 
Philadelph 



Los Angeles, California 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
West Duluth, Minnesota 
Atlanta, Georgia 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Portland, Oregon 
Kansas City, Missouri 



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Alpha Delta Phi 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Harry B. Hutchins, Ph.B., LL,D., Pen., 1871 
Hemrv M. Bates, Ph.B- LL.D.. Pen.. 1890 
William H. Butts, .A.M.. Pen., 1S78 



Evans Holbrook, A.B., LL.B., Pen.. 1897 
Jesse S, Reeves, B.S., Ph.D., Kenyon, 1891 
Robert T. Crane, A.B., Ph.D., LL.B„'Johns 
Hopkins, 1902 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Joseph Rogers. Bowdoin, 1875 
Chauncev H. Shearer, Cornell, 1879 


Char 
Robe 


LEs W. TiNSMAN, Pen.. 1882 
RT RvoN, Cornell, 1903 


FRATRES IN 


UNII'ERSITATE 


Pall W. Reaven, Rochester, 1914 
Mac N. Wilkinson, Rochester, 1913 
Harry Dale R 


Harold D. Barss, Rochester, 190f 
John Heist, Dartmouth, 1915 
.EEER. Wisconsin, 1916 


Paul M. Bowen 

Harol 


1916 

u I,. Smii 


Thomas R. McNamara 


Theodore W. Adams 
Harold 0, Barnes 
Julian S. Burrows 
Harold a. Fitzgerald 
Cyril B. Lewis 
Edward A. Middleton 


1917 


Hamilion H. Patterson 
John C, Robbins 
Clarence 0, Skinner 
Delos G. Smith 
Frank B. Thompson 
Nathan C. Towne. Jr. 


N. HoYNE Howe 
Hepburn Ingham 
William R. Loutjt 
George R. Matteson 
Donald E, Montague 


1918 


James S. Norton 
Nathaniel Robbins. Jr. 
James P. Thompson 
J. SANfORD Wilson 

ROLLIN R. WiNSLOW 


Thomas R. Adams 
Albert A. Clark 
Charles S. Decker 


1919 


CvRLNits A. Newcomb 
Robert A, Orr 
Ralph J. Oster 



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-■}^m 




Founded al Hamilton Colkgf in 1832 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Hamilton Hamilton College 

Columbia .... Columbia University 

Yale Yale University 

Amherst Amherst College 

BrownoN[an Brown College 

Hudson Western Reserve College 

BowDoiN Bowdoin College 

Dartmouth Dartmouth College 

Peninsular University of Michigan 

Rochester University of Rochester 

Williams Williams College 

Middletown Wesleyan University 

Kenyon Kenyon College 

Union . Union University 

Cornell Cornell University 

Phi Kappa Trinity College 

Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins University 

Minnesota University of Minnesota 

Toronto University of Toronto 

Chicago University of Chicago 

McGiLL McGill University 

Wisconsin University of Wisconsin 

California University of California 

Illinois University of Ilhnois 



^ 



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Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Omichon Chapter 


Eilahliskid i 


IS55 


1915 




Douglas Donald 


1916 
James B. Anc.ell, II 
Hensy C. Duffield 


Edwahd Macufre 
Russell B. Stear 
FY Wright 


1917 
John W, Codd 
H. Gray Muizy 

Mllblrn R. 


I.EAVITtJ. BULKC 

Ellis D. Slater 
Palin 


1918 
Wilfred V. Casobain 
Thomas F. McAllister 
Philip B, Maher 

1919 
William D. Craig 
George H. Casgrain 
Darwin S. Barnhart 

Stiles Cubti 


Norman H. Ibsen 
Robert T. Perry 
Harrison L. Good 

Pembroke Hakt 
Jack Miranda 




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■f^ 




Fniindfd at YaU ColUge in 1844 





CHAPTER ROLL 


YaleUniveksifv 


Rutgers College 


BowDoiN College 


DePauw Universiit 


Co I. BY College 


Wesleyan University 


Amherst College 


Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 


Vanderbilt Unlversit 


Western Reserve University 


Universitv of Alabam 


Cornell University 


Brown Universitv 


University of Chicago 


North Carolina Univ 


RsiTY Syracuse University 


University OF Virginia 


Columbia University 


Miami University 


University of California 


Kenvon College 


Trinity College 


Dartmouth College 


University of Minnesota 


Central University o 


Kentucky Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 


MlDDLEBURY CoLLEGE 


Tulane University 


University of Michioa 


N University of Toronto 


Williams College 


Universiiy of Pennsylvania 


Lafayette College 


McGiLL University 


Hamilton College 


Leland Stanford, Jr., University 


Colgate University 


University OF Illinois 


College OF THE City o 


New York University of Wisconsin 


Rochester Univfrsht 


Univehsitv of Washington 



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it' 




Sigma Phi 

Alpha of Michigan 
Established in I85S 



JCTIVE CHAPTER 



Alfbep Ross Th 

Arthur Haviland Torrei' 

Francis Test Mack 

HUMPHREV KeRCHEVAL GrYLLS 

Harry Watt Kerr 
Wjllis Beodhead 
John C. Bundy Parker 
R[CHARi> Gerveys F. Grylls 
John 



Edward Ely Mack 
Gordon Charles Smjih 
John Davls Hibbard 
Carleton Spear Scrihner 
William Stahkett DiNwrnDiE 
Edward Carlyle Warner 
Gordon Chahles Mack 
Henry Anthon Knowlson 
D Wilson 



Mathew Scott Towar 
Adams Brodhead Ho war 
Hugh Mac mill an 



Alfred Day Rathbone, IV 
Reuben Forsyth Houseman 
Percival Lowe Wjlson 



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f^ 








Fo 


,inded mi 






Alpha c 


F New York 


, Union College , . . . 1 


Betao 


New York . 




Hamilton College . 




! 


Alpha 


f Massachl-setis 




Williams College . . 




1 


Delta 


F New York 




Hobart College . . 




1 


Alpha 


F Vermont . 




University of Vermont 




1 


Alpha 


F Michigan . . 




University of Michigan 




1 


Alpha 


F Pennsvlvanfa . 




Lehigh University 




1 


Epsilon 


OF New York . 




Cornell University 




1 


Alpha 


F Wisconsin 




University of Wisconsin 




1 


Alpha 


F California 




University of California 




1 



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Zeta Psi 

Xl ClfAPTER 

Ejtabtishtd in 1S5S 

FRATRES JN FACULTATE 

HOME C. Knowlton, U.R., 1875 I'HiLrp E, Bursley, 1^ 

Hebbeht R, Choss, A.m., E, 1900 

FRATRES !N UNIIERSITATE 

Hadden S. Kirk. '15 Illinois University 

David L. Kennedy, '11 Lafayette College 

Herbert W. Lamb, '13 Lehigh College 

1916 

Charles M. Willitts Philadelphia, Penn. 

John S. SwiTZER Texas City, Texas 

Leslie L, Alexander Detroit, Michigan 

Howard M. Warner Farmington, Michigan 

Harley D. Warner Farmington, Michigan 

Roberts E. Bement Lansing, Michigan 

Louis F. VooRHEEs Toledo, Ohio 

WiLBEB E. Brotherton Detroit, Michigan 

Joseph H. Fee Detroit, Michigan 

1917 

A. Stuart Elton Oak Park, Illinois 

Cecil B. Corbin Alpena, Michigan 

Lawrence G. Puchta Cincinnati, Ohio 

Harry L. Calvin, Jh Detroit, Michigan 

Joseph J. Brotherton Detroit, Michigan 

Kenneth C. Wesley Adrian, Michigan 

H. Kirk White Owosso, Michigan 

1918 

Alfred D. Brown Detroit, Michigan 

Ezra W. Lockwood Detroit, Michigan 

Albert S. Robinson Detroit, Michigan 

William W. McKELVEY,Jr You ngstown, Ohio 

W. GiLMORE Brownlee Detroit, Michigan 

Andrew C. Haich Detroit, Michigan 

David W. Shand Springfield, Illinois 

Dean J. DeButts Austin, Illinois 

Carter Sales Detroit, Michigan 

1919 

R. Allvn Haigh Detroit, Michigan 

Henry G. Hoch Adrian, Michigan 

Fred W. Zoellin Mavwood, Illinois 

Joseph Waggoner Ravenna, Ohio 

Clark W. Bishop Wyandotte, Michigan 

Mortimer L. Smith Detroit, Michigan 

Alan Fox Youngstown, Ohio 



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Founded al ihe Unvjeisity u/ Neai York in IS47 



CHJPTER ROLL 



Phi New York University 

Zeta Williams College 

Delta Rutgers College 

SlOMA University of Pennsylvania 

Chi Colby College 

Epsilon Brown University 

Kappa Tufts College 

Tau Lafayette College 

Upsclon University of North Carolina 

Xl University of Michigan 

Lambda Bowdoin College 

Psi Cornell University 

Iota University of California 

Gamma ... Syracuse University 

Theta Xl University of Toronto 

Alpha Columbia University 

Alpha Psi McGill University 

Nu Case School of Applied Science 

Eta Yale University 

Mu Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Alpha Beta ... University of Minnesota 

Alpha Kpsilon University of Illinois 

Lambda Psi . . ... University of Wisconsin 



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Psi Upsilon 

Phi Chapter 

Eilablished in IS65 

F RAT RES IN FACU I.TATE 



Georcb W. Patterson. Jr., A.M., B-S., 1884 
Frederick R. Waldron, Ph.D., M-D., 1897 



i, Ph.D., 1905. 
FkATRES IN UNIfEfiSITJTE 



Eugene G. Fauntlerov 
Malcolm I- MacGregor 
Bu 


RLLL Wh! 
1916 


William V.TiRNBULL,/ 
Renville Wheat, A.B. 


James M. Barret, Jr. 
John W. Finkenstaedt 
Isaac Kinsey, Jr. 
Arthur H, Lee 
Malcolm S. MacLean 

Henr 


V Rex Wa 
1917 


Christian N. Mack 
George P. McMahon 
BoVD T. Park 
Wilson M. Shafer 
Paul F. Thompson 


Donald A. Finkbeiner 


1918 


Arthur A. Schupp 


Carlton M. Baumgabdner 
Howard P, Nccholson 
Alfred M. Shearer 
Melbourne F. Smalipage 
Cedric C. Smith 


1919 


Frederick J. Thieme.Jb 
William L. Underwood 
George P. Weadock 
Frank A. Willarb 
Philip J.Wilson, Jr. 


Elmer Milton Barber 
Henry L. Caulkins 
Samuel G. Goss 
Richard H. Khuek 




RuFus H. Knight 
John Donald Mabley 
Thomas P. Mehlhop 
Jackson W. Smart 



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Founded m Umon College in 1S33 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Theta Union College 

Delia New York University 

Beta , Yale University 

Sigma Brown University 

Gamma Amherst College 

Zeta Dartmouth College 

Lambda Columbia University 

Kappa Bowdoin College 

Ps[ Hamilton College 

Xi Wesleyan University 

Upsri.oN Rochester University 

Idta Kenyon College 

Phi University of Michigan 

Omega Chicago University 

Pi Syracuse University 

Ch[ Cornell University 

Beta Beta Trinity College 

Eta Lehigh College 

Tau Pennsylvania University 

Mu Minnesota University 

Rho Wisconsin University 

Epsilon California University 

Omicron Illinois University 

Delta Delta Williams College 



f^. 



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Beta Theta Pi 



FRATRES IN FJCVLTATE 



Earl W. Dow, A.B., 1891 






William H. Waite. Ph.D., 1879 


Frank E. Robbins, Ph.D., M.E., 


,1906 




Ali^n S. WHiTNf.Y, A.B., 188S 




FRATRES I.\- URBE 




Junius E. Beal, 1882 






Elmer K- Beal. 1894 


J. J. Goodyear, 1884 
DwicHT H- Ramsdell, 1886 






Wellington H. Tinker, 1889 






Leonard H. Barrett, 1889 


Charles W, Gay, 1902 






Edwin R. Parker. 1895 




LeRo 


Y N. Pattison, 1870 


FRJTRES IN UNIVERSITATE 


Warren Taylor Vauohan 




OUOBE H. CONKLIN 


Maxwell I. Pitkin 


Ralph R. Loonsberry 


..Si 


•EED Rogers 


Laurence V. Kerber 


Julius Lanson Beers 




;s Y. York 


Edwin E. Keatley 


William F. Gerhardt 


i Clayton S. Emery 


Aaron W. Manbv 


Bertr T. Larson 


Jami 


;s M, Fbawer 


Norman F. Miller 


Edward J. Coram 


ioH, 


« Thomas Naylon 
1916 




Arthur VanKirk Moninger 






Herbert Bullock Bartholf 


Louis Mason Bruch 






Sidney Tremble Steen 


Harold James Smith 




1917 


William Preston Wickham 


Donald M. Drake 






Robert Irving Wheeler 


Travis Field Beal 






Frank Ford Nesbit 


William Jenkinson Willson 






Ward Walter Harryman 


Edwin Barbour Palmer 






Ralph Warren Harbert 


WiNFiELD Crittenden Davis 






Clarence Knox Patterson 


Ee 


>WARI, 


Everett Hawkes, 
1918 


JK- 


Nathaniel Starbuck Thompson 






RoBERT Henry Bennett 


Frederick Camille VanBrunt 






John Ecmond Powell 


H. Tracy Kneeland 






P. Stewart Lowe 


Harold Edgar Loud 






Harry Brown McCallum 


Donald Earl Wilson 






H. Clark Hawk 


Donald Upton Bathrick 




1919 


Donald Macrae 


Merritt Bruch 


Charles R, Rowley 


Lewis Hunt Mattern 


Russell G. Cornelius 


Geo, 


RGE Seward Hodge 


s Robert E. Lorimer 


Cedrick a. Smith 


Holland M, Cowen 


Reginald S. Franchot 



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foufid^d at mami m IS39 






CHAPTER ROLL 




Ar«HERST 


lovsA 


Ohio State 




Iowa State 


WlTTENBURC 


BOWDOIN 


Kansas 


Ohio Weslevan 




Missouri 


Western Reser 




Oklahoma 


Purdue 


Colgate 


Texas 


Wabash 


Cornell 


Colorado 


Indiana 


St. Lawrence 


California 


Knox 




Oregon 


Michigan 


Johns Hopkcns 


Brown 


Northwestern 


Davidson 


Dartmouth 


Wisconsin 




Maine 


Minnesota 


Pennsylvania State 


Stevkns 


Nebraska 


Central 


Idaho 


Tulane 


Cincinnati 


Utah 


Vanderbilt 


Miami 


Wesleyan 


Washington 



DrPalw 
Hanover 

Chicago 
Illinois 

Massachusetts Inst, 
OF Technology 



Syracuse 
Toronto 



Colorado Mines 
Denver 
Stanford 
Washington State 
South Dakota 
Colorado College 
Kansas State 
Washimcton-Jeffer! 
Whitman College 



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i"^\ 




Phi Kappa Psi 

Mkhigan Alpha Chapter 
EsidMishrd in 1875 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Abthub N. BACo^ 
George L. Nickli 
Harold M, Cher. 



N O, ROWE 
,[AH H. Kall 
VEY R. Wood 



FRATRKS IN UNIVERSITATE 



Walter Wcilcam PArsLEV 
Francis Fowler McKinnei 
_ Harry Clay Rood 
Gerald Sharpe Frary 
William McKee German 



Harold Mathew Rowcock 
John McDowell McKinney 
Stockbrfdoe Carleton Hilton 



Thomas Cronan Pierce 
Maurice Piatt 
Baxter Latham Broadweli 
Francis Buchanan Smith 
William Henry H. Vail 
Charles Halstead Cottington 



Charles Theron Van Due 



Charles Spencer Clark 
Richard Paul Hummer 
Lyon Gardiner 
Harvey Fames Boyce 
Harold Eells Covert 
Floyd Sanders 



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'^ 







Founded cu Jefermn CotUgi in }g52 



CHAPTER ROLL 



University 
Pennsylvania College 
Dickinson College 
Franklin and Marshall 
Lafayette College 
University of Pennsylvania 
swabthhore college 
State College of Pennsylvania 
Dartmouth College 
Amherst Collech 
Brown University 
Cornell University 
Syracuse University 
Columbia University 
Colgate University 
Johns Hopkins University 



WASHINGTOr 

Vanderbilt Univb 



eUni 



F WeS 



Ohio Wesleyan Univers 
Wittenburg University 
Ohio State University 
Case School of Applied 
DePauw University 
University of Indiana 



Pu 
North' 



E University 
A-ESTERN University 
siTv OF Chicago 
siTY OF Illinois 
siTY OF Michigan 
siTY OF Wisconsin 
College 
SITY OF Minnesota 



Universtfy of Kansas 



Leland Stanforii Univeb 



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Delta Upsilon 

Michigan Chapter 

Established in IS76 

F It AT RES IN FACULTATE 



Arthur Lyons Cross, Ph.D., Harvard, 1895 
Joseph Horace Drake. Ph.D., LL.B, 1885 
Walter Bukton Ford, A.M., Harvard, 1898 
Clabence Linton Meader, Ph.D., 1891 
K M. LooMis, A.B., M.D., 1898 



DN McAllister Randall. Ph.D.. 1893 

:llsworth Reichard, Ph.D., 1892 

: AsHEL HoYT, B.S., M.D., 1912 

; Tlrnek FiSHLEicH, A.B., B.S., 1906 

FisKE Kimball, A.B„ M.Arch., Harvard 

FRATRES IN URBE 
Albekt Emerson Greene, Ph.B., C-E., 1895 Wilford Barnes Shaw, A.B., 1904 
Henry Weed Nichols, 1898 Arthur William Stalker, A.B., 1884 

Horace Grebly Prettyman, A.B., 1885 Merritt Mattison Hawxhurst, A.B., 1898 



George J. Bleekman 
Wayland H. Sanforii, * A 4> 
Bruce Young 

Cecil Aunceb Brown, 't A ^ 
Wavne Johnson, * X 



FRATRES IN UNIFERSITATE 



T B. Bowman, N 2N 
George Douglas Clafperton 
Lyle Haven Smtth 
Herman Harrison Cole, N S N 
Hrhbert Comstock Otis 



Joseph Horace Drake, Jk. 
Melvin Montgomery Beaver 

Julius Reginald St. Clair 
Reno Paul Ransom 
Arthur Douglass Mott, Jr. 
Willis Dean Nance 
Dick Beck with Gardner 
Edwjn Kramer Marshall 
Carson Augustus Cosgrove 

George Edward Dake 
Alan Wilson Boyd 
Chester Wells Clark 
Ben Rollin Clark 



D Harwood Perry 
NT HoovEN Marshall 
<1CK Homer Tinsman 



Edwin Jay Huntington 
Lester Elba Waterburv 
William Cameron McConnel 
Max Gain Robinson 



Donald Carr Stimson 



Clyde James Heath 

James Crampton Finn 
AMES Allen Dorse v 



Raymond Anthony Yacgy 
Charles William Horr, Jr. 
Robert Scott Daucherty 



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^^'1 




Fou»dfd al Witliams ColU^i I 



CHAPTER ROLL 



OF Rochester 
V College 



WlLLCAMS College 
Union University 
Hamilton College 
Amherst College 
Western Reserve I 



Uni 
Mid 

BoWDOrN COLLEC 

Rutgers Collec 
Colgate Unjveh 
New York Uni 
Miami University 
Brown University 
CornellUniversitv 
Marietta College 
Syracuse University 
University of Michigan 
Northwestern University 
Harvard University 
University of Wisconsin 

Uni 



Columbia Univebsii : 
Tufts College 
DePauw Universi IV 



University o 

M, 






Swarthmore College 
Leland Stanford, Jr., Uni 
University of California 
McGiLL University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Toronto 
University of Chicago 
Ohio State University 
\s Illinois 
IF Washington 
A State College 
Iowa State College 
Purdue University 



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Sigma Chi 





Theta Theta Chapter 






Established IB IS77 








FRATRES IN FJCULTJTE 




Fred M. Tavlob. 76 




Henry C, 


Anderson, B.M.E.. '97 




Lewis M. Gram, S,B„ 


•01 






FR-ITRES IN URBK 






MAxBuRNELL,An, '14 




J. L. Mee 


;cHEM. AD. '13 


E. E. Daniels, BH, '14 




F. M. McHALE,ee,'I4 


Prentice P, Douglas, S, 9, 


'08 


S. T. McKinnon, ax, '12 


CarlW-Eberbach, A.B., ee, 




M. C, Mason. Bn. '14 


F. C. Garribaldi, AA, '18 




. R. Nici 


ioLsoN.ee. 'IS 


J. N. Hamilton, E, '16 




. D. Preston. © ©. '15 


F. H. Harrison, An, '12 




. B. Seei 


.Ev. A n. 'u 


L.J.H0LTHER,B.E.,'!4 




luRAND W. Springer, A H, '86 


C. Klinger, r, 'IS 




R. D. Tagcart. r. '17 


L. B. McDowell, A A, '17 




E, S, Tho 


RioN, A X, '09 


H. McKEON,An, '!7 




1. Wall, 


B r, '14 


A. T. McLain, A, '14 




Fielding 


H. Yost, LL.B., M.M., '5 


T.M.Marks, A A, '12 


A. P. Van Lop.k 


Ferris H, 


Fitch, ee, '15 


FR.4TRES IN UMI'ERSITATE 






1916 






George I. Murphy 


Glen P.Thomas 




Reece B. Oberteuefei 


Charles E. Stone 


Walker H.Mills 




Albert B. Parfet 


Charles B. Crawkord 


Walter W. Watson 
1917 






Edward R. Borcherdt 


LeLAND I. DOAN 




William F. Nbwton 


Donald M. Flaitz 


W. T. Watson 




Ray Parfet 


Stanley H. Eaton 


William Benton 
1918 






Thomas H. Wooley 


C. C. Reilly 




Straiton Shartell 


Joseph E. Robins 


CoAN H. Adams 




James S. Sharpe 


John H. Adams 


Ralph Ayres 




Carlton Sarin 


U. S, Grant Cherry 


Raymond F, Blower; 
1919 




Goodie Phillipp 


Carl V. Reilly 


Harold R. Rhode 




Donald M. Springer 


Paul M. Moore 


Steyens S. Clarke 







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CHAPTEk ROLL 



Miami Unive' 
Oh[o Wesley 
Umvehsitv of Geohcta 
George Washington Univej 
Washington and Lee Unive 
Pennsylvania College 
BucKNELi. University 
Indiana University 
Denison University 
DePauw University 
Dickinson College 
Lafayette College 
Butler College 
Hanover College 
University of Virginia 
Northwestern University 
Hobart College 
University of California 
Ohio State University 
University of Nebraska 
Beloit College 
State Univeb 



Massachusei 



III 

Unives 



(sWe; 



rs Inst, of Technc 
eyan University 

■ Wisconsin 

■ Texas 
f Kansas 



eUniv 
Albion College 
Lehigh University 
University of Minnesota 
University of North Carolina 
University of South Carolina 
Cornell University 



A State College 
Vanpebbilt University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
Colorado College 

iF Montana 



Univf 



fUtah 



University of North Dakota 
Case School of Applied Science 
Western Reserve University 
University of Pittsburg 
University of Oregon 
University of Oklahoma 
Trinity College 
University of Colorado 
Brown University 
Purdue University 
Wabash College 

Central University of Kentucky 
University of Cincinnati 
Dartmouth College 
University of Michigan 
University of Alabama 
University of Illinois 
State Universtty of Kentucky 
West Virginia University 
Columbia University 
University of Missouri 
University of Chicago 
University of Maine 
Washington Univers 
University of Washi 
University of Pennsylvania 
Syracuse University 
University of Arkansas 



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Delta Tau Delta 

Delta Chapter 

Enabliihd in 1874 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Warren Fiorer, Ph.D. Hobakt H. Wi 



>, Ph.D. 
¥- Bartli„A.M. 
T. Stockton, Ph.D. 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Raymond Blake 
Rev. Geo. W. Knipper 
William I. Searles 
Robert G. MacKeniie 



Karl H. Bronson 
Edwahp) Ploences 
Frederick W. Shafek 
Charles A. Robertson 



FRATRES IN UNII'ERSITATE 



KEN^ErH S. Clapp 
Carl S. Blomshield 
Wallace E. Reid 
A. Spaldi 



Thomas O'Neil 
Louis A. Arenti 
Harold K. O'BjiiEf 
Edmund W. Marth 



1917 



Raymond E. Gleichauf 
Ralph J. Gleichauf 
Stephen D. l.Ah 
Earl B. McKin 



Staats M. Abrame 
Frederick J. Wurster 
HoBART McK. Birmingham 
Everett W. Pullinc 
Robert L. Satterwhite 



1918 



Harold M. Stephen 
Eleridge G. Dudley 
Douglass D. M 



Walter W, Faben 



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^•^'1;% 






Founded 


HI Rtlhany Collide, 1S50 






CHAPTER ROLL 


Au,EC^HENY College 








Tufts College 


Ohio University 








Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 


Washington and Jef 








Brown University 


UnivehsityofMichi 








Wabash College 


Albion College 








Univeksitv of California 


Adelbert College 








Univrbsitv of Chicago 


Hillsdale College 










Vandehbilt Univers 








Dartmouth College 


Ohio Weslevan Univ 








West Virginia University 


Lafayette College 








Columbia University 


State University of 


Iowa 






George Washington University 


University of Missi 








Wesleyan University 


Stevens Institute o 


Technology 






Bakeb University 


Rens&elaer Polytechnic Institut 






University of Texas 


Washington and Lee 


University 






University of Missouri 


WoosTER University 








Purdue University 


Kenyon College 








University of Washington 


Penn State College 








University of Maine 


University of Penns 








University of Cincinnati 


Indiana University 








University of Syracuse 


DePauw University 








Iowa State College 


University of Georgia 






University of Oregon 


University of Wisconsin 






University of Pittsburg 


Emory College 








University of Kansas 


University of Indianapolis 






Tulane University 


University of the So 








Cornell University 


University of Minnesota 






Northwestern University 


University of Virginia 






Leland Stanford, Jr„ University 


University of Colorado 






University of Nebraska 


Lehigh University 




Ohio 


State U 


University of Illinois 






ALUMNI ClUPTERS 


Chicago 








Kansas City Lima 


New York 


Piitsbur 






Los Angeles Oklahoma City 


Cincinnati ' 


Richmond 






Atlanta Grand Rapids 


San Francisco 


Jackson 






Seattle Denver 


Philadelphia 


New Orleans 




Spokane St. Paul 


Indianapolis 


Far East 






Sioux City Birmingham 


Boston 


Washington 




San Antonio Warken 


Portland 


Dallas 






Harvard Club Minneapolis 


Rochester 


Fargo 






Buffalo Milwaukee 



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Phi Delta Theta 



Established in 1S64. Re-established in 1887 



FRATRES l,\ FACVLTATE 



Y A. Sanders, Ph.D. 



Donald K. Bacon 
Kaymond J, Nutting 
Frank B. Bachelor 
Johnson D. Kenyon 



Y M. Clay, B.S., M.D. 



iiNE C, Case, Ph.D. 
ertE. WH[Te,A.B. 
lV. Moore, A,B. 

;OLD S. HCLBERT, M.D. 



FMATMES F\' URBE 



Benjamin S. Moi 

E, Ray Hazen 
Edgar M. W»,li/ 
Maurice R. Fitt 



James A- Bi . 
Douglas T. Hi 
Georoe W, Wil 



FRATRES !\ UNII'ERSITATE 



Harrv F. Stiles 
Boyd M. Compton 
Morton H. Wilkenson 
Malcolm M, Scott 



Stephen G, Pratt 
Norman T. Bolles 
Clinton F. DeWjtt 



Athol B. Thompsc 
Charles S. Clark 



Y J. Mac 
>; Freem 



Donald P. Yehi 



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<-rn 




foTilldtd 


ac Miami University in 184S 




CHAPTER ROLL 


MiAM[ Uniyersety 


Iowa State College 


Indiana University 


Westminster College 


Central University 


University ok Minnesota 


Wabash College 


University of Iowa 


University of Wisconsin 


University of Kansas 


Northwestern University 


University of the South 


Butler University 


Ohio State University 


Ohio Weslevan University 


University of Texas 


Franklin College 


University of Pennsylvania 


Hanover College 


Union University 


University of Michigan 


Colby College 


Uhivebsitv of Chicago 


Columbia University 


DePauw University 


Dartmouth College 


Ohio University 


University of North Carolina 


UNrVERSITY OF MISSOURI 


Williams College 


Knox College 


Southwestern University 


University of Georgia 


Syracuse University 


Emory College 


Washington and Lee University 


Iowa Wesleyan University 


Amherst College 


Mercer University 


Brown University 


Cornell University 


Tulane University 


Lafayette University 


Washington University 


University of California 


Leland Stanford, Jr., University 


University of Virginia 


PuHDOE University 


Randolph-Macon College 


University of Illinois 


University of Nebraska 


Case School of Applied Science 




University of Cincinnati 


Washington and Jefferson Coll 


GE University of Washington 


Vanderbilt University 


Kentucky State College 


University of Mississippi 


McGiLL University 




University of Colorado 


Lombard College 


Georgia School of Technology 


Alabama Polytechnic Institute 


Pennsylvania State College 


Allegheny College 


University of Toronto 


University of Vermont 


University of South Dakota 


Dickinson College 


University of Idaho 


WAaBBURN College 


University of Oregon 


University of North Dakota 


Denison University 


Colorado College 


Whitman College 



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Frederick S. Bkeb 

Karl Staalz 
Joseph Daknall 
W. Leslie Miller 
E. C. Wolfe 
Philip E, Havnes 
H. D. Bboivn 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Michigan Iota Beta Chapter 

EMblisked in I8SS 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Thec 



; HiLi 



James R, Hill 
Perry H. Stevens 
Carl T. Montcomeh 
J. W. Jones 
Irving T. Norton 
C. H. Robertson 
RoscoE C. Gore 



FRATRES IN URBE 



John J. Cox 

Otto H. Hans 
C. E. Bird 
W. L. Owen 
A. P. Kellv 
Kenneth Westerman 
Walter S. Westerman 
Seale B. Johnson 
Clarence H. Crego 
C. C. Wilson 
' R,W. Leper 
Wade W. Warren 
Robert G. Day 
Clare M. Hess 
Howard L. Kincsley 



Hugo E. Braun 
George B, Fox 
George Brick Smith 
Edward F. Brucker 
Charles A. Everett 
Stuart W. Dubee 
W. DuANE Bird 
Walter A. Niemann 
William K. Niemann 
Karl F. Walker 
John E. Sanders 
Milton C. Bauman 
Jerome Zeigler 
Laurence B. Haoiey 
Ernest L. Zeigler 



ACTll'F. MEMBERS 



Paul M. Ireland 
Fred W. Becker 
William M, Darnall 
Raymond M. Lang ley 
William C. O'Keefe 
Roy W. Elliott 
Willard L. Peach 
F. Cortex Bell 
Emile B. Yoakum 
John A. Ward 
Harry P. Bennett 
Thomas C. Garrett 
Gerald F. Nye 
J. Sterling Wickwire 
J. Walter EwrwG 



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>'t% 




Founded at Ikt Universily of Atahama in 1856 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Univershv of Mainr 

Boston University 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 

Harvard University 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Dartmouth Collece 

Cornell University 

Columbia University 

St. Stephens College 

Syracuse University 

Allegheny College 

Dickinson College 

Pennsylvania State College 

Bucknell University 

Gettysburg College 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Pittsburg 

George Washington University 

University of Virginia 

Washington and Lee University 

University of North Carolina 

Davidson College 

University of Michigan 

Adrian College 

Mt. Union College 

Ohio Wesley an University 

University of Cincinnati 

Ohio State University 

Case School of Applieu Science 

Franklin College 

Purdue University 

University of Indiana 

Northwestern University 

University of Illinois 

University of Chicago 

University of California 

Millike N University 

University of Minnesota 



University of Wisconsin 
University of Georgia 
Mercer University 
Emory College 

Georgia School of Technology 
Southern University 
University of Alabama 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
University of Missouri 
Washington University 
University of Nebraska 

Arkansas 

Kansas 
College 

Iowa State College 
University of Coloraho 
University of Denver 
Colorado School of Mines 
University of South Dakota 
State University 



University 
Universtty 
Kansas Sta 
University 



Tula 



eUniv 



University of Texas 
University of Oklahoma 
Central University 
Bethel College 
Kentucky State University 
Southwestern Presbyterian Universitt 
Cumberland University 
Vanderbilt University 
University of Tennessee 
University of the South 
Union University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., 
■ University OF Washington 
Beloit College 
Washington State College 
Oregon State College 



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W-^"^ 




"iMf»" 



Theta Delta Chi 

Gamma Deuteron Chargk 

Enablisltid in 1SS9 

FRATRES IN URBE 
■H. Ph.B., LL.B., 1891 Edward D- Warner, LL.B,, 1891 

Harry McClure, 1904 

FRATRES IN UNirERSITATE 



Edward C. Stebbins 


John H. Fbrbis 


Bernard A. McDonald 


Walter J, Clement 




1916 


Ronald A. Butler 


Harold E. Groves 


Edgar D.Crumpackeh 


A. Mohell Bentley 




Robert P. Stewart 




1917 


Harry H. Whittingham 


Robert W. Collins 


WiLLARD A. Stevenson 


Eugene A. Ward 


Maurice A. Nichols 


John W. Langs 


Russell M. Boothbv 


James L.Whalen 




Harold A. Taylor 




191S 


George I. Lyman 


W. Garland WiNDLE 


Harry R.Wasson 


ReidelG. Spracue 


Charles Y. Osburn 


Donald W. Crabbs 


Howard H. Heffron 


Robert C.l'ATTERSof 


Hudson W. Fleischauer 


H. Garret Ward 




1919 


Robert G. Wright 


WiLLARD H.Dow 


Thomas S. Saylor 


G, WiLLARD FURLOW 


Donald N. Hand 


Kemp H. Keena 




Paul E. Carrick 



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Founded at Union C.otUgt in !■ 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Gamma Deuthron 
Deita Deutehon 

E?S[LON 

Zeta Deuteron 
Eta . . . 
Eta Deuteron 
Theta Deuteron 

Iota Deuteron 

Kappa Deuteron 
Mu Deuteron 
Nu . . . 
Nu Deuteron 
Xi . . . 
Omicron Deuteron 
Pi Deuteron . 
Rho Deuteron 
Sigma Deuteron 
TauDi 



Phi 

Chi 



Xi Deuteron 
Lambda Deuteron 
Phi Deuteron 



Cornell Universicy 
University of Michigan 
University of California 
College of William and Mary 
Brown University 
McGill University 



Bow. 



n Unive 



iity 



Stanford University 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 

Harvard University 

Williams College 

Tufts College 

University of Illinois 

Amherst College 

University of Virginia 

Lehigh University 

Hobart College 

Dartmouth College 

College of the City of New York 

Columbia University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
Lafayette College 
University of Rochester 
George Washington University 
Hamilton College 
University of Washington 
University of Toronto 
University of Pennsylvania 



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Delta Chi 



EsiaMished IS92 



ACTll'E MEMBERS 



Robert Barnlm 
Clay W. Wfleur 
Howard B. Pelham 
Fred C. Mover 
Ray J. Mills 
C. Howard BREVMENt 
David A. Macdonald 
David R. Ballentjne 
MoHRrsoN C, Wood 
George K, Landis 
Randolph Gordon 



Geokoe E. Ohstkom 
Reginald A, Northcott 
Bernard S. Beaman 
H. Claire Hatch 
Robert M. Allen 
W. CoitAllee 
Eugene C. Wright 
Bryan Akehs 
Carl C. Swart 
W. Kenneth Faunce 
Harold G, Saunders 



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Founded fli Cor:iell Viiivtriity in IS-iO 






CHAPTER ROLL 




Cornell 


Union College 


Michigan 


University o 


Chicago 


Minnesota 


Georgetown 




New York Univ 


RSITV Pennsylvania 




Dickinson 


Virgin FA 




Chicago-Kent 


Stanford 




Buffalo 


University o 


Texas 


Osgood E Hall 


University o 


Washington 


SVRACUSE 


Universitv 


Nebraska 


Ohio State Univ 


ERSirv University o 


Southern California 



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^'^^ 




Kappa Sigma 

Alpha Zeta Chapter 
EilaUhhid 1892. Ri-iHabliihid 1902 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Ferdinand N. Menefe 


• CE. 




Frank H. Stevens, B.S. 


James Gordon Cummin 


■js, M.D 




Carroll D. Paktbiuge, M.D. 


FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 


RicharpTkemper, A.B 






James Bland Catleh, A.B., 1 


Adna R. Johnson, Jr., 


A.B. 




Donald M. Morrill, N Z N 


WaLDRON J. KlNCAfO 




191(i 


John B. (yDoNOGHuE, N I: N 


William D. Cochran 






John F. Linehan 


John K. Norton 






Donald M. Morrill 


Fred H. Beoole, Jh, 






Doufii-As S, Klliott 




Will 


*RD S. Gl 

1917 


RVIN 


Maurice A. Miller 






J. li. O'DONOCHUE 


Harrv G. Sparks 






Francis Walker 


Marcus G. Ruppee 






C, 1,. McKlNNEV 


Clarence T. Fjshlejgh 




I9IK 


M. E. Stevenson 


Elmer C. Schacht 






Rudolph C.Germanson 


Kenneth W. Robinson 






Harold R. Roehm 


Joseph Palma 






John C. Munn, Jr. 


Frank Everts 






Frank Craveb 




Georce R. Whi 


MER 






1919 




ViRGCL T. Bledsoe 






Clifford Sparks 


D. B. Kennedy 






Cecil W. Laird 


Chester C. Pearce 






Augustine McCormick 


Hugh Tremper 






B. Russell DooGE 


Alton Weiman 






Harold A. Holzaepfel 



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—■■■'fi^ 




mversity of rir^ima m 1S.67 
H AFTER ROLL 



Universttv of Vlri 
University of Ala 
Trinity College 
Washington and L 
University of Maryland 



Mei 



R Univ 



Vandkrbilt University 
University of Tennessee 
Lake Forest University 
S. W. Presbyterian University 
Universiiy of the South 
Hampden-Sidney College 
University of Texas 



William Jewell College 
Brown University 
Richmond College 
Washington and Jefferson 
Missouri State University 
Universitv of Wisconsin 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

New Hampshire State College 
University of Georgia 
Kentucky State College 



eUni 



fMai 



PURI 

Uni 

Southwestern Universit 
Louisiana State University 
University of Indiana 
Cumberland University 
swarthmore college 
Randolph-Macon College 
TuLANE University 
William and Mary College 
University of Arkansas 
Davidson College 
University ok Illinois 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Michigan 
Gkorce Washingion Universit 
Cornell University 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Vermont 
University of North Carolina 
Wabash College 
BowDOiN College 
Ohio State University 
Georgia State University 
MiLLSAPS College 



Univ 



But 



lUniv 



fMin 



siTV OF California 
siTY OF Denver 
N College 
University of Iowa 
Washington Univer 



Bah 



rUni 



Mo. 



North Carolina A. & M. College 
Case School of Applied. Science 
University of Washington 
Missouri School of Mines 
Colorado College 



UNIVf 



■F OreC 



.F Chicago 

Colorado School of Mines 
Massachusetts State College 
New York University 
Dartmouth College 
Harvard University 
University of Idaho 
University of Oklahoma 
Washington State College 
Iowa State University 
Syracuse University 
Washburn College 



Dep 



N Unih 



Uni 



F Kansas 



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Sigma Nu 

Gamma Nu Chapter 
Enabtiskid in 1902 

FRATRES IN URBE 
Russell ToMLCNsoN DoBSON John Francis Dunn 

FRATRES IN UNin-RSITATK 

Carl Bcnns Marvin Pattehso 

LiNTEN B. DiMOND JoSEPH ScOTT 

Carl Folks Harry M. Beckeb 

L. D. Funk E. C. Stkele 

Bert H. Sheperu Samuel L. Hudd 

Paul R. Dunten James B. Speeh 

Frank K. Levinson Elmer P. Foglk 





ACTIFE CHAPTER 








1916 




F-arl N, Hackney 






AlbfrtA. Dorrani 


Clarence R. Zewad; 


iK[ 




Jay E. Hanna 


Caleb G, Shipley 






LeKOV J. SCANLON 


Marcus M. Day 






Clarence E. Ueer 




DwinHT G. Estabrook 








1917 




Roman C. Widman 






Louie J. Reieii 


William C. Hansen 






AngeloT. Jennini;; 


Franklin P. Randal 


.L 


1918 


Cyril Y- Bowers 


James Schermerhor, 


■^,JR. 




Cyril 1. Cole 


Roberta. Donaldsi 






Homer D. Biery 


Walter S. Rooers 






Geohoe W, Myers 


Brvant W.Donaldson 




Harold F. Robinso 


George B, Daniels 






Thomas C. .Arndt 




Robe 


RT F. David 
1919 




Fred E, Farr 






Philip P. Bash 


LeeG, Benford 






Ralph H. Watkins 



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-■•■'^ 




CHAPTER ROLL 
University of Virginia Wm. Jewell College 

University of Alabama University of Pennsylvania 

Howard College University of Vermont 

Nortl. Georgia Agric. College N. Carolina College of A. & M. Art 
Washington and Lee University Rose Polytechnic Institute 
Tulane University 
Lei and Stanford University 
University of California 
Georgia School of Technology 
Northwestern University 
Alhion College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 
Lafayette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
State University of Kentucky 
University of Colorado 
University of Wisconsin 



y College 
Mercer University 
University of Georgia 
University of Kansas 
Emory College 
Lehigh University 
Vanderbilt University 
University of Texas 
Louisiana State University 
University of North Carolini 
University of Missouri 
DePauw University 
Purdue University 
Indiana University 
Alabama Polytechnic Insdtu 
Mi. Union College 
Kansas State Agric. College 
State University of Iowa 
Ohio State University 



Birmingham 
Montgomery 
Los Angeles 

Wilmington, Del. 

Savannah 



y of II 
University of Michigan 
Missouri School of Mines 
Washington University 

ALUMNI CHAPTERS 



West Virginia University 
University of Chicago 
Iowa State College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
University of Montana 
University of Washington 
Syracuse University 
Case School of Applied Science 
Dartmouth College 
Columbia University 
Penn. State College 
University of Oklahoma 
Western Reserve University 
University of Nebraska 
Lombard College 
State College of Washington 
Delaware College 
Brown University 
Stetson University 
University of Maine 
University of Nevada 
University of Idaho 



Gales burg 
Des Moines 
New Orlean; 



Baltimore 
New York 
BulFalo 

Wilmington, N.C. 
Akron, O, 
Cleveland 
Columbus 
Portland. Ore, 



Oklahoma City 
Panama, D. de P. 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburg 

Salt Lake City 
Chehalis, Wash. 



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Phi Gamma Delta 

Alpha Phi Chapter 

EstahlUhid in 18S5. Rc-lilablishid in 1902 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
HEBBtRT Charles Sadler, Sc.D. Shirley Wheeler Smith, A.M. 

Henry Earle Rigcs, A.B., C.E. John Robins Allen, M.E. 

Alfred Scott Warthin, Ph.D., M.D. James Barkley Pollock, Sc.D. ' 

Alexander Ziwet, C,E. Morris Palmer Tilley, Ph.D. ■ 

Edson Read Sunderland, A.M., LL.B. Joseph Ralston Hayden, M.A.'" 

Francis Lee Dewey Goodrich, A.B.. B.L.S. Charles Ferdinand Meyer, Ph.D. 

John Castlereach Pakker, A.M., C.E. 

FRATRES IN URBE 



Charles Willett Spooner, 
Floyd Arthuk Rowe, B.S. 


, B.S. 

Samuel Agnew R 


Lloyd C. Douglas, A.B., D.D- 
Charles Louis Loos. .M.E. 
igds, A.B. 




FRATRES IN VNIVERSITATE 




George Clark Caron. A.B 


Fredei 
Philip Hastings Midiileditch 


ucK Waldorf Marble 


Harvey Henry Sfrick 
Kenneth William Vance 
Thomas Wellington Hugh 
Orlo R. Deahl 


1916 
Samuel Ewart 


Elliot 
Fredei 

DONAL 

Emmons 


Wyatt Bisbee 
UCK Anthony McMahon 
D Forney Stiver 
R Branch McGee 


Stanley Phillips Smith 
Glenn Allen Howl and 
Albert Earl Stoll 
Jack Howard Connelly 
Lawrence Edward Vilas 


1917 


Howard Leslie Carroll 
Charles Comfort Garland 
Charles Blackburn Lawton 
M. Purlier Blrkholder 
William Knell Lovering 


Samuel Hynes Riggs 


191 S 


RUFUS 


Royce Loveland 



John Howard Emery 
John Donald Cruise 
James Thomas Groves 
Benjamin R. FuLLERTO^ 



George Owen Brophy, Jr. 
Ward Davis Peterson 
Harold Spencer Trueman 



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Founded at tfashinglon and Jeg 





ACTIVE CHAPTER ROLL 




Washington and Jefferson College 


Knox College 


Kansas University 


University of Pennsylvania 


Pennsylvania State College 


Worcester Polytechnic Inst 


Bucknell University 


University of California 


Bmwn University 


Indiana University 


Washington and Lee Univ, 


Wooster University 


University of Alabama 


William Jewell College 


Richmond College 


DePauw University 


Ohio Wesleyan University 


Lafayette University 


University of Wisconsin 


Colgate University 


Syracuse University 


Gettysburg College 


Mass. Inst, of Technology 


University of Washinglon 


University of Virginia 


Cornell University 


Trinity College 




Williams College 


University of Texas 


Wittenburg University 


University of Tennessee 


University of Illinois 


Union College 


Denison University 


University of Missouri 


Wabash College 


Purdue University 


Colorado College 


Illinois Wesleyan 


University of Nebraska 


Chicago University 


University of Michigan 


Leland Stanford, Jr., Univ. 


University of Maine 


Amherst College 


University of Minnesota 


University of Oregon 


Iowa State University 


Yale University 


University of Colorado 


Johns Hopkins University 
Lehigh University 


New York University 


Dartmouth University 


Ohio State University 


Columbia University 




GRADUATE CHAPTERS 




Lafayette, Indiana 


Lincoln, Nebraska 


Portland, Oregon 


Indianapolis, Indiana 


Dayton, Ohio 


Los Angeles, California 


Chicago, Illinois 


Detroit, Michigan 


Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 


New York, New York 


St. Joseph, Missouri 


Omaha, Nebraska 


Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 


Springfield. Ohio 


Dallas, Texas 


Denver, Colorado 


Des Moines, iou-a 


Buffalo, New York 


Toledo, Ohio 


Knosville, Tennessee 


Peoria. Illinois 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Kansas City, Missouri 


San Antonio, Texas 


Richmond, Virginia 


Newark, New Jersev 


Allentown, Pennsylvania 


Columbus, Ohio 


Albany, New York ' 


San Francisco, California 


Seattle, Washington 


Madison, Wisconsin 





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it^- 



<^ 



Sinfonia 

Phi Mu Alpha 
Epsilon Chapter 
EUahlished in 1902 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
David Bjsfham F. W, Kei 

FRATRES IN FACULTATJi 



Walter F. Colby 




Glen G. MuNt 


Theodore Habblson 




Chas. a. S[nk 


Albert Lock wood 




Albert A, Sta 


Samuel P, Lockwood 




Qrro Stahl 


Earl V. Moore 


A. J. Wkitm[re 
t' RATER IN URBE 


Roy D. Welsh 



FRATRES IN UNiyERSlTATE 



George P. Becker 
John B. Breymann 
Clifford M. Tcohy 
Edmund D. Wood 



Clarence L. Menser 

A. Wentworth Rankin 
Chase B. Sekes 
Erwin W. Weber 
Ralph J. Frackleton 



Gordon Campbell 
W. Churchill Edwards 
Ralph L. Mason 
Sydney S. Shipman 
Albert B, Hastings 

Chables a, Bradley 
Robert R, Dieterle 
Frank W. Grover 
Arthur O. Harris 
Samuel L. Hudd 

Leigh Hoadley 
Wilson J. Kellae 



Raymond Flinn 
Alan D. Honey 
Thatcher W. Rea 
Frank Taber 
Horace Davis 

E. Prescott Smith 
Louis R. Inwood 
Donald F. Kudner 
Clay H. Remington 
Walter C. Robekts 



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Phi Mu Ali'ha 
Fou'idfd in 1S9S 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha New England Conservatory, Boston, Mass. 

Beta Combs Broad Street Conservatory, Philadelphia, 

Delta Ithaca Conservatory, Ithaca, N. Y. . j 

Epsilon University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Zeta . , University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

Eta Cincinnati Conservatory, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Theta ....... Syracuse University, Syracuse, N, Y. 

Iota Northwestern University, Evanston, III. 

Kappa I'eabody Conservatoiy, Baltimore, Md. 

Lambda DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind. 

Mu University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

Nu Denison University, Granville, Ohio 

Xl University of Kansas. Lawrence, Kansas 



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EsiabHAid 188S. Re-established 1904 



FRATRES IN FACVLTATE 



U. B. Phillips, A.B., A.M., Ph. D. 
W. E. Humphries, A.B. 
C. N. Fessenden, M.E. 



H. W. Emehson, B.S., M.D. 
J. A. Elliot, A.B., M.D. 
J. E. Baklr, A.m. 



FRATER IN URBE 
Rev. Courtland Miller 



FRATRES IN UNIFERSITATE 



H.Clement Allen 


John S. Leonard 


Harold L. Humphrie 


Kirk H, Portlr 


W. Whitney Slauht 


Eber J. Reynolds 


Donald E. A. Cameron 


Lyle M. Clift 


Arthur J. Bancroft 


Lawrenl-eE.Whitaker 


James L. Blanding 


DwightW.Jennincs 


William J. Crawford 


John P- C^F^-Br 


Virgil L. Blanding 


Benjamin H. Cakfey, Jr. 


Herbert C.Lange 
1917 




Harold D. Davenpoht 


PaijL F, Schmidt 


Robert B. Ehvni?. 


Harry E. Carlson 


Ralph W. Hicks 
1918 


R, J. BllRGHARD 


Fitzgerald H, Clark 


George A, Brown 


Lewie M. James 


Lathrop F. Berry 


Laurence H. Burchar 


D CaRLA. SORI.ING 


Burton C- Barnard 


Dudley V.Canfield 
Christiancy Pickett 

my 


R.A, KlVBKRLY 


De Forest W. Buckmaste 


R George W. Lovell 


C. Shelton Jones 


Gerald A. Herrick 


Ahtiu-r M. Williams 


John S. Arnold 



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'^ 




Foiindfd al Richmi 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 



UNlVf.BSLTy OF FlORFOA 


MuHLENBURG College 


Universftv of Gkohc-.ia 


Washington and Jefferson College 


Emory College 


Lehigh University 


Mercer University 


Pennsylvania State College 




University OF Pennsylvania 


University of Illtnots 


Pennsylvania College 


University or Chicago 


University of North Carolina 


Rose Polytechnic Institute 


Trinity College 


Purdue University 


College of Charleston 


Adrian College 


Washington and Lee University 


Hillsdale College 


University of Virginia 


University of Wisconsin 


Mt. Union College 


Albion College 


Wittenberg College 


University OF Michigan 


Ohio Wesleyan University 


Indiana University 


Ohio State University 


University of Colorado 


Western Reserve University 


Simpson College 


Kentucky State University 


Iowa State College 


Southwestern Presbyterian Univ. 


University OF Kansas 


Vanderbilt University 


University of Minnesota 


University OF the South 


University of Missouri 


Union University 


University OF Nebraska 


University of Tennessee 


University of Wyoming 


Leland Stanford University 


University OF Iowa 


University of California 


University of Maine 


University of Oregon 


Colby College 


Washington State College 


Massachusetts Institute of Technoi.o 


lY University of Washington 


Worcester Polytechnic School 


Oregon Achicultvbai, College 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute 


Brown University 


SouthernUniversity 


Tufts College 


University of Alabama 


St. Lawrence University 


Tulane University 


Cornell University 


Universtty of Texas 



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f > 's- . 






Acacia 






Michigan Chapter 






Esiahlisyd in 1904 




FRATRES IN FACULTATK 


Russell W. Bunting, D.D.S. 




Clarence T. Johnston, C.E. 


Mortimer E. Cooley, M.E. 




William I.. Migget, M.E. 


ArthurG. Hall, Ph.D. 




0. L, Sfonsler,A.B. 


Neville S. Hope, D.D.S. 


FRATRES IN URBE 


RoeertG. RoiiKEV, A.B. 


Charles A. Sink, A.B. 




John Lindenschmidt 


Roberta. Campbell 




Charles E. Hiscock 


Junius E. Real 




Robert Norris 


FRATRES IN UNII'ERSITATE 


Arthur R. Smith, A.B. 




Albert N- Laird, B.C.E. 


Julius L. Beeks 


Horace L. Davis 
1916 


Carl Mitcheltree, A.B. 


George A. Barnes 




James K. Nichols 


Thomas P. Soddv 




Harold L Phillips 


Ferdinand G. Dratz 




Henry S. Hosmer 


Herbert R. Wilson 


Donald E. Lawrence 
1917 


T. Hawlev Tapping 


Raye E. Eastman 




Charles E. Hubbard 


Donald A. Smith 




Lawrence W. Van Aken 


Carl H. Thorington 




Harry E. Montelius 


Frank H. Wisner 




Karl R. Jackson 


Daniel B. Newton 




William G. Brqwnricg 


William R. Woodward 


1918 


John Rough, Jr. 


Carrol W. Collins 




Frank K. Miller 


Carl E. Gormsen 




Harold A. Brennan 


Walker B. Johnson 




L ELAND S. Thompson 



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,..^ 




founded at Ihl Unhirsity of Michigan in 1904 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Michigan University of Michigan 

Leland Stankorii Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Kansas University of Kansas 

Nebraska University of Nebraska 

California University of California 

Ohio State Ohio State University 

Harvard Harvard University 

Illinois University of lUinois 

Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania 

Minnesota University of Minnesota 

Wisconsin University of Wisconsin 

Missouri University of Missouri 

Cornell Cornell University 

Purdue Purdue University 

Chicago University of Chicago 

Yale Yale University 

Columbia Columbia University 

Iowa State Iowa State College 

Iowa University of Iowa 

Pennsylvania State Pennsylvania State College 

Washington University of Washington 

NosTHWESTERN Northwestern University 

Colorado University of Colorado 

Kansas State Kansas State College 



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#•< 




Phi Kappa Sigma 

Alpha Omjckon Chapjek 
Eslabtifhfd I90ji 

FKJTkES I\ FACULTATE 
Willis Goruon Stoneb, A.B., I.L.B. Hlrbkmt Ai.dhn Kenvon, A.M. 

John R. Brumm, A.M. V\'ri i.iam A. McLaughlin,' A.B. 

FRUITER IN URBE 

RoSCOE 0. BONISTFKI. 

FRATRES IX UNIVERSITATE 
1916 



Louis Fred Dieterich 
Francis Brown Lowhy 
Yancey Roberts Altshel 
Ralph Allington Havwaf 



Alee 



De Thur; 
Owen Jef 



r F. Wakefielh 

s Brown, Jr. 



Roland Karl Ellcs 
Earl Erward Pardee 
FRt-L) Maofe Adams 
George Chaniilek Adie 



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f^ 




Founded lit Ihe Unk- 


vnly -J 


Pennsyhama in IS50 


C.iJAFTKR 


ROLL 


University of Pennsylvania 




University of Maine 


Washington and Jeffekson College 




Armour Institute of Technology 


Dickinson Collrge 




University of Maryland 


Franklin and Marshall College 




University of Wisconsin 


University of Virginia 




Vanderbilt University 


Columbia University 




University of Alabama 


ToLANE University 




University of California 


University of Illinois 




Massachusetts Inst, of Technolo 


Randolpu-Macon College 




Georgia Institute of Technology 


Northwestern University 




Purdue University 


Richmond College 




University of Michigan 


Pennsylvania State College 




University of Chicago 


Washington and Lee Universtty 




Cornell University 


University of West Virginia 




University of Minnesota 


Lelanii Stan 


FORD, 


B., University 


ALUMNI CHAPTERS 


Phu.adeifhia 




New Orleans 


Richmond 




Southern California 


Chicago 




Atlanta 


New York 




Harrisburg 


Pittsburg 




EVANSTON 


Baltimore 




Detroit 


Sa 


Francisco 



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Alpha 


Sigma 


Phi 


The 


taCh^ 


,pter 




Established ii 


1 190S 


F RAT RES !X FACULTJTE 


Thomas E. Rankin, M.A. 






A, Franklin Shulf., Ph.D. 


RalphW. Aecler, LL.B. 






H. G. Raschbacher, B.S. 


FRATRES IX VXIFERSITATE 


Campbell Harvey, B.S, 






Russell H. Neilson, A.B. 


Henry D. Stecher, B.M.E, 






Charles P. Wattels, A.B. 


W. C. MULLENDORE, A.B. 






Theodore L. Scuier 


W^KREN < 


C, IfRLI 

1916 




BACH 


Paul Zerwekh 






Theron D. Weaver 


Clyde E. Bastlan 


1917 




.'\rthur A. Burrell 


John H, Engel, Jr. 






Lathrop W. Hull 


Harry L. W. Bowles 






Walter B. Steele 


Ralph K. Cabman 






C. Frederick Watson 


C. Vernon Sellers 






Thomas B. Oglethorpe 


Edward F. Walsh. Jr. 






Howard S. Taylor 


Walter C. Gebnt 


1918 




Clare M. Jickling 


A. LOOMIS KlRKPATKlCK 






Merle B. Doly 


Bernard G. Khause 






Joseph M. Boos 


Chester S. Lawton 






Clarence E. Netting 


Frederick W. Sullivan, Jr. 






Whitley B. Moore 


Wallace J, Pigcott 


1919 




Francis Bacon 


Charles Clark 






Charles E. Buell 


George F. Owen 






William E, Bandemer 


Krnst L, Maurer 






Raymond Beardsley 



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y^ 




Foundid at Yale Uithtnily in !S45 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Yale University 
Harvard University 
Marietta College 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Ohio State University 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
Cornell University 
University of Wisconsin 
Columbia University 
University of Washington 
University of California 
University of Nebraska 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Colorado 



ALUMM COU\CILS 



Chicago, III. 



Mil 



EE, W[E 



COLUMBL 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Portland, Ore. 



New Haven, N. H- 



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^v 




Zeta Beta Tau 

Phi Chaptek 
Fouxded in 1912 



FRATER I.\ FACULTATE 
I. Lro Sharwan, A-B„ LL.B. 

FRATER IN URBK 
Nathan Kaukman 

ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Harry Rabinowitz . 




William W. Schatikin 


Hbnbv Weinstein 




Emmanuel B. Woolfan 


Samuel L.Cohen 




Walter R, Atlas 


Samuel E. Rosenfield 




Emanuel H. Heimann 


David C. Holub 




Nathan Salon 


Marton L. Goldstein 




Walter N. Frank 


Rov L. Greenthal 




George N. Nobil 


Earl L. Wiener 




William J- Bialoskv 


Peter A. Miller 




SvlvesterG. Miller 


Joseph Arnof 




SOLBERT GrEENBERGER 


Seymour B. Simons 




Samuel Hvman 


Charles L. Kaufman 


Samuel G. Wiene 
PLEDGES 


Jerome J, Freundl.ch 



Lawrence Goldsmitk 



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CHAPTER ROLL 



Foiindfd at the Colhgf oj the City of Nov York, 1893 

Alpha City College of New York 

Delta Columbia University 

Gamma New York University 

TheTa University of Pennsylvania 

Kappa Cornell University 

Lambda Western Reserve University 

Mu Boston University 

Zeta Case School of Applied Science 

SroMA Tulane Universitv 

Kta Union University 

Iota Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 

Nu Ohio State University 

Xi Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Omccron Syracuse Universitv 

Pi Louisiana State University 

Tau Harvard University 

Rho University of Illinois 

Phi Universitv of Michigan 

Upsilon McGill University (Montreal, Canada) 

Chi University of Virginia 

GRADUATE CLUBS 



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Sigma Phi Epsilon 

MicHrcAN Alpha Chapter 
Established in 1912 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
s IT. Marks, B-S. (M.E.) Walter Hoff Spraouf, A.M. 

FRATRES IN UNlfERSITATE 
zcER. A.B., Phi Delta Ph[ Allan Dean Honey, Sinfonia. Delta Sigma Del 
!, Iowa Alpha Richard I.e R. Hardy, Wisconsin Alpha 

Charles E. Hahpv, Wisconsin Alpha 
FRATERIN URBE 
Donald Benjamin Darling 
ACTIFE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 
foHDAN, A.B. Walter Hoff Spbague, A.M., Rhode Island Alp 

Mason H, Kinch. B.S. (C.E.) 
1916 

LvNDALL Edward Hughes 
Charles Thomas Perkins 
Phillip Edgar Bond 
George Edward Adams 
Walter Duenger Ammerman 



John Joseph Lvons, Jr. 
James Donald O'Connor 
Clifford Charles Stone 
Thomas Howard Robertson 
Thomas Walter Sheahan 



John Frederic Maulbetech 
George Walsh Christiansen 
Charles Louis Haas 
Hampton Harrison Irwtn 
Francis Jiroch Emmons 
Harold Humphreys Springstci 



1917 



Harry Lloyd Richards 



Rest Russell Baf 
Hugo George Ma 
Fred Lee Rehor 
Clyde Hum 
Raymond Dietrici 
Walter H, 



Neil Gordon And 



Chester C. Bond 
Clarence L. Rothrock 
Ogden M. Rathert 
Russell C. Missimore 



1919 



Leslie George Field 
Stanley Barnes Robertson 
Edward Raymond Golden 



nD Raymond Golden 
PLEDGES 

E. Reed Hunt 
Glen E. Robinson 
MiNARD A. Scott 
Francis Ignatii 



She^ 



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psilon. 



Founded at Richmond ColUge in 1901 



ACTII'E CHAPTER ROLL 



Richmond College 


Trinity College 


Univehsttv of West Vihcinu 


Dartmouth College 


University of Colorado 


George Washington University 


University of Pennsylvania 


Baker University 


College OF William AND Mary 


University OF California 


North Carolina Agricultural Col 


ege University op Nebraska 


Ohio Northern University 


Washington State College 


Purdue University 


Massachusetts Agricultural College 


Syracuse University 


Cornell University 


Washington and Lee University 


Brown University 


Randolph-Macon College 


University of Michigan 


Georgia School of Technology 


Iowa Wesleyan College 


Delaware State College 


University OF Denver 


University of Vibqtnia 


University of Tennessee 


University of Arkansas 


University of Missouri 


Lehigh University 


Lawrence College 


Ohio State University 


Pennsylvania State College 


Norwich University 


Ohio Wesleyan University 


Alabama Polytechnic Institute 


Colorado Agricultural College 


ALUMNI 


CHAPTER ROLL 


Philadelphia 


Detroit 


Pittsburg 


Denver 


Boston 


San Francisco 


New York 


New Orleans 


Chicago 


Atlanta 



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Kappa Beta Psi 



FR^TRES IN FACULTATE 
, C,E. I-EE H. Cone, Ph.D. 



FRATER IN URBE 
Russell A. Yehington 



FRJTRES IN UNII'ERSITATE 
1916 



Walker Peddicord, A.B. Lancelot C. Rowi 

Howard E, Morse W. Lewjs STANTO^ 

Earnest J. Dcllman Frep A. Br[ 

Carleton E. Strvker 

1917 



Herbert D. Aspland 
Marsh B. Woodruff 
Frederil-kJ, Koi-B 

WlLl 


,js A. Bellow 


MOR, 

Dona 
Lesli 


ICE S, Easton 

.LI. C. MclNTVRE 
E F, HOPKINSON 


PaulO. Davis 
Christ [AN F. Matthews 
C, Stirling Huntley 
GuyA. Reem 


1918 


John 
Geor 

AlTOl 

Alfrj 


M, Ehwin, A.B. 
ciE L Bentoh 
^ B. Sharpe 
edJ.deLormie. 


George F- Loud 
Herbert B. B[erwagen 


1919 


Meri 

JAME. 


E F, Smith 
i L. Bateman 



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Lambda Chi Alpha 

FRATRES IN UNIFERSITJTE 



Darrel D. Alton 




Horace M. Corey 


Glen D. Aldhich 




Mark F. Ferrell 


Lloyd R. Bali. 




Carl H, Pehrson 


K. LeRoy Blood 


1917 


Walter E. Maxweu 


LeRoyH. BlBBV 




RayG. Easton 


Beknard F. Boyd 




Edwin M. Read 


Charles A. Brown 




Franz P. Zemmerli 


Paul E. Gibson 


Wru-UM H, Makhlhi 
1918 


Theodore Williams 

-IE 


KdmundM. Brown 




Frank W. Higgins 


Howard R. Dean 




Earle S. Ladd 


Anton J. Dohmen 




Klnneth L. Porter 


Walter J. D.;iON 




Bruce K. Rathburn 


Harold A. Mills 


Ralph B. Kelly 
1919 


RoLLiN C. Smith 



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•?i^ 




Eslablishd in 1909, 



CHAPTER ROLL 

(Zetas in Okder) 

AlPHA Boston University 

Beta University of Maine 

Gamma Massachusetts Agiicuitural College 

Delta Hucltnel! University 

Epsilon University of Pennsylvania 

Zeta Pennsylvania State College 

Eta Rhode Island State College 

Theta Dartmouth College 

Iota Brown University 

Kappa Knox Colleee 

Lambda Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Mu University of Cahfoinia 

Nu Universitv of Georgia 

Xi DePauw University 

Omicron Cornell University 

Pi Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Rho Union University 

StGMA University of Michigan 

Tau Washington State College 

Upsilon Louisiana State College 

Phi Rutgers College 

Chi University of Illinois 

Psi Purdue Universitj' 

Omega Alabama University 

Ai PHA Alpha .... Butler College 

ALUMS} CHAPTERS 
Boston San Francisco 

Providence Birmingham 

New York Wilkes-Barre 

St. Louis Chkaoo 

Detroit .Atlanta 

Philadelphia Indianapolis 

Albany 



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Phi Chi Delta 



fRJTRES !,\ UKUERSlTJrE 

J. M. Hernandez, !i.S. J. Luiunari 

G. W. Blanco, U.S. A, de Juan 

P. J. Zamoha J. R. Pkon 

M. A. DEL Valll L. M. Deba 

F.A. delValle a, S. Hohee 

A, A. VAIfiUEZ G. GUERRER 

A. Morales C. Esieves 



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ft^ 




CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha Louisiana State University 

Beta Tulane University 

Delt-\ Pennsylvania State College 

Epsjlon Chicago University 

Zeta Michigan University 

Eta Beta Maryland University 

Iota George Washington University 

Kappa Syracuse University 

Slgma Virginia Medical College 

Lambda . , Purdue University 

Mu Pennsylvania University 

Nu Jefferson Medical College 

Xi Medico Chirurgical College 



ALUMNI CHAPTER 
San Juan, Porto Rico 



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Jj!^ 




Phi Sigma Kappa 

Delta Dhutsron Chapter 
Established 1915 





FRATER IN FJCULTATE 






HOWARI 


D B. Merrfch 


:, C.F. 






FRATRES IN URBE 




Charles P, Drury 


J- 


B, CoMSrocf; 


WlL[ 


.iamJ.Ahe«n 


FRATRES IN UNITERSITATE 








1916 






Harold D, Koonsm^ 


,N 




NoRr 


«AN H. DavIUSC 


Benjamcn H. Schapp 


[ORST 




Ebef 


< M. Carroll 


Roy Alan Nord 






Lee 


E. Banghart 


Donald W. OoiLBEE 


De 


AN W, TaYLO 


Tom 


C, Trelfa 


Fred K. Walter 




1917 


WiLl 


.lAM C, SK1NNE^ 


Stanley G. Fontanna 




Max 


WELL B. CUTTI^ 


Norman C. Bender 






liEOS 


(.GE 0. White 


Medahd W.Welch 




1918 


L. K 


, HUSSA 


Lee D. Handy 






Jose 


PH W, Planck 


Hermann Henke 






Ahth 


[urW. Ehrlich 


Harold G. Waller 






C. E. 


. Br[CGS 


Grant H. Laing 






Har< 


)LD C.Cramer 


John L. Garvet 






Fra> 


ic[s D. Re[der 


W. Ashley Bangs 






Gordon B. Hooton 






1919 






Merlin A. Cudlip 






Wjli 


.lAM A, Carl 


PaulO. Strawhecki 


ER 




Otto C. Davidson 



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Ofofessional 
r ' pratemities 



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Phi Delta Phi 

Kent Chapter 
EnabUshid m IS69 



F RAT RES IN FACULTATE 

President Harry B. Hutchins, A.B., LL.D. 
Professor Bradley M. Thompson, M.S., LL.D. (Reti 
Dean Henry M. Bates, Ph.D., LL,B, 



ed) 



Prof. Thomas A. Bogle, M.S. 

Prof. Horace L. Wilgus, M.S. 

Prof. Robert E. Bunker, A.M., LL.B. 

Prof. Victor H. Lane, C.F.„ LL-B. 

Prof. Jerome C. Knowlton, A.B., LL.B. 

Prof, Epwin C. Goddard, Ph.D., LL.B. 



Prof. Edson R. Su^ 
Prof. Evans R. Holbhook, A.B., 
Prof. Jos. H, Drake, Ph.D., LL.B 
Prof. Ralph W. Aiclbr, LL.B. 
Prof. Gordon Stoner, A.B., LL-B 
Prof. John B. Waite, A.B., LL.B. 
rfee, A.B„J,D. 



FRATRES IN UNIl'ERSITATE 



James A. Blackwood, ■I' A O 
Louis M. Brlch, B 9 11 
David F. Kennedy, Ph.B,, Z T 
Eugene R. McCall, A.R. 
Leon D. Metkoer, A. 
Chester J. Morse 



*E 



Russell H. Ne.lson, A.B„ A :^ ■!. 
John R. Nicholson, S X 
WiLirsB. Perkins, Jr., A.B. 
HoLLACB M. Reid, M.A. 
Clyde C. Rowan, A.B. 
BuRRKLL Wright, A.B., T T 



Cecil A. Brown, A Y 
J. Bland Catlett, A.B., K S 
Harry G. Gault, A.B., Eremke 
Glenn A. Howland, * F A 
HaddonS. Kirk, A.B„ Z 'F 
Lester H. Moll 



Wi 



L. OwtN, A.B„r AK 
Harry S. Reber, A A * 
Wayland H. Sanford, A.B., A T 
Albert E. Stoli., * r A 
Hampden Wall, rx 
Charles M. Wid.ette, 7. T 



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Fowtded at Unmrsily of Michigan in IS69 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Department of Law, University of Michigan 
Law Department of Illinois Wesley an Univ. 
Law School of Northwestern University 
Columbia Law School. Columbia University 
St. Louis Law School, Washington Univ. 
Hastings College of Law, Univ. of California 
Law School of George Washington Univ. 
Albany Law School, Union University 
Boston Law School, Boston University 
Law Department, University of Cincinnati 
Department of Law, Univ. of Pennsylvania 
Harvard Law School, Harvard University 
University Law School, New York Univ. 
Yale Law School, Yale University 
Law Department of Cornell University 
Law Deparcment of the Univ. of Missouri 
Law Department of the University of Virginia 
Law Department of the Univ. of Minnesota 
BiitFalo Law School, University of Buffalo 
Law Department of the Univ. of Oregon 
College of Law, University of Wisconsin 
School of Law of the Ohio State Univ. 
Law School of the University of Iowa 
College of Law of the Univ. of Nebraska 



Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Law School of Upper Canada 

Law Department of Stanford University 

School of Law, University of Kansas 



La 


w Departmen 


ofSy 


tacuse University 


New York Law School 




Un 




iana 




Law Depart men 


ofW 


estem Reserve Univ. 


La 


w Departmen 


ofU 


iversity of Illinois 


La 


w Departmen 


, Den 


ver University 


La 




, University of Chicago 


La 


w Departmen 


,\Va 


hington University 


La 


w Departmen 


,Van 


derbilt University 


Br 


ookUn Law School. 


St. Lawrence Univ. 


La 


w Depattmen 


.Um 


versity of Colorado 


College of Law 


Univ 


of Southern California 


La 


w Departmen 


of W ashington and Lee Univ 


La 


w Departmen 


ofU 


niversity of Maine 


La 


w Departmen 


Lm 


versity of Texas 


Law Departmen 


Pit 


sburg University 


La 


w Departmen 


Tul 


ne University 


La 


w Departmen 


University of Oklahoma 


La 


w Departmen 


Un 


V, of North Dakota 


La 


» Departmen 


Un 


V. of South Dakota 



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Nu Sigma Nu 



FR^TRES IN FACULTATE 



Dr. V. C. Vavchan 






Dr.J. F. Breakev 


Dr. C. B. de Nancrfde 






Dr. U. J. Wile 


Dr. R. Peterson 






Dr. C D. Camp 


Dr. F. G. Now 






Dr. D. M. Cowie 


Dr. G. C. Huber 






Dr. I. D. LoREE 


Db, W, R, Parker 






Dr. M. Marshall 


Dr. a. M. Barre-it 






Dr. W. a. Hoyt 


Dr. C.W.Edmunds 






Dr. F. Wilson 


Dr. C. G. Darling 






Dr. F. G. Gage 


F RAT RES !,\ 


UNn-ERSITATE 




Ch 


s of 1916 




D. 0. Walthau. 






L. B, KiNGERV 


J. A, Herring, Jr. 






E. H. Harrison 


C. W. Ebebbach 






E, L. YouNnfiuisT 


H. F. Kennev 






W. M. DllGAN 




Ch 


5 pf 1917 




W. S. GONNE 






T. M. Marks 


A. E. Gehrke 






J. S, Leszinsk, 


A. L. Arnold, Jr. 






R. B. Macdui/f 


W. C. Breidenbach 






R. A, A. Oldheld 


H. L. Keim 






H. H. Cole 




CI 


ss of 19IM 




T. S. Barnett 






C. E. VOLLMAYER 


M, B. Burnell 






D. M. Morrjll 


E. R. Smith 






Campbell Habve 


Cl 


MENT 


H, Marshall 






Cla 


s of 1919 




J. P. Capeev 






G. C. Adie 


J. B. O'DONOCHUE 






R. M. McKean 


A. R, Smith 






E. L. BuLSON 


R. L. Now 






R. V. Walker 


H. H, Donnelly 






T. H. CONKLIN 



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Founded m the Un!versky of Michigan m ISSZ 



CHAPTER ROLL 



^ 




Alpha University of Michigan 

Beta. Detroit College of Medicine 

Delta University of Pittsburg 

Epsilon University of Minnesota 

Zeta , . , : Northwestern University 

.Eta Chicago College of Physicians 

Theta University of Cincinnati 

Iota Columbia University 

Kappa Rush Medical College 

Lambda University of Pennsylvania 

Mu Syracuse University 

Xl New York University 

Omicron ... Albany Medical College 

Alpha Kappa Phi Washington University 

Rho JefTerson Medical College 

Sigma Western Reserve University 

Tad Cornell University 

Upsclon Cooper Medical College 

Phl University of California 

Chi University of Toronto 

Pl Mu Virginia University 

Beta Alpha University of Maryland 

Beta Beta Jobns Hopkins University 

I. C. I University of BufFalo 

Beta Delta University of Iowa 

Beta Epsilon University of Nebraska 

Delta Epsilon Iota Yale University 

Beta Eta , University of Indiana 

Beta Theta University of Kansas 

Beta Iota Tulane University 

Beta Kappa Harvard Medical School 



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i- ;f.Y . 




Delta Sigma Delta 



FRJTKHS l-\ FACILTATE 



Dk. N. S. Hoff 






Dk, R. B. Howell 


Dr. M. L. Ward 






Dr. R, W. Bunting 


Dr. L. p. Hall 






Dr, C. J. Lyons 


Dr. E, T. Loeffcfr 






Dr. M.,T. Watson 


Di 


t, E, 


L. Whjtman 




FRJTRES 


/A" L'MIEJiSlTJTE 






191 f, 




RoscoE D. Cummins 






James A. Gaffney 


Gerald E. Madcson 






(Ieorcf a. Cruscis 


Andrew J. McClellan 






].Eo M. Globinsky 


Harry T. Wood 






Leighton G. Steele 


Francis J. McDonalo 






Charles H. Matson 


Clarence J. Wrecht 






Anthony F. Summfr 




Ebe 


R J. Reynolds 
1917 




John W. Kemper 






GroverC. Bhochma 


Paul S. Crosby 






Nlal D. Cotschall 


George A. Brown 






Albert J. Richards 


Leo 0. Finch 






Richard Burkhardt 


James Glarum 






Clarfncr E. Tuttle 


Alan D. Honey 




191S 


Harold A, Truesdai 


L. Manning James 






Gerard G.Hall 


Carl E. Smith 






J. Orton Goodsell 




Ed 


CAR A. Honey 





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■■•■^^ 




Founded at iht Unviersiiy u/ M\ckigar. 



niSSZ 



SUPREME CHAPTER, 
AUXILIARY 
Detr( 

Chicago Auj 
Minnesota Auxfliary 
Philadelphia Auxiliary 
Indiana Auxiliary 
Kansas City Auxiliary 
St, Louis Auxiliary 
Pittsburg Auxiliary 
New York Auxiliary 
Cleveland Auxiliary 
Pacific Auxiliary 



Den 
Texas Auxi 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
CHAPTER ROLL 

Seattle Auxiliary 
Boston Auxiliary 
New Orleans Auxiliary 
Buffalo Auxiliary 
Iowa Auxiliary 
San Francisco Auxiliary 
Portland Auxiliary 
Los Angeles Auxiliary 
Salt Lake City Auxiliary 
Paris Auxiliary 
Arkansas Au? 
South D\t, 



Neb 



A Auxi 



< Alxil 



Uni 



fMic 



Chicago Collecb of Dental : 
Harvard University 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of California 
Northwestern University 
Vanderbilt University , 
Western Reserve Universiti 
Tl'fts Dental College 
Kansas City Dental College 
Iowa University 

Univi 



SUBORDINATE CHAPTERS 
iGAN Indiana Dental College 

Dental Surgery St. Louis Dental College 



Pittsburg Dental College 
Washington University 
University of Colorado 
Northern Pacific Dental College 
University of So. California 
Creighton University 

University 
nUni 



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C*'^ 



.£'t^ . 



«fc";£ 




Phi Delta Chi 





Alpha Chapter 






Eslahlhhid in ISSn 




FRJTRES IN UNIVERSITATE 




POST GRADUATES 




Harold F. Whittaker 


EiR 

1916 


J. Kennedy 


Edgar T. Olson 


Har 


3LdF. M[]LMAN 


Charles Costa 


JoH> 


W, Stone 


Sidney G. Vedder 


Cha 


LEs W. Anderson 


Maurice L. Rushmore 


Rob 
1917 


rt G. Brown 


J. Warren Driver 


Edw 


ARD J. D[CNAN 


George K. Finz,el 


Ral 


H E. McGee 


Lawrence C, Heustis 


EaRlW. CUMMINGS 


W. Murdoch Riach 


Dan 
Meade W, Patterson 

1918 


EL J. DOUOHERTY 


Vincent H.Stumpf 


HoBART F. Shaw 


Don V. Cross 


Her 
Walter Remlincer 

1919 


CHEL B. McWlLLIAMS 


Roland M. Staubus 


Che 
FRATRES IN URBE 


TER G. KUSS 


L. 0. CUSHINC 


Dr. Charles Merkfl 


Bert Wick 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Julius O. Schlottekbeck, Ph.C, Ph.D. Theophil Klfncmann, Ph.C, M,D- 

Alviso B. Stevens, Ph.C, Ph.D, Charles W. Edmunds, A.B., M.D. 

Victor C, Vaughan, M.D., Ph.D.. Sc.D., LL,D. Clifford C. Glover, Ph.C, M.S. 



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Fi>u,Ldfd at Uninersity of Miihigan in IS33 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alpha University of Michigan 

Beta Northwestern University 

Gamma Columbia University 

Delta University of Wisconsin 

Epsilon Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 

Zeta University of California 

Eta Massachusetts CollcRe of Pharmacy 

Theta University of Minnesota 

Iota ... University of Maryland 

Kappa ... University of Washington 

Lambda University of Texas 

Mu ... University of Pittsburg 

Nu University of Iowa 

Xi .... Ohio State University 

Omicron University of Southetn California 

Pi University of Nebraska 

Rho University of Oklahoma 

Sigma University of Colorado 



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Xi Psi Phi 

Alpha Chapter 
Foundfd in ISS9 

FRJTER IX FACVLTATE 
A- G. Hall, D.D.S. 

FRATRES I.\ URBE 



M. A. Darlcng, D.D.S.. 


, M,D. 




F. C. Palmer, D.D.S. 


W. S. Moore. D.D.S. 






A, W. Shurtz, D.D.S. 


FRATRES I 


A" USn-ERSITATE 






1916 




J. LeSUE LA^,BH■.T 






A, La Verne Souter 


RiCHARn M, Kellogg 






James K. Robinson 


Leon J. Deger 






J.EON.MtD P- Fisher 


W. Kenhall Meade 






HebhfrtW, Weisel 


Walter L. Spenser 






Arthur H. Hadley 




Clvd 


F R. Ch.^vi 
\')\7 


;n 


J. Gordon Brodie 






J, Llovd Graves 


Harry B. Wright 






John Hopkins 


Harold Kahn 






Raymond R. Roussln 


W. Porter Hulett 






Theodore Et-gels 


Ross T. Getty 






Lewis Morrison 


Glenn A. Graham 






Horace Burr 


Robert Gardner 






Edward N. Kellogg 


Jay H. Herrick 




1918 


Arthur S- Harbison 


H. Earle Barlow 






Carlisle B,Rathbi.r: 



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Foundid at University of Michigan ir 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha University of Michigan 

Beta ........ New York College of Dentisrry 

Gamma Philadelphia Dental Colleec 

Delta Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Epsilon University of Iowa, Dental Departmen 

Eta University of Maryland, Dental Dep 

Theta Indiana Dental College 

Iota University of California, Dental Department 

Kappa Ohio State University, Dental Department 

Lambda Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

Mr University of Buffalo, Dental Department 

Xl Medical College of Virginia 

Omicron Royal College of Dental Surgery 

Pi University of Pennsylvania, Dental Departmen 

Rho Northwestern University, Dental Department 

Tau Washington University, Dental Department 

UpsiLON Ohio College of Dental Surgery 

Phi University of Minnesota, Dental Department 

Chi Western Dental University 

Psi Lincoln Dental College 

Omega Vanderbilt University, Dental Department 

Alpha Epsilon North Pacific Dental College 

Alpha Zeta Southern Dental College 

Alpha Theta University of Southern California 

Alpha Iota Central University of Kentucky, Dental Depar 



^LVMM CHAPTERS 



New York State 

New York City AssoctATlON 

Buffalo Alumni Assoc[ation 



Chicago Alumni Association 
Twin City Alumni Association 
Michigan State Alumni Association 



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r:?'V' 




Alpha Sigma 





Mu SJC7MA Alpha Chapt 


ER 




Established in ISSS 






FRATRES IN FACUiTATE 


Dr. W. B. Hinsd. 


1LE 


Dr. D, W, Meyers 


Dr. H. M. BEEBf 




Dr. H. M. Sage 


Dr. C. p. Pillsbi 


JRY 


Dr. R. H. Creswel 


Db. H. H. Hammel 


Dr. H. H, Holcome 




FRATER IN URBE 






Dr. a. E. Atchinson 






FRATRES IN UNIfERSITATE 




1916 




Camp C. Thomas 


L. R. CiAV 
1917 


W. C. VOEGT 


C. B. MANDEkVlL 


191S 


F. J. Cady 


G. W. BOERICKE 




I.. J. Boyd 


L. W. Grice 




C. S- Emery 


J. H. Staacke 


B, W. MM.PR011) 

1919 


C B. PlILSBLRY 


G. B. Wood 




J. K. Durunc 


G. R. BULLSN 




L. W. Snow 


E. Wcnfield 




J, E. SWEETNAM 


D. Young 




C. BOERICKE 


L, H. French 




M. S. Ballard 



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■'fi^ 



Fou,u!^d at Ntw York Ihmiopatkic Medical CoiUge in 1892 



Mv Si'jmii Alpha Fralernily founded at the Univirsily of Michigan in 1888 and 
amalgamated with Alpha Sigma in 1900 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha , , , . . New York Homeopathic Medical College, New York City 

Beta Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia 

Delta Boston University School of Medicine 

Kappa Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago 

Mu Sigma Alpha . Homeopathic Medical College, University of Michigan 

Phi Hahnemann Medical College of The Pacific 



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Phi Rho Sigma 

ZtiA Chapier 
Establishid in 1897 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Warren P. I-^mbard, A.B., Sc.D., M.D. Gradv E. Clay, B.S„ M.D. 

R. Bishop Canfield, A.B., M.D. Leslie L. Bottsford, B,A„ M.D. 

Harry B. Schmfdt, M.D, Harold S. Huleert, M.D. 

Jacob S. Wendel. A.B., M.D. Arnold L. Jacobv, A.B., M.D. 

Roy a. Barlow, B.S., M.D. Rollan W. Kraft, B.S., M.D. 



FRATRES IN . 


URBE 




. R, B. McKeni^ir, M.D. 


T. S 


. Lancford, M.D. 


FRATRES IN UNIFERSITATE 


1916 
Morton E. Brownell, B.S. 
SamW. Donaldson, A.B. 
WiLLiAMj. Egan, B.S. 

EviN G. Galbraii 


Harold A. Miller, B.S. 
Edmund C. Mohr 
WarrenT. Vauchan. A.B. 
-H, B. S. 


1917 
Roland S. Cron, B.S. 
NorrisW. Gillette, A.B. 
John B, Grant, A.B. 

1918 


Geo 
Ray 
Geo 


RGE McClure, B.S. 

MONdJ. NUITING, B.S. 

KCR D. Trhadcold 


Clifford W. Brainard Wm, H. Von Bketschn 
Donald K. Bacon Clyde K. Haslev. A.B 
Chas. a. Bosworth Parker He.vih 
PaulW. Beaven, A.B. 

1919 




George R. Herrmann 
MacNalchton Wilkinson, B.S. 
Thomas L, Tolan 
Doui-.LAs Donald, A.B. 


Earl B. McKinlev Douglas T. Hoffman 
J. Raymond Pugh 




HakryF, Becker 
Leonard F. Thalneh 



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->rn 




ROLL OF CIUPTERfi 

Alpha Northwestern University Medical School 

Beta University of Illinois, College of Medicine 

Gamma Rush Medical College 

Delta University of Southern California, Medical Dep 

Epsilon Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery 

Zeta University of Michigan, Medical Department 

Eta Creighton Medical College 

Theta Tal . .... University of Minnesota, Medical School 

Iota University of Nebraska. College of Medicine 

Kappa Western Reserve University, School of Medicine 

Lambda Medico-Chirurgical College 

Mu State University of Iowa, College of Medicine 

Nu Harvard Medical School 

Omuroh Marquette University, School of Medicine 

Pi Indiana University, School of Medicine 

Rho Jefferson Medical College 

Sigma University of Virginia, Departnient of Medicine 

Upsilon Medical College of Virginia 

Phi University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine 

Skull and ScEFrRK .... Yale University, Medical Department 

Chi University of Pittsburg, Medical Department 

Psi University of Colorado, School of Medicine 

Alpha Omega Delta University of Buffalo, Medical Department 

OmicRON Ohio State University, Medical Department 

Alpha Heta Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Alpha Gamma ... McGill University, Faculty of Medicine 



ALUMNI CHJPTERS 



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Phi Beta Pi 

Beta Chapter 
Eslablishid in ISOS 

FR/HRFS L\- FACULT^TE 

Theophcl 
;, B-S„ M,D. W. 1. LiLi 

F RATER IN URBE 
GtORtJH F, MuEHLcc, B.S., M.D. 



FRJTRES IN UNirERSITJTE 




1916 




Harry C. Hackman, B.S. 




Fred P. Currier, B.S. 


Harolii Henderson, B.S- 




Clarence A, Christensen 


Anthony H. Lanoe, B.S. 




JohnO. Dleterlf, B.S. 


Chab 


us R. Thom 
1917 


AS, A.B. 


R. Lee Lathd, B.S. 




KlssellW. Ullrich, B.S 


Benjamin G. Holtom, B.S, 




Austin W. Heine, B.S. 


Charles M. Anderson, B.S. 




LoREN W. Shaffer. B.S. 


Jack H, Hamjll, B.S. 


191S 


Harold!.. Kennedy, B.S. 


Anthony R, Grcerson 




Harry G. I.undcren 


Elden C. Baumoartf.n, A.B. 




Arvid W. Ericsson 


John F. Foss 


1919 


Charles E. Anderson 


Thos. J. LeBlanc 




Herman E. Bozer 


Albert K. Bothe 




Georoe R. Hagerman 


Carl E. Badgley 




Lawrence W. Becnhauer 


Harold D. Barnabo 




George R. Aniierson 


WCLLCAM D. StINSON 




Charles N. Weller 



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Phi Ps[ 
Chi 
Alpha Alpha 
Alpha Beta 
Alpha Gamma 
Alpha Delta 
Alpha Epsilon 
Alpha Zeta 

Alpha Iota , 
Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Lambda 
Alpha Mu . 



founded at the Univti 



CHAPTER ROIL 
University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Pa. 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Micb. 
Rush Medica! College, Chicago, 111, 

Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md. 
lefFerson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Northwestern University, Chicago. 111. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, III. 
Detroit Medical College, Detroit. Mich. 
St. Louis University, St. Louis. Mo, 
Washington University. St, Louis, Mo. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Ind. 
University of Iowa, Iowa City, la, 
Vanderbilt University, Nashville. Tenn, 
University of Alabama. Mobile. Ala. 
University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 



John A, Creighton University, Omaha, Neb. 

Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 

Syracuse University, Syracuse. N. Y, 

Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington. Ind. 

University of Virginia, University, Va. 

University of Kansas, Lawrence. Kansas 

University of Texas, Galveston. Te^as 

University of III a bom a, Norman. Okla. 

University of Louisville. Louisville, Ky. 

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Harvard University, Brookline, Mass. 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 



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Phi Alpha Deha 

Campbell Chapter 
Established in 1905 



FRJTRES IN F-4CVLTATE 



Grover C. Grtsmore, A.B., J. D. 



i>T, Barbolr. A.M.. LL.D. 



FRJTRES IN UNirERSlTATE 



Hugh G. Alllrton, A.B, 






Roy 


■ A, NoRD. B.S. 


H. Donald Brown, Ph. B. 






Hec 


mvC. KUMMEL, A.B. 


James L. Donnelly 






JOH 


N p. Scott 


Stanley J, HiETT,A.B. 






Wei 


*NER W. SCHROEDER, A.B. 


EdwardS. Martin, A.B. 






Perry H. Stevens 


W. Leslie Miller, A.B. 






Ml-, 


«PHV 0. T.^TE 


William C. Mullendore, 


A.B. 




Las 


H Thomas 




Eloi 


■D L. YoUNf 

1917 


-., A.B. 




Thomas E. Atkinson 






Haf 


LRY R. Hewmt, A.B. 


TheronW-Atwooi>J[<„A,B. 




Hai 


lOLD F. KORN 


Lloyd E. Battles 






Hai 


irisonL, McCarthy, A.B. 


Julius L. Beers. A.B. 






Thomas V. McDonalp, B.S. 


George C, Caron, A.B, 






DoLGLAS F. Smith 


Leonard P. Diederichs 






Charles P. Waitles, A.B. 






1918 






Moss W. Amis 






Gec 


>RGE F, Hurley 


Joseph B. Comstock, A.B, 






AMt 


IS F. Pa LEY 



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onha-tiUrn University, 1S9? 



ROLL OF CIIAPTKkS 



Chccac.o-Kent Collegf 
Northwestern Univer 
Chicago Law School 
University of Chicago 

UnIVERSIIY of WlSCONS 



Ui 
Universcty o 



University of Missouri 

Yale Uncversity 
University of Kansas , 
University of Virginia 
Universitv of Colorado 



Arkansas 
Western Reserve University 
Kansas City Law School 
Illinois Wesleyan University 

Cincinnati Law School 
University of Oregon 
New York University 
John B. Stetson University 



F Maine 



F North Dakota 
University of Southern California 
Leland Stanford, Jr., Univ 
University of California 
Washington and Lee University 
Denver University Law School 
University of Idaho 

F Kentucky 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 



Chicago, Illinois 
Portland, Oreoon 
New York City, New York 
Washington, D. C. 
Kansas City. Missouri 



Los Angeles, California 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Grand Forks, North Dakota' 
::o, California 



J 



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Phi Chi (Medical) 

Psi Chaptfr 



FRATRES IN FJCULTJTE 



R. F. McCoTTER, M.D; 

C. Georg,Jk., A.B.. M.D- 
H. H. CuMMiNfis, M.D, 



O. C. Glaeer, Ph-D. 

J, L. Worcester, M.D, 

J. W. Sherrick, A.B„ M.D, 



FRATER IX URBE 



H, C, Cowan, B,S. 



., C. Todd, A,B, 
-, A. HoAc, B.S. 
I. H. MUI-LER, B.S, 

Z. R. ScARBORO, A.B, 

J. J, Busman 
?, E. Gordon 
iV.J, Greenfield, A.E 
W. R. HooN, A.B. 

^. J. PRALL 



:. W. Sherwooi>, B.S. 

I. E. Parkinson 



FRATRES IN UNIS'ERSITATE 
1916 



R.J. Snider, B.S. 
L, E, Waish 
W. M. Taffan, A.B, 
L, D, Funk, A,B. 

R, H, RufDEMANN, 1!,S. 

R. M, Vincent, B,S, 
D, C, EiSELF, B.S. 
C, Brake 



M, Miner 

¥.. Sink, A,B,, M,S, 

T, Berthold 

W, J, Jo^ 

1., Chrol 



C. C, Steggall 



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"^ 




Alpha Alpha 

Alpha Theta 

Alpha Mu . 

Beta 

Beta Beta . 

Gamma 

Gamma Gamva 



Kappa Delta 
Kappa Upsilos . 
Lambda Rho 



SitiMA The 
Sigma Ups 



Phi Beta 
Phi Rho 
Ph! Sigma 



CHAPTER ROLL 
Uni 



Univi 



V of Vermont 



ville 



ity of Tennessee 
Western Reserve University 
University of Intliana 
University of Oregon 
University of Maryland 
Ohio State University 
Bowdoin College 
Tufts College 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 
Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery 
University of Texas 
Medical College of Virginia 
Temple University 
University of Alabama 
University of Southern California 
Georgetown University 
Johns Hopkins University 
University of Kansas 
University of Arkansas 



Indiai 



. Uni 



IS Chris 



/ of Chicago 
Atlanta Medical College 
University of North Carolina 
Leland Sranford University 
University of Pennsylvania 
George Washington University 
Univeisity of Illinois 
St. Louis University 

Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery 
Jefferson Medical College 
Medico-Chirurgical College 
University of Michigan 



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#■'*" 




Psi Omega 





Gamma Ch 


PTRR 




foB 


ded in 


IS92 




FUJTkKS 


/.\ F.-ICUI.T.ITE 


Dr- H. S. Baii.f,v 




1916 


Dk, i'. C. Coi.E 


Lester H. Bouquin 






Franf N. Leicht 


Ferdinand G. Dratz 






Lyman L, Jones 


Harold M. Lechner 






Cliffior p. Haas 


ROV E. MORAN 






JohnH. Barringer 


Raymond;. MuLLEH 






Herbert R. Wilson 


George E, Chichester 






Joseph R, Hawn 


William B. Klienestec 


KER 




John A. Campbell 


Mathew E. McKenna 






Roy N. Fonda 


Robert J, Wrlls 




1917 


J-GWYNJONES 


Oris L. Sutherland 






Stanley J. SLAZfNSKi 


Spracue F. Carpenter 






Frederick Gerhstad 


Fredic C. Frank 






Arthur E. Hammond 


James E. Oberlin 






Joseph Wilson 


Ray E. Stevens 






Henry B. Felton 


Walter J. Reason 






Charles A. Baribeau 


Fennimore E. Putt 






Frederick W.Friw 


Albert J. Schmultzler 




191S 


Daniel B. Newton 


Lester K. Davjee ■ 






Max M. Williams 



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•^ 




ACTIVE CHAPTERS 



Baltimore'College of Dental Surserv 
New York College of Dentistry 
Pennsylvania Col. of Dental Surgerv, Phila. 
- (Combined with Zeta) 
Tufts Dental College, Boston, Mass. 
Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 0. 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Dental Colle(>e 
University of Buffalo, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Northwestern University, Chicago, 111. 
Chicago College of Dental Surg., Chicago, III, 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
University of Denver, Denver, Col. 
University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Harvard University Dental School 
Louisville College of Dental Surgerv 
Baltimore Medical College, Dental'Dep't, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Dental 

Department, San Ftaneisco, Cal. 
Ohio College of Dental Surgery, Cincinnati 
Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia 
Atlanta Dental College, Atlanta, Ga. 
Western Dental College, Kansas City 



University of Maryland, Baltimore 
North Pacific Dental Col., Portland, Ore. 
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 
Indiana Dental College, Indianapolis, Ind. 
University of Illinois, Chicago 
George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C. 
University of California, San Francisco 
New Orleans College of Dentistry 
St. Louis Dental College, St. Louis, Mo. 
Keokuk Dental College, (Defunct.) 
Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. 
Southern Dental College, Atlanta, Ga. 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Col. of Dental and Oral Surg, of New York 
University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 
Vanderhilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 
University Col. of Medicine, Richmond, Va. 
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 
Washington Univ., D. Dep't., St. Louis, Mo. 
Kansas City Dental College 
Wisconsin College of P. and S., Milwaukee 
Texas Dental College, Houston 
University of Southern California, 
Los Angeles, Cat. 



New York City 
Pittsburg, Pa, 
Minneapolis, Minn 
Chicago, III. 
Boston, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa, 
New Orleans, La. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Seattle, Wash. 
Portsmouth, Ohio 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

Iowa City, la. 
New Jersey State 






D, Cal, 



Portland, Ore, 
Washington, D, C, 
Ohio State 
Wilkes-Barre and Scr 
Atlanta, Ga, 
Kansas City, Mo, 
Alabama State 



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Alpha Kappa Kappa (Medical) 



Eslabtished 1906 



FRJTXER IN FJCULTJTE 



C. J, Addcson 

R. H. BflKER 

D. H, jErFERS 



L, A. Kerglson 

C. M. COLDREN 

J. R. Darnaln 
M. D, Haag 
C, C. Hyde 



H. W. Shutter 
C. L. Steai.v 

K. S. S-JAATi 

J. W, Jones 
R. T. Larson 
W. I. Seakles 

K. F. Traub 
V. A. Van Volkenbi 
R, W. Watson 
L. S, Weleourn 



A. D, Allen 
N. C. Bender 

D, W. GuDAKUNST 



W, C. Kii.: 
W. C, SKrr 
T. L. Suui 



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-■■•?% 




Fcuvded at Dartmouth Coltfgi in ISSS 

CFIAPTER ROLL 

Alpha Dartmouth College 

Beta College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Gamma Tufts Medical School 

Dklta L'niversity of Vermont 

Epsilon Jefferson Medical School 

Ze] A Lone Island Colieee Hospital Medical School 

Eta Universitv of Illinois 

Theta Maine Medical School 

ioTA University of Syracuse 

Kappa Marquette University 

Lambda Cornell University 

Mu University of Pennsylvania 

Nu University of Chicago 

Xr Northwestern Universitjf 

Omicron University of Cincinnati 

Pi Steiling<)hio Medical School 

Kho University of Colorado 

Sigma University of California 

Tau University of the South 

Upsilon University of Oregon 

Pill University of Nashville 

Chi Vanderbilt University 

Psi University of Minnesota 

Omzga University of Tennessee 

Alpha Beta Tulane University 

Alpha Gamma University of Georgia 

Alpha Delta McGill University 

Alpha Epselon University of Toronto 

Alpha Zeta George Washington University 

Alpha El A Yale University 

Alpha Theta University of Texas 

Alpha Iota University of Michigan 

Alpha Kappa University College of Medicine 

Alpha Lambda Medical College of South Carolina 

Alpha Mu St. Louis University 

Alpha Nu University of Louisville 

Alpha Xr Western Reserve University 

Alpha Omicron University Medical College 

Alpha Pi University of Pittsburg 

Alpha Rho Harvard University 

Alpha Sigma Universitv of Souihetn California 

Alpha Tau Atlanta Medical College 



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Pi Upsilon Rho 

Vehtebba Octa 
Eslabhihed ii 1906 



FRJTRES /A" FACULTATE 



C. B. Stoufver, M.D. 

J. F. Br.iNN, B.S,. M.S., M.D, 



FRATRES IN UMIERSITATE 



C. C. WOLCOTT, B.S. 



John D. Coons, A. B. 



J. M.Scott, A.R., M.S. 



PRE MEDIC 
Howard Cobane J. R. Williams 

J. V. Stewart Paul 1- Keller 

H. J, Hyde 



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-.■f 



^ 




ftO 

Founded at Hahnemann Midical ColU^/- in 1S77 

P"™* Hahnemann Medkal College 

TeRTIa Ohio State University 

QOARTA Hahnemann Medical College 

*^* University of Michigan 

ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Chicago, III. Cleveland, 0. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



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Gamma Eta Gamma 

Zeta Chapter 
Eslabhshed in 1910 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 
Professor J, R. Rood 

FRJTRES IN UNIFERSITJTE 



Warren E. Talcott 
Robert 0. Buowhell 
Lawrence M. Spragle 
Harold J. Wafles 



Walter F. Whitman 
George S. Cooper 
LOHIE D. Rartlett 
Harry A. Babcock 



Ralph F. Gates 
Louis F. Dahling 
Leo F. Covey 
Julius L, Berns 
Francis E. Kennev 
Grant L. Cook 



Kenneth O. Dovle 
Lloyd J. Curby 
Jay T. Bell 
Lewis E. Reimann 
Forest E. McKee 
Henry L. Cowi.jn 



Ross G. Walker 
Frank C. Wagner 
Arthur J. Adams 



WiLLiAM W, Jenkins 

Paul P. Bell 

James H. Cartwricht 



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f^ 



^.i^NM 



Founded in 1901 al the UniverHly oj Msint 

CHAPTER ROLl. 

Alpha University of Maine 

Beta University of Boston 

Gamma Albany University 

Delta Syracuse University 

Epsil-ON Cornell University 

Zeta University of Michigan 

Eta Indiana University 

Theta Creighton University 

Iota Georgetown University 

Kappa Oregon University 

ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

New York . Rangor 

Albany Ithaca 

Boston Detroit 



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Sigma Delta Chi 

Gamma Chapter 
Established in lOIO 



FRATRES IN FACVLTATE 



Prof. Fred Newton Scott, Ph.D. 
AssT. Prof. John R. Brumm, A.M. 

Lymann Llc 



Harold Phclippi Scott, .A.B. 
Edward Simpson Everett, A.l 
) Bryson, A.B. 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Walter Stalbler Aiina Jon 

John Singleton Switzer 



FRATRES IN VNIVERSITATE 



Theodore Hawley Tapping 
Francis Fowlrr McKinney 
Clarence Arthur Swaineon 
James Madison Barrett, Jr. 
Edward Pultney Wright 
Donald Abram Smith 
Waldemar Alfred Paul John 
Joseph Broth erton 
H. Kirk Whitk 

JOH 



Conrad N. Church 
Thomas C. Reid 
Albert D. Conkey 
Irwin C. Johnson 
Verne E. Burnett 
H.ARoLD A. Fitzgerald 
William B. Newton 
John C. B. Parker 
Waldo R. Hunt 



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Sigma. Delta Chi 

CHAPTER ROLL 

NATIONAL JOURNALISTIC FRATERNITY 

Foundid al DrPavw University in 1909 



Alpi^a ........ DePauw University 

Beta University of Kansas 

Gamma University of Michigan 

Delta University of Denver 

Zt:\\ University of Washington 

Eta Purdue University 

THtTA Ohio State University 

Iota University of Wisconsin 

Kappa University of Iowa 

Lambda University of Illinois 

Nu University of Missouri 

Xi University of Texas 

Ohicron . University of Oregon 

Pi University of Oklahoma 

Rho University of Indiana 

Si<;m.\ University of Nebraska 

Tau Iowa State College 

UpsiLON Lcland Stanford University 

Phi University of Montana 

Ch[ University of Louisiana 

Psi Kansas State Agricultural College 

Omega University of Maine 

Beta Alpha University of Chicago 

Bkta Beta ... .... Beloit College 



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Delta Theta Phi 

Chhistiancy Senate 
EilahUshid in 1911 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Gkorge W. Banta, *Ae 

F RATER L\ VRBE 
Edward W. Hajelip 

FRATER IN UNIVERSITATE 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



H. 1„ Bell 
G. W. Struckman 
Myron McLaren 
R. A. Butler 
J. C. Melaniphy 
W. J. Edwards 
J. E. Chenot 
J. W. Thomas 

A. A. Mattson 
George Whctmarsh 
Herman Pomfer 
Charles Mehaefy 
S. J. Slavens 
F.G.Millard 



L. C. DjEBLE 

Rutgers Alexander 
G. R. Thoeminc 

F. R. NoHTHWAY 

James Golden 
John D. Waits 
Morse D. Campbell 
Norman Crawford 
Alvon Buiby 
Leonard Neiter 
Wallace C. Hall 
Harky E. Johnson 
Lewis J, Holtiier 
Cljnton p. Anderson 



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Fovndfd at th( Cleveland Latv Sckvol, 1913 



SUBORDINATE SENATES 

Rannky Cleveland Law School 

WiGMORE Northwestern University 

Holmes Dickinson University 

CooLEY Detroit College of Law 

FCNCFC Cornell University 

Warvelle De Pa uw University 

Harlan , . . , University of South Dakota 

Bleckley University of Georjoa 

Freeman University of Tennessee 

Magkuder Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Day Western Reserve University 

KtNT New York Law School 

LuRTON Chattanooga College of Law 

Epsclon University of Arkansas 

Douglas John Marshall Law School 

Lincoln University of Chicago 

Eta Prime .... ...... Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Burks Washington and Lee University 

Theta Prime Washburn University 

Christiancv University of Michigan 

Ramsey St. Paul College 

Marshall Ohio Northern University 

Parker Union University 

Von Mosch/.iskkr Univetsity of Pennsylvania 

White Georgetown University 

Jefferson Richmond College 

Field University of Southern California 

Fuller Fordham University 

Bryan Cieighton University 

Benton Washington University 

Deady University of Oregon 

Chase Ohio State University 

Wayne ... ... Atlanta Law School 

DwiGHT Columbia University 

HowArr ... University of Utah 

Webster Webster College of Law 

Snyder Kansas City 

John Adams Brookline 

Pitney ... Newark, New Jersey 



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Alpha Rho Chi 

Iktinos Chaptkr 

FRATRES IN FACULTATK 

Prok. Her 
ION Prof- Geo 

FRATkES /A' UNII'ERSITATE 





John B, Franks 






1916 






GEOROhF. YouNO, A.B. 




Walt 


PR W, Pearl 


George L. Richardson 




J.Al, 


fXANDER McCOLL 


Chester G. Hennihcer 




Louis 


. VOORHEES 


Warren L. Rindoe 




ROLAI 


VD S. Westbrook 


George J. L.nd 


Gilbert S. Under' 
1917 


A.O, 


AIRE Irving 


George L. Cheffv 




LVNN 


W. Fry 


Glen K. Spraoue 




John; 


!ON D. Kenyon 


Lawrence T. Ray 


John B. Frank 
1918 


How^ 




Roger W.Salmon 




Orhin F. Stone 




Asa F. Colrma 


^ 






1919 




Harold M. Kiefer 




AlEF 


.RT R. Gatzke 



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CHAPTER ROLL 

Jktinos University of Michiean 

Anthemlos University of Illinois 

Demetrius Chapter . . . Ohio University 

JLfMM CHAPTERS 

Detroi: Ai.umn] .... Detroit, Michigan 
Chicago Ah vm .... Chicago. Illinois 



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Theta Xi 

Sigma Chapter 
linabUshfd 1914 

Fk.'ITRES L\' FJCULTATE 

Henrv Harold Hicjeir, E.F.„ Columbia, '04 
Hakry Stevenson Sheppard, B.E.K,, U. of M., '12 
NOBMAH KlRKW001> Shefpard. B.C.E., U. of M., '13 



FRJVmiS L\' UNWERSITATE 



HoiVAKD H. Phjlljps 
Charles R. Reynoiu 
Charles B. Marks 
Sherwood M, PiNKEf 



Francis D, CoutiHi 



Norman T.Thurs' 
Robert D- McCre 
Carl A. Batchell 
Howard W. Sheld 
EdmondA.Thoma 



DaVJT) W. I'lNKERION 

Ralph S. Scott 
Wilbur J. Schoepple 
Harold N. Golinvaux 
Wilbur W. Seablry 



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Founded at Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti 



CHAPTER ROLL 

- . . RensBElaer Polytechnic Institute 
. . Yale University 

Stevens Inscicuce of Technology 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Columbia University 

Cornell University 

Lehigh University 

Purdue University 
. , , Washington University 

Rose Polytechnic Institute 

Pennsylvania State College 

Iowa State College 

University of California 
. . State University of Iowa 

University of Pennsylvania 

Carnegie Institute of Technology 
, , . Univetsicy of Texas 

University of Michigan 
. , , Lcland Stanford, Jr., University 
of Washington 



Omi 



ALUMS! CHAPTERS 



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Sigma Delta Kappa 



FR.iTRES !.\ URBE 



Geoboe W. Sample, LL.IS. 



FRATRES IN U-MIERSITATH 



WALTtR Y.. MORRCS, K'. 

Wclbl-rM.-Brucker 
Louie H. Dunten, A.B. 
Arthur A. Morrow, A. 
Carl Folks 
PaulG. Eqer 
MuRL C. Carlton, A.B 



Albi 



T K, Uv 



Leon D. Ostrander 
Walter W. Kohleb, A.B, 
William A. Neithercut 
Charles A. Neitkercut 
Robert Butler 
Noah B. Gilliom 
Benjamen F. Rosenthal, A 
Henry W. Pet 
Frank J. Brei 



Fred N. Seahl 
Carlton H, Crawkobi 
Karl Rfnz 
Howard D. Gbckfith 
ToNV E, Amtsbuechi.e 
Arthur R. Shebk 
Charles L, Strause, ; 
George W. Lambert 
Howard B. Coblentz, 
Arthur P. Bogue 
Arthur E. Hobbs 
Cecil W. Miller 
William E. Mathews, 
Laurel A. Lundqust 

JoHnG, GUTEKUNST 

Wm. p. Johnson 
Joseph S. Wish'.rt 



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FouHd,-ii at the Cnhmily of Mkkiga'S, I9H 



CHAPTER ROLL 



University of Michigan 
Chicago Law School 
Benjamin Harrison Lan School 
Hamilton College of Law 
Benton Colleae of Law 



f%^ 



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House Clubs 



Hermitage 

Eremites 

Monks 



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.:.**3 




Clubs 



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Trigon 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

n S, Lawk 

Alfred HhNRV i.iovD, Ph.D. 

ACTII'E ROLL 



John Rhoaues Watkcns, A.B. 
Franklcn Georoe Armstrong 
Walter. Woodward Sanderson 
Hubert Brown Sturtevant 
Kemp Stucky Burge 

Chestef 



HcRBKRT Card Garrison 
Robert Milton Goodrich 
Raymond George Day 



Carl William 
Charles Cecil 
Albert Philip 



Warner Cotton Brockway 
Philip TiTL's Raymond 
Al.^n V. Livingston 



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ii..„. 




fli.-JTRES IN FJCULTJTE 
, LI-.B. Lewis M. Gram, B.S. 

Herbert C, Sadler, Sc. D. 

FRATRES IN UNIFERSITATE 



Robert 


F, Smlt 


.Ph.C 


V. WiL 


RRN He 
lAM BeR 


ZL 


John P. Sturce 
L. Gaylohd Hir 
Albert H. Jen 


Z' 


Herbei- 
DeanK 

HoWAIt 


r V. McCov 
T, Heler 

. HOGUE 

a S. Hatch 





Lest 


ER C. StAUDT 




Mav 


NARII A. NORKIS 


1917 








Cha 


LES D, GCLBER 




The 

SlAN 


DORE S. Cox 

LEV H, Emeric 


E E. Fisher 
191S 


Josfc 


f» D, Naftel 




Donald R. Hook 




Rue 


ELL DODD 




Earl A. Gelhaar. 


1919 








Ster 


..Nn Parks. Ja 


s B. Wood 







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Eremites 

{Iiidependiiii] 



nOKOk.lRY MEMBER 
Chas. Brlcr Vcbbert, A.H. 



BROTHERS !X Till-: UMr/':RSITy 
Clay W. WiLBER Harry G. Clam 



Rowland A. Nadeai 
Everett 0. Lobino 
RoBEKT Bridge 
Clinton P, Harres 
Elder A. Porter 
Glenn M. Coulter 
Frank J. Vonachen 
Habrt R. Leach 
William O'B. Hi 
Harry J. Mocford 
Hart H. Fleming 
Ernest E. M. George 
Harold J. McFari^n 
Harry G, Alcox 
Clarence B. Campbe 



William E. Votruba 
BOYQ C, Bi.v 
J. W. Howard Hurd 
Carl A, Anderson 
Leman H. Scott 
Norman W. Wassman 
Harolo W. Collins 
Selwyn a, Lambert 
Pall K. Choletie 
Charles H. McCartv 
Carl H. Wilmot 
William H. Granse 
Carl A. Anderson 



RoBt 



r S, Bri 



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4i''i'% 




FRATER !,\ FACULTATE 
Alfred H. Lloyd, Ph.D. 



FRATER IN URBE 
LvoN F. Tehfiv, C.E. 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
1916 



Wekneh W. Scmhoedek, / 
Floyd L. Yolng, A.B. 
Henry C. Rummel, A.B. 
William R. Carpenter 
W. Ward Mc Arthur 
Eaele D, Atwateh 



Howard H. Brewer 
John P. Carritte, Jr. 
Walter W. Kurtz 
William B. Warren 
Howard S. Map 



John E. Wheeler 
Lee N. Parker 
Glenn O.Williams 
Clarendon E. Streetee 
R. Harry Leslie 



John V. Kuivine> 
Robert J. Kkll 
Lemuel C. Whitn 
FisKE S. Church 
Edward J. RoxBU 



Charles F. He* 



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Phoenix 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



L. Rav Buckendale 
Wilfred A. Davliis 
WiLSOM C. Homer 
Elmer G. Munz 



Donald R. Blakeslee 

Eakle W. CuMMrNCS 

Carl E, Roser 



3eM. Burns 
SICK J. McDoNii 
V K. Storms 



Milton P. Chrcsta 
E. Elmer DesJardini 
Kenneth McColl 
Harry B. Pa ulcer 
Edward M. ScHAFfTb 
Archibald Walls 



MOHBPS P. Dalby 
Lloyd T. Ginn 
William S. O'Donni 
Harold M. Reevhs 
J. Douglas Thoebui 
William T.WatkpN! 



Donald R. Frf 



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mr^- 



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Akhenaton Society 





■ F RAT RE 


K l,\ 


t-RRI: 




NORWAN S. F1.OOK 










l.v«A^ R, Fl 




Chah 


;les 


W. H 


OWKLL 




FRJTk/:S 


IN 


UMfERSITATE 


C. Kenyun Anurls 










Gerald H. Ha, 


Carl E. Badglev 










VicTOK H, Her 


Robert W, Bame 










Ward W. Hogl 


C. Ward Bovce 










Frank J. Kane 


J, Martin Brown 










Alton I- Kolf 


William J, Case 










Harrv D. LoNt 


Hazen Foster 










Carl F. Myers 


Howard L. Garry 










G. Arnold ^Yi 


CarlP. Griesmer 










John B. Smiley 



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Sororities 



In tht order of tkiir ulaMiskmint ai 
Univirsily of Michigan 

Gamma Phi Beta 

Delta Gamma 

SOROSIS 

Pi Beta Phi 

Kappa Kappa Gamma .... 

Alpha Epsilon Iota 

Alpha Phi 

Kappa Alpha Theta, 1879, re-established 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Mu Phi Epsilon (Musical) 

Chi Omega 

Westminster House .... 
Theta Phi Alpha .... 

Delta Delta Delta, 1894, te-established 



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Sororities 



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Gamma Phi Beta 



SORORES I\ URBE 



Ml 






Alice Bec 
Lillian W. Brown 
Mrs. Ruth BuRnsAL Basseit 
Mrs. Grace Colltns Breakey 
Mrs. Makion Dickinson Shaw 
Mrs. Emily Ely Abbott 
Hermina Haller 
Mrs. Sabah Hariiy Adams 



SORORES IN UMrERSirJTE 



Katherine WlEBEl 

Ethelyn Boi.en 
IsABELLE Hicks 
Constance Orcuti 

Agnes Gorman 



Vivian Kerr 




Mar. 


CARET He 


Ada Heath 




Hel* 


:N NlFFS 


Linda Eberbach 




Pansy Blake 


Charlotte Kelsey 




Mar. 


GARET Kf 


Florence Gfor.^e 


PLEDGES 


Elin 


OR True* 


Helen Hughes 




Rlti 


1 Ely 


Florence Vivian 




Dorothy Dub 




Annis Jewell 







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t 




CHAPTER ROLL 

Syracuse Universiiy, Syracuse, N, V- 
University of MichiRan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 
Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 
Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 
Goiicher College, Baltimore, Maryland 
University of California, Berkeley, California 
University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 
Barnard ColleKc Coli.mhia University, New York City 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 
University of Washington, Seattle, Washinnton 
Leiand Stanford, Jr., Universiry, Palo Alto, Cal. 
University of Oregon, Kiigene, Oregon 
University of Idaho. Moscow, Idaho 
University of Illinois. Urbana, Mlinois 



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Mrs. Ralph Aigler 
Mrs. Louis H. Bovnton 
MitS. Max Burnell 
Mr3. Gertrude Carson 




Delta Gamma 

Xi Chapter 
EitablUhtd in ISS5 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Mortimer Coolev Mrs. Karl E. Cm 

Mrs. Gardner Williams Mrs, Hugo Thiem 



SORORES IN URBE 
Miss Mary Hinsdale 
Mrs. Paul Ivy 
Mrs. Samuel MacKinnon 
Mrs. Harry G. Ras 



Mrs. Irving Scott 
Mrs, Shirley Smith 
Mrs. W. Gordon SlOh 



Mrs. Robert Effincer 
SORORES IN UNiyERSlTATE 

Graduate School 



M. Selden Ruger 


1916 


MlNA WiNSLOW 


Grace Fletcher 




Charlotte Sites 


Marion Payne 


1917 


Eleanor Stalker 


Jeannette Bartelme 


Margaret Long 


Amy Nelson 


Doris Hafford 


Caryl Malcomson 


Edith Orton 


Irene Litchman 


Grace Mark 
1918 


Elsie Paul 


Helen Ahrens 


Helen Gtfford 


Nona Myers 


Alethe Baldwin 


Frances Lyon 


Gkace Raynsford 


Helen Bourke 


Florei.la MacKay 
Elizabeth Burgess 
PLEDGES 
191M 


Hflen Grandy 


Catherine MacNaughton 


1919 


Florence Mechem 


Dorothy Armstrong 




Olive Knowlson 


Ida Belle Guthe 




Emily Loman 


Jamie Morgan 




Mary Louise Steere 



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Founded at Unheniiy of Miisiisippi in 1872 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Beta Washington State University, Seattle 

Gamma University of California, Berkeley 

F.PSiLON Ohio State University, Columbus 

Zeta Albion College, Albion 

Eta Akron Munidpal University, Akron 

Theta University of Indiana, Bloomington 

Iota University of Illinois, Champaign 

Kappa University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

Lambda University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 

Mu University of Missouri, Columbia 

Nu University of Idaho, Moscow 

Xl University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Omicron Adeiphi ColleRe, Brooklyn 

Pi ....*. University of Montana, Missoula 

Rho Syracuse University, Syracuse 

SlOMA Northwestern University, Evanston 

Tal University of Iowa, Iowa City 

Upslion Letand Sianfoid, Jr., Univ., Palo Alto 

Ph[ University of Colorado, Boulder 

Chi Cornell University, Ithaca 

Ps[ Goucher College, Baltimore 

Omega University of Wisconsin. Madison 

Alpha Beta Swarthmoie College, Swarthmore 

Alpha Gamma University of Toronto, Canada 

Alpha Delta Oregon University, Eugene 

Alpha Efsilon Washington University. St. Louis 

Alpha Zeta Lawrence College. Appleton 

.ILUMNAE CHAPTERS 

Philadelphia, Pa. Evansville, Ind. New York, N. Y. 

Seattle, Wash. Minneapolis, Minn. Baltimore, Mb. 

Los Angeles, Cal. St. Louis, Mo. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Akron, O. Denver. Colo. Pittsbukg, Pa. 



^ 



In: 



Chica 



). il.L 



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Collegiate Sorosis 

Eslahtished m im> 



ASSOCIATE MEMBIiR^ 



RESIDKNT MEMBERS 



LVDIA Cardei.1, 


Condon 


Marjorje Knowlton Dursley 


Bertha Shaw 




Amy Savage Di 


JRFEE 


Winifred Bem^ 


LN Smalley 


Caroline Esth 


EH PaTTENGILL 


Marjorie Fent 


■ON Tat LOCK 


Florence Wen 


TwoRTH Green 



JCTJFE MEMBERS 



Mrs. George f 


;. Morris 


Mks, Henky M 


. Batm 


Eva Boglk 




Ethel Morris 




Meril RowLtl 


Patierson 


JoA Memia Rat 


UDALL 


Margaret Mil 




El.^anoh Demv 


ION Tealdi 


Lois Hogle 




Bi.ANcHt Anderson Moore 


Ethel Volland Hoyt 


Unity Fletche 


R Wilson ■ 


Phviis 


POVAH 


MiLDR] 


;d Carpenter 





1917 






Clara Grover 


Katharine Remington 


Laui 


<A Parker 


Frances Way 


RUBERTA WOODWORFH 
1918 


Heli 


tN Davis 


Louise Gould 


Margaret Cooley 


Lucj 


iLE Quarry 


Gertrude Brock 


Marian Wilson 


Mar 


V McDonald 


Helen Bates 


Esther Holland 
Anna Lloyd 
PLEDGES 


Hen 


rietta Brande. 


Dorothy Allen 


RheaBarbarin 


EVAI 


ouE Wright 


Mary Brown 


Alice Worcester 


Hel; 


EH McAndrew 


Ardath Paul 


Marjorie Van Zandt 


EvAI 


^GELiNE Lewis 


Margaret Novy 


Naideau Jarvis 







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Founded in i8^S 



CuLiEiiMiK SoKOS[S .... University of lichigan 
(Kslablishtd ISWi) 



■'-^ 



■■■■'^ 



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H'i--:- 






Pi Beta Phi 






MicHCGAN Beta Chapter 






E5iahHsktd ,n I8SS 






PATRONESSES 




Mrs. Martin D'Ooce 




Mrs, Francis Keleey 


Mrs. Israel Russell 


SORORES L\' URBE 


Mrs. Albert Barrett 


Miss Effce Patch 


Mrs. Albert White 


Mrs. George Lewis 


Mrs. Alfred White 


Mrs. Henry Riggs 


Mrs. Frank Parker 


Mrs. Homer Heath 


Mrs. Ermine Case 


Mrs. Albert Chipman 


Mrs. Carl Huber 


Mrs. Lvman Bryeon 

Mrs. Ralph Miller 

SORORE !N FACULTATE 

Mies Nellie Perkins 

1916 


Mrs. Marchie Sturois 


Helen Patterson 


Mildred Backers 


Julia Barksdale 


Leola Royce 


Martha Gray 


Hazfi, Stevens 


Genevieve Corey 


Elsa Apfel 
1917 


Mary Johns 


Beatrice Huff 


Freda Penovar 


Mildred VoRCE 


Carol Meller 


Florentine Cook 


Edna Reed 


Geta Tucker 


Helen Coldren 
1918 




Frances Luke 


Ethel Jocelyn 


MaKIE Rl-ARDON 


Geneva Hayes 


Dorothy Pjerce 
PLEDGES 


Carolinf Sauiler 


Edith Butler 


Irene Kerr 


Fay Hall 


Mary S.ggers 


Eva Sharrow 


Dorothy Chipman 


Irma Robinson 


Sarah Hall 


Marion Henderson 


Helen Green 


Helen Christen 


Laurie Koffman 



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:m 



-:-y^ 




Founded at Monmouth Collfgl in 1S67 



ClUPTEk ROLL 



University OF ToKONTO 
Mioin.EBUHv College 
University of Vermont 
Boston Universitv 
Syracuse Univehstty 
St. Lawrence UNlvtusi i 
GoucHER College 
George Washington Un 
Rasdolph-Macon College 
John B. Stetson Untversi- 
swarthmore college 
BucKNELL University 
Dickinson College 
Ohio University 
Ohio State University 
Hillsdale College 
University of Michigan 
Franklin College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Wisconsin 
Lombard College - 
Knox College 

NoRTHWI 



Simpson College 
Iowa State College 
Iowa State University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Missouri 
Drury College 

OF Kansas 
Kansas State Agricultural C 
University of Arkansas 
Newcomb College 
University of Oklahoma 

University of Wyoming 
University of Colorado 
University of Denver 
Lei. AND Stanford University 
University of California 
University of Washington 
Washington State College 



Univ 



F iLl.lh 



fNeva 
IF Oregon 



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Mrs. C. Bonneb 
Mrs, W. Hobbs 
Mrs. K. Jonks 

Mrs. H. M.M.L01 
Mrs. U. Phillip 
Mrs. C. W. Cha 
Mrs. W. J. Bw 
Miss McCarthy 
Mks. E. L. Gm 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Beta Delta Chapter 

Esfablisheil in ISW 



PATHOS ESSES 



SORORES IN URBE 

KaTHRRINH MtKSERE.. 

Mrs. J. D. Rle 

I.OIS TOWNI.KV 

Mrs. a. li. i^RFKT 



*, E. HotcK 
s A. Hunt 
i, R. T. Cra 



SORORES IN UNIlERSriATE 
GRADUATES 



Honor Gaines 
Nena MacIntyre 
Elizabeth McRaf 



Christina Stringer 



Dorothy Pjerson 


Veka Kevser 


Hklen Bower 
Marian Ackley 
Frances Macdonai.u 
Beulah Thompson 


PLEDGES 
Peggy Hltzel 



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CILIPTER ROLL 

Ph[ ({„5ton University 

Ukta Kpsii i)N Barnard Colleee 

Hkta SrcMA .... AdelphI Collese 

Bfta Ai.PH.* University of Pennsvlvania 

Bpta Iota Swarchmore ColleKe 

Psi Cornell University 

Bi:ta Tau Svraciise University 

BkuPsi L'niversity of Toronto 

Gamma Rhu Alleglieiiy College 

Beta Upsilon West Virginia University 

Lambda Munkipal University 

Bkta Nu Ohio State University 

BeiaRho University of Cincinnati 

'"■'A DePaiiw University 

Ml Butler ColleRe 

Dhlta Indiana State University 

Beta Chi University of Kentucky 

Beta Dm.] a University of Michigan 

X[ ... Adrian College 

Kappa Hillsdale College 

Chi University of Minnesota 

Kta University of Wisconsin 

Upselon Northwestern University 

Epsii.ON .... Illinois Wesleyan 

B KTA Lambda University of Illinois 

Beta Zkta . lov^a State University 

Theta Missouri State University 

Omeca . Kansas State University 

Sigma Nebraska State University 

BetaMu Colorado State University 

Beta Iheta Oklahoma State University 

Beta Xi Texas State University " 

Beta Omicron Tulane University 

Beta Pht University of Montana 

Beta Pr University of Washington 

Beta OwEf-.A University of Oregon 

Pi University of California 

BEiAp:rA Leland Stanford. Jr., Univen 

Beta Bkta St. Lawrence College 



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fl-- 




Alpha Epsilon Iota 

Alpha Chapter 
Establiihd in IS90 

HONORJRY MF.MBI-RS 



Emily Blackwell 
Charlottf Brown 
Emma L. Call 



Mrs. Reuben Pet 



Bertha Van Hoosen 
PJTRONESSES 



Dk. Jeanne Solcs 



SORORES L\' URBE 
Mrs. Davfd Murray Cowi 



SORORE IN F.SCULTATE 
Dr. Elsfe Seeyle Pr^tt 



SORORES IN USII'ERSITJTE 
1916 

Mary Fcshek DeKruif. A.H. 



Helen Gage 
Jane Stf.vi-n. 



A AnNF CM.HiH 

191« 



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Founded a! the Uni 



CHAPTER ROLL 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 
Rush Medical ColleRe, Cincinnati 
Lama Memorial College, Cincinnati 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 
Cooper Medical College, San Francisco 
Cornell Medical College, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Women's Medical College, Philadelphia 
University of California, Berkeley 
University of Southern California, Los Angeles 
University of Syracuse, Syracuse. N. Y. 



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Alpha Phi 

Theta Chapter 
Eslabtished in 1892 

PATRONESSES 



SORORES L\ URBE 



Mrs. Elmer Beal 
Mrs. Florer 
Mrs. Guenther 
Mrs. Raikes 
Marv Paimer 
Margaret Smith 





.\L]cf Smith 




Agnes Inglis 




Mable Rose 




Alice Taylor 




Mrs. Taylor 




Mrs. Cancel 


Mrs. Tcllev (Alpha) 





SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Ruth Brown 




Bertha Pulford 


Esther Bury 


Dorothy Bajltfr Ing 
1917 


HELtN Dow 


Elizabeth Arthur 




Albertine Loomis 


Ruth Dow 




Blanche Kneeland 


Margaret Yocum 


191fj 


Julia Renweck 


Elizabeth Hall 




.Marion Holden 


Anna Miller 




DoKOTHY Probst 


Margaret Henderson 




Helen Brown 


Marie Leville Paulus 




Marian Williams 


Ruth MacLachlan 


PLEDGES 


Katherine Smith 


WiLMA ROTHACKER 




Els A Jane Harris 


Louise Garaghty 




Carrol Waodams 


Hilda Heuzel 




Phyllis Eggelston 


Hilda Hagarty 




Lois Deauvereaux 



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■Yi\ 




Beta 



chjptkr roll 




. Syracuse University . . , 


1872 




Northwestern University , . 


I SSI 




DePauw University .... 


1887 




Cornell University .... 


18S9 




University of Minnesota , . . 


1890 




Coiicher ColleBe, Baltimore . . 


1891 




Boston University .... 


1883 




University of Michigan 


1892 




University of Wisconsin . . . 


1896 




Uland Stanford, Jr.. University . 


1899 




University of California . . . 


1901 




Barnard College .... 


1903 




University of Nehraska . . . 


1906 




University of Toronto . . . 


1906 




University of Missouri . . . 


1910 




University of North Dakota . 


1911 




Ohio State University . 


1912 



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^ 

^^p 




s- John Lawre 
s. Horace Wili 
s. H. Lawrenc! 



Kappa Alpha Theta 

Eta Chapter 
Esiablishd in IS79 

PATRONESSES 



SORORES IN URBE 



SORORE IN FACVLTJTE 



SORORES IN UNirERSITJTE 






GRADUATES 
\9\G 



-,. Arthur G, Cam 



Mary J. Ttnsman 



M. Olivia Williams 
Margahetta DoL-r.LAS 
Dorothy Diss 



Dorothy Bastin 



Dorothea Warren 
Mae Patterson 
Ethel Hosmeb 



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'Yi^ 




founded at DePau'M Unwirsily in 1870 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha .... UePauw Universirv 

Bela Indiana Universiw 

Gamma Butler College 

Delta University of Illinois 

Eta . . , University of Michigan 

Iota Cornell University 

Lambda Vermont Universitv 

Mu ... Allegheny College " 

ScGMA Toronto University 

Ph[ Stanford University 

Tau Northwestern University 

Ch[ Syracuse University 

Rho Nebraska Universitv 

UfSiLON Minnesota University 

Psi Wisconsin University 

Omega ... University of California 

Alpha Beta Swarthmore College 

Alpha Gamma Ohio State 

Alpha Delta Goucher College 

Alpha Eta Vanderbilt University 

Alpha Th ETA Texas University 

Alpha Iota ... Washington University 

Alpha Kappa Adelphi College 

Alpha Mu .... University of Missouri 

Alpha Omicbon University of Oklahoma 

Alpha Pe University of North Dakota 

Alpha Rho University of South Dakota 

Alpha Tau University of Cincinnati 

Alpha Upsilon Washburn College 

Alpha Fht Newcomh College 

Alpha Lambda University of Washington 

Alpha Nu Montana State University 

Alpha Xi Oregon State University 

Alpha Sicma Washington State College 

.Alpha Che Purdue Universitv 

Alpha Psi Lawrence College 



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i:i- 




Alpha Chi Omega 



SORORIiS IN URBE 



Mrs. H. W. Nichols 


Miss 


i LyDIA CONIION 


Mrs.JN, S.'Hoff 


Mrs. C. a. Sink 


Mrs 


. C. F. Kyer 


Miss Leonora Allen 


Mrs. R. B. Howell 


Mrs 


. Harry Mills 


Mrs. Winifred Davis 


Mrs. Josephine Murfin 


Mis: 


! Frances Hamilton 


Mrs. Walter Staebler 


Mrs, S, M, Yutzy 


Misi 


t Maud Kleyn 


Miss Emma Freeman 


Miss Florence Potter 


Miss 


i Mabel Murphy 


Mrs. Theodore Harrison 


Miss Mavpe Bissell 


Mrs 


. Leonari, Miller 


Miss Florence Spence 


SORORES IN VNIFERSITATE 








1910 




Marguerite Caley 


Hazel McCauley 




Laura Feige 


Ruth Thomas 


Adele Westbrook 




Emu 


LV NORTHRUF 
1917 




Virginia Pierce 


BARi 


iARA Wild 


Helen Bush 


Helen Robson 


Jost 


FHiNE Randall 


Irene Russell 


Alice Blodgett 


Mar 


CARET HaUXHVRST 


Mary Drake 


Margaret Reynolds 


RUTI 


i Butler 


Frances Guilford 


Adaline McAllister 


Glai 


jY.'i Whelan 
1918 


Helen Gibson 


EsLA Holmes 


Kati 


1ERINE HaIRE 


Winifred Dayy 



Catherine Coburn 
Elizabeth Patchin 



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i.?8g 



-■■^ 




Fuundfd at DePautii Univirsily in ISS5 



CHJFTER ROLL 



Alpha Del'auw University. Greencastle, Ind. 

Beta Albion College, Albion, Mich. 

Gamma Northwestern University, Evanston, III. 

Delta Allegheny College, MeadviUe, Pa. 

EpsiLON University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Zeta New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass. 

Theta University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Iota University of Illinois, Champaign, III. 

Kappa University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Lambda Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mu Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa 

Nu University of Colorado, Boulder, Col. 

Xi University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebt. 

Omicbon Baker University, Baldwin City, Kan. 

P[ University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Rho University of Washington, Seattle, Wash, 

Sigma . , University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 

TaU Brenau College Conservatory, Gainesville, Ga. 

Upsilon James Millikin University, Decatur, III. 

Ph[ University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. 



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Mu Phi Epsilon 

Gamma Chaptf.h 
Established 1904 



IIOXOKJRY ME!\lfll-:RS 



Mmi 



E Chan 



Alice Nielson 
Germain E Schnitzer 

Jane Osborne-Hannah 
Maggie Tevte 
Katharine Goodson 
Margaret Keyes 



Jessie L. Gaynob 
Carrie Jacobs- Bond 

Alma Gluck 



P.tTRO\ESSES 






Mai 

Nel 

Grace Delry 

Charlotte Walker Hall 

Reva Koon 

Alta Ireman Muehlig 



SOkORES L\ URBE 



> DfPueM(.Club 
V MacKoy 
H Pond 



SORORES !X USIVERSITATE 



Margaret Kilby 
Alice Hall 
F.LOiSE Young 
Mabelle Simpson 
Kathryn Thompson 
Mildred Hatch 
Catherine Roccv 
Alma Knoepf 
Alma Weber 






Hazeldeau Crosby 
Josephine Miller 
Phoebe Maxwell 
Evelyn Pahthidge 
Grace Wrjoht Rathi 
Catherine Westervi 
Ruth Merriman 
Emma Knoepp 



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•^ 




Bela . 
Gamma 

Epstlon" 

Iota Alpha 

Lambda 
Mu . 

Nu . 



F^i-ndid at the MetropoHlan ColUie of Muiic. Cincinnati. Ohio, 1903 

CHAPTER ROLL 
Metropolitan College of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio 
New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mas 
University School of Music. Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Detroit Conservatory of Music, Detroit, Mich. 
Toledo Conservatory of Music, Toledo, Ohio 
DePatiw University, Greencastle, Indiana 
Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Kroeger School of Music, St. Louis, Mo. 
Chicago Musical College, Chicago, 111. 
Metropolitan School of Music, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Ithaca Conservatory of Music, Ithaca, N. Y. 
Rrenau College Conservatory, Gainesville, Ga. 
University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. 
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 
Combs Broad Street Conservatory, Philadelphia, P 
Lawrence Conservatory, Appleton, Wise. 
Von Unschuld University of Music. Washington, D 
Northwestern University Music Department, Eva 
Conservatory of Music. Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ohio 
University of Washington, Seattle, Wash, 
Pennsylvania College of Music, Meadville. Pa. 



JU'MXAE ASSOCIATIONS 



iti, Ohio 



Cincii 

Boston, Mas 
Ann Arbor. Mich. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
St. Louis. Mo. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



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Chi Omega 

Eta Chapter 
EslabtUhed in 1905 



P.iTRONESSES 



Mrs. Edwin C. Goddarii 
Mrs. Julius Schlotterbec 
Mrs. F. N. Menefee 
Mrs. Paul DeKrief 



SOflORES IN URBE 



A TiNKHAM 

Henrietta Calhoun 
Mrs. William Searles 



SORORES IN UNirERSITATE 



Meroe Cubbet 
Helen McDonald 



Nellie Rosewarne 
Luella Gallmeyeh 
Norma Stroh 



Mabcaret Cres 
Alice Fish 
Ruth Rosevflt 



ZoE Fleming 
Gertrude Greenin 
Edith Dvt 



IE HoMINC 

A Norton 
;n Niles 



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r^ 




Faundid at the Uiiversily oj Arkan 



University of Arkansas 
Thansvlvania Uniyersctt 
Randolph-Macon Woman's Colli 
TuLANE Universcty, Newcomae C 
University of Tennessee 
University of Illinois 
Northwestern University 
UNiyERsiTY of Wisconsin 

Ui 
University o 

University of Texas 
West Virginia University 
UNivERSin- OF Michigan 
University of Colorado 
Dickinson College 



■fCai 
IF Kansas 



s 1S95 

Florida Woman's College 
Colbv College 
University of Washington 
University of Oregon 
Jackson College 
George Washington Univers 
Syracuse University 
Ohio University 
Miami University 



-F Missc 

■F ClNCI. 



Univ 

Univ 

CoE College 

University OF Utah 

I, ELAND Stanford University 

New Hampshire College 

Kentucky State University 



Fayeiteville, Arkansas 
Washington, D. C. 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Oxford, Mississippi 
Knoxville, Tennessee 
Chicago, Illinois 
Kansas City, Missouri 
New York City, New Yori 
New Orleans. Louisiana 
Lynchburg, Virginia 



ALUMNAE CHAPTERS 
Den 



I, COLOB 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Portland, Oregon 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Seattle, Washington 
Los Angeles, California 
Dallas, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
EucENE, Oregon 



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Westminster 

Ejlablishfd in 1909 



PATRONESSES 



Mrs. Tracy McGregor 
Mrs. Herbert J. GouLDc 
Mrs. Wclliam D. Hrndei 



Mrs. Thomas E. Rankfn 



ACTIFE MEMBERS 
Maude Hoofer. A.B. Alma El 





1917 






Freda Garre 


tt 




1918 




Lois Donaldson 




Mary McDonald 


Margaret Douglas 




Zelpha Pallfster 


Do ROTH V Johnston 


H.^^el Selb' 
1919 


Mildred Schillin. 


Helen Gourlev 




Mildred Sutton 


Naedeau Jarvis 




Caroline Wittma: 


ASSOCIATE MEMBER 


Ei 


.LEN StEVENSO 


N, '19 



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-:r^ 




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4'1v>- 




Theta Phi Alpha 



PATRONESSES 



KORORI: J\ FACUI.TATE 



SO RO RES IN UNirERSITATE 



Kathlyn C. Hoi. 



Mary E. Walsh 



Cathebine B, Wvnm 



Kathekine M, Dohebly Genevieve A. Walsh 

Marguerite H. Eness Valora F. Quinlan 

Marguerite M. Hill Helen C, Camins 



Edith E, Dunn 



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-v^-m 



■^ 




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Delta Delta Delta 



EstabUsha 


in mi. 


Re-^^Kib, 


Hshei in 1915 


Mrs. Horatio J. Abbott 


PATRONESSES 

Mrs, C^ri 


L F, Bhaun 




Mrs. He 


.RACE W. King 








SORORES IN VRBE 






Mrs. John R. Brumm 
Mrs. James G, Gumming 
Mrs. Lelch J. Young 
Mrs. Charles S. Millen 
Mrs. George W. Knoefper 

Mrs. Ja: 


Miss Daisy Andrus 
Miss Frieda WuERFEL 
Mrs. William A. FRAYER,n 
Mrs. T. a. Lowry. T 

ws F.. Harris 


SORORES /A' 


UNIVERSITATE 






GRADUATE 










Alic 


E Richard 








Margaret Bogeuriedi 

Aris Van Dedsen 
Marcan Stowe 

F.RMINA FlLLINGHAM 


Id 


1916 
A Lewis 




Edna 
Ruth 
Heryi 
Em I LI 

ESTEL 


Bromley 
Elliott 

LE Hooper 


Genevieve Rowe 
Nellie Hobbs 
Mildred Treat 

Paulene Champlin 
Gladys Greening 

Hazel Hoffman 
Hilda Weurfel 
Margaret Addison 
Ella Rae 


1917 

1918 
PLEDGES 




Blanche Williams 
Florence Bowles 
Marjorie Needham 

Ann Christenson 

Ieatrice Grace 
i ANN AH Champlin 

:vA Powell 



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-■■y^ 




C.II.IPTER ROLL 



HoLLiNS College 



University of WiscoNsrN 
Ohio State Univebsjty 
gouchek colleo.e 
svracusk 

Northwestern Univerjii 

University OF Pennsylv. 

Stanford 

Adelphi 

Wesleyan College 
Stetson 
Brenau College 



Franklin 




CoE College 




UnTvositv 


F Arkansas 


Drury 




Butler 




University o 


F Alabama 


Mt. Union 




University o 


F Missouri 


University c 


F Texas 


University c 


F Colorado 


University t 


F Oklahoma 


University c 


F Oregon 


Southwestern University | 


University c 


F Washington 


University c 


F Wyoming 


University c 


F Nevada 


Kansas Stat 


E College 




....„^ — -,*.^,™.-, .*»- 



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Newberry Residence Hall 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Mrs. Henry B. Jov Grosse Pointe Farms 

Mrs. Alexis Angell ... Detroit 

Miss Claihr Sanrehs Detroit 

Mrs, Henry Douglas Ann Arbor 

Mrs. Myra B, Jordan Dean of Women 

Mrs, Erie I.AYTON Gates Social Director 

Miss Cl.ira Hunt Business Manager 

HOUSE OFFICERS 

Donna E. Slllivan .... President 

Janet McFarlane Vice- President 

EiLENE Lamb Secietary 

Blanche Kerns Treasurer 

Evelyn Moore Fire Captain 

Louise Stahmer Sanitarian 

HOUSE COMXHTTEE 

Ilah M. Gordon . , , , Senior 

Evelyn W, Moore Junior 

1 Patchin Sopiiomore 

D Johnson, Dorothy Duri-ee Freshmen 





HOUSE 


ROLL 






SEMORS 




EvALVNN Walker 






Ilah Gordon 


Marjorie Carlisle 






Blanche Kerns 


Bertha Lees Cowley 






Donna Sullivan 




JUMORS 




Florence E. Bowles 






J.ANET McFarlane 


Mildred J. Crissev 






Evelyn W. Moore 


Helkn G. Davis 






Florence B. Paddock 


Helen E. Felpkamp 






Carrie M. Partlow 


Flora Gates 






Mary N. Porter 


Irma Hazel Giddinc.s 






Anne Ratterman 


Nellie M. Hobes 






Julia Reswick 



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SOPHOMORES 




Ruth Bellows 




Anna Miller 


Ella C. Bliss 




Marie C- Macaulav 


Fhancks M. Broene 




Clarissa McCollom 


Margaret K. Cummings 




Elizabeth Patch in 


Ada Fitch 




Meta K. Prance 


Frances Handibo 




Ella G. Ray 


Ejlzne Lamb 


FRESHME,\ 


Louise S, Stahmer 


DoKOTHV Armstrong 




Gertrude E. Gunn 


Ada Arnold 




Lucile Hall 


Mary Louise Alexander 




Katheryn Johnson 


Marcabet Atkinson 




MiLKRED Johnson 


Lo[s Bennallack 




Hope Keeler 


AiLEEN Case 




MUTSU KlKUCHI 


Hannah Champlin 




Carmen McClelland 


Helen M. Cullen 




Phyllis C. Mann 


Olivia Demmon 




Mildred Mighell 


Dorothy Durfee 




Marguerite Novy 


Naomi Dysert 




Antrvnetta Poel 


Irene Eddy 




Emily Powell 


Grace G. Emory 




Leda Prichard 


Groeso Gaines 




Viola B. Rohinson 


Ethel H. Glauk 




Josephine Rosenblum 


Beatrice Grace 




Kameyo Sadakata 


Dorothy W. Gruss 




Olive Wiggins 



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Martha Cook Building 

./ Rfsid^nte Hall for lF<,me>: Ended in Mfmcry 

M*RTHA WoLFORD CoOK 

First opened (or sladenU October, 1915 

BOARD OF GOrERNORS 
,1ke. Chauncey F. Cook, Hillsdale, Mich., Pmi, 
4rs. Frederick li. Stevens. Dectoii, Mich. 
4[SE (iRACE G. MiLLABU, Detroit, Mich. 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

Frances C. Mack 

STUDENT OFFICERS 

Alice Kraft, '18, Treasurer 

EXECUTirE COMMiTTEIC 

STUDENT RESIDENTS 



JoCTrw'n 
Altha Hrf 



H Meakin 
tKNCE Power 



Ruth Butler 
Hflen Clark 
Helen Coldren 
Florentine Cook 
Crystal Emerson 
Golda Ginsburo 
Miriam Heideman 
Maroaret Henkel 



Hei 



■N Krl 



e Krl 



Mahjorze McKeown 



Helen Rickey 

F.VELYN ScHULTK 

Eva Sh arrow 
Marguerite Strachan 



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"'^i 



■•r^ 




Doiinifory 



Selma Bandemer 
Henryetta Bhanhei 
Hermione Cohn 
Lucille Colby 
Grace Edwards 
Hilda Flink 
Marion Galton 
Mable Hall 
Alice Holtzafple 

Marion Ackley 
Lucille Anderson 
Doris Anschutz 
Irma Anschutz 
Vera Afel 
Mabel Bannister 
Rhea Barbaein 
Edna Bar ringer 
Muriel Bauman 



Ha? 

Belle Blumenthal 
Kathleen Brennan 
Helen Christen 
Beryl Chynoweth 
Doris Cline 
Alice Colcord 
Cleta Cole 
Floiience Cooper 
Helen Davis 



Christina Kersey 
Vera Keyshr 
Alice Kbaft 
Blanche Lane 
Catherine MacNaughtom 



Hai 



tMel 



Chaeloite Hui 



Loi 






Emily Loman 
Virginia Look 
Frances Macdonald 
Anna MacMahon 
Helen McAndrew 
Beatrice McKnigkt 
Clara Meche» 



Mil 



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Frith Heall 



PATRONESSES 



LEAGUE HOUSE 
Mrs. J- F. Adams. :i6,Nortli Scar. 



AWEY M 

Mary R< 

Anita Bk 



ROSEV 



Olga Sihnkman 
Marjorii Vote 



Kdith DLt 
Jennie Du 
Edith Dv^ 
Marian Hi 



ROZELLA NoBLK 

Clara TuBBS 
Clara Wohlfahrt 



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^'r-:- 




taBS'i 



Intliefollowingpaoes 
will be fotind the 
animtmcGments of 
many reliible marliaufe 
who have contributed 
aateriaiy to the success 
of this volume, z' 
We bespeak yfour 
patronafee in return 



''aBsssasasaaiB^^^^^^ 



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i'ERTIaEMENTS 



Coffee 17£Z Standardized 




We have the most perfect, modern 
equipment for coffee roasting 

LONG experience has made us experts in selecting 
the best coffees and in blending them with cer- 
tainty of desired results. 

We import direct from the coffee-growing countries. 

We blend and roast the coffees and ship direct to you. 

We ascertain just the blend you want and then supply 
it always the same. 

Our products are standardized. There's no guesswork 
about them. 

Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

409-411 West Huron Street Chicago, 111. 



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DESIGNERS AND MAKERS OF 

Fraternity and Society Badges 




Diamonds, Watches 
Silverware 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

IN NEWEST STYLES 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 




i WOODWARD AVENUE AT GRAND RIVER ^ 

DETROIT 



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You want your clothes 
to possess quality and style 

We can give you both. Our materials are the 
very best and our styles are the very latest 

Burchjield Customers are looked at twice 



S. W. Burchfield & Company 

106 East Huron Street 



S— The Daily 



Ca Unbar 

5 — University opens and the new assem- 
bly of'Frosh" and others ease our 
to their first eight o'clock. Uni- 
versity enrollment increases 500 

6 — Varsity opens football season with 
a 39-0 score over Lawrence. The 
announcement of President Wil- 
son's engagement turns many 
Democrats into Socialists. 

inounces that it will keep 

_.._ ^ ..s posted on the greatest 

conflict the world has ever known. 

Oct. 9— Our team played Mt. Union. We 
nosed out a 36-0 victory. Maulie 
and Pat Smith aren't bad at all. 
A great number of Fresh caps are 
seen at the Majestic. Call for 
Dean Effinger. 

Oct. 12— Doc. Warthin gives his usual line to 
the Freshmen. Professor Tala- 
mon decorated for bravery in the 
French army. 

Oct. 13 — Marietta springs a big surprise by 
scoring on the Varsity. Score 28-6. 
"Oh I just knew Michigan would 
win," gleefully announced one of 
the fair co-eds as she tripped out 
of Ferry Field. 

Oct. 14— Doc May finds the usual number of 
flat-footed "first year men." 



KYER&WHITKER 

PURE FOOD PURVEYORS 

FRUITS AND 
VEGETABLES 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



CANNED GOODS 
IN LARGE LOTS 
OUR SPECIALTY 



BELL PHONE 326-327-328 

114-116 EAST WASHINGTON ST. 

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 



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A D V E li T I S E M E K T S 


"h'i Our IVork That Counts" 


DAINES & NICKELS 


General Photographers 


334 and 336 SOUTH STATE STREET 


ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 


"TAf Only 5tudU on the Campui" 



The Far sit y Way 

Comfortable and Speedy 
Frequent and Reliable 



The Trolley Service 
that makes the U. of 
M. a part of Detroit 



Detroit 

United Lines 



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What Place 
Does 

EQUIPMENT 

Play in Your 

Success 

■? 



Fine equipment will never make 
up for lack of skill. But fine equip- 
ment will make possible the com- 
mercializing of your talents to the 
Cabinet No. fl7 utmost. The best paying patients 

are attracted by handsome, up-to- 
date office furniture. The atmosphere of any well-appointed office is con- 
ducive to substantial fees, supplements your request for fees that correspond 
to your services and makes an increase in rates seem thoroughly justified. 



Nearly Everyone is Untiling to Tay for JVhat They Get 

Patients feel that they are getting more — when they are attended in a 
modern, carefully-appointed office. Such service, rendered under ideal con- 
ditions, is apt to command better fees — to put you on a higher plane, or permit 
you to retain in the eyes of your customers a reputation for being progressive 
^and thus keep earning capacity to the maximum. 

Our No. 97 Cabinet is a masterpiece of beauty and efficiency. It is built 
for nien and women of discrimination and taste. It is exceedingly convenient 
durable, impressive and the price is along lines that will please you. 

Send for our complete catalog. You will find No. 97 illustrated in natural 
colors, and described on pages 36 and 37. Write this request for catalog 
now to 

The American Cabinet Co. 

Two Rivers, Wis. 



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b{ T I S E M E ^ 



SHEET MUSIC 

AN IMMENSE STOCK 

Abo headqaarurs for Instruction Booh 

SluMfs and everything for 

teacher and student 




VIOLINS 

MANDOLINS 

GUITARS 



Steinway, Grinnell Bros, and other famous Pianos 



he superb Pianola Piano Player. Sold on easy payments : 
Exclusive Michigan representatives of the world's best n 



id to 



Victors, Victrolas, Edison Phonographs, Records 

Large Stock Convenient Payment Terms Arranged 

GRINNELL BROS. MUSIC HOUSE 

24 STORES— 3 PIANO FACTORIES— HEADQUARTERS, DETROIT 
ANN ARBOR STORE, - - 116 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



FIRST 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

of Ann Arbor, Michigan 



E. D. KiNNE, S. W. Clurkson, 

President Cashie 

Harrcson Soulr, Cice-President 



Foreign Exchanee bought and sold and 
Letters of Credit for travelers. A SavinKS 
Department has been established and in- 



STARK TAXICAB LINE 

TOURING CARS BY THF, HOUR AND 

SIGHT SEEING, LIMOUSINES. 

BAGGAGE, ETC. 

Phone 2255 Taxi Rate 25 cents 

OPF.N DAY AND NIGHT 
209 W, HURON ST. ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



Oct 


I'^ 




. Thp Ann 






Arbor police force commonly known \ 














three sophs spend th 


night in jail. 


Oct. 






i-er held took 














CooJey enliven the meeting. 1 






-Case holds Michigan 








score. "What's the 










nnihilate the 








Fall Games. 






taking all Ave points. 


Prof, Lloyd 






appointed Dean of 


he Graduate 






School. 













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Hemmeters Champion 

5 Cents 

The Name on Every Cigar 



The Hemmeter Cigar Co. 

Detroit, Michigan 



TELF-PHONE CENTRAL 5880 


A. E. 


Gilberg & Co. 

liicorpoiilcd 


COFFEES - TEAS 


AND 


GROCER'S SPECIALTIES 


305 NO, MICHIGAN AVENUE 


CHICAGO 



VAN DOREN'S 
PHARMACY 


70 3 PACKARD STREET 
ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN 


// you want 
try ours. 


a good chocolate soda. 
It is always good 



A Juicy Steak — 

Or a tender roast — -come to us. 
Going up the river you will 
need a lunch. Come to us. We 
believe that more university 
people patronize our market 
than any-other one in the city. 

The Central Market 

Phone 654 303 So. Main St. 



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A D V E R T I S F: M E N T S 




Billiards 


□ DDDDDDDDn 


Bowling 


Huston Broth 


ers 


Cigars q 


n n a PipeS n o D □ 

" IVe try to treat you right " 


Candies 



TUTTLE'S 
LUNCH 
ROOM 



Ask any Grad — ask any 

Under Grad — They all 

say, 

"GO TO TUTT'S" 



338 South State Street 

Phom 150 



JNO. C. 
FISCHER CO. 

Main AND Washington Street 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 

Manufacturers of 

COPPER, BRASS 

AND SHEET METAL 

APPARATUS 



MEDICAL, CHEMICAL 

AND ENGINEERING 

PROFESSIONS 



I 


|\ INVESTIGATE 


i^^ 


fj We don't ask or expect you to buy the "EUREKA" retainer 
'J on mere advertising claims— but we do ask you to investiftate. 
K Its principle and construction of attachment are correct— nothing 
" of atudimJnt with"othe".^""' ^ ""^^^"^ ^ '"""^ ™mpanson 


^5ji TX/ ' 


"■By every test it's far the best" 




UPPER OR LOWER Ji2.00 PER BOX OF SIX 


EUREKA SUCTION CO., - - Loudonville, Ohio 



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Young Men's Clothes Shop 



W, mak, a Specially of 



Suits and Overcoats 

For the College and Young Business Man 




Latest Domestic and 
Imported Fabrics 
Tailored by the Best 
of Ready-to-Wear 
Manufacturers 

Two and Three Button Single Breasted 
or Smart Norfolk Suits 

$15.00, $19.50 and $25.00 

Single Breasted Form Fitting or Loose 
Box Model Top Coats 

Silk Sleeves — Piped- Seams — 
in Oxford, Green and Navy 
Excellent quality Fabrics 
Also in Special Knitted Cloth 

$15.00 

Kool Cloth Suits 

A wide range of colors^ 

$7.50-$10.00 



'^0cm&-S^dlcc^(m^>a^ 




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ESTABLISHED 1866 



ISCORPOkATED IS94 



DICKERSON & COMPANY 

FASHIONABLE HATTERS 

Sole Agents: Dunlap& Co., New York; Scott &Co., Ltd,, London, Eng. 

Fur lined and Auto Coats, Gloves, 
Canes, Umbrellas, etc. Specialties in 
Riding and Sporting Hats for Ladies 
and Gentlemen. In addition to the 
smart new Dunlap models, original 
importations from France, England 
and Italy. :: :: 

BOTH STORKS 
100 WOODWARD AVENUE DAVID WHITNEY BLDG. 

Between CONGRESS and EARNED STS. 116 WASHINGTON BLVD. 




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g 



N International Jury, Panama-Pacific 
Exposition, awards the Gold Medal to 

HARVARD 

CHAIRS and 
CABINETS 



The U. S. Army Purchasing Board, The U. S. Navy Purchasing 
Board, The U. S. Interior Department Purchasing Board, The 
British Army Purchasing Board, charged with the responsibility of 
buying the most substantial and best, order 

Peerless Harvard Chairs 

and when more are required repeat the orders. The largest Surgical 
Table Manufacturers adopt the Peerless Harvard Base for the 
base of the highest class Surgical Tables known to the World because 
this, the most important part of both Dental Chairs and Surgical 
Tidiles, is found at the highest development in the 

Peerless Harvard Dental Chair 

The Best Dental Offices are adopting Gold Medal Peerless Har- 
vard Chairs and Cabinets because, measured by every standard, they 
have triumphed over the concerted knockings of all competing 
interests. 

Harvard Exposition Products 

embody so many points of vantage that a complete catalog of 
Harvard Art Furniture is necessary to an adequate description. 



F U R-N I S H F 



APPLICATION 



The HARVARD COMPANY 

CANTON, OHIO 

n J \ Room 1100 Marshall Field Annex, Chicago 

Krancncs:-^ Room 1403 Widener Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
The J. J. Crimmings Co., 136 Boylston St., Boston, Mass., and the 
Dental Equipment House, 45 West 34th St., New. York. General 
Sales and Distributing Agencies and special agencies with the best 
Dental Depot in each section of the Country. 



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Invaluable Data for 

the Engineer and 

Architect Seiit Upon 

Request 



Let 


usse 


id you ou 


r catalogues 


to 


add 


to y 


ur library 


Let us send 


you 


our 11 


nagazine ' 


Steel Fabric 





These books thoroughly cover the 
following subjects: 
■'loor and Slab Reinforcement. 
Concrete Road Reinforcement. 
Concrete Protection Work for Structural Steel. 
;orrect Support for Plaster and Stucco, 
Perforated Metal Grilles for all Architectural 

Your name and address is all that is 
necessary to procure one or all. 

rically Welded Wire as Used in Miscel- 
laneous Concrete Construction." 

"Clinton Electrically Welded Wire as Used 
for Reinforcement in Concrete Floors." 
"Clinton Electrically Welded Wire for Rein- 
forcing Concrete Roads and Pavements." 
"Clinton Hand Book on Lath and Plaster." 
"Successful Stucco Houses." 
"'Clintruss' Wall Furring." 
"Perforated Metal Grilles." 
'Steel Fabric." (A magazine devoted to Con- 
crete Reinforcement.) 

We are especially anxious to receive re- 
quests from instructors at Engineering 
Colleges for a sufficient quantity of our 
iterature to distribute to classes. Prompt 
shipments will be made, prepaid, 

CLINTON 
WIRE CLOTH CO. 

ind Boston, Mass. New York, N. Y. Chicaao, III. 
rJ PowiT Loom ir^at-ers of IViri Cloth in ihe Iforld. 

and "Golden Bronie" Scteen CLoch, CIlntoD Painted Wito 

'Silver Finist" Shieqo Cloth, Clinton Poultry KeltinB, 

.tb and Hardware Cloth, Clinton Electticnlly Welded Pabrio for 

Hunt Corner Bead, Tree Guards, Fence CatOB, Clinton 

Ferioraled Metslafot all putpuBea and prDcsaee. 



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SHTiSEMENTS 



ROWE'S LAUNDRY 

THOMAS ROWE, PROPRIETOR 

WORK NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE 
GOODS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 

GIFE US A TRIAL 

406 DETROIT STREET 

BELL PHONE 4S7-L 



e great 



Oct. 21 — A foreign student compares t 

flag rush at Michigan. "Well. 
Manual, you ought to know." 
Oct. 22— First issue of thcGargoyle out today, 
W. A. P. celebrates. Chi Psi fra- 



' dedici 



: their 



Oct. 23 — Varsity falls before the tierce attack 
of M. A, C. Score, 24 to 0. 

Oct. 26 — Michigan comes back in a monster 
Pep-Fest. Greatest mass meeting 
ever held at Michigan. Michigan 
eigns ! 



CHAS. IDEN KIDD 

Tailor and 
'Dry Cleaner 

ALTERATIONS A 

SPECIALTY :: :: 
1112 So. University, Phone 1530-J 



John MacGregor 

STAPLE AND FANCY 

GROCERIES 

Sorority and Fralernily 
Tradt a Specially 

551 E. University Avenue 

Phone 185 300-L 



©' 



HE HOUSE OF GOOD 
FURNISHINGS FOR 
MEN. 



SUITS TO YOUR MEASURE FROM 



to 350 



VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP 
1107 South University Avenue 



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Bell System 

Removals from one location to another, break many 
friendly ties. 

Friendships grow cold through absence. 

The Long Distance Telephone 

is not affected by any location, nor time. It is always 
ready. It is the real conserver of friendship. 

Michigan State Telephone Company 

J. J. Kelley, Manager 




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CHIS TAILORING CONCERN and 
in SKILLED EMPLOYEES REP- 
RESENT HONESTY AND PRAC- 
TICABILITY AND IS COMPOSED OF A 
GROUP OF MEN WHOSE INTEGRITY 
an,/ COMPETENCY HAS BEEN PROVED 

G. H.WILD COMPANY 

LEADING MERCHANT TAILORS 
STATE STREET :: ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



"THE GORHAM SHOP" 
GRAINGER-HANNAN-KAY CO. 



DIAMOND IMPORTERS, JEWELERS 
AND SILVERSMITHS 



238 AND 240 Woodward Ave. Detroit, Mich. 



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'rpOR THIRTY-IWO YEARS this Bank has 
J^ entered into the lives of thousands of people, and 
has been a factor in their prosperity. 

By its conservative and watchful policy it has con- 
served the fortunes of many. 

It wants to serve you in the same way. 

The Farmers & Mechanics Bank 

Main St., Cor. Huron 330 South State St. 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 



J. A. TRUBEY 

HOME MADE 

CANDIES, ICE 

CREAM FOR 

PARTIES 

218 South Main Phone 166 



The Millard Press 

Dance Programs 
Menus ^Stationery 

111 West Liberty Street 
Ann Arbor, Michiean 



Cousins & Hall 

Roses, Palms, Ferns 
and Carnations 



All kinds of choice 
cue flowers and 
flowering plants in 
season. Mail and 
telegraph orders 



Both Phones 115 
1102 South University Avenue 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 



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A MERICAN HEAVY DyiX LATHE 




MICHIGAN SELLING AGENTS 

The CHAS. A. STRELINGER COMPANY 

Metalworking — MACHINERY — Woodworking 
TOOLS— SHOP SUPPLIES 

"everything for the shop" 

bates & congress sts. detroit 



StUDENTjS 
CHOOSE 



Fou 




$2.50 up fj^y LASTS ALIfETlME 

From Your Local Dealer 

L. E. Walorman Company, 173 Broadway, New 




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pVERY practice has an individuality which 
■*-* can and should be reflected in the ap- 
pointments of the office. 

S. S. White office equipments afford the 
means. Adaptable to every need, they give the 
office an air of distinction, surest superior 
service, inspire confidence. 

We invite correspondence and welcome the 
opportunity to consult with you concerning 

\)our individual requirements. 

Our Equipment booklet in colors illustrates 
and describes the complete line of S.S.White 
Equipment Combinations — the new idea in 
denial equipment. We will gladly mail a 
copy to you upon request. 



The S. S. WHITE 

DENTAL MFG. 

CO. 




Inspires ConfiHence 



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r I S E M E N 1 



ATTE have an idea that there are a lot 
^ of men paying a lot of money for a 
lot of clothing that is a lot inferior to the 
clothing we sell for a lot less. That's 
saying a lot, but not enough. We're 
mighty anxious to meet those men who 
are in the habit of paying $30, $35, and 
$40 for their suits under the impression 
that it is impossible to get good clothes 
for less. We're prepared to show those 
men suits from $20 to $30 that can't 
be beat. 

WADHAMS & CO. 

Main Street 





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H. D. EDWARDS & CO. 

16, 18, 20, 22 and 24 WOODWARD AVE. 
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



General Distributors of Factory, Mine, 

Railroad and Marine Supplies : Specialists 

in Garden Hose, all grades : Fire Fighting 

Equipment : Rubber Goods 



Manufc 



of 



"HARTZ" PATENT STEEL TACKLE BLOCKS 
"JOY" PNEUMATIC HOSE COUPLINGS 
"SMITH'S" PATENT BELT FASTENERS 



Osborne-Boynton Co. 



Dinnerware, Glassware, 
Lighting Goods, China, 
Cut Glass, Hotel Sup- 
plies, House Furnishings, 
Refrigerators, Dolls and 
Novelties. :: :: :: 



Telephone Main 1275 

71-73-75 Jefferson Avenue 
Detroit, Mich. 



Oct. 29— Another monster yeil-fest at twilight 

on Ferry Field, 
Oct. 30— Syracuse puts a crimp in Michigan's 

hopes by a U to 7 victory. 
Oct. 31— David Starr Jordon speaks on "The 

Final Cost of the War." A g< ' 

pacifist's plea. 
Nov. 3- Band-Cer-Tainment meets with great 

success. Assures the band ofthelrip 

CO Pennsy. Co-eds in tears because 

Suffrage was defeated in sevi 

Nov. 5— Big mass meeting before the Cornell 
game. Judges Murfin and Codd 
of Detroit are the principal speak- 
ers. Whitey Otis comes back. 

Nov, 6~0ur hats off to Cornell. The Big 
Red team downs Varsity for its 
third defeat— 34 to 7. No alibis, 

Nov. 9—Extta— University Senate decrees mil- 
itary training for Freshmen and 
Sophomores beginning next year. 
Union total passes g600,000 mark. 

Nov. 10— Big send-off for the ceami "Beat 
Pennsy" is the slogan. 

Nov. 13— Michigan and her old rival, Pennsy, 
battle to a scoreless tie. 4000 in- 
terested listeners hear Ex-President 
Taft speak on "The Enforcement 
of Peace." 

Nov. 19 — John F. Maulhetsch elected captaixi 
of the 1916 Michigan Football 
Team. "Maulie" was All Ami 
ican half-back last year, and is t 
mam^tav of the Michigan team. 



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4DVEHTISEMENTS 



Our Service is Unique and Unequalled 
Because it's /W/»/i:/»a/- SERV- SELF. 

We also give: "VARIETY" "QUALITY" "PURITY" 
OREN'S CAFETERIA — (/«'J ™ different) 




'Photograph Studio 
Phone 1911 119 E. Liberty St. 



TINKER & COMPANY 

Furnishers and Hatters to University Men 

342 SOUTH STATE ST., ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 
DRESS SUITS TO RENT — ALL NEW MODELS 



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I- E K T I S E A[ E N T 



Special Gas Appliances for Fraternity 
and Club Houses 



Those contemplating any changes 

are invited to utiHze the services 

of our expert in getting the most 

efficient kitchen appliances. 



WASHTENAW GAS COMPANY 



Fresh Roasted Peanuts 



They have a distinctive flavor because 
of the way we roast them. 



DEAN & COMPANY, Ltd. 

214 S. Main St. 



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ESTABLISHED ISIS 




MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET 
NEW VORK 

Telephone Murray Hill 8800 

FOR MEN AND BOYS: 

Clothing ready made or to measure 

for Dress, Travel or Sport 

Hats, Shoes & Furnishings 

Trunks, Bags & Travelling Kits 

Liveries for menservants 

Snidfor ntujtraled C<llul'<s«e 




BROOKS BROTHERS' 

New Building, only 
a Step from Grand 
Central Terminal, Sub- 
way Express Station 
and man V proininent 
Hotels and Clubs 



Electrical Appliances 
of Many Varieties 

FOR SALE BY 

The Detroit Edison Co. 

(Eastern Michigan Division) 

Main and William Streets 



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The Busiest Spot in All Detroit 

Here it is. The great Hudson Store, the CENTER 

of this city's retail business. 

As an inseparable part of Detroit's wonderful growth 

and activity, this huge mercantile institution takes 

its place. 

It has grown to its present dimensions by right of 

business methods that are built on the true and tried 

principles. 

Men and stores may always add to themselves if they 

hold fast to the right ideas and work steadily on. 

This store has its own individuality that makes it 

different from all others in many ways. 

—in greatness of area 

—in completeness of stocks 

—in freshness of fashions 

—in fairness of prices 

— in courtesy to its customers 

—in real desire to serve 

— in zvillingness to right mistakes 

—in comfort and convenience to the public 

the Hudson Store is in the front rank among the 
greatest stores in America. 
It is always at your service. 



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VDVERTISEMENTS 




FOUR YEARS AGO 

we started supplying 

Good Things to Eat and Drink 

to Michigan Students 
Still going strong — Thanks to you 



Nov 


.- 


-Fresh Denes win Can 
ship in Football, 
Senior Laws 14-0. 


pus Champinn- 
defeating .the 


Nov 


24- 


-"Mail 
for 
on t 


,e" receives the 
being the mos 
e Michij-an te 


Athletic 
valuabi 


rophy 


Nov 


31)- 


-Write 
Hal 


softhel9160peraantio 
Schradski and Wap Jo 


need. 








om posers. 






Dec 


' 


-"The 
that 


Daily" straw 
the students 
ing by a shght 


ballot 
ndorse m 


shows 
litary 



D, 



Charles IV. Warren 

^ Company 

md Merchants tS" JewtUrs 



Detroct, Mk 



Buc 


iley's 


Coffee 


Ranch 


Wese 
hy th 
quant 


1 coffee an<l tea at who 
e poL.nd, You can p 
ty desired. Also spic 


esale prices 
urchase any 


peanu 

Tryo 
211 Ea 


s, and rice. 
ur good! vjitk a sa 

Phon£ 17S7-R 
t Liberty St., Ann 


mfle order 
Arbor. Mich. 




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1 D V E H T I 8 E M E > 



PLATINUM 
PORTRAITS 

'Preferred by discriminating 
people for exquisite and en- 
during beauty of tone, for 
absolute integrity of work- 
manship and undoubted 
reliability 



STUDIO, 319 E. HURON ST. 

PHONE 961-M 



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James Foster's 

Fine Arts Gift House 



Gills for alia 
Pictures, Pottery, Jewelry 
Books, Brass, Mahogany 
Leather Novelties 



Calkins' Pharmacy 
A Good Drug Store 
324 So. State Street 



Our Good Service 



in printing embraces more than mere type-setting 
and press work. It includes good taste, appropri- 
ate stock, careful supervision and punctual delivery. 
Such service is worth much more than our very 
moderate charges. May we send our representa- 
tive to talk printing, at your earliest convenience? 
How about that next order? Call us by phone or 
drop us a card. 

DAVIS & OHLINGER 

PROMPT PRINTERS 

TELEPHONE 432-J 

109-1 HE. Washington St. Ann Arbor 



THE ANN 
SAVINGS 


ARBOR 
BANK 

. S 300.000 

150,000 

, 3.000,000 

siness Transacted 

ea bank in WaahCenaw 

707 
So. University Ave. 


Surplus and Profits . 


J General Banking Bu 

The Meal and alronflcti ssvi 
County. Organixd May. 1860 

N. W. Corner 
Main and Huron 



BOOK-PLATES 

Portraits and Pictures 

engraved on steel by our process at less 
than one-half of the cost of hand en- 
graved plates. Write for free samples. 

Estimates furnished on all kinds of 
steel engraved plates. 

HENRY TAYLOR, JR. & CO. 

143 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, Il|. 



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lDVERTISE^ 



"Brochon 



jy 



Fraternity Jewelry, Engraved 
Stationery, and Gold Novelties 
of every description. Wedding 
Invitations, Announcements, 
Calling Cards, Banquet Menus, 
Dance Programs, etc. 



5 South Wabash Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



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? E M E N T S 



Strengthen Old Friendships 

with a new portrait — the gift that exacts 
nothing in return, yet has a value that can 
only be estimated in kindly thoughtfulness. 

Make the appointment today 

O. F. HOPPE'S STUDIO 

619 East Liberty Street 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Its delightful convenience; its unusual 
service and its dependable excellence of cuisine 
have created for the 

a host of customers whose appreciation and patronage 
are exceedingly gratifying. Special banquets by 
appointment. 



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Dedicated to the Class of 1916 

And when you are through and the chiUing 
winds of the cold, cold world are slapping 
you on this side and that, Cheer Up! for 
you can always go back to that old Memory 
Book and your blood will tingle with warm 
memories of college days. 
Lyndon's Pictures are the foundation 
of all Memory Books for Michigan Students 

A Special Rate for Large Orders 




Afternoon Tea 




302 South Main Street 

Chocolates our specialty 

Dainty LuTicheons 



WURSTER 
BROTHERS 

MOST SANITARY CREAMERY 
IN ANN ARBOR 



Absolutely Pure Milk 
and Cream, Creamery 
Butter, Fresh Eggs 
Cottage Cheese and 
Butter Milk 



DETROIT and CATHERINE STS. 

BELL TELEPHONE NUMBER 423 



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I H E M E N T M 



College Romances 



IS lost in the nodding confusion of 
looking for someone, half anxious 
ting. It was a June for love with 



The maid paused irresolutely and then went on. Soon shi 
the ferns and wild hyacinth bushes. It was evident that she ■ 
to see him and jfet not a little tremulous at the anticipation of 
the air heavy with the sultry fragrance of the late May flowers. 

But let us proceed with the little maid. We are sure that she will pardon our eavesdropping for 
after all has been said love is not wholly modest and Dan Cupid is not averse to publicity. One can 
hear the noisy murmur of the busy broolt as it glides over smooth, moss-covered stones. Yes, that is 
she leaning in pale and anxious presumption over the little pool made by the winding stream. But 
we must nor draw too close for rhere comes the tread of another foot which we believe must be that of 

Now we are sure of it. Already there are fond embraces going on between the pair which in all 
good respect for the affectionate ones have caused us to turn our heads. The youth is drawing some- 
thing bright and gleaming out of his pocket and is showing it to the young lady. It is a beauriful sister 
pin of the man's fraternity, set with a splendid diamond in the center and is his gift to his betrothed. 
In it are expressed the fraternal feelings of the man coupled with his love for her who is to be his wife. 

"B. P." jewelry has often aided true lovers by the side of little brooks in becoming the seal of 
gentle and true affection. 

The sequel to this stirring romance may be found in the publication on The Book for Modern 
Greeks, a copy of which will be mailed free upon mention of this arricle. Address the fraternity jewelers, 
Burr, Patterson & Company, Detroit, Michigan, The book contains many suggestions useful to 



Yoi 






THE 

ANN ARBOR 

PRESS 



We do more Printing for the Student 
Body than all other shops combined. 

PRINTERS OF 

The MlohlKsn Daily Students' Ditectory 

Michigan Alumnua The Technir 



Specialty of Program Work 

PRESS BUILDING 

MAYNARD STREET 
BELL PHONE No. 1 







Dec, 


2 — Lee K, Joslyn chosen to represent the 
University of Michigan on Henry 
Ford's Peace Jaunt. Pretty softi 


Dec. 


4— Maulie is mentioned as hali-back on 
Colliers' All American Feam 


Dec. 


10— The Musical Club Concert makes a 
decided hit. Plans for a million 
dollar library placed betote the 


Dec, 


11— Michigan's Good Fellow Actiwtj 
Pervades the Campus. 


Dec, 


13— Mischa Elman entertains 5000 listen- 
ers at the "Pie Vacation" concerts. 



QUALITY CLOTHES 

'Tailored to Suit" 
NOVELTY SUITINGS 

Arthur Marquardt 



516 E. Wil 



Street 



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''■m 



R R T I S E M E K 'I 



The Experiment 

of changing around to get the best their money 
can buy— style, service and neatness considered, 
has centered the minds of young men on 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 

They fit, they wear, and they satisfy for 
$18, $20, $22.50 up to $30 



LUTZ CLOTHING STORE 

"The Home of Hart, Schaffner St Marx Clothes" 




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ADVEBT18BMBNTS 




SHEEHAN & 


CO. 


STATIONERS AND ENGRAVERS 


Special to Seniors 




•Plate and 100 Cards, $1.50 


Fine Stationery College J 


ewelry 


Correspondence Cards Brass Desk Sets ] 


Brass Book Racks 




SH EEH AN & 


CO. 


STUDENTS' BOOK STORE 






w 100% 
Satisfaction 



It is the aim and pur- 
pose of this store to 
give you a heaping 
dollar's worth of value 
for every dollar you 



;nd hei 



No mat- 



what you purchase 
know 

that you can depend 
on it in every way. 
Only such merchan- 
dise as will satisfy you 
completelywillbesold. 



F.W. Gross 
Men's Togs 

Ann Arbor Two Stores 



-Comedy Club presents "The Pro- 
fessor's Love Story" at Whitney. 
Morrison Wood and Phyllis Povah 



5— Christmas vacation ends. The bunch 
meet 3< "Huston's" "The Maj," 
and Martha Cook "Dorm" to 
swap holiday experiences. "Smuck" 
and "Doc" look over the new 
wearing apparel. 

l-l — Senate decides to prohibit "moon- 
light" dances at the Jay-Hop. 
"Al" Robinson and "Cec" Corbin 
deny that they intend going to 
Northwestern University next 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 



Where the Cool Breezes Blow 




k Cleveland Nav 



THE LUXURY OF A LAKE TRIP 

Where will you spend your summer vacation? Wliy not enjoy the charms o( our InUud Seas? Rest 

necessary to hu.naii endurauoe and hoUdaya are a wise economy. The only enjoyable and economical 

the Great Lakes. All important ports are reached regularly by the Bteamera of tl 

Company. These boats are unrivaled in point of elegance, comfort, and quality of nerviee, the perteot freedom 

WHERE YOU CAN GO 

Daily service between Detroit and Buffalo, May Ist lo November Ist. From June lOth to September lOtb, Steamer 
aty of Detroit III, 500 feet lone, and Steamer City ol Clevelani II, 444 feet long, two of the largest and flncst aide- 
wheel steamen! in the world, operate between above poinM. Daily service between Dstroit and aavelana, April 15lh 
to December Ist During July and August daylight trips will be made Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday 
out of Detroit, and Monday. Wednesday. Thursday and Friday out of Cleveland. Two boats out of Detroit and Cleve- 
land every Saturday and Sunday night during July and August. Four trips weekly between Toledo, Detroit, Mackinao 
Island and wav ports. From June 10th to September 10th daily service from Toledo to Put^ln-Bay. From Juub asth 
to September 10th. apeiaal steamer from Cleveland to Mackinac Island, the Historic Summer Resort of the North 
Country, making two trips weekly, slopping only at Detroit every trip. 

RAILROAD TICKETS AVAILABLE 

Uon on D, & C. Line Steamers in either direction. 

Send two-cent stamp lor illustrated pamphlet and Great Lakes map. Address L, 0. Lewis, General Passenger Agent, 

Detroit. Mich, 

'Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company 

Idem, A- A, SCHANTZ, Vlce-Prea, and General Mflr. 



PHILIP H. McMIL 



MICHIGAN 



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HALLER JEWELRY COMPANY 

State Street Jewelers 



Makers and designers of society and > 

Phi Beta Kappa Barristers 

Sigma Xi Alchemists 

Delta Sigma Rho Sphinx 

Masques Omega Phi 

Engraved wedding stationery and visiting cards 



Mortar Board 
Alpha Nu 
Michigan Pins 
Normal School Pins 



MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT 

We can supply any sterling silver pattern in table ware and in- 
vite your correspondence. Write for prices. 

HALLER JEWELRY COMPANY 



For Fancy Meat Products 


of All Kinds 


See 


Weinmann, 


Geisendorfer & Co. 


Retail and Wholesale 


High Grade Table Supplies 


201 E. WASHINGTON ST. 



Jan. 21 — Varsity Debating team loses to Chi- 

Chicago. The Military Number 
of The Gargoyle makes its appear- 
ance. W. A. P.John leaves town. 
Prof. Hobhs heard from. 

Jan. 2+ — Engineers decide to adopt honor 
system in all exams. Dr. Reed, 
former dean of the literary depart- 
ment, dies in Oeveland. 

Jan. 25— All students having had Military 
Training called to the colors at 

of inauguration of Military Train- 
ing at Michigan. 



THE LAMB h SPENCER STORE 

GROCER 



W. D. McLEAN, Proi 



318 So. State Sire 



Ann Arhor, Michigan j 



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iDVERTISEMENTS 



PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

Fraternity and Sorority Party Programs, Announcements, 

At Home, Professional, Calling and Business Cards, 

Fine Stationery, Etc. 

C. F. MEYERS PRINT SHOP 

215 South Main St., opp. Mack's : Phone 281-M 




Something Different Need 
Imply Freakishness ! 



Not 



The finest exen 
shoes. They hav 
tJon of fit that ra 



rhem out of the ■ 
lap and ginger. 



Being Michigan's largest footwea 

Prices range from S3. 50 upwards! 
Write for catalog. 



snap and ginger is 



Footwear for 
1, Golf, Boating, Hunt- 
c, as well as for every 



mm 



I83-S WOODWARD AVE. 
DETROIT, - - MICH. 



Try 

THE STAEB BAKERY 

in HI ^or All Kinds of Baked Goods ||||n 

PHONE 238 
516 East Liberty St., near State 



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Publications S 



Law and Medical 

Engineering 

Dental 

We present the best inducements to Michigan Alumni for the purchase of Library 
and General Book Supplies that can be secured anywhere in the United States. 

Our Mail Order Business 

Exttnds to Evtry Slate of ihe Umoti, and lo all foreign countries 

Libraries Bought and Sold 

Enimalei furnhked for Secondary, School, College [and Umversily 

Discounts of from 10 to 33}^ per cent from the publishers' prices are allowed to 

school libraries on all publications. Transportation charges prepaid on all orders, 

large or small, received through the mail. 

George Wahr, "Bookseller, Importer, "Publisher 

103-105 N. Main St. : 316 South State St. : Ann Arbor, Mich. 



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IVERTISEMENl 



Ann Arbor Taxicab Company 

Largest and most up-to-date taxicab line in the city 

Big Limousine Taxi, Touring 
Cars and Auto Baggage Trucks 

Garage in Connection 



We Make a Specialty of Limousine Service for House Parties 
Phone 1300— On call day and night. ;: 515 East Liberty Street 




For 36 years we have been 
showing the people of Ann 
Arbor and vicinity, the 
correct designs in Furni- 
ture, Rugs, Draperies. :: 
May we not showyou some- 
thing from our ample line? 

Martin Haller 

Fu rn iture :: 'R.ugs 

112-122 E.Liberty St., AnnArbor 



Jan, 27— Oratorical association presents "The 
Servant In The House" before a 
large audience in U Hall. 

Jan. 28— Friday—Blue Week end begins. 
Enams start on Monday. Every- 
one celebrates by going to the Maj. 
The Daily goes into hiding for 
two weeks. Hop Committee al- 
lows it has some job before it. 

Feb. 11— The long looked for J-Hop came off 
tonight. The Daily announces 
that Michigan's passing show goes 

of all Junior Hops, Freshmen 
are dazzled by beautiful and char 
ing guests. 

Feb. 19-The soph engineers perpttrate a "wh__. 
and asle" ball at Grangers. The 
coming band bounce is to detetn' 
the true relation of the sen 
and women in the University. 

Feb. 20— Coach Lundgren calls out all baseL_.. 
men. Ptof. Hobbs assails Doctor 
Cook, War is begun at once 
spite of all the efforts of true | 

|.>h. 23— Train kills Bryant '19. In order .. 
offset the influence of Doc Cook 
the Security League is bringing on 
Leonard Wood and Bob Perry. 
This war is hell. 



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Randall & Pack 

High Class 
Portraiture 
and Groups 

'By 'Photography 



121 East Washington Avenue 

Phone 598 



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^^Pr^ 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




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JVEHTISEl 



WORTH INVESTIGATING 



YOU often like to drop into a store and look over things 
you have seen advertised. But you don't like to be urged 
to Buy and we agree with you absolutely. 
You can come to this store any tirne, try on our suits and over- 
coats and not feel the slightest obligation to purchase. We are 
glad to have you visit us first to investigate. 
Sooner or later we know you will come back because when you 
are ready to buy you will want the style, comfort and lasting 
quality that only our long experience in the Clothing and Men's 
Furnishings business can give you. 



REULE, CONLIN & FIEGEL 

200 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



ESTABLISHED EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY TWO : EXCELLED BY NONE 

E. A. Wright Company 

Engravers — Trinters — Stationer 



OFFICE AND FACTORY CENTRAL STORE 

Broad AND Huntingdon Sts. 1218 Walnut 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

MANUFACTURER OF 

CLASS AND SOCIETY PINS, MEDALS 



COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

DANCE PROGRAMS 

MENUS 

LEATHER NOVELTIES 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 



STATIONERY 

DIPLOMAS 

YEAR BOOK INSERTS 

NOVELTIES 

CALLING CARDS 



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VDVERTISEMENT 



GEORGE 
BISCHOFF 

Florist 

Choice Cut Flowers 
and Plants 



220 CHAPIN STREET 
ANN ARBOR, MICH, 

TELEPHONE NUMBER 8I)9M 



Schumann - Hotzel 
'Bakery 



Highest Grade 
Baked Goods 
Cottage Bread 
a Specialty 



219 North Main Street 
Phone 790-M 






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ADVERTISEMENTS 



The R. J. F. Roehm Co. 

The Original 

Fraternity Jewelry Manufacturers of Detroit 

ESTABLISHED 1849 

Diamonds, Stationery, Badges, House 
Club Pins and Rings, Jewelry of Special 

Design 



logue and price list sent on request 
When in Detroit call on us 



Room 203 Scherer Hldg. 



27 Grand River Ave., East 



F.b 


H— Second semester starts. 




Ftb 


15— Regents provide for voliinia 
cary traininR. 1916 Opera 
"Tres Rouge." Class Ceai 
practice for 1916 basketbal 


y mili- 
named 
s begin 


Feb 


IR— Comedy Club presents "Professor's 
Love Story" in Saginaw. Scores 
a hit. Ent^ineers declare the honor 
system used in examinations a 


Feb 


24— The campus is greeted with Klannisjn 
H bb E 


Feb 


25-0 fl h 1 
hi 1 B Th 
b 1 d j g h 
p Id b 1 
Ik 


i; d 
d 


Feb- 


26-34 d pp f hi 
Ig Wh h h 


1 
i 




f b H 
h w h Id d 


C 

f bd 
h hm 


Feb. 


27— r dSk k h 

h U Op W 
Notre Dame m the track n 
the score of49 to 45. 


1 
eetby 




J. W. BLASHILL 

PACKARD ST. MARKET 

Meats, Poultry, 
Oysters and Fish 

Bell Phone 697 Home Phone S 

705 Packard Street 



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ADVERTISEMENTS 



The high class Paramount and Triangle Pictures are shown daily at ike OrpheumTkeatre 



The man who wears 

Society Brand Clothes 

is always well dressed and he knows 
it for these clothes invariably measure 
up to their surroundings. They never 
suffer by contrast with other clothes. 



J. F. WUERTH 



Frank P. Harris 




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The bibketball season sea 
Michigan Daily featiirei 
which was rejected by o 
rhetoric professors, Sci 
not sound bad. 



T)elta Cafe 



We are unexcelled for the 
juicy steaks which we 



There is no cuisine in Ann 
Arbor which is causing 
more favorable comment 
than is ours. 

Your approval is requested. 

"■Art is long. 

Life is short." 



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i D V E R T I 



College Class Books 

^W ¥"¥'▼▼■¥' VT V^ "^ '^W W ▼▼ W ▼ ▼ 

Tl We will make attractive propositions to 
Business Managers of College Annuals 
who desire to produce well made books. 

II A contract with us means superior print- 
ing, binding and engraving service. Each 
book is printed under the personal super- 
vision of our president, who is imbued with 
the one ambition to produce a good book. 



THE DU BOIS PRESS 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Builders of Fine Books and Catalogs 



This "Michiganensian" printed by Du Bois 



Hosted by 



Gdpgle 



American Cabinet Co.. The 
Ann Arbor Press .... 
Ann Arbor Savings Bank . 
Ann Arbor Taxicab Co. . . 
Bischoff, George .... 
Blashill, James . , . . 
Brochon Engraving Co., The 

Brooks Bros 

Buckley Coffee Ranch . . 


Index to 

... V 
. , XXXII 
. , XXVII 
, . XXXIX 
, . XLIII 
. . XLIV 

, .xxviii 

, . XXIIl 
. - XXV 


Advertisers 

Jahn k Oilier F.ngr. Co., The . 

Kidd, C. I 

Kyer k Whitker 

Lamb k Spencer Store, The . 

Lohr, E.J 

Lutz Oothing Co., The . . . 

Lyndon, A, S 

MacGregor, John , . , , 


. , XLl 
XIII 
, , III 
. XXXVI 
. . XIII 
.XXXIII 
, XXXi 
. , XIII 


Maedel, G. I 

Marquardt, Arthur .... 

Meyers, Chas. F 

Mich, State Tel Co. . . . 
Millard Press. The ... . 
Newcomb-Endicott Co. , . . 

Oren's Cafeteria 

Osbome-Boynton Co,, The , . 

Randall k Pack 

Rentschler, J, F 

Reule-Contin-Fiegel Co. , . 
Ritter Dental Mfg. Co., The . 
Roehm, R. J, F, Co, ... 
Rowes Laundry 


. .XXi 
, XXXII 
XXXVII 
. . XIV 
. . XVI 
. . IX 
, , XXI 
. , XX 
. . XL 
. XXVI 
XLII 
. XXX 
, XLIV 
, , XIII 


Burr-Patterson Co. . . . 
Busy Bee, The ... . 
Calkin's Pharmacy . . . 
Calumet Tea and Coffee Co. 
Central Market. The . . 
Clinton Wire Cloth Co., The 


, , xxxii 

. . XXV 
, , XXV7I 

.... I 

... VII 
, . , XII 


Crest, The 


- . XXXI 


Davis & Ohiinger . . . 

Dean & Co 

Delta, The 

Detroit & Cleveland Nav. Co 


. , xxvn 

. , XXII 
. , XLVI 
,The XXXV 






Sheehan&Co 

Staeh Bakery, The , , . , 


, XXXIV 
XXXVII 


Dii Bois Press, The . . . 
Eastern Michigan Edison Co 
Eureka Suction Co., The 
Edwards, H. D. & Co, . - 
Farmers & Mechanics Bank 
First National Bank, The , 

Fischer, Jno. C 

Foster, James . . . . 
Fyfe, R. H. & Co, . . . 
Gilberg, A, E, k Co. . . 
Graingei-Hannan-Kay & Co. 


. , XLVI I 
The XXIII 
. , . VIII 
... XX 
. . .XVI 
... VI 

. . . viir 

. - XXVII 
. XXXVII 
... VII 
... XV 
VI 


Strelinger, The Chas, H, . . 
Taylor, Henry Jr,& Co, , , 

Tinker & Co 

Tuttle's Lunch Room . . . 

TrubeyiJ, A 

VanDoren's Pharmacy , , . 

Wadham's & Co 

Wahr, Geo 

Warren. The Chas, W. Co, . . 
Washtenaw Gas Co,, The . . 
Waterman Pen Co,, The L. E. . 
Weinmann-Geisendorfer Co,, Th 
White Dental Co,, The . . . 

Wild, G, H, & Co 

Wright, The E. A. Co. . . . 


. XVII 
. XXVII 
. , XXI 
. , VIII 
, . XVI 
. . VII 
. , XIX 
XXXVIII 

XXV 
. XXH 
. XVII 
, XXXVI 
, XVIII 
, , XV 

XLII 


Gross, Fred W 

Haller Jewelry Co., The 
Haller, Martin . . . . 
Harvard Dental Co.. The . 
Hemmeter Cigar Co., The . 

Hoppe,O.F 

Hudson, J. L, ik Co, . . 
Huston Bros 


. . XXXIV 
. . XXXVI 
. . XXXIX 
... XI 
... VII 
. . XXtX 
, . XXIV 
. . . Vllt 






Wuerth, J. F- Co., The , . , 


XLV 



Hosted by 



Google 



Book Index 



Adelphi 422 

Akhenaron Society S94 

Alchemists 395 

Alpha Nu 423 

Alpha Omega Alpha }7i 

Alumni Association Officers S6 

American Institute of Electrical EnBJneers . . 43! 

Architectural Society 434 

Angell, James B., (An Appreciation) - . . . II 

Archons 401 

Arisrolochite 377 

Athletic Association Officers !82 

Automobile Society 43fi 

Baseball (Varsitv) '.'...'.'.'.'.'. m 

Baseball (19IS Record) 3!2 

Baseball Season (Story) 309 

Baseball, Batting and Fielding Avera(;es ... 311 

Baseball, Qass 1916 Law 348 

Basketball, Class 1916 Dental 349 

Board in Control of Student Publications . . 414 

Cabinet Club 466 

Camp Davis 172 

Cercle Fran^ais 446 

Chinese Students' Chib 472 

Class CommitteeB— 

1916 Literary 73 

1916 Engineerinn 133 

1916 Law 179 

1916 Medical 205 

Class Officer..— 

1916 Literary 

1916 EnsJueerin 

1916 Architect!! 

1916 Law . . 

1916 Medical . 

1916 Dental . 

1916 Pharmical 

1916 Homeopathic 

1917 Literary . 
1917 EngineerinK 
1917 Law . . 
1917 Medical . 
1917 Dental . 

1917 Architectura 

1918 Literary 
1918 Engineering 
1918 Law . . 
1918 Medical . 
1918 Dental . 

1918 Architectura 

1919 Liieraty 
1919 Engineering 
1919 Medical . 
1919 Homeopathic 
1919 Architectural 

Qassical Club 
Comedy Club 
Commerce Clu 
Cornell Game (Story) 
Cosmopolitan Club 

I>ental College 
Debare, Central Leaguf 
Debate, Mid-Wi ' 
Dedication 



.eagiir 



Dedici 



!, Clas 



1916 Literary 
1916 Engineering 
1916 Architectural 
1916 Law . . . 
1916 Medical . . 
1916 Dental . . 



1916 Phaimical 23S 

1916 Homeopathic 241 

Delta Sigma Rho 426 

Deutscher Vetein- 444 

Dixie aub 469 

Dormitories, The New 43 

Druids 387 

EngineerinR College 130 

Engineering Exhibit 135 

Engineering Society 430 

Equal Suffrage Association 370 

Eremites 588 

Faculty 57 

Fellowships, Holders of 68 

Football (Varsity) 28S 

Football, 1915 Record 286 

Football, Review of Season (Story) .... 286 

Football (All Fresh) 303 

Football, Class— 

1916 Literary 347 

1918 Dental 350 

Forestry Club 367 

Fraternities — 

Acacia . . 522 

Alpha Delta I'hi . , . ... 484 

Alpha Kappa Kappa 566 

Alpha Phi Alpha 540 

Alpha Rho Chi 576 

Alpha Sigma SS4 

Alpha Sigma Phi S26 

Alpha Tau Omega 520 

Beta Theta Pi 494 

Chi PsL 482 

Delta Chi 510 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 486 

Delta Sigma Delta 548 

Delta Tau Delta 502 

Delta Theta Phi S74 

Delta Upsilon 498 

Gamma Eta Gamma 570 

Kappa Beta Psi 532 

Kappa Sigma 512 

Lambda Chi Alpha 534 

Nu Sigma Nu 546 

Phi Alpha Delta 560 

Phi Beta Pi 558 

Phi Chi 562 

Phi Chi Delta 536 

Phi Delta Chi 550 

Phi Delta Phi 544 

Phi Delta Theta 504 

Phi Gamma Delta SI6 

Phi Kappa Psi 496 

Phi Kappa Sigma 524 

Phi Rho Sigma SS6 

Phi Sigma Kappa 538 

Pi Upsilon Rbo 568 

Psi Omega .564 

Psi Upsilon 492 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 506 

Sigma Delta Chi 572 

Sigma Delta Kappa S80 

Sigma Chi 500 

Sigma Nu 514 

Sigma Phi 488 

Sigma Phi Epsilon ........ S30 

Sinfonia 518 

Theta Delta Chi 508 

Theta Xi 578 

Xi Psi Phi 552 

Zeta Beta Tau 528 

Zeta Psi 490 

Fraternity List (Order of Founding) .... 480 



Hosted by 



Gai)gle 



Book Index — Continued 



Fraternity Rushire Rules 481 

Freshmen Spread Commictee 463 

Friars' Song 10 

Frith Heall 630 

Galen 400 

Gamma Alpha 379 

Gargoyle 411 

Geneva Club 368 

Girls- Glee Club 440 

Goif Association Officers 335 

Graduate School 63 

Griffins 398 

Hermitage 586 

History, Class- 

1916 Literary 74 

1916 Enaineering 136 

1916 Architectural 165 

1916 Law 181 

1916 Medical 206 

1916 Dental 221 

1916 Pharmical 237 

1916 Homeopathic . 246 

1916 Nurses 249 

Homeopathic School 240 

Illinois Club 470 

Indiana State Club 475 

InMemoriam 50 

Inter-Class Athletics 346 

Interscholastic Track Meet Managers ... 337 

Interscholastic Track Meet (1915 liecords) - , 338 

Jeffersonian 425 

Junior Hop Committees 461 

Junior Girls' Play 448 

Kentucky Qub 468 

Keystone State Club 474 

Latin-American Qiib 477 

Law School 176 

Literary College 70 

Les Voyageurs 399 

Lyceum Club , . . , 419 

Manha Cook Dormitory 628 

Masques 454 

Medical School 202 

Michigamua 385 

Michigan Alumnus 56 

Michigan Daily ' ... 407 

Michigan Dames Association 369 

Michiganensian 404 

Michigan Law Review 410 

Michigan Technic 413 

Michigan Union Campaign (Story) . , , , 47 

Michigan Union (Story) 3S6 

Michigan Union (Board of Directors) ... 358 

Michigan Union Opera Committees .... 359 

Mimes 451 

Monks 590 

Mortar Board 392 

Musical Clubs 439 

Newberry Residence Hall 626 

Nippon aub 476 

Nurses, U, of M 248 

Omega Phi 428 

Oratorical Board 418 

Oratory, The Year in (Story) .416 

Order of the Coif 376 

Owls 390 

Persephone Fete 353 

Pennsylvania Game (Story) 300 

Phatmical College 234 

Phi Alpha Tau 380 



Phi Lambda Upsilon 

Phoeniji Club 

PiescottClub 

Professional Fraternities (Order of founding) 



erdeck 



432 



Regenrs, Board of 54 

Rifle Club 334 

Round-Up 464 

Scalp and Blade 467 

Senior Foresters 366 

Senior Society 391 

Sigma Xi 372 

Sophomore Prom Committee ...... 462 

Sororities — 

Alpha Chi Omega 614 

. Alpha Epsilon Iota 018 

Alpha Phi 610 

Chi Omega 618 

Delta Delia Delta 624 

Delta Gamma 600 

Gamma Phi Beta 598 

Kappa Alpha Theta 612 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 606 

Mu Phi F.psilon 616 

Pi Beta Phi 604 

Sorosis ■ 602 

Theta Phi Alpha 622 

Westminster House 620 

Sorority List, In Order of Establishment , , . .W6 

Sphinx 393 

Starisrics, Class— 

1916 Literary 126 

1916 Engineering ,...',.,. 169 

1916 Law 199 

1916 Medical 216 

1916 Dental 232 

1916 Homeopathic 246 

Student Council 360 

Students' Directory 



Stylus 



429 



Symphonic League 455 

Tau Beta Pi 373 

Tau Sigma Delta 378 

Tennis (Varsity) 331 

Tennis (All-Fresh) 333 

Tennis Tournament Season 332 

Toastmasters 402 

Totem aub 473 

Track, (Varsity) ■,.-., 315 

Track, Record of Competition 316 

Track, Review of Season (Story) 325 

Track, Statistics of Meets 326, 330 

Triangles 394 

Trigon 584 

Underclass Contests (Story] 339 

University Band 441 

University of Michigan (Story) 39 

University Musical Society 456 

Vulcans 386 

Wearers of the "M" 340 

Wearers of the "aMa" 341 

Wearers of the "R" 342 

Wearers of the "1916" 343 

Web and Flange 389 

Webster 424 

Women's Athleric Board ... 354 

Women's League (Executive Board) , , , . 364 

Women's League (Judiciary Council) .... 365 

Woolsack 396 

Wyvern 397 

Y. M. C. A. Students 363 

Y. W. C. A. Students 362 



Hosted by 



Google 



Index 



T Chas, 



0.70 



Adams Fred M 
AdvQS George b 
Adams Johnll 
Adams John Q 



ller lUiTy £ 
irens Hden C 



Adrioh John A 

A dnch, r eonard O 

ander T^slio I 

ander Man I 

andor Rutgers 

1 Edward B 

1 Robort M 

I William C 

I Dorothj 

.1 F M 

Allen H Clnineiit 
" "Walter O 
1 HughG 

John r 

Allmenduucer FrDi 



624 Baokus 






Felipi 



520 244 242 3 



, J 347 78 367 3 



680 347 78 343 

588 
558 78 



i2i Barnsi 



Andrew llarold O 



^ngell, James B , 2ad 
AntenlirsiKlt JoKit A 



Dorothy 



64 3C7 
3n7 

6 78 72 358 



4 392 442 443 454 

475 
3 133 373 375 413 



/Tong Dorothy 



Amof Joseph AI 
Arnold AdaC 
Arnold Alfred L 
Arnold FtfieE 



Attineon MarRsre 
Atkinson Thos E 
Atlas Walter R 



514 268 470 



608 208 205 



827 27(1 

560 260 

S 439 442 446 



]arlc D 590.73, 343,435 

Ataood Tlfe°on W .'.'.'.'.'.]'. ".". 560 

AiigspurKer, Stanley R 387 

Austin Edith D B28 

An Yon. Sum N 472 

Avery Margaret S 624 

Ajers Ralph A 500 

B 

Babbitt Shirley D 84 

Babcock Harry A 182, 570 

Bibel Elmer H 138 

Bacher Byrl F 388 

Bnchors MiMred A. 806, 79, 110. 445. 448 

Backus Elsie L 278 

Baokus Geo. R 79 

Bacon. Arthur N 79,441 

Bacon Donald K 668,79 

Bacon Franras H 528 

Badgloy Carl E 594 

Bair Cornelius G 422 

Beer Fein 8 470, 79, 387 

Baile> Charles C 439 

Bailey Cvril E 423 

Bailov Ruth L 445, 463 

Baker Gerald V 79, 343 

Baker Rest B S30 

Baker Robert H 560, 208,205, 451 

BaldBin John W 64 

Bnll Iloyd 79 

Ball RobertB 534 

Ballard M itner S 554 

Ballentine, David R. .80, 73, 387, 435, 439 

Balaom, Ruth G 8*8, 80. 445 

Bame. Robert W 694 

Bancroft. Arthur J 182, 520 

Bauctoft, Henry L 424 

BanoroCt Huldah 84, 362, 368 

Bandemer. Selma I. 029 

Bandemcr. William E 626 

Banchart. Lee E 538. 138 

Baiigs William A 538 

BarSnn, RheaE 602.020 

Barber EimerM 402 

Barber Harold O.. 678.430 

Barbour Maurice A 138 

Baribeau Chas, A 564 

Barie Richard L 441 

Barker John B 422,80 

Barksdale Julia N 004,80 

'.......,, ..'sbViiO,' 445 

llarnard Burton 520 

Barnaiii Handd D 668 

Bunard Kenneth 496, 280 

Bamee Oeoree A 182, 532, 179 

Barnea Handd O 484 

Bamett Glenn E 50 

Bamett Harry C 84 

Bsrnett, Lester C 548 

Barnhart Daiwin S 486 

Barnum Robert C 510. 436 

Barrett Harvey E 138, 133, 432 

359,' 385 

_..,.. . 629 

nnger John H 564,222.220 

i.arron John C 268,482.462 

Bartelnie Eu(ene A 496,259,443,470 

Bartehny Jeanette M 600 

Baitholf Herbert B 404, 130, 133. 386, 

389, 464 

Batlletl Herbert H... 61 

Bartlett Lawrence D... 570.464 

Barttett,T. F 367 

Bash PhilipP, ,'!!!!!!!!;''!!;!'. :!:514 

Bassett, Margaret A 606, 251. 445 

Bo'^tian CIjX E. . . . 520, 80, 314, 315. 73, 
3SS, 293, 337. 141 

Bastin Dorothy M 812 

BateheHer Catl A ■. 578 

Bsteman James L 632, 362 

Bates HekpB 602 

Bathreok,*2^ld V '.'.'. '.'.'.'. '.'.'.'.. .404 

Battles. Lloyd E 560 

Bsujihman,lleith W 30 

Bauman HurislE. 629 

Baumann, Milton C 506 

Baumgardner. Carlton M 492 

Baumeartner, Elden 558 

Bawden Buby E 81, 445 

Beachly FrankJ,.,. .524 

683 



629 Bamngei 



Beaman. Bernard S SIQ 

Bear<lsleB, Edgar V 20S, MB 

Beardeley, Raymond R. S38 

Bead), CliBrleaP 303 

Beaver.* Melvin M,,*,',4Mi '866, 81. Bill. 73 

Becker. Fred A 506, «80 

Beaker, George P 518. 843 

Becker, Harry F 614, 556, 378 

Becker. Myron O ses 

Beckwith.HmielL 620, 276 

Beers, Julius L 404. 622, 580, S3S 

Begole, Fred H 512. 81, 436 

BeEn. William , ,582 

Bell, FerdnwidC ','.'.'. ..474,'568.' 278 

Bell, Harrv L 67*, 179, 410. 4SS 

Bell, Jay t 670 

Bell, PaulP 670 

BBll,Wm. M 474 

BeUowa; WilUs A '. '. '. . .wi,' 434 

Bement, Roberts E ,490, 130, 133 

Bender, Norman C , , . .538, 566, 467 

Benford. Lee G 474, 611 

Beniamln, Anne L 806 

Bcnnallati, Lois M 827 



Berg, Roy E 470 

Bergman. Alfred E 188, 133 

Bergstrom, ViotorW.. 588,586 

GordonA 64 



ixu; 



losky Wm jV, 
Jbby,'UBoy hV. 



9, 314. 316, 341, 343 

620 

662 

303,304 

'.'.■'.'.'.'.V.'si,73.'445 



s, Robert L 186 



Bird. E. H 130 

"rdsell, Margaret 806,163 

rdsell, Roger 803, 166 

,.. „...._. „ ...502,263 

.516,81,73 



t rmingham, Hobart M.. 



BliM,EltaC 

Bliton, Alice 

Bodgett, Alice J 

B onuUeld. Carl B^' 



cCharleeC 664 

!e,F. Wilkine 554 

eider, Margaret E 624. 82. 446 



Hosted- .by ' 



Index — Continued 



Bobling, Henry 8 268. 335. 4S2 

flohn, Arthur 422 

Boioe, Ralph E 444 

Bolen, Ethelyn 82. 73 



..500.3 



on, Orla 



Bndner, Melvin 



ebury, Hen 
ell. Etmer. 



Bnun, Matilda 

BrueU, Nioholas J . . 
Brennan, Huold A . 

Bmach, Albert W . . . 
Brewboker. Fisnk J . 



BriggB, Fomat S. 
Brirap. Trers E. 

Brinkmim. Fred J 
Btinon, Edgw C 



. .832. 163.378 



Biook, Arthur _ 

Brook, Gertrude E 

Broek, latao V 

Bnnkman, Oraver C. . 
Biookman, Full L 



Brokemhire. John R. . 



BfothettoD, Jdw 



S, 544. 451 CampbeU, ( 



Bolton, Edwin D 140.133 

Bolton, Frank L 64 

BaDd.Cbe9UrC 530 

Bond. Janwa D 504 

Bond. PhiUpE S3D, 133.367 

Bond. Wsltw B 64 

Boniateel. William J 433 

BoBnw,Orti« 269 

Boob, Oiarlea F ROa. MS. 4IS. 4.311 

Boos, Joseph M 



, DudiKr V . 
Lucy M... 



..475 Carlisle, Mar] 



0, 439, 451, 461 



..140. 430,431 
578 

si 236. 376,* 433 



talphK.. 
Liman ... 



Bnnonh. Charlea A 556. 82 

BoHie, Frederick A 568 

Botthby. Rugsel M ,508 

Bottje. Clifford 140. 133, 464 

Boueber. Justus J 662. 464 

Bouquin, Lester H 504. 222, 220, 3 

BourkeTHelen M 600,3 



Carpenter. Mildred. . 
Carpenter, Ruth M. . 
Carpenter. SprB(ue F. 



en. Paul M 484, 82, 73 

Bower, Helen C. 606 

Bower, Lloyd L 273, 140, 489 



ueh, Louie M . . 

uch, Merritt... 
ucker. Edward I 



. .556, 208. 205 

J. 183, 178, 179. 

34S, 3SS 

490.462 

622,112 

3, 494, 544, 179 
385, 343. 470 



..516,269,314,315. 



aH 670,470 



. .506, 140 Case. Ailcen 1 



Boyee, Charles W 694,64 

Boyos. Harvey E 499 

Boyd. Alan W 498.385,341 

Bc^d. Barnard F 534, 46* 

Boyd. Linn J 554 

BoydeU, JohnF 516 

Boynton, Grace M 64, 429 



ilher M.. 

jidee. Moeea M, 
It, Leon D 



. .380 Case. Kenyon H. . 



420, 425, 426 Casenu 



C^^Ar 



F. Cliilord, C '...'.'.'.'.. .'.'.'.'.use Catlett, Jas. B.. 



..83.365,367.464 



eU, CharleeE '.'.'.'.'. ^ ^isio.'SSi 

' YarryC 141,133,431 

DuiKiey. Leavitt J 486 

Bulien, Guy R 654 

Bubon, Eugene T. ...546,482 



Z^auEhey, Sarah R... 
^ulkins, Henry L. . 



290.337,341,343 



Burdick. Kenneth T< . m 

Surge, Kemp S 5S4, 268, 369, 461 , 4es 

BurgesB, EUsaVwtli M 600,368 

Bunhard. Robert J 520, 548 

Burkhart, Riehard H 482 



Chatfield, Robe 



Chen, Ta Che.. 











222,2 




iurkley. Ruth 

:Sg.Sau%;::;; ■ 

Jumett. Verne E 


i;'i33 

■.■.624 
.■.■.V6 


i| 

0, 85. 73 

368. 429 
183:425 


Che 
Chi 


ihester, Geo. C.,S64 
"™°>^wnthyj.. 


6-si 


Jurr.AllredJ 

'Sff;if^,^A-52fli 


urn, b^lo^H... 




„™,4.. 




1 








lelensen, Clarence A 






;:fSr-HSd"4^ 




■624.388 


ury, EaOjer L, , 


:ii="HSl::; 




■'SM! 


utter, Edward Clarence. 


..604 


SSrC-c'S"-":.' 





Butler, Ronald A. .. 

Butler, Ruth. 614, 628, 440 

Buttermore, Joseph R, , , 474 



.574,508.85 Churoh, Harold C ,..473 



Ihynoweth. Beryl M....'. 
laassen, George C.418. 41 

:lapp, l^enneth 8 

;iapperton. Geo. D 



Cadwsilader, Ass ( 
Cady. FredJ... .. 

Caffeyi John P , , , 
Calsy, l^rcuerite. 



.554 Clark, Chs 



?:, J--. 



,504 



20, 546, 278 
. 85, 73, 440 
..608,261 

64 

. .490, 385. 341 



Clark; Cheater rf 

Chirk, Fitigerald H 620 

Clark, Harry M 530 

Clark, Helen L 606,028.04 

Clark, Irving B 334 

Clark, Jbb.P .424 

Clark. JohnF 141,373,386,431 

Clark. Johns 475 

Clark, Robert W .6* 

Clark, S- — 

Clarke. 



5, 205 Clarke, Charles 1 

6, 451 Clarke. Daniel »■ 
8, 446 Clawson. Harry 
,.5»4 CUy, Lloyd R.. 



..244,242 



Hosted by 



Google 



Index — Continued 



^^A^k^^^^l^,:::.: 


*ft| 


C™g, William D 


486 


•esJanliai, EmeatE.. 


«l 




isi 520 m 


Cnnd 
Cran 




5fg 




376.4m«. 














3Lbble, Lester C 










.500.88,73,331 








Crawford, Charles B... 

cJ^r'.kenWc'. .:.' 

Creeo. CUreniM H 

Criasey. H«ldr|lJ 




gotlTfcfffi^l- 


ii;^.M 


jjg 


CoddJohnW^-'" 


jlegebnan, Albert G . . 
)ielefle. Herbert D. . .. 


--I 




**''|?J 


Cron 


ell. "Jg^™* ^- ■ 


tMel«rle, John 

Dieterle, Robert R . . . 

glc^^z^t'j ■■ 


209.205 


Cohen, ^Ijel-^ 


n. Daniel U.. '.'.'■ 


■;:::;;:*l! 


■■ ■■■■■■■■"0 


S;^^4^e^w'^itis.;: 






gi 












314, 315, '323, 337 




Coil, Harolds ., 




Crosby. Pauls 














C™ 




Dohmew. AntonJ., Jr. 

Dolph, Norman L 

Donahue, Thomaa L — 
Donald, DouiUa 




Cole. Charles D 


:Er-S:^^ 


land, John R 


::; ;;;1! 


.■.."."■i44,^4ai 


il^--^.^ 


498, 548 


::::::-SS 


SS^'- 


518, 223, 220, 464 

."•.585: SIS 


m.o.,m!l! 






Curby, LloyJ J 






CoXy. Albert b'.'.'.'. 
Conklin. Theodore H.. 


.MsisM, 442.469 

sie 


Donnelly, Howard*.. 


■■•"■■as 

184. MO 

.■.■::....M4.'a« 










i 




)ou(herty| EUiabeth^W 










gtlSS.:;:.-.: 


..■■■■.'"Sbf'.S 

!:!!!i*2! 133142 

602, « 


ssS-s-- 






DouglM, Margaret,... 
>oag\tM, Msrgarelta B. 








^I^'JSS 


Cookei wmiaml,!!'!! 

g^li::^nT5":-- 








Dab 


■ 


)ow. WillardH 

)owel'l, g'iovwE'!' .. 
gS;rte1,"ne5?^r 


;: ;::;:375;S^ 


."fienry frederidi 


:::;::;;:""!l 




^^Jo^j_..^... 


588, 142 

v.. ■.;:;;. 570, 179 




■■■.v:»^:i:ji 

143,133 




p|iaf::-: 


Drake, HaroourtC... 

Drake, Herbert E 

>take, MarvE. 


.■.".■.■.■.■.■.■....'.144 




^iii 




cS^lHore^M. H,', 


Drati. Ferdinand b... 
)reeM, EminE 

immuiSlMitiii'M' 




Dar 


dson. Donald C. 


■:::»|:| 


■■■■"^■^ 


dwn, Norman H . 


^'^ 


Jr 502,462 


Cornelius. K 


:\\:*^:.^f2 






l«.HelenO 


.,»..», «j.j 














■;&::::"• 


.•*"':«*S1 


lugan, WillfamM. ...' 
)uiho^t, Aana G 

SISbStH,': :: 

Dunne, Maurioe F 

Dnnten, Louie H 

E 










Cortright, Ijele C . . . . 


SJ 














^Si:;::: 


.■.,,'....'.2331 220 


h 

SB 

^' 

of 

h 








■^Skr^""^"' 










rXmG. ..'.'.■-■. 


■■■-■■■■■■■■"■;i 


CouUer, Glenn M 


■.■'...578.166.ie3 
..588,270,87,385 


i^le.LuisM 




™*'M4;279 
















552, m :2C 




















"-"SS 


















A.. .477.536,143. 


.374; ISM, ■m 206 






del Valle. Manvel A. . 

Demmon, Gertrude 

Dennia,JohnH 

Dennis, Will E 


Cowley, Bertha L.... 
Coj^TlieodoreS.' .■.■■. 


::::;-:li 



















Hosted by 



Gosgle 



Index ■ — Continued 



343, 412, 424 



Breert, Sydoev V 303, 304 

EMerth, Arnold H 64 

Egilestone, Phyllis 608, 4S2 

EElert, Geoi«e M 84 

" rlicher. Arthur W.. 538 

lie, DanaC 862 

Elder, Mary E 64 

EUiott. Benie M 455 

Elliott, Dou^S G12 

ElHott, RoyT 506 

EUiottRnth , 824,445 

Ems, GeorieM 474 



Bmenon. Pauline 
Enwraon, Samuel I. 
Emery, Clayton S. . 
Emory, Qisee D , . , 
Emeiy, John H . . . . 

Emmone, Samue 
EnesB, Mareuret 
Engel. John H. . 
Enseis, Theodor 



E 373,516, 144 

sH 622,304,446 

526.473 



Erickson, 



rvid W 



CarioeS 536.477 



EuceniJes. Ei.,^ — 

EranslLMnS.'.'. ■ 
Evans. Porwr H . , 

Ererett. Charles A 

Evens, Prank G . . 
Ewen. Howard W. 



Faber.Walrer William 502 

Fan, FredE 514 

Farrar, Zella B 370 

Faunra. William K 510 

Fauntleroy, Eugene G 4S3 

Fee, JosephH 490 

Feige. Laura 3S2, 014, 362. 368, 440 

Feldkamp, Helen E . ei2, 628 

Felger, Rudolph O 145 

Fellows. Bert 562 

Fellowa. Feriy A 64 

Felt, Edwin H 439,486 

FsrcuBon, Georfe R 367 

FcpgiBon, Keith R..18B, 178. 179. 340. 343 

FeisuBon, LymaD A 566. 261. 464 

Femll, Mark B34, 92, 441 

Fsnia, John H BOS, 314. 315, 323, 343 

FicJten, Richard 64 

Pwld, Florence E 84 

Field, George L 530 

Held, Nellie O 441 

Field. Paul L 921, 441 

Mkret. Haloup H 145, 133 

F Idew, Stanley L 422 

Fillingham. Erminft G 624, 02, 445 



Fiiuel, George K.. 
Fischback, JuUus, . 
Fischei. Charles W 



Fisher. Charles E 

Fisher, Etta 


504 

■,'.:. 552.* 224! 220 


asStfej-S:;:;:::;: 

Garvey, John L 


■,'.'.",','626,'364 










Gatesi Ralph f!^'!!:!^! 










^rhAlteilL 


fl". «o 






IBS, 644. 179. 390 




SfSeJS3;'ira,SdA.;- 




tf. 




::;:::::::;;;so8 




Fleck. EdwinH 

Flenung, RosalyndZ, . 


Georee, Ernest E. M 

George, Florence L 


■::;;;::! 








|rrl;.^^™|rM..^;;: 


|9* 










g^Er;:5^"f^-,-,::;",',-,;- 






iss'.'sso.'eu; 179 




Fo[ey. Albert C 


GibsQQ, Deborah M ,, 








ISjsB:::;;:;: 






gspsSS::::::: 
























33S. 442. 440, 484 
439,4fil 






KShSS ■; 


GSa''bu^''Go]'daY:,'.'.',,', . 


,628. 370. 428 










?=:&.,;....: 


EE3i 


Given! WiiSfam G '.'.'. '.'.'.'.'. 

gfe™":::::::. 




Fa<. George B 94 






FrackelMn, Ralph J... 


Gleiehauf, Ralph J 

Gleiohauf, Ray E 


^I'll 




::::::::::::ire 






GoetiiHarald W,',','.'.'.,,'.' 


.548,224,220 


Frankei, Samuel D..,. 
Franklin. Wells A 


;;;;.".^ .*'"■. *59 


!!!!.'272,'350 


F^ry. Gerald 8 1&5 
^ier,^James^l 

French,"bon8ld a!!''! 

French, Horace L 

Pr,eke,'Fr(d....^.^... 


496. 178: 179, 388 




gajTS.;*.^.::::- 


.i45.'528,'432 

:;:;:::::54o 








Frost, Harrov I, 


1 


....... -.K4 


i,''5™,S---» 


§:SS::i?sS.*i:.;.i« 

420,42 


■■■.-.■.■"'■-fSS 




343, 514, 582, ^ 


468. 489, 428 




















g|SI;;;E 












■,.",",.630. 94,' 445 


'*^'1S| 


G 








-.■.■.■.4».1il 


8S:rdfc*^:;.;. 


Goas, Samuel G. , 






:,::::::"A'g 

606.827 










go^ha|^NoalD^ 






558.210.205^468 


GoSlf ■ 'lld^n^j 


602,463 






Gourley. Margaret T 






6,72.M,41B. 68 

;..,m277; W 




gl-iSS.'rr.;.-.. 


8S&gfe^n"S.*:;. ■.,;■, 


:::::a.g 








Gardipe^, John L 

Ganiner, David E 


Grajewski.Bruno^L 


■::'".:^ 


gss ,*■?,-"'•■■ 

Garland. Charts C... 
Gamer, Myron E 






Graves, Carmen K 

Graves, J, I.loyd 


:::::"■:! 



Hosted by 



Google 



- Continued 



ening, Gladys E . 
eDspiUin, Samuel. 
eaihai. Roy M.. 



. .540. 224 uki 



Griffith, HonardD.. . 
Orimee, Dai-enportJ.. 
GreDstflad, Durward. . 

Griawold, William C hu 

Orover, CIbtk H fflK 

Grover, Frank W 380, 518, 439. 461 

Groyea, Harold E 608 



OryllB. Humphrw M. K. . . 

GrylliS, KiohftrdG 

Gruss, Dorothy W 

Gubblm, Willikm W 



GuerDHy, Martha .... 

Ouerrierr, Joei 

Guilfoil, Kelsey 

Guilford. FranoesM.. 
Guillormety, Vinoent, . 



Haas, Charley L. 
Haas, CUfford P. 
Hackman. Harra 

Hackney, Earl N .„ 

Hadjisky, Joseph N 148. 

Hadley, Laurenr- " "" ••" 

Kadley, Arthur 
Hadley. Robert 



Haigh, Richard A... .'..''.'..'..'...'.'. .AOO Heni 



Hal . Mabel L. . 



Harkius. B 



arvey, Campbell 528, 546 

--'ev, Edith M 612,370 

,bI1, DeVereC 07 



t! Henry C. 
t, loaeph F 



ttC 510,470 



ithaway, John H . . 
luke, Gilbert P.... 



irk.'H8nryC'..*Jr,!""' 
Ktet, Edward E.. Jr. . 



yes, Geneva E.. 
yD(s,PluUi>E.. 

leirjaniea fi, , , I 



210 Heideman, Jidia. 



..500,146.470 Hein 
.552, 224. 220. »60 H«n 



..606. 4S2 Hehner, Walters 147 



raid 374,558,210, 

206. 300, 474 



Hal '. Lucile E'I^'.'.'.'.'.\'.\'.'.^'.\\\'.'.'. .627 Hen 



Herrick, Gerald A 
Herriok. Jay H... 
Herring, JoJin A,, 



Haller, PaulM 411,444 

Haliday, FrankJ.. 380,464 

Halsteacf, Robert H 496,441 

Hanielen. Peler C 148 

Hamill, Jack H 558, 281 

Hanuiton, Gladys I .364 

Hamillon, Jos. N .07, 435 

Hammond. Arthur E 564,441 

Hammond, Georze B 167. 163, 378 

Hammond, Maurice E 280 

Hampton, John P 434 

Hand, Dor N 508 

Handibo. Kathryn F 370 

Handy. Lee D .638 

HaniaK Joseph A. 524, 303, 304 

Hanna, JayE "' "" 



irickK. .. 



lindn 

lDadlY> Leifh . . 
loaE)Ge[I^M! 
lobarc. SethG., 
lobbs, Arthur E, 
Jobbs, Nellie M. 
loch. Hem " 



Hodges, George H.. 
Hoefeld, Norman A . 
Hoemor, Edward M 
lonman. Douglas T 



n, AuUam H-^^.....-.. '.'..'.'.'. '.'.SM 



I, fcsU... 



B, 244. 242 Holiappli 



Hobnes, Josephine M 622 

Holmes, Ka£lyn C 622, W, 73 

Holt. Paul J 474 

Holt. Willard H. 90, 347. 343 

Holiher, Louis J. ,. 574,484 

Holton, Hoy( S S7S 

■ ■ "sniaminG 868.464 

Alice M 62B 



in. Mer' 
ID, David C 
laeplel. Uar. 



... _ .367.592.00,306 

IwaniM 37B 

an D. 411, 518, 548. 262, 430, 461 



k, bonaM r'. ! .■.■.. ..■.■.■.■.■.■..■ 586,' 367 



. .628, 97, 445 Hoopi 



r, Emily M 620,462 

r, Jeanette Mabelle 60 



Hooton, Gordon B... 

Hopkins. H.D 

Hopkins. John M 

Hopkins, Stephen C. . 
Hopkinson, Francis L 
"— - Albert E., Jr. . 
(, Marie ^.,., 



luih, Frederick W . . 



jnd. Glenn 

loyle, Edith 1,. . 
loyt. Margaret 1 
Ihs. Chi-Hrf.... 



Hubbard, Miriam 



i.'navid K.'. .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.. ..i22 Hubbell. Ho» 



428, 429, 454 



jL^SS Hugfies.LyndaHE..'.. '.'.536,' 99, 132/461, 



Hiett, SCanley J. . . 
Higbee. HaroJdB.. 
HiBginB,FrandBj.. 



98,73 Hulstt, William P. 
..520 Hull, I.flthrop W. . 



'. !534 Humphreys, Harold 1,. . 



'. '.SSI, 97 Hifginsi Slcllfl. ...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.. 364 Humphrej 



. . 100, 364, 368, 
392. 446. 446 



Harden,' Elmer P. . . . '.". 466 

Hardy, Charles E 530 

e. Roliin B 468 



Idner. Eulhyn 
Mnxer, Willia 



K J.'.'''.:!!!:::!440,445 Hunde 



! '350 Hunt. E, Reed.. 



Hosted "by 



Goigle 



Index — Continued 



Hun^neton, Edwi 
Huntley. C. 8... 
Hur, Evanoetine. 
Hurd. J. vTh... 
Hurley, Georce F. 
Hum. Margaret J- 

HuiHV. RobindF 

HuteUnson, Harold D. . 
HuCchieon, Waller S 



S, 341 Kane, 



MsiB.. 



..422,580.270. 100 



225. 5»4, 220. 349. 35S 

AJUUJUWHIU. MMX D..-.- -383, 367 

Kalsuuurai. Sotf^ohe. 476 

Ksofmui. Charles L 62S 

Kaufman, Frank E 432 

Keatley, Edwin E 494. 468 

Keeler, Anson H. . .578, 14e, 132. 133. 3Se 

Kealer, Margaret H 827 

Keena, Kemp SOS 



Hutiel. Ruth B 606, 100, 3 

Hyatt. AureY 

Hyde. Carroll C 

Hyde, Harold J 

Hyde, MiloW 



logg, Richard M 
lyrFranciilH. . 



. .488, 411, 470 Kemper. Joh 



Kelly, T. Walter 101 

Keboy, Charlotte B 598, 364, 4S2 

Ketoey. RuthC... MS, 462 

Kempw, Bernard W 



;^ke,Mi;ruN.:;:: 




7« 


Kenn'^d^'.'DavidF.'.V: 


.490, 544 


187: 170 






484,342 














SS^^'^ptA 




Kenney, Fred H 




... ,80 














506 


■ '-i 


rvin, Arthur C 


■ ■ 


163. 67 
530. 74 








Kerns, BlanoheC... 










225. 220 




J 


KernsJUargueriWS. . 


!4SS| lo: 
337 


*-?■*• 








jamb(.r'Mii"on'k:::: 

Jaeger, WiUi*™ * ■ ■ ■ ■ 


e";Ma?yM: :■.;;;: 

Kerr.Suaanl 

Kerr. Vivienne M . . . . 

:erBey. Christina 

esler, Gerald L 


■.498; 314 


""'S 


JSS:tS"» 




802," 20 
270; 485 


iis,m 


SSSSSif.-.;.;; 


■.■.520; 101 


^:i?. 


a5.S.l:-: 


ilby, Margaret 0... 




'"■'i 


JioklinB, Chmt M 




,.::i!S 


imball. RHinald G . 




::S 




264,' 2ii 
2, 101, 73 


WM, 370 

1:1 




John, Hubert R 


KiSS^'i^a^SSSoA;.;: 




::::i49 


















187. 512 


572. 179, 


Kirk, HaddonS 




imMi 



Kirkpatrick. A 

KishUr, Lama 

Kiyoharv, Mitsumi . - 



Johns' 



., lienu 



Johnson, Walker B 

Johnston, Dorothy M... 
Johnston. George S. . - . . 
Johnston, Harold M.... 

JohDstonI wS^m G . .' 
Johnston, William M . . . 



9, 314, 315. 341 



Kyprianides. Prodroi 



,.612 



Jones, Granville D 

Jone^HaroldJ 552 Kolpien Alton L 

Jones. Harvey P 148 Koon Eeva 

Jones, J. Gwyn 564, 225 Roonaman Harold 

Jones, Jack W "- "- ,..__..., 

Jones, Lyman L- - . , 
Jordan. Calvin C . . 
Jordan, John F . . . . 
JosenbauB, Milda C 

Joslyn, LeeE 

Jotter, Walter E... 
. Judson, EvBTt 



..568 



Laim, Albert N 
Lsird, Cecil W, 
Lamb, Herbert 
Lamb, Lanrenci 



. . 54S Lambreeht, Beatrio 



Lamley. Hub 

Lamond, Roy D 482 

Amoeraui, William E BIO, 187, 343 

loee. Harold J 818 

indgrebe. Albert E, 476 

<^ndia, George E 510, 474 

Lane, Creighton I, 225, 439 

.aoge, AnOiohy H 558,211.464,473 

.ange, H. C,.\ 520, 101, 436 

.ange, KorberV A 375,441 

Langley, Raymond M 506. 205. 466 

.angs, JohnW 508, 3fi9, 2SS 

.angworthy, Martin F 102 

Lankel, Arthur K 473 

Lankester, Stejdien D 502 

ApBley, Lorenw B 640,211,315, 341 

.arson. Bsrtel T 494,566,261 

.asko, Ludwifi. 367 

.aubengayeriDrfla C 445 

Lsui, Wiffiam M 102, 444 

ively, Newell E 568 

iver, Floyd P 474 



16. 102. 440 Levii 



Koumjian Aredis H 



e.Zaeh 187.488 



1, see, 387 Kreger Ruth E 
, , 148, 3"" 






.1, Harry F 

^Blanc, Thos. 

^eehner, Harol 

-eel H. C 

rfiever. Lam 



Legemen, Chas. W 475 

.ehle, Louis H 470 

Lehman, Albert T . . . . ,588, 422, 444 
«eht. Frank N 564, 236. 220 



:. RitaM.. 
;ver, I 
;Fevre. 



S, 385, 388, 461 






.439,464,473 



..580.474 Lewis Evnngehm 
■WIS Frank A 
twis Ida M 
LichtiB Henry A 

_ Liebeskind Harrj 

..538.464 Lieu Taoong C 



Lisle Leslie W 
itchman Irene J 

loJT'Alloe C " 
loyd Anna M 
PoS 
Logan Arthur D 
LoEker Claren e 



802 102, 370. 4 



Hosted by 



Google 



Index— Continued 



g, 361, 4S2 McKoDS. Don 



rfiuckw, Alrin E 342 

Loud. Harold E 194 

Lounsbury, RaltJi R 4S4, 103,436 

Mvtfoy, Owen F 103. 366, ' "" " 

lovelmd, AnSur S',',.'.',', .'..'.'.. . 

.oveland, Rulus B 

,ovelJ.Oem|w.W 

_rf)v«nnff, WiUjiun K - . , - - 

Low.HimgT........ 

.owe,HatonM 204. 

!oweg. ^M. P.". ;! ■,■.■[.., ■ .' 

-owry, Frunds B 

,ow.th«, Allred H 



.udwiB. Clinton A 475 



'. ■irndberg. John L- , - 

iUndatE. Itobt. A 

iUDdB;Ten. Harr^ Q - - 
'Uodguist. Idiurel A - 



, in. clflireF,'.*. 



i. 179. 348. S78, 



McCsllum, Han^ B.. 



McColl. AleiH^» ST6, 167,1 



kirmick. Auvustioe. . 

^^..Jormick. CJiarJos A -- - 

MoCormiek, Dorothy V 424 



McCoy, HEri 



..SS6 



McLouth, Olivs 145 

McMBhoD, Fnd A 616. 105 

McMahon. Georire P 105.451 

MoMLUkii. Lyle E 212 

MrMillen, Cecil 239, 236, 376. 377 



MeMuHen. OnieE.... 
MrNomce. Robert L. , 

McNutt. JohnR 

McRse. EliubethM.. 



.606. S28, 106,4' 



73. 363 Mau, Hm 



Johnii.'.' 



MacBtide, KBtbetinB S .' , 



..604 Maodi 



MaodonsU, FninwB H 548, 620 

MacDonaW, Hekn C 598, 103.370 

Mscdonidd, Rc^ukl A 226 

Mooilonald. RaderiDk H 592 

luff. Rnbert B 516 



— jFar^md, Snide.. 
Msclntare, Nena J... 
Maoh.ChiutianN... 
Mack, Edward E.... 
Msnk, Emily M. . 



As T. . .4SS, 160. 133. 359, 35S, 



Mack, Gordon C. 
Mack. HstiyJ.. 
MacKay. FbireUa 



e, Joseph W 150 



MaoLaohisn, Arehib»ld Vi 



McAllister. Thomas F 486, 268 Madiso 



Ma^rudor. Bem^d F. . . 

MsEuire, Edward 

MaHer, Philip B 

MalCroid, Byron W. .. . 
Maltb}', Dale R 



..307,311,386 



i,PhylliB C,.'.''','.\! 627 



..890, I 



Marl 



>. Frederi 



343.4 

.616, 1 



..646,281,4 



McCune, t'ranoea 370 

McDonald. Bernard A 608 

McDonald, Francis J 226 

McDonald. Helen R. . . .GIS, lOS, 440, 452 

McDonald, Mary M 602,620 

MeDonakl. Thomas F 660 

McFarlan. Harold J 688 . -- -. - - . 

McFarlane, Janet M 626.384, 370,445 MaUon. Charlss H 648, 226. 

MoGee, Arthi ■" ..--.- -r -^ 



m. ArthiL. _ -.- 

Marks, Charlca B 678, 188,179,331 

Marks, JuHa" « - sas 

Marks, Thoi 
Marquette, ^ 

Marah, Vena _ 

Marshall, Clement H 498,648, 104 

Marshall, Edwin K 498, 439, 470 

Marth. Edmund W 602 

Martin. Edward 8 560, 188, 318. 313 

Man, Frederick W 114 

Mason, CarlH 518 

Maaon, Ralph L 513 

Masoi^ William J, B 350 

Msssnlcli, Henry F. ■ ■■- ■"" 



..634,5 



MoOee, Raipb 



Matt 



'n. Lewu 



M( 



Hale, 



..425,2: 



Matteson, George R, . . 



■rank M 188, 170. 388 

ityre. Clifford T 151 

ityre, Donald C 532 

■er.Hosswel A 452 



Maulbetcch. Alvii 
Maulbetsob, Jo' 



n F. !.'.'.'.'. .'.530, 288, 340 



i.RiohardM 516, 1 



McKee. Forest E, . . 
McKee, WakioM... 



i, Matthew E.. 661, 2i 



05, 73 Maiwell, Phoebe E 816 

4,440 Maiwell, Walter E 634, 151 

, ,570 Mead, ArkJib 152. 431 

9,141 Mead, Edward M 688 

490 Mead, Madge F 106, 364, 391, 440 



McKeowu, MarjoTJ 
McKinley, Eari B. 
McKinley, Williani 
McKinney.C. L... 
McKinney. Francis 



^.568,'i65, 390 Meai 



F.V.496,'572. 188.386, 



•tR.' 629. 440 



Mchlman, Isadore J. ......... ... ...444 

MehaBy. Charles 574 

Meiheyer, Edwin, H.. 619 

Mclaniphy. John C S74, 189, 1TB 

Mchti, Geor»e R 451 

Melleacamo, Esther E 106 

Menefee, Sliirlsy L 512 

Menser. Clarence L. 618, 441 

Meredith, L. K 206.212.464 

Merrlman, Huth 816 

Merrill E. Fotml 590, 441. 470 

Merritt. Eriesaon H 152, 480 

Meraerean, Katharine L 106 

Merta, Wilbur L. 163 

Mettci. Howaid B 478 

Meti. Edward F ^,467 

MeUger, Leon D... 630, 644, 189,179.474 

Meyers, Martin G., 814 

Michalskc, Wm, F 622, 106 

Mickclson, Albert J.189, 179, 376, 410, 424 

Mickey, Frank D 510 

MiddauEh. Florence K 440 

Middleditch, Leigh B 684 

Middk^ditch, Philip H 616, 2S3 

MiddlctoQ, Edward A 484 

MiEholl. Mildred C 627 

MiTham, Elbert G 152,375 

MilUrd, F. Gumee 189.179,386,283, 

286. 2M, S37, 340 

Miller, Anna 610, 827 

Miller, Carol L 604 

Miller. Cecil W 680,276,380 

Miller, FnokK 622 

Miller, Harokl A 886, 313 

Miller, Harry E 163 

Miller, Hcrron W 162, 481 

Miller, Josephine M 616 

Miller, Margaret E 629 

MUler, Mary D 106 

Miller, Maurice C. , 613 

Miller, Norman F 494 

Miller, Orland A 227 

Miller, Peter A 628, 426, 426 

Miller, Ruby M 273 

Miller. Ruth D 106 

Miller, aylvssler G 62S 

Miller, Wilbur K S24 

Miller. Williani L. . 560, 179, 376. 388, 410, 

468 

Miller, Wyatt A 182. 133, 373, 376 

Milliken, Jacob O 162 

Millman, Harold r. 560 

Mills, Harold A 634 

Mills, Ray J 189.510.179,390, 

282, 337 

Milhi, Walker H 600 

Miner, Harry E 152 

Miner, Martin F 662 

Miranda, Octacilio 488 

Mock, Frank C 422 

Moglord, Harry J 588,227 

Mohr. Edmund C 556,212 

Moll, I*sUr S 544 

Moninger, Arthur V,,,. 494, 163,360.378, 

434 

Monroe, Kenneth H 432 

Monroe, Lowell 153. 133 

MonUKue, Donald E 484 

MontefiuB, Harry E 522, 413 

Moon. Myra D .456 

Mooney, Charles A,... 212 

Mooney. Wimam C 439. 474 

Moore, Evelyn W ,626, 382. 445 

Moore, Helen A 608,212.204 

Moore, Paul M 500,488 

Moore, Balph S 466 

Moore, WjterS 180 

Moore, Whitley B 528,363 

Motak«. Arjimiro .538. 477 

Moran, Roay E 227, 349 

Morden, Bcasie 614 

Morgan, Dwight C. 482 

Morgan, Fannie E 829 

Morrill, Donaki M 512,546, 106 

Morris, Walter E... 680, 189, 179,426,426 

Morrison, Aubrey C 106 

Morrison, Chester C. 474 

Morrison, F. Austin 106, 436 

Morrison, Lewis H 582 

Morrow, Arthur A 680, 190, 376, 4 10 

Morrow, Harvey W 470 

Morse, Chester J....... 544. 179, 348, 388 

Morse, Howard Eurys 532, 270, 107 

Morse, Mildred M 612 

Morse, Vireinia B 628 

Monon, Moses E 640 

Morten, Marcus R 434 

Mosier, DeT 524,469 

Moss, Ben J 220 

Moss, Fred H 237 



Hosted by 



GQji)gIe 



Index — Continued 



Motley Robert E 

Matt Arthur D 


227 220 439 
408 

804 107 73 ^9 
528 560 190 376 

- '" "° i| 

106 73 367 330 


oil"'"™" '"si 

OlsmlldeKT ;.V. ■.550/238,360; 377 


SS«t '::::. 




lii.SS 


SSSI", 




"■'^ 


'"••'§ 


























100,434 


8s"s.ar"-"'-'"'"''"'-s5 














8S2d"£T';.:::;::::::::Sll:S 










fEiiSI^;/ 






MuT*hv Geoise WO 


o.b^.Hm,i .■■,:::::::::;:::;:!37 


■iBi.m 



3I>4 Oebura Charles Y.. 



Notter, Milton A 
- ■■ !,Clareii 
nn. Carl 






6.473 



k.FianeteD 367,467 



niies, neien k 
Nobil, Goerge . 
Nobk Roielta 



Nord, Rov A.. 

NorriB, MavnardA 51 

Nottbcott, Reginald A . . . . ^ , , 



iip.Ceeil,_ 

Norlhrup. Emily F 
Northwiw. Fred R. 



Norton, John K 



2, 308. 153. 132. 373. 

Novy, Marpierit* L ',602! 6271 370 

Novy, Robert L 546, 278. 375 

Nutting, Raymond J 556 

Nye, Gerald F 506 



600 442 463 



Nadeau, Rowland A 588, 1S3 

Nsftel, Joseph D 586 

Nahikian. Garkis M 153 

Nakai, Gentsk .476 

Nance, Willla D 498 

Naah, Franeia B 303. 304 

Naylon.JohnE 494 

Needham. Mariorie E 624 

e«lsou, Russell B 526,644.190.410 
(dthenmt. Ghariea 680. 190, 424 

Ndthermt, Wm. A 580.190,424 

Nelson, Amy L 600 

Nesbit. Frank F 494,466 . 



Paisley. Walter W 496, 191, 179. 343 Poe. J. 





498' 470 


Pinney. N.E 1 


















544,469 

.638,440,446 




p 


fs,sgf: 


;,;*^,',',''^'."*',53 




Patb, HiigoW 

Piatt. Gilbert C... 


::;::::::::;:::;«c 












Pockman. Georgiann 


aB 370,463 



,560l270 Pocl, Ant 



Pallister. Zilpha It 






.DalT 154 

Pappe. Re^nald D 431 

Pardee. Earl E 624,258. 285, 414.481 

Pardon, Carl E 367 

Parfet, Albert B 600, 108 

Parfet, Ray T 500 

Park, Bwd T 492. lOS 

Parker, ilarry D. . .191, 179, 419, 426, 470 



1. AibettM... 367 



6, 298, 285, 340 Pal 



r, Leonard W 574,258,359 



E 614.630 



.510 Payne, Maud H 

.280 Peadi, Waiard I 

4. 107 Pearee, Cheater C. 

.574 Pearl Walter W... 



Pope. Alvah , 
PorMrl Doris 



..626. 370, 462 

192, 179 

, , .603, 72, 302 



Q, Harold E 663 



: Philip O 
b, PhyTlis. 



Miabeth 614, 627. 364 

n, Clarence K 494 

itsison, Helen W 604, 108, 73 

L, Meade W S60 

L, Robert C 508 



.teroon, Marvin L 514. 259 



Prange, Mela K 627 

Preston. John D.',',',' ■.■.■....■.■.■,■,■ .167.' 163 

Preston, Phillips B 482 

Prcuflael, Byron 690 

Priehard. Leda L 614. 627 



.Dorothy L. 

Proctor. Haile M . , 
Publow, Earl W . . . 



Puidi, Joseph R. , 
PuHord, Bertha C 
Pulling^ Everett V 
Putt. Fenimore E 



Pencyar. iVeda II 604 

Perkins, Aradelle F 364 

PeAina, Charles, 530 



Ocobook, Calheri 



O'Douoghue, John B 512.546 



..239,236,377,433 



Ohiniacher. Albert 



1, 464 Peterson. Mario 



i. 133, 373 Raiford, Frank P S40 



, ,314. 316, 341 Ramsdell, Paul V ^^ I . ! !420, 422 



Randall, LeRoyS.. 
Rankin, Albert W.., 



..612.440 Rapp, B 



..614 Dathburn. Carl 



Hosted by 



Google 



Index — Continued 



Rathbiin, EtuceR.. 

Ratlemsn^Anm,'.'. 
Ray, Ella 6 



3W. Z8fi, 295. 340 






I, Philip t , , 



5.341 



Rsyneford, Gi .. . , . .™.,, , „^, ,„„ 

Reo, Thatcher W 518, 3S9 

Read, Edwin M 634,263 

Reardon^. Mtuie 004 

ReewiQ, WnltiT J. S64 

"-- -■11, Riohey B 684 



era'. J. Spoed.'. 
ors. PaulH... 



440.463 Rogers, W 

Roggy, KueV 

RoKgy, MsTthti M . . 

Ro«oeki, Aki J 



Reber, ijarry b.,, 

Bfed. Edns M W4. om 

Reed. Macdonald S SS4. 155, 133, 359. 

373,386 



Reid. riollaccM., S44. 192,179 

" ran, Catherine M 618.110 

^ r. FredL 630,301,285,340 

lert, Cheater K 584 

lie. Waller A.... 584, 156,133 



BenJ. F. 
DavMT 



_. 1, James M 155, 

Reid, Thos. C 572. SS9. 

"■ , Wallace E 602, 



424 RoalisBky, 



Stephen J. 



t. LaVen 



.228.2 



teynolds, Chaa, n.\'.\'.'.'.'.'.'.\\\\\\.'.!i78 
Reynolds, D. I. Clyde Ill 

teynolds, Eber J 520. 54H 

" Dolds,Mv«AtetR... 614, 364,368,442 

._,noldB, PauTH 502, 306. 367 

Riaeh, William M 5S0 



1, Karl.. 



.._ 112 

RoBser, Grace O 465 

ouu Roth, Stella R 387 

600 Rothaoher, Wilma M 610 

'0, 110, 73, 362, Rothroek, Ciarenee L 630, 263 

387. 285. 34U Rothachild. Stanford Z 112 

331 Rough, John, Jr 522 

614 RoiJette, Wayne N 229 

518 RouBrin, Rayninnd R 552 

602 Rowan. Clyde C... 544, 192, 178,170,348. 

560 388,343 

810,626 Rowe, Arthur H 60 

— ... « g Q Prmien™ 624 

" ■ -a A 606 

R 494 

Dt Chas 532. 158, 133. 



a. Hen.. . 
' 1-. Chas. 



Rowley. LaoD 



ihardwn, Robt. E. . . . 192, 170, 363, 41U 

ihey, Helen M 628,364 

. jhtig, Joseph 8 HI 

Riddle, Geo. G 155 

Riecka. Frank C 166,413 

Oeger, Lavanche G 444, 452 

tiggs, Emma K -612 

LiggB, Roland W 213 

R'^,-F«nw."::..:::::::;::::::::«2 

R ndge, Warren L 676, 167.163,378 

Rieedorph, Marguerite L 370 

" tchie, Gaileton P 489, 111 

.oan, Everett H 425 

Robbert, Oeorae 444, 462 

Robbing, John C 484 

tobbine, NaUiamel, Jr 484 

Roberta, Walter C 518 

lobertaoE, John E 228, 220 



^«h". 



Hobaon, RuthM.. 



II H 662,281 



loyce. I. 
tubin, L 

Ss: 

iua;eT, M. Selden . . 

RuhUng, George H 

EummS, Henry C 660,590,193.360 

ihTHarry E 193 

Rush, John H 475 

Rushbrook. Leslie H 112 

".uihmoce, Maurice I< 550, 239. 236 

.UBBell, F. Irene 614. 868, 370, 462 



Sabin, Carlton R.. 5 

Sable. Louis B 422,452, 4 

Sachs. Edward A 3S0, 442, 4 

Sacia, C. Fred 1 

Hadakata. Kameyo 827, 4 

Sadler, Caroline M. 8 

Sallwaeser, Norman H 590,4 

Salmon, Roger W 6 

Balon, Nathan 5 

Sandenburgh. George H 156, 1 

SanderhofT, Raymond F 6 

Sandera, Floyd S 4 

Sanders, John E 508, 280, 4 

Sanders, May 4 

Sanderson, Walter W 5 

Sanlord, Wayland H 498, 5 

Sargeant. Ellen M 113,628.302, 4 

Sargent, Emilie O.. .612. 628, 113. 73, 31 
* 3B1. 392. 440, 4 

SatlerwhiU. Robert L 502, 4 

Sattinger, Oscar C 426.4 

Sauer, SheUon J 1 

Saunders, Harold J.... | 

Saunders, Jessie L 6 

Saur, MelvinH ■ ■} 

Sawin,Fted M 156,1 

Scanlon. r^Roy J...514, 103,178,388,4 



Soarboro, Edwin R. SS3, 4«fi 

SchaHtn, Edward'id' i '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.Ml 

Sohaphorst. Benjamin 538 

Schatikin, Wm. W ,628 

Schoid, DsnaA 590,476 

Schiller, Robert M 411, 470 

Schillinc. Mildied 9 820, 445 

Sohlissel. Meyer A 432 

Schmidt, Herbrat N 113. 43B 

Schmidt, Herman H. 466 

Schmidt, James M 562 

Schmidt, John H 157. 133. 413 

Schmidt, Paul F 52D. 4B8 

Schmutsier, Albert J 584 

Schoepfle. Chaster S 375 

Schoepfle. Wilbur J 678. 334 

Schoetion, Ray E 239. 377 

Scholl. Albert A 468 

Sohrimpf. Albert E 580 

Schroeder. Fred J 193, 424 

Schroeder, Werner W ... 680, 690. 193, 179. 
358, 3T6, 388, 410, 

419, 426 

Schuereren, Leah M 445 

Sohulte, Evelyn J 828 

Sehul., Ewald 367 

Sehumacher, Edna L. ., 113 

Schumann, Herbert 473 

Schupp, Arthur A 492. 85S 

Schwaru, EmiUe C 624, 113 

Scofield, Leland N 504 

Scott. John F 560.193,179,348, 

388.343 

Scott, Joseph M 514,508 

Bcolt. Louise R 814 

Scott, Malcolm M 193, 604 

Scott, Ralphs 578 

Scribner, Carieton S 488 

Scroggie, Dean C 441 

Seabrook, Chancy S 367 

Seahury, WiUiam W 678, 269 

Seaver. Elisabeth 620. 452 

Searl.FredN 580 

Searles. William I 566 

Sears, Charlea F 624 

Seaver, Orrin 118 

Seeley, J. Bradford 662,213,343 

Seiuare, Ralph S 229 

Safert. Gertrude 606. 446 

Seigworth, Vera F 114, 382, 445. 452 

Selby, Hasel S 620 

Sell, Frederick B 422 

Seilere, F. Vernon 826,435,446 

Senff, RuthL.. 114 

Service. Helen F. ..'.'.'.'..'.'.',... .'602,' 114 

Seiaions, Donald W 439 

Sevin, Frederic W 474 

Sevin. Robert E 4T4 

Seiton. Earl C 363 

Shafei, Wilson M 114. 492, 78, 347. 

380,343 

ShaBer. Loren W 558 

Shand, David W 490, 470 

Bhankland, Mildred 1 384 

Sharp, Alton B. . 532 

Sharpe, James H 600. 285. 341 

Sharpe. OtaE 114 

Sharrow, Eva. 804. 628, 442 

Shartel. Shalton. 600 

Shaw, Esther E. . . 612, 429 

Shaw. Hoharc F 550, 239, 23B 

Shaw, Norman D .246,242 

Shea, Clarence W 441 

Shcahan, Thomas W 630,413 

Shearer. Alfred M 492,462 

Shearer. John ...562 

Sheldon, Howard W 578 

Sheldon, John A. 114 

Sheldon, Maurie F 578. 277 

Sheldon, Ralph G . , », IM 

Sheldon, Willaid B 229 

Shepard, Bert H 614 

Sherk,AnhurR....5B0. 194, 178,414,424 

Sherman, Harley B 367 

Sherman Harold, 157 

Sherman, HaroiJ J 444 

Shields, Donald H 470 

Shinkroan, Olga E 630 

Shipley, Caleb G 614, 114,442 

Shipman. Sidney J 618 

Shoemaker, Raymond W 444 

Shutee, Clarence 1 342 

Shutter, HaroMW 566,213 

Siev, Leonard 239, 13e 

ffievert, MinaA 4*6 

Siggere, Mary P 604 

Sikes, Chased. 518,73,387,439,451 

Silsby, DonH. ,245,242 



Hosted by. 



gle 



Index — Continued 



SmooB, ArabibBldC.. 



.ffimpeoD, Jen R . . . 
ffloli, Emory W..., 

BistleT, RufiB^ 

Siteo, Charlotte B. . . 
SldUmsa, WUiam M 
Skiimer, Clarsnoe O. 
Skumer, SAmuel J ■ ■ . 



Skuteetu, Jf 
StaghtrHer._.. 
Skcht, William 



M.. 



SmaUman, Honard L 

SnwrtTCtarenoe F 





ZGi^^:::::. 












Smith. Harold J 


It* 






































































Mk, 










































































iUI 


































































fesss. 




"■' IIS 






































%'^;^^^IA 


































re. Arrh bsld W 







. . 194, 179. 424 



Stadeker, Jerome L.. 


470 




..60(l'.li5.*429;i42 






Stanley. Sarah L.-,. 


...602, 115,78.370 


iA"ii^K-"-v. 


.■;;;.. m-aS 



S, 422 Steams, Ruseell B. . . 



: ^467 Steele, fe. C. . 

0,157 Steele, LeiBhton u. 

. .486 Steele. Walter B.. 

. .574 Steen, Sidney T, . . 

..584 

. .422 Steere. Mary L. . . 

3.206 Steers. Ben T 

,.4B2- Steers, OeotgeE.. 

7, 375 Stescall, Clillord C 

2, 470 Sl*tele< " ' ' 



..548,229,464,474 



Swart, Carl B 

Sweet, Forest H 

Switior, John 8 4S0, 672, 1 ] 



Taber. Frank A .518,439 

Talbot, Cyril. . 359, 470 

Talcott, Warten E S70, 105, 179 



3, 35a, Tallman, James F. , , 



e, PanlL.. 

.Euge - 



StekeU „ 

Stenberz, Bemhart. ._ . 
Stephen, Harold M.. 
StepbeDson, Merritt E 
Sterling. Walter A.. 5» 

Sl«m, Louie D 

3, Clayton E. . . 






s, Kenneth M . . 



. . 572. 157, 373. 386 St«vei 



yH.,560, 194, 179,348.31 



Stilsa, Franklin A. 
Stiles, Harry F . . . 
Stimson. Clara A . . 
Stimsou, Donald C 
Stiver DonakiF. . 



.,516. 194, 17S, 
'.'.iy.'. .4261*25, 



Stoipe nllmore W,, 
Stone Charles E.... 
Stone Clifford C... 



Stone John W . . . 
Stone OrrinF.... 
Stonerock. Bessie ^ 
StonuB, Harrr E 
Stott Louis H . . 



iO. 116, 73, 347 
.'.i59,"556,'343 



nF 382,368,8 

storei LiayjQ D ...,---,-..-.... . 

Stovel, Henry C .. 

Stowell Marjorie M 

Straohan Marguerite K .6 



Btrausa Frederick. G . . 



Streeter Clareodoo E. . 

Streeter Errol H 

Stringer Christina R.. . 



..606,304,440 
*.' .618, 117,452 



. . 195, 179 

195 

B, 368. 367 



i, 133, 373, 389 
.Vim. 116, MO 



Stevens. Roger B 534,278 

Stevenson, Ellen B 620 

Stevenson. Fred L 534 

Stevenson. Jane D 608 



..554,246,242 



2, 391, 445 



o, Alfred R 488, 118. 72. 73 

n, AtholB. 504 

n, Frank B 484,468.489 

n. Howard E 444 

o, James P 484,334,468 

n,Kathryn M 618 

n, LelandS 522,448 

n. Nathaniels... 404.342 

n. Paul F 105. 402. 178, 383 

n, Stanley J, 277 

«ois 160.472 



iglon,CarlH, 
Thornton, Eugene S 
Thrum. Fred M.,,, 



Stryker Carleton E. 159, 532, 307. 133, 388 
Stumpf VinoentH 230, 5J0, 236 



0,826,117,73,391 



Sugnet Floyd P 

Sueujama, Kamerohi . 
Siinivan.DoniiaE...3 



Sulbvan MarieC 622.118 

Supe MarsaretL 118.446 

Surgenor Frank P 482, 118. 73, 439 

Su^erland, Otis L 564, 262 



nyama, Sotaro. . 

in, Tom I, 

IS. CharleaW. .. 



e.Mari 



..592 
..MS, 568, 242 



0, 133. 373, 374 

662 

478, 119 

..556,271, 119 

482 

'.'.'.'.'.' .452,' 474 



,.614 



Tremper, HugbH 

- — iper. Richard H oij 

-..^olitis, Constandne D....... 432 

Tiialer, Royal G 263, 441 

Troester, Marshall F 473 

Trombley. Ruth C 364.828,629, 119, 

391, 446 



Hosted by 



Google 



Trost, Miltoo S 468 

True, Agues A SBS 

Tniemaa, Elmor L -...-- - 598 

Tnieman. Harold S 516 

TpyKll, Ebbs T. , «5, 452 

Tiibbfl, CUnI 614,630,452 

Tuske. OetsL 004. 3S2, 364, 3e§, 

370,454 

Tiimbull, William V 492 

Tiiiuer, Joseph W 534 

Turner, Robert W 482, 335 

TuthiU, Helen 668, 120, 392, 429 

Turtle. LoweU H 470 

Tyson, M. Muriel. .613. 120, 428, 429, 416 

u 

lifer, Clarence E 514, 120, 314. 315, 

318, 319. 320, 7S, 3S5, 330, 340. 343 

Ulenburc. Malhilda F 120.445 

Ullrioh, RusbbU W 5S8 

Underwood, GUbert S 422, 676, 263 

Underwood. Wm. L 402 

V 

Vail, Etliel 362, 368. 428, 445 

VaLI, William H 496,470 

Van Bmnt, IwJrick C.'.'.'.'. .■,',. 494,' 464 

Vance. Kenneth W 516. 120, 73 

VanderKarr, Marie 120 

VandarVeen, Frauds 120 

Vanderveer, Helen 820, 120. 73, 391 

VanderZahn. L. E 120 

Van Deusen, Aria L 496,624,120,73, 

362 368 454 303 
VanDusen Charles T 406 277 

VanDufien David L 411 

VanLeevwen Juha 454 

Van Sohoik John D 568 278 

\an Stone Nathan E 375 

VanZandl Marjone A 602 

\aughBn Warren T 556 494 214 

Vaiquei Antonio A Kb 477 

\edder Fiancie B 498 

Veiier - - 



lernard 
Vibrans Frank C 
Villanneva Guillennol 
Vincent raster B 
Vinoent, Ralph M 
Vie WiUiun R 

vtS" WUlv"c 
V olden TnabnelG 
Vonaehen FranC J 581 
Von Noatiti Ench 
Vonrheea Louis F 

Vonte Mildred L 
Vory! Arthur E 
Votey MarioneM 
Votruba William E 
^jn ClariBsaD 



Waddell Hi^nrj R 

Waeensell Hu(o 
WaegoM^ Joeepb D 
Wagner Ftank C 
Wagner, Paul C 
Waite, Elbndge R 
Takefield Albert F 

Valdo Lewis P 
'alker Dorothy L 

Jn kcr Evalynn H 
Walker franeiaE 
Walker Harriet K 
Waker Kari F 60t 
Walker Portia 

. _. Hampton 
Waller Harold O 
Walb Arch 
Walsh Edward F 



375 



I ndex — Continued 



I'aples Harold J . .570, 196, 179, 410, 424 

tard! H, Gerrit.*.'.' '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'. .'.SOS 

Vard. JohnA 506 

ffard, Leonard D 50 

Sard, Ralph H. 286 

Varner, Edward C, ■.'.,,'..'.".. ■,".'..,. '.488 

Varner, Barley D 161, 490. 133. 

373, 386. 343 
Vamer. Howard M..490, 122, 72, 387, 342 

Varren. Dorothea 612 

Varren, Walter 161,430,432 



Phillip . . . 
Ilanche C 



Weber. Katherine J 616 

Webster. l>rilB.. 367 

Webster, Mai E 470 

Wedemeyer, Frieda M 445 

Wehmeyer. J. L 161. 133 

Weinbereer, Mauriee. . , . 196. I7B. 410. 424 

Weiner.Ha"')'!' *?? 

Weil^, Herbert''^ .■,■.'.'.'.'. '.''.6S2, 230.220 

Weiss. LeIand M 196 

Weiasineer. Carl F 435 

Welbourn, LeIand 8 666 

WelBch. M. W .538, 363 

WeUer, Charlea N , 558 

Welling, David M 196. 179 

Wells. Gilbert B 634 



enley. Call 
eniley. J. \ 



364 445 Wesley 



Westbrook, Hari 
Westbrook "-'- 
Westermai 

Weston, t^an 
Whalen. jami 



161 133 373 Wheeler, Frank 
126 Wheeler, John 1 



te, HmJ^K 

teman, Stanley J 

, tman, Walter P S70, 

utinuBh. George J 

utmer, George R 

rrhitney, Lemuel C 

WhittJngham. Harvy H 

Wickham, William P 161. 



Ii L E 
Valsh MaryE 
.Valter Fr«d E 
Walters Frank 
BalthaU Dam< 



ieelander Albert E.' . ' . ' 867 



WittSr, CUy w 
Wilbur, ReiE. 
WilDDi, Claude 
Wilcoien, Lewii 



.162, 133,386.334 
..614, 4in 
. . 122, 4 



I, 123. 73 



Wiley, Chsrlei D 431. 4TS 

Wilkinson, Morton H . ""' ■"' ""• ""• 

Willard Frank A 

Williams, Arthur G... 
Williams, Arthur M . 

Williams. Blanche - 

Williams. Edger M 504, 3 



(Vilhai 



61, 500, 133 Wilne, 



e! G™nn 



..260 
....», 464 
0, 364. 463 



rt R 622,564.231 



Wilson, Marian G 602,428 

— n. Forcli-al L 488 

.. _-n.PBrEyC 197 

Wilson, PMhp J.. Jr .402 

W leon. V. SUinUy 123, 73, 449 

IV DChell, Constance M 612. 463 

- idb.WUhamG SOS 

idmaeller, Rudolph W 470 

[field, Emery D 654 

ibIow, M. L 600 

aWRoUinR 484,464 



392. 440. 454 
, ,301. 283. 340 

490 

4, 123. 440. 442 

.,„„.. „ 576.584 

1, BohmdS 167. 163 



Wood, FraL_ ,. . . 
Wood, Frank A^ . 



Wood, Motrison C..510, 380, 339. 442, 461 

Woodbury. Bruce 162. 133 

Woodford, John Thornton 452, 468 

Woodman, Joseph E 367 

WoodruH, Marsh B 632 



638. 367, 443 



Wray. Clieeter B *74 

Wright, Burrell 197, 4B2, 644 

Wriaht, Carroll S 262 

Wriiht Clarence J 54S, 231. 349 

Wright Edward P., ,486, 672, 124, 73, 387 

Wrliht. Edwin C 162 

Wright, Eugene C.. Jr 610 

Wright, Evadne R 602 

Wright. Harry B 6M 

Wright, Robert G SM 

WuTOa Chang ". . .182, 4^ 



Hosted by 



G^gle 



/ 







■s 

162 

49S 
4U 


Index- 
Young! Floyd L 

Y^nl; M"rtte^ 
Young! William B 


Continued 

371 

Z 


1 

i 






Wuralsr, Ftwl J 

Wylie. Robert 






Zevait]ii. Clarence's'. .'.* 




Y 












SSfl^ni'a^- 














YokubiMk, Chesler E 


■.162,431 




Y^n^cterafe'!':;;-.-.-.;- 







(^'i^^ 6055 



Hosted by 



Google 



Hosted by 



Google