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Full text of "Michiganensian"

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THE DU BOIS PRESS 

COMPLETE CATALOGUE SERVICE 

ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



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Copyrighud 1916 hy 
Louis M. Bruch 

and 

Glenn M. Coulter 



<^^w\/^^6s^ 






DEDICATION,. 

In gratenil tr^te to | 



iA. 



/t ,^ it<^*«-«y 




"^'W?"^ 




1 



DEDICATIONS 



01 gratefiil tribute to 
AlUrt AStanley; wko W- 
gtven so willingly of his 
dme anJ taLent ikat v«o( 
Michigan might hxrtf the 
mspiiatiDn and enjoyment 
of gcod muse, v« Jedicale 
the 19l6A\ichiganensian. 





In College Days 

(The Friar's Song) 
Harold M. Bowman, *00. 

Where no one asks the *'who" or **why"; 
Where no one doth the sinner ply 
With his embarrassments of guile; 
Where's ne'er a frown but brings a smile, 
And cares are crimes, — 'tis sin to sigh, 
'Tis wrong to let a jest go by, 
And hope is truth, and life is nigh. 
The bourns of the Enchanted Isle 
In College Days. 

Then raise the rosy goblet high, — 
The singer's chalice, — and belie 
The tongues that trouble and defile; 
For we have yet a little while 
To linger, — You and Youth and I, 
In Michigan. 



10 



3f antes; JBurriU ^ngell 

[(1829-1916) 

Although the sad event had been anticipated, the bare announce- 
ment of President Angell's death must prove of peculiar significance 
to every educated American, poignantly significant to Michigan alumni 
the world over. A chasm yawns between the present and the past of 
our education and of our University; an entire order of associations 
departs. The commanding figure of President Eliot is still spared to 
us, indeed. But, even so, the children of all American state universities 
will feel that they have lost their most venerable and venerated leader. 
It is the end of a complete life, rarely ordered, dignified yet touched 
with the veritable savor of democracy, simple albeit stately — an em- 
bodiment of the sterling qualities native to old New England. And, for 
the thousands who owe allegiance to the great institution at Ann Arbor 
— Dr. Angell's monument — something has gone from the order of the 
universe, never to be replaced. With them the first of April, 1916, will 
always remain a day of sorrowful but elevating memories. * * * 

What was his secret? Not intellectual adroitness, with its restless 
experimenting; not ^'energy**, with its bane of **new** departures; em- 
phatically not ambition, with its itch for * 'results*' and consplcuous- 
ness. Rather it reposed in a character.that served as a sounding board for 
moral acoustics; an ability, that is, to let the right men alone, never 
harrying them in their work; an ability, moreover, to set the insignifi- 
cant in its place, and to let it take its own meaningless course. Dr. An- 
gell knew that the human mind can face actual issues, even if they be 
hostile; but he also knew that, to provoke this courage, the issue must 
be real and definite; and he permitted it to shape itself ere he met it. 
He could use prompt decision when necessary ; but he had learned, what 
so few ever learn, that quick decisions are proper in exceptional cases 
only; while for the rest, even blunderers may be counted on to correct 
themselves under kindly persuasion. The charm of his public speech 
was an index of the man here. It bespoke his temperament. His tran- 
quil unaltered humanity was the clue to much that others did not 
understand, or even misinterpreted. For his ripe wisdom lent him in- 
sight to see that great results come very gradually, and thanks only to 
the co-operation of many whose gifts, as is inevitable, are most various. 
He could abide the defects of qualities. His charm of address was indic- 
ative of that rarest of all faculties in an executive, the power [to wait 
on * 'glances that stand agreed". By this principally he won to his 
unique place. Now that he is gone, many of us must think of him as of 
one who sowed the harvest we shall reap — and was content to have sown. 

Keenly as we must feel the absence of his accustomed gracious pres- 
ence, we cannot grieve as for a career cut short in its prime, with prom- 
ise half fulfilled. Nay, remembering his mature performance, which 
so evades our feeble words, we would rather say, with Madame de 
Stael, "When a noble life has prepared old age, it is not the decline that 
it reveals, but the first days of immortality". 

R. M. WENLEY. 

—The Michigan Daily, April 2, 1916 



11 



An Enousk View on the Hij 



A Corner of the New Barton Lake 



iHE BtNi) Above thr Old Mil 



Cascade Glen o 



QuLET Water Near the Island 



On Hairpin Turn on the Boulevard 



On thk Campls, Nkar thj Chkmistrv Bui 



The Elm-I.[ned Walks 



THt Diagonal and the Elm Walks 



A View of the Martha Cook Dormitory 



The Flower Show in Alumni Hall 



L Walk Looking Towav 



The Ivv Entrance to University Hall 



Near thi; Center of the Campus 



Looking Tkrouok the Engineerino Arch 



The Present Union Building 



The Impressive Eni 



The University of Michigan 

THE University of Michigan was organized under an act of the Legislature in 1837 as an integral 
part of the educational system of the State. At that time there were no state institutions of 
learning that were worthy of the name of University. Higher education was confined to private 
corporations, wholly independent of state control. Between these institutions and the few scat- 
tered common schools there were practically no public high schools to be found in a large majority of 
states as late as 1831. The educational revival of the early decades of the nineteenth century expressed 
an insistent demand that the government should assume the responsibility for the instruction of its citi- 
zens. In response to this public demand for better educational facilities the State of Michigan adopted 
the "Prussian idea", a system of public instruction embracing the three divisions of schools — primary 
schools, secondary schools, and university. "Branch" schools, numbering five the first year, were im- 
mediately established for the purpose of preparing students for the University, which opened its doors 
in September, 1841, with a faculty of two professors and a student body numbering six freshmen. The 
branch schools were soon absorbed by the public high schools, thus relieving the University of their sup- 
port and affording opportunity for further development. The first equipment of the University of Mich- 
igan consisted of six buildings: two dormitories, which included class rooms, and four houses for pro- 
fessors. Subsequently the dormitories became the wings of the present University Hall. The president's 
house, extensively altered, still occupies its original site on the campus. Such was the modest begin- 
ning of the great institution of learning which is now widely recognized as a national university of 
first rank. 

PHYSICAL EQUIPMENT 

The campus proper of the University of Michigan comprises forty acres of land and twenty build- 
ings. Thirty-three other buildings occupy sites adjacent to the campus. Among the other properties 
of the University are the following: Ferry Field, the men's athletic grounds; Palmer Field, the women's 
athletic grounds; a ninety-acre arboretum and garden along the Huron river; the Saginaw Forestry 
Farm, eighty acres of land one mile west of Ann Arbor; and the Bogardus Engineering Camp and Bio- 
logical Station, a tract of land including 2,200 acres, in Cheboygan County, seventeen miles south of 
the Straits of Mackinac. 

Ferry Field is one of the best equipped athletic grounds in the country. It contains forty acres of 
land and is surrounded by a high brick wall, with an ornamental gate at the northeast comer. Besides 
numerous football and baseball fields for varsity and class teams, it includes 32 tennis courts, a running 
track, with a 220-yard " straight-away", a stadium, and stands. The football stands seat 22,656 persons, 
while the baseball stand seats 1,632. One section of the football stadium was built two years ago, with 
a seating capacity of 13,200. When completed the stadium will accommodate 52,000 spectators. A 
commodious club house, containing lockers, baths and rubbing and lodging rooms, is situated near 
the entrance to the field. An annual "blanket" tax of five dollars admits the student to all athletic 
events and affords him the privilege of using the facilities of the field for recreation purposes. 

Palmer Field, the women's athletic grounds, contains tennis courts, hockey and baseball fields, 
a basketball court, a club house, and an expansive green for physical recreation. This field, encircled 
by hills, furnishes an amphitheater for open-air celebrations. It is here that the annual cap-night cele- 
bration is held. May-day and other pageants presented by the women are also given in this picturesque 
theater. 

Among the noteworthy buildings recently erected on the University of Michigan campus are Hill 
Auditorium, the Natural Science Building, the Chemistry and Pharmacy Building, and the two dor^ 
mitories for women. 

Hill Auditorium, one of the finest music halls in the world, was erected at a cost of 3300,000, the 
major portion of which was bequeathed by the late Hon. Arthur Hill, of Saginaw, an alumnus of the 



39 



University and for many years a member of the Board of Regents. It has a seating capacity of 5,000 
and is used for all the occasions which assemble the university public, such as the Choral Union and May 
Festival concerts, convocation, lectures, pageants, mass meetings, and the like. This building contains 
the famous Frieze Memorial organ, originally constructed for the Columbian Exposition in 1893, and 
for many years located in University Hall. The large exhibition room on the second floor is devoted 
to the Steams collection of musical instruments, presented to the University several years ago by the 
late Frederick Stearns, of Detroit. 

The Natural Science Building was completed last fall at the beginning of the academic year. This 
splendid structure contains over 270 rooms and cost 3450,000. It includes the departments of Botany, 
Forestry, Geology, Mineralogy, 2^1ogy, and Psychology. Though constructed primarily to serve util- 
itarian purposes, the building conforms in architectural design to Hill Auditorium, which faces it directly 
across North University Avenue. 

The Chemistry Building, a four-story structure, rectangular in shape, includes 125 rooms and 
104,500 square feet of floor space. All the chemistry of the various departments of the University, ex- 
cept the technical chemistry of the College of Medicine and Surgery, is taught in this building. 

From an architectural point of view the most interesting building in the University group is the 
Martha Cook dormitory for women. It is the gift of the Cook family of Hillsdale and New York. Its 
estimated value is approximately half a million dollars. It is Tudor^jothic in design, and quite gener- 
ally conceded to be one of the most artistic structures of its kind in the country. It contains all the mod- 
ern conveniences to be found in club homes and accommodations for 125 women. The other dormitory, 
Newberry Residence Hall, while less pretentious in architectural appointments than the Martha Cook 
building, is a strictly modern building, pleasing to the sight and comfortably and artistically furnished. 
It affords living quarters for sixty women. It is the gift of the Newberry family, of Detroit. 



LIVING CONDITIONS 

Students at the University of Michigan live in the private homes of the city or in fraternity and 
club houses, of which latter there are over sixty in number. The wide choice afforded the student in 
the selection of his rooming house enables him to adjust his living expenses to his allowance. The women 
who do not live in either of the two dormitories or in sorority houses are assigned by the dean of women 
to the various approved "League Houses", private homes conducted under the supervision of the Wo- 
men's League, a student organization which exercises general supervision over the university activities 
of the women. By supervising the rooming houses that are open to women the League is able to stand- 
ardize living conditions and at the same time give direction to the social life of the women. The same 
kind of supervision is being instituted for the rooming houses devoted to men. It is quite generally de- 
sired, however, that dormitories under the direction of the University shall be available to both men 
and women in the not too distant future. 



UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

Not the least important part of a university student's training is acquired through his associations 
outside the class room. A great cosmopolitan student body, with opportunity for intimate social con- 
tact among its individual members, affords opportunities of inestimable value to the future citizen. To 
exchange opinions with men and women from foreign lands, as well as with those from the various states 
in the Union, to share their pleasures and responsibilities, to work with them in the laboratory, the li- 
brary, or the class room, to compete with them for athletic or academic preferment — it is this experi- 
ence alone which can crush out the narrow provincialism of the average student and make him tolerant 
and broad-minded. Contact with his fellows affords the only means whereby the vulgarian or the prig 
can be rendered good company for intelligent men and women. True culture, which evinces a prefer- 
ence for what is superior amid all the accidents of life, can be acquired in no other way. 



40 



THE MICHIGAN UNION 

Foremost among the student organizations which foster this cosmopolitan spirit is the University 
of Michigan Union, whose membership embraces more than three thousand undergraduates and many 
thousand alumni. A million dollar campaign for funds with which to erect and maintain a new club 
house is nearing its completion. It is confidently expected that the last dollar will soon be subscribed, 
so that building operations may be started during commencement week of the present year. This cam- 
paign for a new Union home is the most ambitious project ever undertaken by the alumni of any uni- 
versity, and the success of the movement speaks well for the loyalty and enterprise of Michigan gradu- 
ates and former students. When completed the new Union will serve as a common social center for 
students, faculty, and alumni of the University. It is a significant fact that the Union has been able, 
even with its present inadequate facilities, to give general direction to student activities. It produces 
the annual student opera, conducts student, class, and university affairs, and serves as the social center 
of university undergraduate life. It is obvious that an increase in the facilities of the Union will multiply 
its opportunities for serving the interests of the student body. 

Besides the Union, whose activities cover every day of the academic year, there are a great variety 
of organizations devoted to special social and academic interests. Honor and departmental societies, 
literary and foreign language associations, dramatic, musical, debating, and social clubs, and the like, 
present ample opportunity for the development of the student's aptitudes. Nor are the women of the 
University less active than the men in fostering the interests of their group life. And permeating all 
these activities is a wholesome spirit of democracy, which means open opportunity for all and special 
privilege for none. 

LIVING EXPENSES 

Michigan has long been known as the "poor man's college". It is estimated that forty percent of 
the student body is at least partially self-supporting. Student employment bureaus, conducted by the 
University Y. M. C. A. and the Michigan Union, afford help to needy students throughout the year. 
More than 4,000 "jobs" are opened to students annually through the activity of these employment 
agencies. There are also available to deserving students more than seventy-five scholarships, loan funds, 
and prizes. These funds have been provided by the Board of Regents, graduating classes, alumni associ-: 
adons, and individuals. 

The annual expenses of students, including clothing and incidentals, are, on an average, about four 
or five hundred dollars. Actual living expenses will average less than 3300 a year, while incidental items, 
such as clothing and railroad fare, will fall below 3150 a year. The annual fee, which is less for residents 
of the state than for outsiders, is distributed among the various schools and colleges of the University 
as follows: 

Science and the Arts — 342; Engineering — 357; Medical (including laboratory fees) — ^3100; Law 
— ^367; Pharmacy — ^357; Homeopathic — 3100; Dental Surgery — ^3107; Graduate School — 342. 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

The total number of students enrolled in the University of Michigan during the past year, inclusive 
of the summer session, is 7,214. This enrollment is distributed among the several schools and colleges 
as follows: Literature, Science, and the Arts — 3,225; Engineering and Architecture — 1,571; Medical — 
323; Law — 452; Pharmacy — 126; Homeopathic — 54; Dental Surgery — 353; Graduate — 357; — Summer 
Session — 1,678. The net total eliminates all double registrarions. 

WHAT THE UNIVERSITY STANDS FOR 

The ideal of the University of Michigan is enlightened citizenship. To this end it festers all those 
educational interests and influences which are effectual in producing the cultivated man and women. 



41 



Its relation to the nation is that of a trustee who has assumed a sacred obligation. It recognizes the 
fact that the professional man or woman must always be something more than a technically trained in- 
dividual. He or she must also be equipped to meet the responsibilities of citizenship. The university, 
therefore, besides preparing men and women for their life work, also seeks to broaden their sympathies, 
strengthen their loyalties, enrich their sense of what is superior, so that their personalities may con- 
tribute to life a benefit which does not often find a place in bookkeeping accounts, but which neverthe- 
less possesses an inestimable value to society in general. The public support of a state university is just- 
ified by the good it confers upon those who enjoy its privileges and by the influence it exerts, through its 
graduates and as an intellectual center, upon the commonwealth. Tliis purpose is being achieved by the 
University of Michigan through the thirty-five thousand graduates and former students whom it has 
trained for citizenship. But the University of Michigan is reaching the people of the state even more 
directly by placing within their reach the resources of a great educadonal institution. Besides the ser- 
vices rendered by the hospitals and laboratories, by the libraries and reference bureaus, more than three 
hundred and fifty free lectures are presented annually throughout the state. Through this direct service 
over one hundred thousand people of the commonwealth are reached annually, without extra expense 
to the taxpayers. 

It may truly be said that the splendid ideal of President Henry P. Tappan, who more than any 
other man was the founder of the University of Michigan, has been fully realized — " A University worthy 
of the name, with a capacity adequate to our wants, receiving a development commensurate with the 
growth of all things around us, doing a work which shall be heartily acknowledged by the present genera- 
tion, and reaching with increasing power through the generations to come ... A great work, it will 
require great means; but when once accomplished, it will constitute the glory of our state and give us 
an indisputable pre-eminence. " 

J. R. B. 



42 



Newberry Residence Hall 



The New Dormitories 

THE opening last fall of the two residence halls fot women inauRjraies a new epoch in housing 
conditions for students in the University. They mart the way for a return to the earlier days 
of the University, when all the students were housed in dormitories. The present system of al- 
lowing students to find accommodations for themselves in the homes of the citizens of Ann Arbor was 
instituted as far back as the time when President Tappan saw no way of increasing the facilities of the 
University except by utilizing the rooms in what are now the two wings of University Hall which, be- 
fore his time had been used as dormitories. His marked sympathy with German educational methods 
also predisposed him to follow this practice, which was customary in Germany. 

Since those days, however, conditions have changed and for any one who has made a study of stu- 
dent life the need of better housing conditions is apparent. The obvious solution of the problem is the 
erection of residence halls, or dormitories, particularly for those people who are not accommodated in 
fraternities or clubhouses. For the men, the Michigan Union Clubhouse will have a marked effect. For 
the women, the erection of the Helen Handy Newberry Hall and Martha Cook Building has probably 
been the greatest step towards ameliorating conditions. As is evidenced by their names, each of these 
Halls is a memorial to a mother on the pan of her children. The Martha Cook Building was erected 
by the Cook family of Hillsdale, while Newberry Hall was erected by the children of Mrs. John S. 
Newberry, whose husband was a graduate of the University in the class of 1847. 

Few college buildings, to say nothing of dormitories or halls of residence, surpass the new Martha 
Cook Building in architectural beauty or in perfection of furnishings and decorations. Every detail bears 



The Corridor — Martha Cook 



the evidence of careful thought for the comFbrt of its oc- 
cupants on the part of the designers and donors. In gen- 
eral it is an exceptionally fine adaptation of the Tudor- 
Gothic, always a favorite style for college architecture, 
though this is the first example of this type at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. While in its main hnes it is simple 
it shows an unusual perfection in detail which makes it 
unquestionably the finest building in Ann Arbor. Few 
buildings in the country can be found so perfect in their 
architecture and appointments. 

The main entrance is upon South University. The 
bjildiuK in general is Tapestry brick, relieved hy a simple 
pattern in darker brick. All the trimmings are of cut stone 
in which the Gothic details are accentuated even to rows 
of Gargoyles in the stone cornice neat the top of the build- 
ing. The entrance has become an emblem of the building 
and is reproduced in numerous details throughout, upon 
several of the mantels, upon the china service designed for 
the building and even in the linen. 

Upon entering one stands at the end of a long cloistered hall with flag paving and a groined ceiling 
of white stone upon the blueof the vault. This hallway is flanked by a long seriesof tall windows which 
take up the whole side of the passage way and open upon a terrace overlooking the lawn. At eirher side 
of the main entrance are short hallways, the one on the right leading to the reception room furnished 
in crimson and gold. One of the features of the room is an open fireplace of Botticino marble. At the 
left of the main entrance another passageway leads to the apartments of the social director and the 

Immediately beyond the reception hall and con- 
nected with it by a paneled anteroom is the second and 
larger of the two parlors, which serves as a living and music 
room. This room is elaborately paneled in teak wood 
from the Philippines. The plaster ceiling is a replica of 
one in the South Kensington Museum in London. Several 
doors at the side open into the long Gothic corridors at 
the left. In the blue room is the fire-place dedicated by 
the late President Angell. 

Beyond the living room is the dining room, in its turn 
opening on to the corridor, with seats for one hundred 
and sixteen gitls in groups around small round tables. 
The room is paneled in rich brown oak to which the fui~ 
niture of the room corresponds. Beyond on the first floor 
are the serving rooms and quarters for the servants. 

These central rooms occupy the equivalent of two 
full stories with a mezzanine floor at either end, each of 
which furnish a space for a group of seven or eight rooms. 
Most of the rooms are on the second and third floors, each The Fireplace — Martha Cook 



of whtch has accommodations for approximately forty girls. There are also about iirieen rooms on the 
fourth floor in addition to three reserved as rest rooms to be used by any of those in the building who 
feel it desirable to have absolute quiet. All but a few of the rooms are single, in accordance with the 
desire expressed by a ballot of University women, though there area few double rooms. The furnishings 
of the rooms are simple but of the very best quality. 

In the basement are the kitchen and kitchen equipment and the laundry as well as the coat room 
for men who may possibly be guests of the girls in the building. The building is equipped with an ele- 

Equally attractive though less elaborate in details is the Newberry Hall on State Street. Quite 
unlike the Martha Cook building in its general appearance it furnishes the same character of accommo- 
dations for its residents. It is more simple in architectural design and smaller, but it embodies every 
essential found in the larger building. It is of hollow tile construction with a stucco exterior, relieved 
by white trimmings and green shutters. There are four floors and a basement. 

On entering one finds a reception room on either side, that on the right opening through wide doors 
into a second room which can, if necessary, be made part of the main room, so that the two can be used 
for receptions and dances. The color scheme of these reception rooms is in general deep ivory and old 
Uue with paneled walls in ivory and brown. Various articles of old furniture, davenports and a carved 
chest, the gift of the Newberry family, find places in these rooms. 

At the left behind the reception room is the main stairway. Beyond are several single rooms, in- 
cluding the apartments of the social director, on either side of the hallway leading into the dining room, 
which is exceedingly simple, but particularly attracrive because of its terraces on each side which may 
be made a part of the room in favorable weather. There are nine tables with a capacity of ninety places 
in all. Behind the dining room are the serving room and the offices of the director of the building. 



—Martha Cook Dormitory 



Drawing Room — Smberry 

In rhe bascmeni are the kitchen, laundry, scorage, a bakingt room and other portions of the kirchen 
equipment as well as a completely arranged sewing room for the girls. 

AtFairs in the dormitory are handled by the girls themselves. Rules are made by a body of repre- 
sentatives elected in class meetinns. "l"he offirers are elected by the house at large. Faculty dinners 
are given one Sunday in each month. 

Both the buildings are under the direction of Governing Boards. Mrs. Chauncey F. Cook, of Hills- 
dale, Miss Grace G. Millard, '97, of Detroit, and Mrs. Frederic B. Stevens, of Detroit, are in charge of 
the Martha Cook Building of which Miss Frances C. Mack, formerly of Ferry Hall, Chicago, is business 
manager, while Miss Gertrude H. Biggs, who comes from a school in Chicago, is the social director. 

The Board of Governors of the Newberry Hall of Residence consists of Mrs. Myra B. Jordan, Dean 
of Women. Mrs. Henry B. Joy. of Detroit. Mrs. A. C. Angell, of Detroit, Miss Claire M. Sanders, '04, 
of Detroit, and Mrs. Henry W. Douglas, '97-'01, of Ann Arbor. Miss Clara Hunt, who comes from the 
Michigan Agricultural College, is the business manager, while Mrs. Erie Layton Gates. '98, is the social 
director. J. A. H. 



Drawing V-oatt—Manha Cook 



The MtcHCCAN Union Building Committee 
November 20, 1915 

The Michigan Union Campaign 

THE Universiiy of Michigan has never been advertised so much as ii was durinK the summer of 
nineteen hundred and fifteen, at which time was taking place che organizinR of Michigan 
alumni for the purpose of raising funds with which to build a new clubhouse at Ann Arbor. 
The story of that publicity is best made known by telling the plans for organization and ihe means 
by which they were carried out. 

It is not untruthful to state that the campaign which is just coming to a successful close dates back 
to nineteen hundred and nine. At that rime the first active work was begun among the alumni. How- 
ever, that served only as a preliminary step,- — it resulted in the collection of many bits of information 
needed and used by chose who had the task of actually organizing the older classes. 

WeRcnerally thinkofthethreemonthsof July, August and September, nineteen hundred and fifteen, 
as the time when the most important work was done. The whole campaign has centered around one 
idea, " Let the alumni themselves raise the money by personal solicitation among their fellow classmates. " 
All of which meant that some two hundred committees had to be chosen in three months, and during 
the time allotted these working bodies were chosen. 

The first step was to divide the whole United Stares into ten sections, each one having as its center 
a city containing a very large number of graduates and former students of the University. For example, 
Chicago was chosen the center of a district composed of Wisconsin, northern Illinois and northern In- 
diana. Cleveland was the center of the district composed of Ohio and other surrounding territory. Ten 
men were chosen to select committees in the ten districts above mentioned, each man having charge 
of one district and each district having alumni which would need about twenty committees to properly 
solicit them. Then came the task of getting the men who would do the actual work of raising money. 



The New Union Building; The Plunge 



The organizei when he went into a town, had certain infotmation concerning the men he was lo visit — 
perhaps he knew beforehand jjst what person was best suited to lead in that particular locality — and 
again, the information might consist only of the names of the alumni living there. Wherever an alumni 
association was found in a fairly live condition, it was used as the means of getting to the individual. 
But as they were not very numerous, other means were resorted to. Alumni meetings were arranged 
for where possible and at these a chairman was selected. Then with his help, a local committee of solicit- 
ors was picked out. In many places it was impossible to arrange meetings and the organization was 
perfected only after several visits to the most active Michigan men. 

At the end of three months two hundred committees with a total of over three thousand men had 
signified their intentions of raising one millbn dollars during the month of October. On the second day 
of October, nineteen hundred and fifteen, alumni dinners were held in all places where numbers were 
large enough to warrant them. They can be appreciated only by being present. One can hardly imagine 
old men who finished college thirty years ago waving their hands and yelling when there is flashed on 
the "movie" screen a picture of Bill Day leading a Michigan yell. The alumni have not lost their voices. 
And their conversational qualities are just as. effective. No salesman ever toot a greater interest in his 
line of goods than some of the old boys when they were "hitting" a man for a thousand dollars or more. 
All through October the men were working among those of their classmates assigned to them. In many 
places celebrations were held on the last day of October, and because the whole amount was not sub- 
scribed by that time, new ideas as to the proper way of getting the balance were than advanced. 

Since that time the campaign has been gradually nearing its close and there is no doubt thai the 
whole million dollars will be ultimately subscribed. Since the first active work began there has been 
no small amount of publicity given to the project. The daily newspapers in the larger cities, the Out- 
look, Leslie's Weekly, the Metropolitan and the Saturday Evening Post, all have carried articles on 
different phases of the Union and its activities. It is quite safe to say that no college or University has 
ever received such fair treatment at the hands of the .\merican Press. This is true in spite of the fact 
that one newspaper requested payment for so much advertising space. 



Several incidenrs of the past summer might Rive one an idea of some of the situations really met 
by those who did the actual organizing. It takes the exception to prove the rule so far as Michigan 
spirit is concerned. One alumnus, holdipE an important position on the Fartilty of a well known uni- 
versity, characterized the whole campaign as a farce, at the same time stating that he would rather give 
his spare money to the nations engaged in the present war. However, no one was abk to hnd out that 
he had given anything even to that cause. Another "grad" was troubled so much by the literature 
sent him that he threatened to get an injunction restraining the chairman of his locality from sending 
him more of its kind. Happenings like the above served to make the great majority work all the more 
earnestly. When the editor of a small town newspaper asked for a list of all of the alumni in that lo- 
cality so that he could print tbeit names in (be neni issue, the unpleasantness of some of rbe happenings 
faded away. One of the most cncoiiraginK sights was that of watching a prominent alumnus gather 
his classmates around his table and raise two or three thousand dollars in the course of a few minutes. 
tn midwinter the San Francisco and New York alumni held banquets on the same night and by means 
of a trans-continental telepbune system, held a mutual ontrbour program. At that time the New York 
Chairman informed an Ann Arbor listener that he had already raised fourteen hundred dollars that 
evening. 

The campaign now being hrou|{hl to a close has served more than one useful purpose. The million 
dollars subscribed may be deemed only a small part of the beneficial results. Michigan's alumni body 
has been organized into a great and useful association of associations; and thereby, our alumni have been 
brought into closer relationship with the University. Our Alma Mater has been placed before the whole 
United States in a way hard to be appreciated and only the future can tell the good to be derived from 
such wholesome publicity. Michigan men have been taught to give money and it is to be sincerely hoped 
that they will not shut down on their generosity after having made inch an enterprising beginning in 
providing for needed University buildings. H. (i. (i. 



The New Union Ruilding; The South Pavtlion 



■sjdent 1X71-1909 
t Emeritus I909-19I6 



Harry Burns Hui 
President 



Board of Regents 



Harry B. Hltchcns, LL. D.. President Ann Arbor 

Hon. Junius K. Bfal Ann Arbor 

Hon. Frank B. Leland Detroit 

Hon. Wilmam L. Clements Bay City 

Hon. Harry C. Bllkley Detroit 

Shehley \V. Smjth. Secrerarv Ann Arbor 



Hancheti 
Sawyer 



Board of Regents 



Hon. Benjamin S. Hancheit ■ Grand Rapids 

Hon. Lucius I,. Hubbard Houghton 

Hon. Walter H. Sawyer Hillsdale 

Hon. Victor M. Gore Benton Harbor 

Hon. Fred E. Keeler. Superintendent of Public Instruction . . Lansing 
Robert A. Ca.mpbell, Treasurer .^nn Arbor 




[ A L U M N I J 

Alumni Association of the University of Michigan 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Victor Hugo Lanf, 74K. '7KL, Ann Arbor, Michican .... President 

Junius F.. Beal, 'K2, Ann Arbot, Michiuan Vice-President 

I^uis P.ARKEK JocELVN, '87, Ann Arbor, Michijian .... Secretary 

GoTTHELF Cabl Huber, '87M, Ann Arbor, Michigan .... Treasurer 
Henrv Woolskv DoicLAS. 'SOY., Ann Arbor. Micbi^an 
Davjd Kmil Heineman. '87, lletroit, Micbiitan 
El8[e Seelye Pratt 'CHM, Ann Arbor, MichiEan 

GEKIiR.n. SECRETARY 
WinREU Byron Sha«, 'CM, .Ann .Arbor, Michigan 

THE MICHIGAS AU'MM'S 

Wilfred B. Shaw, '04 Kditor 

Harriet Lawrence, "11 .Assistant Editor 

Isaac Newton Demmon, '68 Necrology 

T. Hawley Tapping, '161, .Athletics 



Members of the Faculties and Other Officers* 

THE UNITERSITV SENATE 

Harry Burns Hutchins, LL.D., President. 

James Burrill Ancell, LL.D., President Emeritus. 

{Martin Luther D'Ooge, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Litt., Professor Emeritus of Greek. 

Isaac Newton Demmon, A.M., LL.D., Professor of English. 

Mortimer Elwyn Cooley, M.E., LL.D., Eng.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Dean 
of the Colleges of Engineering and Architecture. 

WoosTER Woodruff Beman, A.M., LL.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Victor Clarence Vaughan, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Hygiene and Physiological 
Chemistry, and Dean of the Medical School. 

Henry Smith Carhart, A.M., LL.D., Sc.D., Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Raymond Cazallis Davis, A.M., Librarian Emeritus, Beneficiary of the Professor George P. Williams 
Emeritus Professorship Fund. 

Henry Carter Adams, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 

Bradley Martin Thompson, M.S., LL.B., Professor Emeritus of Law. 

Albert Augustus Stanley, A.M., Professor of Music. 

Francis Willey Kelsey, Ph.D., LL.D, Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

Jerome Cyril Knowlton, A.B., LL.B., Marshall Professor of Law. 

Charles Beylard Guerard de Nancrede, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical 
Surgery, and Director of Surgical Clinics in the Medical School. 

Nelville Soule Hoff, D.D.S., Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry and Dean of the College of Dental 
Surgery. 

Joseph Baker Davis, A.M., C.E., Professor Emeritus of Geodesy and Surveying. 

Warren Plimpton Lombard, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Jacob Ellsworth Reighard, Ph.B., Professor of Zoology and Director of the Zoological Laboratory 
and the Biological Station. 

Thomas Clarkson Trueblood, A.M., Professor of Oratory. 

Thomas Ashford Bogle, LL.B., Professor of Law. 

WiLBERT B. Hinsdale, M.S., A.M., M.D., Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and 
Clinical Medicine, Dean of the Homoeopathic Medical School, and Director of the University Homoe- 
opathic Hospital. 

Robert Mark Wenley, D.Phil., Sc.D., Litt.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Professor of Philosophy. 

Willis Alonzo Dewey, M.iD., Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics and Acting Professor 
of Mental and Nervous Diseases, and Secretary of the Faculty in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 

Victor Hugo Lane, C.E., LL.B., Fletcher Professor of Law and Law Librarian. 

Horace Lafayette Wilgus, M.S., Professor of Law. 

Claudius Bligh Kinyon, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Homoeopathic Med- 
ical School. 

Arthur Graves Canfield, A.M., Professor of the Romance Languages and Literatures. 

Reuben Peterson, A.B., M.D., Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children in the Med- 
ical School, and Medical Director of the University Hospital. 

Robert Emmet Bunker, A.M., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Fred Newton Scott, Ph.D., Professor of Rhetoric. 

Max Winkler, Ph.D., Professor of the German Languages and Literatures. 

Frederick George Novy, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Bacteriology, and Director of the Hygienic Lab- 
oratory. 

Edward DeMille Campbell, B.S., Professor of Chemistry, and Director of the Chemical Laboratory. 

Allen Sisson Whitney, A.B., Professor of Education. 

FiLiBERT Roth, B.S., Professor of Forestry. 

G. Carl Huber, M.D., Professor of Anatomy, and Director of the Anatomical Laboratories. 

Henry Moore Bates, Ph.B., LL.B., Tappan Professor of Law, and Dean of the Law School. 

Edwin Charles Goddard, Ph.B., LL.B., Professor of Law, and Secretary of the Faculty of the Law 
School. 

*The names of Profeseors (including Librarian), Associate Professors, Assistant Professors, and other offioerp 
of instruction are placed in their appropriate divisions, according to term of appointment and length of continuous 
service with present rank. 

t The dagger preceding a name indicates that the member of the Faculty is absent on leave. 

X Died, September 11, 1915. 

57 



Aldred Scott Warthin, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Pathology, and Director of the Pathological 
Laboratory in the Medical School. 

Louis Phillips Hall, D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 

Egbert Theodore Loeffler, B.S., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Therapeutics. 

Fred Manville Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 

Alexander Ziwet, C.E., Professor of Mathematics. 

Herbert Charles Sadler, Sc.D., Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. 

Moses Gomberg, Sc.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry. 

George Washington Patterson, Ph.D., Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Frederick Charles Newcombe, Ph.D., Professor of Botany, and Director of the Botanical Labora- 
tory. 

tJoHN Oren Reed, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Director of the Physical Laboratory. 

tTHEODORE Wesley Koch, A.M., Librarian. 

Walter Robert Parker, B.S., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology in the Medical School. 

Roy Bishop Canfield, A.B., M.D., Professor of Otolaryngology in the Medical School. 

William Joseph Hussey, Sc.D., Professor of Astronomy, and Director of the Observatory. 

Emil Lorch, A.m., Professor of Architecture. 

Claude Halstead Van Tyne, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Joseph Horace Drake, LL.B., Ph.D., Professor of Law. 

John Romain Rood, LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Edson Read Sunderland, LL.B., .A.M., Professor of Law. 

Albert Moore Barrett, A.B., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Diseases of the Nervous System 
in the Medical School. 

William Herbert Hobbs, Ph.D., Professor of Geology, and Director of the Geological Laboratory 
and Geological Museum. 

Charles Wallis Edmunds, A.B., M.D., Professor of Therapeutics and Materia Medica, and Secre- 
tary of the Faculty of the Medical School. 

Alfred Henry Lloyd, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the Graduate School. 

MoRiTZ Levi, A.B., Professor of French. 

John Robins Allen, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Joseph Lybrand Markley, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles Horton Cooley, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Dean Wentworth Myers, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, 
and Dean of the Training School for Nurses in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 

Samuel Lawrence Bigelow, Ph.D., Professor of General and Physical Chemistry. 

Julius Orro Schlotferbeck, Ph.C, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacognosy and Botany, and Dean of 
the College of Pharmacy. 

Arthur Graham Hall, Ph.D., Registrar and Professor of Mathematics. 

Edward Henry Kraus, Ph.D., Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography, and Director of the Min- 
eralogical Laboratory, and Dean of the Summer Session. 

Marcus Llewellyn Ward, D.D.Sc, Professor of Applied Physics and Chemistry and of Crown and 
Bridge Work in the College of Dental Surgery. 

Albion Walter Hewlett, B.S., M.D., Professor of Internal Medicine, and Director of the Ginical 
Laboratory in the Medical School. 

{Karl Eugen Guthe, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Dean of the Graduate School. 

Jesse Siddall Reeves, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Earle Wilbur Dow, A.B., Professor of European History. 

Walter Bowers Pillsbury, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Director of the Psychological Labor- 
atory. 

Alviso Burdett Stevens, Ph.C, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy, and Secretary of the College of 
Pharmacy. 

Evans Holbrook, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Clarence Thomas Johnston, C.E., Professor of Geodesy and Surveying, and Director of the Bo- 
gardus F^ngineering Camp. 

Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, Ph.D., Professor of American History. 

Louis A. Strauss, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Alfred Holmes White, A. B., B.S., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Arthur Lyon Cross, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Edward Raymond Turner, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

fHENRY Arthur Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

James Waterman Glover, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics and Insurance. 

{Died September 10, 1915 



58 



Henry Earle Riggs, A.B., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

EwALD Augustus Boucke, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Horace Williams King, B.S., Professor of Hydraulic Engineering. 

John Robert Effinger, Ph.D., Professor of French, and Dean of the College of Literature, Science, 
and the Arts. 

Henry Clay Anderson, B.M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Campbell Bonner, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

Ermine Cowles Case, Ph.D., Professor of Historical Geology and Paleontology, and Curator of the 
Paleontological Collection. 

Stanislaus Jan Zowski (Zwierzchowski), Dipl. Ing., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Willis Gordon Stoner, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 
Ralph William Aigler, LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Herbert Richard Cross, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts, and Curator of Alumni Memorial Hall. 
William Christian Hoad, B.S., Professor of Sanitary Engineering. 
John Barker Waite, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 
Lewis Merritt Gram, B.S., Professor of Structural Engineering. 
Louis Holmes Boynton, Professor of Architecture. 
Henry Harold Higbie, E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Edward David Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Commerce and Industry. 
Benjamin Franklin Bailey, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Clarence Linton Meader, Ph.D., Professor of Latin, Sanskrit and General Linguistics. 
Edgar Noble Durfee, A.B., J.D., Professor of Law. 

Udo Julius Wile, A.B., M.D., Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology in the Medical School. 
David Friday, A.B., Professor of Economics. 
James Bartlett Edmonson, A.M., Inspector of High Schools. 

Hugh McDowell Bee be, M.D., Professor of Surger>s Clinical Surgery, Orthopedics, Electro-Thera- 
peutics, and Roentgenology in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 

RoLLo Eugene McCotter, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Cyrenus Garritt Darling, M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in the Medical School, 
and Professor of Oral Surgery in the College of Dental Surgery. 

Isaiah Leo Sharfman, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Economics. 

Russell Welford Bunting, D.D.Sc, Professor of Dental Pathology and Histology, and Secretary 
of the College of Dental Surgery. 

Elmer Edwin Ware, B.S., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Hugo Paul Thieme, Ph.D., Professor of French. 
Myra Beach Jordan, A.B., Dean of Women. 

Alexander Grant Ruthven, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and Director of the Museum of Zoology. 
Chalmers J. Lyons, D.D.Sc, Professor of Oral Surgery and Consulting Dentist to the University 
Hospital. 

Leroy Waterman, Ph.D., Professor of Semi tics. 

William Warner Bishop, A.M., Librarian. 

John Castlereagh Parker, A.M., E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Tobias J. C. Diekhoff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German. 

Carl Dudley Camp, M.D., Associate Professor of the Diseases of the Nervous System in the Medical 
School. 

David Murray Cowie, M. D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine in the Med- 
ical School. 

William Henry Wait, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern Languages. 

Herbert Jay Goulding, B.S., Associate Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. 

William Lincoln Miggett, M.E., Associate Professor of Shop Practice, and Superintendent of the 
Engineering Shops. 

William Henry Butts, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, and Assistant Dean of the Col- 
lege of Engineering. 

Ira Dean Loree, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery in the Medical School. 

Jonathan Augustus Charles Hildner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German. 



59 



Harrison McAllister Randall, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Walter Burton Ford, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ralph Hamilton Curtiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Astronomy, and Assistant Director of the 
Observatory. 

James Barkley Pollock, Sc.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Joseph Aldrich Bursley, B.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Kn^ineering. 

Morris Palmer Tilley, Ph.D., .Associate Professor of English. 

Arthur Whit.more Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

William D. Henderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics, and Director of the University Ex- 
tension Service. 

QiTO Charles Glaser, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology, and Director of the Biological Station. 

Calvin Olin Davis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education, and Vice-Chairman of the Appoint- 
ment Committee. 

Olenus Lee Sponsler, A.M., Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Thomas Ernest Rankin, .A.M., Associate Professor of Rhetoric, and Secretary of the Summer Session. 

Peter Field, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Edward Milton Bragg, B.S., Associate Professor of Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture. 

Charles Philip Wagner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

James Gerrit Van Zwaluwenburg, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Roentgenology in the Med- 
ical School. 

Aubrey Tealdi, Grad. Roy. Tech. Inst., Livorno, Associate Professor of Landscape Design. 

Arthur James Decker, B.S. (C.E.), Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Theodore Rudolph Running, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Aaron Franklin Shull, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Lee Holt Cone, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Organic Chemistr>'. 

Louis Charles Karpinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

David Martin Lichty, Ph.D., Associate Professor of General Chemistry. 

William Jay Hale, Ph.D., Associate Professor of General Chemistry. 

Charles Scott Berry, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Walter Turner Fishleigh, A.B., B.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

John Garrett Winter, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek and Latin. 

John Frederick Shepard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Samuel Moore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Howard B. Merrick, C.E., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Warren Washburn Florer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

Carl Edgar Eggert, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

George Augustus May, M.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Training, and Director of the Water- 
man Gyitinasium. 

John William Bradshaw, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Henry Allan Gleason, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany, Curator of the Phanerogamic Her- 
barium, and Director of the Botanical Garden. 

Albert Robinson Crittenden, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 

John Dieterle, B.D., A.M., Assistant Professor of German. 

William Gabb Smeaton, A.B., Assistant Professor of General Chemistry. 

Frederick Stephen Breed, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Robert Wilhelm Hegner, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John Edward Emswiler, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical F^ngineering. 

John R. Brumm, A.M., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric, and University News Editor. 

Calvin Henry Kauffman, Ph.D., Assistant] Professor [of Botany, and Curator of the Cryptogamic 
Herbarium. 

George LeRoy Jackson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Hobart Hurd Willard, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 



60 



Beverley Robinson, B.S., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

John William Scholl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

Walter Fred Hunt, Ph.D., .Assistant Professor of Mineralogy. 

Neil Hooker Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, A.M., .Assistant Professor of Oratory. 

Harry Hurd Atwell, B.S., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Joseph Raleigh Nelson, A.M., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. 

Charles Bruce Vibbert, A.B., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

fHENRi Theodore Antoine de Leng Hus» Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Alfred Oughton Lee, M.D., .Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. 

William Alley Frayer, .A.B., Assistant Professor of History. 

WiLLARD Titus Barbour, B. Litt., A.M., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Parish Storrs Love joy, .Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Charles Horace Fessenden, M.K., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Harry George Raschbacher, B.S. (C.E.), Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Edward Larrabee Adams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Irving Day Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiographical Geology. 

Roy Wood Sellars, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Wilbur Ray Humphreys, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Dewitf Henry Parker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Albert Easton White, A. B., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Anton Friedrich Greiner, Dipl. Ing., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Alfred Henry Lovell, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

George William Dowrie, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Economy and Finance. 

Robert Treat Crane, LL.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

William Frank Verner, B.S., (M. E.), Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ferdinand Northrup Menefee, C.E., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Herbert Alden Kenyon, A.M., Assistant Professor of French and Spanish. 

Clyde Elton Love, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

George Rogers LaRue, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology and Honorary Curator of Parasitology 
in the Museum. 

Alice Evans, A.B., Director of Physical Education in Barhour Gymnasium. 

IRene Talamon, Licenci6-^s-Lettres, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Leigh Jarvis Young, A.B., M.S.F., Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Solomon Francis Gingerich, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Albert Ross Bailey, A.B., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

tRALPH Robertson Mellon, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Diagnosis, and Director 
of the Hospital Clinical Laboratory in the Homoeopathic Medical School. 

Thomas J. Mackavanagh, B.S. (E.E.), Assistant Professor of F!lectrical Engineering. 

Frank Richard Finch, Ph.B., Assistant Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. 

George McDonald McConkey, B.A.E., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Frank Howard Stevens, B.S., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

William Aloysius McLaughlin, A.B., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Theophil Henry Hildebrandt, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

William Daniel Moriarty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Hugh Brodie, C.F., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Clifton O'Neal Carey, C.Fl., Assistant Professor of Surveying. 

Charles Wilford Cook, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economic Geology. 



61 



John Howard Rowen, U.S.N. (Retired), Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ToMLiNSON Fort, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

William Frederick Hauhart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

Harry Stevenson Sheppard, B.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

John Davison Rue, A.M., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Walter Francis Colby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

John J. Cox, B. S. (C.E.), Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Sidney Fiske Kimball, M. Arch., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

John Airey, B.S., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Herbert Lester Abbott, B.S., Assistant Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. 

Walter Lucius Badger, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Arthur Edward Boak, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ancient History. 

Paul Henry DeKruif, B.S., Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

Harley Harris Bartlett, A.B., Acting Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Felix Wladyslaw Pawlowski, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Joseph Joachim Albert Rousseau, .Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Officers of Administration 

Harry Burns Hutchins, LL.D., President. 

Shirley Wheeler Smith, A.M., Secretary. 

Robert Alexander Campbell, Treasurer. 

Arthur Graham Hall, Ph.D., Registrar. 

Myra Beach Jordan, A.B., Dean of Women. 

William Warner Bishop, A.M., Librarian. 

John Cornelius Christensen, B.S., Assistant Secretary and Purchasing Agent. 

James H. Marks, B. S. (M.E.), Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Howard Hastings Cummings, M.D., Chief Physician to the University Health Service. 

Elsie Seelye Pratt, B.LL., M.D., Physician to the University Health Service. 

Clyde Bruce Stouffer, M.D., Physician to the University Health Service. 

Charles Parmelee Drury, A.B., M.D., Physician to the University Health Service. 



62 



Graduate School 

Alfred H. Lloyd, Ph.D., Dean 

THE first graduate student at the University is recorded in 'heMtalogueof 1856. The degrees 
of Master of Arts and Master ofScience were earliest conferred, the degree ofDoctor of Philosophy 
being otFered for the iirst time in' 1876. Changes made in studies in 1877-78 had an important 
bearing on graduate work at the University. This was due to the mulriphcation of electives and the 
introduction of the credit system. The seminary method of instruction began then to assume consider^ 
able proportions, and the movement was strengthened by a growing demand for better trained teachers. 
In the spting of 1892 the Graduate School was otganiied, but for many years it was little more than 
a bureau within the College of Literature, Science, and the .Arts. Provision was thus made, however, 
for a more svstemaric and efBcieni administrarion of higher work, and, so far as possible, for the separate 
instruction of gtaduate students. Twenty years later in the fall of 1912 the School was reorganized, 
becoming a separate department, related on terms of equality to all the Colleges and Schools of the 
University. The management r>r the School is now vested in an Executive Board of nine, including 
the President of the University and the Dean of the School. 



Graduate School 



John A. Aldrich, A.B., M.S. 
Horace J. Andrews, A.B. 
Floyd E. Armstrong, A.B. 
Marcjaretha Andrews, A.B., A.M. 
Frank H. Atkinson, A.B. 
Wayne J. Atwell, A.B., .^.M. 

Shirley I). Babbitt, A.B. 

Walter L. Badger, B.A., B.S., M.S. 

John J. Bailey, A.B. 

John W. Baldwin, A.B., A.M. 

HuLDAH Bancroft, A.B. 

Harry C. Barneit, A.B. 

Herbert H. Bartleit, B.C.E. 

John W. Beach, A.B. 

Albert A. Benneit, A.B. 

Wells I. Bennett, B. of Arch. 

Gordon A. Bergy, PH. C, B.S. 

Lynn S. Blake, B.S. 

(lALo W. Blanco, B.S. 

Gertrude V. Boguereider, B..A. 

Frank L. Bolton, B.S. in C.E. 

Walter E. Bond, A.B. 

Orlan W. Boston, B.M.E. 

EiTA A. Bowerman, A.B. 

Pearl K. Bowerman, B.S., A.B. 

Charles W. Boyce, A.B. 

Grace M. Boyton, B.A. 

Albert Bradley, B.C. 

Reed O. Brigham, M.S., B.S. 

Edgar C. Britfon, A.B. 

Carl R. Brown, A.B. 

Robert E. Brown, .A.B. 

Zeltah p. Buck, A.B., M.A. 

Welbur p. Calhoun, Ph.B., A.M. 
Robert J. Camey, A.B. 
Norman L. Cary, A.B. 
George D. Casto, B.S. 
La Che Chen, B.S. 
Le Fen Chen, B.C.E. 
Ralph E. Christian, B.C.E., M.S. 
Helen L. Clark, A.B. 
Robert W. Clark, A.M. 
Harold L. Coil, .A.B. 
George H. Collingwood, B.S. 
Allen C. Conger, B.S., M.S. 
Phillip A. Coombe, A.B. 



Leigh G. Cooper, A.B., A.M. 
William H. Cottrille, Ph.B. 
Arthur C. Cross, A.B. 
Leland E. Grossman, A.B., A.M. 
Ivan N. Cuthbert, B.E.E. 
Kathleen Cutting, A.B. 

Harold M. Davidson, A.B. 
James E. Davis, A.M., M.D. 
John J. De Boer, .A.B. 
Paul H. De Kruif, A.B. 
Elwood L. Demmon, A.B. 
George B. Denton, A.B., A.M. 
William P. Dies, M..\. 
Paul Dorweii er, B.S. 
Lena P. Duell, A.B. 

Robert H. P^asterbrooks, .A.B. 

Arnold H. Eggerth, .A.B. 

George H. Ehlert, .A.B. 

Mary E. Elder, A.B., A.M. 

Oterbert W. Emerson, Ph.C, B.S. in M.D. 

Arthur G. Erickson, A.B. 

Porter H. Evans, B.E.E. 

Charles A. FIverett, A.B. 

Edward S. Everett, A.B. 

Carlotta B. Ewing, Ph.B. 

Perry A. Fellows, B.S. in C.E. 
Richard O. Ficken, A.M. 
Florence E. Field, A.B. 
Albert L. Fitch, A.B., A.M. 
Edwin H. Fleck, B. A. 
Capen a. Fleming, A.B. 
YuE C. EoNG, B.S. 
Franklin E. Ford, A.B. 
Fred J. Fricke, A.B., A.M. 
Chung C. Fu, B.M.E. 

NOHER FURUYA, A.B. 

Frederick M. (iaige, B.S. 
Eli a. Gallup, .A.B. 
William V. Garrelson, B.S. 
William M. German, .A.B. 
Clifford C. Glover, Ph.C, B.S., M.S. 
Emil C . Goethel, B.S., B.C.E. 
Franc's L. Goodrich, A.B. 
Clarence B. (joshorn, A.B. 



64 



Margaret F. Gourley, A.B. 
Robert Granville, A.B. 
LucEiN H. Greathouse, A.B., B.Ch.E. 
Stacy R. Guild, A.M. 

Enoch W. Hall, B.S. 

Robert W. Hamilton, A.B. 

Watson G. Harmon, B.S. 

Harry E. Hatcher, B.Pd., A.B., B.S. 

Florence G. Haxton, A.B. 

William F. Head, B.S. 

Julian L. Heming, A.B. 

Wendel Herbruck, LL.B. 

Jose M. Hernandez, B.S. 

George W. Hess, A.B., A.M. 

Garrett Heyns, A.B. 

Howard H. Hicks, A.B. 

William C. Hirn, C.E. 

Lynne a. Hoag, A.B. 

Edward M. Horrace, A.B. 

Emily M. Hooper, Ph.B. 

Arthur H. Huisken, B.S. 

Elmer S. Imes, A.B., A.M. 
Ray K. Immel, A.M. 
Walter N. Isbell, A.B. 
William F. Isbell, A.B. 
Paul W. Ivey, A.B., A.M. 

William H. Jellema, A.B. 
Albert H. Jewell, B.S. 
George H. Jillson, A.B. 
.Alice K. Johnson, A.B. 
Skale B. Johnson, A.B. 
Walter E. Jominy, B. of Ch.E. 
Flora E. Judd, A.B. 

Josephine N. Keal, A.B. 
Amy Keene, A.B. 
Katherine Kelly, A.B. 
Ezra J. Kennedy, Jr., B.S. 
Russell D. Kilborn, A.B. 
Rachel E. King, A.B. 
Howard Kingsley, A.B. 
John R. Kneebone, A.B. 
Madge V'. Kevels, A.B. 
William F. Koch, A.B., A.M. 
Walter N. Koelz, A.B. 
Frank F. Kolbe, A.B. 



John E. Knezenga, A.B. 
Su C. Krook, B.S. 

Albert N. Laird, B.C.E. 
Howard T. Lambert, B.A. 
Herbert H. Lamley, A.B. 
Robert T. Lane, A.B., M.A. 
Norman A. Lange, B.S. 
Carl D. LaRue, A.B. 
John S. Lathers, B.L. 
Edward H. Lauer, A.B. 
Carlorn L. Legg, A.B., M.A. 
Charles F. Lester, B.S., B.C.S.* 
Edward J. Leiber, B.S. 
Paul B. Line, B.S. 
Henry L. Low, B.Arch. E. 
Clinton A. Ludwig, B.S.A., M.S.A. 
Alfred F. Lusky, A.M. 

Carl E. Macomrer, B. of Arch. 
Roy K. McAlpine, A.B. 
Edward F. McCarthy, B.S. 
Howard McDonald, A.B., A.M. 
Frederick B. McKay, A.B. 
Cornelia H. McKnight, A.B. 
Ross H. McLean, A.B. 
Linley H. McReynolds, A.B. 

Orin E. Madison, A.B. 

Edwin B. Mains, A.B. 

James H. Marks, B.S. in M.E. 

Alice L. Marsh, B.S. 

Phillip L. March, A.B. 

John E. Martin, A.B. 

Rose M. Meyer, .A.B. 

Augusta Meiser, A.B. 

Lewis L. Mellor, A.B. 

Clarence L. Menser, A.B. 

Florence K. Middaugh, A.B. 

Frederick A. Middlebush, A.B., A.M, 

Harry A. Miller, A.B. 

Herman L. Miller, A.B. 

Carl Mitcheltree, A.B. 

Frank C. Mock, E.E. 

Alphonse p. Momenee, A.B. 

Hortense a. Mueller, A.B. 

Floyd A. Nayler, B.S., M.S. 
John T. Naylon, B.Ch.E. 
Guy D. Newton, B.S. in M.E. 
Irby C. Nichols, B.S., M.A., M.S. 



Peter 0. Okkelberg, A.B., M.A. 
Martin J. Orbeck, C. E. 
WiLMA Orlin, B.S. 

Marguerite N. Parsons, A.B. 

Orin D. Parsons, E.E., B.A. 

Robert F. Paton, A.B. 

William A. Paton, A.B. 

Fred D. Patterson, A.B. 

Felix W. Parelowski, M.S. 

Orn B. Peake, B.Pd. 

Albert B. Peck, A.N. 

Nellie L. Perkins, A.B. 

Robert L. Perkins, Ph.C, B.S. 

Louis M. Perrin, B.S. 

James 0. Perrine, B.A. 

Ben E. Perry, A.B. 

Frederick W. Peterson, A.B. 

Marion Peterson, A.B. 

Jessie Phelps, B.S., M.S. 

Benjamin H. Philo, A.B. 

Paul H. Piper, A.B. 

Edward Ploenges, A.B. 

Enos H. Porter, B.Pd., A.B. 

Kick H. Porter, A.B. 

Alfred H. Povah, A.B. 

Bessie L. Priddy, Ph.B., A.M.» A.B. 

Roy W. Pryer, M.S., Ph.C, B.S. 

Antonio P. Racelis, A.B., A.M. 
Theophile Raphael, A.B., A.M., 
Carl F. Raver, M.D., B.S. in Ch.E. 
William O. Raymond, M.A., B.A. 
Cora D. Reeves, A.B. 
Florence L. Rennie, A.B. 
Alice E. Richard, M.A. 
Ura G. Rickert, B.S., M.A. 
John P. Roberts, B.Ch.E. 
Beverly Robinson, B.S. 
Charles S. Robinson, A.B., M.S. 
Emma L. Robson, A.B. 
Robert G. Rodkey, A.B., M.A. 
Howard D. Roelofs, A.B. 
James S. Rogers, A.B. 
Elgie C. Rolfe, A.B. 



Lee V. Roring, A.B. 

Henrietta E. Rosenthal, A.B., A.M. 

Grace A. Rotzel, A.B. 

Louis J. Rouse, A.M. 

Adolph M. Rovelstad, A.B., A.M. 

John D. Rue, B.S., M.A. 

Selden Ruger, B.A., M.A. 

George H. Ruhling, B.S. 

Carl P. Russell, A.B. 

Richard A. Rykenbon, B.S., M.S. 

Chester S. Schoepfle, B.Ch.E. 
Howard P. Scott, A.B., M.A. 
Elizabeth F. Seaver, A.B. 
Esther E. Shaw, A.B., A.M. 
Norman K. Sheppard, B.C.E. 
Porter A. Sherman, B.A. 
Earl C. Sherrard, M.S. 
Samuel J. Skinner, A.B. 
William W. Sleator, A.B., A.M. 
Lelia p. Smith, A.B. 
Ned R. Smith, A.B., A.M. 
Ross H. Smith, A.B. 
Ada L. Snell, A.B., A.M. 
Walter H. Sprague, A.B., A.M. 
Bert A. Standerline, B.Ch.E. 
Ambrose H. Stang, C.E., A.M. 
Sadie G. Stoddard, A.B. 
Alvin Stickler, B.S., M.S. 
Abbie M. Sykes, B. S. 

Chee T. Tan, A.B. 
Elizabeth A. Thompson, A.B., A.M. 
Cornelius Tiesenga, B.S. 
Elizabeth F. Toof, A.B., A.M. 
Lawrence J. Toomey, A.B. 
Gertrude Tenninga, A.B. 

Marguerite M. Ulrich, A.B. 

Mabel R. Van Fleck, A.B. 
Nathan E. Van Stone, M.S. 
Harry F. Vaughn, B.S., M.S. 
Frank C. Vibrans, A.B. 
Lugebrigh G. Volden, B.S. 



66 



EvALYNN H. Walker, B.A. 
Harry V. Warm, A.B., A.M. 
Clayton Ward, B.C.E. 
Carl C. Warden, Ph.B., M.D. 
Edwin O. Weaver, A.M. 
Hal C. Weaver, B.S. in M.E., E.E. 
Clarence M. Webster, A.B. 
Frederick W. Wick, A.M. 
Herman J. Weigaird, A.B., A.M. 
Carl V. Wells, A.B., M.D. 
Harold R. Wells, B.S. 
Volney H. Wells, A.B. 
Christian N. Wenger, A.B. 
Marshall A. Wheatley, A.B., A.M. 
Harold F. Whittaker, B.Ch.E. 



KaTHERINE J. WiEBER, A.B. 

Albert E. Wieslander, B.S. 
Horace Z. Wilber, A.B., A.M. 
Arthur G. Williams, A.B. 

MiNA L. WiNSLOW, A.B. 

Ernest M. Wisdom, A.B. 
Anna L. Woessner, A.B. 
Joseph G. Wolber, A.B. 
Harold F. Wood, A.B., B.Ch.E. 
Alvalyn E. Wood, Ph.B. 
Mark L. Worth, A.B. 
WiNTHROP R. Wright, A.B., A.M. 

Mary Yost, A.B., A.M. 
Ina L. Young, B.C.E., A.B. 



67 



Holders of Fellowships 

1915-1916 

John A. Aldrich, A.B., M.S. University Fellowship in Astronomy. 

Henry J. Bassett, A.B., A.M. Buhl Classical Fellowship in Latin. 

Albert Bradley, B.S. University Fellowship in Economics. 

Robert E. Brown, A.B. University Fellowship in Public Health. 

Zeltah p. Buck, A.B., M.A. University Fellowship in Psychology. 

Ralph E. Christman, B.Ch.E., M.S. (Eng.) Acme White Lead and Color Works Fellowship. 

Phillip A. Coombe, A.B. State College Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Leland E. Crossman, A.B., A.M. University Fellowship in History. 

John J. DeBoer, A.B. State College Fellowship in Philosophy. 

Lena P. Duell, A.B. University Fellowship in Psychology. 

Florence Field, A.B. State College Fellowship in Mathematics. 

Albert Fitch, A.B., A.M. State College Fellowship in Physics. 

F. Edwin Ford, A.B. Paper Manufactures Fellowship in Chemical Engineering. 

Marguerite T. Gourley, A.B. Buhl Classical Fellowship in Latin. 

Howard H. Hicks, A.B. State College Fellowship in Rhetoric. 

William H. Jellema, A.B. University Fellowship in Philosophy. 

Howard L. Kingsley, A.B. State College Fellowship in Education. 

Edward H. Lauer, A.B. University Fellowship in German. 

John T. Naylon, B.Ch.E. Gas Engineering Fellowship in Chemical Engineering. 

Irby T. Nichols, B.S., M.A., M.S. University Fellowship in Mathematics. 

James O. Perrine, A.B. University Fellowship in Physics. 

Ben E. Perry, A.B. Buhl Classical Fellowship in Greek. 

Benjamin H. Philo, A.B. State College Fellowship in History. 

Alice E. Richard, M.A. State College Fellowship in Education. 

M. Selden Ruger, A.B., M.A. University Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Bessie F. Seaver, A.B. State College Fellowship in Latin. 

Esther E. Shaw, A.B., A.M. University Fellowship in Rhetoric. 

Earl C. Sherrard, M.S. University Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Ada L. F. Snell, A.B., A.M. University Fellowship in Rhetoric. 

Bert A. Standerline, B.Ch.E. Gas Engineering Fellowship in Chemical Engineering. 

Ambrose H. Stang, C.E., M.S. University Fellowship in Physics. 

Lawrence J. Toomey, A.B. State College Fellowship in English. 

Nathan E. Van Stone, M.S. University Fellowship in Chemistry. 

Carl C. Warden, Ph.B., M.D. Cholett C. Beach Fellowship in Bacteriology. 

Harold F. Wood, A.B., B.Ch.E. Detroit Edison Company Fellowship in Chemical P'ngineering. 



6K 



College of Literature, Science and Arts 

John Robert Effinger, Ph.D., Dean 

THE College has its origin in the original act passed by the Legislature which created the Uni- 
versity, commonly known as the "Organic Act," passed in 1837. Owing to many complications 
the University was not opened until September, 1S41, with two professors, a librarian and 
six students. The College was cotiducied along the conventional and traditional hnes until 1852, 
which date marks the advent of Dr. Tappan and the passing of a new act by the Legislature granting 
the University much greater power. Until the year 18SS-S6, no electives were allowed and the degree 
given was A.B., but with the beginning of this year the seniors were allowed to elect one-third of their 
work. At this time the College gave three courses. Classical, Scientific and Latin-Scientific, which 
led to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. In 1677 the College was entirely revised, and an English 
course was added, giving the degree of Bachelor of Letters. The elective system had progressed so far 
by this time that fully one-half of the studies required for the bachelor's degree were elective. In 1901 
it was decided to give a single degree, that of Bachelor of Arts, and later this was modified so that 
students who had done a majority of their work in the sciences might receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Sciences if they so desired. In 18yS the technical work in engineering, which had hitherto been done 
in this College, was separated and the College of Engineering was created. In 1912 the work of the 
Graduate School which had been organized in 1892, was separated from this College, and the Regents 
created an independent Graduate School. In spite of these changes, the College of Literature, Science 
and the Arts has grown very rapidly and for the year 1915-1916 has an enrollment of more than 3,050 
students. 



David Friday 

WE have chosen (o address this last expressive effort of ihe Literary class of 
1916 to a man who is beloved by that'class. 

We should confess Cailjre did we not honor these pages with the name 
of one wjio is recognized, not only by us as an excellent teacher but by the judicious 
elsewhere as an authority in his field; he commands the tribute of our minds. 

But that he is populat and respected is not sufficient. It is with appreciation 
ofhii admirable qualities as a man, and with gratitude chat he has so borne witness to 
the truth and nobility which reside with him, that we respectfully dedicate this, the 
Mnior Literary, section, to Professor David Friday. 



Warner Thomas Potter Broth ei«t( 

Cans Thompson Hubbard Chenot 

1916 Literary Class Officers 

James B. Ancell, 2rd President 

Louise Potter Vice-President 

Miriam Hubbari. Secretan' 

Howard Warner Treasurer 

James Chenot Football Manager 

WiLBER Brothkhton Ttack Manauer 

James Thomas Baseball Manatier 

Alfred Thompson Basketball Manager 

Albert Gans Oratorical Deietiate 



BaLLENTINE JoHNSOTi 

Bast IAN Fox 


MOTTER 


ROEHM 


Beaver 


Wrecmt 


Lowes 


Barreti 


1916 Literary Class Committees 


Class Day 


Souvenir 




Banqiifl 


J. M. Barrett 
E. D. Atwater 


D. R. Ballentine 




I. C- Johnson 


C. B. Crawford 




K. W. Vance 


RoBT. Bridge 


R, L, Haskins 




C. C. Stone 


P. M. BOWEN 


H. L. Frost 




R. P. Stewart 


E. A. Cook 


H. W. Gaines 






A. H. Beyer 


K. C Holmes 




Invitation 


H. W. Patterson 






A. H, TORREY 




Cap and Gown 
L. C, Reimann 




Geo. Murphy 


Memorial 




D. W. Jennings 


E. P. Wrlcht 


J. M. Cork 
M. D. Haag 




W. Brotherton 


W. A. P. John 




B.G. I.AMBRRCHT 


A. R. Thompson 


E, Maouire 




H. Vanderveer 


F. I.. Walters 


E. BOLEN 




F. E. Snyder 


L. E. RoYCE 


M. Calev 






E. M. Saroeant 


E. L. BuKY 




Auditing 


G. O'Learv 






M. M. Beaver 




Promenade 




C. E. Ufer 


Sins 


C. E. Bastian 




Wm. a. Pearl 


U. S. WlLSOW 


E. W. BlSEEE 






H. W. Kerr 


p. V. Ramsdell 




Finance 


F. P. SURGESOR 


M. H. Wilkinson 




Geo. B. Fox 


K. H. T.NSMAN 


J. Wenlev 

A. L. VanDelsen 




1. Hicks 


Reception 


R. Brown 




Social 


P. C. I.OVEJOV 






L. S. RoEHM 


A. I. Cans 
1. K.NSEv, Jr. 


Pipe and Cane 

B. S. MoTTER 




B. M. Compton 




A. M. Bentlev 


I. S. Swi-Aer 

S, L. Stanley 


H. M. Bowcock 




R. S. Collins 


R. M. McKean 




R. E. Krecek 


N. J. MacIntvre 

D.t.SuLL.VAN 


W. M. Shafer 




H. Klv- 






C. B. Sikfs 


C. Orcutt 









Senior Literary History 



WAY back in 1912 we opened our eyes on the University world, and proceeded to grow up in the 
peculiar way of our own which has marked us as Fortune's favorite and the chosen of the 
gods. "Sweet Sixteen" we were then, and during our four years we have not been embit- 
tered, but shall go forth with our gracious manner to make for ourselves in the world the same relative 
mark which we have established here. Our aim is not a low one, nor shall we, if supported by the same 
spirit which has been ours through our college days, fail in its achievement. 

May we characterize our work as administrative and executive, and may we be permitted the priv- 
ilege of selecting examples to illustrate our claim from almost every activity in which a class in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan finds itself. If, in some line of work we have failed to make a worthy contribution 
to progress, we shall readily admit our failure; but let us extenuate it by the old economic argument 
which we have all heard from Prof. Taylor, "If United States capital is more efficient economically while 
invested in manufacture, why should it be diverted into promoting the shipping industry". 

No member of our class has settled the question as to which, the Augustan or the Ciceronean age, 
excelled in its literary activity; nor has anyone of us enlightened the world in regard to the fourth di- 
mension. We may have produced no famous scholastic lights, but that we are a steady, level-headed, 
serious, constructive set of students is attested by the fact that after several years of literary poverty, 
the University is to be enriched by the re-establishment of the Inlander. It is one of the proud achieve- 
ments of the class that it has been responsible for the fact that the University is again to have a literary 
magazine. 

Nor is it in the line of literary periodicals that the class has confined its efforts along constructive 
work in the publications' field. From a circulation of about 1,000, The Gargoyle, edited by W. A. P. 
John, and "business managed" by Edward Maguire, has doubled its circulation. The team-work of 
these men has raised the book into the front rank of college comics, and the class of 1916 claims the credit 
for furnishing the men who did the constructive work. 

Passing from the publications' work into another field, the class of Sixteen is not without significant 
athletic figures. When the present senior lits leave college the track team will lose one of the best cap- 
tains it has ever had, and the only man who has twice captained it. For two years "Hal" Smith has 
been leading the Michigan cinder men, and has been leading the cinder men of other colleges for that 
matter. George Murphy, Joe Ufer, and George Fox are members of the two-mile relay team which has 
set a new mark for Michigan's runners, and which has equalled the world's indoor mark. "Stubby" 
Walters on the track and cross country teams has been a man to be figured with at all times. 

In football the class has cut a significant figure with Roehm as the brains of Yost's 1916 machine. 
At quarter "Rummy" played throughout the year, and in previous years he had been with the squad. 
Lewis Reimann made one of Michigan's best players in the Harvard game in 1915, and it was only the 
hard knocks received in that year that prevented him from appearing in his senior year. Clyde Bastian 
has played in the backfield of three Yost elevens, and is the third contribution of the class to Michigan's 
football teams. 

In baseball the class has two claims to fame. Its first. Captain George Labadie, who has played 
three years in the outfield and is leading the Wolverines this year, the class must share, but full claim 
is laid upon Elmer Brandell, who is one of the most valuable men that Coach Lundgren has ever had, 
playing with ability in almost any position on the nine. 

Tennis for the past two years has been almost exclusively supported by the Sixteen Lits, who 
have had three of the four men on the team. Mack has for two years played on the team, and has 
once won the All-Comers tennis title. Crawford, captain of the team this year, is playing his second 
season, as well as Switzer, who was on the team in 1915. 

In the executive, no less than in the athletic and literary and scholastic lines of work, has the class 
distinguished itself. "Jack" Finkenstaedt saw the error of his ways, and turned to the literary depart- 
ment in time to bring credit to it as manager of the track team. Boyd Compton served the football 
team in the same capacity, and if the list of managers is to be continued we may mention "Toots" Shafer, 
Ray Ballentine and "Jimmie" Thomas, who have at one time or another managed the musical clubs 
and interclass athletics. 



74 



Once in a while the class has turned frivolous and has managed to hold a party. Its greatest achieve- 
ment in this line was aiding in the reinstitution of the Junior Hop, which was again established as a re- 
sult of the activities of the classes of 1916. The good behavior enforced at this party so charmed that 
faculty that it has been allowed to remain. The Soph Prom, which was managed by W. A. P. John in 
a most able way, was one of the most successful parties ever held by the sophomores, and the usual good 
time was enjoyed by all. 

We haven't mentioned our women yet. It's not because we are ashamed of them. Indeed not! 
It is because they deserve a separate section all to themselves, and they shall have it. 

OF INTEREST TO WOMEN 

So many of the women in the class of 1916 stand out as one looks back over the four years just 
passed that it is hard to select the few, room for whose mention is available. From knowing the others 
well, however, we fear no jealousy and may go bravely on. 

Martha Gray, besides being one of our most proficient students, has had time to be women's editor 
of the Michigan Daily, and, among other things, to act as chairman of the Junior Girls' play committee, 
and to write the major portion of the lyrics for the production. Ellen Sargeant has also been a busy 
woman, having directed her energies along musical lines. She has acted as president of the Glee club, 
and has written musical scores for several productions, and helped with others, among them being the 
Junior Girls' play and the Shakespeare pageant. 

The Judiciary Council has been dignified by the presence on its roll of such names as: Grace Fletcher, 
Beatrice Lambrecht, who was also vice-president of the Women's League, and Helen Humphreys, w^ho 
is president of the Women's League. Besides being the most beautiful girl in the class, Gertrude Roos 
has found time to serve as class secretary, turning over the honor to Miriam Hubbard, who is serving 
in that position in her senior year. 

Louise Potter has diverted enough of her attention from being popular to being senior class vice- 
president and to running high in the race for the best student job. Eleanor Stalker has written the Jun- 
ior Girls' play, and Marion Stowe has served as president of the Y.W.C.A. Grace Thomasma has been 
engaged in a worthy effort in social work, and has done much in the organization of affairs in Martha 
Cook dormitory. Her cleverness has stood her in good stead in helping her meet and solve the problems 
which she has encountered there. 

There are others who deserve bouquets, and to whom we'd like to hand them, but they are so many 
that we can't name them. This will do for a sample. Haven't they a right to a section of their own? 

Our achievements, such as they are, and we like to flatter ourselves that they are extensive and 
beneficial, are not a mere flash in the pan. Our force is not a short, intense one. It is, we hope, a force 
which will strive for good and justice in the outside world, and if our conduct in the University be any 
criterion, we have just cause to hope that our end will be achieved. 



76 



Literary Seniors 

Anna 0. Adair Ann Arbor 

George E. Adams Buchanan 

Edwin D. Almendincer .... Corttnna 
dug FoDtbaOl (Z) (3) (1) 

Tony E. Amtsbuechler . . . Traaerse City 
Sinna Delta Kappa; Alpb* Nu; Commerce Club: 
"TeuioD" Club; Wntlim: Clu Football 

Chas. E. Anderson Ironteood 

Chas. W. Anderson Norway 

James B. Ancell, II Detroit 

J. M. ARNor McCrary, Ark. 

Zsta Beta Tau 

CBAU.EB Chase Ashbauch . . . Dutoii 



Literary Seniors 

John C. Askam Findlay, 0. 

Round Up 
Earle D. Atwater Shtlby 

Mildred A. Bachers .... Pari Huron 
PI Beta Phi: Censle f ruuaia; Deutsohn Venin; Giifa' 
ateeClub 

G. Roy Backus Sandtuky 

Adelphi 

Arthur N, Bacon ToUdo, 0. 

Phi Kapp* Fn; Band; Open 
Donald K. Bacon ... St. Paui, Minn. 

Phi Rho Sicms 
Feux S. Baer Chicago, III. 

Gerald V. Baker .... Union City 
Llovd Ross Ball Haumrdtn, la. 

Lambdm Chi Alpha 



19 



Literary Seniors 



David R 


«MOND BaLLENTINE 




Detroit 


Delta C 
(21; Mu. 


hi: Dniids: Sphi 
uol Cluba MaOBi 


n.: Co 
|er(3) 


nmero 


Club; Daily 


Ruth G. 


Balsam . . 






Manisitt 


John B. 


Barker . . 




Min 


^^polh. Minn- 


S"^! 




Club; 


Mi 


■KBOta Club; 


Ju[.[A Barksdale 




Portsmoath, J'a. 




PiBftsPh 






Alice M 


Barnard . 






. Coldwaltr 




DeulMhcr Vcro 


q; Girls' Glee 


Club 


jAMt 


M. BARRErr, 


JR, . 


. Fo 


« H'ayn,. Ind. 


Kll 


piKlc>li:S«ini>DeluCl>i 

m (31: Union Opera 

d Hou« CmmillM (1) 


Commillee (31 (4); 


Clyde ¥.. Bastian 




. Ifilliamiport, Pa. 


Alph 






Marj 


ORIK F. IUtes 






. Rffd City 


Kelt 


WkeklerDa 


UGH\f 


N 


Albw«, l„d. 



Litcraify Senior^ 

Ruby E. Bawdeh Paiiusdale 

Melvin M. Beaver .... Fori fF'ayne, Ind. 

Delu UpnloD 
Fred H. Begole, Jr MarpulU 

Kai^aSiEnia 

Anne L. Benjamin Grand Rapid/ 

Kappa Kappa Oanuiu 

MoRELL Bentley ' Oatosjo 

Tbeta Delu Chi; Clan Tnanirei (3): Clan Football 

(3) W 

Bert I. Beverly Ann Arbor 

Adele H. Bever Detroit 

Kathrvn Isabel Bierkamp . . Detroit 

Delu Dalta Delia 
Elliot W. Bisbee . . Morrtouin, Ftrmont 
Pbi Ownma DelU 



Literary Seniors 



Margaret Graff Black . . 


. Mujiry.lU. 


S. Rexforb Black .... 


. . . Flint 


Pr«, Senior' Fo™iry Club^ ' 


ohicHi F«»t«: 


Helen V. Blmr 


. . Ann Arbor 


Chi ChnBgn; atyli«; DBuucber Verei 
Wyvem 


: Mortar Boardi 


Frank L. Blood .... Port Jervis, JV. Y. 


Margaret E. Bogenrieder 


. . Detroit 


DeltH Delta Delta 




Ethelyn R. Bolen . . . 


. BattU Creih 


Camma Phi Beu 




Ckas. a. BoawoRTH . , . 


Poola, Kansas 


Phi Rho Scma 




Harold M. Bowcock . . 


Springfitli, 111. 


Paul M. Bowen . 


Detroit 


Alpha Delta Phi 





Literary Seniors 

LVMAN C. BOVHTON . AiktabiUa, 0. 

Herrmann E. Bozer . . , Loganiport, ind. 

PhiBcun 

Melvin Bradner Poteeri 

C. W. Braikard BiuUt Criek 

Phi Rbo Swma; Medio Ba^etbUI; Vunty Buxl 

Helen S. Brakder Kalameaoo 

Collsfute Sonni 

C. Beryl Brandstetter MiddievUU 

Delu DelU DelU 

Huco E. Braun Saginavi 

3icnu Alpha Epailon 

Rob't Bridge Charlevoix 

Eniniieg Club 
Theva E. Briggs ... , , Cedar Springs 



'-f I' 



Literary Seniors 

JOHt* Roy BitoKEN9H[HE . . Patenulitt, R. I. 
Phi Gkmma D«lt> 

Edna E. Bromley Deimit 

Delta Delta Delta 
Karl H. Bronsoh .... Livonia, N. Y. 
Wilbur Brothsrton, Jfi Detroit 

Roy 6. Brown DaimlU, lU. 

Ruth Brown Ann Arbor 

Alpha Phi; Mortar Board: Wyvern; SMieUry of 
Women'i Uiicue (4} 

K. W. BURDICK r«fiN. N. Y. 

Ruth Olean Burkley .... Ann Arbor 

Esther L. Burt DtiroU 

Alphj Phi: Mortar Board 



Literary Seniors 

Geo. J. BuauAM CoopersmUe 

Phi Chi 

Ronald A. Butler Ann Arbor 

Ttwla Delta Chi 

Makguerite Helen Calev , , . Laptir 

Alpha Chi Omsaa; Girli' Gl» Club 

Ella M. Campbell Ann Arbor 

Wm. J, Campbell Ann Arbor 

aiDfoDia 

Marjorie Carlisle Hoteell 

Empire SUM Club 

Mildred Carpenter . . Grand Rapids 

CoUwsle Sonwa; Omefa Phi; Wyvern; Mortar 
Eber M. Carroll .... Ann Arbor 

James E. Chenot Detroit 

DdtaTbelaPliiiCriffina; L« Orcls FtaDcais, Pres- 
ident (1); Claaa Football Managar (4)^ Clan Foot- 
ball (3) 



Literary Seniors 

Aaron H. Chute Tnledo, 0. 

Kenneth S. Clap? Albion, Ind. 

Delia Tbu Delta 

Harry B. Clawsok .... Parkteood, Fa. 

Saekett Club 

Akvilla R. Closser Cadrdonia 

Mtra Elizabeth Cobb .... Sckodcrafi 

Giris" Gl« Qub 

Russell S. Collins Detroit 

Michiginiua^ Mim«: ftehini; Daily 8ufl (2>; 
General Cbainnan'a Committee Union Opera (3); 

Boyd M. Comfton .... Dayton^ 0. 
Phi Delta Tbeta; Griffins: Dniidi: Sphinx: Vanity 
FoDIball Manager 

Albert D. Conkey , , , , Button //arbor 

Esther A. Cook Toledo, 0. 

Ksppa Alpha TbnH 



Literary Seniors 



RUTGEK H. COOLEV . . . 


. . An« A'hor 


Genevieve B, Corey . . 


. . PorUand, Mt. 


Pi Beu Phi: Clug BMkitbRU MuiaEer (1): Girig' 
OI« Club (2) (3) (4): Oargoyk BuJ[(*oni«i'i Num- 
ber) (3) 


James M.Cork .... 


. . Ay»x Arb^r 


Dniida; M. S. N. C. Club; Chum BuketbBll; Bueb.ll: 
FootbsU. Captain FootbaU (3) (4) 


Mariola Cornell . . . 


. raiparaiso, l^. 


Frank B. Cotner . . . 


WashinpottvilU, Ca. 


PiUpBlonRl 




Glenn M. Coulter . . 


ChilUnaneo, N. Y. 


Eremila 




R. B. CowiN .... 


. . . Mtiick 


Bertha Lees Cowley . 


. . . CcdMnil 


Ethel Crane .... 


St. LoMS, Mo. 



Literary Seniors 

Charles B. Crawfobd .... Farpi, N. D. 

Sigmn Cbij Vandty Tonni* Tmrn (3) (*}. Capuin 
(4!rctua Buketb^l (3) 

G. B. Crawford Rosebush 

Margaret E. Crockett Indianapolis, Ind. 

Kftppa Kftppi Gaiania 
Wendell F. Crockett . IVailiikii, Muni, Hataaii 
CnamopoliUiD Club: Lyceum Club; Olee soil Man- 
dolin ^ub 

Daniel H. Cronin .linn Arbor 

Rex B. Cunliffe Detroit 

Leon M. Cunningham . ... Bay City 

Meroe Currev Dttrait 

Frances Adelaide Cushing Warren, 0. 



Literary Seniors 

M. M. Day Prmidince, R. I. 

SigmsNu 

E. E. Daniels CUviland, O. 

Bernhakd H. Dawson . . . Mtukogie, Okla. 
Dautasbel Vettin; Cognnpolitnu Club; Sicnw XI 

Anna M. Deacon Iowa 

Jean L. Diamond Cdton, O. 

Linton B. Dimond Si. Johns 

Simu Nu; MiohicBD Duly (4) 
A. A. Dorrance CaldtBoter 

Helen Dow Midland 

William Carlos Dowd Fillmore, N. Y. 

Phi lAiDbdi Upsilon: RdudiI Up 



(^u 



Literary Seniors 

Annabel M. Dowling .... Battle Cnek 

Mu Phi Epalon 
Langdon E. EfcvLE Ann Arbor 



Joseph Horace Drake, Jr. 

DelU UpsUon 

Saluda C. Drenninc 
Russell E. Driver . 



tFalheyia, Kansas 
. . Racine, Wis. 
. . . Detroit 



Gilbert S. Ebert 



i: Gl» Club (2) <3) (4) 
Gallon, 0. 
. . Detroit 



Dtlta Dells Delu 



19 



Literary Seniors 

George M. Ellis Ann Arbor 

Roberta Helen Elt . Tarryloan, N. Y. 

Gamma Phi Bclk 
Pauling O. Eherson . Alexandria, Ind. 

Comedy Club; Claasicsl Club 
Arvid W. EmcKSON Iranwood 

Emma J. Erwin Oak Grave 

Anna L. Evans .... Berrien Springs 

L. S. Evans Detroit 

Alpha Phi Alpha 

Myrtle Henrietta Exlev Hancock 

Lauiia Feice Ann Arbor 

Alpha Chi Omega: Mortar Board: Wyvera: Y. W. 

C. A. Cabinrt 



(\ 



Literary Seniors 

Mark Ferrbll Sedalia, Mo. 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Vanity Baod; Orohertra Union 

Paul L. Field Mbion 

Fnahnuw BuebaU; Tr«ck: V. ol M. Band (3) (4) 

Ermina G. Fillincham Holly 

DelU Delta Delu; Deutocher Venio 

JOHK W. FlKKENSTAEETT Bay City 

Ps Upsibn: MiEbinmua: Ttunileg; Vanity Track 
Manacer: Secretary Union (4): Mime* 

Gertrude M. FtacHEit .... Jnn Arbor 

Etta Fisher Grand Rapids 

Grace Fletcher Chelsea 

DelU Gamms; Mortar Board 
William H. Fort, Jr. . . . Chicago, III. 
Geo. a. Foss Sturgis 



Literary 'Striiors 

John Foss Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Phi Bets Fi 

George B. Fojk Walettown, N. X. 

Sifms Alpha Epuloa; Drukb: SptiiDi: Comnwroe 
Club; Traek Team (2) (3) (4); CroM Country Te»in 
(2) (4): Clui Track Team (1) 

Ralph J. Frackleton Fenlon 

Alfred Sfauldinc Friedrich . Traoerje City 

DelU fail belta 

Charles J. Frisbie Hmsdale 

Coamopolitaa Club; Cerdc Fraoiiaii 

Edith C. Gabriel Owosjo 

Helen L. B. Gage ff'ixam 

Alpha EpHlcm Iota 
Honor W. Gaines .... Ann Arbar 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Luella Gallmeyer .... Grand Rapids 
Chi Omeca 



Literary Seniors 

Albert K. Gallowav . . fFaskingioH, D. C. 

Albert J. Gans Loaimllt, Ky. 

VeftNicE J. Garvin OntBna[on 

Alphk Ctii Onwo 

Florence C. Gkrber Saiinaa 

Earle W. Gibb8 Sytsania, O. 

Dkbdrah McD. GrssoN . . . Ann Arbor 

Robert A. Gilmouh Calumet 

Ralph J. Gleichauf . . Rockesttr, N. Y. 

Delta Tku DelU 
RaV E. GLEICHAUlf . . . RoclusUr, N. Y. 
Delia Tua Delu; Union Opera (4) 



■:h\\ 



Literary Seniors 

Edward B. Gkahn Burlington, Iowa 

Hakhiett W. Goodrich Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

William H. Gordon .... Findlay, 0. 

Douglas A. Graham Detroit 

Martha C Gray Dtlrait 

Pi BsU Phi: Styliu; MoKiun; Wwarn; Wniun'a 
Editor "Daily"; Maiuaer Junior Qirla' PUyl Cluii- 

Raymond F. Grefe . . . Dts Moines, U. 

LcaVoyaccun 
William A. Gressmah . . Pomeroy, Wash. 
Howard Griffith Saginaa 

SicDU Delta Kapfia; Gommena Club 
William C. Griswold . . . Akron, N. Y, 



) 



16 



Literary Seniors 

RuBi? Makiett Hall DixUr 

Benior Sodmy; Honon in iodoDr Mbleli™ Fn«h- 

Jo9. M. Hamilton .... Sirvieiliy, Pa. 
Sicnu Chi: Comnunie Club 

Jay Eaton Hanha Ditroii 

SfBit Nu 

Behnice M. Hannah Ann Arier 

Daniel J. Harrison Adrian 

D, C. Haskell .... Arcade, N. Y. 
Ralph Lincoln Has kins . . Detroit 

Delta Kappa Epnloa 
Herbert P. Havdbn .... Detroit 

CluB Football <4) 
Altha Hefpelbower .... Lapetr 
Kgma Alpha loU; E>«uUoher Verejn: Giria' Glee 
C&b 



,>;'l;v 



Literary Seniors 

John A, Heist ChUago, lli. 

Harold E. Held ^kron, 0. 

Victor H. Herbert Dnroii 

AkbBDSton: Mich. Daily; Union Opera 13) 

Geo. R, Herrmann .... Fan ffayne, InJ. 

Phi Rba Sismi 

Isabel Hicks Mptna 

Gamm* Phi Betn; Wyvern 

Gertrude Hills .... Tkrte Rivtrj 

Wm. HlLZlNCER Royal Oak 

Geo. Maxwell Hoak . Niagara Fails, N. Y. 
Seth G. Hobart . . Fritndship, N. Y. 



Literary Seniors 

Kathlyn C. Holmes Detroit 

WjLLARD H. Holt frantaood 

Wilson C. Homer Detroit 

Phoenli Club 

Jennie E. Hooper Iskpeming 

Hehry S. Hosmer Jackson 

Pao H. Hsu . . . . Kin-Kiang. China 

DaVIdI. HUBAR Detroit 

Miriam Hubbard . . East Aurora. N Y. 
Collegintf Soroais: Stylui: Om«gi Plu; Muqun; 

Jean M. Hughes .... An^ Arbor 



Literary Seniors 



Harold L. Humphreys . 

Alpha Tsu Omc 

Helen Humphreys . . . 

Kippa Kappa Gamma; Morta 
Dcuticher Vereio; Frw, ol Woi 

Henry Hundermak . 
Viva Ella Hunawill 
Waldo Russell Hunt 



George F. Hurley . 
Phi Alpha Delta; On 

Ruth Hutzel 



Dorothy B. li 
DWIGHT W. Ji 



. Grand Rapidi 

Ann Arbor 

. . Dttroil 



Literary Seniors 

W. A. P. John J«n Arbor 

Sasjm Delta Cbi; GriffiuB: Mimn; Toutmuten; 
Dniide; Mich. Daily (2): Garcoyle (2). Maruging 
Editoc (3) <4) ; Coautbor "Tr» Rouce" 

Irwin Chester Johnson .... DtifoU 

Signui Dtlia Chi; D™id«; Tolem; Micbigsn Daily: 
CwmopollUin Student: TreaiuRr Y. M. C. A. (5) 

L. C. Johnson .... South Btnd, Ind. 

Granville D. Jones . . Columbus Crovf, 0. 

Walter K. Jotter Mo^rae, 0. 

T. W. Kellv CadiUac 

Blanche C. Kerns Saginma 

James A. Kbrns Siason 

Marguerite Sabin Kerns . Mmoa 

M. S. N. C. Club; Stylui 



Literary Seniors 

Harry W. Kerr Dilroil 

Sigma Phi; Mimes: DmidB 

Margaret 0. Kilbv Marshall 

Isaac Kinsey, J« Toledo, O. 

Psi Upailon 

Ethel Louise Knichts Drranir 

Emma E. Knoepp . , . . Pitlibvrg, Pa. 

Reva Koon Boulder, Colo. 

Mu Phi EpoiLoD 
Ruth E. Kreger .... WyanioOt 
Beatrice G. Lambhecht Minneapolis, Minn. 
KMWa Alpha Tbsts; Morur Boaid; Wyvem; 
Vi»-PnaideDt oC Wonwn's L«cue 

Herbert C. Lahgb .... Daytan, 0. 
Alpha Tau Omega 



Literary Seniors 

Martin F. Langworthy .... Loti/ell 

Gladys Louise Laufman Hillsdate 

William M. Laux Reese 

Donald E. Iawremce Iludion 

Abraham Jacob Levin Detroit 

Pmidcnl Michignn Menorah Socicly 

Ida Mae Lewis Cotdwaier 

Delta Delu Delta: Wyvem 

Selma Lindell Escanaba 

Lillian Lindner .... Aberdeen., IFask. 
Alice C. Lloyd .... . Af,<i Arbor 



Literary Seniors 



Po Shue Lo 


Conlon, Ch.na 


Ralph Robert I.ounsburv 


. . Detroit 


BeUTheUPi 




, 0. L. LovEjov 


Princeton, 111. 


Round Up 




Pkili? C. Lovejoy .... 


. . Ann Arbar 


(4); PrcB. Student Voluuleer Band (3): DepuuUDn 
Sec. Y. M. C. A. (4) 


Chas. p. I.owes 


. Grand Rapids 


HaRRvG. LuNDnREN. . , 


. . Ironaood 


Phi BeU Pi 




Katherine MacBride . . 


. . Ann Arbor 


■ Helen C. MacDonalb 


. . BiyCity 


' GMnma Phi BM* 




Sadie MacFarland . . . 


Turlington, X. J. 



Literary Seniors 

Nena MacIntvre Ballli Creik 

Kkppa Kipm Gamnu 
Christian Mack Ann Arbor 

Psi UpHiLao: FniahiDKD Tenniii TeBm, Vanity Tennis 

Team (3) 

Edw. MACDfRE Detroit 

Delu Ksppn EpiiloD 

BvRoN W. Malfroid Houghton 

Alpba Siims 

Arthur G. Markhaih Saginao! 

Clement H. Marshall . . . GretntiiU, 0. 

Delu Upsilon 
Samuel W. McAllister . , Conneavl, 0. 
Pearl Julia McCain . . . .Ann Arbor 

Junior AdvlMir 

Dudley McClure . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. 



Literary Seniors 

Fledia Grace MeCRimv .... Ann Arbor 

Helen R. McDonald Dttroit 

Chi Ome»i, Girls- Glee CLub 

James Hugh McKean Hartford 

HiBmaChi 

Richard H. McKean Detroil 

Elda Mae McKee Indiana, Pa. 

Girl.' Glee Club 

Earl B. McKinley . H'tllington, Kansas 

Delta Tan Delta: Phi Rbo Si«nia: Griffins: BphiDi: 

Owls: Cammodore Micliigui Unian Boat Club (3) 

Fred A. McMahon . , Niatara Fails, N. Y. 
Phi Gamina Delta; Deuucher Verein 

George Porter McMahon Deiroii 

Elizabeth M, McRae .... Houghton 



Literary Seniors 



Madge F, Mead 




Ruth E. Meakln .... 


. . Detroit 


Esther Mellencamp . . . 


Grass Lake 


Katherine Meksereau . . 


La Grange, lit. 


Kappa KappB Gamm 




Wm. F. Michalskie .... 


. CteceUnd, 0. 


Mahv D. Miller . . . 


. . .Un Arbor 


Ruth Dorothea Miller . 


. . Ann Arbor 


Donald M. Morrill . . 


Big Rapids 


Aubrey C. Morrison . , 


Salem, IV. Fa. 



Literary Seniors 

FiNLEy Austin Morrison . Iran Rker 

Commem Club 
H. E. Morse Dillon, Mont. 

Kappa BeU Fn 
Benjamin S. MoiTeit Lina.O, 

George Mubphv Harbor Brark 

SiEmaChi; Dniids; Sphini: Track Team |Z> <4)^Gle« 
Club (3) (4) 

Mavnard a. Norris .... Foiloria, 0. 
Emily Frances Northhvp Poniiac 

Alpha Chi Omeea 

Katherine Ocobock . Sdu/A llavm. Miss. 
William E. Olds ... F.li Rapid, 

Genevieve E. O'Learv .... Jnn Arbor 



Literary Seniors 

Constance Okcutt Kalamazoo 

Gunma Phi Beta; DeuUctwr Ver«a 
C. Rupus OsBoRN Tekonsha 

Leon D. OsTRANDER . . . St. Thomas, Oni. 

Signu Delta Kappa; Cnnadian Club; CUn FooiIkLI; 
Bisketball 

Albert B. Pareet Goldtn, Colo. 



Boyd T. Park ... Sail Lakt City, Utah 

Rodney A, Parker .... Cievfland, 0. 
Cercle Fnoi^au (3). Trcuurer (4); Amlytu; Gl« 
Club (3> (4> 

Helen Patterson .... Portland, Me. 
Pi Beta Pbi 

Marion LeRoy Payne .... Saginatn 

Delta Gamma; Wyvern 



Maud Payne 



Literary Seniors 

William A. Pearl St. Johtu 

Walter H. Pielemeier Chelw 

LeiLA L. Pike Traverse City 

N. Earl Pinney -^n« Arbor 

Griffins; Acolyua; Druidi; Delia Sionu Rho; Adelphi; 
Univiiaty I>ew» OiUor <3) ; Vnraity Debate <i) : Viee- 
PiH. Y. M. C. A. [3)1 Tnu. Oratoriokl Ao'n («); 
Prat, 8. C. A, (4) 

Bessje Platto hkpemiitg 

J. Wilbur Poe YpiUatai 

Elder A. Porter Greensburg, Ind. 

Louise Potter Hastings 

Collujale 3«r»ia; MorurlBoitrd; Wyvem; Vice- 

Sena Potter Lansing 



Literary Seniors 

PHVLLIS SeELY PoVAH Dftroit 

Collcaiate Soroais 
Florence H. Powers .... Grand Rapids 

Bertha C. Pulford Driroil 

Alpha Phi. Morur Board; Wyvern 

Leila Quirt hon Rit^ 

Paul V. Ramsdell Ann Arbor 

'alfyui Guild <4); Adelphi Hduik of Repro- 

- '"^-' BusTtth Cainjwiin (3); Michi- 

«l; Vanily 



■eatativn; Chairmui Busroh Camjwii 
inn Duily (4): arc. fniir. Y. M. C. A 
Debntiiic Team (4): Delu »i|TTis Rbo 



Leroy D. Randall ... Sfw York City 
Coniuopolilan Club; Bua. Mgr. CoemopoliiBn Stu- 
dent (3> 

Albert W, Rankin Si. Clair 

Sintonia 
Catherine M. Regan .... Ann Arbor 
Lewis C. Reimann .... hon Ricrr 
Gumma Ets Gamma; Pmidcnt Y. M. C. A. 



Literary Seniors 

Karl Renz Toltdo.O. 

SiiniH DelU Kappk; Caiiuner« Club 
Lewis G. Reutter Laming 

Paul H. Rivnolds Dundte 

Phcjeiii.,'.Fo™iry Club 

L. Frayne Richardson Niwberry 

Joseph Schober Ricktic . . Iron JHoiinioin 
Carleton Palmer Ritchie Pajadma, Calif . 

Glw Club: HawaiiiiD Quintette 
Standish W. Robinson . . Grand Rapids 

Juan Rodrccuez . . . Manati, Porto Rico 
Coamopolilan Club 

Lawrence S. Roehm .... Detroit 

Cbi Pail GriRiiu; Dniida; Owk; Sphini; Vanity 
FootbHll (4) 



Literary Seniors 

IsABELLB E. RoNAK MarskoU 

Gertrude W. Rdos Mamstiqui 

Samuel £. Rosenfield Akron, 0. 

David T. Rosenthal E, Chicago, Ind. 

Nellie L. Rosewarne Dtcaiur 

Chi Omegas Omega Phi; Junior Play <3) 

C. Howard Ross Troy. 0. 

Stanford J. Rothschild Baliimori, Aid, 

Leola £. RovcE .... Sauli Sir. Marie 

Pi Bcls Phi 
Leslie H. Rushbrook . Eart Aurora, N. Y. 



Literary Seniors 



Royal Oak 
. Ann Arbor 



edyClub 

M. H. Saur KmtCity 

Herbert N. ScHMiTT . Grand Rapids 

CrutI Rapids Club: Vanity Glee Club (2) (3) (i) 
Edna Lorene Schumacher . Ann Arbor 

Emilie C, ScHWAR-ra .... Detroit 

DelU De[u Delta 
Orren G. Seaveb Ypsilanti 



Literary Seniors 

V. Freda Seigworth Lickingvilli, Pa. 

ClBMiial Club; Deutscher Venin 

Ruth L. Sinff Detroit 

Helen Forsyth Service .... Detroit 

CoUegiBU Soroois 

Wilson M. Shafer . Brockport, N. Y. 

Psi ITpailnD; Sphini; SludfDt Council <3I <4); CUua 

Fooibstl O) 141: A«l. ManBger Muni»l Clubs (2) 

Ora E. Sharpe Ann Arbor 

John A. Sheldon FlainweU 

Caleb Glen Shipley . , Petersburg, III 

SigBiB Nu; Comedy Club 

Charlotte Sites .... Fort Wayne, Ini. 

Delta Gamma; Monar Board 

Harold L. Smith Detroit 

Alpha Delta Phi 



Literary Seniors 

J. Harold Smith .... Coudersport, Pa. 

Met. Msdic FoolbBll Tcnni <4>; CIh BucbaU (2); 
Biaketball (1) 

Llovo Smith Marquetu 

Florence E. Snvder . . CkurckBille, N. Y. 

Chi Omesa; Ometi Phi; Morur Boanl; Wyvern 
Jessik 1. Spence ,,,.,.. Cast City 

Kappa Kappa GaininH; Mortar Board ; WyvEm : Deul- 
«oher Vprein; Vicc-PresideDl Y. W. C. A. 

Mary Ethel Spencer . Champaign, 111. 

Ksppa Alpha Theu 

Ruth M. Spencer Mortnci 

Harvev H. Sprick .... Quincy, III. 
Fiu Ganitna Delta 

Eleanor Nellis Stalker Dtiroit 

Delu Gamma; Comody Club: Slylus; Wyvem; 
Gtoe Club; Author Junior Qirla' Play (3) 

Sarah L'E. Stanley .... Detroit 
Collcciau Somii 



Literary Seniors 

Lester C. Staudt Nanilouioc, ffij. 

The HermitBce 

Russell Bangs Stearns MUwavket, Wis. 

Delta Kappa EpaLoD 

Ben T. Steers Kalamazoa 

E. Hazel Stevens .... Sault Su. Maru 

Jane D. Stevenson . , . , Richmond, Ind. 

Alpha Epnlon lata 

Margaret N. Stewart , , . . Deiroii 

Robert Pearce Stewart .' Saginiue 

Theu Delw Chi 

Wm. D. Stinson . Ml. f'ertion, Ind. 

Clifford C. Stone . . Bmion Harbor 



Literary Seniors 

Chas. E. Stone Si. Josrpk 

Bessie STONCitocK AUtgan 

Marion Franklin Stowe .... Ann Arbor 

Delta Delia Dflta; Mortal Board: Wyvem; Muqim: 

ProsidBnl of Y. W, C. A, 

Marjorie M. Stowell St. Johns 

Virginia Straughn Ann Arbor 

SBcrettry, Cbuical Club 

Norma S, Stroh Detroit 

LuciLE Strong Detroit 

Lyceum. Micliigan I 
Junior GirLi' Play 19 

Victor H. Sugar 

Adelphi House o[ F 
Rbo: Vanity Debatii 

Donna E. Sullivan Jackson 



tceum, Micliigan Damea; Oratorical Play 1913: 
inior GirLi' Play 1913 



Adelphi House o[ Reprcs«nUtiv«; Delta Sigr 
Rbo: Vanity Debating Team (3) 



Literary Seniors 

Marie G. Sullivan Mtuktgon 

Tbets Phi Alphi 
UPE .... Sault Su. Marie 



F. PoRTEK SURGENOR Rochflltr, N. Y. 

Chi Pb 
John S. Switzer .... Trxaj Ciiy. Texas 
Harold L. Tanpy .... Gardner, Man. 

James W. Thomas Detroit 

Dclu Thcta Plii: Sphini; BiiHbiiil Mbubsci- H) 
Ruth Thomas ...... Decatur 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Grace Thomasma Grand Rapids 

Alfred Ross Thompson Rensselaer, Ind. 

Signu Phi; BulietbHll Mir. (4) 



Literary Seniors 

J. William Alexander Tinsley BarbottrviiU, Ky. 
Frederick Homer Tinsman Ann Arbor 

Delta Updlou: Union Duce CominitUe; CIb» FooI- 
bsll (41; Muui»l auba (3) «4| 

SoTARO ToKUYAMA Skidivoka, Japan 

Coomopolitan Clab: Nippon Club 
Tom L. Tolan Iranu/aod 

Clifford M. Toohv Lnlir 

Arthur H. Torrey , Chicago, III. 

1) : ' Ch»ir 
MClub 

RiLLA R. Trathen . . . Highland Park 

Eugene F. Traub Dubuque, loioa 

Ruth C. Tromblkv . . . Bay City, Mich. 



Literary Seniors 

Ebba Trvsell Ann Arbor 

Helen Tuthill Detroit 

Gommo Phi BeU: OmeEB Phi; MorWr Board; W}-veni 

M. Muriel Tyson .... Flora Dale, Pa. 

Ksppa .\lpbB Thol^i; Omt-fii Phi^ Stylus 
Clarence E. Ufer .... Chiiago, lU. 

HiKlnii Nu 

Mathilda P'lorence Ulenbubg . - Fraier 

Junior BuketbaLI; DpuUcher Verria 

Kenneth W. Vance AV,>. Pa. 

Phi Ciamma Drlw 
Marie Van der Karr .... (kaoiio 
Francis. Van der Veen . . Grand Rapid; 

Kaickcrboclier Club: ClBnifil Club; ClaiuicBl 

Club PIsy, Busineu Mannier 



Literary Seniors 



L. E. Vanderialm Grand Hmxn 

Aris Van Deusen Battle Crtek . . 

Delta Dolts Delta; Msniin; Marur Board: Wyvern; 
Giria- Glw Club il) (3); Treaa, Y. W. C. A. (*) 

Hugo Wacenseil Port Huron ' , 

Elbridoe R. Waite ... - Portland, Mt. . 
New EdcUdiI Club 

DoHOTHV Walker Sshoolcrafi ■■ 

Glw Club 

R. V. Walker Dttroii \ 

Nu Sicma Nu 

Mary E. Walsh Mi. PUaianI 

Theu Phi Alpba: Lc Ccrcle Fiancnu 

Frank L. Walters Lansing 

Wm. H. Wanzeck .... Ann Arbor 



Literary Seniors 

Dora E. Ware .... Kamai City, Mo. 

CoLkcutf Soroaifl 
Howard M. Warner .... Farmtngion 

Z«tsPsi 

Blanche C. Washburne .... Ann Arbor 

Erwin W. Weber Duroit 

9iaroDU 
Catherine D. Wenley .... Ann Arbor 
CnllgotLte Sorona; Mortar BoBrd; Wyveni: Girli' 
Glee Club; Maaquea 

Jemima V. Wenlev Ann Arbor 

CaUeipatE SoroBis; Mortar Board; Wyvern;' Girli' 
Gle«Club; Mbhiucb 

Carl F. Wi 



Literary Seniors 



Erwin K. Wild ^«b Arbor 

Morton H. Wilkinson . . . Bugalo, N. Y. 

Phi DelU Tbeu 

Robert E. Williamson . Fori Wayat, Ind. 

Sackelt; CoDOOKrce Oub 
Elisabeth Kissick Wilson . Ann Arbor 



J. Stanley Wilson . 


. . Hanimr 


Luder of U. of M. Glee Club <4) 


: Member Vsnity 


,ESLIE W. WlSHARD , . . 


i.Aw Hawaii 


Phi DcJu Theu 





19 16 



Literary Seniors 

Edmund D. Wood Hastings 

Frank A. Wood Maikerion 

Edward Pultenev Wbccht . Detroit 

DeLu Ksppa Epailan 

Myrtle Young Aan .irhor 

Marie H. Zeiger . . Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Ksppa Alpbs ThcU 
Nettie Zoble .... Bvlle, Mont. 



Senior Literary Statistics 



B 



EFORE entering upon its annual farce, time-honored through its previous patronage by senior 
classes, the class of 1916 elected Professor David Friday the man above all others in the literary 
department to whom it wished its section of Michigan's year book dedicated. 



Having disposed of its serious business the class went ahead in the annual revel, which in previous 
year has been a burlesque of its members. The staid seniors of the class of "Sweet Sixteen," looking 
upon this task as one to be well accomplished, and no less conscientiously done than any other it had 
attempted and completed, weht ahead in spite of the travesty which had formerly been made of the in- 
stitution, and cast an honest ballot on those men and women who were to be honored with the titles 
of "sportiest guy" and "prettiest girl." 

No course seemed to have done the members of the class much good, and the ballot was a close one, 
Accounting leading with a margin of but one vote over Heredity in the contest for the most beneficial 
course. Maybe so many courses had proved of such great benefit that the members of the class had 
difficulty in determining what one should receive the credit. At any rate ^wtry course, from " Dr. May's 
gym" to Calculusy ran third, there being several more courses in the tie for that place than there are 
courses in the curriculum. 

The next two problems were more easily solved by the voters. Creative Listening won the race for 
the biggest snap course in a walk-away, having a wide margin over its nearest rival. Mathematics 52, 
Fine Arts I easily took the palm in the ballot on the most enjoyable course, while Business Organization 
and Management ran second. Again there was a big scramble for third place, eighteen being in a dead 
lock for the position of third most popular course. Some candidate for P. B. K. even went so far as to 
affirm that he enjoyed "any philosophy course," and another man who loves hard work admitted to 
enjoying Corporations. 

Having given the faculty all its ideas on the curriculum, the class proceeded to the election of its 
most popular member. Here was a clash of brains and brawn ! Here was the last stand of the athlete 
against the administrator, and our class president won the race by a narrow margin over the quarter^ 
back of the football team. Close on the heels of this pair were George McMahon and W. A. P. John, 
and no other man in the class was popular with anybody. In spite of the close race run between the two 
high men it is gratifying to see that they were worthy of the number of votes they each received. " Jim- 
mie" Angell and "Rummy" Roehm still speak when they meet on the street. All credit to them for 
concealing the hard feelings of jealousy which we know must be theirs. 

Our vice-president, aside from being the only woman to receive a vote for every position of honor 
open to women in the class, and a few designed for men, proved that she was worthy her title by being 
unanimously elected the most popular girl. Beggin' your pardon — unanimously except one, Dean 
Myra B. Jordan being the other girl in the race for this place. 

There was a lot of hard feeling developed in the class in the lobbying for the next candidate, 
but after three recounts of the ballots Robert Curley Bob Turner was declared to be the hand- 
somest man in the class. The ballot which won him the honor affirmed that he was the prettiest 
man, but Robert deserves all the credit for a well directed campaign just the same. W. A. P. John also 
received a vote, so did George McMahon and "Trig" Torrey. 

Chase Ashbaugh, that Paderewski of the mandola and guitar, won the distinction of being the man 
who thought he was the handsomest devil amongst all the galaxy of handsome Satans in the class of 
Lit '16. Harry Kerr was close, and "Doug" Graham, who for eight semesters has so nobly represented 
the class on the Oratorical board, was also in the race. W. A. P. John received a vote, too. 

The purely aesthetic next occupied the members of the class who were present at the memorable 



126 






Senior Literary Statistics — Continued 

meeting when the ballot was taken, and Gertrude Roos was elected the prettiest girl. Phyllis Povah, 
Vice-Presidentess Potter, and Charlotte Sites also ran. 

The brain which had defeated the brawn in the race for most popular man, suffered defeat at the 
hands of more brain in the race for best student, and "Bill" Pearl beat out "Jimmie" Angell for the job 
of best student. This was one of the places where the vice-president invaded territory traditionally 
reserved for men, nor was she alone on hostile ground. Martha Gray was there with her, even ahead 
of her. A fellow by the name of W. A. P. John received a ballot for the position. 

Ray Gleichauf and Douglas Graham ran a dead heat in the finals in the biggest grind race, with 
Roehm, Gans and DufReld taking what dishonor there was left. John R. Brokenshire was looked upon 
as a dark horse, but he failed to place in the money. 

By far the most prominent man in the competition for all of the positions was Mr. John. He alone 
had the distinction of being the only man to receive a vote for every office, honor, and disgrace which 
it was in the power of the class to confer by ballot. To him alone goes the credit for holding two posi- 
tions of trust at the hands of his class-mates, who in one and the same day elected that gentleman to 
the office of most successful bluffer and shrewdest politician. 

Nobody except Sarah Stanley, Ruth Kreger and Ethylen Bolen argued with Honor Gaines for the 
title of jolliest girl, but even the good work of these young women in the jollying line went for naught 
before the ability which the latter seemed to possess, and the first three named had to be content with 
a tie for second place, and the distinction of being jollier than most of the class's women. The jolliest 
is Honor Gaines. 

"Pete" Surgenor just missed out on being the sportiest guy in the class, but he contented himself 
with the laurels of the biggest fusserand let Harry Kerr and Stan Robinson share the distinction of being 
that type of gentleman in the class of 1916 which most resembles the sportiest guy conceivable. The 
gentlemen appreciated the honor and let "Cap" Murphy and "Doug" Graham come in for a little of 
the credit. "Joe" Gans won the honor of being the man who thought he was the sportiest guy. No- 
body disputed his title. 

Declare the banns and strike up Mr. Mendelssohn's tune! "Cab" Bentley and Helen Paterson each 
won first place in their own class for the first person to get married. It is prophetic! 

How did you fare? The author, although he was overlooked in the ballot, feels sure that he will 
receive sufficient attention after the results of the elections meet the public eye. "The pity of it!' 



128 



Colleges of Engineering and Architecture 

MoRTiMRR Ki,wvN CooLj:y, M.K-. I.I..D.. D.K.. Dean 



THK criuinal Actof lK37provided that Knj 
University. But it was not until 1853-54 tl 



R should be one of the departments in the 
3-54 that the first professor in this branch wasappwinted, 
inbeinKgraduated with the decree of Civil Kngineerin I860. A chair of 
■yEnBi nee ring was established June 27, l86l,insrriiction hein^ fi'ven in the springof 1862, but was 
abandoned in ISfi'A A School of Mines was esta Wished tn 1865, and the degree of Mining K ngi nee r con- 
ferred for the first time in 1867. To Professor DeVolson Wood is due larRely the credit for those early 
ventures of the University into new fields of engineerinK- Professor Wood resigned in 1872 to accept 
a chair in Stevens Institute of Technology, founded in 1870. The Legislature of 1875 appropriated 
money for a School of Mines; that year William H. Pettee was appointed Ptofessor of Mining Engineei- 
ing. The same act provided for a chair of architecture and design; and M r. W. L. B. Jenney was ap- 
pointed to thar chair March 29, 1876. In 1877 the necessary appropriation for the continuance of the 
work in mining and in architecture was not made. Professor Pettee resigned, and was reappointed Pro- 
fessor of Geology in charge of Mining Kngineering, In this way occasional degtees in mining engineei^ 
ing were conferred, the last in 1896. 

Engineering was taught in the Literary College until 1895, then was made a separate department 
with Professor Charles E. Greene as Dean, Following his death in 1903, the present Dean was appointed 
in February, 19(M, together with Professor Joseph B. Davis as Associate Dean. Professor Davis resigned 
his office in 1908, and Professor William H. Butts took his place as Assistant Dean. 

Architecture was reestablished in 1905, being assigned to the Department of Engineering during 
its development period. Ptofessor Emil Lorch, head of Architecture, performs the duties of Assistant 
Dean for architectural students, but the Dean and Secretary conrinue to serve for both departments. In 
January, 1915, the title of the Departments was changed to the present title. Colleges of Engineering 
and Architecture. 

Mechanical Kngineering was reestablished in 1881; followed by entirely new branches;— Electrical 
Engineering in 1889. Chemical Engineering in 1898 and Marine Engineering in 1900. 

The degrees conferred on gtaduarion unril 1881 were Civil and Mining Engineer. But since then 
the bachelor's degree has been used, the professional degree being conferred only as a higher degree. 
Beginning with and aftet Commencement, 1916, Bachelor of Science in Engineering will be conferred 
on all engineering graduates, and Bachelor of Science in Architecture on all graduates in Architecture. 
But the legend of the diploma will contain a reference to the course of study pursued. 



Professor and head of the Department of Civil Kngineering. a civil and consult- 
ing engineer of recognized ability, he is a man with a breailih of view, a sense of humor 
iird an understanditig of men and motives that endear him not alone to his own students 
but to all who may say, " I knew him." He has so imbued the department of which he is 
head with the spirit of simple friendliness and cooperation between faculty and students 
that he has in reality made of it a fraternal organization. 



1916 Engineering Class Officers 

Howard H. Phiiups President 

John B. Brevmann, Jh Vice-President 

Thomas C. Trelfa Secretary 

Anson H. Keeler Treasurer 

Edward C. Headman Football Manager 

W[LLIAM P. WicKHAM Baseball Manager 

Howard Manwaring Basketball Manager 

John K. Norton Track Manager 

LvNDALL E. Hughes Oratorical Delegate 



WiLCOXES ReI 


a Brown 


Harris Leach 


Watson He^ 


■OMAN Warner 


Steen Cooke 


Mack Bue 


ll H. Smith 


G. Smith Weavei 


1916 Engineering Class Committees 


Auditing 


Picture 


Senior Reception 


I. M. Brown 
W. A. Reichle 


L. E. WiLCOXEN 


C. P. Harris 


C. R, Daugherty 


C. S. Bloomshield 


J. D. Todd 


C. BOTTJE 


H. H. Perry 




H. E. Barrett 


R. G. McAndrew 


Sanquft 




G, H. Sandenburg 


H. C. BUELL 






P. E. Bond 


F. T. Mack 


Senior Sing 


R. E. Bement 


A. A. BURRELL 


E. C. Headman 


I. W. Robinson 
R. A. Hall 


M. A. DelValle 


E. F. Brucker 


P. C. Wacner 


H. HuMlSTON 




R. E. Gore 


E. D. Bolton 


Can/ 




F. C. Wheeler 


G. B. Smith 


Financt 


H. M. K. Grylls 


j. L. Wehmeveh 

R. A. LUNDILL 


M. S. Reed 


W. L. Cooke 


R. A. Dodge 




J. H. Schmidt 


H. A. Keeler 


Social 


B. Woodbury 


H. H. Phillips 


H. D. Warner 




J. B. Brevmann 


L. C. Rowley 


Cap and Coum 




R. S. Archer 


H. 1. sSiTH 
D.E. Gardner 


Imitation 


C. E. Stryker 


S, T. Steen 


H. B. Bartkole 


L. S. Monroe 


W. A. Sterling 




T, P. SODDV 


W. A. Miller 


Publicity 


A. F. Grenell 


H. H. FlKRET 


G. D. Cooke 




W. E. Reid 


W.O'B. Henderson 


Promtnadt 




S. M. PiNKERTON 


W. W. Watson 


Pipe and Stfm 




S. W. Dlbee 


H. L. Leach 


Aiiembly 


F. H. HOLLOWAV 


H. M. H. Corey 


T. D. Weaver 


E. K. MacAllister 


C, A. Everett 


A. H. NiLES 


J. P Greiner 


F. M. Sawin 


F. VONACHEN 




P. 0. Potts 


G. Akers 



The Engineering Exhibit 

The Colleges of KrRineering and Architccnire hold an Engineerine Kxhibit every rwo 
years. The exhibit is for the purpose of drmonsiratinc to all students of the University 
and ro visitors at larfte the work which the studenisj^f the College have accomplished and 
that which they are canyinft on at the present. It is a student affair pure and simple, its 
entire conreptinn, development and management being in the hands of the students. 

The general chairman of the exhibit committee of this year was elected from the senior 
class in December. He then appointed men to represent each department of the College, 
The committeemen have already been working for some time and if we may be allowed 
ro prophecy a little ai the time of writing, we uill say that this year's exhibit is going to 
be the " biggBSt and best ever." 






History of Senior Engineers 



"A-II a-board. Train No. 1916 on the Higher Education Route." i 

"A-IIa-board!" 

"A-II a-board!" 

"Train for Freshville, Sophburg, Juniortown, Senior City and intermediate points." 

The big jostling crowd pressed closer to the ticket windows where General Passenger Agent Dean 
Cooley, aided by Assistant Passenger Agent Dean Butts approved or rejected the passports from High 
School City or Prep School Town which ever\' individual presented. Passing along to the next window, 
the crowd bought tickets for the first stage of the journey from Treasurer Campbell. No one requested 
return trip tickets or special tickets with stop-over privileges for any of the points en route. It was later 
learned that a stock of the latter variety was kept on hand. 

After seeing the last ticket purchaser on board, Conductor McAllister consulted Brakeman Hirth's 
watch, signalled to the locomotive cab in which Fireman Hallaway was laboriously shovelling coal; then 
Engineer Haag pulled back the throttle and started us on our long journey. 

When once we were well under way there was a general rush for the diner where we received our 
first surprise. Consultation of the menu revealed the fact that we were not to be allowed to pick our 
own dishes. The plan was strictly American and we all swallowed the same meal composed mainly of 
heavy foods, hard to digest, a meal noticeably lacking in desserts. Besides, we were allowed no lunches. 
One food that was especially hard to digest was listed as Descripto. It caused more than a few of us the 
sharp pangs of indigestion. 

The country was full of surprises during the first part of the journey and we were kept busy adjust- 
mg ourselves to the rapid changes in scenery and acclimating ourselves to the new countr\^ generally. 
Now we were travelling in the depths of a canyon where the steeply rising sides cut off all view of the 
surrounding country. Again we were out in the more open country, but so unused were we to great 
perspectives and glorious distances that we often failed to appreciate the great reaches of our Alma Mater 
which spread out about us. 

The journey passed rapidly for the majority of the passengers. One day some bandits, whom we 
afterwards found to be inhabitants of the next Province of Sophburg tried to board our train, but after 
a brief struggle were driven off with losses. This we learned from the authorities was an annual occur- 
rence named the Fresh-Soph contest. 

With the aid of the General Passenger Agent, we inaugurated the Mentor System, thereby getting 
into close touch with the officials of the road and gaining valuable advice concerning our journey. Along 
in February we stopped for water and, sad to relate, lost a number of passengers who strayed too far 
from the straight and narrow track. Among these, unfortunately, was our engineer; before contin- 
uing our journey therefore, we picked another in the person of Horace Corey. 

The trip, from this point, was rather more pleasant, as the passengers gradually became more in- 
timately acquainted with one another; with but one or two fatalities the train came to a stop at a town 
unknown to all. The sign on the station read "Sophburg." Rumor spread that there was to be a big 
celebration in town that night, so we all got off to attend. It was both magnificent and impressive; here 
it was that we shed the clothes and manners we had brought with us from Freshville, and extravagantly 
tossed the former into a huge fire which the Sophomores had built. 

The summer was soon upon us with its heat and dust. Most of us decided to spend the languid 
hours in Sophburg and continue our journey the next fall. Some, however, took a small excursion to 
a neighboring amusement park called Summer School and from all reports had an enjoyable time. 

On September 29, 1913, we bought tickets and again boarded the old train. Unfortunately several 
of those who had been our fellow passengers found the joys of Sophburg so captivating that they had 
decided not to continue their journey. The train pulled out, manned by a new crew, consisting of En- 
gineer Hyde, Fireman Finkenstaedt, Brakeman Milliken and Conductor Jeter. 

Under the skillful hand of our engineer, the train ran smoothly; and such harmony prevailed that 
when in February we stopped to fix a hot-box, only a few strolled too far away to hear the whistle. 

A little further along our way we became so restless that the engineer suggested. that we stop at 
some suitable spot and have a "Pow-wow". The suggestion was greeted with enthusiasm and we then 
and there inaugurated the Pow-wow custom. Our social boosters conferred with a party from a train 
which was on the next track, concerning a certain Soph Prom. This function was given, with great suc- 
cess, at the next station which was called Armory. Gradually as the spring came, we grew weary of the 
trip, and when the train at last pulled slowly in at "Juniortown," we scrambled out eagerly from every 
available door and window. 

On September 28, 1914, when we gathered at the station, we found ourselves suddenly involved 
in a heated discussion. The trouble was that we were unable to decide upon an engineer. Finally after 
much delay we decided that Don Smith knew more about a locomotive than Fran Mack and so we gave 
him the job. Harry Buell got the job as fireman, while Howdy Phillips and Bob Hadley were made 
brakeman and conductor respectively. 



136 



Our train consisted now entirely of Pullmans. We read the impressive and appropriate names on 
the sides of the coaches and chose according to the way they struck our individual fancies. There were 
Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical and Marine. On entering, we found our coaches something on 
the order of buffet cars, for meals were served us with menu cards particularly adapted to our special 
needs. The European plan was used and although we were all required to assimilate certain staples, 
we were allow^ed to pick out a few dishes to our own liking. The selected dishes were more or less of 
the dessert class. On the other hand, some of us were taking re-orders on certain dishes which had not 
agreed with us in Sophburg. 

The grade of the roadbed through Juniortown was level and it didn't take much effort to keep the 
train going. The surrounding Alma Mater country was pleasant to gaze upon. We were able to get 
glimpses of the end of our journey and a better perspective of the whole road and the great country 
through which we were speeding. 

Soon Johnny Lyons and Jack Benton were given passes in the form of an "M," because of their 
prowess in football. Aside from this the trip passed uneventfully until just before our usual February 
stop. Here a great discussion arose concerning our social liberties. It seems that the officials had been 
so displeased with a few of the passengers on the train two years ahead of ours that they had forbidden 
the continuance of the Junior Hop. Through the efforts of Engineer Smith and Dick Jeter, we did our 
share together with the other Junior classes in having the higher officials repeal their decision and allow 
us to stop over and give the Hop. Thus to us belongs part of the honor of re-establishing the Hop under 
the direct management of the Junior classes. 

In the spring, the train stopped at a picturesque spot where we got out and held another Pow-wow. 
The momentary relief from the prescribed diet aboard the train was too much for our engineer and for 
one or two others. The officials accordingly ruled that they would have to wait for the next train. We 
left them standing by the side of the road, a warning to all trains that should follow, like a sign which 
read in conspicuous capitals "DANGEROUS CURVE— GO SLOW". 

From this point Fireman Buell took charge of the throttle and carried us safely on to the City of 
Seniority. Just before reaching this cit'y, Jack Benton was presented with another pass because of 
the baseball ability he had shown en route. Niany of us decided to remain in Seniority for the hot months, 
others decided that the town of Summer Session looked inviting. The rear coach, filled with very CIVIL 
young men with plumb-bobs and transits, was unhooked from the train and with an engine all its own 
started up a sandy branch line. For further account of this side trip see description at the end of the 
list of passengers. 

On October 5, 1915, we commenced the last stage of our journey. Several passengers who had 
missed the preceding train bought tickets for ours; and so in spite of the loss of those members who had 
left us because they were subject to car-sickness we numbered 263. The new crew answered the follow- 
ing roll-call: Engineer, Howdy Phillips; Fireman, Johnny Breymann; Brakeman, Tom Trelfa; and Con- 
ductor, Howdy Keeler. 

During the first part of the trip. Jack Norton was presented with a pass signed by Coach Yost and 
our brakeman, since he was familiar with the rural highways, was chosen to captain the cross-country 
team. 

Just before February, representatives from our train and from several of the trains in back of ours 
worked out an Honor System. It was adopted by the passengers from all of the trains and when it was 
tried at the February stop it was found to work out excellently. As we started on again we could see that 
the idea of the system had gained a good foothold among our own passengers and among those of the 
following trains. We can only conjecture as to where the influence of the ideal upon which the system 
is founded will finally lead. But judging from our own experience it will offer many charming oppor- 
tunities to those who adopt it sincerely. 

Later in February a serious accident occurred in car " Electrical". The back E. M. F. from a recently 
installed dynamo overcame the usual constant potential and severely shocked several of the passengers. 

In this part of the journey the roadbed was very even and the riding good. The meals were well- 
served. There were numerous desserts. Indeed, some of us subsisted entirely on light lunches. We 
travelled chiefly through the momentum we had already gained. From the heights we had now reached 
we had a good view of the Country of our Alma Mater and of the mile-stones we had left by the road- 
side as we passed. In looking back over the whole length of the Higher Education Route, we could real- 
ize what a relatively short distance it had after all brought us. Ahead of us, far beyond the end of the 
line, stretching away to the farthest reaches of the country and even beyond that to the dim horizon, we 
could see a broad highway, which we knew we would probably have to travel. 

AH that remained now for us to do was to slide down comfortably in our seats and take a well earned 
rest while the train coasted on to the end of the line, where the conductor would wake us with the words, 
"Commencementville, everybody out!" 

G. D. C. 



137 



Engineering Seniors 

Kdward R. Allan A"o. TonauranJa, A. Y. 

A. S. M. r:.; Sculp and Bl*df 
John I,. Allison .... Canamiaigua, A". 1', 
Walter D. Ammehman . . . ShamoHn, Pa. 

.SiEITU Phi Epdlon^ Society Auto. Kag. 

HaruldO, Andrew . . . Springflrld, Man. 

Robert S. Archer Drtroit 

Tau Beta tl; Phi l^nibdn tlmilcm; Alcbi'iniau; Col- 
lege h^lilor ol Micbicm Tnhnic; ttocisl Comniitler: 
Hooor ComrnitlK': ScmtHry. Aiitomobik Society 

Klmer H. Babel .... Bvfiato, S. Y. 

I., v.. llANr.HAKT Yfsilanli 

I'Jii SiflniH Kiippii 
Maurice A. Harhoir . . OfAnrrf Ukr 

H, Karl Harrett .... AVn/ Ciiy 



Engineering Seniors 

Hkiiikrt B. Bartholf .... Glencot, lit. 
Bfis Thpu Pi; Vulmnn; Wfb >n<l r\M.Btx 

R. E. Behent Lansing 

MehlE F. Benneit .... Detroit 

MiD^nl riubd (2) (3) (4) 

Jacob H. Berkowitz Drlroil 

K. v.. Behray /ffl^Wfi. A'. )'. 

Leon C, Bibbeh .... Portland. Mf. 
Weslhv Binti .... Vaian City, Ind, 

KufiENE H. Btrp Uilie 

H. E. Blomcken Nonoay 



Engineering Seniors 

Carl S. Blomshield Bay Ciiy 

Delta Tbu DelU 

Edwin D. Bolton Portland, Mt. 

Clifford Bottje Grand Haven 

Lloyd L, Bower Fosioria, 0, 

A. S. M. E.; MiindoUD Club 
Albert William Bretsch Lafarceeille, N.Y. 

John B. Breymahn, Jr. . . ToUdo, 0. 

anlonia; Owb; Tau Beu Pi; VuIcjiq; Web Bud 
Flange; Clan ^'ice-Pmidpnl 

J. Martin Brown Saginau; 

Akhpiuton: Web and FlaiuK 

Norman F. Brown Kalamavm 

Prnident Ensinotrinc Sodcty 

E. F. Bruckkr Toltdo. 0. 

Siinia Alpha ICpailon; Claw Bueball (I) (2) (3) 
(4); Buketball (1) (i): FouibBll (4) 



Engineering Seniors 

Dttroit 



Harry C. Buell Saginate 

Arthur A. Burrell ^nn Jrbor 

Alpbn Sigrna Phi; Tsu BeU Pi 

A. G..CaDW ALL ACER Hastings 

Arthur B. Cartle Constantint 

CrslUmsn; Vanity Bind: Symphooy Orcheitra; 

Open Orchcatrn <3) 

R. D. Chatfield fVoletrint 



. . . Manisne 

John F. Clark . . . Oktakoma City, Oila. 
Tau BeU Pi; VuIcoim; Geaer.! Ch»irm(ui ot En- 
(inccHnK Eihibil 

John H. Cochran Coloma 



Engineering Seniors 

WtLLiAU Karl Coi»; Saginavr 

liound Vp 

Cordon D. Cooke IMroii 

Vice-Fraiident Aero Club; yiocvP™idc.iil Automobile 

Doily (3) (4); .VUchigHi Tivhnic (31 H);' Michinn" 
<:nii>n (4): Editor BUrli Fly 

W. I,:^NW>N COOKK Uonrot 

Harrv C. Coons findlay. O. 

Horace M. H. Corky .... ChUago, 111. 
[jimbJn Chi Alphit', riiMt I'midcDl [ II ; CUw FwjClslI 

l>ANA R. Cornell CVuirna 

Carl H. Cotter l}etroii 

[ra Stanley Crissnun . . . Ueiroii 

C. Whitsbv Crosbi' Ironxoad 



Engineering Seniors 

Guy Clarence Curtiss , . Oetroii 

W. W. Dalzell CttdUlac 

Cari. R. Dauchertv Dflroit 

Norman H. Davidson Iron Mounlain 

1.KWEI.LVN M. Di-LL[NGER .... Kalamozoo 



iBL Valle San Juan, Porto RUo 
Phi Chi Dclui; CralUmen: Ij.tiii-Ameriain Club 
Manuel A. del Valle San Juan, Porto Rico 



John Dennis l/aitings 

Clarence C. Des Jaruins . . Alpena 



Engineering Seniors 

Ernest J. Dilluan .... Cheytntu, IVyo. 
Kappa Beta Pui 

Russell A. Dodce .... IVhitmore lahe 

N. L. DoLFH CaJillac 

Automobile Societ)'; Treuurer (4) 

L. J. Douglas Grayling 

D. M. Drake /fnn Arbor 

Bcu Tbeis Pi 
Harcourt Colborn Drake . . JrmaJa 

Cnnadian Club; A. I. E. E.: Autamobib Sodely 

Stewart W. Dubee .... Bfloii, WiV. 

Samuel Kwart Emmons . SoulA Bend, I«d. 

Phi Gumma Deltn: Tbu B*tn Pi 
K. Eugene Eugenides . ConjIanlinopU 



%\ 



Engineering Seniors 

Charlks A- EvERKT-r IfaUrlou^i. A", )", 

SiBmn Alphn Kpttiloa 
Rudolph G. ¥eu-.er . . . La Uarpe, Ka«. V 

H. Halouk Fikrkt . . ConilaalinopU, Turkey j ' 

A, H. M. E.; Chft Imitation Commiltm H) 
BvKON John Gadois .... Colfax, III. 

WlLLARB S. GiRVIN .... Bu-^olo, .V. 1'. " 

Kappn Sigma: Srnlp (ind Blidf 
William G. Given , . Long Reach, Calij. 
MartoN I.. GoLDSTKIN .... Sagina-j, ' 

Zeta DfUi Tnu: CJunrtETilvck 
Kuscoe C GoRf .... Tecttmieh, Srb. 

Sigma Alplia EpeiloD ' 

L'larenci! p. Grekn . . . Cle^eiand. O. 



Engineering Seniors 



Morris Greenbla-tt . . 


Nfa LoiUon. Conn. 


Arthur F. Grenell . . . 


La Grangf. III. 


T.U Beta Pi; Tot 


mClub 


Humphrey M. K. Grylls . 


. . . DriTOil 


Sigm» Phi; Soph Prom'Comm 
Mirier (2); CIbm F««i«il (3 


B»b.li {2) 


Louia J. GuREvrcH . . . 


iVaikinglon. D. C. 


J. N. Hadjisky .... 


Sophia, Bulgaria 


ROBEKT W. HaDLEV . . 


. . . Toledo. 0. 


Phi Kappi Ph 


Russell A. Hall 


. . . BUsifitld 


Peter C. Hammelef 


. . . Dttrok 


Clinton P. Harris . . 


. . . Alpena 



Engineering Seniors 

Edward C. Headman .... Wyandotte 
t Vulwu; Wob utd Fiance; Clus Football Mwaoer 
(4);ClaBBBukatbmlU3) 

IC. Warren Heinrich Detroit 

W. S. HtLMER Eicanaba 

William O'Brian Henderson . . . Saginaw 

Samuel Hersch Cteneland 

H. L. Hebeio Toledo, O, 

Harold A. Hicks .... Ann Arhor 

Tbu B«U Pi: Cla« BsHbali M>n>«cr (1> 
Harold B. Hicbie . . . Franklin, Pa. 
William P. Hindman . . . Grand Rapids 



Engineering Seniors 

F. K. HiKTH TolrJo. n. 

Fred H. H0LLO«\, . . , , Rochester, S . Y . ' 
Gerald J. HoRvn/. DmoU 



VNUALL K, HucHES , . . I'hUadHphia. Pa. 
SJBniB I'lii Upsilon; Kounci I'p; Kcystow Cluli; Mimw; 
Clui Dmurirn] DpLwatc (4); I nion Upcrii (1) (2) 
(M); Opera Drninim Uinrtnr (H) 

Warhen H. James . . Rfdland/, Calif. 

Welliam H. Jewell S,gau«fe 

H. P. JoNFs Sandwich, III. 

KvEREiT Jui>sc.N Oe^tland, O. 



Engineering Seniors 

Anson Howard KeeLeR . . . Grand Rapids 

Theu Xi( Web and FUnge^ C1>h Tnnauirr (4) 
R. (i. KiMBAiL Porltand, Mr. 

Marcello a. King .... Ifflh.-illf. .V. }'. 

Chas. S. Klein Detroit 

J. S, KosACKA 4nn Jrbor 

Joseph P. Kreiner . . . Bradford. Pa. 
W. W. Kurtz Sojii.™ 

H. R. LkacH Saginaw 

W, A. Lenski Grand Rapids 



Engineering Seniors 

Leslie Lou LeVeque Marqiutu 

Dempster C. Lewis Uika,N. Y. 

Frank A. Lewis Marquette 

J. E. Long Suelton, Pa. 

ROBRET A. LUNDELL CodittaC 

Elwood K. MacAllister Rochisier, N. Y. 

Round t*p Club; CI™ Trewurer (1) 
W. W, MacArthur .... Cheboygan 

Monlu 
Francis Test Mack .... Toledo, 0. 
SiKDis Phi; Tau Bets Pi; MiEhigamuK: Triuiglea: 
Touunulen: Mima: Juoiin Hop Committee: 
An't Gewml Cbnirnuui L'niao Open (3) ; Student 

mitte* (41: Viiw-Pngident Midiimn Union (4): 
icr of Coetumei. Miehigsn Union Opom {4} ' ' 
Joseph Weslev MacKeniie . . . Adrian 



Engineering Seniors 

Howard S. Manwahinc Ann Arbor 

Mdo1u;8«. udTreu. A. 8. M. E. (3) ; Chuimuin (4); 
Buketbill Muscec (4) 

J. C. Marble Ifajhingion, D. C. 

Walter E. Maxwell , , Schmtetady, N. Y. 

LumbdB Chi Alpbn 
R. G. McAndrew St. Thomdi 

Akhenston 

T. H. McArdle .... Ckauaugay, A'. Y. 
Arthur Branch McGee Pasadena, Calif. 

Pbi CBinma Delia; Tsu Beta Pi 
Clifford T. McIntvre . Si. Thotnai, Canada 

Canadian CLub^ Hockey (3) (4) 
Charles Arthur McKennv . . YpsUanli 

ManJolia Qub 
O. E. McMuLLEN Milan 



Engineering Seniors 

Arleich Mea[> Ilasiinis 

A. I. E. E, 

K. H. Merritt Lockport, N. Y. 

Wilbur L. Meri^ Saginau; 

KlbertO. MiLHAM Kdamazjio 

I'U Umbiln TiMloii 

Harry K. Miller Mancrlona 

Herron W. Miller . - . Dalla,, Tf.w 

AlphnTauOnicBn 
VVvATT A. Miller .... S,il^m. .V. J. 

). CORTUN MlLUKKN .... *,iy Ciiy 

H. K. Miner Dur„„d 



Engineering Seniors 

l-owELi, S. Monroe Dayion.O. 

Hatkrn Dub 

Phij.ip Owen Mulkey Detroit 

Chi I>4i; Tau Bcla Pi: Miuicnl Clubg (31 

Klmer G. MtNZ D^/rai/ 

rtiocnix 
Rowland A. Nadeau Flint 

Kn^mim 

S. M. Nahikian Driroil 

Hugh Newberg Grand .\raraii 

Arthur H. Niles ■/«« ylrhor 

CI0H8 Truck (3) 
Irving T. Norton . Sorikampion, Mars. 

Sigmn Alpha Epsilon 

John K. Norton Ontonagon 

Knppn W^nia; Tim Bcis Pi; Varaiiy Fnolbnll (4) 



Engineering Seniors 

S. A. Oppbnheimer Grand Rapids 

Dai Tung Pang .... Ilondulv, Hawaii 
Carl H. Pehrson .... Miuktil, S. D. 

H. H. Perrv Bay City 

Howard H. Phillips Grand Rapids 

TheUXi; Michiiamus: Vulcan: Webb sod Fluise: 
TrinnglM; Clm» Sectelary (3); Pnaident (4); Clfl» 
FootbaU <3) (4): Treasunr Boat Club (3) 

Sherwood M. Pinkerton, Jr. . . ToUda. 0. 

Thels Xi: Tau Beta Pi; Phi Lambda UpsUon 

A. G. Plankel PiniwaitT 

W. K. PoMMERENiNG .... Ann ArboT 



Philip 0. Potts . . . Ifaikiagion, D. C. 
Vanity Band (4) 



Engineering Seniors 

B. C. PuiMEAU Marqiutti 

Linn M. Rakestraw ToUdo, 0. 

QuoTUrdeok 

MacDonald S. Reed £n>, Pa. 

Trigoni Tau B«ta Pi; MiohiiunuH; TriancUe; Opera; 
(3) M) 

Walter A. Reichle Saginaw 

TrigDQ 

Wallace E. Reid Detroit 

Delta Tau Delta 

G. G. Riddle Mortnci 

Frank C. Riecks Alpena 

\UEhiian Tecbnic (3) (4); Vine Churnun Am. 

Soe. m7E. 

WiLLABD McFaWN RoBlNHON Detroit 

Harold C. Roeser Saginaie 



Engineering Seniors 

J. S. Romas Dtitoii 

Tau Beta Pi 

H. C Rood. Jr inn .irb:r 

Phi Knppn l-ai 

L. C. RowLHV ... - Lneuio-jrn, .l/o«', 

Ka|)pB Bola Pei 

G. A. RuTC.Kks Holland 

Kuickerbocker 

D. A. Rl-xton Shelby 

Fred Sacia Grand Jtapidi 

Clieu Club 

Geo. H. Sandenburgh , , , , Onriama 
Fred M. Sawin . Chkopee Falls, Man. 
Jay H. Schmidt CleveUnd.O. 

T<M!hnifAnaciBte Editor <9> (4)^ Simp Mansgrr. 

All Nxinn Khup 



Engineering Seniors 

John H, Schmidt Saginatf 

Harold Sherman .... EtttnvUU, N. Y. 

A. C, Simons Ml. Morrii 

Itiflc Team (3> <4); Pr«i. Civil Kni. Soinvty (4) 

W. Whitney Slaghi . . . Bufalo, X. Y. 

Alphs Tnu OmE'KB 

Ci.ARENCK F. Smart Boyaf Ciiy 

m LanibdH Up-ilon 
ChaUNCEV W, SmjTH . , , llubbardHon 

Dai.k f„ Smjth Ealon Rapid, 

Dhnali) Adram Smith ilgonac 

Anick; SiiDut Uolta Clii: {Iritfiiu; T(Mgti>iiu(rn<: 
Tbu Una I^: Vulcnus^ .Muiwint Editor. Tbr Micb- 
iDuiT«rhDic(3);UmanOpi-ni (3): Clan I'rwiclEnt 
191; Gin' Club <3| 

G. Brick Smith . , . Ifaihinsion, D. C. 
i^Kniii Alpha Epnilon; (Junrlenli-Fk ; Kound-Lp 
Cfub; C«l«rin Club; Chairman Can* Cummitin- 141 



Engineering Seniors 

Harold J, Smith IVilmttu, lU. 

Beta Theu Pi; AlohenuMs: Tau BeU Pi: Phi Lambda 

Cpsikni: Vulcain; Trianclas; CaounDiiaie UaiDo Br*t 

Cfub W: CIah BaKbalTManaaer {2>; Clam Banball 

(1) (!) (3) 

Rowland D. Smith Battle Cretk 

Plii Lambda Upuba 
Uhl Manchester Smith Hoteell 

ChainnBn A. I. E. E. (4): Circulation Mp. Mich. 

Tochnic (3) 
Thos. Phillips Soddy Calumet 

Acacia; Griffins; Vulcuu; Vcrnty Bswball Squad 

13) (4); PresideDt Student Council (4) 

L. A. Sprague .... Bloomfield HiUi 

Tau Beta Pi 
William Lewis Stanton , Los Angeles, Calif. 

Kappa Beta pBi 
Henry Dean Stecher . . Laketeood, 0. 

Alpha Sigma Phi 
Sidney Tremble Steen .... Allegan 
B«ts TheU Pi; MicbiEamua; Triangles: Mimes; 
Mich. UuioD Opera Chorus (2); An't (3). Muwr 
ol Propertieii <4); Class Baseball (Z); Chaiiman 
Class iDviutian Com. <4>: Board of Direrton of 



Walter A. Sterling .... Negaur 

TriKao; Tnu Beta H; Web and Flange; Triangles 



Engineering Seniors 

Earll R. Stohe Juica, N. Y. 

John W. Stone Don 

Phi Delta Chi 

Louis Henry Stott Manistee 

Hekrv C. Stovel Ann Arbor 

Errol H. Sthbeteii Big Rapids 

Carleton E. Stryker . Los Angeles, Calif. 
KappB BetaPsi 

Edward S. Taub Saginate 

D. W. Taylor .... Des Moines, la. 
Phi Biiiiiu Kappa: A. I.E. E.:EiiginHriD|| Society: 
CtHt Auditor (3) 

Donald A. Thomas . . Milhank, S. D. 



Engineering Seniors 



LuiisThoms Ouli r^r'.: /II. 



JaM.s D, -r.H>l. Hurli:>;i';t. h. 

■|"oM C. Tkklka llr--'"> 

Khnkst R. Vhtur .... IMpli,„.0. 

Frank J. Vonacken h<n .hb-ir 

V.tfia\u-o: Tim H<-iii \'\: It;..|«'i!>ii1l '.'(i 
E. \oN Ncisin/ ruUd„.0. 



Engineering Seniors 

Paul C. Wagner /Tnn Arbor 

Thu Betn R; Trianalcs 

Harley D. Warner Farminglon 

Zela Pai 

Walter Warren Saginatu 

Walter Weaklev Watson . Brixen-jiood, Texas 

^gma Chi 
Theron DeWitt Weaver .... Delroxt 
Alpba Siimik Phi: Michicnmun: Tpu Bets Pi ; TriBniles ; 
Mimm; AliiTnni Ediur Tcfhnic (3): General Chair- 
man MiohifSD Union ChKrs (4>; Ciss GssebBll (1) 
(2) {31, Mkt. (3): Sec'y Junior Hop (31 

J. L. Wemmever Ann Arbor 

Wm. Weltneh Detroit 

Frank Crane Wheeler . Cortland, N. Y. 

Thu BeU Pi 
Wm. p. Wickham .... Norwaik, 0. 
BeU Theta Pi; Web and Flange: Vanity Football 
Squad <4); Mgr. Cla» BaKbtaiHJ 



Engineering Seniors 

Rex E. Wilbur Cotdwaitr 

Skids UpeiloD Pei 

C. V. Wilcox .... Thret Mile Bay, N. Y. 

Lewis Clark Wilcoxen Holyoke, Man. 

H. P. Williamson Ladinglon 

Bruce Woodbury .... Nmtoi, Kam. 

E. C. Wright Ann Arbor 

D. C. Wo Hangchaw. Chxtia 

Robert WvLiE , . , Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
S. YoKOVAHA . Kalaoka, Naganoken, Japan 



,;■;.<- 



ffs 



Hammond 



VOORHEES 



1916 Architectural Class Officers 

R. S. Westbrook President 

J. A. McCoLL Vice-President 

G. J. I.IND Secretary 

H. L. CoRSETT Treasurer 

G. B. Hammond Athletic: Manager 

L, F. VooRHEEs SeiEeant-at-Arms 







COMMITTEES 




Auditing 






Memorial 


A. E. Bergman 






A. V. MONTNCER 


K. D. COUCHUN 






E. E. Edloff 


G. L. Richardson 








Financf 






W, L. RiNDGE 


J. D. Preston 






J.H. P,ELEME[E1 


C. E. Morton 






F. A. Brinkman 


Sccid 






Sfnior Sing 


J. H. LtNDHORST 






C. F. YOLNO 


A. C. IRVIN 






D. E. A. Camero 


W. J. Crawford 






Cants 


Cap and Gown 






A. C. 1rv[n 


D. J. GOTHOLD 






G. B, Hammond 


C.G. Henninger 






D. E. A. Camerc 




Cla^s Hiuorian 






D. 


J. GoTHOLD 





■rcciatioti of his sincere interest in oiir work, his sym pathetic teaching and e 
1 architect which has Instilled in lis not only knowtedite, hut also respect for ot 
the l9Ui Architectural Class dedicates this section o( the Michif-ancnsi: 
r Louis Holmes Boynton. 



The 1915 Architectural Class History 

Back— oh, almost in the bcEinning of time we all had ambitions, yer all strangely alike. Our hearts 
were lom and our minds wearied trying to solve the problem, whether we were to be engineers on rail- 
road locomotives, bandits like Jesse James, or merely Indian Aghtets. All three held forth seductive 
inducements. VVe felt somewhat the awe and dread responsibilities that attended when we leaned out 
of the cab window and felt the rush of the night wind against our face, while the hundred-ton locomo- 
tive, — if they had them then, — tore its way thru the darkness drawing hundreds of crusting passengers; 
or the thrill of glancing along the barrel of an ominous steel blue forty'tive. and commanding our fright- 
ened victims to " throw up your hands, " while our trusty pals looted the baggage car. But man pro- 
poses and God disposes and we came to Michigan to be architects. 

But we were not architects in every sense of the word. We enrolled with the engineers, we went 
to the engineering assembhes, we attended the engineering functions, tho even at that time we rebelled 
somewhat by having an architectural smoker or dance once in a while. There was the rush that year, 
that we, and the other freshmen of course, lost and the pushball contest that we won. We drew dors 
and lines, mouldings and stone courses, and we went to our lirst finals and some of us got thru and some 
of us— well, we wp re more convinced than ever that we should have been bandits or something of the 
kind. 

The second semester we began to realize that we were architects, though it was sometimes hard 
to convince the faculty, for we made the acquaintance of "sketch problems," of "renderings," and 
found out chat life was not all roses, though we did locate Ypsi. Then came June and we dispersed, 
some to play, some to work, and also some to summer school. 

After we had swaggered around the " home town " for a few months we were glad to come back. 
That year we elected Qurown class officers, and Sherwood Holt was chosen as our president. We begah.to 
, diverge from the'eiigineers and their ways. To be sure we attended the same classes in some courses, 
'". but we were mofe certain chat we were architects. We designed, we sketched, we stayed op. nrghts before 
problems were due, so much so in fact, that when some engineer contemptuously r^lerted to the "pipe 
course" we Hfere quite ready for war We began to get acquainted with our fa 
.(on; fd^ t ho ;>«■ attended some classes in the engineering and "lit" departments, 
eiiclusively our. own. We floundered helplessly in the wake of "Mac's" swiftly 
lighcning H^reV on 'beams, walls, and footings." We learned the dread oE 
(he, "Ohfi^ah— Woiildn't do it just that way," and Kimball's maze of ancie 
iiiatwas Hat InGreeceand Rome, Then too, there was Prof. Lorch, the "King, 

.help'or because vie were called, and under whom we first began to see that there | 

w. all th^rweVei^.itill to get, and that four walls and a roof and some openings, 
;' vith allllie^H-chitectural ornament we could think of, was not a design. Then just as We grew used to ,l 
,. tht yoke we wf re fhrowin out to a summer's pleasure. Again the weeks fled; we whis^fered fefvient prom- i 
,is« to wfite ofeeti, and- came back. 

Junit>rs! .Wew(M]')|ered where the Hop money was coming from, and some of us actually got ic. 
" RpUy " Westhrook lAs our president that year. It was quite a year in some ways. We loVed with ' 
this course and foiighti^ith that. We went down under the storm of "Bev's" Italian, French, and Span- 
ish history iiames to emerge again when we finally got to Rngland. We designed great buildings, We .; 
became the Caiege' ofiArchitecture. The divorce from the Engineering College was; Complete. 
■OsT'departTrient-bpslifltball team won its numerals that year. Holt and Hammond of our cjass were . ,■ 
' unotig the brertct-weai an "A" on the campus. 

. .Always,^ of e dealest year is the last, the end is in sight, there is the possibility of getting out iiito 
llie wbfld.io "d^i siiBiething." The jo\ of the prospects of the coming freedom to ^ome tlieaiiite tjHie 
dimnthir teal fegret>e must feel at leavmg We are bound to miss the genial atmosphere, (if rhe draft- 
ing room,- with ira pleiSbiit companionship and sometimes rather causm. but kidding" remarks; This -. 
y*>r> as in [he Junifif-ytar; Westhrook stands at the belm On chcbattetiesof (rhe departnienCal Jndoor 
Baseball team, i-a.6i"[>e¥V' Canieroiv Moninger itat our Kprtisemative *)h the, 'Student Coufiril; 

The fq tote is a lwayMagUt.,aBd indefinite but it li safe to say itat no ht»<)er>\^uere wciati; and under 
*fiat circumstances, we «SU always, Jig able \a look hick tbwhatw^s a_most l+a^ipj' substitittiwi for out 
eacKest am.bitiww. jBe^dw. ;Teise jajhes i; IvipelefsK .iiit of stvle and I o' the puOt l^nd'iaii, :h*i been 
tJiyght'to-we^rTiis Ijaij- shoici'ini places mi rc atrLM nn ihi imiMiit iif miii/ itim ih in uii (iie iluisui* 
nfthesralp.'^-'.. ,, 

' ■ ■■■!^^■--..■^-; D. J. G. 



Architectural Seniors 

Alfred Bercmann East Jordan 

Donald Eucene Ames Cameron . Grand Rapids 
I): Clua Bucball 

OUan, A". 1". 



Harold I.. Cohsett . 

ThcU Xi; CIms ■ 
Francis D. Coughlin 

Thfti 



Olran. S. Y. 



/iLLiAM J. Crawford. Jr. flu/a/o. .V. 1'. 

Alphn Tsu Omega: Scnlp And Blaile 

H. Dalziel Davenport . . . Grand Rapidt 

Alpha Tnu Oniega: Clau In.lnor Ba8?bn]] (3) 

Kthan E. Edloff Detroit 

Harold W. Goetz Bay City 

David J. Gothold .... Chicago, III. 



Architectural Seniors 

Geokge B. Hammond Detroit 

Tau Sigma Dplu; Cla« Athletic Met. (4): Class 
Track (.2) 

, Arthur C, Irvin .1//. Merris. III. 

Ueorce J. LiND Dflrnil 

'_ . Alpha Rho Chi: CIhw Sec'y (4> 

'■- \ John Alexander McColl . . Geaarf Rapids 

C'^ Alpha Rbo Clu; Tau Sigma Delia: ARhiwcturnl 

' ,| . tAiloi of Technic (4) : Cbs. Vice-PrMidpnt {4> : Kniii- 

■^\y John D. Preston .... Si. Joitpk 

Warren Lester Rtudce . Grand Rapids 

' '"'}_f Alpha Rho Chi: Gniul Hapida Oub: Choirnuin 

■■■- Louis F. Vorhees Toledu, O. 

■; ■':( Roland S. Westbrook . Savannah. S. Y. 

;; Aiphn Rho Chi 



Statistics of Senior Engineers 

In compiling these statistics, 
In presenting all the dope, 
I 've spent many weaty hours — 
You'll be satisfied — I hope. 

But let us all remember 
That in the lines below 
No offence is offered — 
Ye reap but what ye sow. 

The man who is most popular 
Has white hair and a smile. 
He's known as "Whitey" Headman, 
Altho his looks beguile. 

Alas! We have no women 
In our graduating class, 
But substituting here and there 
The masculine will pass. 

Our most popular young lady, 
From all our classmates' views, 
Unanimously elected, 
Is none other than "Lyn" Hughes. 

Our handsomest man is Fikret 
With hair of raven hue. 
I think we did our level best 
In choosing him — Don't you ? 

But there is one who thinks he is 
Our most handsome man. 
His name you know is Heinrich, 
Our oratory fan. 

But now, alas, the female 
Breaks in upon the scene. 
The prettiest girl is chosen. 
Ted Marble is the queen. 

But when it comes to studies 
With no dissenting vote 
Bob Archer is elected, 
A student of some note. 



169 



The most successful blufTer 
Is an office of repute. 
It was handed to Ned Brucker 
And there was no dispute. 

A man who studies all the time 
Is sometimes called a grind. 
Bill Hindman seemed to be about 
The biggest we could find. 

What man among us now is called 
Our shrewdest politician ? 
Two men are shrewd — we flip a coin- 
Don Smith gets the position. 

The biggest Fusser in our Qass, 
Unanimous election, 
Is Harley Warner, — Don't you think 
It suits him to perfection.^ 

The sportiest guy within our midst 
Who stands first in his line 
Is — But surely you've all seen him — 
His name is "Cholly" Klein. 

But there is one who would dispute 
Our "Cholly 's" seat of fame. 
He thinks he's just as sporty. 
Hick Woodbury is his name. 

The first man to get married — 
Of course, we hate to say; 
But Seeing Hick is now engaged, 
Why, let him name the day! 



170 



ItTHE black FLm 



er^np 0A^/i3, Michigan, july £3, \3is. 






arrt readings near- fftr: ffehipan 
Lhion #.A<» Mu-d»> -aniiihmd i^ 
hhd a tdotd ondhii gkmcr ctma 
ed tofaXr #j rhr uLtilicr ofthr 
laXa. 

Caaf of Cfuractart. 

rfaid ef th* fTeth-rrtf Bithiof- 
avif, Flr3tf<fyrr^. 

/%iid of fhr One-fltee Suit, 

3acsnd Nymph, 
lia^ "tr Ii9 l6rt/$. Third Nj/tnph. 
Th.Pb.t, T.W/f. 

■6m, 




^ i ifu m^^ Xffrt <Srtyr> 



lAjtijvtfmd hy i^nd or by tvay^, 
/icrosi thmmlii raasin^.grsenitihri 

Whaiijvitt IBhis bbnH. 

Domt tfuicHttKn ffiSfHiibin Ifxy 



Bi,gcK f%Y sTnrF 



CirciJafion /larM^er XMi^'ntmh^ 



B/ISTH LIST. 
Bj/rr^. 
ftb hawB Theplsosur^r of 
irnnovnang ffiat thm^atorH bos 
arrlxad. Bam.in/^rt. Burrell's 
pojames inasu^ £»?«, -foi^r 
liirim rmei n^ica. Height m otAbiM 
/Irt ia derig nicaty. 

iv7/corr/y9 c/j^mvrTftj gtant^fory- 
•Jisnss' £ot7fzopafriobr,ss:>:^'fus. 
Soi^-s pft snifta ^ avicido. 
Curfjs' cn}w, iXt/tit iitdfyestlon. 
/wr IttHe rmd nticm, murder: 




fAnf #ff -*T* *Jfy fijf i* trBrrip, 

Held Ism Ihaf mi tfmy stucK 
f^earBtrtLaH^aiimigM.inthfda^ : 



arol/ad aififBi^ ouflff if/fh 
irhich fh»y rrcn-nr rhs ca-raer 
time from /frfin^ton ai llfUl 
and BP.f1 ly'hw'cxr^difKns grt 
fbmrablr bais ball reports an 



PeiCE 5 tTFNTa 




tapoyforont ball. 

OnTitrSday tfvfdxi 
**sffM/ynm. S/mS Tb^ar^Any 
and phoTorrtarjol basr n/nning 
of Phtf. 0rodia f^eafuf^d. 

The nmr snetnngm ffrefYy 
Leagvm The Boobs dafsat^d 
fjys dnti by the high scant 
of the smjien^SHO Jbn^t 
f-arr aut a^ p^^p^^ orrd a 3 Dix 
n/aa a/eje^ ifitv^ irr^pass/bie 
tonfaanf a/I hits and runs. 



FOOT Bi^LL. 

zydone, afort of 
dynorr^rHj and o Ootids i^tt 

St. irsTTuetday. I^Vien fbedust 
a^nimd war JUM- £2 filtt>y,p}l7tirg 
Inditriduala. ^^orTTe ofpaas hdi 



^ 




^THE BLACK FLYl^ 



VOL nr Nom campqavis. nicmGAn , aug. >■*, 191s. peice 5 cents 

TTta .=Ja3a l9/^Cit^£>^1aers of tfta iMiv^raily t^/Tiehigan 

bid yoi/all o haarty treJcent* rt> auroarr^. ft^ftopm ffia^ jmh' 

trt/l math jioira^atf t3f fwme fftiim hrrm 4rnd -^a/ jtmra^lfang 

you fe am» mtmry phasa of our camp /iiS»^ our 

\tmfn9f9f9. tf*^rf our Aporfv. Eifmryf^trfr^ tn^^mp 

OUR S/X - COUJSSf DINA/Ee 

SOUP /»«r 








INOOOR SPOera: re »agJ*cr 
OiittTufft norH fo9/^f 
bvga' strimming-Tha g 
b» p/ayrd liy ana mof 
jtranait or/iM g/ota. T*Mpep»n^a. Hot 



toMktgt Oi/r grwrfinff* and 

bmtf mnahma ffo mith yav ea 

•r prerM eto«a and »w» or* 




'Ooc'L^ach might b* r 
brft carivanlst in ctimp 
if fiar from bmn^ the b**f»nt 



DOC'S stoee: 

TNE 0\G AUTOMATIC STOBE 
DTftWrtlTE FWEC. ew«ythlng 



r sMVJ jM cAr^ .~ 



.aorr£ ^ SMVJ 
f'ngar, Triortgi/ii 
litm , rtainmll aa 
/1'3ainf rollcal/. Spring boon^ 

itaryCemmt- " Thorm ia hardly > 
t*fff ^affrood uridarf^^fiamcK camp /wfyo iartdfmtvf^hia 
fi rainv dav, Ooc'sffy dopa. 



hoad,Sobw^uba antcapt^d, iyaHw 

hdrsonitiaiiairrifiTTMaa arwTira 

*hin^ tha* ticH/m th* girta 

■rhap^ fhaf /a i^hy^pinabaa 

ai/cA a-favarita fJaca niaaK 

ioos thm lad a 

to p/aaaa athmra. 




(^Wj THC WORLDS SRErtTESr NEW3PflPER<— -v;^['"^"''*^'""~| 

^THE BLACK FLY^SJ 



vot^ NO. c/v^p PAvis. 





The Law School 

Henby Moore Bates, Ph.B., LL.B., Dean 

THIS sthool was provided for in the Organic Act in March, 1859. It was opened on October S, 
and included three professorships, which were later styled Marshall, Kent and Jav chairs 
James V, Campbell, Charles Walker and Thomas M, Cool ey were elected to hll these chairs, 
with Professor Campbell acting as dean. The Arse class was graduated in 1860. 'I he original home of 
the school was the old chapel, and not until October, 1863, did it have a home of its oun The building 
was reconstructed and greatly enlarged in 1893, Again in 1898 it was practically demolished and re- 
built as it now stands. A fourth professorship was established in 1886, and named for the Honorable 
Richard Fletcher, of Boston. This chair was first filled by Ashley Palmer. The fifth chair was the Tappan 
professorship established in 1879, first filled by Alpheus Felch. In 1871 Professor Cooley be- 
came dean of the department. The original course consisted of two terms, each six months long, last- 
ing from October through March. The instruction was entirely by lectures, and at the completion of 
the course the degree of LL.B, was given. In 1877 an entrance examination in English was required. 
In 18S4 the terms were lengthened to nine months each, and in 1895 a third year was required for the 
completion of the course. The Practice Court as it now stands was established In the year 1892-1893. 
In 1912 the entrance requirements were increased to include at least one year of college work and an 
optional fourth year was added to the law course. Beginning with the academic year of 1915-1916, the 
:s were increased to include at least two years of college work. 



EDSON R. SUNDERLAND 

Gratitude akin to obligation demands an enpression of our appreciation of the benefits 
and asiistance which we have received from one with whom it has been out privilege to be 
aisodated during the past three years. 

Realizing as we do [hat only an implicit obedience to every call of duty, and an un- 
wavering exemplification in his daily life of the highest and noblest qualities and the most 
manly principles have given to him a leader's position as a student, teacher, and writer, 
we prize the mote highly the many courtesies extended to us by him. 

Wanned by his friendliness and good fellowship, we, the members of the Senior Law 
Class of 1916, take this opportunity of expressing our high esteem for Edson R, Sunderland. 



1916 Law Class Officers 



LeROV SfANLAK 

M. E. Pitkin 
r. H, Westlak 
P. F. THOMPsor 
K. R. Kehulsoi 
C C. Rowan 

R. O. BROWNhl 
D. V. STJVtK , 

A. R, Shebk , 
<i. S. Krarv . 



President 
Vire-PresiJem 

Treasurer 

Basketball Manaeei 
Kootball Mana(!et 
Biseball Manager 
Track ManaKer 
Oratorical Delet-ate 



SWAINSDN 


Talcott 


Brucker 


Hartesveldt 


Sutter 


Bell 



A- R. Johnson 
H. M. Reid 

A. J. MlCKELSON 

P. F. Thompson 

Banqsul 
James Nichols 
Lyle M. Clift 
Thomas McNamara 

E. W. FlNKLE 

M Lau, Smohr 

Walter E. Morris 

D. F. Stiver 

MvRON McLaren 
ExtcMivt 

C. B. Zewadski 

W. W. Paislev 

Chester J. Morse 
IVaihintlon-i Birlkd 

Renville Wheat 

Ht'GH Allerton 

C. B. Marks 

W. M. Brucker 
L. W, Miller 
W, M. Skillman 



1916 Law Committees 

.iudiling 
Harbv D.Parker G 

Carl Folks 
1,. H. DUNTES 

D. M. Welling 

F. G. Millard 
H. D. Brown 



Union Dinner 

C. A. SwAINSON 

Clyde Rowan 
P. H. Stevens 
C. P. Waples 



Cane 
Eugene McCall 
G. D. Barnes 
F. M. McHale 



Paul Eceb 
R. E. Ric 

Piomtnade 
Lash Thomas 
L. D. Meticer 
Herbert Potter 

Class Memoriai 
R. O. Brownell 
J. F. Tallmam 

W. J. PlERSON 

Maurice Weinberg 

Senior Sinf 
P. C. HarteSveldt 
M. R. FiTTS 
K. M. Stevens 

Receplian 
Harry SutteI 
L. M. Bruch 

W. W. ScKROEDER 

Dave Kennedy 

Class Day 
Harry Bell 
Ray Mills 
W. J. Goodwin 
J. A. Blackwood 



It is the Truth that Helps 



TRUTH is stranger than fiction, so we will tell the truth. 
The Fall of 1913 saw a motley gathering of A. B. men, erstwhile junior and soph lits as- 
sembled at the call of a figurehead from the Student Council to officially launch the 1916 law 
class. The bottle of wine which usually accompanies a launching was notably absent, but all the other 
features were in evidence. After a stormy session marked by the efforts of pseudo-orators and chestnut 
politidans, Roscoe Spencer, present addtess unknown, was selected as the first captain. 

Our maiden cruise was more or less uneventful, the faculty mid-year ambush furnishing most of 
the excitement. Walter Morris stepped into the calcium, though, when he annexed the oratory title 
in the State Peace contest. Also the relay team won the department championship, due more to leg 
work in getting to the gym to accept forfeits than to that displayed on the track. 

Our second start saw Harry Bell at the helm. This was a very turbulent voyage. The football 
team was runner-up in the race for the campus championship, but forced to finish in that position through 
the amateur work of the referee in the final contest. Proverbial sob! Although handicapped by the 
doughy* I. Lash Thomas as leader, the baseball team won the campus championship. An observant 
member discovered a host of campus celebrities in the class who had not as yet acquired a pin, so he or- 
ganized a campus honor society which still flourishes in our midst. It is notable also that during this 
year the class produced a great crop of office seekers and all-round candidates for campus offices. 

We weighed anchor for the final voyage with Leroy Scanlan in the pilot-house. Despite the super- 
human efforts of McCall, McNamara & Company and the loyal support of Adna Johnson's Senior Law 
Band et al, the class eleven was again forced to take the second position in campus football at the hands 
of the combined mouth-carpenters. 

The committee stole all of Ross Granger's honors when they superintended the "Crease" dance. 
The annual sheet was a masterpiece of journalistic ability, the editors thereby acquiring more enemies 
than the umpire. As we go to' press the basketball team is making strenuous efforts to keep out of the 
cellar in the campus league and from present indications bids fair to accomplish its purpose, but will 
have plenty of company. 

As we reflect on past triumphs we find that the class roll is replete with the names of a veritable 
galaxy of campus stars. The stalwart Frank McHale won undying fame by holding the entire Crimson 
line at arms length throughout the whole of one sunny October afternoon, and F. G. Millard held down 
a like position on the Varsity during the past season. It has been said that George Labadie, baseball 
captain, can judge within a few inches at what spot a baseball sent into the air in New York would land 
in California. "Tommy" McNamara has acquired the title of the human 42 centimeter through his 
performances on the mound. 

On the publications we have F. F. McKinney as Managing Editor of The Michigan Daily and 
*'Jack" Leonard as Business Manager; Louis Bruch is Editor of the Michiganensian, and Paul Eger is 
Business Manager of the book of Who's Who and Where. 

Wilbur Brucker, Harry Parker, K. M. Stevens, W. J. Goodwin, and R. S. Munter have won fame 
for Michigan on the debating teams; and A. R. Johnson, Ray Mills, T.H. Tapping, and F.G. Millard are 
officials of the Athletic Associations. 

Old man Pan with his pipe had nothing on Leroy Scanlan, our eccentric ivory artist, for the whole 
campus has swayed to his syncopated melodies. 

Having finally dropped anchor, we prepare to embark singly, each in his own little boat. It is with 
regret that we leave the staunch old ship but each one of us has hopes that our new craft prove as safe 
and trustworthy. 

* doughty. — Aurtorc Anonvnio — 



IXl 



(\ 



Law Seniors 



Habby S. Adler Kama, City, Mo. 

Diiie Club 
Glen Aldrcch .... Schenectady, S. Y. 

lambda Chi Alphn 
Hugh G. Allerton inn Arbor 

Phi Alpha DpIis 

Harry Allan Babcock . . South Dayton. X. Y. 
Gainniu Eta Cuminn 

Arthur J. Bancroft Detroit 

GsoRGE A. Barnes .... irelh. Minn. 

Harry L. Bell .... I'anieburg, Ky. 

Delta TlwtB Phi: Wocduck: Lnw Itrvicw; Airhona; 
Biu. Mdit. Mk^Kin Handbook (II 13) (4): .Adv. 
Mncr. Athletic Proc. (;j) W: CbiH Prcsitlent {3) 

James Arnold Blackwood . Detroit 

Phi DctiH Theia: Phi Delia Phi 

ViRgii, I., Hlanoinc .... Moline. III. 

Alphn Tau Omega 



Law Seniors 



Fran 


K J. Brewbaker . . 


JItamonI, III. 


How 
Phi 

ball 


KD Donald Brown 

Alpha Delia: Barristen; Wo 


. . .mancf,0. .,- ■ 
«bucl<: Cbw Fool- 


Robe 

Gan 


RT 0. BHOWNtLL 
ma Eta Gamma; Wooback 
n: Chairman Memorinl Com 


. . U'eslfifld. Pa. (, : 

Law lleview; Bat- " .' ' 


Louis M. Bruch .... 

Beta Thetn Pi; Phi Delia Phi; M 
Trewrarcr J-Hop(3); A»'t (Ipnc 
Opera (3): Managing Editor Mieh 


. . IVilmelU, lU. ':_ 
il Chalrmkn. Union , '- 


WiLB 


ER M. Bruckeb Sagii<a«, 

m Delia Kappa; Delta SiRnin ithu; Pmidenl. ,; ■ 
naw Club (4); Chsirmtin CItuH Picluro Com. 


R 


BERT BUTLEH . . . 


. . .Ann Arbor 



Sigma Delta Kappa 
Benj. F. Caffey, Jr. . Sail Lahr City, Utah 

Alpha Tau Omega 
MitRL C. Carlton .... Early, la. 

Sigma Delta Kapps; Phi Alpha Tau 
Harrv Cahstahphen . Nne London, Mo. 

Phi Delta Phi 



Law Seniors 

Gaylokd H. CHrzuM iu„ Jrbor 

l.VIK M. Clift BnyCily 

Alpha Tail OmeKa 

Gko. S. CooPEk John,iou-n, Pi. 

Gamma Km Gamma 
I.. I>, Cooper, Jr. ... IIoi Sprin^j, .hk. 

(;i.KN 1.. COWINI; Jolif,, III. 

Norman F. Crawford .... Dciroit 

Delta ThctB Phi 

Orlo R. Deahl Coihtn, Ind. 

Phi Oamma Delta 
J. I.. DoNNRLLv S/dolia, Mo. 

Phi Al|iha Dflu 
Glover ¥.. Dowell . , . UH/lla. Mo. 



-i .'■„. 



:4!i^ 



Law Seniors 



Louie H. Duni 



. Hunurtoam, Inil. 



i>-n; Commerce Club; Phi Alpha Thu 

Paul G. Ecer Bay Cily 

aigm^ DelU KsppH; BuaiiHn Mgr. "The OfficUl 
Sludonta' Directory"; CbuwTrviMunr (l):Clan Foot- 
ball (I) (2); Wrbnlfr Cup Team (I) {2}; PinidBQl 
Crnftsmijii (3) 

Win 



M E. ESSERV . . . 




. Jan J'hor 


R. FERfiuaoN . , . 

Cb» Bulu»l>.ll Mr 


T«! 


n Falls, Idaho 
. .inn Arbor 


uRicE R. Fms . . 


Ka 


nsas City, Mo. 


L Folks .... 




C d 


MJHma l>riui Ksp 






ALD S. FraRV . . 


Hnrr 


It falls. Mont. 


B. GiLLIOM . . . 




Berne. Ind. 



Law Seniors 



A. H. Goldman 


. . . . Cleveland, 0. 


Wm. J. Goodwin _,. 


r«^;,^;ii, k:- 


Phi Kapm t^gma; Delta Sicma Rho; Prenilent Diiie 
Club (4): Treasurer Kentucky Club <4); Clug Football 
(3): Union Opera Cast (3); Vareity DoUtin*Teani (4): 
Treaaurer Oratorical A«»ocialion (41 


DURWARD GrINSTEAD 


LouisvilU, Ky. 


Earl Newell Hackne' 


i . . Kansas Cily, Mo. 


P. A. Hartesveldt . 
Track Manager (5); Chai 
111 (2) (3) (4) (5) (6); Vic 


.... Grand Rapids 
rmau Senior Sing: Glee Club 
re-President (fl> 


EarlW. Hartt . 


. . Bloominglon, Neb. 


JesseJ.Herr . 


. . . ChatsTBOrlh, III. 


Stanley John Hiet 


T . . . . Toledo, 0. 



Phi Alpha Del ta ; G lee Club 
Edward W. Hoffman 



Law Seniors 

D. S. HoRwicH Chicago, III, 

Walter S. HuTCHFSON ScoU,0. 

Adna R. Johnson horuon, O. 

Kspps Stcma: Bmnisten: Arcbons: Board ot ContTDl 
AtMeU« (4) : Bdknl or Cantrol Sludent PubUcntiong (4 J 

William M. Johnston . . . ralparaiso, Ind. 
Uoivenitv Band; Syiuphon]' Qrchmtrs 

Zach Justice Catleitiburg, Ky. 

David Francis Kennedy . Youngstaten, 0. 
Pbi Delia Phi 

Geo. V. I,ABADIE Caniy, Kan. 

Druids; Barriilcni: Vanltr BbscWLL (2) (3) (4), 

W. E. Lamoreaux .... BaUlf Creek 

DelU Chi 

Henry Donald Lawrence . . Bouldrr, Colo. 

Pbi Alpha Delta 



Law Seniors 

John S. Leonard .... Gowa^-da, .V. )'. 

Aaron Levinson Birmingham 

John F. Lineman . . . .VortA Troy, ,V. Y. 
KnppB SigniK 

Chas. B. Mauks Detroit 

Tbetn Xi^ Woolurk^ Hiflr Tmm 121 
Kdward S. Martjn , , . . Cartkagi, III. 

Phi Alplin Dplm 
Eugene R. McCali, , , . lyintenn, fa. 

Phi Ikclta Phi 
Frank M. McHale . Logansporl, InJ. 

Francis F. McKinney . IVaskingion. D. C. 

Phi Knppa Pai 
MvBON McLaren Ybb .Mor 



Law Seniors 



Thos. R. McNamara .... Ml. Plrajant 
Alpha Dclln I'hi 

J. Leland Mechkm BauU Creth 

.SigmB Chi (Alpha Pi) 

John C. Mklaniphy ChUago. III. , 

Drlta ThptA Phi 

Leon Daniel Metzcer .... Idamar, Pa. 

Kipiu Phi Epsilon: Phi Delta Phi 

Albert J. Mickelson Calumet 

F. GuRNEE Millard .... Ann Arbor 
Delta Hiets Phi: MichigBmua: GriSru; Archons; 
Vuvly Foo(b*ll (4) : Wolvetine Bus. Mir. <l J ; Board 
of Dircoton, Athletic Ass'n <3): InlenchoUstle 
Mugt. (3); Board in Coptrol at Athletics (4) 

Ray Jackson Mclls . . . Anamosa, Iowa 

Delia Chi 
Walter S. Moore Allegan 

Walter E. Morris . Geliysburg, Pa. 

Sigma Delta *Kbppb; Delta Siinia Rho: Atchou; 
Prendent Keynoat Club Ui; Clan Vioe-Pna. <3>: 
Varnly Peace Orator (I) ; Frendenl Crattimrn 13^ 



'V^:: 



I \ 



Law Seniors 

Ahttcub a. MORROW , . . fftst Altxandir, Pa. 

Sixnw Delta Kappiii MichiEHD I^" Review 
Chester J. Morse ]aspir 

Phi Dolls Phi; BurrisUni; Clan Bukelbftll Mogr. (3); 

CUn Football (3) (4) : Clua Buebill (3) 

William C. Mullendore Howard, Kan. 

Phi Alpha Delta; Alpha Sicma Phi: Griffiu; Michi- 
(■mua; Wooluc^k; Law Review; Baninen; Dniida: 

Pre.. Univ. Y. M. C. A. (3) 
Chester L. Muller Spokatu, Waih. 

Richard S. Munter .... Spokane, Wash. 
WiKODflin-MicliiflBD Debater (4) 
Russell H. Neilson IVtii Braiuk 

Alpha Siima Phi; Phi Delta Phi: Wooliack: Law 
Review 

Charles S. Neithercut Clare 

SicDU Delta Kappa 

William A. NEnnERCtrr .... Clare 

James K. Nichols ....... Ionia 



Law Seniors 



John Ruthebford Nicholson . Philadelphia, Pa. 
Siainik Cbi; Pbi Delta Phi; Wooluek 

Ror Alan Nord Brookinii, S. D. 

Pbi Siemk Kappa; Phi Alpha Delta 
EhiNALD W. Ogilbee Maniiou, Colo. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Colorado Club 

W. W. Paisley Dubuqut, la: 

Phi Kappa Pai: All-Fresh Foolball 1911: Claai Foot- 
lwll(4) 

Harry D. Parker .... Kanhakte, III. 

Walker Peddicord . . . Portland, Ore. 

WiLLia B. Perkins, Jr. . . . Grand Rapids 

Phi Delu Phi 

Earl L. Phillips Marletu 

Kappa Delia Sisuia 
WiLLts T. PiERSoN , . .\lilwaukee. If is. 



Law Seniors 

M. E. Pitkin RoBmna, 0. 

Herbert J. Potter Ijhpeming 

Harry Rabinowitz .... EvtUth, Minn. 

Zeta B«l«Tau 

HoLLACE M. Reid .... Orijiany, Va. 

Phi Delta Phi; WoolsBeki Lan Rsview 

Robert Earl Richardson UUy 

Kappa Delta Sigmai MichiEsn Law Review 

Benjamin Robinson Detroit 

Jeflenonian: Menarah Society 

P. H. Rogers Atlanta, lU. 

B. F. Rosenthal Ann Arbor 

Biima Delta Kappa 
Clyde C. Rowan . . . Buffalo, Kan. 
Phi Delta Phi; Barriiw™; Claw Football Mgr. (1). 
(4); Clan Baaeball, Football, Baslietball and Traeli 



Law Seniors 



Henry C. RuMMEL .... U Poru. ft,//. ■■•'"'''',■' \ 

Phi Alpha DelM; MankB^ Clriffina; Druide: Preoidfnl < - .. .t - N 

StudcDt Council (4); .Michion Daily; L'nivpnity 

(fe'inphoni' Orchtrtra ■■''!': , 

H. E. Rush Lincoln, K^k " ' , ''.- / 

LeRoy Joseph Scanlan Johnstoam, Pa. > ." ' .■ ' \ > ' 

Sigma NuiGriffina: Bkirialcn: ArchotiB; Mimei; CIbh " ' '- ' . _ .' i 

Pr«id™t (4); GleeClub (3) H); foion Opera (2>{3j -'„■■■ j '! • ./ 

F. J. SCHHOEDER EuSlls, .\fi>. '■;,',■. ' ■' r ' .■ ■'■ 

Werner W. ScHROEDER - - Kankakee, HI. '■,"-'■'■ ' '''-' 
Fhi Alpha Delta; Criffim; WDoLaick; Ijiv RevieK: 
BaTTiaun: Law Virje-Pmident Michigan Uoioa '.': - . . > 



John F. Scott. , , , Si. Cloud, Minn. 

Phi Alpha Delia; ToaBtRiBsters; BuTieten; Pmi- 
deol MinneootsClubO): Anociate ikUtor Mlchi- 
nnewiian <4); Chairman Social Cainm>tt«e <4); 
C1a» Orataricul DebgaU 13): Class Foolball (2) 
(3)<4): ClaH BaKballCS) 

Malcolm M. Scott .... Piushurg, Pa. 

Phi Delta Thela 

R. H. ScHAPKORST . . Brookings, S. Dak. 

Phi Sigma Knppa 

Ralph G. Sheloen /inn Jrbor 



Law Seniors 

Arthur R. Sherr Gra«d Rapidi 

W. McECay Skillman Oxford 

James Beryl Speer, A.B. . . . Montgomery 

Lawrence M. Sprague Ann Arbor 

Gamma Eta Gamma: Phi Beta Kappa: Woalaack; 

Kenneth M. Stevens Detroit 

Pbi Gamma D«Lca: DvltaSiaToaRho; Webster Society. 
Pnaideat |4): AU Freeb Track Team: Varaity DebaM 
Team 

Perry H. Stevens .... Ratmna, 0. 
SigmaAlpliaEpnlaii: Phi Alpha Delta: Barriaten: 
C&w BuKball (2) (3). Football (3). Hockey (2) (3) 

DoNAiD F. Stiver .... Goshtn, Ind. 
Phi Gamma Delta 

Harry B. Sutter .... Indiana, Pa. 

C. A. SWAINSON Ckeynni, U'yo. 

Sigma Delta Chi^ BarriBten: Miehigan Daily (3> 
{4>: Aaaociate Editor MicbicBDeiuiHn. 



Law Seniors 

Waraen E. Talcott . Linngitan, Mo-nt. 

aunma Eta Gamma 

James Francis Tallman BiUaire, 0. 

G. Richard Tandler Ann Arbor 

T. Hawley Tapping Pioria, HI. 

Acui>: Signia Dell* Chi; Griffing; Toaetmutcn: 
CraCumen; Owla: Arcbou: Tnuurcr Athlelie Anoci- 
■liim (3); Miohlcan Duly <l) (3); SporU Editw (3): 
Boanl in Control Student Publicatioiu (4): Board in 
Control AlbktiCB (4> : SporU Editor MicbiiBD AlumnuB 
(3) (4): Athklica E^tor 1916 Michi«BDension; Pub- 
Jjdty Muiafer- Athletic AHwdation (4) 
Murphy O. Tate .... Somerset, Ky. 
Fhi Alpha Delta: Treasurer Ontorical Anodalion ID ; 
Dizis Club Vice-PnnldenI (3>; PresideDt Kentucky 
Club (4): Vioe-Prendent Oratorical AHOciation <3) 

OacAR B. Thiel Pigeon 

Lash Thomas Coniianiine 

Pbi Alpha Delu: Barri>>t«rB: Clan Daaeball Maoa- 

Sr (3): Chug Baseball and Football (I) (3) (4): 
lainnan Promenade Committee (4) 

Paul F. Thompson Bay City 

Pd tipulon 
Donald A. Wallace . ... Detroit 




Law Seniors 

H. J. Waples Ironwood 

Gwtiins EtB GHionu; MiohiiHO Lbw Revjev 
Maurice Weinberger . . Kanja; Cily, Mo. 
Woolauk: Michicsn Law Review 

Leonard M. Weiss Buy Cily 

David M. Welling Pitoiiry 

Thomas Hall Westlake Clevtland, 0. 

WoolsBck: Michipm Lav Review; Ctus SeereUry 
(4); Webalcr Society 

Renville Wheat ^nn Jrbor 

Walter F. Whitman , . . CranJ Rapid/ 



19 16 



Law Seniors 

p. C. Wilson Clart 

C. Stanley Wood , . . Khmaih Falls, On. 

Emerson C. Woolk Alliance, 0. 

Si(DiB Alpha Epiiloa 
BuRRELL Wright . . . Frttport, III. 

P.i Upniioo; Pbi Dslta Phi 

Flovd L. Young LaPorte, Ind. 

Pbi Alpha Delu; Monlu; Ariihoni; Croas-Couatry 
Team, Pra. Cro«-Country Club 

Paul W. Zerwekh Alton, III. 

Alpha aiima Phi; lUiDinii Club 

Clarence B. Zewadski . . . Ocda, FU. 



Recent Important Decisions 



(Ye humble Ed. acknowledges his mental indebtedness to the invaluable aid furnished by such 
admirable works as Paisley on Domestic Relations, Nichols on Bills and Notes (vest pocket edition) 
and McCall on The First and Last Clear Chance.) 

ADVERSE POSSESSION*** TACKING SUCCESSFUL POSITIONS— Plaintiff, one EUGENE 
R. McCALL, contested the defendant's right to the office of "Most Popular Man" as the defendant, 
Herbert J. Potter had openly and publicly conceded himself to be. The question was raised whether 
or not this defendant could tack his prior holdings of Queen of the May held in June, 1907, and High 
School Orator, as popular positions to establish a title in himself by public subscription. H. BLAIR 
SUTTER, L. DOWNEY CXX)PER, I. LASH THOMAS and others with catchy names interpleaded as 
Co-Defendants but were stricken out as surplusage. Held, the defendant can use the reverse English 
and draw unto his present claim any former titles he has acquired, thereby cinching his right to afore- 
said office. McCALL et al v. POTTER, 1 Breeze 1492. 

This case is novel in that it reads like fiction. It is, however, in accord with the defendant's view. 
Bumpkin, J., pulled a good one in stating that after the prior honors had been admitted in evidence for 
and by the defendant, the jury could easily have been swayed to the belief that popularity was truly 
in Potter's Field. There is a conflict of authority as to whether the other defendants should be merely 
stricken out in a case like this or hanged. The court's rulings that as to the plaintiff "nil capiat", and 
as to these excess defendants " Pooh Pooh ", were well rendered. 

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW— ELEVEN HOUR LAW— CLASS LEGISLATION. A statute, 
Bate's Code 666,999, provided that eleven hours of work must be successfully completed by a Senior 
Law during the second semester to entitle him to a degree. Plaintiff, L. M. SPRAGUE, suing for a class, 
seeks to restrain the enforcement of this statute on the ground of class legislation, denial of due process, 
abuse of police power and other Constitutional phrases. HELD, That Plaintiff being elected by his class 
as their biggest grind, he cannot maintain this suit in the capacity in which he appears before the court, 
as a "grind" is not in any sense representative of that class. That as the Eleven Hour Rule is only a 
question of degree, the statute can not be held unconstitutional. 

SPRAGUE V. Law School, 1 Cram. 23. 

This case is important in that it introduces a new element for future class-room definitions of police 
power. Here, where the statute was enacted by men who wore no stars or helmets nor carried dubs, 
the court expressly stated that there "wan't no abuse of perlice powahs kez they wan't no perlice." 
Hereafter, we must look behind the statute. The holding of the principal case as to the " real party in 
interest " was controlled by the case of DUNTEN v. Everybody, 2 Pol. 13, where Plaintiff was denied the 
right to establish his claim as the shrewdest politician. Here the Court being called upon to decide a 
political question said they couldn't treat politicians civilly, so refused jurisdiction. To the same effect 
sec FITTS v. FRARY, 6 Femme, 10 P. M., in which the court refused to decide which party was the 
biggest fusser, applying the maxim: "He who comes into Equity must come cleanshaven." 

SALES— FAILURE OF TITLE— Defendant, W. LESLIE MILLER, transferred his title of 
"Handsomest Man" to Plaintiff, FRANK M. McHALE, for a valuable consideration, to-wit; one pack 
of Nebos, with implied warranty of the same (i.e., the title — not the Nebos). At this time there was 
an outstanding title to this honor in one O. THIEL which was paramount to Defendant's, who had mis- 
takenly thought that he was entitled to the office. Defendant's title being quieted and having utterly 
failed — Opinion of the Justices, 24 En Masse 25, plaintiff brought suit on the warranty. HELD, he can 
recover. McHALE v. MILLER, 14 B. V. D. 92. 

It all depends upon the condition a party is in to recover. In one state he can have hopes; in another, 
he must have more upon which to successfully press his suit. The weight of authority is with the prin- 
cipal case, its rule being followed by 3 states and one professor while only 42 states and the House of 
Lords are contra. The court could well have followed the lead of GRINSTEAD v. Al. Comers, 5 Beaut. 
15, in which Plaintiff was refused legal recognition of the title of" Most Popular Girl", though the court 
conceded Plaintiff's claim O. K. There His Honor disgustedly said he was not supervising any Beauty 
Contest and adjourned court for the day. So in the case we are considering, the court would have been 
justified in dismissing court for a week. 



199 



WATERS— WHAT CONSTITUTES A REAL COURSE— Plaintiff's lot was one of four parcels 
abutting on a waterway. The lot of the Plaintiff was known as Property 4. Plaintiff tried to enjoin 
the Defendants from using the waterway as a means of passage. HELD, The waterway where it touched 
Plaintiff's realty, being incident to the ownership of the lot, should be considered a real course and be 
designated Property 4 also. And even though not a way of necessity yet as it was easy of travel by the 
Defendants, it was to be considered in law as a snap course, and therefore subject to the crowds. 

Rood V. Senior Laws, 1 Pipe 22. 

The cases are not uniform on this point, but dressy. This court seems to base its decision on the 
"40-pages-tomorrow" rule, which is too lengthy to discuss here. However as the court held that a snap 
course is one easy of passage and further that Property 4 could be so considered, we expect a storm of 
disapproval from those western benches which have never overruled the dicta in Matthew Manning's 
case. Surely, they cannot follow the reasoning in the principal case. Neither can we. 

BOOK REVIEWS 

WHY IS A SENIOR, by Adna R. Johnson, first edition, in one volume; Neithercut Bros., 1916, 
pp. X, 192. 

The fact that the work before me is in its first edition speaks very eloquently for the originality of 
purpose, ingenuity of thought and undaunted nerve possessed by the author, who is well known for his 
admirable treatise entitled, "Once a Mortgage Always a Mortgage." 

About half of the book is given up to a consideration of nothing in particular, and from this preface 
the author laboriously gathers his many threads together and presents the Senior as he has found him. 
He shows him at his rooming-quarters and here draws an appealing pen picture of his endeavors to draw 
money from home. His remarkable discovery of the Senior at his studies leads the author to dwell at 
some length on the oddities and peculiarities of his subject. A shiny, new idea is presented at this point 
by the learned writer when he insists that, contrary to all venerable superstition and pedagogical belief, 
the Senior is at heart, human. In closing, the query as presented by the title of this book is unanswered, 
as was expected by all those reading the finis first. 

It will be generally admitted that Blackstone's Commentaries was the most extraordinary perform- 
ance in the history of legal writing. Suffice it to say, that Mr. Johnson's notable work makes Black- 
stone's effort a one-ring affair in comparison, and places Coke under the wide-spreading palm away from 
the sun. This book will be a welcome addition to any library as the binding is very fetchy. 

THE LAW AND I, by Maxwell I. Pitkin, Some Story Professor of Law in the Tooloose Uni- 
versity. Translated by Thomas R. McNamara, Ball Professor of Law at Diamond College: Brown, 
Brownell & Company, 1916, pp. Iviii, 605. 

After a ver>' interesting opening toast, this volume proceeds to bring out into the calcium those 
experiences of the author which had previously been calcimined. To present chronologically the epoch- 
making stages of the author's travels in the Law seems to be the purpose of this work. The scope dis- 
played is remarkable and a keen insight into the various institutions during three periods is vividly 
portrayed. The Law is personified as an individual with whom the venerable author is ever at outs. 
But as page 464 is reached, a lukewarm friendship springs up between them, which, as the story nears its 
close, ripens into a pseudo-companionship, so to speak. 

The author humorously relates a big game hunt he enjoyed while trailing the springing and shifting 
uses, and also of his search for a perpetuity. He here asserts that while on one of his forays (not 4 A's), 
he destroyed a so-called indestructible future estate. If such was the case, (and we hope it was), another 
enemy of the Law was vanquished. 

The chapters presenting his own brand of philosophy introduce an element heretofore unknown to 
legal philosophists. To one who appreciates trite prose and has naught else to do, it is easy to read and 
worth reading. 

J. F. S. 



200 



w 



■» ■ ■■» ''Vi - 



"1 ' 



^\l 



:.^ 



' 1 



&- 







Medical School 

Victor Clarence Vaughan, M,D,. Ph.D., LL.D., Dean 

The School of Medicine ant) Surgery was brought into existence by the organization of a faculty 
by the University on May 15, 1850. The School formally opened the following October with Abram 
Sager as president. The course consisted of lectures which extended over a period of six months, from 
the first of October (o the last of March, Laboratory instruction was furnished from the beginning, 
and this was one of the first medical schools to supply practical work in inorganic and physiological chem- 
istry. The need of extension in laboraEOry instruction became apparent early and in 1872 the laboratory 
of Histology was prucured. This was followed by one for Physiology in 1834, Hygiene in 1SS8, and 
Clinical Medicine in 1891. Laboratory instruction has always been thorough. In the same year the 
University Hospital was opened, accommodatinR about eighty patients. In 1880 the course was lengthened 
to three years, and in 1890 to four years. About the yeai 1890 a six-yeai course leading to the degrees 
of A.B. and M.D. w-asoAered. This combined course has proven so satisfactory that it has been adopted 
by most universities in Enghsh speaking countries. A valuable addition to the hospitals is the Psycho- 
pathic Ward which the Legislature some time ago provided. In this way the medical student is furnished 
with an opportunity for the study of insanity and nervous disorders. The present Medical Building was 
completed in 1903. It is a well designed and complete structure. The hospital now provides more than 
three hundred beds. 



TO ROY BISHOP CANFIELD, A.B., M.D. 

IS gentleman, a profound scholar, a proficient teacher, a man, who by his 
untiring efforts and unselfish zeal has been of untold benefit to the school, has raised the 
department of Oto-LarynKoIoKy from a place of minor significance to one 
and by bis interest in the general welfare of the student body has won a lasting plac 
their hearts, and one whom we honor for what be has accomplished, this section is affect 
aiely dedicated. 



1916 Medical Class Officers 

H. M, I.OWK Pri-5idenr 

A. C. DiMONT Vice-Pn-sidcnc 

H. A. Moore Sccrctarv 

W. M. Dl-uan Treasurer 

F. C. CuHRiER Kasketball Manaf 

H. R. John Track Manager 

S. W. Donaldson Hasrball ManaKtr 



1916 Medical Class Committees 



D. H. Jeffers 
H. Hendeilmn 

F. P. CUBRIER 

C. W. Eberbach 

L. L. YooNcfiurs 



V. H. Hankison 
C. L. Stealv 
K. V. Beardslee 

Cims Dav 
C. W. Eberbach 

H. A. LlCKTIG 

C. A. CHK[STENSE^ 

Picture 

H. L. Smallman 
W. Westrate 
J. J. O-Leary 



L. D. Funk 
H. R. John 

C. W. Eberbach 
W. F. Watton 

D. H. Jeffers 
A. H. Lance 

E. G. GALBKArrK 



1.. K. Meredith 
J. R. McNiTTT 
C. J. Adpison 



W. I. EOAN 
G. J. WiLMORE 
W. M. DUGAN 

Anna G. Dumon 
H. M. Lowe 



W. T. Vauchan 

D. CAMPBELr. 

Effie E. Arnold 

E. V. Beardslee 
H. O. Westervel 
W. M. Ta?pan 

Cap and Gosfn 

J. 0, DlETERlE 
A. H. KOUMJIAN 

M. K. Brownei.i. 



History of the 1916 Medical Class 

THE various classes of all the different departments from the campus were standing in Huston's one 
day just after the commencement exercises in Hill Auditorium. " Speaking of taking an anaesthetic " 
said the Senior Medic, "I hope none of you miss anything like the dream I had. It's better than a 
Cannabis Indica party any day. You see it was this way: I had to have some * cons ' removed, so was sent 
to the University Hospital and directly to the anaesthetic room. Before I had time to realize what was 
happening, an orderly placed me on the table, a stethoscope was put onto my chest by a man in a long 
robe and a cap which came down over his face; while he listened to my heart, he said to those about him, 
*He*s alright, nothing but "Hy" ', and walked out. Then for the first time in my career I found myself 
looking Miss Davis in the eye. She put a strip of rubber and cotton over my forehead, a very bad smell- 
ing cone over my nose and I could hear her saying in a tone that sounded miles away, 'Take a good long 
deep breath now, that's good — ps-u-u-u-gh *. Then as a nurse came in out of the amphitheatre I heard 
one of the students reading a history; he paused, and I heard another voice say, 'A very common case 
in this clinic'; then I took another long deep breath and as the nurse went back into the other room 
she stood holding the door open long enough for me to hear what was going on in there, and between 
the splashing of the water while the surgeons were scrubbing their hands these words reached me, ' Pres- 
ent illness began four years ago, onset acute, and patient says he has suffered continuously ever since". 
Then it all came back to me: 

"We gathered at the Medical building one morning early in the Fall of 1912, to listen to 
the opening exercises and address of our dean to be, already known to us as 'Piggy'- We 
all sat high up in the amphitheatre and gazed over the heads of Seniors, Juniors and Sophomores, at the 
Faculty and others who had gone before us and made a name and reputation for themselves in what was 
to be our chosen profession. After hearing for the first time that ever welcome ' Friends and fellow trav- 
elers', and later, 'So much has been said this morning that I feel unable to say anything', we passed 
out of the building and stood waiting to get one good look at the men we were to face so often in the 
coming years. 

''The next day we again assembled in the East Lecture room and for the first time took a good 'whiff' 
of the odor of the Anatomy lab, — (the ether must have been coming thick and fast just about then). 
That same morning we bought supplies and in the afternoon returned to the building to hear Dr. Huber's 
laboratory lecture about 'skeins', 'polar bodies' 'mitosis' etc., and to draw pictures of cells from an 
onion tip. 

"Soon class activities really started and with the aid of a Student Council representative, a class 
president was elected — Edgar Beardslee being chosen to lead us for the first year — but he soon joined 
the band of Benedicts and by so doing was lost to us outside of the class room. 

"Social activities were now planned and a dance was given at Packard Academy with a very large 
attendance. The next item of interest was the meeting at which the honor system was adopted, to which 
we have adhered very strongly ever since. 

"About this time I felt strong arms take hold of me and push me back upon the table, and a whispered 
voice said ' He's in the excitement stage now'. Then I felt a strong desire to get up, push aside doctors, 
students, nurses, orderlies or anyone who might chance to be in my way and run as far as I could from 
the place. The reason for this was that I had thought of the first 'spot' and Dr. Streeter had handed 
me a very misshapen piece of someone's anatomy and said, 'Show me where the Vena Cava comes off'. 
Another deep long breath and I settled down resting easier again, and seemed to be soaring up among 
the clouds, floating along carefree and irresponsible, — the first vacation had come. But in a short time 
I was back again to thoughts of Nervous Anatomy, and a little later could hear Dr. Novy saying, 'Where 
is Mo-o-o-n-ey. ' Suddenly a quick flash of something, men and women hurrying hither and thither, 
little black things squirming about, small flames burning everywhere, the rattle of test tubes and above 
all a voice kept repeating, 'Your attention for a moment', and in the lull that followed I recognized the 
Bacteriology lab. 

"Dr. McCotter left us about this time, going to Vanderbilt University to take the chair of Anatomy 
there and in his place Dr. McGarry gave us a short course in art, — at vaudeville speed. 

"Our first real vacation came none too soon and ended just as fast. The Sophomore year was 
ushered in by a Tammany Hall proceeding and George Watt was the leader for that term. 

"Athletics now had their run of enthusiasm, a basketball team, a football team, and, later in the 
spring, a baseball team, each making a showing such that several members of the class appeared on the 
campus wearing caps which bore the numerals 19M16. 

"During my reveries I had been wheeled into the operating room, and as I started to think of Dr. 
Warthin, I felt a deep cut, heard a voice calling, 'haemostats!' 'sponges!' but to me it sounded like 
— 'Next! — Next! — NEXT!' I next could see Dr. Vaughan dividing his class into the 'Sheep' and 
the 'Goats', and then I seemed to see him again talking to a very large audience; but above all things 
I noticed many men who seemed to be paying no attention at all to what the speaker was saying, for 
they were looking not at him but across the amphitheatre where a great array of many colorswas moving 
and jostling about. And then I remembered this same group of men as they stood outside of the build- 
ing and watched a parade go by, for it was the second semester and the class in Hygiene open to 'Lit' 



206 



"T^e Junior year began with several members absent when the roll was called, and also for the first 
time the class was now divided into sections so that many who had been working together were separated, 
but new partnerships soon sprang up and new friends were found. 

"Another campus honor society, the Galens, came into prominence about this time, inaugurated and 
made up of members from the Medical department, twelve men from the Junior class being Initiated. 
New lockers were placed In the Hospital halls but remained unused because of the exorbitant tax imposed 
by the superintendent for the privile)te of using them. 

"In the social line an All-Medic Smoker was held at the Michigan Union, attended by practically 
every man in the Medical School and most of the Faculty. This function helped to break the monotony 
of the very uncomfortable seats in the amphitheatre or the routine work in the laboratories, and also sat- 
isfy the cravings of the inner man by indulging in doughnuts and the cider which flowed so generously, 
but above all there was the pleasure of smoking free cigarettes to one's heart's content. Kvery one pres- 
ent was put into a joyous frame of mind by the speakers, especially by Bill Funk's recital of ' That Old 
Sweetheart of Mine', and Dr. Lombard's pet story, '1 won't shoot Horace just now, but you just wait'. 

"During the vacation period between the Junior and Senior years three members of the class answered 
'the call of the wild', faced a minister and said, 'I do,' so when school opened In the Kail there were 
more houses for rent, 

•The Senior class now assembled for the last lap against time 
6f strong, being very much strengthened by the addition of Vis, Her 
by (he wayside as instructors. 

"1 now seemed to be resting easy and taking the ether remarkably well, the reason for this being that 
for the first time in the history of the class, a whole year was to pass without written eiamlnaclons. All 
went well, and I felt sure that the new system so adopted will be pronounced a success. At odd intervals, 
we would miss a man for a week or two, but when he returned he would tell us thai he had secured a 
place as Interne in some Hospital in the East, or In some Middle western city. 

"I then forgot everything In detail, and the next I remember was that I heard some one say, 'Wake 
up and take this.' I opened my eyes and reached out my hand and this is what they gave me. 

•"Where are you going to get it framed?' asked the Fresh Lit." 



Medical Seniors 



Corn 


Lius J. Addison . . . 


Grand Hcntn 




Alpha Ksppa Kapps 




Effie 


E[.[sabi;th Arnold, B.S, . , 

Alpbs Epsil™ Iota 


Detroit 


Robe 


T Harper bVker.AB. . . 
Alph. K.ppa Ksppa 


Bay City 


Edcah V. Beardslee, B.S. . . . 


PoKtiac 




Galciui; Cli« Prwidm (1) 




M01.T 


ON E. Brownell, B.S. . Otuanta, N. Y. 




Phi Rho Sigma: SinFoDii 




Lo 


NA Z. BULVEA, A.B.. M.A. . 






. , LowfrU 


indsor, A. B. 


D 


NCAN-CAMPBtLL, B.S. . - , 


Muni,ing 



rrv C. Cowan, B.S. Waila IValU, Ifaih. 
hi Ctai; RDUDd Up: Nortbwntcm Club: Clau 
ootball ISII-iei4 



Medical Seniors 



FkED CLUtRIER, B.S. ... 


... Ydi 


Phi Beta Pi; Alpha Omen Alplu 


M. EC. Deirmenjiah . .- 


Darigui, Armenia 


Mrs. Mary De Kruif, A.B. . 


. . Ann Arbor 


AlphB EpoloD Iol«: Chi Omegs 


John 0. Dieterle. B.S. . . 


. . Ann Arbor 


Phi Beta Pi 




Sam Wright Donaldson. A.B 


Kno^UU, Tinn. 


Pbi Rho Sicnu: GHmna; Owla: ObIbdi: Aninsnt Bun- 


WiLLiAH M. Dugan. Ph.B. 


FiMill, N. Y. 


Nu Slgms Nu: Knpp 


8i«nia: Galena , 


Anna Gertrude Dumont, A.B. . 


. ffM Coxsackie, N. Y. 


Chi Onwg.: Alphn Ep«lm 
Alpha: Clan Secretary (1): Vi 


Mj^^hB Omiga 


WiLLFAM R. Eaton . . 


Muiino, Ore. 



Carl W. Ebkrbach, A.B, . . Ann Arbor 
Nu Sicma Nu; Alpha Omeia Alpha 



Medical Seniors 

William J. Ecan, B.S. , . . Hurley, Wis. 
Phi Rho Sigma; Alpha OmcKA Alpha; Mftdical Vice- 
Presdeot Michifau Union (4) 

L. D, KuNK, A.B Jthfni 

Sifma Nu; Phi Chi; Cralumsn 
E. G. Galbbaith, B.S. . BrootsviUt, Ky. 

Phi Rho Siams; Alpha Omesa Alpha: Oaleni 
JuLii^s Stanley Shourds Gardner, B.S. 

Harbor Spring! 

William Henry Gordon, B.S. . Finilay, O. 

Phi Chi 
Harrv Clark Hackhan . Hoboken, Pa. 
PhiBeUPi 

Fred H. Harrison, A.B. Dtiroit 

Nu 3i(ma Nu; Oalena 

Harold Henderson, B.S. . . Detrait 

Phi B«U Pi: Alpha Omeca Alpha; Galena: Totem; 
Student Council 

John A. Herring, A.B. Gtorgeiouin, Ky. 

Nu Sicma Nu: Kappa Alpha 



.:^ 



Medical Seniors 

Dean Jeffers WausaiL, Wis. 

Alpba Kappk Ksppit 
Herbert R. John, B.S. . Ann Arbor 

Herbert F. Kenny, A.B. . IhUvih. Minn. 

Nu SicDW Nu; Alpha OmefB Alpha 

LvLE B. KiNCERY, B, S Buchanan 

Nu SUma Nu; Alpha Onwsa Alpha 
Aredis H. Koumjian . Dorchester, Mass. 

Anthony Lange, B.S. Ditroit 

Phi BfiUPi 

Lorenzo Brown Lapsley, A.B. 

. . . Portland, Ore. 

Alpha Phi Alpha; Vanity Track '13, 'M, '15 

Henry Allen Lichtcc, B.S. Ml. CUmms 

Margery J. Lord, B.S, . MoiUrtat, N. C. 

Alpba EpnloD lotai Claaa Sesretaiy (3) 



Medical Seniors 



HOLTON H. UWE, A,B. - 


. . Nomali, 0. 


Cl«g Pr«ideDI 


t(41 


Lyle D. McMillan . . 


. . Indian Kivir 


John R. McNutt . . . 


Niw BlMekrm. Pa. 


L. K. Meredith . . . 


Dti Moirus, la. 


Round Up; ' 


Galena 


Harold Miller, B.S. . 


. . . Lan,in 


PU Rha Sigma: Sinfooi 


a; Rouid Up 


Edmund CMoHR. B.S. 


. . . Bay City 


Pbi Rho SiEmn; f 


iinfonia 


C. A. MOONEV , . . . 


Curllsviltt, Pa. 


Helen A. Moore, A.B. 


. . Carlkage. Hi. 


Alpha EpsiLon 


10141 


John J. O'Leahy, B.S. . 


. . .Vusiegon 



Medical Seniors 

Roland Winfield Riggs BrookvUU, Pa. 

J. Bradford Seelev, B.S. Detroit 

nu Cbi: Round Up; Gklens: Clua FootballO) : Buket- 

t»U(3) 

Harold W. Shittter, B.S. GranJ Rapids 

Alpha Kappa Kappa 

Howard L. Shallman, B.S. Ellicattvillt, N. )'. 

Phi Chi 
Robert J. Snider, Jr., B.S. . Wheeling. W. I'a. 
Phi Chi 
Karl S. Staats . . . Tacama. Wash. 

Clair L. Stealy Charlotte 

Alpha Kappa Kappa 

Louis D. Stern, A.B Kalamtaoo 

W. M. Tappan, A.B. - . If kite Plain, Ga. 

Phi Chi 



i V 



Medical Seniors 

Charles Roberts Thomas, A.B. 

.... WeitmiMir, Md. 
Pbi K»pp> Fall Phi Beu> Pi 

Warren T. Vauohan, A.B. . Ann Arbor 

BbU Tbcu Pi: Phi Rho Sicnwi Alphft OmrtM A1|A* 

William R. Vis, B.S. 7jeland 

Louis E. Walsh St. Ignect 

Phi Chi; Round Up 

Damon O. Walthall, B.S. . . . Paoln, Kan. 

Nu acniB Nu: Vsniity Btnd (1) (2) 



V' 



) 



!0 






Medical Seniors 

Holly 

IerbertO. Westervelt, B.S, . . Ann Arbor 
WiLLCAM Westrate, A.B. . . . Holland 

CU»9 Fooiball (2) 
Glen J. Wjlmorb, B.S. . . I'an Wert, O. 

phi Chi: Round Vp; G»lens 
L. L. YouNGQUiST, B.S. . . Marquetti 



1916 Medic Statistics 

THE last election of the Senior Medical class was held at a most opportune time, being before, 
during, and after a "Blue Book" by Dr.. Parker. Dr. R. Bishop Canfield was chosen as the pro- 
fessor to whom the medical section of the book should be dedicated, winning this honor from 
Dr. Hewlett and Dr. Novy by a very narrow margin. 

The presence of one word alone, and that .word was "think", fairly stumped the entire class when 
it came to selecting the most beneficial course, for each and every one seemed to have a choice, but after 
the ballots had been carefully counted, "Internal Medicine" had the most followers. In casting the 
ballot for the next question on the election blank, humor, satire and seriousness all took a part, humor 
finally winning by voting Pathology as the biggest snap course. Roentgenology coming next, and those 
not quite understanding fully the meaning of what was meant by "snap" voted Hygiene third. For 
the most enjoyable course, — not meaning hour, — Genito-Urinary quiz took first in a walkaway, though 
Psychiatry gained somewhat on the home stretch, with Hygiene getting an occasional and straggling 
vote from some of the members who seemed to have ideas of grandeur and thought it was enjoyable 
that some members (?) had to be across the amphitheatre. 

The most popular man was a neck and neck race between "Hap" Galbraith and "Harold" Hen- 
derson, while Lowe showed that another married man also had a lot of friends. The decision finally 
rested between the first two mentioned, and by saying, "It can't be done", the vote was called a tie. 

The vote for the most popular girl brought out a candidate who carried ofF"severial" honors, being 
voted the most popular girl by a very large majority, running an exceptionally good race for the best 
student, winning the title of the jolliest girl by all but three votes, the prettiest girl by as great a number 
of admirers, and lastly the first girl to get married by all but one vote, due to the fact that some one is 
keeping a secret and voted for herself. This person who was chosen so many times for so many places 
is Miss Anna Dumont, who started out being "one of the boys" and has stayed with us ever since. 

For the handsomest man " Doc" Youngquist came to the front with a rush and stayed there through- 
out the race, while the two "Bills" — Funk and Gordon — ^were fighting it out for first under the wire 
in the "Thinks he is" class. 

While it is a known fact that many cast a vote for themselves or exchanged with a friend for the 
best student, one man was honest and said "There ain't no such animal". Vaughan, Henderson, Ebei^ 
bach and Miss Dumont finished in the order named. 

"The most successful bluffer" — ^Addison won his place four years ago in Physiology and took a 
lead which neither Currier nor Dieterle could overcome, though "Diet" did show real strength on two 
occasions. 

The biggest grind was a repetition of the best student ballot, each and every one hoping to be able 
to show the "Old Folks at Home", — but, alas, alack and woe, that can be done by only one, "Tony" 
Lange, while Kingery can say he was second. 

For the shrewdest politician only a few Tammany Hall followers started and the same number 
finished, they being "Bach" Eberbach, "Sam" Donaldson and "President" Lowe. 

The keenest competition of the day occurred when the race for the biggest fusser started, but many 
who would have been glad to be so designated, and glad to get the honor, did not receive a single vote. 
Some of the men elected "have a reason", others have not, but that matters little and the best man won 
as usual. Result — Christenson, first; Staatz, second; Galbraith, third; while Dugan and Meredith finished 
with the "also ran" group. 

It seems to be the opinion of two of the members of the class "that if you are — then think you are", 
and that is the reason both Thomas and "Hank" Lichtig had an equal number of votes for "the sportiest 
guy" and "thinks he is" — "Tommy" being first in both with Lichtig a close second, but running a better 
race for "I think I am". 

Many of the unattached whom no one dreamed would ever become a benedict had it wished upon 
them to be the first man married, while some one voted "accidents will happen". If votes count for 
anything at all and one is supposed to abide by public opinion Miller, Staatz and Funk will have heard, 
"Do you take this woman for your lawfully wedded wife?" long before they hear, "By the virtue of 
the power of the Board of Regents" — so if this be true then the question of who is the first girl to get 
married is settled at once. 

S. W. D. 



216 



College of Dental Surgery 

Nelville Soule HofT. D.D.S., Dean 

The tirsc a^ication for the creation of this department came in 186^, and in 1875 rhe Legislature 
appropriated S3000 per year, for a term of two years, with which to establish a school of dentistry at 
Ann Arbor, and in May of that year the Regents took steps to provide for the department. Two pro- 
fessorshlpswerecreatedand first filled by Jonathan Taft and J.A.Watling. The department had itsearly 
existence under the general supervision of the Medical Department. The course consisted of two years' 
work, the terms being only six months long, Ociober to March, but in the fall of 1884 the terms were 
lengthened to nine months. In 1S99 the course was hnally made to consist of three years of nine months 
each. The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery has always been given. The first accommodations were 
in the west ward of the old Homeopathic hospital building, then in the building now occupied by the 
Department of Civil Engineering, and in 1891, at the completion of the new University Hospital, the 
Dental Department moved to the old University Hospital building. At this time the Dental Society 
of the University of Michigan was organized, and assumed charge of the publishing of the Dental Journal, 
which ceased publication in 1900. The new Dental building was erected in 1908 and is one of the best 
equipped and most complete dental buildings in the world, especially in its Technical Laboratories and 
Operating Rooms. The Taft Library is located In the Dental building and contains almost every book 
on dentistry, and practically complete files of every Dental journal published. The Dental museum is 
also located in the building, and the odontological collection is especially strong — probably the largest 
and best of its kind to he found in any Dental college. It contains the collections of the late Professor 
Ford and Dr. William Mitchell of London. England. The museum has been named the Ford-Mitchell 
Museum. Beginning with the session of 1917-1918 the course of study will be extended to a four year 
course. .\r\ optional four year course will be offered beginning October, 1916. 



TO LOUIS PHILLIPS HALL 



Who gains our confidence by his kinilly ways ant) pleasing personality, and oi 
•or his high slandard of professional ethics as well as his professional knowledge, v 
Dtntal class of 19ICi, dedicate this section of the Michiganensian. 



Senior Dents 



Pres. . 
Vice-Pres. - 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

Athletic Mgr. 

Social 
R. M. Kellogg 
F. J. Kane 
J. E. Robertson 
L. J. Deger 

W. A. Davids 
H. M. Leckner 
H. W. Weisel 
W. B. Klinesteci 

.Vnnounr^nwnl 

J. R. Hawn 

1. Cote 



b. I. Cc 
R. 1. Ml 
J. L. La 



.Xtrmorial 
C. H. Matson 
L. M. Globenskv 

A. L. SoUTER 

W. G. Rich 



W. Kendall Meai: 
C. D. Cole 

A. H. LOWTHER 

C. M. Rice 

J. H, Barringer 



H. H. Jackso; 
A. J. Bolt 
C. P. Haas 
M. E. McKe» 



C. W. Woods 
R. E. Motley 
L. P. Fisher 

I,. H. BouutJiN 

Cap and Got, 
G. E. Chichesti 

A. H. Hadlev 

B. I. Moss 
F. N. Leicht 



B. L. Graje* 

R. D. CUMMI 

G. E, Madis< 
E. A. Rosa 



The 1916 Dental Class History 

4 

FOREWORD 

While the word history is used in two senses, meaning the record of events or the events themselves, 
and while all things in the universe are continually changing, thus making history, yet in its most com- 
monly accepted meaning history deals with the more important events and their effects. Thus it is 
quite impossible for the author to make mention of those few gentlemen who have made a special re- 
quest that their names appear on these pages. 



In October, 1913, there gathered at the Dental building one hundred fourteen earnest pop-eyed 
freshmen. While they admired the haughty seniors whom they saw about the campus, yet were they 
filled with awe at their great learning, and many, gazing at these upper classmen, had serious misgivings 
^hen they thought of all the difficulties that must be overcome before they might attain that honorable 
and envied rank. 

After receiving the customary admonitions from various members of the faculty, (said admonitions 
were considered as personal at that time, but since it has been learned that they are expounded to all 
freshmen classes) these freshmen proceeded to elect Mr. Peters to the presidency. The first year was 
spent to good advantage with the usual clouds that darken the sky at times for most first year men ap- 
pearing on their horizon. But on close investigation they found that most of these clouds had a silver 
lining; and proper application to their work, on the part of those standing in the shadow, soon cleared 
them away. 

In our Junior and Senior years our numbers for various reasons were somewhat reduced, but as a 
whole the class stood up well under the enforcement of the rules which the faculty carefully followed 
out. The second year, Mr. Moran, and the last year, Mr. Mead, were chosen to guide us thru the diffi- 
culties which confronted us; and these men, as well as Mr. Peters the first year, proved that the con- 
fidence of the class was not misplaced. 

We have supplied our quota of men to the various musical organizations, including the Glee Gub, 
the Mandolin Gub, the U of M Band, etc. 

In athletics, while we have not producted any of the great men, yet we have among our numbers 
some of the near great, as evidenced by the fact that individuals are occasionally seen in our midst wear- 
ing a large " R" on their manly chests. But in class athletics we have made a very creditable showing, 
so that there are many who wear their numerals, thus proving that they prize honor among their own 
people more highly than supple fingers, even in this, their chosen profession. 

In a way the class as a whole has always been somewhat handicapped owing to the fact that the 
class role bears no names of any of the gentler sex. Some of the men, anticipating the lack of refining 
influence in the classroom brought wives with them; and others, after being in school for a greater or 
less period of time, came to realize acutely that to be deprived longer of their association might, and 
probably would, wreck their lives, and proceeded to take unto themselves helpmates. The balance of 
the class are resolutely endeavoring to complete their course alone but the interest of many seems to 
be somewhat divided. 

During the summer intervening between the first and second years, £1 Said, a man who had come 
from Cairo, Egypt, to this dental School in order that he might fit himself to practice dentistry among 
his own people, fell ill and died. It was a privilege to know a man who maintained the greatest optimism 
altho continually confronted by a multitude of difficulties to which the rest of us were strangers, and 
the fact that he could not live to complete the task which he had journeyed so far to undertake and see 
the fulfillment of his ambitions, is lamented by all his associates. 

The last year is now nearing a close and the majority of us are looking forward with pleasure to the 
latter part of June when we hope to have the privilege of following the band down the diagonal walk, 
around the campus, then to the Hill auditorium where we receive our diplomas which will allow us to 
undertake the task of demonstrating to various state examining boards that we are qualified to practice 
dental surgery in our chosen communities. 

This pleasure is, however, tinctured with regret when we realize that we shall shortly be deprived 
of the counsel and assistance of the men who have labored so earnestly with us during the past three years. 
1 refer to all the members of the faculty with whom we have been associated and whose influence and 
kindly interest will have such a distinct bearing on the remainder of our lives. But while most of us can 
enjoy the close association with these men no longer, yet by following their teachings in the main, and 
emulating their excellent examples we shall continue to benefit and likewise prove to them that their 
efforts to send out men who will do a real service for their fellowmen have not been in vain. 



221 



Dental Seniors 

John H. Barrincek , , , Huntington, IF. Fa. 

FA OmriK; Clua Athletic MtDMer (4) 

Arthur J. Bolt Grand Haven 

Lester H. Bouquin .... Freionia, N. Y. 
Pn Onwcn: CIh BcMbaJl aod Buksthdl 

George C. Bowles, Jr Detroit 

P. L. Brockman Romeo 

S. C. Broohfield MiUbrook 

L. D. BtiTANT .... Sasqiukanna, Pa. 

G. E. Chichester . . Grrai Falli, Moni. 

Pd Onwc*: Owla; CUm BHebaU 
Charles D. Cole .... Maple Rapid) 
Clua Vioe-Pmident (4) 



Dental Seniors 

Dona John Cote .... /ron Mountain 
George H. Crusius Paulding, 0. 

Delta Sisnu DelU 

RoscoE D. Cummins HUhdaU 

DelU Sicma DelU: Round Up 

W. A. Davids Detroit 

Leon J. Deger Dayton, 0. 

Xi Pai Phi; CUm Vioe-PraaidBiit (I) 

Jacob de Liefde Grand Rapids 

MiohicBD Sooosr Team 

Will E. Dennis Oxford 

Ferdinand G. Draty .... A/iui/gon 

Acasiii; Pn OnH«a 

Henry Doig Dunlo? . . . 

. TharjetnMJo, Burma, South India 



Dental Seniors 

Leonard P. Fisher Ann Arbor 

Xi Pa Phi: Clus Buketbitll. Muscei (3) 

James A. Gaffnev .... RocktsUr, N. Y. 

DelU SicniB Delia 

Leo M. Globenskv Hillsdale 

D«lts SUma DelU 
Jacob Goldenburo . . Milwaukee, Wis. 

B. L, Grajewski Pittiburg, Pa. 

W. J. Grimes Ailania,Ga. 

Alpha Phi Alphs 
Clifford Haas . Siouir Fails, S. Dak. 

Psi Omttt. 
A. H. Hadley Ihlly 

J. Ray Hawn Bvialo. N. Y. 

Scalp and Blade; CUw Bwebsll (t) (2); CIsb 
Baaketball (1) (2) <3) 



Dental Seniors 

Howard Hamilton Jackson . ,rfnn Arbor 

Phi Delu Chi ; Cntlamcn : Clui Seorsuiy (3) ; Chiur- 

LvMAN L. Jones H'yandoue 

Pn Onwca 

Frank J. Kank Ihinkirk, S. Y. 

Akhenslon Society; Xi Pa Phi: UnioD Vioe-PnsideDt, 
CombiDKi Scfaoola ud CoUecu: CIm Tnuunr (21 ; 
Cl» Bwlietbidl (1) (2): CUh Buebull (1) (2) 

Richard M. Kelloog . . , , Baidr Creik 
a Pb Phi; Social CommitUn- ChuTnun (t> 

E. H. IClLCHERMAN Nortkport 

William B. Klinesteker .... Dorr 
PnOnH«B;GU«CLub(2)<3) (4)1 Presidenl Dentil 
School Y. M. C. A. 

M. Prodomus Kvpriamides Amasiia, Turkey 

J. Leslie Lambert '. Springjield, III. 

XiPaiPhi 
C. L. Lane Albion 



Dental Seniors 

Harold M. I.echner . . . Dunkirk. X. V. 

Frank N. Leicht .... Rothnitr, ,V, Y. 
I'ai UroEis: Chuu Baseball (1); Clou BulmlmU (1) 

Oliver Otto Lecnincer . . If'aujfon, 0. 

Theu Xi^ ChAirman SoubI CominiltFe <2>; Qhs 
Buebsll III (2); Baiiketbnll (Ih CiW nnd Mnndolin 
Club (11) (4); Uirrrtor Fmhman Miuicul Club (4) 

Alfred H. Lowther Dtttoit 

SixniB Nu BI Albion CuIIvk: CIsh »«rettu>- W 
R. A. Macdonald .... Albany, S. Y. 
(J, t. Maihson - . . . Ihrkimrr. S. Y. 

Charles H. Matson Flint 

IX-ICm SiHiiiB Dolln 
Anorew J. McClellan .... Dflroit 

Delu .Sigma Dclu: ItDuud t'|> 
I'hancis J. McDonald Saginaa: 

Dpita Kivnin D^ltn 



Dental Seniors 

Matthew E. McKenna . . . Canon City 

Pai QmcHH 

W. Kendall Meade Orleans 

Xi P»i Pl.i: CIbm Pmidcnt (41 
Orlanu Alfred Miller .... Detroit 

Harrv Moofobb Flint 

F.rcnaus Club 

Rot ¥.. Mohan Pinckney 

■>>[ Umeca; CIoh President <»: CLui BuwbiaL (I) (21 

B. j. Moss Maple Rapids 

Vii Wmcgn 

Robert Emmeit Motley . , . Jnn Arbor 

Mwical Club. (3) H) 
Raymond J. Mullen .... Irotaeood 

Pii Onieift: CIhm BBScbaJI MunagHr (I) 
Harrv Osborn Charlotte 



Dental Seniors 

F«ED C. I'eters Bay City 

R. W. PRUST . /lobar,. Tasmania, .iuslralia 
Clifton M. Rice inUiannon 

W. Grovir Rich Gaylord 

Caputin Clua Buebntl (1); Clnn Buk«tb*U (4): Vht- 
•ity Bnnil (1) (3) (4) 

C Harold Richardson Oa^ono 

y K. Robertson . . Btoomfonuit,, S. Africa 

Socirer FootlnU Tniii 

William Robertson Bloomfonltin, S. Africa 

Prcauli-nl CMmopolitnn Cluh; iiknitl«[n Club; Six- 
James Kane Robinson .... Muikefon 
Xi [>u Phi; ftvuiDr DeauL Scviety; t'oiim Foot- 
hsllSinokiTCnmmitlFe '14; Claw Baakclbsll <3I 



Dental Seniors 



Waj-he Roli.ette 


Frankfort 


Ralph S, Seouar 


. . . liopkinton. S. y. 


A. V. W. Serfon 


E[N . . Boshoj. South Africa 


WiLLARD BaRTLK 


Sheldon Filer, Idaho 


Leonard Siev 


. . . AW York, .V. r. 


Menorah Sorifiy 
01» Club (3) (4) 


IinrrcoUcwuc Scpci»li« Sodsty; 


Anthony Fre 


SoMMKR .... Detroit 


Df U« iSigma Di-lla 


A. 1.. SOLTER 


SMby 


Waiter L. Sp 


encer .... Grand Rapids 
Xi P,.i I'hi 


Archibald W 


Sqiikks Chid 




Dental Seniors 

Leiohton G. Steele .... Butler, Pa. 
Delta Sums Delta; Round Up 

F. W. Stolpe Marquttu 

F. P. SUCNET Midland 

Lynn H. Tincav Albion 

B. Vexler .... KmYork.S.Y. 
Herbert W. Weisel . . Fairbury, Neb. 
XiPnPhi 



19 i'o 



Dental Seniors 

Robert J. Wells Buchanan 

Herbert Roy Wclson . . Springfifid, Man. 

AcHcia: Psi Oraefs: Student Council 

Harry T. Wood Duroii 

Ddu SiKma Dcltn 
Carleton W. Woods An« Arbor 

CU» HutoriBn 

Clarence J. Wrioht Canapolii 

Delia SiKmn Delta; Clam Baseball 
Frank A. Zastrow Lapter 



Personalities of the 1916 Dental Seniors 

From force of habit, the faculty all agree that the 1916 Class is the best ever. In the numerous 
faculty meetings held at the close of the first semester, this did not seem to hold true. 

History and Kthics rank head and shoulders above the rest as the most beneficial course, while Oper- 
ative Principles was considered the biggest snap. In fact quite a few of the fellows were ashamed to 
take credit for the course. Orthodontia was by far the most enjoyable course. Dr. Watson's "abom- 
inable" and "heroic" phrases kept the fellows in good humor. 

Jim de Liefde was chosen to be the most popular man with "Lep" Siev a close second. 

Only having two girls in the class it was not very hard to decide the most popular one. Miss Miller 
winning by a large majority. 

We have many handsome men but "Joe" Applegate's "rosy cheeks," ever present good natured 
smile, and the Hypertrophy on his upper lip, gave him first place. Harry Wood considered himself in 
the "handsome class"; at least, that is the impression made upon the class. 

Alice Motley was considered the prettiest girl; possibly her ever willingness to bandage up and nurs 
all ailments of the class gave her the deciding vote. 

The best student falls to the lot of "Hadley", his perfect recitations always inspiring us to do 
better in the future. 

When it comes to the "All .American Bluffer", " Doc" Woods fills the bill heroically. " Doc" Riek- 
ert his alternate. 

"Jack" Campbell was unanimously chosen as the biggest grind. 

"Dick" Meade proved himself to be the shrewdest politician by guiding us through the year with 
perfect harmony. 

Our jolliest girl, "Hib" Hibler, has been somewhat downhearted lately; cheer up "Hib", it may 
not be all true. 

Our class was mostly made up of fussers, but "Leinie" Leininger gets the belt. 

Grimes, our sportiest guy, was second to none on the campus, even if Lowiher thought that he oc- 
cupied that place. 

"Kyp" Kyprionedes has been acting very strangely lately, pricing furniture, etc.; he seems to have 
lost all interest on clinic work. "Kyp" must be planning on entering the field of matrimony. Good 
luck, old bov! 



232 





i§i- 





College of Pharmacy 

:, Ph.C Ph.D., Dean 



The CoHtEc of Pharmacy was organiied in I8(i8 as part of the department of Literature, Science 
and the Arts. The first degree was conferred in 1869, In 1876-7 the college wai rcoiganiied as a separate 
department of the Universiij-. From the first the college combined laboratory mcihoiis of instruction 
with class work whenever practicable. In 1897 the Degree of B.^. in pharmac)' was first conferred. The 
requirements for entrance and the number of hours required for graduation for the B.S. degree have 
always been the same as for other similar collegiate degrees given by this University. Beginning with the 
fall of 1913, the College of Pharmacy offered three degrees, requiring two years for the degree of Ph.G., 
three years for Ph.C, and four years for B.S. The entrance requirements for these degrees are gradua- 
tion from an approved high school or its equivalent as found on examination hy the university eiamin- 
ing CI 



Since the completion of the new Chemistry and Pharmacy Building in 1910 the department has 
had the advantages of fine commodious quarters, with as complete working equipment as could be de- 
sired. There is an abundance of apparatus for regular work and class illustration, a fine prescription 
room with all modern eiguipment. also a splendid hbrary, including recent publications and periodicals 
of chemistry and pharma'cv. 



TO ALVISO BURDETT STEVENS 

Who has devoted his life lo ihc advancemeni of Professional Pharmacy and Pharma- 
ceutical Education, and who for more chan rwenty-live years has been a faithful guide and 
an inspiration to the students of Pharmacy, this section is affectionately dedicated. A 
man of the highest ideals, who, by his steadfastness of character and gentle spirit, has won 
the love and esteem of all who have been priviktied to knou' him. 



Senior Pharmics 



RoBT. (i. Brown IVesideni 

Andrew K. Roeukl Vice-President 

Cecii. R. McMillen Secretarv 

MAtmcE 1,. RvsHMORt 'Ireasurer 

Ckas. Costa Atlileiic Mar. 

Hdoar Olson Sciidtrn Counci 

Wm. D. Cochran Class Historian 

finan^r Commillee Judiling 

Chas. Costa Wm, D. Cochran 

Root, F. Smith Hobart K. Shaw 

J. Dillon 



Ray E. SHOBTW.N 
Andrew K. Roguei. 



Mavbick I.. Ri.' 
EncAR Olson 



History of 1916 Pharmacy Class 

DURING the last week of September 1912, the Pharmacy class of *16 arrived in the metropolis 
of Washtenaw County, hot in the pursuit of knowledge. After a hard fight they escaped with 
most of their baggage from a group of auto bandits employed by the Ann Arbor Taxicab Co., 
and turned their steps toward Houston Hall, Their ardor had cooled somewhat, when they arrived at 
the top of State Street Hill; however, remembering that beyond the Alps lay Italy, they strode onwards. 

Out of the motley mass of pill rollers came Bill Seibert w^ho ruled supreme during *12 and '13. Much 
credit is due Bill in changing the U. S. P. requirements so that several of our "Preps" were accepted. 
We had the splendid advice of Acting Dean Stevens, and Dr. Hubbard, who won fame by his signal de- 
feat of A. E. Roedel in a controversy over the merits of Oscar Oldberg. About the middle of the month 
of November we were initiated into the mysteries of the Prescott Club, which investment was as profit- 
able as the money put into the Y. M. C. A. was a very poor investment. Near the end of May a trip 
to Parke Davis and Co.'s plant in Detroit was enjoyed by the entire class. 

Class activities started our sophomore year by the election of Dick Arner as class president. Dean 
Stevens and Dr. Hubbard were still with us. The Prescott Club made another feeble attempt for recog- 
nition and existed through the year. During this year the members of the class, according to the length 
of their pockets and the height of their ambitions split into the two, three, and four year classes. The 
class was entertained this year by Frederick Stearns and Co., of Detroit. 

The fall of 1914 found Ed. Olson in charge of a very small but select crowd of pill and powder ex- 
perts. In fact the class was so small that we had five officers and one private. Dr. Schlotterbeck re- 
turned after a two years' absence to resume the duties of Dean of the Dep*t. He has piloted us through 
several of our courses, and though several of the passages were a little rough he has proven himself a 
very good captain, and has th.e respect of every Pharmic in the college. This year Dr. Hubbard left 
us to take charge of the Bureau of Organic Chemistry of the Dep't of Agriculture at Washington, D. C. 
A ver\' feeble attempt was made to revive the Prescott Club but without much success. The class was 
well represented on V^arsity Athletic teams. 

With R. G. Brown at the helm we caught our wind for the last lap. We were joined by several men 
enrolled in the two and three year courses and together assumed the responsibilities of Seniors. Prob- 
ably the most noteworthy event of this year was the revival of the Prescott Club, which at the present 
time is in operation with all its old time glory. In our four years of college life we have seen the College 
of Pharmacy double in numbers. The standard has been much improved and the requirements for ad- 
mission raised. The College has been very prominent in athletics. For the last two years a Pharmacy 
student has been chosen Captain of the football team. We see many things in store for the College of 
Pharmacy and regret that the best four years of our life have so soon come to a close. 

R. B. C. 



237 



Phariiiical Seniors 



Jo 


rs 


\, Ankenbh 


vNin 


.Jr. 




Tolfdo. 0. 


Sa 


Ml 


El. ASKKSOHN 








Bay Cily 


R. 


c 


Ukown - 








P.g™,, 


Ja 


,E 


W, Cahev 


Tnu 


kM. 


nwwrdl 


ocust. .\. y. 


W 




AM 1>. a>CH 
Kuppo Slgni. 


Van, 


lyF 


lotboll Cupl 


Houghton 




c 


ari.es Cost 
phi IWw rh 


; Cl™ At 


l^tir \Un. 


\on.ay 




!■: 


RL W. ClM^ 

Phi 


Del. 


Chi 


Phocnin 


DriroM 




Jc 


y. Dillon 








nenlon. III. 




Jc 


HN .A. Kerr 








Trimou,uai« 



9 IC 



Pharmical Seniors 

Cecil McMillis .... McCooi: .\>4. 

Pbi Ijunbda I'pwIaD: .Arisloloehilr; Cbw Srrntiuj' l-l) 

H. N. OellkicH . , . , .\arrorsbiirg, \. I". 

Pneotl Club Tirm»<aa; .Aruiolorhiir: Cl»> Miehi- 

-M.llRlCE L. RlSHMOKE . ... Old Mh,ion 

Ray ¥., Shoetton Marcellui 

HoBAKT Shaw Oaosio 

Phi [Vlu Chi; Clan IdiIudt Burlnil Itl 

Robert F. Smith , , , . Su-anron, O. 

HrnnitAfp; Phi tjunbda Upailon; .XriAlolochiif 

V, H. Stimpf E»<iki>. lit. 



Phi Dslu Chi 







Homeopathic Medical School 

WiLBKRT B. HiNSDALK, A.M., M,D,. Dean 

THE Homeopathic Medical School was esiablished under aci of the State Let[isl"iire as one of 
the department; of the University in 1875. It afford; the unexcelled advantaice! of a university 
department. Residence in a community of students pursuing a great diversity of professional 
subjects is itself of much cultural value. It aims to give the student who is prepared to register in its 
classes a thorough training in medicine and surgery and bases its therapeutics upon the idea that the 
homeopathic principle is an adequate and successful ^uide in the selections of medicine. The school 
places emphasis upon the objective or clinical methods of instruction; such methods can be carried 
out only in a properly equipped hospital under entire control of a staff of competent teachers and 
demonstrators. The University Hospital (Homeopathic) is in the immediate vicinity of all university 
activities, beinR just across the street from the original campus, occupying a large space of ground so 
that its exposures to light and free atmosphere cannot be impeded. The hospital is conceded to he one 
of the finest structures of the University, is always the scene of practical work which is carried on pri- 
marily in the interest of instruction, and secondarily that those who are attracted to its service may re- 
ceive the most careful and skillful attention, A feature of this department is a laboratory for patho- 
genetic experimental work. There are two nurses' homes in connection with the hospital training school, 
and some small shacks for the purpose of demonstrating the "open air" methods of treating tuber- 
culosis. It also bas a fully equipped clinical laboratory with a skillful director in charge. There is a 
separate building for the lying-in patients, also a building for the departmental offices. 



DEAN WENTWORTH MYERS. '99 

Professor of OphthalmoloKV. Oiology, Rhirolony, Laryn^oloKy; Dean of Training 
School (or Nurses and President of the Ametican Homeopathic Ophihalmological, 
Otological and l.aryn^oloKicai Society 1914-1915, He is a man hroad of mind and 
big at heart, with a kindly inspiring twinkle of the eye that radiates good cheer and 
warmth lo all with whom he comes in contact; a siirpcon of recogniied ability; an 
instructor loved by his pupils: a man honored by his colleaKiies; a man among men. 



1916 Homeopathic Class Officers 

Daniel M. Ci.abkk . . President 

C. C. Jordan Vire-Presidcnt 

BeSSIK N. Newcomb Sectctarv 

L. R. CUY Treasurer 



Invilalion ComnitUe 



Class Day Memorial 

J. I.-Gatks Miss \i. N. Nkwc 

N. D, Shaw ¥.. S. Thornton 

C. C. JOKDAN 



•1 



IP 



lii ^ 



t;:. 



16 



Homeopathic Seniors 

H. C. Allrn Independence, la. 

Alpha Tnu Omen: Phi Alpha Gammm 

Daniel M. Clarke Scraaton, Pa. 

14 tpailoQ Rho; Kt^noiK CIuIj 

Lloyd R. Clav Jnn Arbor 

AlpfaB Siena: Cla» Tnuiunn' |4| 

Philip E. Havnes .... lloa.eli.Ky. 

Sigma Alpha EpsiioD; Pi I'piiluti Rho: Cl*» Pre*. (2) 
Calvjn C. Jordan . H'eit Monterey, Pa. 



19 



Homeopathic Seniors 



Bessie N. Newcomb . . . . 


Carltton. Mkk. 


Ci«. s™, (4} 




Norman D, Shaw . . . . 


. Ulica. N. Y. 


Phi Alphii G-mmn: CbM Tn 


«urcc (3) 


Don H. Silsby . . . . 


RothilUr, N. Y. 


Camp C, Thomas , , . . 


IVaUrfard, Pa. 


Alpha SismB 




Eugene Shahpe Thornton 


. Uhanon, Ind. 



History of the 1916 Homeops 

THERP^ have been class histories, and there will be class histories; but the luckless historian who 
pens these lines seeks not to draw the eyes of the world from the struggle of the Triple Entente 
and the Teutonic hordes, for even a passing moment. 

The class of 1916 lays no claims to hero medals or to unusual genius. We say unusual, for 
genius is simply doing a thing in a way out of the ordinary and we do recall numerous occasions, when we 
have done things as they have never been done before, and we pray never will be again. But the class 
does claim to be the smallest graduating class on the campus and we are proud of it. "Little things 
make perfection, and perfection is no little thing," says Michael Angelo, hence we have the proper 
impetus that leads to success, for success after all is made up of the little things. 

We entered the school in 1912, at the beginning of the increased requirements for entrance, which 
accounts much for our smallness. Forty percent of the class are men with Bachelor's degrees, while 
the remaining numbers have had at least two years of pre-medic work. 

Our history has not been unusual. We have enjoyed all the pleasures of our courses, and have also 
sufFered all the agonies of a "poor medic." We have heard from one of our "learned" instructors, with 
a split-protein smile, that small doses stimulate, while large ones paralyze. That pleased us much; but, 
"oh cruel suspicion," he proceeded to make it more "particulate" and "specific" and said, "I mean 
mathematically small, not homeopathically. " But to this day we have never been told the distinction. 
Yet we still glorv in the power of the "little things," and in this the class stands as a unit; there are no 
"splits". 

The fortunes of the class in the first year were guided by E. S. Thornton, then by P. E. Haynes 
and C. C. Thomas in the following years, in the order named. 

H. C. Allen has ably looked after our interests in the Student Council, and Miss Bessie N. New- 
comb has the honor of being the only woman enrolled in the department. 

The brightest spot in our otherwise uneventful career has been the "pater familia" spirit of our 
Dean and the faculty. The Dean says we haven't been as bright as he expected us to be and he never 
thought we were going to anyway. But he has ever been a father to us all, and many will be the times 
when twilight shadows lengthen across the lawn that our thoughts will revert to "Papy," and, yes, his 
inseparable friend, old " Peter. " 

We will also miss hearing members of the faculty say: "Sure as preachin' ", " For all the world", 
"The indicated remedy is bound to work", "This isn't any text book, but this is my idea", "I per- 
formed that operation before I ever read of 'India' Smith's technic", and "I want my coffee with my 
'meals, not with my pie". 

There can be no sunrise without a sunset, and our medical sun is now far in the west, and is soon 
to pass beyond the horizon to rise on the morrow even brighter, we hope. And although the old scenes 
pass from view, our memories still remain, and ever will of the time when youth, and you and I were 
in Michigan. K. S. T. 

Senior Homeopathic Statistics 

Records show that in no department does the size of classes depreciate so rapidly as in the medical. 
If the toils of anatomy, histology and bacteriology do not send an embryo medic into a coma from which 
he never awakens, then it can be depended upon that pathology will administer the " knock-out blow." 
The instructor himself says that he can get the entire brain of a soph medic under one small cover glass, 
hence less than 60% of the entering freshmen class ever graduate. 

In our freshman year, the class was composed of eight members. It now has eleven, an increase 
instead of a loss; an enviable record. 

We have thoroughly enjoyed the "versatility" of our professors, in telling us what we were study- 
ing. In our first two years we were told Homeopathy was "moonshine," "hot air," "pseudo-Christian 
Science," and numerous other terms less polite. But the last two years upon the other side, have been 
further enlightened by being informed it was a "grand truth," an "infallible law," a "true science," 
a "god-send," etc. 

Our chief regret has been that we could not fill more seats in the operative pit, and act as stimuli 
to the gentle zepher of our operators. But we thank heaven for Dr. StoufFer's class in " First Aid " which 
has always been welcome on Tuesdays and Fridays to take our place and sit in the draught. 

Every member of the class has shown marked ability in some line. 

Miss Newcomb has been the life of the class; 

Haynes has taken more notes and attended more "movies" than all the class combined; 

Allen has specialized in Materia Medica and the honor system; 

Thomas has been conspicuous by his absence from classes; 

Clark is known for his essay on " Pulsatilla"; while Thornton is the pathology shark without com- 
petition. " Mayo" (lates has had care of all major operation and seen that the hospital was run correctly. 

Silsby and Jordan have been successful in all lines, and their troubles have all been "small ones." 
Shaw is not in their class, but has hopes. "Hank" Clay rests upon his high school laurels, earned in 
early 90's. 

We are all happy and glad that we have lived and thankful we have had the privilege of a university 
education at a school like Michigan. K. S. T. 



24(> 




University of Michigan Training School for Nurses 

KANTfNK I'embekton, R.N.. Siiperircendent of Niirses 

THK Univcrslry of Michigan 'rrainint; School for Nurses, which was established hv the Univer- 
sity in 1NV1, ulTets tu young tt'omen desirous of hecuminK professional nurses a course of practical 
and theoretical instruction exiending over a period of three years. To maintain a high standard 
it has been deemed advisable to receive into the School only those having a diploma from a four-year 
high school recognized by the University or an eijuivalent of siich instruction which in all instances 
is determined by the l.ittrjry Department of the University. 

Uy lecnircs and demonstrations the Hospital Staff and other members of the Medical Faculty 
assist Miss I'emberton. the Superintendent of the 1 raining School, and her corps of eighteen graduate 
assistant nurses in the theuretical and practical training of the pupil nurses. The course of instruction 
has been arranged to meet the reijuiremenis of the Michigan State Board of Registration of Nurses 
and it is expected that each nurse upon graduation »ill take the examinations given by the Hoard and 
become a registered nurse. 

The University Hospital offers unusual advantaiics for the education of nurses. Its sine and scope 
make it unnecesssary fur the student nurse to go elsewhere for any branch of hpspital work, since, in 
addition to a varied experience in the medical, surgical, gynecological and iihstetrical wards, she re- 
ceives systematic instruction in the children's, eve, ear, nose and throat, contagious and psychopathic 
wards. Wide experience is received in the operaiing rooms connected with the varioi 
of the Hospital. 



Senior Nurses 



Monica Tarsnev 
Vera M. Rockwhll . 
Elizabeth B. Heinold 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretarv- Treasurer 



Class History 



SKPTKMHKR 1913 marked the entrance into the I'raining School of twenty-four young and in- 
experienced women. Passing unscathed through the first few horrible days of physical exami- 
nation, of orientation, and of the humbling unwritten rule of seniority, we started our careers 
under the military discipline of our chosen calling. Having learned by the end of three months, amongst 
other things, that an appendectomy was not the only operation performed, and that a request for a 
"stick" in an egg-nog did not mean a drinking tube, we were elected to wear the crowning insignia 
of a nurse. 

Our first year was uneventful. Class work, night duty, and our own ludicrous mistakes were the 
only variations from the routine of w^ard work. Eight were added to our class and several dropped 
out during this period. 

In the course of a year we became intermediates and our kerchiefs established more confidence in 
us by the doctors than our experience warranted or our consciences justified, but we ably assumed 
our responsibilities which varied greatly. Simultaneously we acted head-nurse and proved the truth 
of the old adage that a good nurse never ceases being a probationer. Within a period of five minutes 
we made rounds with a chief and cleansed baby bottles in the kitchen. 

Thus time passed and we have become seniors. Three strenuous years have sifted out those whose 
ideals were not concentrated upon the work and have left our original number. In knowledge of life 
we are -years in advance of ourselves and w^e realize now how serious the responsibilities of our lives 
will be. "Suaviter in modo, et fortiter in re" is our motto and we have striven hard to attain these 
virtues attaching themselves to our profession. Although our course is limited to three years, we feel 
that we have been given a wonderfully broad education through our humanizing relations with people. 
Face to face with actual suffering, with sin, and with the pitiful stories we hear, instead of becoming 
hardened we have become more sympathetic, more tolerant of human frailities and more an.xious to 
relieve any condition within our power. 

We are proud to graduate from the University of Michigan Training School for Nurses and we 
gladly take this opportunity to express our appreciation to our Medical Director and Doctors, our 
Superintendent and her Staff, for the keen interest they have taken in us. 



249 



Senior Nurses 



Grace Angel . . . 






1/ arbor SpriHgi 


Anna Marie Alch . 




. . Sibftiains 


Carrie Beerbowek . 






Siy, Ohio 


Florence K. Blrgette 






Alhtm 


Nancv Frv . . 






Bedford, Ind. 


Elizabeth Heindld 






HarriitiUi 


Edna Hemry . . 






. St. Louis 


Helen Hilton 






Pontiac 



19 ilO 



Senior Nurses 

Mary Karskner ZJuranJ 

Louise KtMFf l«n Arbor 

Florence McNamara Ilmell 

Erma Mullen Lansing 

Lela Reacen EdmoTc 

\'era Rockwell .... Ilarijord, Wis. 

Jos>E Rose Frankforl 

CuRAl, Shaver Cora 



19 



A 



le 



Senior Nurses 

Gkace Smith Frankfort 

Louise Southard .... Harbor Springs 

Mabel Steinman Remus 

Monica Tarsnev Deiro t 

HoNORA VrNK Bovrbon, hid. 

Alice Whitman East Asktabula, Ohio 

Marion H. Yovsg . Bourbon, Ind. 

MarvZeile . . . . Ecu Clmland. Ohio 



1917 Literary Class Officers 



T A. Bassett 
Gladys L. Whelan . 
Yancev R. Altsheler 
Thomas B. Oclethohpe 
HoBART M. Birmingham 
William F. Newton 
Leonard W. Nieter 
Earl E. Pardee 



President 

Vice-President 

Secret! ry 

Treasurer 

Football Manager 

Baseball Manager 

Track Manager 

Indoor Baseball Manager 

Oratorical Delegate 



1917 Engineering Class Officers 

M. W. Patterson President 

K. F. Walker Vice-President 

W. W. Seabury Secretary 

M. G. Robinson Treasurer 

H. A. Taylor Football Manager 

W. C. Gernt Basketball Manager 

J. V. KuiviNEN Track Manager 

E. A. Thomas Baseball Manager 

H. L. Carkoll Student Councilman 

E. A. Baktelmk Social Committee, Chaii 

R. W. Rose Finance Committee, Ch 



LoKKEB Cook 

, Barnard 



1917 Law Class Officers 

Louis F. Dahlinc President 

John E. Sanders Vice-Presideni 

Kenneth Barnard Treasurer 

Thomas E. Atkinson Secretary 

Grant L. Cook Oratorical Delegate 

Maurice F. Dunne Football Manager 

Ferris H. Fitch Tract Manager 

Clarence A. Lokker Basketball Manager 

Paul R. Dunten , . Sergeant-at-Arms 



1917 Medical Class Officers 

Thos. M. Marks President 

Henrietta A. Calhoun Vice-President 

LvHAN A. Ferguson Treasurer 

Marv J. Erickson Secretary 

Jack H. Hamiil Football Manager 

Rudolph H. RuEDEMANN Baseball Manager 

Norris W. Gillette Track Manager 

Jack W. Jones Basketball Manager 

BertilT. Larson Indoor Baseball Manager 



1917 Dental Class Officers 

Orrs I.. Sutherland Prwident 

Ross T. CiRTTV Vice-President 

W, E, HificiNS Secretin 

Waltkk U, Stkkie Ireasurer 

Hakrv B. Wrioht Basketball Manager 

Alan D. HuNiir Hasehall Manatter 



Ro,„.eK 


Attwood 


Trvsell 


Read 


Straus a 


CHErnr 




Young 



1917 Architectural Class Officers 

Krnest H. Trysell I'resideni 

Morton H. Incall Vice-President 

(iF.ORGe L. Cheffy Seererary 

Clarence L. Rothrock Treasurer 

FRFDERick G. Strauss Athletic Manager 

Charles W. Attwood Serge a nt-ai- Arms 

Edwin M. R.ead Chairman Social Commitiec 

Harold N.Yoi NO Chairman Auditing Committee 

GlLBFRT S, I'ndkkwood Chairman Finance Committee 



GOI-LI, 



McAllister 



Wat 



1918 Literary Class Officers 

T. F. McAllister President 

Grace Ravksfohd Vice-President 

Margaret Cooley Secretary 

O. J. Watts Treasurer 

R. M. Cleary Football Manager 

G. R. Matteson Track Manager 

H. S. BoHLrNC Publicity Committee. Chairman 

J. C. L, Barron Social Committee, Chairman 

K. R. Golden Good-Fellowship Com,, Chairman 

T. C. Arndt Arrangements Committee, Chairman 

C. F. Boos Oratorical Delegate 



Margaret Coolev 



1918 Engineering Class Officers 

W, McC. McKek . . . President 

J. B. Brill . . Vice-President 

Dorothy Hall ... ... Secretary 

H. A. Knowlson Treasurer 

S. S. Attwood Football Manager 

Harrison GooDsPFi-D Track Manager 

W. G, Johnston Basketball Manager 

J. S. WicKwrRE Baseball Manager 

F. W. HoccK Social Committee, Chairman 

O. BoNNEV, Jr Finance Committee, Chairman 



Wm. E. Mathews 
L. H. Smith , 
R. A. Hall . 

D. LHUBAH . 

Gerald Haoar 
A. F. Paley . 
Geo. Hurlev 
E.O. Snetren 
J. E. Ryan 



1918 Law Class Officers 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Football Manager 
Basketball Manager 
Track Manager 
Oratorical Delegate 
Baseball Manager 



COMMITTEES 



W. S. Kamherer, Chaii 
W. W. Tfnkiks 
G. W, Williams 
W. C. Allee 
C. A. Kramer 

Financial 
G. M. Coulter, Chairn 
C. L. Strauss 
W. E. Mathews 
L. H. Smith 
R. A. Hall 



Advisory 
W. E. Mathews, Chaii 
L. H, Smitk 
R. A. Hall 
D. 1. Hubar 
G. M. Coulter 
E.M.Johnston 

Attdiling 
L.Gheenebaum. Chaii 

iP. Colden 
. £. Morse 
H. E. Taylor 



H. C, Hart, Chaii 



1918 Medical Class Officers 

T. L. Tolas President 

Amelia T. Wood Vice-President 

Archie H. Watt Secretary 

Joseph R. Dahnall Treasurer 

J. H. Smitk Football Manager 

Paul W. Beaven Basketball Maoaget 

MacNaughton Wilkenson Track Manager 

Archie H. Watt Baseball Manager 



1918 Dental Class Officers 



C. E. Stevens 


President 


F. A. Gorman 


Secretary 


F. R. GoETZ 


Treasurer 


G. M. Peterson . . 


Chairman Social Co 


F. H. TiNSMAN 


. . . . Chairman Sport Co 



1918 Architectural Class Officers 



Pau 


0. Davis - . 


Harold A. Brennan 


Rub 


M. Meller . 


Geo 


c.r. H. Burrows 


I.LOV 


dW. Worden . 


Rum 


LPH KrUCER . 


Mos 


s M. Bhundidg 


Wal 


rERj. Dixon . 


Ralfh Bower . 



Athletic Manager 
Chaitman Social Committee 
Chairman Auditing Committee 



1919 Literary Class Officers 

C.W, Miller President 

Ha'/.el Beckwith , , . Vice-President 

Margaret Atkinson ........ Secretary 

W. F. Creis ' Treasurer 

F. C. Bell Track Manager 

H. K. Smith Baseball Manager 

Harkv StockivR Oraiorical Delegate 



1919 Engineering Class Officers 

Davcd p. Wood President 

R. B. Stevens Virc-Presideni 

H. A. Barton Secretary 

A. D. Lewis Treasurer 

S. J. Thompson Football Manager 

J. Gardner Indoor Baseball Manager 

G. H. W'ATKtNS Basketball Manager 

C. T. Van Dusen Traclt Manager 



H. N. Bkan 
C. W. HoRi. 



SOCUL COMMITTEE 
Richard D. Smith, Cbairman 



L. W. Pac 
M. F, She 



1919 Medical Class Officers 



E. W. Sink 
Elsie L. Bachus 
Theodore L. Sqiiieb 
George S.JoH^^STO^ 
t. h. conkun . 

John McKinney 
Horace W. Porter . 
Robert L. Novi 
Harry F. Becki 
WatiAM E. Hov 



Vice-President 

Baseball Manager 

Basket ball Manager 

Track Manager 

Chairman of Social Committee 

Chairman of Honot Committee 

Chairman of Finance Committee 

Chairman of Auditing Committee 



. 1919 Homeopathic Class Officers 

John D. Van Sckoick President 

Georce p. Wood Vice-President 

LiNwooD P. Snow Secretary 

J«M.J K. DumiNO Tre..«rer 

Emmanuel R. Woolfan Athletic Manager 



1919 Architect Class Officers 

C. H. Crkacek President 

H. O. FuLi.E«ToN Vice-President 

Helen Niles Secretary 

C. A. NoRTHktP Treasurer 

R. H. Ward Sergeant-at-Amis 

T. Y. Hewlett Athletic Manager 

M. V. Smith Chairman Finance Committee 

M. E. Hammond . ' Chairman Social Committee 

H. J. B19BEE Chairman Aiiditi 



Tapptnc Kowe 

Athletic Association Officers 

Phillip G. B ARTE LME Directorof Outdoor Athletics 

Floyd A. Rowe Director of Intramural Athlet: 

Phillip H. Middleditcb President 

T. Hawley Tapping Treasurer 

Boyd M. Compton Football Manager 

Sidney T. Steen Baseball Manager 

John W. Finkenstaedt Track Manager 

KAv J. Mills Interscholastlc Manager 

BOyIRD L\' CONTROL Of ATHLETICS 

Faculty Members 
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, Chairman Prof. Walter T. Fishleioh 

Dr. Reuben Peterson Prof, Lewis M. Gram 

Secretary 

Phillip G. Bartelue 

Jlumni Members 

John D. Hibeard. Chicago James E. Duffy, Bay City 

James O.MuHPHiN, Detroit 

Sludint Memberi 
pREnERiCK E. Gould, (First Semester) Adna R. Johnson 

T. Hawley Tapping, (Second Semester) Frank G. Millari) 









Ai 



3« 

i 



1916 Varsity Football Team 

OFFICERS 

William D. Cochran Captain 

FiELDiwo H, Yost Head Coach 

AmiLPH ScHULz First Assistant Coach 

Ernest J. Allmkndinckr Second Assistant Coach 

Ralph A. McGinhis Third Assistant Coach 

StemjenJ. Farrell Trainer 

Phillip G. Bartelmk Graduate Director 

Boyd M. CoMProN Manager 

Lee E. Joslvn Assistant Manager 

John W. Langs Assistant Manager 

John C. Robbins . Assistant Manager 

Earl K. pARDtK Assistant Manager 





Alan W. Boyo, aMa , 


Hapr 


Y L.Calvin, Jr.. af 


I Hi 


AND Catlett. M . 




AM D. Cochran. M 










HOVN 


E Howe, aMa 


te 




K {;. Millard. M 




ter 


K. Norton, M . 
ipT. Raymond. aM 


pRFn 


L. Rehor, M 


Lewi 


Relmann, M . 


Lawrence S. Roehm, M 




H. Sharpe. aMa 




c C. Smith. M . 


Karl S. Staati. M 




RT W. Watson, M 


RirH 


*RD F. Weske, M 


Iamf 


L. Wkalen, M . 




luM-Zeioer, aMa 



PERSONNEL 



Hair Hack 
Guard 

Quarter Back 
Half Back 
Tackle 
Knd 



Half Back 
Guard 

Guard 
Full Back 
Guard 
Tackle 

Quarter Back 

Half Back 

Full Back 



Knd 



The 1915 Football Season 



RECORD 

October 6 — Michigan 39 Lawrence College . . . . 

October 9 — Michigan 35 Mount Union College . . . 

October 13 — Michigan 28 Marietta College .... 6 

October 16 — Michigan 14 Case School of Applied Science . 3 

October 23 — Michigan Agricultural College . 24 Michigan 

October 30 — Syracuse University . . . 14 Michigan 7 

November 6 — Cornell University .... 34 Michigan 7 

November 13 — Michigan Pennsylvania University . . . 

Total Points Scored — Michigan 130, Opponents 81. 
Record — Won 4, Lost 3, Tied 1. 

REVIEW 

THE season of 1915 has been dubbed "the most disastrous of the Yost regime at Michigan." 
Bare figures would seem to bear out this statement of the critics. Of eight games on the sched- 
ule, four were victories, three were defeats and one was a tie game. The four victories were 
scored on the weak teams which came to Ann Arbor at the opening of the season for the custom- 
ary practice tilts. The defeats were suffered at the hands of the "big" teams on the schedule, while 
the tie game, that wnth Pennsylvania, was a battle staged between two leviathans which had suffered 
uniform reverses throughout the fall. To the critic who wishes to see naught save misfortune in the 
record of the 1915 Varsity, the basis for pessimism is not hard to find. 

But there were many bright spots in the season; many features which seemed to forecast great 
success in the future. The team which Yost sent into the games of 1915 was a green and inexperienced 
eleven. There were but few veterans, and these veterans were not of the class commonly called "stars." 
The glamour of the 1914 season cast its shadow over the playing season of 1915. There was no Harvard- 
Michigan game to serve as a goal toward which to strive. The schedule was an uneventful one, patterned 
along the customary lines of Michigan gridiron seasons. The year before had been filled with mo- 
mentous events and the eyes of the collegiate world had been on Ann Arbor and her football team. 
None of that glamour was present in the fall of 1915. The season presented nothing save a hard, grind- 
ing series of games; games in which the Varsity was to be pitted against powerful elevens, and with 
nothing more formidable to present than an eleven far below the average of Michigan teams. 

There were none of the stars of previous years around which Yost might build an eleven which 
would be powerful on attack or stubborn on defense. The All-American Maulbetsch of 1914 could not 
produce the yards he had added to the Michigan total the fall before, for the line in front of him was 
weak, and the star himself was not playing in his usual form. The line could not be built around a 
Raynsford or a Pontius or a Patterson. Yost faced a problem which was no less than discouraging, 
and there was not the material present to solve the difficulty. 

The Varsity won its first four games, those with Lawrence College, Mount Union College, Marietta 
College and the Case School of Applied Science. In the first three instances the games were won by 
large scores, and although the Varsity did not show any startling play, these early battles did not give 
cause for gloom among the rooters. Then came the lowly Case eleven which, besides scoring on the 
Wolverines, held the big team to a scant two touchdowns. 

One week later came the Michigan Aggies, and they administered a stinging defeat, a defeat which 
will always rankle in the hearts of the Michigan rooters who were a witness to it. The Aggies presented 
a powerful eleven, a team trained for this game and for this game alone. Experienced, determined, 
prepared to play the greatest game of their lives, these eleven athletes from East Lansing completely 
overwhelmed the Varsity and the 24 toO score was the result. Then Syracuse came to Ann Arbor and 
earned a 14 to 17 victory. The Orange eleven which defeated Michigan in 1915 was one of the most 
powerful teams which Syracuse had ever sent to Ann Arbor, and its success was well-deserved. Then 
came the defeat at the hands of Cornell, followed by the tie game at Philadelphia. 

Through it all, the Michigan rooters displayed a fighting spirit and a loyalty to their eleven which 
more than compensated for the misfortunes which beset the gridiron athletes themselves. After the 
Aggies had gone back home wildly victorious, the rooters staged a wonderful mass-meeting, a tumul- 
tuous display of sincere loyalty and deep-rooted Michigan spirit which sent the players into the SNTacuse 
game with a grim determination to prove worthy. It was not the fault of the team as individuals that 
the victory did not rest on the Maize and Blue. The same held true of the "come-back" spirit shown 
by the rooters after the Syracuse game, and of the "never-say-die" manner in which the thousands 
on thousands of Michigan rooters cheered their team to the echo in the heart-breaking Cornell battle. 

While the 1915 football team may not go down in history, the 1915 rooters will linger long in the 
memory of Michigan men. The team did its best, but that is always expected. The rooters came 
up out of the lethargy of habitual success and proved themselves worthy of the victories which have 
been earned by Michigan Varsities in the past. 



286 



Cuptain Cocfanm i 



[Rwhi» haiiuE out of the i 



"Thni-U'DKHl" Mnu 
wherevpr loocWIl ia I 
venution. Hv leiul> 1h. 



■oytbiDE. specially I 



en-c (Iffense «u> neriled tr 






. of the Uckle. Buntt et tl tuived the 



CAme ia PhiLodelphu 



ic ■■fiKhline fare-- Df "I'a 
rrinl ipn-or imo the 



nfl»i«n Ih? hnlvfe the Michitean banil in Block "C" lomutioD plHys Cururll's 
Ainu .Mater while thr Cornell men sins 

Michigan-Cornell Game 

ALTHOUGH playine ihe best game of the season, Michigan's eleven was unable lo stem the IM- 
ritic onslaughi of the champion Cornell eleven, and the Varsity went down to a 34 to 7 defeat in 
the closing game of the Ferry Field schedule of 1915. Il was the largest score which had ever 
been totalled against a Yost eleven, although the margin of Cornell's victor)' was not as great as that 
of the 29 to win by Pennsylvania in 1908. 

In losing to Cornell, the \arsity was defeated by perhaps the most powerful team in the country, 
in the fall of 1915. The eleven from Ithaca was victorious over Harvard, which team was generally ad- 
mitted to be among the very best of the season. Although Pittsburgh University might have been ac- 
claimed nearly the equal of the Cornell eleven, the fact that no game was played between these two teams 
made a direct comparison impossible. The type of football shown by Cornell in its game on Feiry Field 
was by far the best of the season, and equal to any ever seen on the Michigan gridiron. The team was 
led by Captain Barrett, a player universally picked for All-American teams, and was composed of ath- 
letes of neariy the same calibre. 

Michigan w*as playing her biggest game when Cornell came to Ferry Field. The team had suFered 
two stinging defeats, one at the hands of the Michigan Agricultural College eleven, and the other from 
Syracuse. But the players had caught the fighting spirit of the rooters, and "came back" for this im- 
portant game with the Big Red team, as if no discouraging defeats had been administered to the inex- 
perienced players. The game was the occasion of the annual "homecoming" of the alumni, the time 
when Ann -Arbor is in gala dress and the annual football holiday is being celebrated. Nearly 23,000 
people were packed into the mammoth stands of Ferry Field, For a few minutes at the opening of the 
second half this vast crowd was supremely, insanely, happy. For during that time Michigan scored her 
lone touchdown, and scored it by dint of a magnificent charge down from the center of the field. But 
during the rest of the game it was a somewhat chastened, although even loyal, crowd which wore the 
Michigan colors. 



Michigan's defense was jnable to atop the terrific attack of the Cornell backfield. Captain Barrett, 
Shiverick, Collins and Mueller found but little difficulty in making ground against the breaking Mich- 
igan line, which was stampeded by the aggressive Cornell forwards. Captain Barrect was the star oF 
the game. He scored two of the live Cornell touchdowns, and added four points to his team's total by 
kicking that many goals following touchdown. He made repeated long runs, 
eluding the Michigan tacklers with an ease which seemed to indicate rather 
a lack of ability on the part of the Varsity players, than any unusual elu- 
sivencss by the star quarterback. The Cornell backReld quartette played 
as a compact, charging machine, and not as a set of individuals, with the 
result that It swept the futile Michigan defense before it. This backfield 
formed an interference for the man with the ball which could not be broken. 
The Michigan defenders, Watson and Benton on the one side, and Norton 
and Staati on the other, were swamped or boxed or bowled over by these 
charging ComelHans, while the man with the ball slipped by to the Var- 
sity secondary defense for a substantial gain. 

Cornell presented nearly the same type of attack that was used with 
such deadly effect the year before. It was a grinding, smashing, overwhelm- 
ing charge against which the individual grit and the desperation of the Var- 
sity players was unavaihng. It was irresistible, the terrific onslaught of that 
compact, united attack. And after the first two touchdowns had given 
Cornell a substantial lead, the success of a Big Red charge was largely a 
matter of psychology. The sight of that determined attack, as it formed 
for the charge, was sufficient to strike terror into the heart of even the most 

_ , staunch Wolverine. 

Doftced oeWTQunAUDn 

marked Nortgn'i plsy And yet, despite the power of Cornell and the seeming weakness of 

He euoed hia letter! Michigan before her, there was a point In the great battle at which the pen- 
dulum might have swung the other way. Had Fate smiled upon the Varsity 
colors at that time, it might have been the Maize and Blue which waved in victory at the end, afld not 
the flaunting red of Cornell. Such a Fate would have been a cruel one for the big easterner, for they 
were dearly the better eleven, but the " break of the game" hasol'ten given to the weaker team the glory 
of a final victory. 

That climax, or turning point, came in the third quarter. To start this quarter, the opening of 
the second half, Michigan started a brilliant rally. Straight down the held to 
a touchdown, the Varsity carried the ball through a frenzied Cornell defense. 
And in a moment after the kick-off which followed, the Varsity again obtained 
possession of the ball. Every indicarion pointed to another march to a 
touchdown. The dogged determination with which Yost had inspired his men 
during the intermission seemed about to materialize into a rally which would 
rival that staged several years before against the very team now attempting It, 
the time that Pennsylvania came from behind and won in the last half of 
the game. But just as this march to a seeming second touchdown was start- 
ing, Maulhetsch fumbled, a Cornellian pounced on the oval, and the chance 
was gone. That play not only took the heart out of the Varsity, but it inspired 
in the Cornell eleven a fear that the unenpected might happen, and so they 
started out to make victory sure. This they accomplished with two more 
touchdowns. 

Thai rally by the Yostmen in the opening minutes of the second half was 
the inspiring feature of the whole disastrous Michigan gridiron season. Nie- 
mann recovered a fumble on the Cornell 30-yard line to start the period, and 
there the Varsity attack started. Smith and Maulhetsch showed, for the first 
and only rime in the game, a flash of the plunging strength they were capable 

of. The Varsity line charged before these hacks and Cornell was pushed hack. Nienivin wu never 
One of the famous Yost tricks, a "talking" play, took the ball from inside the f^"*^' ^^StioL *m 



lO-yard line, rt|ht to the las 
lut few inches necessary to 



chalk mark, and then Roehm 
score. That "talking" playi 



ducked between Niemann's legs for the 
as mjch the same as Yost had planned 
for the Harvard game, and which 
Quarterback Hughitt had called for 
on Soldien' Field at a time when it 
was not needed. In the play used 
against Cornell, Roehm called his sig- 
nals as usual, and then seemed to 
change his mind, shouting "Change 
Signals." At this [he Cornell playen 
eased up from their charging posi- 
tions, and just at the moment when 
they were off-guard, the Wolverines 
charged, and Maulbetsch carried the 
ball through the disorganized Cornell 
line for nearly 10 yards. It was a 
play almost completely misunder- 
stood from the stands, but to the stampeded Cornell eleven it spelt disaster. 

Michigan's Varsity played a class of football far above the average of its work during the season, 
but even that was not equal to the tremendous strength of the Cornell eleven. Flashes of Yost strategy 
could be seen here and there, but even Yost strategy would not overcome the handicap of inexperience 
and so it was the Michigan Maize which met defeat. 



Bilk MAckinf methods <!• 



foothsU pi 



ID Y«t tsku eborge of a Vani 



■Hunr I'p" i 

lh>tV«t,Jr..< 



iA cood a plAyer aj waa 



Michigan-Pennsylvania Game 

MICHIGAN and Pennsylvania fought to a scoreless tie on Franklin Field in Philadelphia, in 
the game which was the final appearance for the 1915 Varsity. In the face of a stubborn re- 
sistance by both teams, the attack of Quaker and Wolverine failed each time it was put to 
the final test under the enemy's goal posts. Pennsylvania failed more often in [his regard than did Mich- 
igan, the Quakers losing a possible chance to score on three separate occasions, while the Michigan eleven 
had a real opportunity only once during the game. For this reason, if no other, the critics who saw the 
game, gave the honors to the easterners depite the brilliant rallies and the stubborn defensive play of 
the Wolverines. 

The best chance offered to Michigan to score came in the second quarter. At this point the Wol- 
verines rushed the hall to the Penn 16-yard line before they met any determined resistance. Here a 
fake kick for goal from placement was tried, with the result that the man who attempted to carry the 
ball was downed for a loss of ten hard-earned yards. The next play was an attempted forward pass, 
which sent the ball behind the goal lines, but instead of a Michigan man's being there to receive the 



oval fbt a winnitiK touchdown, a Pcnnsylvanian reccivnJ the ball, and a touchback was the best gained 
by the Wolverines. 

Pennsylvania was little more successful in her attempts to score. I'he Quaker backs had little 
trouble in rushing the ball for long f^ains just so long as they were out in the center of the field, but the 
moment the play came close to the Michigan 10-yard line, the Wolverine defense invariably stitFened, 
and tu gp farther was an impossibility. On each of the three occasions when the Quakers reached this 
point on the field, chey attempted a goal from the lidd. Twice Quarterback Bell tried to negotiate the 
points which would have meant victor>' for his team, and as many times he failed. On the third trial 
Left Tackle Mathews dropped back for the kick, but he too was unable to send the ball truly, and a 
Pennsylvania score was impossible. To take the oval over the last chalk line by rushing was a task which 
the Quakers early found to be futile. For no matter how easi^' the Michigan defense bent and yielded 
before attack while the play was out in the center of the field, this same defense became of the consist- 
ency of a stone wall when a victory for the enemy seemed to be a probability. Each rime Captain Cochran 
rallied his defense for a last stand, and on every trial the Wolverines proved equal to the emergency. 

The battle which was staged on Franklin Field was a clash of two elevens which had bowed before 
the superiority of their enemies during pracrically the whole season, preceding their mccring. Pennsyl- 
vania had been beaten by Dartmouth, Lafayette, Pittsburgh and others, and was still later defeated by 
Cornell, while Michigan had already met reversal at the hands of M. A. C. Syracuse and Cornell. The 
supporters of both elevens were confident that this battle, staged between two such traditionary rivals, 
would find their particular team of sufficient power to wring a much-desired victory. But each was 
doomed for disappointment. Their favorites were strong enough to stave of defeat, but each lacked 
inch" which was an essenrial to victory. 



Line-plunging was the feature of the game, and for this reason the battle resembled greatly the 
games of five years ago, when a smashing attack was emphasized more than the present open style of 
gaining. In this particular, Pennsylvania exceeded Michigan in actual number of yards gained, but her 
plungers were not more effective considering the fact that the ball was more often in the possession of 
the easteners than in the hands of Michigan. Maulbetsch found it more than difficult to gain ground, 
but Smith was a consistent plunger until he was forced to retire because of injuries. The Quakers seemed 
to have been especially coached to stop Maulbetsch, and the smashinc back was unable to get away for 



Whaba VM Bt bia baa « 
UBtlsck. He Keneratl)' stfli 



consistent gains. The Quakers had evidently been carefully trained in 
the best way to make Maulbetsch ineffective, and they surprised the 
Michigan rooters by their success in this particular. Smith, on the other 
hand, was able to reel off long gains, and was also a power on defense. 
Pennsylvania's line plungers, Derr and Williams, tore great holes in the 
Michigan line, and were the most successful gainers on the held of play. 
They were largely instrumental in placing the Quakers within striking 
distance of the Michigan goal on the three occasions when Pennsylvania 
seemed about to score. The punting of Bell was much better than that 
of the Michigan kicker, Dunne. The Wolverine punier was performing 
this duty for the first time In a Varsity game, and for this reason his 
inability to get his kicks away for any distance and with any direction 

Michigan was further handicapped by a veritable avalanche of 
penalties which the officials inflicted. Off-side penalties were in the 
majority, and more than 

attack was materially 

aided bv the addition of 
YoBt is not a ChsutsuquB a few yards of Varsity 

about cflcciivc apwrb thsn territory. 

moat platform omton C t ^ C h 

Staatz, Roehm and Cat- 
lett played their last game for Yost and Michigan on 
this day. Catlett and Roehm distinguished themselves 
especially, while the Michigan captain was in the thick 
of the fight on each one of those three terrible defenses 
down near the goal posts. Rehor, a substitute all dur- 
ing the season, became a regular in this game, and was 
a demon on both offense and defense. Weske, the 
rawest recruit on the Wolverine squad, stayed in his 
position at right tackle throughout the game, acquit- 
ring himself to the sarisfaction of the critical Voit. 

It was not the glorious finish to a disastrous sea- ■■*■"'' X>\."^'^^" ^ "? ^'^^iJ^l' 

son, which the rooters had hoped tor. But it was a en tor the Twilight FtooeHdon 

finish which showed the Wolverine Varsity display- 
ing a fighting spirit which was worthy of the name which it bore. 



1916 All-Fresh Football Team 



OFFICERS 

Clifford M. Sparks Captain 

Prentiss P. Douglas Head Coach 

James W. Raynsford Ass't Coach 

Alvin M. Bentley Manager 



PERSONiXEL 



Charles P. Beath, 1919 
Clive H. Bevens, 1919 
Roger Birdsell . 
R. H. Dunn, 1919 . 
Russell G. Cornelius 
Sydney V. Eggert, 1919 
Joseph A. Hanish, 1919 
Edward Hauser 
A. W. MacLachlan, 1919 
Donald Macrae, 3rd . 
F. B. Nash, 1919 . 
W. L. Peach, 1919 
Sherwood Reekie, 1919 
Bernard L. Snyder, 1919 
C. M. Sparks, 1919 
C. A. TowsLEY, 1919 
Elton Wieman, 1919 
O. G. Williams, 1919 . 



Center 

Guard 

End 

Tackle 

Half Back 

Half Back 

Half Back 

Guard 

Tackle 

Half Back 

Center 

End 

Half Back 

Full Back 

Quarter Back 

Guard 

End 

Tackle 



I" 

■ 



RECORD OF SEASON 



October 16th — Michigan Freshmen 
October 23rd — Michigan Freshmen 
November 13th — Michigan Freshmen 



Michigan State Normal 

21 Heidelberg College 15 

80 University of Detroit 






.H).> 



5 89s 



1915 Varsity Baseball Team 

OFFICERS 

Edmon p. MctJuEEN C'apram 

Caul Lundcren Coach 

PhilltpG. Bartelme Graduate Director 

Chester H. Lang Manager 

SiUNEY T. Steen Ass'i Manager 

Carleton E. Strvker Ass't Manager 

PERSONNEL 

Charles W. Anderson, aMa Short Stop 

Louis A. Arkniz, aMa Catcher 

Leland H, Benton, M Catcher 

Elmer Bkandell, M Short Stop and Ouihelder 

Harrison H. Caswell, aMa Pitcher 

Wilbur S. Davidson. M Pitcher 

Charles H. Fercuson, M Pitcher 

George V. Labadie, M Outfielder 

Dale R. Maltby First Baseman 

Thomas R. McNamara Pitcher 

Edmom p. McQueen, M Second Baseman 

William K. Niemann, M Outfielder 

Ravmond E. Nichols, aMa Pitcher 

Warren G. Payette, aMa Pitcher 

Frank A. Sheehy Outfielder 

Ralph B. Shivel, M Third Baseman and Short Stop 

George H. Sisler, M Pitcher 

Thomas P. Soddy, aMa Pitcher 

Walter H. Stewart, M First Baseman 

Ralph M, Waltz, M Third Baseman 



w 



1915 Varsity Baseball Season 

Won 16. lost 7, tied J. 

ITH this record, the Michigan Varsity nine of 191S went into history on June 23rd, followinK 
thelastoftheCommencement Weeltscrieswith the Pennsylvania University team. Michigan 
won both those pannes, displaying the best brand of baseball playing of the season, a brand 
tnat nad not been especially evident djring a season which had not been the success anticipated. 

Michigan's team of I'^IS set up a record which has not been surpassed by many baseball nines. 
Tn the terms of "big league" ratings, iis percentage would be .6''6, or high enough to win the average 
league race. But the team which represented the Varsity in 1915 was generally regarded as rhe most 
powerful aggregation ever produced at Michigan, and a much cleaner recuid of games won and lost 
had been looked for. 

The team won its southern trip series, taking every game save one. It broke even on the eastern 
trip, winning two and losing two. But it failed to win all save one of the really important series of the 
season's schedules. Michigan Agricultural College won the majority of the series between the two 
state rivals; Cornell won ihe odd game, while an even break ruled with Syracuse. Pennsylvania, alone, 
of the big teams opposing Michigan, fell a victim to the Varsity nine. Notre Dame also was conquered 
in the series, but it has been so long since the Catholic Varsity won a series with Michigan that it is 
no longer accounted one of the "big" teams. The ignominy of a series lost to the lowly Kalamaioo 
Notmal nine was also a pan of the record of the 1915 nine. 

But even this record cannot detract from the glory of a team which, when ii once hit its real stride, 
showed a better brand of baseball than has ever been exhibited by a Michigan team. In the game 
with the Alumni and with Pennsylvania, the Wolverine Varsity was unbeatable. It was machine- 
like in its defense and unstoppable on offense. The result was three clean-cut victories over teams 
which were both strong and well-balanced. 

A batting slump which could not be shaken off, was the cause of whatever misfortune was the lot 
of the 1915 Varsity. This slump struck the team just at the opening of the series with Syracuse, the 
first of the big Eastern nines to come to Ferry Field, and it stayed with the team until after the Notre 
Dame series. While in its grasp, the strong and aggressive Varsity nine was seemingly powerless. Ball 
players are naturally supersririous, says tradirion, and the Michigan University brand of (he genus 
was evidently no exception, for the players seemed unable to shake off the hoodoo. 

There were two other elements which had much to do with the poor work of the players during 
the middle of the season. A reform campaign, carried on hy several students on the campus, was aimed 
at questioning the amateur standing of three of the leading players. Anxiety concerning the result of 
these charges inierfered materially with the playing of these men, and had much to do with the morale 
of the whole nine. Conversation among the players, on the bench and in the club-house, had more to 
do with the activities of the reformers, than with the playing. 



iichiian pl»yer by st 



Despite these handicaps the 1913 nine played through a hard schedule with its percentage of .696, 

and with batting and fielding marks far above the average. 

The 1913 nine sent to the Major Leagues perhaps the greatest player ever produced by a Michigan 

baseball team, in the person of George Sisler, captain in 1914 and both a pitcher and fielder of wonderful 
ability. He was the brightest star of the 1915 team, winning 
the majority of his games as pitcher and proving a touer of 
strength in the field and at bat. In the final three games of 
the schedule, Sisler hit safely nine consecutive times, just 
missing finishing the season, and his college career, with a 
straight list of safe hits, when a Pennsylvania outfielder, 
playing far back of his regular post in center field, raced back 
under a terrific fly from Sisier's bat, and robbed the Michigan 
star of a safe hit. 

The 1915 Michigan pitching staff was composed chiefly 
of veterans. Sisler, Ferguson, Davidson, Soddy and Mc- 
Nainara were all seasoned plavers, the latter alone serving his 
first year on the Varsity. The infield was made up nearly 
entirely of two-year men, while the outfield also had its quota 
of veterans. It was a team which, at the opening of the season, 
seemed destined to make a brdliant record. 

For the first time, and perhaps for the last, in Michigan 
baseball history, the spring training trip of the team was 
made along the southern Atlantic seaboard. New teams, 
such as Marshall College, Washington and Lee University, 
the University of Virginia and Staunton Mihtary Academy, 
were on the schedule. While a distinct success in the matter 
of games won, as a training trip the tour was not satisfactory', 
and in 1916 the Varsity has again returned to its old haunts 
along the tower Mississippi River Valley for the seasoning 

Rainy weather spoiled the close of the annual eastern 
i the games with Swarthmore College and the Uni- 



?' of Pennsylvania were of necessiiy cancelled, 
he ' ■ ' ■ 



"Whiwy" Oiii niill linaera id Oiq bearti The feature of the season, from the standpoint 

ol "homeEominB" iJumni u ibe best of (he Michigan student watching his team fiom the 

Ferry Field grandstand, was the series with the nine 
from Kalamazoo Normal, Two games were played 
between these two teams, in one of which Sister and 
Koob, both now stars of the St. I.ouis American 
League ream, opposed each other, and in the 
other of which Ferguson and Koob were the 
opposing moundsmcn. Sislet was able to hold the 
Normal nine to a tie, but Ferguson was the victim 
of a 4—2 defeat. 

One unfortunate incident marked the 1915 hasehall 
season. It has been before alluded to, and concerns the 
activities of the reformers who sought to attack the 
amateur standing of several of the Varsity players. 
As a result of the charges brought by these invest!- 
gators, unsavory publicity was given to) Michigan 
athletics in the press throughout the country, two of 
the Varsity players were dismissed from the team and 
a third deprived of his athletic insignia, won in 1915. 
and declared ineligible for further competition during 
that year. 

.Michigan's team in 1913 met some of the strongest 
teams in the college world. They were teams which 
could have rendered a good account of themselves in 
any kind of competition. They possessed strong 
pitchers and a well-cuached defense, .^gainst these nines 
the Varsity was pitied at a time when it was not at 
its best. The result was a record which was not as 
glorious as that of the collegiate championship nine 

of the year before, but was nevertheless as good as "Cy" FergUBon toulil make the hull fwrlj- hub 

that of many Wolvi-rine baseball teams. uhen he ihrcw l™ (ainou-i "sLtaighi aver^ 



THE INDOOR SQUAD IfllB 

Batting and Fielding Averages of the 1915 Varsity 

PLAYER IMS. AB H AVE. PO A E 



Mnllliy . 



^(rwart parncd hifl place amotiic 
■o]e«t when be became fint bafl^ 



1915 Varsity Baseball Record 



Dati 
April 10 
April 13 
April 14 

April 16 

April 17 
April 19 
April 24 
April 28 
May 1 
M»y 6 

May 12 

May 15 

May 17 

May 18 

May 19 

May 20 

May 28 

May 29 

June 1 



On 



Kentucky ll 
Marshall College 
Washington and Lee Uni 
WashinEton and Lee University 
Virginia University . . 
Staunton Military Academv 
Notre Dame Universitv 
Western Reserve University 
Western Stale Normal of Kalam: 
Case School of Applied Science 
Syracuse University . , 

Syracuse University 
Michigan Agri cultural College 
Cornell University . 
Syracuse University . . 
Syracuse Universitv . . 
Cornell University . . 
Cornell University , 
Michigan Agricultural Cullege 
Michigan Agricultural College 
Western Slate Normal of Kalam; 
Notre Dame University 
Notre Dame University 
Michigan Altimni 
Pennsylvania University 
Pennsylvania Uni 

Total Poini 



Ptau 
I^xington, Ky. 
Huntington, W. Va. 

Lexington, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Staunton, W. Va. 
South Bend, Ind. 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 

Ann Arbor 

Ann Arhor 
Syracuse. N. Y. 
Svracuse, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 

Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 



1918 All-Fresh Baseball Record 



May I Michigan State Normal of Ypsilar 

May 8 University of Detroit 

May 15 Orchard Lake Seminary 

May 22 University of Detroit 



, Ann Arbor 
Ann Arbor 
Orchard Lake, Mich. 
Detroit, Mich. 



C 2 c 



1915 Varsity Track Te^m 

OFFICERS 

Harold L, Smith Captain 

Stephen J. P'arrell Coach 

Phillip fi. Babtelme Graduate Director 

Emmett F. Connelly Manager 

loHN W. KcNKENSTAKiiT Ass't Manager 

Melvin M. Beaver Ass't Manager 



PEKSO,\;\EL 

Clyde E. Bastian, aMa Weights 

Kenneth V.. Bekrav, aMa High Jump 

William E. Bl-rbv, aMa Quarter Mile 

H. Leslie Carroll, M Distance Runs 

J. Bland Catlett, aMa Hurdles 

Cecil B. CoRBiN. M Hurdles and High Jump 

Cecil ¥. Cross, M Weights 

Edgar D. Crumfacker, aMa Hurdles 

Watson R. DeGowan, aMa Weights 

Howard A. Donnelly, M Distance Runs 

John H. Ferris. M Broad Jump 

Stanley G. Kontanna, aMa Quarter Mile 

George B. Fox, M . . Distance Runs 

Edwcn J. Huntington, aMa Quarter Mile 

Hubert R.John. aMa Quarter Mile 

Gerald!,. Kesler, aMa Pole Vault 

John V. Kuivlnen, aMa Distance Runs 

loRENio B. Lapslky. aMa Dashes 

Harold E. O'Brien, aMa Dashes 

Walter F. Persckbacher. aMa High Jump 

Max G. Robinson. aMa Quarter Mile 

Harold L. Smith, M . , Dashes 

R E. Ufer, M Distance Runs 

ER E. Watehbury, aMa High Jump 

JLD E. Wilson, M Pole Vault and Hurdles 



Record of Year's Competition 

Indoor 
February 15, 1915. At Buffalo — Pennsylvania defeated Michigan in Medley Relay. Time — 7 min. 

59 1-5 sec. 
Michigan Team — Smith, Burby, Carroll, Lynch. 

February 20, 1915. At Waterman Gymnasium — Princeton defeated Michigan in Two-Mile Relay. 

Time — 8 min. 8 2-5 sec. 
Michigan Team — Carroll, Fox, Donnelly, Ufer. 

February 27, 1915. At Waterman Gymnasium — Michigan vs. Notre Dame Dual Meet. 

Michigan 61, Notre Dame 16. 

March 6, 1915. At New York City — Indoor Eastern Intercollegiate Track Meet. Medley 

Relay Race — Pennsylvania first, Dartmouth second, Michigan third. Time — 
4 min. 22 3-5 sec. 
Michigan Team — O'Brien, Smith, Robinson, Ufer. 

March 13, 1915. At Syracuse — Michigan vs. Syracuse Dual Meet. 

Michigan 40, Syracuse 37. 

Outdoor 
April 17,1915. At Des Moines, Iowa. — Drake Relay Games. Four-Mile Relay Race — Wisconsin 

first, Michigan second, Chicago third, Illinois fourth. Time — 18 min. 4 2-5 sec. 
' Michigan Team — Donnelly, Fox, Ufer, Carroll. 

April 24, 1915. At Franklin Field — Pennsylvania Relay Games. Four-Mile Relay Race — 

Cornell first, Michigan second, Wisconsin third. Time — 18 min. 7 3-5 sec. 
Michigan Team — Donnelly, Fox, Ufer, Carroll. Smith (M) second in lOQ-Yard 
Dash; Wilson (M) tied for third in Pole Vault; Cross (M) fourth in Discus Throw. 

May 1, 1915. At Ferry Field — ^Varsity Meet. 

Sophomores 56, Freshmen 32, Juniors 26, Seniors 12. 

May 8, 1915. At South Bend, Ind. — Michigan vs. Notre Dame Dual Meet. 

Michigan 75 2-3, Notre Dame 50 1-3. 

May 29, 1915. At Franklin Field, Philadelphia — Eastern Intercollegiate. 

Michigan tied with Dartmouth for sixth place. 

Michigan Team — Smith, Wilson, Carroll, O'Brien, Lapsley, Huntington, Ufer, 
Fox, Donnelly, Ferris, Corbin, Cross. 



316 



le gnp between themaelves And the beat Synu 






9 






TT 



9 



CorUn SDil Wilion oi 



The 1915 Track Season 

AT the opening of the 1915 track season. Coach Stephen J. Farrell of the Michigan Varsity, faced 
/\ the problem of developing a strong squad with only a very small nucleus of veterans. That 
the season was a success was due primarily to the fact that the sophomore class presented several 
athletes who proved themselves to be real stars, and capable of going directly into collegiate competi- 
tion and producing results. 

The schedule was a heavy one, starting off with two match relay races, one- with Pennsylvania 
and one with Princeton. Although the Varsity lost both of these races, the margin of the victor's 
win in each instance was a small one, and the showing of the Michigan team was such as to promise 
much for the future. In each case the Varsity team was composed largely of youngsters, and the fact 
that they were given their collegiate baptism in the grilling competition of a match relay race was the 
cause of their defeat. 

As a season of dual meets, the record of 1915 was a complete success, for the Varsity won all four 
of the contests. Two victories were earned over Syracuse and the same number against the Notre 
Dame team. The margin of the victory in the indoor encounter with Syracuse in the latter's gymnasium 
was particularly close, the meet not being decided until the relay race had finished. When the Michigan 
team started this relay, they were behind the Orange Varsity in total number of points scored. They 
won the race and took the meet by a margin of three points. To accomplish this result the Michigan 
racers were forced to beat the very men who had defeated them in the match races of the relay part of 
the event program. 

For the first time in history, Michigan entered the Drake Relay Games at Des Moines. Stephen 
J. Farrell, the Varsity coach, acted as Referee for the meet, and the welcome accorded the 
Wolverines was a most agreeable one in that so many of the supposed Western Conference enemies 
of Michigan were entered. While the single Varsity team entered, the four-mile relay squad, did not 
win its event, it forced the Wisconsin team to clip 32 seconds oflF the former Drake Games record for 
the event in order to win. The showing made by the Varsity team was more than satisfactory, and 
the gritty races run by each one of the four men won the favorable comment of the Western Con- 
ference coaches and athletes. 

Michigan avenged this defeat by Wisconsin at the Drake Relay Games by thoroughly trouncing 
the Badger Varsity one week later at the Pennsylvania Relay Games. At this eastern meet the Varsity 
team was unable to win the victory, as the wonderful Cornell four could not be bested. Michigan 
took second place, however, with Wisconsin in third position. 

Three of the Varsity's individual entries in the Relay Games won places. Smith, the Michigan 
captain, ran in second place to Howard Drew in the 100-yard dash. The colored whirlwind from the 
Pacific coast was by far the best sprinter at the meet, but the Michigan man forced him to his greatest 
speed to win. Wilson of the Varsity tied with thirteen others for third place in the pole vault. Two 
athletes were tied for first place, so that a second place was not awarded. Cross of the Michigan team, 
finished fourth in the discus throw. 

The most satisfactory feature of the whole of the 1915 season was the record made by Captain 
Harold L. Smith at the annual Eastern Intercollegiate meet at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. Pitted 
against the best college sprinters in the country, he took first place in both the dashes, winning easily 
in the 100-yard dash and in the 220-yard dash. By accomplishing this feat, he tied with Meredith, 
the sensational Pennsylvania star, for the individual honors of the meet, for Meredith won both the 
quarter and the half mile races. 

The Michigan Varsity at the Eastern Intercollegiate was composed of twelve men, but only three 
of them worked their way into the scoring columns. Smith made 10 points in the sprints, Carroll 
earned three points in the mile run by taking third place, and Wilson gathered in one point in the pole 
vault when he was awarded fifth place. The pole vault was somewhat of a disappointment, as Wilson 
failed, on the second day, to make as good a record as he had on the day of the preliminary trials. 

The remainder of the Varsity men were mostly sophomores, taken to Philadelphia for the purpose 
of seasoning. O'Brien made a good showing in the 100-yard dash, finishing sixth, but the others failed 
to qualify. 



325 



Michigan vs. Notre Dame Dual Indoor Meet 

Waterman Gymnasium, February 28, 1915 

Score: Michigan 61, Notre Dame 16 

THE SCORE BOARD 





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3 


9 


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61 


Notre Dame 


6 


1 


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• ■ • • 


.... 


6 


.... 


.... 


■ ■ • t 


16 



Event 


first 


Second 


Third 


Record 


35-Yard Dash 


Hardy (ND) 


Smith (M) 


Bergman (ND) 


:04 1/5 


40-Yard High Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Catlett (M) 


Kirkland (ND) 


.•06 


Mile Run 


Carroll (M) 


Waage (ND) 


Grauman (M) 


4:26 4/5 


440-Yard Dash 


Burby (M) 


John (M) 


Huntington (M) 


:53 4/5 


880-Yard Run 


Ufer (M) 


Fox (M) 


Donnelly (M) 


2KX)3/5 


Shot Put 


Bachman (ND) 


Cross (M) 


Keefe (ND) 


43 ft. 3/4 in. 


Pole Vault 


Wilson (M) 


Cross (M) 


Kessler (M) 


11 ft. 2 in. 


High Jump 


Waterbury (M) 


Berray (M) 1 j^^ 
Corbin (M) J 


I 


5 ft. 8 in. 


1200-Yard Relay 


Michigan 


Notre Dame 




1:54 1/5 



326 



Michigan vs. Syracuse Dual Indoor Meet 

Syracuse, New York, March 13, 1915 
Score: Michigan 40, Syracuse 37 



THE SCORE BOARD 









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3 


MileR 


3(X)-Ya 


440-Ya 


880-Ya 


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Pole V 


High J 


1 




Michigan 


5 






5 


5 


4 


3 


5 


' 40 


Syracuse 


.... 


3 


3 


« 


8 


3 


3 


4 


5 




37 



Event 


First 


Second 


* Third 




Record 


40-Yard Dash 


O'Brien (M) 


Lapsley (M) 1 
Smith (M) 1 


^tied 




:04 4/5 


45-Yard High Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Delling(S) 1 
Kingsley (S) 


^tied 




:06 1/5 


Mile Run 


Carroll (M) 


Parmale (S) 


George (S) 




4:30 


300-Yard Dash 


Foertch (S) 


Mixer (S) 


Smith (M) 




:35 2/5 


440- Yard Dash 


Donahue (S) 


Dixon (S) 


Burby (M) 




:55 


880-Yard Run 


Ufer (M) 


Newkirk (S) 


Fox (M) 




2:03 2/5 


Shot Put 


Cross (M) 


Schultz (S) 


White (S) 




42 ft. 8 1/4 in 


Pole Vault 


Curtis (S) \ • 1 
Wilson (M)/^*^^ 
Curtis (S) 




Cross (M) 




12 ft. 6 in. 


High Jump 


Corbin (M) 


Waterbury (M)\ . . 
Berray (M) f 


5 ft. 9 in. 


1200- Yard Relay 


Michigan 


Syracuse 




/ 





*Not counted for totals. 



327 



Michigan vs. Notre Dame 

South Bend, Ind., May 8, 1915 
Score: Michigan 75 2/3, Notre Dame 50 1/3 



THE SCORE BOARD 







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Michigan . 


7SM 


Notre Dame 


1 


3 


1 


3 


5 


3 


1 


1 


4 


3 


6H 


5 


8 


6 


50H 



100-Yard Dash 
120-Yard High Hurdles 
Mile Run 
220-Yard Dash 
440-Yard Dash 
Two-Mile Run 
220-Yard Low Hurdles 
880- Yard Run 
Shot Put 
Pole Vault 

High Jump 

Hammer Throw 
Broad Jump 
Discus Throw 



First 
Smith (M) 
Corbin (M) 
Carroll (M) 
Smith (M) 
Welsh (ND) 
Donnelly (M) 
Crumpacker (M) 
Carroll (M) 
Cross (M) 
Wilson (M) 

Mills (ND) 

Bachman (ND) 
Miller (ND) 
Bachman (ND) 



Second 
O'Brien (M) 
Kirkland (ND) 
Fox (M) 
Hardy (ND) 
Huntington (M) 
Burns (ND) 
Catlett (M) 
Ufer (M) 
Bachman (ND) 
Yaeger (ND) 
Miller (ND) 
Waterbury (M) 
Perschbacher (M) 
DeGowan (M) 
Marrin (ND) 
Cross (M) 



tied 



Third Record 

Hardy (ND) :10 3/5 

Catlett (M) :17 2/5 

Bartholomew (ND) 4:41 2/5 
O'Brien (M) :23 

Fontanna (M) :53 4/5 

Kuivinen (M) 10:30 3/5 
Shaughnessy (ND) :28 
McDonald (ND) 2K)2 3/5 
Keefe (ND) 41 ft. 

Cross (M) 10 ft. 



Bastian (M) 
Ferris (M) 
Keefe (ND) 



9 in. 
6 in. 



5 ft. 5 in. 

140 ft. 5 in. 

20ft. Sin. 

130 ft. 11 in. 



328 



Michigan vs, Syracuse 

Ferry Field, May 15, 1915 
Score: Michigan 73 2/3, Syracuse 48 1/3 



THE SCORE BOARD 



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Relay 
Totals 


Michigan . 


.... 73J^ 


Syracuse . 


1 


\ 


3 


1 


8 


6 


1 


1 


4 


5 


1^ 


8 


3 


5 .48Ji 



Event 


First 


Second 


Third 


Record 


100-Yard Dash 


Smith (M) 


O'Brien (M) 


Kingsley (S) 


:10 1/5 


120-Yard High Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Wilson (M) 


Delling (S) 


:16 4/5 


Mile Run 


Carroll (M) 


Newkirk (S) 


Fox (M) 


4:26 1/5 


220-Yard Dash 


Smith (M) 


O'Brien (M) 


Foertch (S) 


:22 3/5 


440-Yard Dash 


Donahue (S) 


Rulison (S) 


Robinson (M) 


:51 3/5 


220-Yard Low Hurdles 


Corbin (M) 


Crum packer (M) 


Delling (S) \ . , 
Foertch (S) Y'^^ 


:26 3/5 


880-Yard Run 


Ufer (M) 


Carroll (M) 


Finch (S) 


2K)1 


Shot Put . 


Cross (M) 


Schultz (S) 


White (S) 


42 ft. 11 1/2 in. 


Pole Vault 


Curtis (S) 


Wilson (M) 
Berray (M) 


Kessler (M) 


12 ft. 


High Jump 


Perschbacher (M) 


Steele (S) 
Waterbury (M) 


tied 


5 ft. 5 in. 


Hammer Throw 


White (S) 


Johnson (S) 


Bastian (M) 


138 ft. 7 in. 


Broad Jump 


Ferris (M) 


Kingsley (S) 


Thurston (M) 


21 ft. 5 in. 


Two Mile Run 


Haskins (S) 


Donnelly (M) 


Pulling (S) 


10K)5 


One Mile Relay 


Syracuse 


Michigan 




3:31 



329 



Eastern Intercollegiate Track and Field Meet 



Cornell 45 1/2, Harvard 26, Yile 25, PHncecon 21, Pennsylvinia 21, Michigan 14, Dartmouth 14, 
Columbia 10, Maine 9, Pennsylvania State 6, Bowdoin 2, Massachusetts Institute of Technolofiy 1, 
Johns Hopkins 1/2. 
100-Yard Dash— Smith (M) first, Teschner (H) second, Ingersoll (C) third, Treadway (Y) fourth, 

Folev (H) fifth. Time— 10 sec. 
120- Yard High Hurdles— Ferguson (Penn.) first, Starr (C) second, Hammitt (PSJ third, Gnibb (C) 

fourth, Lukens (C) fifth. Time— IS 2/5 sec. 
One Mile Run— MacKeniie (PJ first, Windnagle (C) second, Carroll (M) third, Atha (P) fourth, 

Irish (C) fifth. Time— 4:22 4/5. 
440-Yard Dash— Meredith (P) first. Wilcox (H) second, Wilkie (Y) third. Richardson (P) fourth, 

Rilev (D) fifth. Time-48 sec. 
220-Vard Dash— Smith (M) first, Teschner (H) second, Treadway (Y) third. Lockwood (Penn.) 

fourth, Patterson (Penn) fifth. Time — 22 sec. 
Two-Mile Run— Potter (C) first, Overtson (Y) second, HofFmire (C) third, Holden (V) fourth. Cook 

(MIT) fifth. Time— 9-27 1/S. 
220-Yard Low Hurdles— Stewart (P) first. Smith (H) second, Brown (PS) third, Bradv (Ccd) fourth, 

Crawford (P) fifth. Time— 24 2/5 sec. 
880-Yard Run— Meredith (Penn) first, Spieden (C) second, Hayes (?) third, Capper (H) fourth, 

Coolev (P) fifth. Time— 1:54 2/5. 
Shot Put— Whitnev (0) first, Beattv (Col) second, McCutcheon (C) third. Spears (D) fourth, Allen 

(Maine) fifth. Distance— 47 ft. 4 7/8 in. 
Pole Vault— Carter (Y). Foss (C) and Greeley (H) tied for first. Baker (P) fourth, Wilson (M) fifth. 

Height— 12 ft. 
High Jump— Oler (Y) first, Richards (C) second, Johnstone (H) third, McLaren (C) and Hallec (JH) 

tied for fourth. Height 6 ft. 4 1/2 in. 
Hammet Throw— Bailey (Me) first, McCutcheon (C) second. Murphy (Penn) third. Loughbridee (Y) 

fourth. Leadbetter (B) fifth. Distance — ^165 ft. 3/4. 
Broad Jump— Worth in gton (D) first. Graham (Col) second, French (Me) third, Richards (C) fourth, 

Fredericks (D) fifth. Distancc-23 ft. 1 1 '4 in. 



Donnelly Murphy Farrell Carroll 
MicbiRan'i prnKCHi has loni rented on her relay teamx; thb tu 



TENNIS 

1915 Varsity Tennis Team 

OFflCEkS 

Ira H. REiNotL Captain 

Dr. AlfrkdO. I.kk Coach 

Ira H. Rkindei.. M Number One 

Charles B. Crawfor]), M Number Two 

Christian N. Mack, M Number Three 

John S. Swii7.kr. M Number Four 

David Polaskv 
Harold Eatos 
Samuel L. Cohkn 



The 1915 Tennis Season 



MICHIGAN vs, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

Pittsburgh, Pa., May 17, 1915 

Sindes DoubUs 

McElroy (P) d. Reindel (M) ... 6-4, 6-2 McElroy and Gant (P) d. 

Crawford (M) d. Gant (P) . . . . 6-4, 8-6 Reindel and Crawford (M) . . 6-3, 7-5 

Switzer (M) d. Mvers (P) . . 6-4,6-1 Switzer and Mack (M) d. 

Mack (M) d. Haines (P) .... 6-2,6-0 Haines and Myers (P) . . . 6-4,7-5 

Scorf — Michigan, 4; University of Pittsburgh, 2 

MICHIGAN vs. CARNEGIE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

Pittsburgh, Pa,, May 18, 1915 

Singles Doubles 

Reindel (M) d. Steen (T) 6-3, 4-6, 6-0 Reindel and Crawford (M) d. 

Crawford (M) d. Davis (T) . . . 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 Steen and Davis (T) . . . 4-6, 6-2, 6-4 

Mack (M) d. Bihlman (T) . . . 5-7, 6-0, 6-1 Mack and Switzer (M) d. 

Switzer (M) d. English (T) .... 6-0,6-3 Bihlman and English (T) . 7-5,6-4 

Score — Michigan, 6; Carnegie Technical Institute, 

MICHIGAN vs, HAFERFORD COLLEGE 

Haverford, Pa., May 19, 1915 

Singles Doubles 

Reindel (M) d. Carey (H) . . . 2-6, 7-5, 6-3 Crawford and Reindel (M) d. 

Allen (H) d. Crawford (M) . . . . 6-3,6-0 Carey and Allen (H) . . . 6-4,2-6,6-4 

Mack (M) d. Weller (H), .... 6-2, 15-13 Mack and Switzer (M) d. 

Hallet (H) d. Switzer (M) .... 6-2,6^ Hallet and Weller (H) . . . 5-7,6-1,6-2 

Score — Michigan, 4; Haverford College, 2 

MICHIGAN vs. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia, Pa., May 19, 1915 

Singles Doubles 

Davis (P) d. Reindel (M) .... 6-1,6-1 Davis and Rowland (P) d. 

Rowland (P) d. Crawford (M) ... 6-1,6-4 Reindel and Crawford (M) . . 6-3,6-0 

Disston (P) d. Mack (M) ... 6-3, 1-6, 7-5 Disston and Replegle (P) d. 

Replegle (P) d. Switzer (M) 6-3, 6-0 Mack and Switzer (M) . . 6-4, 6-0 

Score — Michigan, 0; University of Pennsylvania, 6 

MICHIGAN vs. GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 

Washington, D. C, May 20, 1915 

Sindes Doubles 

Reindel (M) d. O'Boyle (G) . . . 6-2, 2-6, 6-1 Crawford and Reindel (M) d. 

Crawford (M) d. McGuire (G) . . . 6-1, 6^ O' Boyle and McGuire (G) . 5-7, 6-4, 7-5 

Switzer (M) d. Hughes (G) .... 6-3, 6-3 Switzer and Mack (M) d. 

Mack (M) d. Cresy (G) 6-2,6-0 Hughes and Cresy (G) . .6-3,6-3 

Score — Michigan, 6; Georgetown University, 

MICHIGAN vs. U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY 

Annapolis, Md., May 21, 1915 

Singles 
Reindel (M) d. Godfrey (N) . . .6-4,6-3 Mack (M) d. Wood (N) . . . . 6-2,6-1 
Randolph (N) d. Crawford (M) . . 6-1, 6-1 Switzer (M) led Waters (N) . . 7-5, 5-7, 2-1 

Score — Michigan, 2; Naval Academy, 1. Called on account of rain 

MICHIGAN vs. OBERLIN COLLEGE 
Ann Arbor, Mich., May 29, 1915 

Singles 
E. C. Andrus (O) d. Switzer (M) 8-<>, 3-6, 6-1 Wilder (O) d. Reindel (M) ... 6-3, 8-6 
D. W. Andrus (O) d. Polasky (M) 6-3, 6-1 Bissell (O) d. Mack (M) . . . 7-5, 3-6, 6-3 

Doubles 
Bissell and Wilder (O) d. Reindel and Crawford (M) ... 6-4, 7-5 

Score — Michigan, 0; Oberlin College, 5. Called on account of darkness. 



332 



1918 All-Fresh Tennis Team 

PERSONSEL 

Paul Steketee, 1918 Mar 
John Coons, 1918 

ALL-FRESH TENNIS RECORD OF 1915 

MICHIGAN FRESHMEN vs. ALBION COLLEGE 

Ann Arbor, Mich., Mav 14, 1915 

Singlti Doublts 

Fox (A) d. Steltetee (M) 6-2,6-2 Coons and Stebbins (M) d. 

Goodrich (A) i. Stebbins (M) . . . 6-3, 6-t Root and Fox (A) 6-2, 6-2 

Stocking (M) d. Dawe (A) . . . . 6-1,6-2 Goodrich and Dawe (A) d. 
Coons (M) d. Rood (A) .... 6-2,3-6,6-1 Stekeiee and Stockinit (M) . . 6-3,6-2 

Coons and Stebbins (M) d. 

Goodrich and Fox (A) . . 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 

SctJf?— Michigan Freshmen, 4; Albion College, 3 
MICHIGAN FRESHMEN vs. SCOTT HIGH SCHOOL OF TOLEDO 
Ann Arbor. Mich.. May 21, 191S 

SingUs Doublts 

Johns (T) d. Coons (M) 6-3.6-1 Coons and Stebbins (M) d. 

Southeriand (T) d. Stebbins (M) . . 6-2. 7-5 Wilson and Johns (T) . . 10-8, 7-9, 12-10 

Steketee (M) d, Wilson (T) . . . 6-3,5-7,6-0 Perkins and Steketee (M) d. 
Perkins (M) d, Bradley (T) . . , . 6-4.6-1 Southeriand and Bradley {T) . . 6-3,6-3 

Sforr—Michigan Freshmen, 4; Scott High School, 2 
MICHIGAN FRESHMEN vs. MICHIGAN STATE NORMAL 
Ann Arbor. Mich., May 2g, 1915 
SingUs Doublts 

Coons (M) d. DeNancrede (N) . , . 6-0.6-3 Steketee and Stocking (M) d. 
Steketee (M) d. Jefferson (N) . . . 6-2,6-3 Jefferson and DeNancrede (N) . 6-2.6-2 

Stebbins (M) d. Brundage (N) . . , 6-2,7-5 Stebbins and Coons <M) d. 
Stocking (M) d. Hutchinson (N) . , 6-3.6-2 Brundage and Hutchinson (M) , 6-2,6-3 

Srorif— Michigan Freshmen, 6; Michigan State Normal, 



W. R. DeGowan R. S. Anderson J. P. Thompson J. B. Steere F. W. Wood 
M. B. CuTTiNO J.E-Snider H. p. Nicholson I.B.Clark W. J. Schoeple A.C.Simons 
J.R.MosER G.C. Curtis R.W.Hussev H.A. Moul F.A. Rowe L.C.Wilcoken C. B, Marks 



Record of 1915 Rifle Team 



January 28 


Michigan 








861 




February 4 


Michigan 








902 


University of Arizona 


February 11 


Michigan 








904 


Kansas State Aggies 




February 18 


Michigan 








911 


Rhode Island State 




February 25 


Michigan 








92J 


University of Nebraska 




March 4 


Michigan 








901 


Lehigh University 




March 11 


Michigan 








906 






March 18 


Michigan 








919 


University of Idaho 




March 25 


Yale Unive 


sicy 






948 


Michigan . . 





FINAL STANDING OF CLASS C 

Total Score Per Cent. Won Lost 

Yale University 8252 91.68 9 

Kansas State Aggies 8246 91.62 7 2 

University of Nebraska 8230 91.44 6 3 

University of Michigan 8146 90.51 8 1 

University of Arizona 7958 88.42 5 4 

Mississippi Aggies 7601 84.45 3 6 

University of Idaho 7301 81.12 9 

Lehigh University 6863 76.25 2 7 

University of Washington 6789 75.43 4 5 

Rhode Island State 1618 17.97 1 8 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Paul L. Sampsell 
Juuu3 L. Beers 

£. R. BORCHEKDT 

JoHN R. Nicholson 
Harvev H. Sfrick 
EowiN B, Palmer 
JohnA. Herr:kc,Jr. 
RoBKRT Turner 
Thomas R. Peirsoi, 
Vincent J. O'Connor 



Stan DISH Robinson 
J. B. Marks 
F. A. Bade 
E. M. Williams 
James D. O'Connor 
U.S.G. Cherrv 
Lester F. Stearns 
Chester L. Fordnev 
Glenn Howland 



Edwin B. Palmer 
Preiident 



T. Hawlev Tapfiho 
Stcrelary- Triamrer 



Action in the 1915 Im 



Rav J. Mills K. (Jurne 

1916 Managir 1915 \ 

The Michigan Interscholastic 

I9IS OFFICERS 

V. GuKNEE Millard Iniersc 

Phillip G. Bartelme Graduj 

Ray J. Mills Assisu 

Alvin M. Bentlev Assists 

J. W. Thomas Assists 

HarrvW. Ker» Assists 

MICHIGAN ISTERSCIIOLASTIC RECORDS 



: Manager 
■ Manager 
: Manager 



Half mite run . 
Mile run . . . 
Two mile run 
120-yard high hurdles . 
220-yard low hurdles 
High jump . . . 
Broad jump , . . 
Pole vanit . . . 



L904— HoRenson, Le«'is Institute. IWXi— Cook, Chillif. 

1913— Von Thom, Oak Harbor, 0. 10 sec. 
1914— Carier. Chicago Universitv High. 21 2/5 sec. 
1914— Shi verick, Chicago Universitv High. 51 1/5 sec. 
1914— Spink, Chicago Onivetsity High, 1 min. 56 sec. 
1909— Cowley, Muskegon. 4 min. 3R 1/5 sec. 
1909— Mann, Muskegon. 10 min. 10 3/5 sec. 
1915— Zoellin. Lewis Institute. IS 3/4 sec 
1913— C. Corev, Chicago Universitv High. 24 2/5 sec, 
1906— Patterson, Detroit U. S. r. (x. 1 1/4 in. 
1906— Cook, ChllHcothe. 23 ft, S in, 
1913— Foss, Chicago Universitv High, 12 ft. 5,'S in. 
1909— Kohler, Lansing H. S. '170 ft. 3 in. 
1907— Homer, Grand Rapids. 50 ft. 4 in. 
1908— Alderman, Lake Forest A. 120 ft. J in. 
1913- Chicago University High, 1 min. 33 1 '5 sec, 

TRACK CHAMPIONS AT THE INTERSCHOLASTIC MEHTS 



1898— Lansing. (Mich,) High School. 
1899— Detroit, (Mich.) Central High School, 
1900— .Ann Arbot. (Mich.); Grand Rapids, (Mich,) 

Central— Tie for first. 
1901— Detroit Central High School. 
1902 — Detroit University School, 
1903— Uwis Institute, (Chicago). 
1904— Detroit University School. 
1905 — Detroit University School. 
1906— Lewis Institute (Chicago). 



. . (Chicago). 
1908— Detroit. (Mich.) Central High School. 
1909— Muskegon. (Mich.) High School. 
1910— Shelby. (.Mich.) High School. 
1911— Toledo Central, (Ohio) High School. 
1912— No meet. 

1913 — Chicago University High. 
1914 — Chicago University High. 
1915— LaGtange High School (III.) 



17th Annual Inter-Scholastic Track and Field Meet 



Ferry Field, May 22, 1915 



THE SCORE BOARD 



CLASS A 



LaGrange, Ills. 
Lewis Institute 
University High 
Muskegon 
Detroit Eastern 
Oregon, Ills. . 
Grand Rapids 
Richmond 
Toledo Scott . 
Mt. Clemens . 
Bay City Western 
Lansing 
D. U. S. . . 
Battle Creek . 
Plymouth 
Wavne 



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34 
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18 
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Class B— Rockford 15, D. U. S. 13, Lowell 13, Deckerville 10^, Plymouth 73^, Crosweli 7, 
St. Joseph 7, Wayne 1. 



CLASS A EVENTS 



lOO-Yard Dash 
120 High H'dles 
Mile Run 
220-Yard Dash 
440-Yard Dash 
220 Low H'dles 
880-Yard Run 
12-lb. Shot Put 

Pole Vault 



Zoellin (LI) 
Zoellin (LI) 
Nott (LaG) 
Zoellin (LI) 
Burke (R) 
Smart (LaG) 
Mueller (LI) 
Kimball (M) 

Graham (UH) 



High Jump Smart (LaG) 

Hammer Throw Kimball (M) 
Broad Jump Landers (O) 
Discus Throw Kimball (M) 
Half Mile Relay Lewis Institute 



Floete (UH) 
Fey (LaG) 
Thompson (DE) 
Floete (UH) 
MacKenzie (GR) 
Fey (LaG) 
Nott (LaG) 
Finzel (DE) 
Albright (UH) ' 
Cross (M) kied 
Landers (O) 

Moorehead (TS) 

Colley (LI) 
Graham (UH) 
Breitmeyer (Mt.C) 
LaGrange 



Henr>' (DE) 
Smart (LaG) 
Vandevisse (GR) 
Smart (LaG) 
Mueller (LI) 
Landers (O) 
Wait (BCW) 
Graham (UH) 



Herschman (TS) :10 1/5 
Williams (DE) :15 4/5 
Gates (BC) 
Henry (DE) 
Lamonde (LI) 
Williams (DE) 
Forbes (GR) 
Smith (W) 



4:45 4/5 

:22 

:52 

:25 1/5 
2:05 

49 ft. 3 J in. 



Scott (DE) 1 . 
Haigh (DUS)/ ^'^"^ 
Miller (L) Scott (LaG) 

Smart (LaG) Colley (LI) 

Belknap (GR) Bennett (P) 
(Other contestants disqualified) 



10 ft. 6 in. 



5 ft. 7 in. 

152 ft. 1 in. 

21 ft. 9 in. 
105 ft. 



338 



Underclass Contests of 1915 



SPRING 

THE freshman class of 1918 had been held scoreless in the fall contests of 1914. This was not an 
encouraging record with which to enter into the games that followed in the spring, but the event 
proved a good test for their "come-back" power. 

The big games were scheduled to come off on May 22nd and 23rd. Both classes had previously 
held large mass meetings at which the traditional spirit of antagonism between these underclasses was 
stirred to overflowing. On these occasions Egmont Hildner was chosen as captain in the push ball con- 
test for the sophomores, and Archie Walls for the freshmen. 

The tugs of war were staged as usual on Friday afternoon; but their location on the Huron was 
changed from above the Michigan Central Depot, as formerly, to the banks between the island and the 
new bridge of the River Road. This change was made in an effort to secure more even conditions for 
both sides in the pulling. The lightweight teams burrowed into their positions first, and, on the shoot- 
ing of the gun to start, there commenced one of the fiercest tugs of war in the history of the University. 
It holds the record for time, they remaining in a deadlock for 1 hour and 18 minutes, and then it was 
discovered that the sophomores had three men on their side above the lawful number, so the decision 
was given to the freshmen as a forfeit. The two following tugs were made much shorter by a ruling that 
all had to stand up from the beginhing. In the middleweight pull the freshmen dragged the sophomores 
into the chilly Huron within 9 minutes; and then the second year men came back in the heavyweight 
and doused the freshmen in 4 minutes. 

The contests were continued on Ferry Field Saturday morning, and first on the program were the 
obstacle relay races. There were three of these and the sophomore teams won the first two by a large 
margin, but the freshmen were victors in the third. This made the score a tie, and the big push ball 
contest had to decide the result. It was hotly fought by both sides, and despite the superior numbers 
of the freshmen they were held thruout from making a goal. However, they were allowed the winning 
point at the end for having the ball over the sophomore line; and thus carried off the spring contests 
by a score of 4 to 3. 

FALL 

The freshmen class that had been squelched in the fall a year ago returned this time and admin- 
istered the same punishment to the aspiring freshmen of 1919. In the mass meetings that preceded, 
rush captains were chosen, Archie Walls again being selected by the sophomores and Ward Peterson 
by the freshmen. 

October 16th was the day set aside for the memorial struggle, and eariy in the morning the oppos- 
ing ranks began to assemble on the campus. The green paint found its way in liberal touches to the 
immature brows of the yearlings, and they followed the sophomores in a riotous march to Ferry Field. 
But their spirit was soon to be humbled. They encircled the three poles which it was their duty to de- 
fend and awaited the onslaughts of the sophomores. Those about the center pole were not kept long 
in wairing, for it was here that the sophomores concentrated their first attack. They came from opposite 
directions, and after a fierce contest which raged for 8 minutes a sophomore rose out of the struggling 
mass and scaled the pole for the flag. This won, the sophomores turned on the west pole and by rapid 
charges crawled over the green topped domes of the helpless freshmen and the flag was lowered within 
the small space of 3 minutes. All efforts of both sides then became centered on the east pole, but here 
again the jubilant second year men were successful within 4 minutes. 

This left the freshmen windless and at the empty end of a 4 to score, but the Cane Spree was yet 
to take place. This developed into a close and hard fight, but the sophomores could not be defeated. 
Draws were called in the case of six canes, but out of the remaining twenty-four the sophomores wrestled 
away thirteen. This added one more point to the sophomores' total, and the freshmen had little to smile 
over when they exposed their tattered shirts to the photographer before Hill Auditorium. 



M 




Bastian (Football) 
Benton (Baseball, Football) 
Brandell (Baseball) 
Carroll (Track) 
Catlett (Football) 
Cochran (Football) 
Corbin (Track) 
Cross (Track) 
Davidson (Baseball) 
Donnelly (Track) 
Dunne (Football) 
Ferguson (Baseball) 
Ferris (Track) 
Fox (Track) 
Labadie (Baseball) 
Maulbetsch (Football) 
McQueen (Baseball) 
Millard (Football) 



W. A. Niemann (Baseball) 
W. K. Niemann (Baseball) 
Norton (Football) 
Rehor (Football) 
Reimann (Football) 
RoEHM (Football) 
Shivel (Baseball) 
SisLER (Baseball) 
Smith (Track) 
Smith (Football) 
Staatz (Football) 
Stewart (Baseball) 
Ufer (Track) 
Waltz (Baseball) 
Watson (Football) 
W^ESKE (Football) 
Whalen (Football) 
Wilson (Track) 



340 




Anderson (Baseball) 
Arentz (Baseball) 
Bastian (Track) 
Berray (Track) 
Boyd (Football) 
Calvin (Football) 
Catlett (Track) 
Caswell (Baseball) 
Crumpacker (Track) 
DeGowin (Track) 
Fontanna (Track) 
Hildner (Football) 
Howe (Football) 
Huntington (Track) 



John (Track) 
Kessler (Track) 
Kuivinen (Track) 
Lapsley (Track) 
Nichols (Baseball) 
O'Brien (Track) 
Perschbacher (Track) 
Raymond (Football) 
Robinson (Track) 
Sharpe (Football) 
SoDDY (Baseball) 
Trelfa (Track) 
Waterbury (Track) 
Zeiger (Football) 



341 




Adams (Football) 
BiBEK (Football) 
BiRNEY (Football) 
BiXLER (Football) 
Brazell (Football) 
Cohen (Football) 
DiEDERS (Football) 
Dorrance (Football) 
EwERT (Football) 
Hendershot (Football) 
Huss (Football) 
Ingham (Football) 
Johnson (Football) 
KoHR (Football) 



LoLCKS (Football) 
McCall (Football) 
Newell (Baseball) 
Payeite (Baseball) 
PoBANZ (Football) 
Shutes (Football) 
Smith (Baseball) 
SoRLiNG (Football) 
Taylor (Baseball) 
Thomas (Baseball) 
Thompson (Football) 
Warner (Football) 
Wickham (Football) 



342 




Addison (Football) 
Allmendinger (Football) 
Amtsbeuchler (Football, 

Wrestling) 
Anken BRANDT (Indoor Baseball) 
Armstrong (Track) 
Atwater (Football) 
Baker (Relay, Football) 
Becker (Relay, Football) 
Bell (Football) 
Bennie (Track) 
Bentley (Football) 
Berray (Track, Basketball) 
Brandell (Football) 
Broth ERTON (Football) 
Brown (Football, Baseball) 
Brownell (Baseball) 
Bruch (Track) 
Cameron (Football) 
Campbell (Football) 
Catlett (Track) 
Casey (Indoor Baseball) 
Chenot (Football) 
Cooper (Football) 
Cork (Football) 
Costa (Indoor Baseball) 
Cowan (Football) 
Cross (Track) 
Coryell (Soccer) 
Cochran (Hockey) 
Christensen (Relay) 
Curry (Basketball) 
Chatfield (Track) 
Day (Track) 
Davis (Track) 
De Liefde (Soccer) 



Donaldson (Football, Baseball) Ostrander (Football) 



DuGAN (Baseball) 
Eger (Football) 
Ferguson (Football) 
Ferris (Football) 
Fox (Track) 

Funk (Football, Baseball) 
Galbraith (Baseball) 
Goodwin (Football) 
Gates (Football) 
Gore (Track) 
Hayden (Football) 



Paisley (Football) 

Pearl (Football) 

Phelps (Track) 

PopiN (Football) 

Quail (Track) 

Richards (Track) 

Richardson (Football) 

W. Robertson (Soccer) 

J. Robertson (Soccer) 

Rowan (Football, Relay, Baseball) 

Scott (Football, Baseball) 



Henderson (Football,Basketball)SEELEY (Basketball, Football) 



Headman (Basketball) 

Holt (Football) 

Hyde (Basketball) 

James (Soccer, Relay) 

John (Relay) 

Jones (Relay) 

Lambert (Track) 

Lamoreaux (Football) 

Lynch (Track) 

Lynch (Relay) 

Lyttle (Track) 

Manwarring (Basketball) 

Martens (Football) 

May (Basketball) 

Martin (Baseball) 

McCall (Football, Baseball, 

Soccer) 
McNamara (Football) 
Monetpa (Track) 
Morse (Baseball, Football) 
Murphy (Track, Relay) 
Nichols (Baseball) 
Norton (Relay) 



Shafer (Football) 

Smallman (Football, Baseball) 

Smith (Track) 

Smith (Relay) 

Snider (Football) 

Staatz (Basketball) 

Staley (Football) 

K. M. Stevens (Baseball. Track) 

P.H. Stevens (Baseball, Football) 

Stewart (Football) 

Stone (Football) 

SuTOR (Football) 

Tappan (Basketball) 

Thomas (Baseball, Football) 

Trelfa (Relay) 

Ufer (Track, Relay) 

Vonachen (Basketball) 

Warner (Basketball) 

Watt (Football) 

Watts (Soccer) 

Westrate (Football) 

Wickham (Relay) 

Woolf (Football) 



343 



James W. Thomas, InUrcolUgi Manas^r Floyd A. Rowe, Intramural Director 

Inter-Class Football, Season of 1915 

FINAL ROUND 
High leam in first division nin« Campus Cliampionship 
FIRST DIVISION 



Senior Laws 

Senior Engini 



6-0| 






. . (1st game 0-0) 7-0 

Forfeit to Senioi Lits 

STANDING, FIRST DIVISION 

Won Lost Team 

2 Senior Laws 

2 1 Senior Engineers 

SECOND DIVISION 

last team in first division for fourth set of ni 



Soph Enginct 
Medics 
Soph Lits 
Senior Engini 



High team , 

|Soph Lits 6-0 

jSoph Engineers . . forfeit 

J.J ISoph Lits 9-0 

Wor 



2 1 Soph Lits . 

Indoor Baseball, 1915-1916 

FINAL STANDING 

Won Lost P.C. Team 

4 1.000 Fresh Lits 

. 3 1 .750 Architects . . 

. 2 2 ,500 Soph EnRineets 

Inter-Class Hockey, 1915-1916 



FINAL STASDING 



Won Lost P.C. 



Won Lost P.C. 



Havden 



Holt Amtsbelthler 
MARTriNs Allmendingeb 
Bbotherton 



1916 Literary Football Team 

Flayers Pmilion 

R. Stewart l-eft Knd 

C. C. Stone Left laclik 

T. Amtsbeuchler Left Guard 

W. Brotherton OntM 

W. Shafer Right Guard 

W. Holt Rieht Tackle 

E. J. Allmendincer RJEht End 

J. Cork, (Captain) Quarter 

A. M. Bentlev Left Half 

E, Brandell Right Half 

A. C. Martons Full Back 

L. OsTRANDER RJKhi Uuard 

H. P. Hayden Right Tackle 

W. A. Pearl Left Tackle 

J. E. Chenot Manager 



1916 Law Baseball Team 

J. K. Nichols Out Field 

P. H. Stevens . Kirs. Base 

C.J. Morse ... Center Field 

J. F. Scott Righc Field 

L. Thomas (Capiain and ManagerJ Catcher 

E. R. McCall Second Base ai 

C. C. Rowan Pitcher 

E. S. Maktcn Third Base 

H. D. Browh Left Field 

R,0. Rkou-nell Shortstop 



1916 Dental Baseball Team 

Rich Captain 

Boi.T Catcher 

Wright Pitcher 

MoRAN Shortstop 

Rich Second 

McKknn* Thitd 

Chichester Left 

ii'-'<oi.f:v Right 

ButfiviN . Center 

Hawn Utility 

BARRiN<^m Utility 



GiLHARR Hadlev Goodsell Cramer Hill Scmons 

WhITMARSH TiNSMAN GoETZ TaVLOR CAMEROh 

Brown Wilson 



1918 Dental Football Team 

A, J. Cardinal Right End 

A. H. Hadlev RiglH Tackle 

E. G. Wilson Right Guard 

F. H. TiNSMAN Center 

F, R. GoETi Left Guard 

J. 0. GooDSELL Left Tactle 

W. J. Mason Ufl End 

G. J. WHtTMARSH Quarter 

W. M. Taylor Right Half 

P. S. Simons Full Back 

B. Brown Left Half 

E. A. Gelhaar Substitute 

H. C. Cramer Substitute 

M. C. Cameron Substitute 

Behj. Hill Substitute 



The Persephone Fete 



The myth of Persephone wis presetitcd in classical dancing on the evening of May 26ih, 1915, a 
Observatory Hollow. The leading characters were: 

Persephone Genevieve O'Leabv Hermes . . Mina Winslow 

Demeter . Helen Ckamfion Aidoneus . Kathercne MacBride 



spectators. The Sf"? dancers were exceptionally good. There was a cast of thirty-live dancets repre- 
senting. "Winter , "Summer", "Famine", and "Spring Pantomime". 

The success of the dancing was due to the careful training of Miss Alice Evans, Physical Director 



of Women, and Miss Marion Wood, assistant. The music for the "Famine Dance" and the ir. 

to the "Greek Maiden Dance" were original compositions of Ellen Sargent. The presenting of the 
idea of the myth was greatly aided by the artistic costuming under the direction of Helen Dow. The 
orchestrations were done by Mr, William Mills. The orchestra was composed of University students 
under the direction of Mr. Lee Parker and Mr, Frank Rummell. The committees in charge wete as 
follows: 

Business Manager Alice Blodcett 

Sub-Committees M. Hanson, M. Bassett, M, Carpenter 

Advertising M. Reynolds, E. Vail, M. Carlysle 

Costumes H, Dow, D, Probst, H, Glass, D. Hafford, H, Kremer 

Dancing Helen Elv 

Music Ellen Sarcent 



Women's Athletic Board 



Holme. 


s TuBBs Shinkman 


MacFarlane Westbrook Armstrong 




PocKMAN Mead 


Evans Bloocett Vyn 




Carpentek Irish 


Fleugel von Walthavsen 



Women's Athletic Department 

Until the year 1915-16, women's athletics at Michigan wete controlled by the Physical Director 
and an Athletic Chairman appointed by the President of the Women's League. 

In October, 1915, the Chairman, Madge Mead, proposed to the University women the organiza- 
tion of a Women's Athletic Department which would arouse more interest and cooperation in women's 
sports. The suggestion was carried out. and a constitution drawn up by the Athletic Committee was 
ratified by the Board of Directors of the League. 

A "tag day" announced the birth of the organization, membership pledges were signed by hundreds 
of women, and a Wienie Roast was celebrated at Palmer Kield. During the last two weeks of the out- 
door season a wienie sale was conducted at Palmer Kield, and on November 12th the Department 
gave a Topsy Turvy Dance which was well attended and hnancially successful. 

At Dean Jordan's suggestion the Department has pledged itself to raise funds for a new club house 
at Palmer Field. This is expected to cost about K'OOO and will be planned on a rustic type. The de- 
partment hopes to raise money for this fund by various events such as rhe skating carnival of 
January IKth, and by a pledge campaign. 



General Lfniverslty 
ORGANIZATIONS 



The Michigan Union 



THE national campaign among Michigan alumni for funds with which to build a new clubhouse . 
served to make the Michigan Union known even to the prospective freshmen about lo enter 
the University last fall. For that reason, the present small quarters were somewhat over- 
crowded during the opening days of school. The free employment bureau and rooming list 
committee were able to render assistance to a greater number of students than ever before. The climax 
came on (he Friday evening of the first week of college, when the freshmen, after attending the mass 
meeting at Hill Auditorium, adjourned to the open house given primarily for them, and packed the 
assembly room to overflowing. 

The annual Football Smoker was attended by the full quota allowed, in spite of the disastrous 
football season. The Band, and Glee and Mandolin Clubs provided (he music for the occasion and 
"Lyndy" with some new slides caused several laughs during the evening. Michigan's "Thanksgiving" 
was well told by Werner Schroeder, and Michigan traditions were clearly described by Professor Hitdner 
of the German Department. " Tom" May of the Detroit Free Press was the only out of town speaker 
but the quality of his speech made up for the lack of numbers. At the close of the Program Professor 
Gram of (he lioard of Control of Athletics presented the " M " certificates to the deserving candidates. 
It is hardly necessary to state that the tobacco supply smoked as well as ever and the doughnuts and 
cider filled the rest of the bill along that line. 

The first membership dinner held in December was attended by about one hundred fifty Union 
members. The second dinner was attended by about the same number. Short snappy programs 
characterized both, it is hoped that the last dinner of the year, to be given as an inauguration banquet 
for the officers newly elected for the coming year, will be even better in every way than the ones already 

"Tres Rouge," the 1916 Opera, had a ver>- successful week before Ann Arbor audiences and was 
received well by the alumni at Chicago, Detroit and Toledo. In spite of the fact that delay seemed 
to be the principal feature of the work in getting (he book and music completed, Mr. Morgan was able 
to stage a musical comedy, free from specialties and srill teeming with situations that made each audi- 
ence laugh. This year's production has certainly done its share in maintaining the standard se( by the 
best of previous oFerings of the Mimes. 

The "Campus" life-membership campaign held just before spring vacation, showed that the great 
mass of students have considerable mierest in the largest organization at the University. A committee 
of men, one hundred fifty strong, raised forty thousand dollars in three nights, making the total amount 
subscribed on the campus approximately one hundred thousand dollars. In short, there are at present, 
two thousand students who have expressed a desire to become life members. 

As a "hanging out" place, the Union has been very popular this year. The Forums and Faculty 
nights have attracted their share of attention and the Sunday afternoons have been attended by an 
appreciable number.. The Bridge Tournament, while not having so many participants as those had in 
the past, was none the less successful than those of previous years. The distinctly new features of the 
Saturday night dances were the long lines which formed about four o'clock each Thursday afternoon, 
and the waiting list for those who were not in time to secure a ticket. Special dances were held on 
various occasions and the attendance at those hardly ever fell below the limit of one hundred couples. 



Present plans call for beginninK work on the new buildinK it a date not far distant. It 
hoped that interest in all various activities will not lessen because the realization of a great d 
near at hand, and we all hope that next year at this time we can see a new structure standing! wl 
present one is now located. H. C. G. 



Board of Directors of the University of Michigan Union 



DEPARTMEST flCE-PRESlDESTS 



te 


£ B. Angell, 11 


Literary 


Frank J. Kane . . 
John W. F.nkenstaed 
WrLFRED B. Shaw . 


. Combined Dcpts. 


crs T. Mack . . 


. . EnEineerinn 


T . RecordirR Secretary' 


Wem 


NER W. SCHROEDER 


. . Law 


Alumni Secretaf)' 


Wii. 


JAM J. ECAN . . 


, . Medicine 


Prof, Evans Hoibroo 


K Financial Secretary 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dean Henri- M. Bates Dr. Reuben Peterson Prof. Herbert C. Sadler 

ALUMNI MEMBERS 
Earl D. Babst, New York Citv Henrv W. Douclas, Ann Arbot 

William F. Carter, St. Louis ' John A. Jameson, Chicago 

Walter E. Oxtoby, Detroii 

Homer L. Heath, General Secretary and Manager Edward W. Haislip, Assistant Manager 



The 1916 Michigan Union Opera 

Book and Lyrics by W. A. P. John and H. R. Schbadzkc 
Music by A. J. GoRNKr/.KV and C. S. I-awton 

(,UV/.l//rr££S 

UnJtr tht dirt-clion and sii|>trvisiDn of C'HAHI.f.S S. MoHr.AN, Jn. 

Thehon D. Weaver General Chairman 

Homer L. Heath 'Ireasiirer 

MacDonald S. Reku Stane Manager 

Francis T. Mack Master of Costumes 

Sidney Steen Master of Properties 

BfiHjAMiN S. MoTTER Chairman of Music Co 

{AMES M, Barrett, J R Chairman of Publicity Committee 

!ari. V. Moore Musical Ditectot 

Aiiislant! lo Gtntrai Chairman 
Kemp S. Burge Glenn Howland Arthur Schui-f 

Aniilonls lo Stage Manager 
GoROON Smith Dick Gardner 

Asiislanh lo Mailer oj Cosluitiei 
E. B. Palmer Thatcher Rea Tom Reiu 

Asjistanis to Mailer of Properliei 

A, S. Hart John W. Neumann John C. B. Parker 

Aiiiitant to Treaiurer 
Staats Abrams 

,WiiJiV Publiihing Commillee 

RoBT. Collins Cvril Talbot Karl Walker 

Pttbtieily Committee 
L. J. Bulklev John Langs Leonard Nieter 

Norman T. Bolles 



Cook 


Carson 


Olsen 




MoNINGER 


Allen 


Hkndei 


Collins 


Carroll 
Sonnv 


Km 


Shafer 


Wilson 



The Student Council 1915-1916 



Fin! Sfmtiler 
Thomas P. Sodliy. President 
Russell S. Collins. Vice-Pre 



Francis T. Ma< 



, CorrcspondiriK Secrccar 



Herbkrt R. Wilson. Aiidiior 



HknryC, RiHHKL. President 
Krancis T. Mack, Vice-President 
H. Clement Allen, Secreiarv 
Herbert R. Wilson, Treasurer 



Has 



dHkp 



CiRANT i.. Co. 



i. Corr, 



. Audit. 





MKMBFHS 


Law School 

H. C. RVMMKL 

C. L. Cook 


Literary CaHegr 
R. S, COLHN.S 

W, M. Shakkr 
R. M. Cakson 
A. S. Hart 


Hcb.ml 01 SUdidnr 
Harold Henmrson 


Drulal Collff.c 
H. R. Wilson 



r. P. SoUDV 

K. r. Mach 
H. I,. Carroll 
H. A. Taylor 

ArKkiUtiural CoHtg' 
A.. V. MONJNGER 



Coll/gr i.j Pharin. 
K. T. Olsln 



CraduaU Sckoo, 
R. a KJLBOH^ 



The Student Council 

THE Presidents of the Student Council for the past year have been T. Soddy, and 
H. C. Rummel, two leaders who have done a great deal to carry out and expand 
the work of the body. The Council has tried to crystallize student sentiment 
and feeling into definite action and has endeavored to determine student sentiment. 
It has also tried to act definitely and rapidly upon a policy of merit which has been ad- 
vanced, and to govern its action by a standard of the greatest ultimate good to the 
student body. 

Several things of a tangible type have been carried out in the past year. The Council 
brought the city, the Eastern Michigan Edison Company, the University authorities 
and the student body together on the "Safer Huron" campaign, and then turned the 
work over to the Michigan Boat Club, though still working with the latter organization. 
It has worked with the Health Service to put rope fire-escapes in every fraternity and 
sorority house. It has taken up Packard Academy for student dancing, the proceeds 
of which go to charity. In that line, it has provided for big campus dances every Saturday 
night next year to be held in Barbour Gymnasium. It has also provided for co-operation 
between the men and women by establishing a joint committee of three Student Council 
members and two of the Women's Judiciary Council, which meets to decide policies of 
special interest to both. The value of each is apparent. 

The Council is now attempting to establish a closer relation between the faculty 
and students in two ways. It is attempting to have three student members on the Board 
in Control of Student Affairs. It is also working toward compulsory Freshmen assemblies 
in the literary college. 

In general it may be said that it is trying to make the Council the officially recognized 
student organization for carrying on the work that is strictly concerned with student affairs. 
It is attempting to do this by establishing closer co-operation between campus societies 
and itself, by appointing society members as the official Student Council committee, etc., 
and by asking them to send representatives to discuss campus problems, so that a thor- 
oughly representative campus opinion may be obtained. All in all, the year has been a 
good one, and the outlook is very promising. J. A. H. 



361 



Mdure 


Feige 


Cornell 


Spencer Vai 


L SeIOW 


'ORTH KrEGER 


ER. LeMERT 


Stowe 


Bancroft S 



Young Women's Christian Association 

ADVISORY BOARD 



Dean Mvra B, Jot 
Mrs. A. E. Jennin< 
Mrs. W. R. Humpi. 



Mrs. T. K. Rankin, President 

Mrs. C. L- Wash 
Mrs-C. H. Kaui 
Mrs. Harrv Mac 



Hui 



H Bancroft, Ass'i Secretarj' 



Marion F. Stowe, President 
Jessie Spence, Vice-President 
Grace Fletcher, Secretary 
Aris Van Deusen, Treasurer 
Geta Tucker 
V. Freda S Etc worth 
Ann ETTA Wood 
Grace Thomas ma 



Mahiola Cornell 
Florence Snvder 
Ethel Vail 
Beatrice Lamdrecii 

Dorothy Pierce 
Evelyn Moore 
Laura Feige 
Ruth Kreger 



Irwin 


Mo 


ORE 




Taylor 


Wo<.i. 


Breitfiel 


WUENSCH 


Reima 


N 


LOVEJOV 


JUDSON 



Students' Christian Association 

JuDOE V, H, Lane Chairman 

N. Karl Pinney President 

Dr. Carl Hatber Mrs. A. K. Jenning 

Prof. W. W. Beman Mrs. T. E. Rankin 

Dr. Dean W. Myers Dean Myra B. Johi 

Mr. DwrcHT Goddard Mr. G, Prank Allmi 

Prof. T. C. Trueblood Prof. John R. Allen 

Prof. J. I.. Marki.fy W. H. Tinker, Secretary 

Young Men's Christian Association 

OFFICERS 

Lewis C. Reimann President 

Waldo R. Hunt Vice-President 

Philip C. LovEjoY Sec-Treasurer 

COLLEGE PRESIDENTS 
M. W. Welch, Literary W. O'K. Henderson. Engineerir 

K. E. Richardson, Law W. B. Klinesteker, Dental 

W. R. Breitfield. Pharmic 

CHURCH REPRESENTATIVES 
Earl Sexton, Congregational L C. Johnson, Episcopal 

D. W. Taylor, Baptist Stanley Wood, Methodist 

H. H. Irwin, Presbyterian 

CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES 
Rudolph Wuensch John R. Kneebone 

Everett Judson Whitley Moore 



Women's League 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 



, '16, President 

Ruth Brown, '16, Recording Secretarj- 
Albertine Loomcs, '17, Corresponding S 



DIRECTORS 



Ui 



•17 



Clab 



A \YT 



COMMITTEE CIIAIRMAS 
Marjorie Delevan, '16, Vocational Kmcue Sarcent, 'K., House Committee 

Martha Gray, '16, Women's Editor of the Michigan Daily Madge Mead, 'lf>, Athletics 
Elsie Pall, '17. Membership Geta TiiCkEk, '17, Social 

Frances Wav, "17, Point System Ruth Hitkei, '16, Banquet 

Helen Elv, '16, Social Service Rubehta Woodworth, '17, Dramatics 

IIOl'SE REPRESESTATirES 



Helen Bush, '17 


Anna I.loyd, '18 


Helen Ritchie. '17 


Ann Christenson, 'IK 


Emily I.oman, '19 


Beatrice Smith, '17 


Winifred Davie, '18 


Janet McFarland, '17 
Maoce Mead, '16 


Marjorie Stoll. '18 


Dorothy Dorfee, '19 


Christina Stringer,' 


Marguerite Eness, 'IS 


Gladys Mvsselwhite, '19 


Mildred Shankland, 


Ilah Gorden, '16 


Florence Orwig, '18 


Ruth'Irombley, '16 


Frieda Garrett, '17 


Elsie Paul, '17 


Marjorie Votev, 'L7 


Gladys Hamilton, '17 


Betty Patchin. 'IS 


Alice WoEssNER, 'IN 


Stella Hicgins, '18 


Ardelle Perkins. '17 


Helen Webb. '16 


CHARLorrE Kelsey, 'IS 


I.HiLLA Quirt, '16 

ADI'ISORY BOARD 


Marion Williams. 'IS 


Mrs. Aicler Mr; 


i. Hall Dr, Pratt 


Mrs, Wans 



Way 
Lambrecht 



Judiciary Council of the Women's League 



Chairman 
Members tx-Offii 


Beatrice I.AMBkECHT, as Vice-President of the League 

: Helen Humphrevs, as President of the l^aRiie 
\Krances Way, as Point System aairman 


tiass Represent at 


.Grace Fletcher. '16 
ives {Frances Way. -17 
I.Anna Lloyd, "18 


AdvlEtory Membei 


Mrs. M.B.Jordan 


The Jiidiciarv Count 
factor of the University 


■il of the Women's League has completed its third year, and is now ai 
life. 



The Judiciary- Council stands in the same relation to the girls as the Student Council docs in re- 
spect to the men. It enforces the laws which are made by the Regents, and also oversees the general 
work of discipline amonjc the girls. Then too. individual cases of conduct are brought up before this 
body and are acted upon privately. The Council acts upon many cases, and passes laws which cannot 
of course be made public. 

In short, the Judiciary Council has interested itself in all viral points of Campus life, greatly aided 
in its work by Professor Lloyd and Mrs. Jordan. 



Ross 


Homer 




HOAK 


Galloway 


Hobart 


Grei 


FE Tandy 


Black 


SOLL 




Love JOY 



Senior Foresters 



S. Rekford Black 




Walter K. Jotter 


MelvinI. Bradner 




Max B. JANN0W3K 


Albert K. Galloway 




Owen L. I.ovejov 


Raymond F. Grefe 




Paul H. Reynolds 


George M. Hoak 




C. Howard Ross 


Seth G. Hogart 




FredJ.W. SoLL 


Wilson C. Homkr 


Harold L. Tandy 


Lester C.Staudt 



CLUB OFFICERS 

E. A. Gallup President 

R, H. Easterbbooks V.c^Presideni 

G. M. HoAK RecordinR Secretary 

F. D. Newbrook Corresponding Secretary 

F. J. W. SoLL Treasurer 

G. O. WHrrE Editor of Forester 

C. E. Streeter Associate Editor of Forester 

S. R. Black Business Manaeer of Forester 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

E. A. Gallup W. E, Bond N. L. Carv 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Stella Rosa Roth Olenus Lee Sponsler Leigh Iahvis Young 

FiLiBERT RoTK Pahrish STORRa LovEjov James Henrv Pottinger 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

E. J. Allmendinger S. B.tANDERSON W. M. Broberg 

H. J. Andrews L. D. Arnold A. S. Brock 

W. E. Bond S. R. Augspurcer O. P. Burnett 

C. W. Bovei L, Brown K. H. Case 

N. L. Cary R. H. Dorr F. R. Clark 

E. L. Demmon Remington Ellis Russell Dodd 

R. H. Easterbrooks S. G. Kontana A. C. Foley 

E. A. Gallup C. C. Garland E. M. Hoerner 
A, P. Racelis H. W. Graham D. R. Hook 

A. E. WiESLANOER E. W. Hartwell W. C. Iohns 

T. F. Bartlett R. C. Hill R. E. Johnson 

S, R. Black S. C. Hopkins A. D. Maulbetsch 

M. I. Bradner R. H. Howard C. E. Pardon 

A. K. Galloway C. H. Hsia T. W. Southworth 

R, F. Grefe C. a. Kutzleb F. L. Tobey 

G. M. HoAK LuDWcc Lasko J. E. Woodman 

S. G. Hobart Y. T. Lockhard H. B. Sherman 

W. C. Homer F. D. Newbrook N. A. Hixson 

W. E. Jon er C. S. Seabrook E. S. Bryant 

M. B. Kannowski Ewali> Schui.z A. W. Cameron 

O. L. Lovejoy C. K. Streeter J. K. Fisk 

P, H. Reynolds G. O. White G. R. Ferguson 

C. H. Ross A. R. VoRYS H. E. Gladhill 

F. j. W. SOLL P. E. AlDEN C. HlLLEBOE 

I., C. Staudt ]. C. Andrews H. Kerber 

H. L. Tandy H. W. Branson H. M. Lumsden 

C. B. Webster A. M. Nicholson 



Geneva Club of the University of Michigan 

OFFICERS 

Gladys Whelan President 

Geta Tucker Vice-President 

Josephine Randall ' , , . Secretary 

Alice Burtlese IVeasurer 



Hai 



T Wai 



H Mk.' 



RuiH Krikcek 
Dorothy Mohan, 

iKENK KiSSELL 

Marian Stowe 



aWo< 



Hope 



The Michigan Dames Association 







OFFICERS 








Mrs. H. M. Lowe . 






Presideni 




Mrs. E. W. Sink 






Vice-President 




Mrs. W. C. RussEt . 






Secretary 




Mrs. S. R. Guild . 






Assistant Secretary 




Mrs. R. D. Chatfielu 


MEMBERS 




Treasurer 


Mrs 


W. J. Atwkll 


Mrs. C. H. Forsythe 


Mrs 


J.O. I'ERRiNE 


Mrs 


H. E. Barklev 


Mrs. W. a. Gressman 


Mrs 


R. W. PRYOR 


Mrs 


E. V. Beardslfe 


Mrs. G.GRtEVE 


Mrs 


A. A. Rather 


Mrs 


R. E. Brown 


Mrs. S. R. Guild 


Mrs 


C. F. Rayer 


Mrs 


M. J. Budge 


Mrs. W. C, Hirn 


Mrs 


J. P. Roberts 


Mrs 


D. A. Campbell 


Mrs.G. F. Jillson 


Mrs 


G. H. RuHLINIi 


Mrs 


R. D. Chatfieu. 


Mrs. H.P.Jones 


Mrs 


W, C. RUSSEL 


Mrs 


H. L. Clark 


Mrs. C. C. Jordan 


Mrs 


F. M. Sawin 


Mrs 


J. S. Clark 


Mrs. E. Judson 


Mrs 


B. H.Sheperd 


Mrs 


P. A. COOMIIE 


Mrs. H. F, Kcnnev 


Mrs 


P. A- Sherman 


Mrs 


J. D. Coons 


Mrs. H. M. Lowe 


Mrs 


E. C, Sherrard 


Mrs 


a B. Crawford 


Mrs. L. M. Lyons 


Mrs 


U. H. Sllsby 


Mrs 


S. T. Cross 


Mrs. R. K. McAlpine 


Mrs 


E. W. Sink 


Mrs 


L. E. Chossman 


Mrs. R. a. McGinnis 


Mrs 


S.J. Skinner 


Mrs 


L. E. Doyle 


Mrs. M. R. Morton 


Mrs 


E,0. Snethens 


Mrs 


G. M. Ehlers 


Mrs. W. E. Olds 


Mrs 


A. H. Stanc 


Mrs 


A. I- Ferguson 


Mrs. S. T. Pace 


Mrs 


A.J.Stoddard 


Mrs 


E. W. Finkle 


Mrs. L. L, Paige 


Mrs 


A. D. WlCKETT 


Mrs 


A. L. Fitch 


Mrs. I-. W, Peck 







The MichiRan Dames is an assoc 
oricanlzed in the spring of 1914. The 
All wives of sriidenls are cordially i 
are now at Newberry Hall. 



of students' wives in the University uf Michigan which was 
held bi-monthly for social and educational purposes. 
Tie members. The headquarters of the 



University of Michigan Equal Suffrage Association 

OFFICERS 

Helen Brander President 

Miriam Hubbard Vice-President 

Edith Harvey Secretary 

Selma Lindell Treasurer 

Georgiana Pockman Chairman of Membership Committee 

Ruth Butler Chairman of Publicity Committee 



Dean Jordan 
Dr. Pratt 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Miss Evans 
Miss Wood 



Dr. Vaughan 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



Pearl Smith 
Dorothy Armstrong 
Miriam Heideman 
Marguerite Novy 
Marjorie Carlisle 
Dorothy Gruss 
Mary Porter 
Gertrude Gann 
Louise Stahmer 
Edith Hoyle 
GoLDA Ginsberg 
Marguerite Risedorph 
Frances McCune 



Alice Lloyd 
Marian Wilson 
Frances Handobo 
Ann Christenson 
Mildred Carpenter 
Irene Russell 
Zella Farrar 
Doris Porter 
Margaretta Douglas 
Blanche Covey 
Ruth MacLachlan 
Constance Orcutt 
Carmen Graves 
Hazel Proctor 



Sarah Stanley 
Ruberta Woodworth 
Geta Tucker 
Helen MacDonald 
Naomi Dysert 
Teannette Armstrong 
Janet McFarlane 
Ethel Jocelyn 
Donna Sullivan 
Ethel Glanz 
Josephine Rosenblum 
Beatrice Lambrecht 
Helen Davis 
Ethel Hosmer 



370 



Society of the Sigma XI 

Michigan Chapter 
Established 1903— Local Kfembership 147 

OFFICERS 

E. C. Case President 

A, M. Barrett Vice-President 

H. A. Gleason Secretary 

A. J. Decker Treasurer 



J. R. Allen 



COUNCIL 
C. W. Edmunds 



M. GOMBERG 



J. A. Aldrich 
S. G. Baits 
R. O. Brigham 
R. E. Christman 
C. C. Delavan 
F. A. Fahrenwald 



ELECTIONS TO MEMBERSHIP 

FACULTY 

John Airey, B.S., Engineering 

A. H. Beifeld, M.D., Medicine 

W. F. Seeley, M.D., Medicine 

F. E. Senear, M.D., Medicine 

W. W. Tupper, A.m., Botany 

A. E. White, A.B., Chemical Engineering 

N. H. Williams, Ph.D., Physics 

RESIDENT GRADUATES 

A. L. Ferguson 
W. G. Harmon 

E. M. Honan 
H. T. Hood 

F. A. Nagler 
A. B. Peck 



Nellie L. Perkins 
A. H. W. Povah 
A. T. Rickettes 
W. C. RuFus 
E. A. Rykenbokr 
W. Webb 



W. Allen 
J. H. Bateman 
N. St.J. Flook 
K. F. Keeler 
C. C. Kennedy 



UNDERGRADUATES 
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 

WiNNAFRED J. ShEPARD 

Colleges of Engineering and Architecture 

W. E. Lay 
R. C. McAllister 
G. B. McCabe 
S. P. Shackleton 
S. Shappirio 

F. R. ZUMBRO 



R. B. Sleight 

E. J. Smith 

B, A. Standerline 

W. W. TUTTLE 

Q. L. Young 



Medical School 
J, W. Sherrick 

The following, and no others, shall be eligible to active membership in the Michigan chapter: (a) any professor 
or instructor of the University who has shown noteworthy achievement as an original investigator in some branch 
of pure or applied science; (^b) as a non-resident member, any professor, instructor, or investigator, connected with 
a neighboring educational, scientific, or professional institution not having a chapter, who would otherwise be eligible 
for active membership; (c) any resident graduate who has by actual work exhibited an aptitude for scientific investi- 
gation; (d) any undergraduate in the fourth year class, or else in the class substantially equivalent thereto, who has 
shown marked ability in the prosecution of some piece of work, done either independently or as a collaborator, or has 
shown evidence of originality in the solution of intricate problems and power to do constructive work with experimental 
data. All candidates must be vouched for by two or more active members of the chapter. 



372 



Tau Beta Pi 

(National Honorary Engineering Society) 

Michigan Gamma Chapter 

Established in 1906 



J. R. Allen 
E. D. Campbell 

M. E, COOLEY 

J. B. Davis 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

W. C. HOAD 
E. LORCH 

G. W. Patterson 
H. E. RiGGS 



H. C. Sadler 

C. J. TiLDEN 

G. S. Williams 

A. ZlWET 



RESIDENT ALUMNI MEMBERS 



V. H. Lane, 74 
H. W. Douglas, '90 

H. J. GOULDING, '93 

C. T. Johnstone, *95 
H. W. King, '95 
B. F. Bailey, '98 
L. M. Gram, '01 
A. H. White, '04 
E. E. Ware, '04 

A. J. Decker, Mich. Alpha 
J. C. Palmer, 111. Alpha 
M. J. Orbeck, Minn. Alpha 
W. W. Kuesterman, Ky. Alpha 
E. F. Tanghe, Wis. Alpha 

R. S. Archer 
J. B. Breymann, Jr. 
A. A. Burrell 
J. F. Clark 
M. del Valle 
S. £. Emmons 
A. F. Grenell 
H. A. Hicks 
S. Holt 

R. H. LUNDELL 



W. T. Fishleigh, '06 
H. K. Holland, '08 
R. K. Holland, '08 
G. E. Lewis, '08 
G. E. Haggas, '08 
W. G. Harmon, '09 
A. H. LovELL, *09 
M. Osgood, '11 
F. C. Morgan, *12 
L. R. Flook, '13 



UNDERGRADUATES 

F. T. Mack 
W. A. Miller 

P. O. MULKEY 

J. K. Norton 
H. H. Perry 
D. A. Smith 
S. Pinkerton 
M. S. Reed 
J. S. Roman 
J. M. Reid 



W. Cook, '14 

A. N. Laird, '14 
C. N. Ward, '14 

C. S. SCHOEPFLE, '14 

N. S. Flook, 'IS 
I. H. Reindel, '15 
J. W. Robinson, '15 

B. a. Standerline, '15 
L. F. Terry, '15 

H. H. Higbie, N. Y. Alpha 
H. G. Raschbacher, Ind. Alpha 
F. A. Nagler, Mich, Alpha 
O. D. Parsons, N. Y. Beta 
H. A. Enos 



H. J. Smith 
L. A. Sprague 
W. A. Sterling 
J. D. Todd 
F. J. Vonachen 
W. A. Warrick 
H. D. Warner 
P. C. Wagner 
T. D. Weaver 
F. C. Wheeler 



Engineering students in the second semester of their Junior Year or the first semester of their Senior Year, whose 
rank in scholarship is in the best one-fourth of their class, and who have completed at least one year of work in this 
university, are eligible. From these are elected, by the active members of the chapter, such men as are considered 
worthy by reason of their personality and good fellowship. 



373 



Alpha Omega Alpha 

(Honorary AMlcal Fraltrnily) 
CIIAPTKR ROLL 



North wESTE II 
Jefferson M: 
Washington ! 

University oi 
Harvard \}v\ 
Syracuse Uni 



fJCULTY SKCTIOX 



Frank Nohman Wil 
Q, O. Gilbert 



VSDF.RCR.Wi'ATE SECTIOX 



I.YiE B. KrN 

Thr undpniniiluali' wciiod ia > loLf-ncrpctuntiiii body, r 



at the flnil ■ 
iider brinK t 
pulty SiTtioi 



Phi Lambda Upsilon 

Delta Chapter 



S. Lawrence Bioelow 
E. D. Campbe 
W. D. Bancr. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



w 


T,. Badcer 


K. 


E. Bartell 


K 


J. Carney 


H 


N. Cole 


I.. 


H. Cone 


A 


L. Ferguson 


\V 


J. Hale 


J 


E. Harris 


A. 


H. Hltskin 


K 


S. Archer 


E 


C. Britton 


J. J. Blrby 


R 


E. Christma 


M 


A, Del Vall 


U 


C, Dowu 


E. 


M. Hon AN 


N 


A. Lange 


O. 


K. Maoison 


K 


M. McCoRMi 


C. 


McMillen 


E. 


<;. MiLKAM 


W 


A. M[LLER 


R 


1.. Now 



RESIDENT ALUMNI AND ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



JL 


LI 


s Stieclitz 


(aicago) 


J. 


0. 


SCHLOTTERBECK 


1/ 


BE 


RS 




J. 


S. 


.A[RD 




D 


M 


- I.ICHTT 




R 


A 


McAlpine 




C. C 


Meloche 




J. 


D 


Rue 




W 


r 


Sm EATON 




E 


E 


Ware 




A 


E 


White 




H 


H 


WiLLARD 




s 


M 


PiNKERTOh 




J- 


W 


Robinson 




E 


A 


Rykenboe 




c 


S. 


ScHoerrLK 




E 


C 


Sherbard 




C 


E 


Smart 




R 


E 


Smith 




H 


J 


Smith 




R 


D 


Smith 




B 
J. 


A 
D 


Stanuerli 
Tout) 


"" 


N 


E 


Van Ston 




E 


C 


Vebhans 




A 


t; 


Williams 





or Omdualp Di-| 



□I the chnpur. siv bnwc] on nclinlurahip nod food 



The Order of the Coif 

(/n the Lose School of the University of Miihigan) 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Ralph W. Aioifr 




c:ro< 


I'ER C. CrISMORE 


WcllabdT. Barbouk 




KVAKS HoLBROOK 


Henry M. Bates 




JERO 


ME C. KnoWMON 


Thomas A. Bo<iLE 




Victor H. Lank 


Robert E. Bunkkr 




John 


1 R, Rood 


Joseph H. Drakf 




W.( 


loRDON Stoker 


EdcarN. Durfek 




Kdsc 


IN R. SUNDERLANI. 


Edwin C. Godoarii 


Horace 1,. Wilols 

STUDENT Af EMBERS 
Clan of 1916 


JOH^ 


1 B. Wah E 


LvLE M. Clikt 




WiLl 


.lAU C. M>JLLEN1>OR 


Eugene R. McCall 




Hollace M. Reii> 


Albert J. Mickelson 




Werner W. Schroedek 


W. Leslie Miller 




Laut 


<enceM. Spha^uk 


Arthur A. Morrow 




Hari 


tY B. Sutter 



Aristolochite Society 



IIOSORARY MEMBERS 

J. O. ScHLOTIHRBIiCK A. B. StKVI 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



R. C. Brown 
W. D. CocHRAf 

G. K. FlNIEL 

C. R. McMiLLt 



ACTIIK MEMBERS 



tnual be pleclnl b: 



H. N. Oellhich 

K. T. 01.80N 

R. R. ScHOETZOW 

R. V. Smcth 

■rimcy <A tlw Univendl, 




Tau Sigma Delta 



{Honorary Fraternity in Architecture and Landscape Design) 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Prof. Emil Lorch 
Prof. Louis H. Boynton 



Associate Prof. Aubrey Tealdi 
Assistant Prof. Fiske Kimball 



Assistant Prof. Beverly Kimball 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Assistant Prof. George M. McConkey 



Mr. H. 0. Whittemore 



Arthur V. Moninger 
Katherine Cutting 
George B. Hammond 



ACrif'E MEMBERS 



Hubert Lamley 



Alexander McColl 
Fred A. Brinkman 
Warren L. Rindge 



378 



Gamma Alpha 





(Graduale Scira 


liHc Fra, 


n,ily) 




.)ucnic.i.\ 


CILil'TKR 


Floyd K. Bartklf, 






FREllERlfK M. I..10MIS 


ReEdO. BuifiHAM 






Clyhe v.. Love 


Robert W. Clabk 






RoyK. McAlpine 


Walter K. Colbv 






Lewis I., Mellor 


Charles W. Cook 






PallW. Merrill 


W.HTRHD Cook 






Peter 0. Okklkberg 


Ralph H. Ci:btiss 






Albert B. Peck 


John H, Khlers 






Harry (i Haschbache 


Albert 1,. Fitch 






J. Speed Rocers 


Chester H. Forsyth e 






Carl P. Russell 


Frederick M.Gaior 






Alexander G Ruthve 


QuiHTER O.Gilbert 






Edward A Rykenboer 


Henry A. Gleason 






Irving D. Scott 


James E. Harris 






John W. Sherrick 


Fdward M. Honan 






A. Franklin Shull 


Walter F. Hint 






Olenus L. Sponsler 


Walter N. Koelz 






Nathan E. Van Stone 


NorbertA. I.an<;k 






Frank C.VtBRANs 


CarlD. LaRik 






CarlV. Weller 


Georoe K. LaRve 









Phi Alpha Tau 

-Va/ionoi Honorary Spifck Arts Fralfrnily 

{Founded at iht Emerson Colltge of Oralory in 1902) 

CHAPTER ROLL 



Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, Massachuse 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 
Leland Stanfoko University, Sranford, California 
Carroll College, Waukesha, Wisronsin 
College ok Puget Sound, Tacoma, WashinRton 



North* 
Univers 



N College, Naperville. Illinois 
F Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 
[VERSlTY, Syracuse, New York 
F Texas, Austin, Texas 
F Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 
p Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Louie H. Dunten 
Humphreys Springstun 
Chester L. M. Fordney 
J™, F, Jordan 
Morrison C. Wood 
Frank W. Grover 
Wilbur M. Brucker 
Murl C. Carlton 



XI CHAPTER 



Harry K. Carlson 



Owen J. Watts 
Walker Peddicohu 
Edward A. Sachs 
Frank H. Atlee 
Cecil W. Miller 
Fred W. Adams 
Hampton H. Irwin 
Horace L, Davis 



CAMPUS 




11 IL lU 



H7l17RnRY:5fl^HErn5: 

gKCflT-HEflKT-flbflMS- 

MflrfOF-ifftrr-FBErasfliiEn- 

FRIEntlLY-^HEF-OTOLET- 
HEflP-THinK-UJEnLEY- 
5infU)-MflKtK-riTZCflTRI<;K- 
EflTTLEfinCiER'BIRTELnlE- 
5REflT-BVILCiER-EflTE'7- 
FlQHTine-BRflUES: 
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Timili-TURTLE-CWLTER- 

CVLL-EM-LE5-FinKEr6TflEllT- 

LOPinS-OX-HYI^E- 

THinKUM-U)l5E-LE0nflRCi- 

SOBER-COUnSEL-rdflW- 

LnZY-T0n«UE-MsNlttEr-5MEN' 

BROTti-BELLYMiaflR^ 

SnRITCflLLER-MULLEnWE- 

SRinfiiris-ro55UM-PHiiuP5- 

5ILEnT-0U)bREEti- 

5CfiNPERre-RflBBIT5t<lTH- 

5inEU)-MEnhER-5TflflTZ- 

5H;MBER-Ffl(:E-5TEEn- 

5R00n-BILL UFER- 

ROMY-HERIiER-UIEflVER- 




Senior Society, Lnw Sthool 



Barristers 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
pRES. Habbv B. Hutchins 



Dean Hehrv M. Bates 
Prof. Thomas A Bogle 



Prof. Evans Holbrook 



Prof. Robert E. Bunker 
Prof, Joseph H. Drake 



MEMBERSHIP 



Hw 



[ G. An 



H. Donald Brown 
Robert O. Brownell 
Lewis D. Cooper, Jr. 
Gerald S. Frary 
.^DHA R.Johnson. Jr. 
George V. Labadie 
John S. Leonard 
Eugene R. McCall 
Thomas R. McNamara 
Frank M. McHale 
W. Leslie Miller 
Chester J. Morse 



Wm.C. Mullendore 
Maxwell E. Pitkin 
Clyde C. Rowan 

LeRoV J. SCANLON 

Werner W. Schroeder 
John F. Scott 
Perry H. Stevens 
H. Blair Sotter 
Clarence A. Swainson 
\. Lash Thomas 
Paul F. Thompson 
Renville Wheat 



JSitg'^ 


•^ J,B.BREYMANN 


EC HEADMAN 1 \ (i^S^ 


fmMr 


J.M BROWN 


LB. HYDE 1 ' /^^UBI 


BSft^ 


E.CRUMPACIVER 


A.H.KEEL£R \ \ C_!l^^ 


IBR^^ 


^ \ D. E.GARDNER 


W.ASTERLING \ V^ ■ 


WP^ 


jA FJ.HALLIDAY 


W.PWICKHAM 1 \ IJIq 


^ 


? 1 


1/ \* 


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(^ 



Senior Society 





HONORARY MEMBER 



Dr. Harold S. Hulbert 



RESIDENT GRADUATES 



W. Gordon Stoner 



Walter Staebler 



Ernest J. Allmendinger 



ACTirE MEMBERS 



Lawrence S. Roehm 
Ray J. Mills 
George C. Chichester 
Louis F. Voorhees 
John B. Breymann 



Harold L. Smith 
T. Hawley Tapping 
Earl B. McKinley 
Maurice R. Fitts 
Sam W. Donaldson 



390 



Senior Society 



Emilie Sargent President 

Margaret Stewart Vice-President 

Helen Vahderveer Treasurer 

Selma Lindell Secreiary 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Florence Gerber 
Ruby Hall 
Bernice Hankan 
Ruth Kreger 
Selma Lindell 
Mai>ce Mead 



Bessie Pi^tto 
Sena Potter 
Kmilie Sargent 

M A RG AR ET^StE wart 

Donna Sullivan 
Grace Thomas ma 
Ruth Tromblev 



Helen Vanoerveer 



Senior Girb' Society, Literary College 




Mortar Board 



Elsa Apfel Beatrice Lambrecht 

Helen Blair Louise Potter 

Ruth Brown Bertha Pulford 

Esther Bury Ellen Sargeant 

Mildred Carpenter Emilie Sargent 

Helen Dow Charlotte Sites 

Helen Ely Florence Snyder 

Laura Feige Jessie Spence 

Grace Fletcher Marion Stowe 

Helen Humphreys Helen Tuthill 

Ruth Hutzel Aris Van Deusen 

Ruth Kreger Jemima Wenley 

Katherine Wenley 



392 




Claude H. Van Tyne 



1916 SPHINXES HONORARY 



Charles P. Wagnek 



Pharaoh "Obie" O'Biiien 

21i|>-the-Zephyr, Peace Interlocutor for the Foreign Powers . . "Lee"Joslvn 

Gazazok, Guardian of the Golden Shekel "Rog" Sylvester 

Pxotnasdh, Chief Scribbler of the Sahara "Hal" Fitzoerald 

Tatatply, Triumphant Tenor of the Desert "Stucky" Buroe 

Jjgquip, Juggler of the Mighty Boulders "Cec" Cross 

Beataklxw, Beacon Light of the Sacred Temple " Red" Donnellev 

Aqwpipljk, Chieftain of the Badge "Don" Fikkbeiker 

Pillstingerik, Slugger of the Sportive Sphere "Billy" Niemann 

Calitupgy, Caretaker of the Camel Caravan "Muiz"Mt;MV 

Baldibaldi, Reflector of the Sacred Sun "Duke" Arenlz 

FlitflitO, Freniied Follower of the Frivolous Dance .... "BlLL"NANeE 

Phuklyiaw, Passer of the Phlying Pigskin "Wally" Niemann 

Philupuykkg, Manager of the Social Whirl "Jack" Pardee 

Roupolhbo, Dispenser of the Royal Rouge "Johnny" Parker 

Wopabkqiu, Trainer of the Caravan Crew " Bill" Adams 

Fghgfhdaeio, Protector of the Royal Seat "Verne" Burnett 

Hyhymapor, Winder of the Desert Clock "Ted" Con 

Nonklyup, Director of the Desert Band "Gornie" Gornetzk) 

Mughithjp, Master Man of Mysteries "Tom" Reip 

Iioledooo, Docile Director of the Desert Dance "Eddie" Mack 




HrtHlOBBC 

AE-.White 



|-^ONOl^-^CE/ 
J.RJ\llbn 



JA.EiOE.6LBY 



OPIOBE5 
HUCAae.ou,u,PB.ES. 5MAE>l^A^4S,5Bor 

'Staats" Adeams 'Qto ftis 

LAMBBOPHe-AD Ffe«E E.AM3£Y 

Edpie-'Cabeolu TThflitriKEA 

'SpncC-mzlsgn MascEobinson 

Ita/'C-LAEJi. "PUUJfinS'ScME-lB&L 

CEOdc'CeLUNd "fifsf&cwJPP 

Ke-ElCiaHLjAE. '(jofto' SivnTii 

kSWKuMNE-N "ElUNNIEr"3TErNBUE.Q 

lE-'Jvfe-APE' , "Te)E.Y"TAYL,OE 

_ AcMcNAMEff , BCO'C'WHAUEN 

HANC'lvfeUMANN iSKlNNyVVhlTnNQH/>Jsl 



L'pper-CU» Chcmi 



T Society. Lav School 



Members of Woolsack 



OFFICERS FOR FIRST SEMESTER 

E. B. Houseman Chincellor 

W. H. Sanford Vice-chancellor 

L. F. Dahlino Qerk 

T. E. ATMNaoN K. D. Barnakd 

R. L. Carpenter B. G. Cameron 

L. F. Dahling G. C. Claassen 

H. G. Gault H, F. Connine 

H, H. Hewitt R. E. Gleason 

E. B. Houseman N. B. Kelly 

M. C. Mason H. F. Korn 

O. Phillips W. L. Owen 

W. H. Sanford D. F. Smith 



Girb' Society. Ijlersi 



Wyvern 



Armstrong, Jeannette 
Bassett, Marcahet 
Champion, Helen 
LtTCHMAK, Irene 
Long, Mabcaret 
Keely, Anita 
LoDMis. Albertine 
Reynolds, Margaret 

ROWE, GEh 



Vail, Ethel 
Way, Frances 
Williams, Olivia 
Wood, Anetta 
Blodcett, Alice 



Carnegie, Lillian 
Crandall, Adele 
GiDDiNGS, Hazel 
GosE, Inez 
Grover, Clara 
Huff, Beatrice 
Laubenguver, Della 
McFablane, Janette 
Paddock, Florence 
Paul, Elsie 
Randall, Josephine 
RisEDORPH, Marguerite 

SCHINKMAN, OlCA 

Whelah, Gladys 
YocuM, Margaret 



Inur-Clwi. ALM:>n: 



HONORARY FACULTY GRIFFINS 
Joseph H. Drake John B. Waite 

Henri T. A. Hus Frederick R. Waidron 

James P, Bird Howard H. Cummincs 

ASSOCIATE GRIFFINS 
"Gee" Gault "Buzz" Catlett 

" Rooster" Johnson " Bill" Cochran 

"Cap" Sckroeder "Mac" McKinlev 

"Fat" Millard "Tommie"Thompso« 

"Bill" Mullehdore "Scan" Scahlan 

"Pete" Middleditch "Hal" SMtTK 

"Hal" HuLiERT 

Grand Griffin "George" McMahon 

Vice Grand Griffin "Tom" Soddy 

Griffin of Apollo, Guardian of Manuscripts " Dutch " Caron 

Griffin of Pljto, Guardian of Gold "Louie" Reimann 

Griffin of Nemesis, Guardian of Suppliants "Wap" John 

Griffin of Mercury "Jack" Leonard 

Griffin of Morpheus "Sam" Donaldson 

Griffin of Eros "Roc" Svltester 

Griffin of Xanthos "Tap" Tapping 

Griffin of Pluvius "Squeal" Parker 

Griffin of Ares "Hank" Rummel 

Griffin of Orpheus "Lob" Bastian 

Griffin of Hephaestus " Staati" Abrams 

Griffin of Neptune "Bovd" Compton 

Griffin ofThemesIs "Joe" Darnall 

Griffin of Mars "Lee"Joslvn 

Griffin of Castor "Kish" Kishlar 

Griffin of Hemos "Rummie" Roehm 

Griffin of Charon "Trig" Torrev 

Griffin of Bacchus "Maully" Mai 

Griffin of Xylos "Eddie" Carroll 

Griffin of Phycudides "Jimmy" Chenot 

Griffin of Phares "Grant" Cook 

Griffin of Thersites "Dek" Coulter 

GriffinofNerones " Billy" Grover 

Griffin of Phylos "Eddie" Hvman 

Griffin of lactas "Pat" Smith 

Griffin of larbas "Eddie" Mack 

Griffin of Saturn "Billy" Niemann 

Griffin of Vulcan "Obie" O'Brien 

Griffin ofPosidon "Nate" Pinnet 



iIes Vic 






Leigh J. Yoi 
Hbnky J, Pott 



Eli a. Gallup 
Horace J. Andrews 
N. Lerov Carv 
Walter E. Bond 
Charles W. Bovce 
Melvin I. Bradner 
Raymond F. Grefe 
Ell WOOD Griest 




Upper-class Society, Medical School 




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DR. V-JWILC- 

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m-HPETfRscirr 
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KI.A.W HEWLCTT 
CR-HMRKMAiyHAU. 
DR..H.6 .SCHMIDT 
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pa r.M.LD0MI5 



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H.R-JOHN 
E.<J.GALBRA(TH 
W-M-CVfiAN 
H. HENPCftSOM 

L .K^MCRTDITH 

C.A<:HRJ37rN5fN 
J J-CLIPRf 

5. W DONALDSON 
r H FttRRJSON 
JB.GRANT 



GCO.McaVPC" 

WA.fOEr 

TM.IVW2KS 

B.H.SHQWRD 

H.H.OOLe- 

R-W.VLLCJCH 

B.T-UBSON 

JT.CDNNfLL 

A.DWKKE1T 
JTBVms 



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li.Vi 











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Juninr Society, Law Schml 



Archons 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
s HoLBROOK Professor Joi- 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



William C. Achi 
Leslie L. Alexander 
Chester K. Barnard 
Llovd E. Battles 
Julius L. Beers 
Charles H. Breymann 
George C. Gabon 
James B. Catlett 
Grant L. Cook 
Louis F. Dahling 
Leonard P, Diedericks 



MAuRtcE F. Dunne 
Joseph H. Fee 
Ferris H. Fitch 
Ralph F, Gates 
LvLE F. Harris 
Glenn A. Howl a no 
Melville C. Mason 
Thomas F. McDonald 
Lester S. Moll 
John E. Sanders 
Donald W. Sessions 



Toastmasters 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Prof. Charles B. Vibbert Prof. R. D. T. Hollistbr 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

T, Hawley Tapping Gerald S. Fkarv 

George P. McMahon Ralph E. Folz 

W. A. P. John George C. Carom 

John F. Scott Harvey H. Sprick 

John A. Heist Joseph H. Fee 

Don a. Smith John C. B. Parker 

Francis T. Mack Harold M. Bowcock 

Eugene R. McCall Duane E. Bird 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Stanley P. Smith, '17 



ASSISTANT EDITORS 
Edwin B. Palm 



EdwardT. Walsh, Jr., '17 



Andrew C Haich, 'Ik 



STAFF MEMBERS 
Wendell \'. Gorton, '18 E 



Klmer C. Schacht. '18.E 



Haigh Brown Gout an Darn all 

Smith Palmer Sckacht Walsh H. Coulter 

Frantz G. Coulter Bruch Nance Tapping 



Michiganensian 



BUSINESS STAFF 




Glinn M. CotLTER, Business ManaKtr 
Willis D. Nance. '17, Assistant Busing 
Ralph W. Harbert, '17, Assistant Bosln 


Manager 
ss Manager 


William Darnall. 'IS La 
Harold B. Coulter. 'IW W 
Robert Pattkiison, 'IN I.o 


ORfiNCE Brown. '18 
u.jamO'Kekfe, '18 
>MJs Kirk PATRICK, 



Michiganensian 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Irwin C. Johnson, Literary 

M. Muriel Tyson, Literary 

Edward P. Wright, Literary 

Gordon D. Cooke, Engineering 

HuHPHREY M. K. Grylls, Engineering 

John F. Scott, Law 

Clarence A. Swainson, Law 

Sam W. Donaldson, Medicine 

Eugene S, Thornton. Combined Schools and Colleges 



The Michigan Daily 

Francis F. McKihkev Managing Editor 

John S. Leonard Business Manager 

E. RoDCERS Sylvester News Editor 

Tom C. Reid Telegraph Fdiior 

Verne Burnett Telegraph Editor 

E. P. Wright . Sports Editor 

J. C. B. Parker Assignment Editor 

Conrad N. Church City Editor 

Edwin A. Hyman City Editor 

Lee Joslyn City Editor 

Gordon D. Cooke Statistical Editor 

Edward E. Mack Advertising Manager 

H. Kirk White Pubhcation Manager 

Y. R. Althseler Circulation Manager 

C. V. Sellers Accountant 

C. T. FishleigK Assistant Business Manager 

NIGHT EDITORS 

Leonard W. Nieter Earl Pardee 

L. S. Thomfson J. L. Stadeker 





REPORTERS 




H. A. Fitzgerald 






H. C. L. Jackson 








JaS. ScHERMERHOtt 








Bruce Swanev 






E. L. Ziecler 


















Phil Pack 






H. C, Garrison 












C. W 


. Neumann 






BUSINESS STAFF 




Albert E. Horne 






RoscoE Rau 










K. S. McCoLL 






L. W. Kennedy 




}.¥.- 


Campbell 





Student Publication Offices 



The Michigan Daily 

THE changing of campus conditions has brought about a change in the demand for the ci 
tion of the campus publications, and acting upon this, The Michigan Daily has resolved icself 
into something more than a mere chronicle of University events. 

The main addition, which has so changed the papet's form and appearance is the telegraph 
news, received by special service from The New York Sun. This has necessitated the adding of two 
pages to the old four-page publication, and has brought about a subsequent change in makeup and 
in the manner of handling university news. 

In addition to the technical appearance of The Daily which this has caused, there is a broadening 
of the paper's field until it now includes the news of the world, the city and the campus. It presents 
briefand yet complete reports of the larger eventsof theday and addsthemto the bulletin of the students' 
affairs. In this way it not only provides informative reading for the campus, but it likewise incorporates 
more of real newspaper principles. 

Though there are doubtless many ways in which The Daily may be improved upon, this latest 
addition has brought it to the front rank of college publications. The university in successfully taking 
this forward step, has won a great victory. It marks an epoch in the history of Michigan affairs, and 
means a broadening of campus outlook. 

The life of The Michigan Daily has been marked with just such progressive steps. It was first 
printed in 1H90 in an office above a fruit store. In 1895 it reached a low financial ebb, and in 1901 
another paper, The U. of M. News, sprang up in opposition. But in 1903, The Daily tcok over the News 
and from that time on has been going forward. The present place of publication and system of its 
management mark the highest point in the history of The Michigan Daily. — J. S., Jr. 



Michigan Law Review 



PUBLISHBO MONTHLY DUKXNO TBB ACADEMIC YBAR, BXCLUSIVB OF OCTOBBB, BT TBB 

LAW FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHICAN 



SUa8CRIf»TION PRICC 92.60 P€m YCAR. 



38 CENTS PCR NUMBCH 



Hbnry M. Bates 



Evans Holbrook, Editor 

ADVISORY BOARD. 

Victor H. Lanb 



HORACB L. WlLGUS 



Editorial Assistants, appointed by the Faculty from the Class of 1916: 



Harky L. Bell, of Kentucky. 
Robert O. Brownell, of Pennsylvania. 
Lyle Nf. Clipt^ of Michigan. 
Eugene R. McCall, of Iowa. 
Myroit McLaren, of Michigan 
J. Leland Mbchem, of Michigan. 
Albert J. Micxelson, of Michigan. 
W. Leslie Miller, of Ohio. 
Arthur A. Morrow, of West Virginia. 
William C. Mullendorb, of Kansas. 



Russell H. Neilson, of Michigan. 
Hollace M. Reid, of Virginia. 
Robert E. Richardson, of Michigan. 
Werner W. Sciiroeder, of Illinois. 
La WREN cs M. Sprague, of Michigan. 
Harry B. Sutter, of Pennsylvania. 
Maurice Weinberger, of Missouri. 
Thomas H. Westlake, of Ohio. 
Renville Wheat, of Michigan. 
Walter F. Whitman, of Michigan. 



Harold J. Waples, of Michigan. 



NOTE AND COMMENT. 



Recovery of the Purchase Price Before Title Has Passed.— In an action 
recently instituted by The General Electric Co. to recover on a contract to 
manufacture certain machinery for the defendant, which machinery the de- 
fendant had refused to accept, the trial court adopted the contract price as 
the measure of damages. The upper court approved this measure of dam- 
ages, rejecting the argument that the measure ,should have been the differ- 
ence between the market value and the contract price, and dismissed, as no 

m 

longer appropriate to modern conditions, the decision? in Bement v. Smith, 
15 Wend. (N. Y.) 493, and Shaivhan v. Van Nest. 25 Oh. St. 490. The court 
recognized, however, that these decisions had been sound when rendered. 
As they have frequently been referred to as anomalous rulings, it may be 
interesting to consider the effect upon them of this recent decision. Manhat- 
tan City, etc., Ry. Co, v. General Electric Co., 226 Fed. 173. 

The rule is established, as a general proposition, that a vendor can not 
bring an action upon a contract of sale in indebitatus assumpsit for the pur- 
chase price until the title has passed. "The principle, concisely stated, is 
tliis — ^that a count for goods bargained and sold can only be maintained 
where the property in the goods has passed from the plaintiff to the defend- 
ant." BUiott V. Pybus, lo Bing. 510. If the goods are not in existence at 



410 















Heist Honev 


fc: 


N Maguire 


Van Dusan 


ILLER J 



EDHAKD MAGL'IBB, 'II BlilH(i lUutn' 



The Official Students' Directory 

of the University of Michigan ind State Normal Coliefte 
1915-1916 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Chas, B. Uwton. -17 Lit. A. Phillip Warrcner. '17 Lit. 

C. Fred Watson, '18 Lit. 

ADIERTISISC .\f.lNJGER 
Franklin Randall, '17 Lit. 

BUSISESS ST.IFF 
Geo. L. Ohrstrom, 'IN Lit. G. B. Kralse, "IK Lit. 

Geo. B. Daniels, '18 Lit. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Wm. G. Browricc, '17 Lit. A. Brobhead Howard, '19 Lit. 

Gordon C. Mack, '18 Lit. Chester C, I'earce, '19 tng. 

Frank J. Riley, '19 Kng. 



THE MICHIGAN TECHNIC 

313-114 New Enffineerinf Buildiatf Abb Arbor, Micbifui 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 

Published quarterly in the inonHis of October, December, March, and May 
by the Engineering Society 



Staff 

R. L. McNamee, '17, Managing Editor 

L. C. Rowley, '16, Business Manager 
R. S. Arcker, '16, College Editor F. C. Riecks, "16. Advertising Manager 

C. M. Burns. '17, Alumni Editor U. M. SMrrH. 16, Cirmlation Manager 

J. H. Schmidt, '16, Ed. Trans. Slants.. H. ¥.. Montelius, 'L7, Asst. Adv. Mgr. 

F. K. HiRTH, '16, Associate Editor F. H. Sweet. '18, Associate Editor 

G. D. Cooke, '16, Associate Editor 

jssisr.ixrs 



Board in Control of Student Publications 



Professor W. G. Stoner 
Professor F. N. Scott 
Professor J. W. Glover 
Dean J. R. Effinger 
Francis T. Mack 
T. Hawley Tapping 
Adna R. Johnson, Jr. 



414 



Michigan's Year in Oratory 



THE record of the University in Oratory and debate for the year 1915-1916 has been highly 
creditable, in that a large majority of the contests were won by her representatives. 

The quarter-centennial of the Northern Oratorical League was celebrated at Iowa City, 
May 7, 1915. The contest was one of the strongest in the quality of the speeches and in the character 
of their presentation that the League has ever had. For the first time in the history of oratory and 
debate at Michigan the University was represented by a woman. Having won the home contest and 
the Chicago Alumni Medal Miss Frances Louise Hickok became Michigan's representative in the 
League contest, at Iowa City. Her subject was "The Mission of New Womanhood." No orator who 
ever spoke for Michigan showed finer feeling or had better attention than did Miss Hickok. The race 
was close between the representatives of Michigan and Minnesota, only one point separating them. 
The judges awarded Miss Hickok second honor, and Mr. Carl M. Painter, of Minnesota, first. 

The seventh annual contest of the Michigan Peace Oratorical Association took place at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Friday, March 19, 1915. Six other of the State Colleges were represented. Nathan 
Earl Pinney spoke for the University and was awarded first honor, the State Normal representative 
receiving second. In the Central Group of States, in which the best college orators of Ohio, Indiana, 
Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan were pitted against one another Mr. Pinney again won first honor 
which carried with it the right to represent the Central Group in the National Contest, at Lake Mohonk, 
New York. Here Mr. Pinney met the winning orators of the other five groups, as follows: The North 
Atlantic Group, The South Atlantic Group, The Southwestern Group, The Western Group and the 
Pacific Group. Mr. Pinney was awarded third honor, being beaten by the representative of Boston 
College who won first honor, and the representative of the University of West Virginia who won second 
honor. 

The question for the Central League debate for 1916 was as follows: Resolved, that Congress 
should adopt a literacy test for all European immigration. 

Michigan's afiirmative team met the Northwestern University team at Ann Arbor, January 21, 

1915. The Varsity team was composed of Wilber M. Brucker,'16 L, Joseph R.Cotton, '16, and Alex- 
ander J. Stoddard, '17 L. Dean Cooley of the Engineering College presided. The two thousand 
people present showed deep interest throughout the debate. There was a divided vote of the judges, 
the decision going to Michigan by a 2 to 1 vote. 

On the same evening at the University of Chicago Michigan's negative met the University of 
Chicago team. The Michigan men were as follows: William J. Goodwin, '16 L, Nathan E. Pinney, 
'16, and Paul V. Ramsdell, '16. Professor Andrew C. McLaughlan, of the University of Chicago, 
formerly of the University of Michigan, presided. There was a large audience and much enthusiasm. 
As at Ann Arbor the decision was divided, Chicago winning by a 2 to 1 vote. 

The second annual contest of the Mid-West Debating League was held March 31, 1916. The 
question chosen for debate was as follows: "Resolved, that the Federal Government should own and 
operate all public service telegraph and telephone systems in the United States, constitutionality waived." 

Michigan's affirmative team met Wisconsin's negative team in Hill Auditorium before a represen- 
tative and enthusiastic Ann Arbor audience,' Governor Edward F. Dunne of Illinois presiding. The 
Michigan team was composed of William T. Adams, '17, Irving S. Toplon, '17, and R. S. Munter, '16 L. 

The debate was full of fine spirit on both sides. The decision was unanimous in favor of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Michigan's negative met the Illinois team at Urbana, III., in the University Auditorium, March 31, 

1916. Michigan's team was composed of George C. Claassen, *17 L, William E. Olds, '16 and Kenneth 
M. Stevens, '16 L. The debate was characterized by great earnestness, keen thrusts and much humor 
and repartee. The decision of the judges was 2 to 1 in favor of the University of Michigan. Michigan 
has won all of her debates in the new Mid-West League losing only two oyt of twelve judges. 

The appropriation of the Regents, whereby all students are given yearly admission tickets to all 
debating and oratorical contests, took effect this year. It has not only brought out more contestants 
than usual but has awakened wider general interest in the public questions discussed. 



416 



Michigan's Record in Oratory to Date 

IN the twenty-five contests of the Northetn Oratotical League, Michigan has won nine first honors, 
three seconds and six thirds, against six other western universities, as many hrst honors as any two 
of her competitors. Six htst honors were won in succession. 
In the Peace Contest the University has represented the State of Michigan in six Interstate or 
Group contests, winning three of them, and has also appeared in three National Peace contests, winning 
two of them in succession at Lake Mohonk. N. Y., the one by Percival Blanshard, in 1912, the other 
by his twin brother, Paul Blanshard. in 19M. 

Michigan has taken part in fifty-two intetcollegiace debates, winning thirty-live of them. Her 
record is as follows: Six of the seven with Wisconsin, nine of the sixteen with Northwestern, three 
of the four with Minnesota, three of the four with Pennsylvania, twelve of the nineteen with Chicago, 
and both of the debates with Illinois. Only three of these debates have been lost by unanimous deci- 
sion, while twenty-one have been won by unanimous decision. At one time eleven debates were won in 
rin succession by unanimous decision, records not equalled by any of the large ui 



., A.M.. Professor of Oratory 



Officers of the Oratorical Association 

WiLBER M. BmjCKER, '16 L President 

Geo. C. Claassen, '16 L Vice-President 

H. B. Teegardeh, '17 Secretary 

N. Earl Pinnev, '16 Treasurer 

FACULTY REPRESENTATlyES 
pRor. Thos. C. Thueblood Mr, R. K. Immel 

Prof. R. D. T. Hollister Mr, Louts Kcch 

SOCIETY REPRESENTATlyES 
Wm. T. Adams, Alpha Nu L. W. Lisle, Webster 

W. A. Pearl. Adelphi S. D. Frankel, Jefferaonian 

CLASS REPRESENTATlyES 

Albert Gans, '16 A. R. Sherk, '16 L 

Earl E. Pardee, '17 G. L. Cook, '17 L 

C. F. Boos. '18 J. E. RvAN, '18 L 

Harry Stocker, '19 

Louie H. Dunten, '16 L N. 0. L. Delegate 



The Lyceum Club 

Y D. Parker President 

r.E C. Claassek Secretair-Trc 

FACl'LTY MEMBERS 
Thomas C. Thi;eblood Rav K. Immei. 

R. D. T. HOLLTSTER I.OUIS ElCH 

STIOEST MEMBERS 
R. J. Cotton Luccle S. Stronc 

E. M. Wisdom W. C. Mullendore 

N. K. PlHNEV W. W. ScHkOEDER 

W. C. Crockett S. J. Skikner 



STdiJOARn t'orr 



Central Debating League 

Univtrsiiits of ChicHRO, Nurthwcsrcrn and Michigan 
Qvfiliiin: " Kvsiilvi-d thai Conervst should adopt a literacy test for all Kiiropean in 

CfllC.lGO vs. MICIIICAS 
Hklu at Chicago, Illinois, Janiakv 21, l')l() 

Michigan Stgaiivr Ttiim 

N. v.. PlNNKY. ■](. I'. V. K,MS1)KLL. 'K. 

W. J. CoonwfN. -K- I. H. B. rKti^AKnrN, 'U (alt 

Won byChicaKO, t»oloone. 

XORTIIiy/iSTERX vs. MICIIIUAS 
Helo ^t Ann Arbor, January 21. I'»l(. 





Michis'in .Iffirmau 


v/ Tram 




J, K, O.i-roN, -ir, 


.1. 

Won by MJchiean, I 


A, .1. Sr<,Bi.A 
K, S, Mlnt. 


,Ki.. -171. 

.:r, 't7L(alteti.att-) 



Midwest Debating League 

UnIVRMSITIKS ok Ij.LlNOrS. WlSCONSFN AND MiCHICAN 

Queilion- " RpHilved, char the Federal Guvernmeni should own and 
operaie all public service telephone and lelejtraph lines in the L'nited States, 
conslitiitionahty waived." 

ILUSOIS -.'.'. MICIIIC.IS 
Ht.i.i> AT Champaign. Illinois. Makch 31, 19U, 

Micliigan Xf-iUlkf Tram 
C. C. Claassfn. '17-1. K- M. SiKVkss. '](. I, 

\V. K. O1.0S. ■!(. H. H, SpkiNMiiN. '17 (alitm-ji 

Won by Michiitan, [wo to one, 

inscoxs/\ -,:'. MiaiH.-is 

HtL.> AT Ann Akbor. March .'I. Vm. 

Mi.l:i^i.,>, .!mrm„lizr Team 
W. T. Adams. "17 I. S. ioi'Los. 'l? 

R. S. Mlntkr. -17 I. S. D. Krankh., '17 I. (.iltcrnat. 

VVim bv Michigan, hv imanimuus decision. 



Adelphi House of Representatives 

OFFICERS 



First S^mtsur 








Second S 


firtfiur 


Wallace C. Hall 


, Speaker 






W[. 


,LiAM A. Pearl, Speaker 


Ralph M. Carson 


, Clerk 






Irving S. Toplon, 


Clerk 


Edward J. Gormai 


N. Treasurer 






jESi 


i R. Simpson, '1 


Preasurer 


Irving S, Toplon, 


Sergeani-at- 


■Arms 




Ho. 


«ard Moses, Sergeant-ac-Arins 


William A, Pearl 


, Oratorical DeleRate 


George F. Hurle 


V, Oratorical Delega 








ROLL 








S. I. FrLDEw 






F. C. Mock 






K. GlLLFOIL 


A. R. I.EVINE 






H. D. Hopkins 




R. Berman 


W. E. Olds 






C. F. Small 






L. James 


B. V. MACRirc 


ER 




D. I. Sugar 






A. BOHN 


L. Pollock 






R. V, Gay 






H. B. Flahsheim 


A. T. Lehman 






J. Sherrin 






1. Leivick 


G. WiLNER 






C. P. Ander 


■ SON 




J. H. Hatkwav 


P. E.Choleti 


PE 




P. V. Ramsd 


lELL 




W. Hall 


J. R, COITON 






N. H. SHER^ 


jer 




P. Daley 


\V. A. Pearl 






R. E. Gal-li 






R. Carson 


C. G. Uaer 






L. B. Sable 






H. Wagensel 


G. F. HiRLtv 






T.J.Thare 






T. A. Hart 


J. R. Simpson 






D. J. McKoNE 




F. S. Sell 


H. K, Massnick 




N. E, PiNNE 


y 




D. R. Herti 


S. J. Sk.nner 






M. A. Schlissel 




D. C. Rose 


Wm. McKlNLI 


EV 




V. H. SucAS 






T. L. Smith 


G. S. LInuhrvi 


'OOD 




V. E. Blrni 


;tt 




I. S. Toplon 


J. B, Barker 






C. Gascho 






E. J. Gorman 


R. P. Collier 












J. B, Wood 



Alpha Nu Society 



H, B.Teecahden, President 
C. E. Bailev, Vice- President 
Rex B. Cunllffe, Secretary 
H. H. Chapman, Treasurer 
Wm. T. Adams, Oratorical DclcKa 
I". K. Amtsbl-echler, Sibvl Kdit. 
Jacob Levph, Marshall 



St<OHd Se»i/.>lrr 
C. K. Bailkv, President 
T. K, Amtsbukchleh, Vice-Pn 
K. K. Dreese, Secretary 
H. H. Chapman, Treasurer 
Wm.T. Ai>ams, Oratorical Dd 
C. A. Reid, Sibvl Editor 
H. B. Teecarden, Marshall 



inyxixc CLP TE.nt ms 

H. B. TtEdARDEN E, L. Carroll H. H. Spkinostun 

Qveslion: " Resolved, that the Federal Governmtnt should own and operate a merchar 



NErTHEKCLT SlKVKNS PhII 

Webster Debating Society 

IIOSORARY MEMBERS 

R. MAt-DcN-ALO 

SESIORS 

K. M. Stevens President 

E. L. PHILLCPS Vice-Pres[<ler 

C. S. NrITHErcUt Secteiarv 

M. Weinbergkk Treasurer 

T. H. Westlake Critic 

H, W. Waples Parliaments. 

A. R. Shehk Reporter 

A. J. .MiCKELSim Sergeant-at-.^ 

W. A. NE1THKKCI.T R, S. MlNTEk V. J. ScHROE 

p. G, Kgeh C, S, Wo<ii> N. v. Ci 

II. S. Harris \V. M. Skjilman H. E. Rlsh 

M. C. Cari.tdn K. W. Hart 

JIWIORS 
L. W. l.isi.E. OtaiorJial IJelecaie 
t:. C. Claissen p. I'orrs H. M. Thompk 

E. P. RkID J. P. CLARk J. A. TOUINEN 

O. Phillips H. B. Gorihin C Siei.el 

A. S. I.OVEl^NJ. 



FIRST YK-IR CLISS 



D. V. MtCoKMICK 


S. Cohen 


L. W. KORBIS 


C. Vii.i.Ar 


A. P. Bo<;le 


K. 0. SSF 




M. K. M, 



H. 1.. Ha-- 

K. SlSTLEI 



Jeffersonian 



OFFICERS 

WiLBER Hrucker President 

E. ». Houseman Viee-Presider 

S. D. Frankel Secretan- 

\V. R. Carpenter Treasurer 



Adams. J. Q. 


Brown. 


D. R. 


Bruckei 


I. WiLBE 


BlTLER. 


K. C. 


Carpeni 


ER. W. ! 


Cotton. 


J.v. 


DeLorm 


ER, A. J. 


DoNNKi.l 


LY. J. M. 


OfNTKN. 


, I.OliS 


Frank El 


., S. D. 


Kink. D 


H. 


Cixmwi: 


.. W. J. 


Cravma 


R, A. W. 



I-. L. S. 



HoLSKMAN. K, B. 

Lawrence. H. I>. 
MoRRrs. Walter 
McCarthy. H. L. 
McGiNNis, R. A. 
Miller, Pctkr 
Roan. H. H. 

<)r,l>EN, S. (i. 

Smith. ).. H. 



STIilll 

Iatl 



'. A. J. 



Delta Sigma Rho 



L'nivtrsiry of MichiRan— Alpha Chapter 
founded 1900 

MEMBERS 

IV D. pAHktR President 

JETH M, Stkvkns Vice-President 

H A. Milieu Secretarv-Trcasu 

lit C Claasskn Cavel Editor 

W. W. SCHROHUEH N. v.. PlNNEY 

H. D. Parker R. B. Pensotti 

K. M. Stevens W. M. Brucker 

W. K, Morris A. J, Stoddard 

P. H. MiLLEK P. V. Ramsdell 

G. C. ClAASSEK W. J. GOODWCN 

V. H. Sugar J. S. Cotton 

O, C. SaTTIN<VER I, S. loPLON 

F. M.GUNTER W, J. AOAMS 

A. H, Kc.;ehth R. S. Munter 

LoLcs KicH \V. v.. Olds 

JFFIUATE MEMBERS 
. Thomas C. Trlebi.oou Ass't Prof. R. V. Holuster 

Prok. I. Leo Skarkman 



OMEG RH I 



Omega Phi 



Honor (mines President 

Helen Champion Vice-President 

Winifred Roehm Secretary 

Helen Tuthill Treasurer 



Elizabeth Arthur 
Jeannette Armstrong 
Mildred Carpenter 
Helen Champion 
Helen Ely 

GOLDA GiNSBURG 

Honor Gaines 
Marian Holden 
Katherine Harrington 
Miriam Hubbard 



Albertine Loom is 
Winifred Roehm 
Nellie Rosewarren 
Donna Sutherland 
Elorence Snyder 
Helen Tuthill 
Muriel Tyson 
Gladys Whelan 
Marian Wilson 
Ethel Vail 



428 



Stylu 



JCTtrE MEMBERS 



Albertine Loomis 
Kthel Hosmer 



.ISSOCIJTE MEMBERS 



Engineering Society 



An organizacion lo encourage original invescigacion in engineering and scientific 
subjects, to acquire a knowledge of the most approved methods of engineering 
procedure, to collect material of value to engineers, to publish such information as 
may be deemed of interest to the profession and of benefit to ourselves, and to pro- 
mote a social spirit amoiiK students and members of the profession. 



General Society 

N. F. Brown ..,.,,.... President 

H. R. Leach Vice-President 

E. H. MERRE'rr Secretary 

Waiter Warrkn Treasurer 



BRJSCtI SOC/KTIES 

A. C. StMONS . . 

H. S- M 
U, M. Smith 



President 

President 
President 



American Institute of Electrical Engineers 

Univkksity of MccHitiAN Branch 
OFFICKRS 



U. M. Smith . . , 




. . . Chairman 


Norman F. Bbown 






H. A. Mankin , Treasurer 


Mtmterjhip CommiiUt 




Social CommilUi 


Arleigk Meai> 




J. Kheiner 


H. A. Mankin 


MEMBERS 


H. C. BUELI 


J. F. Clakk 


Senior, 


F. A. Del Valle 


S. YOHOTAMA 




D. W. Taylor 


H. W. Miller 




H. C. BUEIL 


Vi. A. RUTOIRS 




A. Mead 


N. F. Brown 




J. Kreiner 


U. M. Smith 




N. F. DoLPH 


L. M. Dellincer 




C. W. Smith 


H. A. Mankin 




E. Von NosTm 


H. D. Stechkr 


Junior, 


R. Wyiie 


A. N. Qlark 




J, N. SK..TECKI 


R. D. Pappe 




F, E, RtCHARDaON 






^My- 



nO.SOR.IRY MEMBERS 

I'hok. H. C. S*rii.Rn i>„„f. Y M, Hii,\f 

W.W, \UcArthlk C.,mm.Hlore 

I- t-. B,Bl.KK Vi«-fomm,Klorc 

M. I.. (JomsTKlN ,.„„er 

W. I.. CooKK Assi.ran. i'urs.r 

W, H, Warrkn St.w»r.l 

cRiiir 

r,.\\. AkKHS M. A. NltKOLLS 

K. Altamjrano c. H. 1'khkson 

H. K, IUhrk'it I M Rakkstraw 

K. W. HKfNR.cH N.K.'sato' 

I- R- HussA (i. B. Smmh 

A, Ka.fman C.D.Tki 

K, H. MoNR.jK w c. Vol 



Brown Oki.i.rich 

Prescott Club 

OFFICEJiS 

Chaxlks Costa President 

JosRPH M1LI.NKR Vice-President 

R. C, Brown Secretary 

H. N.OnLRICH Treasurer 

W. J. BoNrSTEKL Reporler 



ARCHiTECTVRAL 

t 



r ./-^/^ 5 f-nrx/ 



University of Michigan Commerce Club 

OFFICERS 

R. R. LoissDLkv I'residcnt 

F. L. Waukrs Vife-PresiJent 

D. R, Bali.kntimk Secrctarv 

B. T. Stkkrs Treasurer 

Karl Rkn/. Correspondinf; Scrric 

FACVLTY MEMBERS 



ACTIfE MEMBERS 



Prof 


H. C. Au 


Prof, 


, K. M. -Va 


Prof, 


, Davii. Fi 


Prof. 


, J. W. (Jl 


T. E. 


Ami'siiiiei 


R, D, 


Atwatkr 


D. R. 


Ballrnt 


R.C. 


Barnlm 


F. H. 


Be.;oi.e 


K, A. 


BiBKR 


A, M 


. Bfnti.fv 


I.. H. 


DUNTFN 


(;. B. 


Fox 


H, l>. 


. GRiFrrTH 


|,N, 


HAMM.rOh 


R.T.. 


Hasklks 


V. 1.. 


HOPKCNS.1 


H. S. 


HOSMKR 



Prof 


. K. D. JoN^ 




As ST. 


Prok. (i, W 


Aio-. 


Skcri 


ETARY S. W. 


Smcti 


H.C. 


I.ANC.E 




1). K. 


I.AWRKNCK 




K. K. 


LOLNSBIRV 




K. A. 


MORRISUN 




F. P. 


Randall 




Kari. 


Rknz 




C. \ , 


Skllkrs 




B. 1 . 


Stekrs 




B. W 


. Tallkkn 




A H. 


Torre V 




F. I.. 


iWAIiKNSKIl 

Walters 




f. F. 


Weiss iN<iHH 




R. F. 


WlLLJAMSOl 





AkCHEN Cooke 

DOIPH MlLLCKES 

"The Automobile Society" 

ONE day i;ist December a group of engineering students got together and 
formed »n organization which they called the "Automobile Society." The 
society has for its object (he promotion of automobile eneineering among 
students and its formation is but a natural sequence to the growth of the Automobile 
Department at Michigan. 

Although the society was organized under the temporary title of "Automobile 
Society" it is expected that before this book appears the society will have taken 
over the title of "University of Michigan branch of the Society of Automobile Engi- 
neers." The S. A. E. is a national organization and it is thru its interest and the 
interest of the local society that the branch will be formed. 



MUSIC and DRAMA 



University of Michigan Glee and Mandolin Club 



Frank C. Wheeler, '16K 
Peter A. Hartesveldt, *16L 
F^RANK A. Taber, '17 . 
David R. Ballentine, '16 . 
Maurice A. Xicholls, '17E 

Theodore Harrison . 
U. S. Wilson, '16 . 



OFFICERS 



GLEE CLUB 



R. M. Allan, 17L 
W. R. Atlas, 'IS 
T. S. Barneit, '16 

J. B. COMSTOCK, '18L 

H. L. Davis, '17 



C. C. Bailey, '17 
John Bloomstrom, '17 
C. H. Boos, '18 
F. W. Grover, 'IS 
H. W. Kerr, '16 • 



R. R. DiETERLE, 'IS 

H. D. Draper, 'ISE 
H. M. Kasley, '16 
Arthur Heuer, 'IS 



Harry Carlson, '17 

J. Fish bach, Jr., '17 

A. J. Gornet/ky, '17 

H. L. Haag, '16 

Frank A. Taber, '17, Pianist 



Karl V. Moore . 

H. B. FoRSYTHE, '17E 



First Tenors 

E. H. Felt, '18 

P. A. Hartesveldt, '17L 
W. S. James, '16D 
H. Liebeskind, 'IS 
C. F. Watson, '18 

Second Tenors 
W. Kleinestecker, '16D 

R. S. KOCHER, '18 

C. L. Lane, '16D 

Y. W. Peterson, Grad. 

S. H. RiGGS, '18 

First Basses 
C. B. SiKES, '16 

F. H. Tinsman, '16 
W. S. Westerman, '17 
H. F. Whittaker, Grad. 

F. P. SURGENOR, M6 

Second Basses 

S. J. Hie IT, '16L 

C. R. Illick, 'ISM 

D. W. Jennings, '16 
W. L. Kemp, 'IS 



MJXDOLIS CLUB 



J. S. SwiTZER, '16 

M. F. Bennett, '16 



J. H. Adams, MSL 
Willis Brodhead, 17E 



W. C. Allee, 'ISL 
P. L. Steketee, 'IS 



C. C. Ashbaugh, '16 
H. Q. Barber, '18E 

Mandola 
L. O. Aldrich, *17E 

^ Cello 
F. C. Wheeler, '16E 

W. C. AcHi, '17L 



First Mandolins 

G. A. Leverenz, '16E 
C. A. McKenney, '16E 

Second Mandolins 

D. (i. ESTABROOK, '17 

J. R. St. Clair, 'ISE 

Third Mandolins 

H. H. Whittingham, '17E 
L. L. Bower, '16E 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Manager 
Assistant Manager 

Director 
Leader 



C. P. Lowes, '16 
Leman Scott, '18 
W. C. Mooney, '17 
R. A. Parker, '16 
G. L Murphy, '16 



E. R. SCARBORO, *17M 

H. N. Schmitt, '16 
L. Siev, '17D 
pREscoTT Smith, '18 

F. W. Sullivan, '18 



U. S. Wilson, '16 
M. C. Wood, '17 
E. L. Zeigler, '18 
J. K. Zeigler, '19M 



C. I. Myers, '18 

C. P. Ritchie, '16 

R. M. Vincent, '17M 
D ,W. Sessions, '17L 

D. T. McKone, '17 



Director 
Leader 



A. J. Richards, '17D 
O. O. Leininger, '16D 



R. L W^HEELER, '17 

F. A. Becker, '18 



G. J. Fischer, '18P 



Guitars 

C. Pickett, 'IS 

E. K. Marshall, '17P] 



I 'keleles 
W. Y. Crock En*, '16 



A. D. Honey, '17D 
R. F. Motley, '16D 

f'iolin 
H. B. Forsyth E, *\7Y. 
Bass riol 
H. L. D.AVis, '17 

J. L. Driscoll, *18 



439 



Girls' Glee Club 

i Sahgknt President 

LLE Roman Vice-I'residcnc 

KREC.Kk Treasiirtr 

Jose Secretarv 

' IksH Librarian 



Hei 



< Ahmi 



Meldrku Kachrks 
Alice liARNARu 

RUBV BoWDEN 

Bkbnice Bordkn 
Helen Hush 



Vki 



rt Bltlf 
V Brou-i 



Lucv Cannon 



K Meau 

etMki 

K Mm 



AuELAlDE McAllister 
Kathehine McBh[[>e 
Elda McKee 
Helen McDonald 
E Packard 



Flo 



E Pa 



Marion Peterson 
Josephine Kanuall 

ClRACE RaYNSFORD 



Ruth Krecer 
Kmma Knoef 

RERNtCE KrLCER 



Poi 



A WaI 



AUELLE WeSTBROOK 

Gladys Whelan 
Jemima Wenley 
Katherine Wknlev 



That Michigan liand' 

OFFICI-RS 



\Vm. E. Mai 
k. H. Halsi 
A. J. BvkR 

K. V. Mkrki 

I. C, CORTR 
U G, KlFLD 

H. Gray . 
Wii 



D Wll, 



Member Govern 


nB Board 


Member Govern 


D)- Itoard 


Member (Jovcrn 


iiK Hoard 


Musical Dirmo 




Kacilty Manage 




Stiidenr Manage 





Arthur N. Bacon, 
Clikkjrl) W. Brain. 
Alfrkd J. Bi 

pHltl 



•Cab 
R B. Cas 



■IS 
. 'ISK 
E, '16K 



l,(SLE C. CoRTRIGHT, '"17 

Donald W. Crabbs. "IHK 
Maxwkll B. Cutting, ']7V. 
William G. Evenson, 'IX 
Mark Ferrell, '16 
E G. Field, '18 



Pail L. Fie 



I, '16 



RoBEt 



■ A. Gu 



. '!(> 



MEMBERS 

Howard Gray, '17Arch. 
Merit D. Haac, •16-'IKM 
Robert H. Halstead, '18 
Arthlr Hammond '17D 
Charles F. Hemans, '18 
KrnestL. Hicks, 'IS 
HerbertG, Johnson, 'iS 
WiLLKM M, Johnston, 'U,l 
Rockwell M. Kempton, 'ISM 
NoRBERT A. Lange, Gcad. 
Walim. McC. McKee,'18E 
William E. Mathews. 'IS-'ISL 
Clarence L. Menser, Grad. 



E. Ecu 



tMei 



, 'IS 



Milton A. NKriER.'l7E 
MaynardA.Norris. '16 
PhiltpO. Potts, 'K.K 
Bri-ce R. Rathbin, 'IKE 
W. Grover Rich, 'U.!) 
Stephen J, Roskoskv, 'IKR 
Dean C. Scro<kjie, 'IS 
Clarence W. She*, TK 
RovalG. Trisleb, '17 
Stanley J. Whiteman, 'In 
Elmer H. WiRTH, 'IHP 
Charles C. Wolcott, 'ITH 
John Y.York. Jr., 'I(,L 
Cecil E. Zwickkv. '17E 




Presenting 

''The Professor's Love Story" 

A Comedy 

By J. M. Barrie 

Whitney Theatre^ Saturday Eveningy Dec. ISy 1915. 

jyhitney Theatre^ Saturday .Ifternooiy Feb. 12, 1916. 

The Jcademyy Saginazu^ Mich., Friday Evening, Feb. IS, 1916. 

Effie Proctor Inez M. Gose 

Lucy White Phyllis Povah 

Dr. Cosens Leon M. Cunningham 

Professor Goodwillie Morrison C. Wood 

Lady Gilding Helen R. Kly 

The Dowager Lady (jilding Pauline O. Emerson 

Sir George Gilding Humphrey Springstun 

Pete Chester E. Fordney 

Henders Arthur J. Adams 

Agnes Goodwillie Mary L. Johns 

Margaret R. Reynolds 

Dr. Yellowlees Clay W. W^ilber 

MEMBERS 

Elsa Apfel Eva Sharrow Clarence Lokker 

Henryetta Brandebury Eleanor Stalker Stanley Lamb 

Helen Ely Emilie Sargent Francis McKinney 

Pauline Emerson Adele Westbrook Walker Peddicord 

Inez Gose Roberta Woodworth James Ryan 

Julia Heideman Auele Crandall Humphrey Springstun 

Mary Johns Walter Atlas John Switzer 

Ruth Kreger Arthur Adams Edward Sachs 

Nona Meyers Lloyd Cur by Glen Shipley 

Jean MacClennan Robert Collins Morrison Wood 

Vera Marsh Leon Cunninc;ham Norman Wassman 

Phyllis Povah Grant Cook Clay Wilber 

Mildred Reese Thomas Donahue F. W. Sullivan 

Margaret Reynolds Chester Fordney 



442 



The Comedy Club 



John S. Swit/.kh . 














President 


KisA Apfel . 














Vice-Preside 


Edward A. Sachs 














Director 


WALkER PEI>l>tC<>Rl> 














Man after 


Crant L. Cook . 














Secretar>-r 


E. G. Babteime - 














Propertv M 


John E. Sanukks . 














Costume M 


H. Kirk \\'<uvf. . 














Ad vei rising 




Prof, i.oii 


A. StraisS 




Chairman Sena 


eC 


mm.tiee in c 


ate 


of 


Jrair 


aiic 


OrB.ni,„ion>. 




OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL FEREIX 

Harold J. Sherman President 

Florence Gerber Vice-President 

Albert T. Lehman Treasurer 

Gertrude Seifert Secretary 

William T. Adams Auditor 

OFFICERS OF THE MEX'S SECTION 

William M. Laux President 

Andrew Tiesenga V-'ice-President 

Bernhard H. Dawson Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS OF THE MEN'S SECTION 



Wm. T. Adams 
Richard Barie 
Ralph Boice 
Ben Clark 
Chester Clark 
Bernhard H. Dawson 
Horace Davis 
Harold Humphreys 
Charles L. Haas 
Paul Haller 



James W. Hoge 
Harold Johnston 
William Laux 
Albert T. Lehman 
Fred Marx 
Norman Muhme 
Henry Massnick 
Isadore Mehlman 
Carl Neumann 
RoscoE Rau 



George Robbert 
Harold Rosenheim 
Lavanche Rieger 
Henry Ryskamp 
Harold J. Sherman 
Earle Schumacher 
Andrew Tiesinga 
Alfred Thompson 



444 



OFFICERS OF IFI'ER SECTIOS 

RlTH Krec.ER ['resident 

Adklk Bkvkr Virc-Presidem 

(iKNEViivK 0-I.EARY Storeiarv and Tre 

OFFICERS Of iOtniR SECTIOS 

KlTHYMlA HiLliNKR President 

Della Laibrngayer , Vice-President 

Mahoaret Henkei Secretary anil T re; 

MEMBERS OF GIRLS' SECTIOX 



Mildred Bachers 


Klthymia Hildner 


Jessie Spence 


Alice Barnard 


Helen Hlmfkrevs 


Margaret Sure 


Margaret Bassett 


Margaret Henderson 


Anna Staeb 


RiBv Bawden 


MildaJgsenhaus 


MinaSievert 


Ahele Beyer 


Margaret Klein 


Mildred Schilling 


Margaret Bocenried 


ER Ruth Kreger 


Marguerite Strachan 


Rlth Bailev 


Beatrice Lambrecht 


V. Frieda Se.gworth 


Ruth Balsom 


Della Lauhengayer 


OlCA ScHINkHAN , 


Helen Blair 


SeLMA LlNDELL 


Grace Thomasma 


Mathila Braun 


F.LTZABETH McRaE 


Ruth Tromblv 


Helen Champion 


Olive McLouth 


Ebba Trysell 


Adele Cranbali 


Evelyn Moore 


Mathilda Ulenberg 


Lucille Colby 


Janet MacFarlane 


Ethel Vail 


Hilda Dieterle 


Genevieve O'Learv 


Marjorie Votey 


Ruth Elliott 


Constance Orcutt 


Harriet Walker 


Ermine Fillingham 


Bessie Platto 


Alice Wieber 


Marie Fluegel 


Florence Powers 


Annie Williams 


Edith Gabriel 


Genevieve Packard 


Florence Walz 


Florence Gerbeh 


Dertha Robinson 


Frieda Wedemever 


Irma Giddings 


Genevieve Rowe 


Alice Waessner 


Altha Hefeelbower 


Leah Schueren 


Marie von Walthausen 


MARGARET HeNKEL 


Gertrude Seifekt 


Anna von Walthausen 



VREAV DU CERCLE 



President 

Vice-Presiden 

Secretary 



MEMISRES .ICTIFS 



Mk. H, V, Wai 



Cercle Francais 

DE L'VSlri'RSITE DV MICIIICJX. 1915-1910 

-LA RUSSiK P:N 1875" M. Philip Bikslfv 

Conference accoinpaEtrfe de projections. 
Mardi 30 novembre. Tappan Hall. 5 heiires. 

"I.A LITIKRATURK AU MIDI'* M. Kdward Adams 

Mardi 14 d^cembre. Tappan Hall, i heitres. 

"LA VIK A PARIS" M. Mokirt Lrvi 

Mardi 11 ianvier. Tappan Hall. 5 heures. 
SOIREK MUSICALK, DRAMATIQUK ET DANSANTK. 

Samedi 22 Janvier, Sarah Caswell Angell Hall. M heures. 

"ALX BALKANS" M. Harrv Wann 

Conf<-rence accl>lllpag^l^e de prDJections. 
Mardi 3 fi^vrier. Tappan Hall. 5 heures. 
-JKANNE d'ARC DANS LES LEITRES ET DANS LES ARTS'' 

M. Arthlk Canfielo 

ConlPrcnce accompann^ de projections. 
Mardi 29 fcvrier. Tappan Hall. 5 heures. 

"LA CIVILISATION FRANCAISK" M. Hico Thcrme 

Mardi 7 mars. Tappan Hall. 5 heur». 
"LKS SAVANTS FRANgAIS ALX ILKS PHII.LIPPINES" 

-M. Emersdn CHRrsTiP 

Mardi 21 mars. Tappan Hall. 3 heiires. 
"L'EOOLK DES BEAUX ARTS DE PARIS" . . . M, J. J. Alb. Rousse.^ 

Mardi 4 avril. Tappan Hall. 5 heures. 
CX)NKKRENCE SUR LA PIECE CHOISIE , . , , M Robert ErMNCER 

Mardi 25 avril. Tappan Hall. 5 heures. 
REPRESENTATION ANNLELLE DU CERCLE FRANCAIS. 
Jetidi 27 avril. 



The Junior Girls* Play 



THE Annual Junior Girls' Play owes its existence to Mrs. Jordan, who suggested that the juniors 
write and produce a play in honor of the graduating class. The senior girls had been in the habit 
of selecting a play from the dramatic literature of various countries and producing it during Com- 
mencement week open to the general public. In contrast to this, the Junior Play is original and gives 
a chance for fun-making often at the expense of people and institutions on the campus. In 1904 an en- 
tertainment dealing with Buster Brown at Michigan was given, and from this the Junior Play developed . 

On the evening of Swing-Out in 1905 the first Junior Play was given. It was called " Fiverysenior", 
obviously a travesty on the old morality play and opened with the following prologue, "This is a treatyse 
how Everysenior is sumoned to render accounte of her ille deedes and well-knowne disgraceful actions. 
Her kind friend, E very junior,perceiveth her portending destruction and hereby warneth her." The Voice 
of God, or Dean Hudson, was taken by Mabel Tuomey. The rest of the characters w^ere Dethe, or Pluck 
and Con; Felowship or Society; Kyndred, or Parents; Goodes, or Bank Account; Knowledge, or Do- 
mesticity; Dyscresion, or Pa Finney; Confession, or Dean Jordan; The Grave or Graduation; Strength, 
or Athletics; Five Wits, Bluff, Bolt, Brass, Jolly, and Excuse; and Everyman or Everysenior. 

The authors were Eugenia Bray, Ann Mulheron, Elizabeth Prall, Juliet Stockbridge and Effie Arm- 
strong. 

The next year "Alice in Seniorland" was given, its authors being Ruth Rizer, Louise Wicks, Mar- 
garet Dresser and Hortense Flexner. Alice, a freshman, was guided through Seniorland by the Cater- 
pillar, a sophomore, who introduced her to the Cheshire Cat representing Coach Yost, and the Right 
and Left Bowers representing Professors Whitney and Markley. The Mock Turtle, Dodo and Griffin 
were other members of the faculty, while President Angell was the King of Hearts. A group of seniors 
came in admitting that they had become engaged during their college course, were ordered off to cook- 
ing school by the Duchess, otherwise Mrs. Jordan. 

The offering of 1907 was "Don Quixote, the Co-ed Knight", "Adapted from the Spanish," by 
Eleanor Demmon, Barbara McAlvay, Marjorie Fenton, and Isabella Watt. Don Quixote, the Spanish 
cavalier, came with his squire Sancho Panza to save the seniors from being overworked by their pro- 
fessors. The Knight clad in armor of boiler and kettle tops was a gallant figure and much admired by 
the girls. Curiosity had been aroused by this play as an editorial in the Daily shows: — "Now in view 
of the present anxiety to maintain a democratic spirit in contemporary affairs, why all this exclusiveness 
at the North West Corner of the Campus? The men are aggrieved at being barred from the gay little 
functions held under Mrs. Jordan's eye. It is too bad to be shunted so into the cold, cold world. Some 
day we shall have a club house of our own and then they can't 'play in our yard. ' Meanwhile we hope 
the Junior Play will be mirth provoking enough to keep them oblivious enough to the envy of those out- 
side. 

A distinct advance was made, when "Michiguse, " by Margaret McLauchlan was given in 1908. 
The idea was very clever, the scene taking place on the airship "Michiguse" where Professor Star- 
gazer's class in skyology is looking on the campus. On spring evenings various "group phenomena" 
could be seen strolling about and one girl thought she observed a snap course in the Engineering College 
but was mistaken. Both "Michiguse" and the second part, "Coedenda" contained takeoffs on the 
Union Opera "Michigenda," the hit of the evening being the " Rah! Rah! College Girl", played by Miss 
McLauchlan, who sang of her various admirers. 

"Martiagan," by Jane Harris and Sarah Sunderland, was performed in 1909. While some of the 
girls are at a spread with certain members of the faculty the alarm comes that a company of Martians 
had landed on the Campus and is marching quickly to the banquet. The rest of the play relates the 
invasion and Hnal conquest of the Martians who come to take the senior girls to Mars and found there 
a University of Martigan. "I Kind O Like Ann Arbor" and "The Billiken" were greatly appreciated. 

"Eds and Co-eds", by Fannie Biggs, Marian Ludington, Nellie Canright, Ruth Anderson and 
Josephine Rankin was played in 1910. This play abounded in local quips and allusions; Professor Thomas 
was seeking rhetorical errors in the book of the Recording Angel, and Professor Wenley was puzzling his 
classes by discussing the "is" and the "isnotness" of the "isnot". 

In 1911 Mary Woodhill recalled to us our nursery days in a farce bearing no name, presenting many 
familiar figures from Mother Goose: — Humpty Dumpty, Bo-Peep, Peter Piper, Miss Moffat and a host 
of others. This piece was somewhat spectacular and the chorus work was good, the Dutch and Black- 
bird Choruses being especially well liked. 



448 






"Thi! Come Back" 



There were many quaint and humorous scenes " In Old Bagdad/' the libretto by Louise Conklin and 
the music by Eva Hanks. Mary Palmer was excellent as Reginald Worthingham of Oxford, travelling 
in the Orient; Marguerite Stanley made a fine caliph and Elaine Shields was amusing as Shampoo. 

A fair>' tale, "In the Realm of Dreams" by Marjorie Nicholson, was enacted in 1913. We wit- 
nessed the adventures of a princess disguised as a peasant girl who was finally found by the prince, rep- 
resented by Isobe! Rizer. Irene Bigalke was very funny as the duenna of the princess, continually re- 
minding her of court etiquette. 

After this play a farce "Daily Life", by Emily Gilfillan, gave to outsiders a glimpse of the Daily 
Office and how that publication "might" be managed. The editor was bothered by a bevy of girls who 
came to chat with him when he was trying to get the paper ready for press. Gwendolyn Brown, a very 
popular girl, played by Phyllis Dunne, was in love with the editor and continually calling him up during 
his business hours. He tried to escape these damsels but could not, so a less attractive editor was in- 
stalled. Louise Robson was screamingly funny as Bob the reporter and Julia Anderson as the lover of 
one of the suffragettes caused that chorus to be encored again and again. 

"The Treasure of Toule", by Louise Markley, was given by the Juniors of 1914. "Castles, Fairy 
Castles", the music by Helen Malcomson and words by Vera Burridge, was very successfully sung by 
Alice Lloyd and Romaine Bramwell. It was probably the best song which had been written by any of 
the junior girls during the history of the plays. 

The eleventh play, "The Come Back", by Eleanor Stalker, appeared in 1915. The scene was laid 
in Ann Arbor in 2002, the men having left college many years before to go to the war in Europe. Act 
I takes place in the Dean's office where we discover her in an angry mood. Some girls have rushed the 
Majestic the night before and she resolves that they shall be "summarily dealt with". Gerald, a daring 
youth enters and tries to persuade the Dean to let the men return to Michigan, but she refuses. Gerald, 
however, is backed in this request by the girls, several of whom have fallen in love with him. Act II 
is on the Campus where the horrified Professor Jones discovers Gerald chatting with the girls. She is so 
shocked that after reproving them for such conduct she tells Gerald to leave at once. 

The Dean has not always been the stern woman she now is. She loved once, but her lover left her, 
embittering her towards man; for this reason, she refuses to reinstate Gerald and his friends. But for- 
tunately her old sweetheart returns and explains his defection in so touching a manner that she relents 
towards men in general and him in particular. The play ends with the promise that Gerald and his 
friends may return to Michigan. Between the acts burnt cork specialties were given by Julia Barksdale, 
Beatrice Hannan and Nina Mclntyre. 

Much of the success of the play was due to the Committee, of which Martha Gray was Chairman, 
Helen Humphreys, Assistant Chairman, with Adele Westbrook, Mildred Bacher, Bertha Pulford as Pro- 
perty, Publicity and Business Managers, respectively. 

The orchestra consisting of Ellen Sargeant, Piano; Marie Paulus, 1st violin; and Amy Nelson, 2nd 
violin, was the first to be composed of University girls. The cast follows: — 
Gerald, bold enough to invade Michigan Elsa Apfel 

Shirley, with whom he falls in love .... Gertrude Roos 

Jane Andrus, Dean of Women Pauline Emerson 

Louise, large and athletic Jemima Wenley 

Letty, who falls in love with Gerald .... Edna Toland 

Jean, affectionately inclined Leola Royce 

Professor Jones, disciplinarian Katherine MacBride 

Stenographers Myrtle Young, Nellie Rosewaren 

College Girls Louise Potter, Helen McDonald 

Horatio Blanker, the Dean's old lover . Elizabeth McRae 

The most popular songs were, " I Know a Secret" (which was afterwards published) words and music 
being by Martha Gray and Ellen Sargeant; "Those Peaceful Days," lyric by Eleanor Stalker, music by 
Ellen Sargeant, sung by Emma Knoepp and a chorus of professors in academic costume; and "You 
Need A Man," by Martha Gray and Ellen Sargeant, sung by Gerald, telling the girls of the good old 
days, when men were at Michigan and pointing out to them the many advantages man's presence 
would bring. 

The more humorous songs were, "The Poor Typewriter," by Jemima Wenley and Ellen Sargeant; 
"The Joyful Spring," by Katherine MacBride and Ellen Sargeant, sung by Katherine and Jemima 
Wenley, and Sunbonnet Chorus; "The Downtrodden Man," by Jemima Wenley and Ellen Sargeant, 
depicting the woes endured by men through Suffragettes. 

The society dancing of Helen Ely and Ethelyn Bolen and the aesthetic dancing of Helen Ely and 
Genevieve O'Leary were the big hits of the program. 

This Junior Play was the first to make an out-of-town trip, going on May 15th, 1915, to Toledo, at 
the invitation of the Association of Collegiate Alumni, where it scored a decided success. This made a 
milestone in the history of the Junior Girls' Play; and so well were the girls received that the 1916 Junior 
Play has been invited to Detroit. 

Taking the play from the beginning we can trace its development from the first farce, "Buster 
Brown," it gradually becoming more compact and unified, though always retaining the local hits on the 
seniors. The first few plays were written by several girls but later one girl has written the play, with 
the music and lyrics written in competition. Many of the former plays employed men to write their 
music, as well as furnish it. Each year it has become more of a Junior function, going outside of the class 
only for part of the orchestra and the director, Professor Brumm. Too much praise cannot be given 
him for the able manner in which he trained the cast of the 1915 play. K. M. 



450 




The Mimes of the University of Michigan Union 



HARitv Carlson 
Lyle M. Clift 
Russell Collins 
Grant L. Cook 
Leon M. Cunningham 
M, F. Dunne 

J. W. FiNKENSTAEDT 

Haroli) Forsvthe 

A. J. GORNETZKY 

Durward Grinstead 
Frank W. Grover 
Edward W. Haislip 
Homer L. Heath 



Morrison C. Wood 



Lvndall E. Hughes 
W. A. P. John 
Harry Kerr 
John S. Leonard 
Georce p. McMahon 
Francis T. Mack 
Earl V. Moore 
Lee N. Parker 

LeROV J. ScAHLAN 

Chase B. Sikes 

Sidney Steen 
Theron D. Weaver 
Kenneth N. Westerman 
Fred Wheeler 
Anthony J. Whitmire 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



William C. Titcomb 



The Classical Club 



Myrtlk Young President 

Ben K. Perry Vice-President 

Virginia Stral'ghn Secretary 

Clarence H inter Treasurer 



Ella Hliss 
H. H. Brhton 
Victor F^rock 
Ruth Brown 
Ella Campbell 
Ralph Carson 
Sarah Caughey 
Alice Colcord 
Blanche Covey 
John Chase 
Helen Davis 
Florence Dee 
William Dressler 
Elizabeth Doughty 
Phyllis Egglestone 
Pauline Emerson 
Louise Ewing 
Howard Gellert 
Kelsey Gilfoil 
Margaret Gourley 
Grace Hag en 
Henry Hoch 
Emily Hooper 
Clarence Hunter 
James K. Hazel 
Parepa Ingraham 
Floyd Jar vis 
Ch a r lott e K e ls e y 
Ruth Kelsey 
Gladys Laughman 
Lillian Lindner 



Emily Loman 
R. F. Mathew 
Helen McDonald 
Rosswell McIver 
(jeo. Melitz 
Ben Perry 
RuiE Pinney 
Antoyneita Poel 
Mary Porter 
Bertha Pulford 
Lavanche Rieger 
Geo. Robrert 
Irene Russel 
Louis Sable 
May Sanders 
Elizabeth Seaver 
Freda Seigworth 
Pearl Smith 
Nelda Springer 
Sadie Stoddard 
Virginia Straughn 
Norma Stroh 
Elaine Tappan 
Maurice Tolochko 
Ebba Trysell 
Clara Tubbs 
Francis Vanderveen 
Louis Waldo 
Charles Wilner 
Geo. Wilner 
John Woodford 



Myrtle Young 



452 



FACULTY ASD IIO\ORARY MEMBERS 



Prof. Arthur Eoward BoAk 


Prof. > 


,ND Mrs. Campbell Bonnkr 


Dr. Or 


.«a F,tch Butler 


Prof. , 


iND Mrs. Albert Robinson Crctte 


Prof. / 


lND Mrs. Josefh Horace Drake 


Prof. , 


lND Mrs. Francis Willey Kelsev 


Prof. , 


kND Mrs. Clarence Linton Meadi 


Mr. Re 


)S8 Hamlin McLean 


Prof. > 


iND Mrs. Josefk Raleigh Nelson 


Dr. Prank Egleston Robbins 


Prof, i 


iND Mrs. Henry .\rthlh Sanders 


Dr. Gilbert Hawthorne Tavu.r 


Mr. AN 


ID Mrs. George Robert Swain 


Prof. > 


iNO. Mrs. John (Jarrett Winter 



Masques 



Helen Ely President 

Jemima Wenley Vice-President 

Helen Champion • Secretary 

RuBERTA WooDwoRTH Treasurer 



Elsa Apfel Mary Palmer 

Helen Champion Phyllis Povah 

Adele Crandall Marian Stowe 

Helen Dow Gita Tucker 

Helen Ely Aris Van Deusen 

Martha Gray Julia Van Leevwen 

Miriam Hubbard Jemima Wenley 

Alice Lloyd Catherine Wenley 

Lavinia McBride Minna Winslow 

Genevieve O'Leary Ruberta Woodworth 



ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. Effinger Mrs. Lombard 

Miss Ann Langley Mrs. Stoner 



454 



Symphonic League 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



Bess M. Elliott 
Haiel K. McCaulev 
Mahguerite Iseman 
Myka D. Mdoh 
Gkace O. Rosser 



Alice Blitton . 



President 

Vice-Presideni 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Social Chairman 

House Committee 

Glee Club President 



The University Musical Society 

Comprising 
The University School of Music 
The University Choral Union and May Festival 



ROJRD OF DIRECTORS 



Francis W. Kelsey, Ph.D., I.L.D. 
Harry B. Hutchins, LL.D. 

Levi D. Wines, C.K 

Albert A. Stanley, A.M. 

G. Frank .Allmendincier, C.K. 
James B. Angell, LL.D. 
Horace (i. Pretfyman, A.B. 
Ottmar Eberbach 
Durand W. Springer, B.S., 

Secretarv of rhe Board of Directors 



President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Musical Director 



Shirley W. Smith, A.M. 
William C. Stevens, A.M. 
\'icTOR C. Vaughan, Ph.D., Sc.D., M.D. 
James H. Wade 
Charles .A. Sink, A.B., 
Business Manager 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC COXCERTS 



October 7, 
October 14, 
October 21, 
November 4, 
November 17, 
November 18, 
December 1, 
December 2, 
December 10, 
December 14, 
December 22, 
January 13, 
January 14, 
January 21, 
January 2S, 



Faculty Concert 
F'aculty Concert 
Faculty Concert 
Faculty Concert 
Students' Recital 
Orchestra Concert 
Students' Recital 
Faculty Concert 
Students' Recital 
Faculty Concert 
Students' Recital 
Faculty Concert 
Students' Recital 
Students* Recital 
Orchestra Concert 



January 31, 
February 1, 
February 2, 
February 3, 
February 4. 
February 7, 
February 10, 
February 11, 
February 12, 
February 17, 
February 25, 
F'ebruary 28, 
March 2, 
March 16. 
.April 6, 



Faculty Concert 
Faculty Concert 
Graduation Recital 
Faculty Concert 
F acuity Concert 
Faculty Concert 
Students' Recital 
Students' Recital 
Students' Recital 
Faculty Concert 
Students' Recital 
Orchestra Concert 
Students' Recital 
Faculty Concert 
Orchestra Concert 



456 



Choral Union and May Festival Concerts 



PRE'FESTirJL CONCERTS 



I. October 19, 



II. November 23, 



III. December 13, 

IV, January 20, 
V'. March 17, 



Pasquale Amato, Baritone; Guiseppe 
Bamboschscheck, Pianist 

Honzaley String Quartet, Adolfo 
Betti, 1st Violin; Alfred Pochon, 2nd 
Violin; Ugo Ara, Viola; Iwan 
d'Archambeau, Violincello. 

Mischa Elman, Violinist; Walter H. 
Golde, Pianist. 

I. J. Paderewski, Pianist. 

New York Philharmonic Orchestra; 
Josef Stransky, Conductor; Albert 
Lindquest, Tenor, Soloist. 



Twenty-third Annual May Festival 



VI. May 17, — First Festival Concert 

Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra, Soloist: Frieda Hem- 
pel, Soprano; Frederick 
Stock, Conductor. 

VII. May 18, — Second Festival Concert 

Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra, University Choral 
Union. 
"Paradise Lost" . . Bossi 
Soloist: Florence Hinkle, 
Soprano; Sophie Braslau, 
Contralto; Reinald Wer- 
renrath. Baritone; Gustaf 
Holmquist, Bass; Albert 
A. Stanley, Conductor. 

VIII. May 19, — ^Third Festival Concert (aft- 

ernoon) 

Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra; Special Chorus of 
Children. 
"The Children at Bethle- 
hem". . . Pierne 
Soloist: Florence Hinkle, 



Soprano; Albert A. Stan- 
ley and Frederick Stock, 
Conductors. 

IX. May 19, — Fourth Festival Concert 

Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra, Soloist: John McCor- 
mack, Tenor; Frederick 
Stock, Conductor. 

X. May 20, — Fifth Festival Concert (Aft- 

ernoon) 

Recital on the Frieze 
Memorial Organ; Soloist: 
Ralph Kinder, Organist. 

XL May 20, — Sixth Festival Concert 

Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra. 
"Samson and Delilah" 

Saint'Sa^ns , 
Soloist: Margarete Mat- 
zenauer; Morgan Kingston, 
Tenor; Pasquale Amato, 
Baritone; Reinald Werren- 
rath, Bass; Albert A. 
Stanley, Conductor. 



457 



Manderville R. Gardner D. Gardner 
Pardee Honey 

HOWLAND WhaLEN Ma 



The 1917 Junior Hop Committee 



Edwin Palmer, Secretary 



Glen Howlanu 




Lawrence Hels 


KOBERT FrANTI 


Richard GARDNtR 

Fubl.cUy 
Richard Gardner 


Gordon Smith 


Clifford Mandevtllf 


Allen Honev 
Rr/rrshmrnlj 


Karl Pardee 


Alfred Arnold 


ExicultK 


Louis Dieterick 


Edward Mack 




Edwin Palmer 


James Whalen 


Robert Franti 


Glen Howland 



Sophomore Prom Committee 

J. C. Barron, General Chairman 
E. G. DuDLEV, Sec-Treasurer 



Charles W. Fischei 



Wm G. Brownlee 



Jrrangitnrnti Commilirt 
ROLLIN R, WlNSLOW 

Decoration CommilUt 
Puilicily CommilUr 



Wilfred V. Casgrain 



A. V. Livingston 



F. C. Van Brunt 



Wm. S. Dinwiddie 



Rc/reihmenli Commiiue 



Blake Hrath Bcrdsell 

WiNCHELL BaILEV GOUID 

Pierce Pauius Cooley Brown 



Myers Quinlan Williamson 

PoCKMAN AhUENS GaLTOH HaRRINGTON 

BuRTLESs Raynsfohd Champlin Hall 



Freshman Spread Committee 

The Thirty-iifih Annual Freshman Spread, given by the Sophomores for all the 
imen of the University, was held at Barbour Gymnasium, on Satufday evening, 
fcember 4, 1915. 



19/S SPREAD COMMITTEE 



Helen Brown, General Chaii 

Helen Ahrens 

Ruth Bailey 

Margaret Birds ell 

Pansy Blake 

Alice Burtless 

Pauline Champlin 

Margaret Cooley 

Marian Galton 

Louise Gould 

Mable Hall 



Ada Heath 
Nona Myers 
Marie Paulus 
Dorothy Pierce 
Geongianna Pockman 
Valora Quinlan 
Marian Williams 
Louise Williamson 
Constance Wincbell 
Grace RAVNsroRD 



Round Up 



O. !., 1.0VEJ0Y, President C. I.. Kohi.nky. Scrretary 

C.T.WfLMORr. IVtasiirtr 





«osr£* 




J. C. ASKAM 


M. Havks 


L K. Meb 


L. C. Anorkws 


B. Haltrlm 


I. R. McN 


L. B. BARTLkrrE 


C, Ha/elv 


.1. K, Madi 


H. B. Bartholf 


L. C. Heistis 


J. G, Mjll 


M. I. ItRAnNKR 


C HlMM 


1). OtiELBR 


f. HonTjH 


K. N. Hallo«av 


H. I'ORTKR 


J. BoLtHHH 


1.. J. HOLTHKR 


H. R. Penn 


B. ¥. B..vi> 


B. Hakkins 


v.. W. Pifl 


S. K. Black 


\V. W. Jenkins 


1.. J. R.CHA 


k. IX Clmmins 


H. D. K.IONSMAN 


A, SCHRIMP 


T. CONKLIN 


R. J. Kell 


(.'. K. Strk 


J. H. CWhran 


¥. W. KM.IKV 


H. H. Sphi 


W. v.. Com 


A, 1„ KOLPIEN 


1.. G. Stee 


W. f. I)uwi> 


H. I.KSLCE 


C. K, iHRl 


K. K, Danikls 


A, I.an<;e 


(1. O. Will 


I., K'KKIVtSON 


O. i.. LoVEJdT 


1., C, Whc-i 


C. 1.. M. KoRLNhV 


Ceo. I.EVEKEN7, 


K. K. WiLi 


J. M. KRA/.rH 


C. A, l-OKKER 


1. Whehlkr 


!., C, KOSIKR 


K. K. McAixisri-R 


W. H. Wan 


I.. K. Hl<;hks 


A, J. Met'LELLAN 


V. K. Wali 




J. i\ Marble 


(1. .1. WiLM 




OFFICERS 



First Semester 

Theodore S. Cox, President 
Robert V. Kohr, Vice-President 
Frank F. Nesbit, Secretary 
Roger Birdseli., Treasurer 
Charles A. Peters, Historian 



Second Semestfr 

Louis F. Dieterich, President 
Karl F. Walker, Vice-President 
Kdwin H. P'elt, Secretary 
Herman H. Schmidt, Treasurer 



Francis F". McKinney 



HONORARY ROLL 



Woodward A. Warrick 



Joseph R. Darnall 
John M. McKinnev 

Roger Hirdsell 
Theodore S. Cox 
Louis F. Dieterich 
Robert F. Kohr 



ACTU'E MEMBERS 
1916 



1917 



Jarvis C. Marble 
G. Brick Smith 



Earle R. MacLaughlin 
Frank F. Nesbit 
Charles A. Peters 
Robert \\. L. Smith 



Karl F. Walker 



191S 



W'lLLiAM M. Darnall 
Edwin H. Felt 
Robin A. Galloway 
Elmer P. Hardell 
(jilbert F. Hauke 

Clifford C. Buchler 



1919 



Paul M. Ireland 
Raymond M. Langley 
Ralph S. Moore 
Gilbert G. Plait 
Herman H. Schmidt 

Carl W. Porter 



466 




Scalp and Blade 



J. Ray Hawn Arthur O. Harris 

W. Whitney Slaght Harold C. O'Connell 

William J. Crawford Harold M. Cherry 

Donald Brodie Edward R. Allen 

Willard S. Girvin Winfield C. King 

Francis D. Newbrook Rollin C. Smith 

Joseph F. Meade Edwin F. Rapp 

Norman C. Bender William A. Jaeger 

Edwin F. Metz Alfred H. Cohn 

Guy L. Terhune 



467 



i 



Kentucky Club 



MuRPHv O. Tate President 

Wm. Kammerer Vice-Presiden 

Wm. Powell Secretary 

Milton S. Trost Treasurer 



Yancey Altshelei 

Harrv Bell 
Wm. Benton 
Kemp Burge 
W. J. Ckipman 
John D. Cotton 



Ivan G. Galbrccht 
Albert Gans 
James Golden 
Norton L. Goldsmcth 
W. J. Goodwin 
Randolph Gordon 

DuRWARD GrINSTEAD 

RoLLiN Hargrove 
Phillip Haines 
Edward Hesse 
John H. Holeman 

Z. J„,TlCi 



Wm. Kammerer 
Thomas Marks 
RoBT. Mathews 
Wm. Miller 
James S. Norton 
Albert Scholl 
Paul Schmidt 
Allen Schoenfielc 
MuRPHV 0. Tate 
James Thompson 
FkANK Thompson 

J. W. TlNCSLEV 

Milton S. Trost 
John Woodford 

Wm, Marsteller 

Paul Moore 
John Powell 
P. Chambers 



Wm. J. Goodwin, 16L President 

Y. R. Altshelter, 17 Vice-President 

W. L. Owen, I7L Secretary 

Frank B. Thompson, 17 Treasurer 

Frank W. Wood, 16 Sergeant-at-Arm 



Prof. H. C. Anderson 
Prop. C. J. Bonnek 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Prop. N. B. Phillips 
Prof. M. P. Tilley 



STATE CHAIRMEN 



Arkansas 


Alex J. Rogoski, '18 


OklahoniR 


D. T. MosiER, '18 


Florida 


Robert W. Collins, ■17E 


S. Carolina 


R. C. Jeter, '16E 


Georgia 


Arthur D. Allen, '17 


Tennessee 


C. H. Creoo, 'HE 


Kentucky 


Wm. S. Kammerer, "ISL 


Texas 


D. R. Penniman, '18 


LouidRna 


Edward W. Brousseau, '17E 


Virginia 


Edward E. Keatlgv, 


Mississippi 


Sam Gisenberger, '17 


Washington. D. C. 


Karl F. Walker, '17 


Missouri 


M. M. Brundidce, 'ISA 


West Virginia 


Joseph £. Robins, '18 



I^f 3.1'IS ii 



1 ,g li lii 's j 



•J: « <L I m 3: si '5? ft iy., f £ *!, 



I 3, .(;..!, ^,.i-:, 1 -::p!«?l 



li 



ILLINOIS CLUB 






It-JHit 



T. Hawley Tapping President 

Eugene A, Bartelme Vice-President 

Thomas C. Arndt Secretary 

Edwin K. Marshall Treasurer 



Henry M. Bates 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



John R. Effinger 



Thomas C. Arndt 
Felix S. Baer 
Y.. A. Bartelme 
Roy E. Berg 
R. P. Brown 
Louis M. Bruch 
J. D. Cameron 
J. H. Cartwright 
H. T. Cohn 

C. H. Cottington 
Dean J. DeButts 
B. L. T. Broadwell 

D. C. Davidson 
Joseph Dillon 
J. A. Dougherty 
Alex S. Elton 
A. C. Foley 

m. r. gombrig 
Samuel Greenspahn 
L. B. Hadley 
A. S. Hart 
H. S. Hatch 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Kelsey Guilfoil 

D. S. Horwich 

E. H. Heimann 
J. A. Heist 

J. J. Herr 
Hoyne Howe 
N. A. Hoefield 
R. P. Hummer 
E. R. Hunt 
N. H. Ibsen 
L. H. Lehle 
E. K. Marshall 
E. F. Merrill 
W. H. Morrow 
M. R. MoTT 
H. C. Otis 
L. W. Page 
H. D. Parker 
J. C. Parker 
Roy Paterson 
T. C. Pierce 
C. L. Rasmussen 
M. G. Robinson 



S. J. Sauer 
R. M. Schiller 
L W. Shand 
D. H. Shields 
J. W. Smart 
F. B. Smith 
W. J. Smith 
H. H. Springstun 
J. L. Stadeker 
B. A. Stenberg 
Cyril Talbot 
T. H. Tapping 
Louis Thoms 
l. h. tuttle 
W. H. Vail 
L. E. Waterbury 
F. B. Webster 
M. E. Webster 

L. G. WiLHARTZ 

O. G. Williams 
R. W. Windmueller 
P. W. Zerwekh 
F. J. Zoellin 



470 



Cosmopolitan Club 

OFFICERS 

J. N. Hadjlskv Secrciarv 

Prof. J. A. C. Hildnkr Treasurer 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
STUDENTS 



FACCLTY 
Prof, J. h. C. Hiu>ner Prof. C. P. Wacneh 

BCSISESS -W£.V 

H. I.. SWJT7.ER J. ¥.. JENNINCS 



H. Lee, W. C. Kwonc, S. C. Chen, F. C. Liu, Y. S. Chen, P. H. Hsu. K. T. Wong 

S. J. HuNCV, Y. D. WoNC, H. T. Low, S. N. Au-Yang. C. H. Hsia, W. T. Yodhg 
G. H. FoNC, D. C. Wu, R. S. Lo, C. F. Tang, T. C. Lieu, C. K. Chow, L. W. Thoms 



Chinese Students' Club 

OFFICERS 

T. C. Lieu President 

C. K. Chow Vice-President 

R. S. Lo . Corresponding Secretary 

D. C. Wlt Recording Secretary 

C. F. Tang Treasurer 

G, H. FoNG Auditor 



Totem 

Organized in 1911 
OFFICERS 

George M. Ellts President 

Harold Wisker Vice-President 

Clarence Kretzschmar Treasurer 

Marshall Troester Secretary 

1916 

George M. Ellis 
Waldo R, Hunt 
Harold Wisner 



Walter Cernt 

Robert M, Allen 

Harold W. Burton 
Robert H. Erlev 
Clarence Kretzschmak 
Herbert Schumann 
Arthur F. Boell 
Clarence Netting ■ 
Flovd Cone 

Robert Bridge 
Richard George 
Duncan Ketch um 
Clarence Kramer 

William Cruse 



;r S. Gri 
1917 



Marshall Troester 
Ernest Wunsch 
Fred Walters 



Hov 



tOhlk 



Hugo Platk 
Henhv Massnick 
Harold Church 
Gerald Gabriel 

George Kretzschmar 
Daniel Lindon 
Arthur Lankle 

Karl Floss 



Keystone Club 

W. E. Morris President 

H. M. Birmingham Vice-President 

T. C. Hill Secretary 

F. J. Beachley Treasurer 



G. M. Craig 
C. Heath 

M. FiNKELHOR 

J. Lyons 
M. A. Coon 

H. B. CoHLINTZ 

M. E. Garner 
C. L. Strauss 
J. M. Chase 
L. E. Hughes 

E. Hill 

E. P. FOGLE 

F. W. Sevin 
J. R. Hill 
F. Layer 
C. B. Wray 
S. L. Sonne 

M. L. TOLOCHKO 

W. M. Bell 

W. W. KOHLER 

P. J. Holt 

R. L. Satterwhite 

F. C. Bell 

G. L. NiCKLIN 

A. H. LusE 
J. W. Irving 
E. S. Tassey 
H. H. Irwin 



L. G. Steel 
H. J. Jones 
L. D. Metzger 

H. D. HUCHINSON 

C. L. Haas 
A. Streeper 

G. H. RUHLING 
A. S. BUCHMAN 

C. C. Morrison 

C. A. McCoRMICK 

L. G. Benford 
J. R. Buttermore 
R. E. Sevine 

G. E. TiSCHER 

E. T. Cranch 

D. Lynch 

R. D. Kelbon 
A. A. Nebron 

A. DiEGELMAN 

L. B. Sable 
S. L Emerson 
G. E. Landis 
N. A. HiPsoN 
J. Graff 
H. C. Cramer 
W. L. Bromley 

W. C. MOONEY 

J. S. Casberger 



474 



Jacobs Dintkn Krmpfr 

Members of Indiana Club 1915-1916 

laiir DiNTfN I'resJJcnc 

H. K. Iavlor Vift-Prfsident 

Mrl.TON K. Iacous Strre.arv 

J. W. KkmPKR 'IVeasiircr 

JDntiOUy COMMITTEI-: 

K, O, CKtMfACkKK I'AIL DlNTI-S 

IIOSOR.IRY MKMBKRfi 

i'wiF, S. V. C:iN<,KKiCH I'hov. 1. S. Rfkvks 

I'hok. W. C. Sionjk 

J. C. Hkown E. I, HhRHrtK V. Ki^ua.s 

Leon Ribin O. V. Satiin(;.r K, K, Worman 

KlfiKNE (ilVKN M. W. Hv»K A. V. Coi.JMAN 

A. K. I.ANix^RFBK (I. C. Ai-n.Ki;ATK ' N. H. Sallwass 

Ralph Dickjk I). Khsknthai. M. K. Ciodwin 

Hi<;o Mass Chas. Wii.kv I. H. Stanton 

H. MuTKf. W. I). StJNSON M. STiH.l.FR 

Kkank (Jlnihkh C. W. I.ki^kman D. A. Schkid 

I,. B. Bkrnhkimkr a. K. Strolsk C, A, I.vi.wio. 

K. J, KiKKMAN H. B. McWiMiAMs V. H. Simmons 

J. RisH I. S. CfARK K. Lkvlnson 

i;. S. I*ii.<;rim R. J. CATts 



The Nippon Club 

University of Michigan 
OFFICERS 

MiTTSU Imaki Presidenr 

NoBU FuBUVA Vice-President 

Shinmatsu Yokoyama Secretary 

SoBEi Ide Treasurer 

Kameichi SuGlVAMA Assistani Treasurer 

Gentok Nakai Manager for Publiri 



NoBU FuRUVA, Grad. 
SoBEi Ide 

MiTSUJI IClVOHARA, '17 Lit. 
Gentok Nakaj, '17 Lit, 
NisA F. Sato. '17 E. 

SOTARO TOKUVAMA, '16 Lit. 

Watanuki ,'17 E. 



MiTTSu N. Imaki, '17 L 
SoTOKicHi Katsuicumi, '17 Lit. 

MUTSU KiKSUCHI, '18 Lit. 
Kamevo Sadakata, '19 Lit. 
Kameichi SucrvAHA, '17 E. 
Shinmatsu Yoko¥ama, '16 E. 



Club Latino Americano 



MIEMBROS HONORARIOS 



Prof. H. E. Kenyon 

Mr. J. S. BURSLEY 



Prof. C. P. Wagner 
Prof. M. Levi 



Mr. a. F. Hurlburt 



Jose M. Hernandez President 

Jose M. Blanco Vice-President 

Pedro J. Samora Secretary 

Vicente Guillermetz Treasurer 

Arginuro Morales Vocal 



F. S. Altamirano 
R. A. Benitez 

G. W. Blanco 
R. H. Bonilla 

M. G. CONSTAIN 

L. M. deBayle 
R. S. Caneco 
F. A. del Valle 
M. A. DEL Valle 

F. DiMAS 
C ESTEVES 
F. GOENAGA 



J. Guerrero 

S. HOHEB 

V. Lebron 

J. LUZUNARIS 

R. E. Martino 
J. Picon 

J. S. QUIROGA 

V. Soto Garagoza 
A. Vazquez 
E. Vasquez 
C. Zanelli 
L. E. Zapata 



477 



Fraternities 

In the order of their establishment at the University of Michigan 

LITERARY 

Chi Psi 1845 

Alpha Delta Phi 1846 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 1855 

Sigma Phi 1858 

Zeta Psi 1858 

Psi Upsilon 1865 

Beta Theta Pi, 1845, re-established 1867 

Phi Kappa Psi 1875 

Delta Ups.lon 1876 

Sigma Chi 1877 

Delta Tau Delta, 1874, re-established 1880 

Phi Delta Theta, 1864, re-established 1887 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1888 

Theta Delta Chi 1889 

Delta Chi 1892 

Kappa Sigma, 1892, re-established 1902 

Sigma Nu 1902 

Phi Gamma Delta, 1885, re-established 1902 

SiNFONIA 1902 

Alpha Tau Omega 1904 

Acacia 1904 

Phi Kappa Sigma 1905 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1908 

Zeta Beta Tau 1912 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1912 

Kappa Beta Psi 1912 

Lambda Chi Alpha 1913 

Phi Chi Delta 1913 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1915 

Alpha Phi Alpha 1909 



4 SO 



General Fraternity Rushing Rules 

Adopted by thf Inter-Fraternity Council 



ARTICLE ONE 

Section I. No prospective matriculate or freshman shall be pledged to 
any fraternity prior to the tenth day preceding the opening day of the college 
year in which he matriculates. 

Section II. All pledging must be done in Ann Arbor. 

Section III. Any pledgeman who has failed to become a student in the 
University within thirty days after the first opening day of college following 
his pledge shall forfeit his pledge. 

ARTICLE TWO 

Section I. No freshman shall room in a fraternity house. 

ARTICLE THREE 

Section I. No student shall be initiated into a fraternity unless such student 
has received, either: 

(A). Eleven (11) hours credit earned in one semester in this University with 
a grade of at least *'C" in each course constituting the said eleven (11) hours 
credit. 

(B). Or has received an average grade of "C in all his courses taken during 
one semester in this University, provided the courses taken amount to thirteen 
(13) hours of work. 

ARTICLE FOUR 

Section I. The failure of any pledgeman to fulfill the above requirements for 
initiation, as stated in Article III, for two semesters after his entrance in this 
University shall render his pledge void and render him ineligible for member- 
ship in any fraternity in this Conference. 

Section II. Article III of above rules shall not apply to students holding 
degrees from any accredited University or College. 



481 



Chi Psi 

Alpha Epsilon Chapter 

Esiabliihtd in IS45 

FRATER IN fJCULTJTE 
James F. Bheakev, M.D., A. E. 

FRATRES IN URBE 

r, A. E. 1898 

tBARD, Jr., a. E, 1903 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

1916 
Frank Porter Surgenor Robert Williams Turner 

Charles Wallace Toles Richard Moore McKean 

Lawrence Stevens Roehm RtcHARD Hcngston Burkhart 

Philip Owen Mulkey Elliot Fisher 

Standish Wemiam Robinson 

1917 
Lee King Richardson Eugene Lorinc Bulson 

DwiGHT Cadogen Morgan, Jr. Blair Taylor 

Lee Everitt Joslyn, Jr. Philip Brooks Preston 

Ror Douglas Lamond 

1918 
DuNcoMBE Arthur MacInnes Frederick William Hough 

Albert Edward Horne, Jr. J. C. Lane Barron 

Henry Skeffer Bohling James Morrison Taylor 

Allan Nichols 

1919 

John F. McManus Andrew Foe Gayer 

Frank Weston Farrincton Holt 

Austin Caine Harmon Sherwood Reekie 



Marshall Crawford 



Fouiidtd at Union CdUgt in IS41 



ROLL OF ALPHAS 



Union College 
Williams College 
MiDDLEBURv College 
Weslevan University 
Hamilton College 



fMic 
AuHERST College 
Cornell University 
University of Minkbso 



BSITY OF WlSeOKSIM 

NS Institute of Tech 
RSITY OF Georgia 

D Stanford, Jr., Uni 
R8ITY OF California 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



New York, New York 
Detroit, Mickican 
Columbus, South Carolina 
Middletown, Connecticut 
HoBOKEN, New Jersey 
Schenectady, New York 
New Brunswick, New Jersi 
Washington, District 
Chicago, Illinois 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Los Angeles, California 
Des Moines, Iowa 
PmsflURG, Pennsylvania 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
West Duluth, MinnesoT:< 
Atlanta, Georgia 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Portland, Oregon 
Kansas City, MiatouRi 



Alpha Delta Phi 



FR.JTRliS L\ F.iCl'LTATE 



Harbv B. Hutchjns, Ph.B., LL.D., Pen.. 1S71 
Henry M. Bates, Ph.B., LL.D., Pen.. IH90 
William H. Bims, A.M.. Pen., 1S7K 



ANs HoLBRooK, .A.B.. LL.B., Pen., 1897 
ssE S. Reeves, B.S., Ph.D., Kenyon, 1891 
BERT T. CR.fNE, A.B., PhD., LL.B., Johns 

Hupkins, 1902 



F RAT RES IS URBE 



GERS, Bowdoin, 1875 

H. Shearer, Cornell. 1879 



FRATRES l.\ VMI'ERSITATE 



Paul W. Beaven, Rochester. 1914 
Mac N. Wilkinson, Rochester, 1913 

Harrv Dale Rei 



D D. Barss, Rochester, 1908 
JEJST. Dartmouth, 1915 
onsin, 1916 



William R. Loutit 
George R. Matteson 
Donald E. Montague 

Thomas R. Adams 
Albert A. Clark 
Charles S. Decker 



Hamilton H. P.\tterso 
John C. RoBBms 
Clarence 0. Skinner 
Delos G. Smith 

NathanC. TowNE, Jr. 


James S. Norton 
Nathaniel Robbins, J 


JAME 

J.Sa 

ROL 


NFORD Wilson 

IN R. WlNSLOW 


CVRENIVS A. NeWCOMB 

Roberta, Orr 
Ralph J. Oster 



Founded al ilamillon College in 1832 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Hamelton Hamikon College 

Columbia Columbia University 

Yale Yale Universit.v 

Amherst Amhersi College 

Brownonian Brown College 

Hudson Western Reserve College 

BowDolN Bowdoin College 

Dartmouth Dartmouth College 

Peninsular University of Michigan 

Rochester University of Rochester 

Williams Williams College 

MlDDLEToWN Wesleyan University 

Kenyon Ken>on College 

Union Union University 

Cornell Cornell University 

Phi Kappa Trinity College 

Johns Hopkins Johns Hopkins University 

Minnesota University of Minnesota 

Toronto University of Toronio 

Chicago University of Chicago 

McGiLL McGill University 

Wisconsin University of Wisconsin 

California University of California 

Illinois University of Illinois 



Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Cmichon Chapter 

EJtablhhtd in iSSS 



Jav 


esB.Angell, 11 






Edward Maclire 


Hf 


■<rvC.Dlff.eld 

K 

N W. COBD 


-- 


D PVLTE 

1917 


Russell B. Stearns 
EY Wricht 

LeaVITtJ. BVLKEV 


H. 


:RAY ML!^7.V 






Ellis D. Slater 






Mil 


BLRN R. 

191H 


Palin 




3MAS F. McAlLIST 


^ 




Norman H. Ibsen 
Robert T. Perry 


Pm 


LIP B. Maher 




1919 


Harrison L. Goodspe 




LMAM D. CrAIC 

OBCE H, Casobain 






Robert L. Bigers 
Pembroke Hart 


Da 


RWIN S. BaRNHART 






Jack Miranda 






Stjl 


S ClRTl 


s Smjth 



Founded ai Vale CotUgi i« I8U 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Yaie Uncversitv 
bowdoin collece 
CoLBV College 
Amherst College 
Vanderbilt L'ni 
University of Alabama 
Brown Universitv 
North Carolina Univeks 
University of Virginia 



Mia% 

Keni 



iUni 



,AER Polytechnic Ii 



Sigma Phi 



EiiMiihid in 1S5S 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Francis Test Mack 
Humphrey Kehcheval Grvlls 
Harry Watt Kerr 
Willis Brodhead 
John C. Bundv Parkkr 
Richard Gerveys K. Grylls 
John 



Got 



nCha 



s Smfti 



John Davis Hibbard 
Carleton Spear Scribner 
William Starrett Dinwidi 
Kdward Carlyle Warner 
Gordon Charles Mack 
Henry Anthon Knc 



D Day Rathbone, IV 
N Forsyth Houseman 
'al Lowe Wilson 



Delta o 



Union College . . . 


1827 


Hamillon ColleRe . 


18J1 


Williams College . . . 


1834 


Hobari College . . . 


1840 


University of Vermont 


L84S 


University of Michigan 


1858 


I.ehigh University 


1887 


Cornell University . . 


1890 


University of Wisconsin 


1908 


University of California 


1912 



Zeta Psi 

Xi Chapter 

Established i« 18S8 

FRJTRES IX FACVLTATE 

1, LI..B., 1875 

Hfrbebt R. Cross, A,M„ E, 1900 



FRATRES i: 



Hadden S. Kmk, '15 . 
David L. Kennedy, 'I 
Herbert W. Lamb, '13 



Leslie I.. Ai 
Howard M. Warner 
Harlrv D. Warner . 
Roberts E. Bement . 

Louis F. VoORHEES 
WiLBER E. BrC 

Joseph H. Eee 

A. Stlart Elti. 
Cecil B. Corbl 
Lawrence (i, P 



H. Kirk White . 

Alfred D, Brown 
Ezra W. Lockwood . 
Alberts. Kobinson . 
William W. McKelv 

W. GiLMORE RrOWNLI 

Andrew C. Haiiih 
David W.Shand 
Dean J. DkBitts 
Carter S*les . 

R. Allvn Haich 
Henry <i. HiicH . 

FrEdW. ZOKLMN 

Joseph Wa,;<;oner . 
Clark tt . Bishop 
Mortimer L, Smith . 



Illinois Univetsiiy 
Lafayette College 
LchiKh CollcRe 

Philadelphia, Penn. 
Texas City, Texas 
Detroit, Michigan 
FarminEton, Michigan 
Farmington, Michigan 
Lansing, Michigan 
Toledo. Ohio 
Detroit, Michigan 
Detroit, Michigan 

Oak Park, Illinois 
Alpena, Michigan 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Detroit, Michigan 
Detroit, Michigan 
Adrian. Michigan 
Ohosso, Michigan 

Detroit, Michigan 
Detroit, Michigan 
Detroit, Michlean 
Youngstown, Ohio 
Detroit, Michigan 
Detroit. Michigan 
Springheld. Illino 
Austin. Illinois 



t, Michigan 



Detroit, Michigan 
Adrian. Michigan 
Mavwood, Illinois 
Ravenna. Ohio 
Wyandotte, Michigan 
" ' , Michigan 



Your 



I, Ohio 



Founded al ihe University of Xne York in IS47 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Phi New Vork University 

Zeta Williams Colleee 

Delta Rurgers College 

SiCHA University of Pennsylvania 

Chi Colby College 

Epsilon Brown University 

Kappa TufrsColleEc 

Tau Lafayette College 

Upsilon University of North Carolina 

Xl University of Michigan 

Lambda Bowdoin College 

Psi Cornell University 

Iota University of Califortiia 

Gamma Syracuse University 

Tmeta X[ University of Toronto 

Alpha Columbia University 

Alpha Psi McGill University 

Nu Case School of Applied Science 

Eta Yale Universitv 

Mu Leiand Stanford, Jr.. University 

Alpha Beta University of Minnesota 

Alpha Epsilon University of Illinois 

Lambda Psi University of Wisconsin 






Psi Upsilon 

Phi CHAPTtR 
Eslablishd in Jfto 



FR.ITRKS t\ FACL'LTJTE 



iAnckli.. I.L.D-. 18-19 



ORCE W. pA-n ERS 
EDEHICK R. WaLD 

Henrv Foster Ai>ams, Ph.D., 1905. 
FR.iTRES IS UMt'ERSIT.iTE 

G. Kaintlkrov William V, 

M I. MacGregor Renville \ 



N, Jr., A.m., B.S., 1884 
ON, Ph.D., M.D., 1897 



James M. Barret, Jr. 
John W. Finkenstaedt 
Isaac KiNSEY, Jr. 
Arthur H. Lee 
Malcolm S. MacLean 

Hf.i 



N N. Mac 
George P. Mc.Maf 
Boyd T. Park 
Wilson M. Shafeb 
Pall F.Thompson 



Carlton M. Bacmgari 
Howard P. Nicholson 
Alfred M. Shearer 
Melbourne F. S^^M.LP, 
Cedric C. Smith 



Frederick J. Thi 
William L t 
George P. Weadoci 
Frank A. Willard 
Philip J. Wilson, Ji 



Henry L. Cailki. 
Samuel G. Goss 
Richard H. Khck 



us H, Knight 
N Donald Mablf 
-MAS P. Mehlhop 
^soN W. Smart 



F<,undfdmlin,.n ColUf,. 



CII.1PTER ROLL 

Tketa Union College 

Delta New York University 

Beta Yale University 

Sigma Brown University 

Gamma Amherst College 

Zeta Dartmouth College 

Lambda Columbia University 

Kappa Bowdoin College 

Psi Hamilton College 

Xi Weslcyan University 

Upsilok Rochesiet University 

Iota Kenyon College 

Phi .... University of Michigan 

Omega .... Chicago University 

Syracuse University 



Ch[ 
Beta Bet 



Cornell University 
Trinity College 
l^high College 
Pennsylvania Univer 



Min 



aUni 



Wisconsin Univeriity 
California Univerwty 
Illinois University 
Williams College 



Beta Theta Pi 

Eslabliikrd in IS45 
FRATRES IS FACULTATE 



EarlW. Dow, A,B.. 1891 






Willi 


M H. Waite, Ph.D.. 1879 


Frank E. Robbins, Ph.D. 


M.E 


19*1 
FRATRES IN URBE 


Allan 


S. Whitney. A,B.. 188S 


luNius E. Beal, 1882 






Elmer 


E. Beal, 1894 


J. J. Goodyear. 1884 






Well 


NCTON H. Tinker. 1889 


DwiCHT H. Kamsdell, 1886 




Leonard H. Barrett, 1889 


Chakles W. Gay, 1902 






Edwin R. Parker, 1896 






LeRoy N. Pattison, 1870 








FRATRES IN UNIFERSITATE 




Warren Taylor Vaughan 




'heodore H. Conklin 




Ma-vwell I, Pitkin 


Ralph R. Lounsberrv 




. Speed Rogers 




Laurence V. Kerser 


Julius Lanson Beers 
William F, Gerhardt 




AMES Y.York 




Edwin E. Keatley 




Clayton S, Emery 




Aaron W, Manby 


Bertil T. Larson 




AMES M. Frazier 




Norman F. Miller 


Edward J. Coram 




oHN Thomas Naylon 
1916 






Arthur VanKirk Moninc 






Kerbe 


RT Bullock Bartholf 


Louis Mason Bruch 






Sidney Tremble Steem 


Harold James Smith 




1917 


Willi 


M Preston Wickham 


Donald M. Drake 






ROBER 


T Irving Wheeler 


Travis Field Beal 






Frank Ford Nesdit 


William Jenkinson Will 


on 




Ward Walter Harryman 



Nathaniel Starblck 
Frederick Camille \ 
H. Tracy Kneeland 
Harold Edgar Loud 
Donald Earl WiLsoP 
Donald Upton Bathi 

Merritt Brlch 



Robert Henry Bennett 
John Edmond Powell 
P. Stewart Lowe 
Harry Brown McCallum 
H, Clark Hawk 
Donald Macrae 

Lewis Hunt Mattern 
:s Robert E. Lorimer 

1. Franchoi 



Founded al Mia 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Amherst 


Iowa 


Boston 


Iowa State 




Kansas 


Columbia 


Missouri 


RirrcBRS 


Oklahoma 


Colgate 


Texas 


Cornell 


Colorado 


St. Lawrence 


Californla 


Dickinson 


Oregon 


Johns Hopkins 


Brown 


Davidson 


Dartmouth 


Bethany 


Maine 


Pennsylvania State 


Stevens 


Central 


Idaho 


Cincinnati 


Utah 


Miami 


Weslevan 


Case 


Yale 


Denisoh 


Syracuse 


Kenvom 


Toronto 


DePauw 


Union 


Hanover 


Lehigh 


Beloit 


Pennsylvania 


Chicago 


North Carol 


Ilunois 


Virginia 


Massachusetts Inst. 


West Virginia 


OF Technology 


Ohio 



Ohio State 

Wittenburg 

Ohio Wesleyan 

Western Reservi 

Purdue 

Wabash 

Indiana 

Knox 

Michigan 

Northwestern 

Wisconsin 



V 

Washington 
Westminster 
Colorado Mines 
Denver 

Washincton State 
South Dakota 
Colorado College 
Kansas State 
Washington-Ji 
Whitman Colli 



Phi Kappa Psi 



)HN Robert Efmni 



Arthur N. Bacon 
George L, Nicklin 
Harold M- Cherry 



Establhktd in IS75 



FRATRES IN FJCULTJTE 



William Frank Verner, B,S. 
Carl Edgar Ecgeht, Ph.D. 
E Bartelme 



FRATRES /,V URBE 



N O. ROWE 

L1AM H. Fallon 
VEY R. Wood 



FRATRES l\ UNirERS/TJTE 



Walter William Paisley 
Francis Fowler McKinnei 
Harry Clay Rood 
Gerald Sharps Fbary 
William McKee German 



Harold Mathew Bowcock 
John McDowell McKinnev 
Stockbbidce Cableton Hilton 



Thomas Cronan Pierce 
Mai.'hice Piatt 
Baxter Latham Bboadweli 
Francis Buchanan Smith 
William Henry H. Vail 
Charles Halstead CoTrmt 



Charles Theron Van DusE^ 



Charles Spencer Clark 
Richard Paul Hummer 
I.voN Gardiner 
Harvey Eames Boyce 

Harold Eells Covert 
D Sanders 



founded al JePrson College in IS52 



CII.IPTER 


ROLL 






N O.M.KaK 


Un 


[VKKSnV Of- 


■1>XA^ 




Ohi 


Wksi,kva> 


[ L'ni^ 




Wii 


rTRNBLRO Ul 


S1VEKI 




Ohi 


o State Us: 


IVERSL 




Ca! 


;r School oi 


. A?pi 




V)f.\ 


Paiw fNlVt 


RSITV 



SVHACIISK LmV 



Johns 



Delta Upsilon 



Mic 






Eilablished in 1876 
FRATRES IN F.1CULTATE 
Arthur Lvons Cross, Ph.D., Harvard. 1895 Harrison McAi.i 
Joseph Horace Drake. Ph.D.. LL.B. ISX5 
Walter Burton Ford, A.M.. Harvard, 1S98 
Clarence Linton Meader, Ph.D.. IN''l 
K M. Looms, A.B., M.D., IM9H 






Randall, Ph.D., 1893 

HARD. Ph.D., 1892 

HovT, B.S., M.D.. I9U 

B FlSHLElGH, A.B.. B.S., 1906 

:iMBALL, A.B.. M.Arch., Harvard 



FRATRES /.V URBE 
Albert Emerson Greene. Ph.B., C-K., 1895 Wilforo Barnes Shaw, A.B., 1901 
Henry Weed Nichols. 1898 Arthur William Stalker. A.B., 1884 

Horace Greelv Prettyman, A.B., 1885 Merritt Mattison Hawxhurst. A.B., I 



George J. Bleekman 
Wayland H. Sanfokd, ♦ d <[> 
Bruce Youno 

Cecil Aunoer Brown. * d * 
Wayne Johnson, * X 



FRATRES IX UNIl'ERSITATE 



T B. Bowman, N S N 
Ueorce Uolclas Clapi-erton 
Lyle Haven Smith 
Herman Harrison Coie, N S N 
Herbert Comstock Otis 



Melvin Moi 

Julius Reginald St. Clair 
Reno Paul Ransom 
Arthur Douglass Mott, Jr. 
Willis Dean Nance 
Dick Beckwith Gardner 
Kdwin Kramer Marshall 
Carson .Augustus Coscrove 

George Kdward Dake 
Alan Wilson Bovd 
Chester Wells Clark 



Harold Harwood Perry 
Clement Hooven Marshall 

Frederick Homer TiNSMAN 

Reginald Warwick Rose 
Malcolm DunlapMurdock 
Gerald Lea Kesler 
Edwin Jay Huntington 
Lester Elba Waterbury 
William Cameron McConneLL 
Ma.x Gain Robinson 



Y Frederick Dake 



r -Alexander Gustin 



Clyde James Heath 
James Crampton Fin 
James Allen Dorsev 



Raymond Anthony Yacgy 
Charles William Horr, Jr. 
Robert Scott Daughertv 



Foundfd at WiUiami ColUge in 1S34 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Williams College 
Union University 
Hamilton College 
Amherst College 
Western Reserve Univeks 
Colby College 
University of Rochester 

MiDDLEBURV CoLLEGC 

BowDoiN College 
Rutgers College 
Colgate University 
New York University 
Miami University 
Brown University 
Cornell University 
Marietta College 
Syracuse University 
University of Michigan 
Northwestern University 
Harvard University 
University of Wisconsin 
Ui 






Massachusf 

Leland Stanford, Jr.. I'nivei 
University of California 
McGiLi, University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Toronto 
University of Chicago 
Ohio State University 



University or Washington 
Pennsylvania State College 
Iowa State College 
Purdue University 




Sigma Chi 







Theta Theta Chapter 






Esiabliihfd it, IS77 






FR.ITRLS IX FACULTATE 


Fred M, TAvum, Ih 




HKNRVC.ANI.KRSON, B.M.F-, '9 

I.Ettis M. Cram, S.B., '01 
FR.ITREH IS LRBE 


Max Burnkll, All, '14 




1. 1.. Meechem, AIT. 'L> 
K. M. McHale, HH.'U 


K.E. Daniels, B 11. '14 




Prektice p. Dou(iL*s, Z, H 


H, 


'ON S, T. McKiNNoN, i X, '12 


(.ARtW. Kberbach, A.B..H 


|«, 


,'12 ' M.C. Mason, H 11, '14 


K. C Garkibaldi, a a, 'IK 




J. R. NKHOI.SON, HH. -i; 


1. N. Hamjlton. Z, •!(. 
K.H.Harrison, All, '12 




J. D, Preston. HH. "15 




I. B. Seelev, All.'!4 


L J. HoLTHEH, B.K., -14 
C.-KLiNCER,r,'l5 




DlrandW. Springer. All. ',% 




R. D. Tacoart. r. '17 


1.. B. McDowKU. AA, -17 




K. S- Thorton, a X. W 


H. McKeon, All, '17 




H- Wam.. b r. '14 


A. T. McLain. A. '14 




Fceldcni; H. Yost, I.1..B.. M.M. 


T.M.Marks. A A, '12 




FhRRLS H. FncH. HH, -15 

A. v. V,N 1.0PIK 




FH.n-RKti IS rSIIERSIT.ITE 






V>U> 


(iEORCEl. MURPHV 




(iLEN P. iHOMAS ReKCK H, ObKRTKI K 


Charles K. Stone 




Walker H. Mills Ai.mjrt B. Farfet 


Charles B. Crawkokj. 




WAl,T^:R W. Waison 
1917 


KdWARD R, BORCKEKIIT 




I.KLAND [. OOAN WlLl.l.^M F. Nt«T<,I 


Donald M, Flait/ 




W, 1., WmoN Rav 1'.^R^^.T 


Stanley H. Katon 




W[L1.[AM BeNION 

lyis 


Thomas H. Woolev 




C. C. Refllv Stratton Shartell 



CIIJPTKK ROLL 



WasH[n 


GTON AND Lee 


Un 


Pennsylvania Colle 




BUCKN 

Indian 


i.L Univrrsit 
Univehsitv 




Deniso 






DePal 


*- Universcty 




DiCKIN 
[.AFAVt 


ON CoLLEdE 
rtE CoLLE<iE 




BUTLKR 


C0LLEi:i- 




Hanover Coi.LEc.r. 




Univeh 


SLTY OF ViRG[ 




North 


WESTERN Univ 




HOBARI 


College 




Univeh 




Ohio Stati- Universi 


TV 



FORD, Jr., L'niversity 

IF Montana 

iF North Dakota 
OF Applied Science 
SKRVE University 
IF Pitts bi;ro 
IF Ohecon 
IF Oklahoma 

IF Colorado 



Delta Tau Delta 

Delta Chapter 

Estahlishld in IS74 



FRATRES IS FACULTATE 



Warren Florer, Ph.D. 
Ralph H- Curtis, Ph.D. 
Chestkk Forsyth, A.M. 



HOBART H. WlLLARD, Ph.D. 

Flovd E. Bartel, A.m. 
Frank T. Stockton, Ph.D. 



Raymond Blake 
Rev. Geo. W. Knii 
William I. Searle 
Robert (i. MacKe 



FRATRES IN URBE 



Karl H. Bronsok 
Edward Ploenges 
Frederick W. Shape r 
Charles A. Robertson 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
1916 



Kenneth S. Clapp 
Carl S, Blomshield 
Wallace E. Reid 

A. SPALDlNCi FrIEDRI. 



Raymond E. Gleichauf 
Ralph J.Olecchauf 
Stephen D. Lankester 
Earl B. McKinley 



Thomas O'Neil 
Louis A. Arentz 
Harold E. O'Brien 
Edmund W. Marth 



Staats M. Abrams 
Frederick J. Wurster 
Hobart McK. Birmihcham 
Everett W. Pulling 



Charles W. Fisckei 
Arthur G.Ippel 
Charles F. Boos 



1918 

Harold M. Stephen 
Elbridge G. Dudley 

DOICLASS D. Ml 

Walter W. Faben 



Allegheny C 


QLLECE 


Ti'FTS College 


Ohio Univers 




Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 


Washlnoton . 


^ND Jefferson College 


Brown University 




F MlCHKlAN 


Wabash College 


Albion College 


University of California 


AdelbertCollkoe 


University of Chicago 


Hillsdale College 


Armour Institute 


Vanderbilt University 


Dartmouth College 


Ohio Wesleyan University 


West Virginia Universit*' 


Lafayette College 


Columbia University 


State Univeb 


srrr of Iowa 


George Washington University 






Weslevan University 


Stevens Institute of Technology 


Baker University 


Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 


University of Texas 


Washington i 


^ND Lee University 


University of Missouri 


Wooster University 


Purdue University 


Kenvoh College 


University of Washington 


Penn State College 


University OF Maine 


University oi 


f Pennsylvania 


University of Cincinnati 


Indiana Univ 




University of Syracuse 


DePauw Uni' 




Iowa State College 


University oi 


r Georgia 


University of Oregon 


Univershy oi 


' Wisconsin 


University of Pittsburg 


Emory College 


University of Kansas 


Univebsitt oi 


' Indianapolis 


TuLANE University 


University oi 


' THE South 


Cornell University 




- Minnesota 


Northwestern University 


University o 


F Virginia 


Leland Stanford, Jr., University 


University oi 




University of Nebraska 


Lehich Unive 




University OF Illinois 




Ohic 


1 State University 




.1LUMSI CHAPTERS 


Chicago 




Kansas City Lima 


New York 


Pittsburg 


Los Angeles Oklahoma City 


Cincinnati 


Richmond 


.Atlanta Grand Rafids 


San Fbancisci 


Nf*^wOrleans 


Seattle Denver 


Philadelphia 


Spokane St. Paul 


Indianapolis 


Kar Kast 


Sioux City Birmingham 


Boston 


Waskincton 


San Antonio Warren 


Portland 


Dallas 


Harvard Club Minneapolis 


Rochester 


KAR<iO 


Buffalo Milwaukee 



Phi Delta Theta 

Michigan Alpha C'haptfr 
Enabliihd in ISfil. Rz-fHabUihrd in JSS7 

fft.irHKS l.\ F.ICfl.TJTi: 



Henry A. Sanders, Ph.D. 
Edwards D. Jones. Ph.D. 
CharlesW. Edmonds. A. B., 

Hugh M. Behbe, M.D. 


, M.D 


M. Clav. B.S., 


EnMiNE C. Case, Ph.D. 
AlbertK. White. A.B. 
Earl V. Moore. A.B. 
Harolds. Hi lbert, M.D. 
M.D, 




FR.nUKti IS CUBE 




Donald K. Bacon 
Raymond I. NuiriNii 
Frank B. Bachelor 
Johnson D. Kkhvon 








James A, Blackwood 
Douglas T. Hoeeman 
(Jeoroe W. Williams 
Edwin D, P.^trick 


FR.ITHIi'. 


s- /,v r.y/rEKsir.tn: 


Benjamjn S. Mottkh 
E. Rav Ha7,kn 
Edgar M. Williams 
Maurice R. Kitts 

Raymond K. SANi.KRHon 
Harold M. Zei<;kr 


Wii 


LI\M B. CVMI-B 




Harry F. Stiles 
Boyd M. Comitos 
Morton H, Wilkenson 
Malcolm M. Scott 

Donald CDamdson 
Leslie W. Wishard 


STEFHf-N C. PraIT 

Norman W Boli.^s 
Cmnion V. DnWiri 




RoyS. Mem. 




Pall-S, Silkktee 
i. eland n. scoeield 
Cerali. J. Fisher 


Ei<;KNE E. SlFKKTflE 

Atkol B.Thompson 
Cmari.fs .-i. Clakk 




I')l'» 




Harry J. Mack 
Donald P. Vlrkes 



li Uni:ersily in IS4S 



CHAPTER ROLL 



A Univ 



1n[ 



Wabash Collece 
UNivEKSmr OE Wisconsin 
Northwestern University 
Butler University 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Franklin College 
Hanover Colle( 



fMic* 

fChic 



Iowa State Colli 



F North Carolina 



Lombard Colleoj 
Alabama Polvtei 
Allegheny Colli 



Frederick's. Brfi 

Karl Staatz 
Joseph Darn all 
W.Leslie Miller 
E. C. Wolfe 
PhiltpE. Haynes 
H. D. Brown 
Theodore Hill 
James R. Hill 
Perry H. Stevens 
Carl T. Montgomery 

J.W.Jo.!! 

Irving T. Norton 
C. H. Robertson 
RoscoE C. Gore 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Michigan Iota Beta Chapter 

EnMishtd i« ISS8 

FR/ITRES IN FACULTATE 

John J. Co> 



FRATRES l\ URBE 



Otto H.'Hans 
C. E.'Bird 
W. L. Owen 
A. P. Kelly 
Kenneth Westermah 
Walter S. Westerman 
Seale B. Johnson 
Clarence H. Crego 
C. C. Wilson 
R. W. Leper 
Wade W. Warken 
Robert G. Day 
Clare M. Hess 
Howard L. Kincslev 



Harrison L. McCarthy 
ACTirE MEMBERS 



Hugo E. Braun 
George B. Fox 
George Brick Smith 
Edward F. Brucker 
Charles A. Everett 
Stuart W. Dubee 
W. DuANE Bird 
Walter A. Niemann 
William K. Niemann 
Karl F. Walker 
John E. Sanders 
Milton C. Bauman 
Jerome Zeigler 
Laurence B. Hadlev 
Ernest L-Zeigler 



Paul M. Ireland 
KredW, Becker 
William M. Darsall 
Raymond M. Lanclev 
William CO-Keefe 



ez Bell 

I. YOAKI 



V. Coi 

Kmile 

John A. Ward 

Harry P. Bennett 

Thomas C. Garrett 

Gfrald F. Nve 

J. Sterling Wickwire 

J. Walter Ewing 



Fotindid at thi Unicersily oj Alabama in IS56 



CHAPTER ROLL 



llNiVERsmr OF Maine 

Boston University 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technolocv 

Harvard University 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Dartmouth Coileoe 

Cornell University 

ColuhbiaUniverstty 

St. Stephens College 

Syracuse University 

Allegheny College 

Dickinson College 

Pennsylvania State College 

Bucknell University 

Gettysburg College 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Pittsburc 

George Washington University 

University or Virginia 

Washington and Lee University 

University of North Carolina 

Davidson College 

University of Michigan 

Adrian College 

Mt. Union College 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

University of Cincinnati 

Ohio State University 

Case School of Applied Science 

Franklin College 

Purdue Univi 



fIni 



Northwestern University 
University OF Illinois 
University of Chicago 
University op California 
MiLLiKEN University 
University of Min 



UNIVf 

Ui 



F Wisconsin 



R University 
Emory College 
Georgia School of TECH^ 
Southern University 
University of Alabama 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
University OF Missouri 
Washington University 
University of Nebraska 

F Arkansas 

F Kansas 
Kansas State College 
University of Iowa 
Iowa State College 
University of Colorado 
University op Denver 
Colorado School of Mines 
University of South Dakota 
Louisiana State Universffy 

University of Texas 
University of Oklahoma 
Central University 

Kentucky State University 

Southwestern Presbyterian University 

Cumberland University 

Vanderbilt University 

Universitv OF Tennessee 

University of the South 

Union University 

L eland Stanford, Jr., University 

University of Washington 

Beloit College 

Washington State College 

Oregon State College 



Theta Delta Chi 

Gamma Deitkron Chaw.!. 
Eslablished in /WV 



FRATRES IS I'RBE 
W. H. Bltler, Ph.B,, I.1..B., \m\ Edward D. Wai 

Harry McCt.lre, 1904 



fRATRES /.V L'MIERSIT.ITK 



Edward C. Stebbens 
Bernard A. McDonai 



Harry H. Wh 

WiLLARD A. Stevenson 
Maurice A. Njchols 
Russell M. Boothbv 





John H. Kerr 
Walter J. Cl 


19 ir. 






Harold E, Gr 




A. MoRiii.L He 


V. Ste" 


*M- 


1917 






Robert W.C« 




Eugene A. W 




John W. [.anc 




James 1.. Wha 



George I. Lyman 
Harry R. Wasson 
Charles Y. Osburn 
Howard H. Heffron 
Hudson W. Fleischaui 



Donald W. Chabbs 
Robert C. Patterson 
H. Garret Ward 



Robert G. Wright 
Thomas S. Saylob 
Donald N. Hand 



Cll.ll'TER ROLL 

Beta Cornell University 

Gamma Deutkron University of Michigan 

Delta Deutekon University of California 

Epsilon College ofWaiiam and Mary 

Zeta Drown University 

Zeta Deutehon McGill Universiiy 

Eta Bowdoin University 

Eta Delteron Stanford University 

Theta Delteron Massachusetts lost.ofTechnology 

Iota Harvard University 

Iota Dei;teron Williams Collene 

Kappa Tufts College 

Kappa Deutkron University of Illinois 

Mu Delteron Amherst ColleKc 

Nl" Univcrsiiv of Virginia 

Ni; Deutehon I.ehiKh University 

Xl Hobart CollcBC 

OMiCROt< Deutkhon Dartmouth Collette 

Pi DEt'TERON CollcRe of the City of New York 

Rho Del-tekon CoUimhia Universiiy 

StCMA Dectkron University of Wisconsin 

Tau Delteron University of Minnesota 

Phi Lafayette Collecc 

Cki University of Rochester 

Chi Dei'tehon (icorce Washington University 

Psi Hamilton ColleRC 

Xl Deuteron University of WashinRton 

Lambda Deuter.in University of Toronto 

Phi Dkiteron .... ... Universi.v of Pennsylvania 



Delta Chi 



Enablishtd IS92 



JCTIl'E MEMBERS 

Robert Barnum 
Clay W. Wilbur 

Howard B. Pelham Bernard S. Beamah 

Fred C. Mover H. Claire Hatch 

Rav J. Mills Robert M. Allen 

C. Howard Breymenn W. Coit Allee 

David A. Macdonald Euoeke C. Wrcqht 

David R. Ballentine Bryan Akers 

Morrison C. Wood Carl C. Swart 

George E. Landis W. Kenneth Faunce 

Randolph Gordon Harold G. Saunders 

WlLLL\M K. LaMOREAVX 



Foundfd at Cnrnrit In. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Cornell 

MlCKIOAN 



Minnesota 

New York University 

Chicaoo-Kent 
Buffalo 
OsGooDE Hall 

svracuse 

Ohio State Universjtv 



Kappa Sigma 

Alpha Zeta Chapter 
EitaUished IS92. Rc-tstablishtd 1902 

FR.iTRES I\ FJCVLTATE 

Ferdinand N. Mknefee. C.E. Frank H. S'rt 

Jamrs Cordon Cimm]N(!s, M.D. Carroll D. I' 

FRATRES l.\ CXIfERSIT.iTE 



*R. Johnson. Jr.. 
dronJ. K.ncmd 



l!)oNALD M, Morrill 
John B. O'Donoghli 



William D.Cochr- 
John K. Norton 
FredH. BfwiLy.Ji 



Malricl A. Miller 
Hanrv G, Sparks 
Marclis U. Ruppee 



J. H. O'DONOGHII 

Francis Walker 

C. 1.. McKlNNEV 



i'iM>i,i.H C. (Ik 
AROI.Il R. Roj 

>HN C MlJNN. 



Cki.il W. l.A RD 

AuasriNK.\U-CoR*u 
Jt. Rlsskm. Doook 
Harold A. Hoi.itAEPt 



CILIPTER ROLL 



NOKT 


hC 


MIOLINA A. & M. 


Ci 


Case 

INIV 


SCH 


ooL OF Applied 
n- OF Washincti 


Sci 


MiSSI 

Colo 


RAW 


School o>M[Ni 


" 



BOWDOIN CoLLEr.i 
Ohio State L'nivi 
Georgia State Ui 

MlLLSAPS CoLLEI.I 



Hai 



t\o, 



.IF Oklahoma 
N State College 
Iowa State Uncvermtv 
Syracuse University 
Washburn CoLLEfiE 



nUncy 






Sigma Nu 

Gamma Nu Chapter 

Eslablhhd in IVOZ 

F RAT RES IS URBE 
lTomlinson Dobson Jo 



IN Yki 



s Dun 



FRATRES IS UMFERSITATE 

Carl Binns Marvin Patteks 

LiNTEN B. DiMONU JoSEPH ScOTT 

Carl Folks Harry M. Becki 

L. D. Funk E. C. Steele 

Bert H. Sheperh Samuel I.. HuDii 

Paul R. Dunten James B. Speer 

Frank K. Levinson Flmer P. Foc.i.k 



JCTIFE CHAPTER 






1916 




Marl N. Halknev 




Albert A. Dorrance 


Clarknce B. Zewadski 




Jav E. Hanna 


Caleb G, Shipley 




LeROY J, SCANLON 


Marcus M. Day 




Clarence E. Ufer 


DwiGH 


I (i. ESTABROOK 

1917 




Roman C. Widman 




Louis J. Reish 


William C. Hansen 




AngeloT. Jennings 


Franklin P. Rani>all 


1918 


Cyril Y. Bowers 


Jamls Schermerhorn, Jr. 




Cyril L. Cole 


Robert A. Donaldson 




Homer D. Biery 


Walter S. Rogers 




George W. Myers 


Bryant W. Donaldson 




Harold F. Robinson 


George B. Daniels 




Thomas C. Arndt 


Rob 


ert F. David 
1919 




Fred K. Farr 




Philip P. Bash 


LeeG. Benford 




Ralph H. Watkihs 



CHAPTER ROLL 



L'niversitv of Virginia Wm. Ji 

Universitv of Alabama Univeri 

Howard College Universii 

Norlh Georgia Agric. College N.Caroli 

Washington and Lee University Rose 

Bethany College 

Mercer University 

University of Georgia 

University of Kansas 

Emory College 

Lehigh University 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Texas 

Louisiana State Universit}; 

University of North Carolin; 

University of Missouri 

DePauw University 

Purdue University 

Indiana University 

Alabama Polytechnic InstitL 

Mt. Union College 

Kansas State Agric. College 

State University of Iowa 

Ohio State University 



■ of Vermont 

a College of A. B( M. At 

Tulane l/niter^'ty ""'"'*'' 
Leiand Stanford University 
University of California 
(leorgia School of Technology 
Northwestern University 
Albion College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 
Lafayette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
Stare University of Kentucky 
University of Colorado 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
Missouri School of Mines 
Washington University 



Bitminghain 
Montgomery 
Los Angeles 

Wilmington, Del. 

Savannah 

Atlanta 






West Virginia University 
University of Chicago 
Iowa Stale College 
s University of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
University of Montana 
Univcrsiry of Washington 
Syracuse University 
Case School of Applied Science 
Dartmouth College 
Columbia University 
Penn. State College 
University of Oklahoma 
Western Reserve University 
University of Nebraska 
Lombard College 
State College of Washington 
Delaware College 
Brown Uni' 



Uni 



n Uni 



<ity of Maine 
University of Nevada 

University of Idaho 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 
Baltimore 
New York 
Galesburg Buffalo 

Des Moines Wilmington, N.C 

New Orleans Akron, O. 

Boston Cleveland 

Detroit Columbus 

Minneapolis Portland, Ore. 

St. Louis Muskogee, Okla. 



Oklahoma City 
Panama. D. de P. 
Philadelphia 

Pitcsburit 
Providence _^ 
Salt Lake City 

Seattle 
Chehalis, Wash. 



Phi Gamma Delta 

Alpha Phi Chapter 

EUabliiked in ISi'S. Rr-Mablhhrd in 1902 



FRATRLS I.\ F.iCVLTATE 



Hehbfrt Charles Sadler, Sc.D. 

Henrv Earle Rlggs. A.B.. C.E. 

Alfred Scott Wabthin, Ph.D., M.D. 

Alexander Ziwet, C.K. 

Edson Read Sunderland, A.M., LL.B. 

Francis Lez Dewey Goodrich, A.B., B.L.S. 

John Castlereach Parke 



Shikl 



*■ Wheb 



rSmct 



, A.M. 



John Robins Allen, M.E. 
James Barkley Pollock, Sc.D. 
Morris Palmer T1LI.EY. Ph.D. * 
Joseph Ralston Hayden, M.A." 
Charles Ferdinand Meyer, Ph.D. 
;, A.M.. C.E. 



rce Clark Caron, A. 



F RAT RES !S VRBE 
, B.S. Lloyd C. Douglas, A.B.. D.D. 

Charles Louis Loos, M.E. 

Samuel Agnew Rigos. A,B. 

FRATRES IN USIf'ERSlTATE 
t. Frederick Waldorf Marble 

Philip Hastinc 



Frederick Anthony McMaj 
Donald Forney Stiver 
Arthur Branch McGee 
T Emmons 



Stanley Phillips Smith 
Glenn Allen Howland 
Albert Earl Stoll 
Jack Howard Connelly 
Lawrence Kdwakd Vila- 



Charles Comfort Gari.ai 
Charles Blackburn Law 

M. PURLIER BlRKHC 

William K 



Don Deuteronomy Dicker; 
Ralph Walter Hovis 
Arthur Duane Logan 
John Francis Bovdell 

Arthur Edward Zicler 
George Owen Brophy. Jr. 
Ward Davis Peterson 
Harold Spencer Trleman 



WashinKton and JefTcrsoi 
UniversJtv of Pennsylvar 
Bucknell Universicv 
Indiana University 
University of Alabama 
DePauw University 
University of Wisconsin 
Gettvsbure CoIIckc 
University of Virginia 
Alleehenv College 
WictenburnUniversitv 
Union Collene 
Wabash Collenc 
Illinois Wesleyan 
University of Michigan 
Amherst College 
loH-a Sure University 

{ohns Hopkins Universit 
■ehigh University 



Lafa}'e<te, Indiana 
Indianapolis. Indiana 
Chicago. Illinois 
New York, New York 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 
Denver, Colorado 
Toledo, Ohio 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Richmond, Virginia 
Columbus, Ohio 
Seattle. Washington 



Foundtd at Wajhinpon and Jfierson in 
ACrifE CHAPTER ROLL 

\ College Kno!i College 

lia Pennsylvania State College 

Unive'rsitv of California 
Washington and Lee Univ. 
William Jewell College 
Ohio Weslcyan University 
Colgate University 
Mass. Inst, of Technology 
Cornell University 
Williams College 
Universiiv of Tennessee 
Denison Cniversitv 
Purdue University 
University of Nebraska 
I, eland Stanford, Jr., Univ, 
University of Minnesota 
Yale University 
York Uni' 



Ohio 



e Univ. 



GRADUATE CHAPTERS 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
Dayton, Ohio 
Detroit, Michigan 
St. Joseph, Missouri 
Sprmglield, Ohio 
Des Moines. Iowa 
Knoxville. Tennessee 
Kansas City, Missouri 
Newark, New Jcrsev 
Albanv, New York ' 
Madison, Wisconsin 



Kansas University 
Worcester Polytechnic InK, 
Brown Uni " 



W 



■rUni 



Jniversity 

Richmond College 
Lafayette University 
Syracuse University 
University of Washington 
Trinity College 
University of Texas 
University of Illinois 
University of Missouri 
Colorado College 
Chicago University 
University of Maine 
University of Oregon 
University of Colorado 
Dartmouth University 
Columbia University 



Portland, Oregon 

Los Angeles, California 

Oklahoma City. Oklahoma 

Omaha, Nebraska 

Dallas, Texas 

Buffalo, New York 

Peoria. Illinois 

San Antonio, Texas 

A lien town, Pennsylvania 

San Francisco, California 



Sinfonia 

Phi Mu Alpha 
Epsilon Chapter 

EstaUiihid in 1902 

HOSORARY MEMBERS 



Walter F. Colby 
Theodore Harrison 
Albert Lockwood 
Samuel P. Lock wool 
Earl V. Moore 



Frederick Stock 
FRATRES IS FACCLTATE 



Glen C. Munn 
Chas. a. Sink 
Albert A. Stani 
Otto Stahl 
Roy D. Welsh 



PRATER IN VRBE 

Allen A. Dudlev 

FRATRES IS USII'ERSITATE 



Bernard Pierce 

George P. Becker 
John B. Brevmann 
Clifford M, Toohy 
Edmund D. Wood 



L. Menser 

A. Wentworth Rankin 
Chase B. Sikes 
Erwin W. Weber 
Ralph J. Fbackleton 



Gordon Campbell 
W. Churchill Edw,. 
Ralph L. Mason 
Sydney S. Shipman 
Albert B. Hastings 

Charles A. Bradley 
Robert R. Dieterlj 
Frank VV. Grover 
Arthur O. Harris 

SaMLFL 1,. HlDD 

Leich Hoadlev 



Thatcher W. Re; 



IS R. Inwoop 

Y H. Remingtoi 
.terC. Robert 



Phi Mu Ali'Ha 

Founded in 1S9S 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha New Kngjand Conservatory, Boston, Mais. 

Beta Combs Broad Street Conservatory. Philadelphia, 

Delta Ithaca Conservator^-, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Efsilon Universiiy of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Zeta University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

Eta Cincinnati Conservatory, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Theta Syracuse Universitv, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Iota Northwestern University. p;vanston. 111. 

Kappa Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore, Md. 

Lambda DePauw University, (ireencastle, Ind. 

Mu University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okta. 

Nu Denison University, Granville, Ohio 

Xl University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 



Alpha Tau Omega 



Eiiablished ISSS. Re-rsiablishrd 1904 

FRJTRES IX FACVLTATE 

U. B. Phillips, A.B.. A.M., Ph. D. H. W. Emerson, B.S.. M.D. 

W. E. Humphries, A.B. J. A, Elliot, A.B.. MD. 

C. N. Fesseni>en, M,E. J. E. Baker. A.M. 

FRATER IS URBE 
Rev. Courtland Miller 

FRATRES IN UMFERSITATE 



H. Clem 


ENT Ali-k: 


Kirk H. 


Porter 


DONALn 


E. A. Cav 


LaWREN' 


cf. E. Whi 


William 


J. CKAWt 


Benjami 


N H, CAKf 


Haroli. 


D- Daven 



W. WhitnevSlaght 


LVLI 

Jam, 

JoHh 


L M. Clift 
^s L. BLA^<Dl^< 
1 P. CAFrtv 




Her] 


bertC. Lan(^i 
1917 




Pali 


_ F. Schmidt 




Ral] 

I.AU1 


'H W. Hicks 

191S 
nr.r. A. Brown 
(ENfE H. Bcr. 




Dli> 


LEV V. Cankik 


I.D 



OLD L. Hun 
R J. Reyno 
HLR J. Bam 
GHT W. Jen 

ilL I,. BlaN 



Faundrd at Richmond, Virgin. 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 



University or Florida 
University of Georgia 
Emorv College 
Mbrcer Untvehsitv 
Georgia School of Technoi 
Universitv of Illinois 
Univehsetv of Chicago 
Rose Polytechnic Instititi 
Purdue University 
Adrian College 



Iowa State Collegi 



Washington AW , 
Lehigh University 
Pennsylvania State College 
iF Pennsylvania 

'F North Carolina 
Trinity College 
College of Charleston 
Washington and Lee Universh 
University of Virginia 
Mt. Union College 



Wit 






University of Mai 
Colby College 
Massachcsetts Ins 



University of California 
fOre<»n 
State College 
University OF Washington 
Oregon Agricultural Collec 
Alabama Polytechnic Isstiti 
Southern Univ 



E Uni 






Acacia 

MtcHiCAN Chapter 
Eitablished in 1904 



FRATRES IX FJCUITATE 
Russell W. Bunting, D.D.S. Clarence T. J. 

MORTIMEIl E. COOLEV, M.E. WiLLIAM L. MlCCE 

Arthur G. Hall, Ph.D. O. L. Sponsleh, A. 

Neville S. Hopf, D.D.S. Robert G. Ropkei 

FRATRES IS CRBE 



Charles A. Sink, A.B. 




John Lindenschmidt 


Roberta. CAMf bell 




Charles E. Hiscdck 


JuNJua E. Beal 




Robert Norris 




FRATRES /.V USIfERSITATE 


Arthur R.Smjth, A.B. 




Albert N. Laird, B.C.E. 


Julius L. Beers 


Horace L. Davis 
1916 


Carl Mitcheltree, A.B. 


George A. Barnes 




James K. Nichols 


Thomas P. Soddy 




Harold I. Phillips 


Ferdinand G.Drati 




HbNRvS. HOSMER 


Herbert R. Wilson 


Donald E. Lawresci 
1917 


T. Hawley Tapping 


Rate E. Kastman 




Charles £. Hubbard 


Donald A. Smith 




Lawrence W. Van Aken 


Carl H. Thorincton 




Harry E. Montelius 


Frank H. Wisner 




Karl R. Jackson 


Daniel B. Newton 




William G. Brownrigc 


William R. Woodward 


lyis 


John Rough. Jr. 


Carrol W. Collins 




Krank K. Miller 


Carl E. Gormsen 




Harold A. Brennan 


Walker B. Johnson 




LelandS. Thompson 



Foiindid at ihi t/ni; 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Michigan University of Michigan 

Leland Stanford Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Kansas University of Kansas 

Nebraska University of Nebraska 

California University of California 

Ohio State Ohio State University 

Harvard Harvard University 

Illinois University of Illinois 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Minnesota 

Wisconsin University of Wisconsin 

Missouri University of Missouri 

Cornell Cornell University 

Purdue Purdue University 

Chicago University of Chicago 

Yale Yale University 

Columbia Columbia University 

Iowa State Io*a State College 

Iowa University of Iowa 

Pennsvlvania State Pennsylvania State College 

Washington University of Washington 

Northwestern Northwestern University 

Colorado University of Colorado 

Kansas State Kansas State College 



3 V 



Phi Kappa Sigma 

Alpha Omickon Chapter 
E>iahli-hfd I'm 

FR.ITRES I.\ FJCULT.ITE 
WcLLis Gordon Signer, A. H., I.I..B. Hkrbeht Aldkn Kenvc 

John R- Brlmm. A.M. Wclham A. McI..^ighl 





FR.ITER IS fRBE 




RoSCOt 0. BONISTE 


"■ 




FRATRES IS USn'ERSIT.tTE 




1916 




I.V..E V. Harris 




Wilbur Kinosblrv Miliar 


Walter P. VVes 


Kr.nk Johnson Beac 

mi 


William Joseph Goodwin 


Louis Fred Die 


FERLCH 


RoLANu Earl Ellis 


Fb.ancis Brown 


LOWRY 


Earl Edwaro Pardee 


Yancky Roberts Altshelfr 


Fred MA<iEE Adams 


R.ALPH AlLINGTO 


N HArWARI. 


George Chandler Adie 


Albert F, Wak 


El Kill 


Charles Fremont Sears, J 


William Elles Brown. Jr. 


Floyd Blaine Brown 


De Thlrston M 


OSIER 


Thomas Elwood Swain 


Owen Jeeferso 


W'atis 

I'all L'pham Ch.^mp 


M. McElroy Brundidge 



Fovndid at the Un 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Univehsitt of Pennsylvania 
Washington and Jeffekson i 
Dickinson College 
Franklin and Marshall Coi 

Uhivermtv OF Virginia 
Columbia University 

TuLANE UmVERSITY 

University of Illinois 
Randolph-Macon College 
Northwestern University 



Leland Stanfc 



F Technology 



Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 



ALUMSI CHAPTERS 



New York 
Pittsburg 
Baltimore 



Southern Califi 

Atlanta 

Harrisburg 



it 



Alpha Sigma Phi 

Theta Chapter 
Eslabtishfd in I90S 



FRATREH IS F.1CULTATE 
Thomas E. Rankin, M.A. A. Franklin Shull, Ph.D. 

Ralph W. Aicler, LL.B. H. G. Raschbacher, B.S. 



F RAT RES 


;.V rSHERSlTATE 


Campbell Harvey. B.S. 




Russell H. Neilson, A 


Henry D. Stecher, B.M.t. 




Charles P. Wattels, A 


W. C. MlTLLENDORE, A.B, 




Theow>be L. Squier 


WARRE^ 


C Bhei 
1911, 


NDENBACH 


Paul Zerwekh 




Tkeron IX Weaver 


Cltde E. Bastian 


1917 


Arthur A. Burrell 


JohnH. Engel.Jr. 




I.athrop W. Hull 


HarrvL. W, Bowies 




Walter B. Steele 


Ralph K. Carman 




C. Frederick Watson 


C. Vernon Sellers 




Thomas B. Oc.lethorpe 


Edward F. Walsh, Jr. 




Howard S. Taylor 


Walter C. Gernt 


19IH 


Clare M. J.cklinc 


A. LOOMIS KlHKPATRlCK 




Merle B. Doty 


Bernard G. Krause 




Joseph M. Boos 


Chester S. Lawton 




Clarence K. NEirrNG 


FrederickW. Sullivan. Jr. 




Whitley B. Moore 


Wallace J. Picton 


1919 


Francis Bacon 


Charles Clark 




Charles E. Buell 


George F.Owen 




William E. Banuemer 


Ernst L. Maureh 




Raymond Beardslev 



fou'ldrd at Yili Unii-tmly in IS4i 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Yale University 

Harvard University 

Marietta College 

Massachiiselts Agriciilciiral College 

Ohio Wesleyan Universitv 

Ohio Stat " 



Univ, 



of Illinois 

y of Michigan 
Ini versify 
y of Wisconsin 
I University 
y of Washington 
y of California 
y of Nebraska 
y of Pennsylvania 
y of Colorado 



JLfMXI COl-SCILH 



Chicago, III. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Columbus, O. 

PlTTSBURfi, Pa. 

NewYork, N. Y. 
Portland, Ore. 



Detroit, Mlc 
Toledo, O. 



Zeta Beta Tau 

Phi Chapter 
Foundid in 1912 



FRJTER IN fJCCLTJTE 
1. Leo Sharfman, A.B., LL.R. 

FRJTER IN URBE 
Nathan Kaufman 



ACTlfE CHAPTER 



f Wein 



Hah 

HEh 

Samuel L. Cohen 
Samvel E. Rosenfield 
David C. Holub 
Marton L. Goldstein 
Roy L. Greenthal 
Earl L.Wiener 
Peter A, Miller 
Joseph Ahnof 

Charles L. Kaufman 



WlLl 


-lAM W. SCHATIKII 


F.MM 


ANUEL B. WOOLFA 


Wal 


TER R. Atlas 


Ema 


NUEL H. HEtMANN 


Nat 


HAN Salon 


Wal 


TER N. Frank 


Geo: 


RCE N. NOB.L 


WlLl 


LIAM J. BlALOSKV 


Sylv 


■ESTER G. Miller 


Sole 


iertGreenberoeh 



Samuel G. Wiener 



Lawrence Goldsmith 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Founded at the Colltge of the City oj Sew York, 1898 

Alpha City CoIIckc of New York 

Delta Columbia Universitv 

Gamma New York Univ^sity 

Theta University of Pennsylvania 

Kappa Cornell University 

Lambda Western Reserve L'nivcrsitv 

Mu Boston University 

2eta Case School of Applied Science 

SiGMA Tulane Universily 

Kta Union Universitv 

Iota Polvtechnic Institute of Bnmklvn 

Nt Ohio State University 

X[ Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

OuicRON Syracuse University 

Pi Louisiana State Universitv 

Tau Harvard Universitv 

Rho University of Illinois 

Phi University of Michigan 

Upsilon Mrtlill University (Montreal, Canada) 

Chi University of Virginia 

GRADUATE CLUBS 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Michigan Alpha Chapter 
Eitabliihid in 1912 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

James H. Marks, B.S. (M.E.) Walter Hoff Sprague. A.M. 

FRATRES /A ISII'ERSITATE 

Leon Daniej.Metzger. A.B., Phi Delta Phi Allan Dean Honev, Sinfonia, Delta Sigma Delta 

Edward J. Lieber, Io*a Alpha Richard Le R. Hahdv, Wisconsin Alpha 

Charles E. Hardy, Wisconsin Alpha 

FRATERIN URBE 

Donald Benjamin Darling 

JCTIFE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

John Francis R. Jordan, A.B. Walter Hoff Spbague, A.M., Rhode Island Alpha 

Mason H. Kinch, B.S. (C.E.) 

1916 

John Joseph Lyons, Jr. Lyndall Edward Hughes 

James Donald O'Connor Charles Thomas Perkins 

Clifford Charles Stone Phillip Edgar Bond 

Thomas Howard Robertson George Edward Adams 

Thomas Walter Sheakan Walter Duenger Ammerman 

1917 
John Frederic Maulbetsch Rest Russell Baker 

George Walsh Christiansen Hugo George Maas 

Charles Louis Haas Fred Lee Rehoh 

Hampton Harrison Irwin Clyde Hum 

Francis Jiboch Emmons Raymond Dietrich Folti 

Harold Humphreys Spr:nc8TUN Walter H. Buchhagen 

Harry Lloyd Richards 
1918 
Irving Sanderson Ellison Leslie George Field 

Leslie Paul Whelan Stanley Barnes Robertson, A.B. 

Neil Gordon Andrew Edward Raymond Golden 

1919 
Edward Raymond Golden 
PLEDGES 
Chester C. Bond E, Reed Hunt 

Clarence L. Rothrock Glen E. Robinson 

Ogden M. Rathert MiNARD A. Scott 

Russell C. Missimore Francis Ignatius Sheahan 



Fvuidfd at Richmond College in 1901 



ACTIIT. CHAPTER ROLL 



University of West Vihctnia 
University of Colorado 
University of Pennsylvania 
College of William and Mary 
North Carolina Agricultural C( 
Ohio Northern University 
Purdue University 
Syracuse University 
Washington anb I,ee University 
Randolph-Macon College 
Georgia School of Technology 
Delaware State College 
University at Virginia 
University of Arkansas 



Le 



hUhi 



Ohio State Ui 
Norwich Univeri 
Alabama Polvtei 



University of California 



Uni 



fNei 



Washington 

Massachuset 
Cornell University 
Brown University 



Univ 



Univei 



» We! 



fMic 



fMis. 



E College 

A State College 
Ohio Wesleyan University 

Colorado Agricultural College 



ALUMSI CHAPTER ROLL 



SanFi 

New Orle, 
Atlanta 



Kappa Beta Psi 



FR.iTRES l.\ F.iCULTJTE 
TON. CK. Lee H. Cone, Ph.D. 



FRATER IN URBE 
Russell A. Yerington 



FRJTRES IS VSlfERSlTATE 
1916 



Walkkr Pkbdicohd, . 
Howard E. Morse 
Earnest J. Dtllman 


^.B, 


Carleton E. Strvke. 


Lancelot C.RowLi 
W. Lewis Stanton 
Fred A. Brinkman 


Herbert D.AspLAND 

Marsh B. Woodruff 

FrFREBICK J, KOLB 




1917 
Willis A. Bellows 


Morace S. Easton 
Donald C.McIntv 
Leslie F. Hopkinsc 


Paul O.Davis 
Christian K. Matthi 
C. Sterlfng Huntley 
Civ a. Reem 


:ws 


1918 


John M. Erwln, A. 
George L. Benton 
.\lton B. Shabpe 
Alfred J. deLormi 


George F. Lord 
Herbert B. Bcerwag 




1919 


Merle F. Smith 
James L, Bateman 



'Wi 



Lambda Chi Alpha 

Sigma Zeta 

Eiiabiished in 1913 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



William E. Mathews, A.B. 



Dakrel D. Alton 
GiEN D. Aldiuch 
Lloyd R. Ball 
F. LeRov Blood 



Horace M. Corey 
Mark F. Ferrell 
CarlH.Pehrson 
Walter E. Maxwell 



LeRoY H. BlBBY 

Bernard F. Bovd 
Charles A. Brown 
Paul E. Gibson 



Ray G. Easton 

Edwin M. Read 
Franz P. Zimmerli 
Theodore Williams 



Edmi;nd M. Brown 
Howard R. Dean 
Anton J, Dohmen 
Walter J. Dixon 
Harold A. Mills 



Frank W. Higgins 
Earle S. Ladd 
Kenneth L. Porter 
Bruce R. Rathburn 
Rollin C. Smith 



EstMiihtdin 1909, Boston Univenily 

CIUPTER ROLL 

(Zetas ir. Order) 

Alpha Boston University 

Beta Universiiy of Maine 

Gahma Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Delta Kuckndl University 

Epsilon University of Pennsylvania 

Zeta Pennsylvania Slate College 

Eta Rhode Island State Cdlege 

Theta Dartmouth College 

Iota Brown University 

Kafpa Knox Collenc 

Lambda Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Mu University of California 

Nu University of Georgia 

Xi DePauw University 

Omicron Cornell University 

Pi Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Rho I'nion University 

Sigma Universiiy of Michigan 

Tau Washington State College 

Upsilun Louisiana State College 

Phi RutKers College 

Chi University of Illinois 

Psi Purdue Universitv 

Omega Alabama University 

Alpha Alpha Butlet College 





./ir-V.\7 CIUPTEKS 




Boston 












Nkw York 






St, l-ovis 










Atlanta 


Philadelphia 




Indianapolis 




Phi Chi Delta 



Zeta Chapter 



Established iti WIS 



FRJTRES IX IMIERSITJTE 



J. M. Hernandez, H.S. 
G. W. Blanco. B.S. 
P. J. Zamora 
M. A. del Valle 
F. A. del Valle 
A. A. Vazquez 
A. Morales 



J. Luzunaris 
A. DE Jl'an 
J. R. Picon 
L. M. Debayle 

A. S. HOHEB 

G. Guerrero 

C. ESTEVES 



536 



Fo«Tided al Louii, 



CII.IPTER ROLL 



Alph/ 



a Slat 



Beta Tulare University 

Delta Pennsylvania State College 

Efsilon Chicago University 

Zeta MichiKan University 

Eta Beta Maryland Univeisicy 

Iota George Washington University 

Kappa Syracuse University 

Sigma Virginia Medical College 

Lambda Purdue University 

Mu Pennsylvania University 

Nl- Jefferson Medical CoUeRe 

Xi Medico Chinirgical College 



JI.VMSI CIIJI'TER 
S.\s .Ins. Porto Rico 



Phi Sigma Kappa 

Delta Deuteron Chapter 
Establiihrd 1915 



FRATER IN FACULT.4TE 
Howard B. Mefhuck, C.E. 



F RAT RES IN URBE 
Charles P. Dfiurv William J. Ahern 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
1916 



Harold D. Koonsman 
Benjamin H. Schaphorst 
Roy Alan Nord 
Donald W. Ogilbee 



Norman H. Davidson 
Ebeh M. Carroll 
Lee E. Banchart 
Tom C, Trelfa 



Fred R. Walter 
Stanley G. Fontanna 
Norman C. Bender 

Medahd W.Welch 

Lee D. Handy 



Hef 



nHei 



Harold G. Waller 
Grant H. Laing 
John L. Garvey 
W. Ashley Bangs 

Merlin A- Cu'dlip 



William C. Skinner 



L. R.HussA 

Joseph W. Planck 
Arthur W.Khrliche 
C. E. Bricgs 
Harold C. Cramer 
Francis D. Reider 
Gordon B. Hooton 

William A. Carl 
Otto C. Davidson 



Founded 1873 
CII.IPTER ROLL 

Alvha Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Beta Union University 

Gamma Cornell University 

Delta West Virginia University 

Epsilon Yale University 

Zeta CollcEe of City of New York 

Eta Maryland University 

Theta Columbia University 

Iota Stevens Institute of Technology 

Kappa Pennsylvania State College 

Lambda George Washington 

Ml-- Pennsylvania Uni 

Nu Lehigh University 

Xi St. Lawrence University 

Omicbon Massachusetts Institute of IVrhnology 

Pi Franklin and Marshall College 

Sigma St. John's College 

Tau Dartmouth College 

Upsilon Brown University 

Phi Swarthmorc College 

Chi Williams College 

Psl Virginia University 

Omeca California University 

Alpha Delteron Illinois University 

Beta Delteron Minnesota University 

Gamma Deiteron . Iowa State College 

Delta Delteron MJchJuan Umvcrsiiv 

Epsilon Delteron Worcester Polytechnic Institute 



Alpha Phi Alpha 

Eslablbhd in 1000 

FRATER L\ I'RBE 
J. A. WwrTE. A.B. 



FRATRES IX UMFERSITATE 
1916 



L. S. Evans 

A. A. Taylor 

S. D. Sparks, A.B. 



D. J.Gbimus, A.B. 
L. B, Lapslev, A.B 
A. J. Pope 



V. P. Raiford, A.B 



1919 
I. K. Mahone 



F. D. Mic 
J- R. Cros 



Founded al Cornell Unifenily in l'M)f) 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha Cornell Universirv 

Bet* Howard Universitv 

Gamma Virginia Union University 

Delta University of Toronto 

P'fsilon Univvrsity of Michigan 

Zeta Yale University 

Eta Syracuse University 

Theta University of Chicago 

Iota Columbia University 

Kappa Ohio State University 

Mu University of Minnesota 

Nu Wilberforce University 

Xi Lincoln University 

Omicron University of Pittsburg 

Pi Western Reserve University 



GRJDLATK CHAPTER 



Professional Fraternities 

In the order of their establishment at the 
University of Michigan 

Phi Delta Phi (Law) 1869 

Nu Sigma Nu (Medical) 1882 

Delta Sigma Delta (Dental) 1882 

Phi Delta Chi (Scientific) 1883 

Xi Psi Phi (Dental) 1889 

Alpha Sigma (Homeopathic) 1893 

Phi Rho Sigma (Medical) 1897 

Phi Beta Pi (Medical) 1898 

Phi Alpha Delta (Law) 1905 

Phi Chi (Medical) 1905 

Psi Omega (Dental) 1905 

Alpha Kappa Kappa (Medical) 1906 

Pi Upsilon Rho (Homeopathic) 1906 

Gamma Eta Gamma (Law) 1910 

Sigma Delta Chi (Journalistic) 1910 

Delta Theta Phi (Law) 1912 

Alpha Rho Chi (Architecture) 1914 

Theta Xi (Scientific) 1914 

Sigma Delta Kappa (Law) 1914 



542 



Phi Delta Phi 

Kent Chapter 
Ellnblifhrd in ISfj" 



PnoKKSSt 

Dean Hi 



FR.ITRES IX FJCCLTATE 

r Harrv B. HuTCHiNs. A.B.. LL.D. 

t Bradley M. Thompson, M.S., LL.D. (Retired) 

)JBV M. rf^TEs, Ph.D.. LL.B. 



Prof. Thomas A. BocLE. M.S. 

Prof. Horack L. Wilcus. M.S. 

Prof. Robert K. Blnker. A.M., LL.B. 

Prof, Victor H. Lane, C.K., LL.B. 

Prof. Jerome C. Knowlton. A.B., LL.B. 

Prof. Kdwin C. Gor>i>ARD. Ph.D., LL.B. 

Prof. Kdoar N. Dii 



Prof. Epson R. Sunderland, A.M., LL.B. 
Prof. Kvans R. Holbrook. A.B.. LL.B. 
Prof. Jos. H. Drake, Ph.D., LL.B. 
Prof. Ralph W. Aioler, LL.B. 
Prof. Gordon Stonkr, A.B., LL.B. 
Prof. John B. Waite, A.B.. LL.B. 
FEE, A.B.,J.D. 



FRATRES IS UMFERSITATE 



James A. Blackwoou, * A B 
LoL[s M. Brich, BHll 
David F. Kennkrv. Ph.B. Z I" 
KuGENE R. McCall, A,B. 
Leon D. MKTZtiER, A.B., i * K 
Chester J, Morse 



Ri.<ssi 


.;i.l H. Ne.L! 


iON, A. 


John 
Willi 


R. NiCHOLSC 

!S B. Pehkin 


S,jR-, 


Hull. 


*CE M, Reid 


., M.A. 


Clvdi 


E C. Rowan. 


A.B. 



Cecil A. Brown, i V 
J. Bland Catlett. A.B., K S 
Harry G. Cault. A.B., Eremit< 
Glenn A. Howlanb, * T i 
Haddon S. Kirk, A.B., Z T 
Lester H. Moll 



■AM L. Owen. A.B., il A K 
yS. Rebeh. a a* 
,andH. Sanford, A.B, a V 
RT E. Stoll, * r a 
>DEN Wall, S X 

LES M. WiLLETTS, Z '!■ 



'lily of Michigan in IS69 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Deparcment of Law, University of Michigan 
Law E)epartinent of Illinois Wcsleyan Univ. 
Law School of Northwesiern University 
ColuTnbia Law School, Columbia University 
St. Louis Law School, Washington Univ. 
Hasilngs College of Law, Univ. of California 
Law School of George Washington Univ. 
Albany Law School, Union University 
Boston Law School, Boston University 
Law Department, University of Cincinnati 
Depanment of Law, Univ. of Pennsylvania 
Harvard Law School, Harvard University 
Universitv Law School, New York Univ. 
Yale Law School, Yale University 
Law Department of Cornell University 
Law Department of the Univ. of Missouri 
Law Department of the University of Virginia 
Law Department of the Univ. of Minnesota 
Buffalo Law School, University of Buffalo 
Law Department of the Univ. of Oregon 
College of Law, University of Wisconsin 
School of Law of the Ohio Srate Univ. 
Law School of the University of Iowa 
College of Law of the Univ. of Nebraska 



Chicago-Kent 


College of Law 


Law School of Upper Canada 


Law Departmi 


!nt of Stanford Univerwty 


School of Law. 


, University of Kansas 


LawDepartm. 


ml of Syracuse University 


New York La^ 


V School 


University of Indiana 


Law Deparlm. 


:nt of Western Reserve Univ. 


Law Departmi 


mt of University of Illinois 


Law Departm< 


;nt, Denver University 


Law Departmi 


;nt. University of Chicago 


La* Departmi 


;nt, Washington University 


Law Depart mi 


;nr, Vanderbilt University 


Brooklyn Law 


School, St. Lawrence Univ. 


Law Departmt 


mt. University of Colorado 


College of La« 


-, Univ. of Southern California 


Law Departm. 


rntof Washington and Lee Univ. 


Law Departm< 


:nt of University of Maine 


Law Departmt 


ml. University of Texas 


Law Departmt 


•nt, Pittsburg University 


Law Departmt 


■nt. Tulane Universitv 


Law Departmt 


^nt, University of Oklahoma 


Law Departmt 


mt, Univ. of North Dakota 


Law Departmt 


mt, Univ. of South Dakota 



Nu Sigma Nu 



FR.ITREH Ii\ F.1CULTATL 
Dr. V. C. Vauchan Db. J. V. BRtAkKV 

Dr. C. B. de Nancrede Dr. U. J. Wile 

Dr. R. Peterson Dr. C. D. Camp 

Dr. F. G. Now Dr. D. M. Cowie 

Dr.G. C. HUBER Dr. I. D. LOREE 

Dr. W. R. Parker Dr. M. Marshall 

Dr. a. M. Barrett Dr. W. A. Hoyt 

Dr. C. W. Edmunds Dr. F. Wilson 

Dr. C. G. Dabunc Dr. F. G. Gage 

FRATRES IN VNIFERSITATE 



D. 0. Walthall 


J. 


A. 


Herring, J 


C. 


W 


. Eberbach 


H. 


F. 


Kenney 


W 


, S. 


GONNE 


A. 


E. 


Gehrke 


A. 


L. 


Arnold, Ji 


W 


. C 


. Breidknb 


H. 


1,. 


Keim 


T. 


S. 


Barnett 


M 


. B. 


. BURNELL 


E. 


R. 


Smith 



Oass of 1917 



F. H. Harrison 

1,. L. YoUNGQUIST 
W. M. DUCAN 

T. M. Marks 
J. S. Leszinski 
R. B. Macduff 
R, A, A. Oldfieli 
H. H. Cole 



C. E. Vol 

D. M. Morrill 
Campbell Habvev 



J. 1 



. Caf 



J. B. O'DONOCHUI 

A. R. Smith 
R. L. Now 
H. H. Donnelly 



G, C. Awe 
R. M. McKean 
E. L. BuLSON 
R. V. Walker 

T. H. CONKHN 



Fovttded ai ikt L'ni 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha University of Michigan 

Beta , . Detroit College of Medicine 

Delta .... University of Pittsburg 

Efsilon University of Minnesota 

Zeta Norihwestern University 

Eta Chicago College of Physicians 

Theta University of Cincinnati 

Iota Columbia University 

Kaffa Rush Medical College 

Lambda University of Pennsylvania 

Mu Syracuse University 

Xi New York University 

Omichon Albany Medical College 

Alfba Kappa Phi Washington University 

Rho Jefferson Medical College 

SiCMA Western Reserve University 

Tau Cornell University 

Ufsilon Cooper Medical College 

Phi University of California 

Chi University of Toronto 

Pl Ml) Virginia University 

Beta Alpha University of Marj^land 

Beta Beta Johns Hopkins University 

I.e.! University of Buffalo 

Beta Delta ,,,,.,.. University of Iowa 

Beta Epsclon University of Nebraska 

Delta Epsiion Iota Yale University 

Beta Eta University of Indiana 

Beta Theta University of Kansas 

Beta Iota Tulane University 

Beta Kappa Harvard Medical School 



Delta Sigma Delta 



FRATRES IS F.-ICCLTJTE 



Dr. N. S. Hoff 
Db. M. L. Ward 
Dr. L. p. Hall 
Dr. E. T. LoEfrLK 



Dr. E. L. Whit 



Dr. R. B. Howell 
Dr- R. W. Bunting 
Dr. C. J. Lyons 
Dr. M.T. Watson_ 



FRATRES l\ rXIIERSlTATE 



Roscoe D. Cummins 
Gerald E. Madison 
Andrew J. McClell 
Harry T. Wood 
Francis J. McDonai 
Clarence J. Wright 



HES A. Gafeney 

ORGE A. CrUSCUS 

o M. Globinsky 
icHTON G, Steele 
arles H. Matson 
THONV P. Summers 



John W. Kemper 
Paul S. Crosby 

George A. Brown 
Leo 0. Finch 
James Glarum 
Alan D. Honey 



Grov 


ER C. BroCHMAN 


Neal 


D. GOTSCHALL 


Albe 


RT J. Richards 


Rich/ 


\RD RURKHARUT 


Clar 


ENCE E. TUTTLE 


Haro 


ld A. Truesdali 


Gera 


RD G. Hall 


J. Orton Goodsell 



Founded atjke University 0/ Michigan in 18S2 



SUPREME Cn.iPTER, 
AUXILI.4RY 
Detroit Auxiliahv 
Chicago Auxiliary 
Minnesota Auxiliary 



A Auxi 



Phi LA 

Kansas City Auxiliaii 
St. Louis Auxiliary 
Pittsburg Auxiliary 

New York Auxiliary 
Cleveland Auxiliary 
Pacific Auxiliary 
Denver Auxiliary 
Texas Auxiliary 



VMFERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
ClI.tPTER ROLL 

Seattle Auxiliary 
Boston Auxiliary 
New Orleans Auxiliai 
Buffalo Auxiliary 

Iowa Auxiliary 



SanFi 






t Auxi 



Auxiliary 
Portland Auxiliary 
Los Angeles Auxiliary 
Salt Lake City Auxiliary 
Parts Auxiliary 
Arkansas Auxiliary 
South Dakota Auxiliary 
Nebraska Auxiliary 



Si'BORDIX.lTE CHAPTERS 

[CAN Indiana Dental College 

Dental Surolry St. Louis Dental College 

University of Buffalo 



Northwestern Univ 



PiTTSBU 


RO Dental College 


Washin 


GTON University 


Univer 


ity or Colorado 


North 


RN Pacific Dental Colleg 


Univer 


ITY of So. California 


Creioh 


ON University 



Phi Delta Chi 

Alpha Chapter 
EslablisM in 1SS3 



FRATRES IS VNIFERSiTATE 
POST GRADUATES 

AKER EzKA J. Kcr 

1916 



Edcar T. Olson 




Harold F. Millman 


Charles Costa 




John W. 


Stone 


Sidney G. Vedder 




Charles W. Anderson 


Maurice L. Rushmore 




Robert G. Brown 




1917 






J. Warren Driver 




Edward 


J. DiGNAN 


George K. Finzel 




Ralph £ 


:. McGeE 


Lawrence C. Heustis 




EarlW, 


CUMMINCS 


W, MtRDOCH RlACH 




Daniel 


]. Dougherty 




Meade W. Patterson 






1918 






Vincent H. Stumpf 




HOBART 


F. Shaw 


Don V. Cross 


Walter Remlinoe 

1919 


Hekscht 


:l B. McWilliams 


Roland M. Staubus 




Chester 


G. Fuss 




Bernard L. Snyder 






FRATRES /,V URBE 




L. 0. CUSHING 


Dr. Charles Merk 




Bert Wicki 



FRATRES /.V FACULTJTE 



Julius O. Schlotterbeck, Ph.C, Ph.D. 

Alviso B. Stevens, PIi.C, Ph.D. 

Victor C, Valghan, M.D., Ph.D., Ec.D., LL.D. 



)H, Ph.C, M.D. 
s W. Edmunds, A.B., M.D. 
ID C. Glover, Ph.C, M.S. 



founded at University oj Michigan in IS83 



CIIJPTER ROLL 



Alpha Urivcrsiry of Michigan 

Beta Northwestern Universiiy 

Gamma Columbia Universiry 

Delta University of Wisconsin 

E?siLON PhiUdelphia College of Pharmacy 

Zeta University of California 

Eta Massachusetts College of Pharmacy 

Theta University of Minnesota 

Iota ... University of Maryland 

Ka?pa ... University of Washineton 

Lambda Universiiy of Texas 

Mu University of Pittsburg 

Nf University of Iowa 

Xl Ohio State University 

Omicron University of Southern California 

Pi University of Nebraska 

Rho University of Oklahoma 

Sigma University of Colorado 



Xi Psi Phi 

Alpha Chapter 
Founded in ISS9 

FR.ITER IX F.1CULTATE 
A. G. Hall. D.D.S. 

FRATRES IS CRBE 



FRATRES I\ iWIFERSITATE 



J. Lesue Lambert 




A. LaVsrneSouter 


Richard M. Kellogc 




James K. Robinson 


LeonJ.Decer 




Leonard P. Fisher 


W.KtNDALL Meade 




Herbert W.Weisel 


Walter I.. Spenser 


CLVI.E R, Crav 
1917 


Arthur H. Hadley 


J. Gordon Brodie 




J. Lloyd Graves 


Harry I). Wright 




John Hopkins 


Harold Kahn 




Raymond R. Roussin 


W, Porter Huleit 




Theodore Encels 


Ross T. Getty 




i-Ewrs Morrison 


Glenn A. Graham 




Horace Burr 


Robert Gardner 




Kdward N. Kellogg 


JayH. Herrick 




Arthur S. Harrison 



FoUJtdid al Univfriily of Michigan 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha University of Michigan 

Beta .New York Collene of Dentistry 

Gamma Philadelphia Dental College 

Delta Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 

Efsilon University of Iowa, Dental Department 

Eta University of Mar>'lan<l, Dental Department 

Treta Indiana Dental College 

Iota University of California, Dental Department 

Kappa Ohio State University, Dental Department 

Lambda Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

Ml.' University of BiitFalo, Dental Department 

X[ Medical College of Virginia 

Omicron Royal College of Denial Surgery 

Pi University of Pennsylvania, Dental Department 

Rho Northwestern University, Dental Department 

Tau Washington University, Dental Department 

Upsilon Ohio College of Dental Surgery 

Phi University of Minnesota, Dental Department 

Chi Western Dental University 

Psi Lincoln Dental College 

Omega Vanderbilt University. Dental Department 

Alpha Epsclon North Pacific Dental College 

Alpha Zeta Southern Dental College 

Alpha Theta University of Southern California 

Alpha Iota Central University of Kentucky, Dental Department 



.IHMM Cn.iPTERS 



New York State Assoc cat con 
New York City Association 
Buffalo Alumni Association 



Chicago Alumni Association 
Twin City Alumni Association 
MicHiG.iN State Alumni Association 



Alpha Sigma 





MuS.cmaAlph 


Chart 


KR 




Established i 


ISSS 






FR.1TRES IN FACULT.1TE 


Dr. W. B. H.nsda 


F. 




Dr. D. W. Meyers 


Dr, H. M. Beebe 






Dr. H. M. Sace 


Dr. C. p. Pcllsbub 


Y 




Dr. R. H. Criswell 


Dr. H. H. HAM^tEl 






Dr. H. H. Holcomb 




PRATER IS 


URBE 






Dr. a. E. Atchinson 




FR.JTMES IX UNll'ERSITATE 




1916 






Camp C.Thomas 






W. C. VOIGT 




J.. R. Clav 






1917 






C. B. Mandervill 


19IK 




V. J. Cady 


G. W. BOERICKE 






L. J. Boyd 


I.. W. Grice 






C. S. Kmery 


J. H. Staacke 


B. W. Mal 
1919 


.„„. 


C. B. PrLLSBURV 


G. B. Wood 






J. K. Durling 


G. R. BULI-EN 






1.. W. Snow 


E. WiNFlELD 






J. E. SWEETNAM 


D. YocNG 






C. Bo E RICK E 


L. H. French 






M. S. Ballard 



Foundtd 01 New York Homiopalkic Medical ColUge in 1892 



Mu Sigma Alpha FraKrnity founded at the Uaiveriity of Michigan in ISSS and 
amalgamated with Alpha Sigma in 1900 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha New York Homeopathic Medical College, New York City 

Beta Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia 

Delta Boston University School of Medicine 

Kafpa Hahnemann Medical College. Chicago 

Mu Sigma Alpha , Homeopathic Medical College, University of Michigan 

Phi Hahnemann Medical College of The Pacific 



Phi Rho Sigma 

Zeta Chart tR 
Eilabliihid in IS07 



FRATRES IS FACVLTATE 



Warren P. Lombard, A.B,. ScD., M.D. 
R. Bishop Canfielo, A.B„ M.D. 
Harrv B. Schmidt, M.D. 
Jacob S. Wendel, A.B.. M.D. 
Roy a. Barlow, B.S.. M.D. 



Grady E. Clay, B.S., M.D. 
Leslie L, Bottsford, B.A., M.D. 
Harold S, Hulbert, M.D. 
Arnold L. Jacobv, A.B., M.D. 
Rollan W. Kraft, B.S., M.D. 



FRATRES IS VRBE 

T. S. Lancford, M.D. 



FRATRES IX VMEERSITATE 



Morton E. Bhownell, B.S. 


Har< 


iLB A. Miller, B.S. 


Sam W. Donaldson. A.B. 


Edmi 


;nd C. Mohr 


WlLLTAM J. ECAN, B.S. 


Wari 


REN T. Vaichan. A.B. 


Evan G. Galbralti 


I, B- S. 




1917 






Roland S. Cron, B.S. 


Geo. 


iGE McCllre, B.S. 


NoRRis W. Gillette, A.B. 


Rav» 


.lOND J.NurriNC, B.S. 


John B. Grant, A.B. 


Geoe 


iGE D. Trfadgold 


191 S 






Clifford W. Brainard W«. H. Von Bretschne 


tl>ER 


Oeoroe R. Herrmann 


Donald K. B.^con Clyde K. Haslev. A.B, 




MacNacghton Wilkins 


Cbas. a. Bosworth Parker Hfath 




Thomas L. Tolan 


PaulW. Beaven, .A.B. 




Douglas Donald, A.B. 


191') 






Earl B. McKjnlev Dohm.as \. Hoffman 




Harry F. Becker 


J. R.«MOND PUCH 




Leonard F. Thalner 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 

Alpha Northwestern University Medical School 

Beta University of Illinois, Cbllege of Medicine 

Gamma Rush Medical ColleKC 

Delta University of Soiiihern California, Medical Department 

Epscldk Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery 

Zeta University of Michigan, Medical Department 

Eta Crcighton Medical College 

Theta Tal- University of Minnesota, Medical School 

Iota Universitv of Nebraska, College of Medicine 

Kappa Western Reserve University. School of Medicine 

Lamboa Mcdico-Chirurgical College 

Mu State University of Iowa, College of Medicine 

Nu Harvard Medical School 

Omichom Marquette Universitv, School of Medicine 

Pi Indiana University. School of Medicine 

Rho Jefferson Medical College 

Sigma ... ... Universitv of Virginia, Department of Medicine 

Upsflon Medical College of Virginia 

?w ....... Universitv of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine 

Skull and Sceptrk .... Vale University. Medical Department 

Chi University of Pittsburg. Medical Department 

Psi Universitv of Colorado. School of Medicine 

Alpha Omega Dklt* University of Buffalo, Medical Department 

Omicron Ohio State University, Medical Department 

Alpha Beta Columbia University. College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Alpha Gamma ... McGill University, f'aculty of Medicine 



.iLCMSI CH.-tPTERS 
iMN[ Chapter. Harvard fnlvi 




!8; 



^ 



Harry C. Hackman, B.S. 
Harold Henderson, B.S. 
Anthony H. Lange, B.S, 



R. Lee I.alrd, B.S. 
Benjamin G. Holtom, B.S. 
Charles M. Anderson. B.S. 
Jack H. Hamii.l, B.S. 



Phi Beta Pi 

Beta Chapter 
EitabHihed i« IS9S 

FRATRES l\ FACVLTATE 

Theopi 
;. B.S., M.D. 

FRATER IN URBE 
(iEORGE V. Muehlic, B.S.. M.D. 

FRATRES IN UNII'ERSITATE 
1916 



Anthonv R. Gr] 
Elden C. Baumc 
John F. Koss 



5 R. Thom/ 

1917 



Fred P. Currier, B.S. 
Clarence A. Chi 

JoHnO, DlETERL 



RussellW. Ullrich, B.S. 

Austin W. Heine, B.S. 
LoREN W.Shaffer, B.S. 
Harold L. Kennedy, B.S. 

Harry G, Llndgren 
Arvid W. Ebickson 
Charles E. Ani 



Herman E. Bozer 
George R. Hacehman 
Lawrence W. Beinhauf 
George R. Anderson 
Charles N. Weller 



Lambda 



Tau 

Ph[ Psi 
Chi 
Alpha Alpha 
Alpha Beta 
Alpha Gamma 

Alpha Efsilon 
Alpha Zeta 
Alpha Eta . 
Alpha Iota . 
Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Lambda 
Alpha Mu . 
Alpha Nu . 
Alpha Xi 
Alpha Omcckoh 



Fovndtd al ihe Cnireriily of Pilliburg in IS9I 

Cl/JPTER ROLL 
University of PittsburE. Pittsburg, Pa. 
University orMichiKan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, III. 

Baltimore College o( Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md. 
JefFcrson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Norihwestem University, Chicago, III. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, I 
Detroit Medical College, Detroit, Mich. 
St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. 
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Ind. 
University of Iowa, Iowa City, la. 
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 
University of Alabama, Mobile, Ala. 
University of Missouri. Columbia, Mo. 
Medical CollcKe of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 
Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. 
John A. Creighton University, Omaha, Neb. 
I'ulane University', New Orleans, La. 
Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, Ind. 
University of Virginia, University, Va. 
University of Kansas. Lawrence. Kansas 
University of Texas, Galveston, Texas 
University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 
University of Louisville, l^uisville, Ky. 
University of Utah, Sail Lake City, Utah 
Harvard University, Brookline, Mass. 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 



Phi Alpha Deha 



Estahtuhfd U 



FRATRES IS FJCILTJTE 
R C. GmsMORE. A.B„ J. D- Willahd T. Barbour. A.M., LL.D. 



FRATRES IS I'SUERSITJTE 



Hlch G. Allerton, A.B. 
H. Donald Brown. Ph.B. 
James L. Donnelly 
Stanley J. Hiett, A.B. 
KpwardS. Martin. A.B. 
W, Leslie Miller, A.B. 
William C Mullendore, , 



Roy a. Norc, B-S. 
Henry C.Rummel. A.B. 

Werner W, Schroeoer, A.B 
Perry H. Stevens 
Mlbphy O.Tate 

Lash Thomas 
:. .A.B. 



Tho 


MAS K. Atkinson 


The 


RON W, Atwood Jl 


Llovd E. Battles 


JLLI 


vsL. Beers, A.B. 


Geo 


ROE C. Caron, A.b 


Leo: 


SARD P- DiEDERlCH 


Mos 


s W. Amis 


Jose 


PH B. Comstock, .' 



;ry R. Hewitt. A.B, 

iRisoN L. McCarthy, A-B. 
ivAs F. McDonald, B.S. 



DOLC.LAS F. SmI 



'. Wattles. A.B 



Foiindfd at NorthvifU, 



ROLL OF CIIJPTERS 



Chicaco-Kei 
North WE ST E 
Chicago La\ 

Univebsitv 1 
Uhiversity . 
University ( 



T COLLEOK OF LaW 

School 
F Chicago 
F Wisconsin 
F Illinois 

F Michigan 
F Arkansas 



Western Reserve Univers 
Kansas City Law School 
Illinois Weslkyan Univers 
University of Iowa 

Cincinnati Law School 



F North Dakota 
F Southern Calii 



AND Lee University 
ersitv Law School 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 



Ckicaoo, Illinois 
Portland, Oregon 
New York Citv, New Vob 
Washington, D. C. 
Kansas City, Missouri 



us, North Dakota 
SCO, California 



Phi Chi (Medical) 

Psr Chapter 



FRATRES l\ F.-ICL'LT.iTE 



R. F. McCoTTER, M.D. 
C, GeorcJh, A.B., M.D, 
H. H. CiMMiN<;s, M.D. 



0, C. Glasei 


., Ph.D. 


J. L. WORCE! 


iTEK, M.D. 


i W. Sherr, 


:cK, A.B.. M.D. 



FRATER IS I'RBE 

L. ROMJNCER. M.D. 

FRATRES l.\ USirERSlTATE 
1916 



W. H.Gordon, B.S. 

L. C. Todd, A.B. 
L. A. HoAG, B.S, 

J. H. MULLER, B.S. 



;. J. Busman 

;. E. Gordon 

k-. I.Greenfield. A.B. 

1. R. HooN. A.B. 



R.J.Snid 
I,. E. Wal 



R. H. Ruedemann, B. 
R. M. Vincent. B.S. 

D. C. ElSELE, B.S. 

J. M. Schmidt 

A. J. Savard 

B. Fellows 

F. M, Allen 
J. P. Shearer 

M. Miner 

E. Sink, A.B., M.S. 
T. Berthold 

U.lZ'"°' 

C. C. Steggall 



Fiiiindfd al ih/ L'nic/rjily 0/ I'ermon 



« 1882 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alfha University of Verj 

Alpha Alpha Universitv of Lou 

Alpha Beta Cnive'rsity of Ten 

Alpha Theta Wesiern Reserve University 

Alpha Mu University of Indiana 

Beta University of Oregon 

Beta Beta , University of Maryland 

Gamma Ohio State University 

Gamma Gamma Bowdoin College 

Delta Tufts College 

Delta Delta ColleKe of Physicians and Surgeons 

Epsiloh Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery 

Zbta University of Texas 

Theta Eta ........ Medical College of Virginia 

Theta Epsilon Temple Utiiversitv 

Iota University of Alabama 

Iota P[ University of Southern California 

Kappa (Jeotuctown University 

Kappa Delta Johns Hopkins University 

Kappa Upsilon University of Kansas 

Lambda Rho University of Arkansas 

Ml' Indiana Oniversity 

Xi Texas Christian iJniyersity 

Omicron Tulane University 

Pi Vanderbilt University 

Pi Delta Phi University of California 

Rho University of Chicago 

Sk^ma .Atlanta Medical College 

SiCMA Theta University of North Carolina 

Sigma Upsilon Leiand Stanford University 

Upsilon Pi University of Pennsylvania 

Phi . George Washington Universitv 

Phi Beta University of Illinois 

Phi Rho St. Louis University 

Phi Sto.MA ........ Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery 

Chi ... . ... Jefferson Medical College 

Chi Theta Medico-Chirurgical College 

Psi University of Michigan 



Psi Omega 



Fovndfd in IS02 



FRJTRKS I.\ F.JCri.T.ITE 

Dr. y. C. Cole 



Lester H. Boubuin 
Ferdinand G. Dratz 
Harold M. Lechner 
Roy E. Moran 
Raymond J. Mulleh 
Georoe K. Chcchsster 
William B. Klienestei 
Mathew E. McKenna 
Robert J. Wells 



Franf N. Leicht 
LvmanL. Jones 
CuEFioR P. Haas 
John H, Barringer 
Herbert R. Wilson 
[OSEFH R. Hawn 

John A. Campbell 
Rov N, Fonda 
J.G.-y,J™„ 



Oris L. Sutherland 
Sprague F. Carpenter 
Fredic C. Frank 
JamfsE.Oberun 
Ray E. Stevens 
Walter J. Reason 
Fennimore E. Putt 
Albert J. Schmultiler 



Stanley J. Slazinshi 
Frederick Gebkstadt 
Arthur E. Hammond 
Joseph Wilson 
Henry B. Felton 
Charles A. Baribeau 
Frederick W. Friog 
Daniel B. Newton 



Lester K. Davies 



Max M. Williams 



JCTll'E CIl.lPTERS 



Baltimore'ColIege of Dental Surgery 
New York' College of Dentistry 
Pennsylvania Col. of Denul Surger>'. Phila. 

(Combined with Zeta) 
Tufts Dental College, Boston, Mass. 
Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 0. 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 
Philadelp>iia Dental College 
University of Buffalo, Buffalo. N. Y. 
Northwestern University, Chicago, III. 
Chicago College of Dental Surg., Chicago, III. 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
University of Denver, Denver, Col. 
University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Harvard University Dental School 
Louisville College of Dental Surgery 
Baltimore Medical College, Dental Dep't. 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dental 

Department, San Francisco. Cal, 
Ohio College of Dental Surgery, Cincinnati 
Medico-Chirurgical College. Philadelphia 
Atlanta Dental College, Atlanta, Ga. 
Western Dental College, Kansas City 



New York City 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Minneapolis, Mint 
Chicago, III, 
Boston, Mass. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
New Orleans, La. 
Los .\ngeles, Cal. 



University of Maryland, Baltimore 
North Pacific Dental Col, Portland. Ore. 
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 
Indiana Dental College, Indianapolis, Ind. 



University of Cahfornia, San Francisco 
New Orleans College of Dentistry 
St. Louis Dental College, St. I^uis, Mo. 
Keokuk Dental College, (Defunct.) 
Georgetown University, Washington, D. C, 
Southern Dental College. Atlanta, Ga. 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Col. of Dental and Oral Surg, of New York 
University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 
Vanderbilt Universitv, Nashville, Tenn. 
University Col. of Medicine, Richmond, Va. 
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 
Washington Univ., D, Dep't,, St. Louis, Mo. 
Kansas City Dental College 
Wisconsin College of P. and S., Milwaukee 
Texas Dental College, Houston 
University of Southern California, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



.ILUMSl CHAPTERS 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Seattle, Wash. 
Portsmouth, Ohio 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



Portland, Ore. 

Washington, D. C. 

Ohio State 

Wilkes-Barre and Scranton, Pa. 

Atlanta, Ga, 

Kansas City. Mo, 

.Alabama State 



Alpha Kappa Kappa (Medical) 



Alpha Iota Chaptei 

Eslablishfd 10(16 



FRATRES l.\ FJCULTJTE 



Dr. Q. 0. Gilbert 




Dr. a. D. Pranoen 


Dr. R. a. Bartholomew 


Db. A. C. Smiti 
I9U. 


Dr. C. p. Drury 


C. J. AnmsoN 




H. W. Shutter 


R. H. Baker 




C. 1.. Stealy 


D. H. Jeffem 


l')17 


K. S. Staati 


M. G. Becker 




J. W. Jones 


W. A. Fort 




B. T. Larson 


L. A. Ferguson 


V)\H 


W. 1. Searles 


C. M. COLDREN 




K. F. Traub 


J. R. Darnall 




V. A.VanVolkenbi 


M. D. Haag 




R. W. Watson 


C. C. HvnE 




1.. S. WEr.BOVRN 




R. M. Klmpk,; 






1919 




A.D.Allen 




W. C. Klllean 


N. C Bender 




W.C. Skinner 


D. W. GuDAKUNsr 




T. 1.. S«UER 



Founded at Dartmouth ColUgf i« ISSS 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha Dartmouth College 

Beta College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Gamma Tiifis Medical School 

Delta Lniversitv of Vermont 

Kpsilon Jefferson Medical School 

Zeta Long Island College Hospital Medical;School 

Eta University of Illinois 

Theta .... .... Maine Medical School 

Iota - . . ... University of Syracuse 

Kappa ... Marquette University 

Lambda ... .... Cornell University 

Mu University of Pennsylvania 

Nu University of Chicago 

Xi Northwestern Universiiv 

Omicron University of Cincinnati 

Pi Sterling-Ohio Medical School 

Rho University of Colorado 

Sigma University of California 

Tau University of the South 

Upsilun University of Oregon 

Phi L'niversitv of Nashville 

Chi Vanderbil't Universiiv 

Psr University of Minnesota 

Omeca ... I'niversitv of Tennessee 

Alpha Beta iLilane University 

Alpha Gamm.^ ....... Universiiv of Georgia 

Alpha Delta McGill University 

Alpha Epsilon University of Toronto 

Alpha Zeta (ieorge Washington Univcrsitv 

Alpha Kt.^ Yale Universitv 

Alpha Theta University of Texas 

Alpha Iota University of Michigan 

Alpha Kappa University College of Medicine 

Alpha Lambui Medical College of South Carolina 

Alpha Mu St. Louis University 

Alpha Nu University of Louisville 

Alpha X[ Westerii Reserve University 

Alpha Omicron University Medical College 

Alpha Pi Umvetsitv of Pittsburg 

Alpha Rho Harvard University 

Alpha Sigma Universitv of Southern Cahfotnia 



Pi Upsilon Rho 

Vertebra Octa 

F.'lablished in 1906 

FRATRES IS FACILTATE 

G. Irving Navlor, B.S.. M.D. C. B. STOLfKEB, M.D. 

F. R. Town, M.D. J. F. Blinn, B.S.. M.S.. M.D. 

FRATREfi IS L'SirERSlTATE 



C. C. WOLCOTT, B.S. 



1919 
John D. Van Shoick N. E. Lavely 

F. A. Stiles E. C, Havnes 

PRE MEDIC 
Howard Cobane J. R. Williams 

J. V. Stewart Paul L. Keller 

H, J. Hvi>E 



Fovndid at Ilahnttnanti Midxcal ColUge in IS7? 



Prima Hahnemann Medical Ctdlege 

Tertia Ohio Staie University 

QuARTA HahncTnann Medical College 

OcTA University of Michigan 

ALUMXI CIl.iPTERS 

Chicago, III. Clfvuand.O. 

Detroit, Mich. Philadelphia, Pa. 

RoCHfSTFR, N. Y. 



Gamma Eta Gamma 

Zeta Chapter 
Eitabliskid in 1910 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 
Pbofessok J, R. Rood 

FRATRES IN UMI'ERSITATE 



Warren E. Talcott 
Robert O. Brownell 
Lawrence M. Spracle 
Harold J, Waples 



Walter F. Whitman 
George S. Cooper 
LoRIE D. Bartlett 
Harhv a. Babcock 



Ralph F. Gates 
Louis F. Dahi.ing 
Leo F, Covev 
Julius L. Berns 



Fr/ 



aE. KEt 



Grant L. Cook 



NNETH 0. DOVLE 
JYD J, CURBY 

! Y. Bell 

ivis E. Reimann 

REST E. McKeE 
NRV L. CowLIN 



Ross G. Walker 
Frank C. Wagneh 



Wjlliam W.Jenkins 

Pall P. Bell 

James H. Cartwright 



FoundrJ in 1901 at thr Unhrrsily of Matni 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Alpha University of Maine 

Beta University of Boston 

Gamma Albany University 

Delta Syracuse University 

Epsilon Cornell University 

Zeta University of Michigan 

Eta Indiana University 

Theta Creichton University 

Iota Geornetown University 

Kappa OreRon University 



ALCMSi cii.ipti;rs 

New York Bangor 

Albany Ithaca 

Boston Detroit 



Sigma Delta Chi 

Gamma Chaptek 

EitaUiihed in I9I0 



FR.1TRES IN FACULTJTE 



Prof. Fred Nswton Scott, Ph.D. 
AssT. Prop. John R. Brvmm, A.M. 



Lymann Lloyd Bryson, A.B. 



FRJTRES IX URBE 



FMJTRES /A" USIFERSITATE 



Theodore Hawlev Tapi 
Francis Fowler McKin 
Clarence Arthir Swaii 
James MADrsoN Barrett, Jr. 

F.DWARD PULT 

Donald Abram Smi 
Waldemar Alfred 
Joseph Brothertoi 
H. Kirk White 



vWr] 



Conrad N. Church 
Thomas C. Reid 
Albert D. Conkey 
I..1»C.JOB«,0» 
Verne E. Burnett 
Harold A. Fiticerall 
William B.Newton 
John C. B. Parker 
Waldo R. Hunt 



Sigma Delta Chi 

CHAPTER ROLL 

NATIONAL JOURNALISTIC FRATERNITY 
Founded at DePauw University in 1909 



Alpha 

Beta . 

Gamma 

Delta 

Zeta . 

Eta . 

Theta 

Iota . 

Kappa 

Lambda 

Nu . 

Xi 

Omicron 

Pi 

Rho . 

Sigma 

Tau . 

Upsilon 

Phi . 

Chi 

Psi 

Omega 

Beta Alpha 

Beta Beta 



DePauw University 
University of Kansas 
University of Michigan 
University of Denver 
University of Washington 
Purdue University 
Ohio State University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Iowa 
University of Illinois 
University of Missouri 
University of Texas 
University of Oregon 
University of Oklahoma 
University of Indiana 
University of Nebraska 
Iowa State College 
Leland Stanford University 
University of Montana 
University of Louisiana 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
University of Maine 
University of Chicago 
Beloit College 



573 



Delta Theta Phi 



Eiiabiishtd in 1911 

IIOSORARY MEMBER 
George W. Banta. * A « 

FR-1TER IS VRBE 
Kdward W. Haislip 

PRATER IN UNIfERSlTJTE 
GcoRGE Barnes Mitchell 

ACTIIE MEMBERS 



H. L. Bell 


L. C. Dibble 


G. W. Struckman 


Rutgers Alexander 


MvRON McLaren 


G. R. Thoeming 


R. A. Butler 


F. R. NORTHWAY 


J, C, Melaniphy 


James Golden 


W. J. Kdwards 


John D. Watts 


J. E. Chenot 


Morse D. Campbell 


J. W. Thomas 


Norman Crawford 


Bernard Kemper 


Alvon Buzby 


A. A. Mattson 


Leonard Neiter 


George Whitmarsh 


Wallace C. Hall 


Herman Pompek 


Harry E. Johnson 


Charles Mehaffv 


LeWIsJ. HOLTHEB 


S.J.Slavens 


CLtNToN P. Anderson 


F. G. MlLLARU 




A.J. 


Stoddard 



FounM at tkt Clitrlajui Late School, 1913 

SUBORDINATE SESATES 

Ranney Cleveland Law School 

WtCMORE Northwestern University 

Holmes Dlrklnson University 

CooLEY Detroit College of Law 

FiNCK Cornell Univereitv 

Warvelle DePauw University 

Harlan University of South Dakota 

Blecklev University of GeorRia 



Magruder Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Day Western Reserve University 

Kent New York Law School 

LuRTON Chattanooga College of Law 

EpsiLON University of Arkansas 

Douglas John Marshall Law School 

Lincoln University of Chicago 

Lta Prime Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Blrks Washington and Lee University 

Theta Priue Washburn University 

Christiancv University of Michigan 

Ramsey St. Paul College 

Marshall Ohio Northern University 

Parker Union University 

Von Moschkisker University of Pennsylvania 

White Georgetown University 

iEFFERSON Richmond College 

ield University of Southern California 

Kui.LER Kordham University 

Bryan Creighton Universitv 

Benton Washington University 

Deady University ofOregun 

Chase . Ohio State University 

Wavnk .Atlanta Law School 

Dwjckt Columbia University 

HowAT-r Universitv of Utah 

Webster Webster College of Law 

Snyder .... ... Kansas City 

John Adams ... Brookline 

Pitney Newark, New Jersey 



Alpha Rho Chi 



Prof. Emil Lorch 
Prof. Louis H. Boy 



fRJTRhS IX FACCLTATE 

Prof. Her 
TON Prof, Choi 

FRATRES IS CM IF RSI TATE 



Georce F. Younc, A.B. 




Walter W. Pearl 


George L. Richardson 




J. Alexander McColl 


Chester G. Hennincer 




Louis VooRHEES 


Warren L. Rfnpge 




Roland S. Westbrook 


George J, L.nd 


Gilbert S. L'nde 
1917 


A, Claire Irving 


George L. Cheffy 




Lynn W. Fry 


Glen K. Spragle 




Johnson D. Kenyon 


Lawrence T. Ray 




Howard Gray 




John B. Y«m 


iKE 




1918 




Roger W. Salmon 


Asa F. Coles 
1919 


Orrin F. Stone 



Albert R. Gatzke 



CIIAPTKR ROLL 



iitv of Michigan 
;ity of Illinois 



.ILL MSI Cll.iPTERS 
rAi.iMNi .... Detroit, Mi chigan 



Theta Xi 

Sihma Chaptfh 
Eiioblhhfd l-iN 

FK.ITRES I.\ F.ICUI.T.-1TE 

H*BOi,i. Mk^bik. K.K„ Columbia, '04 
Sri-vKNsoN Shepparii. H.K.K.. U- of M., 'I 
N KrRKw<Kn> Sheppard. H.C.K., U. of M,, 

FRATRES IS CSIIERSITJTE 



HoWAHD H. Phillips 






FRANtTS I). Co.:.iHLIJ 


Charles R.Revnoli>s 






OlIVEkO. I.EtNJN<;EH 


Charles B. Marks 






Harolu L. Cohseit 


Shekwodd M. I'inkek- 


ION 


1917 


Anson H. Kkki.er 


NORMAN T. ThVSSTON 






DaVIU W. I'iNKkRTOh 


Robert D. McCrek 






Ralph S. Scott 


Carl A. Batchellhr 






WiLlURj. SCHOEPFLE 


Howard W. Sheli>on 






Harold N. Golinvai 


KiiMOND A, Thomas 






Wilbur W, Seaburt 




Car 


Lo M. Kysti 


■R 


HOVT S. Hol.TON 






Raymond R. Brown 


Harold C. Barbkr 






MiLLisV. Parshall 



Founded at Rensselatr PdyUrhnic lislilvu in lS6f 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha . Kenstelaer Potvttchnif Insiirute 

Beta Yale University 

(lAMMA Stevens Institute ofTcchnulogy 

Delta Massachusetts institute of Technology 

Kpsilon Columbia University 

Zeta Cornell University 

Kta LchiRh Universiiy 

Theta Purdue University 

Iota Washinfiton University 

Kappa , . . Rose Polytechnic [nsiiiute 

Lambda Pennsylvania State CfJIeKc 

Ml Iowa Stale College 

Nu .... University of California 

Xi . , State University of Iowa 

Omicron , . University of Pennsylvania 

Pt Carnegie Institute of Technology 

Rho University of Texas 

Sigma University of Michigan 

Tau I.eland Stanford, Jr., Universitv 

Upsilon University of Washingloi. 

JLl'MSI CIIAPTICRS 



Sigma Delta Kappa 



FR.ITRKS IX URBE 



FRATRES IS r.MIERSIT.ITE 



Louie H, Duntrn, A.B. 
Arthlb a. Morrow, A.B. 
Carl Folks 
Pall G. Egkr 

MurlC. CrtRLTo^, A.B. 

Al.BKRT K. SCHRIMPF 

Leon D. Ostbandeh 
Waltir W. Kohler, A.B. 
William A. Neithercl-t 
Charlks a. Neitherclt 
Robert Butler 
Noah B. CirtLJOM 
Benjamen F. Rosenthal, A.B. 
Henry W. Peterson. A.B. 
Frank J. Brevbaker 



Carl 


TON H. Crawforu 


Kari. 


RfN7. 


How, 


*RD D. Gr.fe.th 


Tony 


E. Amtsbdechler 


Ahth 


UR R. Sherk 


Char 


LES L. Strause, A.B 


(!eor 


.iE W. Lambert 


How. 


*RD B. CoBLENTZ, A. 


Arth 


LB P. BOGUE 


Arth 


LR ¥.. HOBBS 


Cech 


. W. Miller 


Will 


lAM K. Mathews. A. 


Laur 


EL A. Lundqvist 


John 


G. Gutekunst 


VVm. : 


p. Johnson 


JOSEP 


H S. Wismart 



fou>,J,d al Iht Vnhrrsily 0/ Michiean. I9N 



aiJPTER ROLL 

Alpha L'niversity of Michigan 

Beta ChiraR" l-aw School 

Gamma Benjamin Harrison Lau' School 

Delta Hamilton C^ollege of Law 

KpstLON . Benton CollcRe of l,aw 



House Clubs 



Trigon 

Hermitage 

Eremites 

Monks 

Phoenix 

Akhenaton 



582 



Clubs 



Trigon 



AlbbrtI-ewisI. 



IIOl^ORJRY MEMBERS 



Walter Albert Rei 
Waldo Russell Hli 



ACTUE ROLL 



JoHK Rhoades W^TKINS, A.B. 

Franklin George Armstrong 
Walter Woodward Sanderson 
HuBEKT Brown Sturtevant 
Kemp Stuckv Burge 



T Card Garrison 
Milton Goodrich 

ID George Day 



Carl William Neumann 
Charles Cecil Andrews 
Albert PhtltpOhlmacher 



Warner Cotton Brockway 
Philip Titus Raymond 
Alan V. I.ii 



Hermitage 



FR.iTRES L\ FACi'LTJTE 

Ralph W. Acgler, LL.B. Lewis M. Cram, B.S. 

Herberi C. Sadler, Sc. D. 



FRJTRES IS CSlfERSlTATE 



Robert F. Smith, Ph.C. 



John P. Stubces 

L. GaVLORD HlLBE 
ALBERf H. JeNKLN 



Charles D. Gilbe 
Theodore S. Cox 
Stanley H. Emeri 



Herbert V. McCoy 
Arthur T.Heuer 
Dean R. Hocuk 
Howard S. Hatch 



:ph D. Naftel 
lALD R. Hook 

L A. Gelhaar 



GEORdE W. Bvs 



\')\9 
Julius B. Wood 



St£rlin<; Parks, Jr. 



Eremites 



IIOyORJRY MEMBER 

ChAS. BrLCK VlBBKRT. A.B. 



BROniERS IS THE VSirERSITY 
y\V, Wilbkr Harry (i. Cl' 



JCrilE ROLL 



Rowland A. Naoeal 
Everett O. Lorlng 
Robert BRtDCE 
Clinton P, Harris 
Elder A, Porter 
Glenn M. Coulter 
Frank J. Vonachen 
Harry R. Leach 
William O'B. Hende. 
Harry J. Mocford 
Hart H. Fleming 
Ernest K. M, Ceorgi 
Harold J. McFarlan 
Harry G. Alcox 
Clarence B- Campbi; 



A. Thomas Lehman 
William K. Votruba 
Boyd C. Bly 
J. W. Howard Hurd 
Carl A. Anderson 
Leman H. Scott 
Norman W. Wassman 
Harold W. CoLLiNa 

Charles H. McCarty 
Carl H. Wilmot 
William H-Granse, 
Carl A. Anderson 
Robert S- Bridge 



Monks 



FRATER IS FACCLT.ITE 
Alfred H. I.lovd, I'li.D. 



FRJTER IS URBF. 
Lyon F. Terry, CK. 



F RAT RES 


IN UMI'ERSITATE 






1916 




WernkrW. Schroeuer, 


A.B. 




George A. Foss 


Floyd L. Young, A.H. 






Howard H. Brewer 


HeNRyC, RirMMEI.,A,B, 






JohnP.Carritte.Jr. 


William R. Carpenter 






Walter W. Kurti 


W. Ward McArtmur 






William B. Warren 


Earle D. Atwater 




1917 


Howard S. Manwarinc 


John E.Wheeler 






John V. Kuivinen 


1.EE N. Parker 






Robert J. Kell 


Glenn O.WiLLTAMS 






Lemuel C. Whitney 


Clarendon E. Streeter 






FisKE S. Church 


R.Harry Leslie 




191K 


Edward J. Roxbury 


E. Forrest Merrill 






Edward H. Haan 


Raymond B. Robinson 






William H. Hogan 



Charles F. Hemans 



Phoenix 



JCTlfE MEMBERS 



L, Ray Bvckendai 
Wilfred A. David 
Wilson C. Homer 
Elmer G. Mlnz 



(ilY C. CUBTISS 
DolCLAS GbAH; 
JOSKFH P. KrEI 

I'avl H. R 



Donald R. Bi.akes 
Earle W. Cl'mmin< 
Carl E. Roser 



Claude M. Burns 
Roderick J. McDonai 
Harry E. Storms 



Milton P. Chris 
E, Elmer DesJai 
Kenneth McCol 



jis P. Dalbv 

D T. GiNN 

1AM S. O'DONNEL 

>ldM. Reeves 
>lfiLAS Tkorbvr! 
hmT. Watkins 



Akhenaton Society 



FR.ITRKS l\ I'R 
Ch.ari.ks W. Howi 



FR,irR/:s IX isirEHSiTjrE 

f. Kenvon Anlrls 



Carl E. Badolev 
Robert W. Bamk 
C. Ward Boyce 
J. Marten Brown 
WcLLiAM J.Cask 

Howard I,. Garry 
Carl P. GnrESMER 



Cekj^ 


Li> H. Hag 


Vict 


R H. Herb 


War 


W, Hocu 


Fran 


K J. Kane 


Alton L. Kolpi 


Har 


Y D. Long 


Carl 


F. Myers 


(;. A 


iiNOLD Mye 


John 


B. Smilev 



Sororities 

In the order of their establishment at the 
University oj Michigan 

Gamma Phi Beta 1882 

Delta Gamma 1885 

SoRosis 1886 

Pi Beta Phi 1888 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1890 

Alpha Epsilon Iota 1890 

Alpha Phi 1892 

Kappa Alpha Theta, 1879, re-established 1893 

Alpha Chi Omega 1898 

Mu Phi Epsilon (Musical) 1904 

Chi Omega 1905 

Westminster House 1909 

Theta Phi Alpha 1912 

Delta Delta Delta, 1894, re-established 1915 



596 



Sororities 



Gamma Phi Beta 



Mr! 



SORORKS I.\ i'RBE 



Ai-ic 



Beck* 



Lillian W. Brown 

Mrs. Rlth Burdsal BASStrr 

Mrs. Grace Collins Breakev 

Mrs. Marion Dickinson Shaw 

Mrs. Emilv Ely Abbott 

Hermlna Haller 

Mrs. Sarah Hariiv Adams 



Margaret A, Lvdecker 



SORORHS /A- VSirERSIT.lTE 
Graduates 



Ethklvn Bolen 
Isabelle Hicks 
Constance Orcl'tt 

Winifred Roehm 
Acnes Gorman 
Rlth Kelsey 



Cll.iPrER ROLL 

ciise University, Syracust. N. Y. 

of MichiRan, Ann Arbor. Michigan 
of Wisconsin. Madison. W isconsin 



n Univ 



(iuiicherCollci! 



Kaltir 



. Kvansi 
ore. Mar 



on, niinui: 



y of Califurnia, Berkeley, California 
University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 
Harnard College, Columbia Universitv. New York Ciry 
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 
University of Washington, Seattle. Washinnton 
l-eland Stanford, jr.. llnivcrsiiv. Palo Alto. Cal. 
University of OreKon. Kin-enc. OrtKon 
University of Idaho. Moscow. Idaho 
Universitv of Illinois, Crh^na, Illinois 



Delta Gamma 

Xi Chapter 

EilaUiihed in 18S5 



HOSORARY MEMBERS 

MkS. MottTIMER COOLEV 

Mrs. Gardntr Williams 



Mrs. Ralph Aigler 
Mrs. Louis H. Bovnton 
Mrs. Max Burnell 
Mrs. Gertrude Carson 



SORORES IS URBE 
Miss Mary Hinsdale 
Mrs. PaulIvv 
Mrs, Samuel MacKinnon 
Mrs. Harry G. Raschbacher 
Mrs. Robert Efpinger 
SORORES /A' UMFERSITATE 
Gradvalt School 



Mrs. Henry A. Sanders 
Mrs. Irving Scott 
Mrs. Shirley SMrnt 
Mrs. W. Gordon Stoner 



M. Selden Ruger 


1916 


MiNA WlNSLOW 


Grace Fletcher 




Charlotte Sites 


Marion Payne 


1917 


Eleanor Stalker 


J e ANNETTE BaRTELME 


Margaret Long 


Amy Nelson 


Doris H afford 


Caryl Malcomson 


Edith Orton 


Irene I.itchman 


Grace Mark 


Elsie Paul 




1918 




Helen Ahrens 


Helen Gifford 


Nona Myers 


Alethe Baldwin 


Frances Lyon 


Grace Ravnsford 


Helen Bourke 


Florella MacK.^v 
Klizabetk BuRCtSS 
PLEDGES 
191!* 


Helen Grandy 


C\THER1NE MacNaUCHTON 


1919 


Florence Mechem 


Dorothy Armstrong 




Oltve Knowlson 


Ida Belle Glthe 




Emily Loman 


Jamie Moro.n 




Mary Louise Stee 



Founded at Uniernily of Mississippi in 1872 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Beta Washinuton State University, Seattle 

Gamma University of California, Berkeley 

I Epsilok Ohio Sraie University, Columbus 

Zeta , . , ' Albion College, Albion 

Eta Akron Municipal University, Akron 

Theta University of Indiana, Bloomington 

Iota University of Illinois, Champaign 

Kappa University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

Lambda University of Minnesota, Minneapolii 

Mu University of Missouri, Columbia 

Nu University of Idaho, Moscow 

Xt University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Omicron Adelphi College. Brooklyn 

Pt University of Montana, Missoula 

Rho Syracuse University, Syracuse 

SiCMA Northwestern University, Evanslon 

Tau University of Iowa, Iowa City 

Upsilon Leland Stanford. Jr., Univ., Palo Alto 

PHr University of Colorado, Boulder 

Chi Cornell University, Ithaca 

?»\ Goucher ColleRe, Baltimore 

Omega University of Wisconsin, Madison 

Alpha Beta Swarthmore College, Swarthmore 

Alpha Gamma University of Toronto, Canada 

Alpha Delta Oregon University, Eugene 

Alpha Epsilon Washington University, St. Louis 

Alpha Zeta Lawrence College, Appleton 

.ILL'MXJE CHAPTERS 

Philadelphia, Pa, Kvansvilj.k. Inu. New York. N. Y. 

Seattle, Wash, Mihneapoi.js. Minn. Baltimoke, Md. 

Los Anreles, Cal. St. Lolis, Mo. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Akron. O. Denver. Colo. Pittsblrc, Pa. 

Indianapolis, Ihd, CHicAtiu, III. 



1,Y 



lCon 



Colleginte Sorosis 

Kslaili'hfd i« ISS6 

.ISSOC/JTE VKMBERS 



RKSrnt-XT MEMBERS 



Marjorje Knowlton Bursi.ky 
Bektha Shaw 
Amv Savage DuBrnE 
Winifred Reman Smalley 
Caroline Kstheb Pattkngill 
Marjorie Fenton Tatlock 
Florence Wentworth Orebn 



MaudMef 



tDra 



Sybil Pettee [)ow 



Fthel Morris 
Meril Rowley Patterson 
Ida Mrmia Randall 
Margaret Milbank Pillsbury 
Eleanor Demmon Tealdi 

Blanche Anderson Moore 
Ethel Vol land Hoyt 



JCTIft: MEMHERS 



Y Flet 



bWils 



Sarah Stanley 
Dora Ware 
Helen Brander 



PHVLIS PoVAH 

Mildred Carpenter 
Miriam Hubbard 






Dorothy Allen 
Mary Brown 

Ardath Paul 
Margaret Novy 



Esther Holland 


Henrtetta Brandei 


Anna Lloyd 




PLEDGES 




Rhea Harbarin 
Alice Worcester 
Marjorie Van Zandt 
Naideau Jar vis 


Evadle Wright 
Helen McAndrew 
EvANGEUNE Lewis 



Foutidfd in Uyt>S 
. . . . Nt« York 



rniversicy of lichiEan 
tKstablisWd \m.) 





Pi Beta Phi 






Mechican Beta Chapter 






EnMishfd i« ms 




Mrs. Martin D'Ooge 
Mrs. Israel Russell 


PATRONESSES 
SORORES IS URBE 


Mrs. Francis Kelsiy 
Mrs. Albert Barrett 


Miss Effie Patch 
Mrs. Alfred White 
Mrs. Homer Heath 
Mrs. Carl Huber 


Mrs. Albert White 

Mrs. Henry Rigcs 

Mrs. Ermine Case 

Mrs. Lvman Bryson 

Mrs. Ralph Miller 

SORORE IN FACULTATE 

Miss Nellie Perkins 

1916 


Mrs. George Lewie 
Mrs. Frank Parker 
Mrs. Albert Chipmak 
Mrs. Marckie Sturgis 


Helen Patterson 
Leola Rovce 
Genevieve Cohev 


Mildred Bachers 
Martha Gray 
Elsa Apfel 

1917 


Julia Barksdale 
Haiel Stevens 

Mary Johns 


Beatrice Huff 
Carol Miller 
Geta Tucker 


Fit EDA Penovah 
Florentike Cook 
Helen CoLDREN 

1918 


Mildred Vorce 
Edna Keed 


Frances I.uke 
Geneva Hayes 


Ethel Jocelvn 
Rmth Carpenter 
Dorothy Pierce 

PLEDGES 


Marie Reardon 
Caroline Sadtler 


Edith Butlek 
Mary Slccers 
Irma RoBlNSo^ 


Irene Kerr 
Eva Sharrow 
Sarah Hall 


Fay Hall 

Marion Henderson 



Founded at \fonmouth ColUgf in ISfu 





CHAPTER ROLL 




L'NivERsm- OF Toronto 


James Milu 


iKEN Universi 


MlDDLEBURV CoLLKCE 


Iowa Wfsi.e 


YAN College 


University of Vermont 


Simpson Coi 


LEGE 


Boston University 


Iowa State College 


Syracuse University 


Iowa State 


University 


St. Lawrenck University 


University 


OE Nebraska 


CiOUCHER Cotl.EdE 


University 


OF Missouri 


CeORGE WASHIN<iTON UnIV 


ersitv Drlrv Col. 


.EGE 


Ranoolph-Macon Collkje 


WASHINCTOh 


1 University 


John B. Stetson Universh 


lY University 


OF Kansas 


SWARTHMORE CoLLEOE 


Kansas State Acricultci 


BucKNELL University 


I.'n IV ERSITV 


OF Arkansas 


Dickinson Collei^e 


Newcomb C' 


□LLEGE 


Ohio University 


University 


OE Oklahoma 


Ohio State University 


University 


OF Tkxas 


HiLLSDALK College 


University 


OF Wyoming 



Knox Collkci 
North WE ST FR 



N State College 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Ieta Delta Chapter 
EnMhhrd in IS9(I 

P.-iriiOM^SSKS 



L\ Bonner 

W. HOBBS 

K- Jones 




SORORJiS IX URBIi 


H. Mai.lohv 
U. Phillips 
C. W. Chapwk 
, W. J. Booth 
McCarthy 
K. L. Gates 


Katherine Mersereal' 
Mrs. J, D. Rie 

;K LOISTOWNLKY 

Mrs. a. B. 1'areet 
Mrs. p. S. I.ovejov 
Betty Seelye 
M[ss K. Crocker 




SORORtX IS LKirERSIT.ITE 




CR.IDV.iTES 



Mr; 


-.. v.. BOLCKE 


Mrs 


s A. Hunt 


Mr. 


;. R. T. Crane 


Mis 


s K. Parker 


Mr. 


i. M. Marshali 


POLI 


LY T.YTTLE 


Qri 


ICE Van Aken 



STINA Stringer 

<EDA PiKRSON 




Carmen Graves 
Aure Hyait 


:e Hacen 


Norma Wkjht 
1918 


Marie Cornwall 


SE Williamson 




Krigda McLellan 


KiET Glass 

1.EE 




Maroarlt Birdsel 
Gene Pixley 


n-HY PlERSON 


Vera Keyser 
PLEDGES 


Marion Klincer 


■N Bower 




Clara Mechem 


UN Ackley 




Gkoeso Gaines 



CHAPTER ROLL 

!'hi Boston Universirv 

Hkta Kpsiion Barnard CollfBc 

BnA SiiiMA Adelphi CollcRt 

Bkta Ai pha University of Pennsylva 

Bkta Iota Swarthmore CnlleKC 



Camma Rho Allenheny CoHene 

Bkta Upsti.on Wtst Virginia University 

r.AMBi>A Mimidpal Univmitv 

BktaNl ... Ohio State Univ " 

Beta Rho University of Cir 

Iota Del'aiiw University 

Mt Butler LolleEt 

Delta Indiana State University 

Beta Chi ... Univcrsitv of Kenturkv 

Bkta Delta University of MirhiRaii 

X[ Adrian College 

Kappa Hillsdale Col letie 

Ch[ University of Minnesota 

Eta University of Wisconsin 

Upsiios Northwestern Univcrsitv 

Kpsiiun Illinuis Weslevan 

Beta Lambda . . University of Illinois 

Beta Zkta Iowa State University 

Theta Missouri Stale University 

OMEfiA Kansas State University 

Sigma . . Nebraska Slate University 

Beta Ml- Colorado State University 

Beta THKrA . ... Oklahoma State Universiiy 

Beta Xl le.vas Siate University 

Beta Omicron 'I'ulane University 

Beta Phi University of Montana 

Beta Pi University of Washiniiton 

Beta Ome'^a University ofOreicon 

Pj University of California 

Beta Kta I-eland Stanford, Jr., Univers 

Beta Beta jSi. Lawrence Collene 



Alpha Epsilon Iota 

Alfha Chapter 
EUabliihfd in IS90 

IIOSOR.iRY MEMBERS 



Emily Blackwell 


Florknce HL-so^ 


CHAkLoTTE Brown 


Kliia M. Moshe 


Emma L. Call 


Florence R. Sai 


Bertha Van Hoosen 




I'ATROS ESSES 




Mrs. REt'BEN Peterson 


Mrs. Victor Vai 


SORORES IS URBE 




Dk. Jeanne Sous 


Mrs. Edward »i 


Mrs. David Ml-rrav Cowie 





SORORE L\' F.iCL'LTJTE 
Dr. Elsie Seevle Pratt 



SORORES IN L'NlrERSIT.lTE 



Marv Fisher DeKrlie. .4.B. 
Margery Juline Lord, B.S. 



Helen Gagk 
Jane Stevens^ 





Foundfd a 


ike Univenily 0/ Michigan in 1390 


CIUPTER ROLL 


Alpha .... L'rivcrsiiy of Michigan, Ann Arbor 


Beta 






Rush Medical CaWtte. Cincinnati 


Gamma 








Lama Memorial College, Cincinnati 


Delta 








College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago 


Epsilon 








University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 


Zeta 








Cooper Medical College, San Francisco 


Eta 








Cornell Medical College, Ithaca, N. V. 


Theta 








Women's Medical College, Philadelphia 


Iota 








University of California, Berkeley 


Kappa 








University of Southern California, Los Anfiel 


Lambda 








l-niversiiy of Syracuse, Syracuse. N. Y. 



Alpha Phi 





Eslablishtd in ISQ2 








P.^TRO\ ESSES 






Mks. Ji^Niua Beal 




Mrs 


. Albert Lloyd 


Mrs. Robert Wenl 


Mrs. Reuben Peterson 
SORORES IN URBE 


Mrs 


. Robert Heguj 


Mrs. Elmer Beal 




.\UCE Smith 


Mrs. Florer 




AcN 


Es Inglis 


Mrs. Guenther 




Mable Rose 


Mrs. Raikes 




Alic 


E Taylor 


Mary Palmer 




Mrs 


. Taylor 


.Margaret Smith 


Mrs. Tjllev (Alpha) 


Mrs 


. Daniel Zimmei 




SORORES IN VSU'ERSITJTE 






1916 






Ruth Brown 




Beri 


FHA PULFORD 


Esther Burv 


Dorothy Ba.xter Inglis 

1917 


Hel 


EN DoW 


Elizabeth Arthur 




Albi 


;RT[NE Loomls 


Ruth Dow 




Blanche Kneklanu 


Margaret Yocim 


191N 


JULI. 


A ReNWICK 


F.Li/.ABETH Hall 




Marion Holder 


Anna Miller 




Dorothy Probst 


M.XRGARET HeNUER) 


iON 


Heli 


EN Brown 



LOLJSE Garaghty 



P^LSA Jane Harris 
Carrol Waddams 
I'hyllis Eggelston 



CIUPTER ROLL 



Alpha Syracuse L'niversitv 

Beta Notthwesietn University 

Gamma DePauw University . . 

Delta Cornell l.'niversitv . 

Epsilon University of Minnesota . 

Zeta CoucherColkRe, Baltimore 

Eta Boston University , . 

Theta Universiiv of Michigan 

Iota University of Wisconsin . 

Kappa Leiand Stanford, Jr., Univers 

Lambda University of California . 

Ml' Harnard CollcRe 

Nl." University of Nebraska . 

Xl University of Toronto 

Omicron University of Missouri . 

Pi University of North Dakota 

Rho Ohio State Universiiv . 



1872 
1881 
1887 
1889 
1890 
1891 
188} 



1903 
1906 
1906 
1910 



m. 



Kappa Alpha Theta 







EslMtjhd x« IS7Q 
PATRONESSES 




Mrs 


.John Lawrence 
. Horace Wilgus 




Mrs. Renville Wheat 


Mrs 




Mrs. Alice Woodbridge 


Mrs 


. H. Lawrence Bicelow 


Mrs. Alice Crocker 
SORORES l.\ URBE 


Mrs. Charles Coolev 


Mrs 


. Henrv C. Adams 




Mrs. Arthur G. Canfiel 


Mrs 


. Alexander Ruthvf.n 




Mbs. French 


Mrs 


. G. R. Swain 




Genevieve Ricgs 


Stel 


LA Roth 




Mary J. Tinsman 




SORORE Ii\ FACl'LTATE 








Gladys Vedder 






SORORES l.\ UMfKRSlTATE 






GRADUATES 






Esther Shaw 


19 If. 


Marion Peterson 




Esther Cook 




Donna Jones 
Ellen S^argeant 




Beatrjce Lambrecht 






Gertrl'de Rods 




Marie Zeiceh 




MvRiEL Tyson 


1917 


Mary Spenser 




M.Olivia Williams 




Mildred Morse 




Maroaretta Dovglas 




DoKOTHEA Warren 




Dorothy Diss 




Mae Patterson 




Margukrite Reisoorp 




Ethel Hosmer 




Dorothy Bastin 


191S 


Helen Eeldkamp 




Doris Porter 




Marcaret Ewing 




Constance Winchlll 


Kdlth Harvey 
PLEDGES 


Florence Orwio. 



Founded at DtPau-ji Univfrsity in 1S70 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alfha . . ; DePauw Univtraltv 

Beta Indiana Universiit- 

Gamma Burler CollcRe 

Delta University of Illinois 

Eta University of Michigan 

Iota Cornell University 

Lambda Vermont Univetsitv 

Ml- Allegheny ColleRe 

SicMA Toronto Universirv 

Phi Stanford University 

Tau Northwestern University 

Chi Syracuse University 

Rko Nebraska University 

Upsilon Minnesota Universitv 

Psi Wisconsin University 

Omega . , . University of California 

Alpha Beta Swarthmore Collecc 

Alpha Gamma Ohio State 

Alpha Delta Goucher College 

Alpha Eta \'anderbilt University 

Alpha Theta Texas Universitv 

Alpha Iota WashinKion University 

Alpha Kappa Adelphi College 

Alpha Ml University of Missouri 

Alpha Omicron University of Oklahoma 

Alpha Pe University of North Dakota 

Alpha Rho University of South Dakota 

Alpha Tau Universitv of Cincinnati 

Alpha Upsilon Washburn College 

Alpha Phi Newcomb College 

Alpha Lambda University of Washington 

Alpha Nl" Montana State University 

Alpha Xi Oregon State University 

Alpha Sioma Washington State College 

Alpha Chi Purdue " ' 




Alpha Chi Omega 



SORORES l.\ VRBE 



Mrs. H. W, Nichols 


Miss Lvuia C 


Mrs. C. a. Sink 


Mrs, C. F. Ki 


Mrs. R. B. Howell 


-Mrs, Harrv 1 


Mrs. Joseph[ne Murfin 


Miss Kr.^nce- 


Mrs. S. M. Yutzv 


Miss Maud K 


Miss Florence Potter 


Miss Mabel I 


Miss Maude Bissell 


Mrs. l.EONARi 



Mrs.'N. S.|Hoff 
Miss Leonora Allen 
Mrs. Winifred Davis 
Mrs. Walter Staebler 
Miss F.hma Freeman 
Mrs. Theodore Harrison 
Miss Florence Spence 



Virginia Pierce 
Helen Robson 

Margaret Reynolds 
Adaline McAllister 



SORORES IS USIIERSITATE 

1916 

HA7.EL McCaLLEV 

Ruth Thomas 
Kmii.v Northhlp 

1917 



B.^R 



A WlL 



Marie Phelp 
Louise Trem 
Mildred Joh 



RoiELLA Noble 



Catherine Coburn 
Clara Tubes 
Elizabeth Patchin 



Founded al DiFaux U'lkfi 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha DePauw University. Greencastle, Ind, 

Beta Albion Collcee, Albion, Mich, 

Gamma Northwestern University. Kvanscon. III- 

Delta Allegheny College, Meaaville, Pa. 

Efsilon University of Southern California, l.os Angeles, Cal. 

Zeta New Enftland Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass. 

Theta University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Iota Universitv of Illinois, Champaign. 111. 

Kappa Universitv of Wisconsin. Madison, Wis. 

Lambda Syraci.se University. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mu Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa 

Nu University of Colorado. Boulder, Col. 

Xl University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. 

OviiCRON Baler Universitv, Baldwin Citv, Kan. 

P[ University of Cahfornia. Berkeley, Cal. 

Rho University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

Sigma Universitv of Iowa, Iowa Citv, Iowa 

Tau Brenau College Conservatorv, Cainesville, Ga. 

Upsilon James Millikin University, iJecatur, III. 

Phi UniversitvofKansas. Lawrence. Kan. 



Mu Phi Epsilon 





Eftablhhid 1904 






IIOSORARY MEMBERS 




Cecile Chahinadk 




Mme. Cahier 


Mme. Schumasm-Heii 




Julia Culp 


Alice Nieison 




Kathleen Parlow 


GeHHAENE ScHNrTKEH 




Tina Lerner 


Lenore Jackson 




Jessie L. Gavnor 


Jane Osborne-Hann.i 
MAfiocE Teyte 




Carrie J.^cobs-Bond 




Alma Gluck 


Katharine Uoodson 




Klena Gerhardt 


Margaret Keyes 


Carolink White 
F AT R0\ ESSES 


Olive Kline 


Mrs. H. H.Seelev 




Mrs. I.. D. Wines 


Mrs, G, a. HASTBErri 


Mrs. K. S. Perry 
SORORES !\ I'RBE 


Mrs. p. H. Kempf 


Mavme Audett 




Winifred DePve McCll 


Nell Brown 




Eva Shaw MacKqy 


CiRACE Drury 




Elizabeth Pond 


Charlotte Walker Hall 


Ethel Seeley 






Frances Seeley 


i-'wTHiioON'"*' 




Bess Poole Seeley 


RevaKoon 




Edith Killits Smallmak 



SORORES l\ rXIIERSITATE 



E Maxwell 
fi Partridge 
WRir.HT Rather 



Founded at the Melropotitan College of Mtiik, Che 



i. Ohio, 1903 



CHAPTER ROLL 
Metropolitan College of Music. Cincinnati, Ohio 
New Knxland Conservatory of Music, Bosion, Mass. 
University School of Music, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Detroit Conservatory of Music, Detroit, Mich. 
Toledo Conservatory of Music, Toledo, Ohio 
DePauu- University, Greencastle, Indiana 
Svracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. 
KroeKer School of Music, St. Uuis, Mo. 
Chicago Musical College, Chicago, III. 
Metropolitan School of Music, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Tthaca Conservatory of Music, Ithaca, N. Y, 
Brenau CollcRe Const rvator>', Gainesville, Ga. 
University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. 
University of Kansas, Lawrence. Kansas 
Combs Broad Street Conservatory, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lawrence Conservatory, Apple ton. Wise. 
Von Unschuld University of Music, Washington, D. C. 
N'orthwesiern Universitv Music Department, Evanston, 1 
Consetvatorv of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mt. Union College. Alliance, Ohio 
Universitv of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 
Pennsylvania College of Music, Meadville, Pa. 



JirMSJE ASSOCIATIOSS 



Cincir 
Rosio: 



i,Ohio 



, Mas 



Ann Arbor. Mich. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Svracuse, N, Y. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Chi Omega 

Kta Chapter 
EsUihlished in l<m 
P.lTROMiSSF.S 



Mhs. Edwin C. Uoddard 
Mrs. Ji^Lius Schlotterbeck 
Mrs. F. N. Menefee 
Mrs. Pall DeKrfef 



SORORKS IX URBE 



LOKA TiNKHAM 

Henrietta Calhoun 

Anna Dumont 



Nelme Rosewarne 

i.LELLA GaLLMEYER 

Norma Stroh 
Florence Snyder 



TULANE UnIV 


ersity, Newc. 


Universjtv 


F Tennessee 


Uncversitt o 


F Illinois 


North WESTEi 


.N University 


University o 


■y Wisconsin 


Uncversitv 


F California 


UmVERSITV o 


■F Kansas 


University o 


F Nebraska 


Uhiversityo 


F Texas 


West ViRcrs 


lA University 


University o 


F Michigan 


University o 


F Colorado 


DickiNsoN College 


Fayeitevilli 


:, Arkansas 


WASHiNirroN, 


D. C. 


Atlanta, Gei 


DHGIA 


Lexington, Kentcckv 


Oxford, Mjs: 


jtSSIPPI 


Knoxville, Tennessee 


Chicago, Illinois 


Kansas City. 


Missouri 


New York C 


ity. New Yor 


NewOrlean; 


s, Louisiana 


Lynchburg, Virginia 



Univ 



CoE College 
University OF Utah 
1, El. AND Stanford Univi 
New Hamfshire Colle. 
Kentucky State Univei 



.H.C.M.\--IE CILIPTERS 



Denver, Colorado 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Portland, Oregon 



Ll^ 



i. Ni 



Boston, Mas 



< Antonio, Texas 



Westminster 

Established in 1909 

PATRONESSES 

Mrs. Tracy McGregor Mrs. Calvin H. Kauffman 

Mrs. Herbert J. Goulding Mrs. Francis W. Kelsey 

Mrs. William D. Henderson Mrs. Victor H. Lane 

Mrs. Thomas E. Rankin 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Maude Hooper, A.B. Alma Ella Hymans, A.B. 

Elizabeth Seaver, A.B. Alma 



Ruth Seuff 



1916 

Helen Vanderveer 

1917 
Freda Garrett 

1918 



Margaret Stewart 



Lois Donaldson 
Margaret Douglas 
Dorothy Johnston 



Helen Gourley 
Naideau Jarvis 



Hazel Selby 
1919 



Mary McDonald 
Zilpha Pallister 
Mildred Schilling 



Mildred Sutton 
Caroline VVittman 



ASSOCIATE MEMBER 
Ellen Stevenson, '19 



620 



Theta Phi Alpha 



P.-ITkOM-SSES 



Mrs. J. J. Ql. 

Mbs. Morris 



SORORI-: IS F.1CULT.1TF. 

Laur* Davis 

SORORES IX iWlrERSlTJTE 



M. 


IRV E. Wals 
1917 


" 


Blanche R. Covev 




Angela P. Rademache 


Cathi 


ERINE B. Wl 

1918 


■NNE 


Katherine M. Dohertv 




Genevieve A. Walsh 


Marguerite H, Eness 




VaLORA F. QflNLAN 


Margl-ebjte M. Hn.i. 


PLEDGES 


Helen C, Camins 


Edith E. Dlnn 




Josephine M. Holmes 



Delta Delta Delta 

Iota Chapter 



EstaUhhtd in IS94. Re-eitablishfi in 1915 



Mrs. HoRATro J. Abbott 



PATRONESSES 

Mrs. Carl F. BRAUh 
Irs. Horace W. King 



SORORES IS URBE 



Mrs. John R. Brumm 
Mrs. James U.Cl'um[n> 
Mrs. Leigh J. Yovno 
Mrs. Charles S, Mille 
Mrs. George W. Knoepper 



Mrs. James E. Hab 
SORORES IS VSiyERSITATE 



Miss Daisy .Andrus 
Miss Frieda Wuerfel 
Mrs, William A, Fraver, FT 
Mrs. T. A. Lowrv, r 

iS Catharine AcKLEN, A r 





GRADUATE 






Alice Richard 






1916 




Margaret Bogelrif.i 




Edna Bromley 






Ri'TH Klliott 


,^Ris Van Deusen 




Beryl Brandsteitei 


Marian Stowe 




Emilie Schwarti 


Erhina Fillingham 


Ida Leb-is 

1917 


EsTEi.LE Hooper 


Genevieve Rowe 




Blanche Williams 


Nellie Hobbs 




Florence Bowles 


Mildred Treat 


1918 


Marjorie Needham 


Paulene Champlin 




Alice Blrtless 


Gladys Greening 


PLEDGES 


Ann Christenson 


Haiel Hoffman 




Beatrice Grace 


Hilda Welrfel 




Hannah Champlin 


Margaret Addison 




Eva Bowen 


Ella Rae 


Margaret Averv 


Eva Powell 



aiJI'TER ROLL 



Ohio Statr Unlver 



s Statk College 



Newberry Residence Hall 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



Mrs. Henry B. Joy 
Mrs. Alexis Angell 
Miss Claire Sanders 
Mrs. Henry Douglas 
Mrs. Myra B. Jordan 

Mrs. Erie Layton Gates 
Miss Clara Hunt 



Grosse Pointe Farms 
Detroit 
Detroit 
Ann Arbor 
Dean of Women 

Social Director 
Business Manager 



HOUSE OFFICERS 



Donna E. Sullivan 
Janet McFarlane 
EiLENE Lamb 
Blanche Kerns 
Evelyn Moore 
Louise Stammer 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Fire Captain 

Sanitarian 



HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Ilah M. Gordon Senior 

Evelyn W. Moore Junior 

Elizabeth Patchin Sophomore 

Mildred Johnson, Dorothy Durfee Freshmen 



EvALYNN Walker 
Marjorie Carlisle 
Bertha Lees Cowley 



HOUSE ROLL 
SENIORS 



Ilah Gordon 
Blanche Kerns 
Donna Sullivan 



JUNIORS 



Florence E. Bowles 
Mildred J. Crissey 
Helen G. Davis 
Helen E. Feldkamp 
Flora Gates 
Irma Hazel Giddings 
Nellie M. Hobbs 



Janet McFarlane 
Evelyn W. Moore 
Florence B. Paddock 
Carrie M. Partlow 
Mary N. Porter 
Anne Ratterman 
Julia Renwick 



Pearl Smith 



626 





aOPIIOMORES 




RfTH Bellows 




Anna Miller 


Elw C. Bliss 




Marie C. Macaulay 


Frances M. Broene 




Clarissa McCollom 


Margaret K. Cumminos 




Elizabeth Patchin 


Ada Fitch 




Meta K. Prance 


Frances Handibo 




Ella G. Rav 


EiLENE Lamb 


FRESHMES 


Louise S. Stahmer 


Dorothy Armstrong 




Gertrude E. Gunn 


Ada Arnold 




Lucile Hall 


Mary Lolise Alexander 




Katheryn Johnson 


Margaret Atkinson 




Mildred Johnson 


Lois Bknnallack 




Hope Keeler 


AiLEEN Case 




Mlrrsu Kikuchi 


Hannah Champlin 




Carmen McClellani 


Helen M. Cullen 




Phyllis C. Mann 


Olivia Demmon 




Mildred Michell 


Dorothy Durfee 




Marguerite Novy 


Naomi Dysert 




Antrvnetta Pokl 


Irene Eddy 




Emily Powell 


Grace G. P;mory 




Leda Pr I chard 


Groeso Gaines 




Viola B. Robinson 


Ethel H.Glaui 




Josephine Rosenblui 


Beatrice Grace 




Kamevo Sadakata 


Dorothy W. Gbuss 




Olive Wiggins 



Martha Cook Building 

./ RfsiJfHii Halt for H'omen Ereclfd in Mfmory of 

Martha Wolford Cook 

Firjl opened for iludenli Oelober, 1915 

BOARD OF GOrt'R.\ORS 
-Ins. Chalncev F. Cook. Hilladalr. Mich.. Pre-ideM 
Ans. Frederick B. Stevens, Detroit. Mich, 
^[ss Grack G. Millard. Detroit. Mich. 

SOCIAL DIRECTOR 

Gertrude H. Bei;<;s 

BiSINESS MA.XACER 

Francks C. M.^ck 

SnOESr OFFICERS 

(i. I'rfsiacnt FiA SHARf 

Alice Kravt, ■!«. Treasurer 

EXECVTIIE COMMITTEE 

A, 'If. 

;, '17 

STl'DEST KESIDESTS 



Marjorie Bates 
Joy Erwin 

AlTHA HKfFELBOW 



Powers 

KoNAN 



lETH McKaI 

1917 



\Urjorik McKf--< 



Selm 


A Bandemer 


Hem 


IVETTA BrANUEI 


Hermione Cohn 


Lueci 


LLE Colby 


GnACE Edwards 


Hud 


A Flink 


Marion Galton 


Mabi 


LE Hall 


Alice Holtk apple 


Mari 


ION AcKLEV 


Llc[ 


LLE Anderson 


Doris Anschctz 


Irma 


Anschl'tz, 


Vera 


L Apel 


Mab 


EL BANNISrKR 


Rhe^ 


I Barbarin 


Edn. 


t Barrincek 


Mlr 


lEL BaIMAN 


Ha7.I 


!L BeCKWITH 



Helen Ch 
Beryl Ch' 

Cleta foi 



Hei 



1 Dav 



Vera Keyser 
Alice Kraft 
Blanche Lane 
Catherine MacNaughtom 



Haf 



tMei 



Olca Perschbacher 
Georgeana Pockmak 

Elinor Trieman 



I,Ol 



E KrE< 



K Lew 
Kmily Loman 

Frances Macdon 
Anna MacMako? 
Helen McAndre 
Beatrice McKni 



, Me< 



Mil 



Frith Heall 



Mrs. T. K. Rankin 



PATRONESSES 



Mrs. \V. W. Rem an 



LEAGUE HOUSE 
Mrs. J. F. Ad.\ms, 216 North State Street 



Edith Gabriel 

Susie Bidwell 
AwEY Macdonald 
Mary Rosevelt 

Anita Beai.s 



MEMBERS 
1916 

1917 



1918 



Jessie Saunders 



Bessie Stonerock 

Ruth Rosevelt 
Olga Shinkman 
Marjorie Votey 

Helen Camins 



Edith Duemling 
Jennie Duemling 
Edith Dunn 
Marian Henderson 



1919 



Emily Mack 
Rozella Noble 
Clara Tubbs 
Clara VVohlfahrt 



630 



'HilSIBEiaSfBEB^ 



.■ E H T I S E M E N 1 



Coffee 



ROASTING 

AND 
BLENDING 



Standardized 



We have the most perfect, modern 
equipment for coffee roasting 

LONG experience has made us experts in selecting 
the best coffees and in blending them with cer- 
tainty of desired results. 

We import direct from the coffee-growing countries. 

We blend and roast the coffees and ship direct to you. 

We ascertain just the blend you want and then supply 
it always the same. 

Our products are standardized. There's no guesswork 
about them. 



Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

409-411 West Huron Street Chicago, III. 



A U V E R T I S E M E N T d 



DESIGNERS AND MAKERS OF 

Fraternity and Society Badges 



Diamonds, Watches 

Silverware 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY i 

I N NE WEST styles! 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLI CI IE D 



JDBIVER^ 

DETROIT 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



You want your clothes 
to possess quality and style 

We can give you both. Our materials are the 
very best and our styles are the very latest 



Burchfield Customers are looked at twice 



S. W. Burchfield & Company 

106 East Huron Street 



■ ■♦ 



Ca Unbar 



Oct. 5 — University opens and the new assem- 
bly of "Frosh" and others ease out 
to their first eight o'clock. Uni- 
versity enrollment increases 500 
over last year. 

Oct. 6 — Varsity opens football season with 
a 39-0 score over Lawrence. The 
announcement of President Wil- 
son's engagement turns many 
Democrats into Socialists. 

Oct. 8 — ^The Daily announces that it will keep 
the campus posted on the greatest 
conflict the world has ever known. 

Oct. 9 — Our team played Mt. Union. We 
nosed out a 36-0 victory. Maulie 
and Pat Smith aren't bad at all. 
A great number of Fresh caps are 
seen at the Majestic. Call for 
Dean Eflinger. 

Oct. 12 — Doc. Warthin gives his usual line to 
the Freshmen. Professor Tala- 
mon decorated for bravery in the 
French army. 

Oct. 13 — Marietta springs a big surprise by 
scoring on the Varsity. Score 28-6. 
"Oh I just knew Michigan would 
win," gleefully announced one of 
the fair co-eds as she tripped out 
of Ferry Field. 

Oct. 14 — Doc May finds the usual number of 
flat-footed "first year men." 



< »*i 



KYER&WHITKER 

PURE FOOD PURVEYORS 



FRUITS AND 
VEGETABLES 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



CANNED GOODS 
IN LARGE LOTS 
OUR SPECIALTY 



BELL PHONE 326-327-328 

114-116 EAST WASHINGTON ST. 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 



III 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



•<a^^i«aiB^i^i-v«a^^i«»^iK^^'— ai^ 



«* r. > 



It's Our IVork That Counts'' 



DAINES & NICKELS 

General Photographers 



334 and 336 SOUTH STATE STREET 



ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 



if 



The Only Studio on the Campus'' 



The Farsity Way 



Comfortable and Speedy 
Frequent and Reliable 



The Trolley Service DetTOlt 

that makes the U. of , , 

M. a part of Detroit United LlTieS 



IV 



What Place 
Does 

EQUIPMENT 

Play in Your 
Success 

■? 



Fine equipment will never make 
up for lack of skill. But fine equip- 
ment will make possible the com- 
mercializing of your talents to the 
Cnbinei \o 07 utmost. The best paying patients 

are attracted by handsome, up-to- 
date office furniture. The atmosphere of any well-appointed office is con- 
ducive to substantial fees, supplements your request for fees that correspond 
to your services and makes an increase in rates seem thoroughly justified. 



Nearly Everyone is Willing to Tay for What They Get 

Patients feel that they are getting more — when they are attended in a 
modern, carefully-appointed office. Such service, rendered under ideal con- 
ditions, is apt to command better fees — ^to put j-ou on a higher plane, or permit 
you to retain in the eyes of your customers a reputation for being progressive 
— and thus keep earning capacity to the maximum. 

Our Xo. 97 ("abinet is a masterpiece of beauty and efficiency. It is built 
for men and women of discrimination and taste. It is exceedingly convenient 
durable, impressive and the price is along lines that will please you. 

Send for our complete catalog. You will find No. 97 illustrate<l in natural 
colors, and described on pages 36 and 37, Write this request for catalog 
now to 

The American Cabinet Co. 

Two Rivers, Wis. 



A D V E R T I S K M E X T S 



< !■ 1 ■ 



OPKRATIC, CLASSIC 
STANDARD, POPULAR 

SHEET MUSIC 

AX IMMENSE STOCK 

Also hfiidquarters for Instruction Books, 

Studies and everything for 

teacher and student 




VIOLINS 

MANDOLINS 

GUITARS 

Best makes of Small Musical Instruments 
and Musical Goods of all kinds 



Steinway, Grinnell Bros, and other famous Pianos 

(Our own make) 

Also the superb Pianola Piano Player. Sold on easy payments and to 
rent. Exclusive Michigan representatives of the world's best makes. 



Victors, Victrolas, Edison Phonographs, Records 

Large Stock Convenient Payment Terms Arranged 

GRINNELL BROS. MUSIC HOUSE 

24 STORES— 3 PIANO FACTORIES— HEADQUARTERS, DETROIT 

ANN ARBOR STORE, - - 116 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



FIRST 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

of Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Capital 

Surplus and Profits 



3100,000 
$ 65,000 



E. D. KiNNK, S. W. Cl.ARKSON, 

President Cashier 

Harrison Soule, f ice-President 



Directors 
v.. D. Kiniio Frederick Schmid 

W. M. Abbott 8. W, Clarkson 

D. B. Sutton Harrison Soule 

GeorRe W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley 

Wirt Cornwcll 



Foreign Kxchange bought and sold and 
Letters of Credit for travelers. A Savings 
Department has been established and in- 
terest at y/c is paid on deposits. 



STARK TAXICAB LINE 

F. B. STARK 

TOURING CARS BY THE HOUR AND 

SIGHT SEEING, UMOUSINES, 

BAGGAGE, ETC. 

Phone 2255 Taxi Rate 25 cents 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
209 W. HURON ST. ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



< »•- 



Oct 15 — Studes rush the Maj. The Ann 
Arbor police force commonly known 
as *'Tom" makes a big haul and 
three sophs spend the night in jail. 

Oct. 16 — Largest Convocation ever held took 
place today. Prexy and Dad 
Cooler enliven the meeting. 

Oct. 17 — Case holds Michigan to a 14 to 3 
score. "What's the trouble with 
Michigan?** Sophs annihilate the 
Frosh in the Annual Pall Games, 
taking all five points. Prof. Lloyd 
appointed Dean of the Graduate 
School. 



■^-^ 



4* 

VT 



ADVERTISE M E \ T S 



Hemmeters Champion 

5 Cents 

The Name on Every Cigar 




The Hemmeter Cigar Co 



Detroit, Michigan 



TELEPHONE CENTRAL 5880 



A. E. 
Gilberg & Co. 



Incorporated 



COFFEES 



TEAS 



AND 



GROCER'S SPECIALTIES 



305 NO. MICHIGAN AVENUE 

CHICAGO 



VAN DOREN'S 
PHARMACY 

703 PACKARD STREET 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 

// you want a good chocolate soda^ 
try ours. It is always good 



A Juicy Steak — 

Or a tender roast — come to us. 
Going up the river you will 
need a lunch. Come to us. We 
believe that more university 
people patronize our market 
than any other one in the city. 

The Central Market 

Phone 654 303 So. Main St. 



f 



VI I 



i' E U T 1 M K M E N T a 



Billiards a a a □ o n a 


3 D n 


Bowling 


Huston Broth 


ers 


Cigars 330= Pipes = 


□ D 3 


Candies 


" JVe try to treat you 


right " 





TUTTLE'S 
LUNCH 
ROOM 



Ask any Grad— ask any 

Under Grad— They all 

say, 

"GO TO TUTT'S" 



338 South State Street 

Phonr 150 



JNO. C. 
FISCHER CO. 

Main and Washington Street 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 

Manufacturers of 

COPPER, BRASS 

AND SHEET METAL 

APPARATUS 

Pertaining to 

MEDICAL, CHEMICAL 

AND ENGINEERING 

PROFESSIONS 





INVESTIGATE 


We don- 
on mere 3 
Itsptincipl 
togiveyoL. 
of artachm 


isk or exp«cc you to buy the "EUREKA" retainer 
vertising claims— but we do ask you to investiRate. 
and construction of attachment are correct— nothing 
trouble in after years. We urftencly invite comparison 
nt with others. 




"By raery Itsi it's far the best" 


A,.™».mc«« UPPER 


OR LOWER 52.00 PER BOX OF SIX 


EUREKA SUCTION CO., 


Loudonville, Ohio 



IDVERTISEMH 



Young Men's Clothes Shop 



iVt make a Specialty of 



Suits and Overcoats 

For the College and Young Business Man 




Latest Domestic and 
Imported Fabrics 
Tailored by the Best 
of Ready-to-Wear 
Manufacturers 

Two and Three Button Single Breasted 
or Smart Norfolk Suits 

$15.00, $19.50 and $25M 

Single Breasted Form Fitting or Loose 
"Box Model Top Coats 

Silk Sleeves — Piped Seams — 
in Oxford, Green and Navy 
Excellent quality Fabrics 
Also in Special Knitted Cloth 

$15.00 

Kool Cloth Suits 
A wide range of colors — 

$7.50— $10.00 



%mSiif^lcc^ampany 



k' ]■: R T I S E M K N T 



ESTABLISHED ISt^i F. C. SCHII.TZ. PresiJent INCORPORATED IS94 

DICKERSON & COMPANY 

FASHIONABLE HATTERS 

Sole Agents ; Dunlap & Co., New York ; Scott & Co., Ltd., London, Eng. 

Fur lined and Auto Coats, Gloves, 
Canes, Umbrellas, etc. Specialties in 
Riding and Sporting Hats for Ladies 
and Gentlemen. In addition to the 
smart new Dunlap models, original 
importations from France, England 
^nd Italy. :: :: 

BOTH STORES 
100 WOODWARD AVENUE DAVID WHITNEY BLDG. 

Between CONGRESS and EARNED STS. 116 WASHINGTON BLVD. 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



/mTN International Jury, Panama- Pacific I 
3 1 Exposition, awards the Gold Medal to 

HARVARD 

CHAIRS and 
CABINETS 



The U. S. Army Purchasing Board, The U. S. Navy Purchasing 
Board, The U. S. Interior Department Purchasing Board, The 
British Army Purchasing Board, charged with the responsibility of 
buying the most substantial and best, order 

Peerless Harvard Chairs 

and when more are required repeat the orders. The largest Surgical 
Table Manufacturers adopt the Peerless Harvard Base for the 
base of the highest class Surgical Tables known to the World because 
this, the most important part of both Dental Chairs and Surgical 
Tables, is found at the highest development in the 

Peerless Harvard Dental Chair 

The Best Denial Offices are adopting Gold Medal Peerless Har- 
vard Chairs and Cabinets because, measured by every standard, they 
have triumphed over the concerted knockings of all competing 



interests. 



Harvard Exposition Products 



embody so many points of vantage that a complete catalog of 
Harvard Art Furniture is necessary to an adequate description. 

FURNISHED ON APPLICATION 

The HARVARD COMPANY 

CANTON. OHIO 

D I \ Room 1100 Marshall Field Annex, Chicago 

iSranclies ^ 

' ( Room 1403 Widener Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The J. J. Crimmings Co., 136 Boylston St., Boston, Mass., and the 
Dental Equipment House, 45 West 34th St., New York. General 
Sales and Distributing Agencies and special agencies with the best 
Dental Depot in each section of the Country. 



XI 



V'ERTISEMENTS 



Invaluable Data for 

the Engineer and 

Architect Sent Upon 

Request 

Let us send you our catalogues to 
add to your library. Let us send 
you our magazine "Steel Fabric." 

These books tboroughly cover the 
following subjects: 
Floor and Slab Reinforcement. 
Concrete Road Reinforcement. 
:oncret« Protection Work for Structural Steel 
)rrect Support for Plistet >nd Stucco, 
forated Metal Grilles for all Architectural 
Purposes. 

' name and address is all that is 
ary to procure one or all. 
Electrically Welded Wife as Used in Miscel- 
laneous Concrete Construction." 
"Ointon Electricatljr Welded Wite as Used 
for Reinforcement in Concrete Floors." 
"Clinton Electrically Welded Wire for Rein- 
forcing Concrete Roads and Pavements." 
"ClinlDD Hand Book on Lath and Plaster." 
'Successful Stucco Houses." 
•aintruss' Wall Furring." 
'etforated Metal Grilles." 
:eel Fabric." (_A magazine devoted to Con- 
ete Reinforcement.) 

are especially anxious to receive re- 
s from instructors at Engineering 
;es for a sufficient quantity of our 
ture to distribute to classes. Prompt 
-nents will be made, prepaid. 

CLINTON 
^IRE CLOTH CO. 

I, Mass. New York, N. Y. Chicago, 111. 
oom Wiatfts of IPirt Clolk in the tf'orld. 
Mskcn of 



react 



BcT«n Cloth. Clinton PainlpJ 1 

cnwo Cloth, Cliolon Poullry Neli 

Clinlon El«nri™lly WrldHi F.brii 

Bead, Tm Guards, Ffdcc Gates. Oil 

)nt«d Metala for all purposofl und pnxv? 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



ROWE'S LAUNDRY 



THOMAS ROWE. PROPRIETOR 



WORK NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE 
GOODS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 



GIFE US A TRIAL 

406 DETROIT STREET 

BELL PHONE 4S7-L 



Oct. 21 — A foreign student compares the great 
European war with the annual 
flag rush at Michigan. "Well, 
Manual, you ought to know.** 

Oct. 22 — First issue of the Gargoyle out today. 
W. A. P. celebrates. Chi Psi fra- 
ternity dedicate their new home. 

Oct. 23 — ^Varsity falls before the fierce attack 
of M. A. C. Score, 24 to 0. 

Oct. 26 — Michigan comes back in a monster 
Pep-Fest. Greatest mass meeting 
ever held at Michigan. Michigan 
spirit reigns supreme. 

Oct. 28 — ^3500,000 mark passed in the Union 
campaign. 



♦ 



< N 






CHAS. IDEN KIDD 

Tailor and 
T)ry Cleaner 

ALTERATIONS A 

SPECIALTY :: :: 

1112 So. University, Phone 1530-J 



John MacGregor 

STAPLE AND FANCY 

GROCERIES 

Sorority and Fraternity 
Trade a Specialty 

551 E. University Avenue 

Phone 185 300-L 




HE HOUSE OF GOOD 
FURNISHINGS FOR 

MEN. 



SUITS TO YOUR MEASURE FROM 

320 to 350 
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP 

1107 South University Avenue 



4*** 



XIII 



Bell System 

Removals from one location to another, break many 
friendly ties. 

Friendships grow cold through absence. 

The Long Distance Telephone 

is not affected by any location, nor time. It is always 
ready. It is the real conserver of friendship. 

Michigan State Telephone Company 

J. J. Kelley, Manager 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



r 



r 



'Iilll1lllll1lili'iiilllii|.|lllllllil!iliuii||illlli|jllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllitlli:ilinilllllllilil»^ 

•^^5^ HIS TAILORING CONCERN and 
I ^ J its SKILLED EMPLOYEES REP- 
^-^ RESENT HONESTY AND PRAC- 
TICABILITY AND IS COMPOSED OF A 
GROUP OF MEN WHOSE INTEGRITY 
and COMPETENCY HAS BEEN PROVED 

G. H. WILD COMPANY 

LEADING MERCHANT TAILORS 
STATE STREET :: ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



" THE GORHAM SHOP 



99 



GRAINGER -HANNAN- KAY CO. 

DIAMOND IMPORTERS, JEWELERS 
AND SILVERSMITHS 



238 AND 240 WOODWARD AVE. DETROIT, MiCH. 



XV 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



rpOR THIRTY-TWO YEARS this Bank has 
J^ entered into the Hves of thousands of people, and 
has been a factor in their prosperity. 

By its conservative and watchful policy it has con- 
served the fortunes of many. 

It wants to serve you in the same way. 

The Farmers & Mechanics Bank 

Main St., Cor. Huron 330 South State St. 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 



J. A. TRUBEY 

HOME MADE 

CANDIES, ICE 

CREAM FOR 

PARTIES 

218 South Main Phone 166 



■< » 



The Millard Press 



for the finest 

Dance Programs 
Menus &^ Stationery 

in the city 

111 West Liberty Street 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 



NHN 



Cousins & Hall 

Roses, Palms, Ferns 
and Camations 



All kinds of choice 
cut flowers and 
flowering plants in 
season. Mail and 
telegraph orders 
given prompt 
attention. 

Both Phones 115 
1102 South University Avenue 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 



XVI 



ADVERTISEMENT 



A MERICAN H EAVY DUTY T . ATHE 



MICHIGAN SELLING AGENTS 



The CHAS. A. STRELINGER COMPANY 

Metalworking — MACHINERY — Woodworking 
TOOLS— SHOP SUPPLIES 



"EVERYTHING FOR THE SHOP 



BATES & CONGRESS STS. 



^TUDBN TjS A 



CHOOSE 
and USE 




n's 



$2.50 up •n1ATUST5AU^ETl^ 




IDVERTISEMENTS 




i: R T I S E M E > 



A D V E R T I S B: M E N T S 



•mr 



H. D. EDWARDS & CO 

16, 18, 20, 22 and 24 WOODWARD AVE. 
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



General Distributors of Factory, Mine, 

Railroad and Marine Supplies : Specialists 

in Garden Hose, all grades : Fire Fighting 

Equipment : Rubber Goods 



Manufacturers of 

"HARTZ" PATENT STEEL TACKLE BLOCKS 
"JOY" PNEUMATIC HOSE COUPLINGS 
"SMITH'S" PATENT BELT FASTENERS 



Osborne- Boy n ton Co, 

Importers and Wholesalers 

Dinnerware, Glassware, 
Lighting Goods, China, 
Cut Glass, Hotel Sup- 
plies, House Furnishings, 
Refrigerators, Dolls and 



Novelties. 






Telephone Main 1275 

71-73-75 Jefferson Avenue 
Detroit, Mich. 



^ 



XX 



Oct. 29 — ^Another monster yell-fest at twilight 
on Ferry Field. 

Oct. 30 — Syracuse puts a crimp in Michigan's 
hopes by a 14 to 7 victory. 

Oct. 31 — David Starr Jordon speaks on "The 
Final Cost of the War." A good 
pacifist's plea. 

Nov. 3 — Band-Cer-Tainment meets with great 
success. Assures the band of the trip 
to Pennsy. Co-eds in tears because 
Suffrage was defeated in several 
states. 

Nov. 5 — Big mass meeting before the Cornell 
game. Judges Murfin and Codd 
of Detroit are the principal speak- 
ers. Whitey Otis comes back. 

Nov. 6 — Our hats off to Cornell. The Big 
Red team downs Varsity for its 
third defeat— 34 to 7. No alibis. 

Nov. 9 — Extra — University Senate decrees mil- 
itary training for Freshmen and 
Sophomores beginning next year. 
Union total passes 3600,000 mark. 

Nov. 10 — Big send-off for the team! "Beat 
Pennsy" is the slogan. 

Nov. 13 — Michigan and her old rival, Pennsy, 
battle to a scoreless tie. 4000 in- 
terested listeners hear Ex-President 
Taft speak on "The Enforcement 
of Peace." 

Nov. 19 — ^John F. Maulbetsch elected captain 
of the 1916 Michigan Football 
Team. "Maulie" was .All Amer- 
ican half-back last year, and is the 
mainstay of the Michigan team. 



IDVERTISEMENTS 



Our Service is Unique and Unequalled 
Because it's individual -SEKV- SELF. 

We also give: "VARIETY" "QUALITY" "PURITY" 
OREN'S CAFETERIA— (/('j so different) 



Thotograph Studio 
Phone 191 1 119 E. Liberty St. 



TINKER & COMPANY 

Furnishers and Hatters to University Men 

342 SOUTH STATE ST., ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 
DRESS SUITS TO RENT — ALL NEW MODELS 



ADVERTIREMENTS 



Special Gas Appliances for Fraternity 

and Club Houses 






Those contemplating any changes 

are invited to utilize the services 

of our expert in getting the most 

efficient kitchen appliances. 



WASHTENAW GAS COMPANY 



♦ 



4 M m 



Fresh Roasted Peanuts 



wsmfmmamiiimtommammmmmammmc^K^nmBi^Ki^fmmammmammmt 



They have a distinctive flavor because 
of the way we roast them. 



tammmammma^maam^mKHmamammmLmmmmammmo^mmommmtimm^aii 



DEAN & COMPANY, Ltd 

214 S. Main St. 



XXII 



e II T I S K M K ( 



UTAaUBHCO Ilia 




■lAOISOM AVINUI COR. FORTY -rOURTH STRHT 

Telephone Murray Hill 8800 

FOR MEN AND BOYS: 

Clothing ready made or to measure 

for Dress, Travel or Sport 

Hats, Shoes & Furnishings 

Trunks, Bags & TraveUing Kits 

Liveries for menservants 

Stnd for Illttslratid Camtogtif 

NEWPORT BRANCH 



BROOKS BROTHERS' 
New Building, only 
a Step from Grand 
Central Terminal, Sub- 
way Express Station 
and many prominent 
Hotels and Clubs 



Electrical Appliances 
of Many Varieties 

FOR SALE BY 



The Detroit Edison Co. 

(Eastern Michigan Division) 
Main and William Streets 



S E M E N T S 



The Busiest Spot in All Detroit 

Here it is. The great Hudson Store, the CENTER 

of this city's retail business. 

As an inseparable part of Detroit's wonderful growth 

and activity, this huge mercantile institution takes 

its place. 

It has grown to its present dimensions by right of 

business methods that are built on the true and tried 

principles. 

Men and stores may always add to themselves if they 

hold fast to the right ideas and work steadily on. 

This store has its own individuality that makes it 

different from all others in many ways. 

— Itt greatnesj of area 

— in completeness of stocks 

— in freshness of fashions 

—in fairness of prices 

— in courtesy to its customers 

— in real desire to serve 

— in toilHngness to right mistakes 

— in comfiirt and convenience to the public 

the Hudson Store is in the front rank among the 
greatest stores in America. 
It is always at your service. 



.' E H T I S E M K N 



FOUR YEARS AGO 

we Started supplying 

Good Things to Eat and Drink 

to Michigan Students 
Still going strong — Thanks to you 



Nov 


21— >resh Dents win Campus Champion- 
ship in Fuoiball. ilrfeaiinK the 
Stniur l.aivs H-0. 


Nov 


24—" Maulie'' receives the Athletic trophv 
for heinn the most valuable man 
on the MichiBan team. 


Nov 


30-\Vriiefsof the 1916 Opera atinonncea. 
Hal Schradski and Wap John ire 
the composers. 


Dec 


1— "The Dailv" straw ballot shows 
that (he students endorse mililary 
traininii by a sIlKht marnin. 



Buckley's 


I 
Coffee Ranch I 


We sell coffee anJ tea a 
by the pound. Yoii 
quantity desired. Also 
peanuts, and rice. 


t wholesale 
an pnrchas. 
spices, ex 


prices 
any 


Try our goods 


zi-ilh 


a sample 


order 


Phone 17 


7-R 




■211 Kast Liberty S 




Ann Arbor 


Mich. 



Charles JV. Warren 
^ Company 

Diamond Merchants tS Jtuelert 



ADVERTISE M E N T S 



N » 




PLATINUM 
PORTRAITS 



T^ref erred by discriminating 
people for exquisite and en- 
during beauty of tone, for 
absolute integrity of work- 
manship and undoubted 

reliability 



STUDIO, 319 E. HURON ST. 



PHONE 961-M 



XXVI 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



James Foster's 

Fine Arts Gift House 

Gifts for all occasions in 

Pictures, Pottery, Jewelry 

Books, Brass, Mahogarny 

Leather Novelties 



Calkins' Pharmacy 

A Good Drug Store 
324 So. State Street 



Our Good Service 



in printing embraces more than mere type-setting 
and press work. It includes good taste, appropri- 
ate stock, careful supervision and punctual delivery. 
Such service is worth much more than our very 
moderate charges. May we send our representa- 
tive to talk printing, at your earliest convenience? 
How about that next order? Call us by phone or 
drop us a card. 

DAVIS & OHLINGER 

PROMPT PRINTERS 



TELEPHONE 432-J 

109-111 E. Washington St. 



Ann Arbor 



i 



THE ANN ARBOR 
SAVINGS BANK 

Capital $ 300,000 

Surplus and Profits . . 150,000 

Resources 3,000,000 

^ General Banking Business Transacted 

The oUesl and strongest savings bank in Washtenaw 
County. Organized May, 1869. 



N. W. Corner 
Main and Huron 



707 
So. University Ave. 



BOOK-PLATES 

Portraits and Pictures 

engraved on steel by our process at less 
than one-half of the cost of hand en- 
graved plates. Write for free samples. 

Estimates furnished on all kinds of 
steel engraved plates. 

HENRY TAYLOR, JR. & CO. 

143 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 



xxvn 



ADVERTISE M E N T S 



"Brochon 



1^ 



Fraternity Jewelry, Engraved 
Stationery, and Gold Novelties 
of every description, Wedding 
Invitations, Announcements, 
Calling Cards, Banquet Menus, 
Dance Programs, etc. 



5 South Wabash Avenue 

Chicago, 111. 



XXVIII 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Strengthen Old Friendships 

with a new portrait — the gift that exacts 
nothing in return, yet has a value that can 
only be estimated in kindly thoughtfulness. 



■juu" -■ -■ ! ~T 



Make the appointment today 
O. F. HOPPE'S STUDIO 

619 East Liberty Street 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Its delightful convenience; its unusual 

service and its dependable excellence of cuisine 
have created for the 




iK 



Qi\oom 



a host of customers whose appreciation and patronage 
are exceedingly gratifying. Special banquets by 
appointment. 



J 



XXIX 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^ 



ICY 

the policy which will 
r owners of Columbia 
villbest maintain rhc 
its product, 
luct has served the <j 
1 years in praaically < 
: result that the name 
ent is generally accep 
riing quality, saiisfact 
e, 

la Chairs, Columbia 
ir Compressors and '. 
ern in design and con: 
ration as more than a 
nee, mechanical skill 
them. They are modi 
can be made for theit 
me payment plan. 



ER DENTAL IV 

LOCHESTER, N. Y., 



a^, 



H 



VEUTISEMENTS 



Dedicated to the Class of 1916 

And when you are through and the chilling 
winds of the cold, cold world are slapping 
you on this side and that, Cheer Up! for 
you can always go back to that old Memory 
Book and your blood will tingle with warm 
memories of college days. 
Lyndon's Pictures are the foundation 
of all Memory Books for Michigan Students 

A Special Rate for Large Orders 



Fountains 



AJternoon Tea 



REST , 



302 South Main Street 

ChocolaUs our specially 

Dainty Luncheons 



WURSTER 
BROTHERS 

MOST SANITARY CREAMERY 
IN ANN ARBOR 



Absolutely Pure Milk 
and Cream, Creamery 
Butter, Fresh Eggs 
Cottage Cheese and 
Butter Milk 



DETROIT aud CATHERINE STS. 

BKI.I, TKI.EFHONE NUMBKIt 423 



A I) \ E K T 1 S E M E N T S 



College Romances 



(Series No. 437; 



I he maid paused irresolutely and then went on. Soon she was lost in the nodding confusion of 
the ferns and wild hyacinth bushes. It was evident that she was looking for someone, half anxious 
to see him and yet not a little tremulous at the anticipation of meeting. It was a June for love with 
the air heavy with the sultry fragrance of the late May flowers. 

But let us proceed with the little maid. We are sure that she will pardon our eavesdropping for 
after all has been said love is not wholly modest and Dan Cupid is not averse to publicity. One can 
hear the noisy murmur of the busy brook as it glides over smooth, moss-covered stones. Yes, that is 
she leaning in pale and anxious presumption over the little pool made by the winding stream. But 
we must not draw too close for there comes the tread of another foot which we believe must be that of 
her lover's. 

Now we are sure of it. Already there are fond embraces going on between the pair which in all 
good respect for the aflf^ectionate ones have caused us to turn our heads. The youth is drawing some- 
thing bright and gleaming out of his pocket and is showing it to the young lady. It is a beautiful sister 
pin of the man's fraternity, set with a splendid diamond in the center and is his gift to his betrothed. 
In it are expressed the fraternal feelings of the man coupled with his love for her who is to be his wife. 

" B. P." jewelry has often aided true lovers by the side of little brooks in becoming the seal of 
gentle and true aflPection. 

The sequel to this stirring romance may be found in the publication on The Book for Modern 
Greeks, a copy of which will be mailed free upon mention of this article. Address the fraternity jewelers. 
Burr, Patterson & Companv, Detroit, Michigan. The book contains many suggestions useful to 

Yours truly, 

Dan Cupid. 



THE 

ANN ARBOR 

PRESS 

Official Printfrs to the 
University of Michigan 

We do more Printing for the Student 
Body than all other shops combined. 



PRINTERS OF 

The MichiRan Daily 

MicIuRan AlumnuH 

AlichiKfUi Law Review 

GarKoylc 

8. C. A. Handbook 

American Tyler- Keystone 



Students' Directory 

The Technir 

Michigan Kchoolmasters' 

Journal 
Text Books in English, 

French, Spanish, Ete. 



Specialty of Program Work 

PRESS BUILDING 

MAYNARD STREET 

BELL P H O N K No. 1 



1 



Dec. 2 — Lee K. Joslyn chosen to represent the 
University of Michigan on Henry 
Ford's Peace Jaunt. Pretty soft I 

Dec. 4 — Maulie is mentioned as half-back on 
Colliers' All American Team. 

Dec. 10 — The Musical Club Concert makes a 
decided hit. Plans for a million 
dollar library placed before the 
regents. 

Dec. 11 — Michigan's Good Fellow Activity 
Pervades the Campus. 

Dec. 13 — Mischa Elman entertains 5000 listen- 
ers at the " Pie V^acation " concerts. 



r 



QUALITY CLOTHES 

''Tailored to Suit'' 
NOVELTY SUITINGS 

Arthur Marquardt 

The Campus Tailor 

516 E. Williams Street 



4> 



XXXII 



The Experiment 

of changing around to get the best their money 
can buy — style, service and neatness considered, 
has centered the minds of young men on 

HART, SCHAFFNER& MARX CLOTHES 

They jit, they wear, and they satisfy for 
$18, $20. $22.50 up to $30 

a [: G □ 

LUTZ CLOTHING STORE 

"The Home of Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes" 



SHEEHAN & CO. 

STATIONERS AND ENGRAVERS 

Special to Seniors 
■Plate and 100 Cards, $1.50 

Fine Stationery College Jewelry 

Correspondence Cards Brass Desk Sets 

Brass Book Racks 



SHEEHAN & CO 

STUDENTS' BOOK STORE 



100% 
Satisfaction 

It is the aim and pur- 
pose of this store to 
give you a heaping 
dollar^s worth of value 
for every dollar you 
spend here. No mat- 
ter what you purchase 
I want you to know 
that you can depend 
on it in every way. 
Only such merchan- 
dise as will satisfy you 
completely will be sold. 

F.W. Gross 

Men's Togs 

Ann Arbor Two Stores 



Dec 


18- 


-Comedy Club presents "The Pro- 
fessor's Love Stoir" at Whitney. 
Morrison Wood and Phyllis Povah 


Dei' 


19- 


-Most important bit of news today — 
"President Wilson marries Mrs. 
Gale." 


Dec 


21- 


-Vacation starts. COOO students leave 
Ann Arbor for their "pilgrimage" 
homes. 


Jan. 


5- 


-Chrisimas vaca 
meet a< "H 
and Martha 
s«ap holiday 
and "Dot" 


ion ends. The bunch 
stop's" "The Maj," 
Cook "Dorm" to 
experiences. "Smuck" 
look over the new 






".carinB appa 


■" 


Jan. 


14- 


-Senate decides to prohibit "moon- 
lieht" dances at ihe Jav-Hop. 
"kV Robinson and "Cec" Corbin 
deny that thev intend going to 
NorthHcstcrn University next 


J.n. 


20— "The Daily" 
by adopting 


Hes to disguise Itself 



A l> \' !•: H T 1 S I-: M K X T S 



HALLER JEWELRY COMPANY 

State Street Jewelers 

Makers and designers of society and class pins 



Phi Beta Kappa 
Sigma Xi 
Delta Sigma Rho 
Masques 



Barristers 

Alchemists 

Sphinx 



Mortar Board 

Alpha Nil 
Michigan Pins 
Normal School Pins 



Omega Phi 
Engraved wedding stationery and visiting cards. 



MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT 

We can supply any sterling silver pattern in table ware and in- 
vite your correspondence. Write for prices. 

HALLER JEWELRY COMPANY 



» 



For Fancy Meat Products 

of All Kinds 

See 



Weinmann, 
Geisendorfer & Co. 

Retail and Wholesale 

High Grade Table Supplies 



1^ ^# ^m 
V %r V 



201 E. WASHINGTON ST, 



t- 



Jan. 21 — Varsity Debating team loses to Chi- 
cago's silver-tongued orators in 
Chicago. The Military Number 
of The Gargoyle makes its appear- 
ance. W. A. P. John leaves town. 
Prof. Hobbs heard from. 

Jan. 24 — Engineers decide to adopt honor 
system in all exams. Dr. Reed, 
former dean of the literar>^ depart- 
ment, dies in Geveland. 

Jan. 25 — .All students having had Military 
Training called to the colors at 
the Union to act as officers in case 
of inauguration of Military Train- 
ing at Michigan. 



I 



THE LAMB & SPENCER STORE 



GROCER 



W. D. McLEAN, Prop. 



318 So. State Street Ann Arbor, Michigan 



XXXVT 



I S E M E N T S 



PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

Fraternity and Sorority Party Programs, Announcements, 

At Home, Professional, Calling and Business Cards, 

Fine Stationery, Etc. 

C. F. MEYERS PRINT SHOP 

215 South Main St., opp. Mack's 



Phone 281-M 




Something Different Need Not 
Imply Freakishness ! 

At least as far as footwear is concerned ! 

The finest exemplification of distircnveness is found In Kvfe's 
shots. They have a certain cut, a fineness of detail and perfec- 
tion of lit that raises them out of the commonplace footwear. 

Fyfe's shoes have snap and Kineer. but this snap and cinger is 
tempered with ("ood style. 

Keing Michigan's largest footuejt store the latest stvles are 
seen here earliest. 

Prices ranne from )!3.50 iipnards! 



Footwear for 
Tennis, Golf, Boating, Hu: 
ing, etc., as well as for evt 
social function. 



183-5 WOODWARD AVE. 



THE 

mill for 

516 


Try 

STAEB BAKERY 

All Kinds of Baked Goods |||||| 

PHONE 238 
East Liberty St., near State 




Law and Medical X^ 1 | • ^ • Literary and 

£r- rublications f'./.,/,. 

We present the best inducements to Michigan Alumni for the purchase of Library 
and General Book Supplies that can be secured anywhere in the United States. 

Our Mail Order Business 

Extends to Entry Stale oj ike Union, and lo all foreign eounlries 

Libraries Bought and Sold 

Eslimatei furnished for Secondary, School, Cotleie \and University 



Discounts of from 10 to 33}^ per cent from the publishers' prices are allowed to 

school libraries on all publications. Transportation charges prepaid on all orders, 

large or small, received through the mail. 

George Wahr, 'Bookseller, Importer, Tublisher 

103-105 N. Main St. : 316 South State St. : Ann Arbor, Mich. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Ann Arbor Taxicab Company 

Largest and most up-to-date taxicab line in the city 



Big Limousine Taxiy Touring 
Cars and Auto Baggage Trucks 



Garage in Connection 



We Make a Specialty of Limousine Service for House Parties 
Phone 1300 — On call day and night. :: 515 East Liberty Street 



HIHALL 
RUGS 




itt-et* ^ ^i 




For 36 years we have been 
showing the people of Ann 
Arbor and vicinity, the 
correct designs in Furni- 
ture, Rugs, Draperies. 
May we not showyou some- 
thing from our ample line ? 

Martin Haller 



Fu rn itu re :: "Rugs 

112-122 E.Liberty St.,AnnArbor 



T 



Jan. 27 — Oratorical association presents "The 
Servant In The House" before a 
large audience in U Hall. 

Jan. 28 — Friday — Blue Week end begins. 
Exams start on Monday. Every- 
one celebrates by going to the Maj. 
The Daily goes into hiding for 
two weeks. Hop Committee al- 
lows it has some job before it. 

Feb. 11 — The long looked for J-Hop came off 
tonight. The Daily announces 
that Michigan's passing show goes 
down in history as premier success 
of all Junior Hops. Freshmen 
are dazzled by beautiful and charm- 
ing guests. 

Feb. 19 — The soph engineers perpetrate a "wheel 
and axle" ball at Grangers. The 
coming band bounce is to determine 
the true relation of the seniors 
and women in the University. 

Feb. 20 — Coach Lundgren calls out all baseball 
men. Prof. Hobbs assails Doctor 
Cook. War is begun at once in 
spite of all the efforts of true pa- 
cificists. 

Feb. 23 — Train kills Bryant '19. In order to 
offset the influence of Doc Cook 
the Security League is bringing on 
Leonard Wood and Bob Perry. 
This war is hell. 



XXXIX 



A D V K K T I S K M E X T S 



I — II ■ «— 



Randall & Pack 



///^^ Class 
Portraiture 
and Groups 

'By 'Photography 




121 East Washington Avenue 

Phone 598 



XL 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




YOU often like to drop into a store and look over things 
you have seen advertised. But you don't like to be urged 
to Buy and we agree with you absolutely. 

You can come to this store any time, try on our suits and over- 
coats and not feel the slightest obligation to purchase. We are 
glad to have you visit us first to investigate. 

Sooner or later we know you will come back because when you 
are ready to buy you w-ill want the style, comfort and lasting 
quality that only our long experience in the Clothing and Men's 
Furnishings business can give you. 



REULE, CONLIN & FIEGEL 

200 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



ESTABLISHED EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND SEVENTY TWO : EXCELLED BY NONE 

E. A. Wright Company 

Engravers — Trinters — Stationer 



office and factory 

Broad and Huntingdon Sts. 



CENTRAL store 

1218 Walnut 



Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
MANUFACTURER OF 



CLASS AND SOCIETY PINS, MEDALS 
COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS STATIONERY 



DANCE PROGRAMS 

MENUS 

LEATHER NOVELTIES 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 



DIPLOMAS 

YEAR BOOK INSERTS 

NOVELTIES 

CALLING CARDS 



« !■ ■ — n— i^— ■ 



XLII 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



GEORGE 
BISCHOFF 

Florist 

Choice Cut Flowers 
and Plants 



220 CHAPIN STREET 
ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

TELEPHONE NUMBER 809M 



Schumann - Hotzel 



'Bakery 



Highest Grade 
Baked Goods 
Cottage Bread 
a Specialty 



219 North Main Street 
Phone 790- M 



I DJV ERTIBEMENT 



The R. J. F. Roehm Co. 

The Original 

Fraternity Jewelry Manufacturers of Detroit 

ESTABLISHED 1849 

Diamonds, Stationery, Badges, House 

Club Pins and Rings, Jewelry of Special 

Design 

Catalogue and price list sent on request 
When in Detroit call on us 



Room 203 Scherer BIdg. 



27 Grand River Ave., East 



Feb. 


14-Second semester starts. 


Feb. 


IS— Regents provide for voluntary mili- 
tary training. 1916 Opera named 
"Tres Rouge." Qass teams begin 
practice for 1916 basketball season. 


Feb 


IR— Comedy Club presents "Professor's 
Love Story" in Saginaw. Scores 
a hit. Engineers declare the honor 
system used in examinations a 


Feb. 


Hobbsy gets into print again. 


Feb. 


25— Our rifle team wins the champion- 
ship in class "B." The band 
bounce lands longer than grand 
opera would, but nearly every one 


Feb. 


26—34 disappear from the literary col- 
lege. "Where oh where are the 
verdant young freshmen?" Gov- 
ernor Ferris s'avs that war is a con- 
test of brains. Heaven forbid 
that we should dispute with him. 


Feb. 


27— Grover and Sikes take the main roles 
in the Union Opera. We lose to 
Notre Dame in the track meet by 
the score of49 to 45. 



J. W. BLASHILL 

PACKARD ST. MARKET 

Meats, Poultry, 
Oysters and Fish 

Bell Phone 697 Home Phone 5 

705 Packard Street 



4.DVERTI8EMBNT8 



The high class Paramount and Triangle Pictures are shown daily at the Orpheum Theatre 



The man who wears 

Society Brand Clothes 

is always well dressed and he knows 
it for these clothes invariably measure 
up to their surroundings. They never 
suffer by contrast with other clothes. 

Jl.WuerthS. 

J. F. WuERTH Frank P. Harris 



Veh. 28— The basketball season si 
Mii^hijtan Daily featiir 
which was reiected bv 
rhetoric professors. 'St 
not sound bad. 



T>elta Cafe 

We are unexcelled for the 
juicy steaks which we 
serve. 

There is no cuisine in Ann 
Arbor which is causing 
more favorable comment 
than is ours. 



Your approval is requested. 



"v^rt is long. 

Life is short." 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



College Class Books 



H We will make attractive propositions to 
Business Managers of College Annuals 
who desire to produce well made books. 

If A contract with us means superior print- 
ing, binding and engraving service. Each 
book is printed ilinder the personal super- 
vision of our president, who is imbued with 
the one ambition to produce a good book. 



THE DU BOIS PRESS 

Rochester, N. Y. 



Builders of Fine Books and Catalogs 



w 



This "Michiganensian" printed by Du Bois 



XLVII 



Index to Advertisers 



American Cabinet Co., The ... V 

Ann Arbor Press XXXII 

Ann Arbor Savings Bank . . XXVII 

Ann Arbor Taxicab Co XXXIX 

Bischoff, George XLIII 

Blashill, James XLIV 

Brochon Engraving Co., The . . XXVIII 

Brooks Bros XXIII 

Buckley CofFee Ranch .... XXV 

Burchfield & Co Ill 

Burr-Patterson Co XXXII 

Busy Bee, The XXV 

Calkin's Pharmacy XXVII 

Calumet Tea and CoflPee Co. .... I 

Central Market, The VII 

Clinton Wire Cloth Co., The ... XII 

Cousins & Hall XVI 

Crest, The XXXI 

Daines & Nickels IV 

Davis & Ohlinger XXVII 

Dean & Co XXII 

Delta, The XLVI 

Detroit & Cleveland Nav. Co., The XXXV 

Detroit United Lines IV 

Dickerson & Co X 

Du Bois Press, The XLVII 

Eastern Michigan Edison Co., The XXIII 
Eureka Suction Co., The .... VIII 

Edwards, H. D. & Co XX 

Farmers & Mechanics Bank . XVI 

First National Bank, The .... VI 

Fischer, Jno. C VIII 

Foster, James XXVII 

Fyfe, R. H. &Co XXXVII 

Gilberg, A. E. & Co VII 

Grainger-Hannan-Kay & Co. . . . XV 

GrinnellBros VI 

Gross, Fred W XXXIV 

Haller Jewelry Co., The . . XXXVI 

Haller, Martin XXXIX 

Harvard Dental Co., The .... XI 
Hemmeter Cigar Co., The .... VII 

Hoppe, O. F XXIX 

Hudson, J. L. & Co XXIV 

Huston Bros VIII 



Jahn & Oilier Engr. Co., The . . XLI 

Kidd, c. I xin 

Kyer&Whitker Ill 

Lamb & Spencer Store, The . . XXXVI 

Lohr, E.J Xm 

Lutz Clothing Co.. The ... . XXXIII 

Lyndon, A. S XXXI 

MacGregor, John XIII 

Mack & Co XXIX 

Maedel, G. L XXI 

Marquardt, Arthur XXXII 

Meyers, Chas. F XXXVII 

Mich. State Tel. Co XIV 

Millard Press, The XVI 

Newcomb-Endicott Co IX 

Oren's Cafeteria XXI 

Osborne-Boynton Co., The .... XX 

Randall & Pack XL 

Rentschler, J. F XXVI 

Reule-Conlin-Fiegel Co. . . XLII 

Ritter Dental Mfg. Co., The . . XXX 

Roehm, R. J. F. Co XLIV 

Rowes Laundry XIII 

Schumann & Hutzel XLIII 

Sheehan&Co XXXIV 

Staeb Bakery, The .... XXXVII 

Stark Taxicab Co VI 

Strelinger, The Chas. H. . . . XVII 
Taylor, Henry Jr. & Co. . . . XXVII 

Tinker & Co XXI 

Tuttle's Lunch Room VIII 

Trubey, J. A XVI 

VanDoren's Pharmacy VII 

Wadham's & Co XIX 

Wahr, Geo XXXVIII 

Warren, The Chas. W. Co. . . . XXV 
Washtenaw Gas Co., The . . XXII 

Waterman Pen Co., The L. E. . . XVII 
Weinmann-Geisendorfer Co., The . XXXVI 
White Dental Co., The .... XVHI 

Wild, G. H. &Co XV 

Wright, The E. A. Co XLII 

Wright, Kay & Co II 

Wurster Bros XXXI 

Wuerth, J. F. Co., The ... . XLV 



XLVIII 



Book Index 



Page 

Adclphi . 422 

Akhenaton Society 594 

Alchemists 395 

A!pha Nu 423 

Alpha Omega Alpha 374 

Alumni Association Officers 56 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers .431 

Architectural Society 434 

Angell, James B., (An Appreciation) .... 11 

Archons 401 

Aristolochite 377 

Athletic Association Officers 282 

Automobile Society 436 

Barristers 388 

Baseball (Varsity) 307 

Baseball (1915 Record) 312 

Baseball Season (Story) 309 

Baseball, Batting and Fielding Averages . 311 

Baseball, Class 1916 Law 348 

Basketball, Class 1916 Dental . . . . 349 

Board in Control of Student Publications 414 



Cabinet Club 
Camp Davis . 
Cercle Fran^ais 
Chinese Students' Club 

Class Committees — 
1916 Literary 
1916 Engineering 
1916 Law . . . 
1916 Medical . . 

Class Officers — 
1916 Literary 
1916 Engineering 
1916 Architectural 
1916 Law . . . 
1916 Medical . . 
1916 Dental . . 
1916 Pharmical . 

1916 Homeopathic 

1917 Literary . . 
1917 Engineering 
1917 Law . . . 
1917 Medical . . 
1917 Dental . . 

1917 Architectural 

1918 Literary 
1918 Engineering 
1918 Law . . . 
1918 Medical . . 
1918 Dental . . 

1918 Architectural 

1919 Literary 
1919 Engineering 
1919 Medical . 
1919 Homeopathic 
1919 Architectural 

Classical Club 
Comedy Club 
Commerce Club . 
Cornell Game (Story) 
Cosmopolitan Club . 

Dental College 
Debate, Central League 
Debate, Mid-West Leagi.t 
Dedication .... 

Dedications, Class — 
1916 Literary 
1916 Engineering 
1916 Architectural 
1916 Law . . . 
1916 Medical . . 
1916 Dental . . 



466 
172 
446 
472 

7} 
133 
179 
205 

72 
132 
163 
178 
204 
220 
236 
242 
258 
259 
1(0 
261 
262 
263 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
452 
442 
435 
297 
471 

218 

420 

421 

9 

71 
131 
IM 
177 
203 
219 



Page 

1916 Pharmical 235 

1916 Homeopathic 241 

Delta Sigma Rho 426 

Deutscher Verein 444 

Dixie Club 469 

Dormitories, The New 43 

Druids 387 

Engineering College 130 

Engineering Exhibit 135 

Engineering Society 430 

Equal Suffrage Association 370 

Eremites 588 

Faculty 57 

Fellowships, Holders of 68 

Football (Varsity) 285 

Football, 1915 Record 286 

Football, Review of Season (Story) .... 286 

Football (All Fresh) 303 

Football, Class — 

1916 Literary 347 

1918 Dental 350 

Forestry Club 367 

Fraternities — 

Acacia 522 

Alpha Delta Phi 484 

Alpha Kappa Kappa 566 

Alpha Phi Alpha 540 

.Alpha Rho Chi 576 

Alpha Sigma 554 

Alpha Sigma Phi 526 

Alpha Tau Omega 520 

Beta Theta Pi 494 

Chi Psi 482 

Delta Chi . . 510 

Delta Kappa F^psilon 486 

Delta Sigma Delta 548 

Delta Tau Delta 502 

Delta Theta Phi 574 

Delta Upsilon 498 

Gamma Eta Gamma 570 

Kappa Beta Psi 532 

Kappa Sigma 512 

Lambda Chi Alpha 534 

Nu Sigma Nu 546 

Phi Alpha Delta 560 

Phi Beta Pi 558 

Phi Chi 562 

Phi Chi Delta 536 

Phi Delta Chi 550 

Phi Delta Phi 544 

Phi Delta Theta 504 

Phi Gamma Delta 516 

Phi Kappa Psi 496 

Phi Kappa Sigma 524 

Phi Rho Sigma 556 

Phi Sigma Kappa 538 

Pi Upsilon Rho 568 

Psi Omega 564 

Psi Upsilon . 492 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 506 

Sigma Delta Chi 572 

Sigma Delta Kappa 580 

Sigma Chi 500 

Sigma Nu 514 

Sigma Phi 488 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 530 

Sinfonia 518 

Theta Delta Chi 508 

Theta Xi 578 



Xi Psi Phi . 
Zeta Beta Tau 



552 
528 



Zeta Psi 490 



Fraternity List (Order of Founding) 



480 



4d-I 



681 



Book Index — Continued 



Fraternity Rushing Rules 
Freshmen Spread Committee 

Friars* Song 

Frith Heall 



Galen 

Gamma Alpha 

Gargoyle 

Geneva Club . . . . 
Girls' Glee Club . . . 
Golf Association Officers 
Graduate School . 
Griffins 



Page 

481 

463 

10 

630 

400 
379 
411 

368 
440 
335 
63 
398 



Hermitage ^^^ 



History, 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1916 

Homeop 



Class — 
Literary 
Kngineering 
Architectural 
Law . 
Medical . 
Dental . 
Pharmical 
Homeopathic 
Nurses . 
athic School 



Illinois Club 

Indiana State Club 

In Memoriam 

Inter-Class Athletics 

Interscholastic Track Meet Managers 
Interscholastic Track Meet (1915 Records) 



JefFersonian 

Junior Hop Committees 

Junior Girls* Play 

Kentucky Club 
Keystone State Club 



Latin-American Club .... 

Law School 

Literary College 

Les Voyageurs 

Lyceum Club 

Martha Cook Dormitory . . . 

Masques 

Medical School 

Michigamua 

Michigan Alumnus 

Michigan Daily . ... 
Michigan Dames Association 

Michiganensian 

Michigan Law Review .... 
Michigan Technic ..... 
Michigan Union Campaign (Story) 
Michigan Union (Story) 
Michigan Union (Board of Directors) 
Michigan Union Opera Committees 

Mimes 

Monks 

Mortar Board 

Musical Clubs 

Newberry Residence Hall 

Nippon Club 

Nurses, U. of M 

Omega Phi 

Oratorical Board . . 
Oratory, The Year in (Story) . . 

Order of the Coif 

Owls 



74 
136 
165 
181 
206 
221 
237 
246 
249 
240 

470 

475 
50 
346 
337 
338 

425 
461 
448 

468 
474 

477 
176 
70 
399 
419 



628 
454 
202 
385 

56 
407 
369 
404 
410 
413 

47 
356 
358 
359 
451 
590 
392 
439 
626 
476 
248 

428 
418 
416 
376 
390 



Persephone Fete 353 

Pennsylvania Game (Story) 300 

Pharmical College 234 

Phi Alpha Tau 380 



Page 

Phi Lambda Upsilon 375 

Phoenix Club 592 

PrescottClub .......... 433 

Professional Fraternities (Order of Founding) 542 

Quarterdeck 432 

Regents, Board of 54 

Rifle Club 334 

Round-Up 464 

Scalp and Blade 467 

Senior Foresters 366 

Senior Society 391 

Sigma Xi 372 

Sophomore Prom Committee 462 

Sororities — 

Alpha Chi Omega 614 

Alpha Kpsilon Iota 608 

Alpha Phi 610 

Chi Omega 618 

Delta Delta Delta 624 

Delta Gamma 600 

Gamma Phi Beta 598 

Kappa Alpha Theta 612 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 606 

Mu Phi Epsilon 616 

Pi Beta Phi 604 

Sorosis 602 

Theta Phi Alpha 622 

Westminster House 620 

Sorority List, In Order of Establishment . . 5% 

Sphinx 393 

Statistics, Class — 

1916 Literary 126 

1916 Engineering 169 

1916 Law 199 

1916 Medical 216 

1916 Dental 232 

1916 Homeopathic 246 

Student Council 360 

Students' Directory 412 

Stylus . . . .' 429 

Symphonic League 455 

Tau Beta Pi 373 

Tau Sigma Delta 378 

Tennis (Varsity) 331 

Tennis (All-Fresh) 3^^^ 

Tennis Tournament Season 332 

Toastm asters 402 

Totem Club 473 

Track, (Varsity) . . 315 

Track, Record of Competition 316 

Track, Review of Season (Story) 325 

Track, Statistics of Meets 326, 330 

Triangles 394 

Trigon 584 

Underclass Contests (Story) 339 

University Band 441 

University of Michigan (Story) 39 

University Musical Society 456 

Vulcans 386 

Wearers of the " M " 340 

Wearers of the "aMa" 341 

Wearers of the "R" 342 

Wearers of the "1916" 343 

Web and Flange ^"*^^^ 

Webster f^4 

Women's Athletic Board 354 

Women's League (Execurive Board) .... 364 

Women's League (Judiciar>' Council) .... 365 

Woolsack 396 

Wyvern ^^^ 

Y. M. C. A. Students 363 

Y. W. C. A. Students 362 



682 



Index 



Abrams. Staats M 502, 359 

Achi, William C. Jr 459, 471 

Ackley, Marion \' 806, 629 

Adair, Anna O 78 

Adama, Arthur J 570, 442 

Adams, Coan H 500 

Adama, Fred M 524, 380 

Adams, George E 530, 78 

Adams, John H 500, 439 

Adams, John Q 425 

Adams, Theodore W 484 

Adams, Thomas R 484 

Adams, Victor 3d 568 

Adams, Wm. T 342, 418, 421, 423, 

426, 444 

Addison, Cornelius J 566. 208, 205 

Addison, Margaret E 624 

Adic, George C 524, 546 

Adler, Harry E 182 

Ahrens, Helen C 600, 440, 463 

Akers, Byran 510 

Akera, Geo. W 133, 432 

Alcox, Harry G 688 

Aldrich, Glen D 182, 534 

Aldrich, John A 64 

Aldrich, I^eonard O 439 

Alexander, Leslie L 490 

Alexander, Marj' L 627 

Alexander, Rutgers 574 

Allan, Edward R 138, 467 

Allan, Robert M 510, 439, 473 

Allee, William C 510, 270, 439 

Allen, Arthur D 566, 469 

Allen, Dorothy 602 

Allen, F. M 562 

Allen, H. Clement 520, 244, 242, 360 

Allen, Walter O 362 

Allerton, Hugh G 182, 560, 179, 388 

Allison, John L 138 

Allmendinger. Ernest J. .347, 78, 367, 343 

Altamirano. Felipe S 477, 432 

Altenburg, Jesse H 522 

Alton, Darrel D 534 

Altsheler. Yancy R.524, 258, 446. 468, 469 

Amis, Moss W 560 

Ammerman, Walter D 530, 138 

Amtsbuechlcr, Tony E. . .580, 347, 78, 343, 

423. 435 

Anderson, Carl A 588 

Anderson, Chas. E 558, 78 

Anderson, Chas. M 558 

Anderson, Chas. W. .550, 78. 307, 311, 341 

Anderson, Clinton P 422 

Anderson, Geo. R 558 

Anderson, Lucille S 629 

Anderson, 8imeon D 367 

Andrew, Harold 138 

Andrew, Neil G 530 

Andrews, Cecil C 584 

Andrew^s, Claire K 594 

Andrews, Horace J 64, 367 

Andrews, James C 367 

Andrews, Louis C 464 

Angell, James B., 2nd 486, 78, 72, 358 

Ankenbrandt, John A 238, 343 

Anschutz, Doris I 629 

Anschutz, Margaret 1 629 

Apel, Vera L 618, 629 

Apfel, EUa W 604, 392, 442, 443, 454 

Applegate, Joseph R 468 

Applogatc, Oliver C 475 

Archer, Robt. S. ... 138, 133, 373, 375, 413 
Arents, Ixmis A . . . 502, 306, 307, 311. 341 

Armstrong, Dorothy 500, 627. 368 

Armstrong, Floyd E 64 

Armstrong, Franklin G 582, 343 

Armstrong, Jeannette 364, 368. 428 

Arndt, Thomas C 514, 268, 470 

Arnof. Joseph M 528. 78 

Arnold, Ada C 627 

Arnold, Alfred L 546. 461 

Arnold, Effic E 608. 208, 205 

Arnold, John S 520 

Arnold, LeRoy D 367 

Arthur, EhzalK-th S 610, 428, 429 

Asersohn, Samuel 238, 236 

Ashbaugh, Chas . C 78, 439 

Askam, John C 79, 464 

Aspland, Herl>ert D 532 

cinson, Margaret W 627, 276 



At 

Atkinson, Thos. E. 
At 



560, 260 

as, Walter R 528, 439, 442, 446 

Atlee, Frank H 380. 530 

Attwood, Chas. W 263 

Attwood, Stephen S 269 



Atwater, Chas. L 590, 79 

Atwater, Earle D 590, 73, 343, 435 

Atwell, Wayne J 64 

Atwood, Theron W .560 

Augspurger, Stanley R 367 

Austin, Edith D 628 

Au Yong, Sum N 472 

•Avery, Margaret S 624 

Ayers, Ralph A 500 



B 



Babbitt, Shirley D 64 

Babcock, Harry A 182, 570 

Babel, Elmer H 138 

Bacher, Byrl F 368 

Bachers, Mildred A. 606, 79, 440, 445. 446 

Backus, Elsie L 278 

Backus, Geo. R 79 

Bacon, Arthur N 79, 441 

Bacon, Donald K 566, 79 

Bacon, Francis H 626 

Badgley, Carl E 594 

Bacr, Cornelius G 422 

Baer, FeUx S 470, 79, 387 

Bailey, Charles C 439 

Bailey, Cvril E 423 

Bailey, Ruth L 446, 463 

Baker, Gerald V 79, 343 

Baker, Rest R 630 

Baker, Robert H 566, 208, 205, 451 

Baldwin, John W 64 

Ball, Lloyd 79 

Ball, Robert B 534 

Ballard, Milner S 554 

Ballcntine, David R .. 80. 73, 387, 435, 439 

Balsom, Ruth G 628, 80, 445 

Bame, Robert W 594 

Bancroft, Arthur J 182, 520 

Bancroft, Henry L 424 

Bancroft, Huldah 64, 362, 368 

Bandemer, Solma L 629 

Bandemer, William E 526 

Banghart. I.ee E 538, 138 

Bangs, William A 6,38 

Barbarin, Rhea K 602, 629 

Barber, Elmer M 492 

Barber. Harold G 578, 439 

Barbour, Maurice A 138 

Baribeau, Chas. A 564 

Barie, Richard L 444 

Barker, John B 422, 80 

Barksdale, Julia N 604, 80 

Barlow, Herman E 562 

Barnard, Alice M 80, 440, 445 

Barnard, Burton 620 

Barnard, Harold D 658 

Barnard, Kenneth 496, 260 

Barnes, George A 182, 522, 179 

Barnes, Harold O 484 

Barnett, Glenn E 60 

Barnett, Harry C 64 

Barnett, Lester C 546 

Bamhart, Darwin S 486 

Barnum, Robert C 610, 435 

Barrett, Harvey E 138, 133, 432 

Barrett, James M 492, 572, 80, 73, 

^ 369, 385 

Barringer, Edna B 629 

Barringer, John H 564, 222, 220 

Barron. John C 268, 482, 462 

Bartelme, Eugene A . . .496, 259, 443, 470 

Bartelmv, Jeanette M 600 

Bartholf. Herlx'rt B. .494, 139, 133. 386, 

389, 464 

Bnrtlett, Herbert H 64 

Bartlett, Lawrence D 670, 464 

Bartlett, T. F 367 

Barton, Henry A 277 

Bash. Philip P 614 

Bassett, Margaret A 606, 251, 445 

Bastian, Clvde E. . . . 526. 80. 314, 316, 73, 

385, 293, 337, 141 

Bastin, Dorothv M 612 

Batcheller, Carl A 578 

Bateman, James L 532, 362 

Bates. Helen B 602 

Bate.s. Marjori*' F 628. 80 

Bathrrck. Donald I' 494 

Battles. Lloyd E 560 

Hnughman. Keith W 80 

Bauman, Muriel E 629 

Baumann, Milton C 506 

Bauingardner, Carlton M 492 

Baumgartner, Eldcn 5.58 

Bawden, Ruby E 81, 445 

Beachly, Frank J 524 



Beal, Trav. F 494 

Beals, Anita G 630 

Beam. Harold A 592 

Beaman, Bernard S 510 

Beardslee. Edgar V 208, 205 

Beardsley, Raymond R 626 

Beath, Charles P 303 

Beaven. Paul W 484, 271 

Beaver, Melvin M 498, 556, 81, 315, 73 

Becker, Fred A 606, 439 

Becker, George P 618, 343 

Becker, Harry F 614, 556, 278 

Becker, Myron G 566 

Beckwith, Hazel L 629, 276 

Beers, Julius L 494, 622, 560, 335 

Begole, Fred H 612, 81. 435 

Behn. William 562 

Beimheimer, L. B 558 

Bell, Ferdnand C 474, 606, 276 

Bell, Harry L 674, 179, 410, 468 

Bell. Jay T 570 

Bell, Paul P 670 

Bell, Wm. M 474 

Bellows. Ruth A 627 

Bellows, Willis A 532, 434 

Bement, Roberts E 490, 139, 133 

Bender, Norman C 538, 666, 467 

Benford, Lee G 474, 514 

Benjamin. Anne L 606 

Bcnnallack, Lois M 627 

Bennett, Albert A 64 

Bennett, Harry P 506 

Bennett, Merle F 439 

Bennett, Richard H 662 

Bennett, Robert H 494 

Bentley, Alvin M 347, 508, 81, 303, 

73, 337, 435 

Benton, George L 532 

Benton, William C 600, 468 

Berg, Roy E 470 

Bergman, Alfred E 166, 133 

Bergstrom, Victor W 668, 586 

Bcrgy, Gordon A 64 

Berkowitz, Jacob 139 

Berman, Robert 422 

Bcrns, Julius L 570 

Berray, Kenneth E.139, 314, 315. 341, 343 

Berry, Lathrop F 520 

Berthold, Theoder W 562 

Sevens, Clive H 303. 304 

Beverly, Best 1 81 

Beyer, Adele H 81, 73, 446 

Bialosky, Wm. J 528 

Bibber, Leon C 139, 432, 436 

Bibby, I^Roy H 534 

Biber, Edward A 342 

Bidwcll. Susie M 630 

Bierkamp. Kathryn 1 624, 81 

Bierwagen, Herbert M 532 

Biery, Homer D 514 

Biggers, Robert L 486 

Binns, Carl 614 

Bintz, Wesley 139 

Bird, E. H 139 

Birdsell. Margaret 606. 463 

Birdsell, Roger 303, 466 

Birmingham. Hobart M 602, 268 

Biabee, Elliot W 616, 81, 73 

Bisbee, Harvey J 280 

Bishop, Clark W 490 

Bixler, George W 342 

Black, Margaret G 82 

Black, S. Rexford 82, 366, 367, 464 

Blackwood, Jamea A 644, 182, 179 

Blair. Helen V 618, 82, 392, 429, 446 

Blake, Pansy Y 598, 463 

Blakeslee, Donald R 692 

Blanco, Galo W 477, 64, 536 

Blanco, Joa^ 477 

Blanding, James L 620 

Blanding, Virgil L 182, 620 

Bledaoo. VirgilT 512 

Bleekmaii, Geo. J 498 

Bliaa. Ella C 452 

Bliton, Alice 466 

Blodgett, Alice J 614 

Blomgren, Eric E 139 

Blomshield, Carl S 502, 140, 133 

Blomstrom, John E 439 

Blood. Frank L 534, 82 

Blowers, Raymond F 600 

Blumenthal, Belle J 629 

Bly, B. C 588 

Boell, Arthur F 473 

Boercke, Charles C 654 

Boericke, F. Wilkins 554 

Bogenreider, Margaret E 624. 82, 446 

Bogue, Arthur P 580, 424 



683 



Index — Continued 



Bohling, Henry S 208, 335. 482 

Bohn, Arthur 422 

Boice, Ralph E 444 

Bolen. Ethelyn 82, 73 

Bolles, Norman T 504. 359, 411 

Bolt, Arthur J 222, 220, 349 

Bolton, Edwin D 140, 133 

Bolton, Frank L 64 

Bond, Chester C 530 

Bond, James D 504 

Bond. Philip E o3l). 133, 367 

Bond, Walter E M 

Bonist«el, William J 433 

Bonney, Orris 269 

Boos, Charles F 502, 268, 418, 439 

Boos, Joseph M 526 

Borcherdt, Edward R 500, 335 

Borden. Berenice C 440 

Boston, Orlan W 64 

Bosworth. Chark'H A 556, 82 

Bothe, Frederick A 558 

Botthby, Russel M 508 

Bottje, Clifford 140, 133. 464 

Boucher, Justus J 562, 464 

Bouquin, Lester H 564, 222, 220, 349 

Bourke, Helen M 600, 368 

Bowcocke, Harold M 496, 82, 73 

Bowen, Eva M 598, 624 

Bowen, Paul M 484, 82, 73 

Bower, Helen C 606 

Bower, Lloyd L 273. 140. 489 

Bowerman, Etta A 64 

Bowers, Cyril 514 

Bowles, Florence E 624 

Bowles. George C 222 

Bowman, Merchant B 498 

Boyce, Charles W 594. 64 

Boyce, Harvey E 496 

Boyd, Alan W 498, 385, 341 

Boyd, Barnard F 534, 464 

Boyd, Linn J 554 

Boydell, John F 516 

Boynton, Grace M 64. 429 

Boynton, Lyman C 83 

Boser, Herrmann E 83 

Bradley. Albert 64 

Bradley, Charles A 518 

Bradner, Melvin 1 83. 365, 367, 464 

Brainard, Clifford W 556. 83. 441 

Brake, Clinton B 562 

Brand, Henry N 277 

Brandebury. Henrvetta 602, 629, 442 

Brandell, Elmer 347, 306. 307, 311, 387 

337, 343 

Brander, Helen S 602, 82, 370 

Brandstetter, Christina B 624, 83 

Branson, Harold W 367 

Braude, Jacob M 446 

Braun, Hugo E 506, 83 

Braun, Matilda 445 

Braxell. Nicholas J 342 

Brennan, Harold A 522, 273 

Brennan, Kathleen E 629 

Bretach, Albert W 140 

Brewbaker, Frank J 183 

Brewer, Howard H 590 

Breymann, Charles H 510 

Breymann, John B 516. 140, 132, 133. 

363, 386. 389. 390 

Bridge, Robert 83, 73 

Bridge, Robert S 588, 473 

Briggs, Charles E 538 

Briggs, Forrest S 475 

Briggs, Treva E 83 

Brigham, Reed O 64 

Brinkman, Fred A 532, 163, 378 

Britton, Edgar C 64 

Britton, Harold H 452 

Broadwell, Baxter L. T 496, 470 

Broberg, Walter M 367 

Brock, Arthur S 367 

Brock, Gertrude E 602 

Brock, Isaac V 452 

Brockman, Grover C 548 

Brockman, Paul L 222 

Brockway, Warner C 584 

Brodhead, Willis 488, 439 

Brodie, John G 552 

Broene, Frances M 627 

Brokenshire. John R 84 

Bromley, Edna E 624, 84 

Bromley. William L 474 

Bronson. Karl H 84 

Broomfield, Hcevillian C 222 

Brophy. George () 516 

Brotherton, Joseph J 490. 572 

Brotherton. Will:)er 490, 84. 72, 73, 

347, 343 

Brousseau, Edward W 469 

Brown. Alfred D 490 



Brown. Carl R 64 

Brown. Cecil A 498, 544, 451 

Brown. Charles A 534 

Brown. Donald R 350, 426 

Brown, Edmund M 534 

Brown, Fanny C 612 

Brown, George A 520, 548 

Brown, Helen S 610. 463 

Brown. Howard D..560. 183. 179. 348. 388 

Brown, J. Martin 594. 140, 133 

Brown, James C 475 

Brown, L 367 

Brown, Mary D 602 

Brown, Norman F 140, 430, 431 

Brown, Ray E 578 

Brown, Raymond P 498 

Brown. Robert G.. .550, 238. 236, 376, 433 

Brown, Roy O 84 

Brown, Ruth 1 610, 84, 73. 364. 

392 452 

Brown. Vera H 618i 440 

Brown, W. E 524 

Brownell, Morton E 556, 208, 205 

Brownell, Robert O 570. 183, 178, 179, 

348, 388 

Brownlee, William G 490, 462 

Brownrigg, William G 522, 412 

Bruch, Louis M 183, 494. 544, 179 

385, 343, 470 

Bruch, Merritt 494 

Brucker, Edward F 506, 140 

Brucker, Lewis S 380 

Brucker, Wilber M 183, 580, 179, 418, 

420 425 426 

Brundidge, Moses M 524! 273,* 469 

Bryant. Leon D 222. 367 

Buchanan, Arthur B 474 

Buchhagen. Walter H 530 

Buchler. Clifford, C 466 

Buck, Zeltah P 64 

Buckendale, Lawrence R 592, 141 

Buckmaster. DeForest W 520 

Buell, Charles E 626. 386 

Buell. Yarr>' C 141. 133, 431 

Bulkley, Leavitt J 486 

BuUen, Guy R 554 

Bulson, Eugene L 646, 482 

Bulyea, Lona J 208 

Burby, William E 375 

Burchard, Laurence W 520, 315 

Burdick, Kenneth W 84 

Burge, Kemp S 584, 258, 359, 451, 468 

Burgess, Elisabeth M 600, 368 

Burghard, Robert J 620, 648 

Burkhart, Richard H 482 

Burkholder, M. P 516 

Burkley, Ruth O 84 

Burnell, Max R 646 

Burnett, Orville P 367 

Burnett, Verne E 572, 422 

Bumey, Antony N 342 

Burns, Claude M 692, 413 

Burr, Alfred J 441 

Burr, Horace B 562 

Burrell, Arthur A.. .526, 141, 133, 373, 412 

Burrows, George H 273 

Burrows, Julian S 484 

Burtless, Alice M 624, 368, 463 

Burton, Harold W 473 

Bury, Esther L 610, 85, 73 

Busman, George J 562. 84 

Butler. Edith P 604, 368, 429 

Butler, Edward Clarence 183, 426 

Butler, Robert 680 

Butler, Ronald A 574, 508. 85 

Butler. Ruth 614, 628, 440 

Buttermore, Joseph R 474 

Buzbee, Alvin S 574 

Byrkit, George W 586 



C 



Cadwallader, Asa G 141 

Cady, Fred J 554 

Caffey, Benjamin 183. 520 

Caffey. John P 520. 546. 278 

Caley. Marguerite 614, 85, 73, 440 

Calhoun. Henrietta A 608, 261 

Calhoun, Wilbur P 64 

Calvin, Harry L., Jr 490, 385, 341 

Cameron, Ancil W 367 

Cameron, Donald E. A 520, 166 

Cameron, John D 163, 470 

Cameron, Michael C 350 

Camins, Helen Clara 622, 630 

Campbell. Duncan 208, 205 

Campbell, Ella M 85. 451 

Campbell. Gordon 518, 446 

Campbell, John A 564 



Campbell, Morse D 574 

Campbell, William B 504 

Campbell, WilUam J 518, 85 

Caneco, Raul S 477 

Canfield, Dudley V 520 

Cannon, Lucy M 440 

Cardinal, Arthur J 350 

Carey, Harrj- M 584, 367 

Carey, James W 238 

Carl, WilUam A 5.38 

Carlisle, Marjorie M 626, 86, 368 

Carlson, Harry 380, 520. 439, 451, 461 

Carlton. MurlC 183, 580. 380, 424 

Carman, Ralph K 526 

Carnegie, Lillian 618, 440 

Caron. Geo. C 516. 560 

Carpenter, Mildred 602. 368, 428 

Carpenter. Ruth M 604, 392 

Carpenter, Hprague F 564 

Carpenter, William R 590. 425 

Carrick, Paul E 508 

Carroll. Eber M 538, 85, 423 

Carroll. H. Leslie 616. 259. 314, 315. 

320. 360. 330. 337 

Carroll, Philip 441 

Carritte. John P.. Jr 590 

Carson, Ralph M 360. 422, 452 

Carstarphen, James H 183 

Cartwright, James H 570. 470 

Cary, N. Leroy 64 

Case, Aileen E 612. 627 

Case, Kenyon H 367 

Case, WilUam J 592 

Casgrain, Geo. H 486 

Casgrain, Wilfred V 486, 462 

Castle, Arthur B 441 

Casto, Geo. D 64 

Caswell, Harrison H 307, 311. 386, 341 

Catlett, Jas. B 512. 644, 315, 285. 

290. 337, 341, 343 

Caughey, Sarah R 452 

Caulkins, Henry L 492 

Cavanaugh, Ruth 614 

Champion, Helen L 618, 428. 445, 464 

Champion, Paul U 524 

Champlin, Hannah 1 624. 627 

ChampUn, Paulene M 624, 446, 463 

Chapman, Herman 423 

Chase, John M 474, 432 

Chatfield, Robert D 141 

Chow. Chung Ki 472 

Cheffy. Geo. L 576, 263 

Chen. Ta Che 472 

Chen. Te Fen 64 

Chen, Yu Soo 472, 64 

Chenot, James E 574, 85. 72, 347. 

343. 446 

Cherry. Harold M 467 

Cherry, Ulysses S. G 500, 335 

Chichester, Geo. C..564, 222, 220. 349, 390 

Chipman, Dorothy J 604 

Chipman, WilUam J 46S 

Chisum, Gaylord H 1H4 

Cholette. Paul E 588. 422 

Christa, Milton P 592 

Christen, Helen F. A 604, 629 

Christensen, Clarence A 208, 205 

Christenson. Ann 624, 368 

Christiansen, Geo. W 530 

Christiansen, Harry 558. 141 

Christman. Ralph E 64, 375 

Chrouch, Lawrence A. S 562 

Church, Conrad N 572 

Church, Fiske 8 590 

Church, Harold C 473 

Chute, Aaron H 8r> 

Chynoweth, Beryl M 629 

Claasscn, George C.418, 419, 421, 424. 426 

Clapp, Kenneth S 502. H6 

Clapperton. Geo. D 498, 270 

Clark, Daniel 56H 

Clark, Albert A 484 

Clark, Albert L., Jr 367 

Clark, Ben R 498, 444 

Clark, Charles S., Jr 504 

Clark, Chester W 498, 444 

Clark, Fitzgerald H 520 

Clark, Harry M 530 

CUrk. Helen L 606. 628, <>4 

Clark, Irving B 3:i4 

Clark Jas P . 424 

Clark! John F . . ". . '. . 141 ', 373, 386. 43 1 

Clark. John S 475 

Clark. Robert W 64 

Clark. Stevens 500 

Clarke. Arrine N 431 

Clarke. Charles W 526 

Clarke. Daniel M 244. 242 

Clawson. Harry B 86 

Clay, Lloyd R 654. 244. 242 



684 



Index — Continued 



Cleary, Robert M 268 

Clement, Walter J 508 

Cleveland, DouRlaa 8 494 

Clift. Lyle M 184. 520, 179. 

376, 410. 451 

Cline, Doris A 629 

Clostjcr. Arvilla R 86 

Cobb. Myra K 86, 440 

Coblentz. Howard B 580 

Cobum, Catherine R 614 

Coburn, Marcia M 614 

Cochran, John H 464 

Cochran. William D. . . .512, 141. 238, 285. 
236, 377, 287, 337, 343, 385 

Codd, John W 486 

Code, WilUam E 142. 464 

Coffin. John G 514 

Cohen. Samuel 424 

Cohen. Samuel L 528 

Cohn. Alfred H 467 

Cohn, Herman T 470 

Cohn, Hermione W 629 

Cohn, Samuel F 381 

Coil, Harolds 64 

Colby. Lueille 629. 445 

Coleord. Alice B 629. 152 

Colden, John P 270 

Coldren, Cassius M 566 

Coldren, Helen M 604, 628. 629 

Cole. Charles D 222, 220 

Colo. Cyril L 514 

Cole. Herman H 498. 546 

Coleman, Asa F 475 

Collier. Ralph P 422 

CollinRwood, Geo. H 64 

Collins. Carroll W 522 

Collins, Harold W .588 

Collins, Robt. W 508, 359. 442. 469 

Collins. Russell S 86. 73. 360. 380. 451 

Compton. Boyd M 504. 86. 73. 282 

Comstook. Joseph B 560. 439 

Cone. Floyd W 473 

Conser. Allen C 64 

Conkey. Albert D 572. 8A. 411 

Conklin, Theodore H.. . .494. 546. 278, 46i 

Connelly, Jack H. Jr 516 

Constain. Manuel J 477 

Cook. Esther A 610. 86. 73 

Cook. Florentine 604. 628 

Cook. Grant L 570, 260, 360. 418. 

442 443 451 

Cooke, Gordon D 142! 133.' 413 

Cooke, William L 142, 133. 423 

Cooley, Margaret H 602. 463 

Cooley, Rutner H 87 

Coon, Alurray A 474 

Coons. John D 568, 142 

Cooper, Florence H 629 

Cooper. Goorue S 570. 179 

Cooper. Hester L 598 

Cooper. I^^igh G 64 

Cooper. Lewis D., Jr 184. 179 

Coombe. Philip A 64 

Coram, Edward J 494 

Corbin, Cecil B 314, 315, 337 

Corey, Clenevieve B 604, 87 

Corey. Horace M. H 534. 142. 133 

Cork. James M 347. 87. 73. 387. 343 

Coriett, Robt. C 496 

Cornelius. R 494. 3:)3 

Cornell. Dana R 142 

Cornell. Mariola 602. 87, 362, 368 

Cornwell. Marie 606, 446 

Corsett, Harol 1 L 578. 166. I(i3 

Cortright. Lisle C 441 

Cosgrove. Carson A 498 

Costa, Charles 550. 238. 236. 433 

Cote. Dona J 223. 220 

Cotner. Frank B 568. 87 

Cotter, Cari H 142 

Cottington, Charles H 496. 470 

Cotton, John V 468 

Cotton, Joseph R. .419. 420, 422. 425. 426 

Cottrille. William H 64 

Coughlin. Francis D 578. 160. 163 

Coulter, Glenn M 588, 270. 87. 385 

Cousinean, Adelard B Ftl) 

Covert. Harold E 496 

Covey. Blanche R 622. 360. 452 

Covey. I>»o F 570 

Cowan. Harry C .562 

Cowan, Walter (J 562 

Cowen, Holland M 494 

Cowin. Roy B 87 

Cowing, Glen L IH4 

Cowley, Bertha L 626. 87 

Cowlin, Henry L 570 

Cox, Theodore 8 586, 466 

Crabbs, Donald W .508. 441 

Craig, Glen M 474 



Craig, William D 486 

Cramer, Harold C 474, 538, 350 

Crandall, Adele L 442, 445. 446, 454 

Crandal, Ethel E 598 

Crane. Ethel T 618, 87 

Craven, Robert C 552" 

Crawford, Carleton H 580 

Crawford, Charles B 500, 88, 73, 331 

Crawford, George B 88 

Crawford, Norman F 574, 184, 424 

Crawford, WilUam J. Jr. 520, 166, 163, 467 

Creager, Henry C 280 

Crego, Clarence H 469 

Crissey, Mildred J 626 

Crissman, Ira S 142 

Criswell, Margaret A 618 

Crockett, Margaret E 88, 368 

Crockett, Wendell F 88, 419 

Cronin, Daniel H 88 

Cron, Roland S 556 

Crosby. Charles W 142 

Crosby. Haxeldean B 616 

Crosby, Paul S 548 

Cross, Arthur C 64 

Cross, Cecil F 314, 315, 323, 337 

Cross, Don 550 

Crossland. John R 640 

Grossman. Leland E 64 

Cruise. John D 516 

Crumpaoker. Edgar D 508. 314. 315, 

386, 389. 341 

Cruse, William R 473 

Crusins, Geo. H 223 

Cudlip, Merlin A 538 

CulUn, Helen M 627 

Cummings, Earl W 550, 592, 238, 236 

Cummings, Margaret E 627 

Cummins, Harold 568 

Cummins. Roscoe D 548, 223, 220. 464 

Cunliffe, Rex B 88, 423 

Cunningham, Leon M 88, 442, 451 

Curby, Lloyd J 570, 446 

Currey. Meroe 618. 88 

Currier. FreJ P 558. 209. 204, 205 

Curtiss. Guy C 592, 143, 334 

Cushing, Frances A 88 

Cuthbert. Ivan N 64 

Cutting, Katherine 598. 64, 378 

Cutting, Maxwell, B 538. 334, 441 



D 



Dahling, Louis Fred. 570, 260 

Dake, Henry Frederick 498 

Daliell, Wynter W 143 

Daniels, Edgar Eugene 464 

Daniels. George B 514. 412 

Darnall. Joseph R 566, 271, 466 

Darnall, William M 506, 466 

Daugherty, Cari R 143, 133 

Daugherty, Robert S 498 

Davenport. Harold D 520. 166 

David. Rol>ert F 614 

Davids. Wilfred A 592, 223, 220 

Davidson, Donald C 504, 470 

Davidson, Harold M 64 

Davidson, Norman H 538, 143 

Davidson. Otto C. Jr 538 

Davies. Willard J 664 

Davis, Helen G 602. 626, 360, 452 

Davis. Helen 1 629 

Davis, Horace* 439, 518, 522, 380, 444 

Davis, James E 64 

Davis. Paul 532. 273. 434 

Davis. Winfield C 494 

Davy. Winifred 614. 364 

Dawson, Bernhard H 444 

Day. Marcus 514 

Dav. Raymond G 584 

Day, Robert G 270 

Deahl, O. R 184, 516 

Dean, Howard R 534 

Debayle. Luis M 477. 536 

DeButts. Dean J 490. 470 

Decker. Charies S 484 

De«'. Florence A 452 

Deger. l^on J 552. 223, 220 

Do Juan, Abel 536 

DeKruif. Mrs. Mary F 608, 209 

De Liefde. Jacob 223 

Dollinger, CM 143. 431 

de Lorimier. Alfred J .5.32.425 

del Valle. Francisco de A. . .477, 536, 143, 

431 
del Valle. Manvel A . .477. 536. 143. 133, 

373, 375. 446 

Demmon. Gertrude O 627. 5 

Dennis. John H 143 

Dennis. Will E 223 



Derrinsijiani Mihram K 209 

Des JardiDB, Clarence C 143 

Dee Jardins. Ernest E 592 

Devereaux. Lois A 610 

DeWitt, Clinton F 504 

Diamond, Jean L 616 

Dibble, Lester C 574 

Dickerson, Don D 516 

Dickie, Ralph E 476 

Diederichs, Leonard P 560 

Diegelman, Albert G 474 

Dies, Wm. P 64 

EWeterioh, Louis F 524, 461, 466 

Dieterle, Herbert D 668 

Dieterle. Hilda P 445 

Dieterle, John O 209, 205 

Dieterle, Robert R 618, 439 

Dignan, Edward J 650 

Dillman. Earnest J 532, 144, 386 

Dillon, Joe 470, 238, 236 

Dimond, Linton B 614 

Dinwiddie, WilUam S 488. 462 

Diss, Dorothy H 612 

Dixon, Walter J 534, 273 

Doan, Leland 1 500 

Dodd, RuescU 686, 367 

Dodge, RusseU A 144, 133 

Doherty, Katherine M 622, 446 

Dohmew, Anton J., Jr 534 

Dolph, Norman L 144, 431 

Donahue, Thomas L 442 

Donald, Douglas 486, 666 

Donaldson, Bryant W 614 

Donaldson, I.k>is E 620 

Donaldson, Robert A 514 

Donaldson, Sam W.556, 209, 204. 390, 343 

Donnelly, Herbert H 646 

Donnelly, Howard A 314, 316. 322. 

330. 337 

Donnelly, J. L 184. 660 

Dooge. Bastian R 612 

Dorranoe. Albert A 614. 342 

Dorsoy. James A 498 

Dott. Robert H 367 

Doty. Merle B 626 

Dougherty. Daniel J 650 

Dougherty, EUzabeth W 452 

Douglas, Lome J 144 

Douglas, Margaret 618 

Douglas, Margaretta B 612, 360 

Dow, Helen 610, 464 

Dow, Ruth A 610 

Dow, Willard H 608 

Dowd, WilUam C 375, 464 

DoweU, Glover E 184 

Dowling, Annabel M 616 

Doyle. Kenneth O 670 

Drake, Donald M 494, 144 

Drake, Harcourt C 144 

Drake, Herbert E 498 

Drake, Mary E 614 

Draper, Arthur B 439 

Drats, Ferdinand G 522, 564, 223 

Dreese, Erwin E 423 

Dressier, WUliam J 452 

DriscoU, James L 616, 439 

Driver, James W 650 

Dubee, Stuart W 506, 144, 133 

Dudley, Elbridge Gerry, Jr 502, 462 

DueU, Lena P 64 

DuemUng, Editha M 630 

Duemling, Jenny A 630 

Duffield, Henry C 486 

Dugan. WilUam M 546, 209, 204. 205 

Dumont, Anna G 608, 209, 204, 206 

Dunlop, Henry D 223 

Dunn, Edith E 622, 630 

Dunn, Robert H 303, 304 

Dunne, Maurice F 496, 260, 285. 

292. 340. 451 
Dunten, Louie H 186, 580. 179. 380, 

418. 425. 435 

Dunten, Paul R 614, 260 

Durfee, Dorothy 698. 627, 364 

Durling. James K 554, 279 



E 



Easley, Harold M 439 

Eastman, Raye C 522 

Easton. Moraoe S 532 

Easton. Ray G 534 

Eaton, William R 209 

Eatore, Stanley H 500 

Eberbach, Carl W 374, 646, 209. 205 

Eberbach. Lynda E 698 

Eddy. Rhea 1 627 

Edloff, Ethan E 166 

Edwards, Grace £ 629 



685 



Index — Continued 



Edwarda, William C 518 

Edwardfl, William J 574 

Egan, William J 556, 210, 358 

Eger, Paul G 185, 580, 179, 

343. 412, 424 

Eggers, W. Howard 520 

Eggert, Sydney V 303, 304 

Eggerth, Arnold H 64 

Egglestone, Phyllis 608. 452 

EhJert, George M 64 

Ehrlicher. Arthur W 538 

Eislie, Dana C 562 

Elder. Mary E 64 

Elliott. Beflsie M 455 

Elliott. Douglas S 512 

Elliott, Roy W 506 

Elliott, Ruth 624, 445 

Ellis, George M 474 

Ellis, R. Earl 524 

EUis, Remington 367 

Ellison, Irving S 530 

Elton, Alexander S 490, 470 

Ely, Helen R 598, 73, 364. 392. 

428, 442, 454 

Ely, Ruth B 598 

Emerick, Stanley H 586 

Emerman, Louis B 424 

Emerson, Crystal G 628 

Emerson. Pauline O 442, 452 

Emerson, Samuel 1 474 

Emery, Clayton S 494, 554 

Emory, Grace D 627 

Emery, John H 516 

Emmons, Francis J 530 

Emmons. Samuel E 373. 516. 144 

Eness. Margurette H 622. 364, 446 

Engel, John H 526, 473 

Engels, Theodore V 552 

Erickson. Arthur G 64 

Erickaon, Arvid W 558 

ErickBon, Mary J 608. 261 

Erley, Robert H 474 

Erwm. Emma J 628 

Erwin. John M 632 

Essey, William E 185, 179 

Estabrook. Dwight G 514, 367. 439 

Estevcs. Carlos S 536, 477 

Eugenides. Eugene K 144 

Evans. Anna L 540 

Evans, Leon S 540 

Evans. Porter H 64 

Evenson, William G 441 

Everett. Charles A S06. 64. 145. 133 

Everett. Edward S 64 

Everts. Frank G 512 

Ewert. Howard W 342 

Ewing, (Mrs.) Carlotta B 64 

Ewing, Margaret A 612 

Eyler, Louise 452 

Eyster, Carlo M 578 



Faber, Walter William 502 

Farr, Fred E 514 

Farrar, Zella B 370 

Faunce, William K 510 

Fauntleroy, Eugene G 492 

Fee, Joseph H 490 

Feige. Laura 392. 614, 362. 368. 440 

Feldkamp. Helen E 612. 626 

Felger, Rudolph G 145 

Fellows. Bert 562 

Fellows, Perry A 64 

Felt, Edwin H 439, 466 

Ferguson, George R 367 

Ferguson, Keith R..185, 178. 179. 340, 343 

Ferguson, Lyman A 566. 261. 464 

Ferrell, Mark 534. 92, 441 

Ferris, John H 508, 314, 315, 323, 343 

Ficken, Richard O 64 

Field, Florence E 64 

Field, George L 530 

Field. Nellie G 441 

Field, Paul L 921, 441 

Fikret, Haloup H 145, 133 

Fildew, Stanley L 422 

Fillingham, Erinina G 624, 92, 445 

Finch, Leo O 548 

Fink, David H 425 

Finkbeiner, Donald A 492 

Finkclhor, Maurice 475 

Finkenstaedt, John W. . .385, 492, 92. 315. 

350. 282, 451 

Finkle, E. Weaver 185, 179 

Finn, James C 498 

Finzel, George K 550. 377 

Fischback. Julius, Jr 439 

Fischer. Charles W 502 



Fischer, Gerald J 504 

Fish, Alice M 618 

Fisher. Charles E 462 

Fisher. Etta 92 

Fisher. George E 586. 439 

•Fisher. Leonard P 552. 224. 220 

Fishleigh, Clarence T 512 

Fisk. John K 367 

Fitch, Ada 627, 440 

Fitch, Albert L 64 

Fitch. Ferris H 260 

Fitts. Maurice R 185. 544. 179. 390 

Fitzgerald, Harold A 484, 572. 411 

Flaitz. Donald M 500 

Fleck. Edwin H 64 

Fleischhauer, Hudson W 508 

Fleming, Capen A 64 

Fleming, Hart H ,588 

Fleming, Rosalynd Z 618 

Fletcher, Grace 1 600. 92. 362, 365, 

368. 392 

Flink. Hilda M 629. 440 

Floss, Carl W 473 

Flucgcl. Marie E 445 

Fogle. Elmer P 514, 474 

Foley. Albert C 367. 470 

Folks. Carl 185. 580, 514, 179 

Foltz. Ray D 530 

Folx, Ralph E 411 

Fonda, Roy W 564 

Fong, Yue C 472 

Fontanna, Stanley G 538, 314, 315, 

322, 367, 341 

Forbus, L. W 424 

Ford, F. E 64 

Fordney, Cheater L 335. 442, 448. 464 

Forsythe. Harold B 439. 451 

Fort. William H., Jr 92 

Foss. Geo. A 590. 93 

Fotis, John F 558, 94 

Foster. Hazen 594 

Foster. Lenius J 464 

Fox. George B 94. 314, 315, 319. 73. 

387. 343, 435 

Frackelton. Ralph J 518. 94 

Franehot. Reginald Stott 494 

Frank. F. C 564 

Frank. Walter N 526 

Franke. John B 576 

Frankel. Samuel D 418. 421, 425 

Franklin, Wells A 50 

Frantz, Robert B 520, 434, 461 

Frary, Gerald S 185, 496, 178. 179. 388 

Frasier. James M 494. 464 

Freeman, Frank 504 

French, Donald A 592 

French, Horace L 554 

Fricke, Fred 64 

Friedman, Joseph B 50 

Friedrich, Alfred S 502, 94 

Frisbie, Charles J 94, 446 

Froemke. Fayette L 496 

Frost. Harvey L 73 

Fry. Lynn W 576 

Fu. Chung C 64 

Fullorton. Benjamin R 516 

Fullerton. Harold O 280 

Funk. L. D 343. 514. 562. 205 

Furgason. Clyde A 568 

Furlow. George W 508 

Furman. John L .50 

Furniss. Irene L 616 

Funiya. Nober 64, 476 

Fuss, Chester G 550 



G 



Gabriel, Arthur G 473 

Gabriel, Edith C 630, 94, 445 

Gaddis, Byron J 145 

Gaflfney, James A 548. 224 

Gage, Helen B 608, 94 

Gaines. Groeso G 606. 627 

Gaines, Honor W 606. 94. 73. 42« 

Galbraith, Evan G..374. 556. 210. 205, 468 

Gallmeyer. Luella 618, 94 

Galloway. Robin A 466 

Gallup, Eli A 64. 367 

Galton, Marion C 629. 463 

Gans, Albert J 95, 72. 73. 418, 468 

Garagty, Louise M 608 

Gardiner, John L 496. 277, 389 

Gardner, David E 512, 133 

Gardner. Dick B 498. 359, 461 

Gardner, Julius Stanley S 210 

Gardnor, Robt. M 552 

Garland. Charles C 516, 367 

Garner, Myron E 474 



Garrelson, William V 64 

Garrett, Freda L 620, 364 

Garrett, Thos. C 506 

Garvey, John L 538 

Garrison. Herbert C 584 

Garvin, V''ernice J 614. 95 

Gascho, Clarence 422 

Gates, Flora B 626 

Gates, John L 343, 242 

Gates, Ralph F . . .• 570, 475 

Gault. Harry G 544, 588 

Gault, Ralph 422 

Gay. R. V 422 

Gelhaar, Earl A 586, 350 

Gellert, H. Howard 452 

George, Ernest E. M 588 

George, Florence L 598 

George, Richard E 473 

Gerber, Florence C 95, 391. 445 

Gerbstadt. Frederick 564 

Gerhardt. William F 494 

German, William M 496 

Germanson. Rudolph C 512 

Gemt, Walter C 526, 259, 473 

Getty, Ross T 552, 262 

Gibbs. Earle W 95 

Gibson. Deborah M 95, 368 

Gibson, Helen J 614 

Gibson, Paul E 534 

Giddings, Irma H 626, 445 

Giflford, Helen G 600 

Gilbert. Charles D 586 

Gillette, Norris W 556. 261 

Gilliom. Noah B 185, 580 

Gilmour, Robert A 95, 441 

Ginn, Lloyd T 592 

Ginsburg, Golda Y 628, 370, 428 

Girvin, Beatrice 1 618 

Gir\nn, Willard S 512, 145, 467 

Given, Eugene 475 

Given, WiUiam G 145 

Gladhill, Harold E 367 

Glass, Harriet E 606 

Glanz, Ethel H 627. 370 

Gleichauf, Ralph J 502, 95 

Glcichauf . Ray E 502. 95 

Glenim. James 548 

Globensky, I^o M 548. 224, 220 

Gnahn, Edward B 96 

Goethel, Emil C 64 

Goetz, Frank R 272, 350 

Goetz, Harold W 166 

Golden, Edward R 530, 268 

Golden, James S 574, 468 

Goldman, .\bncr H 186 

Goldsmith, Norton G 468 

Goldstein, Morton 145, 528. 432 

Golinvaux. Harold N 578 

Gombrig. Melvin R 470 

Gonnc. WilUam S 546 

Goodrich, Franrw L. D 64 

Goodrich, Harriett W 96 

Goodrich. Robert M 584 

Goodsell. John O.. Jr 548. 350 

Goodspced. Harrison 486. 269 

Goodwin, Mvrle E 475 

Goodwin. William J 186. 179. 524. 343. 

420, 425. 468. 469. 426 

Gordon. Benj. B 424 

Gordon, Ilah M 626, 96 

Gordon. Randolph 510, 468 

Gordon. Richard E 562 

Gordon. William H 562 

Gore, Roscoe C 145, 133 

Gorman, Agnes H 598 

Gorman, Edward J 422 

Gorman. Frank A 272 

Gormsen. Carl E 522 

Gornetzky. Abraham J 439. 451 

Gose. Inez M 618. 440, 442 

Goshorn, Clarence B 64 

Goes, Samuel G 492 

Gotfredson. Robt. B 496 

Gothold, David J 166. 163 

Gotschall. Ncal D 548 

Gould, Frederick E 2S2 

Gould. Louise J 602. 463 

Gourley. Helen J 620 

Gourley, Margaret T 452 

Grace, J. Beatrice 624. 627 

Graham. Doughis A 592. 96 

Graham. Glenn A 552 

Graham. Harold W 367 

Grajewski. Bruno L 224, 220 

Grammar. Alva W 425 

Grandy. Helen H 600 

Granse, William 588 

Grant. J. B 556 

Graves, Carmen R 606, 370 

Graves, J. Lloyd 552 



686 



Index — Continued 



Gray, Howard 576, 441 

Gray. Martha C 604. 96. 364, 429, 454 

Green, Clarence P 145 

Green. Helen M 604 

Greenberger, Solbert L 528 

Grcenblatt, Morriis 146 

Greenebaum, Leon 270 

Greenfield. William J 562 

Greening, Gertrude J 618 

Greening, Gladys E 624 

Greenspahn, Samuel 470 

Greenthal, Roy M 528 

Grenell. Arthur F 146. 133, 373 

Gressman, William A 96 

Grice, Louis W 554 

Grierson, Anthony R 55S 

Gries, Walter F 276 

Grieamer. Carl P 594 

Griffith, Howard D 580, 96, 435 

Grimes, Davenport J 540, 224 

Grenstead, Durward 186. 451, 468 

Griswold, William C 96 

Grover, Clara H 602 

Grover, B'rank W 380, 518, 439, 451 

Groves, Harold E 508 

Groves, Jas. T 516 

Grylls. Humphrey M. K 488, 146, 133 

Grylls, Richard O 488 

Grusa. Dorothy W 627, 370 

Gubbins, William W 530 

Gudakunst. Don W 566 

Guernsey, Martha 618 

Guerrierr, Joa6 477 

Guilfoil, Kelsey 452, 470 

Guilford, Frances M 614 

Guillermety, Vincent 477 

Gunn, Gertrude E 627 

Gunter, Frank M 426, 475 

Gurevich, Louis J 146 

Gustin, Herbert A 498 

Guthe, Ida B 600 



H 



Haag, Merit D 566, 73, 439, 441 

Haan, Edward H 590 

Haas, Charley L 530, 444, 474 

Haas, Clifford P 564, 224, 220 

Hackman, Harry C 558, 210 

Hackney, Earl N 186, 514 

Hadjisky. Joseph N 146, 471 

Hadley, Laurence B 506, 146, 470 

Had ey, Arthur H 652, 224, 220, 350 

Hadley, Robert W 496 

Hafford. Doris L 600 

Hagen, Grace K 606, 452 

Hager. Gerald H 594. 270, 425 

Hagerty. Hilda K 606 

Haigh, Andrew C 490 

Haigh, Richard A 490 

Haines, Everett 468 

Haire. Katharine 1 614 

Halfhill, James W ,506 

Hall, AUce M 616 

Hall, Dorothy 269 

Hall, Elizabeth O 608 

Hall, Fay S 604 

Hall, Gerald G 548 

Hall, Lucile E 027 

Hall, Mabel L 628. 629. 463 

Hall, Reese A 270, 133 

Hall. Ruby M 97, 391 

Hall, Russell A 146 

Hall. Sarah A 604 

Hall, Wallace C 574. 422 

Haller, Paul M 411, 444 

Halliday, Frank J 389, 464 

Halstead, Robert H 496, 441 

Hameleff, Pet«r C 146 

Hamill, Jack H 558, 261 

Hamilton, Gladvs I 364 

Hamilton. Joe. N 97, 435 

Hammond, Arthur E 564, 441 

Hammond, George B 167, 163, 378 

Hammond, Maurice E 280 

Hampton, John P 434 

Hand, Don N 508 

Handibo, Kathryn F 371) 

Handy, Lee D 538 

Hanish, Joseph A 524. 303. 304 

Hanna, Jay E 514, 97 

Hannan, Berenice M 391, 97 

Hansen, William C 514 

Harbert, Ralph W 494 

Harden, Elmer P 466 

Hardy. Charies E 530 

Hargrove, RoUin B 468 

Harkins, Bernard E 4(>4 

Harmon, Austin C 482 



Harrington, Katherine W 428 

Harris, Arthur O 518. 467 

Harris, Benjamin 424 

Harris, Clinton P 588, 146, 133, 389 

Harris, Elsa J 610 

Harris, Lyle F 524 

Harrison, Arthur S 552 

Harrison, Fred H 205, 546, 97, 210 

Harryman, Ward W 494 

Hart, Abraham S 359, 360, 470 

Hart, Henry C 270 

Hart. Joseph P 486 

Hart. Tom A 422 

Hartesveldt, PA 186, 179, 439 

Hartsig, Jane O 364, 440 

Hartt, Earl W 186 

HartweU, Edward W 367 

Harvey, Campbell 526, 546 

Harvey, Edith M 612, 370 

Haskell, De Vere C 97 

Haskina, Ralph L 97, 73, 435 

Hastings, Albert B 518 

Hatch. Howard S 586 

Hatch, Hyatt C 510, 470 

Hatch, Mildred A 616 

Hathaway, John H 422 

Haukc, Gilbert F 466 

Hauser, Edward 303 

Haven, Merwin 464 

Hawk, Henry C, Jr 494 

Hawkes, Edward E., Jr 494 

Hawn, Joseph R 564, 224, 220, 466 

Haxton, Florence G 429 

Hayden, Herbert P 97. 347 

Hayes, Ethel K 606 

Hayes, Geneva K 604 

Haynes, PhiUp E 568. 244. 242 

Hayward, Ralph A 524 

Hazel, James K 452 

Hazen. E. P 504 

Headman. Edward C. . .389. 147, 132, 133. 

343 

Heath. Ada F 598. 463 

Heath. Clyde H 474 

Heath. Clyde J 498 

Heath. Parker 556 

Hocht, lister S 425 

Hoffelbower, Altha B 628, 97, 445 

Heffron, Howard H 508 

Heideman, Julia 442 

Heideman, Miriam 628. 370 

Heimann, Emanuel H 528, 470 

Heine, Austin W^ 558 

Heinrich, Kenneth W 586. 147, 432 

Heist, John A. .484, 572, 98, 387, 411, 470 

Hold, Harold E 98 

Helraer, Walter S 147 

Hendershot, Fred 342 

Henderson, Harold 374, 558, 210, 

205, 360, 474 

'Henderson, Margaret 610, 445 

Henderson. Marian M 604, 630 

Henderson, William O'B 588, 147. 133, 

363, 343 

Hcnkel. Margaret M 445 

Henningor, Chester G 576, 163 

Henze, Hermann 538 

Herbert, Jules J 594 

Herbert, Victor H 594, 98 

Hernander, Jos^ M 536, 477 

Herr, Jesse J 186, 470 

Herrick, Erwin J 475 

Herrick, Gerald A 520 

Herrick, Jay H 552 

Herring, John A 335. 646, 210 

Herrmann, George R 556, 98 

Herach, Samuel 147 

Hertz, David R 422 

Herzig, Harold L 147 

Hesse, PMward 468 

Heustis, Lawrence C 5,50, 461, 464 

Hewitt. Harry R 560, 588 

Hewlett. Timothy Y 280 

Hibbard, John D 488. 461 

Hicks, Ernest L 441 

Hicks. Harold A 147. 273 

Hicks, Isabel 598. 98. 73 

Hicks, Ralph W 520 

Hictt, Stanley J 186. 560. 439 

Higbee. Harold B 147 

Higgins. Francis J 506 

Higgins, Frank W 534 

Higgins, Stella 364 

Higgins. W. E 262 

Ilildner, Egmont G 282, 341 

Hildner, Euthymig J 440. 445 

Hilzinger. William, Jr 98 

Hill, Benjamin 350 

Hill. Ernest K 474 

Hill. Gertrude L 98 



HiU, Henley 446 

Hill, Jamea R 474 

HiU, Marguerite M 622 

HiU, RoUin C 367 

Hilleboe, Christian 367 

Hindman, WilUam P 147 

Hirth, Frederick K 148, 413 

Hixson, Norman A 367 

Hoadley, Lei|^ 518 

Hoag, Lynne A 562 

Hoak, George M 367, 98, 365 

Hobart, Seth G 367, 98. 366 

Hobbs. Arthur E 680 

Hobbs, NelUe M 624, 626 

Hoch, Henry G 490. 462 

Hodges, George H 494 

Hoefeld, Norman A 470 

Hoerner, Edward M 367 

Hoffman, Douglas T 556, 41 1 

Hoffman, Edward W 186 

Hoffman, Hazel M 624 

Hogan. WiUiam H . . .'. 690 

Hoge, James W 444 

Hogue. Dean R 686 

Hoheb, Alberto S 477, 536 

Holden, Marion L 610, 428 

Holland, Esther T 602 

HoUoway. Fred H 148, 133 

Holmes, Esla 614 

mes, Josephine M 622 

Imes, Kathlyn C 622, 99, 73 



Ho 
Ho 

Holt, Paul J. . 474 

Holt. WiUard H 99. 347. 343 

Holther. Louis J 674, 464 

Holton, Hoyt 8 678 

Holtom, Benjamin G 668, 464 

Ho zapple, Alice M 629 

Ho tsman, Merwin R 411 

Holub, David C 628 

Holzaepfel, Harold A 512 

Homer. Wilson C 367, 692, 99, 366 

Honan, Edward M 376 

Honey, Alan D. 411. 618, 548, 262, 439, 461 

Honey, Edgar A 548 

Hook, Donald R 686, 367 

Hoon, Merle R 662 

Hooper, Emily M 620, 452 

Hooper, Jeanette Mabelle 60 

Hooper, Jennie E 624, 99 

Hooton, Gordon B 638 

Hopkins. H. D 422 

Hopkins. John M 662 

Hopkins. Stephen C 367 

Hopkinson. Francis L 632, 436 

Home, Albert E., Jr 482 

Horning, Marie K 629 

Horr. Charles W. Jr 498. 277 

Horton. Clarence E 163 

Horwich, David S 187, 470 

Hosmer, Ethel R 370, 429 

Hosraer, Henry S 522, 99, 435 

Hough, Frederick W 482, 269, 462 

Houseman, Eugene B 426 

Houseman, Reuben F 488 

Hovis, Ralph W 516 

Howard, Brodhead 488, 412 

Howard. Ralph H 367 

Howes, William E 278 

Howland, Glenn A.. 359, 616, 544, 336. 461 

Hoyle, Edith L 370 

Hoyt, Margaret K 698 

Hsia, Chi-Hsi 367, 472 

Hsu. Pao H 99. 472 

Hubar. David I 270. 99 

Hubbard, Charles E 622 

Hubbard, Miriam E 602, 99, 72, 370, 

428, 429, 464 

Hubbell. Howard A 148 

Hudd, Samuel L 614. 618 

Huebner. Charlotte R 629 

Huff, Beatrice S 604 

Hughes, Lyndall E 530, 99, 132, 451. 

464, 474 

Hughes. Maria H 698, 629 

Hughes, Thomas W 616 

Huibert L. G 686 

Hulett, William P 552 

HuU, Lathrop W 526 

Hum, Clyde 530, 464 

Humiston, Hiram 133 

Hummer. Richard P 496. 470 

Humphreys. Harold 1 520. 100. 444 

Humphreys, Helen 1 100. 364, 368. 

392, 446, 446 

Hunawill, Viva E 100 

Hunderman, Henry 100 

Hung, Siji C 472 

Hunt, E. Reed 530, 470 

Hunt, Kenelin O 100 

Hunt, Waldo R 572, 684, 363, 474 



687 



Index — Continued 



Huntington, Edwin J. . .408. 314. 315, 341 

Huntley. C. S 632 

Hur, Evangeline 616 

Hurd, J. W. H 588 

Hurley, George F 422, 560, 270, 100 

Hurst, Margaret A 629 

Huasa, Leopold R 538. 432 

Hussey, Roland F 334 

Hutchinson, Harold D 474 

Hutchison, Walter S 187 

Huttel, Mathilda E 606 

Hutiel, Ruth S 606. 100. 363, 364. 392 

Hyatt, Aure Y 606, 440 

Hyde, Carroll C 566 

Hyde, Harold J 568 

Hyde, Milo W 475 

Hyman. Sam R 528 



Ibsen, Norman H 486, 411, 470 

Illick, Charles R 439 

Imake, Mittsu N 476 

Ingall, Morton H 263 

Ingham. Hepburn 484, 342 

Inglis, Dorothy B 610, 100 

Inwood, Louis R 518 

Ingraham, Paupa 452 

Ippel, Arthur G 502 

Ireland, Paul M 506 

Irish, Louise A 606 

Irvin, Arthur C 163. 167 

Irwin, Hampton H 380, 530, 474 

Iseman, Marguerite 455 



Jackson, Howard H 225, 220 

Jackson, Karl R 522 

Jacobs, Milton K 411 

Jaeger, William A 467 

James. Edward W 148 

James, Laylin K 422 

James, Louis M 520, 548 

James. William S 439 

Jarvis, Floyd E 452 

Jarvis, Naidem 602, 620 

Jeffers, Dean H 566, 211, 205 

Jenkins, William W 570, 270, 465 

Jennings, Angelo T 514 

Jennings, Dwight W 520, 100, 73, 439 

Jewell. Annis 598 

Jewell, WilUam H 148 

Jickling, Clare M 526 

Joannes, Leland H 496 

Jocelyn, Ethel L 604, 370 

John, Hubert R 204, 211, 315, 205. 

34 1 343 

John, W. A. P 572, 101, 73, 387! 461 

Johns, Mary L 604, 442 

Johns, Walter C 367 

Johnson, Adna R 187, 512, 672, 179. 

388. 282. 414 

Johnson, Harry E 574 

Johnson, Henry A 342 

Johnson, Herbert G 441 

Johnson, Irwin C 572, 101, 73, 363, 387 

Johnson, Kathryn S 614, 627 

Johnson, Leroy C 101 

Johnson, Mildred 614, 627 

Johnson, Renus E 367 

Johnson, Walker B 522 

Johnston, Dorothy M 620 

Johnston, George S 566, 278 

Johnston, Harold M 444 

Johnston, Wayne A 498 

Johnston, William G 269, 441 

Johnston. William M 187 

Jones, Donna V 612 

Jones. Granville D 101 

Jones. Harold J 552 

Jones. Harvey P 148 

Jones, J. Gwyn 564, 225 

Jones. Jack W 566. 261 

Jones. Lyman L 664 

Jordan, Calvin C 244, 242 

Jordan, John F 380, 530 

Josenhaus, Milda C 445 

Joelyn, Lee E 482, 285 

Jotter, Walter E 101, 366, 367 

Judaon, Everett 148, 363 

Justice. Zach 187. 468 



K 



Kahns, Harold C 552 

Kaounerer, William S 270. 469 



Kane, Frank J 225, 594. 220. 349. 368 

Kannowski, Max B 366. 367 

Katsuixumi, Sotokiche 476 

Kaufman, Charles L 628 

Kaufman, Frank E 432 

Keatley, Edwin E 494. 469 

Keeler. Anson H. . .578, 149, 132. 133, 389 

Keeler. Margaret H 627 

Keena, Kemp 508 

Keim. Harther L 546 

Kell, Robt. J 590, 464 

Keller, Paul L 568 

Kellogg, Edward N 552 

Kellogg. Richard M 226. 662. 220 

Kelly, Francis H 464 

Kelly, Ralph B 634 

Kelly, T. Walter 101 

Kelsey, Charlotte B 698, 364, 462 

Kelsey, Ruth C 598, 452 

Kemp, William L 439 

Kemper, Bernard W 574 

Kemper, John W 548 

Kempton, Rockwell M 666, 441 

Kennedy, David F 490, 544, 187, 179 

Kennedy, Donald B 612 

Kennedy. Eara J.. Jr 650 

Kennedy. Harold L 668 

Kennedy. Samuel L 580 

Kenney. Frank E 570 

Kenney, Fred H 646 

Kenyon, Johnson D 576 

Kepler, Violet L 629 

Kerber, Herman M 367 

Kerber, Lawrence V 494 

Kerns, Blanche C 626, 101 

Kerns, James A 101 

Kerns, Marguerite S 101, 429, 446 

Kerr, Harry W 488, 102, 73, 387, 

337, 439, 451 

Kerr, John A 238 

Kerr, Mary M 698 

Kerr, Susan 1 604, 629 

Kerr, Vivienne M 698 

Kersey, Christina 629 

Kesler, Gerald L 498, 314, 315, 341 

Keyser, Vera K 629 

Khuen, Richard H 492 

Kikuchi, Mutser 627. 476 

Kilbom, Russell D 360 

Kilby, Margaret O 616, 102 

Kilchenman, Ernest F 225 

Killean, William C 566 

Kilwinski, Arthur 473 

Kimball. Harriett J 602 

Kimball. Reginald G 149 

Kimberley, Robt 620 

Kimmiel, Edith E .618 

Kincaid, Waldron J 612 

Kinch. Mason 530 

King, Marcello A 149 

King, Winfield C 467 

Kingery, Lyle B 646, 211, 374 

Kinsey, Isaac, Jr 492, 102, 73 

Kirk, Haddon S 490, 644 

Kirkpatrick, A Loomis 526 

Kishlar, Lamar M 411 

Kiyohars, Mitsuji 476 

Kleeman, Francis J 476 

Klein, Chas. S 149 

Klein, Margaret E. B 445 

Kneeland, Blanche G 610 

Kneeland, Harry T 494 

Knights, Ethel L 102 

Knights, Rufus H 492 

Knoepp, Alma M 616 

Knoepp, Emma E 616, 102. 440 

Knowlson, Henry A 488, 269 

Knowbon, Olive K 600 

Kocher, Ray S 439 

Kohler, Walter W 680, 474 

Kohr, Robt. F 342 

Kolb, Frederick J 532 

Kolpien, Alton L 694, 464 

Koon, Reva 102 

Koonsman, Harold D 638, 464 

Korn, Harold F 660. 60 

Koumjian. Aredis H 211, 206 

Kraft, AUce 628, 629 

Kramer, Clarence A 270, 473 

Krause, Bernard G 526, 412 

Kreger, Louise M 629 

Kreger, Ruth E 628, 629, 102, 73, 360, 

368. 391, 392, 440. 442. 446 

Kreiner. Joseph P 149. 692. 431 

KretSBchmar, Clarence A 473 

Kretssohmar, George H 473 

Kreuser, Otto T 471 

Krueger, Bernice C 628, 440 

Krueger, Helen L 440 

Kruger, Rudolph 273 



Kudner, Donald F 518 

Kuivineu, John V. .690, 269, 314, 316, 341 

Kurta, Walter W 149, 590 

Kutsleb, Chas. A 367 

Kyprianides, Prodronus M 225 



Labaide, George V 187. 306. 307, 311, 

312, 387. 388 

Ladd, Earle, S 534 

Laing, Grant H 538 

Laird, Albert N 622. 658 

Laird, Cecil W 612 

Lamb, Herbert W 490 

Lamb, Lawrence W 413 

Lamb, Zelma E 627 

Lambert, George W 580 

Lambert, John L 225, 562, 220 

Lambert, Selwyn A 688 

Lambrecht, Beatrice G. .612. 628. 101. 73. 
362, 364, 366, 368, 370. 392. 445, 446 

Lamley. Hubert 378 

Lamond, Roy D 482 

Lamoeraux, WiUiam E 510, 187. 343 

Lance, Harold J 618 

Land^be, Albert E 475 

Landis, George E 510, 474 

Lane, Creighton L 226, 439 

Lange, Anthony H 668. 211. 464, 473 

Lange, H. C 520, 101, 435 

Lange, Norbert A .* 375. 441 

Langley. Raymond M 606, 205, 466 

Langs, John W 508. 359, 285 

Langworthy, Martin F 102 

Lankel, Arthur K 473 

Lankester, Stephen D 602 

Lapsley, Lorenzo B 540.211. 316. 341 

Larson, Bertel T 494, 566, 261 

Lasko, Ludwig 367 

Laubengayer, Delia C 445 

Laux, William M 102, 444 

Lavely, Newell E 668 

Laver, Floyd P 474 

Lawrence, Donald E 622. 102, 436 

Lawrence, Henry D 187, 425 

Lawton, Chas. B 616, 412 

Lawton, Chester 526 

Leach, Harry R. . . .688, 149, 133. 411, 430 

LeBlanc, Thos. J 658 

Lebron, Victor M 477 

Leehner, Harold M 564, 226. 220 

Lee, Arthur H 492 

Lee, H. 472 

Lee, Rita M 600 

Leever, Lawrence C 568 

LeFevre, William M 568 

Legemen, Chas. W 476 

Lehle, Louis H 470 

Lehman, Albert T 688, 422, 444 

Leicht, Frank N 564. 226. 220 

Leininger. Oliver O 578. 226, 439 

I.<enfestey, Florence K 618 

Ijcnski, Waldemar A 149 

Leonard, John S.. . .620, 188, 386, 388, 451 

Leonard. Simpson C 512 

Leslie, R. Harry 690, 464 

Lesxcsynski, Joseph S 646 

LeVeque, Leslie L 150 

Leverens, George A 439, 464, 473 

I^evich, Irving J 422 

I^vin, Abraham J 102, 423 

Levine, Archie R 422 

Lev^inson, Aaron B 188 

Lcvinson, Frank K 514, 475 

Lewis, Cyril B 484 

Lewis, Dean A 277 

Lewis, Dempster C 150 

Lewis, Evangeline N 602. 628, 629 

Lewis, Frank A 150 

Lewis, Ida M 624, 102 

Lichtig, Heniy A 211. 205 

Liebeskind, Harry 439 

Lieu, Tsoong C 471. 472 

Limbert. Lee M 49S 

Lind. George J . . 676. 167. 163 

LindcU. Selma 628. 102. 370. 391. 446 

Lindhorst. J Henry 586. 163 

Lindner, LilUan 462. 102 

Lindow, Daniel A 473 

Linehan, John F 612. 188 

Lisle, Leslie W 418 

Litchman, Irene H 600 

Livingston, Alan V 584. 462 

Lloyd, AUoe C 602. 102, 370, 454 

Lloyd, Anna M 602, 364. 365 

Lo, PoS 472 

Logan, Arthxir D 516 

Lokker. Chbrence A 260, 442, 464 



688 



Index — Continued 



S^"" ■■ 


















































MDMBboB, George P. . 






































































































sstSiii^^. 




■.■/.■.-.^■.is 






































472 






103,44. 






































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.VDch.DBviirF 










































■:::ffiir. 


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Slt!&&''-.,-,- 








































VtcCarthy, HuriwD L 




































M^rxfe^er^' ■" 












.878. 167 




























































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MfCreety FledisC... 




















































































































SSS!«::: 


















































ffiSSSStJX-?;; 


















































































864,227 


220.349 
















M«Ki"7"'^"^™'' 












-Wfl 


...',422 







































































Meh: 



1, Isndon 



Meh»ffy, Charln ST* 

Meibeyer, Edwio, H SIS 

MslsDiphy, John C S7t. ISO, ITS 

Melita, GeorgB R tS2 

MiUencnmp, Either E,. 106 

Meoefee, SidAey L S12 

Meager. ClsreDce L SIg, 441 

Meredith, L. K 205, 312, 464 

MBrTinmn, Rulh 819 

MerriL E. Fore«t 690, 441. 470 

" ■ - ■ H 182,430 

TineL 106 

162 

B 476 

487 

. .830, 844, 189, 179, 474 

1 S14 

' 622. 106 

J.lSd. 170, 376, 410. 424 

640 

iceK 440 

hB 684 

Lp H 616, 282 

rdA 4M 

C 627 

162, 376 

« im. 179, 388. 282. 

288, 204. 337. 340 

or. Adds 810.627 

er. CsroIL 804 

er. Ceril W 680.276,380 

sr.FranliK , .522 

er, Hsrotd A 866.212 

ST. Harry E 162 

er, HerronW 162,431 

ar. Joaephine M .,....,.,...... . .616 

er. Mutant E 629 

er. Mary D.... 106 

BT. Maurice C 612 

er. NormsnF 404 

tr, Orland A 227 

er, Peter A 528, 426, 428 

Bi, Ruby M 273 

Br,RutbD... 106 

er, Sylvwter G 528 

or. Wilbur K 624 

er, William L. . 660. 170. 376. 388. 410. 

Miller, Wyalt A 162, 133,373,375 

Milliken, Jacob G 152 

MiUnmn, Harold F 850 

Milla, Harold A.. 634 

Mill*, Ray J 189.810. 170.300. 

2S2, ^ 

Milla, Walker H 600 

Miner, Harry E 162 

Miner, Mutin F 562 

Mirwida. Octacilio 486 

Mook. Frank C 422 

MocTord. Harrv J 688.227 

Mohr. Edmund C 550, 212 

MoU, Laiter 8 544 

MoniDRer, Arthur V .... 494. 163. 380. 378. 
434 

Monroe. Kenneth H. 432 

Monroe, IawcII 163.133 

MontafpiB, Donald E 484 

Monl*Giw. Harry E 822. 413 

Moon, Myra D 456 

Mooney, Charlw A 212 

Mooney, William C. . .439, 474 

Moore, Evelyn W 626.362.445 

Moore. Helen A. 608, 212, 204 

Mooro, Paul M 600. 468 

Moore. Ralph S , . .466 

Moore. WJterS 189 

Moore. Whitley B .626,363 

Moralea. Arjimiro 536. 477 

Morao. Roay E 227, 349 

MonJeo, B«Kie 814 

Moraan. Dwigbt C , 482 

Morgan. Fannie E 629 

Morxill. DonaM M 612.646.106 

Morris. Walter E.. .680. 189, 170. 426. 426 

MorriHD. Aubrey C 106 

Morrison. Chester C 474 

Moniaon. F. Aumin 106, 435 

Morrison. Lewis H 552 

Morrow. Arthur A 580. 190. 376. 410 

Morrow, Harrey W 470 

Morse. Chester J 544. 170, 348, 388 

Morse, Howard Eurys 632, 270, 107 

Morse. Mildred M 812 

Morse. Vitsinia B 628 

Morton. Moses E 540 

Morton. Marcus 11. 424 

Moeier, DeT 524,469 

Moss, Ben J 220 

Moaa,Fr«dU 227 



Index — Continued 



Motley. Robert E 227, 220, 439 

Mott, Arthur D 498 

Mott, Maxwell R 470 

Motter Benjamin S 504, 107, 73, 359 

Mover Fred C 510 

Muhme, Norman B 444 

Mulkey, Philip O 482, 153. 373 

Mullen. Raymond J 504, 227. 220 

Mullendore. William C'..52fi. 5(J0. 190. 376, 

385, 388, 410, 419 

Muller. Chester L 190 

MuUer, John H «i2 

Munger, Reuben B 153 

Muns, Klmer G 592 

Murdock, Malcolm J) 498 

Murphv, Georne. . . ..'iOO, 106, 73, 387, 330. 

439, 343 

Muwoelwhite, Gladys E 364 

MuBzy, Howard G 486 

Myers. Carl F 594 

Myers. Charles 1 439 

Mvers, George A 594 

Myers. Nona Gladys 600. 442. 463 



N 



Nadeau, Rowland A 588, 153 

Naftel, Joseph D 586 

Nahikian, Garkis M 153 

Nakai. Gentok 476 

Nance. Willis D 498 

Nash, Francis B 303, 304 

Naylon. John E 494 

Needham. Marjorie E 624 

Neilson, Russell H 526, 544. 190. 410 

Neithercut, Charles 580, 190, 424 

Neithercut, Wm. A 580, 190, 424 

Nelson, Amy L 600 

Nesbit. Frank F 494, 466 

Netter, Milton A 441 

Netting, Clarence E 526. 473 

Neumann, Carl W 584. 444 

Neumann. John W 584. 359 

Newbrook. Francis D 367. 467 

Newcomb, Bessie N 245, 242 

Newcomb, Cyrenius A 484 

Newell, Frank C 482 

Newell, James F 342 

Newton, Daniel B 522, 564 

Newton, William F 500, 572, 258 

Nicholls, Maurice 508, 432, 439 

Nichols, Alan L 482 

Nichols. James K 522, 179, 348 

Nicholson, Albert M 367 

Nicholson. John R 544, 191, 335 

Nicholson, Howard P 492, 334 

Nichcjson, Hope H 368 

Nicklin, George L 474 

Nieman. Walter A 506, 298, 285, 340 

Niemann, WilUam K 506. 306, 307, 

311. 340 

Nieter, Leonard W 574, 258, 359 

Niles, Arthur H 153, 133 

Niles, Helen R 618, 629, 280 

Nobil, Goerge 528 

Noble. Ro«ella E 614, 630 

Nord, Roy A 538. 560. 191 

Norris, Maynard A 586, 107, 441 

Northcott, Reginald A 510 

Northrup. Cecil A 280 

Northrup. Emilv F 614, 107 

Northway, Fred R 574 

Norton, Emma M 618 

Norton, Irving T 153 

Norton, James S 484, 468 

Norton, John K. . .512, 298, 153, 132, 373, 

386. 389, 285. 340 

Noi-y. Marguerite L 602, 627, 370 

Novy, Robert L 546. 278, 375 

Nutting, Raymond J 556 

Nye, Gerald F 506 



o 



Oberlin, James E 564 

Oberteuffer, Reece B 500 

O'Brien, Harold E..502, 314. 315, 317, 341 

Ocobock, Catherine 107 

OConnell, Harold A 467 

O'Connor, James D 530, 335 

O'Donnell, William S 592 

O'Donoghue, John B 512, 546 

Oellrich, Henry N 239, 236, 377, 433 

Ogden, Shelby G ,. . . .425 

Ogilbee, Donald W 538, 191. 464 

OKlethorpe, Thomas B 526, 258 

Ohlmacher, Albert P 584, 473 

Ohrstrom, George L 412 



O'Keefe, William C 506 

Oldfield, Russell A 546 

Olds. William E 426. 107. 421. 422 

0'I-.ear>'. Genevieve E 454, 107, 73, 

391 445 

O'l^arj', John J 212*, 205 

Olson, Edgar T 550, 236, 3(W, 377 

O'Neill, Thomas E 502 

Oppcnheimer, Seymour A 154 

Orcutt. Constance. . .598. 108. 73, 370. 445 

Orr. Robert J 484 

Orton, Edith B 600 

Orwig. Florence B 612. 364 

Osband. Helen 618, 629 

Osborn, Charles R 108 

Osborn. Harry E 227 

Osborne. Earl D 562 

Osburn, Charles Y 508 

O.sius. Eugene A 473 

Oster. Ralph J 484 

Ostrander. Leon D 580. 108. 347. 343 

Otis. Herbert C 498, 470 

Overman, Kathryn 606 

Owen, George F 526 

Owen. William L 544. 469 



Packard. Genevieve 1 628, 440. 445 

Paddock. Florence B 626, 440 

Page. I^lie W 277. 470 

Paisley, Thomas F 496 

Paisley, Walter W 496. 191, 179, 343 

Paley, Amos F 660, 270 

Palin, Milbum R 486 

Pallister, Zilpha R 620 

Palma, Joseph 512 

Palmer, p:dwin B 461, 494, 359, 335 

Palmer, Mary 454 

Pang, Dai T 154 

Pappe, Reginald D 431 

Pardee, Eari E 524, 2.58, 285, 414, 461 

Pardon. Cari E 367 

Parfet, Albert B 500. 108 

Parfet. Ray T 500 

Park, Boyd T 492, 108 

Parker, Harry D. . .191, 179, 419, 426, 470 

Parker, John C 488, 572, 359. 470 

Parker, Laura M 602 

Parker, Lee N 590, 451 

Parker, Rodney A 108, 439. 446 

Parkinson, Harold E : .562 

Parks, Anne B 628 

Parks. Sterling S 586 

Parshall. Millis V .578 

Partlow. Carrie M 626 

Partridge, Evelyn L 616 

Patchin, Elisabeth 614, 627, 364 

Patterson, Clarence K 494 

Patterson, Helen W 604, 108. 73 

Patterson, Meade W 550 

Patterson. Robert C 608 

Patterson. Mae 612 

Patterson, Marvin L 514, 269 

Paul, Elsie M 600, 364 

Paulger, Harry B 592 

Paulus, Marie S 610 

Payne, Marion L 600, 108 

Payne, Maud H 108 

Peach, WiUard L 506, 303, 304 

Pearce. Chester C 512, 412 

Peari, Walter W 576 

Peari, WiUiam A 109, 73, 347, 343, 

414. 422 
Peddicord, Walker 191, 632, 380, 

442 443 

Pebbles, Thomas A '.562 

Pehrson, Cari H 534, 154, 432 

Pelham, Howard B 510 

Penniman, Bruner R 464, 469 

Penoyar. Freda U 604 

Perkins, Aredelle F -.364 

Perkins, Charles 630 

Perkins, John R 524 

Perkins, Willis B 191 

Perry, Ben E 452 

Perry, Harold H 498, 154, 133. 373 

Perry, Robert T 486 

Perechblacher, Olga C 628 

Perschbacher. Walter F 314, 315, 341 

Peters, Charles A 466 

Peters, Fred C 228 

Peterson, Frederick W 439 

Peterson, George M 272 

Peterson, Henry W 580 

Peterson. Marion 612, 440 

Peterson, Ward D 516 

Phelps, Jesse 343 

Phelpe, Marie C 614 



PhilUpp, Goddie F 500 

Phillips, Eari L 191. 424 

Phillips, Harold 1 522 

Phillips, Howard H 578, 154. 132, 133, 

385. 386. 389 

Phillips, Oliver 424 

Pickett, Christiancy 520. 439 

Pielemeier, John H 163 

Pielemeier. Walter H 109. 434 

Pierce. Barnard 518 

Pierce, Dorothy E 604, 362 

Pierce. Thomai* C 496. 470 

Pierce. Virginia 614 

Pierson. Bernida J 606 

Pierson, Dorothy S 606 

Piereon, Willis T 191, 179 

Pij?gott, Wallace J 526 

Pike. Leila 1 109 

Pilgrim, George S 475 

Pinkerton, David W 578 

Pinkerton. Sherwood 578. 154, 133. 

373 375 
Pinney, N. E 109, 387, 414, 419.'420, 

422, 426 

Pitkin, Dudley W '.578 

Pitkin, Maxwell E 494, 192. 178, 388 

Planck, Joseph W .538 

Plankel, Arthur G 154 

Plath, Hugo W 473 

Piatt. Gilbert C 466 

Platto, Bessie 628, 109. 391, 445 

Pobanx, Otto P 342 

Pockman, Georgianna B .370. 463 

Poe. J. Wilbur 109 

Poel. Antoynetta 627 

Pollock. Lise L 422 

Pommcrening. Wm. K 154 

Pomper. Herman 574 

Pope, Alvah J 540 

Poppen, John R 343 

Porter, Cari W 466 

Porter, Doris E 612. 370 

Porter, Elder A 588, 109 

Porter, Harr>' T 578 

Porter, Horace W 562. 278. 4<>4 

Porter. Kenneth L 534 

Porter. Kirk H .520 

Porter. Mary N 626. 370. 452 

Potter. Herbert J 192. 179 

Potter, Louise 602, 72, 392 

Potter, Sena 109, 391 

Potts, Philip C 424 

Pott«. Philip O 154, 133. 441 

Povah, Phyllis 602, 110, 442. 454 

Powell, Emily 627 

Powell. Eva 624 

Powell, John E 494, 468 

Powers. Florence H 628, 110, 445 

Prange. Meta K 627 

Pratt, Stephen G 504 

Preston, John D 167, 163 

Preston, Philhps B 482 

Preussel, Byron 590 

Prichard, I^a L 614. 627 

Prinieau. Bruno C 155 

Probst. Dorothy L 610 

Proctor. Haale M 370 

Publow, Eari W 464 

Puchta, Lawrence G 490 

Pugh, Joseph R 556 

Pulford, Bertha C 610, 110. 392. 452 

Pulling, Everett W 502 

Putt, Fenimore E 564 



Quarr>', Lucile H 602 

Quinlan, Valora F 622, 463 

Quiroio, Jose S 477 



R 



Rabinowiti. Harry 628, 192 

Racelis, Antonio P 367 

Rademacher, Angela 622 

Raiford, Frank P 640 

Rakestraw, Linn M 166, 432 

Ramsdell, Hellen E 612, 1 10 

Ramsdell, Paul V 420, 422 

Randall, Franklin P 514. 412. 435 

Randall. Josephine H 614, 368. 440 

Randall, LeRoy S 110 

Rankin, Albert W 518, 110 

Ransom. R. Paul 498 

«app, Edwin F 467 

Rasmusscn, Clarence L 470 

Rathbone, Alfred D 488 

Rathburn, Carlisle B 652 



690 



I ndex — Continued 



RathbuD, Bruce R 534, 441 

Rather, Mrs. A. A 616 

Ratterman, Anne 626 

Ray. Ella G 624. 627 

Ray, Lawrence T 676 

Raymond. Philip T 584, 285. 341 

Raynsford. Grace W 600, 268, 440, 463 

Ilea. Thatcher W 518, 359 

Read, Edwin M 534, 263 

Reardon, M. Marie. . : 604 

Rea-son, Walter J 564 

Reavill, Richey B 584 

Reher, Harry I> 484, 544 

Reed. Fidna M 604, 628 

Reed, Macdonald S 584. 155, 133, 359, 

373. 385 

Reekie. Sherwood 482. 303, 304 

Reem, Guy A 532 

Reeves. Harold M 592 

Reid, Hollace M 544. 192. 179 

Regan. Catherine M 616. 1 10 

Rehor. Fred L 530, 301, 285, 340 

Reiehert, Chester K 584 

Reichle, Walter A 584. 155, 133 

Reid, Clarence A 423 

Reid, Edgar P 424 

Reid, James M 155, 373 

Reid, Thai. C 572, 359, 446 

Reid. Wallace E 502. 133 

Reider. Francis D 538 

Reilly. Carl V 500 

Riley. Chas C 500 

Reimann, Louis C 570, 110, 73. 362, 

387. 285. 340 

Reindel. Ira H 331 

Reisch, Louis Joseph 514 

Remington. Clay 518 

Remington. Katherine 602 

Remlinger. Walter A 550 

Renwick. Julia 610, 626 

Reni, Karl 580, 111 

Reutter, I^wia G Ill 

Reynolds, Chas. R 578 

Reynolds, D. I. Clyde HI 

Reynolds, Eber J 520, 548 

Reynolds, Margaret R.. .614, 364. .368, 442 

Reynolds, Paul H 592, 366, 367 

Riach, William M 550 

Rice, Clifton M 228. 220 

Rich, William G 228, 220. 349, 441 

Richard, Alice E 624 

Richards, Albert J 548, 439 

Richards, Harry L 530 

Richardson, Chas. H 228 

Richardson, Frank E 431 

Richardson, George L 576, 163 

Richardson, Laurence Ill 

Richerdson, I..ec K 482 

Richardson, Robt. E. . . .192, 179, 363, 410 

Richey, Helen M 628, 364 

Richtig, Joseph S Ill 

Riddle, Geo. G 155 

Riecks, Frank C 155, 413 

Rieger, Lavanche G 444, 452 

Riggs, Emma K 612 

Riggs, Roland W 213 

Riggs, Samuel H 516 

Riley. Frank J 412 

Rindge, Warren L 576, 167, 163, 378 

Riscoorph, Marguerite L 370 

Ritchie, Carleton P 439, HI 

Roan, Everett H 425 

Robbert, George 444. 452 

Robbins, John C 484 

Robbins, Nathaniel. Jr 484 

Roberts. Walter C 518 

Robertson. John E 228. 220 

Robertson. Tom H 530 

Robertson. William 228. 471 

Robins. Joseph E 500, 469 

Robinson. Alfred H 490 

Robinson. Arthur D 228 

Robinson, Benj 192 

Robinson. Harold F 514 

Robinson. Irma N 604 

Robinson. James K 552 

Robinson, J. Wilson 155, 133, 375 

Robinson, Kenneth W 512 

Robiniion, Max G 498. 259, 314, 215. 

341. 470 

Robinson. Raymoml B 590 

Robinson. Standish W 482. 111. 335 

Robinson. Viola Belle 627 

Robson, Helen G 614 

Robson. Ruth M 440 

Rodriquez. Juan HI 

Roedcl, Andrew E 236 

Roehm. Harold R 612 



Roehm, Lawrence S 482, 111, 73. 387, 

390. 286. 295, 340 

Roehm. Winifred 1 598. 428 

Roeser. Harold C 155 

Rogers, J. Speed 494 

Rogere. Paul H 192 

Rogers. Walter S 514 

Roggy, Kate V 616 

Roggv. Martha M 616 

Rogoski. Alex J 469 

Roman, Jos. S 155, 373 

Ronan, Isabelle E 628, 112. 440 

Rood, Henry C, Jr 156, 496 

Roos, Gertrude W 612, 112 

Rose, Dwight C 422 

Rose. Reginald W 498. 259 

Rosenblum. Josephine 627. 370 

Rosenfield, Samuel E 528 

Rosenheim. Harold W 444 

Rosenthal, Benj. F 192 

Rosenthal, David T 112, 475 

Roser. Carl E 592 

Rosevelt. Mary E 618, 630 

Rosevelt, Ruth P 618, 630 

Roscwarne. Nellie L 618. 1 12. 428 

Roskosky, Stepjien J 441 

Ross, Chas. H 367, 366 

Roes, Ernest A 228, 220 

Roes, LaVem 112 

Rosser, Grace O 455 

Roth. Stella R 367 

Rothacher, Wilma M 610 

Rothrock, Clarence L 530, 263 

Rothschild, Stanford Z 112 

Rough, John, Jr 522 

Roulette, Wayne N 229 

Roussin, Raymond R 552 

Rowan, Clyde C. .544, 192. 178, 179. 348. 

388. 343 

Rowe. Arthur H 50 

Rowe, G. Prudence 624 

Rowe, Henrietta A 606 

Rowley, Cha«. R 494 

Rowley. Lancelot Chas 532. IrS, 133, 

386, 389, 413 

Roxbury, Edward J 690 

Royce, lieola E 112, 604, 73 

Rubin, Leon , 475 

Ruby, Cecil H 678 

Ruedcmann, Albert D 562 

Ruedemann, Rudolf H 562, 261 

Ruger. M. Selden 600 

Ruhling, George H 474 

Rummel. Henry C 660, 590, 193, 360 

Ruppe, Marcus G 512 

Rush, Harry E 193 

Rush, John H 475 

Rushbrook, Ix>slie H 112 

Rushmore, Maurice L 550. 239. 236 

Russell, F. Irene 614, 368, 370, 452 

Russell, Henry R 113 

Russell, Viola 608 

Rutgers, Gerrit A 166 

Ruxton, David A 166, 431 

Ryan, James E 414, 270, 442 

Ryan, Lola M 113 

Rykenboer, Edward A 375 

Ryskamp, Henry J 444 



Sabin, Carlton R 500 

Sable, Louis B 422, 452, 474 

Sachs, Pklward A 380, 442, 443 

Sttcia, C. Fred 156 

Sadakata. Kameyo 627. 476 

Sadler, Caroline M 604 

SuUwasser, Norman H 590, 475 

Salmon, Roger W 576 

Salon, Nathan 528 

Sandenburgh, (Jeorge H 156, 133 

Sanderhoff, Raj'mond F 504 

Sanders. Floyd S 496 

Sanders. John E 506. 260, 443 

Sanders, May 452 

Sanderson. Walter W 584 

Sanford. Wayland H 498, 544 

Sargeant, Ellen M 113, 628, 392, 440 

Sargent, Emilie G.. .612. 628. 113, 73. 364. 

391. 392. 440, 442 

Satterwhite, Robert L 502. 474 

Sattinger. Oscar C 426. 475 

Sauer. Sheldon J 470 

Saunders, Harold J 510 

Saunders, J<»Hsie L 630 

Saiir, Melvin H 113 

Sawin. Fred M 156. 1.33 

Scanlon, U'Roy J... 514, 193, 178, 388, 451 



Scarboro, Edwin R 562, 439 

Schacht, Elmer C 612 

Schaff ter, Edward M 692 

Schaphorst, Benjamin .538 

SchatBkin, Wm. W 528 

Scheid, Dana A 590, 475 

Schiller, Robert M 411, 470 

SchilUng, Mildred S 620, 445 

Schlissel, Meyer A 422 

Schmidt. Herbert N 113, 439 

Schmidt, Herman H 466 

Schmidt, James M 562 

Schmidt, John H 1.57, 133, 413 

Schmidt, Paul F 520, 468 

Schmutsler, Albert J 564 

Schoepfle, Chester S 375 

Schoepfle, Wilbur J 578, 334 

Schoetron, Ray E 239, 377 

Scholl, Albert A 468 

Schrimpf, Albert E 580 

Schroeder, Fred J 193, 424 

Schroeder, Werner W. . .560, 590, 193, 179, 

358, 376, 388, 410. 

419, 426 

Schuereren, Leah M 446 

Schulte, Evelyn J 628 

Schuls, Ewald 367 

Schumacher, EMna L 113 

Schumann, Herbert 473 

Schupp, Arthur A 492, 359 

Schwarts, EmiUe C 624, 113 

Scofield, Leland N ,504 

Scott, John F 560, 193, 179, 348, 

388, 343 

Scott, Joseph M 514, 568 

Scott, Louise R 614 

Scott, Malcolm M 193, 504 

Scott, Ralph S 678 

Scribner, Carleton S 488 

Scroggie, Dean C 44 1 

Seabrook, Chancy S 367 

Seabury, William W 678, 259 

Seaver, Elixabeth 620, 452 

Searl. Fred N .580 

Searles, William 1 566 

Sears. Charles F 524 

Seaver, Orrin 113 

Seeley, J. Bradford 562, 213, 343 

Seguare, Ralph S 229 

Seifert, Gertrude 606, 445 

Seigworth, Vera F 114, 362, 445, 452 

Selby, Hasel S 620 

Sell, Frederick S 422 

Sellers, F. Vernon 526, 435, 446 

Senff, Ruth L 114 

Serfontein, Adnaan 229 

Service, Helen F 602, 114 

Sessions, Donald W 439 

Sevin, Frederic W 474 

Sevin, Robert E 474 

Sexton, Earl C 363 

Shafer, Wilson M 114, 492, 73, 347, 

360, 343 

Shaffer, Loren W 558 

Shand, David W 490, 470 

ShankUnd, Mildred 1 364 

Sharp, Alton B 632 

Sharpe, James H 500, 285, 341 

Sharpe, Ora E 114 

Sharrow, Eva 604, 628, 442 

Shartel, Shalton 500 

Shaw, Esther E 612, 429 

Shaw, Hobart F 550, 239, 236 

Shaw, Norman D 245, 242 

Shea. Clarence W 441 

Sheahan, Thomas W 530, 413 

Shearer, Alfred M 492, 462 

Shearer, John 562 

Sheldon, Howard W 578 

Sheldon, John A 114 

Sheldon, Maurie F 578, 277 

Sheldon, Ralph G 193 

Sheldon, Willard B 229 

Shepard, Bert H 514 

Sherk. Arthur R. . ..580, 194, 178, 414, 424 

Sherman, Harley B 367 

Sherman Harold 167 

Sherman, Harold J 444 

Shields, Donald H 470 

Shinkman, Olga E 630 

Shipley, Caleb G 514. 114, 442 

Shipman, Sidney J 518 

Shoemaker, Raymond W 444 

Shutes, Clarence 1 342 

Shutter, Harold W 566, 213 

Siev. Leonard 229, 439 

Sievert. Mina A 445 

Siggers. Mary P 604 

Sikes. Chase B 518, 73, 387, 439, 451 

Silsby, Don H 245, 242 



691 



Index — Continued 



ffimmons, Victor H 475 

SimoDfl. Archibald C 157, 334 

Simons, Perry 8 360 

Simons, Seymour B 451 

Simpson, Jess R 422 

Sink, Emory W 562, 278 

Sistler, Rufus 424 

Sites, Charlotte B 114, 600, 302 

SkiUman. WiUiam M 194, 179, 424 

Skinner, Clarence O 484 

Skinner, Samuel J 419. 422 

Skinner, William C 538, 566 

Skutechi, Joseph W 431 

Slaght, Herva M 467 

Slaght, WilUam W 520, 157 

Slater, Ellis D 486 

Slavens, Samuel J 574 

Slasinski, Stanley J 564 

Small, Carlton F 422 

Smallman, Howard L 562. 213, 205 

Smallpaffe, Melbourne F 492 

Smart, Clarence F 157, 375 

Smart, Jackson W 492, 470 

Smiley, John B 594 

Smith, Arthur R 522, 546 

Smith. Beatrice E 364 

Smith, Beulah 606 

Smith, Carl E 548 

Smith, Cedric A 494, 340 

Smith. Cedric C 492, 285, 296 

Smith, Chauncy W 157, 431 

Smith, Dale L 167 

Smith, Delos, O 484 

Smith, Donald A 572, 157, 373, 386 

Smith, DougUs F 560 

Smith, E. Prescott 518 

Smith, Edison C 694 

Smith, Edwin R 546 

Smith, Francis B 496, 470 

Smith, George B 157, 506, 133, 432 

Smith. Gordon 488, 359, 461 

Smith. Harold J 158. 494. 133, 373. 

375, 386 
Smith. Harold L. . . 114, 314, 484. 300. 315. 

317, 385, 390, 340 

Smith, Harold R 276 

Smith. Kathcrine 1 610 

Smith, James A., Jr 562 

Smith. John H 271 

Smith, Lyle H 498, 260, 115. 425 

Smith, \fcrie F 532, 280, 532 

Smith, Mortimer 490 

Smith, Peari 626, 370. 452 

Smith, Richard D 158, 375 

Smith, Robert F 586, 239, 236. 375, 

377, 466 

Smith. RoUin C 534. 467 

Smith, Stanley P 516, 439 

Smith, Stiles C 486 

Smith. Tom L 422 

Smith, IJhl M 158. 413, 430, 431 

Smith. Walter J 470 

Snethen, Edward O 424 

Snider, Robert J 213 

Snow, Linwood, W 554, 278 

Snyder, Bernard L 550, 303, 304 

Snyder, Florence E 618. 115, 73. 362, 

392. 428 

Snyder, Howard C 50 

Soddy, Thomas P.. 522, 307, 311, 158, 133, 

360, 386. 341 

Soil. Fred J. W 366, 367 

Sommer, Anthony F 2i9 

Sonne, Stuart L 474 

SorUng, Cari 520, 342 

Souter, Alfred L 552, 229, 220 

Southworth, Tracy W 367 

Sparks, Chfford M 512, 303. 304 

Sparks. Harry G • 512 

Sparks. Stephen D 540 

Speer, James B 514, 194 

Spence. Jessie 1 606. 115. 362. 392. 445 

Spencer, Marv E 612, 115 

Spencer, Ruth M 115 

Spencer, Walter L 552, 229 

Sprague, Glen K 576, 373 

Sprague, Laurence M. . .570. 194, 376, 410 

Sprague. Locke A 158 

Sprague, Riedel G 508 

Sprague, Walter H 530 

Sprague, Harvey H 516, 115, 335 

Springer, Donald M 500 

Springer, Nelda S 452 

Springstun. H. Humphreys. .530, 380, 421, 

423. 442, 464. 470 

Squier, Teodore L 526. 278 

Squiers, Archibald W 229 

Staacke, John H 554 

Staats, Karl S 566, 213, 385. 285. 289, 

340, 343 



Stadeker, Jerome L 470 

Staeb. Anna C 445 

Stahmer, Louise S 627. 370 

Stalker. Eleanor N 600. 116, 429. 442 

SUnderline. Bert A 372, 375 

Standt. Lester C 116 

Stanley. Sarah L 602, 115, 73. 370 

Stanton, William L 158. 532 

St. Clair, Julius R 498. 430 

Stealy. Clair L 666. 213. 205 

Steams, Russell B 486. 116 

Stebbins. Edward 506 

Stecher. Henry D 526. 158. 431 

Steele, E. C 514 

Steele, Leighton G 548. 229, 464. 474 

Steele, Walter B 526. 262 

Steen, Sidney T. . . 158, 404, 307, 133, 350, 

385. 282. 451 

Steere, Mary L 600 

Steers, Ben T 116 

Steers, George E 435 

Steggall, Clifford C 562 

Steketee, Paul L 504, 430 

Steketer, Eugene F 504 

Stenberg, Bemhard A 470 

Stephen, Harold M 502 

Stephenson, Merritt E 512 

SterUng, Walter A.. 584. 158, 133, 373. 380 

Stem, LouiB D 213 

Stevens, Clayton E 272 

Stevens, Emma H 194, 116. 440 

Stevens, Kenneth M 179, 343. 421, 

424,426 
Stevens, Perry H . . 560, 194. 179, 348, 388, 

343 

Stevens, Ray E 564 

Stevens, Roger B 534, 278 

Stevenson, Ellen B 620 

Stevenson, Fred L 534 

Stevenson, Jane D 608 

Stevenson, Willard A 508 

Stewart, John 522 

Stewart. Juan V 568 

Stewart, Margaret N 620, 116, 391 

Stewart, Robert P 116, 73, 347 

Stiles, Franklin A 568 

Stiles, Harry F 504 

Stimson, Clara A 698, 476 

Stimson, Donald C 498 

Stiver, Donald F 516. 194, 178, 179 

Stocker, Harry 414, 276 

Stoddard, Alexander J 420, 425, 426 

Stoddard, Sadie G 452 

StoU, Albert E 516, 544 

StoUer, Emil A 475 

Stolpe, Fillmore W 230 

Stone. Charles E 600. 117 

Stone. CUfford C 530, 116. 73, 347 

Stone, Earll R 150 

Stone, John W 150, 550, 343 

Stone, Orrin F 576 

Stonerock, Bessie V 630, 117 

Storms, Harry E 502 

Stott, Louis H 150 

Stowe, Marion F 362, 368. 302, 454 

Stovel, David D 50 

Stovel, Henry C 150 

Stowell, Marjorie M 117 

Strachan. Mar^^uerite K 628, 445 

Straughn, Virginia L 117, 452 

Strause, Charles L 580, 270 

Strauss. Frederick, G 263, 474 

Strawheckcr, Paul O 538 

Streeper, Austin T 474 

Streeter, Clarendon E 500, 367, 464 

Streeter, Errol H 150 

Stringer, Christina R 606, 364. 440 

Stringer, Roy E 584 

Stroh, Norma S 618, 117, 452 

Strouse, Abe K 574 

Struckman, George W 574 

Stryker. Carleton E. 150, 532. 307. 133, 386 

Stumpf. Vincent H 230, 550, 236 

Sturges, John P 586 

Sturtevant, Hubert B 584 

Styles, Bertrand C 540 

Sugar, David 1 422 

Sugar, Victor H 117, 422, 426 

Sugnet, Floyd P 230 

Sugujama. Kamerchi 477 

Sullivan, Donna E.. .370. 626, 117, 73, 301 

Sullivan, F. W 526, 432 

Sullivan, Julia M 430 

Sullivan. Marie G 622, 118 

Supe, Margaret L 118, 445 

Surgenor, Frank P 482, 118, 73, 430 

Sutherland. Otis L 564, 262 

Sutter, Harry B 104, 170, 376, 388, 

343. 410 
Sutton. Mildred E 620 



Sutton, Palmer E 584 

Swain, Thomas E 624 

Swainson, Clarence A. . .572. 104, 170. 388 

Swart, Carl B 610 

Sweet. Forest H 413 

Switaer. John 8 400. 672. 118. 73. 331. 

430. 442. 443 
Sylvester. E. Rodgers 441 



Taber. Frank A 618, 439 

Talbot. Cyril 350, 470 

Talcott. Warren E 670. 105. 179 

Taleen. Berthel W 436 

Tallman. James F 106. 179 

Tandkr. George R 105 

Tandy. Harold L 118. 366. 367 

Tappan. Brace N 624 

Tappan. William M 213. 662. 205. 343 

Tapping. T. Hawley 622. 672. 66, 105. 

300. 282. 470. 336. 414 

Tate. Murphy 105. 660. 468 

Tatum. Alfred W 425 

Taub. Edward 8 169 

Taylor. Alratheus A 540 

Taylor. Blair 482 

Taylor. Dean W 150. 638. 363. 431 

Taylor. Harold A 608. 250. 360. 342 

Taylor, Harry E 270 

Taylor. Howard S 526 

Taylor, James M 482 

Taylor. William M 350 

Teare. Thos. J 422 

Teegarden. Harold B 414. 420, 423 

Terhune. Guy L 467 

Thalner, Leonard F 556 

Thiel. Oscar B 105 

Thieme. Frederick J.. Jr 492 

Thoeming. Geo. R 674 

Thomas. Camp C 564. 245. 242 

Thomas. Charles R 214, 558 

Thomas, Donald 150 

Thomas, Edmund A 578, 250 

Thomas, Glenn P 500. 160, 342 

Thomas. James W 574, 118, 72. 337 

Thomas. I.ash 105. 660. 170. 348, 388 

Thomas. Ruth 8 614. 118 

Thomasma, Grace. .628, 118, 362. 301, 445 

Thompson, Alfred R 488, 118, 72, 73 

Thompson, Athol B 504 

Thompson, Frank B 484. 468. 460 

Thompson, Howard E 444 

Thompson, James P 484, 334, 468 

Thompson, Kathryn M 616 

Thompson. Leland 8 522, 448 

Thompson, Nathaniel 8 404, 342 

Thompson, Paul F 105, 402, 178, 388 

Thompson, Stanley J 277 

Thorns. Louis 160, 472 

Thorbum, James D 502 

Thorington, Carl H 522 

Thornton. Eugene 8 245, 568, 242 

Thram, Fred M 464 

Thurston, Norman T 578 

Tiesenga. Andrew 444 

Tilma, Anthony G 160 

Tinslcy, J. W. A 468 

Tinsman, Frederick H 408. 272, 110. 

73, 350, 430 

Titus, Marvin, 8 160 

Tobey, Frank L 367 

Todd, James D 180, 133, 373, 374 

Todd, Lester C 562 

Tokuyama, Sotaro 476, 110 

Tolan, Tom L 556. 271, 110 

Toles, Charles W 482 

Toles, Edward 8 482 

Tolochko, Maurice 8 452. 474 

Tolonen, Jacob A 424 

ToQf, Elisabeth L 420 

Toohy, aifford M 518. 119 

Toplon. Irving 8 421, 422, 428 

Torrey, Arthur H.. . .488. 110. 73, 387, 435 

Towne, Nathan C 484 

Towsley. Charles A 303, 304 

Trathen, Rilla R 119 

Traub, Eugene F 566, 119 

Treadgold, Geo. D 556 

Treat, Mildred 624 

Trelfa, Tom. .160, 538. 132. 386. 380, 341 

Tremaine, Margaret L 614 

Tremper, Hugh H 512 

Tromper, Richard H 512 

Tripolitis. Constantine D 432 

Trisler. Royal G 263. 441 

Troester. Marshall F 473 

Trombley. Ruth C 364. 628, 620, 110. 

391.445 



692 



Index — Continued 



Tnmi, Milton 8 468 

Tnie, Agnes A 368 

TruMoan, Elinor L 608 

Trueman, Harold 8 616 

Tiyaell, Ebba T 446. 462 

Tubba, Clara 1 614, 630. 462 

Tueke, Geta L 604, 362, 364. 368, 

370, 464 

TumbulL William V 492 

Turner, Joaeph W 634 

Turner, Robert W 482, 335 

Tuthill, Helen 608, 120, 302, 420 

Tuttle, LoweU H 470 

TyK>n. M. Muriel. .612. 120, 428, 429. 446 



u 



Ufer, Clarence E 614, 120, 314, 316, 

318,319. 320, 73, 386, 330, 340. 343 

Ulenburg. Mathilda F 120, 446 

Ullrich. RuaeeU W 568 

Underwood, GUbert 8 422. 576, 263 

Underwood, Wm. L 492 



Vail. Ethel 362. 368. 428, 446 

Vail,WllliamH 496.470 

VanAken. Laurence W 522 

Van Brunt, Frederick C 494. 464 

Vance, Kenneth W 616, 120. 73 

VanderKarr. Marie 120 

VanderVeen, Frands 120 

Vanderveer. Helen 620, 120, 73. 391 

VaoderZalm. L. E 120 

VanDeuaen, Aria L 496. 624. 120. 73, 

362. 368. 464. 392 

VanDuMn, Charles T 496. 277 

VanDueen. David L 411 

VanLeevwen, JuUa 454 

Van Sohoik. John D 668. 278 

Van Stone. Nathan E 375 

Van Volkenburgh. Vivian A 566 

Van Zandt, Marjorie A 602 

Vaughan, Warren T 656, 494, 214. 

205. 374 

Vaiques, Antonio A 636. 477 

Vedder. Franda B 498 

Vetter. Emeet R 160 

Vexler, Bernard 230 

Vibrans, Frank C 376 

Villanneva. Guillenno T 424 

Vincent. Lester B 429 

Vincent. Ralph M 662 

Vie, WUliam R 214 

Vivian, Florence D 698 

Voiffht, WiUv C 654 

Volden. Ti^brial G 432 

Vonachen. l^adcj . 588. 160, 133, 373. 343 

Von Nostita, Erich 160, 431 

Voorhees. Louis F 676, 490. 167. 

163. 390. 434 

Vorce. Mildred L 604 

Voiys. Arthur R 367 

Votey, Manorie M 630. 364. 445 

Votruba. William E 688 

Vyn, Clarissa D 364 

w 

Waddell, Henry R 492 

Wadhams, Carol W 610 

WagenseU, Hugo 422. 126, 436 

Waggoner, Joseph D 490 

Wagner. Frank C 570 

Wagner, Paul C 161, 133, 373 

Walte. Elbridge R 126 

Wakefield. Albert F 524 

Waldo, Lewia P 452 

Walker. Dorothy L 121. 440 

Walker. Evalynn H 626. 445 

Walker. Frands E 512 

Walker. Harriet K 368 

Walker. Karl F 506. 269. 359. 464. 469 

Walker. Portia 440 

Walker. Roger V 546 

Walker. Ross G 570. 121 

Wall, Hampton 544 

Waller. HaroU G 538 

Walls. Arch 592 

Walsh, Edwaid F 626 

Walsh, Genevieve A 622 

Walsh, L. E 662, 214 

Walsh, Mary E 622. 121. 446 

Waltar, Fred R 638. 464. 473 

Walters. Frank L 73, 387, 436 

Walthall. Damon O 214, 646 



Wals, Florenoa K 446 

WanstronvRuth C 608 

WanaeokTWilliam H 127, 464 

Waples. Harold J . .670, 196, 179, 410, 424 

Ward, Eugene A 508 

Ward, HTGerrit 508 

Ward, John A 506 

Ward, Leonard D 50 

Ward, Ralph H 280 

Ware, Dora E 602, 122 

Warner, Edward C 488 

Warner, Harley D 161. 490. 133, 

373, 386, 343 
Warner. Howard M..490. 122. 72. 387. 342 

Warren. Dorothea 612 

Warren. Walter 161. 430. 432 

Warren, WilHam B 590 

Warrick, Woodward A 373, 466 

Warriner, A. PhilUp 412 

Washbume, Blanche C 618. 122 

Wassman, Norman W 588. 442 

Waason, Harry R 508 

Waterbury. Lester E 408. 314, 315, 341 

Watkina. Geori» B 277 

Watkina. John R 584 

Watkina. Ralph H 514 

Watkina, William J 692 

Wataon. C. Frederick 526. 412 

Wataon. Robert W 566, 285. 293. 340 

Wataon, W. Lee. .i 500 

Wataon. Walter W 161. 600. 133 

Watt, ArchibaM H 271 

Wattles. Charles P 526. 560 

Watton, Walter F 215. 205 

Watts. John D 674 

Watts, Owen J 524, 268. 380 

Way. Frances A 602, 364. 366 

Weadook, George P 492 

Weaver. Howard E 239 

Weaver, Theron D 626. 161, 133, 369. 

373, 385. 451 

Webb. Helen L 616, 364 

Weber, Erwin W 618, 122 

Weber. Katherine J 616 

Webster, Cyril B 367 

Webster, Max E 470 

Wedemeyer. Frieda M 445 

Wehmeyer. J. L 161. 133 

Weinberger. Maurice 196. 179. 410. 424 

Weiner, Harry P 425 

Weinstdn. Henry. 525 

Wdael. Herbert W. 552. 230. 220 

Weiaa, Lehuid M 196 

Weiaainger, Carl F 435 

Welbourn. Leland S 566 

Welach, M. W 538, 363 

WeUer, Charlea N 558 

WeUing, David M 196, 179 

Wella, Gilbert B 534 

Wella, Robert J 564, 230 

Weltner, WilUam 161 

Wenley, Catherine D 602, 122, 392. 

440. 454 
Wemley. J. V 602. 122. 73, 

302. 440, 454 

Weake, Richard F 301, 285. 340 

Wesley, Kenneth C 490 

Westbrook. Adele 614. 123, 440, 442 

Weatbrook. Harry G 576, 584 

Westbrook. Roland S 167. 163 

Westerman, Kenneth N 451 

Westerwelt, Herbert O 215, 205 

Westlake. Thomas H. ... 196, 178, 410, 424 

Weston, Frank W 482 

Weatrate, Wm 215, 205, 343, 440 

Whalen, James L. . . .608, 30, 285. 340, 451 
Wheat, Renville 196, 402, 179, 

376, 388. 410 
Wheeler, Frank C. .161, 133. 373, 439, 451 

Wheeler, John E 590. 464 

Wheeler, Robert 1 494, 411 

Whehiu, Gladys L. .614, 258. 368, 428, 440 

Whelan. Leslie P 530 

WhiUker. Laurence E 520 

White, Albert W 592 

White, George 538, 367, 443 

White. Harold K 490, 572 

Whiteman. Stanley J 441 

Whitman. Walter F 570, 196, 410 

Whitmarsh. George J 674. 350 

Whitmer, George R 451 

Whitney. Lemuel C 590. 464 

Whittingham, Harvy H 608, 459 

Wickham, William P 161, 494, 132, 

389 342 

Wickwiro, James 8 5061 269 

Widmann, Roman C 614 

Wieber, Alioe Y 698, 429. 446 

Wieman, Elton E 808, 804 

Wiener. Earl L 628 



WwDac, Sam G 628 

Wieslander, Albert E 367 

Wiggins. Olive J 627 

WilBer. Clay W *. 510, 642 

WUbur. Rex E 162 

WUcox. Claude V 162 

WUcoxen. Lewis C 162. 133. 386. 334 

Wild. Barbara O 614. 446 

WUd. Erwin K 122. 464 

Wiley. Charles D 431. 475 

Willonson, Morton H 504. 271, 123, 73 

Willaxd Frank A 492 

Williams, Arthur G 375 

Williams. Arthur M 620 

Williams, Blanche 624 

Williams, Edger M 604, 336 

Williams, George W 260 

Williams, Glenn O r 690, 464 

Williams, Marian 610, 364, 463 

Williams. Mary O 612 

Williams, Max M 564 

WiUiams, Orva G 303. 304, 470 

Williams. Theodore 534 

Williamson. H. P 162. 435 

Williamson. Louise B 606. 463 

Williamson. Robert E 123 

WiUits. Charles M 490, 544 

Willson, William J 494 

Wilmore. Glenn J 205. 464 

Wilmot, Carl Huntington 588 

Wilner. Charles F 452 

Wilner. George D 422. 452 

Wilson. Alice K 628 

Wilson. Donald E 494 

Wilson. EUaabeth K 123 

Wilson. Hannah R 360 

Wilson. Herbert R 622. 664. 231 

Wilson. John H 488 

Wilson. John 8 484 

Wilson. Joseph 564 

Wilson. Lealie G 350 

Wilaon, Marian 370 

Wilaon, Marian G 602. 428 

Wilaon, Perdval L 488 

Wilson, Percy C 197 

Wilaon. Philip J.. Jr 492 

Wilaon. U. Stanley 123, 73, 449 

Winchell. Conatance M 612, 463 

Windle. WiUiam G 508 

Windmaeller. Rudolph W 470 

Winfield, Emery D 554 

Winalow, M. L 600 

Window, Rollin R 484. 464 

Wirth. Elmer H 441 

Wisdom, Ernest M 419 

Wishaid. Leslie Winstead 604, 123 

Wisner. Frank H 522 

Wittman. Caroline A 620 

Woeasner, Alice M 364 

Wohlfahrt, Clara B 630 

Wolcott, Charles C 568, 441 

Wong, Kd, Tit 472 

Wong. Yuan Dau 472 

Wood, Amelia T 608, 271 

Wood, AnnetU L 362, 368 

Wood. C. Stanley 197, 363, 424 

Wood, David Pangmon 277 

Wood, Edmund D 518. 124 

Wood. Frank W 124, 334, 469 

Wood, Frank A 124 

Wood. George P 554. 278 

Wood. Harold F 375 

Wood. Harry T 548, 231 

Wood, Julius B 586, 422 

Wood, Morrison C..510, 380. 339. 442. 451 

Woodbury, Bruce 162, 133 

Woodford, John Thornton 452. 468 

Woodman. Joseph E 367 

Woodruff. Marsh B 532 

Woods. Carleton W 220, 231 

Woodward, Richard M 516 

Woodworth. R. I. . .602. 364, 370. 442. 464 

Woolf . Emerson C 197, 179, 343 

Woolfan, Emmanuel B 278 

Woolley, Thomas H 500 

Worcester, Alice E 602 

Worden, Lloyd W 273 

Worman. Forrest F 475 

Wray, Chester B 474 

Wright, BurreU 197. 492, 544 

Wright. Carroll S 262 

Wright. Clarence J 548, 231, 349 

Wright, Edward P.. .486. 572. 124. 73. 387 

Wright, Edwin C 162 

Wright. Eugene C, Jr 610 

Wright. Evadne R 602 

Wright. Harry B 652 

Wright, Robert G 508 

Wu, Da Chang 162, 472 

Wuensch, Rudolph F 363 



693