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Full text of "Michigan summer resorts ... a guide to the summering places in the lake and river region of the state of Michigan; together with a list of hotels and boarding houses, their rates; fishing and juncting lodges and the laws respecting fishing and hunting, etc"

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MICH I G AN 
S U M M E R_ 
R. E S O R-T S 




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V^ \ _i^li*LV^ Vn i. .. -i| Together mth a List of Hotek and Boarding Houses, ^ 
^ their Rates; Fishing and Hunting Lodges and ^" 

^^ '^si><^ the Laws Respecting Fishing and Hunting, etc. 

AVued by ike. :n\^i(i'>!^0.T^^Q'paYt^tuiyc6 

PERE MARQUETTE RAILWAY- 





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Michigan — The Summer Land 

^IQUE among the States of America is Michigan. No other commonwealth is com- 
parable to it. Three lakes join hands and compass the state to make it a peninsula 
and a vast pleasure ground. With one thousand miles of lake — the great unsalted 
seas — that roll around its shores, Michigan is one of the delightfully cool regions of 
the North American continent during the heated season. There are accommodations 
for those who care for the simple outdoor life and accustomed to "roughing it," or 
all the diversified distractions for those who prefer life at well-appointed summer resorts. 
These form an almost unbroken chain that fringes the entire shore line of a thousand miles. 

The physical structure of the country is not without its diversity, from forest and meadow, 
mountain and \'alley, to lake and moor. Sunshine, gayety and life are ne\'er wanting. They 
who have come to Michigan once seldom fail to visit it again and again. 

Rest and comfort are assured in Northern Michigan. 

The peculiar topography of Lower Michigan vouches against the possibility of excesses of heat 
or cold. There is an almost entire absence of humidity. Even at the height of the summer 
season the sun's rays in\ol\c no discomforts. The prevailing winds are from the west and are 
cooled in their sweep across the bosom of Lake Michigan. Cool nights are common in Northern 
Michigan, when only a few hundred miles to the southward, the densely populated cities are 
sweltering. Sound sleep and perfect rest follow naturally in the wake of a stay in this vast country. 

Friendly welcome awaits those seeking a real holiday at the hundreds of summer hotels and 
farm houses that dot this section. From New Buffalo at the southern end of Lake Michigan, 
and extending to the north as far as the Straits of Mackinac and Sault Ste. Marie, and again 
southward down the St. Mary's River, Lake Huron, the St. Clair River and Lake St. Clair, these 
resorts fringe the shore. 

Michigan's resorts are readily accessible. From Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Cleveland, 
Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Louisville, Buffalo, Toledo or Detroit, it is but a twelve to 
a twenty-four-hour ride in a comfortable Pullman sleeping car. For those who li\'e further south 
close train connections are made at almost every other point. 

Brief descriptive sketches of but a small number of the more important resorts are carried 
in this booklet. Specific detailed information relative to the hotels and other places where 
accommodations are offered will be found in the last pages of this publication. Accurate detail 
maps of the resort region are also inserted at the back of the booklet. 

A forecast of the schedules of "The Resort Special" to the principal resorts for the season 
1917 is gi\en. These train schedules are but tentative or approximate, and consequently should 
not be accepted as final. Representatives of the Passenger Department of the Pere Marquette 
Railway, or other lines mentioned in this booklet, will cheerfully lend such assistance and give 
such information as is necessary to make a complete and well-planned vacation. 

For the Lake Michigan East Coast Country, greatly reduced Week-End Fares are offered 
at Chicago and suburban stations for points from New Buffalo to Pentwater, inclusive, from 
May 4th to September 30th. These tickets will be sold for all Friday afternoon trains, all 
Saturday trains and the Sunday morning train. Returning, they will be good until the following 
Monday. (See note below.) 

NOTE — These tickets ivill not be good northbound on Train \'o. 5 , or southbound on Tram 
No. 4, except when reading to or from points north of Holland. See Time-Table and Schedule of 
Week-End Fares. Page Thirty-.\'ine. 

FOR .APPROXIMATE TR.AIN SCHEDULES SEE PAGES 
THIRTY-SIX TO THIRTY-NINE. INCLUSIVE 



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TRANCis Parkman the historian, has paid tribute 
to the sovereign beauty of Mackinac Island, in 
these words: "The Island of Mackinac, owing 
'i^C' to its situation, its beauty, and the fish which 
the surrounding waters supplied, had long been a 
favorite resort of Indians. It is about three miles 
wide. So clear are the waters of Lake Huron, which 
wash its shores, that one may count the pebbles at an 
incredible depth. The island is fenced round by 
white limestone cliffs, beautifully contrasting with the 
green foliage that half covers them, and in the center 
the land rises in woody heights. The rock which forms 
its foundation assumes fantastic shapes, — natural 
bridges, caverns, or sharp pinnacles, which at this day 
are pointed out as the curiosities of the region. 
Legends and superstitions attached a mysterious 
celebrity to the place, and here, it was said the fairies 
of Indian tradition might often be seen dancing upon 
the w hite rocks, or basking in the moonlight." 

The Mackinac Island, which Parkman described, 
is the Mackinac Island of today, for fortunately the 
despoiling hand of commerce has spared it. 

The Island of Mackinac is a well-kept park, main- 
tained by the State of Michigan. Its drives and 
walks are a delight. The State recently added anothei- 
memorial to one of Michigan's great men — General 
Lewis Cass — in the form of a statue. Hotel accommo- 
dations are all that could be desired, and the range ot 
price is such as to fit every purse. 



A Happy Picnrc Pai 



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The Grand Hotel is the largest one there, and its 
location is also the most striking. There is a charm 
that lingers in the memory of all who have witnessed 
the view from the wide veranda looking across the 
sparkling waters of the Straits and toward the islands 
that dot them. Frank A. Nagel, of St. Louis, Mo., 
president of the Grand Hotel Company, and Charles 
j. Holden, Mackinac Island, resident manager, in 
charge of the Grand Hotel since 1910, will again con- 
duct it this year. Under their super\'ision nearly 
$100,000 have been expended in remodeling, redecorat- 
ing and refinishing the hotel. The improvements also 
include 100 additional bathrooms and the installation 
of hot and cold water in every guest room. New 
electric elevators and a steam-heating system have 
been installed. A buffet, a barber shop, ten-pin 
alleys, billiard halls and a casino are maintained also. 

The hotel grounds comprise twenty acres. The 
building itself, which is of "Old Colonial"' style of 
architecture, is situated on an eminence which over- 
looks the Straits of Mackinac, giving by day or night 
an ever-changing and ever-interesting panoramic \iew 
of the commerce of the inland seas. 

Within one hundred yards of the Grand Hotel there 
is a golf course, which, because of natural conditions, 
has been declared one of the sportiest golf links in the 
North. 

The Grand Hotel will open July 1st and will 
positively remain open until September 20th, thus 
assuring hay-fever patients accommodation until after 
the expiration of the season of this malady. 

St. Ignace, The Quaint 

ON the extreme southci'n j^oint ol the mainland 
of the Upper Peninsula, w hich stretches out to 
what is known as the Straits of Mackinac, 
lies another spot hallowed in the history of 
Michigan — St. Ignace. This town was founded by 



the great explorer, Pere Marquette, for whom was 
named the Railway System which serves more than 
three-fourths of the population of the State. Over 
the tomb of Father Marquette rises a simple marble 
shaft. In the little church are a number of interesting 
relics associated with the explorer and the mission of 
St. Ignace. 

Sault Ste. Marie 



l"y'T5]>jNUMERABLE water trips are offered from 
K*ld-. Mackinac Island, and for that matter from 
te J, Petoskey, but few are as interesting in the 
1^^^^ 1 variety of the scenery unfolded as that to or 
from the city of Sault Ste. \larie, on the St. Mary's 
River. Colossal locks and ship canals have been con- 
structed on either side of the river to permit the safe 
navigation of this stream, where the rapids would 
make it impossible. 

Petoskey 

JHAT section which encompasses Petoskey and Bay 

lJ) View has the form of a giant amphi-theater, of 
:^\ which Little Traverse Bay is the arena. There 

■f'^ I are those traxelers, who, looking upon the blue 
waters for the first time. ha\e found in them the 
same iridescent sheen that marks those of the Bay 
of Naples. Such is the site upon which these two 
celebrated summer resorts are located. 

Petoskey, a progressive city of about 8.000 inhabit- 
ants, is usually reinforced by a colony of summer 
visitors and cottagers of as many more during the 
summer season. It is the natural center of a pros- 
perous fruit and agricultural district. The city is 
well paved and maintained with scrupulous care. 
Few places are more beneficial to hay fever patients. 

The country road system is being extended each 
year and offers many fine automobile drives. Chief 
among these is one to the Bliss Farm and the "Old 
Trail Tavern, " near Cross Village. 



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Petoskey has several amusement places, including a 
large roller skating rink. A nine-hole golf course w ill 
be ready for the season's visitors. 

The hotels are jointly capable of comfortably 
accommodating 3,000 guests. In addition, there are 
many desirable boarding houses, rooming houses and 
restaurants. 

Hotel Cushman is a splendid hostelry, which, w hile 
open all the year round, caters particularly to the sum- 
mer tourists who "go North " each season. Itis situated 
on a rise of ground which overlooks Petoskey's 
beautiful central public park. Mr. W. L. McManus, 
Jr., will operate it again this season. 

Hotel Perry, N. J. Perry, proprietor, and Clark's 
Tavern, Mrs. Alexander Clark, owner, are also popular 
tourist rendezvous. 

Three flowing wells, which yield waters rich in their 
medicinal and curative properties in such maladies as 
rheumatism, etc., have recently been discovered. 
The grounds have been beautified into a park, con- 
crete approaches have been laid, and drinking 
fountains erected, these the gift of the women of 
Petoskey. Altogether, the beauty of the city has 
been enhanced considerably thereby. 

Bay View 

JERTAiN conditions make Bay View unique among 
^T all the resorts of the region. During many 
^1 years of growing popularity it has been the 
' seat of a great assembly and summer university, 
this with natural beauties and the wide variety of 
sport provided, making a combination that is a 
powerful magnet to thousands. Its devotees call it 
the most beautiful summer town in the world. Wind- 
ing, shaded streets and hundreds of cottages rise in 
successive terraces from the \ery shore of Little 



Traverse Bay. Upon a park-like campus face the 
public buildings of the university, including a $50,000 
auditorium. On the beach below are tennis courts and 
a handsome casino, where a great swimming pool and 
fine bowling alleys ofTer sport. This year is to mark a 
real forward movement in assembly work. The 
brilliant program v\ill include musicians, entertainers 
and lecturers of uncommon distinction. At the same 
time, the university is at hand with a selected faculty 
and hundreds of students for summer work. It is 
this happy blend of cultivation, entertainment and 
sport in such attractive surroundings that make Bay 
View a delight to young and old. The university 
classes begin July Ibth, the assembly July 20th, and 
there is never a dull minute thereafter. A perfect 
sanitation, water and electric system, 500 cottages, 
easy access to all Bay resorts and such excellent, well- 
appointed and moderate-priced hotels as the Bay 
View House, Terrace Inn and Howard House assure 
comfort for all. Write to Mr. Thomas Gordon. Jr., 
Howell, Mich., for Bay View Bulletin. 

Roaring Brook and Ramona Park 

o more superb \'iew of the beauties of the Little 
SiJpv Traverse Bay and its admirable \irgin shores 
than can be obtained from Ramona Park or 
the Roaring Brook resorts. These resorts are 
situated on the cur\-e of the bay along the north 
shore. The communities of cottages are rather 
exclusive, although Hotel Ramona and Roaring Brook 
Inn cater to transient visitors. The former is situated 
on the shore of the bay: the latter is built on a high 
wooded bluff at some distance inland. The walks to 
and from these two resorts are through beautiful 
woodland. 



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Wequetonsing 

UST a short distance farther is Wequetonsing — a 

community of cottages. Many of these homes 

are built facing the main shore drive, while 

others are erected on the shelf of land just under 

the bluff, running along the north shore of Little 

Traverse Bay. Wequetonsing Hotel, managed by 

Mrs. F. K. and A. A. Brubaker and Maple Grove Inn. 

managed by Mrs. C. B. Gray, have proved popular 

w ith the tourist. 

West Wequetonsing adjoins Wequetonsing, and has 
a station of the Grand Rapids & Indiana summer 
suburban service. The Colonial Hotel, Mrs. C. H. 
Eaton, manager, is located at this point. 

Harbor Springs 

'kAiNS of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway 

maintain a frequent service between Petoskey 

and Harbor Springs. This latter \'illage is the 

terminus of this line. The boats of the Little 

Iraxcrse Bay line touch at all resort docks at hourly 

intervals. Substantial improvements have been made 

to the hotel accommodations during the past season. 

The New Lmmet is the chief one. Tourists find much 

of interest in the Old Mission church which was built 

in the long ago for the uplifting of the Indians. 

Across the little harbor is Harbor Point, which has 
^ecome the summer home of those of wealth and 
eisure, who ha\e made it an e.\clusi\e residence resort. 
Many persons of prominence are entertained each 



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summer at the Harbor Point Club, which has develop- 
ed an enviable record under the management o 
Mr. F. H. Irish. 

Forest Beach 

RIVING westward from Harbor Springs station, 
through woods and over hills, takes the tourist 
to the Forest Beach Resort and Hotel. This 
alluring spot, which is on a slight eminence, 
overlooks Lake Michigan. There is a luxuriant growth 
of virgin forest consisting chiefly of cedar, beech and 
birch. The hotel gives excellent service. 

Suburban Petoskey 

bjp^TLATED in Petoskey s hinterland are numerous 
v^^' pleasant spots uhich may be reached from 
|i . _■ this point via The Grand Rapids & Indiana 
\sLz~\ Railway. Walloon Lake, on which are located 
many desirable hotels, is perhaps the most inviting 
of all. It lies south of Petoskey and northeast ol 
Charlevoix. 

Oden is north and east and has some famous 
springs. Four miles from Petoskey is Wa-ya-ga-mug 
and Round Lake. On the shores of the latter the 
Indian play "Hiawatha" is enacted each summer. 
Thousands of visitors are attracted by the pla\'. 
Another throng takes the steamer of the Inland Route 
from Conway. No more devious trip is known to 
travelers the world over. The boat passes through 
Crooked Lake and Ri\er into Burt Lake and through 
Indian Ri\er to Mullet Lake and to Topinabee. 



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Here luncheon is ser\ed at the Inn, and afterward 
one may return to Conway, or a change of boats may 
he made and the trip continued down the Cheboygan 
Ri\er to Cheboygan. Inland Route of^ces are in 
Petoskey. From Cheboygan one may go to Bois Blanc 
Island, where Pointe aux Pins resort is found, and 
then to Mackinac Island. 

Charlevoix - the - Beautiful 

atmosphere of pure serenity welcomes the 
traveler alighting from the train at Charlevoi.x- 
the-Beautiful. There is none of the character- 
Lt--^! istics of the smoke-filled battlefields of modern 
industrial competition. It is a city given over entirely 
to genuine enjoyment. 

Charlevoix-the-Beautiful is built on a series of three 
natural terraces. Lake Michigan rolls on its west- 
ward ; Round and Pine Lakes on its eastward wooded 
shores. All about there is an abundance of virgin 
wooded growth. On the south side of Round Lake 
ani.1 with Pine Lake to the east, the Charlevoix Homes 
Association holds a large tract of land. Civic enter- 
prise has anticipated every want. Water is supplied 
the city by a private system. Drainage and perfect 
sanitation are assured by a modern and complete 
sewer system. 

Hotel Belvedere, owned by The Resort Association, 
accommodates 300 guests. The service is of the first 
order. Mr. R. P. Foley is the manager. The 
opening date is June 10th. 

Across Round Lake, on the other shore, is the 
Chicago Resort. Transient guests are entertained at 
the club house when recommended by a member of 
the Association. 

The Pere Marquette's attractive station faces Pine 
Lake, and from this point there is a broad a\enue 
which leads back from the station to the business 
tlistrict of Charlevoix —a mile aw ay. on the shore of 



Lake Michigan. This street runs along the north 
shore of Round Lake and skirts the upper terrace, 
while on the left is seen the Chicago Resort. Across 
the sparkling waters of Round Lake one sees on the 
farther shore the terraces of the Charlevoix Summer 
Homes Association. North of the avenue is a large 
tract owned by the Charlevoix Resort Association, 
which lies between Pine Lake and Lake Michigan. 

The Charlevoix Golf Club, which has been described 
by an eastern expert as the "Ekwanok of the West," 
extends northward across a ridge of low hills. It is 
an eighteen-hole course. The grounds are always well 
kept and are ever-inviting to the devotees of this out- 
door sport. Much money has been expended in 
improving this course and expert golfers from all over 
the country come to play upon it. 

The Inn, which is one of the best appointed public 
resort hotels to be found anywhere, will again be 
under the management of Mr. A. I. Creamer, who also 
conducts the Highland Pines Inn. Southern F^ines, N. C. 
He will have with him the same efficient organization 
which has contributed much to the popularity of this 
resort. Upwards of 350 guests are accommodated 
here. Recent improvements and enlargements add 
to the attractiveness of The Inn. There are now 
sixty private suites, each with bath, while every floor 
is provided with public baths and lavatories. The 
date for the opening this year will be June 30th. 

The Charlevoix Beach Hotel, owned and managed 
by Mr. J. S. Baker, has been enlarged since last 
season, and it is now a seven-story structure. Over 
$25,000 have been expended in beautifying the 
building and the grounds. This hotel is located on 
the Lake Michigan side of the city. 

Other hotels are Hotel Michigan and 1 fotcl Charle- 
voix, and the Hallett House, on the avenue leading to 
Belvedere Station. 



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Good accommodations and moderate prices obtain 
at the numerous boarding-houses of the city. Detailed 
information on this subject will be found on the last 
pages of this booklet. 

.A picturesque equestrian trail through the \'irgin 
forests adjacent to Charlevoix has challenged the 
admiration of every votary of this outdoor sport who 
has had the good fortune to ride upon it. A promi- 
nent Riding School will be represented. Experienced 
instructors will have charge of the work. 

One of the distinctive features of The Inn is the 
big swimming pool, which is being patronized by 
thousands each year. The pool is kept filled with 
filtered water from Lake Michigan, flowing constantly, 
and maintained at a temperature that makes a 
plunge a delight at all times. It is also a safe place 
for the little ones who are learning how to swim and 
the mothers have not been slow in appreciating this. 
Competent instructors are always in attendance. 

-Attractive furnished houses and cottages, for the 
month or the season, may be secured in Charlevoix or 
neighboring resorts. A list of these may be found on 
the last pages of this book, and any additional infor- 
mation will be gladly given by Mr. F. V. Alexander, 
Ticket Agent of the Pere Marquette at Charlevoix. 

While Charle\-oix is in th; heart of the Northern 
Michigan resort country, it is surrounded by a 
territory honeycombed with other desirable resorts. 
Sixteen miles north is Petoskey; twelve to twenty -five 
miles to the south is the Intermediate Lake Region, 
easily accessible for a day's fishing through the special 
summer train ser\ice of the Pere N'larquette; eastward 
is the Pine Lake Country, where lie Boyne City, East 
Jordan and Walloon Lake. 

During the summer the gas-electric motor ser\'ice of 
the Pere Marquette offers resorters frequent trains 



during the day and evening between Belvedere, 
Charlevoix and Petoskey-Bay View. At the last 
named point connection is made with dummy trains 
over the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway for Harbor 
Springs, Wequetonsing, Roaring Brook, Wa-ya-ga- 
mug, Oden and Walloon Lake. Two steamers make 
daily trips to the head of Pine Lake, and another 
boat goes frequently to the historic Beaver Islands, 
lying in Lake Michigan, northw est of Charlevoix. 

Resorts of Pine Lake 



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WHITE-WINGED Craft and yachtsmen as well as 
motor boats and motor boatmen, in countless 
numbers preempt Pine Lake during the sum- 
- ■^^^' mer months, as magnificent an expanse of blue 
waters as is to be found in .America. This lake 
stretches eastward from Charlevoix-the-Beautiful. It 
separates into two arms — the south and east bays. 
On the former nestles East Jordan: on the latter, 
Boyne City. East Jordan is reached by the trains of 
the East Jordan & Southern Railw ay, which connect 
with the Pere Marquette Railway at Bellaire, or by 
daily steamer from Charle\oix. 

Restfulness and excellent fishing grounds are among 
the advantages which both Charlevoix and East 
Jordan offer. The immediate streams and lakes are 
the haunts of trout, bass, pike, muskellunge, and 
other fish. Mr. R. A. Brintnall. Secretary of the 
East Jordan Board of Trade, w ill gi\e such infor- 
mation as is required. 

Boyne City is reached by boat from Charlevoix. 
The quiet and peaceful aspect of this place blends 
well with the beauties of the adjacent country, 
reminding one of New England. 

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Intermediate Lakes 

LMOST parallel to the east shore of Grand Traverse 
Bay from Williamsburg to Charlevoix, extend- 
ing at some distance inland, in an almost 
— -' Linhroken chain, are what are known as the 
ntermediate Lakes. Along the shores of these pictur- 
esque bodies of water are hundreds of points of in- 
terest to the summer visitor, the angler or the hunter. 

Elk Rapids, at the outlet of the Intermediate Lakes 
— so popular with those who like an extended canoe 
trip — is situated on the east arm of Grand Traverse 
Bay. It is in the center of the Grand Tra\'erse 
fruit region. The land about Elk Rapids is high; 
the water is pure; the climate is healthful and the 
fishing is excellent. 

.\leguzee Point Resort, just south of Elk Rapids, 
on Elk Lake, is a recent bidder for popular favor 
among the summer visitors. It is delightfully sit- 
uated, and is the first "port of call" for the Interme- 
diate Lake steamers. 

Boarding the little steamer at Elk Rapids, one sails 
through Elk Lake and Round Lake, into Torch Ri\er 
stopping at Torch River Bridge where Bingham's 
Torch Lake Inn. a new and well conducted summer 
hotel, is situated and then out upon Torch Lake (Old 
Torch), and across to .Alden. On the way from Elk 
Rapids the boat stops at Rex Terrace and Skegemog 
Point. These resorts issue booklets descriptive of 
their advantages. After a pause at Alden (and some- 
times a change of boats), the trip up Torch Lake may 

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Ready for a Big One 



be resumed. The first stop is at Lone Tree Point. 
three miles from Aiden. This attractive resort is a 
favorite with Chicago people. Beyond Lone Tree 
is Clam Ri\er entrance, and a half mile north of it is 
the Pere Marquette Beach Hotel, deservedly popular 
with residents of Chicago, Detroit and Ohio points. 

Coming back to Clam River, the steamer once or 
twice a week continues on into Clam Lake, into Grass 
River and Grass Lake, and to the end of the trip at 
Bellaire. There are several fishing camps on Grass 
Lake where are found good entertainment and excel- 
lent sport among the finny tribes. 

Lake View Resort, also on the east side of the 
lake, is a homelike place, and has been improved 
with new detached bungalows. On the west shore 
is Miley's Lodge, a new cottage resort. 

Hayo-Went-Ha Camp for boys, conducted by the 
State Committee of the Young Men's Christian 
Associations and recognized as one of the foremost 
in the world, begins its fourteenth season with the 
summer of 1917. The camp is located on Torch Lake, 
the largest and one of the most beautiful inland 
bodies of water in Michigan. Mr. F. P. Knapp will 
again act as camp director and associated with him 
will be men of national reputation in work with boys. 
The equipment of the camp is as fine as can be found 
anywhere, including a clubhouse, spacious dining 
lodge, tennis courts, baseball diamond, boats, etc. 
Fifty-five acres of wooded land away from resort 
influences make it an ideal camping spot. 




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Hotel Ramona. Ramnna Park 




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Boys ha\e been in attendance from over 150 cities 
and towns and a large percentage of them return 
year after year. 

Parents desiring to send their boys to Hayo- 
Went-Ha should write Mr. C. W. Kirkpatrick, Secre- 
tary, 411 .'\ssociation Building, Detroit, Mich. 

Beyond Bellaire, the fishing along the Intermediate 
chain is the delight of the angler. Stopping at Central 
Lake Station and taking a launch, one is taken to 
Fisk's Lodge, managed by Mrs. C. B. Fisk. This is a 
rallying point for fishermen who like the royal sport 
of bass and muskellunge angling. At the head of the 
chain of lakes is Ellsworth village. E.xcellent fishing 
and competent guides are also found here. 

Fisherman's Paradise, near Bellaire, Mich., is a 
rendezvous of sportsmen. Mr. H. D. Smith, uho 
conducts this family resort, has recently made exten- 
sive improvements to his property including the 
construction of a new and picturesque log and stone 
bungalow dining room, providing seating accommo- 
dations for 200. [-"onies have been added to the 
equipment for the entertainment of the children. 
The bathing beach is safe. 

Good fishing is found at practically all the resorts 
along the Intermediate Lakes, and the experienced 
fisherman will travel far before reaching a district 
which will yield him equal results. There are many 
trout streams in this region. 

Suitable camping sites a-plenty are found along the 
Intermediate Lakes almost anywhere. Each year 
sees an ever-increasing number of these lovers of life 
in the outdoor pitching their camps in the wooded 
slopes running back from the open water front 
Ideal bathing beaches and hundreds of cold springs of 
crystal water are to be found almost everywhere. In 
many cases parties of twenty-five to seventy-fi\e are 
formed in cities miles away to take up some favored 



camping spot in the Intermediate Lake section. 
These camp sites are easily accessible from the railroad. 
Steamer and launch facilities enable campers to 
get to the towns as desired. The steamers Ruth 
and Mabel perform service between Elk Rapids and 
Clam Ri\er, touching at all intermediate resorts. 

Grand Traverse Bay 

HAT summerland, known as Northwestern Michi- 
gan, has Traverse City for its principal gateway 
and capital. 

Tra\erse City is situated at the head of 
beautiful Grand Traverse Bay, a body of water thirty- 
five miles long and from fi\e to six miles in width. 
Its beaches are wide, sandy and safe for bathing or 
boating. In addition, there is all that can be desired 
by the most exacting artistic temperament. The 
sunsets have a diversity of coloring that would be 
declared unreal on an artist's canvas. 

No less than thirty-two inland lakes are found 
within easy distances of the city. On each of these, 
resorts have been developed. They are accessible 
by train, boat or automobile. Good roads ha\e been 
and are still being built. Special drives — se\en in 
number — ha\e been mapped out, making it possible 
to leave in the morning by automobile, motor all day 
and return to Tra\erse City by a different route in 
the evening. 

Near-by streams afford good German brown and 
rainbow trout fishing. Write the Secretary of the 
Chamber of Commerce, Traverse City. Mich., for 
booklet. 

The Traverse City Golf and Country Club main- 
tains a nine-hole 3000-yard course and a large, com- 
modious club house which has just been completed. 
This latter is situated on the brow of a hill and com- 
mands a view of Boardman Lake, Traverse City and 
both arms of Grand Traverse Bay. 



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The course has been pronounced by experts one of 
the most wonderful in the country, as all the hazards 
are natural and of a kind that challenges the skill of 
the expert and stimulates the desire of accomplish- 
ment in those not so proficient. The drive from the 
fourth tee. on the brow of the Lake overlooking 
Boardman Lake, to the fourth hole, over Boot Lake 
is a drop of 100 feet. Syd. J. Cooper, open golf 
champion of Indiana, has been secured as professional. 

For further information address the secretary. Mr. 
K. D. Lewis, Traverse City, Mich. 

The steamer "Mary Ethel" will make close connec- 
tions with "The Resort Special" to and from Bowers 
Harbor, Ne-ah-ta-wanta and Old Mission. 

The Pere Marquette and the Traverse City, 
Leelanau & Manistique Railway operate a through 
sleeping car ser\ice between Chicago and Tra\erse 
City. Omena and Northport during the tourist season. 
Direct automobile service is provided between Sutto.ns 
Bay and Leland at reasonable rates. 

Ne-ah-ta-wanta. Edgewood and Old Mission resorts 
are on the peninsula that projects into Grand Tra\erse 
Bay. These can be reached also by a dri\e from 
Traverse City. 

Ne-ah-ta-wanta is a family resort consisting of a 
number of very attractive cottages. Among the 
varied attractions of this popular resort are golf, 
bowling, tennis, boating, fishing and bathing on a 
safe sandy beach. 

Edgewood is a quiet family resort with excellent 
board and accommodations in rooms and in furnished 
cottages. Edgewood Cottage Resort, with a central 
dining hall, is farther south. Miss Lucy D. Lewis is 
manager. 

Old Mission, with its community of cottages and 
numerous boarding houses, is another delightful point 
to spend a summer vacation. Omena, which is near 
by, has also some indi\'idual claims as a resort point. 



as also the Leelanau Resort, w ith its hotel and cottages. 
Just south of Omena village is Hotel Clovers, a cottage 
resort of the first order, which is managed by Mr, 
William W. Foltz. 

The Northport Point Cottage Resort lies at the 
outer entrance to the big bay. Cedar Lodge affords 
excellent accommodations to the tourists and visitors 
at Northport Point. 

Inland from Traverse City 

AMONG the numerous and beautiful lakes found 
inland from Traverse City, few can compare 
with Lake Leelanau or Long Lake to the north 
and west; Green and Duck lakes at Interlochen 
on the main line of the Pere Marquette; Platte Lakes 
and Crystal Lake, near the shore of Lake Michigan 
at Frankfort ; and Lake Ann and Tra\erse Lake 
Resort, on the Manistee & Northeastern out of 
Tra\erse City. 

The Glen Lake region has a number of attracti\'e 
and comfortable homes that afford accommodations 
for the tourist and the sportsman. Glen Lake is 
well stocked with bass, lake trout, pickerel and perch. 
The streams which empty into the lake teem with 
brook trout. Out in Lake Michigan there is oppor- 
tunity for deep-water fishing. 

Lake Leelanau and Leland 

' V T'ORTHWE.ST of Tra\erse City, twenty miles or 
l'^ - thereabouts, on a narrow strip of land lying 
'.J- between Lake Michigan and Lake Leelanau 

i C- (Carp Lake), lies Leland. This place, which 

has many natural allurements for the angler and 
tourist, is reached from Traverse City by the Manistee 
& Northeastern Railroad to Fouch, and boarding the 
steamer "Leelanau," of which Capt. J. Ver Snyder is 
master, for a delightful water trip of two hours' 
duration. There is an attractive landscape all the way. 



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A Scene Near Bi 






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The Whispering Pine 



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Fountain Point 

ON the route co\-ered by the steamer 
which plies to and from Fouch, are Fountain 
Point Resort and Provemont. The former is 
notable for its big mineral springs, which flow 
steadily. An excellent hotel, cottages, a safe bathing 
beach and good fishing and outdoor sports, are among ^ 
the attractions of this resort section. Mr. Albert "^ 
Meafoy, Pro\emont P. O., is proprietor and manager. 

Interlochen and Pine Park 

SKIRTING the edge of Green Lake and almost 
completely surrounding Hotel Pennington, one 
of the most modern types of summer hostelries p 
to be found in the north country, is a natural 
pine forest of dense growth. Hotel Pennington is 
situated near the Pere Marquette station at Inter- 
lochen, thirteen miles south of Traverse City. There 
are se\eral lakes nearby. In front is Green Lake, 
while half a mile back is Duck Lake. 

Hotel Pennington has a capacity of one hundred 
guests. 1 he Green Lake Resort Association ow ns a 
cottage resort here. A descriptive booklet may be 
had on application to the Interlochen Resort .Asso- 
ciation, Interlochen, Mich. 

Pine Park, another resort similarly situated in a 
virgin forest, is being developed as a cottage resort. 
It lies one mile east of Interlochen, 

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Frankfort and Crystal Lake 

fjN that region adjacent to Frankfort and Crystal 
Lake, reached by the Pere Marquette Railway 
to Thompsonville and the Ann Arbor Railroad 
from that junction point, are a number of 
attractive outing places. The Congregational As- 
sembly is located on Crystal Lake, near Frankfort, 
uhere annual Chautauquas are held. The grounds 
comprise 125 acres of wooded land, with hotels, 
cottages and boarding-houses. This resort, as we 
as Frankfort or Beulah, on Crystal Lake, is an ideal 
place to spend a summer \acation or a week-end. 
Write the Congregational Assembly, Frankfort, or 
G. .A. Weller, A. G. F. & P. A., the Ann Arbor 
Railroad Company, Toledo, Ohio. 

Portage Point 

fjr=^NiQLE, restful, secluded. — that's Portage Point, 
^.'\l^'. the summer resort, point for point, unequalled. 
r - ; Portage Point is unique, primarily in point 
I '-of location. Situated just ten miles north of 
progressive Manistee, the portal to the summer 
resorters' paradise. Portage Point, the golden pine- 
crested, rugged strand of sand, commands, on the 
west, the unparalleled scenic splendor of old Lake 
Michigan in its \ari-colored beauty. 

The placid, crystal-pure waters of Portage Lake 
and a channel, 400 feet wide, connecting it with Lake 
Michigan, bound Portage Point on the east and south. 



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Btacli I luul, lurJi Luku 

Completing the picturesqueness of its environs and 
presenting every known facility for perfect comfort, 
Portage Point Inn and Annex — Beech Lodge — are 
adequate assurance that here is all one may desire 
to make this season the most enjoyable. The Inn, and 
Annex, modern to the last degree, leave naught to 
be desired. They are the center of all attractions 
and the golf, tennis, fishing, sailing, ball-room, club 
house and children's playgrounds are easily accessible. 
All recreations offered at Portage Point are of a 
quality commensurate w ith w hat you have a right to 
expect when seeking the best. 

On the eastern shore of the lake is Onekama, and 
all along its 10 or 12 miles of beautiful shores are 
handsome summer homes and resort colonies. 

For information concerning Portage Point, com- 
munications should be directed to Mr. R. A. Jewell, 
Onekama, Mich. 

Portage Point and Onekama are reached by the 
Pere Marquette and the Manistee & Northeastern 
Railways via Manistee or Kaleva. Write Mr. D. Riely, 
General Passenger Agent, Manistee & Northeastern 
Railroad, Manistee, Mich., for detailed information 
of Portage Lake resorts, cottages /or rent, etc. 

Ludington and Manistee 

^'■< important rendez\'ous for the summer 
visitor, a leading port of the east coast 
of Lake Michigan and also a terminal of 
the Pere Marquette Railway is the three- 
fold character of Ludington. 

It is also from this city that Xlichigan's great 
system of transportation draws its name, for this 
thriving city was long known as Pere Marquette. 
Here, too, the Pere Marquette river discharges into 
Lake Michigan. Ludington is also of importance 
because of the magnitude of trans-lake shipping w hich 
is carried on between this city and Milwaukee, and 




Cutlagcb at M:lc 



also between it and Manitowoc. Two passenger lines 
are in operation to and from Milwaukee. Other 
lines make Ludington a port of call. 

Good hotels and boarding houses make Ludington 
a most desirable place to visit during the summer. 

Manistee likewise is a thriving port city, sixteen 
miles north of Ludington, and at the mouth of the 
Manistee ri\-er. Numerous resorts are near at hand, 
and there is an opportunity for large industrial 
development, through the power afforded by the river. 
Both Ludington and Manistee are centers for rich 
and rapidly de\eloping agricultural and fruit growing 
sections. Thousands of acres are being planted to 
fruit trees. 

Epworth Heights 

'ONSTANTLY growing is the Epworth Heights 
community resort just two miles north of 
Ludington. New cottages have been erected 
'r-^l each year until now the number exceeds 200. 
For those who do not care to be burdened with "keep- 
ing house " there is a good hotel. Of amusements 
there is a w ide range, including tennis, croquet, row ing, 
canoeing and sailing on both inland and Lake Michigan 
waters. The golf links are well laid out and the golf 
club house, which has just been completed, is as 
attract i\e a two-story structure as can be found in 
the North. 

The "walking" sand dunes near-by appeal to the 
curious. An assembly program, w hich brings speakers 
and entertainers of national prominence during the last 
week in July and the first three weeks in August, 
proves a strong feature of the season's activities. 

The Mary Wood Clhase School of Musical Arts, of 
Chicago, holds its Summer School annually during 
July and August at Epworth Heights. Two new 
studios will be ready for the opening of the season. 

This school attracts professional students from all 
over the United States and has enrolled also some 



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pupils from distant countries. The courses ottered 
comprise Elementary as well as Teachers' Training 
Classes. The Conserxatory, which contains studios 
for teaching and practicing, is situated in a wooded 
glen, surrounded by luxuriant foliage and unbroken 
quiet. 

The Ben Greet or the Coburn W oodland Players, 
in Shakespearean repertoire, are annual visitors at 
Epworth Heights and also at Lake Harbor. A steam 
dummy service connects Epworth Heights v\ith Lud- 
ington. 

Mr. Polemus H. Swift, Secretary, 257 Keystone 
Avenue, River Forest, 111., will give particulars as to 
membership or other pri\ileges at Epworth Heights 
on request. 

Hamlin Lake Resorts 

fHERE is a distinctiv^e charm that per\ades the 
entire Hamlin Lake Resort region, north of 
Epworth Heights. This point is also reached 
by the "dummy " line from Ludington. There 
are few Michigan inland lakes that surpass this bod>- 
of water, where the angler's quest is rewarded with a 
plentiful catch of small-mouth black bass, pickerel, 
pike and muskellunge. Several trout streams empty 
into Hamlin Lake. Piney Ridge, Camp Arcadia 
Resort, Grand View Hotel, Sauble Inn and Forest 
Hill are among the numerous other resorts. These 
are all reached bv launch from the "dumm\ " line 



Inland from Ludington 

iROUT streams and lake resorts are to be found 

inland from Ludington. Oak Openings Resort 

is situated at Round Lake, near Batcheller 

Station, on the Manistee Branch of the Pere 

Marquette. There are also fishing camps on the 

Pere Marquette river, which can be reached from 




Baldwin; and at Big Star Lake, eight miles from 
Baldwin, is Oak Lodge, where excellent camping and 
fishing grounds are also located. 

Resorts of the Lake Huron Coast 

QNLY passing mention of the resorts located south 
:' of the Straits of Mackinac, along the west coast 
- ,1] of Lake Huron, so well are they known to the 
_^-^.' American tourist. Cheboygan, Rogers City, 
.\lpena, Harrisville, Au Sable (Oscoda), Tawas 
Beach, 'V'an Etten Lake and Point Lookout are the 
principal ones. Then there are Bay Port and Port 
.Austin, on Saginaw Bay; and the Pointe aux Barques 
resort, at the tip of "The Thumb: " Harbor Beach and 
surrounding section; Huronia, Gratiot and Edison 
beaches and St. Clair River and St. Clair Flats section 
— the "Venice of America." 

Recreation-seekers and prospective farmers, too, 
will find much of interest in the country lying between 
Bay City and Cheboygan, which is tapped by the 
Detroit & Mackinac Railway. From Bay City to 
.Alpena the railroad runs along the Lake Huron shore. 

A large summer hotel and cottage resort is situated 
at Tawas Beach on Tawas Bay. Inquiries for cottages, 
etc., should be directed to Mr. W. G. MacEdward, 
G. P. A., Detroit & Mackinac Railway, Bay City, Mich. 

Several hundred lakes filled with bass and man\' 
trout streams are reached via this line. 

The better-known are the following: Mullet Lake, 
reached from Cheboygan and Aloha; Black Lake, 
reached from Cheboygan and Onaway; Presque Isle 
County chain of lakes, reached from La Roque and 
Millersburg: Long Lake and Grand Lake, reached 
from Alpena; Montmorency County Lakes, reached 
from Hillman; Hubbard Lake, reached from Ossineke, 
.Alpena, Harrisxille and Lincoln; Van Etten Lake, 
reached from Au Sable (OscodaJ and the Tawas Chain 



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of lakes reached from East Tawas, and the [-"rescott 
chain of lakes reached from Prescott. 

An Adirondack Camp has been planted right 
down in the heart of Michigan in what is known as 
\'an Etten Reserve, on Van Etten Lake. .A splendid 
hotel of picturesque woodland architecture has been 
built as well as a number of attracti\e bungalows. 
Write \'an Etten Lake Reserve. Oscoda. .Mich., for 
reser\ations. or .Mr. Harry B. Parker, 125 Woodward 
Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Hackmatack Inn. on Mullet Lake, is reached \'ia 
In\erness Station; steamers of the Inland Route also 
stop there. The Inn. a rustic club house, is managed 
by Watson Beebe. Cheboygan. Mich., and is open 
from July 1st to October 1st. 

The Christian Outing Grounds Association main- 
tains a large resort at Long Lake (Iosco County). 
Long Lake Station is but a few feet from the water's 
edge. Write the secretary, Mr. M. N. Crary, 813 
Spitzer Building. Toledo. Ohio, for booklet. 

The Au Sable River, one of the most noted speckled 
and rainbow trout streams in America, empties into 
Lake Huron at Au Sable (Oscoda). 

Pointe aux Barques 

PicTLRESQt E in its ruggedness is the scenery in 
and around Pointe aux Barques. This is one 
of the most important of the family resorts on 
the eastern side of the State of Michigan 
Well-to-do families from all parts of America have 
their own l">eauuful summer homes there. Many new 



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ones are being erected each year. The Pointe aux 
Barques Association maintains a splendid club house 
and a dance hall for the use of the cottagers and their 
friends. In the club-house are fifteen sleeping rooms, 
attractively furnished and with private baths, and a 
dining hall where a high standard of service prevails. 
The privileges of this club house are extended to 
friends of the cottagers and others on application. 
There is also a good nine-hole golf course. The club 
house opens about June 28th, and the season extends 
until about September 6th. For detailed information, 
rental of cottages, rooms at the club house, etc., write 
Mr. S. T. Crapo, 1525 Ford Building, Detroit, Mich 




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Harrison 

^HEARTY welcome awaits camper and tourist alike 
at Harrison, one of the most recent places to 
find favor with the summer visitors. Budd 
Lake, a picturesque little inland lake that 
abounds with fish, is situated at the foot of Main street. 
A beautiful island in the center of the lake, and a city 
park, comprising fifty acres, where free camping sites 
are offered, are two distinctive features of this point. 
Other lakes, trout streams and near-by hills offer 
inducements for tramping tours. High elevation and 
pure air make this location desirable to those suffering 
from asthma and kindred maladies. 





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Duck Lake, in Grand Traverse Count 

— ■&— 




Fishing and Hunting in Michigan 

lEVOTEES of rod and gun will find that science and 
nature have been working in harmony in Michi- 
gan, for fish hatcheries and game preserves are 
maintained. For a list of hunting and fishing 
lodges, see page thirty-three: for the Michigan Fish 
and Game Laws, see pages thirty-four and thirty-five. 

LAKE MICHIGAN EAST COAST 

economic importance of that section of 
country from New Buffalo to Pentwater is 
two-fold. It includes a large part of what is 
known as the "fruit belt." and it also comprises 
what is commonly known as the "Lake Michigan 
East Coast," a great resort and summer playground. 
Pure air, sunshine, cool breezes, plenty of good water 
and shade, lakes and streams, sand beaches suitable 
for surf-bathing and an abundance of fruit — all make 
for the popularity of this district. 

For the Lake Michigan East Coast country, greatly 
reduced week-end fares are offered at Chicago and 
suburban stations for points from New Buffalo to Pent- 
water, inclusive, from May 4th to September 30th. 
These tickets will be sold for all Friday afternoon 
trains, all Saturday trains and the Sunday morning 
train. Returning, they will be good until the follow- 
ing Monday. 

Note — These tickets irill inti lie tjiKitl iwrthhound nn train So. o or southbound tin Train 
No. .J, ejcept tehen reading to or from points north of Holland. Sec time table 
and schedule of Week-End Fares, page thirty-nitie. 

Six trains each way provide summer service to and 
from the Lake .Michigan East Coast territory situated 
south of Holland; three pro\ide service through to 
and from Lake Harbor. Muskegon, Lakcwood, 
Whitehall (White Lake Resorts), Hart and Pentwater. 

Leaving Chicago \ia the Pere Marquette from the 
Grand Central Station, Harrison St. and Fifth .Axe., 
trains for the Lake Michigan East Coast country 



make stops in Chicago at b3d St. and South Chicago. 
Some trains stop at Whiting. Indiana Harbor (B. & 
O. Stations), and Porter, Ind., and all of them at 
Michigan City. 

The first East Coast resort stop is New Buffalo. 
Here is found Vetterly Park, a cottage resort with 
good accommodations at moderate prices, also the 
Chicago hotel and se\-eral farm resorts. 

At Union Pier accommodations are offered at 
Oak Grove Inn and" at numerous farmhouses and 
summer cottages. Here begins the famous "Michigan 
Fruit Belt." and the farmers are good "providers." 
Seventy-five miles from Chicago is Lakeside, where 
there are a number of resorts and hotels, most of 
them on the Lake Michigan shore. 

Harbert is seventy-se\'en miles from Chicago, and is 
right in the fruit country. .\ short distance from the 
station, and on the Lake Michigan shore, is Birchwood 
Beach Resort, with furnished cottages for rent, a 
central dining hall, and board and rooms at reasonable 
rates. Write Mr. Wells Sizer, Harbert, for booklet. 
There are also farm and cottage resorts. 

Three miles north is the fruit shipping station of 
Sawyer. This is a favorite stopping point for residents 
of Chicago, a number of whorn have built attractive 
summer houses. Chicago capitalists are improving a 
tract of forest land, on the Lake Michigan front. 

Five miles from St. Joseph, and ninety-two miles 
from Chicago, is Cjlenlord. The famed "Lake Shore 
Drive," running along the Lake Michigan bluffs 
southward from St. Joseph, passing through the rich 
vineyard and fruit district of Berrien County, is found 
here. This drive is lined with handsome summer 
homes of city folks, and many of them own small 
pieces of ground w here they grow their ow n fruits and 
vegetables. 

This Lake Shore Dri\e is like a boulc\ard, w ii^le and 
well-graveled. It runs along the lake bluff, and on 



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each side are scores of "gentlemen farmers" with their 
small truit farms and flower gardens. There is no 
more entrancing dri\e in the \\est, at the height of 
the season, than this one through the "Land of Fruit 
and Flowers. ' 

St. Joseph 

A plateau overlooking Lake Michigan and 
Xt directly at the water's edge is the City of St. 
\\~--a\ Joseph, historically one of the most important 
points in the state, and scenically one of the 
most beautiful. The city being in the heart of the 
wonderful southern Michigan Fruit Belt permits of the 
distribution of Berrien County horticultural products 
throughout the entire country. 

As a summer resort St. Joseph has long enjoyed wide 
popularity. Lake bathing from its wonderful beaches: 
lake, pier and river fishing; in\iting motor-boating and 
canoe waters; varied and enchanting scenery, invigor- 
ating air, ample hotel accommodations, pure water and 
a host of other natural or artificial attractions make for 
the fullest enjoyment of a summer vacation. Berrien 
County has more miles of good roads for the automo- 
bile tourist than any other county in the countr\-. 

Benton Harbor 



'summer town" of a 
many years ago and 
i5i^' prominence that is stil 



reputation established 
a center of industrial 
^ „^ . 1 flourishing, is Benton 

^-'"-^ .i Harbor. The mineral bath-house at Benton 
Harbor was the first to be established on the shore of 
Lake Michigan. 

Just outside the city limits is the Israelite House of 
Da\id and the Park Springs of Eden. The property 
of this religious association is closely connected with 
Benton Harbor and St. Joseph and outside towns by 
trolley lines, and one car line ends at the front of the 
grounds. The headquarters buildings are scattered 



over about seventy acres, while several hundred acres 
more are gi\en o\er to farms of the 400 members of 
the colony. 

Higman Park 

"NOTHER rendezvous fa\'ored by the tourists is 
Higman Park Hotel and cottage resort, located 
on the shore of Lake Michigan and just one 
^ - _ mile from Benton Harbor. Transient guests 
are accommodated at the hotel, while the surrounding 
resort has built up rapidly with cottages. Informa- 
tion as to lots or cottages may be had of Mr .A. D. 
Flood, Benton Harbor, Mich. 

St. Joseph River 

t; T^p the sinuous and picturesque St. Joe River 
J^j^/J- from Benton Harbor the tourist finds numerous 
, farm resorts situated on a number of beautiful 
.-- ' J inland lakes. Within ten miles from Benton 
Harbor are SiKer. Brown, Crooked, Magician and 
Pipestone Lakes. 

Spring Bluft Resort is on the ri\er, about two 
miles from St. Joseph. It may be reached by river 
steamer or by the beautiful river road drive. Spring 
Bluff is strikingly located on the high river bank, and 
besides the commodious hotel, there is a community 
of well-built cottages, some of them for rent furnished. 
There are excellent roads for driving or automobiling 
and there is also the recreation provided by the river. 
Interurban cars pass not far away. 

Berrien Springs 

JiXTEEN miles from St. Joseph is Berrien Springs, 
' reached by the Buchanan branch of the Perc 
Marquette from Benton Harbor, or by electric 
car. The various resorts along the river and 
inland, on the way to Berrien Springs, as well as in or 
near the \-illage, are mentioned in the list in this 



.XS- 





I liRman Park, on the Lake Michigan East Coast 



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Leiand Beautit 

booklet. The person seeking quiet and rest on his 
vacation will find entertainment at many farmhouses 
along the river. This is a region of prosperous 
farmers, and their guests usually have the use of a 
boat on the river and a carriage for drives. 

If the country calm begins to pall on the resorter 
the trolley car quickly whisks him to the gayer life 
in Benton Harbor, St. Joseph or some near-by resort. 

Riverside and Coloma 

SIX miles north of Benton Harbor, and one hun- 
dred and four miles distant from Chicago, is 
Riverside, one of the important summer resort 
points on the main line of the Pere Marquette 
Railway, Pottawatomie Park, a resort section that has 
much to commend it, lies two miles west of Riverside, 
on the shore of Lake Michigan. This cottage resort 
accommodates seventy-five persons comfortably. 
Coloma is the key of the Paw Paw Lake resort 
istrict, the lake being about a mile north of the town, 
which is 108 miles from Chicago. Cottages, hotels, 
pavilions and resort grounds completely encircle Paw 
aw Lake, which is visited each summer by 30,000 to 
50,000 people. The trolley line from St. Joseph or 
Benton Harbor circles half-way around the lake, 
passing close to the resorts on the west and north 
shores. 

Visitors to the east end of the lake get off at 
Watervliet station, and are taken to the \arious 
resorts in buses, which meet all regular trains. 

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The Grand River above South Haven 



Hartford and Vicinity 

QT the junction of the Kalamazoo, Lake Shore & 
Chicago Line, running to South Haven and 
^ Lake Cora, and the Pere Marquette Raihvay, 
S^ 1 16 miles from Chicago, is the prosperous 
community of Hartford. Reached by a drive from 
Hartford are a number of small lakes, among them 
Rush and Van Auken lakes, three to four miles north- 
west; Duck, Donovan and Dyar lakes, four to five 
miles north. 

The quiet little village of Lawrence lies seven miles 
east from Hartford, on the Kalamazoo, Lake Shore & 
Chicago Line. It is in a charming fruit and farming 
district, and near the Paw Paw River. 

Lake Cora Resorts 

^^©N the Kalamazoo, Lake Shore & Chicago Line, 
K^^ nine miles east of Hartford, is Lake Cora 
1 1 Station — a point justly popular with summer 

-- tourists and week-end holiday parties. On the 
high ground of the north shore of the lake is a fine 
tract o\\ ned by the Lake Cora Summer Home Associa- 
tion. A good hotel (Lake Cora Inn) has been erected, 
and a large number of cottages, some of which are for 
rent. The resort list at the back of this booklet gives 
further information. 

Paw Paw station is thirteen miles from Hartford, 
on the Kalamazoo, Lake Shore & Chicago Line. Near 
the pleasant little town are several good fishing lakes. 





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A Happy Group at Lakeside 

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: Park. St. Joseph 



The City of South Haven 

P^j'ORTHWEST of Hartford, also on the Kalamazoo, 
, Lake Shore & Chicago Railroad, seventeen 
I ' miles from the junction with the Pere Mar- 
'-_:' quette Railway, is South Haven. Easily 
100,000 visitors come and go each season. Its 
regular quota of the summer population is appro.xi- 
mately 5,000. South Haven has a score of hotels, 
with accommodations varying from twenty-fi\'e to 
300 persons respectively. The South Haven Country 
Club, with its forty-acre tract devoted to a golf course, 
is one of numerous attractions upon which South 
Haven rests its claims for popularity. 

For several miles north and south of the town the 
lake shore is lined \\ ith cottages, while there are other 
cottages and farmhouse resorts up the Black Ri\er, 
which at South Haven finds an outlet in Lake Michi- 
gan and also forms a harbor for lake vessels. 

One of the striking features at South Ha\en is the 
bathing beach, and sometimes as many as a thousand 
bathers are frolicking in the w,ater at one time. 

Few Michigan resorts ha\'e more life than South 
Haven, with its sailing, rowing, bathing, launch rides. 
concerts, dances, "hay rides", and drives inland and 
along the shore, as well as man\' other means of 
recreation and amusement. 

Grand Junction 

r^TT^NOTiiER Pere Marquette Railway main line 
( j/\<j' point, Grand Junction, 1 3 1 miles from Chicago. 
]; I commands the attention of tourists for the 
i- '-' . variety of amusements offered. This is the 
crossing of the South Haven branch of the Michigan 
Central Railroad. Several beautiful lakes arc near 
Grand Junction, among them Silver, Saddle, Oster- 
hout, Lester and Clear Lakes. Cottage resorts are 



found at most of these lakes, or board may be obtained 
at farmhouses. 

Bangor and Vicinity 

'^ITUATED between Hartford and Grand Junction 
|jj" are Bangor and Breedsville, likewise important 
tourist communities. Immense quantities of 
peaches, pears, berries, muskmelons and 
watermelons are shipped from the two points each 
year. In fact that part of Michigan between New 
Buffalo and Grand Rapids is practically a continuous 
fruit farm. 

Pullman is 1 3b miles from Chicago. Those \isiting 
it will find excellent black bass fishing in Upper and 
Lower Scott lakes, which are near the station. There 
are hotels and farmhouses to care for visitors. 

Four miles farther north is Pearle, the stopping 
place for the resorts at Round and Crooked lakes. 
Black bass and pickerel of large size are plentiful. 
Accommodations can be found in cottages and 
farmhouses. 

Fennville and New Richmond 

2"RL1T and Fennville are synonyms in Michigan, 
since this station is the principal shipping point 
for the Michigan Fruit Belt. Over a thousand 
carloads of peaches, plums, grapes, apples and 
pears are shipped out each year. The tourist may 
know what to expect here. Fenn\ille is also noted for 
its beautiful homes, which reflect the prosperity of 
the community. 

New Richmond — a small village on the Kalamazoo 
river — is 148 miles from Chicago. Fishing in this 
section is good. One of many pleasant diversions 
offered is a boat ride down the river to Saugatuck and 
Douglas. 



7^rMT!7;^:^s^ 



^^?!r;:05t- 



^^wJsaSf.^dTfftar.' 




Saugatuck and Douglas 



P* ^ICTLRESQLE hills, torest-co\ered, almost com- 
pletely enfold the cities of Saugatuck and 
Douglas, which are situated on opposite sides of 
i^^^^rz^ the Kalamazoo River, near its point of discharge 
into Lake Michigan. Here the river expansion forms 
almost a still lake and one of the distincti\e delights of 
the residents and tourists is to drift idly in a boat out 
to Lake Michigan. As the crow flies, it is but a mile 
au'ay, but following the sinuous course of the river 
stretches the journey to nearly four miles. The hills 
tower on either side, while snowy water lilies decorate 
the river's edge and e.xhale their delicate perfume. It 
is an experience — this drifting down the stream — that 
causes one to forget the cares and vicissitudes of a 
humdrum existence. 

There are several good hotels and cottage resorts, 
as well as cottage communities, on the Lake Michigan 
shore. An immense new pavilion in Saugatuck, with 
music by a Chicago orchestra, provides recreation for 
those who are fond of dancing. 

The Chicago School of Physical Education will hold 
sessions at Saugatuck in June, August and September. 
In addition, a summer camp for adults who desire 
instruction, and for young people will be maintained. 
Write Mrs. Laura Orvis Parson. President, 430-432 
South Wabash .■\\enue. Chicago, III., for booklet. Camp 
Gray is another Saugatuck entertainment enterprise. 

Holland, Macatawa Park-Ottawa Beach 

|UGGESTING its best Dutch patrial ideals, and yet 
thoroughly permeated with the spirit and 
energy of American progressi\'eness is Holland 
— gateway to Macatawa Park-Ottawa Beach, 
and other resorts situated on Black Lake. Holland is 
159 miles distant from Chicago. It lies at the upper 
end of Black Lake, the shores of which for six miles 



_^ 



form an almost continuous chain of summer cottages 
and tourist resorts. 

Nature-lovers v,\\\ find a veritable fairyland of their 
dreams in Macatawa Park, with its thickly wooded 
hills covered with flowers; its winding, concrete paths 
and drives in the great forest and the adjoining public 
parks, and its varied bird life which adds infinite 
interest. Macatawa Park is a family resort which is 
open all the year. It is owned and operated by the 
cottagers, who have four hotels and 350 other build- 
ings. The district is lighted with electricity. Twenty £» 
stores supply the wants of cottagers and tourists. An 
inclined railway performs serxice to the pa\ilion on 
Lookout Mountain. The regular amusements include 
nightly hops, tennis and other games, fishing, bathing N 
and boating. There is one mile of bathing beach on '^' 
the Lake Michigan side of Macatawa Park, the beach 
being of clear white sand. 

For information, reservations or booklets, etc., 
write Mr. S. A. Miller. Manager, Macatawa Park. 

Ottawa Beach, which is the site of Hotel Ottawa, 
is immediately opposite Macatawa Park, on the 
north side of Macatawa Bay. Hotel Ottawa has 
accommodations for upwards of 600 guests and it is 
at once one of the largest and best summer resort 
hotels on the American continent. It is a modern 
three -story structure. The dining-room and a number 
of guest rooms are located on the first floor. Over one 
hundred of the suites are with baths. The dining- 
room has a capacity of ovev 800 and the ser\ice main- 
tained is of a metropolitan standard. 

Over $30,000 were laid out in 1915 in various 
improvements, chief of which were the enlarging of 
the dining-room and the ball-room, the installation 
ot a grill-room, and the addition of a sun parlor with 
a fireplace, on the office floor, which proves a popular 
gathering place on the few stormy days that may 

^ 





obtrude in the otherwise usually cheerful summer 
season. Hotel Ottawa is under new management. 

Recreation at Ottawa Beach in its many forms is 
not neglected here. 

Pere Marquette passengers destined to Black Lake 
resorts must transfer at Holland to the Michigan 
Railway. Baggage checks should he taken to the 
interurban station at Holland, where they will be 
exchanged for checks to destination. 

Resorts of Grand Haven 

CATERING to the summer tourists and manufac- 
turing are combined in the civic ambitions of 
Grand Haven — one of the important resort 
points on the Pere Marquette Railway — situ- 
ated at the mouth of the Grand River. It is a city of 
7,000 inhabitants and the seat of Ottawa County. 
Grand Ha\cn has long been noted for its delicious 
smoked whitefish. 

The resorts surrounding Grand Haven are High- 
land Park, on Lake Michigan, which has a fine hotel, 
150 cottages, a dancing pavilion, and one of the finest 
bathing beaches on the Great Lakes. 

"Spring Lake, where Nature Smiles for Se\'en 
Miles," is a trim little expanse of pure crystal water, 
which offers good fishing, bathing and boating. Other 
attractions include a dancing pavilion, a motor-boat 
club and a golf course. 

Grand River, the largest water-course in Michigan, 
is noted for its bass and pickerel fishing. A street car 



-?sr- 




-z^r- 



%. 



line and a good county road system connect all the 
points of interest mentioned above. Write the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Grand Haven, Mich., for booklet. 

Akeley Hall, a school for girls and young women, is 
situated on the Lake Michigan shore. Write Miss 
Mary Helen Yerkes, resident principal, for booklet. 

The Spring Lake Yacht Club holds annual regattas, 
which attract yachtsmen from the four points of the 
compass. 

Muskegon 

■'^T3if f^ospEROUS, in all the word implies, is the largest 
'v?^^T- city on the east shore of Lake Michigan — 
!^^] Muskegon. To the north lies Muskegon Lake, 
■~^-^—' which is perhaps the safest harbor of the Great 
Lakes system. On the north shore of this lake is 
the park-like suburban city of North Muskegon. 
Beautiful Lake Harbor is only a short distance from 
the southern limits of Muskegon Heights, the manu- 
facturing suburb of Muskegon. The summer parks 
of Lake Michigan and Lake Mona Park are reached 
by street car lines. Boats connect the Lake Harbor 
Hotel and other points on the lake with the street 
car lines and the Pere Marquette trains. 

North of Muskegon Lake is Bear Lake, which has 
se\'eral miles of wooded banks. Near-by are also 
Wolf and Twin Lakes and other pretty bodies of 
water. The lakes and streams are ail well stocked 
with all varieties of game fish. Varied attractions 
afford opportunity alike for those who want the dis- 



J 



■# 




4 




.J^2U 




tractions of hotel life, or for those who prefer to 
"rough it" in tent or cabin. Thousands visit 
Muskegon each year. 

The splendid gifts of the late Charles H. Hackley, 
which include among others a public library, an art 
gallery, a public park embellished with statues to the 
nation's heroes, make for the renown of the city. The 
Country Club, with its golf course and its spacious 
grounds and the Yacht Club add to the attractive- 
ness of Muskegon life. Write the Muskegon Chamber 
of Commerce's Resort Bureau for booklet. 

Lake Harbor 

'X-^ARIED are the forms of entertainment the \isitor 

Y ' finds at Lake Harbor Hotel, for these include 

fishing, boating, yachting, tennis, golf on an 

eighteen-hole course, bathing in the surf, etc. 

Lake Harbor is at once one of the largest and also one 

of the most attractive watering-places in Michigan. 

This resort is situated five miles south of Muskegon, 

on a stretch of land between Lake Harbor and Lake 

Michigan. All trains of the Pere Marquette Railway 

stop to leave or to pick up passengers for or from this 

point. A steam ferry boat to the Lake Harbor Hotel, 

si.\ miles distant, meets all trains. 

This inviting summer hotel is efficiently managed 
by Mr. Edward R. Swett, who also operates the 
Occidental Hotel at Muskegon. Lake Harbor, as a 
resort, is popular with summer tourists from Chicago 
and the Southern States. Bellevue Hotel is also an in- 
\ iting place to while away the holidays. 

Fremont 

FREMONr, named for the great"Pathfinder"- John 
C. I'remont — is situated on the l^ig Rapids 
dixision of the Pere Marquette. Fremont and 
Pickerel lakes are two inland bodies of water 



of 



shore of the former, is about a mile from town, while 
Basseta Resort is found at Pickerel Lake, about six 
miles distant. Black bass, pickerel and other members 
of the finny tribe, prized by anglers, abound in the 
lakes and streams 

Newaygo 

j^L'GGED, fascinating scenery is one of the distinc- 
'^•j tions of the Muskegon River, in the vicinity of 
Newaygo, on the Petoskey division of the Pere 
Marquette Railway. Newaygo has a population 
■500 inhabitants. The river, which gi\es the village 
the advantage of a splendid water power, abounds 
in fish. 

Two and a half miles east of Newaygo lies the 
Hess Lake summer resort. This resort is still growing 
steadily. Its shores are lined with cottages, and 
good hotel accommodations are available. There 
is an abundance of perch and bass fishing here. 

The Newaygo Lakes resort (Drew Station) lies 
three miles northwest of Newaygo. There are sixty 
cottages in this community, chiefly Chicago people. 
This resort is on a chain of four lakes, which are 
navigable by launch. A low, unevenshore line, contrast- 
ing w ith the steep hills, gives an unusual effect to the 
scenery. Other resorts are found near White Cloud. 

Whitehall and Montague 



T 



iicvst; farmhouses and summer resorts which are 

situated in the White Lake section provide 

excellent accommodations, and this fact has 

come to be w eil known. This district is reached 

bv wav of \\ hitehall station, which is fourteen miles 



-bv. Hotel St. Byno, which is located on the north of Muskegon, on the Pentwater branch of the 



-z^ 



Twenty-Eloht 




Public Balhing Pavil 



Pere Marquette Railway. White Lake is an expansion 
of the White River. It is six miles long and about a 
mile wide. Sylvan Beach, which is a strip of high 
ground which separates Lake Michigan from White 
Lake, is perhaps the favorite resort of this section. 
Over fifty cottages and a hotel are comprised in this 
community. At Whitehall is the Hotel Mears, where 
fifty guests can find accommodation. 

To the south of Sylvan Beach is Michillinda. a 
cottage resort located on Lake Michigan. The Mich- 
illinda Pines and the Fernwood are two splendid 
hotels which cater to the summer tourist trade. 

Three miles south of Whitehall is Duck Lake 
Resort, on the shore of Duck Lake. 

North of Whitehall, and on the north shore of White 
Lake, is the sister village of Montague. The chiet 
hotels and summer resorts are: The Franklin House, 
Sylvan Beach Hotel, Murray's Inn, The Catalpas and 
The Fernw,ood. Other resorts nearby are Johnson's 
and Idlew'ild, also located on White Lake. 

Eleven miles north of Whitehall, and half a mile 
east of Lake Michigan, is Stony Lake, whose waters 
are deep and always cold. This lake is reached by 
the Pere Marquette to Shelby, and a drive of six miles 
west to the lake. 

Pentw ater 

3^1NE-CLAD hills surround Pentwater, a delightful 
holiday point on Lake Michigan. Pentwater 
Lake is a near-by inland expanse of blue waters. 
This latter body of water, which is about two 
miles long, and connected with Lake Michigan by a 
broad channel, has a heavily wooded shore, where 
innumerable sites for summer homes and camps are 
to be found. 



^ 



Pentwater is a progressive city of 1,500 people, 
situated in Oceana County, one of the leading farming 
and fruit counties in the United States. There is an 
excellent harbor. Government piers, a lighthouse and 
life-saving station, all of which add to the picturesque- 
ness of the place. Near by are numerous cottage 
resorts, of which Oceana, Pentwater Beach, Camp- 
bell and Garrison Park resorts are the principal ones. 
Pentwater is the terminus of the AUegan-Pentwater 
branch of the Pere Marquette Railway. 

The civic spirit of Pentwater is exemplified by the 
Boosters' Club, of which V. P. Weidensee is corre- 
sponding secretary. Communications directed to him 
for literature, etc., will receive prompt attention. 

Pere Marquette steamer No. 7 will make trips 
between Pentwater and Ludington and Manistee 
twice daily. 

Bass Lake Park is situated five miles from Pent- 
water. This resort community, situated on Bass Lake, 
has two good hotels which give the best of service at 
moderate prices. 

St. Joseph Mineral Baths 

WITH a $b5.000 structure, the Hotel Whitcomb 
Mineral Baths, which adjoin the hotel itself, 
'<^^[ SlTc situated on an eminence which commands 
8&55J 3 .^jg^, Qf Lake Michigan. Absolutely sanitary 
conditions prevail throughout. Special structural 
glass has been used for the floors, walls and partitions. 
The system of ventilation is the most perfect known. 
There are two distinct departments, one for men and 
one for women. 

Hotel Whitcomb has a capacity of accommodating 
400 guests. Both institutions are open the year round, 
write Mr. E. S. Richardson, Hotel Whitcomb. St. 
Joseph, Mich, for booklet. 



-^Sl. 



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'f^m^p^iJ^i^'^'^yr^ 



^^T<^^:^^- 



^^r^?:^i:^T:m^F:^^r$i^ 




^ ^^*-'^;lH!!lB?fci/"'S*-'.:'''««t*^-; ' ^ 




Benton Harbor Baths 

N the heart of the city of Benton Harbor are the 

^remier Mineral Baths and hotel. The waters 

arc widely known for the curative powers 

in cases of rheumatism, etc. Write R. T. 

Laughery, Manager. 

Hotel Saltzman has also a well-equipped bath-house. 
The baths are under the direction of Dr. W. E. Saitz- 
man, and patients have the advantage of the care of a 
specialist in rheumatic and nervous diseases. 

Eastman Park Springs offer hotel accommodations, 
and its new mud baths in addition to the usual mineral 
baths and the waters from the curative springs in the 
forty-acre park, owned by the Eastman Springs 
Company. 

Detroit Mineral Baths 

INERAL water of wonderful curative properties 
was discovered about four years ago on the 
property owned by J. R. Hayes, adjoining the 
Wayne Hotel, Detroit, Mich. The water is 
ol a sulpho-saline nature and its efficacy is demon- 
strated in cases of rheumatism, blood and skin diseases, 
nervous troubles, dyspepsia, gout, neuritis, etc. 

Located right on the river front, the Wayne Hotel 
and Mineral Baths are especially attractive to people 
who wish to visit Detroit solely for pleasure and 
recreation or to regain their health through hydro- 
therapeutic measures. 

Mr. J. R. Hayes, proprietor, will gladly mail you 
an illustrated booklet on request. 



k 



.^i^ZL 



:S5^ 




-^^^ 



-<3c 



-:£r 



MICHIGAN SUMMER RESORTS 



ALDEN 

Lone Tree Point Wr 

Chapelle'sHome»ResorT Mrs. P. J. Chapelle 

Rex Terrace Mrs. Ella M. King ' 

Crj'Stal Beach Inn .... D. F. Barnes • 

Pere Marquette Beach E. A. Weiss *• 

Skegemog Point John F. Eisznert. . . 



Geo. W. Childs.. . 

Mrs. Jane Martin. 

VV J. DeVol 

Kate A. Lewis . . 

The Auto Inn Emma R. Lewis. 

BELLAIRE 

Fisherman's Paradise. . H. D. Smith 

Lake View Resort. ... A. T. Schoolcraft. 

The Maples W C. Green 

Miiey's Lodge Dale J. Miley. . . . 

Recreation Pomt J. E. Dickinson.. . 



100 



10.00 to 14.00 
2.00 10.00 to 12.00 

2.50 12.50 

2.00 up 12.00 up 



Hotel Howard. . . . 

Terrace Inn 

Florence Cottages. 



150 2.50 to 6.00 14.00 to 35.00 

200 3.00 to 8.00 14.00 to 25.00 

100 2.25 to 4.00 15.00 to 25.00 

75 .... 4.00 to 10.00 

. . . On Application 



100 



2.50 
2.00 
2.00 



BEULAH 

The Crystal Iim Mrs. Gertrude Ross.. 

Platte Lake Hotel .... William Thompson . . 
CENTRAL LAKE 

Fisk Lodge Mrs. C. B. Fisk 



CHARLEVOIX 

The Inn 

Belvedere Hotel. 



. A. I. Creame 
R- P. Foley.. 
J.S. Baker.. . 
Hailett. 



Charlevoix Beach.. 

Hotel Hailett 

Linda Vlata J. M. Saunders. . 

Hotel Charlevoix 

Hotel Michigan Frank T. Biossat. 



ELK RAPIDS 

Valuer Hotel L. Valuer 

Meguzee Point Hotel. . Culman & Hahner 

ELLAKE (SpitzerBldg.Toiedo.O.) 



50 2.00 to 2.50 12.00 to 15.00 

350 3 00 up 21.00 up 

300 3.00 up 21.00 up 

300 4.00 to 6.00 25.00 to 42.00 
15.00 to 21.00 
12.00 to 15.00 
10.00 to 15.00 
lOU ^.50 to 3.50 15.00 up 

150 2.00 to 3.00 10.50 to 12.00 



100 3.00 to 3.50 



2.00 
2.00 



12.00 
10.00 



Cold Brook Inn Geo. R. Robinson . 

Three Pines Inn W. L. Davis 

HARBOR SPRINGS (Via Bay View) 



Forest Beach Inn. 
INTERLOCHEN 

The Pennington Interlochen Resort Ass'n. 

LELAND (Via Traverse City) 

Birchcroft . -. ^ - . . 



400 4.00 to 8.00 28.00 to 50.00 

200 2.00 to 2.60 14.00 to 17.50 
150 2.50 up 15.00 up 

100 2,00 to 3.00 12.00 to 17.50 



The Nicholas 

Hotel Leelanau H. S. Anderson.. 

Riverside Inn Jacob Schwartz. 

LUDINQTON 
Camp Arcadia Resort I. O. Harsh. 



.Sauble Inn Fred Guiembo 

Stearns Hotel Geo. W. Woodcock .... 

Hotel Epworth Mrs. Minnie L. Cooiidge 

Plney Ridge Resort . . . Carter & Helling 

Griswolda Inn Florence N. Jones 

The Bayou Inn Florence N. Jones 

MACKINAC ISL. 

Grand Hotel f Frank .A. Nagel. . . . \ 

\ Chas. J. Holden ] 

Island House w. p. Hiil, Mgr 



30 2.00 to 2.50 



100 2.00 

150 2.00 

200 2.50 to 3.00 



12.00 to 14.00 

12.00 
12.00 to 14-00 



On application 



14.00 to 20 00 
11.00 to lS-00 
Special 



New Murray D. Murray. 

Doud Cottage Miss Mary Doud. 

NORTHPORT 
_ Cedar Lodge Orin A. W'ard 



800j 4.00 up 
275: 3.00 up 
250 1.50 up 

75 2.50 to 5.00 
200 2.50 to 3.00 

75 2.50 to 3.00 

lOol 2.50 to 3.00 



American Plan 



12.00 to 18.00 
12.00 to 15.00 



PETOSKEY 

Hotel Cushman. 



. Geo. E. Bond 300 2.50 to 5.00 

W. L. McManus. Jr. . . . 300 2.50 to 4.00 



10.00 t 
17.00 t 



14.00 
i 25.00 



Park House VVm. O'Neal 

The Grand Hotel Henry Haertel . . 

Clark's Tavern Harry A. Clark . 



1.50 
2.00 
2.00 



. M . M . Cross. . 



La Crosse - . . _ _ . _ . 

Henderson Farm Robt. C. Henderson. 

itel Franklin J. F. Bremmeyr R 

: Hotel Co.§ 

seCity) 



PORT HURON 

The Windermere Windei 



- Gables. 
PROVEMONT 

Fountain Point Hon 



76! 
100 

50 1.25 to 2.00 

50 

50i .50 to 1.50 

25 

751 .75 up 

200! 3.00 up 
100! 3.00 



10.00 up 

8.75 

S.OO to 12-00 

10.00 to 12.00 

8.75 to 10.00 

European 
3.00 to 8.00 
9.00 
Special 



15.00 to 20.00 



jS£~ 



PER Day 1 Per Week 



RAPID CITY 



: Brook Ii 
RAMONA 

el Ramona 

TRAVERSE CITY 



H. J. Bingham 

(Harbor Springs P. O.) 

Thomas J. Leahy 

(Harbor Springs P. O.) 



Park Place Hotel. 
Whiting Hotel. . 
Hdicl Columbia 



Tl]( Timbers 

WALLOON LAKE 
New Walloon 

WEOUETONSING 
Hotel Weouetonsing 
Colonial Hotel 



W. O. Holden 

I. P. Oberlln 

P Burden 

T V, Shilson 

Krr.l AtkinsonM 

Mi^s I.ucv D. Lewis. . . .1. 
Ml.<s l.ucv D. Lewis. ... 
h;ihcl .s Piatt t 

\ia Petoskey) 

'. H- Gerbig 

(\ia Bav View) 

\Irs-F K.&A.A.Brubaker 

Mrs. C. H. Eaton 



S2.00 

3.00 to 3.50 

3.00 up 

2.50 to 3.00 
2.00 to 2.50 
1.50 
On appli I 



S9.00 to 12.00 

18.00 to 23 00 

20.00 up 



1.50 
On appli 
On appli 

3.00 

2.00 



cation 

20.00 
10.00 to 14.00 



I boarding houses and cottages t 



t appears on page thirty-ti 



LAKE MICHIGAN EAST COAST RESORTS 



Railroad Station 


Manager 


I'S 


Rate 


AND Resort 


Per Day 


Per Week 


ALLEQAN 














25 


2.00 




BALDWIN 










12 

50l 


1.50 
1.50 




Oak Lodge 


E. G. Smith 


9.00 


Harve Camp 


Mrs. H. C. Crosby 


.601 


2.50 


14.00 


BANGOR 










Hickory Grove Farm. . 


Mrs. Richard Leedy. . . . 


25 


1.00 


6.00 


Lakeside Fruit Farm. . 


J. L. Mitchelltt 


25 


2.60 


15.00 


BENTON HARBOR 










Hotel Benton 




2261 


3.00 to 3.50 


17.50 up 


Hieman Park Inn. . . . 


R. D. Flood 


lOOj 


3.50 


Special 



1 Springs Res. . W.H.Woodruff. 



Hotel Dwan . 
Emery's Fruit Farm . . 

The Bolingbrook 

Granger Farm Resort . 

Paw Paw View Resort . Mrs. W^m. ^loessner. 

BERRIEN SPRINGS 

Uncks Summer Home Mrs. L. Urick 

BREEDSVILLE 
Jepp Lake Farm Res . 
TMe Elms 



. House Carl Vc 



The Colonial. 

The Florence 

Rattray's Orch. Home 
Hotel Londeen Zimmer 

Locust Beach 

Whip-Poor-Will Hotel 
The Douglas View Res 
Hyde Park Cottages 
Strong's Farm House. . 

Genoar's Resort 

The Marianna 

Adelphia Beach . 
COVERT 

Sturtevant Lodge 

DOUGLAS 
Beachmoni Resort. . 
EAST SAUGATUCK 



O. W. Woodward. . . 
. J. W. Lee 

Alfred Xordeen . . 

. Jennie Mayer 

. Mrs. O. Hansen. 

. C. L. Jenks 

, Mrs. J. A. Fleming. 



lOOi 



35 



00 2.00 up 
70 1.50 to 2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
40 1-50 to 2.00 



2.60 
2.00 
1.50 



1.50 



7.00 t 
10.00 t 
10.00 I 



10.00 to 14.00 



IOC 



IOC 



Mrs. C. J. Genoar. . . 
Miss Dagmar E. Due 
W. A. Peterson 



A. C. Quiekt 

W. C. McVea 

Gebhardt J. Johnson. 



2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
50 1.50 

401 1.50 to 2.00 
60l 2.00 

7J 2.00 

50 1.50 

100 1.50 to 2.00 
4a 1.50 to 2.00 
20 1.50 to 2.00 
80 1.50 



125 1.60 to 2.00 8.00 to 10.00 



. 14.00 
I 12.00 
I 10.00 



10.00 to 12.00 
9.00 to 12.00 
8.00 to 12.00 



8.00 to 10.00 

10.00 

10.00 up 

9.00 

8.00 to 12.00 

9.00 to 10.00 



Willow Brook Fruit Fr. .A. H. Steve 



Robinson Farm Resort ! 

Gildner Hotel ( 

Arbutus Bank 



30 1.50 

100) 2.50 to 3.00 



-azr- 



12.00 to 14.00 


m. 


S.OO 


^ 


8.00 

9.00 i 


^ 


8.00 


Iy 


20.00 to 35.00 

10.00 

Special 

14.00 


1 




V 


m^m 


s 



LAKE MICHIGAN E AST C O AS T R E S O RTS 




-izr- 



2<^m^s^s^ 



MUSKEGON 

Occidfntal Hotel. . 
Hole! Muskegon.. . 
Pen Brvn Hotel 



. Edward R. Swett. 



We 



th He 



75 2.00 to 2.50 
100; 2.00 to 2.50 
50' 1.60 to 2.00 

250 1 .00 up 
200 1.00 to 2.00 
100 2.50 



10.00 
12.00 to 14.00 
9.00 to 12.00 
9.00 to 14.00 

12-00 
12,00 10 14,00 
12.00 to 10 00 
11.00 to 16.00 
8.00 to 12,00 

Sperial 



Lake \lew Ho 



Peninsula 
Rlanzl Iies.iri 
Antf.sdale House 

Klrthwood 

NEW BUFFALO 
<'hleago Hotel 



l.eser Kueny 80 

M .1 MrConnell 30 

Mrs 11 Mavis I 30 

J <i Antisdale. R.F.D. 1, 50 

W K. Firth. R. F. D. 1 25 



.50 to 2.00 
2.00 
1.50 



terly Park. 



NEW RICHMOND 

Eureka Resort Mn 



' Rlelimond . 
NEWAYQO 

Parkwood Lodge. . 



. Mrs. L. C. Campbell. . . 
, Homer Trueadell & Son . 

. M. H. Whitemore 

(Ottawa Beach. P. O.) 



PKNTWATER 



2.00 
2.00 


10.00 
10011 


1.25 
1.00 


roil 


2.00 
1..50 
1..50 


9.00 to HI 


3.50 up 


21,011 11] 


2.25 


12,011 to l.s 


00 to 2.50 
2.00 


S.llll to 12 
:> 11 Ml 



The Nlekerson 

The Imus 

PULLMAN 
Upper Scott Lake Hot. 

RIVERSIDE 
Pottawatomie Park. . . 

Hotel Calayhurat 

Pratt's Lake View Pk.. 

ST. JOSEPH 

Edgnwater Club 

Hotil Whil 



Charles Horn .... 
Joseph J. Barnes . 

ibscar M. Pratt.. . 



Hotel. 



Hotel Ma 

SAUQATUCK 

Hlrd Center 

Rose Cottage 

C'olonlal Rest 

Hotel Butler 

Allahee Lodge 

SAWYER 
Bethany Beach Assem- 



E. 8. Rlchardsou . 
:Wm. Walker 

F. N. Absalom. . . 



100 2.00 to 2.50 10.00 t 



60 2.00 

30! 1.50 

30 1.50 to 1.75 



Miss R. d'A. Ruel. 



. B. A. Anderson | 90 

i -III .t Tripp 150 



50 to 3.00 


15 110 


l.'iO 




3.00 


15.00 to 20 


2 00 up 





3Sjiiy>!ii2^i-XSA_ 



.^2- 



SOUTH HAVEN , 

The loka I. Van De Carr. 



Arbutus Bank.. 



. A. C. Quick* 

. Allen T. Chesebro . 

. E. J. Davis 



20 S2.00 

40 1.50 

50 1.50 

125 1.50 to 2.00 

70 1.50 to 2.50 
60 2.00 

ISO 2.50 to 3.00 



Wi 



ALHAl.LA 

trrvliet' 



Mrs. H. H. Oriel. 



wigwam Hotel F. F. 

Wlnnetka Holel J. 

Lincoln Cabin K, 

Wabana Forest Beach. M 

Bay View House O, A. Dodd 

Coburn Hou.ie , , M, Coburn , . 
Walnut Grove Farm . Mrs, C Z.ahl. 
Naomi Rest L. McMillan. 



oilum 

Ravenkamp. 



-1 iiHD 



. 11. \'. liurland 

. A.F.Kruback R.V.Keck 
. C. W. Johnson. . 



250 2.00 to 2.50 

250 1.50 to 2.00 
75 1.50 

75 2.00 

150 2.00 

80 2.00 

50 1.50 

60 2.00 

65 1.50 

50 l.iiO 

30 2.00 

2.00 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 



60 



8.00 to 10.00 
8.00 to 10.00 
8.00 10 15.00 
12 00 up 
15.00 to 21.00 
10.00 to 12.00 
8.00 to 12.00 
10.00 to 12.00 



10.00 

6.00 to 7.00 

10.00 to 14.00 
8.00 to 10.00 
7.00 to 10.00 

10.00 
9.00 to 1 1 ,00 
8 00 to 12 00 

8,00 
9.00 to 1 1 ,00 
8.00 to 10 00 



9.00 to 12.00 
8.00 to 15.00 
8 00 to 10.00 

10.00 to 12.00 
12.00 

10.00 to 12.00 



i. hliii -. h .I Snii 1 2.5 8.00 

E European Plan M'l: .!. I! 1' '> ttSiiwvi-rP 1) ilWaukzaoo P, o, 
t Lawrence R. F 1) 1 • i l' n : : HkiomlnEdale. R. F. I). 2. 

MH-Ml'.AN l\sl COAST RESORTS 
ADDITIONAL BOARDlMj IIOLM.S Benton Harbor— Mrs. Ernest R Jones. 
The Hillside Farm. .'Ulster Lakes 1' ii Berrien Springs — Mrs. Maggie Harner. 
R. F. I). 2. John L, Knight. Bravo— P. E. Jackson. Breedsville — Henry Nlles. 
R F. D.. Louis Johnson, R, F. D,, Box 40, Bridgman— Merchants Farm Resort, 
Coloma~L, 1 Patterson Douglas — Mrs Samuel Drought. Grand Junction- 
Emily Goodrich. J, c. Hair. Fred A, Strolh. E A. Reynolds. Holla 
nard. Holton— M " " 

McDermed. R, F, 
Bennett, Muskeg 



Thirty-Tteo 





ANTRIM COUNTY 

Mrs. C. B. Fisk. . 



Culman & Hahn 



■ MegU7.ee Point Lodge 



. Central Lake Muskellunge. German brown and rainbow 

, Elk Rapids Muskellunge, bass, trout, pickerel, perch. 



idcock. rabbits 



J. E. Dickinson Recreation Point Hotel.. 

David Denny Denny Lodge 

. ■ - Lakeview Resort 



A. T. Schoolcraft. 



Bellaire Rod and Gun Club. 
BENZIE COUNTY 

M. L. Lake Sportsi 

Mrs. Mary Tyler 



Clare County Gun Club. 

C E Pettit 

CHARLEVOIX COUNTY 

Ralph Davis Countryside. . . . 

GRAND TRAVERSE COUNTY 

Interlochen Resort Association. The Pennington 



Bellaire Muskellunge. pickerel, bass, brook trout, 

. Bellaire Muskellunge, bass, trout, pickerel, etc 

. Bellaire Muskellunge. bass, trout, pike, etc 

. Bellaire Bass. Mackinac trout, pike, etc 

, I-ake Ann Bass, trout, wall-eyed pike, perch, etc. . . 

. Lake Ann Speckled trout, black bass, pickerel, small 



. Houghton Lake* Bass, wall-eyed pike, perch, etc.. 

, Clare Brook and rainbow trout 

. Clare Brook and rainbow trout, etc. . . 



Ducks, rabbits, partridge, i 
Partridge, rabbits, fox. etc. 
Partridge, ducks, rabbits, etc 
[ Deer, partridge, fox, rabbits 
Partridge, ducks, rabbits, et< 



Partridge, quail, rabbits. 

Partridge, ducks, deer, bear, 
Deer, partridge, rabbits. 
Deer, partridge, rabbits. 



Bass pike, etc Ducks, pheasants, rabbits, eti 



KALKASKA COUNTY 

VVilHam Watson Grand View Hotel 

. \\ . Douglas Manistee Lake Reson 



E. F. Sherwood. 
LAKE COUNTY 

W. P. Jones Farm Home Resort 



K;ipul City R.F.D. 1 Speckled trout, bass 

Darraeh P. O.t Black bass, brook trout, pike, perch. 

Kalkaska . Brook trout, bass. pike, etc 



Black bass, pickerel 



L. A. Carpente; 



Anton Watson . 



White Pine Lodge 



Baldwin 
Baldwin 
Baldwin 
Baldwin 



w ilham Utter Log Cabin Resort 

C. W. Florence Florence Cottage. , 

G. N. West Wintersmeet Farm . 

M. A. Freeman Lakeside Ridge 

Rouse & Houseman Little South Camp. . 



. wall-eyed pike, perch, etc. 



Rainbow. brook and German brown trout 



G. B. Cronkrite Crescent View 

Walter MacDougall MacDougall Camp. . 

LEELANAU COUNTY 

W. C. Ray Glen Rav Hotel 

B. L. Burke Cedar Springs Lodge 

M. M. Ocker Cold Spring Inn 

MASON COUNTY 

Ernest Jasper Emerson Lake Club . , 

Geo. Barnett 

Fav Parmeiee 

Mrs. H. H. Oriel Wolverine Cabin 

MIDLAND COUNTY 

Russell Beamish 

NEWAYGO COUNTY 

B. O. BulHs 

Wilkinson & Shaddock 

C. C. Wilkinson 

White River Club Ho 

Homer Truesdell Riverside Farm 

M. H. Whitmore Whitmore's Pavilion. 

OCEANA COUNTY 

Shelby Fish and Gun Club 



. pike, perch, etc 




Bas.^, trout, pickerel. 

Bass, trout, etc 

4 Troiii. bass, etc 

. Trout, bass, etc 



. North Bradley Bass, pickerel, pike. 



. Newaygo. . . . 

. Bitely 

, Bitely 

White Cloud . 



.„ Partridge, ducks, rabbit 

from .' "bass. pTckereV "","" "'.""'. Deer and small game 

Speckled trout, etc Partridge. 

; I Bass, pickerel, pike Partridge, ducks, rabbit; 



. Shelby iBrook and rainbow trout, black bass. 



pickerel, etc ' Partridge, bear, fox, 



Robert L. Fuchs Twin Lake Farm Irons Trout . bass, blufr-giite; perch '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Partridge! woodcock, deer, small birds, etc 



'Via Harrison and Leota fVia Traverse City JVla Kalkaska 



-iSL 



"^^ 



Thirtv-Three 




Birds, ducks, rabbits, black bear, 

Partridge, rabbits, deer, bear, small ga: 

etc. 
Deer, bear, rabbits, etc. 
Deer. bear, rabbits, etc. 
Partridge, small game, 
Deer, rabbits, birds, fox. 
Deer, partridge, etc 
Deer, partridge, quail, rabbits. 
Partridge, deer, rabbits, etc. 
Squirrel, geese, ducks, fox, partridge 

rabbits, etc. 
I Partridge, deer, etc. 
Partridge, deer, etc. 
Partridge. deer, rabbits, etc. 
Partridge, woodcock, ducks, rabbits 

Partridge, deer, rabbits, etc. . 
Deer, birds of all kinds, rabbits, e' 

Partridge, rabbits, black squirrel. 
Partridge, rabbit, fox. etc. 
Partridge, rabbits, ducks, squirrel. 

Partridge, quail, ducks, deer, rabbits, 
Partridge, deer, etc. 
Partridge, deer. etc. 
Partridge, deer, etc. 

Partridge, rabbits, etc. 




.^^^ 



-Oc 



■•^^SS- 



-IZ^ 



ICHIGAN FISHING AND HUNTING LAWS 



FISH 
Non-Residenta of State Must Have Lit 

NoD-resideDt license fee, $3.00, to take all kinds of fish, including brook trout. 
Non-resident license fee, $1.00, to take all kinds of fish, excepting brook trout. 



\ Likt-ly Streiiii 



CAMPING IN MICHIGAN 

Baldwin is the mecca of sportsmen. 
Within easy access are no less than 
twenty-seven small lakes and trout 
streams, innumerable camping spots 
and one of the most delightful water- 
ways that offer attractions for the 
canoeist — the Pere Marquette River. 
Baldwin annually entertains a number 
of Outing Clubs. It is one of the 
highest spots in western Michigan. 
The Baldwin Commercial Club, an 
organization of business men of the 
community, provides free camping 
sites on any of the lakes and arranges 
accommodations for visitors. Write 
Mr. H. W. Davis, Secretary, Baldwin. 
Mich. 





Telling About the Big One He Caught 



May 1st, to Septem- 
ber 1st, inclusive 



Regclations 



Seven inches in length. 
Thirty-five in one day 
Fifty in possession at 



With hook and line only. 
Unlawful to buy or sell at any 

time or have in possession 

during closed season. 



Ten inches in length. 
Ten in one day. 
Ten in possession at any > 
time. 



With hook and line only. 
Unlawful to buy or sell at any 

time, or have in possession 

during closed season. 



une 16th to last 
day of February, 

inclusive. 



Ten inches in length. 
Twenty-five in one day. 
Twenty-five in possession at 
any one time. 



I With hook and line only. 

I Unlawful to buy or sell at any 

I time or have in possession 

1 during closed season. 



White bass, calico \ May be caught dur- 



May be caught dur- 
ing any season of 
the year. 



Suckers, mullet, red- i May be caught dur- 
sides and gra.ss ing any season of 

pike. the year. 



\!1 other kinds of fish, May be caught dur- 

cxcept brook trout, ing any season of 

black bass and the year. 
wall-eyed pike. 



Six inches in length. 
Twenty-five in one day. 
Twenty-five in possession at 
any one time. 



With hook and lie 
Unlawful to buy 
time. 



; only. 



Five inches in length. 
Twenty-five in one day. 
Twenty-five in possession at 
any one time. 



With hook and line only. 
Unlawful to buy or sell at any 
time. 



With hook and line, also spear and 
dip net in streams during March 
and April and spear through 
the ice January and February, 
without artificial light. 



liled. ' With hook and lii 



only 



mollusks and 1 July 



Number and size unlimited. 

Possession unlawful March 
1.5th to May 31st. inclu- 
sive, except for scientific 
purposes. 



Size and number unlimited. 



Unlawful to spear with artificial 
light. Lawful to have in posses- 
sion imported frogs November 
1st to March 14th. inclusive. 



;i,\'s legal catch of fish may be taken k 
luist be attached to package. 



shipped out of the State by licensed fisherman. Coupon from 



Hibjfcl to change 



State Game and Fish Co 



GAME AND FUR BEARING ANIMALS 

I August, 1917, as legislature is in session. Wi 

missioner. Lansing, Mich. 
Unlawful to Hunt or Trap Without License. 
Resident Fee Non-Resident Fee Alien Fee 

Snuill giiin.-. . Sl.lK( Small game $10.00 Small game,. ...SlOOit 

Deer 1.5U Deer... 25.00 Deer 25.00 

Residents of this State and their minor children exempt from license while bunting on their own enclosed 
hinds upon which ih.-v :irc roeularlv do * " ' 



Kind of .Vnimae. 


t)pEN Season Number and Possession 


Regduatioss 


Moose, elk ami 
caribou. 


I'nhnvful to kill at 
any time. 


Unlawful to have in possession 
at any time. 


Deer. 


November 10th to One. 

November 30th, i Unlawful to have in posses- 
inclusive, sion more than thirty days 
after close of season. 


Unlawful to use artificial light or 
dogs in hunting, or to kill deer 
in red coat or fawn in spotted 
coat or while in the water. 


Rabbits and hares. 


< )ctober Ist to March 
1st, inclusive. 


Unlimited. Unlawful to use ferrets or other 
Legally killed may be trans- rodents in hunting. 

ported and sold. Farmers and fruit growers may 
use ferrets to hunt rabbits on 
their own lands. 


Squirrel (fox, black 
and irray)^ 


I'nlawful to kill until 
1920. 


Unlawful to have in possession at 
any time. 



^ 



.£Z- 



-T^r- 




_^^: 

MICHIGAN FISHING AND HUNTING LAWS 



able 
offer shi 
For the 



and streams that 



■t, safe, enjoyable car 
nore ambitious ones i 
I surpass in the vi 
nd experiences that ai 
on such a trip as that which 
as the Intermediate Lakes. 



iety of 
offered 



Recently a number of places in north- 
ern Michigan have been bidding for the 
summer tourist who prefers life "under 
canvas" as an outing, consequently 
free camp sites are provided. Write 
Pere Marquette Passenger Department 
representatives for particulars. 




Kind of Animal 


Open Season 


Number and Possession 


Regulations 


Beaver. 


November 1st, to 
November 15th, 
inclusive. 


Fifteen under one special 
license, costing $10. Addi- 
tional licenses may be 
issued at same price. 


Unlawful to destroy houses, or 
dams, or to have in possession 
without license seal attached. 


< Uter, fisher, martin, 
fox, mink, raccoon, 
and skunk. 


November 1st to 
March 31st, inclu- 


Unlimited. 


LTnlawful to have in possession 
during closed season. 


-Muskrats. 


November 1st to 
April 14th, inclu- 


LTnlimited. 


Unlawful to destroy houses or 

set trap within six feet of same. 

Unlawful to use firearms in killing. 


Wolf. lynx and wild- 
cat. 


May be killed at any 


Unlimited. 

Bounty on wolf, over six 

months old, S25; under 

six. $10. 
Bounty on Ivnx, S5.00. 
Bounty on wildcat, $3.00. 


Bounty paid by county clerks on 
presentation of scalp. 


Bears and other ani- 
mals not protected 
by laws of this 
State. 


May be killed at any 
time. 







GAME BIRDS 
All Persons Must Secure Licei 
Resident Fee, $1.00 Non-Resident Fe 

Residents of this State and their minor children exempt from lit 
lan ds upon which they are regularly dom'.ciled. " 



; fee while hunting 



Kind of Birds 



Open Season 



Mongolian or English pheas- 
ants, quail, black fowl, caper- 
cailzie, hazel grouse, spruce 
hens, or Canada grouse, 
prairie chicken, wild turkey, 
killdeer, wading, shore and 
meadow birds. 



I'artridge (ruffed grouse). 



Regulations 



Unlawful to have in pos- 
1 at any time. 



September 15th to Decem- 
ber 31st, inclusive. 

Woodduck, unlawful to 
kill until 191S. 



Six in one day. 
Fifteen in possession 

at any one time. 
Twenty-five in one 



Unlawful to have in pos- 
session more than thirty 
days after season closes. 

Unlawful to make use of 
automobile in hunting. 



Twenty-five i 

one day. 
Fifty in one 



Unlawful to have in pos- 
session more than thirty 
days after season closes. 



NN'oodcock. 


October 1st to November 
30th. inclusive. 


Six in one day. L^nlawful to have in pos- 
Twenty in possession session more than thirty 
at any one time. days after season closes. 
Twenty-five in one 


Wilson or jack-snipe, black- September loth to Decem- 
breasted and golden plover ber 31st, inclusive, 
and yellow legs. Other shore birds pro- 
tected until 1920. 


Ten in one day. Unlawful to have in pos- 
Twenty in possession session more than thirty 
at any one time. days after season closes. 
Twenty-five in one 


*Uails. coots and gallinules. September 15th to Decem- 
, ber 31st, inclusive. 


Unlawful to have in pos- 
session more than thirty 
days after season closes. 


Blue heron, shelldrake. terns May be killed at any time 

and nierganzers. by securing permit to do 

so from State Game. Fish 

and Forest Fire Com- 





One day's legal bag limit m 

gage without cover in such man 

♦Federal law on rails, coots 



-^2L 



.- be carried out of the State by non-resident licensed hunter as open hand bag- 

er as to be easily inspected. 

nd gallinules, open season September 16th to November 30th, inclusive. 

^ 



Ji 



fe 



Condensed Through Time of Connecting Lines 





» 8.35 
4.35 
7.00 
11.00 



AM 
'7.05 

• 7.30 
5.45 
8.15 
9.00 
12.30 
6.50 
AM 



10 45 

• 3 is 

5.55 
J. 25 

12.45 

R 30 

» 6. 08 

10 20 

8 30 
AM 



7.00 
4 07 
9 00 



Chicago and Northwestern PM 

» 120 Lv Omaha Ar 1159 

8.25 , Cedar Rapids 4-15 

10.20 Clinton 2.15 

2 . 00 |Ar Chicago I.i 



PM 



AM 



PM AM C, M. & St. P. PM . AM 

6.05 * 7.10 Lv Omaha Ar 3.25 I 12.15 

9.|0tl0.35 Des Moines 10.35 !t 825 

7.45 * 9.05 ■ A.r Chicago Lv *I0.30 *10.4 5 

5.55 Lv Kansas City Ar 8,17 

11.40 Ottumwa 2.10 

8.20 At Chicago Lv * 6 00 

_AM __P!!_I 

PM PM Chicago, Burlingt 

3.45 * 6.30 Lv 

7.00 8.09^ Aj^. . Clii.'i 

6 . 20 Lv kansa.s ( 1 1 

4.28 I Leaven«,irtl 

6.50 ' St. .losi.pli 

1.16 Quinc.v.. 

3.55 Galesburg 

.00 Ar Chicago . . 



9 20 
6 50 
131 



AM 

11.05 

7.40 

■10. 05 

6 25 

10.50 

•10 30 

PM 



ha. 



I & Quincy AM 

Ar 12.01 

. .Lv*10.05 



AM 



9.27 
7.20 
12.55 
10. 12 
* 6 10 
PM 



PM Chicago. Rocit Island & Pacific PM 

, . Lv Hot Springs .\r 3 55 

Little Rock I 30 

.^. ^.^. Ar Chicago ._ I^A-* 635 

* 8.50 Lv Topeka.. Ar 1220 

11.00 Kansas City 8.30 

9.00 Rocli Lsland 10 15 

8.00 Pc-orui 9 55 

1.45 .^r, , Cl.i.;,!..,, Lv * 6 00 

• 2.00 Lv, . I>ln;ili..i Ar 11 05 

6.20 n..s .NL.irics 6 42 

4 40 Ar Chicago Lv*10,00 



1,45 
II 20 

I 35 

I 40 

' 9 00 

8 15 



PM 

AM Sante Fe Lines 

*■ 6. 00 Lv Galveston. . . 

8. 15 Houston 

8.25 i Fort Worth... 

11 05 ' Wichita 

4 55 I Topeka. . . . 

7 . 00 Kansas City . 

4 . 03 ' Galesburg . . . 

9, 15 Ar Chicago. . .. 

AM 



AM 



AM 


PI 


9.25 


in 


7.30 


7 


7. 55 


/ 


5,25 


5 


II 59 


11 


10 00 


9 


2 05 


1 1 


* 9 50 


♦ 6 


AM 


PI 



•11 55 L' 

7.55 

12 05 

5 00 A I 



Kansas City Southern ; PM 

Beaumont Ar 5 45 

Shrevcport 10 10 

Pittsburg 5 25 

Kansa.s Citv Lv * I 00 



PM 
10 


AM 
* 7 05 1 


(Id 


7 40 


,ua 


5 30 


,00 


6 55 


, 11 


7 00 . 


AM 


PM 



PM 



St. Louis Southwestern ' PtI 

Waco Arl 7 50 

Fort Worth 7-25 



.Shreveport ' 10, 55 

. Tcxarkana 8.55 

. . St. Louis Lvi* 9 . 50 



AN PM Mobile & Ohio 

8 15 * 4 45 Lv New Orleans Ar 

9, 10 7,45 Mobile 

7.55 6.21 At St. Louis Lv 



9.40 9 05 
8.20 7 45 
8.34 » a 40 



■ Daily, t Daily except Sunday. Time between midnight and noon 

The above schedules are approximate only. Ask Your 
See schedule of The Re.sort Special from Chicado to the 



9.20 
10.05 
11.24 
12 40 



AM j C, C, C. & St. L.— (Big Four Route) 

tlO.35 iLv Indianapolis Arl 3.05 

1 2. 50 Anderson 1 , 40 

I, 57 Marion 12, 35 

, Wabash 11.50 

Warsaw 10.27 

.Elkhart ' 9. 15 



6 40 Ar 
PM 



.Benton Harbor Lv t 7.40 til. 50 

AM AM 



PM 

* 7. 00 

9.00 


AM : AM 

1 Lv 

* 9.00 


M., K. & T. 

, , , Galveston 

Hnust.m 


PM 
Ar 


AN 

9,45 
7,45 


PM 
'7. 55' 


9.00 

8.10 
8.30 


* 9. 10 ' 11.30 . . 
445 900 . 
5.05 9 15 


. .■^.■iii \nl..iiin 
. , l.,ill, \V,,rtli 
Dallas 


8 20 
1 00 
12 40 


7.20 
7.45 
7 35 


6,30 

8.05 
7.50 


11.20 


< II 45 


, Okluliun.a Lit.v,, 




4. 45 


7.00 


4.25 
7.32 
AM 


11.40 1 5.00 ,. 
11.10 7. 30 Ar 

AM PM 


Muskogee. . . . 

St. Louis 


...i 6.00 
Lv!* 6.30 
PM 


H.20 
* 9 05 

PM 


11.45 

* 9.15 
AM 


AM 

* 8.15 

10 40 


PM 

* 7 30 Lv 

10 45 


.Southern Railwa.v 

, , , New Orleans 
, , , Cliiittanooga, , . 


Ar 


AM 

9.40 
5 55 

* 8,00 
AM 


PM 
9 05 

6. 15 


AH 


PM 




PM 



PM Southern Paclflc 

*l I .30 Lv San Antonio Ar' 

7 . 25 I Houston . 

' Galveston . 

7. 30 I New Orleans i 10.45 I 8.45 

9 10 Ar Chicago Lv» 9.15 * 6 35 

PM J 

PM Louisville & Nashville 
* 9 50 ILv New Orleans 

2.30 I Mobile, 

8. 00 I Nashville 

10.15 Chicago 

AM 



light figures; between ] 



and 



Local Agent for schedules to St. Louis and Chicago. 
Xorthorn Michigan Resorts, pages thirty-seven and thirty-eight. 



_^£2L 



-Z2r- 





s 


10 


rt R 


IX 


d 7 


W 


e 7 


lU 



Daily. t Week days. Daily, except Monday. t Daily, except Saturday. a iransier lo i-ere 
Marquette Raiiroad by street car from Woodlawn C63rd Street) to 63rd Street (B. &. O. Station), d Stop 



} leave passengers from Grand Rapids or beyond, e Stop to take passengers for ; 
I Stop on flag to take on or to land passengers. 



Transfer to Pere 

Station), d Stop 

nd Rapids or beyond. 



Unrivaled Train Service 

TO THE 

Summer Resorts 

OF 

Northern Michigan 

"The Resort Special" from 
Chicago, Toledo and Detroit to 
Traverse City, Buttons Bay, Omena, 
Northport, Charlevoix, Petoskey 
and Bay View will go into commis- 
sion June 18th. 

Chicago — Bay View 

This train will carry a Club Car 
between Chicago and Bay View. 
In addition, the equipment will 
comprise modern high-grade Ten- 
Section-One-Drawing - Room - Two 
Compartment and Sixteen-Section 
Sleeping Cars, through Coaches 
and Baggage Cars. 

Chicago — Traverse City — 
Northport 

Twelve-Section - Drawing -Room- 
Compartment Sleeping Car between 
Chicago and Traverse City-5uf- 
tons Bay - Omena - Northport, 
\ia Traverse City, Leelanau & Man- 
istique Railway from Traverse City. 
New feature — direct auto service 
between Sutton's Bay and Leland. 

(Traverse Cily paisrngers max o,-r:ipy 
" " --\lHa.m.} 

Twelve - Section Drawing - 
Room Sleeping Car between 
Chicago and Frankfort, north- 
bound, Fridays, commencing 
June 29th; southbound, Sun- 
days, commencing July 1st. 
Passengers destined for Frank- 
fort on other days may take 
sleeper to Thompsonville. 

Dining Car, serving meals a la 
carte, will be attached to this train 
between Chicago and Benton 
Harbor. 

BufTet service will be provided 
in Club Car between Traverse Cit\' 
and Bay View. 

Toledo — Detroit — Bay View 

Twelve-Section - Drawing- Room 
Sleeping Car between Toledo and 
Bay \'iew and Detroit and Bay 
View; also a Twelve-Section- Draw- 
ing-Room Sleeping Car between 
Detroit and Traverse City. 

iPassfngers mav occupy berths UKlil 7.S0 
a. m. a: Traverse Cily.) 

The time given herein is approxi- 
mate only. Figures should be veri- 
fied before being accepted as final. 

Schedule of .Advance Season 
trains appears on page thirty-eight. 

Ask about Tourist Rates of Fare 



% 



j^:- 



-^T- 



XS?^^5=^^BffiS^ 



Through Sleeping Car Routes for the Season of 1917 

For this season the train service from tlie terminals mentioned in Through Sleeping Car Routes will be about 
as was maintained during the 1916 season, including the line operating between Chicago and Traverse City, 
which will again extend service to Suttons Bay. omena and Northport via Traverse City, Leelanau & Manistique 
Railway from Traverse City. The time of departure of trains, as given in the schedules appended, is approxi- 
mate only, and should not be depended upon absolutely. The summer train service will become effective 
June 18, 1917. Complete and correct schedules of these trains will be sent to any address on request. 
Advance Season Special Train Service from St. Louis, Chicago, Toledo and Detroit. 
For the accommodation of the large number of oassengers who desire to go north in advance of the regular 
summer season, special train service will be operated this year on the following dates; 

From St. Louis and Chicago 

Ar Traverse City 4.50 a. m. 

Lv Traverse City 
Ar Suttons Bay . . . 
Ar Omena 



T c^ T • onn (FRIDAY, 

Lv St Louis 9.00 a. m. juESDAY, 

(via Chicago & Alton) 'pi>Tr»AV 
Lv Chicago 6.30 p. m. I TUESDAY 

(via Pere Marquette) FRIDAY ' 



June 1 
June 5 
June 8 
June 12 
June 15 



Via 
T. C, 



a7.15 a.m. 
a8.00 a.m. 
a8.15 a.m. 



LSzM. 38:25 



the 
following 
day 



Ar Northport 

Ar Charlevoix 7.00 a.m. 

Ar Petoskey 7.50 a.m. 

Ar Bay View 8.00 a.m. 

a Service effective June 19th, via Traverse City, Leelanau & Manistique Railway from Traverse City. 

Ten-Section-Compartment-Drawing-Room Sleeping Car, St. Louis to Bay View. Ten-Section-One- 

Drauing-Room-Two-Compartment Sleeping Car, Sixteen-Section Sleeping Car, Club Car, Coaches and Baggage 

Car, Chicago to Bay View. Twelve-Section-Drawing-Room-Compartment Sleeping Car, Chicago to Traverse 

City, Suttons Bay, Omena and Northport. New feature — Direct auto service between Suttons Bay and 

Leland {Traverse City passengers may occupy berths until 7:10 a. m.) Twelve-Section-Drawing-Room Sleeping 

Car between Chicago and Frankfort, northbound, Fridays, commencing June 29th; southbound, Sundays, 

commencing July 1st. Dining Car, Chicago to Benton Harbor. {Buffet Service in Club Car between Traverse 

City and Bay Vieiv.) 

Advance season service returning: Leave Bay View June 3, 6, 10, 13, 17. 

From Toledo and Detroit 

Lv Toledo .. 6.55 p. m. ir:„-r^Av t ,c ''Ar Traverse City .4.50 a. m. 1 , r „ ■ , 
Lv Detroit 7.40 p. m. [FRIDAY, June 15 ^^^ g^y yj^^ 8 00 ^ m.j'^'^^ following day 

Sleeping Cars, Toledo to Bay View; Detroit to Traverse City and Detroit to Bay View. 
Advance season service returning : Leave B ay View June 17. {Toledo car on June 17 u'ill run via Detroit.) 

AFTER SEASON SERVICE — Following the close of the season (regular service being discontinued 
September 22nd) Special Service will be given as follows: 



Northbound 



Lv Chicago . 



. ■,(. \ THURSDAY, Sept. 27 

o.ju p. m. ^ SATURDAY, Sept. 29 



Lv Bay View 
Lv Petoskey 
Lv Charlevoix 
Lv Northport 
Lv Omena 
Lv Suttons Bay 
Ar Traverse City. 
Lv Iraverse City. 

.Additional information \ 



ix: 



6.35 p. m. 
6.40 p. m. 
7.10 p. m. 
6.15 p. m. 
6.25 p. m. 
6.43 p. m. 
7.25 p. m. 
9.30 p. m. 

ill be gladly given by any of the reprcs* 



Via 
T. C, 
L. &M. 



Southbound 



SUNDAY, Sept. 23' 
TUESDAY, Sept. 25 
FRIDAY, Sept. 28 
SUNDAY. Sept. 30 



Arrive Bay View 

at 8.00 a. m. 
the following day 



Ar Chicago 8.00 a.m. 

St. Louis iviaC.& A.) 6.00 p.m. 
Toledo(UnionStation7.20 a.m. 
Detroit 6.30 a.m. 



nger Department of tlie Pere Marquette Railway 



-^r 




.^^i;. 



■:^^ 



Michigan East Coast Resorts 

1917— APPROXIMATE SCHEDULE OF SUMMER SERVICE 1917 
(Consult Local Agent for Correct Time) 
EFFECTIVE JUNE 17th 



Approximate One- 
Way, Season Tour- 
ist and Week-End 
Fares. Weeli-End 
Faressoldfrom 
May 4 to Sept. 30. 



No.9 


No.7 


No 17 


Sat. 
only 


No.5 


No.3 


No, 15 


No.l 


STATIONS 


NoIOIno 12 


No.2 


No. 4 


No 16 


Sun. 
only 


Sun. 
only 


No.6 


No.8 


One-way Fares are 
quoted (rom Chicago 
(Grand Central Sta,) 


PM 

t 6 30 

6.55 

7-21 


PM 

t 5 00 

5 25 

550 


PM 

t 3 45 
4 10 
435 

t 4 43 

t 4.47 

f 5.10 
5.28 
545 
552 

f 

I 

6.03 
6.12 

t 

6.21 

t 

t 

640 
652 
702 
7 09 
7 15 

t 730 


PM 
1.15 

1 40 

2 11 

t 


N'N 
tl2.00 
12 25 
12 50 


AM 

» 7.30 

7.55 

8.20 




PM 
•II, 50 

12,15 
12,40 


Lv Chicago(Gd.CenI,Sta ).4r 
Chicago. 63d St.(B &0,Sta,) 
, , South Chicago 


AM 

t 8,00 

7,25 

6,55 


AM 

f 9,50 

921 

8,56 

I 8,48 

f 8,44 

t 8,20 

8,00 

7,40 


PM 
t 100 
1231 
12 05 


PM 

t 5, 00 

431 

4,05 




PM 
9 25 
8 53 
825 


PM 

10 10 
9 40 

9 12 

( 


PM 

•10 30 

10 00 

9 35 


AM 

• 7,20 

6,50 

6,24 


Week-End Fares shown 

are from Chicago, 
(Gd, Central). 63d St. 
and So, Chicago Stas. 














Indiana Harbor 










One 

Way 

S 1,65 
1,77 
1.82 
1.88 
1,93 
2,04 
2,09 
2.17 
2 23 
2,30 
2.40 
2.40 
2.54 
2.64 
2.70 
2.83 


Season 
Tourist 

.52,70 
2.95 
3,00 
3,10 
3,20 
3,35 
3.45 
3,60 
3,65 
3.75 
3.95 
3.95 
4,15 
4,30 
4,40 
4,60 






t 6.30 
6 46 






J 9.00 
9 14 
9.29 


jm" 

t 6.15 
6.22 


_ 


fll,30 
11,14 
10,57 


330 
308 








( 9.00 
8,35 
8 15 


( 5,47 

5,19 

4 46 

( 4,35 

! 

t 

( 4,22 
4.11 


End 


S 14 


305 

3 24 

330 
335 
342 
353 
400 
406 
4.11 

4 15 
4 20 
4.25 
4.30 
442 
4 50 
4 56 
509 


1.38 


1.40 


Michigan City 


5.58 


PM 
t 8,00 

742 
( 
(, 

7 27 

7 18 
( 

705 
( 


7.25 
7 00 
6 49 
643 
6 38 
634 
6 25 
6 18 
6 12 
6 04 
557 
PM 


812 


Fares 

S2,00 




'.'.v.. . 

7.33 
738 


f. 




2,00 


a 




cc 


cc 




e^S 7 14 




,,c,. 


2.10 


?1 




f. 




cc 




2.15 






! 943 
( 9.49 


6.35 
6.43 


..c. 




2.20 




i2c 

0)5 = 
Ss § 

5.06 
5.00 


7,04 










2.35 
















2.40 


z 




t 9,56 


6.53 


_ 




6,53 

f 










t 3 58 


2.50 




cc 












2.55 




2.35 
240 

302 
3 II 


lO^OS 
10.16 

10^30 
10.35 
10.45 


t 

7,10 
7 15 
7,28 
7 35 
7.42 
7.55 


cc 










2.65 


9-06 
9 12 


2,46 
3,05 


St. Joseph 

Benton Harbor 


6,39 
6.33 
6,22 
6,15 
6,10 
t 6.00 


10,22 
10,12 

tiooo 

9,54 
9 48 
9,38 


218 
212 

153 
1,43 


6,40 
6,25 
6,10 
603 
557 
5 45 


7,06 
6,55 
6.40 
632 
6.24 
6 10 


7.33 
723 

7,05 
6 52 
64! 


3,40 
3.25 
( 3,11 
t 3,05 
2,58 
2,43 


2.70 
2.70 
2.95 




752 
7 58 
808 


r 3.25 
3,30 
3.38 




3 05 




Watervliet 

Ar Hartford Lv 




3,05 
3,30 






t 8.25 


825 


t 4.00 




tic 20 


tl0,20 


Ar South Haven, , ,Lv 




AM 


t 7.00 


1 12,50 


S 455 




§ 5, 00 


g 4,55 




3.17 


5 30 


3.80 












k 8 05 
k 830 


805 
830 


338 
t 400 




8,23 
8.55 


8,25 

8,55 


At Lake Cora Lv 

Ar Lawton Lv 






8.55 
t 8.30 


1,10 
tl2,45 


1 10 
tl2,45 




309 

§ 244 






3.12 
3.12 


5.05 
5.05 


3.75 










3.75 


















t 814 

823 

I 8 30 

8 40 

( 847 

I 8 52 

t 8 57 

f 901 

90S 

t 9.17 

f 9.27 

t 9. 46 


PM 


5 16 
5.25 
532 
5.39 
5.45 

e 550 
e 5 55 
e 559 
606 
e 6 14 
e 6.25 

6 40 


323 


10.58 
11.10 


8,04 
8,14 
8,22 
8.31 

( 8.41 
8.50 
8,58 

r 9,02 
9,10 


' ■ 3',53 
' 4,05 


Lv McDonald Ar 






f 9.29 

9.20 

t 9.12 

9.05 

I 8.54 

I 8,50 

t 8,45 

r 8,41 

8,35 

8,26 

f 8,16 

t 8,01 

t 7.05 

AM 


r.ii 

1.06 

+ 12.42 
tl2,00 


535 
524 
517 
507 

f 4 59 
454 
4 49 

( 446 
4,40 
4,30 
4 20 

t 400 

t 3 00 





600 
5,49 

542 

532 

523 

( 5.18 

( 5 13 

( 509 

5,03 

d 4 53 

d 4 42 

425 

PM 


::'':■■ 


( 2,29 
2,19 

t 2,14 
2,08 


2.93 
3.03 
3.10 
3.20 
3.29 
3.34 
3.40 
3.45 
3.53 
3.64 
3.72 
3.91 


4,80 
4,95 
5,05 
5,20 
5.35 
5,45 
5,55 
5,60 
5,75 
5,90 
6,05 
6,35 


3.40 








3.55 










3.60 










3.75 










3.85 






..c. 


„ 








6 i3 

• 5, 42 

• 500 


( 1,58 
f 1 53 
I 1,48 
1 41 
( 1,33 
( 1,23 
• 1,05 

•11,55 


3.90 




,,c.. 








3.95 










4.00 




3.52 


11.30 


! 4.35 








4.15 










4 25 








9,27 , c 
9,42 • 5,05 


East Saugatuck 

Ar Holland Lv 


t 3.08 




4.35 


tlO.48 


t 4. 20 


•11.56 


4.60 


+ 11.35 


tlO.35 




PM 


t 5. 00 


•1240 




Ar Grand Rapids, . .Lv 


t 2.25 
AM 




4,55 
















PM 






t 4 25 
f 4 39 

1 a 45 

1 4 52 
5. 10 
5. 14 


t|205 

(1221 

12 29 

112 36 

1255 

100 

t 1 05 

f 1 20 

r 1 25 

1 1,35 

2 55 

1 3 16 

1 

326 

337 

339 

350 

400 

4,10 

! . 
4 23 
438 


m 


• 5,30 

f 5,45 

t 5,53 

t 6,00 

6,18 

6,23 

t 6,27 

t 6,41 

f 6.40 

7,00 

8,25 

8.45 


Lv Holland Ar 




1 12,20 
11201 
111,54 
(11,47 
11.31 
11.26 


PM 




t 5 10 

( 5 02 

( 4 59 

( 4 52 

431 

4 27 

( 422 

(4 11 

406 

400 

320 

255 


•II 59 

(II, 44 

II 35 

(II 26 

II 08 

II, 03 

(1059 

(10 43 

10 39 

10 30 

10 20 

10 00 

( - , 

I 948 

936 

928 

(9,14 

9,04 

854 

(, 

8 40 

825 

• 7 50 

PM 


















4.07 
4 17 
4.25 
4.44 
4.46 
4.51 
4.61 
4.70 
4.76 


6.60 
6.70 
6.90 
7.20 
7.25 
7.30 
7.55 
7.60 
7.70 


4.75 


















4.90 




















5.00 
























5.20 
























5.25 
























5.30 










t 5 33 
5.37 

5 48 
603 

6 20 
f , . 

t 631 
643 
649 
703 
7.13 
725 










til. 11 
tll.06 
11.00 
10.47 
10.30 








5.50 
























5.50 










Ar Muskegon .Lv 

Lv M uskegon Ar 














5.60 
































4.89 
4.93 
5.01 
5.14 
5.16 
5.31 
5.40 
5.51 
5.55 
5.64 
5.73 
5.83 


7.90 
7.95 
8.10 
8.30 
8.35 
8.60 
8.75 
8.90 
9.00 
9.10 
9.25 
9.40 


5.75 
























5.80 






t 8.55 
9.08 
9.14 
9.27 
9.36 
9.50 










110.19 
10.06 
10.00 
9.47 
9.36 
9.25 








245 

235 
232 

220 
2 10 
200 

( 

1 50 
1 35 

t 1 00 
PM 


5.90 
























6.05 
























6.05 
























6.25 
























6.35 
























6.45 
























6.55 










740 
757 




10.00 

10.15 

•11.00 

AM 










9.10 

8,55 

t 8,20 

AM 








6.65 
























6.75 










Ar Pentwater , , , Lv 














6.85 









PM 


PM 

















Dally. 
Stop tc 
Stop tt 
Stop oi 



t Week days, k Saturday only, § Sunday only, 
take on or to land passengers for or from Chicago. 
land passengers from Chicago or Michigan Clty. 
algnal to take on passengers only 



Stop to land passengers only. 

Stop to land passengers or. on signal, to take on passengers. 
Runs daily, except Saturday; on Sunday leaves 5 00 p m- 
Stop. Friday only, to land passengers from Chicago 



Additional information will be gladly given by any of the representatives of the Passenger 
Department of the Pere Marquette Railway (See page forty) 



.uSL 



-^^ 




LOCATION 




^ ^,1 ,,i - ,,i 1 M <' 








Benton Harbor-St. Joseph 


Berrhi 






Charir 
Hast ill 
Rtd U 






- 1 It 1 'In ■ < ..ii[ •.!■ 


Detroit 


Ill (Ji.lf Clllh 




C-outiti 


,■ Club 




Dt'troi 


Golf Club . 




Phu*^nl 


V flnlf Chih 




Flint ( 

Fraiikf 






II < ( ,<.|f 1 lull 


Grand Haven 


Sprliii: 


1 1 ' ' ' ',' III 


Grand Rapids 


HichI;, 




Harbor Springs 


TI:i'i".' 
















Lansing 


1 '1 


< . '.1 < lull 








Ludington . . . 


t IM\ <>! 


' ( ,. ■ \ ... 1 ll M<l 


Mackinac Islnnd 


I hr < 




Manistee. . . 












Oden 


0,1, II 1 


.. ■ 1 |..i. 




tPetu>L 
Poiiih 






1 ,1. <-\ 




■.. 1 . .| .- I I'll 


Portage Point 


Porl;n-' 


1 ■ 1 1 ... ■ 1 ii, 


Saginaw 


.SaKin:i 










Toledo 


Toicin 
Invtrn 
Ottav\. 
Biiv \ 


,.,'';■"■';,:;;, 


Traverse City 


Trav«r 


sf (in ( iiiir .V ( "r 


Watervllet 


Paw P 


w Lake (loir Clul 


\\ equetonsing 


\\ itjUf 


uiisitii: (;oif riuh 




WeqUf 




Walloon Lake 


Walloo 


n Lake Golf Club. 


t Under construction. 







IN VAl»n 
3,?l.i:i 

3.0*0 
5.812 
1.71s 
6.78s 
6,615 
6.482 
3.7SO 
2.942 
2.S0.5 
2.500 
6.4J9 



Published for information only and subject to change without notice. 
Two transportation tickets are required for the exclusive occupancy of a 
Drawing-Room. and one and one-half tickets for a Compartment. 




Sleeping C.\b R.^tes 



Kate lor Kat.. for 
Hate for Compart- Drawing- 
Section ment Room 



6.4(10 
6.2S() 
6.720 
2,900 
3.300 



2.00' 


1.60 


3.60 


00 


7 00 


2.25i 


1.80 


4.05 


6. 50 


,S 00 


2.50 


2.00 


4.50 


7 00 


'.I 00 


2.75i 


2.20 


4.95 


8.00 


10.00 


3.OO1 


2.40 


5.40 


S . M 


11 00 


3.25 


2 60 


5.85 


9.50 


IL' 00 


3.50 


2.80 


C.30 


10 01) 


13 liO 


3.75 


3 00 


6.75 


10 .50 


14 00 


4.00 


3.20 


7 20 


11 .")ll 


11 Oil 



For further particulars of the Train Service, PuUman Car Reservations, etc., 
call upon yniH lu irt^l Pere Marquette Railway Representative. 

GRAND R.-\PIDS— City Office, Morton House Block— Either Phone, 1168. 

Neil DeYouno District Passenger Agent 

City Passenger and Ticket -Agent 



CHICAGO— City Office, 226 South Clark Street— I'h.i : j.il 

O. L. KiNNEV General W. -1. m I', i^. 1 Agent 

J. G. Van Xorsdall <- ii.\ l';i -. i,;;. r Agent 

E. O. N1LE8 City TiiUcl Agent 

C. A. Weeks Traveling Passenger Agent 

R. H. McCuRDY .Traveling Pa.ssengor Agent 

DETROIT— City Office, 26 Fort Street West— PhoncsiMain 368 and 3V)0. 

J. W. Kearns District Passenger Agent 

I,. E. Vaih City Ticket Agent 



JOHN DUNPHY, A. G. P. A DETROIT. MICH. 

W. e;. WOLFENDEN. G. p. a., Detroit, Mich. 



..^2:- 



Copyright, 1917, Pere Marquette Railway Company. 



HER mighty lakes, like oceans 
of liquid silver; her mountains 
with their bright aerial tints; 
her valleys teeming with wild fertility ; 
her tremendous cataracts thundering 
in their solitudes ; her boundless plains, 
waving with spontaneous verdure; her 
broad deep rivers, rolling in solemn 
silence to the ocean; her trackless 
forests, where vegetation puts forth 
all its magnificence; her skies, kind- 
ling with the magic of summer clouds 
and glorious sunshine; — no, never 
need an American look beyond his 
country for the sublime and beautiful 
in natural scenery." 

— \('ashington Irving — 

"The Sketch Book" 



\ 



\BB^f^^ 



OFCONGB&SS 



0A6 



099 169