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Full text of "Milestone"

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY 



KENTUCKIANA 

John Wilson Townsend Room 





EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY 



<«4 



Milestone 

1986 Edition 
Volume 63 

Diana Smith, Editor 

Robert Hughes, Managing Editor 

Larry Bailey, Adviser 






i 

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Contents 




Opening 




Student Life 


id 


Sports 


66 


Academics / Organizations 


108 


People 


222 


Index 


273 






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IT'S JUST BEGUN. The New 
School Year. New Investments. Ar- 
riving at Eastern, we found a 
new beginning — one of invest- 
ments, self-interests and returns. 
Our beginning consisted of cam- 
pus traditions and of trends set 
this year. Our goal was to find 
how to combine these traditions 
and trends to receive the highest 
Return on Our Investment. 



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Investments. As students, we invested ourselves 
to receive the highest return possible, socially, intel- 
lectually and morally Because of the University's 
traditional beliefs, we found ourselves attending 
Saturday afternoon football games, studying in the 
ravine, meeting friends on the corner and involving 
ourselves in campus activities. However, we also 
made investments which began new trends at the 









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University. The inauguration of a new 
president, the approval of a co-ed dorm in 
Martin Hall, the observation of Martin Lu- 
ther King's birthday and the restoration of 
the campus beautiful also helped us to ma- 
ture. 

In combining these investments we grew 
as individuals as well as members of the 
University society, all the while continu- 
ing our search for the highest' point of re- 
turn. 



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Photos by Neil Thompson 



Opening 5 



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As the year progressed, we de- 
veloped varied interests, each one 



went. Finding traditions, we 
went downtown on Thursday 
night and "Krogering" on Satur- 
day, ordered pizza from Dominos 
and pulled all-nighters cram- 
ming for a test. Our individuality 
soared as we participated in the 
band, went rock climbing and 
played football. By making these 
investments, we discovered di- 
verse self-interests which helped 
us develop our individuality. 

Involvement encompassed the 
University, helping students in- 
vest their energy to learn outside 
the classroom. We gained lasting 
friendships from our involve- 
ment in Greek organizations, 
professional clubs or religious or- 
ganizations. This involvement 
provided us with an excellent 
learning opportunity, resulting 
in a higher return at graduation. 




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Photos by Neil Thompson 

Through our involvement at the Universi- 
ty, we discovered how to develop our self- 
interests to maximize our social, intellectual 
and moral growth. Involvement in Home- 
coming activities and Hanging of the Greens 
preserved the University traditions while 
new fashions and more career-oriented atti- 
tudes set trends which led to new traditions. 
This involvement led to achieving our goals 
and bringing the highest 



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Return on our 
Investment 



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10 Student Life 






Investing ourselves to 
receive the highest 

RETURN 



Investments 



Balloons 

Fashions 

Halley's Comet 

National News 

Martin L. King 

Higher Education 

Relationships 

Downtown 

Laundry Room 

Homecoming 

Christmas 

Theater 

Music TV /Movies 

What's In/What's Out 

Student Attitudes 

Rhythm 

History 

Spring Break 

Off-Campus Living 

Chapel 

Bookstore 

Graduation 



Student Life 11 






ke the 
is, socializing 
^onal relationships can 
ie pupil to float in an un- 
chartered direction. In order to con- 
ol the balloon and reach the ulti- 
late highs a balloonist and a stu- 
ent must stay in control at all 
mes to reach that final high! 
Each is unique in its own style; 
owever, all are of the same basic 
:ructure. A balloon is spotted in 
le sky, and the colors and design of 
s exterior are eye-catching and in- 
eresting, much like a person. All 





The 
Top 
of 
Things 





Long hair on women and short hair on men illustrate a significant role in 
fashions. 



14 Student Life 




Years ago most young men 
wanted their hair cut in crew cuts 
and girls wanted ponytails to 
match their bobby socks and 
cheerleading sweaters. 

Then times changed, ducktails 
were in and without them men 
were just a little too clean cut. 
This brought a reaction from the 
feminine side of the style world. 
Just as men began to wear longer 
styles, women began to wear 
shorter ones. 

Then came the sixties and the 
flower children. Both sexes be- 
gan to wear long hair in rebellion 
against social conformity This 
was the beginning of the uni-sex 
hairstyles. 

Now in the eighties the uni- 
sex styles have diversified. Shorl 
hair is popular with both men 
and women and so is long hair. 

There are now rat-tails instead 
of ducktails. and in some cases 



they have also replaced pony- 
tails. 

Instead of crew cuts there are 
mohawks and the Mr. T. look. 

Color also plays an important 
part in todays styles. Some peo- 
ple have orange hair while oth- 
ers choose from a variety of col- 
ors or a combination of colors. 

Of course, there are many peo- 
ple left who have not taken the 
plunge. There are still a few 
women in ponytails and a few 
men who still have that clean cut 
look that their mothers like. 

Many of those people can be 
found on the University's cam- 
pus. There are a few students 
who have chosen one of the 
"new" looks, but they are greatly 
outnumbered. 

However, times will continue 
to change. Who knows what stu- 
dents will like in 20 years? 



Student Life 15 




What was once greeted with 
fear was met with anticipation. 
The reappearance of Halley's 
Comet was more closely watched 
than any other celestial event in 
history. 

Comets were once said to be 
the source of natural disasters. 
People believed that their lives 
were governed by the position of 
the stars and planets. If a cosmic 
object violated the established or- 
der of the heavens it was called a 
"sick star" (or disaster, from the 
Latin word meaning "ill star.") 

The first sighting of Halley's 



Comet was probably a Chinese 
report of 240 B.C. The comet has 
appeared every 76 years since 
then. Edmund Halley observed it 
in the 1600's and predicted it 
would return in 1758. He died 16 
years before its return but his 
theory was proved when a Ger- 
man farmer spotted the comet on 
Christmas night 1758. 

The 1986 return of the comet 
was its worst visit in 2000 years, 
according to Jack Fletcher, Direc- 
tor of Hummel Planetarium at 
the University. This is because 
when the comet was at its bright- 



est, it was on the opposite side of 
the sun from the earth. 

Nevertheless, working togeth- 
er, scientists from all countries 
compared photos and studied its 
composition. 

The comet was viewed by mil- 
lions of non-scientific people 
who weren't seeking to develop 
theories. Instead they were seek- 
ing only a glimpse of the long 
awaited comet in their attempt to 
touch a part of history. 
SKY Nov. 1985 



ALLEY 







Student Life 17 




imiminiimiiKiKSiiiiminanHmn 



Top: The space shuttle Challeng- 
er was the first in-flight disaster 
in 56 manned U.S. space mis- 
sions. Above: The Challenger di- 
saster cost NASA seven crew 
members, including high school 
teacher Christa McAuliffe, the 
first teacher in space. Opposite 
Page: The Trans World Airlines 
jet with 145 passengers and crew 
members was hijacked in Ath- 
ens, Greece, in June. Sheite hi- 
jackers killed one American hos- 
tage. 



18 Student Life 



Right: The Kansas City Royals 
won the World Series. Royals' 
pitcher Bret Saberhagen embraces 
third baseman George Brett after 
pitching a five-hitter to give the 
Royals the World Series crown. Be- 
low: President Reagan and Soviet 
leader Mikhail Gorbachev talk in 
front of a fire place at the Fleur 
D'Eau in Geneva. 




Student Life 19 



NEWS (cont.) 






Left: Three prominent actors 
died in 1985; Rock Hudson, 59, 
after a battle with AIDS. Middle: 
Orson Welles 70, died of a heart 
attack. Bottom: Yul Brynner, 65, 
died of cancer, after a long battle. 
Below: Ceremonies were held at 
various times during the year at 
the Vietnam Memorial in Wash- 
ington to commemorate the 
tenth anniversary of the fall of 
the Saigon government. Right: 
The war in the Mid-East contin- 
ued in 1985. A distraught Mos- 
lem man hugs his son moments 
after they survived a car bomb 
explosion in West Beirut. 





20 Student Life 






Top: Super Bowl XX. Chicago 
Bears Jim McMahon and kicker 
Kevin Butler on the sidelines 
during the game. The Bears beat 
the New England Patriots 46-10. 
Left: Cincinnati Reds player- 
manager Pete Rose broke Ty 
Cobb's career hit record in Sep- 
tember. Below: A series of devas- 
tating earthquakes rumbled 
through Mexico City in Septem- 
ber. Measuring on the Richter 
scale from 7.5 to 8.1. 
Photos by Wide World Photos 





LIVING 

THE DREAM 



The third Monday in January 
of every year is a national holi- 
day recognizing the birthday of 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He is 
considered by many to be a great 
civil rights leader, orator, and 
Baptist minister whose life com- 
mitments and sacrifices helped 
to change societal norms in 
America. He became the moti- 
vating force that encouraged in- 
dividuals of all races and social 
classes to unify. 

Dr. King preached about free- 
dom, justice, love and equality. 



22 Student Life 




IftJIL 






His philosphy of non-violence 
exhibited by the thousands who 
participated in rallies, marches, 
and boycotts melted the icy 
hearts of the racists and separat- 
ists and allowed justice and truth 
to prevail in this land. It was ob- 
vious to all who knew him and 
revered him that Dr. King was a 
God-fearing man who believed 
that America would one day live 
up to the creed proclaimed in the 
Untied States Constitution. 

The first observance of Dr. 
King's birthday at the University 



Left: A candlelight service was held on campus in honor of King. Above: Services in observance of 
the King holiday involved many members of the academic community. 

was a memorable and an educa- 
tional experience. The week's 
events included movies about 
the life and work of Dr. King, a 
candlelight service, commemo- 
rative luncheon and an evening 
tribute entitled "Living the 
Dream." There were many par- 
ticipants from the Richmond and 
University communities. 

During this week many indi- 
viduals signed pledges to dedi- 
cate or rededicate their lives to 
living out the true meaning of 
brotherhood and to doing what 
is necessary to make Dr. King's 
dream — a reality. 



Student Life 23 







RALLY DRAWS SUPPORT 



"Never before have represen- 
tatives from every public and 
private college and university 
gathered with distinguished citi- 
zens to express support for edu- 
cation," said KY Gov. Martha 
Layne Collins. "With this unity 
of purpose and this spirit of co- 
operation, we cannot fail in our 
resolve to move higher education 
forward." 

This upbeat statement by Col- 
lins had similarities to the enthu- 
siasm expressed by the estimated 
5,000 people who attended the 
Rally for Higher Education at the 
Convention Center in Frankfort 
on Feb. 5, 1986. The rally was a 
joint cooperative effort between 
Kentucky Advocates for Higher 
Education, the Council on High- 
er Education, the eight public 
universities, 13 community col- 
leges and 21 independent col- 
leges and universities in Ken- 
tucky. Their purpose was to ap- 
ply pressure for more money for 
the universities. 

Included in the crowd were an 
estimated 700 Eastern students 
who cheered loudly whenever 
the opportunity arose and waved 
their EKU paper fans proudly in 
the air when Eastern's name was 
announced. 

"I thought it was great the way 
Eastern students cheered togeth- 
er," said Marci Strange, junior 
Special Education major from 



Bardstown, KY. "Eastern doesn't 
do that much together as a stu- 
dent body. Usually when we do 
something, it is with a separate 
organization within Eastern. 
This time it was the whole stu- 
dent body working for one goal." 



"I thought it was great 
the way Eastern stu- 
dents cheered togeth- 
er/ said Marci Strange 
from Bardstown, KY. 



Collins remarked that the high 
school and university bands, bal- 
loons, and pompons reminded 
her of a "political convention, 
pep rally and old-time tent reviv- 
al all rolled into one." 

Collins' speech to the crowd 
was preceded by guest speaker 
James Hunt, former governor of 
North Carolina who gained na- 
tional attention for his support of 
education. He stressed the idea 
that "Kentucky today is on a 



roll." 

Collins agreed with that idea 
in her speech. "It's exhilarating to 
see such a large and enthusiastic 
crowd come out to support edu- 
cation." 

Special incentives were of- 
fered to Eastern students who at- 
tended the rally. A Capital Col- 
lege Caravan of students and 
teachers went to Frankfort to- 
gether and were led out of Rich- 
mond by a police escort. The 
Kentucky Advocates purchased 
a van that was given away dur- 
ing the rally to a Midway College 
student. A banner contest was 
won by the Sigma Chi Fraternity, 
and a $600 party at the Mulebarn 
was won by the Eastern group 
who had the most participants — 
the Panhellenic and Interfrater- 
nity Council. 

"I'm glad we had the rally be- 
cause it shows they're putting 
more emphasis on education, 
and I think that's important," said 
Strange. "Maybe they'll start to 
develop better programs since 
there seems to be more emphasis 
being put on education." 

If the enthusiastic crowd in at- 
tendance at the Rally is any indi- 
cation of the state's attitude con- 
cerning education, then pro- 
grams will be developed to 
improve higher education and 
Kentucky's status in the nation 
will be improved. 



24 Student Life 





Top: University students display enthusiasm 
by hanging banners at the rally claiming their 
support for higher education. Above: Students 
proudly showed their fans and buttons as they 
rallied for higher education. Left: The Ken- 
tucky Advocates for Higher Education pur- 
chased a van which was given away during the 
rally. 
Photos by Paul Lambert 




Student Life 25 




26 Student Life 



RELATIONSHIPS: i^X 



Everyone has a unique and 
special idea about relationships 
— how to keep one together, 
when to get serious, when to 
date around, and when to call it 
quits. It is often hard to convince 
someone that his ideas are wrong 
while yours are right. 

Some students fall in love in 
high school and manage to hold 
a relationship together, even in 
the college scene. Others date in 
high school and find it too sti- 
fling to continue the relationship 
in college. Others prefer to give 
up school to maintain their rela- 
tionship. 

The different thoughts and 
feelings that people possess 
about relationships are what 
make it so interesting. 

David Laughlin, a sophomore 
from Louisville, KY, said, "I dated 
a girl for two years in high 
school, and when I came to col- 
lege, it was easier to break the 
attachment than to try to make it 
work." 

It takes effort to make a rela- 
tionship work. Many students 
become interested in the new ex- 
periences and the new people at 
college, and leave their high 
school sweethearts behind. 

"I think there are so many 
things to learn in college; I want- 
ed to learn all I could without 
being tied down," said Laughlin. 
"I was ready to party and be 
free." 

This attitude is shared by 
many other college students. The 
commitments and relationships 
are set aside to be dealt with later. 
However, other students come to 



the University involved in a seri- 
ous relationship, and they have 
plans of maintaining it, regard- 
less of the distance between 
them. 

"I'm happy with my boy- 
friend," said Cheryl Ballard from 
Bardstown, KY. "I've dated him 
for four years, and if I didn't have 
him, I don't think I'd be as happy 
as I am now." 

Distance often becomes a ma- 
jor barrier in many relationships. 
"But I think if two people really 
care about each other, they're go- 
ing to make it work, no matter 
how far apart they are," said Bal- 
lard. 

This thought was echoed by 
Beth Jewitt, a sophomore from 
Ashland, KY, who recently mar- 
ried her high school sweetheart 
before he was stationed at a ma- 
rine base in Japan. 

"It's a challenge to keep the re- 
lationship going," said Jewitt. "I 
think the key to it is keeping the 
lines of communication open. 
Without communication, you 
have no relationship." 

This was one of the main rea- 
sons Jewitt married her husband 
before he was shipped overseas. 
"Besides our love for each other, 
we were also influenced by the 
benefits we would receive from 
the military. I have my board 
paid here, and I'll also have trav- 
el expenses paid for me to go to 
Japan." 

According to Jewitt, the mili- 
tary doesn't seriously consider a 
marine's girlfriend or fiancee be- 
cause these relationships could 
end in a minute. "However, if 



you're married, it's a different 
story. They make all efforts to 
help us keep in touch. Thev al- 
ways let me know where he is 
and what he's doing." 

"I really miss him," said Jewitt. 
"When he's here, I feel a lot more 
secure and happier because I'm 
not missing him. I'm indepen- 
dent though and I like to look at 
it as a challenge to be able to sur- 
vive on my own." 

Missing the loved one seems 
to present major problems to 
many students. "It's really diffi- 
cult for me to be away from my 
boyfriend," said Tonda Littrell, 
sophomore from Albany, KY. 
"I'm always moody when I'm 
away from him, and I don't want 
to do a lot of things because he's 
not a part of it." 

Because of the difficulty cre- 
ated by being apart, Littrell has 
decided to get married this sum- 
mer and continue her education 
by commuting to another col- 
lege. 

"I think I'll be a lot happier," 
said Littrell. "We've been dating 
for over five years and we've 
been planning on marriage for a 
long time. I think it will improve 
my grades if we can be together." 

Different ideas, thoughts, 
dreams and goals are found at the 
University. Many people know 
what they want, while others re- 
main confused. However, a lot of 
times these things can't be 
planned. They just happen, and 
each individual has to decide 
what's best for him or her with- 
out listening to what others 
think is best. 



Student Life 27 



When students get tired of 
studying, working and 
being cramped up in their dorm 
rooms, many of them have one 
destination in mind: downtown. 
"Downtown gives you the 
chance to relax, kick back and get 
away from school and home- 
work," said Rebecca Smith, soph- 
omore from South Shore, KY. 

Downtown is an escape for 
many students, an outlet. But 
most of all, it's a place to have 
fun. "You can be wild and people 
won't think you're stupid; they 
just know you're having fun," 
said Sue Gladding, sophomore 
from Pocomoke, MD. 

Many students go to the bars 
to dance and socialize. Everyone 
usually has his/her own favorite 
place to hang out. Two of the 
more popular bars are the Family 
Dog and O'Riley's Pub. 

"I like the atmosphere at the 
Dog," said Scarlett Shumate, 
freshman from Vine Grove, KY. 
"I like the people that go there 
because there's more of a Greek 
crowd, and I like the music they 
play." 

"I go to O'Riley's because a lot 
of my friends from UK go there," 
said Smith. "I like to party with 
them and dance and have a good 
time." 

Some University students 
have their own unique reasons 
for going downtown. "I like to go 
play pool in the bars on First 
Street," said Jacquie Hellmann, 




senior from Park Hills, KY "It's a 
good way to meet guys if you 
challenge them to a pool game. 
Some of them will look down on 
us because we are girls and they 
don't think we should know the 
rules; they are shocked when we 
do." 

"First Street is different be- 
cause there's no cover charge and 
there's a really relaxed atmo- 
sphere. We can go in sweats and 
still feel comfortable," said Hell- 
mann. 

At the beginning of the even- 
ing, many students go to Paco's, a 
Mexican restaurant located be- 
low the Dog. 

"Paco's is a neat restaurant," 
said Carry Doyle, freshman from 
Maysville, KY. "They have a nice 
atmosphere and great food that's 
not really too expensive. I just go 
there for starters; then I go some- 
where to dance and have fun." 

Two of the newest additions to 
the downtown scene also include 
food as an added attraction. They 
are Bash Riprock's and Baja Ca- 
tina. 

"Bash Riprock's is a place 



where you can go if you want to 
party, but it's also a place where 
you can bring your family," said 
Lisa Yates, senior from Bards- 
town, KY. 

"I don't go downtown that of- 
ten and when I do go, it's usually 
to eat so Bash Riprock's is a nice 
place to go," said Kim Harmon, 
senior from Fairfax, VA. 

Harmon was also a part of an 
MTV video commercial that was 
filmed at Bash Riprock's. "They 
had free beer and free food so I 
went. It was a lot of fun!" 

Besides the video, other special 
events were held which drew 
large crowds. One of the more 
popular events was the male re- 
view at J. Sutter's Mill. 

"It was great!" said Jill Guter- 
muth, freshman from Louisville, 
KY. "It was really different. That's 
why I wanted to go." 

"Everyone was screaming, hol- 
lering, and clapping, even the 
married women," said Jenny Ma- 
grane, freshman from Morehead, 
KY. 

Some of the more popular 
events attended by the students 



28 Student Life 




included 99c Margaritas at Bash 
Riprock's; Beat the Clock at J. Sut- 
ter 's Mill; WFMI night at O'Ri- 
ley's; 50c Jack and Coke at T- 
Bomb's; and Dime Draft at the 
Family Dog. 

"It's fun going to Dime Draft at 
the Dog," said Shumate. "It's 
cheap and there are not many 
people there. They also play 
good drinking music then." 

Downtown usually has some- 
thing for everyone ranging from 
special drink prices and food to 
dancing, music, and the chance 
to see old friends and make new 
ones. 

Whatever one's reason is for 
going, downtown Richmond re- 
mains popular with University 
students as well as students from 



nearby colleges and communi- 
ties. It's a place to escape, to meet 
friends, to party, and a place to 
have fun. 




Student Life 29 



HeLu hOStq 





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Laund^ 



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30 Student Life 



It began around noon as I 
awoke to the grotesque odor of 
burritos. I guess my drunken 
state from last night's festivities 
at Paco's (our local Mexican res- 
taurant) had gotten out of con- 
trol. 

Well, this was D-Day (Deter- 
gent Day) and I knew it. Those 
clothes had to be washed, along 
with the rest of the evolving life 
forms inhabiting my closet floor. 

The trek was to go where no 
student had gone before (Except 
for maybe twice a semester) — to 
seek out new life and new civil- 
izations (in the lint traps). The 
laundry room experience was be- 
fore me. This is something which 
the college student never forgets. 
It ranks right up there with your 
first collegiate hangover and 
having your wisdom teeth cut 
out. I knew that this was the true 
test — the survival of the fittest 
— the ultimate in competition. 

I knew my first task would be 
to collect quarters. The search 
was on for the little tokens. First 
trying the Powell Grill and hav- 
ing no luck, my next option was 
Hamm's Gulf Station. The little 
man behind the counter must 
have seen me coming. He asked 
if a $10 roll was sufficient. I 
prayed to the Great Maytag Man 
in the sky that it would be 
enough! 

Back in the room I found my- 



self faced with yet another chal- 
lenge. Did I dare open the closet 
to see what needed washing? 
Nope, I thought, I'll just pick up 
the clothes laying around the 
room and that will get me 
through until next semester. On 




my way out the door, after gath- 
ering together a couple of trash 
bags of my wardrobe, my room- 
mate reminded me not to forget 
my Levis which were standing 
in the corner. I grabbed a text- 
book, my quarters, detergent and 
clothes and off I went. I entered 
the dreaded laundry room. As I 
walked in all eyes slyly lifted 
from textbooks and the grip of 
the highlighters were tightened 
as I vied for one of those washing 
machines. I knew it would be a 
tough fight but I was ready. 

We all listened intently for the 
shut down of the washers and 



those insidious buzzers on the 
dryers; the stakes were high as 
we competed for those ma- 
chines. 

The afternoon grew longer 
and my highlighter grew dim. I 
began to wonder if I would ever 
escape this room. Was I being 
held hostage? I sat through spin 
cycle after rinse cycle after cycle 
after cycle. 

It was a strange existence; 
however, I inserted my last quar- 
ter in the dryer and it slowly 
came to life as it sent my last load 
of jeans into orbit! 

The final buzzer rang, but of 
course, as I pulled my Levis from 
the dryer drum, they were all as 
wet as they were when they 
went in twelve quarters ago. It 
was getting late and my room- 
mate had come down to see if I 
was still alive. He suggested a 
trip to Taco Tico but I refused; 
however, I knew it was my only 
chance of escape. 

I quickly gathered my life to- 
gether. Once back in the room, I 
dumped the clean clothes beside 
the bed where I knew they 
would stay until I needed them. 
My mission had been accom- 
plished and I had survived the 
laundry room experience. 
Photo by Sam Maples 



Student Life 31 




East meets 
West 

The 
Rivalry 

Continues 



§ 




I 



Top: Fans pack the hill for the East-vs-West game. Above: The 
winning float makes its way down Lancaster Avenue. 



Homecoming festivities were 
held throughout the week of Oc- 
tober 21-26. This year's theme 
was "Fabulous Fads." 

On Monday night, fraterni- 
ties, sororities and other groups 
gathered at local warehouses to 
build their floats, which repre- 
sented the overall theme. 

The day of Homecoming, Oc- 
tober 26, dawned with a beauti- 
ful sunrise. At 10 a.m. the annual 
Homecoming parade began. 

Throughout the parade mem- 
bers of various organizations 
sold balloons for Juvenile Diabe- 
tes; these balloons were released 
at the Colonel's first touchdown. 

Among the many high school 
bands, the floats glided down 
Lancaster Avenue onto Main 
Street. 

A friendly competition was 



32 Student Life 




Student Life 33 




held between the organizations 
who made the floats. The Chi 
Omega sorority and the Kappa 
Alpha Order won first place with 
their float of a football player on 
a surfboard. 

Before the game began the 
1985 Homecoming Queen was 
announced and Julie Rees was 
crowned as her sister Jane's re- 
placement. 

The old rivalry with the Hill- 
toppers of Western Kentucky 
University was alive and well, as 
the Colonels defeated the Hill- 
toppers with apparent ease. 

The final score of 51-21 was 
worthy of any homecoming 
game. 



Top Opposite Page: Students 
work hard to finish their float. 
Bottom Left Opposite Page: 
Workers enjoy the work and the 
homecoming spirit. Bottom 
Right Opposite Page: Fans of all 
ages enjoy the parade. Left: 
Alumni is welcomed to all home- 
coming events. Below: A young 
fan is ready for an exciting day. 



Thompson 




Thompson 




Homecoming: 

A 

Family 
Tradition 



Above: Julie Rees rides in the parade before 
she becomes queen. Right: Proud father Gayle 
H. Rees stands with Julie, the second Rees 
queen in two years. Opposite Page: Jane Rees, 
the 1984 homecoming queen makes sure that 
her sister, Julie, is crowned properly. 



36 Student Life 




As Eastern fans anxiously 
awaited the announcement and 
crowning of their 1985 home- 
coming queen, four family mem- 
bers stood on the field with fin- 
gers crossed. 

Jane Rees, the 1984 queen, 
stood with her escort, brother Jon 
Rees, both hoping that their sis- 
ter Julie Gail Rees, the 22-year- 
old representative of Alpha Eta 
Rho, would make homecoming 
queens a family tradition. 

Julie stood with her father, 



Gayle H. Rees, who escorted her 
just as he escorted Jane in 1984. 
Julie wanted him to escort her as 
soon as she knew she was in the 
top 15. "I just love him so much I 
wouldn't have it any other way," 
said the new queen. 

Julie, a member of Chi Omega 
Sorority and the show choir, 
hopes to achieve a career in mu- 
sic, but she is majoring in Com- 
puter Information Systems so 
she will have something to fall 
back on. 




Thompson 




Teresa Sammons 

First Runner-up 

Chi Omega 




Kari Coleman 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 





Lori Estep 

Phi Kappa Tau 




Jennifer Williams 

Sigma Chi 



Melody Stoner 

Combs Hall 









1 m\"\ 9*'i 


1^ ' . ■•'•-?*.:■■' 




Becky Beaumont 

Theta Chi 



Lorre Black 

Todd Hall 



38 Student Life 




April Russell 

Kappa Alpha Theta 





Bonnie Wilkinson 

Phi Beta Sigma 





Terri Nolan 

ROTC 



mm, —> « 





Angee Ellis 

Second Runner-up 

Phi Delta Theta 




Tammy Robinson 

Keene Hall 



Shelley Smith 

Mortar Board 



SI mil-ill l.il,- M) 



\ 




seasons 





* 



I 



Investments and Christmas — 
two words which one usually 
wouldn't associate together. 
However, during the holidays, 
these words have a quantitative 
meaning. Christmas is a special 
time of year, a time which holds 
many meanings for many peo- 
ple. For some, Christmas is a time 
of giving and sharing. For a per- 
former, these words have an 
even deeper meaning. 

Being a performer is an outlet 
of expression, an expression of 
feelings of what Christmas 
means to each. This, a perform- 
er's gift to the season. Each has 
his own means of expression; 
however, music is a personal, in- 
tense, and internal means. As a 
poet interprets his feelings and 



* 




emotions through words, a sing- 
er goes a step beyond, to bring 
those words to life through song. 

Music is a reflection of all of 
what Christmas is — family, 
friends, gifts of joy, happiness 
and love. A special gift which is 
given at Christmas by a perform- 
er is one of important investment. 
A gift which is given to a per- 
former is returned at this time 
through a joy which is brought to 
an audience. 

This is a performer's unique 
gift of Christmas, the talent to 
perform. This talent has in- 
creased in value through a per- 
former's personal investment of 
training, rehearsal, and experi- 
ence. 

On the University level, this 



investment is even more appar- 
ent. The campus is full of tradi- 
tional looks at the Christmas 
holiday. Many events have be- 
come a part of University life 
through tradition. For example, 
the Hanging of the Greens, Han- 
dels' Messiah and the Madrigal 
Feast. 

Each person involved in these 
traditions, either a singer, dancer, 
or musician knows of the in- 
depth investment which they 
hold. 

The gift of love is an intricate 
part of Christmas and as a per- 
former, this is a time when their 
investment can be shared with 
others, giving the performer, the 
return on their investment. 



k 






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Much like tin 
taking construction 
volvcd in developing a buh> 
the Um\ theatrical 

performance of the season, 
"Working", was like a building. 
This show was built with 
care and talent — from the 
ground up, just like that 
building. 



WORKING 



The musical was adapted I 
the Pulit/.er Prize-Winning n< 
el h lurkel, The show was 

a representation of Amerii 
working class. The audience 
shared happy, inspirational, 
well as sad and painful moments 
with the characters, as a slice of 
their lives, jobs and careers were 
brought to life on stage The au- 
diences were transported to not 
just one setting, but many 



frc>m the factories, to the super- 
markets, to the officies of corpo- 
rations. 

Department instructor, Homer 
ied and constructed 
this production with style and 
life. Misdirection and chore< 
phv were superb. 

The production, loaded with 
talent, was truly a success in de- 
sign for the University's Theatre 
Department It was a show con- 



structed with enthi care 

and style. It was apparent, be- 
in the end the fine perfor- 
mances were there for all e\ 
see — standi ,\nd proud, 

just like that of a building. 

I'lii'los In s.wii M.ipli". 






As the fog creeps over the pal- 
ace steps, a god slowly emerges 
from the smoke — soon his rage 
to behold. 

Dionysus, god of wine and fer- 
tility, has come to Thebes from 
Asia to establish his religion. Re- 
turning to his homeland he mes- 
merizes the women of Thebes 
and causes them to abandon 
their homes and worship him. 
Pentheus, Dionysus' cousin and 
young king of Thebes, is enraged 



An ancient story, set in an an- 
cient land, however; the Bacchae 
lends itself to modern connota- 
tions. Euripides' characters are a 
portrayal of man then, as well as 
now, with modern conflicts. 
Dionysus is representative of 
what nature stands for. The con- 
flicts arise from man's battle with 
man, and his battle against him- 
self. 

The Bacchae was the Universi- 
ty Theatre Department's second 



BACCHAE 



by the behavior of the women, 
and tries to imprison Dionysus 
without success. A spellbound 
Pentheus is then led to the hills 
with the women where his 
mother, Agave, also under the 
Dionysian spell, thinks Pentheus 
a lion and tears him limb to limb. 
A crazed Agave returns to the 
city clutching her son's bloody 
head, still seeing only the lion. 
Kadmus, Pentheus' grandfather, 
sees what has occured and brings 
Agave out of her trance and to a 
realization; to pure madness, as a 
result of her action. A god denied 
— a god revenged. 



production of the season, under 
the direction of Bill Logan. It was 
the University's entry into the 
American College Theatre Festi- 
val. The production was taken to 
Louisville for the entry into the 
Kentucky College Theatre Festi- 
val. 

Senior Todd Berling, a theatre 
arts major, designed and con- 
structed the set. Department fac- 
ulty Jeffrey Dill, costume and 
make-up artist, and Keith John- 
son, light and set designer, 
brought their elements of cos- 
tuming and lighting together to 
form a solid production. 

Photos by Neil Thompson 



44 Student Life 





Above: Messenger, Randy Randall describes the horrible death of 
Pentheus. Left: In horror, Kadmus and Agave realize her brutal deed. 
Below: (L-R) Pepper Stebbins as Pentheus. Kari Coleman portrayed 
Agave. Dionysus played by David Blackburn. Claire Farley as the Bac- 
chae chorus. 







Top Videocassettes Sales 



* 



1. Jane Fonda's Workout 

2. Prime Time 

3. Star Trek II — The Search for Spock 

4. Purple Rain 

5. Gone With The Wind 

6. The Jane Fonda Workout Challenge 

7. Raiders of the Lost Ark 

8. Raquel, Total Beauty and Fitness 

9. We Are the World — The Video Event 
10. Wham! The Video 





Top Pop Artists * 

1. Madonna 

2. Bruce Springsteen 

3. Prince and the Revolution 

4. Phil Collins 

5. Bryan Adams 

6. Wham! 

7. Tears For Fears 

8. Tina Turner 

9. Billy Ocean 

10. The Pointer Sisters 



Top Pop Albums * 

1. Born in the U.S.A. — Bruce Springsteen 

2. Reckless — Bryan Adams 

3. Like A Virgin — Madonna 

4. Make It Big — Wham! 

5. Private Dancer — Tina Turner 

6. No Jacket Required — Phil Collins 

7. Beverly Hills Cop — Soundtrack 

8. Suddenly — Billy Ocean 

9. Purple Rain — Prince And The Revolution 
10. Songs From The Big Chair — Tears For Fears 

* c 1985 by Billboards Publishing, Inc. Reprinted by Permission 
46 Student Life 






. ■•- -* 






**** 




Top Movies Among Students 

1. Rocky IV 

2. Back to the Future 

3. Rambo — First Blood, Part II 

4. Gremlins 

5. White Nights 

6. Witness 

7. St. Elmo's Fire 

8. Color Purple 

9. Out of Africa 

10. Nightmare on Elm Street 




e 




s 



STRIPE IT 




3vM4 




Rhinestones 

Trivia 

Tanning Beds 

Cartoon Characters 

Opus 

Bruce Springsteen 

Tina Turner 

Amy Grant 

Phil Collins 

Whitney Houston 

The Cosby Show 

The Golden Girls 

Family Ties 

Miami Vice 

Camaros 

Honda Preludes 

Paisley 

Shaker Sweaters 

Sweatshirts 

Reeboks 



Lee Jeans 

Levi's 

Polo 

Esprit 

Swatches 

Jim Beam 

Bud Light 

Wine Coolers 

Classic Coke 

Dairy Queen Blizzards 

Bash Riprock's 

Paco's 

Sweets 

Michael J. Fox 

Rob Lowe 

Don Johnson 

Cybil Shepperd 

Sylvester Stallone 

Styling Mousse 

Equal 






SWATCH : STATE OF THE ART 



The brand that tits. 




THE JORDACHE LOOK. 



Aerobic activities — swimming, run- 
ning/jogging, cycling, brisk walking 
— strengthen your cardiovascular 
system by demanding oxygen. Ex- 
perts suggest a minimum of three 
15-minute sessions per week. 



The Prelude 



HOKTD A 




Add-A-Beads 

Twist-A-Beads 

Dayglow 

Garfield 

Prince 

Michael Jackson 

Boy George 

Cyndi Lauper 

Julian Lennon 

Billy Idol 

Eurythmics 

Dallas 

Dynasty 

Knight Rider 

Fieros 

Nikes 

Argyle 

Stripes 

Designer Jeans 





Gorgio 

Coors Light 

Hudy Delight 

Cherry Coke (Never In) 

New Coke 

Tab 

Mr. T 

Eddie Murphy 

Mary Lou Retton 

Shelly Long 

Joan Collins 

Jane Fonda /Aerobics 

Clara "Where's the Beef" 

Peller 
Walkmen 
Video Games 
Cabbage Patch Kids 
Break Dancing 
Ghostbusters 
He-Man 



G 




V z 



CAMARO. 




3* 



DYNASTY 



n 



i 





The more things 
the more they stay 



This quote holds true for 
many things, including students' 
attitudes concerning their educa- 
tion and their role in society. 

In the 1950's the students were 
serious minded and were con- 
cerned about getting a quality 
education. There was a shift 
away from this feeling in the late 
60's and early 70's. Students of 
the 80s have once again realized 
the importance of a quality edu- 
cation and have become serious 
minded like students of the 50's, 
according to Dr. John Rowlett, 
vice president for Academic Af- 
fairs and Research. 

In the 50's there were a lot of 
Korean War veterans on campus, 
and a feeling of great national 
pride surrounded the area, ac- 



cording to Donald Feltner, vice 
president for University Rela- 
tions Development. The stu- 
dents were more interested in 
preparing for their own lives 
rather than trying to change the 
world, said Feltner. 

Then in the 60's the war babies 
flooded the campuses in large 
numbers. There were a large 
number of students searching for 
their "identities," and they be- 
came more socially aware of the 
world around them. 

The idea of social awareness 
extended over into the 70's. Infla- 
tion played a big factor in mak- 
ing students become more career 
conscious and more aware of 
preparation for their lives, ac- 
cording to Feltner. "Once again 



change, 
the same. 

in the 80's, students are mainly 
concerned about their educa- 
tion." 

"I see a lot of similarities be- 
tween the students of the 50's 
and 80's," said Dr. Donald Hen- 
rickson, professor of music. "One 
main difference is that there has 
been a communication explosion 
and we can see the whole world 
now. The students now have a lot 
more understanding and sympa- 
thy for the entire world." 

"I think students of today have 
to be more disciplined because 
there are more distractions — 
television, automobiles, more ac- 
tivities, more bars and more 
things to do," said Feltner. Hen- 
rickson believes the sum of the 
problems that have occurred at 



the University were caused by 
these outside influences. 

"However, I have never found 
a group of students at the Uni- 
versity that has been hard to get 
along with," said Henrickson. "I 
am proud of their behavior." 

A typical example of the stu- 
dents' responsible behavior oc- 
curred during a time when stu- 
dents at other universities were 
holding violent demonstrations 
in protest of the Vietnam War 
and the slaying of students at 
Kent State University. Eastern 
students held a candlelight 
march through Richmond and 
sang "Give Peace A Chance." 
They returned to the ravine on 
campus and kept an overnight 
vigil. Because of this unusual, 



peaceful demonstration a news 
release was written for the pub- 
lic, and in turn, Peter Jennings of 
ABC News did a news story on 
the University describing it as a 
campus at peace. 

"We often hear people talk 
about 'going for the gold,' but I 
don't hear it much from the stu- 
dents I've taught," said Henrick- 
son. "They like to have a good 
life, but they also want to do 
something they think is worth- 
while. Their attitudes are very se- 
rious." 

Thus, the students' attitudes 
have evolved into those similar 
to students of the 50's. "The more 
things change, the more they 
stay the same." 







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The University's 1919 theatrical 
production of Of Mice and Men, 

by John Steinbeck. 



1906-1986 Changes in policies 
mark a "milestone" for 

Higher Education 



As higher education marks its 
80th year at the University, a 
multitude of changes in rules 
and regulations have affected the 
students since the 1874 Central 
University. 

In 1906, upon approval of the 
General Assembly Central Uni- 
versity was changed to Eastern 
Normal School No. 1. The transi- 
tion in the school characterized 
the improvement of quality edu- 
cation in Kentucky. 

Dr. Ruric Nevel Roark is re- 
sponsible for the cultivation of 
the new Normal School in the 
early years. In the 1907 Normal 
School Catalog most of the rules 
and regulations centered around 
the strict supervision of students' 
morals. 

One rule in the student catalog 
stated the school was responsible 
for the morals of students, which 
included visitation among men 
and women students. Men were 
allowed to visit the women from 
7:30 to 10:00 on Saturday night, 
and women were required to 
have chaperones if they went off 
campus at night. Women weren't 
allowed to call or visit the men's 
dormitory. 



54 Student Life 



Among the rules dealing with 
the moral standards of students 
was a prohibition concerning to- 
bacco and alcohol usage. This 
rule stated "tobacco-using 
hinders intellectual progress and 
ought not to be used in any form 
by students. The use of tobacco 
in any of the school buildings or 
on or about school premises is 
positively forbidden, as also is 
indulgence in intoxicating li- 
quors." 

Today the rules are not as strict 
as they were 80 years ago and 
don't deal with morals of stu- 
dents as much. Open house 
hours are arranged in each of the 
dormitories, so men and women 
are allowed to visit each other at 
specified times. 

Regulating students' behavior 
is the focus of the rules in the 
eighties. These rules include the 
prohibitions of cheating, ob- 
struction, disruption, obsceni- 
ties, motor vehicles, dangerous 
weapons, drugs and alcohol. 

The University policies have 
changed considerably over the 
last 80 years, and, thus, marking 
a "milestone" for regulations in 
higher education. 

Photos courtesy of 
University Archives 




The Carpediem Society was a liter- 
ary organization on campus which 
was started in 1910. The club pub- 
lished literary pamphlets and par- 
ticipated in debates. 



The early 1900's showed women out 
of doors at the University canning 
the summer garden harvest. 








In May of 1911, Richmond was the 
sight for a May Day Queen Parade. 



k 

_ * 






Student Life 55 



The University Explorer's Club spent their Spring Break in the Florida 
Keys. All enjoyed camping on the beach and the spectacular sunsets. 



• *TU 


,* '^ 






Jw iAhkM^ 


n 


l 



56 Student Life 







It happens each spring. Sud- 
denly there's a brief lapse in the 
frantic, frenzied life of the col- 
lege student, and they are freed 
for a week. It's then that hun- 
dreds of thousands of them mi- 
grate south in droves toward the 
ultimate party para- 
dise: FLORIDA. For so 
many of them the crav- 
ing for sunshine and 
warm sand between 
the toes can be 
quenched in only one 
manner: cruise to Flor- 
ida for spring break. 
The 1200-mile-journey 
is merely a small obsta- 
cle for these fun hungry students 
who have been pinned up with 
teachers, textbooks, and tests for 
ten weeks. It's an inspiring sight 
to see a river of cars packed to 
capacity, flowing south. 

Once the Florida state line is 
spotted, options for excitement 
and insanity are endless. Most 
are lured to the seductive sights 
and bright lights of Daytona 
Beach or Fort Lauderdale. All 
that can be seen for miles are 
beaches infested by tanlines and 
muscular bodies worshipping 
the sun. Intense partying is the 
agenda. 

But there are some who man- 
age to escape the outrageousness 
of these culture centers, and have 




their sights set lower — The 
Conch Republic of Key West. 
Anyone who has experienced 
the Florida Keys knows how re- 
freshingly different it is from any 
other place on earth. One is con- 
tinually greeted with an endless 
array of tranquil and 
serene scenarios. 

To be in a hurry is ta- 
boo in Florida. So why 
rush? Take time to ex- 
perience a few nights 
of oceanside camping. 
It's fascinating to stroll 
along the massive coral 
structures each morn- 
ing to see what Mother 
Nature washed ashore over- 
night. Go snorkeling or scuba 
diving in the midst of hundreds 
of brightly colored tropical fish. 
Key West has an original charac- 
ter unlike any other city. Where 
else does the whole city close 
shop to celebrate the sunset? 

The trip back is 24 hours of 
sunburnt numbness and snack 
cakes. The realization of return- 
ing to campus life comes too 
quickly as battered weary bodies 
are carried back home. Minds be- 
gin to painfully drift back to 
where they were ten days ago, as 
the anticipation begins to mount 
for yet another trip south in 
twelve months. 

Photos by Sam Maples. 



Student Life 57 




LIVING 



Togetherness may be nice and 
campus life can be fun but there 
are times when it gets a little too 
confining. The call of freedom 
and privacy leads to an uncon- 
trollable urge to escape. It is then 
that the search begins for the key 
to happiness. 

Living off-campus can give 
you that key. Independence and 
freedom go hand in hand with 
life away from the campus grind. 

Ann Rudd, a senior finan- 
ce/insurance student from 
Springfield, feels more comfort- 
able in her apartment. "I enjoy 
apartment life over dorm life be- 
cause I feel like a whole person 
rather than just a student. I can 
come home and relax, whereas in 
the dorm I always felt tense." 

Having a place to call home is 
also very important to Mary 
McGill, a graduate student in 
chemistry. "The best thing about 
living off campus is having that 
space you know is yours. You can 
come home, kick off your shoes 
and really be home," said McGill. 
"It is difficult to think of it as liv- 
ing off-campus. It's just home." 

Studying is easier in the more 
relaxed comfort of apartment 
life, according to Pam Scheeler, a 
senior marketing /management 
student from Greenfield, Ohio. 
"The atmosphere is more relaxed 
and a lot quieter for studying. 
You can have the privacy you 
want by going to another room." 

"Apartment life is the next 
best thing to home," said 




Scheeler. 

However, despite the many 
joys of life off-campus there are a 
few problems and times when 
the key to happiness can seem a 
heavy load. "The disadvantages 
are the added responsibilities 
that accompany the freedom, 
such as paying bills on time and 
conserving water and electric- 
ity," said Scheeler. 

Glenn Stover, a junior police 
administration major, pin points 
the problem most often men- 
tioned by students who live off- 
campus. "Living off-campus 



gives you the ability to park your 
car near your house, but you can 
never find a parking place on 
campus." 

Rudd agrees with Stover. "The 
major disadvantage to living off- 
campus would have to be the 
parking situation," said Rudd. 

These problems do not affect 
the desire to live far away from 
the drag of campus life. "Free- 
dom from the stifling rules of the 
dorm is well worth any hassle 
associated with living off-cam- 
pus." 



58 Student Life 




Opposite Page: Jeff Braun, junior 
from Tipp City, Ohio, unloads 
groceries at his apartment in 
Odessa. Left: Living off campus 
gives students the opportunity to 
decorate their apartments accord- 
ing to their tastes. Jim Krieger 
and Tom Eckert built a wooden 
bar which holds a fish aquarium 
and stereo systems. 




- 





Left: Martha Ruble enjoys the extra space an apart- 
ment offers her. Above: The freedom of cooking is 
one advantage Linda Sherman found in living off 
campus. 



Student Life 59 



Right: The center altar of the Medi- 
tation Chapel is surrounded by the 
stained glass windows. Below: The 
delicate carvings of the chapel doors 
flank the entrances. Bottom Right: 
The fountains add to the Meditation 
Chapel's beauty. Opposite Page: The 
tranquility of the chapel is reflected 
in the snow covered plaza area. 







fRom OReam to Reality 



The Chapel of Meditation be- 
gan as just a dream of Dr. Robert 
Martin's. During the Christmas 
season of 1967 he discussed the 
idea with several of his col- 
leagues. Then the idea was 
brought before the Alumni Asso- 
ciation in January of 1968. 

In January of 1968 the chapel 
became a reality. The plans for 
the chapel building were made, 
and the estimated cost of the 
chapel was to be $200,000. 

By November of 1968, the 
funds for the chapel had been 
raised by the Century Club of 
the Alumni Association. The 
funds came from alumni mem- 
bers, faculty, staff, students, 24 
states and four countries. Sup- 
port for the building of the chap- 
el came from the community as 
well as the University. 



To build the chapel there were 
several problems that had to be 
solved. One of the problems was 
separation of church and state. To 
offset this problem the Universi- 
ty deeded the property to the 
Alumni Association for im- 
provements for five years. At 
this time the Alumni Association 
proceeded to build the Chapel of 
Meditation at a cost of $365,000. 
The chapel dedication ceremo- 
nies were held on May 13, 1972. 

The chapel provides a place for 
people to just go and think. It's a 
nice place for one to go to escape 
from the pressures of life for a 
few minutes. The uses of the 
chapel vary from meditation to 
weddings. The chapel is also 
used by the religious organiza- 
tions, sororities and fraternities 
at the University. The chapel's 



use is limited to alumni, faculty, 
staff and students. 

The Lambda Sigma campus 
honorary for sophomores uses 
the chapel for their annual 
spring initiation. Former Lamb- 
da Sigma member Heather 
Braun said, "I found the chapel to 
be the perfect place for initiation 
because of its tranquil beauty." 

ADPi sorority members use 
the Chapel of Meditation for 
pledge inductions, big sister 
ceremonies, etc. Sally Wilfret: 
"The chapel is a little, more for- 
mal then the Powell Building 
and more convenient than hav- 
ing to go off campus to a church." 

The chapel is under the care of 
Dr. George Nordgulen, who has 
been with the University since 
1972. 



Student Lh'e 61 



c 



A 



M 



P 



U 



S 



I 



Right: In the bookstore, students find a variety 
of items which makes shopping easier. 
Below: The friendly smiles of the employees 
make the bookstore seem like an old general 
store. 




a. 

£ 

o 

X. 

H 




H 



62 Student Life 



s 



T 



O 



R 



E 




People of all ages can find something that interests 
them in the campus store. 




The campus bookstore may 
look like a modern university 
store, but underneath the bright 
lights and orderly displays, there 
beats the heart of a friendly old 
general store. Friends meet over 
selections of books, food, posters 
and cards to talk. 

Friendly smiles and open con- 
versation are commonplace 
throughout the store. "It's a won- 
derful place to work," said Doris 
Forquer, who has worked in the 
store for 10 years. She said, 
"Ninety-nine percent of the stu- 
dents are great. They really make 
my day." 

Betsy Wiseman has been with 
the campus store for 11 years. "I 
just like to make everyone feel at 
home," said Wiseman who tends 



to practice what she preaches. 
She added, "One time this girl 
was sick so I brought her some 
homemade soup." 

Students appreciate the com- 
fortable atmosphere of the store. 
"Sometimes I just go in and look 
around," said Robin Schwein- 
hart, a senior biology major from 
Louisville. However, she rarely 
buys anything because she says 
she feels that she can get things 
cheaper off campus. 

Ricki Clark, a senior journal- 
ism student, agrees with 
Schweinhart that things are of- 
ten more expensive on campus. 
"The prices are high but it's very 
convenient because they catch 
the people who don't have cars," 
said Clark. 



"I think the film developing 
was a good idea but I also think 
they need a refrigeration section 
for milk and things like that," 
said Clark. "I don't go in there as 
much as I did when I was an un- 
derclassman." 

Despite the questions of price, 
students continue to frequent the 
store and enjoy the homey atmo- 
sphere. "The store workers are 
very friendly and they always 
try to help you," said Clark. 

To many the store offers com- 
fort and supplies as well as an 
occasional substitute mother. 
Family seems to be the key to the 
world found within the book- 
store. 



Student Life 63 



Initial Investment Yields 
in Final Payoff 



College life, like a wise invest- 
ment, requires an initial amount 
of capital, yet the dividends and 
eventually the final sale yields 
higher returns than the initial 
outlav. 

Unlike a company, the capital 
for college life requires more 
than just money. College stu- 
dents invest their time, their in- 
tellectual abilities and for many 
students their soul and dedica- 
tion as they work for the better- 
ment of an organization or club. 
Yet for these investments stu- 
dents yield dividends such as a 
good grade in a major class, a 
leadership position in an organi- 
zation or a valuable relationship. 

For seniors, the dividends will 
soon culminate into a final re- 
turn as they enter the working 
world. For some a career and fi- 
nancial success will be the return 
they receive. The education and 
skills they acquired at the Uni- 
versity will lay the groundwork 
for them to begin on their road to 
career success. 

Other seniors may use the 
same educational foundation yet 
decide to postpone their return 
as they pursue a graduate career. 
Through their educational in- 
vestments, they will increase 
their marketability in the work 
world and thus yield higher re- 
turns. 



Marriage and family life may 
be a return some seniors will re- 
alize in the near future. The per- 
sonal relationships formed at col- 
lege will lay the foundation for 
success and happiness in this 
path. Lifelong friendships will 
continue through the years for 
some as a result of the challenges 
and experiences shared with col- 
lege friends. 

And perhaps some seniors will 
display their individuality and 



pursue a unique adventure or ca- 
reer, such as playing professional 
sports, doing missionary work or 
traveling across the United States 
or Europe. 

Whatever path a senior takes, 
part of the University will go 
with him. For the investment the 
student makes in his college ca- 
reer, whether large or small, will 
affect the dividends and returns 
he will receive during his life- 
time. 




1 



64 Student Life 









Graduation was held May 11, 1985, at Hanger Field. Several thousand 
students, alumni, faculty, family members of degree candidates and distin- 
guished guests attended the ceremony. 



'm&*y i^vrvjfij*-" j -' 




Student Life 65 



■ 



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■ 



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•*» 







66 Sports 




jyiwiWKk"- 



Striving through competition 
to receive the highest 

Return 



H 9 


L Investments 


* 


Football 




Basketball 


..^^fcfc^^^^^^. .— wi*^ 


Field Hockey 


a_ 


J 1 Volleyball 




1 J Cross Country 




Swimming 




Tennis 




Golf 




Baseball 




Track 



i >• 



■ 









« 



Sports 67 




Showing sportsmanship 
and pride is 

Football 




For Head Coach Roy Kidd and 
the Eastern Kentucky University 
football team, the 1985 football 
season was a roller coaster ride 
full of dreams and hopes that 
were never fulfilled. 

As the season opened on a 
bright and sunny day in Septem- 
ber, so were the hopes of Colonel 
fans everywhere that this team 
would shine and bring back the 
brilliance that only a national 
championship could do. 

With 37 returning lettermen 
and the addition of two highly 
touted transfers, there was ample 



reason to think that the Colonels 
might bring another champion- 
ship trophy back to Richmond. 

After beating Akron easily in 
the season opener, the Colonels 
were upset by one of the best 
Marshall University teams ever. 
This only made the Colonels 
tighten their belts and work 
harder. 

When the Colonels posted 
back-to-back victories over 
Youngstown State and Austin 
Peay, hopes were again up to fe- 
ver pitch. But a heart-breaking 
loss to Middle Tennessee brought 



sorrow to the players and had the 
coaches scrambling back to the 
drawing board to work some 
magic and win the rest of their 
games. 

But it was not meant to be. 
After defeating Central and 
Western, Eastern lost to Murray 
State in a game it should have 
won. This loss all but dashed the 
Colonels' hopes of making the 
playoffs. Their only chance was 
to win their last three games by a 
convincing margin. 

They proceeded to do just that. 
The Colonels won their last two 



68 Sports/ Football 




Opposite Page: Head Coach Roy Kidd discusses a play with Defensive 
Back Sean McGuire. Right: Pat Smith dodges an Akron player. Below: 
Trying to break away from an Akron player, Elroy Harris show his deter- 
mination. Bottom: Demonstrating the strength of Eastern's defense, Jessie 
Smith tackles an Akron player. 





conference games with victories 
over Tennessee Tech and More- 
head. The season finale was 
against Louisville, a Division I 
school that wanted a win very 
badly. The Colonels dashed Lou- 
isville's hopes by thrashing the 
Cardinals in front of 5000 thun- 
derous Eastern supporters. 

But it was all to no avail. Two 
teams were chosen from the 
OVC and neither of them was 
Eastern. In the infinite wisdom 
of the selection committee Akron 
was chosen over Eastern even 
though the Colonels defeated the 
Zips earlier in the season. 

For most teams in the country 
an 8-3 final record would be a 
cause for celebration, but for an 
Eastern football player it is a 



Sports/ Football 69 





Above: James Crawford out-maneuvers an Akron player as he at- 
tempts to gain yardage. Top Right: Defensive Tackle Aaron Jones 
watches the football carrier at the Louisville game. Right: Showing 
concentration, Head Coach Roy Kidd looks at the scoreboard Op- 
posite Page Top: With a forceful tackle from John Tingle, this player 
fumbles the ball. Opposite Page Bottom: Jeff Walker is determined 
not to let these Austin Peay players get by him. 




70 Sports/ Football 




cause for more drive and deter- 
mination than ever before. This 
1985 Colonel football team gave 
their all, even through the hard- 
est of times, and they truly em- 
body the spirit of Eastern sports- 
manship that is contained in the 
motto, "A Matter of Pride." 




Sports /Football 71 





72 Sports/Football 




Opposite Page Far Left: Mathew Wallace holds the football as Dale Daw- 
son prepares to kick it. Opposite Page Bottom: James Crawford dodges 
three defensive players from Austin Peay. Left: During an Akron game, 
Vic Parks looks for an open path to the goal. Below: Elroy Harris leaps 
across a mound of players to gain further yardage. 





EKU 




OPP 


16 


Akron 


6 


7 


Marshall 


13 


36 


Youngstown St. 


29 


20 


Austin Peay 


10 


14 


Middle Tennessee 


28 


28 


Central Florida 


21 


51 


Western Kentucky 


21 


20 


Murray St. 


27 


35 


Tennessee Tech 


17 


26 


Morehead 





45 


Louisville 


21 












Sports /Football 73 




Displaying Hard Work and 
Intense Play is 

Men's Basketball 



When the 1985-86 version of 
the Eastern Kentucky University 
Colonel basketball team opened 
their season, there was an air of 
excitement around the campus. 
And why shouldn't there have 
been? 

Eastern boasted a senior point 
guard with 4 years' experience in 
John DeCamillis. Along with 
John was guard Antonio Parris, 
one of the conference's leading 
scorers last year. 

It was evident that this team 
could be a good one, but would 
it? The first of the season was up 
and down while the Colonels ex- 
perimented with different line- 
ups trying to get the right combi- 
nation. They seemed to have a 
chance to win almost every game 
but would have a hard time in 
the last minutes putting the op- 
position away 

As the season progressed, the 
team never seemed to gell. Lack 
of experience in the forward and 
center positions and a lack of 
depth all around spelled out the 
Colonels' downfall. Lady Luck 
never seemed to give this team a 
break. 

The conference schedule was 
just as tough as ever, with the 
Colonels going 5-9. No team ever 
beat the Colonels soundly, but 
Eastern just couldn't put many of 
the close games in the win col- 
umn. Injuries at crucial times to 
key players also hampered the 
team's ability to compete. 

At the end of the season, East- 




74 Sports/Men's Basketball 






Opposite Page: Antonio Parris 
does all he can to defend against 
the Louisville player. Top Left: 
Lewis Spence jumps above the 
other players to get the rebound. 
Above: Head Coach Max Good 
instructs his players from the 
bench. Left: Eastern Player John 
McGill guards the Louisville 
player while teammate looks on. 



Sports/Men's Basketball 75 



ern had posted a disappointing 
10-17 record. What you can't see 
is the hard work and intense play 
that this team displayed. The fact 
that they lost most of their games 
by just a few points was testimo- 
ny to that. 

Although the season was dis- 
appointing to players and fans 
alike, this team gave 100% and 
played an exciting brand of bas- 
ketball that was a joy to watch. 




o 




76 Sports/Men's Basketball 








Opposite Page Top: Randolph Taylor 
stands close to the Louisville player 
to block him from getting the pass. 
Opposite Page Far Left: Shawnie 
Anderson sets up for the pass against 
the Miami players. Opposite Page 
Bottom: John DeCamillis drives 
around the opponent and to the bas- 
ket in a fast break down the floor. 
Left: This University player posi- 
tions himself against the opponent. 



EKU 




OPP 


61 


Georgia Southern 


77 


82 


Ohio Domician 


66 


73 


Valpariso 


48 


56 


Illinois 


79 


61 


Murray 


63 


63 


Miami of Ohio 


65 


65 


Cincinnati 


68 


78 


Wilmington (Ohio) 


60 


64 


Furman 


68 


55 


Louisville 


86 


61 


Indiana SE 


49 


55 


Akron 


63 


69 


Youngstown 


75 


70 


Clinch Valley 


60 


73 


Tennessee Tech 


64 


57 


Middle Tennessee 


66 


55 


Murray 


67 


66 


Austin Peay 


73 


65 


Morehead 


48 


60 


Bowling Green 


61 


64 


Austin Peay 


70 


70 


Murray 


68 


54 


Youngstown 


67 


84 


Akron 


64 


74 


Middle Tennessee 


84 


57 


Tennessee Tech 


61 


79 


Morehead 
OVC 


63 


65 


Middle Tennessee 


88 




FRONT ROW: David Hagan, Terry Sanders, Bill Wilson, Student Managers. SECOND ROW: Jim 
Kammer, Jerry Gordin, Mario Pearson, Antonio Paris, John DeCamillis, Bobby Collins, Jeff 
McGill, Terry Manning. BACK ROW: Head Coach Max Good, Assist. Coach John Ferguson, Darryl 
Hughes, Randolph Taylor, Nelson David, Gary Powell, Lewis Spence, Shawnie Anderson, Mike 
Herndon, Grad. Assist. Coach John Primm, Assist. Coach Marc Comstock, Trainer Bobby Barton. 



Sports/Men's Basketball 77 




_ Sharing a Total Team _ 
Concept is 

Women's Basketball 



The 1985-86 season was a re- 
building season for the Lady 
Colonels. After setting a new 
school record with 18 victories 
last season, the team lost all five 
starters. Head Coach Dianne 
Murphy said that this year was 
"a totally new experience for the 
program in that, after two very 
successful seasons, we under- 
went major rebuilding." 

The team members shared a 
strong "blue collar work ethic" 
according to Murphy. "They 



worked hard to rebuild a success- 
ful program. They had a belief in 
themselves and in each other." 

Although the members shared 
a total team concept, Murphy 
cited Angela Fletcher, a senior 
guard, and Margy Shelton, a se- 
nior forward, as being "outstand- 
ing players." Murphy also said 
that Freshman Guard Tina Reece 
and Freshman Forward Pam Tay- 
lor were outstanding newcomers 
to the team. 

Many factors combined to 




78 Sports /Women's Basketball 




Opposite Page: With a determined look on her 
face, Lois Buntyn attempts to block the pass from 
an Austin Peay player. Top: Lady Colonel Margy 
Shelton finds herself in a trap between two Mid- 
dle Tennessee players. Left: Tracey Underwood 
(42) attempts to pass the ball to Cindy Taylor while 
eluding the Austin Peay playeis. Above: Head 
Coach Dianne Murphy shouts orders from the 
bench to the Lady Colonels. 



Sports /Women's Basketball 79 



hurt the team's chances of hav- 
ing a winning season. There was 
a lack of depth that hurt the team 
at the end of their games. Also, 
key injuries hit the team at the 
most inopportune times. 

Even though the Lady Colo- 
nels had a tough season, there 



were some high points. One of 
these, according to Murphy, was 
that "each of our players found 
out who they were as people and 
found out that they could do 
more than they thought they 
could. Overall, the season was a 
positive learning experience." 




Above: Sondra Miller attempts a jump shot 
over a Middle Tennessee player. Right: Pam 
Taylor catches the pass in a fast break against 
Tennessee Tech. 




c 
o 
HI 

a 
6 
o 

_C 
H 



80 Sports/Women's Basketball 




Left: Freshman Tina Reece attempts to shoot the ball 
over the close guarding of the Middle Tennessee 
players. Below: Two Middle Tennessee players try to 
block a shot by Lady Colonel Margy Shelton. 




EKU 




OPP 


75 


Dayton 


72 


82 


Bellarmine 


71 


85,59 


Georgia, Mississippi (Atlanta Inv.) 


80,72 


78 


Kentucky St. 


57 


90 


Cleveland St. 


73 


63 


Louisville 


83 


76 


Davis & Elkins 


52 


72 


Campbellsville 


65 


75 


Nebraska 


80 


55 


Kentucky 


97 


71 


Akron 


75 


72 


Youngstown 


82 


52 


Tennessee Tech 


82 


78 


Middle Tennessee 


87 


68 


Murray St. 


89 


78 


Austin Peay 


84 


52 


Morehead 


77 


66 


Austin Peay 


79 


78 


Murray 


69 


78 


Youngstown 


86 


76 


Akron 


77 


85 


Middle Tennessee 


99 


70 


Tennessee Tech 


97 


71 


Morehead 


81 




FRONT ROW: Lois Buntyn, Mary Lynn Barnett, Tina Reece, Tracey Underwood, Sondra 
Miller, Sivi Thomas. BACK ROW: Head Coach Dianne Murphy, Assist. Coach Linda 
Myers, Assist. Coach Kathy Barnard, Cindy Taylor, Karen Carrico, Carla Coffey, Margy 
Shelton, Pam Taylor, Angela Fletcher, Donna Baird, Student Manager; David Miller, Grad. 
Assist. Paula Sammarone, Assist. Athletic Trainer; Patty Jo Waller. 



Sports /Women's Basketball 81 




The team with unity is 

Field Hockey 



After a disappointing season 
last year, the Colonels worked 
extra hard to make this year's 
season successful. According to 
Head Coach Lynne Harvel, "The 
team members believed in them- 
selves. They trained hard over 
the summer, were committed to 
improvement and had a determi- 
nation to make it a good year." 

The Colonels achieved a re- 
cord of 10-8-2 and were especial- 
ly strong in the early season. The 
University upset Southern Illi- 
nois, St. Louis and Ohio Univer- 
sity, all three of which are very 
strong teams. The team also tied 
Miami University. According to 
Harvel, "Miami, in past years, 
has always beaten us by more 
than four goals." 

"All of the team members gave 
it their all. We got good perfor- 
mances from a lot of people," said 
Harvel. Siobhon Devlin, who is a 
senior, will definitely be missed. 
Devlin served as captain of the 
team and played goal-keeper. 
Traci Thompson had a very good 
early season and was a sparkplug 
for the team. D.D. Carley had an 
outstanding freshman year. She 
played exceptionally well. Carol 
Vanwinkle, a junior, also had a 
very good season. She played a 
link position which means she 
played both offense and defense. 
She showed herself as a team 
leader," said Harvel. 

"The team had a lot of unity. 
Everyone played her hardest. Ev- 




eryone was committed to the 
same goal — a winning season. 
We surprised everybody," ob- 
served Harvel, "even ourselves." 



Above: Carol VanWinkle prepares to drive the 
ball. Opposite Page Right: D.D. Carley take the 
ball down the field. Opposite Page Far Right: 

Traci Thompson fights for the ball. 
Photos by Neil Thompson 



82 Sports/Field Hockey 




\ 



* 



£& 




. ■--'■ 

■ 



OPPONENT 

Appalachian St. 

Pfieffer 

Ohio 

Miami 

Berea 

Southern Illinois 

St. Louis 

Radford 

Louisville 

Richmond 

Lockhaven 

Ball State 

Transylvania 

Virginia Tech 

Davis and Elkins 

Louisville 



EKU 

L 

W 

W 

Tie 

W 

W 

W 

L 

W 

L 

L 

L 

W 

W 

Tie 

W 




FRONT ROW: Siobhon Devlin, Traci Thompson, Monica Storz, Teresa Eckert. SECOND ROW: Karen 
Olde, Grad Asst.; Sue Zimmerman, Tammy Vrooman, Karen Tatum, Robin Young, Maria Vertone, 
Robin Blair, Kelly Finley BACK ROW: Bob Case, Trainer; Karen Radspinner, Trainer; Cheri Hoff, Sue 
Gladding, Barb Lecoque, Carol VanWinkle, Kathy Branch, Pam Haley, D.D. Carley, Julie Potter, Barb 
Dorgan, Lynne Harvel, Head Coach. 



Sports/Field Hockey 83 




Ranking in the Southern 
Region every week is 

Women's Volleyball 



The Colonels had a very excit- 
ing year according to Coach Geri 
Polvino. "It was one of our best 
years," she said. "In the past, 
sometimes, we've played the 
schools instead of the volleyball 
team. This vear was different. We 
went up against the giants and 
won." 

The team finished the season 
with a record of 27-8. For the first 
time, the Colonels were ranked 
in the Southern Region every 
week. They also placed first in 
the Ohio Valley Conference for 
the fifth consecutive year. 

Many team members made 
outstanding contributions to the 
success of the team. Senior Lisa 
Tecca, Junior Angela Boykins, 
and Junior Cathy Brett were cho- 
sen for the All-OVC team and 
also received Ail-American 
nominations. Cindy Thomsen 
and Deb Winkler played very 
well, as did Margrith Semones, a 
freshman who earned a starting 
position by mid-season. 

According to Coach Polvino, 
each of the players has her own 
story. "They all worked together 
for a successful season. They 
were close-knit like a family. 
They helped each other, settled 
each other, and took charge. The 
bench was outstanding under 
pressure. The team had a lot of 
confidence." 




84 Sports/Volleyball 




Left: Cathy Brett blocks the ball. Below: Lisa Tecca plays at the net Oppo- 
site Page: Angela Boykins spikes the ball as Cathy Brett looks on. 




Louisville 

Kentucky 

Xavier 

West Virginia 

Texas Tech 

Schoolcraft College 

Louisville 

Texas Tech 

Oklahoma 

Georgia 

Notre Dame 

Tennessee 

Youngstown St. 

Akron 

Morehead St. 

Marshall 

Cincinnati 

Tennessee Tech 

M. Tennessee 

Murray St. 

Austin Peay 

Georgia 

Wisconsin 

North Carolina 

Cincinnati 

Morehead St. 

Akron 

Youngstown St. 

Louisville 

Tennessee 

Miami (O.) 

Kentucky 

Penn State 

Akron 

Morehead 



W 
W 

w 
w 

L 

w 
w 

L 
L 
L 

L 
W 

W 

w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 

L 

w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 

L 
L 
W 
W 
W 




FRONT ROW: Margrith Semones, Deb Winkler, Sue Nano, Sarah Ewy, Cathy Brett, Marcia Hinz. 
BACK ROW: Geri Polvino, Coach; Linda Dawson, Joelle Condon, Lesa Crabtree, Mary Granger, Lisa 
Tecca, Cindy Thomsen, Angela Boykins, Kathleen Moore, Debbie Dingman, Alice McCauley, Michael 
Crowden, Trainer; Lindi Gray, Trainer; Kellin Lovegren, Graduate Assistant. 



Sports/Volleyball 85 




Making a strong 
comeback is 



Men's Cross Country 



After being dropped as a sport 
in 1982 and being reinstated in 
1983, cross country has made a 
major comeback. This year, with 
a new team and a new coach, the 
Colonels finished first in three of 
their five meets. The team placed 
fourth in the Ohio Valley Confer- 
ence Championship. "With only 
two of the team's top five run- 
ners from last season's OVC 
Championship team returning, 
the Colonels lacked both depth 
and experience. However, the 
voung team worked very well 
with Coach Bonk," according to 



Coach Rick Erdmann. Coach 
Bonk was a new addition to cross 
country this season who worked 
mainly with the men. 

According to Coach Bonk, the 
team members all had a good at- 
titude. Sophomore Orssie Bum- 
pus, Freshman James Vanden- 
berg, and Junior Steve Duffy 
were the mainstay of the team. 
They were the most consistent. 

Coach Bonk is looking forward 
to next year. Everyone is return- 
ing and should improve as much 
as they want to work. "If the 
team members have the right at- 





»**.. 



titude, next season will definite- 
ly be a success. 

Photos by Neil Thompson 



Below Left: Michael Oldering rounds the cor- 
ner expressing his determination. Below: 
Charlie Paynter fights a runner from Cincin- 
nati. Opposite Page: Eastern's cross country 
leads as they run against Cincinnati. 




86 Sports/Men's Cross Country 






\ 



S 5 "*' 




E* ^^te^f-^s 






£&*!*» *& 

!^v 



Jd 





Morehead State Inv. 


1st 


Cincinnati 


1st 


Appalachian State Inv. 


3rd 


Berea College Inv. 


1st 


Ohio Valley Conf. 


4th 




FRONT ROW: J. Smythe, D. Bryant, B. Caroline, D. Kinder, R. Wafford. 
SECOND ROW: S. Duffy, G. Kirk, M. Rogers, J. Flynn, M. Olderding, E. 
Marratte, C. Paynter. BACK ROW: T. Hoyles, O. Bumpus, R. Reeser, J. 
Mudrack, R. Chapman, B. Webster, J. Vandenberg. 



Sports/Men's Cross Country 87 




Winning their fourth straight 
OVC championship is 

Women's Cross Country 



Coach Rick Erdmann, in his 
fourth year as head coach of the 
University Women's Cross Coun- 
try Team, led the Colonels to 
their fourth straight Ohio Valley 
Conference Championship win. 

The Colonels placed first in 
five of their eight meets — in- 
cluding the Queen City Invita- 
tional in which they competed 
against thirteen other teams. The 
University finished eighth in a 
field of 35 in the N.C.A.A. Re- 
gion III Meet. 

Many factors contributed to 
the success of this year's team. 
According to Coach Erdmann, 
"They had a very positive atti- 
tude. They also had pretty good 
work habits and became more 
competitive as the season pro- 
gressed." 

Three members of the team 
did especially well this season. 
Freshman Allison Kotouch had 
an outstanding season and 
earned an OVC individual cham- 
pionship. Pam Raglin, junior, 



also had an outstanding season 
as did senior Linda Davis who, as 
the captain of the team, "will 
definitely be missed next sea- 
son." 

Although the team will miss 
Davis' contribution next season, 
many talented runners will be 
returning and the future looks 
right for the Colonels. 





Sports/ Women's Cross Country 




■ 



Far Left: Beth Collins concentrates as 

g she rounds the flag. Opposite Page: 

^ Cathy Jones is closely followed by 

. o Paula Garrett. Left: Competition 

H brings team members together. 



Illinois St. Inv. 
Kentucky Inv. 
Cincinnati 
Tennessee 

Appalachian St. Inv. 
Berea College Inv. 
Queen City Inv. 
Ohio Valley Conf. 
NCAA Region III 



3rd 
7th 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
8th 




FRONT ROW: R Garrett, D. Johnson, C. Snow, A. Kotouch, S. Rosser. BACK 
ROW: K. Wynn, A. Cheek, G. Brown, J. Green, C. Scully, M. Johnson, B. Collins, L. 
Davis, P. Raglin, T. Baver. 



Sports /Women's Cross Country 89 




Returning Alumni Celebrate 
Anniversary of 

Men's Swimming 



"Fifty Years of Swimming Ex- 
cellence" was the motto of the 
Eels' program at the University 
during the 1985-86 season. The 
group celebrated the 50th anni- 
versary of the first men's swim 
team at the University by hold- 
ing an alumni reunion. It was at- 
tended by 40 swimmers, includ- 
ing three members of the origi- 
nal squad during the 1935-36 
season. These men were Bob 
Dickman, Ed Hesser, and Paul 
Love. 



Under the leadership of Coach 
Dan Lichty the Eels continued 
the University's tradition of 
swimming excellence this season 
and finished the year in fifth 
place out of 10 teams in the Mid- 
west Independent Champion- 
ship. They also finished their 
dual meet season with a record of 
three wins and six losses. Co- 
Captains of the group were Se- 
nior Mike Strange and Junior Bil- 
ly Reddick. 

The Eels also set four new 



team records and a pool record. 
The following records were set: 
Senior Dave Mercer — 50 yard 
freestyle; Strange — 100 yard 
freestyle; Junior Mike Kirsch — 
100 yard and 200 yard breast- 
stroke. The pool record was also 
set by Kirsch in the 100 yard 
breaststroke. 

The Eels reached a landmark 
during the 1985-86 season and 
continued the tradition of excel- 
lence at the University. 




90 Sports/Men's Swimming 




Opposite Page: Coach Dan Lichty and Sopho- 
more Bob Stocks discuss the results of the meet. 
Left: The Eels cheer their teammates on at the 
beginning of a meet. Below: Coach Dan Lichty 
congratulates Junior Steve Dial. 




EKU 



OPP 





Bowling Green State Relays 






6th of 12 




44 


Kentucky 
Missouri Rolla Inv. 

3rd of 4 

Tennessee Relays 

6th of 6 


69 


43 


Cincinnati 


62 


53 


Tennessee 


58 


56 


Western Kentucky 


57 


53 


Morehead 


39 


58 


Transylvania 


52 


88 


Vanderbilt 


24 


47 


Missouri, Rolla 


64 


43 


Louisville 

Midwest Independent Championships 

5th of 10 


70 




FRONT ROW: Todd Crawford, Chuck Miller, Jeff Falk, Robert Gibbs. 
SECOND ROW: Frank Ramsdell, Mike Strange, Co-Capt.; Dave Mercer, 
Ted Hansen, Mike Kirsch, Bob McKendrick, Billy Reddick, Co-Capt.; 
Barbara Judge, Grad. Asst. BACK ROW: Tim Scott, Grad. Asst.; Dan Lichty, 
Coach; Lee Robinson, Bob Stocks, Steve Dial, Rob Greene, Scott 
Kretzschmar, Jon Cenkner, Scott Brown, Tim Cahill, Asst. Coach. 



Sports/Men's Swimming 91 




In their second year of compe- 
tition, the Electrifying Eels im- 
proved their standing in the 
Midwest Independent Champi- 
onship and also set 10 new 
school records. 

Under the leadership of Coach 
Dan Lichty the group trained by 
lifting weights three times a 
week and swimming twice daily 
This paid off as their record was 
improved to sixth of 14 in the 
Midwest Independent Cham- 
pionships. Their dual meet re- 
cord was three wins and three 
losses. The group was led by 
Captain Sophomore Linda Da- 
gen. 

The following school records 
have been established: Junior Jill 
Decker— 200, 500, 1000, 1650 
freestyle; Freshman Laura Stan- 
ley— 100 fly, 100 backstroke- 
Freshman Ginny Ferguson — 200 
backstroke, 50 freestyle; Fresh- 
man B.J. Brannick — 100 breast- 
stroke; Junior Teri Terrell — 100 
freestyle; Stanley, Brannick, 
Sophomore Julie Cook, Terrell — 
200 medley relay; Freshman Terri 
Hicks, Decker, Freshman Janice 
Dagen, Terrell — 800 freestyle re- 
lay; Ferguson, J. Dagen, Hicks, 
Terrell — 200 freestyle relay; Fer- 
guson, Brannick, Stanley, Ter- 
rell — 400 medley relay; Fergu- 
son, Hicks, Decker, Terrell— 400 
freestyle relay. 

Improving their standing and 
establishing new records made 
the Electrifying Eels' second sea- 
son at the University a successful 
one. 



Improvement Shown in 
Second Season of 

Women's Swimming 




92 Sports/Women's Swimming 




Opposite Page: The captain of the Electrifying 
Eels was Sophomore Linda Dagen. Left: Fresh- 
man Ginny Ferguson hits the water in a meet. 
Below: Sophomore Pam Woltenberg competes 
in the backstroke competition. 




EKU 



OPP 







Bowling Green St. 










5th of 9 






48 




Kentucky 

Missouri Inv. 

2nd of 8 




65 


49 




Cincinnati 




62 


50 




Morehead 




23 


65 




Transylvania 




36 


50 




Vanderbilt 




60 


64 




Louisville 




45 




Midwest 


Independent Champ 
6th of 14 


onships 






FRONT ROW: Suzanne Echternacht, Jenny Kiser, Michelle Spears, Michelle 
Thompson, Julie Cook, Linda Dagen, Capt.; Laura Riedel. SECOND ROW: Jim Scott, 
Grad. Asst.; Melanie Mcintosh, Patti Gerdes, Pam Woltenberg, Jill Decker, Terri 
Hicks, Ginny Ferguson, Patty Yannuzzi, Barbara Judge, Grad. Asst. BACK ROW: Dan 
Lichty, Coach; Teri Terrell, B.J. Brannick, Janice Dagen, Karen Lowery, Leighan 
McKenzie, Lee Livesay, Laura Stanley, Debbie Houser, Tim Cahill, Asst. Coach. 



Sports /Women's Swimming 93 




Pulling out a fourth place finish is 

Men's Tennis 



The men's tennis team was 
lacking in experience but not in 
ability. Depth was a major prob- 
lem since seven of the nine 
members of the team were fresh- 
men. 

The competition was stiff, but 
the Colonels finished their sea- 
son with an 11-13 record. This re- 
cord pulled a fourth place finish 
m the OVC. "We did about as 
well as I could expect," said 
Coach Higgins. 

The overall performance of 
the team was good considering 



the inexperience. "We have a 
young team; we worked really 
hard, and the coach was happy 
with the way we played," said 
player Todd Carlisle. 

The number one seed on the 
team for singles was Chris Smith 
who finished the season with an 
overall record of 14-15. The num- 
ber one doubles team of Chris 
Brown and Scott Patrick ended 
with a 13-14 record. 

Chris Smith and Todd Ham- 
monds, the number two doubles 
team placed second in the OVC. 



Brian Markham, the number five 
singles seed placed third in the 
OVC. 

The future of the team looks 
really good. With everyone re- 
turning and a more experienced 
team, the Colonels should be 
tough. "We've added a couple of 
good recruits," said Coach Hig- 
gins. "This will be a big factor in 
the performance of the Colonels 
team." 



Below: Chris Smith slices a backhand volley at 
the net for the win. 



1 




94 Sports/Men's Tennis 





; ,, 



Left: Todd Hammonds concentrates on the ball to stroke a hard 
forehand. Above: Extending down low, Chris Brown returns a one- 
handed backspin. 
Photos By Neil Thompson 



EKU 




OPP. 


7 


Bellarmine 


2 


3 


Miami 


6 


4 


E. Tennessee 


5 


1 


Ferris St. 


8 


9 


Vinvinns 





6 


Texas-Arlington 


3 


3 


M. Tennessee 


6 


2 


Murray 


7 


6 


Toledo 


3 


3 


W. Virginia 


6 


9 


Transylvania 





2 


San Ambrose 


7 


5 


S.E. Missouri 


4 


1 


Ohio St. 


8 


5 


Akron 


4 


5 


Youngstown 


4 


9 


Tennessee Tech. 





1 


Murray 


8 


3 


Louisville 


6 


5 


Morehead 


4 


4 


Austin Peay 


5 


2 


M. Tennessee 


7 


8 


Centre 


1 




FRONT ROW: Chuck Jody, John Pallo, Chris Brown. 
SECOND ROW: Todd Carlisle, John Grieve, Todd 
Hammonds. BACK ROW: Chris Smith, Brian 
Marcum, Kevin Lindley, Scott Patrick. 



Sports /Men's Tennis 95 




The women's tennis team was 
a "verv voung team and we 
didn't have much depth," said 
Coach Sandra Martin. 

The Lady Colonels played 
well and solid in the top two po- 
sitions, but "we had too much in- 
consistency from the latter posi- 
tions." The top two seeds won 
the majority of the matches. 
However, these matches were 
not enough to win against a team 
under the nine point system, 
which consisted of six singles 
and three double matches. 

The team encountered stiff 
competition, such as Ohio State, 
but they lost on the long points. 
"They played excellent matches 
with them, but in comparison to 
the scores, it wasn't that close," 
said Martin. 

The Colonels ended their sea- 
son with a 4-13 record which 
placed them in fifth place in the 
OVC. However, the top singles 
and double seeds placed as run- 
ners-up in the OVC. Kristi Span- 
genberg ended her season and 
college career with a 16-15 record 
in the top singles position. The 
team of Kristi Spangenberg and 
Claudia Porras teamed as the 
number one doubles seed and 
ended the season with a 22-12 re- 
cord. 

During the fall season at the 
state tournament held for all Di- 
vision 1-A schools, Claudia Por- 
ras won her number two posi- 



Improvement is the key for 

Women's Tennis 




tion. She defeated Lee McGuire 
from the University of Kentucky, 
a top twenty team. 

Coach Martin knew her team 
was young, as did some of the 
players. "I was happy that we 
had the two seniors that won for 
us," said Traci Parella. 

The team's overall attitude was 



encouraging since improvement 
could be seen by the players. "We 
should have set our goals high- 
er," said Kim Carson. 

Next year's team looks really 
good. "Returners should be back 
with consistency," said Martin. 
"We may surprise a few people 
with our depth." 



96 Sports/ Women's Tennis 







Opposite Page: Beckie Mark takes a break during a match. Left: Claudia 
Porras extends to get full power on her serve. Below: While changing sides 
between odd games, Traci Parrella flips her game score. 




EKU 




OPP. 


4 


Radford 


5 


8 


Marshall 


1 


1 


Vanderbilt 


8 


3 


W. Kentucky 


6 


1 


M. Tennessee 


8 


3 


W. Virginia 


6 


3 


Murray 


6 





Morehead 


9 


1 


Tennessee 


8 


2 


Ohio St. 


7 


3 


Louisville 


6 


3 


Purdue 


6 


3 


Bowling Green 


6 


9 


Wright St. 





7 


Illinois 


2 





E. Michigan 


9 





Miami 


9 


1 


Morehead 


8 


3 


Ohio 


6 


6 


Brehav 


3 





Georgia 


9 


3 


Columbus 


6 




Left to Right: Sandra Martin, Chris Gerber, Kristi Spangenberg, Angie 
Wilson, Julie Hayes, Kim Carson, Traci Parrella, Jeannie Waldron, Beckie 
Mark, Laura Hesselbrock, Claudia Porras. 



Sports/Women's Tennis 97 




A Rebuilding Year for the 

Golf Team 



For the Colonels Golf team, 
the 84-85 vear was a rebuilding 
one. The team, consisting of all 
freshman and sophomores, was 
experimental, using eleven dif- 
ferent combinations of teams 
throughout the year. The result 
was a pleasing one — first place 
in the Ohio Valley Conference. 

Two of the team's members 
were selected for the All-OVC 
team — Bruce Oldendick and 
Kick Montanaro. Oldendick was 
also named player of the year in 
the OVC. 

Coach Smither looks to the 86 
spring season with a positive at- 
titude. He feels the team will be 
more competitive and will be 
able to compete with top teams. 
He also believes they should be 
strong contenders for national 
ranking and with their schedule 
of games and competitions, 
among the nation's best. 



Right: Fred Mattingly on the follow through 
Opposite Page Right: Pat Bennett gets ready to 
putt. Opposite Page Far Right: Mike Crow 
lines up a putt. 





:;*. 





B 



*«*•»«*. 



98 Sports/Golf 






7 ""ne ws 




Tampa Invitational 

Hilton Head Intercollegiate 

Florida Southern Intercollegiate 

Palmetto Intercollegiate 

Troy State Invitational 

Univ. of Alabama Invitational 

Duke Spring Classic 

Furman Invitational 

Marshall Invitational 

EKU Spring Colonel Classic 

The Chris Schenkel Invitational 

Ohio Valley Conference Championship 




FRONT ROW: Tom Klenke, John Diana, Pat Ohler, Pete Gemmer, John 
Gaynor, C.B. Bailiff, Mike Crowe, Coach Lou Smither. BACK ROW: Bruce 
Oldendick, Danny Parrett, Nick Montanaro, Pat Bennett, Scott Gasser, Fred 
Mattingly 



Sports/Golf 99 




Defending their OVC title 
_ for the second year is _ 

Baseball 




The 1984 spring season 
brought many new school re- 
cords and extreme success for the 
Colonels. Head Coach Jim Ward 
said he felt "very good about the 
season." 

After compiling a record of 42- 
26, the Colonels went on to suc- 
cessfully defend their title as 
OVC tournament champion. 
The colonels also represented the 
OVC in the NCAA tournament 



for the second year in a row. Ac- 
cording to Coach Ward, the Colo- 
nels were the only team compet- 
ing in the NCAA tournament 
that had "hit more than 100 
home runs and stolen more than 
200 bases." 

Nationally, the team ranked 
extremely well. The ESPN Colle- 
giate Baseball Division I Poll 
ranked the Colonels 27th in the 
country in its final rankings. 



Robert Moore was tied for sec- 
ond in the nation with 26 dou- 
bles and Scott Fromwiller was 
tenth in the nation with 49 stolen 
bases. The team, as a whole, was 
ranked sixth, with 113 homer- 
uns; fifth, with 209 stolen bases; 
and seventh, with a .572 slug- 
ging percentage. 

Many school records were also 
broken. Clay Elswick hit 15 ho- 
meruns this season, bringing his 



100 Sports/Baseball 





career total to 32 and setting a 
school record. Elswick also drove 
in 63 runs which brought his ca- 
reer total to 118 and a new school 
record. Scott From wilier 's 49 sto- 
len bases set a school record as 
well as a new OVC record. Ed 
Norkus pitched his way to nine 
victories, which tied a school re- 
cord. The team's 42 victories also 
set a new school record. 




Opposite Page: Jeff Cruse delivers the ball to the plate. Above Left: 
Coach Ward confers with Brad Brian and Doug Losey. Left: The 
pitch is from Doug Losey. Above: Bob Moranda takes off for first. 



Sports /Baseball 101 



Four Colonel players were 
named to the all-OVC team. 
Thev were Trov Williams, John 
Miles, Robert Moore, and Jay 
Steele. Troy Williams was also 
named to the NCAA Southern 
Region All-Star team. 

The 1984 season was a season 
for individual accomplishments. 
Yet each individual made contri- 
butions that led to a strong team 
overall, and a successful season. 

Right: Clay Elswick scores a run. Below: Rob- 
ert Moore gets a hit. 





102 Sports/Baseball 




Left: Scott Privitera makes a catch in the outfield. Below: Brett Forbush tries for a double-play. 




EKU 




OPP. 


6/6/9/2 


W. Carolina 


7/10/3/0 


2/0 


Bellarmine 


3/1 


16 


Kentucky 


17 


9 


W. Michigan 


14 


7/8 


Wingate 


5/3 


2/6/6 


UNC-Wilmington 


3/7/13 


6/7 


N. Carolina St. 


5/12 


4 


Fairfield 


9 


2 


E. Carolina 


9 


7 


N. Carolina 


9 


13/11 


UNC-Ashville 


4/5 


7/10 


Marshall 


3/5 


6/4 


Evansville 


2/5 


6/4 


Cincinnati 


8/10 


12/16 


Louisville 


5/11 


8 


Austin Peay 


12 


8/7/6 


Akron 


5/2/5 


8 


Morehead 


6 


14/9/17 


Youngstown 


3/4/6 


5/2/6 


Morehead 


7/6/14 


17/9 


Dayton 


4/3 


3/2/15 


Akron 


2/1/3 


11/9 


Morehead 


4/16 


11/10 


Georgetown 


9/9 


3/6/23 


Youngstown 


8/4/3 


6/6 


UNC-Ashville 


3/3 


3/9 


Xavier 


4/4 


10 


Murray 


11 


22 


Morehead 


11 


15 


Austin Peay 


2 


11/19 


Murray 


7/18 


13 


Arkansas 


20 


10 


C. Michigan 


7 


13 


Georgia Tech 


14 








£0 











FRONT ROW: Troy Williams, Scott Fromwiller, Paul Friess, Clay Elwick, Brett Forbush, Jeff Cruse, 
Brad Evans, Robert Moore, David Butcher. SECOND ROW: Manager Devon Brown, John Miles, 
Doug Losey, Mike Morvissey, Joe Demus, Dennis Quigley, Wes Hagan, Tony Weyrich, Scott Privitera, 
Sam Holbrook, Rick Congleton, Head Coach Jim Ward. BACK ROW: Manager Terry Mullins, Asst. 
Coach Greg Weyride, Asst. Coach Tom Stull, Eric Zimmerman, Joel Stockford, Bob Moranda, Sherman 
Bennett, Tim Redmon, Bill Sherry, Dan Thompson, Jay Steele, Ed Norkus, Brad Brian. 



Sports /Baseball 103 




Capturing the OVC title for a second year 

Men's Track 



The return of the fourteen let- 
termen from the OVC champi- 
onship team was definitely a fac- 
tor in the Colonels' success this 
season. 

After winning the OVC In- 
door Track Championship last 
year for the first time, the Colo- 
nels came back to almost win it 
again. The Colonels' placed sec- 
ond in the OVC championship. 

Besides finishing second in the 
OVC, the team also made a 
strong showing at the Penn Re- 
lays. The Colonels made it to the 
finals in both the 4 X 100 and the 
4X200 relays. 

Head Coach Rick Erdmann 
said that the sprint relays "ran 
relatively well" throughout the 
season. He said Kevin Johnson, 
Vince Scott, Stan Pringle, and 
Jerome Dorsey were very com- 
petitive. 

Although many members 
contributed to the success of the 
team, the accomplishments of se- 
nior Larry White were especially 
outstanding. White increased his 
personal best in the long jump 
from 24'10" to 253" and triple- 
jumped 50'. 

Overall, the season was a suc- 
cessful one for the Colonels.. 

Right: Orssie Bumpus leads the race. Opposite 
Left: Mark Morns lands after a nice jump Op- 
posite Right: Roger Humpheries lunges to the 
finish. 




104 Sports/ Men's Track 



















Meet 


EKU 


Eastman Invitational 


NS 


Purdue 


NS 


Milrose Games 


NS 


Indiana Univ. Relays 


NS 


Mason Dixon Games 


NS 


Ohio State Invitational 


NS 


Ohio Valley Conference 


2nd 


Middle Tenn. Invitational 


NS 


Berea Invitational 


NS 


Domino's Classic 


NS 


Tri Meet 


NS 


Tom Samuels 


NS 


Ohio Univ. Relays 


NS 


Dogwood Relays 


NS 


Univ. of Ky. Relays 


NS 


Penn Relays 


NS 


Ohio Valley Conf. 


2nd 




FRONT ROW: John Walsh, Juan Moseby, Andre Williams, Mark Morris, Kevin Johnson, Jerome 
Dorsey, Stan Pringle, Andy Bowles. SECOND ROW: Roger Chapman, Pat Woods, Paul Sturgis, Jeff 
Goodwin, Bret Den Hases, Vince Scott, Larry White, Anton Reece, Bill Webster. THIRD ROW: 
Charles Paynter, Kirk Slate, Rick Marcum, Roger Humphries, Tim Crumbie, Steve Sattinger, Orssie 
Bumpus, Bobby Carrolin. BACK ROW: Jay Hodge, Steve Duffy, Dave Holt, Jay Jones, George Zydel, 
Bill Jones, Matt Rogers, Jay Martin. 



Sports/Men's Track 105 




A Strong Returning Nucleus for 

Women's Track 



Opposite Right: Christine Snow injured in a 
relay. Opposite Left: Angie Barker hurls the 
javeline. Below: Jackie Humphrey clears the 
hurdles. 



With a "strong returning nu- 
cleus" and many outstanding 
freshmen, the Colonels had a 
successful season. The team 
overcame a challenging schedule 
and performed well. 

For the third year in a row the 
Colonels placed first in the Becky 
Boone Relays. The team also won 
the OVC Indoor and Outdoor 
Championships. 

Although every member of 
the team contributed to its suc- 
cess, a few people made special 
contributions. 

Rose Gilmore, a senior, was 
named an All-American in the 



NCAA. 

Head Coach Rick Erdmann 
said Freshman Jackie Humphrey 
and Freshman Angie Barker also 
had outstanding seasons. 

Sophomore Pam Raglin was a 
"leader in distance" and was cho- 
sen as an outstanding athlete in 
track in the OVC. 

Overall, the Colonels finished 
in first place in 5 out of six scored 
meets and came in second in the 
sixth meet. Winning the OVC 
Outdoor Championship merely 
capped off an outstanding sea- 
son. 




106 Sports/Women's Track 




I 




Eastman Invitational 


NS 


Purdue 


2nd 


Milrose Games 


NS 


Indiana Univ. Relays 


NS 


Ohio State 


1st 


Mason Dixion Games 


NS 


Illini Invitational 


NS 


OVC 


1st 


Florida State 


NS 


UOK 


NS 


Ohio Univ. Relays 


NS 


Dogwood Relays 


NS 


UK Relays 


NS 


Becky Boone Relays 


1st 


OVC 


1st 


Gatorade Track Classic 


NS 




FRONT ROW: Linda Davis, Jackie Humphrey, Donna Schuh, Paula Garrett, Carrie Congleton, 
Chrisitine Snow, Tina Smith, Linda Dowdy, Barbra Wildermuth, Rose Gilmore. BACK ROW: Danielle 
Sparks, Beverly Bobbitt, Angie Barker, Marilyn Johnson, Linda Frye, Janiece Gibson, Edy th Childress, 
Diane Johnson, Pam Raglin, Charamaine Byer, Tracy Webb, Jill Blair. 



Sports /Women's Track 107 



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108 Academics/Organizations 







Developing one's 

self-interest to receive 

the highest 

Return 



Investments 




President Funderburk 


110 


Mrs. Funderburk 


114 


Administrators 


116 


Deans and Outstanding Students 


122 


Honoraries 


132 


Organizations 


143 


Greeks 


172 



Academics/Organizations 109 






The "Commitment to Excellence" 



The "Commitment to Excel- 
lence" was the main topic of dis- 
cussion on Saturday, May 11, 
1985, as Dr. Hanly Funderburk 
became the University's eighth 
president. 

"If we have a role to play in 
higher education in the com- 
monwealth it must be one of true 
excellence, not one of somebody 
else's idea of acceptable mediocri- 
ty," said Funderburk in his ad- 
dress at the joint inauguration/ 
commencement program at 
Hanger Field at the University. 

Funderburk said he hopes to 
obtain excellence at the Univer- 
sity through four elements, 
which he claimed are involved 
in any search for excellence. 

"First, I believe that no person 
and no institution can strive for 
excellence and be easily satisfied 
by the commonplace," he said. 

Funderburk also said, that ex- 



cellence embodied the realiza- 
tion that bigger is not necessarily 
better and that "the achievement 
of excellence requires pain and 
hard work." 

As his fourth and final point, 
he said, "I am firmly convinced 
that excellence for an institution 
requires that we attract the most 
talented and the most committed 
people we can find to this cam- 
pus." 

The oath of office was admin- 
istered by Robert F. Stephens, 
chief justice of the Kentucky Su- 
preme Court. Funderburk had 
earlier assumed his duties as 
president of Jan. 1, 1985. 

"I hope we'll be successful in 
our venture for this 'commit- 
ment to excellence' at the Uni- 
versity," said Funderburk. "It's a 
vital part of what we tend to ac- 
complish here." 

Photos by Paul Lambert. 



110 Academics/ 
Organizations 







Opposite Page: Robert F. Stephens, chief justice of Ken- 
tucky Supreme Court, swears in the University's eighth 
President Dr. Hanly Funderburk during commencement 
exercises at Hanger Field. Above Left: President Funder- 
burk with his wife Helen and their son, daughter, son-in- 
law, and grandchild in Blanton House. Left: President 
and Mrs. Funderburk enjoy meeting guests during the 
Inauguration Weekend at the University. Above: Presi- 
dent Funderburk addresses the graduates, faculty, digni- 
taries and guest at the Inauguration ceremonies. 



Academics/Organizations 111 



Facing 

Challenges 

of 

New 

Goals 



"Eastern is a very well run in- 
stitution and has a good reputa- 
tion throughout the state, region 
and nation," said Pres. Hanly 
Funderburk. "Therefore, my 
overall goal is simply to make a 
good university a better one." 

Funderburk realized he had to 
confront several challenges in or- 
der to reach this goal. Since tak- 
ing office on Jan. 1, 1985, he has 
done several things to work to- 
ward facing their challenges. 

These challenges include 
maintaining and retaining a 
quality faculty, providing sound 
management techniques to get 
the most from every state-appro- 
priated dollar, seeking additional 
sources of funding from both 
state government and the private 
sector, encouraging active in- 
volvement of alumni and other 
friends and recruiting and re- 
taining quality students. 

He has developed several new 
programs to improve the Univer- 
sity's financial status as well as its 




role in the community. 

One of these programs is the 
University Legislative Network, 
which is a group of alumni and 
friends throughout the state who 
help with legislation important 
to the institution. 

"We are also laying the basis 
and foundation for the Develop- 
ment Program," said Funder- 
burk. "This is a way to get private 



support by inviting people to the 
campus for functions, such as 
football and basketball games. 
We want to make these people 
more aware of the University's 
programs." He is also working 
with the staff on several pro- 
grams which will help make the 
people of Kentucky more aware 
of the availability of programs 
offered at the University. 



112 Academics/Organizations 




Opposite Page: President Funderburk enjoys 
the Homecoming Parade as it passes down Lan- 
caster Avenue. Left: Dr. Funderburk address- 
ing a University panel. Below Left: During 
Homecoming 1985 President Funderburk 
crowned the new queen, Julie Rees. Below: Dr. 
Funderburk enjoys relaxing with his grand- 
daughter. 















"We serve a 22-county region 
and I want to take more of our 
programs off-campus and move 
into more areas of the state," said 
Funderburk. 

Funderburk claims some of his 
greatest accomplishments have 
been in the area of communica- 
tions. He has tried to establish 
dialogue with various constitu- 
ents of the University, particular- 



ly the students. 

I enjoy working with and 
meeting the students," said Fun- 
derburk. "I think the students' 
attitudes now are more like they 
were in the mid 1950's. This is a 
very good time in terms of how 
students feel about life." 

Other accomplishments noted 
by Funderburk are his ability to 
delegate authority to staff mem- 



bers and the improvements in 
the maintenance at the Universi- 
ty 

"I've really enjoyed being a 

part of Eastern," said Funder- 
burk. "I have attended many en- 
joyable events; it's been a really 
pleasant venture for me." 



Academics/Organizations 113 




The Scenario: 



' 'Childhood Sweethearts ' ' 



The scenario of the "childhood 
sweethearts" who marry and live 
happily ever after was the basic 
storyline for the two residents of 
Carrolton, Alabama, who mar- 
ried thirty-two years ago. 

Hanly and Helen Hanson 
Funderburk grew up in the small 
Alabama community together. 
They started dating in junior 
high and their relationship con- 
tinued through high school and 
beyond to Auburn University. 
They were married in 1953, after 
Dr. Funderburk graduated. Start- 
ing a family a few years later, the 
Funderburks became the parents 
of a son and a daughter. 

The life as a first lady at the 
University is one that Helen 
Funderburk truly enjoys. She 
feels the role as first lady is an 
important one. She is a multi-fac- 
eted woman: a wife, a mother, a 

114 Academics/Organizations 



Above: Always seen together Dr. and Mrs. Funderburk attend University functions. Below: 
Helen Funderburk enjoys her needlework hobbies. Photos by Paul Lambert 




grandmother and a confidant. 
She is at her husband's side in 
many ways. "If there is a prob- 
lem, well, we'll talk it over and 
I'll tell him how I feel about the 
situation, but I never know the 
outcome until it's over. We trust 
each other's opinions, just like 
any couple that's been married 
for thirty-two years." 

A large portion of Mrs. Fun- 
derburk's time is spent planning 
and preparing to entertain. The 
president's home, Blanton 
House, is the sight of many 
weekend gatherings. "Hanly and 
I just love football season. We en- 
tertain out-of-town guests and 
alumni during the season." 

Finding time for hobbies out- 



side of University life is difficult 
for Mrs. Funderburk. Needle- 
work is her greatest interest. She 
also enjoys counted-cross stitch- 
ing and smocking for her grand- 
daughter. 

However, she tries not to get 
involved in outside activities be- 
cause there isn't time. "The Presi- 
dent and I spend approximately 
four nights out a week, attending 
various University functions and 
don't have time for many other 
activities, because we do thor- 
oughly enjoy university life. It 
offers so much. I guess that I 
would say it is the activities with 
the students that I enjoy the 
most. They are more fun than 
anything else we do." 





Above: Mrs. Funderburk spends time in her 
office at Blanton House making arrangements 
for weekend entertaining. Above Right: Mrs. 
Funderburk discusses menu planning with 
Valerie Clemons. Right: Southern hospitality 
is important to the University^ first lady. 




Academics /Organizations 115 



President Emeritus 
Dr. Robert R. Martin 



President Emeritus Robert R. 
Martin announced that he will 
not seek another term in the 
Kentucky Senate, which he has 
served on since 1976. Martin 
served as President of Eastern 
Kentucky University for 16 
years. 

While in the Senate he served 
on the Education Committee, 
and the Sub-Committee on 
Higher Education. The Welfare 
Committee also receives his at- 
tention. 

Prior to that he had served the 
Commonwealth as Superinten- 
dent of Public Institution and 
Secretary of Finance. 

He was an outspoken advocate 
of higher education. 

Right: Former Vice-President William Sexton 
talks with Dr. Martin at spring commencement 
activities. Below: Dr. Martin is still actively in- 
volved in campus activities. Below Right: Dr. 
Martin is concerned with supporting higher 
education in his senatorial duties. 





116 Academics /Organizations 




President Emeritus Dr. J. C. Powell 



President Emeritus J.C. 
Powell was named to the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky's Hall of 
Distinguished Alumni. Powell 
is one of only 177 graduates 
who have been designated as a 
distinguished alumni. 

Powell, who received both 
his bachelor's and doctor of 
education degrees from the 
University of Kentucky said, 
"I'm especially pleased to be 
numbered among such a dis- 
tinguished — and small — 
group of men and women." 

Since Powell's retirement in 
December 1984, he has also 
been named as an honorary 




alumnus of the University. 

In his first year of retire- 
ment, Powell traveled to Eu- 
rope with his wife, Downey, as 
a result of a gift from alumni 
and friends. 

Powell served as the Uni- 
versity's seventh president 
since 1976, which he strived 
for the "quest of quality" in the 
University's academic pro- 
gram. 



Left: J. C. and Downey Powell take notice of 
the newly dedicated "J.C. Powell Room" at 
Arlington Country Club. Top Left: Dr. 
Powell enjoys Saturday afternoons spent at 
Hanger Field supporting the Colonels. Top: 
Dr. Powell exits the spring commencement 
exercises. 



i 



Academics/Organizations 117 



Board of Regents 



The Board of Regents is the of- 
ficial policy-making and statu- 
tory governing body of the Uni- 
versity. The Board approved co- 
ed housing in Martin Hall and 
allowed microwave ovens and 
various other appliances in the 
residence halls. 

Each year a student represen- 
tative is elected to serve on this 
governing board. Ken Kearns 
served the students by attending 
quarterly meetings and speaking 



on issues facing the Board. 

The student regent's responsi- 
bilities vary from year to year. 
Representing the University, 
Kearns spoke at the Council for 
Higher Education in June at the 
University and attended the Ral- 
ly for Higher Education in 
Frankfort. 

Kearns said, "As a student re- 
gent, I bring in the students' per- 
spectives of various issues that 
come before the Board." 




FRONT ROW: Henry D. Stratton, Chair.; Pres. Hanly Funderburk, Alois Mclntyre, Robert J. Begley, Jr., Tommy Harper. BACK ROW: Dr. 
Robert Warren, John Keith, Ken Kearns, Student Rep.; Dr. Rodney Gross. NOT PICTURED: Dr. Bonnie Gray, Craig Cox. 



118 Academics/Organizations 




C.E. Baldwin 
Business Affairs 



Schwendeman 

Named 

Vice President 

Dr. Joseph R. Schwendeman, 
formerly Associate Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Planning and 
Develoment, was named Vice 
President of Administrative Af- 
fairs by President Funderburk. 
Schwendeman replaces Dr. Wil- 
liam Sexton who retired. Includ- 
ed in Schwendeman's responsi- 
bilities will be special programs, 
the planetarium, administrative 
computing, academic comput- 
ing, radio and television, natural 
areas and physical plant. 
Schwendeman said his goal was 
to "supply quality service in an 
economical manner. Dr. Sexton 




Donald Feltner 
University Relations Development 




Dr. John Rowlett 
Academic Affairs & Research 



left a sound organization on 
which to build, with a group of 
capable and cooperative direc- 
tors." 

The quality of student life to a 
large extent is the responsibility 
of the divisions under the direc- 
tion of the Vice President for Stu- 
dent Affairs headed by Dr. 
Thomas Meyers. 

The Office of the Vice Presi- 
dent of Academic Affairs is a 
very real part of the life of the 
student from the time of registra- 
tion until graduation and tran- 
scripts used after graduation. 
This office is headed by Dr. John 




Dr. Thomas Meyers 
Student Affairs 




Dr. Joseph R. Schwendeman 
Administrative Affairs 



Rowlett. 

Donald R. Feltner, Vice Presi- 
dent of University Relations and 
Development, directs the divi- 
sions of development, alumni af- 
fairs, etc, which combine efforts 
to raise both "friends" and 
"funds" for the University. 

Earl Baldwin, Vice President of 
Business, is responsible for the fi- 
nancial stability of the Universi- 
ty by managing such areas as 
purchasing and store, accounts 
receivable and the auxiliary en- 
terprises. 






Academics /Organizations 119 




Miss Michelle L. Smith, an Ac- 
counting major from the College 
of Business, has been awarded 
the 1986 Hall of Fame Award. 

With a G.PA. of 3.955, Mi- 
chelle had quite an intense major. 
"I found accounting challenging, 
and I guess that's what drew me 
to it." said Smith. 

However, she found time for 
many outside activities. She was 
a member and held offices in the 
Alpha Delta Pi sorority. 



"The sorority was very helpful 
to me. It taught me to structure 
my time well," Smith says. 

Michelle was involved in oth- 
er student organizations, such as 
Mortar Board, Sigma Tau Pi, 
United Methodist Campus Cen- 
ter, and Gamma Beta Phi. 

When asked about offering ad- 
vice to other students Smith re- 
plied "Do your best — don't go 
overboard in just one area; aca- 
demics aren't the only thing to be 



Hall of Fame Recipient 

Michelle L. Smith 




learned here at Eastern. Students 
tend to forget that. Get involved 
in the entire college scene." 
Smith is proof that excellent 
grades and college activities can 
be held together. 

The Hall of Fame Award was 
chosen from a group of outstand- 
ing students — one student from 
each of the seven colleges at the 
University. The final recipient 
was then chosen by President 
Hanly Funderburk. 



Mortar Board sponsors Michelle as a Home- 
coming Queen candidate. Smith was one of fif- 
teen finalists. 



120 Academics/Organizations 




David Gale has been the Dean 
of the College of Allied Health 
and Nursing for thirteen years. 
He feels that improvement of his 
college lies in a continuance of 
the same things they are doing 
now. 

A list of the college goals in- 
cluded such points as: 1) to pro- 
vide high quality programs at 
the undergraduate and graduate 
levels for individuals who wish 
to pursue a health profession, 2) 
to provide for career mobility 
and continuing education within 
various health professions, 3) to 
provide career guidance that will 
attract students of high quality 
who will find a rewarding career 



in the health care field, and 4) to 
ensure that the admission pro- 
cess supports the non-discrimi- 
nation policy. 

A highly qualified faculty is a 
strong point of this college. 
When asked what he enjoys 
most about Eastern, Gale said, 
"It's the fine university with ex- 
cellent resources." 



College of 
Allied Health and Nursing 



The outstanding student of the 
College of Allied Health and 
Nursing is Debra Rose, who is a 
senior nursing major. 

Rose has participated in sever- 
al organizations and activities in 
her field of study. She served as 
chairperson of the Ways and 
Means Committee in the Bacca- 
laureate Student Nurses Associ- 
ation. She was also an American 
Red Cross Blood Mobile volun- 
teer and a ward clerk and nurs- 
ing assistant at the Clark County 
Hospital. 

Honors Rose received were 
Lambda Sigma Sophomore Hon- 
or Society, Eastern Kentucky 





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University Nursing Honor Soci- 
ety, Mortar Board Senior Honor 
Society and Who's Who Among 
American Colleges and Univer- 
sities. 



Academics/Organizations 121 



Kenneth Hanson, Dean of the 
College of Applied Arts and 
Technology, has filled this posi- 
tion since 1975. He feels that im- 
provement of the college lies in 
continuation of the same day-to- 
day, hands-on-experience and 
fine tuning the skills students 
will need to get a good job. He 
added that more students would 
also be an improvement to the 
program as there are many excel- 
lent job opportunities in this 
field. 

Some of the strong points of 
the college are that the college 
provides a broad technical or 
professional education so gradu- 
ates can expand in their field. He 



also said that his college gives 
students excellent experience 
which enables them to find good 
jobs. 

One of the things Hanson 
likes most about the University 
is the relationship of students 
with faculty. He also added that 
he felt the students at the Uni- 
versity are very goal-oriented. 

Hanson grew up in Sweden. 
He served in the Air Force in 
both Sweden and the United 
States. He did his undergraduate 
work at the University of South- 
ern Illinois and received his Mas- 
ters and Ph.D from the Universi- 
ty of Missouri. Hanson came to 
the University in 1966. 




College of Applied Arts 



and Technology 




The outstanding student of the 
College of Applied Arts and 
Technology was Laura Wine- 
brenner, senior Technical Horti- 
culture major. 

Honors she has received while 
at the University include the 
Dean's List for five semesters, 
Honors award from Phi Kappa 
Phi Honor Society, Presidential 
Scholarship, Kentucky State Flo- 
rist Association Scholarship and 
the National Jane R. Layman 
Scholarship. 

Winebrenner was also a mem- 
ber of the EKU Horticulture 
Club; Allied Landscape Institute, 
Bedding Plants, Inc., and the Ex- 
plorers Club. 



122 Academics/Organizations 



After completing his under- 
graduate work at Furman Uni- 
versity in Greenville, South 
Carolina, Dean John Long re- 
ceived his Master of Arts degree 
from Northeastern University in 
Boston and his Ph.D from the 
University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. Long has been the 
Dean of the College of Arts and 
Humanities at the University 
since 1979. 

Long feels that re-examining 
the existing program and im- 
proving the curriculum would 
be an improvement in his col- 
lege. He added: "Improvement is 
a continuing effort." 

One of the goals for the Col- 
lege of Arts and Humanities this 
year was to establish "Friends of 




the Fine Arts." Long feels that in- 
creased public knowledge and 
participation in the perfor- 
mances at the University are im- 
portant. 

According to Long, the faculty 
of his college is its strongest 
point. The faculty is very well- 
prepared and comes from a wide 
variety of backgrounds, he said. 
He added that having good facili- 
ties is an important plus, also. 
When asked what he enjoyed 
most about the University, Long 
said he thought it was a good 
size. "Eastern is large enough to 
have advantages the smaller 
schools don't have, but not so big 
that people get lost from one an- 
other." 



College of 
Arts and Humanities 



Johanna Smith, senior Music 
major, was chosen as the out- 
standing student of the College 
of Arts and Humanities. 

Smith received the Hall of 
Fame Award, Dean's Award, was 
on the Dean's List each semester 
and received a music scholar- 
ship. 

She was extremely involved in 
the music field and was a mem- 
ber of the University Singers, 
Madrigal Singers and director of 
the Baptist Student Union Choir. 

Smith has performed as a vo- 
calist at numerous places and 
plans to continue professional 
work as a performer. 




Academics /Organizations 123 



"I enjoy the people I work 
with and the support they have 
given me," said Alfred Patrick, 
Dean of the College of Business. 
"\ also enjoy the campus atmo- 
sphere, the beauty of the campus 
and the area, the location, and 
the challenges." 

Patrick has been dean of the 
College for two years. He has 
been at the University since 1965 
and served as chairman of De- 
partment of Business Education 
and Office Administration from 
1966 to 1983. He was a professor 
in 1983 and 84; chairman in 1984- 
85; and then he became acting 
dean. 



As dean he has set several 
goals for the college — comple- 
tion of microcomputer lab, facul- 
ty review of some programs and 
services (MBA and Central Ad- 
vising Office), and the develop- 
ment of college guidelines for 
merit pay for faculty. 

He also noted the college's 
strongest points: excellent facul- 
ty, sound curriculums, respected 
by employers, wide variety of 
majors available, Central Advis- 
ing Office, and good facilities. 

Patrick received his Bachelor s 
and Master s degrees from Vir- 
ginia Tech and his doctorate from 
the University of Tennessee. 







College of Business 



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T 




» 







Senior Michelle Smith was 
chosen as the outstanding stu- 
dent in the College of Business. 
Smith, an accounting major, 
graduated Summa Cum Laude in 
December with a GPA of 3.955. 

She was on the Dean's List ev- 
ery semester and received a 
Dean's award. While maintain- 
ing her high GPA, Smith was also 
President of Mortar Board and a 
member of Alpha Delta Pi. She 
participated in Intramural sports 
and was chosen as a Homecom- 
ing Queen Candidate. 



124 Academics/Organizations 



"I belong in a museum, I think/' 
said Dr. Dixon Barr, who has been 
Dean of the College of Education 
for 21 years. "That's a long time, but 
I wouldn't have been here all this 
time if I didn't like the University." 

Barr likes all aspects of the Uni- 
versity — the friendly people, the 
exciting atmosphere, and the gor- 
geous campus. "I have a great love 
for this place." 

Barr came here after receiving his 
Bachelors degree from Ball State 
University in Indiana, and his Mas- 
ters and Doctorate from Columbia 




University in New York City. 

He works to improve his college 
each year. His major goals this year 
were computer literacy for all stu- 
dents becoming teachers and better 
faculty development. 

"I think we have a strong dedi- 
cated faculty," Barr said. "That's the 
best thing about our college, along 
with the fact that we have Model 
Laboratory School. That is a vital 
part of our education program be- 
cause it gives students the chance to 
work with kids from the start." 



College of Education 



The outstanding student of the 
College of Education was Susan 
Martin, senior Elementary Edu- 
cation and Kindergarten major. 

Awards received by Martin at 
the University were Who's Who 
among students of American 
Colleges and Universities, Dean's 
List, and the Florence B. Strate- 
meyer Award. 

She was involved in several 
organizations dealing with her 
major. She was an officer in 
Kappa Delta Pi Education Honor 
Society and served as a student 
representative on the College of 
Education Curriculum Coordi- 
nating Committee. She also par- 
ticipated in Mortar Board and the 
EKU Christian Student fellow- 
ship. 




Academics /Organizations 125 




After being Dean of the Col- 
lege of Health, Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Athletics for 
seven years, Dean Russell Bogue 
said, on the subject of improve- 
ment, "I think we're pretty well 
on target." He said they have re- 
vised the curriculum to meet the 
needs of the students. The goals 
this year were, as for every year, 
to meet those needs by changing 
the curriculum and to have bet- 
ter advising to meet changing 
times so when a student enters 
the University, they have a good 
opportunity to be employed. 

Bogue feels that one of the 



strongest points of his college is 
the faculty. "We have a lot of peo- 
ple who are well-educated and 
they have a strong interest in 
helping students." He added that 
he enjoys working at the Univer- 
sity because the friendliness of 
faculty and students make it a 
fine University. 

Bogue did his undergraduate 
work at Kearney State in Nebras- 
ka. He received his Masters from 
the University of Nebraska and 
his Doctorate from Wyoming 
University. He has three sons and 
enjoys the outdoors. 



College of Health, Physical 
Education, Recreation and Athletics 



The outstanding student of the 
College of Health, Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation and Athletics 
is Allan Horner, a senior Physical 
Education major. 

To receive practical experience 
in his major, he has worked with 
the Nashville Sounds Baseball 
team three summers, and he is a 
student member of the Universi- 
ty Athletics Committee. 

He was chosen as the Out- 
standing Junior in Physical Edu- 
cation in 1985 and he was also 
awarded the Hood Hughes, Pres- 
nell Scholarship Award the same 
year. 

Horner is also a member of 
Kappa Alpha order Fraternity 
and the Student Association at 
the University. 




126 Academics/Organizations 




Truett Ricks, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Law Enforcement, cen- 
tered his college's goals for the 
coming years mainly on recruit- 
ment of students. He would like 
to expand recruiting in Ohio, 
Tennessee, and Kentucky, and he 
would also like to have graduates 
assist in representing the Univer- 
sity in high school career days in 
their hometowns. He would also 
like to formalize relationships 
with community colleges so that 
they can assist in recruiting. As 
far as Ricks' goals in teaching, he 
would like to assist the faculty in 
obtaining resources so that they 
can be more involved in research 
and service. Ricks feels that the 
college has been a success so far 
mainly because the programs 



meet the needs of the students in 
the field and the faculty. He be- 
lieves that the colleges' good 
reputation comes from the qual- 
ity of the faculty and the success 
of graduates after they go into 
the field. 

His spare time, when not at 
home with his family, is spent 
doing outside consulting work 
and attending Eastern football 
games. 

He is originally from Bolivar, 
Louisiana, and he was employed 
by the University in January 
1972 and he became Dean-Pro- 
fessor of Police Administration 
in June 1983. Today Ricks is 
working hard to make the Col- 
lege of Law Enforcement the best 
for those interested in the field. 



College of Law Enforcement 




The outstanding student in 
the College of Law Enforcement 
was senior Catherine Moore. She 
received a double major in Psy- 
chology and Corrections. 

Moore was a member of Psi 
Chi, an honorary society for Psy- 
chology majors, and she was 
nominated for Who's Who 
among students in American 
Universities and College and for 
Outstanding College Woman. 

Moore was also involved in 
the Greek program at the Uni- 
versity. She was president of 
Kappa Alpha Theta sorority and 
served on the Greek Week and 
Greek Leadership Committees. 



Academics /Organizations 127 



Since his wife, Betty, teaches 
science in a Madison County- 
middle school, the sciences seem 
to be a major interest in the fam- 
ily of Donald Batch, Dean of the 
College of Natural and Math- 
ematical Sciences. Originally 
from Springfield, Illinois, Batch 
has filled the position of Dean 
since 1979. 

He feels getting more financial 
support would be an improve- 
ment in the College because this 
would allow higher faculty sala- 
ries and development, as well as 
better equipment. Batch said 
their goals for the year included 
maintaining the current aca- 
demic courses and programs and 
the current academic advising 
courses. 




The three strongest points of 
the College are, according to the 
Dean, having the best academi- 
cally prepared students at the 
University, a highly qualified 
and dedicated faculty and good 
courses and program offerings. 

When asked what he enjoys 
about Eastern, Batch responded 
by saying, "my association with 
students and the faculty." He 
added that he also enjoys inter- 
and intra-personal relationships 
in the academic community. 

Batch attended Illinois College 
where he received his B.S. and 
Masters. He received his Ph.D 
from the University of Illinois 
and came to the University in 
1965. 



College of Natural 
and Mathematical Sciences 



Donna Lambers, senior Biol- 
ogy major, was selected as the 
outstanding student of the Col- 
lege of Natural and Mathemat- 
ical Sciences. 

She received several honors at 
the University including Out- 
standing Freshman in Biology, 
Outstanding sophomore in 
Chemistry, Dean's List, Dean's 
Award, and Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universi- 
ties and Colleges. 

She was vice-president of Stu- 
dent Association and Senate and 
seved on the Parish council of 
the Catholic Newman Center. 




128 Academics/Organizations 



Originally from El Paso, Texas, 
and reared in Los Crusus, New 
Mexico, Russell Enzie has been 
the Dean of the College of Social 
and Behavioral Sciences for sev- 
en years. He and his wife, Nancy 
have a daughter named Julie, 
who is a graduate student at 
Morehead. 

According to Enzie, the goals 
for his college this year were: 1) 
to provide the highest quality in- 
struction possible to the stu- 
dents, 2) to provide high quality 
programs for general education 
and specialized courses, and 3) to 
improve teaching effectiveness 
and advising system. 

Enzie feels the dedicated and 



highly qualified faculty is a ma- 
jor strong point of his college. He 
added that working with the 
people is one of the things he 
enjoys most about working at the 
University. 




College of 
Social and Behavioral Sciences 




Kimberly Goodman, a senior 
psychology major, was chosen as 
the outstanding student of the 
College of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences. 

Goodman was a member of 
several honor societies at the 
University including Phi Theta 
Kappa Honor Society, Psi Chi 
Honor Society and Mortar Board. 
She was also in Who's Who 
Among Students in American 
Colleges and Universities. 

She was a member of the 
Kappa Delta Sorority and re- 
ceived the Kappa Delta Aca- 
demic Award in the fall of 1985. 



Academics /Organizations 129 



College of Allied Health and Nursing • College of Applied Arts and Technology • College of Arts an< 







Colleges: Diverse Yet Unified 



The University as one unit is 
composed of several parts that 
together make it into a strong 
and undivided university. The 
nine different colleges work sep- 
arately, but together, to create an 
appropriate curriculum for the 
students and an enjoyable envi- 
ronment for both the faculty and 
students. 



The College of Allied Health 
and Nursing offers educational 
opportunities in a variety of dis- 
ciplines which are concerned 
with the maintenance and pro- 
motion of health. The students 
are required to take courses in the 
biological, social, and physical 
sciences. 

The College offers Bachelor of 



Science degrees in environmen- 
tal health science, health record 
administration, medical technol- 
ogy, nursing, and occupational 
therapy. 

The College of Applied Arts 
and Technology offers a variety 
of degrees in four departments: 
Agriculture, Home Economics, 
Industrial Education and Tech- 



College of Arts and Humanities • College of Business • College of Education • College of Health, Physica 



130 Academics/Organizations 



Humanities • College of Business • College of Education • College of Health, Physical Education, 




Opposite Page: In fire prevention and control, hands-on-experience 
with equipment prepares students for fire safety. Left: Students learn 
to use various types of equipment in geology class. Below: With super- 
vision, these students examine different models of skulls. 

Photos By Paul Lambert 




nology, and Mass Communica- 
tions. The Department of Military 
Science is also included in this Col- 
lege. 

The College offers a large num- 
ber of extended campus classes and 
encourages its faculty to provide 
consultative services for the public 
good. The College is also engaged 
in special projects and provides ser- 
vices for the public in applied arts 
and technologies. 

The purpose of the College of 
Arts and Humanities is to pro- 



vide for all students the artistic 
and humanistic elements of a lib- 
eral education. It provides stu- 
dents with courses to help them 
gain an understanding of what it 
means to be human and the 
skills to express that understand- 
ing. 

The College offers the follow- 
ing degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Fine Arts, Music, Music Educa- 
tion, and Individualized Studies. 
The Bachelor of Arts is granted to 
students who major in art, Eng- 



lish, French, German, Ibero- 
American Studies, music, philos- 
ophy, religion, Russian, Spanish, 
speech, speech and theatre arts, 
speech communication and hu- 
man relations, and theatre arts. 
Students in art and performing 
arts may work towards the Bach- 
elor of Fine Arts degree. 

The programs in the College of 
Business are designed to provide 
professional education for ca- 
reers in business. The Bachelor of 
Business Administration is of- 



Education, Recreation and Athletics • College of Law Enforcement • College of Natural and Mathematical 



Academics /Organizations 131 



Recreation and Athletics • College of Law Enforcement • College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences • 



fered in the areas of accounting, 
coal mining administration, in- 
surance, management, market- 
ing, office administration, real 
estate, and transportation and 
physical distribution. 

The preparation of teachers 
has been a strong priority at the 
University since it was founded 
and the College of Education 
continues to a be strong and com- 
mitted part of the University 
Teacher education is viewed as 
an all-university function, but 
the programs of elementary edu- 
cation, library science, rehabilita- 
tion education, special educa- 
tion, and communication disor- 
ders are located and advised in 
the College of Education. Secon- 
dary teaching programs are lo- 
cated in their respective colleges. 

The College of Health, Phys- 
ical Education, Recreation and 
Athletics prepares professionals 
in the areas of leisure, recreation 
alternatives, fitness and health- 
ful living, which are major con- 
cerns in today's society. The Col- 
lege gives emphasis to the hu- 
man factors involved in 
movement, mental and physical 
well-being, leisure, and skilled 
motor performance. 

The College offers Bachelor 
degrees in health education, 
physical education, and recrea- 
tion and park administration. 

The College of Law Enforce- 
ment was founded to fulfill the 
threefold purpose of the Univer- 














sity — teaching, service, and re- 
search. The College is composed 
of the Department of Correction- 
al Services, the Department of 
Fire Prevention and Control, the 
Department of Police Adminis- 
tration, the Department of Secu- 
rity, and the Traffic Safety Insti- 
tute. 

The College offers baccalauer- 
ate degrees in corrections, fire 
prevention and control, forensic 
science, police administration, 
and security. 

The College of Natural and 
Mathematical Sciences offers the 
Bachelor of Arts to students who 
major in chemistry and geology, 
the Bachelor of Science to stu- 
dents who major in biology, 
chemistry, computer science, 
earth science, environmental re- 
sources, fisheries management, 
geology, mathematics, microbi- 
ology, physics, statistics, and 




Sciences • College of Social and Behavioral Sciences • College of Allied Health and Nursing • College of Applied 



132 Academics/Organizations 



College of Social and Behavioral Sciences • College of Allied Health and Nursing • College of Applied 






Opposite Page: In geology class, students study minerals and rocks 
and geological processes. Top: One requirement for a Home Eco- 
nomics major is clothing construction and design. Above: The in- 
structor is illustrating the variations in the chart of the 1980 Census 
data. Left: Baccalaureate nursing students demonstrate how to 
make a hospital bed without disturbing the patient. 

Photos By Paul Lambert 



Arts and Technology • College of Arts and Humanities • College of Business • College of Education • College of 



Academics /Organizations 133 



Arts and Technology • College of Arts and Humanities • College of Business • College of Education 





Above: Providing students with administrative 
counseling and educational studies is an impor- 
tant aspect of the College of Education. Top Right: 
Dr. Michael Bright lectures about English princi- 
ples. Right: Students gain practical experience in 
theatrical set reproduction in the College of Arts 
and Humanities. 

Photos Bv Paul Lambert 




Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics • College of Law Enforcement • College of Natural an< 



134 Academics/Organizations 



• College of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics • College of Law Enforcement 




Left: Law Enforcement students learn to do 
blood typing in criminalistics lab. Below: In 
the College of Health, Physical Education, Re- 
creation and Athletics, students choose a vari- 
ety of physical education classes. One class that 
is offered in the Begley Building is gymnastics. 




wildlife management. They also 
offer the Bachelor of Individual- 
ized Studies. 

The College of Social and Be- 
havioral Sciences is concerned 
with mankind's social, political, 
economic, and physiological de- 
velopment. Their focus is on the 
various peoples of the world and 



their histories, cultures, physical 
environments, and problems. 

The College consists of six aca- 
demic departments: Geography 
and Planning, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, Social Sci- 
ence, and Anthropology, Sociolo- 
gy and Social Work. 

The University offers a wide 



variety of programs which are 
recognized throughout the state. 
The nine colleges which com- 
prise the University set individ- 
ual goals to work for the better- 
ment of their college and the 
University as a whole. 



Mathematical Sciences • College of Social and Behavioral Sciences • College of Allied Health and Nursing 



Academics /Organizations 135 



Alpha Epsilon Rho 
Broadcasting Honorary 

FRONT ROW: David Jones. Pre* .: Kelli Gast, Act., Joy 
Howard V.P. SECOND ROW: Cindy Meholovitch. 
MeiindaEmrick. Sec.: Scott Ford. Dana Kidwell. Elissa 
Biley. THIRD ROW: Sherri Cheek. Samantha 
Rouezon, kathy Stone. Sherry Higgins. Greg Ouss. 
Denis Gravely. Treas. 



Alpha Phi Sigma 

Criminal Justice 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Amy DeCamp. V.P.; Douglas Skinner. 
Pres ..- Carol Taylor, Treas.; Steve Suhr, Sec SECOND 
ROW: Annis Crabtree. Paul Schmuck, Steve 
kalinchak. Myra Rayburn, Robert Stack. THIRD 
ROW: Bruce Baisden. Bill Kayatin. Robert Kain, 
Samuel Mason. Mittie Southerland. Adv. 



Delta Omicron 
Music Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Carolyn Rogers. Dana Kidwell. Karla 
Hmkle. Pres ; Shelly Victor. Beth Zirnheld SECOND 
ROW: Lilla Durham. Jennifer Moon, Treas., Pam 
Hunt, Elaine Mullins, Sec ; Kimberly Volk, Lesa 
Kidwell THIRD ROW: Sandra Bass, Diane 
Thornton, Kathi Keeney. Verda Tudor, Timothy Byrns, 
Candace Ralenkotter. Peter Sour FOURTH ROW: 
Robert Mitchell, Edward Johnson, Robin Livezey, 
Rachel Taylor. Jenny Cauhorn, Mitchell Ruth, Bob 
Paugh. Bill Boyd. 



Delta Sigma Rho 
Communication Honorary 

ll-Rl Robert Bell, Scott Blakely, Lisa Higgins, Pres., 
Rosa McCormack. VP 



136 Academic9/Organizations 




This is a story of an invest- 
ment — an investment of time, 
talent and energy Like in any 
other investment, a return is ex- 
pected. 

For Dr. Charles Sweet and Dr. 
Harold Blythe, professors of Eng- 
lish at the University, the gain on 
their investment is profitable. 

Doctors Sweet and Blythe are 
writers — writers of mystery. 
They have been ghost writers for 
three years, writing under an as- 
sumed name. 

The two started by playing 
doubles tennis together. After 
writing education tapes together, 
they decided to combine their 
talents and write a book. This 
first book took nine months to 
complete and is now being read 
by a publishing company 

The ideas for their stories 
come from the many books they 
have read and from the conversa- 
tions that have taken place over 
coffee and doughnuts at a local 
McDonalds. The two have met 
for long lunch breaks so often 





McDonald's 

Produces Novel Discussions 



that their special reserved booth 
has been dedicated to them. A 
picture of the two men and a 
plaque hang over the booth. 

The two often become so ab- 
sorbed in their work that they 
forget their surroundings. 
"Sometimes we get on a roll and 
my wife will be talking to me; I 



never hear a word she says," 
Sweet said. 

There are many reasons why 
the men write these books. Writ- 
ing has become a hobby for 
them. "It's something I just like 
doing/' Sweet said. They do it for 
fun and also as a source of sup- 
plemental income. "We've been 



earning such an income that we 
have to get H&R Block to fill out 
our taxes," said Sweet. 

The two men are not limited to 
their teaching professions. Their 
investment of time and energy 
has produced one novel and 
hopefully more successful ven- 
tures in the future. 




Left: Doctors Sweet and Blythe have spent 
many hours of collaboration in this booth at 
McDonalds, a booth which is dedicated to their 
enduring patronage. Below: A public question- 
/answer session was held by Blythe and Sweet 
to discuss their latest book. It was attended by 
faculty, students, and Richmond residents. 




c 
o 

D. 
S 

o 

A 
H 



Academics /Organizations 137 







Mentor Program 

Making Friends and Helping Others 



The Mentor Program provides 
a chance for incoming students 
to take advantage of opportuni- 
ties available to them at the Uni- 
versity. 

Mentor, an organization run 



by students, was started in the 
fall of 1984 and has grown con- 
siderably since then. 

"This year we have 77 mentors 
and about 200 freshmen in- 
volved in the program," said Joe 



Kappes, director of the program. 
"Next year we want to work 
more on recruitment by provid- 
ing information about the pro- 
gram during summer orienta- 
tion," he said. 




138 Academics/Organizations 



"Our main purpose is to wel- 
come the freshmen to campus 
and help them to get involved 
with activities before boredom 
and apathy set in," said Kappes. 

"The organization gives the 
new student group support and 
personal attention when he 
needs it most. Since the program 
is optional, the mentor can pro- 
vide as much or as little help as 
the new student needs," said 
Teressa Renner, a mentor. 

The groups, made up of one 
veteran student and two or three 
freshmen, are matched up ac- 
cording to similar interests. The 
veteran student does not act as 
an authoritative figure, but rath- 
er as a resource and friend. 

Even when a mentor may not 
be able to help you directly, he 
can introduce you to someone 
who can. 

Academic help, financial help, 
professional counseling, social 
opportunities, job availability 
and health care are all services 
that Mentor can help with. 

But, perhaps most important- 
.ly, a mentor can be a friend when 
things get rough. 



Left: Students support each other by helping 
each other and being their friend. 




Delta Tau Alpha 
Agriculture Honorary 



FRONT ROW: Terrell Medley. Man Miles. Pres., Ver- 
non Shackelford, Robert Zielinski. SECOND ROW: 
Dwight Barkley, Adv., Tim Mink, Treas., Edwark Whi- 
taker. Sec: Deborah Ball. V.P; Jill Mann. 



Gamma Beta Phi 
Honorary Society 



FRONT ROW: Amy O'Daniel, V.P: Amy DeCamp, 
Pres.,- Joni Naiser. SECOND ROW: Ruth Strohmeier. 
Tammy Damron, Eileen McCarthy, Florence Dolin. 
THIRD ROW: Susan Denney, Tamara Murphy, Tracy 
Hobbs, Tracy Powell. 



Kappa Delta Pi 

Education Honorary 



FRONT ROW: Dr. Glynn Creamer, Adv.; Susan Mar- 
tin, Pres.; Jennifer Ellis, V.P.; Tina Tingle, Treas.; Tracy 
Powell, Sec.; Heidi Lose, Marci Strange, Dr Roberta 
Hendricks, Adv. SECOND ROW: Sandra Knauer, An- 
nette Cowden, Allison Harrop, Sheila Mullins, Deb- 
orah Mercer, Connie McCoy. THIRD ROW: Karen 
Ball, Susan Edwards, Mary-Anne Witten, Jodee Dyer, 
Toni French. FOURTH ROW: Joni Naiser, Ann Bown- 
ing, Carla Wells, Annette Gevedon, Hanners Geve- 
don. 



Kappa Mil Epsilon 
Math Honorary 



FRONT ROW: Jackie Back. Dana Baxter, John Carroll, 
Lorie Barker. SECOND ROW: Patrick Costello, Facul- 
ty Adv.; Karen Cardwell, Teri Terrell. Mike Strange, 
Scott Taylor. THIRD ROW: Brenda McCool. Michelle 
Drewes, Jill Blair, Becky Lane, April Rader, Fran Gard- 
ner. FOURTH ROW: Tim Daniel, Rodney Buis.Mark 
Tussey, Ted Averbeck, Arthur Crawford. Paulerte Wil- 
son. 



Academics/Organizations 139 



Lambda Sigma 

Sophomore Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Julie Baumann, Jenny Grace, Charla 
Buschelman. Karen Gaines, Carol Durham. Treas.; 
Krista Gellart, Pres.; Shelley Roser. VP; Martha 
Kinkec Sec.; Melissa Galloway. Delinda Douglas. 
SECOND ROW: Serena Head. Alice York, Tamara 
Murphv, Lisa McGowan. Jill Blair. Karen Stanley. 
Teressa Renner. Ellen Strange, Ron Wolfe, Faculty 
Adv THIRD ROW: Donna Schuh, Dorothy Wigger, 
Debbie Scheer. Wanda Daugherty. Barry Sutherland, 
Libby Williamson. Pam Woltenberg, Colleen Moran. 
David Bryant FOURTH ROW: Adnenne Cole, Annis 
Crabtree. Sr. Adv.; Amy DeCamp, Jr. Adv.; Ellen 
Hancock. Sr. Adv., Susan Mitchell. Sr. Adv.; Kelley 
Cline, Gregory Simpson, Jr. Adv. 



Mortar Board 
Senior Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Kimberly Goodman, Andrew Neville. 
Shelly South. Pres.; Julie Burt. VP. Donna Buckman. 
Sec.. Susan Mitchell. Mary Miller. Treas SECOND 
ROW: Terri Womer. Dianne Storey. Dana Kidwell, 
Robin Gamett. Lisa Frye. Shelia Smith. THIRD ROW: 
Amv Scharringhausen. Susan Martin. Pamela Baker. 
Debra Rose. Katie Kordwitz. Julia Maeder. FOURTH 
ROW: Bobbi Brennan. Julie Baldwin, Dr. Martha 
Conawav. Sr. Adv.; Ellen Hancock. Hau-Yin Cheng. 



Phi Alpha Theta 
History Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Wendell Hamm. Elizabeth Crawford. 
Erin Combs, lanet White. Terri Arthur SECOND 
ROW: Bobby Harmond. Pres.; Kenneth Buckle, John 
Benge. Charlie Phans. Mark Beasley, VP 



Phi Epsilon Kappa 

Physical Education 

Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Robin Mullins. Stephanie Domanico. 
Patti Miller. Pres SECOND ROW: Hal Holmes. 
Faculty Adv, Dana Elliott, Karen Stayton, David 
Faulkner THIRD ROW: Lee Creynolds. Monica 
Storz, Dan Lichty. Faculty Adv 



140 Academics/Organizations 




From grammar school on, the 
message has always been clear: 
in the world of academics, it pays 
to get A's. In today's competitive 
world, a high grade point aver- 
age has become increasingly im- 
portant in helping a college grad- 
uate land a good job. 

"Grades are not the only thing 
that an employer looks for when 
hiring someone, but good grades 
will often help you get your foot 
in the door to get an interview," 
said Dr. Bertee Adkins, Associate 
Professor of Business Education 
and Office Administration. 

However, a high GPA doesn't 
always ensure a person the job. 
"It will get you the interview, but 
then you have to prove your- 
self," said Adkins. "You have to 
show the company that there is 
something special about you, 
and you have something unique 
to offer the company." 

Another important factor for 
the graduate is proving that he 
has human skills to the employ- 
er. "Just because you have a 4.0 
doesn't mean you can relate well 
to the public," said Adkins. "You 
have to show them you've 
learned something about life 
while maintaining a high GPA." 

A study published in the Jour- 
nal of College Placement (JCP) in 
1981 showed that recruiters val- 
ued a person's communication 
skills, clarity of career goals, con- 
fidence and assertiveness a great 
deal more than grades when it 
came to making a final hiring de- 
cision. 

On the other hand, just be- 
cause a person has bad grades 
doesn't mean he won't be able to 
get a good job. The main problem 
is getting the company to grant 
him an interview because re- 
search has shown that nine times 
out of ten, grades still determine 
whether a person is given a first 
interview with a company. 



Students Benefit From 
Successful Upgrading 




Once a person with bad grades 
is given an interview, he has the 
chance to prove himself. "A lot of 
times students with bad grades 
have the ability to apply what 
they have learned better than 
someone with good grades," said 
Adkins. 

Another way to downplay bad 
grades is by gaining experience 
in jobs dealing with their field of 
study. Some job markets, such as 
broadcasting, journalism and 
public relations, stress experi- 



ence as a main factor in being 
considered for a job. Other fields 
are less influenced by experi- 
ence. "Some companies want 
you to have established a good 
basis on which to learn what 
they want to teach you. They 
prefer that you have no experi- 
ence in case you have learned to 
do things the wrong way. Then 
they can train you their way," 
said Atkins. 

Another way of downplaying 
bad grades is to have a break- 



Practical experience helps students in certain 
areas of study to receive a better job. Alan 
White edits the University paper, The Pro- 
gress, to receive experience for his journalism 
career. 



down of the GPA into separate 
semesters. Then if the student 
had a bad freshman year and im- 
proved over the next three years, 
the employer could see that the 
student had a "change of heart or 
goals," according to Adkins. A 
smart employer probes the 
grades and determines if pro- 



Academics/Organizations 141 



Upgrading cont. 

gress was made over each semes- 
ter, or if the student had to work 
40 or 50 hours a week to pay for 
school. These factors might affect 
the employer's decision. 

Some students don't under- 
stand the significance of obtain- 
ing a high GPA. "I think the 



freshmen should be counseled 
about how important it is to get 
good grades," said Adkins. "They 
have to realize that the reason 
they're in school is to prepare 
themselves for a career." 

Adkins believes that the most 
important quality a student can 



possess to enable him to get a 
good GPA and a good job is a 
positive attitude and the willing- 
ness to work. "I think if a student 
possesses these virtues, then ev- 
erything else will fall into place." 



Top Majors At The 
University 



Major Enrollment 


Police Administration 


406 


Elementary Education 


306 


Computer Science 


285 


Pre-Accounting 


275 


Pre-Baccalaureate Nursing 


272 


Pre-General Business 


208 


Pre-Pharmacy 


188 


Nursing, Baccalaureate 


184 


General Psychology 


173 


Broadcasting 


172 


2 year Pre-Associate Nursing 


169 




142 Academics/Organizations 




Phi Mu Alpha 
Music Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Douglas Lloyd, David Alexander 
SECOND ROW: Greg Robinson, Jeff Byrd, Dan 
Duncan, Faculty Adv THIRD ROW: Tom Mueller. 
V.P; Scot! Tomlison, Sec; Dan Bisig, Scolt Reese 
FOURTH ROW: Chris Reineke, Treas.; Chris 
Simonsen, Jeff Rogers, Mark Stepp, Pres.; Tim Hart. 



Phi Upsilon Omicron 
Home Economics Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Denise Pyles, Mary Lynn Sturgill, 
Pres., Peggy Moore, Linda Sherman, VP SECOND 
ROW: Cheryl Vocum, Jernlvun Barnett, Missy 
Danzinger, Colleen Russell, Susan Greer, Treas. 
THIRD ROW: Renee Wolfe, Denise Laduke, Beth Von 
Mohr, Susan Skarbowski, Wanda Lee. 



Pi Omega Pi 

Business Education 

Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Dr. Myrena Jennings, Adv., Cindy 
Stringer, Ellisa Wuilleumier SECOND ROW: Dr. 
Janna Vice, Adv., Denise Brothers. THIRD ROW: 
Jamie Hopkins, Pres. 



\ I i 




Society of 

Manufacturing 

Engineers 

FRONT ROW: Richard Harp, Greg Smith SECOND 
ROW: Don Ward. Marianne Waterman. Chairperson, 
Dr. Raj Chowdhury. Faculty Adv.; Mike Ritter THIRD 
ROW: Dr. Clyde Craft, Dr James Masterson. Dr. Dan 
Torbett. FOURTH ROW: Dr Hugh Cillihand. Dr. 
John Jenkins. 



Academics/Organizations 143 



Psi Chi 

Psychology Honorary 



FRONT ROW: kimberly Goodman, Trea*.; Christo- 
pher Fowler. Pres ludy Kaelin. Sec.: Robert Kramp. 
VJR SECOND ROW: Connie Mason, Anders Peder- 
sen. Bill Meyer Rhonda York. THIRD ROW: William 
Uatkins. Faculty Adv. Robin Gamett. Teresa Byrnside. 
Tanya Cheatham, John Cutright. 



Scabbard and Blade 
Military Science Honorary 

FRONT ROW: DeWavne Brewer. Wayne Eccles. Timo- 
thy Snvder. David Scott. John Laswell. SECOND 
ROW: Ron Scott. John Minogue, Michelle Berry. 
THIRD ROW: Dennis Daniels. Darrell Brimberry, Da- 
vid Cannon FOURTH ROW: Jim Rainey, James Rose, 
|im Simpson. 



Sigma Tau Delta 
English Honorary 



FRONT ROW: Richard Myers. VP: T Elaine Baker, 
Joseph Powell, Pres,; Mary Bucher. VP SECOND 
ROW: Sara Klisz, Elesha Pennington, Sec/Treas.. 
Diane Thornton, Dorothy Sutton, Faculty Adv. 
TH1RD ROW: Cecilia Crosby, Elizabeth Crawford, 
Harry Brown, Faculty Adv. 



Sigma Tau Pi 
Business Honorary 



FRONT ROW: Darlene Adams. Treas , Melba Vaughn, 
VP, Michelle Swiney, Tom Sheets, Pres., Janne Sasser 
SECOND ROW: Janet Deaton. Hau-Yin Cheng. Jan- 
ene Wiley, Penny Snowden, Kim Davis THIRD 
ROW: Sonya Fuller, Bobbi Brennan, Jolene Wiley, Val- 
erie Caudill, Lisa Price, Michelle OBryan FOURTH 
ROW: Thomas Maeberlin, Sara Sayers, Timothy Mill- 
er, Kurt Cieble. Paul Dean 



144 Academics/Organizations 




The interview has become the 
most important factor in the job 
search, so much emphasis has 
been placed on helping students 
at the University prepare them- 
selves for it. 

"It's very important that when 
you go in for an interview and 
make a first impression, that it's a 
good one," said Laura Melius, 
placement coordinator at the Ca- 
reer Development and Place- 
ment Center at the University. 

The job market has become so 
competitive that the employers 
have begun to place more em- 
phasis on the interview Very few 
employees will hire a person 
sight unseen because they are 
looking for the whole individual, 
not just someone who has the 
knowledge. 

Melius and other members of 
CD&P give students advice 
while explaining the interview- 
ing process to them. "The most 
important thing is to make sure 
you're well prepared before go- 
ing to the interview," said Melius. 
"This includes knowing yourself 
and what skills you have to offer 
the organization and also know- 
ing the organization." 



Right: Senior Jimmy Woods prepares for job 
searching while receiving assistance from 
C.D.&P. 



Career Development and Placement 

Center Helps Students Prepare 

For Their Job Search 



Another necessity is to have 
concrete examples of your skills. 
"It's not enough to say you're or- 
ganized," said Melius. "You have 
to be able to tell them the clubs 
you were in and the jobs you 
held while working to receive 



your degree." 

Another important require- 
ment of an interview is to pre- 
sent yourself professionally. In a 
list of reasons employers gave for 
rejecting applicants during the 
interview the number one rea- 



son was poor personal appear- 
ance. This is stressed in CD&P's 
interview seminars. They note 
the importance of maintaining a 
conservative appearance in one's 
actions, hairstyles, jewelry and 
clothing, (cont.) 




Academics/Organizations 145 



Occupation 


Percentage Change 
In Employment 


Employment Growth 


Computer Service 
Technicians 


97% 


Much faster than average as 
more computer equipment is 
used 


. ,'v Legal Assistants 


94% 


Much faster than average as 
the use of legal assistants to 
aid lawyers increases 


"„v Computer Systems 
1 Analysts 


85% 


Much faster than average as 
computer capabilities are in- 
creased and computers are 
used to solve a greater variety 
of programs 


Tool programmers, 
Numerical Control 


78% 


Much faster than average due 
to increased use of automated 
machinery 


Computer Programmers 


77% 


Much faster than average as 
computer usage expands 


Office Machine 
r Repairers 


72% 


Much faster than average as 
the number of machines in- 
creases 


Electrical Engineers 


65% 


Much faster than average due 
to growing demand for com- 
puters 


9 Electrical and 

Electronics Technicians 


61% 


Much faster than average due 
to increased demand for com- 
puters 


Occupational Therapists 


60% 


Much faster than average due 
to rapidly growing demand 
for rehabilitation services 


Health Service 
Administrators 


58% 


Much faster than average as 
health industry expands 








146 Academics/Organizations 



Careers cont. 

Other top reasons for rejection 
include nervousness, the failure to 
look the interviewer in the eye, 
and a limp, fishy handshake. 

The advice the directors of 
CD&P give are beneficial to the 
students at the University "She 
gave me an idea of what to expect 
in an interview and I learned how 
to better prepare myself," said Lori 
Coleman, senior sociology major 
from Frankfort. 

"I didn't know there was so 
much involved in an interview," 
said Rebecca Smith, sophomore 
interior design major from South 
Shore. "Now I know you have to 
be careful about everything from 
the length of your skirt to the 
way you shake the employer's 
hand." 

So, learning to prepare oneself 
for an interview is important 
and could be a deciding factor in 
helping one get a job. 




Alpha Eta Rho 

FRONT ROW: Samuel Mason, Pres .; Theresa Daugh- 
erty. Sec, Brenda Rice, VP. A L Embry, Treas SEC- 
OND ROW: DuWayne Davidson, Eric Fuson. Steven 
Amundson THIRD ROW: Sieve Robinson, Elmer 
Bontrager, Larua Shircliff. DeWayne Baker FOURTH 
ROW: Dr William Walker, Sponsor, Floyd Wrenn, Eric 
Johnson, James Anderson, Stephen Sims. 



Accounting Club 



FRONT ROW: Lisa Frye, Cynthia Tudor, Karen Mat- 
thews. Shauna Van Pelt, Pres.; Susan Grififth. VP: Lisa 
Hart, Sec , Kurt Giebel. Treas SECOND ROW: Melis- 
sa Coleman, Melba Vaughn, Kim Davis- Michelle 
Swiney, LaDonna Wells, Ruth Strohmeier, Darlene 
Adams, THIRD ROW: Donald Wiley, Tracy Hobbs, 
Bobbi Brennan, Janne Sasser, Lisa Price, Toni Sheets, 
Patricia Boothe, FOURTH ROW: Ken Griffith. Faculty 
Adv., Neil Thompson, Dana Overall, Paul Dean. Billv 
Thompson, Craig Dundon, Mark Turpin, Glenn Gen- 
try. 



Agriculture Club 



FRONT ROW: Matthew Miles, V.P.; Tim Kollenberg. 
Pres.; Daryl Morris; Clark Jackson, Treas.; Dr. Michael 
Wilson, Adv. SECOND ROW: Terrell Medley. Edward 
Whitaker, Joanne Fay, Jackie Edmor.dson THIRD 
ROW: Dwayne Duncan, Tommy Jackson, DaveFeders, 
Roger Ogburn. Kari Higgms. FOURTH ROW: Mike 
Kuchenbrod, Brent Muncy, Joseph Jansen, Mike Say- 
lors, Debbie Ball. 



American Advertising 
Federation 



FRONT ROW: Lisa Cofer, Sec ; Jennifer Leinweber. 
Pres SECOND ROW: Mark Gailey. Treas, David 
Jones, Jessica Taul. 



Academics/Organizations 147 



American Marketing 
Association 



FRONT ROW: Teresa Weaver, Sec.; Mia Bisig, Pres.; 
Teresa Sammons. VP; Ellen Wessels, Treas.; Rebecca 
Greer SECOND ROW: Krista Welsh. Jodi Watters. 
Karia leiterson. Jim Rogers, Dr. S.J. Garnet Adv. 
THIRD ROW: Steve Wright. Tim Miller. Scott Lo- 
haugh. John Sandman, Monica Francis. FOURTH 
ROW: Rick Branham. Chuck Preston. Doug Powell, 
Dewayne Biddy, Mark Stringer. 



American Society of 
Interior Designers 



FRONT ROW: Elizabeth Seidel, Carter Northcutt, 
VHi Wanda Lee, Pies.; Susan Sfcarbowski, Treas.; Linda 
Eckert. Tammy Brown. SECOND ROW: Debbra Ste- 
vens, Stacy Patterson, Melodee Franklin, Beth von 
Mohr, Missy Danzinger, Susan Lazenby THIRD 
ROW: Tun Thiersch, Debbie Keliey, Charlotte Get- 
man. Becky Hicks, Greg Johnson. Margaret Hensel. 



Association of 
Computer Machinery 



FRONT ROW: Ron Hart. Pres.; Brad Meuth, Treas.; 
Ruth Aylor. Sec.; Scott Taylor. Joe Langdon. SECOND 
ROW: Robert McCool, VP; Rose Hoskins, Janet Jones, 
Wally Siddiqui. Avery Muliins. THIRD ROW: Brenda 
McCool, Lawrence Walker, Paul Oligee. 



Association of 
Law Enforcement 



FRONT ROW: Kathleen Matthews, Carol Taylor, 
Trea».; Charlie Swmey, Andy Bethard, VP; Kathy Hig- 
gins. Pres.; Carlos Flores, Susan Morrissey. SECOND 
ROW: Kathy Calhoun, Cynthia Morrow, Sonja Burke, 
Steve Suhr, Sec. Myra Raybum, Pam Brown, Carme- 
lita Kidd. THIRD ROW: Samuel Mason, Thomas 
Webster, Alan Hall, Mark Wickersham, Cheryl Bray, 
Deborah Miller FOURTH ROW: Tony Embry, Carl 
Bee, Todd Hume, George Weimann, Michael Darst, 
Jim Gibson, Timothy Roberts, John Yarberry. 



148 Academics/Organiztions 




Along with the emergence of 
the goal-oriented student at the 
University has come the increas- 
ing number of professional orga- 
nizations to help students learn 
more about their areas of study. 

"I think the idea behind these 
clubs is awareness," said senior 
Brenda Peter, member of the Tex- 
tiles, Clothing and Fashion Club. 
"Students want to find out what 
their degree will enable them to 
do, and they want to meet people 




Organizations Heighten Career Awareness 



who work in the field." 

The various professional 
groups on campus give students 
these opportunities by providing 
field trips, seminars, speakers, 
newsletters, and chances for ac- 
tual participation. 

The Accounting Club helps its 
students in many ways, accord- 
ing to Pres. Shauna VanPelt. The 
group visited accounting firms 
in Louisville and Cincinnati, and 
they also had presentations at 



their meetings from CPA's. Per- 
haps the most beneficial activity 
for them is the VITA (Voluntary 
Income Tax Assistance) program. 
"This is where we help the lower 
income people fill out their tax- 
es," said Van Pelt. "This is benefi- 
cial to the students and the com- 
munity." 

Another group which allows 
the students to have hands-on 
experience with their field of 
duty is the Public Relations Stu- 




dent Society of America 
(PRSSA). "We have a program 
entitled Pro-Am, where we 
spend the morning with profes- 
sionals and see what they do," 
said Pres. Patti Roper. They also 
participated in the Levi Strauss 
contest and the Bizarre Bazaar. 
"Working with the Bazaar gives 
students the opportunity to learn 
how to coordinate special events 
and that's an important part of 
PR," said Roper. 

These groups also give stu- 
dents the opportunity to get to 
know each other better, as well as 
the teachers within their depart- 
ment and professional contacts. 
The American Home Economics 
Association also provides its 
members with a magazine 
which helps them become more 
aware of job opportunities. "The 
main goal of our group is to pro- 
vide programs that will enlight- 
en students on what fields are 
available in that area," said Pres. 
Libby Searles. 

"I think these organizations 
are important for students," said 
Peter. "Members get the chance 
to see what it's really like out 
there in the big world. They can 
make sure that type of career is 
what they really want." 

The students don't always 
learn these things in class, so the 
development and growth of pro- 
fessional organizations has given 
them the opportunity to become 
more aware of what lies ahead of 
them when they start their ca- 
reer. 



Academics /Organizations 149 



Progress: 

For Students By Students 



Student Association 



Involvement. That's what Stu- 
dent Association is all about. The 
54 senators making up the group 
gain experience and responsibil- 
ity as they work to improve the 
University as well as the commu- 
nity. 

At the beginning of the school 
year, the students elected mem- 
bers of their colleges to make up 
the Student Senate. Each senator 
represented 150 students. An- 
other election was held at the be- 
ginning of the spring semester to 
fill the seats of those graduating 
or resigning senators. 

"Under the leadership of 
President Ken Kearns and Vice 
President Donna Lambers, the 
senate has made great progress 
this year," according to Senator 
Tammy Dietsch. 

"I think Ken and Donna have 
done a very good job," said Sena- 
tor Lisa Schmidt. "Ken has 
gained a lot of respect for the 
University and has represented 
us well at the various colleges he 
has visited around the state." 

This year the Student Associ- 
ation held their annual Fall Festi- 
val and Spring Expo. They also 
sponsored a Book Fair, in which 
the surplus books at the library 
were sold. The senators also at- 
tended The Rally for Higher 
Education in Frankfort. 



The senators are also members 
of various committees. "The 
committees offer each member 
the chance to work with others 
in a positive and productive 
manner for the school," said 
Dietsch. 



There's a lot of things that 
need to be improved on the Uni- 
versity's campus, according to 
Schmidt. The Senate has done a 
lot of work trying to improve 
these problems. Some of the leg- 
islation the group passed this 




150 Academics/Organizations 



year dealt with handicap access. 
They passed bills requiring a 
handrail be put on the ramp by 
the Wallace Building, and they 
also helped make the library 
more accessible for the handi- 
capped. 

The Senate also worked on im- 
proving the curriculum and safe- 
ty of the University. A bill was 
passed which set up guidelines 
for the Academic Orientation 
classes and they changed the fi- 
nal exam policy. Now if a student 
has three or more finals in one 
day, he can request that one be 
changed to another date. Finally, 
the group voted to make the 
street by Walters Hall a two-lane 
street rather than one-lane to 
solve the traffic problem. 

"I think these bills gave the 
Senate the opportunity to im- 
prove University life for the stu- 
dents," said Dietsch. 

These projects and others are 
among the many challenges 
faced by the Student Senate each 
year. "This year, I think the on- 
going challenge for the Senate 
has been increased awareness by 
the University Community," said 
Dietsch. "I do think Donna and 



Left: Student Association President, Ken 
Kearns speaks of a program in honor of M.L. 
King. 




BSNA 



FRONT ROW: Lesa W.msatt, Pres., Elena Wheallcy, 
VP; Sharon Smith, Treas., Debra Rose-, Sue Ellen Pohl- 
man. SECOND ROW: Martha Caprioli, Billie Van- 
Over, Cynthia Simmons, Mary Beth McAuliffe, Traci 
Masters, Debbie Morgan THIRD ROW: Kim Brewer, 
Debbie Hoying, Tammy Robinson, Jolene Horney, 
Kelly Daugherty, Joy Hagan, Cynthia Proctor. Anne 
Reckteneckeld FOURTH ROW: Betsy Cambron. 
Cheryl Lappin, Angie Bailey, Susan McLian. Kimber- 
ly Lake, Annette Marchal, Brenda Simon, Laura Mat- 
tingly. 



Barristers 



FRONT ROW: Greg Lay, VP; Steve Parsons, Pres 
SECOND ROW: Brent Patrick, Patty Patrick, Melissa 
Johnson, Claire Farley. THIRD ROW: Kenneth Buck- 
le, Kelly Hargadon, Kimberly Goodman, Terri Arthur, 
Steven McClain. 



Black Student Union 



FRONT ROW: Juan Mosby, Treas.; Jacqueline Combs, 
Sec.; Paula Garrett, VE; Karen Robinson, Austin Pur- 
sifull, Pres. SECOND ROW: Anna Combs, Melissa 
Hines, Kimberly Johnson, Roselyn Morris. THIRD 
ROW: William Robinson, Michael Eiam, Adv.; Kerwin 
Samuels, Jonathan Young, Timothy Crumble, Dione 
Johnson. 



Bowling Club 

FRONT ROW: Joy Garland. Robin Isaacs. Linda Ad- 
ams, Sherry Lakes. SECOND ROW: Rick Green, Leo 
Dyehouse, Coach; Kelley Ford, Pam Blakeney. THIRD 
ROW: Mickey Lacy, Mark Brewer, Mark Fyfe. Rod An- 
gel, Sec./Treas. FOURTH ROW: Brian Harden, John 
Poynter, Bill Slusher, VP; Perry Lipker. 



Academics/Organizations 151 






Caduceus 



FRONT ROW: Jetf Craig. Shantae Lucas. V.E. Tammv 
Gilbert, Pres.; Steve sfpple. Sec SECOND ROW: 
Cyndi Reusch, Rose Gilmore, Laura Hiers, Kelli Med- 
ley, Mike Sulkamp. THIRD ROW: John Greene. 
Treas.; Sherry Buskirk, Michael McKinney, Ronald 
Oafton. Daren Marionneaux FOURTH ROW: Dr. 
John Meisenheimet Adv.; Bill Durham. William Har- 
low. Derrick Singleton. 



Catalina Club 



FRONT ROW: Karen Olde, Carrie Sauer, Debra Tim- 
mons. SECOND ROW: Frances Houk, Julie Baumann, 
Sec.; Cindy Bonax Brenda Boucher. THIRD ROW: 
Connie Reece. Susan Wooten, CoLleen Moran, Lisa 
Arnold, Melinda Shields, Joe Brangers. FOURTH 
ROW: Elmer Bontrager, Lyn Bailey, Adv.; Beverly 
Kruer, Pres., Janet Clark, Scarlett Shumate. 



Christian Student 
Fellowship 

FRONT ROW: Joe Whitaker, Campus Minister; Jenny 
Wolfford. Renee Wolfe, Beth Hornbuckle, Susan Mar- 
tin, V.P., Jody McBride, Pres., Susan Spurr, Sec.; Don 
Wiley, Stephanie Grooms. SECOND ROW: Denise 
Lichty, Debbie Jett, Lorie Swanks, Melissa Coleman, 
Mary Martnez, Melanie Cummins, Sherry Gidley, 
Tom French, John Schneider, Dana Wahl, Denise Gray 
THIRD ROW: Kurt Giebel, Dave Oligee, Eric Lauter- 
wasser. Damn Turpin, Rick Bowden, Rebekah Ray, 
Sandra Kinder, Jennifer Neat. James Inman, Lori 
Fritz. FOURTH ROW: Robert McCool, Brenda 
McCool. William Sutton, Mark Turpin, Andy Hender- 
son, David Wiese, David Jackson, Amy Bright, Robin 
Storms, Tracie Jackson, Susan McGuire. 



D.P.M.A. 



FRONT ROW: Sonya Fuller, Sec ; Mark O'Daniel, 
Pre*.; Mark Read, VP; Patti Etherington, Treas.; Joseph 
R. Lurrrell. SECOND ROW: Glenn Buchter, Larry Pat- 
tenon, Tamara Thompson, Larry Calvert, Pat Brotzge, 
Luticia Coyle THIRD ROW: Robbie Weaver, Jenny 
Bowling, Charlie Fritz, Amy Mersch, Carol Fitzger- 
ald, Jane Rees, Vera Maloney, Stephen Young, James 
Trousdale FOURTH ROW: Kelley Comett, David 
Hensley, Dan Egbers, Joe Felts, John Schraer, Scott 
Torbet. 



152 Academics/Organizations 




Student 
Senate 

(cont) 

Ken have faced the challenge ef- 
fectively." 

The senators have committed 
their time, responsibility, and en- 
ergy in order to fulfill their roles 
as college representatives. "I've 
learned so much more about the 
University by being a senator," 
said Schmidt. "I am more aware 
of my rights and my responsibil- 
ities to these rights." 

This demanding job has pre- 
pared these students to become 
responsible citizens in their com- 
munities. 





Executive Council 



Student Court 



FRONT ROW: Tammy Dieesch, Donna Lambers, V.P.; Kenneth Kearns, Pres.; Steve Parsons. SECOND 
ROW: Kathy Gammon, David Burch, Kathryn Papineau, Anne Allegrini. THIRD ROW: Mark Hundley, 
David Wolfzorn, Tony Ryan, Jon Marshall, Stephen Schilffarth. 



FRONT ROW: Michelle O'Bryan, Julie Pecoraro, Yvette Reynolds, Melissa Johnson SECOND ROW: John 
Cutright, Caroline Kiehl, Maria Kremer, Denise LaDuke, Dewayne Robinson. 




Student Senate 



FRONT ROW: David Burch, Tammy Dietsch, Kathy Gammon, Jon Marshall, Donna Lambers, V.P; Kenneth Kearns, Pres.; Stephen Schilffarth, Anne Allegrini, Mark Hundley, David Wolflorn, Kathryn 
Papineau. SECOND ROW: John Melton, Gary Coleman, Lisa Robinson, Janet Walker, Steve Parsons, Steve Gahafer, Cherie Clevinger, Angela Hunt, Nancy Marcum. Bunny Gray. THIRD ROW: Brenda 
McCool, Rose Hoskins, Claire Farley, Lisa Schmidt, Rose Gilmore, Suzie McGuire, Lori Harlow, Becky Bottoms, Belinda Bishop, Enitan Kalejaiye, Peter Davy, Joey Osbourne. FOURTH ROW: Robert MeCool, 
James Campbell, Tony Ryan, Jamie Bishop, Lisa Lambers, Anthony Rogers, Steve Hensley, Wendell Skeen, Ginnifer Saylor, Eugene Fox, Rhonda Meyer, John Deck. 



Academics /Organizations 153 



Cheer leading: 

An Investment of 

Spirit and Enthusiasm 



Cheers of "GO BIG E." ring in 
Hanger Stadium as the cheer- 
leaders arouse the crowd's enthu- 
siasm. This chant can not only be 
heard at football and basketball 



games, but at conventions. These 
14 young men and women trav- 
eled to Frankfort to support 
higher education for Kentucky 
in February cheering this famil- 



iar chant. 

Cheerleading is an eight- 
month sport which requires time 
and dedication. They pracitce 
two-and-one-half hours three 




FRONT ROW: Jacqueline Thomas, Donya Noel, Beth Isabell, Stacey Adams, Jennifer Rhule, Capt.; Angie Ellis, Lori Estep. BACK ROW: Chris Champ, Mark 
Sutton, Jay Martin, Bill Downey, Capt.; Phil Hester, Alan Tatum, Rob Hays. 



154 Academics/Organizations 



days a week and also cheer for 
football games and men's and 
women's basketball games. 

"Cheerleading requires dedi- 
cation and a lot of hard work. 
Each squad member must be in 
good physical condition," said 
Jennifer Rhule, captain. 

When trying out for cheer- 
leader, one must perform one 
floor cheer, a sideline, partner 
stunts, gymnastics, and a dance, 
and three minutes are alloted for 
the individual to perform their 
routines. After tryouts the top fi- 
nalists are called back for an in- 
terview. 

Spirit and enthusiasm pre- 
vailed the squad for it received a 
high return on their invest- 
ments. The squad sent a video- 
tape of themselves to the Nation- 
al Universal Cheerleading Com- 
petition and earned eleventh 
place in the district. During 
cheerleading camp at Virginia 
Tech, the squad won first in side- 
line, second in fight song, the 
(cont.) 



■If A ^ "? * * /% 



Judo Club 




FRONT ROW: Jill Luckett, Brian Tenter, Lisa Rakes, 
Sec, Mark Napier, Sensei, Bob Hensley. VP, Andy 
Smeltzer, Pres . Aubrey Liptcomb. SECOND ROW: 
Bill Sutton, Charlie Helm, Eric Lauterwasser, Thomas 
Kieta. THIRD ROW: Dennis Smith, Nicki-y Jenkins. 
Melanie Cummins, Karen Fouts, Paul Tresenriler. 
FOURTH ROW: Mike Berger. Alisha Haynes, Wayne 
Reed, Sam Watkins, Felicia Cole. 



Explorer's Club 



FRONT ROW: Ross Smallwood, VP; Brian Hauck, 
PR., Robert Faulkner, Pres.; Nancy Forward, Sec, Trev 
Ford.Treas. SECOND ROW: Ed Heeg, Jeannette Bur- 
chell, Julia Roberts, Andrea Bell, Monica Camacho, 
Rita Mutt. THIRD ROW: Kevin Craft, Earle Johnson, 
Sebrina Lovensheimer, Anthony Hudson, Tracy Ber- 
tram, Greg Shouse, Susan Skarbowski, Laura Wine- 
brenner. FOURTH ROW: Janet Clark, Karen Oide, 
Beth Wilder, Brent Boyd, Craig Sheehan, David 
Thompson, Richard Ford, Stuart Keams. 



Food & Nutrition Club 



FRONT ROW: Missy Reynolds, V.P.; Nanette Harpr- 
ing, Pres.; Brenda Davis. SECOND ROW: Colleen 
Russel, Karen Miller, Sharon Borg, Susan Denney 
THIRD ROW: Carol Baugh, Sec; Joanna Armstrong, 
Donna Buckman, Cheryl Guest. 



Football Hostesses 



FRONT ROW: Charlotte Tanara. Sponsor; Carole 
Ridgley, Pres.; Kathryn Roddy, V.R; Tracy Pate, Sec. 
SECOND ROW: Amy Abrams, Shelley Can-, Kay- 
Lynn Grogan, Ella Floyd, Pamela Allgeier. THIRD 
ROW: Patachia Sowers, Karen Kuhn, Kimberly Blan- 
kenship. Amy Mastin. FOURTH ROW: Carla Lindsay. 
Cindra Ridgley, Angela Griffin, Hope Hellard, Tiffa- 
ny Frohm. 



Academics /Organizations 155 



German Club 

FRONT ROW: )ay Hoffmann. Ursel Boyd SECOND 
ROW: Robert Zielinski. Pres.; Jennifer Starr, Allison 
Harrop. Robert Mitchell. THIRD ROW: Suzanne Sra- 
lev. Rebecca Smith, Carol Fortwenglet Julie Simmer- 
man VJ> Treas FOURTH ROW: Bruce Cline. Rodney 
Tavlor. David Brvant. 



Health Records 



FRONT ROW: Dina Hardin. Julie Roark. Sec. /Treas.; 
Karen Hancock, Pres., Carroll Schnabel, Faculty Adv. 
SECOND ROW: Kim Prvor, Rhonda Terry, Ruby 
Moore, Linda Wheat. Teresa Davis. THIRD ROW: 
Laurie Walker. Wendy Bryan, Susan Schehx Karla Por- 
ter 



Hearing Impaired 

FRONT ROW: Viola McCormack, Denise Berry, V.P.; 
Donna Lewis, Pres.; Anita Williamson, Pres. SEC- 
OND ROW: Mary Klumb, Shirley Newsome, Kerry 
Gillespie, Nancye Gridet Denise Bswick, Theresa 
Gardner. THIRD ROW: Elizabeth Rogers, Josef Haas, 
Richard Benningfield, Darla Yazell, Janice Wightman, 
Patty Newman, Molly Tharp FOURTH ROW: H. Pro- 
bizanski, Jean Andrews, Faculty Adv.; Rhonda Cook, 
Edi CUne, Martha Steinrock, Denise Keenan, 



Horticulture Club 



FRONT ROW: Laura Winebrenner. Tony Gerber, Car- 
la Blanton. Owen Shackelford SECOND ROW: Tom 
Knight. Faculty Adv.; Vernon Shackelford, Sec.; Bon- 
nie OTlynn. Jay Biedenharn THIRD ROW: Barb 
Hesse. Treas , Debbie Ball, V.P; Janis Anderson. 
FOURTH ROW: Jeanne Wilson, Thomas Kiek. Lori 
Black, Steve Black. Adv 



156 Academics/Organizations 




Cheerleading cont. 

spirit award and qualified for the 

top ten in the cheer. 

Jacqueline Thomas, Fort 
Thomas, said, "The most impor- 
tant goal is to promote spirit in 
an organized way." The team per- 
formed skits, dances and cheers 
to project this team spirit 
throughout the year. 

Since cheerleading demands 
numerous hours of practice the 
members must motivate them- 




selves and budget their time 
well. Rhule said, "Since it's such a 
long season, it's difficult to keep 
everyone motivated for the 
whole season. Its also difficult to 
budget your time around cheer- 
leading and studies." 

Although cheerleading is a de- 
manding sport; it is also a re- 
warding sport; for each member 
is a spirit leader of the University. 





Right: Showing spirit and enthusiasm, Stacey Adams and Bill Downey 
lead the crowd in cheers. Above: Donya Noel arouses the fans in Hanger 
Stadium. Photos by Sam Maples 



Academics/Organizations 157 



The 
Marching 
Maroons 



Below: These band members know how to 
work this xylophone during halftime at Hang- 
er Field. 



w ^ 




It takes a dedicated student to 
spend at least ten hours a week 
perfecting the marching band 
show and receiving only one 
hour's credit in return. 

However, one receives a lot 
more from being involved with 
the Marching Maroons than just 
one hour's credit according to 
band member Amy DeCamp. 
"You make at least 150 instant 
friends and you get to meet dif- 
ferent people from different 
areas. It's a lot of fun." 



It takes endless hours of hard 
work and dedication to prepare 
for the marching show per- 
formed at each game according 
to band director Robert Belsar. 

The work begins at band camp 
which is held the week before 
classes begin in the fall. During 
this week the group works main- 
ly on the fundamentals of 
marching because all students 
come from different schools and 
they all have unique styles of 
marching. They have to combine 



their various styles into a com- 
mon unity. 

The band practices together at 
least 10 hours a week. They also 
work a countless number of 
hours on their own memorizing 
their music. The group performs 
a different halftime show at each 
home football game. "A lot of 
band members have a hard time 
with this because in high school 
the same show was performed 
every week and this takes a lot 
more patience and concentra- 



158 Academics/Organizations 




tion." 

The band traveled to Louis- 
ville for the Eastern and Univer- 
sity of Louisville football game 
this year. They marched through 
the parking lot at the tailgate par- 
ty prior to the game and played 
for the students and alumni. 
"The people were rowdy and we 
all had a good time," said De- 
Camp. "Band is a lot of fun be- 
cause it's like a big family. We 
work hard, but we have a lot of 
fun together." 




International 
Christian Fellowship 



FRONT ROW: David Mullins. Beverly True, Scott 
Taylor, (ami Read SECOND ROW: ToniD'Auna, Ka- 
ren Ball, Allison Harrop, Theresa Schneider, Muriel 
Haynes. THIRD ROW: David Coode, Stephanie Beck, 
Theresa Bryant, Frank Walls, Donna McCollor. 
FOURTH ROW: John Konerman, Ernie Fitzgerald, 
Richard Benningfield, Ron Jones, Jonathan Young. 



International 
Students Association 



FRONT ROW: Petronia Maurice, V.P.; Enitan Kale- 
jaiye, Pres.; Liliana Diaz, Sec. SECOND ROW: Fa- 
biana Chiu, Keith Lindley, Public Relations; Toni 
Sheets, Treas.; Joanna Hightower. THIRD ROW: 
Francis Siaw, Krishan Jayararive, Walter Mayet 



Medical Assisting 
Technology Association 



FRONT ROW: Sheila Crider, Pres.; Dianne Hickman, 
Sec.; Henrietta Smith, Treas. SECOND ROW: Julia 
Anderson, Lee McKnight, Mary Applegate, Julie 
Yeary, Act. Chmn. THIRD ROW: Clotine Gullette. 
Pub. Chmn.; Karen Lawson, V.P 



Paralegal Association 

FRONT ROW: Mary Hardy, Pres.; Gail Marsall, Pub.; 
Joanna Hightower, V.P. SECOND ROW: Johnna 
Sheared Treas.; Chris Schoborg, Teresa Isaac, Adviser, 
THIRD ROW: Susan Taber, Vickie Long, Sec. 



Academics/Organizations 159 



Pershing Rifle 



FRONT ROW: Alisha Haynes. John Minogue. 
Tammy England. Houston Tucker. Faculty Adv. SEC- 
OND ROW: Mart Napier. William Sutton. Virginia 
Johnson. Suzie Kincaid. THIRD ROW: Alan Riggs. 
Pamela Mullins. Kim Robertson. FOURTH ROW: 
Ronald Alexander. Jill Jackev. Camellia Rov, Dennia 
Kellv. 



PRSSA 



FRONT ROW: Path Roper. Pres.; Mary Bopp. Adv. 
SECOND ROW: Karen Kelley. Treas.; David Bloss, 
Sec. Leigh Hacker. Melissa Eads. Lisa Cofer THIRD 
ROW: Julie Small. Robert Faulkner, V.R: Noel Perkins, 
Lisa Garnet FOURTH ROW: Christi Ward. Andrea 
Smith, Jenny Chambers. 



Ranger Company 



FRONT ROW: Jack Hensley. Ronda Meece, Wendy 
Barlow. Dennis Daniels SECOND ROW: Glenn Sto- 
ver, Asst. Adv.; Tom Turning. Andrew Smeltzer, Chris 
Blombach. John Minogue. David Cannon, Lee How- 
ard, Asst. Adv. THIRD ROW: Anthony Faris, Leonard 
Srimmel, Garland Sams, Keith Lynch, J. R. Williams, 
Adv FOURTH ROW: Ronald King, John Smallwood, 
Jim Rainey, Jim Simpson, Mary Miller. 



Phi Beta Lambda 



FRONT ROW: Jackie Cecil, Pres ; Lisa Hart. Tammy 
Humble, Debbie Carder. Jon Stinger, Colleen Murphy, 
Rick Branham, Dr Bertee Adkins, Faculty Adv SEC- 
OND ROW: Tim Yeaxy, Tonya Rose, Donna Pace, Sara 
Church, Michelle Swiney, Jennifer Flint, Sandra Rob- 
inson, Michelle Davis, Suzanne Keefe, Kevin Dar- 
land, Jim Vallez, Robin Chadwick, Scott Hechlinger, 
Lisa Manuel, Julie Baugh THIRD ROW: Angela 
Pyles, Teresa Sammons. Timmy Hicks, Patrick Puck- 
ett, Susan Milburn, Kathy Pope, Brenda Smith, Sa- 
bnna Burgett, Donna Wilson, Holly Bisping, Tracey 
Lafferty, Kathy Herrin. Stacy Saylor. Chuck White, 
Tina McKinney. Jeff Keith FOURTH ROW: Rick 
Parker, Brian Clark, Glenn Gentry, Roy Vermillion, 
John Jameson, Julia Gearing, Monica Francis, Carole 
Ridgley, Dan Wardrip, Robin Dixon, Sara Sayers, Lori 
Abell. Andrea Bell, Ray Clark, David Branham, Mary 
Hart. 



160 Academics/Organizations 




"We have brought smiles to 
many people — young and old. 
The smiles mean more to me 
than all the social aspects of be- 
ing in KDTs/'said Cyndy Barney. 

Kappa Delta Tau is a unique 
group at the University because 
their main reason for existing is 
service. "The main purpose of 
KDTs is to provide time, love, 
care, and service to the campus as 
well as Richmond and surround- 
ing areas," said Carol Ann Leedy 

Their emphasis on service is 
reflected through the many pro- 
jects the group performed 
throughout the year. They paint- 
ed the Telford Center, worked at 
the Bloodmobile, worked at var- 
ious student elections, collected 
money for muscular dystrophy, 
helped the Jaycees with the child 
identification programs, visited 
various nursing homes and hos- 
pitals and had parties for the resi- 
dents and sponsored Sunshine 
Week during the week before 
finals. 

The group also participated in 
social events. They had a dance, 



T£ A T^ Invest in Providing 
XVzA 1 Services for Others 



campout, reception for their 
alumnae, a Parent's Day Banquet 
and a Senior Day Picnic. These 
social events exist as a reward for 
the hard work the group does 
during the year, according to 
President Michelle O'Bryan. 

This is the area in which KDTs 
differ from sororities. The sorori- 
ties' emphasis is more social, 
while KDTs is more service. "So- 
rorities focus on being together 
and having fun," said O'Bryan. 
"We accomplish that, too. By 
helping others, we help our- 
selves in return." 



Right: Melanie Boyle cuts out a card to paste on 
the placemats the KDTs made for local nursing 
homes. 





FRONT ROW: Carol Leedy, Beth Sininger, Suzi Rushford, Joan Mobley, Sheila Patrick, Michelle O'Bryan, Pres.; Lisa Gatwood, Lisa Cubbage, Leslie 
Cummins, Amy Wolfford, Diana McMillan. SECOND ROW: Jenny Wolfford, Diana Wilkins, Becky Robinson, Cherie Clevinger, Cathy Reardon, Renee 
Wolfe, Sherri Lewter, Stacey Stevens, Gina Young, Laura Strange, Theresa Smith, Stephanie Langfels, Jill Denham, Michele Bartlett, Sabrina Burgett, Brenna 
Garnett. THIRD ROW: Barbara Botkin, Carolyn DeLong, Toni French, Sherry Buskirk, Kathleen Clark, Greta Cropper, Michele Douglas, Debbie Jett, Joy 
Garland, Jill Blair, Cyndy Barney, Amy Speer, Jonmarie Compton, Kathy Lair, Elizabeth Proctor, Debbie Scheer, Lisa Skundrich. FOURTH ROW: Christine 
Zirkelbach, Melanie Doyle, Karen Zirkelbach, Jennifer Bentley, Angela Bell, Janne Sasser, Amy Bright, Robin Isacs, Susan Carl, Debbie Wilkins, Tammy 
Hooper, Anita Denham, Sandra Salyers, Mary Simon, Jodee Dyer, Denise Scalf, Sharon Doll, Brenda Peter. 



It often seems 
like a large fam- 
ily rather than a 
staff producing 
the 



Eastern 
Progress 




Ad Staff 




(-•• 





^* - 



Progress Staff 



FRONT ROW: Sieve Lincoln. Ad Rep , Ron Saver. Ad Dir BACK ROW: 
Leanne Fields. Bus Man , Jessica Taul, Ad Rep , Martha Ruble, Ad Rep. 



FRONT ROW: Amy Wolfford, Man Ed , Suzanne Staley, Organ. Ed.Terri Martin, Feat. Ed; Sean Elkins, Photo Ed. BACK ROW: Mike 
Marsee, Sports Ed , Marilyn Bailey, Adv.; Scott Rupp, Copy Ed.; Alan White, Ed.; Darenda Dennis, Arts. Ed.; Phil Bowling, News Ed. 



The insistent ringing of 
phones blends with voices and 
mixed conversations to fill the 
office which is the heart of the 
Eastern Progress. 

Staff members can be found 
there working and talking to- 
gether at almost any hour of the 
day or night. It often seems more 
like a large family than the staff 
of a college paper. 

The news and advertising 
staffs work together toward a 
mutual goal — to produce the 
best and most successful news- 
paper that they can. 

To obtain this goal, staff mem- 
bers work long hours with a 
dedication equal to that of any 
members of a large paper's staff. 

Pride in one's own work and a 
willingness to help each other 
come together to make the Pro- 
gress what it is. 

However, staff members are 
by no means all work and no 
play. The office blackboard is the 
focus for creative photos, draw- 
ings, and word games to name 
only a few. 

Good natured joking runs wild 
on most days, lightening the 
mood and easing the pressures of 
getting everything done. Even 
with a deadline fast approaching 
laughter can be heard, mixed 
with the bustle of a busy news- 
paper office. 
Photos by Robb Carr 



Opposite Page: Scott Rupp, copy editor, proofs 
one of the pages from the arts and entertain- 
ment section. 




Resident Hall 
Association 



FRONT ROW: Michael Evans, Mary Ellis, V.P.; Melis- 
sa King, Pres.; David Goeing, Sec SECOND ROW: 
Kelly Hargadon, Steve Parsons, Chene Clevinger, Ka- 
ren Lynn, Ann Browning, Larry Hubbs, Bert Brum- 
mett, Glenda Whitledge THIRD ROW: Tammy Mar- 
tin, Terri Arthur, Patti Campbell, Allison Harrop, Hei- 
di Lose, Jay Taylor, Vickie Hale, Amy Bright, Julie 
Trenkamp, Kathleen Crogan FOURTH ROW: Lynn 
Whayne, Adv; Jennifer Hargadon, Melissa Webb, Mi- 
chael Lewis, Den ise Garrett, Drew Squires, Ron Harri- 
son, Ron Hammond, Robert CaJhoun, Jeff Belonger 



Soccer Club 



FRONT ROW: Jeff Overwein, Stewart Haag, Mike 
Slukich, Eddie GraybeaJ, Scott Kerr, Jim Kurzner 
SECOND ROW: Dwayne Merrilatt, Ahmad Teraib, 
Tom Whitehead, John Gensheimer, Rick Hulse, Ben 
Pope, Jimmy Sexstone, Christopher Metz, Rossi Lin- 
coln, Dan Robinette. 



Society for Advanced 
Management 

FRONT ROW: Debbie Cole, Pres; Kim Barrows. SEC- 
OND ROW: Regina Burch, Sec; Sandra Carroll, Treas. 
THIRD ROW: Michelle O'Bryan, Mark Davenport 



SMENC 



FRONT ROW: Scott Tomlison, Pres.; Carolyn Rogers, 
V.P.; Clair Jacobs, Sec; Daryl Mesch, Treas. SECOND 
ROW: Donna Insko, Jennifer Stansbury. Rita Hartley, 
Lesa Kidwell. THIRD ROW: Carol Collins, Kathi 
Keeney, Marsha Webb, Duane Crowe. FOURTH 
ROW: Rob Paugh. Ed Johnson, Peter Sour, David Ar- 
vold. 



Academics /Organizations 163 



Milestone Staff 

Editor-in-Chief: Diana Smith 
Managing Editor: Robert Hughes 
Copy Editor: Laura Strange 
Layout Editor: Janet Franklin 

Staffers 

Debbie Scheer, Martha Ruble, 
Debra Cole, Beverly Johnson, 
Christine Propp, Rebecca Smith, 
Edward Teck, Kim Harmon, 
Sharon Dobos, Cammie King, 
Terri Sweeney, Dawna East, Elvena 
Perry, Robin Blair, Debbie Powell. 

Contributing Writers 

Shelia Smith, Dan Steely, Sherry 
Kaffenbarger, Scott Mandel, 
Robert Faulkner, Theresa Smith, 
Debbie Swinford, Tiffany Patrick, 
Laura Robinson, Becky Clark. 

Contributing Artist 

Jeff Coatney 

Photographers 

Paul Lambert, Neil Thompson, 
Sam Maples, Tom Penegor, Rob 
Carr, Larry Bailey. 




Lambert 




^r**fc\JS 



Carr 



164 Academics/Organizations 




Milestone 

\mi(a) l-,ston/ n: 
a significant point 
in development 



Opposite Top: Managing Editor Robert 
Hughes spends many hours preparing photo- 
graphs for publication. Opposite Left: Debbie 
Scheer spent much of her time working on the 
Sports section. Opposite Left Bottom: Rebecca 
Smith lays out pages for Student Life. Oppo- 
site Right: Copy Editor, Laura Strange proofs 
and types copy submitted. Left: Editor-in- 
Chief Diana Smith oversees all areas of produc- 
tion. She also spends much time preparing lay- 
outs for the Milestone. 



Milestone: (Mi(a)l-ston): 1) a 
significant point in develop- 
ment. This definition in Web- 
ster's Dictionary describes the in- 
vestment by a few dedicated stu- 
dents who share a common in- 
terest of preserving the accom- 
plishments and the Milestones of 
the University in a book which 
has gained recognition for its tra- 
ditional look at campus life. The 
Milestone staff at the University 
invest their time, energy and 
dedication to receive a return 
that will be treasured by many. 

The organization of the 1985- 
86 staff was somewhat different 
than it has been in the past. In- 



stead of having separate editors 
for each section, the staff contain- 
ed only four editors: Diana 
Smith, editor-in-chief; Robert 
Hughes, managing editor; Laura 
Strange, copy editor; and Janet 
Franklin, layout editor. They, 
along with the staff members, 
photographers, and contributing 
writers, worked to produce the 
63rd edition of the Milestone and 
captured the year by the com- 
bined usage of copy, photogra- 
phy, artwork and design. 

The book was also honored 
with receiving the PICA award 
for the 1985 Milestone cover de- 
sign. Staffers also attended the 



College Media Advisers and As- 
sociated Collegiate Press Nation- 
al Convention in Dallas to bring 
modern techniques in the pro- 
duction of the book. 

The Milestone has become a 
"significant point of develop- 
ment" in the lives of many — not 
only the people who work to- 
gether in producing it, but also 
those at the University who par- 
ticipate in various activities, fol- 
low along with traditions, set 
their own traditions, and make 
the year a memorable one at the 
University. 



Academics/Organizations 165 



Society of 

Professional 

Journalists, ZAX 

FRONT ROW: Debra Jasper. Rebecca Clark. Sec., Terri 
Martin. Pres.; Scott Rupp. VP. SECOND ROW: Jamie 
Baker. Darenda Dennis. Diana Smith. Jay Carey 
THIRD ROW: Delinda Douglas. Libby Fraas. Adv.; 
Alan White. Mike Marsee FOURTH ROW: Pam Lo- 
gue. Chris Niblock. Scott Mandl. Martha Ruble, 



Student Alumni 
Association 



FRONT ROW: Cynthia Smith. Robin Gamett. Sec.. 
Dianne Storev. Pres.: Donna Buckman, Mark Turpin. 
Mike Shover SECOND ROW: Gregory Simpson, Ta- 
mara Murphv. Denise Lichtv, Leigh Dosch. Michelle 
Drewes. Tracy- Hobbs THIRD ROW: Ron Wolfe, Adv.; 
Karen Crav, Delinda Douglas, Lisa Thompson. Daren 
Marionneaux FOURTH ROW: Linn Dunn. Julie 
Burt. Scott Lockard, Amy DeCamp, Jeffrey Falk. 



Textiles, Clothing 
and Fashion 



FRONT ROW: DeLynn Harris. Hist.. Brenda Peter, 
Treas-, Jill Ford. Sec.; Thomasina Dabney. Pres.. Melin- 
da Gaw. VP SECOND ROW: Janet McGeorge. Sherry 
Bvrd, Jennifer Leinweber Genny Flesch, Sharon True, 
Julie renkamr. THIRD ROW: Deborah Dawson, 
Cora Pearson, Leslye Johnson. 



University Ensemble 



FRONT ROW: Edye Robinson. Rec Sec , Dawn 
Hanks. VP. Austin Pursifull, Pres ; Gladys Evans. Be- 
verly Haggard SECOND ROW: Zi na Burton, Rhonda 
Webb. Shern Pointer. Julie Browen THIRD ROW: 
Melissa Hines. Franane Smith, Ramona Pointer, April 
Beach FOURTH ROW: Ella Williams, Robin Harris, 
Tracy Brown, Mona Smith, Joanne Simpson, Director 



166 Academics/Organizations 




If students that pray together 
stay together, Campus Crusade 
for Christ should remain at the 
University for some time to 
come. Having now completed its 
fifth year at Eastern, "Crusade," 
as it is often called, is one of 13 
registered religious groups on 
campus. There are over 500 chap- 
ters of Crusade nationwide. 

Senior graphic design major 
Tom Jones, chapter president for 
the fall semester, said that the 
main purpose of the group is 
"sharing the life of Jesus Christ 
with others and giving them the 
opportunity to have the relation- 
ship with Him that we have." 
Jones said Crusade combines Bi- 
ble studies, prayer, a weekly 
meeting, and fellowship oppor- 
tunities into an ongoing program 
of spiritual growth. The group 
also encourages students to at- 
tend conferences and workshops 
designed to heighten under- 
standing and commitment. 

While most ministries on cam- 
pus have advisers, Crusade also 
has four full-time staff members 
who live in Richmond. Rich 
Bostwick, staff director for the 
University's chapter of Crusade, 
said the staff's purpose is to en- 
sure that the group operates ac- 
cording to the strategy estab- 
lished by Campus Crusade for 
Christ International, headquar- 
tered in Arrowhead Springs, 
Colo. 

He said this included "persua- 
sion, going to somebody one-on- 
one and bringing them to the 
point of decision; proclamation, 



Campus Organizations 

Enhance 

Spiritual Growth 



reaching a lot of people at once, 
often through large meetings 
and guest speakers; and pres- 
ence, providing an example 
through one's lifestyle." 

Bostwick, 27, said that the staff 
works together with the student 
leadership of Crusade to direct 
the group. "It's staff directed and 
student led," said Bostwick. 

Jones said he first got involved 
in an "entry-level Bible-study," 
his sophomore year. 

"I found that Campus Crusade 
met my needs where I needed 



them met," said Jones. "It pro- 
vided fellowship which is what I 
needed." 

University Chaplain George 
Nordgulen observed that the 
various ministries like Crusade 
are aided by the region in which 
Eastern is located. "We do have a 
very religious campus because 
we draw from 'a Bible belt' and 
we have a good many students 
interested in furthering their 
spiritual studies," said Nordgu- 
len. 

The chance to gain encourage- 



ment and find ways to deal with 
the rigors of college life were rea- 
sons given by students who were 
involved with Crusade. "Things 
in my life just weren't right and I 
thought getting involved in Cru- 
sade was what I might need to 
help things go better," recalled 
Junior physical therapy major 
Melanie Woosley, who first at- 
tended Crusade's weekly meet- 
ing, Prime Time, halfway 
through the fall semester. 

"I think Crusade has been real- 
ly beneficial to me because it has 




Senior Scott Mandi speaks to PRIME TIME, Campus Crusades weekly meeting. 



Academics/Organizations 167 



These University students enjoy the fellowship and 
friendship which is shared among their organization 
and with others, such as this time together at Prime 
Time, Crusade's weekly meeting. 
Photos by Tom Penegor 





168 Academics/Organizations 



Religious Organizations (cont.) 



encouraged me to make God a 
bigger part of my life . . . I've 
learned a lot from it as far as how 
important it is to study the Bible 
and find time each day for pray- 
er. I look forward to going every 
week," said the Springfield, 
Ohio, native. 

Dionne Brodbeck, a Junior Ju- 
venile Corrections major from 
Dayton, Ohio, said that minis- 
tries like Crusade are an impor- 
tant addition to church because 
they are attended wholly by col- 
lege students. "... you make 



good friends going through the 
same type of problems: tests, per- 
sonal and family problems, and 
all the hassles of school." 

She said that since she had be- 
come involved in Crusade the 
previous year she'd "learned 
what it is to have a personal rela- 
tionship with Jesus and also how 
important it is to put God first, 
above everything else. (Crusade 
has) changed my life — it really 
has." 

While he said his time in Cru- 
sade was beneficial, Jones decid- 



ed to resign his presidency after 
the fall semester because the 
large number of activities he was 
required to be involved in was 
"getting in the way of (his) rela- 
tionship with God." 

"Activities should be the result 
of our relationship with God — 
not the cause," said Jones. "After 
all, our responsibility and our 
loyalty should be to God. That's 
who we need to focus on — not 
the groups." 




Baptist Student Union 



FRONT ROW: Sterling Smith, Pres; Libby Searles, V.P.; Wanda Daugherty, Stephanie Ellis, Kathy Randall, Lisa Davis, Darren McGee. Laura Harris, Chris Kurtz, Kathy Watson, Debbie Vincent, Susan McGuire, 
Pam Clifton, Steve Graves, Suzanne Hinton. SECOND ROW: Margaret King, Cindy Withers, Terry Ward, Victoria Hamby, Mary Hall, Michael Kearney, Came Davis, Dawn Logan, Jenny Wolfford. Donna 
Young. THIRD ROW: Lisa Geyer, Melanie Allison, Jamie Davis, Anita Antle, Lorie Barker, Sandy Shackelford, Amy Mclntyre, Karen Gaines, Ed Meece, Donna Bailey, Nick Wilson. FOURTH ROW: Derrick 
Singleton, Bill Ellis, Cohen Copley, David Atcher, Bruce Baker, Norman Hurt, Jerry McKinney, Sarah Dantzler, Pam Patrick, Anne Weyhrauch, Beth Mauney, Hunter Bates, Ricky Loudermelt, Carlos Flores, 
Randy Roll, Beckham Eldridge, Eddie Massey, Paul Oligee, Mike Harmon. BACK ROW: Peggy Seiber, Tamara Murphv, Tammy Sidwell, Nancy Sparks, Stacy Stillwell, Sherrie Lamkin, Mindy Miller, Barbara 
Bowman, Mahala Duff, Angie Antle, Harry Turner, Christopher Querry, Eugene Reffett. 



Academics /Organizations 169 




Investment 
Provides High Return 



Johnnie Smith's entrepre- 
neurial abilities provide 
him with high returns. 



A return on an "artistic" in- 
vestment could best describe Se- 
nior Johnnie Smith's college ca- 
reer. 

Johnnie Smith Designs is the 
name of Smith's business which 
he owns and operates. The senior 
from Olive Hill, Kentucky, de- 
signs and constructs clothing; 
specializing in sportswear, even- 
ing and children's wear. 

Graduating in December, 
Smith obtained a B.S. in Clothing 
Construction and Design from 
the University. 

Johnnie's work has been both 
a learning and teaching tool as 



well as a source of income during 
his college years. "Embellishing 
my checking account has been 
due to my design work. It's 
helped pay my way through 
school," said Smith. 

He gained much of his experi- 
ence in the Theatre Department's 
costume shop. Smith started 
working during his freshman 
year and has worked under three 
designers. 

However, there are disadvan- 
tages to his work. "I suffered a 
lack of social contact in college. If 
I wasn't in class or the costume 
shop, I was home working on 



170 Academics/Organizations 




special-ordered designs. I never 
felt like I was working, because I 
enjoy designing and construc- 
tion," Smith said. 

Having been commissioned 
by persons all over the state, 
Smith has designed for every oc- 
casion — from actresses to brides. 
On the average, he will receive a 
special order design every two 
weeks. 

"I guess the most pleasure I re- 
ceive from my work is taking 
what physical features a person 
may have and flattering them 
with my designs." 

'Photos by Neil Thompson 




Opposite Page: Smith involves his family in his work with sister Shannon as a 
model for his style show. Above Left: Senior Kari Coleman brings Smith's fashions 
to the stage. Above: Johnnie Smith taking care of last minute alterations on model 
Jacque Champlain. 



Academics/Organizations 171 



Greeks share 

a special 

bond 



A new semester. 

Both hectic and exciting. So- 
rority and fraternity members 
prepare for the new beginning — 
one of investments. 

Each semester brings new be- 
ginnings and new investments. 
These investments begin with 
RUSH, the busiest week of the 
year for both Greek members 



and rushees. 

Plans for rush begin in the 
spring semester and sororities 
come to school early to prepare 
for rush. Formal rush for sorori- 
ties began the first week of 
classes. 

"Formal rush gives perspec- 
tive sorority members a broad 
view of each sorority. By meeting 
sisters from each sorority, a ru- 
shee can decide which organiza- 
tion complements her personal- 
ity," said Sherry Kaffenbarger, 
president of Alpha Delta Pi. 

Fraternity rush took a positive 
approach towards a drier rush. 
They reduced the amount of par- 
ties where alcohol was served. 

"During a dry rush party the 
rushees get a better view of the 



fraternity while the members re- 
late on a more personal basis," 
said Jeff Braun, Sigma Chi. "I 
think a drier rush will enhance 
the quality of the Greek system." 

Rush — whether formal or in- 
formal — gives students the op- 
portunity to see what each orga- 
nization stands for and how the 
entire Greek system operates. 

Investments continue through- 
out the year for members of the 
Greek system. Striving for a high- 
er quality system, each member 
invests in the social, intellectual 
and moral development of the 
members of the individual group. 

Being involved with a Greek 
organization has both positive 
and negative returns. Hence 
Greek life isn't for everyone. 




172 Greek Opening 




Opposite Page: Greek Week is a time for sororities and fraternities to better their relationship 
with each other. Left: David Shoengart concentrates on building a winner float for the 
Homecoming Parade. Below: Interfraternity spirit prevails as Trip McCracken and Bob Herzog 
participate in pin-the-tail on the Greek Week chairman. Bottom: Sorority girls make a splash 
while trying to sit on a greased watermelon during the Lambda Chi Watermelon Bust. Bottom 
Right: Rush proves to be an enjoyable time for both sorority women and rushees. 




Greek Opening 173 



Greeks cont. 




Time and dedication are re- 
quired of each member. Certain 
events, such as initiation, weekly 
meetings, service projects and 
workshops are mandatory for 
members to attend. If a potential 
member doesn't have the time or 
dedication, a sorority or fraterni- 
ty may not be right for her or 
him. 

However, a sorority or frater- 
nity does have its positive quali- 
ties for other students. With 
dedication, members can receive 
many positive returns on their 
investments. 

A Greek organization supports 
a positive development of each 



member, but the member must 
have a desire for this develop- 
ment. A sorority or fraternity 
benefits a student in many ways. 
It gives structure and security by 
creating a built-in family. In- 
volvement in social activities and 
community service. Opportuni- 
ties to develop leadership and in- 
terpersonal communication 
skills and lifetime friendships 
prevail in sororities and fraterni- 
ties. 

A Greek organization is a 
home away from home. Mem- 
bers, like siblings, share a special 
bond. A bond which only broth- 
ers and sisters can share. 




174 Greek Opening 




Opposite Page: Drivers help Matt 
u Hackathorn in supporting Wallace 
(jo Village. Left: Sororities participate in 
c many fun events such as Sigma Alpha 
(5J Epsilon County Fair. 








zmv< 



: •;- 



Thompson 

Opposite Page: Alpha Delta Pis observe sorority sing. Left: 
Fraternity men pull together during Delta Zeta's Frat Man's 
Classic. Above: Julie Lynch is in search of Kappa Delta's 
watermelon. 



Greek Opening 175 




176 Greeks 



Keeping the Cork on the Bottle 



As we look back upon the last 
twenty years in retrospect, we 
see an increase in alcohol con- 
sumption with the growth of our 
generation. 

We have matured in an alco- 
hol-oriented society, but when 
this pastime becomes abused and 
dealt with irresponsibly, it can be 
fatal to those tampering with it. 

Only in recent years have indi- 
viduals decided to combat this 
problem. Organizations such as 
MADD (Mothers Against Drunk 
Drivers) have been formed to 
protect and alert the public. 

Within this past year, various 
Greek organizations took posi- 
tions on the issue of alcohol re- 
sponsibility. 

"Because of the responsibility 
chapters have to every member, 
they're increasing alcohol aware- 
ness and responsibility involved 
in that through educational pro- 
grams," said Troy Johnson, Assis- 
tant Director of Student Activi- 
ties. "They're designing social 
functions to cooperate with Ken- 
tucky State Law." 

Pressure was exerted on indi- 
vidual chapters by their national 
officers. 

"Our national organizations 
are simply trying to protect us," 
said Carol Gibson, Traveling Col- 
legiate Secretary for Alpha Delta 
Pi sorority. 

Gibson, who serves in this role 
as a national officer advising 
chapters nationwide, said she 
feels that the sororities who are 
taking a stand on the issue now 



will be better off in the future. 

Some organizations showed 
responsibility by naming desig- 
nated drivers after social func- 
tions. Others established a sys- 
tem to take car keys when mem- 
bers entered a function. If they 
were intoxicated at the end of the 
evening, they did not receive 
their keys and were provided 
with alternate transportation. 
The Lambda Chi Alpha fraterni- 
ty found that this system was 
successful for them. 

Alpha Gamma Delta began a 
system in the uprising to require 
each couple to deposit $5 when 
they entered the dance. If they 
were intoxicated at the close of 
the dance that $5.00 paid for a 
cab fare. 

Alpha Delta Pi also held the 
first dry dance off-campus held 
in Richmond. 

Members of this organization 
were also required to ride buses 
to their spring formal in Frank- 
fort. 

Kappa Alpha Theta members 
attended dry mixers during the 
spring. 

"We're adhering to the NPC 
(National Panhellenic Confer- 
ence) rules that were passed in 
September," said Cathy Moore, 
Kappa Alpha Theta President. 

Those rules require all nation- 
al sororities to abide by individ- 
ual state laws, insure sober driv- 
ers, provide key checks, food and 
alternate beverages (soft drinks). 

These provisions are required 
to decrease the risk an organiza- 



tion may incur in the case of in- 
jury to a member or their date. 
Several national organizations 
have been named in lawsuits be- 
cause a member of their organi- 
zation was involved in a mishap 
following a Greek activity 

"The Greek system at the Uni- 
versity has realized the liabilities 
and detrimental effects that alco- 
hol has on our activities," said 
Doug Hartline, Inter-Fraternity 
Council President. "We have all 
begun to find that alcohol is a 
facet of Greek life that the Uni- 
versity Greeks don't need." 

IFC took a stand by holding a 
spring dry rush. 

When organizing the 1986 
Greek Week, the steering com- 
mittee had to be aware of such 
risks involved during the week's 
activities. 

"Considering the volatile envi- 
ronment surrounding alcohol-re- 
lated affairs, Greek Week has, for 
the first time, undertaken a risk 
avoidance strategy in all events 
throughout the week," com- 
mented Don Bornhorst, Overall 
Greek Week Co-Chairman. "We 
feel that this will not only show 
the concern of the Greek com- 
munity on these matters, but 
will contribute to the awareness 
of the potential dangers of alco- 
hol abuse." 

A step has definitely been tak- 
en in the right direction, but the 
future of responsible alcohol-re- 
lated activities is in the hands of 
future leaders on this campus. 



Greeks 177 



Panhellenic 
and IFC 

Entering Greek life at the Uni- 
versity is a commitment to in- 
volvement and a promise of ful- 
fillment resulting from that in- 
volvement. Students who choose 
Greek life build their futures to- 
gether through working toward 
common goals. 

The Panhellenic and Interfra- 
ternity Councils are the govern- 
ing bodies over the Greeks on 
campus. These councils are made 
up of two delegates from each 
fraternity and sorority on cam- 
pus. 

In addition to making guide- 
lines for the Greeks to follow, 
they also sponsor many activi- 
ties. Together they sponsor Greek 
Week in April and Richmond 
children and elderly as Greek 
friends. 




r'RONT ROW: Sharon Johnson, Mia Bisig, Nancy Howard, Pres.; Laura Van Wagenen; Laura 
Robinson, Sec. SECOND ROW: Judy Martin, Trish Friedman, Jennifer Kent, Jennifer Price, Denise 
Garrett, Paisley Hill. THIRD ROW: Maria Saylor, Kimberly Ferguson, Kim Trimble, Sherry Morton, 
Audrey Bortner, Beth Maurer, Cindy Thompson. FOURTH ROW: Michelle Warndorf, Shawnna 
Webster, Trina Kuhrmann, Debbie Gregory, Michelle Martini. 



Panhellenic holds Panhellenic 
Week in November and collects 
money for the United Way. 

IFC and Panhellenic both par- 
ticipate in many other philan- 
thropic activities. Together they 
sponsor a non-alcoholic mixer 
for the pledges to raise canned 
foods for the area needy. In De- 



cember they participate in the 
Hanging of the Greens and carol- 
ling to area houses and nursing 
homes. 

Both councils' stated purpose 
is to strive for better communica- 
tion between sororities and fra- 
ternities as well as the Universi- 
ty 




FRONT ROW: Dan Steely, Mike Reed, David Hall, Robert Hatcher, John LeForge, V.P.; Chris Rector, 
Treas ; Todd Taylor, Pres.; Greg Fiedler, Sec; Bill Hodapp, Wayne Pointer, Robert Mosley, Chet Wright. 
SECOND ROW: Russell Young, Doug Hartline, Craig Jones, Don Bornhorst, Brian Wiles, David 
Hahn, Kane Flanary, Michael Thompson, Todd Marksberry, Pat Humphrey, Tim Thornberry, Tracy 
Barker, Shawn Erschell. THIRD ROW: Steve Bennett, Jeff Belonges, Mike Feeback, Victor Edwards, 
Reggie Clark, Marion Johnson, Todd Murphy. FOURTH ROW: Steven Arave, Guthrie Green, Anson 
Steel, Tyrone Sturdivant, James J. Johnson, Robert Wilson, Barry Arnold, Lonny Hill, Kevin Costello, 
Jim Vaught, Alexander Brosky. 



Left: Working diligently in the Student 
Activities Office is Troy Johnson, Greek 
adviser. 



178 Greeks/Panhellenic and IFC 






FRONT ROW: Marilyn Johnson, Pres. SECOND ROW: Sherry Morton, 
Wanda Hunt. THIRD ROW: Kimberly Ferguson, V.P., Thomasina Dabney, 
Regina Morton, Treas. 




Above: This AKA participates in the watermelon race at the Lambda Chi Watermelon Bust. 



The sisters of Alpha Kappa Al 



pha set a special goal for them- 
selves to complete at least 10 ser- 
vice projects for the schoolyear. 
These projects included the Bar- 
bara Hunter scholarship, Eldora 
Rhea scholarship, Adopt-a- 
Grandparent program, Voter 
Registration, Bloodmobile, and 
Halloween-Christmas parties for 
the Telford Community Center. 
Their philanthropy project was 
the NAA.C.P. and the United 
Negro College Fund. These 
served to help them achieve 
their goal to become more in- 
volved on campus and in the 
community. 

The group also found time for 
social activities. They sponsored 
Alpha Kappa Alpha week where 
various activities were held. 
They received the third place tro- 
phy in the Lambda Chi Alpha 
Watermelon Bust. 

Famous Alpha Kappa Alpha's 
include Coretta Scott King, Pearl 
Bailey, Suzette Charles and Shir- 
ley Chissolm. 



FOUNDED: 

January 15, 1908 

CAMPUS: 

Howard University 

COLORS: 

Salmon Pink and Apple Green 

FLOWER: 

Pink Rose 

SYMBOL: 

Ivy Plant 

ADVISER: 

Donna B. Kinney 



Greeks/AKA 179 



Below: Some members of Alpha Delta Pi perform their version 
of the Chorus Line during fall rush. Right: Participating in a 
game at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon County Fair, this ADPi rushes 
to the finish line. Bottom: During Greek Week, the ADPis watch 
the games. 








o 





FRONT ROW: Ann Kozlowski, Treas.; Cynthia Stanford, Lisa Free, Lisa Bellanca, Stephanie Hughes, Caroline Kiehl, Second V.P., Pledge Ed.; Sherry 
Kaffenbarger, Pres.; Patsy Edlin, First V.P; Kelley Curtin, Mary Hayes, Jane Kiehl, Gayle Houze, Cathy Carrier, Rec. Sec. SECOND ROW: Julie Lohre, Peggy 
Murphy, Peggy Moore, Jenny Jordan, Lynda Schneider, Paula Shaffer, Michele Leist, Nicole Callendee, Tina Pfaehler, Janice Woodward, Micheie Mullins, 
Yvette Reynolds, Sally Wilfert, Julia Anderson. THIRD ROW: Tonya Rose, Susie Glass, Martha Flood, Stacey Seaton, Martha Chandler, Patti Booten, Jill 
Schroering, Linda Eckert, Leslie Dunham, Jill Benge, Virginia Mauer, Julie Bergdoll, Lisa Toole, Stephanie Hapeman. FOURTH ROW: Laura Estep, Julie 
Hoffmeister, Jena Howard, Christy Strong, Michelle Martini, Julie Doerr, Mary McAuliffe, Tracey Osborne, Donna Stratton, Debbie Kaffenbarger, Wendy 
Barlow, Kara Kelly, Amy Wilfert, Jennifer Hartmann, Regina Gruber. 



Alpha Delta Pi celebrated five 
national awards. These awards 
were Legacy Award, History 
Award, Pi Pride Award, Service 
Project Recognition and Treasur- 
er Award. 

The ADPis were proud of their 
campus awards also. These 
awards were Sigma Chi Derby 
Queen, Kappa Alpha Old South 
Southern Belle, Lambda Chi Al- 
pha Watermelon Bust Queen, 
second place in Lambda Chi Wa- 
termelon Bust and third place in 
Sigma Chi Derby. 

Alpha Delta Pi continued to 
support their philanthropy, the 
Ronald McDonald House by 



sponsoring the Alpha Delta Pi 
McDonalds Carnival. Other 
events they sponsored were the 
ADPi Road Rally and ADPi crab 
races. 

Alpha Delta Pi recognized the 
need for alcohol awareness ac- 
tivities. They sponsored a non- 
alcoholic dance. 

"Not only were our sisters ac- 
tively involved in our sorority's 
activities, but they also dedicated 
time to show choir, honoraries, 
little sister functions, profession- 
al organizations and much 
more," said President Sherry Kaf- 
fenbarger. 



FOUNDED: 

May 15, 1851 

CAMPUS: 

Wesleyan Female College 

COLORS: 

Azure blue and white 

FLOWER: 

Woodland Violet 

SYMBOL: 

Alphie the Lion 

ADVISER: 

Dr. Nancy Harp 



Greeks/AAn 181 



Alpha Gamma Delta sorority 
has been active on campus for 17 
years. In this time, they have 
shown the spirit of their sorority. 

The Alpha Gams' spirit was 
evident throughout the semester. 
They received the spirit award in 
Sigma Chi Derby. 

Other events that kept the Al- 
pha Gams busy were Beta Theta 
Phi football tournament, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon basketball tour- 
nament, Kappa Delta Dating 
Game and Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
County Fair. 

The sisters excelled in their 
philanthropy by participating in 



the maroon balloons sale, canned 
food drive and Adopt-a-Grand- 
parent. 

Some events the Alpha Gams 
sponsored included a trivial pur- 
suit tournament and Run for the 
Roses Week, which was spon- 
sored for the first time. 

Nationally, the Alpha Gams 
received two awards. These 
awards were Rose for Founder's 
Memorial Contributions and 
Star for Standards. 

Some famous Alpha Gams are 
Tanya Tucker, Doris Day Donna 
Fargo and Gloria Loving. 




Thompson 




FRONT ROW: Shelia Pendleton, Adv.; Jamie Baker, Angela Hunt, Tammy Hatfield, Chrissy Barber, Lori Durst, VP. Schol.; Laura Hiers, Pres.; Alesia 
Asuncion, VP. Frat. Ed.; Lela Durham, Stephane Schildmeyer, Bronwyn Wierman, Michelle Warndorf, Elizabeth BuSteed, Lana Prater, Rec. Sec. SECOND 
ROW: Kristen Schilder, Mimi Sanders, Stacie Richard, Lori Munsie, Martha Kindred, Teresa Gartman, Priscilla Snell, Toni Coffman, Janice Duff, Kelly 
Woodruff, l.pia LeMaster, Lynne Sommerfield. THIRD ROW: Stacey Lueken, Laura Larkin, Nancy Marcum, Beth Cummins, Sharon Gilbert, Sandy Haste, 
Fran Crawford, Sabrina Insko. FOURTH ROW: Amy Brown, Anita Clare, Tammy Taylor, Colleen Gallagher, Liz Dobos, Maria Saylor, Rebecca Cole. 



182 Greeks/ATA 





Opposite Page Top: Kelly Woodruff discusses 
the next game with Sigma Chi Coach Mike 
Lanasa. Left: At Sigma Chi Derby, Martha Kin- 
dred watches the other sororities participate in 
the games. Bottom: The Alpha Gams show 
their spirit during sorority sing. 



FOUNDED: 

May 30, 1904 

CAMPUS: 

Syracuse University 

COLORS: 

Red, buff and green 

FLOWER: 

Red and buff roses 

SYMBOL: 

Squirrel 

ADVISER: 

Shelia Pendleton 




Greeks /ATA 183 



FOUNDED: 

April 5, 1895 

CAMPUS: 

Arkansas 

COLORS: 

Cardinal and straw 

SYMBOL: 

Owl 

ADVISER: 

Jackie Cruse 








Above: Sharon Johnson enjoys talking to a 
friend at the corner. Right: Chi Omegas have a 
good time during rush while performing their 
version of the Wizard of Oz. Top Right: The 
egg-toss game is no problem for Wendi Powell. 







184 Greeks/Xfi 





FRONT ROW: Denise lichty, Cynthia Tudor, Susan Minks, Jodi Watters, Jennifer Price, Paige Williams, Laura Heun, V.P.; Julie Baldwin, Pres.; Wendi 
Powell, Sec.; LisaFrye, Tres.; Elizabeth Phillips, Carol Crisologo, Leigh Ann Dosch, Sharon Johnson, Jodi Dunn. SECOND ROW: Deanna Dunn, Julie Cook, 
Donna Schmidt, Kimberly Mclntyre, Magen Powell, Tammy Hubbard, Stacey Adams, Lisa Brown, Lisa Tabb, Sherry Girdler, Anne Papineau, Kimberly 
Gibson, Lisa Napier, Beth Evans. THIRD ROW: Teresa Newman, Diana Ziegler, Rhonda Gouge, Christy Walters, Leigh Harville, Stephanie Miller, Tracy 
Shrout, Lisa Weber, Hallie Brennenstuhl, Rhonda Williams, Lissa Judy, Jeanie Wampler, Trina Hembree, Sherri Ferguson, Vicki Delong. FOURTH ROW: 
Jeana Tbmpkins, Cindy Thopson, Donna Bingham, Lorie Avis, Stacy Duff, Karen Sapp, Mia Bisig, Teresa M. Sammons, Suzanne Sebree, Meg Barton, Meg 
Dorough, Shelly Moore, Holly James. 



"The Chi Omegas have contin- 
ued our long history of success 
this year. As Mary Love Collins, a 
founder of Chi Omega, once said, 
'Chi Omega contributes some- 
thing wholesome to the whole of 
one's life/ " said Julie Baldwin, 
president. 

The sisters of Chi Omega 
sponsored several events for lo- 



cal philanthropies. Chi-O-Lym- 
pics were held to benefit the 
Madison County Special Olym- 
pics and road blocks were held 
for Robbie Webb and Shari Eldot. 
The Chi-Os were active in 
many campus events. They won 
first place in SAE County Fair 
and received the award for the 
most beautiful float in the home- 



coming parade. Chi-Os were also 
involved in 56 percent of all oth- 
er University organizations. 

Along with activities, the sis- 
ters stressed academics. They 
placed second in grades for the 
spring semester. 

Some well-known Chi-Os are 
Martha Layne Collins, Joyce 
Dewitt and Joanne Woodward. 



- 



Greeks/Xii 185 



- 




FRONT ROW: Anne Breckel, Denise Halderman, Diana King, Judy Martin, Treas.; Angie McKee, V.P., Membership; Cyndie Jones, Pres.; Tonya Martin, VP., 
Pledge Ed.; Julia Cunningham, Rec. Sec; Julie Overton, Cheryl Vanderpool, Kelly McBride, Dawn Williams. SECOND ROW: Jennifer Brooks, Debbie 
Powell, Michelle Sheringer, Sharon Alexander, Lisa Martin, Megan Mansour, Mary Brennan, Donna Newnam, Virginia Rowiett, Tammy Martin, Becki Von 
Luehrte, Amy Curtis, Shelly Carmack. THIRD ROW: Alison Culley, Stefanie Seigta, Tanya West, Laura West, Susan Gillespie, Sue Mustar, Amy Cox, Kim 
Wilson, Alison Tierney, Lisa Mouser, Gidget Brown, Tammy Flener, Annette Cowden, Farron Bridgman. FOURTH ROW: Kimberly Catlett, Mary Duell, 
Trish Friedman, Theresa Ball, Allison Haddock, Kimberly Clark, Delinda Davis, Stacy Lewis, Barbara Latham, Kate Krueger, Patty Crider, Stephanie Jordan, 
Cvnthia Massman, Maresa Smith. 



The sisterhood of Delta Zeta 
sorority was very special to each 
involved as they participated in 
various events at the University. 

The Delta Zetas were honored 
by receiving the national awards 
for Excellence in Membership 
and Excellence in Sorority Edu- 
cation. 

The sisters sponsored the Del- 
ta Zeta Frat Man Classic to raise 
money for their national philan- 




thropy project, the Gallaudet 
College for the Speech and Hear- 
ing Impaired and the House Ear 
Institute. They also participated 
in the EKU Maroon Balloon Day. 

A special event for the chapter 
this year was a visit to the Na- 
tional Headquarters in Oxford, 
OH. 

Famous Delta Zeta's include 
Mercedes Bates (Betty Crocker). 

FOUNDED: 

October 24, 1902 

CAMPUS: 

University of Miami 

COLORS: 

Rose and green 

SYMBOL: 

Turtle 

ADVISER: 

Lynn Whayne 



186 Greeks /AZ 





o 

bo 



Opposite Page: A wet Delta Zeta races for the 
finish line. Left: Delta Zetas intensely support 
their sorority. Below: Rushees get their first 
&< glance at Delta Zeta as the girls perform a skit. 




o 

00 



Greeks/AZ 187 



" 



Enthusiasm and togetherness 
best describes the individual 
members that make up Kappa 
Alpha Theta Sorority. 

Participating in most of the 
events held throughout the year, 
the Thetas captured several titles: 
first place in Greek Week, second 
place in Sigma Chi Derby, third 
place in Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
County Fair and first place in 
Beta Theta Pi football. 

The Thetas sponsor a tanning 
contest and their annual 
Halloween party to raise money 
for their philanthropy, the 
Institute of Logopedics for the 
Speech and Hearing impaired. 
Other service projects include 
Alpha Delta Pi Carnival, 
Madison County Tower Penny 
Drop, and Sigma Nu Pizza 
Eating Contest. 

Although Kappa Alpha Theta 
is a very active and busy sorority, 
the members place scholarship 
as its highest aim. Theta's ranked 
third in scholastic achievement. 

Cathy Moore, president, said, 
"The fraternity has a strong bond 
and we all come together to 
strive for the goals of our 
fraternity." 

Some famous Thetas include 
Mario Thomas, Ann Margaret 
and Amy Grant. 



FOUNDED: 

January 27, 1870 

CAMPUS: 

DePaul Univ. Greencastle, IN 

COLORS: 

Black and Gold 

FLOWER: 

Pansy 

SYMBOL: 

Kite 

ADVISER: 

Shirley Deane 



Right Hanging a banner is no problem for 
Sigma Chi Eric McCarter. Below Collecting for 
the Institute of Logopedics, Bridget Hornung 
helps support Kappa Alpha Theta's 
philanthropy. Opposite Page Jennifer 
Williams, Cathy Moore, and Nancy Parker are 
cheered on as they participate in the four- 
legged race during Sigma Chi Derby. 





188 Greeks/ KA6 








FRONT ROW: Karen Zins, Diana Smith, April Russell, Nancy Parker, Marie Goodman, Jennifer Williams, Lynn Ray, V.P., Finance; Kim Thomas, V.P., 
j Efficiency; Cathy Moore, Pres.; Cheri Barber, V.P., Pledge Ed.; Amy Edmonds, Lisa Major, Delia Gaines, Elizabeth Baughman, Kim Staliins, Debbie Cole, 
Carol Layton, Kelly Kuethe. SECOND ROW: Muffet Wright, Debbie Gregory, Gerri Duvall, Vicky White, Susie Wilson, Chellie Creamer, Bridget Hornung, 
Paisley Hill, Jeani&Schreiber, Stephanie Perry, Amy Thielmeier, Rhonda Roberts, Sarah McConkey, Melanie Hughes, Amber Callahan. THIRD ROW: Kim 
Harmon, Tonia Gordon, Pam Wise, Lisa Henson, Amy Gross, Traci Parrella, Tiffany Patrick, Jackie Stengel, Jill Schmidt, Terri Sweeney, Lisa Clifford, Susan 
Hardy, Lisa Obenshain, Margaret Hensel. FOURTH ROW: Belinda Becker, Leslie Wuilleumier, Amy Abrams, Denease Smith, Pam Gibson, Ellen Baxter, 
Courtney Kosid, Michelle Dix, Kim Herbig, Laura Robinson, Lisa House, Megan Sanders, Charlotte Gose. 



Greeks/KAe 189 



FOUNDED: 

October 23, 1897 

CAMPUS: 

Longwood College 

COLORS: 

Olive green and pearl white 

FLOWER: 

White rose 

SYMBOL: 

Ladybug 

ADVISER: 

Debra Core 



Right: Lisa Owens clears the obstacle course 
during the Lambda Chi Watermelon Bust. Top 
Opposite Page: Kappa Delta's gather for a Rush 
party. Bottom Opposite Page: Greek Week 
brings out crowds of Greek fans. 





FRONT ROW: Laura VanWagenen, Alyson Squires, Kim Goodman, Kari Coleman, Kim Parker, Beth Maurer, Rhonda Williams, Lisa Rose, Sec; Michelle 
Hammons, Pres.; Wendy Woelfel, V.P.; Teresa Thornbury, Tres.; Gwyn Cullen, Diana Clark, Michele Tanamachi, Sherrie Bush, Kim Parsons, Meg Wallace. 
SECOND ROW: Paula Damron, Audrey Bortner, Beth Bivens, Virginia Shannon, Michelle Slone, Lisa Sloan, Deana Heeger, Amy Mastin, Terri Bagby, Sherri 
Estes, Jodi Polechek, Carol Lozier THIRD ROW: Lisa Owens, Anne Secrest, Kristi Huber, Jennifer Schwertman, Renee Noel, Julie Lynch, Teri Lyons, 
Leanne Fitzhugh, Becky Beaumont, Kris Kersey, Stephanie Rehn, Kay Quandt, Melissa Weartz, Suzanne Duddy. FOURTH ROW: Christina Warnke, Leighan 
McKenzie, Pauline Myers, Missy Castle, Jennifer Ravencraft, Lee Napier, Annette Kline, Tina Hollback, Susan Ebert, Susan Kidwell, Leslie Meredith, Lisa 
Thompson. 



190 Greeks/ KA 






"Let us strive for that which is 
honorable, beautiful and high- 
est" was the motto for the Kappa 
Delta sorority. 

The 75 sisters of Kappa Delta 
strived to obtain these goals 
through participation in social 
and service activities at the Uni- 
versity and in the community. 
They participated in all Greek ac- 
tivities on campus, including the 
Sigma Chi Derby, SAE County 
Fair, Lambda Chi Watermelon 
Bust, KA Old South, and Greek 
Week. 

Homecoming was a successful 
event for the KDs. They teamed 
with the brothers of Beta Theta 
Pi to win the best float competi- 
tion. Two KD sisters, Becky Beau- 
mont and Kari Coleman, were 
members of the 1985 Homecom- 
ing Court. 

They also had a successful year 
in service. They raised over 
$1,000 for the Crippled Chil- 
dren's Hospital in Richmond, 
Virginia, for their national phil- 
anthropy project. They also vis- 
ited area nursing homes. 

It was evident that the mem- 
bers of KD were guided by their 
motto as they strived to grow 
both socially and academically 
through friendship and fellow- 
ship. 

Greeks/KA 191 




FRONT ROW: Sue Snell, Denise Hatfield, Karin Breines, Tres.; Francie Simpson, Karen Cardwell, First V.P.; Suzi Fischer, Pres.; Trina Fuhrmann, Amy Rueff, 
Laura Clayton, Janice Swanger. SECOND ROW: Sarah Lyons, Emily Scott, Barbara Martini, Sandy Hagan, Angela King, Janis Anderson, Diana Spencer, 
Brigid Enochs, Judy Kincer, Amy Jenkins, Stephanie Ray, Gala Trent, Wendy Hanna, Lisa O'Keily, Sandi Denny. THIRD ROW: Rachel Floyd, Samantha 
Schnering, Portia Spurlin, Julie Roark, Sid Kittila, Kim Warden, Susan Williams, Deborah Howser, Jackie Blackman. FOURTH ROW: Jill Goldey, Shawnna 
Webster, Karen Howser, Sandra Turley, Julie Stuard, Karen Cuis, Paula Caudill. 



The sisters of Phi Mu sorority 
had a productive year, and they 
planned to increase the 
productivity of the sorority by 
strengthening the bond of 
sisterhood among its members. 

To strengthen this bond, the 
group participated in several 
social and service projects at the 
University. 

The group participated in 
several Greek activities on 
campus and won second place in 
the SAE County Fair, Beta Theta 
Pi football, and in the Lambda 
Chi Watermelon Bust. 

The group also sponsored 
events in the community. They 
took part in the Adopt-a- 
Grandparent at Madison Manor. 
They had a toy cart at Pattie A. 
Clay Hospital, and they raised 
money for the Veteran's 
Memorial in Richmond. 

Nationally, the Phi Mu's 
demonstrated their excellence as 
a sorority by winning the award 




192 Greeks/«J>M 





FOUNDED: 

March 4, 1852 

CAMPUS: 

Wesleyan College 

COLORS: 

Rose and white 

FLOWER: 

Carnation 

SYMBOL: 

Lion 

ADVISER: 

Marilee Gabbard 



Opposite Page: Emily Scott shows a rushee the 
various Phi Mu designed sweatshirts. Left: 
Eating watermelon with no hands is no 
problem for Francie Simpson. Below: Phi Mus 
get support from their sisters. 




for the best execution of Rituals. 

The members of Phi Mu set 
several goals for themselves. 
They planned to raise $1,000 for 
M.D.A. and $1,000 for Project 
HOPE by holding their annual 
Carnation Week. They also 
wanted to become more actively 
involved with Panhellenic. 

Through their involvement in 
campus and community projects, 
the bond of sisterhood will be 
strengthened. 



Greeks/<DM 193 



FOUNDED: 

April 28, 1867 

CAMPUS: 

Monmouth College 

COLORS: 

Wine and silver blue 

FLOWER: 

Wine carnation 

SYMBOL: 

Angels and arrows 

ADVISER: 

Rita Davis 



The sisters of Pi Beta Phi val- 
ued their close sisterhood, which 
was an outstanding quality they 
shared. 

The Pi Phis had a successful 
year in service, scholarship and 
socially. 

In scholarship, the Pi Phis at- 
tained the highest grade point 
average among all of the sorori- 
ties on campus for two semesters 
in a row. Nationally, the Pi Phis 
received the Westchester Award 
for Improved Grade Point Aver- 
age. 

The Pi Phis excelled in service 
projects at the University. These 
projects included Panhellenic 
and United Way road block. Also, 
they adopted a member of the 
Telford Community Center once 
a month. 

The Pi Phis sponsored the Pi 
Beta Phi Hoedown, which was 
open to all fraternities to partici- 
pate in. They sponsored this ac- 
tivity to raise money for their 
philanthropy, Arrowmont 
School of Arts and Crafts. 

Their close sisterhood was evi- 
dent in their participation in 
Greek activities. The Pi Phis cap- 
tured a first place in both the Sig- 
ma Chi Derby and the Lambda 
Chi Watermelon Bust. 

Some famous Pi Phis include 
Grace Coolidge, Faye Dunaway, 
Mary Margaret Trumen and Su- 
san Lucci. 

194 Greeks/riBO 








1 A*. Tu _« 





Opposite Page Top: Pi Phis sing to rushees at 
the fall sorority sing. Opposite Page Bottom: A 

Pi Phi member exhibits sorority spirit. Left: 
Michele Grau is careful while participating in 
an egg-toss. 







FRONT ROW: June Crenshaw, Laura Riedel, Laura Hargrove, Sec; Shelia Smith, Pres.; Kim Hale, Tres.; Lisa Smith, Jeni Grau, Molly Tharp. SECOND ROW: 
Dandy Hopkins, Tina Grau, Stacy Prewitt, Carmen McElwain, Rebecca Clark, Michelle Newman, Laura Schardein, Elizabeth Long, Catherine Rao, Debra 
Jasper, Missy LeRoy, Shawn Bowman. THIRD ROW: Joanna Stephens, Linda Dagen, Kim Trimble, Lynn Deibert, Michele Grau, Molly Hackathorn, Jeanne 
Sites, Denise de Reynier, Crystal Walker, Lisa Cahill, Dana Ruble, Mary Beth Hart, Sara Church, Stephanie Sharkey, Tracy Carter. FOURTH ROW: Kathryn 
Papineau, Tracy Vineyard, Laura Kersey, Amy Mersch, Stace Thomas, Leigh Wilson, Tammy Stacy, Stacey Gable, Janet Mitchell, Vicki Bowman, Kim Stinson, 
Nancy Howard, Kathi Meuth, Mary-Anne Witten, Donna Avery. 



Greeks /TIBO 195 



Right: In the Homecoming Parade, the Betas 
display their version of the theme, Fantastic 
Fads. Below: Striving for perfection, this Beta 
works diligently painting one side of the 
phone booth for their float. Bottom Right: 
Concentration is the key as Donnie Perry rolls 
a cigarette at the SAE County Fair. 





196 Greeks/ BOM 




"The past semester has been an 
eventful one — one in which the 
Betas have grown closer and de- 
veloped greater bonds of broth- 
erhood," said John LaForge, 
president of Beta Theta Pi. 

The brothers of Beta Theta Pi 
placed a great importance on ser- 
vice. This dedication was recog- 
nized when the Betas received 
first place for the National Phil- 
anthropy Award for sponsoring 
the best philanthropy. They 
raised over $18,000 by sponsor- 



ing a Jail-A-Thon to benefit the 
American Cancer Society. 

Socially the Betas sponsored 
Beta football and basketball. The 
brothers were overall winners in 
Greek Week and placed first in 
the Delta Zeta Frat Man Classic. 
They also received the original- 
ity award for their homecoming 
float. 

Some famous members of the 
fraternity include Adam West, 
Cawood Ledford and Stan Smith. 



FOUNDED: 

August 8, 1839 
CAMPUS: 
Miami of Ohio 
COLORS: 
Pink and blue 
SYMBOL: 
Dragon 
ADVISER: 
Ed Smathers 




FRONT ROW: Aubrey Lipscomb, Scott Howard, Dan Perry, George Zydel, Treas.; John LeForge, Pres.; Harry Waggoner, Sec; Greg Creech, Tyler Scott, 
Tim Sears. SECOND ROW: Joseph Alexander, Charles E. Eastin, II, Kevin Chamberlin, David Schoengart, Michael Thompson, Dwayne Biddy, Todd 
Marksberry, David Russell, Randy Underwood, Wendell Hamm. THIRD ROW: Charles Goodlet, Scott Kerr, Tony Ryan, Jack Scriber. Pat Humphery, 
Jeff Prohaska, James Aquavivia II. BACK ROW: Jeff Banmone, John Long, Perry Goldfarb, Douglas Scunteh, Tom Linebach, Todd Boatman, John 
Crisologo, Blake Burchell, Dennis Hensley, Jr. 



Greeks/Ben 197 



Right: Cheering on their team, these KAs dis- 
play their spirit at Greek Week. Opposite Page: 
Andy Mathews and Jane Mayfield display KA 
letters as they walk to class together. 



FOUNDED: 

December 21, 1865 

CAMPUS: 

Washington and Lee 

COLORS: 

Crimson red and old gold 

FLOWER: 

Magnolia and red rose 

SYMBOL: 

Confederacy (Robert E. Lee) 

ADVISER: 

Dr. Stephen Fardo 





FRONT ROW: John Moser, Rick French, Dave Ayres, Randy Thomas, Treas.; Todd Murphy, Andy Mathews, Pres.; Debbie Cole, KA Rose; Allan Horner, V.P.; 
Graig Casada, Corr. Sec; Dale Bartlett, Glenn Mills, Mark Starns, Greg Farris. SECOND ROW: Tom Rahan, Wayne Miller, Paul Taylor, Greg Dee, Kenny 
Walton, Kerry Hall, Michael Baker, Troy McCracken, Terry Troutt, Trevor Stine, Tom Morgan, Glenn Barber, David Bryson, Troy Myers, Matthew Rhody, Bill 
White. THIRD ROW: Trip McCracken, Matt Huddleston, Jeff Myers, David Schildmeyer, Pat Stipes, Timothy Long, Daniel Schuerman, Robert Brown, Marc 
Taylor, Benny Foley, Doug Schuerman, Rick Shane, Mark Ford, Shannon Cornett. FOURTH ROW: Michael Watson, Andy Walters, Chris McAfee, Mark 
Altic, Freddie Branharn, Steve Milby, Michael Everett, Tim Owens, Alan Brown, Jody Rucker, Randy Martin, Ralph Asher. 



198 Greeks /KA 




FRONT ROW: Debbie Cole, Barbara Martini, Brigid Enochs, Lisa Garner, Elizabeth 
Baughman, Melinda Wood, Emily Scott. SECOND ROW: Kim Harmon, Cheri Barber, 
Sherry Girdler, Kim Gibson, Lisa Obenshain, Wendy Hanna, Dawn Daley. THIRD 
ROW: Beth Tingle, Lynda Schneider, Lisa Stewart, Kathy Barker, Jackie Redfield. 
FOURTH ROW: Tina Pfaehler, Amy Rueff, Michelle Martini, Lisa Durham. 





The men of Kappa Alpha Or- 
der took pride involving them- 
selves in campus activities. 

The KAs participated in many 
intramural sports and placed in 
several of them. They won sec- 
ond place in racquetball, third 
place in football, first place in 
tennis and second place in soft- 
ball. 

For community service pro- 
jects, the KAs participated in Sig- 
ma Alpha Epsilon County Fair 
and Delta Zeta Frat Man Classic. 
They also sponsored a dance-a- 
thon and KA Old South and 
raked leaves for the Richmond 
community. 

Some famous KAs include An- 
thony Perkins, Admiral Bird, J. 
Edgar Hoover and George Pat- 
ton. 

Graig Cassida said, "Our stron- 
gest point this year is the pledge 
class. They are a diverse pledge 
class, and the bonds of brother- 
hood are already visible." 



Greeks/KA 199 




FOUNDED: 
January 13, 1913 
CAMPUS: 
Howard University 
COLORS: 
Crimson and cream 
FLOWER: 
African violet 
SYMBOL: 
Elephant 
ADVISER: 
Beverly Haliday 



The sisters of Delta Sigma 
Theta claim their organization is 
a service-oriented one and they 
have plenty of proof to back up 
their statement. The group won 
honorable mention for doing the 
most service projects regionally. 

Their service projects included 
Voters Registration, can food 
drive, Halloween party for the 
Richmond kids, and Gas and 
Heat fund raiser for the 
Richmond community. Their 
philanthropy project was the 
United Negro College Fund. 

The group also hosted several 
events on campus, including 
Delta Week in the spring, the Mr. 
Esquire Pageant and the Annual 
Step Show. 

The group hoped to do service 
projects for the community as 
well as for the campus and 
developed better overall 
relationships with the Greeks. 

Some famous Delta Sigma 
Theta's include Lena Home, 
Natalie Cole, Nancy Wilson and 
Niki Giovanni. 




FRONT ROW: Janet Walker, Rec. Sec; Lisa Williams, Pres. 
SECOND ROW: Penrte Reed, Treas.; Sharon Owens, Charlene 
Jones, Corr. Sec. THIRD ROW: Terri Jones, Frederica Smith, Rush 
Chair. FOURTH ROW: Renata Goodloe, Alecia Owens, Melody 
Stoner. 




Above: Delta Sigma Thetas show their sisterhood as they sing. 



200 Greeks/Aie 




FRONT ROW: Tyrone Sturdivant, Troy Ellis. SECOND ROW: James Johnson, Anson Steel, Juan Mosby, Roderick Neal, Curtis 
Dunn. 



The Kappa Alpha Psi fraterni- 
ty set several goals for them- 
selves in their attempt to make 
their organization one of 
achievement. 

They hoped to become more 
oriented with the community 
through service projects and 
some social events. Their service 
projects included Shriner's Hos- 
pital, a Greek friend, and retire- 
ment homes. Their philanthropy 
project was the United Negro 
College Fund. They sponsored 
the can food drive at Thanksgiv- 
ing and the Kappa Ball. 

The group also participated in 
intramural basketball and they 
won the Frat. tournament and 
the 1984-85 TKE tournament. 

They stress achievement and 
quality of membership and they 
hope to instill this idea in their 
members as well as others. 



Famous Kappa Alpha Psi s in- 
clude Wilt Chamberlain, Thomas 
Bradley, three-time mayor of Los 
Angeles; Chappie James, first 
black four-star general; and Ar- 
thur Ashe, tennis professional. 



FOUNDED: 

January 5, 1911 
CAMPUS: 
Indiana University 
COLORS: 
Crimson and cream 
SYMBOL: 
Playboy bunny 
ADVISER: 
Dan Bertsos 



Greeks /KAY 201 



FOUNDED: 

January 9, 1914 

CAMPUS: 

Howard University 

COLORS: 

Blue and white 

FLOWER: 

White carnation 

SYMBOL: 

Dove 

ADVISER: 

Mike Elam 



The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma 
hope to enlarge their family and 
become a more positive force on 
campus. 

To develop their role on cam- 
pus the group hosted and partici- 
pated in several events at the 
University. They had the Blue 
and White family dinners as well 
as social dances. The Blue and 
White family consists of the Phi 
Beta Sigma's, the Zeta Phi Beta 
sorority, and the Phi Beta Sigma 
sweethearts. The Phi Beta Sig- 
mas also received the Homecom- 
ing Step Show trophy 



The group was guided by their 
motto: Culture for service and 
service for humanity." They vis- 
ited nursing homes and raised 
money to help the elderly people 
with their heating bills in their 
effort to promote service in the 
community. Their philanthropy 
project was the United Way. 

The group was also active in 
intramural sports at the Univer- 
sity and participated in flag foot- 
ball, volleyball and basketball. 

Some famous Phi Beta Sigma's 
include James Weldon Johnson 
and George Washington Carver. 




FRONT ROW: William Wilkinson, Glenn Williams, Dwayne Walker, Ronald Woods. SECOND ROW: Greg Parker, Treas.; Enitan Kalejaiye, Robert Mosley, 
Wayne Pointer, Sec , Michael Elam, Adv. THIRD ROW: Anthony Frazier, Chet Wright, Pres.; Dsaiah Hill, Charles Davis, VP; Bernard Grimes. 



202 Greeks/4>BI 




FRONT ROW: James Bryant, Social Chair.; Joseph Weather, Treas. SECOND ROW: Marion Johnson, Sec; Victor Edwards, Pres.; Reginald 
Clark, V.R (Not Present — Tony Berry, John Barbour), 



The brothers of Omega Psi 
Phi's hope to bring about a closer 
relationship between black 
Greeks and to bring back the 
campus party spirit. To do this, 
the brothers hosted several 
events on campus and they took 
part in various service projects. 

They hosted the Talent Hunt 
Program in the spring, Achieve- 
ment Week, and Community- 
/ Social Action. One of their ser- 
vice projects was a road block to 
raise money for the Kentucky 
River Foothills Development As- 
sociation, a local organzation that 
has a winter assistance program. 
They also had a Halloween party 



at the Telford Community Cen- 
ter for the children of Richmond 
and helped in the Anti-Apart- 
heid day demonstration on cam- 
pus. 

The group hopes to increase 
the total membership and also 
scholarship among its brothers. 
They have study hours set up to 
help promote this idea of schol- 
arship. 

Some famous Omega Psi Phi's 
include the Rev. Jesse Jackson, 
Vernon Jordan, Langston 
Hughes, Ozzie Newsome, and 
Benjamin Hooks, head of the 
N.AA.CP. 



FOUNDED: 

November 17, 1911 

CAMPUS: 

Howard University 

COLORS: 

Royal blue and old gold 

FLOWER: 

Budding red rose 

ADVISER: 

Dr. Wilt Berge 



Greeks /O-Sr 1 * 203 



Right: Lambda Chis put the final touches on as they prepare for the three-legged race. 
Bottom Page: Coaches make sure their teams have the proper instructions for the 
watermelon bust. 





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FRONT ROW: Sandy Fraley, Sec. and Treas.; Robin Harrel, Stacey Lueken, V.P.; Carrie 
Barnes. Pres.; Bobbi Brennan, Sports Coordinator; Debbie Powell, Hist.; Lori Wampler, 
Pat Hirsh. Crescent Coord. SECOND ROW: Monica Pearce, Teri Terrell, Debra Jasper, 
Missy Leroy, Beth Bivens, Karen Figgins, Dina Greenwell. THIRD ROW: Jackie Price, 
Tammie Sloan. Angela Johnson, Katherine Calhoun, Dana Mullins, Fonda Hall, Karen 
Abernathy. FOURTH ROW: Leanne Fitzhugh, Stephanie Denton, Elizabeth Shackleth, 
Helen Chandler, Joanna Chirichigno. 





204 Greeks/AKA 





FRONT ROW: Jeffrey Browning, Jeff Moore, John Jennings, Jeff Goderwis, Treas.; Brian Wiles, V.P.; David Hahn, Pres.; Mark Baumann, Sec; Greg Wilson, 
Danny Waits, Mark Smith, Dan Bertsos, Advisor. SECOND ROW: Eddy Cunagin, Barry Omohundro; Scott J. Jesseman, Tom Spence, Kevin Link, Darren 
Baker, Joe Scannell, Brad Butler, Ron Hammond, Tony Smith, Dean Heibert, Scott Gasses, Pat Hirsh, Will Johnson, Jr.; Chris Howard, Doug Dearing. THIRD 
ROW: Derek Lee Kirby, David Samson, Jeff Haake, Shannon Stone, Michael C Dupont, Nathaniel Ragland, Stephen Schilffarth, Charlie McDonald, Jeffrey- 
Jones, Scott Slattery, Joe Allen, John Scannell, Mark Ohlman, D. J. Bores, Doug Atchoson. FOURTH ROW: Ken Sanders, Guy Guckenberger, David Combs, 
Brian Field, Russ Romons, Kane Flanary, Michael McGhee, David Golden, David Nusz, Don Evans, Tom Slone, Fray Duncan, David Miska, Steve Kaninski, 
Wayne Adams. 



The Lambda Chi Alpha Frater- 
nity had a successful year. They 
won first place in the Sigma Al- 
pha Epsilon County Fair and the 
Alpha Delta Pi Road Rally. They 
won second place in the Pi Beta 
Phi Hoedown and third place at 
Greek Week. 

The group also participated in 
intramurals and sponsored some 
events at the University includ- 
ing the Lambda Chi Alpha Wa- 
termelon Bust, Sorority Kidnap 
and an air band contest. 

The group was also service 



minded and chose the Ronald 
McDonald House and Operation 
Read as their philanthropy pro- 
jects. They also gave cans to 
needy families in Richmond 
from the Sorority Kidnap. In the 
Sorority Kidnap, they kidnapped 
the president of each sorority. In 
order to get its president back, 
the sorority had to donate a can 
of food. 

Famous Lambda Chi Alpha's 
include Robert Urich, Harry Tru- 
man, Will Geer and Frank Reyn- 
olds. 



FOUNDED: 

Nov. 2, 1909 

CAMPUS: 

Boston University 

COLORS: 

Purple, green and gold 

SYMBOL: 

Cross and crescent 

FLOWER: 

White rose 

ADVISER: 

Dan Bertsos 



Greeks/AKA 205 



FOUNDED: 

December 26, 1848 

CAMPUS: 

Miami of Ohio 

COLORS: 

Baby blue and white 

ADVISER: 

Dr. Ralph Thompson 




FRONT ROW: Denebola Cook, Monica Wehrman. SECOND ROW: 
Suzanne Schilling, Lou Roberts, Laura Hesselbrock. THIRD ROW: 
Patrick Bennett, Michele Bouteiller, Cindy Thompson. BACK ROW: Kim 
Carson, Heather Cruickshank, Ann Monin. 




What do men such as Neil 
Armstrong, John Y. Brown, Bert 
Reynolds and Tim Conway all 
have in common? They are all 
members of the Phi Delta Theta 
fraternity. 

The University's Phi Delt fra- 
ternity was an active member of 
the Greek community. Their ser- 
vice projects included the 



Maroon Bash and they sponsored 
a Spring Softball Tournament. 
The fraternity also ushered for 
the University's football games. 
The Phi Delt Philanthropy 
was Lou Gehrigs Disease. Their 
goals were to improve nationally 
and win the Gold Star (best 
chapter) while maintaing 
scholastic status and winning the 



all-sports trophy. 

These fraternity brothers 
maintained the highest GPA of 
all the fraternities on campus. 
The Silver Star Award was given 
to the Phi Delts, nationally for 
the second best chapter. They 
also received the General 
Headquarters Trophy. 



206 Greeks/<t>Ae 





§> Opposite Page: Patrick Wilson stops to talk 
C between classes. Left: Phi Delts team together 
l£ to win during an intramural game of soccer. 




FRONT ROW: Pat Bennett, Patrick Wilson, David Hall, Allen Volz, V.P.; Don Bornhorst, Pres.; Kevin Wilson, Tres.; 
Dave Kauscher, Rick Hulse, Brian Howell. SECOND ROW: Deron Thompson, Mike Shover, Gary Snyder, Robert 
Hatcher, Terry Sellers, Donald Griffin, Mike Reed, Chris Hooten. THIRD ROW: Keith Kleine, Glen Daves, Rick 
Muterspaw, Chuck McHale, Todd Shinkle, Dave Igo, Chris Mover. FOURTH ROW: Tim Murphy, Jeff Brown, Troy 
Benne, Daniel Carney, Randy Adams, Scott Cooney. 



Greeks/OAe 207 



The Phi Kappa Taus participat- 
ed in several service projects in- 
cluding the Cardinal Hill Tele- 
thon and the Santa Claus Hot 
Line. 

The Delta Rho Chapter won 
the national award, Administra- 
tive Excellence Award, for its ex- 
cellence. 

Two of their parties they spon- 
sored were a big success. These 
parties included a Pep Rally for 
Homecoming at J. Suffers Mill 
and a Spring Break party 

Paul Newman and Mitch 
McConnell are two famous Phi 
Taus. 



FOUNDED: 

March 17, 1906 

CAMPUS: 

Miami University 

COLORS: 

Harvard red and old gold 

FLOWER: 

Red carnations 

SYMBOL: 

Unicorn 

ADVISER: 

Joseph Jointer 





FRONT ROW: Dan Drake, Sec; Dave Dale, Erzk Schultz, Treas.; John Martin, Pres.; John Stewart, VP; Bruce Williams, Eric Brandenburg, Jeff Castle. 
SECOND ROW: Kimberly Ward, Julie Oliver, Mania Saylor, Kelly Woodruff, Francie Simpson, Audrey Bortner, Christopher Tucker, Scot Skidmore, Ron 
Trenkamp, Ken Simon, Fred Welch, Tammy Damron, Teresa Gartman, Laura Ritter, Donna Hospkins, Nikki VanHoose, Stephanie Domanico. THIRD ROW: 
Diana Wilkins, Kay Barber, Bronwyn Wierman, Nancy Marcum, Kathy Giles, Brian Smith, Calvin Haughaboo, Walt Wisnieky, Pete Jones, Bill Hoelsber, John 
Spencer, Lance Petty, Karen York, Donna Wilson, Rena Gartman, Dena Korzeniewski. FOURTH ROW: Sandy Vickers, Chuck Davis, Chris Jennings, Todd 
Sloan, Mark Roberts, Jody Rhude, Dan Eubank, Jim Williams, Tom Eckert, Brent Whitehouse, Kevin Smith, Tommy Shouse, Colin Coburn, Joe Hayslett, 
Cheryl Evans, Scarlett Shumate, Jane Arnold. 



208 Greeks /<t>KT 





Opposite Page: Pete Jones puts the final touch- 
es on his cigarette at the SAE County Fair 
games. Left: Dave Dale eagerly prepares for the 
pie-eating contest. Below: Phi Taus await direc- 
tions from Deltas Zetas. 




Greeks /<J>KT 209 




FOUNDED: 

March 1, 1868 

CAMPUS: 

University of Virginia 

FLOWER: 

Lily of the Valley 

SYMBOL: 

Fire truck 

ADVISER: 

Steve Dickey 



Above: Pikes prepare for the three-legged race 
in the Delta Zeta Frat Man Classic. Opposite 
Page Top: The corner is a great place to find 
brothers and get signatures. Opposite Page 
Bottom: Participating in the Delta Zeta Frat 
Man Classic, this Pike jumps rope in one of the 
relay races. 




FRONT ROW: Dan Steely, Pres.; Michael Feeback, Sec. SECOND ROW: Stan Born, Mike Ridenour, 
Mike Lawson, Doug Bailey, Scotty Smith, Johnny Callebs, Rusty Strait. THIRD ROW: Paul Kelly, 
James Lewis, Wayne Bosley, Jeffrey Pack, Alan Whited, Stan Cole. FOURTH ROW: Bob Richardson, 
Craig Jones, Chaz Klosterman, Suave Jabi, Todd Mahorn. 



210 Creeks/riKA 






The brothers of Pi Kappa Al- 
pha worked together to make 
this year a successful one. 

For the thirteenth consecutive 
year, the men of Zeta Tau Chap- 
ter sponsored the Dream Girl 
Pageant to choose the women 
who would appear on their 
Dream Girl Calendar. The pag- 
eant was just the peak of a week 
full of activities. This week was 
called Pikes Peak Week and was 
held in the spring semester. 

The Pikes won several sport- 
ing events including second 
place in football, second place in 
TKE basketball and first place in 
the campus tug-of-war tourna- 
ment. 

A.B. "Happy" Chandler, Dan 
Issel, and Colonel Harlan B. 
Sanders are some famous Pikes. 



Greeks/nKA 211 




The brothers of Sigma Chi 
achieved many goals this year. 
Aside from having a successful 
rush, the Eta Alpha Chapter par- 
ticipated in many campus activi- 
ties. Among these activities were 
Brothers Day, intramural sports, 
Kappa Alpha Theta Halloween 
Partv and Greek Week. 

During the fall semester, the 
brothers sponsored their annual 
Sigma Chi Derby Week. This 
year 's Derby was one of the most 
profitable with a donation of 
S1500 going to their philanthro- 
py, Wallace Village. 

The brothers also attended the 
Kentucky Province Workshop 
held at Western Kentucky Uni- 
versity. Eta Alpha Chapter had a 
higher attendance than any oth- 




er chapter. 

John Wayne, Tom Selleck, Wil- 
liam Christopher, Eddie Sutton, 
David Letterman and Warren 
Beatty are some famous Sigma 
Chis. 

Left: Pat Joles attempts to roll his cigarette the 
fastest at the Sae County Fair. 

FOUNDED: 

June 28, 1855 

CAMPUS: 

University of Miami 

COLORS: 

Blue and old gold 

FLOWER: 

White rose 

SYMBOL: 

White cross 

ADVISER: 

Dr. James McCord 




FRONT ROW: Karen Zins, Kim Young, Mike Lanasa, Sec; Chris Rector, Treas.; Doug Harline, Pres.; Jennifer Williams, Sweetheart; Pat Armstrong, VP; 
Amber Newt Bautel, Jeff Braun, James Kreiger, Carrie Wales, Sandra Neef, Jeni Grau. SECOND ROW: Sherry Kaufenbarger, Janice Woodward, Russ Young, 
Pat Jates, Charles Pendleton, Tony Sturgill, Todd Mowry, Bob Joles, John Pallo, Kimberly King, Mary Hayes, Stephanie Perry, Virginia Shannon. THIRD 
ROW: Karen Miller, Lisa Knuckles, Linda Dagen, Molly Hackathorn, Bill Boirley, Brent Price, Eric McArtor, Matt Hackathorn, Frank Peters, Barry Slone, 
Alan Lloyd, Thomas Miller, Kelly Kuethe, Laura Van Wagenen. FOURTH ROW: Nancy Parker, Dandy Hopkins, Laura Hargrove. 



212 Greeks/IX 




FRONT ROW: Lawrence Justice, Thomas Atkin, Stephen Campbell, Treas.; Kevin Costello, Eminent 
Comm. Paul Miller, Daniel Timmerman. SECOND ROW: Mike Stephens, Todd Cook, Tony Smith, 
David Brown, Clark Sackson, Alexander Brosky, Pledge Pres.; Jim Vaught. THIRD ROW: Mike 
Whitehouse, Lt. Comm.; Carroll Roberts, Bob Lushy, Marty Thompson, Joseph Brosky, Joel Cotton, 
Greg Sizemore. 



After Neil Armstrong placed 
the first American flag on the 
moon, a Sigma Nu flag was also 
put there by former Sigma Nu 
Allen Shephard. 

This is just one of the things 
the Sigma Nu Fraternity at the 
University can be proud of. They 
also received the Shriner's Gold 
Book Award for Dedicated ser- 
vice of five years. 

The group sponsored and par- 
ticipated in several events dur- 
ing the year. They sponsored the 
Morehead Ball Run for Shriner's 
Hospital and they worked with 
the Kappa Alpha Theta's in spon- 
soring the Domino's Pizza eating 
contest for Marc's Center and 
helped at a dinner to benefit the 
veterans. Their philanthropy 
project was United Way. 

The group also participated in 
Greek Week, the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon County Fair, the Delta 
Zeta Frat Man Classic and intra- 
mural sports. 

"We have been striving for 



quality, not quantity," said Presi- 
dent Kevin Costello. "I feel we've 
achieved this goal." 

Famous Sigma Nu's include 
Bob Barker, James Dean, Harri- 
son Ford and Bear Bryant. 




FOUNDED: 

Jan. 1, 1869 
CAMPUS: 

Virginia Military Institute 

COLORS: 

Black, gold and white 

SYMBOL: 

Sword, Bible and rock 

FLOWER: 

White rose 

ADVISER: 

Jim Clark 



c" Left: Struggling for a victory, the Sigma Nus 
o show their determination during the Delta 
H Zeta Frat man classic. 



Greeks /IN 213 




Above- SAEs are cheered by their brothers as they struggle in a 
game of tug-of-war. Right: The SAEs participate in the three-legged 
race. 




FRONT ROW: Shelia Bradford, Cheri Mosley, Jeaxtie Wampler, Sec; Trina 
Hembree, Pres.; Wendy Sorensen, V.P.; Anita Ryan, Treas.; Kari Coleman. 
SECOND ROW: Tracy Pate, Sharon Johnson, Lisa Wayman, Angie Wills, Bridgit 
Carwile, Sheree Hamilton, Michelle Warndorf, Alesia Asuncion. THIRD ROW: 
Karen Hardin, Cathy Daminco, Julie Scheker, Fred Arbogast, Chrm.; Becky 
Redfield, Jennifer Geske, Theresa Butterhoff, Norma Long. BACK ROW: Angela 
Griffin, Diane Scribner, Mary Brown, Eillen McNamara, Jeni Stenger, Kristy 
Nolan, Denise Donning, Gerri Marksberry, Stephanie Pitts. 







■V. 



214 Greeks /I A E 





FRONT ROW: Rusty Hoffman, Tracy Banken, Bill Herrell, David Fischer, Otto Spence, Kari Coleman, Sweetheart; Tim Thornberry, 
Robert Groeschen, Brad Kisker, Treas.; Kevin Morgan, Kenny Karl, SECOND ROW: Scott McFarland, Michael Wagner, Thad Judy, 
Ashley Keith, Mark Brewer, Kevin Jones, Doug Grant, Mark Lockwood, Chris Hawkins, Pete Ramsey, David de la Pena, Jeffery Eisner, 
Tim Gentry, Mark Schiedmeyer, Wayne Young, Fred Muschong. THIRD ROW: Edward Goins, Shawn Erschell, Christopher Terry, Ernie 
Barry, Eric Yatteau, Alan Goodman, Fred Arbogast, Donald Pitts, George Skellie, Trey Webster, Pat Brotzge, David Laughlin, Todd Smith, 
Neville Watkins, Jamie Burns, David Barron, Greg Terry. BACK ROW: Steve Baugh, Jonathan Gift, Bob Lemker, Chip Brenner, Jim 
Phillips, Chip Spencer, Bill Arbogast, Doug Asher, lyier Payne, Richard Bascom, Keith Hindman, Gary Conley, Marc Fowler, Lerter 
Meyter, John Quinlan, Tom Bellew. 



The chapter of Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon was founded on campus 
on October 27, 1973, and they 
have been active members of the 
Greek community since then. 

This year was a busy one for 
the SAEs. They sponsored the 
SAE County Fair in the fall se- 
mester with the proceeds going 
to their philanthropy, Cystic Fi- 
brosis. 



During the year, the SAEs par- 
ticipated in many intramural 
sports, and they won the All 
Sports Award. Also, the brothers 
won first place in the Chi Olym- 
pics and second place in Greek 
Week. 

Some famous SAEs include 
John McEnroe, Greg Nettles and 
William McKinley. 



FOUNDED: 

March 23, 1856 

CAMPUS: 

Alabama University 

COLORS: 

Purple and gold 

FLOWER: 

Violet 

SYMBOL: 

Lion 

ADVISER: 

Dr. Dan Varney 



Greeks/IAE 215 




Above: Greg Fielder tags a Theta Chi during a 
Greek Week game. Right: These Sigma Pis 
demonstrate the friendship each brother has. 
Opp. Page: Preparing for the Delta Zeta Frat 
Man Classic, these brother await final instruc- 
tions. 

"We are still the underdogs, but 
we've come a long way," said Sigma 
Pi President Greg Fielder. "I think 
we've done a lot to build up our 
reputation during the past year." 

The Sigma Pi's participated in 
many events at the University. 
They received second place awards 
in both the Beta Theta Pi Football 
Tournament and Fraternity Soccer. 
They also received a third place 
award in Intramural Volleyball. 
The group raised the most money 
for the Ronald McDonald House at 
the Alpha Delta Pi Carnival. 

The group has close ties with 
other Sigma Pi chapters around the 
nation and at the University where 
the organization was founded in 
Vincennes, Indiana. In the spring 
they hold a pig roast and softball 
tournament and invite other Sigma 
Pi chapters. They also take their 
Fall pledges to Vincennes for their 
initiation. "That has become a tradi- 
tion," said Fielder. 

Some famous Sigma Pi's include 




216 Greeks/If! 



— — : — 

IN 

p RRT MHNS 
- CLRSSIC! 
^ V con tuts 





astronaut Walter M. Schirra, Jr., 
syndicated columnist and author 
Dr. Maxwell Rafferty actor James 
Garner, Judge Curtis Shake and 
Jimmy Buffett. 

FOUNDED: 
Feb. 26, 1897 
CAMPUS: 
Vincennes, Indiana 
COLORS: 
Lavender and white 
ADVISER: 
Mike Frasier 




FRONT ROW: Beverly Noonan, Morris Blair, Sec; Barry Arnold, V.P.; Greg Fielder, Pres.; Ron Bell, Tres.; Jay Taylor, 
Hearld. SECOND ROW: Pamela NewelLPatrick Beckham, Pledge V.P.; Bobby Stevens, Rob Davis, Kevin Derringer, 
Robert Wilson, Tim Campbell, Leia LeMaster, Lynn King, Kendra Headen. THIRD ROW: Chrissy Barber, Sarah Lyons, 
Vincent Jones, Steve Minton, Scott Hogan, Bob Broecker, Patrick McCoy, Ann Wilson, Cheryl Guest. FOURTH ROW: 
Molly Johnson, Mark Hicks, Steven Owen, Lonny Hill, Kent Lewis, James Webb, Michael O. Durbin, Brenda Boucher, 
Monica Meder. 



Greeks /in 217 



The TKE Men of the Universi- 
ty have much to be proud of. 
Their goals were "to receive most 
improved chapter and increase 
in quality, not quantity." These 
are important words to live by, 
says Bill Hodapp, TKE president. 

The fraternity received awards 
nationally for the most improved 
chapter and the National Order 
of The TKE Eagle. Locally, the 
men received the Kappa Alpha 
Theta Halloween Party award 
for best participation. 

They also sponsor numerous 
events during the year. One 
event is the TKE Basketball Tour- 
nament. The brothers also col- 





FRONT ROW: Kim Murphy, Lisa Owens, Stuart Morgan, Randy Miller, Robert Baker, Chap.; Chris Niblock, Sec; Bill Hodapp, Pres.; Paul Snyder, Treas.; 
Chris Landers, Pledge Trainer; Boo Kempson, Jenny Meyers, Debbie Kerrick, Mary Schroeder. SECOND ROW: Cordell Brackett, Christopher Pagel, Todd 
Taylor, Charles Salmons, Jeffrey Serber, Wayne Warning, Scott Abney, Mark Johnson, Len Ellis, Fred Schnefer, John Peck, Bill Bentley, Donny Hebert, Tom 
Miller. THIRD ROW: Blake Dotsen, Steve Morrison, Mike Scott, Bob Woltermann, Ed Vegso, David Rich, Mike De Simone, James Conley. FOURTH ROW: 
Blaine Loomer, Mike Cordray, Stan Browning, Bill Story, Mark Miniler, Todd Gonterman, Brent New, Trey Stephens, David Wilson, Jeff Newman. 

218 Greeks/TKE I 






lected over $2000 last year for the 
Special Olympics. Their philan- 
thropy is St. Judes and the Madi- 
son Co. Special Olympics. Other 
service projects include the Na- 
tional Council for Crime and De- 
linquency and the Research As- 
sistance for the National Coun- 
cil. 

Former TKE's range from 
names such as Elvis Presley, to 
Danny Thomas, to Pres. Ronald 
Reagan. 

Opposite Page: This TEKE avoids the tag in 
duck-duck-goose game at Greek Week. Above: 
At Greek Week games, these TEKES support 
their fraternity brothers. Left: The TEKES re- 
ceive instructions from their coach during Pi 
Phi Hoedown. 



FOUNDED: 

January 10, 1899 

COLORS: 

Cherry red and gray 

ADVISER: 

Ron Hopkins and 

David Malcom Jones 



Greeks /TK£ 219 




Above: Showing their spirit, this group of The- 
ta Chis support their Homecoming float at the 
parade. Right: The water appears to be cool at 
Greek Week. Opposite Page: This Theta Chi 
watches other Greek members receive a pie in 
the face. 



FOUNDED: 

April 10, 1856 

CAMPUS: 

Norwich Univ. 

COLORS: 

Military red and white 

ADVISER: 

Dr. Dan Bodley 




220 Greeks/eZ 




"Increase the pride within 
the chapter and excel at every- 
thing we participate in," said 
Theta Chi President Guthrie 
Green. 

The men of Theta Chi have 
been active on campus in sev- 
eral service projects. The fra- 
ternity was involved in raising 
money for Cardinal Hill Hos- 
pital, on the University's cam- 
pus. Also, the philanthropy 




for the fraternity is the Statue 
of Liberty in its celebration 
year. Chosen second in the DZ 
Frat Man Classic, the Theta 
Chis are proud. They also, 
sponsor the Fall Quarter's 
Tournament and in the spring 
a Rally Week. 

Some famous Theta Chis in- 
clude Chrylser Magnet, Lee Ia- 
cocca and Movie Fame Steven 
Spielberg. 




FRONT ROW: Donna Callahan, Susie Quesenberry, Christy Strong, Robert Mercke, Daniel Phillips, Larry Creamer, Treas.; Steve Bennett, VP; Becky 
Beaumont, Guthrie Greene, Pres.; Jeff Coomes, Sec; Stephen Pyle, John Ries, Bob Wright, Jennifer Sinclair, Laura Kline. SECOND ROW: Tricia Ryle, Jenny 
Jordan, Pete Humes, Wendell Haag, Jon Campbell, Michael Hurd, Kevin Stephens, Franklin Smith, Mark Buell, Scott Turner, Gene Adams, Robert 
Steinmetze, Melanie Mcintosh. THIRD ROW: Beth Whitfield, Paula Parker, Lisa Mouser, John Osborne, Randall Moore, Phillip Taylor, John Tapp, W.C 
Carroll, Steven Arave, Greg Rinehart, Craig Caddock, Richard Burke, Cathy Burt, Amy Smith. FOURTH ROW: Tammy Wilson, Christopher Kaelin, Rick 
Parker, Paul Justice, Carlos Flores, Brent Manley, Kevin Morton, Michael Fletcher, Ray Bastin, Michael Gray, Rob Jenkins, Caroline Wariord, Kathy Rockwell. 



; 



Greeks /6Z 221 



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222 People 




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Growing as individuals 
to receive the highest 



Return 



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Investments 



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Seniors 
Juniors 
Sophomores 
Freshmen 






People 223 



Seniors 



ABXER, PATRICIA A. 


Richmond, KY 


ABSHER, JEFFREY K. 


Eubank, KY 


ARVOLD, DAVID ALLEN 


Clearwater, FL 


ASHLEY, KEVIN 


Argillite, KY 


AYERBECK, THEODORE T. 


Walton, KY 


BALES, LISA 


Corbin, KY 


BERRYMAN, MICHAEL W. 


Stanton, KY 


BOYD, JOHN M. 


Lexington, KY 


BRADY, MAUREEN S. 


Louisville, KY 


BUCKER, MARY LEIGH 


Richmond, KY 


BUTLER, ROBIN L. 


Prospect, KY 


CALABRIA, RENNIE 


Hamilton, OH 


CARRICO, NORMA 


Matewan, WV 


CASEY, NORMA 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


CLARK, NANCY 


Lebanon, OH 


COVINGTON, ROTHEL 


Louisville, KY 


CRAFT, JOE 


Lexington, KY 


DUNCAN, ALICIA K. 


Sturgis, KY 


DURHAM, MICHAEL W. 


East Bernstadt, KY 


ETHERINGTON, PATTI 


Versailles, KY 



FARAH, ABDUL-RAHMAN Las-Anod, Somalia 

FELEMBAN, FAIZ Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 

GAFFNEY, MARK Bardstown, KY 

GAMBREL, RICHARD Pineville, KY 

GHENG, HAU-YIN Richmond, KY 



GILBERT, CHERYL 


Corbin, KY 


GLASS, KATHRYN 


Owensboro, KY 


GRAHAM, MARY BETH 


Louisville, KY 


HAMMEL, LISA 


Fairfield, OH 


HANEY, MARCIA 


Bedford, KY 


HARLEY, REBECCA J. 


Harrodsburg, KY 


HARTLAGE, THOMAS E. 


Louisville, KY 


HASSUR, DAVID 


Lexington, KY 


HAUGHABOO, TANJA M. 


Maysville, KY 


HAZEGHAZAM, MEHPAT 


Richmond, KY 




224 Seniors/Abn-Haz 



m*'m 




HINZE, HOWARD 


Bellbrook, OH 


HOLMES, MARK 


Ashland, KY 


HORN, JAMES H. 


Inez, KY 


INMAN, JAMES 


Cincinnati, OH 


JACKSON, DAVID W. 


Richmond, KY 


KAYS, PATRICK 


Mooresville, IN 


KING, LYNN 


Louisville, KY 


KORB, JOSEPH 


Hollywood, FL 


LINVILLE, CYNTHIA 


Mt. Olivet, KY 


LONG, G. TIMOTHY 


Louisville, KY 


McCOLLOR, DONNA 


Springboro, OH 


McELHONE, KATHLEEN M. 


Rockville, MD 


McGONIGLE, DALE 


Clay City, KY 


McLEAN, LAIRD 


Canada 


MILLER, DEBORAH 


Leburn, KY 


MULLINS, STEPHEN 


Burdine, KY 


NEEF, SANDIE 


Louisville, KY 


NEWPORT, KIM 


Pineville, KY 


NICHOLSON, MIKE 


Richmond, KY 


PENNINGTON, ELESH L. 


Sandyhook, KY 


PERRY, SHELLYE K. 


Richmond, KY 


PHILLIPS, BETHANY 


Manchester, KY 


PRICE, ALISSA 


Grape Orchard, KY 


PRUITT, DIANA 


Hamilton, OH 


READ, MARK 


Louisville, KY 


REYNOLDS, ANTHONY L. 


Danville, KY 


RIDGLEY, CINDRA S. 


Richmond, KY 


SCHARDEIN, LAURA D. 


LaGrange, KY 


SHACKELFORD,SANDRA 


Corbin, KY 


SMITH, B. DARLENE 


Busy, KY 


SMITH, FREDERICA D. 


Lexington, KY 


SMITH, GREGORY SCOTT 


London, KY 


SNYDER, GARY 


Richmond, KY 


STEELE, LAURA M. 


Bellbrook, OH 


STEWART, BRAD 


Campbellsburg, KY 



Seniors /Hin-Ste 225 



Seniors 



SUTTON, MARK T. Frankfort, KY 

TAMPTHIA, MOSES Williamsburg, KY 

TANAMACH, MICHELE ANN Somerset, KY 

THOMPSON, NANCY Campbellsville, KY 

THORNTON, DIANE Demossville, KY 



TURNER, THOMAS L. 


Paint Lick, KY 


TWIS, LISA L. 


Berea, KY 


YERVILLE, PAMELA J. 


Maysville, KY 


WALKER, JANET 


Louisville, KY 


WALKER, LAURIE 


Owensboro, KY 


WHITAKER, BETTY 


Irvine, KY 


WHITT, GINNY 


Mt. Washington, KY 


WILKE, RONALD E. 


Bellevue, KY 


WILLIAMS, CHRISTINE M. 


Edgewood, KY 


WILLIAMS. THERESA 


Clay City, KY 


WILLIAMSON, JEFFERY 


Big Clifty, KY 


WILLIS, TERESA 


Pineville, KY 


WILSON, ANGELA M. 


Lexington, KY 


WIREMAN, LAURA L. 


Jackson, KY 


WRIGHT, CAROLINE 


Lexington, KY 


ABBOTT, MICHAEL D. 


Frankfort, KY 


ABELL, WANDA 


Lebanon, KY 


ABNER, RENE 


Cincinnati, OH 


ARNEY, JOHN L. 


Irvine, KY 


ACOSTA, SUSAN 


Richmond, KY 


ADAMS, DARLENE 


Woodbine, KY 


ADRIAN, LYNN R. 


Frankfort, KY 


ALCORN, JERRI L. 


McKee, KY 


ALIG, DANIEL ADAM 


Dayton, OH 


ALLEGRINI, ANNE 


Fort Thomas, KY 


ALLEN, CAROL 


Carrollton, KY 


ALLISON, MELANEI BAYS 


Williamsburg, KY 


ALLISON, ROGER 


Middlesboro, KY 


ALTIC, MARK 


Arcanum, OH 


ANDERSON, JULIA H. 


Walton, KY 




226 Seniors/Sut-And 







"1 r~ 





ANDERSON, MAJA 


Paris, KY 


ANDERSON, SCOTT 


Lexington, KY 


ANGEL, RODNEY 


Covington, KY 


ANTEL, ANGIE 


Ft. Mitchell, KY 


ARINGTON, KIM 


Shelbyville, KY 


ARNOLD, BARRY S. 


Danville, KY 


ASBERRY, STEVEN J. 


Albany, KY 


ASUNCION, ALESIA 


Elizabethtown, KY 


ATUNZY, LINUS 


Richmond, KY 


ATWOOD, JENNIFER 


Cincinnati, OH 


AYLOR, RUTH 


Hebron, KY 


AYRES, ROGER 


Lancaster, KY 


BACK, JACKIE L. 


Monticello, KY 


BAILEY, ELISSA 


Betsy Layne, KY 


BAILEY JESSE ALLEN 


Ravenna, KY 


BAIN, KATY K. 


Berea, KY 


BAKER, RHONDA 


LaGrange, KY 


BAKER, T. ELAINE 


Hazard, KY 


BALDWIN, JULIE 


Richmond, KY 


BALL, JOE 


Lancaster, KY 


BALLINGER, THERESA 


Richmond, KY 


BARKER, LORIE 


Corbin, KY 


BARNES, DANNY 


Sylva, NC 


BARNES, TERI L. 


Richmond, KY 


BARNETT, JERRILYN 


Lewisport, KY 


BARNEY JOHN CASEY 


Louisville, KY 


BASS, SANDRA KAY 


Richmond, KY 


BAXTER, DANA 


Lexington, KY 


BEAM, DAVID W. 


Bardstown, KY 


BEASLEY, MARK 


Somerset, KY 


BELL, ANDREA 


Florence, KY 


BELL, JACQUELINE 


Monticello, KY 


BELLANCA, LISA M. 


Maysville, KY 


BENGE, ELAINE 


Crab Orchard, KY 


BENGE, JILL 


Bellevue, KY 



Seniors/And-Ben 227 



Seniors 



BENNE, TROY 
BENNETT, MISSY A. 
BENNINGFIELD, DEANNA 
BENTLE, JULIE 
BENTLEY HOWARD D. 



BENTLEY, MELISSA 
BERNARD, JUNE A. 
BERRY, RHONDA K. 
BEST, LAURA L. 
BISHOP, JANET A. 



BISIG, MIA 
BLACKBURN, LINDA 
BLAKELY, JOSEPH SCOTT 
BLANTON, CARLA DENISE 
BLOSS, DAVID 



BOBBITT, DENNIS L. 
BOLCAS, MICHAEL A. 
BOLTHE, PATRICIA 
BORDER, PAUL T. 
BOTTS, LUCILLE 



BOTTS, SUSAN 
BOUCHER, BRENDA 
BOWLING, STEVE 
BOWLING, ZALA ANN 
BRACKETT, SHEILA 



Burlington, KY 

Irvine, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Falmouth, KY 

Shelbiana, KY 



Neon, KY 

Jamestown, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Shelbyville, KY 

Harrods Creek, KY 



Louisville, KY 

Hardy, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Barbourbille, KY 

Louisville, KY 



Somerset, KY 
Versailles, KY 

Brooksville, KY 
Lancaster, KY 

Denniston, KY 



Denniston, KY 

Fremont, OH 

Independence, KY 

Irving, KY 



BRADSHAW, SHANNON LYNN Woody, KY 

BRADENBURG, J. ERIC Richmond, KY 

BRANDENBURG, SUSAN Beattyville, KY 

BRANHAM, RICHY Robinson Creek, KY 

BRENNAN, BOBBI Frankfort, KY 



BRENNER, CHIP 
BRETT, CATHYRN 
BREWER, KIM 
BROCKMAN, BRAD 
BROCKMAN, GREGORY S. 



Richmond, KY 
Titusville, FL 

Booneville, KY 
Lebanon, KY 

Sandy Gap, KY 




228 Seniors/Ben-Bro 




i , -n 



BROOKS, MINNIE 


Richmond, KY 


BROTZGE, J. PAT 


Louisville, KY 


BROWN, BETSY 


London, OH 


BROWN, MARY B. 


Prospect, KY 


BROWN, ROBERT 


Maysville, KY 


BROWN, TAMMY 


Richmond, KY 


BROWNING, ANN 


Lancaster, KY 


BROWNING, JEFFREY 


Falmouth, KY 


BRUCE, LAURA 


Corbin, KY 


BRYANT, KATHY L. 


Taylorsville, KY 


BUCKLE, KENNETH 


Hyden, KY 


BUCKMAN, DONNA 


Louisville, KY 


BUGG, LARRY 


Lebanon, KY 


BUIS, JAMES R. 


Lancaster, KY 


BUNCH, MARCIA 


Paducah, OH 


BURCH, REGINA 


Booneville, KY 


BURCHWELL, PAULA 


Flatwoods, KY 


BURDINE, TAMMY 


Somerset, KY 


BURKE, SONJA LYNN 


Montiecello, KY 


BURNS, JAMES EDWARD 


London, KY 


BURT, JULIE 


Somerset, KY 


BURTON, SHIRLEY 


Liberty, KY 


BURTON, ZANE, 


Standford, KY 


BUSH, SHERRIE J. 


Richmond, KY 


BUTLER, DWIGHT 


Harned, KY 


BYRNSIDE, TERESA A. 


Shelbyville, KY 


CALDER, JENNA 


Donierset, KY 


CALHOUN, NERISSA J. 


Carling, KY 


CAMPBELL, STEPHEN 


Hyden, KY 


CANDILL, KEVIN 


Richmond, KY 


CANN, MICKI 


Beattyville, KY 


CAREY, JAY D. 


Wilmington, OH 


CARRICO, LORETTA ANN 


Matewan, WV 


CARROL, JULIE 


Leitchfield, KY 


CAUDILL, DALERIE 


Hazard, KY 



Seniors/Bro-Cau 229 



Seniors 



CECIL, JACKIE 


Stanville, KY 


CECIL, RUSHA 


Stanville, KY 


CHANEY. REBECCA 


Oxford, OH 


CHAPMAN, ROGER 


England 


CHIN, NORA 


Richmond, KY 


CHIU, FABIANA 


Lima Peru 


CHRISTOPHER, LAURA 


Winchester, KY 


CLARK, MARK A. 


Maysville, KY 


CLARK, ONDEA L. 


South Shore, KY 


CLARK, REBECCA 


Bloomfield, KY 


CLARK, RICKI 


Frankfort, KY 


CLAY, SHARON 


Louisville, KY 


CLIFTON, PAMELA 


Hebron, KY 


COBB, SALLY M. 


Campbellsville, KY 


COCHRAN, KAREN 


Lebanon, OH 


COLE, DEBRA 


Beattyville, KY 


COLEMAN, H. McKENSEY 


Lexington, KY 


COLLINS, ANDREA 


Franklin, OH 


COMBS, TARA 


Raceland, KY 


CONATSER, JEFF 


Louisville, KY 


CONNER, LISA 


Haron, KY 


COOK, DENEBOLA 


Blanchester, OH 


COONEY, LISA ANN 


Fort Wright, KY 


CORNETT, KELLEY 


Lexington, KY 


COUCH, DEBBIE 


Harlan, KY 


COUCH, SHEILA 


Wooton, KY 


COWAN, CLARISSA 


London, KY 


COX, JAN ELIZABETH 


Somerset, KY 


COX, W. BRENT JR. 


Louisville, KY 


CRAIG, PATRICK E. 





CRAVEN, CHRISTINE ELAINE Covington, KY 
CRAWFORD, ALICE Science Hill, KY 

CRAWFORD, ARTHUR Science Hill, KY 

CREAMER, LARRY LEE Jeffersonville, OH 

CREECH, TERESA Stanton, KY 




230 Seniors /Cec-Cre 




CRENSHAW, JUNE 
CROUCH, JAHNNA 
CRUME, CRAIG 
CUMMINS, LESLIE 
CUNAGIN, EDDY DEWAYNE 



CURTIS, AMY 

BARNEY, THOMASINA E. 

BAILEY, PAULA GALE 

BALEY, DAWN 

DALTON, REGINA HARGIS 



New Castle, KY 

Mariba, KY 

Frankfort, KY 

Frankfort, KY 

Nicholsville, KY 



St. Clairsville, OH 

Lexington, KY 

Lancaster, KY 

Lexington, KY 

Stanford, KY 



DANIEL, TIM Catlettsburg, KY 

DARST, GREGORY A. Louisville, KY 

DAUGHERTY-HOPKINS, EMMIE Mt. Vernon, KY 
DAUGHERTY, MARLENE Stearns, KY 

DAUX, PETER Richmond, KY 



DAVENPORT, MARK 
DAVENPORT, SUSAN 
DAVIS, MICHELLE 
DAVISON, K. 
DE REYNIER, DENISE LYNN 



Bardstown, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Stambaugh, KY 

South Shore, KY 

Cincinnati, OH 



DEATON, JANET CAROL 
DECKER, NANCY 
DEDMAN, TIMOTHY 
REIBERT, LYNN 
DENNIS, JEFF 



DENNY, SANDY 
DEVLIN, STOBHAN 
DIETSCH, TAMMY 
DINGMAN, DEBBIE 
DIXON, DAVE 



DIXON, FONTAINE 
DOBSON, CHRYL 
DOERR, JULIE A. 
DOLL, SHARON 
DOLSTON, DAN 



Jackson, KY 

Lexinton, KY 

New Kingstown, PA 

Irvine, KY 



Richmond, KY 

Stirling, NJ 

Louisville, KY 

Canada 

Independence, KY 



Lexington, KY 

Irvine, KY 

W. Chester, OH 

Kettering, OH 

Louisville, KY 



Seniors /Cre-Dol 231 



Seniors 



DORRIS, GREG 


Paducah, KY 


DOSCH, LEIGH ANN 


Bellevue, KY 


DOTSON, ED 


McVeigh, KY 


DOUGHERTY, KELLY 


Independence, KY 


DOUGLAS, MICHELE T. 


Kings Mountain, KY 


DOWNEY, WILLIAM M. 


Louisville, KY 


DRESSMAN, MONICA D. 


Erlanger, KY 


DUFF, ANGELA 


Booneville, KY 


DUNCAN, MICHAEL LOUIS 


Louisville, KY 


DUNLAP, RACHELLE 


New Bremen, OH 


DUNN, JODI 


Cincinnati, OH 


DUNN, LINN 


Marion, OH 


DYEHOUSE, LISA K. 


Crab Orchard, KY 


ECKERT, LINDA 


Louisville, KY 


EDLIN, PATSY 


Louisville, KY 


EDWARDS, BARBARA 


Sharpsburg, KY 


EDWARDS, INEZ 


Sharpsburg, KY 


ELDER, N. DIANE 


Louisville, KY 


ELLIS, MARY HELEN 


Shelbyville, KY 


ELSWICK, DOUG 


Elkhorn City, KY 


EMRICK, MELINDA 


Richmond, KY 


ESTEP, JON 


Grove City, OH 


FARLER, ROBIN 


Wendover, KY 


FAULCONER, KIMBERLY SUE Paris, KY 


FAULKNER, ROBERT 


Union, KY 


FAY, JOANNE 


Campbellsville, KY 


FEKETE, SUSAN LYNN 


Louisville, KY 


FIELDER, GREGORY K. 


Monroe, OH 


FISTER, KIMBERLY 


Lexinton, KY 


FITZPATRICK, ANGELA PERRY Frankfort, KY 


FLETCHER, TERESA 


Williamson, W VA 


FLINT, JENNIFER 


Offutt, KY 


FLOYD, ELLA M. 


South Shore, KY 


FOWLER, THOMAS E. 


Fairfax, VA 


FOWLER, CHRISTOPHER 


Richmond, KY 




232 Seniors/Dor-Fow 




FOX, EUGENE 


Lexington, KY 


FRANCIS, MONICA 


Middletown, OH 


FRANKLIN, NANCY 


Taylorsville, KY 


FRAZIER, PATTI 


Louisville, KY 


FREE, LISA 


New Holland, OH 


FRITZ, LORI 


Richmond, KY 


FRYE, LISA 


Monricello, KY 


GADD, KENDALL 


Berea, KY 


GAINES, DELIA 


Campbellsville, KY 


GAMMON, KATHLEEN M. 


Florence, KY 


GARNETT, ROBIN K. 


Burlington, KY 


GARRETT, DENISE KIM 


Springfield, OH 


GASH, TRENT 


Harrodsburg, KY 


GATWOOD, LISA 


Sanders, KY 


GAW, MELINDA S. 


Middletown, OH 


GAY, LAURIE L. 


Frankfort, KY 


GEARING, JULIA 


Wabakoneta, OH 


GENSHEIMER, JOHN P. 


Louisville, KY 


GETMAN, CHARLOTTE LEE 


Lancaster, KY 


GEVEDON, HANNERS RENARD Crab Orchard, KY 


GEVENDON, CAROLYN A. 


Crab Orchard, KY 


GEWERTZ, MICHELLE 


Kettering, OH 


GIEBE, KURT 


Richmond, KY 


GIER, JENNIFER M. 


West Covington, KY 


GILBERT, TAMELA 


Louisville, KY 


GILES, VICKY L. 


Cynthiana, KY 


GODWIN, TERRI L. 


Winchester, KY 


GOLDEN, DAVID 


Hope, IN 


GOODE, DAVID 


Liberty, KY 


GOODE, DAVID 


Versailles, KY 


GOODMAN, KIMBERLY J. 


Babson Park, FL 


GOODPASTER, PAULA E. 


Kenton Hills, KY 


GRAHAM, RICHARD 


Louisville, KY 


GRAU, JENIFER A. 


Florence, KY 


GREENJOHNIE 


Hendricks, KY 



Seniors/ Fox-Gre 233 



Seniors 



■ 



GREEN, LISA L. 


London, KY 


GREENE, JOHN STEPHEN 


Charleston, WV 


GREER. SUSAN 


Frankfort, KY 


GREGORY, JAMES STEPHEN 


Bronston, KY 


GRIDERS, SHEILA A. 


Glasgow, KY 


GRIFFITH, SUSAN 


Berea, KY 


GUBBAGE, LISA 


Gahanna, OH 


GUEST, CHERYL 


Kettering, OH 


GUIER, KEVIN BRIAN 


Oak Grove, KY 


GUIZIO, TONY 


Louisville, KY 


GULLfclTE, CLOTINE 


Lexington, KY 


HACK, JACQUELINE 


Louisville, KY 


HACKBURN, KATHY 


Southgate, KY 


HAFENDORFER, LISA 


Louisville, KY 


HAHLE, KARA 


Huber Heights, OH 


HAHN, DAVID 


Brandenburg, KY 


HALEY, ROBERT TODD 


Middlesboro, KY 


HALL, CURT 


Winchester, KY 


HALL, KAY 


Cumberland, KY 


HALL, RUSS 


Booneville, KY 


HAMBY, VICTORIA LEIGH 


Frankfort, KY 


HAMLIN, MARCIA 


Louisville, KY 


HAMM, WENDELL L. 


Stanford, KY 


HAMMOND, RONALD 


Falcoer, NY 


HANCOCK, ELLEN 


Columbia, KY 


HANSON, DENISE 


Andover, OH 


HARDIN, KAREN 


Lebanon, KY 


HARDY, MARY ELLEN 


Louisville, KY 


HARGADON, KELLY ANN 


Waddy, KY 


HARGIS, SHIRLEY 


Somerset, KY 


HARGROVE, LINDA 


Crawfordsville, TN 


HARMON, BOBBY D. 


Danville, KY 


HARMON, KIMBERLY A. 


Fairfax, VA 


HARPRING, NANETTE M. 


Louisville, KY 


HARRIS, GREG 


Glasgow, KY 









Si 

di 










(& 



234 Seniors/Gre-Har 




HARRIS, GREGORY C. 


New Crolla, KY 


HARRIS, KEVIN 


Louisville, KY 


HARRISON, RON 


Medora, IN 


HART, LISA 


Louisville, KY 


HART, RONALD W. 


Somerset, KY 


HARTJEN, RAY 


Indianapolis, IN 


HARTLAGE, DEBBIE 


Richmond, KY 


HARTLEY, RITA 


Versailles, KY 


HASBROUCK, KIRSTEN 


Lexington, KY 


HASKINS, RHODA 


Louisville, KY 


HATCHER, ROBERT L. 


Louisville, KY 


HATFIELD, CHRIS 


Kenvir, KY 


HATFIELD, HOLLY R. 


Kenvir, KY 


HATFIELD, TAMMY RENEE 


Belfry, KY 


HATOOR, RENEE J. 


Titfin, OH 


HATTON, TERRI 


Beattyville, KY 


HAYES, MARY McCORMICK 


Shelbyville, KY 


HEAD, CATHY 


Louisville, KY 


HEAD, TERRI J. 


Bardstown, KY 


HEDRICK, CINDY 


Richmond, KY 


HEFNER, DENNIS K. 


Lilburn, GA 


HELTON, PEGGY 


McKee, KY 


HENDRIX, STEWART D. 


Harrodsburg, KY 


HENRY, LARRY C. 


Lexington, KY 


HENSEL, MARGARET 


Louisville, KY 


HENSLEY, ALAN J. 


Gray, KY 


HENSLEY, ANGELA LEA 


Richmond, KY 


HERKAMP, DAVID 


Lexington, KY 


HESSE, BARBARA 


Cincinnati, OH 


HICKMAN, BRENDA 


Bardstown, KY 


HICKMAN, DIANNE E. Lebanon Junction, KY 


HICKS, JIM 


Monticello, KY 


HICKS, REBECA 


Bardstown, KY 


HIERS, LAURA 


Canada, KY 


HIGGINS, JANE 


Berea, KY 



Seniors/Har-Hig 235 



Seniors 



HIGGIXS, LISA 


Louisville, KY 


HILL. CYNTHIA 


Bedford, KY 


HOCHWACT, DAVID 


Dayton, OH 


HODGE, DALE LEE 


Lexington, KY 


HODGE, JAY 


Covington, KY 


HOLBROOK, WANDA 


Rousseau, KY 


HOLIDAY, AMY 


Erlanger, KY 


HONAKER, SANDY 


Paris, KY 


HOOD, LISA 


Chaplin, KY 


HORNER, ALLAN W. 


Hendersonville, TN 


HOUK, FRANCES 


Louisville, KY 


HOUZE, GAYLE 


Louisville, KY 


HOWARD, NANCY 


Lexington, KY 


HOWARD, SHERRY 


Mozelle, KY 


HULSHULT, SUZANNE 


Kettering, OH 


HURTST, DONNA 


Harlan, KY 


IDUWE, DANIEL 


Nigeria, W. Africa 


INGRAM, DIANNE 


Frankfort, KY 


ISAACS, RHONDA J. 


Beattyville, KY 


ISAACS, ROBIN A. 


Richmond, KY 


IVERS, ANDY 


New Castle, KY 


JACKSON, JAMES 


Gray, KY 


JACOBS, CLAIR 


Louisville, KY 


JACOBY SANDRA 


Carrollton, KY 


JARRETT, NANCY R. 


Charleston, WV 


JEFFERSON, KARLA 


Brooksville, KY 


JENNINGS, JOHN 


Shelbyville, KY 


JETT, DEBBIE A. 


Mount Olive, KY 


JOHNSON, BEVERLY 


Lexington, KY 


JOHNSON, BRUCE A. 


Danville, KY 


JOHNSON, EDWARD 


London, KY 


JOHNSON, ERNIE L. 


Danville, KY 


JOHNSON, JODIE ELLEN 


Cincinnati, OH 


JOHNSON, KEVIN 


Daytona, OH 


JOHNSON, MOLLY ANN 


Xenia, OH 




.0 fr D IB 






" ^~^^ 



V ^*> > 




236 Seniors/ Hig-Joh 




JOHNSON, RICHARD 


Paintsville, KY 


JOHNSON, TIMOTHY LEE 


Taylorsville, KY 


JOHNSON, VIRGINIA L. 


Beattyville, KY 


JONES, CHARLENE 


Louisville, KY 


JONES, DAVID R. 


London, KY 


JONES, SHARON 


Somerset, KY 


JONES, THOMAS 


Lexington, KY 


KAELIN, JUDY 


Park Hills, KY 


KALINCHAK, STEPHEN G 


Harrisburg, PA 


KAMINSKI, STEVE 


Owensboro, KY 


KANEKO, HIROMI 


Japan 


KEARNS, KEN 


Richmond, KY 


KELLY, REGINA 


Louisville, KY 


KERN, EDDIE 


Brooksville, KY 


KESSLER, KURT R. 


Louisville, KY 


KETTERING, ELLEN 


Stamping Ground, KY 


KIDWELL, DANA RENEE 


Vanceburg, KY 


KING, MELISSA ANN 


Burlington, KY 


KING, TRACY 


Lexington, KY 


KING, TERRI 


Lexington, KY 


KIPKER, THERESA MARIE 


Aela, OH 


KITTILA, SIDNEY M. 


Louisville, KY 


KNAUER, SANDRA SUE 


Fort Thomas, KY 


KONERMAN, JOHN B. 


Erlanger, KY 


KOTTAK, DAVID 


Louisville, KY 


KOUNS, ROBERT 


South Portsmouth, KY 


KRAFT, SUSAN 


Alexandria, KY 


KUETHE, KELLY M. 


Cincinnati, OH 


KUHN, KAREN 


Richmond, KY 


KUTZNER, JAMES 


Louisville, KY 


LAKE, KIMBERLY 


Williamsburg, KY 


LAMB, CAROL 


Connersville, IN 


LAMB, KAREN SUZANNE 


Bardstown, KY 


LAMBERS, DONNA 


Richmond, KY 


LAND, DAVID 


Beattyville, KY 



Seniors/Joh-Lan 237 



Seniors 



LANFORD, BRANDEE 


Lepinaton, KY 


LANGDON, JOE 


Science Hill, KY 


LANNING, BRIAN 


Greenup, KY 


LANTRIP, CHIP 


Richmond, KY 


LARSEN, JEFFREY A. 


Grand Rapids, MI 


LASWELL, JOHN 


Brooks, KY 


LATHAM, BARBARA J. 


Frankfort, KY 


LAVVSON, ANGELA 


Burkesville, KY 


LAVVSON, CHARLES M. 


Richmond, KY 


LAWSON, KAREN 


East Bernstadt, KY 


LAVVSON, SHERRY K. 


Magnolia, KY 


LAY, BRENDA S. 


Camden, OH 


LAY, KENNETH 


Licenty, KY 


LEACH, PHYLLIS 


Richmond, KY 


LEE, WANDA 


Lewisport, KY 


LENST, MICHELE 


Farmersville, OH 


LEWIS, STACY 


Knoxville, TN 


LOBAUGH, SCOTT 


Troy, OH 


LOGUE, RHODA ANN 


Danville, KY 


LONDEREE, MARILYN J. 


Charleston, WV 


LONG, JILL 


McConnell, WV 


LORANCE, MARC S. 


Hamilton, OH 


LOVELACE, SHARON KAY Somerset, KY 


LUTES, DEBRA 


Irvine, KY 


LUTTRELL, JOSEPH R. 


Mount Washington, KY 


LUTZ, RANDY 


Louisville, KY 


LYNN, KAREN 


Liberty, KY 


MACDER, JULIA A. 


Lexington, KY 


MALONEY, VERA J. 


Winchester, KY 


MANN, VIRGINIA 


Williamstown, KY 


MANN, JILL F. 


Richmond, KY 


MARBURGER, BRIAN L. 


Evans City, PA 


MARCH, KIM 


Miami, FL 


MARSALL, GAIL 


Mt. Wash., KY 


MARSHALL, ANGIE 


Ashland, KY 




238 Seniors/ Lan-Mar 




Lalil 



MARSHALL, JON 


Greenup, KY 


MARTIN, DON 


Ft. Wright, KY 


MARTIN, JOHN JOSEPH 


Louisville, KY 


MARTIN, PAUL WARREN 


Winchester, KY 


MARTIN, SUSAN 


LaGrange, KY 


MARVEL, LINDA 


Paris, KY 


MASON, SAMUEL K. 


Danville, KY 


MASSEY, TERRI 


Somerset, KY 


MATTHEWS, KAREN 


Louisville, KY 


MAURER, BETH 


Dayton, OH 


MAYNES, TANYA 


Barbourville, KY 


McAULIFFE, MARY BETH 


Cincinnati, OH 


McCHESNEY, MARK H. 


Frankfort, KY 


McCOLLUM, SUSAN 


Berea, KY 


McCOOL, BRENDA MUSIC 


Burkesville, KY 


McCORMACK, ROSA 


Stanford, KY 


McCORMICK, VICKI 


Lima, OH 


Mccracken, trip 


Louisville, KY 


Mcdonald, tracey m. 


Owensboro, KY 


McGURE, suzie 


Erlanger, KY 


McKENZIE, michele 


Ashland, KY 


Mcknight, angela m. 


Fairdale, KY 


Mcknight, leeanne 


Fairdale, KY 


Mclean, susan 


Bronston, KY 


McMillan, diana 


Walton, KY 


McWHARTER, LOIS 


London, KY 


MEDLEY, kelli 


Louisville, KY 


MEECE, RONDA 


Somerset, KY 


MEHOLOVITCH, CINDY 


Versailles, KY 


MEINHART, CHRIS 


Henderson, KY 


MERCER, DEBORAH 


Science Hill, KY 


METCALF, QUENTIN 


Lancaster, KY 


MEYER, RHONDA 


Louisville, KY 


MICKLE, WHITNEY 


Wash. C.H., OH 


MILBURN, SUSAN 


Bardstown, KY 




Seniors/Mar-Mil 239 



Seniors 



MILES. DAVID 


Richmond, KY 


MILES, DAVID 


Louisville, KY 


MILLER. KAREN 


Louisville, KY 


MILLER, MARY E. 


Corbin,, KY 


MILLER, MARY RUTH 


Somerset, KY 


MILLER, RANDY 


Florence, KY 


MILLER, TIMOTHY 


West Point, IN 


MIXK. TIMOTHY H. 


Mt. Vernon, KY 


MITCHELL, SUSAN 


Frankfort, KY 


MOORE, CATHERINE J. 


Ashland, KY 


MOORE, CHARLOTTE 


Corbin, KY 


MOORE, RUBY 


Hyden, KY 


MORGAN, DEBRA J. 


Middletown, KY 


MORGAN, TOM 


Covington, KY 


MORRIS, KATRINA 


Charleston, WV 


MORRIS, SHERRY 


Florence, KY 


MORRIS, TERRY 


Florence, KY 


MOTOKI, ETSUKO 


Japan 


MOUSER, JOSEPH 


Louisville, KY 


MUDD, TODD 


Vine Grove, KY 


MULLINS, ROBIN 


Winchester, KY 


MULLINS, SHEILA 


Corbin, KY 


MURPHY, KIM G. 


Lancaster, KY 


MURPHY, VELINA J. 


Lexington, KY 


MYERS, DWIGHT LEE 


Richmond, KY 


NAISER, JONI M. 


Louisville, KY 


NANCE, JAMIE BETH 


Louisville, KY 


NAPIER, JOHNNY EDWARD 


Richmond, KY 


NEWBY, LEESA 


Harrodsburg, KY 


NEWMAN, MIKE 


McDowell, KY 


NOLAN, DELLA 


Tyner, KY 


NOLD, MIKE 


Prospect, KY 


NORKUS, ED 


Stevensville, MI 


NORRIS, BRENT 


Lexington, KY 


NORTHCUTT, CARTER 


Richmond, KY 




240 Seniors/Mil-Nor 



6SJF 





W Wf tff 





k 



NUNN, KENNETH 
NURSE, BRUCE 
O BRIEN, CHRIS 
O NAN, JACKIE 
O'BRYAN, MICHELLE M. 



O'HARA, KELLY S. 
ODANIEL, BRENDA MARIE 
OMAN, TERI LYNNE 
OOTEN, DJUNA 
OSBORNE, TRACEY 



OSBORNW, THERESA 
OTIS, LISA SEARS 
OWENS, TIMOTHY W. 
OWHASO, VINCENT 
PAINTER, SAM 



PARKS, JEFF 
PARKS, REBECCA 
PARKS, VALERIE 
PARRIS, EVELYN 
PATRICK, BRENT N. 



PATRICK, PATTY C. 
PATTERSON, SUZANN 
PAUL, TIMA 
PENDLETON, CHARLES 
PENROD, MICHAEL ALAN 



PERKINS, NOEL 
PERRY, STEPHANIE 
PETER, BRENDA 
PETERS, LINDA 
PETTIT, MIKE 



PHILLIPS, SUSAN ELAINE 
PHIPPS, PAMELA 
PINNOW, CATHY 
POHLMAN, SUE ELLEN 
PORTER, JOHN 



Louisville, KY 

Owensboro, KY 

Centerville, OH 

Henderson, KY 

Louisville, KY 



Zionsville, IN 

Lebanon, KY 

Williamsfield, OH 

Springboro, OH 

Rochester, MI 



Beattyville, KY 

Berea, KY 

Liberty, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Lexington, KY 



Stanton, KY 
Ravenna, KY 

Stanton, KY 
Burerville, KY 
Richmond, KY 



Richmond, KY 

Flatlick, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Mt. Sterling, KY 

Xenia, OH 



Middletown, OH 

Franklin, OH 

Frankfort, KY 

Booneville, KY 

Prospect, KY 



Richmond, KY 

Burnside, KY 

Lima, OH 

Cincinnati, OH 

Terrace Park, OH 



Seniors/ Nun-Por 241 



Seniors 



PORTER, KARLA S. 


Verona, KY 


PORTWOOD, RAMONA 


Stanford, KY 


POWELL, JAMES D. 


Germantown, KY 


POWELL, JOAN 


London, KY 


POWELL, MELISSA 


Bimble, KY 


POWELL, TRACY 


Richmond, KY 


PRATER, JIM 


Louisville, KY 


PRESTON, CHUCK 


Maysville, Ky 


PRESTON, GORDON 


Pikeville, KY 


PREWITT, STACY 


Richmond, KY 


PRIEST, NORRIS N. 


Henderson, KY 


PROCTOR, CYNTHIA L. 


Shelbyville, KY 


PROWS, LISA 


Somerset, KY 


PRYOR, CHRISTOPHER W 


Louisville, KY 


PRYOR, KIM 


Albany, KY 


PUCKETT, LEIGH 


Winchester, KY 


PUCKETT, PATRICK 


Bardstown, KY 


PURSIFULL, AUSTIN W. 


Pineville, KY 


QUESENBERRY, SUSAN MARIE Louisville, KY 


QUISENBERRY, JACQUELINE 


Frankfort, KY 


RADER, JENNIFER D. 


McKee, KY 


RADIN, BECKY 


Shelbyville, KY 


RAFFIGNONE, APRIL LYNN 


Dillsboro, IN 


RAGLAND, NATHANIEL C. 


Winchester, KY 


RALENKOTTER, CANDACE 


Florence, KY 


RAMSEY, DEBORAH 


Mt. Olive, KY 


RANDALL, KATHARINE 


Xenia, OH 


RAVENSCRAFT, PAM 


Highland Hgts., KY 


RAYBURN, MYRA 


Louisville, KY 


REDMON, JANA LEA 


Russell Springs, KY 


REED, CARLA 


London, KY 


REED, MIKE 


Richmond, KY 


REES, JANE B. 


Lexington, KY 


REES, JULIE GAIL 


Lexington, KY 


REESE, ARCH 


Beattyville, KY 



242 Seniors/Por-Res 





REYNOLDS, MISSY 


Allen, KY 


RHULE, JENNIFER 


Franklin, OH 


RICE, KATHI 


Winchester, KY 


RICHARDSON, JEFFREY T. 


Shelbyville, KY 


RIDGLEY, CAROLE J. 


Richmond, KY 


RIEOEL, LAURA 


Ashland, KY 


ROARK, JULIE 


Louisville, KY 


ROBBINS, ALAN 


Lancaster, KY 


ROBERTS, VICKY 


Bronston, KY 


ROBERTS, DOROTHY SUE 


Richmond, KY 


ROBINSON, MICHAEL 0. 


Irvington, KY 


ROBINSON, SANDRA 


Webster, KY 


ROBINSON, TAMMY LEE 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


ROGERS, CAROLYN M. 


Glendale, KY 


ROGERS, SUSAN 


Richmond, KY 


ROLF, THOMAS E. 


Ft. Wright, KY 


ROOF, GRETCHEN ALICIA 


Paducah, KY 


ROSE, DEBRA KAY 


Winchester, KY 


ROSS, GINA S. 


Shelbyville, KY 


RUBLE, MARTHA 


Shelbyville, KY 


RUCKRIEGEL, SUSAN 


Jeffersontown, KY 


RUDD, ANN 


Springfield, KY 


RUTLEDGE, TAMMY 


Bardstown, KY 


SAMUELS, EVERETT 


Elsmere, KY 


SATTERLY, LORI 


Owensboro, KY 


SAYERS, SARA 


Ingle, KY 


SAYLOR, GINNIFER 


Berea, KY 


SAYLOR, LOLA EUDELL 


Williamsburg, KY 


SCALF, DENISE 




SCHECLER, PAMELA 


Greenfield, OH 


SCHEHR, SUSAN 


Blue Ash, OH 


SCHERDER, AMY L. 


Crestview Hills, KY 


SCHLEICHER, SHERI 


Louisville, KY 


SCHRAER, JOHN 


Cincinnati, OH 


SCHUERMAN, DANIEL 


Ft. Thomas, KY 



Seniors/ Rev-Sch 243 



Seniors 



SCOTT, VINCENT 


Philadelphia, PA 


SCOTT, WILLIAM 


Cumberland, KY 


SEARCY, TAMMY M. 


Sanders, KY 


SEARS, JAMES T. 


Stanford, KY 


SEBASTIAN, LISA 


Irvine, KY 


SEIBER, PEGGY 


Greenville, OH 


SHADE, ROBERT F. 


Louisville, KY 


SHANNON, GREG WAYNE 


Millersburg, KY 


SHAW, TOM 


Independence, KY 


SHEETS, TONI 


Danville, KY 


SHERMAN, LINDA 


Cumberland, KY 


SHINKLE, TODD 


Bethel, OH 


SHIRLEY, DANA P. 


Bardstown, KY 


SIDDIQUI, MAYA 


Liberty, KY 


SIMMONS, CONNIE 


Bedford, KY 


SIMMONS, CYNTHIA 


Lexington, KY 


SIMPSON, JANE MARIE 


Fort Wright, KY 


SISSEL, LEE ANN 


Falmouth, KY 


SITES, JEANNE 


Jackson, OH 


SIZEMORE, MONA 


Paint Lick, KY 


SKEEN, WENDELL 


Corbin, KY 


SKIDMORE, ROCHELLE 


Stanton, KY 


SLAGLE, RITA 


Monticello, KY 


SMITH, ANDREA 


Winchester, KY 


SMITH, CHRIS J. R. 


Bucking, England 


SMITH, DEBORAH 


Ft.Mitchell, KY 


SMITH, DIANA 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


SMITH, GEORGIA 


Turners Stat., KY 


SMITH, HENRIETTA 


Covington, KY 


SMITH, JEANNIE-GAYLE 


Hustonville, KY 


SMITH, JEFFREY 


Corbin, KY 


SMITH, JEFFREY WADE 


Irvine, KY 


SMITH, JOHANNA 


Lexington, KY 


SMITH, JULIE LYNNE 


Batavia, OH 


SMITH, MARK H. 


Versailles, KY 







i'P 



O ft 





0b ff> 




244 Seniors/Sco-Smi 




Mlfc 



SMITH, MELODY 


Freeburn, KY 


SMITH, SHARON 


Richmond, KY 


SMITH, SHELIA 


Lexington, KY 


SNOWDEN, PENNY 


Stanton, KY 


SOSBE, MIKE 


Cynthiana, KY 


SOUDER, MICHAEL 


Nicholasville, KY 


SPARKS, NANCY 


Cattettsburg, KY 


SPENCER, ROSELLA 


Lexington, KY 


SPICER, LISA ANNE 


Shelbyville, KY 


SPRADLIN, DAVE 


Elkhorn City, KY 


SPURLIN, PORTIA 


Stanford, KY 


SPURLING, TRAYCE M. 


Williamstown, KY 


SPURR, SUSAN 


Carrollton, KY 


SQUIRES, JOSEPH PERRY 


Louisville, KY 


STACK, ROBERT 


Louisville, KY 


STAMPER, MELANIE A. 


Richmond, KY 


STANFORD, CYNTHIA J. 


Cincinnati, OH 


STANHOP, LATONYA 


Stanton, KY 


STAUB, RICHARD R. 


Taylo Mill, KY 


STAYTON, KAREN R. 


Le anon, KY 


STEED, ELIZABETH A. B. 


Defiance, OH 


STEELE, KEVIN 


Winchester, KY 


STENGEL, JACKIE 


Louisville, KY 


STEPHAN, DARREN WAYNE 


Comolton, KY 


STEVENS, STACEY 


Philpot, KY 


STEWART, NATHAN R. 


Worthville, KY 


STOREY, DIANNE 


Louisville, KY 


STRANGE, MIKE 


Midway, TN 


STRINGER, JON MARK 


Somerset, KY 


STROHMEIR, RUTH E. 


Louisville, KY 


STURGILL, MARY LYNN 


Ashland, KY 


STUTSMAN, JEFF 


Nicholasville, KY 


SUTHERLAND, BARRY 


Campbellsburg, KY 


SUTKAMP, MICHAEL 


Bellevue, KY 


SWANSON, CHERYL A. 


Lexington, KY 



Seniors/Smi-Swa 245 



Seniors 



SWINEY, CHARLES 
SUTXEY, MICHELLE 
SYDNOR, CONNIE 
TALBOTT, VICKIE J. 
TAUL, JESSICA A. 



TAYLOR, CAROL 
TAYLOR, MARGARET 
TAYLOR, RACHEL 
TAYLOR, RITA B. 
TAYLOR, SCOTT 



Elizabethtown, KY 

Elkhorn City, KY 

Lakeside Park, KY 

Albany, KY 

Ashland, KY 



Loretto, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Beaver Dam, KY 

Beattyville, KY 

Louisville, KY 



TEASLEY, SHERRY RENEE Clay City, KY 

TECCA, LISA Akron, OH 

TECK, KIM LIM Richmond, KY 

TEMPLETON, STEPHANIE ROSE Richmond, KY 

TERRY, RHONDA Richmond, KY 



THACKER, JANIE 


Pineville, KY 


THALER, CHARLES 


Corbin, KY 


THOMPSON, BRUCE A. 


Pineville, KY 


THOMPSON, DUANNE 


Pikeville, KY 


THOMPSON, LISA K. 


Nicholasville, KY 


THORNBURY, TERESA B. 


Grundy, VA 


TILLEY, TAMARA 


Ferguson, KY 


TINGLE, TINA M. 


Campbellsburg, KY 


TOMPKINS, TAMMY 


Albany, KY 


TOOLE, MICHAEL R. 


Somerset, KY 


TRIPP, MICHEL 


Louisville, KY 


TROWELL, SHARON E. 


Louisville, KY 


TUDOR, CYNTHIA 


Richmond, KY 


TYRA, CHARLOTTE 


Mt. Sterling, KY 


VANCE, PATRICIA M. 


Louisville, KY 


VANDELT, SHAUNA 


Erlanger, KY 


VANWAGEN, LAURA 


Cincinnati, OH 


VAUGHN, MELBA L. 


Corbin, KY 


VEIT, THOMAS PATRICK 


St. Marys, OH 


VERTONE, MARIA 


Watchung, NJ 



246 Seniors/Swi-Ver 




ft ' 




WADE, JACK P. 


Richmond, KY 


WAGNOR, TOM 


Louisville, KY 


WALDRON, JEANIE 


Dayton, OH 


WALL, DAVID KEITH 


Winchester, KY 


WALLACE, MEG 


Versailles, KY 


WALLING, BEVERLY 


Harrodsburg, KY 


WALTER, JAMES 


Ashland, KY 


WARD, CHRISTI RENE 


Louisa, KY 


WARD, DONNA S. 


Beauty, KY 


WARDRIP, DAN 


Brandenburg, KY 


WARE, ANGELA 


Winchester, KY 


WATSON, PAULA 


Irvine, KY 


WEAVER, TERESA 


Charleston, WV 


WELLS, CARA 


Cox's Creek, KY 


WELLS, KEVIN 


Paintsville, KY 


WELLS, LADONNA 


Paintsville, KY 


WESSELS, ELLEN 


Park Hills, KY 


WEST, AMY 


Frankfort, KY 


WEST, CHRISTINA A. 


Blaine, KY 


WEST, LISA 


Russell, KY 


WEST, SCOTT 


Rushville, OH 


WHEATLEY, ELENA 


Louisville, KY 


WHITTAKER, EDWARD RAY 


Brodhead, KY 


WHITE, ALAN 


Somerset, KY 


WHITE, JANA M. 


Bloomfield, KY 


WICKER, MELANIE 


Jeffersonville, KY 


WILDER, DEBORAH 


Ingram, KY 


WILES, BRIAN 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


WILEY, JANENE 


Freehold, NJ 


WILEY, JOLENE F. 


Freehold, NJ 


WILLIAMS, BRUCE 


Ashland, KY 


WILLIAMS, FRANCES C. 


May's Lick, KY 


WILLIAMS, JENNIFER 


Harlan, KY 


WILLIAMS, LISA A. 


Baughman, KY 



WILLIAMS, NANCY COLLETTE Simpsonville, KY 



Seniors /Wad- Wil 247 



Seniors 



WILLIAMS, RHONDA 
WILLIS, DEBORAH 
WILSON, ANN 
WILSON, DOUGLAS ALAN 
WILSON, GREG 



WILSON, JEFFREY T. 
WILSON, JENNY L. 
WILSON, KAREN KELTNER 
WILSON, PAULETTE 
WILSON, RICK 



WINEBRENNER, LAURA 
WIMBATT, LESA 
WTREMAN, JONATHAN W. 
WOLFFORD, AMY 
WOLFORD, TERESA 



WOLFZORN, DAVID E. 
WOOD, MELINDA 
WOOD, DORIS L. 
WOOLFORK, WILHETTE 
W 7 REN, PAT 



WRIGHT, ROBERT S. 
WRIGHT, STEVE 
YATES, JEFF 
YATES, LISA 
YEARY, JULIE 



YOCUM, CHERYL 
YORK, RHONDA REY 
YOUNG, GINA L. 
YOUNG, JONATHAN C. 
ZAHNDER, PHILLIP E. 



ZIELINSKI, ROBERT S. 
ZINS, KAREN 
ZIRKELBACH, KAREN 
BAKER, SHARI 



Louisville, KY 
Berea, KY 

Lebanon, OH 

Springfield, OH 

Stanton, KY 



New Castle, IN 

Science Hill, KY 

Columbia, KY 

Stanton, KY 

Chenoa, KY 



Louisville, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Jackson, KY 

Taylor Mill, KY 

Burnside, KY 



Ft. Thomas, KY 

London, KY 
Lexington, KY 
Richmond, KY 



Pewee Valley, KY 

Shelbyville, KY 

Corbin, KY 

Bardstown, KY 

Frankfort, KY 



Kings Mountain, KY 

Columbia, KY 

Winchester, KY 

Lexington, KY 

LaGrange, KY 



Cincinnati, OH 

Cincinnati, OH 

Erlanger, KY 

Richmond, KY 




248 Seniors/ Wil-Bak 



Juniors 









ABSHER, MELISSA ANN 


Lexington, KY 


ADAMS, DANIEL 


Lancaster, KY 


ADAMS, GENE 


Danville, KY 


ADAMS, MELISSA 


Prestonsburg, KY 


ADAMS, ROBERT 


Eubank, KY 


ADKINS, BRENDA 


McKee, KY 


ALDRIDGE, ALICIA J. 


Clarksdale, MS 


ALEXANDER, SHARON 


Louisville, KY 


ALFORD, MELISSA SUE 


Artemus, KY 


ALLEN, JOE 


Crestwood, KY 


AMEND, PAUL 


Park Hills, KY 


ANDERSON, J. 


Arlington Hts., IL 


ANDERSON, KEVIN 


Pineknot, KY 


ANDERSON, THERESA 


Paris, KY 


ARBOGAST, BILL 


Richmond, KY 


ARNOLD, LEANN 


Mt. Vernon, KY 


ARNOLD, LISA L. 


Otwav, OH 


ARNOLD, MATTICE CTORIA 


Louisville, KY 


ARNOLD, SUSAN 


Lexington, KY 


ATKINS, CAROLINE 


Paducah, KY 


BARBROWSKI, TIM 


Louisville, KY 


BACH, BECKY 


Mt. Sterling, KY 


BAEHNER, ROD C, 


Ft. Wright, KY 


BAILEY, CARLA 


Hazard, KY 


BAILEY, JACK 


Lancaster, KY 


BAILEY, MARK A. 


Pikeville, KY 


BAIRD, THERESA ROSE 


Louisville, KY 


BALDWIN, LORI LYNN 


Burdine, KY 


BALL, KAREN 


Englewood, OH 


BALLARD, CHERYL ANNE 


Bardstown, KY 


BARBER, CAROLYN 


Clay City, KY 


BARBER, CHERI 


Ashland, KY 


BARBER, KAY 


Louisville, KY 


BARGER, KIM 


Richmond, KY 


BARGO, TROY 


Mary Alice, KY 


BARLOW, BRUCE 


Louisville, KY 


BARRETT, VICKIE 


Manchester, KY 


BARRY, ERNIE 


Dayton, OH 


BARRY, TRACEY 


Danville, KY 


BARTLEY, LETIA R. 


Jonancy, KY 


BAUGH, JULIE 


Somerset, KY 


BAUGHMAN, ELIZABETH 


Louisville, KY 


BAXTER, RALPH 


Richmond, KY 


BEARD, JONATHAN 


Dillsboro, IN 


BEATTY, PAMELA RAE 


Florence, KY 


BEGLEY, JIM 


Aurora, IN 


BEGLEY, ROBERT 


Frankfort, KY 


BELL, ANGELA 


Liberty, KY 


BEMISS, BRYAN 


Frankfort, KY 


BENGE, JOHN P. 


London, KY 


BENNETT, PAT 


Springfield, OH 


BENNINGFIELD, RICHARD L. Summersville, KY 


BENTLEY, PAULA 


Wheelersburg, OH 


BERRY, CARL A. 


Eminence, KY 


BEVERLY, LISA ANN 


Mt. Washington, KY 


BISHOP, BELINDA H. 


Paris, KY 


BLACK, CHRISTEEN 


Eubank, KY 


BLACK, LORRE L. 


New Holland, OH 


BLAIR, LISA 


Richmond, KY 


BLANDFORD, RENEE M. 


Elizabethtown, KY 


BLEVINS, AMY 


Ashland, KY 


BLEWER, JANNIE MARIE 


Campbellsburg, KY 


BLUE, MICHELE 


Louisville, KY 


BOBBITT, BEVERLY 


Somerset, KY 


BOLDUC, MONIQUE 


Louisville, KY 


BOLGE, SCOTT D. 


Somerset, KY 


BOLING, DAWN 


Frankfort, KY 


BORNHORST, DON 


Erlanger, KY 


BOTTOMS, REBECCA 


Georgetown, KY 


BOUTEILLER.MICHELE 


Louisville, KY 


Juniors/Abs-Bou 249 



Juniors 



^« 



BOWEN. EDATH 


Harrodsburg, KY' 


BRANSEUM, CINNY 


Bradhead, KY 


BRAUN. HEATHER A. 


Louisville, KY 


BRAUN, JEFF 


Tipp Citv, OH 


BREL'XIG. MICHAEL 


Paris, KY 


BRIGHT, JACQUELINE 


Flatlick, KY 


BROCKMAX, MIKE 


Florence, KY 


BROCKMAN, TRACY 


London, KY' 


BROOKS, ANGELA 


Louisville, KY 


BROOKS. I.AMES 


Richmond, KY 


BROOKS, JENNIFER 


Louisville, KY 


BROTHERS, MARY DENISE 


Brooksville, KY 


BROWN. BETH ELLEN 


Baltimore, OH 


BROWN. JUDY 


Argillite, KY 


BROWX. STACY 


Harrodsburg, KY 


BRUGLER. KLM 


Springfield, OH 


BRYANT. MARY 


McKee, KY 


BUCKLEY; ERIC K. 


New Castle, KY 


BUCKLEY. RENEE R. 


New Castle, KY 


BLELL, MARK 


Whiting, IN 


BUMJ.ARDNER, LLOYD J. 


Somerset, KY 


BUNCH. KAREN 


Glasgow, KY 


BUXTYX. LOISETINE 


Crestwood, KY 


BURXETT, TAMERA 


London, KY 


BURTON', TERESA 


Nancy, KY 


BUSKIERK. SHERRY D. 


Inez, KY 


BYRNS, JAMES KEVIN 


Union, KY 


C.AHILL, LISA 


Petersburg, KY 


CAIN, MARVA 


Wace, KY 


CALLAHAN, DONNA MARIE 


Louisville, KY 


CAMERON, RONNTE 


Mt. Vernon, KY 


CAMPBELL, DONNA 


Booneville, KY 


CAMPBELL, GEORGE E. JR. 


Richmond, KY 


CAMPBELL, JOX R. 


Louisville, KY' 


CAMPBELL, TERRY 


Monricello, KY 


CANADA, ARTHUR L. 


Corbin, KY 


CANTERBURY TERESA 


Berea, KY 


CARDWELL, KAREN 


Frankfort, KY 


CARMON, TAMMIE 


Irvington, KY 


CARRIER, CINDY 


Lancaster, KY 


CARRIER, SUSAN E. 


Danville, KY 


CARROLL, H, W.C 


Crestwood, KY 


CARROLL, MIKE 


Vanceburg, KY 


CARTER, TRACY SUE 


Ashland, KY 


CARTWRIGHT, DARLENE 


Louisville, KY 


CASEY, DONNA 


Brooksville, KY 


CASEY, SHEILA 


Harrodsburg, KY 


CATHERS, TONY 


Richmond, KY 


CECIL, KEVIN 


Bardstown, KY 


CENKNER, JON A. 


North Versaille, PA 


CENTERS, TAMMIE J. 


Ingram, KY 


CHADWICK. ROBIN 


Frankfort, KY 


CHAMBERS, JENNY 


Hillsboro, OH 


CHAMP, CHRISTOPHER P. 


Mason, OH 


CHANSLER, PRISCILLA K 


ings Mountain, KY 


CHARLES, FRANKLIN 


Lexington, KY 


CHESTER, TRENA 


Hazard, KY 


CLARK, JANET 


Hazard, KY 


CLARK, JEFF 


Lexington, KY 


CLARK, LEE ANN 


Lawrence, KY 


CLARK, WILLIAM RUSSELL 


Lancaster, KY 


CLAWSON, SONDRA EILEEN 


Richmond, KY 


CLEMMONS, SANDI 


Annville, KY 


CLOUD, MARY 


Ludlow, KY 


COFER, LISA 


Elizabethtown, KY 


COLE, CINCELIA ANGEL1A 


Beatryville, KY 


COLEMAN, DENNIS 


Pikesville, KY 


COLEMAN, GARY KEITH 


Shelbiana, KY 


COLEMAN, MELISSA 


Pikeville, KY 


COLEMAN, TIFFANY S. 


Stanville, KY 


250 Juniors/Bow-Col 


















Juniors 








COLLIER, ALICIA K. 


Load, KY 


COLLINGS, GERALD 


Greensburg, KY 


COLLINS, LISA 


McKee, KY 


COMBEST, SUSANNE L. 


Louisville, KY 


COMBS, CAROL 


West Union, OH 


COMBS, JENNIFER 


Paintsville, KY 


COMBS, WYAMON MARK 


Jackson, KY 


CONN, PAULA JEAN 


Berea, KY 


COOMES, JEFF 


Louisville, KY 


COOPER, PERRY 


Elizabethtown, KY 


COPAS, ANN 


Dayton, OH 


COWDEN, ANNETTE 


Washington, OH 


COX, NATALIE 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


CRABTREE, KIMBERLY JO 


Stanton, KY 


CRADDOCK, CRAIG 


Erlanger, KY 


CRAGE, CHARLENE 


Piketon, OH 


CRAIG, JEFFREY LEE 


Mt. Washington, KY 


CRAWFORD, ELIZABETH 


Stone, KY 


CRISOLOGO, JOHN P. 


Harlan, KY 


CROSS, JUDY A. 


Libertv, KY 


CRUMP, LAURA LEIGH 


Winchester, KY 


CRUTCHER, KAREN 


Ekron, KY 


CUMMINS, BETH 


Louisville, KY 


CURLINGTON, MITCHELL 


Harlan, KY 


CURTIS, DOUG 


Crestood, KY 


CURTIS, ROBERT 


Georgetown, KY 


DAMRON, TAMMY L. 


Belfry, KY 


DANIELS, JINNIFER ANN 


Street', MD 


DANT, MARY KATHLEEN 


New Haven, KY' 


DANZINGER, MISSY- 


Louisville, KY 


DAVIS, AMANDA 


Campbellsville, KY' 


DAVIS, ANGELA 


Chaplin, KY 


DAVIS, KIM 


Libertv, KY 


DAWSON, DALE Palm Beach Gardens, FL 


DE HART, MICHAEL L. 


McKee, KY 


DEAN, PAUL A. 


Perryville, KY 


DEARING, DOUG 


Winchester, KY 


DECAMP, AMY R. 


Vandalia, OH 


DECKER, JILL 


Rockledge, FL 


DENNEY, SUSAN 


Stanton, KY 


DICK, JIMMY 


Science Hill, KY 


DIXON, ROBIN 


Louisville, KY' 


DOMANICO, STEPHAINE LYNN Villa Hills, KY 


DPONISKE, AMY 


Cincinnati, OH 


DRAPER, JEFF 


Louisville, KY 


DREWES, R. MICHELLE 


Birmingham, AL 


DUNAHUE, MARY 


Richmond, KY 


DUPONT, MICHAEL C. 


Lexington, KY 


DYKE, SHERI 


Pleasurevillle, KY 


EASTERLY, KIMBER 


Nicholasville, KY 


EASTHAM, MARGARET 


Georgetown, KY' 


EDWARDS, SUSAN 


Hazard, KY 


EGELSTON, CHARLES TODD London, KY 


EGNER, KIMBERLY 


Louisville, KY 


ELDER, ERIC 


Loretto, KY 


ELKINS, WANDA 


Jenkins, KY' 


ELLIOTT, DANA 


Louisville, KY 


ELSWICK, DONAN D. 


' ouisville, KY' 


ELY, MARK 


Berham, KY 


EMBREE, EVELYN C. 


Radcliff, KY 


EMBRY, A. L. 


Millwood, KY 


ENGLE, SUSAN 


Loyall, KY 


ENZWEILER, AMY 


Melbourne, KY 


ESHMAN, DOUGLAS 


Richmond, KY 


ESPINOSA, LAURA 


Richmond, KY' 


ESTES, JENNY 


Hamilton, OH 


EVANS. CINDY LYNN 


Wayard, KY 


EVANS, LONNIE JOE 


Tipp City, OH 


EVERETT, MICHAEL S. 


Franklinville, NY 


EWY, SARAH 


Evergreen, CO 


Juniors 


/Col-Ewy 251 



Juniors 



EAIN, PAULA 
FANNIN, BILLY RAY 
FEEBACK. MICHAEL W. 
FELTNER. II. RAUL R. 
FELTNER, SCOTT 
FERGUSON". KIMBERLY A. 
FERRI\"C. THOMAS J. 

FETTERS. LESLIE WAYNE 
FILICKY. TOM 
FISHER. JOSEPH 
FITCH. CHRISTINA K. 
FITZGERALD, CAROL 
FITZGERALD, SHAROX 
FLYNN. MELISSA 

FOLLOWELL, BYRON 
FOSTER. JAMES H.. JR. 
FOX, BRENDA 
FRENCH, TONI 
FRIES, CATHERINE 
FROHM, TIFFANY' ANN 
GABBARD. LISA 

GABB.ARD, MARIJILL G. 
GAILEY, MARK A. 
GALDNER. FRAN 
GARLAND. JAN 
GARNER, USA 
GIBSON, JIM 
GIDLEY, SHERRY 

GILES, JOHN W 
GILREZTH, MELISSA DAWN 
GOODMAN, ALAN WAYNE 
GRANT, MICHAEL DOUGLAS 
GRARSE, MICHAEL 
GRAU, TINA 
GRAVELY, DENNIS E. 

GRAY, CHARLES H. 
GRAY, KAREN 
GREEN, KELLI 
GREEN, SHARON 
GREENAVALT. ROBERT W 
GREENE, GUTHRIE 
GREENE, JOHN V., JR. 

GREENE, MARY 
GREENE, ROBERT DALE 
GREER, REBECCA L. 
GREER, ROBIN 
GREYNOLDS, LEE 
GROSS, JERRY 
GROSS, JOANNIE 



GROVE, STEVE 

GUMBERT, TONYA 

GUTHIER, BOB 

GUTHIER, SUSAN 

HACKER, MARGARET LEIGH A. 

HAFFT, JENNIFER 

HAFLING, SONDRA 

HAIL, ROBIN R. 
HALE, KAREN GAIL 
HALL, DAVID ROBERT 
HALL, MICKEY 
HALL, TOBIANNA 
HALLORAN, RICK 
HAMBLIN, LORI 



Richmond, KY 
Louisville, KY' 

Han-odsburg, KY 

London, KY 

Bardstown, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Fort Thomas, KY 

Keavy, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Middlesboro, KY 

Richmond, KY 

South Charlston, OH 

Hamilton, OH 

Nicholasville, KY 

Harrodsburg, KY 

Danville, KY 

Lerose, KY 

Mt. Washington, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Marshall, MI 

Frankfort, KY 

Jackson, KY 

Berea, KY 

Lebanon, KY 

London, KY 

Cincinnati, OH 

Vicco, KY 

Corbin, KY 



Lawrenceburg, KY 

Pine Knot, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Raddiff, KY 

Florence, KY 

Jackson, KY 



Barbourville, KY 

Scalf, KY 

London, KY 

Salyersville, KY 

Cincinnati, OH 

Worthington, OH 

Louisville, KY 



Juneau, Al 

Cocoa Beach, FL 

Cincinnati, OH 

Lexington, KY 

Georgetown, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Jackson, KY 

Corbin, KY 

Greenup, KY 
Bellevue, KY 
Bellevue, KY 

Richmond, KY 
Versailles, IN 

Louisville, KY 

Halen, KY 

Barbourville.KY 

Westerville, OH 

Slemp. KY 

Ashland, KY 

Somerset, KY 

Hamilton, OH 



HAMILTON, MIKE 
HAMILTON, RUSTY R. 
HANDY, SHAYNE 
HARDIN, GEORGIA 
HARDY, SHARON 
HARGROVE, LAURA 
HARLOW, LORI LIN 



London, KY 

Beaver, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Harrodsburg, KY 

Irvine, KE 

Crawfordsville, IN 

Harrodsburg, KY 



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252 Juniors/Fai-Har 



Juniors 




£ m r m ' f\ f. 




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ft 






HARMON, KATHERYN ANN 


Danville, KY 


HARNED, ANNA M. 


Elizabethtown, KY 


HARPER, LISA ANN 


Pleasureville, KY 


HARRIS, SENOXIA 


Richmond, KY 


HARRISON, WAYNE 


Somerset, KY 


HARROP, ALLISON 


Brandenburg, KY 


HARVEY, DEBRA 


Nicholasville, KY 


HASINDSKI, ANDY 


Richmond, KY 


HATFIELD, KATHY 


Raceland, KY 


HATTON, JEFF 


Lexington, KY 


HAYES, CONNIE 


Erlanger, KY 


HAYS, WALLACE DEAN 


McKee, KY 


HAYSLETT, JOE JR. 


Burgin, KY 


HEIMERDINGER, JOHN C. 


Louisville, KY 


HELLARD, ANN HOPE 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


HELM, CHERYL KAYE 


Dunnville, KY 


HEMING, CYNTHIA 


Jenkins, KY 


HENDRIX, MELISSA A. 


Hydes, KY 


HENRY, CAROLYN 


Louisville, KY 


HERLAD, ANDREW D. 


Georgetown, KY 


HERNDON, EDWINA 


London, KY 


HESSELBROCK, LAURA 


Mt. Sterling, KY 


HESTER, PHIL 


Florence, KY 


HETTINGER, SHERI 


Louisville, KY 


HCKS, BARRY 


Libert)', KY 


HICKS, TIMMY 


Bardstown, KY 


HIGGINS, SHERRY 


Louisville, KY 


HITTON, SUZANNE 


Maysville, KY 


HOBBS, MELANIE 


Taylorsville, KY 


HOBBS, TRACY 


Ashland, KY 


HODAPP, MARY ELLEN 


Louisville, KY 


HOFFMAN, JAY 


Erlanger, KY 


HOFFMAN, RUSTY LEE 


Union, KY 


HOLLAND, DAVID 


Louisville, KY 


HOLLERAN, DEBBIE 


Richmond, KY 


HOOTEN, CHRIS 


Walton, KY 


HOOTMAN, CANDICE 


Lexington, KY' 


HORNE, BETTY 


Paintsville, KY 


HOUCK, MARY JAYNE 


Bardstown, KY 


HOWARD, KATHY M. 


Richmond, KY 


HOWARD, KEITH 


Ashland, KY 


HOWARD, KENNETH 


Winchester, KY 


HUBBS, LARRY 


Rockholds, KY 


HUGE, ELIZABETH H. 


Ashland, KY 


HUGHES, DARVELL 


Inane, KY 


HUGHES, LORIE ANN 


Campbellsville, KY 


HUGHES, ROBERT H. 


Carlisle, KY 


HUGUELY, ANGELINA 


Richmond, KY 


HUMES, GORDON 


Lancaster, KY 


HUNT, ANGELA 


Pinsonfork, KY 


HUNT, LISA ANNE 


Louisville, KY 


JACKSON, CLARK C. 


Carlisle, KY 


JAMESON, JOHN 


Richmond, KY 


JAYARATNE, KRISHAN 


Lexington, KY 


JOHNSON, CHERYL A. 


Maysville, KY 


JOHNSON, GERALD 


Paintsville, KY 


JOHNSON, MARILYN LYNNE 


Louisville, KY 


JOHNSON, MICHAEL D. 


Booneville, KY 


JOHNSON, TIM 


Booneville, KY' 


JONES, ALAN 


Greensburg, KY 


JONES, CATHY 


Martinsburg, WV 


KATCZEWSKI, WAYNE J. 


Jaccettsville, MD 


KATZENSTEIN, LORI 


Cincinnati, OH 


KEEKE, SUZANNE 


Hukon, OH 


KEGLOY, LESA K. 


Evarts, KY 


KEITH, JEFF 


Somerset, KY 


KELSCH, CINDY A. 


Augusta, KY 


KING, BONNIE 


Lexington, KY 


KING, DIANA L. 


Louisville, KY 


KING, TERESA LYNN 


Jackson, KY 


HAR-KIN /Juniors 


253 



Juniors 



KITCHEN', TINA 


W Portsmouth. OH 


KITTS. STEPHEN' RAY 


Louisville, KY 


KLENSCH, CHRISTOPHER G. 


Tavlor Mill, KY 


KLINE. ANNETTE 


' Tell Citv, IN 


KUSZ. SARA 


Parksville, KY 


KREILING. KATHERINE 


Chicago, IL 


KRL'ER. BEVERLY 


Louisville, KY 


KUEE. EDDY RAHRAJA 


Lexington. KY 


LAMB, JANET 


Providence. KY 


LAMBERS. LISA MARIE 


Union, KY 


LARK FRANK B 


Marshall, MI 


LARUE, LASSIE 


Louisville. KY 


LAWRENCE. SHERRY 


Fairfield, OH 


LWSON. JUNE 


Burkesville, KY 


LAY. GREG 


Barbourville, KY 


LA! TON, CAROL 


Cynthiana, KY 


L.AZENBY. SANDRA LEE 


Cincinnati, OH 


LAZLNBY SUSAN 


Cincinnati, OH 


LEEDY, CAROL ANN 


Stanford, KY 


LEINWEBER, JENNIFER A. 


Euclid, OH 


LB\TS. BARRY 


Manchester, KY 


LEWIS, DONNA LYNN 


Confluence, KY 


LEWIS. MICHAEL 


Georgetown, KY 


LEISTER. SHERRI 


Frankfort, KY 


LINEHAN. REBECCA 


Louisville, KY 


LISLE, MARGARET 


Irvine, KY 


LOCKARD. ANTHONY SCOTT Hazel Green, KY 


LOGUE. PAM 


Harrodsburg, KY 


LONG. NORMA 


Hustonville, KY 


LOSE, HEIDI 


Louisville, KY 


LOZIER, CAROL ANNE 


Cincinnati, OH 


LLTZ, GREG 


Cincinnati, OH 


LYNCH, SAMUEL 


Pikeville, KY 


MAJOR, LISA M. 


Richmond, KY 


MANSFIELD, ROBERT 


Louisville, KY 


MARCUM. MICHELLE 


Jamestown, KY 


MARION, KIMBERLY 


Richmond,KY 


MARSTON, MARY BETH 


Owenton, KY 


MARTIN, JUDITH 


Lexington, KY 


MARTIN, TERRI A. 


La Grange, KY 


MATTTNGLY, LISA 


Bardstown, KY 


McCarthy, eileen a. 


Louisville, KY 


Mccarty, patti 


Oil Springs, KY 


McCOOL, ROBERT 


Burkesville, KY 


McCOY, REGINA K. 


McCair, KY 


McCOY, THOMAS W. JR. 


Brandenburg, KY 


McDERMOTT, CHARLES 


Danville, KY 


McFALL, JACKIE 


Alpha, KY 


McGRAW, SHAWN 


Louisa, KY 


McHARQUE, AARON 


Bedford, KY 


MclNTOSH, DONNA MARIA 


Hazard, KY 


McROBERTS, LORI 


Cincinnati, OH 


MEDER, MONICA A. 


Batavia, OH 


MEMAINE, MARY ANN 


Richmond, KY 


MERS, KAREN 


Maysville, KY 


MERSCH, AMY 


Union, KY 


METCALF, BILL 


Irvine, KY 


METCALFE, KELLIS 


Nicholsville, KY 


MEYER, LESTER 


Cleves, OH 


MIDKIFF, GARY E. 


Richmond, KY 


MILES, ANNETTE 


St. Francis, KY 


MILLER, KAREN 


London, KY 


MIRACLE. JAN 


Miracle, KY 


MIZE, PAMELA R. 


Danville, KY 


MONSOUR, MEGAN 


Huntington, WV 


MOORE, JEFFREY C. 


Lexington, KY 


MOORE, MELISSA 


Dawson Spring, KY 


MOORE, PEGGY 


Kettering, OH 


MOORE, RANDALL BROOKS 


Radcliff, KY 


MOORE, ROBIN 


Elizabethtown, KY 


254 Juniors/KIT-MOO 



re a a 




Juniors 




MORGAN, BRYON 


Hamilton, OH 


MORGAN, MARGARET M. 


London, KY 


MORRIS, CHRISTY 


Louisville, KY 


MORTON, REGINA 


Lexington, KY 


MOSER, JOHN 


Frankfort, KY 


MOSES, DEBBORAH 


Pleasant View, KY 


MOUSER, LISA 


Rineyville, KY 


MUDD, THERESA A. 


Radcliff, KY 


MULLINS, PAMELA SUZETTE Erlanger, KY 


MURPHY, COLLEEN 


Erwin, TN 


MURPHY, COLLEEN M. 


West Chester, OH 


MURPHY, TIM 


Louisville, KY 


MURPHY, TODD 


Ft. Thomas, KY 


MURRAY, JAMES P. 


Salvisa, KY 


NAPIER, MARK 


Russell, KY 


NEAL, JANET S, 


Louisville, KY 


NEIHAUS, CATHERINE C. 


Danville, KY 


NETTRO, PAMELA A. 


Louisville, KY 


NEWCOMB, PATRICK A. 


Campbellsville, KY 


NEWNAM, DONNA 


Lexington, KY 


NIBLOCK, CHRIS 


Louisville, KY 


NOEL, DONYA JEANINE 


Mackville, KY 


NORVELL, TAMI DAWN 


Harrodsburg, KY 


O'BANNON, E. 




O'RYAN, MARY 


Monticello, KY 


OAKES, JERRI 


Jenkins, KY 


O'BRIEN, MIKE 


Paintsville, KY 


OLDHAM, JO 


Richmond, KY 


OLIGEE, PAUL 


Louisville, KY 


OSBORNE, JOHN L. 


Paris, KY 


OSBORNE, WAYNE 


Virgee, KY 


PACK, ALAN B. 


McDowell, KY 


PAPINEQU, KATHRYN A. 


Avon, CT 


PATSIAVOS, PETE 


Van Wert, OH 


PATTERSON, LARRY 


Louisville, KY 


PATTERSON, STACY 


Lexington, KY 


PATTERSON, TAMMY 


Flatlick, KY 


PAYNE, GREG 


Barbourville, KY 


PAYTON, TWYLANE E. 


Irvington, KY 


PEARCE, MONICA 


Greenville, IN 


PELLEGRINO, MELINDA JANE Rockville, MD 


PERRERO, LAURA A. 


Cincinnati, OH 


PERRY, DAVID RAYMOND 


Danville, KY 


PETREY, LEON 


Corbin, KY 


PETRIE, KIMBERLY A. 


Lovely, KY 


PHARIS, CHARLIE 


Barksville, KY 


PICKENS, TIMOTHY D. 


Albany, KY 


POLAKOVS, DAVID 


Ashland, KY 


PORTER, DWIGHT D. 


Richmond, KY 


POTTER, LEIA 


South Shore, KY 


PRICE, DEBBIE 


Turkey Creek, KY 


PRICE, JENNIFER 


Danville, KY 


PRICE, LISA 


Libert}', KY 


PYLES, ANGELA 


Vine Grove, KY' 


PYLES, DENISE 


Louisville, KY 


RADER, APRIL ELIZABETH 


Jeffersonville, IN 


REDFIELD, JACKIE 


Crestview Hills, KY 


REECE, ANTON 


West Indies 


REED, CHAD 


Mayfield, KY 


REESE, KAREN 


Lexington, KY 


REFFETT, EUGENE 


Van Lear, KY 


REGAN, PATRICK W. 


Lexington, KY 


REYNOLDS, CAROL 


Finley, KY 


RICHARDSON, LISA 


Yosemite, KY' 


RIES, JOHN 


Louisville, KY 


RIFFE, KIMBERLY 


Rush, KY 


RITCHIE, LORRIE JO 


Ekron, KY' 


ROARK, VICKIE D. 


Hyden, KY 


ROBERTS, JULIA 


Georgetown, KY 


ROBERTS, KEITH 0. 


Forest Hills, KY 


MOR-ROB/Juniors 


255 



Juniors 



ROBIN". WRIGHT 


Lebanon, KY' 


ROBINSON". DEWAYNE 


Richmond, KY 


RODDY. K1MBERLY 


S. Williamson, KY 


ROGERS, JAMES 


Raleigh, NC 


ROGERS, KIMBERLY ANN 


Bardstown, KY 


ROPER, PATRICIA A. 


Louisville, KY 


ROSE, LESLIE 


Gray, KY 


ROSE, USA 


Shelbyville, KY 


ROUTZON, SAM 


Newport, KY 


ROWE, CAROL 


Elkhan City, KY 


ROWLAND. JOYCE 


McKee, KY 


ROWLETT, VIRGINIA 


Richmond, KY 


RL'EFF, .AMY- 


Louisville, KY 


RUSSELL, TIM 


Harrodsburg, KY 


RUSSELL, TIM A. 


Kirkwood, NY 


S.AMMONS, TAMMY LYNN 


Raceland, KY 


SANDMAN, JOHN N. 


Louisville, KY 


SASSER. JANNE K. 


Corbin, KY 


SCHADLER. KRISTY 


Florence, KY 


SCHMAEDECKE, SARA 


Crestview Hills, KY 


SCHMIDT, LISA 


Ft. Mitchell, KY 


SCHNEIDER, THERESA C. 


Milton, KY 


SEALSCOTT, CHERI 


Quincv, MI 


SEARS, MARK 


Paris, KY 


SEIDEZ, ELIZABETH 


Towson, MD 


SEVERLN, DIANN I. 


Lexington, KY 


SHACKELEFORD, KATHRYN 


Whitesburg, KY 


SHELTON, MARGY 


Corbin, KY 


SHELTON, SHAWN 


Carrollton, KY 


SHORT, DOROTHY 


Richmond, KY 


SHROUT, TRACY 


Taylor Mill, KY 


SIDDIQU1, WALEED 


Liberty, KY 


SIMON. MARY- 


Louisville, KY 


SIMPSON, GREG 


Frankfort, KY 


SIMPSON, JAMES 


Williamstown, KY 


SIMS, STEPHEN E. 


Worthington, KY 


SINGLETON", DERRICK 


Mt. Vernon, KY 


SIPPLE, STEPHEN 


Erlanger, KY 


SIZEMORE, DAVID D 


Elizabethtown, KY 


SIZEMORE, HOWELL 


McKee, KY 


SKARBOWSKI, SUSAN 


Ashland, KY 


SLOAN, LISA 


Shelbyville, KY 


SLONE, ALICE 


Prestonburg, KY 


SLONE, CAROLYN 


Beatvville, KY 


SLONE, SHEILA A. 


Legon, KY 


SMITH, ANTON 


New Castle, KY 


SMITH, FRANKLIN LEE II 


S. Williamson, KY 


SMITH, LISA 


Lexington, KY 


SMITH, MARGARET D 


Raddiff, KY 


SMITH, MELINDA LONNA 


Richmond, KY 


SMITH, SUSAN 


Hazard, KY 


SMITH, THERESA S. 


Versailles, KY 


SNACKLEFORD, ELLEN 


Jackson, KY 


SNOW, MARY KAY 


Pikeville, KY 


SPIVEY, MICHAEL WAYNE 


Richmond, KY 


SPONCIL. KEVIN 


Paris, KY 


SQUIRES, ALYSON 


Cincinnati, OH 


SQUIRES, DREW 


Richmond, KY 


STAFFORD, PATRICIA ANN 


Newfoundland, KY 


STAMPER, CHERYL 


Aberdeen, OH 


STEELE, DENELLEN L. 


Louisville, KY 


STEELY, DAN 


Corbin, KY 


STEPHENS, KEVIN 


Morehead, KY 


STEPHENS, LARRY WAYNE 


Union, KY 


STEPHESN, DOROTHY 


Louisville, KY 


STICKLER, JAMIE LEE 


Stanford, KY 


STOCKER, VALERIE 


Frankfort, KY 


STOCKTON, ANGELA 


Albany, KY 


STONER, SHELLY 


Lexington, KY 


STRANGE, LAURA F. 


Bardstown, KY 


256 Juniors/ROB-STR 





Mi 

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Juniors 






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STRANGE, MARC! 


Bardstown, KY 


STUDDARD. CHARLOTTE 


Louisville, KY 


SWANGER, JANICE LYNN 


Berea, KY 


TACKETT, STEVEN LANE 


Lookout, KY 


TANNER, DAVINA 


Covington, KY 


TAYLOR, CINDY 


Pineville, KY 


TERRELL, THERESA L. 


Ashland, KY 


TERRILL, MARGIE M. 


Lambric, KY 


TERRY, KENT D. 


South Shore, KY 


THOMAS, KIM 


Burlington, KY 


THOMAS, MARK 


Mt. Olivet, KY 


THOMPSON, GARY EUGENE 


Jackson, KY 


THOMPSON, RON 


Louisville, KY 


THRASHER, TINA 


Albany, KY 


THREASHER, LISA 


Albany, KY 


TIMMONS, DEBRA LYNN 


Verona, Wl 


TINCHER, WENDY 


Paris, KY 


TOMPKINS, BRENT 


Brooksville, KY 


TRENKAMP, JULIE 


Independence, KY 


TRIMBLE, KIM 


Greensburg, KY 


TROUTT, TERRY L. 


Richmond, KY 


TRUE, BEVERLY 


Paris, KY 


TUCKER, KIM 


Louisville, KY 


TURNAU, JEFF 


Cincinnati, OH 


TURNER, JANICE 


Jackson, KY 


TURNER, LISA 


Jackson, KY 


VANDUER, JOHN 


Berham, KY 


VANDY, GEORGE A. 


London, KY 


VEST, DANIEL 


Frankfort, KY 


VONLUIHRTE, BECKI 


Erlanger, KY 


WAINRIGHT, PHIL 


Loveland, OH 


WALTERS, MELISSA ANN 


Newport, KY 


WAMPLER, JAMI 


Zephyrhills, FL 


WASHBISH, GAIL 


Louisville, KY 


WATERMAN, MARIANNE 


Richmond, KY 


WATKINS, NEVILLE M. 


Richmond, KY 


WAYMAN, LISA 


West Edmeston, NY 


WEBB, JOHN D. 


Muncheston, KY 


WEBSTER, TROY 


La Grange, KY 


WEHRMAN, MONICA 


Florence, KY 


WELLS, CARLA 


Pleasureville, KY 


WELSH, KRISTA 


Circleville, OH 


WHITE, ART 


Science Hill, KY 


WHITE, CHUCK 


Science Hill, KY 


WHITE, LINDA C. 


Harrodsburg, KY 


WHITE, RICHARD B. 


Science Hill, KY 


WHITE, RON 


Somerset, KY 


WICKER, DAVID 


Russell Spring, KY 


WICKLINNE, KIM 


Lexington, KY 


WIEDERHOLD, KATHY 


Lancaster, KY 


WIETHOLTER, JEFF 


Cold Spring, KY 


WILDER, MARILU 


Baxter, KY 


WILEY, DONALD 


Louisville, KY 


WILHELM, ANGEL 


Fort Thomas, KY 


WILKINSON, BONNIE 


Stanford, KY 


WILLIAMS, KIMBERLY 


Lexington, KY 


WILLIAMS, LISA CAROL 


Mavsville, KY 


WILLIAMS, LISA DAWN 


Hodgenville, KY 


WILLIAMS, VIRGINIA 


Richmond, KY 


WILLIAMSON, JAMES 


Pikeville, KY 


WILMES, DONNA 


Cincinnati, OH 


WILSON, BRETT 


Helton, KY 


WILSON, TAMMY L. 


Manchester, KY 


WITT, GREGG 


Louisville, KY 


WOLFE, RENEE 


Mt. Vernon, KY 


WOLFFORD, JENNIFER 


Taylor Mill, KY 


WOLFINGER, ROBERTA. 


Grove City, OH 


WOLLERT, DEBBIE 


Louisville, KY 


WOODARD, TERESA 


Owensboro, KY 


WOODLEE, JEFFREY D. 


Gray, KY 


STR-WOO/Juniors 


257 



Juniors 



WOODY MARGARET ANN 


London, KY 


WOODY, SHHIA C. 


London, KY 


WOOTEN, SUSAN' R. 


Ashland, KY 


WORLEY ANTHONY M. 


Stearns, KY 


WRENN. FLOYD H. II 


Stanford, KY 


WRIGHT. CHET 


Middletown, OH 


WRIGHT, MATTHEW 


Middletown, OH 


WRIGHT, MELINDA 


Pikeville, KY 


WRIGHT, WILLIAM V. 


Louisville, KY 


WYATT, GREG 


Baxter, KY 


WYRICK, KELLY 


New Paris, OH 


YATES, DELEITH 


Wilmore, KY 


YORK, KAREN 


Hamilton, OH 


YORK, MONA QUINN 


Richmond, KY 


YOUNG, H. WAYNE 


Lexington, KY 


YOUNG, KIM 


Springfield, OH 




^ 









Right: The warm weather of August brought 
pipers outdoors as the University hosted a bag- 
pipe camp, sponsored by the University's Spe- 
cial Program. 

258/ Juniors/ Woo- You 




1 



Sophomores 









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ABNEY, CARRIE 


Berea, KY 


ABRAMS, AMY 


Rushville, IN 


ADAMS, KIMISY 


Mallie, KY 


ADAMS, STACEY 


Richmond, KY 


ADAMS, WAYNE 


Ozark, AR 


AEBERSOLD, DOUG 


Bradenburg, KY 


ALEXANDER, RONALD RAY 


Campton, KY 


ALLEN, NORMA 


Monticello, KY 


ALTMAN, JIM 


Pikeville, KY 


ANDERSON, DAVID 


Bedford, KY 


ANDERSON, FREDA 


Harrodsburg, KY 


ANDERSON, MICHAEL 


Bedford, KY 


ANDERSON, SHERRY 


Nicholsville, KY 


ANDREWS, DENNIS 


Richmond, KY 


APPLEGATE, MARY DAWN 


Vanceburg, KY 


ARNOLD, ANGELA D. 


Otwav, OH 


ATCHISON, DOUGLAS 


Paris, KY 


ATKIN, THOMAS 


Artemos, KY 


AUGLIN, PAUL 


Berea, KY 


BAKER, DARREN 


Richmond, KY 


BALLEW, SANDRA 


Lexington, KY 


BANKS, JEFF 


Frankfort, KY 


BARNES, CARL R. 


Sizerock, KY 


BARNET, TRACEY 


Jackson, KY 


BARNEY, CHRISTOPHER 


Louisville, KY 


BARROWS, KIM MARIE 


Campbellsville, KY 


BARTLETT, MICHELE 


Frankfort, KY 


BASS, JESSE 


Crestwood, KY 


BAUMANN, JULIE 


Ft. Thomas, KY 


BAVER, THOMAS 


Ghent, KY 


BEAM, LAURA ANN 


Flaherty, KY 


BELL, LISA L. 


Louisville. KY 


BENTLE, LORA 


Falmouth, KY 


BENTLEY, GINA 


Mallie, KY 


BERTRAM, TRACY 


Cincinnati, OH 


BINDER, ANNETTE 


London, KY 


BLACK, J. MECHELLE 


Corbin, KY 


BLACK, LORI 


Catlettsburg, KY 


BLACKBURN, CRYSTAL R. 


Berea, KY 


BLACKBURN, KATHARINE 


Frankfort, KY 


BLAIR, JILL 


West Chester, OH 


BLAIR, MORRIS W. 


Sandy Hook, KY 


BLAKENEY, PAMELA KAYE 


Louisville, KY 


BLEVINS, TAMMY 


Monticello, KY 


BLOMBACH, CHRIS 


La Grange, KY 


BOITMAN, CATHERINE 


Ft. Wright, KY 


BOLDERY, DAVE 


Milton, KY 


BORDERS, LISA 


Springfield, KY 


BOTTS, DARRIN A. 


Ml. Sterling. KY 


BOWER, DEBBIE 


Washington, OH 


BOWLIN, STEVEN RAY 


Berea, KY 


BOWMAN, JAMES D. 


Lexington, KY 


BRANGERS, JOE 


Louisville, KY 


BRAY, CHERYL A. 


London, KY' 


BRESLIN, KELLY 


Louisville, KY 


BRIGHT, AMY 


Lancaster, OH 


BRIGHT, MITZI 


Bradfordsville, KY 


BROCKMAN, MARIA M. 


Lebanon, KY 


BROWN, ALAN 


Manchester, KY 


BROWN, MARY J. 


Frankfort, KY 


BROWN, SCOTT RUSSELL 


Vienna, VA 


BROWNING, LINDA M. 


Lebanon, KY 


BRUMMETT, BERT 


Somerset, KY 


BRYANT, DAVID 


Cecilia, KY 


BUCHANAN, BRUCE 


New Albany, IN 


BURGETT, SABRINA 


Williamson,' WV 


BUSCHELMAN, CHARLA 


Florence, KY 


BYER, CHARMAINE 


Ann Arbor, MI 


CALDWELL, DAVID E. 


London, KY 


CALLEBS, JOHNNY W. 


Pineville, KY 


ABN-CAL / Sophomores 


259 



Sophomores 



CAMPBELL, PATTI 


Cincinnati, OH 


CAMPBELL, TAMMY 


Hazard, KY 


CAREY, MELANIE 


Willisburg, KY 


CARL. SUSAN 


Versailles, KY 


CARMACK. SHELLY 


Tipp City, OH 


CARNEY CATHY 


Willisburg, KY 


CARR. ROB 


Independence, KY 


CAUDILL. DEANNA 


Closplint, KY 


CAYWOOD, REBECCA 


Paris, KY 


CHADWELL, GOLVIN 


Corbin, KY 


CHANDLER, JOSEPH C. 


Louisville, KY 


CHARLESTON, JODY KAY 


Louisville, KY 


CHILDERS, ANTHONY 


Hellier, KY 


CHIR1CHIGNO, JOANNA M 


Louisville, KY 


CHRISTOFIELD. DIANE 


Woodlawn, KY 


CLARK, CATHI 


Richmond, KY 


CLARKSON, JACQUELINE R 


Erlanger, KY' 


CLEVINGER, CHERIE 


Bellevue, OH 


CLIFFORD, USA 


Milton, KY 


CLINE, KELLEY 


Flatwoods, KY 


CLOYD, LEE 


Lexington, KY 


COBLE, BRENDA 


Florence, KY 


COFFEY, CARIA 


Mt. Washington, KY 


COFFEY', MICHELE 


Lexington, KY 


COLE, ADRIENNE 


Louisville, KY 


COLE, REBECCA 


Berry, KY 


COLLINS, SANDRA 


Bulan, KY 


CONFIDES, KAREN 


Lexington, KY 


CONSLEY, STEVEN CRAIG 


Milton, KY 


COOMBS, DEBORAH M. 


Louisville, KY 


CORDARO, USA 


Louisville, KY 


CORNETT, JILL K 


Lexington, KY 


CORNETT, M. B. 


Liberty, KY 


CORNETT, ROBERT 


Williamsburg, KY 


COVINGTON, MONICE 


Louisville, KY 


COX, FRANCES STANHOPE 


Lexington, KY 


COX, LORI 


Georgetown, KY 


CRABTREE, ANN R. 


Stanton, KY 


CRAWFORD, RALPH W. 


Manchester, KY 


CRAWFORD, TODD WILLIAM Ft. Thomas, KY 


CRIDEER, DANA 


Louisville, KY 


CROSS, AMY B 


Mason, OH 


CROWDER, TONY R. JR. 


Louisville, KY 


CUNIGAN, BRIAN 


Annville, KY 


CURTIS, MICHAEL 


Morehead, KY 


DAFFRON, LEE ANN 


Campbellsville, KY 


DAMERON, ANTHONY WAYNE Belcher, KY 


DAUGHERTY, WANDA 


Radcliff, KY 


DAVIS, LISA 


Richmond, KY 


DENHAM, ANITA 


Vanceburg, KY 


DENHAM, CHRIS 


Danville, KY 


DEVINE, M. 




DITTO, BETHANE 


Brandenburg, KY 


DIXON, TIMOTHY 


Richmond, KY 


DOBBS, KURT 


Louisville, KY 


DOUGLAS, D. DELINDA Kings Mountain, KY 


DOUGLAS, HOLLENA A 


Marcum, KY 


DOUGLAS, LYNNETTE 


Pleasureville, KY 


DOYLE, MELANIE 


Cynthiana, KY 


DUFF, MAHALA A. 


Stanton, KY 


DUMSTORF, JULIE K. 


Louisville, KY 


DUNCAN, TEDDY 


Pilgram, KY 


DURHAM, CAROL 


Troy, OH 


DUVALL, JULIE 


Waddy, KY 


DYKES, MICHAEL 


Fegason, KY 


EADS, MELISSA 


Monticello, KY 


EAGLE, DEBRA 


Loyall, KY 


EDWARDS, CAROLINE 


Booneville, KY 


ELDRIDCE, BECKHAM T. 


Somerset, KY 


ELLIOT, JACKIE 


Grayson, KY 



260/Sophomores/Cam-Ell 




Sophomores 















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HjA 




ELLIS, STEPHANIE 


Owensboro, KY 


ENGLAND, TAMMY 


Louisville, KY 


ENGLEBRECHT, SUSAN 


Dayton, OH 


ERSCHELL, SHAWN 


Fori Thomas, KY 


ESSELMAN, MARCIA 


Ft. Thomas, KY 


ESTER LAURA LEE 


Springfield, OH 


EVANS, DON 


Lexington, KY 


EVANS, TATE 


Louisville, KY 


FARMER, KIM 


Loyall, KY 


FERGUSON, HOLLY 


Meally, KY 


FIELDS, RANDY G. 


Evarts, KY 


FITZHUGH, LEANNE 


Owensboro, KY 


FLARIDA, DANIELLE 


Lebanon, OH 


FLETCHER, MICHAEL 


Williamson, WV 


FLICK, MARY 


Hamilton, OH 


FLYNN, LANA 


Hamilton, OH 


FORD, KELLEY J. 


Louisville, KY 


FORD, RICHARD 


Bethesda, MD 


FORWENGLER, CAROL 


Louisville, KY 


FOX, BELINDA 


Ravenna, KY 


FRALEY, LISA 


Quincy, KY 


FRAZIER, PAM 


Campbellsburg, KY 


FREDERICK, SCOTT A. 


Paeton, OH 


FRITZ, AMELIA A. 


Jeffersonville, IN 


FRYMAN, DORA LOUANN 


Cynthiana, KY 


GABBNEY, SHERR1 R 


Lancaster, KY 


GAINES, KAREN 


Frankfort, KY 


GAITHER, JIM 


Corbin, KY 


GALLOWAY, MELISSA D, 


Partridge, KY 


GANDER, NANCY L. 


Stanford, KY 


GARNETT, BRENNA B. 


Ekron, KY 


GAY, GLENNA 


Bucktown, KY 


GAZAWAY, SHARON Y. 


Louisville, KY 


GELLART, KRISTA 


Akron, NY 


GENTRY, TIM 


Berea, KY 


GIBSON, PAM 


Morganfield, KY 


GIFT, JONATHAN 


Hagerstown, MD 


GILPIN, RANDY 


Somerset, KY 


GLASS, SUSIE 


Somerset, KY 


GOINS, III, EDWARD F 


Frankfort, KY 


GOODLETT, HOPE 


Taylorsville, KY 


GOODWIN, BETTY R. 


Louisville, KY' 


GRACE, JENNY 


West Chester, OH 


GRANT, DIANA 


Danville, KY 


GRIFFIN, ANGELA 


Grangetown, KY 


GROOMS, STEPHANIE 


Paris, KY 


GROSS, AMY 


Gary, IN 


GROSS, BERLENA 


Jackson, KY 


GROSS, JEFFREY 


Jackson, KY 


GRUBB, SAMANTHA 


Irvine, KY 


GULLETTE, MYLES 


Lexington, KY 


GURNEY, SUSAN 


Trotwood, OH 


GUTERMUTH, JULIE 


Fairdale, KY 


HAAKE, JEFFREY SCOTT 


Taylor Mill, KY 


HALL, ALAN 


New Haven, KY 


HALL, VICKI 


Vine Grove, KY 


HALLORAN, KATHLEEN 


Laieside Park, KY 


HAM, TAMMY 


Winchester, KY 


HAMES, KELLY 


Park Hills, KY 


HANSEL, BRIAN 


Georgetown, KY 


HARDESTY, ELIZABETH ANN 


Lexington, KY 


HARDIN, DINA 


New Castle, KY 


HARDIN, JANET 


Guston, KY 



HARRIS, ROBIN Lexington, KY 

HARRIS, SAMANTHA LEA Harrodsburg, KY' 

HART, TIM Bellevue, KY 

HARVEY, LOIS Richmond, KY 
HAUGHABOD, HOWARD CALVIN Maysville, KY 

HAYDEN, DONNA Louisville, KY 

HAYES, JULIE ANN Louisville, KY 

Sophomores / Ell-Hay / 261 



Sophomores 



HAYES, KIM 


Perrwille. KY 


HAYS ROBERT 


McKee, KY 


HEAD, SERENA A. 


Bardstown, KY 


HEBEL, RANDY 


Bellevue, KY 


HENDERSON, GINA 


Louisville, KY 


HEX5LEY DORIS BOYDETTA 


Paint Lick, KY 


HENSON. LISA 


Harlan, KY' 



HERALD. CRYSTAL Newport, KY 

HERRLN, KATHY W. Chester, OH 

HICKS, MARILYN E. Frankfort, KY 
HIERANYMUS, ELIZABETH ANN McKee, KY 

HISSOM, JAMIE Richmond, KY 

HOCKEN, SHARON Lexington, KY 

HOELSCHER, BILL La Grange, KY 



HOFFMHSTER. JULIE 


Prospect, KY 


HOCUE, MARILYNDA L. 


Pineville, KY 


HOLT, DEBBIE A. 


Mitchellsburg, KY 


HOLTZCLAW, RITA MARIE 


Morrow, OH 


HOOK, CHRIS 


South Shore, KY 


HOSKINS, BONNIE ELISA 


Eriline, KY 


HOUSE. LISA 


Versailles, KY 


HOWARD, LOUNETTE L. 


Noctor, KY 


HOWARD, TAMMY S. 


La Grange, KY 


HOWELL, JENNIFER 


Dayton, OH 


HOYLN'G, DEBORAH D. 


West Union, OH 


HUDDLESTON, GEORGE M. 


Greensburg, KY 


HUDSON. ANTHONY 


Milton, KY 


HUDSON, JEFFREY- 


Somerset, KY 


HUFFMAN, JAMES WARREN 


Florence, KY 


HUGHES, DONNA L. 


Falmouth, KY 


HULSE, RICHARD E. 


Cincinnati, OH 


HUMPHREY, JACKIE 


Jacksonville, NC 


HUNTER. CHUCK 


Frankfort, KY 


HURST, TIM 


Albany, KY 


ISAAC, BILL 


Richmond, KY 


ISBaL, DARWIN 


Richmond, KY 


ISHAM, ALAN 


Bardstown, KY 


JAMES, MELINDA 


Shelbyville, KY 


J.AMES, TONYA DENISE 


Louisville, KY 


JARMEN, MARSHAL 


Harrodsburg, KY 


JOHNSON, ANGELA 


Erlanger, KY 


JOHNSON, CONNIE 


Williamsburg, KY 


JOHNSON, DIANA 


Berea, KY 


JOHNSON, MELISSA 


Betsy Layne, KY 


JOHNSON, WILL 


'Hazard, KY 


JONES, SABRINA 


Williamsburg, KY 


JORDAN, JOLINDA SUE 


Argillite, KY 


JUDE, TERESA G. 


Inez, KY 


JURY, JULIE 


Louisville, KY 


JUSTICE, JIM 


Corbin, KY 


KAFFENBARGER, DEBBIE 


New Carlisle, OH 


KARL, KENNY 


Louisville, KY 


KEARNS, KARRI JO 


Williamstown, KY 


KEHL, STEVEN JOSEPH 


Louisville, KY 


KEMPER, PRISCILLA 


Danville, KY 


KENDALL, MARK A. 


Frankfort, KY 


KENNEY, ANGELA 


Cincinnati, OH 


KERSEY, KRISHNA RENEE 


Russell, KY 


KINCAID, ELICIA 


Seattyville, KY 


KING, TONIA 


Olive Hill, KY 


KINKER, MARTHA 


Cincinnati, OH 


KNEPSHIELD, SHELBY 


Newport, KY 


KNUCKLES, L. 




KUCHENBROD, MICHAEL J. 


Perryville, KY 


KUNTZ, DINDA 


Lebanon, OH 


LACEY, DAVID 


Louisville, KY 


LARIMORE, GREG 


Prospect, KY 


LASH, CARRIE 


Richmond, KY 


LAWSON, MYRA ANN 


Guston, KY 


LAWSON, RONA MINAE 


Prestonsburg, KY 



262/Sophomores/ Hay-Law 




Sophomores 







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rt'-A 



LAYMAN, MANDY 


Louisville, KY 


LEE, SAMMY 


Manchester, KY 


LEIGH, DONNIE 


Waynesburg, KY 


LENTINI, GINA 


Shelbyville, KY 


LESLIE, LISA 


Washington, OH 


LEWIS, JANE 


Cynthiana, KY 


LINK, KEVIN 


La Grange, KY 


LIPKER, PERRY 


Ashland, KY 


LIPPERT, DEANNA 


Versailles, KY 


LIST, SHARON 


Ripley, OH 


LITER, CHRIS 


Milton, KY 


LITTRELL, TONDA 


Albany, KY 


LUCAS, KRISTEN 


Cincinnati, OH 


LUNSFORD, TIM 


Manchester, KY 


LUTES, LORI 


Frankfort, KY 


LUXON, KATHY 


Richmond, KY 


LYNAM, LIBBY 


Louisville, KY 


MACKENS, DEN1SE 


Miami, FL 


MANN, DAVID J. 


Prestonsburg, KY 


MANN, SONYA L. 


Florence, KY 


MANNING, TAMI LYNN 


Lakeside Park, KY 


MANUEL, LISA 


Owingsville, KY 


MARCHAL, ANNETTE JULIA 


Dayton, OH 


MARCUM, NANCY E. 


Blartchester, OH 


MARLOWE, TRACY 


Lebanon, KY 


MARSEE, MICHAEL W. 


Waynesburg, KY 


MARSTON, CRAIG 


Danville, KY 


MARSU, THOM 


Ashland, KY 


MATTINGLY, LAURA 


Lorerto, KY 


MCCORMACK, ELESE M. 


Park Hills, KY 


MCGOWAN, LISA M. 


Waynesville, OH 


MCGUIRE, SUSAN 


Louisville, KY 


MCHALE, CHUCK 


Richmond, KY 


MCINTYRE, CANDICE R, 


Carrollton, KY 


MCIVER, TERESA C. 


Albany, KY 


MCKIMLEY, ELLEN 


Kettering, OH 


MCKINLEY, JAMES T 


Lexington, KY 


MCKINLEY, LOUVA ELLEN 


Elizabethtown, KY 


MCKINNEY, TINA 


Somerset, KY 


MEADOWS, TAMMY 


Paint Lick, KY 


MEDLEY, RAY 


Louisville, KY 


MEDLEY, ROBBIE 


Richmond, KY 


MICHELSEN, CHRIS 


Louisville, KY 


MIDDLETON, JEFFREY S. 


Richmond, KY 


MILLER, BOBBY 


Danville, KY 


MILLER, KRISTINA L. 


Louisville, KY 


MILLER, MIKE 


Louisville, KY 


MILLER, SONDRA DENISE 


Hazard, KY 


MILLER, VICKI 


Ravenna, KY 


MOBLEY, PHILIP RYAN 


Manchester, KY 


MOFFETT, ELIZABETH E. 


Louisville, KY 


MONIN, ANN 


Bardstown, KY 


MOORE, WENDELL F. JR. 


Owingsville, KY 


MORAN, COLLEEN KELLY 


So. Charleston, WV 


MORAN, MARTHA 


Louisville, KY 


MORRIS, MARY ANN 


Jeremiah, KY 


MORROW, KAREN 


Louisville, KY 


MORTON, SHERRY 


Lexington, KY 


MULLINS, VONDA 


Sidnev, KY 


MUNIZ, CARMEN 


Frankfort, KY 


MURPHY, KIMBERLY L. 


Ft. Thomas, KY 


MURPHY, TAMARA 


Richmond, KY 


NANCE, JOE 


Mt. Sterling, KY 


NANOS, SUE 


Battle Creek, MI 


NAPIER, DEBBIE 


Dwarf, KY 


NELSON, MARGARET J. 


Alexandra, KY 


NEWMAN, PATTY 


Louisville, KY 


NEWTON, ANGELA Washington, Ct. Hse, OH 


NIDAY, WILLENE 


WalLins Creek, KY 


NOEL, MELANI 


Mackville, KY 


Sophomores / Lay-Noe / 263 



Sophomores 



OGBURN, USA CAROL 


Louisville, KY 


OLDABER. SABRINA 


Crestwood, KY 


OPELL, VIRGINIA L. 


Catlettsburg, KY 


OSBORNE. BART 


Robinson Creek, KY 


OVERSTREET, STACY 


BradfordsviUe, KY 


OWENS. JAMES 


Waco, KY 


PARKER. PAULA J. 


Radcliff, KY 


PARKS. MATT 


Richmond, KY 


RATE. TRACY R. 


Anchorage, KY 


PATRICK, PAM 


Richmond, KY 


PATRICK. TIFFANY 


Mount Sterling, KY 


PEARSON. ONDY 


Irvine, KY 


PEINEKE, CHRIS 


Hebron, KY 


PENN, MELISSA 


Frankfort, KY 


PENWELL, JANEY 


Wash. Ct. Hse, OH 


PERRY. ELVENA 


Hodgenville, KY 


PETERS, WAYNE 


Booneville, KY 


PETREY. ROBLN 


Crab Orchard, KY 


PHELPS. KARLA JO 


Science Hill, KY 


PHELPS, TIMOTHY W. 


Rising Sun, IN 


PHILLIPPI, DAVID M. 


Williamstown, KY 


PHILLIPS, DENISE L. 


Covington, KY 


PLOETNER, SARAH 


La Grange, KY 


POWELL, DEBBIE 


Winchester, KY 


POWERS, VICTORIA LYNN 


Stanford, KY 


PRICE, MELISSA 


Shelbyville, KY 


PRICE. PENNY 


Jamestown, KY 


PRUITT. MICKIE LEA 


Brodhead, KY 


PYLE, STEPHEN 


Lexington, KY 


QUARLES, TABATHA 


Hopkinsville, KY 


RALEIGH, MICHELLE 


Southgate, KY 


RAMSEY, MARY 


Corbin, KY 


RAMSEY, PETER 


Richmond, KY 


RATUFF, ROBERT B 


Louisa, KY 


RAWLINS. TERRY 


Crestwood, KY 


RAY, REBEKAH RACHEL 


Hazard, KY 


RECKTENWALD. ANNE 


Louisville, KY 


RECTOR. ELIZABETH 


Waynesburg, KY 


REECE, CONNIE 


Louisville, KY 


REED. PAMELA JO 


Liberty, KY 


RHTZ, KATHY 


Louisville, KY 


REMZELLO. TEONTA 


Hazard. KY 


RENNER, TERESSA 


Orlando, KY 


REYNOLDS, EUGENE 


Manchester, KY 


REYNOLDS, PAMELA 


Greenville, KY 


RHODUS, SHERRI 


Richmond, KY 


RICE, SHERRI 


Winchester, KY 


RICE. YVETTE 


Paris, KY 


RICHARDSON. SHARON 


Lancaster, KY 


RICHMOND, MOLETA YVONNE Richmond, KY 


RICHTER, DEANNA 


Cincinnati, OH 


ROBINETTE, LINDA 


Med, KY 


ROBINSON, EDYE 


Lexington, KY 


ROBINSON, GREG 


Morrow, OH 


ROBLNSON, JOHN 


Manchester, KY 


ROBINSON, LEE 


Richmond, KY 


ROCKWELL, KATHY 


London, KY 


RODDY, KATHRYN 


South Williamson, KY 


ROLF, JENNIFER 


Ft. Thomas, KY 


ROLF, KAREN 


Ft. Wright, KY 


ROSE. JAMES K. 


Pineville, KY 


ROSE, TONYA 


Xenia, OH 


ROSH. SUSAN 


Louisville, KY 


ROY, CAMELLIA 


Columbia, KY 


RUTHERFORD, MARK J. 


Elkhorn City, KY 


RYAN, JOHN 


Clermont, KY 


SANDERS, TERRY 


Mayfield, KY 


SCANNELL, JOHN 


Louisville, KY 


SCHACFER, FRED 


Frankfort, KY 


SCHAEFER, CHERI 


Crestwood, KY 


264/Sophomores/Ogb-Sch 




Sophomores 






*- ■■■■ I » ^b^^ " — - 

1 




<V Of «A£ 




SCHEER, DEBBIE 


Louisville, KY 


SCHEPER, JENNIFER E. 


Edgewood, KY 


SCHILLING, SUZANNE 


Crestview Hills, KY 


SCHLAFKE, TAMMY KAYE 


Munfordville, KY 


SCHNEIDER, JOHN L. 


Catlettsburg, KY 


SCHOBORG, CHRISTINE 


Independence, KY 


SCHOENGART, DAVID KURT Sleepy Hollow, 1L 


SCHULTZ, ERIK CONRAD 


La Grange, KY 


SCOTT, ROBERT W. 


Yeaddiss, KY 


SCOTT, TIMOTHY 


Hardy, KY 


SCOTT, TYLER 


Covington, KY 


SEBASTIAN, CHARLOTTE J 


Booneville, KY 


SENGER, KIMBERLY 


Newport, KY 


SHADE, DIANNE 


Louisville, KY 


SHEEHAN, CRAIG A. 


Louisville, KY 


SHIELDS, MELINDA 


Barbourville, KY 


SHOUSE, DEREK 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


SIDWELL, TAMMY 


Richmond, KY 


SIMPSON, MELIDNA 


Bardstown, KY 


SINGLETON, JULIE ANN 


Guston, KY 


SLATER, BENNY 


Turkey Creek, KY 


SMALLWOOD, REBECCA 


Manchester, KY 


SMITH, BRIAN N. 


Maysville, KY 


SMITH, DEBORA ANN 


Louisville, KY 


SMITH, LISA G. 


Albany, KY 


SMITH, MARK LONDON 


Lexington, KY 


SMITH, REBECCA R. 


South Shore, KY 


SMITH, SHERRY LYNN 


Chesapeake, OH 


SNOW, CHRISTINE Old Orchard Beach, ME 


SPARKS, TIMOTHY 


Beattyville, KY 


SPEER, LOGAN 


Stanford, KY 


STACY, TAMMY 


Mt. Gilead, OH 


STALLARD, KIMBERLY A. 


Anchorage, KY 


STANLEY, KAREN 


Nebo, KY 


STANLEY, SHARON 


Morehead, KY 


STANO-BOND, KERI 


Cincinnati, OH 


STEINGER, EARL 


Louisville, KY 


STEWART, TIM 


Campbellsburg, KY 


STINE, TREVOR 


Louisville, KY 


STIVERS, ELIZABETH 


Manchester, KY 


STOUT, JOHN 


Lexington, KY 


STRANGE, ELLEN 


Bardstown, KY 


STRATTON, DONNA 


Finchville, KY 


STRATTON, JENNIFER 


Harfodsburg, KY 


STRONG, CHRISTY 


Lexington, KY 


SUPPLEE, TANYA KAY 


Carrollton, KY 


SUTTON, WILLIAM M. 


Springfield, KY 


SWATZYNA, MIKE 


Frankfort, KY 


SWEENEY, TERRI LYNN 


Winchester, KY 


SYLORE, STACY 


Berea, KY 


TACKETT, LISA 


Means, KY 


TAUL, TANYA 


Ashland, KY 


TAYLOR, RODNEY A. 


Carrollton, KY 


TECK, EDWARD 


Lexington, KY 


THOMAS, ELMER C. 


Irvine, KY 


THOMAS, JACQUELINE G. 


Burlington, KY 


THOMAS, PAMELA 


Louisville, KY 


THORNBURY, DAN 


PikeviUe, KY 


TINGLE, BETH 


Campbellsburg, KY 


TURNER, REBECCA 


PineviUe, KY 


UBELHART, BETH 


Louisville, KY 


VANDUER, MICHAEL 


Virgie, KY 


WAHL, DANA 


Owensboro, KY 


WALKER, CRYSTAL L. 


Lexington, KY 


WALKER, JADA ANN 


Cynthiana, KY 


WALLEN, JAMIE LYNN 


Prestonsburg, KY 


WALLEN, ROBIN 


Hager Hill, KY 


WALTERHAM, TINA 


Elizabethtown, KY 


WALTON, SONYA LYNN 


Richmond, KY 


WAMPLER, MONICK 


Youngsville, NC 


Sophomores/Sch-Wam/265 



Sophomores 



WARFORD, JANICE Richmond, KY 

WARNDORF. MICHELLE MARIE Hebron, KY 



WASHINGTON, JAMES L. 


Radcliff. KY 


WATSON, KATHY 


Bryson City, NC 


WATSON, RAM L. 


Louisville, KY' 


WEATHERS. ERIC P. 


Lexington, KY 


WEBB. TOBY R. 


Jefi'ersonville, KY' 


WBLENKEN, ERIC 


Prospect, KY 


WERNER, GERALD TODD 


Meta, KY 


WEST, TANYA ANN 


Blanchester, OH 


WHEELER. EMILY- 


Shelbyville, KY 


WHEELER. MELISSA 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


WHITE, PAUL 


Stanton, KY' 


WHITE. TARA 


Louisville, KY 


WHITEHOUSE, DAVID 


Georgetown, KY 


WHITFIELD. BETH 


Louisville, KY 


WICKERSHAM, DAVTD 


Richmond, KY 


WIGFALL, TONIA R. 


Middlesboro, KY 


WIGGER, JERRY 


Covington, KY 


WILLIAMS, CYNTHIA D. 


Louisville, KY 


WILLIAMS, PATRICK 


Peoria, IL 


WILLIAMSON, LIBBY 


Harold, KY 


WILSON. CARL M. 


Cox's Creek, KY 


WILSON, DONNA 


La Grange, KY 


WILSON, KEVIN 


Louisville, KY 


WILSON, KIMBERLY 


Springfield, OH 


WILSON. LISA 


Winchester, KY 


WILSON, MICHELLE 


London, KY 


WILSON, NICK 


Williamsburg, KY 


WISE. TERENA 


Stanton, KY 


WOLFE, JENNIFER 


Manchester, KY 


WREN, JOY 


Richmond, KY 


YATES, KELLIE J. 


Crestwood, KY 


YORK, ALICE 


Albany, KY 


YORK, QUENTIN M. 


Richmond, KY 


YOUNG, in, FRANK S 


Georgetown, KY 



Right: This Student receives help 
at the registration center in the 
Combs Building. 

266/Sophomores/War-You 



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Freshmen 



L% 




£ Q £ f|f> 





AARON, RENEE 


Campbellsville, KY 


AARON, ROBBIN 


Campbellsville, KY 


ABELL, LORI 


Lebanon, KY 


ABNER, DONNA 


Manchester, KY 


ABSHER, KARL 


Whitesburg, KY 


ADAMS, PAMELA 


Irvine, KY 


ATKINS, AUDREY 


McKee, KY 


ALBRINCK, SANDY 


Edgewood, KY 


ALDRIDGE, TINA 


Hawesville, KY 


ALEXANDER, )EFF 


Oakland, KY 


ALEXANDER, MICHELLE 


Grayson, KY 


ALLEN SALLY BETH 


Brandenburg, KY 


ALLEN, PAM 


Ashland, KY 


ANDERSON, JEFFREY 


Harrodsburg, KY 


ANTLE, ANITA 




APPLEGATE, SHAWN 


Tollesboro, KY 


ARMSTRONG, CHRISTINE M. Erlanger, KY 


AYRES, JOEY 


Springfield, OH 


BAIRD, DONNA 


Louisville, KY 


BAKER, GARY N. 


Irvine, KY 


BAKER, MICHAEL STRATTON Nicholasville, KY 


BAKER, RAYNELLE 


Erlanger, KY 


BALYEAT, NATALIE J. 


Lima, OH 


BARLOW, WENDY 


Somerset, KY 


BARNES, RONNIE S. 


Nicholasville, KY 


BARON, JULIE 


Louisville, KY 


BARRETT, BILLIE JEAN 


London, KY 


BASTIN, RAY 


Lancaster, KY 


BATES, G. HUNTER 


Williamsburg, KY 


BECKETT, MELISSA 


Mt. Olivet, KY 


BEGLEY, H. 


Busy, KY 


BEISER, KATHY 


Trenton, OH 


BELL, TERESA 


Cynthiana, KY 


BELLAMY, KELLE 


Gate City, VA 


BELLEW, MELISSA 


Wurtland, KY 


BENTLEY, REGENNA 


Shelleiana, KY 


BEVINS, BETH 


PineviUe, KY 


BISHOP, JOHN PIERCE 


Woodbine, KY 


BISSELL, CHARLIE 


Ashland, KY 


BLAIR, ROBIN S. 


Independence, KY 


BLAIR, WILLIAM G. 


Blackev, KY 


BOGGS, KEVIN 


Whitesburg, KY 


BOGGS, MARVIN 


Whitesburg, KY 


BOLLING, SCOTT 


Junction City, KY 


BOLLINGER, MICHELE R. 


Fort Monmouth, NJ 


BOLTON, BETH 


Lancaster, KY 


BORDERS, LYN 


Versailles, KY 


BOTKTN, BARBARA 


Versailles, KY 


BOWEN, MONICA LEE 


Campbellsville, KY 


BRANNICK, BOBBI J. 


Canton, OH 


BRENNAN, MARY 


Frankfort, KY 


BROCK, MILBURN 


Manchester, KY 


BROCK, PATRICIA 


Helton, KY 


BROWN, BRENDA 


Ashland, KY 


BROWN, JENNIFER 


Paris, KY 


BRUCE, KEVIN 


Lexington, KY 


BRYANT, REBECCA J. 


Calvin, KY 


BRYANT, ROBERT 


Cecilia, KY 


BRYANT, ROBERT 


Williamsburg, KY 


BURBRIDGE, ROGERNETTA 


Columbia, KY 


BURKHARDT, STACY 


Milton, KY 


BURNS, LISA 


Louisville, KY 


BURNS, TAMMY LYNN 


Irvine, KY 


BURRUS, LEQUETTA R. 


Louisville, KY 


BYRD, SHERRY 


Willisburg, KY 


CALHOUN, KATHERINE 


Okeana, OH 


CALLEBS, LEE BO 


PineviUe, KY 


CAMPBELL, JEFF 


Allen, KY 


CAMPBELL, RAGINA 


Winchester, KY 


CARDWELL, BETH 


Forest Park, OH 


Freshman / Aar-Car / 267 



Freshmen 



CARIGAX. KATHERINE E. 


Frankfort. KY 


CARMAN. DARLAN 


Big Spring, KY 


CARSON. LISA J. 


Louisville, KY 


CASEY. NLARK 


Lawrenceburg. KY 


CASH, CYNTHIA 


Mt. Vernon, KY' 


CAUDILL, AMY 


Blackev, KY 


CHAXEY DEBORAH S. 


Irvine. KY 


Ca\P MAN. BETH 


Painrsville, KY 


CHASTEEN, BRENDA 


Berea, KY 


CHURCH, MISTY RENEE 


Frankfort, KY 


CHURCH, SARA JANE 


Louisville, KY 


CLARK. KATHLEEN ANNE 


Ft. Wright, KY 


CLATWORTHY. GOLDIE 


Mt. Olivet, KY 


CLOWERS. PHILLIP 


Richmond, KY 


COHORN, T. 


Frankfort, KY 


COLE, USA 


Irvine, KY 


COLEMAN. JAMES RONALD 


Pikeville, KY 


COLEMAN, KATRINA 


Shelbiana, KY 


COLEMAN, MELISSA 


Lexington, KY 


COLEMAN, SHEILLA K 


Shelbiana, KY 


COOLEY, MICHAEL SHANNON Liberty, KY 


CORUM, MARSHA 


Manchester, KY 


COX, LOGAN K. 


Anchorage, KY 


CRAWFORD, DEBBIE 


Louisville, KY 


CREAMER. CHELUE 


Shelbyville, KY 


CREECH, LISA ANN 


Lynch, KY 


CRIDER. PATRICIA ANN 


Lexington, KY 


CROPPER. GRETA LYNN 


Maysville, KY 


CUNNINGHAM, MELISSA 


Vanceburg, KY 


DAGEN, JANICE KAY 


Vero Beach, FL 


DANIELS, SARAH 


Fort Thomas, KY 


DANOTT, DANIEL E. 


Barbourville, KY 


DAVID, GEORGE 


Ashland, KY 


DAVIDSON. MELISSA 


Oneida, KY 


DAMS. JAMIE 


Winchester, KY 


DAVIS, KELLY 


Trenton, OH 


DAVIS, RHONDA 


Winchester, KY 


DAWSON, DEBORAH E. 


Cynthiana, KY 


DAYTON, SUSAN 


Manesville, OH 


DEBOIS, MARIA 


Covington, KY 


DEMLING, KIM 


Louisville, KY 


DIX, MICHELLE 


Campbellsville, KY 


DOWNING, DEANNA G. 


Georgetown, KY 


DOYLE. CARRY 


Maysville, Ky 


DRAKE, TERRANCE 


Lexington, KY 


DRAKE, TERROY L. 


Lexington, KY 


DUFF, KIMBERLEY SUE 


Berea, KY 


DURHAM, MAR 


Richmond, KY 


DUVALL. GARNELL 


Burkesville, KY 


DYE, SHELLEY 


Price, KY 


EARLES, KIMBERLY DAWN 


Liberty, KY 


EAST, DAWNA 


Nicholasville, KY 


EASTERLING, SHARON 


Mt. Sterling, KY 


EASTWOOD, CHRISTY 


Covington, KY 


ECKHART, DAVID F 


Versailles, KY 


ECKHART, KARLA 


Springboro, OH 


EDLIN. GARY ROBERT 


Louisville, KY 


ENGLAND. JODI 


Ashland, KY 


FALK, JEFF 


Cincinnati, OH 


FARLEY, MARY 


Louisville, KY 


FELTNER, ANTHONY 


Bardstown, KY 


FELTY, AMY DAWN 


Grayson, KY 


FERGUSON, VIRGINIA E. 


Charlestown, IN 


FLANAGAN, CATHY 


Lebanon, KY 


FLANARY, LORI 


Robinson Creek, KY 


FLEMING, BILLY JOE 


Richmond, KY 


FLEMING, WAYNE 


Byrdine, KY 


aOOD, MARY E. 


Richmond, KY 


FOX, GINGER 


Beattyville, KY 


FRANKLIN, AMY 


Clarkson, KY 


268/Freshmen 


/Car-Fra 





fi * n 




^ 



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Freshmen 




m iiiii 

^i ^ n a 







FRANZ, ALLISON 


Russell, KY 


FREEMAN, BETH 


Paintsville, KY 


FUGATE, DELORIS 


Wellington, KY 


GABBARD, TAMARA LISA 


Jackson, KY 


GALES, TIMOTHY 


Jenkins, KY 


GARTMAN, RENA M. 


Lexington, KY 


GIBSON, TINA 


McRoberts, KY 


GILLESPIE, KERRY ANN 


Louisville, KY 


GINGER, SHEREE 


Shelbyville, KY 


GODBEY, KARLE 


Bardstown, KY 


GOFF, CHERYL LESLIE 


Bardstown, KY 


GOINS, LARRY 


Whitesburg, KY 


GOSS, MARGO 


Louisville, KY 


GRAVES, DAVID NEIL 


Versailles, KY 


GREEN, JOANNA ! 


>outh Harpwell, ME 


GREENWELL, DINA 


Cox's Creek, KY 


GREER, TAMALA 


Bardstown, KY 


GRIFFIN, ETHEL MAE 


Halen, KY 


GROGAN, KAY LYNN 


Cincinnati, OH 


GUTERMUTH, JILL 


Fairdale, KY 


HAAG, JEFF 


Louisville, KY 


HAGAN, KAREN LYNN 


Bardstown, KY 


HAHN, SHERRI LYNN 


Harrodsburg, KY 


HAIL, DONNA 


Ferguson, KY 


HALL, FONDA 


West Point, KY 


HAMILTON, JAMES 


Berea, KY 


HARLOW, WILLIAM C. 


Irvine, KY 


HARMON, MELANIE ANNE 


Louisville, KY 


HARRIS, BOBBY 


Harrodsburg, KY 


HARRIS, DAVID 


Owensville, KY 


HARRIS, JULIE 


Louisville, KY 


HARRISON, KAREN 


Corbin, KY 


HARTMAN, JENNIFER 


Trov, OH 


HARVARD, PATRICK 


Salyersville, KY 


HASH, LISA MICHELLE 


Somerset, KY 


HAWKINS, BRIAN T. 


Lexington, KY 


HAYNES, MURIEL 


Lexington, KY 


HENDRICKS, GARY 


Paint Lick, KY 


HERMAN, ANN 


Louisville, KY 


HESELSCHWERDT, KEITH 


Louisville, KY 


HICKS, SMANTHA 


Grayson, KY 


HIGGINS, KAREN 


Louisville, KY 


HINKLE, JACKIE South Williamson, KY 


HOFF, CHERI 


Hanover, PA 


HOLBROOK, APRIL 


Fleming, KY 


HOLLOWAY, STEPHANIE 


MasviUe, KY 


HOSKINS, DONNA 


Falmouth, KY 


HOUK, DANA ROBERT 


Louisville, KY 


HOUSER, DEBBIE 


Richmond, KY 


HOWARD, JENA MARIE 


Brandenburg, KY 


HUESING, KAREN A. 


Burlington, KY 


HULETT, RAYE ANN 


Lancaster, KY 


HUME, TODD 


Glasgow, KY 


HUNKEMOELLER, LAURI C. 


Fort Mitchell, KY 


HUNTINGTON, REBECCA 


Holton, IN 


JACKSON, TRACIE 


Independence, KY 


JENKINS, NICKEY 


Salyersville, KY 


JOHNS, PATRICIA 


Louisville, KY 


JOHNSON, LESLYE 


Georgetown, KY 


JOHNSON, LISA A. 


Whitley City, KY 


JONES, ELLA J. 


Georgetown, KY 


JONES, JENNIFER RENEE 


Berea, KY 


JONES, TIMOTHY M. 


Barbourville, KY 


KAY, THOMAS D. JR. 


Versailles, KY 


KEITH, ASHLEY 


Cynthiana, KY 


KELLER, CHRIS 


Harrodsburg, KY 


KERN, ANGELA 


Brooksville, KY 


KINCAID, WIL 


Somerset, KY 


KING, MADONNA R. 


Hazard, KY 


KINNEY, HOPE 


Dover, KY 


Freshmen / Fra-Kin / 269 



^reshmen 



KISER. TIMOTHY D. 


Kina, KY 


KNOBLOCK, BETH 


Shelbwille, KY 


KORZENIEWSKI, DENA LYNN Ft. Knox, KY 


KURTZ, MICHAEL R. 


Brooksvilie, KY 


LAFFERTY, TRACEY 


Florence, KY 


LAKES, LISA 


Hamilton, OH 


LAKES. SHERRY 


McKee, KY 


LAND, DAWN KARRELL 


Liberty, KY 


LARKIN, LAURA 


Louisville, KY 


LASWELL, KELLY 


Marrow, OH 


LAUTERWASSER, ERIC 


Walton, KY 


LAWSON, MARIA C. 


Hazel Green, KY 


LEE. VIOLET 


Liberty, KY 


LEFEVER, .TILL RENEE 


Bridgeport, WV 


LEWIS, JENNIFER 


Ashland, KY 


LOWE, STEVE 


Monticello, KY 


lowry; LOLA J. 


Louisville, KY 


MABRY, JAMES M. 


Lebanon, KY 


MADARIS, BRIGID 


Cincinnati, OH 


MADDEN, GINA 


Lawrenceburg, KY 


MADDOX, KIM 


Pleasureville, KY 


MAGRANE, JENNY 


Morehead, KY 


MAGRUDER, MICHELLE 


Louisville, KY 


MAHANEY PAUL 


Hodgenville, KY 


MARKSBERY, TERESA L. 


Louisville, KY 


MARSH, ANDREA 


Carrollton, KY 


MARSHALL, BONNIE L. 


Fleming, KY 


MARTIN. TAMYRA 


Stanford, KY 


MASSEY, EDDIE 


Erlanger, KY 


MATTHEWS, FAITH 


Louisville, KY 


MATTINGLY, MICHELLE 


Lebanon, KY 


MAUNEY, BETH ANN 


Williamsburg, KY 


MAY, ROBIN ANN 


Louisville, KY 


MAYFIELD, LYNN C. 


Englewood, OH 


MCBRAYER, SCOTT 


Argillite, KY 



MCCLAIN, STEVEN Smithfield, KY 

MCCOMIS. KIM Ashland, KY 
MCCORMOCK, CHARLES KEVIN California, KY 

MCCOY, KIM Wheelersburg, OH 

MCCOY, SHARI Philport, KY 

MCCUTCHEN, ARLENA F. Indianapolis, IN 

MCFALL, KIM Fleming, KY 



MCGUFFEY, DONALD LUKE 


Bradfordsville, KY 


MCKENZIE, DARRELL 


Loveland, OH 


MCKINNEY, BRIAN KEITH 


Clay City, KY 


MCKINNEY, MICHAEL 


Irvine, KY 


MCKNIGHT, CONNIE 


Erlanger, KY 


MCQUEEN, LESLIE 


Manchester, KY 


MEADE, CINDY 


Richmond, KY 


MEECE, EDWIN R 


Durham, NC 


MIKESELL, MOLLY 


Union, OH 


MILES, JAMES MARK 


Louisville, KY 


MILICH, ALISHA ANN 


Frankfort, KY 


MILLER, CHEEK 


Springfield, OH 


MILLER, LEE 




MILLS, DEBBIE Mt. Washington, KY 


MIRACLE, KAREN 


Flatwoods, KY 


MITCHELL, EVELYN 


Paintsville, KY 


MITCHELL, JANET KAY 


Eminence, KY 


MITCHELL, ROBERT DARIN 


Frankfort, KY 


MOHR, JOHN A Pleasure Ridge Park, KY 


MONTGOMERY, BRADLEY 


Berea, KY 


MONTGOMERY, STEPHANIE C. Lancaster, KY 


MOORE, KATHLEEN 


Downers Grove, IL 


MOORE, LISA ADAIR 


Frankfort, KY 


MOORE, VONDA KAY 


Corbin, KY 


MORAN, MICHELLE 


Cincinnati, OH 


MUDD, JO ANN 


Louisville, KY 


MULLINS, ANN 


McKee, KY 


MULLINS, SHAWN 


Burdine, KY 


270/Freshmen/Kis-Mul 




Freshmen 




MUNCY, MICHAEL 
MURRAY, KRIS 
MYERS, CAROL 
OHLMANN, MARK 
PALMER, T. R. 
PAUL, ANGIE 
PEARSON, TAMMY ANN 

PENN, LORI 
PENNELL, STEVEN 
PERRY, DALE ALLEN 
PETER, GREGORY ). 
PHELPS, SANDRA 
PHILLIPS, ANGELA D. 
PHILLIPS, MARK 

PITTS, ANITA 
POPE, KATHY M, 
POPE, SALLY 
PRICE, RHONDA 
QUEERY, CHRIS 
RAILEY, RENEE 
RAY, STEPHANIE 

REUSCH, CYNDI A. 
REYNOLDS, ARTHUR D. 
RICHARD, STACIE DANIELLE 
RICHARDSON, AMY L. 
RICHMOND, PAMELA ANN 
RIEDEL, GLENN 
ROARK, CYNTHIA 

ROBERTS, ANDREA 
ROBINSON, KELLIE A. 
ROGERS, SONJA 
ROSE, SHERRY LYNN 
ROY, AMY P. 
ROY, STEPHANTE 
RUBLE, DANA LYNN 

RUNYON, JAMES E. 
SCHELL, MIKE 
SCHULZ, DIANE 
SCOTT, RUBY 
SEARS, ERIC 
SEIGLA, STEFANIE 
SEMONES, MARGRITH 

SHEARER, JOHNNA E. 
SHEENE, ROBIN RENE 
SHELTON, JANET L. 
SHENBERGER, TIM A. 
SHEPPERD, KIMBERLY 
SHEWMAKER, TERRI 
SHUMATE, SCARLETT LEE 

SIMMS, MARY BETH 
SIMPSON, JUDY 
SIMS, MICHAEL SHANE 
SINGLETON, DANA K. 
SINGLETON, LESHA 
SLIDER, SANDRA 
SLOAN, TRACEY 

SMITH, DORY LYNN 
SMITH, JODY ANNE 
SMITH, MIKE 
SMITH, MONA 
SOWERS, PATACHIA 
SPAHN, LINDA 
SPARKS, SHERI ANN 



Hyden, KY 

Newport, KY 

Springfield, OH 

Brandenburg, KY 

Lexington, KY 

Sidney, KY 

Ghent, KY 

Independence, KY 

Jenkins, KY 

Waynesburg, KY 

Frankfort, KY 

Somerset, KY 

Martha, KY 

Manchester, KY 

Griffin, GA 
London, KY 

Brooksville, KY 
Liberty, KY 
Corbin, KY 

Covington, KY 
Danville, KY 

Covington, KY 

Salvisa, KY 

Chaplin, KY 

Somerset, KY 

Berea, KY 

Ashland, KY 

Vine Grove, KY 

Louisville, KY 

Frankfort, KY 

Winchester, KY 

Sandy Gap, KY 

IHB, FL 

Paris, KY 

Eminence, KY 

Pikeville, KY 

Lawrenceburg, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Corbin, KY 

Corbin, KY 

Goshen, OH 

Jeffersonville, IN 

Quincy, IN 

Middlesburg, KY 

Alpha, KY 

Corbin, KY 

Science Hill, KY 

Vine Grove, KY 

Fayetteville, GA 

Somerset, KY 

Stanford, KY 

Mt. Vernon, KY 

Mt. Vernon, KY 

Richmond, KY 

Lexington, KY 

La Grange, KY 

McKee, KY 

Greensburg, KY 

Lexington, KY 

Stanford, KY 

Harrodsburg, KY 

Buckhom, KY 



SPEARS, LISA MICHELLE 
SPENCER, TONY 
SPURLOCH, STEVE F. 
STARNES, GERALD BRUCE 
STEINEMANN, JULIE 
STEWART, AMELIA 
STEWART, LIESA R. 



Stanford, KY 

Mount Sterling, KY 

Pikeville, KY 

Science Hill, KY 

Louisville, KY 

McRoberts, KY 

Berea, KY 



Freshmen / Mun-Ste / 27 1 



Freshmen 



STONE, VICKI 


Covington, KY 


STRUNK, WINSTON 


Jenkins, KY 


SUMMERVILLE, DAWN 


Harrodsburg, KY 


SW'INK. PAMELA 


Louisville, KY 


TAYLOR. CYNTHIA K. 


Independence. KY 


TAYLOR, TOMMY W. 


Barbourville, KY' 


THAD, JUDY 


Cvnthiana, KY' 


THATCH, KYLE A. 


Louisville, KY 


THISTLE, TIM 


Russellville, KY 


THOMAS. TIMOTHY D. 


Franklin, OH 


THOMPSON, TERESA L. 


Erlanger, KY 


THURSBY. REBECA 


Richmond, KY 


TINGLE, TRACY RENEE 


Campbellsburg, KY 


TOWNSEND, KIMBERLY 


Clay City, KY 


TRL'ETT, KIMBERLY 


Elsmere, KY 


TL'RLEY, SANDRA 


Lexington, KY 


TYLER. TERRI L. 


Radcliff, KY 


UHL, HEIDI LORI 


Franklin, OH 


VALLEZ. JIM 


Hazard, KY 


VANCE, TINA 


Mt. Vernon, KY 


VANDUER, THERESA 


Pikeville, KY 


YANLANDINGHAM. JEFF 


Falmouth, KY 


VAUGHN, REGINA 


Louisville, KY 


VIRGIN. LORI 


Oldtown, KY 


WADE. J D. 


Waynesville, OH 


WAGNER. JENNIFER 


Kettering, OH 


WALKER, MARCELLA 


Goose Rock, KY' 


WARD, CHRIS 


Georgetown, KY 


WARD, KIM 


Flatwoods, KY 


WARD, KIMBERLY 


Louisa, KY 


WATSON, PAUL E. 


Barbourville, KY 


WATTS, MELLNDA 


Frankfort, KY 


WEBB. MARSHA 


Danville, KY 


WEBSTER, BRIAN D. 


Waltare, KY 


WETDLE, MELANIE 


Aurora, IN 


W EIMANN, GEORGE 


Radcliff, KY 


WELLS, DEBORAH 


Winchester, KY 


WELLS, RAGINA L. 


West Vanlear, KY 


WEST, DIANA R. 


Rushville, KY 


WEST. LAURA 


Blanchester, OH 


WESTPHAL, ELIZABETH ANN Louisville, KY 


WEYHRAUCH, ANNE 


Richmond, KY 


W r HITE. BARRY- 


Liberty, KY 


WHITE, DENNA 


Homa, KY 


WHITE, KIMBELLE 


Versailles, KY 


WHITE, TINA MARIE 


Somerset, KY 


WHITE. WILLIAM 


Erlanger, KY 


WHITERS, BETH 


Batavia, OH 


WHITLEDGE, GLENDA 


Frankfort, KY 


WHITT. SHERRY RENAI 


Winchester, KY 


WTCKERSHAM. MARK 


Richmond, KY 


WTEDENHOEFER, JANE 


Louisville, KY 


WIGHTMAN, JANICE 


Greenfield, MA 


WILLIAMS, PHILLIP 


Richmond, KY 


WILLIMS, DIANE 


Columbia, KY 


WILLIS, ANDREW 


Berea, KY 


WILSON, DEANA LYNNE 


Lexington, KY 


WILSON, KAREN 


Springfield, OH 


WILSON, SHANNON 


Linchburg, OH 


WISE, TAMMY 


Ravenna, KY 


WITT, SHERRIE 


Jeffersonville, KY 


YAZELL, DARIA 


Versailles, KY 


YORK, JANET L. 


Junction City, KY 


ZECK, SALLY 


Crescent Springs, KY 


ZEHNDER, JERRY 


Fairdale, KY 


ZIRKELBACH, CHRISTINE 


Erlanger, KY 


DORTEN, JULIE A 


Prospect, KY 


LADD, LISA MICHELLE 


Cromona, KY 


PRICE, TERRY 


Shelbyville, KY 


WE1DENHOEFER, MARY A 


Louisville, KY 


272 Freshmen/STO-WEI 












m (fa f\ fS 




* ff> 



- A - 



Aaron, Renee 267 
Aaron, Robin Lynn 267 
Abell, Lori Michelle 160, 267 
Abernathy, Karen 204 
Abner, Donna Sue 267 
Abney, Deland Scott 218 
Abrams, Amy Marie 155, 189 
Absher, Karl Ellis 267 
Adams, Darlene 144, 146-147 
Adams, Bene 221 
Adams, Linda 151 
Adams, Pamela 267 
Adams, Stacey Renee 154 
Adams, Thomas Wayne 205 
Adkins, Bertee 160 
Albrinck, Sandy M. 267 
Aldridge, Tina L. 267 
Alexander, David W 143 
Alexander, Jeffrey D 267 
Alexander, Joseph S 197 
Alexander, Michelle 267 
Alexander, Ronald R. 160 
Alexander, Sharon K. 186 
Allegrini, Anne M. 153 
Allen, Joe 205 
Allen, Pamela Sue 267 
Allen, Sally E. 267 
Allison, Melanie B. 167 
Allison, Pamela Lynn 155 
Altic, Mark A- 198 
Amundson, Steven R. 146-147 
Anderson, James 146-147 
Anderson, Janis Lynn 156, 157, 192 
Anderson, Jeffrey S. 267 
Anderson, Julia H 159, 181 
Anderson, Shawnie L. 77 
Andrews, Jean France 156-157 
Angel, Rodney B 151 
Antle, Angela Kay 167 
Antle, Anita Fay 267, 1167 
Applegate, Mary Dawn 159 
Apptegate, Shawn Ann 267 
Aquaviva, James F. II 197 
Arave, Steven M 178, 1221 
Arbogast, Frederic T, 214 
Arbogast, William L 215 
Armstrong, Christina 267 
Armstrong, Joanna 155 
Armstrong, Patrick L. 212 
Arnold, Barry S. 178, 217 
Arnold, Jane 208 
Arnold, Lisa Lavonne 152 
Arthur, Terri 163, 151 
Arvold, David A. 163 
Asher, Douglas 215 
Asher, Ralph B. 198 
Asuncion, Alesia G. 182-183, 214 
Atcher, David M. 167 
Atchison, Douglas J. 205 
Atkin, Thomas James 213 
Atkins, Audrey 267 
Averbeck, Theodore T. 139 
Avery, Donna Blaine 195 
Avis, Delores Jane 184-185 
Aylor, Ruth A. 148 
Ayres, David William 198 
Ayres, Joseph Edward 267 



-B- 



Back. Jackie L. 139 

Bagbv, Tern L 190 

Bailey, Angela J. 151 

Bailey. Donna R. 167 

Bailev, Douglas G. 210 

Bailey, Lyn 152 

Bailey, Marilyn 162 

Baird, Donna M. 267, 181 

Baisden, Bruce 136 

Baker, Bruce Edward 167 

Baker, David Michael 198 

Baker, Densil D. 205 

Baker, Dewavne 146-147 

Baker, Gary Neal 267 

Baker, Jamie Sue 182-183. 166 

Baker, Michael S. 267 

Baker, Pamela 140 

Baker, Raynelle L. 267 

Baker, Robert 218 

Baker, Tamara E. 144 

Baldwin, Julie C. 184-185, 1140 

Ball, Deborah Kaye 139, 147, 156, 

157 
Ball, Karen Sue 139, 159 
Ball, Theresa K. 186 
Ballard, Cheryl Anne 27 
Bailiff, C. B. 99 
Balyeat, Natalie J. 267 
Banken, Tracy 215 
Banmore, Jeff 197 
Barber, Charles Glen 198 
Barber, Cheryl E. 189, 199 
Barber, Christina M, 182-183, 217 
Barber, Kay 208 
Barker, Angela Marie 106 
Barker, Kathy Lane 199 
Barker, Lorie A. 139, 167 
Barker, M. Tracy 178 
Barkley, Dwight 139 
Barlow, Wendy Leah 160, 181, 267 
Barnard, Kathy 81 
Barnes, Carrie Lee 204 
Barnes, Ronnie Sean 267 
Barnett, Jerrilyn L. 143 
Barnett, Marylynn 81 
Barney, Cynthia I. 160, 161 
Baron, Julie Ann 267 



Barrett, Billie J. 267 

Barrgh, Steve 215 

Barron, David Rice 215 

Barrows, Kim Marie 163 

Barry, Ernest M. 215 

Bartlett, Anne M. 161 

Bartlett, Dale A. 198 

Bascom, Richard B. 215 

Bass, Sandra K. 136 

Bastin, Howard Ray 267, 221 

Batch, Donald 128 

Bates, G. Hunter 267, 167 

Baugh, Carol Jo 155 

Baugh, fulie Renee 160 

Baughman, Helen E. 189, 199 

Baumann, Julie A. 152, 140 

Baumann, Mark A. 205 

Bauer, T. 89 

Baxter, Dana P. 139 

Baxter, Ellen Ison 189 

Beach, April Wandell 166 

Beasley, Mark S. 140 

Beaumont, Becky Ann 38, 190, 221 

Beck, Stephanie F. 159 

Becker, Belinda Mary 189 

Beckett, Melissa Lyn 267 

Beckham, Patrick T. 217 

Bee, Carl Philip 148 

Begley. Helleana G. 267 

Begley, Robert J. 118 

Beiser, Kathy Ann 267 

Bell, Andrea 155, 160 

Bell, Angela Gail 161 

Bell, Robert C, 136 

Bell, Ronald David 217 

Bell, Teresa Lynn 267 

Bellamy, Kelle Gene 267 

Bellanca, Lisa M. 181 

Bellew, Melissa Dell 267 

Bellew, Thomas Leona 215 

Belonger, Jeffrey J. 163. 178 

Benge, John P. 140 

Benne. Troy A. 207 

Bennett, Patrick J. 99, 207, 206 

Bennett, Sherman 103 

Bennett, Steven C. 178, 221 

Benningfield, Richard 156-157, 159 

Bentley, Gina Renee 267 

Bentley, Jennifer L. 161 

Bentley, William E. 218 

Bergdoll, Julie Lynn 181 

Berger, Michael Alan 155 

Berling, Todd W. 44 

Berry, Denise Diane 156-157 

Berry, Michelle E. 144 

Bertram, Tracy E. 155 

Bethard, Kenneth A. 148 

Bevins, Beth Camilte 267 

Biddy, Ernest D. 197, 148 

Biedenham, Jay A. 156-157 

Bingham, Donna Lynn 184-185 

Bishop, Belinda H, 153 

Bishop, John Pierce 267 

Bisig, Daniel Robert 143 

Bisig, Dorothy M. 178, 184-185, 148 

Bisping, Holly R. 160 

Bissell, Charles D. 267 

Bivens, Beth Ann 190, 204 

Black, Lori Frances 156-157 

Black, Lorre Lynn 38 

Black, Rodger 156-157 

Blackburn, H. David 44 

Blackman, Jacqueline 192 

Blair, Jill Michelle 106, 134, 161, 140 

Blair, Morris Wendel 217 

Blair, Robin 267, 83 

Blair, Robin S 164 

Blair, William Geoff 267 

Blakely, Joseph S. 136 

Blakeney, Pamela Kay 151 

Blankenship, Kimberl 155 

Blanton, Carla D 156-157 

Blombach, Chris A. 160 

Bloss, David A. 160 

Boatman, William T. 197 

Bobbitt, Beverly Ann 106 

Boggs, Kevin Kendall 267 

Boggs, Marvin Ray 267 

Bogue, Russell 126 

Boiling, Scott Kevin 267 

Bollinger, Michele R. 267 

Bolton, Elizabeth J. 267 

Bonar, Cynthia Ann 152 

Bontrager, Elmer A. 146-147, 152 

Booten, Patricia L. 181 

Boothe, Patricia J. 147 

Bopp, Marv 160 

Borders, Evelyn D 267 

Bores, Donald John 205 

Borg, Sharon Claire 155 

Born, John Stanley 210 

Bornhorst, Donald T. 172, 207 

Bortner, Audrey M. 178, 190, 207 

Bosley, Robert Wayne 210 

Botkin, Barbara Lynn 161, 267 

Bottoms, Rebecca Ann 153 

Boucher, Brenda K. 152 

Bouteiller, Anne M. 206 

Bowden, Richard Eric 152 

Bowen, Monica Lee 267 

Bowles, Anderson 105 

Bowling, Jenny L. 152 

Bowling, Phillip Lee 162 

Bowman, Barbara E. 167 

Bowman, Jennifer S. 195 

Bowman, Vicki Lynn 195 

Boyd, Bill 136 

Boyd, Bobby Brent 155 

Boyd, Orsel 156-157 

Boykins, Angela D. 84 

Brackett, Cordell D, 218 

Bradford, Sheila Ann 214 

Branch, Kathryn M. 83 



Brandenburg, J. Eric 208 

Brangers, James Jose 152 

Branham, David Alan 160 

Branham, Freddie Lee 198 

Branham, Ricky A 160, 148 

Brannick, Bobbi Jo 267, 93 

Braun. Jeffrey Lee 59, 172, 212 

Bray, Cheryl Ann 148 

Breckel, Anne Marie 186 

Breines, Karin Ann 192 

Brennan, Bobbi L, 144, 147, 204, 140 

Brennan, Mary Ellen 186, 267 

Brennenstuhl, Hallie 184-185 

Brenner. Charles E. 215 

Brett. Cathryn E. 84 

Brewer, Dewayne L. 144 

Brewer, Kim A. 151 

Brewer, Stanley Mark 215, 151 

Brian, Braden T. 100, 103 

Bridgman, Farron C. 186 

Bright, Amy Diane 161, 163, 152 

Bnmberry, Darrell L 144 

Brodbeck, Dionne 167 

Brock, Mlburn D. 267 

Brock, Patricia 267 

Broecker, Robert A. 217 

Brooks, Jennifer Ann 186 

Brosky, Joe 1. 213 

Brosky, John A. 178, 213 

Brothers, Mary D 143 

Brotzge, John P 215. 152 

Brown, Amy Elizabeth 182-183 

Brown, Brenda Lee 267 

Brown, Chris Robert 89, 95 

Brown, Dale Allen 198 

Brown, David 213 

Brown, Devon 103 

Brown, Grade Marie 89 

Brown. Harry 144 

Brown, Jeffery A. 207 

Brown. Jennifer D 267 

Brown. Julie Regina 166 

Brown, Lisa 184-185 

Brown. Mary B. 214 

Brown, Pamela Sue 148 

Brown, Robert Glenn 198 

Brown, Scott 91 

Brown, Tammy Kaye 148 

Brown. Tracey 166 

Browning, Ann M. 139, 163 

Browning, Jeffrey S 205 

Browning, Stanley K 218 

Bruce. Kevin Wayne 267 

Bryan, Wendy E. 156-157 

Bryant, David Edward 87, 156-157. 

140 
Bryant, Jamea A. II 203 
Bryant, Rebecca Jane 267 
Bryant, Robert Reed 267 
Bryant, Robert R. 267 
Bryant, Theresa Ann 159 
Bryson, David S. 198 
Bucher, Maryleigh 144 
Buckle, Kenneth A. 151, 140 
Buckman, Donna M 155, 166, 140 
Buell. Mark R. 221 
Buirley, William L. J. 212 
Buis, James Rodney 139 
Bumpus. Orssie F 86, 87, 105 
Buntyn, Loisetine 81, 79 
Burbridge, Rogernett 267 
Burch, David Anthony 153 
Burch, Regina 163 
Burchell, Blake M. 197 
Burchell, Jeannette 155 
Burgett, Sabrina M 161, 160 
Burke, Richard C. 221 
Burke, Sonja L. 148 
Burkhardt, Stacy A. 267 
Burns, Jamie 215 
Burns, Lisa Gayle 267 
Burns, Tammy Lynn 267 
Burrus, Lequetta R. 267 
Burt, Catherine M. 221 
Burt, Julie E. 166, 140 
Burton, Zina Michele 166 
Buschelman, Charla J 140 
Bush, Sherrie J. 190 
Buskirk, Sherry D. 161, 152 
Busteed, Elizabeth A. 182-183 
Butcher, Glenn 152 
Butcher, Robert D. 103 
Butler, Bradley Alle 205 
Butterhoff, Theresa 214 
Byer, Charmaine M. 106 
Byrd, Jeffrey Alan 143 
Byrd, Sherry 166 
Byrd, Sherry Fugett 267 
Byrns, Timothy S. 136 
Byrnside, Teresa A. 136. 137 



-c- 



Caddock, Craig 221 

Cahill, Lisa Ann 195 

Cahill, Tim 91. 93 

Calhoun, Katherine A 148, 204, 267 

Calhoun, Robert Paul 163 

Callahan, Amber Kay 189 

Callahan, Donna M. 221 

Callebs, Johnny W 210 

Callebs, Lee Nelson 267 

Callender, Nicole L. 151 

Calvert, Roy L. 152 

Camacho, Monica E. 155 

Cambron, Betsy 131 

Carney, Daniel 207 

Campbell, James 153 

Campbell, Jeffery D. 267 

Campbell, Jon Robert 221 



Campbell, Patricia 163, 260 
Campbell, Ragina Kay 267 
Campbell, Stephen C 213 
Campbell, Tammv M 260 
Campbell, Timothy D 217 
Cannon, David Merril 144, 160 
Caprioli, Martha 151 
Carder. Deborah June 160 
Cardwell, Elizabeth 260 
Cardwell, Karen M. 139, 192 
Carey Melanie Sue 267 
Carigan, Katherine E. 268 
Carl. Susan Gay 161. 267 
Carley, D D. 83 
Carlisle, Todd David 44, 95 
Carmack, Mashell R. 186, 260 
Carman, Darlah Renee 268 
Carney, Catherine S 260 
Carolin, Robert L. 87 
Carr, Robert Lee 164, 260 
Carr, Shelley B. 155 
Carnco, Karen Jean 81 
Carrier, Cathy R. 181 
Carrohn. Bobby 105 
Carroll. John M. 139 
Carroll, Sandra L. 163 
Carroll. William C. 221 
Carson, Kim J. 97, 206 
Carson, Lisa Jane 268 
Carter, Tracy Sue 195 
Carwile, Bridgit M. 214 
Casada, Graigory D 198, 199 
Case. Bob 83 
Casey, Mark Wavne 268 
Cash, Cynthia Lou 268 
Castle, Melissa D. 190 
Castle, Scott 208 
Catlett, Kimberly K. 186 
Caudill, Amy E. 268 
Caudill, Deanna Lynn 260 
Caudill. Paula Ann 192 
Caudill, Valerie 144 
Cauhorn. Jennifer A. 136 
Caywood, Rebecca All 260 
Cecil. Jackie B. 160 
Cenkner, Jon Alan 91 
Chadwell, Golvin G. 260 
Chadwick, Robin Fave 160 
Chamberlin, Kevin R. 197 
Chambers, Jennifer L 160 
Champ, Christopher P 154 
Champlain, Jacque 171 
Chandler, Helen E. 204 
Chandler, Joseph C. 260 
Chandler, Martha L. 181 
Chaney, Deborah S. 268 
Chapman, Beth Larimo 268 
Chapman, Roger 87. 105 
Charleston, Jody Kav 260 
Chasteen, Brenda K.268 
Cheatham, Tanya Lee 136, 137 
Cheek, Angela'89 
Cheng, Hau Yin 140, 144 
Childers, Anthony R 260 
Childress, Edyth 106 
Chirichigno, Joanna 204, 260 
Chiu. Fabiana L. 159 
Chnstofield. Diane 260 
Church. Misty R 268 
Church, Sara Jane 160. 195, 268 
Clare, Anita J. 182, 183 
Clark, Brian Neal 160 
Clark, Cathi B. 260 
Clark, Diana G. 190 
Clark, Janet L, 152, 155 
Clark, Kathleen Anne 161, 268 
Clark, Kimberlv Ann 186 
Clark, Ray D 160 
Clark, Rebecca L. 164, 166, 195 
Clark, Reginald Alan 178, 203 
Clark, Ricki M. 62 
Clarkson, Jacqueline 260 
Clatworthy, Golden R. 268 
Clayton, Laura Jane 192 
Clevinger, Cherie D, 153, 161, 163, 

260 
Clifford, Lisa Rae 189, 260 
Clifton, Pamela G. 167 
Cline, Bruce Allen 156. 157 
Cline, Edwina Lynn 156, 157 
Cline, Kelley Denise 140, 260 
Clowers, Phillip G. 268 
Cloyd, Lee Howard 260 
Coatnev, James J. 164 
Coble, Brenda Sue 260 
Coburn, Colin Keith 208 
Cofer, Lisa Ann 147, 160 
Coffey, Carla June 81, 260 
Coffey, Saundra M. 260 
Coffman. Toni Lynn 182. 183 
Cohorn. Tammi Lvnn 268 
Cole, Adrienne M, 140, 260 
Cole, Debra L. 163, 164. 189, 198, 199 
Cole, Felicia Larae 155 
Cole, Lisa Anne 268 
Cole, Rebecca Ann 182, 183, 260 
Cole, Stanley Bruce 210 
Coleman, Gary Keith 153 
Coleman, James R 268 
Coleman, Kari L. 38, 44, 170, 190, 

214, 215 
Coleman, Katrina L. 268 
Coleman, Lori A. 144, 145 
Coleman, Melissa 147 
Coleman, Melissa 268 
Coleman, Melissa 152 
Coleman, Sheilla Kav 268 
Collins, Beth Ann 89 
Colins, Bobby 77 
Collins, Carol L. 163 
Collins, Sandra 260 
Combs, Anna Ruth 151 
Combs, David Vincent 205 



Combs, Erin J.H 140 
Compton. Jonmarie 161 
Condon, Joelle E. 85 
Confides, Karen L, 260 
Congleton, Carrie S. 106 
Congleton, Ricky 103 
Conley, Gary Wayne 215 
Conley, James Kennar 218 
Consley, Steven C. 260 
Cook, Denebola R 206 
Cook, Dewayne T 213 
Cook, Julie Anne 92, 93, 184, 185 
Cook, Rhonda Darlene 156, 157 
Cooley, Michael Shan 268 
Coombs, Deborah M, 260 
Coomes, Jeffery S- 221 
Cooney, Scott P, 207 
Copley, Cohen E. 167 
Cordaro, Lisa Marie 260 
Cordray, Michael Way 218 
Cornett, Dale S. 198 
Cornett, Jill K. 260 
Cornett, Kelley Ann 152 
Cornett, Robert, Jr. 260 
Corum, Marsha 268 
Costello, Kevin S. 178, 213 
Costello, Patrick 139 
Cotton, Joel N 213 
Covington. Monice J- 260 
Cowden. Annette D 139. 186 
Cox, Amy L 186 
Cox, Frances S. 260 
Cox, Logan Kendall 268 
Cox, Loren Lee 260 
Coyle, Luticia A. 152 
Crabtree, Ann R. 260 
Crabtree, Annis M. 136, 140 
Crabtree, Lesa Ann 85 
Craft. Kevin 155 
Crafton. Ronald Lee 152 
Crawford, Arthur R. 139 
Crawford, Debra Ann 268 
Crawford, Elizabeth 140, 144 
Crawford, Fran 182, 183 
Crawford, James 70. 72 
Crawford, Ralph W. 260 
Crawford, Todd W. 91, 260 
Creamer, Dr Glvnn 139 
Creamer, Larry Lee 221 
Creamer. Michelle C 189, 268 
Creech, Gregory Dean 197 
Creech, Lisa Ann 268 
Crenshaw, June L 195 
Crider, Dana Lynn 260 
Crider, Patricia 186, 268 
Crisologo, Carol L. 184, 185 
Crisologo, John Phil 197 
Cropper, Greta Lynn 161, 268 
Crosby, Cecilia J, 144 
Cross, Amy Beth 260 
Crowder, Tony R- Jr. 260 
Crowe, Charles D 163 
Crowe, Michael Lee 99 
Cruickshank, Heather 206 
Crumble, Tim L. 151 
Crumble, Tvron O'Nea 105 
Cruse, Jeffrey 100, 103 
Cubbage, Lisa B 161 
Cuis, Karen 192 
Cullen, Margaret G 190 
Culley, Alison Fiona 186 
Cummins, Elizabeth F 182. 183 
Cummins, Leslie 161 
Cummins. Melanie Sue 152, 155 
Cunnagin, Brian 260 
Cunagin, Eddy D. 205 
Cunningham, Julia H 186 
Cunningham, Melissa 268 
Curtin. Kelley Marie 181 
Curtis, Amy E. 186 
Curtis, Michael Dean 260 
Cutright, John D. 136, 137, 153 



-D- 



D'Auria, Antoinette 159 
Dabney, Thomasina E 166, 179 
Daffron, Lee Ann 260 
Dagen, Janice Kay 193, 268 
Dagen, Linda C 92, 93, 194, 212 
Dale, David M 208, 209 
Daley. Dawn M. 199 
Damico, Cathy Lynn 214 
Damron, Anthony W. 260 
Damron, Paula Jude 190 
Damron, Tammy Lynn 139, 208 
Daniel, Timothy Lee 139 
Daniels, Dennis 144, 160 
Daniels, Sarah Y 268 
Danott, Daniel 268 
Dantzler, Sarah Kay 167 
Danzinger, Melissa J- 143, 148 
Darland, Kevin Dale 160 
Darst, Michael D. 148 
Daugherty, Kelly 151 
Daugherty, Theresa 146, 147 
Daugherty, Wanda Jo 140, 167, 260 
Davenport, Mark E. 163 
David, Delinda 186 
David, George 268 
David, Nelson 77 
Davidson, Duwayne 146, 147 
Davidson, Melissa 268 
Davis, Brenda Lee 155 
Davis, Came Ann 167 
Davis, Charles B. 202 
Davis, Charles 208 
Davis, Jamie Lvnn 167, 268 
Davis, Kelly S. 268 
Davis, Kim 144, 147 



273 Index 



Davis. Linda L. 88 B9 106 

Davis. Lisa 167. 260 

Davis. Michelle 160 

Davis. Rhonda D. 268 

Davis. Robert Scott 217 

Davis. Teresa 15t> 157 

Davy. Peter A 153 

Dawson, Dale Anthony 72 

Dawson. Deborah E. 166. 26S 

Davton. Susan K 26S 

Dean. Paul A 144. 147 

Deanng, Douglas Ray 205 

Deaton. Janet Carol 144 

Debois. Maria 268 

Decamillis. Tohn A. 77 

Decamp. Amv R 136, 139. 140. 167 

Deck, John M. Jr. 153 

Decker. Jill Ann 92. 93 

Dee Gregorv Thomas 198 

Deibert. Lvnn Pamela 195 

Delong, Carolvn 161 

Delong. Vicki'Sue 1S4. 185 

Deling. Kimberlv D 268 

Demus. Joseph D. 103 

Denhaese. Bret lames 105 

Denham. Anita Marie 161. 260 

Denham. Chns Clav 260 

Denham. Jill L, 161 

Dennev, Susan Grace 139, 155 

Dennis. Darenda G. 102, 166 

Denny. Sandra E. 192 

Denton. Stephanie E. 204 

Derringer, Kevin J. 217 

Devine. Margaret Gav 260 

Devlin, Siobhan A 83 

Dial, Steven Charles 91 

Diana. John Michael 99 

Diana. Liliana C 159 

Dietsch. Tammy R 153 

Dmgman. Deborah M 85 

Ditto, Bethane K 260 

Dix, Alaina Michelle 189, 268 

Dixon, Robin Denise 160 

Dixon. Timothv S 260 

Dobbs. Kurt Tvler 260 

Dobos. Lizabeth C. 182, 183 

Dobos. Sharon Kav 164 

Doerr, Julie A 187 

Dolin, Elorence 139 

Doll, Sharon Lee 161 

Domanico. Stephanie 140, 208 

Dorgan. Barbara J, 83 

Dorough, Margaret A, 184. 185 

Dorsev. Jerome W. 104. 105 

Dosch, Leigh A 167, 184. 185 

Dotson. Blake W 218 

Douglas, Charla Dell 140, 166, 260 

Douglas. Hollena Ann 260 

Douglas, Lvnnette 260 

Douglas. Michele X 161 

Dowdy. Linda 106 

Downey, William M 154 

Downing, Deanna G, 268 

Dovle, Carrv A. 268 

Dovle. Melanie Carol 161, 260 

Drake. Daniel W 208 

Drake. Terrance L. 268 

Drake. Terrov L. 268 

Drewes, Rhonda M 139, 166 

Duddv, Suzanne Mahe 190 

DuelL Mary Beth 186 

Dull. Kimberlev Sue 268 

Duff, Mahala Ann 167, 260 

Duff. Stacev Lvnn 184, 185 

Duff. Therese 'Janice 182. 183 

Duffy Stephen J 86, 87, 105 

Dum'storf. Julie K 260 

Duncan, Danny J, 143 

Duncan, Dwavne Alton 147 

Duncan, Teddy Albert 260 

Dundon, Craig A. 147 

Dunham, Leslie Clair 181 

Dunn, Curtis L. 201 

Dunn, Deanna Gay 184, 185 

Dunn, Jodi E 184, 185 

Dunn, Linn Ann 166 

Dupont, Michael C. 205 

Durbin. Michael O. 217 

Durham, Carol Deleen 140. 260 

Durham, Fred M 268 

Durham. Lela Anne 136. 182, 183 

Durham. Lisa 199 

Durham, William R. 152 

Durst, Lori Michelle 182. 183 

Duvall, Geraldine G 189 

Duvall, Julie Carole 260 

Duvall, Stella G 268 

Dye, Shelley M 268 

Dvehouse, Frankie L 151 

Dyer. Jodee L 139, 161 

Dykes, Michael Ray 260 



-E- 



Eads, Melissa Ellen 160, 260 
Eagle, Debra Lynn 260 
Earles. Kimberly D 268 
East. Dawna G 164, 268 
Easterling. Sharon 268 
Eastin. Charles E. II 197 
Eastwood, Christy L. 268 
Ebert, Susan Elaine 190 
Eccles, Wayne A Jr. 144 
Echternacht, Suzanne 93 
Eckert, Linda E. 148 
Eckert. Theresa M. 83 
Eckert, Thomas K. 59, 208 
Eckhart, David 268 
Eckhart, Karla Sue 268 
Edlin. Gary R 268 



Edlin. Patricia L, 181 
Edmonds. Amy Cheryl 189 
Edmondson, Jacquelin 147 
Edwards, Caroline 2r>0 
Edwards. Susan D. 139 
Edwards. Victor L 178. 203 
Egbers, Daniel W. 152 
Eisner, leffrev A 215 
Elam, Michael 151, 202 
Eldndge. Beckham T 167, 260 
Elkins, Sean L 162 
Elliott, Dana C. 140 
Elliott, Jacqueline 260 
Ellis, Angee L. 39. 154 
Ellis, Jennifer Ann 139 
Ellis. Man- Helen 163. 218 
Ellis. Stephanie Lee 167. 261 
Ellis, Troy Anthony 201 
Ellis, William F, 167 
Elswick, Clayton C. 100, 101 
Elswick. Donna Denis 156. 157 
Embrv, Anthonv 148 
Embry, Aubrey.L. Jr 146, 147 
Emnck, Melinda S 136 
England, Jodi Denise 268 
England, Tammv Louis 160, 261 
Englebrecht. Stefani 261 
Enochs, Bngid A 192. 199 
Enzie, Russell 129 
Erschell. Peter Shaw 178, 215, 261 
Esselman, Marcia M 261 
Estep, Laura Lee 38, 181, 261 
Estep, Lori 154 
Estes, Sherri 190 
Ethenngton, Patnci 152 
Eubank, Daniel Lee 208 
Evans, Beth Ann 184, 185 
Evans, Bradley Ray 103 
Evans, Chervl Ann 208 
Evans, Donald Wade 261 
Evans, Gladvs Man' 166 
Evans, Michael James 163 
Evans, Tate Owen 261 
Everett, Michael S 198 
Ewv, Sarah Ross 85 



F- 



Falk, Jeffrev Scott 91, 166, 268 

Farlev, Aletha Clair 44, 151, 153 

Farley, Mary C. 268 

Farmer Kim Lvnne 261 

Farris, Anthonv Pete 168 

Farris, Gregory' W 198 

Faulkner, James D 140 

Faulkner, Robert D 155, 160, 164 

Fav, Joanne Theresa 147 

Fedders, David G 147 

Feeback, Michael Way 178, 210 

Feltner, Anthony D 268 

Feltner. Donald R. 119 

Felts. Joe C. 152 

Felty, Amy Dawn 268 

Ferguson. Ginny 92, 93 

Ferguson, Holly J. 261 

Ferguson, John 77 

Ferguson, Kimberlv A 178, 179 

Ferguson, Sherri M 184, 185 

Ferguson, Virginia E 268 

Fielder, Greg 178 

Fielder, Gregon K 216, 217 

Fields, Brian A. 205 

Fields, Leanne 162 

Fields, Randy Glenn 261 

Figgins, Karen Sue 204 

Finley Kelly V 83 

Fischer, David E 215 

Fischer, Susan M. 192 

Fitzgerald, Carol F 152 

Fitzgerald, Ernest 159 

Fitzhugh, Leanne B 190, 204. 261 

Flanagan. Catherine 268 

Flanary Kane 178, 205 

Flanarv, Lori Ann 268 

Flanda, Danielle L. 261 

Fleming, Billy Joe 268 

Fleming. Wayne J 268 

Flener. Tammy Renee 186 

Flesch, Mary G 166 

Fletcher. Angela R 81, 78 

Fletcher, Michael S 261, 221 

Flick. Mary Beth 261 

Flint, Jennifer A 160 

Flood-Towers, Mary E, 268 

Flood, Martha J, 181 

Flores, Richard 221, 148, 167 

Floyd, Ella Marie 155 

Floyd, Rachel M 192 

Flynn, John T 87 

Flynn, Lana Ray 261 

Foley. Richard B 198 

Forbush, Brett B 103 

Ford, Jill Ann 166 

Ford, Kelley Jayne 261, 151 

Ford, Mark Andrew 198 

Ford, Richard Hoover 155, 261 

Ford, Scott E 136 

Ford, Trev B 155 

Fortwengler. Carol L. 156-157, 261 

Forward, Nancy L 155 

Fouts, Karen Sue 155 

Fowler, Chris Howard 136, 137 

Fowler, Marc D 215 

Fox. Belinda Gay 261 

Fox, Eugene H 153 

Fox, Ginger Lee 268 

Fraley, Lisa Leann 261 

Fraley, Sandra Kay 204 

Francis, Monica L. 160, 148 

Franklin Amy Dianne 268 



Franklin, Janet R. 164 
Franklin, Melodee A. 148 
Franz, Allison Lee 269 
Frazier, Anthonv R 202 
Frazier, Pamela Hope 2bl 
Frederick. Scott A. 261 
Free. Lisa G. 187 
Freeman, Lana M 269 
French, Rickv Allen 198 
French, ToniMarv 139, 161, 152 
Friedman, Patricia L. 178, 186 
Friess, Paul 103 
Fritz, Amelia Ann 261 
Fritz, Charles A. 152 
Fritz, Lori Allison 152 
Frohm, Tiffanv Ann 155 
Fromwiller. Scott A. 100, 101, 103 
Frye, Lisa A, 147, 184-185, 140 
Frye, Linda 106 
Fn'man, Dora Louann 261 
Fugate. Deloris 269 
Fuhrmann, Tnna M 192 
Fuller, Sonya H 144, 152 
Funderburk, Dr Hanley 110, 111, 

112, 118 
Funderburk, Helen 114, 115 
Fuson, Eric Scott 146-147 
Fyfe. Mark Randall 151 



-G- 



Gabbard, Tamara Lisa 269 

Gabbnev, Sherri R. 261 

Gable. Stacey Sue 195 

Gahafer, Stephen A. 153 

Gailev, Mark A. 147 

Gaines, Delia L. 189 

Gaines, Karen Denise 261, 140, 167 

Gaither, lames Ralph 261 

Gale, Daivd 121 

Gales, Timothy 269 

Gallagher, Col'leen M 182-183 

Galloway. Melissa D 261. 140 

Gammon, Kathleen M. 153 

Gander, Nancy Lynn 261 

Gardner. Fran 139 

Gardner. Theresa Kav 156-157 

Garland, Jov L 161, 151 

Garner, Lisa Michele 160. 199 

Garner, Dr, S I 148 

Garnett, Brenna Beth 161, 261, 140 

Garnett. Robin K 136. 137, 166 

Garrett, Denise Kim 163, 178 

Garrett, Paula R 89. 106, 151 

Gartman, Rena M 208, 269 

Gartman, Teresa M 182-183,208 

Gasser, Scott 99, 205 

Gast, Kelli Louise 136 

Gatwood, Lisa A. 161 

Caw, Melinda S. 166 

Gay, Glenna 261 

Gavnor, John 99 

Gazaway. Sharon Y 261 

Gearing. Julia K, 160 

Gellart, Knsta E. 261, 140 

Gemmer, Peter Armond 99 

Gensheimer, John P 163 

Gentry, Glenn Edwin 147, 160 

Gentry, Timothy W, 261, 215 

Gerber, Tony 156, 157 

Gerber, Chris 97 

Gerdes, Patricia Ann 93 

Geske, Jennifer Ann 214 

Getman, Charlotte L. 148 

Gevedon, Hanners R, 139 

Gevedon, Janice C. 139 

Geyer, Lisa Kay 167 

Gibbs, Robert Clay 91 

Gibson. Janice 106 

Gibson, Jimmv Randal 148 

Gibson, Kimberly Ann 184-185, 199 

Gibson, Pam Ann 189, 261 

Gibson, Tina Michell 269 

Gidley, Sherry Lynn 152 

Giebel, Kurt E. 144, 147, 152 

Gift, Jonathan G. 261, 215 

Gilbert. Sharon K 182-183 

Gilbert. Tameta G 152 

Giles, Kathryn A, 208 

Gillespie, Kerry Ann 156-157, 269 

Gillespie, Susan M 186 

Gilhhand, Dr Hugh 143 

Gilmore, Rose A 106, 152, 153 

Gilpin, Randall Dee 261 

Ginger, Sheree Marie 269 

Girdler, Sherry Ann 184-185, 199 

Gladding, Susan E, 83 

Glass, Laura Susan 181, 261 

Godbey, Karla Denise 269 

Goderwis, Jeffrey M 205 

Goeing, David B 163 

Goff, Cheryl Leslie 269 

Goins, Edward F 261, 215 

Goins, Larry 269 

Golden, David Alan 205 

Goldey, Jill F 192 

Goldfarb, Perry A 197 

Gonterman, Michael T 218 

Good, Max 75, 77 

Goode, David 159 

Goodlet, Charles N, 197 

Goodlette, Margaret 261 

Goodloe, Renata Lynn 200 

Goodman, Alan W 215 

Goodman, Kimberly J, 136, 137, 190, 

140, 129, 151 
Goodman, Marie E, 189 
Goodwin, Betty R 261 
Goodwin, Jeffrey W 105 
Gordon, Jerry 77 



Gordon. Tonia Mane 189 

Gose. Charlotte Lynn 189 

Goss, Margo Dinwiddi 269 

Grace, Jenny Marie 261, 140 

Granger, Mark K. 89 

Grant, Diana Jo 261 

Grant, Michael D 215 

Grau. Christine E. 195 

Grau, Jenifer A, 195, 212 

Grau, Michele Susan 195 

Gravely, Dennis E. 136 

Graves, David Neil 269 

Graves, Steven Gene 167 

Gray, Bunny 153 

Grav, Denise Michele 152 

Gray Michael 221 

Gravbeal, Eddie 163 

Green. Guthrie 221 

Green, Joanna 89, 269 

Green, Richard Allen 151 

Greene, J Guthrie 178 

Greene, John 152 

Greene, Robert Dale 91 

Greenwell, Dina Lvnn 204, 269 

Greer, Rebecca Lynne 148 

Greer, Susan M 143 

Greer. Tamala S 269 

Gregory, Deborah J 178, 189 

Greynolds, Lee 140 

Gnder, Nancye 156-157 

Gnder, Sheila A. 159 

Grieve, John 95 

Griffin, Angela A. 155, 214, 261 

Griffin, Donald Gene 207 

Griffin, Ethel Mae 269 

Griffith, Ken 147 

Griffith, Susan K 147 

Grimes. Bernard 202 

Groeschen, Rob A. 215 

Grogan, Kathleen L 155, 163, 269 

Grooms, Stephanie L. 261, 152 

Gross, Amy 189, 261 

Gross, Berlena O 261 

Gross, Jeffrey Scott 261 

Gross, Dr, Rodnev 118 

Grubb. Flora S- 261 

Gruber, Regina K. 181 

Guckenberger, Guy C. 205 

Guest, Cheryl K. 155,217 

Gullette, Clothine W. 159 

Gullette, Myles L. 261 

Gurnev. Susan Jeanne 261 

Gutermuth, Jill L, 269 

Gutermuth, Julie M. 261 



-H- 



Haag, Jeff Alan 269 
Haag. Stewart Robert 163 
Haag, Wendell Ramsey 221 
Haake, Jeffrey Scott 205, 261 
Haas, Joseph Marlowe 156-157 
Hackathron, Matthew 174, 212 
Hackathron, Molly B 195, 212 
Haddock, Allison M. 186 
Hagan, David Alan 77 
Hagan, Jay 151 
Hagan, Karen Lvnn 269 
Hagan, Michael W. 103 
Hagan, Saundra Fay 192 
Haggard, Beverlv D. 166 
Hahn, David C 178, 205 
Hahn, Sherri Lvnn 269 
Hail, Donna Michelle 269 
Halderman, Marv D. 186 
Hale, Kimberley Shaw 195 
Hale, Vickie Lynn 103 
Haley, Pamela Kaye 83 
Hall, Alan Keith 261, 148 
Hall. David 178, 207 
Hall, Fonda Denise 269 
Hall, Kerry L. 198 
Hall, Mary 167 
Hall, Tonya Sue 204 
Hall, Vicki Lynn 261 
Halloran, Kathleen A. 261 
Ham, Tammy Jo 261 
Hambv. Victoria L. 167 
Hames, Kelly M. 261 
Hamilton, James A. 269 
Hamilton, Sheree E 214 
Hamm, Wendell Lee 197, 140 
Hammond, Ronald W 163, 205 
Hammonds, Todd David 94, 95 
Hammons, Michelle 190 
Hancock, Ellen F. 140 
Hancock, Karen S. 156-157 
Hanks, Dawn Renee 166 
Hanna, Wendy Marlene 192, 199 
Hansel, Donald Brian 261 
Hansen, Kenneth 122 
Hansen, Theodore J. 91 
Hapeman, Stephanie D. 181 
Harden, Brian Lewis 151 
Hardesty, Elizabeth 261 
Hardin, Dina L 156-157, 261 
Hardin, Janet F 261 
Hardin, Karen E, 214 
Hardy, Mary E, 159 
Hardy, Susan M. 189 
Hargadon, Jennifer M. 163 
Hargadon, Kelly A 163, 151 
Hargrove, Laura Anne 195, 212 
Harlow, Lori L. 153 
Harlow, William C. 269, 152 
Harmon, Bobby D 140 
Harmon, James M 167 
Harmon, Kimberly Ann 189. 199, 

164 
Harmon, Melanie Anne 269 



Harp. Richard W 143 

Harper. Tommy 118 

Harpnng, Nanette M. 155 

Harrel, Robin M. 204 

Harris, Bobby D 269 

Harris, David D, 269 

Harris. Delynn 166 

Harris, Elrov 68, 72 

Harris, Julie 269 

Harris, Laura Lynne 167 

Harris, Robert Ernes 261 

Harris, Robin Regina 166 

Harris, Samantha L 261 

Harrison, Karen 269 

Harrison, Ron E. 163 

Harrop, Allison L. 139, 156, 157, 159, 

163 
Hart, Lisa K. 147, 160 
Hart, Mary Beth 160, 195 
Hart, Ronald Wayne 148 
Hart, Timothv Ross 143, 261 
Hartley Rita K 163 

Hartline, Robert D. 178, 212 
Hartmann, Jennifer A. 181, 269 
Harvard, Patrick 269 
Harvel, Lynne 82, 83 
Harvev, Lois Anne 261 
Harvil'le, Leigh Ann 184-185 
Hash, Lisa M. 269 
Haste, Sandy Dee 182-183 
Hatcher, Robert L. 178, 207 
Hatfield, Denise L. 192 
Hatfield, Tammy Rene 182-183 
Hauck, Brian Charles 155 
Haughabod. Howard C. 208, 261 
Hawkins, Brian Todd 269 
Hawkins, Christopher 215 
Havden, Donna Jean 261 
Hayes, Julie Ann 97, 261 
Hayes, Kimberly 262 
Hayes, Marv M' 181, 212, 269 
Havnes, Alisha M 155, 160 
Haynes, Muriel V. 159 
Hays, Robert Bruce 154, 262 
Hayslett, Joseph H J. 208 
Head, Serena Anne 262, 140 
Headen, Kendra D. 217 
Hebel, Randall Paul 262 
Hebert, Don R 218 
Hecklinger, Scott A. 160 
Heeg, Edward H. 155 
Heeger, Deana E 190 
Heibert. Richard D 205 
Hellard, Ann Hope 155 
Helm, Charles Noel 155 
Hembree, Tnna R 184-185, 214 
Henderson, Andrew 152 
Henderson, Gina M. 262 
Hendricks, Charles G. 269 
Hendricks, Dr. Roberta 139 
Hensel, Mary M 189, 148 
Hensley David 152 
Hensley, Doris B. 262 
Hensley, Jack E. 160 
Henslev, lames D 197 
Hensley Robert W. 155 
Henslev. Steve 153 
Henson, Lisa Carol 189, 262 
Herald, Crystal M 262 
Herbig, Kim S, 189 
Herman, Ann Hines 269 
Herrell, William R. 215 
Hernn, Kathy Jean 160, 262 
Herron. Robert K. 172 
Heselschwerdt, Keith 269 
Hesse. Barbara Ann 156-157 
Hesselbrock. Laura A. 97, 206 
Hester, Philip John 154 
Heun, Laura K 184-185 
Hickman, Dianne E, 159 
Hicks, Marilyn E. 262 
Hicks, Mark A. 217 
Hicks. Rebecca J. 168 
Hicks, Samantha Anne 269 
Hicks, Terri Lynn 93 
Hicks, Timothy E 160 
Hieronymus, Elizabet 262 
Hiers, Laura Grace 182, 183, 152 
Higgins, Karen Sue 269 
Higgins, Kan Ann 147 
Higgins, Kathy R 148 
Higgins, Lisa G 136 
Higgins, Sherry Jean 136 
Hightower, Joanna L 159 
Hill, Isaiah 202 
Hill, Lonnv Ray 178, 215 
Hill, Paisley Ann 178, 189 
Hindman, Keith Allen 215 
Hines, Melissa 166, 151 
Hinkle, Jacquelin L 269 
Hinkle, Karla Kay 136 
Hinton, Suzanne 167 
Hirsh, Patrick L, 205, 204 
Hissom, Jamie Lynne 262 
Hobbs, Tracy Leigh 139. 147 
Hockensmith, Sharon 262 
Hodapp, William R. 178, 218 
Hodge, Jay A. 105 
Hoelscher, William A. 208 
Hoff, Cheri Lynn 83, 269 
Hoffman, James J, 156-157 
Hoffman, Russell Lee 215 
Hoffmeister, Julie A, 181, 262 
Hogan, Scott C. 217 
Hogue, Marilynda L. 262 
Holbrook, April Lynn 269 
Holbrook, Sam W. 103 
Hollback, Tina Renee 190 
Holloway, Stephanie 269 
Holmes. Hal 140 
Holt, Dave 105 
Holt, Debra A, 262 
Holtzclaw, Rita M. 262 



274 Index 



Hook, Christopher M. 262 
Hooper, Tammy Sue 161 
Hooten, Christopher 207 
Hopkins, Dani M. 195, 212 
Hopkins, Jamie 143 
Hornbuckle, Beth Ann 152 
Horner, Allan W. 126, 198 
Horney, Jolene 151 
Hornung, Bridget M. 188, 189 
Hoskins, Bonnie E. 262 
Hoskins, Donna Lynn 208, 269 
Hoskins, Rose 148, 153 
Houk, Dana Robert 269 
Houk, Frances H. 152 
House, Lisa 189 
House, Lisa Dawn 262 
Houser, Deborah Lynn 93, 269 
Houze, Gayle M. 181 
Howard, Christopher 205 
Howard, Gregory S. 192 
Howard, Jena M. 181, 269 
Howard, Joy 136 
Howard, Lee J- 160 
Howard, Lounette Lyn 262 
Howard, Nancy L. 178, 195 
Howard, Tammy Sue 262 
Howell, Brian Keith 207 
Howell, Jennifer L. 262 
Howser, Deborah M. 192 
Howser, Karen C. 192 
Hoying, Deborah D. 262, 151 
Hoyles, T. Edward 87 
Hubbard, Tammy Lynn 184-185 
Hubbs, Larry Joseph 163 
Huber, Kristiana L. 190 
Huddleston, George M. 198, 262 
Hudson, Anthony D. 155, 262 
Hudson, Jeffrey W. 262 
Huesing, Karen A. 269 
Huffman, James W. 262 
Hughes, Darryl Lee 11 
Hughes, Donna L. 262 
Hughes, Melanie A. 189 
Hughes, Robert Hagan 164, 165 
Hughes, Stephanie C. 181 
Hulett, Raye A. 269 
Hulse, Richard Ellis 63, 207, 262 
Humble, Tamara L. 160 
Hume, Mitchell Todd 269, 148 
Humes. Pek 221 
Humphrey, Jacqueline 106, 262 
Humphrey, Pat C. 178, 197 
Humphries, Roger P. 105 
Hundley, Mark B. 153 
Hunkemoeller, Laura 269 
Hunt, Lartha Angela 153, 182, 183 
Hunt, Pamela Sue 136 
Hunt, Wanda M. 179 
Hunter, Charles D. 262 
Huntington, Rebecca 269 
Hurd, Michael Robert 221 
Hurst, Timothy Joe 262 
Hurt, Norman Lee 167 



"I" 



Igo, David Harlan 207 
Inman, James L. 152 
Insko, Donna Bridget 163 
Insko, Sabrina Paige 182-183 
Isaac, Teresa 159 
Isaac, William Cecil 262 
Isaacs, Robin A. 161, 151 
Isabell, Beth 154 
Isbell, Darwin Lee 262 
Isham, Francis A. 262 



zIj^ 



Jackey, Jill Marie 160 
Jackson, Clark Cecil 147 
Jackson, David 152 
Jackson, Thomas Alan 147 
Jackson, Tracie Lynn 269, 152 
Jacobs, Clair E. 163 
James, Holly Kay 184-185 
James, Melinda Ann 262 
James, Tonya Denise 262 
Jameson, John B. 160 
Jansen, Joseph M. 147 
Jarman, Marshall T. 262 
Jasper, Debra Elaine 195, 204, 166 
Jayaratne, Krishan J. 159 
Jefferson, Karla A. 148 
Jenkins, Amy Diane 192 
Jenkins, Dr. John 143 
Jenkins, Nickey C. 155, 269 
Jenkins, Robert D. 221 
Jennings, Christophe 208 
Jennings, John K. 205 
Jennings, Dr. Myrena 143 
Jett, Deborah A. 152, 161 
Jewitt, Beth 27 
Jody, Chuck A. 95 
Johns, Patricia Ann 269 
Johnson, Angela Kay 204, 262 
Johnson, Beverly J. 164 
Johnson, Connie A. 262 
Johnson, D. 89 
Johnson, Diana 106, 262 
Johnson, Dione Elena 151 
Johnson, Earle Ernst 155 
Johnson, Ed 136, 163 
Johnson, Eric Keith 146-147 
Johnson, Gregory T. 148 
Johnson, James J. 178, 201 
Johnson, Kevin 104, 105 
Johnson, Kimberly 151 



Johnson, Leslye J, 166, 269 

Johnson, Lisa Ann 269 

Johnson, Marilyn L. 89, 106, 179 

Johnson, Marion R. 203 

Johnson, Mark Lloyd 218 

Johnson, Melissa 262 

Johnson, Melissa 151, 153 

Johnson, Molly Ann 217 

Johnson, Sharon L. 178, 184, 185, 214 

Johnson, Troy 178 

Johnson, Virginia L, 160 

Johnson, William G. 262 

Johnson, Willie, Jr. 205 

Joles, Pat W. 212 

Joles, Robert B. 212 

Jones, Aaron D 70 

Jones, Charlene A. 200 

Jones, Craig William 178, 210 

Jones, Cynthia A 186 

Jones, David 136, 147 

Jones, Ella Jean 269 

Jones, Janet E, 148 

Jones, Jay Darrin 105 

Jones, Jeffrey Scott 205 

Jones, Jennifer Rene 269 

Jones, Kevin K. 215 

Jones, Pete 209, 208 

Jones, Ron 159 

Jones, Sabrina Lee 262 

Jones, Terri L. 200 

Jones, Timothy M 269 

Jones, Tom 167 

Jones, Vincent Lamar 217 

Jones, William 105 

Jordan, Johnda Sue 262 

Jordan, Mary J. 181, 221 

Jordan, Stephanie D. 186 

Jude, Teresa Gail 262 

Judge, Barbara Ellen 91, 93 

Judy, Elisabeth Ann 184-185 

Judy, Thad 215 

Jury, Julie Ann 262 

Justice, James E. 262 

Justice, Lawrence J. 213 

Justice, Paul A. 221 



K- 



Kaelin, Christopher 221 
Kaelin, Judy L. 136, 137 
Kaffenbarger, Debora 181, 262 
Kaffenbarger, Sherry 164, 172, 181, 

212 
Kain, Robert Joseph 136 
Kalejaiye. Enitan A. 153, 159, 202 
Kalinchak, Stephen G. 136 
Kaminski, Steve C. 205 
Kammer, James J. 77 
Karl, Ken Edward 262, 215 
Kauscher, David H. 207 
Kay, Thomas Denton 269 
Kayatin, William F 136 
Kearney, Michael Lee 167 
Kearns, Karri Jo 262 
Kearns, Kenneth L, 118, 151, 153 
Kearns, Stuart 155 
Keefe, Suzanne Marie 160 
Keenan, Denise M. 156, 157 
Keeney, Kathi Lyn 136, 163 
Keer, Scott 163 
Kehl, Steven Joseph 262 
Keith, Jeffery Scott 160 
Keith, John 118 
Keith, John Ashley 215, 269 
Keller, Chris M. 269 
Kelley, Debbie S. 148 
Kelley, Karen E. 160 
Kelly, Dennia Lynn 160 
Kelly, Laura 181 
Kelly, Paul G. 210 
Kemper, Priscilla S. 262 
Kempson, Boo 218 
Kendall, Mark Allan 262 
Kenney, Angela Noell 262 
Kent, Jennifer S. 178 
Kern, Angela Dawn 269 
Kerr, Scott Alan 197 
Kerrick, Deborah L. 218 
Kersey, Kristina R. 190, 262 
Kersey, Laura Lee 195 
Kidd, Carmelita 148 
Kidwell, Dana R. 140, 136 
Kidwell, Lesa Kaye 163, 136 
Kidwell, Susan J. 190 
Kiehl, Caroline R. 153, 181 
Kiehl, Jane R 181 
Kiek, Thomas 156, 157 
Kieta, Thomas V. 155 
Kincaid, Elicia C. 262 
Kincaid, Toni S. 160 
Kincaid, Wil Mason 269 
Kincer, Judith Ann 192 
Kinder, Darrin A. 87 
Kinder, Sandra Ellen 152 
Kindred, Martha Jo 182-183 
King, Angela 192 
King, Cammie 164 
King, Diana Lee 186 
King, Kimberly Jane 212 
King, Lynn M. 217 
King, Madonna Rhnea 269 
King, Margaret Ann 167 
King, Melissa A. 163 
King, Ronald 160 
King, Tonia Denise 262 
Kinker, Martha Mary 262, 140 
Kinney, Hope E. 269 
Kirby, Derek Lee 205 
Kirsch, Michael P. 91 
Kiser, Jennifer Lee 93 



Kiser, Timothy D. 270 
Kisker, Brad B 215 
Kittila, Sidney M. 192 
Kleine, Keith D. 207 
Klenke, Thomas R. 99 
Kline, Annette Lee 190 
Kline, Laura A. 221 
Klisz, Sara Louise 144 
Klosterman, Chad 210 
Klumb, Mary Jude 156-157 
Knauer, Sandra S. 139 
Knepshield, Shelby R. 262 
Knight, Tom 156, 157 
Knoblock, Beth Ellen 270 
Knuckles, Lisa Mane 212, 262 
Kollenberg, Timothy 147 
Konerman, John B. 159 
Kordwitz, Kathleen P 140 
Korzeniewski, Dena L. 208, 270 
Kosid, Courtney, A, 189 
Kotouch, Allison L. 88, 89 
Kozlowski, Ann Marie 181 
Kramp, Robert E. 136, 137 
Kremer, Maria Lynn 153 
Kretzschmar, Scott S. 91 
Krieger, James E. 59, 212 
Kruer, Beverly Sue 152 
Kuchenbrod, Michael 147, 262 
Kuethe, Kelly M. 189, 212 
Kuhn, Karen K. 155 
Kuhramann, Trina 178 
Kuntz, Cinda Kae 262 
Kurtz, John C. 167 
Kurtz, Michael Rodes 270 
Kutzner, James R 163 



-L- 



Lacey, Mark David 262 

Lacy, Michael James 151 

Laduke, Denise Marie 143, 153 

Lafferry, Tracey R. 160, 270 

Lair, Katherine Jean 161 

Lake, Kimberly K. 151 

Lakes, Lisa A, 270 

Lakes, Sherry Lynn 151, 270 

Umbers, Donna S 153, 128 

Lambers, Lisa Marie 153 

Lambert, Paul 164 

Lamkin, Sherrie E. 167 

Lanasa, Mike 212 

Land, Dawn Karrell 270 

Landers, Christopher 218 

Lane, Becky 139 

Langdon, Joe G. 148 

Langfels, Stephanie 161 

Lappin, Cheryl A. 151 

Larimore, James G. 262 

Larkin, Laura Anne 182, 183, 270 

Lash, Carrie Lynn 262 

Laswelt, John F. 144 

Laswell, Kelly Mason 270 

Latham, Barbara J, 186 

Laughlin, David A. 26, 215 

Lauterwasser, Eric 152, 155, 270 

Lawson, Karen Lee 159 

Lawson, Maria C. 270 

Lawson, Michael S 210 

Lawson, Myra Ann 262 

Lawson, Rona M. 262 

Lay, Gregory Allen 151 

Layman, Amanad 263 

Layton, Carol J. 189 

Lazenby, Susan Lee 148 

Lecoque, Barbara Ann 82 

Lee, Sammy Keith 263 

Lee, Violet June 270 

Lee, Wanda L. 148 

Leedy, Carol Ann 160, J61 

Lefevre, Jill Renee 270 

Leforge, John 178, 197 

Leigh, Donald 263 

Leinweber, Jennifer 147, 166 

Leist, Michele E. 181 

Lemaster, Leia L. 182, 183, 217 

Lemker, Robert J, 215 

Lentini, Mary G. 263 

Leroy, Melissa Ann 195, 204 

Leslie, Lisa Gaye 263 

Lewis, Donna Lynn 156-157 

Lewis, James A. 210 

Lewis, Jane Monique 263 

Lewis, Jennifer Lee 270 

Lewis, Kent Erwin 217 

Lewis, Michael 163 

Lewis, Stacy L. 186 

Lewter, Sherri L. 161 

Lichty, Denise Lynn 152, 166, 184, 

185 
Lichty, Dan 90, 92, 140, 193 
Lincoln, Stephen A. 162 
Lindley, Keith D. 159 
Lindley, Kevin Bruce 95 
Lindsay, Carla Renee 155 
Linebach, Thomas M. 197 
Link, John Kevin 205, 263 
Lipker, Perry Robert 151, 263 
Lippert, Deanna M. 263 
Lipscomb, Aubrey L. 197 
List, Sharon Marie 263 
Liter, D. Christophe 263 
Littrell, Tonda Rene 26, 263 
Livesay, Lee Powell 93 
Livezey, Robin Dawn 136 
Lloyd, Douglas E. 143 
Lobaugh, Geoffrey S. 148 
Lockard, Anthony S. 166 
Lockwood, Mark J. 215 
Logan, Dawn 167 
Logue, Pamela Lee 166 



Lohre, Julie M. 181 
Long, Elizabeth H. 195 
Long, G. Timothy 198 
Long, Jeff 197 
Long, John Dean 123 
Long, Norma Sue 214 
Long, Vickie C. 159 
Lommer, Blaine Mitch 218 
Lose, Heidi Lyn 139, 163 
Losey, Doug 100, 103 
Loudermelt, Ricky R. 167 
Lovensheimer, Sebnn 155 
Lowe, Steven Martin 270 
Lowry, Karen L. 93 
Lowry, Lola Jean 270 
Loyd, Alan B, 212 
Lozier, Carol Anne 190 
Lucas, Kristen E, 263 
Lucas, Shantae Ladon 152 
Luckett, Jill Simone 155 
Lueken, Stacey Ann 182-183, 204 
Lunsford, Timothy L. 263 
Lushy, Bob 213 
Lutes, Lori Dawn 263 
Luttrell, Joseph R. 152 
Luxon, Kathy Lynn 263 
Lynam, Lizabeth Amy 263 
Lynch, Julie Marie 175, 190 
Lynch, Keith Edward 160 
Lynn, Karen L. 163 
Lyons, Sarah Anne 192, 217 
Lyons, Teri Lynne 190 



-M- 



Mabry, James Michael 270 

Mackens, Denise 263 

Madaris, Bngid M. 270 

Madden, Gina L. 270 

Maddox, Kimberly J. 270 

Maeberlin, Thomas 144 

Maeder, Julia A. 140 

Magrane, Jennifer P 270 

Magruder, Michelle A. 270 

Mahaney, Paul M. 270 

Mahorn, Todd 210 

Major, Lisa M. 189 

Maloney, Vera J. 152 

Mandl, Scott C. 166, 164 

Manley, Brent M. 221 

Mann, David Jerome 263 

Mann, Jill F. 139 

Mann, Sonya Lenora 263 

Manning, Terry L. 77 

Manning, Tomi Lynn 263 

Mansour, Megan Rose 186 

Manuel, Lisa Jo 160, 263 

Maples, Sam Robert 164 

Marchal, Annette J. 151, 263 

Marcum, Brian L. 95 

Marcum, Nancv Ellen 153, 182. 183, 

208, 263 
Marcum, Rick 105 
Manonneaux, Ralph D. 152, 166 
Mark, Rebecca Jean 97 
Markham, Todd 94 
Marksberry, Darryl T 178, 197 
Marksberry, Teresa L. 270, 214 
Marlowe, Tracy Lynn 263 
Marratta, Eric Daivd 87 
Marsall, Gail M. 159 
Marsee, Michael W, 162, 166, 263 
Marsh, Andrea Denise 270 
Marshall, Bonnie Lyn 270 
Marshall, Jonathan T 153 
Marston, Craig Alan 263 
Marsu, Thorn 263 
Martin, John J. 105, 154, 208 
Martin, Judith Ann 106, 178 
Martin, Lisa 186 
Martin, Randy E 198 
Martin, Robert R. 116, 117 
Martin, Sandra 97 
Martin, Susan J. 139, 140, 152 
Martin, Tammy L. 162, 186 
Martin. Tamyra Faith 270 
Martin, Terri Ann 162, 166 
Martin, Tonya Renee 186 
Martinez, Mary M. 152 
Martini, Barbara A. 192, 199 
Martini, Michelle M 178, 181, 199 
Mason. Constance L. 136, 137 
Mason, Samuel K. 136, 146, 148 
Massey, Charles E. 167, 270 
Massman, Cynthia L. 186 
Masters, Traci A. 151 
Masterson, James Dr. 143 
Mastin, Amy Allen 155, 190 
Mathews, Thomas A. 198 
Matthews, Faith D. 270 
Matthews, Karen A. 147 
Matthews, Kathleen E. 148 
Mattingly, Fredrick 99 
Mattingly, Laura E 151, 263 
Mattingly, Theresa M. 270 
Mauer, Virginia L. 181 
Mauney, Elizabeth A. 167, 270 
Maurer, Beth A. 178, 190 
Maurice, Petronila M. 159 
May, Robin Ann 270 
Mayer, Walter T. 159 
Mayfield, Jane W. 198 
Mayfield, Lynn Carol 270 
McAfee, Chris T 198 
McArtor, Eric Keith 212 
McAuliffe, Mary B. 151, 181 
McBrayer, W. Scott 270 
McBride, Jody 152 
McBride, Kelly Sue 186 
McCarter, Eric 189 



McCarthy, Eileen Ann 139 
McCauley, Alice L. 89 
McClain, Steven T. 151, 270 
McCollor, Donna Ruth 159 
McComis, Kimberly A. 270 
McConkey, Sarah E. 189 
McCool. Brenda Kav 139, 148, 152, 

153 
McCool, Robert 148, 152, 153 
McCormack, Elese M. 263 
McCormack, Rosa L. 136 
McCormack, Viola P.. 156-157 
McCormick, Charles K. 270 
McCoy, Connie Renee 139 
McCoy, Kimberly M. 270 
McCoy, Patrick M 217 
McCoy, Shan Lynn 270 
McCracken, Trip 198 
McCracken. Troy S 198 
McCutchen, Arlena F 270 
McDonald, Charles A 205 
McElwain, Carmen D 195 
McFall, Kim 270 
McFarland, Scott D. 215 
McGee, James Darren 167 
McGee, Michael 205 
McGeorge, Janet Lynn 166 
McGill, Jeffery Q. 77 
McGowan, Lisa M, 263, 140 
McGuffey, Donald L. 270 
McGuire, Sean P 68 
McGuire, Susan Jayne 152, 167, 263 
McGuire, Suzanne E. 153 
McHale, Charles E. 263 
Mcintosh, Melanie A. 93, 221 
Mclntyre, Adonis, J. 118 
Mclntvre, Amy J. 167 
Mclntyre, Candice R. 263 
Mclntyre, Kimberly A 184-185 
Mclver, Teresa Colen 263 
McKee, Angela G, 186 
McKendrick, Bob 90 
McKenzie, Darrell T. 270 
McKenzie, Leighan F 93, 190 
McKinley, Ellen Kay 263 
McKinley, James T. 263 
McKinley, Louva E. 263 
McKinney, Brian K- 270 
McKmney, Jerry W 167 
McKinney, Michael L. 152, 270 
McKinney, Tina Jane 160, 263 
McKnight, Constance 270 
McKnight, Lee A. 159 
McLam, Susan 151 
McMillan, Diana Lynn 161 
McNamara, Eileen M 214 
McQueen, Leslie Ann 270 
Meade, Cynthia Rae 270 
Meadows, Tammv Jo 263 
Meder, Monica Ann 217 
Medley, Bobby Terrel 139, 147 
Medley, Kelli M. 152 
Medley, Raymond B 263 
Medlev, Robert Louis 263 
Meece! Edwin Ray 167, 270 
Meece, Ronda Lou 160 
Meholovitch, Cindy L. 136 
Meisenheimer, John Dr 152 
Melius, Laura 144, 145 
Melton, John T 153 
Mepcila, Dwayne 163 
Mercer, David Wyman 90 
Mercer, Deborah L. 139 
Mercke, Robert S. 221 
Meredith, Leslie Ann 190 
Mersch, Amy S. 195, 152 
Mesch, Dary'l P 163 
Metz, Christopher A. 163 
Meuth, Bradley John 148 
Meuth, Katherine Ann 195 
Mever, Rhonda M. 153 
Meyer, William P 136, 137 
Meyers, Jennifer Ann 218 
Meyers, Thomas Dr 119 
Michelsen, Christoph 263 
Middleton, Jeffrey S. 263 
Mikesell, Molly Lois 270 
Milburn, Nancv Susan 160 
Milby, Steve P 198 
Miles, James Mark 270 
Miles, John 100, 103 
Miles, Matthew G 139, 147 
Milich, Aleisha Ann 270 
Miller, Bobbv 270 
Miller, Chuck 90, 270 
Miller, David John 81 
Miller, Deborah L. 148 
Miller, Karen 155, 212 
Miller, Kristina L 263 
Miller, Lee Kemp 270 
Miller, Mary E. 140 
Miller, Marv Ruth 160 
Miller, Michael 263 
Miller, Mindy 167 
Miller, Patricia A. 140 
Miller, Paul S. 213 
Miller, Randy A. 218 
Miller, Sondra D. 81, 263 
Miller, Stephanie C. 184. 185 
Miller, Thomas 212 
Miller, Thomas 218 
Miller. Timothy S. 144^148 
Miller, Vicki F. 263 
Miller, Wayne L. 198 
Mills. Debbie Lynn 270 
Mills, Glenn T. 198 
Minier, Mark R. 218 
Mink, Timothy H. 139 
Minks, Susan K. 184, 185 
Minogue, John K. 144, 160 
Minton, Steven Ray 217 
Miracle, Karen E. 270 
Miska, David Mark 205 



Index 275 



Mitchell. Evelvn M. 270 

Mitchell. Janet K. 195. 270 

Mitchell. Robert D. 136. 157. 270 

Mitchell. Susan M 140 

Mcasor. Lisa ISC' 

Mobley. Joan 161 

Mobley, Philip Rvan 263 

Moffett. Elizabeth E. 263 

Mohr, John Anthonv 270 

Monin. Ann Bridget 206. 263 

Montanaro. Nicholas 99 

Montgomery. Bradley 270 

Montgomery. Stephani 270 

Moon. Jennifer Lvnn 136 

Moore, Cathenne J. 127, 189 

Moore. Jeffrey C. 205 

Moore. Kathleen R. 270 

Moore. Lisa Adair 270 

Moore. Peggy Mane 143, 181 

Moore, Randall Brook 221 

Moore, Robert V 100, 101, 103 

Moore, Rubv F 156. 157 

Moore, Shelley Renee 184, 185 

Moore, Vonda Kav 270 

Moore. Wendell Frank 263 

Moran Colleen Kelly 140. 152. 263 

Moran. Martha Conway 263 

Moran, Michelle Joan 270 

Moranda. Robert S. 100, 101, 103 

Morgan. Debra J. 151 

Morgan. Kevin L. 215 

Morgan. Robert S 218 

Morgan. Thomas VV II 198 

Morris, Daryl 147 

Mortis, Mark Anthonv 105 

Morris, Marv Ann 263 

Morris. Roselvn S 151 

Morrison. Stephen L 218 

Morrissey. Michael P. 103 

Monissev, Susan E. 148 

Morrow. Cynthia E. 148 

Morrow. Karen Elise 263 

Morton, Kevin D 221 

Morton, Regina Ann 179 

Morton, Sherry Lvnn 178, 179, 263 

Mosbv. Juan F. 105, 151, 201 

Moser. John F 198 

Mosley, Robert David 178. 202 

Mosley. Wanda Cherie 214 

Mouser. Lisa Renee 221 

Mowry. Todd P 212 

Mover. Christopher M 207 

Mu'dd. Jo Ann 270 

Mudd. Rita Ann 155 

Mudrak, Jeffrey Alan 87 

Mueller, Thomas G 143 

Mullins, Ann Mane 270 

Mullins, Avery 148 

Mullins, Dana M 204 

Mullins, David 159 

Mullins, Elaine M 136 

Mullins. Michele D 181 

Mullins. Pamela 160 

Mullins Robin Ann 140 

Mullins, Shawn T. 270 

Mullins. Sheila D. 139 

Mullins. Terry W. 103 

Mullins, Vonda Lynne 263 

Muncv. Brent Reece 147 

Muncv, David Michael 271 

Muniz. Carmen Mana 263 

Munsie, Lon Lynn 182, 183 

Murphv, Colleen, M 160 

Murphv, Diane 78, 81 

Murphy. Kimberly L 218. 263 

Murphy. Peggy A. 181 

Murphv. Tamara A. 139, 140, 156, 

167, 263 
Murphv, Timothy Jane 207 
Murphy, Todd Anthony 178, 198 
Murray, Krishna M 271 
Muschong, Manfred Jo 215 
Mustar, Sue Ellen 186 
Muterspaw, Richard L 207 
Myers, Carol Ann 271 
Myers, Jeffrev M 198 
Mvers, Linda S. 81 
Myers. M Richard II 144 
Myers. Pauline E 190 
Myers, Troy Caywood 198 



Xoonan. Beverly Jean 217 
Norkus, Ed S. 100, 101 
Northcutt, Carter A. 148 



-o- 



-N- 



Naiser, Joni M 139 

Nance, Joseph 263 

Nands, Suzanne 85. 263 

Napier, Deborah 263 

Napier, Lee Ann 190 

Napier, Lisa 184, 185 

Napier, Mark Noah 155, 160 

Neal, Roderick Q, 201 

Neat, Jennifer S. 152 

Neef, Sandra R. 212 

Nelson, Margaret J 263 

Neville, Andrew T, 140 

New, Brent 218 

Newell, Pamela Rose 217 

Newman, Jeffrey Gary 218 

Newman, Michelle A, 195 

Newman, Patncia Ann 156, 157, 263 

Newman, Teresa A. 184, 185 

Newman, Donna L. 186 

Newsome, Shirley B. 156, 157 

Newton, Angela Mane 263 

Niblock, Christopher 106, 218 

Niday, Willene Kay 263 

Noel, Donya Jeanine 154 

Noel, Melani Jo 263 

Noel, Renee Jennifer 190 

Nolan, Mary Kristin 214 



O'Daniel, Amv 139 
O'Daniel, Mafk B, 152 
O'Flvnn, Bonnie Sue 156, 157 
O'Kellv, Lisa Ann 192 
Obenshain, Lisa Rene 189, 199 
Obrvan. Michelle M, 144, 153, 160, 

161, 163 
Ogburn. Lisa Carol 2b4 
Ogburn, Roger Grant 147 
Ohler, Patrick R 99 
Ohlmann, Mark A 205. 271 
Olberding, Michael T 87 
Oldaker, Sabina N. 264 
Olde. Karen E. 83, 152, 155 
Oldendick. Thomas B. 99 
Ohgee. Dave 152 
Oligee. Louis Paul 148, 167 
Oliver, Julie Anne 208 
Omohundro. Barry D. 205 
Opell, Virginia Lynn 264 
Osborne, Bart Ronald 264 
Osborne, John Lee 221 
Osborne, Tracev Jane 181 
Osbourne, Joev 153 
Overall, DanaC. 147 
Overstreet, Stacy 264 
Overton, Julie Anne 186 
Overwein, Jeff A 163 
Owen, Steven K, 217 
Owens, Alecia Lynett 200 
Owens, James 264 
Owens, Lisa Amanda 190, 218 
Owens, Sharon D 200 
Owens, Timothy W. 198 



P- 



Pace, Donna Gail 160 
Pack, Jeffrey Alan 210 
Pagel, Christopher Y. 218 
Pale. Tracy 155 
Pallo. John A 95, 212 
Palmer, Thomas Ray 271 
Papineau, Anne Mane 184, 185 
Papineau, Kathryn A 153, 195 
Parker, Frederick L. 160 
Parker, Greg J 202 
Parker, Kimberlee A 190 
Parker, Nancy H 189, 212 
Parker, Paula Jean 221, 264 
Parker, Rick 221 
Parks. Charles M. 264 
Parks, Victor Lee 72 
Parrella, Traci Ann 97, 189 
Parrett, Danny Leo 99 
Parns, Antonio L. 77 
Parnsh, Antonio 74 
Parsons, Kimberly K 190 
Parsons, Steve R. 151, 153, 163 
Pate, Teresa Renee 214, 264 
Patrick, Alfred 124 
Patrick, Brent Neil 151 
Patrick, Pamela Dawn 167, 264 
Patrick. Patty C 151 
Patrick, Scott T 94, 95 
Patrick, Sheila A 161 
Patrick, Tiffany S. 164, 189, 264 
Patterson, Lawrence 152 
Patterson, Stacy L. 148 
Paugh. Robert C 136, 163 
Paul, Angela 271 
Payne, Tyler K 215 
Paynter, Charles P. 87. 105 
Pearce, Monica K. 204 
Pearson, Cindy Lynn 264 
Pearson, Cora Denise 166 
Pearson, Mario C 77 
Pearson, Tammy Ann 271 
Peck, John William 218 
Pecoraro, Julie Ann 153 
Pedersen, Anders P 136, 137 
Peineke, Chris 264 
Pendleton, Charles R 212 
Pendleton, Sheila H 182, 183 
Penegor, Thomas M 164 
Penn, Lon Jean 271 
Penn, Melissa D 264 
Pennell, Steven W 271 
Pennington, Elesha L 144 
Penwell, Jane E 264 
Perkins, Noel L. 160 
Perry, Dale Allen 271 
Perry, Elvena M. 164. 264 
Perry, Oan 197 
Perry, Stephanie D. 189, 212 
Peter, Brenda M 161, 166 
Peter, Gregory J 271 
Peters, Frank Calvin 212 
Peters, Wayne 264 
Petrey, Robin Lee 264 
Petty, Robin Lance 208 
P/aehler, Christina 181, 199 
Pilaris, Charlie C. 140 
Phelps, Karla Jo 264 
Phelps, Sandra Lee 271 
Phelps, Timothy W 264 
Phillippi, David M 264 
Phillips, Angela 271 
Phillips, Daniel D 221 
Phillips, Denise Lyn 264 
Phillips, James Lee 215 
Phillips, Julie Rene 184, 185 



Phillips, Mark G. 271 

Pitts, Anita 271 

Pitts, Donald G. 215 

Pitts, Stephanie Ann 214 

Ploetner, Sarah L. 264 

Pohlman. Sue E. 151 

Pointer, Ramona Y. 166 

Pointer, Sherri A. 166 

Pointer, Wavne E. 178, 202 

Polechek, Jodi 190 

Pope, Benjamin Carl 163 

Pope. Kathy Michelle 160, 271 

Pope, Sallv Ann 271 

Porras, Claudia H. 97 

Porter, Karla Sue 156, 157 

Potter, Julie Lvnn 82 

Powell, Deborah Ann 164, 186, 204, 

264 
Powell, Downey 116, 117 
Powell, Doug 148 
Powell, Garv M. 77 
Powell, J. C. 116. 117 
Powell, Joseph F 144 
Powell, Magen E. 184, 185 
Powell, Tracy L 139 
Powell, Wendi K 184, 185 
Powers, Victoria Lyn 264 
Poynter, John W. 151 
Prater. Lana Renee 182, 183 
Preston, Charles W 148 
Prewitt, Stacy L. 195 
Price, Jacquelvn Sue 204 
Price, Jennifer 178 
Price, Jennifer Anne 184, 185 
Price, John Brent 212 
Price, Lisa 144, 147 
Price, Melissa E 264 
Price, Penny Lvnn 264 
Price, Rhonda "jane 271 
Primm, John Russell 77 
Pnngle, Stan 105 
Pnvitera, Scott M. 102, 103 
Probizanski, Hobert 156, 157 
Proctor, Cynthia L. 151 
Proctor, Elizabeth A. 161 
Prohaska, Jeffrey J. 197 
Propp. Christine E 164 
Prmtt, Mickie L. 264 
Pryor, Kimberly Carl 156, 157 
Puckett, James P. 160 
Pursiful, Austin W. 151, 166 
Pyle, Stephen A 221, 264 
Pyles, Angela Sue 160 
Pyles, Denise 143 



-Q- 



Quandt, Mary Kay 190 
Quarles, Tabatha Ann 264 
Querry, Christopher 167, 271 
Quesenberry, Susan M. 221 
Quigley, Dennis 103 
Quinlan, John T 215 



-R- 



Rader. April E 139 
Radspmner, Karen A. 83 
Ragland, Nathaniel C. 205 
Raghn. Pamela Jean 88, 89, 106 
Rahan, Tom 198 
Railey, Carole Renee 271 
Rainey, James Eugene 144, 160 
Rakes, Lisa Carol 155 
Raleigh, Michelle E. 264 
Ralenkotter. Candace 136 
Ramsdell, Frank D. 90 
Ramsey, Mary Jane 264 
Ramsey, Peter Oliver 215, 264 
Randall, Kathenne L. 167 
Randall, Randy 44 
Rao, Catherine Jane 195 
Ratliff, Robert Burn 264 
Ravencraft, Jennifer 190 
Rawlins, Terry Lee 264 
Ray, Donnie L. 189 
Ray, Rebekah Rachel 152, 269 
Ray, Stephanie Dawn 192, 271 
Rayburn, Myra L. 136 
Read, Jami Ann 159 
Read, Mark T 152 
Reardon, Catharine R 161 
Reasch, Cyndi 152 
Reckenwald, Anne M. 151, 264 
Rector, Christopher 178, 212 
Rector, Elizabeth J. 264 
Reddick, William P 90 
Redfield. Mary J. 199 
Redfield, Rebecca L 214 
Redmon, Timothy Carl 103 
Reece, Anton Ricardo 105 
Reece, Connie Lee 152, 264 
Reece, Tina L. 81 
Reed, Michael D 178, 207 
Reed, Pamela Dawn 264 
Reed, Penne L. 200 
Reed, Stanley Wayne 155 
Rees, Jane B. 36, 152 
Rees, Julie G. 36 
Reeser, R. 87 
Reese, Scott A. 143 
Reffett. Donald E. 167 
Rehm, Stephanie Lynn 190 
Reineke, Chris Scott 143 
Reitz, Kathy Marie 264 
Remzello, Teonta 264 
Renner, Teressa Lynn 140, 264 
Reusch, Cyndi 271 



Reynier, Denise D 195 
Reynolds, Arthur D. 271 
Reynolds. Eugene 264 
Reynolds. Melissa A. 155 
Reynolds, Pamela R. 264 
Reynolds, Yvette D. 39, 153, 181 
Rhodus, Sherri Ann 264 
Rhodv, Donald M 198 
Rhude, Jody Baker 208 
Rhule, Jennifer L. 154 
Rice. Brenda C. 146, 147 
Rice, Sheri 264 
Rice, Yvette B 264 
Rich, David R. 218 
Richard, Stacie D 182, 183, 271 
Richardson, Amy L. 271 
Richardson, Robert A. 210 
Richardson, Sharon 264 
Richmond, Moleta Y 264 
Richmond, Pamela Ann 271 
Richter, Deanna Lvnn 264 
Ricks, Truett 127 
Ridenour, Michael L. 210 
Ridgley, Carole S. 155, 160 
Ridgley, Cindra S 155 
Riedel. Glenn A. 271 
Riedel, Laura J. 93. 195 
Ries, John Steven 221 
Riggs, Alan D 160 
Rinehart, Gregory L. 221 
Ritter, Laura L. 208 
Ritter, Michael Dale 143 
Roark, Cynthia Rae 271 
Roark, Julie M. 156, 157, 192 
Roberts, Andrea M 271 
Roberts. Julia Lynn 155 
Roberts. Mark 208 
Roberts, Rhonda J 189 
Roberts, Sherrell L. 206 
Roberts, Sherrell L. 206 
Roberts, Thomas C 213 
Roberts, Timothy W. 148 
Robertson, Kimberly 160 
Robinette, Dan 163 
Robinette, Linda M. 264 
Robinson, Dewavne M 153 
Robinson, Edyth J. 166, 264 
Robinson, Gregory E. 143, 264 
Robinson, John B 264 
Robinson, Karen E. 151 
Robinson. Kellie A. 271 
Robinson, Laura Jane 164, 178, 189 
Robinson, Lee Tevis 90, 264 
Robinson, Lisa 153 
Robinson, Rebecca A. 161 
Robinson, Sandra A. 160 
Robinson, Steve 146, 147 
Robinson, Tammy L. 38, 151 
Robinson, William 151 
Rockwell, Kathy Sue 221, 264 
Roddy, Kathryn Lynn 155, 264 
Rogers, Anthony Matt 153 
Rogers, Carolyn M 136, 163 
Rogers, Elizabeth A. 156, 157 
Rogers, James R. 148 
Rogers, Jeffrey S. 143 
Rogers. Matthew W 87, 105 
Rogers, Ruby Sonja 271 
Rolf, Jennifer A 264 
Rolf, Karen Anne 264 
Roll, Randall Steven 167 
Romans, Russell A. 205 
Roper, Patricia Anne 148, 160 
Rose. Debra K 121, 140, 151 
Rose, James Keith 144, 264 
Rose, Lisa Jo 190 
Rose, Sherry Lynn 271 
Rose, Tonya Kaye 160, 181, 264 
Rosh, Susan 264 
Rosser, Shelley Ann 89, 140 
Routzon, Samantha L. 136 
Rowlett. John 119 
Rowlett, Virginia A 186 
Roy, Amy Dolores 271 
Roy, Camellia Gail 160, 264 
Roy, Stephanie Y 271 
Ruble, Dana L. 195, 271 
Ruble. Martha A 59, 162, 164, 166 
Rucker, Ronald Joe 198 
Rudd. Elizabeth A. 58 
Rueff, Amy Jo 192, 199 
Runyon, James Edward 271 
Rupp, John Scott 162, 166 
Rushford, Suzanne C. 161 
Russell, April D. 39, 189 
Russell, Charles D 197 
Russell, Colleen A 155, 143 
Ruth, J. Micthell 136 
Rutherford, Mark T 264 
Ryan, Anita Lee 214 
Ryan, John Kelly 264 
Ryan, Michael A. 197 
Ryan, Tony 153 
Ryle, Tricia E. 221 



-s- 



Saaley, Suzanne 155 

Sackson, Clark 213 

Salmons, Charles G. 218 

Salyers, Sandra Dean 161 

Sammons, Tammy L. 148 

Sammons, Teresa M 38, 160, 184, 185 

Sams, Garland Ray 160 

Samson, David Martin 205 

Samuels, Kerwin L. 151 

Sanders, Ken Eugene 205 

Sanders, Megan E, 189 

Sanders, Mimi R. 182, 183 

Sanders, Terry Lee 164, 264 



Sandman, John Nichol 148 

Sapp, Karen R. 184, 185 

Sasser, Janne K, 144, 147. 161 

Sattinger, Steven M. 105 

Sauer, Carrie Ann 152 

Saver, Ron 162 

Sayers, Sara ]. 144, 160 

Saylor, Ginnifer P. 153 

Saylor, Maria J. 178, 182, 183, 208 

Saylor, Stacy Lynn 160 

Saylor, William M. 147 

Scalf, Denise 161 

Scannell, John A. 205, 271 

Scannell, Joseph W, 205 

Schaefer, Cheri L. 264 

Schaefer, Frederick 264 

Schardein, Laura D. 195 

Scharringhausen, Amy 140 

Scheeler, Pamela K 58 

Scheer, Deborah Ann 77, 161, 164, 

265 
Scheer, Julie 214 
Schehr, Susan A. 156, 157 
Schell, Mike Patrick 271 
Scheper, Jennifer E, 265 
Schildler, Kristan A 182, 183 
Schildmever, Mark J. 214 
Schildmeyer, Stephan 182, 183 
Schilffarth, Stephen 153, 205 
Schilling, Suzanne E. 206. 265 
Schlafke, Tammy Kaye 265 
Schmidt. Donna Ellen 184, 185 
Schmidt, Jill A 189 
Schmidt, Lisa Mane 153, 166 
Schnabel, Carroll, 137, 156, 157 
Schnefer, Fred 218 
Schneider, John L. 152, 265 
Schneider, Lynda Kay 181, 199 
Schneider. Theresa C, 159 
Schnenng, Samantha 192 
Schoborg, Christine 159, 265 
Schoengart, David K. 172, 197, 265 
Schraer, John D. 152 
Schreiber, Jean A. 189 
Schroeder, Mary B. 218 
Schroering, Jill M, 181 
Schuerman, Daniel R 198 
Schuerman, Douglas F. 198 
Schuh, Donna Marie 77, 106 
Schultz, E Conrad 208, 265 
Schulz, Signd Diane 271 
Schwendeman 119 
Schwertman, Jennifer 190 
Scott, David 144 
Scott, Emilv E. 192, 199 
Scott, James R. 93 
Scott, Michael Grant 218 
Scott, Robert Wesley 265 
Scott, Ronald Ray 144 
Scott, Rubv Ann 271 
Scott, Timothy David 91, 265 
Scott, Tyler, Neill 197, 265 
Scott, Vincent 105 
Scriber, Jack N, 197 
Scnbner, Diane M. 214 
Scully, Colette 89 
Scunteh, Douglas 197 
Sears, Anthony T 197 
Sears, Charles Eric 271 
Seaton, Stacey Kay 181 
Sebastian, Charlotte 265 
Sebree. Suzanne S. 184, 185 
Secrest, Anne Rochel 190 
Seiber, Peggy Jean 167 
Seidel, Elizabeth A. 148 
Seigla, Stephanie L 156, 271 
Sellers, Terry Wayne 207 
Semones, Margrith M. 84, 271 
Senger, Kimberly Ann 265 
Serber. Jeffrey T 218 
Sexton, Jimmy 163 
Sexton, William 116, 117, 119 
Shackelford, Owen A. 156, 157 
Shackelford, Sandra 167 
Shackelford, Vernon 139, 156, 157 
Shacklette, Elizabet 204 
Shade, Dianne T 265 
Shaffer, Paula A 181 
Shane, Richard James 198 
Shannon, Virginia K 190, 212 
Sharkey, Stephanie D 195 
Shearer, Johnna E. 159, 271 
Sheehan, Craig Alan 155, 265 
Sheene, Robin Rene 271 
Sheets, Tom A 144, 147, 159 
SheHon, Ann M. 81 
Shelton, Janet Lynn 271 
Shenberger, Timothy 271 
Shepperd, Kimberly R. 271 
Sheringer, Michelle 186 
Sherman, Linda L. 59, 143 
Shewmaker, Terri R. 271 
Shields, Melinda Lee 152, 265 
Shinkle, Todd P. 207 
Shirchtf, Laura L. 146, 147 
Shouse, Derek Scott 265 
Shouse, Gregory A. 155 
Shouse, Tommy H. Jr. 208 
Shover, Michael D. 166, 207 
Shrout, Tracy Lynn 184, 185 
Shumate, Scarlett L. 152, 208, 271 
Siaw, Francis Farp N. 159 
Siddiqui, Waleed W. 148 
Sidwell. Tammy Jane 167, 265 
Simmerman, Julie D, 156 
Simmons, Cynthia G. 157 
Simms, Mary Beth 271 
Simon, Brenda J. 151 
Simon, Kenneth P. 208 
Simon, Mary Joyce 161 
Simonsen, Christophe 143 
Simpson, Gregory F. 166, 77 
Simpson, James G. 144, 160 



276 Index 



Simpson, Joanne 166 

Simpson, Judy A 271 

Simpson, Melinda Lee 265 

Simpson, Susan F 192, 208 

Sims, Michael Shane 271 

Sims, Stephen Edward 146, 147 

Sinclair, Jennifer A. 221 

Singleton, Dana Kay 271 

Singleton, Derrick 152, 167 

Singleton, Julie Ann 265 

Singleton, Lesha Rae 271 

Sininger, Beth Ann 161 

Sipple, Stephen Scott 152 

Sites, Jeanne A. 195 

Sizemore, Gregory 213 

Skarbowski, Susan M. 143, 148, 155 

Skeen, Wendell J. 153 

Skellie, George R. 214 

Skidmore, Jerry S. 208 

Skinner, Douglas R. 136 

Skundrich, Lisa K. 161 

Slade, Kirk 105 

Slater, Benny Lee 265 

Slattery, Billy S. 205 

Slider, Sandra C. 271 

Sloan, Tammie Diane 204 

Sloan, Todd Ireland 208 

Sloan, Tracey Lane 271 

Slone, Barry James 212 

Slone, P. Michelle 190 

Slukich, Michael Y. 163 

Slusher, William W. 151 

Small, Julie M. 160 

Smallwood, John K, 160 

Smallwood, Rebecca 265 

Smallwood, Ross P. 155 

Smeltzer, Andrew C. 155, 160 

Smith, Amy 221 

Smith, Andrea L. 160 

Smith, Anthony J. 205 

Smith, Anthony Wayne 213 

Smith, Brenda 100 

Smith, Brian Nelson 208, 265 

Smith, Christopher J. 94, 95 

Smith, Cynthia A. 166 

Smith, Debora Ann 265 

Smith, Denease 189 

Smith, Dennis Wayne 155 

Smith, Diana L. 164, 166, 189 

Smith, Dory Lynn 271 

Smith, Francine Jean 166 

Smith, Franklin Lee 221 

Smith, Frederica D. 200 

Smith, Gregory E, 193 

Smith. Henrietta 159 

Smith, Jessie 68 

Smith, Jody Anne 271 

Smith, Johanna 123 

Smith, Johnnie 170, 171 

Smith, Kevin S. 208 

Smith, Lisa 195, 265 

Smith, Maresa Dawn 186 

Smith, Mark A. 205 

Smith, Mark Landon 265 

Smith, Michael 271 

Smith, Michael 214 

Smith, Michelle L. 39, 124, 140 

Smith, Mona Lisa 166 

Smith, Monta Jo 271 

Smith, Pat 68 

Smith, Rebecca Ruth 144, 145, 156, 

164, 265 
Smith, Scotry 210 
Smith, Sharon H, 151 
Smith, Shelia M. 140, 164, 195 
Smith, Sherry Lynn 265 
Smith, Sterling M. 167 
Smith, Theresa Jean 161, 164 
Smith, Tina 106 
Snell, Priscilla B. 182, 183 
Snell, Sue A. 142 
Snow, Christine Tara 89, 106, 265 
Snowden, Penny Sue 144 
Snyder, Gary Eugene 207 
Snyder, Paul E. 218 
Snyder, Timothy J. 144 
Sommerfield, Lynne I 182, 183 
Sorensen, Wendy Lee 214 
Sour, Peter Willard 136, 163 
Southerland, Lisa D. 137 
Sowers, Patachia D. 155, 271 
Spahn, Linda Beth 271 
Spangenberg, Kristi 97 
Sparks, Danielle R. 106 
Sparks, Kimothy M. 265 
Sparks, Nancy Lynn 167 
Sparks, Sheri Ann 271 
Spears, Lisa Michell 93, 271 
Speer, John Logan 265 
Spence, Lewis A. 164 
Spence, Thomas D. 205 
Spence, William D. 214 
Spencer, Chip 214 
Spencer, Diana Dee 192 
Spencer, John A. 208 
Spencer, Tony 271 
Spurlin, Portia L. 192 
Spurlock, Steve F. 271 
Spurr, Susan K. 152 
Squirers, Alyson 190 
Squires, Andrew Mill 163 
Stack, Robert S. 137 
Stacy, Tammy Karen 195, 265 
Staley, Suzanne Kay 162 
Stallard, Kimberly A. 265 
Stallins, Kim A. 189 
Stanford, Cynthia J. 181 
Stanley, Karen Sue 77, 265 
Stanley, Sharon L. 265 
Stanley, Tammy L. 93 
Stano-Bond, Kerian L. 265 
Stansbury, Jennifer 163 
Starnes, Gerald B. 271 



Starns, Mark Gregory 198 

Starr, Jennifer Lynn 156 

Stayton, Karen R. 140 

Stebbins, Pepper 44 

Steel, Anson Jerome 178, 201 

Steele, Julian R. 100, 103 

Steely, Dan C. 164, 178, 210 

Steinemann, Julie M. 271 

Steinger, Earl 265 

Steinmetz, Robert D. 221 

Steinrock, Marsha A 156, 157 

Stengel, Jacqueline 189 

Stenger, Jennifer A. 214 

Stephens, Joanna L 195 

Stephens, Kevin Todd 221 

Stephens, Michael D. 213 

Stephens, Trey 218 

Stepp, Mark Freeman 193 

Stevens, Debbra Kay 148 

Stevens, Stacey J. 161 

Stewart, Amelia D, 271 

Stewart. John K. 208 

Stewart, Liesa R. 199, 271 

Stewart, Timothy L. 265 

Stillwell, Stacy Ann 167 

Stimmel, Leonard E 160 

Stine, Richard T. 198, 265 

Stinson, Kimberly A. 195 

Sripes, J- Patrick 198 

Stivers, Elizabeth G. 265 

Stockford.Joel E. 103 

Stocks, Robert A. II 91 

Stone, Kathleen 137 

Stone, Shannon C. 205 

Stoner, Melody Lynn 38,200 

Storey, Dianne M. 140, 166 

Storms, Robin Rose 152 

Story, Billy Rhea 218 

Storz, Monica L. 83, 140 

Stout, John David 265 

Stover, Glenn M. 58, 160 

Strait, Russell L. 210 

Strange, Beverly E. 77, 265 

Strange, Laura F 161, 164 

Strange, Mary B. 139 

Strange, Michalle V. 91, 139 

Stratton, Donna Rene 181, 265 

Stratton, Henry D. 118 

Stratton, Jennifer M 265 

Stringer, Cindy Lou 143 

Stringer, Jon Mark 143, 160 

Strohmeier, Ruth E. 139, 147 

Strong, Christy Ann 181, 221, 265 

Stuard, Julie Ann 192 

Sturdivant, Tyrone A. 178, 201 

Sturgill, Anthony L. 212 

Sturgill, Mary L. 103 

Sturgis, Paul 105 

Suhr, Steven P. 137, 148 

Supplee, Tanya Kay 265 

Sutherland, Barry W. 77 

Sutkamp, Mike W 152 

Sutton, Dorothy M. 144 

Sutton, Mark T. 154 

Sutton, William M. 152, 155, 160, 265 

Swanger, Janice L. 192 

Swanks, Lorie Lynn 152 

Swatzyna, Robert M. 265 

Sweet, Charles 137 

Sweeney, Terri Lynn 164, 189, 265 

Swiney, Charles E, 148 

Swiney, Michelle 144, 147, 160 

Swinford, Debra L. 164 

Sylore, Stacy 265 



-T- 



Tabb, Lisa Gaye 184, 185 
Taber, Susan Arbuthn 159 
Tackett, Lisa Renee 265 
Tanamachi, Michele A. 190 
Tanara, Charlotte 155 
Tapp, John Martin 221 
Tatum, Joseph Alan 154 
Tatum, Karen Lee 83 
Taul, Jessica A. 147, 160 
Taul, Tanya 265 
Taylor, Carol J. 136, 148 
Taylor, Cynthia 79, 81 
Taylor, Jay Edward 163, 217 
Taylor, Mark Arthur 198 
Taylor, Pamela Sue 80, 81 
Taylor, Paul Joseph 198 
Taylor, Phillip B. 221 
Taylor, Rachel L. 136 
Taylor, Randolph 77 
Taylor, Rodney A. 156, 265 
Taylor, Scott A. 139, 148, 159 
Taylor, Tamara S. 182-183 
Taylor, Todd K. 178, 218 
Tecca, Lisa A. 84 
Teck, Edward John 164, 265 
Tenter, Brian 155 
Teraifi, Ahmad S. 163 
Terrell, Ten 93, 139, 204 
Terry, Chris Scott 214 
Terry, Gregory Keith 214 
Terry, Rhonda L. 156, 157 
Tharp, Molly J. 156, 157, 195 
Tharp, Molly J. 156-157, 195 
Thielmeier, Amelia C. 189 
Thiersch, Timothy B. 148 
Thomas, Elmer Clyde 265 
Thomas, Jacqueline G. 154, 265 
Thomas, Kimberly Ann 189 
Thomas, Pamela Renee 265 
Thomas, Randall J. 198 
Thomas, Sivi E. 81 
Thomas, Stacy Ann 195 
Thompson, Billy C. 147 



Thompson, Cindy Y. 178 
Thompson, Cynthia A. 206 
Thompson, Daniel D 103 
Thompson, David E. 155 
Thompson, Deron Lynn 207 
Thompson, Lisa 166, 190 
Thompson, Martin T 213 
Thompson, Michael 178, 197 
Thompson, Michael 93 
Thompson, Neil R. 147, 164 
Thompson, Tamara D, 152 
Thompson, Traci H, 82, 83 
Thomsen, Cynthia M. 84, 184, 185 
Thornberry, Timothy 178, 214 
Thornbury, Dan W. 265 
Thornbury, Teresa B 190 
Thornton, Dinae L. 136, 144 
Tierney, Alison S. 186 
Timmerman, Daniel J. 213 
Timmons, Debra Lvnn 152 
Tingle, Beth 265 
Tingle, Beth Ann 199 
Tingle, John 70 
Tingle, Tina M. 139 
Tomlinson, Rondal S 143, 163 
Tompkins, Jeana Lynn 184, 185 
Toole, Lisa Ann 181 
Torbet, Alan S. 152 
Trenkamp, Julie M, 163, 166 
Trenkamp, Ronald A. 208 
Trent, Gala Ann 192 
Tresenriter, Paul D 155 
Trimble, Kimberly R. 178, 195 
Trousdale, James T. 152 
Troutt, Terry L, 198 
Trowell, Sharon E. 166 
True, Beverly Jo 159 
Tucker, Christopher 208 
Tucker, Houston A, Jr. 160 
Tudor, Cvnthia L. 147, 183, 184 
Tudor, Verda L. 136 
Turley, Sandra L. 192 
Turner, Harry R. 167 
Turner, Rebecca A 265 
Turner, Scott 221 
Turpin, Darrin T. 152 
Turpin, Mark R. 147, 152, 166 
Tussey, Mark S. 139 



-u- 



Ubelhart, Beth Ann 265 
Underwood, Randal B. 197 
Underwood, Tracey L. 79, 81 



- V- 



Vallez, James A. 160 
Vandenberg, James R. 86 
Vanderpool, Cheryl A. 186 
Vanduer, Michael 265 
Vanhoose, Nikki Lynn 208 
Vanover, Willene F 151 
Vanpelt, Shauna R. 147, 149 
Vanwagenen, Laura K. 178, 190, 212 
Vanwinkle, Carol S. 82, 83 
Vaughn, Melba L. 144, 147 
Vaught, James M. 178, 213 
Vegso, Edward Allan 218 
Vermillion, Roy Lee 160 
Vertone, Maria Rose 83 
Vice, Janna 143 
Vickers, Sandra Ann 208 
Victor, Michelle E. 136 
Villadsen. Deborah 167 
Vineyard, Tracy Jean 195 
Volk. Kimberly G. 136 
Volz, T. Allen 207 
Von Luehrte, Rebecca 186 
Von Mohr, Beth T. 143 
Vrooman, Tammy Lynn 83 



- w- 



Waggoner, Harry F 197 
Wagner, Mike Joseph 214 
Wahl, Dana Lynn 152, 265 
Waits, Daniel Lewis 205 
Waldron, Jean M. 97 
Wales, Carrie Ann 212 
Walker, Crystal Lynn 195, 265 
Walker, Dwavne E. 202 
Walker, Jada Ann 265 
Walker, Janet 153, 200 
Walker, Jeff 70 
Walker, Laurie A. 156, 157 
Walker, Lawrence W. 148 
Walker, William Dr. 146, 147 
Wallace, Margaret J. 190 
Wallace, Matthew 72 
Wallen, Jamie Lynn 265 
Wallen, Robin R. 265 
Waller, Patti Jo 81 
Walls, Charles F Jr. 159 
Walsh, John 105 
Walterham, Tina L. 265 
Walters, Andrew S. 198 
Walters, Christy 184, 185 
Walters, Joni 148 
Walton, Kenneth R. Jr. 198 
Walton, Sonya Lynn 265 
Wampler, Jean C. 184, 185, 214 
Wampler, Lori L. 204 
Wampler, Melissa M. 265 
Ward, Christi R. 160 



Ward, Don Fox 193 

Ward, Kimberly 208 

Ward, Terry 167 

Warden, Kimberly R. 192 

Wardrip, Danny L. 160 

Warford, Caroline Y. 221 

Warlord, Janice C. 266 

Warndorf, Michelle M. 178. 182, 183, 

214, 266 
Warning, Wayne L. 218 
Warnke, Blanche C. 190 
Warren, Dr. Robert 118 
Washington, James L. 266 
Waterman, Marianne K. 193 
Watkins, Neville M, 214 
Watkins, Samuel E. 155 
Watkins, William 136, 137 
Watson, Kathy Ann 167, 266 
Watson, Michael E. 198 
Watson, Pamela Lvnn 265 
Walters, Jodi L. 184, 185 
Wayman, Lisa Claire 214 
Weartz, Melissa Jean 190 
Weathers, Eric P. 266 
Weathers, Joseph M. 203 
Weaver, Robert D. 152 
Weaver, Teresa K. 198 
Webb, James T. 217 
Webb, Marsha Leigh 163 
Webb, Melissa A. 163 
Webb. Rhonda Jean 166 
Webb, Toby Ray 266 
Webb, Tracy Lynn 106 
Weber, Lisa Rose 184, 185 
Webster, Brian David 87 
Webster, Ross P 214 
Webster, Shawnna M. 178, 192 
Webster, William G. 105 
Wehrman, Monica Ann 206 
Weimann, George T 148 
Welch, Frederick P 208 
Welenken, Eric R. 266 
Wells, Carla Andrea 139 
Wells, Ladonna J. 147 
Welsh, Krista Jean 148 
Werner, Gerald Todd 266 
Wessels, Mary E. 148 
West, Laura R. 186 
West, Tanya Ann 186, 266 
Weyhrauch, Anne M 167 
Weyrich, Gregory J. 103 
Whayne, Barbara Lynn 163 
Wheat, Linda A. 156, 157 
Wheatley, Carol E. 151 
Wheeler, Emily Jo 266 
Wheeler, Melissa Lyn 266 
Whilaker. Edward R 139, 147 
Whilaker, Joe 152 
White, Chuck 160 
White, Dana Michelle 140 
White, James A 210 
White, Larry D. 105 
White, Paul Edward J. 266 
White, Tara Lynn 266 
White, Vicky Lvnn 189 
White, William Alan 162 
White, William A. 198 
Whitehead, Thomas M. 163 
Whitehouse, David 266 
Whitehouse, James B. 208 
Whitehouse, Michael 213 
Whitfield, Beth Ann 221, 266 
Whitledge. Mary Glen 163 
Wickersham, Allan D. 266 
Wickersham, Mark K. 148 
Wierman. Bronwyn 182, 183, 208 
Wiese, Davdi Dodd 152 
Wigfall, Tonia Rene 266 
Wigger, Dorothy Jean 140 
Wigger, Jerry Ray 266 
Wightman, Janice L. 156, 157 
Wilder, Elizabeth A. 155 
Wildermuth, Barbara 106 
Wiles, Brian L. 178, 205 
Wiley, Donald Ray 147, 152 
Wiley, Janene K. 144 
Wiley, Jolene F. 144 
Wilfert, Amy Susanne 181 
Wilfert, Sally Ann 181 
Wilkins, Diana Marie 161, 208 
Wilkinson, Bonnie K. 39 
Wilkinson, William S. 202 
Williams. Andre C. 105 
Williams, Bruce A. 208 
Williams, Cynthia D. 266 
Williams, Dawn 186 
Williams, Ella L. 166 
Williams, Glenn Curt 202 
Williams, J. R. 160 
Williams, James 208 
Williams, Jennifer L. 38, 189, 212 
Williams, Lisa A. 200 
Williams, Paige 184, 185 
Williams, Patrick N. 266 
Williams, Rhonda L. 184, 185, 190 
Williams, Susan D. 192 
Williams. Troy Aaron 100, 103 
Williamson, Anita C. 156, 157 
Williamson, Elizabet 140, 266 
Willis, Angela Dawn 214 
Wilson, Angela M. 97 
Wilson, Ann E. 217 
Wilson, Carl Matthew 266 
Wilson, David 218 
Wilson, Donna 160, 207, 266 
Wilson, Gregory Lee 205 
Wilson, Jeanne G, 156, 157 
Wilson, Kenny E. 209 
Wilson, Kevin 266 
Wilson, Kimberly D, 186, 266 
Wilson, Leigh A. 195 
Wilson, Lisa Lynn 266 
Wilson, Dr. Michael 147 



Wilson, Michelle D. 266 

Wilson, Mark Philip 167. 266 

Wilson, Patrick A. 207 

Wilson, Paulette M. 139 

Wilson, Robert 178 

Wilson, Robert Wayne 217 

Wilson, Susan D 189 

Wilson, Tammy Lynn 221 

Wilson, William H. 77 

Wimsatt. Lesa M 151 

Winebrenner, Laura A. 155, 156, 157, 

122 
Winkler, Deborah L. 84 
Wise, Pamela Kay 189 
Wise, Terena F 266 
Wisnicky, Walter L. 208 
Withers, Cynthia Fay 167 
Witten, Mary-Anne 139, 195 
Woefel, Wendy L. 190 
Wofford, Ron Robert 87 
Wolfe, Jennifer Lvnn 266 
Wolfe. M. Renee 143, 152, 161 
Wolfe. Ron 166, 148 
Wolfford, Amy J. 161, 162 
Wolfford, Jennifer L. 152, 161, 167 
Wolflorn, David 153 
Wolfzorn, David E. 152 
Woltenberg, Pamela S. 93, 140 
Woltermann, Robert G. 218 
Wood, Melinda J. 199 
Woodruff, Kelly Rene 182, 183. 208 
Woods, James Thomas 144 
Woods. Patrick Chris 105 
Woods, Ronald Ray 202 
Woodward, Janice Lyn 181, 212 
Woody, Margaret Ann 258 
Woody, Sheila C. 258 
Woosley. Melanie Lyn 167 
Woolen, Susan Renee 152, 258 
Worlev, Anthonv M 258 
Wren,' Reva Joy 266 
Wrenn, Floyd Harlan 146, 147, 258 
Wright, Chetland Roy 178. 202. 258 
Wright, Matthew S. 258 
Wright, Melinda 258 
Wright, Muffet 189 
Wright, Robert S. 221 
Wright, Steve B. 148 
Wright, William V 258 
Wuilleumeir, Ellisa 143 
Wuilleumier, Leslie 189 
Wyatt, Greg S. 258 
Wynn, Kelly 89 
Wyrick, Kelly Sue 258 



- Y- 



Yannuzzi, Patricia A 93 
Yarberrv. John R. 148 
Yates, Deleith, M. 258 
Yates, Kellie Jean 266 
Yates, Pat 212 
Yatteau, Eric S. 214 
Yazell, Darla F 156, 157 
Yeary, Julie Marie 159 
Yeary, Timothy L. 160 
Yocum, Cheryl L. 143 
York, Alice 140 
York, Karen 208, 258 
York, Mitsue Alice 266 
York, Mona Quinn 258 
York, Quentin M. 266 
York, Rhonda R. 136, 137 
Young, Donna Ramona 167 
Young, Frank S. 258 
Young, Gma L. 161 
Young, Hubert Wayne 258 
Young, Jonathan 159 
Young, Jonathan 151 
Young, Kimberlv 212, 266 
Young, Robin E. 83 
Young, Ronald Wayne 214 
Young, Russell Glenn 178, 212 
Young, Stephen 152 



-z- 



Ziegler, Diane M. 184, 185 
Ziehnski, Robert S. 139, 156 
Zimmerman, Susan K. 83 
Zins. Karen M. 189, 212 
Zirkelbach, Christin 161 
Zirkelbach, Karen L. 161 
Zirnheld, Elizabeth 136 
Zydel, George John 105, 197 



Index 277 



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278 Closing 




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THE YEAR HAS DRAWN TO 
A CLOSE. As we reflect back to 
the goals we set at the beginning 
of the school year, we evaluate 
each one for its point of return. 
Our experiences at the Universi- 
ty helped us to mature by allow- 
ing us to help preserve Universi 



ty traditions and set our own tra- 
ditions. As we graphed each point, 
we developed our investment and 
return pattern. While some of our 
points were peaks and others 
were not, we achieved the highest 

"° ssme Return on 
our Investments 



Closing 279 



When I started college four 
years ago, one of the goals I set 
for myself was to become editor 
of Eastern's yearbook. Now, with 
my job completed, I sit at my 
desk with mixed emotions — re- 
lieved, excited and saddened. 

I'm relieved I don't have any 
more interviews to rush to, pages 
to layout and check, and stories 
to write. All the pressure and re- 
sponsibilities have vanished. 

Excited doesn't begin to ex- 
plain how I feel about this book. 
When I decided to become editor, 
I wanted a unique Milestone, a 
book like no other seen by the 
University before. I believe we 
have captured the trends and 
moods of an up-to-date year- 
book. 

Most of all, I feel saddened. It's 
time to leave a valuable part of 
me behind. As I sit here, I think 
about how scared I was when I 
wrote my first story, all the trips 
to Delmar Publishing Company 
and to the conventions in St. 
Louis, Louisville and Dallas, and, 
most importantly, all the friends 
I've made along the way. It's go- 
ing to be difficult to leave it all 
behind. 

To Larry Bailey, Bill Stoess, 
Becky Alexander and Greg Wha- 
len, thank you for the tremen- 
dous amount of support and en- 
couragement you've given me. 
I'll never forget any of you or 



all the good times we shared to- 
gether. 

I also want to thank all the 
contributing writers: Shelia, 
Dan, Sherry, Scott, Robert, There- 
sa, Debbie, Tiffany, Laura and 
Becky. Your writing abilities pro- 
vided us with a strong copy 
book. A special thank-you goes 
to Dr. Libby Fraas. 

Also, I want to thank our con- 
tributing artist, Jeff Coatney. 
Thanks also to Marlene Daught- 
ery Debbie Swinford, Debbie 
Cole and Jeff Koonce. 

To the staff and photogra- 
phers, thank you for all your 
dedication and hard work. Paul, I 
don't know what I would have 
done without your endless hours 
of work and harassment. 

Laura, I don't know where to 
begin. You've been a great friend 
and you've kept my sanity. Your 
journalistic skills are an impor- 
tant part of this book. 

To my managing editor, Robert 
Hughes, I couldn't have made it 
without you. Thanks so much 
for everything you've done, and 
don't forget the trips to Dallas 
and Charlotte. 



I would also like to thank my 
sisters of Kappa Alpha Theta; my 
parents, Tommy and Thelma; 
and my high school yearbook ad- 
visor, Glenda Thompson, for all 
their encouragement. It's greatly 
appreciated. 



I hope you enjoy the 1986 
Milestone as much as I enjoyed 
putting it together! God bless 
you all. 

Diana Smith 
Editor 



Specifications 

Volume 63 of the Eastern Kentucky Univer- 
isty Milestone was printed by Delmar Publish- 
ing Company Charlotte, North Carolina. All 
printing was done using offset lithography. 
The 280-page book had a press run of 6000. 

The cover is white Holliston Roxide Degrade 
book cover. The design was printed with PMS 
195 Maroon and PMS 430 Gray. The endsheets 
are dusk Gray Simpson Sundance. A number of 
headline types are used within the text; how- 
ever, the body text is Palantino 12/14 and cut- 
lines are 8/9. 

Senior and underclass portraits were photo- 
graphed by Yearbook Associates, Miller Falls, 
Massachusettes. Activity photographs were 
taken by University students and employees. 



280 Editor's Notes