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Full text of "Milligan College New Horizon, 1909-1914"

Milligan College Library 
LB2342.86.M5 1909-1914 MA 

Mjlligan College catalog / 




1881 0001 3279 1 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/milligancollegen1913mill 



I 



Vol. I NEW HORIZON No. VI 

Olatalngup 5f«mbpr lflfl3-19in 



A BOimA Senidrb ta OUtaracter itniOKng 3VUrat of All 



ENTERED in POST OFFICE at JOHNSON C(TY, TENN.. aj 2nd CLASS 
MATTER. ACCORDING to ACT of CONGRESS, APPROVED JULY 1 6. 1 894 



P.H. was: '^^ 

MllUGAN COLLEGE, TM 37682 



p. C. MOSE PRINTING CO. 
JOHNSON CITY. TENNESSEE 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

OF TENNESSEE 



INCORPORATED 1882 
RE-INCORPORATED 1908 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 



CATALOGUE 1909-1910 



MILLIGAN. TENNESSEE 
MDCDIX 



^,A'/-/,,f^<^'' 






MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



FOREWC^'^ 

Every institution must be in the last analysis, the 
embodiment of an Idea. Colleges, like men, possess, 
and must possess, many traits in common; but, like 
men too, each exhibits an individuality of its own. 
The distinctive idea back of Milligan College is that of 
CHARACTER BUILDING, FIRST OF ALL. The 
peculiar environment of the College, its seclusion, the 
religious and moral atmosphere which surrounds it, 
and the dominant aims of its Faculty and those who 
have it in charge, to say nothing of the cherished leg- 
acy of the past, all conspire to further the realization 
of the ideal it has in view. He who wrote " A good 
name is rather to be chosen than great riches, " em- 
bodied to the fullest the educational ideal of Milligan. 



101841 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



CALENDAR 



1909 

September 1 Classification and Registration Tuesday 3:15 
- ------ A. M. 

September 9 Regialar recitations begin Thursday 8:15 A. M. 
November 25 Thanksgiving Recess - - - Thursday 
December 2S Christmas Holidays beg'in - - Thursday 

1910 

January 3 Christmas Holidays end - - - Monday 
January 8 First Term ends - _ - _ Saturday 
January 1 1 Second Term begins - - - - Tuesday 
February 22 Washington's Birthday Celebration - Tuesday 
May 10 Final Examinations begin _ - - Tuesday 
May 12 Final Examinations close - - - Thursday 

Literary Societies' Program - Monday 7:30 P. M. 
May 13 Junior Class Program - - Friday 7:30 P. M. 
May 14 Athletic Meet - - - Saturday 2.-30 P. M. 

Musical and Dramatic. Program - 7:30 P.M. 

May 15 Baccalaureate Sermon - Tuesday 10:30 A. M. 
May 16 Senior Class Day - - - Monday 10:30 A. M. 

Oratorical Contest - - Monday 2:30 P. M. 

Annual Literary Address - Monday 7:30 P. M. 
May 17 Commencement, Senior Program Tuesday 10:30 A. M. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees - - 2:30 P.M. 

Alumni Banquet - - - > 7:30 P. M. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



RESOLUTION 



Passed by the Official Board of the Tennessee 
Christian Missionary Society, February, 1908: 

Whereas the greatest need of our missionary 
work in Tennessee is an adequate supply of ministers; 
and, whereas, we are compelled in a large measure to 
depend upon our schools and colleges to supply them; 
and, whereas, Milligan College, an institution of our 
State, has in the past done valuable service for the 
Church and is free of debt; and whereas this college, 
through its Board of Trustees, desires to co-operate 
more fully with our work, especially in educating min- 
isters; and whereas it is understood that the Tennes- 
see Christian Missionary Convention is not to assume 
as such, any debt or financial obligation of said college, 
now existing or hereafter contracted. Therefore, 

Be it resolved, That the Board of Directors of 
the Tennessee Christian Missionary Convention en- 
dorse the work of Milligan College and commend it to 
the Brotherhood of Tennessee as worthy of assistance 
and patronage. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MILLIGAN COLLEGE 



TERM EXPIRES 1909 

J. F. Robertson, Crockett Mills, Tenn. 
Judge A. B. Lamb, Paris, Tenn. 
Geo. W. Hardin, Johnson City, Tenn. 
L. G. Shelburne, Dot, Va. 
J. F. Witt, Zion Mills, Va. 
J. I. Bitner, Hagerstown, Md. 
N. H, Hyder, Elizabethton, Tenn. 
S. W. Price, Johnson City, Tenn. 

A. A. Ferguson, Kinston, N. G. 
J. Hopwood, Lynchburg, Va. 

Geo. T. Williams, Johnson City, Tenn. 

TERM EXPIRES 1910 

M. H. Meeks, Nashville, Tenn. 

J. Cheek, Nashville, Tenn. 

E. K. Leake, Collierville, Tenn. 

W. J. Matthews, Johnson City, Tenn. 

B. A. Abbott, Baltimore, Md. 
I. A. Hill, Harriman, Tenn. 
L. M. Scott, Jellico, Tenn. 

T. A. Wright, Rockv/ood, Tenn. 
H. A. Blake, Roanoke, Va. 
W. G. Payne, Milligan, Tenn. 
I, M. Boswell, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

TERM EXPIRES 1911. 

G. N. Tillman, Nashville, Tenn. 

B. J. Farrar, Nashville, Tenn, 
A. I. Myhr, Belleview, Tenn. 

C. C. Taylor, Milligan, Tenn. 

J. G. Hamlett, Crockett Mills, Tenn. 
A. W. Boyd, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
C. E. Snodgrass, Crossville, Tenn. 
J. W. Williams, Elizabethton, Tenn. 
G. W. Jones, Piney Flats, Tenn. 
J. E. Crouch, Johnson City, Tenn. 
J. F. Tarvirater, Rockwood, Tenn. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

C. C. Taylor, President 
S. W. Price, Secretary 
G. W. Hardin, Treasurer 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



PURPOSES AND AIMS 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE stands for a definite and 
fixed idea of education. The central core of that 
idea is that character development is the FIRST 
THING to be considered, and that intellectual train- 
ing, while vastly important, is always subsidiary to it. 

Those who have charge of the school believe in 
the Christian Religion. They believe, therefore, in 
the immortality of the soul. If it be true that the 
soul is immortal, then the first question which every 
teacher should ask is, how can I so train the plastic 
mind placed in my charge that it shall develop into 
something worth lasting forever ? Most modern 
systems of education think only of time; they leave 
the question of eternity, the question of the soul, as 
though it were unworthy of attention. At Milligan, 
the one purpose of the school is to build strong, clean, 
noble manhood and womanhood. We do not neglect 
intellectual development, as our curriculum will indi- 
cate, but we stand, first of all, for the building of 
character. All the intellectual culture in the world 
will not atone for vicious habits and a tarnished soul. 
How many parents have sent their children to school, 
desiring that they should receive a " liberal educa- 
tion, " and have gotten them back, intemperate in 
body and in mind, and ruined morally, both for time 
and for eternity ! Whatever Milligan does, and has 
done in the past, it makes, and has made, clean men 
and women. The success of our graduates is the 
best possible practical demonstration of the MILLI- 
GAN IDEA. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



FACULTY 



FREDERICK D. KERSHNER, M. A., (Prince- 
ton) President and Professor of Philosophy and Bib- 
lical History and Exegesis, 

Kentucky University, 1899; Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1900; Graduate study in Italy and England, 
1903; Staff lecturer for the American Society for the 
Extension of University Teaching, 1902-6; Dean of 
Kee-Mar College, 1902-5; Dean of the Bible De- 
partment of the American University, 1906-8; Presi- 
dent of Milligan College, 1908. 

* Dean of Women. 

ELM A E. R. ELLIS, M. A., (University of Ten- 
nessee) Professor of Ancient Languages. 

B. A., 1895; M. A., 1899; Prof, of Ancient Lan- 
guages, Milligan College, 1900-3; Prof, of Greek and 
German, Virginia Christian College, 1903-5; Prof, of 
Greek and History, Bethany College, 1905-8; Prof. 
of Ancient Languages, Milligan College, 1908. 

PEARL KATHERYN ARCHER, A. B., (Uni- 
versity of Michigan) Professor of English. 

Albion College, 1903; A. B. University of Michi- 
gan, 1904; Professor of Latin, Milligan College, 
1904-6; Graduate Study, University of Michigan, 
1907-8; Prof, of English, Milligan College, 1908-9. 

ERNEST P. LANE, A. B., (University of Ten- 
see) Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B. University of Tennessee, 1909. Graduate 
study in Mathematics, 1908-9. 

EDGAR C. LACY, A. B., (Milligan College) 
Professor of History and Science. 

Milligan College, 1907. Professor of History 
and Science, Milligan College, 1907-9. 

*To be supplied. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



FACULTY— Continued 



MARGELENA HOUSTON, A. B., Director of 
Music. 

Graduate of Kee-Mar Conservatory of Music, 
Hagerstown, Md., Student under Myer of New York, 
and of the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Balti- 
more. Instructor in Kee-Mar Conservatory, 1901-4. 
Director of Music, Milligan College, 1908-9. 

MARY BELLE BARLOW, A. B., Assistant in 
Music, and Teacher of Expression. 

Kee-Mar College, A. B,. 1905. Graduate of the 
Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, 1908. Grad- 
uate study in New England Conservatory of Music. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

J. ROBERT GARRETT, Ph. B., (Milligan Col- 
lege) Principal and Professor of Mathematics and 
Science. 

Milligan College, 1904. Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Milligan College, 1904-9. 

J. W. STEPHENS, A. B., (Milligan College) 
Assistant in Languages. 

SHELBURNE I^ERGUSON, A. B., (Milligan 
College) Assistant in English. 

F. H. KNIGHT, Secretary of Faculty. 



^^^^ 



10 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

LECTURES 

Given in the College Chapel during the Scholastic year 1908-9 

John T. Brown, " Christian Education Throughout the 

World," Sept. 22, 1908. 
JohnT. Brown, "Japan," Sept, 26, 1908. 
John T. Brown, " China, " Oct. 3, 1908. 
John T. Brown, " India, " Oct. 13, 1908. 
JohnT. Brown, "Palestine, " Oct. 17, 1908. 
John T. Brown, " Optimism and Pessimism, " Oct 23, 

1908. 
John T. Brown, "Australia" Oct. 24, 1908. 
A. A. Ferguson, " Dreams, " Oct. 20, 1908. 
A, A. Ferguson, " Manuscript of the Bible," Oct. 21, 

1908. 
A.A.Ferguson, "Church History." Oct. 22, 1908. 

A. A. Ferguson " The Reception of Jesus, " Oct. 23, 

1908. 

B. A. Abbott, " The Ministry as a Life Calling " Nov. 

10, 1908. 

B. A.Abbott, " Practical Utility of the Minister," 
Nov. 11, 1908. 

B. A. Abbott, " Justification for Continued Effort in 
Education, " Nov. 12, 1908. 

B. A. Abbott, "The Need for Trained Men," Nov. 
13, 1908. 

B. A.Abbott, "Personal Reminiscences of Milligan, " 
Nov. 14, 1908. 

W.J. Wright "Conservation of Resources," Dec. 10, 
1908. 

H. A. Blake, "Spiritual Development of The Apostle 
Paul, " Dec. 15, 1908. 

H. A. Blake, "Friendship, " Dec. 16, 1908. 

H. A. Blake, " Personal Reminiscences of a Minis- 
ter, " Dec. 17, 1908. 

H. A. Blake, "The Call of the Wild." Dec. 18, 1908. 

J. T. McKissick " Hidden Forces of Character Build- 
ing, " Jan. 12, 1909. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 11 



LECTURES— Continued 



J. T. McKissick, " Martin Luther, " Jan. 13, 1909. 

J. T. McKissick, "John Calvin," Jan. 14, 1909. 

J. T. McKissick, "John Wesley, " Jan. 15, 1909. 

W. P. Crouch, " The Value of a Man' " Jan. 19, 1909. 

W. P. Crouch, " The Secret of Christianity's Power, " 
Jan. 20, 1909. 

W. P. Crouch, "The Problem of Problems, " Jan. 21, 
1909. 

W. P. Crouch, " Living by Losing, " Jan. 22, 1909. 

W. P. Crouch, " Life's Purpose, Plan and Prize, " Jan. 
23, 1909. 

F. D. Power, " The Logic of the Disciples' Plea," Feb. 
2, 1909. 

F. D. Power, " The Spirit of the Restoration Move- 
ment, " Feb. 3, 1909. 

F. D. Power, "James A. Garfield, " Feb. 4, 1909. 

F. D. Power, "Jeremiah S. Black," Feb. 5, 1909. 

F. D. Power, " Story of a Thirty-Three Years' Pas- 
torate, " Feb. 6, 1909. 

H.J. Derthick, ''The Mountaineer," Feb. 17, 1909. 

C. C. Collins, " The Influence of the Ideal Upon 
Thought," Feb. 23, 1909. 

L. D. Riddell, " The Divine Prerogative of Choice, " 
March 2, 1909. 

L. D. Riddell, "Counting the Cost," March 3, 1909. 

L. D. Riddell, " Sympathy, " March 4, 1909. 

A. A. Taylor, " The Passing of the Sword, " March 9, 
1909. 

R. E. Moss, "David and Jonathan, "March 16, 1909. 

R. E. Moss, " The Rose of Sharon, " March 17, 1909. 

R. E. Moss, " The Playground of the Boy Jesus, " 
March 18, 1909. 

R. E. Moss, "Life Through Death," March 19, 1909. 

Philip F. King, "The Beatitudes, " April 6, 1909. 

Philip F. King, " The Mustard Seed, " April 7, 1909. 

Philip F. King, "The Lord's Prayer, " April 8, 1909. 



12 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



LECTURES— Continued 



Philip F. King, " How to Be an Angel, " April 8, 

1909. 
W. S. Buchanan, "The Book, " April 13, 1909. 
W. S. Buchanan " Wanted, a Man, " April 14, 1909. 
W. S. Buchanan, '"Evangelism," April 15, 1909. 
Count A. M. Lochwitzky, " Recent Experiences of a 

Russian Nobleman in Exile," April 22, 1909. 
Dr. J. P. McConnell, "The Two Poverties, " May 10, 

1909. 
Peter Ainslie, "Tolstoi," May 18, 1909. 
Peter Ainslie, " Headquarters of American Catholi- 
cism, " May 19, 1909. 
Peter Ainslie, " The Second Coming of Christ, " May 

20, 1909. 
Peter Ainslie, " My Experiences in Europe, " May 

20, 1909. 
Peter Ainslie, " Men in the Ministry, " May 21, 1909. 
A. McLean, " Missions and the Bible, " May 20, 1909. 
A. McLean, " Thomas and Alexander Campbell, " 

May 21, 1909. 
A McLean, "Christ, the Savior," May 21, 1909. 

The Lecture Courses for the coming year had 
not been fully arranged at the time the Catalogue 
went to press. They will be equally as interesting 
and helpful as they have oroven during the past year. 
Among the lecturers who have already been secured 
are the following: 

Dr. Chas. Hastings Dodd 

Dr. Frederick D, Power 

Dr. J. H. Garrison 

Peter Ainslie 

Hon. T. Asbury Wright 

Herbert Moninger 

Howard T. Cree 

W. H. Sheffer 

Philip Y. Pendleton 

J. E. Stuart 

Wm. J. Shelburne 

B. A. Abbott 

W. P. Crouch 

R. E. Moss 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 13 



LECTURES— Continued 



President Kershner will give two courses of 
University Extension Lectures prepared under the 
auspices of The American Society for the Extension 
of University Teaching. The Courses are as follow&e 

I. The Dramas of Shakspere 

Richard III 
Romeo and Juliet 
Twelfth Night 
Othello 
King Lear 
The Tempest 

II. Masters of Modern Art. (Illustrated). 
Leonardo da Vinci, The Wizard of Art. 
Botticelli and the Gospel of the Ideal. 
Michael Angelo, The Prophet of the Sublime. 
Raphael, the Shakspere of Art. 

Andrea del Sarto, The Tragedy of a Soul. 

Titian and The Story of Venice. 

These lectures will be illustrated by lantern 
slides secured by Mr. Kershner while studying in 
Italy and on the continent. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



MiLLiGAN College was chartered in 1882, being 
the successor to Buffalo Institute, which had been a 
power for good in the community and surrounding 
country since the time of the Civil war. The good 
accomplished by the old institution was greater than 
can be estimated now, but with the chartering, came 
a new era of larger and better things for the school. 
There was the development of the college life and 
work and spirit; a new building gave increased capa- 
city for the larger number of students who flocked to 
the institution; the force of teachers was strength- 
ened to meet the growing needs, and great interest 
was taken in the development of the new college. 



14 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



From the beginning, tiiere was an earnest desire 
to maice the college an instrument for the accom- 
plishment of good. The moral standard was raised 
very high, and every question, religious, political, social 
and individual, was tested by this high standard The 
Ghapel exercises were made a forum for the discus- 
sion of the great questions of life, and the ideal of 
clean and manly or womanly character was constantly 
held up before the students. The wholesome influ- 
ence of this policy resulted in a class of graduates 
who stand firmly in opposition to every wrong and 
hurtful thing, who are zealous for every genuine re- 
form, and ever ready to lend assistance to any good 
cause. Thus, while the school has not been behind 
as to literary training, its great success has been in 
character building. It has developed sterling quali- 
ties in its men and women, and no institution can 
claim a larger percentage of successful graduates. 

The college has had but three presidents during 
its history: J. Hopwood, from 1882 to 1905; H. R. 
Garrett, from 1903 to 1908, and F, D. Kershner. who 
was elected to the position in February, 1908. Both 
the founder, President Hopwood, and his successor, 
President Garrett, have left an undying impression 
for good upon those placed under their charge, and 
bequeathed an invaluable legacy of good men and 
lofty spirit to the college, the success of which has 
been largely due to their self-sacrificing energy and 
devotion. 

The first class went out from Milligan in the 
spring of 1882, and the graduates now number one 
hundred and ninety-six. Of these, the greater part 
are teachers and preachers; some have entered the 
professions of law and medicine, and some are to be 
found in other callings. Nearly all of them are suc- 
ceeding in their chosen fields of work. Besides the 
Sr,,duates of the institution, there are hundreds of 
students who did not stay in school long enough to 
complete the course, but who nevertheless received 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 15 



their training for their life's worlf here. They are 
scattered throughout this section of the country, and 
form a body of honest, industrious, pure-minded and 
safe citizens. 

These twenty-seven years of college work have 
made great and lasting impression on the life of our 
country. The college points to its record with a feel- 
ing of just pride, sees in it the certain promise of 
great possibilities for the future, and asks but the 
patronage and support to which the principles for 
which it stands and the history of what it has accom- 
plished entitle it to make a proportionately brighter 
record in the years to come. 



MEMBERS OF THE ALUMNI 

Their Addresses and Occupations 

Class of 1882. 

James A. Tate, A. M., teacher and lecturer, Shelbyville, Tenn. 
Aaron A, Ferguson, A. M., preacher . . Kinston, N. C. 
J. A. Rutrough, A. M., Principal of Normal School Willis, Va. 
C. B. Armentrout, A. M., teacher, . Washington College, Tenn. 
James H, Smith, A. M,, insurance . Johnson City, Tenn. 
George V/. Hardin, B. L., railroad official Johnson City, Tenn. 
±Lula Hendrix, (Crockett) B. L., teacher . . Milligan, Tenn, 
George E. Borea, B, L., lawyer , , Bristol, Tenn, 

iLucy C. Matthews, (Hardin) B. S., , Johnson City. Tenn. 
Charles F. Carson, B. S., farmer . , Leesburg, Tenn. 
Class of 1883. 

rhWilliam J. Sheiburne, A. B., . . Christiansburg, Va. 
Sa nuel B. Carson, A. B,, lawyer . . Greeneville. Tenn. 

W. H. Henry, B. S., Sherman, Texas 

Class of 1885. 
iFrank F. Bullard, A, M., preacher , Lynchburg, Va. 

Edmund A, Miller, A. M., lawyer . Los Angeles, Cal. 

Preston B. Hall, A, M., Professor V, C. C. . Lynchburg, Va. 
Charles Madox, A. B,, preacher and farmer . Crocketts, Va. 
Walter M, Straley, A, B., Piedmont Business College 

Lynchburg. Va. 
±Mary Elizabeth Epps (Hardin) B. S,, , Jonesboro, Tenn, 
Robert H. Walker, B, S.. . . Pandora, Tenn. 

William E. Reed, B. S., farmer, . . Pocahontas, Va. 

drDeceased. 



16 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



Calss of 1887. 

Laetitia L. C. Tate, (Cornforth) A.M., teacher Shelbyville,Tenn. 
Edward C. Wilson, A. B., preacher . Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Eugene M. Crouch, A. M., President of College 

North Manchester, Indiana 
James W. Giles, A. B., Principal of Business College 

Lynchburg, Virginia 

Class of 1888. 

William B. Kegley, A. B., lawyer , . Wytheville, Virginia 
Susan A. Kegley, (Gibson) B. S. , . Wytheville, Virginia 

A. Irvin Miller, A. M, Eustis, Florida 

Francis E. Caldwell, (Baber) B. S. . Charleston, W. Va. 

Class of 1889. 

Henry R. Garrett, A. M., teacher . . . Bangs, Texas 
Annie M. Finley, (Preston) B. S. . . Red Ash, Kentucky 
Chas. G. Price, B. S., Penman and Teacher in 

Packard's Business College . New York City 
Frank D. Love, B. S., Representative, State 

Legislature . . Georgetown, Texas 

Class of 1890. 

John P. McConnell, A. M., Ph. D. Emory and 

Henry College . . Emory, Virginia 

Thomas J. Cox, A. B., business . Johnson City, Tenn. 

Samuel G. Sutton, A. B., preacher . Ellerson, Virginia 

Mamie Haun, (LaRue) B. S. . , Bessemer, Alabama 

William H. Haun, B. S., railroad engineer . Bessemer, Ala. 
Charles Cornforth, A. M., newspaper reporter Savannah, Ga. 
William P. Cousins, B. S., real estate agent . Norfolk, Va. 
Mrs. Sarah C. Straley, (Thomas) B.S., teacher Lynchburg, Va. 

Class of 1891. 

John V. Thomas, A. M. . . . Sherman, Texas 

Mary Hendrickson, B. S. . , Lexington, Kentucky 

Elizabeth E. Cox, (Matthews) B. S. . Johnson City, Tenn. 
D. Sinclair Burleson, A. M., teacher State Normal 

School . . . Florence, Alabama 

Chester D. M. Showalter, A. M. . . Roanoke, Virginia 

W. R. Motley, A. B., preacher . Newport News, Va. 

George E. Lyon, Ph. B., preacher . Topeka, Kansas 

Lou Ella Showalter, (English) B. S. . Roanoke, Va. 

Class of 1892. 

James E. Stuart, Ph. B. A., M., preacher . Washington, D. C. 
Walter L. Dudley, A. M., Principal of Academy Orando, Va. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 17 



Mary E. Burleson, (Dew) B, S. . Florence, Alabama 

David Lyon, B, S., preacher . , Topeka, Kansas 

S, T. Willis, LL. D., preacher . . . New York City 

Cordelia P. Henderson, A. B., teacher Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. Frank Serg'ent, B. S., lawyer , Gate City, Virginia 

Clara McConnell, (Lucas) Ph. B. . Emory, Virginia 

Class of 1893. 

Andrew Jackson Wolf, Ph. B. . . Kahoka, Missouri 

Robert W. Lilley, B. S., preacher , . Oklahoma 

Agatha Lilley, (Miller) B. S. . . Oklahoma 

Etta Reynolds, (Brown) B. S. . New Philadelphia, Ohio 

Nannie Givens, Ph. B., teacher . Blacksburg, Virginia 

George C. Simmons, B. S., teacher Fayetteville, Tennessee 

Class of 1894. 

John P. Givens, A. B., preacher . Heyworth, Illinois 

Daniel E. Motley, A. M., Ph. D., President Washington 

Christian College . Washington, D. C. 

James C. Coggins, A. M., President Christian 

College . . Black Mountain, N. C, 

William J. Matthews, B. S., M. D. . Johnson City, Tenn. 

Lee R. Dingus, A. B., teacher . . Florence, Alabama 

James J. Cole, B. S., preacher . Barboursville, Ky. 

J. Wesley Showalter.A.B., Prin. High School near Snowville.Va. 
William J. Shelburne, A. B., preacher . Norwood, Ohio 

Class of 1895. 

George R. Cheves, B. S., editor . . Pulaski, Virginia 

If R. J. English, B. S., M. D. . Glade Hill, Virginia 

L. C. Felts, B. S. . . . Bluefield, West Virginia 

If William S. Givens, A. B., teacher and preacher Newport, Va. 
Lula M. Dye, (Hagy) . . . Greendale, Virginia 

Edward E. Hawkins, Ph. B., teacher Burnesville, N. C. 

Thomas B. McCartney, A. M. Ph. D. , Kentucky University 
C. Burnett Reynolds, A. B., preacher New Philadelphia, Ohio 
George H. P. Showalter, A.B., Prin, of Academy Lockney,Tex. 
Pearl Shelburne, Ph. B., teacher . Green Bay, Virginia 

Bertha E. Tomlin, (Thomas) B. S., teacher . Oklahoma 
George P. Rutledge, A. M., preacher . Philadelphia, Penn. 
Byrdine A. Abbott, A. B., preacher Harlem Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
Lizzie Wilburn Thomas, B. S., . . Sherman, Texas 

Ina Yoakley, teacher . . Johnson City, Tennessee 

Class of 1896. 

J. Edwin Crouch, Ph. B., business Johnson City, Tennessee 

H- Deceased. 



18 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



Class of 1897. 

James G. Johnson, A. B,, A. M., University of 

Virginia . . Charlottesville, Virginia 

G. Wiley Johnson, B. L., Univer. of Virginia Charlottesville, Va. 
A. Jackson Bunts, B. S. . . University of Chicago 

Laura R. Clark, B. S., teacher . . Hiawassie, Virginia 

Annie L. Lucas, B. S., teacher . Childress, Virginia 

Isaac A. Briggs, A. B., M. D, . Itoka, Indian Territory 

I, G. W. Buck, B. S., teacher . Weatherford, Oklahoma 

Class of 1898, ^ /., ^ 

Juliet Rowlett Massie, (Showalter) Ph. B., teacher BenrVa. 
Mary Virginia Harmon, (Shelburne) Ph. B., teacher Dot, Va. 
George Sells, B. S., M. D. . Johnson City, Tennessee 

Thomas M. Sells, B. S., business Johnson City, Tennessee 

Edward Rodny Massie, B. S., 4^acher '■; . Ben, Virgfinia 

Ogden Johnson, Ph. B., teacher . Rockdell, Virginia 

Samuel Walter Price, A. M., lawyer Johnson City, Tennessee 
Forrest Summers, B. S., M. D. . War Eagle, W. Virginia 
Elbert L, Anderson, B. S., teacher Johnson City, Tennessee 
Charles D. Hart, B. S., teacher . Milligan, Tennessee 

Class of 1899. 
Charles W. Givens, A. B., student Charlottesville, Virginia 

Annie L. Bolton, Ph. B., stenographer Bluefield, W. Virginia 
Minnie D. Myhr, (Bolton) Ph. B. . Belleview, Tennessee 
Richard Maury Leake, A. B., physician Colliersville, Tennessee 

CLiSS OF 1900. 
James S. Taomas, a. m., Dist. Supt. Schools Lynchburg, Va. 
Monte E. Hyder, b. s., farmer . Elizabethton, Tenn. 

MoUie Hale, b. s., teacher . . Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Landon C. Bell ph. b., a. m., lawyer Bryson City, N. C. 

Ida Anderson, ph. b., teacher . Johnson City, Tenn. 

Gentry Hodges, a. b., Prin. High School McGaheyville, Va. 

Joe B. Sells, b. s., business . . Johnson City, Tenn. 

Amanda Shelburne, ph. b. . . Pageton, W. Virginia 

Fay H. Price, a. s., . . Johnson City, Tennessee 

Geneva Wallace, b. s., teacher , . Gate City, Virginia 

Nannie Sutton, (Bishop) b. s. . . Pikeville, Kentucky 

Robert S. Field, b. s., business . . Romeo, Tennessee 

Wilson R. Bowers, b. s., Prin. of School Rural Retreat, Va. 
George A. Watson, a. b., preacher , Middletown, Va. 

Stephen A. Morton, a. b., preacher Elizabethton, Tennessee 
Daisy Boring, b. s., principal high school Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Larkin E. Crouch, a. b., teacher and preacher Nashville, Tenn. 
Sue Bell, (Brummett) a. b„ a. m., teacher New Castle, Va. 

Laura Burchfield, (Hyder) b. s. . Milligan, Tennessee 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



19 



Class of 1901. 

Samuel F. GoUehon, a. m., Pres. Graham College Graham, Va. 
Gideon 0. Davis, A. B., Prof, of History and Vice-President 

Virginia Christian College Lynchburg, Virginia 

Frank M. Broyles, b. s. . . Knoxville, Tennessee 

William Leslie Leake, a. b., m. d. , Colliersville, Tennessee 

Class of 1902. 

William Thomas Anglin, b. s., lawyer 
Matthew Crockett Hughes, a. b.. preacher 
William Hamilton Jones, a. b., business 
Minor Johnson Ross, a. b., preacher . 
Elizabeth Graham Sayers, b, s., teacher 
Jeremy Pate Whitt, a. b., teacher 

Class of 1903. 



Oklahoma 

Shoals, Indiana 

Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Virginia 

Pine, Virginia 

Radford, Virginia 



Washington Budd Sager, a. b.. Medical College Richmond, Va. 



Nannie Ethel Reynolds, b. s., teacher 
Joseph Thomas Watson, a. b., preacher 
Cordelia May Hopwood, b. s. 
Craig Byrd Givens, ph. b.. 
Myrtle Jeanette McPherson, ph. b. 
Carrie Louise Hopwood, ph. b. 
Annie Burner Watson, ph. b. 
Edward Everett Price, b. s., 
Jesse Brown Givens, ph. b. 
Gilbert Henry Easley, b. s., teacher 
Oscar Monroe Fair, a. b., lawyer 
William Henry Book, a. m., preacher 

Class of 1904. 



Simmonsville, Va. 

Simmonsville, Va. 

Springfield, Missouri 

University of Virginia 

Simmonsville, Va. 

Springfield, Missouri 

Simmonsville, Va. 

Johnson City, Tenn. 

Newport, Virginia 

Bristol, Tenn. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Columbus, Indiana 



Arthur C. Maupin, b. s., preacher 
Elgin K. Leake, b. s„ business 
J, Robert Garrett, b. s., teacher 
William R. Harrell, pm. b., teacher 
Robert L. Peoples, ph. b., preacher 
James I. Scott, b, s., business 



Oklahoma 

Colliersville, Tenn. 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Providence, Rhode Island 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Bristol, Tenn. 



Class op 1905. 
Elizabeth Wilson, (Kelley) b. s., teacher Seven Mile Ford, Va. 
Nannie Lee Price, (Ratcliff) b. 6. Johnson City, Tennessee 

Lula Leatitia Lacy, (Wilson) b. s., teacher Milligan, Tennessee 
Georgia Marion White, a. b., teacher Milligan, Tennessee 

Lola Eleanor Roberts, (Wilson) b. s., teacher Knoxville, Tenn. 
W. H, Garfield Price, b. s., teacher 
|-|- Laura Alice Baker, (Wilson) b. s, 
Lucy Louise Hatcher, a. b., teacher 

If Deceased. 



Johnson City, Tennessee 

California 

Johnson City, Tennessee 



20 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



Aylette Rains Van Hook, a. b. 
W. P. Crouch, A. M., preacher 



Johnson City, Tennessee 
. Athens, Alabama 



Class of 1906. 



Samuel D. Kesner, a. b., teacher 
Mary L. Hanen, b. s., teacher 
Frank A. Taylor, b. s„ farmer . 
If Lucy J. Hart, b. s., teacher 
Robert D. Hyder. a. b„ teacher . 
M. Nola Fields, ph, b., teacher 
Owen F. Kilburne, ph. b., business 
Roscoe Hodges, b. s., teacher 



Abingdon Virginia 

Bangs, Texas 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Millif an, Tennessee 

Elizabethton, Tennessee 

Baileyton, Tennessee 

Pennington Gap, Virginia 

Jonesboro, Tennessee 



Class of 1907. 



R. Bannick, b. s., teacher 

James M. Price, b. s. 

Edgar- C. Lacy, a. b., teacher 

John L. Kuho, ph. b. 

N. Petibone Hyder, b. s., teacher 



Elizabethton, Tennessee 

Jonhson City, Tennessee 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Wardsboro, Texas 

Elizabethton, Tennessee 



Class of 1908. 

Stella Lee Burleson, (Sutton) a. b. 
Mary Frances Price, b. s. 
Maggie Matilda Wright, a. b., teacher 
William Lee Cook, b. s. 

Class of 1909. 

Shelbume Ferguson, a. b., teacher 

J. W. Stephens, a. b., teacher 

Rennie Bolton White, a. b. 

Persie I. Owen, ph. b. 

Mary Evelyn Sevier, ph. b. 

George M. Bowman, ph. b. . 

George Robert Lowder, ph. b. 

Anna Kelly, ph. b. 

Nell V. Snodgras3, ph. b. 

W. I, Williams, ph. b. 

Jennie Hatcher, ph. b. 



Largo, Florida 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Jellico, Tennessee 



Kinston, N. C. 

Bristol, Virginia 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Burnside, Kentucky 

. Harriman, Tennessee 

Milligan, Tennessee 

Bluefield, West Virginia 

Unaka, Virginia 

. Crossville, Tennessee 

Johnson City, Tennessee 

Johnson City, Tennessee 



MILLIQAN COLLEGE GATALOQUE 


21 


REGISTER OF STUDENTS. 


PREPARATORY. 




Anderson, Frankie .... 


Tennessee 


Anderson, Lela .... 


Tennessee 


Bailey, Frank ..... 


Tennessee 


Bailey, Wilmetta .... 


Tennessee 


Barry, Francis .... 


Tennessee 


Bowers, Donnelly .... 


Tennessee 


Gates, James R. .... 


Tennessee 


Crowell, H. C. . 


Virginia 


Douglas, Frank .... 


Tennessee 


Dougflas, Fullerton . . 


Tennessee 


Ellis. Bertha ..... 


Tennessee 


Ellis, Edmond .... 


Tennessee 


Ellis, John W. .... 


Tennessee 


Ellis, Pearl 


Tennessee 


Evans, Lloyd ..... 


Tennessee 


Fair, Willie Frank 


Tennessee 


Garrett, Hobart .... 


Tennessee 


Garrett, Lucille ..... 


Tennessee 


Gentry, Maggie .... 


North Carolina 


Gentry, Martin ..... 


Tennessee 


Gilliam, Macie .... 


Tennessee 


Gouge, Arthur ..... 


Tennessee 


Gouge, Jeter .... 


North Carolina 


Gouge, Sherman .... 


Tennessee 


Grandstaff, Minnie 


Tennessee 


Greer, Ashley .... 


Tennessee 


Gwynn, Lucy .... 


North Carolina 


Hendrix, Ernest .... 


Tennessee 


Hendrix, Lawrence .... 


Tennessee 


Johnson, Ernest 


North Carolina ' 


McCurry, Edgar .... 


North Carolina 


Milam, R. A. 


Tennessee 


Miller, Rosa .... 


North Carolina 


Minton, Josie .... 


Tennessee 


Nave, John ..... 


Tennessee 


Nolan, Edward .... 


Tennessee 


Nolan, John W. .... 


Tennessee 


Payne, Robert B. . 


Tennessee 


Pearce, Bruce .... 


Tennessee 


Peoples, Georgie 


Tennessee 


Rowe, Lula ..... 


Tennessee 


Russell. W. P. . . ... 


. West Virginia 



22 



MILLIQAN COLLEGE GATALOaUS 



Shepherd, Carl 
Shepherd, R. L. 
Shepherd, Pearl 
Shoun, Charles 
Shoun, Lizzie 
Simerly, Celia 
Simerly, David 
Simmons, Jeanette 
Slemp, David 
Sw^anner, Samuel W. 
Taylor, Alfred 
Taylor, Lena 
Taylor, Mary 
Taylor, Robert 
Usary, Joe Ernest 
Wallace, Dora May 
Wallace, Gw^endolin Z. 
White, Myhr 
Whitehead, Thomas 
Williams, Robert 
Williams, Roberta 
Wilson, Edward 
Witt, Clyde 
Witt, Hazen 
Woodby, Charles 



Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
North Carolina 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Virginia 
Virgrinia 
Tennessee 



COLLEGE. 



Adams, C. R. 
Alexander, Samuel 
Allamong, Ira 
Anderson, J. C. 
Anderson, Jennie 
Anderson, Nell 
Boren, Robert 
Bov*rman, George M. 
Bov/man, Talmage R. 
Buck, E. C, Jr. 
Buck, Eugene 
Buck, James M. 
Buck, Marcella F. 
Burchfield, Delia 
Burleson, Arthur 
Campbell, Edith 
Carter, B. B. 
Cecil, Caldona 
Chapman, D. Park 



Virginia 
Tennessee 
West Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
West Virginia 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



25 



Clark, Joseph 
Coffee, B. L. 
Cox, Cyrus 
Cox, Samuel 
Dobyns, Flem 
Donahue, R. P. 
Duggar, T. P. 
Dye, Carrie 
Easterly, Elmer 
Ferguson, Shelburne 
Fields, Bessie Pearl 
Fields, Elsie May . 
Fink. R. E. . 
Garland, Daisy , 
Garrett, L. E. 
Gaunt, Alfred C. 
Gentry, E. Roy 
Gentry, G. W. 
Greer, W, Conley 
Hancock, Lambreth 
Hartsell, David 
Hatcher, Jennie 
Hendrjx, Clyde 
Hendrix, Ray 
Henley, Earl 
Hill, Guy 
Hodges, Lottie , 
Hodges, Nelle 
Humphrey, E. 0. 
Huntsman, George 
Hyder, Frankie 
Hyder, Josie 
Johnson, William T., Jr. 
Jones, Paul 
Kearley, Pearl 
Kelly, Anna 
Kelly, Harris 
Kuhn, Luna 
Lacy, George . 
Lacy, James 
Lacy, Lena 
Lawson, Minnie 
LeSeueur, Ruth 
Linville, Margaret 
Lowder, Robert 
Lutz, J. T. 
Maloney. N. K. 



Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
North Carolina 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
North Carolina 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
New York 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
, Tennessee 

. Virginia 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 



24 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



McCormick, F. O. 
McNabb, George 
McNeil, Hexie 
Milam, A. B. 
Millwood, Edward 
Minton, Glen 
Mumpower, Ottie 
Nave, E. C. 
Nave, May 
Owen, Persie 
Priee, Elizabeth 
Price, Lucy 
Richardson, Lula 
Ritchie, James R. 
Rowe, Lula 
Seale, W. H. 
Sevier, Mary Evelyn 
Shelburne, L. F. 
Shelburne, Minerva 0. 
Shelburne, Ollie M. 
Shepherd, J. B. , 
Shepherd, J. N. 
Shickle, Ada 
Shickle, Pearl 
Shipley, Myrtle 
Shipley, W. B. 
Shores, Anna 
Snodgrass, Nell 
Stephens, J. W. 
Suthers, John T. 
Sutton, C. E. 
Tabor, R. H. 
Taylor, Benjamin H. 
Taylor, David H. 
Taylor, James B. 
Taylor, Nat. 
Taylor, Robert L., Jr. 
Taylor, S. C. 
VanHook, Alma 
VanHook, Mabel 
Wade, Bertie 
Wade, Mae 
Wade, Mary 
Wade, Estella 
Ward, L F. 
Warren, Ethel 
Webb, T. O. 



Virginia 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

. West Virginia 

West Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

District of Columbia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Virginia 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



25 



White, Byrl 
White, Rennie 
V/hitehead, H. R. 
Wilcox, F. N. 
Williams, G. B. 
Williams, HarrisoH 
Williams, N. T. 
Williams, Robert A. 
Williams, W. I. 
Worrell, Wise 



Anderson, Anna 
Anderson, Jennie 
Anderson, Nell 
Campbell, Edith 
Dye, Carrie 
Ellis, Bertha 
Gwyn, Lucy 
Hancock, Lambreth 
Hill, Guy 
Hodges, Lottie 
Hodg-es. Nelle 
Hyder, Frankie 
Hyder, Josie 
Jones, Girlie 
Kearley, Pearl 
Lacy, Lena 
LeSeueur, Ruth 
Linville, Margeret 
Minton, Myrtle 
Payne, Ethyl 
Rowe, Lula 
Shickle, Ada 
Shickle, Pearl . 
Shipley, Myrtle 
VanHook, Alma 
VanHook, Mabel 
Wade, Mae 
Warren, Ethel 
Whitehead, H. R. 



Allamong, Ira 
Chapman, D. Park 
Dugger, T. P. 
Gentry, E. Roy 



MUSIC. 



MINISTERIAL. 



Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 



Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
North Carolina 
Texas 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
West Virginia 
West Virginia 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 
Tennessee 

Virginia 
Tennessee 

Virginia 



West Virginia 

West Virginia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 



26 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



Gentry, G. W. . . . . Tennesses 

Greer, W. Conley ..... Tennessee 

Hancock, Lambreth . .... Texas 

Lutz, J. T. . . . . . Tennessee 

Milwood, Edward .... Tennessee 

Shepherd, J. N. . . . . Tennessee 

Stephens, J. W, . . . . . Virginia 

d: Includes only those actually enrolled in Ministerial course. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission to the College is by accredited Certifi- 
cate or examination, the examination covering the 
ground of the third year Preparatory v/ork, as out- 
lined elsewhere in the Catalogue. Students who 
have finished their Preparatory work here, are ad- 
mitted without examination. No examinations are 
required for admission to the Prepa-ratory Depart- 
ment. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The full requirements for the various undergrad- 
uate degrees are given in tabulated form, elsewhere in 
the catalogue. 

For the degree of Master of Arts, the student 
must havft received the A. B. Degree, and must pur- 
sue at least two full years' work under the special 
direction of the Faculty. The preparation of a satis- 
factory thesis is also required. For the degree of 
Master of Science, the possession of som.e other aca- 
demic degree than that of A. B., together with the 
completion of tv/o full years" graduate study, and a 
satisfactory thesis, are required. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 27 



COLLEGE CURRICULUM 

THE CLASSICAL COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHE- 
LOR OF ARTS (a. B.) 

hreshman Year — Greek, Latin, Mathematics. English. 

Sophomore Year — Greek, Latin, Mathematics, En- 
glish. 

Junior Year — Greek. Latin, Mathematics, English, 
Philosophy. 

Senior Year — Greek, Latin, Philosophy, Bible, one 
Elective. Two years' work in the modern 
languages may be substituted for the final 
year in either Greek or Latin, in this course. 

THE LITERARY COURSE 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 
(Ph. B.; 

Freshman Year — Latin, History, Mathematics, En- 
glish. 

Sophomore Year — Latin, History, Mathematics, En- 
glish. Bible. 

Junior Year — Latin or German, Mathematics, Phil- 
osophy, English, French. 

Ssnior Year — Latin or German, English, French, 
Philosophy, one Elective. 

THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE 

Leadincr to the degree of Bachelor of Science. (B. S.) 

Freshman Yea;?'^ History^- English, Mathematics, 
Science, Frencn or German. ^ 

Sophomore y^^if'^--History, English' Mathematics, 
French or German. / ' 

Junior Year — English/; Mathematics, Philosophy, 
Bible, one Elective. 

Senjor Year — English. Mathematics, Philosophy, two 

Electives. 



28 MILLIGAN COLLEGE 


CATALOGUE 




PROGRAM OF RECITATIONS 


COLLEGIATE STUDIES 




7:30 French I. 


German I 






8:15 


CHAPEL 






9:00— 








Sophomore 


Setiior 


Sophomore 


Freshman 


Bible 


English 


Latin 


Science 


9:45 Junior 


Freshman 






Latin 


English 






10:30— 








Freshman French II. 


Sophomore 




Junior 


Bible 


English 




Philosophy 


11:15 SeniorSophomore 


Junior 


Freshman 




Bible Greek 


English 


Latin 




12:00 


DINNER 






1:00 Junior Senior 


German II. 


Freshman 


Sophomore 


Bible Greek 




Mathemat's 


History 


1:45 


Junior 


Senior 


Freshman 




Greek 


Mathemat's 


History 


2:30 


Senior 


Sophomore 


Junior 




Latin 


Mathemat's 


History 


3:15— 








Senior Freshman 




Junior 




Philosophy Greek 




Mathemat's 




PREPARATORY STUDIES 




8:15 


CHAPEL 






9:00 Science I 








9:45 Mathematics I 


Latin I 






10:30 Mathematics III 


History I 






11:15 Science II ' 


Latin II 






12:00 


DINNER 






1:00 English II 








1 :45 Mathematics II 








2:30 English III 








3:15 Science III 


English I 







MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 29 

Departments and Courses of 
Instruction 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND LATIN 
Professor Ellis 

It is the aim of this department to lay, as thor- 
oughly as possible, the foundation for an appreciative 
reading of the Greek and Latin Languages. As a 
very necessary means to this end, prose composition 
in both languages will be studied systematically 
throughout the course. In translation, the authors 
commonly used In college courses will be studied, 
and an effort made to present their books as works of 
literature, not merely so much material for grammati- 
cal dissection. More important than the mere study 
of form, is a realization of the eloquence of Cicero, 
the beauty of Virgil and Horace, and the living, irre- 
sistible charm of genius and spirit in the whole field 
of Greek literature. 

LATIN — FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term— Cicero's Orations; Prose Composition. 
Second Term — Virgil, first four Books; Latin Prose. 
11:15 a. m. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term — Livy, Books I and XXI; Prose Compo- 
sition. 

Second Term — Cicero, De Amicitia and De Senectute; 
Prose Composition. 9:00 a. m. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First Term — Horace, Odes and Epodes; Prose Com- 
position. 

Second Term — Tacitus, Germania and Agricola; Prose 
Composition. 9:45 a. m. 
SENIOR year 

First Term — The Latin Drama, selected Plays of 
Plautus and Terence. 



30 MILLIGAW COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Second Term — Early Latin; History of Latin Litera- 
ture. 2:30 p. m. 

GREEK — FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term— White's First Greek Book. 
Second Term — V/hite's First Greek Book, completed. 
3:15 p. m. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term— Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-III. Good- 
win's Greek Grammar, Jones" Greek Prose 
Composition. 

Second Term — Homer's Iliad, Books I-III. Grammar 

and Composition. 11:15 a. m. 

JUNIOR year 

First Ter.m — Plato's Apology; Lysias' Orations; Gram- 
mar and Composition. 

Second Term — Demosthenes' Philippics; Herodotus. 
Grammar and Composition. 1:45 p. m. 

senior year 
First Term — Homer's Odyssey; Aeschylus" Prome- 
theus Bound. Review of Greek Syntax. 
Second Term — Sophocles' Antigone; Euripides' Iphi- 
geneia in Tauris. Jebb's Primer of Greek 
Literature. 1:00 p.m. 
Graduate courses in both Latin and Greek will be 
offered to students desiring and prepared to take 
them. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professor Archer 

The ability to express thought clearly and intelli- 
gently is one of the most important requirements of a 
college education. Next to this, a knowledge of the 
masterpieces of English and American Literature is a 
possession of supreme and lasting value in every av- 
enue of life. The English course is designed to meet 
both of these requirements, and also to give some 
knowledge of the development and history of the 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 31 



most important language ever used by the human 
tongue. The Courses in detail follow : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term — Hill's Principles of Rhetoric, with thor- 
ough drill in theme work and composition. 

Second Term— Pancoast's Representative English 
Literature, with outside reading. 9:45 a. m. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term — Pancoast's Introduction to American 
Literature, with collateral reading 

Second Term — English Prose : Brewster's Specimens 
of Narration; Baldwin's Specimens of 
Prose Description, with theme work. 
10:30 a. m. 

junior YEAR 

■ First Term — The Elizabethan Drama. Dowden's 
Shakspere Primer. Miss Woodbridge's The 
Drama, Hs Law and Its Technique; Read- 
ings from Marlowe and Shakspere 's early 
plays, such as Richard III, Romeo and 
Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing. 

Second Term — The Drama continued. Middle and 
later Shaksperian Plays : Hamlet, Othello, 
King Lear, The Tempest. 11:15 a. m. 

SENIOR YEAR 

First Term — Early English. Bright's Anglo-Saxon 
Reader. Readings from Chaucer. 

Second Term-- Winchester's Principles of Literary 
Criticism, with study of the English Es- 
sayists and Reviewers. 9:00 a. m. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
Professor Lane 

The objects of teaching in this department are 
three : 

First: The full and harmonious development of 



32 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



the reasoning faculties as an equipment for the per- 
formance of the student's life-work with the best 
possible results for himself and his fellow men. 

Second: To reveal to the student the moral 
worth of the science in developing habits of prompt- 
ness, accuracy and decision, and discriminating be- 
tween truth and error. 

Third: To set forth the utility of the science in 
its practical application to industrial enterprise. 

Outline of the courses follows : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term — Higher Algebra, Wentworth. 

Second Term — Higher Algebra, completed. 1 :00 p. m. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term — Solid Geometry, Wentworth. 

Second Term — Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical. 

2:30 p.m. 

junior year 
First Term — Analytical Geometry, Hardy. 
SocondTerm — Analytical Geometry, completed. 3:15 

p. m. 

SENIOR YEAR 

First Term — Differential Calculus. 

Sdcond Term — Integral Calculus. 1:45 p. m. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

The design of this department is to furnish a 
working knowledge of the two most important repre- 
sentatives of the modern language group. The stu- 
dent is carefully drilled in the forms, and is taught to 
acquire as large a vocabulary as possible. Sight 
reading is extensively employed in the course of study. 
An attempt is also made to familiarize the students 
with the most important facts dealing with the lit- 
erature of the French and German Peoples. The 
courses in detail are as follows: 

FRENCH I 

First Term— Muzzarelli, Academic French Course 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 3S 



Second Term — Muzzarelli completed. Joynes French 
Reader. Merimee's Golumba, Erckmann- 
Ghatrian's Le Juif Polonais. Lamartine's 
Scenes de la Revolution Francaise. 7:30 
a. m. 

FRENCH II 

First Term — French Prose, Erckmann-Ghatrian, Mad- 
ame Therese and Waterloo. George Sand's 
La Mare au Diable. Merimee's Ghroni- 
que du Regne de Gharles IX. Victor Hu- 
go's Bug Jargal. 

Second Term — The French Drama. Selected plays 
of Moliere, Gorneille and Racine. Victor 
Hugo's Ruy Bias. 10:30 a. m. 

GERMAN I 

First Term — Bierwirth's Beginning German and 

" Gluck Auf. " 
Second Term — Thomas' Practical German Grammar. 

Heyse's L'Arrabiata, Hauff's Tales; Easy 

Prose. 7:30 a. m. 

GERMAN II 

First Term — Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jungfrau 
von Orleans. Lessing's Nathan der Weise. 

Second Term — Goethe's Faust and Iphigenie auf Tau- 
ris. History of German Literature. 1 :00 
p. m. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 
Professor Lacy 

The design of this department is to familiarize 
the student with the more important facts of both 
Ancient and Modern History, and also to give some 
insight into the social life and constitutional develop- 
ment of the various nations of the world. The course 
while not extensive, has been carefully and very 
thoroughly planned. 



34 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term — English History, Andrews. 

Second Term — Civil and Political History of the United 
States. United States Government and 
Laws. Hinsdale's American Government. 
1:45 p. m, 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Ancient History, West. 
Second Term — Mediaeval and Modern History, West. 
1:00 p. m. 

junior year. 

First Term — Outline History of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. Muller's Political History of Re- 
cent Times. 

Second Term— Political and social achievements of 
the Anglo-Saxon Peoples. Justin Mc- 
Carthy's History of Our Own Times, with 
collateral reading. 2:30 p. m. 



DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

Owing to circumstances, it is only possible for us 
to present outline courses in the various sciences, 
with a minimum of laboratory work. Since the col- 
lege course is moreover practically filled with othar 
studies, we have deemed it advisable to place most 
of our work in Science in the Preparatory Department. 
A general outline of Biology, including a brief study 
of Zoology, Botany and Physiology, occupies the 
second year of preparatory work. Outline courses in 
Physics and Chemistry are given in the third year. 
Only one year's study in science is required in the 
college proper. The work for this year is as follows: 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term — Geology, LeConte. 

Second Term — Astronomy, Todd, 9:00 a. m. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE S5 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 
Pres. Kershner. Prof, Lacy 

This department is designed to afford a careful 
and systematic study of the various mental, moral and 
social sciences, including Logic, Psychology, Ethics 
and Economics. The method of study is by lectures 
and recitations from approved texts. The courses in 
detail are as follows: 

JUNIOR year 
First Term — Logic. Greighton's, with supplementary 

problems. 
Second Term — Psychology, James' Briefer Course. 

10:50 a. m. 

SENIOR YEAR 

First Term — Ethics, Seth's Ethical Principles. 
Second Term — Economics, Bullock's Introduction. 
3:15 p. m. 



BIBLE DEPARTMENT 
President Kershner 

The design of the Bible Department is two-fold. 
First, to furnish an accurate and systematic knowl- 
edge of the Bible for the benefit of all who may desire 
to study the greatest book of the ages; and second, 
to train and prepare young men for the ministry of 
the gospel. The Courses have been carefully ar- 
ranged to this end, as a thoughtful survey of the 
following outline will indicate : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Term — Old Testament Historj', with critical 
reading and study of one of the Poetical Books. 
Text-books, the Authorized and American Revised 
Texts of the Old Testament, with MacLear's Old Tes- 
tament History as a guide-book. 

Second Term— Old Testament History, completed. 
Critical reading and study of one of the Books of 



S6 MILLIQAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



Prophecy. The same texts will be used as in the 
first term, with the Standard Bible Dictionary as a 
work of reference. 10:30 a. m. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Term — New Testament History, with espec- 
ial attention to the life of Christ. Critical reading 
and study of one of the Gospels. MacLear's New 
Testament History used as a guide. Reference books. 
Farrar's, Andrew's and Edersheim's Lives of Christ, 
Stevens and Burton's Harmony of the Gospels, and 
The Standard Bible Dictionary. 

Second Term — New Testament History completed. 
The Apostolic History, with critical study and reading 
of one or more of the Epistles. Reference books, 
Gonybeare and Howson's Life of St. Paul, Farrar's 
Early Days of Christianity, Standard Bible Diction- 
ary. 9:00 a. m. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First Term — Church History, from the Apostolic 
Days to the Reformation. Careful attention paid 
to the period of the early Fathers, and the develop- 
ment of the Papacy. Lectures, with Fisher's Text 
as a guide-book. 

Second Term — Church History completed. The 
period from the Reformation to the present time, 
with careful study of the view-point occupied by the 
different Protestant Churches. Lectures. 1:00 p.m. 

SENIOR YEAR 

First Term — Homiletics. Johnson's The Ideal 
Ministry, used as a guide-book. Special attention 
paid to the practical problems of the minister. 

Second Term — Christian Doctrine and Polity. The 
Doctrine and organization of the New Testament 
Church. Lectures, with Milligan's Scheme of Re- 
demption as a guide-book. 11:15 a. m. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 37 

OUTSIDE COURSES FOR BIBLICAL STUDENTS 

I, THE BIBLE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Readings from the English Poets, showing the 
influence of the Bible upon them, with a study of 
their distinctive messages. Selections from Brown- 
ing. Wordsworth, Tennyson, Emerson and others. 

Two Terms. Three hours weekly. (Elective.) 

II. THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 

A study of ancient and modern systems of thought 
from Heraclitus to Herbert Spencer. Guide book, 
Weber's History of Philosophy, 

Two Terms. Three hours weekly. (Elective.) 

IIU GREEK EXEGESIS 

A critical and exegetical study of the New Tes- 
tament in the original Greek, using Westcott and 
Hort's Text. For graduate students in Greek, only. 

Two Terms. Three hours weekly. (Elective.) 

BIBLE LECTURE COURSE 

Daily chosen lectures by prominent ministers, 
upon various phases of Christian doctrine and life. 

This series embraces lectures upon practically 
every side of the Minister's life and problems, by 
recognized masters of the subject. Special attention 
iias been given to secure speakers upon such vital 
features as Missions— State, Home and Foreign; Evan- 
gelistic Work; and the Bible School. This course 
alone will be of incalculable value to the observant 
and thouR-htful student. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT MILLIGAN 
COLLEGE— COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FIRST YEAR 

First Term — Advanced Arithmetic (Robinson), Ad- 
vanced United States History (Montgomery's Stu- 
dents' Am. Hist.) Adv. Grammar (Reed &i Kellog's 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



H. S. Grammar, Advanced Geography, (Tarr & Mc- 
Murray. 

Second Term — Advanced Arithmetic (Completed). 
Advanced U. S. History (Completed), Advanced 
Grammar f^Gompleted). Physical Geography (Davis;. 

SECOND YEAR 

First Term — Beginning Algebra (Lippincott). First 
Year Latin (Collar and Daniel), Elementary Biology. 
(Hunter), Preparatory Rhetoric (Williams). 

Second Term — Beginning Algebra (Completed). 
First Year Latin (Completed), Elementary Biology 
(Completed), Preparatory English Literature ( West- 
lake j. 

THIRD YEAR 

First Term — Plane Geometry (Wentworth), Latin 
(Caesar). Bennett's Prose Composition and Gram- 
rnar; Elementary Physics, English, (College Entrance 
Requirements for 1909-10). 

Second Term — Plane Geometry (Completed), Latin 
(Caesar and Composition Completed), Elementary 
Chemistry. English (College Requirements continued). 



SUB-PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT MILLI- 
GAN COLLEGE. 
Students not ready for first year work in the 
Preparatory Department are assigned such studies in 
the Common-School Branches as will fit them, when 
completed, for admission to that department. Com- 
petent instructors and classes properly graded, are 
arranged as they are needed, for this class of work. 
But, under the circumstances, no definite schedule of 
such classes can be published in the catalogue. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Miss MARCELENA HOUSTON 
PIANO 

The Method of Pianoforte instruction pursued is 
the '■ Flexible wrist, loose-arm system." inaugurated 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 39 



by Mendelssohn, Chopin and Talburg, and continued 
by Liszt and his pupils. Technical and theoretical 
instruction are combined. All possible questions re- 
lating to the pupil's work are asked, and constant 
reference is made to Musical Dictionaries and Ency- 
clopedias. 

Two thirty-minute lessons or one forty-minute 
lesson per week will be given in the Music Depart- 
ment, in accordance with arrangements mutually 
satisfactory to teacher and pupil. 

Recitals will be given by the pupils during the 
school year, to which the patrons and friends of the 
college are invited. 

VOICE CULTURE 

I The aim of our method is, first to develop the 

voice, throughout its entire compass, then to perfect 

I it. We teach the proper use and extent of the reg- 

I isters of the voice, diaphragmatic breathing, and pure 

j flexible tone. Tone is the chief aim during the entire 
course of study. The peculiarities presented by dif- 
ferent voices are directed and modified, each accord- 

1 ing to its own nature. 

Any pupil in the school may belong to the Glee 

j Club, whether a student in the Music Department or 

I not. 

MUSICAL CURRICULUM 

I First Grade — Sartorio. Practical Method. Gay- 

j nor's Melody Pictures. Kohler, Easy Studies. Little 
I Pieces by Spaulding, Richter, Streabog. 
I Secoad Grade — -Studies: Duvernoy, Loeschhorn, 

Kohler. Simple pieces by Schumann, Hayden. Chop- 
in. Heller, Lange. 

Third Grade — Studies: Czerny, Etudes de la Velo- 
cite. Heller, Etudes Loeschhorn. 

Compositions of Jensen, Jungmann. Bohm, Schu- 
mann. Mozart, dementi, Kroeger. and other compos- 
ers. 

Fourth Grade — Studies: Cramer; Etudes, four 
books. Heller, The Art of Phrasing. Bach, Little 



40 MILLiGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUa 



Preludes. The Compositions of Chopin, Greig, God- 
ard, Mendelssohn, Rubenstein and Liszt, are carefully 
studied in this grade, special attention being given to 
Interpretation and technic. 

Fifth Grade — Studies: Bach; Two Part Inventions; 
dementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; Kullak, Octave 
Studies. Difficult compositions of Bach, Beethoven 
Liszt. Grieg, Raff and MacDoweli are studied in this 
grade. 

A thorough knowledge of the Elements of Har- 
mony is required for the completion of this Grade. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

MARY BELLE BARLOW, A. B. 

The aim of this department is the harmonious 
development of mind, body and voice; to "educate 
the body to spontaneously express in a beautiful way 
the highest emotions of the soul." The desire for 
freedom and the instinct to express thought and feel- 
ing are common to all. Artistic expression, however, 
is the result of specific training. The inspiration, the 
so-called " divine fire, " rests with the individual; but 
the result of careful preparation and definite techni- 
que, no less important, must not be left to impulse. 
The instruction seeks to free the voice from stilted, 
elocutionary habits in reading and speaking, not by 
mechanical imitation, but by development of the in- 
stincts and feelings, and by training the voice and 
every muscle of the body, by means of which the soul 
or inner psychic being is manifested. 

To this end, the method of instruction is based 
iipon the principles of nature, or the order of the de- 
velopment of the human mind, as formulated in the 
'■ Evolution of Expression, " a system of education, or 
series of progressive steps through which the pupil 
may be led to a realization of himself, and to a plane 
of art in expression. The subjects included in the 
course are : 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 41 

Vocal and physical culture, Gesture, Platform 
Deportment, Poetic interpretation. Dramatic action 
and impersonation, Reading from the Bible and best 
authors, Interpretation of Shakspere. 

Voice is the natural expression of the individual, 
therefore should be given careful training for its best 
use. 

Through a system of aesthetic, psycho-physical 
culture, health, strength, grace and beauty are ob- 
tained without the use of apparatus. 

Gesture is not taught materially, but from the 
mind. 

The process of development is from acute self- 
consciousness, through the practice of the laws which 
govern any art to a rounded, wise, beautiful self-ex- 
pression. Soul and body should work together to an 
ideal end. 

OTHER COURSES 

The following branches, while not a part of the 
regular work of the college, may be pursued under 
the private direction of teachers affiliated with the 
institution: Book-keeping, both single and double 
entry; Stenography and Typewriting, the Gregg sys- 
tem of Shorthand, and Touch Typewriting. Art, oil 
painting and water colors, drawing, silk and china 
decoration, etc. The fees for work in these courses 
depend upon the length of time spent in their study, 
and may be learned upon application to the college. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The college is located three miles from John- 
Location son City, and half a mile from the Millligan 

station on the East Tennessee and Western 
North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small 
village named Milligan in honor of the institution. 

The location is one of the most beautiful in 
America. The Watauga River flows only a short dis- 
tance below the grounds, and the scenery around the 



42 KILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



college is unsurpassed in natural beauty and grandeur. 

One of the most important considerations in 
HeaUKful- selecting a college is its healthfulness of 
ness location. Other advantages amount to but 

little v/ithout this, the most valuable of all. 
In the tv.fenty-six years of its history, no epidemic 
has been known at Milligan. The purity of the air. 
the excellent water, and the splendid advantages for 
physical development have been chiefly responsible 
for this condition. 

The college buildings are three in number: 
Buildings The main building, a substantial brick struc- 
ture, containing the recitation rooms, chap- 
el, library, and society halls, occupies the centre of 
the campus. It has been newly refitted, painted and 
papered, during the vacation of 1908, The young 
men's home, a two-story frame building, containing 
nearly thirty rooms, plainly furnished, but affording 
substantial accommodations for students, is located 
to the rear of the main building. The young ladies" 
home is a three-story brick structure, opened for the 
first time for the season of 1908-9. It contains 
thirty-two rooms, with reception rooms and parlor, 
has hot and cold water on each floor, is handsomely 
furnished, heated by steam and lighted by electricity. 
Rooms in this building should be engaged as soon as 
possible, as a number had already been reserved when 
the catalogue went to press. 

The college campus contains over thirty acres of 
ground. A large and beautiful grove, each tree of 
which was planted by some former student, surrounds 
the main building. There are excellent ball grounds 
and tennis courts for the use of the student body. 

The library contains about five thousand 
Library volumes and is being rapidly increased. The 

departments of history and Biblical litera- 
ture are particularly well equipped. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 43 



The reading room is kept supplied with the 
Reading best weekly and monthly magazines, among 
Room others being 'The Outlook," 'The Indepen- 
dent," "The Saturday Evening Post," 'The 
Christian Standard," "Christian Evangelist," "The 
Literary Digest," "McGlure's," "Review of Reviews," 
'"Harpers." "The Atlantic Monthly," and many oth- 
ers. All students have the privilege of the library 
and reading room, subject, of course, to proper rules 
and regulations. 

The literary societies are three in number — 
Literary The Adelphian and American for young 
Societies men, and the Sorosis for young ladies. 

They do excellent work during the year, 
giving public performances upon stated occasions. 

Milligan, with its location and facilities, nat- 
Athletics uraily offers every advantage for clean and 

successful athletics. Athletics are encour- 
aged, within the proper bounds, and in accordance 
with proper Inter-Collegiate standards. Only "Glean 
ball," in every sense of the term, will be permitted in 
connection with the institution. 

The greatest and best inheritance of Milli- 
College gan is its "college spirit." It is not of the 
Spirit kind which delights to express itself in row- 
dyism and profanity, but rather in a clean. 
pure, healthful moral tone which irresistibly perme- 
; ates the whole student body. The very air of Milligan 
I breathes purity and high-toned Christian character. 

The religious and moral influences thrown 
I Religious around the student at Milligan are of the 
I aod Moral best. The prayer meetings, both mid-week 
\ Influences and Sunday evenings, have a reputation that 
j has become national, if not indeed interna- 

! tional. The "Number Nine" students' prayer meet- 
l ing has exerted an influence unexcelled by any other 
meeting of the kind in existence, and the regular 
mid-week prayer meeting is also unsurpassed in its 



-J 



44 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

own way. The chapel exercises at Milligan are far 
less perfunctory and more genuinely devotional than 
any the writer has observed elsewhere, although he has 
had large opportunities for observation in the matter. 

The rules governing the conduct of girls in 
Young our young ladies" home, while strict, are not 
Ladies' burdensome. The greatest care is exer- 
Home cised by those who have them in charge, and 

parents may safely trust their daughters in 
our hands. We have a thoroughly efficient and capa- 
ble Dean of women, and an experienced matron in 
charge of the housei<:eeping department. The young 
ladies' rooms are extra large, are well ventilated, 
equipped with new furniture, and are comfortable in 
every sense of the term. We furnish exceptionally 
good board for the prices charged. There are few 
places in the world where a young lady can secure a 
thorough education at so little expense, as in Milligan. 

Students boarding at the homes will furnish 
What to their own toilet articles, towels, napkins, 
Furnish pillow cases and sheets, and one blanket each. 

The parents or guardians of students are 
Breakage held responsible for any breakage or damage 

done to property or furniture. 

Young ladies attending the college are not 
Outside permitted to board outside of the home, ex- 
Board cept with the express approval of their 

parents, and special permission from the 
faculty. 

Text-books, stationery, etc., can be pur- 
Text chased at publishers' price from the college 
Books book store. All purchases at the store are 

strictly cash. Nearly all necessary books 
can be secured second-hand, thus reducing the ex- 
pense for books to a minimum. 

Monday instead of Saturday is the regular 
Monday weekly holiday. 
Holiday 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



45 



The school year is divided into two terms, 
Two or semesters, of eighteen weeks each, in- 

Terms stead of three terms of twelve weeks each, 

as in former years. 

EXPENSES 

For tuition in the College or Preparatory 
Department, per term of eighteen 

weeks $ 20.00 

For tuition in either Vocal or Instrumental 

Music, per term of eighteen weeks 20.00 

Piano practice, on new pianos, (per month, 

$1.00), perterm, 4.00 

For tuition in Expression, per term of eigh- 
teen weeks 20.00 

Tuition for Ministerial students in all Minis- 
terial courses Free 

For tuition and board, with furnished room, 
heat, fuel, lights, etc., in the boys' home 

per year 1 40.00 

For tuition and board, with furnished room, 
heat, fuel, lights, etc., in the girls home, 

per year, 1 50.00 

Furnished rooms, with board, can be secured out- 
side the college, in private families, at from $9.00 to 
$12.00 per month, the usual price being $10.00. 

A Matriculation and Library Fee of ten ($10.00) 
dollars per year is charged all Ministerial students 
who do not board in the home. If they are taking the 
regular college course, the amount is deducted from 
the tuition. 

A Matriculation fee of ten ($10.00) dollars per 
year will admit any one to all lectures given in the 
college, but not to class-room instruction or exami- 
nations. 

All tuition and board bills are payable per term 
in advance. In all cases where the student leaves, 
no refund or deduction of tuition will be made, except 
in cases of serious illness, necessitating absence from 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



the institution. Board paid in advance, will of course, 
be refunded. 

Laundry costs about one dollar per month, stu- 
dents securing special rates. 

The fee for the Bachelor's Diploma is in all 
Diploma cases five dollars. The fee for the Mas- 
Fee ter's Degree is ten dollars. 

Five unexcused absences in any one study 
Class will suspend the student thus absent. 
Absences 

By a resolution of the Executive Committee 
Athletic of Milligan College, no student will be al- 
Require- lowed to represent Milligan College in Inter- 
ments Collegiate Athletic contests who has not been 

enrolled for one full term, and who has not 
made during that time a passing grade in at least 
three studies. 

The college takes an active interest in mis- 
Mission sion work, and mission study classes will be 
Study conducted. A complete library, embracing 
Class such books as "The Price of Africa," "The 

Christian Conquest of India," "Where the 
Book Speaks," etc., is provided for the use of students. 

Within a distance of one to ten miles are 
Noted many spots of historic interest. Among 
Places them are: 

Near The starting point of the patriotic 

Milligan mountaineers who faced death on King's 
Mountain, and by their gallant victory 
changed the colonial rebellion into a successful revo- 
lution. 

The battlefield where, in 1788. the force of arms 
decided that East Tennessee and Western North 
Carolina should not remain as the separate STATE 
of FRANKLIN. 

The seat of the first legislative body ever assem- 
bled in Tennessee. 



MILLIQAN COLLEGE CATALOQUE 47 



The bed-log of the first gristmill ever built west 
of the Alleghany Mountains. 

The tree on which is cut "D Boon Gild Bar;" and 
many other points of interest. 

These may all be seen in our excursions. 

Students are expected to deport themselves 
Rules and as ladies and gentlemen, above all, as those 
Regula- who are, or expect to be, Christian men and 
tions women. No profanity is permitted on the 

grounds, nor is the use of tobacco or alco- 
hol in any form allowed. Insubordination, or violation 
of the 'aws of the school will lead to expulsion and 
permanent exclusion from its privileges. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

Many friends of Milligan College will doubtless 
be glad to help its work, after they have passed from 
this earth to their reward. In this way, they will be 
able to originate a stream of influence, continuing 
throughout eternity. The following, or an equivalent 
form, should be used in your will, which should fully 
describe real estate, and should be signed by you. in 
the presence of witnesses, whose signatures should 
likewise appear: 

"I give and bequeath to Milligan College of 
Tennessee, an institution chartered under the 
laws of the State of Tennessee, and located at 
Milligan, Garter County, Tennessee, the sum of 
$ (or if real estate, let loca- 
tion and description appear at this point) for the 
use of said institution in conducting its work of 
education; and the receipt of the secretary of the 
said institution for the above-named sum, or de- 
scribed property, shall constitute a release for my 
executor for the same." 



48 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



HOW TO GET TO MILLIGAN 



Eastern students come to Bristol, Tenn.. thence 
to Johnson Gity. 

Western students come to Knoxville, Tenn., 
thence to Johnson Gity. 

Southern students come via Asheville, N. G., and 
Morristown, Tenn., to Johnson Gity. 

MILLIGAN STATION is three miles from John- 
son Gity, on the East Tennessee and Western North 
Carolina R. R. 




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illtgan Olnlbg^ 

Vol. 11 NEW HORIZON No. IX 

aiatal0gu? Number 1910-1911 I □ 



Eotered in Post Office at Johnion City, Tenn., as Second CI&s* Matter, Ac- 
cording to Act of Congre**, Approved July 16, 1894. . '. . 




i>RKsa or 

!• C MUCK PniNTINS COMPANY 
JOHNBOW CITV. TfNN 



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ROBERT MILLIGAN 



Educator, Preacher, Author 



Born July 25, 1814; died March 20, 1875 



'He was a good man, and full of the Holy Spirit, and of faith. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

OF TENNESSEE 



INCOFIPORATED 1882 
RE-INCORPORATED 1908 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 



CATALOGUE 1910-1911 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE. TENN. 
MDCDX 



FOREWORD. 



Every institution must be, in the last analysis, 
the embodiment of an idea. Colleges, like men, pos- 
sess, many traits in common; but like men too, each 
exhibits an individuality of its own. The distinct- 
ive idea back of Milligan College is that of CHAR- 
ACTER BUILDING, FIRST OF ALL. The pecul- 
iar environment of the College, its seclusion, the re- 
ligious and moral atmosphere which surrounds it, 
and the dominant aims of its Faculty and those who 
have it in charge, to say nothing of the cherished leg- 
acy of the past, all conspire to further the realiza- 
tion of the ideal it has in view. He who wrote, '*A 
good name is rather to be chosen than great riches," 
embodied to the fullest the educational ideal of Mil- 
ligan. 



4 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

CONTENTS 

Title Page 1 

Foreword 3 

Contents ^ 4 

Calendar 6 

Resolution *. 7 

Board of Trustees 8 

Faculty 9 

Lectures 1909-10 1 1 

Lectures 1910-11 12 

Purposes and Alms 14 

Historic Sketch 15 

Robert Milligan ,a Sketch 16 

Officers of Alumni Association 19 

List of Alumni 19 

Graduates and Degrees Conferred 17 may, 1910 33 

Graduates and Degrees Conferred 17 May, 1910 34 

The Collegiate Department 45 

Requirements for Admission 46 

'Matriculation 46 

Requirements for Degrees 47 

College Curriculum 47 

Program of Recitations 48 

Departments and Courses of Instruction 49 

The Robert Milligan Bible College 5S 

Requirements for Admission 56 

Requirements for Graduation 56 

Curriculum 66 

Program of Recitations 8? 

Departments and Courses of Instruction 58 

Milligan Preparatory School 60 

Curriculum 60 

Program of Recitations 61 

Departments and Courses of Instruction 61 

School of Music 63 

Curriculum 64 

Diplomas 64 

Milligan Business College 64 

Stenography and Typewritting 65 

Bookkeeping and Office Practice 65 

Diplomas 66 

General Information 66 

Location 66 

Healthfulness , 66 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 5 

CONTEKTS 

Building's 67 

Tllie Francis T. and Coliumbius A. Mee Memorial Hall 67 

Llbnary .• 67 

Reading Room 67 

Honors 67 

Contests 68 

Organization of Classes 68 

Literary Societies 68 

Athletdcs 68 

College Spirit 68 

Religious and Moral Influenices 68 

Young Ladies' Home 69 

"Wiiat to Furnish 69 

Breakage 69 

Outside Board 69 

Text-books 69 

Monday Holiday 69 

Two Terms 69 

lOlasis Absences 70 

Age Limit in Young Men's Dorm.itory 70 

Athletic Requirements 70 

Mission Study Class 70 

iMilligan Band 70 

Noted Places Near Milligan College 70 

Rules and Regulations 70 

Milligan Endowment 71 

iScholarships 71 

Form of Bequest 71 

How to Get to Mililigan Coliege 72 

Expenses 72 

Tuition 72 

Room Rent in Dormitories 73 

Board in Coilege Dining Hall 75 

Outside Board 7o 

Combination Courses and Total Expenses Estimated 73 

Diploma Fees 74 

Laundry and Incidental Expenses 74 

Terms of Payment, Etc 74 

Athletics 74 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



CALENDAR. 



1910 

September 13 Classification and Registration Tuesday 8:15 a. m. 

September 15, Regular Recitations begin Thursday 8:15 a. m. 

November 25, Thanksgiving Recesis Friday 

December 23, Christmas Holidays begin Friday 

1911 

January 2, Christmas Holidays End Monday 

January 14, First Term Ends Saturday 

January 17, Second Term Begins Tuesday 

Feibruary 22, Washington's Birthday Celebration Wednesday 

May 16, Final Examinations Begin Tuesday 

May 18, Final Examinations Close Thursday 

May 19, Junior Class Program Friday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 20, Athletic Meet Saturday, 2:30 p. m. 

Musical and Dramatic Program Saturday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 21, Baccalaureate Sermon , Sunday, 10 : 30 a. m. 

May 22, Senior Ciass Day Monday, 10:30 a. m. 

Oratorical Contest Monday, 2 : 30 p. m. 

Annual Literary Address Monday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 23, Commencement, Senior Program Tuesday 10:30 a. m. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees Tuesday, 2:30 p. m. 

Alumni Banquet Tuesday, 7:30 p. m. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



RESOLUTION 



Passed by the Official Board of the Tennessee Christian Missionary 
Society, February, 1908: 

Whereas the greatest need of our missionary work in Tennessee 
is an adequate supply of ministers; and, whereas, we are compelled in 
a large measure to depend upon our schools and colleges to supply 
them; and, Wihereas, Milligan College, an institution of our State, has 
in the past done valuable service for the Church and is free of debt; 
and, whereas, this college, through its Board of Trustees, desires 
to co-operate more fully with our work, especially in educating min- 
isters; and, whereas, it is understood that the Tennessee Christian 
Mis'sdiomary Ooinvemtion is not to assume as such any debt or fimancial 
obligation of said college, now exisiting, or hereafter contracted, 
therefore. 

Be it resolved. That the Board of Directors of the Tennessee 
Christian Rlissionary Convention endorse the work of Milligan College 
and commend it to the Brotherhood of Tennessee as worthy of assist- 
ance and patronage . 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MrLLIGAN COLLEGE. 
Term Expires 1910. 

B. A. Abbott, Baltimore, Md. 



r I. M. Boswell, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



J. O. Cheek, Nashville, Tenn. 

L A. Hill, Harrlman, Tenn. 

Dr. E. K. Leake, Collierville, Tenn. 

Dr. "W. J. Matthews, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Hon. M. H. Meeks, Nashville, Tenn. 

W. G. Payne, Milligan, Tenn. 

Dr. L. M. Scott, Jellico, Tenn. 

Hon. T. A. Wragh^t, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Term Expires 1911 

Dr. A. W. Boyd, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
J. E. Crouch, Johnson City, Tenn. 

B. J. Farrar, Nashville, Tenn. 
G. W. Jones, Piney Flats, Tenn. 
A. L Myihr, Belleview, Tenn. 

J. F. Robertson, Crockett Mills, Tenn. 
Judge C. E. Snodgrass, Crossville, Tenn. 
J. F. Tarwater, Rockwood, Tenn. 
Hon. G. N. Tillman, Nashville, Tenn. 

C. C. Taylor, Milligan, Tenn. 

J. W. Williams, Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Term Expires 1912. 

A. B. Crouch, Johnson City, Tenn. 
A. A. Ferguson, Elizabethton, Tenn. 
J. C. Hamlet, Crockett Mills, Tenn. 
G. W. Hardin, Johnson City, Tenn. 
N. H. Hyder, Elizabethton, Tenn. 
P. Y. Pendleton, Nashville, Tenn. 
S. W. Price, Johnson City, Tenn. 
W. H. Sheffer, Memphis, Tenn. 
A. S. Warren, Nashville, Tenn. 
G. T. Williams, Johnson City, Tenn. 
J. F. Witt, Zion Mills, Va. 

Officers of Board. 

C. C. Taylor, President. 
S. W. Price, Secretary. 
G. W. Hardin, Treasurer. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 
FACULTY. 



FREDERICK D. KERSHNER, M. A., (Princeton), President, and 
Robert Milligan Professor of Piiilosophy. 

Kentucky University, 1899; Princeton University, 1900; graduate 
study in Italy and England, 1903; Staff Lecturer for the American 
Society for the Extension of University Teaching, 1902-06; Dean of 
Kee-Mar College, 1902-05; Dean of the Bible Department of the Amer- 
ican University, 1906-08; President of Milligan College, 1908-10. 

TYLl^R ELLIOTT UTTERBACK, M .A., (Columbia), Dean and Pro- 
fessor m&^ History. 

A. B. Centre College, 1891 • Classical Graduate, College of the Bible, 
1S92; A. B. Kentucky University, 1893; M. A., Columbia University, 
1908, and Master's Diploma in Education and Supervision, Teachers' 
College; Minister New Richmond and Ripley, Ohio, Poplar Bluff, Mo., 
and Rochester, Minn., Superintendent City Schools, Plainview and Kan- 
son, Minn., and Johnson City, Tenn. 

MRS. E. L. THOMAS, Dean of Women. 

ELMA E. R. ELLIS, M. A., (University of Tennessee) , Professor of 
Ancient Languages. 

B. A., 1895; A. M., 1899; Prof, of Ancient Languages, Milligan 
College, 1900-03; Prof, of Greek and German, Virginia Christian Col- 
lege, 1903-05; Prof, of Greek and History, Bethany College, 1905-08; 
Prof, of Ancient Languages, Milligan College, 1908-10. 

MRS. P. D. KERSHNER, A. B., (University of Michigan), Profes- 
sor of English. 

Albion College, 1900-03; A. B., University of Michigan, 1904; Pro- 
fessor of Latin, Milligan College, 1904-06; Graduate Study, University 
of Michigan, 1907-08; Prof, of English, Milligan College, 1908-10. 

lERNEST P. LANE, A. B., (University of Tennessee), Professor 
of Mathematics. 

A. B., University of Tennessee, 1909; Graduate Study in Mathe- 
matics, 1908-09; Prof, of Mathematics in Milligan College, 1908-10. 



10 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

FACULTY. 



AARON A. FERGUSON, A. M., Professor of Exegeisis ajid New 
Testament Greek. 

A. B., Milligan College, 1882; Graduate student, Kentucky Univer- 
sity, 1884; President Tazewell College, Va., 1896-07; Minister,. Lynch- 
burg, Va., Johnson City, Tenn., Elizabethton, Tenn., Rockwood, Tenn., 
Kinston, N. C. 

WALTER S. BUCHANAN, Professor of Applied Christianity. 

Graduate College of the Bible, Lexington, Ky., 1900; Graduate stu- 
dent Kentucky University, 1901 ; Minister Lake Charles, La., Church, 
1902-04; Minister Marion, Ind., Cliurch 1904-06; Christian Standard 
Evangelist 1906-09; Minister Johnson City Christian Churoh, 1910. 

MARCELENA HOUSTON, A. B., Director of Music. 

Graduate of Kee-Mar Conservatory of Music, Hagerstown, Md.; 
Student under Myer of New York, and of the Peabody Conservatory of 
Music, Baltimore. Instructor in Kee-Mar Conservatory, 1901-04; 
Director of Music, Milligan College, 1908-10. 

iMELVIN M. KNIGHT, Principal of Commercial Department. 
Graduate Modern School of Business, (Denver, Colo.), Legal Re- 
porter and Stenographer. 

J. ROBERT GARRETT, Ph. B., Principal of Prepamtory Depart- 
ment 

Milligan College, 1904. Professor of Mathematics, Milligan College, 
1904-09. 

ALMA PISKE VANHOOK, A. B., Assistant in Preparatory. 

F. H. KNIGHT, Secretary of the Faculty. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Field Secretary of the College. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 1 1 

LECTURES 1909-1910. 



Given in the College Cliapel During tlie Scliolagtic Year 1909-10 



John T. Brown, "The Purpose of Education," Sept. 7, 1909. 
David Lyon, "School Days at Milligan," Sept. 30, 1909. 
John T. Brown, "Sam Houston and the Alamo," Oct. 2, 1909. 
J. W. Hardy, "College Life," Oct. 28, 1909. 

J. W. Hardy, "The Opportunities of the Student," Oct. 29. 1909. 
J. W. Hardy, "The Actual and the Possible," Nov. 5, 3 909. 
J. W. Hardy, "Life's Responsibilities," Nov. 6, 1909. 
Frederick Warde, "William Shakespeare," Nov. 13, 1909. 
J. W. Hardy, '"The Battle of Life," Nov. 23, 1909. 
W. P. Crouch, "Unselfish Service is Greatness," Nov. 24, 1909. 
W. P. Crouch, "I Am a Debtor," Nov. 25, 1909. 
W. P. Crouch, "Life," Dec. 1, 1909. 
■ J. B. Stuart, "Blunder No.l. — That the Dollar Makes the Man," Dec. 

4, 1909. 
J. E. Stuart, "Blunder No. 2. — A Man Can Sow Without Reaping," Dec. 

7, 1909. 

J. E. Stuart, "Blunder No. 3. — A Man Can Reap Without Sowing," Dec. 

8, 1909. 

J. E. Stuart, "Blunder No. 4. — A Man Can Get Along Without Christ," 
Dec. 9, 1909. 

A. I. Myhr, "Dependability," Dec. 14, 1909. 
J. A. Campbell, "Work," Jan. 14, 1910. 

W. H. Sheffer, "The Actual and the Possible," Jan. 25, 1910. 
W. H. Sheffer, "Shoes That Fit," Jan. 26, 1910. 
W. H. Sheffer, "How Big is a Man," Jan. 27, 1910. 
W. H. Sheffer, "The Central Beatitude," Jan. 28, 1910. 

B. A. Abbott, "The Spirit of Science and Progress — Roger Bacon," 

Feb. 1, 1910. 
B. A. Abbott, "The Spirit of Science and Progress — Charles Darwin," 

Feb. 2, 1910. 
B. A. Abbott, "The Spii^it of Science and Progress — Thos. A. Edison," 

Feb. 3, 1910. 
B. A. Abbott, "The Spirit of Science and Progress — ^Luther Burbank," 

Feb. 4, 1910. 
Frederick D. Kershner, "Romeo and Juliet," Feb. 18, 1910. 



12 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

I. N. McCash, "Christianity, the Starting Point of Progress," Feb. 23, 

1910. 
L N. McCash, "America's Need," Feh. 24. 1910. 
W. S. Buchanan, "The Broken Harmony," March 2, 1910. 
W. S. Buchanan, "The Old Covenant," March 3, 1910. 
W. S. Buchanan, "The New Promise," March 4, 1910. 
Frederick D. Kershner, "Othello, March 11, 1910. 
J. A. Ruble, "Character Building," March 24, 1910. 
W. Powell Hale, "Impersonations," March 25, 1910, 
Preston B. Hall, "Old Milligan," April 14, 1910. 
T. E. Utterback, " The Four-Faced Man," April 16, 1910. 



LECTURE COURSES 1910-11. 



The Milligan Catalogue goes to press so early this year that 
it is impossible to schedule the full list either of lecturers or of themes 
for the coming year. It may be said, however, that the lecture courses 
will be fully up to the excellent standard of former years. The fol- 
lowing lecturers, with a partial list of subjects, have already been 
engaged: 

Peter Ainslie, Pastor of the Christian Temple, Baltimore, Md., and 
President of the A. C. M. S. 

"The Imperialism of Christ." 

"Problems of City Evangelization." 

"One Hundred Years "With the Disciples." 

"Christianizing the Americans Necessary to the Christianizing 
of the World." 

"David Livingstone; an Explorer of a Continent." 

B. A. Abbott, Pastor Union Avenue Christian Church, St. Louis, 



Mo. 



"Prophets of the Middle Age." 

"St. Augustine." 

"Thomas A'Quinas." 

'St. Benedict." 

"St. Francis." 

"Savonorola." 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 13 

PMliip Y. Pendleton, Paator Vine St. Chrisitian' Church, Nashville, 
Tenn. : 

"Expression." 

"Story Telling." 

"Supeiiiclality." 

"One Talent Folk." 

Other lecturers, subjects unannounced so far, are: Ira M. Bos- 
well, pastor Walnut St. Christian Cthurch, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

W. H. Siheffer, Pastor Linden St. Church, Memphis, Tenn. 

W. P. Shamhart, Pastor Christian Church, Rocfewood, Tenn. 

W. P. Crouch, Pastor Christian Church, Athens, Alabama. 

W. H. Book, Pastor Christian Church, Columibus, Indiana. 

Professor Preston B. Hall, Lynchburg, Va. 

Evangelist Charles Reign Scoville, Chicago, 111. 



14 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



PURPOSES AND AIMS. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE stands for a definite and fixed idea of 
education. The central core of that idea is that character develop- 
ment is the FIRST THING to be considered, and that intellectual 
training, while vastly important, is always subsidiary to it. 

Th'ose who have charge of the school believe in the Christian 
Religion. They believe, therefore, in the immortality of the soul. If 
it be true that the soul is immortal, then the first question which every 
teacher should ask is, "How can I so train the plastic mind placed 
in my charge that it shall develop into something worth lasting for- 
ever?" Most modern systems of education think only of time; they 
leave the question of eternity, the question of the soul, as though 
it were unworthy of attention. At Milligan, the one purpose of the 
school is to build strong, clean, noble manhood and womanhood. We 
do not neglect intellectual development, as our curriculum will indi- 
cate, but we stand, first of all, for the building of character. All the 
intellectual culture in the world will not atone for vicious habits 
and a tarnished soul. HofW many parents have sent their children 
to school, desiring that they should receive a "liberal education," 
and have gotten them back, intemperate in body and in mind, and 
ruined morally, both for time and for eternity? Whatever Milligan 
does, and has done in the past, it makes, and has made, clean men 
and women. The success of our graduates is the best possible prac- 
cal demonstration of the MILLIGAN IDEA. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 15 

HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE was chartered in 1882, being the successor 
to Buffalo Institute, which had been a power for good in the commu- 
nity and surrounding country since the time of the Civil War. The 
good accomplished by the old institution was greater than can be 
estimated now; but, with the chartering, came a new era of larger 
and better things for the school. There was the development of 
the college life and work and spirit; a new building gave increased 
capacity for the larger number of students who flocked to the insti- 
tution; the force of teachers was strengthened to meet the growing 
needs; lamd great lnite.rest was taken in the development of the new 
college. 

From the beginning, there was an earnest desire to make the 
college an instrument for the accomplishment of good. The moral 
standard was raised very high; and every question, religious, political, 
social and individual, was tested by this high standard. The Chapel 
exercises were made a forum for the discusisiiOin of the great questions 
of life, and the ideal of clean and manly or womanly character was 
constantly held up before the students. The wholesome influence of 
this policy resulted in a class of graduates who stand firmly in oppo- 
sition to every wrong and hurtful thing, who are zealous for every 
genuine reform, and who are ever ready to lend assistance to any 
good cause. Thus, while the school has not been behind as to literary 
training, its great success has been in character building. It has 
developed sterling qualities in its men and women, and no institution 
can claim a larger percentage of successful graduates. 

The college has had but three presidents during its history; 
J. Hopwood, from 1882 to 1903; H. R. Garrett, from 1903 to 1908, ajnd 
P. D. Kershner, who was elected to the position in February, 1908. 
Both the founder. President Hopwood, and his successor, President 
Garrett, have left an undying impression for good upon those placed 
under their charge, and bequeathed an invaluable legacy of good men 
and lofty spirit to the college, the success of which has been largely 
due to their self-sacrificing energy and devotion. 

The first class went out from Milligan in the spring of 1882, and 
the graduates now number two hundred and four. Of these, the 



16 MILLIQAl^ COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

greater part are teachers and preachers; some have entered the pro- 
fessions of law and medicine; and some are to be found in other 
callings. Nearly all of tliem are succeeding in their chosen fields of 
work. Besides the graduates of the institution, there are hundreds 
of students who did not stay in school long enough to complete the 
course, but who nevertheless received their training for their life's 
work here. They are scattered throughout this section of the country, 
and farm a body of honest, industrious, pure-minded and safe citdzenis. 
These twenty-eight years of college work have made great and 
lasting impression on the life of our country. The college points 
to its record with a feeling of just pride, sees in it the certain prom- 
ise of great possibilities for the future, and asks but the patronage 
and support to which the principles for which it stands and the history 
of what it has accomplished entitle it to make a proportionately 
brighter record in the years to come. 



ROBEBT MILLIGAN. 



Robert Milligan was born m Tyrone, a county of the most north- 
ern province of Ireland, July 25th, 1814. In 181S he was brought 
to thie United States by his parents, John and Margaret MlLligan, who 
settled in Trumbull county, Ohio, which was afterward the native 
county of the late President McKinley. In 1831 he entered Zelienople 
Academy, in Beaver county. Pa., and, in 1833, a classical academy, 
conducted by a graduate of the University of Edinburgh at Jamestown 
in the same state. As one of nine children of parents in moderate 
circumstances, he had to begin life for himself before he had com- 
pleted his collegiate training. Accordingly, in 1837, he opened a 
school at Flait Rock, in Bourbon county, Ky. A careful study 
of the New Testament, in the original Greek, resulted in his immer- 
sion, on March 11th, 1838, by Elder John Irvin, of the Church of 
Christ at Cane Ridge. 

Earnestly desiring the advantages of 'a collegiate education, he 
left Kentucky in 1839, with the intention of entering Yale College. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 17 

His journey over the National Road brought him to Washington, Pa. 
A delay, occasioned probably by his unwillingness to travel on the 
Lord's Day, led to his remaining in Washington, where he could at- 
tend what was then called Washington College, and where he could, 
at the same time, worship with the small congregation of disciples in 
the neighboring village of Martinsburg. Graduated in 1840, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, which had then a very definite meaning, 
he was at once promoted from the tutorship, which he had held in 
the college before his graduation, to the professorship of the English 
language and literature; and during a part of that time, he gave 
instruction in Greek and Latin classics also. Meanwhile, in 1842, he 
married Miss Ellen Blaine Russell, of Washington, whose father at 
the time, and one of whose brothers afterwards, represented the Bed- 
ford (Pa.) district in congress. In 1843, Professor Milligan received 
from has alma mater the degree of Master of Arts; in 1844 he was 
ordained a minister of the gospel, with imposition of the hands of 
Elder Thomas Campbell, the venerable father of Alexander Campbell; 
and in 1849 or 1850, he was transferred to the department of chem- 
istry and natural history. When in 1852 the college was placed under 
the control of the Presbyterian Synod of Wheeling, he insisted on the 
acceptance of his resignation, that the institution might be wholly in 
the hands of those who were entitled to guide its fortunes. 

Invited at once to Bloomington, Ind., he held first the chair of 
mathematics, and then that of chemistry, natural philosophy and 
astronomy, in Indiana University. The degree of Doctor of Divinity, 
which was tendered to him by the University, he declined. Resigning 
his professorship at Bloomington, because of the ill health of his son, 
he accepted in 1854 the chair of mathematics and astronomy in Beth- 
any College, in what was then a part of Virginia. Besides the duties 
of his professorship, he discharged those of an elder of the church at 
Bethany, and for three years, beginning with 1857, he was a co-editor 
of the Millenial Harbinger. 

In May of 1857 he was elected President of Bacon College at 
Harrodsburg, Ky. The name of the institution having in the meantime 
been changed, he was inaugurated President of Kentucky University, 
on Wednesday, September 21st, 1859, which was the third day of the 
first session under the new name. After the destruction of the col- 



18 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

lege building by fire, in February of 1864, had made the removal of the 
institution from Harrodsburg necessary, he was a member of the 
committee that decided in favor of removal to Lexington. When Ken- 
tucky University, which had now attained university proportions, was 
reorganized in 1865, with its founder as the head of the associated 
colleges, Pi'esident Milligan was placed at the head of the College of 
the Bible, a place most congenial to his tastes and purposes, which 
he filled until his last illness. 

As an author, President Milligan, in addition to his Tract on 
Prayer, which he had written before, composed during the last ten 
years of his life, the volumes entitled, Eeason and ReTelatlon, The 
Scheme of Redemption, The Great Commission, Analysis of the 
Gospels and Acts, and which was published as a posthumous work. 
Commentary on Hebrews. 

He died peacefully, in full possession of his faculties, and sur- 
rounded in his home by his family and by friends, on March 20th, 
1875. His death was lamented in the ccmmunities in vrliich he had 
lived, and was deplored throughout the Christian Brotherhood. The 
Apostolic Times concluded its announcement of his decease with 
" APrince has this day fallen in Israel;" theAmerican Christian Ke- 
yiew declared that he was one of those "of whom the world was 
not worthy;" and President .John W. McGarvey, his fi-iend and oo- 
laborer in the College of the Bible, in the funeral discourse which 
he pronounced, summed up the general estimate of his character in 
the words that are repeated on his monument in the Lexington 
cemetery: "He was a good man, and full of the Holy Spirit and of 
faith." — (Excerpt from Article, "Robert Milligan," in John T. Brown's 
"Church «f Christ." 



THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ALUMNI. 

(Note. — It is our desire to secure a brief record and the cor- 
rect address of each of the alumni. To this end, we sent out a large 
number of letters during the past year. The information we were 
able to secure is published herewith. Members of the alumni will 
confer a favor upon us by sending us any corrections or further 
information they may happen to know of individually. Address all 
communications to Frederick D. Kershner, Milligan College, Tenn., or 
to George W. Hardin, Johnson City, Tenn.) 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 19 

THE SOCIETY OP ALUMNI OF j^EILLIGAN COLLEGE 



OFFICERS. 

G^o. W. Hardin ('82), President. 
Geo. E. Lyon ('91), Vice-President. 
J. E. Crouch ('96), Secretary and Treasurer. 

Annual banquet and reunion held the evening of Commence- 
ment day at the College. 



THE ALUMNI. 



Class of 1882. 



C. B. Armentrout, A. M., teacher Washington College, Tenn. 

George E. Boren, E. L., lawyer Bristol, Tenn. 

Cihajrlies F. Carson, B. S., farmer TeiMord, Tenn. 

Aaron A. Ferguson, A. M., preacher Elizabeth ton, Tenn. 

Has held pastorates for the churches at .Johnson City, 
Tenn., Rockwood, Tenn., and Kinston, N. C, leaving the latter 
place to take up his present work. He is now Professor of 
Exegesis and New Testament Greek in Milligan College and 
also pastor of the church at Elizabethton, Tenn. 

George W. Hardin, B. L Johnson City, Tenn. 

Vice President and Superintendent of the E. T. & W. N. 
C. R. R. Member of the State Board of the Tennessee Chris- 
tian Miss. Society. President Milligan Alumni Association, 
1909-10. Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of Milligan Col- 
lege. An elder and active worker in the .Johnson City church. 

*Lulu Henidrix (Crockeitt), B. L., teacher Milligan, Tenn. 

*Lucy C. Matthews (Hardin), B. S .Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. H. Rutrough, A. M., Principal of Normal School Willis, Va. 

James H. Smith, A. M., insurance Johnson City, Tenn. 

*Deceased. 



20 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

James A. Tate, A. M., teacher and lecturer Slielbj^ille, Tenn. 

Former Chancellor of the American University of Har- 
riman, Tenn., and Prohibition Candidate for Governor of Ten- 
nessee. Now Principal of Dixon Academy and a prominent 
lecturer in the cause of Temperance. 
Class of 1883. 

Samuel L. Carson, A. B., attorney-at-law Greeneville, Tenn. 

Teacher in Washington College, 1883-88. Principal of 
Academy in Clinch Valley, Tenn., 1888-90. President of Cur- 
ry College in Lee Co., Va., 1890-91. Studied law at Sneedville, 
Tenn., and is now County Judge at Greeneville, Tenn. 

W. R. Henry, B. S Sherman, Texas. 

"Went "West to Sherman, Texas, in early fall of 1883. In 
real estate business. 

♦William J. Slielbuine, A. B Christiansburg, "Va. 

Died in the spring of 1885, while a student in the law 
department of the University of "V'irginia. 
Class of 18S5. 

♦Frank F. Bullard, A. M., preacher Lynchburg, "Va. 

Mary Elizabeth Epps (Hardin), B. S., Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Preston B. Hall, A. M., Professor "V. C. C Lynchburg, "Va. 

Pastor church at Luray, Va., 1885-88; missionary to Japan 
1889-90; pastor of church in California five years; in Kinston, 
N. C, six years; Deaa Bible College, Virginian Christian Col- 
lege, Lynchburg, Va., 1908-10. 
Chas. L. Maddox, A. B., preacher and farmer, Crocketts, Wythe Co, Va. 

Edmund A. Miller, A. M., lawyer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Taught in Duncard College in Valley of Virginia, also in 
Lordsburg, Cal., for several years. 

William E. Reed, B. S., farmer Stanton, Texas. 

Waller M. Straley, A. B., Simmonsville, Craig, Co., Va. 

Was a student in the Normal School, Dayton, Ohio, after 
leaving Milligan College. Taught in Milligan several years; 
also in Craig County, Va.; in Fayetteville, Tenn., and in the 
Piedmont Business College, Lynchburg, Va. Is now prin- 
cipal of High School in Craig county, Va. 

* — Deceased. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 21 

Robert H. Walker, B. S Pandora, Tenn. 

Class of 1887. 

EJugene M. Cnoucih, A. M., President of College, North Manchester, Ind. 
James W. Giles, A. B., Principal of Business College. . . .Lynchburg, Va. 
Teacher in Business College, Lynohburg, 1887-1910. 

Leajtitiia L. C. Tate (Cornforth), A. M Shelbyviille, Tenn. 

Professor of English in the American University of Har- 
iriman. Term.., 1903-08; Professor of English in Dixon Academy, 
iShelbyville, Tenn., 1908-10. 

Edward C. Wilson, A. B., preacher East Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Was pastor of ForeS't Avenue Church, Knoxville, Tenn., 
'before going to Chattanooga; has been in Chattanooga since 
1906. 

Class of 1888. 

Francis E. Caldwell (Baber), B. S Charleston, W. Va. 

Susan A. Kegley (Gibson), B. S Wytheville, Va. 

Wife of Wm. B. Kegley. 

William B. I^egley, A. B., lawyer Wytheville, Va. 

A. Irvin Miller, A. M., Va. Christian College Lynchburg, Va. 

Class of 1889. 

Annie M. Finley (Preston), B. S Red Ash, Ky. 

Wife of Dr. Finley. 

Henry R. Garrett, A. M., teacher Thorpe Springs, Texas. 

Professor of Mathematics in Milligan College, 1889-1902; 
President Mjilligan College, 1902-08; Principal High School, 
■Bangs, Texas, 1908-09; President Add Ran-Jarvis College, 
Thorpe Springs, Texas, 1909-10. 

Frank D. Love, B. S., lawyer Georgetown, Texas. 

Formerly member of the Texas State Legislature. 

Charles G. Price, B. S 101 E. 23d St., New York City 

Teacher in Commercial Department, Milligan College, 
1889-90; pupil in Knoxville Business College and accountant 
in Knoxville Fire Insurance Co. office, 1890-91; teacher in 
Business College, Atlanta, Ga., 1891-95; teacher in Business 



22 MILLIGA!>f COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

College and Baker-Himel University School, Knoxville, Tenn., 
1895-98; teacher of Commercial Branches, Sadler's B. & S. 
Business College, Baltimore, Md., 1898-1907; teacher Commer- 
cial Branches in the Packard Commercial School, New York 
City, 1907-10. 

Class of 1890. 

William P. Cousins, B. S., real estate agent Norfolk, Va. 

Oharles Cornifonth, A. M., newspaper repoiiter Savannah, Ga. 

Thomas J. Cox, A. B., business Johnson City, Tenn. 

Mamie Haun (LaRue), B. S Bessemer, Ala. 

Willijam H. ELaun, B. S., railroad engineer Bessemer, Ala. 

John P. McConnell, A. B. Milligan College, A. M., Ph. D. University of 

Virginia, Emory and Henry College Emory, "Va. 

Former Professor of Languages in Milligan College. Mt- 
erward graduate student of the University of Virginia. Now 
professor of History and Economics in Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, Va. 

Sarah C. Straley (Thomas), B. S., teacher Lynchburg, Va. 

Samuel G. Sutton, A. B., preacher Saltville, Va. 

Class of 189L 

D. Sinclair Burleson, A. M., teacher State Normal School, Florence Ala. 

Elizabeth E. Cox (Matthews), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Alary Hendrickson, B. S Lexington, Ky. 

George E. Lyon, Ph. B., preacner 703 Jackson St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corresponding Secretary Kansas Christian Missionary 
Society. 

W. R. Motley, A. B., pi'eacher Chatham, Va. 

Chester D. M. Showalter, A. M Roanoke, Va. 

Real estate and insurance business. 
Lou Ella Showalter (English), B. S Roanoke, Va. 

Wife of Chester D. M. Showalter. 
John V. Thomas, A. M., preacher, farmer, merchant. . .Sherman, Texas. 

Class of 1892. 

Mary E. Burleson (Dew), B. S Florence, Ala. 

Wife of Prof. D. Sinclair Burleson. 



MlLLIQAJ^ COLI^EGE CATALOGUE 23 

Walter L. Dudley, A. M., principal of Academy Orando, Va. 

Oardelia P. Henderson, A. B., teaaher Johnson City, Tenn. 

David Lyon, B. S., preacher Topeka, Kan. 

Clara McConnel (Lucas) , Ph. B Emory, Va. 

Wife of Prof. John P. McConnell. 

J. Prank Sergent, B. S., lawyer Gate City, Va. 

James E. Stuart, Ph. B., A. M., preacher Union City, Tenn. 

Has held pastorates at Harriman, Tenn., and Washington, 
D. C, hefore going to Union City; was pastor of the 15th 
St. Churoh, Washington, D. C, and Corresponding Seicretary of 
the Maryland, District of Columbia and Delaware Christian 
Missionary Society, 1905-09. 

S. T. Willis, A. B., LL. D., 1268 Union Ave., New York City. 

Born in Kentucky July 16, 1864; studemt College of the 
Bible, Lexington, Ky., 1883-86; pastor of church. Bowling 
Green, Ky., 1886; Chattanooga, Tenn., 1SS7; Knoxville, Tenn., 
1888-89; graduated from Milligan College 1892, with degree 
of A. B., and from Union Theological Semiinary, 1893; took five 
year post graduate study in the University of New York, re- 
ceiving degree of A. M., in 1893; pastor church in New York 
City, 1889-1910. 

Class of 18i)3. 

Nannie Givens, Ph. E., teacher Buchanan, Va. 

Agatha Lilley (Miller), B. S Keokuk, Iowa. 

Wife of Robert W. Lilley. 

Robert W. Lilley, B. S., preacher Keokuk, Iowa. 

Etta Reynolds (Brown), B. S Alliance, Ohio 

Wife of C. B. Reynolds. 

George C. Simmons, B. S., teacher Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Andrew Jackson Wolfe, Ph. B Kahoka, Missouri 

Class of 1894. 

James C. Coggiins, A. M., teacher Lenore Co., N. C. 

Lee R. Dingus, A. B., teacher Florence, Ala. 

John P. Givens, A. B., preacher Heywoi'th, 111. 

William J. Matthews, B. S., M. D Johnson City, Tenn. 

Member Board of Trustees of Milligan College. 



24 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

D.aniel E. Motley, A. M., Ph. D., President Washington Christian Col- 
lege Washington, D. C. 

William J. S'helburne, A. B Norwood, Ohio. 

Former State Evangelist for Tennessee and pastor of the 
ichurcihes at Rockwood, Tullaihoraa, and the Vine St. church 
at Nashville, Tenn. ; pastor of the church at Norwood, Ohio, 
1908-10. 

J. Wesley Showalter, A. B., Prnicipal High Scho'ol near Snoiwville, Va. 

Class of 1895. 

Byrdine A. Abhott, A. B St. Louis, Mo. 

Born in Craig Co., Va., Jan. 6, 1866; educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Virginia, Milligan College, and at the University 
of Virginia; taught school; served as evangelist; has been 
editorially connected with four of our papers; was pastor six 
years at Charlottesvdlle, Va., and fifteen years in the Harlem 
Avenue Church, Baltimore, Md.; pastor of the Union Avenue 
Church, St. Louis, Mo., 1910. 

George R. Cheves, B. S., editor Pulaski, Va. 

Lula M. Dye (Hagy), B .S Greendale, Va. 

*R. J. English, B. S., M. D Glade Hill, Va. 

L. C. Felts, B. S Bluefield, Vv^. Va. 

*Williiam S. Givens, A. B., teacher and preacher Newport, Va. 

Edward E. Hawkins, Ph. B., teacher Burnsville, N. C. 

Thoimias B. McCaritney, A. M., Ph. D., (Univ. of Va.) . . . .Lexington, Ky. 
Former Prefessor of Languages in Milligan College; aft- 
erward graduate student of the University of Virginia; Pro- 
fessor of Greek and Dean of Transylvania University, 1903-10; 
Acting President of Transylvania Univeirsity, 1906-08. 

C. Burnett Reynolds, A. B., preacher New Philadelphia, Ohio. 

Geo. P. Rutledge, A. M., preacher 4209 Viola St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pastor Third Christian Church, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pearl Shelburne, Ph. B., teacher Green Bay, Va. 

Geo. H. P. Showalter, A. B., principal of Academy. .. .Lockney, Texas. 

Lizzie Wilbuirn Thomas, B. S Sherman, Texas. 

Wife of John V. Thomas, class of 1891. 

Bertha E. Tomlin, (Thomas), B. S., teacher Oklahoma. 

* Dec eased. 



MILLIGAJ^ COLLEGE CATALOGUE 25 

Ina Yoakley, B. S., teacher New York City. 

Teacher in Johnson City schools for several years; stu- 
dent in Columbia University, 1909-10. 

Class of 1896. 

J. Edwin Crouch, Ph. B., business Johnson City, Tenn. 

Former Superintendent Schood'S, Johnson City Tenn. 
Elder in Johnson City church, and one of the best known 
Sunday school workers in the south. Preacher, teacher and 
business man. 

Class of 1897. 

Isaac A. Briggs, A. B., M. D 1117 E. Main St., Enid, Oklahoma. 

Graduated from Eclectic School of Medicine, 1901; gradu- 
ated from Allopathic School of Medicine, 1905; President of 
Indian Territory Medical Association one year; Vice-President 
of Oklahoma Medical Association two years; appointed mem- 
ber of Medical Examining Board of Oklahoma by Gov. C. N. 
Haskell, 1908. 

I. G. W. Buck, B. S., teacher Woodsboro, Texas. 

Went West in 1898; is at present the proprietor of a store, 
lowns a fine farm, is a county ofiicial, and is still teacihing. 
Has been a teacher ever since graduation. 

A. Jackson Bunts, B. S Bowie, Texas. 

Taught at Max Meadows, Va., 1897-98; Stuart, Va., 1898- 
1900; student University of Chicago, 1900-03; taught in Chi- 
cago several years; superintendent of schools, Bowie, Texas. 

Laura Belle Clark, B. S., teacher Pulaski, Va. 

Taught in Hiwassee, Va., 1897-1903; Belspring, Va., 1903- 
07; Pula3ki, Va., 1907-08; Pime, Va., 1908-09; Snowville, Va., 
1909-10. 

Charles V/iley Johnson, Pb. B Rockdell. Va. 

Taught in schools of Russell and Tazewell counties, Va., 
1897-1905; student in University of Virginia, 1905-07; teacher 
of Psychology, Logic and Latin in Rawlings Institute, Char- 
lottesville, Va., 1906-07. On account of poor health he is now 
living on a farm in Rockdell, Va. 



26 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

James G. Johnson, A. M., Ph. D., (Univ. of Va. '09), Charlottesville, Va. 
Graduated at Mllligan in 1897; principal of Masonic In- 
atitute. Mountain City, Tenn., 1898-1900; principal Martha Wil- 
der school, Johnson City, Tenn., 1900-04; student University 
of Virginia, 1904-09; A. M., Milligan College, 1905; M. A. Uni- 
versity of Virginia, 1906; Ph. D., UniversiJty Oif Virginia, 1909; 
city isuperintendent of schools, Charlottesvine, Va., 1909-10. 
Charlottesville, Va., 1909-10. 

Annie Lee Lucas, B. S., teacher Childress, Va. 

Teacher in Childress, Va., 1897-1903; Belspring, Pulaski 
County, Va., 1903-05; principal of Snowville Graded School, 
Snowville, Va., 1905-06; principal of Auburn High School, 
Riner, Va., 1906-07; principal of High School, Shawsville, Va., 
1907-08; teacher in Academic department of Shoemaker Col- 
lege, Gate City, Va., 1908-10. 

A. Robert Ramey, A. B Defiance, Ohio. 

Professor of Greek and History, Tazewell College, 1897-08; 
Greek and English, 1898-1900; principal of Newcastle Insti- 
tute and teacher of English, 1900-02; M. A., Milligan College, 

1902; Graduate student in English, University of Virginia, 1902-03; 
professor of Latin, Elon College, N. C, 1903-05; English, 
1905-06; Greek, 1906-07; head of department of English in 
Defiance College, 1907-10. 

Class of 1898. 

Elbert L. Anderson, B. S., teacher .Johnson City, Tenn. 

Charles D. Hart, B. S., teacher Milligan, Tenn. 

Ogden Johnson, Ph. B., teacher Rockdell, Va. 

Edward Rodney Massie, B. S., teacher Ben, Va. 

Juliet Rowlett Massie (Showalter), Ph. B., teacher Ben, Va. 

Mary Virginia Orr (Shelhurne), Ph. B., teacher Dot, Va. 

Samuel Walter Price, A. M., lawyer Johnson City, Tenn. 

Studied law in University of Tennessee, 1898-1900; attor- 
ney in Johnson City, Tenn., 1900-10; superintendent of John- 
son City Sunday School and active Church and Sunday School 
worker. 

George Sells, E. S., M. D Johnson City, Tenn. 



MULLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 27 

Thomas M. Sells, B. S., business Johnson City Tenn. 

Forrest Summers, B. S., M. D War Eagle, W. Va. 

Class of 1899. 

Annie L. Bolton, Ph. B., stenographer Bluefield, W. Va. 

Charles W. Givens, A. B., University of Virginia Charlottesville, Va. 

Kichard Maury Leake, A. B., physician Oolliersville, Tenn. 

Minnie D. Myhr (Bolton), Ph. B Belleview, Tenn. 

Class of 1900. 

Landon C. Bell, Ph. B., A. M., lawyer Asheville, N. C. 

Sue Bell (Brummett), A. B., A. M., teacher Covington, Va. 

Daisy Boring, B. S., principal High School Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Principal of High Schools in Washington County, Tenn., 
1900-10. 

Wilson R. Bowers, B. S., principal of school Rural Retreat, Va. 

Horace M. Burleson, A. B., insurance Johnson City, Tenn. 

Launa Burchfield (Hyder), B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Librarian Milligan College, 1900-07. 

Larkin E. Crouch, A. B., teacher and preacher Nashville, Tenn. 

Robert S. Field, B. S., business Romeo, Tenn. 

Mollie Hale, B. S., teacher Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Ida Hendrix (Anderson), Ph. B., teacher Johnson City, Tenn. 

Gentry Hodges, A. B Ardmore, Oklahoma. 

Student University of Virginia 1904-07; principal of High 
School in McGaheyville, Va., 1908-10. 

Monte E. Hyder, B. S., teacher and farmer Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Stephen A. Morton, A. B., preacher Garlard, Texas. 

Former pastor of churches at Danville, Va., and Eliza- 
bethton, Tenn. 

Fay H. Price, B. S Bristol, Va. 

Joe B. Sells, B. S., business .Tohnson City, Tenn. 

Amanda Shelburne, Ph. B Pageton, W. Va. 

Geneva Smith (Wallace), B. S., teacher Gate City, Va. 

Nannie Sutton (Bishop), B. S Pikeville, Ky. 

James S. Thomas, A. M., District Supt. Schools Richmond, Va. 

George A. Wajtson, A. B., preacher Middletown, Va. 



28 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Class of 1901. 

Prank M. Broyles, B. S Knoxville, Tenn. 

!>ideon O. Davis, A. M., 1 Leonard Avenue Cambridge, Mass. 

Professor in Milligan College, 1901-02; student in Univer- 
sity of Virginia 1902-04; professor of History and English., 
Milligan College, Tenn., 1904-05; vice-president and field sec- 
retary Virginia Christian College, Lynchburg, Va., 1905-09; 
graduate student Harvard University, 1909-10. 

Samuel F. Gollehon, A. M Graham, Va. 

William Leslie Leake, A .B., M. D Golliersville Tenn. 

Class of 1902. 

William Thomas Anglin, B. S., lawyer Calvin, Oklahoma. 

I\iatt]i6w Crockett Hughes, A. B., preacher Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Pastor for five churches in Goochland, Fluvanno, Louisa, 
and Hanover counties of Eastern Virginia, 1902-04; pastor 
of Randall St. Church, Baltimore, Md., 1904-05; Shoals, Ind., 
1905-06; Becknell, Ind., 1906-08; Jeffersonville, Ind., 1908-10; 
Married Feb. 1, 1905. 

William Hamilton Jones, A. B., business Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Minor Johnson Ross, A. B., preacher Pulaski, Va. 

Pastor of churches at Chilhowie, Sugar Grove, and Mead- 
ow View, Va., 1902-03; student at Bible College, K. U., Lex- 
ington, Ky., 1903-05; pastor churches at Alton, Ky., and 
Nineveh, Ky., 1904-05; Sulp'hur and Campbellsburg, Ky., 
1905-07; Harrisonburg, Dayton and Shenandoah, Va., 1907-09; 
Pulaski, Va., 1909-10. 

Elizabeth Graham Sayers, B. S., teacher Pine, Va. 

Jeremy Pate Whitt, A. B., teacher Radford, Va. 

Class of 1908. 

William Henry Book, A .M., preacher Columbus, Ind. 

Pastor of church at Pulaski, Va., six years; Cliftan Forge, 
Va., five years; Columbus, Ind., five years; has done much 
evangelistic work; author of a "Volume of Sermons," and 
"Real Life." 

Gilbert Henry Easley, B. S., teacher Bristol, Tenn. 

Oscar Monroe Fair, A. B., LL. B Chattanooga, Tenn. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 29 

Taught In public schools of Carter county, Tenn., 1903-04; 
commercial department of Milligan College, 1904-05; assistant 
auditor of Virginia Coal and Iron Co., Big Stone Gap, Va., 
1905-06; bookkeeper in Johnson City, Tenn., 1906-07; student 
of law. University of Chattanooga, Tenn., 1907-09; admitted 
to bar July 3, 1909; valediotorian in a class of thirty-seven 
■students, 1909; also manager of foot ball team, and captain 
of baseball team of University of Chattanooga, Tenn., 1909; 
.lawyer in Chattanooga, Tenn., 1909-10. 

Craig Byrd Givens, Ph. B 1116 East Main St., Danville, Va. 

Teacher in public school, Craig Co., Va., 1903-04; pro- 
fessor of Mathematics in Mdlligan College, 1904-06; student 
in University of Virginia, 1907-09; piincipai Bellevue Gram- 
mar School, Danville, Va., 1909-10. 

Jesse Brown Givens, Ph. B Newport, Va. 

Myrtle Jeanette Helsabeck (McPherson), Ph. B., A. B., Asheville, N. C. 
Taught in Virginia Christian College and did postgraduate 
work, receiving A. B., 1903-04; taught in Virginia Christian 
College, 1904-05; Alleghany county, Va., 1905-06; Craig coun- 
ty, -906-07; in 1907 was married to James Oscar Helsa.beck, 
who is now pastor of the Christian Church at Asheville, N. C. 

Nannie Ethel Helsabeck (Reynolds), B. S "Williamsburg, Va. 

Taught in Simmonsville, Va., 1903-07; in 1907 was married 
to Edgar N. Helsabeck, now principal of the High School at 
"Williamsburg, Va. 

Carrie Louise Hopwood, Ph. B Springfield, Mo. 

Cordelia May Hopwood, B. S Springfield, Mo. 

Edward Everett Price, B. S., farmer Belle Plain, Kansas 

"Washington Budd Sager, A. B "Woodstock, Va. 

Taught in public schools of Samsville, Va., 1904-05; stu- 
'dent at Medical College of Virginia, 1905-08; at Jefferson 
Medical College of Philadelphia, 1908-09, graduating in a class 
of 215; passed examination of the Medical State Board of 
Virginia, June 27, 1902; physician in Woodstock, Va., 1909-10. 

Annie "Watson (Burner), Ph. B Lexington, Ky. 

Wife of Joseph Thomas Watson. 



30 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Joseph Thomas Watson, A. B., preacher, 425 S. Upper St., Lexington,Ky. 
Pastor church at Vienna, Va., 1903-05; V. C. C, Lynch- 
hurg, Va., 1905-06; In Craig county, Va., 1906-08; Maxwell 
St. Christian Church, Lexington, Ky., 1908-10; student in the 
College of the Bible, Transylvania University, 1908-10. 

Class of 1904. 

J. Robert Garrett, Ph. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Professor in Milligan College, Tenn., 1905-10. 

■William R. Howell, A. B., preacher Beacon Falls, Conn. 

Elgin K. Leake, B. S., business Colliersville, Tenn. 

Arthur C. Maupin, B. S., preacher Cash, Oklahoma. 

Robert L. Peoples, Ph. B., preacher Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James I. Scott, B. S., business Elk Park, N. C. 

Class of 1905. 

*Laura Alice Baker (Wilson), B. S California. 

Teacher in Washington, 1905-06; married, 1906; died, 
Nov. 1908. 

W. P. Crouch, A. M., preacher Athens, Alabama. 

Pastor Central Christian Church, Bristol, Tenn., from 
its organization until 1909; pastor Athens, Alabama, 1909-10; 
prominent evangelist. 

Lucy Louise Hatcher, A. B Walter, Oklahoma. 

Teacher Johnson City, Tenn., 1905-09; High School in 
Walter, Oklahoma, 1909-10. 

Lula Leatitia Lacy (Wilson), B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Taught in Mountain City public schools, 1905-07; Milligan 
College, 1908-09; married, 1908. 

Nannie Lee Price (Ratliff), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Married Attorney S. W. Price, 1905. 

W. H. Garfield Price, B. S., teacher .Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools! of Washington Co., Tenn., 
1905-10. 

Lola Eleanor Roberts ( Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Taught in public schools of Mountain City, Tenn., 1905-07; 
Knoxville, 1907-08; married, 1909. 
*Deceaaed. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 31 

Aylette Rains Van Hook, A. B Jolinson City, Tenn. 

Business, 1905-06; teacher in Milligan College, Tenn., 
1906-07; position in Jolinson City post oflBce, 1907-10. 

Georgia Marion White, A. B., teacher Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter county, 1905-09; Wa- 
tauga, Tenn., 1909-10. 

Elizabeth Leatitia Wilson (Kelley), B. S Kent, Oregon. 

Taught in Cherokee, Tenn. ,1905-06; Oak Grove, Tenn., 
1906-07; Green Pine, Tenn., 1907-08; married Jeremiah Wilson, 
1908. 

Class of 1806. 

M. Nola Fields, Ph. B Baileyton, Tenn. 

Teacher of elocution in Milligan College, 1907-08. 

Mary Lydia Hanen, B. S., teacher Thorpe Springs, Texas 

Taught music in Milligan College, 1906-08. 

'*Lucy J. Hart, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Taught in public schools of Carter county, Tenn., 1906- 
07; died from typhoid fever, Nov. 1907. 

Roiscoe Hodges, B. S., teacher R. F. D., Jonesbo-ro, Tenn. 

Teacher in Milligan College, 1906-08; in public schools 
of Washington county, Tenn., 1908-09; Knoxvillg, Tenn., 
1909-10. 

Robert Decker Hyder, A. B Elizabeth ton, Tenn. 

Teacher in High School in Georgia, 1906-09; county super- 
intendent of schools, 1909-10. 

Samuel D. Kesner, A. B., teacher Greendale, Va. 

Owen F. Kilburne, Ph. B., business Inman, "Va. 

Frank A. Taylor, B. S., farmer Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1907. 

N. Petibone Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter county, Tenn., 1907-09; 
student in Medical College, Knoxville, Tenn., 1909-10. 

R. Bennick Hyder, B. S., teacher Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter county, Tenn., 1907-10. 
♦Deceased. 



32 MILIJGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

John L. Kulin, Ph. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Business, 1907-09; law student in University of Tennes- 
isee, Knoxville, Tenn., 1909-10. 

Edgar C. Lacy, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Student in Summer School, University of Tennessee, 1908; 
teacher in Milligan College, 1907-10. 

James M. Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools in Washington county, Tenn., 
1907-10. 

Class of 1908. 

Stella Lee Burleson (Sutton), A. B Largo, Florida. 

William Lee Cook, B. S., business Jellico, Tenn. 

Mary Frances Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Maggie Matilda Wright, A. B., teacher Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter county, Tenn., 1908-10. 

Class of 1909. 

George M. Bowman, Ph. B Pearidge, Arkansas. 

Principal Masonic Academy, Pearidge, Ark., 1909-10. 
Shelburne Ferguson, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Instructor in Milligan College, 1909-10. 
Jennie Hatcher, Ph. B Temple, Oklahotia. 

Teacher in public schools. Temple, Okla., 1909-10. 
Anna Kelley, Ph. B Unaka, Va. 

Student in Milligan College, 1909-10. 
G&OTge Robert Lowder, Ph. B Bluefleld, W. Va. 

Business, 1909-10. 
Persia I. Owen, Ph. B Burnside, Ky. 

Instructor in Milligan College, 1909-10. 

Mary Evelyn Sevier, Ph. B Harriman, Tenn. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, Ph. B Crossville, Tenn. 

Student in Milligan College, 1909-10; A. B., Milligan Col- 
lege, 1910. 
James W. Stephens, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Instructor in Milligan College, 1909-10. 
Rennie Bolton White, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schoiols of Carter county, Tenn., 1909-10. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 33 

William I. Williams, Ph. B Johiisoii City, Term. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter county, Tenn. 1909-10. 

Class of 1910. 

Professior Alexander Reed Milligan, Lltt. D Lexington, Ky. 

Hon. Robert Love Taylor, LL.D., U. S. Senate, .... Washington, D. C. 

Arthur Eugene Buck, Ph. B Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Frances Temperance Hyder, Ph. B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Ann Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Lucius Fields Shelburne, A. B Pennington Gap, Va. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, A. B Crossville, Tenn. 

Catharine Emma Thomas, Mus. B Bristol, Va. 

Charmian Lestelle Thomas, Mus. B Bristol, Va. 

Alma Fiske Van Hook, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 



GEABUATES AND DEGREES CONFERRED 17 MAY, 1910. 



Honorary Degrees. 

Professor Alexander Reed Milligan, Lexington, Ky Lltt. D. 

Hon. Robert Love Taylor, U. S. Senate, Washington, D. C LL. D. 

Degrees In Course. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, Tennessee A. B. 

Alma Fiske Van Hook, Tennessee A. B. 

Lucius Fields Shelburne, Virginia A. B. 

Arthur Eugene Buck, Tennessee Ph. B. 

Frances Temperance Hyder, Tennessee Ph. B. 

Elizabeth Ann Price, Tennessee B. S. 

Catharine Emma Thomas, Virginia Mus. B. 

Charmian Lestelle Thomas, Virginia Mus. B. 



34 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



1909-1910. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Ferguson, Shelburne North Carolina 

A. B. (Milligan College), 1909. Englisti Literature (Brown- 
ing), History of Philosopliy, German, Frencli. 

Kelly, Anna Virginia 

Ph. B. (Milligan College), 1909, French, Music. 

Owen, Persie I Kentucky 

Ph. B. (Milligan College), 1909. English Literature 
(Browning), History of Philosophy, German, Greek. 

Stephens, James W Tennessee 

A. B. (Milligan College), 1909. English Literature 
(Browning), History of Philosophy, French. 
Under Graduate Students. 

Acuff, Charlie Tennessee 

English Classics, Beginning Rhetoric, Freshman History. 
Alf ord, Annie Texas 

Freshman English, Higher Algebra, Plane Geometry. 
Alford, Patricia Texas 

Latin I, English Classics, French I., Beginning Algebra. 
Allamong, Ira West Virginia. 

Latin I., Beginning Rhetoric, Beginning Algebra, Old 
Testament History, New Testament History. 
Anderson, James Tennessee 

English Classics, Plane Geometry, Beginning Algebra. 
Anderson, Jennie Tennessee 

Latin XL, Soph. English, Plane Geometry, Physics. 
Barlow, Ralph West Virginia 

Plane Geometry, Fresh. Mathematics, English Classics, 
Physics. 
Bowers, Carmon Tennessee 

Fresh. History, Plane Geometry, Latin I., English Classics. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 35 

Bowman, Talmage Tennessee 

Latin II., Fresh. English, Beginning Algebra, GeoLogy. 

Buck, Eugene Tennessee 

Jun. Latin, Sen. English, Jun. Mathematics, Senior Phi- 
losophy. 

Burchfield, Yolande Washington, D. C. 

Fresh. History, Latin I., English Classics, Beginning Al- 
gebra. 

Caihoon, Jesse Virginia 

Latin II., Fresh. Greek, Soph. English, Higher Algebra, 
Geology. 

Campbell, Edith Tennessee 

Fresh. Mathematics, English Classics, Latin I., Biology. 

Chapman, D. Park West Virgima 

Latin II., Fresh. English, Plane Geometry, New Testament 
History. 

Clark, Joseph D Tennessee 

Latin II., Fresh. Greek, Fresh. English, Plane Geometry. 

Crouch, Joseph Alabama 

Old Testament History, English Classics, Beginning Alge- 
bra, Latin I., Biology. 

Dobyns, Flem Tennessee 

Latin I., Fresh. English, Plane Geometry, Soph. History, 
Geology. 

Ellis, Bertha Tennessee 

Fresh. History, English Classics, Beginning Rhetoric, 
Latin I. 

Fishpaw, T. S Maryland 

Old Testament History, Fresh. History, English Classics, 
Beginning Rhetoric. 

Garrett, Logan B Virginia 

Jun. Latin, Fresh. Greek, Sen. English, Old Testament 
History, German I., Soph. Mathematics. 

Gentry, G. W Tennessee 

Soph. English, New Testament History, Fresh. History, 
Junior Philosophy. 

Godby, Margaret Virginia 

Higher Algebra, Plane Geometry. 



101841 



36 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Ham m it, Abe Virginia 

Latin I., Englisli Classics, Beginning Algebra. 

Hancock, Lambretti Texas 

Fresb. Englisb, Sopb. History, Old Testament History, 
Geology. 

Hardy, John B Tennessee 

Latin II., Englisb Classics, French I., Plane Geometry, 
Geology. 

Hendrix, Clyde Tennessee 

English Classics, Latin I., Beginning Algebra, Higher 
Arithmetic. 

Hendrix, Ray Tennessee 

Soph. English, French I., Plane Geometry, Soph. History. 

Hill, Guy Tennessee 

Fresh. History, Soph. Mathematics, Fresh. English, Geol- 
ogy, Biology. 

Hyder, C. E Tennessee 

English Classics, Beginning Algebra, Plane Geometry, 
Higher Arithmetic. 

Hyder, Frankie Tennessee 

Old Testament History, Junior Philosophy, Senior Philos- 
ophy, Fresh. Greek. 

James, White Tennessee 

Fresh. English, Latin I., Beginning Algebra, Physics. 

Knight, Frank H Tennessee 

Fresh Latin, Jun. English, French II., Jun. Mathematics, 
Sen. Philosophy. 

LeSueur, Ruth Virginia 

Old Testament History, English Classics, Latin I., White's 
Arithmetic. 

Milam A. B Tennessee 

Plane Geometry, Fresh. Mathematics, Beginning Rhetoric. 

Milwood, Edward Tennessee 

Old Testament History, New Testament History. 

Mlnton, Myrtle Tennessee 

Fresh. English , Plane Geometry, Fresh. Mathematics, 
Preah. History. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 11 

Munisoii, Elm&r B West Virginia 

Old Testament History, English Classics, Beginning 
Rihetoiric, Pbysics. 

Nave, Earl C Tennessee 

Latin L, Plane (ieometry, Fresh. Mathematdics, Bmglish 
History. 

Nave, May Tennessee 

Englis'h Clasisica, Latin I., Biology, Beginning Algebra. 

Perry, F.rank Tennessee 

Beginning Rihetoric, English Classics, Old Testameiut 
IHiiStary, New Testamemt HisitoiT. 

Price, Elizabeth Tennessee 

Jun. Engliish, Sen. Engldsh, French I., Jun. History, Sen. 
Philosophy. 

Price, Lucy Tennessee 

Latin I., Sotpii. English, .lunior English, Plane Geom- 
letoy, New Tesitament History. 

Rainige, George Tennessee 

Latin I., Fresh. English, Soph. Mathematics, Soph. History. 

Rhoades, Myrtle ,. Virginia 

Soph. Englis'h, Higher Arithmetic, Fresh. Hi.itory, Geology. 

Ryian, Wm. A Mai-yland 

Latin L, Beginining Rhetoiuc, Old Testamen't Hisitoxy, 
New Testamen't HistoiT- 

Shamhart, Wilmer H Tennessee 

Jun. English, German I., Plane Geomeiti'y, Geology. 

Shel'buime, Lucius F Viirginia 

Sen. English, Jun. Greek, Sen. Greek, Oid Testamemft His- 
tory, Jun. PMloiSophy. 

Sbeliburne, IMinerva Virginiia 

Jun. Latin, Jun. English, French L, Jun. Phiolsophy. 

Shelbnrne, OUie Virginia 

Fresh. Latin, Sopih. Greek, Soph. English, Plane Geomeitry, 
Geology. 

Shickle, Ada West Virginia 

English Classics, Latin L, Beginning Algebra, Biology. 
S.hickle, Pearl West Virginia 



38 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Englisli Classics, Latin I., Beginning Algebra, Biology. 
Smalling, Claude Tennessee 

Adv. Grammar, Fresh. History, Wliite'is Arithmetic, Biol- 
ogy. 
Snodgrass, Nell V Tennessee 

(Ph. B. Milligan College, 1909), Soph. Greek, Jun. Greek, 
French III. 
Sutton, Chas. E Virginia 

Fresh. English, Higher Algehra, Plane Geometry. 
Suttoa, Margaret Virginia 

Latin II., Old Testament History, New Testament History. 
Swanner, Samuel Tennessee 

Fresh. History. English I., White's Arithmetic. 
Taber, C. W Pennsylvania 

Old Testament History, New Testament History, Adv. 
Grammar, Beginiiing Rhetoric, English Clasisics. 
Tabor, Raleigh H Virginia 

Soph. English, German I., Plane Geometry, Jun. Philos- 
ophy. 
Talbott, Frank Maryland 

New Testament History, Old Testament History, Adv. 
Grammar, Beginning Rheto-ric. 
Taylor, Ben. H Tennessee 

Fresh. Latin, French I., Higher Algebra, Old Testament 
History. 
Taylor, David Tennessee 

Latin I., Fresh. Mathematics, Old Testament History. 
Taylor, James Blaine Tennessee 

English Classics, Latin I., Biology, Beginning Algebra. 
Thomas, Catharine Virginia 

Latin II., Soph. Mathematics, Physics. 
Thomas, Charmian Virginia 

Latin II., Soph. Mathematics, Physics, French I. 
Thomas, G. Tollie Tennessee 

Latin I., Beginning Rhetoric, Beginning Algebra, Old Tes- 
tament History, Biology. 
Trusler, Howard Tennessee 

Plane Geometry, Latin I., Beginning Rhetoric, Biology. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 39 

Van Hook, Alma Tennessee 

Jun. Latin, Sen. Greek, Sen. English, Old Testament His- 
to.ry. Sen. PMlosopliy, Biology. 

Van Hook. Mabel Tennessee 

Fresh. Latin, Fresh. Greek, Soph. English, Plane Geom- 
etry. 

Wade, Bertie Tennessee 

Jun. English, French IL, New Testament History. Junior 
PhilOiSophy. 

Waide, Mary Tennessee 

Latin IL, Fresh. English, Fresh. Greek,, Plane Geometry. 

Wade, Estella Virginia 

English Classics, Biology, Higher Arithmetic. 

Walker, Walieir Owen Tennes.see 

La;tin II. , English Classics, Beginning Algebra, Fresh. 
History. 

White, J. Byrl Tennessee 

Latin II. , Fresh. Greek, Soph. English, Plane Geometry, 
Fi*6Sh Science. 

Williams, Nat Tennessee 

Fresih. Science, Plane Geometry, Beginning Rhetoric. 

Williams, S. A Tennessee 

English Classics, Higher Ariithme'tic, Beginning Algebra. 

Wollard, Leelon F Maryland 

Beginning Rhetoric, Higher Arithmetic, Beginning Alge- 
bra, Old Testament History, New Testament Histoj'y. 

Worrell, Wise Virginia 

Latin II. , Fresh. English, Fresh. Mathematics, Sophomore 
Mathematics, Physios, Geology. 



PBEPAEATORT STUDENTS. 

Anderson, Frank Tennessee 

Anderson, Leia Tennessee 

Anderson, Mabel Tennessee 

Amderson, Margaret Tennessee 

Bacon, Hugh Tennessee 



40 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Bailey, Frank Tennessee 

Bailey, Pinkey Tennessee 

Bailey, Wllmetta Tenniesisee 

Bammom, Junie Tennessee 

Blevinis, Leibtie Tennessee 

Blevims, McKinley Tennessee 

Boren, W. E Tennessee 

Bowman, George .Tennessee 

BoiwmaB, Harry Tennessee 

Bowman, Maggie Tennessee 

Bowman, Ollie Tennesisee 

BurleS'On, Fred Tennessee 

Burleson, Gutchie Tennessee 

Burleson, Millard Tennessee 

Burleson, Pearl Tennessee 

Burleson, Wi«lson Tennessee 

Butner, Eugene Tennessee 

Carrier, Sallle Tennessee 

Oarty, Blanolie Virginda 

Gates, James R Tennessee 

Cox, Cldnton Tennessee 

Oox, Lucy Tennessee 

Oox, William Tennessee 

Crumb, Nellie Tennessee 

Crumb, Wamp Tennessee 

Curtis, Gilson Tennessee 

Dillinder, Sue Tennessee 

Douglas, Frank Tennessee 

Barsley, Ollie Tennessee 

Edens, Amy Tennessee 

Edens, Felix Tennessee 

Ellis, Edmund Tennessee 

Ellis, Pearl Tennessee 

Fair, Will Frank Tennessee 

Faust, Carl Tennessee 

Faust, Emma Tennessee 

Faust, Robert Tennessee 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 41 

Forbes, Riobent Tennessiee 

Freinch, Frankie Tennessee 

Garland, Daisy Tennessee 

Garland, George Ten-nessee 

Garland, Earl Tennessee 

Garrett, Hobart .Tennessee 

Garrett, Luolle Tennessee 

Gentry, Martin Tennessee 

GilXlam, Leona Tennessee 

Glover, Roy Tennessee 

Goiad, Byrum Virgiinla 

Goad, Grosvenor McKiinley Virginia 

Godby, Robeirt Virginia 

Gouge, Arthur Tennessee 

Gouge, Claude North Carolina 

. Gwyn, Lucy Noonth Carolina 

Hampton, Bessie North Carolina 

Hancock, Ruby Texas 

Hartsell, David Tennessee 

Hendrix, Ernest Teaneissee 

Hendrix Laurence Tennessee 

Herell, George D Tennessee 

Hester, Corrie Florida 

Hinds, George W Tennessee 

Hooper, Sterling M Tennessee 

Hughes, Clyde Tennessee 

Hughes, Grace Tennessee 

Hughes, Kate Tennessee 

Hughes, Maude Tennessee 

Hughes, Nola Tennessee 

Hyams, Rohert Henry Nonth Carolina 

Hyder, Geneva Tennessee 

Hyder, S. J Tennessee 

Jones, Herman Tennessee 

Keebler, Joseph Tennessee 

Kethley, Charles Virginia 

Kite, Dempsle Tennessee 



42 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Kite, Frank Tennessee 

Kite, Hattie Tennessee 

Kite, Luther Tennessee 

Lacy, Lena Tennessee 

Larson, Alice Tennessee 

Larson, Wilbur Tennessee 

Leonard, S, S Tennessee 

Lewis, Clarence Kentucky 

Maston, Ira Tennessee 

Maston, Junior Tennessee 

Mclnterf , Anna Tennessee 

Mclnterf , Rossde Tennessee 

Meddlin, Gessie Tennessee 

Melltiorn, Mary Tennessee 

Milam, Roby A Tennessee 

Miller, Joe Tennessee 

Minton, Glen Louis Tennessee 

Moore, J. Luther Tennessee 

Nave, Hazel Tennessee 

Nave, Steward Tennessee 

Patton, Maurice Tennessee 

Payne, Anderson Tennessee 

Payne, Ceslor Tennessee 

Payne, Christine Tennessee 

Payne, Temple Tennessee 

Pearce, Bruce Tennessee 

Pearce, Kate Tennessee 

Pearce, Oscar Tennessee 

Pearce, Ray Tennessee 

People, Georgie Tennessee 

Perry, Noah Tennessee 

Price, Joe Tennessee 

Price, Ralph Tennessee 

Price, Ruth Tennessee 

Range, Cleveland Tennessee 

Redmond, Osa Tennessee 

Rice, Anna May Tennessee 



MILLIQAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 43 

Rice, Howard Tennessee 

Rice. Rachel Tennessee 

Roberts, Mary Tennessee 

Sampson, Cliarley Tennessee 

Schumaker, George W Virginia 

Scyphers, Minnie Virginia 

Shephercl, Bradley Tennessee 

Sihepherd, Carl Tennessee 

Shepherd, Luther Tennessee 

Shepherd, Pearl Tennessee 

Shepherd, Roscoe Tennessee 

Shoun, Charles Tennessee 

Shoun, Earl Tennessee 

Shoun, Ernest Tennessee 

Shoun, Joseph Tennessee 

Shoun, Lizzie Tennessee 

Shoun, Myhr Tennessee 

Shoun, Ray Tennessee 

Shoun, Umbra Tennessee 

Shoun, Wise Tennessee 

Simmons, C. L Tennessee 

Simmons, Jeanette Tennessee 

Simmons, Leslie Tennessee 

Simmons, Virge Tennessee 

Slimp, David Tennessee 

Slusher, Lora Virginia 

Smalllng, Laurence Tennessee 

Smalling, Pearl Tennessee 

Smalling, Raymond / Tennessee 

Smalllng, Sam Tennessee 

Snodgrass, Chlo Tennessee 

Snodgrass, Myrtle Tennessee 

Spoon, Charles Tennessee 

Spoon, George Tennessee 

Spoon, Henry Tennessee 

Spoon, Myra Tennessee 

Spoon. Myritle Tenneasee 



44 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Spoon, Raymond Tennessee 

Southard, Davidson Tenneissee 

Stephenrs, Arthur Tennessee 

Stepp, Willie Tennessee 

Taylor, Alfred Tennessee 

Taylor, Lena Tennessee 

Taylor, Mary Tennessee 

Taylor, Robert Tennessee 

Taylor, Samuel Tennessee 

Tucker, Thad Tennessee 

Usary, Carl Tennesse 3 

Usary, Ernest Tennessee 

Webb, T. O Virginia 

White, Myihr Tennessee 

Whitehead, George North Carolina 

Whitehead, Thomas North Carolina 

Williams, Anna Tennessee 

Williams, Blaine Tennessee 

Williams, Jem Tennessee 

Williams, Jesse Tennessee 

Williams, Nathaniel Hyder Tennessee 

Williams, Robert Tennessee 

Williams, Roberta Tennessee 

Wilson, Newton Tennessee 

Wilson, Tyler Tennessee 

Witt ,Clyde Virginia 

Witt, Hazea Virginia 

Woodby, Charles Tennessee 

Woodby, Dosia Tennessee 

Woodby, George Tennessee 

Woodby, Jeanette Tennessee 

Woodby, Laara Tennessee 

PIANO. 

Alford, Annie Texas 

Bailey, Wilmetta Tennessee 

Burchfield, Yolande Waslhington, D. C. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 45 

Campbell, Edith Tenmeasee 

Edens, Amy Tennessee 

Ellis, Bertha Tennessee 

Garland, Daisy Tennessee 

Qwyn, Lucy North Carolina 

Hancock Ruby Texas 

Hyder, Frankie Tennessee 

Hyder, Geneva , Tennessee 

James, White Tenneasee 

Kelly Anna Virginia 

Lacy, Lena Tennessee 

LeSueur, Ruth Virginia 

Milam, Roby , . . . Tennessee 

Roberts, Mary Tennessee 

Scyphers, Minnie Virginia 

Shickle, Ada West Virginia 

Shickle, Pearl West Virginia 

Thomas, Catharine Virginia 

Thomas, Charmian Virginia 

Trusler, Howard Tennessee 

Van Hook, Alma Tennessee 

Van Hook, IVIabel Tennessee 

Woodby, Mary Tennessee 

VOICE. 

Hancock, Lambreth Texas 

Milam, Roby Tennessee 

Roberts, Mary Tennessee 

Shickle, Pearl West Virginia 

Thomas, Catharine Virginia 

Thomas, Charmian Virginia 

Van Hook. Alma Tennessee 

Van Hook, Mabel Tennessee 

MINISTERIAL. 

Allamong, Ira West Virginia 

Chapman, D. Park West Virginia 



46 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Fishpaw, T. S Maryland 

Gentry, G. W Tennessee 

Hancock, Lambretli Texas 

Millwood, Edward Tennessee 

Munson, Elmer West Virginia 

Perry, Frank Tennessee 

Ryan, Wm. A Maryland 

Stephens, James W Virginia 

Taber, C. Walter Pennsylvania 

Talbot, Frank Maryland 

Thomas, G. Tollie Virginia 

Wollard, Leelop F Maryland 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 



EEQUIREMEKTS FOB ADMISSION. 

Admission to the College is by accredited certificate or examina- 
tion, the examination covering the ground lof the Sub Freshman work 
as outlined elsewhere in the Catalogue. Students who have finished 
their preparatory work here are admitted without examination. No 
examinations are required for admission to the Preparatory Depart- 
ment. For the facilitation of matriculation, printed blanks covering 
the entire list of preparatory studies must be filled out by the student, 
showing, by means of the proper credits, the completion of all work 
below the class he desires to enter. 

MATRICULATION. 

.Students upon their arrival should report at once to the President 
of the College in the College Office. The President will fill out the 
proper blanks and then send the student to the Treasurer; after re- 
ceiving the receipt of the latter for the term fees (see item "Expenses" 
under "General Information"), the matriculate will go to the Sec- 
retary of the College who will enroll him upon the permanent rec- 
ords of the institution, thereby completing the matriculation. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 47 

BEQUIKEMENTS FOE DEGKEES. 

The full requirements for the various undergraduate degrees are 
given in tabulated form, elsewihere in the catalogue. 

For the degree of Master of Arts, the student must have received 
the A. B. degree, and must pursue at least two full years' work under 
the special direction of the Faculty. The preparation of a satisfactory 
thesis is also required. For the degree of Master of Science, the pos- 
session of some other academic degree than that of A. B., together 
with the completion of two full years' graduate study, and a saxis- 
faotory thesis, are required. 



COLLEGE CUfiBICULUM. 



Requirements of Units. 

(A unit means one full tei-m's work, eighteen weeks, in any study 
designated.) 

The Classical Course. 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A. B.) 

Greek Eight Units 

Latin Twelve Units 

English (above Grammar) Twelve Units 

Mathematics (above Arithmetic) Twelve Units 

Science (above Physiology) Four Units 

Philosophy Four Units 

History (above U. S. History) Two Units 

Bible Two Units 

Four units in the Modern Languages may be substituted for the 

two final units in either Greek or Latin. 

The Literary Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy (Ph. B.) 

Latin Twelve Units 

English (above Grammar) Twelve Units 

Mathematics (above Arithmetic) Twelve Units 

French or German Four Units 



48 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



Science (above Physiology) Four Units 

Philosophy Four Units 

History (above U. S. History) Six Units 

Bible Two Units 

Four units in the Modern Languages may ibe substituted for an 
equivalent amount of Latin or History, in this course. 

The Scientific Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 

English (above Grammar) Twelve Units 

Modern Languages Eight Units 

Mathematics (above Arithmetic) Fourteen Units 

Science (above Physiology) Six Units 

Philosophy Four Units 

History (above U. S. History) Six Units 

Bible Two Units 

Electives Four Units 



PKOGBAM OF HE CITATIONS. 





Colle^ate 


Department. 




7:30 French L 










8:15 




CHAPEL 




9:00 Greek L 


Senior 
English 




Freshman 
Science 




9:45 Junior 


Freshman 






New Testament 


Latin 


English 






Histoi-y 


10:30 Frendh II. 


Sophomore 
English 






Old Testament 
History 


11:15 iSophomore 


German I. 




Junior 


Senior 


Latin 






History 


Philosophy 


12:00 




DINNER 




1:00 Greek IV. 


Junior 




Freshman 


Sophomore 




English 




iMathemafcics 


History 


1:45 Greek III. 


German II 




Senior 
Mathematics 


Freshman 
History 


2:30 Gr«ek II. 






Sophomore 

Mathematics 


Junior 
Philosophy 


3:15 Senior 


Freshman 




Junior 





MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 49 

DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND LATIN 



Professor Ellis 



It is the aim of this deparitment to lay, as thoroughly as poisstible, 
the foundation for an apprecdative reading of the Greek and Latin 
Languages. As a very necessary means to this end, prose composition 
in both languages will be studied .systematically throughout the course. 
In translation, tlie authors commonly used in college courses will be 
studied, and an effort made to present their books as works of liter- 
ature, not merely so much material for grammatical dissection. More 
important than the mere study of form, is a realization of the eloquence 
of Cicero, 'the beauty of Virgil and Horace, and the living, irresistible 
charm of genius and spirit in the whole field of Greek literature. 



GREEK. 

Freshman Year 

FIRST TERM— White's "First Greek Book." 
SECOND TERM — White's "First Greek Book," completed. 
Sophomore Tear. 

FIRST TERM — Xenophon's "Anabasis," Books I-III. Goodwin's 
"Greek Grammar," Jones' "Greek Prose Composition." 

SECOND TERM — Homer's "Iliad," Books I-III. Grammar and 
Composition. 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM — Plato's "Apology," Lysias' "Orations," Grammar 
and Composition. 

iSECOND TERM — Demosthenes' "Phillipics," Grammar and Com- 
position. 

Senior Year. 

FIRST TERM — Homer's "Odyssey," Aeschylus' "Prometheus 
Bound." Review of Greek Syntax. 

SECOND TERM— Sophocles' "Antigone," Euripides' "Iphigenela 
in Tauris." Jebb's "Primer of Greek Literature." 

Graduate courses in both Latin and Greek will be offered to stu- 
dents desiring and prepared to take them. 



50 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

LATIN 



Senior Preparatorj^ 

'FIRST TERM — ^First year Latin ((Collar & Daniel). 
SECOND TER.M — First year Latin, concluded. 

Sub Fresliman. 
FIRST TERM— -Second year Latin (Greenough , D'Ooge & Daniel). 
Bennett's Latin Grammar and Prose Coniposition (two hours). 

SECOND TERM — Second year Latin, concluded. Grammar and 
Prose Composition. 

Freshraau 
FIRST TERM — Cicero's Orations. Bennett's Grammar and Prose 
Composition (D'Ooge), (one hour). 

iSECOND TERM — Ovicl, with Prose Composition and Grammar. 

Sopiiomore 
FIRST TERM — Virgil's "Aeneid." Prose Composition and Gram- 
mar (Gildersleeve & Lodge.) 

iSECOND TERM — Cicero's "De Senectute and De Amicitia." Prose 
Composition and Grammar. 

Jniiior Year. 
FIRST TERM — Horace, Books I and II. Selections from Epistles 
and Satires. Prose Composition and Grammar (Gildersleeve & Lodge). 
SECOND TERM — Tacitus' "Agricola and Germania." Prose Com- 
position and Grammar. 

Senior Year. 
FIRST TERM — Livy, Books 1 and 21. Latin Comedy. 
-SECOND TERM— History of Latin Literature. 



DEPARTMEJfT OF ENGLISH. 



Mrs. F. D. Kersliner. 

The ability to express thought clearly and intelligently is one of 
the most important requirements of a college education. Next to this, 
knowledge of the masterpieces of English and American Literature is 
a possession of supreme and lasting A'^alue in every avenue of life. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 51 

Tihe English course is designed to meet both, of these requirements, 
and also to give some knowledge oi the development and history of the 
most important language ever used by the human tongue. The courses 
in detail follow : 

Freshman Tear. 

FIRST TERM — "Manual of Composition and Rhetoric" (Gardiner, 
Kittredge and Arnold), with thorough drill in theme work and com- 
position. 

iSECOND TERM — Panooast's "Representative English Literature," 
with outside reading. 

SopJioHiore Year. 

FIRST TERM — Pancoast's "Introdviction to American Literature," 
with collateral reading. 

SECOND TERM— English Prose. "Specimens of Prose Composi- 
tion," Nutter, Hersey and Greenough. 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM — The Elizabethan Drama. "Shakespeare: Life and 
Work, (Purnivall & IVIunro) ; Miss Umbridge's, "The Drama, Its 
Law and Its Teehndque;" Readings from Marlowe and Shakespeare's 
early plays, such as "Richard III," "Romeo and Juliet," and "Much 
Ado About Nothing." 

SECOND TBE.M — ^^The Drama continued. i\ fiddle and later plays 
of Shakespeare, "Hamlet," "Othello," King Lear," "The Tempesc." 

Seulor Year. 

IFIRST TERM— Early English. "First Book in Old English" 
(Cook). Readings from Chaucer. 

SECOND TERM — Winchester's "Principles of Literary Criticism," 
with istudy of the English Essayists and Reviewers. 

Cfraduate Course. 

FIRST TERM — Nineteenth Centui-y Drama. The Dramatic Mon- 
ologue with a special study of Browning — "The Dramatic Monolgues," 
"Dramatis Personae," "Men and Women," "Paracelsus," "A Blot in 
the Scutheon," "Strafford," and an outline study of "The Ring and the 
Book." Four hours weekly. Pres. Kershner. 

SECOND TERM — The Drama of the Present Day. Later works 
of Browning, Stephen Phillips, George Bernard Shaw, and the Ibsen 
cult. Present tendencies in the Drama. Four hours weekly. President 
Kershner. 



52 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

DEPAETMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 



Professor Lane. 



The "work in roattiematics is designed to give as thorougli and as 
practical a knowledge of the subjects studied as it is possible to gain 
in the time devoted to them. The objects of teaching in this depart- 
ment are three: 

First: The full and harmonious development of the reasoning 
faculties as an equipment for the performance of *he student's life- 
work with the best possible results for himself and his fellow men. 

Second: To reveal to the student the moral worth of the science 
in developing habits of promptness, accuracy and decision, and dis- 
criminating between truth and error. 

Third: To set forth the utility of the science in its practical ap- 
plication to Industrial enterprise. 

An outline oif the courses follows: 

Freshman ¥ear. 

FIRST TERM— Solid Geometry (Wentwor.th). 

SECOND TERM— Advanced Algebra (Wentworth's "College Alge- 
bra, Revised"). This course covers graphs, progressions, logarithms, 
binominal theorems, undetermined coefficients, choice and chance, con- 
tinued fractions, series, the elements of determinants, and such other 
subjects as time allows. 

Sophomore Tear. 

FIRST TERM— Plane Trigonometry (Wentworth's "Plane and 
Spherical Trigonometry, with Tables"). 

SECOND TERM— Plane Trigonometry completed, and Spherical 
Trigonometry. In this course much supplementary woi-k in proving 
identities is done. 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM— Analytics (Wentworth's "Analytic Geometry"). 
iSECOND TERM— Analytics, continued. 

Senior Tear. 
FIRST TERM— Differential Calculus (Hardy). 
SECOND TERM— Integral Calculus. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 53 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 



Professor Ellis and Mrs. Kershner. 

Tlie design of tMs department is to furnish, a working knowledge 
of the two most important representatives of the modern language 
group. The student is carefully drilled in the forms, and is taught to 
acquire as large a viocabulary as possible. Sight reading is extensive- 
ly employed in the course of study. An attempt is also made to famil- 
iarize the students with the most important facts dealing with the 
literature of the French and German peoples. The courses in detail 
are as follows : 

Freuch I. 

FIRST TEP^M— Edgren's "French Grammar." 

SECOND TERM — Edgren's "French Grammar," completed ,Joj'ne's 
"French Reader." Merimee's "Columba," Erckmann-Chatrian's "Le 
Juif Polonais," Jjamartine's "Scenes de la Revolution Francaise." 

French II. 

FIRST TERM — French Prose, Erokmann — ^Chatrian, "Madame 
Therese and Waterloo," George Sand's "La Mare au Diable," Merimee's 
"ChToaiique du Regne de Charles IX," Victor Hugo's "Bug Jargal." 

SECOND TERM— Tiie French Drama. Selected plays of Moliere, 
Corneille and Racine. Victor Hugo's "Ruy Bias." 

German I. 

FIRST TERM — Bierworth's "Beginning G&rman" and "Gluck Auf." 
• SECOND TERM — Thomas' "Practical German Grammar," Heyse's 
"L'Arrabiata," Hauff's "Tales," Easy Prose. 

German n. 

FIRST TERM — Schiller's "WiLhelm Tell" and "Jungfrau von 
Orleans." Lessing's "Nathan der Weise." 

SECOND TERM — Goethe's "Faust" and "Iphigenie Auf Tauris." 
History of German Literature. 

ESPERANTO CLUB. 

A number of the students and faculty of Milligan College are 
interested in the new language, Esperanto; and while no provision 
for its study is made in the curriculum, an Esperanto Club under the 
direction of a competent teacher makes it possible for those who desiru 
to become acquainted with the subject to do so. 



54 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

BEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 



Professor Utterbaek. 

The design of this depiartmenit is to familiarize the student with 
the more important facts of both Ancient and Modern History, and 
also to give some insight into the social life and oonstitutional devel- 
opment of the various nations of the world. 'The course, while no; 
extensive, has been carefully and very thoroug''hly ipLanned. 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM— English History (Andrews). 

SECOND TERM— Civil and Political History . of the United 
States. United States Government and Laws. (Hinsdale's "American 
Gc-vernment") 

Sophomore Tear. 

FIRST TERM— Ancient History (West). 

SECOND TERM— Mediaeval and Modern History (West). 

Junior Year. 

FIRST TERM — Outline History of the Nineteenth Century. Po- 
litical History of Recent Times (Muller's). 

iSECOND TERM — Political and Social Achievements of the Anglo- 
Saxon Peoples. History 'Of Our Own Times (Justin McCarthy), with 
collaterial reading. 



DEPARTMENT OP NATURAL SCIENCE. 



Professor Utterback 

Owing to ciircumstances, it is only possible for us to present outline 
courses in the various sciences, with a minimum of laboratory work. 
Since the college course is moreover practically filled with other 
studies, we have deemed it advisable to place most of our work in 
Science in the Preparatory Department. A general outline of Biology, 
including a brief study of Zoology, Botany and Physiology, occupies the 
Senior Year of preparatory work. Outline courses in Physics and 
Chemistry are given in the Sub Freshman Year. Only one year's 
study in science is requirc'd in tiie college proper. The work for this 
year is as follows: 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST TERM— Geology (Leconte). 
SECOND TERM— Astronomy (Todd). 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 55 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY. 



President Kershner and Professor Utterbnck. 

This department is designed to afford a careful and systematic 
study of the various mental, moral and social sciences, including Logic, 
Psychology, Ethics and Economics. The method of study is by lectures 
and recltationis from approved texts. The courses in detail are as 
follows : 

Junior Tear. 

FIRST TERM — Logic (Creighton), with supplementary problems. 
SECOND TERM— Psychology (James' "Briefer Course.") 

Senior Tear. 

FIRST TERM-^Ethics (Seth's "Ethical Principles.") 
SECOND TERM— Economics (Bullock's "Introduction.") 

Graduate Course. 

FIRST TERM— The History of Philosop,hy. Ancient and Mediaeval 
Philosophy from Heraclitus to the Schoolmen. Lectures witli Rudolph 
Encken's "Problems of Human Life," and Weber's "History of Philos- 
oiphy" as guides. 

SECOND TERM— The History of Philosophy. Modern Philosophy 
from Descartes to the present day. Lectures, with Encken and Weber 
as guides. Assigned collateral reading from Kant and other thinkers. 

BOBEBT MILLIGAN BIBLE COLLEGE. 

The Robert Milligan Bible College has grown out of the needs of 
religious work in the South. Its aim is to furnish an adequate prep- 
aration for the ministry of the Gospel on the part of those who com- 
plete the work assigned. The ideals which govern those who have 
charge of the school are entirely opposed to any legalistic or formal- 
istic interpretation of Christianity. On the contrary, they assume that 
the one need of the world today is the vital, living Christ, Avith His 
message of supreme tenderness and love. To see somewhat of that 
message, to become enthused with it, and to go forth to proclaim it to 
the world, they conceive to be the mission of the preacher. The school 
aims always at thoroughness of preparation and accuracy of scholar- 
ship rather than mere numerical display. It appeals to all jhose who 
have the ideal of q'lality rather than quantity in the work of the 
ministry. 

Unswerving fidelity to the word, and thorough devotion to the 
Christ are the appropriate watchwords of a School bearing the name 



56 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

of one of the noblest of all God's Noblemen, since the Apostolic Age. 
And surely no place could be better adapted by location and environ- 
ment to preserve and cherish the spirit of Robert Milligan than the 
spot which bears his honored name. 

KOBEET MILLIGAN BIBLE COLLEGE FACULTY. 

Frederick D. Kershner, President, Biblical History and Christian 
Doctrine. 

Aaron A. Ferguson, Exegesis and New Testament Greek. 
T. E. Utterback, Church History and Homiletics. 
Walter S. Buchanan, Applied Christianity. 

EEQUIBEMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

To enter the Freshman Class of the Robert Milligan Bible College 
a student must give evidence, by examination or otherwise, that he has 
completed satisfactorily the College Preparatory requirements in Eng- 
lish, Mathematics, History and Science. 



The Robert Milligan Bible College does not confer degrees. It 
does, however, grant an appropriate diploma upon the completion of 
either the classical or English course. These diplomas are certificates 
of merit and carry with them quite as much value as the usual 
academic degrees. Graduates in either course, with very little addi- 
tional work, may secure the regular degrees conferred by the College 
upon their completing the required courses of study. The fee for 
the Bible College Diploma is $3.00. 

CURRICULUM. 
(All studies two terms unless otherwise specified.) 



CLASSICAL MIi!fISTEEIAL COURSE. 



Fresliman Year. 

Greek I, Fresh. English, Old Testament History, Higher Algebra. 
Sophomore Year. 

New Testament Greek, New Testament History, Sophomore Eng- 
lish, Christian Doctrine und Polity, Sophomore Mathematics. 

Junior Year, 

New Testament Greek II, Apostolic History, Junior English, Prac- 
tical Work of the Minister, Junior Philosophy. 



MILLIQAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 57 

Senior Tear. 

Senior Ptiilosophy, Senior English, Church History, Exegesis (one 
iterm), Homiletics (one term), and one elective In History or Science. 



ENGLISH MINISTEKIAL COURSE. 



Freshman Year. 



Freshman English, Old Testament History, Freshman History, 
Higher Algebra. 

Sophomore Year. 

Sophomore English, New Testament History, Christian Doctrine 
and Polity, Sophomore Mathematics, Sophomore History. 

Junior Year. 

Junior English, Apostolic History, Practical Work of the JVIiniater, 
•Junior Philosophy, and one elective in History or Science. 

Senior Tear. 

Senior English, Church History, Exegesis (one term), Homiletics 
(one term). Senior Philosophy. 



PKOGEAM OF RECITATIONS. 

9:00 Freshman Science, Senior English, Practical Work of Min- 
ister, Greek I. 

9:45 Freshman English, Exegesis and Homiletics, New Testa- 
ment History. 

10:30 Sophomore English, Old Testament History. 
11:15 Senior Philosophy, Junior History. 
12:00 Dinner. 

1:00 Freshman Mathematics, Church History, Sophomore His- 
tory, Junior English. 

1:45 New Testament Greek III, Apostolic History, Preahman 
History. 
2:30 New Testament Greek H, Sophomoi-e Mathematics, Junior 
Bhilosopmy. 

3:15 Christian Doctrine and Polity. 



58 . MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

BEPAETMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

I 

SCHOOL OF SACEEB HISTORY. 



President Kershner, Professor Utterback. 

COURSE 1. Old Testament History. The History of the Jewish 
people from the Creation of the World to the Captivity. Textbooks 
— The Authorized and American Revised editions of the Holy Script- 
ures with Maclear's "Old Testament History" as a guide. Selections 
from the Old Testament are read and critically studied in this class. 
For 1910, the books studied will be The Psalms, Ecclesiastes, and the 
Prophesy of Jeremiah. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

COURSE II. New TestamenJt Plistory. Sacred Hisitory from the 
Dispersion to the Resurrection. Textbooks — ^Tihe Gospels, Authorized 
and Amerioan Revised editions, with Maclear's "New Testament His- 
tory" as a guide. Lectures with chart outline and a critical study of 
one oif the Apocryphal Books and at least one of the Gospels. The 
Gospel studied in 1910 will be Luke. Two termis — iflvie hours weekly. 

COURSE III. Apostolic History. The History of ithe church 
from the day of Pentecost until the close of the New Testament Canon. 
Textbooks — The Acts and Epistles, Auibhorized land American Re- 
vised ©diitions. Lectures with careful reading and study of selected 
Epistles. Two terms — ifour hours weekly. 

'COURSE IV. Church History since the Apostolic pei'lod. Church 
hasitory /from tihe death of the Apoistle John to the presemt time. 
Special attention given to the Reformation and the later restoration 
movementis. Lectures. Two termis — ^fiour hours weekly. 



U 
SCHOOL OF EXEGESIS AND CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE 



President Kershner, Professor Ferguson 

COURSE I. New Testament Exegesis. Careful study of tlhe prin- 
ciples of Hermenefutics iwith exegesis of selected portions of the 
Scriptures. Lectures. One term — four hours weekly. 

COURSE II. Cihrisitian Docitrine and Polity. Two terms. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 69 

First Term — The Comteut of Christianity. A careful study of the 
essential message of Ghrlist, with a scrutiny of the Ideals of Life He 
strove to inculcate. 

Second Term — The Form of Christianity. A study of the Ordi- 
iianoes, Creed and Polity of the Chiistian Church. Lectures. Four 
hours weekly. 



in. 

SCHOOL OF APrLIED CHfilSTIANITT. 



Professor W. S. Buchanan, Professor Uiterback 

COURSE I. Practical work of the Minisiter. (a) Pastoral duties, 
(b) The Sunday Sohool, (c) Evangelism, (d) Missions. Lectures. This 
course will be given by an eiminentJy practical and successful minister 
who will embody his personal experience in his teachings Two terms 
— two hours weeklj'. 

COURSE IL Theoretical Homiletios. Lectures, -with Johinson's 
"The Ideal Ministry" as a guide. One term — ^three hours weeMy. 

COURSE III. The Social Mission of .Jesus. The Message of 
Clirist for the shifting social conditioins of the present day. Mission 
work in the large cities, tenement life, etc. Lectures. One term — 
tlir«e hours weekly. (Elective.) 



IV. 
SCHOOL OF BIBLICAL GREEK 



Professor Ferguson, Professor Elllw. 

(Not required for Englisb Certificate). 

COURSE I. Beginner's Course. White's "First Greek Book" com- 
pleted. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

COURSE II. The Greek New Testament with composition. Exe- 
getical study of the Gospels. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

COURSE III. The Greek New Testament completed. Critical 
study of the Acts and Epistles. Two terms — five hours weekly . 



60 , MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

MILLIGAN PBEPARATOBY SCHOOL 

The Milligan Preparatory Scliool is designed to furnlsli sucli in- 
structloai in the preparatory and secondary branches as will prepare 
students properly for the College course. It is also designed for the 
benefit of such students as are partially or incompletely prepared to 
take up the Freshman year's work and who therefore need special 
instructions along certain lines. There are no specific entrance re- 
quirements as the student is placed where his previous record, in 
public or private school, entitles him to go; and in case he fails to 
keep up his work properly, he is dropped to a lower class. 



CUEBICULmi 



Sub Freshman 

FIRST TERM— Plane Geometry (Wemtworth) , Latin (Caesar) 
with Bennett's Prose Composition and Grammar, Elementary Physics, 
English (College Entrance Requirements for 1910 — 1911). 

SECOND TERM — Plane Geometry (completed), Latui (Caesar 
and Composition completed). Elementary Chemistry, English (College 
Entrance Requirements continued). 

Senior Preparatory. 

FIRST TERM— Higher Algebra (Wentworth), First Year Latin 
(Collar & Daniel), Elementary Biology (Hunter), Preparatory Rhet- 
oric (Williams). 

SECOND TERM— Beginning Algebra (completed), Firt Year Latin 
(completed), Physical Geography (Davis), Preparatory English liter- 
ature (Westlake). 

Junior Preparatory 

FIRST TERM— Beginning Algebra (Milne), Advanced United 
States History (Montgomery's "Student's American History"), Ad- 
vanced Grammar ("Mother Tongue Series, No. 11"), Advanced Geog- 
raphy (Tarr & McMurray). 

SECOND TERM— Advanced Arithmetic (completed). Advanced U. 
S. History (completed). Advanced Grammar ,eomplet€<i). Advanced 
Geography (Tarr & McMurray) completed. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 61 

First Year Preparatory 

FIRST TERM— Arithmetic (White), English Grammar ("Mother 
Tongue Series, No. 1"), Geogi'aphy (Frye "Elementary Geography"), 
U. S. History (Thompson), Physiology (Steele), Spelling. 

SECOND TERM — First term's studies completed. 



PROGRAM OF RECITATIONS 



Preparatory Department 

8 : 15 Chapel. 

9:00 Beginning Latin, Advanced Geography. 

9:45 Sub-Fresh. Mathematics (Plane Geometry), Sen. Prep. 
Science f Biology). 

10:30 Sen. Prep. Math. (Algebra II), Jun. Prep. History (U. S.) 
11:15 Sub-Fresh. Latin (Latin II), Jun. Prep. Math. (Beg. Alg.) 
12 : 00 Dinner. 

1:00 Senior Prep. English (Beg. Rhetoric) 

1:45 Sub-Fresh. Science, (Physics.) 

2:30 Sub-Fresh. English (College Entrance Requirements.) 

3:15 Junior Prep. English (Advanced Grammar.) 
(Firsit Year Preparatory Classes unscheduled.) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



LATIN 

Senior Preparatory 

FIRST YEAR LATIN ((Collar and Daniel), with careful drill in 
the forms. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Sob Freslnnan 

SECOND YEAR LATIN (Caesar and Bennett's Latin Prose). Two 
terms — ifive hours weekly. 



ENGLISH 

Mrs. F. D. Kershuer 

First Year Preparatory 

ENGLISH GRAMMAR ("Mother Tongue, Book 1"), with Spelling. 
Twio terms — five hours weekly. 



62 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Junior Preparatory 

ADVANCED GRAMMAR ("Mother Tongue, Book 11"), witli com- 
poQition work. Two terms — five hours weekly. 
Senior Preparatory 

PREPARATORY RHETORIC (Williams). First term— five hours 
weekly, 

PREPARATORY ENGLISH LITERATURE (Westlake). Second 
term — five hours weekly. 

Sub Freshman 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS IN ENGLISH. List for 
1910-11). Two terms — five hours weekly. 



PBEPAEATOEY MATHEMATICS 



Professor Lane 
First Year Preparatory 

FIRST TERM— Advanced Arithmetic (White). 
SECOND TERM— Advanced Arithmetic, continued. 

Junior Preparatory 
FIRST TERM— Beginning Algebra (Milne's High School Algebra). 
SECOND TERM— Beginning Algebra, continued. 

Senior Preparatory 
FIRST TERM— Higher Algebra (Wentworth's "Higher Algeibra"). 
SECOND TERM— Higher Algebra, continued. 

Sub Freshman 
FIRST TERM— Plane Geometry (Wentworth's "Plane Geometry"), 
SECOND TERM— Plane Geometry, continued. 



SCtENCE 
First Tear Preparatory 



PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE (Steele). Two terms— five hours 
weekly. 

Senior Preparatory 

ELEMENTARY BIOLOGY (Hunter). First term— five hours 
weekly. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 63 

Sub Freshman 

ELEMENTARY PHYSICS (Steele). First term— Ave hours 
weekly. 

ELEMENTARY CHEMISTRY (Steele). Second term— five hours 
weekly. 



HISIOET 

First Tear Preparatory 

ELEMENTARY U. S. HISTORY ( Thompson). Two terms— five 
hours weekly. 

Juuior Preparatory 

ADVANCED U. S. HISTORY (Montgomery). Two terms— five 
hours weekly. 



GEOGEAPHY 



First Year Preparatory 

ELEMENTARY GEOGRAPHY (Frye). Two terms— five hours 
weekly. 

Junior Preparatory 

ADVANCED GEOGRAPHY ((Tarr & McMurray). Two terms— five 
hours weekly. 

Senior Preparatory 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (Davis). Second term— five hours 
weekly. 

DEPAKTMENT OF MUSIC 



Miss Marcelena Houston 
Piano 

The Method of Pianoforte instruction pursued is the "Flexible wrist 
loose-arm sytem," inaugurated by Mendelssohn, Chopin and Talburg, 
and continued by Liszt and his pupils. Technical and theoretical in- 
sitructlon are combined. All possible questions relating to the pupil's 
work are asked, and constant reference is made to Musical Diction- 
aries and Encyclopedias. 

Two thirty-minute lessons or one forty-minute lesson per week 
will be given in the Music Department in accordance with arrange- 
ments mutually satisfactory to teacher and pupil. 

Recitals will be given by the pupils during the school year, to 
which the patrons and friends of the college are invited. 

Voice Culture 

The aim of our method is, first to develop the voice throughout its 
entire compass, then to perfect It. We teach the proper use and 



64 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

extent of the registers of the voice, diapliragmatic breathing, and pure 
flexible tone. Tone is the chief aim during the entire course of study. 
The peculiarities presented by different voices are directed and modi- 
fied, each according to its own nature. 

Any pupil in the school may beilong to the Glee Club, whether a 
studemt in th.e Music Department or not. 

MTSICAL CURBICULUM 

FIRST GRADE — Sartorio, Practical Method. Gaynor's "Melody 
Pictures." Kohler, "Easy Studies," "Little Pieces" by Spaulding, 
Richter, Streabog. 

SECOND GRADE! — Situdies; Duvernoy, Loeschhorn, Kohler. Sim- 
ple pieces by Schumann, Hayden, Chopin, Heller, Lange. 

THIRD GRADE— Studies : Czerney, "Etudes de la Velocite;" Hel- 
ler, "Etudes Loeschhorn." Composition of Jenson, Jungmann, Bohm, 
Schuimann, Mozart, Clemeruti, Kroeger, and other composers. 

FOURTH GRADE — Studies: Cramer, "Etudes," four books; Hel- 
ler, "The Art of Phrasing;" Bach, "Little Preludes." The Compositions 
of Ohopin, Grieg, Godard, Mendelssohn, Rubenstein, and Liszt, are 
carefully studied in this grade, special attention being given to inter- 
pretation and technics. 

FIFTH GRADE— Studies : Bach, "Two Part Inventions;" dem- 
enti, "Gradus ad Parnassum;" Kullak, "Octave Studies." Difficult 
oompositions of Bach, Beethoven, Liszt, Grieg, Raff and MacDowell are 
stuidied in this grade. 

A thorough knowledge of the Elements of Harmony is required for 
the completion of this grade. 

BEQUIEEMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music (Mus. B.), completion of the 
entire Music Course is required, together with two years of Harmony, 
and one year of Theory and History of Music. Graduates in Music are 
also required to give a public Recital, unassisted, previous to grad- 
uation. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



Mr. MelTlu 3L Knight 

The ai'm of the Commercial Department is to be complete and 
practical!. The courses are designed, work outlined, text-books select- 
ed, and everything planned with the one design of giving the student 
everything necessary in training and equipment, to enable him to fill 
comipetently the positions in the actual comimeroial world of today, 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 65 

ifor wliich the work he tekes is supposed to be a preparation, and to 
tax his time aud energies with as little as possible that is not directly 
useful. The courses usually offered in Business Colleges throughout 
the country, are taught here as foltows; 

1. Stenography and Typewriting 

(a) SHORTHAND. There is a great deal of irrelevant, polemical 
discussion indulged in over the merits of different shorthand systems. 
We do noit believe the matter of choice of sysitem to be nearly so vital 
as diligent appilication to the one selected, until its principles have 
become mastered by study and their application has grown natural and 
easy through practice. We give students their choice of either the 
Graham or the Gregg systems. The former is usually conceded to be 
the most rapid of the Pitmanic systems; while the latter is best known, 
and we believe, e^ierything considered, the best, of the liglit-line posi- 
tionless sysitems. Tlie course consists in tihe regular texts with prac- 
tice matter for dictation work. 

(;b) TYPiEWRITING. Typewriting by touch is so far aud so 
obviously superior to the old method, that we compel all students to 
learn "absolute touch," and deal shortly with any indications of a 
tendency to drift into the clumsy sight-writing. Studenits practice 
two hours each school day on naw standard machines. A rental of 
50'C per week, $2.00 per monrbli, is charged for the use of the machines, 
payable in advance; or students may furnisih their own machines. 

(c) STENOGRAPHERS' BUSINESS PRACTICE. The short-hand 
and typewriting work is supplemented by two weeks of actual oilice 
work, involving the taking and transcriibing of business letters, the 
use of those business foi'ms with wliich a stenographer must be ac- 
quainted, coipyinig, filing, card-indexing systems, and everything the 
student will find in a modem office. 

IL BOOKKEEPING A>D OFFICE BPACTICE 

Tihi'S course will make competent business bookkeepers of those 
who conscientiously pursue and finish it. It includes "Practical Book- 
keeping," a thorough and up-to-date text-book, and "Twentieth Cen- 
tury Business Practice," a practice-course in which the student act- 
ually keeps in suocesslon five different sets of books, in different kinds 
of business, making all the transactions and handling all tlie bus- 
iness papers, cash, etc., with which he would have to deal in keeping 
the books of a modern business enterprise. A Supplementary Course 
gives Instruction in Bank Accounting, by the same methods. 
m. COMMERCIAL LAW 

A comprehensive course in the laws of business with which bus- 
iness men should be familiar. Study and recitation from a good Com- 



66 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

merciial College Texit, two hours weekly, alternating with the Penmaiu- 
isihip Course. 

IV. BUSINE,S.S EEKMANSHIP 

We teach the well-knoiwn "Palmer Method of Business Writing," 
which develops a rapid, easy, legible, business hand — that which the 
'business world of today demands. Practice, under instructor's su- 
pervision, three hours peir week, alternating with Co*mmercial Law. 

©IFL03IAS 

Two diplomas are granted for Commercial work, one in Stenog- 
raphy, and the other in Bookkeeping. 

(a) STENOGRAPHY. To receive the Stenographer's Diploma, 
itihe student must satisfactorily compilete the course, must pass exam- 
ination in Shorthand and in Typewriting, and must be proficient in 
Spelling, English Grammar and Rhetoric. The Shorthand examina- 
tion covers the taking of dictation from new matter from different 
sources a^t a speed of one hundred words per minute, and reading 
same back accurately and readily from the Shoa'thand notes. The 
standard for typewriting is a coipying speed of seventy words per 
minute from unfamiliar matter of different kinds, five words to be 
deducted for each error. The Diploma fee is $3.00. 

(b) BOOKKEEPING. Students who satisfactorily complete the 
course in Bookkeeping, furnish evidence of competency, and paas an 
examination in Commercial Law, and who write a plain business hand, 
will be granted our Accountants' Diploma, on payment of the Diploma 
tee of $3.00. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Location 



The college is located three miles from Johnsion City, and half a 
mile from the Milligan station on the East Tennessee and V/estern 
North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small village named 
Milligan College in honor of the insititution. 

The looation is one of the most beautiful in Aanerica. The Watau- 
ga River flows only a short distance belov/ the grounds, and the scen- 
ery around the college is unsurpassed in natural beautty and grandeur. 

Healthfulness 

One of the most imipo.ntaa:irt oonskieiratfioins in selecteing a college 
is its healthfulness of location. Other advantages amount to but little 
wiithout this, the most valuable of all. In the thirty years of Its his- 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 67 

tory, no epidemic has been known at Mlligan. The purity of the 
air, the excellent water, and the splendid advantages for physical de- 
velopment have been chiefly responsible for this condition. 

Bnil dings 

The college buildings are three in number. The main builddng, a 
substantial brick structure, containing the recitation rooms, chapel, 
library, and society halls, occupies the center of the campus. It has 
been newly refitted, painted and papered. The young men's home, a 
ftwo-story frame building, containing nearly thirty rooons, plainly 
furnished, but affording substantial accommodatio'ns for students, is 
located to the rear of the main building. 

The Frances T. and Columbus A. Mee Memorial Hall 

Through the munificence of Mrs. Frances T. Mee, of Cleveland, 
Tenn., we now have free of deht our spacious and handsotmely fur- 
nished young ladies' dormitory. Mee Hail is a three-story brick 
structure, opened for the first time for the season of 1908-09. It 
contains thirty-ttwo rooms, with reception rooms and parlor, has hot 
and cold water on each floor ,is handsomely furnished, and is heated 
iby steam. Rooms in ithis building should be engaged as soon as possi- 
ble, as a number had already been reserved when the catalogue went 
to press. 

The college campus contains over thirty acres of ground. A large 
and beautiful grove, each tree of which was planted by some former 
student, surrounds tlie main building. There are excellent ball 
grounds and tennis courts for the use of the student body. 

Library 

The library contains aboux five thousand volumes and is being 
rapidly increased. The departments of history and Biblical literature 
are particularly well equipped. 

Heading Room 

The reading room is kept supplied with the best weekly and 
monthly magazines, among others being "The Outlook," "The Indepen- 
dent,'" "The Saturday Evening Post," "The Christian Standard,' 
"Christian Evangelist," "The Literary Digest," "McClure's," "Review of 
Reviews" "Cosmopolitan," "The American Magazine," "Harpers," and 
many others. All studembs have the privilege of the library and 
reading room, subject, of course, to proper rules and regulations. 

Honors 

The average grades for tlie entire length of time spent in school 
are printed upon the Commencement programs. The student in the 



68 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Classical Course, sustaining the highest general average is awarded 
the Valedictory. The student sustaining the next highest average, 
in any course, is awarded the Saluta'fcory; and the situdent sustaining 
the highest average after those of the Valedictorian and Salutatoirian 
is awarded the Class Oration. 

Contests 

Through the miunificence of two of our alumni, Mr. Oscar M. Fair 
(1903), and Mr. George E. Lyon (1891), two gold medal oratorical 
contests are held during the week of the Commencement exercises. 
The George E. Lyon Contest is open to all students, irrespective of 
age or class, while the Oscar M. Fair Contest is between the represen- 
tatives of the Literary Societies of the College. The Fair contest car- 
ries with it a prize of $15 in gold and a gavel made of wood from 
Lookout Mountain for the successful society. 

Organization of Classes 

The College makes no provision for the organization of classes 
in any department in which less than five students have signified their 
IntenbLoca of taking up the work. 

Literary Societies 

The literary societies are four in number — The American, Adel- 
phian, and Volunteer for young men, and the Ossolian for young 
ladies. They do excellent work during the year, giving public per- 
formances upon stated occasions. 

Athletics 

Milligan, with its looation and facilities, naturally offers every ad- 
vantage for clean and successful athletics. Athletics are encouraged, 
within the proper bounds, and in accordance with the proper Inter- 
Collegiate standards. Only "clean ball,' 'in every sense of the term, 
will be permitted in connection with the institution. 

College Spirit 

The greatest and best inheritance of Milligan is its "college 
spirit." It is not of the kind which delights to express Itself in row- 
dyism and profanity, but rather in a clean, pure, healthful moral tone 
which irresistibly permeates the whole student body. The very air of 
Milligan breathes purity and high-toned Christian character . 

Bellgious and Moral Influences 

The religious and moral influences thrown around the student at 
Milligan are of the best. The prayer meetings, both mid-week and 
Sunday evenings, have a reputation that ha3 become national, if not 





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MILLIG/vIs^ COLLEGE CATALOGUE 69 

indeed intermational. The "Number Nine" students' prayer meeting 
has exerted an influence unexcelled by any other meeting of the kind 
in existence, and the regular mid-week prayer meeting is also unsur- 
passed in its own way. The chapel exercises at Milligan are far less 
perfunctory and more geuinely devotional than any the writer has 
observed elsewhere, although he has had large opportunities for obser- 
vation in the matter. 

Young Ladles' Home 

The r-ules governing the conduct of girls in our young ladies' 
home, while strict, are not burdensome. The greatest care is exer- 
cised by those who have them in charge, and parents may safely trust 
their daughters in our hands. We have a thoroughly efficient and 
capable Dean of Vv^'omen, and an experienced matron in charge of the 
housekeeping department. The young ladies' rooms are extra large, 
are well ventilaited, equipped with new furnit-ure, and are coimtortable 
in every sense of the term. We furnish exceptionally good board for 
the prices charged. There are few places in the world where a young 
iady can secure a thorough educatiion at so little expense, as at JVLil- 
gan. 

What to Furnish 

Students boarding at the homes will furnish their own toilet arti- 
cles, towels, napkins, pillow cases and sheets, and one blanket each. 

Breakage 

The parents or guardians of students are held responsible for any 
breakage or damage done to property or furniture. 

Outside Board 

Young ladles attending the college are not permitted to board 
outside of the home, except with the express approval of their pa- 
rents, and special permission from the faculty. 

Text Books 

Text-tbooks, stationery, etc., can be purchased at publishers' price 
from the college book store. All purchases at the store are strictly 
cash. Nearly all necessary books can be secured second-hand, thus 
reducing the expense for books to a minimum. 

Monday Holiday 

Monday instead oif Saturday is the regular weekly holiday. 

Two Terms 

The school yeai* is divided imto two term's, or semesters, of eigh- 
teen weeks each. 



70 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

Class Absences 

Five unexcu&ed absences in any one study will suspend the stu- 
dent thus absent. 

Age Limit in Young Men's Dormitory 

Boys under fifteen years of age are not allowed to room in the 
young men's dormitory. 

Athletic Requirements 

By a resolution of the Executive Committee of Milligan College, 
no student will be allowed to represent Milligan College in Inter-Col- 
legiate Athletic contests who ,has not been enrolled for one full term, 
and who has not made during that time a passing grade in at least 
three studies. 

Mission Studies 

The college takes an active interest in mission work, and mission 
study classes will be conducted. A complete library, embracing such 
books as "The Price of Africa," "The Christian Conquest of India," 
"Where tiie Book Speaks," etc., is provided for the use of students. 

Milligan Baisil 

The.caliiege maintained an excellent band and orches'tra in 1909-10. 
The outlook for the coming year is also priomising as regards this 
feature of college life. 

Jfoted Places IV' ear Milligan 

Within a distance of one to ten miles are many spots of historic 
interest. Among them are: 

The starting point of the patriotic mountaineers wJio faced death 
on King's Mountain, and by their gallant victory changed the colonial 
rebellion into a successful revolution. 

The battlefield where, in 1788, the force of arms decided that East 
Tennessee and Western North Carolina should not remain as the 
separate STATE of FRANKLIN. 

The seat of the first legislative body ever asseimbled in Tennessee. 

The bed-log of the first gristmill ever built west of the Alleghany 
Mountains. 

The tree on which is cut "D Boon did Bar," and many other points 
of interest. 

Tfhese may all be seen in oair excursions. 

Rules and Eeg^ulatious 

Students are expected to deport themselves as ladies and gentle- 
men, above all, as those who are, or expect to be, Christian men and 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 71 

women. No pi'ofanity is permitted on Lhe grounds, nor is the use of 
tobacco or alcoliol in anj"- form allowed. Insubordination, or viola- 
tion of the laws of the school will lead to expulsion and permanent 
exclusion 'from its privileges. 

Milligau Eudowment 

Through the kindness of Professor Alexander H. Milligan of Lex- 
ington, Ky., who gave $5,000 for the purpose in December, 1909, we 
now have the nucleus of a permanent endowment fund. This fund 
ought to be increased to at least $100,000 in order to enable Milligan 
College to accomplish the work it can and ought to do. 

Scholarships 

Those who cannot help with the permanent endowment may lind 
it possible to endow named scholarships in the institution. The sum 
of $800 will endow a perpetual scliolarship, carrying with it the tuition 
expense of one student for every year. The sum of $2,000 will endow 
a ministerial scholarship, carrying with it the board, room, heat, light, 
and tuitio.n expense of one student in the ministerial course each 
year. The sum of $2,500 will endow a similar scholarship for a young 
lady In any of the regular collegiate courses. 

Annual scholarships providing for student expense, year by year, 
may be contributed individually as follows. Forty dollars, in four 
equal payments, will constitute a named tuition scholarship for the 
year; and one hundred dollars, in ten equal payments, will constitute a 
named ministerial scholarship for the year. Churches, Endeavor or 
Ladies' Aid Societies, and even Sunday School Classes should provide 
iicholarships of the kind for worthy students among their number or 
elsewhere. 

Form of Bequest 

iMany friends of Milligan College will doubtless be glad to help its 
work, after they have passed from this earth to their reward. In this 
way, they will be able to originate a stream of influence, continuing 
throughout eternity. The following, or an equivalent form, should be 
used in youx will, which should fully describe real estate, and should 
be signed by you, in the presence of witnesses, whose signatures should 
likewise appear: 

"I give and bequeath to Milligan College of Tennessee, an institu- 
tion chartered under the laws of the state of Tennessee, and located 

at Milligan College, Carter County, Tennessee, the sum of $ 

(or if real estate, let location and description appear at this point) 
for the use of said institution in conducting its work of education; and 
the receipt of the secretary of the said institution for the above-named 
sum, or described property, shall constitute a release for my executor 
for the same." 



72 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

How to Gfet to Miilfgau College 

Eastern students come to Bristol, Tenn., thence to Johnson City. 

Western students come to Knosviile, Tenn., thence to Johnson City. 

Southern students come via Asheville, N. C, and Morrisfcown, 
Tenn., to Johnson City. 

MILLIGAN COLLEGE STATION is three miles from Johnson City, 
on the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina R. R. 

Conduct in Examinations. 

By a Resolution of the Faculty, adopted May 2nd, 1910, it "was 
determined that in all classes in the Collegiate Department, and the 
Sub-Freshman Class of the Preparatory Department, the penalty for 
any sort of dishonesty on the part of students in examinations shall 
be, in the first instance "Suspension from that class in which the of- 
fence occurred for the term, v/ith the loss of all credit for the term's 
work in the aforesaid class, no opportunity for making up said work to 
be permitted until the scholastic year following. For a second offence 
by the same party, the penalty shall be suspension from the College 
for the term in which the offence was committed, with the loss of 
all credits for the term's work." 

ilt was also resolved, "That in all cases, the srtudent accused of 
dishonesty shall be given a fair trial, and conviction shall follow an 
affiranative vote of three fourths of the niembersMp of the entire 
faculty." 



EXPENSES 



loitiou 



COLLEGE LITERARY— College, Sub Freshman, aad Beaiior 
Preparatory classes, per term of eighteen weeks, in advance, $20.00 

If paid by the month (at the beginning of the month), per 
month of four weeks I 5.00 

PREPARATORY — Junior Preparatory, First Year Prepara- 
tory, and Sub Preparatory classes, per term of eigbteeai weeks, 
in advance $15.00 

If paid by the month (at the beginning of the month), per 
month of four weeks $ 4.00 

MUSIC — Instrumental or Vocal, per term of eighteen 
weeks $20.00 

If paid by the month (at the beginning of the month), per 
month of four weeks S 5.00 

BUSINESS — Bookkeeping per term of eighteen weeks SIO.OO 

■Stenography and Typewriting, per term $10.00 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 73 

Oomiplete business course, per term $20.00 

Typewriter rent extra, as per under Business Department. 

MINISTERIAL— English Course (Dormitory Students) Free 

iClassieal Course, per term of eighteen weeks $10.00 

GRADUATE — ^Any one course, per term of eighteen weeks. . $ 5.00 
ROOM RENT in Dormitories, including, Heat, Light, etc. 

IN BOYS' HOME, per term of eighteen weeks $14.00 

In MEE HALL, per term of eighteen weeks, from $15.00 to $20.00, 
according to location of ,room. 

Board in College Diuing Hall 

Board must be paid in advance, by ticket. Price for single ticket 
Cone week's board), $2.25; price for ten tickets, purchased at one time, 
$20.00. Board tickets are always cash. They are transferable, but 
not redeemable. 

Outside Board 

Furnished room with board can be secured outside the college in 
private families at from $9.00 to $12.00 per mionth, tlie usual price 
being $10.00. 

Fees. 

The only fees connected with the college are the following: 

(a) Library fee of one dollar charged each student upon ma- 
triculation, and the proceeds applied strictly to the purchase of books 
and magazines for the library. 

(b) Matriculation fee of $10.00 charged all students in the Eng- 
lish Ministerial Course, who do not room and board in the College 
dormitory. This fee will also admit anyone to all lecture courses 
in the College, ibut not to class room work or examinations. 

Combination Courses and Total Expenses Estimated 

For the benefit of those young ladies who desire to take music 
chiefly, we have a special musical course, giving either vocal or in- 
strumental music and a maximum of two English studies for $75.00 
per term, in advance, for everything (board, room, heat, light, tuition, 
etc.) 

If both vocal and instramental music are desired, the fee is $90.00 
per term. In advance, for everything (board, room, heat, light, tuition, 
etc.) 

The total necessary expense of a student at Milligan College 
varies from $100.00 per year to $175.00. $140.00 for a young man, and 
$150.00 for a young lady is a good general average. The Milligan rates 
do not aim at that cheapness which negates comfort, nor on the other 



?4 MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

hand, do they embody more than ttie actual expense wliicli comfort 
bringis. 

MffUdua Tees 

The fee for the Bachelor's Diploma is, in all cases, $5.00. The fee 
for the Miaster's Degree is $10.00. The fee for the Ministerial Diploma 
in ■either the English or the Classical Course is $3.00. The fee for 
either of the Business Diplomas is also $3.00. 

Laundry and Incidental Expenses 

Laundry costs from 7&c to |1.50 per month, in accordance with 
amount. Incidental expenses are at a minimum at Milligan College. 
There is no reason why a student should spend anything beyond the 
smallest possible allowance, for expenses outside of college charges. 

Terms o£ Payment, Etc. 

All tuition and room rent bills, for the term, are payable strictly 
In adTance, and payment must be arranged for at the time of matric- 
ulation. Board is payable weekly, in advance, as elsewhere stated. 
In all cases, where the student leaves during the term, no refund or 
deduction of tuiition or room rent wiill be made, unless hy special ac- 
tion of the Executive Committee. The justice of the latter regulation 
will become apparent when it is understood that a room vacated 
during the term cannot be filled, except in :rare Instances, before the 
opening of the next term. 



ATHLETICS 
MiilMgan OoLlege has always maioittalned a fine record as regardiS 
athletics. In common with the more advanced educational ideals, we 
do not play football at all; but base ball, basket ball, tennis, and 
other legitimate games are encouraged, within proper bounds, and in 
accordance with the regulations mentioned elsewhere in the cata- 
logue. The record of the Milligan base ball team during the past 
number of years has been an exceedingly creditable one. We have 
crossed bats with some of the largest universities and colleges in the 
South and have held our own with them or defeated them. We have 
played Vanderbilt University to a tie on their home grounds, and 
among others have defeated the University of Tennessee and the 
University of Chattanooga. During the season of 1908-09, we won 
fitteei oul of eighteen games played, and defeated the excellent IMa^y- 
vill'i College team three times in succession on their home gro mds. 
Owing tt more stringent regulations regarding absence from the col- 
lege,, fewer games were played during the season of 1909-10; but our 
record has none the less been a thoroughly creditable one. The line- 
up and schedule for 1909-10 follow, in detail. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE CATALOGUE 



75 



Milllgan College Baseball Team, 1910 

Manager J. W. Stephens 

Captain S. Ferguson 

Coach. W. P. Dungan 

Line-up 

Cahoon, ss; B. Taylor, 2nd b; D. Taylor, c; Walker, If; Ferguson, 
3rd b; Hartsell, cf; Stephens, rf; Schumaker, 1st h; AcufT, p; Witt, c, 
(iSub); Hester, rf, (Sub.) 

Becord of Games 

JlUligan College, vs. at Score 

Johnson Cdty Mllllgan College Milligan 4, Jno. Cy 3 

Elizabethton Milligan College Milligan 15, Eliz'n 1 

Wasihington College Washington College Milligan 11, Wasli'n 

Washington Colle>ge Washington College Milligan 3, Wash'n 

Tusculum College Tus-culum College Milligan 3, Tusc'm 1 

.TuscuLum College Tusculum College Milligan 9, Tusc'm 

Washington College Milligan College Milligan 4, Wash'n 2 

Washington College Milligan College Milligan 6, Wash'n 3. 

Elizabethton Elizabethton Milligan 4, Eliz'n 1 

Johnson City Milligan College Milligan 9, Jno. Cy 3 

Union College Milligan Milligan 4, Union Col. 0. 

Union College Milligan Milligan 5, Union Col. 1 




iltlUgan QlclUg^ 

YEAR-BOOK 1911-12 

Vol. IV. NEWHORIZON No. VI. 




A SCHOOL 

DEVOTED TO CHARACTER BUILDING 

FIRST OF ALL 




Entered in Post Office at Johnson City. 
Tenn^ as Second-class Matter. Accord- 
ing to Act of Congress. Approved 
July 16. 1894. 



I 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

OF TENNESSEE 



YEAR-BOOK 



/^^MILlIGAN COLLEGE, TN 37682 



ANNO DOMINI NINETEEN ELEVEN 



PRCSS OF 

P. C. MUSE PRINTING COMPANY 

JOHNSON CITY, TCNN. 



FOREWORD 



Every in^tution must be, in the la^ analysis, the embodi- 
ment of an idea. Colleges, like men, possess many traits in 
common; but like men too, each exhibits an individuality of its ow^n. 
The di^ndlive idea back of Milligan College is that of CHAR- 
ACTER BUILDING, FIRST OF ALL. The peculiar 
environment of the College, its seclusion, the religious and moral 
atmosphere which surrounds it, and the dominant aims of its 
Faculty and those who have it in charge, to say nothing of the 
cherished legacy of the past, all conspire to further the realization 
of the ideal it has in view. He who wrote, "A good name is 
rather to be chosen than great riches," embodied to the fulled 
the educational ideal of Milligan. 



4 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

CONTENTS 

Title Page 1 

Foreword 3 

Contents 4 

Calendar 6 

PART I — Location and History 7 

Early History, tlie State of Franklin, King's Mountain, the 

Boone Tree 7 

Early History of the College, Its Founding and Administration 8 

Sketch of the Life of Robert Milligan 9 

Altitude and Healthfulness of Location 12 

PART II— The Personnel of Milligan College 12 

Board of Trustees, Charter Provisions, Executive Committee. . . 12 

Faculty for 1911-12 14 

Lecture List for 1910-11 17 

Lecture Schedule for 1911-12 17 

'Department of the Alumni 19 

Graduates, 1910-11 34 

Student List, 1910-11 34 

PART III — ^Departments and Conrses of Instruction 47 

I. Collegiate Department 47 

Requirements for Admission 47 

Matriculation of Students 50 

Requirements for Degrees 50 

Courses Leading to the Various Degrees 51 

Courses of Instruction by Departments 52 

I. Greek 52 

II. Latin 53 

III. English 53 

IV. French 55 

V. German 56 

VI. Mathematics 56 

VII. History 57 

VIII. Science 58 

IX. Philosophy 58 

X. Education 60 

XI. Bible 61 

II. The Robert Milligan Bible School 62 

Introductory Statement 62 

Requirements for Admission 62 

Requirements for Graduation 62 

Curriculum — English and Classical Courses 63 

Depa(rtments 64 

I. Sacred History 64 

II. Exegesis and Christian Doctrine 65 

III. Applied Christianity 65 

IV. Biblical Greek 66 

V. Bible-'School Pedagogy 66 

VI. Missions 67 

VII. Evangelism 67 

III. The Milligan Academy 67 

Introductory Statement 67 

Study Hall 68 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 5 

Requirements for Admission 68 

Choice of Courses 68 

Substitutions 69 

Equivalent units other than Latin 69 

iRhetoricals and Exercises 69 

Graduation 69 

iSchedule of Studies 69 

Courses of Instruction 70 

I. Latin 70 

IL English 71 

IIL French 71 

IV. German 72 

V. Mathematics 72 

VI. History 73 

VII. Science 73 

The Elementary School 73 

IT. Program of Becitations in the Collegiate, Preparatory and 

Biblical DepiP^rtments 74 

V. Department of Music 74 

YI. Commercial Dep?«rtment 7 i 

PABT IV — Miscellaneous Information 78 

I. Buildings .ind Grounds 78 

Buildings 78 

Grounds, Libraries and Reading Room 79 

Frances T. and Columbus A. Mee Memorial Hall 79 

II. Literary Societies and Publications 80 

Literary Societies, Contests Honors 80 

The New Horizon 81 

III. Eules and Eegulations 81 

Student Behavior, Class Absences 81 

Age Limit in Young Men's Dormitory 81 

Conduct in Examinations 81 

Organization of Classes, Breakage, Outside Board 82 

IT. Scholarships and Bequests 82 

Milligan Endowment, Scholarships 82 

Form of Bequest 83 

T. Eeligious and Moral Atmosphere 83 

College Spirit S3 

VI. Expenses and Fees 84 

Tuition in all Departments, Room-rent 84 

Board in the College Dining Hall, Outside Board 84 

Fees 84 

Combination Courses, Diploma Fees 85 

Laundry and Incidental Expenses 85 

Terms of Payment 85 

VII. General Information 86 

Location, Healthfulness 86 

Young Ladies' Home 86 

What to Furnish, Monday Holiday, Two Terms 87 

Text Books 87 

Vin. Athletics 87 

Past Record 88 

Line-up and Record for 1910-11 88 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



CALENDAE 



1911 

September 5, Classification and Registration. . . .Tuesday, 8:15 a. m. 
September 5-6, Entrance Examinations. . . .Tuesday and Wednesday 

September 7, Regular Recitations Begin Thursday 

November 30, Thanksgiving Recess Thursday 

Annual Program of the American Literary Society. 
December 22, Christmas Holidays Begin .Friday, 8:15 a. m. 

1812 

January i, Christmas Holidays End Monday, p. m. 

January 6, First Term Ends Saturday 

January 9, Second Term Begins Tuesday 

February 22, Washington's Birthday Thursday 

Annual Program of the Ossolian Literary Society. 
March 20, Robert Milligan Day Wednesday 

Annual Program of the Adelphlan Literary Society. 

May 6, Primary Program Monday, 7 :30 p. m. 

May 9, Academy Program Thursday, 7 :30 p. m. 

May 10, Society Program Friday, 7 130 p. m. 

May II, Junior Class Program Saturday, io:oo a. m. 

May 1 1 , Oscar M. Fair Oratorical Contest .... Saturday, 7 :so p. m. 

May 12, Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday, 10:30 a .m. 

May 12, Lord's Supper Sunday, 3 :oo p. m. 

May 12, Commencement Prayer Service Sunday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 13, Senior Class Exercises Monday, 10:00 a. m. 

May 13, Annual Literary Address Monday, 7 :30 p. m. 

Moy 14, Commencement Day Exercises Tuesday, 10:00 a. m. 

May 14, Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees. .Tuesdaj^ 2 :30 p. m. 
May 14, Alumni Banquet Tuesday, 7:30 p. m. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 
PART I 



LOCATIOJf AND HISTOET 

Milligan College is located in Carter County, Tennessee, about 
twenty-four miles from the North Carolina line and twenty-five 
miles from the Virginia line at Bristol. It is one hundred and six 
miles by rail from Knoxville, Tennessee; one hundred and seven- 
ty-five miles by rail from Roanoke, Virginia; and one hundred and 
fifty-one miles from Asheville, North Carolina. The main line of 
the Southern railroad runs three miles below it, the nearest station 
being Johnson City. The C. C. & O. R. R. passes two miles south of 
the College at the station of Ocolona, and also passes through Johnson 
City. The E. T. & W. N. C. R, R., connecting Johnson City with 
Cranberry, N. C, runs one-half mile from the campus at its station of 
Milligan College. 



Early History — The State of Franklin — King's Mountain — The Boone 

Tree 

The College is located in that section of Tennesese v/hich once 
formed part of the long defunct State of Franidin — a commonwealth 
whose brief but romantic existence v»'as terminated in a battle fought 
only a short distance from the site now occupied by the College 
grounds. Tv/o miles to the north, at Sycamore Shoals, the American 
volunteers who fought the decisive battle of King's Mountain started 
on the famous march which in the opinion of a competent historian 
was the turning point of the American Revolution. Upon the Board 
of Trustees of Milligan College are gentlemen who are lineal descend- 
ants of these King's Mountain veterans, while in its faculty list h 
included the name of one who is a direct descendent of the brave but 
misguided Tory who led the British hosts upon the day of the battle. 
In the month of June, 19 lO, a shaft vras unveiled at Sycamore Shoals, 
under the auspices of the D. A. R., commemorating the departure of 
the King's Mountain volunteers. The principal oration upon this oc- 
casion was delivered by United States Senator Robert L. Taylor, an 
alumnus of Milligan College, who has been three times Governor of 
and is now the Senior Senator from, the State of Tennessee. 

After Sycamore Shoals and the da^vs of King's Mountain, came 
Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett. Boone's original trail passed only 
a few miles west of the College; and at Boone's Creek, about eight 



8 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

miles south, there is shown to this day a mighty oak tree with the fol- 
lowing inscription carved upon it: 

"D Boon Cild Bar." 

Whether the illustrious Daniel actually performed the feat at this 
place, which tradition and this inscription attribute to him, we do not 
know; but the unique orthography was certainly D. Boone's own, and 
the tree is old enough to substantiate the legend. One of the annual 
College pilgrimages leads to this tree, which is conveniently reached 
either by rail or by driving. Davy Crockett was born at Limestone, 
on the Southern Railroad eighteen miles below Johnson City; and 
legends dealing with his early prowess and history are numerous 
throughout this section. 



Early History of tlie College — Its Fonndlng and Administration 

The site of Milligan College, with its superb view of the majestic 
Buffalo Mountain and the silver waters of the Buffalo Creek flowing 
just below, was early chosen as an ideal spot for an institution of 
learning. Before the Civil War, a school was established which was 
attended by many men who afterward became illustrious in the history 
not only of Tennessee but also of the nation. After the War between 
the States, this school v/as given the name of Buffalo Institute, and 
numbered among its students both "Bob" and "Alf" Tayloi*, as well 
as other men who achieved prominence in national and civic life. 
During this time the institution was largely under the direction of 
Colonel Barker, a man whose talented and lovable character left its 
impress upon the future history of the College. In 1880 a young 
man from Kentucky, by the name of Josephus Hop wood, came to Car- 
ter County in search of a place to found an institution of learning 
built upon the broad foundation of Christian culture, a clean heart 
and a clean life. Buffalo Institute was turned over to him; and in 
1882 the old name was changed to Milligan College, after the sainted 
character whose history is given elsewhere in detail. Professor Hop- 
wood always regarded Robert Milligan as the highest embodiment of 
ideal manhood he had met, and therefore named the College, which 
he designed as an instrument for the development of Christian char- 
acter among men and women, after his beloved teacher. For twenty- 
three years from 1880 to 1903, President Hopwood directed the des- 
tinies of Milligan College. The story of those twenty-three years of 
disinterested, unselfish service for God and the world is written, not 
in books or upon marble, but in the hearts and lives of hundreds of 




ROBERT MILLIGAN 



EDUCATOR. PREACHER, AUTHOR. BORN JULY 25. 1814: DIED MARCH 20. 1875. 
"HE WAS A GOOD MAN. AND FULL OF THE HOLY SPIRIT, AND OF FAITH." 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 9 

men and women who are scattered all over America, and who are 
blessing humanity because they were given high ideals of life at Mil- 
ligan College. Many privations were endured during these years, pri- 
vations known only to those who bore them and to the Recording 
Angel who wrote them down. In 1903, President Hopwood relin- 
quished the. burden he had borne so long to one who had graduated 
under him and who was associated with him for years as a teacher. No 
finer spirited man, or one more loyal to those ideals of Service and 
Purity which belong to the heritage of Milligan, could have been 
found than Henry R. Garrett. Unselfish Service was the keynote of 
his life at Milligan; and after five years of labor, largely worn out 
by his efforts, aided by bodily sickness, he was obliged to seek a 
warmer climate in the dry atmosphere of Western Texas. President 
Garrett's mantle fell upon another young man, Frederick D. Kersh- 
ner, a native of Maryland and a graduate of Kentucky University 
and of Princeton. President Kershner took charge of the College 
■in the spring of 1908, and the work has progressed rapidly since that 
time. The enrolment in 1907-1908 was 167; in 1908-1909, 193; in 
1909-1910, 268, and in 1910-1911, 275. The same ideals of life 
which ruled under the former administrations obtain today, and the 
same emphasis upon purity and cleanness of living and the develop- 
ment of Christian character, remains as the core of the Milligan 
Spirit. 

Over two hundred — 212 to be exact — students have been gradu- 
ated from Milligan College since the first class left its halls in 1882. 
A host of young men and women who were not able to complete their 
education were also instructed during this period. The aim of the 
College has been toward higher ideals, not only of character, but also 
of scholarship; and the work has been constantly graded up with this 
end in view. Where honesty of purpose is inculcated, there will be 
thoroughness of work; and this has always been true of Milligan men 
and women, as the records of the alumni clearly disclose. We do not 
believe the statement to be boastful that no college can claim a larger 
percentage of successful graduates than Milligan, success being defined 
as the living of an honest, influential and altruistic life. 



Life of Robert Jmiligaii 

It seems altogether appropriate that a brief account of the life of 
the man whose honored name the College wears should be included in 
its literature, and the following statement, abridged from a longer 



10 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

article contained in John T. Brown's Churches of Christ, is therefore 
given here. 

Robert Milligan was born in Tyrone, a county of the most north- 
ern province of Ireland, July 25th, 18 14. In 1818 he was brought 
to the United States by his parents, John and Margaret Milligan, 
who settled in Trumbull county, Ohio, which was afterward the 
native county of the late President McKinley. In 183 1 he entered 
Zelienople Academy, in Beaver county, Pa., and, in 1833, a classical 
academy, conducted by a graduate of the University of Edinburgh at 
Jamestown in the same state. As one of nine children of parents in 
moderate circumstances, he had to begin life for himself before he had 
completed his collegiate training. Accordingly, in 1837, he opened a 
school at Flat rock, in Bourbon county, Ky, A careful study of the 
New Testament, in the original Greek, resulted in his immersion, 
on March nth, 1838, by Elder John Irvin, of the Church of Christ 
at Cane Ridge. 

Earnestly desiring the advantages of a collegiate education, he 
left Kentucky in 1839, w^ith the intention of entering Yale College. 
His journey over the National Road brought him to Washington, 
Pa. A delay, occasioned probably by his unwillingness to travel on 
the Lord's Day, led to his remaining in Washington, where he could 
attend what was then called Washington College, and where he could, 
at the same time, worship with the small congregation of disciples in 
the neighboring village of Martinsburg. Graduated in 1840, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, which had then a very definite mean- 
ing, he was at once promoted from the tutorship, which he had held 
in the college before his graduation, to the professorship of the English 
language and literature; and during a part of that time, he gave 
instruction in Greek and Latin classics also. Meanwhile, in 1842, he 
married Miss Ellen Blaine Russell, of Washington, whose father at 
the time, and one of whose brothers afterwards, represented the 
Bedford (Pa.) district in congress. In 1843, Professor Milligan 
received from his alma mater the degree of Master of Arts; in 1844 
he was ordained a minister of the gospel, with imposition of the 
hands of Elder Thomas Campbell, the venerable father of Alexander 
Campbell; and in 1849 or 1850, he was transferred to the department 
of chemistry and natural history. When in 1852 the college was 
placed under the control of the Presbyterian Synod of Wheeling, he 
insisted on the acceptance of his resignation, that the institution might 
be wholly in the hands of those who were entitled to guide its fortunes. 

Invited at once to Bloomington, Ind., he held first the chair of 
mathematics, and then that of chemistry, natural philosophy and 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Eook 11 

astronomy, in Indiana University, The degree of Doctor of Divinity, 
which v/as tendered him by the University, he declined. Resigning 
his professorship at Bloomington, because of the ill health of his son, 
he accepted in 1854 the chair of mathematics and astronomy in 
Bethany College, in vi^hat was then a part of Virginia. Besides the 
duties of his professorship, he discharged those of an elder of the 
church at Bethany; and for three years, beginning with 1857, he was 
a co-editor of the Millenial Harbinger. 

In May of 1857 he was elected President of Bacon College at 
Harrodsburg, Ky. The name of the institution having in the mean- 
time been changed, he was inaugurated President of Kentucky Uni- 
versity, on Wednesday, September 21st, 1859, which was the third 
day of the first session under the new name. After the destruction 
of the college building by fire, in February of 1864, had made the 
removal of the institution from Harrodsburg necessary, he was a 
member of the committee that decided in favor of removal to Lex- 
ington. When Kentucky University, which had now attained uni- 
versity proportions, was reorganized in 1865, with its founder as the 
head of the associated colleges, President Milligan was placed at the 
head of the College of the Bible, a place most congenial to his tasti;s 
and purposes, which he filled until his last illness. 

As an author. President Milligan, in addition to his Tract on 
Prayer, which he had written before, composed during the last ten 
years of his life the volumes entitled Reason and Revelation, The 
Scheme of Redemption, The Great Commission, Analysis of the 
Gospels and Acts, and, which was published as a posthumous work, 
Commentary on Hebrews. 

He died peacefully, in full possession of his faculties, and sur- 
rounded in his home by his family and by friends, on March 20, 1875. 
His death was lamented in the communities in which he had lived, 
and was deplored throughout the Christian Brotherhood. The 
Apostolic Times concluded its announcement of his decease with "A 
Prince has this day fallen in Israel;" the American Christian Review 
declared that he was one of those "of ^\•hom the world was not 
worthy;" and President John W. McGarvey, his friend and co- 
laborer in the College of the Bible, in the funeral discourse which he 
pronounced, summed up the general estimate of his character in the 
words that are repeated on his monument in the Lexington cemetery: 
"He was a good man, and full of the Holy Spirit and of faith." 



12 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Altitude and Healtlifulness of Location 

Milligan College has an altitude of 1740 feet. It is only four 
miles from Buffalo Mountain, over 4,000 feet high, and twelve miles 
from Roan Mountain, 6,000 feet. Mt. Mitchell, the highest peak in 
America east of the Rockies, is located only forty miles to the east, 
and is reached from Milligan via the C. C. & O. R.R. The climate 
is temperate, and perhaps the most perfect illustration of that of the 
temperate zone. The air is remarkably pure, there is an abundance 
of pure water, and all natural advantages for school life would seem 
to be possessed by this favored section of Eastern America. Criticism 
has sometimes been directed against the large number of schools and 
colleges in East Tennessee. The reason for this apparent crowding 
of institutions lies in the fact that the location is practically ideal for 
school purposes. With modern railroad facilities, it is far better that 
a school should be located well from the point of view of healthful- 
ness and climate than from the point of view of purely geographical 
fitness. 



PART II 



THE perso:nnel of milligan college 



The Boa*rd of Trustees 

The Charter of Milligan College provides that its property shall 
be owned and controlled by a Board of Trustees consisting of thirty- 
three members, one-third of whom or eleven members shall be elected 
each year by the Tennessee Christian Missionary Society, when 
assembled in Annual Convention. The control and ownership of the 
College is thus vested in the Christian Churches of Tennessee. The 
membership of the Board of Trustees is not, however, limited to any 
religious body, nor by any state or territorial requirements. The 
Board of Control, or Executive Committee of the Institution, is 
composed of nine members, five of whom constitute a quorum for 
business. 

The following gentlemen constitute the Board of Trustees: 

Term Expires 1911 

Dr. A. W. Boyd, Physician Chattanooga, Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 13 

J. E. Crouch, Merchant Johnson City, Tenn. 

B. J. Farrar, Business Man Nashville, Tenn 

G. W. Jones, Farmer Piney Flats, Tenn. 

A. I. Myhr, Minister Belleview, Tenn. 

J. F. Robertson, Business Man Crockett Mills, Tenn. 

C. E. Snodgrass, Judge 5th Judicial Dist. of Tenn., Crossville, Tenn. 

J. F. Tarwater, Business man Rockwood, Tenn. 

Hon. G. N. Tillman, Lawyer Nashville, Tenn. 

C. C. Taylor, Farmer Milligan College, Tenn. 

J. W. Williams, Business Man Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Term Expires in 1912 

Adam B. Crouch, Cashier Unaka Bank Johnson City, Tenn. 

Aaron A. Ferguson, Minister Elizabethton, Tenn. 

J. C. Hamlett, Business Man Crockett Mills, Tenn. 

Geo. W. Hardin, V.-Pres. & Supt. E. T. & W. 

N. C. R.R Johnson City, Tenn. 

N. H. Hyder, Farmer Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Philip Y. Pendleton, Minister Vine Street Christian 

Church Nashville, Tenn. 

S. W. Price, Lawyer Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. H. Sheffer, Minister Linden Street Christian 

Church Memphis, Tenn. 

A. S. Warren, Business Man Nashville, Tenn. 

G. T. Williams, Farmer Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. F. Witt, Business Man Zion Mills, Va. 

Term Expires in 1913 

Ira M. Boswell, Minister Walnut Street Christian 

Church Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Harris L. Browne, Business Man Memphis, Tenn. 

Joel O. Cheek, Merchant, (Pres Cheek-Neal Coffee 

Company) Nashville, Tenn. 

Dr. C. W. Cowden, Physician Nashville, Tenn. 

Capt. L A. Hill, Farmer Harriman, Tenn. 

Dr. E. K. Leake, Physician ColHersville, Tenn. 

Dr. W. J. Matthews, Physician Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. G. Payne, Business Man Milligan College, Tenn. 

Hon. L N. Pendleton, Lawyer Nashville, Tenn. 

Dr. L. M. Scott, Physician Jellico, Tenn. 

Hon. T. Asbury Wright, Lawyer Knoxville, Tenn. 

The officers of the Board are as follows: 



14 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

President — C. C. Taylor Milligan College, Tenn. 

Secretary — S. W. Price Johnson City, Tenn. 

Treasurer — Geo. W. Hardin Johnson City, Tenn. 

The Executive Committee is composed of the following mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees : 

Messrs. Taylor, Price, Hardin, J. E. Crouch, A. B. Crouch, 
Hyder, J. W. Williams, G. T. Williams, and Payne. Its officers, 
by a provision of the Charter, are the same as those of the Board of 
Trustees. 



FACULTY 

FREDERICK D. KERSHNER, M. A. (Princeton), Presi- 
dent and Robert Milligan Professor of Philosophy and English 
Criticism. 

B. Lit., Kentucky University, 1899, M. A., Princeton Univer- 
sity, 1900; graduate study in Italy and England, 1903; Staff 
Lecturer for the American Society for the Extension of University 
Teaching, 1902-06; Dean of Kee-Mar College, 1902-05; Dean 
of the Bible Department of the American University, 1906-08; 
President of Milligan College, 1908 — . 

TYLER ELLIOTT UTTERBACK, M. A. (Columbia), 
Dean, and Professor of History and Education. Director of the 
Milligan Academy. 

A. B., Centre College, 1891; classical graduate. College of the 
Bible, 1892; A. B., Kentucky University, 1893; M. A., Columbia 
University, 1908 and Master's Diploma in Education and Super- 
vision, Teachers' College; minister, Nevv^ Richmond and Ripley, 
Ohio, Poplar Bluff, Mo., and Rochester, Minn.; Superintendent 
of City Schools, Plainview and Kasson, Minn., and Johnson City, 
Tenn.; Dean of Milligan College, 1910 — . 

MRS. E. L. THOMAS, Dean of Women. 
ELMA E. R. ELLIS, M. A. (University of Tennessee), Pro- 
fessor of Ancient Languages. 

B. A., 1895; M. A., 1899; Professor of Ancient Languages, 
Milligan College, 1900-03; Professor of Greek and German, Vir- 
ginia Christian College, 1903-05; Professor of Greek and Historj'-, 
Bethany College, 1905-08; Professor of Ancient Languages, Milli- 
gan College, 1908 — . 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 15 

MRS. F. D. KERSHNER, A. B. (University of Michigan), 
Professor of English and German. 

Albion College, 1900-03 ; A. B., University of Michigan, 
1904, Professor of Ancient Languages, Milligan College, 1904-06; 
graduate study. University of Michigan, 1907-08; Professor of 
English, Milligan College, 1908 — . 

AARON A. FERGUSON, A. M., Professor of Mathematics 
and Church History. 

A. B., Milligan College, 1882; graduate student, Kentucky 
University, 1886; minister Matthews' Court House and Rappa- 
hanock, Va., 1886-89, Roanoke, Va., 1889-90; President Tazewell 
College, Va., 1 891-1900; Minister, Johnson City, Tenn., 1900-03, 
Rockwood, Tenn., 1904-09; Kinston, N. C, 1909-10; Professor of 
Church History, Milligan College, 19 10 — . 

WALTER S. BUCHANAN, Professor of Applied Christi- 
anity. 

Graduate College of the Bible, Lexington, Ky., 1900; graduate 
student, Kentucky University, 1901 ; minister, Lake Charles, La., 
1902-04; minister, Marion, Ind., 1904-06; Christian Standard 
Evangelist, 1906-09; minister, Johnson City, Tenn., Christian 
Church, 1910 — . 

MARY J. HARDIN, A. B. (University of Tennessee), Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages. 

MARCELENA HOUSTON, A. B., Director of Music. 

Graduate of Kee-Mar Conservatory of Music, Hagerstown, 
Md. ; student under Myer, of New York, and of the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music, Baltimore. Instructor in Kee-Mar Con- 
servatory, 1901-04; Director of Music, Milligan College, 1909 — . 

LOGAN E. GARRETT, A. B., Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish and Mathematics. 

MELVIN M. KNIGHT, Principal of Commercial Depart- 
ment. 

Graduate Modern School of Business, Denver, Colo, Legal 
reporter and stenographer. Principal Commercial Department of 
Milligan College, 19 10 — . 

CHESTER ALLEN, JR., Assistant Instructor in Science. 

MRS. F. D. KERSHNER, Secretary of the Faculty. 



16 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

LECTURE LIST 
1910 

(In addition to the lectures listed here, a number of excellent 
addresses were made during the year by Professors Ferguson, Utter- 
back and Buchanan, of the regular faculty.) 

Sept. 13, Dr. R. Lin Cave, "The Right Life and How to 
Live It." 

Sept. 14, Dr. R. Lin Cave, "An Honest Man, the Noblest 
Work of God." 

Sept. 14, Dr. R. Lin Cave, "Love the Centre of the Uni- 
verse." 

Sept. 15, Dr. R. Lin Cave, "The Doubter." 
Sept. 15, Dr. R. Lin Cave, "Robert E. Lee." 
Sept. 16, Dr. R. Lin Cave, "The Threefold Division of Wages.'" 
Oct. 13, Dr. W. H. Osborne, "The Psychology of College 
Life." 

Oct. 28, G. W. Muckley, "The Magical Development of 
America." 

Nov. 8, Frederick D. Kershner, "Richard HI." 
Nov. 15, Frederick D. Kershner, "Romeo and Juliet." 
Nov. 22, Frederick D. Kershner, "Twelfth Night." 
Dec. 9, Herbert Moninger, "The Unfolding Life." 
Dec. 9, Herbert Moninger, "The Bible School and the Min- 
ister." 

Dec. 9, Herbert Moninger, "The Law of Service." 
Dec. 10, Herbert Moninger, "Methods of Teaching." 
Dec. 10, Herbert Moninger, "Christianity and Womanhood." 
Dec. 10, Herbert Moninger, "Methods of Organization." 
Dec. 13, W. P. Shamhart, "A Square Talk to Young People." 
Dec. 14, W. P. Shamhart, "The Beginning of the Christian 
Life." 

Dec. 14, W. P. Shamhart, "The Vision of Christ." 
Dec. 15, W. P. Shamhart, "The Greatest Business in the 
World." 

Dec. 15, W. P. Shamhart, "The Rifted Clouds." 

Dec. 20, J. A. Campbell, "Extemporaneous Preaching." 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 17 

1911 

Jan. 17, E. S. Smith, "The Bible School Analyzed." 

Jan. 26, Dr. W. W. Hamilton, "Pigs and Woodpeckers." 

Jan. 27, Dr. W. W. Hamilton, "Three Words." 

Feb. 7, Dr. Jno. L. Allison, "Aspiration, or Reaching Toward 

the Heights." 

Feb. 21, Peter Ainslie, "Our Mission and Our Peril." 

Feb. 22, Peter Ainslie, "America for Christ." 

Feb 23, Peter Ainslie, "My Brother and I." 

Feb. 23, Peter Ainslie, "Practical Problems of the Minister." 

Feb. 24, Peter Ainslie, "The Imperialism of Christ." 

Feb. 24, Peter Ainslie, "Problems of City Evangelization." 

Feb. 28, Jas. T. McKissick, "Honesty." 

March i, Jas. T. McKissick, "Character Building." 

March 3, Dr. S. B. Vaught, "The Kingdom of God. 

March 4, Jas. T. McKissick, "The Greatest Thing in the 

World." 

March 7, Jas. T. McKissick, "Words and Deeds." 

March 8, Robt. M. Hopkins, "The Mission of the Bible 

School." 

March 8, Robt. M. Hopkins, "The Preacher and the Bible 

School." 

March 17, Dr. Dayton A. Dobbs, "The Place of the Preacher 

in Modern Progress." 

April 10, Z. T. Sweeney, "What You Are Here For." 

April 16, R. P. Shepherd, "The Problem." 

April 16, R. P. Shepherd, "The Metaphysical Significance of 

the Resurrection." 

(Later lectures not recorded because of catalogue's going to press.) 



LECTURE COURSES FOR 1911-12 

The schedule of courses for the coming year had not been com- 
pleted when the Catalogue went to press, but the follov.-ing list had 
been definitely arranged, with a number of others to be added later: 

Herbert Moninger, Editorial Staff of tb^ Christian Standard, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

C-rcncal Subject, "The Bible School." 

I. Childhood— Early, Middle and L^ater. 

H. Youth — Early, Middle and Later. 

HL Maturity, Early, Middle and Later. 



18 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

IV. Adapting Pedagogy to the Bible School. 

V. The Social Life of the Adult Bible Class. 

VI. The Devotional Life of the Adult Bible Class. 

VII. The Membership Life of the Adult Bible Class. 

VI I I. Training for Leadership. 

IX. The Pocket Testament League. 

X. Teaching Bible Geography in the Bible School. 

XI. The Graded Bible School. 

f'Mr, Moninger expects to give his lectures in order beginning 
Tuesday, Sept. 12, 191 1.) 

Prof. Chas. T. Paul, Principal of the Missionary Training 
School of the C. W. B. M., Indianapolis, Ind. 

General Subject, "Missions and the Mission Field." 

I. Some Shrines of Christian England. 

II. Paris and Religion. 

III. From Paris to the Mediterranean. 

IV. Italy, Past and Present. 

V. Suez, the Gateway to the Far East. 

VI. Down the Red Sea to Aden. 

VII. Ceylon, "The Pearl on the Brow of Hindustan." 

VIII. Malaysia and the East Indies. 

IX. From Hong Kong to Nanking. 

X. Dragon and Cross in China. 

XI. Glimpses of Pagan and Christian Japan. 

XII. America and Her Relation to the Non-Christian World. 
(Prof. Paul's lectures will be given in order during one week of 

the College year, the exact dates to be announced later.) 
W. P. Crouch, A. M. 
General Subject, "Evangelism." 

I. The Evangelist of the New Testament Day. 

II. Modern Evangelism — Methods. 

III. Modern Evangelism — Mistakes. 

IV. How to Prepare for the Evangelist. 

V. Great Evangelists of Yesterday — Whitfield, Finney, Moody. 

VI. Great Evangelists of Today — G3T3sy Smith, Chapman, 
Sunday, Scoville. 

VII. The Leader of Song and Evangelism. 

(Mr. Crouch's Lectures will be given during one week of the 
College year, dates to be announced later.) 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 19 

THE SOCIETY OF ALUMNI OF MELIIGAN COLLEGE 



Officers 



Geo. W. Hardin ('82), President. 

Geo. E. Lyon ('91), Vice-President. 

J. E. Croucli ('96), Secretary and Treasurer. 

The next Special Reunion will take place in 1912 at Commence- 
ment. Every alumnus and friend of Milligan College should plan to 
be present upon this occasion. 

Annual banquet and reunion held the evening of Commencement 
day at the College. 



The Alumni 



(Note. — It is our desire to secure a brief record and the correct 
address of each of the alumni. To this end, we sent out a large num- 
ber of letters during the past year. The information we were able to 
secure is published herewith. Members of the alumni will confer a 
favor upon us by sending us any corrections or further information 
they may happen to know of individually. Address all communications 
to Frederick D. Kershner, Milligan College, Tenn., or to George W. 
Hardin, Johnson City, Tenn.) 



Class of 1882 



C. B. Armentrout, A. M., teacher Washington College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Washington County for seven years. Pro- 
fessor in Washington College the past nineteen years. 

George E. Boren, B. L., lawyer Bristol, Tenn. 

Charles F. Carson, B. S., farmer Telford, Tenn. 

Aaron A. Ferguson, A. M., preacher Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Has held pastorates for the churches at Johnson City, Tenn., Rock- 
wood, Tenn., and Kinston, N. C, leaving the latter place to take 
up his present work. Now Professor Church History and Mathe- 
matics in Milligan College, and also pastor of the church at 
Elizabethton, Tenn. 

George W. Hardin, B. L Johnson City, Tenn. 

Vice-President and Superintendent of the E. T. & W. N. C. Railroad. 
Member of the State Board of the Tennessee Christian Missionary 
Society. President Milligan Alumni Association, 1909-11. Treas- 
urer of the Board of Trustees of Milligan College. Elder and 
active worker in the Johnson City Christian Church. 



20 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

♦Lulu Hendrix (Crockett), B. L., teacher Milligan, Tenn. 

♦Lucy C. Matthews (Hardin), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. H. Rutrough. A. M Willis. Va. 

Principal of the Mountain Normal for the past twenty-six years. 

James H. Smith, A. M., insurance Johnson City, Tenn. 

James A. Tate, A. M., teacher and lecturer Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Former Chancellor of the American University of Harriman, Tennes- 
see, and prohibition candidate for Governor of Tennessee. Now 
Principal of Dixon Academy and a prominent lecturer in the 
cause of Temperance. 

Class of 188S 

Samuel L. Carson, A. B., attorney at law Greeneville, Tenn. 

Teacher in Washington College, 1883-88. Principal of the Academy 

in Clinch Valley, Tenn, 1888-90. President of Curry College in 

Lee County, Virginia, 1890-91. Studied law at Sneedville, Tenn., 

and is now County Judge at Greeneville, Tenn. 

W. R. Henry, B. S Sherman, Texas. 

Went West to Sherman, Texas, in early fall of 1883. In real estate 

business. 

♦William J. Shelburne, A. B Christiansburg, Va. 

Died in Spring of 1885, while a student in the law department of the 

University of Virginia. 

Class of 1885 

♦Frank P. Bullard, A. M., preacher Lynchburg, Va. 

Mary Eliza'beth Bpps (Hardin), B. S Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Preston B. Hall, A. M Bloomfield, Ky. 

Pastor church at Luray, Va.. 1885-88; missionary to Japan, 1889-90; 

pastor of church in California five years; in Kinston, N. C, six 

years. Dean Bible College, Virginia Christian College, Lynchburg, 

Va., 1908-1910. Now pastor of Christian church at Bloomfield, 

Ky. 
Charles L. Maddox, A. B., preacher and farmer, Crocketts, Wythe 

County, Va. 

Edmund A. Miller, A. M., lawyer Los Angeles, Cal. 

Taught in Duncard College in Valley of Virginia, also in Lordsburg, 

Cal., for several years. 

William E. Reed, B. S., farmer Stanton, Texas. 

Waller M. Straley, A. B Sinking Creek, Va. 

Student in Norma! School, Dayton, Ohio, after leaving Milligai] 

* — Deceased. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 21 

College. Teacher in Milligan several years; also in Craig County, 
Va.; in Fayetteville, Tenn.; and in Piedmont Business College, 
Lyncliburg, Va. Now Principal of Maywood High School. 
Robert Walker, B. S Pandora, Tenn. 

Class of 1887 

EiUgene M. Crouch, A. M., President of College. .North Manchester, Ind. 

James W. Giles, A. B., Principal of Business College. .Lynchburg, Va- 

Teacher in Piedmont Business College, 1887-1911. 

Leatitia L. C. Tate (Cornforth), A. M Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Professor of English in the American University of Harriman, Ten- 
nessee, 1903-08; in Dixon Academy, Shelbyville, Tenn., 1908-11. 

Edward C. Wilson, A. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Pastor of Forest Avenue Christian Church, Knoxville, Tenn., before 
going to Chattanooga; Sherman Heights Christian Church, Chat- 
tanooga, 1906-11; Forest Avenue Christian Church, Knoxvilla, 
Tenn., 1911. 

Class of 1888 

Francis B. Caldwell (Baber), B. S Charleston, W. Va. 

Susan A. Kegley (Gibson), B. S Wytheville, Va. 

Wife of Wm. B. Kegley. 

William B. Kegley, A. B., lawyer Wytheville, Va. 

Student of law, 1888-89, Principal of Cholola High School, Bradley 

County, Tenn., 1889-90. Student in Law School, University of 

iMichigan, 1890-91. B. L., 1891. Engaged in practice of law In 

Wytheville, Va., 1891-1911. 
I. Irvin Miller, A. M., Va. Christian College Lynchburg, Va. 

CLiss of 1889 

Annie M. Finley (Preston), B. S Red Ash, Ky. 

Wife of Dr. Finley. 

Henry R. Garrett, A. M., teacher Midland, Texas. 

Professor of Mathematics in Milligan College, 1889-1902; President 

Milligan College, 1902-08; Principal High School, Bangs, Texas, 

1908-09; President Add Ran-Jarvis College, Thorpe Springs, 

Texas, 1909-10. 

Franklin D. Love, B. S., lawyer Georgetown, Texas. 

Graduate student Johns Hopkins University, 1889-91; law student, 

Vanderbilt University, 1891-94; went to Georgetown, Texas, 1897. 

Member Legislature of Texas two terms, 1905-09, refusing a third 

nomination, which was tendered him. 



22 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Charles G. Price, B. S 101 E. 23d St., New York City. 

Teacher in Commercial Department, Milligan College, 1889-90; student 
in Knoxville Business College and accountant in Knoxville Fire 
Insurance Co. office, 1890-91; teacher in Business College, Atlanta, 
Ga., 1891-95; teacher in Business College and Baker-Himel Uni- 
versity School, Knoxville, Tenn., 1895-98; teacher in commercial 
branches, Sadler's B. & S. Business College, Baltimore, Md , 
1898-1907; teacher commercial branches, Packard Commercial 
School, New York City, 1907-11. 

Class of 1890 

William P. Cousins, B. S., real estate agent Norfolk, Va. 

Charles Cornforth, A. M., editor Nashville, Tenn. 

Taught school in Fayetteville for three years, then engaged in news- 
paper work in Nashville; went on "The American" in 1896; came 
to "The Tennessean" March, 1910, as political reporter; now city 
editor of "The Tennessean and American." 

Thomas J. Cox, A. B., business Johnson City, Tenn. 

Mamie Haun (La Rue), B. S Bessemer, Ala. 

William H. Haun, B. S., railroad engineer Bessemer, Ala. 

John P. McConnell, A. B., Milligan College; A. M., Ph.D., University 
of Virginia Emory, Va. 

Formerly professor of Languages in Milligan College; afterward grad- 
uate student in University of Virginia; now professor of History 
and Economics in Emory & Henry College, Va. 

Sarah C. Straley (Thomas), B. S Sinking Creek, Va. 

Samuel G. Sutton, A. B., preacher Saltville, Va. 

Pastor Williamsburg, Ky., 1891-92; Bluefield, W. Va., 1893-94; Winston- 
Salem, N. C, 1895; Rural Hall, N. C, 1895-1900. In Virginia, 
pastor Smyrna and Jerusalem churches two years; Gethsemane 
church five years, two years of that time being spent in school 
work; pastor Saltville, Va., 1910-11. 

Class of 1891 

D. Sinclair Burleson, A. M., State Normal School Flo'^ence, Ala. 

Professor of Mathematics, Tazewell College, Va., 1893-94; Principal 
Newcastle (Va.) Institute, 1894-96; student University of Virginia, 
1896-98; prize orator, University of Virginia, also Intercollegiate 
Oratorical Association, Richmond, 1898; professor of Latin and 
English, State Normal College, Ala., 1898-1911; summer student at 
Harvard, 1901-02; traveling in Europe, 1909; acting President of 
State Normal College, 1910. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 23 

Elizabeth E. Cox (Matthews), B. S Johnson City, Tenu. 

Mary Hendrickson, B. S Lexington, Tenn. 

George E. Lyon, Ph. B., preacher 703 Jackson St., Topeka, Kan. 

Corresponding Secretary Kansas Christian Missionary Society. 

W. R. Motley, A. B., preacher Chatham, Va. 

Pastor at West Riepert, Vt.; Watertown, N. Y.; Montague & Hamp- 
ton, Va. ; Newport News, Va., ten years; at present pastor at 
Chatham, Va. 

Chester D. M. Showalter, A. M Roanoke, Va. 

Principal at Greendale, Va., and Rockwood, Tenn. Teacher of Math- 
ematics at Milligan. Post-graduate student at Johns Hopkins 
University. Principal and Superintendent Harriman city schools. 
Principal Tazewell College and Business School. Fire insurance 
adjuster and special agent for Southern Underwriters for Vir- 
ginia and West Virginia. At present President and Treasurer 
of the Savings Investment Corporation, Roanoke, Va. 

Lou Ella Showalter (English), B. S Roanoke, Va. 

Wife of Chester D. M. Showalter. 

John V. Thomas, A. M Sherman, Texas. 

Teacher several years at Milligan; American University of Harriman, 
four years; Pampa, Texas, two years. Engaged in business at 
Sherman, Texas, 1908-11. 

Class of 1892 

Mary E. Burleson (Dew), B. S Florence, Ala. 

Wife of Prof. D. Sinclair Burleson. 

Walter L. Dudley, A. M Covington, Pa. 

Teacher in Falls Mills, Va., 1902-03. Pastor Church of Christ at 
Ronceverte, W. Va., 893-94. Married Miss S. K. Showalter. Pas- 
tor Walnut Springs Church at Oranda, Va., 1893-1906. Established 
Oranda Institute. Pastor of churches in California and Lancaster, 
Pa. At present pastor at Covington, Pa. 

Cordelia P. Henderson, A. B., teacher Johnson City, Tenn 

David Lyon, B. S., preacher Topeka, Kan. 

Clara McConnell (Lucas), Ph.B Emory, Va. 

Wife of Prof. John P. McCounell. 

J. Frank Sergent, B. S Clinchport, Va. 

Taught school, 1892-93; admitted to bar Feb., 1894; U. S. Commis- 
sion, 1894; Commonwealth Attorney for Scott County, Virginia, 
1904-07; Clerk in House of Representatives Postoffice, 1908-11. 

James E. Stuart, Ph.B., A. M., preacher Union City, Tenn. 



\^i<S 



24 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Pastor at Harriman, Tenn., and WastLing-toii, D. C, before going to 
Union City. Pastor of the 15tli St. church, Washington, D. C, and 
Corresponding Secretary of the Maryland, District of Columbia and 
Delaware Christian Missionary Society, 1905-09. 

S. T. Willis, A. B., LL. D Lynchburg, Va. 

Born in Kentucky July 16, 1864; student College of the Bible, Lex- 
ington, Ky., 1883-86; pastor of church, Bowling Green, Ky., 1886; 
Chattanooga, Tenn., 1887; Knoxvlle, Tenn., 1888-89; graduated 
from Milligan College 1892, with degree of A. B., and from Union 
Theological Seminary, 1893; took five years post-graduate study 
in the University of New York, receiving degree of A. M., in 1893; 
pastor church in New York City, 1889-1910; Professor in Bible 
Dept., Virginia Christian College, 1910-11; President Virginia 
Christian College, 1911. 

Class of 1893 

Nannie Givens, Ph.B., teacher Buchanan, Va. 

Agatha Lilley (Miller), B. S Keokuk, Iowa. 

Wife of Robert W. Lilley. 

Robert W. Lilley, B. S Keokuk, Iowa. 

Pastor chnrch at Corydon, Iowa, four years; Keokuk, Iowa, past three 
years. 

Etta Reynolds (Brown), B. S Alliance, Ohio. 

Wife of C. B. Reynolds. 

George C. Simmons, B. S., teacher Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Andrew Jackson Wolfe, Ph.B Kahoka, Mo. 

Class of 1894 

James C. Coggins, A. M., teacher Lenoir Co., N. C. 

Lee R. Dingus, A. B., teacher Florence, Ala. 

Professor of Latin and Modern Languages in West Central Academy, 
Va., four years; English and History, South Kentucky College 
(now McLean), two years; M, A. (University of Virginia), 1907; 
imarried, 1907; Dept. of Modern Languages, State Normal, Flor- 
ence, Ala., 1907-11. 

John P. Givens, A. B., preacher Hey worth. 111. 

William J. Matthews, B. S., M. D Johnson City, Tenn. 

Member Board of Trustees of Milligan College. 

Daniel E. Motley, A. M., Ph.D., Washington Christian College, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 25 

A. B. (Milligan), 1904; pastor, 1904-06; student Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1906-09; Ph.D., 1909; State Evangelist of North Carolina, 

1900-1902; President of Washington Christian College, 1902-11. 

Author of "Early Education and Religion in Virginia." 

"William J. Shelburne, A. B Norwood, O. 

Former State Evangelist for Tennessee and pastor of the churches 

at Rockwood, Tullahoma, and the Vine St. church at Nashville, 

Tenn.; pastor of the church at Norwood, 0., 1908-11. 

J. Wesley Sho waiter, A. B E. Radford, Va., RED No.l. 

Principal High Schools in Virginia eight years. Now farmer. 

Class of 1895 

Byrdine A. Abbott, A. B St. Louis, Mo. 

Born in Craig Co., Va., Jan. 6, 1866; educated in the public schools 
of Virginia, Milligan College, and at the University of Virginia; 
taught school; served as Evangelist; has 'been editorially con- 
nected with four of our papers; was pastor six years at Char- 
lottesville, Va., and fifteen years in the Harlem Avenue Church, 
Baltimore, Md.; pastor of the Union Avenue Church, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1910-11. 

George R. Cheves, B. S., editor Pulaski, Va. 

Editor "The Southwest Times," published three times per week. 

Lula M. Dye (Hagy), B. S Greendale, Va. 

Teacher three years, now living on a farm. 

*R. J. English, B. S., M. D Glade Hill, Va. 

L. C. Felts, B. S Thurmond, XL Va. 

Superintendent Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency. 

*William S. Givens, A. B., teacher and preacher Newport, Va. 

Edward E. Hawkins, Ph.B., teacher Burnsville, N. C. 

Thomas B. McCartney, A. M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Va.) Lexington, Ky. 

Farmer of Professor of Languages in Milligan College; afterward grad- 
uate student of the University of Virginia; Professor of Greek and 
Dean of Transylvania University, 1903-11; Acting President of 
Transylvania University, 1906-08. 

C. Burnett Reynolds, A. B., preacher New Philadelphia, 0. 

Geo. P. Rutledge, A. M., preacher 4209 Viola St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pastor at Williamsville, N. Y.; Minerva, 0.; First Christian Church at 
Norfolk, Va., five years; Evangelist and lecturer fifteen months; 
pastor Third Christian Church in Philadelphia, Pa., 1898-1911. 
Author of "The Pledge in Sermon."' 

Pearl Shelburne, Ph.B., teacher Green Bay, Va. 

* — Deceased. 



26 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

George H. P. Showalter, A. B Austin, Tex. 

President Lockney Christian College, Dockney, Texas, 1895-1905; 
President Sabinal Christian College, Sabina, Texas, 1906-07; 
Managing Editor of the "Firm Foundation," 1908-11; President 
Firm Foundation Publishing Co. 

Lizzie Wilburn Thomas, B. S Sherman, Texas. 

Wife of John V. Thomas, Class of 18S1. 

Bertha E. Tomlin (Thomas), B. S., teacher Oklahoma 

Ina Yoakley, B. S 19 Madison Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

Teacher in Johnson City, Tenn., 1895-1909; student in Teachers' Col- 
lege, Columbia University, New York, 1909-11; teacber in Jersey 
City High School and doing graduate work at Columbia, 1911. 

Class of 1896 

J. Edwin Crouch, Ph.B., business Johnson City, Tenn. 

Former Superintendent of Schools, ohnson City, Tenn.; elder in 
Johnson City church, and one of the best known Sunday school 
workers in the South. Preacher, teacher and business man. 

Class of 1897 

Isaac A. Briggs, A. B., M. D 1117 B. Main St., Enid, Okla. 

Graduated from Eclectric School of Medicine, 1901; graduated from 

Allopathic School of Medicine, 1905; President of Indian Territory 

Medical Association one year; Vice-President of Oklahoma Medical 

Association two years; appointed member of Medical Examining 

Board of Oklahoma by Gov. C. N. Haskell, 1908. Still member of 

that Board. 

I. G. W. Buck, B. S., teacher Woodsboro, Tex. 

Went West in 1898; is at present the proprietor of a store, owns a fine 

farm, is a county official, and is still teaching. Has been a 

teacher ever since graduation. 

A. Jackson Bunts, B. S Bowie, Texas 

Taught at Max Meadows, Va., 1897-98; Stuart, Va., 1898-1900; student 

at University of Chicago, 1900-03; taught in Chicago several years; 

Superintendent of Schools, Bowie, Texas. 

Laura Belle Clark, B. S., teacher Pulaski, Va. 

Taught in Hiwassee, Va., 1897-1903; Belspring, Va., 1903-07; Pulaski, 

Va., 1907-08; Pime, Va., 1908-09; Snowville, Va., 1909-10. 
Charles Wiley Johnson, Ph.B Rockdell, Va. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 27 

Taught in schools of Russell and Tazewell counties, Va., 1897-1905; 
student in the University of Virginia, 1905-07; teacher of Psy- 
chology, Logic and Latin in Rawlings Institute, Charlottesville, 
Va., 1906-07. On account of poor health he is now living on a farm 
in Rockdell, Va. 

Jam^es G. Johnson, A. M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Va.' 09) . .Charlottesville, Va. 

Graduated at Milligan in 1897; Principal of Masonic Institute, Moun- 
tain City, Tenn., 1898-1900; Principal Martha Wilder school, John- 
son City, Tenn., 1900-04; student University of Virginia, 1904-09; 
A. :M., Milligan College, 1905; M. A., University of Virginia, 1906; 
Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1909; City Superintendent of schools, 
Charlottesville, Va., 1909-11; Conductor of Summer School in 
Virginia, 1906-11. 

Annie Lee Lucas, B. S., teacher Childress, Va. 

Teacher in Childress, Va., 1897-1903; Belspring, Puiaski County, Va., 
1903-05; Principal of Snowville Graded School, Snowville, Va., 
1905-06; Principal of Auburn High School, Riner, Va., 1906-07; 
Principal of High School, Shawsville, Va., 1907-08; teacher in 
Academic department of Shoemaker College, Gate City, Va., 
1908-10. 

A. Robert Ramey, A. B Defiance, 0. 

Professor of Greek and History, Tazewell College, 1897-98; Greek and 
English, 1898-1900; Principal of Newcastle Institute and teacher 
of English, 1900-1902; M. A., Milligan College, 1902; Graduate 
student in English, University of Virginia, 1902-03; Professor of 
Latin, Elon College, N. C, 1903-05; English, 1905-06; Greek, 
1906-07; Head of Department of English in Defiance College, 
1907-10. 

Class of 1898 

Elbert L. Anderson, B. S., teacher Johnson City, Tenn. 

Charles D. Hart, B. S., teacher Milligan College 

Ogden Johnson, Ph.B., teacher Rockdell, Va. 

Edward Rodney Massie, E. S., teacher Ben, Va. 

Juliet Rowlett Massie (Showalter), Ph.B. teacher Ben, Va. 

Mary Virginia Orr (Shelhurne), Ph.B., teacher Dot, Va. 

Samuel "Walter Price, A. M., lawyer Johnson City, Tenn. 

Studied law in University of Tennessee, 1898-1900; attorney in John- 
son City, Tenn., 1900-11; superintendent Johnson City Sunday 
School and active Church and Sunday School worker. 

George J. Sells, B. S., M. D 261 Main St., Johnson City, Tenn. 



28 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Graduate Medical department of George Washington University, 
Washington, D. C, 1905. Physician in Johnson City, Tenn , 
1906-11. 

Thomas M. Sells, B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools; law student in University of Chattanooga; 
^admitted to the bar, 1908; lawyer in Johnson City, Tenn., 1909-11. 

Forest Summers, B. S., M. D War Eagle, W. Va. 

Class of 1899 

Annie L. Pruett (Bolton), Ph.B 130 North St., Bluefield, W. Va. 

Stenographer eight years in Bluefield. 
Charles W. Givens, A. B., University of Virginia. . .Charlottesville, Va. 

Richard Maury Lieake, A. B., physician Colliersville, Tenn. 

Minnie D. Myhr (Bolton). Ph. B Belleview, Tenn. 

Class of 1900 

Landon C. Bell, Ph.B., A. M., lawyer Asheville, N. C. 

liaw student. University of Virginia. Lawyer in Virginia and W. Va. 
•until 1905. Since 1905, Asst. Gen. Counsel, W. M. Rittew Lumber 
Co., and connected with allied interests. 

Sue Bell (Brummett), A. B., A. M Jordan Mines, Va. 

Teacher, Stoneville Academy, N. C, 1900-01; teacher and post-grad- 
uate student, Milligan College, 1901-03; Professor of English and 
Latin, Dexter Christian College, Mo., 1903-05; student in Univer- 
sity of Mo., 1904; A. M., Milligan College, 1905; Principal of Mis- 
sion School, Unicoi, Tenn., 1905-06; married Delbert W. Bell, 
June 20, 1906. 

Daisy Boring, B. S., Principal High School Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Principal High Schools in Washington County, Tenn., 1900-11. 

Wilson R. Bowers, B. S Rural Retreat, Va. 

Principal High School, Rural Retreat, Va., 1900-11; student in Univer- 
sity Summer School, Charlottesville, Va., for three summers; 
married Miss Brown Eiffert, 1906. 

Horace M. Burleson, A. B., insurance Johnson, City, Tenn. 

Launa Burchfield (Hyder), B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Librarian Milligan College. 1900-07. 

Larkin E. Crouch, A. B Noel Block, Nashville, Tenn. 

M. A. and LLB. at Vanderbilt University; lawyer in Nashville. 

Robert S. Fields, B. S., business Romeo, Tenn. 

(Mollie Hale, B. S., teacher Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Ida Hendrix (Anderson), Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Gentry Hodges, A. B Ardmore, Okla. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 29 

Student University of Virginia, 1904-07; Principal High School in. 

McGaheyville, Va., 1908-10; of Ardmore High School, Oklahoma, 

1910-11. 

Monta E. Hyder, B. S., teacher and farmer Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Stephen A. Morton, A. B., preacher Garlard, Texas. 

Former pastor of churches at Danville, Va., and Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Fay H. Price, B. S 641 Alabama St., Bristol, Tenn. 

In Railway Postal Service since leaving Milligan. 

Joe B. Sells, B. S., business Johnson City, Tenn. 

Amanda Shelburne, Ph.B Pageton, W. Va. 

Geneva Smith (Wallace) , B. S Hiltons, Va. 

Teacher seven years in Scott County, Virginia; wife of Prof. 0. M. 

Smith. 

Nannie Sutton (Bishop), B. S Pikeville, Ky. 

James S. Thomas, A. M Southern Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Teacher, Virginia Christian College, 1900-02; State School Examiner 

of Virginia, 1903-06; State Supervisor of Rural Schools, 1906-08; 

dean of Faculty at Virginia Christian College, 1909-11; President 

Va. Christian Missionary Society, 1909-11. At present, Commla- 

sioner of Education for Southern Commercial Congress. 
George A. Watson, A. B., preacher Durham, Okla. 

Class of 1901 

Frank M. Broyles, B. S Knoxville, Tenn. 

Gideon 0. Davis, A, M 1 Leonard Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

Professor in Milligan College, 1901-02; student in University of Vir- 
ginia, 1902-04; Professor of History and English, Milligan Col- 
lege, 1904-05; Vice-President and Field Secretary Virginia Chris- 
tian College, Lynchburg, Va,., 1905-09; graduate student in Har- 
vard University, 1909-11, 

Samuel F. Gollehon, A. M Graham, Va. 

William Leslie Leake, A. B., M. D Colliersville, Tenn. 

Class of 1902 

Williams Thomas Anglin, B. S., lawyer Calvin, Okla. 

Matthew Crockett Hughes, A. B., preacher Jeffersonville,, Ind. 

Pastor for five churches in Goochland, Fluvanna, Louisa, and Hanover 

Counties of Eastern Virginia, 1902-04; pastor of Randall St., 

church, Baltimore, Md., 1904-05; Shoals, Ind., 1905-06; Becknell. 

Ind., 1906-08; Jeffersonville, Ind., 1908-10. Married Feb. 1, 1905. 
William Hamilton Jones, A. B., business Jonesboro. Tenn. 

Lawyer in Calvin, Oklahoma, 1906-11. 



30 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Minor Johnson Ross, A. B., preacher Pulaski, Va. 

Pastor of churches at Chilhowie, Sugar Grove and Meadow View, Va., 
1902-03; student at Bible College, K. U., Lexington, Ky., 1903-05; 
pastor churches at Alton, Ky., and Nineveh, Ky., 1904-05; Sulphur 
and Camphellsburg, Ky., 1905-07; Harrisonburg, Daytoin and 
■Shenandoah, Va., 1907-09; Pulaski, Va., 1909-10. 

Elizabeth G-raham Sayers, B. S., teacher Pine, Va. 

Jeremy Pate Whitt, A. B., teacher Radford, Va. 

Class of 1903 

William Henry Book, A. M. Preacher Columbus, Ind. 

Pastor of church at Pulaski, Va., six years; Clifton Forge, Va., five 
years; Columbus, Ind., five years; has done much evangelistic 
work; author of a "Volume of Sermons and Real Life." 

Gilbert Henry Easley, B. S., teacher Bristol, Tenn. 

Oscar Monroe Fair, A. B., LL. B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Taught in public schools of Carter County, Tenn., 1903-04; commer- 
cial department of Milligan College, 1904-05; assistant auditor of 
Virginia Coal and Iron Co., Big Stone Gap, Va., 1905-06; book- 
keeper in Johnson City, Tenn., 1906-07; student of law, University 
of Chattanooga, 1907-09; admitted to the bar, July 3, 1909; vale- 
dictorian in a class of thirty-seven students, 1909; also managi^r 
of football team and captain of baseball team of University of 
Chattanooga, Tenn., 1909; lawyer in Chattanooga, Tenn., 1909-10; 
in Elizabethton, Tenn., 1910-11. Married, 1911. 

Craig Byrd Givens, Ph.B 1116 East Main St., Danville, Va. 

Teacher in public school, Craig Co., Va., 1903-04; professor of Mathe- 
matics in Milligan College, 1904-06; student in the University of 
Virginia, 1907-09; principal Bellevue Grammar School, Danville, 
Va., 1909-10. 

Jesse Brown Givens, Ph.B Newport, Va. 

Myrtle Jeanette Helsbeck (McPherson), PhB., A. B Ashevlile, N. C. 

Taught in Virginia Christian College and did post-graduate work, re- 
ceiving A. B., 1903-04; taught in Virginia Christian College, 
1904-05; Alleghaney County, Va., 1905-06; Craig County, 1906-07; 
in 1907 was married to James Oscar Helsabeck, who is now pastor 
of the Christian Church at Asheville, N. C. 

Nannie Ethed Helsabeck (Reynolds), B. S Cumnor, Va. 

Taught in Simmonsville, Va., 1903-07; in 1907 was married to Edgar N 
Helsabeck, who was principal of the high school at "Williamsburg, 
Va., 1909-11; living on a farm, 1911. 

Carrie Louise Hopwood, Ph.B Springfield, Mo. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 31 

Cordelia May Hopwood, B. S Springfield, Mo. 

Edward Everett Price, B. S., farmer Belle Plain, Kan. 

Washington Budd Sager, A. B Woodstock, Va. 

Taught in puhlic schools of Samsville, Va., 1904-05; student at Medical 
College of Virginia, 1905-08; at Jefferson Medical College of Phil- 
adelphia, 1908-09, graduating in a class of 215; passed examination 
of the State Medical Boa;rd of Virginia, June 27, 1902; physician in 
Woodstock, Va., 1909-11. 

Annie Watson (Burner), Ph.B 423 Johnson Ave., Lexington, Ky 

Wife of Joseph Thomas Watson. 

Joseph Thomas Watson, A. B., preacher and student, 423 Johnson Ave., 
Lexington, Ky. 

Pastor church at Vienna, Va., 1903-05; Virginia Christian College, 
Lynchburg, Va., 1905-06; in Craig County. Va., 1906-08; Maxv/ell 
St. Christian Church, Lexington, Ky., 1908-10; student in the 
College of the Bible, Transylvania University, 1908-11. 

Class of 1904 

J. Robert Garrett, Ph.B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Professor in Milligan College, 1905-11. 

William R. HoweP, A. B Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 

Ph.B., 1904, B. A., 1905, Milligan College; teacher, Atlantic Christian 
College, Wilson, N. C, 1904-05; teacher, Raeford Institute, Raeford, 
N. C, 1905-06; student, Yale University, 1906-07; M. A. Biblical 
Literature and Philosophy, Yale University, 1908; B. D., Yale 
Divinity School, 1909; student in Dept. of Social and Political 
Science, Yale Univ., 1909-11; preaching for United Church at 
Beacon Falls, Conn., 1909-11. 

Elgin K. Leake, B. S., business Colliersville, Tenn. 

Arthur C. Maupin, B. S., preacher Cash, Okla. 

Robert L. Peoples, Ph. B., preacher Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James I. Scott, B. S., business Elk Park, N. C. 

Class of 1905 

*Laura Alice Baker (Wilson), B. S California 

Teacher in Washington, 1905-06; married, 1906; died, Nov., 1908. 

W. P. Crouch, A. M., preacher Clarksville, Tenn. 

Pastor Central Christian Church, Bristol, Tenn., from its organization 

until 1909; pastor, Athens, Alabama, 1909-10; pastor, Clarksville, 

Tenn., 1910-11. Prominent evangelist. 

Lucy Louise Hatcher, A. B Walter, Okla. 

Teacher, Johnson City, Tenn., 1905-09; High School in Walter, Okla., 

1909-11. 



32 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Lula Leatitia Lacy (Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Taught in Mountain City public sdhools, 1905-07; Milligan College, 

1908-09; married, 1908. 
Nannie Lee Price (Ratliff), B. S Jolinson City, Tenn, 

Married Attorney S. W. Price, 1905. 
W. H. Garfield, B. S., teacher Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Washington Co., Tenn., 1905-11. 

Lola Eleanor Roberts (Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Taught in public schools of Mountain City, Tenn., 1905-07; Knoxville, 

1907-08; married, 1909. 

Aylette Rains VanHook, A. B Johnson City Tenn. 

Business, 1905-06; teacher in Milligan College, Tenn., 1906-07; position 

in Johnson City postoffice, 1907-11. 

Georgia Marion White, A. B., teacher Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public school of Carter County, 1905-09; Watauga, Tenn.. 

1909-10; Hampton, Tenn., 1910-11. 

Elizabeth Leatitia Wilson (Kelley), B. S Kent, Ore. 

Teacher in Cherokee, Tenn., 1905-06; Oak Grove, Tenn., 1906-07; Green 

Pine, Tenn., 1907-08; married Jeremiah Wilson, 1908. 

Class of 1906 

M, Nola Fields, Ph. B Baileyton, Tenn. 

Teacher of elocution in Milligan College, 1907-08. 
Mary Lydia Han en, B. S., teacher Midland, Texas 

Teacher of music in Milligan College, 1906-08. 

*Lucy J. Hart, B. S Milligan College, Tenn, 

Teacher in public schools of Carter county, Tenn., 1906-07; died from 

typhoid fever, Nov., 1907. 

Roscoe Hodges, B. S., teacher R.F.D., Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Teacher in Milligan College, 1906-08; in public schools of Washington 

County, Tenn., 1908-09; Knoxville, Tenn., 1909-10. 

Robert Decker Hyder, A. B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Teacher in High School in Georgia, 1906-09; County Superintendent of 

Schools, Carter County, Tenn., 1909-11. 

Samuel D. Kesner, A. B., teacher Greendale, Tenn. 

Owen F. Kilburne, Ph.B., business Inman, Va, 

Frank A. Taylor, B. S., farmer Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1907 

N. Petibone Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

*Deceased. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 33 

Teacher in public schools of Carter County, Tenn., 1907-09; student in 
.Medical College, Knoxville, Tenn, 1909-11. 

R. Bennick Hyder, B. S., teacher Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter County, Tenn., 1907-10. 

John L. Kuhn, Ph.B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Business, 1907-09; law student in the University of Tennessee, Knox- 
ville, Tenn., 1909-10; position in Washington, D. C, 1910-11. 

Edgar C. Lacy, A. B Mountain City, Tenn. 

Student in Soimmer School, University of Tennessee, 1908; teacher in 
Milligan College, 1907-10. Preacher, Mountain City, Tenn., 1910-11. 

James M. Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools in Washington County, Tenn., 1907-11. 

Class of 1908 

Stella Lee Burleson (Sutton), A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

William Lee Cook, B. S., business Jellico, Tenn. 

Mary Frances Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Maggie Matilda Wright, A. B., teacher Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter County, Tenn., 1908-11. 

Class of 1909 

George M. Bowman, Ph.B King, N. C. 

Principal Masonic Academy, Pearidge, Ark., 1909-10; of State High 

School, King, N. C, 1910-11. 

Shelburne Ferguson, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Instructor in Milligan College, 1909-10; graduate student in Milligan 

College, 1910-11. 
Jennie Hatcher, Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools. Temple, Okla., 1909-10. 
Anna Kelley, Ph.B Unaka, Va. 

■Student in Milligan College, 1909-10. 
George Robert Lowder, Ph.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Business, 1909-11. 
Persie I. Owen, Ph.B Burnside, K.v. 

Instructor in Milligan College, 1909-10. 

Mary Evelyn Sevier, Ph.B Harriman, Tenu. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, Ph.B Crossville, Tenn. 

Student in Milligan College, 1909-10; A. B., Milligan College, 1910; 

post-graduate student in Columbia University, 1910-11. 

James W. Stephens, A. B Philadelphia, Pa. 

Instructor in Milligan Colligan College, 1909-10; student in University 

of Pennsylvania, 1910-11. 



34 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Rennie Bolton White, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter County, Tenn., 1909-11. 
"William I. Williams, Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Teacher in public schools of Carter County, Tenn., 1909-11. 

Class of 1910. 

Professor Alexander Reed Milligan, Litt.D Lexington, Ky. 

Hon. Robert Love Taylor, LL.D U. S. Sena4;e, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur Eugene Buck, Ph.B., teacher Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Teacher in Bernice, La., High School, 1910-11. 

Frances Temperance Hyder, Ph.B , Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Ann Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Lucius Fields Shelburne, A. B.. teacher Wise, Va. 

Teacher in High School, Wise, Va., 1910-11. 
Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, A. B , Crossville, Tenn. 

Graduate student at Columbia University, 1910-11. 
Catharine Emma Thomas, Mus. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Student at Milligan College, 1909-11. 
Charmian Lestelle Thomas, Mus. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Student in Milligan College, 1909-11. 
Alma Fiske VanHook, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Teacher in public school at Milligan College, Tenn, 1910-11. 

Members of Senior CI^iss, 1911 

Logan E. Garrett Virginia 

Mary Huff Virginia 

Frank H. Knight Tennessee 

Minerva 0. Shelburne Virginia 

Ben H. Taylor Tennessee 

Bertie Wade Tennessee 

Wise Worrell Virginia 



CATALOGUE OF STUDEJfTS 
1910-11 



Graduate Students 

Ferguson, Shelburne, A. B., (Milligan College), 1909 Tennessee 

French, German. 

Undergraduate Students 

(Students listed here for work taken in Collegiate Department 
only. Work taken in other departments scheduled separately.) 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 35 

Acred, Annie Lou Tennessee 

Rhetoric, Physiography. 
Acuif, Charles Tennessee 

Astronomy, Ancient [History, Arithmetic. 
Acufi, Minnie Tennessee 

English LiteratuTe, Astronom.^ 
Alford, Patricia Tennessee 

Latin, American Literature, Algebra. 
Allamong, Ira C West Virginia 

Rhetoric, English Literature, Astronomy, American Government. 
Allen, Chester, Jr Tennessee 

German, Rhetoric, Trigonometry, Ancient History. 
Anderson, Frank A Tennessee 

English Literature, Arithmetic, Algebra. 
Anderson, James Tennessee 

American Literature, Geometry. 
Anderson, Jennie Tennessee 

Latin, French, English Drama, Trigonometry. 
Banner, Hyder Tennessee 

Latin, Analytics, English History, Psychology. 
Boothe, George Wythe Virginia 

English Literature, Geometry, Geology. 
Bowman, Talmage North Carolina 

Latin, American Literature, Geometry, Ancient History, Sociology. 

Buck, Ephraim C, Jr Virginia 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Englisli History, American Gov- 
ernment. 

Buck, Fred C Virginia 

Algeora, Commercial Arithmetic, Physical Geography, Civil Govern- 
ment. 
Burchfield, Nat Virginia 

Lai in, English Literature, Geometry, Ancient History. 
Burleson, Fred Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography. 
Burleson, Millard Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra, Astronomy, Physical Geography. 
Burleson, Wilson Tennessee 

Latin, Grammar, Algebra, Biology, Physical Geography. 
Cahoon, Jesse N Virginia 

Latin Greek, French, Geometry, Civil Government. 
Campbell, ' Edith Tennessee 

Latin, French, American Literature, Geometry, Astronomy. 



36 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Campbell, Mary Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography. 
Chapman, D. Park West Virginia 

Roman History, Civil Government Sociology, Psychology. 
Clark, Joseph Tennessee 

Latin, Greek, American Literature, Trigonometry. 
Clark, Russell Tennessee 

Latin, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Physical Geography. 
Cole, Samuel S Tennessee 

English Literature, Arithmetic, Physical Geography. 
Cooke, Sallie Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic. 

Crouch, Joseph H Tennessee 

Latin, Greek, American Literature, Geometry, Ancient History, Civil 

Government. 
Dixon, Zion Virginia 

Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Physical Geography, U. S. History. 
Dobyns, Flem Tennessee 

French, American Literature, Geometry, Civil Government. 
Ellis, Bertha Tennessee 

Latin, American Literature, Rhetoric, Algebra. 
Ferguson, Arthur Tennessee 

Latin, Greek, American Literature, Geometry, Algebra. 
Forbes, Walter Virginia 

Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, U. S. History. 
Forrester, Robert Tennessee 

EngliSih Literature, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic. 
Garrett, L. E Virginia 

Greek, French, American Literature, Logic, Economics, Sociology. 
Gentry, G. W Tennessee 

American Literature, Logic. 
Go'dbey, Cora Virginia 

Latin, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Biology, Physical Geography. 
Godbey, Grace Virginia 

Latin, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Biology, Physical Geography. 
Godbey, Laura Virginia 

Latin, French, English Literature, Geometry. 
Grinestaff , Sam Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Adv. Grammar, Algebra, Biology. 
Gwyn, Lucy North Carolina 

English Literature, Astronomy, Biology. 
Hamby, Stitzel J Tennessee 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 37 

English Literature, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Physical Geog- 
raphy. 

Hampton, Bessie North Carolina 

English Literature, Algebra, Arithmetic, Astronomy. 

Hancock, Lambreth Texas 

American Literature, English Drama, Civil Government. 

Hardesty, Vernon C Kentucky 

English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography, Astronomy. 

Hardy, John Tennessee 

American Literature. 

Hendrix, Clyde W Tennessee 

Latin, American Literature, Ancient History, Physical Geogrophy. 

Hill, Guy Ocanell Teniiessee 

French, English Drama, Psychology, Economics. 

Hinds, George Tennessee 

Rhetoric, Adv. Grammar, Geology. 

Hester, Corrie Florida 

English Literature, Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic, Astronomy, 
Geology. 

Hodges, Lotta Tennessee 

Latin, French, American Literature, Astronomy. 

Hodges, Nell Tennessee 

Latin, French, American Literature, Astronomy. 

Huff, Mary Virginia 

French, Anglo-Saxon, Trigonometry, Economics, Sociology, Psy- 
chology. 

Hurt, Burman Virginia 

Latin, German, English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography. 

Hyder, Fred Tennessee 

Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic, Physical Geography. 

Hyder, Geneva Tennessee 

English Literature, Astronomy. 

Hyder, Roy Tennessi^e 

Arithmetic, History, Physical Geography. 

Hyder, Sam J Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra, Astronomy. 

James, White Tennessee 

Latin, Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic, Civil Goverment. 

Jobe, Aineta Pruden Tennessee 

French, English Literature, Algebra, Arithmetic, Physical Geog- 
raphy. 



38 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Johnson, Ernest North Carolina 

English Literature, Algebira, Arithmetic, Physical Geography. 
Jones, Carter Tennessee 

English Literature. 
Kelly, Edgar Virginia 

Adv. Grammar, Algebra, Arithmetic, Civil Government. 
Kelly, Margaret Vifrginia 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Astronomy. 
Kelly, Pleasant Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, English History. 
Keplinger, John Tennessee 

English Literature. 
Kite, Julia Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra, Biology. 

Knight, F. H Tennessee 

German, Anglo Saxon, Psychology, Sociology, Astronomy, Civil Gov- 

eirnment. 

Knight, Melvin M Colorado 

Latin, American Literature, Algetora, Geometry, Astronomy, Soci- 
ology. 
Lacy, Lena Tennessee 

Latin, Rhetoric, Algebra, Arithmetic. 

LeSneur, Ruth Virginia 

French, American Literature, Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic, 

Astronomy. 
Miller, Nannie Virginia 

Latin, English Literature, Geometry, Geology. 
Munson, Elmer Baron West Virginia 

American Literature, Ancient History, Civil Government, Geology. 

Nave, May Tennessee 

American Literature, English Literajture, Ancient History, As- 
tronomy. 
Nave, Earl Carter - Tennessee 

English Literature, Trigonometry, Ancient History, Astronomy. 
Nave, Stev?-ard Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic, Astronomy. 
Perry, Noah Tennessee 

English Literature, Arithmetic, Ancient History, Astronomy. 
Peoples, GeoTgie Tennessee 

Latin, Rhetoric, Adv. Grammar. 
Perry, Annie Mildred Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Arithmetic. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 39 

Porter, Ethyl Tennessee 

English Literature, Astronomy. 
Porter, W. H Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra. 
Price, Lucy Ethel Tennessee 

French, Anglo-Saxon, Geometry, Psychology. 
Range, Cleveland J Tennessee 

Rhetoric, EnglisTi Literature, Algebra, Geometry. 
Range, George Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, English Drama, Psychology, Sociology. 
Roller, Wm. Martin, Jr Tennessee 

English Literature, Arithmetic, Civil Government, Astronomy. 
Ryan, Wm. A Maryland 

Frencih, Psychology, Sociology, Astronomy. 
Scyphers, Minnie Virginia 

English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography. 
Scurry, B. M South Carolina 

English Drama, Civil Government. 
Shamhart, Clarice Tennessee 

Latin,Rhetoric, Astronomy. 
Shamhart, Wilmer Tennessee 

German, Anglo-Saxon, Geometry, Psychology. 
Shelburne, Claude Virginia 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Biology. 
Shelburne, Minerva Virginia 

German, French, Anglo-Saxon, Analytics, Economics. 
Shelburne, Ollie May Virginia 

Latin, Greek, French, English Drama, Trigonometry. 
Shelburne, Samuel Virginia 

Latin, French, English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography. 
Shepherd, James Bradley Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography. 
Shepherd, Lutber Tennessee 

Physical Geography, Astronomj^ Arithmetic. 
Simmons, Leslie L Tennessee 

English Literature, Algebra, Biology, Physical Geography. 
Smalling, Raymond Tennessee 

English Literature, Arithmetic, Biology. 
Smith, Ada E Virginia 

English Literature. 
Smith, Edward C, Jr Texas 



40 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

English Literature, Algebra, Commercial Arithmetic, Physical 
Geography. 

Smith, Gus Georgia 

English Literature, Commercial Arithmetic, Ancient History. 

Snodgrass, Edward Tennessee 

Latin, Greek, English Literature, Geometry. 

Snodgrass, Jonas Tennessee 

Latin, Greek, English Literature, Geometry. 

Stallings, P. F Tennessee 

Latin, Rhetoric, Algebra, Biology. 

Stuibblefield, Grover Carl Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geograpliy. 

Swanner, Samuel Tennessee 

English Literature, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Astronomy. 

Taber, C. W Tennessee 

English Literature, Ancient History. 

Tabor, H. T .Virginia 

English Literature, Adv. Grammar, Arithmetic, Physical Geog- 
raphy. 

Talbott, Frank V Maryland 

English Literature, Rhetoric, Ancient History, Astronomy. 
Taylor, David Tennessee 

Ancient History. 
Taylor, Ben H Tennessee 

French, English Drama, Trigonometry, Ancient History, Sociology. 
Taylor, James Blaine Tennessee 

American Literature, Ancient History, Civil Government. 
Taylor, Samuel Carter Tennessee 

Rhetoric, Algebra, Astronomy. 
Thomas, Catharine Virginia 

Greek, Latin, French, English Literature, Analytics. 
Thomas, Charmian Virginia 

French, English Literature, Analytics, Astronomy. 

Thomas, G. Tollie Tennessee 

Greek, English Literature, Geometry, American Government, 

Astronomy. 

Thomas, Mary Tennessee 

Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Trigonometry, Astronomy, Sociology, Eco- 
nomics. 
Tiller, Will Virginia 

Adv. Grammar, Physical Geography, U. S. History, Biology. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 41 

Todd, John R., Jr Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Astronomy. 
Trussler, Howard Tennessee 

English Literature, Geometry, Civil Government, Astronomy. 
Vance, Sam F Tennessee 

Latin, Adv. Grammar, Physical Geography. 
VanHook, Mabel Tennessee 

Greek, Latin, English Drama, Trigonometry, Astronomy. 

Wade, Bertie Tennessee 

Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Trigonometry, Astronomy, Sociology, Econo- 
mics. 

Wade, Mary Tennessee 

French, American Literature, English Drama, Astronomy, Psychology, 

Sociology. 

Waring, Lurline Tennessee 

English Literature, Astronomy, Ancient History, Physical Geog- 
raphy. 
Warren, Claude Tennessee 

Adv. Grammar, U. S. History, Physical Geogiraphy. 
White, Byrl Tennessee 

Greek, Latin, English Drama, Trigonometry. 
White, William Myhr Tennessee 

Latin, English Literature, Geometry, Ancient History. 
Whitehead, Anna Tennessee 

English Literature, Adv. Grammar, Algebra, Astronomy. 
Williams, Elena Tennesisee 

English Literature, Algebra, Physical Geography 

Woodby, Savada Tennessee 

English Literature, Adv. Grammar. 
Worrell, Wise Virginia 

French, German, Anglo-Saxon, Sociology, Economics. 



Students in Academy 

Anderson, Lela Tenn. Maston, Junior Tenn. 

Anderson, Mabel Tenn. McKay, Edna Tenn. 

Anderson, Margaret Tenn. McKay, Elsie Tenn. 

Archer, Bertie Tenn. McKay, Ethel Tenn. 

Archer, Claude Tenn. McKay, Ed Tenn. 

Archer, Carl Tenn. IMcInturff, Annie Tenn. 



42 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



Ar clier. Earl Tenn. 

Archer, Frank Tenn. 

Bailey, Prank Tenn. 

Bailey, Pinkie Tenn. 

Bailey, Wilmetta Tenn. 

Boren, Wiley Edward Tenn. 

Bowman, George Tenn. 

Bowman, Harry Tenn. 

Bowman, Od Tenn. 

Bowman, Ollie Tenn. 

Burleson, Pearl Tenn. 

Burleson, GutcMe Tenn. 

Butler, Eugene Tenn. 

Carrier, James Tenn. 

Carrier, Sally Tenn. 

Carter, Jesise C Va. 

Cox, Clinton Tenn. 

Cox, Lucy Tenn. 

Cox, William Tenn. 

Elliott, Clyde Tenn. 

Ellis, Edmond Tenn. 

Ellis, Pearl Tenn. 

Ellis, Robert Tenn. 

Ellis, Rose Tenn. 

Crowe, Clyde Tenn.| 

Fair, Ora Tenn. 

Fair, Will Frank Tenn. 

Faust, Emma Tenn. 

Faust, Ro'bert Tenn. 

Faust, John Carl Tenn. 

Forbes, Robert Tenn. 

French, Frankie Tenn. 

Garrett, Georgie Tenn. 

Garret, Hobart Tenn. 

Garrett, Lucile Tenn. 

Gillon, Leona Tenn. 

Glover, Roy Tenn. 

Gourley, William Tenn. 

Gourley, Josie Tenn. 

Greer, Ashley Tenn. 

Grindstaff, Hobart Tenn. 

Hampton, Nellie Tenn. 



Mclnturff, Bessie Tenn. 

Mclnturff, Julia Tenn. 

Minton, Glenn Tenn. 

Minton, Josie Tenn. 

Moore, Luther Tenn. 

Nave, Hazel Tenn. 

Oakes, Irene Tenn. 

Patton, Maurice Tenn. 

Payne, Anderson Tenn. 

Payne, Christine Tenn. 

Payne, Cesler, Tenn. 

Payne, Temple Tenn. 

Pearce, Kate Tenn. 

Pearce, Oscar Tenn. 

Pearce, Ray. Tenn. 

Pearce, Roy Tenn. 

Peoples, Mack Tenn. 

Price, Joe Tenn. 

Price, Ruth Tenn. 

Redmond, Ocie Tenn. 

Rice, Anna May Tenn. 

Rice, Howard Tenn. 

Roller, David Sevier Tenn. 

Sampson, Charles Tenn. 

Scott, Lena Tenn. 

Shell, Oliver N. C. 

Shepherd, Carl Tenn. 

Shepherd, Roscoe Tenn. 

Shepherd, Pearl Tenn. 

Shoun, Caswell Tenn. 

Shoun, Charley Tenn. 

Shoun, Lizzie Tenn. 

Shoun, Ray Tenn. 

Simmons, Roy C Tenn. 

Smith, Paul Ga. 

Snodgrass, Chloe Tenn. 

Snodgrass, Nell Tenn. 

Snodgrass, Gertrude Tenn. 

Spoon, George Tenn. 

Spoon, Raymond Tenn. 

Taylor, Alfred Tenn. 

Taylor, Kate Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



43 



Hampton, Wamp Tenn. 

Helvey, Miae Va. 

Hendrickson, M. D Tenn. 

Hendrickson, W. B Tenn. 

Hendrix, Ernest Tenn 

Hendrix, (Laurence Tenn. 

Hines, Earl Tenn. 

Huglies, Grace Tenn. 

Hughes, Maud Tenn. 

Hughes, Ronald N. C. 

Keywood, Bonnie Tenn. 

Kite, Frank Tenn. 

Kite, Hattie Tenn. 

Kite, Percy Tenn. 

Lewis, Clarence Ky. 

Lewis, Joe Tenn. 

JJewis, Josie Tenn. 

Maston, Ira Tenn. 



Taylor, Mary Tenn. 

Taylor, Robert Tenn. 

Underwood, Wm Tenn. 

Usuary, Carl Tenn. 

Usuary, Ernest Tenn. 

Usuary, Montie Tenn. 

Usuary, Ollie Tenn. 

VanHoy, Alma Tenn. 

Watkims, Grace Tenn. 

Watkins, Ralph Tenn. 

Webb, Lucy Tenn. 

Whitehead, George N. C. 

Williams, Annie Tenn. 

Williams, Robert Tenn. 

Williams, Roberta Tenn. 

Woodby, Charles Tenn. 

Young, Carl N. C. 



Ministerial Students 

Allamoag, Ira C West Virginia 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Practical Work of Minister, Apostoli? 
History, Church History. 

Boothe, George Wythe Virginia 

Old Testament History. 

Chapman, D. Park West Virginia 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Practical Work of the Minister, Apos- 
tolic History, Church History. 

Forbes, Walter Virginia 

Old Testament History. 

Forrester, Robert Tennessee 

New Testament History. 

Gentry, G. W Tennessee 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Apostolic History, Church History. 

Greer, W. Conley Tennessee 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Practical Work of the Minister, Apos- 
tolic History, Church History. 

Hancock, Lambreth Texas 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Apostolic History, Church History. 

Keplinger, John Tennessee 



44 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

New Testabent History. Practical Work of the Minister. Church 
History. 

Munson, Elmer Baron West Virginia 

New Testament History, Church History, Apostolic History. 

Porter, Ethyl Tennessee 

Old Testament History. 

Porter, W. Herbert Tennessee 

Old Testament History, New Testament History, Practical Work of the 
Minister. 

Ryan, Wm. A Maryland 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Practical Work of the Minister, Apos- 
tolic History, Church History. 

Stubblefield, Grover Carl Tennessee 

Old Testament History. 

Taber, C. W Tennessee 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Practical Work of the Minister, Apos- 
tolic History, Church History. 

Talbott, Frank V Maryland 

Christian Doctrine and Polity, Practical Work of the Minister, Apos- 
tolic History, Church History. 

Thomas, G. Tollie Tennessee 

Apostolic History, Church History. 



Other Students Electing Work in the Ministerial Department 

Acuff, Charles Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Clark, Joseph Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Garrett, Logan E Virginia 

Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Godbey, Laura Virginia 

Old Testament History. 
Huff, Mary Virginia 

Old Testament History, New Testament History. 

Knight, F. H Tennessee 

Old Testament History, New Testament History, Crhistian Doctrine 

and Polity. 
Price, Lucy Ethel Tennessee 

Old Testament History. 
Scurry, B. M South Carolina 

New Testament History. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 45 

Shelburne, Claude Virginia 

Old Testament History. 
Shelburne, Oliie Virginia 

Old Testament History. 
Taylor, David H Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Taylor, Ben H Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Worrell, Wise Virginia 

Christian Doctrine and Polity. 



PIANO 

Acred, Annie Lou Tenn. Lacy, Lena Tenn. 

Acuff, Minnie Tenn. LeSueur, Ruth Va. 

Campbell, Edith Tenn. Peoples, Georgie Tenn. 

Campbell, Mary Tenn. Perry, Annie Mildred Tenn. 

Cole, Samuel S Tenn. Scyphers, Minnie Mae Va. 

Cooke, Sallie Tenn. Shamhart, Clarice Tenn. 

Gwyn, Lucy N. C. Shamhart, Wilmer Tenn. 

Hancock, Lambreth Tex. Smith, Ada Va. 

Helvey, Mae Va. Thomas, Catharine Va. 

Hodges, Lotta Tenn. Thomas, Charmian Va. 

Hodges, Nell Tenn. Trussler, Howard Tenn. 

Hyder, Geneva Tenn. Waring, Lurline Tenn. 

James, White Tenn. Webb, Lucy Tenn. 

Kelly, Margaret Va. 



VOICE 

Acred, Annie Lou Tenn. Porter, Ethyl Tenn. 

Hancock, Lambreth Tsx. Shamhart, Clarice Tenn. 

Hester, Corrie Fla. Snodgrass, Jonas Tenn. 

Peoples, Georgie Tenn. Thomas, Catharine Va. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Shorthand Taylor, Samuel Carter Tenn. 

Acuff, Minnie Tenn. Typewriting 

Hammitt, Lynne Va. Acuff, Minnie Tenn. 

Hart, J. L Tenn. Dobyns, Flem Tenn. 

Hardy, John B Tenn. Hart, J. L Tenn. 

Hyder, Geneva Tenn. Hardy, John B Tenn. 



46 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



Jones, Carter Tenn. 

Potter, Joel Ellett Ky. 

Smith, Ada Va. 

Taber, C. W Tenn. 

Woodby, Savada Tenn. 

Commercial Arithmetic 

Buck, Fred C Va, 

Cooke, Sallie Tenn. 

Hardy, Jobn B Tenn. 

Hester, Oorrie Fla. 

Hyder, Fred Tenn. 

James, White Tenn. 

LeSueur, Ruth Va. 

Nave, Steward Tenn. 

Smith, Ed C Tex. 

Smith, Gus Ga. 



Hendrix, Ray Tenn. 

Hester, Corrie Fla. 

Hyder, Geneva Tenn. 

Jones, Carter Tenn. 

Moore, Luther Tenn. 

Pierce, David Tenn. 

Potter, Joel Ellett Ky. 

Shelburne, Minerva Va. 

Smith, Ada Va. 

Smith, Gus Ga. 

Woodby, Savada Tenn. 

Bookkeeping 

Anderson, James Teun. 

Cooke, Sallie Tenn. 

Hammitt, Lynne Va. 



PENMANSHIP 



Burleson, Wilson Tenn. 

Carter, Jesse C Va. 

Dobyns, Flem Tenn. 

Helvey, Mae Va. 

Hendrix, Clyde Tenn. 

Hinds, George Tenn. 

Hyder, Geneva Tenn. 

Jobe, Aineta Pruden Tenn. 

Jones, Carter Tenn. 

Kelly, Edgar Va. 



Perry, Annie Mildred Tenn. 

Smalling, Raymond Tenn. 

Smith, Ada Va. 

Smith, Gus Ga. 

Smith, Paul Ga. 

TaJbor, H. T Va. 

Tiller, Will Va. 

Vance, Sam F Tenn. 

Whitehead, Geo N. €. 

Woodby, Savada Tenn. 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1910-11 

Graduate Students 1 

Undergraduate 133 

Academy 132 

Ministerial 30 

Music — • 

Piano 27 

Voice 8 



Total Music 35 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 47 

Business — 

Shorthand 10 

Typewriting 16 

Bookkeeping 3 

Commercial Arithmetic 11 

Penmanship 20 

Total Business 60 

390 
Deduct for recounting 115 

Total Number of Students 1910-11 275 



Classification hj States 

Tennessee 225 

Virginia 29 

North Carolina 7 

Kentucky 3 

Georgia 2 

Texas 2 

Florida 1 

South Carolina 1 

Maryland 2 

West Virginia 3 

Colorado 1 



PART III 

©FPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

I 



Collegiate Department 



Requirements for Admission 

All candidates for admission to the College must offer satisfac- 
tory evidence of good moral character, and those coming from other 
colleges must present letters of honorable dismissal. 



48 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

From the point of view of scholarship, students are admitted to 
Milligan College in one of three ways : 

First — By certificate from the Milligan Academy, no examina- 
tion whatever being required in this case. 

Second — By certificate showing at least fifteen units of work 
from a High School or Preparatory School accredited by the State 
University of the state in w^hich said school is located. Students 
admitted in this way are placed upon a probationary requirement 
which provides that a failure to make the usual number of credits 
during the first session involves the student in the entrance examina- 
tions outlined below. 

Third — By examination. The examination covers the follow- 
ing requirements: 

I — English, three units. 

(a) Grammar and Composition (i unit). Spelling, Punctu- 
ation, Paragraphing, Syntax complete. The fundamental principles 
of Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write easy descriptions 
and narrations. 

(b) Outline course in English and American Literature, (i 
unit). The history of the more important periods and some knowl- 
edge of the authors and their representative works. Such knowledge 
as should be gained from a good one-volume text in the history of 
English Literature with collateral reading. 

(c) College Entrance Requirements in English, (i unit). 
For reading, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and The Merchant of Ven- 
ice; Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Scott's Ivanhoe; George Eliot's 
Silas Marner; Irving's Sketch Book; DeQuincey's Joan of Arc, and 
Coleridge's Ancient Mariner; Scott's Lady of the Lake. For study 
and practice, Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comus and 
Shorter Poems; Burke's Conciliation; Macaulay's Life of Johnson; 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

II — Mathematics, three units. 

(a) Algebra, (i unit). A good elementary text to quadratics. 
Thorough knowledge of factoring, least common multiple and linear 
equations, both numerical and literal, containing one or more unknown 
quantities. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 49 

(b) Plane Geometry, complete, (i unit). 

(c) Solid Geometry, (1-2 unit). 

(d) Advanced Algebra, (1-2 unit). 

Algebra from quadratics. Progressions. Binominal Theorem. 
Ratio and Proportion. One-half year's work with a comparatively 
advanced text. 

Ill — History, three units. 

(a) Ancient History, including one year's work, five hours 
per week, in the history of Greece and Rome, (i unit). 

(b) Mediaeval and Modern History, (i unit). 

One year's work with a satisfactory text, five hours per week. 

(c) American History and Civil Government, (i unit). 
A full year's work, five hours per week. 

Other work in history of an equivalent grade will be accepted, 
providing credits shov/ the time spent in the study to be the same as 
required here. 

IV — Science, three and one-half units. 

(a) Physics, (^one unit). An elementary course, pursued one 
full year, with laboratory demonstrations. 

(b) Chemistry, (i unit). A course similar to the requirements 
in Physics. 

(c) Botany, (1-2 unit). A half year's outline course. 

(d) Zoology, (1-2 unit). A half year's outline course. 

(e) Physiography, (1-2 unit). The subject complete. 
V — Latin, four units. 

(a) Grammar and composition. Easy translation. (lunit). 

(b) Caesar, four books, with Composition, (i unit). 

(c) Cicero, six orations with drill in syntax. ( i unit). 

(d) Vergil, six books with prosody, (i unit). 
VI — Modern Languages, four units. 

Two years full work in either French or German, embracing 
a thorough knowledge of the forms, together with ordinary skill in 
composition, and the ability to read easy prose at sight. Two units 
credit given in either language, but no entrance credit given for a 
single year's work considered alone. 



50 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Fifteen units are required for admission, of which three must 
be offered in English, two in Mathematics, two in Foreign Languages, 
one in History and one in Science. The remainder must be selected 
in harmony with the particular course elected for pursuit in the Col- 
lege, as outlined below. 

Matriculation of Students 

Students upon their arrival should report at once to the President 
of the College in the College Office. The President will fill out 
the proper blanks and then send the student to the Treasurer; after 
receiving the receipt of the latter for the term fees (see item "Ex- 
penses" under "Miscellaneous Information"), the matriculate will 
go to the Secretary of the College who will enroll him upon the per- 
manent records of the institution, thereby completing the matricu- 
lation. 

Requirements for Degrees 

The full requirements for the various undergraduate degrees 
are given in tabulated form, elsewhere in the Catalogue. 

For the degree of Master of Arts, the student must have 
received the B. A. degree, and must pursue at least two full years' 
work under the special direction of the Faculty. The preparation of 
a satisfactory thesis is also required. For the degree of Master of 
Science, the possession of some other academic degree than that of B. 
A., together with the completion of two full years' graduate study, 
and a satisfactory thesis, are required. 

Tabulated Requirements for the different degrees 

(In every case the necessary fifteen units required for admission 
to the College are presupposed). 

The Classical Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) 

Sixteen Colleye years, meaning sixteen college studies, each of 
which has been pursued not less than four recitation periods per week 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 51 

for thirty-six weeks, selected according to the following schedule : 

Ancient Languages 5 

Mathematics 2 

English 3 

Philosophy 2 

Bible I 

Electives 3 

f'At least one elective must be in Language work) . 
The Literary Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Literature (B. Lit.) 

English 4 

Modern Languages 4 

Philosophy 2 

Mathematics 2 

Bible I 

Electives 3 

The Scientific Course 
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 

Mathematics and Science 5 

(Not less than two in Mathematics) 

English 3 

History 2 

Bible I 

Philosophy 2 

Elicetives 3 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES (COLLEGE) LEADDfG TO THE DIE- 
FERENT DEGREES 

Classical (B. A.) Literary (B. Lit.) Scientific (B. S.) 

Freshman Year 

Greek I English V English V 

Latin IV Mathematics III Mathematics III 

English V French III History IV 

Mathematics III German I Science V 



52 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



Greek II 
English VI 
Mathematics IV 
Latin V 

English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
Greek III 



Sophomore Year 
English VI 
Mathematics IV 

French IV 
German II 
Junior Year 

English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
One Elective 



Philosophy II 



Senior Year 
English VIII 
Philosophy II 
Three electives Two Electives 

(German III and IV may be offered 
III and IV in the Literary course, in which 
II must be offered in the place of German 
schedule. ) 



English VI 
Mathematics IV 
History V 
One Elective 

English VII 

Philosophy I 

Bible I 

One Elective in 

Math, or Science 

Philosophy II 

Mathematics V 

Two Electives 

as substitutes for French 

case French I and French 

I and German II in the 



COURSES OF IJfSTRUCTIOlV BY DEPARTMEJ^fTS 
I 

The Greek Language and Literature 

Professor Ellis 

Greek I First Term — Beginners' Course. White's First Greek 
Book. 
Second Term — ^White's First Greek Book completed. 
Greek II First Term — Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-III. Good- 
win's Greek Grammar. Jones' Greek Prose Compo--ition. 
Second Term — Homer's Iliad, Books I-III. Grammar and 
Composition. 
Greek III First Term — Plato's Apology, Lysias' Orations, Gram- 
mar and Composition. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 53 

Second Term — Demosthenes' Phillipics, Grammar and Compo- 
sition. 
Greek IV First Term — Homer's Odyssey, Aeschylus' Prometheus 
Bound, Review of Greek Syntax. 
Second Term — Sophocles' Antigone, Euripides' Iphigeneia in 

Tauris. Jebb's Prnner of Greek Literature. 
Advanced courses in both Greek and Latin w^iil be offered to stu- 
dents desiring and prepared to take them. 

Students so desiring may use Greek I and II as part of the 
required fifteen units for admission to the College, providing the full 
sixteen years of College credits required for a degree are superimposed 
upon the entrance credit. 



II 

The Latin Language and Literature 

Professor Ellis 

Latin V First Term — Cicero, De Amicitia and De Senectute. 
Second Term — Livy, Books I and XXI. 

Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar and Prose Composition one hour 
per w^eek during the year. 
Latin VI First Term — Horace, Odes, Book I-IV. 

Second Term — Tacitus, Agricola and Germania. Latin Prose 
Composition. 
Latin VII First Term — Selected Plays of Plautus and Terence. 

Second Term — Extracts from Latin Authors not previously 

read. History of Latin Literature. 
Students offering only three years Latin as part of the required 
fifteen units for admission to the College may use fourth year Latin 
in the Academy as a college credit. 



Ill 

The English Language and Literature 
President Kershncr, Mrs. Kershner, Mr. Garrett 



54 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

English V First Term — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition, with 
study of English Prose. Assigned readings from special 
texts with written exercises upon them. Thorough drill 
in theme work. 
Second Term — English Prose. A study of the essay as exem- 
plified in the work of the English reviewers. Biographical 
and historical literature, with assigned collateral reading 
and theme work. 

English VI First Term — The Drama. A study of technique as 
well as the greater masterpieces of the Elizabethan epoch 
for their purely literary value. Early Miracle and Morality 
plays. Marlowe's Tamburlaine and Faustus. Shakespeare's 
Early Plays. 
Second Term — The Drama continued. Middle and Later plays 
of Shakespeare. Ben Jonson and the close of the Eliza- 
bethan epoch. 

English VII First Term — Epic and Lyric Poetry, with special study 
of the Romantic Period in English Literature. The struc- 
ture of the Epic, with careful study of Paradise Lost as 
compared with the Iliad, the Aeneid and the Divine Comedy. 
The Excursion and Prelude of Wordsworth. 
Second Term — The structure of the Lyric, with careful and 
detailed study of the work of Shelley, Burns and Keats. 

English VIII First Term — Nineteenth Century Poetry and Drama. 
Byron, Keats and Tennyson. The decadence of the older 
type of drama. 
Second Term — Robert Browning. The Dramatic Monologue. 
Careful study of the Dramatic Lyrics and The Ring and 
the Book. 

English IX First Term — Early English and Anglo-Saxon. Care- 
ful study of Anglo-Saxon forms. Readings from Beowulf 
and Caedmon. Selections from Chaucer and his contem- 
poraries. 
Second Term — Prose Fiction. The Short Story, and the tech- 
nique of the Novel. Assigned reading for analysis of the 
Masterpieces of English fiction. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 55 

English X First Term — Present Day Drama. George Bernard 
Shaw, Stephen Phillips, Pinero. Tendencies of the mod- 
ern dramatic movements. 
Second Term — Present Daj'^ Fiction. The Modern Novel. 
Magazine and Short Story writing. The demands of 
modern journalism. Literature as a profession. 



IV 

The French Language and Literature 
Miss Hardin 

French I First Term — Elementary French. Textbook work in 
Grammar, and the reading of simple texts. Careful atten- 
tion to pronunciation. 
Second Term — Grammar completed. Merimee's Columba 
Erckmann-Chatrian's Le Juif Polonais. Lamartine's Scenes 
de la Revolution Francaise. 

French II First Term — French Prose. Erckmann-Chatrian's 
Madame Therese and Waterloo. George Sand's La Mare 
au Diable. Merimee's Chronique du Regne de Charles IX. 
Victor Hugo's Bug Jar gal. 
Second Term — The French Drama. Selected plays of Moliere, 
Corneille and Racine. Victor Hugo's Ruy Bias. 

French III First Term — French Prose. The Romanticists. Se- 
lected readings from the works of Dumas, Hugo, Sue and 
De Maupassant. Conversation and dictation. 
Second Term — French Prose. The Realists. Selections from 
Balzac, Flaubert and Zola. Conversation and dictation. 

French IV First Term — History of French Literature. Early 
French tales and ballads. 
Second Term — French essayists and critics. A study of the work 
of Saint Beuve, Taine and others. 



56 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

V 

The German Language and Literature 
Miss Hardin, Mrs. Kershner 

German I First Term — Bierwirth's Beginning German. Easy 

reading and composition. Muller and Wenckebach's Gluck 

Auf. 
Second Term — Thomas' Practical German Grammar. Heyse's 

UArrabiata. Hauff s Tales. Easy Prose. 
German II First Term — Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jungfrau von 

Orleans. Careful review of forms, and composition. 

Scheffel's Der Trompeter von Sakkingen. 
Second Term — German Prose. Riehl's Burg Neideck. Frey- 

tag's Soil und Haben. .Fulda's Tier Talisman, and similar 

texts. 
German III First Term — The German Drama. A careful study 

of the masterpieces of Goethe, Schiller and Lessing. Wallen- 

stein, Maria Stuart, Nathan der Weise. 
Second Term — Egmont, Faust (Parts I and II), Torquato 

Tasso. German Conversation. 
German IV First Term — History of German Literature. Old and 

Middle High German. 
Second Term — Readings from the German Philosophers; Kant, 

Fichte, Schopenhauer. Conversation. 



VI 

Mathematics 

Professor Ferguson, Miss Hardin 

Mathematics III First Term — Algebra from Quadratics. Permu- 
tations and Combinations, Binomial Theorem. Series. 
Theory of Equations and Determinants. 
Second Term — Solid Geometry, complete. 

{Mathematics III will be accepted as either a College or an 
Academy credit). 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 57 

Mathematics IV First Term — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 
The Trigonometric ratios. Solution of Trigonometric 
Equations. Solution of Triangles and use of Tables. 
Second Term — Elementary Analytical Geometry. The straight 
line. General equation of the first degree in two vari- 
ables. 
Mathematics V First Term — Conic Sections. The Ellipse and 
Parabola, Analytical Geometry of three dimensions. 
Second Term — Differential Calculus. Careful study of the 
functions of one variable. 
Mathematics VI First Term — Integral Calculus. 
Second Term — History of Mathem.atics. 



VII 

History 
Professor Utterback 

History IV First Term — History of Greece. This course consists 
of lectures and a study of the principal events in Grecian 
History from the earliest times until the Roman Subjuga- 
tion. 
Second Term — History of Rome. Lectures and a study of the 
principal events of Roman History from the foundation of 
the city to the death of Theodosius. Particular attention 
is given to the development of Roman political institutions. 

History V First Term— History of England. Lectures and a study 
of the political, industrial, religious, educational and social 
institutions of England from the earliest times to George V. 
Second Term — Outline of Medieval and Modern History. Lec- 
tures and a study of the successive phases of social, religious, 
political and constitutional developments since A. D. 476, 
Special attention will be given to one or two modern periods, 
such as the French P>.evolution and Napoleonic Era, or the 
Period of English Reform. 



58 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

History VI First Term — Political History of the United States — 
1 7501 890. 
Second Term — American Institutions. This course aims to 
give the student some idea of the framework of the Amer- 
ican Government, state and national. The President, 
Congress, the Courts and the outline of state government 
receive most careful attention, and are further elucidated 
by a brief historical account of the grovv^th of the Consti- 
tution. 



VIII 

Natural Science 

Professor Utterback, Mr. Allen 

Science III First Term — General Physics. Elementary Mechanics, 
Sound, Light, Heat, Electricity and Magnetism. Experi- 
mental demonstrations. 
Second Term — The above concluded. 
Science IV First Term — General Chemistry. The fundamental 
principles and phenomena of inorganic and physical Chem- 
istry. Laboratory work. 
Second Term — The above concluded. 
Science V First Term — General Geology. A general discussion of 
dynamical, structural, physiographical and historical 
geology. 
Second Term — Mineralogy and Crystallography. Outline 
course, field and laboratory work. 



IX 

Philosophy 
President Kershner, Professor Utterback 

Philosophy I First Term — Logic, Deductive and Inductive, with 
careful study of the laws of thought and the inductive 
process. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 59 

Second Term — General Psychology. The special problems of 
consciousness. 

Philosophy II First Term — Ethics. A study of the Moral Ideal as 
viewed by both Hedonists and Rationalists, as well as an 
analysis of the Moral Life. Lectures, with Seth's Ethical 
Principles as a guide. 
Second Term — Economics. The Problems of Currency, Trans- 
portation, Taxation, etc., as applied to present day life. 

Philosophy III First Term — The History of Philosophy. Ancient 
Philosophy from Heraclitus to Neo-Platonism. Medieval 
Philosophy, Scholasticism, Aquinas, Abelard and Duns 
Scotus. 
Second Term — Modern Philosophy, from Descartes to Herbert 
Spencer and Eucken. Special study of the Critical Period 
and the works of Kant. 

Philosophy IV First Term — Outline Course in Philosophy. Ele- 
ments of Epistemology. Outline of the Theory of Knowl- 
edge. The Categories of the Objective and Subjective 
Worlds. 
Second Term — Outline Course in Metaphysics. General theo- 
ries of the Universe. The constant element in Philosophy. 
A critical examination of the Agnostic, Positivistic, Panthe- 
istic and Theistic positions. 

Philosophy V First Term — Elements of Sociology. A study of the 
organization of Society, its self-maintenance, self-perpetua- 
tion, and self-gratification. Mental and social relations. 
The origin of civilization and the development of institutions 
treated in the light of historical anthropology and eth- 
nology. 
Second Term — (a) A study of the American City and its rela- 
tion to Democracy, (b) Crime, Corrections and Charities. 
(Philosophy V three hours per week.) 

Philosophy VI First Term — Aesthetics and the History of Art. 
Elementary principles of Aesthetics. Definition of Art. 
The Fine Arts. Study of Architecture and Sculpture ia 
ancient and modern times. 



60 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Second Term — The History of Painting in the Ancient and 
Modern World. Special attention paid to the Italian 
Renaissance. Lectures with lantern illustrations of the 
masterpieces of Leonardo, Michael Angelo, Raphael and 
Titian. The present status of painting. 



X 

Education 
Dean Utterback 



Education I First Term — ^The History and Principles of Education. 
Text book, lectures and selected reading, and class room 
discussion. The object of this course is to study the evolu- 
tion of the educational ideal in connection with the condi- 
tions in which it had its origin and amid which it developed. 
Special attention is given to the systems of education in 
Greece and Rome, in Europe during the Middle Ages, the 
Renaissance and the Reformation, and in Modern Ger- 
many, France, England and America. Physical environ- 
ment, social, industrial and political conditions, traditions, 
customs, and religion, have had their influence in determin- 
ing racial development, one phase of which has found its 
expression, during the different periods, in the educational 
systems of the several nations. These systems are analyzed 
as revealing epochal and national ideals, the writings of 
individuals being studied for their contribution to and inter- 
pretation of these systems. 
Second Term — Elementary and Secondary Education. The 
theory and practice of teaching in the elementary and sec- 
ondary schools, and the applications of the principles of 
teachingj are special features of this course. Reports, dis- 
cussions, observation and practice, with supervision and 
criticism. 

Education II First Term — Methods of instruction in elementary 
and secondary schools. Lectures, selected readings, reports 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 61 

and class room discussion. The aim of this course is to 
investigate the learning process as a basis for the study of 
the factors in successful teaching. 

Education III First Term — Introduction to the Philosophy of Edu- 
cation. Results of investigation in Psychology, Biology, 
Neurology, Anthropology, Ethnology and Sociology will be 
interpreted in their relation to Education. (^Graduate). 
Second Term — Administration. A study of the national, state 
and city systems; public finance and education; school build- 
ings and equipment. The supervision and employment of 
teachers. The relation between school, home and society. 
The educational systems and policies of the Southern States 
are considered in detail. (Graduate). 



XI 

Bible 

President Kershner, Professor Ferguson 

Bible I First Term — Old Testament History, Genesis to Judges, 
with careful study of the Hebrew Law and the development 
of national life. 

Second Term — The Monarchy from its founding to its dissolu- 
tion. Careful study of Hebrew Literature and the writings 
of the Prophets. 
Bible II First Term — New Testament History. The period 
between the Old and New Testaments. History of the 
Maccabees and Herod. The life of Christ to the Sermon 
on the Mount. 

Second Term — The Life of Christ during the Middle and Later 
periods. Careful study of the text of the individual Gospels. 

Other courses in the Robert Milligan Bible School are also open 

to students of the College proper. 



62 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

II 
THE ROBERT MELLIGIN BIBLE SCHOOL 

The Robert Milligan Bible School has grown out of the needs 
of religious work in the South. Its aim is to furnish an adequate 
preparation for the ministry of the Gospel on the part of those who 
complete the work assigned. The ideals w^hich govern those who 
have charge of the school are entirely opposed to any legalistic or 
formalistic interpretation of Christianity. On the contrary, they 
assume that the one need of the world today is the vital, living 
Christ, with His message of supreme tenderness and love. To see 
somewhat of that message, to become enthused with it, and to go 
forth to proclaim it to the world, they conceive to be the mission 
of the preacher. The school aims always at thoroughness of prep- 
araration and accuracy of scholarship rather than mere numerical 
display. It appeals to all those who have the ideal of quality rather 
than quantity in the ministry. 

Unswerving fidelity to the Word, and thorough devotion to the 
Christ are the appropriate watchwords of a school bearing the name 
of one of the noblest of all God's noblemen since the apostolic 
age. And surely no place could be better adapted by location and 
environment to preserve and cherish the spirit of Robert Milligan 
than the spot which bears his honored name. 



Eeqiiireiiients for Admission 

To enter the Freshman Class of the Robert Milligan Bible 
School, a student must give evidence, by examination or otherwise, 
that he has completed satisfactorily the College Preparatory require- 
ments in English, Mathematics, History and Science. 



Requirements for Grradnation 

The Robert Milligan Bible School does not confer degrees. 
It does, however, grant an appropriate diploma upon the completion 
of either the Classical or the English course. These diplomas are 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 63 

certificates of merit, and carry with them quite as much value as 
the usual academic degrees. Graduates in either course, with very 
little additional work, may secure the regular degrees conferred 
by the College upon completing the required courses of study. The 
fee for the Bible School Diploma is $3.00. 



Curriculum 



The Robert Milligan Bible School offers two distinct courses. 
The first, entitled the English Ministerial, is designed for those 
students who wish to prepare for the ministry without being able to 
take Greek or other classical work. The second, entitled the Clas- 
sical Ministerial, is designed for those who wish to pursue the classics 
in connection with the ministerial studies proper. The courses are 
as follows: 



English Ministerial 

Freshman Year First Term — English V, Old Testament History, 
History IV, Mathematics HI. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Sophomore Year First Term — English VI, New Testament History, 
History V, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Junior Year First Term — Apostolic History, English VII, Philos- 
ophy I, Practical Work of the Minister. 
Second Term — Tiie above continued. 
Senior Year First "Term — English VIII, Church History, Exegesis, 
Philosophy II. 
Second Term — English VIII, Church History,Homiletics, Phil- 
osophy II. 
The courses in Bible School Pedagogy and Missions are also 
required in order to receive a diploma. 



54 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Classical Ministerial 

Freshman Year First Term — Greek I, English V, Old Testament 
History, Mathematics III. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Sophomore Year First Term — New Testament Greek I, New Tes- 
tament History, English VI, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Junior Year First Term — New Testament Greek II, Apostolic 
History, English VII, Philosophy I, Practical Work of 
the Minister. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Senior Year First Term — English VIII, Philosophy II, Church His- 
tory, Exegesis, one elective. 
Second Term — English VIII, Philosophy II, Church History, 

Homiletics, one elective. 
The courses in Bible School Pedagogy and Missions are also 
required in order to receive a diploma. 



DEPAETMEJfTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTIOJf 
I 

School of Sacred History 
President Kershner, Professor Ferguson 

Course I — Old Testament History. The History of the Jewish 
people from the Creation of the World to the Captivity. Text- 
books — The Authorized and American Revised editions of the Holy 
Scriptures with MacLear's Old Testament History as a guide. Selec- 
tions from the Old Testament are read and critically studied in this 
class. For 191 1 the books studied will be The Psalms j Ecclesiastes, 
and the Prophecy of Isaiah. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course II — New Testament History. Sacred History from 
the Dispersion to the Resurrection. Textbooks — The Gospels, 
Authorized and American Revised editions, with MacLear's New 
Testament History as a guide. Lectures with chart outline and v. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 65 

critical study of one of the Apocryphal Books and at least one of the 
Gospels. The Gospel studied in 191 1 will be Luke. Two terms — 
five hours weekly. 

Course III — Apostolic History. The History of the Church 
from the Day of Pentecost until the close of the New Testament 
Canon. Textbooks — The Acts and Epistles, Authorized and Amer- 
ican Revised editions. Lectures with careful reading and study of 
selected Epistles. Two terms — four hours weekly. 

Course IV — Church History since the Apostolic Period. 
Church History from the death of the Apostle John to the present 
time. Special attention given to the Reformation and the later resto- 
ration movements. Lectures. Two terms — four hours weekly. 



II 

School of Exegesis and Christian Doctrine 
President Kershner, Professor Utterback 

Course I — New Testament Exegesis. Careful study of the prin- 
ciples of Hermeneutics with exegesis of selected portions of the 
Scriptures. Lectures. One Term — four hours weekly. 

Course II — Christian Doctrine and Polity. Two terms. 

First Term — The Content of Christianity. A careful study of 
the essential message of Christ, with a scrutiny of the ideals of life 
He strove to inculcate. 

Second Term — The Form of Christianity. A study of the 
Ordinances, Creed and Polity of the Christian Church. Lectures. 
Four hours weekly. 



Ill 

School of Applied Christianity 

Professor Buchanan and Professor Utterback 

Course I — Practical work of the Minister, (a) Pastoral duties, 
(b) The Sunday School, (c) Evangelism, (d) Missions. Lectures. 



66 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

This course will be given by an eminently practical and successful 
minister, who will embody his personal experience in his teachings. 
Two terms — two hours weekly. 

Course II — Theoretical Homiletics. Lectures, with Johnson's 
The Ideal Ministry as a guide. One term — three hours weekly. 

Course III — The Social Mission of Jesus. The Message of 
Christ for the shifting social conditions of the present day. Mission 
work in the large cities, tenement life, etc. Lectures. One term — 
three hours weekly, (Elective). 



IV 

School of Biblical Greek 
Professor Ferguson, Miss Ellis 

(Not required for English Certificate.) 

Course I — Beginner's Course. White's First Greek Book com- 
pleted. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course II — The Greek New Testament, with composition. 
Exegetical study of the Gospels. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course III — The Greek New Testament completed. Critical 
study of the Acts and Epistles. Two terms — five hours weekly. 



V 

School of Bible School Pedagogy 
Professor Herbert Moninger 

The work of the Bible School in all of its departments out- 
lined by one of the best-known authorities. Milligan College 
maintains a Front Rank Bible School as a Training Department, 
and emphasizes the Bible School in every possible way. Mr. Mon- 
inger will deliver the lectures, during 1911-12, outlined in Part II 
of this Catalogue. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 67 

VI 

School of Missions 

Professor Chas. T. Paul, Professor Ferguson 

A study of Modern Missions and Methods, conducted by one 
of the foremost of American authorities. (Lecture list given under 
Part II). Professor Paul will also conduct studies in Missionary 
Methods and Problems while at Milligan. Studies in Barton's The 
Unfinished Task, with collateral reading, will be conducted through- 
out the year. 



VII 

School of Evangelism 
Professor W. P. Crouch 
Studies in Modern Evangelistic Methods and Problems, by a suc- 
cessful Pastor-Evangelist. The subject will be handled also in the 
course under Practical Problems of the Minister. Practical evange- 
listic methods constitute a part of the regular study of the ministerial 
student at Milligan. Students are encouraged to hold meetings at 
near-by mission points under competent direction. A large section 
of the country adjoining Milligan has been evangelized in this way. 



Ill 
THE ACADEMY 



Two objects are kept in view in arranging the courses of study 
and directing the Academy: first, to offer preparation for College, 
which will be sufficient in quality to admit a student to the Fresh- 
man Class of any College or University; second, to provide for young 
men and women who may be denied the advantage of a college course, 
as much training and culture as is possible in a four year's course of 
academic work In secondary school. 

The courses of study are arranged to meet the individual 
needs of the student. Under the advice of the director of the Acad- 



68 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

emy, every opportunity is afforded the student to progress in his 
work of preparation as rapidly as is consistent with thoroughness 
and good scholarship. 

The work and discipline of the Academy is under the supervision 
of the Dean of the College, who is ex officio director of the prepara- 
tory schools. The Academy is in close touch with the College. The 
President and Faculty of the College also give special attention to 
the work of the Academy and in certain subjects the instruction is by 
College professors. In every department, the instruction is thorough, 
and special effort is made that the student may at all times feel the 
personal impress of the instructor. The students of the Academy 
enjoy all the privileges of the library and reading room, and the 
advantages of the athletics of the college. 

The young ladies attending the Academy from abroad are re- 
quired, except when other arrangements are allowed by the President, 
to reside in the Mee Memorial Hall, which is a pleasant home of 
refined influences. 

Study Hall 

Students are required to study in the Study Hall provided for 
the purpose, under the scheduled regulations, unless excused by the 
Director of the Academy. 

Admission 

Completion of the course of study in the elementary schools is 
required for admission to the Academy. Certificates from teachers 
or school officers certifying that the student has completed the work 
in Elementary English Grammar, Practical Arithmetic, United States m 

History and Complete Geography will ordinarily be accepted in lieu 
of examination in these subjects. Students wishing to enter without 
such certificates may be examined on these subjects during the first 
three daj^s of school. Students conditioned in one or more of the 
above named studies will have to make up that condition in the 
Elementary School during the first year of the Academy course. 

Choice of Courses 

Students may, by and with the advice and consent of the Director 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 69 

of the Academy, choose a course of study differing from the Curricu- 
lum; but when the course is chosen and the classes entered, no change 
will be made after the beginning of the fourth week of school. The 
work of each course should be taken in order from the beginning, but 
the Director for sufficient reasons may give permission to vary the 
order. 

Substitutions 

Studies in one course may be substituted for those of another 
provided the credit is the same, and the Director is satisfied that the 
substitution will be for the best; but in the Classical and Literary 
courses, no substitution will be made for Latin. In the third and 
fourth years, Greek may be substituted for equivalent units other than 
Latin. 

A credit or unit means the equivalent of five prepared recita- 
tions a week for one scholastic year or not less than one hundred and 
fifty (150) recitations, two periods of laboratory work being consid- 
ered equivalent to one period of recitation work. 

BhetoricaTs and Exercises 

All the students shall perform Rhetorical work throughout the 
year under the direction of the Director of the Academy. 

Graduation 

Students who satisfactorily complete a course of study offered in 
the Academy shall be granted a diploma certifying that fact, but in 
all cases the conduct of a student must be satisfactory before the 
honors of graduation can be conferred. 

Schedule of Studies 

Below is submitted a schedule of studies. Each course contin- 
ues throughout one year, unless otherwise stated. 

The average amount of work required of each student is twenty 
periods in recitation per week. No student will be assigned less 
work than this except for reason. 



70 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

FIRST YEAR 

Classical — Latin I, Mathematics I, Science I, English I. 
Literary — Latin I, Mathematics I, Science I, English I. 
Scientific — French I, Mathematics I, Science I, English L 

SECOND YEAR 

Classical — Latin II, Mathematics II, History I, English II. 
Literary — Latin II, Mathematics II, History I, English II. 
Scientific — French II, Mathematics II, History I, 
English II. 

THIRD YEAR 

Classical — Latin III, History II, Science III, English III. 
Literary — French I or German I, History II, Science III, 

English III. 
Scientific — German I, Science II, Science III, English III. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Classical — Latin IV, History III, Science IV, English IV. 
Literary — French II or German II, History III, Science 

IV, English IV. 
Science — German II, History III, Science IV, English IV. 



COURSES OF OSTRUCTIOIf 



LATIN 



Latin I — Hale's First Latin Book is completed; especial attention 

paid to vocabulary and forms. Two terms. 
Latin II — Four Books of Caesar's Gallic War are read. Emphasis 

is constantly laid on accuracy in declensions and conjugations. 

Prose composition (Bennett) — two written exercises per week. 
Two terms. 
Latin III — The whole year is devoted to Cicero's Orations. The 

four against Cataline and the Manilian Law and Archias are 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 71 

read. Special attention is given to Latin Subjunctive. Bennett's 
Latin Grammar. Prose composition one hour per week. Tw^o 
terms. 
Latin IV — First six books of Vergil's Aeneid are read. Constant 
practice in scanning is given. Special attention is given to Ver- 
gil's syntax. Derivation and composition of v^^ords are studied 
during this year. Latin Composition. Tviro terms. 

ENGLISH 

English — Composition and Grammatical Analysis. Thorough review 
of the forms. Special attention paid to inaccuracies of speech and 
writing. Drill work in syntax, punctuation, and paragraphing. 
Two terms. 

English II — First Term: Elementary Rhetoric. The essentials of 
Narration, Description, Exposition and Argumentation. One 
term. Second Term: Outlines of English and American Lit- 
erature (Westlake). Composition work once per week. One 
term. Outside readings in literature throughout the year. 

English III — ^The History of English Literature. Pancoast's Repre- 
sentative English Literature with collateral reading. All the 
College Entrance Requirements in English are read and studied 
in Courses II and III. Two terms. 

English IV — The History of American Literature. Pancoast's Intro- 
duction with outside collateral reading. Theme work through- 
out the year. Two terms. 
(Either Academy or College credit.) When offered as the 

latter, three additional years of College English are required in the 

Classical and Scientific courses, and four additional years of College 

English, in the Literary Course. 

FRENCH 

French I — First Term: Elementary French. Textbook work in 
Grammar, and the reading of simple texts. Careful attention 
to pronunciation. Second Term: Grammar completed. Meri- 
mee's Columba. Erckmann-Chatrian's Le Juif Polonais. 
Lamartine's Scenes de la Rcvoliilion Francaise. 



72 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

French 11 — First Term: French Prose. Erckmann-Chartrian's 
Madame Therese and Waterloo. George Sand's La Mare au 
Diable. Merimee's Chronique du Regne de Charles IX. Victor 
Hugo's Bug Jar gal. Second Term: The French Drama. 
Selected plays of Moliere, Corneille and Racine. Victor 
Hugo's R.uy Bias. 

GERMAN 

German I — First Term: Bierwirth's Beginning German. Easy 
reading and composition. Muller and Wenckebach's Gluck 
Auf. Second Term: Thomas' Practical German Grammar. 
Heyse's UArrabiata. Hauff s Tales. Easy prose. 

German II — First Term: Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jungfrau 
von Orleans. Careful review of forms, and composition. Schef- 
fel's Der Trompeter von Sakkingen. Second Term: German 
Prose. Riehl's Burg Neideck. Freytag's Soil und Ilaben. 
Fulda's Der Talisman, and similar texts. 

MATHEMATICS 

I — Elementary Algebra. 

The four fundamental operations, equations of the first degree 
with one unknown quantity. Simultaneous equations of the first 
degree, factors, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, 
fractions, including complex fractions, involution and evolution, 
theory of exponents (positive, negative, fractional and zero), radicals, 
including imaginaries, equations involving radicals, quadratic equa- 
tions involving one unknown quantity. Two terms. 

n — Plane Geometry. 

Wentworth's Plane Geometry is used as a text in this course. 
The work includes all the propositions which are demonstrated in 
the text-book. Nearly all the exercises are worked, including those 
for demonstration, construction and computation. Books I to V are 
completed. Two terms. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 75 

will be given in the Music Department in accordance with arrange- 
ments mutually satisfactory to teacher and pupil. 

Recitals will be given by the pupils during the school year, to 
which the patrons and friends of the College are invited. 

Voice Culture 

The aim of our method is, first to develop the voice throughout 
its entire compass, then to perfect it. We teach the proper use and 
extent of the registers of the voice, diaphragmatic breathing, and pure 
flexible tone. Tone is the chief aim during the entire course of 
study. The peculiarities presented by different voices are directed 
and modified, each according to its own nature. 

MUSICAL CURRICULUM 

FIRST GRADE— Sartorio, Practical Method. Gaynor's 
"Melody Pictures." Kohler, "Easy Studies," "Little Pieces" by 
Spaulding, Richter, Streabog. 

SECOND GRADE— Studies; Duvernoy, Loeschhorn, Kohler. 
Simple pieces by Schumann, Hayden, Chopin, Heller, Lange. 

THIRD GRADE— Studies: Czerney, "Etudes de la Velo- 
cite;" Heller, "Etudes Loeschhorn." Composition of Jenson, Jung- 
mann, Bohm, Schumann, Mozart, Clementi, Kroeger, and other 
composers. 

FOURTH GRADE— Studies : Cramer, "Etudes," four books; 
Heller, "The Art of Phrasing;" Bach, "Little Preludes." The Com- 
positions of Chopin, Grieg, Godard, Mendelssohn, Rubenstein, and 
Liszt, are carefully studied in this grade, special attention being given 
to interpretation and technics. 

FIFTH GRADE— Studies: Bach, "Two Part Inventions;" 
Clementi, "Gradus ad Parnassum ;" Kullak, "Octave Studies." 
Difficult compositions of Bach, Beethoven, Liszt, Grieg, Raff and 
MacDowell are studied in this grade. 

A thorough knowledge of the Elements of Harmony is required 
for the completion of this grade. 



76 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music (Mus B.), comple- 
tion of the entire Music Course is required, together with two years 
of Harmony, and one year of Theory and History of Music. Grad- 
uates in Music are also required to give a public Recital, unassisted, 
previous to graduation. 



VI 
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Mr. Melvin M. Knight 

The aim of the Commercial Department is to be complete and 
practical. The courses are designed, work outlined, text-books select- 
ed, and everything planned with the one design of giving the student 
everything necessary in training and equipment, to enable him to fill 
completely the positions in the actual commercial world of today, 
for which the work he takes is supposed to be a preparation, and to 
tax his time and energies with as little as possible that is not directly 
useful. The courses usually offered in Business Colleges throughout 
the country, are taught here as follows : 

I— STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING 

(a) SHORTHAND. There is a great deal of irrelevant, 
polemical discussion indulged in over the merits of different short- 
hand systems. We do not believe the matter of choice of system to 
be nearly so vital as diligent application to the one selected, until its 
principles have become mastered by study and their application has 
grown natural and easy through practice. We give students their 
choice of either the Graham or the Gregg systems. The former is 
usually conceded to be the most rapid of the Pitmanic systems ; while 
the latter is the best known, and we believe, everything considered, the 
best, of the light-line positionless systems. The course consists of 
the regular texts with practice matter for dictation work. 

(b) TYPEWRITING. Typewriting by touch is so far and 
so obviously superior to the old method, that we compel all students 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 77 

to learn "absolute touch," and deal shortly with any indications of a 
tendency to drift into the clumsy sight-writing. Students practice 
two hours each school day on new standard machines. A rental of 
50c per week, $2.00 per month, is charged for the use of the machines, 
payable in advance; or students may furnish their own machines. 

(c) STENOGRAPHERS' BUSINESS PRACTICE. The 
short-hand and typewriting work is supplemented by two weeks of 
actual office work, involving the taking and transcribing of business 
letters, the use of those business forms with which a stenographer 
must be acquainted, copying, filing, card-indexing systems, and every- 
thing the student will find in a modern office. 

II— BOOKKEEPING AND OFFICE PRACTICE 
This course will make competent business bookkeepers of those 
who conscientiously pursue and finish it. It includes "Practical 
Bookkeeping," a thorough and up-to-date text-book, and "Twentieth 
Century Business Practice," a practice course in which the student 
actually keeps in succession five different sets of books, in different 
kinds of business, making all the transactions and handling all the 
business papers, cash, etc., with which he would have to deal in keep- 
ing the books of a modern business enterprise. A Supplementary 
Course gives instruction in Bank Accounting, by the same methods. 

Ill— COMMERCIAL LAW 

A comprehensive course in the laws of business with which 
business men should be familiar. Study and recitation from a good 
Commercial College Text, two hours weekly, alternating with the 
Penmanship Course, 

IF— BUSINESS PENMANSHIP 

We teach the well-known "Palmer Method of Business Writ- 
ing," which develops a rapid, easy, legible, business hand — that which 
the business world of today demands. Practice, under instructor's 
supervision, three hours per week, alternating with Commercial Law. 

DIPLOMAS 
Two diplomas are granted for Commercial work, one in Ste- 
nography and the other in Bookkeeping. 



78 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

(a) STENOGRAPHY. To receive the Stenographer's 
Diploma, the student must satisfactorily complete the course, must 
pass an examination in Shorthand and in Typewriting, and must be 
proficient in Spelling, English Grammar and Rhetoric. The Short- 
hand examination covers the taking of dictation from new matter 
from different sources at a speed of one hundred words per minute, 
and reading same back accurately and correctly from the Shorthand 
notes. The standard for typewriting is a copying speed of fifty words 
per minute from unfamiliar matter of different kinds, five words to 
be deducted for each error. The Diploma fee is $3.00. 

(b) BOOKKEEPING. Students who satisfactorily complete 
the course in Bookkeeping, furnish evidence of competency, and pass 
an examination in Commercial Law, and who write a plain business 
hand, will be granted an Accountants' Diploma, on payment of the 
Diploma fee of $3.00. 



PART IV 
MISCELLAJTEOUS OFOKMATIOlf 

This division of the Catalogue is divided into sections covering 
the following sub-heads: 

I — Buildings and Grounds 

II — Literary Societies and Publications 

III — Rules and Regulations 

IV — Scholarships and Bequests 

V — Religious and Moral Atmosphere 

VI — Expenses and Fees 

VII — General information 

VIII— Athletics 

I 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Buildings 

The College buildings are three in number. The main building, 
a substantial brick structure, containing the recitation rooms, chapel. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 79 

library and society halls, occupies the center of the campus. It has 
been newly refitted, painted and papered. The Young Men's Home, 
a two-story frame building containing nearly thirty rooms, plainly 
furnished but affording substantial accommodations for students, is 
located to the rear of the main building. 

The Frances T. and Columbus A. Mee Memorial Hall 
Through the munificence of Mrs. Frances T. Mee, of Cleve- 
land, Tenn., we now have free of debt our spacious and handsomely 
furnished young ladies' dormitory. Mee Hall is a three-story brick 
structure, opened the first time for the season of 1908-09. It con- 
tains thirty-two rooms, with reception rooms and parlor, has hot and 
cold water on each floor, is handsomely furnished, and is heated by 
steam. Rooms in this building should be engaged as soon as possible, 
as a number had already been reserved when the Catalogue went to 
press. 

Grounds 

The College campus contains over thirty acres of ground. A 
large and beautiful grove, each tree of which was planted by some 
former student, surrounds the main building. There are excellent 
ball grounds and tennis courts for the use of the student body. 

Libraries 

The College maintains three libraries : ( i ) the Old Library, 
containing mostly reference books and government or statistical pub- 
lications; (2) the Reading Room, containing the later reference 
works and about three thousand volumes of standard literature; and 
(3) The Number Nine Library, containing about two thousand vol- 
umes dealing principally with theological or Biblical literature. These 
libraries are all available for student use under the proper restrictions. 

The new Reading Room is supplied with all the standard maga- 
zines and periodicals. The list of last year was as follows : Dailies — 
Baltimore American, Chattanooga Times, Knoxville Journal and 
Tribune, Johnson City Staff, Bristol Neius. Weeklies — Christian 
Standard, Outlook, Independent, Christian Evangelist, Saturday 
Evening Post, Nation, Scientific American, Dial, Harper's Weekly, 



80 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Harper's Bazar, Collier'Sj Commoner, Literary Digest. Monthlies — 
Century, Harper s, N. Am. Review, Cosmopolitan, Hampton s, Amer- 
ican, McClure's, Everybody's, Ladies' Home Journal, St. Nicholas, 
Delineator, Forum, Review of Reviews, Current Literature, Atlantic 
Monthly, Bookman, Missionary Review of the World, Musician, 
Outing, World Today, World's Work, Physical Culture, Human 
Life, Tennessee Christian, Missionary Intelligencer, Advocate of 
Peace, The Labor Digest. 

II 

LITERARY SOCIETIES, PUBLICATIONS, ETC. 

Literary Societies 

The literary societies are four in number — The American, Adel- 
phian and Ciceronian for young men, and the Ossolian for young 
ladies. They do excellent work during the year, giving public per- 
formances upon stated occasions. 

Contests 

Through the munificence of two of our alumni, Mr. Oscar M. 
Fair (1903) and Mr. George E. Lyon (1891), two prize oratorical 
contests are held during the week of Commencement exercises. The 
George E. Lyon Contest is open to all students, irrespective of age or 
class, while the Oscar M. Fair Contest is between the representatives 
of the Literary Societies of the College. The Fair contest carries with 
it a first prize of $15 in gold, a second prize of $10 in gold, and a 
gavel made of wood from Lookout Mountain for the successful 
society. 

Honors 

The average grades for the entire length of time spent in school 
are printed upon the Commencement programs. The student in the 
Classical Course sustaining the highest general average is awarded the 
Valedictory. The student sustaining the highest average in any other 
course, is awarded the Salutatory; and the student sustaining the 
highest average in any course after those of the Valedictorian and 
Salutatorian is awarded the Class Oration. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 81 

The Neiu Horizon 

The student body publishes a monthly paper entitled "The New 
Horizon," which is managed and directed by the students at large, 
and which affords considerable scope for reportorial and literary 
talent. 

Ill 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Student Behavior 

Students are expected to deport themselves as ladies and gentle- 
men — above all, as those who are, or expect to be, Christian men and 
women. No profanity is permitted on the grounds, nor is the use of 
alcohol or tobacco in any form allowed. Insubordination, or violation 
of the laws of the school will lead to expulsion and permanent exclu- 
sion from its privileges. 

Class Absences 
Five unexcused absences in any one study will suspend the stu- 
dent thus absent. 

Age Limit in Young Mens Dorjnitory 
Boys under fifteen 5'ears of age are not allowed to room in the 
young men's dormitory. 

Conduct in Examinations 

By a resolution of the Faculty, adopted May 2d, 19 10, it was 
determined that in all classes in the College, the penalty for any sort 
of dishonesty on the part of students in examinations shall be, in 
the first instance, "Suspension from that class in which the offence 
occurred, for the term, with the loss of all credit for the term's work 
in the aforesaid class, no opportunity for making up said work to be 
permitted until the scholastic year following. For a second offence 
by the same party, the penalty shall be snspension from the College 
for the term in which the offence was committed, with the loss of all 
credits for the term's work." 

It was also resolved, "That in all cases, the student accused of 
dishonesty shall be given a fair trial, and conviction shall follow an 



82 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

affirmative vote of three-fourths of the membership of the entire 
faculty." 

Organization of Classes 

The College makes no provision for the organization in any 
department of classes in which less than five students have signified 
their intention of taking up the w^ork. 

Breakage 

The parents or guardians of students are held responsible for 
any breakage or damage done to property or furniture. 

Outside Board 

Young ladies attending the College are not permitted to board 
outside of the Home, except with the express approval of their 
parents and special permission from the faculty. 

IV 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BEQUESTS 

Milligan Endowment 

Through the kindness of Professor Alexander R. Milligan of 
Lexington, Ky., who gave $5,000 for the purpose in December, 1909, 
we now have the nucleus of a permanent endowment fund. This 
fund ought to be increased to at least $100,000 in order to enable 
Milligan College to accomplish the work it can and ought to do. 

Scholarships 

Those who cannot help with the permanent endowment may 
find it possible to endow named scholarships in the institution. The 
sum of $800 will endow a perpetual scholarship, carrying with it 
the tuition expenses of one student for every year. The sum of 
$2,000 will endow a ministerial scholarship, carrying with it the 
board, room, heat, light, and tuition expense of one student in the 
ministerial course each year. The sum of $2,500 will endow a simi- 
lar scholarship for a young lady in any of the regular collegiate 
courses. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 83 

Annual scholarships providing for student expense, year by year^ 
may be contributed individually as follows: forty dollars, in four 
equal payments, will constitute a named tuition scholarship for the 
year; and one hundred dollars, in ten equal payments, will constitute 
a named ministerial scholarship for one year. Churches, Endeavor 
or Ladies Aid Societies, and even Sunday School Classes should pro- 
vide scholarships of the kind for worthy students among their num- 
ber or elsewhere. 

Form of Bequest 

Many friends of Milligan College will doubtless be glad to 
help its work, after they have passed from this earth to their reward. 
In this way, they will be able to originate a stream of influence, con- 
tinuing throughout eternity. The following, or an equivalent form, 
should be used in your will, which should fully describe real estate, 
and should be signed by you, in the presence of witnesses, whose sig- 
natures should likewise appear: 

"I give and bequeath to Milligan College of Tennessee, an 
institution chartered under the laws of the State of Tennessee, and 
located at Milligan College, Carter County, Tennessee, the sum of 

$ (or if real estate, let location and description appear at 

this point) for the use of said institution in conducting its work of 
education ; and the receipt of the secretary of the said institution for 
the above-named sum, (or described property) shall constitute a 
release for my executor for the same." 

V 

RELIGIO US AND MORAL A T MO SPHERE 

College Spirit 

The greatest and best inheritance of Milligan is its "college 
spirit." It is not of the kind which delights to express itself in 
rowdyism and profanity; but rather is a clean, pure, healthful moral 
tone which irresistably permeates the whole student body. The very 
air of Milligan breathes purity and high-toned Christian character. 



84 MiLLiGAN Cot. LP HE Year-Eook 

"^ T 

EXPENSE ■ FEES 

T ...I 

College Literary — Per term of ei'rhteen weeks, in advance. . . .$20.00 
If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks. . . .$ 5.00 

Academy — Per term of eighteen weeks, in advance $20.00 

If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks. . . .$ 5.00 

Music — Instrumental or Vocal, per term of eighteen weeks. .$20.00 

If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks. . . .$ 5.00 

Business — Bookkeeping, per term of eighteen weeks $10.00 

Stenography and tj'pevrriting, per term $20.00 

Complete Business Course, per term $25.00 

(Tj'pevvriter rent extra, as per under Business 
Department) 

Ministerial — English Course (Dormitory students) Free 

Classical Course, per term of eighteen weeks $10.00 

Graduate — Any one course, per term of eighteen weeks $ 5.00 

Room Rent 

In Dormitories, including Heat, Light Etc. 

In Boys' Home, per term of eighteen weeks $15.00 

In Mee Hall, per term of eighteen weeks, from $15.00 to. . . , $20.00 
according to location of room. 

Board in College Dining Hall 

Board must be paid in advance. The rate per week in the Col- 
lege Dining Hall is $2.25. 

Outside Board 

Furnished room with board can be secured outside the College 
in private families at from $9.00 to $12.50 per month, the usual 
price being $10.00 to $12.00. 

Fees 

The only fees connected with the College are the following: 
(A) Library fee of one dollar, charged each student upon 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 85 

matriculation, and the proceeds applied strictly to the purchase of 
books and magazines for the Library. 

(B) Matriculation fee of $io.oo charged all students in the 
English Ministerial Course, who do not room and board in the Col- 
lege dormitory. This fee will also admit anyone to all lecture 
courses in the College, but not to class room work or examination. 

Combination Courses and Total Expenses Estimated 

For the benefit of those young ladies who desire to take music 
chiefly, we have a special musical course, giving either vocal or 
instrumental music and a maximum of two English studies for $75.00 
per term, in advance, for everything (board, room, heat, light, tuition, 
etc.) 

The total necessary expense of a student at Milligan College 
varies from $100.00 per year to $175.00. $140.00 for a young man, 
and $150.00 for a young lady, is a good general average. The Milli- 
gan rates do not aim at the cheapness which negates comfort ; nor 
on the other hand, do they embody more than the actual expense 
which comfort brings. 

Diploma Fees 

The fee for the Bachelor's Diploma is in all cases $5.00. The 
fee for the Master's Degree is $10.00. The fee for the Ministerial 
Diploma in either the English or the Classical Course is $3.00. The 
fee for either of the Business Diplomas is also $3.00. 

Laundry and Incidental Expenses 

Laundry costs from 75c to $2.00 per month, in accordance with 
the amount. Incidental expenses are at a minimum at Milligan Col- 
lege. There is no reason why a student should spend anything 
beyond the smallest possible allowance for expenses outside of College 
charges. 

Terms of Payment 

All tuition and room rent bills, for the term, are payable strictly 
IN ADVANCE, and payment must be arranged for at the time of 
matriculation. Board is payable weekly, IN ADVANCE, as else- 



86 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

where stated. In all cases, where the student leaves during the term, 
no refund or deduction of tuition or room rent will be made, unless 
by special action of the Executive Committee. The justice of the 
latter regulation will become apparent when it is understood that a 
room vacated during the term cannot be filled except in rare 
instances, before the opening of the next term. 

VII 
GENERAL INFORMATION 

Location 

The College is located three miles from Johnson City, and 
half a mile from the Milligan College station on the East Tennessee 
and Western North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small 
village named Milligan College in honor of the institution. 

The location is one of the most beautiful in America. The 
Watauga River flows only a short distance below the grounds, and 
the scenery around the College is unsurpassed in natural beauty and 
grandeur. 

Healthfulness 

One of the most important considerations in selecting a college 
is its healthfulness of location. Other advantages amount to but 
little without this, the most valuable of all. In the thirty yearss of 
its history, no serious epidemic has been known at Milligan. The 
purity of the air, the excellent water, and the splendid advantages 
for physical development, have been chiefly responsible for this 
condition. 

Young Ladies' Home 

The rules governing the conduct of girls in our young ladies* 
home, while strict, are not burdensome. The greatest care is exer- 
cised by those who have the young ladies in charge, and parents may 
safely trust their daughters in our hands. We have a thoroughly 
efficient and capable Dean of Women, and an experienced matron 
in charge of the housekeeping department. The young ladies' rooms 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 87 

are extra large, well ventilated, equipped with new furniture, and 
are comfortable in every sense of the term. We furnish exceptionally 
good board for the prices charged. There are few places in the world 
where a young lady can secure a thorough education at so little 
expense, as at Milligan. 

What to Furnish 
Students boarding at the homes will furnish their own toilet 
articles, towels, napkins, pillow cases and sheets, and one blanket each. 

Monday Holiday 

Monday instead of Saturday is the regular weekly holiday. 

Two Terms 

The school year is divided into two terms, or semesters, of 
eighteen weeks each. 

Text Books 

Text-books can be purchased at publishers' price from the College 
book store. All purchases at the store are strictly cash. Nearly all 
necessary books can be secured second-hand, thus reducing the ex- 
pense for books to a minimum. 

VIII 

ATHLETICS 

Milligan College has always maintained a fine record as regards 
athletics. In common with the more advanced educational ideals, 
we do not play football at all ; but baseball, basketball, tennis, and 
other legitimate games are encouraged, within proper bounds, and 
in accordance with the regulations mentioned elsewhere in the cata- 
logue. The record of the Milligan baseball team during the past 
number of years has been an exceedingly creditable one. We have 
crossed bats with some of the largest universities and colleges in the 
South and have held our own with them or defeated them. We have 
played Vanderbilt University to a tie on their home groirnds, and 
among others have defeated the University of Tennessee and Univer- 
sity of Chattanooga. During the season of 1908-09, we won fifteen 



88 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

out of eighteen games. Owing to more stringent regulations regard- 
ing absence from the College, fewer games were played during the 
season of 1 909-10; but our record was even better than that of the 
preceding year, our team winning all twelve of the games played. 
The record for 1910-11 was almost equally good. The line-up and 
record of games for 1910-11 follow, in detail: 

MILLIGAN COLLEGE BASEBALL TEAM 



Manager W. H. Shamhart 

Captain D. H. Taylor 

Coach B. M. Scurry 

Line-up 

D. Taylor, c; B. Taylor, 2d b; Hardy, ist b; Cahoon, ss; Fer- 
guson, 3d b; Hester, If; Crouch, cf; Shelburne, rf; Acuff, p; Shep- 
herd, p; Hardesty, sub; Kelly, sub. 



Record of Games 

'Date M. C. vs. at 

April 5 "Wasli. Col. Washington College M. C. 

April 6 Wash. Col. Washington College M. C. 

April 7 Maryv. Col. Maryville M. C. 

April 8 Maryv. Col. Maryville M. C. 

April 10 Mooney S. Harriman ' M. C. 

April 11 Mooney S. Harriman M. C. 

April 12 U. of Chatt. Chattanooga M. C. 

April 13 U. of Chatt. Chattanooga M. C. 

April 14 Athens S. Athens M. C. 

April 15 Athens S. Athens M. C. 

April 17 U. of Tenn. Knoxville M. C. 

April 18 Deaf & D. ,S. Knoxville M. C. 

April 19 C. & N. Col. Jefferson City M. C. 

April 20 C. & N. Col. Jefferson City M. C. 

April 24 Stanley McC. Milligan College M. C. 

April 25 Stanley McC. Milligan College M. C. 



Score 
1, Washington 
6, Washington 

1, Maryville 

2, Maryville 2 
0, Mooney 11 
2, Mooney 

11, U. of Chatt. 
8, U. of Chatt 

6, Athens 7 

2, Athens 3 

7, U. of Tenn 3 
4, Deaf & D, S. 

3, C. & N. 6 
4; C. & N. 10 
24, S. McC. 3 

3, S. McC. 2 



The above are all the games that had been played when the. 
Catalogue went to press. 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

YEAR BOOK 1912-13 
Vol. v. ^^nt Horizon No. \. 




^ SCHOOL 

"DEVOTED TO CHARACTER BUILDING 

FIRST OF ^LL 



Entered in Post Office at Johnson City, Tenn., 
as Second-class Matter, According to Act of 
Congress, Approved July 16, 1894. :: :: :: :: 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

OF TENNESSEE 


YEAR-BOOK 

MILLIGAN COLLEGE, TN 37682 


ANNO DOMINI NINETEEN TWELVE 


Pre«» oi 

Mu«e-Whitlock Company 

Johaaon City. Teaa. 



FOREWORD 



Every in^itution mu^ be, in the la^ analysis, the embodiment 
of an idea. Colleges, like men, possess many traits in common; 
but like men too, each exhibits an individuality of its own. The 
di^indive idea back of Milligan College is that of CHARAC- 
TER BUILDING, FIRST OF ALL. The peculiar envir- 
onment of the College, its seclusion, the religious and moral 
atmosphere which surrounds it, and the dominant aims of its 
Faculty and those who have in charge, to say nothing of the cher- 
ished legacy of the pa^, all conspire to further the realization of 
the ideal it has in view. He who wrote, "A good name is rather 
to be chosen than great riches, ' ' embodied to the fuUejft the edu- 
cational ideal of Milligan. 



4 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

CALENDAR 

1912 

September 2, Classification and Registration. . . .Tuesdaj^ 8:30 a. m. 
September 2-3, Entrance Examinations. . .Tuesdaj' and Wednesday 

September 5, Regular Recitations Begin Thursday 

November 29, Thanksgiving Recess Thursday 

Annual Program of the American Literary Society. 
December 2, Christmas Holidays Begin Saturday, 8:30 a. m. 

1913 

January I , Christmas Holidays End Wednesday 

January 4, First Term Ends Saturday 

January 7, Second Term Begins Tuesday 

February 22, Washington's Birthday Saturday 

Annual Program of the Ossolian Literary Society. 
March 20, Robert Milligan Day Thursday 

Annual Program of the Adelphian Literary Society 

May 5, Primary Program Monday, 7 :30 p. m. 

May 7, Academy Program Thursday, 7 :30 p. m. 

May 8, Society Program Friday, 7 :30 p. m. 

May 9, Junior Class Program Saturday, 10:00 a. m. 

May 10, Oscar M. Fair Oratorical Contest. . . .Saturday, 7:30 p. m. 

May II, Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday, 10:30 a. m. 

May II, Commencement Prayer Service Sunday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 12, Senior Class Exercises Monday, 10:00 a. m. 

May 12, Annual Literary Address Monday, 7 :30 p. m. 

May 13, Commencement Day Exercises Tuesday, 10:00 a. m. 

May 13, Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees. .Tuesday, 2:30 p. m. 
May 13, Alumni Banquet Tuesday, 7 :30 p. m. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 
PART I 



LOCATION AND HISTORY 

Milligan College is located in Carter County, Tennessee, about 
twenty-four miles from the North Carolina line and twenty-five 
miles from the Virginia line at Bristol. It is one hundred and six 
miles by rail from Knoxville, Tennessee ; one hundred and seven- 
ty-five miles by rail from Roanoke, Virginia; and one hundred and 
fifty-one miles from Asheville, North Carolina. The main line of 
the Southern railroad runs three miles below it, the nearest station 
being Johnson City. The C, C. & O. R. R. passes two miles south of 
the College at the station of Ocolona, and also passes through Johnson 
City. The E. T. & W. N. C. R. R., connecting Johnson City wnth 
Cranberry, N. C, runs one-half mile from the campus at its station of 
Milligan College. 



Early History — The State of Franklin — King's Mountain — IJooue Tree 

The College is located in that section of Tennessee which once 
formed part of the long defunct State of Franklin — a commonwealth 
whose brief but romantic existence was terminated In a battle fought 
only a short distance from the site now occupied by the College 
grounds. Two miles to the north, at Sycamore Shoals, the American 
volunteers who fought the decisive battle of King's Mountain started 
on the famous march which in the opinion of a competent historian 
was the turning point of the American Revolution. Upon the Board 
of Trustees of Milligan College are gentlemen who are lineal descnd- 
ents of these King's Mountain veterans, while in its faculty list is 
included the name of one who is a direct descendent of the brave but 
misguided Tory who led the British hosts upon the day of the battle. 
In the month of June, 19 lo, a shaft was unveiled at Sycamore Shoals, 
under the auspices of the D. A. R., commemorating the departure of 
the King's Mountain volunteers. The principal oration upon this oc- 
casion was delivered by the late U. S. Senator Robert L. Taylor, an 
alumnus of Milligan College, who was three times Governor of 
and also Senior Senator from the State of Tennessee. 

After Sycamore Shoals and the days of King's Mountain, came 
Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett. Boone's original trail passed only 
a few miles west of the Collecre; rmd at Bonne's Creek, ah-.-^it e'r^ht 



6 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

miles south, there is shown to this day a might j" oak tree with the fol- 
lowing inscription carved upon it: 

"D Boon Cild Bar." 

Whether the illustrious Daniel actually performed the feat at this 
place, which tradition and this inscription attribute to him, we do not 
know ; but the unique orthography was certainly D. Boone's own, and 
the tree is old enough to substantiate the legend. One of the annual 
College pilgrimages leads to this tree, which is conveniently reached 
either by rail or by driving. Davy Crockett was born at Limestone, 
on the Southern Railroad eighteen miles below Johnson City; and 
legends dealing with his early prowess and history are numerous 
throughout this section. 



Early History of the College — ^Its Founding and Administration 

The site of Milligan College, with its superb view of the majestic 
Buffalo Mountain and the silver waters of the Buffalo Creek flowing 
just below, was early chosen as an ideal spot for an institution of 
learning. Before the Civil War, a school was established which was 
attended by manj'^ men who afterward became illustrious in the history 
not only of Tennessee but also of the nation. After the War between 
the States, this school was given the name of Buffalo Institute, and 
numbered among its students both "Bob" and "Alf" Taylor, as well 
as other men who achieved prominence in national and civic life. 
During this time the institution was largely under the direction of 
Colonel Barker, a man whose talented and lovable character left its 
impress upon the future history of the College. In 1880 a young 
man from Kentuckj^, by the name of Josephus Hopwood, came to Car- 
ter County in search of a place to found an institution of learning 
built upon the broad foundation of Christian culture, a clean heart 
and a clean life. Buffalo Institute was turned over to him ; and in 
1882 the old name was changed to Milligan College, after the sainted 
character whose history is given elsewhere in detail. Professor Hop- 
wood always regarded Robert Milligan as the highest embodiment of 
ideal manhood he had met, and therefore named the College, which 
he designed as an instrument for the development of Christian char- 
acter among men and women, after his beloved teacher. For twenty- 
three years from 1880 to 1903, President Hopwood directed the des- 
tinies of Milligan College. The story of those twenty-three years of 
disinterested, unselfish service for God and the world is written, not 
in books or upon marble, but in the hearts and lives of hundreds of 



MiLLiGAK College Year-Book 7 

men and \\'omen who are scattered all over America, and who are 
blessing humanity because they were given high ideals of life at ^IIl- 
ligan College. Many privations were endured during these 3'ears, pri- 
vations known only to those who bore them and to the Recording 
Angel who wrote them down. In 1903, President Hopwood relin- 
quished the burden he had borne so long to one who had graduated 
under him and who was associated with him for years as a teacher. No 
finer spirited man, or one more loyal to those ideals of Service and 
Purity which belong to the heritage of Milligan, could have been 
found than Henry R. Garrett. Unselfish Service was the kej-note of 
his life at Milligan; and after five years of labor, largely worn out 
by his efforts, aided by bodily sickness, he was obliged to seek a 
warmer climate in the dry atmosphere of Western Texas. President 
Garrett's mantle fell upon another young man, Frederick D. Kersh- 
ner, a native of Marjdand and a graduate of Kentucky University 
and of Princeton. President Kershner took charge of the College 
in the spring of 1908, and the work has progressed rapidly since that 
time. The enrollment in 1907-1908 was 167; in 1908-1909, 193; in 
1909-1910, 268; in 1910-1911, 275, and in 1911-1912, 228. Presi- 
dent Kershner resigned soon after the opening of the session 191 1- 
1912 and his resignation took effect Oct. 31, 191 1, The Board im- 
mediately elected the Dean Tyler E. Utterback, a native of Ken- 
tucky, graduate of Kentucky University, Central University of Ken- 
tucky and Columbia University, New York, a man of large exper- 
ience both as an educator and preacher. The work of the College 
progressed without a jar from the time he took charge as president. 
The same ideals of life which ruled under the former administrations 
obtain today, and the same emphasis upon purity and cleanness of 
living and the development of Christian character, remains as the 
core of the Milligan spirit. 

Over two hundred — 225 to be exact — students have been gradu- 
ated from Milligan College since the first class left its halls in 1882. 
A host of young men and women who were not able to complete their 
education were also instructed during this peried. The aim of the 
College has been toward higher ideals, not only of character, but also 
of scholarship; and the work has been constantly graded up with this 
end in view. Where honesty of purpose is inculcated, there will be 
thoroughness of work; and this has always been true of Milligan men 
and women, as the records of the alumni clearly disclose. We do not 
believe the statement to be boastful that no college can claim a larger 
percentage of successful graduates than Milligan, success being defined 
as the living of an honest, influential and altruistic life. 



8 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

ALTITUDE X^J) HEALTHFULNESS OF LOCATI0?f 

Milligan College has an altitude of 1,740 feet. It is only four 
miles from Buffalo Mountain, over 4,000 feet high, and twelve miles 
from Roan Mountain, 6,000 feet. Mt, Mitchell, the highest peak in 
America east of the Rockies, is located only forty miles to the east, 
and is reached from Milligan via the C, C. & O. R. R. The climate 
is temperate, and perhaps the most perfect illustration of that of the 
temperate zone.. The air is remarkably pure, there is an abundance 
of pure water, and all natural advantages for school life would seem 
to be possessed by this favored section of Eastern America. Criticism 
has sometimes been directed against the large number of schools and 
colleges in East Tennessee. The reason for this apparent crowding 
of institutions lies in the fact that the location is practically ideal for 
school purposes. With modern railroad facilities, it is far fetter that 
a school should be located well from the point of view of healthful- 
ness and climate than from the point of view of purely geographical 
fitness. 



PART II 



THE PEBSOIVJfEI OF MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

The Charter of Milligan College provides that its property shall 
be owned and controlled by a Board of Trustees consisting of thirty- 
three members, one-third of whom or eleven members shall be elected 
ach year by the Tennessee Christian Missionary Society, when 
assembled in Annual Convention. The control and ownership of the 
College is thus vested in the Christian Churches of Tennessee. The 
membership of the Board of Trustees is not, however, limitd to any 
religious body, nor by any state or territorial requirements. The 
Board of Control, or Executive Committee of the Institution, is 
composed of nine members, five of whom constitute a quorum for 
business. 

The following gentlemen constitute the Board of Trustees: 
Term Expires in 1912 

Adam B. Crouch, Cashier Unaka Bank Johnson City, Tenn. 

Aaron A. Ferguson, Minister Elizabethton, Tenn. 

J. C. Hamlett, Business Man Crockett Mills, Tenn. 

Geo. W. Hardin, V.-Pres. & Supt. E. T. & W. 

N. C. R. R Johnson City, Tenn. 

N. H. Hyder, Farmer Elizabethton, Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 9 

Philip Y. Pendleton, Minister Vine Street Christian 

Church Nashville, Tenn, 

S. W. Price, Lawyer Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. H. Sheffer, Minister Linden Street Christian 

Church Memphis, Tenn. 

A. S. Warren, Business Man Nashville, Tenn. 

G. T. Williams, Farmer Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. F. Witt, Business Man Zion Mills, Va. 

Term Expires in 1013 

Ira M. Boswell, Minister Walnut Street Christian 

Church New Castle, Pa. 

Harris L. Browne, Business Man Memphis, Tenn. 

Joel O. Cheek, Merchant, (Pres. Cheek-Neal Coffee 

Company) Nashville, Tenn. 

Dr. C. W. Cowden, Physician Nashville, Tenn. 

Capt. L A. Hill, Farmer Harriman, Tenn. 

Dr. E. K. Leake, Physician CoUiersville, Tenn. 

Dr. W. J. Maththews, Phj^sician Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. G. Payne, Business Man Milligan College, Tenn. 

Hon. L N. Pendleton, LawA^er Nashville, Tenn. 

Dr. L. M. Scott, Physician JelHco, Tenn. 

Hon. T. Asbury Wright, Lawyer Knoxville, Tenn. 

Term Expires in 1914 

Dr. A. W. Boyd, Physician Chattanooga, Tenn. 

J. E. Crouch, Merchant Johnson City, Tenn. 

B. J, Farrar, Business Man Nashville, Tenn. 

G. W. Jones, Farmer Piney Flats, Tenn. 

A. L Myhr, Minister Belleview, Tenn. 

J. F. Robertson, Business Man Crockett Mills, Tenn. 

C. E. Snodgrass, Judge 5th Judicial Dist. of Tenn., Crossville, Tenn. 

J. F. Tarwater, Business Man Rockwood, Tenn. 

Hon, G. N. Tillman, Lawyer Nashville, Tenn. 

C. C. Taylor, Farmer Milligan College, Tenn. 

J. W. Williams, Business Man Elizabethton, Tenn. 

The officers of the Board are as follows: 

President — C. C. Taylor Milligan College, Tenn. 

Secretary — S. W. Price Johnson City, Tenn. 

Treasurer — Geo. W. Hardin Johnson Citv, Tenn. 



10 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

The Executive Committee is composed of the following mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees: 

Messrs. Taylor, Price, Hardin, J. E. Crouch, A. B. Crouch. 
Hyder, J. W. Williams, G. T. Williams, and Payne. Its officers, 
by a provision of the Charter, are the same as those of the Board of 
Trustees. 



FACULTY 



TYLER ELLIOTT UTTERBACK, M. A. (Columbia), 
President and Robert Milligan Professor of Philosophy and English 
Criticism. 

A. B. Centre College of Central University of Kentucky; A. B. 
Kentucky University; Classical graduate of the College of the Bible; 
M. A. Columbia University, New York, and Master's Diploma in 
Education and Supervision, Teachers' College, New York. Pastor 
and teacher in Ohio, Missouri and Minnesota. Professor of History 
and Education Milligan College 1 910- 191 2. President since No- 
vember, 191 1. 

GLENN GATES COLE, A. M., M. S., C. E., Dean and 
Head of Department of Mathematics and science. 

C. E., Lebanon University, 1890; Ph. B., Atlantic College 
,1903; A. M., Bethany College, 1904; M. S,, University of Wooster, 
1912, etc. 

Principal, Holmesville, Ohio, schools, five years, 1 890-5; County 
Engineer, Holmes County, Ohio, 1896-99; Instructor In Wadsworth 
Normal School, 1897-8; Instructor in High School ( Mlllersburg, 
Ohio, 1901-2; County Examiner of Teachers, 1898-1902; Professor 
of Mathematics, Atlantic Christian College, Wilson, N. C, 1902-5 ; 
Professor of Science, Virginia Christian College, Lynchburg, Va,, 
1905-10; Principal of Preparatory Department, ibid, 1905-9; Dean 
of the College, ibid, 1909-10; Fellow in Chemistry, Ohio State 
University, Columbus, Ohio, 1910-11; Instructor in English, Mathe- 
matics, Physics and Chemistry, University of Wooster Summer School, 
eight years, 1904-12; Member of Ohio Engineering Society, National 
Geographical Society, and American Association for the Advancement 
of Science. 

ELMA E. R. ELLIS, M. A. (University of Tennessee), Pro- 
fessor Ancient Languages and Literature. 

B. A., 1895; M. A., 1899; Professor Ancient Languages Mil- 
ligan College 1900-3; Professor of Greek and German, Virginia 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book U 

Christian College, 1903-5 ; Professor of Greek and History, Bethany 
College, 1905-8; Professor of Ancient Languages Milligan College, 
1908 — . 

MRS. E. L. THOMAS, Dean of Women and Librarian. 

LOGAN E. GARRETT, A. B., Adjunct Professor of English 
and Science and Phlncipal of the Academy. 

Teacher In the Public Schools in Washington and Virginia. 
Professor Adjunct, Milligan College, 191 1 — . 

MILDRED McBRIDE, B. S., (University of Missouri), Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages. 

B. S., University of Missouri, 1910; State Life Certificate of 
Missouri; Professional State Certificate of Oklahoma; Teacher of 
English in University Model High School, Columbia, Mo., 1910-11 ; 
Teacher English and German, Ramona, Oklahoma, High School 
1911-12. 

J. EDWIN CROUCH, Ph. B., Professor Bible School, Peda- 
gogy and Evangelism. 

Ph. B. Milligan, 1896; Principal Science Hill High School and 
Superintendent Johnson City, Tenn. ; one of the best known Bible 
School workers in the South. 

MARCELENA HOUSTON, A. B., Director of Music. 

Graduate of Kee-Mar Conservatory of Music, Hagerstown, 
Md., Student under Myers, New York, and of the Peabody Con- 
servatory of Music, Baltimore. Instructor in Kee-Mar Conserva- 
tory, 1901-4; Director of Music, Milligan College, 1909 — , 

WILLIAM S. TAYLOR, M. D., Lecturer on Anatomy, Phy- 
siology and Hygiene. (College Physician), 

JESSE CAHOON, Assistant Instructor in Mathematics. 

LOGAN E. GARRETT, A. B., Secretary of the Faculty. 

* , Principal Commercial Department. 

* , Professor of English Bible, Church 

History and Applied Christianity. 

* — To Be Appointed. 



LECTURES FOR 1911-12. 

In addition to the excellent addresses delivered at various times 
by members of the faculty, the following men of acknowledged 
ability lectured to the faculty and students: 

S. S. Lappln, Editor Christian Standard. 

W. S. Buchanan, General Evangelist, Washington, D. C. 

J. T. McKlssick, Corresponding Secretary, T. C. M. S. 



12 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

A. J. Myhr, Ex-Cor. Secretary, T. C. M. S. 

J. Hopwood, Ex-President of MilHgan College and Virginia 
Christian College. 

The Rev. Ira M. Boswell, Chattanooga. 

Judge J. N. Pendleton, Nashville. 

The Rev. Henry Peebles, Ohio. 

The Hon. A. A. Taylor. 

Prof. D. Shepherd. 

Besides these, many of the brethren and sisters attending the 
Annual State Convention of the Christian Church at Johnson City 
came to the College during the sitting of the convention and delivered 
addresses of worth and merit. 



THE SOCIETY OF ALUMNI OF MILLIGAN COLLEGE 



Officers 



Geo. W. Hardin ('82), President. 

Geo. E. Lyon ('91), Vice-President. 

J. E. Crouch ('96), Secretary and Treasurer. 

The next Special Reunion v^^ill take place in 19 12 at Commence- 
ment. Every alumnus and friend of Milligan College should plan to 
be present upon this occasion. 

Annual banquet and reunion held the evening of Commencement 
day at the College. 



The AIumEii 



It is our desire to keep in close touch with our alumni and to 
have the correct addresses at all time on file in the office. Members 
will confer a great favor upon us by giving us any information rela- 
tive to the Alumni which they may happen to know individually. 
Address all communications to the President, Milligan College, Tenn. 



Class of 1882 



C. B. Armentrout, A. M Washington College, Tenn. 

George E. Boren, B. L Bristol, Tenn. . 

Charles P. Carson, B. S Telford, Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 13 

Aaron A. Ferguson, A. M Elizabethton, Tenn 

Geofge W. Hardin, B. L Johnaon City, Tenn. 

*Lulu Hendrix (Crockett) , B. L Milllgan, Tenn 

=*Lucy C. Matthews (Hardin), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

J. H. Rutrough, A. M Willis, Va. 

James H. Smith, A. M Johnson City, Tenn. 

James A. Tate, A. M Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Class of 1883 

Samuel L. Carson, A. B Oreene'V'ille, Tenn. 

W. R. Henry, B. S Sherman, Texas 

* William J. Sh^elburne, A. B Christianshurg, Va. 

Class of 1884 

MolHe Todd (Hendrix) .Music 

Mary Peebles (Lyon) Music 

Class of 1885 

*Frank P. Bullard, A. M Lynchburg, Va. 

Mary Elizabeth Epps (Hardin), B. S Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Preston B. Hall, A. M Bloomfield, Ky. 

Charles L.. Maddox, A. B Crocketts, Wythe County, Va. 

Edmund A. Miller, A. M Los Angeles, Cal. 

William E. Reed, B. S Stanton, Texas. 

Walter M. Straley, A. B Sinking Creek, Va. 

Robert Walker, B. S Pandora, Texas 

Class of 1887 

Eugene M. Crouch, A. M North Manchester, Ind. 

James W. Giles, A. B Lynchburg, Va. 

Leatitia L. C. Tate (Coruforth), A. M Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Edward C. Wilson, A. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Class of 1888 

Francis E. Caldwell (Baber), B. S Charleston, W. Va. 

Susan A. Kegley (Gibson), B. S Wytheville, Va. 

William B. Kegley, A. B Wytheville, Va. 

I. Irvin Miller, A. M ^ Lynchburg, Va. 

Class of 1889 

Annie M. Finley (Preston), B. S Red Ash, Ky. 

Henry R. Garrett, A. .M Midland, Texas 

Franklin D. Love, B. S Georgetown, Texas 

Charles G. Price, B. S 101 E. 23d St., New York City. 



14 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book ' ' 

Class of 189© 

William P. Cousins, B. S Norfolk, Va. 

Charles Cornforth, A. M Nashville, Tenn. 

Thomas J. Cox, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Mamie Haun (La Rue), B. S Beesemer, Ala. 

William H. Haun, B. S Bessemer, Ala. 

John P. McConnell, A. B., Milligan College; A. M., Ph. D., University 

of Virginia Emory, Va. 

Sarah C. Straley (Thomas), B. S Sinking Creek, Va. 

Samnel G. Sutton, A. B Saltville, Va. 

Class of 1891 

D. Sinclair Burleson, A. M., :State Normal School. .Johnson City, Tenn, 

Elizabeth E. Cox (Matthews), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Mary Hendrickson, B. S Lexington, Tenn. 

George E. Lyon, Ph. B 703 Jackson St., Topeka, Kan. 

W. R. Motley, A. B Chatham, Va. 

Chester D. M. Sho waiter, A. M , Roanoke, Va. 

Lou Ella Shawalter (English) , B. S Roanoke, Va. 

John V. Thomas, A. M Sherman, Texas. 

Class of 1892 

Mary E. Burleson (Dew) , B. S Florence, Ala. 

Walter L. Dudley, A. M Covington, Pa. 

Cordelia P. Henderson, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

David Lyon, B. S Topeka, Kan. 

Clara McConnell (Lucas) , Ph. B Emory, Va. 

J. Frank Sergent, B. S Clinchport. Va. 

James E. Stuart, Ph. B., A. M Union City, T^na. 

S. T. Willis, A. B., LL. D Lynchburg, Va. 

Class of 1898 

Nannie Givens, Ph< B.< Buchanan, Va. ^ 

Agatha Lilley (Miller), B. S Keokuk, Iowa 

Robert W. Lilley, B. S Keokuk, Iowa 

Etta Reynolds (Brown) , B. S Alliance, Ohio 

George C. Simmons, B. S Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Andrew Jackson Wolfe, Ph.B Kahoka, Mo. 

Class of 1894 

James C. Scroggins, A. M Lenoir Co. N. C. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 15 

Lee R. Dingns, A. B Floreiw^e, Ala. 

Jolm P. Givens, A. B H^ywortli, III. 

William J. Matthews, B. S., M. D Johnson City, Tenn. 

■Daniel E. Motley, A. M., Ph.D., Washington Christian College, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

William J. Sh-elburne, A. B Shelbyville, Tenn. 

J. Wesley Showalter, A. B E. Radfor-d, Va., RFD No. 1 

Class of 1895 

Byrdine A. Abbott, A. B St. Louis, Mo. 

George R. Cheves, B. S Pulaski, Va. 

Lula M. Dye (Hagy) , B. S Greendale, Va. 

*R. J. English, B. S., M. D Glade Hill, Va. 

L. C. Felts, B. S Thurmond, W. Va. 

*William S. Givens, A. B Newport, Va. 

Edward E. Hawkins, Ph.B Burnsville, N. C. 

Thomas B. McCarthey, A. M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Va.) . . .Lexington, Va. 

C. Burnett Reynolds, A. B New Philadelphia, O. 

Geo. P. Rutledge, A. M 4209 Viola St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pearl Shelburne, Ph.B Green Bay, Va. 

George H. P. Showalter, A. B Austin, Texas 

Lizzie Wilburn Thomas, B. S Sherman, Texas 

Bertha E. Tomlin (Thomas), B. S Oklahoma 

Ina Yoakley, B. S 19 Madison Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

Class of 1896 
J. Bdwin Crouch, Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Claes of 1897 

Isaac A. Briggs, A. B„ M. D 1117 E. Main St., Enid, Okla. 

I. G. W. Buck, B. S Woodsboro, Texas 

A. Jackson Bunts, B. S Bowie, Texas 

Laura Belle Clark, B. S Pulaski. Va. 

Charles Wiley Johnson, Ph.B Ko^kdell, Va. 

James G. Johnson, A. M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Va. '09) . .Charlottesville, Va. 

Annie Lee Lucas, B. S Childress, Va. 

A. Robert Ramey, A. B Defiance, Ohio 

Class of 1898 

Elbert L. Anderson, B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Charles D. Hart, B. S Milligan College 



16 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Og-den Johnson, Ph.B Rockdell, Va. 

Edward Rodney Massie, B. S Ben, Va. 

Juliet Rowlett Massive (Sho waiter), Ph.B Ben, Va. 

Mary Virginia Orr (Shelburne) , Ph.B Dot, Va. 

Samuel Walter Price, A. M, Johnson City, Tenn. 

George J. Sells, B. S., M, D 261 Main St., Johnison City, Tenn. 

Thomas M. Sells, B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Forest Summers, E. S., M. D War Eagle, W. Va. 

Class of 1889 

Annie L. Pruett (Bolton), Ph.B 130 North St., Bluefield, W. Va. 

Charles W. Givens, A. B., University of Virginia. . .Charlottesville, Va. 

Richard Maury Leake, A. B Colliersville, Tenn. 

Minnie D. Myhr (Bolton), Ph.B Belleview, Tenn. 

Class of 1900 

Landon C. Bell, Ph.B., A. M Asheville, N. C. 

Sue Bell (Brummett), A. B., A. M Jordan Mines, Va. 

Daisy Boring, B. S Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Wilson R. Bowers, B. S Rural Retreat, Va. 

Horace M. Burleson, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Laura Burchfield (Hyder), B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Larkin E. Crouch, A. B Noel Block, Nashville, Tenn. 

Robert S. Fields, B. S Romeo, Tenn. 

Mollie Hale, B. S .Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Ida Hendrix (Anderson), Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Gentry Hodges, A. B Ardmore, Okla. 

■Monta E. Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Stephen A. Morton, A. B -Garland, Texas 

Fay H. Price, B. S 641 Alabama St., Bristol, Tenn. 

Joe B. Sells, B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Amanda Sheliburne, Ph.B Pageton, W. Va. 

Geneva Smith (Wallace) , B. S Hiltons, Va. 

Nannie Sutton (Bishop), B. S Pikeville, Ky. 

James S. Thomais, A. M Southern Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

George A. Watson, A. B Durham, Okla. 

Class of 1901 

Frank M. Broyles, B. S Knoxville, Tenn. 

Gideon 0. Davis, A. M 1 Leonard Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

Samuel F. Gollehon, A. M Graham, Va. 

Williajn Leslie Leake, A. B., M. D Colliersville, Tenn. 



MiLLiCAN College Year-Book 17 

Class of 1902 

William Thomas Anglin, B. S Calvin, Okla. 

Matthew Crockett Hughes, A. B J'ei;fersonvill€, Ind. 

William Hamilton Jones, A. B Jon«shoro, Tenn. 

;\Iinor Johnson Roes, A. B Pulaski, Va. 

Elizaheth Graham Sayers, B. S Pine, Va. 

Jeremy Pate Whitt, A. B Radford, Va. 

Class of 1903 

William Henry Book, A. M Columbus, Ind. 

Gilbert Henry Easley, B. S Bristol, Tenn. 

Oscar Monroe Fair, A. B., LL. B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Craig Byrd Givens, Ph.B 1116 East Main St., Danville, Va. 

Jesse Brown Givens, Ph.B Newport, Va. 

Myrtle Jeanette Helsbeck (McPherson), Ph.B., A. B Asheville, N. C. 

Nannie Ethel Helsbeck (Reynolds), B. S Cumnor, Va, 

Carrie Louise Hop wood, Ph.B Springfield, Mo. 

Cordelia May Hopwood, B. S Springfield, Mo. 

Edward Everett Price, B. S. Belle Plain, Kan. 

Washington Budd Sager, A. B Woodstock, Va. 

Annie Watson (Burner), Ph.B 423 Johnson Ave., Lexington Ky. 

Joseph Thomas Watson, A. B 423 Johnson Ave,, Lexington, Ky. 

Class of 1904 

J. Robert Garrett, Ph.B Tenn. 

William R. Howell, A. B Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 

Elgin K. Leake, B. S Colliersville, Tenn. 

Arthur C. Maupin, B. S Cash, Okla. 

Robert L. Peoples, Ph.B Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James I. Scott, B. S Elk Park, N. C. 

Class of 1905 

*Laura Alice Baker (Wilson), B. S California 

W. P. Crouch, A. M Clarksville, Tenn. 

Lucy Louise Hatcher, A. B W^alter, Okla. 

Lula Leatitia Lacy (Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Nannie Lee Price (Ratliff), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. H. Garfield, B. S » Milligan College, Tenn. 

Lola Eleanor Robert.s (Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Aylette Rains VanHook, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Georgia ]\Iarion White, A. B Milligan Collegie, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Leatitia Wilson (Kelley), B. S Kent, Ore. 



18 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Class of 1906 

M. Nola Fields, Ph.B Baileyton, Tenn. 

Mary Lydia Hanen, B. S Midland, Texas 

*Lucy J. Hart, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

RoECOe Hodges, B. S R.F.D., Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Robert Decker Hj'der, A. B Elizabethton, Tenn, 

Samuel D. Kesner, A. B Greendale, Tenn. 

Owen F. Kilburne, Ph.B Inman, Va. 

Frank A. Taylor, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1907 

N. Petibone Hyder, B. S Elizaibethton, Tenn. 

R. Bennick Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

John L. Kuhn, Ph.B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Edgar C. Lacy, A. B INIountain City, Tenn. 

James M. Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1908 

Stella Lee Burleson (Sutton), A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

William Lee Cook, B. S Jellico, Tenn. 

Mary Frances Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Maggie Matilda Wright, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1909 

George M. Bowman, Ph.B King, N. C. 

Shelburne Ferguson, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Jennie Hatcher, Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Anna Kelley, Ph.B TJnaka, Va. 

George Rohert Lowder, Ph.B BluefieM, W. Va. 

Persie I. Owen, Ph.B Burnside, Ky. 

Mary Evelyn Sevier, Ph. B Harriman, Tenn. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, Ph.B Crossville, Tenn. 

James W. Stephens, A. B Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rennie Bolton White, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

William L Williams, Ph.B Johnson City, Tenn, 

Class of 1910 

Professor Alexander Reed Milligan, Litt.D Lexington Ky, 

*Hon. Robert Love Taylor, LL.D U. S. Senate, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur Eugene Buck, Ph.B Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Frances Temperance Hyder, Ph.B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Ann Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 19 

Lucius Fields Shelburne, A. B Wise, Va. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, A. B Crossville, Tenn. 

Catharine Emma Thomas, ^lus. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Charmian L-estelle Thomas, Mus. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Alma Fiske VanHook, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1911 

Logan E. Garrett, A. B Virginia 

Mary Huff, B. S Virginia 

Frank H. Knight, Ph.B Tennessee 

Minerva O. Knight (Shelburne), Ph.B Virginia 

Ben H. Taylor, Ph.B Tennessee 

Bertie Wade, Ph.B Tennessee 

Wise Worrell, Ph. B Virginia 

Wise Worrell, Ph.B Virginia 

Class of 1912 

Ira Camillas Allamong, English Ministerial W. Va. 

Jennie Taylor Anderson, B. Lit Tennessee 

David Park Chapman, English Ministerial W. Va. 

W. Conley Greer, English Ministerial W. Va. 

Lambreth Hancock, English Ministerial Tennessee 

Guy Ocanell Hill, B. Lit Tennessee 

Mary Frances Huff, B. Lit. and English Ministerial Virginia 

Lucy Eethel Price, B. S Tennessee 

Roy Schmucker, A. B Maryland 

Ollie May Shelburne, A. B Virginia 

Mary Ella Wade, B. S Tennessee 

* — Deceased. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDEXTS 
1911-12 



Oraduate Student 

Huff, Man-, B. S., 1911 '.Virginia 

English, Education. 

Undergraduate Students 

Aicred, Annie Lou Tennessee 

Mathematics, Latin, English, French. 
Allamong, Ira Camillas West Virginia 

Logic, English, Ethics. 



20 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Anderson, Prank Tennessee 

History, Science, English. 
Anderson, Jennie Tennessee 

Logic, Ethics, English, French, Education. 
Bailey, Wilmetta Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, Science. 
Bailey, Frank Wesley Tennessee 

English, Algebra, Arithmetic. 
Banner, Hyder Tennessee 

English, New Testament, Ethics, German. 
Blackwell, W. P., Virginia 

English, Latin, New Testament, Arithmetic, 
Bowers, Carmon., Tenness&e 

English, Latin, French, Greek, Mathematics. 
Bowman, Adam Broyles Tennessee 

English, Science, Mathematics, French. 
Brumit, Clarence Tennessee 

English, Science, Mathematics, History. 
Buck, Ephraim Virginia 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Buck, Kate Virginia 

English, History. 
BurchfieM, Nat Virginia 

Latin, French, Science, Mathematics, Old Testament. 
Burleson, Fred Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Burleson, Millard Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Burleson, Wilson Tennessee 

English, Latin, r^Iathematics, History. 
Burrus, Qttelia Katherine Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Latin, French. 
Cahoon, Jesse Virginia 

English, Latin, Greek, French, Logic. 
Campbell, Edith Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Mathematics, Old Testament, Logic. 
Campbell, .:Mary Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Mathematics. 
Chapman, David Park West Virginia 

English, Mathematics, Greek, Ethics. 
Clarke, Joeeph Tennessee 

English, Greek, Latin, Logic, German, Old Testament. 



MiLLiCAK College Year-Book 21 

01ark€, Russell Teunessee 

English, Latin, Science, Matliematics, History. 

Crouch, Joseph Tennessee 

English, Greek, Latin, French. 

Estep, W. A i Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Ferguson, Arthur .Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Old Testament. 
Forbes, Robert Tennessee 

English, Algebra, Arithmetic, Science, History. 
Fonbes, Walter Virginia 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History, New Testament. 
Forrester, Robert Tennessee 

Latin, Mathematics, History, Old and New Testament. 
Garrison, W. M Tennessee 

En,glish, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
■ Godbey, Laura Virginia 

English, Mathematics, Latin, Science, French, German, Logic. 
Gray, Lucy Tennessee 

Latin, Mathematics, Historj^ French. 
Hancock, Lambreth Tennessee 

English, Logic, Ethics, Mathematics. 
Hardy, Maurice Virginia 

English, Logic, Old and New Testament, Mathematics. 
Hendrix, Clyde Williams. Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Mathematics, Science. ( 

Hill, Guy Ocanell Tennessee 

Eu'glish, Ethics, Logic, German, French, Education. 
Hinds, George Washington Tennessee 

English, History, Com. Arithmetiic, Science. 
Hodges, Lottie Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Logic, Old Testament. 
Hodges, Nelle Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Logic, Old Testament. 
Huie, Maury Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Latin, History. 
Hyder, Fred Baker Tennessee 

Mathematics, Science, History, Com. Arith. 
Hyder, Geneva Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics. 
Hyder, Roy Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Com. Arith. 



22 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Hyder, Sam Tennessee 

iBnglisih, Mathematics, Latin. 
James, White Tennessee 

Eng-lish, ilathematics, Latin, Greek. 
Kelly, Edgar Virginia 

English, History, French, Com. Arith. 
Kelly, Margaret Virginia 

English, Latin, French, Mathematics, History. 
Keplinger, John Hunter Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, New Testament. 
Knight, Melvin. Colorado 

English, Mathematics, French, Education, Old Testament. 
Loyd, Adrian Tennessee 

■Science, English, Arithmetic. 
Minton, Glen Louis Tennessee 

English, Science, Mathematics. 
Munson, Elmer B West Virginia 

English, Logic, History. 
Nave, Stewart Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics. 
Perry, Annie Mildred Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Mathematics. 
Porter, Ethyl Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Old Testament. 
Price, Luicy Ethel Tennessee 

Mathematics, Ethics, German, French. 

Sohmucker, Roy Virginia 

Shelburne, Ollie Mae Virginia 

English, Logic, Ethics, French German. 
Shelbnrne, Claude Virginia 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Old Testament. 
Shelburne, Sam Virginia 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Shepherd, Bradley Tennessee 

English, Latin, Science, Mathematics. 
Shepherd, Luther Tennessee 

English, Latin, History, Mathematics. 
Shoun, Joseph Bernie Tennessee 

English, History, Mathematics. 
Simmons, Leslie Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 23 

Smith, Harry Adonis Tennessee 

Latin, Science, Mathematics, Hietory. 

Smith, Ed C, Texas 

English, Mathematics, iShorthand. 

Snodgrass, Edward Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, History. 
Snodgrass, Jonas Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, History. 
StuhblefieM, Grover, C, Tenneseee 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics, New Testament. 
Swanner, Samuel Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Science, History. 
Taber, Walter Tennessee- 

English, Latin, Mathematiics, Psychology. 
Taylor, James Virginia 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics. 
Taylor, James Blaine Tennessee 

English, Shorthand. 
Taylor, Samuel Carter Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Thomas, Catherine Virginia 

English, Latin, French, German. 
Thoma.s Sharmian Virginia 

English, Ethics, German. 
Thomas, G. Tollie Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, .Mathematics, New Testament. 
Thomae, Mary Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, French, History, Old Testament. 
Thompson, Mary Ward Tennessee 

English, Science. 
Trussler, Howard Tennessee 

English, Science, French, Com. Arithmetic. 
Van Hook, Mabel Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, Logic, German. 
Wade, Mary Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Logic, Ethics, Mathematics, French. 
Waring, Lurline Tennessee 

English, iScience, French ,Mathematics. 
Warren, Claude Tennessee 

English, History, Arithmetic. 
Watkins, Grace Tennessee 

English, Science, Latin, History, Arithmetic. 



24 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Watkins, Rwth Tennessee 

Englisli, French, Scknee, Old Testament. 
White, Byrl Tennetssee 

Latin, Greek, Logic, German, Old Testament, Education. 
WMte, Myhr Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, Frentch, New Testament. 
Williams, Hyder Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics. 
Worrell, Montgomery "Virginia 

English, Mathematics, Latin, Science, History. 

an>ISTEBIAL STUDENTS. 

. Allamong, Ira C, West Virginia 

Christian Doctrine & Polity, Exegesis, Homiletics, Church History. 
Blackwell, W. P., Virginia 

New Testament History. 
Chapman, D. Park, West Virginia 

Exegesis, Homiletics. 
Forbes, Walter G Virginia 

New Testament History. 
Forrester, Robert Tenneseee 

New Testament History, Old Testament History. 
Greer, W. Conley Virginia 

Christian Doctrine & Polity, Church History, Apostolic History. 
Hancock, Lambreth Tennessee 

Christian Doctrine & Polity, Exegesis, Homileti<;s, Church History. 
Huif, Mary Virginia 

Christian Doctrine & Polity, Exegesis, Homiletics, Church History, 

Apostolic History. 
Keplinger, John H Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Munson, Elmer B West Virginia 

Exegesis, Homiletics. 
Porter, Ethel Tennessee 

Old Testament History. 
StubbM'field, Grover C Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Taber, C. Walter , Tennessee 

Exegesis, Homiletics. 
Talbott, Frank V Maryland 

Exegesis, Homiletics. 
Thomas, G. Tollie Tennessee 

New Testament History. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Bcmdk 25 

STUDENTS ELECTI>G WORK IX MIMSTERIAL DEPARTMEXT 

Banner, Hyder Tennessee 

New Testament. 
Buck, Epihraim C Tennessee 

Old Testament. 
Burchfield, Nat Virginia 

Old Testament 
Campbell, Edith Tennesse-e 

Old Testament. 
Clark, Joseph D , Tennessee 

Olid Testament. 
Ferguson, Arthur Tennessee 

Olid Testament. 
Hardy, Maurice T Tennessee 

Old Testament. 
. Hodges, Lottie Tennessee 

Old Testament. 
Hodges, Nelle Tennessee 

Old Testament. 
Knight, Meivin Colorado 

Old Testament. 
Sheliburne, Claude Virginia 

Old Testament 
Thomas, Mary Tennessee 

Old Testament. 
Watkins, Ruth Tennessee 

Old Testament. 
White, J. Byrl Tennessee 

Olid Testament. 
White, Myh.r Tennessee 

New Testament. 

ACADEMY MJ) PREPARATORY STIDEXTS 

Anderson, Lela Tenn. Aroher, Earl Tenn. 

Anderson, Mahel Tenn. Archer, Frank Tenn. 

Anderson, Margaret Tenn. Bailey, Pinkie Tenn. 

Anderson, William Tenn. Bowman, Geoi'ge Tenn 

Archer, Bertie Tenn. Bowman, Harry Tenn. 

Archer, Cloyd Tenn. Buck, Mabel Va. 

Archer, Carl Tenn. Burleson, Gutchie Tenn. 



26 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



Burleson, Pearl Tenn. 

Bussell, Henry ^.Tenn. 

Butler, Eugene Tenn. 

Crow, Clyde Tenn. 

Ellis, Edmond Tenn. 

Ellis, Pearl Tenn. 

Ellis, Pearl N. C. 

Ellis, Rosa Tenn. 

Ellis, Robert Tenn. 

Fair, Will Frank Tenn. 

Feathers, George Tenn. 

Feathers, Marshall Tenn. 

Ferguson, Blanich Tenn. 

Ferguson, Pauline Tenn. 

Ferguson, Sadie Tenn. 

Ferguson, William Tenn. 

Froga, Fred N. C. 

French, Frankie Tenn. 

Garland, Earl Tenn. 

•Gentry, Clayton Tenn. 

Gilliam, Leona Tenn. 

Godbey, William Tenn. 

Gouge, Wexter N. C. 

Gourley, Josie Tenn. 

Gourley, Flora Tenn. 

Grinstaff , Hobart Tenn. 

Hampton, Nellie Tenn. 

Hendrix, Ernest Tenn. 

•Hendrix, Laurence Tenn. 

Hines, Earl Tenn. 

Hodges, David Tenn, 

Hodges, Waits Tenn. 

Holden, Fred Tenn. 

Holden, Omer Tenn. 

Holden, Ivilee Tenn, 

Holt, Mary Tenn. 

Holt, Willie Tenn. 

Holtsclaw, Carl Tenn. 

Kite, Bryan Tenn. 

Kite, Edward Tenn. 

Kite, Frank Tenn. 

Kite, Hattie Tenn. 



Kite, Percy Tenn. 

Lewis, Joe Tenn. 

Lewis, Josie Tenn. 

Love, Alfred Tenn. 

Love, Evelyn Tenn. 

Love, Robert Tenn. 

Maston, Ora Tenn. 

Maston, Hubert Tenn. 

Maston, Junior Tenn. 

Mclnturff, Annie Tenn. 

Mclnturff , Eva Tenn. 

Mclnturff, Julia Tenn. 

Mclnturff, Leona Tenn. 

McQueen, Wane Tenn. 

Wanton, Joe Ethel Tenn. 

Moref ield, Willie Tenn. 

Mumpower, Fred Tenn, 

Patton, Morris Tenn. 

Payne, Anderson Tenn. 

Payne, Christine Tenn. 

Payne, Cester Tenn. 

Payne, Tempile Tenn. 

Pearce, Oscar Tenn. 

Pearce, Ray Tenn. 

Pearce, Roy Tenn. 

Peoples, INIack Tenn. 

Pratha, Paul Tenn. 

Pratha, Stella Tenn. 

Price, Joe Tenn. 

Price, Ralph Tenn. 

Price, Rnth Tenn. 

Pritchard, Lucy N. C. 

Redmond, Ocie Tenn, 

Rhines, James Tenn. 

Rice, Annie Tenn. 

(&am.pson, Charlie Tenn, 

Sihaw, Arthur Tenn. 

Shaw, Alonza Tenn. 

Shell, Laurence Tenn. 

Shell, Ocea Tenn. 

Shepherd, Carl Tenn. 

Shepherd, Roscoe Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



27 



Shepherd, Pearl Tenn. 

Shoun, Caswell Tenn, 

ShouD, Charlie Tenn. 

Shoun, Lizzie Tenn. 

Shoun, Ray Tenn. 

Smalling, Pearl Tenn. 

Smalling, Sam Tenn. 

Snodgrass, Chloe Tenn. 

SnodgraS'S, Myrtle Tenn. 

Snodgrass, Nell Tenn. 

Tabor, Clinton Va. 

Talbott, Frank Md. 

Talbott, Sherman Md. 

Taylor, Alf Tenn. 

Taylor, Henry Tenn. 



Taylor, Kate Tenn. 

Taylor, Mary Tenn. 

Taylor, Otis Tenn. 

Taylor, Robert Tenn . 

Taylor, Vernie Tenn. 

Townsen, Earl Tenn. 

Townsen, Rose Tenn. 

Underwood, William Tenn. 

Usary, Ernest Tenn. 

Usary, Ollie Tenn. 

Watkins, Ralph Tenn. 

Whitehead, George N. C. 

Williams, Jessie Tenn. 

Williams, Robert Tenn. 

Williams, Roberta Tenn. 



PIANO 



Acred, Anaie Lou Tenn. 

Acuff, Minnie Ellen Tenn. 

Brents, Zorada Tenn. 

Burrus, Katherine Tenn. 

Campbell, Mary Tenn. 

Carrier, Sarah Tenn. 

Ferguson, Blanche Tenn. 

Ferguson, Pauline Tenn. 

Ferguson, Saidee Tenn. 

Forbes, Walter Tenn. 

Godbey, Laura Tenn. 

Gray, Lucy Tenn. 

Hancock, Lambreth Texas 

Hyder, Geneva Tenn. 

VOICE 

Acred, Annie Lou Tenn. 

Acuff, Minnie Ellen Tenn. 

Burrus, Kathenine Tenn. 

Hancock, Lambreth Texas 

James, White Tenn. 

Porter, Ethel Tenn. 



Hyder, Sam Tenn. 

Kelly, Margaret Va. 

Keplinger, John Tenn. 

Love, Evelyn Tenn. 

Perry, Annie Mildred Tenn. 

Ray, Mrs. J. T Tenn. 

Smalling, Georgia Tenn. 

Thomas, G. Tollie Tenn. 

Thomas, Mary Tenn. 

Thompson, ]\lary Tenn. 

Tmiisler, Howard Tenn. 

Van Hook, Alma Tenn. 

Watkins, Ruth Tenn. 



Ray, Mrs. J. T Tenn. 

Smith, Harry Tenn. 

Snodgrass, Jonas Tenn. 

Thomas, Catherine Va. 

Thomas, Charmain Tenn. 

Thompson, ^Mary Tenn. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

Shorthand 

B-ov.'ers, Carmon S Tenn. Taylor, Blaine Tenn. 

Johnson, Webster Tenn. Smith, Ed C Texas 



28 MiLLiGAN College Year-Bgok 

Typewriting 

Bailey, Prank Tenn. Watkins, Grace Tenn. 

Garland, Earl Tenn. Kelly, Edgar Va. 

Penmanship 

Bailey, Frank Tenn. Rayne, Temple Tenn. 

Bussell, B. H Tenn. Tabor, Clinton Va. 

Garland, Earl Tenn. Talbott, Frank Md. 

Godbey, William Va. Talbott, Sherman Md. 

Morrell, Joseph Tenn. Taylor, Blaine Tenn. 

Mos'by, Frank Ala. 

COMMEECIAL ARITHMETIC 

Buck, Katie Va. Kite, Edward Tenn. 

Burleson, Wilson Tenn. Minton, Glen Tenn. 

Bussell, Henry Tenn. Morrell, Jo© Tenn. 

Ellis, Pearl , N. C. Peoples, Mack Tenn 

Hinds, George Tenn. Price, Ruth Tenn. 

Huie, Maury Tenn. Sheipherd, Luther Tenn. 

Hyder, Fred Tenn. .Shoun, Joseph B Tenn. 

Hyder, Boy Tenn. Taylor, Henry Tenn. 

Kelly, Edgar Va. Trusler, Howard Tenn. 

Kite, Bryan Tenn. Warren, Claude Tenn. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 1011 -12 

• Graduate Staudents 1 

Undergraduate Students 91 

Preparatory and Academy 129 

Ministerial 15 

Music — 

Piano 27 

Voice '2 



39 



Business — 

iShorthand 4 

Typewriting 4 

Commercial Arithmetic 20 

Penmanship 11 



39 

314 

Counted Twice , 86 

Total 1911-12 228 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 29 

PART III 



DEPARTMENTS AND C0UB8ES OF IXSTiRUCTION 
I 
Collegiate Department 



Requirements for Admission 

All candidates for admission to the College must offer satisfac- 
tory evidence of good moral character, and those coming from other 
colleges must present letters of honorable dismissal. 

From the point of view of scholarship, students are admitted to 
Milligan College in one of three ways: 

First — By certificate from the Milligan Academy, no examina- 
• tion whatever required in this case. 

Second — By certificate showing at least fifteen units of work 
from a High School or Preparatory School accredited by the State 
University of the state in which said school is located. Students 
admitted in this way are placed upon a probationary requirement 
which provides that a failure to make the usual number of credits 
during the first session involves the student in the entrance examina- 
tions outlined below. 

Third — By examination. The examination covers the follow- 
ing requirements: 

I — English, three units. 

(a) Grammar and Composition (i unit). Spelling, Punctu- 
ation, Paragraphing, Syntax complete. The fundamental principles 
of Rhetoric and Composition. The ability to write easy descriptions 
and narrations, 

(b) Outline course in English and American Literature, (I 
unit). The history of the more important periods and some knowl- 
edge of the authors and their representative works. Such knowledge 
as should be gained from a good one-volume text in the history of 
English Literature with collateral reading. 

(c) College Entrance Requirements in English, (i unit). 
For reading, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and The Merchant of Ven- 
ice; Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Scott's Ivanhoc; George Eliot's 
Silas Marner; Irving's Sketch Book: DeQuincey's Joan of Arc, and 
Coleridge's Ancient Mariner; Scott's Lady of the Lake. For study 
and practice, Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comas and 



30 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Shorter Poems; Burke's Conciliation; Macaulay's Life of Johnson; 
Carl34e's Essay on Burns. 

(a) Algebra, (i unit). A good elementary text to quadratics. 
Thorough knowledge of factoring, least common multiple and linear 
equations, both numeral and literal, containing one or more unknown 
quantities. 

(b) Plane Geometry, complete, (i unit). 

(c) Solid Geometry, (1-2 unit). 

(d) Advanced Algebra, (1-2 unit). 

Algebra from quadratics, Progressions. Binominal Theorem. 
Ratio and Proportion. One-half jear's work with a comparatively 
advanced text. 

Ill — History, three units. 

(a) Ancient History, including one year's work, five hours 
per week, in the history of Greece and Rome, (i unit). 

(b) Mediasval and Modern History, (i unit). 

One year's work with a satisfactory text, five hours per week. 

(c) American History and Civil Government, (i unit). 
A full year's work, five hours per week. 

Other work in history of an equivalent grade will be accepted, 
providing credits show the time spent in the study to be the same as 
required here. 

IV — Science, three and one-half units. 

(a) Physics, (one unit). An elementary course, pursued one 
full year, with labratory demonstrations. 

(b) Chemistry, (i unit). A course similar to the requirements 
in Physics. 

(c) Botany, (1-2 unit). A half year's outline course. 

(d) Zoology, (1-2 unit). A half j-ear's outline course. 

(e) Physiography, (1-2 unit). The subject complete. 
V — Latin, four units. 

(a) Grammar and Composition, Easy translation, (i unit). 

(b) Caesar, four books, with Composition, (i unit). 

(c) Cicero, six orations with drill in syntax, (i unit). 

(d) Vergil, six books with prosody, (i unit). 
VI — Modern Languages, four units. 

Two years full work in either French or German, embracing 
a thorough knowledge of the forms, together with ordinary skill in 
composition, and the ability to read easy prose at sight. Two units 
credit given in either language, but no entrance credit given for a 
single year's work considered alone. 



Mtlligan College Year-Book 31 

Fifteen units are required for admission, of which three must 
be offered In English, two in Mathematics, two In Foreign Languages, 
one In HIstorjr and one In Science. 1 he remainder must be selected 
in harmony with the particular course elected for pursuit in the Col- 
lege, as outlined below. 

Matriculatio7i of Students. 

Students upon their arrival should report at once to the President 
of the College In the College Office. The President wall fill out 
the proper blanks and then send the student to the Treasurer; after 
receiving the receipt of the latter for the term fees (see item "Ex- 
penses" under "Miscellaneous Information") the matriculate will 
go to the Secretary of the College who will enroll him upon the per- 
manent records of the institution, thereby completing the matricu- 
lation. 

Requirements for Degrees. 

The full requirements for the various undergraduate degrees 
are given in tablulated form, elsewhere in the Catalogue. 

For the degree of Master of Arts, the student must have 
received the B. A. degree, and must pursue at least two full years' 
work under the special direction of the Faculty. The preparation of 
a satisfactory thesis Is also required. For the degree of Master of 
Science, the possession of some other academic degree than that of B. 
A,, together with the completion of two full years' graduate stud}^ 
and a satisfactory thesis, are required. 

Tabulated Requirements for the Different Degrees 

(In every case the necessary fifteen units required for admlssioa 
to the College are presupposed). 

The Classical Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) 

Sixteen College years, meaning sixteen college studies, each of 
which has been pursued not less than four recitation periods per week 
for thirty-six weeks, selected according to the following schedule: 

Ancient Languages 5 

Mathematics 2 

English 3 

Philosophy 2 

Bible I 

Electives ^^ 

(At least one elective must be in Language work). 



32 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 



The Literary Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Literature (B. Lit.) 

English 4 

Modern Languages 4 

Philosophy 2 

Mathematics 2 

Bible I 

Electives 3 

The Scientific Course 

Mathematics and Science 5 

(Not less than two in Mathematics.) 

English 3 

History 2 

Bible ' I 

Philosophy 2 

Electives 3 



SCHEDULE OF COUBSES (COLLEGE) LEADING TO THE DIF- 
FERENT DEGEEES 



Classical (B. A.) 

Greek I 
Latin IV 
English V 
Mathematics III 

Greek II 
English VI 
Mathematics IV 
Latin V 
English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
Greek III 



Philosophy II 
Three Electives 



Literary (B. Lit.) 

Freshman Year 

English V 

Mathematics III 

French III 

German I 
Sophomore Year 
English VI 
Mathematics IV 
French IV 
German II 
English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
One Elective 

Senior Year 
English VIII 
Philosophy II 
Two Electives 



Scientific (B. S.) 

English V 

Mathematics III 

History IV 

Science V 

English VI 

Mathematics IV 

History V 

One Elective 

English VII 

Philosophy I 

Bible I 

One Elective In 

Math, or Science 

Philosophy II 

Mathematics V 

Two Electives 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 33 

(German III and IV may be offered as substitutes for French 
III and IV in the Literarj' Course, in which Case French I and French 
II must be offered in the place of German I and German II in the 
schedule.) 



COURSES OF INSTBUCTION BY DEPARTMEXTS 
I 

2 he Greek Language and Literature 

Professor Ellis 

Greek I First Term — Beginners' Course. White's First Greek 
Book. 
Second Term — White's First Greek Book completed. 
Greek II First Term — Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-III. Good- 
win's Greek Grammar. Jones' Greek Prose Composition. 
Second Term — Homer's Iliad, Books I-III. Grammar and 
Composition. 
Greek III First Term — Plato's Apology, Ljsias' Orations, Gram- 
mar and Composition. 
Second Term — Demosthenes' Phi Hi pics. Grammar and Compo- 
sition. 
Greek IV First Term — Homer's Odyssey, Aeschylus' Pronuthus 
Bound, Review of Greek Syntax. 
Second Term — Sophocles' Antigone, Euripides' Iphigenia in 

Tauris. Jebb's Primer of Greek Literature. 
Advanced courses in both Greek and Latin will he offered to stu- 
dents desiring and prepared to take them. 

Students so desiring may use Greek I and II as part of the 
required fifteen units for admission to the College providing the full 
sixteen years of College credits required for a degree are superimposed 
upon the entrance credit. 



II 

The Latin Language and Literature 

Professor Ellis 

Latin V First Term— Cicero, De Amicitia and De Senectute. 
— Livy, Books I and XXI. 



34 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar and Prose Composition one hour 
per week during the year. 
Latin VI First Term — Horace, Odes, Book I-IV. 

Second Term — Tactus, Agricola and Germania.. Latin Prose 
Composition. 
Latin VII First Term — Selected Plajs of Plautus and Terence. 

Second Term — Extracts from Latin Authors not previously 

read. History of Latin Literature. 
Students offering only three years Latin as part of the required 
fifteen units for admission to the College may use fourth year Latin 
in the academy as a college credit. 



Ill 

The English Language and Literature 
President Utterback, Miss McBride, Professor Garrett 

English V First Term — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition, with 
study of English Prose. Assigned reading from special 
texts with written exercises upon them. Thorough drill 
in theme work. 
Second Term — English Prose. A study of the essay as exem- 
pilified in the work of the English reviewers. Biographical 
and historical literature, with assigned collateral reading 
and theme work. 

English VI First Term — The Drama. A study of technique as 
well as the greater masterpieces of the Elizabethan epoch 
for their purely literay value. Early Miracle and Morality 
plays. yiarlQwe'sTamburlaine and Faustus. Shakespeare's 
Early Plays. 
Second Term— The Drama continued. Middle and Later plays 
of Shakespeare. Ben Jonson and the close of the Eliza- 
bethan epoch. 

English VII First Term — Epic and Lyric Poetry, with special study 
of the Romantic Period in English Literature. The struc- 
ture of the Epic, with careful study of Paradise Lost as 
compared with the Iliad, the Aeneid and the Divine Coinedy. 
"TheExcursion and Prelude of Wordsworth. 
Second Term — The structure of the Lyric, with careful and 
detailed study of the work of Shelley, Burns and Keats. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 35 

English VIII First Term — Nineteenth Century Poetry and Drama, 
Byron, Keats and Tenn\son. The decadence of the older 
type of drama. 

Second Term — Robert Browning. The Dramatic Monologue. 
Careful study of the Dramatic Lyrics and The Ring and 
the Book. 
English IX First Term — Early English and Anglo-Saxon. Care 
ful study of Anglo-Saxon forms. Readings from Beowulf 
and Caedmon. Selections from Chaucer and his contem- 
poraries. 

Second Term — Prose Fiction. The Short Story, and the tech- 
nique of the Novel. Assigned reading for analysis of the 
Masterpieces of English fiction. 
English X First Term — Present Day Drama. George Bernard 
Shaw, Stephen Phillips, Pinero. Tendencies of the mod- 
ern draamtic movements. 

Second Term — Present Day Fiction. The Modern Novel. 
Magazine and Short Story writing. The demands of 
modern journalism. Literature as a profession. 

{The course in English Lang and Literature subject to change. 



IV 

The French Language and Literature, 

Miss McBride 

French I First Term — Elementary French. Text used : Eraser & 
Squair's Grammar. Careful attention to pronunciation. 
Second Term — Grammar completed. Labiche & Martin's Le 
Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon. Merimee's Coluniba. 
French II First Term — French Prose. Daudet's Tartaria de Tara- 
scon, Hugo's Les Miscrables, Souvestre's Philosophic Sur 
Les Toits, Blanchand's French Idioms. 
Second Term — Continuation of First. 
French III First Term — French Prose. Selected readings from 
Dumas, Hugo, Moliere, De iVlaupassant. 
Second Term — Continuation of First. 
French IV First Terrm — History of French Literature. Early 
French Tales and Ballads. 
Second Term — French Essayists and critics. Study of work of 
Tanied and others. 



36 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

V 

The German Language and Literature 

Miss McBride 

German I First Term — Joynes Me'issnerj German Grammar, Nie- 
butir's Hroengeschichten. 
Second Term — Grammar complete to Part III. Storm's 
lonmenseej Hej'se's L' Arabiats. 
German II First Term — Grammar completed from Part III to end. 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jungfrau von Orleans. 
Second Term — Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn, Schiller's Der 
Neffe als Oukel. 
German III First Term — The German Drama. A careful study 
of the masterpieces of Goete, Schiller and Lessing. Wallen- 
stein, Maria Stuart, Nathan der Weise. 
Second Term — Egniont, Faust (Parts I and II), Torquato 
Tasso. German Conversation. 
German IV First Term — History of German Literature. Old and 
Middle High German. 
Secsond Term — Readings from the German Philosophers; Kant, 
Fische, Schopenhauer. Conversation. 



VI 

Mathematics 

Professor Cole, Mr. Calhoon 

Matematics III First Term — Algebra from Quadratics. Permu- 
tations and Combinations. Binominal Theorem. Series. 
Theory of Equations and Determinants. 
Second Term — Solid Geometry, complete. 

{Mathematics III will be accepted as either a College or an 
Academy credit). 
Mathematics IV First Term — Plain and Spherical Trigonometry. 
The Trigometric ratios. Solution of Trigonometric 
Equations. Solution of Triangles and use of Tables. 
Second Term — Elementary Analytical Geometry. The straight 
line. General equation of the firts. degree in tv/o vari- 
ables. 



MiLLicAN College Year-Book 37 

Mathematics J' First Term — Conic Sections. The Ellipse and 
Parabola, Analytical Geometr}^ of three dimensions. 
Second Term — Differential Calculus. Careful study of the 
functions of one variable. 

Mathematics VI First Term — Integral Calculus. 
Second Term — History of Mathematics. 



VII 

History 

President Utterback, Prof. Garrett, Miss McBride 

History IV First Term — History of Greece. This course consists 
of lectures and a study of the principal events in Grecian 
History from the earliest times until the Roman Subjuga- 
tion. 

Second Term — History of Rome. Lectures and a study of the 
principal events of Roman History from the foundation of 
the city to the death of Theodosius. Particular attention 
is given to the development of Roman political institutions. 

History V First Term — History of England. Lectures and a study 
of the political, industrial, religious, educational and social 
institutions of England from the earliest times to George V. 

Second Term — Outline of Medieval and Modern History. Lec- 
tures and a study of the successive phases of social, religious, 
political and constitutional developments since A. D. 476. 
Special attention will be given to one or two modern periods, 
such as the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era, or the 
Period of English Reform. 

History VI First Term — Political History of the United States — 
1 750- 1 890. 

Second Term — American Institutions. This course aims to 
give the student some idea of the framework of the Amer- 
ican Government, state and national. The President, 
Congress, the Courts and the outline of state government 
receive most careful attention, and are further elucidated 
by a brief historical account of the growth of the Consti- 
tution. 



38 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

VIII 

Natural Science 

Professor Cole, Professor Garrett 

Science III First Term — General Physics. Elementary Mechanics, 
Sound, Light, Heat, Electricity and Magnetism. Experi- 
mental demonstrations. 
Second Term — The above concluded. 
Science IV First Term — General Chemistry. The fundamental 
principles and phenomena of inorganic and physical Chem- 
istry. Laboratory work. 
Second Term — The above concluded. 
Science V First Term — General Geology. A general discussion of 
dj^namical, structural, physiographical and historical 
geology. 
Second Term — Mineralogy and Crystallography. Outline 
course, field and labratory work. 



IX 

Philosophy 
President Utterback, Professor Cole 

Philosophy I First Term — Logic, Deductive and Inductive, with 
careful study of the laws of though and the inductive 
process. 
Second Term — General Psychology. The special problems of 
consciousness. 

Philosophy II First Term— Ethics. A study of the Moral Ideal as 
viewed by both Hedonists and Rationalists, as well as an 
analysis of the Moral Life. Lectures, with Seth'sEthical 
Principles as a guide. 
Second Term — Economics. The Problems of Currency, Trans- 
portation, Taxation, etc., as applied to present day life. 

Philosophy III First Term — The History of Philosophy. Ancient 
Philosophy from Heraclitus to Neo-Platonism. Medieval 
Philosophy, Scholasticisf, Aquinas, Abelard and Duns 
Scotus. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 39 

Second Term — Modern Philosophy, from Descartes to Herbert 
Spencer and Eucken. Special study of the Critical Period 
and the works of Kant. 
Philosophy IV First Term — Outline Course in Philosophy. Ele- 
ments of Epistemology. Outline of the Theory of Knowl- 
edge. The Categories of the Obiective and the Subjective 
Worlds. 

Second Term — Outline Course in Metaphj'sics. General theo- 
ries of the Universe. The constant element in Philosophy. 
A critical examination of the Agnostic, Posltivistic, Panthe- 
istic and Thelstic positions. 
Philosophy V First Term — Elements of Sociology. A study of the 
organization of Society, Its self-maintenance, self-perpetua- 
tion, and self-gratification. Mental and social relations. 
The origin of civilization and the development of institutions 
treated in the light of historical anthropology and eth- 
nology. 

Second Term — (a) A study of the American City and Its rela- 
tion to Democracy, (b) Crime, Corrections and Charities. 

(Philosophy V three hours per week.) 
Philosophy VI First Term — Aesthetics and the History of Art. 
Elementary principles of Aesthetics. Definition of Art. 
The Fine Arts. Study of Architecture and Sculpture In 
ancient and modern times. 

Second Term — The History of Painting In the Ancient and 
Modern World. Special attention paid to the Italian 
Renaissance. Lectures with lantern Illustrations of the 
masterpieces of Leonardo, Michael Angelo, Raphael and 
Titian. The present status of painting. 



X 

Education 

President Utterback, Prof. Cole 

Education I First Term — The History and Principles of Education. 
Text book, lectures and selected reading, and class room 
discussion. The object of this course is to study the evolu- 
tion of the educational ideal in connection with the condi- 
tions In which It had its origin and amid which it developed. 



40 MiLLiGAN College Year-Eook 

Specal attention is given to the systems of education in 
Greece and Rome, in Europe during the Middle Ages, the 
Renaissance and the Reformation, and in Modern Ger- 
many, France, England and America. Phj^sical environ- 
ment, social, industrial and political conditions, traditions, 
customs, and religion, have had their influence in determin- 
ing racial development, one phase of which has found its 
expression, during the different periods, in the educational 
systems of the several nations. These systems are analyzed 
as revealing epochal and national ideals, the w^ritings of 
individuals being studied for their contribution to and inter- 
pretation of these systems. 
Second Term — Elementary and Secondary Education, The 
theory and practice of teaching in the elementary and sec- 
ondary schools, and the applications of the principles of 
teaching, are special features of this course. Reports, dis- 
cussions, observation and practice, with supervision and 
criticism. 

Education II First Term — Methods of instruction in elementary 
and secondary schools. Lectures, selected readings, reports 
and class room discussion. The aim of this course is to 
investigathe the learning process as a basis for the study of 
the factors in successful teaching. 

Education III First Term — Introduction to the Philosophy of Edu- 
cation. Results of investigation in Psychology, Biology, 
Neurology, Anthropology, Ethnology and Sociology w^ill be 
interpreted in their relation to Education. (Graduate). 
Second Term — Administration. A study of the national, state 
and city systems ; public finance and education ; school build- 
ings and equipment. The supervision and employment of' 
teachers. The relation between school, home and society. 
The educational systems and policies of the Southern States 
are considered in detail. (Graduate). 



Bible 
President Utterback and 



Bible I First Term — Old Testament History, Genesis to Judges, 
with careful study of the Hebrew Law and the development 
of national life. 



MiLLicAN College Year-Book 41 

Second Term — The Monarch}' from Its founding to its dissolu- 
tion. Careful study of Hebrew Literature and the writings 
of the Prophets. 
Bible 11 First Term — New Testament History. The period 
between the Old and New Testaments. History of the 
Maccabees and Herod. The life of Christ to the Sermon 
on the Mount. 

Second Term — The Life of Christ during the Middle and Later 
periods. Careful study of the text of the individual Gospels. 

Other courses in the Robert Milligan Bible School are also open 
to students of the College proper. 



n 

THE EOBEiST MILLIGAN BIBLE SCHOOL 

The Robert Milligan Bible School has grown out of the needs 
of religious work in the South. Its aim is to furnish an adequate 
preparation for the ministry of the Gospel on the part of those who 
complete the work assigned. The ideals which govern those who 
have charge of the school are entirely opposed to any legalistic or 
formalistic interpretation of Christianity. On the contrary, they 
assume that the one need of the world today is the vital, living 
Christ, with His message of supreme tenderness and love. To see 
somewhat of that message, to become enthused with it, and to go 
forth to proclaim it to the world, they conceive to be the mission 
of the preacher. The school aims always at thoroughness of prep- 
aration and accuracy of scholarship rather than mere numercial 
display. It appeals to all those who have the ideal of quality rather 
than quantity in the ministry. 

Unswerving fidelity to the Word, and thorough devotion to the 
Christ are the appropriate watchwords of a school bearing the name 
of one of the noblest of all God's noblemen since the apostolic 
age. And surely no place could be better adapted by location and 
environment to preserve and cherish the spirit of Robert Milligan 
than the spot which bears his honored name. 



Requirements for Admission 

To enter the Freshman Class of the Robert Milligan Bible 
School, a student must give evidence, b\ examination or otherwise. 



42 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

that he has completed satisfactorily the College Preparatory require- 
ments in English, Mathematics, History and Science. 



Ecctttirements for Graduation 

The Robert Milligan Bible School does not confer degrees. It 
does, however, grant an appropriate diploma upon the completion 
of either the Classical or the English course. These diplomas are 
certificates of merit, and carry with them quite as much value as 
the usual academic degrees. Graduates in either course, with very 
little additional work, may secure the regular degrees conferred 
by the College upon completing the required courses of study. The 
fee for the Bible School Diploma is $3.00. 



Curriculum 



The Robert Milligan Bible School offers two distinct courses. 
The first, entitled the English Ministerial, is designed for those 
students who wish to prepare for the ministry without being able to 
take Greek or other classical work. The second, entitled the Clas- 
sical Ministerial, is designed for those who wish to pursue the classics 
in connection with the ministerial studies proper. The courses are 
as follows : 



EnglTsh Ministerial 

Freshman Year First Term — English V, Old Testament History, 
History IV, Mathematics III. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Sophomore Year First Term — English VI, New Testament History, 
History V, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Junior Year First Term — Apostolic History, English VII, Philos- 
ophy I, Practical Work of the Minister. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Senior Year First Term — English VIII, Church History, Exegesis, 
Philosophy II. 
Second Term — English VIII, Church History, Homiletics, 

Philosophy II. 
The courses in Bible School Pedagogy and Missions are also 
required in order to receive a diploma. 



MiLLiGAN' College Year-Book 43 

Classical 3Iinisterial 

Freshman Year First Term — Greek I, English V, Old Testament 
History, Mathematics III. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Sophomore Year First Term — New Testament Greek I, New Tes- 
tament History, English VI, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Junior Year First Term — New Testament Greek II, Apostolic 
History, English VII, Philosophy I, Pratctical Work of 
the Minister. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Senior Year First Term — English VIII, Philosophy II, Church 
History, Exegesis, one elective. 
Second Term — English VIII, Philosophy II, Church History, 

Homiletics, one elective. 
The courses in Bible School Pedagogy and IVIissions are also 
required in order to receive a diploma. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF I\STRCCTIO-\ 
I 

School of Sacred History 
President Utterback, Prof 



Course I — Old Testament History. The History of the Jewish 
people from the Creation of the World to the Captivity. Text- 
books — The Authorized and American Revised editions of the Holy 
Scriptures with MacLear'sOW Testament History as a guide. Selec- 
tions from the Old Testament are read and critically studied in this 
class. For 1912 the books studied will be The Psalms. Ecclesiastes. 
and the Prophecy of Isiah. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course II — New Testament History. Sacred History from the 
Dispersion to the Resurrection. Textbooks — The Gospels, Author- 
ized and American Revised editions, with MacLear's Neu> Testament 
History as a guide. Lectures with chart outline and a critical study 
of one of the Apocryphal Books and at least one of the Gospels. 
The Gospel studied in 19 12 will be Luke. Two terms — five hours 
weekly. 

Course HI — Apostolic History. The History of the Church 



44 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

from the Day of Pentecost until the close of the New Testament 
Canon. Textbooks — The Acts and Epistles, Authorized and Amer- 
ican Revised editions. Lectures with careful reading and study of 
selected Epistles. Two terms — four hours weekly. 

Course IV — Church History since the Apostolic Period. 
Church History from the death of the Apostle John to the present 
time. Special attention given to the Reformation and the later resto- 
ration movements. Lectures. Two terms — four hours weekly. 



II 

School of Exegesis and Christian Doctrine 
President Utterback, Prof. . 

Course I — New Testament Exegesis. Careful study of the prin- 
ciples of Hermeneutics with exegesis of selected portions of the 
Scriptures. Lectures. One Term — four hours weekly. 

Course II — Christian Doctrine and Polity. Two terms. 

First Term — The Content of Christianity. A careful study of 
the essential message of Christ, with a scrutiny of the ideals of life 
He strove to inculcate. 

Second Term — The Form of Christianity. A study of the 
Ordinances, Creed and Polity of the Christian Church. Lectures. 
Four hours weekly. 



Ill 

School of Applied Christianity 
Professor Crouch and . 

Course I — Practical work of the Minister, (a) Pastoral duties, 
(b) The Sunday School, (c) Evangelism, (d) Missions. Lectures. 
This course will be given by an eminently practical and successful 
minister, who will embody his personal experience in his teachings.. 
Two terms — two hours weekly. 

Course II — Theoretical Homiletics. Lectures, with Johnson's 
The Ideal Ministry as a guide. One term — three hours weekly. 

Course III — The Social Mission of Jesus. The Message of 
Christ for the shifting social conditions of the present day. Mission 
work in the large cities, tenement life, etc. Lectures. One term — 
three hours weekly. (Elective). 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 45 

IV 
School of Biblical Greek 
Professor Ellis 

(Not required for English Certificate.) 

Course I — Beginner's Course. White's First Greek Book com- 
pleted. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course II — The Greek New Testament, with composition. 
Exegetical study of the Gospels. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course III — The Greek New Testament completed. Critical 
study of the Acts and Epistles. Two terms — five hours weekly. 



V 

School of Bible School Pedagogy 

Professor J. E. Crouch 

The work of the Bible School in all of its departments out- 
lined by one of the best known authorities. Milligan College 
maintains a Front Rank Bible School as a Training Department, 
and emphasizes the Bible School in every possible way. Professor 
Crouch will deliver the lectures, during 1912-13, outlined in Part II 
of this Catalogue. 



VI 

School of Missions 

To Be Supplied. 

A study of Modern Missions and Methods, conducted by one 
of the foremost of American authorities. (Lecture list given under 
Part II). Professor Paul will also conduct studies in Missionary 
Methods and Problems while at Milligan. Studies in Barton's The 
Unfinished Task, with collateral reading, will be conducted through- 
out the year. 



VII 

School of Evangelism 

To Be Supplied. 

Studies in Modern Evangelistic Methods and Problems, by a suc- 
cessful Pastor-Evangelist. The subject will be handled also in the 



46 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

course under Practical Problems of the Minister. Practical evange- 
listic methods constitute a part of the regular study of the ministerial 
student at Milligan. Students are encouraged to hold meetings at 
near-by mission points under competent direction. A large section 
of the country adjoining Milligan has been evangelized in this way. 



Ill 
THE ACADEMY 



Two objects are kept in view in arranging the courses of study 
and directing the Academy: first, to offer preparation for College, 
which will be suficient in quality to admit a student to the Fresh- 
man Class of any College or University; second, to provide for young 
men and women who may be denied the advantage of a college course, 
as much training and culture as is possible in a four year's course of 
academic work in secondary school. 

The courses of study are arranged to meet the individual 
needs of the student. Under the advice of the director of the Acad- 
emy, every opportunity is afforded the student to progress in his 
work of preparation as rapidly as is consistent w^ith thoroughness 
and good scholarship. 

The work and discipline of the Academy is under the supervision 
of the Dean of the College, who is ex officio director of the prepara- 
tory schools. The Academy is in close touch with the College. The 
President and Faculty of the College also give special attention to 
the work of the Academy and in certain subjects the instruction is by 
College professors. In every department, the instruction is thorough, 
and special effort is made that the student may at all times feel the 
personal impress of the instructor. The students of the Academy 
enjoy all the privileges of the library and reading room, and the 
advantages of the athletics of the college. 

The young ladies attending the Academy from abroad are re- 
quired, except when other arrangements are allowed by the President, 
to reside in the Mee Memorial Hall, which is a pleasant home of 
refined influences. 



Study Hall 



Students are required to study in the Study Hall provided for 
the purpose, under the scheduled regulations, unless excused by the 
Director of the Academv. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 47 

Admission 

Completion of the course of study in the elementary schools is 
required for admission to the Academy. Certificates from teachers 
or school officers certifying that the student has completed the work 
in Elementary English Grammar, Practical Arithmetic, United States 
History and Complete Geography will ordinarily be accepted in lieu 
of examination in these subjects. Students wishing to enter without 
such certificates may be examined on these subjects during the first 
three days of school. Students conditioned in one or more of the 
above named studies will have to make up that condition in the 
Elementary School during the first year of the Academy course. 



Choice of Courses 

Students may, by and with the advice and consent of the Director 
of the Academy, choose a course of study differing from the Curricu- 
lum ; but when the course is chosen and the classes entered, no change 
will be made after the beginning of the fourth week of school. The 
work of each course should be taken in order from the beginning, but 
the Director for sufficient reasons may give permission to vary the 
order. 



Substitntlous 



Studies in one course may be substituted for those of another 
provided the credit is the same, and the Director is satisfied that the 
substitution will be for the best; but in the Classical and Literary 
courses, no substitution will be made for Latin. In the third and 
fourth years, Greek may be substituted for equivalent units other 
than Latin. 

A credit or unit means the equivalent of five prepared recita- 
tions a w^eek for one scholastic year or not less than one hundred and 
fifty (150) recitations, two periods of laboratory work being consid- 
ered equivalent to one period of recitation work. 



Rhetoric.! Is and Exercises 

All the students shall perform Rhetorical work throughout the 
year under the direction of the Director of the Academy. 



48 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Gfr-iiduation 

Students who satisfactorily complete a course of study offered in 
the Academy shall be granted a diploma certifying the fact, but in 
all cases the conduct of a student must be satisfactory before the 
honors of graduation can be conferred. 



Scliedule of Studies 

Below is submitted a schedule of studies. Each course contin- 
ues throughout one year, unless otherwise stated. 

The average amount of Mork required of each student is twenty 
periods in recitation per week. No student will be assigned less 
work than this except for reason. 

FIRST YEAR 

Classical — Latin I, Mathematics I, Science I, English I. 
Literar}^ — Latin I, Mathematics I, Science I, English L 
Scientific — French I, Mathematics I, Science I, English L 

SECOND YEAR 

Classical — Latin II, Mathematics II, History I, English II. 
LIterar}- — Latin II, Mathematics II, Lllstory I, English II. 
Scientific — French II, Mathematics II, History I, 
English 11. 

THIRD YEAR 

Classical — Latin III, History II, Science III, English III. 
Literary — French I or German I, History II, Science III, 

English HI. 
Scientific — German I, Science II, Science III, English III. 

FOURTH YEAR 

Classical — Latin IV, History III, Science IV, English IV. 
Literary — French II or German II, History HI, Science 

IV, English IV. 
Science — German II, History III, Science IV, English IV. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 49 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



LATIN 



Latin I — Hale's First Latin Book is completed ; especial attention 
paid to vocabulary and forms. Two terms. 

Latin II — Four books of Caesar's Gallic IVar are read. Emphasis 
Is constantly laid on accuracy in declensions and conjugations. 
Prose composition (Bennett) — two written exercises per week. 

Two terms. 

Latin III — The whole year is devoted to Cicero's Orations, The 
four against Cataline and the Manilian Law and Archias are 
read. Special attention is given to Latin Subjunctive. Bennett's 
Latin Grammar. Prose composition one hour per week. Two 
terms. 

Latin IV — First six books of Vergil's Aeneid are read. Constant 
practice in scanning is given. Special attention is given to Ver- 
gil's syntax. Derivation and composition of words are studied 
during this year. Latin Composition. Two terms. 

ENGLISH 

English — Composition and Grammatical Analysis. Thorough review 
of the forms. Special attention paid to inaccuracies of speech and 
writing. Drill work in syntax, punctuation, and paragraphing. 
Two terms. 

English II — First Term: Elementary Rhetoric. The essentials of 
Narration, Description, Exposition, and Argumentation. One 
term. Second Term: Outlines of English and American Lit- 
erature (Westlake). Composition work once per week. One 
term. Outside readings in literature throughout the year. 

English III — -The History of English Literature. Pancoast's Repre- 
sentative English Literature with collateral reading. All the 
College Entrance Requirements in English are read and studied 
in Courses H and HL Two terms. 

English IV — The History of American Literature. Pancoast's Intro- 
duction with outside collateral reading. Theme work through- 
out the year. Two terms. 
(Either Academy or College credit.) When offered as the 

latter, three additional years of College English are required In the 

Classical and Scientific courses, and four additional years of College 

English, in the Literary Course. 



50 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

FRENCH 

French I — First Term: Elementary French. Textbook work in 
Grammar, and the reading of simple texts. Careful attention 
to pronunciation. Second Term: Grammar completed. Meri- 
mee's Columba. Erckmann-Chatrian's Le Juif Polonais, 
Lamartine's Scenes de la Revolution Francaise. 

Fi'ench II — First Term: French Prose. Erckmann-Chatrian's 
Madame Therese and Waterloo. George Sand's La Mare an 
Diable. Merimee's Chronique du Regne de Charles IX. Victor 
Hugo's Bug Jar gal. Second Term: The French Drama 
Selected plays of Moliere, Corneille and Racine. Victor 
Hugo's Riiy Bias. 

GERMAN 

German I — First Term : Bierwirth's Beginning German. Easy 
reading and composition. Muller and Wenckebach's Gluck 
Auf. Second Term: Thomas' Practical German Grammar. 
Heyse's UArrabiata. Hauff's Tales. Easy prose. 

German II — First Term : Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jungfrau 
von Orleans. Careful review of forms, and composition. Schef- 
fel's Der Trompeter von Sakkingen. Second Term: German 
Prose. Riehl's Burg Neideck. Freytag's Soil und Ilaben. 
Fulda's Der Talisman, and similar texts. 

MATHEMATICS 

I — Elementary Algebra, 

The four fundamental operations^ equations of the first degree 
with one unknown quantity. Simultaneous equations of the first 
degree, factors, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, 
fractions, including complex fractions, involution and evolution, 
theory of exponents (positive, negative, fractional and zero), radicals, 
including imaginaries, equations involving radicals, quadratic equa- 
tions involving one unknown quantit}'. Two terms. 

// — Plane Geometry. 

Wentworth's Plane Geometry is used as a text in this course. 
The work includes all the propositions which are demonstrated in 
the text-book. Nearly all the exercises are worked, including those 
for demonstration, construction and computation. Books I to V are 
completed. Two terms. 



MiLLIGAN COLLEGIE YeAR-BoOK 51 

HISTORY 

I — Ancient History: Text-book and recitations during the 
year. The scope of this subject shall include the history from the 
beginning to 800 A. D. Two terms. 

II — Modern History: From 800 A. D. to the present time. 
Text-book and recitations throughout the year. Two terms. 

Ill — American History: (a) From the European discovery 
of the New World, with especial attention in the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries to the British empire in America. After the 
Revolution, the History and Civil Government of the United States 
are studied. One term. 

(b) Civics: Lectures and text-book on general civil govern- 
ment of the United States and of the States, Counties and Munici- 
palities. One term. 

SCIENCE 

I — (a) Zoology: Vertebrate and invertebrate Zoology are 
studied by means of a text-book. Laboratory work. One term, 
(b) Botany: Text-book and Laboratory work. One term. 

II — (a) Physical Geography: Text-book and laboratory and 
field work. One term. 

(b) Astronomy: Elementary Astronomy. One term. 

Ill — Physics: One year of study devoted to Elementary 
Physics. Text-book and laboratory work. Two terms. 
Pre-requisites : Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

IV — Chemistry: One year's work offered in Elementary Chem- 
istry by text-book, lectures, recitations and laboratory work. At least 
four laboratory periods are held each week. Two terms. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



The Elementary School is divided into two departments, viz: — 
the Primary and Grammar Schools. The primary includes the first 
four grades or years in school. The Grammar School includes from 
the fifth to eighth inclusive. 

The course of study for the Elementary School will be furnished 
upon application. 



52 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



BEPABTMEXT OF MTSIC 

Miss Marcelena Houston 
Piano 

The Method of Pianoforte instruction pursued is the "Flexible 
wrist loose-arm system," inaugurated by Mendelssohn, Chopin and 
Talburg, and continued by Liszt and his pupils. Technical and 
theoretical instruction are combined, and constant reference is made 
to Musical Dictionaries and Encyclopedias. 

Two thirty-minute lessons or one forty-minute lesson per week 
will be given in the Music Department is accordance with arrange- 
ments mutually satisfactory to teacher and pupil. 

Recitals will be given by the pupils during the school j'ear, to 
w^hich the patrons and friends of the College are invited. 

Voice Culture 

The aim of our method is, first to develop the voice throughout 
its entire compass, then to perfect it. We teach the proper use and 
extent of the registers of the voice, diaphragmatic breathing, and pure 
flexible tone. Tone is the chief aim during the entire course of 
study. The peculiarities presented by different voices are directed 
and modified, each according to it sown nature. 

MUSICAL CURRICULUM 

FIRST GRADE— Sartorio, Practical Method. Gaynor's 
"Melody Pictures." Kohler, "Easy Studies," "Little Pieces" by 
Spaulding, Richter, Streabog. 

SECOND GRADE— Studies; Duvernoy, Loeschhorn, Kohler. 
Simple pieces by Schumann, Haj'den, Chopin, Heller, Lange. 

THIRD GRADE— Studies: Czerney, "Etudes de la Velo- 
cite;" Heller, "Etudes Loeschhorn." Composition of Jenson, Jung- 
mann, Bohm, Schumann, Mozart, Clementi, Kroeger, and other 
composers. 

FOURTH GRADE— Studies: Cramer, "Etudes," four books; 
Heller, "The Art of Phrasing;" Bach, "Little Preludes." The Com- 
positions of Chopin, Grieg, Godard, Mendelssohn, Rubenstein, and 
Liszt, are carefully studied in this grade, special attention being given 
to interpretation and technics. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 53 

FIFTH GRADE— Studies: Bach, "Two Part Inventions;" 
Clement!, "Gradus ad Parnassum;" Kullak, "Octave Studies." 
Difficult compositions of Bach, Beethoven, Liszt, Grieg, Raff and 
MacDowell are studied in this grade, 

A thorough knowledge of the Elements of Harmony is required 
for the completion of this grade. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music (Mus B.), comple- 
tion of the entire Music Course is required, together with two years 
of Harmony, and one j^ear of Theory and History of Music. Grad- 
uates of Music are also required to give a public Recital, unassisted, 
previous to graduation. 



VI 
COaCttERCIAL DEPARTME>T 

To Be Supplied. 

The aim of the Commercial Department Is to be complete and 
practical. The courses are designed, work outlined, text-books select- 
ed, and everything planned with the one design of giving the student 
everything necessary In training and equipment, to enable him to fill 
completely the positions In the actual commercial world of today, 
for which the work he takes is supposed to be a preparation, and to 
tax his time and energies with as little as possible that Is not directly 
useful. The courses usually offered in Business Colleges throughout 
the country, are taught here as follows: 

I— STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING 

(a) SHORTHAND. There is a great deal of irrelevant, 
polemical discussion indulged in over the merits of different short- 
hand systems. We do not believe the matter of choice of system to 
be nearly so vital as diligant application to the one selected, until Its 
principles have become mastered by study and their application has 
grown natural and easy through practice. We give students their 
choice of either the Graham or the Gregg systems. The former is 
^usually conceded to be the most rapid of the Pitmanic systems; while 
the latter is the best known, and we believe, everything considered, the 
best, of the light-line positionless systems. The course consists of 
the regular texts with practice matter for dictation work. 



54 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

(b) TYPEWRITING. Typewriting by touch Is so f^r and 
so obviously superior to the old method, that we compel all students 
to learn "absolute touch," and deal shortly with any indications of a 
tendency to drift Into the clumsy sight-writing. Students practice 
two hours each school day on new standard machines. A rental of 
50c per week, $2.00 per month, is charged for the use of the machines, 
payable in advance ; or students may furnish their own machines. 

(c) STENOGRAPHERS' BUSINESS PRACTICE. The 
short-hand and typewriting work is supplemented by two weeks of 
actual office work. Involving the taking and transcribing of business 
letters, the use of those business forms with which a stenographer 
must be acquainted, copying, filing, card-indexing systems, and every- 
thing the student will find In a modern office. 

II— BOOKKEEPING AND OFFICE PRACTICE 

This course will make competent business bookkeepers of those 
who conscientiously pursue and finish it. It Includes "Practical 
Bookkeeping," a thorough and up-to-date text-book, and "Twentieth 
Century Business Practice," a practice course In which the student 
actually keeps In succession five different sets of books. In different 
kinds of business, making all the transactions and handling all the 
business papers, cash, etc., with which he would have to deal in keep- 
ing the books of a modern business enterprise. A Supplementary 
Course gives instruction In Bank Accounting by the same methods. 

Ill— COMMERCIAL LAW 

A comprehensive course in the laws of business with which 
business men should be familiar. Study and recitation from a good 
Commercial College Text, two hours weekly, alternating with the 
Penmanship Course. 

IV— BUSINESS PENMANSHIP 

We teach the well-known "Palmer Method of Business Writ- 
ing," which develops a rapid, easy, legible, business hand — that which 
the business world of today demands. Practice, under instructor's 
supervision, three hours per week, alternating with Commercial Law. 

DIPLOMAS 

Two diplomas are granted for Commercial work, one In Ste- 
nography and the other In Bookkeeping. 



MiLLiCAN College Year-Book 55 

(a) STENOGRAPHY. To receive the Stenographer's 
Diploma, the student must satisfactorily complete the course, must 
pass an examination in Shorthand and in Typewriting, and must be 
proficient in Spelling, English Grammar and Rhetoric. The Short- 
hand examination covers the taking of dictation from new matter 
from different sources at a speed of one hundred words per minute, 
and reading same back accurately and correctly from the Shorthand 
notes. The standard for tj^pewriting is a copying speed of fifty words 
per minute from unfamiliar matter of different kinds, five words to 
be deducted for each error. The Diploma fee is $3.00. 

(b) BOOKKEEPING. Students who satisfactorily complete 
the course in Bookkeeping, furnish evidence of competency, and pass 
an examination in Commercial Law, and who write a plain business 
hand, will be granted an Accountants' Diploma, on payment of the 
Diploma fee of $3.00. 



PART IV 
MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

This division of the Catalogue is divided Into sectl'^ns covering 
the following sub-heads: 

I — Buildings and Grounds 

II — Literary Societies and Publications 

III — Rules and Regulations 

IV — Scholarships and Bequests 

V — Religious and Moral Atmosphere 

VI — Expenses and Fees 

VII — General Information 

VIII— Athletics 



I 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
Buildings 

The College buildings are three In number. The main building, 
a substantial brick structure, containing the recitation rooms, chapel, 
library and society halls, occupies the center of the campus. It has 
been newly refitted, painted and papered. The Young Men's Home, 



56 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

a two-story frame building containing nearly thirty rooms, plainly 
furnished bvit affording substantial accommodations for students, is 
located to the rear of the main building. 

The Frances T. and Columbus A. Mee Memorial Hall 
Through the mnuificence of Mrs. Frances T. Mee, of Cleve- 
land, Tenn., we now have free of debt our spacious and handsomely 
furnished young ladies' dormitory. Mee Hall is a three-story brick 
structure, opened the first time for the season of 1908-09. It con- 
tains thirty-two rooms, with reception rooms and parlor, has hot and 
cold water on each floor, is handsomely furnished, and is heated by 
steam. Rooms in this building should be engaged as soon as possible, 
as a number had already been reserved when the Catalogue went to 
press. 

Grounds 

The College campus contains over thirty acres of ground. . A 
large and beautiful grove, each tree of which was planted by some 
former student, surrounds the main building. There are excellent 
ball grounds and tennis courts for the use of the student body. 

Libraries 

The College maintains three libraries: (I) the Old Library, 
containing mostly reference books and government or statistical pub- 
lications; (2) the Reading Room, containing the later reference 
works and about three thousand volumes of standard literature ; and 
(3) The Number Nine Library, containing about two thousand vol- 
umes dealing principally with theological or Biblical literature. These 
libraries are all available for student use under the proper restrictions. 

The new Reading Room is supplied with all the standard maga- 
zines and periodicals. The list of last year was as follows: Dailies — 
Baltimore American, Chattanooga Times, Knoxville Journal and 
Tribune, Johnson City Staff, Bristol News. Weeklies — Christian 
Standard, Outlook, Independent, Christian Evangelist, Saturday 
Evening Post, Nation, Scientific American, Dial, Harper's Weekly, 
Harper's Bazar, Collier's, Commo7ier, Literary Digest. Monthlies — 
Century, Harper's, N. Am. Review, Cosmopolitan, Hampton s Amer- 
ican, McClure's, Everybody's, Ladies' Home Journal. St. Nicholas, 
Delineator, Foi'um, Review of Reviews, Current Literature, Atlantic 
Monthly, Bookman, Missionary Review of the World, Musician, 
Outing, World Today, M^orld's Work, Physical Culture. Human 
Life, Tennessee Christian, Missionary Intelligencer, Advocate of 
Peace, The Labor Digest. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 57 

II 

LITERARY SOCIETIES, PUBLICAW'IONS, ETC. 

Literary Societies 

The literary societies are four in number — The American, Adel- 
phian and Ciceronian for j^oung men, and the Ossolian for _ young 
ladies. They do excellent work during the year, giving public per- 
formances upon stated occasions. 

Contests 

Through the munificence of one of our alumni, Mr. Oscar M. 
Fair (1903) a prize oratorical contest is held during the week of 
Commencement exercises. The Oscar M. Fair Contest is between 
the representatives of the Literary Societies of the College, and carries 
with it a first prize of $15 in gold, a second prize of $10 in gold, and 
a gavel made of wood from Lookout Mountain for the successful 
society. 

Honors 

The average grades for the entire length of time spent in school 
are printed upon the Commencement programs. The student in the 
Classical Course sustaining the highest general average is awarded the 
Valedictory. The student sustaining the highest average in any other 
course, is awarded the Salutatory; and the student sustaining the 
highest average in any course after those of the Valedictorian and 
Salutatorian is awarded the Class Oration. 

The New Horizon 

The student body publishes a monthly paper entitled "The New 
Horizon," which is managed and directed by the students at large, 
and which affords considerable scope for reportorial and literary 
talent. 



HI 
RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Student Behavior 

Students are expected to deport themselves as ladies and gentle- 
men — above all, as those who are, or expect to be, Christian men and 



58 ' MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

women. No profanity Is permitted on the grounds, nor Is the use of 
alcohol or tobacco in any form allowed. Insubordination, or violation 
of the laws of the school will lead to expulsion and permanent exclu- 
sion from its privileges. 

Class Absences 

Five unexcused absences in any one study will suspend the stu- 
dent thus absent. 

Ag'e Limit in Young Mens Dormitory 

Boys under fifteen years of age are not allowed to room in the 
young men's dormitory. 

Conduct in Examinations 

By a resolution of the Faculty, adopted May 2d, 1910, it was 
determined that in all classes in the College, the penalty for any sort 
of dishonesty on the part of students in examinations shall be, in 
the first Instance, "Suspension from that class in which the offence 
occurred, for the term, with the loss of all credit for the term's work 
in the aforesaid class, no opportunity for making up said work to be 
permitted until the scholastic year following. For a second offence 
by the same party, the penalty shall be suspension from the College 
for the term In which the offence was committed, with the loss of all 
credits for the term's work." 

It was also resolved, "That In all cases, the student accused of 
dishonesty shall be given a fair trial, and conviction shall follow an 
affirmative vote of three-fourths of the membership of the entire 
faculty." 

Organization of Classes 

The College makes no provision for the organization In any 
department of classes In which less than five students have signified 
their intention of taking up the work. 

Breakage 

The parents or guardians of students are held responsible for 
any breakage or damage done to property or furniture. 

Outside Board 

Young ladles attending the College are not permitted to board 
outside of the Home, except with the express approval of their 
parents and special permission from the faculty. 



MiLLiGAN" College Year-Book 59 

IV 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND BEQUESTS 

Milligan Endowment 

Through the kindness of Professor Alexander R. Milligan of 
Lexington, Ky., who gave $5,000 for the purpose in December, 1909, 
we now have the nucleus of a permanent endowment fund. This 
fund ought to be increased to at least $100,000 in order to enable 
Milligan College to accomplish the work it can and ought to do. 

Scholarships 

Those who cannot help with the permanent endowment ma}' 
find it possible to endow named scholarships In the institution. The 
sum of $800 will endow a perpetual scholarship, carr3ang with it 
the tuition expenses of one student for every year. The sum of 
$2,000 will endow a ministerial scholarship, carrjang with it the 
ministerial course each j^ear. The sum of $2,500 will endow a simi- 
lar scholarship for a young lady In any of the regular collegiate 
courses. 

Annual scholarships providing for student expense, year by year, 
may be contributed individually as follows : forty dollars. In four 
equal payments, will constitute a named tuition scholarship for the 
year; and one hundred dollars, in ten equal payments, will constitute 
a named ministerial scholarship for one year. Churches, Endeavor 
or Ladies Aid Societies, and even Sunday School Classes should pro- 
vide scholarships of the kind for worthy students among their num- 
ber or elsewhere. 

Form of Bequest 

Many friends of Milligan College will doubtless be glad to 
help Its work, after they have passed from this earth to their reward. 
In this way they will be able to originate a stream of Influence, con- 
tinuing throughout eternity. The following, or an equivalent form, 
should be used in your will, which should fully describe real estate. 
and should be signed by 30U, in the presence of witnesses, whose sig- 
natures should likewise appear: 

"I give and bequeath to I\iilllgan College of Tennessee, an 
institution chartered under the laws of the State of Tennesse, antl 
locatd at Milligan College. Carter County, Tennessee, the sum of 



60 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



$ (or if real estate, let location and description appear at 

this point) for the use of said institution, in conducting its work of 
education; and the receipt of the secretary of the said institution for 
the above-named sum, (or described property) shall constitute a 
release for my executor for the same." 



RELIGIOUS 4ND MORAL ATMOSPHERE 
V 

College Spirit 

The greatest and best inheritance of Milligan is its "college 
spirit." It is not of the kind which delights to express itself in 
rowdyism and profanity; but rather is a clean, pure, healthful moral 
tone which irresistably permeates the whole student body. The very 
air of Milligan breathes purity and high-toned Christian character. 



VI 

EXPENSES AND FEES 

Tuition 

College Literary — Per term of eighteen weeks, in advance. 
If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks. 

Academy — Per term of eighteen weeks, in advance 

If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks. 
Music — Instrumental or Vocal, per term of eighteen week: 
If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks 

Business — Bookkeeping, per term of eighteen weeks 

Stenography and typewriting, per term 

Complete Business Course, per term 

(Typewriter rent extra, as per under Business 
Department). 

Ministerial — English Course (Dormitory students) Free 

Classical course, per term of eighteen weeks $iO.OO 

Graduate — Any one course, per term of eighteen weeks $ 5.00 



.$20.00 
.$ 5.00 
.$20.00 
.$ 5.00 
.$20.00 
.$ 5.00 
.$10.00 
. $20.00 
.$25.00 



Re 



Rent 



In Dormitories, including Heat, Light, etc. 

In Boys' Home, per term of eighteen weeks $15.00 

In Mee Hall, per term of eighteen weeks, from $15.00 to. . . .$20.00 
according to location of room. 



MiLLicAN College Year-Book 61 

Board in College Dining Hall 

Board must be paid in advance. The rate per week In the Col- 
lege Dining Hall is $2.25, 

Outside Board 

Furnished room with board can be secured outside the College 
in private families at from $9.00 to $12.50 per month, the usual 
price being $10.00 to $12.00. 

Fees 

The only fees connected with the College are the following: 

(A) Library fee of one dollar, charged each student upon 
matriculation, and the proceeds applied strictly to the purchase of 
books and magazines for the Library. 

(B) Matriculation fee of $10.00 charged all students in the 
English Ministerial Course, who do not room and board In the Col- 
lege dormitory. This fee will also admit anyone to all lecture 
courses in the College, but not to class room work or examination. 

Combination Courses and Total Expenses Estimated 

For the benefit of those young ladies who desire to take music 
chiefly, we have a special musical course, giving either vocal or 
instrumental music and a maximum of two English studies for $75.00 
per term, in advance, for everything (board, room, heat, light, tui- 
tion, etc.) 

The total necessary expense of a student at Milligan College 
varies from $ioo.OO per year to $175.00. $140.00 for a young man 
and $150.00 for a joung lady. Is a good general average. The Milli- 
gan rates do not aim at the cheapness which negates comfort ; nor 
on the other hand, do they embody more than the actual expense 
which comfort brings. 

Diploma Fees 

The fee for the Bachelor's Diploma is in all cases $5.00. The 
fee for the Master's Degree is $10.00. The fee for the Ministerial 
Diploma in either the English or the Classical Course Is $5.00. The 
fee for either of the Business Diplomas Is also $5.(X). 



62 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Laundry and Incidental Expenses 

Laundry costs from 75c to $2.00 per month, in accordance with 
the amount. Incidental expenses are at a minimum at Milligan Col- 
lege. There is no reason why a student should spend anything 
beyond the smallest possible allowance for expenses outside of College 
charges. 

Terms of Payment 

All tuition and room rent bills, for the term, are payable strictly 
IN ADVANCE,, and payment must be arranged for at the time of 
matriculation. Board is pa_vable weekly, IN ADVANCE, as else- 
where stated. In all cases, where the student leaves during the term, 
no refund or deduction of tuition or room rent will be made, unless 
by special action of the Executive Committee. The justice of the 
latter regulation will become apparent when it is understood that a 
room vacated during the term cannot be filled except in rare 
instances, before the opening of the next term. 



VII 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Location 

The College is located three miles from Johnson City, and 
half a mile from the Milligan College station on the East Tennessee 
and Western North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small 
village named Milligan College in honor of the institution. 

The location is one of the most beautiful in America. The 
Watauga River flows onh^ a short distance below the grounds, and 
the scenery around the College is unsurpassed in natural beauty and 
grandeur. 

Healthfulness 

One of the most important considerations in selecting a college 
is its healthfulness of location. Other advantages amount to but 
little. \^^■thout this, the most valuable of all. In the thirty years of 
its history, no serious epidemic has been known at Milligan. The 
purity of the air, the excellent water, and the splendid advantages 
for physical development, have been chiefly responsible for this 
condition. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 63 

Young Ladies' Home 

The rules governing the conduct of girls in our young ladies' 
home, while strict, are not burdensome. The greatest care is exer- 
cised by those who have the 3^oung ladies in charge, and parents may 
safely trust their daughters in our hands. We have a thoroughly 
efficient and capable Eiean of Women, and an experienced matron 
in charge of the housekeeping department. The young ladies' rooms 
are extra large, well ventilated, equipped with new furniture, and 
are comfortable in every sense of the term. We furnish exceptionally 
good board for the prices charged. There are few places in the world 
where a young lady can secure a thorough education at so little 
expense, as at Milligan, 

What to Furnish 

Students boarding at the homes will furnish their own toilet 
articles, towels, napkins, pillow cases and sheets, and one blanket each 

Monday Holiday 

Monday instead of Saturday is the regular weekly holiday. 
Two Terms 

The school year is divided into two terms, or semesters, of 
eighteen weeks each. 

Text Books 

Text-books can be purchased at publishers' price from the College 
book store. All purchases at the store are strictly cash. Nearly all 
necessary books can be secured second-hand, thus reducing the ex- 
pense for books to a minimum. 



VIII 

ATHLETICS 



Milligan College has always maintained a fine record as regards 
athletics. In common with the more advanced educational ideals, 
we do not play football at all; but baseball, basketball, tennis, and 
other legitimate games are encouraged, within proper bounds, and 



64 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



in accordance with the regulations mentioned elsewhere in the cata- 
logue. The record of the Milligan baseball team during the past 
number of j'ears has been an exceedingly creditable one. We have 
crossed bats with some of the largest universities and colleges in the 
South and have held our own with them or defeated them. We have 
played Vanderbilt University to a tie on their home grounds, and 
among others have defeated the University of Tennessee and Univer- 
sity of Chrfttanooga. During the season of 1908-09, we won fifteen 
out of eighteen games. Owing to more stringent regulations regard- 
ing absence from the College fewer games were played during the 
season of 1909-10; but our record was even better than that of the 
preceding year, our team winning all twelve of the games played. 
The record for 1910-11 was almost equally good. The 1911-12 
record is as follows: 



Milli^'an vs 
Milligan vs 
Milliigan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Milligan vs 
Games 



Record of Games 

Carson & Newman Milligan 

Tusculum Milligan 

Tueculum Milligan 

Washington College Milligan 

Wasihin'gton College -Milligan 

Washington College Milligan 

Washington College Milligan 

Emory & Henry Milligan 

Emory & Henry Milligan 

Emory & Henry Milligan 

King College Milligan 

Athens Milligan 
played 12. Won six. Lost six. 



1, Carson «fe Ne-wman 
5, Tusculum 8 

3, Tusculum 1 

5, Washington College 8 

4, Washington College 7 

6, Washington College 5 
4, Washington College 7 

1, Emory & Henry 2 

2, Emory &, Henry 1 
0, Emory & Henry 6 

4, King College 3 

5, Athens 



// R.l/r 



i,,..!v\. h j 






YEAR BOOK 1913-1914 
Vol. I. muU^titt no. a 



3 



^ SCHOOL 

TfEVOTE'D TO CHARACTER "BUILDING 

FIRST OF ^LL 



w 



Entered in Post Office at Johnson City, Tenn., as Second-class 
Matter, According to Act of Congress, Approved July 16, 1894 



^iJ4a4ajKM443cM4xmaM4]a43M4^ 



I 1 84-1 



P.H. WELSH MlR A^EMORiAL LieRARY 
AAILLIGAN COLLEGE, TN 37682 



MILLIGAN COLLEGE 

OF TENNESSEE 



YEAR BOOK 



ANNO DOMINI NINETEEN FOURTEEN 



Press of 

Muse-^'liitlock Company 

JotiDSon City, Tenn. 



FOREWORD 



Every institution must be, in the last analysis, the embodi- 
ment of an idea. Colleges, like men, possess many traits in com- 
mon: but like men too, each exhibits an individuality of its own. 
The distinctive idea back of Milligan College is that of CHAR- 
ACTER BUILDING FIRST OF ALL. The peculiar 
environment of the College, its seclusion, the religious and moral 
atmosphere which surrounds it, and the dominant aims of its Facul- 
ty and those who have it in charge, to say nothing of the cherish- 
ed legacy of the past, all conspire to further the realization of the 
ideal it has in view. He who wrote, "A good name is rather to 
be chosen than great riches," embodied to the fullest the educa- 
tional ideal of Milligan. 



4 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

CALENDAR 
1913 

September 9, Classification and Registration Tuesday, 8:30 a. m. 

September 9-10, Entrance Examinations Tuesday and Wednesday 

September 11, Regular Recitations Begin Thursday 

November 27, Thanksgiving Recess Thursday 

Annual Program of the American Literary Society. 
December 23, Christmas Holidays Begin Tuesday, 8:30 a. m. 

1914 

January 1, Christmas Holidays End Thursday 

January 10, First Term Ends Saturday 

January 13, Second Term Begins Tuesday 

February 23, Monday 

Annual Program of the Ossolian Literary Society. 

March 20, Robert Milligan Day Friday 

Annual Program of F. D. Kershner Literary Society. 

May 12, Elementary School Program Monday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 14, Academy Program Thursday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 15, Oscar M. Fair Contest Friday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 16, Junior Class Program Saturday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 17, Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday, 10:30 a. m. 

May 18, Senior Class Exercises Monday, 7:30 p. m. 

May 19, Commencement Day Exercises Tuesday, 10:00 a. ra. 

May 19, Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees Tuesday, 2:30 p. m. 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 
PART I 



LOCATION AND HISTORY 

Milligan College is located in Carter County, Tennessee, about 
tAventy-four miles from the North Carolina line and twenty-five 
miles from the Virginia line at Bristol. It is one hundred and six 
mile by rail from Knoxville, Tennessee; one hundred and seventy- 
five miles by rail from Roanoke, Virginia; and one hundred and fifty- 
one miles from Asheville, North Carolina. The main line of the 
Southern railroad runs three miles below it, the nearest station being 
Johnson City. The C, C. & O. R. R. passes two miles south of the 
College at the station of Okolona, and also passes through Johnson 
City. The B. T. & W. N. C. R. R., connecting Johnson City with 
Cranberry, N. C, runs one-half mile from the campus at its station of 
Mdlligan College. 



Early History — The State of Franklin — King's Mountain — Boone Tree 

The College is Jocated in that section of Tennessee which once 
formed part of the long defunct State of Franklin — a commonwealth 
whose brief but romantic existence was terminated in a battle fought 
only a short distance from the site now occupied by the College 
grounds. Two miles to the north, at Sycamore Shoals, the American 
volunteers who fought the decisive battle of King's Mountain started 
on the famous march which in the opinion of competent historians 
was the turning point in the American Revolution. Upon the Board of 
Trustees of Milligan College are gentlemen who are lineal descendents 
of these King's Mountain veterans. In the month of June, 1910, a shaft 
was unveiled at Sycamore Shoals, under the auspices of the D. A. R. 
commemorating the departure of the King's Mountain volunteers. The 
principal oration upon this occasion was delivered by the late U. S. 
Senator Robert L. Taylor, an alumnus of Milligan College, who was 
three times Governor and also Senior Senator from the State of 
Tennessee. 

After Sycamore Shoals and the days of King's Mountain, came 
Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett. Boone's original trail passed only 
a few miles west of the College; and at Boone's Creek, about eight 
miles south, there is shown to this day a mighty oak tree with the fol- 
lowing inscription carved upon it: 

"D Boon Cild Bar." 

Whether the illustrious Daniel actually performed the feat at this 



6 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

place, which tradition and this inscription attribute to him, we do not 
know; but the unique orthography was certainly D. Boone's own, and 
the tree is old enough to substantiate the legend. One of the annual 
College pilgrimages leads to this tree, which is conveniently reached 
either by rail or by driving. Davy Crockett was born at Limestone, 
on the Southern Railroad eighteen miles below Johnson City; and 
legends dealing with his early prowess and history are numerous 
throughout this section. 



Early History of the College — Its Founding and Administration 

The site of Milligan College, with its superb view of the majestic 
Buffalo Mountain and the silver waters of the Buffalo Creek flowing 
just below, was early chosen as an ideal spot for an institution of 
learning. Before the Civil War, a school was established which was 
attended by many men who afterward became illustrious in the history 
not only of Tennessee but also of the nation. After the War between 
the States, this school was given the name of Buffalo Institute, and 
numbered among its students both "Bob" and "Alf" Taylor, as well 
as other men who achieved prominence in national and civic life. 
During this time the institution was largely under the direction of 
Colonel Barker, a man whose talented and lovable character left its 
impress upon the future history of the College. In 1880 a young 
man from Kentucky, by the name of Josephus Hopwood, came to Carter 
County in search of a place to found an institution of learning built 
upon the broad foundation of Christian culture, a clean heart and a 
clean life. Buffalo Institute was turned over to him; and in 1882 
the old name was changed to Milligan College, after the sainted 
character whose history is given elsewhere in detail. Professor Hop- 
wood always regarded Robert Milligan as the highest embodiment of 
ideal manhood he had met, and therefore named the College, whicii 
he designed as an instrument for the development of Christian charac- 
ter among men and women, after his beloved teacher. For twenty- 
three years from 1880 to 1903, President Hopwood directed the des- 
tinies of Milligan College. The story of those twenty-three years of 
disinterested, unselfish service for God and the world is written, not 
in books or upon marble, but in the hearts and lives of hundreds of 
men and women who are scattered all over America, and who are 
blessing humanity because they were given high ideals of life at Mil- 
ligan College. Many privations were endured during these years, pri- 
vations known only to those who bore them and to the Recording 
Angel who wrote them down. In 1903, President Hopwood relin- 
quished the burden he had borne so long to one who had graduated 
under him and who was associated with him for years as a teacher. No 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 7 

finer spirited man, or one more loyal to those ideals of Service and 
Purity which belong to the heritage of Milligan, could have been 
found than Henry R. Garrett. Unselfish Service was the keynote of 
his life at Milligan; and after five years of labor, largely worn out 
by his efforts, aided by bodily sickness, he was obliged to seek a 
warmer climate in the dry atmosphere of Western Texas. President 
Garrett's mantle fell upon another young man, Frederick D. Kersh- 
ner, a native of Maryland and a graduate of Kentucky University 
and of Princeton. President Kershner took charge of the College 
in the spring of 1908. He resigned soon after the opening of the session 
1911-1912 and his resignation took effect Oct. 31, 1911. The Board im- 
mediately elected the Dean Tyler E. Utterback, a native of Kentucky, 
graduate of Kentucky University, Central University of Kentucky, and 
Columbia University, New York, a man of large experience both as an 
educator and preacher. At the close of the year 1912-1913, President 
Utterback's resignation which had been offered one year before, wa.s 
accepted, and E. W. McDiarmid, a graduate of Bethany and of Hiram 
College, was elected President of Milligan College. The same ideals 
of life which ruled under the former administrations obtain today, 
and the same emphasis upon purity and cleanness of living and the 
development of Christian character, remains as the core of the Milli- 
gan spirit. 

Over two hundred— 240 to be exact — students have been graduated 
from Milligan College since the first class left its halls in 1882. A 
host of young men and women who were not able to complete theii." 
education were also instructed during this period. The aim of the 
College has been toward higher ideals, not only of character, but also 
of scholarship; and the work has been constantly graded up with this 
end in view. Where honesty of purpose is inculated, there will be 
thoroughness of work; and this has always been true of Milligan men 
and women, as the records of the alumni clearly disclose. We do not 
believe the statement to be boastful that no college can claim a larger 
percentage of succssful graduates than Milligan, success being defined 
as the living of an honest, influential and altruistic life. 

^ 



ALTITUDE AND HEALTHFULNESS OF LOCATION 

Milligan College has an altitude of 1,740 feet. It is only four 
miles from Buffalo Mountain, over 4,000 feet high, and twelve miles 
from Roan Mountain 6,000 feet. Mt. Mitchell, the highest peak in 
America east of the Rockies, is located only forty miles to the east, 
and is reached from Milligan via the C, C. & O. R. R. The climate is 
temperate, and perhaps the most perfect illustration of that of the 



8 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book; 

temperate zone. The air is remarkably pure, there is an abundance 
of pure water, and all natural advantages for school life would seem 
to be possessed by this favored section of Eastern America. Criticism 
has sometimes been directed against the large number of schools and 
colleges in East Tennessee. The reason for this apparent crowding 
of institutions lies in the fact that the location is practically ideal for 
school purposes. With modern railroad facilities, it is far better that 
a school should be located well from the point of view of healthfulness 
and climate than from the point of view of purely geographical fitness. 



PART II 



THE PERSONNEL OF ^HLLIGAN COLLEGE 

The Charter of Milligan College provides that its property shall 
be owned and controlled by a Board of Trustees consisting of thirty- 
three members, one-third of whom or eleven members shall be elected 
each year by the Tennessee Christian Missionary Society, when assem- 
bled in Annual Convention. The control and ownership of the Col- 
lege is thus vested in the Christian Churches of Tennessee. The 
membership of the Board of Trustees is not however, limited to any 
religious body, nor by any state or territorial requirements. The 
Board of Control, or Executive Committee of the Institution, is 
composed of nine members, five of whom constitute a quorum for 
business. 

The following gentlemen constitute the Board of Trustees: 

Term Expires in 191B. 

Ira M. Boswell Chattanooga, Tenu, 

H. L. Brown Memphis, Tenn. 

J. O. Cheek , Nashville, Tenn. 

C. N. Cowden Nashville, Tenn, 

I. N. Pendleton Nashville Tenn. 

I. A. Hill Harriman, Tenn, 

E. K. Leake Colliersville, Tenn. 

L. M. Scott Jellico, Tenn. 

T A. Wright Knoxville, Tenn. 

Yi. G. Payne Milligan College, Tenn. 

W. J. Matthews , Johnson City, Tenn, 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 9 

Term Expiring 1914 

A. W. Boyd Chattanooga, Tenn. 

J. E. Crouch Johnson City, Tenn. 

C. C. Dabney Nashville, Tenn. 

J. T. McKissick Nashville, Tenn. 

G. N. Tillman Nashville, Tenn. 

J. P. Tarwater Rockwood, Tenn. 

J. F. Robertson Crockett Mills, Tenn. 

C. E. Snodgrass Crossville, Tenn. 

J. W. Williams Elizabethton, Tenn. 

C. C, Taylor Milligan College, Tenn. 

L. C. Shelburne Dot, Va. 

Term Expiring 1915 

J. C. Hamlett Crockett Mills, Tenn. 

Geo. W. Hardin Johnson City, Tenn. 

S. W. Price Johnson City, Tenn. 

A. B. Crouch Johnson City, Tenn, 

Geo. T. Williams Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. P. Crouch Louisville, Ky 

W. P. Shamhart Rockwood, Tenn. 

W. H. Shef f er Memphis, Tenn. 

W. J. Shelburne Shelbyville, Tenn. 

J. W. Scott Harriman, Tenn. 

C. E. Morgan Nashville, Tern 

Officers of the Board 

C. C. Taylor President 

S. W. Price Secretary 

Geo. W. Hardin Treasurer 

The Executive Committee is composed of the following members 
of the Board of Trustees: 

Messrs. Taylor, Price, Hardin, J. E. Crouch, A. B. Crouch, J. W. 
Williams, and Payne. Its officers, by a provision of the Charter, are 
the same as those of the Board of Trustees. 

FACULTY 

ERRETT W. McDIAR^MID, M. A., President and Robert Milligan 
Professor of Philosophy and English Criticism. 

A. B., Bethany, 1895; A. M., Bethany, 1896; A. M., Hiram College. 
1897; Professor of Latin and Mathematics, Fairfield College, Neb.. 1898- 
1899; Professor of Latin and Mathematics. Morehead Normal School, 



10 MiLLiGAN College Year^Book 

Ky., 1901-1906; Professor of Latin, Bethany College, 1906-1908; Prin- 
cipal of Beckley Institute, Beckley, W. Va., 1908-1913. 

BELA HUBBARD HAYDEN, M. A., Professor of English Bible, 
Church History and Applied Christianity. 

A. B., Bethany; A. M., Bethany. Pastor at Canton and Erie, Pa., 
Chicago, 111., Bowmanville, Ontario; Buffalo, N. Y.; London, Ontario; 
State Evangelist, N. Y.; Evangelist in England. Travel Study in 
Egypt, Palestine, Turkey, Greece, Italy. Lecturer. 

T. NEWTON HILL, B. S., A. B., Professor of Science and Mathe- 
matics. 

B. S. Kansas Agricultural College, 1909; A. B., Kansas University, 
1911; Instructor in El Dorado, Kans., High School, Science and Mathe- 
matics, 1909-1910; Instructor in Science and Mathematics Beckley 
Institute, Beckley, W. Va., 1911-1913. 

MARY HARDIN, Professor of French and Director of the Depart- 
ment of Home Economics. 

A. B., (University of Tennessee). Professor of Modern Languages 
Milligan College, 1911-1912. 

JAMES MILLER, Professor of English Literature and History. 
Instructor in English, Texas Christian University, 1912. 

* , Professor of German. 

BLMA E. R. ELLIS, M. A., (University of Tennessee), Professor of 
Ancient Languages and Literature. 

B. A., 1895; M. A., 1899; Professor Ancient Languages Milligan 
College 1900-3; Professor of Greek and German, Virginia Christian 
College, 1903-5; Professor of Greek and History, Bethany College, 
1905-8; Professor of Ancient Languages Milligan College, 1908 — . 

LOGAN E. GARRETT, A. B., Adjunct Professor of English and 
Science, and Principal of the Academy. 

Teacher in the Public Schools in Washington and Virginia. Prof- 
essor Adjunct, Milligan College, 1911 — . 

MARCBLENA HOUSTON, A. B., Director of Music. 

Graduate of Kee-Mar Conservatory of Music, Hagerstown, Md., 
Student under Myers, New York, and of the Peabody Conservatory of 
Music, Baltimore. Instructor in Kee-Mar Conservatory, 1901-4; Direc- 
tor of Music, Milligan College, 1909—. 

ZORAYDA BRENTS, Assistant in Music. 

MRS. B. H. HAYDEN, Dean of Women and Librarian. 

WILLIAM S. TAYLOR, M. D., Lecturer on Anatomy, Physiology 
and Hygiene. (College Physician). 

LOGAN E. GARRETT, A. B., Secretary of the Faculty. 

* , Principal of Commercial Department, 

* — To be supplied. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 11 

THE SOCIETY OF ALUMNI OF MILLIGAN COLLEGE 



Officers 



Geo. W. Hardin ('82), President. 

Geo. E. Lyon ('91), Vice-President. 

J. B. Crouch ('96), Secretary and Treasurer. 

The next Special Reunion will take place in 1914 at Commence- 
ment. Every alumnus and friend of Milligan College should plan to 
be present upon this occasion. 

Annual banquet and reunion held the evening of Commencement 
day at the College. 

The Alnnini 

It is our desire to keep in close touch with our alumni and to 
have the correct addresses at all time on file in the office. Members 
will confer a great favor upon us by giving us any information rela- 
tive to the Alumni which they may happen to know individually. 
Address all communications to the President, Milligan College, Tenn. 



Class of 1882 



C. B. Armentrout, A. M Washington College, Tenn. 

George E. Boren, B. L Washington, D. C. 

Charles F. Carson, B. S Telford, Tenn. 

Aaron A. Ferguson, A. M Elizabethton, Tenn. 

George W. Hardin, B. L Johnson City, Tenn. 

*Lulu Hendrix (Crockett) ), B. L Milligan, Tenn. 

*Lucy C. Matthews (Hardin), B. S Johnson City. Tenn. 

J. H. Rutrough, A. M Willis, Va. 

James H. Smith, A. M Johnson City, Tenn. 

James A. Tate, A. M Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Class of 1883 

Samuel L. Carson, A. B Greeneville, Tenn. 

W. R. Henry, B. S Sherman, Texas 

* William J. Shelburne, A. B Christiansburg, Va. 

Class of 1884 

Mollie Todd (Hendrix) Music Greeneville, Tenn. 

Mary Peebles (Lyon) ]\Iusic Unicoi, Tenn. 



12 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

Class of 1S85 

*Frank F. Bullard, A. M Lynchburg, Va. 

Mary Elizabeth Epps (Hardin), B. S Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Preston B. Hall, A. M Bloomfield, Ky. 

Charles L. Maddox, A. B Crocketts, Wythe County, Va. 

Edmund A. Miller, A. M Los Angeles, Cal. 

William E. Reed, B. S Stanton, Texas 

Walter M. Straley, A. B Sinking Creek, Va. 

Robert Walker, B. S Pandora, Texas 

Class of 1887 

Eugene M. Crouch, A. M Edingborg, Ind. 

James W. Giles, A. B Lynchburg, Va. 

Leatitia L. C. Tate (Cornforth), A. M Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Edward C. Wilson, A. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Class of 1888 

Francis E. Caldwell (Baber), B. S Charleston, W. Va. 

Susan A. Kegley (Gibson), B. S Wytheville, Va. 

William B. Kegley, A. B Wytheville, Va. 

*I. Irvin Miller, A. M Lynchburg, Va. 

Class of 1889 

Annie M. Finley (Preston), B. S Red Ash, Ky. 

Henry R. Garrett, A. M Midland, Texas 

Franklin D. Love, B. S Georgetown, Texas 

Charles G. Price, B. S 101 E. 23rd St., New York City 

Class of 1880 

William P. Cousins, B. S Norfolk, Va. 

Charles Cornforth, A. M Nashville, Tenn. 

Thomas J. Cox, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Mamie H:aun (La Rue) , B. S Bessemer, Ala. 

William H. Haun, B. S Bessemer, Ala. 

J. P. McConnell, A. B., Ph. D., (Virginia) • Radford, Va. 

Sarah C. Straley (Thomas), B. S Sinking Creek, Va. 

Samuel G. Sutton, A. B Saltville, Va. 

Class of 1891 

D. Sinclair Burleson, A. M., State Normal School. .Johnson City, Tenn. 

Elizabeth E. Cox (Matthews), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Mary Hendrickson, B. S Lexington, Tenn. 

George E. Lyon, Ph. B 703 Jackson St., Topeka, Kan. 



MiLLiGAN College Year- Book 13 

W. R. Motley, A. B New Castle, Ind. 

Chester D. M. Showalter, A. M Roanoke, Va. 

Lou Ella Showalter (English), B. S Roanoke, Va. 

John V. Thomas, A. M Sherman, Texas. 

Class of 1892 

Mary E. Burleson (Dew), B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Walter L. Dudley, A. M Covington, Pa. 

Cordelia P. Henderson, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

David Lyon, B. S Topeka, Kan. 

Clara McConnell (Lucas) , Ph. B Radford, Va. 

J. Frank Sergent, B. S Clinchport, Va. 

James E. Stuart, Ph. B., A. M Union City, Tenn. 

S. T. Willis, A. B., LL. D Minneapolis, Minn. 

Class of 1893 

Nannie Givens, Ph. B Buchanan, Va. 

Agatha Lilley (Miller), B. S Keokuk, Iowa 

Robert W. Lilley, B. S Keokuk, Iowa 

Etta Reynolds (Brown), B. S Alliance, Ohio 

George C. Simmons, B. S Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Andre v^f Jackson Wolfe, Ph. B Kahoka, Mo. 

Class of 1894 

James C. Coggins, A. M Lenoir, N. C. 

Lee R. Dingus, A. B Florence, Ala. 

John P. Givens, A. B Carbondale, 111. 

William J. Matthews, B. S., M. D Johnson City, Tenn. 

Daniel E. Motley, A. M., Ph. D Washington, D. C. 

William J. Shelburne, A. B Shelbyville, Tenn. 

J. Wesley Showalter, A. B E. Radford, Va., R. F. D. No. 1 

Class of 1895 

Byrdine A. Abbott, A. B St. Louis, Mo. 

George R. Cheves, B. S Pulaski, Va. 

Lula M. Dye (Hagy) , B. S Greendale, Va. 

^R. J. English, B. S., M. D Glade Hill, Va. 

L. C. Felts, B. S Thurmond, W. Va. 

* William S. Givens, A. B Newport, Va. 

Edward E. Hawkins, Ph. B Burnsville, N. C. 

Thomas B. McCartney, A. M., Ph. D., (Univ. of Va.) .. .Lexington, Ky. 

C. Burnett Reynolds, A. B New Philadelphia, O. 

Geo. P. Rutledge, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

Pearl Shelburne, Ph. B Green Bay, Va. 



14 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

George H. P. Showalter, A. B Austin, Texas 

Lizzie Wilburn Thomas, B. S Sherman, Texas 

Bertha E. Tomlin (Thomas), B. S Oklahoma 

Ina Yoakley, B. S Johnson City;, Tenn. 

Class of 1896 

J. Edwin Crouch, Ph. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Class of 1897 

Isaac A. Briggs, A. B., M. D 1127 E. Main St., Enid, Okla. 

I. G. W. Buck, B. S Woodsboro, Texas 

A. Jackson Bunts, B. S Bowie, Texas 

Laura Belle Clark, B. S Pulaski, Va. 

Charles Wiley Johnson, Ph. B Rockdell, Va. 

James G. Johnson, A. M., Ph. D. (Univ. of Va. '09) . .Charlottesville, Va. 

Annie Lee Lucas, B. S Childress, Va. 

A. Robert Ramey, B. S Defiance, Ohio 

Class of 1898 

Elbert L. Anderson, B. S. Johnson City, Tenn. 

Charles D. Hart, B. S Milligan College 

Ogden Johnson, Ph. B Rockdell, Va. 

Edward Rodney Massie, B. S Ben, Va. 

Juliet Rowlett Massie (Showalter), Ph. B Ben, Va. 

Mary Virginia Orr (Shelburne), B. S Dot, Va. 

Samuel Walter Price, A. M Johnson City, Tenn. 

George J. Sells, B. S., M. D 261 Main St., Johnson City, Tenn. 

Thomas M. Sells, B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Forest Summers, B. S., M. D War Eagle, W. Va. 

Class of 1899 

Annie L. Pruett (Bolton), Ph. B 130 North St., Bluefield, W. Va. 

Charles W. Givens, A. B., University of Virginia. .Charlottesville, Va. 

Richard Maury Leake, A. B ; . Colliersville, Tenn. 

Minnie D. Myhr (Bolton), Ph. B Belleview, Tenn. 

Class of 1900 

Landon C. Bell, Ph. B., A. M Asheville, N. C. 

Sue Bell (Brummett), A. B., A. M Jordan Mines, Va. 

Daisy Boring, B. S Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Wilson R. Bowers, B. S Rural Retreat, Va. 

Horace M. Burleson, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Laura Burchfield (Hyder), B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Larkin E. Crouch, A. B Noel Block, Nashville, Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 15 

Robert S. Fields, B. S Romeo, Tenn. 

Mollie Hale, B. S Jonesboro, Tena. 

Ida Hendrix (Anderson), Ph. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Gentry Hodges, A. B Ardmore, Okla. 

Monta E. Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Stephen A. Morton, A. B Elizabethton, Ten a. 

Fay H. Price, B. S 641 Alabama St., Bristol, Tenn. 

Joe B. Sells, B. S Johnson City, Tenn. 

Amanda Shelburne, Ph. B Pageton, W. Va. 

Geneva Smith (Wallace) , B. S Hiltons, Va. 

Nannie Sutton (Bishop), B. S Pikeville, Ky. 

James S. Thomas, A. M Southern Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

George A. Watson, A. B Durham, Okla. 

Class of 1901 

Frank M. Broyles, B. S Knoxville, Tenn. 

Gideon 0. Davis, A. M Virginia Christian College, Lynchburg, Va. 

Samuel F. Gollehon, A. M Graham, Va. 

William Leslie Leake, A. B., M. D Colliersville, Tenn. 

Class of 1902 

William Thomas Anglin, B. S Calvin, Okla. 

Matthew, Crockett Hughes, A. B Jeffersonville, Ind. 

William Hamilton Jones, A. B Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Minor Johnson Ross., A. B Pulaski, Va. 

Elizabeth Graham Sayers, B. S Pine, Va. 

Jeremy Pate Whitt, A. B Radford, Va. 

Class of 1903 

William Henry Book, A. M Columbus, Ind. 

Gilbert Henry Easley, B. S Knoxville, Tenn. 

Oscar Monroe Fair, A. B., LL. B Johnson City, Tenu. 

Craig Byrd Givens. Ph. B 1116 East Main St., Danville, Va. 

Jesse Brown Givens, Ph. B Newport, Va. 

Myrtle Jeanette Helsbeck (McPherson), Ph. B., A. B Asheville, N. C. 

Nannie Ethel Helsbeck (Reynolds). B. S Cumnor, Va. 

Carrie Louise Hopwood, B. S Springfield, Mo. 

Cordelia May Hopwood, B. S Springfield, Mo. 

Edward Everett Price, B. S Belle Plain, Kan. 

Washington Budd Sager, A. B Woodstock, Va. 

Annie Watson (Burner) , Ph. B Lynchburg, Va. 

Joseph Thomas Watson, A. B Lynchburg, Va. 

Class of 1904 

J. Robert Garrett Ph. B Tennessee 



16 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

William R. Howell, A. B Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 

Elgin K. Leake, B. S Collierville, Tenn, 

Arthur C. Maupin, B. S Cash, Okla,. 

Robert L. Peoples, Ph. B Chattanooga, Tenn. 

James I. Scott, B. S Elk Park, N. C. 

Class of 1905 

*Laura Alice Baker (Wilson) , B. S California 

W. P. Crouch, A. M Louisville, Ky. 

Lucy Louise Hatcher, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Lula Leatitia Lacy (Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Nannie Lee Price (Ratliff), B. S Johnson City, Tenn, 

Y^. H. Garfield (Price), B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Lola Eleanor Roberts (Wilson), B. S Mountain City, Tenn. 

Aylette Rains VanHook, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Georgia Marion White, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Leatitia Wilson (Kelley), B. S Kent, Ore. 

Class of 1906 

M. Nola Fields, Ph. B Baileyton, Tenn. 

Mary Lydia Hanen, B. S Midland, Texas 

*Lucy J. Hart, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Roscoe Hodges, B. S R. P. D., Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Robert Decker Hyder, A. B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Samuel D. Kesner, A. B Greendale, Tenn. 

Owen F. Kilburne, Ph. B Inman, Va. 

Frank A. Taylor, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1907 

N. Pettibone Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

R. Bennick Hyder, B. S Elizabethton, Tenn. 

John L. Kuhn, Ph. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Edgar C. Lacy, A. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

James M. Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn 

Class of 1908 

Stella Lee Burleson (Sutton), A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

William Lee Cook, B. S Jellico, Tenn. 

Mary Frances Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Maggie Matilda Wright, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1909 

George M. Bowman, Ph. B King, N. C. 

Shelburne Ferguson, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 17 

Jennie Hatcher, Ph. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Anna Kelley, Ph. B Unaka, Va. 

George Robert Lowder, Ph. B Bluef ield, W. Va. 

Persie I. Owen, Ph. B Burnside, Ky. 

Mary Evelyn Sevier, Ph. B Harriman, Tenn. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, Ph. B Crossville, Tenn. 

James W. Stephens, A. B Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rennie Bolton White, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

William I. Williams, Ph. B Johnson City, Tenn. 

Class of 1910 

*Professor Alexander Reed Milligan, Litt. D Lexington, Ky. 

*Hon. Robert Love Taylor, LL. D U. S. Senate, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur Eugene Buck, Ph. B Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Frances Temperance Hyder, Ph. B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Ann Price, B. S Milligan College, Tenn. 

Lucius Fields Shelburne, A. B Wise, Va. 

Nell Vaughan Snodgrass, A. B Crossville, Tenn. 

Catharine Emma Thomas, Mus. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Charmian Lestelle Thomas, Mus. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Alma Fiske VanHook, A. B Milligan College, Tenn. 

Class of 1911 

Logan E. Garrett, A. B Virginia 

Mary Huff, B. S Tennessee 

Frank H. Knight, Ph. B Tennessee 

Minerva 0. Knight (Shelburne), Ph. B Virginia 

Ben H. Taylor, Ph. B Tennessee 

Bertie Wade, Ph. B Tennessee 

Wise Worrell, Ph. B Virginia 

Class of 1912 

Ira Camillas Allamong, English Ministerial W. Va. 

Jennie Taylor Anderson, B. Lit Tennessee 

David Park Chapman, English Ministerial W. Va. 

W. Conley Greer, English Ministerial W. Va. 

Lambreth Hancock, English Ministerial Tennessee 

Guy Ocanell Hill, B. Lit Tennessee 

Mary Frances Huff, B. Lit. and English Ministerial Virginia 

Lucy Ethel Price, B. S Tennessee 

Roy Schmucker, A. B Maryland 

Ollie May Shelburne, A. B Virginia 

Mary Ella Wade. B. S Tennessee 



18 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

Class of 1913 

Jesse Norman Cahoon, A. B /r, /..,,.. .Virginia 

Mabel Van Hook, A. B Tennessee 

Joseph Deaderick Clark, A. B Tennessee 

Ruby Pearl Albert, Ph. B Virginia 

Edith Campbell, Ph. B Tennessee 

David Park Chapman, Ph. B West Virginia 

Annie Laura Godby, Ph. B Virginia 

Lottie Grayson Hodges, Ph. B Tennessee 

Nell Bly Hodges, Ph. B Tennessee 

Catharine Emma Thomas, Ph. B Tennessee 

Charmian Lestelle Thomas, Ph. B , Tennessee 

John Byrl White, Ph. B Tennessee 

Elmer Munson, English Ministerial West Virginia 

C. Walter Taber, English Ministerial Tennessee 

Alma Fiske Van Hook, Music Tennessee 

*— Deceased, 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 

1912.'13 

Undergradnates and Academy Students 

Albert, Ruby Pearl Virginia 

English, French, Bible, Education, 
Anderson, Frank Alexander Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics. 
Athey, Edwin Ruthwin , , West Virginia 

English, Bible, Mathematics, Christian Doctrine, 
Bailey, Frank Wesley Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Bookkeeping, Commercial Law. 
Bailey, Williametta Blandenaihe . , Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics. 
Blackwell, William Pierce Virginia 

History, Mathematics, Christian Doctrine. 
Brumit, Robert Clarence . , Tennessee 

English, History, Mathematics, Business. 
Brumit, Nelle Bly Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics. 
Buck, Ephraim C, Jr Virginia 

English, Mathematics, Philosophy, 
^urchfield, Nathaniel Tennessee 

English, Latin, German, French, Science. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 19 

Burleson, Millard Tennessee 

English, Latin, History, Mathematics, Science. 
Cahoon, lessee Virginia 

English, Latin, Philosophy, Science. 
Campbell, Edith Tennessee 

English, French, Philosophy, Science, Education. 
Campbell, Mary Tennessee 

English, French, Mathematics, Botany. 
Chapman, David Park West Virginia 

Greek, Mathematics, New Testament Greek. 
Clark, Joseph Deaderick Tennessee 

English, Latin, German, Philosophy, Mathematics, Science, N. T. 

Greek, Education. 
Clark, Russell Boon Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, History, Mathematics. 
Crouch, Joseph Henry Kentucky 

English, Latin, Greek, French, Mathematics. 
Forbes, Walter Gregory Virginia 

English, Latin, History, Mathematics, Science. 
Godbey, Annie Laura Virginia 

English, German, Mathematics, Education, Philosophy. 
Godbey, William Virginia 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Gourley, Josie Myrtle Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Gray, Lucy Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, Science. 
Hathaway, Harry Carriger Tennessee 

English, Mathematics. 
Hendrix, Clyde Williams Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History, Science. 
Hodges, Lottie Grayson Tennessee 

English, French, German, Mathematics, Philosophy, Bible, Educa- 
tion. 
Hodges, Nelle Bly Tennessee 

English, Latin, French, German, Philosophy, Education. 
Hyder, Goldie Tennessee 

English, Mathematics. 
Hyder, Roy Grant Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Hyder, Sam Jack Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, Science. 
James, Mary ElizaboMi Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics. 



20 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

James, White Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Philosophy. 
Kite, Edgar Thomas Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Latin, History. 
Kite, Eugene Bryan Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Kite, Walter Emmett Tennessee 

English, History, Mathematics. 
Leeper, Prank Coffman : Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Science, Commercial Law. 
Lewis, Benjamin Franklin Virginia 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Love, Evelyn Wyche Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History, Latin. 
Minton, Glenn Lewis Tennessee 

Latin, Mathematics, Business. 
Minton, Joe Ethel Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Mosby, Francis B , Alabama 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Munson, Elmer Baron West Virginia 

English, Philosophy, Education, Christian Doctrine. 
Nave, Anna Mae Tennessee 

English, Latin, German, Mathematics, Education. 
Nave, Steward Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Osborne, Vesta North Carolina 

English, Mathematics. 
Payne, Tempie Bell Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Peoples, Mack Tennessee 

Mathematics, History. 
Price, Jessie Ruth Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Powers, Larry Carson Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Commercial Law. 
Redmond, Osa Belle Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Robinson, Myrtle Tennessee 

English, Bookkeeping, Shorthand. 
Seagraves, William Lewis Tennessee 

English, French, Mathematics, Science. 
Shepherd, James Bradley Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, Science. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 21 

Shepherd, Richard Luther Tennessee 

English, Latin, History, Bible. 
Smalling, Georgia Bryan Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Latin, History. 
Smith, Ed C | .Texas 

English. 
Smith, Kirby Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Bible, History, Christian Doctrine. 
Snodgrass, Jonas Leslie Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, French, Mathematics, Science. 
Swanner, Sam Monroe Tennessee 

English, Mathematics. 
Swanner, Tressie Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Taber, C. Walter Pennsylvania 

English, Mathematics, Philosophy. 
Taber, John Clinton Virginia 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Talbott, Prank Landen Maryland 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Talbott, Sherman Norwood Maryland 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Taylor, Alfred Alexander Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History. 
Taylor, James Virginia 

English, Greek, German, Philosophy, Bible. 
Taylor, Henry Evans Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History. 
Taylor, Judge Bynum North Carolina 

English, Mathematics, Commercial Law, Typewriting. 
Taylor, Samuel Carter Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, History, Bible. 
Thomas, Catharine Emma Virginia 

German, Philosophy, New Testament. 
Thomas, Charmian Lestelle Virginia 

German, Science, Philosophy, Bible. 
Thomas, George Tollie Tennessee 

English, German, Bible, Philosophy, N. T. Greek. 
Thomas, Mary Ellen Tennessee 

English, French, Mathematics, History, Science. 
Trusler, Howard Charles Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Commercial Law. 
Van Hook, Mabel Tennessee 

Philosophy, German, Mathematics, Bible. 



22 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

Warren, Claude James Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Business. 
Watkins, Grayce Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics, History, Commercial Law. 
Watkins, Ruth Tennessee 

English, German, French, Mathematics, Science. 
White, John Byrl Tennessee 

English, Mathematics, Philosophy, Science. 
White, William Myrh Tennessee 

English, Latin, Greek, French, Philosophy. 
Whitehead, Annie Brown Tennessee 

English, Latin, German. 
Whitehead, Thomas James N. Carolina 

English, Commercial Law, Bookkeeping. 
Williams, Sama Kate Tennessee 

English, Latin, Mathematics. 
Worrell, Mollie Kate Virginia 

English, Mathematics, History. 

Ministerial Students. 

Athey, Edwin Ruthwin West Virginia 

English, Bible, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Blackwell, William Pierce Virginia 

Bible, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Chapman, David Park West Virginia 

New Testament Greek. 
Forbes, Walter Gregory Virginia 

Bible and Ministerial. 
Munson, Elmer Baron West Virginia 

Bible, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Shepherd, Luther Tennessee 

Bible, English, History. 
Smith, Kirby Tennessee 

Bible, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Taber, C. W Pennsylvania 

Bible, Philosophy, English. 
Thomas, G. Tollie Tennessee 

N. T. Greek, Bible, English. 

STUDENTS ELECTOG WORK MINISTERIAL DEPARTMEIVT 

Albert, Ruby Virginia 

New Testament History. 
Clark, Joseph Deaderick Tennessee 

New Testament Greek. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



23 



Hodges, Lottie Tennessets 

New Testament History. 
Taylor, James W Virginii* 

New Testament History. 
Taylor, Samuel Carter Tennessee 

New Testament History. 
Thomas, Catherine Virginia^ 

New Testament History. 
Thomas, Charmian Virginia 

New Testament History. 
Van Hook, Mabel Tennessee 

New Testament History. 

PREPARATORY SCHOOLS 



Anderson, William. . .Tennessee 

Anderson, Lela Tennessee 

Anderson Mabel Tennessee 

Anderson, Margaret. .Tennessee 

Archer, Bertie Tennessee 

Archer, Carl Tennessee 

Archer, Cloyd Tennessee 

Archer, Frank Tennessee 

Bailey, Juanita Tennessee 

Bowman, George Tennessee 

Bowman, Harry Tennessee 

Boren, Mack Tennessee 

Broyles, Clyde Tennessee 

Burleson, Gutchie. .. .Tennessee 

Burleson, Pearl Tennessee 

Butler, Clinton Tennessee 

Butler, Eugene Tennessee 

Campbell, Fred Tennessee 

Cooper, Birdie Tennessee 

Ellis, Edmond Tennessee 

Ellas, Pearl Tennessee 

Ellis, Robert Tennessee 

Fair, Will Frank Tennessee 

Feathers, George Tennessee 

Feathers, Marshall. . .Tennessee 

Forbes, Walter Tennessee 

French, Clay Tennessee 

French, Frankie Tennessee 

Gentry, Clayton Tennessee 

Godbey, Ruth Virginia 



McQueen, Wanna Tennessee 

McKeehan, Ossie Tennessee 

Mas ton, Hubert Tennessee 

Maston, Ira Tennessee 

Maston, Junior Tennessee 

Morefield, William. . .Tennessee 

Morris, Edith Tennessee 

Morris, Hubert Tennessee 

Morris, Ralph Tennessee 

Nave, Hazel Tennessee 

Odom, Aaron N. Carolina 

Patton, Maurice Tennessee 

Payne, Anderson Tennessee 

Payne, Cesler, Tennessee 

Payne, Christeen Tennessee 

Payne, Earnest Tennessee 

Price, Joe Tennessee 

Rice Annie May Tennessee 

Rice, Howard Tennessee 

Scott, Melba Tennessee 

Shell, Lawrence Tennessee 

Shell, Ocea Tennessee 

Shepherd, Carl Tennessee 

Shepherd, Pearl Tennessee 

Shepherd, Roscoe. .. .Tennessee 

Shipley, Edward Tennessee 

Shoun, Lizzie Tennessee 

Simmons, Claude Tennessee 

Smalliing, Samuel Tennessee 

Snodgrass, Frank Tennessee 



24 



MiLLiGAM College Yearbook 



Gouge, Jeter N. Carolina 

Gouge, Rexter N. Carolina 

Hampton, Marshall . . N. Carolina 

Hathaway, Fred Tennessee 

Hendrix, Earnest Tennessee 

Hendrix, Lawrence. . .Tennessee 

Himes, Earle Tennessee 

Hodge, Waits Tennessee 

Holden, Fred Tennessee 

Holden, Ivlee Tennessee 

Holden, Omer Tennessee 

Kite, Frank Tennessee 

Kite, Hattie Tennessee 

Kite, Percy Tennessee 

Kite, Sina Tennessee 

Linkous, Ruf us Virginia 

Love, Robert Tennessee 

Mclnturff, Eva Tennessee 

Mclnturff, Leona Tennessee 



Snodgrass, Mjaude Tennessee 

Snodgrass, Lela Tennessee 

Taylor, Katherine. .. .Tennessee 

Taylor, Mary Tennessee 

Taylor, Otis Tennessee 

Taylor, Vernie Tennessee 

Taylor, Robert Tennessee 

Teague, Cora Tennessee 

Townsend, Cecil Tennessee 

Usary, Earnest Tennessee 

Usary, Monta Tennessee 

Usary, Ollie Tennessee 

Underwood, Will Ohio 

Williams, Robert Tennessee 

Williams, Roberta Tennessee 

Williams, Jesse Tennessee 

Watkins, Ralph Tennessee 

Williams, Jesse Tennessee 

Whitehead, Clyde Tennessee 



STUBEJfTS Ilf THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
PIANO 



Albert, Ruby Virginia 

Anderson, Annie Tennessee 

Anderson, Jennie Tennessee 

Anderson, Lela Tennessee 

Anderson, Margaret. .Tennessee 
Bailey, Juanita. ..... .Tennessee 

Bailey, Whillamette. .Tennessee 

Burleson, Pearl Tennessee 

Campbell, Mary Tennessee 

Chapman, Mrs. V...W. Virginia 

Cooper, Birdie Virginia 

Godbey, Laura .Virginia 

Godbey, Ruth Virginia 

Gray, Lucy Tennessee 

Hodges, Lottie Tennessee 

Hodges, Nell Tennessee 



James, White Tennessee 

Kite, Sina Tennessee 

James, Mary E Tennessee 

Lewis, Benj. F Tennessee 

Love, Evelyn ........ Tennessee 

Minton, Joe Ethel .... Tennessee 

Powers, Larry Tennessee 

Seagraves, W. L Tennessee 

Simmons, Rosa Tennessee 

Smalling, Georgia. .. .Tennessee 

Taylor, Mary Tennessee 

Thomas, Mary Tennessee 

Trusler, Howard Tennessee 

Van Hook, Alma Tennessee 

Watkins, Ruth Tennessee 

Worrell, Mollie Virgiinia 



VOICE 



Anderson, Jennie Tennessee 

Athey, Ned Virginia 

Bailey, Whillametta. .Tennessee 



Shepherd, Bradley. . .Tennessee 

Smith, Kirby Tennessee 

Snodgrass, Jonas Tennessee 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 25 

Oahoon, Jesse Virginia Taber, C. W Pennsylvania 

Chapman, Mrs. D. P. W. Virginia Thomas, Catherine Virginia 

Forbes, "Walter Virgiinda Thomas, Charmdan Virginia 

Garrett, Logan Virginia Thomas, Tollie Tennessee 

Hendrix, Clyde Tennessee Utterback, Aileen M.. Tennessee 

Hyder, Sam Jack Tennessee Van Hook, Alma Tennessee 

James, White Tennessee Watkins, Ruth Tennessee 

Kite, Sina Tennessee Worrell, Mollie Virginia 

studejvts in the business department 
shorthand 

Brumit, Clarence. .. .Tennessee. Robinson, Myrtle Tennessee 

Jobe, Nathaniel A. .. .Tennessee Taber, Walter Pennsylvania 

Loyd, Adrian A Tennessee Warren, Claude Tennessee 

Minton, Glenn Tennessee 

TYPEWRITING 

Brumit, Clarence Tennessee Shepherd, Luther Tennessee 

Jobe, Abraham Tennessee Taber, C. W Tennessee 

Loyd, A. A., Jr Tennessee Taylor, J. B N. Carolina 

Minton, Glenn Tennessee Warren, Claude Tennessee 

Robinson, Myrtle Tennessee Whitehead, Tom N. Carolina 

BOOKKEEPING 

Brumit, Clarence Tennessee Taylor, Bynum N.Carolina 

Loyd, A. A., Jr Tennessee Whitehead, Thomas. N. Carolina 

Robinson, Myrtle Tennessee 

COMMERCIAL LAW 

Burchfield, Nat Tennessee Powers, Larry Tennessee 

Clark, Russell Tennessee Taylor, J. Bynum. . . .N. Carolina 

Hyder, Roy Tennessee Watkins, Grayce Tennessee 

James, White Tennessee Whitehead. Tom N. Carolina 

PENMANSHIP 

Clark, Russell Tennessee Seagraves, W. L Tennessee 

Gourley, Josie Tennessee Simmons, Claude Tennessee 

Kite, Bryan Tennessee Smalling, Georgia. .. .Tennessee 

Kite, Sina Tennessee Taylor, J. B N. Carolina 

Kite, Walter Tennessee Taylor. S. C Tennessee 

Love, Evelyn Tennessee Thomas, Charmian Virginia 

McKeehan, Osstie Tennessee 



26 MiLLiGAN College Year Book: 

SUaOIART OF STLDEJfTS 1912.'1§ 

Undergraduate Students 84 

Preparatory Students 98 

Ministerial Students 9 

Music — 

Piano 32 

Voice 22 

— 54 

Business — 

Shorthand 7 

Typewriting 10 

Commercial Law 8 

Penmanship ,,,,,... 13 



Total 283 

Counted Twice 93 

Total 1912-'13 190 



PART m 
BEPARTMEJfTS AlVD COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

I 

Collegiate Department 



Requirements for Admission 

All candidates for admission to the College must offer satisfactory 
evidence of good moral character, and those coming from other colleges 
must present letters of honorable dismissal. 

From the point of view of scholarship, students are admitted to 
Milligan College in one of three ways: 

First — By certificate from the Milligan Academy, no examination 
whatever required in this case. 

Second — By certificate showing at least fifteen units of work from 
a High School or Preparatory School accredited by the State University 
of the state in which said school in located. Students admitted in this 
way are placed upon a probationary requirement which provides 
that a failure to make the usual number of credits during the first 
session involves the student in the entrance examinations outlined 
below. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 27 

Third— By examination. The examination covers the following 
requirements: 
English: (1913-1915) (a) Grtimmar and Bhetoric 1 unit 

(b) Reading and Practice 1 unit 

Two from each of the following groups: — 

A. I. Selections from the Old Testament (the chief narrative episodes 

in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, 
and the books of Buth and Esther); 2. the Odyssey, (English 
translation), (Books I, II, III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII may be omit- 
ted) ; 3. the Iliad, (English Translation), (Books XI, XIII, XIV, 
XV, XVII, XXI may be omitted) ; 4. Virgils Aeneid (English Trans- 
lation). 

A unit from any other group may be substituted for any unit in 
this group. 

B. I. Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice; 2. A Midsummer Night's 

Dream; 3. As Ton Like It; 4. Twelfth Night; 5. Henry the Fifth; 
6. Julius Caesar. 

C. I. Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, (Part 1) ; 2. Goldsmith's The Vicar of 

Wakefield; 3. either Scott's Ivanhoe or Quentin Durward; 4. Haw- 
thorne's The House of Seven Gables; 5. either Dicken's David Cop- 
perfield or A Tale of Two Cities; 6. Thackeray's Henry Esmond; 7. 
Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; 8. George Eliot's Silas Maruer; 9. Steven- 
son's Treasure Island. 

D. I. Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress, (Part 1) 2. The Sir Roger de 

Coverly Papers in The Spectator; 3. Franklin's Autobiography; 4. 
Irviing's Sketch Book; 5. Macaulay's Essays on Lord CUve and 
Warren Hastings; 6. Thackeray's English Humorists; 7. Selections 
from Lincoln (including at least the two Inaugurals, the Speeches 
in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the last public Address, 
and Letter to Horace Greeley) along with a brief memoir or esti- 
mate; 8. Parkman's The Oregon Trail; 9. Either Thoreau's Walden, 
or Huxley's Autobiography and selections from Lay Sermons, in- 
cluding the addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A Liheral 
Education, and A Piece of Chalk; 10. Stevenson's An Inland Voy- 
age and Travels With a Donkey. 

E. I.Palgrave's Golden Treasury, (First Series), Books II and III, with 

especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns; 2. 
Gray's An Elegy in a Country Churchyard and Goldsmith's The 
Deserted Village; 3. Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner 
and Lowell's The Vision of Si'r Launfal; 4. Scott's The Lady of the 
Lake; 5. Byron's Childe Harold; Canto IV, and The Prisoner of 
Cliillon; 6. Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, 
with especial attention to Wodrsworth, Keats, and Shelley; 7. Foe's 



28 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

The Earen, Longfellow's The CourtsMp of Miles Standish, and 

Whittier's Snow-Bound; 8. Macauley's Lays of Ancient Eome and 

Arnold's Sohrab and Eustum; 9. Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, 

Lauucelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; 10. Browning's 

Caralier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the Good 

News from Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home 

Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, Herye Eiel, 

Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa — Down in the City. 

The candidate is expected to have sufficient knowledge of these 

books to enable him to answer general questions on their substance. 

The form of the examination will be the composition of paragraphs 

on a number of topics connected with the works. The ability of the 

candidate to express his ideas in clear, accurate English is a main 

consideration. No applicant should present himself who is notably 

deficient in spelling, grammar, or paragraphing. 

(C) Study and Practice 1 unit 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's L'AUegro, II Penseroso and Co. 
mus; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or Washing- 
ton's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration; 
Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 
The questions on these books will be on subject matter and 
structure. 



Mathematics, Three Units 

II 

(a) Algebra, (1 unit). A good elementary text to quadratics. 
Thorough knowledge of factoring, least common multiple and linear 
equations, both numeral and literal, containing one or more unknown 
quantities. 

(b) Plane Geometry, complete, (1 unit). 

(c) Solid Geometry, (1-2 unit). 

(d) Advanced Algebra, (1-2 unit). 

Algebra from quadratics. Progressions, Binomial Theoreih, Ratio 
and Proportion. One-half year's work with a comparatively advanced 
text. 

Ill — History, three units. 

(a) Ancient History, including one year's work, five hours per 
week, in the history of Greece and Rome. (1 unit). 

(b) Mediaeval and Modern History. (1 unit). 

One year's work with a satisfactory text, five hours per week. 

(c) American History and Civil Government. (1 unit). 
A full year's work, five hours per week. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 29 

Other work in history of an equivalent grade will be accepted, 
providing credits show the time spent in the study to be the same 
as required here. 

IV— Science, three and one-half units. 

(a) Physics, (one unit). An elementary course, pursued one full 
year, with laboratory demonstrations. 

(b) Chemistry, (1 unit). A course similar to the requirements 
in Physics. 

(c) Botany, (1-2 unit). A half year's outline course. 

(d) Zoology, (1-2 unit). A half year's outline course. 

(e) Physiography, (1-2 unit). The subject complete. 
V — Latin, four units. 

(a) Grammar and Composition. Easy translation. (1 unit). 

(b) Caesar, four books, with Composition. (1 unit). 

(c) Cicero, six orations with drill in syntax. (1 unit). 

(d) Vergil, six books with prosody. (1 unit). 
VI — Modern Languages, four units. 

Two years full work in either French or German, embracing a 
thorough knowledge of the forms, together with ordinary skill in 
composition, and the ability to read prose at sight. Two units credit 
given in either language, but no entrance credit given for a single 
year's work considered alone. 

Fifteen units are required for admission, of which three must be 
offered in English, two in Mathematics, two in Foreign Languages, 
one in History and one in Science. The remainder must be selected 
in harmony with the particular course elected for pursuit in the Col- 
lege, as outlined below. 

Matriculation of Students 

Students upon their arrival should report at once to the President 
of the College 'in the College Office. The President will fill out the 
proper blanks and then send the student to the Treasurer; after 
receiving the receipt of the latter for the term fees (see item "Ex- 
penses" under "Miscellaneous Information") the matriculate will go to 
the Secretary of the College who will enroll him upon the permanent 
records of the institution, thereby completing the matriculation. 

Requirements for Degrees 

The full requirements for the various undergraduate degrees are 
given in tabulated form, elsewhere in the Catalogue. 

For the degree of Master of Arts, the student must have received 
the B. A. degree, and must pursue at least two full years' work under 
the special direction of the Faculty. The preparation of a satisfactory 
thesis is also required. For the degree of Master of Science, the pos- 



30 MiLLiGAN College Yearbook 

session of some other academic degree than that of B. A., together with 
the completion of two full years' graduate study, and a satisfactory 
thesis, are required. 

Tabulated Retjuirements for the Different Degrees 

(In every case the necessary fifteen units required for admission 
to the College are presupposed). 

The Classical Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) 

Sixteen College years, meaning sixteen college studies, each of 
which has been pursued not less than four recitation periods per week 
for thirty-six weeks, selected according to the following schedule: 

Ancient Languages 5 

Mathematics 2 

English 3 

Philosophy 2 

Bible 1 

Electives 3 

(At least one elective must be in Language Work). 

The Philosophical Course 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy (Ph. B.). 

English 4 

Modern Languages 4 

Philosophy 2 

Mathematics 2 

Bible 1 

Electives 3 

The Scientific Course 

(Not less than two in Mathematics.) 

English 3 

History 2 

Bible 1 

Philosophy 2 

Electives 3 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES (COLLEGE) LEADOO TO THE 
DIFFERENT DEGREES 



Classical (B. A.) Philosophical (Ph. B) Scientific (B. S.) 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 



31 



Greek 1 
Latin IV 
English V 
Mathematics III 

Greek II 
English VI 
Mathematics IV 
Latin V 

English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
Greek III 



Philosophy II 
Three Electives 



Freshman Year 

English V 
Mathematics III 
French III 
German I 

Sophomore Tear 
English VI 
Mathematics IV 
French IV 
German II 

Junior Tear 
English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
One Elective 

Senior Tear 

Philosophy II 
English VIII 
Two Electives 



English V 
Mathematics III 
History IV 
Science V 

English VI 
Mathematics IV 
History V 
One Elective 

English VII 
Philosophy I 
Bible I 
One Elective 
Math, or Science. 

Philosophy II 
Mathematics V 
Two Electives 



(German III and IV may be offered as substitutes for French III 
and IV in the Literary Course, in which case French I and French It 
may be offered in the place of German I and German II in the schedule. 



COURSES OP INSTEUCTION BT DEPARTMENTS 



The Greek Language and Literature 

Professor Ellis 

Greek I First Term — Beginners' Course. White's First Greek Book. 

Second Term — White's First Greek Book completed. 
Greek II First Term — Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-III. Goodwin's 
Greek Grammar. Jones' Greek Prose Composition. 
Second Term — Homer's Iliad, Books I-III. Grammar and Com- 
position. 
Greek III First Term — Plato's Apology, Lysias' Orations, Grammar 
and Composition. 
Second Term — Demosthenes' Phillipics, Grammar and Composi- 
tion, 



32 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

Greek IV First Term— Homer's Odyssey, Aeschylus' Prometheus 
Bound, Review of Greek Syntax. 
Second Term — Sophocles' Antigone, Euripides' Iphigenia in Tauris, 
Jebb's Primer of Greek Literature 

Advanced courses in both Greek and Latin will be offered to 
students desiring and prepared to take them. 

Students so desiring may use Greek I and II as part of the requir- 
ed fifteen units for admission to the College providing the full sixteen 
years of College credits required for a degree are superimposed upon 
the entrance credit. 



II 

The Latin Language and Literature 

Professor Ellis. 
Latin V First Term — Cicero, De Amicitia and De Senectute. Livy, 
Books I and XXI. 
Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar and Prose Composition one hour per 
week during the year. 
Latin TI First Term — Horace, Odes, Book I-IV. 

Second Term — Tacitus, Agricola and Germania. Latin Prose and 
Composition. 
Latin VII First Term — Selected Plays and Plautus and Terence. 

Second Term — Extracts from Latin Authors not previously read 

History of Latin Literature. 
Students offering only three years Latin as part of the required 
fifteen units for admission to the College may use fourth year Latin 
in the academy as a college credit. 



III 

The English Language and Literature 

Professor Miller 

English V First Term — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition, with 
study of English Prose. Assigned reading from spec- 
ial texts with written exercises upon them. Thorough drill in 
theme work. 
Second Term — English Prose. A study of the essay as exemplified 
in the work of the English reviewers. Biographical and his- 
torical literature, with assigned collateral reading and theme 
work. 

English VI First Term — The Drama. A study of technique as well 
as the greater masterpieces of the Elizabethan epoch for their 
purely literary value. Early Miracle and Morality plays. Mar- 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 33 

lowe's Tamburlaine and Faustus. Shakespeare's Early Plays. 
Second Term — The Drama continued. Middle and later plays of 
Shakespeare, Ben Jonson and the close of the Elizabethan 
epoch. 

English VII First Term — Epic and Lyric Poetty, with special study of 
the Romantic Period in English Literature. The structure 
of the Epic, with careful study of Paradise Lost as compared 
with the Iliad, the Aeneid and the Diyiue Comedy. The Excur- 
sion and Prelude of Wordsworth. 
Second Term — The structure of the Lyric, with careful and detail- 
ed study of the work of Shelley, Burns and Keats. 

EngUsh VIII First Term — Nineteenth Century Poetry and Drama. 
Byron, Keats and Tennyson. The decadence of the older type 
of drama. 
Second Term — Robert Browning. The Dramatic Monologue. Care- 
ful study of the Dramatic Lyrics and The Ring and the Book. . 

English IX First Term— Early English and Anglo-Saxon. Careful 
study of Anglo-Saxon forms. Readings from Beowulf and 
Caedmon. Selections from Chaucer and his contemp raries. 
Second Term — Prose Fiction. The Short Story, and the technique 
of the Novel. Assigned reading for analysis of the Master- 
pieces of English fiction. 

English X First Term— Present Day Drama. George Bernard Shaw, 
Stephen Phillips, Pinero. Tendencies of the modern dramatic 
movements. 
Second Term — Present Day Fiction. The Modern Novel. Magazine 
and Short Story writing. The demands of modern journalism. 
Literature as a profession. 

(The course in English Language and Literature subject to change.) 



IV 
The French Language and Literature 

Miss Hardin 

French I First Term — Elementary French. Text used: Eraser & 
Squair's Grammar. Careful attention to pronunciation. 
Second Term — Grammar Completed. Labiche & Martin's Le Voy- 
age de Jlonsieur Perrichon. Merimee's Columba. 
French II First Term— French Prose. . Daudet's Tartaria de Tarascon, 
Hugo's Les Miserables, Souvestre's Philosophic Sur Les Toits, 

Blanchand's French Idioms. 
Second Term — Continuation of First. 



34 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Jrench III First Term — French Prose. Selected readings from Da- 
mas, Hugo, Moliere, De Maupassant. 
Second Term — Continuation of First. 
French IV First Term — History of French Literature. Early French 
Tales and Ballads. 
Second Term — French Essayists and critics. Study of work of 
Tanied and others. 



Tlie German Language and Literature 

German I First Term — Joynes Meissner, German Grammar, Niebut- 
ir's HroengescliicLten. 

Second Term — Grammar complete to Part III. Storm's Immen- 
see, Heyse's L' Arabiats. 
German II First Term — Grammar completed from Part III to end. 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jnngfrau yon Orleans. 
Second Term — Baumbach's Der Schwiegersolin, Schiller's Der 
IVeffe als Oukel. 
German III First Term — The German Drama. A careful study of 
the masterpieces of Goete, Schiller and Lessing. Wallensteita, 
aiaria Stnart, Kathan Der Weise. 
Second Term — Egmont, Fanst (Parts I and II), Torqnato Tasso. 
German conversation. 
German IV First Term — History of German Literature. Old and 
Middle High German. 
Second Term — Readings from the German Philosophers; Kant, 
Fische, Schopenhauer. Conversation, 



VI 
Mathematics 

Professor Hill, Professor Garrett 

Mathematics III First Term— Algebra from Quadratics. Permuta- 
tions and Combinations. Binomial Theorem. Series. Theory 
of Equations and Determinants. 
Second Term — Solid Geometry, complete. 

(Mathematics III Mill be accepted as either a College or an 
Academy credit. 

Mathematics IV First Term— Plain and Spherical Trigonometry. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 35 

The Trigonometric ratios. Solution of Trigonometric Equations 
Solution of Triangles and use of Tables. 
Second Term— Elementary Analytical Geometry. The straight 
line. General equation of the first degree in two variables. 
Mathematics V First Term — Conic Sections. The Ellipse and Para- 
bola, Analytical Geometry of three dimensions. 
Second Term — Differential Calculus. Careful study of the func- 
tions of one variable. 
Mathematics VI First Term — Integral Calculus. 
Second Term — History of Mathematics. 



TH 

History 

Professor Miller 

History IV First Term — History of Greece. This course consists of 
lectures and a study of the principal events in Grecian His- 
tory from the earliest times until the Roman Subjugation. 
Second Term — History of Rome. Lectures and a study of the 
principal events of Roman History from the foundation of the 
city to the death of Theodosius. Particular attention is given 
to the development of Roman political institutions. 

History V First Term — History of England. Lectures and a study of 
the political, industrial, religious, educational and social in- 
stitutions of England from the earliest times to George V. 
Second Term Outline of Medieval and Modern History. Lec- 
tures and a study of the successive phases of social, religious, 
political and constitutional developments since A. D. 476. 
Special attention will be given to one or two modern periods, 
such as the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era, or the 
Period of English Reform. 

History VI First Term— Political History of the United States— 1750- 
1890. 
Second Term — American Institutions. This course aims to give 
the student some idea of the framework of the American 
Government, state and national. The President, Congress, the 
Courts and the outline of state government receive most care- 
ful attention, and are further elucidated by a brief historical 
account of the growth of the Constitution. 



36 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

Tin - -. 

Natural Science 

Professor Hill, Professor Garrett. 

Science III First Term — General Physics. Elementary MechanicF, 
Sound, Light, Heat, Electricity and Magnetism. Experimental 
Demonstrations. 
Second Term — The above concluded. 
Science IV First Term — General Chemistry. The fundamental prin- 
ciples and phenomena of inorganic and physical Chemistry. 
Laboratory work. 
Second Term — The above concluded. 
Science V First Term — General Geology. A general discussion of 
dynamical, structural, physiographical and historical geology. 
Second Term — Mineralogy and Crystallography. Outline course, 
field and laboratory work. 



IX 

Philosophy 

President McDiarmid, Professor Hayden 

Philosophy I First Term — Logic, Deductive and Inductive, with care- 
ful study of the laws of thought and the inductive process. 
Second Term — General Psychology. The special problems of con- 
sciousness. 

Philosophy II First Term — Ethics. A study of the Moral Ideal as 
viewed by both Hedonists and Rationalists, as well as an 
analysis of the Moral Life. Lectures, with Seth's Ethical 
Principles as a guide. 
Second Term — Economics. The Problems of Currency, Transpor- 
tation, Taxation, etc., as applied to present day life. 

Philosophy III First Term — The History of Philosophy. Ancient 
Philosophy from Heraclitus to Neo-Platonism. Medieval Phil- 
osophy, Scholasticism, Aquinas, Abelard and Duns Scotus. 
Second Term — Modern Philosophy, from Descartes to Herbert 
Spencer and Eucken. Special study of the Critical Period and 
the works of Kant. 

Philosophy IV First Term— Outline Course in Pbilcsophy Elements 
of Epistemology. Outline of the Theory of Knov/ledge. The 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 37 

Categories of the Objective and the Subjective Worlds. 
Second Term — Outline Course in Metaphysics. General theories 
of the Universe. The constant element in Philosophy. A 
critical examination of the Agnostic, Positivistic, Pantheistic 
and Theistic positions. 

Philosophy V. First Term — Elements of Sociology. A study of the or- 
ganization of Society, its self-maintenance, self-perpetuation, 
and self-gratification. Mental and social relations. The or- 
igin of civilization and the development of institutions treated 
in the light of anthropology and ethnology. 
Second Term — (a) A study of the American City and its relatioji 
to Democracy, (b) Crime, Corrections and Charities. (Phil- 
osophy V three hours per week.) 

Philosophy VI First Term — Aesthetics and the History of Art. Ele- 
mentary principles of Aesthetics. Definition of Art. The Fine 
Arts. Study of Architecture and Sculpture in ancient and 
modern times. 
■ Second Term — The History of Painting in the ancient and Modern 
World. Special attention paid to the Italian Renaissance. 
Lectures with lantern illustrations of the masterpieces of 
Leonardo, Michael Angelo, Raphael and Titian. The present 
status of painting. 



X 

Education 

President McDiarmid 

£ducati<on I First Term— The History and Principles of Education 
Text Book, lectures and selected reading, and class room dis- 
cussion. The object of this course is to study the evolution of 
the educational ideal in connection with the conditions in which 
it had its origin and amid which it developed. Special atten- 
tion is given to the systems of education in Greece and Rome, 
in Europe during the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Re- 
formation, and in Modern Germany, France, England and 
America. Physical environment, social, industrial and politi- 
cal conditions, traditions, customs, and religion, have had their 
influence in determining racial development, one phase of 
which has found its expression, during the different periods, in 
the educational systems of the several nations. These systems 
are analyzed as revealing epochal and national ideals, the writ- 
ings of individuals being studied for their contribution to and 



38 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

interpretation of these systems. 
Second Term — Elementary and Secondary Education. The theory 
and practice of teaching in the elementary and secondary 
schools, and the applications of the principles of teaching, 
are special features of this course. Reports, discussions, ob- 
servation and practice, with supervision and criticism. 

Education II.. First Term — Methods of instruction in elementary and 
secondary schools. Lectures, selected readings, reports and 
class room discussion. The aim of this course is to investi- 
gate the learning process as a basis for the study of the fac- 
tors in successful teaching. 

Education III,. First Term — Introduction of the Philosophy of Educa- 
tion. Results of investigation in Psychology, Biology, Neurol- 
ogy, Anthropology, Ethnology and Sociology will be interpre- 
ted in their relation to Education. (Graduate). 
Second Term — Administration. A study of the national, state and 
city systems; public finance a,nd education; school buildings 
and equipment. The supervision and employment of teachers. 
The relation between school, home and society. The educa- 
tional systems and policies of the Southern States are consid- 
ered in detail. (Graduate). 



XI 

Bible 

President McDiarmid, Professor Hayden 

Bible I. .First Term — Old Testament History, Genesis to Judges with 
careful study of the Hebrew Law and the development of 
national life. 
Second Term — The Monarchy from its founding to its dissolution. 
Careful study of Hebrew Literature and the writings of the 
Prophets. 

Bible II.. First Term — New Testament History. The period between 
the Old and New Testaments. History of the Macabees and 
Herod. The life of Christ to the Sermon on the Mount. 
Second Term — The Life of Christ during the Middle and Later 

periods. Careful study of the text of the individual Gospels. 
Other courses in the Robert Milligan Bible School are also open to 
students of the College proper. 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 39 

II 

THE ROBERT MILLIGAJ BIBLE SCHOOL 

The Robert Milligan Bible School has grown out of the needs of 
religious work in the South. Its aim is to furnish an adequate prep- 
aration for the ministry of the Gospel on the part of those who com- 
plete the work assigned. The ideals which govern those who have 
charge of the school are entirely opposed to any legalistic or formal- 
istic interpretation ef Christianity. On the contrary, they assume 
that the one need of the world today is the vital, living Christ, with His 
message of supreme tenderness and love. To see somewhat of that 
message, to become enthused with it, and to go forth to proclaim it 
to the world, they conceive to be the mission of the preacher. The 
school aims always at thoroughness of preparation and accuracy of 
scholarship rather than mere numercial display. It appeals to all 
those who have the ideal of quality rather than quantity in the ministry. 

Unswerving fidelity to the Word, and thorough devotion to the 
Christ are the appropriate watchwords of a school bearing the name 
of one of the noblest of God's noblemen since the apostolic age. And 
surely no place could be better adapted by location and environment 
to preserve and cherish the spirit of Robert Milligan than the spot 
which bears his honored name. 

Requirements for Admission 

To enter the Freshman Class of the Robert Milligan Bible School, 
a student must give evidence, by examination or otherwise, that ho 
has completed satisfactorily the College Preparatory requirements in 
English, Mathematics, History and Science. 

Requirements for GIraduation 

The Robert Milligan Bible School does not confer degrees. It 
does, however, grant an appropriate diploma upon the completion of 
either the Classical or the English course. These diplomas are cer- 
tificates of merit, and carry with them quite as much value as the 
usual academic degrees. Graduates in either course, with very little 
additional work, may secure the regular degrees conferred by the 
College upon completing the required courses of study. The fee for the 
Bible School Diploma is $3.00. 

Curriculum 

The Robert Milligan Bible School offers two distinct courses. 
The first, entitled the English Ministerial, is designed for those stu- 
dents who wish to prepare for the ministry without being able to take 
Greek or other classical work. The second, entitled the Classical 



40 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

Ministerial, is designed for those who wish to pursue the classics in 
connection with the ministerial studies proper. The courses are as 
follows: 

Englisli Ministerial 

Freshman Year First Term — English V, Old Testament History, 
History IV, Mathematics III. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Sophomore Year First Term — English VI, New Testament History, 
History V, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Junior Year First Term— Apostolic History, English VII, Philosophy 
I, Practical Work of the Minister. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Senior Year First Term — English VIII, Church History, Homiletics, 
Philosophy II. 
Second Term — English VIII, Church History, Homiletics, Phil- 
osophy II. 
The courses in Bible School Pedagogy and Missions are also re- 
quired in order to receive a diploma. 

Classical 3Iinisterial 

Freshman Year First Term— Greek I, English V, Old Testament 
History, Mathematics III. 
Second Term — The above continuea. 
Sophomore Year — First Term — New Testament Greek I, New Testa- 
ment History, English VI, Christian Doctrine and Polity. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Junior Year First Term — New Testament Greek II, Apostolic His- 
tory, English VII, Philosophy I, Practical Work of the Minister. 
Second Term — The above continued. 
Senior Year First Term — English VIII, Philosophy II, Church His- 
tory, Exegesis, one elective. 
Second Term — English VIII, Philosophy II, Church History, Hom- 
iletics, one elective. 
The courses in Bible School Pedagogy and Missions are also re- 
quired in order to receive a diploma. 



DEPARTMEIfTS AND COURSES OF IIVSTRUCTION 

President McDiarmid, Professor Hayden 
Course I — Old Testament History. The History of the Jewish 
people from the Creation of the World to the Captivity. Text-books — 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 41 

The Authorized and American Revised editions of the Holy Scriptures 
with MacLear's Old. Testament History as a guide. Selections from the 
Old Testament are read and critically studied in this class. For 1913 
the books studied will be The Psalms, Ecclesiastes, and the Prophecy 
of Isaiah. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course II — New Testament History. Sacred History from the Dis- 
persion to the Resurrection. Textbooks — The Gospels, Authorized and 
American Revised editions, with MacLear's New Testament History as 
a guide. Lectures with chart outline and a critical study of one of 
the Apocryphal Books and at least one of the Gospels. The Gospel 
studied in 1914 will be Luke. Two Terms — five hours weekly. 

Course III — Apostolic History. The History of the Church from 
the Day of Pentecost until the close of the New Testament Canon. 
Textbooks — The Acts and Epistles, Authorized and American Revised 
editions. Lectures with careful reading and study of selected Epistles. 
Two terms — four hours weekly. 

Course IV — Church History since the Apostolic Period. Church 
History from the death of the Apostle John to the present time. Spec- 
ial attention given to the Reformation and the later restoration move- 
ments. Lectures. Two terms — four hours weekly. 



II 
School of Exeg'esis and Christian Doctrine 

President McDiarmid, Professor Hayden 

Course I — New Testament Exegesis. Careful study of the princi- 
ples of Hermeneutics with exegesis of selected portions of the Scrip- 
tures. Lectures. One Term — four hours weekly. 

Course II — Christian Doctrine and Polity. Two Terms. 

First Term — The Content of Christianity. A careful study of the 
essential message of Christ, with a scrutiny of the ideals of life He 
strove to inculcate. 

Second Term— The Form of Christianity. A study of the Ordinan- 
ces, Creed and Polity of the Christian Church. Lectures. Four hours 
weekly. 



in 
School of Applied Christianity 

Professor Crouch and Professor Hayden 

Course I — Practical work of the Minister, (a) Pastoral duties, (b) 
The Sunday School, (c) Evangelism, (d) Missions. Lectures. This 



42 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

course will be given by an eminently practical and successful minister, 
who will embody his personal experience in his teachings. Two terms 
-—two hours weekly. 

Course II — Theoretical Homiletics. Lectures, with Johnson's The 
Ideal Ministry as a guide. One term — three hours weekly. 

Course III — The Social Mission of Jesus. The Message of Christ 
for the shifting social conditions of the present day. Mission work 
in the large cities, tenement life, etc. Lectures. One term— -three 
hours weekly. (Elective). 



IV 
School of Biblical Greek 

Professor Ellis 
(Not required for English Certificate.) 

Course I — Beginner's Course. White's First Greek Book completed 
Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course II — The Greek New Testament, with composition. Exe- 
getical study of the Gospels. Two terms — five hours weekly. 

Course III — The Greek New Testament completed. Critical study 
of the Acts and Epistles. Two terms — five hours weekly. 



V 
School of Bible School Pedag-ogy 

Professor J. E. Crouch 

The work of the Bible School in all of its departments outlined by 
one of the best known authorities. Milligan College maintains a 
Front Rank Bible School as a Training Department, and emphasizes 
the Bible School in every possible way. Professor Crouch will de- 
liver the lectures, during 1913-14, outlined in Part II of this Catalogue. 



VI 
School of Missions 

To Be Supplied. 

A study of Modern Missions and Methods, conducted by one of 
the foremost of American authorities. (Lecture list given under Part 
II). Professor Paul will also conduct studies in Missionary Methods 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 43 

and Problems while at Milligan. Studies in Barton's The Unfinished 
Task, with collateral reading, will be conducted throughout the year. 



VII 
School of ETangelism 

To Be Supplied. 

Studies in Modern Evangelistic Methods and Problems, by a suc- 
cessful Pastor-Evangelist. The subject will be handled also in the 
course under Practical Problems of the Minister. Practical evangelis- 
tic methods constitute a part of the regular study of the ministerial 
student at Milligan. Students are encouraged to hold meetings at near- 
by mission points under competent direction. A large section of the 
country adjoining Milligan has been evangelized in this way. 

Home Economics 

We feel very much gratified that we can offer this course to our 
students. During the last ten years the study of Domestic Science has 
come into prominence. In the past the task of teaching the girl to 
cook, to sew, and to keep the home, was left to the mother. Now the 
schools have taken the subject into their hands, and all over the 
country this science is being taught It has been called, and properly 
so, the Science of "Home Making." 

In offering it this first year, we are giving only two courses, one 
in cooking, and one in sewing. Next year we will give the second 
course in cooking and a more advanced sewing course. We have new 
laboratories and the very best of equipment, and we recommend this 
to you. 

The courses are as follows: 

Course I — Household Science. Study of food materials and their 
classification as to structure, nutritive value and use in the body. The 
combustion of foods. The study of fuels, different cooking apparatus, 
and cooking processes. The food combinations, and the planning and 
serving of meals. 

Course II— Domestic Art. Study of textiles and their relation to 
clothing. The application of different stitches to useful articles. The 
use of patterns, also the cutting and making of garments. 



Ill 
THE ACADE3IT 

Two objects are kept in view in arranging the courses of study and 
directing the Academy; first, to offer preparation for College, which 



44 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

will be sufficient in quality to admit a student to the Freshman Class 
of any College of University; second, to provide for young men and 
women who may be denied the advantage of a college course, as much 
training and culture as is possible in a four year's course of academic 
work in secondary school. 

The courses of study are arranged to meet the individual needs 
of the student. Under the advice of the director of the Academy, 
every opportunity is afforded the student to progress in his work of 
preparation as rapidly as is consistent v/ith thoroughness and good 
scholarship. 

The work and discipline of the Academy is under the supervision 
of the Dean of the College, who is ex officio director of the preparatory 
schools. The Academy is in close touch with the College. The Pres- 
ident and Faculty of the College also give special attention to the work 
of the Academy and in certain subjects the instruction is by College 
professors. In every department, the instruction is thorough, and 
special effort is made that the student may at all times feel the per- 
sonal impress of the instructor. The Students of the Academy enjoy 
all the privileges of the library and reading room, and the advantages 
of the athletics of the college. 

The young ladies attending the Academy from abroad are re- 
quired, except when other arrangements are allowed by the President, 
to reside in the ladies' dormitory which is a pleasant home of re- 
fined influences. 

Study Hall 

Students are required to study in the Study Hall provided for the 
purpose, under the scheduled regulations, unless excused by the Direct- 
or of the Academy. 

Admission 

Completion of the course of study in the elementary schools is re- 
quired for admission to the Academy. Certificates from teachers or 
school officers certifying that the student has completed the work in 
Elementary English Grammar, Practical Arithmetic, United States His- 
tory and Complete Geography will ordinarily be accepted in lieu of 
examination in these subjects. Students wishing to enter without such 
certificates may be examined on these subjects during the first three 
days of school. Students conditioned in one or more of the above 
named studies will have to make up that condition in the Elementary 
School during the first year of the Academy course. 

Choice of Conrses 

Students may, by and with the advice and consent of the Director 
of the Academy, choose a course of study differing from the Curricu- 



MiLLiGAN College Yearbook 45 

lum; but when the course is chosen and the classes entered, no change 
will be made after the beginning of the fourth week of school. The 
work of each course should be taken in order from the beginning, but 
the Director for sufficient reasons may give permission to vary the 
order. 

Substitutions 

Studies in one course may be substituted for those of another pro- 
vided the credit is the same, and the Director is satisfied that the sub- 
stitution will be for the best; but in the Classical and Literary courses, 
no substitution will be made for Latin. In the third and fourth years, 
Greek may be substituted for equivalent units other than Latin. 

A credit or unit means the equivalent of five prepared recitations 
a week for one scholastic year or not less than one hundred and fifty 
(150) recitations, two periods of laboratory work being considered 
equivalent to one period of recitation work. 

Elietoricals and Exercises 

All the students shall perform Rhetorical work throughout the year 
under the direction of the Director of the Academy. 

Graduation 

Students who satisfactorily complete a course of study offered in 
the Academy shall be granted a diploma certifying the fact, but in all 
cases the conduct of a student must be satisfactory before the honors 
of graduation can be conferred. 

Schedule of Studies 

Below is submitted a schedule of studies. Each course continues 
throughout one year, unless otherwise stated. 

The average amount of work required of each student is twenty 
periods in recitation per week. No student will be assigned less work 
than this except for reason. 

FIRST YEAR 

Classical — Latin I, Mathematics I, Science I, English I. 
Literary — Latin I, Mathematics I, Science I, English I. 
Scientific — French I, Mathematics I, Science I, English I, 

SECOND YEAR 

Classical — Latin II, i\]athematics II, History I, English II. 
Literary — Latin II, Mathematics II, History I, English II. 



46 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

Scientific — ^French II, Mathematics II, History I, English IL 

THIRD YEAR 

Classical — Latin III, History II, Science III, English III. 
Literary — French I or German I, History II, Science III Eng- 
lish IIL 
Scientific — Germanl, Science II, Science III, English III. 
FOURTH YEAR 

Classical — Latin IV, History III, Science IV, English IV. 
Literary — French II or German II, History III, Science IV, 
English IV. 
Science — German II, History III, Science IV, English IV. 



COURSES OF OSTRUCTION 
LATIJf 

Latin I — Hales First Latin Book is completed; especial attention paid 
to vocabulary and forms. Two terms. 

Latin II — Four books of Caesar's Gallic War are read. Emphasis is 
constantly laid on accuracy in declensions and conjugations. Prose 
composition (Bennett) — two written exercises per week. Two 
terms. 

Latin III — The whole year is devoted to Cicero's Orations. The four 
against Cataline and the Manallian Law and Archias are read. 
Special attention is given to Latin Subjunctive. Bennett's Latin 
Grammar. Prose composition one hour per week. Two terms. 

Latin IV — First six books of Virgil's Aeneid are read. Constant prac- 
tice in scanning is given. Special attention is given to Vergil's 
syntax. Derivation and composition of words are studied during 
the year. Latin Composition. Two terms. 

ENGLISH 

English I — Composition and Grammatical Analysis. Thorough review 
of the forms. Special attention paid to inaccuracies of speech and 
writing. Drill work in syntax, punctuation, and paragraphiny. 
Two terms. 

English II — First Term: Elementary Rhetoric. The essentials of Nar- 
ration, Description, Exposition, and Argumentation. One term. 
Second Term: Outlines of English and American Literature (West- 
lake). Composition -work once per week. One term. Outside 
readings in literature throughout the year. 

English III — The History of English Literature. Pancoast's Represen- 
tative English Literature with collatteral reading. All the College 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 47 



Entrance Requirements in English are read and studied in Courses 
II and III. Two terms. 

Hn^lish IV — The History of American Literature. Pancoast's Introduc- 
tion with outside collateral reading. Theme work throughout the 
year. Two terms. 
(Either Academy or College Credit). When offered as the latter, 

three additional years of College English are required in the Classical 

and Scientific courses, and four additional years of College English, in 

the Literary Course. 

FREJfCH 

French I — First Term: Elementary French. Textbook work in Gram- 
mar, and the reading of simple texts. Careful attention to pronun- 
ciation. Second Term; Grammar completed. Merimee's Columba. 
Erckmann-Chatrian's Le Juif Polonais. Lamartine's Scenes de lu 
RcTolntion Francaise. 

French II — First Term: French Prose. Erckmann-Chatrian's Madame 
Therese and Waterloo. George Sand's La Mare au Diable. Meri- 
mee's Chronique du Regne de Charles IX. Victor Hugo's Bug 
Jargal. Second Term: The French Drama. Selected plays of 
Moliere, Corneille and Racine. Victor Hugo's Ruy Bias. 

GERMAN 

German I — First Term: Bierwirth's Beginning German. Easy read- 
ing and composition. Muller and Wenckebach's Gluck Auf. Second 
Term: Thomas' Practical German Grammar. Heyse's L'Arrabiata. 
Hauff's Tales. Easy prose. 

German II — First Term: Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Jungfrau Ton 
Orleans. Careful review of forms, and composition. Scheffel's 
Der Trompeter von Sakkingen. Second Term: German Prose. 
Riehl's Burg Neideck. Freytag's Soil und Ilaben. Fulda's Der 
Talisman, and similar texts. 

MATHEMATICS 

I — Elementary Algebra. 

The four fundamental operations, equations of the first degree with 
one unknown quantity. Simultaneous equations of the first degree, 
factors, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, fractions, 
including complex fractions, involution and evolution, theory of expo- 
nents (positive, negative, fractional and zero), radicals, including im- 
aginaries, equations involving radicals, quadratic equations involving 
one unknown quantity. Two terms. 
II — Plane Geometry. 

Wentworth's Plane Geometry is used as a text in this course. The 



48 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

work includes all the propositions which are demonstrated in the 
text-book. Nearly all the exercises are worked, including those for 
demonstration, construction and computation. Books I to V are com- 
pleted. Two terms. 

HISTORY 

I — Ancient History: Text-hook and recitations during the year. 
The scope of this subject shall include the history from the beginning 
to 800 A. D. Two terms. 

II — Modern History: From 800 A. D. to the present time. Text- 
book and recitations throughout the year. Two terms. 

Ill — American History: (a) From the European discovery of the 
New World, with especial attention in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries to the British empire in America. After the Revolution, the 
History and Civil Government of the United States are studied. One 
term. 

scmmcE 

I — (a) Zoology: Vertebrate and invertebrate Zoology are studied 
by means of a text-book. Laboratory work. One term. 

(b) Botany: Text-book and Laboratory work. One term. 

II — (a) Physical Geography: Text-book and laboratory and field 
work. One term. 

(b) Astronomy: Elementary Astronomy. One term. 

Ill — Physics: One year of study devoted to Elementary Physics, 
Text-book and latoratory work. Two terms. 

Pre-requisites: Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

IV — Chemistry: One year's work offered in Elementary Chemistry 
by text-book, lectures, recitations and laboratory work. At least four 
laboratory periods are held each week. Two terms. 

ELEMEJfTART SCHOOL 

The Elementary School is divided into departments, viz: — the 
Primary and Grammar Schools. The primary includes the first four 
grades or years in school. The Grammar School includes from the fiftii 
to eighth inclusive. 

The course of study for the Elementary School will be furnished 
upon application. 



DEPARTMEJfT OF MUSIC 

Miss Marcelena Houston 
Piano 
Theory — The course in general musical theory consists of two 
parts: Preparatory. Acoustics and tone quality. Accent (natural and 



MiLLiGAN College Yearbook 49 

artificial), rythm, tempo. Practical work in the explanation and the 
analysis of musical form. Description of orchestral instruments, their 
distinguishing characteristics, etc. Special instruction in the inter- 
pretation of music. 

Harmony — Preliminary studies, systems of intervals. Triads of 
the major and minor scales and their inversions. Seventh chords and 
their inversion. Chords of the ninth. Modulation, suspensions. Or- 
gan (pedal) point. Passing tones. Passing chords. Exercises in part- 
writing. 

History of Music — The course in History of Music consists of lec- 
tures treating the earliest beginnings down to the present time. The 
crudest ancient forms. The early part song. The chorale. The op- 
era. The oratorio. The modern chorus. Early notation. The staff. 
The folk song. The part song. The madrigal. The aria. The ballad. 
The history of musical instruments. Biographies of the masters. 
Their principal works noted and illustrated by performance. Sketches 
of living musicians. 

Beading Pifano Classes — Four pupils form a class and on two 
pianos play arrangements for eight hands of the classic and modern 
works. This gives exercise in reading at sight, gives experience in 
ensemble playing, develops the sense of rythm, and familiarizes with 
the compositions of the great masters. 

FIRST GRADE— Sartorio, Practical Method. Kohler. Pieces by 
Spaulding, Richter, Streabog. 

SECOND GRADE — Herz scales and Technical studies. Studies by 
Loeschorn, op. 65. Duverno, op. 176. Czerny, Kohler, Sonatinas and 
selections by Clementi, Llchner, Schumann, Heller and others. 

THIRD GRADE— Plaidy's Technical Studies. Czerny, op. 299, 
Books I, II, III, IV. Czerny's octaves. Heller op. 45 and 47. Selections 
by Bach, Schumann, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Weber and others. 

FOURTH GRADE— Cramer's studies, Books I, II, III, IV. Kullak's 
Octaves Studies, Books I, II. Bach's Little Preludes and Fugues. Eas- 
ter Sonatas of Hayden, Mozart, and Beethoven. Selections by Chopin, 
Chaminade, Liszt, Raff, Wollenhaupt, Mendelssohn. 

FIFTH GRADE— dementi's Gradus and Parnassum. Kullack's 
8va., Book III. Bach's Inventions. Hayden, Mozart and Beethoven 
Sonatas, Book II. Selections by Liszt, Chopin, Moskowski, Leschetizki, 
Chaminade, Grieg, MacDowell, Brahms. 

Voice 

FIRST GRADE — Rules for breathing and their practical applica- 
tion; formation of tone; method of singing. Abt's Practical Singing 
Tutor, exercises by Ed J. Myer. Easy songs. 



50 MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 

SECOND GRADE — Study of slow trill, portmento, etc.; exercises 
and studies for flexibility of vocal chords. Abt's Practical Singing 
Tutor. Concone opus 9. Songs by Tosti, Denza, Bartlett, Neidlinger, 
Vannah, DeKoven, 

THIRD GRADE — Continuation of exercises in vocalization. Studies 
try Bonoldi, Concone op 10. Songs by Buck, Grieg, Hadley, E. Neviu, 
Lassen. 

FOURTH GRADE — More difficult exercises in vocalization; mu- 
sical embellisbment. Marcbesi's Art of Singing, op. 21. Studies by 
Bonoldi, Panopka op. 85. Song from the French, German, Italian, 
and English schools. 

FIFTH GRADE — Continuation of studies of previous year. Study 
of oratorio, arias. Songs by Brahms, Schubert, Gounod, Luzzi, Schu- 
mann, Franz. 

Eequlremeiits for Gradnation 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music, (Mus. B) completion of the 
entire music course is required, together with two years of harmony, 
and one year of Theory and History of Music. The regular course in 
Voice includes first and second grades of Piano Forte. Graduates in 
music are also required to give a public recital, unassisted previous to 
graduation. 



TI 
C0M3IERCIAL DEPAETMEJfT 

To Be Supplied. 

The aim of the Commercial Department is to be complete and 
practical. The courses are designed, v.'ork outlined, text-books select- 
ed, and everything planned with the one design of giving the student 
everything necessary in training and equipment, to enable him to fill 
completely the positions in the actual commercial world of today, 
for which the work he takes is supposed to be a preparation, and to 
tax his time and energies with as little as possible that is not directly 
useful. The courses usually offered in Business Colleges throughout 
the country, are taught here as follows: 

Stenography and Typewriting 

(a) SHORTHAND. There is a great deal of irrelevant, polemical 
discussion indulged in over the merits of different shorthand systems. 
We do not believe the matter of choice of system to be nearly so vital 
as diligant application to the one selected, until its principles have 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 51 

become mastered by study and their application has grown natural 
and easy through practice. We give students their choice of either 
the Graham or the Gregg systems. The former is usually conceded 
to be the most rapid of the Pitmanic systems; while the latter is the 
best known, and we believe, everything considered, the best, of the 
light-line positionless systems. The course consists of the regular 
texts with practice matter for dictation work. 

(b) TYPEWRITING. Typewriting by touch is so far and so obvi- 
ously superior to the old method, that we compel all students to learn 
"absolute touch," and deal shortly with any indications of a tendency to 
drift into the clumsy sight-writing. Students practice two hours each 
school day on new standard machines. A rental of 50c per week, $2.00 
per month, is charged fo rLhe use of the machines, payable in advance; 
or students may furnish their own machines. 

(c) STENOGRAPHERS' BUSINESS PRACTICE. The short-hand 
and typewriting work is supplemented by two weeks of actual office 
work, involving the taking and transcribing of business letters, the use 
of those business forms with which a stenographer must be acquainted, 
copying, filing, card-indexing systems, and everything the student will 
find in a modern office. 

II— BOOKKEEPmG AlfD OFFICE PRACTICE 

This course will make competent business bookkeepers of those 
who conscientiously pursue and finish it. It includes "Practical Book- 
keeping," a thorough and up-to-date text-book, and "Twentieth Century 
Business Practice," a practice course in which the student actually 
keeps in succession five different sets of books, in different kinds of 
business, making all the tranactions and handling all the business 
papers, cash, etc., with which he would have to deal in keeping the 
books of a modern business enterprise. A Supplementary Course gives 
instruction in Bank Accounting by the same methods. 

Ill— COMMERCIAL LAW 

A comprehensive course in the laws of business with which busi- 
ness men should be familiar. Study and recitation from a good Com- 
mercial College Text, two hours weekly, alternating with the Penman- 
ship Course. 

IV— BUSINESS PENMAXSHIP 

We teach the well-known "Palmer Method of Business Writing," 
which develops a rapid, easy, legible, business hand — that which the 



52 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

business world of today demands. Practice, under instructor's super- 
vision, three hours per week, alternating with Commercial Law. 

DIPLOMAS 

Two diplomas are granted for Commercial work, one in Stenog- 
raphy and the other in Bookkeeping. 

(a) STENOGRAPHY. To receive the Stenographer's Diploma, the 
student must satisfactorily complete the course, must pass an examin- 
ation in Shorthand and in Typewriting, and must be proficient in 
Spelling, English Grammar and Rhetoric. The Shorthand examinatioa 
covers the taking of dictation from new matter from different sources 
at a speed of one hundred words per minute, and reading same back 
accurately and correctly from the Shorthand notes. The standard 
for typewriting is a copying speed of fifty words per minute from un- 
familiar matter of different kinds, five words to be deducted for each 
error. The Diploma fee is $3.00. 

(b) BOOKKEEPING. Students who satisfactorily complete the 
course in Bookkeeping, furnish evidence of competency, and pass a-n 
examination in Commercial Law, and who write a plain business hand, 
will be granted an Accountants' Diploma, on payment of the Diploma 
fee of $3.00. 



PART IV 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

This division of the Catalogue is divided into sections covering 
the following suD-neads: 

I: — Buildings and Grounds. 

II — Literary Societies and Publications. 

Ill — Rules and Regulations. 

IV — Scholarships and Requests. 

V — Religious and Moral Atmosphere. 

VI — Expenses and Fees. 

VII — General Information. 

VIII— Athletics. 



I 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
Buildings 

The College buildings are five in number. The main building, a 
substantial brick structure, containing the recitation rooms, chapel. 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 53 

library and society halls, occupies the center of the campus. It is 
being remodeled and a new and larger addition built giving adequate 
accommodations for recitation rooms and study hall. 

The Frances T. and Columbus A. Mee Memorial Hall 

Through the munificence of Mrs. Frances T. Mee, of Cleveland, 
Tenn., we now have free of debt our spacious and handsomely furnish- 
ed young men's dormitory. Mee Hall is a three-story brick structure, 
opened the first time for the season of 1908-09. It contains thirty-two 
rooms, with reception rooms and parlor, has hot and cold water on 
each floor, is handsomely furnished, and is heated by steam. Rooms 
in this building should be engaged as soon as possible. 

The New Dormitory for Women. 

This new structure is being erected now and will be ready for 
occupancy by the first of September. It will be handsomely furnished, 
heated by steam, water in each room, bath rooms on each floor and 
latge parlors, reception rooms and music practice rooms. This build- 
ing is a beautiful brick structure, three stories high and so siUiated 
between the new main college building and the Mee Hall as to command 
a beautiful view of the magnificent Bullafo Mountain range. Young 
ladies should immediately reserve rooms in this building as a number 
have already been spoken for. 

Central Heating Plant 

A central heating plant is being erected now and by the opening 
of school in September 1913, it will be in use. All the college buildings 
are to be furnished with steam heat from this plant. 

The President's Residence 

The trustees of the college are putting up on the campus a resi- 
dence for the President. This splendid cottage will be the means of 
adding much to the social life of Milligan College. 

Grounds 

The College campus contains over thirty acres of ground. A large 
and beautiful grove, each tree of which was planted by some former 
student, surrounds the main building. There are excellent ball grounds 
and tennis courts for the use of the student body. 

Libraries 

The College maintains three libraries: (I) the Old Library, con- 
taining mostly reference books and government or statistical publica- 



54 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

tions; (2) the Reading Room, containing the later reference works and 
about three thousand volumes of standard literature; and (3) The 
Number Nine Library, containing about two thousand volumes dealing 
with theological or Biblical literature. These libraries are all available 
for the student under the proper restrictions. 

The new Reading Room is supplied with all the standard maga- 
zines and periodicals. The list of last year was as follows: Dailies — 
Baltimore American, Chattanooga Times, Knoxville Journal and Tri- 
bune, Johnson City Staff, Bristol Herald Courier. Weeklies — Christian 
Standard, Ontlook, Independent, Christian Evangelist, Saturday Eve- 
ning Pos^ Jfation, Scientific American, Dial, Harper's Weekly, Harper's 
Bazar, Collier's, Commoner, Literary Digest. Monthlies — Century, Har- 
per's, N. Am. Eeview, Cosmopolitan, Hampton's American, McClure's, 
Everybody's, Ladies' Home Journal, St. Nicholas, Delineator, Forum, 
Eeview of Reviews, Current Literature, Atlantic Monthly, Bookman, 
Missionary Eeview of the World, Musician, Outing, World Today, 
World's Work, Physical Culture, Human Life, Tennessee Christian, 
Missionary Intelligencer, Advocate of Peace, The Labor Digest. 



II 

LITERAET SOCIETIES, PUBLICATIONS, ETC. 

Literary Societies 

The literary societies are four in number — The American, and the 
F. D. Kershner for young men; and the Ossolian and the Ellisonian 
for young ladies. They do excellent work during the year, giving 
public performances upon stated occasions. 

Contests 

Through the munificence of one of our alumni, Mr. Oscar M. Pair, 
(1903) a prize oratorical contest is held during the week of Commence- 
ment exercises. The Oscar M. Fair Contest is between the representa- 
tives of the Literary Societies of the College, and carries with it a 
first prize of $15 in gold, a second prize of $10 in gold, and a gavel 
made of wood from Lookout Mountain for the successful society. 

Honors 

The average grades for the entire time the student has spent in 
school is made the basis for awarding the honors. The student in the 
Classical Course sustaining the highest general average for that course 
is awarded the first honor and will deliver the Valedictory at Com- 



MiLLiGAX College Year-Book 55 



mencement, the highest geenral average in any other course is awarded 
the second honor and will deliver the Salutatory and the next highest is 
awarded the third honor and is assigned the Class Oration. 

The Bulletin 

The student body publishes a monthly paper entitled "The Bulletin" 
■which is managed and directed by the students at large and which 
affords considerable scope for reportorial and literary talent. 



ni 

RULES AND BEGULATIONS 
Student Beliayior 

Students are expected to deport themselves as ladies and gentlemen 
— above all, as those who are, or expect to be, Christian men and 
women. No profanity is permitted on the grounds, nor is the use of 
alcohol or tobacco in any form allowed. Insubordination, or violatiQn 
of the laws of the school will lead to expulsion and permanent exclu- 
sion from its privileges. 

Class Absences 

Five unexcused absences in any one study will suspend the stu- 
dent thus absent. 

Age Limit in Young Men's Dormitory 

Boys under fifteen years of age are not allowed to room in the 
young men's dormitory. 

Conduct in Examinations 

By a resolution of the Faculty, adopted May 2nd, 1910, it was 
determined that in all classes in the College, the penalty for any sort 
of dishonesty on the part of students in examinations shall be, in the 
first instance, "Suspension from that class in which the offense occur- 
red, for the term, with the loss of all credit for the term's work in the 
aforesaid class, no opportunity for making up said work to be per- 
mitted until the scholastic year following. For a second offense by the 
same party, the penalty shall be suspension from the College for the 
term in which the offense was committed, with the loss of all credits 
for the term's work." 

It was also resolved, "That in all cases, the student accused of 
dishonesty shall be given a fair trial, and conviction shall follow an 



56 MiLLiGAN College Year Book 

affirmative vote of three-fourths of the membership of the entire 
faculty." 

Organization of Classes 

The College makes ^ no provision for the organization In any 
department of classes in which less than five students have signified 
their intention of taking up the work. 

Breakage 

The parents or guardians of students are held responsible for any 
breakage or damage done to property or furniture. 

Outside Board 

Young ladies attending the College are not permitted to board 
outside of the Home, except -with the express approval of their parents 
and special permission from the faculty. 



IV 
SCHOLAESHIPS A^B BEQUESTS 
Milligan Endowment 

Through the kindness of Professor Alexander R. Milligan, of Lex- 
ington, Ky., who gave $5,000 for the purpose in December, 1909, we now 
have the nucleus of a permanent endowment fund. This fund ought to 
be increased to at least $100,000 in order to enable Milligan College to 
accomplish the work it can and ought to do. 

Scholarships 

Those who cannot help with the permanent endowment may find 
it possible to endow named scholarships in the institution. The sum of 
$800 will endow a perpetual scholarship, carrying with it the tuition 
expenses of one student for every year. The sum of $2,000 will endow 
a ministerial scholarship, carrying with it the ministerial course each 
year. The sum of $2,500 will endow a similar scholarship for a young 
lady in any of the regular collegiate courses. 

Annual scholarships providing for student expense, year by year, 
may be contributed individually as follows: forty dollars, in four equal 
payments, will constitute a named tuition scholarship for the year; and 
one hundred dollars, in ten equal payments, will constitute a named 
Ministerial scholarship for one year. Churches, Endeavor or Ladies' 



MiLLiGAN College Year-Book 57 

Aid Societies, and even Sunday School Classes should provide scholar- 
ships of the kind for worthy students among their number or elsewhere. 

Form of Bequest 

Many friends of Milligan College will doubtless be glad to help 
its work, after they have passed from this earth to their reward. In 
this way they will be able to originate a stream of influence, contin- 
uing throughout eternity. The following, or an equivalent form, should 
be used in your will, which should fully describe real estate, and should 
be signed by you, in the presence of witnesses, whose signatures should 
likewise appear: 

"I give and bequeath to Milligan College of Tennessee, an institu- 
tion chartered under the laws of the State of Tennessee, and located at 

Milligan College, Carter County, Tennessee, the sum of $ 

(or if real estate, let location and description appear at this point) 
for the use of said institution, in conducting its work of education; 
and the receipt of the secretary of the said institution for the above- 
naimed sum, (or described property) shall constitute a release for my 
executor for the same." 



RELIGIOUS AND MORAL AT3I0SPHERE 
College Spirit 

The greatest and best inheritance of Milligan is its "college spirit." 
It is not of the kind which delights to express itself in rowdyism and 
profanity; but rather is a clean, pure, healthful moral tone which irres- 
istibly permeates the whole student body. The very air of ^lilligan 
breathes purity and high-toned Christian character. 



VI 

EXPENSES AND FEES 

Tuition 

College Literary — Per term of eighteen weeks, in advance $20.00 

If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks $ 5.00 

Academy — Per term of eighteen weeks, in advance $20.00 

If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks $5.00 

Music — Instrumental or Vocal, per term of eighteen weeks $20.00 



58 MiLLiGAN College Yearbook 



If paid monthly in advance, per month of four weeks $5.00 

Easiness — Boolckeeping, per term of eighteen weeks $10.00 

Stenography and Typewriting, per term $20.00 

Complete Business Course, per term $25.00 

(Typewriter rent extra, as per under Business 
Department.) 

Home Economics — Cooking, per term of eighteen weeks $ 7.50 

Home Economics — Sewing, per term of eighteen weeks $ 2.50 

Maisterial — English Course (Dormitory students Free 

Classical course, per term of eighteen weeks $10.00 

Graduate — Any one course, per term of eighteen weeks $ 5.00 

Boom Bent 

In Dormitories, including Heat, Light, Etc. 
In Mee Hall, per term of eighteen weeks, from $15.00 to $20.00 

according to location of room. 
In the new Young Ladies' Home, from $15.00 to $20.00 

according to location of room. 

Board in College Dining Hall. 

Board must be paid in advance. The rate per week in the College 
Dining Hall is $2.25. 

Outsi'de Board 

Furnished room with board can be secured outside the College in 
private families at about $12.50 per month. 

Fees 

The only fees connected with the College are the following: 

(A) Library fee of one dollar, charged each student upon matricu- 
lation, and the proceeds applied strictly to the purchase of books and 
magazines for the Library. 

(B) Matriculation fee of $10.00 charged all students in the English 
Ministerial Course, who do not room and board in the College dormi- 
tory. This fee will also admit anyone to all lecture courses in the 
College, but not to class room work or examination. 

Combination Courses and Total Expenses Estimated 

For the benefit of those young ladies who desire to take music 
chiefly, we have a special musical course, giving either vocal or instru- 
mental music and a maximum of two English studies for $75.00 per 
term, in advance, for everything (board, room, heat, light, tuition, etc.) 

The total necessary expense of a student at Milligan College varies 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 59 

from $100.00 per year to $175.00. $140.00 for a young man and $150.00 
for a young lady, is a good general average. The Milllgan rates do 
not aim at the cheapness which negates comfort; nor on the other hand, 
do they embody more than the actual expense which comfort brings. 

Diploma Fees 

The fee for the Bachelor's Diploma is in all cases $5.00. The fee 
for the Master's Degree is $10.00. The fee for the Ministerial Diploma 
in either the English or the Classical Course is $3.00. The fee for either 
of the Business Diplomas is also $5.00. 

Laundry and Incidental Expenses 

Laundry costs from 75c to $2.00 per month, in accordance with the 
amount. Incidental expenses are at a minimum at Milligan College. 
There is no reason why a student should spend anything beyond the 
smallest possible allowance for expenses outside of College charges. 

Terms of Payment 

All tuition and room rent bills, for the term, are payable strictly 
IN ADVANCE, and payment must be arranged for at the time of ma- 
triculation. Board is payable weekly, IN ADVANCE, as elsewhere stat- 
ed. In all cases, where the student leaves during the term, no refund 
or deduction of tuition or room rent will be made, unless by special 
action of the Executive Committee. The justice of the latter regulation 
will become apparent when it is understood that a room vacated during 
the term cannot be filled except in rare instances, before the opening 
of the next term. 



VII 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Location 

The College is located three miles from Johnson City, and half a 
mile from the Milligan College station on the East Tennessee and 
Western North Carolina Railroad. It is surrounded by a small village 
named Milligan College in honor of the institution. 

The location is one of the most beautiful in America. The Watauga 
River flows only a short distance below the grounds, and the scenery 
around the College is unsurpassed in natural beauty and grandeur. 

Healthfnlness 

One of the most important considerations in selecting a college is 
its healthfnlness of location. Other advantages amount to but little 



60 MiLLiGAN College Year- Book 

without this, the most valuable of all. In the thirty years of its history, 
no serious epidemic has been known at Milligan. The purity of the 
air, the excellent water, and the splendid advantages for physical de- 
velopment, have been chiefly responsible for this condition. 

Young Ladies' Home 

The rules governing the conduct of girls in our young ladies' home, 
while strict, are not burdensome. The greatest care is exercised by 
those who have the young ladies in charge, and parents may safely 
trust their daughters in our hands. We have a thoroughly efficient and 
capable Dean of Women, and an experienced matron in charge of the 
housekeeping department. The young ladies' rooms are extra large, 
well ventilated, equipped with new furniture, and are comfortable in 
every sense of the term. We furnish exceptionally good board for the 
prices charged. There are few places in the world where a young lady 
can secure a thorough education at so little expense as at Milligan. 

What to Furnish 

Students boarding at the homes will furnish their own toilet 
articles, towels, napkins, pillow cases and sheets, and one blanket each. 

Monday Holiday 

Monday instead of Saturday is the regular weekly holiday. 
Two Terms 

The school year is divided into two terms, or semesters, of eighteen 
weeks each. 

Text Books 

Text-Books can be purchased at publishers' price from the College 
book store. All purchases at the store are strictly cash. Nearly all 
necessary books can be secured second-hand, thus reducing the expense 
for books to a minimum. 



VIII 
ATHLETICS 



Milligan College has always maintained a fine record as regards 
athletics. In common with the more advanced educational ideals, we 
do not play football at all; but baseball, tennis, and other legitimate 
games are encouraged, within proper bounds, and in accordance with 
the regulations mentioned elsewhere in the catalogue. The record of 
the Milligan College baseball team during the past has been 



MiLLiGAN College Year Book 



61 



an exceedingly creditable one. "We have crossed bats with soHoe of the 
largest universities and colleges in the South and have held our own 
with them or defeated them. We have played Vanderbilt University to 
a tie on their home grounds, and among others have defeated the 
University of Tennessee and University of Chattanooga. During the 
season of 1908-09, we won fifteen out of eighteen games. Owing to 
more stringent regulations regarding absence from the College fewer 
games were played during the season of 1909-10; but our record was 
even better than that of the preceding year, our team winning all 
twelve of the games played. The record for 1910-11 was almost 
equally good. The 1911-12 record was fair showing six won, six lost. 
The 1912-13 record and line up are as follows: 

Mlligan Base Ball Team 1912-13. 



Shepherd First Base 

Hathaway Second Base 

Cahoon Short Stop 

A, Taylor Third Base 

Crouch Left Field 

Anderson Center Field 



H. Hathaway Right Field 

D. Taylor Catcher 

Hall Pitcher 

Lloyd Pitcher 

Shepherd Pitcher 

Pat Taylor Coach 



Record of Games 



Milligan vs. Stanley McCormick Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Elizabethton Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Washington College Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Washington College Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Johnson City Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Tusculum Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Emory and Henry Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Emory and Henry Milligan, 

Milligan vs. Emory and Henry Milligan, 



13; Stanley McCormick, 0. 

4; Elizabethton, 0. 

4; Washington College, 2. 

4; Washington College, 0. 

2; Johnson City, 3. 

13; Tusculum, 8. 

8; Emory and Henry, 1. 

6; Emory and Henry, 5. 

3; Emory and Henry, 5.