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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1907-1908"

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REGISTER 



OF 



MSllsaps College 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



FOR 1907-1908 



SEVENTEENTH SESSION 



BEGINS SEPTEMBER 30, 1908 



Tucker Printtng House, Jaokson 



CALENDAR 

1908 

Seventeenth Session begins Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 30. 

Entrance examinations in Latin, Greek, and History, 
September 29. 

Entrance examinations in English, Mathematics, and 
Modem Languages, September 30. 

Recitations begin September 30. 

Thanksgiving Day, November 26. 

First Quarter ends November 27. 

Christmas Holidays, December 24-January 5. 

1909. 

Examinations, First Term, January 18-30. 
Second Term begins February 1. 
Third Quarter ends March 31. 
Patriots' Day, April 23. 

Examinations, Second Term, May 4 to June 3. 
Commencement Exercises begin June 4. 
Commencement Sunday, June 6. 
Commencement Day, June 8. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE. 

Calendar 2 

Commencement Exercises - 5 

Board of Trustees.. 6 

Faculties 7 

Officers of Administration 11 

History _ 13 

Entrance Requirements. 24 

Degrees — 

— Bachelors 31 

— Masters 34 

Outline of Courses 35 

Detailed Statement of Courses — 

— Philosophy and Biblical Instruction 41 

— Mathematics 43 

— Chemistry 46 

— Geology and Biology 52 

— Physics and Astronomy _ 55 

— History 57 

— Economics and Sociology... 60 

— Latin and Greek 62 

—English 67 

— Modem Languages 70 

—Law. „ 73 

General Information — 

— Location .._ 80 

— Observatory _ 81 

— Library 81 

— Literary Societies 82 

— Boarding Facihties 83 

—Founder's Hall. 84 

— Scholarships 84 

—College Mail 85 

—Text-Books 85 

— Election of Classes 85 



PAGE. 

— Examinations 86 

— Discipline - 86 

— Certificate of Character 87 

—Prizes 87 

— Candidates for Admission 87 

— Entrance Examinations 88 

—Athletics 88 

— Religious Instruction 88 

— The Young Men's Christian Association 88 

— Public Lectures 90 

— Expenses 90 

Preparatory Department — 

— General Information 93 

— Requirements for Admission 93 

— Courses of Study 94 

— Outline of Courses 97 

Alumni — 

— Oflttcers - 99 

— Members -. 99 

Catalogue of Students.. Ill 

Schedule of Recitations 121 

Medals Awarded Commencement, 1907 122 

Acknowledgements 122 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES, 1908. 



Friday, June 5. 

11 o'clock, A. M., Freshman Prize Declamation. 
8 o'clock, p. M., Debate by Representatives of 
the GaUoway and Lamar Literary Societies. 

Saturday, June 6. 

11 o'clock, A. M., Sophomore Oratorical Contest. 

Sunday, June 7. 

11 o'clock, A. M., Commencement Sermon by 
Dr. W. F. Tillett, Dean of Biblical Department 
of Vanderbilt University. 
8 o'clock, p. M., Sermon before Young Men's 
Christian Association, by Dr. Alonzo Monk, 
Louisville Conference. 

Monday, June 8. 

9 o'clock, A. M., Annual Meeting of the Board of 
Trustees. 

10 o'clock, A. M., Graduating Speeches and Dehv- 

ery of Medals. 
8 o'clock, p. M,, Alumni Reunion. 

Tuesday, June 11. 

10:30 o'clock, a. m.. Alumni Address by Rev. J. R. 
Count iss, Greenville. 

11 o'clock, A. M., Annual Address by Dr. W. F. 

Tillett, Dean of Bibhcal Department, Van- 
derbilt University; Conferring of Degrees. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



OFFICERS 

Bishop Charles B. Galloway, D. D., LL.D., President 

Dr. a. F. Watkins Vice President 

J. B. Streater - Secretary 

Maj. R. W. Millsaps- - - Treasurer 

Term Expires in 1911. 

Rev. W. C. Black, D. D Heridian 

*J. T. Harkey __ __ _ Tupelo 

Rev. T. B. Holloman Hattiesburg 

Rev. T. W. Lewis - -Jackson 

Rev. R. a. Meek - - - Greenville 

Maj. R. W. Millsaps -— Jackson 

H. S. Stephens- Hattiesburg 

J. B. StreateR- Black Hawk 

Term Expires in 1908. 

R. L. Bennett - — Hattiesburg 

J. R. Bingham - Carrollton 

I C. Enochs. Jackson 

Rev. W. B. Lewis Moss Point 

Rev. W. W. Woollard Water Valley 

Dr. W. G. Sykes. _ _ _ Aberdeen 

Rev. S. M. Thames _ Oxford 

Rev. a. F. Watkins, D. D Jackson 

* Deceased. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

FACULTIES. 



REV. WILLIAM BELTON MURRAH, D. D., LL. D. 
President. 



THE COLLEGE FACULTY AND ASSISTANTS. 



REV. WILLIMI BELTON MURRAH, D. D. ,LL. D. 

Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 
A. B., Southern University, 1874; Member of North Mississippi 
Conference since 1874; Principal Winona High School, 
1882-84; Vice President Whitworth Female College, 1886- 
1892; D. D., Centenary College, 1887; LL. D., Wofford 
College, 1897. 

REV. JMIES ADOLPHUS MOORE, A. M., Ph. D.* 

Professor of Mathemntics, Actiny Professor of Astronomy. 
A. B., Southern University, 1880, and A. M., 1881; Member of 
Alabama Conference, 1881-94, and of Mississippi Confer- 
ence since 1894; Professor of Mathematics, Southern Uni- 
versity, 1883-94; Ph. D., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1888. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of ChemiMry and Geology, Acting Professor of Physics. 
A. B., Centenary College, Louisiana, 1887; A. M., University 
of Mississippi, 1890; A. M., Vanderbilt University, 1897; 
Ph. D., Vanderbilt L^niversity, 1900; Principal Centenary 
High School, 1887-89; Professor Natural Science, Centenary 
College, Louisiana, 1889-1902; Assistant in Astronomy 
Vanderbilt University, 1896-97. 

* Deceased. 



8 MILLS A PS COLLEGE .... 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of History and Economics. 
A. B., and A. M., Randolph-Macon College, 1894; Ph. D., Illinois 
Wesleyan University, 1907; Instructor in English and 
Greek, Randolph-Macon College, 1893-95; Instructor Latin 
and Greek, Randolph-Macon Academy, 1895-97; Professor 
Latin and History, Kentucky Wesleyan College, 1897- 
1901; Professor History and Economics, Kentucky Wes- 
leyan College, 1901-1903; Professor History and Modern 
Languages, Millsaps College, 1903-04, 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, B. A., M. A. 

Professor of Greek and Latin. 
Student at University of Virginia, 1891-93; Instructor in English 
and History, Shenandoah Valley Academy, 1893-95; 
B. A., University of Virginia, 1897; Graduate Student, 1897- 
1899; The Mason Fellow 1899-1900; M. A., 1900; Pro- 
fessor of Latin and Greek, Fort Worth University, 1900-03; 
Professor Greek and German, Milwaukee Academy, 1903- 
1904; Graduate Student in Greek, Summer School, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1907. 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of English. 
A. B., Randolph-Macon College, 1898; A. M., 1899; Teaching 
Fellow, Vanderbilt University, 1899-1900; Fellow in Eng- 
Msh, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-03; Fellow by Courtesy, 
1903-04, 1906-07; Ph. D., 1907. 

OLIN HARRIS MOORE, A. B., A. M.* 

Professor of Modern Languages. 
A. B., University of Missouri, 1902; A. M., Harvard University, 
1904; Special Student at the University of Chicago, Sum- 
mer Session of 1904; Instructor in Summer School (Uni- 
versity of Missouri), 1902 and 1903. 



* Absent on leave. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 9 

HENRY THOMAS MOORE, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Modern Languages. 
A. B., University of Missouri, 1903; A. M., 1904; Graduate 
Student Yale University, 1904-07; Holder of Lockwood 
- Scholarship Yale Music School,, 1906-07. 

JEFF COLLINS 

Instructor in Greek and Latin. 

CHARLES HASCAL KIRKLAND 

Instructor in Biology. 

MISS BERTHA LOUISE RICKETTS 
MISS SUSIE PEARL SPANN 

Aisistants in English. 



THE LAW SCHOOL FACULTY 



EDWARD MAYES, LL. D. 

Dean. 
A. B., University of Mississippi, 1868; LL. B., 1869; Professor 
of Law, 1877-92; Chairman of the Faculty, 1886-89; Chan- 
cellor, 1889-January, 1892; LL. D., Mississippi College, 1882. 

ALBERT HALL WHITFIELD, A. M., LL. D. 

Criminal Law , Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Law of Corpora- 
tions, Law of Real Property, Constitutional Law, and 
Law and Practice in Federal Courts. 
A. B., University of Mississippi, 1871, and A. M., 1873; LL. B., 
University of Mississippi, 1874, and LL. D., 1895; Adjunct 
Professor of Greek, University of Mississippi, 1871-74; 
Professor of Law, University of Mississippi, 1892-94; Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the State. 



10 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

WILLIAM R. HARPER, Esq. 

Contracts, Torts, Personal Property, Pleading, and Commercial 
Law, Equity Jurisprudence and Equity Pleading 
Practice. 

Graduate, University of Mississippi, Harvard Law School. 



THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL FACULTY 



ROBERT SCOTT RICKETTS, A, M 

Head Master. 

A. M., Centenary College, 1870; President and Professor, Port 
Gibson Female College, 1867-73; Professor Whitworth, 
Female College, 1872-93. 

GEORGE W HUDDLESTON, A. M. 

Assistant Master. 

A. B., Hiwassee College, 1883; Professor in Greek in Hiwassee 
CoUege, 1884-91; A. M., Hiwassee College, 1886; Professor 
of Latin and Greek, Harperville College, 1891-93; Principal 
of Dixon High School, 1893-97; Associate Principal of 
Harperville School, 1897-1899; Associate Principal of 
Carthage School, 1899-1900. 

JEFF COLLINS 
C. H. KIRKLAND 

Assistants. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE H 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION. 



REV. WILLIAM BELTON MURRAH, D. D., LL. D. 

President. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D 

Chairman pro tempore. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 
MRS. M. W. SWARrZ 

Librarians. 

REV. T. W. LEWIS 

Commissioner of Education. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 
MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, A. B., A. M. 
ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Committee on Admissions. 



12 - MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

ROBERT SCOTT RICKETTS, A. M. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

Library Committee. 

JAMES ADOLPHUS MOORE, A. M., Ph. D.* 
JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 
JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 
MIFFLIN WYATT SWART7, A. B., A. M. 
ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 
HENRY THOMAS MOORE, A. B., A. M. 

Curricvlum Committee. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 
HENRY THOMAS MOORE, A. B., A. M. 
ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Athletic Committee. 

ROBERT SCOTT RICKETTS, A. M. 

Head Master of Preparatory Department. 
* Deceased. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13 



x^tot:^. 



The charter of Millsaps College, which was granted 
February 21, 1890, reads as follows: 

An Act to incorporate Millsaps College. 
Section 1. Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State 
of Mississippi, That John J. Wheat, Samuel M. Thames, 
Thomas J. Newell and Rufus M. Standifer, of the North Mis- 
sissippi Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and Gawin D. Shands, Da\'id L. Sweatman, James B. Streater, 
and John Trice, lay members of said Church within bounds 
of said Conference, and Thomas L. MeUen, Warren C. Black, 
Alexander F. Watkins and Charles G. Andrews, members of 
the Mississippi Conference of said Church, and Marion M. Evans, 
Luther Sexton, William L. Nugent, and Reuben W. Millsaps, 
of Jackson, lay members of said Church within the bounds 
of said Mississippi Conference, and Bishop Charles B. Galloway, 
be and they are hereby constituted a body corporate and politic 
by and under the name and style of MiUsaps College, and by 
that name they and their successors may sue and be sued, 
plead and be impleaded, contract and be contracted with, 
and have a common seal and break the same at pleasure, and 
may accept donations of real and personal property for the 
benefit of the College hereafter to be established by them, 
and contributions of money or negotiable securities of every 
kind in aid of the endowment of such CoUege; and may confer 
degrees and give certificates of scholarship and make by-laws 
for the government of said College and its affairs, as well as for 
their government, and do and perform all other acts for the 
benefit of said institution and the promotion of its welfare 
that are not repugnant to the Constitution and Laws of this 
State or of the United States, subject, however, to the approval 
of the said two Conferences. 

Section 2. As soon as convenient after the passage of this 
Act, the persons named in the first section thereof shall meet 



14 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

in the City of Jackson, in this State and organize by acceptance 
of the charter and the election of Bishop Charles B. Galloway 
as their permanent President and of such other persons as 
they may determine to fill the offices of Vice President, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, and shall prescribe the duties, powers 
and terms of office of all said officers, except as to the term 
of their said President, who shall hold office during life or good 
behavior, or so long as he may be physically able to discharge 
his duties. 

They shall also select by lot from the lay and clerical 
Trustees from each of said Conferences, one-half who shall 
be Trustees of said College for three years and until their suc- 
cessors are elected' and the other half not so selected shall 
remain in office for the term of six years and until their suc- 
cessors are chosen as hereinafter mentioned. Upon the death, 
resignation or removal of said Galloway, or his permanent 
physical disability to discharge the duties of his office, the said 
Trustees may elect their President and prescribe his duties, 
powers and term of office. 

Section 3. That the said Trustees shall before the meet- 
ing of said Conferences next before the expiration of the term 
of office of any of their number notify the Secretary of said 
Conferences thereof, and the vacancies shall be filled by said 
Conferences in such way and at such time as they may de- 
termine, and the persons so elected shall succeed to the office, 
place, jurisdiction and powers of the Trustees whose terms of 
office have expired. And the said Corporation and the CoUege 
established by it shall be subject to the visitorial powers of said 
Conferences at all times, and the said College, its property and 
effects shall be the property of said Church under the special 
patronage of said Conferences. 

Section 4. That the said Trustees, when organized, as 
hereinbefore directed, shall be known by the corporate name 
set out in the first section of this Act, and all money, promissory 
notes and evidences of debt heretofore collected under the 
direction of said Conferences for said College shall be turned 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 15 

over to and receipted for by them in their said corporate name, 
and the payee of all such notes and evidences of debt shall 
endorse and assign the same to the corporation herein provided 
for, which shall thereafter be vested with the full, legal title 
thereto, and authorized to sue for and collect the same. 

The said corporation shall have the power to select any 
appropriate town, city, or other place in this State at which 
to establish said College, and to purchase grounds not to exceed 
one hundred acres as a building site and campus therefor, and 
erect thereon such building, dormitories, and halls as they 
may think expedient and proper to subserve the purposes of 
their organization and the best interests of said institution, 
and they may invite propositions from any city or town or 
individual in the State for such grounds, and may accept do- 
nations or grants of land for the site of said institution. 

Section 5. That the lands or grounds not to exceed one 
hundred acres used by the corporation as a site and campus 
for said College, and the buildings, dormitories and halls thereon 
erected, and the endowment fund contributed to said College 
shall be exempt from all State, County and Municipal taxation 
so long as the said College shall be kept open and be maintained 
for the purposes contemplated by this Act and no longer. 

Section 6. That the cost of education shall as far ae 
practicable be reduced by said corporation to the lowest point 
consistent with the efficient operation of said College, and to 
this end reports shall be made to the said Conferences from 
year to year, and their advice in that behalf taken, and every 
reasonable effort shall be made to bring a collegiate education 
within the reach and abihty of the poorer classes of the State. 

Section 7. That this Act take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

The College has its origin in the general poUcy 
of the Methodist Church to maintain institutions under 
its own control for higher learning in the Arts and 
Sciences. 



16 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

At the annual session of the Mississippi Conference 
in the City of Vicksburg on December 7, in the year 
1888, the following resolutions were adopted by a 
large majority of the Conference: 

"Resolved, 1. That a College for males under the auspices 
and control of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, ought 
to be estabhshed at some central and accessible point in the 
State of Mississippi. 

"2. That a committee of three laymen and three preach- 
ers be appointed to confer with a hke committee to be appointed 
by the North Mississippi Conference to formulate plans and 
to receive offers of donations of lands, buildings, or money 
for that purpose, and to report to the next session of this 
Conference." 

In accordance with this action the President of 
the Conference, Bishop R. K. Hargrove, appointed 
the following Committee: Rev. T. L. Mellen, Rev. 
W. C. Black, Rev. A. F. Watkins, Major R. W. Mill- 
saps, Col. W. L. Nugent and Dr. Luther Sexton. 

On December 12, 1888, the North Mississippi 
Conference met in Starkville, Mississippi, Bishop C. B. 
Galloway presiding. The Rev. T. L. Mellen appeared 
and reported the action taken by the Mississippi 
Conference. The following transcript from the North 
Mississippi Conference Journal gives the response 
made by that body: 

"Resolved, 1. That a CoUege for the education of boys 
and young men should be established in the State of Mississippi 
under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

"2. That a committee of three laymen and three ministers 
be appointed to confer with a like committee already appointed 
by the Mississippi Conference." 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 17 

The following committee was accordingly ap- 
pointed: Rev. J. J. Wlieat, Rev. S. M. Thames, 
Rev. T. J. Newell, Hon. G. D. Shands, Capt. D. L. 
Sweatman and Mr. J. B. Streater. 

To the action of these Conferences we may trace 
the direct origin of the College. 

The joint commission constituted by the action 
summarized above met in the City of Jackson in Jan- 
uary, 1889. The Rev. Dr. J. J. ^ATieat was called 
to the chair. In stating the purpose of the meeting 
he made a stiiTing appeal in behalf of the proposition 
to establish a Methodist College in Mississippi for 
the education of young men. In response to this 
earnest appeal Major R. W. Millsaps, a member of 
the conunission, proposed to give S50,000 to endow 
the institution, provided the Methodists of Mississippi 
would give a sum equal to this amount for said purpose. 
This proposition was enthusiastically approved, and 
after a plan of procedure was adopted, Bishop Charles 
B. Galloway was invited to conduct a campaign in 
the interest of the proposed endowment fund. 

Under the direction of this distinguished leader, 
the most gratifying progress was reported from time 
to time. The report submitted to the Conferences 
by the committee in December, 1889, refers to the 
movement in the following language: 

"The canvass, on account of the numerous necessitated 
absences of Bishop Galloway from the State, could not be 
continuously carried on, but even the partial canvass made, 
embracing not more than one-fifth of our territory, resulted 
in the most gratifying and encouraging success. The interest 



18 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

awakened in the enterprise has extended beyond the limits of our 
own Church and is felt by every denomination of Christians, and 
by every section of the State. It is safe to say that say that no 
effort of Methodism has ever kindled such enthusiasm in our State 
or evoked such liberal offerings to the Lord. The fact has been 
demonstrated that the Church is profoundly convinced that the 
College is an absolute necessity.^' 

The report continues: 

"So high is the appreciation of the value of the proposed 
institution, that numerous towns in the State have entered 
into earnest competition to secure the location of the College 
within the limits of their respective borders, offering from 
$10,000 to S36,000, and from twenty to eighty acres of land." 

In December, 1889, the Rev. A. F. Wat kins, a 
member of the Mississippi Conference, was appointed 
a special agent to co-operate with Bishop Galloway 
in all matters pertaining to the endowment of the 
proposed College. As the work of raising the sum 
designated in the original proposition progressed, and 
S25,000 had been collected. Major Millsaps, in the year 
1890, paid $25,000 into the College treasury. 

In December, 1892, the Rev. J. W. Chambers 
was appointed agent for the College and on December 
30, 1893, he reported that the full amount had been 
collected to meet the terms of Major Millsaps' prop- 
osition, and thereupon $25,000 were immediately paid 
by Major Millsaps to the Executive Committee, and 
the following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved, That the Executive Committee return our 
most heartfelt thanks to Major R. W. Millsaps for his second 
gift of $25,000, this day turned over to us. For his princely 
liberahty and unfaltering interest in the great enterprise so 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 19 

happily and successfully inaugurated, the Church and State 
owe him a large debt of gratitude." 

The Conferences having provided for a Board 
of Trustees, the joint commission dissolved in Jan- 
uary, 1890. This Board, to which was referred the 
matter of organizing the College, was composed of 
the following: 

Bishop Charles B. Gallow^\y, President. 
Rev. J. J. Wheat, D. D., Rev. W. C. Black, D. D., 
Rev. S. M. Thames, Rev. T. L. Mellen, 

Rev. T. J. Newell, Rev. A. F. Watkins, 

Rev. C. G. Andrews, D. D., Rev. R. M. Standifer, 
Hon. G. D. Shands, Maj. R. W. Millsaps, 

Capt. D. L. Sweatman, Col. W. L. Nugent, 

Mr. J. B. Streater, Dr. Luther Sexton, 

Mr. John Trice, Hon. M. M. Evans. 

After the Board organized under the charter, 
the question of locating the College was considered 
with great care. The Board met repeatedly to con- 
sider the offers made by different towns, and finally 
on May 20, 1891, while in session in Winona, Mis- 
sissippi, decided to locate the College in Jackson, 
the capital of the State. The citizens of Jackson 
contributed S21,000 for grounds and buildings, and 
to this sum Major Millsaps added §15,000. Plans for 
a commodious main building were immediately pro- 
cured, grounds were purchased and in a comparatively 
short time buildings were in process of erection. 

When it became evident that everything would 
soon be in readiness for formally opening the College 



20 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

for the reception of students, the Board of Trustees, 
at a meeting held in Jackson, April 28, 1892, began 
the work of organizing a faculty of instruction. 

The Rev. W. B. Murrah was elected president. 
Many apphcations were considered for professorships, 
and Mr. N. A. Patillo was elected Professor of Math- 
ematics, and Mr. W. L. Weber was elected Professor 
of the Enghsh Language and Literature. 

At the time of his election. Professor Patillo was 
doing post graduate work in the Johns Hopkins 
University of Baltimore. Professor Weber was the 
acting Professor of English at the Southwestern 
University, Georgetown, Texas, when he was by this 
action called to Millsaps College. The department 
of Mental and Moral Philosophy was established, and 
President Murrah took charge of this department. • 

At a subsequent meeting of the Board of Trustees 
held July 13, 1892, Mr. G. C. Swearingen was elected 
Professor of Latin and Greek, and the Rev. M. M. 
Black was elected Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment. Both of these gentlemen had recently 
taken post-graduate degrees at the Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, Nashville, Tennessee. 

The necessary buildings having been erected, the 
first scholastic session began with appropriate cere- 
monies September 29, 1892. 

At the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees 
in June, 1893, Mr. A. M. Muckenfuss was elected 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

In June, 1894, the Rev. AI. M. Black resigned 
the principalship of the Preparatory Department to 
enter on the work of the regular pastorate. In re- 
organizing the department it was made more dis- 
tinctively a training school with independent juris- 
diction, and Professor R. S. Ricketts was elected Head 
Master, with Mr. E. L. Bailey as Assistant Master. 

The formal estabHshment of the Department of 
Modem Languages and History was effected by action 
of the Board of Trustees in June, 1897, and Professor 
J. P. Hanner was elected to fill the chair thus created. 
Work, however, had been offered in these subjects 
prior to this time. 

In 1904, Dr. B. E. Young, who then had charge 
of the work in History and Modem Languages, re- 
signed his position to take charge of the work in 
Romance Languages in Vanderbilt University. The 
department was then divided, Mr. 0. H. Moore, 
a graduate of Harvard University being chosen Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages, and Mr. J. E. Waimsley 
taking charge of the work in History and Economics. 

The organization indicated by this review rep- 
resents the status of affairs existing at this time, though 
the personnel of the faculty has been changed in 
several departments. 

The remarkable facilities for conducting a Law 
School in Jackson led to the estabhshment in 1896 
of a Law Department. The Hon. Edward Mayes, 
ex-Chancellor of Mississippi State University, and 



ZZ MILLS APS COLLEGE 

for over fourteen years a professor of Law in that 
institution, was engaged to take the active control 
of this department. Dr. Mayes has associated with 
him as active Professors, Judge A. H. Whitfield, 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of our State, and 
Judge Wm. R. Harper, a distinguished member of 
the Jackson Bar. ... 

In addition to the buildings first provided con- 
sisting of the main college building, the President's 
house, and homes for the accommodation of students, 
the facilities of the institution were greatly enlarged 
during the session 1895-96 by the generosity of Major 
Millsaps in the gift of Webster Science Hall, at a cost 
of S10,000. In 1901 Mr. Dan A^ James, of Yazoo 
City, Mississippi, built an observatory for the College, in 
honor of the memory of his father, Mr. Peter James, 
and of his brother, Mr. Samuel James, and furnished 
it with a magnificent telescope, thus enabling us to 
ofl'er the finest advantages in the study of Astronomy. 

The evolutionary process through which Millsaps 
College has passed during the first ten years of its 
history has developed an ever increasing demand 
for better dormitory and dining hall facilities. This 
need was supplied in 1902 by the gift of Major Millsaps 
of the property formerly known as the Jackson Col- 
lege. The splendid brick structure thus secured, 
together with other buildings admirably adapted to 
college uses enables the institution adequately to meet 
the demands made upon it. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 23" 

With an endowment of near two hundred thousand 
dollars and buildings and grounds worth approx- 
imately one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars 
more, it rests on a foundation which guarantees its 
perpetuity. It has the support of a great religious 
denomination, yet it is not sectarian in its policy, 
but numbers among its patrons representatives of all 
the Christian churches. 

One of the purposes the College keeps constantly 
in view is indicated by the following section of the 
charter: 

''The cost of education shall, as far as practicable, be 
reduced to the lowest point consistent with the efficient oper- 
ation of said College, and every reasonable effort shall be made 
to bring collegiate education within the abihty of the poorer 
classes of the State." 



24 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

The authorities of Millsaps College prefer that 
applicants for admission into the College should sub- 
mit themselves to the regular test of an entrance 
examination. But in case the Principals of Prepar- 
atory Schools desire to have their pupils admitted 
on trial without examination, arrangements looking 
to that end may be had as a result of correspondence 
with the College authorities. 

It is essential that students wishing credit for 
work done in High Schools or Preparatory Schools, 
should bring written certificates, stating the exact 
amount of work on which they have passed. The 
delay incident to writing for these certificates after 
arriving here would prevent the organization of classes; 
therefore, all students who do not have their certificates 
present will be required to stand the entrance ex- 
aminations. 

Special attention is called to the following state- 
ment of requirements for admission: 

Students are admitted to the College on the system 
of entrance units, a unit meaning a subject of study 
pursued in an academy, or high school, through a 
session of nine months with recitations five times 
a week the first two years and not less than three times 
a week the last two j^ears, an average of forty -five 
minutes being devoted to each recitation. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 25 

The required entrance units are to be selected 
from the following list of subjects, to which is attached 
their value as entrance units: 

I. English. 3 Units — 

1. Higher English Grammar. ^ unit. 

2. Elements of Rhetoric and weekly written 

Compositions. 1 unit. 

3. English Literature. H units. 

The study of English Literature includes the special 
study of some works and the reading of others, as laid 
down in the requirements of the Southern and other 
associations of schools and colleges in the United 
States, as follows: 

(a) Reading. — A certain number of books will 
be set for reading. The candidate will be required 
to present evidence of a general knowledge of the 
subject-matter, and to answer simple questions on 
the lives of the authors. The form of examination 
will usually be the writing of a paragraph or two 
on each of several topics, to be chosen by the can- 
didate from a considerable number — perhaps ten or 
fifteen — set before him in the examination paper. 
The treatment of these topics is designed to test 
the candidate's power of clear and accurate expres- 
sion, and will call for only a general knowledge of 
the substance of the books. In place of a part or 
the whole of this test the candidate may present 
an exercise book, properly certified by his in- 
structor, containing compositions or other written 
work done in connection with the reading of the 



26 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

books. It is especially recommended that candi- 
dates whose reading has not been confined to the 
books set below should avail themselves of this 
alternative. 

'- • The books set fcr this part of the examination 
in 1907 and 1908 will be: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth and Merchant of Venice, The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers in The Spectator, Irving's Life of Gold- 
smith, Coleridge's Ancient Mariner, Scott's Ivanhoe and 
Lady of the Lake, Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, Lance- 
lot and Elaine, and Passing of Arthur, Lowell's Vision of 
Sir Launfal, George EHot's Silas Mamer. 

In 1909, 1910, 1911: 

Group 1 (two to be selected) — Shakespeare's As You Like It, 
Henry Fifth, Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth 
Night. 

Group 2 (one to be selected) — Bacon's Essays, Bunyan's The 
Pilgrim's Progress, Part 1; The Sir Roger de Coverley 
Papers in The Spectator; Franklin's Autobiography. 

Group 3 (one to be selected) — Chaucer's Prologue; Spenser's 
Faerie Queene (selections); Pope's The Rape of the Lock; 
Goldsmith's The Deserted Village; Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series,) Books 2 and 3, with especial at- 
tention to Dry den, Colhns, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. 

Group 4 (two to be selected) — Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wake- 
field; Scott's Ivanhoe; Scott's Quentin Durward; Haw- 
thorne's The House of Seven Gables; Thackeray's Henry 
Esmond; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Dicken-' A Tale of Two 
Cities; George Eliot's Silas Mamer; Blackmore's Loma 
Doone. 

Group 5 (two to be selected) — Irving's Sketch Book; Lamb's 
Essays of Elia; DeQuincey's Joan of Arc and The EngUsh 
Mail Coach; Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Worship; Emer- 
son's Essays (selected); Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 27 

Group 6 (two to be selected) — Coleridge's The Ancient Mar- 
iner; Scott's The Lady of the Lake; Byron's Mazeppa 
and The Prisoner of Chillon; Palgrave's Golden Treasury 
(First Series), Book 4, with especial attention to Words- 
worth, Keats, and Shelley; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient 
Rome; Poe's Poems; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal; 
Arnold's Sohrab and Riistum; Longfellow's The Courtship 
of Miles Standish; Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot 
and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Browning's CavaUer 
Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the Good News 
from Ghent to Aix, Evelyn Hope, Home Thoughts from 
Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the 
French Camp, The Boy and the An-^el, One Word More, 
Herve Kiel, Pheidippides. 

In preparation for this part of the requirement 
it is important that the candidate shall have been 
instructed in the fundamental principles of rhetoric. 

(b) Study and Practice. — This part of the 
examination presupposes the thorough study of 
each of the works named below. The examination 
will be upon subject-matter, form, and structure. 

The books set for this examination in 1907 and 
1908 will be: 

Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L'Allegro, 
and II Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America; Macaulay's Essay on Milton and Life of Johnson. 

In 1909, 1910, 1911: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comus L'Allegro, 
and n Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 
America, or Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's 
First Bunker HiU Oration; Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 



2S MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

In addition, the candidate may be required to 
answer questions involving the essentials of English 
grammar, and questions on the leading facts in those 
periods of English literary history to which the pre- 
scribed works belong. 

II. Mathematics. 3 Units — 

1. College Algebra. 

(a) To Quadratics. 1 unit. 

(b) Quadratics through Progressions. ^ unit 

2. Plane Geometry. 1 unit. 

3. Solid Geometry. ^ unit. 

III. Latin. 3 Units— 

1. Grammar and composition. 1 unit. 

2. Caesar — any four books on the Gallic War. 

1 unit. 

3. Cicero — six orations. 1 unit. 

IV. Greek. 2 Units— 

1. Graromar and Composition. 1 unit. 

2. Xenophon — first four books of the Anabasis. 

1 unit. 

V. French. 2 Units — 

1. One-half of Elementary Grammar, and at least 

100 to 175 pages of approved reading. 1 imit. 

2. Grammar complete, and 200 to 400 pages of 

approved reading. 1 unit. 

YI. German. 2 Units — 

1. One-half of Elementary Grammar, and at least 

75 to 100 pages of approved reading. 1 unit. 

2. Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 

150 to 200 pages of approved reading. 1 unit. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 29 

VII. History. 2 Units— 

1. American History (Civics may be a part of 

this course). 1 unit. 

2. General History, or Greek and Roman History. 

1 unit. 

Credit in History must be based on the time devoted to 
each course, not upon the ground covered. In estimating 
the value of a particular course, the definition of a unit 
must be rigidly adhered to. 

VIII. Science. 1 Unit.— 

1. Physics. ^ unit. 

The study of a modem text-book, such as Carha t & 
Chute's Physics, with a Laboratory Notebook, cover ng 
at least forty exercises from a list of sixty or more. 

2. Chemistry. ^ unit. 

The preparation in Chemistry shall be upon the same 
general plan as that prescribed for Physics. 

3. Physics and Chemistry. 1 unit. 

A half year in each of these subjects T\ill be accepted as 
one unit. 



Students are admitted to College as: 

1. Full Freshmen. 

2. Conditioned Freshmen. 

3. Special Students. 

1. Full Freshmen — For admission as Full Fresh- 
man the student must present fourteen entrance 



30 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

units. The following are prescribed for all degrees: 
English. 3 units. 
History. 2 units. 
Algebra. H units. 
Plane and Solid Geometry. 1^ units. 
Science. 1 unit. 

In addition to these, the candidate for A. B. must 
present : 

Latin. 3 units. 

Greek or Modem Languages. 2 units. 
B. S. students must present either three units in 
Latin and two in Modem Languages, or five in 
Modem Languages. 

2. Conditioned Freshmen — Students who cannot enter 
as Full Freshmen may enter as Conditioned Fresh- 
men. Conditioned Freshmen may enter on ten 
units, provided that three of these are in English 
and one and a half in Mathematics. But, when so 
admitted, they must arrange to satisfy the remaining 
four units in the first two years. 

3. Special Students — Under certain conditions stud- 
ents who have not satisfied the minimum of entrance 
units required of candidates for degrees may be 
admitted as "Special Students," provided they have 
satisfied the requirements in English, History, and 
one other subject, or be at least twenty years of age* 

4. Note.— For the sessions of 1908-09 and 1909-10 
only twelve units will be required. This requirement 
applies both to Full Freshmen and Conditioned 
Freshmen. Conditioned Freshmen entering under 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 31 

this provision may offer eight units and be con- 
ditioned on four. 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE. 

The reader of the arrangement of courses will 
notice that two undergraduate degrees are offered by 
the Literary Department of the College — B. A. and 
B. S. It will also be seen from the following schedule 
that the preparation required for the different courses 
is not the same: 

B. A. Degree — The Bachelor of x\rts course offers 
special instruction in the departments of Latin and 
Greek. This course presupposes two years of pre- 
paratory work in Greek or Modem Languages, 
three in Latin. In order to be allowed to enter upon 
the B. A. course, the applicant must stand an ap- 
proved examination in English, History, Science, 
Mathematics, Latin,and Greek or Modern Languages. 

B. S. Degree — The Bachelor of Science course offers 
special work in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics, 
Instead of Greek and partly of Latin, French and 
German are studied. In order to be allowed to 
enter upon the B. S. course, the apphcant must 
stand an approved examination in English, History, 
Science, Mathematics, Latin and Modem Languages. 

LL. B. Degree — No entrance examination is exacted 
of Law students who apply for the Junior Class. 
They are expected to have a good elementary English 
education. Applicants for the Senior Class are 
examined in the Junior Course. 



ARRANGEMENT FOR ACADEMIC COURSES FOR THE A. B. DEGREE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Bible 1 hr. 

History 2 hrs. 

Latin 3 

Greeks, or Modem Languages 3 

Mathematics 3 

English 4 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin 

Greek, or Modem Languages 

Mathematics 

English 

Chemistry I (a) (b) 3 



Economics. 
Latin 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



16 hrs. 

3 hrs. 

3 

3 

3 
+ 1 
16 hrs. 

2 hrs. 

3 

3 

+ 1 
3 



English 

Physics I (a) (b) 2 

History , 

Elective from 

Psychology 2 

Greek 2 

Bible Greek 2 

Mathematics (A) 3 

Mathematics (B) 2 - 

Surveying 1 

Chemistry II (a) (b) 2+1 

Chemistry II (c) 1 +1 

Biology 2 

French 3 

German 3 

16 hrs. 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Logic 1 hr. 

Psychology 2 hrs. 

Astronomy 2 

Geology 2 

History (A) 3 

Elective from 

Philosophy 2 

Latin 2 

Greek 2 

Mathematics 2 

English 2 !► 6 

Chemistry III (a) (b) 2 

Physics II 2 

Sociology 2 

History (B) 2 

16 hrs. 



ARRANGEMENT OF ACADEMIC COURSES FOR THE B. S. DEGREE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Bible 1 hr. 

History 2 hrs. 

Latin, or German 3 

Mathematics 3 

French 3 

EngUsh 4 

16 hrs. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin, or German 3 hrs. 

French -. 3 

Mathematics 3 

English 3 

Chemistry I (a) (b) 3+1 



16 hrs. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Economics 2 hrs. 

Mathematics (A) 3 

Chemistry II (a) (b) 2 +1 

Physics I (a) (b) 2+1 

Elective from 

History 3 

Psychology 2 

German 3 

French 3 

Mathematics (B) 2 ■ 

Surveying 1 | 

English 3 | 

Chemistry II (c) 1 | 

Biology 2 J — 

16 hrs. 

SENIOR YEAR, 

Logic 1 hr. 

Psychology 3 hrs. 

Astronomy 2 

Geology 2 

History (A) 3 

Elective from ] 

Philosophy 2 j 

Mathematics 2 I 

English 2 ^ 6 

Chemistry III (a) (b) 2 | 

Physics II 2 | 

Sociology 2 j 

History (B) 2 J — 

16 hrs. 
(Students who offer five units of Modern Languages for 
entrance "nill be required to take twenty hours of 
elective work instead of eleven hours.) 



34 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

Each school of collegiate instruction offers work 
looking toward the Master's Degree. Applicants for 
the M. A. or M. S. Degree will be required to elect 
three courses of study, not more than two of which 
may be in the same school or under the same professor. 
The principal subject chosen — known as the major 
course — will be expected to employ one-half the 
apphcant's time; each of the minor courses, one- 
quarter of Ms time. It is expected that the applicant 
for a masters' degree, after receiving a bachelor's 
degree, spend at least one year at Millsaps College 
engaged in graduate study. In most cases non-res- 
ident study, during two or more years will be accepted 
as the equivalent of one year's resident work. All 
examinations must be stood in Jackson. Attention 
is directed to the schedule of degrees following, and 
to the statement in connection with the account 
of work done in each department. The courses so 
announced are major courses; a minor course is ex- 
pected to require for its completion half the time 
required for the completion of a major course. 
M, A. Degree — To take the Master of Arts Degree the 
student must choose for his major course Latin, 
Greek, History, Philosophy, or English. His minor 
course must be in schools in which he has already 
finished the full course for the bachelor's degree. 
M. S. Degree — To take the Master of Science Degree 
the student must choose his major and one minor 
course from the schools of Chemistry, Physics, Bi- 
ology, Geology, Mathematics, or Astronomy. His 
second minor must be in a school in which he has 
already finished the full course for the bachelor's 
degree. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 35 

OUTLINE OF DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES 



ACADEMIC CLASSES. 



BIBLE 

Freshman — Outlines of Bible Study (Steele). One hour. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Senior — Logic (Hill). One hour. 

Senior — History of Philosophy (Text to be selected.) Two hours. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Junior — Psychology (Halleck). Two hours. 
Senior — The Ground Work of Psychology (Stout). Ethics. 
(Mackenzie). Two hours. 

MATHEMATICS 

Freshman — Higher Algebra (Wells' New); Plane and Solid 
Geometry, Revised (Went worth); Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry (Lyman and Goddard); History of Mathe- 
matics (Ball). Three hours. 

Sophomore — Analytic Geometry (Nichols); Three hours. 
Surveying (Barton). One hour (Elective). 

Junior (A) — Calculus for Beginners (Edwards). Three hours. 

Junior (B) — Analytic Geometry (Nichols); Determinants and 
Theory of Equations (Barton). Two hours. 

Senior — Elements of Mechanics (Wright). Two hours. 

CHEMISTRY 

Sophomore — Chemistry I (a) Descriptive Chemistry (Newell). 
Three hours. 

(b) Laboratory Exercises (McPherson & Henderson). 
Two hours. 



36 • MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Junior — Chemistry II (a) Organic Chemistry (Remsen, Perkin, 
and Kipping). Two hours. 

(b) Qualitative Analysis (Newish). Two hours. 

(c) General Chemistry (Advanced Course). One hour. 
Senior — Chemistry III (a) (b) Organic Preparations (Gatte- 

mann); Quantitative Analysis (Clowes & Coleman). Four 
hours. 

GEOLOGY 

Senior — Geology I (a) (b) (c) Elements of Geology (Scott). 
Text Book of Geology (Dana). 

BIOLOGY 

Junior — Biology I (a) Lessons in Biology (Parker); (b) Prin- 
ciples of Botany (Bergen and Davis). Two hours. 

PHYSICS 

Junior — Physics I (a) General Physics (Ganot). Two hours, 
(b) Physical Experiments (Milliken and Gale). Two 

hours. 
Senior — Physics II — General Physics (Advanced Course). 

Two hours. 

ASTRONOMY 

Senior — I. Manual of Astronomy (Young); History of Astron- 
omy (Berry). 

HISTORY 

Freshman — European History — Harding's Essentials of Me- 
diaeval and Modern History; Seebohm's Era of Protestant 
Reformation; McCarthy's Epoch of Reform. Two hours. 

Junior — American Political History — One of the following 
courses is given: 

I. Early Period — Woodbum's Lecky's American Rev- 
olution; Fiske's Critical Period of American History; Mc- 
Laughlin's Confederation and Constitution; Gordy's Po- 
litical History of the United States, Vols. I and II; Hins- 
dale's Old Northwest; Ogg's Opening of the Mississippi. 
Three hours. 



- - MILLS A PS COLLEGE 37 

II. Middle Period — Burgess's Middle Period; Smith's 
Parties and Slavery; Macy's Political Parties in the United 
States; Curry's Southern States of the American Union; 
Chad wick's Causes of the Ci\'il War. Three hours. (Omit- 
ted in 1908-09). 
III. Later Period — Burgess's Reconstruction and the 
Constitution; Dunning's Essays on Civil War and Recon- 
struction; Gamer's Reconstruction in Mississippi. Three 
hours. (Omitted in 1908-09). 

Senior (A) — Political Science — Bryce's American Common- 
wealth; Moran's English Government; Wilson's State* 
Three hours. 

Senior (B) — One of the following courses is given: 

I. International Law — Davis's Elements of Inter- 
national Law; Reinsch's Colonial Government; Reinsch's 
Colonial Administration; Lectures on Current Phases of 
International Questions; Foster's Practice of Diplomacy. 
Two hours. (Omitted in 1908-09). 

II. Nineteenth Century History — Andrew's His- 
torical Development of Modem Europe; Hassall's Balance 
of Power; Stephens's Revolutionary Europe. Two hours. 

ECONOMICS 

Junior — Seligman's Principles of Economics; Dewey's Financial 
History of the United States; Sparling's Industrial Or- 
ganization. Two hours. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Senior — Gidding's Elements of Sociology; Wright's Practical 
Sociology; Kidd's Principles of Western Civilization. Two 
hours. 

GREEK 

Freshman — Lysias (Selected Orations); Homer (three books 
of the Iliad or four of the Odyssey); Xenophon, Agesilaus; 
Study of Epic forms; Prosody; Prose Composition. Gram- 
mar (Goodwin); Gayley's Classic Myths; Literature (Jebb). 

Sophomore — Plato (the Dialogue varies from year to year, 
the Protagoras is offered for 1909); Herodotus, Books VI 



38 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

and VII; Euripides; Medea or Alcestis. Meters. Grammar 
and Composition. Collateral reading. 
Junior — Attic Orators — History of their times. 

Texts — Tarbell's Philippics of Demosthenes; Jebb's 
Attic Orators; Tyler's Olynthiacs of Demosthenes. 

The Drama — Its History and Development; Sophocles' 
Oedipus Rex or Antigone; Aeschylus' Prometheus Vinctus. 

Syntax — Prose Composition. 
Senior — History — Selections from Thucydides and Herodotus. 

Texts — Morris' Thucydides I; Merriam's Herodotus. 

Comedy and Lyric Poetry — Study of the structure of 
Comedy; Meter. 

Texts — Humphrey's Clouds; Starke's Wasps; Felton's 
Birds; Tyler's Lyric Poets. 

LATIN 

Freshman — Virgil's Aeneid (six books); Livy, Books I, XXI, 

XXII; Grammar (Bennett's); The Latin Verb (Swartz); 

Dactylic Hexameter. Prose Composition; Gayley's Classic 

Myths. 
Sophomore — Horace, Odes and Epodes (Bennett); Satires and 

Epistles (Kirkland); Cicero de Amicitia; Pliny's Letters. 

Prose Composition; Literature (Wilkins); The Private 

Life of the Romans, Preston and Dodge. 
Junior — Tacitus, Agricola and Germania; Terence, Phormio; 

Plant us, Captivi; Juvenal. Collateral reading, bearing on 

the times of Tacitus and Juvenal. Prose Composition. 

Meter of Comedy. 
Senior — The course being elective it will be arranged to suit the 

needs of the appUcants. For 1909 a course in Latin Histoiy 

will be offered based upon Caesar, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, 

and Seutonius. 

COURSE IN BIBLE GREEK 

Two Courses will be offered: 

(a) The Gospels. 

(b) The Letters of Paul, and Acts. 

Texts — Burton's Moods and Tenses; Westcott and 
Hort's Text of the Greek Bible; Gardiner's Principles of 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 39 

Textual Criticism; Meyer's Commentary on Acts; Coney- 
beare and Howson's Life of Paul; Davis' The Story of the 
Nazarene; Matthew's History of New Testament Times in 
Palestine. 

ENGLISH 

Freshman — Foundations of Rhetoric (Hill); Selections from 
Poe (Gambrill); Poe's Prose Tales (Macmillan); Hawthorne's 
Twice Told Tales (Lathrop); Irving's Tales of a Traveller 
(Krapp); Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside Inn. Daily and 
weekly themes. Four hours. 

Sophomore — A First View of English Literature (Moody and 
Lovett); English Poetry (Manly); Bulwer-Lytton's Harold; 
Kingsley's Westward Ho (Innes); Thackeray's Henry Es- 
mond; Lamb's Essays of Elia; Stevenson's Essays (Phelps); 
Richard II (Herford); Henry IV, Part 1 (Moorman); 
Hamlet (Chambers); As You Like It (Smith). Monthly 
exercises. Three hours. 

Junior — Old English Grammar (Smith); History of English 
Literature from the Beginning to the Norman Conquest 
(Brooke); Chaucer's Prologue, Knight's Tale, and Nun's 
Priest's Tale (Mather); The Tale of the Man of La we, the 
Pardoneres Tale, etc. (Skeat); The Poetry of Chaucer 
(Root). Three hours. 

Senior — The Works of Tennyson (Globe); Alfred Tennyson (Ben- 
son); Harold (Bulwer-Lytton); Select Poems of Browning 
(Burton). Three essays. Two hours. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

FRESHMAN. 

German — Bacon's German Grammar; Moser's Der Bibliothekar; 
Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn; Schiller's Der Neffe als 
Onkel; Werner's Heimatklang; Freytag's Die Joumalisten. 

French — Chardenal's Complete French Course; Labiche and 
Delacour's Les Petits Giseaux; Lazere's Contes et Nouvelles; 
Sand's La Mare au Diable; Hugo's La Chute; House's Three 
French Comedies; Feval's La Fee des Greves; Labiche and 
Martin's Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon. 



40 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

SOPHOMORE. 

German — Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; Lessing's Nathan der Weise; 
Goethe's Faust, Egmont, Hermann und Dorothea; Keller's 
Bilder aus der Deutschen Litteratur. 

French — Moliere's Le Misanthrope, L'Avare, Les Precieuses 
Ridicules; Comeilie's Le Cid; Racine's Athalie; Warren's 
Histoire de La Litterature Francaise; French Prose of the 
XVII Century; Dumas' Les Trois Mousquetaires. 

LAW CLASSES. 

JUNIOR. 

First Term — Blackstone's Commentaries; Stephen on Pleading; 
Greenleaf on Evidence, Vol. I; Smith on Personal Property; 
Mississippi Code, 1906; Mississippi Constitution. 

Second Term — Clark's Criminal Law; Clark's Criminal Proced- 
ure; Kent's Commentaries, Commercial Chapters; Adam's 
Equity; Barton's Suit in Equity; Mississippi Code, 1906; 
Mississippi Constitution; Constitution of the United States; 
Cooley's Principles of Constitutional Law. 

SENIOR. 

First Term — Lawson on Contracts; Bigelow on Torts; Boone 
on Corporations; Bispham's Equity; Mississippi Code, 1906; 
Mississippi Constitution; Mississippi Jurisprudence, his- 
torically. 

Second Term — Real Estate Reviewed, Kent; International Law, 
Kent; Federal Judicial System, Kent; Curtis' United States 
Courts; Cooley's Constitutional Limitations; United States 
Constitution, historically. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 41 

DETAILED STATEMENT 

IN REGARD TO 

The Several Departments of the College 



The Departments comprising the Course of In 
struction are: 

I. The School of Philosophy and Biblical In- 
struction. 
II. The School of Mathematics. 

III. The School of Chemistry. 

IV. The School of Geology and Biology. 

V. The School of Physics and Astronomy. 
VI. The School of History. 
VII. The School of Economics and Sociology. 
VIII. The School of Latin and Greek. 
IX. The School of English. 
X. The School of Modem Languages. 



I. THE SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND 
BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION. 

PRESIDENT MURRAH. 

Philosophy of the mental economy and the great 
subject of morals, as they affect the heart and influence 
the life, will be taught with great care and fidelity. 
This School embraces three departments: 
I. Biblical Instruction. 
11. Mental Philosophy, Logic, and the History of 

Philosophy. 
III. Ethics and Christian Evidences. 

No entrance requirements are prescribed for the 
work of this Department. 



42 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

FRESHMAN. 

The members of the Freshman Class are required 
to devote one horn* a week to recitation, though they 
are expected to give a part of every day to the work 
of preparation. The scope of this Department will 
be enlarged from time to time as conditions favor 
such enlargement, but it is not designed that the 
course shall take the place of the private and devo- 
tional study of the sacred Scriptures. 

The English Bible and Steele's Outlines of Bible 
Study will be used as text -books in connection with 
the Department of Biblical Instruction. 

Throughout the School of Pliilosophy text -books 
and books of references of the most approved char- 
acter will be used, and the method of instruction 
will be by lectures, and daily oral examinations, by 
analysis of subjects studied, and by original theses 
to be presented by the students on topics prescribed 
relating to the various departments of the school. 

JUNIOR. 
An elementary course in Psychology is offered 
in the Junior year. WTiile this course is elective it 
supplies very helpful preparation for the more ad- 
vanced work of the Senior year, and should be taken 
by all Juniors when practicable. 

Text-Book — Psychology and Psychic Culture (Halleck). Two 
hours. 

SENIOR. 

1. Logic. — A course extending through the session is 
required of all candidates for degrees. The first 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 43 

term is devoted to the study of Deductive Logic; 
the second term, to Induction, Fallacies and 
Method. 

Text-Book — Elements of Logic (Jevons-Hill). One hour. 

2. Psychology. — ^The Senior class will give the first 

term of the session to the study of Psychology. 

Text-Book— The Ground Work of Psychology (Stout). Two 
hours. 

3. Ethics. — The second term of the Senior year will 

be given to the study of Moral Philosophy in its 
relations to practical life. 
Text-Book — (Mackenzie). Two hours. 

4. History of Philosophy. — A course, elective for the 

Senior class, is offered in the History of Philosophy. 
Text-Book — To be selected. Two hours. 

COURSE LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 
AppUcants for the degree of M. A, or M. S. will 
be required, in this Department, to devote at least 
one year to the study of Hamilton's Metaphysics, the 
History of Philosophy, and the Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

Text-Books — Hamilton's Lectures, History of Philosophy 
(Schwegler); The Grounds of Theistic and Christian Belief 
(Fisher). 



n. THE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR J. A. MOORE. 

The general aim is to have the work of this de- 
partment brought within such limits and made so 
systematic and thorough as to secure to the student a 



44 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

mastery of leading principles and methods, for it 
is believed that only in this way can the best results 
be obtained. The text -books will form the basis 
of instruction to be supplemented by frequent expla- 
nations, criticisms and discussions on leading and 
crucial points of the science. 

FRESHMAN. 
After a brief review of the advanced principles 
of Algebra and Geometry, the work of the year is given 
to Trigonometry. 

Plane Trigonometry. — The solution of triangles both 
graphically and by computation is made prom- 
inent. In addition to this a good beginner's 
course in Trigonometrical Analysis is given. 

Spherical Trigonometry. — A good beginner's course is 
taken. 

History of Mathematics. — A brief course in the history 
of Mathematics will be required of those in Fresh- 
man Mathematics. 

Text-Books— Higher Algebra (Well's New); Plane and Solid 
Geometry Revised (Went worth); Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry (Lyman and Goddard); History of Mathe- 
matics (Ball). Three hours. 

SOPHOMORE. 
The required work of the Sophomore year is in 
Analytic Geometry, and an elective course in Surveying 
is offered. 

Analytic Geometry. — ^This course includes fundamental 
principles and methods, the straight hue, the 
circle, the parabola, the eUipse, and the hyperbola. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 45 

Plane Surveying. — This course includes chain sur- 
veying, compass surveying, computation of areas, 
plotting surveys, and transit surveying. The 
department is well equipped for this work. 

Text-Books — Analytic Geometry (Nichols). Three hours. 
Surveying (Barton). One hour (Elective). 

JUNIOR. 

Junior (A). — Embraces the Differential and the In- 
tegral Calculus. 

Text-Books — Calculus for Beginners (Edwards). Three hours. 

Junior (B). — Analytic Geometry, embracing general 
equations of the second degree, higher plane 
curves, and Solid Analytic Geometry of the plane, 
the straight line, and surfaces of the second order. 
Also Determinants and Theory of Equations. 

Text-Books — Analytic Geometry (Nichols); Determinants and 
Theory of Equations (Barton). Two hours. 

SENIOR. 
Mechanics. — A course in Theoretical Mechanics, in- 
volving a knowledge of the Calculus will be offered, 
alternating with Junior B. 
Text-Book — Elements of Mechanics (Wright). Two hours. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

Course (A) — Geometry — (1) Or-ordinate Geometry (Loney). 

(2) Conic Sections (Salmon). 
Course (B) — Algebraic Analysis — (1) Determinants (Scott). 

(2) Theory of Equations (Panton and Bumsides). 
Course (C) — Infinitesimal Analysis — (1) Differential Calculus 

(Edwards). (2) Integral Calculus (Edwards, Byerly); 

(3) Differential Equations (Edwards, Murray). 

Course (D)— Mechanics— (1) Anal>i;ic Mechanics (Bartlett). 
Parallel Reading on History of Mathematics— Authors : Cajori, 
Gow, Heath, Grant, Whewell and Bledsoe. 



46 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

For the Master's Degree, the above courses are 
offered, as follows: 

As a minor for A. M., Course (A); as a major 
for M. S., 1. Courses (A) and (B), or 2. Courses (A) 
and (C), or 3. Courses (B) and (C), or 4. Courses 
(C) and (D), with parallel reading in the history of 
the subjects. Wlien a major course is taken, a Thesis 
will be required. 



III. THE SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY. 

The rooms given up to the study of this subject 
are modem both in size and convenience, and occupy 
the whole lower floor of Webster Science Hall. One 
of the laboratories opens into a dark room for photog- 
raphy, and into a room specially isolated and designed 
to retain dehcate apparatus. The general laboratory 
opens conveniently into a small fuming room outside 
of the building so that vapors may not pass from 
one to the other, and is also connected with the store- 
room. Gas, water, experiment tables, hoods and 
pneumatic troughs are to be found in convenient 
places. There is a cellar for gas and electric generators, 
and for assay and other furnaces. A large lecture 
room on the second floor is soon to be supphed with 
modern equipment. 

The course in this department consists of three 
years of chemistry, one year being required of can- 
didates for all degrees, while B. S. students are re- 
quired in addition to take a second year. The sub- 
jects are taught by recitations and lectures and work 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 47 

which each student must perform in the laboratory. 
It is aimed that the laboratories be kept well equipped 
with apparatus necessary to the correct appreciation 
of the science. Each student has his own desk and 
apparatus and is closely supervised, so that he may 
not only gain a true idea of the substance under in- 
spection, but also cultivate a hand careful to the 
smallest detail, an eye observant of the shghtest 
phenomenon, and habits of neatness, skill and econ- 
omy. Each student will be expected to keep accurate 
notes. 'I^ I; 

I. (a) Inorganic Chemistry. — This course is designed 
to give the student a thorough working knowl- 
edge of general chemistry, including a careful 
study of fundamental laws of chemistry, the 
occurrence, properties and preparation of the 
common elements and their compounds, and a 
course of chemical calculations. The year's work 
will be closed with an introductory study of 
organic chemistry. This course is a prescribed 
study of the Sophomore class for all degrees, 
and is a prerequisite to either of the other courses 
in Chemistry. 

Lectures and recitations, three hours. (Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday.) 

Text-Book — Ne well's Descriptive Chemistry. 
Reference Books — Remsen, Richter, Holleman. 

(b) Experimental Chemistry. — This course is given 
in connection with (a), and each student is 
assigned the preparation of a number of elements 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

and compounds, and required to note the de- 
portment of various substances with reagents. 
The class each year is given an opportunity to 
visit certain industrial establishments, as sul- 
phuric acid plant, phosphate works, and gas works. 
Laboratory exercises, two hours. (Tuesday.) 
Text-Book — McPherson& Henderson's Experimental Chemistry. 

II. (a) Organic Chemistry. — The purpose of this 
course is to furnish a somewhat comprehensive 
knowledge of organic chemistry, the instruction 
being given chiefly by lectures illustrated by 
experiments. Some attention is given to physi- 
ological chemistry. Students will be expected 
to consult various works of reference. This 
course is required of apphcants for the B. S. de- 
gree, and is a prescribed study in the Junior year. 
This course in connection with II (b) will appeal 
specially to preliminary dental and medical 
students. 

Lectures and recitations, two hours. (Tuesday 
and Wednesday). 

Text-Book — Organic Chemistry (Remsen). 

Reference Books — Perkin and Kipping, Richter, HoUeman. 

(b) 1. Qualitative Analysis. — This course consists in 
a systematic analysis of simple and compound 
substances and mixtures, the contents being un- 
known to the student. It is a prescribed study 
in the Junior year, and required for the B. S. 
degree. The work is not confined to mere test- 
tube exercises, but is the subject of regular 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 49 

quizzes. The course will extend through the 
third quarter. 

Two hours. (Thursday.) 

Text-Books — Newth, Fresenius. 

2. Practical Organic Chemistry. — ^The preceding 
course will be followed during the last quarter 
with a course in the preparation and purification 
of organic substances. 
Text-Books — Leffman and La Wall, HoUeman, or Remsen. 

(c) General Chemistry (Advanced Course). — This 
course is intended to supplement course I (a). 
Some phase of advanced chemistry — theoretical 
inorganic, or physical, will be taught. A brief 
study of historical chemistry will be included. 
This course is elective in the Junior year, and 
is designed for those who would know more of 
chemistry than is possible in the Sophomore year. 
Students electing this work must also elect II (b). 
The course will be varied from time to time as 
may be needed. 

Lectures and recitations, one hour. (Thursday) 

Text and Reference Books — Inorganic Chemistry (Remsen, 
Smith, Holleman), Physical Chemistry (Jones, Walker); 
History of Chemistry (Venable). 

III. (a) Organic Chemistry. — A course in advanced 
organic chemistry, including the preparation of 
coal-tar products, as dyes, remedies, etc., with a 
few determinations of vapor density and molec- 
ular weight. 

Text-Books — Gattermann, Fischer, Omdorff. 



50 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

(b) Quantitative Analysis. — A course in gravimetric 
and volumetric analysis, for which a special 
laboratory room is furnished with modem desks 
and apparatus. 

Text-Books — Ladd, Clowes and Coleman. 
Reference Books — Fresenius, Sutton, Leach. 

Both of these courses are given during the Senior 
year, and are elective for all degrees. Four hours. 
(Wednesday and Thursday.) 

Finally, it should be said that in the chemical 
laboratory text -books will be dispensed with as far 
as possible. The student will be taught to feel that 
the substances and apparatus around him are his 
alphabet. The teacher is constantly on hand to 
question and suggest, and in other ways to stimulate 
thoughtfulness. 

Library copies of Watts' Revised Dictionary, 
Thorp's Applied Chemistry, Roscoeand Schorlemmer's 
Treatise, Allen's Commercial Organic Analysis, 
Journal of the American Chemical Society, and 
other works, are on hand for reference. In both 
Junior and Senior courses some laboratory work will 
be required outside of the regular schedule. 

A prize of $10 will be given to the student who 
does the best work in Chemistry during the Junior 
and Senior years. Class record, laboratory record, 
and an original paper at the close of the Senior year 
will each be valued at 33^ per cent. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 51 

COURSE LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

In the post graduate work of this department, 
200 hours of laboratory work in the subject chosen 
are required. 

Courses are offered as follows: (a) The Analysis 
of Potable and Mineral Waters, and such mineral 
products as Iron Ores, Gypsum, Phosphate, Marl, 
Fire Clay, and Limestone, (b) An advanced course 
in accurate Quantitative Analysis, and molecular 
weight determinations, (c) A course in the prepara- 
tion and analysis of Organic Substances, (d) A course 
in Theoretical, Physiological and Historical Chemistry. 

Text-Books — Examination of Water (Leffmann, ISIason); Quan- 
titative Analysis (Clowes and Coleman); Organic Prepa- 
rations (Gattermann). 

Reading Course — Theoretical Chemistry (Remsen); Physical 
Chemistry (Jones); Industrial Chemistry (Thorp); Develop- 
ment of Organic Chemistry (Schorlemmer) ; History of 
Chemistry (Meyer); Physiological Chemistry (HalUburton). 

In addition, a satisfactory examination must be 
passed on work assigned from the above courses. 

The courses outhned are for major subjects, and 
for minors each will be reduced one -half. 



52 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

IV. THE SCHOOL OF GEOLOGY AND BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN. 
C. H. KIRKLAND. 

A portion of the second floor of Webster Science 
Hall is occupied by this Department. The museum 

contains about 300 minerals collected from various 
parts of the world, 200 specimens of rock presented 
by the United States Geological Survey, a fine cab- 
inet of 300 minerals and rocks presented by the 
Woman's College of Baltimore, and a fine collection 
of Mississippi rocks and fossils, all thoroughly indexed. 
The excellence of the latter is yearly increased by 
donations from friends of the College, and a collection 
made by the Senior Class. During the present year 
several handsome specimen cases have been added 
to the museum, and larger space provided for this 
Department. 

GEOLOGY. 

I. (a) Mineralogy and Lithologic Geology. — ^This 
includes a study of mineral species, crystalline 
forms, chemical composition, occurrence and uses, 
with a description of the kind and arrange- 
ment of rock masses. First Term (First half). 

(b) Physiographic and Dynamic Geology. — ^This por- 
tion of the course embraces the study of phys- 
iographic features and processes, the mechanical 
and chemical effects of the atmosphere, water, 
heat, and of life. Special attention will be given 
to some phase of the subject, as the work of 
glaciers, or volcanoes. First Term (second half). 



• ■ • MILLS APS COLLEGE ■ 53 

(c) Historical Geology. — In addition to general his- 
torical geology some attention will be given to 
economic products and to paleontology. Second 
Term. 

This course is a prescribed study in the Senior 
year for the A. B. or B. S. degree. The college museum 
and the private museum of the head of the Depart- 
ment afford minerals and fossils for class study. 

Several geological expeditions regularly made in 
the fall and spring to localities easily accessible from 
Jackson, give the class a practical conception of this 
kind of surveying. The college is fortunate in being 
located in the midst of a region that is quite varied 
in geological character. Occasionally the faculty 
grants a week's leave of absence on trips to more 
distant points. In the last month of the year Hilgard's 
Geology of Mississippi and annual Reports of the 
Smithsonian Institution and of the U. S. Geological 
Survey are used with the class. 

Lectures and recitations, two hours. (Wednes- 
day and Friday.) 

Text- Books— Introduction to Geology (Scott); Text-Book of 
Geology (Dana). 

Reference Books— Manual of Geology (Dana); Text Book of 
Geology (Chamberlain and Salisbury); Minerals (Dana); 
Reports; Physiography (Salisbury), 

BIOLOGY. 

I. (a) General Biology. — An elective course is offered 
in the Junior year. It is aimed to enhance the 



54 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

value of the course by microscopic work of a 
general character. 

First Term. Two hours. 

(b) Botany and Zoology. — A lecture course on se- 
lected subjects, with special reference to the 
study of medicine and Pharmacy. This work 
is also important as preparatory to the courses 
in Geology. 

Second term. Two hours. 

This course is elective for all degrees. 

Text-Books — Lessons in Biology (Parker); Principles of Botany 
(Bergen and Davis). 

Reference Books — General Biology (Sedgwick and Wilson); 
Briefer Course in Zoology (Packard). 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

Graduate work as a minor subject is offered in 
both geology and biology, but for the present no reg- 
ular field or laboratory work will be required. An 
examination must be passed upon a course of reading 
which for each subject is as follows: 

Geology — Chamberlain and Salisbury's Text-book of Geology; 
Tarr's Economic Geology of the United States; Williams's 
Elements of Crystallography; Hilgard's Geology of Mis- 
sissippi. Selected articles in geological reports. 

Biology — Sedgwick and Wilson's General Biology; Wilsons' 
Cell in Development and Inheritance; Haddon's study of 
Man, Jordan's Bacteriology. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 55 

V. THE SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN. 
PROFESSOR J. A. MOORE. 

The course in this Department consists of two 
years of physics and one year of astronomy. Besides 
a general lecture room on the second floor of Science 
Hall, a room provided with laboratory tables, and 
supplied with water, gas, and electricity, is devoted 
to experimental physics. 

An observatory supplied with a six-inch equatorial 
telescope affords means for practical work in astronomy. 

PHYSICS. 

I. (a) General Physics. — This course embraces a study 
of the principles of mechanics, sound, heat, 
light, magnetism, and electricity, and is a re- 
quired study in the Junior year for all degrees. 
The work will be conducted by lectures, recita- 
tions, and experiments before the class. 
Two hours. (Monday and Tuesday.) 

Text-Book — Ganot's General Physics (Atkinson). 

(b) Experimental Physics. — A course in laboratory 
experiments accompanied by lectures will be re- 
quired in connection with the course in General 
Physics. A separate room is furnished with work 
tables, and each student provided with apparatus 
for performing carefully selected experiments. 
Two hours. (Wednesday.) 

Text-Book — Laboratory Course (Milliken and Gale). 



56 MILLSAPS COLLEGE ■ ■ 

II. Advanced Physics. — This course will be varied 
as the needs suggest, and is elective in the Senior 
year for all degrees. It is designed that this class 
especially shall keep in touch with the scientific 
progress of the day. Two hours. 

ASTRONOMY. 

The course embodies a general survey of Astronom- 
ical facts and prinicples, and is required in the 
Senior year for all degrees. Frequent use of 
the six-inch equatorial telescope of the James 
Observatory adds interest to the study. A brief 
course in the history of Astronomy will be re- 
quired. Two hours. 

Text- Books — Manual of Astronomy (Young); History of Astron- 
omy (Berry). 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

In Physics the courses offered are measurements 
in (a) mechanics, heat, and electricity; (b) General 
Physics, including a special study of some selected 
phase of the subject, 

Text-Books — Peddie's Physics, Thompson's Electricity and 
Magnetism, Cajori's History of Physics, Glazebrook's 
Heat and Light, Stewart's Conservation of Energy, Wat- 
son's Physics. 

In Astronomy some practical work in the deter- 
mination of time and latitude will be required in 
addition to a reading course. 

Text-Books — Astronomy (as a Science of Observation) (God- 
fray); Mechanical Astronomy (Herschell's Outlines, Part 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 57 

2); History of Astronomy (Gierke); Practical Astronomy 
(Doolittle). 

In addition, a satisfactory examination must be 
passed on work assigned from the above courses. 

The courses outKned are for major subjects, and 
for minors each will be reduced one-half. 



VI. THE SCHOOL OF HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR WALMSLEY. 

The purpose of the courses in History is rather 
the training of the mind of the student for critical 
historical judgment than the accumulation of facts. 
It is believed that there is no line of work in which 
more rigidly scientific training is possible than in the 
work in Historical and Social Science, and it is certain 
that there is none in which the knowledge acquired is 
of more immediate or more practical use. Text books 
are not taught as infallible authorities; in fact, many 
of the text-books contain statements from which 
the head of the Department dissents in toto, but it 
is thought that these very books may be of especial 
service. Under the guidance of the Professor the 
students are taught to reserve their own judgment 
until they are confident of the trustworthiness of 
the author. 

All students applying for admission to any of 
the classes in History will be required to show a 
satisfactory knowledge of General History and Amer- 



58 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

ican History. The entrance examination is made 
more rigid in Ancient History than in Modem, inas- 
much as the emphasis in the college classes is thrown 
on Modern History. 

FRESHMAN. 
In the Freshman year an outline of the history 
of Europe is given, and the stress is laid on the period 
since the Barbarian Invasion, the period to which 
the modem nations trace their beginning. Written 
reports on assigned topics form an important part of 
the work of this year. Two hours. 

Text-Books — Harding's Essentials of Mediaeval and Modem 
History; Seebohm's Era of Protestant Reformation; Mc- 
Carthy's Epoch of Reform. 

JUNIOR. 

This course is devoted to a careful study of one 
of the three periods in American political and con- 
stitutional history indicated below. A large amount 
of special parallel work is required in this class. 
Three hours. 

Text-Books — I. Woodbum's Lecky's American Revolution; 
Fiske's Critical Period of American History; McLaughlin's 
Confederation and Constitution; Gordy's Political History 
of United States, Vols. I and II; Hinsdale's Old North-west; 
Ogg's Opening of the Mississippi. 

II. Burgess's Middle Period; Smith's Parties and Slav- 
ery; Macy's Political Parties in United States; Curry's 
Southern States of American Union; Chadwick's Causes of 
Civil War (omitted in 1908-09). 

III. Burgess's Reconstruction and the Constitution; 
Dunning's Essays on Civil War and Reconstruction; Gar- 
ner's Reconstruction in Mississippi. (Omitted in 1908-09). 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 59 

SENIOR. 

In the Senior year two courses are offered. The 
first, which is required, is given to PoHtical Science, 
and after studying our own government as it is, takes 
c.p the outKnes of the existing governments in Europe 
and lays the foundation for inteUigent political crit- 
icism. Three hours. 

The work of the second course, which is elective 
for all degrees, is either a study of the elementary 
principles of International Law and of their applica- 
tion in current questions of world poHtics, or an 
intensive study of the politics of Europe from the 
time of the French Revolution to the present. Two 
hours. 

Text-Books (A) — Bryce's American Commonwealth; Moran's 
English Government; Wilson's State. 

Text-Books (B) — I. Davis' Elements of International Law; 
Reinsch's Colonial Government; Reinsch's Colonial Ad- 
ministration; Foster's Practice of Diplomacy; Class Lec- 
tures. (Omitted in 1908-1909). 

II. Andrews's Historical Development of Modem Europe; 
Hassall's Balance of Power; Stephen's Revolutionary 
Europe. 

The Ralph Humphreys Chapter of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution offers a medal each 
year to the Junior Class. This is given to the member 
of the Class who prepares the best paper on some 
subject connected with the American Revolution. 
The subject for 1908-09 wiU be, "The English Side of 
the American Revolution." 



60 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

In the Senior Class a set of books is given by 
the Head of the Department for the best paper on 
some subject in Pohtical Science. This paper in 
1908-08 will be written on "The Theoretical and the 
Actual Power of the Senate." 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

Graduate work, both as a major and as a minor 
subject is offered in History. 

The major course is a study of the moral forces 
in the Middle Ages. The following books are required 
in addition to such parallel as may be assigned : 

Duruy's Middle Ages; Bryce's Holy Roman Empire; 
Fisher's History of the Reformation; Parts of May's History 
of Democracy in Europe and of Draper's Intellectual De- 
velopment of Europe; Lecky's History of European Morals; 
Buckle's History of Civilization in England; Guizot's History 
of Civilization. 

The minor course is devoted to a study of Eng- 
land in the Eighteenth Century. 

Selected Chapters of Lecky's England in the Eighteenths 
Century; Ashton's Social Life in time of Queen Anne;; 
Biographies of Eighteenth Century Statesmen. 



VII. THE SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND 
SOCIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOE WALMSLEY. 

The work in Economics, which is required of 
all Juniors, is given for about half the year to theoret- 



MI LIS APS COLLEGE 6 

ical economics, and an attempt is made to set forth 
clearly the present condition of economic thought. 
This is followed by a more practical course, in which 
some phase of economic teaching is developed more 
at length. During the past year the nature and 
function of money was studied. 

Text-Books — Seligman's Principles of Economics; Dewey's Fi- 
nancial History of the United States; Sparling's Industrial 
Organization. 

In the Senior year a course is given in Sociology, 
in which, after a theoretical course in the study of 
Society as a scientific phenomenon, some of the prob- 
lems of our present social organization are studied 
in detail. 

Text-Books — Gidding's Elements of Sociology; Wright's Prac- 
tical Sociology; Kidd's Principles of Western Civilization. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

In neither Economics nor Sociology is major work 
given, but a minor course is given in each. 

The work in both courses will be largely historical, 
showing how the modem teaching in each subject is 
derived from the earlier modes of thought. 

In economics a study of Adam Smith's work 
and its development will be followed by a discussion 
of some of the new and still unsettled theories in 
this field of work. 

In Sociology an attempt will be made to outline 
the field of work, and to discuss the more prominent 
theories of society. 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

VIII. DEPARTMENT OF LATIN AND GREEK. 

PKOFESSOR SWARTZ. 
MR. COLLINS. 

It is believed that for the average under-graduate 
the study of Latin and Greek subserves in a marked 
degree the primary object of education. This primary 
object is to give one such mastery over one's own 
mind as to enable him to focus his thoughts with 
intentness and at will upon problems of intrinsic 
difficulty. The aim of this department will be so to 
shape the work as to endeavor to accomplish this 
result. To this end thoroughness and accuracy in 
all the courses will be insisted upon so that the solution 
of the linguistic problems which arise may be effected 
upon the basis of knowledge, and not upon that of 
conjecture. The character of the work of each year is 
clearly shown by the following outline. 

The aim of the work of the Freshman and Soph- 
omore classes is to train the student toward reading 
Greek and Latin with ease and accuracy. To this end 
the authors read will serve as a basis for an accurate 
and thorough review of forms, syntax, and case re- 
lations, and to the acquisition of a vocabulary. A 
hterary appreciation of the authors studied will be 
sought and their influence upon modern literature 
emphazised. 

Both Freshmen and Sophomore Classes meet 
three times a week. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 63 

FRESHMAN. 

Latin. 

Text-Books — Virgil's Aeneid (six books); Livy, Books I, XXI 
XXII; Grammar (Bemiett's); The Latin Verb (Swartz); 
Dactylic Hexameter; Prose Composition; Gayley's Classic 
■ MythjB. 

GREEK. 

Text-Books — Lysias (Selected Orations); Homer (three book) 
of the Iliad or four of the Odyssey); Xenophon, Agesilaus; 
Study of the Epic forms; Prosody; Prose Composition; 
Grammar (Goodwnn); Gayley's Classic Myths; Literature 
(Jebb). 

SOPHOMORE. 

Latin. 
Text-Books — Horace, Odes and Epodes (Bennett); Satires and 
Epistles (Kirkland); Cicero, de Amicitia; Phny's Letters; 
Prose Composition; Literature (Wilkins); The Private Life 
of the Romans, Preston and Dodge. 

Greek. 
Text-Books — Plato (the Dialogue varies from year to year — the 
Protagoras is offered for 1909); Herodotus, Books VI and 
VII; Euripides, Medea or Alcestis; Meters; Grammar and 
Composition. Collateral reading. 

JUNIOR. 

In the Junior and Senior years the effort will 
be continually made to instil into the minds of the 
students an enthusiasm for Greek and Latin literature: 
to show him that the literature of antiquity is not a 
dead, impassive something, but that in it there 
pulsates a fiery glow and genial warmth unequaled 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

in the literature of modern times. The authors read 
will be expected, each in his several way, to contrib- 
ute his quota towards the accomplishment of this 
result. 

Latin. 

Text-Books — Tacitus, Agricola and Germania; Terence, Phor- 
mio; Plautus, Captivi; Juvenal; Collateral Reading, bearing 
on the times of Tacitus and Juvenal. Prose Composition; 
Meter of Comedy. 

Greek. 

Attic Orators — History of their times. 
Text-Books — Tarbell's Philippics of Demosthenes; Jebb's Attic 

Orators; Tyler's Olynthiacs of Demosthenes. 

The Drama — Its History and Development; Sophocles' 

Oedipus Rex, or Antigone; Aeschylus' Prometheus Vinctus. 
Syntax — Prose Composition. 

SENIOR. 
Latin. 

This course, being elective, will be arranged to suit the needs 
of the applicants. For 1909, a course in Latin History will be 
offered, based upon Caesar, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, and Sue- 
tonius. 

Greek. 

History — Selections from Thucydides and Herodotus. 
Texts — Morris' Thucydides I; Merriam's Herodotus. 

Comedy and Lyric Poetry — Study of the structure of 

Comedy; Meter. 
Texts — Humphrey's Clouds; Starke's Wasps; Felton's Birds; 
Tyler's Lyric Poets. 

Note. — In all the courses there will be parallel 
reading of Greek texts; also collateral reading in 
English. Sight reading will be practiced in all courses. 



MI LIS A PS COLLEGE 65 

FOR GRADUATES. 

The course leading to the M. A. degree will be 
varied from year to year to suit the needs of the 
class. For the year 1908-1909, the following courses 
are suggested: 

Text-Books. 
Latin (A) — A Study of Roman Elegy, based upon Catullus, 
Tibullus and Propertius. 

(B) — Satire, based upon a study of Lucilius, Horace, 
Persius and Juvenal. 

In either course a thesis will be required. 

Greek (A) — The Drama with a critical and complete study 
of Sophocles. 

(B) — Epic Poetry. In this course the entire Iliad or 
Odyssey will be read. 

In either course a thesis will be required upon 
some assigned subject of research. 

COURSE IN BIBLE GREEK. 

As many of our students go out into the active 
work of the ministry without having the advantages 
of a Theological Seminary, it has been thought advis- 
able to offer a course in Bible Greek. The course 
as outhned on page 38 is offered as a substitute for 
the Junior Course in Classic Greek. 

Since a thorough appreciation of Hellenistic Greek 
from a linguistic standpoint can not be had without 
an accurate knowledge of Classic Greek, students 
will be discouraged from taking this course who have 



et) MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

not finished the Sophomore year in Classic Greek. 
Furthermore no student will be encouraged to take 
this course in Bible Greek who is not looking to the 
ministry as his hfe work, for this course is in no way 
intended as a substitute for more difficult Greek. 

The method of instruction will be to find out the 
exact meaning of the passage in hand by a close scru- 
tiny of the words, by a comparison of the words with 
their uses in other passages, and by a discussion of 
their meaning in the classic period. Ancient customs 
and manners will be laid under requisition to ex- 
plain all kindred references in the text; in short, every- 
thing will be done to elucidate the passage under 
discussion^ and to bring out its meaning linguistic- 
ally. The course is not designed to be theological. 
Two courses will be offered: 

(a) The Gospels. 

(b) The letters of Paul and Acts. 

Text-Books — Burton's Moods and Tenses; Westcott and Hort's 
Text of the Greek Bible; Gardiner's Principles of Textxial 
Criticism; Meyer's Commentary on Acts; Coneybeare and 
Howson's Life of Paul; Davis' The Story of the Nazarene; 
Matthew's History of New Testament Times in Palestine. 

Note. — It is the purpose of the Professor each 
year to deliver to the students a lecture on some 
topic connected with the work of his Department. 
Some of the topics discussed in the past have been: 
"The Eruption of Vesuvius in 79 A. D.", "Why the 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

Classics are Shunned", "Why They Should be 
Studied". In 1908-1909 the subject of the lecture 
win be: "Euripides: His Art and Modernity." 



IX. THE SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 

PROFESSOR KERN. 

MISS RICKETTS. 

MISS SPANN. 

FRESHMAN. 

During the first term the work is in prose com- 
position. It is the aim of the course to give the stu- 
dent such a command of English as will enable him 
to write clear, correct prose, with proper regard for 
unity, order, and proportion in the paragraph and 
in the whole composition. Selections from Ameri- 
can literature are studied during the last term with 
the purpose of developing literary appreciation and 
the love of good literature. Especial attention is 
given to Poe and Hawthorne. Daily and weekly 
themes are required throughout the year. Four hours. 

Text-Books — Fovuidations of Rhetoric (Hill); Selections from 
Poe (Gambrill); Poe's Prose Tales; Hawthorne's Twice- 
Told Tales (Lathrop); Irving's Tales of a Traveller (Krapp); 
Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside Inn. 

SOPHOMORE. 

In the Sophomore year a general outline course 
in English literature is given, preparatory to the study 
of special periods and topics. Parallel with the de- 



68 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

velopment of the literature select poems and essays 
are studied with the view of applying the principles 
of the text -book and lecture. Harold, Westward 
Ho, and Henry Esmond are read as illustrative of 
the customs and manners of the Old English period, 
the age of Elizabeth, and the Augustan Age. In the 
spring term a short course in Shakespeare is given, 
in which stress is laid upon plot and character de- 
velopment, and upon methods of interpretation. 
Monthly exercises in short story writing are required 
throughout the year. Three hours. 

Text-Books — A First View of English Literature (Moody and 
Lovett); English Poetry (Manly); Lamb's Essays of Elia; 
Stevenson's Essays (Phelps); Bulwer-Lytton's Harold; 
Elingsley's Westward Ho (Innes); Thackeray's Henry Es- 
mond; Richard II (Herford); Henry IV, Part 1 (Moorman); 
Hamlet (Chambers); As You Like It (Smith). 



JUNIOR. 

During the first half year the essentials of Old 
English phonology and grammar are taught by the 
means of text -books and lectures, and selections from 
the prose and poetry are read. Brooke's English 
Literature from the Beginning to the Norman Con- 
quest is assigned as parallel reading. During the 
remainder of the year the work is in Chaucer; the 
Prologue and four Tales are read in class, and parallel 
reading is assigned. Throughout the course the 
history of the language is presented briefly by means 
of lectures. Three hours. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 69 

Text-Books — Old English Grammar (Smith); English Liter- 
ature from the Beginning to the Norman Conquest (Brooke); 
Chaucer's Prologue, Knight's Tale, Nun's Priest's Tale 
(Mather); The Tale of the Man of La we, The Pardoneres 
Tale, etc. (Skeat); The Poetry of Chaucer (Root). 

SENIOR. 

The autumn term is occupied with the study of 
Tennyson. The best and most characteristic of the 
shorter poems are read in class, especial attention 
being paid to poetic interpretation. Benson's Life of 
Lord Tennyson and a detailed study of Harold con- 
stitute the parallel work. After Christmas the Idylls 
of the King are studied. Tennyson's dependence upon 
his sources and the relation of the separate Idylls to 
each other will be considered, but the chief emphasis 
will be placed upon the conflict between Sense and 
Soul. The spring term is spent in gaining a general 
estimate of Browning's method and work as a poet 
as manifested in his shorter poems. Three essays are 
required during the year. Two hours. 

Text-Books— The Works of Tennyson (Globe); Alfred Tenny- 
son (Benson); Select Poems of Browning (Burton). 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

For the session of 1908-09 three courses are of- 
fered, two in English Literature and one in Old English. 
English may be elected as either a major or a minor 
subject; the outlines given below are for the minor 
courses; for the major courses additional work will be 
assigned and a thesis will be required. 



70 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

I. Literature — 

(a) Tennyson (see the course for the Senior year) . 

(b) Browning — Poetical Works of Robert Brown- 
ing (Globe); The Poetry of Robert Browning 
(Brooke); Robert Browning: Life and Letters 
(Orr). 

IL Old English— 

(a) Beowulf — Beowulf (Heyne-Socin) ; Grammar 
of Old English (Sie vers -Cook) ; History of Early 
English Literature (Brooke). 



XL THE SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

*PROFESSOE O. H. MOOEE. 
ACTING-PROFESSOR H. T. MOORE. 

The regular college work in Modern Languages 
begins with second year French and German. The 
beginning year in each of these languages is taught 
in the preparatory department, but the first year of 
either French or German will be given college credit 
for those students who do not offer the work for 
entrance. 

FRESHMAN. 

The aim of the Freshman year will be to develop 
the student in ability to read French and German 
fluently, to pronounce it accurately, to understand it 



* On leave of Absence. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 71 

when pronounced or spoken, and to acquire a fair 
knowledge of grammatical principles. To this end 
the recitations will be conducted as follows: One- 
fourth of each recitation will consist of black-board 
exercises on the daily assignment in grammar; following 
this the students will be asked to translate the lesson 
in reading from hearing it pronounced. All trans- 
lation will be done with books closed. Thus the 
baneful practice of "cribbing," — a practice so common 
among students, and one which at the same time in- 
evitably cuts short all hope of hnguistic progress — 
will be forever barred. Lastly, the reading, after 
ha\ing been translated, will be carefully pronounced 
by the students, and careful attention will be given to 
this branch of training. 

Effort will be made to read during the year about 
400 pages of German and 700 pages of French. 

Text-Books. 

German — Baeon's German Grammar; Moser's Der Bibliothekar; 
Bavmibach's Der Schwiegersohn; Schiller's Der Neffe als 
Onkel; Werner's Heimatklang; Frejtag's Die Joumalisten. 

French — Ctiardenars Complete French Course; Labiche and 
Delacour's Les Petits Oiseaux; Lazare's Contes et Nouvelles; 
Sand's La Mare au Diable; Hugo's La Chute; House's 
Three French Comedies; Feval's La Fee des Greves; La- 
biche and ilartin's Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon. 

SOPHOMORE. 

The general method of the Sophomore work 
will be the same as that of the preceding year, but 
less attention will be given to the grammar, and much 



72 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

more to the reading. The aim will be to acquaint 
the student as largely as possible with the masters of 
German and French literature. Not less than 1,000 
pages of German and 1,500 pages of French will be 
covered during the year. 

Text-Books. 

German — Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; Lessing's Nathan der Weise; 
Goethe's Faust; Egmont; Hermann und Dorothea; Keller's 
Bilder aus der Deutschen Litteratur, 

French — Moliere's Le Misanthrope, L'Avare, Les Pr^cieuses 
Ridicules; Corneille's Le Cid; Raeine's Athalie; Warren's 
Histoire de La Litterature Francaise; French Prose of the 
XVII Century; Dumas Les Trois Mousquetaires. 

JUNIOR. 

A fourth year course in German will be given 
as a Junior elective, or as Sophomore work for those 
students who offer two years of German for entrance. 
This will be a rapid reading course in German fiction 
and history. 1,600 pages will be covered and special 
attention will be given to conversation. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 73 

DEPARTMENT OF PROFESSIONAL 
EDUCATION. 



THE LAW SCHOOL 



THE FACULTY 

William Belton Murrah, D. D., LL. D,, Presi- 
dent of the College. 

Edward Mayes, LL. D., Dean, for fourteen and a 
half years Professor of Law in the State Uni- 
versity. 

Albert H. Whitfietd, LL. D., Professor; Chief Justice 
in the Supreme Court; for three and a half years 
Professor of Law in the State University. 

William R. Harper, Esq., Professor. 

The work of the school will be distributed between 
the instructors as follows: 

1. Professor Whitfield— The Law of Evidence; Crim- 

inal Law; Criminal Procedure; Law of Corpora- 
tions; Constitutional Law; Federal Courts, Juris- 
diction and Practice; Conflict of Laws; the Law 
of Real Property. 

2. Professor Harper— The Law of Pleading and Prac- 

tice, Personal Property, Commercial Law, Con- 
tracts, Torts, Statute Law; Equity Jurisprudence; 
Equity Pleading; Practice. 



74 MI LIS APS COLLEGE 

In the original foundation of Millsaps College, 
it was designed by its promoters to establish, in due 
season, and when the success of the Literary Depart- 
ment should be assured, a Department of Professional 
Education, embodying a Law and a Theological 
School. 

In the year 1896 the time came when, in the 
judgment of the trustees, it was possible and proper 
to establish the Law Department. Accordingly, they 
directed that at the beginning of the next session, 
the doors of this institution should be opened for the 
students of law, and Professor Edward Mayes was 
engaged to take the active control and instruction 
of that class. 

Our law school was not, even then, in any sense 
an experiment. Before that step was determined 
on, a respectable class was already secured for the 
first session. Dr. Mayes came to us with fourteen 
years of experience as a law professor in the State 
University, and with a reputation for ability and skill 
as an instructor which was thoroughly established. 
He had already secured the assistance of a number 
of most accomplished lawyers who promised to deliver 
occasional lectures, thus adding greatly to the interest 
and variety of instruction offered. 

The total attendance during the first year was 
twenty-eight, of whom fifteen were classed as Seniors. 
At the expiration of the college year, fifteen students 
presented themselves to the Hon. H. C. Conn, Chan- 
cellor, presiding over the Chancery Court, for exam- 



• • • MILLS A PS COLLEGE 75 

ination for license to practice law in conformity 
with the requirements of the Annotated Code of 1892. 
'They were subjected to a rigid written examination 
in open court, and their answers were, as law directs, 
forwarded by the Chancellor to the Supreme Judges. 
Every applicant passed this ordeal successfully and 
received his license. We are now closing the twelfth 
annual session of our Law School, and no student 
has failed in any year to pass the examination and 
receive his license. We point with pride to the re- 
sults. We now have one hundred and seventy-five 
graduates. 

The nature of the examination passed, being 
held by the Chancellor in his official character, puts 
beyond question or cavil the genuineness of that 
result. We do not ask of our patrons or those who 
contemplate becoming our patrons to accept any 
statement of our own. The finding and the statement 
are those of the Judicial Department of the State; 
-and every law graduate of Millsaps College stands 
before the world endorsed, not by the college alone, 
which is much, but also by the State itself, speaking 
through its Chancellors. This is more than can be 
said for any other young lawyers in the State. None 
others have such a double approval as a part of their 
regular course. 

The location of the school at Jackson enables 
the managers to offer to the students extraordinary 
advantages, in addition to the institution itself. 
Here is located the strongest bar in the State, whose 
management of their cases in court, and whose ar- 



76 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

guments will furnish an invaluable series of object 
lessons and an unfailing fountain of instruction to 
the students. Here also are located courts of all 
kinds known in the State, embracing not only the 
ordinary Municipal and the Circuit and Chancery 
Courts, but also the United States Court and the Su- 
preme Court. Thus the observant student may follow 
the history and course of cases in actual litigation from 
the lower tribunal to the highest, and observe in their 
practical operation the nice distinction between the 
State and Federal jurisdiction and practice. Here 
also is located the extensive and valuable State Law 
Library, unequalled in the State, the privileges of 
which each student may enjoy without cost. Here, 
too, where the Legislature convenes every second year, 
the student has an opportunity, without absenting 
himself from his school, to witness the deliberations 
of that body and observe the passage of the laws which, 
in after Mfe, he may be called upon to study and apply, 
thus he acquires a knowledge of the methods and 
practice of legislation. 

Applicants for admission to the Junior class must 
be at least nineteen years of age; those for admission 
to the Senior class must be at least twenty. Students 
may enter the Junior class without any preliminary 
examination, a good English elementary education 
being all that is required. Students may enter the 
Senior class upon satisfactory examination on the 
matter of the Junior course or its equivalent. No 
student will be graduated on less than five months of 
actual attendance in the school. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

Each student will be required to present satis- 
factory certificates of good moral character. 

Each student will be required to pay a tuition fee 
upon entrance, of fifty dollars, for the session's in- 
struction. No rebate of this fee will be made, because 
a student may desire to attend for a period less than 
a full session. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The full course of study will consist of two years, 
the Junior and Senior, each comprising forty weeks, 
five exercises per week. 

The instruction will consist mainly of daily ex- 
amination of the students on lessons assigned in stand- 
ard text -books. Formal written lectures will not be 
read. The law is too abstruse to be learned in that 
way. The professor will accompany the examination 
by running comments upon the text, illustrating and 
explaining it, and showing how the law as therein 
stood has been modified or reversed by recent ad- 
judications and legislation. 

The course will be carefully planned and con- 
ducted so as to meet the requirements of the Mississippi 
law in respect to the admission of applicants to prac- 
tice law, by examination before the Chancery Court, 
and will therefore embrace all the titles prescribed by 
Law for that examination, viz. : (1) The Law of Real 
Property; (2) The Law of Personal Property; (3) The 



78 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Law of Pleading and Evidence; (4) The Commercial 
Law; (5) The Criminal Law; (6) Chancery and Chancery 
Pleadings; (7) The Statute Law of the State; (8) The 
Constitution of the State and the United States. 

The objects set for accomplishment by this 
school are two: 

First, to prepare young men for examination for 
license to practice law, in such manner as both to 
ground them thoroughly in elementary legal principles 
and also to prepare them for examination for hcense 
with assurance of success; Secondly, to equip them 
for actual practice by a higher range of legal scholarship 
than what is merely needed for a successful exam- 
ination for license. Therefore, our course of study 
is so arranged as fully to meet both of these ends. 

First: The curriculum of the Junior class will 
embrace each of the eight subjects on which the apph- 
cant for hcense is required by the Code to be examined. 
A careful, detailed and adequate course is followed, 
so that any student, even although he shall never have 
read any law before coming to us, if he will apply 
himself with reasonable fidelity, can go before the 
Chancellor at the expiration of his Junior year, with 
a certainty of success. The preparation of applicants 
for hcense in one year, will be in short, a specialty of 
this school. 

Wlien a student shall have completed his Junior 
year, he will have open to him either one of two courses: 
He may stand his examination for Hcense before the 



. MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

Chancellor, or he may stand his examination before 
the law professor simply for advancement to the Senior 
Class if he does not care to stand for license at that 
time. If he shall be examined before the Chancellor 
and pass, he will be admitted to the Senior class, of 
course, and without further examination, in case 
he shall desire to finish his course with us and take a 
degree of Bachelor of Lawes. On the other hand, if 
he prefer to postpone his examination for hcense, he 
can be examined by the professor for advancement 
merely, and stand his test for license at the hands 
of the court at the end of the Senior year. 

As stated above the Senior year is designed to give 
to the student a broader and deeper culture than is 
needed only for examination for license. It is not 
strictly speaking, a post-graduate course, since it 
must be taken before graduation, but it is a post- 
licentiate course, and the degree conferred at its 
conclusion represents that much legal accomplishment 
in excess of the learning needed for license to practice 

The Senior Class is required to attend the reci- 
tations of the Junior Class by way of review, and to be 
prepared for daily questioning on the daily lessons of 
the Junior Class. 

Moot courts will be conducted under the direction 
of the professor in charge, in which the young men 
will be carefully instructed and drilled in the practical 
conduct of cases. 



80 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

M'^^ILLSAPS COLLEGE is named in honor of 
^^J Major R. W. Millsaps, whose munificent gifts 
^^^ have made the existence of the institution 
possible. The College is the property of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and was organized by the 
concurrent action of the Mississippi and North Mis- 
sissippi Conferences. It is not sectarian, however, 
but numbers among its patrons members of all the 
Christian denominations. 

The College has an endowment of $200,000, and 
several partially endowed scholarships. The build- 
ings and the grounds are worth §125,000. The first 
scholastic session began September 29, 1892, and 
the College has had remarkable prosperity from the 
beginning. The generous founder. Major Millsaps, by 
the gift of the Webster Science Hall, at a cost of $10,- 
000, and the Jackson College property, at a cost of 
more than S30,000, has greatly enlarged our facilities. 

LOCATION. 

Jackson, the capital of the State, and the seat of 
the College is easily accessible by five lines of railway. 
Thirty passenger trains arrive and depart daily. The 
college is located just north of the city, on a com- 
manding elevation with perfect drainage, and in a 
beautiful campus of fifty or more acres. A healthier 
spot it would be difficult to find within the limits of 
the State. The location secures all the advantages 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

of the town and yet supplies all the healthful conditions 
and immunities of the country. Jackson is a small 
city of 31,000 with handsome churches and public 
buildings, and is noted for the refinement and intel- 
ligence of its people. Its literary, social and rehgious 
advantages are superior. Bishop Galloway, President 
of the Board of Trustees, resides here, and his lectures 
and special sermons deUvered from time to time add 
greatly to the interest and profit of each session. 

THE JAMES OBSERVATORY. 

Millsaps College is prepared to offer the very finest 
advantages in the study of astronomy. The late Mr. 
Dan A. James, of Yazoo City, Miss., built an ob- 
servatory for the College in honor of the memory of 
his father, Mr. Peter James, and of his brother, IVIr. 
Samuel James. He also furnished the observatory 
with a magnificent telescope. 

LIBRARY. 

The College authorities have realized from the 
first that much of the success of the institution depends 
on its library facilities. It is a matter of great grati- 
fication that so early in its history the College has 
secured a large and valuable collection of books. Most 
of the well selected libraries of the late Dr. C. K. Mar- 
shall and Rev. W. G. Millsaps, besides many excellent 
volumes from Ex-Chancellor Edward Mayes, Dr. A. 
F. Wat kins and others, have been generously contrib- 
uted. In addition to his other munificent gifts, Major 



82 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

R. W. Millsaps has made valuable contributions to the 
library. Soon after the founding of the College, Mrs. 
J. R. Bingham, of Carrollt on, Mississippi, gave $1,000 
to endow the Martha A. Turner Library. This money, 
known as the Turner Fund, has been separately in- 
vested, and the annual interest used in purchasing 
books. With the proceeds of the library fee, paid 
by each student at his matriculation, the reading 
room is supplied with periodicals. The number of 
these has been much increased in the last few years, 
and all of the leading periodicals are now found in 
the Library. 

Near the close of the session of 1905-6, Mr. An- 
drew Carnegie offered to give the College SI 5,000 for 
a library building if the College authorities would 
supply an endowment of equal amount. Major Mill- 
saps added to his many contributions to the College 
by giving the full amount of the endowment. The 
new building was completed and formally dedicated 
with appropriate ceremonies, October 2.Q, 1907. Thein- 
come from the endowment will allow additions each 
year to the stock of books and periodicals, and will 
offer library facilities that are not equaled in the State. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Two large halls have been provided for the Lit- 
erary Societies organized for the purpose of improve- 
ment in debate, declamation, composition, and ac- 
quaintance with the methods of dehberative bodies. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

These societies are conducted by the students under 
constitutions and by-laws of their own framing. They 
are named, respectively, the Galloway and the Lamar 
Societies, and contribute greatly to the improvement 
of their members. 

BOARDING FACILITIES. 

We have established "Students' Homes", capable 
of accommodating a hmited number of boarders, and 
each placed in charge of a Christian family. These 
homes, "Asbury Home" and "Williams Home", have 
each a capacity of from twenty-four to thirty young 
men. In addition we have several small cottages in 
which students can board themselves at reduced cost, 
or, if they prefer, lodge there, and take their meals else- 
where. These cottages form a group of eight build- 
ings admirably situated on the eastern side of the 
campus. The rooms are sufficiently large to accom- 
modate two students each. The room rental per 
student in the cottages is $9.00 for the session and 
must be paid as follows: S5.00 at the beginning of the 
session, and $4.00 the 1st of February. No student 
will be permitted to room at the cottages without 
special permission from the President. 

Memorial Cottages.— The friends of the late Rev. 
John A. Ellis, of the Mississippi Conference, and the Rev. 
J. H. Brooks, of the North Mississippi Conference, have 
built two cottages for the accommodation of students. 
These Homes are named, respectively, the John A 
Ellis Cottage, and the J. H. Brooks Cottage. 



84 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

FOUNDER'S HALL. 

Through the generosity of Major Millsaps we have 
recently come into possession of additional valuable 
property, including a large dormitory building. This 
supplies the finest facilities for boarding accommoda- 
itons. The rooms are heated with steam, and are 
well ventilated — all having outside exposure. Rooms 
in Founders Hall will cost each student $18.00 per 
session of nine months, and must be paid as follows: 
$10.00 on receiving key to room, and $8.00 the 1st of 
February. Students in Founders Hall are expected 
to supply their own lights and bed-room furniture. 
Lights cost very little, and the room furniture can be 
easily disposed of when they leave College. The man- 
agement of the Hall is in charge of the Founders Hall 
Club — J. M. Guinn, Manager. 

Table board in Founders Hall can be had at $8.00 
per month. All of the advantages of the Hall, in- 
cluding lodging, fires in winter, table board, and lights, 
will cost only $10.40 per month. 

Private families in the vicinity of the College ofi'er 
excellent board to students at moderate cost. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Several scholarships have been established, the 
income from which will be used in aiding deserving 
young men in securing a collegiate education — the 
W. H. Tribbett Scholarship, the W. H. Watkins Schol- 
arship, the Peebles Scholarship, established by Mrs. N. 
McPherson, and the scholarship in Latin and Greek. 



MILL SAPS COLLEGE 85 

The holder of the last named scholarship will be 
expected to give a portion of his time in assisting the 
Head of the Department. It is open to graduates of 
the Junior and Sophomore classes. 

The Oakley Memorial.— Under the direction of 
Mrs. J. R. Bingham, of Carrollton, Mississippi, a fund has 
been raised to establish a memorial in honor of the late 
Rev. J. S. Oakley, who was for many years an honored 
member of the North Mississippi Conference. The 
following Sunday Schools have contributed to this fund : 
Macon, Black Hawk, Carrollton, Rosedale, Starkville, 
Water Valley (Wood Street), Winona, Pickens, Durant. 

COLLEGE MAILS. 

All correspondence intended for students at the 
College should be addressed care of Millsaps College. 
Mails are distributed to students on the campus, there- 
by avoiding the necessity of personal visits to the 
city postofiice. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

There is an organization among the students 
which orders text books for the college, and these books 
may be obtained on the campus at publishers' prices. 

ELECTION OF CLASSES AND COURSES. 

Students are allowed some hberty of choice of 
classes and courses, either by themselves, or their 
friends, limited to the judgment of the Faculty and 
by the exigency of classification. A student is not 



86 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

allowed to withdraw from any class to which he has 
been assigned without the consent of the Faculty. 
A request to be allowed to drop a study must be made 
in writinsr. 



^?3' 



EXAMINATIONS. 

Written examinations will be held twice a year, 
and special examinations at other times as the several 
professors may elect. 

There is a tendency among students to withdraw 
just before, or in the midst of the June examinations. 
This results in a loss to the student, for examinations 
are more than a test of knowledge. They are an ed- 
ucational instrument for teaching method, prompti- 
tude, self-reliance, for training in accuracy, and for 
developing in the student the power of concentration 
of attention and readiness in the shaping and arranging 
of thought. Examinations will not be given in ad- 
vance of the set time. No student who leaves College 
before the completion of his examinations will be ad- 
mitted to the next higher class until he has submitted 
himself to the prescribed tests. 

During the session reports will be sent to the pa- 
rent or guardian of each student, in which will be an 
estimate of his class standing and deportment. 

DISCIPLINE. 

It will be the constant care of the administration 
to guard the moral conduct of students. The discip- 
line will be firm. Obedience to College regulations 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 87 

will be strictly required. Young men unwilling to 
submit to reasonable, wholesome government are not 
desired and will not be retained. 

CERTIFICATES OF GOOD CHARACTER. 

Candidates for admission are required to give 
satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and if 
the candidate comes from another college, he must 
show that he was honorably discharged. 

PRIZES. 

Prizes are annually awarded for excellence in: 

1. Oratory. The Carl J. v. Seutter medal and 
the Oscar Kearney Andrews medal. 

2. Declamation. The Millsaps medal. 

3. Essay. The Clark medal. 

4. Scholarship. The Oakley Memorial Prize. 

5. Essay. The Political Science Prize. 

6. Essay. The D. A. R. medal. 

CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must report to the 
President and to the Secretary as soon as possible after 
their arrival and secure board at some place approved 
by the College authorities. Except in cases where 
special permission is granted students to board in the 
cottages, or in town, they will be required to board in 
Founder's Hall, or in private families near the College. 
New students should be present on Tuesday that they 
may be examined and classed before the opening day, 
Wednesday, September 30. 



88 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations for those applying for admission 
into Millsaps College will be held September 29-30. 
See calendar on page 2. See detailed statement as to 
entrance requirements, page 24. 

ATHLETICS. 

With the help of friends, the students have 
equipped a commodious gymnasium. The annual 
spring Field Day gives an opportunity for public con- 
tests in all athletic games. There is a student organ- 
ization, the Millsaps College Athletic Association, 
which helps to keep up enthusiastic interest in health- 
ful sports. A member of the Faculty is always an 
officer of this Association. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Students will be required to be present at morn- 
ing worship in the CoUge Chapel. In this daily ser- 
vice the Faculty and students come together to hear 
the reading of the Sacred Scriptures and to engage in 
singing and prayer. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Organized shortly after the College was founded, 
the Young Men's Christian Association has been 
dominated by the double purpose of leading men to 
accept Christ and to form such associations as will 
guard them against the tempations of College life. 
It places the spiritual above the intellectual and 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

emphasizes the importance of Christian activity in 
education. 

In order to accomphsh its worthy ideal, the 
Association holds meetings on Friday and Sunday 
evenings. The services are conducted usually by 
some one of the students, but occasionally by some 
member of the Faculty or minister from town. Also 
in the spring, annual revival services lasting over 
a week result in renewing enthusiasm and in giving 
great stimulus to Association work. 

The Association sends yearly a large delegation 
to the Southwestern Students' Conference, at Ruston, 
Louisiana. Since the ten days of the Convention are 
assiduously devoted to discussing Association work and 
problems, the delegates always return enthusiastic 
and zealous for doing Christian service, thus they give 
new impetus and a lively interest in the King's business. 

The work of the Association is carried on by tha 
students; each man has his part to do according to 
the plan of organization. The President, elected by 
its members, appoints chairmen of seven committees, 
each composed of three or more men. It is the 
duty of the advertising committee to advertise all 
meetings and secure good attendance. A small hand- 
book with campus information is distributed at the 
opening of the session. On the first Friday evening 
of the College year the Reception Committee provides 
entertainment for the new students, and this committee 
also meets all new students as they arrive. At the 
reception, all are made acquainted with one another. 



90 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Each new student is urged by the membership Com- 
mittee to join the Association. The past session 
the membership was one hundred and seventeen. 
The Committee on Finance, whose chairman is the 
Treasurer of the Association, collects the annual dues 
($1.50) and raises funds sufficient for meeting current 
expenses. The Devotional Committee provides leaders 
for the meetings. 

But most important is the Bible Study Committee. 
The importance of studying the Bible is presented 
and every student is urged to engage in Systematic 
Bible work. Daily Bible study is felt to be of incalcu- 
lable value in Christian hving. The Missionary Com- 
mittee arranges courses in biographies of Missionaries 
and in various mission fields. Also the students are 
trained in systematic living. For several years the 
Association has aided in the support of a Chinese stu- 
dent in the Anglo -Chinese College. 

It is hoped that every student who matriculates 
in the College will become a member of the Association. 

PUBLIC LECTURES. 

With the view of promoting general culture among 
the students, and to furnish them pleasant and profi- 
table entertainment, occasional lectures are deUvered 
in the College Chapel by distinguished speakers. 

EXPENSES— LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 

Tuition for full scholastic year, $30.00 

Incidental fee 5.00 

Library fee - - 1.00 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 91 

A contingent deposit of $2.00 is required of each 
student boarding in liouses owned by the College on 
entering the College, to be deposited with the Pres- 
ident in order to cover any damage that may occur. 
The whole of this deposit, or any unexpended part 
thereof, will be refunded on Commencement Day, 
provided the student has not previously left the Col- 
lege without permission. 

The tuition may be paid in two installments, as 
follows: First payment, S15.00, at the beginning of 
the session, and the second payment, S15.00, the first 
of February. The Incidental and Library fees must 
be paid in full when the student enters. 

Students preparing for the- work of the ministry 
in any Christian denomination, and the sons of preach- 
ers, will have no tuition to pay, but all students will 
be required to pay the Incidental and Library fees. 

Board in good famiUes can be had at from S 15.00 
to $12.00 per month, including lodging and Ughts. 

Students are expected to furnish their own fuel, 
but if they prefer, it will be supplied at a cost of S5.00 
for the session. Each student is expected to furnish 
his own pillow, bed clothes, and toilet articles. 

If students prefer to room in one of the cottages 
and take their meals elsewhere, table board will not 
cost them more than $11.00 per month. 



92 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Ample facilities are provided for board at the 
above rates. Any student may feel assured that 
board will not cost him more than $125.00 for the 
entire session. 

Tuition in Law Department, $50.00,. 
Laboratory Fees. — Students pursuing laboratory 
courses are charged additional fees varying with 
the Department. 

In the Chemical Laboratory a fee is required in 
the nature of a deposit, an account being kept of 
material used, and unexpended balances being 
returned to the student at the end of the year. 
In all Departments; students are chargeable for 
unnecessary breakages. 
The Laboratory fees are as follows: 

Chemistry. $5.00 

Physics -• 5.00 

Geology _. 1.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 93 

THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



The main object of this Department is to prepare 
students for the Freshman Class. The lack at present 
of good training schools in our State makes the need 
of such a Department imperative. To students who 
find it necessary to leave home in order to fit them- 
selves for college, we offer special advantages. 

The enlargement of the College Course of Study 
and the higher standard now fixed for entrance' re- 
quire of this Department a corresponding increase in 
the scope of its work. In general this increase amounts 
to the addition of somewhat more than a year to the 
work heretofore done. As now constituted our Pre- 
paratory School covers 14 Carnegie units (see page 
24) , so that its graduates will be prepared to enter any 
college North or South. With this end in view ade- 
quate equipment will be provided, and not only will 
a higher grade of work be done but thoroughness 
will everywhere be more strictly enforced. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

No student will be admitted to this Department 
who is under fourteen years of age. For entrance 
into the First Year Class the pupil must have com- 
pleted Geography, United States History (Grammar 
School Course), English Grammar and High School 
Arithmetic. 



94 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Applicants for admission into the second year 
Class should have had one year's instruction in Ele- 
mentary Algebra, Beginner's Latin (Collar & Daniel 
or its equivalent) and Higher English Grammar. 

To the Third Year Class those only will be ad- 
mitted who give satisfactory evidence by written 
examinations or certificates of recognized affihating 
High Schools that they have completed properly the 
work of the first two years as given in the appended 
table. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

English. — The Course in English is designed not only 
to teach the student to write and speak with 
granmiatical correctness, but also to inspire in 
him a love of good literature. The reading under 
competent guidance of classics such as are 
recommended by our General Board of 
Education can hardly fail to secure this result. 

Mathematics. — The work in Mathematics is suffic- 
iently indicated by the appended tabular state- 
ment. Care will be taken to make the student 
so thorough in his knowledge of the authors 
studied that he will be enabled to pursue the 
higher work of the College with increasing inter- 
est and power. 

History. — History will be read with a view to pre- 
paring the student for the more comprehensive 
study of the same subjects in College. In ad- 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE ■ 95 

dition, therefore, to drill on facts and the succes- 
sion of events some attention will be given to 
the principles involved in the development of 
civilization during the periods under consideration. 

Ancient Languages. — There are five regular courses 
in the Ancient Languages offered in the Depart- 
ment, three in Latin, and two in Greek. In 
Latin, four books of Caesar are read in the second 
Year; the forms are stressed; elementary gram- 
mar is mastered; a vocabulary is acquired; week- 
ly exercises are written by the class; the grammar 
is systematically studied; in short, a foundation 
is laid for the future accurate study of the 
language. 

In the Third Year six orations of Cicero are 
read, systematic study of the grammar is con- 
tinued; weekly exercises are written and the 
student is thoroughly prepared to take up with 
profit and ease the work of the Freshman Year 
in College. 

Greek will be begun in the Second Year of the Pre- 
paratory Department. White's First Greek Book 
will be thoroughly mastered. If possible, the 
last six weeks of the Course will be spent in read- 
ing a few chapters in the Anabasis. 

In the Third Year four books of the Anabasis 
will be read. The method pursued in this Class 
will be the same as that pursued in the Caesar 



96 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Class in Latin; grammar, syntax, exercise work 
reading, — all making for thoroughness in elemen- 
tary Greek, and in preparation for College. 

Modern Languages. — One year of German, and one 
of French will be offered. In this beginning 
work the student will be especially drilled on 
the principles of grammar, and will be required 
to cover 250 pages of reading in each language. 
The student may also take for entrance two 
years of German without any French. In this 
case he would take Freshman German in his 
third year of preparatory work. 

Science. — One year in Science will be given, the first 
half to Physics, and the last half to Chemistry. 
The study of the text book will be supplemented 
by illustrative experiments and an occasional 
lecture by the Head of the Department of Science 
in the College . 

The Department, as reorganized, is prepared 
to supply the needs of those who can not continue 
at school till graduation, but desire to take an 
advanced High School Course of study. It is 
important, however, that those desiring to do 
this should, before coming, correspond with the 
President, or with the Head Master of the De- 
partment. 

The following table will exhibit the Course of 
Study in detail. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 97 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

HRS. 

English — Advanced English Grammar -with daily exercises, 
in dictation and weekly exercises in composition (Al- 
len) ; Franklin's Autobiography and Silas Mamer 5 

Mathematics — School Algebra through Simultaneous Equa- 
tions (Went worth) 4 

Latin — Collar & Daniell's First Latin Book 5 

Science — Carhart & Chute's Physics; Chemistry (Hesler and 

Smith) 3 



17 
SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

HRS. 

English — Rhetoric and Composition (Espenshade), written 
exercises once a week. For study: Lycidas, L' Allegro, 
II Penseroso, and Washington's Farewell Address. Par- 
allel Reading: The Deserted Village, Ivanhoe, Sir Roger 
de Coverly 3 

Mathematics — College Algebra, through Progressions (Wells 

or Wentworth); Plane Geometry (Wentworth) 4 

History — Myers' Ancient History 4 

Latin — Caesar (Bennett); Bennett's Grammar, pp. 1-165; 

exercises based on the text of Caesar 4 

Greek — White's Greek Book (Anabasis begun) 4 

or 
German — Bacon's German Grammar; Guerber's Marchen 
und Ezrahlungen; MuUer and Wenckebach's Gluck Auf . 



19 



THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

English — Rhetoric (Espenshade) continued; weekly written 

exercises. For study: Macbeth, Webster's Bunker 

Hill Oration, Macaulay's Life of Johnson. Parallel 

reading: Macaulay's Addison and Milton, The Ancient 



98 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

HRS. 

Mariner, Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, The 
Last of the Mohicans 5 

Mathematics — Sohd Geometry (Went worth) 3 

History — United States (Adanas and Trent,'oi Chambers).... 4 
Latin — Cicero (six orations); Grammar continued; Latin 
Composition based on Cicero; Parallel reading, Froude's 
Caesar 4 

Greek — Anabasis (continued) and weekly written exercises.. 4 

or 
French — Chardenal's Complete French Course; Lazare's 

Lectures Faciles; Mairet's La Tache du Petit Pierre; 

Labiche and Martin's Moi, DeVi. 

20 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 99 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President 
Rev. William Noah Duncan Durant 

Vice President 

Miss Frances Virginia Park _ ..Jackson 

Secretary 

Rev. Henry Thompson Carley New Orleans 

Annual Orator for 1908 
John Richard Co^ntiss Greenville 



CLASS OF 1895. 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Francis Marion Austin, G^unty Judge Edna, Texas 

Bachelors of Science. 

John Gill Lilly, Physician Vidalia, La. 

Hiram Stuart Stevens, Attorney Hattiesburg 

CLASS OF 1896. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Jos. Anderson Applewhite, Physician Portland, Ore. 

Jesse Thompson Calhoun, Supt. of School Mt. Ohve 

Stith Gordon Green, Physician Deceased 

Aquila John McCormick, County Supt., Attorney, Deceased 

CLASS OF 189". 
Bachelors of Arts. 

LUcius Edwin Alford, Minister Meridian 

Walter Wilroy Catching, Physician Jackson 

William Henry FitzHugh, Attorney Memphis, Tenn. 

William Burwell Jones, Minister Gulfport 

Daniel Gilmer McLaurin, Sec. Y. M. C. A Canton 

George Boyd Power, Attorney Jackson 



100 MI LIS APS COLLEGE 

Bachelor of Science. 

Monroe Pointer, Merchant Como 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Francis Marion Austin, County Judge Edna, Texas 

John Crumpton Hardy, Pres. A. & M. College Starkville 

William Houston Hughes, Lawyer Raleigh 

Walter Abner GuUedge, Attorney Monticello, Ark. 

John Quitman Hyde, Attorney Greensburg, La. 

Aquila John McCormick, Attorney Deceased 

Myron Sibbie McNeil, Attorney Crystal Springs 

Julius Alford Naul, Attorney Gloster 

Richard Davas Peets, Attorney Natchez 

Paul Dinsmore Ratliff, Attorney Raymond 

Edgar Gayle Robinson, Attorney Raleigh 

Walter Hamlin Scott, Attorney Houston, Texas 

Robert Lowrey Ward, Attorney Sumner 

William Wilhams, Attorney General Deceased 



CLASS OF 1898. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

James Blair Alford, Bookkeeper Norfield 

Charles Girault Andrews, Physician Colon, Panama 

Percy Lee Clifton, Asst. R. R. Commissioner Jackson 

Gamer Wynn Green, Attorney Jackson 

Albert George Hilzim, Commercial Traveler Jackson 

Blackshear Hamilton Locks, Professor Mathematics 

in High School Oklahoma City 

John Lucius McGehee, Physician Memphis, Tenn. 

Alexander Harvey Shannon, Nashville, Tenn. 

Bachelors of Science. 

William Hampton Bradley, Civil Engineer Flora 

Wharton Green, Civil Engineer New York 

Robert Barron Ricketts, Attorney Jackson 

George Lee Teat, Attorney Kosciusko 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 101 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Thomas Edwin Stafford, Physician Vossburg 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Robert Lowrey Dent, Attorney G. & S. I. R. R Gulfport 

Lemuel Himiphries Doty, Attorney Biloxi 

John Price Edwards, Attorney Edwards 

Louis T. Fitzhugh, Jr., Attorney Memphis, Tenn. 

Garrard Harris, Attorney, Claim Agent I. C. R. R Jackson 

Bee King, Attorney Jackson 

George William May, Attorney Jackson 

William Leisis Nugent, Attorney Jackson 

John Lundy Sykes, Commercial Traveler, Memphis, Tenn. 

George Lee Teat, Attorney Kosciusko 

Harvey Earnest Wadsworth, Attorney Meridian 

CLASS OF 1S99. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Wm. Edward Mabry Brogan, Minister Okolona 

Henry Thompson Carley, Minister New Orleans, La. 

Ashbel Webster Dobjms, Professor Little Rock, Ark. 

Harris Allen Jones, Teacher Pickens 

Edward Leonard Wall Deceased 

James Percy Wall, Medical Student New York 

Herbert Bro^Ti Wat kins, Minister Hazlehurst 

Bachelor of Science. 

Geo. Lott Harrell, Professor Mathematics and 

Astronomy, Epw^orth University Oklahoma 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

John Tillery Le\s'is, Minister Durant 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Percy Lee Clifton, Asst. R. R. Commissioner Jackson 

William Urbin Corley, Attorney Collins 

William Henry FitzHugh, Attorney Memphis, Tenn. 

Gamer Wynn Green, Attorney Jackson 

Robert Samuel Hall, Attorney Hattiesburg 



102 MILLS APS COLLEGE 



Robert Earl Hiimphries, Attorney Gulfport 

Herschel Victor Leverett, Attorney Hattiesburg 

George Boyd Power, Attorney Jackson 

William Henry Livingston, Attorney Bums 

William Wallace Simonton, Auditor's Clerk Jackson 

• Eugene Terry, Editor Magee 

CLASS OF 1900. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Morris Andrews Chambers, Electrical Engineer McHenry 

Ethelbert Hines Galloway, City Physician Jackson 

James Ford Galloway, Civil Engineer Gulfport 

Thomas Wynn Holloman, Attorney Alexandria, La. 

Wm. Walter Holmes, Minister New Orleans, La. 

Thos. Mitchell Lemly, Sec'y. Y. M. C. A., Americus, Ga. 

Henry Polk Lewis, Jr., Minister Natchez 

Thos. Eubanks Marshall, Pres. Clarksville 

Academy Clarksville, Tenn. 

James Boswell Mitchell, Minister Guthrie, Oklahoma 

James Asgill Teat, Attorney Kosciusko 

Bachelors of Science. 

Stephen Luse Burwell, Asst. Cashier Bank Lexington 

WilUam Thomas Clark, Bookkeeper Yazoo City 

Wilham Lee Kennon, Professor in Williams College, 

Williamstown, Mass. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Clarence Norman Guice, Minister , Edwards 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Frank Moye Bailey, Attorney Chickasha, I. T. 

Edgar Lee Brown, Attorney Yazoo City 

Robert Lee Cannon, Attorney Brookhaven 

William Leroy Cranford, Attorney Seminary 

Daniel Theodore Currie, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Neal Theophilus Currie, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Joseph Bowmar Dabney, County Supt. Education, Vicksburg 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 103 

Desmond Marvin Graham, Attorney Gulfport 

Lovick Pierce Haley, Attorney Okolona 

Elisha Bryan Harrell, Attorney Madison 

Robert Barron Ricketts, Attorney Jackgon 

Hardy Jasper Wilson, Attorney Hazlehurst 

Thomas Beasley Stone, Attorney Fayette 

James Asgill Teat, Attorney Kosciusko 

Samuel David Terry, Teacher Texas 

William Calvin Wells, Attorney Jackson 

CLASS OF 1901. 

Masters of Science. 

Geo. Lott Harrell, Prof, ilath., Epworth University, Okla- 
William Lee Kennon, Professor in Williams College, 

Williamstown, Mass. 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Robert Adolphus Clark, Minister Columbus 

Henry Thomas Cunningham, Minister Orange, Texas 

Barney Edward Eaton, District Attorney Laurel 

Luther Watson Felder, Farmer McComb 

Albert Angelo Hearst, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Leon Catching HoUoman, Real Estate Jackson 

James Thomas McCafTerty. Minister Moorehead 

Holland Otis White, Law Student University 

Bachelors of Science. 

Edward Burnley Ricketts, Chemist New York 

Hamilton Fletcher Sivley, Cashier Braxton 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

John Sharp Ewing, Medical Student New Orleans, La. 

Harry Greenwell Fridge, Physician Sanford 

Robert Paine Neblett, Minister Tunica 

James Albert Vaughan, Medical Student Virginia 

Ebbie Ouchterloney Whittington, Merchant Gloster 



104 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Hulette Fugua Aby, Attorney Luma, I. T. 

Frank Edgar Everett, Attorney Meadville 

Frederick Marion Glass, Attorney Vaiden 

Arthur Warrington Fridge, Adjutant General Jackson 

Joel Richard Holcomb, Editor Purvis 

Thomas Wynn Holloman, Attorney Alexandria, La. 

Thomas Mitchell Lemly, Sec'y. Y. M. C. A., Americus, Ga. 

James Douglass Magruder, Attorney Canton 

Reuben Webster Millsaps, Attorney Hazelhurst 

John Magruder Pearce, Attorney Woodville 

Robert Patterson Thompson, Attorney Jackson 

Vince John Strieker, Attorney Jackson 

CLASS OF 1902. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

John Richard Countiss, Minister Greenville 

William Larkin Duren, Minister Clarksdale 

Albert Langley Fairley, State Mgr. La. Life Ins. Co., Jackson 

George Marvin Galloway, Dentist Canton 

Mary Letitia Holloman Hattiesburg 

John Blanch Howell, Physician Canton 

Clayton Daniel Potter, Attorney Jackson 

Claude Mitchell Simpson, Missionary China 

Allen Thompson, Attorney Jackson 

James David Tillman, Jr., Book-keeper CarroUton 

Bachelors of Science. 

Henry LaFayette Clark, Book-keeper New Orleans, La. 

Leonard Hart, Physician Omaha, Neb. 

Walton Albert Williams, Teacher Philippines 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Pope Jordan, Pharmacist Welch, La. 

Bachelors of Laws. 

George Hansel Banks Newton 

John David Carr Meridian 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 105 

Abe Heath Conn, Attorney Hazlehurst 

Wm. Stanson Da\as, Jr Waynesboro 

John David Fatheree Pachuta 

Wm. Columbus Ford Bezer 

Albert Angelo Hearst, Attorney Hattiesburg 

R. T. Hilton, Attorney Mendenhall 

Thomas Richmond James, Attorney Lucedale 

John Reed Matthews, Attorney Meridian 

Bernard Slaton Mount, Attorney Vicksburg 

James Colon Russell Raleigh 

Oscar Greaves Thompson Jackson 

Victor Hugo Torrey Hattiesburg 

Warren Upton Hattiesburg 



CLASS OF 1903. 
Master of Arts. 

Mary Letitia HoUoman Hattiesburg 

Bachelors of Arts. 

William Felder Cook, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Lamar Easterling, Attorney Jackson 

Alfred Moses Ellison, Postal Clerk Jackson 

DeWitt Carroll Enochs, Attorney Pinola 

Felix Eugene Gunter, Agt. Penn. Mut. Life Ins. Co Jackson 

Harvey Brown Heidelberg, City Superintendent Clarksdale 

Osmond Summers Le'^is, Minister Myers\'ille 

Frederic Davis Mellen, Prof. English A. & M. Col., Starkville 

Walter McDonald Merritt, Physician Jackson 

George Nobles Roscoe, Teacher Morton 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Allen Smith Cameron, Minister Centralia, Ind. Ter. 

Felix Wilhams Grant, Book-keeper Vicksburg 

Aimee Hemingway Jackson 

Janie Millsaps Hazlehurst 



106 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Bachelors of Law. 

E. A. Anderson, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Henry Lewis Austin, Attorney Philadelphia 

Robert Eli Bennett, Attorney Meadville 

John A. Clark, Attorney DeKalb 

Joseph Oliver Cowart, Attorney Cross Roads 

Tandy Walker Cranford, Attorney Seminary 

Barney Edward Eaton, District Attorney Laurel 

W. D. Hilton, Attorney Mendenhall 

James Wilson Holder, Attorney Bay Springs 

Paul B. Johnson Hattiesburg 

H. L. McLaurin Mount Olive 

James Terrell Mounger, Attorney Taylorsville 

E. S. Richardson Philadelphia 

Peter FrankUn Russell Raleigh 

Richard C. Russell Magee 

William Asa Tew Mount Olive 

John LawTence Thomson Sylvarena 

Isaac Powell Touchstone Braxton 

CLASS OF 1904. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Charlton Augustus Alexander, Attorney Jackson 

David LeRoy Bingham, Cashier Bank CarroUton 

William Chapman Bowman, Attorney Natchez 

Ellis Bowman Cooper, Law Student University 

Dolph Griffin Frantz, City Clerk Shreveport, La. 

Miller Craft Henry, Physician Gulfport 

James Madison Kennedy, Teacher Union 

William Marvin Langley, Minister Glen Allen 

Joseph Hudson Penix, Attorney Jackson 

Charles Robert Ridgway, Jr., Attorney Jackson 

Lovick Pinkney Wasson, Minister Rosedale 

Bachelors of Science. 

Louise Enders Crane, Stenographer Jackson 

Benton Zachariah Welch, Physician Wool Market 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 107 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

John Clanton Chambers, Minister Plainsview, Texas 

James Marvin Lewis, Minister Oakridge 

Walter Anderson Terry, Minister Vicksburg 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Lamar Easterling, Attorney Jackson 

Luther E. Grice Tyrus 

Louis C. Hallam, Attorney Jackson 

Charles Buck Hamilton, Attorney Jackson 

James B. Hillman Beech Springs 

Jesse David Jones Newton 

Joseph Albert May Mendenhall 

D. K. McDonald Augusta 

Thornton E. Mortimer, Attorney Belzoni 

Hubert Parker Perkinston 

Joseph Hudson Penix, Attorney Jackson 

W, S. Pierce Hattiesburg 

Charles Frazier Reddock Bassfield 

Henry Vaughan Watkins, Attorney Jackson 

William Warren West Rickston 



CLASS OF 1905. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Ernest Brackstone Allen, Teacher Prentiss 

Joseph Enoch Carruth, Jr., Prin. High School... McComb City 

William Noah Duncan, Minister Durant 

Robert Pain Fikes, Ministerial Student Vanderbilt 

Sanford Martin Graham, Attorney Oak Grove 

Albert Powe Hand, Medical Student New Orleans, La. 

Jesse Walter McGee, Minister McCool 

Marvin Summers Pittman, Parish Supt. Education, 

Tallulah, La. 

James Slicer Purcell, Jr., Minister Baton Rouge, La. 

John Baxter Ricketts, Attorney Jackson 

Talmage Voltaire Simmons, Salesman Sallis 



108 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Bachelor of Science. 

Leonidas Forister Barrier, Student Louisville, Ky. 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Osbom Walker Bradley, Minister Hernando 

Theophilus Marvin Bradley, Minister Alligator 

James Nicholas Hall, Minister Starkville 

William LaFayette Weems, Jr., Salesman Shubuta 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Norman Rudolph Allen Fayette 

William Harrison Austin Oxford 

John Walton Baekstrom Merrill 

J. W. Bradford Itta Bena 

O. W. Currie Mt. Olive 

J. H. Daws Colmnbus 

J. Fred Fant McComb aty 

Raymond Edgar Jones Philadelphia 

R. F. Langston Aberdeen. 

John Alexander McFarland Bay Springs 

Green Huddleston Merrell ColUns 

Thomas Edward Pegram Ripley 

Louis Lonzo Posey Moorehead 

M. M. Robertson, Attorney A. & V. R. R Vicksburg, 

J. D. Smith Meridiaru 

J. A. Smylie Union Church 

Z. C. Stewart Biloxi 

Neadom Walter Sumrall Hazelhurst 

B. S. Sylverstein Vicksburg, 

M. Thompson New Orleans: 

■R. S. Tullos Rollins; 

J. Upton Poplarville 

CLASS OF 1906. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

• Robert Bradley Carr, Merchant Pontotoc 

Evan Drew Lewis, Minister Gunnison 

Ethel Clayton McGilvray, Minister Terry 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 109 

Elisha Grigsby Mohler, Jr., Teacher Gulfport 

Frances Virginia Park, Teacher Jackson 

Bachelors of Science. 

Joseph Atkins Baker, Principal High School Flora 

John Lambert Neill, Minister Pass Christian 

Luther Emmett Price, Student Cornell Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Hugh Ernest Brister, Merchant Bogue Chitto 

James Edward Heidelberg, Cashier Bank of 

Commerce Hattiesburg 

Joseph Atkins Baker, Principal High School Flora 

Luther Emmett Price, Student Cornell Univ Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Vernon Derward Barron Crystal Springs 

Briscoe Clifton Cox Gulfport 

James Andy Cunningham Boone \'ille 

Julian Half East, District Attorney Brandon 

Toxey Hall Columbia 

Robert Edgar Jackson Liberty 

John Baxter Ricketts Jackson 

Carroll Steen Russell Prentiss 

James Madison Sheffield Oxford 

Matthew J. Sikes Waldo 

Oscar Bomar Taylor Jackson 

Ben Lawrence Todd, Jr., Postal Clerk Jackson 

Walter Scott Welch Prentiss 



CLASS OF 1907. 
Master of Arts. 

James Archibald McKee, Minister Lambert 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Calvin Crawford Applewhite, Teacher Winona 

Oscar Backstrom, Superintendent of Education, Leakes'V'ille 



110 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

James Robert Bright, Minister Carrollton 

James Wilson Frost, Salesman Oakland 

James Archibald McKee, Minister Lambert 

Charles Lamar Neill, Teacher Hattiesburg 

Susie Boyd Ridgway. Teacher Jackson 

Arthur Leon Rogers, Banker New Albany 

Wirt Alfred Williams, Teacher Ruth 

Bachelors of Science. 

James Leo Berry, Merchant PrentisS 

Harvey Hasty Bullock, Teacher Morton 

Landon Kimbrough Carlton, Deputy Clerk Batesville 

John William Loch, Teacher Magnolia 

Grover Cleveland Terrell, Medical Student New Orleans 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Samuel Ivy Osbom, Bookkeeper Norfield 

Henry Wilbur Pearce, Jr., Dental Student Nashville 

John Wesley Weems, Merchant Shubuta 

Bachelors of Laws. 

John Luther Adams, Attorney Quitman 

George Manning Beaver, Attorney Newton 

Fred Bush, Attorney New Hebron 

Theodore B. Davis, Attorney Columbia 

A. M. Edwards, Attorney Colimabia 

Mack James, Attorney Newton 

Lee Harrington Pritchard, Attorney Meadeville 

T. H. Round, Attorney Hattiesburg 

J. D. Stewart, Attorney Jackson 

Orbrey Dehnond Street, Attorney Ripley 

O. F. Turner, Attorney Sallis 

Albert Hall Whitfield, Jr., Attorney Jackson 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE m 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

0. G. Cantwxll.. Raleigh 

J, A. CooPER- — - - _ Jackson 

1. E. Davis- - - Meridian 

J. E. Franklin _ - Mendenhall. . 

L. W. Felder. „ -McComb Gty 

J. B. Guthrie - Ted 

S. M. Graham ....Meridian 

P. K. Grice „ Hazelhurst 

W. G. Griffing _ Mead\alle 

C. R. Haydon -... .— Gulfport 

P. M. Harper.-.. Jackson 

Luther ^Ianship, Jr... Jackson 

J. A. McNair.._ ...Brookhaven 

R. R. NoRQUiST ...Carrollton 

L. C. Nugent.- Jackson 

W. H. Thompson Blue Mountain 

C. E. Thompson—.- - Jackson 

L. L. Tyler —Brookhaven 

J. C. Tally -... _ -... Poplar\ille 

Arthur Russell. _ Edinburg 

L. L. White Vicksburg 

COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Ernest Brackstone Allen, A. B. (History).... Prenties 

Herbert D. Casey, A. B. (History) Jackson 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Orlando Percival Adams Locust Ridge, La. 

James L.^avrence Addington ....Water Valley 

James Andrew Blount Collins 



112 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Jeff Collins -.- - Soso 

Gilbert Pierce Cook Crystal Springs 

Marvin Geiger .Collins 

James Miles Hand Meridian 

Bessie Neal Huddleston Jackson 

Charles Hascal Kirkland... _ Ellisville 

HosiE Frank Magee _ Auburn 

Wesley Powers Moore Sharon 

William Fitzhugh Murrah ...Jackson 

Walter Stevens Ridgway Jackson 

John Cude Rousseaux Jackson 

David Thomas Ruff Ruflf 

Jesse Levi Sumrall ...Laurel 

Donald Edward Zepernick. Macon 

Sing-Ung Zung Soochow, China 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Walter Ralph Applewhite Winona 

Thomas Lowrey Bailey Mathiston 

William DuBose Bratton Jackson 

Joseph Howard Moorman Brooks Benoit 

Robert Milton Brown ....Shreveport, La. 

John Gass Jackson 

Charles Conner Hand Meridian 

William Franklin Holmes Tylertown 

Jesse Charles Klinker Jackson 

William Charles Leggett Caswell 

Robert Jackson Mullins ....Meadville 

Bertha Louise Ricketts — Jackson 

Ralph Bridger Sharbrough Madison 

Susie Pearl Spann -Jackson 

Tom Andrew Stennis DeKalb 

Harman Richard Townsend Kilmichael 

William Amos Welch Collins 

Basil Franklin Witt Laurel 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 113 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Lewis Walter Addington.- —.Water Valley 

Richard Baxter Alexander —Montrose 

Will Hundley Anderson .—Water Valley 

Mary Edward Bailey. Jackson 

Allen Gerald Baird Shreveport, La. 

Henry Freeman Baley.— Jackson 

Laurence McCollum Blount Collins 

Edward Cage Brewer ...Black Hawk 

Vernon Bryan — North CarroUton 

Alexander Boyd Campbell. Hesterville 

Wyatt Clinton Churchwell ....Leakesville 

CouRTENAY Clingan Jackson 

Florence Cooper.. Jackson 

Mattie Nell Cooper Jackson 

John Wesley Crisler .—Crystal Springs 

Stephen Ethelbert Davies ...Sicily Island, La. 

Isaac Columbus Enochs, Jr Jackson 

Rees William Fitzpatrick Natchez 

Henry Marvin Frizbll. ....Deasonville 

Jesse Mark Guinn Houston 

HoDGiE Clayton Henderson Gibbsland, La. 

Samuel Lee Hervey Water Valley 

Jasper Hease Holmes. .— Tylertown 

Grace Wilma Hoover _ Jackson 

James Gann Johnson Jackson 

Lewis Barrett Jones ...Madison 

Louie Madison Jones .Tom 

Augustus Foster Kelly ....Laurel 

Adele Cecelia Knowles. ....Jackson 

Everett Leslie Marley. Jackson 

Edith McCluer.. Jackson 

Hugh Brevard McCluer Jackson 

Walter Leon McGahey Lerma 

Jacob Ernest Mohler. .Gulfport 

Martin Luther Neill Montrose 

William Edward Phillips, Jr Belle Prairie 

Ro scoE Conkling Pugh Montrose 



114 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Charles Reynolds Rew Forest 

Percy Albert Ricketts Drew 

Chester Daniel Risher.. -Hickory 

Lucy Margaret Saums -— Jackson 

Charles James Sharborough -.- Laure 

Morris Strom.— Jackson 

Tip Newton STUARr__._ — — - Pulaski 

William Granville Tabb Montevista 

Charles Galloway Terrell - Terrell 

David Ratliff Wasson Creek 

Leon Winans Whitson. — Jackson 

John Whitaker Centerville 

Samuel Ernest Williamson.— .—Collins 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

John Charles Adams Kosciusko 

Magruder Drake Adams. Locust Ridge, La. 

Jason Abraham Alford __ _ Magnolia 

Charles Edward Allen Crystal Springs 

John Adam Anders .-. ....McComb City 

Augustus Capers Anderson Mayhew 

Olis Gray Andrews Lamar 

William Leon Atkins — Mathiston 

Frank Watson Backstrom..... _ McLain 

Sampey Backstrom _. McLain 

George Eastland Bancroft ...Jackson 

Andrew Joseph Beasley -... Woodland 

Marcus Lafayette Berry — Boggan 

Roscoe Conklin Berry Prentiss 

Robert Jacob Bingham..... — — Embry 

Waller Kyle Boggs ..Shreveport, La. 

Willie Henry Boltz.. Pleasant Hill 

Benjamin Addie Boutwell Orange 

James Wesley Broom -.. Daisy 

Charles Wesley Ford Bufkin..... ..Bowerton 

Henry Grady Butler Smithdale 

Brian Campbell — Silver City 

Alfred Boyd Carruth Summit 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE . 115 

LoNGSTREET Cavett Jackson 

Andrew Belton ClarK— - _ Yazoo City 

Roy Griffith Clark Yazoo City 

William Carl Coggin- - Nettleton 

Frank Burkitt Collins ...Soso 

WiNFRED Eaton Collins — Tylertown, 

Manly Ward Cooper Euporp, 

John Lo yd Decell Wesson 

Madison Price Ellzey Jackson 

Thomas Lawrence Evans _ Jackson, 

Charles Atkins Galloway Mississippi City 

James Hervey Galloway Mississippi City 

Edward Lamar Gibson-— :.- Hickory 

David Henry Glass- - -Sallis 

Anna Irma Graves— — .— Jackson- 

John Kirk Graves- Jackson 

Albert Augustus Green — Jackson 

James Lee Haley, Jr .— Itta Bena 

Samuel Friedlander Hart Jackson 

Fletcher Lawrence Harper Thomasville 

Charles Hayman ._.. Summit 

William Edgar Hays _ - — Durant 

Albert Lee Heidelberg Heidelberg 

Andrew Olin Hemphill— -Lerma 

Clifton Howard Herring Hub 

Harry Ewell Hill Byhalia 

Ellis Albert Hoffpauir - -Boyce 

John Wesley Holifield.. Soso 

Joseph Howa.rd Hollingsworth.- Crystal Springs 

Malica Lavada Honeycutt Jackson 

William Talal\ge Hood Moselle 

Alice Myrtle Johnson Jackson 

Charles Edward Johnson - Batesville 

Horace Barr Klinker- Jackson 

Robert Ogden Jones, Jr.. Jackson 

Arthur Cecil Jones, Jr _ Jackson 

Tho\l\s Wiley Lewis Jackson 

WiLLL^M Bryant Lewis - Moss Point 



116 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Samuel Ernest Lowe -Jackson 

William Bonner McCarty.- - ...Jackson 

Richard Albert Miller .Jonesboro, La. 

James Marion Morse, Jr ....Gulfport 

Samuel Bingaman Myers ...Light 

Andrew Malcolm Nelson Jackson 

Lamar Otis _ _ Logtown 

Marguerite Chadwick Park .Jackson 

Charles Frederick Partin. Chunky 

Allen Ripley Peeples Jackson 

Thomas Henry Phillips Belle Prairie 

Ernest Bartram Pickering.. Collins 

Felix Ralph Prince.. Haughton, La. 

Robert Lee Rabb Zeiglerville 

LuciEN Wyckliffe Reed Jackson 

IvisoN Boyd Ridgway Jackson 

Luther Lee Roberts. Jackson 

William Frank Roberts Jena, La. 

Julio Buel Robinson Centerville 

James Benjamin Louis Rook.... .Black Hawk 

Oscar Stevens Rouse Langford 

Harvey Antione Rousseaux Logtown 

William Wallace Rousseaux Logtown 

Clyde Ruff Ruff 

George Russum— ....Russum 

James Shoffnar Savage New Albany 

Robert Kelly Simmons _ Meridian 

Robert Bruce Smith, Jr .....Blue Mountain 

Harry Raymond Spann Garland ville 

Robert Ealie Stuart. Newton 

James Bennett Teylor Jackson 

Zachary Taylor..... Jackson 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 117 

Willie Newton Thoxla.s D'Lo 

Claude Shaw Till ...Russum 

James Orion Ware Morton 

Carrie -Hewes- Wharton Jackson 

Virgil Stewart Whitesides. Shannon 

Frederick William Wimberly.^ - - Wesson 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Fred Walter Adams. Kosciusko 

Jesse Henry Adams.. ...Ripley 

Leland Baird -_ -...- Shreveport, La- 

Bennie King Beacham McComb City 

Martin Marshall Brabston.. Bovina 

Daniel Webster Bufkin Barlow 

Samuel Lawrence Bufkin Auburn 

James Frank Campbell _ Botton 

George Lawson Carlisle.. .Dallas, Tex. 

Grover Cleveland Clarke.. Eucutta 

William Sim Clarke... Eucutta 

Ford Converse Bogue Chitto 

Annie May Cooper Jackson 

John Willis Crouch _ _ Bovina 

George Edward Denham ...Long Beach 

Richard Loftin Douglas Vaughn 

James Selwyn Duke ..Greenwood 

Walter Thomas Grace. Meridian 

Edward Green.. Jackson 

John William Green . .West 



118 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

George Alexander Gunter .West 

Melville Guy Holloman - -....Flora 

James Bernard Honeycutt Jackson 

George Brunner Huddleston Jackson 

Thomas Bernard Hughes Greenwood 

Edwin McLaughlin Jones Jackson 

John Burruss Kirkland Ellisville 

Clayton Lawrence Kirkland Ellisville 

Willard Lester Lewis Woodland 

Edd Cole Lord .Sims 

Charlie McNair. _ Jackson 

Joe Henry Morris.... Jackson 

William Thomas Naff Jackson 

Henry Myron Newton ....'. Sontag 

Randolph Peets Wesson 

Ernest Pittman Walthall 

Olin Ray .- ._ Chalybeate 

Erwin Ridgway Jackson 

George Frank Roberts Jena, La. 

Simeon Duncan Roberts Deerford, La. 

John William Robinson. ...Jackson 

Charles Edward Rush Lawrence 

James Roy Rush.. _..Porterville 

George Russum Russum 

Charlie Estus Ryals Biloxi 

Bartlett White Sharborough, Jr ....Laurel 

Augustus Sheppard ..Rayville, La. 

Joseph King Shrock Shrock 

Phillip Charles Smashey Jackson 

LuciAN Lamar Smith Allen 

SwEPSON Smith Taylor Jackson 

Fulton Thompson Jackson 



MILLS APS COLLEGE . 119 

Warren Black Trimble -Natchez 

James Carl Wasson — - -Creek 

Richard Whitaker. Centerville 

LowERAiN Whitesides - Shannon 

Robert Highgate Wright- Grenada 

Ming-Ung-Zung — — Scoohow, China 



i- FIRST YEAR CLASS. 
w 
James Andrew Biffle Mud Creek 

Fred Martin Connel - —Asylum 

James Dunton Crisler —. Jackson 

George Boyd Downing. Jackson 

William Bryant Faust : —Springfield, La. 

Oscar Homer Flowers —..Asylum 

Henry Grady Heidelberg — Heidelberg 

Charlton Jones Jackson 

Enoch King Auburn 

Orlando Murrah Koon— Jackson 

James Lawrence- - Carlisle 

Andrew Dee Lewelling — —Jackson 

Franklin Jay McCoy -Estherwood, La. 

Julius Moore Moody Pool's Bluff, La. 

Marion Peterson Moore Jackson 

Robert Taylor Morrison _ Heidelberg 

Paul Morrison Heidelberg 

Albert Brown Russ Pearlington 

James Douglas Sevier, Jr — Tallulah, La. 

Eugene Simmons Water Valley 

John Byron Sloane. Farmerville, La. 

Robert Gethron Sloane Farmerville, La. 

Samuel David Stainton - — .Laurel 



120 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Howard Morton Sykes — Asylum 

Ralph Taylor Sykes -_ Asylum 

George Willl^m Thomas Shrock 

RoYALL Trawick — - Asylum 

Earl Watkins- _._._ -Philadelphia 

James Gaulding Watkins -....Jackson 

Ott Wilson.. Otroe 







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122 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

MEDALS AWARDED COMMENCEMENT, 1907. 

The Millsaps Declamation Medal — James Gann 
Johnson. 

The Oscar Kearney Andrews Medal for Oratory — 
Robert Hamric Ruff. 

The Carl v. Seutter Medal for Oratory — Samuel Ivy 
Osborn. 

The Galloway-Lamar Debater's Medal — William Fitz- 
hugh Mun'ah. 

The Collegian Prize for the best Short Story — ^Thomas 
Lowrey Bailej^ 

The Clark Essay Medal — Landon Kimbrough Carlton. 
The Political Science Prize — Ai'thur Leon Rogers. 
The Daughters of American Revolution Historical 

Medal— David Thomas Ruff. 
The Oakley Scholarship Prize, Bertha Louise Ricketts. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. 
GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Rev. G. W. Bachman, The Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. J. E. Walmsley, Dr. A. A. Kern, 

Maj. R. W. Millsaps, Mrs. T. W. Lewis, 

The Science Department, Mr. M. S. Pittman. 

GIFTS TO THE MUSEUM. 
The Senior Class, Dr. C. A. Galloway.