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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1910-1911"

REGISTER 



OF 



Millsaps College 



Jackson, Mississippi 



FOR 1910-1911. 



Twentieth Session 



BEGINS SEPTEMBER 20, 1911. 



OFFICE SUPPLY A BOOK COMPANY, JACKSON. Mil 



CALENDAR. 

1911. 

TWENTIETH SESSION begins Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 20. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS in Latin, Greek, 
and History, September 19. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS in English, 
Mathematics and Modern Languages, Septem- 
ber 20. 

RECITATIONS begin September 21. 

THANKSGIVING DAY, November 23. 

FIRST QUARTER ends November 30. 

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS, December 21-Jan. 2. 
2. 

igi2. 

EXAMINATIONS, First Term, January 15-27. 

SECOND TERM begins January 29. 

THIRD QUARTER ends March 30. 

FIELD DAY, April 20. 

EXAMINATIONS, Second Term, May 20 to June 

6. 
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES begin June 6. 
COMMENCEMENT SUNDAY, June 9. 
COMMENCEMENT DAY, June 11. 



COMTENTS. PAGE. 

Map of the College Grounds Fronting Title 

Calendar. 2 

Commencement Exercises 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Faculties 7 

Officers of Administration 12 

History 14 

General Information— 

— Location 25 

— Observatorj'. 26 

— Library 26 

— Literary Societies..... 27 

— Boarding Facilities.. 27 

— Scholarships.. 28 

-College Mail.. 29 

—Text-Books. _..: 29 

— Election of Classes 29 

— Examinations 30 

—Discipline _ 30 

— Certificate of Character 31 

— Prizes 31 

—Candidates for Admission 31 

—Withdrawals 32 

—Entrance Examinations 32 

—Athletics 32 

— Religious Instruction 33 

—The Young Men's Christian Association 33 

— Public Lectures 35 

— Expenses... 36 

The College. 

College Faculty 39 

Entrance Requirements 40 

Degrees— 

— Bachelor's. 47 

—Master's 52 

Outline of Courses 53 

Detailed Statement of Courses— 

— Philosophy and Biblical Literature 62 

— Chemistry 65 

— Geology 70 

-Physics 73 



PAGE. 

- Biology 74 

—Mathematics and Astronomy 75 

—History. 78 

— Social Science 81 

—Greek and Latin 82 

—Bible Greek 86 

—English 87 

— Modern LanguaL,'es 89 

Schedule of Recitations 92 

Schedule of Examinations 93 

The Law School. 

Faculty... 94 

General Information 95 

Course of Study _. 97 



Alumni— 

—Officers 100 

—Members— 100 

Catalogue of Students— 

Graduate 116 

— Law 116 

— Senior Class 117 

—Junior Class 118 

— Sophomore Class 118 

— Freshman Class 119 

— Summary 121 

Medals and Awards Commencement, 1910 122 

Acknowledgments 122 

Accredited Schools 124 

MiLLSAPS Preparatory School. 

Calendar 133 

Faculty 134 

General Information.... 135 

Requirements for Admission... 138 

Courses of study -. 139 

Expenses 139 

Catalogue of Students 142 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES, 1911 



Thursday, June i. 
8 o'clock, P. M., Prize Declamations by Members 
of Prentiss Literary Society. 

Friday, June 2. 

II o'clock, A. M., Freshman Prize Declamation. 
8 o'clock, P. M., Debate by Representatives of 
the Galloway and Lamar Literary Societies. 

Saturday, June 3. 

II o'clock, A. M., Sophomore Oratorical Contest 
Sunday, June 4. 

II o'clock, A. M., Commencement Sermon, by 
Bishop Collins Denny, of Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. 

8 o'clock, P. M., Sermon before Young Men's 

Christian Association, by Rev. H. G. Hen- 
derson, D. D., Columbus, Mississippi. 

Monday, June 5. 

9 o'clock, A. M., Annual Meeting of the Board 

of Trustees. 

10 o'clock, A. M., Graduating Speeches and De- 

livery of Medals. 
8 o'clock, P. M., Alumni Reunion, Alumni Ad- 
dress by H. S. Stephens, Hattiesburg, Mis- 
sissippi. 

Tuesday, June 6. 

11 o'clock, A. M., Annual Address, by Bishop 

Collins Denny, Nashville, Tennessee. 
Conferring of Degrees. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS 

Bishop W. B. Murrah, D. D., LL. D„. . . . President 

Rev. A. F. Watkins, D. D Vice President 

J. B. Streater Secretary 

Maj. R. W. Millsaps Treasurer 

Term Expires in 19 ii. 

Rev. W. C. Black, D. D Edwards 

G. h' Jones New Albany- 
Rev. T. B. Hollomon Moss Point 

Rev. J. R. Countiss Grenada 

Rev. R. A. Meek New Orleans, La. 

Maj. R. W. Millsaps Jackson 

H. S. Stephens Hattiesburg 

J. B. Streater Black Hawk 

Term Expires in 1914. 

J. L. Dantzler Moss Point 

J. R. Bingham Carrollton 

W. M. Buie Jackson 

Rev. W. H. Huntley Natchez 

Rev. W. W. Woollard Greenville 

J. D. Barbee Greenville 

Rev. S. M. Thames Pickens 

Rev. A. F. Watkins, D-D Hattiesburg 



FACULTIES 

REV. DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S., M. S. 

President. 

THE COLLEGE FACULTY AND ASSISTANTS 



JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN. A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Geology, Acting Professor 

of Physics. 

(College Campus. 

A B., Centenary College, Louisiana, 1887; A. M. Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, 1890; A. M., Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, 1897; Ph. D., Vanderbilt University, 1900; 
Principal Centenary High School, 1887-89; Professor 
Natural Science, Centenary College, Louisiana, 1889- 
1902; Assistant in Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 
1896-97; Graduate Student in Chemistry and Geol- 
ogy, Summer School, University of Chicago, 1907 
and 1908. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WAMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of History, Acting Professor of Social Science. 

(1275 North President St. 

A. B., and A. M., Randolph-Macon College; Ph. D., Illi- 
nois Wesleyan University; Instructor in English 
and Greek, Randolph-Macon College, 1893-95; In- 
structor Latin and Greek, Randolph-Macon Acad- 
emy, 1895-97; Professor Latin and English, Ken- 
tucky Wesleyan College, 1897-1901; Professor His- 
tory and Economics, Kentucky Wesleyan College, 
1901-1903; Professor History and Modem Languages. 
Millsaps College, 1903-04. 



8 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, M. A. Ph. D- 

Professor of Greek and Latin. 

(631 Park Avenue. 
Student at University of Virginia, 1891-93; Instructor 
in English and History, Shenandoah Valley Acad- 
emy, 1893-95; B. A., University of Virginia, 1897; 
Graduate Student, 1897-1899; The Macon Fellow, 
1899-1900; M. A., 1900; Professor of Latin and Greek, 
Fort Worth University, 1900-03; Professor of 
Greek and German, Milwaukee Academy, 1903-1904; 
Graduate Student in Greek, Summer Quarter, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1907, 1908, 1909; Ph. D., Univer- 
sity of Virginia, 1910. 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of English. 

(729 Fairview Street. 

A. B., Randolph-Macon College, 1898; A. M., 1899; Teach- 

ing Fellow, Vanderbilt University, 1899-1900; Fel- 
low in English, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-03; 
Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04; 1906-07; Ph. D., 1907. 

EMMETTE YOUNG BURTON, B. A. 

Professor of Mathematics and Acting Professor of As- 
tronomy. 

(637 Park Street. 

B. A., University of Virginia, 1902; Graduate Student, 

Summer Quarter, University of Chicago, 1903 and 
1905; Graduate Student in Engineering iJepartment, 
University of Wisconsin, Summer Term, 1909; Grad- 
uate Student, University of Virginia, 1908-09; Prin- 
cipal of Howell Institute, Howell, Missouri, 1902-03; 
Professor of Mathematics in St. Charles Military 
College, St. Charles, Missouri, 1903-05; Teacher of 
Mathematcis in State Normal, Kirksville, Missouri, 
1905-07; Superintendent of St. Charles Military Col- 
lege, St. Charles, Missouri, 1907-08; Assistant in 
Mathematics, University of Virginia, 1908-09. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE » 

DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S., M. S. 
Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

(President's Home, College Campus. 

B. S., Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College^ 
1895; M. S., Mississippi A. and M., 1905; Graduate 
Student in English, University of Chicago, Summer 
Quarter, 1907, Winter, Spring, and Summer Quar- 
ters, 1908; Principal Whitfield High School, Meridi- 
an, Mississippi, 1898-1902; Instructor in Public 
Speaking, Mississippi A. and M. College, 1902-03; 
Head Master Preparatory Department, 1903-Oi, 
Professor of Industrial Education, 1904-09; Direc- 
tor School of Industrial Education, 1909-10; Elected 
President Millsaps College, June, 1910. 

JOHN MARVIN BURTON, A. B., A. M. 
Acting Professor of Modern Languages. 

(1295 North President Street. 
A. B., Randolph-Macon College, 1909; A. M., 1910. 

J. C. HERRINGTON, M. D., 

Assistant in Chemistry. 
ANNIE BESSIE WHITSON, 

Assistant in English. 
MARY BARROW LINFIELD, 

Assistant in Latin. 
COURTNAY CLINGAN, B. S., 

Assistant in History, 



THE LAW SCHOOL FACULTY 



EDWARD MAYES, LL. D. 
Dean. 

(504 Fortification Street. 
A. B., University of Mississippi, 1868; LL. B., 1869; Pro- 
fessor of Law, 1877-92; Chairman of the Faculty, 



10 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

1886-89; Chancellor, 1889-January, 1892; LL. D., 
iMississippi College, 1882. 

ALBERT HALL WHITFIELD, A.M., LL. D. 

Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Law of 
Corporations, Law of Real Property, Constitutional 
Law, and Law and Practice in Federal Courts. 

(516 Fortification Street. 

A. B., University of Mississippi, 1871, and A. M,, 1873; 
LL. B., University of Mississippi, 1874, and LL. D., 
1895; Adjunct Professor of Greek, University of Mis- 
Mississippi, 1871-74; Professor of Law, University of 
Mississippi, 1892-94; Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State. 

WILLIAM R. HARPER, Esq. 

Contracts, Torts, Personal Property, Pleading, and Com- 
mercial Law, Equity Jurisprudence and Equity 
Pleading Practice. 

(802 North State Street. 

Graduate, University of Mississippi, Harvard Law 
School. 



THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL FACULTY 



ROBERT SCOTT RICKETTS, A. M. 

Head Master. 

(1300 North President Street. 
A. M., Centenary College, 1870; President and Professor 



MILLSAtS COLLEGE 11 

Port Gibson Female College, 1867-73; Professor 
Whitworth Female College, 1872-93. 

GEORGE W. HUDDLESTON, A. M. 
Assistant Master. 

(1321 North President Street. 

A. B., Hiwassee College, 1883; Professor in Greek in 
Hiwassee College, 1884-91; A. M., Hiwassee College, 
1886; Professor of Latin and Greek, Harpervillc 
College, 1891-93; Principal of Dixon High School, 
1893-97; Associate Principal of Harperville High 
School, 1897-99; Associate Principal of Carthage 
School, 1899-1900. 

STUART GRAYSON NOBLE, A. B-, M. A- 
Professor of English and Latin. 

(729 Fairview Street. 

A. B., University of North Carolina, 1907; Instructor 
English and History, Horner Military School, 1907- 
08; Student, University of Chicago, Summer Quar- 
ter, 1908, M. A., University of Chicago, 1910. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



REV.DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S., M. S. 
President 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 
Chairman pro tempore. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 
Secretary of Faculty. 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, M. A., Ph. D. 
Treasurer of the Faculty. 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

MRS. MARY BOWEN CLARK 

Librarians. 

EMMETTE YOUNG BURTON, A. B. 
Faculty Manager of Athletics. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 
MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, B. A., M. A., Ph. D. 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

EMMETTE YOUNG BURTON, B. A. 
Committee on Schedule and Admission. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 13 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, M. A,, Ph. D. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Committee on Library. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, M. A., Ph. D. 

ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

EMMETTE YOUNG BURTON, B. A. 

JOHN MARVIN BURTON, A. B., A. M. 

Committee on Curriculum. 

EMMETTE YOUNG BURTON, B. A. 
ALFRED ALLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 
JOHN MARVIN BURTON, A. B., M. A. 
Committee on Athletics. 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, M. A., Ph. D. 
JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 
JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

Committee on Public Lectures and Addresses. 
(The President of the College is an ex-officio member 
of all committees.) 



Iffutor^ 



The charter of Millsaps College, which was 
granted February 21, 1890, reads as follows: 

AN ACT to incorporate Millsaps College. 

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Legislature of 
the State of Mississippi, That John J. Wheat, Samuel 
M. Thames, Thomas J. Newell and Rufus M. Standifer, 
of the North Mississippi Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and Gawin D. Shands, David 
L. Sweatman, James B. Streater, and John Trice, lay 
members of said Church within bounds of said Confer- 
ence, and Thomas L. Meilen, Warren C. Black, Alexander 
¥. Watkins and Charles G. Andrews, members of the Mis- 
sissippi Conference of said Church, and Marion M. Ev- 
ans, Luther Sexton, William L. Nugent, and Reuben W. 
Millsaps, of Jackson, lay members of said Church with- 
in the bounds of said Mississippi Conference, and 
Bishop Charles B. Galloway, be and they are hereby 
constituted a body corporate and politic by and un- 
der the name and style of Millsaps College, and by that 
name they and their successors may sue and be sued, 
plead and be impleaded, contract and be contracted 
with, and have a common seal and break the same at 
pleasure, and may accept donations of real and per- 
sonal property for the benefit of the College hereafter 
to be established by them, and contributions of money 
or negotiable securities of every kind in aid of the 
endowment of such College; and may confer degrees 
and give certificates of scholarship and make by-laws 
for the government of said College and its affairs, as 
well as for their government, and do and perform all 
other acts for the benefit of said institution and the 
promotion of its welfare that are not repugnant to the 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 15 

Constitution and Laws of this State or of the United 
States, subject, however, to the approval of the said 
two Conferences. 

SECTION 2. As soon as convenient after the pas- 
sage of this Act, the persons named in the first sec- 
tion thereof shall meet in the City of Jackson, in this 
State and organize by acceptance of the charter and 
the election of Bishop Charles B. Galloway as their 
permanent President and of such other persons as they 
may determine to fill the offices of Vice President, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, and snail prescribe the duties, 
powers and terms of office of all said officers, except 
as to the term of their said President, who shall hold 
office during life or good behavior, or so long as he 
may be physically able to discharge his duties. 

They shall also select by lot from the lay and 
clerical Trustees from each of said Conferences, one- 
half who shall be Trustees of said College for three 
years and until their successors are elected, and the 
other half not so selected shall remain in office for 
the term of six years and until their successors are 
chosen as hereinafter mentioned. Upon the death, 
resignation or removal of said Galloway, or his per- 
manent physical disability to discharge the duties of 
his office, the said Trustees may elect their President 
and prescribe his duties, powers and term of office. 

SECTION 3. That the said Trustees shall before 
the meeting of said Conferences next before the 
expiration of the term of office of any of their number 
notify the Secretary of said Conferences thereof, and 
the vacancies shall be filled by said Conferences in 
such way and at such time as they may determine, and 
the persons so elected shall succeed to the office, place, 
jurisdiction, and powers of the Trustees whose terms of 
office have expired. And the said corporation and the 
College established by it shall be subject to the vis- 



16 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

itorial powers of said Conferences at all times, and the 
said College, its property and effects shall be the prop- 
erty of said Church under the special patronage of 
said Conferences. 

SECTION 4. That the said Trustees, when orga- 
nized, as hereinbefore directed, shall be known by the 
corporate name set out in the first section of this Act, 
and all money, promissory notes and evidence of debt 
heretofore collected under the direction of said Con- 
ferences for said College shall be turned over to and 
receipted for by them in their said corporate name, 
and the payee of all such notes and evidences of debt 
shall endorse and assign the same to the corporation 
herein provided for, which shall thereafter be vested 
with the full, legal title thereto, and authorized to sue 
for and collect the same. 

The said corporation shall have the power to select 
any appropriate town, city, or other place in this 
State at which to establish said College, and to pur- 
chase grounds not to exceed one hundred acres as a 
building site and campus therefor, and erect thereon 
such buildings, dormitories, and halls as they may 
think expedient and proper to subserve the purposes 
of their organization and the best interests of said in- 
stitution, and they may invite propositions from any 
city or town or individual in the State for such grounds, 
and may accept donations or grants of land for the 
site of said institution. 

SECTION 5. That the lands or grounds not to ex- 
ceed one hundred acres used by the corporation as a 
site and campus for said College, and the buildings, 
dormitories and halls thereon erected, and the endow- 
ment fund contributed to said College shall be exempt 
from all State, County and Municipal taxation so long 
as the said College shall be kept open and maintained 
for the purpose contemplated by this Act and no longer. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 17 

SECTION 6. That the cost of education shall as 
far as practicable be reduced by said corporation to the 
lowest point consistent with the effip'-en^ operation of 
said College, and to this end reports shall be made to 
the said Conferences from year to year, and their advice 
in that behalf taken, and every reasonable effort shall 
be made to bring a collegiate education within the reach 
and ability of the poorer classes of the State. 

SECTION 7. That this Act take effect and be in 
force from and after its passage. 

The College has its origin in the general policy 
of the Methodist Church to maintain institutions 
under its own control for higher learning in the 
Arts and Sciences. 

At the annual session of the Mississippi Con- 
ference in the City of Vicksburg on December 7, 
in the year 1888, the following resolutions were 
adopted by a large majority of the Conference: 

"Resolved, 1. That a College for males under the 
auspices and control of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, ought to be established at some central and 
accessible point in the State of Mississippi. 

"2. That a committee of three laymen and three 
preachers be appointed to confer with a like committee 
to be appointed by the North Mississippi Conference 
to formulate plans and to receive offers of donations 
of lands, buildings, or money for that purpose, and 
report to the next session of this Conference." 

In accordance with this action the President of 
the Conference, Bishop R. K. Hargrove, appointed 
the follow^ing committee: Rev. T. L- Mellen, Rev. 
W. C. Black, Rev. A. F. Watkins, Major R. W. 



18 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Millsaps, Col. W- L. Nugent and Dr. Luther Sex- 
ton. 

On December 12, 1888, the North Mississippi 
Conference met in Starkville, Mississippi, Bishop 
C. B. Galloway presiding. The Rev. T. L. Mellen 
appeared and reported the action taken by the 
Mississippi Conference. The following transcript 
from the North Mississippi Conference Journal 
gives the response made by that body. 

"Resolved, 1. That a College for the education of 
boys and young men should be established in the State 
of Mississippi under the auspices of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. 

"2. That a committee of three laymen and three 
ministers be appointed to confer with a like committee 
already appointed by the Mississippi Conference." 

The following committee was accordingly ap- 
pointed: Rev. J. J. Wheat, Rev. S. M. Thames, 
Rev. T. J. Newell, Hon. G. D. Shands, Capt D. L. 
Sweatman and Mr- J. B- Streater- 

To the action of these Conferences we may trace 
the direct origin of the College. 

The joint commission constituted by the ac- 
tion summarized above met in the City of Jackson 
in January, 1889. The Rev- Dr. J. J. Wheat was 
called to the chair. In stating the purpose of the 
meeting he made a stirring appeal in behalf of the 
proposition to establish a Methodist College in 
Mississippi for the education of young men. In 
response to this earnest appeal Major R. W. Mill- 
saps, a member of the commission, proposed to give 
$50,000 to endow the institution, provided the Meth- 
odists of Mississippi would give a sum equal to this 
amount for said purpose. This proposition was en- 
thusiastically approved, and after a plan of proce- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE ID 

dure was adopted, Bishop Charles B- Galloway was 
invited to conduct a campaign in the interests of the 
proposed endowment fund. 

Under the direction of this distinguished leader, 
the most gratifying progress was reported from 
time to time. The report submitted to the Ccnfer- 
ences by the committee in December, 1889, refers 
to the movement in the following language : 

"The canvas?, on account of the numerous neces- 
sitated ahsence of Bishop Galloway from the State, 
could not be continuously carried on, but even the par- 
tial canvass made, embracing not more than one-fifth of 
our territory, resulted in tlie most gratifying and encour- 
aging success. The interest awakened in the enterprise 
lias extended beyond the limits of our own Church and 
is felt by every denomination of Christians, and by 
every section of the State. It is safe to say that no 
effort of Sletiiodism has ever ivindled such enthusiasm 
in our State or evoked such liberal offerings to the 
Lord. The fact has been demonstrated that the Church 
is profoundly convinced that the College is an ab- 
solute necessity." 

The report continues : 

"So high is the appreciation of the value of the 
proposed institution, that numerous towns in the 
State have entered into earnest competition to secure 
the location of the College within the limits of their 
respective borders, offering from $10,000 to $36,000, 
and from twenty to eighty acres of land." 

In December, 1889, the Rev- A- F- Watkins, a 
member of the Mississippi Conference, w^as appoint- 
ed a special agent to co-operate with Bishop Gallo- 
way in all matters pertaining to the endowment 
of the proposed College- As the work of raising the 
sum designated in the original proposition progres- 
ed, and $25,000 had been collected, Major Millsaps, 



20 MI LISA PS COLLEGE 

in the year 1890, paid $25,000 into the College treas- 
ury. 

In December, 1892, the Rev- J. W- Chambers 
was appointed agent for the College and on Decem- 
ber 30, 1893, he reported that the full amount had 
been collected to meet the terms of Major Millsaps' 
proposition, and thereupon $25,000 were immedi- 
ately paid by Major Millsaps to the Executive Com- 
mittee and the following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved, That the Executive Committee return 
our most heartfelt thanks to Major R. W. Millsaps for 
his second gift of $25,000, this day turned over to us. 
For his princely liberality and unfaltering interest in 
the great enterprise so happily and successfully in- 
augurated, the Church and State owe him a large debt 
of gratitude." 

The Conferences having provided for a Board 
of Trustees, the joint commission dissolved in Jan- 
uary, 1890. This Board, to which was referred the 
matter of organizing the College, was composed of 
the following: 

BISHOP CHARLES B. GALLOWAY. President. 

REV. J. J. WHEAT, D. D., REV. W. C. BLACK, D. D, 

REV. S. M. THAMES, REV. T. L. MELLEN, 

REV. T. J. NEWELL, REV. A. F. WATKINS, 
REV. C. G. ANDREWS, D. D.REV. R. M. STANDIFER, 

HON. G. D. SHANDS, MA.J. R. W. MILLSAPS, 

GAPT. D. L. SWEATMAN, COL. W. L. NUGENT. 

MR. J. B. STREATER, DR. LUTHER SEXTON, 

MR. JOHN TRICE, HON. M. M. EVANS. 

After the Board organized under the charter, 
the question of locating the College was considered 
with great care. The Board met repeatedly to con- 
sider the offers made by different towns, and finally 
on May 20, 1891, while in session in Winona, Mis- 
sissippi, decided to locate the College in Jackson, 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

the capital of the State. The citizens of Jackson 
contributed $21,000 for grounds and buildings, and 
to this sum Major Millsaps added $15,000. 
Plans for a commodious main building were im- 
mediately procured, grounds were purchased and 
in a comparatively short time buildings were in 
process of erection. 

When it became evident that everything would 
soon be in readiness for formally opening the Col- 
lege for the reception of students, the Board of 
Trustees, at a meeting held in Jackson, April 28, 
1892, began the work of organizing a faculty of in- 
struction. 

The Rev. W. B. Murrah was elected president. 
Many applications were considered for professor- 
ships, and Mr, N. A. Patillo was elected Professor 
of Mathematics, and Mr. W. L. Weber was elected 
Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

At the time of his election. Professor Patillo 
was doing post-graduate work in the Johns Hopkins 
University of Baltimore- Prof. Weber was the 
acting Professor of English at the Southwestern 
University of Georgetown, Texas, when he was by 
this action called to Millsaps College. The de- 
partment of Mental and Moral Philosophy was es- 
tablished, and President Murrah took charge of this 
department. 

At a subsequent meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees held July 13, 1892, Mr. G. C. Swearingen was 
elected Professor of Latin and Greek, and the Rev. 
M. M. Black was elected Principal of the Prepara- 
tory Department. Both of these gentlemen had re- 
cently taken post-graduate degrees at the Van- 
derbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee- 

The necessary buildings having been erected. 



22 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

the first scholastic session began with appropriate 
ceremonies September 29, 1892. 

At the first meeting of the faculty Professor 
W. L- Weber was elected Secretary, and at the 
request of the President the senior member of the 
faculty was selected as chairman pro tempore- At 
the commencement of 1910 the Board of Trustees 
created the office of Treasurer of the Faculty and 
chose Dr. I\I. W. Swartz for this position. 

At the regular meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees in June, 1893, ^^^- -^- ^^- Muckenfuss was elec- 
ted Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

In June, 1894, the Rev. ]M. M. Black resigned 
the principalship of the Preparatory Department 
to enter on the work of the regular pastorate. In 
reorganizing the department it was made more dis- 
tinctively a training school with independent juris- 
diction, ard Professor R. S. Ricketts was elected 
Head Master, Avith Mr- E. L- Bailey as Assistant 
Master. 

The formal establishment of the Department 
of History and Modern Language was affected by 
action of the Board of Trustees in June, 1897, and 
Professor j. P. Hanner was elected to fill the chair 
thus created- Work, how^ever, had been offered in 
these subjects prior to this time- 
In 1904 Dr- B- E. Young, who then had charge 
of the work in History and Modern Languages, re- 
signed his position to take charge of the work in 
Romance Languages in Vanderbilt University- The 
department was then divided, Mr. O. H. Moore, a 
graduate of Harvard University, being chosen Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages, and Mr. J. E. Walms- 
ley taking charge of the work in History and Econo- 
mics. 

In 1908, the chair of Assistant in English and 



MILLS.IPS COLLEGE 23 

Latin in the Preparatory Department was added, 
and Mr. S. G. Noble was elected to this position- 

The organization indicated by this review rep- 
resents the status of affairs existing at this time, 
though the personnel of the faculty has been 
changed in several departments- 

The remarkable facilities for conducting a Law 
School in Jackson led to the establishment in 1896 
of a Law Department. The Hon. Edward ]\Iayes. 
ex-Chancellor of Mississippi State University, and 
for over fourteen years a professor of Law in that 
institution, was engaged to take the active control 
of this department- Dr. Mayes has associated with 
him as active Professors, Judge x\. H. Whitfield, 
of the Supreme Court of our State, and Judge Wm. 
R. Harper, a distinguished member of the Jackson 
Bar. 

At the close of the session of 1910-1911 the Pre- 
paratory Department was formally separated from 
the College, and erected into a distinct institution 
under the name of the Millsaps Preparatory School. 
This school with its buidlings is described in its 
own catalog. 

In addition to the buildings first provided, con- 
sisting of the main college building, the President's 
house, and homes for the accommodation of stu- 
dents, the facilities of the institution were greatly 
enlarged during the session 1895-96 by the generosi- 
ty of Major Millsaps in the gift of Webster Science 
Hall, at a cost of Sicooo. In 1901 Mr. Dan A. 
James, of Yazoo City, Mississippi, built an observa- 
tory for the College, in honor of the memor}- of his 
father, Mr. Peter James, and of his brother. Mr. 
Samuel James, and furnished it with a magnificent 



24 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

telescope, thus enabling us to offer the finest advan- 
tages in the study of Astronomy. 

The evolutionary process through which Mill- 
saps College has passed during the first ten years 
of its history has developed an aver-increasing de- 
mand for better dormitory and dining hall facilities. 
This need w^as supplied in 1902 by the gift of Major 
Millsaps of the property formerly known as the 
Jackson College- The splendid brick structure thus 
secured, together with other buildings admirably 
adapted to college uses enables the institution ad- 
equately to meet the demands made upon it. 

With an endowment of over three hundred 
thousand dollars and buildings and grounds worth 
approximately one hundred and seventy-five thous- 
and dollars more, it rests on a foundation which 
guarantees its perpetuity- It has the support of a 
great religious denomination, yet it is not sectarian 
in its policy, but numbers among its patrons rep- 
resentatives of all the Christian churches. 

One of the purposes the College keeps consis- 
tantly in view is indicated by the following section 
of the charter: 

"The cost of education shall, as far as practicable, 
be reduced to the lowest point consistent with the 
efficient operation of said College, and every reasonable 
effort shall be made to bring collegiate education within 
the ability of the poorer classes of the State." 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 25 



(Beneral ^nformatlOR 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE is named in honor of 
]\Iajor R \V. ]\lillsaps, whose munificent gifts have 
made the existence of the institution possible- The 
College is the property of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, and was organized by the concur- 
rent action of the Mississippi and North Mississippi 
Conferences- It is not sectarian, however, but num- 
bers among its patrons members of all the Chris- 
tian denominations. 

The College has an endowment of 530O1OOO, and 
several partially endowed scholarships. The build- 
ings and the grounds are worth $175-000. The first 
scholastic session began September 29, 1892, and the 
College has had remarkable prosperity from the 
beginning. The generous founder, Major Millsaps, 
by the gilt of the Webster Science Hall, at a cost 
of $10,000, the Jackson College property at a cost of 
more than $30,000, and fifty acres of land immedi- 
ately adjoining our campus, has greatly enlarged 
our facilities. 

LOCATION. 

Jackson, the capital of the State, and the seat ol 
the College, is easily accessible by five lines of rail- 
way. Thirty passenger trains arrive and depart 
daily. The College is located just north of the city, 
on a commanding elevation with perfect drainage, 
and in a beautiful campus of one hundred or more 
acres. A healthier spot it would be difficult to find 
within the limits of the State. The location secures 
all the advantages of the town and yet supplies 
all the healthful conditions and immunities of the 



2G MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

country. Jackson is a small city of 25,000 inhabi- 
tantswith handsome churches and public buildings 
and is noted for the refinement and intelligence 
of its people. Its literary, social and religious ad- 
vantages are superior. 

THE JAMES OBSERVATORY. 

Millsaps College is prepared to offer the very 
finest advantages in the study of astronomy. The 
late Mr. Dan A- James, of Yazoo City, Miss., built 
an observatory for the College in honor of the mem- 
ory of his father, Mr. Peter James, and of his 
brother, Mr. Samuel James. He also furnished the 
observator}' with a magnificent telescope. 

LIBRARY. 

The College authorities have realized from the 
first that much of the success of the institution 
depends on its librar}- facilities. It is a matter of 
gratification that so early in its history the College 
has secured a large and valuable collection of books. 
Most of the well selected libraries of the late Dr. C- 
K. Marshall and Rev. W. G- Millsaps, the entire 
law library of Col. W. L. Nugent, besides many 
excellent volumes from ex-Chancellor Edward 
Mayes, Dr. A. F. Watkins, and others, have been 
generously contributed- In addition to his other gifts, 
Major R. W. Millsaps has made valuable contri- 
butions to the library. Soon after the founding 
of the College. Mrs. J. R. Bingham, of Carrollton, 
Mississippi, gave Si, 000 to endow the Martha A. 
Turner Library. This money, known as the Turner 
Fund, has been separately invested, and the annual 
interest is used in purchasing books in English and 
American literature. With the proceeds of the li- 
brary fee, paid by each student at his matriculation, 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 27 

the reading room is supplied with periodicals- The 
number of these has been greatly increased in the 
last few years and now includes all of the leading 
periodicals. 

Near the close of the session of 1905-1906, ?\Ir- 
Andrew Carnegie ottered to give $15,000 for a li- 
brary building if the trustees would supply an en- 
dowment of equal amount. Major Millsaps added 
to his many contributions by giving the full amount 
of the endowment. The ne^v building w-as com- 
pleted and formally dedicated on October 26, 1907. 
With the income from this endowment, which is 
applied to the purchase of books and periodicals, 
and the complete A. L. A. card catalog, which has 
recently been installed, the College is able to offer 
library facilities that are not surpassed in the State- 

LITERARY SOCIETIES- 

Two large halls have been provided for the Lit- 
erary Societies organized for the purpose of improv- 
ment in debate, declamation, composition, and ac- 
quaintance with the methods of deliberative bodies. 
These societies are conducted b}'^ the students un- 
der constitutions and by-laws of their own framing. 
They are named, respectively, the Galloway and the 
Lamar Societies, and contributed greatly to the im.- 
provement of their members. 

BOARDING FACILITIES. 

We have established "Students' Homes," ca- 
pable of accomodating a limited number of boarders, 
and each placed in charge of a Christian family. 
In addition we have several small cottages in which 
students can board themselves at reduced cost, or, 



28 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

if they prefer, lodge there, and take their meals 
elsewhere. These cottages form a group of eight 
buildings admirably situated on the eastern side of 
the campus. The rooms are sufficiently large to ac- 
commodate two students each- The room rental 
per student in the cottages is $9.00 for the session 
and must be paid as follows : $5.00 at the beginning 
of the session, and $4.00 the ist of February. No 
student will be permitted to room at the cottages 
without special permission from the President- 
Memorial Cottages. — The friends of the late 
Rev. John A- Ellis, of the Mississippi Conference, 
and the Rev- J- H- Brooks, of the North Mississippi 
Conference, have built tw^o cottages for the accom- 
modation of students. These Homes are named^ 
respectively, the John A. Ellis Cottage, and the J. 
H. Brooks Cottage. 

SCHOLARSHIP. 

Several scholarships have been established, the 
income from which will be used in aiding deserving 
young men in securing a collegiate education. For 
information concerning these scholarships the Pres- 
ident or the Treasurer of the Faculty should be con- 
sulted. The following is a list of the scholarships 
at present available : 

The W. H. Tribbett Scholarship; 
The W. H. Watkins Scholarship; 
The Peebles Scholarship ; 
The Clara Chrisman Scholarship ; 
The Jefferson Davis Scholarship ; 
The Dr. W. T. J. Sullivan Loan Fund, 

Besides these scholarships there is a teaching 
scholarship in each department, the holder of which 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 29 

will be expected to aid the head of the department in 
some definite work- Also there are two scholar- 
ships from the Jackson High School and one of- 
fered by the U. D- C 

The Oakley Memorial- — Under the direction of 
Mrs- J- R. Bingham, of Carrollton, Mississippi, a 
fund has been raised to establish a memorial in 
honor of the late Rev. J. S. Oakley, who was for 
many years an honored member of the North Mis- 
sissippi Conference. The following Sunday Schc"Mils 
have contributed to this fund: Macon, Black 
Hawk, Carrollton, Rosedale, Starkville, \\^ater \'al- 
ley (Wood Street), Winona, Pickens, Durant, 
Acona. 

COLLEGE MAILS. 

All correspondence intended for students at 
the College should be addressed care of Millsaps 
College. Mails are distributed to students on the 
campus, thereby avoiding the necessity of personal 
visits to the city postoifice. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

There is an organization among the students 
which orders text-books for the college, and these 
books may be obtained on the campus at publisher's 
prices- 

ELECTION OF CLASSES AND COURSES. 

Students are allowed some liberty of choice of 
classes and courses, either by themselves, or their 
friends, limited by the judgment of the Faculty and 
by the exigency of classification. Students are not 



30 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

allowed to select more than nineteen hours per week 
of college work, and, in case of students working" off 
conditions on entrance, not more than sixteen hours 
of college Avork may be selected. A student is not 
allowed to withdraw from any class to which he has 
been assigned without the consent of the Faculty- 
A request to be allowed to drop a study must be 
made in writing. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written examinations will be held twice a 3^ear. 
and special examinations at other times as the sev- 
eral professors may elect- The regular examina- 
tions come according to the schedule on page 93. 

There is a tendency among students to with- 
draw just before, or in the midst, of the June exami- 
natio'ns- This results in a loss to the student, for 
examinations are more than a test of knowledge- 
They are an educational instrument for teaching 
method, promptitude, self-reliance, for training in 
accuracy, and for developing in the student the 
power of concentration of attention and readiness 
in the shaping and arranging of thought. Examina- 
tions will not be given in advance of the set time. 
No student who leaves College before the comple- 
tion of his examinations will be admitted to the 
next higher class until he has submitted himself to 
the prescribed tests. 

During the session reports will be sent to the 
parent or guardian of each student, in which will 
be an estimate of his class standing and deport- 
ment. 

DISCIPLINE. 

It will be the constant care of the administra- 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 31 

tion to guard the moral conduct of students. The 
discipline will be firm. Obedience to College regu- 
lations will be strictly required- Young men un- 
willing to submit to reasonable, wholesome govern- 
ment are not desired and will not be retained- 

CETRTIFICATES OF GOOD CHARACTER. 

Candidates for admission are required to give 
satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and 
if the candidate comes from another college, he must 
show that he was honorably discharged- 

PRIZES. 

Prizes are annually awarded for excellence in : 

1. ORATORY. The Carl J. v. Seutter medal, 
the Sophomore medal, and the T. E- Alortimer med- 
al. 

2. DECLAMATION. The Millsaps medal- 

3. ESSAY. The Clark medal, and the Politi- 
cal Science prize. 

4. SCHOLARSHIP. The Oakley ^lemorial 
prize, and the Geiger Chemistry medal. 

CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION- 

Applicants for admission must report to the 
President and to the Secretary as soon as possible 
after their arrival and secure board at some place 
approved by the College authorities. 

New students should be present on Tuesday 
that they may be examined and classed before the 
opening day, Wednesday, September 20. 



32 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

WITHDRAWALS. 

Students who havt been regnlarly enrolled 
should not withdraw from the institution during 
the session without formal notification to the Fac- 
ulty or to the President, in order that the Secre- 
tary's records may show the date and manner of 
withdrawal. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS- 

Examinations for those applying for admission 
into Millsaps College will be held September 19-20. 
See calendar on page 2. See detailed statement as 
to entrance requirements, page 40. 

ATHLETICS. 

The College view of athletics is that an oppor- 
tunity for diversion, healthful exercises, and phys- 
ical development should be furnished to the stu- 
dent body, and that a lively interest in a clean well- 
fought contest should be encouraged. A well de- 
veloped system of inter-class games stimulates the 
participation of a majority of the students. En- 
thusiastic approval is given to all the popular sports. 
The opening up of a new athletic field gives ample 
room for every kind of collegiate contest- A com- 
mittee of the Faculty supervises athletics. 

There is a student organization, the Millsaps 
College Athletic Association, which helps to keep 
up enthusiastic interest in healthful sports- A 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 33 

member of the Faculty is always an officer of this 
Association. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Students will be required to be present at morning 
worship in the Colleg"e Chapel. In this daily service 
the Faculty and students come together to hear the 
reading of the sacred Scriptures and to engage in 
singing and prayer. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION- 

One of the most potent factors in the College 
for developing the students into a broader life is the 
Young Men's Christian Association- Its policy and 
aim is to develop the three-fold nature of the stu- 
dents — the moral, intellectual and spiritual. It is a 
well known fact that the student who develops him- 
self intelligently at the expense of his moral and 
spiritual nature, is in no sense a complete man- Un- 
less one become a well rounded man, he is not fit 
to fight the battles of life. 

Realizing this, the Association was organized 
shortly after the College was founded- It has done 
more to mould character and to hold up a high 
standard of ideals before the students than any other 
department in connection with the College. It has 
been dominated by the double purpose of leading 
men to accept Christ and to form such associations 
as will guard them against the temptations of college 
life- The Association has done much to strengthen 
the spiritual life and influence of the College, to pro- 
mote Christian character and fellowship and pro- 
gressive Christian work. It trains its members for 



34 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Christian service and leads them to devote theii 
lives to the cause of Christ w^here they can accom- 
plish the most for the extension of the Kingdom of 
God- In order to accomplish this purpose the As- 
sociation holds weekly meetings on Friday even- 
ings. These services are usually conducted by some 
one of the students, but occasionally by some mem- 
ber of the Faculty, or by some minister from town. 

Realizing the imr^ortance of a young man's 
choosing his life work while in college, a series of 
aidresses, on "Life Work" has been arranged and 
prominent men of each profession are invited to 
address the Association from time to time on their 
respective professions. 

An annual revival is held in the SDring, lasting 
more than a week, which results in leading many 
young men to Christ each year- These services last 
year were conducted by R.ev. Paul Kern, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., and resulted in renewing enthusiasm 
and in giving great stimulus to Association work. 

The Association sends yearly a delegation to 
the Southern Student's Conference at Montreat, 
North Carolina. Since the ten days of the Conven- 
tion are assiduously devoted to discussing Associa- 
tion work and problems, the delegates always return 
enthusiastic and zealous for doing Christian service- 

The vv'ork of the Asociation is carried on by the 
students ; each man has his part to do according to 
the plan of organization- The President, elected by 
the members, appoints chairmen of nine committees, 
each composed of three or more men- It is the duty 
of the Publicity Committee to advertise, by means 
of blotters and in other ways, all meetings, and se- 
cure good attendance- The Membershio Committee 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 35 

meets all new students as they arrive, and gives 
them any information desired concerning College, 
boardine, facilities, etc. Afterwards this committee 
calls on each student and urges him to become a 
member of the Association. The Reception Com- 
mittee has charge of College Night and any other 
entertainment that the Association may choose to 
give, during the year- The object of College Night 
is to make the students acquainted with one an- 
other and to interest the new men in the different 
phases of College life. The Employment Commit- 
tee assists deserving students in getting employment 
for their spare time. The City Mission Committee 
has charge of work in different parts of the city. 
The Devotional Committee provides leaders, and 
the Music Committee provides music for each meet- 
ing. The Finance Committee, whose Chairman is 
the Treasurer of the Association, collects the an- 
nual dues ($1.50) and raises funds sufficient for 
meeting current expenses. 

But most important are the Bible Study and 
Mission Study Committees- Bible study groups are 
formed at the Dormitory and at the boarding houses. 
The students engage in daily Bible reading and 
meet, for one hour once a week, for discussion. The 
Mission Study Committee arranges courses in bi- 
ographies of missionaries in various mission fields 
and secures leaders for the various classes. 

The Y. M. C. A. is back of every phase of Col- 
lege life, and it is expected that every student shall 
identify himself with the organization. 

PUBLIC LECTURES. 

With the view of promoting general culture 
among the students, and to furnish them with pleas- 



36 MILLS/IPS COLLEGE 

ant and profitable entertainment, there will be a 
lyceum lecture course conducted by the college au- 
thorities. There will be from three to six numbers. 
The best talent available for the money will be 
engaged each year and each student upon entering 
college will be required to pay along with his other 
fees $i.oo for a season ticket to these lectures- 

In addition to the lyceum lecture course a se- 
ries of lectures will be given by the Faculty. These 
lectures Vvill be open to the general public and will 
be, during the session of 1911-1912, upon the fol- 
lowing subjects: President Hull, "The Value of 
Culture in Modern Life;" Dr. Sullivan, "Some As- 
pects of the Relation of Science to Health and 
Wealth ;" Dr. Walmsley, "The Spirit of American 
Democracy;' Dr. Swartz, "Socrates;" Dr. Kern, 
"Irwin Russell ;" Professor E- Y. Burton, "Things 
Worth Knowing about Mathematics;" Professor J. 
M. Burton, "The Development of Symbolism in the 
French Lyric-" 

EXPENSES-ACADEMIC AND GRADUATE 
DEPARTMENT. 

Tuition for full scholastic year . . . .$30.00 

Incidental fee 5-oo 

Library fee i.oo 

A contingent deposit of $2-00 is required of each 
student on entering the College, to be deposited 
with the Treasurer of the Faculty in order to cover 
any damage that may occur- The whole of this de- 
posit, or any unexpended part thereof, will be re- 
funded on Commencement Day, provided the stu- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 37 

dent has not previously left the College without 
permission- 

The tuition may be paid in two installments, as 
follows: First payment $15.00, at the beginning of 
the session, and the second payment, $15,00, the jfirst 
of February. The Incidental and Library fees must 
be paid in full when the student enters- 
Students preparing for the work of the minis- 
try in Christian denomination, and the sons of 
preachers, will have no tuition to pay, but all stu- 
dents will be required to pay the Incidental and 
Library fees. 

Any student claiming exemption from fees on 
the ground of preparing for the ministry must bring 
certificate to that effect from his Quarterly Confer- 
ence; if not a Methodist then from some ecclesiasti- 
cal body of his denomination- 
Board in good families can be had at from $15.- 
00 to $17.00 per month including lodging and lights. 

Students are expected to furnish their own fuel, 
but if they prefer, it will be supplied at a cost of 
$5,00 for the session. Each student is expected to 
furnish his own pillow, bed clothes, and toilet ar- 
ticles. 

If students prefer to room in one of the cottages 
and take their meals elsewhere, table board will not 
cost them more than $12-00 per month- 

Ample facilities are provided for board at the 
above rates. Anv student mav feel assured that 



38 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

board will not cost him more than $135.00 for the 
entire session. 

Tuition in Law Department . . . . $50.00 

This tuition must be paid in full to the Treas- 
urer of the Faculty at the opening of the Law 
School. 

Laboratory Fees — Students pursuing labora- 
tory courses are charged additional fees varying 
with the Department. 

In the Chemical Laboratory a fee is required in 
the nature of a deposit, an account being kept of ma- 
terial used, and unexpended balances being re- 
turned to the student at the end of the year- 

In all Departments, students are chargeable for 
unnecessary breakages- 

The Laboratory fees are as follows : 

Chemistry $6-(X) 

Physics 5.00 

Geology 2.00 

Biology i.QO 



Ol)e (Tollege 



FACULTY. 



DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S., M. S. 

President. 



JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Geology, Acting Professor 
of Physics. 

JAMES ELLIOTT V/ALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 
Professor of History, Acting Professor of Social Science. 

MIFFLIN WYATT SWARTZ, M. A., Ph. D. 

Professor of Greek and Latin. 

ALFRED A^LLAN KERN, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of English. 

EMMETTE YOUNG BURTON, B- A- 

Professor of Mathematics, Acting Professor of Astron- 
omy. 

DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S., M. S. 

Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

JOHN MARVIN BURTON, A. B., A. M. 

Actmg Professor of Modern Languages. 



40 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Entrance ^eq ulrements 

The authorities of Millsaps College prefer that 
applicants for admission into College should sub- 
mit themselves to the regular test of an entrance 
examination. But in case the Principals of Prepar- 
atory Schools desire to have their pupils admitted 
on trial without examination, arrangements looking 
to that end may be had as a result of correspond- 
ence with the College authorities. 

It is essential that students wishing credit for 
work done in High Schools or Preparatory Schools, 
should bring written certificates, stating the exac: 
amount of work on which they have passed. The 
delay incident to writing for these certificates after 
arriving here would prevent the organization of 
classes ; therefore, all students who do not have their 
certificates present will be required to stand the en- 
trance examination. 

There is published on page 124 of this catalogue 
a list of schools which have submitted their courses 
to the entrance committee of Millsaps College. 
This list gives the number of entrance credits al- 
lowed to full graduates of these schools when offer- 
ing certificates from the Principals. 

Special attention is called to the following state- 
ment of requirements for admission : 

Students are admitted to the College on the sys- 
tem of entrance units, a unit meaning a subject of 
study pursued in an academy, or high school, 
through a session of nine months with recitations 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 41 

five times a week, an average of forty-five minutes 
being devoted to each recitation. 

The required entrance units are to be selected 
from the following list of subjects, to which is at- 
tached their value as entrance units: 

I. English. 3 . . Units — 

1. Higher Englisn Grammar. ^ unit. 

2. Elements of Rhetoric and weekly written 

Compositions, i unit. 

3. English Literature. iH units. 

The study of English Literature includes the 
special study of some works and the reading of 
others, as laid down in the requirements of the 
Southern and other associations of schools and col- 
leges in the United States, as follows : 

(a) READING. — A certain number of books 
will be set for reading- The candidate w^ill be re- 
quired to present evidence of a general knowledge 
of the subject-matter, and to answer simple questions 
on the lives of the authors- The form of examina- 
tion \\\\\ usually be the waiting of a paragraph or 
two on each of several topics, to be chosen by the 
candidate from a considerable number — perhaps 
ten or fifteen — set before him in the examination 
paper- The treatment of these topics is designed to 
test the candidate's powder of clear and accurate ex- 
pression and will call for only a general knowledge 
of the substance of the books- In place of a part or 
the w^hole of this test the candidate may present 
an exercise book, properly certified by his instructor, 
containing compositions or other written work done 
in connection with the reading of the books- It is 
especially recommended that candidates whose read- 



42 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ing has not been confined to the books set below 
should avail themselves of this alternative. 

The books set for this part of the examination 
in 1910 and 191 1, are: 

GROUP 1 (two to be selectodi — Shakespeare's As You 
Like It, Henry Y, Julius Caesar, The Merchant of 
Venice, Twelfth Night. 

GROUP 2 (one to be selected) — Bacon's Essays, Bun- 
yan's The Pilgrim's Progress, Part 1; The Sir Roger 
de Goverley Papers in The Spectator; Franklin's 
Autobiography. 

GflOUP 3 (one to be selected; — Chaucer's Prologue, 
, Spenser's Faerie Queene (selections) ; Pope's The 
Rape of the Lock; Goldsmith's The Deserted Yillage; 
Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Books 2 
and 3; with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, 
Gray, Cowper. and Burns. 

GROUP 4 (two to be selected) — Goldsmith's The Yicar 
of Wakelield; Scott's Ivanhoe; Scott's Quentin Dur- 
ward: Hawthorne's The House of Seven Gables; 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond; Mrs. Gaskell's Cran- 
ford; Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities; George Eliot's 
Silas Marner; Blackmore's Lorna Doone. 

GROUP 5 (two to be selected) — Irving's Sketch Book; 
Lamb's Essays of Elia; DeQuincey's Joan of Are 
and The English Mail Coach; Carlyle's Heroes and 
Hero Worship; Emerson's Essays (selected); Rus- 
kin's Sesame and Lilies. 

GROUI^ 6 (two to be selectea) — Coleridge's The Anci- 
ent Mariner; Scott's The Lady of the Lake; Mazeppa 
and The Prisoner of Chillon; Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series), Book 4, with especial at- 



MILLS.-! PS COLLEGE 13 

tention to Wardswortli, Keats, and Shelly; Mac- 
aulay's Lays of Ancient Koine; ]>oe'fl Poems. Lowell's 
The Vision of Sir Launfal; Arnold's Soluah and 
lUistum; Longfellow's Tlie Courtship of Miles Stand- 
ish; Tennyson's dareth and Lynette, Lancelot and 
Elaine, and 'J'ho Passing of AHInii-; Browning's 
Cavalier Tunes, Tiie Lost Leader, How They 
Brought the Good Xews from Ghent lo Aix, Evelyn 
Hope, Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts 
from the Sea, Incident of the French Camp. The 
boy and the Angel. One Word More, Herve Hiel^ 
Pheidippides.. 

In preparation for this part of the requirement 
it is important that the candidate shall have been 
instructed in the fundamental principals of rhet- 
oric. 

(b) STUDY AND PRACTICE.— This part ot 
the examination presupposes the thorough study ol 
each of the works named below. The examination 
will be upon subject-matter, form, and structure. 

The books set for this part of the examination 
in 191 1 and 1912, are : 

Shakespeare's Macbeth: Milton's Lycidas, Comus, 
L'Allegro, and H. Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation with America, or Washington's Farewell 
Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration: 
Macaulays Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on 
liurns. 

In addition the candidate may be required lo 
answer questions involving" the essentials of English 
grammar, and questions on the leading facts in those 
periods of English literary history to which the pi*- 
scribed works belong. 



44 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

II. Mathematics. 4 Units — 

I- College Algebra- 

(a) To Quadratics, i unit. 

(b) Quadratics through Progressions. J4 
unit. 

2. Plane Geometry, i unit. 

3. Solid Geometry. /-- unit 

4. Plane Trigonometry. V2 unit. 

5. Mechanical Drawing. V2 unit. 

III. Latin. 3 Units — 

1. Grammar and Composition, i unit. 

2. Caesar — any four books on the Gallic War. 

I unit. 

3. Cicero — six orations, i unit. 

IV. Greek. 2 Units — 

1. Grammar and Composition, i unit 

2. Xenophon — first four books of the Ana- 

basis. I unit. 

V. French, i Unit— 

One-half of Elementary Grammar, and at 
least 250 pages of approved reading. 
I unit. 

VI. German. 4 Units^ 

One-half of Elementary Grammar, and at 
least 250 pages of approved reading. 
I unit. 

VII. History. 4 Units— 

1. American History (Civics may be a part of 

this course), i unit. 

2. Ancient History, i unit. 

3. Modern History, i unit. 

4. English History, i unit. 

Credit in History must be based on the time de- 
voted to each course, not upon the ground cov- 
ered. 



MILLS.1PS COLLEGE 45 

In estimating tlie value of a particular course, the 
detinition of a unit must be rigidly adhered to. 

VIII. Science, i Unit— 

1. Physics. I unit. 

The study of a modern text-book, such as Garhari 
& Chute's Physics, with a Laboratory Notebook, 
covering at least forty exercises from a list of sixty 
or more. 

2. Chemistry, i unit. 

The preparation of Chemistry shall be upon the 
same general plan as that prescribed for Physics. 

3. Botany, i unit. 

4. Zoology. I unit. 

5. Zoology. H unit. 

6. Physiology. H unit. 

Students are admitted to College as : 

1. Full Freshman. 

2. Conditioned Freshmen, 

3. Special Students. 

I. Full Freshmen. For admission as Full 
Freshman the students must offer fourteen units. 

For the A. B. Degree the following are pre- 
scribed : 

English 3 units 

Algebra i^ 

Plane Geometry i 

Latin 3 

Greek, or French, or 
German i 



46 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 



For the B. S. Degree the following are pre- 
scribed : 



English 3 units 

Algebra VA 

Plane Geometry i 

Two Foreign Languages 4 

In addition all students must offer for entrance 
4/4 units to be selected from the following list : 

Solid Geometry H unit 

Greek 

French 

German 

Ancient History 

Modern History 

English History 



American History 
DrawinsT 



Physiology . . 
Physiography , 

Botany 

Chemistry. . . 

Physic? 

Zoology 



are necessary 

o be admitted 

have done or 



The above list of elective units 
for admission to College. In order 
to any Department the student mus 
must arrange to do the minimum amount of work 
required for entrance to that Department. A. B. 
students who take Modern Languages in place of 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 47 

Greek must offer work in both French and German. 

(If one of the two languages offered is Latin, 
three units are required therein). 

2. Conditioned Freshmen, Students who can 
not enter as Full Freshmen may enter as Condi- 
tioned Freshmen. Conditioned Freshmen may en- 
ter on twelve units, provided that three of these are 
in English and one and a half are in Mathematics. 
But when so admitted they must arrange to satisfy 
the remaining two units in the first two years. 

3. Special Students. Under certain conditions 
students of maturity who have not satisfied the 
minimum of entrance units required of candidates 
for degrees may be admitted as "Special Students," 
provided they have satisfied the requirements in 
English, History, and one other subject. 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE. 

The reader of the arrangement of courses will 
notice that two undergraduate degrees are offered 
by the Literary Department of the College — B. A. 
and B. S. It will also be seen from the following 
schedule that the preparation required for the dif- 
ferent courses is not the same: 

B. A. Degree — The Bachelor of Arts course offers 
special instruction in the departments of Latin 
and Greek. This course presupposes two years 
of preparatory work in Greek or Modern Lan- 
guages, three in Latin. In order to be allowed to 
enter upon the B. A. course, the applicant must 
stand an approved examination in English. His- 
tory, Science, Mathematics, Latin, and Greek or 
Modern Languages. 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

B. S. Degree — The Bachelor of Science course offers 
special work in Chemistry, Physics and Mathe- 
matics. Instead of Greek and partly of Latin, 
French and German are studied. In order to be 
allowed to enter upon the B. S. course, the ap- 

• plicant must stand an approved examination in 
English, History, Science, Mathematics, Latin 
and Modern Languag"es. 

LL. B. Degree — No entrance examination is exacted 
of Law students who apply for the Junior Class. 
They are expected to have a good elementary 
English education. Applications for the Senior 
Class are examined in the Junior course. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 



49 



ARRANGEMENT OF ACADEMIC COURSES FOR THE 

A. B. DEGREE. 

FRESHMAN YK\R. 



Bible 

History 

Latin 

Greeli;, or Modern Languages, 

Mathematics 

English 



SOPHOMORE Y^EAR. 



Latin 

Greek, or Modern Languages. 

Mathematics 

English 

Chemistry I (a) (b' 



JUNIOR YEW. 



i'b, 



Economics. . 

Latin 

English.. .. 
Physics I (a) 

History 

Elective from 

Greek 

Bible Greek. . . . 

Mathematics 'A 

Mathemaiics (B; 



Chemistry II 
Biolog>-.. .. 
French.. .. 
German.. .. 



1x1 



1 hr. 

3 hrs. 

3 

3 

3 

3 



16 


hrs 


3 


hrs 


3 




3 




3 




3x1 





16 hrs. 



2 
3 
3 
2x1 
3 



hrs. 



Chemistry II (aj {b^ 2x1 |^ 2 



16 hrs. 



50 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Logic 1 hs. 

Psychologj^ 2 hrs. 

Astronomy 2 

Geology 2 

Political Science 3 

Elective from 

Education 2 

Latin 2... 

Greek 2 

Mathematics 2... 

jlish 2.... 

Chemistry III (a) (b) 2... 

Physics II 2.... 

Sociology 2 

History 2 



J 



16 hrs. 
(In substituting Modern Languages for Greek, or vice 
versa, only college classes may be substituted for col- 
lege classes.) 



ARRANGEMENT OF ACADEMIC COURSES FOR THE 
B. S. DEGREE. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Bible 1 hr. 

History 3 

Latin, or German 3 

Mathematics 3 

French 3 

English 3 

16 hrs. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin, or German 3 hrs. 

P'rench 3 

Mathematics 3 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



51 



English 3 

Chemistry 1 (a) (b) . . . 2x1 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



16 hrs. 



Economics 

Mathematics (A) . . . 
Chemistry II (a) (b) 
Physics I (a) (h) . . . 
Elective from 

History 

German , 

French 

Mathematics (B) . 

English 

Chemistry 11 (c) . 
Biology 



2 hr^ 

3 
2x1 
2x1 



SENIOR YEAR 

Logic 

Psychology 

Astronomy 

<ieolog>- 

Political Science 

Elective from 

Education 2 

Mathematics 2 

English 2 

Chemistry III (a) (b) 2 \ 

Physics II 2 

Sociology 2 

History 2 



16 hrs. 



1 hr. 

2 hr; 

9 



10 hrs. 



52 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE. 

Each school of Collegiate instruction offers 
work looking toward the Master's Degree. Ap- 
plicants for the M. A. or M. S. Degree will be re- 
quired to elect three courses of study, not more than 
two of which may be in the same school. The prin- 
cipal subject chosen — known as the major course — 
will be expected to employ one-half the applicant's 
time; each of the minor courses, one-quarter of his 
time. It is expected that the applicant for a mas- 
ter's degree, after receiving a bachelor's degree, 
spend at least one year at Millsaps College engaged 
in graduate study. Attention is directed to the 
schedule of degrees following, and to the statement 
in connection with the account of work done in 
each department. 

The candidate for the Master of Arts degree 
must offer as a prerequisite an A. B. degree, or a B. 
S. degree including two college years of Latin, from 
Millsaps College or from a college whose degree 
is accepted by the Committee on Admission, and the 
candidate for the Master of Science degree must, 
under the same conditions, offer a B. S. degree. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 53 

OUTLINE OF DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSES 



ACADEMIC CLASSES. 



BIBLE. 

Freshman — Outline of Bible Study v Steele.} One hour. 

LOGIC. 

Senior — Elements of Logic (Jevons-Hill . One hour. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Senior — Psychology' (Angell. Ethics (Gregory). Two 
hours. 

CHEmSTRY. 

Sophomore— CHEMISTRY I (a) General Chemistry 
(Kahlenherg). Three hours. 
fb) Laboratory Exercises (Smith & Hale). Two 
hours. 

Junior— CHEMISTRY II (a^ Theoretical Organic Chem- 
istry ^Cohen;, Perkin and Kipping. Bernthsen, Hol- 
leman. Two hours. 

(b' Oualitative Analysis (Sellersi). Two hours. 
(c) General Chemistry (Advanced Course . One 
hour. 

Senior— CHEMISTRY III (a) (b) Organic Preparations 
'Gattemann; ; Qunntitative Analysis .Clowes & Cole- 
raan. Four hours. 



54 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GEOLOGY. 

Senior— GEOLOGY T (a) (b) (o) College Geology 
(Chaniberlin & Salisbury)- Two hours. 

BIOLOGY. 

Junior— BIOLOGY T (a^ Lessons in Biology (Parker), 
(b) Principles of Botany (Bergen and Davis) ). Two 
hours. 

PHYSICS. 

Junior— Physics I (a) General Physics (Ganot). Two 
hours. 

(b) Physical Experiments (Miliken and Gale). 
Two hours. 

Senior— PHYSICS II — General Physics (Advanced 
Course). Two hours. 

ASTRO\0:»IY. 

Senior — I. Manual of Astronomy (Young) ; History of 
Astronomy (Berry). 

MATIIE^IATICS. 

Freshman — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry (Roth- 
rock) ; College Algebra (C. Smith). Three hours. 

Sophomore — Analytic Geometry (Nichols). Three 
hours. 

Teachers Course in Mathematics (by Lectures). 
Two hours (elective). 

Junior — Calculas, Differential and Integral (Osborne). 
Three hours, Surveying (Barton). Two hour.«; 
(elective). 

Senior — Mechanics (Morley). Two hours (elective). 
Solid Analytic Geometry (G. Smith). Two hours 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 55 

(elective). Ditterontial Equations (Pago,. Two 
hours (elective). 

fflSTORY. 

Freshman — Formation of Modern Europe. Handbook 
of European History; Notes and references to se- 
lected texts. Three hours. 

Junior— AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY— One of the 
following courses is given: 

I. EARLY PERIOD— Woodburn's Lecky's Ameri- 
can Revolution; Fiske's Critical Period of Ameri- 
can History; McLaughlin's Confederation and Con- 
stitution; Gordy's Political History of the United 
States; Vols. I and II; two papers. Three hours. 

II. MIDDLE PERIOD— Burgess's Middle Period; 
Smith's Parties and Slavery; Macy's Political Par- 
ties in the United States; Curry's Southern States 
of the American Union; Chadwick's Causes of the 
Civil War; tw^o papers. Three hours. (Omitted in 
1911-12.) 

III. LATER PERIOD— Burgess's Reconstruc- 
tion and the Constitution; Dunning's Essays on Civil 
War and Reconstruction; Garner's Reconstruction 
in Mississippi: Latane's America as a World Power, 
Coolidge's United States as a World Powder; two pa- 
pers. Three hours. (Omitted in 1911-12). 

Senior — One of the following courses is given: 

I. INTERNATIONAL LAW— Lawrence's Princi- 
ples of International Law; Reinsch's Colonial Gov- 
ernment; Reinsch's Colonial Administration; Lec- 
tures on Current Phases of International Questions; 
Foster's Practice of Diplomacy. Two hours. 

il. NINETEENTH CENTURY HISTORY— Robin- 



56 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

son & Beard's Development of Modern Europe; Tar. 
dieu's France and The Allies. Two hours, (Omit- 
ted in 1911-12). 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Senior— POLITICAL SCIENCE— I Bryce's American 
Commonwealth; Lowell's Government of England. 
Three hours. 

II. Garner's Introduction to Political Science; 
Beard's American Government and Politics. Three 
hours. 

ECONOMICS 

Junior — Ely's Outline of Economics; Bogart's Economic 
History of the United States. Two hours. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Senior — Dealy's Sociology'; Ross's Social Control; 
Wright's Practical SoclologJ^ Two hours. 

GREEK. 

Fresliman — Lysias (selected orations} ; Plato, Apology 
and Crito; Homer, Iliad or Odyssey (two books); 
Study of Epic Forms; Prosody; Prose Composition; 
Grammar (Goodwin.) Gayley's Classic Myths. 

Sophomore — Homer, Iliad or Odyssey continued, — six 
books; Herodotus, Books YI and VII; Euripides, Al- 
cestis; Meters; Grammar; Prose Composition; Lit- 
erature (Jebb). 

Junior— Course A. Attic Orations — History of their 
times. Texts: Tarbell's Philippics of Demos- 
thenes; Tyler's Olynthiacs; Jebb's Attic Orators, 
The Lyric Poets; Tyler's Lyric Poets. Prose Com- 
position. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE S7 

Course B — Attic History. Herodotus, Thucydides 
Xenoptione. Texts: iMorris' Tliucydides I; Manattie 
Hellenica I-IV; Xenophon, Agesilaus 

Course C — The Drama. Its History and Development; 

Aesctiylus, Prometheus Bound, Porsae; Sophocles 
Oedipus Rex; Euripides' Medea, Heracleidae. Ar- 
istophanes, Aves or Nubes. 

Course D — Epic Poetry: A thorough study of Homeric 
Literature consisting of: The Homeric Hymns, 
the Batrachomyomachia, the Iliad, Odyssey, the 
Epic Clyde, etc. 

Course A was offered 1910-11: 

Course B (with parts of course A) will be offered in 

1911-12. 
Course G and D will be offered in 1911-12 as Senior or 

M. A. work. 

LATIN. 

Freshman — Virgil's Aeneid (six books) ; Livy, Books I, 
XXI, XXII; Grammar (Bennett's); The Latin Verb 
(Swartz) ; Dactylic Hexameter. Prose Composition; 
Gayley's Classic Myths. 

Sophomore — Horace, Odes and Epodes (Bennett) ; Sa- 
tires and Epistles (Kirkland) ; Cicero de Amicitia; 
Pliny's Letters. Prose Composition; Literature 
(Wilkins) ; The Private Life of the Romans, Pres- 
ton and Dodge. 

Junior — Course A, Early English History based upon 
Tacitus, (Agricola and annals) ; Caesar and Sue- 
tonius. Parallel reading; Merivale's Rome. Plau- 
tus and Terence: One play each. Meters of Plautus 
and Terence; Prose Composition; Literature, Mac- 
kail. 

(Jourse B— Early History of Germany based upon Taci- 



5S MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

tus, (Germania and Annals'. Parallel rending 
Merivale's Rome. Plautus and Terence: One play 
each; Prose Composition: Literature, Mackail; Me- 
ters of Comedy. 

Course C— Latin History. Livy, Caesar, Sallust, Tacitus 
and Suetonius. Some topic, sucti for example as the 
formation of tlie Empire, or the reign of Claudius, 
will be selected for discussion and research. 

Course D — Latin Poetry. Horace, Catullus. Propertius, 
Virgil, Ovid, Juvenal, etc. Some field of Latin poet- 
ry, such for example as the Lyric, Epic or Satiric, 
will be selected for study. The field so chosen will 
be exhausted as far as possible. 

Course A was offered in 1910-1911. 

Course B will be offered in 1911-1912. 

Course C and D will be offered in 1911-12 as Senior or 

M. A. work. 
In both Latin and Greek essays will be required in thi.* 

Junior class. 

COURSE IN BIBLE GREEK. 

Two courses will be offered: 

(a) The Gospels. 

(b) The Letters of Paul, and Acts. 

TEXTS— Burton's Moods and Tenses; Westcott and 
Hort's Text of the Greek Bible; Gardiner's Principles of 
Textual Criticism; Meyer's Commentary on Acts; Coney- 
beare and Howson's Life of Paul; Davis's The Story or 
the Nazarene; Matthew's Histoiy of New Testament, 
Times in Palestine. 

ENGLISH. 

Freshman — Woolley's Handbook of Composition; La- 
mont's English Composition; Poe's Pf^iems and Tales; 
Poe's Prose Tales; Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales, 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 59 

Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside Inn; Stevenson's 
Treasure Island and Kidnapped; Cooper's Spy. 

Sophomore — Moody and Lovett's First View of English 
Literature; Paneoast's Standard English Poems; 
Lamb's Essays of Elia; Stevenson's Essays; Dick- 
ens' Tale of Two Cities; Thackeray's Henry Es- 
mond; Eliot's Adam Bede; Shakespeare's Hamlet, 
Macbeth, Henry IV, As You Like It. 

Junior — Smith's Old English Grammar; Sweet's Anglo 
Saxon Primer; Greenough and Kittredge's Words 
and their Ways; Chaucer's Prologue, Knight's Tale, 
Nun's Priest's Tale, The Tale of the Man of Lawe 
The Pardoner's Tale, etc.; Root's the Poetry of 
Chaucer. 

Senior — W^orks of Browning; Orr's Piobert Browning; 
Life and Letters; Brooke's Poetry of Browning; Mrs. 
Browning's Poems. 

FRENCH. 

l''reshman — Eraser and Squair's French Grammar: 
Merimee's Columbia; Maupassant: Ten Short Sto- 
ries: Hugo's Chute; Sand's La Mare au Diable,. 

Sophomore — Gorneille's Le Cid; Racine's Athalie; Moli- 
ere's Le Misanthrope; Warren's French Prose of the 
XVII Century; Hugo's Hernani; Augier's Le Gendre 
de M. Poirier; Balzac; Cinq Scenes de la Comedie 
Humaine; Duval's Histoire de la Literature Fran- 
caise; Wendell's France of To-day. 

Junior — Fortier's History of French Literature; selected 
chapters of Saintsbury's French Literature; the 
Development of Romanticism, Victor Hugo: the Re- 
alists and Balzac; Naturalism, Zola; the Symbolists; 
Neo-Romanticism, Rostand. 



60 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GERiMAX. 

Freshman — Whitney's German Grammar; Bacon's Im 
Vaterland; Baumbach's Der Schwlegerson; Fraytags 
Die Journalisten. 

Sophomore — Lessing's Emilia GaloUi; Heine's Die 
HarHarzreise; Schiller's Wilholm Tell; Goeth's Faust; 
Moore's German Literature; Sidwick's Home Life 
in Germany. 

Junior — Scherer's and Kuno Francke's Histories of Ger- 
man Literature; the Contemporary Drama, Haupt- 
man, Sudermann, Wildenbruch, Fulda; the reaction 
from Realism, Seidel and the Idyllic School. 

la;w classes. 

JUNIOR. 

First Term — Blacksfone's Commentaries; Stephen on 
Pleading; Greenleaf on Evidence, A^ol. I; Smith on 
Personal Property; Mississippi Code, 19C'6; Missis- 
sippi Constitution. 

Second Term — Clarke's Criminal Law; Clarke's Criminal 
Procedure; Kent's Commentaries, Commercial 
Chapters; Adam's Equity; Barton's Suit in Equity: 
Mississippi Code 1906; Mississippi Constitution; 
Constitution of the United Stat(*s; Cooley's Princi- 
ples of Constitutional Law. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 61 

SE.MOR. 

First Term — Lawson on Contracts; Bigelow on Torts; 
Boone on Corporations; Bispham's Equity; Missi.-- 
sippi Code, 1906; Mississippi Constitution; Missis- 
sippi Jurisprudence, historically. 

Second Term — Real Estate Reviewed, Kent; Internati- 
onal Law, Kent; Federal Judicial System, Kent; 
Curtis's United States Courts; Cooley's Constitutional 
Limitations; United States Constitution, historically. 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DETAILED STATEMENT 

In Regard to 

The Several Departments of the College. 

The Departments comprising the Course of In- 
struction are : 

I. The School of Philosophy and Biblical In- 
struction. 

II. The School of Chemistry. 

III. The School of Geology. 

IV. The School of Physics and Biology. 

V. The School of ^Mathematics and Astronomy. 
VI. The School of History. 
VII. The School of Social Science, 
VIII. The School 61 Greek and Latin. 
IX. The School of English. 
X. The School of Modern Languages. 



I. THE SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND 

BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION. 

PRESIDENT HULL. 

Philosophy of the mental economy and the great 
subjects of morals, as they affect the heart and in- 
fluence the life, will be taught with great care and 
fidelity. 

This School embraces three departments : 

I. Bible Instruction. 

II. ]\Iental Philosophy and Logic. 

III. The History and Philosophy of Education. 

No entrance requirements are prescribed for 
the work of this Department, 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE B3 

FRESHMAN. 

The members of the Freshman Class arc re- 
quired to devote one hour a week to recitation, 
though they are expected to give a part of every day 
to the work of preparation. The scope of this De- 
partment will be enlarged from time to time as con- 
ditions favor such enlargement, but it is not de- 
signed that the course shall take the place of the 
Private and devotional study of the sacred Scrip- 
tures, 

The English Bible and Steele's Outlines of 
Bible Study will be used as text-books in connection 
with the Department of Biblical Instruction, 

Throughout the School of Philosophy text- 
books and books of references of the most approved 
character will be used, and the method of instruc- 
tion will be by lectures, and daily oral examinations, 
by analysis of subjects studied, and by original 
theses to be presented by the students on topics 
prescribed relating to the various departments of the 
school. 

SENIOR. 

1. Logic — A course extending through the session is 

required of all candidates for degrees. The first 
term is devoted to the study of Deductive 
Logic ; the second term, to Induction, Fallacies 
and method. 

Text -Book— Elements of Logic (Jevons-Hill). One 
hour. 

2. Psychology. — The Senior Class will devote the, 

first term of the session to the study of Psy- 
chology. 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Text-Book — Psychology (Angell). Two hours. 

3. Ethics. — The second term of the Senior year will 

be given to the study of Moral Philosophy in its 
relations to practical life. 

Text-Book — (Gregory), Two hours. 

4. Education. — Courses in education, elective for 

the Senior Class are offered as follows : 

(a) The History of Education in which the 
course of educational thought and progress 
will be traced from its beginnings among 
the Greeks and the Romans, through the 
Middle Ages, and the Renaissance, into the 
several movements and tendencies of the 
present time. 

(b) The Philosophy of Education in which 
education is viewed as the process by which 
social experience is developed and transmit- 
ted, (2) the several types of racial experi- 
ence are tested with regard to their ed- 
ucational value, and (3) the principles thus 
developed are applied to the problems of 
the school. 

These courses will be offered in alternate years, 
course (b) only being given in 1911-12. 

Text-Books — Monroe's Brief Course in the History of 
Education, Bogley's the Educative Process, and Dr. 
Garmo's Principles of Secondary Education. Two 
hours. 

MASTER'S DEGREE. 

Applicants for the degree of M. A. and M. S. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 65 

may elect either (a) or (b) of course 4 as part of the 
work leading to the degree sought, provided the ap- 
plicant did not take the course in question as a part 
of his undergraduate work. 



II. THE SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY. 
PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 
DR. HERRINGTON:. 

The rooms given up to the study of this sub- 
ject are modern both in size and convenience, and 
occupy the whole lower floor of Webster Science 
Hall. One of the laboratories opens into a dark 
room for photography, and into a room specially 
isolated and designed to retain delicate apparatus. 
The general laboratory opens conveniently into a 
small fuming room outside of the building so that 
vapors may not pass from one to another, and is 
also connected with the storeroom. Gas, water, 
experiment tables, hoods and pneumatic troughs are 
to be found in convenient places. There is a cellar 
for gas and electric generators, and for assay and 
other furnaces. A large lecture room on the second 
floor is soon to be supplied with modern equipment. 

The course in this department consists of three 
years of chemistry, one year being required of can- 
didates for all degrees, while B. S. students are re- 
quired in addition to take a second year. The sub- 
jects are taught by recitations and lectures and 
work which each student must perform in the lab- 
oratory. It is aimed that the laboratories be kept 
well equipped with aoparatus necessary to the cor- 
rect appreciation of the science. Each student has 
his own desk and apparatus and is closely super- 
vised, so that he may not only gain a true idea ci 



66 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

the substance under inspection, but also cultivate a 
hand careful to the smallest detail, an eye observ- 
ant of the slightest phenomenon, and habits of neat- 
ness, skill and economy. Each student will be ex- 
pected to keep accurate notes. 

Entrance credit for at least one Carnegie unit 
in Natural Science is required for admission to this 
department. 

I. (a) Inorganic Chemistry. — This course is de- 
signed to give the student a thorough working 
knowledge of general chemistry, including a 
careful study of fundamental laws of chemistry, 
the occurrence, properties and nreparation of 
the common elements and their compounds, 
and a course of chemical calculations. The 
year's work will be closed with an introductory 
study of organic chemistry. This course is a 
prescribed study of the Sophomore class for all 
degrees, and is a prerequisite to either of the 
other courses in Chemistry. 

Lectures and recitations, three hours. (Mon- 
day, Wednesday and Friday). 

Text-Book — Outlines of Chemistrj (Kahlenberg). 

IJeferenee Books — Richter, Holleman, Smith. 

(b) Experimental Chemistry. — This course is 
given in connection with (a), and each student 
is assigned the preparation of a number of ele- 
ments and compounds, and required to note the 
deportment of various substances with reagents. 
The class each year is given an opportunity to 
visit certain industrial establishments, as sul- 
phuric acid plant, phosphate works, and gas 
works. 

Laboratory exercises, two hours. (Tues- 
day.) 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

Text-Book — Laboratory Outline (Smith & Halej. 

II. (a) Organic Chemistry. — The purpose of this 
course is to furnish a somewhat comprehensive 
knowledge of organic chemistry, the instruc- 
tion being given chiefly by lectures illustrated 
t»y experiments. Some attention is given to 
physiological chemistry. Students will be ex- 
pected to consult various works of reference. 
This course is required of applicants for the B. 
S. degree, and is a prescribed study in the Junior 
year. This course in connection with II (bj 
will appeal specially to preliminary dental and 
medical students. 

Lectures and recitations, two hours. (Tues- 
day and Wednesday.) 

Text-Book — Theoretical Organic Chemistry (Cohen). 

Reference Books — Perkin and Kipping, Bernthsen, Hol- 
leman. 

(b) I. Qualitative Analysis. — This course con- 
sists in a systematic analysis of simple and com- 
pound substances and mixtures, the contents 
being unknown to the student. It is a pre- 
scribed study in the Junior year, and required 
for the B. S. degree. The work is not confined 
to mere test-tube exercises, but is the subject of 
regular quizzes. The course will extend 
through the third quarter. 

Two hours. (Thursday.) 
Text-Books — Qualitative Analysis (Sellers"; . 

Reference Books — Newth, Fresenius. 



68 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

2. Practical Organic Chemistry. — The pre- 
ceding course will be followed during the last 
quarter with a course in the preparation and 
purification of organic substances, or in Sani- 
tary and Applied Chemistry. 

Text-Books — Cohen, HoUeman, Bailey. 

(c) General Chemistry (Advanced Course). — Thit^ 
course is intended to supplement course I (a). 
Some phase of advanced chemistry — theoret- 
ical inorganic, or physical, will be taught. A 
brief study of historial Chemistry will be 
included. This course is elective in the Junior 
year, and is designed for those who would know 
more of chemistry than is possible in the Sopho- 
more year. Students electing this work must 
also elect II (b). 

The course will be varied from time to time 
as may be needed. 

Lectures and recitations, one hour. (Thurs- 
day. 

Text and Reference Books — Inorganic Chemistry (Rem- 
sen, Smith, HoUeman), Physical Chemistry (Jones, 
Walker); History of Chemistry (Meyer), 

III. (a) Organic Chemistry. — A practical course in 
advanced organic chemistry, including the prep- 
aration of coal-tar products, as dyes, remedies, 
etc., with a few determinations of vapor density 
and molecular weight. 

Text-Books — Gattermann, Fischer, Orndorff. 

. . (b) Quantitative Analysis. — A course in gravime- 
tric and volumetric analysis, for which a special 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 69 

laboratory room is furnished with modern desks 
and apparatus. 

Text-Book — Clowes and Coleman. 

Kei'erence Books — Fresenius, Sutton, Talbot. 

Both of these courses are given during the Se- 
nior year, and are elective for all degrees. Four 
hours, (Thursday and Friday.) 

Finally, it should be said that in the chemical 
laboratory text-books will be dispensed with as far 
as possible. The student will be taught to feel that 
the substances and apparatus around him are his 
alphabet. The teacher is constantly on hand to 
question and suggest, and in other ways to stimulate 
thoughtfulness. 

Library copies of Watts' Revised Dictionary, 
Thorp's Applied Chemistry, Roscoe and Schorlem- 
mer's Treatise, Allen's Commercial Organic Analy- 
sis, Journal of the American Chemical Society, and 
other works, are on hand for reference. In both 
Junior and Senior courses some laboratory work will 
be required outside the regular schedule. 

A gold Medal is oftered by ]\Ir. Marvin Gieger 
for general excellence in scholarship in Chemistry 
during the Sophomore year, 

COURSE LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DE- 
GREE. 

In the post graduate work of this department, 
200 hours of laboratory work in the subject chosen 
are required. 

Courses are offered as follows: (a) The An- 



70 MI LIS A PS COLLEGE 

alysis of Potable and Mineral Waters, and such 
mineral products as Iron Ores, Gypsum, Phosphate, 
Marl, Fire Clay, and Limestone, (b) An advanced 
course in accurate Quantitative Analysis, and mole- 
cular weight determinations, (c) A course in the 
preparation and ana)dsis of Organic Substances, in- 
cluding food analysis, (d) A course in Theoretical, 
Physiological and Historical Chemistry. 

Texl -Books — Examination of Water (Leffmann, Mason) ; 
Quantitative Analysis (Clowes and Coleman) ; Or- 
ganic Preparations (Gattermann) ; Food Inspection 
(Leach). 

Reading Com'se — Theoretical Chemistry (Remsen) ; 

Physical Chemistry (Jones) ; Industrial Chemistry 
(Throp); Development of Organic Chemistry 
(Schorlemmer) ; History of Chemistry (Meyer) ; 

J^hysiologJcal Chemistry (Halliburton) ; Sources and 
Modes of Infection (Chapin). 

In addition, a satisfactory examination must be 
passed on work assigned from the above courses. 

The courses outlined are for major subjects, 
and for minors each will be reduced one-half. 



III. THE SCHOOL OF GEOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN. 

A portion of the second floor of Webster Sci- 
ence Plall is occupied by this Department. The 
museum contains about 300 minerals collected from 
various parts of the world, 200 speciments of rock 
presented by the United States Geological Survey, 
a fine cabinet of 300 minerals and rocks presented 
by the Woman's College of Baltimore, and a fine 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 71 

collection of Mississippi rocks and fossils, all thor- 
oughly indexed. The excellence of the latter is 
yearly increased by donations from friends of the 
Collegfe. and a collection made bv the Senior Class. 



-?3' 



GEOLOGY. 

I. (a) Mineralogy and Lithologic Geology. — This 
includes a study of mineral species, crystalline 
forms, chemical composition, occurrence and 
uses, with a description of the kind and ar- 
rangement of rock masses. First term (first 
half.) 

(b) Physiographic and Dynamic Geology. — 

This portion of the course embraces the study of 
physiographic features and processes, the me- 
chanical and chemical effects of the atmos- 
phere, water, heat, and of life. Special atten- 
tion will be given to some phase of the subject, 
as the work of glaciers, or volcanoes. First 
term (second half.) 

(c) Historical Geology. — In addition to general 
historical geology some attention will be given 
to economic products and to paleontology. 
Second term. 

This course is a prescribed study in the Senior 
year for the A. B. or B. S. degree. The college 
museum and the private museum of the head of the 
Department afford minerals and fossils for class 
study. 

Several geological expeditions regularly mada 
in the fall and spring to localities easily accessible 
from Jackson, give the class a practical conception 
of this kind of surveying. The college is fortunate 



72 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

in being located in the midst of a region that is quite 
varied in geological character. Occasionally the 
faculty grants a week's leave of absence on trips to 
more distant points. In the last month of the year 
Hilgard's Geology of Mississippi and annual Re- 
ports of the Smithsonian Institution and of the U. 
S. Geological Survey are used with the class. 

Lectures and recitations, two hours. (Tues- 
day and Friday.) 

Text-Books — College Geology (Chamberlain and Salis- 
bury). 

Reference Books — Manual of Geology (Dana) ; Text 
Book of Geology (Chamberlain and Salisbury) ; Min- 
erals (Dana); Reports; Physiography (Salisbury); 
Text Book of Geology (Geike) ; Volcanoes (Bonney) ; 
Introduction to Geology (Scott) ; Journal of Geology. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DE- 
GREE. 

Graduate work as a minor subject is offered in 
Geology, and some regular field or laboratory work 
will be required. An examination must be passed 
upon a course of reading as follows : 
Chamberlain and Salisbury's Text-Book of Geology; 
Geike's Text-Book of Geology; Tarr's Economic Ge- 
ology of the United States; William's Elements of 
Crystallography; Hilgard's Geology of Mississippi. 
Selected articles in Geological reports; Physi- 
ography (Salisbury). 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 73 

IV. THE SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND 
BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN. 

The course in this Department consists of two 
years of physics and one year of biology. Besides 
a general lecture room on the second floor of Sci- 
ence Hall, a room provided with laboratory tables, 
and supplied with water, gas, and electricity, is de- 
voted to experimental pl\vsics. 

Entrance credit for at least one Carnegie unit 
in Natural Science is required for admission to this 
department. 

PHYSICS. 
I. (a) General Physics. — This course embraces a 
study of the principles of mechanics, sound, 
heat, light, magnetism, and electricity, and is 
a required study in the Junior year for all de- 
grees. The work will be conducted by lectures, 
recitations, and experiments before the class. 
Two hours. (Tuesday and Thursday). 

Texl-Books — Ganot's General Physics (Atkinson). 

(b) Experimental Physics.— A course in labora- 
tory experiments accompanied by lectures will 
be required in connection with the course in 
General Physics. A separate room is furnished 
with work tables, and each student provided 
with apparatus for performing carefully selec- 
ted experiments. 

Two hours. (Wednesday). 

Text-Books — Laboratory Course (Milliken and Gale). 
II. Advanced Physics. — This course will be varied 



74 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

as the needs suggest, and is elective in the Se- 
nior year for all degrees. It is designed that 
this class especially shall keep in touch with 
the scientific progress of the day. Two hours. 

BIOLOGY. 

I. (a) General Biology. — An elective course is 
offered in the Junior year, including general 
work in Botany and Zoology. This course will 
be of value as preparatory to the work in Ge- 
ology. It is aimed to enhance the value of the 
course b}^ microscopic work. 
First term. Two hours. 

(b) Physiology. — A lecture course on selected 
subjects, with special reference to the stud}^ oi 
medicine and ])harmac3'. 

Second Term. Two hours. 

This course is elective for all degrees. 

Text-Books — Lessons in Biology (Parker); Principles 
of Botany (Bergen and Davisj ; Physiologj'. 

Reference Books — General Pjiology (Sedgwick and 
Wilson); Briefer Course in Zoology (Packard;. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S 
DEGREE. 

In Physics the courses offered are measure- 
ments (a) mechanics, heat, and electricity; (b) Gen- 
eral Physics, including a special study of some se- 
lected phase of the subject. 

Text -Books — Peddie's Physics, Thompson's Electricity 
and Magnetism, Gajori's History of Physics, Glaze- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 75- 

brook's Heat and Light, Slewart's Conservatism of 
Energy, Watson's Piiysics. 

V. THE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS 
AND ASTRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR E. Y. BURTON. 

The leading- purpose of the course in ]\Iathe- 
matics is the logical training of the mind. A mas- 
tery of the fundamental principles of the subjects 
is insisted upon and much attention is given to the 
application of the knowledge acquired to the solu- 
tion of problems of every day life. Entrance credit 
for at least two and une-half Carnegie units in 
Mathematics is required for admission to this de- 
partment. 

FRESHMAN. 

Solid Geometry is completed the first part of 
the first term. The greater part of this year is de- 
voted to the study of the principles of Trig^onometry 
and their application to land surveying, problems 
in heights and distances and astronomy. The graphic 
side of the subject is made a substantial part of the 
course. The students are taught the use of the sur- 
vcA'or's chain, compass, etc., and are required to 
m.ake drawings and coinputations from data oh • 
taincd by themselves in the use of these instruments. 

The latter part of the year is given to the study 
of such topics as Theory of Equations, Indetermi- 
nate Forms, Permutations and Combinations, and 
Determinants. Geometry is to be selected. Three 
hours. 

Text-B«wks— Geometry to be selected. Plane and 



76 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Spherical Trigonom^ry (Lyman and Goddard) ; Go'- 
lege Algebra (C. Smith, Wells, and Wentworth). 

SOPHOMORE. 

The required work of the Sophomore year is 
Analytic Geometry. A careful stud}^ is made of the 
straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, hyperbola and 
their properties, followed by a discussion of the gen- 
eral conic of the second degree and higher plane 
curves. The course is completed b}" a brief study of 
Solid Analytic Geometry. Three hours. 

We also offer in this year a course of special in- 
terest to teachers and those wishing a rapid review 
of Algebra and Trigonometry. This is a lecture 
course dealing with subject matter and methods of 
presentation. Students desiring this course should 
confer with the Professor before entering College. 
Tliree hours. (Elective). 

Text-Books — Analytic Geometry (Nichols) ; Algebra 
(Wells, Wentworth, C. Smith, Slaught and Lenne.■^, 
Hedrlck, Downey, Tanner, and others); Trigonome- 
try, (Lyman and Goddard, Weils, Loney, Crockett, 
Taylor^ and others). 

JUNIOR. 

Two courses are oftered in the Junior year. Cal- 
culus and Surveying. 

Calculus. — The student is expected to acquire fa- 
cilit}- in the Difterentiation and Integration of 
all the elementary functions. The Differential 
Calculus is applied to Geometry and INIechanics. 
In the Integral Calculus applications are made 
to finding the areas of plane surfaces. It is 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

hoped that this course will be such as to lead 
many to continue the study of Alathematics for 
its own sake. Three hours. 

Plane Surveying. — This course includes chain sur- 
veying, compass surveying, computation of area, 
platting surveys, and transit surveying. Two 
hours. (Elective). (A fee of $3.00 is required 
in this course). 

Text-Books — Calculus (Osborne); Surveying (Barton;. 

SENIOR. 

(a) Mechanics (Morleyj. Two hours. (Elec- 
tive). 

(b) Solid Analytic Geometry (C. Smith). Two 
hours. (Elective). 

(c) Differential Equations (Page). Two hours. 
(Elective). 

Remarks. — (I). In addition to the above 
courses others may be offered, if there is sufficient 
demand. 

(2) Students in the Freshman class will be 
charged a fee of one dollar per year for the use oJ 
field instruments. 

(3) Students wishing to make up work during 
the summer may be granted a special examination 
by applying to the Professor for same and paying 
the special examination fee. In case the student's 
instructor is not the Professor of Mathematics, on 
application, the examination may be given by the 
instructor on the payment of the regular fee. 

ASTRONOMY. 

The course embodies a general survey of Astron- 



78 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

omical facts and principles, and is required in 
the Senior year for all degrees. Frequent use 
of the six-inch equatorial telescope of the Jame-- 
Observatory adds interest to the study. A brief 
course in the history of Astronomy will be re- 
quired. Two hours. 

Text-Books— Manual oi" Astronomy (Youngj ; History 
of Astronomy (Berry). 



VI. THE SCHOOL OF HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR WALMSLEY. 
MISS CLINGAN. 

The purpose of the courses in History is rather 
the training- of the mind of the student for critical 
historical judgment than the accumulation of facts. 
It is believed that there is no line of work in which 
more rigidly scientific training is possible than in 
the work in Historical and Social Science, and it is 
certain that there is none in which the knowledge 
acquired is of more immediate or more practical use. 
Text books are not taught as infallible authorities , 
in fact, many of the text-books contain statements 
from which the head of the Department dissents in 
toto, but it is thought that these very books may be 
of special service. Under the guidance of the Pro- 
fessor the students are taught to reserve their own 
judgment until they are confident of the trust- 
worthiness of the author. 

Entrance credit for at least one Carnegie unit 
in History is required for admission to this Depart- 
ment. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

FRESHMAN. 

In the Freshman year an outline of the history 
of Europe is given, and the stress is laid on certain 
of the periods since the Barbarian invasion, the pe- 
riod to which the modern nations trace their begin- 
ning. Written reports on assigned topics form an 
important part of the work of this year. No equiva- 
lent is accepted for this course unless it covers the 
same epochs and is believed to be of equal grade. 
Three hours. 

Handbook of European History; Notes and refer- 
ences to selected texts. 

JUNIOR. 

This course is devoted to a careful study of ant* 
of the three periods in American political and con- 
stitutional history indicated below. A large amount 
of special parallel work is required in this class. 
Three hours. 

Text-Books — I. Woodburn's Lecky's American Revolu- 
tion; Fiske's Critical Period of American History: 
McLaughlin's Confederation and Constitution; 
Gordy's Political History of United States, Vols. I 
and II; two papers. 

II. Burgess's Middle Period: Smith's Parties and 
Slavery; Macy's Political Parties in United States; 
Curry's Southern States of American Union; Chad- 
wick's Causes of Civil War; two papers. (Omitted 
in 1911-12). 

III. Burgess's Reconstruction and the Constitu- 
tion; Dunning's Essays on Civil War and Recon- 
struction; Garner's Reconstruction in Mississippi; 
Latane's America as a World Power; Coolidge's 



80 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

United States as a World Power; two papers, 
(Omitted in 1911-12). 

In the Junior class a medal is given by Mrs 
Chalmers Meek Williamson, State Regent of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, for the best 
paper on some revolutionary subject. For 1911-12 
the assigned subject is "The Character and Services 
of Samuel Adams." 

SENIOR. 

The work of the Senior 3^ear, which is elective 
for all degrees, is either a study of the elementary 
principles of International Law^ and of their applica- 
tion in current questions of world politics, or an in- 
tensive study of the politics of Europe from the time 
of the French Revolution to the present. Two 
hours. 

Text-Books — I. Lawrence's Principles of International 
Law; Remsch's Colonial Government; Reinsch's 
Colonial Administration; Foster's Practice of Di- 
plomacy; Class Lectures. 

n. Robinson and Beard's Development of Mod- 
ern Europe; Tardieu's France and The Allies. 
(Omitted in 1911-12). 

In the Senior class a set of books is given by 
the Head of the Department for the best paper on 
some subject in Political Science. This paper in 
1911-12 will be on "The Power of the Senate.'' 

COURSES LEADING TO THE MASTER'S DE- 
GREE. 

The alternate courses in the Junior or Senior 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

year may be credited on the Master's work, if not 
already credited in the bachelor's work. 



VII. THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE. 
PROFESSOR WALMSLEY. 

While no extended work in the Social Sciences 
can be attempted in the time allotted to this depart- 
ment, it is believed that thorough, honest work is 
done, and an insight into problems as well as an ap- 
preciation of the complexity of modern social life 
is eained. 



ts' 



JUNIOR. 

The work in Economics, which is required of all 
Juniors, is given for about half the year to theoreti- 
cal Economics, and an attempt is made to set forth 
clearly the present condition of economic thought. 
This is followed by a more practical course in which 
some phase of economic thought is developed more 
at length. During the past year the nature and 
functions of money and credit were studied. Two 
hours. 

Text -Books — Ely's Outlines of Economics; Bogart's Eco- 
nomic History of the United States. 

SENIOR. 

In the Senior year two courses are ofifered. The 
first, which is required of all Seniors, is in Political 
Science, and, after studying our own government as 
it is, takes up the outlines of the government of 
England, and thus lays the foundation for intelligent 
political criticism. Three hours. 



82 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Text-Books — I. Bryce's American Commonwealth; 
Lowell's Government of England. 

II. Garner's Introduction to Political Science; 
Beard's American Government and Politics. 

The work of the second course, which is elective 
for all degrees, is a study of the elementary prin- 
ciples of Sociology, and of their application to cur- 
rent questions. After a theoretical course in the 
study of Society as a scientific phenomenon, some 
of the problems of our present Social organization 
are studied in detail. Two hours. 

Text-Books — Dealy's Sociology; Ross's Social Control; 
Wright's Practical Sociology. 



VIII. DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND LATIN. 

PROFESSOR SWARTZ. 

MISS LINFIELD. 

It is believed that for the average under-grad- 
uate the study of Latin and Greek subserves in a 
marked degree the primary object of education. 
This primary object is to give one such mastery 
over one's own mind as to enable him to focus his 
thoughts with intentness and at will upon problems 
of intrinsic difficulty. The aim of this department 
will be so to shape the work as to endeavor to ac- 
complish this result. To this end thoroughness and 
accuracy in all the courses will be insisted upon so 
that the solution of the linguistic problems which 
arise may be effected upon the basis of knowledge, 
and not upon that of conjecture. The character of 
the work of each year is clearly shown by the fol- 
lowing outline. 

The aim of the work of the Freshman and Soph- 
omore classes is to train the student toward reading 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

Greek and Latin with ease and accuracy. To this 
end the authors read will serve as a basis for an ac- 
curate and thorough review of forms, syntax, and 
case relations, and to the acquisition of a vocabu- 
lary. A literary appreciation of the authors studied 
will be sought and their influence upon modern lit- 
erature emphasized. 

An entrance credit of at least three units in 
Latin and at least two units in Greek is required 
for admission to the work of this department. 

Both Freshman and Sophomore cla-sses meet 
three times a week. 

FRESHMAN. 
Latin. 

Text-Books — virgiTs Aeneid (six books;; Livy, Books 
I, XXT, XXII; Grammar (Bennetfs; ; The Latin Verb 
(Swartz) ; Dactylic Hexameter; Prose Composition, 
Gayley's Classic Myths. 

Greek, 

Lysias (selected orations); Plato, Apology and Crito; 
Homer, Iliad or Odyssey (two books). Study of 
Epic Forms; Prosody; Prose Composition; Gram- 
mar (Goodwin); Gayley's; Classic Myths. 

SOPHOMORE. 

Latin. 

Text-Books — Horace, Odes and Epodes (Bennett) ; Sa- 
tires and Epistles (Kirkland) ; Cicero, de Amicitia; 
Pliny's Letters; Prose Composition; Literature (Wil- 
kins) ; The Private Life of the Romans, Preston and 
Dodge. 

Greek. 

Homer, Iliad or Odyssey continued,— six books; Hero- 



84 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

dolus, Books VI and VII; Euripides, Alcestis, Meters: 
Grammar; Prose Composition; Literature (Jebb). 

JUNIOR. 

In the Junior and Senior years the effort will 
be continually made to instil into the minds of the 
students an enthusiasm for Greek and Latin litera- 
ture; to show him that the literature of antiquity is 
not a dead, impassive something, but that in it there 
pulsates a fiery glow and genial warmth unequaled 
in the literature of modern times. The authors read 
will be expected, each in his several ways, to con- 
tribute his quota towards the accomplishment of 
this result. 

Latin. 

Course A. — Early English History based upon Taci- 
tus, Agricola and Annals ; Caesar and Sueton- 
ius. Parallel reading; ]\Ierivale's Rome. 
Plautus and Terence: One play each; Meters 
of Plautus and Terence; Prose Composition. 
Literature, Mackail. 

Course B. — Early History of Germany based upon 
Tacitus, Germania and Annals ; Parallel read- 
ing, Merivale's Rome. 

Plautus and Terence: One play each; Prose 
Composition; Literature, Mackail; JMeters ci 
Comedy. 

Course C. — Latin History: Livy, Caesar, Sallust, 
Tacitus and Suetonius. Some topic, such for 
example as the foundation of the Empire, or the 
reign of Claudius will be selected for discussion 
and research. 

Course D. — Latin Poetry: Horace, Catullus, Pro- 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 85 

pertius, Virgil, Ovid and Juvenal, etc. Some 
field of Latin poetry, such for example as Lyric, 
Epic or Satiric, will be selected for study. Tbe 
field so chosen will be exhausted as far as pos- 
sible. 

Course A was offered in 1910-11. 
Course B will be offered in 1911-12. 
Course C or D will be offered in 1911-12 as Senior 
or M. A. work. .; , 

Greek. 

Course A. — Attic Orators. History of their times. 
Texts: Tarbell's Philippics of Demosthenes; 
Tyler's Olynthiacs ; Jebb's Attic Orators. 

The Lyric Poets:. Tyler's I yric Poets. Prose 
Composition. 

Course B. — Attic History. Herodotus, Thucydides, 
Xenophon ; Texts : Morris' Thucydides, I ; 
Manatt's Hellenica, I-I V ; Xenophon's Agesi- 
laus. Prose Composition. 

Course C. — The Drama. Its Plistory and Develop- 
ment; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound. Persae; 
Sophocles, Oedipus Rex; Euripides, Medea, 
Pleracleidae ; Aristophanes, Aves or Xubes. 

Course D. — -Epic Poetry. A thorough study of Ho- 
meric Literature, consisting of : The Homeric 
Hymns, the Batrachomyomachia, the Iliad, 
Odyssey, the Epic Cycle, etc. 

Course A w^as oft'ered in 1910-1911. 
Course B will be offered in 1911-1912. 
Course C or D will be offered in 1911-1912 as Se- 
nior or M. A. work. 



86 MI LISA PS COLLEGE 

FOR GRADUATES. 

See requirements for M. A. work — page 52. 
In both Latin and Greek for 1911-1912, Courses C. 
and D. will be offered as graduate work. 

COURSE IN BIBLE GREEK. 

As many of our Bible students go out into the 
active work of the ministry without having the ad- 
vantages of a Theological Seminary, it has been 
thought advisable to offer a course in Bible Greek. 
The course as outlined on page 58 is offered as a 
substitute for a Junior Course in Classic Greek. 

Since a thorough appreciation ol Hellenistic 
Greek from a linguistic standpoint cannot be had 
without an accurate knowledge of Classic Greek, 
students will be discouraged from taking this course 
who have not finished the Sophomore year in Classic 
Greek. Furthermore no student will be encouraged 
to take this course in Bible Greek who is not look- 
ing to the ministry as his life work, for this course 
is in no way intended as a substitute for more dif- 
ficult Greek. 

The method of instruction will be to find out the 
exact meaning of the passage in hand by a close 
scrutiny of the words, by a comparison of the words 
with their uses in other passages, and by a discus- 
sion of their meaning in the classic period. Ancient 
customs and manners will be laid under requisition 
to explain all kindred references in the text ; in short, 
everything will be done to elucidate the passage un- 
der discussion, and to bring out its meaning lin- 
guistically. The course is not designed to be the- 
olos:ical. Two courses will be offered : 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 87 

(a) The Gospels. 

(b) The letters of Paul, and Acts. 

Text-Books — Burton's Moods and Tenses; Westcott and 
Hort's Text of the Greek Bible; Gardiner's Princi- 
ples of Textual Criticism; Meyer's Commentary on 
Acts; Coneybeare and Howson's Life of Paul; Davis's 
The Story of the Nazarene; Matthew's History of 
New Testament Times in Palestine. 

Note. — It is the purpose of the Professor each 
year to deliver to the students a lecture on some 
topic connected with the work of his Department. 
In 1911-12 the subject will be, "Socrates: His Life, 
Work and Times." 

IX. THE SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 

PROESSOR KERN. 

MISS WHITSON 

The aim of the four years' course in English is 
three-fold — to teach English composition, to study 
the origin and development of the English language 
and literature, and to interpret and appreciate Eng- 
lish literature. 

FRESHMAN. 

After a rapid review of the essentials of compo- 
sition and rhetoric, in which stress is placed chiefly 
upon correctness and clearness, the more technical 
aspects of composition are studied in detail. Daily 
and weekly exercises serve to enforce the principles 
of the text-book. During the spring term selections 
from American literature are read wath the purpose 
of developing literary appreciation and the love of 
good literature. Especial attention is given to Poe 



88 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

and Hawthorne. Parallel reading is assigned 
throughout the year. Three hours. 

Text-Books — Woolley, Handbook of Composition; La- 
mont, English Composition; Poe, Poems and Talcs 
(Trent) ; Poe, Prose Talcs (Macmillan's Pocket Clas- 
sics) ; Hawthorne, Twice Told Tales (Scott) ; Long- 
fellow, Tales of a Wayside Inn (R. L. S.) ; Stevenson, 
Treasure Island (Broadus), Kidnapped (Brown); 
Cooper, The Spy. 

SOPHOMORE. 

The object of this course is to give the student 
a general view of the history and development of 
English literature from the Old English period to 
the present, preparatory to the study of special 
periods and topics. Parallel with the development 
of the literature, select poems, essays, and novels 
are studic-l. In the spring term a short course in 
Shakespeare is given, in which stress is laid upon 
plot and character development, and upon methods 
of interpretation. Exercises in short story writing 
are required throughout the year. Three hours. 

Text-Books — IMoody and Lovett, First View of English 
Literature; Pancoast, Standard English Poems; 
Lamb, Essays of Elia (Wauchope) ; Stevenson, Es- 
says (Phelps) ; Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities 
(Moore) ; Thackeray, Henry Esmond (R. L. S.) ; Eliot, 
Adam Bede; Henry IV, Pt. I (Moorman); Hamlet 
(Black and George) ; Macbeth (Black and George) ; 
As You Like It (Hudson). 

JUNIOR. 

During the first half year the essentials of Old 
English phonology and grammar are taught by 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

means of text-books and lectures, and selections 
from Old English prose and poetry are read. Par- 
allel work will be assigned in the history of the lan- 
giaage. For the remainder of tlie year the work is 
in Chaucer. Three hours. 

Text-Books — Smith, Old English Grammar; Sweet, An- 
glo-Saxon Primer; Greenough and Kittredge, Words 
and Their Ways; Chaucer, Prologue, Knight's Tale, 
Nun's Priest's Tale (Mather) ; Chaucer, The Tale of 
the Man of Lawe, The Pardoneres Tale, etc., 
(Skeat) ; Root, The Poetry of Chaucer. 

SENIOR. 

In this course the class spends the entire year 
in the study of a single author. During the present 
year Tennyson has been studied ; next year the 
course will be in Browning. Three essays are re- 
quired during the year. Two hours. 

Text-Books — I. Works of Tennyson (Globe j ; Benson, 
Life of Tennyson; Lytton, Harold. 

II. Works of Browning (Globe) ; Orr, Robert 
Browning; Life and Letters; Brooke, The Poetry of 
Robert Browning; Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Se- 
lected Poems (Lee). 



X. THE SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR J. M. BURTON. 
FRESHMAN. 

It is assumed that the student of French and 
German shall have acquired in an elementary course 
the fundamental principles of grammar and pro- 



90 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

nunciation, and also a fair facility in translation. 
An entrance credit of at least one Carnegie unit is 
required for admission to the work in either French 
or German. The aim of the Freshman year is to 
complete a standard grammar in each subject, with 
weekly exercises and further work on pronunciation, 
and to enable the student to read, French and Ger- 
man fluently. Sight-reading will be stressed in the 
second term. 

Text-Books — German. Whitney's German Grammar; 
Bacon's Im Vaterland; Baumbach's Der Schwieger- 
sohn; Freytag's Die Journalisten. 
French — Fraser and Squair's Freqich Grammar; 
Merimee's Columba; Maupassant; Ten Short Sto- 
ries; Hugo's La Chute; Sand's La Mare au Diable. 

SOPHOMORE. 

The work of the Sophomore year is similar to 
that of the Freshman but is conducted less from a 
grammatical standpoint ; its purpose is to widen the 
horizon of the student by giving him a first-hand 
knowledge of some other literature and people than 
his own. With some standard work as a basis, an 
effort will be made to introduce the student to the 
principal features and personalities of the French 
and German literatures. 

Text-Books — German. Lessing's Emilia Galotti; Heine's 
Die Harzreise; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; Goethe's 
Faust; Moore's German Literature; Sidwick's 
Home Life in Germany. 

French — Gorneilie Le Cid; Racine's Athalie; Mo- 
liere's Le Misanthrope; Warren's French Prose 
of the XVII Century; Hugo's Hernani; Augier's L3 
Cendre de M. Poirier; Balzac: Cinq Scenes de la 
Gomedie Humaine; Duval's Histoire de la Littera- 
ture Francaise; Wendell's France of To-day. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 91 

JUNIOR. 

A fourth year will be given in both French and 
German if there is sufficient demand. These courses 
are Junior or Senior electives, but no student may 
offer both Junior French and Junior German for thv^* 
same degree. 

These courses are intended as aids to the study 
of Composition Literature. Reading, though nec- 
essarily rapid, will attempt to cover at least one 
representative work of each school. In lectures 
and conferences there will be an endeavor to give 
in addition a general view of the entire field. 

Textr-Books — German. Scherer's and Kuno Francke's 
Histories ol' German Literature; the Contemporary 
Drama; Hauptman, Suderman, Wildenbruch, Fulda; 
the reaction from Realism, Seidel and the Idyllic 
School. 

French — Fortier's History of French Literature; se- 
lected chapters of Saintsbury's French Literature; 
the Development of Romanticism, Victor Hugo; the 
Realists and Balzac; Naturalism, Zola; the Sym- 
bolist; Neo-Romanticism, Rostand. 



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94 MI LISA PS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF PROFESSIONAL 

EDUCATION 

THE LAW SCHOOL. 

THE FACULTY 

DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S., M. S. 
PRESIDENT. 

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D. 

Secretary. 

MIFFLIN WYATT SAVARTZ, M. A., Ph. D. 
Treasurer. 

EDWARD MAYES, LL. D. 
Dean. 
For fourteen and a hall' years Professor of Law in the 
State University. 

ALBERT WHITFIELD, LL. D. 
Professor. 

Justice in the Supreme Court: for three and a half 
years Professor of Law in the State University. 

WILLIAM R. HARPER, Esq. 
Professor. 

The work of the school will be distributed be- 
tween the instructors as follows : 

1. Professor Whitfield.^ — The Law of Evidence; 

Criminal Law^; Criminal Procedure; Law of 
Corporations ; Constitutional , Law ; Federal 
Courts, Jurisdiction and Practice; Conflict of 
Laws ; the Law of Real Property. 

2. Professor Harper — The Law of Pleading- and 

Practice, Personal Property, Commercial Law, 
Contracts, Torts, Statute Law; Equity Juris- 
prudence; Equity Pleading. Practice. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 95 

(General Unformahou 

In the original foundation of ^lillsaps College 
it was designed by its promoters to establish, in due 
season, and when the success of the Literary De- 
partment should be assured, a Department of Pro- 
fessional Education, embodying a Law and a The- 
ological School. 

In the year 1896, the time came when, in the 
judgment, of the trustees, it was possible and pro- 
per to establish the Law Department. Accordingly, 
they directed that at the beginning of the next ses- 
sion, the doors of this institution should be opened 
for the students of ^law, and Profesor Edward Mayes 
was engaged to take the active control and instruc- 
tion of that class. 

CXir law school was not, even then, in any sense 
an e>:periment. Before the step was determined 
on, a respectable class v\-as already secured for the 
first session. Doctor Mayes came to us with four- 
teen 3''-ears experience as a lavv^ professor in the State 
University, and with a reputation for ability and 
skill as an instructor which was thoroughly estab- 
lished. He had already secured the assistance of a 
number of most accomplished lawyers who prom- 
ised to deliver occasional lectures, thus adding 
greatly to the interest and variety of instruction of- 
fered. 

The total attendance during the first, year was 
twenty-eight,of whom fifteen were classed as Sen- 
iors. At the expiration of the college year, fifteen 
students presented themselves to the Hon. 
H. C. Conn, Chancellor, presiding over the Chancery 
Court, for examination for license to practice law 
in conformity with the requirments of the Anno- 



96 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

tated Code of 1S92. They were subjected to a rigid 
written examination in open court, and their an- 
swers were, as law directs, forwarded by the Chan- 
cellor to the Supreme Judges. Every applicant 
passed the ordeal successfully and received his li- 
cense. We are now closing the fifteenth annual ses- 
sion of our Law School, and no student has failed 
in any year to pass the examination and receive his 
license. We point with pride to the results. AVc 
now have two hundred and ten graduates. 

The nature of the examination passed, being 
held by the Chancellor in his official character, puts 
beyond question or cavil the genuineness of that re- 
sult. We do not ask of our patrons or those who 
contemplate becoming our patrons to accept any 
statement of our own. The finding and the state- 
ment are those of the Judicial Department of the 
State; and every law graduate of Millsaps College 
stands before the world endorsed, not by the College 
alone, which is much, but also by the State itself, 
speaking through its Chancellors. This is more 
than can be said for any other young lawyer in the 
State. None others have such a double approval as 
a part of their regular course. 

The location of the school at Jackson enables 
the managers to oft"er to the students extraordinary 
advantages, in addition to the institution itseli. 
Here is located the strongest bar in the State, whose 
management of their cases in court, and whose ar- 
guments will furnish an invaluable series of object 
lessons and an unfailing fountain of instruction to 
the students. Here also are located courts of all 
kinds known in the State, embracing not only the 
ordinary Municipal and the Circuit and Chancery 
Courts, but also the United States Court and the 
Supreme Court. Thus the observant student may 
follow the history and course of cases in actual liti- 



MILLS.-IPS COLLEGE 97 

gation from the lower tribunal to the .highest, and 
observe in their practical operation the nice distinc- 
tion between the State and Federal jurisdiction and 
practice. Here also is located the extensive and val- 
uable State Law Library, unequalled in the State, 
the privileges of which each student may enjoy 
without cost. Here, too, where the Legislature con- 
venes every second year, the student has an oppor- 
tunity, without absenting himself from his school, 
to witness the deliberations of>that body and observe 
the passage of the laws which, in after life, he may 
be called upon to study and apply; thus he acquires 
a knowledge of the methods and practice of legisla- 
tion. 

Applicants for admission to the Junior class 
must be at least nineteen years of age ; those for 
admission to the Senior class must be at least twen- 
ty. Students may enter the Junior class without 
any preliminary examination, a good English ele- 
mentary education being all that is required. Stu- 
dents may enter the Senior class upon satisfactory 
examination on the matter of the Junior course or 
its equivalent. No student will be graduated on 
less than five months of actual attendance in the 
school. 

Each student will be required to present satis- 
factory certificates of good moral character. 

Each student will be required to pay a tuition 
fee upon entrance, of fifty dollars, for the session's 
instruction. No rebate of this fee will be made, 
because a student may desire to attend for a period 
less than a full session. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The full course of study will consist of two 
years, the Junior and Senior, each comprising forty 
weeks, five exercises per week. 

The instruction will consist mainly of daily ex- 



98 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

amination of the students on lessons assigned in 
standard text-books. Formal written lectures will 
not be read. The law is too abtruse to be learned 
in that way. The professor will accompany the 
examination by running comments upon the text, 
illustrating and explaining it, and showing how the 
law as therein stood has bc^n modified or reversed 
by recent adjudications and legislation. 

The course will be carefully planned and con- 
ducted so as to meet the requirements of the Mis- 
sissippi law in respect to the admission of applicants 
to practice law, by examination before the Chan- 
cery Court, and will therefore embrace all the titles 
prescribed by Law for that examination, viz: (i) 
The Law of Real Property; (2) The Law of Per- 
sonal Property; (3) The Law of Pleading and Evi- 
dence; (4) The Commercial Law; (5) The Criminal 
Law; (6) Chancery and Chancery Pleadings; (7) 
The Statute Law of the State ; (8) The Constitution 
of the State and the United States. 

The objects set for accomplishment by thi>) 
school are two : 

First, to prepare young men for examination 
for license to practice law, ,in such manner as both 
to ground them thoroughly in elementary legal 
principles and also to prepare them for examination 
for license with assurance of success ; Secondly, to 
equip them for actual practice by higher range of 
legal scholarship than what is merely needed for a 
successful examination for license. Therefore, our 
course of study is so arranged as fully to meet both 
of these ends. 

First : The curriculum of the Junior class will 
embrace each of the eight subjects on which the ap- 
plicant for license is required by the Code to be ex- 
amined. A careful, detailed, and adequate course is 
followed, so that any student, even although he shall 
never have read any law before coming to us, if he 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 99 

will apply himself with reasonable fidelity, can go 
before the Chancellor at the expiration of his Junior 
year, with a certainty of success. The preparation 
of applicants for license in one year, will be in short, 
a specialty of this school. 

When the student shall have completed his Ju- 
nior year, he will have open to him either one of two 
courses : He may stand his examination for license 
before the Chancellor, or he may stand his examina- 
tion before the law professor simply for advanc- 
ment to the Senior Class if he does not care to stand 
for license at that time. If he shall be examined 
before the Chancellor and pass, he will be admitted 
to the Senior class, of course, and without further 
examination, in case he shall desire to finish his 
course with us and take a degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. On the other hand, if he prefer to post- 
pone his examination for license, he can be examined 
by the professor for advancement merely, and stand 
his test for license at the hands of the court at 
the end of the Senior year. 

As stated above the Senior year is designed to 
give to the student a broader and deeper culture 
than is needed only for examination for license. It 
is not strictly speaking, a post-graduate course, 
since it must be taken before graduation, but it is a 
post-licentiate course, and the degree conferred at its 
conclusion represents that much legal accomplish- 
ment in excess of the learning needed for license to 
practice. 

The Senior class is required to attend the reci- 
tations of the Junior Class by way of review, and to 
be prepared for daily questioning on the daily les- 
sons of the Junior Class. 

Moot courts will be conducted under the direc- 
tion of the professor in charge, in which the young 
men will be carefully instructed and drilled in the 
practical conduct of cases. 



100 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President. 

R. B. RICKETTS Jackson 

Vice President. 

T. J, McLAURIN Canton 

Secretary. 
AIMEE HEMINGWAY Jackson 

Annual Orator for 1911. 
H.S.STEVENS Hattiesburg 



CLASS OF 1895. 

Bacheior of Arts. 

Austin, Francis Marion, Attorney Houston, Texas 

Bachelors of Science. 

Lilly, John Gill, Physician Vidalia, La, 

Stevens, Hiram Stuart, Attorney Hattiesburg 

CLASS OF 1896. 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Applewhite, Jos. Anderson, Physician Portland, Ore. 

Calhoun, Jesse Thompson, County Superintendent, Mt. Olive 

Green, Stith Gordon, Physician Deceased 

McCormick, Aquila John, County Supt. Attorney, . . Deceased 

CLASS OF 1897. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Alford, Lucius Edwin, Minister . . Lotrgbeash 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 101 

Catching, Walter Wilroy, Physician Georgetown 

Fitzhugh, William Henry, Attorney Memphis, Tenn. 

Jones, William Burwell, Minister Gulfport 

McLauiiin, Daniel Gilmer, Sec'y. Y. M. C. A Cantorr 

Power, George Boyd, Attorney Jackson 

* The S'ccretary of the Faculty- will esteem it a favor if any 
errors in this list are reported to him. 

bachelor of Science. 

Pointer, Monroe, Merchant Como 

Bachelors of Laivs. 

Austin, Francis Marion, Attorney Houston, Texas 

Hardy, John Crumpton, Pres. A. & M. College .... StarkviUe 

Hughes, William Houston, Lawyer Raleigh 

Gulledge, Walter Abner, Attorney Monticello, Ark. 

Hyde, John Quitman, Attorney Greensburg. La. 

McCormick, Aquila John, Attorney Deceased 

McNeil, Myron Sibbie, District Attornev- . , Crystal Springs 

Naul, Julius Alford, Attorney Gloster 

• Peets, Richard Davis, Attorney Natchez 

Ratliff, Paul Dinsmore, Attorney Raymond 

Robinson, Edgar Gayle, Attorney Raleigh 

Scott, Walter Hamlin, Attorney Houston, Texas 

Ward, Robert Lowrey, Attorney Sumner 

Williams, William, Attorney General Deceased 

CLJSS OF i8c8. 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Alford, James Blair, Bookkeeper Ncrfield 

Andrews, Charles Girault, Physician Memphis, Tenn. 

Clifton, Percy Lee, Attorney Jackson 

Green, Garner Wynn, Attorney Jackson 

Hilzim, Albert George, Ccmmercial Traveler . . . . Jackson 
Locks, Blackshear Hamilton, Professor Mathematics 

■, I in High School Oklahoma City 

McGehee, John Lucius, Physician Memphis, Tenr". 



102 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Shannon, Alexander Harvey Nashville, Tenn. 

Bachelors of Science. 

Bradley, William Hampton, Farmer Flora 

Green, Wharton, Electrical Engineer New York 

Ricketts, Robert Barron, Attorney Jackson 

Teat, George Lee, Attornej- Houston, Texas 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Stafford, Thomas Edwin, Phj'sician Vossburg 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Dent, Robert Lowrey, Attorney Vicksburg 

D«t)-, Lemuel Humphries, Attcrnej- Jackson 

Edwards, John Price, AttorBrey Eklwards 

Fitzhiigh, Louis, T. Jr., Attorney Memphis, Tenn. 

Harris, Garrard, Attorney, Claim Agent I, C. R. R., Jackson 

King, Bee, Attorney Mendenhall 

May, Geo. William, Attorney M.J. & K. C. R. R.Jackson 

Nugent, William Le^vis, Attorney Jackson 

Sykes, John Lundy, Commercial Traveler, Memphis, Tenn. 

Teat, George Lee, Attorney Houston, Texas 

Wadsworth, Harvey Earnest, Attorney Meridian 

CLASS OF 1899. 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Brogan, Wm. Edward Mabry, Minister Starkville 

Carley, Henry Thompson, Minister . . . . . . New Orleans, La. 

Dobyns, Ashbel Webster, Professor Little Rock, Ark. 

Jones, Harris Allen, Meteorologist . . Wagon Wheel Gap, Col. 

Wall, Edward Leonard Deceased 

W^all, James Percy, Phjsician Jackson 

Watkins, Herbert Brown, Minister Magnolia 

Bachelor of Science 

Harrell, Geo. Lott, President Mansfield Female College, 

Mansfield, La. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 103 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Lewis, John Tillery, Minister Clarksdale 

Bachelors of Laws. 

•Clifton, 'Pctfcy Lee, Attorne>' Jackson 

Corle>', William Urbin, Attorney Collin? 

Fitzhugh, William Henry, Attorney Memphis, Tenn. 

Green, Garner Wiynn, Attorney Jackson 

Hall, Robert Samuel, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Humphries, Robert Earl, Attorney Gulfport 

Leverett, Herschel Victor, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Power, George Boyd, Attorney Jackson 

Livingston, William Hienry, Attorney Burns 

Siraonton, William Wallace, Auditor's Clerk Jackson 

Terry, Eugene, Editor Magcc 

CLASS OF 1900. 

Bachelors of Arts'. 

Chambers, Morris Andrews, Electrical Engineer . . McHenry 

Galloway, Ethelbert Hines, Physician Jackson 

Galloway, James Ford, Civil Engineer Gulfport 

Holloman, Thomas Wynn, Attorney Alexandra, La. 

Holmes, Wm. Walter, Minister New Orleans, La. 

Lemly, Thos. Mitchell, Sec'y. Y. M, C. A, . . Americus, Ga, 

Lewis, Henry Polk, Jr., Minister Natchez 

Marshall, Thos. Eubanks, Minister Hermitage, Tenn. 

Mitchiell, James Boswell, Minister . . . . Guthrie, Oklahoma 
Teat, James Asgill, Attorney Kosciusko 

Bachelors of Science. 

Burwell, Stephen Luse, Bank Cashier Lexingt(MJ 

Clark, William Thomas, Bookkeeper Yazoo City 

Kennon, William Lee, Professor of Chemistry .... University 

Bachelor of Philosofhy. 

Guice, Clarence Norman, Minister Summit 



104 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Bailey, Frank Moye, Attorney Chickasha, Okla. 

Brown, Edgar Lee, Attorney Yazoo City 

Cannon, Robert Lee, Attorney Brookhaven 

Cranford, William Leroy, Attorney Seminary 

Currie, Daniel Theodore, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Currie, Neal Theophilus, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Dabney, Joseph Bowmar, County Supt. Education, Vicksburg 

Graham, Desmond Marvin, Attorney Gulfport 

Haley, Lovick Pierce, Attorney Okolona 

Harrell, Elisha Brj-an, Attorney Canton 

Ricketts, Robert Barron, Attorney Jackson 

Wilson, Hardy Jasper, Attorney Hazlehurst 

Stone, Thomas Beasley, Attorney Fayette 

Teat, James Asgill, Attorney Kosciusko 

Terry, Samuel David, Teacher Texas 

Wells, William Calvin, Jr., Attorney Jackson 

CLASS OF 1 901. 
Master of Science. 

Harrell, Geo. Lott, President Mansfield Female College, 

Mansfield, La. 

Kennon, William Lee, Professor of Chemistrv- . . University 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Clark, Robert Adolphus, Minister Okolona 

Cunningham, Henry Thomas, Minister . . . . Orange, Texas 
Eaton, Barney Edvpard, Attorney G. & S. L R. R., Gulfport 

Felder, Luther Watson, Farmer McComb 

Hfearst, Albert Angelo, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Holloman, Leon Catching, Real Estate Jacksoe 

McCafferty, James Thomas, Minister MooreheaJ 

White, Holland Otis, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Bachelors of Science. 

Rkketts, Ed^Yard Burnley, Chemist Pittsburg 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 105 

Sivley, Hamilton Fletcher, Cashier Braxton 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Ewing, John Sharp, Physician Vicksburg 

Fridge, Harry Greenwell, Physician Sanford 

Neblett, Robert Paine, Minister Tunica 

Vaughan, Janies Albert, Medical Student Virginia 

Whittington, Ebbie Ouchterlcney, Merchant Gloster 

Bachelors of Laivs. 

Aby, Hulette Fuqua, Attorney Luna, Okla. 

Everett, Frank Edgar, Attorney Meadville 

Glass, Frederick Marion, Attorney Vaiden 

Fridge, Arthur Warrington, Adjutant General . . . . Jackson 

Holcomb, Joel Richard, Editor Purvis 

Holloman, Thomas W}-nn, Attorney Alexandria, La, 

Lemly, Thomas Mitchell, Sec'y. Y. M. C. A., Americus, Ga. 

Magruder, James Douglass, Attorney Canton 

Millsaps, Reuben Webster, Attorney Hazlehurst 

Pearce, John Magruder, Attorney Dallas, Texas 

Strieker, Vince John, Attorney Jackson 

Thompson, Robert Patterson, Attorney Jackson 

CLASS OF 1902. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Countiss, John Richard, Minister Aberdeen 

Duren, William Larkin, Minister Tupelo 

Fairley, Albert Langley, Sec'y. La. Life Ins. Co., New Orleans 

Galloway, George Marvin, Dentist Canton 

Howell, John Blanch, Physician Canton 

Potter, Clayton Daniel, Attorney Jackson 

Scott, Mrs. Mary Letitia (Holloman) Itta Bena 

Simpson, Claude Mitchell, Minister Texas 

Thompson, Allen, Attorney Jackson 

Tillman, James Davis, Jr., Bookkeeper Carrollton 

Bachelors of Science. 

Clark, Henrj^ LaFayette, Bookkeeper . . . . New Orleans, La. 



106 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Hart, Leonard, Physician Omaha, Neb. 

Williams, Walton Albert, Teacher Philippines 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Jordan, Pope, Pharmacist Welch, La. 

Bachelors of Laivs, 

Banks, George Hansel, Attorney Newton 

Carr, John Davis Meridian 

Conn, Abe Heath, Attorney Hazlehurst 

Davis, Wm. Stanson, Jr Waynesboro 

Fatheree, John Davis Pachuta 

Ford, Wrr^ Columbus Bezer 

Hearst, Albert Angelo, Attorney Hattiesbur^ 

Hilton, R. T., Attorney Mendenhall 

James, Thomas Richmond, Attorney Lucedale 

Matthews, John Reed, Attorney Meridian 

Mount, Bernard Slaton, Attorney Vicksburg 

Russell, James Colon Raleigh 

Thompson, Oscar Greaves Jackson 

Torrey, Victor Hugo, County Supei^intendent . . . . Meadville 
Upton, Warren, Attorney Hattiesburg 

CLASS OF 1903. 

Master of Arts. 

Scott, Mrs. Mary Letitia (Holloman) Itta Bena 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Cook, William Felder, Attorney Hattiesburg 

Easterling, Lamar, Attorney Jackson 

Ellison, Alfred Moses, Postal Clerk Jackson 

Enochs, DeWitt Carroll, Attorney Mendenhall 

Gunter, Felix Eugene, Agt Penn Mut. Life Ins. Co., Jackson 
Heidelberg, Harvey Brown, City Superintendent, Clarksdale 

Lewis, Osmond Summers, Minister Hattiesburg 

Mellen, Frederic Davis, Prof. English, A. & M. Col., Starkvillc 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 107 

Merritt, Walter McDonald, Physician Asylum 

Roscoe, Gtorge Nobles, Teacher Morton 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Burnley, Mrs. Janie (Millsaps) Hazlehurst 

Cameron, Allen Smith, Minister Centralia, Okla. 

Grant, Felix Williams, Book-keeper Delta, La, 

Hemingway, Aimee Jackson 

Bachelors of Laivs. 

Anderson, E. A., Attorney Hattiesburg 

Austin, Henry Lewis, Attorney Philadelphia 

Bennett, Robert EH, Attorney Meadville 

Clark, John A., Attorney Decatur 

Cow^art, Joseph Oliver, Attorney Rolling Fork 

Cranford, Tandy Walker, Attorney Seminary 

Eaton, Barney Edward, District Attorney Gulfpori 

Hilton, W. J>., Attorney Mendenhall 

Holder, James Wilson, Attorney Bay Springs 

Johnson, Paul B., Circuit Judge Hattiesburg 

McLaurin, H. L Mount Olive 

Montgomery, James Terrell, Attorney Taylorsville 

Richardson, E. S Philadelphia 

Russell, Peter Franklin Raleigh 

Russell, Richard C Magee 

Tew, William Asa Mount Olive 

Thomson, John Lawrence Sylvarena 

Touchstone, Isaac Powell Braxton 

CLASS OF 1904. 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Alexander, Charlton Augustus, Attorney Jackson 

Bingham. David LeRoy, Cashier, Bank Carrollton 

Bowman, William Chapman, Attorney Natchez 

Cooper, Ellis Bowman, Attorney Newton 

Frantz, Dolph Griffin, City Clerk Shreveport, La. 

Henry, Miller Craft, Physician Gulfport 

Kennedy, James Madison, Teacher Shubuta 



108 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Langley, William Marvin, Minister Water Valley 

Penix, Joseph Hudson, Attorney Jackson 

Ridgway, Charles Robert, Jr., Attorney Jackson 

Wasson, Lovick Pinkney, Minister Friars Point 

Bachelors of Science. 

Crane, Louise Enders Jackson 

Welch, Benton Zachariah, Physician Wool Market 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Chambers, John Clanton, Minister Ellisville 

Lewis, James Marvin, Minister Vancleave 

Terry, Walter Anderson, Minister Bolton 

Bachelors of Lavjs. 

Easterling, Lamar, Attorney Jackson 

Grice, Luther E . • Tyrus 

Hallam, Louis C, Attorney Jackson 

Hamiltjon, Charles Buck, Attorney Jackson 

Hillman, James B Beech Springs 

Jones, Jesse David Newton 

May, Joseph Albert Mendenhall 

McDonald, D. K., Attorney Augusta 

Mortimer, Thornton E., Attorney Belzoni 

Parker, Hubert Perkinston 

Penix, Joseph Hudson, Attorney Jacksion 

Pierce, W. S Hattiesburg 

Reddock, Charles Frazier Brassfield 

Watkins, Henry Vaughan, Attorney Jackson 

West, William Warren Rickston 

CLASS OF 1905. 
Bachelors of Arts. 

Allen, Ernest Brackstone, Principal High School, Prentiss 
Carruth, Joseph Enoch, Jr., Principal High School, Fayette 

Duncan, William Nioah, Minister Batesville 

Fikes, Robert Pain, Minister Ocean Springs 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 109 

Graham, Sanford Martin, Attorney DeKalb 

Hand, Albert Powe, Physician Shubuta 

McGee, Jesse Walter, Minister Jackson 

Pittman, Marvin Summers, Parish Supt. Education, 

Principal High School Nachitoches, La. 

Purcell, James Sliceir, Jr., Minister Florence 

Ricketts, John Baxter, Attorney Jackson 

Simmons, Talmage Voltaire, Attorney Sallia 

Bachelor of Science 

Barrier, Leonidas Forister, Physician Delta, La. 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Bradley, Osborn Walker, Minister Holly Springs 

Bradley, Theophllus Marvin, Minister Jonesboro 

Hall, James Nicholas, Principal High School . . . . Starkville 
Weems, William LaFayette, Jr., Merchant Shubuta 

Bachelors of Laivs. 

Allen, Norman Rudolph Fayette 

Austin, William Harrison Oxford 

Backstrom, John Walton Merrill 

Bradford, J. Wl, Attorney Itta Bena 

Currie, O. W., Attorney Mount Olive 

Daws, J. H., Attorney Columbus 

Jones, Raymond Edgar, Atorney Philadelphia 

Langston, R. F Aberdeen 

McFarland, John Alexander Bay Springs 

Merrell, Green Huddleston Collins 

Pegram, Thomas Edward, Attorney Ripley 

Pcsey, Louis Lonzo Moorehead 

Robertson, M. M., Attorney A. & V. R. R., . . . . Vicksburg 

Smith, J. D Meridian 

Smile, J. A., Attorney Meridian 

Stewart, Z. C Biloxi 

Sumrall, Neadom Walter Hazlehurst 

Sylverstein, B. S Vicksburg 

Thompson, M., Merchant New Orleans 



110 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Tullos, R. S Rollins 

Upton, J Poplarville 



CLASS OF 1906. 



Bachelors of Arts. 



Carr, Robert Bradley, Merchant Pontatoc 

Lewis, Evarr Drew, Ministerial Student . . Nashville, Tenn. 

McGilvray, Ethel Clayton, Minister Iowa 

Mohler, Elisha Grisgby, Jr., Minister Gulf port 

Park, Frances Virginia, Professor High School . . . . Jackson 

Bachelors of Science. 

Baker, Joseph Atkins, Teacher Edwards, Okla. 

Neil, John Lambert, Minister Lorman 

'Price, Luther Emmett, Electrical Engineer Forest 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Brister, Hugh Ernest, Merchant Bogue Chitto 

Heidelberg, James Edward, Bank Cashier . . . . Hattiesburg 

Baker. Joseph Atkins, Teacher Edwards, Okla. 

Price, Luther Emmett, Electrical Engineer Forest 

Bachelors of Laivs. 

Barron, Vernon Derward, Attorney Deceased 

Cox, Briscoe Clifton, Attorney . . Gulfport 

Cunningham, James Andy Booneville 

East, Julian Ralf, District Attorney, Brandon 

Hall, Toxey, Attorney Columbia 

Jackson, Robert Edgar, Attorney Liberty 

Ricketts, John Baxter, Attorney Jackson 

. Russell, Carroll Steen , Deceased 

Sheffield, James Madison Oxford 

Sikes, Matthew J Waldo 

Taylor, Oscar Bomar, County Attorney Jackson 

Todd, Ben Lawrence, Jr., Postal Clerk Jackson 

Welch, Walter Scott, City Attorney Prentiss 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 



111 



CLASS OF 1907. 
Master of Arts. 

McKee, James Archibald, Minister Denver, Col, 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Applewhite, Calvin Crawford, Medical Student . . Vanderbilt 

Backstrom, Oscar, Supt. Education Leaksville 

Bright, James Robert, Ministerial Student . . . . Vanderbilt 
Frost, James Wilson, Planter . . Oakland 

McKee, James Archibald, Minrister Denver, Colo. 

Neill, Charles Lamar, Principal High School Laurel 

Ridgway, Susie Boyd, Professor High School . . . . Jackson 

Rogers, Arthur Leon, Banker New Albany 

Williams, Wirt Alfred, Principal High School . . Edwards 

Bachelors of Science. 

Berry, James Leo, Merchant Prentiss 

Bullock, Harvey Hasty, Teacher Pulaski 

Carlton, Landon Kimbrough, Attorney Sardis 

Loch, John William, Teacher Woodville 

'f'errell, Grover Cleveland, Physician Prentiss 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Osborn, Samuel Ivy, Atorney Norfield 

Pearce, Henry Wilbur, Jr., Dental Student Nashville 

Weems, John Wesley, Merchant Shubuta 

Bachelors of Lanvs. 

Adams, John Luther, Attorney Louisville 

Beaver, George Manning, Attornej^ Newton 

Bush, Fred, Attorney New Hebron 

Davis, Theodore B., Attorney Columbia 

Edwards, A. M., Attorney Columbir. 

James, Mack, Teacher Union 

Pritchard, Lee Harrington, Attorney Oklahoma 

Round, T. H., Attorney Hattiesburg 



112 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Stewart, J. D., Attorney Jackson 

Street, Orbrey Delmond, Attorney Ripley 

Turner, O. F., Attorney Sturgis 

Whitfield, Albert Hall, Jr., Attorney Jackson 

CLASS OF 1908. 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Addington, James Lawrence, Salesman Water Vallc}' 

Collins, Jeff, Teacher Brooksville 

Cook, Gilbert Pierce, Prof. Hargrove College, Ardmore, Okl. 
MiQore, Wesley Powers, Graduate Student . . Nashville, Tenn. 
Murrah, William Fitzhugh, Law Student . . Nashville, Tenn. 

Ridgway, Walter Stevens, Law Student University 

Rousseaux, John Cude, Minister Bon Ami, La. 

Bachelors of Science. 

Adams, Orlando Percival, Engineering Student, New Orleans 

Blount, James Andrew, Teacher Charleston 

Geiger, Marvin, Chemist A. & M. College 

Hand, James Miles, Pharmacist Shubuta 

Huddleston, Bessie Neal, Student New York 

Kirkland, Charles Hascal, Attorney Laurel 

Magee, Hosie Frank, Professor Mathematics. . Tallulah, La. 
Zung, Sing-Ung, Government Translator . . Shanghai, China 

Bachelors of Philosophy. 

Geiger, Marvin, Chemist A. & M. College 

Kirkland, Charles Hascal, Attorney Laurel 

Ruif, David Thomas, Principal High School . . . . Camden 

Sumrall, Jesse Levi, Law Student Lexington, Va. 

Zepernick, Donald Edward, Merchant Macon 

Bachelors of Laius. 

Cantwell, O. G., Attorney Raleigh 

Franklin, J. E., Attorney Rosedale 

Guthrie, J. B., Attorney Taylorsville 

Graham, S. M., Attorney Pass Christian 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE ll'j 

Grice, P. K., Attorney Hazlehurst 

Griflinrg, W. G., Attorney Eufaula, Okla. 

Haydon, C. R, Attorney Biloxi 

Harper, P, M., Attorney Greenville 

Manship, Luther, Jr., Attorney Jackson 

McNair, J. A., Attorney Brookhaven 

Norquist, R. R., Attorney Yazoo City 

Thompson, W. H., Teacher Blue Mountain 

Thompson, C. E. Attorney Jackson 

Tvler, L. L., Attorney Brookhaven 

Tally, J. C, Attorney Poplarville 

Russell, Arthur, Attorney Edinburg 

White, L. L., Railroad Attorney Vicksburg 

CLASS OF 1909. 

Master of Arts. 

Dooley, Earl Ralph, Professor of Chemistry Montana 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Applewhite, Walter Ralph Winona 

Bailey, Thomas Lowrey, Principal High School . . Woodville 
Brooks, Joseph Howard Moorman, Prin. High Sc, Gunnison 

Hand, Charles Connor, Merchant Shubuta 

Sharbrough, Ralph Bridger, Teacher Hattiesburg 

Witt, Basil Franklin, Teacher Yazoo City 

Bachelors of Science. 

Leggett, William Charles, Planter Etta 

Mullins, Robert Jackson, Secy. Y. M. C. A., Boone, Iowa 
Ricketts, Bertha Louise, Teacher Jackson Schools .... Jackson 

Ruflf, David Thomas, Principal High School Cam.den 

Spann, Susie Pearl, Teacher Jackson 

Stennis, Tom, Planter DeKalb 

Welch, William Amos, Sec'y. Y. M. C. A., Palestine, Texas 



114 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Bachelors of Laivs. 

Anderson, David Moore, Attorney Lorena 

Baker, Joseph Atkins, Teacher Edwards, Okla. 

Browning, Aaron J., Attorney Newton 

Davis, Silas Woodward, Attorney Jackson 

Gillespie, Cade D., Attorney Raymond 

Heslep, Talley, Attorney Pelahatchie 

Jackson, William Franklin, Attorney Summit 

Kirkland, Charles Hascal, Attorney Ellisville 

Lauderdale, James Abner, Attorney Myrtle 

Millo}^ Guy McNair, Attorney Prentiss 

Noble, James Franklin, Attorney Red Star 

Russell, Robert Edward, Attorney Jackson 

Thompson, Harmon Lawrence, Attorney Jackson 

CLASS OF 1910. 

Master of Arts. 

Ruff, Robert Hamric, Principal High School, Rolling Fork 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Alexander, Richard Baxter, Merchant Montrose 

Bratton, William Du Bose, Principal High School, Pascagoula 
Brewer, Edward Cage, Graduate Student Vanderbilt, 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Brown, Robert Milton, Minister Simrasport, La. 

Crisler, John Wesley, Book-keeper Jackson 

Frizell, Henry Marvin, Teacher Winona 

Guinn, Jesse Mark, Minister Crawford 

Johnson, James Gann, Graduate Student Vanderbilt, 

Nashville, Tenn. 

Jones, Lewis Barrett, Clerk Jackson 

Kelly, Augustus Foster, Clerk Laurel 

Pugh, Roscoe Conkling, Teacher Montrose 

Ruff, Robert Hamric, Principal High School.. Rolling Fork 
Wasson, David Ratliff, Teacher Auburn 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 115 

Bachelors of Science. 

Baley, Henry Freeman, Salesman Jackson 

Campbell, Alexander Boyd, Principal High School, Mathiston 
Clingan, Courtenay, Graduate Student Millsaps . . Jackson 

McCluer, Edith Jackson 

McCluer, Hugh Brevard, Farmer Jackson 

Phillips, William Edward, Jr., Book-keeper . . Belle Prairie 

Rew, Crales Reynolds, Merchant Forest 

Strom, Morris, Pharmacist Tchula 

Terrell, Charles Galloway, Teacher Prentiss 

WTiitson, Leon Winans, Engineer Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Williams, Frank Starr, Principal High School . . Brookhaven 

Bachelors of Laws. 

Alford, J. M,. Attorney McComb 

Berry, J. E., Attorney Booneville 

BoutweHl, Benjamin Addie, Attorrfey Orange 

Collins, Frank W., Attorney Meridian 

Ellzey, E. J., Attorney Jackson 

iLee, M. N,, Attorney Magazine, Ark. 

Luper, O. C, Attorney Georgetown 

Martin, J. D., Attorney Raleigh 

Osborn, Samuel Ivy Greenwood 

Simmons, T. V,, Attorney Sallis 

Snowden, G. W., Attorney Meridian 

Thompson, M. E., Attorney Blue Mountain 

Waller, Curtis I., Attorney Washington 

Williams, W. G., Attorney Brookhaven 



116 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Allen, Ernest Brackstone Prentiss 

A. B., MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 

Casey, Herbert D Williamstown, Vermont 

A. B., BROWN UNIVERSITY. 

Clingan, Courtenay Jackson 

B. S., MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 

Herrington, John Cornelius Asylum 

B. S., M. D., UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

LAW STUDENTS. 

Andrews, Percy A Belen 

Dickinson, James Harris Denmark, Tennessee 

Green, Curtis Taylor Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Green, Marcellus, Jr Jackson 

Gulledge, Reuben W Bowling Green 

Gunning, Edgar Dale Jackson 

B. S., A. & M. COLLEGE. 

Hair, William Theodore Cedar Creek, North Carolina 

Hopkins, Donald D Taylorsville 

Horn, W. J Bay Springs 

Huddlestcn, Summerfield Limbaugh Bay Springs 

Hunter, J. Q. Jr Union 

Johnson, Charles Edward Batesville 

Lee, Robert Charles, Jr Jackson 

McDonald, J. O Union 

Morse, Joshua Marion, Jr Gulfport 

Powers, Neely Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 117 

Ross, J. C Gulfport 

Ruff, David Thomas Ackerman 

Ph. B., B. S., MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 

Saxon, John Byron Waynesboro 

Tindall, John Benton . . Water Valley 

B. S., UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Truly, Everette Geoff re)' . . . . Fayette 

Weinstein, Adolph Ed Charleston 

\\1iitten, S. R., Jr Jackson 

Woods, M. C Water Valley 

Yerger, Frederic £ Jackson 

COLLEGE STUDENTS. 
SENIOR CLASS. 

Berry, Roscoe Conkling Prentiss 

Bingham, Robert Jacob . Embry 

Coggin, William Carl Nettleton 

Collins, Frarrk Burkitt Soso 

Enochs, Isaac Columbus Jackson 

Green, Albert Augustus, Jr Jackson 

Hart, Samuel Freidlander Jackson 

Henderson, Hodgie Clayton Rayville, Louisiana 

Holifield, John Wesley Soso 

Johnson, Alice Myrtle Jackson 

Johnson, Charles Edward Batesville 

Knowles, Adele Cecelia Jackson 

Lewis, Thomas Wiley, Jr Memphis, Tennessee 

Linfield, Mary Barrow Biloxi 

Park, Marguerite Chadwick Jackson 

Phillips, Thomas Haywood, Jr Belle Prairie 

Savage, James Shoffner Ruleville 

Taylor, James Bennett Jackson 

Taylor, Zacharj- Jackson 

Williamson, Samuel Ernest Collins 

Zung, Ming-Ung Soochow, China 



118 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Beasle}', Andrew Joseph Woodland 

Broom, James Wesley Daisy 

Bufkin, Daniel Webster Barlow 

Cameron, Daniel DeWitt Hattiesburg 

Clark, Crrover Cleveland Eucutta 

Clark, William Sim Eucutta 

Cooper, Manly Ward Eupora 

Dodds, Nellie Calhoun Jackson 

Dorman, William Moody Itta Bena 

Green, Edward Hammond Jacks-^n 

Honeycutt, Malica Lavada Downsville, La, 

Kirkland, Lyonel Clayton Ellisville 

Leivis, Willard Lester Wocdland 

Lett, Thomas Edison Kilmichael 

Mitchell, John Hendrix Water Valley 

Morris, Joe Henry Jackson 

Peets, Randolph Dillion Wesson 

Rainey, Oscar Decaturville, Tenn. 

Smith, Frederick Brougher Blue Mountain 

Steen, Robert Ernest Florence 

Taylor, Swepscn Smith Jackson 

Thomas, ^Vllliam Nathaniel Jackson 

Thompson, Fulton Jackson 

Mliitson, Annie Bessie Jackson 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Adsms, Mounger Favre Lumberton 

Baley, Sallie Whitfield Jackson 

Beraud, Paul Desire Fayette, Louisiana 

Boswell, Harry Harmon Kosciusko 

Burns, Willis Cole Brandon 

Cain, Cyril Edward Dead Lake 

Cain, William N-ielvin Dead Lake 

Chidiester, Robert Robb Edwards 

Fairley, Kenneth Wise Hazlehurst 

Galloway, Hervey Leavell Port Gibson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 119 

Godbold, John Foster Summit 

Harkey, Swepson Fleetwood Tupelo 

Howard. Rosa Bonheur Jackson 

Huddleston, George Beaman Jackson 

In'ing, Clyde Davis Weir 

Jolly, Richard Irvin Xewton 

Lamptcn, Samuel Benjamin Tylertown 

Lester, Herbert Hamilton Jackson 

Linfield, Janie Barrow Biloxi 

Livingston, Edward Martin Louisville 

Logue, Ullen Francis Jackson 

Montgomery, William Battles Pontotoc 

Moore, George Hyer Jacksoin 

Morse, William Eugene Jackson 

Ramsey, Willing Hazlehurst 

Ray, Olin Holcomb 

Reynolds, Omar Marion Taylorsville 

Rook, James Berr\- Louis Tyro 

Rush, Benjamin Clarence Mississippi City 

Scott, Frank Tomkeys Hattiesburg 

Smith, Lucy Hortense Jackson 

Stuart, Tip Newton Morton 

W^cilenman, Richard Shaw 

Wroten, James Dansy Bconeville 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Adams, Jesse Hunt Ripley 

Ard, John Redding Matthews Brookhavcn 

Armstrong, Jesse Cade Vaiden 

Barrier, Lenard Paul Rolling Fork 

Barrington, Ernest Ellison Centerville 

Bauer, Andrc^v Stamforth Natchez 

^^^^^^cW, Henry Marvin Braxton 

Boggan, John Braxton 

Boykin, Solomon Relophard Natchez 

Bradford, Emma Lucile Jackson 

Branton, John Elliot Burdette 

Burks, Buford Singleton Bedford City, Virginia 



120 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Burks, Rutherford Bernard Jackson 

Byrd, Joe Webster Florence 

_,,^-CabeIl, Charles Francis Bowling Green, Kentucky 

Clark, Daniel Laurel 

^>Clifford, Victor Cranberry Yazoo City 

Colmer, William Meyers Gulfporr 

Cooper, Thomas Melvin Jackscn 

Crisler, Charles Weems Jackson 

Crisler, James Dunton Jackson 

Crockett, Servetus Love Tyro 

Curtis, Robert George French Camp 

Daniel, Paul Foster Washington, Louisiana 

Davis, Ernest Jefferson New Albany 

Flurry, John Ervin Daisy 

Foster, Benjamin Franklin Lexington, Kentucky 

Garraway, Aurelius West Bassf.eld 

Harkey, Welton Troy Harpervilie 

Harmon, Nolan Bailey, Jr Philadelphia 

Henderson, Bessie Lee Rayville 

^.^ Hodges, Gee: ge Neoma Weir 

y' Honeycutt, Julian Bernard Downsville, Louisiana 

, Howe, Donald Witter Jacksou 

Huntington, John William Pontotoc 

Lassiter, Harry Treland McHenry 

Lewis, Flora Broad Jackson 

Magee, Hugh Fairley Jackson 

Moss, Austin Nolen Ackerman 

McGee, Frank Howard Jackson 

/'McGehee, Stella Galloway Woodville 

Neville, Edward McDov\' Gufport 

Owen, Archie M'cGehee Jackson 

. Phillips, John Fryer Belle Prairie 

''otter, Chalmers Jackson 






Reed, James Ernest Chester 

. Roberts, Ramsey Wharton Jackson 

Rogers, Herbert Graham New Albany 

Rogillio, Nettie Gloster 

Russell, Flave Puckett 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE • 121 

J&avage, David Jackson Mathiston 

,,Selby, Henry Cook Natchez 

Session?, Valentine Hunter Hazlehurst 

Shell, Oliver Enochs Okolona 

Steen, Birdie Grey Jackson 

Sterling, Robert Lee Gloster 

Summer, Eckford Luther Meridian 

Trice, Thomas Edwin Tupel > 

-•—Ward, James Walter Edwards 

Wasson, James Carlyle Ethel 

Welsh, James Woodward Philadelphia 

West, Noland Frederick Sardis 

Wilson, Homer Flowers Bogue Chitto 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Henderson, Walter Ford Rayville, Louisiana 

^--'Hinds, Stanley Robins Tupelo 

McDowell, Charles Wilson Holly Springs 

McLaurin, Julius Augustus Jackson 

Offutt, Barry Roseberry Jackson 

Offutt, Colvin Patterson Jackson 

Phillips, Levi Archie Booneville 

Vardaman, James Kimball, Jr Jackson 

SUMMARY. 

Graduate Students 4 

Law Students 25 

Seniors 2i 

Juniors 34 

Sophomores 34 

Freshmen 63 

Special Students 8 

179 

Preparatory School 86 

Total 26^ 



122 MILLS.1PS COLLEGE 

Medals Awarded Commencement 1910. 

The Millsaps Declamation Medal — James Dansey 
W rot en. 

The Sophomore Medal for Oratory — Daniel DeWitt 
Cameron. 

The Carl v. Seutter Medal for Oratory — John Wes- 
ley Crisler. 

The Clark Essay Medal — Morris Strom, 

The Daughters of American Revolution Historical 
i\Iedal — iMarguerite Chadwick Park. 

The Oakley Scholarship Prize. — James Thompson 
Weems . 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Emory College, Georgia, 

^lajor R. W. Millsaps, 

Mrs. M. B. Clark, 

J. A. Homan, 

National Lumbermen's Association, 

Mississippi Geological Sun-ey, 

Joseph Debar, 

jNIississippi State Bar Association, 

L'nited States Government, 

Dr. T. D. Sloan, 

Professor S. G. Noble, 

Prof. I. M. Burton, 

Dr. j'. E. Walmsley, 

H. N. Casson, 

R. E. Steen. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Rev. W. Fred Long. 

Dr. A. A. Kern. 

Bureau of Railn-ay Economics. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 123 



M. U. Zung-. 

M. I. O. A. 

Louis Lombard. 

J. M. Kern. 

G. L. Raymond. 

Sir Edward Durning-Lawrence. 

Dr. F. F. Frantz. 

Railway Age Gazette. 



GIFTS TO THE MUSEUM. 

Mr. W. G. Stevens, 
Mrs. A. F. Smith, 
Rev. J. L. Neil, 
Rev. T. P. Clark, 
Rev. O. Rainey, 
Mr. Falley Baldwin, 

The Senior Class. 



124 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS. 

The following list of accredited High Schools, 
Preparatory Schools, and Colleges is based on the 
entrance requirements on page 40, and gives the 
number of units allowed as entrance credits in each 
study. Each school is expected to keep the Secre- 
tary of the College advised as to any change in its 
curriculum. Changes and additions to this list will 
be made from time to time. 

School or College. Principal. Location. 

BILOXI HIGH SCHOOL. . . .T. K. Boggan, Supt Biloxi 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, Sci- 
ence 4^ Latin 3. 

BLUE MOUNTAIN COLLEGE— B. G. Lowiey, 

Prr:^., Blue Mountain 

Full credit, except in Greek^ as far as course is taken. 

BOLTON HIGH SCHOOL— E. B. Baxter, Supt Bolton 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, Sci- 
ence 4, Latin 3. 

BOONEVTLLE INSTITUTE .... D. A. Hill, Prin., 

Booneville 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, Sci- 
ence 2, Latin 3. 

BR00KHA\T:N high school ...T. p. Scott, 

Supt., Brookhaven 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Science 1, Latin 3. 

CENTEBVILLE GRADED SCHOOL— G. W. Shaw, 

Supt., Centerville 

English 2, Algebra 1,' Geometry 1, History 1, Greek 1, 
Latin 3. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE 125 

School or College. Principal. Location. 

CHAMBERLAIX-HUNT ACADEMY— Rev. M. E. 

Melvin, Pres., Port Gibson 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 

3, Latin 4, Greek 2, Science 3. 

COLUMBUS HIGH SCHOOL— Joe Cook, Supt., Columbus 
English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Greek 1, Latin 3. 

CORIXTH HIGH SCHOOL— \V. P. Dobbins, Supt.. 

Corinth 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 

4, Science 3, Latin 4. 

CRYSTAL SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL— W. T. 

Foster, Supt., Crystal Springs 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 

2, Latin 3. 

EDWARDS GRADED SCHOOL— W. A. Williams, 

Supt., Edwards 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1 1-2, History 1. 
Science 1-2, Latin 2. 

ELLISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL— Andrew Allison, 

Supt., Ellisville 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Science 1, Latin 3. 

FOREST HIGH SCHOOL— J. A. Huff, Supt Forest 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 

3, Science 1, Latin 3. 

FREXCH CAMP MILITARY ACADEMY— Rev. F. 

L. McGue, Prin, French Gamp 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 2, 
Science 1, Greek 2, Latin 3. 

GLOSTER HIGH SCHOOL— W. B. Massey, Supt., 

Gloster 



126 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

School or College. PrinciPaL Location. 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 2, 
Greek 1. Latin 3. 

GREENMLLE HIGH SCHOOL— E. E. Bass, Supt, 

Greenville 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 4, 
tScience 3, Latin 4, German 2. 

GREENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL— C. E. Saunders, 

Supt., Greenwood 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 
2, Science 1, Latin 3. 

GRENADA PUBLIC SCHOOL— S. Q. Hall, Supt., 

Grenada 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 i-2. History 3, 
Latin 4, Science 1. 

HATTIESBURG HIGH SCHOOE^-F. B. Woodley, 

Supt., Hattiesburg 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 2, 
Science 1. Latin 3. 

HAZLERURST PUBLIC SCHOOL— H. L. Mc- 

Cleskey, Supt., Hazlf'hurst 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 3, 
Latin 4, Science 1 1-2. 

HOUSTON GRADED SCHOOL— L. B. Rfid, Supt.. 

Houston 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 1, 
Science 1, Latin 2. 

JACKSON HIGH SCHOOL— E. L. Bailey. Supt., Jackson 
English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 1, 
Latin 3. 

JASPER CO. AG. HIGH SCHOOL— W. S. Huddie- 

ston, Supt., Bay Springs 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 127 

School or College Principal. Location. 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 4, 
Latin 3, Science 3. 

JEFFERSON CO. fflGH SCHOOL— J. E. Carnith, 

Supt., Fayette 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 3, 
Science 3, Latin 4. 

JEFFERSON MILITARY COLLEGE— J. S. Ray- 
mond, Supt., Washington 

Full credit as far as course is taken. 

KOSCIL SKO HIGH SCHOOL— G. F. Boyd, Supt., 

Kosciusko 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Science 3, Greek 1, Latin 3, German 1. 

LAUREL HIGH SCHOOL— R. H. Watkins, Supt., Laurel 
English 4, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 i-2, History 
3, Science 2, Latin 4. 

LEXINGTON IHGH SCHOOL— David Sanderson, 

Supt., Lexington 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 3, 
Latin 3, Science 2 1-2. 

LOUISVILLE TRAINING SCHOOL— Will Jacobs, 

Prin., Louisville 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 2, 
Science i. Latin 3. 

LUMBERTON HIGH SCHOOL— M. E. Morehead, 

Supt., Lumberton 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Science I, Greek 1, Latin 3. 

MABEN HIGH SCHOOL— Almon Cooper, Prin., Maben 
English 3, Algebra 11-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Science 1. Latin 3. 



128 MILLS J PS COLLEGE 

School or College. Principal. Location. 

MAGNOLIA HIGH SCHOOL— W. B. Stark. Supt., 

Magnolia 

English 3, Algebra 1. GtoniL-try 1, History 2, Science 
1-2, Latin 2. 

MERIDIAN HIGH SCHOOL— J. C. Fant. Supt., Meridian 
English 3, Algebra 1 1-2. Geometry ii-2, History 2, 
Greek 1, Latin 3, German 1, Science 1. 

MILLSAPS PREPARATORY SCHOOL— R. S. 

Ricketts, Prin.^ Jackson 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2. Geometry 1 i-2, History 2, 
Science 1, Latin 3. Greek 1. Germ.an 1, French 1. 

MISSISSIPPI HEIGHTS ACADEMY— J. E. Brown, 

Supt., Blue Mountain 

English i. Algebra 1 i-2. Geometry 1 1-2, History 4, 
Science 2 1-2, Greek 2, Latin 4. German 1. 

MONTROSE TRAINING SCHOOL— Rev. W. A. 

Belts, Prin., Montrose 

Full credit as far as course is taken, 

MT. OLRT: high school— S. L. Woodward, 

Supt., Mt. Olive 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 2, 
Science 1, Latin 3. 

McCO^IB HIGH SCHOOL— H. P. Hughes, Supt., 

McComb City 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 2, 
Latin 3, Science 1 1-2. 

McT\TERE SCHOOL— J. A. Robbins, Prin., Mc- 

Kenzie, Tenn. 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 4, 
Latin 4, Greek 2. 

NETTLETON HIGH SCHOOL— K. S. Archer, 
Supt Nettleton 



MILLS.^PS COLLEGE 129 

School or College. Principal. Location. 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 
■i, Latin 4, Science 1. 

\EWTO.\ PUBLUC 8CH00F.— W. C. Williams. 

Supt,, Newton 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1, History 3, Latin 
3, Science 2. 

XEW ALBANY GBADED SCHOOL— B. T. Schum- 

bert, Supt., Ts'ew Albany 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 1, 
Latin 2 1-2. 

OCEAX SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL— John W. 

Loch^ Supt., Ocean Springs 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1-2, History 1 1-2, 
Latin 2, Science 1-2. 

OKOLOXA HIGH SCHOOL— J. J. Huggins, Supt., Okolona 
English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Latin 3. 

OXFORD HIGH SCHOOL— R. E. Philbeck, Supt.. 

Oxford 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry i 1-2, History 2, 
Greek 1, Latin 3. 

PELAHATCHIE GRADED SCHOOL— John Rundle, 

Supt., Pelahatchie 

English 2 1-2, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 
2, Latin 3. 

SCRAXTOX HIGH SCHOOL— R. P. Linfield. 

Supt., Scranton 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Latin 3. 

STARKVILLE GRADED SCHOOL— J. A. Lamb, 
English 3. Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 

Prin ..Starkvillc 

Latin 2. 



130 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

School or College. Principal. Location. 

SUMMIT HIGH SCHOOL— J. D. Wallace, Supt., 

Summit 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1, History 1, Sci- 
ence 1, Latin 3. 

TUPELO HIGH SCHOOL— D. C. Lampton, Supt., Tupelo 
English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1, History 1, Sci- 
ence 1, Latin 3. 

UNIVERSITY TRAINING SCHOOL— Wyatt and 

Hurst, Prins., Oxford 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 4, 
Latin 4, Greek 2, Science 1. 

YICKSBURG HIGH SCHOOL— J. P. Garr, Supt., 

Vicksburg 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1, History 1, Sci- 
ence 1, Latin 3. 

WATER VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL— J. M. Consley, 

.. Supt., Water Valley 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 
3 1-2, Science 1 1-2, Latin 4, German 2, 

WESSON HIGH SCHOOL— W. L. Rather, Supt, Wesson 
English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 
2, Science 1, Latin 3. 

WEST POINT HIGH SCHOOL— G. F. Gapps, 

Supt., West Point 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 2, 
Latin 3. 

WIGGINS IHGH SCHOOL— W. F. Bond, Supt., 

Wiggins 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1, History 1, 
Science 1, Latin 3. 

WINONA HIGH SCHOOL— 0. A. Shaw, Supt., Winona 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 131 

School or College. Principal. Location. 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geometry 1, History 2, Sci- 
ence 1, Latin 3, Greek 1. 

Wm. WIX.WS I\STITLITE— C. M. Shaw, Prin., 

Centerville 

English 3, Algebra 1 1-2, Geometry 1 1-2, History 
3, Latin 3, Greek 1 1-2. 

YAZOO CITY HIGH SCHOOL— M. Rose, Supt., 

Yazoo City 

English 3, Algebra 1, Geemetry 1. History 2, Science 
1, Latin 3. 



REGISTER 



OF 



Miilsaps Preparatory School 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 



FOR 1911-1912 



Twentieth Session 



BEGINS SEPTEMBER 20, 1911 



CALENDAR 

TWENTIETH SESSION beg:ins Wednesday, Sep 
tember 20. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS in Latin, Greek, 
and History, September 19. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS in English, 
JMathematics, and ^Modern Languages, Septem- 
ber 20. 

RECITATIONS begin September 21. 

THANKSGIVING DAY, November 23. 

FIRST QUARTER ends November 30. 

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS, December 21-January 

2. 

1912 

EXAMINATIONS, First Term, January 15-27. 

SECOND TERM begins January 29. 

THIRD QUARTER ends March 30. 

FIELD DAY, April 20. 

EXAMINATIONS, Second Term, May 20 to June 
6. 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES begin June 6. 

COMMENCEMENT SUNDAY, June 9. 

COMMENCEMENT DAY, June 11. 



FACULTY 



REV. DAVID CARLISLE HULL, B. S.. M. A, 

President 



ROBERT SCOTT RICKETTS, A. M. 
Head Master 
A. M., Centenary College, 1870; President and Professor, 
Port Gibson Female College, 1867-73; Professor 
Whltworth Female College, 1872-93. 

GEORGE \V. HL^DDLESTON, A. M. 

Assistant Master 
A. B., Hiwassee College 1883: Professor in Greek in 
Hiwassee College, 1884-91; A. M., Hiwassee College, 
1886; Professor of Latin and Greek, Harperville Col- 
lege, 1891-93; Principal of Dixon High School, 1893- 
97; Associate Principal of Harperville School 
1897-1899; Associate Principal of Carthage School, 
1899-1900. 

bTUART GRAYSON NOBLE, A. B., M. A. 

Professor of English and Latin 
A. B., University of North Carolina, 1907; Instructor 
English and History, Horner Military School, 1907- 
08; Student University of Chicago, Summer Quar- 
ter 1908; M. A.. University of Chicago, 1910. 



135 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

(General information 

The object of this school is primarily to pre- 
pare students for the Freshman Class of Millsaps 
College, but its course is admirably adapted to the 
needs of those who are expecting to enter their chos- 
en professions without a college education. The lack 
at present of good training schools in our state 
makes the need of such a department imperative. 
The enlargement of the college course of study and 
the higher standard now fixed for entrance, require 
of this School a corresponding increase in the scope 
of its work. As now constituted, the work of the 
Millsaps Preparatory School covers fourteen Carne- 
gie units, so that its graduates are prepared to en- 
ter any college or university in the country. In 
accomplishing this end an adequate equipment has 
been provided, a high grade of work is done, and 
thoroughness is insisted upon. 

RECENT REORGANIZATION 

To bring its work into fuller accord with the 
plan proposed by the General Board of Education, 
it has been decided to separate the Preparatory 
Department entirely from the College, 
and thus to provide for a more careful supervision of it« 
students. 

To this end Founders Hall is being remodelej 
so that students in the Preparatory School, except- 
ing those over twenty-one years of age, will be re- 
quired to board in the Hall, and will be at all times 
under the supervision of the House Master, a mem- 
ber of the Preparatory Faculty. Students over 
twenty-one, may, with the consent of the President 
or Head Master, board elsewhere, but in all other 
respects, will be subject to the discipline of the 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13C 

School. All students will be taught in the hall, the 
class rooms and assembly room on the first floor be- 
ing* well adapted to this purpose. 

Study Hours. — From seven to ten at night all 
students, unless specially excused by the Head 
Master, shall sit in the Study Hall and engage in 
the preparation of their lessons. In the day, dur- 
ing school hours, the same rule will apply to those 
not engaged in recitations. 

The regulation against going to town at night 
will be rigidly enforced. 

Physical Culture. — Attention will be given to 
the physical development of the students. Every 
student will be required to give at least one hour 
every school day to some kind of physical exercise, 
in-doors or out-doors. Inter-class athletics will be 
encouraged, and games with other schools of equal 
grade may be arranged, subject to the same regula- 
tions as those governing the College, or such modi- 
fications thereof as may be determined upon by the 
President of the College and the Preparatory fac- 
ulty. In-door drills and exercises will be conducted 
by a competent director. Out-door sports will also 
be supervised. 

Domestic Management. — As far as possible 
students will be given the care and conveniences 
of a home. The domestic management of the Hall 
will be in the hands of a matron whose business it 
will be to inspect daily the rooms occupied by stud- 
ents and to see to it that a sufficiency of wholesome 
food is properly prepared and served. Purchases 
for this department will be made by an agent ap- 
pointed and supervised by College authority. 

For the better care of those who may be se- 
riously ill, a room near that of the matron has been 



137 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

set a])art for hos])ital uses. Tliis room has been se- 
lected with special reference to light, heat and gen- 
eral sanitation. 

Library. — Preparatory students will have ac- 
cess to the Carnegie-Millsaps Library, containing 
15,000 volumes. Carefully selected reading cours- 
es will be recommended to students. 

Discipline. — Orderly conduct, becoming a gen- 
tleman is insisted upon. Boys guilty of persist- 
ent misconduct and inattention to class duties will 
be advised to leave school. 

Dipioma. — A diploma will be awarded to the 
student who completes with credit the work of 
our three 3^ears' course. 

Literary Society. — The Prentiss Literary 
Society offers students a splendid opportunity for 
training in debate, public speaking and parliamen- 
tary practice. The Bailev-Ruff medal is awarded 
by Professors T. L. Bailey and D. T. Ruff to the 
student w^ho makes the best declamation in a con- 
test at commencement. This medal was awarded 
at the commencement of igio to Robert Cleveland 
Edwards. 

An Essay Prize is also awarded to the stud- 
ent who writes the best essay on a given subject. 

FOUNDERS HALL 

The home of Millsaps Preparatory School i.s 
Founders Mall, a three story brick building, con- 
taining a large assembly hall, class rooms, and liv- 
ing rooms enough to accommodate a goodly num- 
ber of students. The building is stem-heated and 
equioped with electric lights, baths and modern con- 
veniences. 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE iLiS 

The cost of ilie ronni is S 18.00 per year fur 
each sliuleiit which niusl he paid as follows i.Sio.CJ 
at the opcniiii; of the session; $8.00 Fehruary 1st. 
In addition there will he a charije of S4.50 for stu- 
dents to cover the cost of lii^hts for the entire ses- 
sion. Students are expected to furnish their own 
furniture which may be purchased after arrival un- 
der the super\i>iiin of the I lead Master. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSIOxN. 

No student will be permitted to matriculate 
who is under fourteen years of at^e. I'or entrance 
to the First Year Class the student must have 
completed Geog"raphy, United States History 
(Grammar School Course), English Grammar and 
High School Arithmetic. 

For admission to the second and third years the 
student must give satisfactory evidence by written 
examinations or certificates of recognized affiliat- 
ing High Schools, that he has completed properly, 
work equivalent to that done in our course. 

ESTIMATED COST OF BOARD. 

P.oard will be furnished to students at acin:il 
cost. Each student will be required to have on de- 
jiosit Si 2.50 at the beginning of every month. At 
the end of the nK)nth the total cost of b.iard will be 
estimated, and each student will be charged with his 
proportionate share thereof. 

It is believed that the average cost for board 
will not exceed Sio.oo per month, and an effort will 
be made to keej) it within that limit. 

Xo deduction v.ill be made for absences except 
those authorized by the faculty and extending over 
one week. In case of withdrawal before the end ('\ 



i:VJ MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

any board month Students will be charged 40 cents 
per day for part of the month past. 

Whenever a student discontinues, all money 
on deposit in excess of what is due for board, will 
be returned. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition for full scholastic year .... $30.00 

Incidental fee 5.00 • • 

Library fee i.oo 

Contingent fee, paid on entrance .... 2.00 

Room rent for entire session 18.00 

Ligl^ts 4.50 

Lyceum ticket i.oo 

COURSES OF STUDY. 
ENGLISH. 

The Course in English is designed not only to 
teach the student to write and speak with grammati- 
cal correctness, but also to inspire in him a love 
of good literature. The reading under competent 
guidance of classic such as are recommended by our 
General Board of Education can hardly fail to se- 
cure this result. During the second year special 
attention is given to theme-writing, and in the third, 
to the study of English Classics. 

First Year. — Review of Grammar. First Princi- 
ples of Composition. Weekl}- themes. Liter- 
ature for Reading and Study. — Silas Marner; 
Franklin's Autobiography. 

Second Year. — Composition comtinued. Daily and 
weekly themes. 

Literature for Study. — Irving's Sketch Book ; Wash- 
ington's Farevv'ell Address and Vv^ebster's First 



AflLLSAPS COLLEGE liU 

r.unker Hill (^ration. 

Literature for Reading. — Cooper's Last of the Mohi- 
cans ; ('•oKlsinilh's Deserted \'illage; Scott's 
Lady of the Lake. 

Third Year.— Rhetoric and Compositit^n. Periodic 
iJKM^ies. Introduction to English Literature. 

Literature for Study.— Shakesjiearc's Macbeth; Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems ; Macaulay's Life of John- 
son. 

Literature for Reading. — Shakespeare's Julius Cae- 
sar and Merchant of Venice; Lamb's Essays of 
Elia; Coleridi^e's Ancient Mariner; Scott's 
Ivanhoe; Pope's Homer's Iliad; Addison's Dc 
Coverley Papers. 

HISTORY. 

History will be read with a view to preparing 
the student for the more comprehensive study of 
the same subjects in College. In addition, therefore, 
to drill on facts and the succession of events some 
attention will be given the development of civilization dur- 
ing the periods under consideration. 

First Year. — English History. 

Second Year. — Ancient History. 

Third Year.— Advanced United States History; 
To])ical reports: This course will take up the 
social, political and industrial features in much 
greater detail than the Grammar School Course 
treated them. 

MATHEMATICS. 
The work in Mathematics is sufficiently indi- 
cated by the appended tabular statement. Care 
will be taken to make the student so thorough in his 



141 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

knowledge ot the authors studied that he will be 
enabled to pursue the higher work of the College 
with increasing interest and power. 

First Year. — School Algebra through Simultaneous 
Equations (Wentworth). 

Second Year.— Higher Algebra, to Quadratics; Plane Geom- 
etry (Wentworth.) 

Third Year. — Higher Algebra, through Progressions 
(Wentworth) ; Plane Geometry completed. 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

There are four regular courses in the Ancient 
Languages offered in the Department, three in La- 
tin, and one in Greek. In Latin, four books of Cae- 
sar are read in second year ; the forms are stressed ; 
elementary grammar is mastered ; a vocabulary is 
acquired ; weekly exercises are v/ritten by the class ; 
the grammar is systematically studied; in short, 
a foundation is laid for the future accurate study of 
the language. 

In the Third Year six orations of Cicero are 
read, systematic study of the grammar is continued ; 
weekly exercises are written and the student is 
thoroughly prepared to take up with profit and ease 
the work of the Freshm.an Year in College. 
Greek will be begun in the third Year of the Pre- 
paratory Department. White's First Greek 
Book will be thoroughly mastered. If possible, 
the last six weeks of the course will be spent 
in reading a fevv^ chapters in the Anabasis. 

Latin. — First Year. — First Latin Book ; Forms thor- 
oughly mastered ; reading of Simple Latin Sen- 
tences. 

Second Year. — Four Books of Caesar carefully read ; 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 142 

Latin Grammar; a review of forms; Case con- 
structions; Simple Kni^lish into Latin. 

Third Year. — Six Orations of Cicero; Careful at- 
tention to Syntax; English into Latin; a study 
of Roman Life. 

Greek. — First Year — First Creek Rook; Mastery 
of forms; reading" ni Simple Greek Sentences. 

SCIENCE 

In order to bring" our work more into harmony 
with the public schools we have decided to offer a 
course in Elementary Agriculture. In the courses 
in Chemistry and Physics some attention will he 
given to laboratory experiments under the direction 
of the head of the Department of Science in the 
College. 

First Year.— Elementar}^ Agriculture. 
Second Year. — The Elements of Clicmistry. 
Third Year — Elements of Physics. 



Un MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 
CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Applewhite, Raymond Vaiden 

Bailey, Martin Jasper Jackson 

Burns, Walter Scott New Orleans, Louisiana 

Cain, John Buford Dead Lake 

Campbell, Robert Newton Jackson 

Clark, Clyde Columbus Lyman 

Cook, William Vincent Bovina 

Cotton, Leon Harris Jackson 

Decell, William Wheat Bowertown 

Donnell, Need King , Johns 

Felder, Oliver Wendell Holmes Holmesville 

Galloway, Charles Jackson 

Garner, David Ambrose, Jr Jackson 

Gatlin, Henry Grady Natalbany, Louisiana 

Gilmore, Samuel Hugh Lena 

Harris, Jasper Green Harrisville 

Honeycutt, Martin Hinds Downsville, Louisiana 

Howard, Orville Hulvatus Jackson 

Jones, Charlton Jackson 

Jones, Hamilton Jackson 

Jones, Jesse Fred, Jr Inverness 

Keister, McFaelten Pinola 

Lauderdale, Giles Lawrence New Albany 

Lewis, Eleanor Thatcher Jackson 

Lloyd, Samuel Thames Pickens 

Lowry, Thomas Jefferson Houston 

Millican, Robert Edward Jackson 

Norwood, Stanley Atkinson Bobo 

Owen, William Marvin Woodland 

Perlin, Phillip Jackson 

Scudder, Walter Howard, Jr Mayersville 

Selby, Robert Elvin Russellville 

Tucker, Lester Alexander Gary 



MILLS A PS COLLEGE ITi 

Tynes, Roy Gloster 

Witt, Lynn Elbert Sumrall 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Bclcw, Joe Hunter Jackson 

Bingham, Thomas Frederick Bcllcfontai-.i 

Brewer, Jack WTiite Black Hawk 

Clark, Thomas Phelan Rara Avis 

Denson, John Mack Jackson 

Dupree, Sam Frank Jackson 

Edwards, Robert Cleveland Glancy 

Graham, Charles Miller Meridian 

Hill, A. S Meridian 

Hutton, Arthur Dixon Jackson 

Lx)gue, Augustus Jackson 

Middleton, Arthur Pocahontas 

Morrison, Paul >r^ Heidelberg 

McKie, Ray Tyro 

Regan, Cle\'eland McComb 

Russell, John William McHenry 

Ryan, Jeremiah Lewis McHenry 

Sample, Samuel Edmond E^eneezer 

Sargent, Samuel Stegall Greenwood Springs 

Smith, Dudley Jackson 

Tucker, Aldine Stevens ^^^^ 

Tucker, Keiffer Gaskell Gary 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Barrow, Carl Vivian Jackson 

Burke, Elbert Alexander Braxton 

Doughtie, Louis Girard, Louisiana 

Everts, Harold Sermbough Ridgland 

Ferguson, Benjamin Franklin Patrick 

Fletcher, Ernest Jackson 

Eraser, Fabian Mendenhall 

Hairston, George Williams, Jr. Crawford 

Harden, Walter Benton Pontoroc 

Havens, Lyman Eugene Carterville 



145 MILLS A PS COLLEGE 

Heflin, John Leslie Bellefontaine 

Hicks, Irl Douglas Benton 

liobart, Win Bert Jackson 

Hobbs, William Elmer Crystal Springs 

Monroe, Harold Glenmore, Louisiana 

Mooney, Dan Collins 

McElveen, Clinton Tylertown 

Newton, William Houston Dwiggins 

Phillips, William Thomas Ratliffe 

Price, Ralph Lake Jackson 

SiiT'mons, William. Edwin Magnolia 

Spinks, Raleigh Joe Daleville 

Wii'tson, Edward Lewis Jackson 

Whitson, Edwin Pearce Jackson 

Wilkinson, Fred GJoster 



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