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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1934-1935"

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CALENDAR 1935-1936 

THE FORTY-FOURTH- SESSION begins Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 11. 

RECITATIONS BEGIN September 13. 

THANKSGIVING DAY, November 28. 

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS, from 12:00 m. Thursday, Decem- 
ber 19, to the morning of Thursday, January 2. 

EXAMINATIONS, First Semester, January 20, through Janu- 
ary 28. 

SECOND SEMESTER BEGINS January 29. 

CAMPUS DAY, April 1. 

EXAMINATIONS, Second Semester, May 21, through May 29. 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES begin May 29. 

COMMENCEMENT SUNDAY, May 31. 

ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES, June 1. 

COMMENCEMENT DAY, June 2. 

SUMMER SCHOOL, June 5, through August 20, 1935. 



CONTENTS 

Academic Schools : 63 

Alumni Association, Officers of 148 

Attendance Upon Class 51 

Athletics 47 

Boarding Facilities 47 

Board of Trustees 7 

Calendar 3 

Carnegie-Millsaps Library 41 

Change of Classes 52 

Commencement Exercises 6 

Conduct 54 

Courses Required for B.A. Degree 68 

Courses Required for B.S. Degree 69 

Definition of Unit 39 

Degrees 6 6 

Delayed Registration 51 

Delinquency 54 

Demerit System 54 

Department of Ancient Languages 74 

Department of Biology 78 

Department of Chemistry 82 

Department of Education 89 

Department of English 9 5 

Department of Geology 101 

Department of German 103 

Department of History 104 

Department of Mathematics 10 6 

Department of Philosophy 107 

Department of Physical Education 109 

Department of Physics and Astronomy Ill 

Department of Religion 115 

Department of Romance Languages 120 

Department of Social Sciences 123 

Department of Music 125 

Department of Piano 126 

Department of Voice and Public School Music 130 

Department, Theoretical 135 

Dormitories 48 



Examinations 50 

Expenses 55 

Faculty 12 

General Information 41 

General Outline by Groups of Degree Courses 68 

Gifts to College 35 

Gifts to Library 62 

Grades 51 

Grenada College 147 

History of the College 24 

Honors 67 

Honorary Fraternities 46 

James Observatory 41 

Literary Societies 45 

Location 41 

Matriculation 49 

Memorial Cottages 49 

Musical Organizations 46 

Officers of Administration 10 

Prizes 59 

Quality Point System 67 

Register of Students 150 

Registration of New Students 50 

Religious Instruction 43 

Reports 50 

Requirements for Admission 38 

Residence 51 

Schedule of Lectures 140 

Scholarships 59 

Student Publications 46 

Summer School 142 

Teacher Placement Bureau 94 

Visiting the City at Night 54 

Whitworth College 145 

Withdrawals 53 

Young Men's Christian Association 43 

Young Women's Christian Association 45 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES, 1935 

Friday, May 31 

7:00 o'clock p. m. — Music by Millsaps Band. 
8:00 o'clock p. m. — Concert, Millsaps Singers. 

Saturday, June 1 

11:00 o'clock a. m. — Contest for Buie Medal in Declama- 
tion. 

8:00 o'clock p. m. — The Millsaps Players. 

Sunday, June 2 

11:00 o'clock a. m. — Commencement Sermon. 

Rev. Costen J. Harrell, D.D., Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Monday, June 3 

9:00 o'clock a. m. — Annual meeting of the Board of 

Trustees. 

8:00 o'clock p. m. — Alumni Meeting and Banquet. 

Tuesday, June 4 

11:00 o'clock a. m. — Final Concert, Music Department. 

5:00 o'clock p. m. — President's Reception to Seniors 
and their families. 

8:00 o'clock p. m. — Graduating Exercises. Address, Pres- 
ident H. N. Snyder, LL.D., Wof- 
ford College, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Announcement of honors and 
prizes, conferring degrees, and 
awarding diplomas. 



BOARD OP TRUSTEES 
OFFICERS 

*REV. M. L. BURTON President 

tJ. T. CALHOUN President 

tJ. R. COUNTISS, D.D Vice-President 

J. B. STREATER Secretary 

A. B. CAMPBELL Treasurer 

Term Erpires in 1935 
REV. M. M. BLACK Vicksburg 

W. O. TATUM Hattiesburg 

J. W. KYLE Sardis 

REV. O. S. LEWIS Brookhaven 

REV. L. P. WASSON Clarksdale 

REV. T. M. BRADLEY Belzoni 

T. B. LAMPTON Jackson 

J. B. STREATER Black Hawk 

Term Expires in 1938 

REV. OTTO PORTER McComb 

REV. W. W. WOOLLARD Ripley 

J. T. CALHOUN Jackson 

J. G. McGOWEN Jackson 

REV. J. T. LEGGETT Hattiesburg 

REV. J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Greenville 

H. M. IVY Meridian 

W. T. ROGERS New Albany 

*Died Jan. 17, 1935. 
tElected Feb. 21, 1935. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/millsapscollegec1935mill 



PART I 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATIONS 



10 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DAVID MARTIN KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., 
President 

B. E. MITCHELL, M.A., Ph.D., 
Dean 

A. P. HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D., 
Dean of Freshmen 

MRS. MARY B. STONE, M.A., 
Dean of Women 

J. REESE LIN, M.A., 
Secretary 

R. H. MOORE, M.A., 
Assistant Secretary 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL, B.S., M.S., 

Director James Observatory 

Registrar 

Director of the Summer School 

VERNON BURKETT HATHORN, B.A., 
Bursar 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS, B.A., M.A., 
Librarian 

MRS. MARY BOWEN CLARK, M.E.L. 

MARY ORMOND HEALD, B.A., B.S. in Library Science 

Assistant Librarians 

CARRIE OLIVIA SISTRUNK, M. E. L., 
Secretary to the President 

HOSEA FRANK MAGEE, B.S., M.D., 
College Physician 

MRS. C. F. COOPER 
Matron Men's Dormitories 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 11 

MRS. S. V. CLEMENTS 
Matron Women's Dormitories 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK, A.B., M.A., 
Director of Athletics 

J. B. PRICE, B.S., M.S., 
Director of Coaching School 

T. A. GILBERT, B.S., 
Bookkeeper 

LaRIENE CALDWELL 

MARGARET BLACK 

Secretary to the Registrar 

READ DUNN 

JAMES FERGUSON 

SIDNEY SMITH 

DAN CROSS 

Tutors in Coaching School 

LOUIS DECELL 
Assistant in Bursar's Office 

OTHO MONROE 

MARY FRANCES GUINN 

BURNICE CROSBY 

Assistants in Library 

J. D. NOBLIN 

SPENCER SISSELL 

JOE BAXTER 
Dormitory Monitors 

JAMES SPOTTSWOOD 
Alumni and Publicity 



12 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE FACULTY AXD ASSISTANTS 

DAVID MARTIN KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

(President's Home, Millsaps Campus). 

B.A., Central College, 1898; M.A., Vanderbilt, 1906; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1916; Professor of Ancient Lan- 
guages, Morrisville College, 1903-05; Fellow and Assist- 
ant in Latin and Greek, Vanderbilt, 19 06-07; Graduate 
Student University of Chicago, Summer of and Session of 
1913-14; LL.D., Emory University, 1926; Professor of 
Ancient Languages, Southern University, 1907-15; Pro- 
fessor of Ancient Languages, Millsaps College since 1915. 
Vice-President, Millsaps College, 1923-1924; President 
since 1924. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, M.A., Ph.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Geology 

(2 Park Ave.) 

B.A., Centenary College, Louisiana, 1887; M.A., University of 
Mississippi, 189 0; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 189 7; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 19 00; Principal Centenary 
High School, 1887-89; Professor Natural Science, Centen- 
ary College, Louisiana, 1889-1902; Assistant in Astron- 
omy, Vanderbilt University, 1896; Graduate Student in 
Chemistry and Geology, University of Chicago, Summer 
Terms of 1907, 1908, and 1911; Professor in Millsaps 
College since 19 02. 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL, B.S., M.S., 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

Director of James Observatory 

(812 Arlington Ave.) 

B.S., Millsaps College, 1899; M.S., Millsaps College, 19 01; 
Professor of Science, Whitworth College, 1899-1900; Pro- 
fessor of Physics and Chemistry, Hendrix College, 1900- 
02; Professor of Natural Science, Centenary College of 
Louisiana, 1902-04; Professor of Mathematics and As- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13 

tronomy, Epworth University, Oklahoma, 1904-08; Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Astronomy, Centenary College 
of Louisiana, 19 8-09; President of Mansfield Female 
College, 1909-1910; Professor of Science, Winnfield High 
School, 1910-11; Professor of Mathematics, Louisiana 
State University (Summer), 1911; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, Summers 1900 and 1902; Profes- 
sor in Millsaps College since 1911. 

J. REESE LIN, B.A., M.A., 

Professor of Philosophy and History 
(712 Arlington Ave.) 

B.A., Emory College; Fellow in Vanderbilt University, 1894- 
189 6; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Sage Fellow in Phil- 
osophy in Cornell University, 1910-1911; Honorary Fel- 
low, 1911-1912; Superintendent Wesson Schools, 1890- 
1901; Superintendent Natchez Schools, 1901-1907; 
Superintendent Alexandria, Louisiana, Schools, 1907- 
1909; Student in Columbia University, Summer Terms of 
19 8 and 1910; Instructor in History, University of Mis- 
sissippi, Summer Terms of 1902, 1903, and 1904; In- 
structor in Psychology and English Literature, Tulane 
University, Summer Term of 19 09; Professor of Philos- 
ophy and Education in Central College, Missouri, 1909- 
1912; Professor in Millsaps College since 1912. 

BENJAMIN ERNEST MITCHELL, M.A., Ph.D., 

Professor of Mathematics 

(72 7 Arlington Ave.) 

B.A., Scarritt-Morrisville, Mo.; M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Col- 
umbia; Professor of Mathematics, Scarritt-Morrisville 
College, 1903-1906; Scholastic Fellow in Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, 1906-1907; Teaching Fellow, 1907-1908; Instruc- 
tor in Mathematics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 
1908-1912; Student Columbia University, 1912-1914; 
Tutor in Mathematics, College of the City of New York, 
1912-1913; Instructor Columbia Extension Teaching, 
1913-1914; Professor of Mathematics in Millsaps College 
since 1914. 



14 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin and German, and Head of the Department 

of Ancient Languages 

(777 Belhaven St.) 

B.A., Southern University, 1908; M.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1911; Ph.D., ibid, 1923; Assistant Professor of 
Ancient Languages, Southern University, 1908-1909; 
Graduate Student, University of Leipzig, 1909-1910; Har- 
rison Fellow in Latin, University of Pennsylvania, 1910- 
1911; Harrison Fellow in Indo-European Comparative 
Philology, University of Pennsylvania, 1911-1912; Stu- 
dent in University of Chicago, Summers of 1914 and 1920; 
Professor of Latin and German, Woman's College of Ala- 
bama, 1912-1917; Instructor in Latin, University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1921-1922; Professor in Millsaps College since 
1917. 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS, B.A., M.A., 

Professor of Romance Languages 

(735 Arlington Ave.) 

B.A., Southwestern (Texas), 1904; B.A., Yale University, 
1907; Rhodes Scholar, 1907-1910; B.A., University of 
Oxford (Honors School), 1910; M.A., 1914; Fellow in 
Classics, Yale University, 1910-1912; Acting Professor 
of Greek, Emory University, 1912-1913; Professor of 
Romance Languages, Emory and Henry College, 1913- 
1919; Professor in Millsaps College since 1919. 

MILTON CHRISTIAN WHITE, M.A., 
Professor of English 
(1715 Edgewood Ave.) 
B.A., Southern University, 1910; Professor of English, Barton 
Academy, Mobile, Alabama, 1910-1912; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Harvard University, 1912-1914; M.A., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1914; Instructor, Peacock's School, 1914-1915; 
Professor of English, Alabama Presbyterian College, 
1915-1918; Professor of History, Austin College, 1918- 
1920; Graduate Student, University Wisconsin, 1930- 
1931; Professor in Millsaps College since 1920. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 15 

GEORGE W. HUDDLESTON, M.A., Litt.D., 

Associate Professor of Ancient Languages, Emeritus 

(1321 North President Street) 

A.B., Hiwassee College, 1883; Professor of Greek, Hiwassee 
College, 1884-91; M.A., Hiwassee College, 1886; Litt.D., 
Millsaps College, 1927; Principal of Dixon High School, 
1893-97; Associate Principal of Carthage School, 1899- 
1900; Professor in Millsaps Academy, 1900-1922; Asso- 
ciate Professor in Millsaps College since 19 22. 

VERNON BURKETT HATHORN, B.S., 
Bursar 

(512 Marshall St.) 

B.S., Millsaps College, 1915; Graduate Student, University of 
Missouri, Summers 1915 and 1916; Professor of Science, 
Missouri Military Academy, 1914-1916; Instructor Sea- 
shore Campground School, 1916-1917; Superintendent 
Lumberton Public Schools, 1917-1920; Superintendent 
Stephenson Public Schools, 1921-1923; Bursar and As- 
sistant in English, Millsaps College, 1923-24; Bursar 
since 1923. 

ROSS HENDERSON MOORE, M.S., M.A., 
Associate Professor of History 
(33 3 Millsaps Avenue) 

B.S., Millsaps College, 1923; Graduate Student and Assistant 
in Chemistry, 1923-1924; M.S., Millsaps College, 1924; 
M.A., University of Chicago, 192 8; Graduate Student in 
University of Chicago, Summers of 1924, 1925, 1926, 
1933, and Session 1927-28; Columbia University, Sum- 
mer of 1929; Duke University, Summer of 1934; Assist- 
ant Professor of History 1924-1932; Associate Professor 
of History since 19 32. 



16 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK, A.B., M.A., 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

(Founders Hall) 

A.B., Millsaps College, 1918; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 
1922; Instructor in Mathematics, Millsaps Preparatory 
School, 1918; Athletic Director and Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Seashore Camp-ground School, 1919-1920; Fellow 
and Assistant in Mathematics, Vanderbilt University, 
1920-19 22; Duke University, Summers of 19 33 and 1934; 
Instructor in Mathematics, Vanderbilt University, 19 23; 
Athletic Director and Professor of Mathematics, Seashore 
Camp-ground School, 1923-1925; Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics since 19 25. 

ELIZABETH CRAIG, B.A., M.A., 

Assistant Professor of French 

(610 North State Street) 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University, 1922; Graduate 
Student Columbia University, Summer Sessions, 1927 and 
1928; M.A., Columbia University, 1930; Diplome de la 
Sorbonne, Ecole de preparation des professeurs de fran- 
cais a I'etranger, Faculty of Letters, University of Paris, 
1930; Instructor in French, Millsaps College since 1926. 

MAGNOLIA SIMPSON, A.B., A.M., 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

(1507 North West Street) 

A.B., Millsaps College, 1924; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1927; Instructor in Latin and History, High School, Tyl- 
ertown, Miss., 19 24-26; Graduate Student, American 
Academy in Rome, Summer, 19 30; Assistant Professor 
of Latin, Millsaps College since 19 2 7. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 17 

CHARLES FRANKLIN NESBITT, B.D., M.A., 

Associate Professor of Religion 

(836 Arlington) 

A.B., Wofford College, 1922; B.D., Emory University, 1926; 
M.A., University of Chicago, 193 3; Y.M.C.A. Secretary, 
The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina, 1923- 
24; Harlan County, Kentucky, Public Schools, 1924-25, 
1925-26; Acting Professor of Bible and Philosophy, Lan- 
der College, South Carolina, 1926-27; Graduate Student, 
Junaluska School of Religion (Duke University), Summer 
1929, University of Chicago, Summers, 1927, 1931, 1933; 
Associate Professor of Religion at Millsaps College since 
1927. 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS, A.B., B.M., 
Professor of Piano 

(710 E. Poplar Boulevard) 

A.B., B.M., Whitworth College; Sherwood Music School; Amer- 
ican Conservatory; Pupil of Elizabeth McVoy, Albert 
Berne, Georgia Kober, Silvio Scionti, Walter Keller; Spe- 
cial work with Josef Lhevinne, Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler, 
and Percy Grainger. 

FRANK SLATER, B.M.. 
Professor of Voice 

(820 Oakwood Ave.) 
B.M., New Orleans Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art, 
Inc., three years student at the Royal College of Music, 
Manchester, England. Pupil of John Francis Harford 
and Madame Marie Brema. In New York, pupil of F. H. 
Haywood. Special opera coaching work with Sol Albert! 
and Emil Polak. Mr. Slater is an internationally known 
artist, and teacher of many successful professional sing- 
ers. 



18 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ROBERT RAYMOND HAYNBS, B.A., M.A., 

Assistant Professor of History and Education 

(1057 N. Congress) 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1912; Instructor in the Social 
Sciences in high schools, 1912-1914; Student in the Law 
Department, University of Tennessee, 1914-1915; Vice- 
Consul of the United States in Scotland and Englanrt, 
1916-1919; M.A., George Peabody College, 1927; Prin- 
cipal of the Academy Department, Lincoln Memorial Uni- 
versity, 1927-19 28; Instructor in History, Demonstration 
School, Peabody College, 192 8-1930; Assistant Professor 
of History and Education in Millsaps College since 1930. 

J. B. PRICE, B.S., M.S., 

Instructor in Chemistry and Mathematics 

(Galloway Hall) 

B.S., Millsaps College, 1926; High School Instructor, Yazoo 
City High School, 1926-1927; Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry, University of Mississippi, 1927-1928, and 
Summer Session of 1928; High School Principal, Sanders- 
ville, Mississippi, 1928-1929; M.S., University of Missis- 
sippi, 1929; Instructor of Chemistry, University of Mis- 
sissippi, Summer Session, 1929; University of North Caro- 
lina, Summer of 1934; Instructor of Chemistry and Math- 
ematics, Holmes County Junior College, Goodman, Mis- 
sissippi, 19 29-19 30; Instructor in Millsaps College since 
1930. 

TRANNY LEE GADDY, B.S., 

Director of Physical Education 

(Burton Hall) 

B.S., Mississippi A & M. College, 1917. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 19 

*MRS. HENRY W. COBB, B.A., 

Instructor in Spanish 

(Canton Highway) 

B.A., St. Lawrence University, 1901; Instructor, High School, 
Bath, Maine, 1903-1908; Instructor High School, Boston, 
Mass., 19 8-1911; Private Classes, Augusta, Maine, 1913- 
1917; Graduate study, The Spanish School of Middlebury 
College, Summers 19 31 and 1932; Instructor Millsaps Col- 
lege since 1930. 

MRS. MARY B. H. STONE, M.A., 
Assistant Professor of English 
(1612 North State Street) 
B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 190 8; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, 19 28; Graduate study in 
Peabody College, 1928-1929; Professor of Mathematics, 
Soule College, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1908-1910; Teacher 
of English and Superintendent Anding Consolidated 
School, 19 26-1928; Instructor Mississippi State College 
for Women, 1929-1930; Assistant Professor English, and 
Dean of Women Millsaps College since 1931. 

♦GERTRUDE DAVIS, B.A., Ph.B., M.A., 

Assistant Professor of English 

(750 Mims Place) 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1912; Ph.B., University of Chicago, 
1926; M.A., University of Chicago, 1927; Instructor, 
Grange Hall High School, 1912-1915, Principal, 1914- 
1915; Student in University of Chicago, Summers of 1915, 
1916; Professor of English and Latin, Co-Lin Jr. Coll., 
1915-1920; Student in Peabody College, Summer of 1918; 
Professor of English and History, Holmes Co. Jr. Coll., 
1920-1922; Student in Tulane University, Summers of 
1922, 1923; Professor of English and Bible, Whitworth 
College, 1922-1925, Dean 1923-1925; Instructor of Eng- 
lish, High School, St. Petersburg, Florida, 19 25-19 27, 
Spring term 1928; Graduate Student in University of 
Chicago, Summers of 1924-25-26-27, and Fall term of 

♦Absent on leave. 



20 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

1927; Professor of English and Dean, Whitworth College, 
1928-1932; Professor of English, Hinds Junior College, 
Summers of 19 31, 19 32; Assistant Professor of English 
in Millsaps College since 19 32. 

WILLIAM EMIL RIECKEN 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Indiana University, 1923; M.A., Indiana University, 1925; 
Ph.D., Indiana University, 1928; Oakland City College, 
Summer, 1911; Indiana State Teachers College, Summers, 
1912, 1914, 1916, 1917; Instructor in Grades and High 
School Mathematics and Science, 1911-1921; Principal of 
Junior High School, 1923-1924; Graduate Assistant in 
Botany, Indiana University, 19 24-19 25; Instructor in 
Botany, Indiana University, 1925-1928; Assistant Profes- 
sor of Botany, Texas A. & M., Summer, 1925; Instructor 
of Botany, Indiana State Teachers College, Summers, 
19 27 and 1931; Instructor of Biology, Evansville College, 
Summer, 1929; Assistant Professor of Botany, Ohio Wes- 
leyan University, 1928-19 33; Assistant Professor of Bot- 
any and Zoology, Ohio Wesleyan University, 19 3 3-19 34; 
Graduate Study, Indiana University Biological Station, 
Summer, 1934; Assistant Professor Biology, Millsaps Col- 
lege since 19 3 4. 

MRS. LEO B. ROBERTS, B.A., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of English 
(8 04 Euclid Avenue) 
B.A., University of South Carolina, 1921; M.A., University of 
South Carolina, 1922; Instructor, High School, Fulton, 
Kentucky, 19 22-19 23; Professor of English, Marvin Col- 
lege, Fredericktown, Missouri, 1923-1924; Y. W. C. A. 
Industrial Secretary, Greenville, South Carolina, 19 24- 
1925; Professor of English, Whitworth College, Brook- 
haven, Mississippi, 1925-1926; Instructor of English, 
Florida State College for Women, Tallahassee, Florida, 
1926-19 27; Assistant Professor of English, Millsaps Col- 
lege, Jackson, Mississippi, 1928-1931; Professor of Eng- 
lish, Bowdon College, Bowdon, Georgia, 1933-1934; As- 
sistant Professor of English, Millsaps College, 19 3 4-1935. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

COLLEY F. SPARKMAN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., Valparaiso University, 1908; M.A., Clark University, 
1911; Ph.D., New- York University, 1914; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Columbia University, Half-time, 1914-1915; Hon- 
orary Fellow in Romance Languages, University of Wis- 
consin, 1924-1925; Summer School Student, Jena Uni- 
versity, 1913; Summer School Student, Centro de Estu- 
dios Historicos, Madrid, Spain, 192 6; Instructor in Mod- 
ern Languages, A. & M. College of Texas, 1915-1918; In- 
structor of Romance Language, Indiana University, 1918- 
1919; Member of the American Commission of Educa- 
tion to Peru, 19 20-19 23; Assistant Professor of Spanish, 
University of Utah, 1923-1924; Associate Professor of 
Spanish, University of South Dakota, 1925-1927; Profes- 
sor of Modern Languages, University of Wyoming, 1927- 
1929; Dean and Professor of Modern Languages, Missis- 
sippi State Teachers College, 192 9-193 4; Millsaps College 
1934-1935. 

ARTHUR LOUIS GILMORE, A.B., M.A., 
Instructor in Religion 
(1276 N. Congress) 
A.B., Marshall College, 1923; Instructor, Poca District, West 
Virginia, High School, 1923-1924; Instructor, West Jr. 
High School, Huntington, W. Va., 192 5; M.A., Emory 
University, 19 29; Director of Christian Education, Gal- 
loway Memorial Church, 1929 until the present; Millsaps 
College, 1934-35. 

FRANCES PRESTON MILLS, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in Education 
(9 64 Morningside) 
B.A., Northwestern University, 1924; Instructor in English in 
Tchula High School, Tchula, Mississippi, 1924-1925; As- 
sociate Professor of English and Education in Belhaven 
College, 1925-1926; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 19 27; Professor of Education in Belhaven Col- 
lege, 1927-1928; Dean of the College and Professor of 
Education in Belhaven College, 19 2 8-19 33; Professor of 



22 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Education in Belhaven College, 1934-1935; Associate in 
Education in Belhaven College, Summer, 1925; Profes- 
sor of Education, Summer, 1932; Professor of Education, 
Whitworth Normal, Summer, 1927; Instructor in Educa- 
tion, State Teachers College, Hattiesburg, Summers 19 29, 
1931; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summer, 
1928; Graduate Student University of Chicago, Summer, 
1933; Instructor in Education in Millsaps College, 19 34- 
19 35 (first semester). 

THOMAS ADRIAN GILBERT, B.S., 
Bookkeeper 
B.S., Millsaps College, 1932. 

MELVIN RICHARDSON, B.S., 
Freshman Coach 

B.S., Millsaps College, 1934. 

AIMEE SHANDS, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in Education 

B.A., Tulane University, 19 30; M.A., Columbia University, 
19 31; Instructor in Psychology, Belhaven College, Sum- 
mer, 19 33; Instructor in Education, Millsaps College, 
1934-35 (second semester). 

Assistants in History 

EVELYN CLARK 

PAUL HARDIN 

Laboratory Assistants in Chemistry 

W. L. WALTON 

WILLIAM CARRAWAY 

WYATT CLOWE 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 23 

Laboratory Assistants in Biology 

LUTHER CRULL 
GORDON REEVES 

Assistants in Mathematics 

REBER LAYTON 
DAN CROSS 

Assistants in English 

PAUL RAMSEY 
LAURA HELEN BYRD 
ROBERT CUNNINGHAM 
H. V. ALLEN 

Assistants in Religion 

RAYMOND McCLINTON 
CAXTON DOGGETT 

Assistants in Education 

DOROTHY STRAHAN 

GILCIN MEADORS 

Assistants in Physical Education 

GABRIEL FELDER 

CHAUNCY GODWIN 

MARTHA DONALDSON 

Assistant in Physics 
WARFIELD HESTER 

AD3nNISTRATrVE COMMITTEES 

CURRICULUM AND DEGREES: Harrell, Sanders, Mrs. 
Stone. 



24 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

LITERARY ACTIVITIES: Periodicals, Debate, Literary 
Clubs: White, Sanders, Mrs. Stone, Price, Mrs. L. B. 
Roberts. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES: Nesbitt, Mitchell, Moore, Sulli- 
van, Gilmore. 

ATHLETICS: White, Hamilton, Gilmore, Mitchell, Harrell. 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES: Fraternities, Sororities, Public Meet- 
ings, Music: Hamilton, Moore, Lin, Miss Simpson, Miss 
Craig, Mrs. Stone. 

LIBRARY: Sanders, Miss Simpson, White, Haynes, Riecken. 

ALUMNI AND ANNUAL CONFERENCES: Sullivan, Harrell, 
Moore, Van Hook, Nesbitt, Price. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE RELATIONS: Lin, Harrell, Hamilton. 

STUDENT ADVISORY: Dean Mitchell, Harrell, Hamilton, 
Mrs. Stone, Haynes, White, Riecken. 

FRESHMAN COUNCIL: Dean Hamilton, Mrs. Stone, Miss 
Simpson, Miss Craig, Haynes, Miss Heald, Van Hook, Gil- 
more, King. 

WOMAN'S COUNCIL: Dean Stone, Miss Simpson, Miss Heald, 
Mrs. J. L. Roberts. 

DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTION: Haynes. 

NOTE: 

The Committee on Curriculum and Degrees will have 
charge of the work of classification of students. 

The Committee on Literary Activities will superintend in- 
tercollegiate debates and oratorical contests, as well as the 
student publications, the Bobashela and the Purple and White. 

HISTORY 

The Charter of Millsaps College, which was granted Feb- 
ruary 21, 1890, reads as follows: 

AN ACT to incorporate Millsaps College. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 25 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State 
of Mississippi, That John J. Wheat, Samuel M. Thames, 
Thomas J. Newell and Rufus M. Standifer, of the North Mis- 
sissippi Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and Garvin D. Shands, David L. Sweatman, James B. Streater 
and John Trice, lay members of said church within bounds of 
said Conference, and Thomas L. Mellen, Warren C. Black, 
Alexander F. Watkins and Charles G. Andrews, members of 
the Mississippi Conference of said church, and Marion M. 
Evans, Luther Sexton, William L. Nugent and Reuben W. 
Millsaps, of Jackson, lay members of said church, within the 
bounds of said Mississippi Conference, and Bishop Charles B. 
Galloway, be and they are hereby constituted a body corporate 
and politic by and under the name and style of Millsaps Col- 
lege, and by that name they and their successors may sue and 
be sued, plead and be impleaded, contract and be contracted 
with, and have a common seal and break the same at pleasure, 
and may accept donations of real and personal property for 
the benefit of the College hereafter to be established by them, 
and contributions of money or negotiable securities of every 
kind in aid of the endowment of such College; and may con- 
fer degrees and give certificates of scholarship and make by- 
laws for the government of said College and its affairs, as well 
as for their government, and do and perform all other acts 
for the benefit of said institution and the promotion of its wel- 
fare that are not repugnant to the Constitution and laws of 
this State and of the United States, subject, however, to the 
approval of the said Conferences. 

Sec. 2. As soon as convenient after the passage of this 
Act, the persons named in the first section thereof shall meet 
in the City of Jackson, in this State, and organize by accept- 
ance of the charter and the election of Bishop Charles B. Gal- 
loway as their permanent President, and of such other persons 
as they may determine to fill the offices of Vice-President, 
Secretary and Treasurer, and shall prescribe the duties, pow- 
ers and terms of office of all said officers, except as to the 
terms of their said President, who shall hold office during life 
or good behavior, or so long as he may be physically able to 
discharge his duties. 



26 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

They shall also select by lot from the lay and clerical trus- 
tees from each of said Conferences one-half, who shall be 
trustees of said College for three years and until their succes- 
sors are elected, and the other half not so selected shall re- 
main in office for the term of six years and until their succes- 
sors are chosen, as hereinafter mentioned. Upon the death, 
resignation or removal of said Galloway, or his permanent 
physical disability to discharge the duties of his office, the said 
Trustees may elect their President and prescribe his duties, 
powers and term of office. 

Sec. 3. That the said Trustees shall, before the meeting 
of said Conference next before the expiration of the term of 
office of any of their number, notify the secretary of said Con- 
ferences thereof, and the vacancies shall be filled by said Con- 
ferences in such a way and at such time as they may deter- 
mine, and the persons so selected shall succeed to the office, 
place, jurisdiction and powers of the Trustees whose terms of 
office have expired. And the said Corporation and the Col- 
lege established by it shall be subject to the visitorial powers 
of said Conferences at all times, and the said College, its 
property and effects shall be the property of said Church un- 
der the special patronage of said Conferences. 

Sec. 4. That the said Trustees, when organized as here- 
inoefore directed, shall be known by the corporate name set 
out in the first section of this Act, and all money, promissory 
notes and evidence of debt heretofore collected under the di- 
rection of said Conference for said College shall be turned 
over to and receipted for by them in their said corporate name, 
and the payee of such notes and evidences of debt shall en- 
dorse and assign the same to the corporation herein provided 
for, which shall thereafter be vested with the full legal title 
thereto, and authorized to sue for and collect the same. 

The said corporation shall have the power to select any 
appropriate town, city or other place in this State at which to 
establish this College, and to purchase grounds not to exceed 
one hundred acres as a building site and campus therefor, and 
erect thereon such buildings, dormitories and halls as they 
may think expedient and proper to subserve the purposes of 
their organization and the best interest of said institution, and 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 27 

they may invite propositions from any city or town or individ- 
ual in the State for such grounds, and may accept donations 
or grants of land for the site of said institution. 

Sec. 5. That the land or grounds not to exceed one hun- 
dred acres used by tho corporation as a site and a campus for 
said College, and the buildings, dormitories and halls thereon 
erected, and the endowment fund contributed to said College 
shall be exempt from all State, County and Municipal taxa- 
tion so long as the said College shall be kept open and main- 
tained for the purpose contemplated by this Act, and no longer. 

Sec. 6. That the cost of education shall, as far as prac- 
ticable, be reduced by said corporation to the lowest point con- 
sistent with the efficient operation of said College, and to this 
end reports shall be made to the said Conferences from year 
to year, and their advice in that behalf taken, and every rea- 
sonable effort shall be made to bring a collegiate education 
within reach and ability of the poorer classes of the State. 

Sec. 7. That this Act take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

The College has its origin in the general policy of the 
Methodist Church to maintain its institutions under its own 
control for higher learning in the Arts and Sciences. 

At the Annual Session of the Mississippi Conference in the 
City of Vicksburg, on December 7, in the year 1888, the fol- 
lowing resolutions were adopted by a large majority of the 
Conference: 

"Resolved, 1. That a college for males under 
the auspices and control of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, ought to be established at some cen- 
tral and accessible point in the State of Mississippi. 

"2. That a committee of three laymen and 
three preachers be appointed to confer with a like 
committee to be appointed by the North Mississippi 
Conference to formulate plans and to receive offers 
of donations of land, buildings or money for that 
purpose, and report to the next session of this Con- 
ference." 



28 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

In accordance with this action, the President of the Con- 
ference, Bishop R. K. Hargrove appointed the following com- 
mittee: Rev, T. L. Mellen, Rev. W. C. Black, Rev. A. F. Wat- 
kins, Major R. W. Millsaps, Col. W. L. Ntigent and Dr. Luther 
Sexton. 

On December 12, 1888, the North Mississippi Conference 
met at Starkville, Mississippi, Bishop C, B. Galloway presid- 
ing. The Rev. T. L. Mellen appeared and reported the action 
taken by the Mississippi Conference, The following tran- 
script from the North Mississippi Conference Journal gives 
the response made by that body: 

"Resolved, 1. That a College for the education 
of boys and young men should be established in the 
State of Mississippi under the auspices of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 

"That a committee of three laymen and three 
ministers be appointed to confer with a like com- 
mittee already appointed by the Mississippi Confer- 
ence." 

The following committee was accordingly appointed: 
Rev. J. J. Wheat, Rev. S. M. Thames, Rev. T. J. Newell, Hon. 
G. D. Shands, Capt. D. L. Sweatman and Mr. J. B Streater. 

To the action of these Conferences we may trace the di- 
rect origin of the College. 

The joint commissions constituted by the action summar- 
ized above met in the City of Jackson in January, 1889. The 
Rev. Dr. J. J. Wheat was called to the chair. In stating the 
purpose of the meeting he made a stirring appeal in behalf of 
the proposition to establish a Methodist College in Mississippi 
for the education of young men. In response to this earnest 
appeal. Major R. W. Millsaps, a member of the commission, 
proposed to give $50,000 to endow the institution, provided 
the Methodists of Mississippi would give a sum equal to this 
amount for said purpose. This proposition was enthusiasti- 
cally approved, and after a plan of procedure was adopted, 
Bishop Charles B. Galloway was invited to conduct a campaign 
in the interest of the proposed endowment fund. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 29 

Under the direction of this distinguished leader, the most 
gratifying progress was reported from time to time. The re- 
port submitted to the Conferences by the committee in Decem- 
ber, IS 89, refers to the movement in the following language: 
"The canvass, on account of the numerous ne- 
cessitated absences of Bishop Galloway from the 
State, could not be continuously carried on, but even 
the partial canvass made, embracing not more than 
one-fifth of our territory, resulted in the most grati- 
fying and encouraging success. The interest awak- 
ened in the enterprise has extended beyond the limits 
of our own Church, and is felt by every denomina- 
tion of Christians, and by every section of the State. 
It is safe to say that no effort of Methodism has ever 
kindled such enthusiasm in our State or evoked such 
liberal offerings to the Lord. The fact has been 
demonstrated that the Church is profoundly con- 
vinced that the College is an absolute necessity." 
The report continues: 

"So high is the appreciation of the value of the 
proposed institution that numerous towns in the 
State have entered into earnest competition to se- 
cure the location of the college within the limits of 
their respective borders, offering from $10,000 to 
$36,000, and from twenty to eighty acres of land." 

In December, 18 89, the Rev. A. F, Watkins, a member of 
the Mississippi Conference, was appointed a special agent to 
co-operate with Bishop Galloway in all matters pertaining to 
the endowment of the proposed College. As the work of rais- 
ing the sum designated in the original proposition progressed, 
and $25,000 had been collected. Major Millsaps in the year 
1890 paid $25,000 into the College treasury. 

In December, 1892, the Rev. J. W. Chambers was appoint- 
ed agent for the College, and on December 30, 189 3, he re- 
ported that the full amount had been collected to meet the 
terms of Major Millsaps' proposition, and thereupon $25,000 
was immediately paid by Major Millsaps to the Executive Com- 
mittee and the following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved, That the Executive Committee return 



30 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

our most heartfelt thanks to Major R. W. Millsaps 
for his second gift of $25,000, this day turned over 
to us. For his princely liberality, and unfailing in- 
terest in the great enterprise so happily and suc- 
cessfully inaugurated, the Church and State owe him 
a large debt of gratitude." 

The Conference having provided for a Board of Trustees, 
the joint commission dissolved in January, 1890. This Board 
to which was referred the matter of organizing the College, 
was composed of the following: 

BISHOP CHARLES B. GALLOWAY, President 
REV. W. C. BLACK, D.D. REV. S. M. THAMES 

REV. T. L. MELLEN REV. T. J. NEWELL 

REV. A. P. WATKINS REV. C. G. ANDREWS, D.D. 

REV. R. M. STANDIFER HON. G. D. SHANDS 

MAJ. R. W. MILLSAPS CAPT. D. L. SWEATMAN 

COL. W. L. NUGENT MR. J. B. STREATER 

DR. LUTHER SEXTON MR. JOHN TRICE 

HON. M. M. EVANS REV. J. J. WHEAT, D.D. 

After the Board organized under the charter, the question 
of locating the College was considered with great care. The 
Board met repeatedly to consider the offers made by different 
towns, and finally on May 20, 1891, while in session in Wi- 
nona, Mississippi, decided to locate the College in Jackson, the 
capital of the State. The citizens of Jackson contributed 
$21,000 for grounds and buildings, and to this sum Major 
Millsaps added $15,000. Plans for a commodious main build- 
ing were immediately procured, grounds were purchased, and 
in a comparatively short time buildings were in process of 
erection. 

The College opened its doors for the reception of students 
in 1892 with Rev. W. B. Murrah as President, and three pro- 
fessors in the College. A Preparatory School was opened at 
the same time with one Master. From time to time its facili- 
ties have been enlarged and additional departments created, 
until it now has, in addition to its President, twenty-two pro- 
fessors in fourteen departments. 

The Presidents of the College have been W. B. Murrah, 
D.D., LL.D., later Bishop Murrah (1892-1910), D. C. Hull, 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 31 

M.A., (1910-1912), A. F. Watkins, D.D., (1912-1923), and 
D. M. Key, Ph.D., LL.D., (1923 ). 

The unusual facilities for conducting a Law School in 
Jackson led to the establishment in 189 6 of a Law School. 
Hon. Edward Mayes, ex-Chancellor of the University of Mis- 
sissippi, and for more than fourteen years a professor of law 
in that institution, took active control of the new school. In 
1918 it was discontinued. 

In 1911 the Academy was formally separated from the 
College. It was made a distinct institution with the official 
title of the Millsaps Academy. In 1922 it was discontinued. 

The facilities of the College were enlarged in 1895-1896 
by the generosity of Major Millsaps, who gave Webster Science 
Hall. In 1901 Mr. Dan A. James, of Yazoo City, built an ob- 
servatory for the College, in memory of his father, Mr. Peter 
James, and of his brother, Mr. Samuel James, and furnished 
it with a fine telescope. Millsaps College can thus offer un- 
usual advantages in astronomy. In 1902, to supply the in- 
creasing demand for better dormitory and dining hall facili- 
ties, Major Millsaps gave the College the property formerly 
known as Jackson College. This enabled the College to fill 
the demands made on it at that time. In addition to this gift 
Major Millsaps gave fifty acres of land immediately adjoin- 
ing our campus. Ample provision is thus made for the future 
expansion of the College. 

In 1906 the General Education Board offered to donate 
from the funds provided by John D. Rockefeller for Higher 
Education $25,000, provided an additional sum of $75,000.00 
should be collected from other sources, for the permanent en- 
dowment of the College. Rev. T. W. Lewis, of the North 
Mississippi Conference, was made financial agent of the Col- 
lege to collect this sum. In 1910, $32,279.10 had been col- 
lected for this purpose. Mr. I. C. Enochs, a generous citizen 
of Jackson, gave an additional $5,000. Major Millsaps, with 
characteristic generosity, contributed the remaining $37,- 
720.9 0. Thus the endowment of the College was increased 
by $100,000. 



32 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

In 1913 Major Millsaps gave to the College property on 
Capitol Street, Jackson, valued at $150,000. This is the 
largest single gift to the College, 

The dormitory of the Preparatory School was destroyed 
by fire in 1913, but was promptly rebuilt and made more val- 
uable by alterations which also improved greatly the appear- 
ance of the structure. A more disastrous fire destroyed the 
main building in 1914. But within a few months the old 
structure had been replaced by a far more commodious and 
imposing administration building. 

At the decease of Major R. W. Millsaps in 1916, it was 
found that he had left for the endowment of the College life 
insurance to the amount of $88,000. This final benefaction 
fittingly closed the long list of his gifts to the College. 

During the Christian Education Campaign of 1921 Mr. W. 
S. F. Tatum, a generous layman of Hattiesburg, donated 
$100,000 to the College for the establishment of the Depart- 
ment of Religious Education. The Board of Trustees accept- 
ed the gift, giving the department the name of the generous 
donor. Later, in 1923 Mr. Tatum, realizing the growing im- 
portance of this field in the church college, added $25,000 to 
the sum at first given by him. By these gifts he created the 
first separately endowed department in the college. The de- 
partment was organized at the opening of the session of 1921- 
'22, with Professor C. A, Bowen in charge. Provision was 
made in the deed of gifts for the employment of an Associate 
Professor, and Millsaps College now has two professors in this 
department. The work of this department has grown in 
scope and effectiveness until it is now recognized as doing a 
leading work in the Methodist Church in this field. It is to 
be hoped that others will see the opportunity for promoting 
instruction in particular subjects by endowing other depart- 
ments. The Science Departments, the History Department, 
the Department of Education, and the Carnegie-Millsaps Libra- 
ry are, because of their needs, promising fields for a fruitful 
investment in Christian Education. 

In 19 26 the number of women students had increased to 
such an extent that it became necessary to provide housing ac- 
commodations on the College campus, and the Sullivan House 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 33 

which had been removed in order to make room for the new 
Carnegie-Millsaps Library, was fitted up and equipped for this 
purpose. During the session of 1928-29, a second building, a 
new apartment house on "West street was leased and furnished 
as a home for young women. It immediately became appar- 
ent, however, that this provision is inadequate and will have 
to be enlarged. Plans are now on foot by which it is expected 
that adequate provisions will be made for all young women 
now in the College and for those who may enter the Junior or 
Senior Class. It will not be possible to admit young women 
not residents of Jackson to the Freshman or Sophomore Class. 

Since the foundation of the old library had so given away 
as to make the building unsafe, the Carnegie Library Board 
agreed in 1923 to rebuild the Library on a new site, and to 
provide a larger one more nearly adequate to the needs of the 
college, which had grown greatly since the original Library 
was built. So a new Library costing $60,000.00 became 
available in 1925-1926. 

In 19 2 6 and again in 1927 the Conferences took action 
approving and endorsing the purpose of the College to make a 
special appeal for the enlargement and improvement of the 
physical equipment. In the spring of 19 2 8 this appeal was 
begun and some $2 6 8,000 in subscriptions was secured. This 
amount included a number of gifts of considerable sums in- 
cluding $50,000 from B. B. Jones who had previously given 
$20,000 to the endowment, $15,000 from W. M. Buie, whose 
previous gifts have amounted to $28,300; and $15,000 from 
I. C. Enochs family. At the next Annual Conference, Rev. V. 
G. Clifford was appointed as financial commissioner who de- 
voted his time to the raising of funds for the completion of 
the buildings needed. As a result of the subscriptions already 
made, a magnificent science building costing about $180,000 
has been erected. 

In compliance with a request from the student body the 
Board of Trustees, at their annual meeting in June 1932, 
named the new science building Sullivan-Harrell Hall. 

Since 1912 Millsaps College has been a member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. An 



34 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

impartial committee of the Association made exhaustire in- 
quiry into the financial resources of the institution, its courses, 
the training of its instructors, and the character of its work, 
and unanimously recommended it for membership. This in- 
quiry extended over a year, and no conditions whatever were 
imposed for the election of the College, since it had been of 
the first rank for some years. Its degrees are recognized by 
all institutions of learning as among the best in the land. 

The College is also a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Colleges, and of the American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars. 

The following statement of the resources of the College, 
while not inclusive of all sources of its revenue, gives some 
idea of the solidity of its foundation, and also furnishes a 
guaranty of its perpetuity: 

Productive endowment, including reve- 
nue producing property .$ 902,955.53 

Unproductive endowment (land) 100,000.00 

Buildings 506,898.91 

Grounds 12 7,071.18 

Books, Equipment, etc 80,587.15 

New Construction and Equipment 13,740.80 

TOTAL $1,731,253.57 

One of the purposes which the College keeps constantly 
in view is indicated by the following section of the charter: 

"The cost of education shall, as far as practica- 
ble, be reduced to the lowest point consistent with 
the efficient operation of said College, and every rea- 
sonable effort shall be made to bring collegiate edu- 
cation within the reach of the poorer classes of the 
State." 

With a productive endowment of $902,955.53, and build- 
ings and grounds worth $63 3,970.09, it rests on a foundation 
which assures its perpetuity. It has the support of a great 
religious denomination, yet it is not sectarian in its policy. 
It numbers among its patrons representatives of all the Chris- 
tian churches. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 35 

Gifts of over $1,000.00 to Millsaps College from, the Beginning 

of Its History, Including Cash Payments on Subscriptions 

Made in Building Campaign of 1928 

R. W. Millsaps, Jackson $550,000.00 

W. S. F. Tatum, Hattiesburg 130,000.00 

W. M. Buie, Jackson 28,300.00 

B. B. Jones, Berryville, Va 30,000.00 

I. C. Enochs Family, Jackson 18,500.00 

Stewart Gammill, Jackson 11,000.00 

Estate J. H. Scruggs, Dec'd, Corinth 9,000.00 

J. L. and M. S. Enochs, Jackson 4,860.00 

Jas. Hand, Purvis 4,500.00 

T. B. Lampton, Jackson 3,900.00 

Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Fitzhugh, Memphis 3,500.00 

W. H. Tribbett, Terry 3,000.00 

P. H. Enochs, Fernwood 2,833.33 

J. L. Dantzler, New Orleans 2,250.00 

D. W. Babb 2,000.00 

W. A. Davenport, Forest 2,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Wortman, Jackson 1,680.00 

W. H. Watkins, Jackson 1,500.00 

J. A. Moore, Quitman 1,500.00 

Mrs. A. D. Gunning, Jackson 1,500.00 

R. E. Kennington, Jackson 1,000.00 

C. R. Ridgeway, Jr., Jackson 1,000.00 

Enochs & Wortman, Jackson 1,000.00 

Weston Lumber Co., Logtown 1,000.00 

H. L. Wilkinson, Shelby 1,000.00 

J. E. Coleman, Doddsville 1,000.00 

L. L. Roberts, Canton 1,000.00 

J. R. Bingham, Carrollton 1,000.00 

E. W. Reid, Magnolia 1,000.00 

Peebles Estate, Jackson 1,000.00 

Corporations 

General Education Board, New York 125,000.00 

Carnegie Corp., New York 69,000.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 87 



PART n. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR AD>nSSION 

ANNOUNCEMENTS ANTD REGUIiATIONS 

EXPENSES 



38 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

For admission to Millsaps College, the general require- 
ments are as follows: 

1. Good Character — As attested by the certificate from 
the school last attended, or other valid proof. 

2. Adequate Preparation — As shown by the certificate 
of an accredited school, or an equivalent examination. 

Students are admitted to Millsaps College as: 

1. Full Freshmen. 

2. Students with advanced standing, 

3. Special Students. 

FuU Freshmen 

For admission as Full Freshmen the candidate must of- 
fer fifteen units as specified below. English 3 units. Algebra 
1% units. Plane Geometry 1 unit. History 2 units, Foreign 
Language 2 units in one Language. 

Advanced Standing 

For admission to advanced standing the candidate must 
submit a transcript of the work done in a recognized junior or 
senior college. The transcript must show the satisfactory com- 
pletion of at least twenty-four semester hours with a grade 
of 80% in six of these hours. 

Special Student 

For admission as a Special Student, the candidate must 
present adequate proofs of good character, and of the needful 
maturity of training. Such students must in all cases meet 
the specific entrance requirements, as prescribed for the 
courses elected by them. But it is expressly ordered that no 
special student shall be recognized as a candidate for any de- 
gree from Millsaps unless he shall have completed all entrance 
requirements at least one year before the date of graduation. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 39 

DEFINITION OF UNIT 

The unit in the following estimate (p. 40) means a sub- 
ject of study pursued in' an academy or high school through a 
session of nine months with recitations five times a week, an 
average of forty-five minutes being devoted to each recitation. 

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR AD>nSSION 

The subjects accepted for admission and their value in 
units are given in tabulated form on page 40. The applicant 
for admission may enter either by certificate or by examina- 
tion. 

For admission by certificate, the candidate should file 
with the Registrar of the College, not later than September 1, 
a certificate of preparation, made out on a blank form fur- 
nished by the State High School Inspector to the Principal of 
th'3 high school. This certificate must come from some recog- 
nized institution of collegiate rank, or an accredited high 
school or academy. It must bear in all cases the signature 
of the head of the school, must specify the character and con- 
tents of each course offered for entrance credit, must give 
the length of time devoted to the course, and must give the 
candidate's grades in percentage. In the scientific course two 
hours of laboratory instruction will be counted as the equiva- 
lent of one hour recitation. Certificate of preparation from 
private tutors will in no case be accepted. Students thus pre- 
pared must in all cases take the entrance examination. 

For admission by examination, the candidate must pre- 
sent himself at the College in September, if the Examination 
has not been previously taken. 



40 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
Subjects Accepted for Admission 



SUBJECTS 


TOPICS UNITS 


English A 
English B 
English C 


Higher English Grammar % 

Elements of Rhetoric and Composition 1 

English Literature 1% 


Mathematics A 
Mathematics B 
Mathematics C 
Mathematics D 
Mathematics E 
Mathematics F 
Mathematics G 


Algebra to Quadratic Equations 1 

Quadratics Through Progressions Yz to 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

Solid Geometry % 

Plane Trigonometry % 

•Mechanical Drawing 1 

Advanced Arithmetic 1 


Latin A 
Latin B 
Latin C 
Latin D 


Grammar and Composition 1 

Caesar, four books or their equivalent 1 

tCicero, six orations 1 

tVergil, the first six books of the Aeneid 1 


Greek A 
Greek B 


Grammar and Composition 1 

Xenophon, first four books of the Anabasis 1 


French A 
French B 


One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


Spanish A 
Spanish B 


One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 

Eilementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


German A 
German B 


One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at lej.st 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


History A 
History B 
History C 
History D 


Ancient History 1 

Mediaeval and Modern History 1 

English History 1 

American History, or American History and 
Civil Government 1 


Science A 
Science B 
Science C 
Science D 
Science E 


Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Botany 1 

Zoology 1 

Physiography 1 

Physiology _ _ _ 1 


Science G 


Agriculture 1 to 2 




Bible _ _ _ 1 




General Science 1 

Home Economics 1 

Economics _ 1 




Manual Training 2 

Bookkeeping 2 

Stenography 1 

Typewriting 1 

Physical Training _ _ 1 







•Conditioned on the presentation of an equal amount of geometry. 

tin place of a part of Cicero an equivalent of Sallust's Cataline, and in 
place of a part of Vergil an equivalent of Ovid will be accepted. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 41 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Millsaps College is named in honor of Major R. W. Mill- 
saps, whose munificent gifts have made the existence of the 
institution possible. The College is the property of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South, and was organized by the con- 
current action of the Mississippi and North Mississippi Confer- 
ences. It is not sectarian, however, but numbers among its 
patrons members of all the Christian denominations. 

LOCATION 

Jackson, the capital of the state, and the seat of the Col- 
lege, is easily accessible by five lines of railway. Thirty pas- 
senger trains arrive and depart daily. The College is located 
in the northern part of the city on a commanding elevation, 
with perfect drainage, and in a beautiful campus of one hun- 
dred or more acres. A healthier spot it would be difficult to 
find within the limits of the State. Jackson is a city of 48,000 
inhabitants, with handsome churches and public buildings, 
and is noted for the refinement and intelligence of its people. 
Its literary, social and religious advantages are superior. 

THE JAMES OBSERVATORY 

Millsaps College is prepared to offer excellent advantages 
In the study of astronomy. The late Mr. Dan A. James, of 
Yazoo City, Mississippi, built an observatory for the College 
in memory of his father, Mr. Peter James, and of his brother, 
Mr. Samuel James. He also furnished the observatory with a 
fine telescope. The class of 1916 donated a fine photographic 
lens to the observatory. A two inch prismatic transit by 
Gaertner was added to the equipment in 1930. 

CARNEGIE ailLLSAPS LIBRARY 

Near the close of the session of 1905-1906, Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie offered to give ?15,000 for a library building if the 
trustees would supply an endowment of equal amount. Major 
Millsaps added to his many contributions by giving the full 
amount of the endowment. 



42 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

The foundations of this handsome building unfortunate- 
ly gave way so that it became necessary to rebuild the struc- 
ture, and the Carnegie Corporation has generously appro- 
priated $50,000.00 for this purpose. The books are cata- 
logued fully by the A. L. A. system and are in charge of Mrs. 
M. B. Clark and Miss Mary Heald, trained and experienced 
librarians. 

From time to time additions have been made from the en- 
dowment funds and from the Library fees. 

In addition to the books thus obtained, the library has 
been so fortunate as to secure most of the well selected libra- 
ries of the late Dr. C. K. Marshall, John W. Burruss and Rev. 
W. G. Millsaps, the entire library of Colonel W. L. Nugent, 
besides many volumes from the libraries of ex-Chancellor Ed- 
ward Mayes, Dr. A. F. Watkins, and Major R. W. Millsaps. 
Dr. J. M. Burton, late professor of Romance Languages, who 
died in France in the service of his country on October 5, 
1918, generously left to the College his entire Romance li- 
brary. This has been appropriately labeled and shelved, and 
constitutes a valuable addition to the books on Romance Lan- 
guages. The Martha A. Turner Fund, founded by Mrs. J. R. 
Bingham, of Carrollton, Mississippi, is used for the purchase 
of books in English literature. Through the generosity of 
Hon. "W. S. F. Tatum a fine collection of books has been built 
up for the use of the Department of Religion. 

Mrs. Charles B. Galloway made a notable addition to our 
collection of valuable books by giving to the College the fine 
theological library of the lamented Bishop Charles B. Gallo- 
way. 

In 19 31 the Carnegie Corporation included the Millsaps 
College library in the list of college libraries to which special 
donations were made for the purchase of books. A sum of 
$10,000 has been allotted to the library to be paid in five an- 
nual installments. This fund has already greatly strengthened 
the library, especially by making it possible to obtain many 
works and sets of books that it would otherwise have been 
difficult or impossible to obtain at this time. In the last 
three and one-half years, through January, 19 35, more than 
3,300 books have been added to the library from this source. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 43 

The students also have access to the State Library and 
the Jackson Public Library, which are unusually complete in 
many departments. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION 

Students will be required to be present at morning wor- 
ship in the College Chapel. In this daily service the Faculty 
and students come together to hear the reading of the Bible 
and to engage in singing and prayer. Students must attend 
religious worship at least once on Sunday in one of the 
churches of Jackson. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

One of the most potent factors in the College for develop- 
ing the students into a broader life is the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. Its policy and aim is to develop the three- 
fold nature of the students — the moral, intellectual, and spirit- 
ual. It is a well known fact that a student who develops him- 
self intellectually, but neglects his spiritual nature, is in no 
sense a complete man. Unless one becomes a well-rounded 
man, he is not fit to fight the battles of life. 

In this connection the association was organized shortly 
after the College was founded. It has done as much to mould 
character and to hold up a high standard of ideals before the 
students as any other department in connection with the Col- 
lege. It has been dominated by the double purpose of leading 
men to accept Christ and to form such associations as will 
guard them against the temptations of college life. The As- 
sociation has done much to strengthen the spiritual life and 
influence of the College, to promote Christian character and 
fellowship and progressive Christian work. It trains its mem- 
bers for Christian service and leads them to devote their lives 
to the cause of Christ where they can accomplish the most for 
the extension of the Kingdom of God. In order to accomplish 
this purpose the Association holds weekly meetings on Wed- 
nesday evenings. These services are usually conducted by 
some of the students, but occasionally by some member of the 
Faculty, or by some prominent minister or layman. 



44 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Realizing the importance of a young man's choosing his 
life work while in college, a series of addresses on "Life 
Work" has been arranged and prominent men of each profes- 
sion are invited to address the Association from time to time 
on their respective professions. 

An annual revival is held some time in the year, lasting 
more than a week, which results in leading young men to 
Christ each year. During the current year a spiritual life con- 
ference conducted by Rev. W. C. Newman and Dr. W. D. 
Weatherford contributed very much to the religious life of 
the students. 

The Association sends yearly a delegation to the South- 
ern Students' Conference at Blue Ridge, North Carolina. 
Since the ten days of the Convention are assiduously devoted 
to discussing Association work and problems, the delegates 
always return enthusiastic and zealous for doing Christian 
service. 

The work of the Association is carried on by the students; 
each man has his part to do according to the plan of the organ- 
ization. The President, elected by the members, appoints 
chairmen of nine committees, each composed of three or more 
men. It is the duty of the Publicity Committee to advertise 
all meetings, and secure good attendance. The Membership 
Committee meets all new students as they arrive, and gives 
them any information desired concerning College, boarding 
facilities, etc. Afterward this committee calls on each stu- 
dent and urges him to become a member of the Association. 
The Reception Committee has charge of College Night, and 
any other entertainment that the Association may choose to 
give during the year. The object of College Night is to make 
the students acquainted with one another and to interest the 
new man in the different phases of College life. The Em- 
ployment Committee assists deserving students in getting em- 
ployment for their spare time. The City Mission Committee 
has charge of work in different parts of the city. The Devo- 
tional Committee provides leaders, and the Music Committee, 
whose Chairman is the treasurer of the Association, collects 
the annual dues and raises funds sufficient for meeting cur- 
rent expenses. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 45 

But most important are the Bible Study and Mission 
Study Committees. Bible study groups are formed at the dor- 
mitories and at the boarding houses. The students engage 
in daily Bible reading and meet for one hour each week, for 
discussion. The Mission Study Committee arranges courses 
in biographies of missionaries in various mission fields and 
secures leaders for the various classes. A student Volunteer 
Band is organized and is active in preparation for mission 
work. Delegates are sent each year to the Volunteer Con- 
vention, and the College is now represented in the foreign 
field by a number of efficient missionaries. 

The Y. M. C. A. is back of every phase of College life, 
and it is expected that every student will identify himself with 
the organization. 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTLIN ASSOCIATION 

The Young Women's Christian Association plays the same 
part in the lives of the young women of the college as is played 
by the Y. M. C. A. in the lives of the men. It exerts a pro- 
found influence for good on the whole college. 

Religious services are held by the Y. W. C. A, each week, 
a period being set apart in the college programme of exercises 
for that purpose. The Association sends each year a delegate 
to Blue Ridge. The girls of the college have in the Y. W. C. A. 
all the advantages offered by that organization in the best col- 
leges for women. 

The Freshman Commission constitutes those who are in 
training for position as future officers of the Association. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Two large halls have been provided for the Literary So- 
cieties organized for the purpose of improvement in debate, 
declamation, composition and acquaintance with the methods 
of deliberative bodies. These societies are conducted by the 
students under constitutions and by-laws of their own fram- 
ing. They are named, respectively, the Galloway and the La- 
mar Societies, and contribute greatly to the improvement of 
their members. 



46 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Representatives chosen from the societies engage in in- 
tercollegiate debate with teams from the other colleges of the 
state and also other institutions. In recent years there have 
been debates with Emory University, Birmingham Southern 
College, Vanderbilt University, Centenary College, and others. 
In 1925-'26 Millsaps debate teams won every one of the six 
debates engaged in, and since that time have won a majority 
of their contests. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

There are two literary publications which have an excel- 
lent standing among the student publications of the South, 
viz., the Purple and White, the campus weekly, and the Col- 
lege annual, the Bobashela. 

HONORARY FRATERNITIES 

Student leadership in college activities is signalized and 
rewarded by election to various honorary fraternities. Liter- 
ary ability among the men of the college leads to member- 
ship in the Kit-Kat Chapter of the national literary frater- 
nity, Sigma Upsilon. Similar ability among the co-eds leads 
to membership in Chi Delta Phi, a national literary honor so- 
ciety for women. Excellence in scholarship is given recog- 
nition by election to Eta Sigma. Pi Kappa Delta recognizes 
the leaders in oratory and debate at Millsaps. Student lead- 
ership, of whatever kind, is recognized by membership in 
Omicron Delta Kappa, an intercollegiate leadership fraternity. 
Membership in this organization is regarded as a great honor. 
Excellence in dramatics at Millsaps, as manifested by partici- 
pation in the dramas presented by the Millsaps Players, leads 
to association with Alpha Psi Omega, the youngest honorary 
fraternity on the campus and one of the livest. Such honors 
as those mentioned above are much sought after in our insti- 
tution, and cause students to attain a high degree of excel- 
lence in their chosen fields of student activity. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

For a number of years there have been two excellent glee 
clubs, the men's glee club under the direction of Dr. A. P. 



MUjLSAPS college 47 

Hamilton, and the women's glee club under the direction of 
Miss Magnolia Simpson. Both glee clubs are now under 
the direction of Mr. Alvin J. King. An excellent band has been 
organized, the student body raising some $1,200.00 for instru- 
ments and equipment, and it has made rapid progress. The 
students of the Fine Arts Department have organized the 
Beethoven Club, and presented some excellent programs, 
privately and publicly. 

Several other voluntary organizations, such as the Science 
Club, and the Classical Club, give expressions to collateral 
scholarly interests outside the regular curriculum. 

ATHLETICS 

Millsaps College is a member of the Southern Intercolle- 
giate Athletic Association, and the Dixie Conference, and takes 
part in all intercollegiate games. Games and sports of all 
kinds are under the special direction of the General Athletic 
Association, a student organization, whose object is to pro- 
mote this class of physical exercise. The faculty exercises a 
general advisory control endeavoring to foresee and avert dan- 
gerous tendencies or excess in physical exercises while giving 
to the students as far as possible entire liberty of manage- 
ment; a strict limit is placed upon the character of the inter- 
collegiate games and the number played away from the Col- 
lege. 

The Athletic Director has supervision of all intercolle- 
giate teams and conducts mass games and interclass leagues 
that enlist a large percentage of the students in some form 
of active participation in athletics. For those who report 
regularly two hours a week for exercise, under the instruc- 
tion of the Athletic Director, a scholastic credit of one session- 
hour is granted. 

BOARDING FACTLITIES 

Students of Millsaps College, as a rule arrange for their 
living in one of two ways. 

1. There are seven small cottages, in which students can 
room at reduced cost. These cottages are provided with the 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

same furniture provided for dormitory rooms. The cottages 
are admirably situated on the eastern side of the campus. The 
rooms are sufficiently large to accommodate two students 
each. The room rental per student in the cottages is $20.00 
per year in advance or $12.50 per half year in advance. Furni- 
ture, lights, fuel, and water are furnished except to families 
using apartments. Students wishing to engage a room in one 
of the cottages should write Mr. V. B. Hathorn, at the college. 

2. In the dormitories the expense will be approximate- 
ly $18.00 to $21.00 per month including room, light, steam 
heat, board, matron's services, and hospital facilities. The 
dining room is conducted on the cooperative plan. During 
1933-34 the cost amounted to approximately $15.00 per 
month. Students who room in the cottages take their 
meals at the college dormitory. There are Christian homes 
where students may get rooms without board. In such cases 
the students may get meals at the college dormitory or at pri- 
vate homes. 

3. Since the formation of the Millsaps System and the 
recent development of a number of excellent State Junior col- 
leges in Mississippi, the number of women students in the 
junior and senior classes of Millsaps has increased to such an 
extent that the College has provided living quarters for women. 
This is at present done in a number of cottage homes providing 
accommodations for twelve to fifteen young women. These 
are comfortably furnished and in each is provided reception 
rooms and apartment for a house mother. All non resident 
women students will be required to reside in the home provid- 
ed by the College and to conform to the regulations of the dean 
of women. Room rent in these homes is $63.00 per year or 
$35.00 per half year and board $18.00 per month. 

THE DORMITORIES 

Founder's Hall is a three story structure, beautifully lo- 
cated on the east campus facing State Street. At the South 
end of the campus and overlooking the city with the beautiful 
dome of the New Capitol in the foreground are Burton Hall 
and Galloway Hall. These handsome buildings with their 
columned porticoes are connected by a colonnade. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 49 

The great dining room is unusually fine and is separated 
from the large kitchens by a commodious serving room. A 
feature which will be greatly appreciated by the students is 
a large common room where the boys may gather for a social 
hour. 

Millsaps now is able to offer dormitories equal in all their 
appointments to the best to be found in any institution in this 
section. Each student should bring with him four sheets for 
a single bed, blankets, or quilts, a pillow with cases, and six 
towels. 

No change of rooms will be allowed except by permission 
of the President. 

Early reservation should be made if a student wishes to 
be assured of a room. A deposit of $5.00 must accompany a 
request for a reservation. Students entering College for the 
first time are entitled to reserve a room upon payment of the 
application fee of $15.00. 

A home for young women near the College campus under 
the supervision of the Matron and the Dean of Women has 
been provided and newly furnished, and adequate provision 
will be made to accommodate all out of town young women 
who are accepted. 

MEMORLllj COTTAGES 

The friends of the late Rev. John A. Ellis, of the Missis- 
sippi Conference, and the Rev. J. H. Brooks, of North Mis- 
sissippi Conference, have built two cottages for the accommo- 
dation of students. These homes are named respectively, the 
John A. Ellis, and J. H. Brooks Cottage. 

IVIATRICUTLATION 

The various departments are under the direction of pro- 
fessors who are responsible for the systems and methods pur- 
sued. 

The session begins on the second Wednesday of Septem- 
ber and continues with recess of about ten days at Christmas, 



50 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

until the first Tuesday in June. The first two days of the 
session are given to registration and all students, both old and 
new, are required during that time to place their names upon 
the books of the College and the rolls of their respective 
classes. Lecture courses begin Friday, and absences will be 
recorded against any student not present from the opening 
lecture of each course. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The examinations in each class are held in writing. Oral 
examinations are held in some departments but they are aux- 
iliary to the written examinations, which in conjunction with 
the class standing, as determined by the daily work of the 
student, are the main tests of the student's proficiency. 

At the end of the four years' course a comprehensive 
examination is given in the student's major field. 

REPORTS 

Reports are sent at the close of each nine weeks to the 
parent or guardian of each student. These reports give the 
number of excused and unexcused absences from lectures, 
and indicate, as nearly as practicable, the nature of the prog- 
ress made by him in his work at the College. 

REGISTRATION OF NEW STUDENTS 

Applicants seeking admission to the College for the first 
time should present themselves to the Registrar of the College 
at his office in the main building promptly at 9:00 o'clock on 
the opening day, September 11th. In each instance a certifi- 
cate of good moral character, signed by the proper official of 
the institution attended during the previous session, or by 
some persons of known standing, must be sent to the Regis- 
trar at least two weeks before the opening of the session. 
Each candidate who satisfies these requirements and those 
for admission by certificate or examination will be furnished 
with a card containing the courses offered, from which he 
may select those which he proposes to pursue during the ses- 
sion. The card must then be carried to the Bursar, who will, 
after the College fees have been paid to him, sign the card. 
Registration is incomplete unless the registration card is 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 51 

signed by both the Registrar and the Bursar, On payment of 
these fees the applicant will be admitted to classes. 

DELAYED REGISTRATION 

Students are not permitted to delay their registration 
through carelessness or for inadequate reasons. Any student, 
new or old, who fails to present himself for registration dur- 
ing the first two days of the session will be admitted to regis- 
tration only upon the consent of the President, and will be 
required to pay a special fee of $3.00. 

RESIDENCE, ATTENDANCE, AND GRADES 

The Academic year begins on the morning of the second 
Wednesday of September and continues for thirty-six weeks. 
Thanksgiving Day is a holiday, and there is a Christmas re- 
cess of about ten days. 

Attendance is required of each student throughout the 
session, with the exception of the days above indicated, unless 
he has received permission to be temporarily absent, or to 
withdraw before its close. Leave of absence is granted by the 
Faculty or President for sufficient reasons, and must in every 
case be obtained in advance. While in residence each student 
is required to attend regularly all lectures and other pre- 
scribed exercises and ail examinations in the courses which he 
pursues, (unless excused for cause), and in every way to con- 
form to the regulations of the College. 

Absence from the College is permitted only upon the 
leave of the Dean, obtained in every case in advance. But 
leave of absence for purposes of accompanying the athletic 
teams, debating teams and all other recognized clubs will 
not be granted except to officers and members of the organi- 
zations. 

Absence of athletic teams and other student organiza- 
tions is provided for by Faculty regulations. 

Absence from any class is not excused except for sickness 
or like providential cause. But absences, whether excused or 



52 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

not, from one-fourth or more of the recitation period in any 
term will result in proportionate decrease of credits allowed. 
If a student is absent from a class more than one-fourth of 
the time devoted to that course he loses one-half credit in 
that course. The deficiency is made up by adding the loss 
in credit to the 128 hours for graduation. If a student is 
absent from one-half of the time devoted to a course then 
all credit in that course is lost and the entire course must 
be repeated. 

Absence from examinations will not be excused except 
for sickness on day of examination, attested by a physician's 
certificate, or other cause which the Faculty by special order 
may approve. An unexcused absence or presentation of an 
unpledged paper is counted as a total failure in the examina- 
tion in which it occurs. A student whose absence from ex- 
amination is excused Is admitted to a special examination 
ordered by the Faculty. 

CHANGE OF CLASSES 

Students cannot change classes or drop classes or take up 
new classes except by the consent of the Faculty. 

The grade of the student in any class, either for a semes- 
ter or for the session is determined by the combined class 
standing and the result of examination. The daily average 
counts 60%, and the examination 40% of the grade 
for the semester. If the combined grade is below 70 the stu- 
dent is required to repeat the course, except in courses where 
the grades for the two semesters may be averaged. 

Those reported delinquent in two or more subjects at any 
faculty meeting are required to report to Coaching School from 
7:30 to 9:30 in the evening of the following two weeks. 

Class standing in any course is determined by the regu- 
larity of attendance of the student upon lectures and labora- 
tory or other similar exercises where included in the course 
in question and by the faithful performance of his work as 
indicated by the answers when questioned, by written exer- 
cises, note books, the faithful performance of laboratory or 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 53 

other similar work, etc. Students are regarded by the facul- 
ty as under the law of honor in matters affecting class stand- 
ing or in examinations. The grade for passing in any course 
is 70 per cent. For quality requirements see page 67. 

WITHDRAWALS 

Voluntary withdrawals from the College require the writ- 
ten consent of the Faculty or President. 

Enforced withdra,wal is inflicted by the Faculty for ha- 
bitual delinquency in class, habitual idleness or any other 
fault which prevents the student from fulfilling the purpose 
for which he should have come to College. 

The College reserves the right to cancel the registration 
of any student at any time. In such a case, the prorata por- 
tion of board, room rent, and tuition will be returned. 

AID TO METHODIST 3IIiaSTERS 

Library Extension Service. — One of the most effective 
ways in which we are serving the ministers of Mississippi is in 
placing the books of our libiary subject to their call. We not 
only do this free of charge but we pay postage one way on any 
book that may be ordered from us. Books may be kept out 
for the period of one month. 

AID TO HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS AXD TEACHEP^ 

Debates and Public Speaking. — The College provides as- 
sistance for high school pupils in the selection of speeches and 
in the preparation of debates. 

Lectures and Commencement Orators. — Members of the 
College faculty are available for lectures and public speeches 
on commencement anniversaries, and other public occasions. 

Judges and Referees for High School Contests. — On short 
notice the College can provide properly qualified judges and 
referees for high school contests, athletic and literary. 



54 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

AH) TO CLUB WOMEN 

Lectures and Advice. — Members of the College faculty 
from time to time lecture before women's clubs. We are in 
position to provide assistance in the planning and preparation 
of club programs. 

CONDUCT 

The rules of the College require from every student de- 
corous, sober and upright conduct as long as he remains a 
member of the College, whether he be within its precincts or 
not. 

They require from the student regular and diligent appli- 
cation to his studies, and regular attendance upon chapel. 

Drinking, gambling, and dissoluteness are strictly forbid- 
den, and any student found guilty of them is punished by sus- 
pension or expulsion. 

Firearms. 

The keeping of firearms by the students is strictly for- 
bidden. 

Visiting the City at Night. 

Students who are delinquent in their studies are forbid- 
den to visit the town, or other places away from the College at 
night, without permission from the President. 

Delinquency. 

Reports are made each two weeks of all those failing dur- 
ing the preceding two weeks in each subject. The names of 
those delinquent are posted and notice is sent to the parent or 
guardian. 

Those students who do not pass in as many as three sub- 
jects during a semester, except Freshmen, who must pass two 
subjects and make 60 in a third for the first semester shall 
be dismissed from College. 

Demerit System. 

1. The demerit system is used. Demerits are incurred by 
unexcused absence from class, chapel, and for other vio- 



\ 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 55 

lations of the college regulations, such as hazing and oth- 
er offences, 

2. When a student has received an aggregate of thirty-five 
demerits he is called before the Faculty and warned. A 
notice of the same will be sent to his parent or guardian. 

3. When the aggregate of demerits reaches sixty-five, he re- 
ceives a second warning, and a second notice is sent to his 
parent or guardian. 

4. When the aggregate of demerits reaches one hundred, he 
is dismissed from the College. 

EXPENSES 

Parents desiring to settle all College bills, such as board, 
etc., through the Treasurer may do so by simply sending 
check to Mr. V. B. Hathorn, Bursar, and specifying what the 
enclosure is intended to cover. 

FEES 

No student will be admitted into any class of the College 
except upon presentation to the instructor of the Bursar's re- 
ceipt for all entrance and tuition fees. In no case are en- 
trance or laboratory fees returned. 

TUITION 

Tuition fees will be charged by the year or half-year and 
must be paid not later than the second we«k of each period. 
For scale of tuition see page 57. 

BOARD 

Board is payable by terms of 6 weeks (42 days) strictly 
in advance. When a student has paid his board a meal ticket 
will be issued to him by the Bursar which will be good until 
the next payment falls due. Payments for board will not be 
returned except for absence of not less than two weeks. 



56 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Charges for board do not include the Christmas holidays, dur- 
ing which period meals will not be served in the dining hall. 

Students will not be admitted to the dining hall without 
meal tickets after classes begin. 

No student shall be allowed to graduate unless he shall 
have settled with the Treasurer all his indebtedness to the 
College by May 1st preceding the commencement. 

Students who have already been matriculated as members 
of the College will present themselves not later than the sec- 
ond day of the session and conform, as regards the registration 
in their respective classes and payment of dues, to the re- 
quirements stated in the preceding paragraph. 

For a complete statement of fees and expenses see next 
page. 

Each student should bring with him four sheets for a 
single bed, blankets, or quilt, a pillow with cases, and six 
towels. 

Free Tuition. 

Children of itinerant and superannuated preachers of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and young men prepar- 
ing for the ministry may receive tuition free in the academic 
department, but are expected to pay all other fees. Any 
student, wishing exemption from the payment of the tuition 
fee upon this ground, will be required to present a certifi- 
cate from the Quarterly Conference or some other ecclesias- 
tical body showing that he is recognized by his Church as a 
student preparing for the ministry. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 57 

COST OF ATTENDING ]\IILL.SAPS COLLEGE 

The total cost for all college expenses, except books, 
varies somewhat according to the dormitory accommodations. 
The cost for freshmen is $32 3.00 and the items that make 
up this amount are as follows: 

Tuition (by the year in advance) $110.00 

Registration fee 25.00 

Library fee 6.00 

Student Activities fee 15.00 

Contingent Deposit 2.00 

Total for resident students $158.00 

For non-resident students, add: 

Room Rent (Founder's Hall) $ 25.00 

Dormitory Contingent Deposit 3.00 

Medical fee 2.00 

Board at $15.00 per month. 135.00 

Total College Expense $323.00 

Of this amount, tuition, all fees and deposits, room rent 
and board deposit of $20.00, a total of $208.00, is due at the 
opening of school, the remainder of the board being paid by 
the month. 

For those who find it more convenient to pay tuition 
and room rent in two installments, the following schedule 
of payments has been arranged: 

First Semester 

Tuition for the semester $60.00 

Registration fee 25.00 

Library fee 3.00 

Student Activities fee 15.00 

Contingent Deposit 2.00 

Total for resident students... $105.00 



58 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

For non-resident students add: 

Room Rent for semester (Founder's Hall) $15.00 

Dormitory Contingent Deposit 3.00 

Medical fee 2.00 

Board Deposit 20.00 

Total due September 15tli $145.00 

Second Semester 

Second semester tuition $60.00 

Room Rent (Founder's Hall) 15.00 

Total due February 1st $75.00 

Besides these payments, the only additional charge by 
the college will be board payable monthly at approximately 
$15.00 per month. All accounts due for any preceding se- 
mester must be paid in cash before a student will be enrolled 
for the next semester. Corner rooms in Founder's Hall will 
be charged for at $2.50 per semester more than the above. 
Rooms in Burton and Galloway Hall rent for $40.00 per year, 
corner rooms $45.00 per year. There are a few rooms avail- 
able in cottages at $20.00 per year. 

All fees and a board deposit of $20.00 must be paid at 
the opening of school. No refund on fees will be made. In 
case of unavoidable withdrawal in the midst of the semester 
if approved by the president of the college, tuition, room rent, 
and board will be charged only for the time actually spent in 
school, at the rate of one-eighth of the yearly rate for room 
rent and tuition for each month or fraction thereof and $5.00 
per week or fraction thereof for board. Except in the case 
of such withdrawals from school, rooms will not be rented for 
less than one semester, and no refund will be made for dormi- 
tory rooms vacated in the middle of a semester. All freshmen 
except day students will be required to room in Founder's 
Hall during the entire freshman year. 

LABORATORY FEES 

Students pursuing Laboratory Courses are charged addi- 
tional fees varying with the department, as follows: 

Chemistry $ 10.00 

Physics 10.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 59 

Geology 3.00 

Biology 10.00 

Astronomy 10.00 

Surveying 10.00 

Laboratory Breakage Deposit (per course) 2.0 

SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES AND LOANS 

There are a number of endowed scholarship funds, the 
income from which may be used by the Board of Trustees to 
aid deserving young men in securing a college education. The 
following is a list of the endowments at present available for 
such use: 

THE W. H. TRIBBETT SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE CLARA CHRISMAN SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE JEFFERSON DAVIS SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE PEEBLES SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE W. H. WATKINS SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE MARVIN GALLOWAY SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE J. A. MOORE SCHOLARSHIP. 

♦THE W. T. J. SULLIVAN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND. 

Besides these scholarships, there is a service scholarship 
in each of several departments, the holder of which will be 
expected to aid the head of the department in some definite 
work. 

The Board of Trustees have authorized 20 scholarships 
worth $75.00 each to be awarded to graduates of the Missis- 
sippi high schools. These scholarships will be awarded by 
the president of the college on the recommendation of the 
high school superintendent and the local Methodist pastor, 
and in consideration of character and promise of usefulness. 
Only graduates who rank among the upper 10% of each 
graduating class will be eligible to apply for such scholarship. 

The Ralph Humphreys Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution offers a scholarship of $100.00, to which 
the college adds $50.00. This scholarship is awarded by a 
committee of representatives of the chapter and of the fac- 
ulty and is granted for superiority in scholarship, promise of 
usefulness and self reliance as shown by earning at least 50% 

•Administered by Dr. J. M. Sullivan. 



60 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

of the college expenses. The United Daughters of the Con- 
federacy have also for a number of years provided a partial 
scholarship for a student selected by themselves. 

The Oakley Memorial. 

Under the direction of Mrs. J. R. Bingham, of Carrollton, 
Mississippi, a fund has been raised to establish a memorial in 
honor of the late Rev. J. S. Oakley, who was for many years 
an honored member of the North Mississippi Conference. 

The Tribbett Teaching Scholarship. 

I. This scholarship is to be awarded at the end of each 
session to the member of the Sophomore, Junior or Senior 
class, who shall have made the highest general average for 
the year, subject to the following conditions: 

(a) He must be a regular student, with not less than 
sixteen hours per week, and must have made at least 75 in 
each of the subjects studied. 

(b) He must have been an active member of the College 
Young Men's Christian Association, and one of the College 
Literary Societies, and an active participant in at least one 
form of athletic activity in the College Athletic Association. 

(c) He must agree to work assigned by the President 
of the College. 

II. The student to whom the Scholarship is awarded 
shall receive Two Hundred Dollars ($200.00) due and payable 
one-half at the beginning of the session, and one-half on Feb- 
ruary 1st. 

PRIZES 
Prizes are awarded for excellence in: 
I. Scholarship. 

1. The Founder's Medal. 

2. The Bourgeois Medal. 

3. The Ida V. Sharp Medal. 
n. Oratory. 

The John C. Carter Medal. 
ni. Essay Writing. 

1. The Clark Medal. 

2. The D. A. R. Medal. 
IV. Declamation. 

The Buie Medal. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 61 

Conditions of the Awarding of Medals 

1. The Founder's Medal is to be awarded annually to 
the member of the Senior Class who has made the highest 
average throughout the entire College course. 

2. The Bourgeois Medal is awarded annually to the 
member of the Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior Class who 
has made the highest record for the year. Such student must 
have satisfied all entrance conditions, must be a candidate for 
a degree, and must have taken a minimum of fifteen hours of 
College work during the year in which the medal is awarded 
to him. No student who has won this medal can compete 
for it again. 

3. The Ida V. Sharp Medal in English is awarded to the 
member of the Senior Class who has the highest record in his 
English Course. The candidate must have at least twenty- 
four hours in English. 

4. The John C. Carter Medal for Oratory is awarded an- 
nually, and is limited to members of the Senior Class in the 
Academic Department. 

5. The Clark Medal is awarded annually for the best 
essay presented by any College student; but no student can 
successfully compete for this medal more than one time. 

6. The D. A. R. Medal, established and maintained by 
the Ralph Humphreys Chapter of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, is awarded annually to any student who has 
had American History, who shall have written the best essay 
on some patriotic subject, the subject being chosen by the pro- 
fessor of history. No one who has won this medal may com- 
pete for it. 

7. The Buie Medal is open to members of the Freshman 
and Sophomore Classes, but it cannot be taken by any student 
more than one time. 

MEDALS AWARDED AT THE C03IMENCEMEXT OF 1934 

Founder's Medal John T. Kimball 

Bourgeois Medal H. V. Allen 

John C. Carter Medal No Award 

Buie Medal Read Dunn 

Clark Essay Medal Helen Boswell 

D. A. R. Medal M. E. Mansell 

Commencement Debate Medal No Award 

Tribbett Scholarship... H. V. Allen 

Ida V. Sharp Medal .Maurice Jones 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY, 1934-35 

Dr. Mack Swearingen, 

The University of Chicago Press. 

The Carnegie Corporation. 

Fordham University Press. 

The Carnegie Foundation For the Advancement of 

Teaching. 
Dr. B. E. Mitchell. 
Dr. C. H. Brough. 
H. F. Firestone. 
Mrs. Mary S. Fitzgerald. 
Cokesbury Press. 
Rockefeller Foundation. 
Richard Whitney. 
Harris Collins. 
R. O. Wyland 
Chemical Foundation. 
I. Lehman. 
Walker Wood. 
Professor Nesbitt. 
Mr. P. J. Rutledge. 
Dr. James M. Magruder. 
Dr. Sullivan. 
Mrs. Emmons Blaine. 
Ministerial League. 
Mr. Milam Reeves. 

The American Academy of Arts and Letters. 
General Motors Company. 
Galloway Memorial Church. 
World Peace Foundation, 
Mr. Lowrey. 

The Wellcome Foundation. 
Beaman Triplett. 
The Smithsonian Institution. 
Dr. Key. 

U. S. Government Printing Office. 
Mr. Harold F. McCormick. 
Mr. Cyrus Hall McCormick. 
Mr. Stanley McCormick. 
Mr. Ross H. Moore. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 63 



PART m. 

ACADEMIC SCHOOLS 
FACULTY 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DAVID MARTIN KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., 

President 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN, M.A., Ph.D.. 
Professor of Chemistry and Geology 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL, B.S., M.S., 
Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

J. REESE LIN, B.A., M.A., 
Professor of Philosophy and History 

BENJAMIN ERNEST MITCHELL, M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of Mathematics 

DAVID MARTIN KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., 
Professor of Ancient Languages 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin and German and Head of the 

Department of Ancient Languages 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS, B.A., M.A., 
Professor of Romance Languages 

MILTON CHRISTIAN WHITE, B.A., M.A., 
Professor of English 

GEORGE HUDDLESTON, M.A., Litt.D., 
Associate Professor of Greek and Latin, Emeritus 

ROSS HENDERSON MOORE, M.S., M.A., 
Associate Professor of History 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK, B.A., M.A., 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

ELIZABETH CRAIG, B.A., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of French 

MAGNOLIA SIMPSON, B.A., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of Latin 

CHARLES FRANKLIN NESBITT, B.A., B.D., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Religion 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 65 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS, A.B., B.M., 
Professor of Piano 

FRANK SLATER, B.M., 
Professor of Voice 

ROBERT RAYMOND HAYNES, B.A., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of Education 

J. B. PRICE, B.S., M.S., 
Assistant Professor Chemistry and Mathematics 

TRANNY LEE GADDY, B.S., 
Director of Physical Education 

*MRS. HENRY W. COBB, B.A., 
Instructor in Spanish 

MRS. MARY B. H. STONE, M.A., 
Assistant Professor of English 

*GERTRUDE DAVIS, B.A., Ph.B., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of English 

WILLIAM EMIL RIECKEN, M.A., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

MRS. LEO B. ROBERTS, B.A., M.A., 

Assistant Professor of English 

COLLEY F. SPARKMAN, M.A., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Spanish 

ARTHUR LEWIS GILMORE, A.B., M.A., 
Instructor in Religion 

MRS. FRANCES PRESTON MILLS, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in Education 

THOMAS ADRIAN GILBERT, B.S., 
Bookkeeper 

MELVIN RICHARDSON, B.S., 
Freshman Coach 

AIMEE SHANDS, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in Education 



'Absent on leave. 



66 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Assistants in History 

EVELYN CLARK 

PAUL HARDIN 

Laboratory Assistants in Chemistry 

W. L. WALTON 

WILLIAM CARRAWAY 

WYATT CLOWE 

Laboratory Assistants in Biology 

LUTHER CRULL 

GORDON REEVES 

Assistants in Mathematics 

REBER LAYTON 

DAN CROSS 

Assistants in English 

PAUL RAMSEY 

LAURA HELEN BYRD 

ROBERT CUNNINGHAM 

H. V. ALLEN 

Assistants in Religion 

RAYMOND McCLINTON 

CAXTON DOGGETT 

Assistants in Education 

DOROTHY STRAHAN 

GILCIN MEADORS 

Assistants in Physical Education 

GABRIEL FELDER 

CHAUNCY GODWIN 

MARTHA DONALDSON 

Assistant in Physics 

WARFIELD HESTER 

The Academic Schools comprise the Departments of Lan- 
guages, Mathematics, Science, History, Social Science, Litera- 
ture, Philosophy, Education, and Religion. In the courses of 
these departments is comprised the work of the College with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

B.A. Degree. 

The Bachelor of Arts Course offers special instruction in 
the departments of Ancient and Modern Languages. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

B.S. Degree. 

The Bachelor of Science Course offers special work in 
Chemistry, Biology and Physics. 

A full outline of the required and the elective studies of- 
fered for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of 
Science is given in the pages following this announcement. 

One hundred and twenty-eight semester hours are re- 
quired for graduation both for the B.A. and B.S. degrees. 
Specific courses are prescribed in the Freshman and the Soph- 
omore classes, including alternative courses offered in ancient 
and modern languages. All the courses in the Senior and 
almost all in the Junior class are elective. 

The usual course is 32 semester hours for each year. 
Not fewer than 24 semester hours nor more than 38 semester 
hours may be taken in a year, unless by express permission of 
the President and Faculty. 

A student who makes a grade of 70% in a subject will 
be advanced in that subject, but a certain number of quality 
points is requisite for advancement from one class to the next 
higher class. The student must have six quality points to be 
classed as a Sophomore, 22 to be classed as a Junior, 42 to be 
classed as a Senior, and 64 for graduation. The completion 
of any college course with a grade of 80% for one semester 
shall entitle a student to one quality point for each semester 
hour, and the completion of a course with a grade of 90% for 
the semester shall entitle a student to two quality points for 
each semester hour. 

HONORS 

A student who has earned 160 quality points during his 
course shall be graduated with "honors"; one who has earned 
248 quality points shall be graduated with "high honors." 

To be eligible for "honors" or "high honors" a student 
must have passed at least sixty semester hours in Millsaps 
College. Sixty per cent of the quality points on which "hon- 
ors" or "high honors" are given must be earned at Millsaps. 
Quality points earned in other colleges of the Millsaps sys- 
tem and semester hours passed in such colleges shall be 
reckoned as if they had been done in Millsaps College. These 
regulations do not apply to those who transfer back as much 



68 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

as eighteen semester hours for their degree. These regula- 
tions to go into effect in 1936. 

General Outline of Degree Courses, by Groups 

(All credits are in semester hours). 

The following are semester unit courses and cannot be 
averaged the first with the second semester. 

Latin 31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 61, 62. 

Greek 11 12. 

Biology 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, 71, 72. 

Education, all courses. 

English 91, 92. 

History 31, 32. 

Mathematics, all courses. 

Physics 61, 62. 

Astronomy 41, 42. 

Religion, all courses. 

Social Science 41, 42. 

B.A. B.S. 

S. S. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Group I English 12 12 

Group II Foreign Languages 18 12 

Group III Mathematics 6 6 

Group IV Science 6 20 

Group V Social Science 6 6 

Group VI Philosophy 6 

Group VIII Religion 6 6 

Group VII Physical Training 2 2 

DETAILED COURSES FOR THE B.A. DEGREE 

Freshnian 

English 11, 12 6 S. hours 

Latin 11, 12 or Greek 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12 6 

♦History 11, 12 or Foreign Language 11, 12 or 

Religion 11, 12 12 

Physical Training 11, 12 2 

32" S. hours 

♦Twelve semester hours must be selected from the three 
subjects. The subject not taken must be taken in sophomore. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 69 

Sophomore 

English 21, 22 , 6 S. hours 

Latin 21, 22 or Greek 21, 22 6 

Chemistry 11, 12 or Physics 11, 12 or Biol. 11, 12 

or Biol. 21, 22 6 

For. Language 11, 12 or Hist. 11, 12 or Rel. 11, 12 6 

Elective 6 

30 S. hourg 

Junior 

Philosophy 6 S. hours 

Elective 28 S. hours 

sT S. hours 
Senior 

Elective 32 S. hours 

32" S. hours 

DETAILED COURSES FOR THE B.S. DEGREE 

Pi'eshman 

**Religion, 11, 12 6 

English 11, 12 6 

Modern Language 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12 6 

History 11, 12 6 

Physical Training 11, 12 2 

32" S. hours 

Sophomore 

English 21, 22 6 S. hours 

Modern Language 21, 22 6 

Chemistry 21, 22 8 

Biology 11, 12 or Biology 21, 22 6 

Elective 6 

32 S. hours 
Junior 

Physics 11, 12 6 S. hours 

Elective 26 

32 S. hours 
**May be taken Sophomore. 



70 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Senior 

Elective 32 S. hours 

If a language is chosen as an alternative in a language 
group at least twelve semester hours in that language will be 
required to satisfy the language requirements of that group. 
In no case will it be allowed to combine six semester hours of 
one language with six semester hours of another language and 
offer the combination in satisfaction of the language require- 
ments of a group. 

Those students preparing to study medicine should in- 
clude the following courses in their schedule: 



Inorganic Chemistry 




8 


S.H. 






Organic 


Chemistry 




6 


S.H. 






Biology 






8 


S.H. 






Physics 






8 


S.H. 






Inorganic Chemistry 


and 


Biology 


shi 


ould 



be taken the 

first year and Organic Chemistry and Physics the second year. 
Majors 

In addition to taking the prescribed work for the degree 
the student must major to the extent of 24 hours in one of 
the following departments: 

Ancient Languages. 

Biology. 

Chemistry and Geology. 

Chemistry and Biology. 

Education. 

English. 

General Science (In three Departments). 

History. 

Mathematics. 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Philosophy (Including Education 11, and Social Sci- 
ence 41). 

Physics and Astronomy. 

Religion. 

Romance Languages. 

Social Sciences. 

Other majors may be arranged on consultation with heads 
of departments and by consent of the faculty. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



71 



ELECTIVE COURSES 





Semester 




Semester 


First Semester 


Hours 


Second Semester 


Hoars 


Astronomy 11 


S 


Astronomy 12 


3 


Astronomy 21 


3 


Astronomy 22 


3 


Astronomy 31 


3 


Astronomy 3 2 


3 


Biology Al 


4 


Biology A2 


4 


Biology 11 


3 


Biology 12 


3 


Biology 31 


1 


Biology 32 


1 


Biology 41 


3 


Biology 42 


3 


Biology 51 


3 


Biology 52 


3 


Biology 61 


3 


Biology 62 


3 


Biology 71 


3 


Biology 72 


3 


Chemistry 31 


2 


Chemistry 32 


2 


Chemistry 41 


2 


Chemistry 42 


2 


Chemistry 51 


2 


Chemistry 52 


2 


Chemistry 61 


3 


Chemistry 62 


3 


Chemistry 71 


1 


Chemistry 72 


1 


Chemistry 81 


2 


Chemistry 82 


2 


Chemistry 91 


2 


Chemistry 92 


2 


Education 11 


3 


Education 12 


3 


Education 21 


3 


Education 22 


3 


Education 31 


3 


Education 32 


3 


Education 41 


3 


Education 42 


3 


Education 51 


3 


Education 52 


3 


Education 61 


3 


Education 62 


3 


Education 71 


3 


Education 72 


3 


English 31 


3 


English 32 


3 


English 41 


3 


English 42 


3 


English 51 


3 


English 52 


3 


English 61 


3 


English 62 


3 


English 71 


3 


English 72 


3 


English 81 


3 


English 82 


3 


English 91 


3 


English 9 2 


3 


French Al 


3 


French A2 


3 


French 31 


3 


French 32 


3 


French 41 


3 


French 42 


3 


Geology 11 


3 


Geology 12 


3 


Geology 21 


3 


Geology 22 


3 


German Al 


3 


German A2 


3 



72 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



German 31 




3 


German 32 




3 


Greek Al 




3 


Greek A2 




3 


Greek 31 




3 


Greek 32 




3 


Greek 41 




3 


Greek 42 




3 


History 21 




3 


History 22 




3 


History 31 




3 


History 32 




3 


History 51 




3 


History 52 




3 


History 61 




3 


History 6 2 




3 


Latin Al 




3 


Latin A2 




3 


Latin 31 




3 


Latin 32 




3 


Latin 41 




3 


Latin 42 




3 


Latin 51 




3 


Latin 52 




3 


Mathematics 


21 


3 


Mathematics 


22 


3 


Mathematics 


31 


3 


Mathematics 


32 


3 


Mathematics 


41 


3 


Mathematics 


42 


3 


Mathematics 


51 


3 


Mathematics 


52 


3 


Mathematics 


61 


3 


Mathematics 


62 


3 


Mathematics 


81 


3 


Mathematics 


82 


3 


Physical Education 21 


2 


Physical Education 22 


2 


Physical Education 31 


2 


Physical Education 32 


2 


Physics 21 




1 


Physics 22 




1 


Physics 31 




3 


Physics 32 




3 


Physics 41 




3 


Physics 42 




3 


Physics 51 




3 


Physics 52 




3 


Physics 61 




3 


Physics 62 




1 


Religion 21 




3 


Religion 22 




3 


Religion 31 




3 


Religion 32 




3 


Religion 41 




3 


Religion 42 




3 


Religion 51 




3 


Religion 52 




3 


Religion 61 




3 


Religion 62 




3 


Religion 71 




3 


Religion 72 




3 


Religion 81 




3 


Religion 82 




3 


Religion 91 




3 


Religion 9 2 




3 


Social Science 11 


3 


Social Science 12 


3 


Social Science 21 


3 


Social Science 22 


3 


Social Science 31 


3 


Social Science 32 


3 


Social Science 41 


3 


Social Science 42 


3 


Spanish Al 




3 


Spanish A2 




3 


Spanish 31 




3 


Spanish 3 2 




3 


Spanish 41 




3 


Spanish 42 




3 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



73 



DETAELED STATEMENTS REGARDING THE SEVERAL 
DEPARTMENTS 



The Departments compr 

I. The Department o 

II. The Department o 

III. The Department o 

IV. The Department o 
V. The Department o 

VI. The Department o 

VII. The Department o 

VIII. The Department o 

IX. The Department o 

X. The Department o 

XI. The Department o 

XII. The Department o 

XIII. The Department o 

XIV. The Department o 
XV. The Department o 

XVI. The Department o 



ising the Course of Instruction are: 
Ancient Languages. 
Biology. 
Chemistry. 
Education. 
English. 
Geology. 
German. 
History. 
Mathematics. 
Philosophy. 
Physical Education. 
Physics and Astronomy. 
Religion. 

Romance Languages. 
Social Sciences. 
Music. 



74 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

I. DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

PROFESSOR KEY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HUDDLESTON * 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SIMPSON 

It is believed that the mastery of these highly inflected 
languages will effect the purposes aimed at in education in 
the following ways: 

Constant drill in the processes of correlation, comparison, 
discrimination and classification of the phenomena of lan- 
guage is required, both in the study of inflection and syntax 
and in translation. This drill affords a most rigorous exer- 
cise in correct scientific method and produces habits and re- 
flexes of accuracy, efficiency and system. 

A first hand acquaintance with the language and modes 
of expression of the ancients and with the evolution of literary 
forms lays open a field of knowledge that is essential to a full 
understanding of modern life and literature. 

Intimate contact with the very words which express the 
best ideals and aspirations of those great spirits whose influ- 
ence has been most abiding and formative in our world should 
shape the character to fine and worthy purposes. The "ul- 
timate objectives" are not lost sight of. 

LATIN 

Al. Grammar review. 

A2. Selected orations from Cicero. This course is a pre-req- 

uisite to Latin 11 if only two units in Latin are offered. 
When so taken it gives three hours elective credit. 
Miss Simpson, 

11. ** Vergil. The Aeneid. Three hours, first semester. 

12. Vergil. The Aeneid continued. Three hours second 
semester. 

Miss Simpson. 



* Emeritus. 

** For students who have had three years high school Latin. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 76 

11. *Livy, Books I and IL Three hours, first semester. 

12. Latin Poetry. Three hours, second semester. 

Miss Simpson. 

21. Horace, Odes and Epodes. Three hours, first semester. 

22. Plautus. Two plays. Three hours, second semester. 

Dr. Hamilton. 

21. Horace, Odes and Epodes. Three hours, first semester. 

22. Petronius. Three hours, second semester. 

Miss Simpson. 

31. Juvenal, Satires. Three hours, first semester. 

32. Horace (Satires). Three hours, second semester. 

Dr. Hamilton. 

41. Roman drama. History of the Roman Drama with 
extensive reading in Plautus, Terence and Seneca. Three 
hours throughout the year. 

42. Elegiac Poets. 

Courses 31, 32 and 41, 42 are given in alternate years. 

51. A course in methods of teaching Caesar, Cicero and 
Vergil. Especially designed for teachers and prospec- 
tive teachers in high schools. This course is offered as 
a Senior elective; as such it may be counted in satisfac- 
tion of the requirements for teacher's license. Three 
semester hours. 

52. Classical Archaeology. (Alternates with Latin 51.) Three 
hours. 

This course attempts to visualize ancient classical civili- 
zation and those who are not taking formal courses in 
Latin and Greek may elect it. It consists of lectures 
and outside reading supplemented by lantern slides. 
Dr. Hamilton. 

61. Roman Private Life. Three hours, first semester. 

62. Greek and Roman Mythology and Prose Composition. 
Three hours, second semester. This course is offered as 
an elective. (1934-35). 

Miss Simpson. 



* For students who have had four years of high school Latin. 



76 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



71. Latin prose writers. Three hours first semester. 

72. Martial. Three hours second semester. (1935-36), 

Miss Simpson 



Majors In Latin 



11 Vergil (six books) 

12 Pliny (letters) 

21 Horace (Selected Odes 
and Epodes) 

22 Plautus (One play) 
Petronius (Satiricon) 

31 Juvenal (Satires) 

32 Horace (Satires) 

41 Roman Drama (Seneca, 
Plautus and Terence) 

42 Roman Elegy 



11 Livy (Books I and H) 

12 Latin Poetry 

21 Horace (Odes & Epodes) 

22 Plautus 

61 Roman Private Life 

62 Greek and Roman Myth- 
ology and Prose Composi- 
tion 

71 Latin Prose Literature 

72 Martial (Epigrams) 



Latin 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42 and either 61 or 62 
must be taken by all who make Latin a major subject. 

Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major. 



GREEK 

Al, A2. Thorough mastery of the forms and syntax. Intro- 
duction to Greek by Crosby and Shaeffer. This course 
which is given under the supervision of the head of the 
department may be counted as elective. Or it may be 
used to satisfy the entrance requirements in foreign lan- 
guages. Three hours throughout year. 
Dr. Hamilton. 

11, 12. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I-IV. 

Review of verb inflection and systematic study of syn- 
tax. Exercises in sight translation and in reading with- 
out translation. The writing of simple prose. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

Constant effort is made to form proper habits of study 
in translation, without which no great progress can be 
made in ability to read. Three hours throughout year. 
Dr. Hamilton. 

21, 22. Select Orations of Lysias. Plato's Apology and Crito. 
History of Greek Literature. 
Three hours throughout year. 
Dr. Key. 

31, 32. Thucydides, Book VIII; Herodotus, Book VI and VII. 

Selections from the New Testament. 

41, 42. Sophocles' Electra or Antigone; Aeschylus' Agamem- 
mon; Aristophanes' The Clouds and Plutus. Study of 
the development of the Greek Drama. 



78 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

n. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR RIECKEN 

LUTHER CRULL 

GORDON REEVES 

The courses offered in this department are designed to 
give the student a general knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of plant and animal life. Special courses are offered to 
pre-medical students, and other courses of a more general na- 
ture are offered to students who may anticipate majoring in 
the department. 

Al. General Biology. (Not offered in 19 33-'34). 

An introductory course intended to give the student a 

knowledge of the general principles of the biology of 
plant and animal life. Laboratory work will consist of 
microscopic and macroscopic examination of typical 
forms. Field work and classification will be empha- 
sized. 

The first semester will be devoted to a general survey of 
the plant kingdom. 

A2. The second semester will be devoted to a general survey 
of the animal kingdom. 

Credit: Six semester hours. Two lectures and two 

hours laboratory or field work per week. 

(Both semesters must be completed to obtain credit). 

11. General Botany. 

A survey of the plant kingdom in which special attention 
is given to general biological principles, morphology, 
physiology and life cycles of plants. Laboratory work 
consists of microscopic and macroscopic study of plants 
with occasional field trips. 

First semester. The structure and physiology of angio- 
sperms. 

12. Second semester. The structure and life cycles of gym- 
nosperms, ferns, mosses, fungi and algae. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

Credit: Six semester hours. Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period a week. (Both semesters must be com- 
pleted to obtain credit). 

21. General Zoologj'. 

A survey of the animal kingdom. Attention is given to 
the study of the cell and the fundamental principles of 
animal biology. A study of the phyla and the develop- 
ment of organs and systems is stressed. 

First semester. Microscopic and macroscopic study of 
invertebrate forms. 

22. Second semester. Anatomy and physiology of vertebrate 
forms with special attention to methods of dissection. 
Credit: Six semester hours. 

(Both semesters must be completed to obtain credit.) 

31. Vertebrate Anatomy. 

This course can be taken only in connection with Biology 
21 and 22. The course is designed to meet the needs of 
pre-medical students. Special attention will be given to 
the dissection of vertebrate forms. 

The first semester will be devoted to a detailed dissec- 
tion of some of the lower vertebrate forms. 

32. The second semester will be devoted to a detailed dis- 
section of a few of the higher vertebrate forms. 

Credit: Two semester hours. One laboratory period 
per week. (Both semesters must be completed to obtain 
credit). 

41. General Bacteriology. (Offered the first semester). 

This course is designed to give a general survey of the 
field of bacteriology. Special attention will be given in 
the preparation of media, cultivation, methods of isola- 
tion, identification, and sterilization. 

Credit: Three semester hours. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods per week. 

Prerequisite: Biology A, 11 and 12, or 21 and 22. 



80 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

42. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. (Offered the sec- 
ond semester). 

A study of the homologies of organ systems of a series 
of vertebrates. This course is designed to further train 
the student in the principles of dissection and to develop 
in him an appreciation of the significance of structures. 
Laboratory work will be emphasized. 

jCredit: Three semester hours. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods per week or three laboratory periods 
per week. 

Prerequisite: Biology 21 and 22. 

51. Histological Tectuiique. (Offered the first semester). 
Attention is given to training in the technique of pre- 
paring temporary and permanent microscopic sections of 
plant and animal tissues. Much freedom is allowed in 
the selection of materials. Opportunity is given for 
making slides of value in high school teaching. 
Credit: Three semester hours. 

52. Genetics. (Offered the second semester), 

A study of the fundamental principles of variation and 
heredity in plants and animals. 

Credit: Three semester hours. Lectures and recita- 
tions. 

Prerequisite: Biology A, 11 and 12, or 21 and 22. 

61. General Embryology. (Offered the first semester). 

A study of the development of Amphioxus, the Chick and 
the Pig. 

Credit: Three semester hours. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Biology 21 and 22. 

62. General Physiology. (Offered the second semester). 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
essentials of the physiological processes which take place 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

in the living organism. A study of the functions of the 
human body will be emphasized. 

Credit: Three semester hours. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Biology 21 and 22. 

71. Special Problems. 

This work will allow the student to work on problems 
in which he has a special interest. Much freedom will 
be allowed the student in this work, both in the nature 
of the work and the direction which it will take. Work 
will be done under the direction of the instructor. Reg- 
istration for this course is only with the consent of the 
instructor. 

Credit: Three semester hours. 

72. This is a continuation of course 71. 
Credit: Three semester hours. 

82. Taxanoniy. (Offered second semester). 

Laboratory and field identification of plants. Some at- 
tention is given to herbarium methods. Work is in- 
dividual with class discussions. 

Credit: Three semester hours. Two or three labora- 
tory periods a week. 

Prerequisite: Biology 11 and 12. 



82 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

in. THE DEPARTMENT OP CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 
INSTRUCTOR PRICE 

Laboratory Assistants 

W. L. WALTON 

WILLIAM CARRAWAY 

WYATT CLOWE 

The Department of Chemistry is now well provided for in 
the SuUivan-Harrell Hall, a new and thoroughly modern sci- 
ence hall, which was recently built as a gift from citizens of 
Jackson and Hinds County at a cost of approximately $200,- 
000.00 There are two lecture rooms supplied with tablet-arm 
chairs fixed in elevated rows, improved lecture desks with 
Alberene stone tops and removable down-draft hoods, sliding 
blackboards with separate control for lighting, and other con- 
veniences. There are four large laboratories, one for general 
chemistry provided with five double desks eighteen feet long to 
accommodate 140 students in three sections (and piping 
roughed-in for two more desks as needed), one for organic and 
qualitative work provided with five double desks eighteen feet 
long to accommodate seventy individuals (provision being 
made for expansion), one for quantitative analysis equipped for 
fourteen students, (expansion provided for), and one for in- 
dustrial chemistry. There are three smaller laboratories for 
physical chemistry, nitrogen determinations, and research, re- 
spectively, besides six small laboratory rooms for individual 
and specialized work. All desks have Alberene tops and 
sinks, with lead trough inclined in one direction the entire 
length, and are supplied with an adequate number of outlets 
for water, gas, compressed air, and 110-volt electric current. 

All laboratory hoods are of the high velocity and open- 
type made of Transite board on Alberene shelf supported on 
steel pipe frame, and range from four to eight feet in length. 
Each hood is provided with outlets for water, gas, compressed 
air, and 30-ampere electric current, with separate control for 
lighting fixture attached to ceiling of hood. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

All horizontal drain pipes from chemical laboratories and 
stockrooms are of Duriron. All floors are of "mastic," and 
lecture-room ceilings are of Masonite board which eliminates 
practically all echo. 

Three stockrooms, one for apparatus, one for inorganic 
and one for organic chemicals, are located on the ground floor 
convenient to a freight elevator. Two departmental stock- 
rooms are located conveniently, one on the main floor and 
connecting by service window directly with the laboratory for 
general chemistry, and the other immediately above with serv- 
ice window connecting directly with the qualitative and or- 
ganic laboratory. The weighing room is located between the 
laboratories for quantitative and physical chemistry. 

Distilled water is supplied by gravity through block-tin 
pipe to laboratories on each floor and to lecture table. 

The seven motors and fans that produce the ventilation 
for hoods and chemical laboratories are located in the attic, 
each motor controlling a separate group of hoods and its oper- 
ation indicated at each control switch by a pilot-light signal. 

The head of the department is provided with a well equip- 
ped office and adjoining private laboratory, which latter con- 
nects directly with his lecture room. 

The work in this department includes one year of Chem- 
istry required of candidates for B.S. degree, besides other 
courses open to all students who have completed chemistry 
11-12, or 21, 22. 

The subjects are taught by recitations and lectures and 
work which each student must perform in the laboratory. 
The laboratories are kept well equipped with apparatus neces- 
sary to the correct appreciation of the science. Each student 
has his own desk and apparatus, and is closely supervised, so 
that he may not only gain a true idea of the substance under 
inspection but also train his hands to be careful to the smallest 
detail, and the eye observant of the slightest phenomenon, 
and habits of neatness, skill and economy. Each student will 
be expected to keep accurate notes. In all courses attention 



84 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

will be given to chemical calculations, and the use ot i-efer- 
ence books and periodicals will be encouraged. 

11. Inorganic Chemistry. 

The first semester will be devoted to a careful study of 
fundamental principles and laws, the occurrence, prop- 
erties, preparation and uses of the non-metallic elements 
and some of their compounds, and to chemical calcula- 
tions. 

12. Inorganic Chemistry. 

The work of the second semester will include a study of 
metals with special reference to commercial use and to 
qualitative analysis, and an elementary course in Organic 
Chemistry. 

This is a double course, designed to give the student a 
thorough working knowledge of general chemistry, and 
is elective with Physics 11, 12 and Biology 11, 12, for 
B.A. degrees. It is a prerequisite to either of the other 
courses in chemistry. A laboratory course is given in 
connection with the lectures, and each student is assigned 
the preparation of a number of elements and compounds, 
and required to note the deportment of various sub- 
stances with reagents. The class each year is given an 
opportunity to visit certain industrial establishments, as 
sulphuric acid plant, phosphate works, gas works and 
water works and filtration plants. 

Two lecture periods and one laboratory period. Six se- 
mester hours credit. 

Text-book — College Chemistry (Hopkins). Laboratory Out- 
line (Sullivan). 

Reference Books — Simon, Holleman, Holmes, Bloxman, Mc- 
Coy, Mellor, Slosson, Deming, Holland, Newell, Foster, 
Gordon, Richardson, Smith. 

A.B. students may substitute courses 21, 22 for 11, 12. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 85 

21. Inorganic Chemistry. 

The first semester will be devoted to a careful study of 
fundamental principles and laws, the occurrence, prop- 
erties, preparation and uses of the non-metallic elements 
and some of their compounds, and to chemical calcula- 
tions. 

Special attention will be given to valence and the ioniza- 
tion theory. 

22. The work of the second semester will include a study of 
metals with special reference to commercial uses and to 
qualitative analysis, and an elementary course in Or- 
ganic Chemistry. 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough 
working knowledge of general chemistry, and is a pre- 
scribed study of the Sophomore year for the B.S. degree. 
It is a prerequisite to either of the other courses in chem- 
istry, and is open to Freshmen who are registered as 
pre-medical or pre-engineering students. 

A laboratory course is given in connection with the lec- 
tures, and each student is assigned the preparation of a 
number of elements and compounds, and required to 
note the department of various substances with reagents. 
The class each year is given an opportunity to visit cer- 
tain industrial establishments, as sulphuric acid plant, 
phosphate works, gas works and water works and filtra- 
tion plants. 

Three lecture hours and one laboratory period. Eight 
semester hours credit. 

Text-book — College Chemistry (Hopkins). Laboratory Out- 
line (Sullivan). 

Reference Books — Simon, Holleman, Holmes, Bloxman, Mc- 
Coy, Mellor, Slosson, Deming, Holland, Newell, Foster, 
Gordon, Richardson, Kendall. 

31. Organic Chemistry. 

The first semester's work will include a study of the 
open-chain compounds, and methods of organic analysis 



86 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

and determination of formula. Special attention will be 
given to the alcohols, aldehydes, acids, amines, cynano- 
gen compounds, carbohydrates and other derivatives. 
The study of relationships as shown by rational formula 
will be emphasized. 

32. Organic Chemistry. 

The cyclic compounds will be studied during the second 
semester. The purpose of this course is to furnish a 
somewhat comprehensive knowledge of the carbon com- 
pounds, the instruction being given chiefly by lectures 
illustrated by experiments. 

Some attention is given to psysiological chemistry. Stu- 
dents will be expected to consult various works of refer- 
ence. This course, in connection with 41, 42 and 51 and 
52, will appeal specially to preliminary dental and medi- 
cal students. This course is required for all pre-medical 
students. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21, 22. 

Lectures and recitations four semester hours. 

Text-Book — Organic Chemistry. (Lowy and Harrow, Mac- 
beth). 

Reference Books — Norris, Bernthsen, Holleman, Perkin and 
Kipping, Richter, Chamberlain, Cohen, Conant, Williams. 

41, 42. Qualitative Analysis. 

This course consists in a systematic analysis of simple 
and compound substances and mixtures with the separa- 
tion and identification of the metal and acid radicals in 
a set of unknowns including some minerals. It is elec- 
tive with an equivalent course in Biology for the B.S. de- 
gree but may be elected by all students who have had 
Chemistry 21, 22. The work is not confined to mere test- 
tube exercises, but will include a consideration of the 
application of the ionzation theory to qualitative analy- 
sis. The later part of the course will embrace some 
work in volumetric analysis. 
One afternoon per week. Pour semester hours credit. 



p 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 87 

Text-Book — Qualitative Analysis. Curtman, Brockman. 

Reference Books — Newth, Fresenius, Steiglitz, Perkin, Scott, 
Cornog and Vosshurg. 

51, 52. Experimental Organic Chemistry. 

This course is planned especially to meet the needs of 
pre-medical students, but is open to all who enter course 
31, 32, or its equivalent. It will include exercises in pu- 
rification, analysis, and synthesis of certain carbon com- 
pounds, the determination of melting and boiling points, 
vapor density, and molecular weights, the preparation of 
some coal-tar products, and a few experiments in urine 
and food analysis. Students electing this course must 
elect Chemistry 31-32. Four semester hours credit. 

Text-Books — West, Gatterman. 

61. Physical Chemistry. 

This course is planned for Chemistry majors, and pre- 
medical students who desire credit beyond their medical 
school requirements. The work of the first semester 
will be a study of: Atomic Structure, Gas Laws, Matter 
in the Solid and Liquid States, Elementary Thermody- 
namics, Properties of Solutions, and Thermochemistry. 

62. The work of the second semester will be: Chemical 
Kinetics, Homogeneous Equilibrium in Gases and Liq- 
uids, Homogeneous Equilibrium in Solutions and Elec- 
trolytes, Heterogeneous Equilibrium, Electrical Proper- 
ties of Solutions, Phase Rule Studies, and Colloid Chem- 
istry. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. Six 
semester hours credit. 

Texts — Elements of Physical Chemistry (Bell and 
Gross), and Experimental Physical Chemistry (Daniels). 

References — Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry (Getman 
and Daniels), Physical Chemistry (Jones and Walker), 
New Theories of Matter and the Atom (Berthoud), 
Physico-Chemical Methods (Reilly and Rae), The Phase 
Rule (Findlay). 



88 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Electrons (Sullivan), Matter and Energy (Windt and 
Smith). 

71, 72. Quantitative Analysis. 

A course in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Two 
semester hours credit. 

Text-Books — Clowes and Coleman, Newth. 

Reference Books — Fressenius, Sutton, Smith, Talbot, Scott. 

81, 82. This course is similar to 71, 72, but double the time. 
Four semester hours credit. 

91, 92. CJommercial Analysis. 

This course will include the analysis of minerals, foods, 
waters, coal, gas and other industrial substances with 
the preparation of a few drugs and coal-tar dyes. Four 
semester hours credit. 

Library copies of Watt's Revised Dictionary, Thorp's Ap- 
plied Chemistry, Roscoe and Schorlemmer's Treatise, Allen's 
Commercial Organic Analysis, Journals of the American 
Chemical Society, Mellor's Comprehensive Treatise on Inor- 
ganic and Theoretical Chemistry, Lunge and Kean's Technical 
Methods, Olsen's Chemical Annual, Industrial Chemistry 
(Riegel), American Chemistry (Hale), and other works, are 
on hand for reference. In both Junior and Senior courses 
some library work will be required outside the regular sched- 
ule. 

PREMEDICAL COURSES 

Premedical students may take up General Chemistry dur- 
ing the Freshman year and one or more advanced courses in 
chemistry during each subsequent year. 

Courses required for premedical students are: Chemistry 
21-22, 31-32, 41-42, and 51-52. It will be found advisable to 
take courses 61-62 and 81-82 when possible. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

IV. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HAYNES 

MRS. H. P. MILLS 

MISS SHANDS 

DOROTHY STRAHAN 

GILCIN MEADORS 

The department of education welcomes capable students 
who contemplate teaching. Those who do not intend to teach 
are advised not to attempt the technical courses in education. 

Students should consult a member of the department be- 
fore enrolling in any course in education. An attempt is made 
to furnish definite guidance to prospective teachers concern- 
ing the courses in education and the academic courses that 
will best fit them for their work. 

Courses in education are not open to Freshmen. 

The courses offered in this department are approved by 
the State Department of Education. 

The state program specifies that the training of the high 
school teacher shall contain the following: 1. A specified 
academic core curriculum; 2. A specified professional core 
curriculum; 3. A specified number of hours training in the 
subject or subjects taught. Two high school subjects are 
specified as the maximum number for which one can be 
trained to teach. 

The core curriculum specifies that all high school teach- 
ers have a minimum of twelve semester hours in English, nine 
semester hours in social studies, six semester hours in science 
and two semester hours in physical education and health. 

The professional work required consists of a minimum of 
eighteen semester hours in education. 

The most frequently occurring high school subject com- 
binations are English-Social Studies, English-Foreign Lan- 
guage, Mathematics-Science. A teacher of these subjects 
should have the minimum number of hours specified for each. 



90 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Subject Sem. Hours Subject Sem. Hours 

English 30 Social Studies 30 

English 30 A Foreign Language 18 

Mathematics 18 Science 3 6 

The content of each subject is briefly outlined as fol- 
lows: 

English 

Grammar and composition 6 Semester hours 

English Literature 12 " " 

American Literature 6 " " 

Elective 6 



TOTAL 30 

Mathematics 

College algebra and trigonometry 6 

Analytical geometry 6 

Calculus 6 



TOTAL 18 

Social Studies 
Ancient, Medieval, Modern, American His- 
tory , 18 

Government and economics 6 

Geography 6 



TOTAL 30 

Foreign Language 

Eighteen semester hours in each based on two high school 
entrance units. 

Science 

Biology 6 Semester hours 

Chemistry 6 

Physics 6 

Health 3 

Elective 15 

TOTAL 3 6 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 91 

If a student elects to teach social studies only, or science 
only, the number of hours training in each should be increased 
to forty-eight. Teachers having the combination of mathe- 
matics and physical sciences or mathematics and biological 
sciences, should increase the number of hours training in sci- 
ence to twenty-four in each case. 

11. An Introduction to Education. 

This course seeks to give the student an extensive view 
of the practices and principles of modern education. It 
serves as a finding or try-out course for those who wish to 
know something of the field of education. A broad founda- 
tion is laid for the beginning teacher. Attention is focused 
on the need for a simple, working philosophy of education, 
individual differences, health and physical training, discipline, 
administration and supervision, the school plant, rural educa- 
tion, social aspects of education and teaching opportunities. 
A brief survey will be made of education in Mississippi 
Credit: 3 hours. 

12. General Psychologj'. (Offered first semester). 

This is a basic, introductory course in modern, scientific 
psychology. It includes a study of the following topics: (1) 
The nature and methods of psychology. (2) Physiological 
basis of psychology. (3) A study of mental organization. 
(4) The stimulus-response hypothesis. (5) Inherited equip- 
ment. (6) Learning and maturation. (7) Motivation of be- 
havior. (8) Observation and Perception. (9) Imagination. 
(10) Thinking, (11) Social behavior. (12) Language ac- 
quisition and habits. (13) Personality. The course seeks to 
interpret human behavior, intellectual, emotional, and physi- 
cal in the light of modern scientific psychology. It furnishes 
the basis for further study of psychology and applied psychol- 
ogy. Credit: 3 hours. 



92 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

21. Educational Psychology. 

This course applies the facts and principles of the science 
of psychology to the problems of education. It is an intro- 
ductory course in the science of education. The following 
problems receive emphasis: (1) The original nature of the 
child. (2) The psychology of learning. (3) Economy in 
learning. (4) Transfer of training. (5) General intelli- 
gence and special aptitudes of children. (6) Individual dif- 
ference in children. (7) The motivation of school work. 
All students who are preparing to enter the teaching profes- 
sion will need to take this course. Prerequisite: Education 
12. Credit: 3 hours. 

22. Tests and Measures. 

This course attempts to give the student a working knowl- 
edge of the techniques and procedures involved in scientific 
testing and measuring in the high school. Standardized edu- 
cational and mental tests are studied as to sources, uses, and 
limitations. Much emphasis is placed on the study of the 
new-type objective examination. Students are given practice 
in the construction and use of the various kinds of the new- 
type examination. Prognosis and special aptitude tests are 
studied as to sources, uses, and limitations. Diagnostic test- 
ing for remedial teaching receives emphasis. Further empha- 
sis is placed on the proper interpretation and use of test re- 
sults. Necessary statistical devices and procedures are stud- 
ied. A laboratory fee of $1.50 is charged to cover the cost 
of materials used by the student. Prerequisite: Education 
12 and 21. Credit: 3 hours. Summer. 

31. Principles and Problems of High School Teaching. 

An attempt is made in this course to develop the under- 
lying principles of high school teaching through the use of 
practical problems of the teacher in high school. Considera- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 93 

tion is given to the aims and functions of secondary educa- 
tion, high school personnel, curriculum differentiation, to pro- 
vide for individual differences, extra-curricular activities, dis- 
cipline and teaching procedures. Credit: Three hours. Pre- 
requisites: 12, 21. 

32. Methods of Teaching High School Subjects. 

This is one of the required courses for those preparing to 
teach in the high school. Emphasis is placed on the follow- 
ing topics: The nature of learning and teaching; organiza- 
tion of subject matter for instruction; planning lessons; types 
of assignments; use of projects; socialized class procedure; 
supervising pupil study; guidance in learning. Education 12 
and 21 prerequisite. Credit: Three hours. Summer. 

41, 42. 

Teaching English 

Teaching French 

Teaching Latin 

Teaching Spanish 

Teaching Mathematics 

Teaching Science 

Teaching Social Sciences: 
These courses will be offered for one semester each year. 
Each course will comprehend the organization of subject mat- 
ter in the light of desirable objectives. Methods to be em- 
ployed in each subject will be worked out in detail. Credit: 
3 hours. Prerequisites: 12, 21, 31, 32. 

51, 52. Directed Observation in the High School. 

Millsaps College has an arrangement with the Jackson 
City Schools whereby student-teachers are privileged to ob- 
serve and teach under supervision. Credit: 3 hours. Pre- 
requisites: 12. 21, 31, 32. 

61. 62. Supervised Teaching in the High School. 

Supervised teaching consists of directed observation, dis- 
cussion of observation, planning and teaching. Students tak- 



94 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ing this course must arrange their schedules so as to report 
for duty six days a week. Credit: 6 hours. Prerequisites: 
12, 21, 31, and 32. 

71. Supervision of Instruction. 

The purpose of this course is to study the principles of 
school supervision, the chief problems that confront the school 
supervisor, and the devices, techniques and procedures in- 
volved in scientific school supervision. It is understood that 
the primary purpose of school supervision is to increase the 
efficiency of the classroom teacher. Clear distinction will be 
made between what supervision is and what it is not. The 
class will study the methods, techniques, and procedures used 
by the school supervisor in increasing the efficiency of the 
classroom teacher. Real, live, supervisory problems will be 
studied. All students preparing for supervisory positions 
should take this course. Credit: 3 hours. 

72. The High School Curriculum. 

Emphasis will be placed on the underlying principles of 
curriculum construction and the application of these princi- 
ples to the organization of high school courses of study. At- 
tention will be paid to the effect of the size of the high school 
on the curriculum. Each student will have an opportunity to 
outline a course of study in the subject of his chief interests. 
This will include a statement of objectives, the unit divisions 
of contents, and the definite purpose of each, the activities 
necessary to accomplish stated purposes and tests to ascertain 
goals reached. Credit: 3 hours. Summer. 

Teacher Placement Bureau. 

A teacher placement bureau for teachers is maintaind 
under the direction of the Department of Education. It is the 
desire of this bureau to further the interests of teachers 
trained at Millsaps College and to be of service to school of- 
ficials who wish to secure efficient teachers. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 95 

V. THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR WHITE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR STONE 

*ASSISTANT PROFESSOR DAVIS 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ROBERTS 

PAUL RAMSEY 

LAURA HELEN BYRD 

ROBERT CUNNINGHAM 

H. V. ALLEN 

Composition 

The students in this class are divided into two groups. 
The lower group spends the first semester on review of 
grammar and on mechanics generally. A text is used in 
this work. The upper class analyzes selected pieces of 
composition and does more extensive reading and more 
experimental writing. All students are urged to read 
widely, especially from recommended lists. Conferences 
on composition are required. 

Group A 

11. After a preliminary review of grammar and the fund- 
amentals of composition, the first semester is devoted to 
exposition. Short and long expository themes are writ- 
ten. Instruction in methods of research and prepara- 
tion of bibliographies is given. Three hours. 

12. The second semester is devoted mainly to imagina- 
tive composition. Descriptive-narrative themes are re- 
quired weekly, and one long theme is written during the 
semester in some form of imaginative writing. Selec- 
tions from literature are studied and analyzed. Three 
hours. 

Group B 

11. The entire first semester in this group is devoted to 
a review of grammar and the mechanics of writing. 
Short expository themes are required weekly, and fre- 
quent conferences with the instructor are expected. 
Three hours. 

12. The second semester is given to a study of the larger 
units of composition with much practice in writing and 



*Absent on leave. 



9 6 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

speaking. A brief survey of the forms of prose discourse 
is given. Weekly themes required. Library reading. 
Three hours. 

TEXTBOOKS: Group A: College Composition, Rankin, 
Thorpe, and Solve. 

Group B: Writing and Thinking, Foerster and Stead- 
man; Corrective English Exercises, Jensen. 
Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Stone 
Assistant Professor Roberts 

21. English Literature. 

A survey of the history of English literature from the 
beginnings of the eighteenth century, with a study of 
literature representative of periods and great writers. 
Three hours. 

Professor White 
Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Stone 
Assistant Professor Roberts 

32. English Literature. 

The continuation of the study of the history of English 
literature from the point reached in the first semester 
through the nineteenth century. Three hours. 

TEXTBOOKS: History of English Literature, Moody and 
Lovett; Century Readings in English Literature. 

(The above courses of the first and second semesters are 
to be regarded as a double course. 21 is a pre-requisite 
to 22). 

Professor White 
Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Stone 
Assistant Professor Roberts 

SI. Shakespeare. 

An intensive study of Macbeth, Hamlet, and Henry IV, 
Part I. Lectures on the plays. Careful attention to 



I 



I 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 97 

Shakespearean diction and construction. Three hours 
during first semester. 

Professor White 

32. Shakespeare. 

During this term King Lear, Othello, and the Winter's 
Tale will be studied. Three hours during the second 
semester. 

TEXTBOOKS: The New Hudson Shakespeare. Parallel read- 
ing: the other dramas of Shakespeare; The Facts About 
Shakespeare, Neilson and Thorndike. Elective for all 
students. Three hours. 

Professor White 

41. The Poetry of the Age of Wordsworth. 

A study of Wordsworth's poetry, with special attention 
to his development as a poet as revealed through the 
Prelude; the poetry of Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and 
Keats. Assignments and lectures will supply a social 
and historical background to the course. Three hours. 
Professor White 

42. The poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and the 
minor Victorian writers. Social and historical back- 
ground. Three hours. Elective for all students. 

Professor White 

51. Advanced Composition 

This course in higher composition is intended for a lim- 
ited number of students who have done creditable work 
in Freshman English, and who desire by further study 
and practice to attain individuality and effectiveness of 
prose style. The course should appeal especially to 
those interested in journalism. The first semester's 
work will be a study of newspaper making, of news and 
news values, and of getting the news. Time will be 
given to the analysis of the structure and style of news 
stories, and to the writing of news stories of unexpected 
occurrences, of speeches, interviews, and trials, of follow- 
up and rewrite stories. The student will practice, also, 



98 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

the writing of headlines, editing copy, and proof reading. 
Three hours, 

52. Advanced Composition 

During the second semester the student will have much 
practice in the writing of feature stories, editorials, book 
reviews, familiar essays, and short stories. Three hours 
Elective. 

Professor White 

TEXTBOOKS: Newspaper Writing and Editing, Bleyer; 
Pathways to Print, Harrington and Martin. (51, 52 not 
offered in 1933-34). 

61. Study of English Language. 

Old English grammar and phonology are taught by 
means of text-books and lectures. Selections from Old 
English poetry and prose are read. Three hours during 
the first semester. 

Professor White 

62. Study of the English Language. 

Middle English will be studied in the works of authors 
other than Chaucer. Three hours during the second 
semester. 

Professor White 

TEXTBOOKS: Old English Grammar, Smith; Middle English 
Reader, Emerson. 

71. Drama. 

A rapid survey of the history of English drama is at- 
tempted in lectures. Twenty-five or thirty dramas are 
assigned for rapid reading and study. These dramas are 
typical of all ages of English dramatic history from the 
earliest mystery plays to the twentieth century drama. 
Three hours. Elective for all students. 
Professor White 

72. Drama 

A study of contemporary British, American, and Conti- 
nental drama. About twenty-five or thirty plays are 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 99 

assigned for reading. Three hours. Elective for all 
students. 

Professor White 

TEXTBOOKS: Representative English Dramas, Tatlock and 
Martin; other texts to be selected. 

81. American Literature to the Civil War 

Beginning with the work of the early seventeenth cen- 
tury, this course covers the periods and movements in 
American intellectual history to the Civil War. The 
work of the major New England writers is emphasized. 
An attempt is made to present the historical background 
so as to aid students in correlating the literature and the 
history of America of this period. Elective for all stu- 
dents. Three hours. 

TEXTBOOKS: A History of American Literature, Boynton; 
Century Readings in American Literature, Pattee, editor. 

Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Roberts 

82. American Literature from the Civil War to 1900 

Emphasis in this course is placed on the development of 
literature in the South, and on the growth of the short 
story in America. Elective for all students. Three 
hours. 

TEXTBOOKS: Century Readings in American Literature, 
Pattee, editor; A History of American Literature, Boyn- 
ton; American Short Stories, Pattee, editor. 
(81, 82 not offered in 1933-34). 

Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Roberts 

91. Introduction to Fiction 

The object of this course is to prepare students for intel- 
ligent enjoyment of good fiction. Wide reading in the 
art, technique, and types of prose fiction is required. 
Ten novels are selected for intensive study. Elective for 
all students. Three hours. 



100 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

TEXTBOOKS: A Study of Prose Fiction, Perry; A Manual of 
the Art of Fiction, Hamilton. 

Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Stone 

92. The English Novel before 1800 

This course is concerned with the historical development 
of English prose fiction from its beginnings to the close 
of the eighteenth century, Reading assignments and lec- 
tures are given to present the social, religious, and sci- 
entific backgrounds. Twenty-five or thirty novels are 
selected for rapid reading and study. Elective for all 
students. Three hours. 

TEXTBOOKS: The History of the Novel in England, Lovett 
and Hughes; The English Novel, Raleigh. 
Assistant Professor Davis 
Assistant Professor Stone 

101. The Teaching of English 

This course is designed for those who expect to teach high 
school English. Each of the several divisions of the high 
school course in English is taken up in turn, but the in- 
struction will relate to the methods rather than to the 
materials of teaching. Three hours during the first se- 
mester. 

Professor White 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 101 

VI. THE DEPAKTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 

A lecture room, a laboratory, and a large room for the 
display of specimens are provided for this department in the 
new fireproof Science Hall. The Museum contains about 300 
minerals collected from various parts of the world, 200 speci- 
mens of rock presented by the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, 3 00 minerals and rocks presented by Goucher College, 
and a fine collection of Mississippi rocks and fossils. The 
excellence of the latter is yearly increased by donations from 
friends of the College, and a collection made by the professor 
and class on annual trips. 

11. Lithologic and Physiographic Geology. 

This includes a study of mineral crystalline forms, chem- 
ical composition, occurrence, and uses, with a description 
of the kind and arrangement of rock masses. Folios 
and topographical sheets of the U. S. Geological Survey 
will be used in connection with a study of physiographic 
features and processes. 

Dynamic Geology. 

This portion of the course embraces the study of the 
mechanical and chemical effects of the atmosphere, wa- 
ter, heat, and life. Special attention will be given to 
some phases of the subject, as the work of glaciers, and 
of volcanoes. 

12. Historical Geology. 

In addition to general historical geology, some atten- 
tion will be given to economic products and to paleon- 
tology. 

The College museum and the private museum of the head 
of the department afford minerals and fossils for class study. 

Several geological expeditions, regularly made in the fall 
and spring to localities easily accessible to Jackson give the 
class a practical conception of this kind of surveying. The 
College is fortunate in being located in the midst of a region 



102 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

that is quite varied in geological character. Occasionally the 
faculty grants a week's leave of absence on trips to more dis- 
tant parts. In the last month of the course special attention 
will be given to Geology of Mississippi. Six semester hours. 

Lectures and recitations. Four hours. 

Museum and field work. Two hours. 

Text-Books — Introduction to Physical Geology (Miller); Col- 
lege Geology, Part II (Chamberlain and McClintock). 

Reference Books — Text-Book of Geology (Grabau) ; Text- 
Book of Geology (Chamberlain and Salisbury) ; Physical 
and Historical Geology (Cleland); Physiography (Salis- 
bury; Text-Book of Geology (Geikie) ; Volcanoes (Bon- 
ney) ; Introduction to Geology (Scott); Journal of Geol- 
ogy; Economic Geology (Reis); Paleontology (Zittel) ; 
Foundations of Geology (Geikie); Introduction to Earth 
History (Shimmer) ; Physical and Historical Geology 
(Miller); Ice Age in North America (Wright). 

21. History of Geology and Economic Greology. 

22. Paleontology, Special Problems and Geology of Missis- 
sippi. 

This course will extend through two semesters and em- 
brace some field work. Geology 11-12 is a prerequisite. 
Six semester hours. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 103 

Vn. THE DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

Al, A2. 

The regular college work in German begins witli course 
11, but for the benefit of those students who have not been able 
to make the required preparation in this subject, a preparatory 
course (Course A) is offered. This course, if taken under the 
supervision of the College and not used as an entrance unit, 
may be used as Junior or Senior elective. When thus used 
it counts three hours toward graduation. All classes in Ger- 
man meet three times a week, unless otherwise specified. For 
entrance Course A will count as two units, provided the student 
makes a grade of not less than 80. 

Text-Books — Grammar. Storm, Immensee; other short 
stories in German. 

11, 12. 

For graduation, college work in German, French, or 
Spanish may be substituted for Greek in the B.A. course. In 
the B.S. course, modern languages may be substituted for 
Latin, classes in the three languages offered being inter- 
changeable, hour for hour. But a student should consult the 
professors in charge before so planning his course as to in- 
clude more than two modern languages. Any course not oth- 
erwise counted may be used as an elective. 

Text-Books — German Review Grammar; Wilhelm Tell; Frey- 
tag, Die Journalisten. For parallel reading; Schiller, 
Die Jungfrau von Orleans; Ernst, Flaschmann als 
Erzieher, 

Lessing, Minna von Barnheim; Heine, Die Harzreise; 
Sudermann, Frau Sorge, or Der Katzensteg; Modern German 
Stories (Porterfield) ; collateral reading in the stories of 
Thomas Mann and Jakob Wassermann. 

31, 32. 

A course in scientific German for the benefit of those 
who are interested in graduate work in Science- 



104 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Vin. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

PROFESSOR LIN 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MOORE 

EVELYN CLARK 

PAUL HARDIN 

In the courses in History two things will be kept in view. 
Students will be required to acquaint themselves with the sig- 
nificant facts in the development of the nations studied, and 
to learn why these facts are considered significant. As far as 
possible, the causal connection between historical events will 
be indicated, and emphasis will be laid on the idea that his- 
tory is a record of the continuous development of the human 
race, whose growing self-consciousness manifests itself in the 
progressive organization of its moral and intellectual ideals 
into laws and customs. 

In order to understand each people or nation studied, ac- 
count will be taken of its literature, its racial composition, its 
religious and social institutions, its economic condition, and 
the organization of its government. 

11. History of Europe 378-1776. 

In this course an attempt will be made to show that the 
problems and ideal of modern nations grow out of their 
history. This will be done as a preparation for the study 
of the governmental institutions of our own and other 
countries, and as the basis for a correct understanding of 
the questions now engaging civilized nations. Required 
in Freshman year for B.S. students. Required in either 
Freshman or Sophomore year for B.A. students. 
Associate Professor Moore 
Assistant Professor Haynes 

12. Modern World History 1776-1935. 

A continuation of History 11. 

Associate Professor Moore 
Assistant Professor Haynes 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 105 

21. History of the United States 1492-1850. 

This is a general course in American History. 
Associate Professor Moore 

22. History of the United States 1850-1936. 

Associate Professor Moore 

31. Historj' of Ancient Times. The history of the Orient 
and of Greece to the rise of Alexander the Great. Three 
hours a week. First semester. 
Prerequisite: History 11 and 12. 
Professor Lin 

33. Ancient History, through the history of Greece and 
Rome. This is a continuation of course 31. 
Three hours a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite: History 11 and 12. 
Professor Lin 

51. Problems in Modern History. 

This course deals with such present day problems in in- 
ternational relations as Nationalism, Imperialism, Mili- 
tarism, and Propaganda. It follows the general outline 
of the "Syllabus on International Relations," by P. T. 
Moon. 
Prerequisite History 11 and 12. 

Associate Professor Moore 

52. History of Europe 1914-1936. 

A continuation of History 51. 

The Causes of the World War, and a broad view of the 

History of Europe since the War. 

Associate Professor Moore 

61. Recent American History 1865-1900. 

A topical survey of American History in which emphasis 
is given to political, economic, and social problems. 
Prerequisite: History 21 and 22 or consent of instructor. 
Associate Professor Moore 

62. Recent American History 1900-1936. 

A continuation of History 61. 

Associate Professor Moore 



106 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

IX. DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR MITCHELL 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

INSTRUCTOR PRICE 

REBER LAYTON 

DAN CROSS 

Required Courses 

11. College Algebra. Credit: Three semester hours. 

12. Trigonometry. Credit: Three semester hours. 

12-4. Mathematics of Finance. Credit: Three semester hours. 
During the first semester there are four sections in 
Course 11 and three in Course 12. During the second 
semester there are two sections in Course 11, four in 
Course 12, and one in Course 12-4. 

Note: — Course 12-4 is assigned to students who enter 
with high school credit in Trigonometry. 

Elective Courses 
22. Differential Calculus. Credit: Three semester hours. 

31. Integral Calculus. Credit: Three semester hours. 

32. Differential Equations. Credit: Three semester hours. 

41. Descriptive Geometry. 

42. Mechanical Drawing. 

51. Analytic Mechanics. 

52. Analytic Mechanics. 

61. College Geometry. 

62. Projective Geometry. 

81. Advanced Algebra. 

82. Theory of Equations. 

During the Session 1934-35 Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 61, 
62, 81, 82 were given. 

For the session 193 5-36 the following courses will be of- 
fered: 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, 81, 82. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 107 

• X. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR LIN 

The courses in Philosophy are designed to give an intelli- 
gent view of the constitution of the mind, and to indicate the 
conditions of all valid thought. Only what is fundamental 
will be considered. 

In Logic both deductive and inductive logic will be given, 
but neither course will receive credit for graduation unless it 
is supplemented by the other course in this subject. In the 
History of Philosophy a comprehensive view will be given of 
the results attained by the greatest thinkers who have at- 
tempted to frame a consistent theory of the material and the 
spiritual world. One course in pre-christian ethics will be 
given, and one in the ethics of recent times. As in Logic, 
both courses must be taken in order to receive credit for either 
looking to graduation. It is recommended that Logic be tak- 
en before either Ethics or the History of Philosophy is at- 
tempted. 

11. Deductive Logic. 

Three hours a week. First Semester. 

Text — The Principles of Reasoning — Robinson. 

12. Inductive Logic. 

Three hours a week, Second Semester. 

Text — The Principles of Reasoning — Robinson. 

21. The Nichomachean Ethics. 

Three hours a week. First Semester. 

Text — ^The Nichomachean Ethics of Aristotle (Welldon's 

Translation). 

22. Ethics from a Modem Viewpoint. (Pre-requisite: Course 
21). 

Three hours a week. Second Semester. 
Text — Manual of Ethics — MacKenzie. 



* Courses in Philosophy are not open to Freshmen or Sophomores. 



108 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

31. Types of Philosophy — Hocking. (1st half of complete 
course). 

Three semester hours. 

32. History of Philosophy — Weber and Perry. 
Three semester hours. 



■H^BMBaMitiM 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 109 

XI. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAIj EDUCATION. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

DIRECTOR T. L. GADDY 

MELVIN RICHARDSON 

GABRIEL FELDER 

CHAUNCY GODWIN 

MARTHA DONALDSON 

11, 12. Physical Training for Men. The requirements in 
physical work are designed to cover the whole school year at 
the rate of two hours a week for each Freshman. Although 
this work is compulsory, considerable freedom in selection is 
offered. The sole aim is to create a healthy desire to engage 
in some form of recreation, under proper supervision, so as to 
benefit the student morally, mentally, and physically. This 
exercise takes form of competitive games in order to arouse 
the proper interest, develop team work, teach initiative, 
strengthen the morale, teach true sportsmanship, and create a 
life-long interest in some form of sport which will benefit the 
student in after life. An idea is also gained as to the natural 
ability of each man and quite frequently students discover 
that they are really better in athletics than they thought they 
were and are encouraged to try for the varsity teams. 

Physical Education for Women. General gymnastics (light 
apparatus); rhythmic plays and games. Tumbling, Pyramid- 
building, etc; developmental and corrective gymnastics. Spring 
Festival. Point system used. Monograms awarded. Re- 
quired of all Freshmen. Credit: Two semester hours. 

ai, 22. Coaching for Men. In order to better equip those 
students who expect to combine coaching with teaching a 
course in the theory of all major sports will be offered. This 
course will comprise football, baseball, basketball and track. 
Two hours a week of classroom work will be given, which will 
also include a number of lectures. 

In football, subjects such as the equipment and outfitting 
of players, training units, practice methods, various offensive 
and defensive methods, the forward pass, trick plays, general- 



110 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ship and field tactics, and numerous other important items 
will be given consideration. 

In baseball, individual play and team play will be taken 
up in detail. Offense and defense will be thoroughly dis- 
cussed; also batting, base running, position play, strategy, etc. 

Basketball will include such topics as goal throwing, pass- 
ing, guarding, dribbling, blocking, plays from center and 
plays from out of bounds. Various styles of offense and de- 
fense will be discussed. 

Field and track athletics will cover diet and training, the 
dashes and long distance events, hurdling, vaulting, jumping, 
shot put, discus throw, javelin, and other points which are es- 
sential to track work. Prerequisite for this course: At least 
two years participation In major sports. 

Coaching for Women: Soccer, Field Ball, and Speed Ball. 
Basketball (Intercollegiate); Hand Ball, German Bat Ball, 
Volley Ball, etc.; Track and Field events; Tennis. Theory and 
Practices of Physical Education. Gymnastic terminology. 
Classification of gymnastic material. Principles and tech- 
nique of teaching. History of Physical Education. The fall 
program for High Schools completed. Instruction in major 
sports for women. Intramural program in winter sports 
studied. Special emphasis placed on Basketball technique, 
officiating, etc. The Spring program for High Schools includ- 
ing track and field events: The May Day Festival. Biblio- 
graphy. Physical Education for Women a pre-requisite to 
this course. 4 hours credit. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 111 

Xn. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR HARRELL 
WARFIELD HESTER 

This department occupies ten rooms on the main and 
basement floors of the New Science Building. These rooms 
were specially designed for the work for which they are in- 
tended. The laboratories are supplied with all essentials for 
carrying on the work in the various courses and with baloptl- 
con and moving picture machine as well as automatic balopti- 
con for lecture purposes. Both alternating and direct cur- 
rents are available where needed. 

The work in Astronomy is carried on both in the Science 
Building and in the James Observatory. The department is 
equipped with globes, tellurian, gyroscopes, and spectrometer 
for laboratory work. 

The Observatory occupies a commanding position on the 
north campus and is equipped with a six-inch equatorial with 
mounting by Warner and Swazey and optical parts by Brash- 
ear, also a two-inch prismatic transit by Gaertner. The other 
equipment consists of a sidereal chronometer, a fine clock, 
filar micrometer, portrait lens for photography, a high grade 
surveyor's transit, and two sextants. 

The Observatory is open to visitors one night each week 
when the weather and other conditions permit. 

A knowledge of Mathematics through Plane Trigonome- 
try is required for admission to this department. 

PHYSICS 

11. General Physics — This course is designed to cover the 
general principles of mechanics of solids, liquids, and 
gases and the general principles of heat. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 



112 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

12. General Physics — This course consists of a study of 
sound, magnetism and electricity, and light. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. Courses 11 and 12 must be taken to 
satisfy the required work in Physics. 

21. Premedical Physics — A laboratory course designed, in 
conjunction with Premedical Physics 22, to meet the 
needs of those students who expect to enter a medical 
school where eight semester hours only are required for 
admission. The course is in substance an additional 
laboratory period to courses 11 and 12. 

One laboratory period. One semester hour credit. 

22. Premedical Physics — This course is a continuation of 
course 21. Both 21 and 22 must be taken to satisfy the 
Premedical requirement. 

One laboratory period. One semester hour credit. 

31. Mechanics and Heat — This course is devoted to a fur- 
ther study of mechanics and heat with special attention 
given to thermodynamics, calorimetry, and the kinetic 
theory of gases. The laboratory work in connection 
with this course will be devoted, in part, to the deter- 
mination of the fuel value of different fuels. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods. Three semester 
hours credit. 

S2. Light — This course treats of the principles and laws of 
reflection, refraction, interference, polarization, and 
color phenomena. 

One lecture and two laboratory periods. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

41. Electricity — This course involves a more extended dis- 
cussion of the topics than can be given in General Phys- 
ics. The student will be expected to become thorough- 
ly familiar with measuring instruments and their use in 
actual measurements. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 118 

One lecture and two laboratory periods, Three semester 
hours credit. 

42. Electricity — This course will be devoted to a study of 
electro-magnetism and the principles of the radio. 

One lecture and two laboratory periods. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

51. Electricity — The purpose of this course is to study the 
principles and construction of the direct current gener- 
ator and direct current motor; electrochemistry, the 
principles of the alternating current, alternating current 
generator, the transformer, and the alternating current 
motor. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

52. Electricity — This course consists of a study of power sta- 
tions and the distribution of power, electric lighting, 
electric heating, electric traction, and electric communi- 
cation. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

61. Sound — This course comprises a more extended study 
of sound. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

62. The Teaching of Physics — This is a lecture course on the 
teaching of Physics designed for those who are planning 
to teach the subject. 

One lecture period. One semester hour credit. 

ASTR0N03IY 

11. General Astronomy — This course will be devoted to a 
study of the earth, the moon, time, the constellations, 
and the solar system. 



114 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Two lectures and one observatory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

12. General Astronomy — This course will consist of a study 
of the planets, comets, meteors, the sun, the develop- 
ment of the solar system, and the sidereal universe. 

Two lectures and one observatory period. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. 

21. Spherical and Practical Astronomy — This course covers 
the subject of spherical astronomy and the theory of 
astronomical instruments with exercises in making and 
reducing observations. 

Three semester hours credit. 

22. Spherical and Practical Astronomy — This is a continua- 
tion of course 21. 

Three semester hours credit. 

81. Surveying — This course involves the general principles 
of surveying with particular attention to the method of 
laying out the public lands and the methods of the Coast 
and Geodetic Survey. 

Three semester hours credit. 

32. Surveying — This course is a continuation of Course 31. 
Three semester hours credit. 

41. Navigation — This course consists of the fundamental 
principles of navigation. 

Three semester hours credit. 

42. Navigation — This is a continuation of Course 41. 
Three semester hours credit. 






MILLSAPS COLLEGE 115 

Xm. THE DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

Tatuni Foundation 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR NESBITT 
INSTRUCTOR GILMORE 

CAXTON DOGGETT 
RAYMOND McCLINTON 

It is assumed in this department that all true education 
is religious, and in the light of this assumption the purpose 
here is to provide courses of study which will represent the 
proper emphasis upon the religious, historical, and literary 
values of education in Religion. These courses include studies 
in the Bible itself and closely related subjects of Biblical Lit- 
erature and History, Christian Religious Education, and some 
phases of the History of Religion. 

Two definite motives underlie this general idea: (1) 
to meet the curriculum requirements of the college for six 
semster hours in Bible for graduation, which requirement may 
be satisfied in either Freshman or Sophomore years; (2) to 
provide a logical set-up for a major in Religion to satisfy the 
needs of those students who wish to take their comprehensive 
examinations in the department. 

It may be observed that these courses of study are not 
offered for any special professional or pre-professional inter- 
est, such as the ministry or Christian life-service, but gen- 
erally for the training of the future laity of the Church uni- 
versal. These special interests are not neglected, but the 
modern program of the church makes such heavy demands 
upon an intelligent and effective lay leadership that it is 
hoped many students will avail themselves of the offerings of 
this department. 

Those Millsaps students who are properly qualified are 
in demand for Cokesbury Training School work in the sum- 
mer vacations in the Mississippi Conferences. This depart- 
ment co-operates with the General and Conference Boards of 
Christian Education in helping to prepare students to meet 
the requirements. 



116 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

*Students who wish to take the required course in Religion 
in the Freshman year will take 11 and 12, which is specially- 
designed for first-year students. Those who for any reason 
postpone the requirement until the Sophomore or subsequent 
years, or transfers from other colleges who lack the require- 
ment in Bible, will take 21 and 22. Variation from this gen- 
eral procedure will not be permitted. 

All courses are considered as semester units, and carry 
three semester hours credit each. 

Majors in this department may choose either of two lines 
of study offered, as follows: 

(1) Biblical Literature and History; 21, 22, 31, 32, 51, 

52, 81, 82. 

(2) Religious Education; 21, 22, 41, 42, 61, 62, 71, 72. 

*11, 12. Introductory Bible: Designed especially for first- 
year college students, to give necessary backgrounds for 
intelligent study and appreciation of the Bible and some 
insight into the nature and meaning of the Christian 
religion, and to prepare for further study in this field 
for those who desire it. 
Through entire year; open only to Freshmen. 

21, 22. Biblical Survey: A general survey study of the lit- 
erature, history, and religious ideals of the Old and New 
Testaments respectively, with emphasis upon thorough- 
ness and detail. 

Required for graduation unless 11 and 12 are taken in 
Freshman year; then may be taken as an elective. The 
course is a basic requirement for all majors in the de- 
partment. 

Through entire year; not open to Freshmen. 

31. The Life and Teachings of Jesus: This is a special study 
of the Synoptic Gospels, searching for the permanent 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 117 

ethical and religious values, with emphasis upon the 
teachings of Jesus and their application to problems of 
individual and society today. 
First semester; pre-requisite, Religion 11, 12, or 21, 22. 

32. The Life and Letters of Paul: An intensive study of the 
Acts and Pauline Letters, considering the life and work 
of the Apostle in the light of its historical setting and 
emphasizing the permanent religious values. 
Second semester; pre-requisite, Religion 11, 12, or 21, 
22. 

41. Historical Development of Religious Education: A 

historical survey of the beginnings of Religious Educa- 
tion in its Jewish and pre-Christian backgrounds, its 
early Christian growth and development during the mid- 
dle ages, with special emphasis upon the growth of 
Christian Religious Education in America down to the 
present time. 
First semester; pre-requisite. Religion 11, 12, or 21, 22. 

42. Theory and Principles of Religious Education: A study 
of the nature of the human material subject to religious 
and educational influences; the function of religion in 
individual life, and the place of the Church and the Bible 
in a changing society. 

Second semester; pre-requisite, Education 12, and Re- 
ligion 11, 12, or 21, 22. 

51. The Old Testament Prophets: A special study of the 
literature, history and religion of the Hebrew people as 
shown in the writings of their Prophets; seeking their 
permanent historical and religious values. 

First semester; pre-requisite. Religion 11, 12, or 21, 22. 

52. The Wisdom and Poetic Literature of the Old Testament: 

A general study of the origin and development of He- 
brew poetry and philosophy and English text of Job, 
Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, etc. 

Second semester; pre-requisite. Religion 11, 12, or 21, 
22. 



118 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

61. Organization and Worship in Religious Education: A 

study of the principles and procedures in worship, and 
the organization and administration of the local church 
educational program, involving the functioning of the 
local church board of Christian education. The course 
is an attempt to prepare the layman for effective service 
in the local church. 

First semester; pre-requisite, Religion 41, 42. 

62. Psychology of Religious Experience: A consideration of 
the religious mind, its genesis and growth, and the per- 
sonal factor in religious experience. Religion is con- 
sidered as conduct control, in connection with various 
aspects of religious belief. 

Second semester; pre-requisite, Religion 41, 42. 

71. Child Study: A study of child nature, its capacities and 
responses, its activities, the normal and wholesome ex- 
periences in the growth and achievement of a social and 
religious personality. A discussion of the new psychol- 
ogy in relation to child life. 

First semester; pre-requisite, Religion 41, 42. 

72. The Teaching of Ideals: A study of methods; the theory 
and practice in character education; the use of materials 
and agencies and means of achieving dependable Chris- 
tian behavior. 

Second semester; pre-requisite. Religion 41, 42. 

81. Introduction to the History of Religion: An introduc- 
tory study of the origin and development of religion; the 
beliefs and practices of primitive peoples; with brief sur- 
vey of the great living religions of the world. 

First semester; pre-requisite, nine semester hours in Re- 
ligion. 

82. The Origin and Meaning of Methodism: A brief survey 
of the times and forces that produced the Methodist 
movement; the part played by the Wesleys; the histori- 
cal development of Methodism and its function as a great 
religious organization today. 

Second semester; pre-requisite nine semester hours in 
Religion. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 119 

91. Principles of Sociologj-: Same as Social Science 31: A 
study of the various aspects of human society — human 
nature, social groups, isolation, contacts, interaction, con- 
flict, accommodation, collective behavior and social con- 
trol. 

First semester; open only to Juniors and Seniors. 

92. Social Problems: Same as Social Science 32: A survey 
of social problems and adjustments in modern society. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the bases for individual 
behavior and its relation to society. 

Second semester; open only to Juniors and Seniors. 



120 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XIV. THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR SANDERS 

MISS ELIZABETH CRAIG 

*MRS. H. W. COBB 

DR. SPARKMAN 

This department offers courses in French and Spanish. 
The regular work begins with Course 11, but for the benefit 
of those who have not been able to fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements in this subject before entering college, a prepara- 
tory course (Course A) is offered. This course, (when taken 
under the supervision of the College, and not counted as an 
entrance unit), may be used as a Junior or Senior elective. 
Classes meet three hours a week. For entrance Course A will 
count as two units, provided the student makes a grade of not 
less than 80. 

For graduation twelve hours of work above the elemen- 
tary course (Course A) in French or German or Spanish are 
accepted as a substitution for Greek in the B.A. course. In 
the B.S. course twelve hours of French or German, or Span- 
ish above the elementary course are required. 

Under no condition will a student be permitted to begin 
French and Spanish the same year. 

A student should consult the professors in charge before 
planning to take more than two modern languages. Any 
course not already counted, may be used as a Junior or Senior 
elective. 

FRENCH 
Al. An elementary course. Especial attention is given to 

pronunciation. 
A3. The elementary grammar begun in Al is completed. The 

reading of simple texts is begun. Dictation and oral 

practice is given. 

Al and A2 together constitute a double course. No 

credit is given for Al unless A2 is also completed. 
Miss Craig 



*Absent on leave. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 121 

11. The methods of French Al and A2 will be continued ac- 
cording to the needs and aptitudes of the class. A re- 
view of grammar will be used as a text for the study of 
grammar and composition. The semester will be de- 
voted to the careful reading of texts from nineteenth 
century prose. 

Especial attention will be paid to the irregular verbs, 
idioms and to pronunciation. 

12. A continuation of French 11. 

Miss Craig 

21. A survey of French literature. Readings from the prin- 
cipal French writers from the Renaissance to 1715. Es- 
pecial attention is paid to Molisre. 

Professor Sanders 
Miss Craig 

22. The survey begun in 21 is continued from 1715 to 1850. 

Professor Sanders 
Miss Craig 

SI. A more Intensive study of French literature of the Eight- 
eenth Century than is offered in French 22. (Offered 
in 1935-1936). 

Professor Sanders 

32. French Romanticism. Chateaubriand, Hugo and the 
French lyric poets of the Nineteenth Century. (Offered 
in 1935-1936). 

Professor Sanders 

41. French classic drama; Corneille, Racine. (Not offered 
in 1935-1936). 

Professor Sanders 

42. Advanced composition and conversation. (Not offered 
in 1935-1936). 

Professor Sanders 



122 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SPANISH 

The requirements for admission and for graduation in 
Spanish are the same as those in French. Two entrance units 
in Spanish will be required for admission to Course 11. 

Al. An elementary course in grammar and reading with con- 
stant oral practice. 

A2. Grammar continued and completed. Reading continued. 
Al and A2 together constitute a double course. No 
credit is given for Al unless A2 is also completed. 

Mrs. Cobb 

Dr. Sparkman , 

i 1. This course is devoted to the reading of modern Spanish 
prose. A Spanish review grammar is used and special 
attention is paid to the irregular verbs and to idioms. 
Practice is given in reading Spanish at sight. 

12. A continuation of Spanish 11. 

Professor Sanders 
Mrs. Cobb 
Dr. Sparkman 

21. The nineteenth century regional novel; Fernan Cabal- 
lero, Pardo Bazan, Juan Valera, History of Spanish Lit- 
erature. 

Professor Sanders 
Dr. Sparkman 

22. The regional novel; Benito Perez Galdos, Armando Pal- 
acio Valdes, Vicente Blasco Ibanez. 

Professor Sanders 
Dr. Sparkman 

31. Selections from Cervantes. 

Professor Sanders 

32. Lope de Vega and Calderon. 

Professor Sanders 

41. Spanish Romanticism; Bequer and Espronceda. (Of- 
fered in 1935-1936). 

Professor Sanders 

42. Composition and conversation. (Offered in 19 35-1936). 

Professor Sanders 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 123 

XV. THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL, SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR LIN 
ASSISTANT. PROFESSOR HAYNES 

The aim of this department will be rather to do well a 
small amount of work than to cover a large field. Courses in 
Economics, Political Science, and Sociology will be offered. 
While these are elementary in their scope and nature, they 
will serve as a sound basis for further study in these subjects, 
and will be useful to those who seek to understand and im- 
prove our financial, political, and social life and institutions. 

11. Geography. This is an introductory course dealing with 
the fundamental principles of geography of college grade. 

Text-Book — College Geography, (Peattie). Three se- 
mester hours. 

Assistant Professor Haynes 

12. Geography. In this course the subject will be treated 
more from the standpoint of the social sciences than that 
of a pure science. The vital problems in the present 
world situation — territorial, political, economic, racial, 
and religious — are studied and discussed in class. 

Text-Book — The New World, Fourth Edition, (Bowman). 
Three semester hours. 

Assistant Professor Haynes 

t21. Economics, Principles and Problems. 
Three hours a week. First semester. 

Text — Outlines of Economics — Ely. Fifth Edition. 

t22. Economics. Problems of Industry, Labor, and Govern- 
ment Control, Public Finance. 

Three hours a week, Second Semester. 

Text — Outlines of Economics — Ely. Fifth Edition. 
Professor Lin. 



tNot open to Freshmen. 



124 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

31. Priiicii>les of Sociology. Same as Religion 91: A study 
of the various aspects of human society — human nature, 
social groups, isolation, contacts, interaction, conflict, ac- 
commodation, collective behavior and social control. 
First Semester; open only to Juniors and Seniors. 

First Semester. 

32. Social Problems. Same as Religion 92: A survey of 
social problems and adjustments in modern society. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the bases for individual be- 
havior and its relation to society. 

Second Semester; open only to Juniors and Seniors. 

Second Semester. 

*41. Political Science — European Governments. 
Three hours a week, First Semester. 

Text — The Governments of Europe — Munro. 

*42. Political Science — The Government of the United States. 
Three hours a week, Second Semester. 

Text — The Government of the United States — Munro. 
Professor Lin 



*Not open to Freshmen. Open to Sophomores with an average 
grade of 9 0. Courses 31 and 32 offered also in Depart- 
ment of Religion. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 126 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS 

Professor of Piano 

MR. FRANK SLATER 

Professor of Voice and Public School Music 

MR. ALVIN KING 

Chorus Director 

Environment 

Jackson is truly a center of art and learning. The De- 
partment of Music is an integral part of the city's magnificent 
educational and cultural system and makes its contribution to 
this ideal environment. 

IMusical Attractions 

The Fine Art students of Millsaps College have splendid 
opportunities of hearing some of the world's renowned mu- 
sicians who are brought to Jackson under the auspices of the 
community concerts and local musical clubs. 

Radio Broadcasting 

Musical programs by members of the faculty and advanced 
students are broadcast regularly over WJDX. From this sta- 
tion pupils are afforded opportunity in securing experience in 
broadcasting. On account of the far-reaching power of this 
station friends in distant cities may listen in and enjoy the 
programs. 

Recitals 

Recitals are given by students of all degrees of advance- 
ment. These serve to provide the student with that experience 
so necessary to his development. Members of the faculty also 
give recitals for the students, their programs designing to il- 
lustrate some particular phase of study, interpretative, histori- 
cal or technical. 

Music Study Club 

The Beethoven Club of Millsaps College offers attractive 
and helpful features in the community life of the musical stu- 
dents. 



126 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF PIANO 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS 

Admission Requii*eiuents — ( Academic ) 

Candidates for a certificate, diploma or degree requi- 
sites must meet the regular college entrance requirements, 
viz: graduation from an approved high school, or a minimum 
of fifteen units of high school work. 

To enter the college course in piano the student should be 
grounded in correct touch and reliable teclmique. He should 
play all major and minor scales correctly in moderately rapid 
tempo, also broken chords in octave position in all keys and 
should have acquired systematic methods of practice. 

He should have studied some of the standard etudes, such 
as Czerny, op, 299, Book 1; Heller, op. 47 and 46 (according 
to the individual needs of the pupil); Bach, Little Preludes; 
a few Bach two-part Inventions and compositions correspond- 
ing in difficulty to — 

Haydn, Sonata No. 11, G major No. 20 (Schirmer). 

Mozart, Sonata C major No. 3, P major No. 12 (Schirm- 
er). 

Beethoven, Variations on Nel cor Piu, Sonata Op. 49, 
No. 1. 

Schubert, Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2, etc. 

ADVANCED STANDING — Work complete in other insti- 
tutions of accredited standing will be recognized toward grad- 
uation. Transferred credits in academic subjects and in His- 
tory of Music, as required for graduation in the American 
Conservatory, will be given full credit. Transferred credits 
in applied music (performance, instrument or voice), and 
theoretical subjects, will receive credit subject to examination 
or to continued study in courses of similar content in the 
Conservatory. 

Entrance and advanced credits, in both music and in 
academic subjects, should be submitted in transcript form in 
advance of the opening of the session. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



127 



Freshman 



Bachelor of Music Degree Requisites 

Piano As Major Subject 

Sem. Hrs. Sophomore 



Sera. Hrs. 



Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject 

(Ensemble) 2 

Academic Subjects 

(English 11, 12 6 

Religion 11, 12) 6 

Harmony I 4 

Keyboard Harmony I .... 2 

Solfeggio (Ear Training 

and Dictation) 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion I 2 



32 



Junior Sem. Hrs. 

Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject 

(Ensemble) 2 

Academic Subjects 

(Modern Language).. 6 

(Psychology) 6 

Counterpoint I 4 

Composition I 4 

Form and Analysis II .. 2 



32 



Major Subject 6 

Secondary Subject 

(Ensemble) 2 

Academic Subjects 

(English 21, 22) 6 

(Modern Language 

11, 12) 6 

Harmony II 4 

Keyboard Harmony II .. 2 

Solfeggio (Ear Training 
and Dictation) 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion II 2 

Form and Analysis I .... 2 



32 
Senior Sem. Hrs. 

Major Subject 12 

Secondary Subject 

(Teaching Piano, En- 
semble) 2 

Counterpoint (Canon & 

Fugue) 4 

Composition II 4 

Orchestration 4 

Thesis or Original Com- 
position 2 

Performance & Recital 2 
Chorus 2 



The thesis must deal with some musical topic, 
nal composition may be substituted for this. 



32 

An origi- 



A Sophomore license in Piano will be granted after the 
completion of the first and second years of the above course. 



128 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

The Certificate in Piano will be awarded students who 
complete the four years of the course in Piano and a minimum 
of eighteen semester hours in theoretical music suitable to 
their needs, the courses to be selected with the approval of 
the head of the department. This does not include the Lib- 
eral Arts courses. 

The Collegiate Diploma in Piano will be awarded students 
who complete the four-year course in Piano and the following 
theoretical music: Piano with the Liberal Arts degree and 
the first three years' work of the B.M. course. Requisite 
hours in theoretical music suitable to their needs with the 
approval of the head of the department. 

Graduates of the Department of Music are entitled to a 
professional teacher's license from the state. 

Special Students 

Persons who wish to pursue studies as a cultural ac- 
tivity without registering as candidates for certificates, diplo- 
mas or degrees, may enter as Special Students for the purpose 
of developing their talents under the instruction of a most ex- 
cellent faculty and to derive musical and educational inspira- 
tion through association with a large number of serious mind- 
ed students. In this department, students may register for 
any study or combination of studies desired. No specific 
scholastic requirements are imposed as a condition of entrance. 

Special students desiring credit for such work as they 
may take are subject to the same examinations and regula- 
tions as full course students. All credits earned are entered 
on the school records and may be used toward credentials at 
a later time, should they eventually become candidates for 
graduation. 

Examinations and Final Requisites 

All students taking the regular course in the Depart- 
ment of Music will be required to take two examinations dur- 
ing the year: One at the end of each semester. 

In the certificate class for final examination, candidates 
are required to play a fugue from the Well tempered Clavi- 
chord by Bach, a Sonata of Beethoven equivalent in grade of 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 129 

difficulty to Op. 2 6 or Op. 31, No. 2 and two representative 
compositions by romantic or standard modern composers, dis- 
playing both expressive and technical features. 

Requirements for Diploma 

Candidates for diploma in piano must be prepared to per- 
form a program, consisting of a prelude and fugue by Bach, 
a sonata of the more advanced type by either Beethoven, Schu- 
mann, von Weber or Chopin, at least six compositions from 
the more advanced type by romantic and standard modern 
composers. 

Requisites for Degree 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Music requisites must pre- 
sent a public program, varied and well-balanced, selected 
from the Classic, Romantic, and Modern schools of music, in- 
cluding a two-piano composition and one movement of a con- 
certo. 



130 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF VOICE AND PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

FRANK SLATER, B.M. 
Voice 

Mr. Slater 

The teaching of this subject embraces: 

Correct breathing and breath control, position and action. 

Tone placement and the development of resonance. 

The method taught is the Old Italian Bel Canto, or art of 
beautiful song, that has developed the world's greatest singers. 

Course requirements are those outlined in the Music De- 
partment for all instruments with the addition of French, 
German and Italian diction. 

Enunciation and diction. Special attention is given to 
the consonant attack and release. 

Training of mind and ear. 

Song Interpretations and Repertoire. 

Special training for professional work in Grand Opera, 
Oratoria. Concert or Teaching, Radio. 

Admission Requirements — ( Academic ) 

1. Candidates for a certificate, diploma or degree must 
meet the regular college requirements; viz: graduation from 
an approved high school, or a minimum of fifteen units of 
high school work. 

2. Same as the outline for piano. 

3. Same as the outline for piano. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



131 



4. Specific requirements for major in Voice for Bache- 
elor of Music degree. 



Freshman 



Sem; Hrs. Sophomore 



Sem. Hrs. 



Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrum't .... 2 

Academic Subjects, 

English & Religion.. 12 

Harmony I 4 

Solfeggio (Ear-training, 
Dictation and Sight- 
Singing) 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion, I 2 

French, German, o r 
Italian I 2 



32 
Sem. Hrs. 



Junior 

Major Subject 8 

Secondary subject. 

Piano or Instrum't .... 2 
Academic Subjects, 

Psychology, Modern 

Language 12 

Counterpoint I 4 

French, German, o r 

Italian III 2 

Composition 2 

Chorus or Ensemble .... 2 



32 



Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrum't .... 2 
Academic Subjects, 
English and Modern 

Language 12 

Harmony II 4 

Solfeggio 2 

History & Appreciation 2 
French, German, or Ital- 
ian, II 2 



32 
Senior Sem. Hrs. 
Major Subject 12 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrum't .... 2 

Orchestration 4 

Conducting 2 

Counterpoint II 4 

Thesis, on Music, or 

Original Composition 2 
Chorus or Ensemble, 

Position 2 

History of Opera 2 

Performance & Recital 2 



32 



Total 128 



5. The thesis must deal with some musical topic, or an 
original composition may be substituted in place of this. 

6. A Certificate in Voice will be awarded students who 
complete the four-year course in voice, and a minimum of 
eighteen semester hours in theoretical music, suitable to their 



132 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

needs; the courses to be selected with the approval of the 
head of the department. This does not include the Liberal 
Arts courses. 

7. The Collegiate Diploma in Voice will be awarded to 
students who complete the four-year course in Voice, with 
the Liberal Arts degree, and the first three years work in 
requisite B.M. course. 

Special Students 

9. Persons who wish to pursue studies as a cultural ac- 
tivity without registering as candidates for certificates, diplo- 
mas or degrees, may enter as Special Students for the purpose 
of developing their talents under the instruction of a most ex- 
cellent faculty and to derive musical and educational inspira- 
tion through association with a large number of serious mind- 
ed students. In this department, students may register for 
any study or combination of studies desired. No specific 
scholastic requirements are imposed as a condition of en- 
trance. 

Special students desiring credit for such work as they 
may take are subject to the same examniations and regula- 
tions as full course students. All credits earned are entered 
on the school records and may be used toward credentials at 
a later time, should they eventually become candidates for 
graduation. 

10. Examinations and final requisites. All students 
taking the regular course in the Department of Music, will be 
required to take two examinations during the year: one at 
the end of each semester. 

12. Requisites for Degree: Candidates for the Bach- 
elor of Music degree requisites, must present a public pro- 
gram, varied and well-balanced, selected from the Classic, 
Romantic and Modern schools, and to be sung in the original 
language, from memory. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 133 

Public School Music 

Mr. Slater 

The remarkable development of Public School Music dur- 
ing the past ten years has created a demand for thoroughly 
trained supervisors and special teachers of Music. 

A two-year course, leading to Certificate. A three-year 
course, leading to Diploma. The sophomore certificate entitles 
the student to a sophomore license for teaching Public School 
Music in Mississippi. The music courses prescribed for the 
sophomore certificate constitute a minor in Public School 
Music. 

11, 12. Public School Music Methods and Materials (Ele- 
mentary Grades). This course deals with methods and 
materials used in developing musical experience for the 
child in elementary grades; note singing, care of the 
child's voice, treatment of monotones, development of 
rhythm and musical appreciation by use of interpretative 
games, rhythm bands, and phonograph, rote to note 
methods and the beginning of sight music reading. 

21, 22. Public School 3Iusic Methods (Upper Grades and 
Junior High School). This course deals with methods 
and materials to be used in the intermediate grades for 
a further development of music reading and voice, part 
singing and musical appreciation, testing and classifica- 
tion of voices and planning of classes, organization of 
glee clubs, choruses, instrumental classes and orchestra 
for Junior High School. 

31, 32. Supervision of Public School Music (Including High 

School Methods). The Principles of Supervision and 
educational objectives of public school music, outlining 
of work, planning of a high school music course, organi- 
zation of instrumental classes, choral and instrumental 
ensembles, the giving of concerts, operettas, and pag- 
eants, methods used in teaching Musical Appreciation. 



134 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

BAND SCHOOL 

FRANK SLATER 
Charter Member, Gulf States Bandmasters' Conference 

The School of the Band comprises the full course required 
by the state, and will include the following subjects: 

The instrument; its technique, range, tone, and care; its 
range and possibilities for the professional player, and its 
practical use for the average player. The theory of music 
with especial emphasis on tempi, and other signs and marks 
of rhythmic values in band and orchestra music, with ear- 
training, sight-reading and transposing. Technique of the 
baton for all rhythms. Organization and conducting. The 
formation of bands and orchestras. Harmony and orchestra- 
tion. The writing of melodies and arranging them for large 
or small organizations. Arranging and transposing of hymns, 
marches, overtures, and the larger musical forms. Orchestral 
balance, tone color, interpretation and performance. 

Three hours weekly, not including the usual practices and 
drills. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 135 

THEORETICAL DEPARTMENT 

MRS. ROBERTS 

MR. SLATER 

MR. KING 

Theoretical courses are to be arranged in consultation 
with the director of the department in which the student is 
majoring. 

Theoretical Requirements for Bachelor of Music Degree 
Definition of Courses 

HARMONY — Two years, the result of which a student 
should have acquired the ability to harmonize melodies and 
figured basses with and without modulations; to write freely 
in four-part harmony with good voice leading modulations to 
near related and extraneous keys; to write an original melody 
and harmonize it with secondary seventh chords, chords of 
the ninth and using suspension, anticipation, pedal point and 
the like. 

SIGHT-SINGING, EAR-TRAINING AND DICTATION — 
Two years, at the conclusion of which the student should be 
able to sing melodies at sight; to sing accurately any interval; 
to take down from dictation melodies involving difficult prob- 
lems. 

KEYBOARD HARMONY — Two years, to be taken in cor- 
relation with the study of Harmony, at the end of which time 
the student should be able to play all the cadences in four 
part harmonization and to execute simple modulations at the 
keyboard. 

COMPOSITION — In the smaller forms up to and includ- 
ing the sonatina form, at the conclusion of which the student 
should present a work in sonatina form showing an ability to 
put into actual practice his knowledge of harmony, counter- 
point and form. 

COUNTERPOINT — Two years, at the conclusion of which 
the candidate must show sufficient grasp of the subject to be 
able to write a two or three part invention employing canonic 
imitation. 



136 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

HARMONIC AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS — Of the 
Larger Forms, including the larger homophonic and poly- 
phonic forms; the sonata and fugue. 

ORCHESTRATION — At the conclusion of which the stu- 
dent should possess a knowledge of instrumentation and suf- 
ficient ability to make simple orchestra arrangements. 

Description of Theoretical Coui'ses 

11, 12. Harmony I. Intervals, the primary triads, first and 
second inversions, cadences, sequences, harmonization of 
simple melodies, melody patterns and melodic invention. 
Dominant sevenths and their inversions. Figures and 
free basses. Close and open position. Secondary triads, 
chords of the dominant ninth and diminished seventh 
and their inversions. Two hours, four credits. 

TEXT: Harmony, by Foote and Spalding. References, Goet- 
schius, Weidig, Anderson, Chadwick. 

21, 22. Harmony H. Secondary chords of the seventh. Ir- 
regular treatment of chords of the seventh. Harmoniza- 
tion of melodies and basses. Passing tones. Modula- 
tion to related melodic Figuration. Florid melodies. 
Harmonization of Figured chorale. Melodies in each 
part. Old Modes. 

TEXT: Harmony, Foote and Spalding. References, Goet- 
schius, Weidig, Chadwick, Anderson. 

TEXT: Bach's 371 chorales. Two hours, four credits. 

KEYBOARD HARMONY II. A general outline of this course 
includes the playing and connecting at the keyboard of 
all triads and their inversions, seventh chords, harmoni- 
zation of melodies, improvisation and transpositions of 
melodies as well as short piano compositions leading 
finally to the reading of scores. Four semester hours. 

TEXT: Wedge. 

31, 32. Harmonic and Structural Analysis III. Figures, 
motives, phrases, cadences, periods and the two and 
three part song forms. The Sonata Form, Rondo and 
irregular forms. The polyphonic forms. Analysis of 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 137 

composition in smaller forms. Complete analysis of 
standard works. 

TEXT: Goetschius, Lessons in Musical Form. Four semes- 
ter hours. 

41, 42. Composition III. Original work in the simple 
periodic forms. Practical composition in smaller forms. 
The larger forms, including Rondo, Sonatina and Sonata. 

TEXT: Goetschius, The Homophonic Forms. The Larger 
Homophonic. Four semester hours. 

51, 52. Counterpoint. The treatment of simultaneous me- 
lodic voices in two, three and four parts, and its applica- 
tion in invention and other forms of imitation. Double 
Counterpoint. The application of Counterpoint to the 
Fugue. 

TEXT: Strict and Free Counterpoint, Anderson. Refer- 
ences: Goetschius, Applied Counterpoint, Elementary 
Counterpoint. Four semester hours. 

61, 62. Canon and Fugue. An outline including a study and 
analysis of the Bach Fugues, writing the Canon and 
Fugue in good style. 

TEXT: Fugue, by Higgs. Four semester hours. 

71, 72. Orche.stration. The study of the various orchestral 
instruments. Arranging for small groups and the large 
orchestras. 

TEXT: Practical Orchestration, Anderson. References, 
Forseyth. Four semester hours. 

11, 12. Sight Singing and Dictation. Intervals, various 
rhythms, major and minor triads, melodic and harmonic 
dictation. Later, work in seventh and ninth chords. 
Dictation of three and four-part harmony. Melodies with 
modulation, and aural analysis of form. 

TEXTS: Alchin and Brown. References, Wedge. Solfeggio 
(Ear-Training, Dictation, Sight-Singing). 

EAR TRAINING. Reading of melodies in major, minor, 
treble and bass clefs in various rhythms. Ear training 
and dictation. Later, two, three and four part etudes. 



138 MILLSAPS COIjLEGB 

canons, treble and bass clefs, with more study of rhythm 
and chromatics. Ear training and dictation. Later, 
reading at sight of different solfeggi, then more difficult 
part songs. 

TEXTS: Wedge. Four semester hours. 

21, 22. History and Appreciation. A survey of the growth 
of music from earliest times through the nineteenth cen- 
tury, with emphasis upon the classic period. Lectures, 
text material and collateral reading. Illustration by 
sound-reproducing instruments. The Romantic com- 
posers, modern tendencies and present day composers. 
Reports and digests with text material and collateral 
reading. Critical and biographical study. 

TEXT: Outlines of Music History, Hamilton. 

TEXT: Music Appreciation, Mason. Two semester hours. 
31, 32. A continuation of 11, 12. Four semester hours. 
41, 42. A continuation of 21, 22. Two semester hours. 

RATES OF TUITION AND FEES 

Piano — Freshmen and Sophomore $120.00 

Piano — Junior and Senior 150.00 

Group — Piano 40.00 

Voice — Freshman and Sophomore 120.00 

Voice — Junior and Senior 150.00 

Group — Voice 40.00 

Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 20.00 

History and Appreciation 20.00 

Public School Music 40.00 

Solfeggio (Ear-Training, Dictation, and Sight-Singing) 20.00 

Canon and Fugue 24.00 

Form and Analysis 20.00 

Counterpoint 24.00 

Composition 20.00 

Orchestration 20.00 

Registration Fee 2.00 

Piano Practice, per hour 3.00 

Certificate 2.50 

Collegiate Diploma 5.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 139 

Note: — Students will be charged three-fifths the regular 
rate for half time lessons. 

Terms: One half of the tuition is payable at entrance, 
the balance February 1st. Prompt payments by the month 
will be allowed to those students unable to pay in advance for 
one-half sessions but these monthly payments must be strictly 
in advance. 

All business arrangements must be transacted at the Bur- 
sar's Office. 

Students will not be enrolled by the month. 

Students who miss private lessons on account of illness 
may have such lessons made up, but if missed for any other 
reason they will not be made up. 

No refund will be made for temporary absence or for les- 
sons discontinued. 

Students are enrolled for the session of nine months and 
are obliged to continue at least until the end of the semester. 

Certificates or diplomas will be granted or conferred only 
on those students who have completed the regular course of 
study, passed the required examinations and paid all accounts 
due the school. 

A proportionate refund of music charges will be made in the 
case of prolonged absence or withdrawal on account of sick- 
ness or for other necessary reasons; provided that no refund 
will be made for absence of less than three weeks. 

Tuition fees will not be refunded, except in cases of with- 
drawal on account of illness. 



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142 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

JUNE 5 TO AUGUST 20, 1935 

FACULTY 

D. M. KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., President 

G. L. HARRELL, B.S., M.S., Director 
Physics 

B. E. MITCHELL, M.A., Ph.D., 
Mathematics 

Spanish 

A. P. HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D., 
Latin 

J. M. SULLIVAN, M.A., Ph.D.; 
Chemistry 

English 

English 

R. R. HAYNES, M.A., 
Education 

A. L. GILMORE, A.M., 
Religion 

R. H. MOORE, B.S., M.A., 
History 

French 

W. E. RIECKEN, M.A., Ph.D., 
Biology 

MISS SALLIE B. NEWMAN 
Elementary Education 

V. B. HATHORN, B.S., 

Bursar 

MRS. M. B. CLARK, 

Librarian 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 143 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS. A.B., B.M., 
Piano 

FRANK SLATER, B.M., 
Voice 

MRS. C. F. COOPER, 
Matron 

GENERAIi STATEMENT 

The Summer School of Millsaps College for 1935 will 
open on June 5 and will continue for eleven weeks. 

The Summer School is planned especially for college stu- 
dents and for teachers who desire further professional work 
or regular college work. Teachers may secure renewal of li- 
cense by attendance for nine weeks. Entrance units and tran- 
scripts will be required of all new students. 

In opening its doors to the teachers of the State, Mill- 
saps College feels that it is serving a long felt need in that 
some provision should be made at the Capital of the State for 
teachers to spend a few weeks during their vacation and at the 
same time take such work as they may find in the list of 
courses. 

All the advantages of the other summer schools will be 
afforded in the way of renewal and extension of license pro- 
vided by the State Department of Education. 

College graduates who lack the required number of hours 
in Education will find, here, an opportunity to make up some 
of those hours. Students with two years of college training 
may, with six hours in Education, be granted a temporary 
State License without examination by the State Board of Ex- 
aminers. 

The amount of work that a student may take will be lim- 
ited to two subjects with a total credit of twelve semester 
hours, or to four semester courses of three hours each. 



144 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

There will be a series of lectures by special lecturers from 
time to time. Announcement will be made beforehand. 

The tuition fee will be $35.00 and a matriculation fee of 
$5.00 will be charged. Board will be $25.00 or $26.00 per 
month, or at the rate of $8.00 per week. For a period of less 
than a week the rate will be $1.50 per day. Science fee, 
$10.00. Library fee $3.00. Science breakage fee, $2.00 for 
each course, unused portion returned. Those who expect to 
live on the campus will bring with them a pillow, bed-linen, 
towels, and toilet articles. The dormitories and dining hall 
will be open on the evening of June 4. Fees and board pay- 
able strictly in advance. 

Those expecting to enter the Summer School should make 
reservation of room by sending to the Bursar a deposit of 
$5.00. 

The following courses will be offered: 

Biology 31, 32 History 21, 22 

Biology 21, 22 History 71, 72 

Chemistry 21, 22 Latin 11, 12 

Education 21, 22 Latin 21, 22 

Education 31, 32 Mathematics 11, 12 

Education, Elementary Mathematics 21, 22 

English 21, 22 Physics 11, 12 

English 41 Physics 21, 22 
English 72 (11, 12 Prerequisite) 

English 81, 82 Religion 11, 12 

French 11, 12 Religion 41, 42 

French 21, 22 Spanish 11, 12 

Spanish 21, 22 

For further information address 

G. L. HARRELL, Director. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 145 



For Young Women 

Established 1858 

A Coordinate Junior College of the Millsaps System 

Approved by the State Accrediting Commission 

Member: Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of 
the Southern States, American Association of Junior Col- 
leges and Southern Association of Colleges for 
Women 

Operated and Controlled by the Board of Trustees 
of Millsaps College 

SEVENTY-SIXTH SESSION 

First Semester Begins September 9, 1935 

Second Semester Begins Januarj' 20, 1936 

Commencement, May 26, 1936 

BROOKHAVEN, »nSS. 
Lincoln County 



146 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Whitworth College, located in the beautiful little city of 
Brookhaven, has a long and honorable history in the educa- 
tion of Mississippi women. Traditions of piety, learning, and 
culture of more than a half century enshrine the campus and 
historic community. The college may be reached by the Illi- 
nois Central, the Mississippi Central and the Brookhaven and 
Pearl River Railroads. Situated in the most elevated region 
of southern Mississippi (489.5 feet above sea level) the com- 
munity has an enviable record for health, while at the same 
time the mild southern climate renders out door exercise pos- 
sible and enjoyable at all seasons. The college occupies a 
beautiful campus where nine buildings, six of them built of 
the famous Brookhaven brick, constitute the most complete 
physical plant of any woman's college in the State. 

With this admirable physical setting, the college is now 
excellently equipped in plant, faculty, and academic organiza- 
tion for thorough work. In accordance with the action taken 
by the Mississippi Conference on the fourteenth day of Novem- 
ber, 1927, the physical plant and all the resources of the col- 
lege have been taken over by the Board of Trustees of Mill- 
saps College and Whitworth College is now being operated as 
a coordinate Junior College Division of the Millsaps Collegiate 
system. In 1927, the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States admitted Whitworth College to 
full membership. The college is also a member of the South- 
ern Association of Colleges for Women and of the American 
Association of Junior Colleges. The courses of study for the 
Freshman and Sophomore years are the same as those offered 
in the Freshman and Sophomore years of Millsaps College as 
indicated on page 68 of this catalogue. A maximum of three 
year hours in home economics and three year hours in fine 
arts may, however, be counted toward the bachelor's degree. 
Other courses, not leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree, are of- 
fered in home economics, in fine arts and in education. Those 
completing these courses will be awarded a certificate of grad- 
uation. Young women who wish to work towards the Mill- 
saps B.A. or B.S. degree will be enrolled in Whitworth Col- 
lege for the first two years of the course. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 147 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students will be classed and given membership into Col- 
lege classes under the following conditions: 

Freshmen must have at least fifteen entrance units to 
their credit and carry work equivalent to fifteen hours. For 
sophomore classification the attainment of one of the Whit- 
worth College Diplomas at the end of the school year must 
be possible, and the student's schedule must be arranged ac- 
cordingly. 

For further information and catalo^ae of Whitworth Col- 
lege, address, 

GEO. F. WINFIELD, Dean 
Whitworth College, 
Brookhaven, I^Iiss. 

A MEMBER OF THE MILLSAPS SYSTEM 

Offers Standard College Courses for Young Women in the 
Freshman and Sophomore Classes. 

Excellent Dormitories with Connecting Baths; A Well- 
selected Library of about 10,000 Volumes; Ample Reading 
Room; Brick Gymnasium with standard basket ball court; 
Beautiful Art Studio; Bible Training and Physical Education 
for all Students. 

Piano, Voice, Expression, Home Economics, Art and De- 
signing. 

Charges $275 to $300 per Session. 

Eighty-fourth Session begins September 19th. 

For full information write 

W. C. NEWMAN, Dean, 

Box 1015, Grenada, Mississippi 



148 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President 
Gilbert P. Cook, '08 Canton 

Vice-President 
Otto Porter, '21 ;. McComb 

Secretary-Treasurer 
J. W. Campbell, '24 Jackson 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John B. Howell, Canton, one year. 
S. M. Bailey, Forest Hill, two years. 
O. H. Swayze, Jackson, three years. 
O. B. Triplett, Forest, four years. 

HONORARY DEGREES 

1917 

R. S. Ricketts, Litt.D. 

1921 

H. T. Carley, D.D. 

J. R. Countiss, D.D. 

C. W. Crisler, D.D. 

1923 

B. E. Eaton, LL.D. 

1924 

Gypsy Smith, jr., D.D. 

1927 

C. A. Bowen, D. D. 
G. W. Huddleston, Litt.D. 

1928 

J. Loyd Decell, D.D. 

R. H. Tucker, D.D. 

1929 

N. B. Harmon, jr., D.D. 

B. B. Jones, LL.D. 

1934 

A. A. Kern, Litt. D. 

W. L. Duren, D.D. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 149 



CLASS OF 1934 



Bachelor of Arts 

Allen, Violet Jackson 

Applewhite, Lou Ellen Tylertown 

Boswell, Helen Sanatorium 

Bufkin, C. Wesley Ford Sardis 

Corley, Mynelle Raleigh 

Davis, Florence Eugenia Gary, W. Va. 

Grantham, Robert Gordon Terry 

Griffin, John Thomas Johns 

Gulledge, Jeanette Mendenhall 

Harrell, Laura Drake Satterfield Jackson 

Heard, Franklin C Okolona 

Holt, Cliffie Mae Mendenhall 

Hozendorf, Connie Ray Mendenhall 

Jones, Maurice Greenwood 

Lane, Juanita Forest 

Maxwell, Edith Crawford Jackson 

Moore, Basil Amory 

McLean, Maud Wilkinson Jackson 

Shumaker, Lee Roy McCool 

Winstead, Daree DeKalb 

Young, Ruth Mildred Jackson 

Bachelor of Science 

Allred, Pauline Frances Jackson 

Bennett, Luther Alcorn Fulton 

Boland, Gladys Wiggins 

Bradley, Norman Jackson 

Breland, Rachael Wesson 

Briscoe, Audrey Lee Meridian 

Brumfield, Dudley Copeland Pelahatchie 

Buckley, Spurgeon Newton 

Caldwell, Clois French Camp 

Chambers, John C Webb 

Cone, Vivian Gladys Shubuta 

Cook, Wendell Holmes Philadelphia 

Copeland, Mrs. Clyde (Dorothy Dean) Jackson 



150 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Davis, Garland Dace Ackerman 

Dees, James Wilton Hazlehurst 

Dorris, Henry C Jackson 

Hales, Mary Cathleen Hickory 

Higdon, Robert Sexton Hazlehurst 

Holloman, Garland Friars Point 

Ivy, Henry Berry Winona 

Kimball, John T Jackson 

Kinnaird, Richard Jackson 

Lackey, Samuerl E., Jr Forest 

Luter, Ouida Mae Jackson 

Mayfield, Thomas Norris Taylorsville 

Morehead, Mrs. O. H. (Rachael Breland) Houston, Texas 

Morrison, James Bernard Jackson 

McEwen, Fred Louisville 

McMahon, Neil Grafton Jackson 

O'Dom, Floyd Hamberg 

Ross, George Thomas Hermanville 

Richardson, Melvin Jackson 

Scott, Roberta Chrystine Johns 

Sisk, Paul Amory 

Stark, Cruce Vidor, Tex. 

Stoaks, Du Val Meridian 

Weems, Alice Vicksburg 

Wilson, Joseph Crawford Hollandale 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SENIORS 

Adams, Charles Macon 

Akers, Buren T Pontotoc 

Alexander, Edith Jackson 

Alford, Mosby Hazlehurst 

Allen, H. V Jackson 

Averitte, Virginia Jackson 

Baxter, Joe Lumberton 

Beard, Norvelle Jackson 

Black, Margaret Flora 

Boland, Helen Calhoun City 

Brown, Charles Jackson 

Byrd, Laura Helen Barlow 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 151 

Cabell, Helen Jackson 

Caldwell, Gladen Jackson 

Caraway, Bill Brookhaven 

Carter, Malcolm : Gulf port 

Castlen, John Greenville 

Collins, Harris Yazoo City 

Crosby, Burnlce Jackson 

Crull, Luther Greenwood 

Darden, Frank Rea Jackson 

Decell, Louis Brookhaven 

Donaldson, Martha Jackson 

Ezelle, Robert Lenoir Jackson 

Felder, Charles Gabriel Magnolia 

Ferguson, Mary Hermanville 

Ferguson, Louise Hermanville 

Friedberg, Martha Vicksburg 

Gilbert, J. K Meridian 

Godwin, Chauncey Jackson 

Gregory, Manley Okolona 

Guinn, Mary Frances McCondy 

Hand, Carolyn Shubuta 

Hardin, Paul Jackson 

Harris, Kathleen Jackson 

Heald, Emma Louise Jackson 

Heidelberg, Katherine Jackson 

Henry, John Paul Jackson 

Hester, Warfield Terry 

Holmes, John Sharp Yazoo City 

Horton, Adelaide Grenada 

Hughes, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Humes, Mary Jackson 

Jackson, Muriel Dekalb 

Karow, Armand Jackson 

King, Richard Jackson 

Layton, Reber Jackson 

Mansell, M. E Camden 

Mason, Grace Jackson 

Massey, R. M Bay Springs 

Meadors, Gilcin Clarksdale 

Mitchell, Dorothea Jackson 



152 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Moffitt, Ida Cole Jackson 

Monroe, Otho Canton 

Murtagh, Lucille Pickens 

McCormick, Hertha Jackson 

McDonnell, Thomas Jackson 

McGahey, Ayrlene Jackson 

McMurray, Ethel Tougaloo 

Noblin, J. S Forest 

Noel, Mary Inez Jackson 

Parker, Mary Lee Gulf port 

Plummer, Nancy Jackson 

Ramsey, Paul Porterville 

Reeves, Gordon McComb 

Regan, Robert Fernwood 

Ridgeway, Robert Jackson 

Stubbs, Blanche Walnut Grove 

Swartzfager, James Ovett 

Terrell, Kenneth Prentiss 

Tremaine, Wanda Monroe, La. 

Underwood, Felix J., Jr Jackson 

Vinson, Wilson Mendenhall 

Walton, Warren Lewis Amite, La. 

Ward, Fred Jackson 

Weems, Frances Shubuta 

Womack, Robert Bogalusa, La. 

Wright, Christine Bassfield 

Wright, Ellis Jackson 

JUNIORS 

Alexander, Seta Jackson 

Arrington, Charles Collins 

Anderson, Hiram Meridian 

Assaf, Jimmy Jackson 

Birdsong, Charles Terry 

Bond, Helen Jackson 

Bosarge, W. K Pascagoula 

Bounds, Jimmie Roy Jackson 

Boyles, Dorothy Jackson 

Bowen, Jack Burton 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 153 

Buckels, Winnie Lucien 

Bufkin, Edward Hazlehurst 

Buie, Webster Jackson 

Bullard, Polly .'- Jackson 

Bullock, Malton Biloxi 

Clark, Evelyn .....Jackson 

Clowe, Henry W ...Jackson 

Collier, Nancy Jackson 

Colson, Lilla Jo Water Valley 

Cross, Dan Jackson 

Cunningham, Robert E Jackson 

Decell, William Jackson 

Denson, La Verne - Jackson 

Doggett, Caxton -. Kossuth 

Dubard, William V Dubard 

Dunn, Read P Greenville 

Felder, Mamye B Magnolia 

Ferris, Will D Shaw 

Flowers, Edward Jackson 

Flowers, Myrtis Jackson 

Ford, Marianne Jackson 

Fuller, Roger Laurel 

Fulgham, William Jackson 

Gallman, Andrew Jackson 

Golden, John Jackson 

Graves, Nora Columbus 

Graves, Oralee Jackson 

Grittman, Sophia Gene Ruleville 

Hand, Robert S Shubuta 

Haynes, Brooks Woodland 

Hendrick, H, Julius Jackson 

Hickman, Eva Jackson 

Hinson, James Noel Etta 

Hutchins, Laura Louise Jackson 

Johnson, Earline Jackson 

Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth Hollandale 

Lauderdale, James Jackson 

Lemly, James H Jackson 

Loflin, John Robert Jackson 

Mayo, Lexie E Picayune 



154 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Mayo, Robert Polkville 

Meier, Joe Shaw 

Melvin, John E Camden 

Minor, Alton Winnfield, La. 

Morehead, Helen Jackson 

Morrow, Josephine Gloster 

Myers, Margaret Morton 

McClinton, Raymond Quitman 

McCullar, Virginia Booneville 

McDaniels, Roy Prentiss 

Norton, Mary Jackson 

Pickett, Joseph Candler Natalbany, La. 

Ramsey, Vivian Gallman 

Riggs, Stanley Jackson 

Ross, Thomas Jackson 

Samples, Eual Sumrall 

Selman, Charles Monticello 

Shelton, Baldwin Lambert 

Slenker, LeRoy El Segunda, Cal. 

Smith, Sidney Allen Jackson 

Smith, Jasper, Leroy Newton 

Sneed, Hays Jackson 

Spotswood, James Poplarville 

Stacy, Harold Jackson 

Strahan, Dorothy Jackson 

Sturgeon, Purser Jackson 

Suydam, Martha Macon 

Swayze, Harris Benton 

Sykes, India Jackson 

Vickers, John T Jackson 

Watkins, Earline Eden 

Weber, Dorothy Mathiston 

Wilson, A. W Brookhaven 

SOPHOMORES 

Artz, Jefferson Vicksburg 

Assaf, Kathleen Jackson 

Banks, Thomas Jackson 

Battley, F. D Ridgeland 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 15 5 

Bennett, M. M Booneville 

Boggs, Marie Jackson 

Best, Harold Lorman 

Bradshaw, Francis Bentonia 

Brent, William Crystal Springs 

Breeland, Bradford Magnolia 

Brooks, David Jackson 

Butler, Ellisine Jackson 

Caldwell, La Reine Jackson 

Caldwell, N. M Aberdeen, N. C. 

Carmichael, Hubert Jackson 

Cortner, George Greenwood 

Cunningham, Elizabeth Jackson 

Curtis, Leland Jackson 

Davis, M. M Jackson 

Delaup, Talbot Jackson 

Dement, Frank Meridian 

Durham, Eunice Louise Jackson 

Ezelle, Fred Jackson 

Ferguson, James Hermanville 

Finger, Ellis Ripley 

Flowers, Bernice Jackson 

Gordon, Slater Florence 

Green, George Jackson 

Griffin, Thomas Shubuta 

Harris, Grace Jackson 

Hilton, Catharine Jackson 

Horton, Hurd Grenada 

Houston, Alvin Burton 

Hymers, George Laurel 

Jones, William Jackson 

Karow, Eugene Jackson 

Lee, James Leland 

Lemly, John Jackson 

Lotterhos, Russell Crystal Springs 

Malone, Lucien Grenada 

Matthews, Phyllis Jackson 

Maxted, Aubrey Pascagoula 

Montgomery, W. B Jackson 

McDonnell, Will Jackson 



156 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Newell, Martha Jackson 

Nobles, Russell Jackson 

Owsley, Robert W Laurel 

Parker, John Jackson 

Parker, William Philadelphia 

Prichard, Charlie Jackson 

Redus, John F Shannon 

Rehfeldt, Fred Jackson 

Robinson, Will Jackson 

Ruoff, Mildred Jackson 

Sandusky, Herbert Jackson 

Sharpe, William Jackson 

Slater, Frank Jackson 

Smith, Hazel Brookhaven 

Stout, Harry Ridgeland 

Stubbs, Aline Walnut Grove 

Sutherland, Lloyd Jackson 

Tatum, Addison Hattiesburg 

Taylor, Agatha Jackson 

Taylor, Swep ..Jackson 

Tidwell, Segrest Batesville 

Ulmer, David Taylorsville 

Wall, Valerie Jackson 

Walters, Waudenna Raleigh 

FRESHMEN 

Adams, M. F Lumberton 

Agard, Leland Brandon 

Alford, Lee Gulfport 

Allen, Braxton Jackson 

Barnes, Lewis Columbia 

Beeland, Jean Greenville, Ala. 

Bilbo, Claude Moss Point 

Bingham, Eugene Shreveport, La. 

Bond, Marjorie ...Jackson 

Boone, James Pontotoc 

Bradshaw, William Bentonia 

Brannon, R. A _ Utica 

Breland, Daniel Leakesville 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 157 

Brock, Katherine Jackson 

Brown, Kathryn Jackson 

Brown, George - Columbia 

Bullock, Francis ". Brandon 

Cassels, Ottomese Gloster 

Cassels, Sella Gloster 

Chambers, Sally Jackson 

Cirlot, Neal Moss Point 

Clark, O. A Silver City 

Clark, G. C, Jr "Waynesboro 

Cocke, Charles Leland 

Cohen, Marvin Jackson 

Conner, James S., Jr Hattiesburg 

Cox, Thomas E Brandon 

Cunningham, R. W Meridian 

Davis, Jessie Lola Jackson 

Dickson, Kathleen Jackson 

Dorris, George Jackson 

Drane, Bettie Jackson 

Dunn, James C Greenville 

Dye, Allen L Clarksdale 

Ellis, Mary Ruth Jackson 

Ellis, Samuel Lauderdale 

Flint, Calvin Batesville 

Ford, Billy Jackson 

Foster, Floyd Jackson 

Garrett, William L Jackson 

Gordon, Alex Jackson 

Glover, "W. B .Hattiesburg 

Graves, Ethel Jackson 

Graves, Elizabeth Jackson 

Green, Albert Jackson 

Guyse, James C Homewood 

Grubbs, Elliot Lang Jackson 

Hamilton, Francis Jackson 

Hamilton, Charlotte Jackson 

Hand, Albert Shubuta 

Haneline, Herschel Tongs 

Harala, James Moss Point 

Hardin, Bill Jackson 



158 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Hare, Helena Jac?kson 

Hartman, Oscar Brookhaven 

Harvey, Wirt Turner Water Valley 

Hassel, J. C Moss Point 

Haynes, George W Lumberton 

Heidelburg, Annie Lou Jackson 

Hester, Jefferson Moore Laurel 

Higgins, Frances Clanton, Ala. 

Hill, Archie Holcomb 

Hinson, J. B Lucedale 

Hoffpauir, Billy Jackson 

Hollingsworth, Hazel Jackson 

Horton, Cowles Grenada 

Howard, H. H Jackson 

Jackson, Charles Leakesville 

Jagger, Dudly T Lucedale 

Jones, Warren Biloxi 

Kellum, Stacy Shaw 

Kimbrell, Billy Jackson 

Kinnaird, Jean Jackson 

Lauderdale, Billy Jackson 

Lewis, Dewitt Jackson 

Leonard, J, B Corinth 

Loflin, Frank Jackson 

Luter, Juanita Jackson 

Macgowan, Clifford Jackson 

Magee, K. B Columbia 

Manning, Harris Jackson 

Marks, Elsie Jackson 

Matheny, R. M Waynesboro 

Miller, Loren Jackson 

Millstein, Conan Jackson 

Milner, Helen Jackson 

Mimms, Sam Grenada 

Moore, Dudly Byhalia 

Morrow, Madeline Gloster 

Moss, Charles Jackson 

Muh, Berkely Jackson 

Mulligan, Woodrow Brownsville, Tenn. 

Murray, Campbell Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 159 

Myers, Elizabeth Jackson 

McAuldy, Martin Jackson 

McBroom, Jimmy Batesville 

McCormick, Lilian Jackson 

McCool, A. R Jackson 

McLaurin, Mary Sue Jackson 

McRae, John Jackson 

McRee, Jack Fulton Holcomb 

Nelson, Martha Ann Jackson 

Norton, W. L Jackson 

Owens, Herbert Hattiesburg 

Palmer, Dolores Jackson 

Patton, George E Jackson 

Paulk, Joe Jackson 

Permenter, Nell Jackson 

Perrin, James Yazoo City 

Pigford, Malcolm Laurel 

Pounds, Tucker Magnolia 

Power, Jack Hattiesburg 

Powers, Grady Jackson 

Price, Robert Gloster 

Rawls, Canton Collins 

Rebold, Johnny Magnolia 

Richardson, Weldon Bolton 

Rimmer, John R Camden 

Robbins, Clark Lennis Pelahatchie 

Roby, Victor Tylertown 

Rogers, Lee New Albany 

Rogers, Leslie Greenwood 

Roberts, Geraldine Jackson 

Russell, Jessie Vic Jackson 

Rutledge, O. H Shannon 

Scott, Pagan Jackson 

Serkins, Leon Laurel 

Sharpe, Margaret Jackson 

Sheffield, George Fannin 

Siddon, Harold Sweatman 

Simpson, J. D Jackson 

Simmons, William Jackson 

Simms, Lavelle Jackson 



16 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Sissell, Spencer Water Valley- 
Sparks, Ruth Jackson 

Spencer, William Jackson 

Stevens, Joe Grenada 

Stewart, James E Water Valley 

Stewart, Willie Moss Point 

Stone, Ruby Frances Jackson 

Strahan, Lucille Jackson 

Stuart, Jack Morton 

Sutton, Billy Jackson 

Taylor, Mary Rebecca Jackson 

Thompson, Floy Denton Jackson 

Thomas, Mitchell Yazoo City 

Veazey, Fletcher Coldwater 

Vest, Marjorie ....Jackson 

Wagner, Henry F Marks 

Waldrop, William ....Utica 

Walker, William Jackson 

Wall, Virginia Jackson 

Walker, Rodney Lauderdale 

Walters, Marjorie Jackson 

Warfield, Scott Gunnison 

Wasson, Wilbourn Clarksdale 

Weathersby, Robert Jackson 

Welch, Susan Jackson 

White, Npncy ...Jackson 

Wood, K. . Lena 

Wofford, William Drew 

SPECIAL 

Burnham, Trella Mae Jackson 

Cagle, Mildred Jackson 

Daniels, H. L Edwards 

Hasty, Mrs. J. I Florence 

Jones, Ephraim Peyton Jackson 

Phelps, Mrs. Dudley Jackson 

Rogers, Clarence L Sardis 

Roll, Mrs. Ethel Jackson 

Shoemaker, Carolyn Jackson 

Turnage, Wade Watkins Water Valley 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 161 

Simpson, Mary Velma Jackson 

Smith, Herman Brookhaven 

Sutherland, Louis Jackson 

Taylor, Alberta Jackson 

SUMMER SCHOOL — 1934 

Alexander, Seta Jackson 

Anderson, Hiram Meridian 

Ard, Rea Hazlehurst 

Ashley, Jessie Jackson 

Baker, Quintard Jackson 

Banks, Thomas Jackson 

Barber, Mildred Edwards 

Barton, Margaret Jackson 

Beard, Norvelle Jackson 

Boggs, Marie Jackson 

Bradley, Mrs. Ollie Jackson 

Branton, Thyrza Pettit 

Bradshaw, Francis Bentonia 

Bridges, Eleanor Jackson 

Bridges, Jackson Belzoni 

Broom, Eola Maye Jackson 

Broom, Myrtle E Jackson 

Broyles, Henry Jackson 

Buie, Webster Jackson 

Burkhead, Dorothy Jackson 

Cabell, Mrs. Helen Jackson 

Casey, Hattie Jackson 

Castlen, John Greenville 

Chapman, John Kenton Columbia 

Chilton, Mrs. Lynne Jackson 

Chisholm, Allyce Jackson 

Clark, Fay Hattiesburg 

Collins, Albert Ruston 

Cook, Martha Jackson 

Cook, Bertie Bell Laurel 

Corley, A. Ruth Jackson 

Cox, Mrs. Etta Bean Kosciusko 

Cunningham, Robt. E Jackson 



162 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Darden, Frank Rea Jackson 

Davis, Florence Anguilla 

Dean, Grace Elizabeth Jackson 

Dickson, Ellen Virginia Jackson 

Ellzey, Howard Tylertown 

Everett, Mrs. T. L Braxton 

Everett, Tfiomas Lafayette Braxton 

Ezelle, Robert Jackson 

Ezelle, Annie Morris Jackson 

Ferguson, Mary Alice Hermanville 

Ferguson, Louise Hermanville 

Fitzbugh, Mrs. J. M Jackson 

Fletcher, May Jackson 

Flowers, Margaret Jackson 

Flurry, Irene Perkinston 

Forterberry, Joyce Lampton Lumberton 

Foxworth, Hilda Foxworth 

Fowler, Sudie Carthage 

Fuller, Roger Laurel 

Gilliland, Bessie Will Jackson 

Green, Emma Jackson 

Griffith, Rosalind Jackson 

Harris, Kathryn Jackson 

Heggie, Sue Vaiden 

Hemeter, Mildred Lee Seminary 

Henry, John Paul Union 

Herlong, D. V., Jr Hermanville 

Herring, Mrs. Elise G ....Jackson 

Hill, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Hoff, F. T Gloster 

Holder, Mary Evelyn Jackson 

Horton, Mrs. Susie M Carpenter 

Hough, Margarete Shaw 

Howie, Caroline Jackson 

Hozendorf, Mrs. Glenn F Jackson 

Houston, Mercedes Philadelphia 

Hughes, Rush Jeannette Jackson 

Jacobs, Katherine Jackson 

Jordan, Nancy Jackson 

Keister, McFaelton Fondren 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 163 

Keathley, Vivian Irene Jackson 

Kemp, Carter Noxapater 

Key, David Jackson 

Key, Mary Belle Jackson 

Kimbrough, Celeste Morgan City 

Kinnaird, Robert Newell, Jr Jackson 

King, Gordon Jackson 

Knowles, Adele Jackson 

Latimer, Mrs. Rose Jackson 

Lester, Laura Rebecca Jackson 

Lewis, Henry Jackson 

Lindsley, Marguerite Jackson 

Loflin, Frank Walker Jackson 

Martin, Lucille Houston 

Maxted, Aubrey Pascagoula 

MacKenzie, Edith Hill Jackson 

Magee, Edna Prentiss 

Majors, Doree Jackson 

Massey, Robert Jackson 

Mathis, Mrs. R .•. Benton 

Maynor, Robert Clayton Jackson 

Meadows, Mrs. Alberta Jackson 

Measells, Mrs. D. T Morton 

Meier, Joe Shaw 

Melvin, John E Camden 

Mitchell, Dorothea Jackson 

Miller, Mrs. J. C Hazlehurst 

Misterfeldt, Alfreda Florence 

Moore, Mrs. R. P Jackson 

Moore, Meta Martha Lexington 

McKay, Bess Pelahatchie 

McMullan, Francis Willard Jackson 

McManus, Martha Raymond 

Nelson, John H Danville, Va. 

Newman, Mrs. Eleanor Jackson 

Nail, Minnie Lucille Jackson 

Newell, Susie Louise Jackson 

Noblin, John Darrington Jackson 

Noel, Mary Inez Jackson 

Nolan, Mrs. Abe Holly Bluff 



164 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Parnell, Frances Jackson 

Potts, Nancy Ackerman 

Power, Gertrude Kosciusko 

Price, Sterling Herbert Catchings 

Price, Lena Scott... Jackson 

Purvis, Evie M Eden 

Reeves, Mrs. Luther Auburn 

Rehfeldt, Fred C Jackson 

Rembert, Lucy E Jackson 

Ross, Catherine Josephine Wesson 

Ruff, Hazel Jackson 

Rush, Ida Cornelia Biloxi 

Ruoff, Mildred Elizabeth Jackson 

Rush, Margaret Jackson 

Seamans, Pattie McFee ' Crossett, Ark. 

Simpson, Mary Velma Pickens 

Smith, Vivian Bay Springs 

Smith, Frankie Mae Laurel 

Smith, Ethel Jackson 

Smith, May E -. Jackson 

Stephens, Arey Belmont 

Stevens, Sarah Jackson 

Stone, Ruby Frances Jackson 

Street, H. G Jackson 

Street, Lucy Ripley 

Sutherland, Louis Lee Jackson 

Tannehill, Wilma Ruth Jackson 

Tennant, Mathield Vicksburg 

Therrell, Vivienne Florence 

Tye, Aileen Jackson 

Tynes, Dorothy Cowen Meridian 

Upshaw, Christine Louise 

Vardaman, Joseph Bruce Hermanville 

Vickers, John T Jackson 

Voigt, Marguerite Jackson 

Watkins, Betty Jackson 

Watkins, Georgie Jackson 

Watkins, Charles Braxton 

Wiggins, Lula K Jackson 

Wheatley, Evelyn Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 165 

SUMIVIARY 

Senior 79 

Junior '. 8 3 

Sophomore 68 

Freshman 161 

Special 14 



Total 405 

Summer School 1934 153 



Total 558 

Counted Twice 26 



TOTAL ATTENDANCE 532 



JACKSON, M/ss.