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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1936-1937"

REGISTER OF 



MiLLSAPS College 



Jackson, Mississippi 




The Forty-sixth Session Begins 
September 15, 1937 



FOREWORD 

ly/flLLSAPS is a liberal arts college. Its purpose is to pre- 
pare the minds and hearts of serious students for effec- 
tive and unselfish service in the professions and in the busi- 
ness world. In the pursuit of this ideal, Millsaps has behind 
it almost half a century of honorable and successful accom- 
plishment. 

Millsaps is recognized by the General Board of Christian 
Education of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, as one 
of the strongest and most valuable institutions in the connec- 
tion. The college is fully accredited by all the accrediting 
agencies, both regional and national. 

On the fully approved list of: 

The Association of American Universities 
The American Association of University Women 

Holds membership in: 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 
The Southern University Conference. 

The college shares in current educational thought and 
life through membership in the following agencies: 

The American Council on Education 

The American Association of Collegiate Registrars 

The Association of American Colleges 

The National Conference of Church-related Colleges 

The Mississippi Association of Colleges 

The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association 

The Dixie Conference 



1937— CALENDAR— 1938 



1937 JAN. 1937 


1937 JULY 1937 


1938 JAN. 1938 


S M T W T F S 


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23124 
30131 


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28129 


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1937 AUG. 1937 


— 1 — 






1937 FEB. 1937 




1938 FEB. 1938 




S M T W T F S 




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1937 SEPT. 1937 


27 28 


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1 





1937 MAECH 1937 








1938 MARCH 1938 


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1937 OCT. 1937 


31| 


1937 APRIL 1937 








1938 APRIL 1938 


S M T W T F S 


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6 


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1937 MAY 1937 








1937 NOV. 1937 


1938 MAY 1938 


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1937 JUNE 1937 




1937 DEC. 1937 


1938 JUNE 193^ 


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26 27 


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29130131 


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28 


29 301 



June 9 
June 10 
July 10 
July 12 
August 24 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
FORTY-SIXTH YEAR 

SUMMER SESSION, 19 3 7 
Registration of students. 
Recitations begin. 
First semester ends. 
Second semester begins. 
Second semester ends. 



September 15-16 
September 17 
November 25 
December 18 
January 3 
January 28- 
February 3 



February 4 
March 25 
3Iarch 29 
May 28-June 
June 3 
June 5 
June 6 
June 7 



FALL SEMESTER, 1937-3 8 
Registration and orientation of students. 
Recitations begin. 
Thanksgiving Day. 
Christmas holidays begin at 12 M. 
Classes resumed at 8:30 A.M. 

First semester examinations. 

SPRING SEMESTER, 19 3 8 
Second semester begins. 
Spring holidays begin at 12 M. 
Classes resumed at 8:30 A.M. 
Second semester examinations. 
Commencement exercises begin. 
Commencement Sunday. 
Annual meeting of Board of Trustees. 
Commencement Day; close of the forty- 
sixth session. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

J. T. CALHOUN President 

J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Vice-President 

J. B. STREATER Secretary 

A. B. CAMPBELL Treasurer 

Term Expires in 1938 

REV. OTTO PORTER McComh 

REV. W. W. WOOLLARD Rosedale 

J. T. CALHOUN Jackson 

J. G. McGOWEN Jackson 

REV. J. T. LEGGETT Hattieshurg 

REV. J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Greenville 

H. M. IVY Meridian 

W. T. ROGERS .New Albany 

Term Expires in 1941 

REV. J. L. DECELL, D.D Jackson 

W. O. TATUM Hattiesburg 

J. W. KYLE Sardis 

REV. O. S. LEWIS Meridian 

REV. L. P. WASSON Columbus 

REV. T. M. BRADLEY Holly Springs 

T. B. LAMPTON Jackson 

J. B. STREATER Black Hawk 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

DAVID MARTIN KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D President 

BENJAMIN ERNEST MITCHELL, M.A., Ph.D Dean 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D.. .Dean of Freshmen 

MRS. MARY B. STONE, M.A Dean of Women 

VERNON BURKETT HATHORN, B.A Bursar 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 

Curriculum and Degrees: 

Mitchell, Harrell, Sanders, Mrs. Stone, Haynes. 

Literary Activities — Periodicals, Debate, Literary Clubs : 

White, Sanders, Mrs. Stone, Price, Wharton, Hamilton. 

Religious Activities: 

Bullock, Mitchell, Sullivan, Miss Thomas, Hamilton, Whar- 
ton, White. 

Athletics : 

White, Hamilton, Mitchell, Harrell, Haynes. 

Social Activities — Fraternities, Sororities, Public Meetings, 
Music : 

Hamilton, Wharton, Mrs. Goodman, Lin, Miss Simpson, Miss 
Craig, Mrs. Stone, Van Hook, Moore. 

Library : 

Sanders, Miss Simpson, White, Haynes, Riecken, Miss 
Mounger. 

Alumni and Annual Conferences: 

Moore, Sullivan, Harrell, Wharton, Price, Culley. 

Intercollegiate Relations : 

Mitchell, Lin, Harrell, Hamilton. 

Student Advisory: 

Mitchell, Van Hook, Hamilton, Mrs. Stone, Haynes, White, 
Riecken, Wharton. 

Freshman Council: 

Hamilton, Mrs. Stone, Miss Simpson, Miss Craig, Haynes, 
King, Culley, Bullock, Wharton. 

Woman's Council: 

Mrs. Stone, Miss Simpson, Miss Thomas, Miss Craig. 

Director of Instruction: 

Haynes. 

Editing of Catalog: 

White, Wharton, Moore. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE FACULTY 

DAVID MARTIN KEY President 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

B.A., Central College; M.A., Vanderbilt University; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; LL.D., Emory University. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN Professor of Chemistry 

and Geology 

B.A., Centenary College ; M.A., University of Mississippi ; 
M.A., Vanderbilt University ; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL Professor of Physics 

and Astronomy 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., Millsaps College; 
graduate work, University of Chicago. 

J. REESE LIN Professor of Philosophy and History 

B.A., Emory College ; M.A., Vanderbilt University ; 
graduate work, Cornell University. 

BENJAMIN ERNEST MITCHELL Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Scarritt-Morrisville ; M.A., Vanderbilt University ; 
Ph.D., Columbia University. 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON Professor of German 

and Ancient Languages 

B.A., Southern University ; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Southwestern (Texas) ; B.A., Yale University ; Rhodes Scholar, 1907-10 ; 
B.A., M.A., Uiiiversity of Oxford (Honors School). 

MILTON CHRISTIAN "WHITE Professor of English 

B.A., Southern University; M.A., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

GEORGE W. HUDDLESTON Associate Professor 

of Ancient Languages, Emeritus 

B.A., M.A., Hiwassee College; Litt.D., Millsaps College. 

VERNON BURKETT HATHORN Bursar 

B.S., Millsaps College ; graduate work. University of Missouri. 

ROSS HENDERSON MOORE Associate Professor of History 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., Millsaps College; M.A., University 
of Chicago ; graduate work, Duke University. 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK Associate Professor 

of Mathematics 

B.A., Millsaps College ; M.A., Vanderbilt University ; 
graduate work, Duke University. 

ELIZABETH CRAIG Assistant Professor of French 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University ; M.A., Columbia University ; 

Diplome de la Sorbonne, Ecole de preparation des professeurs, de 

francais a I'etranger, Faculty of Letters, University of Paris. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



MAGNOLIA SIMPSON Assistant Professor of Latin 

B.A., Millsaps College ; M.A., University of Pennsylvania ; graduate work, 
American Academy in Rome, University of Chicago. 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS Professor of Piano 

B.A., Whit'worth College ; B.M., American Conservatory. 

FRANK SLATER Professor of Voice 

B.M., New Orleans Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art, Inc. 

ROBERT RAYMOND HAYNES Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Tennessee ; student of law. University of Tennessee ; 

Vice-Consul of the United States in Scotland and England ; M.A., George 

Peabody College ; graduate work, George Peabody College. 

J. B. PRICE Instructor in Chemistry and Mathematics 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., University of Mississippi; 
graduate work. University of North Carolina. 

TRANNY LEE GADDY Director of Physical Education 

B.S., Mississippi A. and M. College ; graduate work, Columbia University. 

MRS. HENRY W. COBB Instructor in Spanish 

B.A., St. Lawrence University ; graduate work, Spanish School of 
Middlebury College, University of North Carolina. 

MRS. MARY B. H. STONE Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., George Peabody College. 

WILLIAM EMIL RIECKEN Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

MELVIN RICHARDSON Assistant Coach 

B.S., Millsaps College. 

HENRY MORTON BULLOCK Professor of Religion 

B.Ph., B.D., Emory University; S.T.B., Yale Divinity School; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

VERNON LANE WHARTON Instructor in History 

B.A., Millsaps College ; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

MRS. MARGUERITE GOODMAN Instructor in English 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Tulane University. 

ELIZABETH ANN TAYLOR Director of Physical Education 

for Women 

B.A., Huntingdon College ; graduate work, George Peabody College, 

Columbia University. 

MARY VELMA SIMPSON Assistant Instructor 

of Piano and Theory 

B.A., B.M. (requisites), Millsaps College; graduate work, 
Chicago Musical College. 

ALBERTA TAYLOR. .Assistant Instructor of Piano and Theory 

B.A., B.M. (requisites), Millsaps College; graduate work, 
Chicago Musical College. 



10 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Biology: KELLER BRELAND, W. H. PARKER. 

Chemistry: NORMAN ROBERTSON, J. A. DROKE, 

W. H. SIDDON. 

Education: EUNICE DURHAM, MADELINE MOR- 

ROW. 

English: MELBA SHERMAN, WEALTH A SUY- 

DAM, DOROTHY CHICHESTER. 

History: MENDELL DAVIS, R. M. MAYO. 

Library: J. D. SMITH, LUCIEN FREEMAN, M. F. 

ADAMS, PHYLLIS MATTHEWS. 

LAVELLE SIMS, FLORENCE HUTCH- 
SON. 

G. C. CLARK, BRADFORD BREELAND, 
ELISABETH PICKETT. 

J. L. KAYES. 

IDA LOUISE ALFORD. 

BILLY LAUDERDALE. 

OPAL BRUMFIELD, LILLA MILLS. 



Mathematics: 

Physical Education: 

Physics : 
Religion: 
Publicity: 
Registrar's Assistants: 



OTHER OFFICERS 

CATHERINE ADELE MOUNGER Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Mississippi ; B.S. in Libr. Sc, Carnegie Institute. 

MRS. MARY BOWEN CLARK Assistant Librarian 

M.E.L., Whitworth College. 

CARRIE OLIVIA SISTRUNK Secretary to President 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK Director of Athletics 

HOSEA FRANK MAGEE, M.D College Physician 

MRS. C. F. COOPER Matron of Dormitory 

MRS. T. B. HOLLO MAN Matron of Dormitory 

A. L. SPEIGHT Bookkeeper 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 11 

HISTORY 

MILLSAPS College owes its existence primarily to the 
consistent policy of the Methodist Church of establish- 
ing and maintaining colleges in which to educate its young 
people, and all others who wish to receive a liberal training 
for life. 

Prior to 189 the Methodists of Mississippi had no college 
for young men. Whitworth College for women was in opera- 
tion at Brookhaven, and this institution had a fine and hon- 
orable history. But young men who wished to attend a 
Methodist college were compelled to leave their native state 
to obtain that which they desired. Many went to Centenary 
College in Louisiana, or to Southern University in Alabama. 
Some had gone to far-off Indiana to attend Asbury College, 
now DePauw University. Among them Major R. W. Millsaps 
had lamented the necessity of going out of his native state for 
an education, and had resolved to remedy this matter when 
he had accumulated a fortune. 

By 188 8 this feeling had become general and urgent in 
Mississippi, and the Mississippi Conference in its session at 
Vicksburg first gave definite expression to the general de- 
termination of Mississippi Methodists to remedy this situa- 
tion. On December 7, 1888, the Mississippi Conference passed 
by a iinanimous vote a resolution to establish a college for 
males in Mississippi, in conjunction with the North Mississippi 
Conference. The same resolution further named a committee 
to co-operate with a similar committee from the North Missis- 
sippi Conference to formulate plans for such an institution, 
and to report back to the Mississippi Conference at its next 
session. On December 12 a similar resolution was passed by 
the North Mississippi Conference, and a similar committee was 
appointed by the North Mississippi Conference. The commit- 
tee from the Mississippi Conference consisted of three laymen 
and three preachers, Rev. T. L. Mellen, Rev. W. C. Black, 
Rev. A. F. Watkins, Major R. W. Millsaps. Col. W. L. Nugent, 
and Doctor Luther Sexton. That from the North Mississippi 
Conference consisted of Rev. J. J. Wheat, Rev. S. M. Thames, 
Rev. T. J. Newell, Hon. G. D. Shands, Capt. D. L. Sweatman, 
and Mr. J. B. Streater. 



12 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

The joint committee organized at Jackson, Mississippi, 
in January of 1889, and entered upon plans for the projected 
college. Major R. W. Millsaps, carrying out a plan of his 
youth, offered to give $50,000 toward the establishing of the 
new institution, provided that the Methodists of Mississippi 
would contribute an equal amount for the same purpose. The 
commission promptly accepted this offer and formulated plans 
for raising the required amount by public subscription from 
the Methodists of the state. Bishop Charles B. Galloway was 
named to lead the campaign, and he immediately began this 
work. In December of 1889 Rev. A. F. Watkins was ap- 
pointed by the Mississippi Conference to act as agent for the 
campaign, and to assist Bishop Galloway. The North Missis- 
sippi Conference ratified this appointment. 

By 1890 $25,000 of the $50,000 sought had been raised 
and Major Millsaps paid into the college treasury $25,000 to 
match that amount. The commission having discharged the 
duty for which it had been appointed, dissolved and was suc- 
ceeded by a board of trustees duly appointed by the co-operat- 
ing conferences. This board consisted of four laymen and 
four preachers from each of the two conferences. Its per- 
sonnel was as follows: 

BISHOP CHARLES B. GALLOWAY, President 

REV. W. C. BLACK, D.D. REV. S. M. THAMES 

REV. T. L. MELLEN REV. T. J. NEWELL 

REV. A. F. WATKINS REV. C. G. ANDREWS, D.D. 

REV. R. M. STANDIFER HON. G. D. SHANDS 

MAJ. R. W. MILLSAPS CAPT. D. L. SWEATMAN 

COL. W. L. NUGENT MR. J. B. STREATER 

DR. LUTHER SEXTON MR. JOHN TRICE 

HON. M. M. EVANS REV. J. J. WHEAT, D.D. 

The new board of trustees at once proceeded to obtain a 
charter for the new college which they officially named 
Millsaps College. Major Millsaps preferred another name for 
the institution, but his colleagues on the board unanimously 
overruled him, and gave the college the name by which it is 
now known. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13 

The resolutions by the two conferences which initiated 
the movement for the -establishment of Millsaps College con- 
templated a college for young men only, but the charter con- 
tained no restrictions as to the sexes or as to race; it simply 
specified a college, and left the matters of race and sex to the 
administration by the conferences, acting through their auth- 
orized agents, the board of trustees. For the first six years 
of the operation of the college only men applied for enrol- 
ment, but girls were admitted in the seventh session of the 
college, in 1898. Since that time the enrolment of women 
has steadily though slowly increased until now they consti- 
tute approximately one-fourth of the total enrolment of the 
college. 

Rev. W. B. Murrah, of the North Mississippi Conference, 
was elected the first president of the college, and the college 
was located in Jackson, Mississippi, on the site which it now 
occupies. Suitable buildings were erected and a faculty was 
chosen in 1891, and the college began its first session in 1892. 
A preparatory department was established with one master 
in charge. There was no definite line between the college 
and the preparatory department, and for some years the mas- 
ters of the preparatory department also taught college classes. 

The college faculty with which Millsaps College began 
consisted of four professors, one of whom was the president 
of the college. He taught mental and moral philosophy and 
the Bible, and there were professors of mathematics, English, 
and the ancient languages. The instruction in the sciences 
was distributed among the other members of the faculty. 

President Murrah determined that Millsaps College should 
be a sound and thorough institution rather than a large one. 
To do a few things unusually well rather than to attempt a 
program more ambitious than the resources and equipment 
of the college warranted was the ideal which he set, and this 
ideal has become the characteristic of the college, maintained 
to this day. Character and scholarship of a high order were 
the qualities he sought and found in his first faculty, and 
these qualities that original faculty communicated to their 
pupils. The character of the college was thus determined by 
its first president. In consequence of this the graduates of 



14 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

the college from the beginning of its operation took unusually 
high rank in the professional schools and the graduate courses 
which they attended in the larger universities. 

The presidents of the college have been W. B. Murrah, 
D.D., LL.D., (1892-1910); D. C. Hull, M.A., (1910-1912); A. 
F. Watkins, D.D., (1912-1923); D. M. Key, Ph.D., LL.D., 
(1923). 

In the administration of President Murrah the notable 
advances of the college, from the material side, v^ere as fol- 
lows: In 1893, under the leadership of Rev. J. W. Chambers, 
the agent of the college, the campaign for endowment was 
completed by the collection of $25,000 from the Methodists 
of Mississippi, which was matched by a payment of $25,000 
by Major Millsaps, bringing the endowment to $100,000. In 
1895 Major Millsaps gave Webster Science Hall, which ac- 
commodated the departments of chemistry and physics, and 
also housed the library. Cottages for the students were built, 
a dormitory and dining hall added, and a residence for the 
president was erected. Mr. Dan A. James gave the James 
Observatory, and so added equipment to the department of 
astronomy. Major Millsaps gave the adjoining property for- 
merly known as Jackson College, including a large brick dor- 
mitory valued at $80,000, and he added to this gift fifty acres 
of land, bringing the grounds of the college to the one hun- 
dred acres contemplated in the charter. An athletic field was 
provided in 1909, and adequate playing grounds were thus 
available for intra-mural games. 

The General Education Board recognized the promise and 
the importance of the college by offering to give $25,000 to 
the endowment fund provided that $7 5,000 should be obtained 
from other sources. The requisite amount necessary to meet 
this condition was complied with in 1910, and so the endow- 
ment of the college was increased to $200,000. 

During the administration of President Murrah the col- 
lege had grown steadily. The faculty of four original profes- 
sors was increased by the addition of a professor of chemistry 
and physics in 1894, a professor of history and modern lan- 
guages in 1896, a professor of laAv in 189 6, and a professor 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 15 

of history and economics in 1904. In 1906 Andrew Carnegie 
offered a small but excellent library building to the college, 
provided an endowment of equal value should be obtained 
from other sources. Major Millsaps promptly supplied the re- 
quired endowment. 

In 1910 President Murrah was elected a Bishop in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and D. C. Hull was chosen 
to succeed him. In the two years of President Hull's admin- 
istration the most notable advancement made in the college 
was the complete separation of the college from the prepara- 
tory school which became the Millsaps Academy, under the 
Millsaps Board of Trustees. Also, in 1911 Millsaps College 
entered into intercollegiate athletics, becoming a member of 
the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association, and enter- 
ing into all intercollegiate sports except football. In 1922 
this ban was removed and Millsaps College now plays all inter- 
collegiate games. 

In 1912 President Hull resigned, to be succeeded by Rev. 
A. F. Watkins, who had been identified with the college from 
its beginning, and who was at the time of his election a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees. In the administration of Presi- 
dent Watkins many additions were made to the physical equip- 
ment of the college. 

The building occupied by the Millsaps Academy and 
known as Founder's Hall was partially destroyed by fire in 
1912, but it was soon repaired and made far more valuable 
than the old building had ever been. In 1913 the main build- 
ing was totally destroyed by fire. Within a year it was re- 
placed by a far larger and more finely equipped building now 
known as Murrah Hall. In 1912 Millsaps College became a 
member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools, being one of the two institutions in Mississippi 
to hold such membership. 

In 1913 Major Millsaps gave the college an office build- 
ing in Jackson valued at $150,00 0, to be counted as addition- 
al endowment. By the will of Major Millsaps, who died in 
1916, the college received a life insurance policy amounting 
to $88,000. This final bequest fittingly closed the long list 
of gifts to the college by its illustrious founder. 



16 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

In 1918 the law school was discontinued in order that 
the resources of the college might be wholly devoted to the 
development of the college of arts and sciences. During its 
existence of twenty-two years many outstanding attorneys had 
been trained in the law school, and it had added much to the 
usefulness and prestige of the college. In 1922 the high 
schools of the state had so improved that the Millsaps Acad- 
emy was no longer necessary for the secondary training of 
students, and so it also was discontinued. 

In 1919 the old frame building known as the "Cooper 
House" was demolished and on its site were built two fine 
dormitories. One was named Galloway Hall after the great 
bishop, and the other was named Burton Hall, to honor the 
memory of Dr. John M. Burton, Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages, who died for his country in France in the World War. 

In 1920 the General Education Board of New York en- 
tered into a contract to pay into the endowment fund $100,- 
000.00, conditioned on the increase of the endowment fund 
by $250,000.00 from other sources, and to contribute sub- 
stantially to the annual support while this sum was being 
raised. At this time the Christian Education Movement was 
under way in the Methodist Church and the Methodists of 
Mississippi responded generously to the call. Mr. W. S. F. 
Tatum, of Hattiesburg, gave $100,000.00 for the endowment 
of a Department of Religion, which endowment was named by 
the trustees the Tatum Fund after the generous donor. This 
Department of Religion which has two full-time professors 
has given the college a position of leadership in the church 
in the field of religious studies. 

In 1923 President Watkins resigned to enter the active 
ministry and D. M. Key was chosen to succeed him as presi- 
dent of the college. Dr. Watkins vv^as made president of the 
Board of Trustees. 

The administration of President Key has been marked by 
a more thorough business organization, and by more definite 
academic organization, also. 

Through the collection of pledges made in the Christian 
Education Movement and through additional gifts made to 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 17 

the endowment, the contract with the General Education 
Board was finally completed in 1926. Mr. Tatum increased 
his gift to the endowment by $25,000.00; Mr. B. B. Jones 
gave $20,000.00 to the endowment; $10,000.00 came from 
the estate of Rev. J. H. Scruggs; and many lesser amounts. 
Finally, the trustees transferred $25,000.00 from the oper- 
ating surplus to the permanent endowment and the task was 
finished. Thus the endowment was increased by $350,000.00 
and reached its maximum of over $900,000.00. 

The physical plant of the college has been greatly en- 
larged, also, the value of the new buildings and improvements 
totalling approximately $350,000.00. 

The small Carnegie-Millsaps library building given the 
college in 19 6 having greatly deteriorated because of the 
sinking of its foundation, a thing not uncommon in Jackson 
soil, the building was demolished and the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion built in its stead a far larger and better building on an- 
other site. The new Carnegie-Millsaps library has a capacity 
of 60,000 volumes, and large reading rooms for the students. 
This building was projected in 19 23 and finished in 192 5. 
Since that time the Carnegie Corporation has furnished a fund 
of $10,000 to be used in the purchase of new books. With 
that sum the college has purchased approximately 4,400 books. 
At present there are approximately 25,000 volumes in the 
library. 

To meet the need for enlarged laboratories for the sci- 
ences an unusually fine and well-equipped science building 
was completed in 19 29, and was dedicated with appropriate 
ceremonies by the world-renowned scientist R. A. Millikan, 
president of the California Institute of Technology. On pe- 
tition of the students of the college this building was named 
Sullivan-Harrell Hall, in honor of two professors of science 
of the college. 

A new and excellent athletic field was completed in 1929, 
providing additional facilities for the physical education of 
the students. In the will of the late lamented Webster M. 
Buie, a former member of the board of trustees, and one of 
the most valued alumni of Millsaps College, provision was 



18 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

made for the erection of a gymnasium. Additions were made 
by loyal friends of Millsaps College to the sum available un- 
der Mr. Buie's will, and the gymnasium was completed and 
furnished in 1936 at a cost of $45,000. It is officially known 
as the Buie Memorial Building for Physical Education. It 
is near the new athletic field, and is used in connection with 
that field for physical education. The Webster Science Hall 
having become unsafe because of the shifting of its founda- 
tion was demolished and part of the material so obtained was 
used in the construction of the Buie Gymnasium. This en- 
abled the college to get for the money expended a much bet- 
ter gymnasium than it could have obtained otherwise. 

The alumni of the college greatly improved the campus 
by clearing many trees which were not ornamental and grad- 
ing and beautifying the campus, and by providing for its up- 
keep. Their constructive interest in their Alma Mater is one 
of its greatest assets. 

While the improvement of the college plant and equip- 
ment in the administration of President Key has been notable, 
more impressive to judicious friends of the college is the re- 
markable recognition gained for Millsaps College from the na- 
tional rating agencies. Every rating agency which estimates 
the standing of colleges ranks Millsaps among the foremost 
colleges in the nation. Not one agency is lacking in this im- 
posing list. 

In the years 19 25-1927, under the leadership of the late 
Governor Whitfield and with the financial support of Mr. 
Bernard B. Jones, a most notable benefactor of education in 
Mississippi, a survey of all education institutions and of their 
policies was made by an impartial commission headed by Pro- 
fessor M. V. O'Shea, of the University of Wisconsin. After 
a two years' study of all the institutions in the state the com- 
mission published their report. In this report Millsaps Col- 
lege was given the foremost place among the institutions for 
higher education in Mississippi. The college had never sought 
to surpass any other institution, but had only striven to do 
the best work in its power. Unobtrusively it had come to 
the first rank. 

This achievement has been largely due to the original 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 19 

ideal set by President Murrah when the college was founded, 
and to the consistent adherence to that ideal by all his suc- 
cessors. But much credit is especially due to the vision, sys- 
tem, and persistent energy of President Key in whose term of 
office Millsaps College has become more closely affiliated 
with associations of national scope. 

That the high position of Millsaps College is not confined 
to comparative excellence in its own locality is shown by its 
general acceptance by every national rating agency without 
a single exception. In 1912 it became one of the two col- 
leges in Mississippi recognized as members of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools; in 1924 it be- 
came a member of the Association of American Colleges, and 
also a member of the American Council of Education. It 
had been approved by the American Association of University 
Women in 1921, and it was again formally approved by that 
organization when it was put on the Approved List of Colleges 
by the American Association of Universities. 

Beginning in 18 9 2 with four professors, including the 
president, about one hundred college students and $100,000 
endowment, it has grown to more than twenty professors and 
instructors, exclusive of the president, about four hundred 
and fifty students, and more than $888,000 endowment. From 
one brick building and a few wooden residences it has grown 
to an imposing array of brick buildings, with one hundred 
acres of beautiful campus and ample athletic fields. 

But its chief excellence lies in its high standard of schol- 
arship, its exalted ideals, and the fine character of the alumni 
who have studied in its halls and been nurtured in its ideals. 
Millsaps College aspires to become increasingly a home for 
free and devout spirits who wish to fill with honor and use- 
fulness offices in church and state. 



20 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESOURCES 

The physical resources, the grounds, the buildings and 
the endowment are sufficient to enable the college to do a 
high grade of work; but all, except the area of the grounds, 
need to be strengthened in order to provide for reasonable 
increase of enrollment, to improve the conditions under which 
the work is done, to increase the faculty support, to maintain 
an improved physical plant, to beautify the campus, and to 
offset probable decrease in endowment productivity. 

GROUNDS 

The campus of 100 acres, situated on a beautiful emi- 
ne.nce almost in the heart of the city, is large enough to af- 
ford room for the full development of all the phases of col- 
lege life. It is pleasantly wooded with many fine old oaks 
and elms and open fields and playing grounds. Much im- 
provement in the appearance of the campus has been effected 
in recent years. A fine concrete drive gives access to all the 
buildings. Two commodious playing fields for football and 
baseball, a track and tennis courts are readily reached from 
the heart of the campus. A fine nine-hole golf course covers 
the north end of the campus, with convenient access to the 
showers and dressing rooms in the gymnasium. 

BUILDINGS 

The instructional buildings are all relatively new and 
modern. The administration building, Murrah Hall, was 
erected in 1914; the Carnegie-Millsaps Library building in 
1926; the Sullivan-Harrell Science Hall in 1928; and the Buie 
Memorial Building for Physical Education in 19 36. These 
buildings which constitute the heart of the institution, are 
well equipped for the functions they are designed to perform. 
The examining committee of Phi Beta Kappa said in regard 
to them: "The library, though small, seems adequate, and 
the collections are well chosen. The laboratories in the new 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

science building are adequate, the equipment is new and up- 
to-date." 

Founders Hall, the dormitory for freshmen, is located 
across the drive from the library. There are rooms for 80 
men. On the ground floor is a large rest and recreation room, 
the apartment of the house mother and one other apartment. 
Only freshmen are allowed to room in this dormitory. Bur- 
ton Hall and Galloway Hall and the dining hall are located 
at the south end of the campus. Galloway Hall has been 
reserved for women students. Its elegant reception rooms 
have been newly equipped with handsome furnishings. 

ENDOWMENT 

The productive endowment, according to the last audit, 
amounted to $800,441. In addition to the income from this 
endowment, the college budget receives pro rata share of con- 
ference assessments amounting to $13,000 and also the pro- 
ceeds of a producing gas well located on the college campus. 
Owing to decrease in the productivity of invested funds as 
well as the need of greater operating income the college needs 
contributions to its endowment more urgently than anything 
else. The statement of total assets derived from the last of- 
ficial audit, July, 19 3 6, is as follows: 

Productive endowment $ 800,441.36 

Unproductive endowment (land) 100,000.00 

Buildings 561,838.19 

Grounds 127,071.18 

Equipment, etc 83,318.19 

Other assets 18,727.33 

Total $1,691,3 9 6.25 



22 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GIFTS OF OVER $1,000.00 TO MILLSAPS COLLEGE FROM 
THE BEGINNING OF ITS HISTORY 

R. W. Millsaps, Jackson $550,000.00 

W. S. F. Tatum, Hattiesburg 130,000.00 

W. M. Buie, Jackson 35,800.00 

B. B. Jones, Berryville, Va 30,000.00 

L C. Enochs Family, Jackson 18,500.00 

Stewart Gammill, Jackson 11,000.00 

Estate J. H. Scruggs, Dec'd, Corinth 9,000.00 

J. L. and M. S. Enochs, Jackson 4,860.00 

Jas. Hand, Purvis 4,500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Fitzhugh, Memphis 4,500.00 

T. B. Lampton, Jackson 4,000.00 

W. H. Tribbett, Terry 3,000.00 

P. H. Enochs, Fernwood 2,833.33 

J. L. Dantzler, New Orleans 2,250.00 

D. W. Babb 2,000.00 

W. A. Davenport, Forest 2,000.00 

W. H. Watkins, Jackson 2,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Wortman, Jackson 1,680.00 

J. A. Moore, Quitman 1,500.00 

Mrs. A. D. Gunning, Jackson 1,500.00 

R. L. Ezelle 1,300.00 

R. E. Kennington, Jackson 1,000.00 

C. R. Ridgeway, Jr., Jackson 1,000.00 

Enochs & Wortman, Jackson 1,000.00 

Weston Lumber Co., Logtown 1,000.00 

H. L. Wilkinson, Shelby 1,000.00 

J. E. Coleman, Doddsville 1,000.00 

L. L. Roberts, Canton 1,000.00 

J. R. Bingham, Carrollton 1,000.00 

E. W. Reid, Magnolia 1,000.00 

Peebles Estate, Jackson 1,000.00 

D. M. Key, Jackson 1,000.00 

F. L. Adams 1,000.00 

H. C. Couch..... _.... 1,000.00 

Corporations 

General Education Board. New York 125,000.00 

Carnegie Corp., New York 69,000.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 23 

CARNEGIE-MILLSAPS LIBRARY 

Near the close of the 1905-06 session, Andrew Carnegie 
offered to give the college $15,000 for a library building if 
the trustees would supply an endowment of equal amount. 
Major Millsaps added to his many contributions by giving the 
full amount of the endowment. 

The foundations of this handsome building unfortunately 
gave way, and it became necessary to provide a new library. 
The Carnegie Corporation generously appropriated $50,000 
for this purpose. The present building was completed in 
1925-2 6 and with the addition of two floors of shelving will 
house 60,000 volumes. Furniture for the reading rooms was 
given by the Enochs Lumber & Manufacturing Company. 

The library contains approximately 25,000 volumes and 
receives one hundred and twenty periodicals. A special grant 
of $10,000 for the purchase of books was made by the Car- 
negie Corporation during the five years 1931-1936, and about 
4,600 volumes were added from this source. The income 
from the Martha A. Turner Fund of $1000, founded by Mrs. 
J. R. Bingham of Carrollton, Miss., is used for the purchase 
of books in English literature. 

Library Hours: Monday through Friday, 8 to 1, 2 to 6, 
7 to 9. 

Saturday, 8 to 1:15 
Sunday, 3 to 5 (for reading only) 

The library is closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
and spring holidays. Books are loaned for two weeks or a 
shorter period of time. 

A special collection of documents, manuscripts, and books 
on Methodism in Mississippi has been started, and gifts of ma- 
terial related to this subject would be especially valuable. 

During 1936 thirty-five volumes on mathematics from 
the library of the late H. H. Lansford, a Millsaps alumnus, 
were donated to the library by Mrs. Lansford. Other dona- 
tions have been received from the following: American Coun- 
cil on Education, Atlantic Monthly Company, Chaplain J. H. 



24 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Brooks, Carnegie Corporation, Carnegie Endowment for In- 
ternational Peace, Cotton Club of the Port of Mobile, Rev. 
Murray Cox, Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, Mrs. J. D. 
Fowler, J. T. Griffin, Rev. T. A. Holloman, Illinois Central 
Railroad, Jackson Printing Company, Maurice Jones, Marks. 
Laser and Company, Mrs. Lucy H. McKee, Mississippi Geolog- 
ical Survey, Mr. J. C. Penny, Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
Prof. A. G. Sanders, Smithsonian Institution, Dr. J. M. Sulli- 
van, A. L. Taveau, Jr., Dr. M. C. White, Hon. Walker Wood, 
Secretary of State, Woodrow Wilson Foundation. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 25 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS, PRIZES 

ENDOWED FUNDS 

The income from the following funds may be used by the 
Board of Trustees to aid deserving applicants: 

The Clara Chrisman Scholarship 
The Peebles Scholarship 
The W. H. Watkins Scholarship 
The Marvin Galloway Scholarship 
The J. A. Moore Scholarship 

SPECIAL SCHOLAKSHIPS 

THE TRIBBETT SCHOLARSHIP 

The student to whom the scholarship is awarded receives 
two hundred dollars, payable one-half at the beginning of the 
first semester and one-half at the beginning of the second. 
The award is subject to the following conditions. 

This scholarship is to be awarded at the end of each ses- 
sion to the member of the sophomore, junior or senior class 
whose quality index is highest for the year, subject to the 
following qualifications: 

a. He must be a regular student with not less than thirty- 
two semester hours work for the year, and must have made 
at least "C" in each of the subjects studied. 

b. He must be qualified for and agree to work assigned 
by the president of the college. 

THE TREVELLI SCHOLARSHIP 

This scholarship of $120.00 is awarded at the end of each 
session to a qualified member of one of the upper classes. It 
is awarded by the Trevelli Foundation of New York on the 
recommendation of a faculty committee. 

THE D. A. R. SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Ralph Humphreys chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution offers a scholarship of $100.00, to which 



26 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

the college adds $50.00. This scholarship is awarded by a 
committee of the representatives of the chapter and of the 
faculty, and is granted for superiority in scholarship, promise 
of usefulness, and self-reliance. 

The Belvidere chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution of Greenville, Mississippi, awards an annual schol- 
arship of $50.00, to which the college adds $50.00. This 
scholarship is awarded to a resident of the Greenville area. 

THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OP THE CONFEDERACY 
SCHOLARSHIP 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy provide a par- 
tial scholarship for a student whom they select. 

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Board of Trustees have authorized the award of 
twenty scholarships worth $75.00 each to graduates of Mis- 
sissippi high schools. These scholarships are awarded by the 
president of the college upon the recommendation of the high 
school superintendent and of others who are in a position to 
know the character and promise of usefulness of the appli- 
cant. Only graduates who rank in the upper ten per cent of 
each graduating class are eligible to apply for these scholar- 
ships. Application should be sent to Dr. D. M. Key, President 
of Millsaps College. 

SERVICE SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are service scholarships in each of several depart- 
ments, the holders of which are expected to aid the head of 
the department in some definite work. These scholarships 
are ordinarily open only to members of the upper classes. Ap- 
plication should be made to the president of the college. 

LOAN FUNDS 

THE W. T. J. SULLIVAN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 
This fund is administered by Dr. J. M. Sullivan, Profes- 
sor of Chemistry, Millsaps College. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 27 

THE FEILD COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION LOAN FUND 

The Feild Cooperative Association, a private philanthrop- 
ic enterprise, makes loans to members of the junior and senior 
classes who are of good character and show promise of use- 
fulness. The loans are to cover only a part of the expenses 
of the student. Application should be addressed to Miss S. 
Frances Sale, Executive Secretary of the Feild Cooperative 
Association, Lamar Life Building, Jackson, Mississippi. 

MEDALS 

1. The Founder's Medal is to be awarded annually to the 
member of the senior class who has made the highest quality 
index for the entire college course and has received a grade 
of excellent on his comprehensive examination. Only stu- 
dents who have done at Millsaps College all the work required 
for the degree are eligible for this award. 

2. The Bourgeois Medal is awarded annually to the mem- 
ber of the freshman, sophomore, or junior class who has made 
the highest quality-index during the year. Such student must 
be a candidate for a degree, and must have taken a minimum 
of thirty semester hours of college work during the year in 
which the medal is awarded to him. No student who has won 
this medal can compete for it again. 

3. The Ida V. Sharp Medal in English is awarded to the 
member of the senior class who has made the highest quality- 
index in his English course. The candidate must have taken 
at least twenty-four semester hours in English. 

4. The John C. Carter Medal for Oratory is awarded an- 
nually to the student who presents the best original oration 
in the oratorical contest. This contest is open to men and 
women students and is held in February or March of each 
year. 

5. The Clark Essay Medal shall be awarded annually to 
that student who presents the best and most original paper 
in any English course in Millsaps College. 

6. The Buie Medal for Declamation is open to members 
of the freshman and sophomore classes, but it cannot be 
awarded to any student more than once. The contest for this 
medal is held at commencement each year. 



28 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Millsaps College, as an institution of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. South, seeks to be a genuinely Christian col- 
lege. The faculty is made up of scholars who are Christians 
striving to fulfill the highest ideals of personal devotion and 
of community citizenship. The religious life of the college 
centers around the churches of Jackson, and the campus Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Every inducement is brought to bear 
upon the students to attend a church and church school of 
their own denomination A chapel or assembly of the entire 
college provides opportunity for worship, inspiration, and busi- 
ness of college-wide concern. Varied programs, including ad- 
dresses by faculty members, students, and outside speakers of 
ability, are presented at these services. 

THE CAMPUS-CHURCH RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
AND THE MILLSAPS CHRISTIAN COUNCIL 

The Christian program of the college is coordinated with 
the local and general program of the church through the Cam- 
pus-Church Relations Committee. The various religious ac- 
tivities of the college are correlated and unified by the Mill- 
saps Christian Council, composed of representatives of all 
religious groups on the campus. This council sponsors dele- 
gations of students to the summer conferences of the church 
at Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, and to the Methodist State 
Student Conference. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The College Y. M. C. A. is the recognized channel of stu- 
dent religious activity for men. The association was organ- 
ized shortly after the college was founded, and has done much 
to strengthen the spiritual life and influence of the college 
and its members, and to promote progressive Christian work. 
"Wednesday evening meetings are held for the presentation 
and discussion of questions of interest to students. The as- 
sociation shares vitally in the college program for the adjust- 
ment of freshmen to the Millsaps community. Delegations of 
members represent the association at state, regional, and Blue 
Ridge. N. C, conferences each year. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 29 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Y. W. C. A. provides expression for the religious in- 
terests of Millsaps women through a program similar to that 
of the Y. M. C. A. It holds Thursday evening meetings de- 
voted to the religious needs of college women, and cooperates 
in the orientation of new students in campus life. Repre- 
sentatives of the association participate in all of the confer- 
ences of the Y. W. C. A., and Christian Student Movement. 

MINISTERIAL LEAGUE 

Students preparing for the Christian ministry may join 
the Ministerial League, which provides programs appropriate 
to the needs of students interested in Christian life work. 
Through its activities, the league provides opportunity for 
Christian service for its members, and contributes much to 
the religious life of the campus, and of the local churches. 

RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK 

The annual Religious Emphasis Week is sponsored by all 
of the religious groups of the campus, functioning through 
the Millsaps Christian Council. For this week some outstand- 
ing religious leader familiar with student life and problems 
is brought to the campus. The speaker for the Religious 
Emphasis Week of 1936 was Dr. G. Ray Jordan (Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina), whose public messages and individ- 
ual conferences proved of great value to many students. The 
evening services of the week were conducted as the Millsaps 
Youth Conference, and were open to all of the young people 
of the Jackson area. Large numbers of young people from 
the city and nearby places enjoyed attendance at these serv- 
ices. 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTER 
All religious groups of the campus share the use of a 
frame building known as the Christian Center. This building 
has been recently remodelled and now provides facilities for 
worship, forum, recreation, and committee meetings. In ad- 
dition to the meetings of the various religious organizations, 
a vesper service is conducted in the center each evening after 
dinner. 



30 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ATHLETICS 

Millsaps College has maintained a consistently high ath- 
letic standard, not only in developing teams for intercollegiate 
competition, but in providing a well rounded program which 
attempts to bring every student in college into some form of 
athletic competition. 

I. ELIGIBILITY. 

Millsaps is a member of the Dixie conference and the S. 

I. A. A. Important rules which govern Millsaps athletics are: 
(1) During his freshman year of residence a student may par- 
ticipate only in limited competition with the freshmen of 
other institutions or with junior colleges. (2) A student may 
have three years of participation as a member of the varsity 
teams, but must advance each year in class standing. (3) 
Graduates of junior colleges are eligible at once for varsity 
teams provided they enter Millsaps College directly from jun- 
ior college. 

II. AWARDS. 

(1) Freshmen. Freshman sweaters are awarded in base- 
ball, basketball, football, and tennis upon the recommenda- 
tion of the coach. (Freshmen, however, will not receive their 
sweaters until they have attained a scholastic record which 
will make them eligible for intercollegiate competition.) 

(2) Varsity. A varsity jacket with an "M" is given a 
student upon recommendation of the coach, the first time he 
is a regular member of a varsity team in baseball, basketball, 
football, or tennis. 

III. INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS. 

In the desire to have a "sports for all" program, the col- 
lege sponsors, intramural activities in: archery, baseball, bas- 
ketball, boxing, free throwing, touch football, golf, horseshoe, 
Softball, track, tennis, and volley ball. 

Cups are awarded to championship squads in these ac- 
tivities. In general, the units are based upon residence in 
dormitories and teams sponsored by social fraternities. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 31 

IV. ATHLETIC FACILITIES. 

(1) A new gymnasium provides a large playing floor for 
basketball, boxing, volley ball, indoor baseball, and tennis. 
It has a regulation ring for boxing, mats for gymnastics, dress- 
ing rooms for all teams, a room for visiting teams, trainer's 
room complete with equipment for injuries, a club room for 
wearers of the "M", and the college store. The gymnasium 
has become the center of the activities of the students. (2) 
The football stadium with seating accommodations for five 
thousand spectators is equipped with lights for night games 
and also contains a fine 24 ft. quarter mile cinder track. (3) 
The baseball field is separate from the football stadium and 
is also used as a freshman football practice field. (4) Five 
new clay tennis courts have been constructed near the gymna- 
sium and are kept in perfect condition in nine out of the 
twelve months of the year. (5) A very fine nine hole golf 
course has been built and is for use by all students. 



32 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Millsaps Student Association is composed of officers 
elected by the student body and the student executive board. 
The president, vice-president, and the secretary-treasurer are 
elected annually from the student body. Members of the stu- 
dent executive board are chosen by the activities which they 
represent. 

Meetings of the student executive board are held at least 
once a month, with other meetings called when the president 
considers them necessary. The Student Association holds its 
regular meeting during the chapel period every Friday morn- 
ing. All members of the student body automatically become 
members of the Student Association. 

The duties and functions of the Student Association are 
to act in the administration of student affairs, to cooperate 
with the administration in the orientation program of the 
college, to promote a better understanding between student 
and faculty, and to work for the benefit of the student body 
and the progress of the college. 

THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

A working laboratory for students with journalistic In- 
clinations is furnished in The Pui*ple and White, weekly Mill- 
saps student publication. A college newspaper with a reputa- 
tion which ranks it among the best in the South, The Purple 
and White affords actual experience in the editorial, business, 
and advertising phases of a modern news-sheet. Extra-cur- 
ricular college credit for members of the staff, the valuable 
experience it affords, make this activity both profitable and 
interesting to students. 

THE BOBASHELA 

The Bobashela is the annual student publication of Mill- 
saps College. It attempts to give a comprehensive view of 
campus life as enjoyed by the student body and faculty mem- 




52 

o 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 33 

bers. The 19 37 edition is the thirty-first volume of this 
Millsaps book. Bobashela is a Choctaw Indian name for "good 
friend." 

THE PLAYERS 

The dramatic club of the college has as its official name 
"The Millsaps Players." Under the direction of Professors 
White and Moore the Players put on two or more three-act 
plays each year, and produce with first year novices five or 
six one-act plays. The organization is a live one and its pro- 
ductions are highly creditable. 

The Players within recent years have greatly added to 
the facilities for play production: The stage has been en- 
larged, a handsome curtain and cyclorama, two complete sets 
of scenery, and complete lighting equipment have been pur- 
chased. 

THE GLEE CLUB 

The Millsaps Singers, a chorus composed of men and 
women students under the able direction of Mr. Alvin J. 
King, is one of the most important organizations on the 
Millsaps campus. 

In addition to numerous appearances in Jackson and 
nearby towns, the purple-robed chorus takes an extensive 
trip over Mississippi each year, giving musical programs in 
various parts of the state. 

Membership is open to freshmen and upper-classmen 
alike and two semester hours' credit is given for the year's 
work. 

THE BAND 

The Millsaps Band is the official band of the 106 th En- 
gineers, Mississippi National Guard. Members are paid for 
their services and attend field training camp for two weeks 
each summer. This is an important campus organization and 
membership is sought by all students with musical aspira- 
tions. 



34 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEBATING 

Since the year the college was founded, debating has 
occupied an important place in its activities. Millsaps teams 
participate in about seventy-five debates each year, meeting 
teams from the leading institutions in the South and South- 
west. 

Extra-curricular credit is offered for successful partici- 
pation in debating, oratory, and extemporaneous public 
speaking. 

THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

The International Relations Club of Millsaps College is 
an endowed honorary organization which recognizes superior 
work in current history. 

Membership is elective and restricted. 

The club holds bi-monthly meetings at which timely world 
problems and events are discussed by student and faculty 
members. Another feature of the club is to sponsor occa- 
sional lectures of international interest. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 35 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

ETA SIGMA PHI 

Eta Sigma Phi is a national honor fraternity for the 
recognition and stimulation of interest in classical studies, 
including the history, art and literature of ancient Greece and 
Rome. Its forty-six chapters scattered throughout the United 
States foster a closer relationship among students interested 
in the classics. 

Alpha Phi, the Millsaps chapter, was founded in Decem- 
ber, 193 5, and has since been an active group on the campus. 

PI KAPPA DELTA 

The Millsaps chapter of Pi Kappa Delta offers member- 
ship to those who have given distinguished service in debat- 
ing, oratory, or extemporaneous public speaking. The na- 
tional honorary fraternity with its one hundred and forty- 
eight chapters performs a valuable service in co-ordinating 
the forensic activities of colleges throughout the country. 

CHI DELTA 

Chi Delta is a local honorary literary sorority whose 
purpose is to stimulate the art of creative writing among the 
women students at Millsaps. Membership includes women 
members of the faculty who are interested in writing, 

KIT KAT 

Kit Kat is a literary fraternity with a selected member- 
ship of men students who have the ambition combined with 
ability to write. Monthly programs consist of original papers 
given by the members and criticized by the entire group of 
student and faculty members. 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

Omicron Delta Kappa is a widely recognized leadership 
fraternity with chapters in the principal colleges and uni- 



36 MILLSAPS COLLEGE > 

versities throughout the country. Pi Circle at Millsaps brings \ 

together those members of the student body and faculty most I 

interested in campus activities, together with a limited num- ; 

ber of alumni and supporters who discuss Millsaps problems, ' 

and work for the betterment of the college. ■) 

Membership in Omicron Delta Kappa is one of the high- , 
est honors a student can attain. i 

i 

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA \ 

Alpha Epsilon Delta is an honorary pre-medical frater- ! 
nity, founded at the University of Alabama in 1926. Its \ 
purpose is to promote the interests of pre-medical students. ! 
Leadership, scholarship, expertness, character, and person- 
ality are the qualities by which students are judged for mem- I 
bership. Alpha Epsilon Delta strives to bridge the gap be- ' 
tween pre-medical and medical schools and to link the under- j 
graduate with the medical student and the physician. | 

\ 
ETA SIGMA ] 

Eta Sigma is a local honorary fraternity which recog- 
nizes excellence in scholarship. It selects its members from i 
the junior and senior classes. The high standards required \ 
for membership in Eta Sigma make it a coveted honor at j 

Millsaps. ; 

j 

ALPHA PSI OMEGA i 

Effective service in "The Millsaps Players" is rewarded 
by membership in Alpha Psi Omega, the national honorary 
dramatic fraternity. Students may qualify for the honor 
fraternity by notable achievement in make up, stage man- 
agement, business management, costuming, and acting. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 37 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES 

Four national fraternities: Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Theta Kappa Nu, and one local fraternity, 
Sigma Rho Chi, have chapters on the Millsaps campus. These 
social clubs maintain houses in which some of their members 
reside. 

During the first ten days of the school year, each fra- 
ternity extends invitations to from ten to twenty new students, 
bidding them to membership in their organization. The new 
men are given an opportunity during this "rush" period to 
become acquainted with fraternities and at the end of this 
time bids are extended and the new students are pledged. 
While pledging is not allowed for the first ten days of school, 
a fraternity may extend an invitation to join at any other 
time during the year. 

Initiation of new pledges cannot take place until the 
student has been at Millsaps for a semester during which he 
has made at least nine quality points with not more than one 
grade below D. 

SOCIAL SORORITIES 

Millsaps College has four national sororities: Phi Mu, 
Kappa Delta, Beta Sigma Omicron, and Chi Omega. 

Formal rushing for new students takes place at the be- 
ginning of the fall term and is done according to rules which 
the sororities have all agreed upon. One week after regis- 
tration sororities may make afternoon dates with their 
rushees, the time of the date being limited, and all such 
engagements arranged in Pan-Hellenic council. During this 
period of restricted rushing the new student is permitted to 
promise membership to the organization of her choice. At 
the end of rush week, formal bids are extended to the rushee 
through the Dean of Women. 

Informal rushing is allowed throughout the year accord- 
ing to the desires of the various groups. 



38 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

For admission to Millsaps College, the general require- 
ments are as follows: 

1. Good Character — As attested by the certificate from 
the school last attended, or other valid proof. 

2. Adequate Preparation — As shown by the certificate 
of an accredited school, or an equivalent examination. 

Students are admitted to Millsaps College as: 

1. Full freshmen. 

2. Students with advanced standing. 

3. Special students. 

Full Freshmen 

For admission as full freshman the candidate must of- 
fer fifteeu units as specified below. English 3 units, algebra 
1 % units, plane geometry 1 unit, history 2 units. 

Advanced Standing 

For admission to advanced standing the candidate must 
submit a transcript of the work done in a recognized junior 
or senior college. The transcript must show the satisfactory 
completion of at least twenty-four semester hours with a 
grade of "C" in nine of these hours. 

Sixty-four semester hours maximum credit will be al- 
lowed on work done in state junior colleges approved by the 
State Junior College Commission. Full credit will be allowed 
for all academic courses of freshman and sophomore level. 
Other courses will be allowed full elective credit with the 
proviso that junior college transfers may be called upon to 
do extra work necessary to fulfill Millsaps' requirements for 
majors, pre-professional work, and for high school professional 
licenses. 

Special Student 

For admission as a special student, the candidate must 
present adequate proofs of good character, and of the need- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 39 

ful maturity of training. Such students must in all cases 
meet the specific entrance requirements, as prescribed for the 
courses elected by them. But it is expressly ordered that no 
special student shall be recognized as a candidate for any de- 
gree from Millsaps unless he shall have completed all entrance 
requirements at least one year before the date of graduation. 

DEFINITION OF UNIT 

The unit in the following estimate (p. 40) means a sub- 
ject of study pursued in an academy or high school through a 
session of nine months with recitations five times a week, an 
average of forty-five minutes being devoted to each recitation. 

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ADMISSION 

The subjects accepted for admission and their value in 
units are given in tabulated form on page 40. The applicant 
for admission may enter either by certificate or by examina- 
tion. 

For admission by certificate, the candidate should file 
with the registrar of the college, not later than September 1, 
a certificate of preparation, made out on a blank form fur- 
nished by the state high school inspector to the principal of 
the high school. This certificate must come from some recog- 
nized institution of collegiate rank, or an accredited high 
school or academy. It must bear in all cases the signature 
of the head of the school, must specify the character and con- 
tents of each course offered for entrance credit, must give 
the length of time devoted to the course, and must give the 
candidate's grade in percentage. In the scientific course two 
hours of laboratory instruction will be counted as the equiva- 
lent of one hour recitation. Certificate of preparation from 
private tutors will in no case be accepted. Students thus pre- 
pared must in all cases take the entrance examination. 

For admission by examination, the candidate must pre- 
sent himself at the college in September, if the examination 
has not been previously taken. 



40 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ADMISSION 



SUBJECTS 



TOPICS 



UNITS 



English A Higher English Grammar % 

English B Elements of Rhetoric and Composition 1 

English C English Literature 1% 


Mathematics A Algebra to Quadratic Equations 1 

Mathematics B Quadratics Through Progressions % to 1 

Mathematics C Plane Geometry 1 

Mathematics D Solid Geometry % 

Mathematics E Plane Trigonometry Va 

Mathematics F *Mechanical Drawing 1 

Mathematics G Advanced Arithmetic 1 


Latin A | Grammar and Composition 1 

Latin B | Caesar, four books or their equivalent 1 

Latin C | fCicero, six orations 1 

Latin D | fVergil, the first six books of the Aeneid 1 


Greek A | Grammar and Composition 1 

Greek B | Xenophon, first four books of the Anabasis 1 


French A i One-haU Elementary Grammar and at least 175 


French B Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


Spanish A One-half Elementary Qrammar and at least 175 

pages of approved reading _ 1 


Spanish B Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 

pages of approved reading 1 


German A One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 

pages of approved reading- _ 1 


German B Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 

1 pages of approved reading 1 


History A 1 Ancient History 1 

History B | Mediaeval and Modern History 1 


History C 1 English History 1 

History D | American History, or American History and 

1 Civil Government 1 


Science A ! Chemistry _ 1 


Science B J Physics _ _ _ 1 


Science C Botany _ _ _ 1 


Science D | Zoology _ _ _ 1 


Science E Physiography _ 1 


Science F Physiology 1 

Science G Agriculture 1 to 2 


Bible - 1 


General Science 1 

Home Economics 1 

Economics _ 1 


Manual Training 2 

Bookkeeping _ 2 


Stenography _ _ 1 


Typewriting _ __ _____1 


Physical Training 1 



♦Conditioned on the presentation of an equal amount of geometry, 
tin place of a part of Cicero an equivalent of Sallust's Cataline, and 
place of a part of Vergil an equivalent of Ovid will be accepted. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 41 

COST OF ATTENDING MILLSAPS 
COLLEGE 

The total cost for all college expenses, except books, 
varies somewhat according to the dormitory accommodations. 
The cost for freshmen is $328.00 and the items that make up 
this amount are as follows: 

COST FOR FRESHMEN 

Tuition (by the year in advance). $110.00 

Registration fee 25.00 

Library fee - 6.00 

Student Activities fee - 15.00 

Contingent Deposit 2.00 

Total for resident students ...$158.00 

For non-resident students, add: 

Room Rent $ 25.00 

Dormitory Contingent Deposit 3.00 

Medical fee 2.00 

Board for the year (Actual cost of food plus 

service, estimated) 140.00 

Total college expense ....$328.00 

Of this amount, tuition, all fees and deposits, room rent 
and board deposit of $27.50, a total of $215.50, is due at the 
opening of school, the remainder of the board being paid by 
the term of six weeks, at approximately $22.50 each for five 
terms. 

For those who find it more convenient to pay tuition and 
room rent in two installments, the following schedule of pay- 
ments has been arranged: 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Tuition for the semester $ 60.00 

Registration fee 25.00 

Library fee 6.00 

Student activities fee 15.00 

Contingent deposit 2.00 

Total for resident students ...$108.00 



42 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

For non-resident students, add: 

Room rent for semester $ 15.00 

Dormitory contingent deposit 3.00 

Medical fee 2.00 

Board deposit 27.50 

Total due for September 15tli $155^50 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Second semester tuition $ 60.00 

Room rent 15.00 

Total due February 1st 75.00 

Total College Expense $338.00 

Besides these payments, the only additional charge by 
the college will be board payable by terms of six weeks at 
approximately $22.50 per term. 

The above includes all college expenses except books. 
These may be purchased for cash at the college book store 
and cost approximately $20.00 per year. Laundry, travel, 
an^ personal expenses are not included in the above. 

COST FOR UPPER CLASSMEN 

Fees, tuition, deposits and board are the same for upper 
classmen as stated above for freshmen, except that most upper 
classmen will have science fees to pay. Other costs are as 
follows: 

Room Rent For the year By the semester 

Cottages (Limited number available) $20.00 $12.50 

Burton Hall 40.00 22.50 

Galloway Hall (For girls. Payable by 

the month at $7.00 per month) 63.00 

SPECIAL FEES 
In addition to the above regular costs, students are 
charged certain fees for special services which are here listed: 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 43 

. Science Fees 

Chemistry $10.00 

Physics 10.00 

Geology - 3.00 

Biology 10.00 

Astronomy 10.00 

Surveying 10.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit (per course) 2.00 

Education Fee 

Practice teaching and observation 10.00 

Late Registration 

Fee for enrollment more than five days after 

the opening of school - 3.00 

Graduation Fee 

Diploma 15.00 

REGULATIONS AS TO PAYMENTS 

All accounts due for any preceding semester must be 
paid before a student will be enrolled for the next semester. 
Corner rooms (in all dormitories) will be charged for at $2.50 
per semester more than the above. Rooms in Burton Hall 
rent for $40.00 per year, or $22.50 per semester; corner 
rooms $45.00 per year, or $25.00 per semester. Rooms in 
Galloway Hall for girls rent for $63.00 per year. 

All fees and a board deposit of $27.50 must be paid at 
the opening of school. No refund on fees will be made. In 
case of unavoidable withdrawal in the midst of the semester 
if approved by the president of the college, tuition, room rent, 
and board will be charged only for the time actually spent 
in school, at the rate of one-eighth of the yearly rat© for room 
rent and tuition for each month or fraction thereof, and $5.00 
per week or fraction thereof for board. Except in the case 
of such withdrawals from school, rooms will not be rented 
for less than one semester, and no refund will be made for 



44 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

dormitory rooms vacated in the middle of a semester. Ali 
freshmen except day students will be required to room in 
Founder's Hall during the entire freshman year. 

Beginning with the 1937-38 session, board will be payable 
by terms of six weeks (42 days) strictly in advance. When 
a student has paid his board a meal ticket will be issued to 
him by the bursar which will be good until the next payment 
falls due. Payments for board will not be returned except 
for absence of not less than two weeks. Charges for board 
do not include the Christmas holidays, during which period 
meals will not be served in the dining hall. 

Students will not be admitted to the dining hall without 
meal tickets after classes begin. 

No student shall be allowed to graduate unless he shall 
have settled with the treasurer all his indebtedness to the col- 
lege, including graduation fee of $15.00, by May 1 preceding 
the commencement. 

Each student should bring with him four sheets for a 
single bed, blankets, or quilt, a pillow with cases, and six 
towels. 

The dining room is conducted on the cooperative plan, 
the student being charged the actual cost of food, plus the 
cost of service and management. During the session of 1935- 
36 the cost amounted to $15.00 per month. All students 
who room in the cottages or dormitories must take their meals 
in the college dining hall. All resident arrangements for 
room or room and board off the campus must be approved 
by the Dean or the Dean of Women. In such cases the stu- 
dent may get meals at the college dining room, if desired. 

PURPOSE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE STUDENT 
ACTIVITIES FEE 

The student activities fee of fifteen dollars ($15.00) paid 
by a student at the beginning of each year is distributed 
among different organizations existing on the campus. The 
distribution of this fee is at the suggestion of the Student 
Executive Board. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 45 

The Athletic Association receives 60% of this amount 
and other remaining organizations receive 40%. For the 
amount the Athletic Association receives, the student is given 
a season ticket to all athletic contests held during the year 
and is granted permission to use the gym and other athletic 
facilities. The other part of the amount allotted to the Ath- 
letic Association goes to buy necessary equipment. The re- 
maining 40% of the student activities fee is distributed among 
organizations such as the Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., The Student 
Association, Debate Clubs, Band, Glee Club, Dramatics, Pur- 
ple and White, Bobashela, M Club, and The Woman's Asso- 
ciation. That part of the fee assigned the Bobashela is in 
part payment on the student year book. The portion desig- 
nated for The Purple and White gives each student a year's 
subscription to the college weekly paper. 



46 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The academic schools comprise the departments of lan- 
guages, mathematics, science, history, social science, litera- 
ture, philosophy, education, and religion. In the courses of 
these departments is comprised the work of the college with 
the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of science. 

B.A. Degree. 

The bachelor of arts course offers special instruction in 
the departments of ancient and modern languages. 

B.S. Degree. 

The bachelor of science course offers special work in 
chemistry, biology and physics. 

A full outline of the required and the elective studies of- 
fered for the degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of 
science is given in the pages following this announcement. 

One hundred and twenty-eight semester hours are re- 
quired for graduation both for the B.A. and B.S. degrees. 
Specific courses are prescribed in the freshman and the soph- 
omore classes, including alternative courses offered in ancient 
and modern languages. All the courses in the senior and 
almost all in the junior class are elective. 

GENERAL OUTLINE OP DEGREE COURSES, BY GROUPS 

B.A. B.S. 

S. S. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Group I English 12 12 

Group II Foreign Languages 18 12 

Group III Mathematics 6 6 

Group IV Science 6 20 

Group V Social Science 6 6 

Group VI Philosophy 6 

Group VII Physical Training 2 2 

Group VIII Religion 6 6 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 47 

DETAILED COURSES FOR THE B.A. DEGREE 

Freshman 

English 11, 12 6 S. hours 

Latin 11, 12 or Greek 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12 6 

♦History 11, 12 or Foreign Language 11, 12 or 

Religion 11, 12 12 

Physical Training 11, 12 2 

32 S. hours 
Sophomore 

English 21, 22 6 S. hours 

Latin 21, 22 or Greek 21, 22 6 

Chemistry 11, 12 or Physics 11, 12 or Biol. 11, 12 

or Biol. 21, 22 6 

For. Language 11, 12 or Hist. 11, 12 or Rel. 11, 12 6 

Elective 6 

30 S. hours 
Junior 

Philosophy - 6 S. hours 

Elective 28 S. hours 

34 S. hours 
Senior 

Elective 32 S. hours 

32 S. hours 

DETAILED COURSES FOR THE B.S. DEGREE 
Freshman 

**Religion 11, 12 6 

English 11, 12 6 

Modern Language 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12. ....\. 6 

History 11, 12 6 

Physical Training 11, 12 2 

32 S. hours 

♦Twelve semester hours must be selected from the three subjects. The sub- 
ject not taken must be taken in sophomore. 
**May be taken sophomore. 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Sophomore 

English 21, 22 - 6 S. hours 

Modern Language 21, 22 6 

Chemistry 21, 22 8 

Biology 11, 12 or Biology 21, 22 6 

Elective 6 

32 S. hours 
Junior 

Physics 11, 12 6 S. hours 

Elective 26 

32" S. hours 
Senior 
Elective 32 S. hours 

DETAILED COURSES FOR PREPROFESSIONAL 
STUDENTS 

(Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre-Engineering) 

Freshman 

English 11, 12 6 S. hours 

Modern Language 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12 6 

Biology 21, 22 6 

Biology 31, 32 2 

Chemistry 21, 22 8 

' 3T S. hours 

Sophomore ^ 

Religion 11, 12 6 S. hours 

English 21, 22 6 

Modern Language 21, 22 6 

Chemistry 31, 32 or *Mathematics 21, 22 6 

Physics 11, 12 6 * 

Physics 21, 22 2 

32 S. hours 



*Pre-engine€ring students will take Mathematics 21, 22 in Bophomore year 
instead of Chemistry 31, 82. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 49 

If a language is chosen as an alternative in a language 
group at least twelve semester hours above the "A" course in 
that language will be required to satisfy the language re- 
quirements of that group. In no case will it be allowed to 
combine six semester hours of one language with six semester 
hours of another language and offer the combination in sat- 
isfaction of the language requirements of a group. 

No senior may take for credit on graduation any required 
course primarly open to freshmen. 

The following extra curricular activities to a maximum 
of eight semester hours may be included in the 128 semester 
hours required for graduation: 

Physical Training (Required) 2 

Physical Training (Elective) 6 

P. & W. (Editor) (Elective) 4 

P. & W. Bus. Mgr. (Elective) 4 

P. & W. Dept. Editors (Four) 
(Elective) 6 

P. & W. Reporters (Four) 



(Elective) 


6 


Bobashela (Editor) (Elective) 


4 


Bobashela (Business Manager) 




(Elective) 


4 


Players (Elective) 


6 


Glee Club (Elective) 


6 


Band (Elective) 


6 


Debate (Elective) 


6 



(Only two semester hours in each per year, except P. and W. 
and Bobashela Editor and Business Manager). 



50 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MAJORS 

In addition to taking the prescribed work for the degree 
the student must major to the extent of 24 hours in one of 
the following departments: 

Biology. 

Chemistry. 

English. 

French and Spanish. 

General Science (In three Departments). 

History. 

Latin. 

Mathematics. 

Music 

Philosophy. 

Physics and Astronomy. 

Religion. 

Social Sciences. 

Other majors may be arranged on consultation with heads 
of departments and by consent of the faculty. 

Biology. — A student majoring in biology may take any 
four or more courses offered in the department. 

Chemistry. — Required courses for a major in chemistry 
are Chemistry 21-22, 31-32, 41-42, and 51-52. It is advised 
that Chemistry 61-62 and 71-72 be taken in addition to the 
above. 

English. — An English major is required to take English 
11-12 and 21-22. In addition the student must take twelve 
semester hours from the following group of courses: Eng- 
lish 31-32, 41-42, 71-72, and 81-82, 91. 

French and Spanish. — For students majoring in either of 
these subjects no one course is required with more emphasis 
than the others. Such students are urged to take every 
course in their major subject which they can include in their 
schedules. 

General Science. — To major in general science a student 
must take courses totaling twenty-four hours including at 
least one course in each of the following departments: Biology. 
Chemistry, and Physics. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 51 

History. — Any four courses in this department will be 
accepted for a major in history. 

Latin. — To major in Latin a student is required to take 
Latin 11-12. 21-22, 31-32, 41-42, 52, and either 61 or 62. 

Mathematics. — For a major in mathematics Mathematics 
11-12, 21-22, and 31 are required; nine semester hours se- 
lected from the other courses given in the department must 
also be taken. An additional six hours is strongly recom- 
mended for the student who intends to major in mathematics. 

Philosophy. — In the Department of Philosophy a major 
may be taken in Ethics or in History of Philosophy. In all 
cases, Logic will be required in addition to the course offered. 
Courses in Political Science and certain courses in Religion 
may be counted to make up the requisite hours. 

Physics and Astronomy. — Students majoring in these two 
subjects are required to take Physics 11-12 and Astronomy 
11-12 and an additional twenty-four hours in other courses. 

Religion. — Majors in religion are required to take Re- 
ligion 31 and 41 in addition to the course in Religion 11-12 
which all students must take. Other courses are elective with 
the student, up to the required number. 

Social Science. — In the Department of Social Science cer- 
tain courses in History, Philosophy, or Religion may be count- 
ed for credit, this to be determined by the department con- 
cerned. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Before receiving a bachelor's degree the student must 
pass a satisfactory comprehensive examination in his major 
field of study. This examination is given in the senior year 
and is intended to cover subject matter greater in scope than 
a single course or series of courses. The purpose of the com- 
prehensive examination is to coordinate the class work with 
independent reading and thinking in such a way as to relate 
the knowledge acquired and give the student a general un- 
derstanding of the field which could not be acquired from in- 
dividual courses. 



52 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

The major field must be chosen by the student at the 
opening of his junior year. The consent of the professor in 
charge is required before a student is allowed to major in a 
department. At least twenty-four semester hours credit must 
be taken in the department in which the student is majoring. 
Juniors and seniors meet with their major professors for con- 
ferences at least once a month. The examination requires 
three hours and is both written and oral. 

All comprehensive examinations must be completed by 
May 15 of the year in which the degree is to be awarded. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 53 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The academic year begins on tlie morning of the third 
Wednesday of September and continues for thirty-six weeks. 
Thanksgiving Day is a holiday, there is a Christmas recess 
of about ten days, and a spring recess. 

Attendance is required for each student throughout the 
session, with the exception of the days above indicated, un- 
less he has received permission to be temporarily absent, or 
to withdraw before its close. Leave of absence is granted by 
the faculty or president for sufficient reasons, and must in 
every case be obtained in advance. While in residence each 
student is required to attend regularly lectures and other 
prescribed exercises and all examinations in the courses which 
he pursues, (unless excused for cause), and in every way to 
conform to the regulations of the college. 

Absence from the college is permitted only upon the 
permission of the dean, obtained in every case in advance. But 
leave of absence for purposes of accompanying the athletic 
teams, debating teams and all other recognized clubs will not 
be granted except to officers and members of the organiza- 
tions. 

Absence of athletic teams and other student organizations 
is provided for by faculty regulations. 

Absence from any class is not excused except for sickness 
or like providential cause. But absences, whether excused or 
not, from one-fourth or more of the recitation period in any 
term will result in proportionate decrease of credits allowed. 
If a student is absent from a class more than one-fourth of 
the time devoted to that course he loses one-half credit in 
that course. The deficiency is made up by adding the loss 
in credit to the 128 hours for graduation. If a student is 
absent one-half of the time devoted to a course then all credit 
in that course is lost and the entire course must be repeated. 

Absence from examinations will not be excused except 
for sickness on day of examination, attested to by a physician's 



54 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

certificate, or other cause which the faculty by special order 
may approve. An unexcused absence is counted as a total 
failure in the examination in which it occurs. A student 
whose absence from examination is excused is admitted to a 
special examination ordered by the faculty. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

Attendance upon chapel is required of all students three 
days each week. All freshmen are required to attend chapel 
on one additional day during the first semester. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The examinations in each class are held in writing. Oral 
examinations are held in some departments but they are aux- 
iliary to the written examinations, which in conjunction with 
the class standing, as determined by the daily work of the 
student, are the main tests of the student's proficiency. 

At the end of the four years' course a comprehensive ex- 
amination is given in the student's major field. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

All marks are changed from a percentage to a six-point 
letter scale as follows: "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", and "F". 
"A" represents superior work, largelj^ of a creative nature 
and in addition to the regularly prescribed work of the class. 
"B" represents above the average achievement in the regu- 
larly prescribed work. "C" represents the average achieve- 
ment of the class in the regularly prescribed work. "D" 
represents the level of achievement in the regularly pre- 
scribed work of the class below the average in the same re- 
lationship as the grade of "B" is above the average. "E" 
represents a condition and may be changed to a "D" if the 
grade in the other semester of the course is "C" or above. 
"P" represents failure to do the regularly prescribed work of 
the class. All marks of "D" and above are passing marks 
and "F" represents failure. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 55 

The following are semester unit courses and cannot be 
averaged the first with the second semester, 

Latin 31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 61, 62. 

Greek 11, 12. 

Biology 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, 71, 72. 

Education, all courses. 

English 91, 92. 

History 31, 32. 

Mathematics, all courses. 

Physics 61, 62. 

Religion, all courses. 

Social Science 41, 42. 

A student who makes a grade of "D" in a subject will be 
advanced in that subject, but a certain number of quality 
points is requisite for advancement from one class to the next 
higher class. The student must have nine quality points to be 
classed as a sophomore, 36 to be classed as a junior, 72 to be 
classed as a senior, and 120 for graduation. The completion 
of any college course with a grade of "C" for one semester 
shall entitle a student to one quality point for each semester 
hour, and the completion of a course with a grade of "B" for 
the semester shall entitle a student to two quality points for 
each semester hour, and the completion of a course with the 
grade of "A" for the semester shall entitle a student to three 
quality points per semester hour. 

GRADES 

The grade of the student in any class, either for a semes- 
ter or for the session is determined by the combined class 
standing and the result of the examination. The examina- 
tion grade shall be counted as approximately one-third of the 
grade for the semester. If the combined grade is below D 
the student is required to repeat the course, except in courses 
where the grades for the two semesters may be averaged. 

Class standing in any course is determined by the regu- 
larity of attendance of the student upon lectures and labora- 
tory or other similar exercises where included in the course 
in question and by the faithful performance of his work as 



56 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

indicated by the answers when questioned, by written exer- 
cises, note books, the faithful performance of laboratory or 
other similar work, etc. The grade for passing in any course 
is D. For quality requirements see page 55. 

In determining honors and high honors, and all other 
awards based solely on scholarship, a quality index is arrived 
at by dividing the number of quality points by the number of 
semester hours taken. 

HOURS PERMITTED 

The usual course is 32 semester hours for each year. 
Not fewer than 24 semester hours nor more than 38 semester 
hours may be taken in a year, unless by express permission of 
the president and faculty. 

HONORS 

A student whose quality point index is l.S for his entire 
course shall be graduated with Honors; one whose quality 
point index is 2.7 and who has a rating of excellent on com- 
prehensive examination shall be graduated with High Honors. 

To be eligible for "honors" or "high honors" a student 
must have passed at least sixty semester hours in Millsaps 
College. Sixty per cent of the quality points on which "hon- 
ors" or "high honors" are given must be earned at Millsaps. 
These regulations do not apply to those who transfer back as 
much as eighteen semester hours for their degree. 

CONDUCT 

The rules of the college require from every student de- 
corous, sober and upright conduct as long as he remains a 
member of the college, whether he be within its precincts or 
not. 

They require from the student regular and diligent ap- 
plication to his studies, and regular attendance upon chapel. 

Drinking, gambling, and dissoluteness are strictly for- 
bidden, and any student found guilty of them is punished by 
suspension or expulsion. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 57 

Firearms 

The keeping of firearms by the students is strictly for- 
bidden. 

Delinquency. 

Reports are made each two weeks of all those failing 
during the preceding two weeks in each subject. The names 
of those delinquent are posted and notice is sent to the parent 
or guardian. 

To remain in college a freshman must pass in the first 
semester at least two subjects and have a grade of E in a 
third. After the first half of the freshman year a student 
must pass at least three subjects a semester to continue in 
college. The respective deans may exercise their discretion 
in the enforcement of this regulation. 

Demerit System. 

1. The demerit system is used. Demerits are Incurred by 
unexcused absences from class, chapel, and for other vio- 
lations of the college regulations, such as hazing and other 
offences. 

2. When a student has received an aggregate of thirty-five 

demerits he is called before the dean and warned. A 
notice of the warning is sent to his parent or guardian. 

3. When the aggregate of demerits reaches sixty-five, he re- 
ceives a second warning, and a second notice is sent to his 
parent or guardian. 

4. When the aggregate of demerits reaches one hundred, he 
is dismissed from the college. 

REPORTS 

Reports are sent at the close of each nine weeks to the 
parent or guardian of each student. These reports give the 
number of excused and unexcused absences from lectures, and 
indicate, as nearly as practicable, the nature of the progress 
made by him in his work at the college. 



58 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

WITHDRAWALS 

Voluntary withdrawals from the college require the con- 
sent of the faculty or president. 

Enforced withdrawal is inflicted by the faculty for ha- 
bitual delinquency in class, habitual idleness or any other 
fault which prevents the student from fulfilling the purpose 
for which he should have come to college. 

The college reserves the right to cancel the registration 
of any student at any time. In such a case, the prorata por- 
tion of board, room rent, and tuition will be returned. 

MATRICULATION 

The various departments are under the direction of pro- 
fessors who are responsible for the systems and methods pur- 
sued. 

The session begins on the third Wednesday of Septem- 
ber and continues with recess of about ten days at Christmas, 
until the first Tuesday in June. The first three days of the 
session are given to registration and all students, both old and 
new, are required during that time to place their names upon 
the books of the college and the rolls of their respective 
classes. Lecture courses begin Friday, and absences will be 
recorded against any student not present from the opening 
lecture of each course. 

REGISTRATION 

Applicants seeking admission to the college for the first 
time should present themselves to the registrar of the col- 
lege at his office in the main building promptly at 9:00 o'clock 
on the opening day, September 15. In each instance a 
certificate of good moral character, signed by the proper of- 
ficial of the institution attended during the previous session, 
or by some persons of known standing, must be sent to the 
registrar at least two weeks before the opening of the session. 
Each candidate who satisfies these requirements and those 
for admission by certificate or examination will be furnished 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 59 

with a card containing the courses offered. From these he 
must take the required courses and those electives which he 
proposes to pursue during the session. The card must then 
be carried to the bursar, who will, after the college fees have 
been paid to him, sign the card. Registration is incomplete 
unless the registration card is signed by both the registrar 
and the bursar. On payment of these fees the applicant will 
be admitted to classes. 

DELAYED REGISTRATION 

Students are not permitted to delay their registration 
through carelessness or for inadequate reasons. Any student, 
new or old, who fails to present himself for registration dur- 
ing the first five days of the session will be admitted to regis- 
tration only upon the consent of the president, and will be 
required to pay a special fee of $3.00. 

CHANGE OF REGISTRATION 

Students cannot change classes or drop classes or take 
up new classes except by the consent of the registrar or fac- 
ulty. 



60 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

I. The Department of Ancient Languages. 

IL The Department of Biology. 

III. The Department of Chemistry. 

IV. The Department of Education. 
V. The Department of English. 

VI. The Department of Geology. 

VII. The Department of German. 

YIII. The Department of History. 

IX. The Department of Mathematics. 

X. The Department of Philosophy. 

XI. The Department of Physical Education. 

XII. The Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

XIII. The Department of Religion. 

XIV. The Department of Romance Languages. 
XV. The Department of Social Sciences. 

XVI. The Department of Music. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 61 

I. DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

PROFESSOR KEY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HUDDLESTON * 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SIMPSON 

It is believed that the mastery of these highly inflected 
languages will effect the purposes aimed at in education in 
the following ways: 

Constant drill in the processes of correlation, comparison, 
discrimination and classification of the phenomena of lan- 
guage is required, both in the study of inflection and syntax 
and in translation. This drill affords a most rigorous exer- 
cise in correct scientific method and produces habits and re- 
flexes of accuracy, efficiency and system. 

A first hand acquaintance with the language and modes 
of expression of the ancients and with the evolution of literary 
forms lays open a field of knowledge that is essential to a full 
understanding of modern life and literature. 

Intimate contact with the very words which express the 
best ideals and aspirations of those great spirits whose influ- 
ence has been most abiding and formative in our world should 
shape the character to fine and worthy purposes. The "ul- 
timate objectives" are not lost sight of. 

LATIN 
A-1. Latin Grammar Review. — A quick review of the funda- 
mental rules of syntax, forms, and vocabulary. This 
course is for students who have had two years of high 
school Latin. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Simpson 

A-2. Cicero. — A study of selected orations with attention to 
forms and constructions. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Simpson 

J 1-1. Vergil. — Translation of part of the Aeneid. This course 
is for students who have had three years of high school 
Latin. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Simpson 

*Eineritus. 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

12-1. VergiL — The Aeneid continued. Three hours credit. 

Second semester. 

Simpson 

11-2. A Survey of Classical Roman Literature. — ^An anthology 
of Roman literature up to the time of Augustus. This 
course is for students who have had four years of high 
school Latin. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Simpson 

12-2. A Survey of Classical Roman Literature. — An anthology 
of Roman literature from the time of Augustus through 
the beginning of the first century A. D. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Simpson 

21. Horace, Odes and Epodes. — This course is designed to 
give the student an appreciation of the place occupied 
by the poet not only in his own environment and age 
but through the centuries. Also to create an intelligent 
appreciation of his poetry. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Hamilton 

22. Plautus. — The student is introduced to Roman comedy 
and its Greek background. Wide reading in this period 
of literature is required. Two plays of Plautus are read 
in the Latin and several in translation. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 

31. Juvenal, Satires. — This course is intended to give the 
student an introduction to the study of Roman satire. 
Constant reading of other sources and comparison with 
Horace and Lucilius are required. Given in alternate 
years. Offered in 1937-38. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Hamilton 

32. Horace, Satires. — Horace as satirist is studied in close 
connection with Juvenal and others. Given in alternate 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 63 

years. Offered in 1937-38. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Hamilton 

41. Roman Drama. — History of the Roman Drama with ex- 
tensive reading in Seneca, Plautus and Terence. Given 
in alternate years. Offered in 1938-39. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Hamilton 

42. Roman Elegy. — The four principal elegiac poets are 
studied: Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid. Ex- 
tensive outside reading is included in the course. Given 
in alternate years. Not offered in 1937-3 8. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 

51. Methods of Teaching. — Especially designed for those who 
expect to teach high school Latin. This course is of- 
fered as a senior elective; as such it may be counted in 
satisfaction of the requirements for teacher's license. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 

52. Classical Archaeologj'. — This course attempts to vizual- 
ize ancient classical civilization and may be elected by 
those who are not taking formal courses in Latin and 
Greek translation. It consists of lectures and outside 
reading supplemented by lantern slides. Two hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 

61. Roman Private Life. — A course of study designed to fa- 
miliarize students with the every day life and habits of 
the Romans. Given in alternate years. Not offered in 
1937-38. Three hours credit. First semester, 

Simpson 

62. Mythology. — A study of the ancient myths of Greece and 
Rome and their influence on later literature. Given in 



r 



I 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

alternate years. Not offered in 1937-38. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Simpson 

71. Lucretius. — A course in translation of De Rerum Natura 
of Lucretius. Given in alternate years. Offered in 1937- 
38. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Simpson 

72. Martial. — ^A course in translation of the epigrams of 
Martial. Given in alternate years. Offered in 1937-38. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Simpson 

GREEK 

Al. Introduction to Greek. — Attention is paid to the thorough 
mastery of forms, vocabulary and syntax, but emphasis 
is laid also upon the great contributions made by the 
Greeks to Western civilization in the fields of art, litera- 
ture and philosophy. The course may be counted as an 
elective, or it may be used to satisfy the entrance re- 
quirements in foreign languages. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Hamilton 

A2. Introduction To Greek. — This is a continuation of the 
course outlined above. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

Hamilton. 

11. Xenophon's Anabasis. — The first two books of the Ana- 
basis are covered in this course. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Key 

12. Xenophon's Anabasis. — Continuation of course 11. The 
last two books of Anabasis. Selections from the Greek 
New Testament are sometimes read in this course. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Key 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 65 

21. Orations of Lysias.^ — The most important orations of this 
great master of Attic prose are studied during the first 
semester of this course. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

Key 

32. Plato's Apology and Crito. — The student is here intro- 
duced to the great heart and mind of Socrates, as in- 
terpreted by his devoted pupil, Plato. This is one of 
the great books of all time. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Key 



66 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

II. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR RIECKEN 

The courses offered in this department are designed to 
give the student a general knowledge of the fundamental con- 
ceptions which underlie all life phenomena. Special courses 
are offered to pre-medical students and to students who may 
anticipate majoring in the department. 

11. General Botany. — A survey of the plant kingdom in 
which special attention is given to general biological 
principles, morphology, physiology and life cycles of 
plants. Laboratory work consists of microscopic and 
macroscopic study of plants with occasional field trips. 
The structure and physiology of angiosperms. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

12. General Botany. — The structure and life cycles of gymno- 
sperms, ferns, mosses, liverworts, fungi and algae and 
their adaptations. Two recitations and one laboratory 
period a week. Both semesters must be completed to 
obtain credit. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 

21. General Zoology. — A survey of the animal kingdom. At- 
tention is directed to the cell and the fundamental prin- 
ciples of animal biology, to the study of the phyla, the 
development of tissues, organs and systems and their 
adaptations. Microscopic and macroscopic study of in- 
vertebrate forms. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

22. General Zoology. — Anatomy and physiology of vertebrate 
forms. Both semesters must be completed to obtain 
credit. Pre-medical students should take courses 31 and 
32 with 21 and 22 for the required 8 hours credit. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 

31. Vertebrate Anatomy. — This course should be taken only 
in connection with Biology 21 and 22. It is designed 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

to meet the needs of pre-medical students. Special at- 
tention is given to the dissection of vertebrate forms. 
Detailed dissection of the lower vertebrate forms. One 
laboratory period a week. One hour credit. First se- 
mester. 

Riecken 

32. Vertebrate Anatomy. — Detailed dissection of the higher 
vertebrate forms. One laboratory period a week. Both 
semesters must be completed to obtain credit. One hour 
credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 

41. General Bactei'iolog5\ — This course is designed to give a 
general survey of the field of bacteriology. Special at- 
tention in the laboratory is given to the preparation of 
media, sterilization and to the cultivation, methods of 
isolation, staining and identification of microorganisms. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 11 and 12, or 21 and 22. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

42. Comparative Anatomy. — A comparative study of the 
homologies of organs and systems of a series of verte- 
brates. The course is designed to give further training 
in the principles of dissection and to develop an appre- 
ciation of the significance and relationship of structures. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 21 and 22. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Riecken 

51. Histology and 3Iicrotechnique. — Training in the tech- 
nique of preparing temporary and permanent microscopic 
sections of plant and animal tissues. Much freedom is 
allowed in the selection of materials. Opportunity is 
given for making slides as aids in high school teaching. 
For pre-medical students, readings and discussions of 
animal tissues and organs. Pre-requisite, Biology 11 
and 12, or 21 and 22. Given in alternate yeai's. Not 



68 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

offered in 1937-38. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. 

Riecken 

52. Genetics. — A study of the fundamental principles of va- 
riation and heredity in plants and animals. Lectures 
and recitations. Pre-requisite, Biology 11 and 12 or 
21 and 22. Given in alternate years. Not offered in 
193 7-38. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Riecken 

61. General Embrjology. — A study of the development of 
Amphioxis, the chick and the pig. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Pre-requisite, Biology 21-22. 
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1937-38. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

62. General Physiology. — A study of the physiological pro- 
cesses of the living organism. Functions of the organs 
of the human body are emphasized. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Pre-requisite, Biology 
21 and 22. Given in alternate years. Offered in 1937- 
38. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 

71. Special Problems. — Opportunity is given the student to 
do further work on problems in which he has developed 
a special interest. "Work will be done under the direc- 
tion of the instructor. Registration for this course is 
only with the consent of the instructor. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

72. Special Problems, — This may be a continuance of 71 but 
is not contingent upon the first semester. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 

82. Taxonomy. — Laboratory and field identification of plants 
with attention given to herbarium methods. "Work is 
largely individual under the supervision of the instruc- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 69 

tor. Three laboratory periods a week. Pre-requisite. 
Biology 11. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Riecken 

91. Methods and Materials of Teaching Science. — Same as 
Education 71. Students wishing to take this course 
should first consult the head of the department of edu- 
cation. Given in alternate years. Offered in 1937-38. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 
Riecken 



70 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

III. THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 

INSTRUCTOR PRICE 

The Department of Chemistry is now well provided for in 
the Sullivan-Harrell Hall, a new and thoroughly modern sci- 
ence hall, which was recently built as a gift from citizens of 
Jackson and Hinds County. There are two lecture rooms 
supplied with tablet-arm chairs fixed in elevated rows, im- 
proved lecture desks with Alberene stone tops and removable 
down-draft hoods, sliding blackboards with separate control 
for lighting, and other conveniences. There are four large 
laboratories, one for general chemistry provided with five 
double desks eighteen feet long to accommodate 140 students 
in three sections and (piping roughed-in for two more desks 
as needed), one for organic and qualitative work provided 
with five double desks eighteen feet long to accommodate sev- 
enty individuals (provision being made for expansion), one 
for quantitative analysis equipped for fourteen students, (ex- 
pansion provided for), and one for industrial chemistry. There 
are three smaller laboratories for physical chemistry, nitrogen 
determinations, and research, respectively, besides four small 
laboratory rooms for individual and specialized work. All 
desks have Alberene tops and sinks, with lead trough inclined 
in one direction the entire length, and are supplied with an 
adequate number of outlets for water, gas, compressed air, 
and 110-volt electric current. All laboratory hoods are of 
the high velocity and open-type made of Transite board on 
Alberene shelf. Each hood is provided with outlets for water, 
gas, compressed air, and 30-ampere electric current. 

The work in this department includes one year of chem- 
istry required of candidates for B.S. degree, besides other 
courses open to all students who have completed chemistry 
21, 22. 

The subjects are taught by recitations and lectures and 
work which each student must perform in the laboratory. 
The laboratories are kept well equipped with apparatus neces- 
sary to the correct appreciation of the science. Each student 
has his own desk and apparatus, and is closely supervised, so 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 71 

that he may not only gain a true idea of the substance under 
inspection but also train his hands to be careful of the smallest 
detail, and the eye observant of the slightest phenomenon, 
and habits of neatness, skill and economy. Each student will 
be expected to keep accurate notes. In all courses attention 
will be given to chemical calculations, and the use of refer- 
ence books and periodicals will be encouraged. 

11, 12. Inorganic Chemistry. (Not offered 1937-38. See 
course 21, 22). 

21. Inorganic Chemistry. — A careful study of fundamental 
principles and laws, the occurrences, properties, prepara- 
tion and uses of the non-metallic elements and some of 
their compounds, and to chemical calculations. Special 
attention will be given to valence and the ionization the- 
ory. Incomplete without Chemistry 22. Four hours 
credit. First semester. 

Sullivan 

22. Inorganic Chemistry. — The work of this semester will 
include a study of metals with special reference to com- 
mercial uses and to qualitative analysis, and an elemen- 
tary course in organic chemistry. This course is de- 
signed to give the student a thorough working knowledge 
of general chemistry, and is a prescribed study of the 
sophomore year for the B.S. degree. It is a prerequisite 
to either of the other courses in chemistry, and is open 
to freshmen who are registered as pre-medical or pre- 
engineering students, and to A.B. students who elect 
chemistry. A laboratory course is given in connection 
with the lectures and each student is assigned the prep- 
aration of a number of elements and compounds, and is 
required to note the deportment of various substances 
with reagents. The class each year is given an oppor- 
tunity to visit certain industrial establishments, as sul- 
phuric acid plant, phosphate works, gas works, water 
works and filtration plants. Three lecture hours and 
one laboratory period. Four hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Sullivan 



72 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

81. Organic Chemistry. — The semester's work includes a 
study of the open-chain compounds, and methods of 
organic analysis and determination of formula. Special 
attention will be given to the alcohols, aldehydes, acids, 
amines, cyanogen compounds, carbohydrates and other 
derivatives. The study of relationships as shown by 
rational formula will be established. Incomplete with- 
out Chemistry 32. Two hours credit. First semester. 
Sullivan 

32. Organic Chemistry. — A study of the cyclic compounds. 
The purpose of this course is to furnish a somewhat 
comprehensive knowledge of the carbon compounds, the 
instruction being given chiefly by lectures illustrated by 
experiments. Some attention is given to physiological 
chemistry. Students will be expected to consult various 
works of reference. This course in connection with 41, 
42 and 51, 52 will appeal specially to preliminary dental 
and medical students. This course is required for all 
pre-medical students. Pre-requisite, Chemistry 21, 22. 
Lectures and recitations. Two hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Sullivan 

41. Qualitative Analysis. — Theoretical part of course: ioniza- 
tion, oxidation, reduction, and solubility product prin- 
ciple, with application of each to qualitative analysis. 
In the laboratory: individual tests for metals and acid 
radicals, a known and unknown for each of the five 
groups of metals. One laboratory period of four hours 
a week. Incomplete without Chemistry 42. Two hours 
credit. First semester. 

Price 

42. Qualitative Analysis. — Continuation of chemistry 41, fol- 
lowed by analysis of one general unknown for metals 
and acid radicals. Introduction to another scheme of 
analysis without hydrogen sulphide. Two hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Price 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 73 

51. Exi)eriinental Organic Chemistrj'. — Arranged to accom- 
pany Chemistry 31. Experiments in purification of 
organic compounds, determination of physical constants, 
and preparation of aliphatic compounds. One laboratory 
period of four hours a week. Incomplete without Chem- 
istry 52. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Price 

52. Experimental Organic Chemistry. — Arranged to accom- 
pany Chemistry 32. Preparation of aromatic compounds 
and coal tar dyes. Introduction to organic qualitative 
analysis. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Price 

61. Physical Chemistry. — This course is planned for chemis- 
try majors and pre-medical students who desire credit 
beyond their medical school requirements. Atomic struc- 
ture, gas laws, matter in the solid and liquid states, 
elementary thermodynamics, properties of solutions and 
thermochemistry. Two one hour lectures, and one two 
hour laboratory period a week. Incomplete without 
Chemistry 62. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Price 

62. Physical Chemistry. — Continuation of Chemistry 61. 
Chemical kinetics, homogeneous equilibrium, electrical 
properties of solutions, phase rule studies, and colloid 
chemistry. Two one hour lectures, and one two hour 
laboratory period a week. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Price 

71. Quantitative Analysis. — Volumetric analysis with knowns 
and unknowns in acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidation 
and reduction, and iodimetry. Potentiometric titrations. 
Laboratory period of four hours a week. Incomplete 
without Chemistry 72. Two hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

Price 



74 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

72. Quantitative Analysis. — Continuation of Chemistry 71 
with gravimetric knowns and unknowns in metals and 
acid radicals. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Price 

81. Commercial Chemistrj'. — Analysis of river and deep well 
water; analysis of coal and gas, including B.T.U. determi- 
nations. Incomplete without Chemistry 82. Two hours 
credit. First semester. 

Sullivan 

82. Commercial Chemisti'y. — This course is a continuation 
of Chemisti-y 81, and will include the estimation of 
nitrogen in a substance of known composition and in 
cotton seed combustion analysis of an organic com- 
pound. The work of both semesters is subject to modi- 
fication. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Sullivan 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 75 

IV. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HAYNES 

The department of education welcomes capable students 
who contemplate teaching. Those who do not intend to teach 
are advised not to attempt the technical courses In education. 

Students should consult a member of the department be- 
fore enrolling in any course in education. An attempt is made 
to furnish definite guidance to prospective teachers concern- 
ing the courses in education and the academic courses that 
will best fit them for their work. 

Courses in Education are not open to freshmen. 

The courses offered in this department are approved by 
the State Department of Education. 

The state program specifies that the training of the high 
school teacher shall contain the following: 1. A specified 
academic core curriculum; 2. A specified professional core 
curriculum; 3. A specified number of hours training in the 
subject or subjects taught. Two high school subjects are 
specified as the maximum number for .which one can be 
trained to teach. 

The core curriculum specifies that all high school teach- 
ers have a minimum of twelve semester hours in English, 
nine semester hours in social studies, six semester hours in 
science and two semester hours in physical education and 
health. 

The professional work required consists of a minimum of 
eighteen semester hours. The following courses are specified 
to meet this requirement: 

12. Educational Psychology 3 sem. hours 

21. Tests and Measurements or Curriculum 

Construction 3 sem. hours 

31 or 32. Methods of Teaching High School 

Subjects 3 sem. hours 

and one or two courses in special methods, observation and 



76 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

practice teaching in the field, or fields in which the prospec- 
tive teacher is interested for 9 semester hours in addition to 
the above. See special methods courses listed on page 77. 
Subjects Sem. Hours 

English — 30 

Mathematics - 18 

Science 36 

Social Studies 30 

Foreign Language 18 

(Based on 2 entrance units) 

Foreign Language 24 

(Based on no entrance units). 

The most frequently occurring high school subject com- 
binations are English-Social Studies, English-Foreign Lan- 
guage, Mathematics-Science. A teacher of these subjects 
should have the minimum number of hours specified for each. 

Teacher Placenaent Bureau 

A teacher placement bureau for teachers Is maintained 
under the direction of the Department of Education. It is the 
desire of this bureau to further the interests of teachers 
trained at Millsaps College and to be of service to school offi- 
cials who wish to secure efficient teachers. 

11. General Psychology. — This is an introductory course in 
modern, scientific psychology. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Haynes 

12. Educational Psychology. — This course applies the facts 
and principles of psychology to the problems of educa- 
tion. Pre-requisite, General Psychology. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Offered in summer session 
also. 

Haynes 

21. Curriculum Construction. — In this course emphasis will 
be placed on the underlying principles of curriculum 
construction. Pre-requisite, Education 11 and 12. Three 
hours credit. First semester. Offered in summer ses- 
sion, also. 

Haynes 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

31. General Methods of Teaching High School Subjects. — 

This course is designed to introduce to the student the 
fundamental principles of learning and teaching. Pre- 
requisite, Education 11 and 12. Three hours credit. 
First semester. Offered in summer session, also. 
Haynes 

32. General Methods of Teaching High School Subjects. — 

This course is a repetition of Education 31. Second 
semester. 

Haynes 

41. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the High 
School. — This course consists of directed observation, 
discussion of observation, planning and teaching. Pre- 
requisite, C average and Education 11, 12, 31 or 32. Four 
hours credit. First semester. 

Haynes 

42. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the High 
School. — This course is a repetition of Education 41. 
Second semester. 

Haynes 

51. Materials and Methods of Teaching English. — Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Stone 

52. Materials and Methods of Teaching Modern Languages. — 

Three hours credit. Second semester. Offered in 1937- 
38. 

Cobb 

62. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics. — Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Mitchell 

71. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science. — Three 
hours credit. First semester, 

Riecken 

72. Materials and Methods of Teaching the Social Sciences. — 

Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Haynes 



78 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

V. THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR WHITE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR STONE 

INSTRUCTOR GOODMAN 

11. Composition (Group A). — The first semester is devoted 
to a review of grammar, a study of the fundamentals 
of composition, weekly themes, and an analysis of con- 
temporary essays. Instruction is given in methods of 
research and preparation of bibliographies. Definite 
independent reading is expected. Stress is placed on 
intensive reading and methods of study. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Goodman 

12. Composition (Group A). — The second semester la de- 
voted mainly to imaginative composition. Descriptive- 
narrative themes are required weekly, and one long 
theme is written during the semester in some form of 
imaginative writing. Selections from literature are 
studied and analyzed. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Goodman 

11. Composition (Group B). — Review of grammar and the 
fundamentals of composition. Instruction in sentence 
and paragraph writing, in methods of research, in mak- 
ing of footnotes, outlines, and bibliographies. Short and 
long expository themes required. Approximately one 
period a week devoted to work of contemporary essay- 
ists. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Stone 

12. Composition (Group B). — The second semester is given 
to a study of the larger units of composition with much 
practice In writing and speaking. A brief survey of 
the forms of prose discourse is given. Weekly themes 
required. Library reading. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Stone 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

21. English Literature (Group A). — ^A survey of English 
literature from the beginnings to the eighteenth cen- 
tury. A study of authors and literary forms by periods. 
The course attempts a study of the literature itself and 
of its historical development. Open only to those ma- 
joring in English literature. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

White 

22. English Literature (Group A). — ^A continuation of the 
study of English literature from the eighteenth century 
through the nineteenth. English 21 is a prerequisite 
to English 22. Open only to those majoring in English 
literature. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

White 

21. English Literature (Group B). — A survey of English 
literature from the beginnings to the eighteenth cen- 
tury, with especial emphasis on major writers. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Stone 
Goodman 

22. English Literature (Group B). — A continuation of the 
survey of English literature from the beginning of the 
eighteenth century through the nineteenth century. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Stone 
Goodman 

81. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of Macbeth, Hamlet, 
and Henry IV, part one. Lectures on the plays. Care- 
ful attention to Shakespearean diction, constructions, 
and customs. Ten of Shakespeare's plays are required 
as parallel reading during the semester. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

White 

32. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of King Lear, Othello, 
and the Winter's Tale. A life of Shakespeare and ten 
more of his plays are required as parallel reading. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
White 



80 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

41. English Romantic Poets. — A study of the poetry and the 
prose of the great Romantic poets. Extensive library 
readings and a term paper on a special topic are re- 
quired. Three hours credit. First semester. 

White 

42. Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. — A study of the poetry 
and prose of the great Victorian poets. Library read- 
ings and a term paper are required. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

White 

61. Advanced Composition. — This course in higher composi- 
tion is intended for a limited number of students who 
have done creditable work in freshman English, and who 
desire by further study and practice to attain individu- 
ality and effectiveness of prose style. The course should 
appeal especially to those interested in journalism. The 
first semester's work will be a study of newspaper mak- 
ing, of news and news values, and of getting the news. 
Time will be given to the analysis of the structure and 
style of news stories, and to the writing of news stories 
of unexpected occurrences, of speeches, interviews, and 
trials, of followup and rewrite stories. The student will 
practice, also, the writing of headlines, editing copy, and 
proof reading. Three hours credit. First semester. 
White 

52. Advanced Composition. — During the second semester the 
student will have much practice in the writing of feature 
stories, editorials, book reviews, familiar essays, and 
short stories. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
White 

61. A Study of the English Language. — Old English gram- 
mar and phonology are taught by means of text-books 
and lectures. Selections from old English poetry and 
prose are read. Three hours credit. First semester. 

White 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

62. A Study of the English Language. — Middle English will 
be studied in the. works of authors other than Chaucer. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
White 

71. A Survey of English Drama. — An account of the origin 
and development of English drama is attempted in lec- 
tures. Forty or more dramas are required for rapid 
reading or for study. These dramas are typical of all 
ages of English dramatic history from the earliest mys- 
tery plays to the drama of the twentieth century. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

White 

72. Modem Drama. — A study of contemporary British, 
American, and Continental drama. Approximately fifty 
plays are assigned for reading. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

White 

81. American Literature. — A survey of American literature 
from the early seventeenth century through the nine- 
teenth century. Historical background presented as an 
aid to the understanding of American intellectual devel- 
opment. Emphasis on major movements and major 
authors. Elective for all students. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Stone 

82. American Literature. — A survey of American literature 
in the twentieth century, with emphasis on developments 
and trends in the fields of poetry, prose fiction, and 
serious prose. Elective for all students. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Stone 

92. Introduction to Fiction. — Course planned to give stu- 
dents a comprehensive background of the development 
of fiction in general and of English fiction in particular. 
Wide reading in the art, technique, and types of prose 
fiction required. Ten novels illustrating various types 



82 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



of fiction selected for intensive study. Elective for all 

students. Three hours credit. Second semester. < 
Stone 

101. The Methods and Materials of Teaching English. — This ! 

is the same course as Education 51. Three hours credit. ,; 

First semester. ■•■ 

Stone \ 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

VI. THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 
PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 

A lecture room, a laboratory, and a large room for the 
display of specimens are provided for this department in the 
new fireproof science hall. The museum contains about 300 
minerals collected from various parts of the world, 200 speci- 
mens of rock presented by the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, 3 00 minerals and rocks presented by Goucher College, 
and a fine collection of Mississippi rocks and fossils. The 
excellence of the latter is yearly increased by donations from 
friends of the college, and a collection made by the professor 
and class on annual trips. 

11. Lithologic and Physiographic Geology. — This includes a 
study of mineral crystalline forms, chemical composition, 
occurrence, and uses, with a description of the kind and 
arrangement of rock masses. Folios and topographical 
sheets of the U. S. Geological Survey will be used in con- 
nection with a study of physiographic features and pro- 
cesses. 

Dynamic Geology. — This portion of the course embraces 
the study of the mechanical and chemical effects of the 
atmosphere, water, heat, and life. Special attention will 
be given to such phases of the subject as the work of 
glaciers and of volcanoes. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Sullivan 

12. Historical Geology. — In addition to general historical 
geology, some attention will be given to economic prod- 
ucts and to paleontology. The college museum and the 
private museum of the head of the department afford 
minerals and fossils for class study. Several geological 
expeditions, regularly made in the fall and spring to 
localities easily accessible to Jackson give the class a 
practical conception of this kind of surveying. The 
college is fortunate in being located in the midst of a 
region that is quite varied in geological character. Oc- 
casionally the faculty grants a week's leave of absence 



84 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

for trips to more distant parts. In the last month of 
the course special attention will be given to Geology of 
Mississippi. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Sullivan 

21. Topography, Paleontology, and Geology of Mississippi. — 

This course will include a study of topographic maps and 
folios of the U. S. Geologic Survey; field observations, 
collection of fossils and correlation of horizons; special 
studies in the paleontology of Mississippi. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Sullivan 

22. History of Geology and Economic Geology. — In this 

course the student will be expected to make a systematic 
digest of material assigned for study. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Sullivan 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 85 

VII. DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 
PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

Al. Beginner's German. — This course is designed to give be- 
ginners the fundamentals of grammar and syntax to- 
gether with easy reading exercises. The course may be 
used as a junior, or senior elective, or may be applied 
to entrance units in satisfaction of language requirement. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 
Hamilton 

A2. Beginner's German. — A continuation of the above. 
Several easy, short stories are read during this semester. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Hamilton 

11. Intermediate German. — Review of grammar. The stu- 
dent is introduced to the great writers of German liter- 
ature: Schiller, Freytag and others. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Hamilton 

12. Intermediate German. — A continuation of the work done 
in the first semester with variation of authors. Stan- 
dard works on German literature are read, both in the 
original and in English translation. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Hamilton 

21. Advanced German. — More difficult reading in the works 
of the authors of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, 
is taken up in this semester. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Hamilton 

22. Advanced German. — Modern German short stories and 
plays are usually read In this semester. This course is 
sometimes omitted and one in scientific German is sub- 
stituted. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 



86 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

VIII. THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

PROFESSOR LIN 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MOORE 

INSTRUCTOR WHARTON 

In the courses in History two things will be kept in view. 
Students will be expected to acquaint themselves with the 
significant facts in the development of the nations studied, 
and to learn why these facts are considered significant. As far 
as possible the causal connection between historical events 
and the development of nations will be indicated, and emphasis 
will be laid upon the idea that history is an account of the 
development of the human race. Both the facts and the 
reasons will be studied to account for the progressive organi- 
zation of the social, intellectual, and moral ideals of the 
various peoples into laws and customs. 

In the attempt to understand the progress of the nations, 
account will be taken of their literatures, their racial compo- 
sition, their economic conditions, their religions, their social 
institutions, and their forms of government. 

11. History of Europe. — In this course an attempt will be 
made to show that the problems and ideals of modern 
nations come to them from previous history. This is 
done that the students may understand the problems of 
modern life, including those of our own nation and the 
relation of our problems to those of other nations with 
which we must deal. Required in the freshman year of 
B.S. students. Required in either the freshman or the 
sophomore year of B.A. students. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Moore 
Wharton 

12. Histoi-y of Europe. — A continuation of History 11. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Moore 
Wharton 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 87 

21. History of the United States — 1492-1850. — This is a 
general course in American History, treating of the 
European background of colonial life, the revolution, 
the constitution, and the new government. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Moore 

22. History of the United States — 1850-1937. — ^A continu- 
ation of History 21, treating of the Civil War, Recon- 
struction, and the history of the United States to the 
present time. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Moore 

31. History of Ancient Times. — The history of the Orient 
and of Greece to the rise of Alexander the Great. Pre- 
requisite, History 11 and 12. Three hours credit. 
First semester, 

Wharton 

32. Ancient History. — This is a continuation of History 31. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Wharton 

41. Mediaeval History. — This begins with the fall of Rome 
and goes approximately through the year 1000 A. D. 
Three hours credit. First Semester. 

Lin 

42. Mediaeval History. — A continuation of History 41, be- 
ginning about the year 1000 A. D. and terminating with 
the discovery of America. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Lin 

51. Problems in Modem History. — This course deals with 
such present day problems in international relations as 
Nationalism, Imperialism, Militarism, and Propaganda. 
It follows the general outline of the Syllabus on Inter- 
national Relations, by P. T. Moon. Pre-requisite History 
11 and 12. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Moore 



88 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

52. History of Europe — 1914-1937. — A continuation of His- 
tory 51. The causes of the World War, and a broad 
view of the history of Europe since the war. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Moore 

61. Recent American History — 1865-1900 — A topical survey 
of American history in which emphasis is given to poli- 
tical, economic, and social problems. Pre-requisite, His- 
tory 21 and 22, or the consent of the instructor. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Moore 

62. Recent American History — 1900-1937. — A continuation 
of History 61. Special papers on recent American his- 
tory will be required. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Moore 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

IX. DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR MITCHELL 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

INSTRUCTOR PRICE 

"The chief end of mathematics is thought, not routine — 
natural thought, exercising the powers of the thinker in an 
unforced, interesting manner, not a forced and convulsive 
struggle for what is beyond grasp." — (Young). 

The aim of this department is to realize the goal ex- 
pressed in this quotation. 

For requirements for major in mathematics see page 51. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

11. College Algebra. — The notion of functional relation in 
two real variables; linear, quadratic. The equation; 
simultaneous linear, quadratic; use of determinants in 
the solution of the foregoing. Elementary series. Mathe- 
matical induction, the binomial theorem, complex num- 
bers, theory of equations: rational, irrational roots. 
Permutations, combinations, probability. Elementary 
problems in mathematics of finance. First semester, 
second semester. Three hours credit. 

Mitchell 
Van Hook 
Price 

12. Plane Trigonometrj'. — Definition of the trigonometric 
functions, their properties, graphs, relations, identities, 
equations. Analysis. Solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles, logarithmic computation. First semester, sec- 
ond semester. Three hours credit. 

Mitchell 
Van Hook 
Price 

21. Plane Analytical Geometry. — Rectangular and polar co- 
ordinate systems. Discussion of curves by means of their 



90 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

equations. The straight line and the circle, systems 
of curves. The conic sections, transformations of co- 
ordinates. The general equation of the second degree. 
Loci and higher plane curves. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Van Hook 

22. Differential Calculus. — The fundamental notions of limit, 
infinitestimal, infinity, continuity. Differentiation of 
algebraic and the elementary transcendental functions. 
Applications: geometry, slope, curvature, maxima, 
minima, curvetracing, asymptotes, singular points, en- 
velopes; mechanics, velocity, acceleration, rectilinear 
and curvilinear motion. Differentials, mean value, series. 
Expansion of functions. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Van Hook 

81. Integral Calculus. — Integration as an operation, integra- 
tion as summation. The definite integral. Applications: 
areas, volumes, lengths, center of gravity, center of 
pressure. Multiple integrals. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Van Hook 

82. Differential Equations. — ^A first course in differential 
equations of the first and second orders, with applica- 
tions to geometry, physics, and mechanics. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Van Hook 

41. Descriptive Geometry. — Orthographic projection. Solu- 
tion of problems of points, lines, planes in space. Curved 
surfaces, intersections, developments. Applications to 
roof structures, transition pieces, mine problems. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Mitchell 

42. Mechanical Drawing. — Isometric and cabinet projections. 
Dimensioning, working drawings, free-hand sketching. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 91 

51. Mechanics. — Statics: problems of equilibrium of a parti- 
cle and rigid body. Framed structures and flexible cords. 
Graphical methods employed. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Mitchell 

52. Mechanics. — Dynamics of particle and rigid body. The 
gyroscope. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell 

61. College Geometrj^ — Post-Euclid Euclidean Geometry: 
Division of line segments, angles, areas. nomothetic 
figures, collinearity and concurrency. Geometry of the 
triangle and circle. Inversion. Duality. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Mitchell 

62. Teaching of Mathematics. — Teaching of Demonstrative 
Geometry: What is geometry? Types of definition, types 
of proof, types of class procedure. Mechanical aids. 

Mitchell 

71. Mathematics of Finance. — Interest and annuities. Appli- 
cations to debts, bonds, capitalization, perpetuities. Ele- 
ments of life insurance. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

Mitchell 

72. Statistics. — Graphical representation of data. The several 
means, distribution, correlation, drift, concentration. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell 

81. Advanced Algebra.- — Properties of rational numbers. 
Limits. Convergence and divergence of series. Deter- 
minants. Irrational numbers. Complex numbers. Theory 
of equations. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Van Hook 

82. Theory of Equations. — Irrational numbers. Construc- 
tions. Algebraic solutions of the cubic and the quartic 
equations. Symmetric functions of the roots. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Van Hook 



92 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

X. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR LIN 

The courses in philosopliy are designed to give an intelli- 
gent view of the human mind, and to indicate the conditions 
of all valid thought. Only what is fundamental will be con- 
sidered. 

In logic both deductive and inductive logic will be studied, 
but neither course will receive credit for graduation unless 
supplemented by the other course in this subject. In the 
Introduction to Philosophy attention will be given to types 
of philosophy which enter into modern thought. In the 
History of Philosophy a comprehensive view will be given of 
the results obtained by the greatest thinkers who have at- 
tempted to frame a consistent theory of the material and the 
spiritual world. An attempt will be made to show that these 
have a consecutive connection in development. 

In ethics one course will consider pagan ethics, and a 
following course will be given in modern ethics. It is recom- 
mended that courses in logic be taken before other courses 
are attempted. 

11. Deductive Ijogic. — Three hours credit. First semester. 

Lin 

12. Inductive Logic. — Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lin 

21. The Nichomachean Ethics. — Three hours credit. First 

semester. 

Lin 

22. Modem Ethics. — Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lin 

31. An Introduction to Philosophy, Types of Philosophy. — 

Three hours credit. First semester. 
Lin 

32. History of Philosophy. — Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

Lin 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 93 

XI. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

DIRECTOR OP ATHLETICS 

COACH T. L. GADDY 

COACH MELVIN RICHARDSON 

DIRECTOR ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

The following courses are offered for college credit: 
11, 12. Physical Training for Men. — The requirements in 
physical work are designed to cover the whole school year at 
the rate of two hours a week for each freshman. Although 
this work is compulsory, considerable freedom in selection is 
offered. The sole aim is to create a healthy desire to engage 
in some form of recreation, under proper supervision, so as to 
benefit the student morally, mentally, and physically. This 
exercise takes form of competitive games in order to arouse 
the proper interest, develop team work, teach initiative, 
strengthen the morale, teach true sportsmanship, and create a 
life-long interest in some form of sport which will benefit the 
student in after life. An idea is also gained as to the natural 
ability of each man and quite frequently students discover 
that they are really better in athletics than they thought they 
were and are encouraged to try for the varsity teams. 

Physical Education for Women. — General gymnastics (light 
apparatus); rhythmic plays and games. Tumbling, pyramid- 
building, etc; development and corrective gymnastics. Spring 
Festival. Point system used. Monograms awarded. Re- 
quired of all freshmen. Two hours credit. 

21, 22. Coaching for Men. — In order to better equip those 
students who expect to combine coaching with teaching a 
course in the theory of all major sports will be offered. This 
course will comprise football, baseball, basketball and track. 
Two hours a week of classroom work will be given, which 
will also include a number of lectures. 

In football, subjects such as the equipment and outfitting 
of players, training units, practice methods, various offensive 



9 4 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

and defensive methods, the forward pass, trick plays, general- 
ship and field tactics, and numerous other important items 
will be given consideration. 

In baseball, individual play and team play will be taken 
up in detail. Offense and defense will be thoroughly dis- 
cussed; also batting, base running, position play, strategy, etc. 

Basketball will include such topics as goal throwing, 
passing, guarding, dribbling, blocking, plays from center and 
plays from out of bounds. Various styles of offense and de- 
fense will be discussed. 

Field and track athletics will cover diet and training, the 
dashes and long distance events, hurdling, vaulting, jumping, 
shot put, discus throw, javelin, and other points which are 
essential to track work. Pre-requisite for this course: At 
least two years participation in major sports. 

Coaching for Women. — Soccer, field ball, and speed ball, 
basketball (intercollegiate) ; hand ball, German bat ball, vol- 
ley ball, etc.; track and field events; tennis. Theory and 
practices of physical education. Gymnastic terminology. Classi- 
fication of gymnastic material. Principles and technique of 
teaching. History of physical education. The fall program 
for high schools completed. Instruction in major sports for 
women. Intramural program in winter sports studied. Special 
emphasis placed on basketball technique, officiating, etc. The 
spring program for high schools including track and field 
events: The May Day Festival. Bibliography. Physical Ed- 
ucation for Women, a pre-requisite to this course. Four hours 
credit. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 9 5 

XII. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND 
ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR HARRELL 

This department occupies ten rooms on the main and 
basement floors of the Sullivan-Harrell Building. The labora- 
tories are supplied with all essentials for carrying on the work 
in the various courses and with balopticon and moving picture 
machine for lecture purposes. Both alternating and direct 
currents are available where needed. 

The work in astronomy is carried on in the Sullivan- 
Harrell Building and in the James Observatory. The depart- 
ment is equipped with globes, tellurian, gyroscopes, and spec- 
trometer for laboratory work. 

The observatory occupies a commanding position on the 
north campus and is equipped with a six-inch equatorial with 
mounting by Warner and Swazey and optical parts by Brashear, 
also a two-inch prismatic transit by Gaertner. The other 
equipment consists of a sidereal chronometer, a fine clock, 
filar micrometer, portrait lens for photography, a high grade 
surveyor's transit, and two sextants. 

The observatory is open to visitors one night each week 
when the weather and other conditions permit. 

A knowledge of mathematics through plane trigonometry 
is required for admission to this department. 

PHYSICS 

11. General Physics. — The course is designed to cover the 
general principles of mechanics of solids, liquids and 
gases, and the general principles of heat and sound. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Harrell 

12. General Physics. — This course consists of a study of 
magnetism and electricity, and light. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Courses 11 and 12 must be taken 



96 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

to satisfy the required work in physics. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

21. Pre-medical Physics. — A laboratory course designed, in 
conjunction with Pre-medical Physics 22, to meet the 
needs of those students who expect to enter a medical 
school where eight semester hours only are required for 
admission. The course is in substance an additional 
laboratory period to courses 11 and 12. One laboratory 
period. One hour credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

22. Pre-medical Physics. — This course is a continuation of 
course 21. Both 21 and 22 must be taken to satisfy the 
pre-medical requirement. One laboratory period. One 
hour credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

31. Mechanics and Heat. — This course is devoted to a further 
study of mechanics and heat with special attention given 
to thermodynamics, calorimetry, and the kinetic theory 
of gases. The laboratory work in connection with this 
course will be devoted, in part, to the determination of 
the fuel value of different fuels. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

32. Light. — This course treats of the principles and laws of 
reflection, refraction, interference, polarization, and 
color phenomena. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

41. Electricity. — This course involves a more extended dis- 
cussion of the topics than can be given in general physics. 
The student will be expected to become thoroughly 
familiar with measuring instruments and their ufee in 
actual measurements. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Harrell 




< 



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m 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 97 

42. Electruity. — This course consists of a study of power 
stations and the distribution of power, electric lighting, 
electric heating, electric traction, and electric communi- 
cation. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Courses 
41, 42 and 51, 52 not offered same year. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

51. Electricity. — The purpose of this course is to study the 
principles and construction of the direct current gener- 
ator and direct current motor; electrochemistry, the 
princip' « of the alternating current, alternating current 
genera the transformer, and the alternating current 
motor. wo lectures and one laboratory period. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

52. Electricity. — This course will be devoted to a study of 
electro-magnetism and the principles of the radio. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Harrell 

61. So-md. — This course comprises a more extended study 
oi sound. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

62. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. — Same as 
Education 82. Three lecture periods. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

ASTRONOMY 

tl. General Astronomy. — This course will be devoted to a 
study of the earth, the moon, time, the constellations, 
and the solar system. Two lectures and one observatory 
period. Three hours credit First semester. 
Har.-ell 

12. General Astroaomy. — This coarse will consist of a study 
of the planets, comets, moteors, the sun, the develop- 



98 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ment of the solar system, and the sidereal universe. 
Two lectures and one observatory period. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

21. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. — This course covers 
the subject of spherical astronomy and the theory of 
astronomical instruments with exercises in making and 
reducing observations. One lecture and two observa- 
tory periods. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

22. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. — This is a continua- 
tion of course 21. One lecture and two observatory 
periods. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

31. Surveying.— This course involves the general principles 
of surveying with particular attention to the method of 
laying out the public lands and the methods of the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey. One lecture and one double 
laboratory period. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

32. Surveying. — This course is a continuation of course 31. 
One lecture and one double laboratory period. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE ^ 99 

XIII. THE DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

TECE TATUM FOUNDATION 

PROFESSOR BULLOCK 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR THOMAS 

The courses in this department are offered for the con- 
tribution they make to intelligent Christian living, and to a 
genuine cultural education, rather than for any special profes- 
sional interest such as the ministry or other Christian life- 
service. These special interests are not neglected, but the 
department seeks primarily to meet the urgent need of the 
Church for an effective leadership among its lay members. 
It is hoped that many students will avail themselves of these 
courses. 

Some Millsaps students, under the direction of the De- 
partment of Religion and the Board of Christian Education, 
serve in Short Term Training Courses in the Mississippi 
Methodist conferences during the summer. This department 
gladly cooperates in preparing students for this important 
service to the Church. 

Religion 11 and 12, providing an introduction to both 
the Old and New Testaments, and some insight into the mean- 
ing of the Christian religion, is required of all freshmen ex- 
cept pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-engineering students, 
who are required to take it during the sophomore year. 

Other than Religion 11 and 12, both of which must be 
taken, any single semester course may be taken. Pre- 
requisites for any given course may be waived under special 
circumstances, but only upon the consent of the professor. 

Majors in this department may emphasize either Biblical 
literature or religious education, but in either case the whole 
plan should be carefully worked out in cooperation with the 
professor of religion. It is the growing sentiment among the 
leaders of the Church that students preparing for the ministry 
should not major in religion but rather in the social sciences 
or in English, leaving their professional training in religion 



100 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

for the seminary years. With the generous financial assis- 
tance now given students In seminaries, almost every student 
who so desires can obtain a seminary education. It is, how- 
ever, suggested that all ministerial students should take some 
electives in religion, thereby orienting themselves for seminary 
work. 

11. Introductory Bible. — An introduction to the necessary 
background for the study and appreciation of the Bible, 
and a study of the religious development and contribu- 
tion of the Hebrews as revealed in the Old Testament. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 

Bullock 
Thomas 

12. Introductory Bible. — An introduction to the necessary 
background for the study and appreciation of the New 
Testament, and a study of the New Testament with a 
view to achieving some insight into the meaning of the 
Christian religion. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Bullock 
Thomas 

31. The Life and Teachings of Jesus. — This is a study of the 

Gospels, emphasizing the teachings of Jesus and their 
application to problems of the individual and society 
today. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 and 12. Given in 
alternate years. Offered in 19 37-'3 8. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Thomas 

32. The Life and Letters of Paul. — A study of the Acts of 
the Apostles and of Paul's letters in order to understand 
Paul and the permanent religious values of his letters. 
Pre-requisite, Religion 11 and 12. Given in alternate 
years. Offered in 19 3 7-'3 8. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Bullock 

41. The Program of the Christian Religion. — A study of the 
meaning, purpose, and program of the Christian religion, 
intended to give a grasp of the place of the Church in the 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 101 

social order, and of the basic principles of Christian 
education. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 and 12. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Bullock 

42. The Art of Christian Living. — This course is intended 
to offer rather definite help in the methods by which 
the teachings of Jesus may be realized in one's own life. 
It will involve the study of methods of living used by 
some great Christians of the past and present. Pre- 
requisite, Religion 11 and 12. Given in alternate years. 
Not offered in 19 37-'38. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Bullock 

51. Old Testament Prophets. — A study of the literature, his- 
tory, and religion of the Hebrew prophets, seeking their 
permanent religious values. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 
and 12. Given in alternate years. Not offered in 19 37- 
'38. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Thomas 

52. The Poetry of the Old Testament. — A study of Hebrew 
poetry, devotional, philosophical, and occasional, using 
Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, etc. Pre-requisite, 
Religion 11 and 12. Given in alternate years. Offered 
in 1937-'38. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Thomas 

61. Organization of Christian Education. — A study of the 
organization and administration of the local church edu- 
cational program, designed to prepare the student for 
effective leadership in the educational work of the 
church of which he is a member. Pre-requisite or con- 
current. Religion 41. Given in alternate years. Offered 
in 1937-'3 8. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Thomas 

62. Psychology of Religion. — A consideration of religious 
experiences and growth from the psychological viewpoint. 



10 2 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

This course should contribute to personal religious 
development, as well as to fuller understanding in guid- 
ing religious development as a teacher in the church 
school. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 and 12, and Educa- 
tion 11. Given in alternate years. Offered in 1937-'38. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Bullock 

71. The Story of Christianity. — A survey of the development 
of the Christian movement from Jesus to the present 
time, including an examination of the occasions, issues, 
and emphases giving rise to the principal divisions of 
Christianity in the world today, and a brief study of 
contemporary trends. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 and 12. 
Given in alternate years. Offered in 19 3 7-' 3 8. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Bullock 

72. Methods of Christian Education. — A study of methods of 
Christian character education, including the use of ma- 
terials and agencies contributing to the achievement of 
dependable Christian behavior. Pre-requisite, Religion 
41, Education 11. Given in alternate years. Not offered 
in 19 37-'3 8. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Thomas 

81. Comparative Religion. — An introductory study of the 
origin and development of religion, and a study of the 
great living religions of the world. Pre-requisite, Re- 
ligion 11 and 12. Given in alternate years. Not offered 
in 193 7-'38. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Bullock 

82. The Origin and Meaning of Methodism. — A brief survey 
of the times and forces that produced the Methodist 
movement; the part played by the Wesleys; the historical 
development of Methodism and its function as a great 
religious organization today. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 
and 12. Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1937- 
'38. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Bullock 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



103 



91. Social Science. — Principles of Sociology. Same as Social 
Science 31. Open only to juniors and seniors. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Wharton 



92. Social Science. — Social problems. 
32. Open only to juniors and 
credit. Second semester. 

Wharton 



Same as Social Science 
seniors. Three hours 



104 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XIV. THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE 
LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR SANDERS 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CRAIG 

INSTRUCTOR COBB 

This department offers courses in French and Spanish. 
The regular work begins with course 11, but for the benefit 
of those who have not been able to fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements in this subject before entering college, a prepara- 
tory course (course A) is offered. This course, (when taken 
under the supervision of the college, and not counted as an 
entrance unit), may be used as a junior or senior elective. 
Classes meet three hours a week. For entrance, course A will 
count as two units, provided the student makes a grade of not 
less than C. 

For graduation twelve hours of work above the elemen- 
tary course (course A) in French or German or Spanish are 
accepted as a substitution for Greek in the B.A. course. In 
the B.S. course twelve hours of French or German, or Span- 
ish above the elementary course are required. 

Under no condition will a student be permitted to begin 
French and Spanish the same year. 

A student should consult the professors in charge before 
planning to take more than two modern languages. Any 
course not already counted, may be used as a junior or senior 
elective. 

FRENCH 

Al. Elementary French. — An elementary course in which 
especial attention is given to pronunciation. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Craig 

A2. Elementary French. — The elementary grammar begun in 

Al is completed. Simple texts are read. Dictation and 

oral practice is begun. Al and A2 together constitute 

a double course. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Craig 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 105 

11. Intermediate French. — The methods of French Al and 
A2 will be continued according to the needs and apti- 
tudes of the class. A review of grammar will be used 
as a text for the study of grammar and composition. The 
semester will be devoted to the careful reading of texts 
from nineteenth century prose. Especial attention will 
be paid to the irregular verbs, idioms and to pronuncia- 
tion. Three hours credit. First semester, 

Craig 

12. Intermediate French. — A continuation of French 11. 
Three hours credit. Second semester, 

Craig 

21. Survey of French Literature. — An anthology is used 
which contains selections illustrating the development 
of the literature from its beginnings to the present time. 
An outline history of French literature is also used. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 

Sanders 

22. Survey of French Literature. — A continuation of the sur- 
vey begun in 21. Three hours credit. Second semester, 

Sanders 

31. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. — A more 
intensive study of French literature of the eighteenth 
century than is offered in French 22. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Sanders 

32. French Romanticism. — Chateaubriand, Hugo and the 
French lyric poets of the nineteenth century. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Sanders 

41. French Literature of the Seventeenth Centui*y. — Not of- 
fered in 1937-38. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Sanders 

42. Composition and Conversation. — Not offered in 1937-38. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Sanders 



106 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

52. Materials and Methods of Teaching French and Spanish. 

— Same as Education 52. Offered in alternate years and 
will be given in 1937-38. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Cobb 

SPANISH 

The requirements for admission and for graduation in 
Spanish are the same as those in French. Two entrance units 
in Spanish will be required for admission to course 11. 

Al. Elementai-y Spanish. — An elementary course in grammar 
and reading with constant oral practice. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Cobb 

A2. Elementary Spanish. — Grammar continued and com- 
pleted. Reading continued. Al and A2 together consti- 
tute a double course. No credit is given for Al unless 
A2 is also completed. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

Cobb 

11. Intermediate Spanish. — This course is devoted to the 
reading of modern Spanish prose. A Spanish review 
grammar is used and special attention is paid to the ir- 
regular verbs and to idioms. Practice is given in read- 
ing Spanish at sight. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. 

Sanders 
Cobb 

12. Intermediate Spanish. — A continuation of Spanish 11. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Sanders 
Cobb 

21. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novelists. — Fernan Cabal- 
lero, Palacio Valdes, Perez Galdos, Blasco Ibanez. His- 
tory of Spanish literature. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Sanders 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



107 



22. Cervantes, Don Quixote. — Three hours credit, 
semester. 

Sanders 



Second 



31. Recent and Contemporary Spanish Dramatists. — Not of- 
fered in 1937-3 8. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Sanders 

32. Lope de Vega and Calderon. — Part of the semester is 
devoted to a survey of Spanish lyric poetry. Not of- 
fered in 1937-38. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. 

Sanders 

41. Spanish Romanticism. — Espronceda and Becquer. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Sanders 

42. Composition and Conversation. — Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Sanders 

52. The Methods and Materials of Teaching French and 
Spanish. — This is the same course as French 52 and Edu- 
cation 52. It is offered in alternate years and will be 
given in 1937-38. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. 

Cobb 



108 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XV. THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR LIN 
INSTRUCTOR WHARTON 

The aim of this department will be rather to do well a 
small amount of work than to cover a large field. Courses 
in economics, political science, and sociology will be offered. 
While these are elementary in their scope and nature, they 
will serve as a sound basis for further study in these subjects, 
and will be useful to those who seek to understand and im- 
prove our financial, political, and social life and institutions. 

The enrollment will be limited to a number that can be 
taught thoroughly by the staff dealing with these subjects. 
Since these subjects deal with the matters which are engross- 
ing the attention of every important nation in the world, and 
which lie at the basis of all material welfare it is believed 
that students who are awake to the things of first importance 
in civilization will be profited by the courses given. 

21. Economics: Principles and Problems. — Not open to fresh- 
men. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Wharton 

22. Economics: Problems of Industi*j% Labor and Govern- 
ment. — Not open to freshmen. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Wharton 

SI. Principles of Sociology. — A study of the various aspects 
of human society — human nature, social groups, isola- 
tion, contacts, interaction, conflict, accommodation, col- 
lective behavior and social control. Open to juniors and 
seniors only. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Wharton 

82. Social Pi-oblems. — A survey of social problems and ad- 
justments in modern society. Emphasis will be placed 
on the bases for individual behavior and its relation to 
society. Open only to juniors and seniors. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Wharton 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 109 

41. Political Science. — In this course an attempt will be made 
to study the principles which underlie all governments, 
and especial attention will be given to the governments 
of Europe. Open only to juniors and seniors and to 
sophomores who have made an average grade of B in 
the freshman year. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. 

Lin 

42. Political Science. — The government of the United States 
will be studied in comparison with other governments 
in the light of the basic principles of all government, 
and with reference to the problems peculiar to the United 
States. Open only to juniors and seniors and to sopho- 
mores who have made an average grade of B in the 
freshman year. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lin 



110 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS 
Professoi' of Piano 

MR. FRANK SLATER 
Professor of Voice and Public School Music 

MR. ALVIN KING 
Chorus Director 

MISS MARY VELMA SIMPSON 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

MISS ALBERTA TAYLOR 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS, A.B., B.M., 
Professor of Piano 

A.B., Whitworth College; diploma in piano from Whitworth 
College, Elizabeth McVoy, instructor; B.M., American 
Conservatory of Chicago, piano with Silvio Scionti, ad- 
vanced composition and orchestration with Leo Somerby, 
distinguished American composer, criticism and aes- 
thetics, seminar and thesis, with Carlton Hackett, mu- 
sical critic for the Chicago Herald for eighteen years; 
Sherwood Music School of Chicago, piano with Georgia 
Kober, composition with Walter Seller; Chicago Musical 
College, advanced composition with Gustave Dunkel- 
berger, repertoire with Rudolph Ganz; student in the 
American Conservatory of Chicago for six summers, 
studying repertoire in the master classes of Josef Lhe- 
vinne; student four summers in the repertoire and en- 
semble classes of Percy Grainger, of the Chicago Musi- 
cal College; special work with Madame Fannie Bloom- 
field-Zeisler, student of Theodore Leschetizky, student 
also in her master classes conducted in the American 
Conservatory; special work in piano literature with Ma- 
bel Osmer; class piano with Gail Martin Haake, co-editor 
of Oxford Piano Course, and in Louise Robyn's Musical 
Training for Children, all of the American Conservatory. 
Mrs. Roberts is a sincere artist and musician, appearing 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 111 

in frequent recitals, and teacher of fine pianists who 
have won honors -in and out of the state. Her efforts 
as teacher have been crowned with unusual success, both 
as regards the number of students and the character of 
the work accomplished. She is also a composer whose 
compositions have been well received. 

FRANK SLATER, B.M., 
Professor of Voice and Public School Music 

B.M., New Orleans Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art, 
Inc.; three years student at the Royal College of Music, 
Manchester, England; pupil of John Francis Harford 
and Madame Marie Brema; pupil of F. H. Haywood, New 
York; special opera coaching work with Sol Alberti and 
Emil Polak. Mr. Slater is an internationally known 
artist, and teacher of many successful professional sing- 
ers. 

MISS MARY VELMA SIMPSON, A.B., B.M., (Requisites) 
Assistant Instructor of Piano and Theory 

A.B., B.M., (Requisites) Millsaps College; Chicago Musical 
College of Chicago; work begun on master's degree, 
piano, with Silvio Scionti; master class work with Silvio 
Scionti and Rudolph Ganz; public school music and 
child-training courses with Mary Frances Frothingham; 
American Conservatory, winner of piano scholarship with 
Kurt Zanieck, renowned teacher and virtuoso, and stu- 
dent of Gail Martin Haake, co-editor of the Oxford Piano 
Course. Miss Simpson is an accomplished pianist and 
an accompanist of rare skill. As a teacher Miss Simp- 
son has been remarkably successful. 

MISS ALBERTA TAYLOR, A.B., B.M., (Requisites) 
Assistant Instructor of Piano and Theory 

A.B., B.M., (Requisites) Millsaps College; American Conserva- 
tory, piano with Silvio Scionti; the Oxford Class-Piano 
Course with Gail Martin Haake, co-editor of the course; 
Robyn System of Musical Training for the child given 
by Louise Robyn; Chicago Musical College, piano, with 



112 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Silvio Scionti; master class work with Silvio Scionti and 
Rudolph Ganz; public school music arid child-training 
courses with Frances Frothingham. Miss Taylor has a 
strong personality, rare skill as instructor, and fine mu- 
sicianship. Her pupils have had splendid success in pub- 
lic contests for state honors. 

Environment 

Jackson is truly a center of art and learning. The De- 
partment of Music is an integral part of the city's magnificent 
educational and cultural system and makes its contribution to 
this ideal environment. 

Musical Attractions 

The fine art students of Millsaps College have splendid 
opportunities of hearing some of the world's renowned mu- 
sicians who are brought to Jackson under the auspices of the 
community concerts and local musical clubs. 

Radio Broadcasting 

Musical programs by members of the faculty and ad- 
vanced students are broadcast regularly over WJDX. From 
this station pupils are afforded opportunity in securing experi- 
ence in broadcasting. On account of the far-reaching power 
of this station friends in distant cities may listen in and enjoy 
the programs. 

Recitals 

Recitals are given by students of all degrees of advance- 
ment. These serve to provide the student with that experi- 
ence so necessary to his development. Members of the fac- 
ulty also give recitals for the students, their programs design- 
ed to illustrate some particular phase of study, interpretative, 
historical or technical. 

Music Study Club 

The Beethoven Club of Millsaps College offers attractive 
and helpful features in the community life of the musical stu- 
dents. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 113 



DEPARTMENT OF PIANO 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS 
Admission Requirements — (Academic ) 

Candidates for a certificate, diploma or degree requisites 
must meet the regular college entrance requirements, viz: 
graduation from an approved high school, or a minimum of 
fifteen units of high school work. 

To enter the college course in piano the student should be 
grounded in correct touch and reliable technique. He should 
play all major and minor scales correctly in moderately rapid 
tempo, also broken chords in octave position in all keys and 
should have acquired systematic methods of practice. 

He should have studied some of the standard etudes, such 
as Czerny, op. 299, Book 1: Heller, op. 47 and 46 (according 
to the individual needs of the pupil); Bach, Little Preludes: 
a few Bach two-part inventions and compositions correspond- 
ing in difficulty to — 

Haydn, Sonata No. 11, G major No. 20 (Schirmer). 

Mozart, Sonata C major No. 3, F major No. 12 (Schirm- 
er). 

Beethoven, Variations on Nel cor Piu, Sonata Op. 49, 
No. 1. 

Schubert, Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2, etc. 

ADVANCED STANDING — Work completed in other insti- 
tutions of accredited standing will be recognized toward grad- 
uation. Transferred credits in academic subjects and in His- 
tory of Music, as required for graduation in the American Con- 
servatory, will be given full credit. Transferred credits in 
applied music (performance, instrument or voice), and the- 
oretical subjects, will receive credit subject to examination or 
to continued study in courses of similar content in the Con- 
servatory. 

Entrance and advanced credits, in both music and in 
academic subjects, should be submitted in transcript form in 
advance of the opening of the session. 



114 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE REQUISITES 
Piano As Major Subject 



Freshman Hrs. 

Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject 

(Ensemble) 2 

Academic Subjects 

(English 11, 12) 6 

(Religion 11, 12) 6 

Harmony I 4 

Keyboard Harmony I 2 

Solfeggio (Ear Training 

and Dictation) 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion I 2 



32 
Junior Hrs. 

Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject 

(Ensemble) 2 

Academic Subjects 

(Modern Language) .... 6 

(Psychology) 6 

Counterpoint I 4 

Composition I 4 

Form and Analysis II 2 



32 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Major Subject 6 

Secondary Subject 

(Ensemble) 2 

Academic Subjects 

(English 21, 22) 6 

(Modern Language 

11, 12) 6 

Harmony II 4 

Keyboard Harmony II 2 

Solfeggio (Ear Training 

and Dictation) 2 

History and Appreciation 

II 2 

Form and Analysis I 2 



32 

Senior Hrs. 

Major Subject 12 

Secondary Subject 

(Teaching Piano, En- 
semble) 2 

Counterpoint (Canon and 

Fugue) 4 

Composition II 4 

Orchestration 4 

Thesis or Original Compo- 
sition 2 

Performance and Recital.. 2 
Criticism and Aesthetics.. 1 
Seminar and Thesis 1 



The thesis must deal with some musical topic. 
nal composition may be substituted for this. 



32 



An origi- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 115 

A sophomore license in Piano will be granted after the 
completion of the first- and second years of the above course. 

The Certificate in Piano will be awarded students who 
complete the four years of the course in Piano and a minimum 
of eighteen semester hours in theoretical music suitable to 
their needs, the courses to be selected with the approval of 
the head of the department. This does not include the Lib- 
eral Arts courses. 

The Collegiate Diploma in Piano will be awarded students 
who complete the four-year course in Piano and the following 
theoretical music: Piano with the Liberal Arts degree and 
the first three years' work of the B.M. course. Requisite 
hours in theoretical music suitable to their needs with the 
approval of the head of the department. 

Graduates of the Department of Music are entitled to a 
professional teacher's license from the state. 

Special Students 

Persons who wish to pursue studies as a cultural activity 
without registering as candidates for certificates, diplomas 
or degrees, may enter as special students for the purpose of 
developing their talents under the instruction of a most ex- 
cellent faculty and derive musical and educational inspira- 
tion through association with a large number of serious mind- 
ed students. In this department, students may register for 
any study or combination of studies desired. No specific 
scholastic requirements are imposed as a condition of entrance. 

Special students desiring credit for such work as they 
may take are subject to the same examinations and regula- 
tions as full course students. All credits earned are entered 
on the school records and may be used toward credentials at 
a later time, should the students eventually become candidates 
for graduation. 

Examinations and Final Requisites 

All students taking the regular course in the Department 
of Music will be required to take two examinations during the 
year, one at the end of each semester. 



116 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

In the certificate class for final examination, candidates 
are required to play a fugue from the well tempered Clavi- 
chord by Bach, a Sonata of Beethoven equivalent in grade of 
difficulty to Op. 2 6 or Op. 31, No. 2 and two representative 
compositions by romantic or standard modern composers, dis- 
playing both expressive and technical features. 

Requii'eiaents for Diploma 

Candidates for diploma in piano must be prepared to per- 
form a program, consisting of a prelude and fugue by Bach, 
a sonata of the more advanced type by either Beethoven, Schu- 
mann, von Weber or Chopin, at least six compositions from 
the more advanced type by romantic and standard modern 
composers. 

Requisites for Degi-ee 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Music requisites must pre- 
sent a public program, varied and well-balanced, selected from 
the classic, romantic, and modern schools of music, including 
a two-piano composition and one movement of a concerto. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 117 

DEPARTMENT OF VOICE AND PUBLIC 
SCHOOL MUSIC 

FRANK SLATER, B.M. 

Voice 

Mr. Slater 

The teaching of this subject embraces: 

Correct breathing and breath control, position and action. 

Tone placement and the development of resonance. 

The method taught is the Old Italian Bel Canto, or art of 
beautiful song, that has developed the world's greatest singers. 

Course requirements are those outlined in the Music De- 
partment for all instruments with the addition of French, 
German and Italian diction. 

Enunciation and diction. Special attention is given to 
the consonant attack and release. 

Training of mind and ear. 

Song interpretations and repertoire. 

Special training for professional work in grand opera, 
oratorio, concert or teaching, radio. 

Admission Requirements — ( Academic ) 

Candidates for a certificate, diploma or degree must 
meet the regular college requirements; viz: graduation from 
an approved high school, or a minimum of fifteen units of 
high school work. 

Graduates of the Department of Music are entitled to a 
professional teacher's license from the state. 



118 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Special Students 

Persons who wish to pursue studies as a cultural activity 
without registering as candidates for certificates, diplomas or 
degrees, may enter as special students for the purpose of de- 
veloping their talents under the instruction of a most excel- 
lent faculty and derive musical and educational inspiration 
through association with a large number of serious minded 
students. In this department, students may register for any 
study or combination of studies desired. No specific scholas- 
tic requirements are imposed as a condition of entrance. 

Special students desiring credit for such work as they 
may take are subject to the same examinations and regulations 
as full course students. All credits earned are entered on the 
school records and may be used toward credentials at a later 
time, should they eventually become candidates for gradua- 
tion. 

Examinations and Final Requisites 

All students taking the regular course in the Department 
of Music will be required to take two examinations during the 
year, one at the end of each semester. 

Recitals 

Recitals are given by students of all degrees of advance- 
ment. These serve to provide the student with that experi- 
ence so necessary to his development. Members of the fac- 
ulty also give recitals for the students, their programs design- 
ing to illustrate some particular phase of study, interpretative, 
historical or technical. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



119 



Specific requirements for major in Voice towards Bach- 
elor of Music degree. 



Freshman Hrs. 

Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrument .... 2 

Academic Subjects, 

English & Religion 12 

Harmony I 4 

Solfeggio (Ear - training, 
Dictation and Sight- 
Singing) 2 

History and Appreciation, 
I 2 

French, German, or Ital- 
ian I 2 

32 

Junior Hrs. 

Major Subject 8 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrument .... 2 

Academic Subjects, 

Psychology, Modern 

Language 12 

Counterpoint I 4 

French, German, or Ital- 
ian III — 2 

Composition 2 

Chorus or Ensemble 2 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Major Subject S 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrument .... 2 
Academic Subjects, 

English a nd Modern 

Language 12 

Harmony II 4 

Solfeggio 2 

History and Appreciation.. 2 
French, German, or Ital- 
ian, II 2 



32 



32 

Senior Hrs. 

Major Subject 12 

Secondary Subject, 

Piano or Instrument .... 2 

Orchestration 4 

Conducting 2 

Counterpoint II 4 

Thesis on Music, or Orig- 
inal Composition 2 

Chorus or Ensemble, 

Position 2 

History of Opera 2 

Performance and Recital.. 2 

32 

Total. 128 



The thesis must deal with some musical topic, or an origi- 
nal composition may be substituted in place of this. 



120 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SIGHT-SINGING, EAR-TRAINING AND DICTATION — 
Two years, at the conclusion of which the student should be 
able to sing melodies at sight; to sing accurately any interval; 
to take down from dictation melodies involving difficult prob- 
lems. 

11, 12. Sight -Singing and Dictation. — Intervals, various 
rhythms, majors and minor triads, melodic and harmonic 
dictation. Later, work in seventh and ninth chords. 
Dictation of three and four-part harmony. Melodies with 
modulation, and aural analysis of form. 

EAR-TRAINING. — Reading of melodies in major, minor, 
treble and bass clefs in various rhythms. Ear-training 
and dictation. Later, two, three and four parts etudes, 
canons, treble and bass clefs, with more study of rhythm 
and chromatics. Ear-training and dictation. Later, 
reading at sight of different solfeggi, then more difficult 
part songs. 

21, 22. History and Appreciation. — A survey of the growth 
of music from earliest times through the nineteenth cen- 
tury, with emphasis upon the classic period. Lectures, 
text material and collateral reading. Illustration by 
sound-reproducing instruments. The romantic com- 
posers, modern tendencies and present day composers. 
Reports and digests with text material and collateral 
reading. Critical and biographical study. 

31, 32. — A continuation of 11, 12. Four hours credit. 

41, 42. — A continuation of 21, 22. Two hours credit. 

Public School Music 

Mr. Slater 

The remarkable development of public school music dur- 
ing the past ten years has created a demand for thoroughly 
trained supervisors and special teachers of music. 

A two-year course, leading to certificate. A three-year 
course, leading to diploma. The sophomore certificate entitles 
the student to a sophomore license for teaching public school 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 121 

music in Mississippi. The music courses prescribed for the 
sophomore certificate constitute a minor in public school 
music. 

11, 12. Public School Music Methods and Materials (Ele- 
mentary Grades). — This course deals with methods and 
materials used in developing musical experience for the 
child in elementary grades; note singing, care of the 
child's voice, treatment of monotones, development of 
rhythm and musical appreciation by use of interpretative 
games, rhythm bands, and phonograph, rote to note 
methods and the beginning of sight music reading. Three 
hours credit. 

21, 22. Public School Music Methods (Upper Grades and 
Junior High School). — This course deals with methods 
and materials to be used in the intermediate grades for 
a further development of music reading and voice, part 
singing and musical appreciation, testing and classifica- 
tion of voices and planning of classes, organization of 
glee clubs, choruses, instrumental classes and orchestra 
for junior high school. Three hours credit. 

31, 32. Supervision of Public School Music (Including High 
School 3Iethods). — The principles of supervision and 
educational objectives of public school music, outlining 
of work, planning of a high school music course, organi- 
zation of instrumental classes, choral and instrumental 
ensembles, the giving of concerts, operettas, and pag- 
eants, methods used in teaching musical appreciation. 
Three hours credit. 

Band School 

Frank Slater 
Charter Member, Gulf States Bandmasters' Conference 

The school of the Band comprises the full course required 
by the state, and will include the following subjects: 

The instrument; its technique, range, tone, and care; its 
range and possibilities for the professional player, and its 



122 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

practical use for the average player. The theory of music 
with especial emphasis on tempi, and other signs and marks 
of rhythmic values in band and orchestra music, with ear- 
training, sight-reading and transposing. Technique of the 
baton for all rhythms. Organization and conducting. The 
formation of bands and orchestras. Harmony and orchestra- 
tion. The writing of melodies and arranging them for large 
or small organizations. Arranging and transposing of hymns, 
marches, overtures, and the larger musical forms. Orchestral 
balance, tone color, interpretation and performance. Three 
hours weekly, not including the usual practices and drills. 
Three hours credit. 

The Band 

The Band is the college band and also the official band 
of the 106th Engineers, Mississippi National Guard. Members 
are paid from 65 to 120 dollars per year, according to rank. 
Instruments, uniforms and all other equipment are provided 
by the government. Two weeks camp in summer with pay 
and everything provided. State-wide trips, concerts, football 
and basketball games are part of the interesting program. 
This is an outstanding organization, worthy of consideration. 
One hour credit. 

Note: — Students will be charged three-fifths the regular 
rate for half time lessons. 

Terms: — One half of the tuition is payable at entrance, 
the balance February 1. Prompt payments by the month 
will be allowed to those students unable to pay in advance for 
one-half sessions but these monthly payments must be strictly 
in advance. 

All business arrangements must be transacted at the Bur- 
sar's Office. 

Students will not be enrolled by the month. 

Students who miss private lessons on account of illness 
may have such lessons made up, but if missed for any other 
reason they will not be made up. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 123 

No refund will be made for temporary absence or for les- 
sons discontinued. 

Students are enrolled for the session of nine months and 
are obliged to continue at least until the end of the semester. 

Certificates or diplomas will be granted or conferred only 
on those students who have completed the regular course of 
study, passed the required examinations and paid all accounts 
due the school. 

A proportionate refund of music charges will be made in 
the case of prolonged absence or withdrawal on account of 
sickness or for other necessary reasons; provided that no 
refund will be made for absence of less than three weeks. 

Tuition fees will not be refunded, except in cases of with- 
drawal on account of illness. 



124 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THEORETICAL DEPARTMENT 

MRS. ROBERTS 

MR. SLATER 

MR. KING 

Theoretical courses are to be arranged in consultation 
with the director of the department in which the student is 
majoring. 

Theoretical Requirements for Bachelor of Music Degree 
Definition of Courses 

HARMONY — Two years, the result of which a student 
should have acquired the ability to harmonize melodies and 
figured basses with and without modulations; to write freely 
in four-part harmony with good voice leading modulations to 
near related and extraneous keys; to write an original melody 
and harmonize It with secondary seventh chords, chords of 
the ninth and using suspension, anticipation, pedal point and 
the like. 

SIGHT-SINGING. EAR-TRAINING AND DICTATION — 
Two years, at the conclusion of which the student should be 
able to sing melodies at sight; to sing accurately any inter- 
val; to take down from dictation melodies involving difficult 
problems. 

KEYBOARD HARMONY — Two years, to be taken in cor- 
relation with the study of harmony, at the end of which time 
the student should be able to play all the cadences in four 
part harmonization and to execute simple modulations at the 
keyboard. 

COMPOSITION — In the smaller forms up to and includ- 
ing the sonatina form, at the conclusion of which the student 
should present a work in sonatina form showing an ability to 
put into actual practice his knowledge of harmony, counter- 
point and form. 

COUNTERPOINT — Two years, at the conclusion of which 
the candidate must show sufficient grasp of the subject to be 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 125 

able to write a two or three part invention employing canonic 
imitation. 

HARMONIC AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS — Of the 
larger forms, including the larger homophonic and polyphonic 
forms; the sonata and fugue. 

ORCHESTRATION — At the conclusion of which the stu- 
dent should possess a knowledge of instrumentation and suf- 
ficient ability to make simple orchestra arrangements. 

Description of Theoretical Courses 

11, 12. Harmony I. — Intervals, the primary triads, first and 
second inversions, cadences, sequences, harmonization of 
simple melodies, melody patterns and melodic invention. 
Dominant sevenths and their inversions. Figures and 
free basses. Close and open position. Secondary triads, 
chords of the dominant ninth and diminished seventh 
and their inversions. Two hours, four credits. 

TEXT: Harmony, by Foote and Spalding. References, Goet- 
schius, Weidig, Anderson, Chadwick. 

21, 22. Harmony II. — Secondary chords of the seventh. Ir- 
regular treatment of chords of the seventh. Harmoniza- 
tion of melodies and basses. Passing tones. Modula- 
tion to related melodic figuration. Florid melodies. 
Harmonization of figured chorale. Melodies in each 
part. Old Modes. 

TEXT: Harmony, Foote and Spalding. References, Goet- 
schius, Weidig, Chadwick, Anderson. 

TEXT: Bach's 371 chorales. Two hours, four credits. 

KEYBOARD HARMONY II. A general outline of this course 
includes the playing and connecting at the keyboard of 
all triads and their inversions, seventh chords, harmoni- 
zation of melodies, improvisation and transpositions of 
melodies as well as short piano compositions leading 
finally to the reading of scores. Four hours credit. 

TEXT: Wedge. 



126 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

31, 32. Harmonic and Structural Analysis III. — Figures, mo- 
tives, phrases, cadences, periods and the two and three 
part song forms. The sonata form, rondo and irregu- 
lar forms. The polyphonic forms. Analysis of compo- 
sition in smaller forms. Complete analysis of standard 
works. 

TEXT: Goetschius, Lessons in Musical Form. Four hours 
credit. 

41, 42. Composition III. — Original work in the simple pe- 
riodic forms. Practical composition in smaller forms. 
The larger forms, including rondo, sonatina and sonata. 

TEXT: Goetschius, The Homophonic Forms. The Larger 
Homophonic. Four hours credit. 

51, 52. Counterpoint. — The treatment of simultaneous me- 
lodic voices in two, three and four parts, and its applica- 
tion in invention and other forms of imitation. Double 
counterpoint. The application of counterpoint to the 
fugue. 

TEXT: Strict and Free Counterpoint, Anderson. References: 
Goetschius, Applied Counterpoint, Elementary Counter- 
point: Four hours credit. 

61, 62. Canon and Fugue. — An outline including a study and 
analysis of the Bach fugues, writing the canon and fugue 
in good style. 

TEXT: Fugue, by Higgs. Four hours credit. 

71, 72. Orchestration. — The study of the various orchestral 
instruments. Arranging for small groups and the large 
orchestras. 

TEXT: Practical Orchestration, Anderson. References, 
Forseyth. Four hours credit. 

11, 12. Sight-Singing and Dictation. — Intervals, various 
rhythms, major and minor triads, melodic and harmonic 
dictation. Later, v/ork in seventh and ninth chords. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 127 

Dictation of three and four-part harmony. Melodies with 
modulation, and aural analysis of form. 

TEXTS: Alchin and Brown. References: Wedge. Solfeggio 
(Ear-Training, Dictation, Sight-Singing). 

EAR-TRAINING. Reading of melodies in major, minor, treble 
and bass clefs in various rhythms. Ear-training and 
dictation. Later, two, three and four part etudes, can- 
ons, treble and bass clefs, with more study of rhythm 
and chromatics. Ear-training and dictation. Later, 
reading at sight of different solfeggi, then more difficult 
part songs. 

TEXTS: Wedge. Four hours credit. 

21, 22. History and Appreciation. — A survey of the growth 
of music from earliest times through the nineteenth cen- 
tury, with emphasis upon the classic period. Lectures, 
text material and collateral reading. Illustration by 
sound-reproducing instruments. The romantic com- 
posers, modern tendencies and present day composers. 
Reports and digests with text material and collateral 
reading. Critical and biographical study. 

TEXT: Outlines of Music History, Hamilton. 

TEXT: Music Appreciation, Mason. Two hours credit. 

31, 32. — A continuation of 11, 12. Four hours credit. 

41, 42. — A continuation of 21, 22. Two hours credit. 



128 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MUSIC FEES AND TUITION 

Piano — Freshman and sophomore $120.00 

Piano — Junior and senior 150,00 

Group — Piano 40.00 

Voice — Freshman and sophomore 120.00 

Voice — Junior and senior 150.00 

Group — Voice A 40.00 

Harmony 20.00 

Keyboard Harmony 20.00 

History and Appreciation 20.00 

Public School Music 40.00 

Solfeggio (Ear-training, dictation, and sight-singing) 20.00 

Canon and Fugue 24.00 

Form and Analysis 20.00 

Counterpoint 24.00 

Composition 20.00 

Orchestration 20.00 

Criticism and Aesthetics 10.00 

Seminar and Thesis 10.00 

Band School Course 10.00 

Registration (in every music course) 2.00 

Piano practice, per hour 3.00 

Certificate 2.50 

Collegiate diploma 5.00 

Special examination fee 5.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 129 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

JUNE 9 TO AUGUST 24, 1937 

FACULTY 

D. M. KEY, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., President 

G. L. HARRELL, B.S., M.S., Director 

Physics 

B. E. MITCHELL, M.A., Ph.D., 

Mathematics 

A. G. SANDERS, B.A., M.A., 

French and Spanish 

A. P. HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D., 

Latin 

J. M. SULLIVAN, M.A., Ph.D., 

J. B. PRICE, B.S., M.S., 

Chemistry 

M. C. WHITE. M.A.. Ph.D.. 

MRS. MARGUERITE GOODMAN, M.A.. 

English 

R. R. HAYNES, B.A., M.A., 

Education 

MISS VIRGINIA THOMAS. A.B.. M.A., 

Religion 

R. H. MOORE, M.A., M.S.. 

History 

W. E. RIECKEN, M.A., Ph.D.. 

Biology 

V. B. HATHORN, B.S., 

Bursar 

MRS. M. B. CLARK, M.E.L.. 

Librarian 

MISS SALLIE B. NEWMAN, M.A., 

Elementary Education 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS, A.B., M.A., 

Piano 

FRANK SLATER, B.M., 

Voice 

MRS. C. F. COOPER, 

Matron 



130 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Summer School of Millsaps College for 1937 will 
open on June 9 and will continue for eleven weeks. 

The Summer School is planned especially for college stu- 
dents and for teachers who desire further professional work 
or regular college work. Teachers may secure renewal of li- 
cense by attendance for nine weeks. Entrance units and tran- 
scripts will be required of all new students. 

In opening its doors to the teachers of the state, Millsaps 
College feels that it is serving a long felt need in that some 
provision should be made at the capital of the state for teach- 
ers to spend a few weeks during their vacation and at the 
same time take such work as they may find in the list of 
courses. 

All the advantages of the other summer schools will be 
afforded in the way of renewal and extension of license pro- 
vided by the State Department of Education. 

College graduates who lack the required number of hours 
in Education will find, here, an opportunity to make up some 
of those hours. Students with two years of college training 
may, with six hours in Education, be granted a temporary 
state license without examination by the State Board of Ex- 
aminers. 

The amount of work that a student may take will be lim- 
ited to two subjects with a total credit of twelve semester 
hours, or to four semester courses of three hours each. 

There will be a series of lectures by special lecturers from 
time to time. Announcement will be made beforehand. 

The tuition fee will be $35.00 and a matriculation fee of 
$5.00 will be charged. Board will be $25.00 or $26.00 per 
month, or at the rate of $8.00 per week. For a period of less 
than a week the rate will be $1.50 per day. Science fee, 
$10.00. Library fee $3.00. Science breakage fee, $2.00 for 
each course, unused portion returned. Those who expect to 
live on the campus will bring with them a pillow, bed-linen, 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



131 



towels and toilet articles; The dining hall will be open on 
the evening of June 8. Rooms open on June 9. Fees and 
board payable strictly in advance. 

Those expecting to enter the Summer School should make 
reservation of room by sending to the Bursar a deposit of 
$5.00. 

The following courses will be offered: 



Biology 11, 12 
Biology 21, 22 
Chemistry 21, 22 
Chemistry 31, 32 
Chemistry 51, 52 
Education 21, 12 
Education 31, 32 
Education, Elementary 
English 11, 12 
English 21, 22 
English 41, 42 
English 111, 72 
French 21, 22 



History 21. 22 
History 61, 62 
Latin 11, 12 
Latin 21, 22 
Mathematics 11, 12 
Mathematics 21, 22 
Physics 11, 12 
Physics 21, 22 

(11, 12 Prerequisite in sum- 
mer) 
Religion 11, 12 
Religion 41. 72 
Spanish 21, 22 



For further information address 



G. L. HARRELL. Director. 



132 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Pi'esident 
Walter Spiva, '25 Newton 

Vice-President 
S. M. Bailey, '26 Forest Hill 

Secretary-Treasurer 
I. H. Sells, '26 Jackson 

Alumni Secretary 
D. D. Culley, '24 Jackson 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

O. H. Swayze, '28, Jackson — Term expires 1937. 
O. B. Triplett, '24, Forest — Term expires 1938. 

G. P. Cook, '08, Canton — Term expires 1939. 
W, M. Mann, '28, Jackson — Term expires 1940. 

CLASS OF 1936 

Bachelor of Arts 

Alexander, Seta Wharton Jackson 

Beard, Norvelle Chilton Jackson 

Bond, Helen Patti ...Jackson 

Bounds, James Roy Jackson 

Boyles, Dorothy Clemence Jackson 

Clark, Evelyn Elizabeth Jackson 

Clark, Lois Barrow.. Jackson 

Collier, Nancy Pearl Jackson 

Collins, Harris Yazoo City 

Dodge, Annie Frances Hattiesburg 

Doggett, Robert Caxton Yale Divinity School 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Dubard, William Vassar, Jr University of Wisconsin 

Madison, Wisconsin 

Ford, Marianne Jackson 

Graves, Oralee Marjorie Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 133 

Graves, Nora Calhoun ; University of Mississippi 

University, Mississippi 

Holmes, John Sharp ,... Yazoo City 

Key, David Martin, Jr Cincinnati, Ohio 

Maxted, Aubrey Clement University of the South 

Sewanee, Tennessee 

Morehead, Helen Elise Jackson 

Morrow, Josephine Madison Station 

Myers, Margaret Elizabeth Morton 

Ramsey, Vivian Jackson 

Rush, Ida Cornelia Biloxi 

Smith, Sidney Allen, Jr Harvard Law School 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Stephenson, George Royster University of the South 

Sewanee, Tennessee 

Sturgeon, Purser Kent Northwestern University 

Evanston, Illinois 

Suydam, Martha Ann Shannon 

Swayze, Harris Sojourner Benton 

Watkins, Martha Earline Hermanville 

Wilson, Autie Wylie Lorman 

Bachelor of Science 

Allen, Henry Vergil, Jr Mass. Institute of Technology, 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Arrington, Charles Robert Jackson 

Bennett, Mouzon Murrah Oakvale 

Birdsong, Charles Henry _... Jackson 

Bo wen, Jack ...Brookhaven 

Brooks, Merritt Harland Sartartia 

Bufkin, Edward Otis _. Lula 

Buie, Webster Millsaps Jackson 

Clowe, Henry Wyatt .....Jackson 

Colson, Lilla Josephine ..Ackerman 

Cook, Bertie Belle _ Laurel 

Decell, William James Jackson 

Dunn, Read Patten, Jr Greenville 

Ezelle, Robert Lenoir, Jr Jackson 

Felder, Mamye Barksdale Prentiss 

Perriss, William Douglass, Jr .......Jackson 



134 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Floyd, Edith St. John Jackson 

Fuller, Roger Jackson 

Golden, John M Jackson 

Graves, Glenn Pelahatchie 

Hand, Robert Stephens Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, Boston, Massachusetts 

Haynes, Maurice Brooks Mathiston 

Hinson, James Noel Duke University 

Durham, North Carolina 

Johnson, Viola Earline Jackson 

Kirkpatrick, Sarah Elizabeth Hollandale 

Lauderdale, James Abner, Jr Jackson 

Meadors, Gilcin Finley Tulane Medical School 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

Meier, Joseph Yazoo City 

Miller, Edwin Delphin Lucedale 

Minor, Alton Floyd Jackson 

Montgomery, William Burton Jackson 

McClinton, Raymond University of North Carolina 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

McCullar, Virginia Pauline Jackson 

McDaniel, Roy H Okolona 

McNeil, Margaret Laurel 

Neill, Charles Lamar Cornell Medical School 

Ithaca, New York 

Pickett, Joseph Candler Emory University, Georgia 

Plummer, Nancy Blanton Jackson 

Prichard, Charlie Alexandria, Louisiana 

Riggs, Louis Stanley Jackson 

Ross, Thomas Griffin Tulane Medical School 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

Smith, Hazel Marie Mendenhall 

Smith, Jasper Leroy, Jr Bowling Green Business University 

Bowling Green, Kentucky 

Spotswood, James Eastin Jackson 

Stacy, Richard Harold Jackson 

Strahan, Dorothy Edmondson Jackson 

Tynes, Dorothy Cowen Terry 

Walters, Dorothy Waudeena Enterprise 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 135 

REGISTER OP STUDENTS 

SENIORS 

Alford, Ida Louise Gallman 

Assaf, Kathleen Jackson 

Biggs, Lois Jackson 

Bradshaw, Francis Bentonia 

Breeland, Bradford Brough Tylertown 

Breland, Keller Wesson 

Breland, Mildred Elizabeth Hattiesburg 

Brumfield, Opal Bentonia 

Butler, Elllsine Jackson 

Chichester, Dorothy Booth Jackson 

Cunningham, Elizabeth S Jackson 

Davis, Mendell M Jackson 

Droke, James Albert Jackson 

Durham, Eunice L Jackson 

Ezelle, Fred Jackson Jackson 

Ferguson, James S Florence 

Finger, Homer Ellis, Jr Ripley 

Galloway, Stella Truesdel Canton 

Gordon, Slater R Florence 

Hollingsworth, Hazel Jackson 

Horton, Hurd Grenada 

Hutchison, Florence Jackson 

Kayes, John Lewis Brookhaven 

Kennedy, Edna May Natchez 

LeGette, Virgil Dudley DeKalb 

Matthews, Phyllis Jackson 

Mayo, Robert Murrah Polkville 

Meadows, Archie L Crawford 

Mills, Lilla Carthage 

Morrow, Madeline Madison 

Newell, Martha Lee Jackson 

Nichols, Mary Louise Grenada 

Nobles, Russell Jackson 

Parker, William H Philadelphia 

Payne, John Price Pelahatchie 

Pickett, Elisabeth May Simsboro, Louisiana 

Pigford, Malcolm Leon .Laurel 



13 6 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Rhodes, Minnie Etta Brandon 

Richerson, W. Robert Sarah 

Rimmer, John Robbins Camden 

Robertson, William Norman Jackson 

Robinson, Will Jackson 

Ruoff, Mildred Elizabeth Jackson 

Schultz, George Henry Brandon 

Shaw, Mary Katherine. Houlka 

Sherman, Melba Forest 

Stewart, Haskell Bob Waynesboro 

Stone, Ruby Frances Jackson 

Strait, Robert C Gloster 

Sutherland, Loyd Columbia 

Suydam, Wealtha Harriet Shannon 

Tatum, Addison Thrash Hattiesburg 

Taylor, Swep S., Jr Jackson 

Triple tt, Dorothy Erwin 

Ulmer, David M Jackson 

Walker, Nancy Rebecca Lauderdale 

White, Leora C Guntown 

White, Sidney Henry Holly Springs 

Wofford, William Drew 

JUNIORS 

Adams, Aubrey Longview, Washington 

Adams, Mounger Favre Lumberton 

Best, Harold J Lorman 

Blount, Imogene Bassfield 

Bridewell, Joseph Albert Columbia 

Brooks, David Jackson 

Bryant, R. T Jackson 

Cassels, Sella Gloster 

Castle, Edythe Magee 

Cirlot, Neal Moss Point 

Clark, G. C, Jr Waynesboro 

Clark, Leonard Jackson 

Clegg, Mildred Brookhaven 

Coltharp, Marguerite New Albany 

Commander, Willard Philadelphia 

Conner, James S., Jr Hattiesburg 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 137 

Cortner, George : Greenwood 

Courtney, John W Star 

Cox, James H Bolton 

Cunningham, Robert W., Jr Meridian 

Davis, Catherine E Brookhaven 

Davis, Lola Jackson 

Dement, Annie Katherine Jackson 

Dorris, George Jackson 

Dunn, James C Greenville 

Ellis, Sam Lauderdale 

Enochs, Mildred Jackson 

Ford, William Taylorsville 

Freeman, Lucien Raymond Kansas City, Missouri 

Golden, Maude Lyle Laurel 

Gordon, Alex, Jr Jackson 

Gordon, Sara E Vaiden 

Griffin, Thomas L Shubuta 

Hamilton, Francis A Jackson 

Harvey, Wirt Turner Water Valley 

Heard, Coleman Itta Bena 

Hester, Jeff Laurel 

Hill, Gerald Gabe Louisville 

Hinson, Syble Lumberton 

Hoffpauir, William Jackson 

Hogue, Marjorie E Natchez 

Holloman, Mary Louise Jackson 

Horton, Cowles, Jr Grenada 

Houston, Alvin Lamar Jackson 

Kelly, James Charlton Raleigh 

Kimbrell, William Jackson 

Kinnaird, Jean Mary Jackson 

Lauderdale, Billy Jackson 

Litton, L. Ruby Shaw 

Manning, Harris, Jr Jackson 

Matheny, Robert Waynesboro 

Mauldin, Eugenia Baldwyn 

Muh, Berkley Jackson 

Murrah, Anne Elizabeth Jackson 

Murray, W. R Jackson 

McKenzie, Chester Memphis, Tennessee 



138 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

McRae, John M Jackson 

Permenter, Nell Jackson 

Roberts, Geraldlne Jackson 

Roby, Victor Mills Jackson 

Rogers, Lee, Jr New Albany 

Sanders, Ava Glen Allan 

Sandusky, Herbert Jackson 

Scott, Fagan Jackson 

Shrader, Laura Mae Brookhaven 

Siddon, William Harold Sweatman 

Simpson, Joe Dixon Jackson 

Sims, Lavelle Jackson 

Suttle, Elizabeth Edwards 

Walker, Rodney Lauderdale 

Wallace, Gill Hubert Shaw 

Wasson, Wilbourn Columbus 

Williams, James Brandon 

Williams, Thomas Marvin Lexington 

Wofford, Catherine Oak Ridge, Louisiana 

Wood, Neva Lanier Crystal Springs 

Young, Helen Clara Yazoo City 

SOPHOMORES 

Ainsworth, Joe Whitfield 

Ballard, Hampton H Shaw 

Beasley, Harvey L Caledonia 

Bennett, Barbara Jackson 

Bingham, Eugene Lowther Shreveport, Louisiana 

Bizzell, William Hardy Pace 

Blakeny, Ance Taylorsville 

Blough, David Okolona 

Bonner, Oscar D Jackson 

Buie, Sarah Jackson 

Burwell, James D Jackson 

Carruth, Paul McComb 

Cassels, Ottomese Gloster 

Chichester, May Ellen Jackson 

Collins, Foster Yazoo City 

Cook, Gilbert Pierce, Jr Canton 

Cooper, George Euel Shaw 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 139 

Cox, Robert Elton Madison 

Critz, Wiley Hyram Clarksdale 

Crowder, Herman Greenville 

Currie, John M Raleigh 

Currie, Keyes T Raleigh 

DeLamotte, Roy Carroll Moss Point 

Doggett, Blanton Mills Kossuth 

Dye, Allan Lane Clarksdale 

Edwards, Edwin Wilty, Jr Gulfport 

Elfert, Ralph Jerry Seminary 

Elfert, Roger Seminary 

Elkin, William Tupelo 

Evans, Ben P Water Valley 

Felts, Ernest Tucker Batesville 

Fitzgerald, William Dakin Okolona 

Fleming, Hays Minter City 

Galloway, Samuel Belton Jackson 

Godbold, John W Jackson 

Cranberry, Henry Hazlehurst 

Hamilton, Charlotte Jackson 

Hardin, Bill G Jackson 

Hardy, Thrashley M Natchez 

Harper, Earl Brandon 

Hegwood, Charles Richard Forest 

Heidelberg, Annie Lou Jackson 

Hetrick, J. H Jackson 

Hicks, Charles Hill Minter City 

Hill, Robert Jackson 

Holloman, William Fielding Jackson 

Horton, Frank Collins Grenada 

Ivy, Robert Adams Muldon 

Kellum, Stacy Shaw 

Kisner, James Natchez 

Knight, Annie Sue Brandon 

Lamb, Mary Sue Laurel 

Litton, Wallis B Shaw 

Loflin, Frank W Jackson 

Luke, Edward Bernard Jackson 

Lytle, Mark F Jackson 

Macgowan, Clifford Jackson 



140 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Martin, Rubye Midnight 

Martin, Ruth Midnight 

Martin, Sue Picayune 

Mathers, Leon Matherville 

May, Albert Louis, Jr Jackson 

Millstein, Conan Himber Jackson 

Moorer, Louise Jackson 

Murphree, Lee Roy Okolona 

Murphy, Margaret Lucile Jackson 

Murray, Campbell Jackson 

Myers, Elizabeth Jackson 

McAlilly, Alton Louisville 

McKinnon, Marx Laverne Lauderdale 

McRae, Rowena Green Jackson 

Naylor, Myrt Lauderdale 

Nelson, Carol Jackson 

Newman, Eloyce Bude 

Newsom, Carl Ray Madison 

O'Connor, Donald Vicksburg 

Palmer, Dolores Jackson 

Parker, Ellis Laurel 

Parmer, Jake Louis Porterville 

Parnell, C. C, Jr Pace 

Patton, George E Jackson 

Peden, Milton Jay Schlater 

Pitard, Cecil Edwin Jackson 

Price, Gene Jackson 

Reeves, Boyd Moselle 

Ricks, Catherine Sherrod Jackson 

Robertson, Edgar Harold Jackson 

Robertson, Gavan Carson Jackson 

Rogers, Benjamin Butler, Jr Montgomery, Alabama 

Sheffield, Paul R Jackson 

Shelton, Edward Caledonia 

Shelton, Helen Rose Leland 

Shelton, Lewis Ross Jackson 

Simpson, Joe Dixon Jackson 

Simpson, Joe F Ackerman 

Smith, J. D Madison 

Sparks, Ruth Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 141 

Spinks, A. C, Jr Decatur 

Strahan, Lucile Jackson 

Stuart, Jack N Morton 

Sykes, Ben L Jackson 

Tate, Edwin Picayune 

Thompson, Floy Denton Jackson 

Thompson, John Bassfield 

Triplett, Cecil Mashulaville 

Walters, Marjorie Jackson 

Weston, Fred Bourbon 

Williams, E. B., Jr Poplarville 

Wilson, Elizabeth Pelahatchie 

Wright, Charles Gerlock Jackson 

Wroten, Ruth Steen Corinth 

FRESBBIEN 

Allen, Thomas Moore Cockrum 

Allen, Willie Rhymes... Jackson 

Bain, Edwin Jackson Jackson 

Bain, John Burton Belzoni 

Bain, Pauline Frederick Jackson 

Batte, John C Jackson 

Beacham, Loyd Lamar, Jr Jackson 

Becker, John Thomas Jackson 

Bennett. Conoy Lena 

Bilbro, Charles F Dozier, Alabama 

Bledsoe, Fred Seminary 

Booth, James Livingston Jackson 

Bourn, Willard, Jr Monticello 

Brent, Edwin Guy Crystal Springs 

Broyles, Nash Columbus 

Bryant, Olen Cooper Jackson 

Buck, Carolyn Kelly Jackson 

Burdette, Mary Jackson 

Burkhead, Vera Jackson 

Burkhead, Vernon Jackson 

Byars, Roy Cascilla 

Carter, Willie... ..Moselle 

Cater, Wilson C Jackson 

Chapman, Willie Dennis Pocahontas 



142 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Clark, Charles Leggette Jackson 

Clark, Kathryn New Orleans, Louisiana 

Clay, James Ethel Stallo 

Clowe, Jane Jackson 

Cobb, Elizabeth DeKalb 

Cole, Bill Jackson 

Cotten, John Jackson 

Curtis, Nannie Catherine Clarksdale 

Darden, Marguerite Jackson 

Darnall, Roland Jackson 

Dees, Martha Jackson 

Denton, Joel Jackson 

Denton, Sarah Blanche Jackson 

Dickerson, Tom Sumrall 

Dye, Dolores Jackson 

Elliott, James Nettleton 

Ellis, Alfred Clayton Lexington 

Emanuel, Percy '. Lorman 

Fairly, Jean Hazlehurst 

Fitts, Ina Bell Jackson 

Flowers, Edwina Jackson 

Folse, James L Jackson 

Fuller, Leon Guy Kilmichael 

Gable, Gerald P Eastabuchie 

Gaddy, Virginia Jackson 

Gainey, Andrew Meridian 

Gardner, Dudley Jackson 

Gill, Frances Jackson 

Greene, William Plant City, Florida 

Hall, George C Cherrydale, Va. 

Hall, George F West Palm Beach, Florida 

Hall, Jimmye Agnes Jackson 

Hammond, James Columbia 

Harper, Dale Lamar Brandon 

Hathorn, Vernon Jackson 

Hawkins, D. W Jackson 

Henderson, Ray F Carthage 

Hilton, Carson Jackson 

Holleman, Henry Pickens 

Holliday, Charles Dewitt Canton 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 143 

Hollingsworth, George A Jackson 

Holman, Marion Elvin Gonzalez, Florida 

Hopper, Eugene Rienzi 

Horn, Carl Magee 

Home, W. Hooper Carriere 

Howard, Ben Robin Jackson 

Hudson, Manning New Albany 

Johnston, Dedrick Pierce, Jr LaFayette, Georgia 

Jurney, L. M Ackerman 

Keith, Edwin Springfield, Missouri 

Kernaghan, Sylvian, Jr Hattiesburg 

Kersh, Henry Grady Jackson 

Lampton, John Barton Magnolia 

Landrum, Hugh B Jackson 

Landrum, Oswald Poplarville 

Langley, James Jackson 

Lloyd, Sam Thames Jackson 

Lord, Richard Guy, Jr Tunica 

Lowther, Edwin Florence 

Magee, Archie D'Lo 

Mangum, Wallace T Jackson 

Manning, Mary Frances Jackson 

Mayfield, Olin Jackson 

Miller, Bessie Edwina Jackson 

Moore, Adele Jackson 

Mosley, Dick DeKalb 

McAlilly, Hoyle Louisville 

McCool, Ralph Kosciusko 

McGahey, Evelyn Jackson 

McKee, Clyde Jackson 

Newman, Prentiss Jackson 

Nichols, Edwina Jackson 

Noble, Edward Davis Fayette 

Painter, Lawrence Columbus 

Parker, James Jackson 

Pattie, Frank, Jr New Orleans, Louisiana 

Penn, Earl Barksdale Ridgeland 

Perkins, Claude Jackson, Alabama 

Phifer, Glenn Jackson 

Phillips, Tom H Holly Bluff 



144 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Pierce, Annie Belle McComb 

Pierce, Juanita Jackson 

Pitner, Dan New Albany 

Pool, Marion Alice Meridian 

Poole, George Jackson 

Porter, Margaret Jackson 

Quin, Hillrie Marshall Jackson 

Reeves, Dorothy Jackson 

Ricks, Gappy Jackson 

Ridgway, William Bryant Jackson 

Roberts, Doll Jackson 

Roberts, Edwin Prentiss 

Roberts, Jean Jackson 

Robertson, George Jackson 

Salassi, Jimmie Slidell, Louisiana 

Saucier, George Sumrall 

Selman, Herbert Monticello 

Sharp, Hillie Walnut Grove 

Shaughnessy, Mary Eleanor Jackson 

Simmons, Fred Columbia 

Skinner, Caswell Meridian 

Smith, Aubrey Liberty 

Stewart, Horace Jackson 

Stock, Esther Madison 

Stone, Ann Jackson 

Sumrall, Jimmie Belzoni 

Sykes, M. Tom Jackson 

Taylor, Esther Stuart Jackson 

Taylor, Rita Jackson 

Thames, Lewis Albert, Jr Sanatorium 

Thompson, Rochester Collins Jackson 

Turnage, Jesse Vander New Hebron 

Vandiver, J. S., Jr Jackson 

Walker, Bruce Lucedale 

Watkins, Bert Jackson 

Watkins, Sale Jackson 

Watts, Eugene Camden 

White, Kathryn Jackson 

Whitsett, Paul T Mobile, Alabama 

Whittington, John Rufus Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 145 

Wiggins, Sam Paul Wadley, Georgia 

Williams, Joe Frank Brandon 

Williams, Lampton O'Neal Poplarville 

Willoughby, Lloyd Cline Jackson 

Wilson, James Natchez 

Winborn, Jack Durant 

Wood, Clotaire Jackson 

Worthington, Florence McClung Jackson 

Wright, John Jackson 

Yeager, John A., Jr Lumberton 

SPECIALS 

Allen, Mrs. Justena Rio 

Baley, Catherine Ann Jackson 

Boswell, Barbara Jackson 

Cagle, Mildred Jackson 

Fischer, Juanita May Jackson 

Flowers, Joseph Carruth Jackson 

Grambling, Jean Jackson 

Mounger, Adele Winona 

Newell, Anne Jackson 

Orkin, David H Jackson 

Parker, Patricia Mildred Jackson 

Phelps, Mrs. Dudley Jackson 

Plummer, Nancy Blanton Jackson 

Powers, H. P. Grady Pearl City 

Simpson, Magnolia Jackson 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1936 

Ainsworth, Nell Red Lick 

Allred, Frances Jackson 

Ashley, Jessie Jackson 

Assaf, Kathleen Jackson 

Ates, Mrs. Katherine Jackson 

Bacot, Myra Elizabeth Osyka 

Bagby, Woodrow Jackson 

Bagley, Clara B Jackson 

Ballard, Hampton H Shaw 

Barker, Stephen Ray Tupelo 



146 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Barrett, Clara Frances Vicksburg 

Bennett, Mrs. Annie W Natchez 

Biggs, Martha Lois Jackson 

Blue, Blanche Brookhaven 

Boggan, Mrs. W. M D'Lo 

Bosarge, Willie Kell Pascagoula 

Briscoe, Audrey Jackson 

Brooks, Merritt Harland Sartartia 

Broom, Maye Jackson 

Broom, Myrtle Jackson 

Bruce, Leila J Jackson 

Brunson, Bettie J Laurel 

Byrd, Mrs. Isobelle Bude 

Calhoun, Sarah Leonard Jackson 

Cameron, James Harrison Jackson 

Carter, Haskell Triplett Jackson 

Cirlot, Neal W Moss Point 

Clark, Leonard Ellis Jackson 

Collins, Mary Evelyn Myrtle 

Colson, Lilla Jo Water Valley 

Cook, Gilbert Pierce, Jr Canton 

Coon, Alice Jackson 

Cooper, O. N Hazlehurst 

Covacevich, Mrs. Henrietta Biloxi 

Cox, William E Jackson 

Craft, Leah E Hattiesburg 

Creekmore, Mittie Elizabeth Jackson 

Critz, Wiley Hyram Clarksdale 

Crout, Naomi D'Lo 

Crowder, Herman Murphy Greenville 

Cruthirds, Mrs. Niles Bond 

Dabbs, Elizabeth Dale Shannon 

Dale, Mrs. Esther Benton 

Daspit, Dorothy Ocean Springs 

Dement, Annie K Jackson 

Dubard, Eunice Marian Dubard 

Dukes, J. T Gunn 

Eager, Mary Jane Jackson 

Erwin, William J Shellman, Georgia 

Evans, Grady C Carriere 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 147 

Fagan, Alvin E Jackson 

Freeman, Lucien Raymond Kansas City, Missouri 

Gibson, Mrs. Mildred Meridian 

Goodlett, Frank O Tupelo 

Gowdy, Dixie Anne Batesville 

Cranberry, Henry D Hazlehurst 

Gregory, Manley Kosciusko 

Hairston, Mrs. G. H Silver City 

Hall, George C Cherrydale, Virginia 

Hall, Tommye Bay Springs 

Harry, Bourdon Sledge 

Hendrick, Julian Lena 

Herrlngton, Juanita Terry 

Herrington, Maude Ellisville 

Hightower, Mrs. Meta P Starkville 

Hill, Gerald Gabe Louisville 

Hines, Robert H Jackson 

Hinton, Eunice Liberty 

Hollingsworth, George Jackson 

Hollingsworth, Hazel B Jackson 

Hooper, Sunshine Jackson 

Home, W. Hooper Carriere 

Horton, Cowles, Jr Grenada 

Hudson, Pearl Olive Branch 

Hughes, Mrs. Lillian Tunica 

Hutton, Frank B Jackson 

James, Frankie Newton 

Johnson, Mrs. Rowena Indianola 

Jones, Mrs. Arthur McComb 

Jones, Charles D Senatobia 

Jones, E. Peyton Jackson 

Jones, Mrs. Frank Porterville 

Jones, W. D Jackson 

Kelly, Ellen Newman Homochitto 

Landrum, Hugh B Jackson 

Latimer, Mrs. Rose Davenport Jackson 

Laughlin, Dorothy Hanes - Vlcksburg 

Lemly, Rebecca Jackson 

Lester, Laura Rebecca Jackson 

Lewis, Alice Meridian 



148 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

Lewis, Josephine Esther Lucedale 

Litton, Wallis Brown Shaw 

Lockhart, Julia Jackson 

Luse, Mrs. W. S - - Vaughan 

Lytle, Mark F - Jackson 

MacKenzie, Edith Hill Jackson 

Mangum, Norma Ruth Jackson 

Marks, Elsie Marian Jackson 

Marshall, Bessie N - ....Jackson 

Martin, Mrs. "Ward Waynesboro 

May, H. S Decatur 

Maynor, Mrs. R. C Jackson 

Mayo, Lexie E Picayune 

Mlmms, Minnie C Utica 

Mogan, Martha McComb 

Morrow, Madeline - ..Madison 

Murrah, Anne Elizabeth Jackson 

Murray, William R _. -..- - Jackson 

Myers, Elizabeth Jackson 

Myers, Mrs. Mary O Jackson 

McAlexander, Mrs. Hattie Holly Springs 

McCoy, Bessie Lee _ Morton 

McDaniel, Robert Jackson 

McKay, Bess Pelahatchie 

McKenzie, Chester L Memphis, Tennessee 

McLeod, Clara James Jackson 

McMichael, Sybil ._ Purvis 

McNeill, Lillian ....Meridian 

Neely, Buford Berry Magee 

Nelson, Carol Jackson 

Nelson, Martha Ann ...Jackson 

Nobles, Russell Jackson 

Orkin, D. H Jackson 

Owens, J. Herbert, Jr Hattiesburg 

Parnell, Frances ..Jackson 

Patterson, Annie D'Lo 

Permenter, Nell Jackson 

Reeves, Flim Boyd Moselle 

Ricketts, Edmond F Jackson 

Ricks, Catherine Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 149 

Roscoe, Mrs. Lottie Carrollton 

Rush, Monie Meridian 

Sams, Mrs. M. K Meridian 

Scott, Sybil Jackson 

Sharron, Lorene Jackson 

Shaughnessy, Mary Eleanor Jackson 

Shipp, Mrs. Lucile Mayersville 

Shumaker, Le Roy Matherville 

Simpson, Emmett Calhoun City 

Skinner, Mrs. Pauline Lucedale 

Slater, Frank Jackson 

Smith, Cassie B Vicksburg 

Soper, Jessa Greenville 

Speights, Aubrey L Jackson 

Stewart, Myrtle Nelson Silver City 

Stone, Ruby F Jackson 

Strahan, Lucile Jackson 

Sutherland, Loyd Columbia 

Sutton, Wilton Carey Jackson 

Thompson, Rochester Collins Jackson 

Thurman, Woodrow W Bassfield 

Trussell, Clara Powell Jackson 

VanZandt, Jeanette Jackson 

Varnado, Mrs. M. S State Line 

Varnado, Otto S Osyka 

Vaughn, Mrs. Hortense Jackson 

Watkins, Archie Sale Jackson 

Wharton, Frances Slidell, Louisiana 

White, Elizabeth Haynes Jackson 

White, Frances Anthony Pickens 

White, Harry Edward Florence 

Wiggins, Lula K Jackson 

Wilde, Genevieve... Jackson 

Wilkinson, Louise Jackson 

Wilson, Elizabeth Pelahatchie 

Womack, Mary Lane Jackson 

Wright, Mrs. Coralie Cotton Jackson 



150 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SUMMARY 

Senior — 

Men 31 

Women 28 59 

Junior — 

Men 50 

Women 27 77 

Sophomore — 

Men 83 

Women 27 110 

Freshman — 

Men 114 

Women 40 154 

Special — 

Men 3 

Women 12 15 

Total — 

Men 281 

Women 134 415 

Summer School 1936 — 

Men 57 

Women Ill 16& 

Total — 

Men 338 

Women 245 583 

Counted twice — 

Men 29 

Women 15 44 

Total attendance — 

Men - 309 

Women 230 539 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 151 

HONORARY DEGREES 
1936 

J. T. Leggett, D.D. 
F. S. Harmon, LL.D. 

MEDALS AWARDED AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF 1936 

Founder's Medal H. V. Allen 

Bourgeois Medal W. H. Blzzell 

John C. Carter Medal No award 

Bule Medal William Ford 

Clark Essay Medal William Lauderdale 

D. A. R. Medal No award 

Commencement Debate Medal No award 

Ida V. Sharp Medal Virginia McCuUar 

Tribbett Scholarship M. M. Davis 

Trevelli Scholarships — James Ferguson, William Kimbrell 



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INDEX 

Accreditment 3 

Academic Calendar 5 

Administrative Committees 7 

Alumni Associations, Officers of 132 

Attendance Upon Classes 53 

Athletics 30 

Band 33, 122 

Board of Trustees 6 

Buildings 20 

Calendar 4 

Carnegie-Millsaps Library 23 

Change of Registration 59 

Christian Center 29 

Conduct 56 

Costs of Attending Millsaps 11 

Courses Required for B.A. Degree 47 

Courses Required for B.S. Degree 47 

Degrees 46 

Delayed Registration 43 

Delinquency 57 

Defnerit System 57 

Departments 60 

Department of Ancient Languages 61 

Department of Biology 66 

Department ofi Chemistry 70 

Department of Education 75 

Department of English 7S 

Department of Geology 8 3 

Department of German 85 

Department of History 86 

Department of Mathematics 89 

Department of Philosophy 92 

Department of Physical Education 9 3 

Department of Physics and Astronomy 95 

Department of Religion 99 

Department of Romance Languages 104 

Department of Social Sciences lOS 

Department of Music 110 

Department of Piano 113 

Department of Voice and Public School Music 117 

Dormitories 20 



INDEX 

Endowments 21 

Examinations 54 

Faculty 8 

Fraternities and Sororities 37 

General Information 20 

General Regulations 53 

General Outline by Groups of Degree Courses 46 

Gifts to College 22 

Gifts to Library 23 

Glee Clubs 33 

Grounds 20 

Grading System 54 

History of the College 11 

Honorary Degrees 151 

Honors 56 

Hours Permitted 56 

Societies 35 

James Observatory 14, 95 

Majors 50 

Matriculation 58 

Ministerial League 29 

Officers of Administration 6 

Other Officers 10 

Prizes 27 

Quality Point System 55 

Registry of Students 135 

Registration 58 

Religious Activities 28 

Reports 57 

Resources 20 

Requirements for Admission 38 

Requirements for Degrees 46 

Schedule for Lectures 152 

Scholarships, Loans, Prizes 25 

Student Assistants 10 

Student Organizations 32 

Summer School 129 

Teacher Placement Bureau 76 

Withdrawals 58 

Young Men's Christian Association 28 

Young Women's Christian Association 29 



/.N 



Vv;