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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1939-1940"

REGISTER OF 



MiLLSAPS College 



Jackson, Mississippi 




Forty-nintli Session Begins 
September 9, 1940 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In the list below are the officials to whom inquiries of 
various types may be sent. 

General interests of the college and 

scholarships The President 

Requests for general catalogues, admission 

of students, and advanced standing The Registrar 

Academic work of students already matriculated, 

and withdrawal of matriculated students The Dean 

Educational progress of students during 

the freshman year The Dean of Freshmen 

Health, social life, dormitory life, and 

general welfare of women students The Dean of Women 

Requests for information concerning 

evening classes The Director of the Department 

of Extension Teaching 

Requests for information concerning 

the summer session Director of the Summer Session 

Payment of College bills The Bursar 



FOREWORD 

j^fl^ILLSAPS is a liberal arts college. Its purpose is to pre- 
pare the minds and hearts of serious students for effec- 
tive and unselfish service in the professions and in the busi- 
ness world. In the pursuit of this ideal, Millsaps has behind 
it almost half a century of honorable and successful accom- 
plishment. 

Millsaps is recognized by the General Board of Christian 
Education of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, as one 
of the strongest and most valuable institutions in the connec- 
tion. The college is fully accredited by all the accrediting 
agencies, both regional and national. 

On the fully approved list of: 

The Association of American Universities 
The American Association of University Women 

Holds membership in: 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 
The Southern University Conference. 

The college shares in current educational thought and 
life through membership in the following agencies: 

The American Council on Education 

The American Association of Collegiate Registrars 

The Association of American Colleges 

The National Conference of Church-related Colleges 

The Mississippi Association of Colleges 

The Dixie Conference 



1940 — CALENDAR— 1941 



JAN. 



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FEB. 



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1940 APRIL 1940 


S M T W T F S 





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S M T W T F S 



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1940 JULY 1940 



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28129 30|31|__ 


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1940 AUG. 



1940 



S M T W T F S 











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1940 OCT. 1940 


S M T W T F S 



6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 



II 2 

8 9 

15 16 

22 23 

29 30 



31 41 5 
10 11 12 
17 18119 
24 25126 
3lL_ L. 



1940 NOV. 1940 


S M T W T F S 








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1940 DEC. 1940 


S M T W T F S 



II 2 

8 9 

15|16 

22123 

29 30 



31 41 51 6 
10 11 12|13 
17 18 19120 
24l25!26 27128 
3l|-l_-L-|- 



1941 JAN. 



S M T W T F S 



5| 6| 7| 8 
12113 1 14 1 15 
19|20|21|22 
26|27|28|29 



2| 31 4 

9|10|H 

16117 18 

23124125 
30131 _. 



1941 FEB. 1941 


S M T W T F S 




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1941 MARCH 1941 


S M T W T F S 












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26127 


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ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

FORTY-NINTH YEAR 



May 31 
June 1 
July 6 
July 8 
August 10 



September 9-10 
September 11 
November 21-23 
December 20 
January 2 
January 20-25 



January 27 
Maich 28 
March 31 
May 26-31 
May 31 
June 1 
June 2 
June 3 



SUMMER SESSION, 1940 
Registration. 
Classes begin. 
First semester ends. 
Second semester begins. 
Second semester ends. 

FALL SEMESTER, 1940-41 
Registration and orientation of students. 
Recitations begin. 
Thanksgiving holidays. 
Christmas holidays begin 1:00 P. M. 
Christmas holidays end 8:30 A. M. 
First semester examinations. 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1941 
Second semester begins. 
Spring holidays begin 1:00 P. M. 
Spring holidays end 8:30 A. M. 
Second semester examinations. 
Commencement exercises begin. 
Commencement Sunday. 
Meeting of Board of Trustees. 
Commencement Day. 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

BISHOP J. L. DECELL, D.D., LL.D President 

J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Vice-President 

J. B. STREATER Secretary 

A. B. CAMPBELL Treasurer 

Temi Expires in 1941 

REV. C. A. BOWEN, D.D Nashville 

W. O. TATUM Hattiesburg 

J. W. KYLE Sardis 

REV. 0. S. LEWIS Philadelphia 

REV. L. P. WASSON, D.D Columbus 

REV. T. M. BRADLEY Itta Bena 

R. L. EZELLE Jackson 

J. B. STREATER Black Hawk 

Term Expires in 1944: 

REV. OTTO PORTER Yicksburg 

*REV. W. W. WOOLLARD Rosedale 

J. T. CALHOUN Jackson 

J. G. McGOWEN Jackson 

REV. J. T. LEGGETT, D.D Hattiesburg 

REV. J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Starkville 

H. M. IVY Meridian 

A. L. ROGERS New Albany 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

MARION LOFTON SMITH, M.A., B.D., Ph.D President 

WILLIAM EMIL RIECKEN, B.A., M.A.. Ph.D Dean 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON, M.A., Ph.D.. .Dean of Freshmen 

MRS. MARY B. STONE, M.A Dean of Women 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL, M.S Registrar 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS, M.A Librarian 

VERNON BURKETT HATHORN, B.A Bursar 



•Deceased. 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 
1939-40 

Cnrrlculum and Degrees: 

Riecken, Harrell, Sanders, Mrs. Stone, Hamilton, Haynes, 
Moore, Musgrave, Bullock. 

Literary Activities — Periodicals, Debate, Literary Clubs: 

White, Moore, Wharton, Wallace. 

Religious Activities: 

Bullock, Sullivan, Miss Thomas. 

Social Activities — Public Meetings, Music: 

Mitchell, Miss Craig, Mrs. Coullet, Riecken, Mrs. Roberts, 
Mr. Coullet, Hamilton, Galloway. 

Fraternities and Sororities: 

Hamilton, Emigh, Van Hook, Lin, Moore, Mrs. Goodman. 

Library : 

Sanders, Mrs. Cobb, Haynes, Mrs. Sparkman, Ricketts. 

Student Advisory: 

Van Hook, Hamilton, Mrs. Stone, Haynes, White, Riecken, 
Mrs. Cobb, Musgrave. 

Freshman Council: 

Hamilton, Mrs. Stone, Mrs. Coullet, Miss Craig, Haynes, 
King, Bullock. 

Woman's Council: 

Mrs. Stone, Miss Thomas, Miss Craig, Mrs. Coullet. 

Research : 

Sanders, Mitchell, Currie. 

Athletics : 

White, Mitchell, Van Hook, Riecken, Hathorn. 



8 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE FACULTY 
MARION LOFTON SMITH President 

A.B.. Kingwood College; B.D., A.M., Emory University; 
Ph.D.. Yale University. 

WILLIAM EMIL RIECKEN Dean 

Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

JOHN MAGRUDER SULLIVAN Professor of Chemistry 

and Geology 

B.A., Centenary College ; M.A., University of Mississippi ; M.A., 

Vanderbilt University ; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University ; graduate 

work. University of Chicago. 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL Professor of Physics 

and Astronomy 
B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., Millsaps College; 
graduate work, University of Chicago. 

J. REESE LIN Professor of Philosophy and History 

B.A., Emory College ; M.A., Vanderbilt University ; 
Sage FeIlov7 in Philosophy, Cornell University 

BENJAMIN ERNEST MITCHELL. .. .Pro/essor of Mathematics 

B.A., Scarritt-Morrisville ; M.A., Vanderbilt University ; 
Ph.D., Columbia University. 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON Professor of German 

and Ancient Languages 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College ; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania. 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Southwestern (Texas); B.A., Yale University; Rhodes Scholar, 1907-10; 
B.A., M.A., University of Oxford (Honors School). 

MILTON CHRISTIAN WHITE Professor of English 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College ; M.A., Harvard University ; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

ROSS HENDERSON MOORE Professor of History 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., Millsaps College; M.A., University 
of Chicago ; Ph.D., Duke University. 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK Associate Professor 

of Mathematics 

B.A., Millsaps College ; M.A., Vanderbilt University ; 
graduate work, Duke University. 

ELIZABETH CRAIG Assistant Professor of French 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University ; M.A., Columbia University ; 

Diplome de la Sorbonne, Ecole de Preparation des Professeurs, de 

Francais a I'Etranger, Faculty of Letters, University of Paris. 

MRS. ARMAND COULLET Assistant Professor of Latin 

and Teacher of Voice 

B.A., Millsaps College ; M.A., University of Pennsylvania ; gn*aduate work, 

American Academy in Rome, University of Chicago ; 

B.M., Belhaven College ; graduate work in 

Voice, Bordeaux, France. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 9 

HERBERT SAFFORD EMIGH Instructor of Chemistry 

B.A., University of Mississippi ; M.A., University of Mississippi. 

ELBERT STEPHEN WALLACE Professor of Economics 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College ; M.A., Duke University ; 
Ph.D., Duke University. 

JOHN WILLIAM VEST Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Mississippi College ; M.A., University of Texas. 
RAY SIGLER MUSGRAVE Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Bethany ; M.A., Ohio Wesleyan ; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

JOHN ALBERT FINCHER Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., University of South Carolina ; M.S., University of South Carolina ; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

CHARLES BETTS GALLOWAY Instructor in Chemistry 

and Physics 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.A., Duke University; Graduate 
■work, Diake University. 

MARY VELMA SIMPSON Assistant Instructor of 

Piano and Theory 

B.A., Millsaps College ; graduate vyork, S.M.U. and 
Chicago Musical College. 

EDMOND F. RICKETTS Instructor in History 

and Social Science 

A.B., University of Illinois ; A.M., University of Illinois ; 
graduate work. Harvard University. 

ROBERT BERNARD WARD Assistant Laboratory Instructor 

B.S., Mississippi State; graduate work, Mississippi State. 

F. FAGAN THOMPSON Instructor in Public Speaking 

B.S., Peabody College for Teachers ; M.A., B.D., Vanderbilt University ; 
Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS Professor of Piano 

B.A., Whitworth College ; B.M., American Conservatory. 

ROBERT RAYMOND HAYNES. Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Tennessee; LL.B., University of Tennessee; Vice- 
Consul of the United States in Scotland and England ; M.A., George 
Peabody College ; graduate work, George Peabody College. 

*J. B. PRICE Instructor in Chemistry and Mathematics 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., University of Mississippi; 
graduate work. University of North Carolina. 

MRS. HENRY W. COBB Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A., St. Lawrence University ; M.A., University of North Carolina 

MRS. MARY B. H. STONE Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., George Peabody College. 



10 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



HENRY MORTON BULLOCK Professor of Religion 

B.Ph., B.D., Emory University ; S.T.B., Yale Divinity School ; 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

VERNON LANE WHARTON Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Millsaps College ; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

MRS. W. F. GOODMAN Instructor in English 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Tulane University. 

VIRGINIA THOMAS Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Grenada College ; B.A., University of Mississippi ; M.A., 
Northwestern University ; graduate work, Columbia University 

MRS. A. G. SANDERS Instructor in English 

B.A., Smith College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

ARMAND COULLET Professor of Violin 

Conductor of Symphony Orchestra 

ALBERTA TAYLiOR. .Assistant Instructor of Piano and Theory 

B.A., Millsaps College ; graduate work, Chicago Musical College. 
HENRY LAFAYETTE STONE. . .Director of Physical Education 

*Absent on leave, 1940-41. 

♦ROBERT PAUL RAMSEY Instructor in History 

B.S., Millsaps College ; graduate work, Yale University. 

♦RALPH GRAY JONES Instructor in Social Science 

B.A., M.A., Louisiana State University; graduate work, 
Duke University 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CURRIE. . .Prof, of Ancient Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



11 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Biology: JAMES BOOTH, JAMES LANCASTER, 

CHARLOTTE NICHOLS, DOLORES 
DYE. 

Chemistry: PEMBLE FIELD, JAMES FERGUSON, 

LONGSTREET HAMILTON. 

Education: MRS. R. E. FARR, ROSALIE RAMSEY. 

EnglisJi: CARL MILLER, CAPPY RICKS, THOM- 

AS ROBERTSON. 

History: NASH BROYLES, HERBERT SELMAN. 

Library: SHIRLEY CHICHESTER, MARY ALYCE 

MOORE, MARY E. MOORE, MARY 
CRAWFORD DENNIS, JOEL Mo- 
DAVID. 



Mathematics : 
Physical Education. 

Physics : 

Freshman Debate 
Coach : 

Bursar's Office: 

Dean's Office: 

Registrar' s Office: 

Religion: 



Sociology and 
History 12: 



JACK BAIN, BURT SUMRALL. 

MARGARET PORTER, VIRGINIA GAD- 
DY, CHARLES WARD, WILLARD 
SAMUELS, MILAN RICHARDSON, 
HUGH ADCOCK. 

MILTON WHITE, DALE HARPER. 



NAT ROGERS. 

VERNON B. HATHORN, JR. 

CHARLTON ROBY, AUBREY SMITH. 

ROY CLARK, MADELINE MOONEY. 

RUDOLPH BANGERT, CLAYTON MOR- 
GAN. 

J. S. VANDIVER, JR. 



12 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OTHER OFFICERS 
MRS. MARY BOWEN CLARK Assistant Librarian 

M.E.L., Whitworth College 

MRS. ANNE KATHRINE SPARKMAN Assistant Librarian 

B.A., Oslo Katedralskole, Oslo, Norway ; Library certificate, New York 

State Library School ; Assistant Cataloguer, Harper Memorial 

Library, University of Chicago 

MARTHA BENNETT Secretary to the President 

HOSEA FRANK MAGEE College Physician 

B.S., Millsaps College ; M.D., Tulane University 

FRED E. MASSEY Bookkeeper 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern 

CAROLYN BXJFKIN Assistant to the Registrar 

A.B.. Whitworth College 

BENJAMIN ORMOND VAN HOOK Director of Athletics 

MELVIN RICHARDSON Assistant Coach 

HENRY LAFAYETTE STONE Director Physical Education 

MRS. W. K. BARNES. Director Phys. Ed. for Women 

MRS. C. F. COOPER Matron Girls' Dormitory 

MRS. CARROLL VARNER Matron Tamer Hall 

MRS. MELVILLE JOHNSON Matron Galloway Hall 

MBS. W. T. BARNES Matron Elsinore 

ROBERT BEIRNARD WARD Assistant Football Coach 



A 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13 

THE COLLEGE 

S a living ideal of service, Millsaps College draws inspira- 
tion from intangible but dramatic beginnings. 



Almost a century ago a lone Mississippi youth, making 
a slow and painful journey in search of an education far from 
the scenes of his birth, dreamed of making it possible for the 
highest type of Mississippi's youth to secure a Christian edu- 
cation within the Magnolia State. 

Today Millsaps College stands in Jackson, product of a 
half-century of development, as the concrete realization of 
that dream come true. Major Reuben W. Millsaps, its found- 
er, lived to see the college recognized as an institution deep- 
rooted in the traditions of scholarship. 

With material and inspirational support from Major Mill- 
saps, the Mississippi conferences of the Methodist church re- 
solved in 1888 to establish a college for men. Four years 
later, with four professors and a handful of students, Millsaps 
opened its doors in the City of Jackson. Coeducation was in- 
stituted when the college began its seventh session. 

The Rev. W. B. Murrah, of the North Mississippi confer- 
ence, launched the institution's career as its first president. 
President Murrah and the executive heads who followed him 
after he became a Methodist bishop have played leading roles 
in making the institution what it is. 

Presidents of the college have been W. B. Murrah, D.D., 
LL.D., (1892-1910); D. C. Hull, M.A., (1910-1912); A. F. 
Watkins, D.D., (1912-1923); D. M. Key, Ph.D., LL.D., (1923- 
1938); and M. L. Smith, Ph.D., (1938- ). 

Growth of the college has been consistent and healthy. 
For the first 2 5 years attendance was almost static, fluctu- 
ating between 100 and 200. Then the 1920's witnessed the 
beginnings of a steady rise, reaching a peak during the 1928- 
29 session. The enrollment then remained between 400 and 
500 until the 1938-39 session when it reached an all-time 
high of 609. The enrollment for 1939-40 was 676. 

"No finer or more wholesome young people were ever 
assembled in any college community," in the words of a re- 



14 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

cent presidential report to the Methodist conferences of Mis- 
sissippi. "They have made the reputation of Millsaps and 
have been excelled in no line of academic endeavor. Almost 
without exception they have found a place of useful service. 
They are the chief outcome of Methodist college effort in 
Mississippi." 

Pointing out that the value of a college such as Millsaps 
may be measured by the subsequent careers of those it trains, 
the report shows that an overwhelming proportion of those 
entering the Methodist ministry in Mississippi are Millsaps 
graduates. 

"Not only through Millsaps-trained pastors, but also 
through her graduates who are teaching in the public schools 
and engaged in business and the professions, Millsaps is con- 
tributing to the highest interests of church and state," con- 
tinues the report. "There are more than 400 Millsaps grad- 
uates and many more former students teaching in state 
schools. Most of the more than 1,500 graduates are now liv- 
ing in Mississippi." 

Looking forward to a Greater Millsaps in recognition of 
its expanding fields of service, a $400,000 endowment drive 
was begun by the two conferences of the Methodist church 
in Mississippi during the fall of 1938. College needs for 
which funds are sought include an endowment increase, 
strengthening of the library, and a religion and fine arts 
building. This movement will continue until 19 42 when Mill- 
saps celebrates its semi-centennial. 

A keynote to the spirit of Millsaps College was recently 
struck by a prominent graduate who had returned to the cam- 
pus for a chapel address. He paid tribute to his alma mater 
as an institution which instills in its students "a conception of 
the things which really count — the ultimate values." He 
added that "Millsaps 'goes in for' the things which widen one's 
vision . . . which enable him to look for the horizon which 
others have not yet seen." 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 15 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESOURCES 

The physical resources, the grounds, the buildings and 
the endowment are sufficient to enable the college to do a 
high grade of work; but all, except the area of the grounds, 
need to be strengthened in order to provide for reasonable 
increase of enrollment, to improve the conditions under which 
the work is done, to increase the faculty support, to maintain 
an improved physical plant, to beautify the campus, and to 
offset probable decrease in endowment productivity. 

GROUNDS 

The campus of 100 acres, situated on a beautiful emi- 
nence almost in the heart of the city, is large enough to af- 
ford room for the full development of all the phases of col- 
lege life. It is pleasantly wooded with many fine old oaks 
and elms and open fields and playing grounds. Much im- 
provement in the appearance of the campus has been effected 
in recent years. A fine concrete drive gives access to all the 
buildings. Two commodious playing fields for football and 
baseball, a track and tennis courts are readily reached from 
the heart of the campus. A fine nine-hole golf course covers 
the north end of the campus, with convenient access to the 
showers and dressing rooms in the gymnasium. 

BUILDINGS 

The instructional buildings are all relatively new and 
modern. The administration building, Murrah Hall, was 
erected in 1914; the Carnegie-Millsaps Library building in 
1926; the Sullivan-Harrell Science Hall in 1928; and the Buie 
Memorial Building for Physical Education in 19 36. These 
buildings which constitute the heart of the institution, are 
well equipped for the functions they are designed to perform. 
The examining committee of Phi Beta Kappa said in regard 
to them: "The library, though small, seems adequate, and 
the collections are well chosen. The laboratories in the new 



16 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

science building are adequate, the equipment is new and up- 
to-date." 

Founders Hall, is located across the drive from the li- 
brary. There are rooms for 8 men. On the ground floor is 
a large rest and recreation room and an apartment occupied 
by a member of the college staff. Burton Hall and Galloway 
Hall and the dining hall are located at the south end of the 
campus. Galloway Hall has been reserved for women stu- 
dents. Its elegant reception rooms have been newly equipped 
with handsome furnishings. 

The new dormitory for women is located on the east 
campus near North State Street. It is a handsome structure, 
thoroughly modern, and gives luxurious accommodation to 
forty-four women students. 

ENDOWMENT 

The productive endowment, according to the last audit, 
amounted to $784,407.65. In addition to the income from this 
endowment, the college budget receives pro rata share of con- 
ference assessments amounting to $6,800 and also the pro- 
ceeds of a producing gas well located on the college campus. 
Owing to decrease in the productivity of invested funds as 
well as the need of greater operating income the college needs 
contributions to its endowment more urgently than anything 
else. The statement of total assets derived from the last of- 
ficial audit, June 30, 193 9, is as follows: 

Current funds $ 10,584.25 

Loan funds 4,802.01 

Endowment 784,407.65 

Plant funds 923,668.87 

Total -$1,68 7,46 2.78 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 17 

GIFTS OF OVER $1,000.00 TO MILLSAPS COLLEGE FROM 
THE BEGINNING OF ITS HISTORY 

R. W. Millsaps, Jackson $550,000.00 

W. S. F. Tatum, Hattiesburg 130,000.00 

W. M. Buie, Jackson 35,800.00 

B. B. Jones, Berryville, Va 30,000.00 

L C. Enochs Family, Jackson 18,500.00 

Stewart Gammill, Jackson 11,000.00 

Estate J. H. Scruggs, Dec'd, Corinth 9,000.00 

W. A. Davenport, Forest 7,000.00 

J. L. and M. S. Enochs, Jackson 4,860.00 

Jas. Hand, Purvis 4,500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Fitzhugh, Memphis 4,500.00 

T. B. Lampton, Jackson 4,000.00 

W. H. Tribbett, Terry 3,000.00 

P. H. Enochs, Fernwood 2,833.33 

W. H. Watkins, Jackson 2,625.00 

R. L. Ezelle 2,300.00 

J. L. Dantzler, New Orleans 2,250.00 

D. W. Babb 2,000.00 

R. E. Kennington, Jackson 2,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Wortman, Jackson 1,680.00 

J. A. Moore, Quitman 1,500.00 

Mrs. A. D. Gunning, Jackson 1,500.00 

F". L. Adams 1,500.00 

Mississippi Power & Light Co 1,500.00 

Jackson Clearing House 1,500.00 

C. R. Ridgeway, Jr., Jackson 1,000.00 

Enochs & "Wortman, Jackson 1,000.00 

Weston Lumber Co., Logtown 1,000.00 

H. L. Wilkinson, Shelby 1,000.00 

J. E. Coleman, Doddsville 1,000.00 

L. L. Roberts, Canton 1,000.00 

J. R. Bingham, Carrollton 1,000.00 

E. W. Reid, Magnolia 1,000.00 

Peebles Estate, Jackson 1,000.00 

D. M. Key, Jackson 1,000.00 

H. C. Couch 1,000.00 

McCarty-Holman 1,000.00 



IS 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



Mississippi School Supply Company 1,000.00 

J. L. Decell 1,000.00 

Wright & Ferguson 1,000.00 

R. W. Naef 1,000.00 

Corporations 

General Education Board, New York 125,000.00 

Carnegie Corp., New Yorlc 69,000.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 19 

CARNEGIE-MILLSAPS LIBRARY 

Near the close of the 19 05-06 session, Andrew Carnegie 
offered to give the college $15,000 for a library building if 
the trustees would supply an endowment of equal amount. 
Major Millsaps added to his many contributions by giving the 
full amount of the endowment. 

The foundations of this handsome building unfortunate- 
ly gave way, and it became necessary to provide a new library. 
The Carnegie Corporation generously appropriated $50,000 
for this purpose. The present building was completed in 19 25- 
26 and with the addition of two floors of shelving will house 
60,000 volumes. Furniture for the reading rooms was given 
by the Enochs Lumber & Manufacturing Company. 

The library contains approximately 2 6,750 volumes and 
receives one hundred and forty periodicals. A special grant 
of $10,000 for the purchase of books was made by the Car- 
negie Corporation during the five years 1931-19 3 6, and about 
4,600 volumes were added from this source. The income from 
the Martha A. Turner Fund of $1000, founded by Mrs. J. R. 
Bingham of Carrollton, Miss., is used for the purchase of 
books in English literature. 

Library Hours: Monday through Friday, 8-5, 6-9:30. 
Saturday, 8 to 1:15 

The library is closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
and spring holidays. Books are loaned for two weeks or a 
shorter period of time. 

A special collection of documents, manuscripts, and books 
on Methodism in Mississippi has been started, and gifts of 
material related to this subject would be especially valuable. 

Donors to library, 1939-40 — Terramare Office, Berlin, 
Germany, Dr. M. L. Smith, Hon. Walker Wood, Prof. P. L. 
Rainwater, Dr. J. M. Sullivan, Henry B. Collins, Pentecostal 
Publishing Company, F. B. Joyner, Dr. R. S. Musgrave, Mr. 
and Mrs. Colin Clements, Mrs. R. L. Hunt, Dr. R. L. Hunt, 
Mrs. E. F. Ricketts, Dr. Bullock's Religion Class, Standard 
Oil Company, Pennsylvania State Commission, Gettysburg, 
Penn, Dr. G. W. Currie, Raymond Pitcairn, Dr. Wm. E. Rieck- 
en, American Youth Commission, Hon. Dan R. McGehee, Bir- 
mingham Publishing Company, Dallas News, Cokesbury Press, 
Dr. Henry Ricks, State Board of Health, American Jewish 
Joint Distributing Commission. 



20 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS, PRIZES 

ENDOWED FUNDS 

The income from the following funds may be used by the 
Board of Trustees to aid deserving applicants: 

The Clara Chrisman Scholarship 
The Peebles Scholarship 
The W. H. Watkins Scholarship 
The Marvin Galloway Scholarship 
The J. A. Moore Scholarship 

SPECIAL SCHOLAKSHIPS 

THE TRIBBETT SCHOLARSHIP 

The student to whom the scholarship is awarded receives 
two hundred dollars, payable one-half at the beginning of the 
first semester and one-half at the beginning of the second. 
The award is subject to the following conditions. 

This scholarship is to be awarded at the end of each ses- 
sion to the member of the sophomore, junior or senior class 
whose quality index is highest for the year, subject to the 
following qualifications: 

a. He must be a regular student with not less than thirty- 
two semester hours work for the year, and must have made 
at least "C" in each of the subjects studied. 

b. He must be qualified for and agree to work assigned 
by the president of the college. 

THE TRAVELLI SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships of $120.00 are awarded at the end of each 
session to two qualified members of one of the upper classes. 
They are awarded by the Travelli Foundation of Boston on 
the recommendation of a faculty committee. 

THE D. A. R. SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Ralph Humphreys chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution offers a scholarship of $100.00, to which 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

the college adds $50.00. This scholarship is awarded by a 
committee of the representatives of the chapter and of the 
faculty, and is granted for superiority In scholarship, promise 
of usefulness, and self-reliance. 

The Belvidere chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution of Greenville, Mississippi, awards an annual schol- 
arship of $50.00, to which the college adds $50.00. This 
scholarship is awarded to a resident of the Greenville area. 

THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE- CONFEDERACY 
SCHOLARSHIP 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy provide a par- 
tial scholarship for a student whom they select. 

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Board of Trustees have authorized the award of 
thirty scholarships worth $75.00 each to graduates of Mis- 
sissippi high schools. These scholarships are awarded upon 
recommendation of the Scholarship Awards Committee. The 
awards are made on the basis of psychological examinations 
and interviews held at the college in the spring of each year. 
Only those ranking in the upper 10% of their class and able 
to furnish evidence of good character and promise of useful- 
ness are eligible to apply for these scholarships. Application 
forms may be secured from Dr. M. L. Smith, President of 
Millsaps College. 

SERVICE SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are service scholarships in each of several depart- 
ments, the holders of which are expected to aid the head of 
the department in some definite work. These scholarships 
are ordinarily open only to members of the upper classes. Ap- 
plication should be made to the president of the college. 

LOAN FUNDS 
THE W. T. J. SULLIVAN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 
This fund is administered by Dr. J. M. Sullivan, Profes- 
sor of Chemistry, Millsaps College. 



22 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THE FEILD COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION LOAN FUND 

The Feild Cooperative Association, a private philanthrop- 
ic enterprise, makes loans to members of the junior and senior 
classes who are of good character and show promise of use- 
fulness. The loans are to cover only a part of the expenses 
of the student. Application should be addressed to Miss S. 
Frances Sale, Executive Secretary of the Feild Cooperative 
Association, Lamar Life Building, Jackson, Mississippi. 

MEDALS 

1. The Founder's Medal is to be awarded annually to the 
member of the senior class who has made the highest quality 
index for the entire college course and has received a grade 
of excellent on his comprehensive examination. Only stu- 
dents who have done at Millsaps College all the work required 
for the degree are eligible for this award. 

2. The Bourgeois Medal is awarded annually to the mem- 
ber of the freshman, sophomore, or junior class who has made 
the highest quality-index during the year. Such student must 
be a candidate for a degree, and must have taken a minimum 
of thirty semester hours of college work during the year in 
which the medal is awarded to him. No student who has won 
this medal can compete for it again. 

3. The Ida V. Sharp Medal in English is awarded to the 
member of the senior class who has made the highest quality- 
index in his English course. The candidate must have taken 
at least twenty-four semester hours in English. 

4. The John C. Carter Medal for Oratory is awarded an- 
nually to the student who presents the best original oration 
in the oratorical contest. This contest is open to men and 
women students and is held in February or March of each 
year. 

5. The Clark Essay Medal shall be awarded annually to 
that student who presents the best and most original paper 
in any English course in Millsaps College. 

6. The Buie Medal for Declamation is open to members 
of the freshman and sophomore classes, but it cannot be 
awarded to any student more than once. The contest for this 
medal is held at commencement each year. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 23 

7. Chi Omega Award. Chi Omega sorority, seeking to 
further the interest of women in the social sciences, presents 
an award of $25.00 to the girl having the highest average for 
the year in the field of psychology, sociology, economics, or 
other courses in the social sciences. The field is selected 
yearly at the suggestion of the head of the social science de- 
partment. 



24 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Millsaps College, as an institution of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, seeks to be a genuinely Christian col- 
lege. The faculty is made up of scholars who are Christiana 
striving to fulfill the highest ideals of personal devotion and 
of community citizenship. The religious life of the college 
centers around the churches of Jackson, and the campus Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Every inducement is brought to bear 
upon the students to attend a church and church school of 
their own denomination. A chapel or assembly of the entire 
college provides opportunity for worship, inspiration, and busi- 
ness of college-wide concern. Varied programs, including ad- 
dresses by faculty members, students, and outside speakers of 
ability, are presented at these services. 

THE CAMPUS-CHURCH RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
AND THE MILLSAPS CHRISTIAN COUNCIL 

The Christian program of the college is coordinated with 
the local and general program of the church through the Cam- 
pus-Church Relations Committee. The various religious ac- 
tivities of the college are correlated and unified by the Mill- 
saps Christian Council, composed of representatives of all 
religious groups on the campus. This council sponsors dele- 
gations of students to the summer conferences of the church 
at Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, and to the Methodist State 
Student Conference. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The College Y. M. C. A. is the recognized channel of stu- 
dent religious activity for men. The association was organ- 
ized shortly after the college was founded, and has done much 
to strengthen the spiritual life and influence of the college 
and its members, and to promote progressive Christian work. 
Each Monday meetings are held for the presentation and dis- 
cussion of questions of interest to students. The association 
shares vitally in the college program for the adjustment of 
freshmen to the Millsaps community. Delegations of mem- 
bers represent the association at state, regional, and Blue 
Ridge, N. C, conferences each year. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 2 5 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Y. W. C. A. provides expression for the religious in- 
terests of Millsaps women through a program similar to that 
of the Y, M. C. A. It holds weekly meetings devoted to the 
religious needs of college women, and cooperates in the orien- 
tation of new students in campus life. Representatives of 
the association participate in all of the conferences of the Y. 
W. C. A., and the Christian Student Movement. 

MINISTERIAL LEAGUE 

Students preparing for the Christian ministry may join 
the Ministerial League, which provides programs appropriate 
to the needs of students interested in Christian life work. 
Through its activities, the league provides opportunity for 
Christian service for its members, and contributes much to 
the religious life of the campus, and of the local churches. 

RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK 

The annual Religious Emphasis Week is sponsored by 
all the religious groups of the campus, functioning through 
the Millsaps Christian Council. For this week some outstand- 
ing religious leader familiar with student life and problems 
addresses the student-body and various groups of students and 
professors, and is available for private conference with in- 
dividuals. Speakers of recent years have included Bishop 
W. T. Watkins, Dr. D. D. Holt, of South Carolina, Dr. Mar- 
shall Steel of Texas. The speaker for this occasion in the 
1940-41 college year is Dr. W. A. Smart, of Emory University. 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTER 
All religious groups of the campus share the use of a 
frame building known as the Christian Center. This building 
has been recently remodelled and now provides facilities for 
worship, forum, recreation, and committee meetings. In ad- 
dition to the meetings of the various religious organizations, 
a vesper service is conducted in the Center each evening after 
dinner. 



26 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

ATHLETICS 

Millsaps College has maintained a consistently high ath- 
letic standard, not only in developing teams for intercollegiate 
competition, but in providing a well rounded program which 
attempts to bring every student in college into some form of 
athletic competition. 

I. ELIGIBILITY. 

Millsaps is a member of the Dixie conference. Important 
rules which govern Millsaps athletics are: (1) During hia 
freshman year of residence a student may participate in the 
major sports only in limited competition with the freshmen 
of other institutions or with junior colleges. (2) A student 
who participates as a member of varsity teams, must advance 
each year in class standing. (3) Graduates of junior colleges 
are eligible at once for varsity teams. 

II. AWARDS. 

(1) Freshmen. Freshman sweaters are awarded in base- 
ball, basketball, football, and tennis upon the recommenda- 
tion of the coach. (Freshmen, however, will not receive their 
sweaters until they have attained a scholastic record which 
will make them eligible for intercollegiate competition.) 

(2) Varsity. A varsity jacket with an "M" is given a 
student upon recommendation of the coach, the first time he 
is a regular member of a varsity team in baseball, basketball, 
football, or tennis. 

III. INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS. 

In the desire to have a "sports for all" program, the col- 
lege sponsors Intramural activities in: archery, baseball, bas- 
ketball, boxing, free throwing, touch football, golf, horseshoe, 
Softball, track, tennis, and volley ball. 

Cups are awarded to championship squads in these ac- 
tivities. In general, the units are based upon residence in 
dormitories and teams sponsored by social fraternities. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 27 

IV. ATHLETIC FACILITIES. 

(1) A new gymnasium provides a large playing floor for 
basketball, boxing, volley ball, indoor baseball, and tennis. 
It has a regulation ring for boxing, mats for gymnastics, dress- 
ing rooms for all teams, a room for visiting teams, trainer's 
room complete with equipment for injuries, a club room for 
wearers of the "M", and the college store. The gymnasium 
has become the center of the activities of the students. (2) 
The football stadium with seating accommodations for five 
thousand spectators is equipped with lights for night games 
and also contains a fine 24 ft. quarter mile cinder track. (3) 
The baseball field is separate from the football stadium and 
is also used as a freshman football practice field. (4) Five 
new clay tennis courts have been constructed near the gymna- 
sium and are kept in perfect condition in nine out of the 
twelve months of the year. (5) A very fine nine hole golf 
course has been built and is for use by all students. 



28 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Millsaps Student Association is composed of officers 
elected by the student body and the student executive board. 
The president, vice-president, and the secretary-treasurer are 
elected annually from the student body. Members of the stu- 
dent executive board are chosen by the activities which they 
represent. 

Meetings of the student executive board are held at least 
once a month, with other meetings called when the president 
considers them necessary. The Student Association holds its 
regular meeting during the chapel period every Friday morn- 
ing. All members of the student body automatically become 
members of the Student Association. 

The duties and functions of the Student Association are 
to act in the administration of student affairs, to cooperate 
with the administration In the orientation program of the 
college, to promote a better understanding between student 
and faculty, and to work for the benefit of the student body 
and the progress of the college. 

THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

A working laboratory for students with journalistic in- 
clinations is furnished in The Purple and AVhite, weekly Mill- 
saps student publication. A college newspaper with a reputa- 
tion which ranks it among the best in the South, The Purple 
and White affords actual experience in the editorial, business, 
and advertising phases of a modern news-sheet. Extra-cur- 
ricular college credit for members of the staff, and the valua- 
ble experience it affords, make this activity both profitable 
and interesting to students. 

THE BOBASHELA 

The Bobashela is the annual student publication of Mill- 
saps College. It attempts to give a comprehensive view of 
campus life as enjoyed by the student body and faculty mem- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 29 

bers. The 19 40 edition is the thirty-fourth volume of this 
Millsaps book. Bobashela is a Choctaw Indian name for "good 
friend." 

THE PLAYERS 

The dramatic club of the college has as its official name 
"The Millsaps Players." Under the direction of Professor 
White the Players put on two or more three-act plays each 
year, and produce with first year novices five or six one-act 
plays. The organization is a live one and its productions are 
highly creditable. 

The Players within recent years have greatly added to 
the facilities for play production: The stage has been en- 
larged, a handsome curtain and cyclorama, three complete sets 
of scenery, and complete lighting equipment have been pur- 
chased. 

THE GLEE CLUB 

The Millsaps Singers, a chorus composed of men and 
women students under the able direction of Mr. Alvin J. 
King, is one of the most important organizations on the 
Millsaps campus. 

In addition to numerous appearances in Jackson and 
nearby towns, the purple-robed chorus takes an extensive 
trip over Mississippi each year, giving musical programs in 
various parts of the state. This year's tour carries the Singers 
into Alabama, Tennessee, Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois. 

Membership is open to freshmen and upper-classmen 
alike and two semester hours' credit is given for the year's 
work. 

THE BAND 

The Millsaps Symphonic Band is the official band of the 
10 6th Engineers, Mississippi National Guard. Members are 
paid for their services and attend field training camp for two 
weeks each summer. This is an important campus organiza- 
tion and membership is sought by all students with musical 
aspirations. 

Membership is open to all students who qualify. Two se- 
mester hours' credit is given for the year's work. 



30 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEBATING 

Since the year the college was founded, debating has 
occupied an important place in Its activities. Millsaps teams 
participate in about seventy-five debates each year, meeting 
teams from the leading institutions in the South and South- 
west. 

Extra-curricular credit is offered for successful partici- 
pation in debating, oratory, and extemporaneous public 
speaking. 

THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

The International Relations Club of Millsaps College is 
an endowed honorary organization which recognizes superior 
work in current history. 

Membership is elective and restricted. 

The club holds bi-monthly meetings at which timely world 
problems and events are discussed by student and faculty 
members. Another feature of the club is to sponsor occa- 
sional lectures of international interest. 

THE EMPYRIANS 

The Empyrians Club, organized in 1934, intends that all 
Millsaps students should have access to social activity. Both 
men and women students who do not join Greek letter social 
fraternities and sororities are welcomed by the non-Greek 
organization. Numerous parties, picnics, and entertainments 
are given during the year with each member sharing the ex- 
penses. No membership fees are charged, however. The 
Empyrians are well represented in intra-mural sports compe- 
tition and other campus activities. 

LE CERCLE FRANCAI3 

Le Cercle F'rancais supplements classroom activity in af- 
fording additional opportunity for practice in oral French. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 31 

Meetings are held bi-monthly when French lectures, 
games and songs are enjoyed. 

Only students with an average of A or B in French are 
eligible. Membership is not open to freshmen. 

"LA TERTULIA" 

"La Tertulia" is an honorary organization composed of 
fifteen Spanish students with an average of A or B. 

The club was organized in the fall of 193 6 by a group 
of students especially interested in the Spanish language. 

Programs are arranged in which spoken Spanish plays a 
large part, and studies are made of the various Spanish-speak- 
ing countries, particularly the Latin-American countries. 



32 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

ETA SIGMA PHI 

Eta Sigma Phi is a national honor fraternity for the 
recognition and stimulation of interest in classical studies, 
including the history, art and literature of ancient Greece and 
Rome. Its forty-six chapters scattered throughout the United 
States foster a closer relationship among students interested 
In the classics. 

Alpha Phi, the Millsaps chapter, was founded in Decem- 
ber, 19 3 5, and has since been an active group on the campus. 

PI KAPPA DELTA 

The Millsaps chapter of Pi Kappa Delta offers member- 
ship to those who have given distinguished service in debat- 
ing, oratory, or extemporaneous public speaking. The na- 
tional honorary fraternity with its one hundred and forty- 
eight chapters performs a valuable service in co-ordinating 
the forensic activities of colleges throughout the country. 

BLUE STOCKINGS 

Blue Stockings is a local honorary literary sorority whose 
purpose is to stimulate the art of creative writing among the 
women students at Millsaps. Membership includes women 
members of the faculty who are interested in writing. 

KIT KAT 

Kit Kat is a literary fraternity with a selected member- 
ship of men students who have ambition combined with 
ability to write. Monthly programs consist of original papers 
given by the members and criticized by the entire group of 
student and faculty members. 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

Omicron Delta Kappa is a widely recognized leadership 
fraternity with chapters in the principal colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the country. Pi Circle at Millsaps brings 
together those members of the student body and faculty most 
interested in campus activities, together with a limited num- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 33 

ber of alumni and supporters who discuss Millsaps problems, 
and work for the betterment of the college. 

Membership in Omicron Delta Kappa is one of the high- 
est honors a student can attain. 

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 

Alpha Epsilon Delta is an honorary pre-medical frater- 
nity, founded at the University of Alabama in 1926. Its 
purpose is to promote the interests of pre-medical students. 
Leadership, scholarship, expertness, character, and person- 
ality are the qualities by which students are judged for mem- 
bership. Alpha Epsilon Delta strives to bridge the gap be- 
tween pre-medical and medical schools and to link the under- 
graduate with the medical student and the physician. 

DELTA KAPPA DELTA 

Delta Kappa Delta is an honorary pre-law fraternity. Its 
purpose is to promote justice, truth, and all the high ideals 
of law. It recognizes ability and interest in the field of law 
preparation. It endeavors to serve as the link between pre- 
law and law training. 

DKD is the only pre-law fraternity in existence. Alpha, 
the Millsaps chapter, was founded on March 6, 1939. 

ETA SIGMA 

Eta Sigma is a local honorary fraternity which recog- 
nizes excellence in scholarship. It selects its members from 
the junior and senior classes. The high standards required 
for membership in Eta Sigma make it a coveted honor at 
Millsaps. 

ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

Effective service in "The Millsaps Players" is rewarded 
by membership in Alpha Psi Omega, the national honorary 
dramatic fraternity. Students may qualify for the honor 
fraternity by notable achievement in make up, stage man- 
agement, business management, costuming, and acting. 



34 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SIGMA LAMBDA 

Sigma Lambda is a women's leadership sorority organ- 
ized for the purpose of recognizing outstanding leadership 
among women at Millsaps. It is a forum for the discussion 
of questions of interest to the college. Sigma Lambda is 
composed of a limited number of women students and facul- 
ty members. 

Sigma Lambda membership is one of the most distinctive 
honors a woman can receive at Millsaps. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 35 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES 

Four national fraternities: Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Lambda Chi Alpha, and one local fraternity, 
Sigma Rho Chi, have chapters on the Millsaps campus. These 
social clubs maintain houses in which some of their members 
reside. 

During the first week of the school year, each fra- 
ternity extends invitations to from ten to twenty new students, 
bidding them to membership in their organization. The new 
men are given an opportunity during this "rush" period to 
become acquainted with fraternities and at the end of this 
time bids are extended and the new students are pledged. 
While pledging is not allowed for the first week of school, 
a fraternity may extend an invitation to join at any other 
time during the year. 

Initiation of new pledges cannot take place until the 
student has been at Millsaps for a semester during which he 
has made at least nine quality points with not more than one 
grade below D. 

SOCIAL SORORITIES 

Millsaps College has four national sororities: Phi Mu, 
Kappa Delta, Beta Sigma Omicron, and Chi Omega. 

Formal rushing for new students takes place at the be- 
ginning of the fall term and is done according to rules which 
the sororities have all agreed upon. Initiation of new pledges 
cannot take place until the student has been at Millsaps for a 
semester during which she has made at least nine quality 
points with not more than one grade below D. Informal 
rushing is allowed throughout the year according to the de- 
sires of the various groups. 



36 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

For admission to Millsaps College, the general require- 
ments are as follows: 

1. Good Character — As attested by the certificate from 
the school last attended, or other valid proof. 

2. Good Physical Condition — As attested by a complete 
physical examination, required of each freshman or transfer 
student at the time of registration. At the opening of school 
in September these examinations will be given free of charge 
through the generous cooperation of the State Board of 
Health. Those who register at other times must bear the ex- 
pense of the examination. 

3. Adequate Preparation — As shown by the certificate 
of an accredited school, or an equivalent examination. 

Students are admitted to Millsaps College as: 

1. Full freshmen. 

2. Students with advanced standing. 

3. Special students. 

Full Freshmen 

For admission as full freshman the candidate must of- 
fer fifteen units as specified below. English 3 units, algebra 
1 % units, plane geometry 1 unit, history 2 units. 

Advanced Standing 

For admission to advanced standing the candidate must 
submit a transcript of the work done in a recognized junior 
or senior college. The transcript must show the satisfactory 
completion of at least twenty-four semester hours with a 
grade of "C" in nine of these hours. 

Sixty-four semester hours maximum credit will be al- 
lowed on work done in state junior colleges approved by the 
State Junior College Commission. Full credit will be allowed 
for all academic courses of freshman and sophomore level. 
Other courses will be allowed full elective credit with the 
proviso that transfers may be called upon to do extra work 
necessary to fulfill Millsaps' requirements for majors, pre- 
professlonal work, and for high school professional licenses. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 37 

Special Student 

For admission as a special student, the candidate must 
present adequate proofs of good character, and of the need- 
ful maturity of training. Such students must in all cases 
meet the specific entrance requirements, as prescribed for the 
courses elected by them. But it is expressly ordered that no 
special student shall be recognized as a candidate for any de- 
gree from Millsaps unless he shall have completed all entrance 
requirements at least one year before the date of graduation. 

DEFINITION OF UNIT 

The unit in the following estimate (p. 38) means a sub- 
ject of study pursued in an academy or high school through a 
session of nine months with recitations five times a week, an 
average of forty-five minutes being devoted to each recitation. 

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ADMISSION 

The subjects accepted for admission and their value in 
units are given in tabulated form on page 38. The applicant 
for admission may enter either by certificate or by examina- 
tion. 

For admission by certificate, the candidate should file 
with the registrar of the college, not later than September 1, 
a certificate of preparation, made out on a blank form fur- 
nished by the state high school inspector to the principal of 
the high school. This certificate must come from some recog- 
nized institution of collegiate rank, or an accredited high 
school or academy. It must bear in all cases the signature 
of the head of the school, must specify the character and con- 
tents of each course offered for entrance credit, must give 
the length of time devoted to the course, and must give the 
candidate's grade. In the scientific course two hours of lab- 
oratory instruction will be counted as the equivalent of one 
hour recitation. Certificate of preparation from private tutors 
will in no case be accepted. Students thus prepared must in 
all cases take the entrance examination. 

For admission by examination, the candidate must pre- 
sent himself at the college in September, if the examination 
has not been previously taken. 



38 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ADMISSION 



SUBJECTS 



TOPICS UNITS 

Higher English Grammar \'% 

Elements of Rhetoric and Composition 1 

English Literature 1% 

Algebra to 
Quadratics 
Plane Geoi 
Solid Geor 
Plane Trig 
*Mechanic« 
Advanced 
Grammar i 
Caesar, foi 
tCicero, si: 
tVergil. th 
Grammar 
Xenophon, 

One-lialf E 

pases 
Elementarj 

pages 

One-half I 

pages 
Elementarj 

paKes 
One-half E 

pages 
Elementarj 

pages 

Ancient H 
Mediaeval 
English H 
American 

Civil ( 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Botany 1 

Zoology 1 

Physiography 1 

Physiology 1 

Agriculture 1 to 2 

Bible 1 

General Science 1 

Home Economics 1 

Economics _ 1 

Manual Training 2 

Bookkeeping _ 2 

Stenography _ 1 

Typewriting _ 1 

Physical Training 1 



English A 
English B 
English C 



Mathematics A 
Mathematics B 
Mathematics C 
Mathematics D 
Mathematics E 
Mathematics F 
Mathematics G 


Algebra to Quadratic Equations 1 

Quadratics Through Progressions Y^ to 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

Solid Geometry % 

Plane Trigonometry % 

*MechanicaI Drawing 1 

Advanced Arithmetic 1 


Latin A 
Latin B 
Latin C 
Latin D 


Grammar and Composition 1 

Caesar, four books or their equivalent 1 

tCicero, six orations 1 

tVergil, the first six books of the Aeneid 1 


Greek A 
Greek B 


Grammar and Composition 1 

Xenophon, first four books of the Anabasis 1 



French A 
French B 


One-lialf Elementary Grammar and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


Spanish A 
Spanish B 


One-half Elementary Q^rammar and at least 176 
pages of approved reading 1 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


German A 
German B 


One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 
pages of approved reading 1 


History A 
History B 
History C 
History D 


Ancient History 1 

Mediaeval and Modern History 1 

English History 1 

American History, or American History and 
Civil Government 1 



Science A 
Science B 
Science C 
Science D 
Science E 
Science F 
Science G 



*Conditioned on the presentation of an equal amount of geometry, 
tin place of a part of Cicero an equivalent of Sallust's Cataline, and in 
place of a part of Vergil an equivalent of Ovid will be accepted. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 39 

COST OF ATTENDING MILLSAPS 
COLLEGE 

The cost for students living on the campus varies accord- 
ing to the dormitory accommodations. The cost for students 
living in the city, except books and laboratory fees, is as fol- 
lows: 

Expenses — Local Students 

Registration Pee $ 25.00 

Library Fee .- 6.00 

Student Activities Fee 15.00 

Bobashela Fee - 2.00 

Tuition — year in advance 125.00 

Due beginning first semester |173.00 

For those w^ho find it more convenient to pay tuition by 

the semester, the following schedule of payments has been 

arranged: 

Fees $ 48.00 

Tuition — first semester 67.50 

Due beginning first semester 115.50 

Due beginning second semester 67.50 

Total for year $183.00 

Expenses — Boarding Students, add: 

Dormitory Contingent Fee $ 3.00 

Medical Fee 2.00 

Room Rent: 

For the Year By the Semester 

Cottages (limited number) $ 25.00 $ 15.00 

Founders Hall (Men) 30.00 17.50 

Burton Hall (Men) 50.00 27.50 

Galloway Hall (Women) 75.00 40.00 

*New Dormitory (Women) 100.00 50.00 

(Corner Rooms) 125.00 62.50 

*Varner Hall (Women) 90.00 45.00 

*Elsinore Hall (Women) 63.00 31.50 



40 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

All corner rooms except in dormitories marked (*) will 
be charged for at $2.50 per semester more than the above. 

CAFETERIA 

Boarding students secure their meals at the college cafe- 
teria which is located in Galloway Hall. The cafeteria is open 
to day students as well as those who live in the dormitories. 
This dining-room is under expert supervision and furnishes 
wholesome food at very moderate rates. The food is furnished 
practically at cost and there is ample variety from which to 
select. All students who room in the cottages and dormitories 
must take their meals in the college cafeteria and are required 
to buy a minimum of nine meal books per year at $15.00 each 
or a total of $135.00. 

SPECIAL FEES 
In addition to the above regular costs, students are 
charged certain fees for special services which are listed be- 
low. These fees apply only to those students registering for 
these particular courses: 

Science Fees 

Chemistry $10.00 

Physics - 10.00 

Geology 3.00 

Biology 10.00 

Astronomy 10.00 

Surveying 10.00 

Laboratory Breakage deposit (per course) 2.00 

Education Fees 

Practice Teaching $10.00 

Observation 10.00 

Psychology, all courses except 61, 62, 91, 

and 101, Materials Fee 50 

Laboratory Fees 
Psychology 61-6 2 $10.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 41 

Late Registration 

Fee for enrollment more than five days 

after the opening of school $ 3.00 

(Complete with both Registrar and Bursar) 

Graduation Fee 

Diploma, cap, gown, commencement expense.. ..$15. 00 

Excess Hours 

The normal student load is five subjects with either 
physical education or extra-curricular activities making a 
maximum of seventeen hours. Students registering for courses 
in excess of seventeen hours will be charged $5.00 for each 
additional hour per semester. 

MINISTERS' CHILDREN AND MINISTERIAL STUDENTS 
Sons and daughters of active or super-annuated Metho- 
dist ministers will be allowed a reduction of one-half tuition 
on either the yearly or semester plan of payment. 

Students who have been licensed by the conferences to 
make preparation for service in the ministry will be charged 
tuition at the regular rate, but will be allowed to sign tuition 
notes wliich will be cancelled after four years' service in the 
ministry. Should the student renounce his pursuit of the 
ministry the tuition notes would become due and payable at 
once. 

PURPOSE AND DISTRIBUTION OP THE STUDENT 
ACTIVITIES FEE 

The student activities fee of $15.00 paid by a student at 
the beginning of each year is distributed among different or- 
ganizations existing on the campus. The distribution of this 
fee is at the suggestion of the Student Executive Board. 

The Athletic Association receives 60% of this amount 
and other remaining organizations receive 40%. For the 
amount the Athletic Association receives, the student is given 
a season ticket to all athletic contests held during the year 
and is granted permission to use the gym and other athletic 
facilities. The other part of the amount allotted to the Ath- 



42 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

letic Association goes to buy necessary equipment. The re- 
maining 40% of the student activities fee is distributed among 
organizations such as the Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., The Student 
Association, Debate Clubs, Band, Glee Club, Dramatics, Pur- 
ple & White, Bobashela, "M" Club, and The Woman's Asso- 
ciation. That part of the fee assigned the Bobashela is in 
part payment on the student year book. To insure a bigger 
and better year book, the student body voted to turn over 
the contingent fee, heretofore charged, to the Bobashela, 
thereby increasing the appropriation by $2.00. This enables 
all students paying regular fees to secure a year book for only 
fifty cents additional. The portion designated for The Pur- 
ple & White gives each student a year's subscription to the 
college weekly paper. 

REGULATIONS AS TO PAYMENTS 
All fees are due and payable at the opening of school. 
Tuition and room rent may be paid for the year in advance 
at a reduction or may be paid by the semester in advance. 
Board is strictly cash in advance and is taken care of by the 
use of $15.00 meal books purchased on the basis of a mini- 
mum of one book per month for nine months. 

No refund on fees will be made. But, if a student ma- 
triculates and for a good reason, is not able to attend classes, 
all fees will be refunded except a matriculation fee of $10.00. 
In case of unavoidable withdrawal after classes have begun, 
if approved by the President and Bursar of the college, tui- 
tion and room rent will be charged only for the time actually 
spent in school at rate of one-eighth yearly rate for room and 
tuition for each month or fraction thereof spent in school. 
Except in case of such withdrawal from school, rooms will 
not be rented for less than one semester, and no refund will 
be made for dormitory rooms vacated in midst of semester. 
The student's withdrawal from the college will be counted as 
occurring on the day he presents to the business office a drop 
card secured from the Dean or Registrar's office. 

All accounts due for any preceding semester must be paid 
before a student will be enrolled for the next semester. The 
Registrar is not permitted to transfer credits until all out- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 43 

standing indebtedness to the college is paid in the Bursar's 
office. 

No student shall be allowed to graduate unless he shall 
have settled with the Bursar's office all his indebtedness to 
the college including graduation fee of $15.00 by May first 
preceding the commencement. 

Each student should bring with him four sheets for single 
bed, blankets or quilts, a pillow with cases and six towels. 



44 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

MINEMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DEGREES 

Sem. Hrs. 

English 11, 12 and 21, 22 12 

Foreign Language — 2 college years 12 

History 11, 12 6 

Natural Science (Chem., Phys., Biol.) 6 

Religion 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12 (not required if Latin or Greek are 

taken for B.A.) 6 

Physical Training 2 

Additional Requirements for B.A. : 

Philosophy 6 

Elective (36 in a group of which 24 are in one sub- 
ject) To total 128 

Additional Requirements for B.S. : 

Chemistry 11, 12 8 

Biology 11, 12 or 21, 22 6 

Physics 11, 12 6 

Electives (3 6 in a group of which 24 are in one sub- 
ject) to total - 128 

For the B.A. Degree 

IN THE LOWER DIVISION (freshman and sophomore) : 
The Humanities 

1. English 12 semester hours. 

*2. Foreign Language 12 semester hours, in one language. 
The Natural Sciences 

*1. Mathematics 6 semester hours. This may be omitted 
if 6 hours of Latin or Greek is included in No. 2 above. 

2. Science 6 semester hours. (If chemistry, 8 semester 
hours). 

The Social Sciences 

1. History 6 semester hours. 

2. Religion 6 semester hours. 

In addition two hours in Physical Education are required 
of each student in the freshman year. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 45 

IN THE UPPER DIVISION (junior and senior) : 

1. Philosophy 6 semester hours. 

2. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours in a 
major subject. 

3. The comprehensive in the major subject. 

4. Twelve semester hours must be taken in the group of 
major concentration for a minor, in addition to the 
twenty-four for the major. 

For the B.S. Degree 

IN THE LOWER DIVISION (freshman and sophomore) : 
The Humanities 

1. English 12 semester hours. 

*2. Foreign Language 12 semester hours, in one language. 
The Natural Sciences 

*1. Mathematics 6 semester hours. 

2. Chemistry 6 semester hours. 

3. Biology 6 semester hours. 
The Social Sciences 

1. History 6 semester hours. 

2. Religion 6 semester hours. 

In addition, two hours in Physical Education are required 
of each student in the freshman year. 

IN THE UPPER DIVISION (junior and senior) : 

1. Physics 6 semester hours. 

2. The completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours In 
a major subject. 

3. The comprehensive examination in the major subject. 

4. Twelve semester hours must be taken in the group of 
major concentration for a minor, in addition to the 
twenty-four for the major. 



♦These courses are on the college level. Prerequisite courses, such as high 
^hool entrance units or Foreign Laanguage "A" courses must be completed 
before taking them. 



46 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Courses are arranged in three groups as follows: 
Humanities 

Languages, Fine Arts, Philosophy 
Natural Science 

Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, 

Geology, Astronomy. 
Social Science 

Social Science, History, Religion, Psychology, Economics. 

The following extra curricular activities to a maximum 
of eight semester hours may be included in the 128 semester 
hours required for graduation: 

Physical Training (Required) 2 

Physical Training (Elective) 6 

P. & W. (Editor) (Elective) 4 

P. & W. Bus. Mgr. (Elective) 4 

P. & W. Dept. Editors (Four) 
(Elective) 6 

P. & W. Reporters (Four) 

(Elective) 6 

Bobashela (Editor) (Elective) 4 

Bobashela (Business Manager) 
(Elective) 4 

Players (Elective) 6 

Glee Club (Elective) 6 

Debate (Elective) 6 

(Only two semester hours in each per year, except P. and W. 
and Bobashela Editor and Business Manager), 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 47 

MAJORS 

In addition to taking the prescribed work for the degree 
the student must major to the extent of 24 hours In one of 
the following departments: 

Biology. 

Chemistry and Geology. 

Economics. 

English. 

French and Spanish. 

General Science (In three departments). 

History. 

Latin. 

Mathematics. 

Music 

Philosophy. 

Physics and Astronomy. 

Psychology. 

Religion. 

Social Sciences. 

Other majors may be arranged on consultation with heads 
of departments and by consent of the Dean. 

Biology. — A student majoring in biology may take any 
four or more courses offered in the department. 

Chemistry. — Required courses for a major in chemistry 

are Chemistry 21-22, 31-32, 41-42, 51-52, and 71-72. It is 
advised that Chemistry 61-62 be taken in addition to the 
above. 

Economics. — Any courses in the department totaling 
twenty-four hours will be accepted for a major in economics. 

English. — An English major is required to take English 
11-12 and 21-22. In addition the student must take twelve 
semester hours from the following group of courses: Eng- 
lish 31-32, 41-42, 61-62, 71-72, and 81-82, 91-92, 110. 

French and Spanish. — For students majoring in either of 
these subjects no one course is required with more emphasis 
than the others. Such students are urged to take every 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

course in their major subject which they can include in their 
schedules. 

General Science. — To major in general science a student 
must take courses totaling twenty-four hours including at 
least one course in each of the following departments: Biology, 
Physics, and Chemistry or Geology. 

History. — Any four courses in this department will be 
accepted for a major in history. 

Latin. — To major in Latin a student is required to take 
Latin 11-12, 21-22, 31-32 or 41-42, 52, and either 61 or 62. 

Mathematics. — For a major in mathematics. Mathematics 
11-12, 21-22, and 31 are required; nine semester hours se- 
lected from the other courses given in the department must 
also be taken. An additional six hours is strongly recom- 
mended for the student who intends to major in mathematics. 

Philosophy. — In the Department of Philosophy a major 
may be taken in Ethics or in History of Philosophy. In all 
cases, Logic will be required in addition to the course offered. 
Courses in Political Science and certain courses in Religion 
may be counted to make up the requisite hours. 

Physics and Astronomy. — Students majoring in these two 
subjects are required to take Physics 11-12 and Astronomy 
11-12 and additional work in other courses to make a total 
of twenty-four hours. 

Psychology. — A student majoring in psychology will be 
required to earn a total of 24 hours of credit in this field, in- 
cluding courses 11 and either 12 or 102, and at least 3 hours 
in Problems of Psychology. Students contemplating a psy- 
chology major should consult with the head of the department 
and work out a program of courses which will best serve the 
interests and needs of the student. 

Religion. — Majors in religion are required to take Re- 
ligion 31 and 41 in addition to the course in Religion 11-12 
which all students must take. Other courses are elective with 
the student, up to the required number. Ministerial students 
follow pre-theological course. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 49 

Social Science. — Students majoring in Social Science 
should include at least one full year course each in Economics, 
Political Science, and Sociology, History 11-12, and six addi- 
tional hours of History. In addition, Religion 31 is recom- 
mended. 

IVUNORS 

In addition to the requirement that a student must take 
twenty-four semester hours in one subject, he will be required 
to take twelve additional hours within the same group of sub- 
jects. The dean may waive this requirement for any stu- 
dent. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Before receiving a bachelor's degree the student must 
pass a satisfactory comprehensive examination in his major 
field of study. This examination is given in the senior year 
and is intended to cover subject matter greater in scope than 
a single course or series of courses. The purpose of the com- 
prehensive examination is to coordinate the class work with 
independent reading and thinking in such a way as to relate 
the knowledge acquired and give the student a general un- 
derstanding of the field which could not be acquired from in- 
dividual courses. 

The major field must be chosen by the student at the 
opening of his junior year. The consent of the professor in 
charge is required before a student is allowed to major in a 
department. At least twenty-four semester hours credit must 
be taken in the department in which the student is majoring. 
Juniors and seniors meet with their major professors for con- 
ferences at least once a month. The examination "r'fequires 
three hours and is both written and oral. 

All comprehensive examinations must be completed by 
May 15 of the year in which the degree is to be awarded. 



JJ* fo: 



50 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The academic year begins on the morning of the second 
Monday of September and continues for thirty-six weeks. 
Thanksgiving Day is a holiday, there is a Christmas recess 
of about ten days, and a spring recess. 

Attendance is required of each student throughout the 
session, with the exception of the days above indicated, un- 
less he has received permission to be temporarily absent, or 
to withdraw before its close. Leave of absence is granted by 
the faculty or president for sufficient reasons, and must in 
every case be obtained in advance. While in residence each 
student is required to attend regularly lectures and other 
prescribed exercises and all examinations in the courses which 
he pursues, (unless excused for cause), and in every way to 
conform to the regulations of the college. 

Absence from the college is permitted only upon the 
permission of the dean, obtained in every case in advance. But 
leave of absence for purposes of accompanying the athletic 
teams, debating teams and all other recognized clubs will not 
be granted except to officers and members of the organiza- 
tions. 

Absence of athletic teams and other student organizations 
Is provided for by faculty regulations. 

Absence from any class is not excused except for sickness 
or like providential cause. If a student is absent twelve times 
in a *«i-hour course, or a proportionate number in a course 
ving other credit, then all credit in that course is lost and 
the entire course must be repeated. 



Absence from examinations will not be excused except 
for sickness on day of examination (attested to by a physi- 
cian's certificate), or other cause which the faculty by special 
order may approve. An unexcused absence is counted as a 
total failure in the examination in which it occurs. A student 
whose absence from examination is excused is admitted to a 
special examination ordered by the faculty. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 51 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

Attendance upon chapel is required of all students one 
day each week. All freshmen are required to attend chapel 
on one additional day during the first semester. A student 
who is absent from chapel three times in a semester will be 
called before the advisory committee. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The examinations in each class are held in writing. Oral 
examinations are held in some departments but they are aux- 
iliary to the written examinations, which in conjunction with 
the class standing, as determined by the daily work of the 
student, are the main tests of the student's proficiency. 

At the end of the four years' course a comprehensive ex- 
amination is given in the student's major field. 

REMEDIAL ENGLISH 
I. A Committee on Remedial English shall consist of: 

1. A chairman, designated by the president, to devote a 
part or all of his time to the duties of the position. 

2. Three other members representing equally the three 
divisions of the College. 

II. The duties of the committee shall be: 

1. To confer with the chairman at any time that he re- 
quests advice and authority in conduction of his duties. 

2. To supervise in general the students' use of English. 

3. To examine, through the chairman, all student com- 
positions and papers presented for inspection. 

4. To administer the work of remedial English. 

III. Tlie powers of the committee shall be as follows: 

1. To request at any time from any faculty member any 
or all term papers, reports, quizzes, or examinatioiffi 
for study in determining what students are deficient 
in the use of correct English. 

2. To request at any time from any faculty member an 



52 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

expression of that faculty member's opinion on the 
use of English of any student then in his classes, and 
to ask the co-operation of that faculty member in as- 
sisting the student to remedy his deficiency by such 
means as the committee, the chairman, and the fac- 
ulty member may deem wise. 
3. To request the instructor to give a grade of "cc" 
(comp. condition) to any student in any course in 
which the committee has found that student to be de- 
ficient in the use of English. This "cc" will be re- 
moved when that student has satisfied the committee, 
the chairman, and the instructor consulted by the com- 
mittee, that he has removed the deficiency in the use 
of English. 

IV. The method of remedying the student's deficiency shall be 
left largely to the discretion of the chairman and the 
committee, by one of the two following methods: 

1. To require any student who is found deficient in Eng- 
lish to take a prescribed course in remedial English; or 

2. To require that student to do work especially and per- 
sonally designed by the chairman to relieve the indi- 
vidual student's own peculiar difficulties in the use of 
English. 

V. Each member of the teaching staff shall continue: 

1. To require that his students strive to improve in the 
use of correct English. 

2. To submit at any time to the committee evidence con- 
cerning any student whose use of English is defective 
in his or any other class. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

All marks are made on a six-point letter scale as follows: 
"A", "B", "C", "D", "E", and "F". "A" represents superior 
work, largely of a creative nature and in addition to the regu- 
larly prescribed work of the class. "B" represents above the 
average achievement in the regularly prescribed work. "C" 
represents the average achievement of the class in the regu- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 5S 

larly prescribed work. "D" represents a level of achievement 
In the regularly prescribed work of the class below the aver- 
age in the same relationship as the grade of "B" is above the 
average. "E" repi'esents a condition and may be changed to 
a "D" if the grade in the other semester of the course is "C" 
or above. "P" represents failure to do the regularly pre- 
scribed work of the class. All marks of "D" and above are 
passing marks and "F" represents failure. 

The following are semester unit courses. First semester 
grades cannot be averaged with those of the second. 

Biology 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, 71, 72. 

Economics 41, 42, 61, 62, 71, 72, 91, 92. 

Education, all courses. 

English 41, 42, 51, 52, 71, 72, 91, 92, 101. 

Greek 11, 12. 

History 31, 32. 

Latin 31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 61, 62. 

Mathematics, all courses. 

Physics 61, 62. 

Psychology, all courses. 

Religion, all courses. 

Social Science 41, 42. 

A student who makes a grade of "D" in a subject will be 
advanced in that subject, but a certain number of quality 
points is requisite for advancement from one class to the next 
higher class. The student must have nine quality points to be 
classed as a sophomore, 36 to be classed as a junior, 72 to be 
classed as a senior, and 120 for graduation. The completion 
of any college course with a grade of "C" for one semester 
shall entitle a student to one quality point for each semester 
hour, and the completion of a course with a grade of "B" for 
the semester shall entitle a student to two quality points for 
each semester hour, and the completion of a course with the 
grade of "A" for the semester shall entitle a student to three 
quality points per semester hour. 

GRADES 

The grade of the student in any class, either for a semes- 
ter or for the session is determined by the combined class 



54 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

standing and the result of the examination. The examina- 
tion grade shall be counted as approximately one-third of the 
grade for the semester. If the combined grade is below D 
the student is required to repeat the course, except in courses 
where the grades for the two semesters may be averaged. 

Class standing in any course is determined by the regu- 
larity of attendance of the student upon lectures and labora- 
tory or other similar exercises where included in the course 
In question and by the faithful performance of his work as 
indicated by the answers when questioned, by written exer- 
cises, note books, the faithful performance of laboratory or 
other similar work, etc. The grade for passing in any course 
is D. For quality requirements see page 53. 

In determining honors and high honors, and all other 
awards based on scholarship, a quality index is arrived at by 
dividing the number of quality points by the number of se- 
mester hours taken. 

HOURS PERMITTED 

Fifteen academic semester hours is considered the nor- 
mal load per semester. 

No student may take more than seventeen semester hours 
of academic work unless he has a quality index of 1.5 on 
the latest previous college term or semester. No student 
may take more than nineteen semester hours of academic 
work unless he has a quality point index of 2. on the latest 
previous college term or semester, and obtains permission 
from the Dean. 

Any student who is permitted to take more than seven- 
teen semester hours of academic work will be required to 
pay at the rate of $5.00 for each additional semester hour 
over seventeen. 

HONORS 

A student whose quality point index is 1.8 for his entire 
course shall be graduated with Honors; one whose quality 
point index is 2.7 and who has a rating of excellent on com- 
prehensive examination shall be graduated with High Honors. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 55 

To be eligible for "honors" or "high honors" a student 
must have passed at least sixty semester hours in Millsaps 
College. Sixty per cent of the quality points on which "hon- 
ors" or "high honors" are given must be earned at Millsaps. 
Honors or high honors may be refused a student who, in the 
judgment of the faculty, has forfeited his right. 

DEANS' LIST 

I. Requirements: 

(1) Scholastic: (a) A quality point average for the pre- 
ceding semester of 2.00, 

(b) No mark lower than a D. 

(2) Conduct: The student shall be, in the judgment of 
the deans, a good citizen of the college community. 

II. Privileges: The student who qualifies under (I) shall not 
be subject to the college regulations governing class attend- 
ance. This shall not be construed to apply to announced 
tests, laboratory exercises, absences immediately preceding 
and following holidays, and to freshman courses. 

III. Eligibility: Seniors and juniors who have been In resi- 
dence at least one semester. Sophomores may have the 
privilege of this list during their second semester. 

CONDUCT 

The rules of the college require from every student de- 
corous, sober and upright conduct as long as he remains a 
member of the college, whether he be within its precincts or 
not. 

They require from the student regular and diligent ap- 
plication to his studies, and regular attendance upon chapel. 

Drinking, gambling, and dissoluteness are strictly for- 
bidden, and any student found guilty of them is punished by 
suspension or expulsion. 

Firearms 

The keeping of firearms by the students is strictly for- 
bidden. 



56 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Delinquency 

To remain in college a freshman must pass in the first 
semester at least two subjects and have a grade of E in a 
third. After the first half of the freshman year a student 
must pass at least three subjects a semester to continue in 
college. The respective deans may exercise their discretion 
in the enforcement of this regulation. 

REPORTS 

Reports are sent at the close of each nine weeks to the 
parent or guardian of each student. These reports give the 
number of excused and unexcused absences from lectures, and 
indicate, as nearly as practicable, the nature of the progress 
made by him in his work at the college. 

WITHDRAWALS 

Voluntary withdrawals from the college require the con- 
sent of the faculty or president. 

Enforced withdrawal is Inflicted by the faculty for ha- 
bitual delinquency in class, habitual idleness or any other 
fault which prevents the student from fulfilling the purpose 
for which he should have come to college. 

The college reserves the right to cancel the registration 
of any student at any time. In such a case, the prorata por- 
tion of room rent and tuition will be returned. 

MATRICULATION 
The various departments are under the direction of pro- 
fessors who are responsible for the systems and methods pur- 
sued. 

The session begins on the second Monday of Septem- 
ber and continues with recess of about ten days at Christmas, 
until the first Tuesday in June. The first three days of the 
session are given to registration and all students, both old and 
new, are required during that time to place their names upon 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 57 

the books of the college and the rolls of their respective 
classes. Lecture courses begin Wednesday, and absences will 
be recorded against any student not present from the opening 
lecture of each cours'e. 

REGISTRATION 

Applicants seeking admission to the college for the first 
time should present themselves to the registrar of the col- 
lege at his office in the main building promptly at 9:00 o'clock 
on the opening day, September 9. In each instance a 
certificate of good moral character, signed by the proper of- 
ficial of the institution attended during the previous session, 
or by some persons of knovrn standing, must be sent to the 
Registrar at least two weeks before the opening of the session. 
Each candidate who satisfies these requirements and those 
for admission by certificate or examination will be furnished 
with a card containing the courses offered. From these he 
must take the required courses and those electives which he 
proposes to pursue during the session. The card must then 
be carried to the bursar, who will, after the college fees have 
been paid to him, sign the card. Registration is incomplete 
unless the registration card is signed by both the registrar 
and the bursar. On payment of these fees the applicant will 
be admitted to classes. 

DELAYED REGISTRATION 

Students are not permitted to delay their registration 
through carelessness or for inadequate reasons. Any student, 
new or old, who fails to present himself for registration dur- 
ing the first five days of the session will be admitted to regis- 
tration only upon the consent of the president, and will be 
required to pay a special fee of $3.00. 

CHANGE OP REGISTRATION 

Students cannot change classes or drop classes or take 
up new classes except by the consent of the registrar or fac- 
ulty. 



58 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

I. The Department of Ancient Languages. 

IL The Department of Biology. 

III. The Department of Chemistry. 

IV. The Department of Economics. 
V. The Department of Education. 

VI. The Department of English. 

VII. The Department of Geology. 

A^III. The Department of German. 

IX. The Department of History. 

X. The Department of Mathematics. 

XI. The Department of Philosophy. 

XII. The Department of Physical Education. 

XIII. The Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

XIV. The Department of Psychology. 
XV. The Department of Religion. 

XVI. The Department of Romance Languages. 

XVII. The Department of Sociology and Government. 

XVIII. The Department of Music. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 59 

I. DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

PROFESSOR CURRIE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR COULLET 

It is believed that the mastery of these highly inflected 
languages will effect the purposes aimed at in education in 
the following ways: 

Constant drill in the processes of correlation, comparison, 
discrimination and classification of the phenomena of lan- 
guage is required, both in the study of inflection and syntax 
and in translation. This drill affords a most rigorous exer- 
cise in correct scientific method and produces habits and re- 
flexes of accuracy, efficiency and system. 

A first hand acquaintance with the language and modes 
of expression of the ancients and with the evolution of literary 
forms lays open a field of knowledge that is essential to a full 
understanding of modern life and literature. 

Intimate contact with the very words which express the 
best ideals and aspirations of those great spirits whose influ- 
ence has been most abiding and formative in our world should 
shape the character to fine and worthy purposes. The "ul- 
timate objectives" are not lost sight of. 

LATIN 

A-1. Elementary Latin. — This course is for those who have 
not previously studied Latin. A thorough mastery of 
the declensions and conjugations, of syntax and sen- 
tence structure; a working vocabulary, a familiarity 
with the Latin thought order and the technique of 
translation. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Currie 

A-2. Elementary Latin. — A continuation of the grammar 
study. A large amount of easy reading. Vocabulary 
is enlarged and sight reading is practiced. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 
Currie 



6 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

B-1. Second Year Latin. — In this course there will be a con- 
tinuous review of the forms and syntax and sentence 
structure and their application. Enlargement of the 
vocabulary. Translation and sight reading of a large 
amount of elementary Latin. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Currie 
B-2. Second Year Latin. — Continuation of the above. Com- 
pletion of the equivalent of the reading embraced in 
the high school course. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Currie 
11-1. Vergil. — Translation of part of the Aeneid. This course 
is for students who have had three years of high school 
Latin. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Coullet 
11-2. VergiL — The Aeneid continued. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Coullet 
12-1. A Survey of Classical Roman Literature. — An anthology 
of Roman literature up to the time of Augustus. This 
course is for students who have had four years of high 
school Latin. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Currie 
12-^. A Survey of Classical Roman Literature. — An anthology 
of Roman literature from the time of Augustus through 
the beginning of the first century A. D. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 
Currie 

21. Horace, Odes and Epodes. — This course is designed to 
give the student an appreciation of the place occupied 
by the poet not only in his own environment and age 
but through the centuries. Also to create an intelligent 
appreciation of his poetry. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Hamilton 

22. Plautus. — The student is introduced to Roman comedy 
and its Greek background. Wide reading in this period 
of literature is required. Two plays of Plautus are read 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 61 

in the Latin and several in translation. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 

81. Pliny, Letters. — There is no more delightful type of lit- 
erature than the letter as used by Pliny the Younger. 
The eternal truths of life whether ancient or modern, 
are set forth in his discussions of great men and women 
together with vivid pictures of the customs of the times. 
His language is easy enough as a rule but furnishes 
opportunity for development in interpreting knotty pas- 
sages. Given in alternate years. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Currie 

82. Lucretius, De Natura Rerum. — The translation of this 
remarkable poem gives one an opportunity to see the 
accuracy of the insight of the ancients into things scien- 
tific as proved by modern development as well as ac- 
quaintance with the Epicurean philosophy. Given in 
alternate years. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Currie 

41. Roman Drama. — History of the Roman Drama with ex- 
tensive reading in Seneca, Plautus and Terence. Given 
in alternate years. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Hamilton 

42. Introduction to Latin Inscriptions. — This course gives 
abundant material for practice in handling Latin names 
in the English form. It is also valuable as explaining 
many technicalities met in the authors, archaeology, and 
in historical documents. Given in alternate years. Sec- 
ond semester. Three hours credit. 

Currie 

61. Methods of Teaching. — Especially designed for those who 
expect to teach high school Latin. This course is of- 
fered as a senior elective; as such it may be counted in 
satisfaction of the requirements for teacher's license. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Coullet 

62. Classical Archaeology. — This course attempts to visual- 
ize ancient classical civilization and may be elected by 



6 2 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

those who are not taking formal courses in Latin and 
Greek translation. It consists of lectures and outside 
reading supplemented by lantern slides. Two hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 

61. Roman Private Life. — A course of study designed to fa- 
miliarize students with the every day lite and habits of 
the Romans. Given in alternate years. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Coullet 

62. Mythology. — A study of the ancient myths of Greece and 
Rome and their influence on later literature. Given in 
alternate years. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Coullet 

81. Roman Literature. — The reading in English translations 
of the great works of Roman literature. Three hours. 
First semester. 

Coullet 

82. Greek Literature.- — Continuation of the above. Three 
hours. Second semester. 

Coullet 

GREEK 
Al. Introduction to Greek. — Attention is paid to the thorough 
mastery of forms, vocabulary and syntax, but emphasis 
is laid also upon the great contributions made by the 
Greeks to Western civilization in the fields of art, litera- 
ture and philosophy. The course may be counted as an 
elective, or it may be used to satisfy the entrance re- 
quirements in foreign languages. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Currie 
A2. Introduction To Greek. — This is a continuation of the 
course outlined above. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

Hamilton 
11. Xenophon's Anabasis. — The first two books of the Ana- 
basis are covered in this course. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Hamilton 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 63 

12. Xenophon's Anabasis. — Continuation of course 11. The 
last two books of Anabasis. Selections from the Greek 
New Testament are sometimes read in this course. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Hamilton 

21. Orations of Lysias. — The most important orations of this 
great master of Attic prose are studied during the first 
semester of this course. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

Hamilton 

22. Plato's Apology and Crito. — The student is here intro- 
duced to the great heart and mind of Socrates, as in- 
terpreted by his devoted pupil, Plato. This is one of 
the great books of all time. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Hamilton 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

II. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR RIECKEN 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FINCHER 

INSTRUCTOR WARD 

The courses offered in this department are designed to 
give the student a general knowledge of the fundamental con- 
ceptions which underlie all life phenomena. Special courses 
are offered to pre-medical students and to students who may 
anticipate majoring in the department. 

11. General Botany. — A survey of the plant kingdom In 
which special attention is given to general biological 
principles, morphology, physiology and life cycles of 
plants. Laboratory work consists of microscopic and 
macroscopic study of plants with occasional field trips. 
The structure and physiology of angiosperms. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Riecken 
Ward 

12. General Botany. — The structure and life cycles of gymno- 
sperms, ferns, mosses, liverworts, fungi and algae and 
their adaptations. Two recitations and one laboratory 
period a week. Both semesters must be completed to 
obtain credit. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 
Ward 

21. General Zoolog3\ — A survey of the animal kingdom. At- 
tention is directed to the cell and the fundamental prin- 
ciples of animal biology, to the study of the phyla, the 
development of tissues, organs and systems and their 
adaptations. Microscopic and macroscopic study of in- 
vertebrate forms. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Fincher 
Ward 

22. General Zoology. — Anatomy and physiology of vertebrate 
forms. Both semesters must be completed to obtain 
credit. Pre-medical students should take courses 31 and 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 65 

3 2 with 21 and 22 for the required 8 hours credit. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Fincher 

Ward 
31. Vertebrate Anatomy. — This course should be taken only 
in connection with Biology 21 and 2 2. It is designed 
to meet the needs of pre-medical students. Special at- 
tention is given to the dissection of vertebrate forms. 
Detailed dissection of the lower vertebrate forms. One 
laboratory period a week. One hour credit. First se- 
mester. 

Fincher 

82. Vertebrate Anatomy. — Detailed dissection of the higher 
vertebrate forms. One laboratory period a week. Both 
semesters must be completed to obtain credit. One hour 
credit. Second semester. 

Fincher 

41. General Bacteriology. — This course is designed to give a 
general survey of the field of bacteriology. Special at- 
tention in the laboratory is given to the preparation of 
media, sterilization and to the cultivation, methods of 
isolation, staining and identification of microorganisms. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 11 and 12, or 21 and 22. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

42. Comparative Anatomy. — A comparative study of the 
homologies of organs and systems of a series of verte- 
brates. The course is designed to give further training 
in the principles of dissection and to develop an appre- 
ciation of the significance and relationship of structures. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 21 and 22. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Fincher 

51. Histology and Microtechnique. — Training in the tech- 
nique of preparing temporary and permanent microscopic 
sections of plant and animal tissues. Much freedom is 
allowed in the selection of materials. Opportunity is 



66 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

given for making slides as aids in high school teaching. 
For pre-medical students, readings and discussions of 
animal tissues and organs. Pre-requisite, Biology 11 
and 12, or 21 and 22. Given in alternate years. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Fincher 

52. Genetics. — A study of the fundamental principles of va- 
riation and heredity in plants and animals. Lectures 
and recitations. Pre-requisite, Biology 11 and 12 or 
21 and 22. Given in alternate years. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 

61. General Embrj'ology. — A study of the development of 
Amphioxls, the chick and the pig. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Pre-requisite, Biology 21-22 
and 42. Given in alternate years. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Riecken 

62. General Physiology. — A study of the physiological pro- 
cesses of the living organism. Functions of the organs 
of the human body are emphasized. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Pre-requisite, Biology 
21 and 2 2. Given in alternate years. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Fincher 

71. Special Problems. — Opportunity is given the student to 
do further work on problems in which he has developed 
a special interest. Work will be done under the direc- 
tion of the instructor. Registration for this course is 
only with the consent of the instructor. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Riecken 
Fincher 

72. Special Problems. — This may be a continuance of 71 but 
is not contingent upon the first semester. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Riecken 
Fincher 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

82. Taxonomy. — Laboratory and field identification of plants 
with attention given to herbarium methods. Work is 
largely individual under the supervision of the instruc- 
tor. Three laboratory periods a week. Pre-requisite, 
Biology 11. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Riecken 
Fincher 

91. Methods and Materials of Teaching Science. — Same as 
Education 71. Students wishing to take this course 
should first consult the head of the department of edu- 
cation. Given in alternate years. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Riecken 



68 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

III. THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 

INSTRUCTOR GALLOWAY 

INSTRUCTOR EMIGH 

The Department of Chemistry is now well provided for In 
the Sullivan-Harrell Hall, a new and thoroughly modern sci- 
ence hall, which was recently built as a gift from citizens of 
Jackson and Hinds County. There are two lecture rooms 
supplied with tablet-arm chairs fixed in elevated rows, im- 
proved lecture desks with Alberene stone tops and removable 
down-draft hoods, sliding blackboards with separate control 
for lighting, and other conveniences. There are four large 
laboratories, one for general chemistry provided with five 
double desks eighteen feet long to accommodate 140 students 
in three sections and (piping roughed-in for two more desks 
as needed), one for organic and qualitative work provided 
with five double desks eighteen feet long to accommodate sev- 
enty individuals (provision being made for expansion), one 
for quantitative analysis equipped for fourteen students, (ex- 
pansion provided for), and one for industrial chemistry. There 
are three smaller laboratories for physical chemistry, nitrogen 
determinations, and research, respectively, besides four small 
laboratory rooms for individual and specialized work. All 
desks have Alberene tops and sinks, with lead trough inclined 
in one direction the entire length, and are supplied with an 
adequate number of outlets for water, gas, compressed air, 
and 110-volt electric current. All laboratory hoods are of 
the high velocity and open-type made of Transite board on 
Alberene shelf. Each hood is provided with outlets for water, 
gas, compressed air, and 30-ampere electric current. 

The work in this department includes one year of chem- 
istry required of candidates for B.S. degree, besides other 
courses open to all students who have completed chemistry 
21, 22. 

The subjects are taught by recitations and lectures and 
work which each student must perform in the laboratory. 
The laboratories are kept well equipped with apparatus neces- 
sary to the correct appreciation of the science. Each student 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 69 

has his own desk and apparatus, and is closely supervised, so 
that he may not only gain a true idea of the substance under 
inspection but also train his hands to be careful of the smallest 
detail, and the eye observant of the slightest phenomenon, 
and habits of neatness, skill and economy. Each student will 
be expected to keep accurate notes. In all courses attention 
will be given to chemical calculations, and the use of refer- 
ence books and periodicals will be encouraged. 

11, 12. Inorganic Chemisti-y. (See course 21, 22.) 

21. Inorganic ChemistiT. — A careful study of fundamental 
principles and laws, the occurrences, properties, prepara- 
tion and uses of the non-metallic elements and some of 
their compounds, and to chemical calculations. Special 
attention will be given to valence and the ionization the- 
ory. Incomplete without Chemistry 2 2. Four hours 
credit. First semester. 

Sullivan 

22. Inorganic Chemistry. — The work of this semester will 
include a study of metals with special reference to com- 
mercial uses and to qualitative analysis, and an elemen- 
tary course in organic chemistry. This course is de- 
signed to give the student a thorough working knowledge 
of general chemistry, and is a prescribed study of the 
sophomore year for the B.S. degree. It is a prerequisite 
to either of the other courses in chemistry, and is open 
to freshmen who are registered as pre-medical or pre- 
engineering students, and to A.B. students who elect 
chemistry. A laboratory course is given in connection 
with the lectures and each student is assigned the prep- 
aration of a number of elements and compounds, and is 
required to note the deportment of various substances 
with reagents. The class each year is given an oppor- 
tunity to visit certain industrial establishments, as sul- 
phuric acid plant, phosphate works, gas works, water 
works and filtration plants. Three lectare hours and 
one laboratory period. Four hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Sullivan 



70 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

81. Organic Chemistry. — The semester's work includes a 
study of the open-chain compounds, and methods of 
organic analysis and determination of formula. Special 
attention will be given to the alcohols, aldehydes, acids, 
amines, cyanogen compounds, carbohydrates and other 
derivatives. The study of relationships as shown by 
rational formula will be established. Incomplete with- 
out Chemistry 32. Two hours credit. First semester. 
Sullivan 

32. Organic Chemistry. — A study of the cyclic compounds. 
The purpose of this course is to furnish a somewhat 
comprehensive knowledge of the carbon compounds, the 
instruction being given chiefly by lectures illustrated by 
experiments. Some attention is given to physiological 
chemistry. Students will be expected to consult various 
works of reference. This course in connection with 41, 
42 and 51, 52 will appeal specially to preliminary dental 
and medical students. This course is required for all 
pre-medical students. Pre-requisite, Chemistry 21, 22. 
Lectures and recitations. Two hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Sullivan 

41. Qualitative Analysis. — Theoretical part of course: ioniza- 
tion, oxidation, reduction, and solubility product prin- 
ciple, with application of each to qualitative analysis. 
In the laboratory: individual tests for metals and acid 
radicals, a known and unknown for each of the five 
groups of metals. One laboratory period of four hours 
a week. Incomplete without Chemistry 42. Two hours 
credit. First semester. 

Emigh 

42. Qualitative Analysis. — Continuation of chemistry 41, fol- 
lowed by analysis of one general unknown for metals 
and acid radicals. Introduction to another scheme of 
analysis without hydrogen sulphide. Two hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Emigh 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 71 

51. Experimental Organic Chemistry. — Arranged to accom- 
pany Chemistry 31. Experiments in purification of 
organic compounds, determination of physical constants, 
and preparation of aliphatic compounds. One laboratory 
period of four hours a week. Incomplete without Chem- 
istry 52. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Emigh 

52. Experimental Organic Chemistry. — Arranged to accom- 
pany Chemistry 32. Preparation of aromatic compounds 
and coal tar dyes. Introduction to organic qualitative 
analysis. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Emigh 

61. Physical Chemistry. — This course is planned for chemis- 
try majors and pre-medical students who desire credit 
beyond their medical school requirements. Atomic struc- 
ture, gas laws, matter in the solid and liquid states, 
elementary thermodynamics, properties of solutions and 
thermochemistry. Two one hour lectures, and one two 
hour laboratory period a week. Incomplete without 
Chemistry 62. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Galloway 

62. Physical Chemistry. — Continuation of Chemistry 61. 
Chemical kinetics, homogeneous equilibrium, electrical 
properties of solutions, phase rule studies, and colloid 
chemistry. Two one hour lectures, and one two hour 
laboratory period a week. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

' Galloway 

71. Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric analysis with knowns 
and unknowns in metals and acid radicals. Laboratory 
period of four hours per week, and lecture one hour per 
week. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Emigh 

72. Quantitative Analysis. — Continuation of Chemistry 71, 
Volumetric analysis with knowns and unknowns in 
acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidation and reduction and 
iodimetry. Laboratory period of four hours per week. 



72 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Lecture of one hour per week. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Emigh 

81. Commercial Chemistry. — Analysis of river and deep well 
water; analysis of coal and gas, including B.T.U. determi- 
nations. Incomplete without Chemistry 82. Two hours 
credit. First semester. 

Sullivan 

82. Commercial Chemistry. — This course is a continuation 
of Chemistry 81, and will include the estimation of 
chlorine and nitrogen in various organic substances, 
analysis of cotton seed products, and analysis of petro- 
leum products. The work of both semesters is subject 
to modification. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Sullivan 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 73 

IV. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

PROFESSOR WALLACE 
MR. JOHN KIMBALL* 

The courses in this department are arranged with three 
purposes in mind: first, to provide all students with a more 
adequate understanding of the economic and business aspects 
of the world in which they live; second, to provide the pre- 
liminary background and some of the specialized courses need- 
ed by those who expect to enter the business world or a school 
of business; third, to provide a thorough basic preparation 
for those who desire to continue with graduate study in the 
field. 

Students may arrange a major or minor in the depart- 
ment, or may count courses in Economics as part of a gen- 
eral major in Social Science. 

21-22. Economic Pi"inciples and Problems. — This is the intro- 
ductory course in Economics and is designed to provide 
a general survey of the subject for those who take but 
one course in the field and to prepare others for ad- 
vanced courses. It is not open to freshmen. Students 
will not be admitted to the second half without credit 
for the first, nor given credit for the first without the 
second. Throughout the year. Six hours credit. 
Wallace 

31-32. Introduction to Accounting. — A standard course in the 
fundamentals of accounting suitable for both the general 
student of economics and business and the student who 
expects to do advanced work in accounting. No previous 
knowledge of bookkeeping is required. Students will 
not be admitted to the second half of the course without 
credit for the first, nor given credit for the first with- 
out the second. Prerequisite or corequisite. Economics 
21-22. TVo recitations and one laboratory period a 
week. Throughout the year. Six hours credit. 
Wallace 



•Special lecturer in salesmanship. 



74 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

41. Personal Finance. — This is a non-technical course which 
should be of practical value to everyone. It consists of 
a study of the problems which every individual must 
face in managing his personal income: budgeting; rec- 
ord keeping; savings and investments; life insurance; 
home ownership; installment buying and other forms of 
consumer credit; sources of information and protection 
in connection with the selection and purchase of com- 
modities. No prerequisite. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Wallace 

42. Economic Geogi-aphy. — A survey course covering the dis- 
tribution of basic resources throughout the world, with 
special attention to population, minerals, plants, ani- 
mals, climate, physiography, international trade, and 
causes of international conflict. Approximately the first 
half of the course is devoted to North America and the 
other half to the rest of the world. A materials fee of 
fifty cents is charged each student. No prerequisite. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Wallace 

51. Business Law. — This course is designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with the basic legal problems which most frequent- 
ly arise in industry, commerce, and the home, and with 
which nearly every individual must at some time come 
in contact. It is not intended to train persons to be 
their own lawyers, but rather to equip them to take ele- 
mentary measures for protection of their legal rights 
which will prevent litigation from arising, and to en- 
able them to recognize situations in which the advice 
of an attorney is necessary. Topics covered include con- 
tracts, negotiable instruments, bailments, and sales. Pre- 
requisite or corequisite. Economics 21-22. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Wallace 

52. Business Law. — A continuation of Economics 51. Topics 
covered include property, agency, master and servant. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 75 

insurance, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite, 
Economics 51. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Wallace 

61. Money, Banking, and Finance. — A study of the financial 
organization of our economic system, with emphasis on 
the part played by commercial, investment, and con- 
sumer credit in the production as well as the exchange 
of goods. Major stress is placed on the history, theory, 
and practice of the commercial banking system, but con- 
siderable attention is also devoted to sther types of fi- 
nancial institutions. Prerequisite, Economics 21. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Wallace 

62. Public Finance. — A study of governmental expenditure, 
taxation, borrowing, and fiscal administration, with at- 
tention to Federal, state, and local governments. Pre- 
requisite, Economics 21-22. Offered in alternate years, 
including 1940-41. Three hours credit. Second semes- 
ter. 

Wallace 

71. Mathematics of Finance. — Same as Mathematics 71. In- 
terest and annuities. Application to bonds, capitaliza- 
tion, perpetuities. Elements of life insurance. Pre- 
requisite, Mathematics 11. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Mitchell 

72. Statistics. — Same as Mathematics 72. Graphical presen- 
tation of data. The several means; distribution; corre- 
lation; drift; concentration. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
11. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell 

81-82. Advanced Accounting. — Advanced theory and practice 
applied to special accounting problems, such as install- 
ment sales, consignments, agencies and branches, con- 
solidations, and liquidations. Problems of asset valua- 
tion, interpretation of statements, and construction of 
accounting systems. Prerequisite, Economics 31-32. 



76 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Lectures and laboratory work. Throughout the year. 
Six hours credit. 

91. Salesmanship: Piiiiciples and Practice. — A practical 
course dealing with the psychological aspects of buying 
and selling and effective sales methods, w^hich will be 
of value to the student, not only as training for work 
in the selling field, but also in helping him to develop 
the ability to "get along" with people and sell himself 
to others. Lectures, student reports, sales demonstra- 
tions, and talks by outside speakers. Application of 
principles to the selling of various types of commodities 
and services. Two-hour class period and field work. 
Open only to juniors and seniors. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Kimball 

92. Business Finance. — A comparison of individual proprie- 
torships, partnerships, and corporations, and of the dif- 
ferent types of corporate securities, Avith major empha- 
sis on methods of providing fixed and working capital 
for the promotion, operation, and expansion of corpora- 
tions. Prerequisite, Economics 21-22. Students are 
also advised to take Economics 61 before taking this 
course. Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 19 40- 
41. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Wallace 

101-2. Advanced Economic Theory and History of Economic 
Thought. — A course designed particularly for seniors 
who are majoring in Economics or Social Science. It 
deals particularly with the theories of value and dis- 
tribution, tracing the development of these and other 
theories through the writings of outstanding economists 
of modern times. Prerequisite, average of B or above 
in Economics 21-22 or consent of instructor. Not of- 
fered in 1940-41. Throughout the year. Four hours 
credit. 

Wallace 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

111-112. Special Pi-oblems. — Open only to advanced students 
of superior standing wlio desire to do independent study 
and research work under the supervision and guidance 
of the instructor. Prerequisite, Economics 21-22 and 
consent of instructor. Either or botli semesters. Two 
to six liours credit. 

Wallace 



78 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

V. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HAYNES 

The department of education welcomes capable students 
who contemplate teaching. Those who do not intend to teach 
are advised not to attempt the technical courses in education. 

Students should consult a member of the department b&- 
fore enrolling in any course in education. An attempt is made 
to furnish definite guidance to prospective teachers concern- 
ing the courses in education and the academic courses that 
will best fit them for their work. 

Courses in Education are not open to freshjnen. 

Professional training is offered in both the secondary and 
elementary fields and is designed to meet all the requirements 
for the Professional Certificates As and Ae. 

The courses offered in this department are approved by 
the State Department of Education. 

The state program specifies that the training of the high 
school teacher shall contain the following: 1. A specified 
academic core curriculum; 2. A specified professional core 
curriculum; 3. A specified number of hours training in the 
subject or subjects taught. Two high school subjects are 
specified as the maximum number for which one can be 
trained to teach. 

The core curriculum specifies that all high school teach- 
ers have a minimum of twelve semester hours in English, 
nine semester hours in social studies, six semester hours in 
science and two semester hours in physical education and 
health. 

The professional work required consists of a minimum of 
eighteen semester hours. The following courses are specified 
to meet this requirement: 

12. Educational Psychology 3 sem. hours 

21. Tests and Measurements or Curriculum 

Construction 3 sem. hours 

31 or 32. Methods of Teaching High School 

Subjects 3 sem. hours 

snd one or two courses in special methods, observation and 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

practice teaching in the field, or fields in which the prospec- 
tive teacher is interested for 9 semester hours in addition to 
the above. See special methods courses listed on page 71. 

Subjects Sem. Hours 

English 30 

Mathematics 18 

Science 36 

Social Studies 30 

Foreign Language 18 

(Based on 2 entrance units) 
Foreign Language 24 

(Based on no entrance units). 

The most frequently occurring high school subject com- 
binations are English-Social Studies, English-Foreign Lan- 
guage, Mathematics-Science. A teacher of these subjects 
should have the minimum number of hours specified for each. 

Teacher Placement Bureau 

A teacher placement bureau for teachers is maintained 
under the direction of the Department of Education. It Is the 
desire of this bureau to further the interests of teachers 
trained at Millsaps College and to be of service to school offi- 
cials who wish to secure efficient teachers. 

21. Tests and Measurements. — An introductory course de- 
signed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
techniques and procedures involved in testing and meas- 
uring in the elementary and high school. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 11 and 12. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. Laboratory fee, $1.50. Offered in summer ses- 
sion, also. 

Haynes 

31. General Methods of Teaching in the High SchooL — This 
course is designed to introduce to the student the funda- 
mental principles of learning and teaching. Prerequi- 
site, Psychology 11 and 12. Three hours credit. First 
semester. Offered in summer session, also. 
Haynes 



80 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

32. General Methods of Teaching in the High School. — This 
course is a repetition of Education 31. Second semes- 
ter. 

Haynes 

41. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the High 

School. — This course consists of directed observation, 
discussion of observation, planning and teaching. Pre- 
requisite, C average and Education 21, 31 or 32. Four 
hours credit. First semester. 

Haynes 

42. Du*ected Observation and Practice Teaching in the High 
School. — This course is a repetition of Education 41. 
Second semester. 

Haynes 

51. Materials and Methods of Teaching English. — Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Goodman 

52. Materials and Methodis of Teaching Modern Languages. — 

Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Craig 

01. Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. — Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Hamilton 

62. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics. — Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Mitchell 

71. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science. — Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Riecken 

72. Materials and Methods of Teaching the Social Sciences. — 

Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Haynes 

91. Principles of Teaching in the Elementary School. — This 
course includes study of the subject matter and methods 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

of instruction in the elementary scliool. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 12. First semester. Three hours credit. 
Haynes 

92. Principles of Teaching in the Elementary School. — This 
course is a continuation of Education 91. Second se- 
mester. Three hours credit. 
Haynes 

101. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the Ele- 
mentary School. — This course consists of directed obser- 
vation, discussion of observation, planning and teaching. 
Prerequisite, "C" average and Education 21, 91, and 92. 
Four hours credit. First semester. 

Haynes 

102. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the Ele- 
mentai-y School. — This course is a repetition of Educa- 
tion 101. Second semester. 

Haynes 



82 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

VI. THE DEPARTMENT OP ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR WHITE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR STONE 

INSTRUCTOR GOODMAN 

INSTRUCTOR SANDERS 

11. Composition (Group A). — The first semester is devoted 
to a review of grammar, a study of the fundamentals 
of composition, weekly themes, and an analysis of con- 
temporary essays. Instruction is given in methods of 
research and preparation of bibliographies. Definite 
independent reading is expected. Stress is placed on 
Intensive reading and methods of study. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Goodman 

12. Composition (Group A). — The second semester Is de- 
voted mainly to Imaginative composition. Descriptive- 
narrative themes are required weekly, and one long 
theme is written during the semester in some form of 
imaginative writing. Selections from literature are 
studied and analyzed. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Goodman 

11. Composition (Group B). — Review of grammar and the 
fundamentals of composition. Instruction in sentence 
and paragraph writing, in methods of research, in mak- 
ing of footnotes, outlines, and bibliographies. Short and 
long expository themes required. Approximately one 
period a week devoted to work of contemporary essay- 
ists. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Stone 

12. Composition (Group B). — The second semester Is given 
to a study of the larger units of composition with much 
practice in writing and speaking. A brief survey of 
the forms of prose discourse is given. Weekly themes 
required. Library reading. Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Stone 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

ai. English Literature (Group A). — A survey of English 
literature from the beginnings to the eighteenth cen- 
tury. A study of authors and literary forms by periods. 
The course attempts a study of the literature itself and 
of its historical development. Open only to those ma- 
joring in English literature. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

White 

22. English Literature (Group A). — A continuation of the 
study of English literature from the eighteenth century 
through the nineteenth. English 21 is a prerequisite 
to English 22. Open only to those majoring in English 
literature. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
White 

21. English Literature (Group B). — A survey of English 
literature from the beginnings to the eighteenth cen- 
tury, with especial emphasis on major writers. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Stone 
Sanders 

22. English Literature (Group B). — A continuation of the 
survey of English literature from the beginning of the 
eighteenth century through the nineteenth century. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Stone 
Sanders 

81. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of Macbeth, Hamlet, 
and Henry IV, part one. Lectures on the plays. Care- 
ful attention to Shakespearean diction, constructions, 
and customs. Ten of Shakespeare's plays are required 
as parallel reading during the semester. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

White 

32. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of King Lear, Othello, 
and the Winter's Tale. A life of Shakespeare and ten 
more of his plays are required as parallel reading. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
White 



84 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

41. English Romantic Poets. — A study of the poetry and the 
prose of the great Romantic poets. Extensive library 
readings and a term paper on a special topic are re- 
quired. Three hours credit. First semester. 

White 

42. Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. — A study of the poetry 
and prose of the great Victorian poets. Library read- 
ings and a term paper are required. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

White 

61. Journalism. — A fundamental course in news reporting, 
with practice in writing various types of news stories. 
Evaluation of the newspaper's position in modern so- 
ciety. To be taken as the foundation for more advanced 
work in journalism. Three hours credit. Not offered 
in 1940-41. First semester. 
White 

52. Advanced Composition. — During the second semester the 
student will have much practice in the writing of feature 
stories, editorials, book reviews, familiar essays and 
short stories. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
White 

61. The Writing of Verse. — The purpose of this course is to 
interpret the qualities of English poetry, its metric and 
stanzaic forms, and to guide the student in experimental 
writing of verse. 

White 

62. Recent Southern Fiction. — A reading course in twentieth 
century Southern fiction, with some study of types, move- 
ments, and authors. 

White 

71. A Survey of English Drama. — An account of the origin 
and development of English drama is attempted in lec- 
tures. Forty or more dramas are required for rapid 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 85 

reading or for study. These dramas are typical of all 
ages of English dramatic history from the earliest mys- 
tery plays to the drama of the twentieth century. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
White 

72. Modem Drama. — A study of contemporary British, 
American, and Continental drama. Approximately fifty 
plays are assigned for reading. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

White 

81. American Literature. — A survey of American literature 
from the early seventeenth century through the nine- 
teenth century. Historical background presented as an 
aid to the understanding of American intellectual devel- 
opment. Emphasis on major movements and major 
authors. Elective for all students. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Stone 

82. American Literature. — A survey of American literature 
in the twentieth century, with emphasis on developments 
and trends in the fields of poetry, prose fiction, and 
serious prose. Elective for all students. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Stone 

02. Introduction to Fiction. — Course planned to give stu- 
dents a comprehensive background of the development 
of fiction in general and of English fiction in particular. 
Wide reading in the art, technique, and types of prose 
fiction required. Ten novels illustrating various types 
of fiction selected for intensive study. Elective for all 
students. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Goodman 

101. The Methods and Materials of Teaching English. — This 
Is the same course as Education 51. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Goodman 



86 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Thompson 

11. The Public Speech.^Systematic practice in the prepara- 
tion and delivery of the short extemporaneous speech; 
daily drill in thinking while facing an audience and in 
clothing thought in appropriate and forcible language; 
voice and gesture. Three hours credit. First semester. 

12. Argumentation. — A study of the principles of argumen- 
tation, including the simple rules of preparing argumen- 
tative discourses. Three hours credit. Second semes^ 
ter. 

21. Literary Analysis and Interpretation. — Effective rendi- 
tion of poetry and prose; careful study of selected mas- 
terpieces from the standpoint of expression, cultivation 
of voice, gesture and general presence. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

22. Advanced Public Speaking. — This course is designed to 
develop the faculty of observation and the art of mak- 
ing the events of everyday life furnish effective illustra- 
tions for addresses. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 87 

YII. THE DEPARTMENT OP GEOLOGY 
PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 

A lecture room, a laboratory, and a large room for the 
display of specimens are provided for this department in the 
Sullivan-Harrell Hall. The museum contains about 300 min- 
erals collected from various parts of the world, 200 speci- 
mens of rock presented by the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, 3 00 minerals and rocks presented by Goucher College, 
and a fine collection of Mississippi rocks and fossils. The 
excellence of the latter is yearly increased by donations from 
friends of the college, and a collection made by the professor 
and class on annual trips. 

11. Lithologic and Physiographic Geology. — This includes a 
study of mineral crystalline forms, chemical composition, 
occurrence, and uses, with a description of the kind and 
arrangement of rock masses. Folios and topographical 
sheets of the U. S. Geological Survey will be used in con- 
nection with a study of physiographic features and pro- 
cesses. 

Dynamic Geology. — This portion of the course embraces 
the study of the mechanical and chemical effects of the 
atmosphere, water, heat, and life. Special attention will 
be given to such phases of the subject as the work of 
glaciers and of volcanoes. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Sullivan 

12. Historical Geology. — In addition to general historical 
geology, some attention will be given to economic prod- 
ucts and to paleontology. The college museum and the 
private museum of the head of the department afford 
minerals and fossils for class study. Several geological 
expeditions, regularly made in the fall and spring to 
localities easily accessible to Jackson give the class a 
practical conception of this kind of surveying. The 
college is fortunate in being located in the midst of a 
region that is quite varied in geological character. Oc- 
casionally a week's leave of absence is granted for trips 



88 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

to more distant parts. In the last month of the course 
special attention will be given to Geology of Mississippi. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Sullivan 

21. Topographj', Paleontology, and Geology of Mississippi. — 

This course will include a study of topographic maps and 
folios of the U. S. Geologic Survey; field observations, 
collection of fossils and correlation of horizons; special 
studies in the paleontology of Mississippi. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Sullivan 

22. History of Geology and Economic Geology. — In this 

course the student will be expected to make a systematic 
digest of material assigned for study. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Sullivan 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

VIII. DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 
PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

Al. Beginner's German. — This course is designed to give be- 
ginners the fundamentals of grammar and syntax to- 
gether with easy reading exercises. The course may be 
used as a junior, or senior elective, or may be applied 
to entrance units in satisfaction of language requirement. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 
Hamilton 

A2. Beginner's German. — A continuation of the above. 
Several easy, short stories are read during this semester. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Hamilton 

11. Intermediate German. — Review of grammar. The stu- 
dent is introduced to the great writers of German liter- 
ature: Schiller, Freytag and others. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Hamilton 

12. Intermediate German.— A continuation of the work done 
in the first semester with variation of authors. Stan- 
dard works on German literature are read, both in the 
original and in English translation. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Hamilton 

21. Advanced Gennan. — More difficult reading in the works 
of the authors of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, 
is taken up in this semester. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Hamilton 

22. Advanced German. — Modern German short stories and 
plays are usually read in this semester. This course is 
sometimes omitted and one in scientific German is sub- 
stituted. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Hamilton 



90 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

IX. THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

PROFESSOR LIN 

PROFESSOR MOORE 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WHARTON 

INSTRUCTOR RICKETTS 

In the courses in History two things will be kept in view. 
Students will be expected to acquaint themselves with the 
significant facts in the development of the nations studied, 
and to learn why these facts are considered significant. As far 
as possible the causal connection between historical events 
and the development of nations will be indicated, and emphasis 
will be laid upon the idea that history is an account of the 
development of the human race. Both the facts and the 
reasons will be studied to account for the progressive organi- 
zation of the social, intellectual, and moral ideals of the 
various peoples Into laws and customs. 

In the attempt to understand the progress of the nations, 
account will be taken of their literatures, their racial compo- 
sition, their economic conditions, their religions, their social 
institutions, and their forms of government. 

11. Histoi-y of Europe. — In this course an attempt will be 
made to show that the problems and ideals of modern 
nations come to them from previous history. This is 
done that the students may understand the problems of 
modern life, including those of our own nation and the 
relation of our problems to those of other nations with 
which we must deal. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. 

Moore 

Wharton 

Ricketts 

12. History of Europe. — A continuation of History 11. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Moore 

Wharton 

Ricketts 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 91 

21. HistoiT of the United States — 1492-1850. — This is a 
general course in American History, treating of the 
European background of colonial life, the revolution, 
the constitution, and the new government. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Ricketts 

22. History of the United States — 1850-1941.^ — A continu- 
ation of History 21, treating of the Civil War, Recon- 
struction, and the history of the United States to the 
present time. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Ricketts 

31. Ancient History. — The history of the Near East and of 
Greece to the Peloponnesian War. Emphasis is placed 
on the contribution of ancient civilization to modern 
western culture. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Wharton 

32. Ancient History. — This is a continuation of History 31, 
covering Hellenistic civilization, the development of the 
Roman Republic and Empire, and the blending of Roman 
culture with that of the people of northern Europe. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Wharton 

41. Mediaeval History. — This begins with the fall of Rome 
and goes approximately through the year 1000 A. D. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 

Lin 

42. Mediaeval Histoiy. — A continuation of History 41, be- 
ginning about the year 1000 A. D. and terminating with 
the discovery of America. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Lin 
51. Problems in Modem History. — This course deals with 
such present day problems in international relations as 
Nationalism, Imperialism, Militarism, and Propaganda. 
It follows the general outline of the Syllabus on Inter- 
national Relations, by P. T. Moon. Pre-requisite History 
11 and 12. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Moore 



92 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

52. History of Europe — 1914-1941. — A continuation of His- 
tory 51. The causes of the "World War, and a broad 
view of the history of Europe since the war. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Moore 

61. Recent American History — 1865-1900 — A topical survey 
of American history in which emphasis is given to poli- 
tical, economic, and social problems. Pre-requisite, His- 
tory 21 and 22, or the consent of the instructor. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Moore 

62. Recent American Histoi-j' — 1900-1941. — A continuation 
of History 61. Special papers on recent American his- 
tory will be required. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Moore 

71. Hispanic America — Colonial Period. — A study of the po- 
litical, social, and economic characteristics established 
by Spain in the New World, and of the wars for inde- 
pendence. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Wharton 

72. Hispanic America — ^Period of the Republics. — A study of 
the development, culture, and resources of the Hispanic 
American nations. Special attention is given to their 
relations with the United States. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Wharton 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 93 

X. DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR MITCHELL 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

INSTRUCTOR VEST 

"The chief end of mathematics is thought, not routine — 
natural thought, exercising the powers of the thinker in an 
unforced, interesting manner, not a forced and convulsive 
struggle for what is beyond grasp." — (Young). 

The aim of this department is to realize the goal ex- 
pressed in this quotation. 

For requirements for major in mathematics see page 46. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

11. College Algebra. — The notion of functional relation in 
two real variables; linear, quadratic. The equation; 
simultaneous linear, quadratic; use of determinants in 
the solution of the foregoing. Elementary series. Mathe- 
matical induction, the binomial theorem, complex num- 
bers, theory of equations: rational, irrational roots. 
Permutations, combinations, probability. Elementary 
problems in mathematics of finance. First semester. 
Three hours credit. 

Mitchell 
Van Hook 
Vest 

12. Plane Trigonometry. — Definition of the trigonometric 
functions, their properties, graphs, relations, identities, 
equations. Analysis. Solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles, logarithmic computation. Second semester. Three 
hours credit. 

Mitchell 
Van Hook 
Vest 

21. Plane Analytical Geometry. — Rectangular and polar co- 
ordinate systems. Discussion of curves by means of their 



94 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

equations. The straight line and the circle, systeniB 
of curves. The conic sections, transformations of co- 
ordinates. The general equation of the second degree. 
Loci and higher plane curves. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Van Hook 

22. Differential Calculus. — The fundamental notions of limit, 
infinitesimal, infinity, continuity. Differentiation of 
algebraic and the elementary transcendental functions. 
Applications: geometry, slope, curvature, maxima, 
minima, curvetracing, asymptotes, singular points, en- 
velopes; mechanics, velocity, acceleration, rectilinear 
and curvilinear motion. Differentials, mean value, series. 
Expansion of functions. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Van Hook 

81. Integral Calculus. — Integration as an operation, integra- 
tion as summation. The definite integral. Applications: 
areas, volumes, lengths, center of gravity, center of 
pressure. Multiple integrals. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Van Hook 

82. Differential Equations. — A first course in differential 
equations of the first and second orders, with applica- 
tions to geometry, physics, and mechanics. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Van Hook 

41. Descriptive Geometry. — Orthographic projection. Solu- 
tion of problems of points, lines, planes in space. Curved 
surfaces, intersections, developments. Applications to 
roof structures, transition pieces, mine problems. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Mitchell 

42. Mechanical Drawing. — Isometric and cabinet projections. 

Dimensioning, working drawings, free-hand sketching. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Mitchell 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 9 5 

51. Mechanics, — Statics: problems of equilibrium of a parti- 
cle and rigid body. Framed structures and flexible cords. 
Graphical methods employed. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Mitchell 

52. Mechanics. — Dynamics of particle and rigid body. The 
gyroscope. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell 

61. College Geometrj'. — Post-Euclid Euclidean Geometry: 
Division of line segments, angles, areas, nomothetic 
figures, collinearity and concurrency. Geometry of the 
triangle and circle. Inversion. Duality. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Mitchell 

62. Teaching of Mathematics. — Teaching of Demonstrative 
Geometry: What is geometry? Types of definition, types 
of proof, types of class procedure. Mechanical aids. 

Mitchell 

71. Mathematics of Finance. — Interest and annuities. Appli- 
cations to debts, bonds, capitalization, perpetuities. Ele- 
ments of life insurance. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

Mitchell 

72. Statistics. — Graphical representation of data. The several 
means, distribution, correlation, drift, concentration. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Mitchell 

81. Advanced Algebra. — Properties of rational numbers. 
Limits. Convergence and divergence of series. Deter- 
minants. Irrational numbers. Complex numbers. Theory 
of equations. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Van Hook 

82. Theory of Equations. — Irrational numbers. Construc- 
tions. Algebraic solutions of the cubic and the quartic 
equations. Symmetric functions of the roots. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Van Hook 



96 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XI. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 
PROFESSOR LIN 

The courses in philosophy are designed to give an intelli- 
gent view of the human mind, and to indicate the conditions 
of all valid thought. Only what is fundamental will be con- 
sidered. 

In logic both deductive and inductive logic will be studied, 
but neither course will receive credit for graduation unless 
supplemented by the other course in this subject. In the 
Introduction to Philosophy attention will be given to types 
of philosophy which enter into modern thought. In the 
History of Philosophy a comprehensive view will be given of 
the results obtained by the greatest thinkers who have at- 
tempted to frame a consistent theory of the material and the 
spiritual world. An attempt will be made to show that these 
have a consecutive connection in development. 

In ethics one course will consider ancient ethics, and a 
following course will be given in modern ethics. It is recom- 
mended that courses in logic be taken before other courses 
are attempted. 

Students who have not studied physics are badly handi- 
capped in the understanding of philosophy. It is highly to 
be desired that such students prepare themselves for these 
courses by studying a text of physics of at least high school 
grade. 

11. Deductive liOgic. — Three hours credit. First semester. 

Lin 

12. Inductive Logic. — Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lin 

21. An Introduction to Philosophy, Types of Philosophy. — 

Three hours credit. First semester. 
Lin 

22. Introduction to Philosophy, Types of Philosophy. — Three 

hours credit. Second semester. 
Lin 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 9 7 

31. History of Philosophy. — An liistoi'ical sui'vey of the 
growth of philosophical thought in the ancient and 
medieval periods. Ancient philosophy includes the ma- 
jor thinkers from Thales to Plotinus, with emphasis on 
the systems of Plato and Aristotle. The medieval period 
gives special attention to the development of Christian 
thought and to Scholasticism. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Lin 

32. History of Pliilosophy. — A continuation of Philosophy 
31. The history of modern philosophy includes the de- 
velopment of thought from the Renaissance to our own 
times. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lin 

41. The Nichomachean Etlilcs. — Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Lin 

42. Modem Ethics. — Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Lin 



98 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XII. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

COACH HENRY L. STONE 

DIRECTOR HELEN NEWELL BARNES 

The following courses are offered for college credit: 
11, 12. Physical Training for Men. — The requirements In 
physical work are designed to cover the whole school year at 
the rate of two hours a week for each freshman. Although 
this work is compulsory, considerable freedom in selection is 
offered. The sole aim is to create a healthy desire to engage 
in some form of recreation, under proper supervision, so as to 
benefit the student morally, mentally, and physically. This 
exercise takes form of competitive games in order to arouse 
the proper interest, develop team work, teach initiative, 
strengthen the morale, teach true sportsmanship, and create a 
life-long interest in some form of sport which will benefit the 
student in after life. An idea is also gained as to the natural 
ability of each man and quite frequently students discover 
that they are really better in athletics than they thought they 
were and are encouraged to try for the varsity teams. 

Physical Education for "Women. — General gymnastics (light 
apparatus); rhythmic plays and games. Tumbling, pyramid- 
building, etc; development and corrective gymnastics. Spring 
Festival. Point system used. Monograms awarded. Re- 
quired of all freshmen. Two hours credit. 

21, 22. Coaching for Men. — In order to better equip those 
students who expect to combine coaching with teaching a 
course in the theory of all major sports will be offered. This 
course will comprise football, baseball, basketball and track. 
Two hours a week of classroom work will be given, which 
will also include a number of lectures. 

In football, subjects such as the equipment and outfitting 
of players, training units, practice methods, various offensive 
and defensive methods, the forward pass, trick plays, general- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 99 

ship and field tactics, and numerous other Important items 
will be given consideration. 

In baseball, individual play and team play will be taken 
up in detail. Offense and defense will be thoroughly dis- 
cussed; also batting, base running, position play, strategy, etc. 

Basketball will include such topics as goal throwing, 
passing, guarding, dribbling, blocking, plays from center and 
plays from out of bounds. Various styles of offense and de- 
fense will be discussed. 

Field and track athletics will cover diet and training, the 
dashes and long distance events, hurdling, vaulting, jumping, 
shot put, discus throw, javelin, and other points which are 
essential to track work. Pre-requisite for this course: At 
least two years participation in major sports. 

Coaching for Women. — Soccer, field ball, and speed ball, 
basketball (intercollegiate) ; hand ball, German bat ball, vol- 
ley ball, etc.; track and field events; tennis. Theory and 
practices of physical education. Gymnastic terminology. Classi- 
fication of gymnastic material. Principles and technique of 
teaching. History of physical education. The fall program 
for high schools completed. Instruction in major sports for 
women. Intramural program in winter sports studied. Special 
emphasis placed on basketball technique, officiating, etc. The 
spring program for high schools including track and field 
events: The May Day Festival. Bibliography. Physical Ed- 
ucation for Women, a pre-requisite to this course. Four hours 
credit. 



100 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XIII. THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND 
ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR HARRELL 
INSTRUCTOR GALLOWAY 

A knowledge of mathematics through plane trigonometry 
is required for admission to this department. 

The department occupies eight rooms on the main and 
basement floors of the Sullivan-Harrell Building. The labora- 
tories are supplied with all essentials for carrying on the work 
in the various courses and with balopticon and moving picture 
machine for lecture purposes. Both alternating and direct 
currents are available where needed. 

The work in astronomy is carried on in the Sullivan- 
Harrell Building and in the James Observatory. The depart- 
ment is equipped with globes, tellurian, gyroscopes, and spec- 
trometer for laboratory work. 

The observatory occupies a commanding position on the 
north campus and is equipped with a six-inch equatorial with 
mounting by Warner and Swazey and optical parts by Brashear, 
also a two-inch prismatic transit by Gaertner. The other 
equipment consists of a sidereal chronometer, a fine clock, 
filar micrometer, portrait lens for photography, a high grade 
surveyor's transit, and two sextants. 

The observatory is open to visitors Friday night each 
week when the weather and other conditions permit. 

PHYSICS 

11. General Physics. — This course is designed to cover the 
general principles of mechanics of solids, liquids, and 
gases, and the general principles of heat and sound. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Galloway 

12. General Physics. — This course consists of a study of mag- 
netism, electricity, and light. Two lectures and one lab- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 101 

oratory period. Courses 11 and 12 must be taken to 
satisfy the required work in physics. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Galloway 

21. Pre-medical Physics. — A laboratory course designed, in 
conjunction with Physics 22, to meet the needs of those 
students who expect to enter a medical school where 
eight semester hours are required for admission. The 
course is in substance an additional laboratory period 
to courses 11 and 12. One laboratory period. One hour 
credit. First semester. 

Galloway 

22. Pre-medical Physics. — This course is a continuation of 
course 21. Both 21 and 22 must be taken to satisfy 
the pre-medical requirement. One laboratory period. 
One hour credit. Second semester. 

Galloway 

31. Advanced General Physics. — This is an advanced course 
in general physics dealing with the properties of matter, 
mechanics, and heat. Prerequisite, Physics 11 and 12. 
Three lecture periods. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. 

Galloway 

32. Advanced General Physics. — This is a course dealing 
with the more advanced phases of magnetism, electricity, 
and light. Prerequisite, Physics 31. Three lecture pe- 
riods. Three hours credit. Second semester, 

Galloway 

41. Mechanics and Heat. — This course is devoted to a further 
study of mechanics and heat with special attention given 
to thermodynamics, calorimetry, and the kinetic theory 
of gases. The laboratory work in connection with this 
course will be devoted, in part, to the determination of 
the fuel value of different fuels. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Harrell 



102 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

43. Light. — This coui'se treats of the principles and laws of 
reflection, refraction, interference, polarization, and 
color phenomena. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Harrell 

51. Electricity. — This course involves a more extended dis- 
cussion of the topics than can be given in general physics. 
The student will be expected to become thoroughly 
familiar with measuring instruments and their use in 
actual measurements. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

52. Electricity. — This course consists of a study of power 
stations and the distribution of power, electric lighting, 
electric heating, electric traction, and electric communi- 
cation. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

61. Sound. — This course comprises a more extended study of 
sound than is possible in physics 11. The origin, propa- 
gation, and reception of sound waves, the physical basis 
of music, musical instruments, acoustics of buildings and 
reproduction of sound. Two lecture and one laboratory 
period. First semester. Prerequisite, Physics 11 and 
12. Three hours credit. 

Galloway 

91. Civilian Pilot Training. — This course has been set up by 
the Civil Aeronautics Authority for the purpose of train- 
ing a limited number of young men and young women 
as pilots. It consists of a seventy-two hour "Ground 
School Course" in the following topics: History of avia- 
tion, civil air regulations, navigation, meteorology, para- 
chutes, aircraft and theory of flight, engines, instru- 
ments, and radio uses and forms, together with thirty- 
five to fifty hours of flight training. Two double lec- 
ture periods and flying periods as required. Upon the 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 103 

completion of the course the trainee will be given a pri- 
vate pilot's license. Three hours credit. 

Harrell, Director 

Howell 

Moore 

Bell 

ASTRONOMY 

11. General Astronomy. — This course will be devoted to a 
study of the earth, the moon, time, the constellations, 
and the solar system. Two lectures and one observatory 
period. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

12. General Astronomy. — This course will consist of a study 
of the planets, comets, meteors, the sun, the develop- 
ment of the solar system, and the sidereal universe. 
Two lectures and one observatory period. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

21. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. — This course covers 
the subject of spherical astronomy and the theory of 
astronomical instruments with exercises in making and 
reducing observations. One lecture and two observa- 
tory periods. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Harrell 

22. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. — This is a continua- 
tion of course 21. One lecture and two observatory 
periods. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Harrell 

31. Surveying. — This course involves the general principles 
of surveying with particular attention to the method of 
laying out the public lands and the methods of the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey. One lecture and one double 
laboratory period. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Harrell 

82. Surveying. — This course is a continuation of course 31. 
One lecture and one double laboratory period. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Harrell 



104 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XIV. THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

PROFESSOR MUSGRAVE 

The courses in psychology are designed to acquaint the 
student with the facts and principles which govern human 
behavior as demonstrated by psychological investigation, and 
to further the student's understanding both of himself and 
his fellow men. Certain advanced courses are planned to 
meet the needs of students who expect to enter vocations in 
which work with people holds a central place. 

11. General Psychology. — An introduction to the methods 
and finding of a modern, scientific psychology. Mate- 
rials fee, fifty cents. Not open to freshmen. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 

Musgrave 

12. Educational Psjchology. — The application of psychology 
— its methods and principles — to the problems of edu- 
cation and the work of the teacher. Materials fee, fifty 
cents. Prerequisite, Psychology 11. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Haynes 
Musgrave 

102. Applied Psychology. — A study of the psychological fac- 
tors related to human efficiency in work and play. This 
course is planned for students expecting to enter profes- 
sions other than teaching; teacher training students 
should elect Psychology 12. Materials fee, fifty cents. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Musgrave 

21. Social Psychology. — A study of the behaviors of individ- 
uals in multi-individual situations and relationships, in- 
cluding the crowd, the audience, fads and fashions, and 
institutions. Prerequisite, Psychology 11. Materials 
fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. Given in alternate 
years. Not offered in 1940-41. 

Musgrave 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 105 

22. Psychology of Personality. — A study of methods and in- 
struments employed in personality measurement; the de- 
velopment of personality. Each student will make an 
intensive study of the personality of one individual. Pre- 
requisites, Psychology 11 and permission of the instruc- 
tor. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. 
Given in alternate years. Evening class in 1940-41. 
Musgrave 

31. Developmental Psychology. — Infancy and Clilldhood. — A 

study of the psychological development of the individual 
from infancy through later childhood. Prerequisites, 
Psychology 11 and permission of the instructor. Ma- 
terials fee, fifty cents. Given in alternate years. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Musgrave 

32. Developmental Psychology. — Adolescence and Maturity. 

— Continuous with Psychology 31, dealing with the psy- 
chological development of the individual during adoles- 
cence and maturity. Prerequisite, Psychology 11 or per- 
mission of the instructor. Materials fee, fifty cents. 
Given in alternate years. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Musgrave 

41. Mental Hygiene. — A study of the psychology of adjust- 
ment with special emphasis on the principles of sound 
mental health. Prerequisite, Psychology 11 and permis- 
sion of the instructor. Materials fee, fifty cents. Given 
in alternate years. Not offered in 19 40-41. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Musgrave 

42. Psychology in Business and Industry. — A study of the 
applications of psychology to problems of consumer re- 
search, advertising, selling, employee selection, and har- 
monious industrial relations. Materials fee, fifty cents. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 11 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Given in alternate years. Evening class in 1940- 
41. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Musgrave 



106 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

51-52. Problems in Psychology. — Each student will work on 

an individual problem, and the class will meet only once 

a week. Open only to psychology majors and minors, 

and required of majors. Credit from two to six hours. 

Musgrave 

61. Clinical Psychology. — A study in the methods of and 
techniques in making a clinical study of an individual. 
Opportunity will be afforded each student to obtain 
some experience in the administration of a number of 
psychological examinations commonly employed in clin- 
ical work. Prerequisites, Psychology 11-12 and permis- 
sion of the instructor. Given in alternate years. Lab- 
oratory fees, $5.00. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. 

Musgrave 

62. Experimental Psychologj'. — An introduction to the meth- 
ods and techniques employed in experimental psychol- 
ogy. Each student will be required to carry out and 
write up a number of psychological experiments. Pre- 
requisites, Psychology 11 and permission of the instruc- 
tor. One hour of lecture and four hours laboratory for 
three hours credit. Given in alternate years. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Second semester. 

Musgrave 

01. Salesfuansliip — its Pi'inciples and Pi-actice. — (Same as 
Economics 91). A practical course dealing with the 
psychological aspects of buying and selling and effective 
sales methods, which will be of value to the student, not 
only as training for work in the selling field, but also 
in helping him to develop the ability to "get along" with 
people and sell himself to others. Lectures, student re- 
ports, sales demonstrations, and talks by outside speak- 
ers. Application of principles to the selling of various 
types of commodities and services. Two hour class pe- 
riod and field work. Open only to juniors and seniors. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 107 

101. The Family. — Same as Social Science 41. A study of the 
development of the family as an institution, of relation- 
ships within the family group, and of the place of the 
family in the larger society. Open to juniors and sen- 
iors, with the permission of the chairman. One hour 
credit. First semester. 

Musgrave, Chairman 

Bullock 

Ricketts 

Rieckeu 

Wallace 

Wharton 



108 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XV. THE DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 
THE TATTJTVI FOUNDATION 

PROFESSOR BULLOCK 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR THOMAS 

The courses In this department are offered for the con- 
tribution they malfe to Christian living and genuine culture, 
rather than for any special professional interest such as the 
ministry or other Christian life-service. These special inter- 
ests are not neglected, but the department seeks primarily to 
meet the urgent need of the Church for an effective leader- 
ship among its lay members. It is hoped that many students 
will avail themselves of these courses. 

Some Millsaps students under the direction of the De- 
partment of Religion and the Methodist Boards of Education, 
teach Short Term Training Courses in the Mississippi Meth- 
odist conferences during the summer. This department glad- 
ly cooperates in preparing students for this important service 
to the Church. 

Religion 11 and 12, providing an introduction to the 
Bible and some insight into the meaning of the Christian re- 
ligion, is required of all students in either the freshman or 
the sophomore year. Other than Religion 11 and 12, both of 
which must be taken, any single semester course may be tak- 
en. Prerequisites for any given course may be waived under 
special circumstances upon the consent of the professor. 

Majors should plan their course of study in cooperation 
with the professor of religion. It is the growing sentiment 
among the leaders of the Church that students preparing for 
the ministry should seek to build a broad cultural foundation 
for their professional training in a school of theology. All 
ministerial students should plan their course in accordance 
with the pre-theological curriculum available upon application 
to the Department of Religion. 

11. Introductoi'y Bible. — An introduction to the necessary 
background for the study and appreciation of the Bible, 
and a study of the religious development and contribu- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 109 

tion of the Hebrews as revealed in the Old Testament. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 

Bullock 

Thomas 

12. Introductory Bible. — An introduction to the necessary 
background for the study and appreciation of the New 
Testament, and a study of the New Testament with a 
view to achieving some insight into the meaning of the 
Christian religion. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Bullock 

Thomas 

21. The Life and Teachings of Jesus. — This is a study of the 
Gospels, emphasizing the teachings of Jesus and their 
application to problems of the individual and society 
today. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 12. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Bullock 

22. The Bible as Literature. — An appreciative study of rep- 
resentative masterpieces of the varied types of Biblical 
prose and poetry, stressing literary form and values, and 
the influence of Biblical writings upon English litera- 
ture. This course is intended to provide integration with 
the Division of Humanities, and is suggested as an elec- 
tive for majors in that Division. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. 

Thomas 

31. The Program of the Christian Religion. — A study of the 
meaning, purpose, and program of the Christian religion, 
planned to give a grasp of the place of the Church in the 
social order, and of the basic principles of Christian 
education. This course is intended to provide integra- 
tion with the Division of Social Sciences, and is sug- 
gested for an elective for majors in that Division. Pre- 
requisite, Religion 11 and 12. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Bullock 



110 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

32. Methods of Christian Education. — A study of methods of 
Christian character education, including the use of ma- 
terials and agencies contributing to the achievement of 
dependable Christian behavior. Prerequisite or concur- 
rent, Religion 31. Given in alternate years. Offered in 
1940-41. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Thomas 

41. Organization of Christian Education. — A study of the 
organization and administration of the local church edu- 
cational program, designed to prepare the student for 
effective leadership in the educational work of the 
church of which he is a member. Pre-requisite or con- 
current, Religion 31. Given in alternate years. Not 
offered in 1940-41. Three hours credit. First semes- 
ter. 

Thomas 

42. Teaching in Training Schools. — This course prepares stu- 
dents to teach one of the training courses of the Meth- 
odist Church. A study is made of the principles and 
methods of teaching, a course plan for teaching is de- 
veloped, and an opportunity is given to teach the course 
under supervision. Open to juniors and seniors. Given 
in alternate years. Not offered in 19 40-41. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 

Thomas 

51. Christianity and Science. — A course designed to assist 
the student in working out a philosophy of life, with 
special attention to the relationships of Christianity and 
science. The course is intended to provide integi'ation 
with the Division of Natural Sciences, and is suggested 
for an elective for majors in that Division. Pre-requi- 
site (concurrent for upperclassmen) Religion 11, 12. 
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1940-41. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. 
Bullock 

62. History of Christianity. — A survey of the development 
of the Christian movement from Jesus to the present 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 111 

time, including an examination of the occasions, issues, 
and emphases giving rise to the principal divisions of 
Christianity in the world today, and a brief study of 
contemporary trends. Pre-requisite, Religion 11 and 12. 
Given in alternate years. Not offered in 19 40-41. Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Bullock 

61. Comparative Religion. — An introductory study of the 
origin and development of religion, and a study of the 
great living religions of the world. Pre-requisite, Re- 
ligion 11 and 12. Given in alternate years. Offered in 
1940-41. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Thomas 

62. Methodism. — A study of the origin, meaning, and his- 
torical development of Methodism, leading up to a study 
of the present organization and message of Methodism 
in America. This course seeks to assist the student to 
become a more effective church member. Prerequisite, 
Religion 11 and 12. Given in alternate years. Offered 
in 1940-41. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Bullock 

71. Seminar. — A course to guide the student in extensive 
readings in the general field of religion, to help him 
achieve a unified grasp of his knowledge, and to assist 
him in seeing religious knowledge in the matrix of our 
total human culture. Required in the senior year of 
students majoring in the Department. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Bullock 

72. The Christian Ministry. — An introduction to the Chris- 
tian ministry, including a study of preaching and pas- 
toral work. Required of ministerial students in their 
sophomore year, or in the case of transfer students In 
the first year of residence. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Bullock 



112 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XVI. THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE 
LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR SANDERS 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CRAIG 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR COBB 

This department offers courses in French and Spanish. 
The regular work begins with course 11, but for the benefit 
of those who have not been able to fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements in this subject before entering college, a prepara- 
tory course (course A) is offered. This course, (when taken 
under the supervision of the college, and not counted as an 
entrance unit), may be used as a junior or senior elective. 
Classes meet three hours a week. For entrance, course A will 
count as two units, provided the student makes a grade of not 
less than C. 

In the B.S. course twelve hours of French or German, 
or Spanish above the elementary course are required. 

Under no condition will a student be permitted to begin 
French and Spanish the same year. 

A student should consult the professors In charge before 
planning to take more than two modern languages. Any 
course not already counted, may be used as a junior or senior 
elective. 

FRENCH 

Al. Elementary French. — An elementary course In which 
especial attention is given to pronunciation. Three houra 
credit. First semester. 

Craig 

A2. Elementary French. — The elementary grammar begun In 
Al is completed. Simple texts are read. Dictation and 
oral practice is begun. Al and A2 together constitute 
a double course. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Craig 



I 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 113 

11. Intermediate French. — The methods of French Al and 
A2 will be continued according to the needs and apti- 
tudes of the class. A review of grammar will be used 
as a text for the study of grammar and composition. The 
semester will be devoted to the careful reading of texts 
from nineteenth century prose. Especial attention will 
be paid to the irregular verbs, idioms and to pronuncia- 
tion. No student will be admitted to French 11 unless 
he has passed both semesters of the beginning course in 
French, French Al and French A2. Three hours credit. 
First semester. 

Craig 

12. Intermediate French. — A continuation of French 11. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Craig 

21. Survey of French Literature. — An anthology is used 
which contains selections illustrating the development 
of the literature from its beginnings to the present time. 
An outline history of French literature is also used. 
Three hours credit. First semester. 

Sanders 
Craig 

22. Survey of French Literature. — A continuation of the sur- 
vey begun in 21. Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Sanders 
Craig 

81. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. — A more 

intensive study of French literature of the eighteenth 
century than is offered in French 22. Three hours credit. 

First semester. Not offered in 1940-41. 
Sanders 

82. French Romanticism. — Chateaubriand, Hugo and the 
French lyric poets of the nineteenth century. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. Not offered in 1940-41. 

Sanders 
41. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. — Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Sanders 



114 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

42. Composition and Convei'sation. — Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Sanders 

52. Materials and Methods of Teaching French and Spanish. 

— Same as Education 5 2. Three hours credit. Second 
semester. Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 
1940-41. 

Craig 

Cobb 

SPANISH 

The requirements for admission and for graduation in 
Spanish are the same as those in French. Two entrance units 
in Spanish will be required for admission to course 11. 

Al. Elenientai-y Spanish. — An elementary course in grammar 
and reading with constant oral practice. Three hours 
credit. First semester. 

Cobb 

A2. Elementary Spanish. — Grammar continued and com- 
pleted. Reading continued. Al and A2 together consti- 
tute a double course. No credit is given for Al unless 
A2 is also completed. Three hours credit. Second se- 
mester. 

Cobb 

11. Intermediate Spanish. — This course is devoted to the 
reading of modern Spanish prose. A Spanish review 
grammar is used and special attention is paid to the Ir- 
regular verbs and to idioms. Practice is given in read- 
ing Spanish at sight. No student will be admitted to 
Spanish 11 unless he has passed both semesters of the 
beginning course in Spanish, Spanish Al and Spanish 
A2. Three hours credit. First semester. 

Sanders 
Cobb 

12. Intermediate Spanish. — A continuation of Spanish 11. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 

Sanders 
Cobb 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 115 

21. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novelists. — Fernan Cabal- 
lero, Palacio Valdes, Perez Galdos, Blasco Ibanez. His- 
tory of Spanish literature. Three hours credit. First 
semester. 

Sanders 

22. Cervantes, Don Quixote. — Three hours credit. Second 
semester. 

Sanders 

31. Recent and Contemporary Spanish Dramatists. — Three 
hours credit. First semester. 
Sanders 

82. Lope de Vega and Calderon. — Part of the semester is 
devoted to a survey of Spanish lyric poetry. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. 

Sanders 

41. Spanish Romanticism. — Espronceda and Becquer. Three 
hours credit. First semester. Not offered In 1940-41. 

Sanders 

42. Composition and Conversation. — Three hours credit. Sec- 
ond semester. 

Sanders 

52. The Jlethods and Materials of Teaching French and 
Spanish. — This Is the same course as French 52 and Edu- 
cation 5 2. Three hours credit. Second semester. Of- 
fered in alternate years. Not offered in 1940-41. 

Craig 

Cobb 

61. Survey of Spanish American Literature. — A brief outline 
of the literature of the Spanish American countries with 
some attention to historical and cultural backgrounds, 
and with special emphasis on the Modernista Movement, 
Open to students who have had Spanish 21-22 or the 
equh'alent. 

Cobb 
02. A continuation of Spanish 61. 

Cobb 



116 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XVII. THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 
AND GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WHARTON 
INSTRUCTOR RICKETTS 

The aim of this department will be rather to do well a 
small amount of work than to cover a large field. Courses 
In economics, political science, and sociology will be offered. 
While these are elementary in their scope and nature, they 
will serve as a sound basis for further study in these subjects, 
and will be useful to those who seek to understand and im- 
prove our financial, political, and social life and institutions. 

The enrollment will be limited to a number that can be 
taught thoroughly by the staff dealing with these subjects. 
Since these subjects deal with the matters which are engross- 
ing the attention of every important nation in the world, and 
which lie at the basis of all material welfare it is believed 
that students who are awake to the things of first importance 
In civilization will be profited by the courses given. 

31. Principles of Sociology. — A study of the various aspects 
of human society. Same as Religion 81. Open to jun- 
iors and seniors. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Wharton 

82. Social Problems. — A survey of social problems and their 
adjustment in modern society. Emphasis Is placed on 
problems of population, distribution of wealth and in- 
come, race relations, the family, crime, health, social 
control, and democracy. Prerequisite, Social Science 31. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Wharton 

41. The Family. — Same as Psychology 101. A study of the 
development of the family as an institution, of relation- 
ships within the family group, and of the place of the 
family in the larger society. Open to juniors and sen- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 117 

iors, with the permission of the chairman. One hour 
credit. First semester. 

Musgrave, chairman 

Bullock 

Ricketts 

Riecken 

Wallace 

Wharton 

51-52. Political Science. — The American federal system of 
government as it exists today, together with emphasis 
upon its historical background and current trends and 
consideration of its politico-economic aspects. Open to 
sophomores, only with consent of instructor. Six hours 
credit for the year course only. 
Ricketts 



118 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
Organization 

THE SCHOOL 

The School of Music is a distinct school within Millsaps 
College, subject to the general regulations governing the va- 
rious departments. It makes and administers its own laws 
with reference to admission and graduation. 

Officers of the Faculty 

Dr. M. L. SMITH President 

Dr. W. E. RIECKEN _ Dean 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS Director 

MISS MARY VELMA SIMPSON Secretary 

Faculty 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS 
Professor of Piano, Theory, and Composition 

MR. ALVIN J. KING 
Chorus Director 

MR. ARMAND COULLET 

Professor of Violin and Theory 

MRS. ARMAND COULLET 
Professor of Voice and Theory 

MISS ALBERTA TAYLOR 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

MISS MARY VELMA SIMPSON 
Instructor in Public School Music, Piano and Theory 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 119 

MRS. J. L. ROBERTS, A.B., B.Mus. 

Director of Piano 

A.B., Whitworth College; diploma in piano from Whitworth 
College, Elizabeth McVoy, instructor; B.Mus., American 
Conservatory of Chicago, piano with Silvio Scionti, ad- 
vanced composition and orchestration with Leo Sowerby, 
American composer, criticism and aesthetics, seminar 
and thesis, with Carlton Hackett, musical critic for the 
Chicago Herald; Sherwood Music School of Chicago, 
piano with Georgia Kober, composition with Walter Kel- 
ler; Chicago Musical College, advanced composition with 
Gustavo Dunkelberger, repertoire with Rudolph Ganz; 
student In the American Conservatory of Chicago for 
six summers, studying repertoire in the master classes 
of Josef Lhevinne; student four summers in the reper- 
toire and ensemble classes of Percy Grainger, of the 
Chicago Musical College; special work with Madame 
Fannie Bloomfield-Ziesler, student of Leschetizky, stu- 
dent also in her master classes conducted in the Ameri- 
can Conservatory; special work in piano literature with 
Mabel Osmer; class piano with Gail Martin Haake, co- 
editor of Osford Piano Course, and in Louise Robyn's 
Musical Training for Children, all of the American Con- 
servatory. 

ARMAND COULLET 

Director of Violin 

Conductor of Symphony Orchestra 

In Algiers, North Africa, studied violin with Jules Sauvageot, 
Concert Master and Conductor, Municipal Opera House; 
with Auguste Tessier of the Geneva Conservatory; Con- 
ducting and Orchestration under Camille Saint-Saens. 
For two years was first violin of the Societe' des Concerts 
Symphoniques under Saint-Saens. Later was Concert 
Master and first violin in Symphony Orchestras in Paris, 
Marseilles, Algiers, Seville, and Casablanca. For four 
years taught in New York and Palm Beach. Conductor 
of Millsaps Symphony Orchestra and professor of Violin 
at Millsaps College since 1937. 



120 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MRS. ARMAND COULLET, A.B., A.M., B.M., 
Director of Voice 
B.M., Belhaven College; private instructor in voice three 
years; concert and oratorio; director of voice at Millsaps 
since 1937; graduate work with Mme. Bonnet-Baron of 
the Paris opera, and head of the Voice Department of 
the Conservatoire De Bordeaux. 

MISS ALBERTA TAYLOR, A.B. 
Assistant Instructor of Piano and Theory 
A.B., Millsaps College; B.Mus. Requisites Millsaps College; 
American Conservatory, piano with Silvio Scionti; the 
Oxford Class-Piano course with Gail Martin Haake, co- 
editor of the course; Robyn System of Musical Trainijig 
for the child given by Louise Robyn; Chicago Musical 
College, piano, with Silvio Scionti, master class work 
with Silvio Scionti and Rudolph Ganz; public school 
music and child-training courses with Frances Frothing- 
ham. 

MISS MARY VELMA SIMPSON, A.B. 
Director of Public School Music 
Instructor of Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College; diploma in piano, Millsaps College; 
B.Mus. requisites, Millsaps College; post graduate v/ork 
in Chicago Musical College, piano with Silvio Scionti; 
master class work with Silvio Scionti and Rudolph Ganz; 
public school music and child-training courses with 
Frothingham and graduate work in Public School Music 
in the School of Music at Southern Methodist University. 

Environment 

Jackson is truly a center of art and learning. The School 
of Music is an integral part of the city's magnificent educa- 
tional and cultural system and makes its contribution to this 
ideal environment. The fine art students of Millsaps College 
have splendid opportunities of hearing some of the world's 
renowned musicians who are brought to Jackson under the 
auspices of the community concerts and local musical clubs. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 121 

Musical Attractions 

Music facilities available to Millsaps students are of the 
highest order. The concert season which begins during the 
fall term and closes in late spring includes performances by 
world-famous musicians. During the past seasons Millsaps 
students were privileged to hear such great artists as Albert 
Spalding, Rose Bampton, Rudolph Ganz, Nino Martini, Percy 
Grainger, and Jeanette MacDonald. The San Carlo Opera Com- 
pany, the Mordkin Ballet, the Don Cossack Chorus, the Jooss 
Ballet, the Saint Louis Symphony, were also included in the 
list of attractions presented. The Millsaps Special Committee 
on Artists Series is making every effort to secure the world's 
outstanding talent. The 19 40-19 41 concert series will in- 
clude Nelson Eddy, Joseph Szigeti, violinist, and the famous 
Westminister Choir, chosen by Toscanini to fulfill the vocal 
assignments in connection with the NBC Symphonic Concerts 
under his direction. Student admission to this series of con- 
certs is reasonable and attractive due to the financial coopera- 
tion of the college administration. 

Recitals and Radio Programs 

Opportunities for appearance in recital in Murrah Plall, 
the main auditorium in the college building will be given to 
all students. Radio programs offer to those qualified to ap- 
pear in them a very valuable experience. Participation in the 
college orchestra and chorus, give further performing experi- 
ence. 

Music Study Club 

The Beethoven Club of Millsaps College offers attractive 
and helpful features in the community life of the musical stu- 
dents. The club brings noted artists to the campus to hold 
master classes and give concerts. Some of the artists who 
have been here under the club auspices are Isabel and Silvio 
Scionti, Rudolph Ganz, and Percy Grainger. 

Courses of Study 

The curricula of the School of Music are divided into 
classifications, as follows: Preparatory, Intermediate, Col- 
lege. 



122 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

There are no requirements for admission into the pre- 
paratory department. 

Students are promoted to the intermediate division upon 
completion of the work of the preparatory department. 

Candidates for a certificate, diploma or degree must meet 
the regular college entrance requirements, viz: graduation 
from an approved high school, or a minimum of fifteen units 
of high school work. 

Students may also be admitted to advanced standing in 
the course on the presentation of a satisfactory transcript of 
record of work pursued in an accredited music school of col- 
lege grade. 

A maximum of thirty semester-hours of credit may be 
secured through examinations, by students who have had work 
subsequent to high school graduation under competent pri- 
vate instructors. Examinations for advanced standing must 
be taken and the grades must be recorded in the Registrar's 
office, within six weeks of the student's registration at Mill- 
saps School of Music. 

No student will be granted a certificate or degree un- 
less the residence requirement has been met. Residence may 
be established by a year of study (minimum of thirty-six 
weeks) in which at least 24 semester hours have been earned 
toward the last thirty hours for a degree. A six weeks' sum- 
mer session may be accepted as the equivalent of a quarter 
of a year provided the student earns six semester hours dur- 
ing that period. 

Credit in applied music is based on the hours of practice, 
one semester hour for each three hours per week of practice, 
plus the necessary individual instruction, with a limit of six 
semester hours per semester. Credit is not earned unless 
final examinations are passed. 

Special students are admitted without reference to en- 
trance requirements, but no credit toward degree is allowed 
to such students. However, special students who can satisfy 
entrance requirements and who desire credit for such work 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 123 

as they may take are subject to the same examinations and 
regulations as full course students. All credits earned are 
entered on the school records and may be used toward cre- 
dentials at a later time, should the students eventually be- 
come candidates for graduation. 

The requirements for entrance and for graduation in the 
Millsaps School of Music are in accordance with the published 
regulations of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

A maximum of twenty-four semester-hours in the School 
of Music may be credited toward the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science. 

Regular hours of practice are assigned to each student by 
the Director of the School of Music. The number of hours 
of daily practice depends upon the classification of students. 
Of B.Mus. students with Piano, Violin as major subject, three 
hours and a half daily practice are required in their fresh- 
man and sophomore years and four hours daily in junior and 
senior years; with Voice as the major subject, two hours daily 
practice are required in their freshman, sophomore and jun- 
ior years and three hours in their senior year. Of all other 
classifications of students, one hour and a half or two hours 
of daily practice Is required. 



124 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



CURRICULA LEADING TO DEGREES 

For Bachelor of Music with a Major in Piano 

Freshman Hrs. Sophomore Hrs. 



Piano 



Repertory and 

Interpretation 2 

Harmony I 4 

Keyboard Harmony I 2 

Solfeggio, Ear Training 

and Dictation I 2 

History and Appreciation I 2 

English 11, 12 6 

Religion 11, 12 6 



Piano 6 

Repertory and 

Interpretation 2 

Harmony II 4 

Keyboard Harmony II .... 2 

Solfeggio, Ear Training, 

and Dictation II 2 

History and Appre- 
ciation II 2 

Form and Analysis I 2 

English 21, 22 6 

Modern Language 11, 12 6 



32 



32 



Junior 

Piano 



Hrs. 



Repertory and 

Interpretation 2 

Counterpoint I 4 

Composition I 4 

Form and Analysis II 2 

Modern Language 6 

Psychology 6 



Senior Hrs. 

Piano and Recital 12 

Repertory and 

Interpretation 2 

Counterpoint II 4 

Composition II or History 4 

Orchestration 4 

Piano Normal 4 

Music elective 2 



32 



32 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



125 



For Bachelor of IMusic with a Major in Violin 
Freshman Hrs. Sophomore 



Hrs. 



Violin 6 

Symphony Orchestra 2 

Harmony I 4 

Keyboard Harmony I 2 

Solfeggio, Ear Training 
and Dictation I 2 

History and Appreciation I 2 

Piano A 2 

English 11, 12 6 

Religion 11, 12 6 



Violin 6 

Symphony Orchestra 2 

Harmony II 4 

Keyboard Harmony II .... 2 

Solfeggio, Ear Training 
and Dictation II 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion II 2 

Form and Analysis I 2 

English 21, 22 6 

Modern Language 11, 12.. 6 



32 



32 



Junior Hrs. 

Violin 8 

Symphony Orchestra 2 

Counterpoint I 4 

Composition I 4 

Form and Analysis II 2 

Modern Language 6 

Psychology 6 



Senior Hrs. 

Violin and Recital 10 

Symphony Orchestra 2 

Counterpoint II 4 

Composition II or History 
of Music 4 

Orchestration 4 

Musical Electives 8 



32 



32 



126 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



The Curriculum for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with 
a Major in A^oice 

A. The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree as listed 
on pages 4 2 and 43. 



B. The following muscial studies. 
Freshman Hrs. Sophomore 

Voice 11, 12 4 

Solfeggio 11, 12 2 

Harmony 11, 12 4 

Keyboard Harmony 11, 12 2 



Hrs. 

Voice 21, 22 4 

Solfeggio 21, 2 2 2 

Harmony 21, 22 4 

Keyboard Harmony 11, 12 2 



12 



Junior Hrs. Senior 

Voice 31, 32 -.. 4 

History of Music 11, 12.... 2 
Counterpoint 11, 12 4 



Hrs. 

Voice 41, 42 4 

History of Music 21, 22.... 2 



10 



6 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



127 



For Bachelor of Music with a major in Composition 



Freshman Hrs. 

Piano 4 

Harmony I 4 

Keyboard Harmony I 2 

Solfeggio, Bar Training, 
Dictation I 2 

History and Appreciation I 2 

String Instrument 4 

Chorus or Orchestra 2 

English 11, 12 6 

Religion 11, 12 6 



Sophomore 



Hrs. 



Piano 4 

Harmony II 4 

Keyboard Harmony II .... 2 
Solfeggio, Ear Training, 

Dictation II 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion II 2 

Form and Analysis I 2 

Counterpoint I 4 

String or Wind 

Instrument 4 

English 21, 22 6 

Chorus or Orchestra 2 



32 



32 



Junior Hrs. 

Counterpoint II 4 

Composition I 4 

Orchestration I 4 

Form and Analysis II 2 

Piano 2 

Wind Instrument 2 

History of Music 6 

Ensemble 2 

Psychology 6 



Senior Hrs. 

Counterpoint III 4 

Composition II 6 

Orchestration II 4 

Wind Instrument 4 

Score Reading and 

Conducting 4 

Ensemble 2 

Music Electives 2 

Academic Electives 6 



32 



32 



128 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



For Bachelor of Music with a major in School Music 



Freshman Hrs. 

Piano 4 

Voice 4 

Harmony I 4 

Keyboard Harmony I 2 

Solfeggio, Ear Training, 

Dictation I 2 

History and Appreciation I 2 

Chorus 2 

English 11, 12 6 

Psychology 6 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Piano 4 

Voice 4 

Harmony II 4 

Keyboard Harmony II .... 2 

Solfeggio, Ear Training, 
Dictation II 2 

History and Apprecia- 
tion II 2 

Form and Analysis I 2 

English 21, 22 6 

Education 6 



32 



Junior Hrs. 

Piano 4 

Voice 4 

School of Music Methods.. 4 

Practice Teaching 

and Observation 6 

Counterpoint .-. 4 

Form and Analysis II 2 

History of Music 6 

Conducting 2 



Senior Hrs. 

Voice 6 

School of Music Methods.. 4 

Observation, Practice 

Teaching 5 

Orchestration 4 

Conducting 2 

Chorus or Orchestra 2 

Music Elective 3 

Academic Elective 6 



32 



32 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 129 

Description of Courses 

HARMONY I. Scales; intervals; elementary chord for- 
mation, melody writing; primary and secondary triads; domi- 
nant seventh and secondary sevenths; harmonization of origi- 
nal melodies; harmonic analysis. 

HARMONY II. Ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords; 
altered chords derived from interchange of mode; Neapolitan 
sixth; augmented harmonies; transition; modulation; har- 
monic analysis. 

KEYBOARD HARMONY I and II. Two years, to be 
taken in correlation with the study of harmony, at the end 
of which time the student should be able to play all the ca- 
dences in four part harmonization and to execute simple mod- 
ulations at the keyboard. 

SIGHT-SINGING, EAR-TRAINING AND DICTATION I 
and II. Two years, at the conclusion of which the student 
should be able to sing melodies at sight; to sing accurately 
any interval; to take down from dictation melodies involving 
difficult problems. 

COUNTERPOINT I. The C clefs; the modes; the study 
of simple counterpoint in strict style for two, three and four 
parts; combined counterpoint in strict style for three and four 
parts; writing for more than four parts in strict style; ap- 
plied strict counterpoint. 

COUNTERPOINT II. Modern free counterpoint for two, 
three and four parts, both single and combined and in both 
instrumental and vocal styles; invertible counterpoint; can- 
onic imitation; original writing in the less advanced contra- 
puntal forms. 

FORM AND ANALYSIS I and II. A study of musical 
form through the analysis of homophonic and contrapuntal 
composition. 

COUNTERPOINT I. A study of the methods and forms 
of counterpoint including simple and double counterpoint, in- 
ventions and fugues. 



130 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

COUNTERPOINT IL Contrapuntal technique, both strict 
and free. Drill in the writing of inventions, fugues, char- 
connes and passacaglias. 

COUNTERPOINT III. Further drill in all contrapuntal 
forms for the composer. As much as six semester hours dur- 
ing the year may be earned with private lessons. 

COMPOSITION I. Analysis and practical written work 
in musical forms, including the simple two and three part, to 
the sonatina form. 

COMPOSITION II. Analysis and practical v/ritten work 
In musical forms, including variations, rondo, and a complete 
sonata. 

ORCHESTRATION I. Study of the character of each in- 
strument of the orchestra; scoring the different combinations. 

ORCHESTRATION II. The course includes the advanced 
study of orchestral writing leading to the scoring of a sym- 
phonic movement of some length and of original composi- 
tions. 

MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION I. Biographi- 
cal and appreciation study of the lives and writings of the 
classical, romantic and early modern composers. General 
survey of the development of the art of music. 

MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION II. More criti- 
cal survey of development of the musical arts with emphasis 
on special movements and phases, such as: Notation, Early 
Contrapuntal Schools, Rise and Development of Opera, Classi- 
cal and Romantic Schools, Modern Music. 

ORCHESTRA CONDUCTING I. Baton technic; score 
reading; organization and management of high school orches- 
tras, and band repertoire for high school organizations. 

CONDUCTING II. The interpretation of the orchestral 
score and the realization of the music with orchestra and 
band. 

REPERTORY AND INTERPRETATION. The aim oi 
this course is to promote a detailed as well as a general mu- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 131 

sical education and make for fine musicianship. These mas- 
ter classes are interesting and helpful to both players and 
liBteners. The works performed are chosen by the players, 
who receive constructive criticism. Special emphasis will 
be given to symphonic attitude, that is, the knowledge and 
musicianship necessary for performing the piano part of a 
concerto with orchestral accompaniment. Concerted playing, 
as in two-piano work, will also be discussed and illustrated. 

PIANO NORMAL. This course is designed to meet the 
problems of piano teachers, including the correct presenta- 
tion of the rudiments of music, the principles of modern 
technique, teaching material, and pedagogical problems. Ac- 
tual teaching will be demonstrated during this course and 
teaching material will be on hand for Inspection. 

ENSEMBLE PLAYING. To the modern student the abil- 
ity to play together with others is an indispensable asset. 
This course will include the study of piano, sonatas, concertos, 
and other two-piano literature. Tv/o hours credit. 

GROUP PIANO. This course is designed for students 
who find it impossible to have individual lessons. It com- 
prises the playing of hymns, accompaniments, sight reading, 
and a continuation of repertoire. Two hours credit. 

CHORUS. Practical experience in choral training. 

SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS I. Aims and objectives of 
music education; material for use in kindergarten and pri- 
mary grades. 

SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS II. High school music. The 
development of chorus and glee club with special attention to 
the selection and training of the adolescent voice. 

SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS III. General supervision 
and management of the music program. Music tests and their 
use. 

PRACTICE TEACHING AND SEMINAR IV. Practical 
experience in the class room under supervision. Class dis- 
cussion of the problems arising from this experience. 



132 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

BAND. The Band is the college band and also the of- 
ficial band of the 106th Engineers, Mississippi National 
Guard. Members are paid from $65.00 to $120.00 per year, 
according to rank. Instruments, uniforms and all other 
equipment are provided by the government. Two weeks camp 
in summer with pay and everything provided. State-wide 
trips, concerts, football and basketball games are part of the 
interesting program. 

DESCRITTION OF REQUIREMENTS IN APPLIED IMUSIC 

PIANO 

For Entrance to College Division 
To enter this four year degree course, the student should 
play all major and minor scales in rapid tempo, also broken 
chords in octave position in all keys, and should have sys- 
tematic methods of practice. 

He should have studied some of the standard etudes, 
such as Czerny, Op. 299, Book I; Heller, op. 47-46; Bach, 
Little Preludes; a few Bach two-part Inventions, and Com- 
positions corresponding in difficulty to: 

Haydn, Sonato No. II, No. 20 (Schirmer) 

Mozart, Sonata No. 3, No. 13 (Schirmer) 

FRESHMAN. Scales, major and minor, in octaves, 3rds, 
6ths, and lOths, four octaves to M. M. 8 8 four notes to the 
beat; Arpeggios in all major and minor triads, dominant and 
diminished sevenths, Czerny, op. 7 40; Bach: Three Part In- 
ventions, French Suites, Beethoven sonatas of the difficulty 
of Op. 14 No. 1, etc. 

SOPHOMORE. All major and minor scales with in- 
creased speed; Arpeggios as in freshman, with increased 
speed; Etudes of grade of Clementi Gradus or special techni- 
cal training; Bach: English Suites, Well-Tempered Clavi- 
chord; Beethoven sonatas. 

JUNIOR. Bach: Well-Tempered Clavichord; Chopin, 
Etudes; Beethoven Sonatas; Concerto. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 133 

SENIOR. Bach: larger works such as Chromatic Fantasy 
and Fugue, Italian Concerto; Sonatas of Beethoven, Chopin, 
etc., Concertos of Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, etc. 

Piano A and B. Special piano course for students ma- 
joring in violin and voice, giving them the fundamentals and 
enabling them to play accompaniments. 

The applicant for a Certificate in Piano must complete 
the four years of the course in piano and the first two years 
In the theory outlined in the Bachelor of Music Degree with 
piano as major, plus the Counterpoint as required in the jun- 
ior year. This does not include the Liberal Arts courses. 

The applicant for the Diploma in Piano must complete 
the four years course in piano and theoretical subjects through 
the junior year of Bachelor of Music Degree, plus the Liberal 
Arts degree. 

The applicant for a degree with piano as major must be 
able to read well by sight; must present a public program, 
including a two-piano composition and a concerto or part of 
a concerto. 

In the certificate class for final examination, candidates 
are required to play a Prelude and fugue from the Well-Tem- 
pered Clavichord by Bach, a Sonata of Beethoven, equivalent 
in grade of difficulty to Op. 2 6 or Op. 31, No. 2 and two com- 
positions by romantic or standard modern composers. 

Candidates for diploma in piano must be prepared to 
perform a program consisting of a prelude and fugue by Bach, 
a sonata of the more advanced type by either Beethoven, Schu- 
mann, or Chopin, at least six compositions from the more ad- 
vanced type by romantic and standard modern composers. 

Requisites for Degi*ee 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Music requisites with 
piano as major must present a public program, varied and 
well-balanced, selected from the classic, romantic, and mod- 
ern schools of music, including a two-piano composition and 
one movement of a concerto. 



134 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Graduates of the department of music are entitled to a 
professional teacher's license from the state. 

VOICE 

Before beginning the study of voice, the pupil should 
have some knowledge of the rudiments of music. The names 
of the notes and their position on the keyboard, the under- 
standing of time and note values should be mastered before 
the pupil attempts the culture of the voice. Hence, the study 
of piano for at least one year is desirable for the voice stu- 
dent. 

Freshman. — Principles of correct breathing and support, 
study of tone placing, attack of tone, staccato, and legato, 
enunciation. Major scales and arpeggios. Vocal exercises by 
Panofka, Sieber, Abt, Concone. Songs of easy grade. 

Sophomore. — Study of flexibility. Development of full 
range of voice, covered head tones, uniformity in color and 
quality of tone. Major and minor scales and arpeggios. Vo- 
calises by Concone, Sieber, Lutgen, Lamperti, etc. Songs of 
medium difficulty in English and other languages. 

Junior. — Attention to embellishments, turns, mordents, 
and trills. Development of tone, color and volume. Italian 
vocalises, Vaccai, Panofka, Bordona. Study of classics. Dif- 
ficult songs in English, German, French, and Italian arias. 

Senior. — Continued study in advance technique. Study 
of style and interpretation, beauty and finish of tone. Vo- 
calises by Marchesi, Lutgen, Lamperti. Master songs by Schu- 
bert, Schumann, Brahms, Grieg, etc. Oratoria, arias from 
opera in English, Italian, French, German. 

VIOLIN 

Students are required to have mastered the 4 2 Kreutzer 
Exercises before entering the senior year. A resume of these 
exercises will be left to the discretion of the teacher. 

A, B. Prepai'atory Courses. — A series of studies following a 
definite scheme, yet adapted to needs of individual stu- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 135 

dents, for those not sufficiently advanced to take Violin 
1, 2. 

11, 13. First Year. — Rode 24 Caprices; Viotti Concerto No. 
22; Rode Concertos Nos. 7 and 8; DeBeriot Fantaisie 
Lyrique and Scene de Ballet; solo pieces by Godard, 
Dvorak, Massenet, and Svenson. 

21,22. Second Year. — Studies by Rode, Rovelli; DeBeriot Airs 
Nos. 5, 6, and 7; DeBeriot Concertos Nos. 1 and 7; 
Spobr Concerto No. 2; solo pieces by David, Ries, Hu- 
bay, Leonard, Wieniawski, and Bazzini. 

81, 32. Third Year. — Studies by Mazas, Dont (Gradus and 
Parnassum); solo pieces by Wieniavi^ski, Vieuxtemps, 
Sarasate, Brahms; concertos by Mendelssohn, Wieniaw- 
ski, and Bruch. 

41, 42. Fourth Year. — Studies by Wieniawski; Paganini Ca- 
prices; concertos by Beethoven, Lalo, Ernst, Vieuxtemps; 
solo pieces by Sarasate, Saint-Saens, Wieniawski and 
Vieuxtemps. 



136 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Expenses, Music Fees and Tuition for year: 

Piano — Freshman and Sophomore 120.00 

Piano — Junior and Senior 150.00 

Single Lessons, each 3.00 

Piano, A and B 60.00 

Group Piano 20.00 

Ensemble Playing 20.00 

Junior Piano 54.00 

Voice — Freshman and Sophomore 100.00 

Voice — Junior and Senior 120.00 

Violin — Freshman and Sophomore 120.00 

Violin — Junior and Senior 150.00 

Harmony 20.0 

Keyboard Harmony 20.00 

♦History and Appreciation (Two Semester Hours) 20.00 

Public School Music 40.00 

Solfeggio (Ear-training, dictation and sight-singing).. 20.00 

Form and Analysis 20.00 

Counterpoint 24.00 

♦Composition 20.00 

Orchestration 20.00 

Repertory and Interpretation 10.00 

Band School Course 20.00 

Piano Normal 20.00 

♦Conducting (Two Semester Hours) 20.00 

Symphony Orchestra 30.00 

Registration 2.00 

Piano Practice, per hour 3.00 

Certificate 2.50 

Diploma 5.00 

Special examination fee (one semester's work) 5.00 

*Price proportional to semester hours earned. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 137 

For students taking work in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and also in the School of Music the following fees 
are to be charged: 

Registration fee $ 23.00 

Student Activities fee 15.00 

Library fee 6.00 

One academic course (including fees) 50.00 

Two academic courses (including fees) 90.00 

Three academic courses (including fees) 130.00 

Four or more academic courses Full tuition and fees 

Regulations 

A student must register before any lessons may be taken. 
Students will not be received for less than one semester or 
the unexpired portion of a semester. 

Tuition to be paid in advance, one half at entrance, the 
balance February 1. This not being possible, terms may be 
arranged, although interest will be charged on all fees not 
paid in full. 

Tuition will not be refunded, unless the lessons have been 
missed because of protracted illness. Lessons missed because 
of such illness may be made up at hours agreed on by the 
student and the instructor. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music are re- 
quired to take at least two lessons a week in major subjects. 
Students who do not intend to graduate may be permitted to 
take a minimum of one lesson a week. 

Student recitals will be held regularly and all students 
are required to appear at reasonable intervals. The require- 
ment is made to stimulate a healthful spirit of competition 
and to accustom the student to appearing before an audience. 
A schedule of student recitals will be posted at the beginning 
of each semester. 

Students are required to attend all recitals given by the 
School of Music. 



138 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President 

Ezelle, Robert, '3 6 Jackson 

Vice-President 
Ricketts, Barron C Jackson 

Vice-President 

Naylor, Mrs. T. H., '28 Jackson 

Secretary-Treasui"er 
Davis, Mendel M., '37 Jackson 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

G. P. Cook, *08, Canton — Term expires 1939 
W. M. Mann, '28, Jackson — Term expires 19 40 
R. D. Peets, '12, Jackson — Term expires 1941 
R. J. Landis, '25, Jackson — Term expires 1942 

CLASS OF 1939 

Bachelor of Arts 

Brooks, Martha Evelyn _ Carthage 

Buckles, Winnie Louise Lucien 

Bush, Frederick Judson Brookhaven 

Cassels, Ottomese Gloster 

Cunningham, Nina Grace Amory 

DeLamotte, Roy Carroll Moss Point 

Denson, Rose Nell Jackson 

Dent, Clara Frances Jackson 

Doggett, Blanton Mills Kossuth 

Godbold, John Walter Jackson 

Grice, Phil Harold Durham, N. C. 

Hull, Sarah Marjorie Lawrence 

Mitchell, Lottie McRaney Ponchatoula, La. 

Pettit, Ella Virginia Jackson 

Shaw, Mary Katheriue. Houlka 

Triplett, Cecil L Mashulaville 

Tucker, Alfred Thomas Clarksdale 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 139 

Vardaman, Joseph Bruce Hermanville 

Watkins, Sue Frances... Grenada 

West, Jane Hyde Shaw 

Bachelor of Science 

Ainsworth, Joseph Thomas New Orleans, La. 

Ainsworth, William Lott Bay Springs 

Ballard, Hampton Hinton Shaw 

Beard, Wirt Adams Jackson 

Bingham, Eugene L ...Shreveport, La. 

Bizzell, William Hardy Pace 

Blough, David ...Okolona 

Blue, Blanche Brookhaven 

Bonner, Oscar Davis ...Jackson 

BrideAvell, Joseph Albert Durham, N. C. 

Broadfoot, Mary Douglas Jackson 

Carmichael, Gerald Bolton Utica 

Carruth, Paul McComb 

Carter, Malcolm ...Gulf port 

Castle, Edythe Wylma Poplarville 

Champenois, Roma Fern Plattiesburg 

Chichester, May Ellen Jackson 

Collins, Foster Edmund Jackson 

Cook, Gilbert Pierce, Jr Canton 

Cooper, George Euel Jackson 

Courtney, John W Star 

Cox, Robert Elton Madison 

Crisler, Jessie Charity Jackson 

Dorris, George Thomas Jackson 

Edwards, Edwin Wiltz Gulf port 

Elfert, Roger Seminary 

Evans, Ben Pickering ....Water Valley 

Fleming, Hays Minter City 

Fulgham, William Carroll Jackson 

Gray, Ollie Mae Burnsville 

Hardin, William Giles Jackson 

Hardy, Thrashley Moncrief, Jr Natchez 

Harper, Orville Earl Brandon 

Hegwood, Charles Richard Forest 

Heidelberg, Annie Lou Jackson 



140 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Hetrick, John Harold Sumrall 

Hilton, James Carson Jackson 

Holleman, J. Henry Pickens 

Ivy, Robert Adams Jackson 

Jones, Lib Burkes Jackson 

Knight, Annie Sue Brandon 

Lamb, Mary Sue Laurel 

Latimer, Rose Davenport Jackson 

Luke, Edward Bernard Jackson 

Martin, Rubye Midnight 

Martin, Ruth Midnight 

May, Albert Louis, Jr Jackson 

Melton, Bertrand Ackerman 

Mitchell, Corinne Plantersville 

No well, Hulbert Thomas Louisville 

O'Connor, Donald Russell Vicksburg 

Palmer, Willard Aldrich Brookhaven 

Parker, Ellis D University 

Pierce, Juanita... Jackson 

Pitard, Cecil Edwin Jackson 

Price, Milton Eugene Jackson 

Rehfeldt, Frederick Cooper Jackson 

Robertson, Edgar Harold Jackson 

Sharp, Robert Hilliard, Jr Carthage 

Sheffield, Paul Robinson Jackson 

Shelton, Lewis Ross.. Jackson 

Simpson, Joe F Ackerman 

Sykes, Ben L Jackson 

Thames, Lewis Albert, Jr Sanatorium 

Thompson, Floy Denton Jackson 

Thompson, John William Bassfield 

Williams, James A Brandon 

Wright, Charles Gerlach Jackson 

Wroten, Ruth Steen Columbus 

SENIORS 

Askew, Mary Kathryn Sardis 

Bain, Edwin Jackson Jackson 

Bain, John Burton Belzoni 

Bangert, Rudolph Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 141 

Bierdeman. Corde Joe Jackson 

Bledsoe, Fred Collins 

Booth, James L Jackson 

Bourn, Willard J., Jr Monticello 

Broyles, E. Nash Atlanta, Ga. 

Bryant, Olen Cooper Jackson 

Buie, Sarah Millsaps Jackson 

Burkhead, Vera Lucile Jackson 

Caruthers, Joe Duck Hill 

Chichester, Shirley Jackson 

Clowe, Jane Vicksburg 

Conner, Martha F Hattiesburg 

Darden, Marguerite Jackson 

Dickerson, Thomas Lee Sumrall 

Doggett, Gayle Kossuth 

Durley, Elizabeth M Drew 

Dye, Dolores Jackson 

Elliott, James F Mooreville 

Farr, Mrs. R. E Jackson 

Farrar, Larston D Jackson 

Ferris, Everett John Yazoo City 

Field, Jennings Pemble, Jr Magee 

Fitts, Ina Bell Jackson 

Forsyth, Margaret Jackson 

Gable, Gerald P Eastabuchie 

Gaddy, Elsie Virginia Jackson 

Gerald, Martha Wilson Leland 

Gill, Frances Jackson 

Green, William Brandsford. Plant City, Fla. 

Gunn, Annie Mae Ellisville 

Hall, George F West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Hamilton, Longstreet Cavett Jackson 

Harper, Dale Brandon 

Hathorn, V. B., Jr Jackson 

Hogan, Edwin St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Holyfield, Thomas Kenney Summit 

Horn, Edgar Bridges Magee 

Hudson, Manning New Albany 

Johnsoc, Mrs. Bindley Gowdy Jackson 

Kendrick, Martha Ann Jackson 



142 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Kersh, Henry Grady Jackson 

Kolb, Gwin Durant 

Lancaster, James W Sunflower 

Lang-ford, Robert Lee Conehatta 

Litton, Wallis B Shaw 

Lloyd, S. Thames Jackson 

Loflin, J. R Jackson 

Lowery, Kelton Lamar Greenville 

Lowther, Edwin Florence 

Maloney, John Philip Jackson 

Manning, Mary Frances Jackson 

Mathison, Annie Marguerite Prentiss 

Mayfield, Virginia Tchula 

Moore, Mary Elizabeth Biloxi 

Moorer, Louise Jackson 

Morgan, Clayton A Ellisville 

Murry, Charles M., Jr Ripley 

Myers, Mary Eleanor Morton 

McCaf forty, Bessie Hester Belzoni 

McGahey, Evelyn Jackson 

McKeigney, Alexander Eupora 

Naylor, Myrt Lauderdale 

Nichols, Charlotte Purnell Jackson 

Nichols, Edwina Jackson 

Nix, John Paul Gulf port 

O'Brien, Patricia Clare Jackson 

Ogden, Frances Hattiesburg 

Oliver, Algie M McComb 

Phifer, Glenn Jackson 

Phillips, Lem M Holly Bluff 

Phillips, Tom H Holly Bluff 

Pierce, Annie Belle Jackson 

Porter, Gracealine Vicksburg 

Porter, Margaret Anne Jackson 

Ramsey, Rosalie ...Meridian 

Rhymes, Sara Nell Monticello 

Ricks, Henry C ...Jackson 

Rimmer, James Camden 

Rogers, Nat S New Albany 

Rundle, John Grenada 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 143 

Scales, Jean Morton 

Scott, James Prentiss Bay Springs 

Scott, Paul Tliigpen Bay Springs 

Selman, Herbert Monticello 

Smith, Aubrey B Harperville 

Smith, Jasper Campbell Jackson 

Smith, Mary Hanes Jackson 

Stone, Ann S Jackson 

Sumrall, Elton Levi Laurel 

Swayze, Edith Virginia Yazoo City 

Terry, Marjorie Northey Fernwood 

Thompson, James W., Jr Jackson 

Trimble, Celia Natchez 

Vandiver, Joseph S., Jr Jackson 

Walker, Bin L Magee 

Wall, James David Rosedale 

Walters, Terry Harland Laurel 

Watkins, Bert Jackson 

Wells, Jeffie Kate Anguilla 

White, Milton Robert Jackson 

Wilson, James Ramer Natchez 

Wilson, Virginia Allene Clarksdale 

Worthington, Florence McCluny Jackson 

Wright, John Richard Jackson 

JUNIORS 

Adcock, Hugh, Jr St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Ains worth, Melvina Decatur 

Anders, Virgil M Natchez 

Bailey, James Leo Vardaman 

Baker, Wayne D Centre, Ala. 

Barnes, Edmund Franklin, Jr Jackson 

Reall, Elizabeth Watkins Lexington 

Beard, Walter Jackson 

Bilbo, Claude V Pascagoula 

Birdsong, Samuel Ernest, Jr Jackson 

Borum, Ruth Blanche Aberdeen 

Boutwell, James Laurel 

Brantley, Otho Fannin 

Brooks, Joseph Hov?ard Long Beach, Calif. 



144 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Brown, John Paul Pulaski 

Burwell, John L Jackson 

Caldwell, Jack Canton 

Cameron, Roger Meridian 

Campbell, Elizabeth Lee Laurel 

Carraway, Mary Jackson 

Carter, Willie Moselle 

Castle, Eleanor Louie Crystal Springs 

Cavett, James Richard Jackson 

Cavin, Elizabeth Lenora Wilkinson 

Clark, Roy C Columbia 

Craig, Mildred Hart Jackson 

Daniels, Vera Lee Wesson 

Davis, Virginia Jackson 

Dear, Farely Denver Star 

DeCelle, Kathryn Ryan Hazlehurst 

Dennis, Mary Crawford Jackson 

Donald, David H Goodman 

Dorman, Richard Jackson 

Eager, Patricia Jackson 

Eudy, Rosa Annette Eupora 

Farr, Alonza Lewis Edwards 

Faucette, Julia Fred Carthage 

Ferguson, James C Jackson 

Fitts, Una B Jackson 

Floyd, Johnnie Merrill Weathersby 

Ford, Mary Louise Taylorsville 

Fortenberry, Eugene Thomas Jackson 

Pox, Lucile Brandon 

Gant, Sarah Jane Elliott 

Gregg, Virginia D Jackson 

Gwin, Laura Allyne Kosciusko 

Hall, Mary Margaret Columbia 

Hamby, Granvil T Grenada 

Heflin, James Cyril Lake 

Heidelberg, Mae Black Jackson 

Hodges, Frank Kosciusko 

Howard, Myrtle Ruth Jackson 

Humphries, Joseph Thomas Louisville 

James, Virginia Midnight 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 145 

Jones, Joseph Woodrow Columbia 

Kennedy, Robert A Whistler, Ala. 

Kilgore, Charles Doak Jackson 

Klee, George Edward Memphis, Tenn. 

Larsen, Betty Council Bluffs, Iowa 

Livesay, Jim Jackson 

Michel, Calvin Joachim Jackson 

Miles, Joe Gavin Canton 

Miller, John Carl Moss Point 

Miller, Marjorie Tylertown 

Mooney, Madeline Jackson 

Moore, Blifil Fulton 

Moore, Mary Alyce Water Valley 

Morgan, Leeland Jackson 

Mcllwain, Martha Jane Greenville 

McKeithen, David Holcomb Meadville 

McWhorter, James P Baldwyn 

Naylor, Wye Nelson Lauderdale 

Nichols, Dorris Elise Vaughan 

Noble, Ed Davis Fayette 

Noto, Albert John St. James, La. 

Oliver, H. Bufkin Laurel 

Painter, Lawrence Columbus 

Peacock, Harold Eugene Montgomery, Ala. 

Pearson, David Sweetwater, Ala. 

Pierce, Inazelle _ Jackson 

Powell, C. J Yazoo City 

Powell, Martha Ruth Calhoun City 

Rankin, Harold Allen Corinth 

Ray, Sarah W Canton 

Reese, Mary Fay Tupelo 

Richardson, Milan Bolton 

Roberts, James Waddell Meridian 

Robertson, Tom Myrtle 

Rush, Paul Everard ..Burnell 

Samuels, Willard, Jr Clarksdale 

Saums, Alf Jackson 

Saxton, Wilford Newton 

Shelton, Sarah Virginia Leland 

Smith, Myriam McAllister.. Jackson 



146 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Stephens, Sara Clarksdale 

Sumrall, James Burt Jackson 

Sutphin, Felix Shannon 

Terry, Marianna Jackson 

Timberlake, Josephine Crawford 

Turner, W. Berdyne.. Hattiesburg 

Tynes, Oscar, Jr Gloster 

Upton, J. B Stringer 

Walker, Ralph B McComb 

Walton, Bernard Union 

Ward, Charles Lipsey Pelahatchie 

Ward, James Myron Jackson 

Warren, Eugene Columbia 

Webster, Davie Louise Winona 

White, Ess Jackson 

Whitsett, Paul T Mobile, Ala. 

Williams, John Buford, Ga. 

Wilson, Louis Hugh Brandon 

Winborn, Jack Durant 

Worthington, Gordon Jackson 

Wroten, James D Columbus 

Young, Maxine Terry 

SOPHOMORES 

Addison, Leslie Jackson 

Applewhite, Robert Hov.'^ell Louise 

Avery, Shuford Courtland 

Ball, Corinne Walker Jackson 

Beacham, Loyd Lamar, Jr Canton 

Bell, William Brandon Brooksville 

Berger, Fred F., Jr Victorville, Calif. 

Boswell, Hugh P., Jr New Albany 

Brady, Judge Graham, Jr Jackson 

Branch, Willie J McComb 

Brumfield, Charles E Jackson 

Bryant, Giles Wheeler Purvis 

Burdette, Mary Cecilia Jackson 

Burns, Ola Pearl Jackson 

Burt, Floyd Archie Weir 

Canterbury, Ford Bogalusa, La. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 147 

Carter, Harris M., Jr Jackson 

Chatham, Allie Ruth Montrose 

Clark, Jane... Pearson 

Cobb, Eleanor Jackson 

Cole, Evelyn B Jackson 

Condon, Robert - Greenville 

Cooper, Lester Shaw 

Council, Bertha Jackson 

Crook, Clem Jackson 

Crouch, William Lewis Noxapater 

Crowder, Herman Yazoo City 

Crowell, Joseph McCabb Isola 

Currie, Julian Edward Jackson 

Currie, Mary Joe Raleigh 

Daniels, Edwin Clyde Jackson 

Dean, Guy Walker Shaw 

DeCell, Eva Vicksburg 

Dement, Frank Gallman 

Dickerson, Beverley McComb 

Dickson, Nathan A Bassfield 

Doss, W. C Houston 

Douglas, Harold Jackson Greenville 

Ellzey, H. Irl Goss 

Epperson, Earl Russell, Jr Clinton 

Ethridge, Mark Emerson Jackson 

Fazakerly, William Jackson 

Fleming, Edward ..- Minter City 

Cillis, Elizabeth Ann... Jackson 

Craham, H. G., Jr Jackson 

Graham, Nancy Jackson 

Graves, Sidney Laurel 

Grimes, Katheriue Ann Jackson 

Hammack, Raj'^ - Tutwiler 

Hampton, Jeff Grover, Jr Jackson 

Hanes, Eugene Garnett Birmingham, Ala. 

Hart, Wendell Evergreen, Ala. 

Hearon, James Jackson 

Heron, Mary Sylvia ..Jackson 

Herring, Minnie Gay Jackson 

Herron, Carol Canton 



148 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Hines, Horace H Jackson 

Hinman, James C Carthage 

Holmes, Alan Robert Danbury, Conn. 

Hughes, Sara Beth Clarksdale 

Humphreys, Stewart Jackson 

Irving, William R., Jr Electric Mills 

Jackson, Charles D Leakesville 

Jackson, Eugene Brandon 

Jones, Clifton Raleigh 

Jones, Dorothy Henrietta, Texas 

Jones, Haniel Mobile, Ala. 

Jones, Miriam Elma Okolona 

Keenan, Frances Jackson 

Kellum, Thomas Boyd Greenville 

Kennedy, Sarah Katherine Natchez 

Key, Glenn Shelton Birmingham, Ala. 

Khayat, Evaline Jackson 

King, Curtis Wesson 

King, Janie Lou Madison 

Lane, Frances Jackson 

Lauderdale, Elizabeth Jackson 

Lauderdale, Richard Lynn Jackson 

Ledbetter, Robert Lane Jackson 

Lloyd, William Baldwin Jackson 

Lott, James Walter Jackson 

Lott, Jeanne Marie Sumrall 

Lucas, Eleanor Grace Kosciusko 

MacFalls, Jeannette Eleanor Jackson 

Mansfield, Martha Jane Jackson 

Martin, Albert Franklin Aberdeen 

Martin, Raymond Jackson 

Matulich, Edward Joseph Columbia 

Messina, Aurelia Pascal Vicksburg 

Miller, Frances Lucille Leland 

Mohead, Mary Jane Canton 

Montgomery, Evelyn Leland 

Moore, George Hyer, Jr Jackson 

Murff, Rex M Artesia 

Murphy, Betty Belzoni 

McAlilly, Robert Wendell Sidon 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 149 

McDavid, Joel D Whistler, Ala. 

McFaiiane, Graham Jackson 

Mcllwain, Mary Greenville 

McLelland, William Calvin Hattiesburg 

Navarro, Louis Biloxi 

Neely, Tom, Jr Jackson 

Nelson, James E Jackson 

Newsom, Mary Cavett ...Vicksburg- 

Nordin, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

O'Callaghan, James P., Jr Tupelo 

Outlaw, Margaret Hutchins Jackson 

Peeler, Charlotte Elizabeth Ashland 

Pevey, Frances Virginia Forest 

Philp, William Avery Jackson 

Proudfit, Richard Duval Grenada 

Rabb, Lawrence Wynne, Jr Lexington 

Ricks, Helen Jackson 

Riddell, Katherine Jackson 

Riser, Robert Thomas Jackson 

Roby, Charlton S Jackson 

Rodgers, Laura Jean Brandon 

Roell, Ethel Eleanor Jackson 

Rossie, Emmett Anthony Shaw 

Sanders, Albert G., Jr Jackson 

Schiek, Sam Meridian 

Schilling, T. C, Jr Jackson 

Schultz, Charles S Sharon 

Shanks, Jack Jackson 

Sheffield, Martha Frances Jackson 

Shell, Ferd M Clarksdale 

Shipp, P. Phillip Benton 

Sigman, John Lynch Jackson 

Simmons, W. E Columbia 

Sims, Roy Vernon Jackson 

Smith, Billy Ripley 

Spann, Hal Henry Pelahatchie 

Spengler, Thomas Lawrence Jackson 

Stephenson, Frank Meridian 

Stone, Mary Jackson 

Stroud, Marcus Burch, Jr Louise 



150 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Stubblefiekl, A. B Jackson 

Sullivan, William Randolph Jackson 

Sweany, Glenn Minter City 

Tatum, William Ernest Lawi-ence 

Taylor, Donald E Ocean Springs 

Teachout, Frank Jackson 

AVade, Clifton Richton 

Wade, Charlie Bay Springs 

Waring, Lawrence Albert Tylertown 

W^aters, Glenn Atmore, Ala. 

Wells, Elden Jackson 

AVest, Robert Laurel 

AVhitehead, Marie Jackson 

Vv'illiams, Wiley Andlng 

AVilson, George Rice, Jr Jackson 

AVright, Mildred Ethel ._ Jackson 

AVright, Olga Jackson 

-Zimoski, Herman Fredric Jackson 

FRESHMEN 

Allen, Eugene Jackson 

Amnions, Elton D _ Jackson 

Armstrong, James Edgar Jackson 

Arnold, Herbert Michial Camden 

Baggett, Myrtis - Jackson 

Bailey, Hazel Tchula 

Bain, Joseph Melvin Jackson 

Barlow, Aden _. Jackson 

Barnett, Jean Kelly Jackson 

Barr, John S Jackson 

Barrett, Elizabeth Ponca City, Okla. 

Beasley, Hettie Faye Vaughan 

Bennett, David N Ripley 

Benton, Richard Carlton Jackson 

Berry, John Jackson 

Bishop, Billie Jackson 

Bishop, Geraldine Lawreuceburg, Tenu. 

Blake, Marion Pocahontas 

Booth, Helen Pauline Kosciusko 

Boswell, Barbara Sanatorium 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 151 

Boutwell, Harold Knight Laurel 

Boyd, Robert Emmett Amite, La. 

Boyles, Jack C Jackson 

Bradford, Robert William Birmingham, Ala. 

Brown, Charles Dillard Jackson 

Brumfield, Elizabeth Tylertown 

Brumfield, Max Jackson 

Burdette, Genevieve Bruns Jackson 

Burnet, Eugene J Jackson 

Busby, Mary Lee Meridian 

Busier, R. P Galatia, 111. 

Bynum, Rufus Rienzi 

Caldwell, Una Canton 

Campbell, W. Robert Jackson 

Carr, Nancy Helen Jackson 

Childress, Geraldine Price Jackson 

Childress, Sammy Hale, Jr Satartia 

Christmas, Davis Lee Laurel 

Cleckler, Doyce E Weslaco, Texas 

Coney, Max Jackson 

Cook, William Louis Canton 

Cope, DeLoach Hollandale 

Cope, John Amos Knox, Pa. 

Craft, Dolores Jackson 

Crawford, Charles Greenville 

Cresswell, Mildred Frances Jackson 

Crisler, Herbert, HI Bay Springs 

Crook, Effie Coreene Jackson 

Cropper, Julia Magruder Columbia 

Cunningham, Evelynne Franklin, Tenn. 

Dabbs, Clyde Harwell, Jr Tupelo 

Darby, James Courtland 

Davis, Rosier Jackson 

Dawkins, Edwin Jackson 

DeWees, Mason Lee, Jr Madison 

Dick, Warner Roseland, La. 

Dinkins, Suenette Canton 

Dobbs, Kay Jackson 

Doggett, Maye Evelyn Kossuth 

Duke, Ann Kathryn Jackson 



152 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Early, Lauress Cleveland 

Eaton, Vernon Jackson 

Epps, Allen Burnett Jackson 

Ervin, Mary Emma Inverness 

Eure, James R Harperville 

Farmer, L. E Shaw 

Fleener, Royce A Jackson 

Floyd, Wilma Lee Flora 

Ford, Bobbie Jackson 

Fowler, Charles T Jackson 

Fox, Carol Willis Jackson 

Fox, Woodrow York, Ala. 

Galloway, Annie Laurin McComb 

Gibbons, Ruth Jackson 

Gibson, Gertrude McLaurin Jackson 

Gillis, Floyd Eugene, Jr Jackson 

Gillum, Ed Farmerville, La. 

Godbold, Ruth Alma Jackson 

Gordon, Robert T. Florence 

Gordon, Walter Scott Jackson 

Grambling, Jean Hinton Jackson 

Gray, Julious William Russellville, Ala. 

Green, Bess Jackson 

Green, Dora Frances Hattiesburg 

Gregory, Hubert Davis Jackson 

Grimes, G. Lindsay Jackson 

Gross, Floyd Carthage 

Hall, Benjamin Mortimer Jackson 

Harding, Monta Greenwood 

Hare, Audrey Jackson 

Hargrave, Sally Ann Jackson 

Harpole, David Jackson 

Harrison, J. T Jackson 

Hart, Ida Sylvia Jackson 

Hathorn, TTiomas Quitman Jackson 

Haughton, Davis Morton 

Henry, Jane Corinth 

Higgins, Shelbert Amory 

Hill, George - Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Hi wilier, Jack Knox, Pa. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 153 

Holliman, Virginia Sunflower 

Horn, Robert H Grenada 

Howard, Robert Crawford Mobile, Ala. 

Hudson, Ira Purvis 

Hudson, Floyd Marzine New Albany 

Hunt, David L Jackson 

Ingram, Walter Century, Fla. 

Jacob, Harry Jackson 

James, Dewitt Midnight 

James, Marvel Stratton 

Johnson, Douglas Jackson 

Johnson, James Luther Tupelo 

Johnson, Kathryn Sue Jackson 

Johnson, Patrick Hayes Jackson 

Jones, Martha Frances Jackson 

Jones, Patricia Hazleliurst 

Judkins, Robert Century, Fla. 

Karraker, Nanette Tutwiler 

Kemmitzer, Charles Joseph Decatur, Ala. 

Kemp, Sarah Josephine Jackson 

Kilgore, Hinton Joe Jackson 

King, Pat Jackson 

King, Phil H Jackson 

Knowlton, Marie McComb 

Kuriger, Joseph C Jackson 

Kuriger, Randolph Sylvester Jackson 

Laird, Ralph Carson 

Lampe, Millicent Ardis Jackson 

Lancaster, Louise Jackson 

Larr, David Birchett, Jr Vicksburg 

Lesley, Dexter Jackson 

Liles, L. E McComb 

Loflin, C. Lynette Vicksburg- 

Logue, Joseph Casey Jackson 

Lowe, Louise Jackson 

Lowther, John Earl Florence 

Magee, Manly Magee 

MagTuder, Bob Mexia, Texas 

Martin, Althea Midnight 

Massey, Mary Julia Fornfelt, Mo. 



154 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Measells, Dewitt Talmage Morton 

Miller, John Stevens Jackson 

Miller, Velma Louise Jackson 

Minyard, John Jackson 

Minyard, Virginia Jackson 

Mitchell, H. Meredith Forest 

Moore, Sam R Jackson 

Morris, Charles _ Jackson 

Murphy, Joe P Jackson 

Murray, Nell Jackson 

McCay, John Marion Nettleton 

McClendon, A. D Jackson 

McElveen, Hugh _ Jackson 

McGough, William Marion Catchings 

McKeown, Virginia _ Vicksburg 

McKinnon, Michael McComb 

McNeil, Ragsdale .Jackson 

Nail, Nelson R Jackson 

Nelson, Donald Bay St. Louis 

Nelson, W. F., Jr Jackson 

Nichols, Bob Jackson 

Odom, Joe Jackson 

Ogden, James _ Hattiesburg 

Patton, Roy Shubuta 

Pearson, Robert Dodd Jackson 

Perkins, Frank Arthur _ Vicksburg 

Phillips, Eva Kathleen _ Jackson 

Phillips, Herbert _ Jackson 

Pickett, Ross A Jackson 

Price, Frances Virginia Canton 

Raiglns, Archie _ Aberdeen 

Ramsey, Thomas Hattiesburg 

Ratliff, Jack Jackson 

Raymond, Harry Vicksburg 

Reddick, Allen Chipley, Fla. 

Richardson, L. Binford Bolton 

Richardson, Catherine Lawson Jackson 

Rigby, Elinor Glenn Madison 

Roberts, Sylvia Jackson 

Rogers, William Raymond Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 15 5 

Ross, Billy Crystal Springs 

Ruoff, Helen Mae Jackson 

Rush, Ann Susie _ Vaughn 

Rush, Clarine Vaughn 

Schwartz, Bill Jackson 

Scott, Charles _ _.. Yazoo City 

Sells, Ellenita Jackson 

Sharp, Everett Ed .- Corinth 

Shell, Robert Vinson Union Springs, Ala. 

Shelton, Simmons Jackson 

Sherman, Dot Forest 

Shields, C. Judson Jackson 

Simmons, Mitzie Lee Hazlehurst 

Simpson, Joe Jackson 

Smith, Burt Chipley, Fla. 

Smith, Burnell ._ Magnolia 

Smith, Ollie Daughlton Whistler, Ala. 

Smith, William Jefferson Brookhaven 

Spann, Janie Sue Pelahatchie 

Steinriede, Henry Lacey Yazoo City 

Stephenson, Victoria Enterprise 

Stern, Maurice Glen Allan 

Stevens, Gene _ McComb 

Stewart, Emma Hernando 

Stewart, Helen Saxon.. Jackson 

Stone, J. C Okolona 

Stroud, Polly _ Louise 

Strohecker, Anne Irene Jackson 

Stuart, William Lee Weslaco, Tex. 

Stubblefield, Calvin Yazoo City 

Stubblefield, Joe Brandon 

Sullivan, Joseph D Jackson 

Sumrall, Geraldine _ Jackson 

Tatum, Frederick _ Hattiesburg 

Taylor, D. Lucilla Brandon 

Thorn, Ira H., Jr Jackson 

Thornhill, Abner _ Jackson 

Trimble, Janice _ Natchez 

Triplett, Nell Erwin 

Triplett, Ray _ Mashulaville 



156 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Van Norman, Garnet Vicksburg 

Van Zandt, Jack D'Lo 

Watkins, Archie Sale _ Jackson 

Weathersby, Margaret Elizabeth Jackson 

Webb, John H., Jr Columbia 

Weems, Harold W Shubuta 

Weissinger, Sara Memphis, Tenn. 

Whatley, Ray E Whatley, Ala. 

"White, Margaret Ann _ Natchez 

White, Sarah Clare Jackson 

White, William _ Guntown 

Whitney, Jack M Jackson 

Whitesides, William Wallace Jackson 

Wilder, Eugene Hattiesburg 

Wilkinson, Jack _ Gulf port 

Williams, Frank B., II Jackson 

Williams, Lamar Anding 

Williams, Margaret Jackson 

Williams, Ney, Jr Raymond 

Williams, Vernon O., Jr Jackson 

Williamson, James A Philadelphia 

Wilson, Jack Lee Jackson 

Wilson, Marjorie Love Hattiesburg 

Wood, Bertha Mae Lena 

Worthington, Agatha Jackson 

Wroten, Edgar Bailey Bude 

SPECIALS 

Baldwin, Barbara Clarice Jackson 

Bufkin, Joe Jackson 

Cabell, Mrs. Helen Jackson 

Clements, Mary Nash Jackson 

Comfort, Christine Jackson 

Corley, Kathryn Jackson 

Corley, Myra Ray Jackson 

Cunningham, Grace Brandon 

Cunningham, Magdalene ...Jackson 

Dampeer, Ann Jackson 

Ellard, May Catherine ..Jackson 

Fisher, Jimmie Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 157 

Flynt, Helen Elizabeth Columbia 

Fridge, Bettie Lou Jackson 

Fridge, Sara Ann Jackson 

Galloway, Samuel Belton Jackson 

Gatlin, Jean - Jackson 

Glasgow, Sue Tyrone, Pennsylvania 

Griee, Pattie Wesson 

Hamilton, Catherine Jackson 

Hart, Edith Madalyn Jackson 

Hathorn, Amanda Ruth Jackson 

Hathorn, Dorothy Jackson 

Henderson, Emily Jackson 

Hester, Marie Jackson 

Holman, Marie Jackson 

Johnson, Lillian Jackson 

Knight, Annie Sue Brandon 

Knight, Luther Jackson 

Langford, Sara Louise Jackson 

Luckett, Elizabeth ...Jackson 

MacFalls, Blanche Jackson 

Murphy, Loraine Jackson 

Murphy, Martha Ann Jackson 

McLaurin, Ann Jackson 

Palmer, Thos. P.. Preston 

Palmerlee, Faith Eastman Jackson 

Powell, Joy Jackson 

Rehfeldt, Virginia Lee Jackson 

Rehfeldt, William Jackson 

Robinson, Keenon Jackson 

Roper, Jewel Jackson 

Scanlon, Betty Jackson 

Simpson, Melvin Jackson 

Smith, Antoinette Jackson 

Sparks, Ruth Jackson 

Stuart, Frances Jackson 

Suttle, Ada Dorothy Tupelo 

Thompson, Jean Jackson 

Van Hook, Lane Jackson 

Warren, Electra Jackson 

Wells, Polly Jackson 



158 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Willoughbj^ Dan Jackson 

Wilson, Elizabeth Madison 

SUMMER SCHOOL — 1939 

Adcock, Hugh S ...St. Petersburg, Florida 

Aldrich, Catharine Hope Jackson 

Anders, Virgil M Natchez 

Ates, Katherine Jackson 

Bangert, Rudolph Jackson 

Banks, Thomas V Jackson 

Barlow, Aden Jackson 

Barnes, Edmund P., Jr Jackson 

Bell, Mrs, W. M Lena 

Berry, Catherine Louise Benton 

Biggs, Robert Jackson 

Brackin, Thomas T., Jr Jackson 

Brandon, Catherine Conio 

Brooks, Elene Mathiston 

Broom, Maye Jackson 

Broom, Myrtle Jackson 

Bryant, Giles Wheeler Purvis 

Bryant, Olen Cooper Jackson 

Buie, Sarah Millsaps Jackson 

Durdette, Anna Jeanne Jackson 

Burkhead, Vera Jackson 

Burnet, Eugenia Jackson 

Butler, Ellisine Jackson 

Canterbury, Ford Utica 

Carpenter, Jesse Lee Rosedale 

Carroll, Arthur Clovis Slate Spring 

Carter, Harris M., Jr Jackson 

Caulfield, Elizabeth Jackson 

Chapman, Angle Newton 

Clark, Jane Pearson 

Colbert, Mary Belle Jackson 

Condon, Robert Morris Greenville 

Conner, Martha Faust Hattiesburg 

Conner, Mary Frances Jackson 

Corban, Bessie D Fayette 

Daniel, Al Fred Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 159 

Dear, Denver Star 

Denson, Corinne Jackson 

Dye, Dolores ...Jackson 

Ellis, Elon E .Jackson 

Ellzey, H. I Goss 

Emmons, Martha Jackson 

Fitzgerald, Wm. Dakin Okolona 

Fitzhugh, Paul Tatom Mendenhall 

Foster, Lillian Frances Vicksburg 

Geesler, Bessie Vicksburg 

Geesler, Rose Vicksburg 

Gable, Gerald P Eastabuchie 

Gill, Frances Jackson 

Golding, Eleanor Gene Aberdeen 

Goodloe, Adine Jackson 

Hanes, Eugene G Birmingham 

Harpole, David Jackson 

Hathorn, Tommy Jackson 

Hathorn, V. B., Jr Jackson 

Hemeter, Edith Annette Jackson 

Herring, Minnie Gay Jackson 

Hodges, Frank Kosciusko 

Holloman, V/illiam Fielding Itta Bena 

Hulen, Margaret Jackson 

Humphreys, Stewart Jackson 

Jernigan, Thomas Mathiston 

Jones, Clifton Raleigh 

Jones, G. Eliot Jackson 

King, Pat Jackson 

Landrum, Hugh B., Jr Jackson 

Landstreet, Elizabeth Jane Jackson 

Longinotti, Malcolm Durant 

Luter, J. C, Jr Jackson 

Lyle, Mrs. Gilbert Lena 

MacKenzie, Edith Hill Jackson 

Mackey, Mrs. J. N Jackson 

Magruder, Bob .Mexia, Texas 

Manning, Mary Frances Jackson 

Mathison, Marguerite Prentiss 

Mayfield, Virginia Tchula 



160 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Milner, Mrs. W. C Lena 

Morgan, Viola Star 

Murphy, Betty Belzoni 

Murphy, Charles M., Jr Belzoni 

Murray, Nell Jackson 

McDavid, Joel Whistler, Alabama 

McGahey, Evelyn Jackson 

McKee, Clyde Vernon, Jr Jackson 

McKinnon, M. L Lauderdale 

McLain, Mrs. Mary Emma Crystal Springs 

McLellaud, Wm. Calvin Hattiesburg 

McWhorter, James P Baldwyn 

Nail, Nelson Jackson 

Neal, Aline Brandon 

Neely, Tom, Jr Jackson 

Newsom, Mary Cavett Vicksburg 

Nichols, Edwina Jackson 

Noto, Albert St. James, Louisiana 

O'Brien, Patricia Jackson 

Parker, Hazel Jean Jackson 

Pierce, Annie Belle Jackson 

Porter, Gracealine Vicksburg 

Puckett, Joe Pat Jackson 

Rhymes, Sarah Nell Jackson 

Robbins, Janice W Macon 

Rush, Paul E Burnell 

Sharp, Everett Corinth 

Shelton, Rae Allen 

Slay, Dudley Purvis 

Smith, Betty Jane Jackson 

Smith, Jasper Jackson 

Smith, Mary Hanes Jackson 

Smith, Lorena Union Church 

Smith, Myriam McAllister Jackson 

Smith, W. J Brookhaven 

Stapleton, C. S Jackson 

Stein, Mrs. Lillian Mobile, Alabama 

Stroud, Marcus Burch, Jr Louise 

Stuart, Catherine Jackson 

Sullivan, Randolph Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 161 

Terrell, Mary Willing Wiggins 

Thompson, Anne Nashville, Tenn. 

Thorne, Ira H., Jr Jackson 

Truitt, Frances Lucille Durant 

Turnage, Laura Louise New Hebron 

Tynes, Mrs. Roy E Meadville 

Upshaw, Mary Blanche Jackson 

Upton, J. B Stringer 

Upton, Leona Mendenhall 

Walker, Bin Newton Jackson 

Walton, Alma Opal Union 

Ward, Charles Lipsey Pelahatchie 

Warren, Eugene Columbia 

Watkins, Archie Sale Jackson 

Webb, John H Columbia 

Westbrook, Mrs. Fannye Smithdale 

White, Elizabeth Jackson 

White, Frances Anthony Pickens 

Wilburn, A. D Laurel 

Williamson, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Wilson, Elizabeth Pelahatchie 

Wilson, Virginia Allene Clarksdale 

Wolbrecht, Harriet Jackson 

Wright, John R Jackson 

Youngblood, Jennie Meadville 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT — 1939-40 

Aebli, Helen Jackson 

Alexander, Mary L Jackson 

Anders, Virgil Natchez 

Anderson, Mrs. Emma Whitfield 

Barnes, Edmund F Jackson 

Barrow, Elaine Jackson 

Battaile, Rosemary Jackson 

Best, Harold J Jackson 

Bilbo, Claude V Pascagoula 

Black, Vadie Mae Jackson 

Blough, David Jackson 

Bodker, Edolie Jackson 

Bredal, Roy H Jackson 



162 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Broadfoot, Mary D Jackson 

Broyles, Nash Atlanta 

Bruner, H. Newell Jackson 

Burwell, John Jackson 

Butts, Leslie N Jackson 

Caldwell, Jack Canton 

Cambre, Frances O Jackson 

Canizaro, P. C, Jr Vicksburg 

Case, Mary Ellen Jackson 

Causey, "Winfred E Jackson 

Cheatham, Robert E Jackson 

Clark, Woodrow Jackson 

Clowe, Jane Vicksburg 

Cocke, Lee Jackson 

Cranford, Lucille Jackson 

Cranford, Norfleet Jackson 

Currie, Julian Jackson 

Daniels, Ruth Corley Jackson 

Darby, James Courtland 

Davis, Mendel M Jackson 

Day, Genevieve J Jackson 

Denser, Dr. C. H Whitfield 

Dickson, Marion L Jackson 

Dobbs, Kay Jackson 

Early, Lauress Cleveland 

Enochs, Crawford Jackson 

Everett, Frances Jackson 

Feigler, Josie Jackson 

Flowers, J. C Jackson 

Fortenberry, Eugene Jackson 

Freeman, Henry Jackson 

Gilliland, Bessie Will Jackson 

Goings, Nelson Jackson 

Griffin, Thomas M Jackson 

Hamilton, Francis A Jackson 

Hanes, Eugene Birmingham, Alabama 

Hardin, Mardelle Jackson 

Hathorn, V. B., Jr Jackson 

Hawkins, Sadie Jackson 

Hearon, James Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 16 3 

Herring, Louise M Jackson 

Hodges, Frank Kosciusko 

Hoffpauir, W. I Jackson 

Holcombe, Kedric Jackson 

Holliday, Charles D Madison 

Hollingsworth, George, Jr Jackson 

Hudson, Marzine New Albany 

Hughes, Ruah H Jackson 

Humphries, Joe Louisville 

James, Marvel Stratton 

Jones, Lucile Jackson 

Jones, Myrtle Jackson 

Kilgore, Charles Jackson 

King, Gertrude E. N Jackson 

Lancaster, James Sunflower 

Lane, Lamar W Jackson 

Lauderdale, Richard Jackson 

Lay, Mac N Jackson 

Lee, Etta Florence Jackson 

LeNoir, D. D Jackson 

Liles, L. E McComb 

Litton, Wallis Shaw 

Lowery, Kelton Greenville 

Majors, Doree Jackson 

Martin, Virginia Jackson 

May, J. E Jackson 

Mayfield, J. W., Jr Jackson 

Moore, George Jackson 

Morrow, Leslie, Jr Jackson 

Murff, Rex Artesia 

McLain, Gladys Jackson 

McLelland, W. C Hattiesburg 

McNair, Annie Lois Jackson 

McMurray, George H Jackson 

Neal, Aline Jackson 

Newell, Louise Canton 

Nicholson, Meta Jackson 

O'Hara, Pauline C Jackson 

Pace, Eunice Canton 

Palmer, Thomas Pershing Jackson 



164 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Peart, Kathleen Jackson 

Peery, Mrs. Gilbert Jackson 

Pendergraft, Sadie M Jackson 

Pendley, Mary Louise Jackson 

Phillips, Herbert Jackson 

Phillips, Lem Holly Bluff 

Phillips, Tom Holly Bluff 

Philp, Avery Jackson 

Planchard, Mary Helen Jackson 

Powell, C. J Yazoo City 

Puckett, L. G Jackson 

Puckett, Pat Jackson 

Reber, Sidney Jackson 

Reed, Morris L Jackson 

Rees, Helen L Jackson 

Riser, Bob Jackson 

Rogers, Margaret Jackson 

Rogers, Martha E Jackson 

Ruff, Jessie Lynn Jackson 

Rush, Paul Burnell 

Sandusky, Herbert Jackson 

Saunders, Fay Jackson 

Schultz, Charles S Sharon 

Scott, J. Tate Jackson 

Shanks, Mary Jackson 

Sheppard, William Jackson 

Shipp, Phillip Benton 

Simpson, Dola Neal Jackson 

Smith, Aubrey Harperville 

Smith, Mary Hanes Jackson 

Smith, Monelle Brookhaven 

Smith, Myriam M Jackson 

Speed, Lottie Jackson 

Spikes, Hilda Jackson 

Spikes, Lorraine Jackson 

Stewart, Myrtle Jackson 

Stone, J. C - Okolona 

Stone, John H., Jr Jackson 

Stubblefield, Delta Jackson 

Sumrall, Elton Laurel 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 165 

Suthoff, Marjorie Jackson 

Suttle, Dorothy Tupelo 

Thames, Shannon Jackson 

Upton, J. B - Stringer 

Varnado, Martha Jackson 

Walker, Bin Magee 

Warren, Eugene Columbia 

Watts, David E Jackson 

Whatley, Ray Whatley, Alabama 

Wilburn, Adolphus D Jackson 

Williams, Maurice Jackson 

Willis, Ed Jackson 

Wilson, James R Natchez 

Wilson, Louis Brandon 

Wright, John Jackson 

Yarbrough, Mildred Jackson 



166 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SURBIARY 

Senior — 

Men 59 

Women 49 108 

Junior — 

Men 72 

Women 44 116 

Sophomore — 

Men 104 

Women 50 154 

Freshman — 

Men 158 

Women 88 246 

Special — • 

Men S 

Women 46 54 

Total — • 

Men 401 

Women 277 678 

Summer School 19 39 — 

Men 63 

Women 78 141 

Extension School — 

Men 9 5 

Women 57 152 

Total — ■ 

Men 559 

Women 412 971 

Counted Twice — 

Men - 87 

Women 28 115 

Total Attendance — 

Men 472 

Women 384 856 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 1G7 

MEDALS — AWARDS — COROIENCEIVIENT 1939 

Founders Robert A. Ivy- 
Ida V. Sharp Roy C. Delamotte 

Bourgeois Gwin Kolb 

Buie Harold A. Douglas 

Tribbett Gwin Kolb 

Travelli J Graham McFarlane 

1 Lawrence Painter 

John C. Carter Clayton Morgan 

Clark Essay Roma Fern Champenois 

Chi Omega Louise Moorer 

Rehfeldt Essay James Booth 

Pan Hellenic Ollie Mae Gray 

HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED — 1939 

Huntley, Michell Carter Doctor of Laws 

Tatum, William Sion Franklin Doctor of Laws 

CERTIFICATE IN PIANO 

Dye, Lillie Hinton Jackson 

DIPLOMA IN PIANO 

Knight, Annie Sue Brandon 

Wilson, Elizabeth Pelahatchie 

COMPLETED REQUIREMENTS FOR B.M. DEGREE 

Harvey, Wirt Turner Water Valley 

Terrell, Katheryn Prentiss 




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INDEX 

Accreditnient 3 

Academic Calendar 5 

Administrative Committees 7 

Alumni Associations, Officers of 138 

Attendance Upon Classes 50 

Athletics 26 

Band 30, 132 

Board of Trustees 6 

Buildings - 15 

Calendar -. 4 

Carnegie-Millsaps Library 19 

Change of Registration 57 

Christian Center 25 

College, The _ 13 

Conduct _ - 55 

Correspondence _ 2 

Costs of Attending Millsaps 39 

Courses Required for B.A. Degree 44 

Courses Required for B.S. Degree 45 

Delayed Registration _ 57 

Delinquency 56 

Departments _ 58 

Department of Ancient Languages 59 

Department of Biology 64 

Department of Chemistry 68 

Department of Economics 73 

Department of Education 78 

Department of English 82 

Department of Geology _ 87 

Department of German _ 89 

Department of History 90 

Department of Mathematics 93 

Department of Philosophy 96 

Department of Physical Education 98 

Department of Physics and Astronomy 100 

Department of Psychology 10 4 

Department of Religion 10 8 

Department of Romance Languages 112 

Department of Sociology and Government 116 

Department of Music _ 118 

Department of Piano 132 



INDEX 

Department of Voice and Public School Music 134 

Department of Violin 13 4 

Dormitories _ 16 

Endowments _ 16 

Examinations 51 

Faculty 8 

Fraternities and Sororities 35 

General Information 15 

General Regulations 50 

Gifts to College 17 

Gifts to Library 19 

Glee Club 29 

Grounds _ 15 

Grading System _ 52 

Honor Societies _ 3 2 

Honorary Degrees 167 

Honors _ 54 

Hours Permitted. 5 4 

Societies 32 

Majors _ 47 

Minors _ 49 

Matriculation 56 

Ministerial League 25 

Officers of Administration 6 

Other Officers 12 

Prizes 22 

Quality Point System 53 

Registry of Students.. 138 

Registration 5 7 

Religious Activities 2 4 

Remedial English 51 

Reports 56 

Resources 15 

Requirements for Admission _ 36 

Requirements for Degrees 44 

Scholarships, Loans, Prizes 20 

Student Assistants _ 11 

Student Organizations _ 28 

Teacher Placement Bureau 79 

Withdrawals _ 56 

Young Men's Christian Association 24 

Young "Woman's Christian Association 25