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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1942-1943"

REGISTER OF 



Jackson, Mississippi 



t/l^ 



The Fifty'second Session Bef 
September 8, 1943 



CORRESPONDENCE 

In the list below are the officials to whom inquiries of 
various types may be sent. 

General interests of the college and 

scholarships The President 

Requests for general catalogues, admission of 

students, and advanced standing The Registrar 

Academic work of students already matriculated, 

and withdrawal of matriculated students The Dean 

Educational progress of students during 

the freshman year The Dean of Freshmen 

Health, social life, dormitory life, and 

general welfare of women students The Dean of Women 

Requests for information concerning Evening Classes and the 

Summer Session Dean of the Summer Session 

and Evening Division 

Payment of college bills The Bursar 



FOREWORD 

■|\ yriLLSAPS is a liberal arts college. Its purpose is to prepare 
^^■'- the minds and hearts of serious students for effective and 
unselfish service in the professions and in the business world. 
In the pursuit of this ideal, Millsaps has behind it half a cen- 
tury of honorable and successful accomplishment. 

Millsaps is recognized by the General Board of Christian 
Education of the Methodist Church as one of the strongest 
and most valuable institutions in the connection. The college 
is fully accredited by all the accrediting agencies, both re- 
gional and national. 

On the fully approved list of: 

The Association of American Universities 

The American Association of University Women 

Holds membership in: 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools 

The Southern University Conference 

The college shares in current educational thought and life 
through membership in the following agencies: 

The American Council on Education 

The American Association of Collegiate Registrars 

The Association of American Colleges 

The National Conference of Church-related Colleges 

The Mississippi Association of Colleges 

The Dixie Conference 



1943- 


CALENDAR - 


-1944 


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1943 APRIL 1943 


1943 OCT. 1943 


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ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
FIFTY-SECOND YEAR 



June 2 
July 6 
July 7 
August 10 
August 11 
August 31 



SUMMER SESSION, 1943 

First term begins 
First term ends 
Second term begins 
Second term ends 
Third term begins 
Third term ends 



FALL SEMESTER, 1943-44 

September 8 Orientation of students 

September 9 Registration of upperclassmen in forenoon 

September 9 Registration of freshmen in afternoon 

September 10 Classes begin 

September 11 Last day for registration without penalty 

September 15 Last day for payment of fees without penalty 

November 24 Thanlisgiving recess begins 4 P.M. 

November 29 Thanltsgiving recess ends 8 A.M. 

December 22 Christmas holidays begin 4 P.M. 

January 3 Christmas holidays end 8 A.M. 

January 17-22 First semester examinations 

January 24 Registration for second semester 

January 25 Classes begin 

April 7 Spring recess begins 4 P.M. 

April 11 Spring recess ends 8 A.M. 

May 19-25 Final examinations 

May 28 Commencement Sunday 

May 29 Meeting of Board of Trustees 

May 29 Commencement Day 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

BISHOP J. L. DECBLL, D.D., L.L.D President 

J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Vice-President 

MARTHA BENNETT Acting Secretary 

A. B. CAMPBELL Treasurer 

Term Expires in 1944 

REV. OTTO PORTER, D.D Jackson 

REV. N. J. GOLDING Aberdeen 

VIRGIL D. YOUNGBLOOD Brookhaven 

P. B. SMITH RiiJley 

REV. J. T. LEGGETT, D.D Hattieshurg 

REV. J. R. COUNTISS, D.D Starkville 

H. M. IVY, Ph.D Meridian 

A. L. ROGERS New Albany 

Term Expires in 1947 

REV. C. A. BOWEN, D.D Nashville 

W. O. TATUM Hattiesburg 

V. B. MONTGOMERY Belzoni 

REV. O. S. LEWIS Hattiesburg 

REV. L. P. WASSON, D.D Greenville 

REV. T. M. BRADLEY Inverness 

R. L. EZELLE Jackson 

E. C. BREWER Clarksdale 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

MARION LOFTON SMITH, A.M., B.D., Ph.D President 

WILLIAM EMIL RIECKEN, A.M., Ph.D Dean of the Faculty 

MARY B. H. STONE, A.M Dean of Women 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON, A.M., Ph.D Dean of Freshmen 

*RAY SIGLER MUSGRAVE, A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Summer Session and Evening Division 

GEORGE LOTT HARRELL, M.S Registrar 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS, A.M Librarian 

VERNON BURKETT HATHORN, A.B Bursar 

*On temporary leave 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 9 

MABEL BENNER COBB Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A.B., St. Lawrence University ; A.M., University of North Carolina 

MARY B. H. STONE Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College ; A.M., George Peabody College 

*HENRY MORTON BULLOCK The Tatum Professor of Religion 

B.Ph., B.D., Emory University ; S.T.B., Yale Divinity School ; Ph.D., Yale University 

*VERNON LANE WHARTON Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Millsaps College ; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

MARGUERITE WATKINS GOODMAN Instructor in English 

A.B., Agnes Scott College ; A.M., Tulane University 

ALBERTA TAYLOR Instructor in Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College ; graduate work, Chicago Musical College 
VIRGINIA THOMAS Assistant Professor of Religion 

A.B., Grenada College ; A.B., University of Mississippi ; A.M. and advanced 
graduate work. Northwestern University 

*RALPH GRAY JONES Assistant Professor of Government 

A.B., A.M., Louisiana State University ; advanced graduate work, Duke University 

ARMAND COULLET Professor of Violin 

B.Mus. (Premier Prix), Conservatoire d'Alger 

*RAY SIGLER MUSGRAVE Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Bethany College ; A.M., Ohio Wesleyan University ; Ph.D., Syracuse University 
*ELBERT STEPHEN WALLACE Professor of Economics 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College ; M.A., Duke University ; Ph.D., Duke University 

*CHARLES BETTS GALLOWAY Instructor in Chemistry and Physics 

B.S., Millsaps College ; A.M. and advanced graduate work, Duke University 

JOHN ALBERT FINCHER Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina ; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

*FRANCES ELIZABETH DECELL Director of Physical Education 

for Wornen 

A.A., Whitworth College ; A.B.. Millsaps College ; A.M., University of Alabama 

*WIRT TURNER HARVEY Instructor in Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College ; M.M., Chicago Musical College 

♦WILLIAM DAVID McCAIN Lecturer in History 

B.S., Mississippi Delta State Teachers' College ; A.M., University of Mississippi ; 
Ph.D., Duke University 

FRANCES GILL Instructor in Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College ; graduate work, Chicago Musical College 

WILLIAM ROBERT HOLLINGS WORTH, JR Instructor in Art 

Graduate, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago 

NANCY BROGAN HOLLOWAY Instructor in Secretarial Studies 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women 

OSCAR SELBOURNE DOOLEY Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., University of Mississippi ; A.M., University of Mississippi ; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

ROLF E. WUBBELS Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S., M.A., New York University 

SHIRLEY CHICHESTER Associate Librarian 

B.A., Millsaps College ; B.S. Lib. Sci., School of Library Science, 
University of North Carolina 

SIBYL McDonald Professor of Public School Music and Theory 

B.M., American Conservatory 

DAVE M. CARSON Director of Athletics 

B.A., Union University ; Graduate Work, University of Alabama 
*On temporary leave 



10 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OTHER OFFICERS 

MRS. MARY BOWEN CLARK Assistant Librarian, Emeritus 

M.E.L., Whitworth College 

SCOTT F. CONE Bookkeeper 

MARTHA BENNETT Secretary to the President 

HOSEA FRANK MAGEE College Physician 

B.S., Millsaps College ; M.D., Tulane University. 

*FRED E. MASSEY Bookkeeper 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 

CAROLYN BUFKIN Assistant to the Registrar 

A.B., Whitworth College 

MRS. C. F. COOPER Matron Whitworth Hall 

MRS. MELVILLE JOHNSON Assistant Librarian, Matron Galloway Hall 

MRS. F. E. MASSEY Matron Burton Hall 

*On leave 



Biology: 

Chemistry: 

Economics: 
Education : 
English: 

History: 
Mathematics : 
Piano : 

Physical Education: 
Physics : 

Psychology : 
Romance Languages: 
Voice : 

Bursar's Office : 
Deans' Offices: 

Registrar's Office: 

Duplication Office: 
Publicity: 
Library : 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 11 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

VIRGINIA MINYARD, SUE McCORMACK, JAMES 
CALLOWAY 

DOLORES CRAFT, W. R. AXTELL, DONALD 
WINNER 

MAR'JORIE MURPHY 

MARY FRANCES YOUNG 

JANICE TRIMBLE, ELLENITA SELLS, KINCHEN 
EXUM 

DORIS MURPHREE 

RICKITTS CHILDRESS 

JEAN CALLOWAY 

HETTIE FAYE BEASLEY 

RICKITTS CHILDRESS, ADEN BARLOW, RICH- 
ARD CATLEDGE 

HAZEL BAILEY 

DONNIE GUION 

RUTH GIBBONS 

CARBOLL MITCHELL, DANNIE RICE 

JEAN CALLOWAY, KINCHEN EXUM, ROBERT 
YARBROUGH 

DOLORES CRAFT, MARTHA NELL WILLINGHAM, 
BOB WILLIAMS 

ALMA ZENFELL 

CHARLINE HARRIS, ANNE BUCHANAN 

MARY LEE BUSBY, ELMER DEAN CALLOWAY, 
PRISCILLA MORSON, HARRIET REAGEN, EM- 
MA GENE GAINEY, SARAH KATHLEEN POSEY, 
ALICE OWENS, LILLIAN JOHNSON 



12 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE 

Symbolizing the progress of higher education in Mississippi through 
half a century now becomes another tradition in the proud heritage of 
Millsaps College. Keenly aware that the immediate moment is only the 
cutting edge of time, the College always remembers that it is the past 
which draws the shape of things to come. 

As a living spirit of service, Millsaps draws inspiration from dramatic 
beginnings. Almost a century has passed since the boy Reuben Webster 
Millsaps dreamed of making it possible for the highest type of Mississippi's 
youth to secure a Christian education here at home in the Magnolia State. 

Today Millsaps College stands in Jackson, product of a half-century 
of development, as the realization of that dream. Major Millsaps lived to 
see the College recognized as an institution deeprooted in the traditions 
of scholarship. Through his work, and that of those who followed him, the 
work has gone on. 

With material and inspirational support from Major Millsaps, the 
Mississippi conferences of the Methodist church resolved in 1888 to estab- 
lish a college for men. Four years later, with four professors and a handful 
of students, Millsaps opened its doors in the City of Jackson. Coeducation 
was instituted when the college began its seventh session. 

The Rev. W. B. Murrah, of the North Mississippi conference, launched 
the institution's career as its first president. President Murrah and the 
executive heads who followed him after he became a Methodist bishop have 
played leading roles in making the institution what it is. 

Presidents of the college have been W. B. Murrah, D.D., LL.D., (1892- 
1910); D. C. Hull, M.A., (1910-1912); A. F. Watkins, D.D., (1912-1923); 
D. M. Key, Ph.D., LL.D., (1923-1938); and M. L. Smith, Ph.D., (1938 — ). 

Growth of the college has been consistent and healthy. For the first 
25 years attendance was almost static, fluctuating between 100 and 200. 
Then the 1920's witnessed the beginnings of a steady rise, reaching a peak 
during the 1928-29 session. The enrollment then remained between 400 
and 500 until the 1938-39 session; since that time it has exceeded 600. 

"No finer or more wholesome young people were ever assembled in 
any college community," says a recent presidential report to the Methodist 
conferences of Mississippi. "They have made the reputation of Millsaps 
and have been excelled in no line of academic endeavor. Almost without 
exception they have found a place of useful service. They are the chief 
outcome of Methodist college effort in Mississippi." 

Pointing out that the value of a college such as Millsaps may be meas- 
ured by the subsequent careers of those it trains, the report shows that an 
overwhelming proportion of those entering the Methodist ministry in Mis- 
sissippi are Millsaps graduates. 

"Not only through Millsaps-trained pastors, but also through her 
graduates who are teaching in the public schools and engaged in business 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13 

and professions, Millsaps is contributing to the highest interest of church 
and state," continues the report. "There are more than 400 Millsaps grad- 
uates and many more former students teaching in state schools. Most of 
the more than 1,500 graduates are now living in Mississippi." 

Looking forward to a Greater Millsaps in recognition of its expanding 
fields of service, a $400,000 endowment drive was begun by the two 
conferences of the Methodist Church in Mississippi during the fall of 
1938. College needs for which funds are sought include an endowment 
increase, strengthening of the library, and a religion and fine arts 
building. This movement is being continued in the dollar-a-month en- 
dowment fund, inaugurated by Dr. Smith in 1940. 

A keynote to the spirit of Millsaps College was recently struck by a 
prominent graduate who had returned to the campus for a chapel address. 
He paid tribute to his alma mater as an institution which instills in its 
students "a conception of the things which really count — the ultimate 
values." He added that "Millsaps 'goes in for' the things which widen one's 
vision . . . which enable him to look for the horizon which others have not 
yet seen." 



14 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

RESOURCES 

The physical resources, the grounds, the buildings, and the endow- 
ment are sufficient to enable the college to do a high grade of work; but 
all, except the area of the grounds, need to be strengthened in order to 
provide for reasonable increase of enrollment, to improve the conditions 
under which the work is done, to increase the faculty support, to main- 
tain an improved physical plant, to beautify the campus, and to offset 
probable decrease in endowment productivity. 

GROUNDS 

The campus of 100 acres, situated on a beautiful eminence near the 
heart of the city, is large enough to afford room for the full development 
of all the phases of college life. It is pleasantly wooded with many fine 
old oaks and elms and open fields and playing grounds. Much improvement 
in the appearance of the campus has been effected in recent years. A fine 
concrete drive gives access to all the buildings. Two commodious playing 
fields for football and baseball, a track, and tennis courts are readily 
reached from the heart of the campus. A fine nine-hole golf course covers 
the north end of the campus, with convenient access to the showers and 
dressing rooms in the gymnasium. 

BUILDINGS 

The instructional buildings are all relatively new and modern. The 
administration building, Murrah Hall, was erected in 1914; the Carnegie- 
Millsaps Library building in 19 26; the Sullivan-Harrell Science Hall in 
1928; and the Buie Memorial Building for Physical Education in 1936. 
These buildings, which constitute the heart of the institution, are well 
equipped for the functions they are designed to perform. The examining 
committee of Phi Beta Kappa said in regard to them: "The library, though 
small, seems adequate, and the collections are well chosen. The laboratories 
in the new science building are adequate, the equipment is new and up- 
to-date." 

Founders Hall, located across the drive from the library, has rooms 
for 120 men. Burton Hall and Galloway Hall are located at the south end 
of the campus. Both these halls have been reserved for women students. 
The elegant reception rooms have been newly equipped with handsome 
furnishings. 

Whitworth Hall, the new dormitory for women, erected in 1939, is 
located on the east campus near North State Street. It is a handsome 
structure, thoroughly modern, and gives luxurious accommodation to 
forty-four women students. 

ENDOWMENT 

The productive endowment, according to the last audit, amounted to 
$753,220.37. In addition to the income from this endowment, the college 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 15 

budget receives pro rata share of conference assessments amounting to 
$5,000. Owing to decrease in the productivity of invested funds as well 
as the need of greater operating income, the college needs contributions 
to its endowment more urgently than anything else. The statement of total 
assets derived from the last official audit, June 30, 1940, is as follows: 

Current funds $ 9,327.93 

Loan funds 6,245.32 

Endowment 753,220.37 

Plant funds 929,075.01 



Total $1,69 7,868.63 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



GIFTS OF OVER $1,000.00 TO MILLSAPS COLLEGE FROM THE 
BEGINNING OF ITS HISTORY 

R. W. Millsaps, Jackson $550,000.00 

W. S. F. Tatum, Hattiesburg 130,000.00 

W. M. Buie, Jackson 35,800.00 

B. B. Jones, Berryville, Va 30,000.00 

I. C. Enochs Family, Jackson 18,500.00 

Stewart Gammill, Jackson 11,000.00 

Estate J. H. Scruggs, Corinth 9,000.00 

W. A. Davenport, Forest 7,000.00 

J. L. and M. S. Enochs, Jackson 4,860.00 

Jas. Hand, Purvis 4,500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Fitzhugh, Memphis 4,500.00 

T. B. Lampton, Jackson 4,000.00 

R. L. Ezelle, Jackson 3,300.00 

W. H. Tribbett, Terry 3,000.00 

P. H. Enochs, Fernwood 2,833.33 

W. H. Watkins, Jackson 2,625.00 

J. L. Dantzler, New Orleans 2,250.00 

D. W. Babb 2,000.00 

R. E. Kennington, Jackson 2,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Wortman, Jackson 1,680.00 

J. A. Moore, Quitman 1,500.00 

Mrs. A. D. Gunning, Jackson 1,500.00 

F. L. Adams 1,500.00 

Mississippi Power & Light Co 1,500.00 

Jackson Clearing House 1,500.00 

C. R. Ridgeway, Jr., Jackson 1,000.00 

Enochs & Wortman, Jackson 1,000.00 

Weston Lumber Co., Logtown 1,000.00 

H. L. Wilkinson, Shelby 1,000.00 

J. E. Coleman, Doddsville 1,000.00 

L. L. Roberts, Canton 1,000.00 

J. R. Bingham, Carrollton 1,000.00 

E. W. Reid, Magnolia 1,000.00 

Peebles Estate, Jackson 1,000.00 

D. M. Key, Birmingham, Ala 1,000.00 

H. C. Couch, Hot Springs, Ark 1,000.00 

McCarty-Holman, Jackson 1,000.00 

Mississippi School Supply Co., Jackson 1,000.00 

J. L. Decell, Birmingham, Ala 1,000.00 

Wright & Ferguson, Jackson 1,000.00 

R. W. Naef, Jackson 1,000.00 

Ed C. Brewer, Clarksdale 1,100.00 

W. O. Tatum, Hattiesburg, 1,100.00 

V. B. Montgomery, Belzoni 1,000.00 

E. M. Fant, Coahoma 1,000.00 

D. H. Hall, New Albany 1,000.00 

Corporations 

General Education Board, New York $125,000.00 

Carnegie Corporation, New York 69,000.00 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 17 

CARNEGIE-MILLSAPS LIBRARY 

Near the close of the 19 05-06 session, Andrew Carnegie offered to give 
the college $15,000 for a library building if the trustees would supply 
endowment of equal amount. Major Millsaps added to his many contri- 
butions by giving the full amount of the endowment. 

The foundations of this handsome building unfortunately gave way, 
and it became necessary to provide a new library. The Carnegie Corpora- 
tion generously appropriated $50,000 for this purpose. The present build- 
ing was completed in 19 2 5-2 6 and with the addition of a second floor of 
shelving, recently completed, will house 60,000 volumes. Furniture for 
the reading rooms was given by the Enochs Lumber & Manufacturing 
Company. 

During the session of 1941-42 the Historical Society of the Mississippi 
Conference placed its valuable and interesting collection of books and 
papers relating to Mississippi Methodist history in a special room in the 
library. A special grant of $10,000 for the purchase of books was made by 
the Carnegie Corporation during the five years 1931-1936, and about 
4,600 volumes were added from this source. The income from the Martha 
A. Turner Fund of $1,000, founded by Mrs. J. R. Bingham of Carrollton, 
Miss., is used for the purchase of books in English literature. 

Library Hours: Monday through Friday, 8 to 5, 6 to 9; Saturday, 
8 to 4. 

The library is closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, and spring 
holidays. 

A special collection of documents, manuscripts, and books on Meth- 
odism in Mississippi has been started, and gifts of material related to this 
subject would be especially valuable. 

Donors to the library in 1941-42: Alfred P. Sloan, Jr., C. M. Goethe, 
Harry Laughlin, Bernard M. Baruch, American Council on Education, 
History 62 class, History 51 class, International Relations Club, the Car- 
negie Foundation, B. Franklin Atkinson, E. G. Grigg, University of 
Michigan Press, University of Chicago Press, Gustavus A. Pfeiffer, Chris- 
tian Science Church of Jackson, Wilmot Brewer, Brookes Moore, R. M. 
Rice, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Otto 
Degener, Mrs. W. S. Hamiltoh, University of Mississippi, Sam Houston 
Teachers College of Texas, Dr. Merrill Moore, the Thistle Press, the Mis- 
sissippi Conference Board of Ministerial Training. 



18 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS, PRIZES 

ENDOWED FUNDS 

The income from the following funds may be used by the 
Board of Trustees to aid deserving applicants: 

The Clara Chrisman Scholarship 
The Peebles Scholarship 
The W. H. Watkins Scholarship 
The Marvin Galloway Scholarship 
The J. A. Moore Scholarship 

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

THE TRIBBETT SCHOLARSHIP 

The student to whom the scholarship is awarded receives two hundred 
dollars, payable one-half at the beginning of the first semester and one- 
half at the beginning of the second. The award is subject to the following 
conditions: 

This scholarship is to be awarded at the end of each session to the 
member of the sophomore or junior class whose quality index is highest 
for the year, subject to the following qualifications: 

a. He must be a regular student with not less than thirty-two semester 
hours' work for the year, and must have made at least "C" in each of the 
subjects studied. 

b. He must be qualified for and agree to work assigned by the presi- 
dent of the college. 

THE TRAVELLI SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships of $120.00 are awarded at the end of each session to two 
qualified members of one of the upper classes. They are awarded by the 
Travelli Foundation of Boston on the recommendation of a faculty com- 
mittee. 

FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Board of Trustees has authorized the award of one four-year 
tuition scholarship valued at $500, one two-year tuition scholarship valued 
at $250, and one one-year tuition scholarship valued at $125. In addition, 
thirty scholarships worth $75 each are awarded each year to graduates 
of Mississippi high schools upon recommendation of the Scholarship 
Awards Committee. The awards are made on the basis of psychological 
examinations and interviews held at the college in the spring of each year. 
Only those ranking in the upper 10% of their class and able to furnish 
evidence of good character and promise of usefulness are eligible to apply 
for these scholarships. Application forms may be secured from Dr. M. L. 
Smith, President of Millsaps College. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 19 

SERVICE SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are service scholarships in each of several departments, the 
holders of which are expected to aid the head of the department in some 
definite work. These scholarships are ordinarily open only to members of 
the upper classes. Application should be made to the president of the col- 
lege. 



LOAN FUNDS 

THE W. T. J. SULLIVAN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 

This fund is administered by Dr. J. M. Sullivan, Professor of Chemistry, 
Millsaps College. 

THE FEILD COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION LOAN FUND 
The Feild Cooperative Association, a private philanthropic enterprise, 
makes loans to members of the junior and senior classes who are of good 
character and show promise of usefulness. The loans are to cover only a 
part of the expenses of the student. Application should be addressed to 
Miss S. Frances Sale, Executive Secretary of the Feild Cooperative As- 
sociation, Lamar Life Building, Jackson, Mississippi. 



20 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MEDALS AND PRIZES 

1. The Founder's Medal is awarded annually to the member of the 
senior class who has made the highest quality index for the entire college 
course and has received a grade of excellent on his comprehensive exami- 
nation. Only students who have done at Millsaps College all the work re- 
quired for the degree are eligible for this award. 

2. The Bourgeois Medal is awarded annually to the member of the 
freshman, sophomore, or junior class who has made the highest quality- 
index during the year. Such student must be a candidate for a degree, and 
must have taken a minimum of thirty semester hours of college work 
during the year in which the medal is awarded to him. No student who 
has won this medal can compete for it again. 

3. The John C. Carter Medal for Oratory is awarded annually to the 
student who presents the best original oration in the oratorical contest. 
This contest is open to men and women students and is held in February 
or March of each year. 

4. The Clark Essay Medal shall be awarded annually to that student 
who presents the best and most original paper in any English course in 
Millsaps College. 

5. The Buie Medal for Declamation is open to members of the freshman 
and sophomore classes, but it cannot be awarded to any student more 
than once. The contest for this medal is held at commencement each year. 

6. Chi Omega Award. Chi Omega sorority, seeking to further the inter- 
est of women in the social sciences, presents an award of $25.00 to the 
girl having the highest average for the year in the field of psychology, 
sociology, economics, or other courses in the social sciences. The field is 
selected yearly at the suggestion of the head of the social science division. 

7. The Rehfeldt Prize of $10 is awarded to the pre-medical student who 
presents the best essay on some phase of the history of medicine. The Pre- 
Medical Club sponsors the contest. The award is given by Dr. F. E. 
Rehfeldt and Fred Rehfeldt. 

8. Pan-Hellenic Award. The Women's Pan-Hellenic Council makes each 
year a cash award of $25 to the best woman citizen of the college com- 
munity — to that one whose life and influence have contributed most to 
the happiness and welfare of the student body. 

9. The Charles Betts Galloway Award for the best sermon preached by 
a ministerial student of Millsaps College is presented on Commencement 
Sunday. This annual award was established by Mrs. E. H. Galloway and 
family in honor of the late Bishop Galloway, and is given in the form of 
a medal. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Millsaps College, as an institution of the Methodist Church, seeks to 
be a genuinely Christian college. The faculty is made up of scholars who 
are Christians striving to fulfill the highest ideals of personal devotion 
and of community citizenship. The religious life of the college centers 
around the churches of Jackson and the campus Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. 
A. Every inducement is brought to bear upon the students to attend a 
church and church school of their own denomination. A chapel or assembly 
of the entire college provides opportunity for worship, inspiration, and 
business of college-wide concern. Varied programs, including addresses 
by faculty members, students, and outside speakers of ability are present- 
ed at these services. 

METHODIST CAMPUS-CHURCH RELATIONS COMMITTEE AND THE 
MILLSAPS CHRISTIAN COUNCIL 

The Christian program of the college is coordinated with the local and 
general program of the Methodist Church through the Campus-Church 
Relations Committee. The various religious activities of the college are 
correlated and unified by the Millsaps Christian Council, composed of 
representatives of all organized religious groups on the campus. This 
council sponsors delegations of students to the summer conferences of 
the church at Lake Junaluska, North Carolina, and to the Methodist State 
Student Conference. It is the channel for all activities of the Methodist 
Student Movement at Millsaps. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The College Y. M. C. A. is the recognized channel of student religious 
activity for men. The association was organized shortly after the college 
was founded, and has done much to strengthen the spiritual life and 
influence of the college and its members, and to promote progressive 
Christian work. Each Monday meetings are held for the presentation and 
discussion of questions of interest to students. The association shares 
vitally in the college program for the adjustment of freshmen to the 
Millsaps community. Delegations of members represent the association at 
state, regional, and Blue Ridge, N. C, conferences each year. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
The Y. W. C. A. provides expression for the religious interests of 
Millsaps women through a program similar to that of the Y. M. C. A. It 
holds weekly meetings devoted to the religious needs of college women, 
and cooperates in the orientation of new students in campus life. Repre- 
sentatives of the association participate in all of the conferences of the Y. 
W. C. A., and the Christian Student Movement. 

MINISTERIAL LEAGUE 
Students preparing for the Christian ministry may join the Ministerial 
League, which provides programs appropriate to the needs of students 



22 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

interested in Christian life work. Through its activities, the league pro- 
vides opportunity for Christian service for its members, and contributes 
much to the religious life of the campus, and of the local churches. 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

All Baptist students at Millsaps are included in the membership of 
the Baptist Student Union, which was organized in 1938. The Union 
carries on a religious program in cooperation with the local Baptist 
churches, and the BSU Council at its weekly meetings plans an active 
religious and social program for Baptist students on the campus. The 
organization attempts to develop a feeling of brotherhood among its mem- 
bers and to induce them to participate in other religious activities on the 
campus and in the churches. 

RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK 

The annual Religious Emphasis Week is sponsored by all the religious 
groups of the campus, functioning through the Millsaps Christian Council. 
For this week some outstanding religious leader familiar with student 
life and problems addresses the student body and various groups of stu- 
dents and professors, and is available for private conference with in- 
dividuals. Speakers of recent years have included Bishop W. T. Watkins, 
Dr. W. A. Smart, of Emory University, Dr. Marshall Steel of Texas, 
and Dr. G. Ray Jordan, of Charlotte, N. C. Dr. Roy M. Smith, editor of 
the Chicago "Christian Advocate" was the speaker in 1942-43. 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTER 

All religious groups of the campus share the use of a frame building 
known as the Christian Center. This building provides facilities for wor- 
ship, forum, recreation, and committee meetings. 



ATHLETICS 

Millsaps College has maintained a consistently high athletic standard, 
not only in developing teams for intercollegiate competition, but in pro- 
viding a well rounded program which attempts to bring every student 
in college into some form of athletic competition. 

I. INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS. 

In the desire to have a "sports for all" program, the college sponsors 
intramural activities in: baseball, basketball, boxing, free throwing, 
touch football, golf, horseshoes, Softball, track, tennis, and volley ball. 

The Intramural organization is made up of members of each fra- 
ternity or independent group on the campus. The program includes both 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 23 

team and individual sports. No credit is given for intramurals, but it 
is urged that every one take part. 

Individual Activities. The athletic department offers its facilities to 
students and faculty for individual or group use at any time. These 
facilities include five tennis courts, soft ball fields, football field, running 
track, obstacle course, boxing and wrestling room, and gymnasium. 

Purpose of Millsaps Sports Program: 

1. To stimulate better personal strength and health habits through 
the medical examination and physical exercises. 

2. To provide instruction and participation for all in a variety of 
clean, wholesome sports. 

Cups are awarded to championship squads in these activities. In 
general, the units are based upon residence in dormitories and teams 
sponsored by social fraternities, 

II. ATHLETICS FOR WOMEN. 

Women's athletics are encouraged for the reason that when properly 
regulated they tend to promote both the physical and moral well-being 
of the students and to foster a wholesome college spirit. 

Millsaps does not sponsor inter-collegiate athletics for women. The 
desire is to have a program in which all girls may participate. The 
intramural program satisfies this need. The sororities. Empyreans, and 
non-sorority group form the teams which compete in these activities, 
which include archery, ping-pong, volleyball, basketball, Softball, golf, 
and tennis. 

Women students are encouraged to participate in athletic activities 
during their leisure time. The college offers an unlimited number of 
facilities for their use — the golf course, tennis courts, archery range, 
the gymnasium, and many other places which may be used at the students' 
pleasure. 

III. ATHLETIC FACILITIES. 

(1) A new gymnasium provides a large playing floor for basketball, 
boxing, volley ball, indoor baseball, and tennis. It has a regulation ring 
for boxing, mats for gymnastics, dressing rooms for all teams, a room 
for visiting teams, trainer's room complete with equipment for injuries, 
a club room for wearers of the "M," and the college store. The gym- 
nasium has become the center of the activities of the students. (2) The 
football stadium with seating accommodations for five thousand spec- 
tators is equipped with lights for night games and also contains a fine 
24 ft. quarter mile cinder track. (3) The baseball field is separate from 
the football stadium and is also used as a freshman football practice 
field. (4) Five new clay tennis courts have been constructed near the 
gymnasium and are kept in perfect condition in nine out of the twelve 
months of the year. (5) A very fine nine hole golf course has been built 
aftd is for use by all students. 



24 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Millsaps Student Association is governed by officers elected by 
the student body and the student executive board. The president, vice- 
president, and the secretary-treasurer are elected annually from the stu- 
dent body. Members of the student executive board are chosen by the 
activities which they represent. 

Meetings of the student executive board are held at least once a month, 
with other meetings called when the president considers them necessary. 
The Student Association holds its regular meeting during the chapel period 
every Friday morning. All members of the student body automatically 
become members of the Student Association. 

The duties and functions of the student executive board are to act in 
the administration of student affairs, to cooperate with the administration 
in the orientation program of the college, to promote a better under- 
standing between students and faculty, and to work for the benefit of the 
student body and the progress of the college. 

THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

A working laboratory for students with journalistic inclinations is 
furnished in The Purple and A¥hite, weekly Millsaps student publication. 
A college newspaper with a reputation which ranks it among the best in 
the South, The Purple and White affords actual experience in the edi- 
torial, business, and advertising phases of a modern news-sheet. Extra- 
curricular college credit for members of the staff, and the valuable ex- 
perience it affords, make this activity both profitable and interesting to 
students. 

THE BOBASHELA 

The Bobashela is the annual student publication of Millsaps College. 
It attempts to give a comprehensive view of campus life as enjoyed by the 
student body and faculty members. The 1943 edition is the thirty-seventh 
volume of this Millsaps book. Bobashela is a Choctaw Indian name for 
"good friend." 

THE PLAYERS 

The dramatic club of the college has as its official name "The Millsaps 
Players." Under the direction of Dr. M. C. White, the Players put on two 
or more three-act plays each year, and produce with first year novices 
six or more one-act plays. The organization is a live one and its pro- 
ductions are highly creditable. 

The Players within recent years have greatly added to the facilities 
for play production: The stage has been enlarged, a handsome curtain and 
cylorama, three complete sets of scenery, and complete lighting equip- 
ment have been purchased. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 25 

THE MILLSAPS SINGERS 

The Millsaps Singers, a chorus composed of men and women students 
under the able direction of Mr. Alvin J. King, is one of the most important 
organizations on the Millsaps campus. 

In addition to numerous appearances in Jackson and towns nearby, 
the purple-robed chorus takes an extensive trip each year. 

Membership is open to freshmen and upper-classmen alike and two 
semester hours' credit is given for the year's work. 

BEETHOVEN CLUB 

The Beethoven Club of Millsaps College offers attractive and helpful 
features in the community life of the musical students. The club brings 
noted artists to the campus to hold master classes and give concerts. Some 
of the artists who have been here under the club auspices are Isabel and 
Silvio Scionti, Rudolph Ganz, and Percy Grainger. 

THE BAND 

The Millsaps Symphonic Band is open to all students, men and women, 
who can qualify. The year's repertoire work covers all phases of symphonic 
music. Two semester hours' credit is given for the year's work. 

DEBATING 

Since the year the college was founded, debating has occupied an im- 
portant place in its activities. Millsaps teams participate in about 150 de- 
bates each year, meeting teams from the leading institutions in the South 
and Southwest. 

Extra-curricular credit is offered for successful participation in debat- 
ing, oratory, and extemporaneous public speaking. 

THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

The International Relations Club of Millsaps College is an endowed 
honorary organization which recognizes superior work in current history. 

Membership is elective. 

The club holds bi-monthly meetings at which timely world problems 
and events are discussed by student and faculty members. Another feature 
of the club is to sponsor occasional lectures of international interest. 

THE EMPYREANS 
The Empyreans Club, organized in 19 3 4, intends that all Millsaps stu- 
dents should have access to social activity. Both men and women students 
who do not join Greek letter social fraternities and sororities are welcom- 
ed by the non-Greek organization. Numerous parties, picnics, and enter- 
tainments are given during the year with each member sharing the ex- 
penses. The Empyreans are well represented in intra-mural sports competi- 
tion and other campus activities. 



26 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

ETA SIGMA PHI 

Eta Sigma Phi is a national honor faternity for the recognition and 
stimulation of interest in classical studies, including the history, art, and 
literature of ancient Greece and Rome. Its forty-six chapters scattered 
throughout the United States foster a closer relationship among students 
interested in the classics. 

Alpha Phi, the Millsaps chapter, was founded in December, 1935, and 
has since been an active group on the campus. 

PI KAPPA DELTA 

The Millsaps chapter of Pi Kappa Delta offers membership to those 
who have given distinguished service in debating, oratory, or extempora- 
neous public speaking. The national honorary fraternity with its one 
hundred and twenty-nine chapters performs a valuable service in co- 
ordinating the forensic activities of colleges throughout the country. 

CHI DELTA 

Chi Delta is a local honorary literary society whose purpose is to 
stimulate the art of creative writing among the women students at Mill- 
saps. Membership includes women members of the faculty and student 
body who are interested in writing. 

KIT KAT 

Kit Kat is a literary fraternity with a selected membership of men 
students who have ambition combined with ability to write. Monthly pro- 
grams consist of original papers given by the members and criticized by 
the entire group of student and faculty members. 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

Omicron Delta Kappa is a widely recognized leadership fraternity with 
chapters in the principal colleges and universities throughout the country. 
Pi Circle at Millsaps brings together those members of the student body 
and faculty most interested in campus activities, together with a limited 
number of alumni and supporters who discuss Millsaps problems, and 
work for the betterment of the college. 

Membership in Omicron Delta Kappa is one of the highest honors a 
student can attain. 

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 

Alpha Epsilon Delta is an honorary pre-medical fraternity, founded 
at the University of Alabama in 1926. Its purpose is to promote the in- 
terests of pre-medical students. Leadership, scholarship, expertness, char- 
acter, and personality are the qualities by which students are judged for 
membership. Alpha Epsilon Delta strives to bridge the gap between pre- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 27 

medical and medical schools and to link the undergraduate with the 
medical student and the physician. 

DELTA KAPPA DELTA 

Delta Kappa Delta is an honorary pre-law fraternity. Its purpose is to 
promote justice, truth, and all the high ideals of law. It recognizes ability 
and interest in the field of law preparation. It endeavors to serve as the 
link between pre-law and law training. 

ETA SIGMA 

Eta Sigma is a local honorary fraternity which recognizes excellence 
in scholarship. It selects its members from the junior and senior classes. 
The high standards required for membership in Eta Sigma make it a 
coveted honor at Millsaps. 

ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

Effective service in "The Millsaps Players" is rewarded by member- 
ship in Alpha Psi Omega, the national honorary dramatic fraternity. Stu- 
dents may qualify for the honor fraternity by notable achievement in act- 
ing, make up, stage management, business management, and costuming. 

SIGMA LAMBDA 

Sigma Lambda is a women's leadership sorority organized for the pur- 
pose of recognizing outstanding leadership among women at Millsaps. It 
is a forum for the discussion of questions of interest to the college. Sigma 
Lambda is composed of a limited number of women students and faculty 
members. 

Sigma Lambda membership is one of the most distinctive honors a 
woman can receive at Millsaps. 

KAPPA DELTA EPSILON 

Kappa Delta Epsilon is a professional education sorority the purpose 
of which is to promote the cause of education. It seeks to foster among 
its members professional ideals, high standards of scholastic attainment, 
and a spirit of mutual helpfulness. 

THETA NU SIGMA 

Theta Nu Sigma is composed of a select group of students especially 
outstanding in science. With the purpose of furthering general interest 
in the sciences, membership is offered to second semester sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors who are majoring in one of the natural sciences and 
who fulfill certain other qualifications. 



28 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES 

Four national fraternities: Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa 
Alpha, and Lambda Chi Alpha, have chapters on the Millsaps campus. 
These social clubs maintain houses in which some of their members reside. 

During the first week of the school year, each fraternity extends in- 
vitations to from ten to twenty new students, bidding them to membership 
in the organization. The new men are given an opportunity during this 
"rush" period to become acquainted with fraternities, and at the end of 
this time bids are extended and the new students are pledged. While 
pledging is not allowed for the first week of school, a fraternity may ex- 
tend an invitation to join at any other time during the year. 

Initiation of new pledges cannot take place until the student has been 
at Millsaps for a semester during which he has made at least nine quality 
points with not more than one grade below D. 

SOCIAL SORORITIES 

Millsaps College has four national sororities: Phi Mu, Kappa Delta, 
Beta Sigma Omicron, and Chi Omega. 

Formal rushing for new students takes place at the beginning of the 
fall term and is done according to rules which the sororities have all 
agreed upon. Initiation of new pledges cannot take place until the student 
has been at Millsaps for a semester during which she has made at least 
nine quality points with not more than one grade below D. Informal rush- 
ing is allowed throughout the year according to the desires of the various 
groups. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 29 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

General Requirements 

Millsaps College will accept as members of its student body only young 
men and women who are well qualified to benefit from the kind of edu- 
cational experience and academic life offered by the college. All applicants 
for admission must furnish evidence of 

1. Good moral character 

2. Sound physical and mental health 

3. Adequate scholastic preparation 

4. Intellectual maturity 

Admission to Freshman Standing 

Application for admission to freshman standing may be made accord- 
ing to either of the following plans: 

1. By Certificate 

Graduates of an accredited high school or secondary school may 
be admitted to freshman standing on presentation of a certificate 
signed by the proper authorities of that school, showing the kind and 
amount of scholastic work done, provided that: 

(a) The student's record shows the satisfactory completion of at least 
fifteen acceptable units of secondary school work. 

(b) One-half of the units of secondary school work accepted for 
entrance must be in English, mathematics, and social studies or 
foreign language. These units should normally include three 
units of English, two units in mathematics, and at least two units 
of history, other social studies, or foreign language. 

(c) Final acceptance of the student is dependent upon the quality 
of his work in high school. Exceptions to this requirement of 
scholastic achievement will be made only upon evidence from 
scholastic aptitude tests administered at the college on designat- 
ed days. 

2. By Examination 

Students who have not regularly prepared for college in a 
recognized secondary school may apply for admission by making 
complete statement regarding qualifications and training. Such 
students may be regularly admitted if they qualify in a battery 
of achievement examinations given at the college under the di- 
rection of the Department of Education. These examinations are 
given on the scholastic work covered by the list of secondary 
units approved by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

College Entrance Board Examination certificates may be ac- 
cepted in place of high school certificates or examination by 
Millsaps College. 



30 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



Transfers 



Students intending to transfer to Millsaps should present themselves 
to the registrar September 8, and must have their transcript sent direct 
before that date to avoid payment of a fee for late registration. 

Sixty-four semester hours' maximum credit will be allowed on work 
done in state junior colleges approved by the State Junior College Com- 
mission. Full credit will be allowed for all academic courses of freshman 
and sophomore level. Other courses will be allowed full elective credit 
with the proviso that transfers may be called upon to do extra work neces- 
sary to fulfill Millsaps' requirements for majors, pre-professional work, 
and for high school professional licenses. 

Special Student 

For admission as a special student, the candidate must present ade- 
quate proof of good character and of maturity of training. Such 
students must in all cases meet the specific entrance requirements, as 
prescribed for the courses elected by them. But it is expressly ordered 
that no special student shall be recognized as a candidate for any de- 
gree from Millsaps unless he shall have completed all entrance require- 
ments at least one year before the date of graduation. 

DEFINITION OF UNIT 

The unit in the tabulation on the following page means a subject of 
study pursued in an academy or high school through a session of nine 
months with recitations five times a week, an average of forty-five min- 
utes being devoted to each recitation. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



31 



SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ADMISSION 



SUBJECTS 



English A 
English B 
English C 



Higher English Grammar 

Elements of Rhetoric and Composition 

English Literature 1% 



Mathematics A 
Mathematics B 
Mathematics C 
Mathematics D 
Mathematics E 
Mathematics F 
Mathematics G 



Algebra to Quadratic Equations 

Quadratics Through Progressions ^ to 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry 

Plane Trigonometry 

*Mechanical Drawing 

Advanced Arithmetic 



Latin A 
Latin B 
Latin C 
Latin D 



Grammar and Composition 

Caesar, four books or their equivalent 

fCicero, six orations 

tVergil, the first six books of the Aeneid 



Greek A 
Greek B 



Grammar and Composition -_ 

Xenophon, first four books of the Anabasis 



French A 



One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 pages of 
approved reading 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 pages of 
approved reading 



Spanish A 
Spanish B 



One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 pages of 
approved reading 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 pages of 
approved reading _ _ 



German A 
German B 



One-half Elementary Grammar and at least 175 pages of 
approved reading 

Elementary Grammar completed, and at least 175 pages of 
approved reading 



History A 

History B 

History C 

History D 



Ancient History 

Mediaeval and Modern History 

English History 

American History, or American History and 
Civil Government 



Science A 
Science B 
Science C 
Science D 
Science E 
Science F 
Science G 



Chemistry 

Physics 

Botany _ 

Zoology 
Physiography 
Physiology _ 
Agriculture 



Bible 

General Science __ 
Home Economics _ 

Economics 

Manual Training - 

Bookkeeping _ 

Stenography _ 

Typewriting _ 

Physical Training 



♦Conditioned on the presentation of an equal amount of geometry. 

fin place of a part of Cicero an equivalent of Sallust's Cataline, and in place of a part 
of Vergil an equivalent of Ovid will be accepted. 



32 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

COST OF ATTENDING MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

The cost for students living on the campus varies according to the 
dormitory accommodations. The cost for students living in the city, except 
books and laboratory fees, is as follows: 

Expenses Local Students 

Registration fee $ 25.00 

Library fee 6.00 

Physical education fee 9.00 

Student activities fee 6.00 

Bobashela fee 2.50 

Tuition — year in advance 125.00 

Due beginning first semester $173.50 

For those who find it more convenient to pay tuition by the semester, 
the following schedule of payments has been arranged. 

Fees $ 48.50 

Tuition — first semester 67.50 

Due beginning first semester 116.00 

Due beginning second semester 67.50 

Total for year $183.50 

Expenses — ^Boarding Students, add: 

Dormitory contingent fee $ 3.00 

Medical fee 2.00 

Room rent: 

For the Year By the semester 

Apartments — Woollard Hall $112.50 $56.25 

Rooms — Woollard Hall (Men) 30.00 15.00 

Founders Hall (Men) 30.00 17.50 

Burton Hall (Women) 75.00 40.00 

Galloway Hall (Women) 75.00 40.00 

♦Whitworth Hall (Women) 100.00 50.00 

(Corner Rooms) 125.00 62.50 

All corner rooms except in dormitories marked (*) will be charged 
for at $2.50 per semester more than stated above. 

CAFETERIA 

Boarding students secure their meals at the college cafeteria, which 

is located in Galloway Hall. The cafeteria is open to day students as well 

as those who live in the dormitories. This dining-room is under expert 

supervision and furnishes wholesome food at very moderate rates. The 

food is furnished practically at cost and there is ample variety from which 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 33 

to select. All students who room in the dormitories must take their meals 
in the college cafeteria and are required to buy a minimum of nine meal 
books per year at $15.00 each or a total of $135.00. The meal books are 
not transferable. 

SPECIAL FEES 

In addition to the above regular costs, students are charged certain 
fees for special services which are listed below. These fees apply only to 
those students registering for these particular courses: 

Science Pees 

Chemistry (except 31-32) $10.00 

Physics (except 31-32) 10.00 

Geology 3.00 

Biology (except 52) 10.00 

Astronomy 10.00 

Surveying 10.00 

Laboratory breakage deposit (per course) 2.00 

Education Fees 

Practice Teaching (Ed. 41-42) $10.00 

Observation (Ed. 101-102) 10.00 

Education 21 materials fee 1.50 

Psychology, all courses except 61-62, 91, 

and 101, materials fee 50 

Laboratory Fees 

Psychology 61-6 2 $10.00 

Typing, machine rented 5.00 

Typing, materials fee 1.00 

Late Registration 

Fee for late registration $1.50 

Fee for late payment of fees 1.50 

Graduation Fee 

Diploma, cap, gown, commencement expense $15.00 

Excess Hours 

The normal student load is five subjects with either physical edu- 
cation or extra-curricular activities making a maximum of seventeen 
hours. Students registering for courses in excess of seventeen hours will 
be charged $5.00 for each additional hour per semester. 



34 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MINISTERS' CHILDREN AND MINISTERIAL STUDENTS 

Sons and daughters of active or super-annuated Methodist ministers 
of the Mississippi Conferences will be allowed a reduction of one-half 
tuition on either the yearly or semester plan of payment. 

Students who have been licensed by the Methodist conferences of 
Mississippi to make preparation for service in the ministry will be charged 
tuition at the regular rate, but will be allowed to sign tuition notes which 
will be cancelled after four years' service in the ministry. Should the stu- 
dent renounce his pursuit of the ministry the tuition notes would become 
due and payable at once. 

PURPOSE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE 

The student activities fee of $6.00 paid by a student at the beginning 
of each year is distributed among different organizations existing on the 
campus. The distribution of this fee is at the suggestion of the Student 
Executive Board. 

The student activities fee is distributed among organizations such as 
the Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., The Student Association, Debate Clubs, 
Band, Glee Club, Dramatics, Purple & White, Bobashela, "M" Club, and 
The Woman's Association. That part of the fee assigned the Bobashela is 
in payment for the student year book. This enables all students pay- 
ing regular fees to secure a year book. The portion designated for 
The Purple & White gives each student a year's subscription to the 
college weekly paper. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FEE 

Establishment of a carefully planned and effectively administered 
physical education program has now been effected by the college. In re- 
turn for a physical education fee of $9.00 the student receives the ad- 
vantages afforded by the gymnasium's facilities as well as the supervision 
of a highly trained physical education instructor who will plan a com- 
plete program of intramural athletics. Each student will also receive 
locker and towel service without additional charge. 

REGULATIONS AS TO PAYMENTS 

All fees are due and payable at the opening of school. Tuition and 
room rent may be paid for the year in advance at a reduction or may be 
paid by the semester in advance. Board is strictly cash in advance and is 
taken care of by the use of $15.00 meal books purchased on the basis of 
a minimum of nine for nine months. 

No refund on fees will be made after 5 days from the opening of 
school. But if a student matriculates and for a good reason is not able to 
attend classes, all fees will be refunded except a matriculation fee of 
$10.00. In case of unavoidable withdrawal after classes have begun, if 
approved by the President and Bursar of the college, tuition and room 
rent will be charged only for the time actually spent in school at rate of 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 35 

one-eighth yearly rate for room and tuition for each month or fraction 
thereof spent in school. Except in case of such withdrawal from school, 
rooms will not be rented for less than one semester, and no refund will 
be made for dormitory rooms vacated in midst of semester. The student's 
withdrawal from the college will be counted as occurring on the day he 
presents to the business office a drop card secured from the Dean or 
Registrar's office. 

All accounts due for any preceding semester must be paid before a 
student will be enrolled for the next semester. The Registrar is not per- 
mitted to transfer credits until all outstanding indebtedness to the college 
is paid in the Bursar's office. 

No student shall be allowed to graduate unless he shall have settled 
with the Bursar's office all his indebtedness to the college including 
graduation fee of $15.00 one month before commencement. 



36 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Minimum Requirements for All Degrees : Sem. Hrs. 

English 11, 12 and 21, 22 12 

♦Foreign Language — 2 college years in one language 12 

History 11, 12 6 

Natural Science (Chem., Phys., Biol.) 6 

Religion 11, 12 6 

Mathematics 11, 12 (not required if Latin or Greek are 

taken for B. A.) 6 

Physical Education 2 

Comprehensive Examination in major subject, taken in the senior year. 

Additional Requirements for B. A.: 

Philosophy 6 

Elective (36 in a group of which 24 are in one subject) to total 128 

Additional Requirements for B. S.: 

Chemistry 21, 22 8 

Biology 11, 12 or 21, 22 6 

Physics 11, 12 6 

Electives (36 in a group of which 24 are in one subject) to total 128 
Eight of these elective hours may be gained by extra curricular activities. 

'These courses are on the college level. Prerequisite courses, such as high school entrance 
units or foreign language "A" courses must be completed before taking them. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



37 



SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF COURSES 



I 



B. A. DEGREE 

Freshmen: 

Eng. 11-12 6 hr. 

♦Math. 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Lang 6 hr. 

History 11-12 ] Elect 

Religion 11-12 i- two 6 hr. ea. 

Science J 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

♦Not required if Latin or Greek 
is taken for B.A. Degree. 



B.S. DEGREE 
Freshmen: 

Eng. 11-12 6 hr. 

Math. 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Lang 6 hr. 

Science 6 hr. 

History 11-12 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 



b 



Sophomores : 

Eng. 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Lang 6 hr. 

History, Religion, 

or Science 6 hr. 

Elective 12 hr. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Major Subject 
Elective 



Sophomores : 

Eng. 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Lang 6 hr. 

Science 6 hr. 

Religion 6 hr. 

Elective 6 hr. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Major Subject 
Elective 



PREMEDICAIi AND 
PRE-DENTAL 

Freshmen : 

Eng. 11-12 6 hr. 

Math. 11-12 6 hr. 

Fr. or Ger 6 hr. 

Biol. 21-22 

and 31-32 8 hr. 

Chem. 21-22 8 hr. 

Sophomore : 

Eng. 21-22 6 hr. 

Fr. or Ger 6 hr. 

History 6 hr. 

Organic Chem 10 hr. 

Physics 11-12 

and 21-22 8 hr. 

Or Biol. 41-42 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Major Subject 

Biology, Chemistry, or Physics 

Elective 



TECHNICIANS 

Freshmen : 

Eng. 11-12 6 hr. 

Math. 11-12 6 hr. 

Fr. or Ger 6 hr. 

Biol. 21-22 

and 31-32 8 hr. 

Chem. 21-22 8 hr. 

Sophomore: 

Eng. 21-22 6 hr. 

Fr. or Ger 6 hr. 

History 6 hr. 

Biol. 41-42 6 hr. 

Organic Chem 10 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 



Junior and Senior: 

Biology 51 or 62 6 hr. 

Biology Clinical Lab. 92 3 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Physics 11-12 6 hr. 

Chemistry Quant. 
Elective 



38 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



PRE-ENGINEERING 



Freshmen: 

Eng. 11-12 6 hr. 

Math. 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Lang 6 hr. 

History 6 hr. 

Religion 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 



Sophomore : 

Eng. 21-22 6 hr. 

Physics 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Lang 6 hr. 

Math 6 hr. 

Elective 6 hr. 



Junior and Senior 

Math 

Physics 

Astronomy 

Surveying 

Elective 



PRE-LAW B.A. 



Freshmen : 

Hrs 

English 11, 12 6 

Foreign Language 11, 12 6 

Math. 11, 12 6 

History 11, 12 6 

Religion 11, 12 6 

Physical Education 2 

32 
Suggestions: Extra-Curricular ac- 
tivity in debate and dramatics. 

Sophomore: 

English 21-22 6 

Foreign Language 21-22 6 

Chem. 21-22, or Biol. 11-12, 

or 21-22 8 (or 6) 

Economics 21-22 6 

Government 21-22 6 



32 



Junior: 

Philosophy 31-32 6 

Psychology 21-22 6 

Economics 31-32 6 

Government 31-32 6 

(Or Physics 11-12) ....Suggested 

History 21-22, or 61-62 6 

Economics 61-62 6 



36 



Senior: 

Economics 101-102 4 

Economics 41-42, or 51-52, 

or 71-72 6 

Social Science 31-32 6 

History 41-42, or 51-52 6 

English 81-82, or 71-72 6 

28 
TOTAL 128 



PRE-aUNISTERIAL B.A. 



Freshman Year: 

Hrs. 

English 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Foreign Language 11-12, 

or A1-A2 6 

Mathematics 11-12 (Other 
courses may be substituted 
for this if 6 hours of Latin or 
Greek is included in above) 6 

History 11-12 6 

Physical Education 2 

Typing 2 



Junior Year 

Hrs. 

Biology 21-22, or 11-12 6 

Sociology 31-32 6 

English Elective 6 

History or Social 

Science Elective 6 

Religion 21 and 32 or 41 6 

Elective 3 



33 



34 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 39 

PRE-MINISTERIAL B.A. — Continued 

Sophomore: Senior Year 

English 21-22 6 Philosophy 31-32 6 

Foreign Language 6 Religion 101 1 

Chemistry 21-22 8 Science other than biology 

Religion 102 1 and chemistry 6 

Psychology 21-22 6 English elective 6 

Religion 31 3 History-social science elective.... 6 

Economics 21-22 or Elective 6 



Government 21-22 6 

36 



31 



TEACHERS — B.A. OR B.S. 

Detailed Courses in Professional Training for a Teacher 
in the High School 

Psychology 11-12 6 semester hours 

Education 21-32 or 31-22 6 semester hours 

Any one or two of the following courses: 

Education 51, 52, 61, 62, 71, 72 3 or 6 semester hours 

Education 41 or 42 4 semester hours 



19 or 21 semester hours 

Detailed Courses for Preparation for a Teacher in the 
Elementary School 

Psychology 11-12 6 semester hours 

Psychology 31 3 semester hours 

Education 91, 92 6 semester hours 

Education 101 or 

Education 102 4 semester hours 

19 semester hours 
TEACHER PLACEMENT BUREAU 

A teacher placement bureau for teachers is maintained under the 
direction of the Department of Education. It seeks to further the inter- 
ests of teachers trained at Millsaps College and to be of service to school 
officials who wish to secure efficient teachers. 

DIVISIONAL GROUPINGS 
Courses are arranged in three groups as follows: 
Humanities — 

Languages, Fine Arts, Philosophy 
Natural Science — 

Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Geology, 

Astronomy. 
Social Science — 

Sociology, Government, History, Religion, Psychology, 

Economics, Education. 



40 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

EXTRA CURRICULAR CREDITS 

The following extra curricular activities to a maximum of eight se- 
mester hours may be included in the 128 semester hours required for 
graduation: 

Physical Training (Required) 2 

Physical Training (Elective) 6 

Purple & White Editor 4 

Purple & White Bus. Mgr. 4 

Purple & White Dept. Editors (four) 6 

Purple & White Reporters (four) 6 

Bobashela Editor 4 

Bobashela Business Manager 4 

Players 6 

Millsaps Singers 6 

Debate 6 

Typewriting 4 

(Only two semester hours may be earned in each per year, except to editor 
and business manager of the Purple & White and the Bobashela). 

MAJORS 

In addition to taking the prescribed work for the degree, the student 
must major in one of the following departments: 

Biology. — A student majoring in Biology may take any four or more 
courses offered in the department. 

Chemistry. — Required courses for a major in Chemistry are Chemistry 
21-22, 31-32, 41-42, 51-52, and 71-72. It is advised that Chemistry 61-62 
be taken in addition to the above. Majors are also advised to take both 
differential and integral calculus. 

Econoiuics. — An Economics major is required to take Economics 21-22, 
31-32, and at least sixteen additional semester hours in the department. 
Courses in shorthand and typewriting are not counted toward fulfillment 
of this requirement. 

English. — An English major is required to take English 11-12 and 
21-22. In addition the student must take twelve semester hours from the 
following group of courses: English 31-32, 41-42, 61-62, 71-72, 81-82, 
91-92, 101-102. 

French and Spanish. — For students majoring in either of these sub- 
jects no one course is required with more emphasis than the others. Such 
students are urged to take every course in their major subject which they 
can include in their schedules. 

History. — Any four courses in this department will be accepted for a 
major in History. 

Latin. — To major in Latin a student is required to take Latin 11-12, 
21-22, 31-32 or 41-42, 52, and either 61 or 62. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 41 

Mathematics. — For a major, Mathematics 11-12, 21-22, and 31 are 
required; nine semester hours selected from the other courses given in the 
department must also be taken. An additional six hours is strongly recom- 
mended. 

Music. — See listings under the School of Music. 

Physics and Astronomy. — Students majoring in these two subjects are 
required to take Physics 11-12 and Astronomy 11-12 and additional work 
in other courses to make a total of twenty-four hours. 

Psychology. — Students majoring in Psychology are required to earn a 
total of 24 hours in this field, including either 11-12, or 21-22. Courses 
in Zoology, Physics, and Statistics are strongly recommended for Psychol- 
ogy majors. 

Religion. — Majors in Religion are required to take Religion 31 and 41 
in addition to the course in Religion 11-12 which all students must take. 
Other courses are elective with the student, up to the required number. 
Ministerial students follow pre-theological course. 

MINORS 

In addition to the requirement that a student must take twenty-four 
semester hours in one subject, he will be required to take twelve addition- 
al hours within the same group of subjects. The dean may waive this re- 
quirement for any student. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

Before receiving a bachelor's degree the student must pass a satis- 
factory comprehensive examination in his major field of study. This 
examination is given in the senior year and is intended to cover subject 
matter greater in scope than a single course or series of courses. The pur- 
pose of the comprehensive examination is to coordinate the class work 
with independent reading and thinking in such a way as to relate the 
knowledge acquired and give the student a general understanding of the 
field which could not be acquired from individual courses. 

The major field must be chosen by the student at the opening of his 
junior year. The consent of the professor in charge is required before a 
student is allowed to major in a department. At least twenty-four semester 
hours' credit must be taken in the department in which the student is 
majoring. Juniors and seniors meet with their major professors for con- 
ferences at least once a week. The examination requires at least three 
hours and is both written and oral. 

The time of the comprehensive examinations is to be set each year 
by the faculty. 



42 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

If a student is absent twelve times in a three-hour course, or a 
proportionate number in a course giving other credit, then all credit in 
that course is lost and the entire course must be repeated. In case of 
loss of credit because of excessive absence, three quality points will be 
deducted from the total already earned. No class absences are excused. 

Absence from examinations will not be excused except for sickness on 
day of examination (attested by a physician's certificate), or other cause 
which the faculty by special order may approve. An unexcused absence 
is counted as a total failure in the examination in which it occurs. A stu- 
dent whose absence from examination is excused is admitted to a special 
examination ordered by the faculty. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

Attendance upon chapel is required of all students one day each week. 
All freshmen are required to attend chapel on one additional day during 
the first semester. 

REMEDIAL ENGLISH 

The English Department is offering a course in Remedial English for 
students above the freshman class who are deficient in English compo- 
sition. It seeks to determine each student's deficiencies and to overcome 
them by teaching the fundamental rules of grammar, spelling, punctuation, 
and sentence structure. It requires practice in corrective exercises and 
the writing of brief themes as a means of establishing habits of correct 
usage. Until the student has removed the deficiency in English his in- 
structor will give him a grade of c.c. (composition condition). No credit. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

All marks are made on a six-point letter scale. "A" represents superior 
work, largely of a creative nature and in addition to the regularly pre- 
scribed work of the class. "B" represents above the average achievement 
in the regularly prescribed work. "C" represents the average achievement 
of the class in the regularly prescribed work. "D" represents a level of 
achievement in the regularly prescribed work of the class below the aver- 
age in the same relationship as the grade of "B" is above the average. "E" 
represents a condition and may be changed to a "D" if the grade in the 
other semester of the course is "C" or above. "F" represents failure to 
do the regularly prescribed work of the class. All marks of "D" and above 
are passing marks and "F" represents failure. 

The following are semester unit courses. First semester grades cannot 
be averaged with those of the second. 

Biology 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, 71, 72, 82, 92. 

Economics 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, 71, 72, 91, 92. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 43 

Education, all courses. 

English 41, 42, 51, 52, 71, 72, 91, 92, 101, 102. 

Greek 11, 12. 

Latin 31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 61, 62. 

Mathematics, all courses. 

Physics 61, 62. 

Psychology, all courses. 

Religion, all courses. 

A student who makes a grade of "D" in a subject will be advanced in 
that subject, but a certain number of quality points is requisite for ad- 
vancement from one class to the next higher class. The student must have 
nine quality points to be classed as a sophomore, 36 to be classed as a 
junior, 72 to be classed as a senior, and 120 for graduation. The comple- 
tion of any college course with a grade of "C" for one semester shall en- 
title a student to one quality point for each semester hour, the completion 
of a course with a grade of "B" for the semester shall entitle a student 
to two quality points for each semester hour, and the completion of a 
course with the grade of "A" for the semester shall entitle a student to 
three quality points per semester hour. 

GRADES 

The grade of the student in any class, either for a semester or for the 
session, is determined by the combined class standing and the result of a 
written examination. The examination grade shall be counted as approxi- 
mately one-third of the grade for the semester. If the combined grade is 
below "D" the student is required to repeat the course, except in courses 
where the grades for the two semesters may be averaged. 

HOURS PERMITTED 

Fifteen academic semester hours is considered the normal load per 
semester. 

No student may take more than seventeen semester hours of academic 
work unless he has a quality index of 1.5 on the latest previous college 
term or semester. No student may take more than nineteen semester hours 
of academic work unless he has a quality point index of 2. on the latest 
previous college term or semester, and obtains permission from the Dean. 

Any student who is permitted to take more than seventeen semester 
hours of work will be required to pay at the rate of $5.00 for each 
additional semester hour over seventeen. 

HONORS 

In determining honors and high honors, and all other awards based 
on scholarship, a quality index is arrived at by dividing the number of 
quality points by the number of semester hours taken. 



44 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A student whose quality point index is 1.8 for his entire course shall 
be graduated with Honors; one whose quality point index is 2.7 and who 
has a rating of excellent on comprehensive examination shall be graduated 
with High Honors. 

To be eligible for "honors" or "high honors" a student must have 
passed at least sixty semester hours in Millsaps College. Honors or high 
honors may be refused a student who, in the judgment of the faculty, has 
forfeited his right. 

DEAN'S LIST 

I. Requirements: 

1. Scholastic: 

(a) The student must carry not less than four literary subjects 
during the semester on which the scholastic average is based; 

(b) A quality point average for the preceding semester of 2.00; 

(c) No mark lower than a D. 

2. Conduct: 

The student shall be in the judgment of the deans, a good citizen 
of the college community. 

II. Privileges: The student who qualifies under (I) shall not be subject 

to the college regulations governing class attendance. This shall not 
be construed to apply to chapel, to announced tests, laboratory exer- 
cises, absences immediately preceding and following holidays, and to 
freshman courses. 

III. Eligibility: Seniors and juniors who have been in residence at least 
one semester. Sophomores may have the privilege of this list during 
their second semester. 

CONDUCT 

The rules of the college require from every student decorous, sober, 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, wheth- 
er he be within its precincts or not. 

They require from the student regular and diligent application to his 
studies, and regular attendance upon chapel. 

Drinking, gambling, and dissoluteness are strictly forbidden, and any 
student found guilty of them is punished by suspension or expulsion. 

The keeping of firearms by the students is strictly forbidden. 

DELINQUENCY 

To remain in college a freshman must pass in the first semester at 
least two subjects and have a grade of "E" in a third. After the first half 
of the freshman year a student must pass at least three subjects a se- 
mester to continue in college. The respective deans may exercise their 
discretion in the enforcement of this regulation. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 45 

REPORTS 

Reports are sent at the close of each nine weeks to the parent or 
guardian of each student. These reports give the number of absences 
from lectures and indicate, as nearly as practicable, the nature of the 
progress made by him in his work at the college. 

WITHDRAWALS 

Voluntary withdrawals from the college require the consent of the 
faculty or president. 

Enforced withdrawal is inflicted by the faculty for habitual delin- 
quency in class, habitual idleness, or any other fault which prevents the 
student from fulfilling the purpose for which he should have come to 
college. 

The college reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student 
at any time. In such a case, the pro rata portion of room rent and tuition 
will be returned. 

REGISTRATION 

Applicants seeking admission to the college for the first time should 
present themselves to the registrar of the college promptly at 9:00 o'clock 
on the opening day. In each instance a certificate of good moral character, 
signed by the proper official of the institution attended during the pre- 
vious session, must be sent to the Registrar at least two weeks before the 
opening of the session. Each candidate who satisfies these requirements 
and those for admission by certificate or examination will be furnished 
with a card containing the courses offered. From these he must take the 
required courses and those electives which he proposes to pursue during 
the session. The card must then be carried to the bursar, who will, after 
the college fees have been paid to him, sign the card. Registration is in- 
complete unless the registration card is signed by both the registrar and 
the bursar. 

CHANGE OF REGISTRATION 

Students cannot change classes or drop classes or take up new classes 
except by the consent of the dean of the faculty and of all faculty mem- 
bers concerned. Courses dropped after the first nine weeks of a semester 
shall be recorded as failures. 



46 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

I. Department of Ancient Languages. 

II. Department of Biology. 

III. Department of Chemistry. 

IV. Department of Economics. 
V. Department of Education. 

VI. Department of English. 

VII. Department of Geology. 

VIII. Department of German. 

IX. Department of Government. 

X. Department of History. 

XI. Department of Mathematics. 

XII. Department of Philosophy. 

XIII. Department of Physical Education. 

XIV. Department of Physics and Astronomy. 
XV. Department of Psychology. 

XVI. Department of Religion. 

XVII. Department of Romance Languages. 

XVIII. Department of Sociology. 

XIX. School of Music. 

XX. Department of Art. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 47 

I. DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES 
PROFESSOR HAMILTON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR COULLET 

The ideas and culture of Greece and Rome live on today in their 
contributions to the culture of Western Civilization. Intimate contact with 
the very words which express the aspirations of those great spirits whose 
influence has been so abiding and formative in the modern world should 
help shape the student's character to fine and worthy purposes. Further- 
more, this undertaking affords a most rigorous exercise in the scientific 
method, producing habits and reflexes of accuracy, efficiency, and system. 

LATIN 

A-1, A-2. Elementary Latin.- — Designed for students who have under- 
taken no previous study of the language. Mastery of declensions and 
conjugations, of syntax and sentence structure; familiarity with the Latin 
thought order and the technique of translation. A large amount of easy 
reading is required. Vocabulary is enlarged and sight reading is practiced 
during the second semester. Six credits. Dr. Hamilton, Mrs. CouUet. 

B-1, B-2. Intermediate Latin.— Continual review of forms, syntax, and 
sentence structure, as well as their application. Enlargement of the 
vocabulary. Translation and sight reading of a large amount of elementary 
material. Completion of the equivalent of the reading embraced in the 
high school course. Six hours credit. Mrs. CouUet. 

11-12. Vergil. — Translation of part of the Aeneid. This course is for 
students who have had three years of high school Latin. Six hours 
credit. Mrs. Coullet, Dr. Hamilton. 

21. Horace, Odes and Epodes. — This course is designed to give the stu- 
dent an appreciation of the place occupied by the poet not only in 

his own environment and age but through the centuries, and to create 
an intelligent appreciation of his poetry. Three hours credit, first 
semester. Mrs. Coullet, Dr. Hamilton. 

22. Plaiitus. — The student is introduced to Roman comedy and its Greek 
background. Wide reading in this period of literature is required. 

Two plays of Plautus are read in the Latin and several in translation. 
Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. Hamilton. 

31. Roman Satire. — This course is based on Horace's Satires and the 
Cena Trimalchionis of Petronius. Given in alternate years. Three 

hours credit, first semester. Dr. Hamilton, Mrs. Coullet. 

32. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura. — The translation of this remarkable 
poem gives one an opportunity to see the accuracy of the insight of 

the ancients into things scientific as proved by modern development as 
well as acquaintance with the Epicurean philosophy. Given in alternate 
years. Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. Hamilton. 

41. Roman Drama. — History of the Roman Drama with extensive read- 
ing in Seneca, Plautus, and Terence. Given in alternate years. Three 
hours credit, first semester. Dr. Hamilton. 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

42. Elegaic Poetry. — Roman elegy is based on the Greek Elegists, but 
considerable originality is shown in the works of Catullus, Ovid, 
Propertius and Tibullus. Given in alternate years, second semester. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Hamilton. 

52. Classical Archaeology. — This course attempts to visualize ancient 
classical civilization and may be elected by those who are not taking 
formal courses in Latin and Greek translation. It consists of lectures and 
outside reading supplemented by lantern slides. Two hours credit, second 
semester. Dr. Hamilton. 

61. Roman Private Life. — A course of study designed to familiarize stu- 
dents with the every day life and habits of the Romans. Given in 

alternate years. Three hours credit, first semester. Mrs. Coullet. 

62. Mythology. — A study of the ancient myths of Greece and Rome and 
their influence on later literature. Given in alternate years. Three 

hours credit, second semester. Mrs. Coullet. 

81-82. Greek and Roman Literature. — The reading in English trans- 
lations of the great works of ancient literature. Three hours credit 
for each semester. Mrs. Coullet. 

GREEK 

A-1, A-2. Introduction to Greek. — Attention is paid to the thorough 
mastery of forms, vocabulary, and syntax, but emphasis is laid also 
upon the great contributions made by the Greeks to Western civilization 
in the fields of art, literature, and philosophy. The course may be counted 
as an elective, or it may be used to satisfy the entrance requirements in 
foreign languages. Six hours credit. Dr. Hamilton. 

11-12. Xenophon's Anabasis. — Two books of the Anabasis are covered 
during each semester. Selections from the Greek New Testament are 
sometimes read in this course. Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. 
Hamilton. 

21-22. Plato. — The Apology, Crito, Phaedo and parts of the Symposium 
and Xenophon's Memorabilia are covered in the two semesters. 
Dr. Hamilton. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 49 

II. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 
PROFESSOR RIECKEN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FINCHER 

11-12. A Survey of the Plant Kingdom. — Structure and physiology of 
seed plants, life cycles, and development of lower forms. The fun- 
damental principles underlying all life phenomena are stressed. Two 
recitations and one two-hour laboratory a week. Six hours credit. Dr. 
Riecken. 

21-22. A Survey of the Animal Kingdom. — Invertebrate and vertebrate 
animal structure and physiology. The fundamental principles of life 
phenomena are stressed. Two recitations and one two-hour laboratory a 
week. Six hours credit. Dr. Fincher. 

31-32. Vertebrate Anatomy. — For pre-medical students and biology ma- 
jors. This course must be taken with 21-22. Special emphasis on 
dissection of vertebrate forms. One two-hour laboratory a week. Two 
hours credit. Dr. Fincher. 

41. Elementary Bacteriology. — Preparation of media, culture methods, 
sterilization, isolation, staining, and identification of micro- 
organisms. Prerequisite: Biology 11-12 or 21-22. One lecture and one 
four-hour laboratory a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Riecken. 

42. Comparative Anatomy. — A comparative study of vertebrate struc- 
tures. Prerequisite: Biology 21-22. One lecture and one four-hour 

laboratory a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Fincher. 

51. Histology and Microtechnique. — Study and preparation of temporary 
and permanent microscopic sections of plant and animal tissues. 

Prerequisite: Biology 11-12 or 21-22. Given in alternate years. One lec- 
ture and one four-hour laboratory a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Fincher. 

52. Genetics. — Principles of inheritance in plants and animals. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 11-12 or 21-22. Given in alternate years. Three 

lectures a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Riecken. 

61. Embryology. — Development of vertebrates in embryo. One lecture 
and one four-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite: Biology 21-22 

and 42. Given in alternate years. Offered in 1943-44. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Fincher. 

62. Physiology. — Physiological processes of the cell and functions of 
the organs in vertebrates. Prerequisites: Biology 21-22. Given in 

alternate years. Offered in 1943-44. Two lectures and one laboratory 

a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Fincher. 

71-72. Special Problems. — Three hours credit for each. Dr. Riecken, Dr. 

Fincher. 
82. Taxonomy. — Laboratory and field classifications of plants with 

herbarium methods. Prerequisite: Biology 11. Dr. Riecken. 
92. Clinical Laboratory Technic. — Theory and practice for those who 

wish technicians training. It includes a study of blood, urine, milk, 
and water analysis and serology. Pre-requisite Biology 11 or 21 and 
preferably 41. Second semester. Three hours credit. Dr. Riecken. 



50 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

III. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR SULLIVAN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PRICE 

The work in this department includes one year of chemistry required 
of all candidates for the B. S. degree, in addition to courses open to ma- 
jors and other students who have completed Chemistry 21-22. 

21-22. Inorganic Chemistry. — A study of fundamental principles and 
laws, the occurrences, properties, preparation, and uses of the non- 
metallic elements and some of their compounds. Special attention will be 
given to valence and ionization theory. The work of the second semester 
includes a study of the metals with special reference to commercial uses 
and to qualitative analysis, and an elementary course in organic chem- 
istry. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory a week through both 
semesters. Eight hours credit. Dr. Sullivan, Dr. Price. 

31-32. Organic Chemistry. — The work of the first semester includes a 
study of the open chain compounds, methods of organic analysis, 
and determination of formula. The second semester is devoted to the 
study of the aromatic compounds with some attention given to physiologi- 
cal chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22. Three one-hour lectures 
each week through both semesters. Six hours credit. Dr. Sullivan. 

41-42. Qualitative Analysis. — The theory and practice of inorganic 
qualitative analysis accordiw^ to semi-micro methods. A careful study 
of such topics as: Mass action law, chemical equilibrium, solubility product 
principle, and modern theory of electrolytes. One lecture and four hours 
of laboratory each week through both semesters. Dr. Price. 

51-52. Experimental Organic Chemistry. — Arranged to accompany Chem- 
istry 31-3 2. Preparation and study of aliphatic and aromatic com- 
pounds with some attention directed to the identification of organic com- 
pounds. One four-hour laboratory period each week through both 
semesters. Four hours credit. Dr. Price. 

61-62. Physical Chemistry. — Atomic structure, gas laws, thermo- 
dynamics, thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, phase rule, electro 
and colloid chemistry. Two one-hour lectures and two hours of laboratory 
work each week through both semesters. Six hours credit. Dr. Price. 

71-72 Quantitative Analysis. — Theory and practice of quantitative 
analysis. Gravimetric and volumetric methods with unknowns in 
acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidation and reduction, iodimetry, and pre- 
cipitation methods. One lecture and four hours of laboratory each week 
through both semesters. Six hours credit. Under certain conditions three 
hours credit may be given for Chemistry 71 only. Dr. Price. 

81-82. Commercial Chemistry. — The work of the first semester includes 
analysis of water, and analysis of fuels including B. T. U. determina- 
tion. During the second semester the course will include the estimation 
of halogens and nitrogen in organic compounds, and analysis of cotton- 
seed products. The work of both semesters is subject to modification. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 51 

Four hours of laboratory work each week through both semesters. Four 
hours credit. Dr. Sullivan. 

91. Organic Qualitative Analysis. — A course in the identification of or- 
ganic compounds and mixtures or organic compounds. Laboratory 
period of four hours each week, and lecture one hour per week. Three 
hours credit. First semester. Dr. Price. 

102. Chemical Calculations and History of Chemistry. — Second semester, 
two lectures a week. Two hours credit. Dr. Price or Dr. Sullivan. 



52 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

IV. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

♦PROFESSOR WALLACE INSTRUCTOR HOLLOWAY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR WUBBELS 

21-22. Economic Principles and Problems. — This is the introductory 
course, designed to provide a general survey of the subject for those 
who take but one course in the field and to prepare others for advanced 
courses. Students will not be admitted to the second half without credit 
for the first, nor given credit for the first without the second. Throughout 
the year. Six hours credit. Mr. Wubbels. 

31-32. Introduction to Accounting. — A lecture and laboratory course 
suitable for both the general student of economics and business and 
the student who expects to do advanced work in accounting. Students 
will not be admitted to the second half without credit for the first, nor 
given credit for the first without the second. Required for a major in 
Economics. Throughout the year. Six hours credit. Mr. Wubbels. 

41. Personal Finance. — A non-technical course consisting of a study of 
the problems which every individual must face in managing his 

personal income: budgeting; record keeping; savings and investments; 
life insurance; home ownership; installment buying and other forms of 
consumer credit; sources of information and protection in connection with 
the selection and purchase of commodities. No prerequisite. First semester. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Wubbels. 

42. Economic Geography. — A survey course covering the distribution of 
basic resources throughout the world, with special attention to popu- 
lation, minerals, plants, animals, climate, physiography, international 
trade, and causes of international conflict. No prerequisite. Second 
semester. Three hours credit. Mr. Wubbels. 

51. Business Law. — This course is designed to acquaint students with 
the basic legal problems with which nearly every individual must at 

some time come in contact, to equip them to take elementary measures 
for protection of their legal rights in order to prevent litigation from 
arising, and to enable them to recognize situations in which the advice 
of an attorney is necessary. Topics covered include contracts, bailments, 
sales, and personal property. First semester. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Wubbels. 

52. Business Law. — A continuation of Economics 51. Topics covered in- 
clude agency, negotiable instruments, real property, partnerships, 

and corporations. Three hours credit. Mr. Wubbels. 

61. Money, Banking, and Credit. — A study of the financial organization 
of our economic system, with emphasis on the part played by com- 
mercial, investment, and consumer credit in the production as well as the 
exchange of goods. Prerequisite, Economics 21-22. Three hours credit. 
Mr. Wubbels. 

62. Business Finance. — A comparison of individual proprietorships, 
partnerships, and corporations, and of the different types of corpo- 



♦Absent on leave, 1942-43. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 53 

rate securities, with major emphasis on methods of providing fixed and 
working capital for promotion, operation, and expansion of corporations. 
Prerequisite, Economics 21-22. Three hours credit. Offered in alternate 
years. Mr. Wubbels. 

71. Mathematics of Finance. — Same as Mathematics 71. Mr. Van Hook. 

72. Statistics. — Same as Mathematics 7 2. Mr. Van Hook. 

81-82. Intermediate Accounting. — Advanced theory and practice applied 
to problems of asset valuation and other special accounting prob- 
lems. Prerequisite, Economics 31-32. Throughout the year. Six hours 
credit. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Wubbels. 

91. The Economics of War. — A study of some of the important economic 
problems faced by the government of a nation at war: expansion of 
production; control of labor; rationing of consumer goods; price con- 
trol; methods of financing the war effort. Prerequisite, Economics 21-22 
or consent of Instructor. Second semester. Three hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 

101-102. Advanced Economic Theory and History of Economic Thought. 

— A course designed particularly for seniors who are majoring in 
Economics. It deals particularly with the theories of value and distri- 
bution, tracing the development of these and other theories — through the 
writings of outstanding economists of modern times. Prerequisite, aver- 
age of B or better in Economics 21-22 or consent of instructor. Through- 
out the year. Four hours credit. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Wubbels. 

104. Industrial Management. — A course dealing with the general prin- 
ciples of management, problems of administration, interdepartment- 
al planning, personnel problems, purchasing and stores. Second semester. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Wubbels. 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

11-12. Beginning TjT)ewTltlng. — Development of basic techniques for 
control of the keyboard and machine parts. Some familiarity with 
office forms and office procedures is also acquired. Throughout the year. 
Laboratory and materials fee, $6.00 per semester. Two hours credit. 
Mrs. Holloway. 

21-22. Advanced Typewriting. — Continued development in office forms 
and office practice. Greater speed and accuracy in use of the key- 
board and machine parts are developed. Prerequisite, course 11-12 or its 
equivalent. Throughout the year. Laboratory and materials fee, $6.00 per 
semester. Two hours credit. 

31-32. Introduction to Shorthand. — The functional method is used in 
developing the fundamental principles of shorthand. Emphasis is 
placed at first on reading shorthand; dictation is introduced later, and 
both methods of learning are stressed. Prerequisite or corequisite, course 
11-12 or its equivalent. Students will not be admitted to the second half 
of the course without credit for the first, nor given credit for the first 



54 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

without the second. Throughout the year. Four hours credit. Mrs. 
HoUoway. 

41-42. Advanced Shorthand. — ^A "continuous review of the fundamental 
principles is provided, and a larger vocabulary and greater speed 
in dictation and transcription are acquired. Prerequisite, course 31-32 or 
its equivalent. Students will not be admitted to the second half of the 
course without credit for the first, nor given credit for the first without 
the second. Throughout the year. Four hours credit. Mrs. Holloway. 



V. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HAYNES 

The Department of Education welcomes capable students who contem- 
plate teaching. Those who do not intend to teach are advised not to at- 
tempt the technical courses in education. Students should consult the de- 
partment head before enrolling in any course. An attempt is made to 
furnish definite guidance to prospective teachers concerning the courses 
in education that will best prepare them for their work. 

Courses in education are not open to freshmen. Professional training 
is offered in both the secondary and elementary fields and is designed 
to meet all requirements for the Professional Certificates As and Ae. The 
courses offered in this department are approved by the State Department 
of Education. 

11. General Psychology. — An introduction to the basic principles of 
modern scientific psychology. Open to all students beyond the 

freshman year planning to enter any profession or life work dealing with 
people. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Mr. Haynes. 

12. Educational Psychology. — A study of the principles of psychology 
as applied to the methods and techniques in the professional edu- 
cation of teachers. Materials fee, fifty cents. Not open to freshmen. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. Mr. Haynes. 

21. General Methods of Teaching in High School. — This course is de- 
signed to introduce the student to the fundamental principles of 

learning and teaching. Prerequisite: Psychology 11-12. Three hours 
credit. First semester. Mr. Haynes. 

22. Educational and Psychological Measurements. — A study of the in- 
struments of measurement and their functions in teaching, social 

work, and the professions. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. Mr. Haynes. 

31. Psychology of Childhood. — A study of the psychological develop- 
ment of the child from infancy through later childhood. Pre- 
requisite, Psychology 11. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. 
First semester. Mr. Haynes. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 55 

41-42. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the High School. 

— This course consists of directed observation, discussion of obser- 
vation, planning and teaching. Prerequisite: "C" average and Education 
21 or 22, 31 or 32. Four hours credit for either semester. Mr. Haynes. 

51. Materials and Methods of Teaching English. — Three hours credit. 
First semester. Mrs. Goodman. 

52. Materials and Methods of Teaching Modem Languages. — Three 
hours credit. Second semester. Given in alternate years. Offered 

in 1943-44. Miss Craig. 

61. Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. — Three hours credit. First 
semester. Mrs. Coullet. 

62. Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathematics. — Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Dr. Mitchell. 

71. Materials and Methods of Teaching Science. — Three hours credit. 
First semester. Dr. Riecken. 

72. Materials and Methods of Teaching the Social Sciences. — Three 
hours credit. Second semester. Mr. Haynes. 

91. General Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School. — This 
course is designed to orient those students who are planning to teach 

in the elementary field to certain principles and problems of our elemen- 
tary schools. Prerequisite: Psychology 11-12. Three hours credit. First 
semester. Mr. Haynes. 

92. Special Methods of Teaching In the Elementary School. — This course 
includes study of the subject matter and methods of instruction in 

the elementary school. Prerequisite: Psychology 11-12. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Mr. Haynes. 

101-102. Directed Observation and Practice Teacliing in the Elementary 
School. — This course consists of directed observation, discussion of 
observation, planning and teaching. Prerequisite: "C" average and Edu- 
cation 91-92. Four hours credit for work through both semesters. Mr. 
Haynes. 



56 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

VI. DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR WHITE ASSISTANT PROFESSOR STONE 

INSTRUCTOR GOODMAN 

11. Composition (Group A). — The first semester is concentrated study 
of fundamentals of composition, weekly themes, and analysis of 

contemporary essays. Intensive reading and methods of study are stress- 
ed. Three hours credit, first semester. Mrs. Goodman. 

12. Composition (Group A). — The second semester is a continuation 
of the work of the first semester involving preparation of a term 

paper. Selections from literature are studied and analyzed. Three 
hours credit, second semester. Mi's. Goodman. 

11. Composition (Group B). — Review of grammar and the fundamentals 
of composition. Instruction in sentence and paragraph writing, 

in methods of research, in making of footnotes, outlines, and bibliogra- 
phies. Three hours credit, first semester. Mrs. Stone. 

12. Composition (Group B). — The second semester is given to a study 
of the larger units of composition and intensive reading and analy- 
sis of essays. Three hours credit, second semester. Mrs. Stone. 

21. English Literature (Group A). — A survey of English literature 
from the beginnings to the eighteenth century. The course at- 
tempts a study of the literature itself and of its historical development. 
For those majoring in English literature. Three hours credit, first 
semester. Dr. White. 

22. English Literature (Group A). — A continuation of the study of 
English literature from the eighteenth century through the nine- 
teenth. English 21 is a prerequisite to English 22. Three hours credit, 
second semester. Dr. White. 

21. English Literature (Group B). — A survey of English literature from 
the beginnings to the eighteenth century, with especial emphasis 

on major writers. Three hours credit, first semester. Mrs. Stone, Mrs. 
Goodman. 

22. English Literature (Group B). — A continuation of the survey of 
English literature from the beginning of the eighteenth century 

through the nineteenth century. Three hours credit, second semester. 
Mrs. Stone, Mrs. Goodman. 

31. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of Macbeth, Hamlet, and Henry 
IV, part one. Lectures on the plays. Careful attention to Shakes- 
pearean diction, constructions, and customs. Ten of Shakespeare's plays 
are required as parallel reading during the semester. Three hours credit, 
first semester. Dr. White. 

32. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of King Lear, Othello, and the 
Winter's Tale. A life of Shakespeare and ten more of his plays 

are required as parallel reading. Three hours credit, second semester. 
Dr. White. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 57 

41. English Romantic Poets. — A study of the poetry and the prose of 
the great Romantic poets. Extensive library readings and a term 

paper on a special topic are required. Three hours credit, first semester. 
Dr. White. 

42. Tennyson, BrowTiing, and Arnold. — A study of the poetry and prose 
of the great Victorian poets. Library readings and papers are 

required. Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. White. 

51. Journalism. — A fundamental course in news reporting, with prac- 
tice in writing various types of news stories. To be taken as the 

foundation for more advanced work in journalism. Three hours credit. 
Dr. White. 

52. Advanced Composition. — During the second semester the student 
will have much practice in the writing of feature stories, editorials, 

book reviews, familiar essays, and short stories. Three hours credit, 
second semester. Dr. White. 

61. The Writing of Verse. — The purpose of this course is to interpret 
the qualities of English poetry, its metric and stanzaic forms, and 

to guide the student in experimental writing of verse. Three hours 
credit, first semester. Dr. White. 

62. Recent Southern Fiction. — A reading course in twentieth century 
Southern fiction, with some study of types, movements, and authors. 

Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. White. 

71. A Survey of English Drama. — An account of the origin and develop- 
ment of English drama is attempted in lectures. Forty or more 

dramas are required for rapid reading or for study. These dramas are 
typical of all ages of English dramatic history from the earliest mystery 
plays to the drama of the twentieth century. Three hours credit, first 
semester. Dr. White. 

72. Modern Drama. — A study of contemporary British, American, and 
continental drama. Approximately fifty plays are assigned for 

reading. Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. White. 

81. American Literature. — A survey of American literature from the 
early seventeenth century through the nineteenth century. Historical 

background presented as an aid to the understanding of American in- 
tellectual development. Emphasis on major movements and major 
authors. Elective for all students. Three hours credit, first semester. 
Mrs. Stone. 

82. American Literature. — A survey of American literature in the 
twentieth century, with emphasis on developments and trends in 

the fields of poetry, prose fiction, and serious prose. Elective for all 
students. Three hours credit, second semester. Mrs. Stone. 

92. Introduction to Fiction. — Course planned to give students a compre- 
hensive background of the development of fiction in general and 
of English fiction in particular. Wide reading in the art, technique, 



58 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

and types of prose fiction required. Ten novels illustrating various types 
of fiction selected for intensiv^e study. Elective for all students. Three 
hours credit, second semester. Mrs. Goodman. 

101. Anglo-Saxon. — An elementary course in Anglo-Saxon language and 
literature. The study of Anglo-Saxon grammar is followed by 

easy readings in prose and poetry. Three hours credit, first semester. 
Dr. White. 

102. Chaucer. — An intensive reading and study of the best of the Canter- 
bury Tales and of Troilus and Creseide. Three hours credit, second 

semester. Dr. White. 

111-112. Literature of the Western World. — A chronological study of 
the literature of the Western World, by moods. Classicism, Ro- 
manticism, and Realism are considered in turn. Six hours. Dr. White. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 59 

VII. THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 
PROFESSOR SULLIVAN 

11. Lithologic and Dynamic Geology. — TMs course includes a study of 
minerals as well as the study of the mechanical and chemical effects 

of the atmosphere, water, heat, and life. Special attention will be given 
to such phases of the subject as the work of glaciers and volcanoes. Three 
hours credit. First semester. Dr. Sullivan. 

12. Historical Geologj'. — In addition to general historical geology, some 
attention will be given to economic products and to paleontology. 

Several geological expeditions, regularly made in the fall and spring to 
localities easily accessible to Jackson give the class a practical conception 
of this kind of surveying. The college is fortunate in being located in 
the midst of a region that is quite varied in geological character. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11. Three hours credit. Second semester. Dr. Sulli- 
van. 

21. Topography, Paleontologj-, and Geology of Mississippi. — This course 
will include a study of topographic maps and folios of the U. S. 

Geologic Survey; field observations, collection of fossils and correlation 
of horizons; special studies in Bulletins of the State Geological Survey 
and in the paleontology of Mississippi. Three hours credit. Prerequisite: 
Geology 11-12. First semester. Dr. Sullivan. 

22. History of Geology and Economic Geology. — In this course the stu- 
dent will be expected to make a systematic digest of material assign- 
ed for study. Three hours credit. Prerequisite: Geology 11-12. Second 
semester. Dr. Sullivan. 

31-32. Advanced General Geologj'. — This course includes field work and 
a study of special problems. Two hours credit for the first semester, 
with the second semester given only by special arrangement with the 
professor. Dr. Sullivan. 



60 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

VIII. DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 
PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

A-1, A-2. Beginner's German. — This course is designed to give begin- 
ners the fundamentals of grammar and syntax together with easy 
reading exercises. The course may be used as a junior or senior elective, 
or may be applied to entrance units in satisfaction of language require- 
ment. Several easy, short stories are read during the second semester. 
Dr. Hamilton. 

11-12. Intermediate German. — Review of grammar. The student is in- 
troduced to the great writers of German literature: Schiller, Freytag, 
and others. Six hours credit. Dr. Hamilton. 

21-22. Advanced German. — More difficult reading in the works of the 
authors of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is taken up in 
this course. One hour a week is devoted to military German. This course 
is sometimes omitted and one in scientific German is substituted. Six hours 
credit. Dr. Hamilton. 



IX. THE DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JONES 

21-22. Government of the United States. — The American federal system 
of government as it operates today, with emphasis upon historical 
development and current trends, as well as consideration of politico-eco- 
nomic implications. Selected cases in constitutional law. Three hours credit 
for each semester. Mr. Jones. Not offered in 1942-'43. 

31-32. Constitutional Interpretation. — American constitutional law and 
theory. Development of the federal constitution, particularly as this 
has been accomplished through United States Supreme Court decisions. 
Special attention is given to the commerce and due-process-of-law clauses, 
and to the nature of judicial power as conceived under the American sys- 
tem. Six hours credit for the year course. Mr. Jones. Not offered in 
1942-'43. 

42. The Crisis of Democracy. — Consideration of some of the major in- 
ternal and external problems which confront the democratic ap- 
proach in an era of war and technological change. Comparison of the 
democratic and totalitarian ideologies. Three hours credit, second semester. 
Mr. Jones. Not offered in 1942-'43. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 61 

X. THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

PROFESSOR EMERITUS LIN PROFESSOR MOORE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JONES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR DOOLEY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WHARTON 

History courses have been so planned that the student may follow the 
causal relationship in human development. Upon a thorough factual 
foundation, emphasis is placed on the progressive organization of social, 
intellectual, and moral ideals of peoples and nations. In the approach to 
an understanding of historical phenomena, literature, religion, racial fac- 
tors, economic conditions, and social institutions, as well as forms of 
government, will be considered. 

11-12. History of Europe. — An attempt is made to show that the prob- 
lems and ideals of modern nations have come to them out of the 
past. This is done in order that the student may intelligently approach 
the problems of modern life in both its national and international aspects. 
Three hours credit for each semester. Dr. Moore, Dr. Dooley. 

21-22. History of the United States. — A general course in American his- 
tory, covering the European background of colonial life, the Revo- 
lution, the constitution, and the new government in the first semester, 
while in the second semester, the course deals with the Civil War, Recon- 
struction, and the history of the United States to the present time. Three 
hours credit for each semester. Dr. Moore. 

41-42. The South. — Development of the southern region of the United 
States from the time of discovery to the present. The first semester 
takes the study through the Civil War, while the second semester con- 
siders the effects of the War and Reconstruction on the social, economic, 
and political structure of the South, and of the development of the region's 
current problems. Three hours credit for each semester. Dr. Dooley. 

51-52. Problems in Modem History. — The nature and impact of such 
present-day problems in international relations as Nationalism, Im- 
perialism, Militarism, and Propaganda. The second semester continues 
with a study of the causes of the World War of 1914 and a broad view 
of the history of Europe since 1914. Prerequisite: History 11-12. Three 
hours credit for each semester. Dr. Moore. 

61 '62. Recent American History. — A topical survey of American history 
in which emphasis is placed upon political, economic, and social 
problems. Special papers on recent American history will be required. 
Three hours credit for each semester. Dr. Moore. 

71-72. Hispanic America. — Consideration of both the Colonial era and 
the period of the Republics. A study of the political, social, and 
economic characteristics established by Spain in the New World, and of 
the wars for independence is made during the first semester. The second 
semester continues with a study of the development, culture, and re- 
sources of the Hispanic American nations. Special attention is given to 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

their relations with the United States. Three hours credit for each se- 
mester. Dr. Dooley. 

81-82. History of the American West. — This course examines the suc- 
cessive wests in American history beginning with the settlement of 
the first west on the colonial Atlantic seaboard and ending with the 
disappearance of the frontier in 1890; the significance of the westward 
movement in American history is emphasized. Three hours credit for 
each semester. Dr. Dooley. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 63 

XI. DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR MITCHELL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR VAN HOOK 

lla-12a. Intermediate Algebra and Mathematics of Business. — Systems 
of equations, progressions, logarithms, probability. Fundamental 
notions of business, interest, annuities, elementary statistics, with appli- 
cations. Six hours credit. Dr. Mitchell. 

11. College Algebra. — The notion of functional relation in two real 
variables; the equation; simultaneous linear, quadratic; deter- 
minants. Elementary series. Mathematical induction, the binomial 
theorem, complex numbers, theory of equations. Permutations, combi- 
nations, probability. First semester. Three hours credit. Dr. Mitchell, Mr. 
Van Hook. 

12. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. — Definition of the trigonometric 
functions, properties, graphs, relations, identities, equations. An- 
alysis. Solution of right and oblique triangles, logarithmic computation. 
Second semester. Three hours credit. Dr. Mitchell, Mr. Van Hook. 

21. Plane Analytical Geometry. — Rectangular and polar coordinate sys- 
tems. The straight line and the circle. The conic sections, trans- 
formations of coordinates. The general equation of the second degree. 
Loci and higher plane curves. Three hours credit. Offered both semesters. 
Mr. Van Hook. 

31. Differential Calculus. — The fundamental notions of limit, infini- 
tesimal, infinity, continuity. Differentiation of algebraic and the 

elementary transcendental functions. Applications. Differentials, mean 
value, series. Expansion of functions. Three hours credit. First semester. 
Mr. Van Hook. 

32. Integral Calculus. — Integration as an operation, integration as 
summation. The definite integral. Applications. Multiple integrals. 

Three hours credit. Second semester. Mr. Van Hook. 

41a-41b. Descriptive Geometry. — Solution of problems of points, lines, 
planes, and surfaces of single and double curvature. Problems in 
intersections and developments. The course is concluded with problems 
in graphic statics. Six hours credit. First and second semesters. Dr. 
Mitchell. 

42a-42b. — ^Mechanical Drawing. — Orthographic, auxiliary, isometric, and 
cabinet projections. Dimensioning. Developments. The course is 
concluded with airplane drafting. Six hours credit. First and second 
semesters. Dr. Mitchell. 

51. Mechanics. — Statics: problems of equilibrium of a particle and 
rigid body. Three hours credit, first semester. Dr. Mitchell. 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

52. Mechanics. — Dynamics of particle and rigid body. The gyroscope. 
Three hours credit, second semester. Dr. Mitchell. 

61. College Geometry. — Post-Euclid Euclidean Geometry: nomothetic 

figures, collinearity and concurrency. Geometry of the triangle and 

circle. Inversion, Duality. Three hours credit, first semester. Dr. Mitchell. 

71. Mathematics of Finance. — Interest and annuities. Applications to 
debts, bonds, capitalization, perpetuities. Elements of life insurance. 
Three hours credit, first semester. Dr. Mitchell. 

72-73. Business Statistics. — Tabulation and graphical representation of 
data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Time series. 
Indexes. Correlation. Forecasting. Six hours credit. Mr. Van Hook. 

81. Differential Equations. — A first course in differential equations of 
the first and second orders, with applications to geometry, physics, 

and mechanics. Three hours credit, first semester. Mr. Van Hook. 

82. Theory of Equations. — Irrational numbers. Constructions. Algebraic 
solutions of the cubic and the quartic equations. Symmetric functions 

of the roots. Three hours credit, second semester. Mr. Van Hook. 

111. Solid Geometry and Spherical Trigonometry. — Elements of spheri- 
cal geometry with applications to mensuration of solids, and air 
and marine navigation. Three semester hours. Second semester. Dr 
Mitchell. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 65 

XII. DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR EMERITUS LIN ACTING PROFESSOR BULLOCK 

PRESIDENT SMITH 

The courses in philosophy are designed to give an intelligent view of 
the human mind, and to indicate the conditions of all valid thought. 

In logic both deductive and inductive logic will be studied, but neither 
course will receive credit for graduation unless supplemented by the 
other course in this subject. In the Introduction to Philosophy attention 
will be given to types of philosophy which enter into modern thought. In 
the History of Philosophy a comprehensive view will be given of the re- 
sults obtained by the greatest thinkers who have attempted to frame a 
consistent theory of the material and the spiritual world. An attempt will 
be made to show that these have a consecutive connection in development. 
In ethics one course will consider ancient ethics, and a following course 
will be given in modern ethics. It is recommended that courses in logic 
be taken before other courses are attempted. 

Students who have studied physics and psychology will find those sub- 
jects helpful in the understanding of philosophy. 

11. Deductive Logic. — Three hours credit, first semester. Not offered in 
1942-43. 

12. Inductive Logic. — Three hours credit, second semester. Not offered 
in 1942-43. 

21. An Introduction to Philosophy, Types of Philosophy. — Three hours 
credit, first semester. Offered in 1942-41'.. Dr. Bullock. 

22. A continuation of Philosophy 31. — Not offered in 194 2-43. 

31. History of Philosophy. — An historical survey of the growth of 
philosophical thought in the ancient and medieval periods. Three 

hours credit, first semester. Not offered in 194 2-4 3. 

32. History of Philosophy. — A continuation of Philosophy 31. The his- 
tory of modern philosophy includes the development of thought from 

the Renaissance to our own times. Three hours credit, second semester. 
Not offered in 1942-43. 

41. The Nichomachean Ethics. — Three hours credit, first semester. Not 
offered in 1942-43. 



42. Modern Ethics. — Three hours credit, second semester. Offered in 
194 2-43. President Smith. 



k 



66 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XIII. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 

ATHLETICS 

DIRECTOR DAVE M. CARSON DIRECTOR FRANCES DECELL 

11-12. Physical Training for Men. — The requirements are designed to 
cover two hours each week for the entire school year. The course 
includes training in each of the seasonal sports in addition to several of 
the individual sports. It is the desire of the physical education depart- 
ment that every one possible enter the Intramural Program putting into 
play those things learned in the Physical Education Classes. Two hours 
credit for the year. Mr. Carson. 

21-22. Physical Fitness and Gymnastics. — This is a specialized class 
for those interested in more individual type of physical training. 
This course includes body development through calisthenics, boxing and 
wrestling, and gymnastics. Those desiring to enter the Armed forces 
should take this course. Every student of the physical education depart- 
ment is required to run the obstacle course at least one time each week. 
Two hours a week with two hours credit for the year. Mr. Carson. 

Open to Men and Women 
61-62. First Aid. — The American Red Cross Advanced course of First 
Aid will be taught. Class to meet twice each week with two hours credit 
for the semester. Mr. Carson. 

Open to "Women 
Group A. Required of all freshmen. — A general course including funda- 
mentals of golf, tennis, archery, tumbling, and selected team sports 
is offered the first semester. The student may specialize in any one of 
these, swimming or horse back riding, the second semester. Two hours 
credit. Mr. Carson. 

Group B. Correctives and Restrictives for Women. — Registration based 
on recommendation of the college physician. This course is designed 
for those who are physically unable to take any exercise, and those for 
whom a special type of exercise is recommended. Two hours credit. 
Mr. Carson. 

Group C To upperclassmen. — Classes are offered in golf, tennis, recre- 
ational sports, tumbling, swimming and horseback riding. First and 
second semesters. Two hours credit. Mr. Carson. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

XIV. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR HARRELL INSTRUCTOR GALLOWAY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PRICE ASSISTANT CHILDRESS 

Physics 
11-12. General Physics. — An elementary treatment of Mechanics, Heat, 
Sound, Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. Prerequisite: Trigo- 
nometry. Two lectures and one laboratory period. Six hours credit. 
(Physics 11 and 12 may be taken during the same semester if desired). 
Mr. Galloway, Dr. Price. 

21-22. Preprofessional Physics. — A laboratory course designed, in con- 
junction with Physics 11-12, to meet the needs of those students who 
expect to enter professional schools where eight semester hours of physics 
are required for admission. One laboratory period. Two hours credit. Mr. 
Galloway, Mr. Childress. 

31-32. Intermediate General Physics. — An advanced course dealing with 
the properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, elec- 
tricity, and light. Three lecture periods. Six hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

41. Mechanics and Heat. — A further study of mechanics and heat with 
special attention given to thermodynamics, calorimetry, and the 

kinetic theory of gases. The laboratory work will be devoted, in part, to 
the determination of the fuel value of different fuels. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods. Thrfee hours credit. Mr. Harrell. 

42. Light. — This course treats of the principles and laws of reflection, 
refraction, interference, polarization, and color phenomena. One 

lecture and two laboratory periods. Three hours credit. Mr. Harrell. 

51-52. Electricity. — A study of electrical measuring instruments and 
their use in actual measurements, power stations and the distri- 
bution of power, lighting, heating, and communication. One lecture and 

two laboratory periods. Six hours credit. Mr. Harrell. 

61-62. Special Problems. — A laboratory course designed to give the stu- 
dent opportunity to do work on problems in which he has developed 

a special interest. Six hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

71. Meteorology. — Two lectures and one laboratory period. Three hours 
credit. Mr. Harrell. 

Astronomy 
11-12. General Astronomy. — This course will be devoted to a study of 
the earth, the moon, time, the constellations, the solar system, the 
planets, comets, meteors, the sun, the development of the solar system, 
and the siderial universe. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. Two lectures and 
one observatory period. Six hours credit. Mr. Harrell. 
21-22. Practical Astronomy and Navigation. — This course covers the 
subject of spherical astronomy and the theory of astronomical instru- 
ments with exercises in making and reducing observations. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Six hours credit. Mr. Harrell. 
31-32. Surveying. — This course involves the general principles of sur- 
veying with particular attention to the method of the Coast and 
Geodetic Survey. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. One lecture and one double 
laboratory period. Six hours credit. Mr. Harrell. 



6S MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XV. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

PROFESSOR MUSGRAVE ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HAYNES 

11-12. Psychology For Students of Education. — An introduction to 
psychology, and the application of its methods and principles to edu- 
cation and the work of the teacher. Materials fee, one dollar. Not open 
to freshmen. Six hours credit. See Education 11-12. Throughout the 
year. Dr. Musgrave. 

21-22. Psychology and Modern Living. — An introduction to psychology, 
followed by a study of its applications to problems of modern living. 
This course is planned for students expecting to enter professions other 
than teaching; teacher training students should elect Psychology 11-12. 
Materials fee, one dollar. Not open to freshmen. Six hours credit. Through- 
out the year. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 1943-'44. 

31. Psychology of Childhood. — A study of psychological development 
from infancy through later childhood. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12 

or 21-22. Materials fee, fifty cents. Given in alternate years. Offered in 
1943-'44. Three hours credit. First semester. Mr. Haynes. See also 
Education 31. 

32. Psychology of Adolescence. — A study of psychological development 
during the adolescent years, with emphasis on principles of counsel- 
ing the adolescent. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12 or 21-22. Materials fee, 
fifty cents. Given in alternate years. Not. offered in 1943-'44. Three hours 
credit. Second semester. Dr. Musgrave. 

41. Social Psychology. — A study of the behaviors of individuals in multi- 
individual situations and relationships, including the crowd, the 

audience, fads and fashions, and institutions. Prerequisite, Psychology 
11-12 or 21-22. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. First se- 
mester. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 1943-'44. 

42. Psychology of Adjustment. — A study of the development of person- 
ality, with emphasis on principles of sound mental health. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12 or 21-22. Materials fee, fifty cents. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 1943-'44. 

52. Vocational Psychology. — A study of the factors which influence 
choice of occupation, and problems of adjustment to the working 
world. Planned especially for students seeking to orient themselves occu- 
pationally. No prerequisite and open to freshmen. Given in alter- 
nate years. Not offered in 19 4 3-' 44. Three hours credit. Second semester. 
Dr. Musgrave. 

61. Experimental Psychology. — An introductory course in the methods 
and techniques of psychological experimentation and measurement. 
May be taken concurrently with Psychology 11 or 21. Laboratory fee. 
$5.0 0. Two hours credit. Second semester. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 
1943-'44. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 69 

62. The Psychological Clinic. — A study of the diagnostic and remedial 
methods commonly employed in psychological clinics. Each stu- 
dent will have opportunity to administer some of the more widely used 
psychological tests and examinations. Prerequisites, Psychology 11-12 or 
21-22, and permission of the instructor. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Three 
hours credit. First semester. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 1943-'44. 

72. Personnel Administration. — A study of the problems, methods and 
techniques of personnel administration in modern business and 
industrial organizations. Special attention is given to problems of se- 
lection and training of workers, and maintaining harmonious human re- 
lationships within the organization. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three 
hours credit. Second semester. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 1943-'44. 

101. The Family. — A study of the development of the family as an insti- 
tution, of relationships within the family group, and of the place 
of the family in the larger society. Open to juniors and seniors, with the 
permission of the chairman. Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1943- 
'44. Two hours credit. First semester. Dr. Musgrave, chairman. 

111-112. Special Problems. — Open only to advanced students qualified to 
do independent study and research under the guidance and super- 
vision of the instructor. Prerequisites, at least nine hours of psychology 
and permission of the instructor. Two to six hours credit. Either or both 
semesters. Dr. Musgrave. Not offered in 1943-'44. 

22. Educational and Psycliological Measurements. — A study of measure- 
ments of human behavior and their application in teaching social 
work and the professions. Materials fee, fifty cents. Three hours credit. 
Second semester. Mr. Haynes. 



70 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XVI. DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

THE TATUM FOUNDATION 

PROFESSOR BULLOCK PRESIDENT SMITH 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR THOMAS 

The courses in this department are offered for the contribution they 
raalte to Christian living and genuine culture, rather than for any special 
professional interest such as the ministry or other Christian life-service. 
These special interests are not neglected, but the department seeks pri- 
marily to meet the urgent need of the Church for an effective leadership 
among its lay members. It is hoped that many students will avail them- 
selves of these courses. 

Some Millsaps students, under the direction of the Department of 
Religion and the Methodist Board of Education, teach Short Term Train- 
ing Courses in the Mississippi Methodist conferences during the summer. 
This department gladly cooperates in preparing students for this import- 
ant service to the Church. 

Religion 11 and 12, providing an introduction to the Bible and some 
insight into the meaning of the Christian religion, is required of all 
students in either the freshman or the sophomore year. Other than Re- 
ligion 11 and 12, both of which must be taken, any single semester 
course may be taken. Prerequisites for any given course may be waived 
under special circumstances upon the consent of the professor. 

Majors should plan their courses of study in cooperation with the pro- 
fessor of religion. It is the growing sentiment among the leaders of the 
Church that students preparing for the ministry should seek to build 
a broad cultural foundation for their professional training in a school of 
theology. All ministerial students should plan their courses in accord- 
ance with the pre-theological curriculum available upon application to 
the Department of Religion. 

11. Introductory Bible. — An introduction to the necessary background 
for the study and appreciation of the Bible, and a study of the 

religious development and contribution of the Hebrews as revealed in 
the Old Testament. Three hours credit, first semester. Dr. Bullock, Miss 
Thomas. 

12. Introductory Bible. — An introduction to the necessary background 
for the study and appreciation of the New Testament, and a study 

of the New Testament with a view to achieving some insight into the 
meaning of the Christian religion. Three hours credit, second semester. 
Dr. Bullock, Miss Thomas. 

21. The Life and Teaching of Jesus. — This is a study of the Gospels, 
emphasizing the teachings of Jesus and their application to problems 
of the individual and society today. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 12. 
Three hours credit, first semester. Dr. Bullock. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 71 

22. The Bible as Literature. — An appreciative study of Biblical prose 
and poetry, stressing literary form and values, and the influence of 
Biblical writings upon English literature. This course is intended to pro- 
vide integration with the Division of Humanities, and is suggested as 
an elective for majors in that Division. Three hours credit, second se- 
mester. Not offered in 1943-'44. Miss Thomas. 

31. Church and Society. — A study of the meaning, purpose, and pro- 
gram of the Christian religion, planned to give a grasp of the place 

of the Church in the social order, and of the basic principles of Christian 
education. This course is intended to provide integration with the Di- 
vision of Social Sciences, and is suggested as an elective for majors in 
that Division. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 12. Three hours credit, first 
semester. Miss Thomas. 

32. Methods of Christian Education. — A study of methods of Christian 
character education, including the use of materials and agencies 

contributing to the achievement of dependable Christian behavior. Pre- 
requisite or concurrent, Religion 31. Not offered in 1943-44. Three hours 
credit. First semester. Miss Thomas. 

41. Organization of Christian Education. — A study of the organization 
and administration of the local church educational program. Pre- 
requisite or concurrent. Religion 31. Offered in 1943-'44. Three hours 
credit. First semester. Miss Thomas. 

42. Teacliing in Training Scliools. — This course prepares students to 
teach one of the training courses of the Methodist Church. A study 

is made of the principles and methods of teaching. The course planned for 
teaching is developed, and an opportunity is given to teach the course 
under supervision. Open to juniors and seniors. Not offered in 194 3-'4 4. 
Three hours credit. Second semester. Miss Thomas. 

51. Christianity and Science. — A course designed to assist the student 
in working out a philosophy of life, with special attention to the 

relationships of Christianity and science. The course is intended to pro- 
vide integration with the Division of Natural Sciences, and is suggested as 
an elective for majors in that Division. Prerequisite (concurrent for up- 
perclassmen). Religion 11, 12. Not offered in 1943-'44. Three hours 
credit. First semester. Dr. Bullock. 

52. History of Christianity. — A survey of the development of the 
Christian movement from Jesus to the present time, including a 

study of the rise of the principal denominations and a brief study of 
contemporary trends. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 12. Offered in 
1943-'4 4. Three hours credit. First semester. Miss Thomas. 

61. Comparative Religion. — An introductory study of the origin and 
development of religion, and a study of the great living religions of 
the world. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 12. Not offered in 1943-'44. 
Three hours credit. First semester. President Smith. 



72 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

62. Methodism. — A study of the origin, meaning, and historical develop- 
ment of Methodism, leading up to study of the present organization 
and message of Methodism in America. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 
12. Not offered in 1943-'44. Three hours credit. Second semester. Dr. 
Bullock. 

82. The Art of Christian Living. — This course is intended to offer defi- 
nite help in the methods by which the teachings of Jesus may be 
realized in one's own life. Prerequisite, Religion 11 and 12. Not offered 
in 1943-'44. Three hours credit. Second semester. Dr. Bullock. 

101. Seminar. — A course to guide the student in extensive readings in 
the general field of religion, to help him achieve a unified grasp of 

his knowledge and to assist him in seeing religious knowledge in the 
matrix of our total human culture. Required in the senior year of stu- 
dents majoring in the department. One hour credit. First semester. Dr. 
Bullock. 

102. The Christian Ministry. — An introduction to the Christian ministry, 
including a study of preaching and pastoral work. Required of 

ministerial students in their sophomore year, or in the case of transfer 
students in the first year of residence. One hour credit. Second semester. 
Dr. Bullock. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 73 

XVII DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

PROFESSOR SANDERS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CRAIG 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR COBB 

This department offers courses in French and Spanish. The regular 
work begins with course 11, but for the benefit of those who have not 
been able to fulfill the entrance requirements in this subject before enter- 
ing college, a preparatory course (course A) is offered. This course 
(when taken under the supervision of the college and not counted as 
an entrance unit) may be used as a junior or senior elective. For entrance, 
course A will count as two units provided the student makes a grade 
of not less than C. 

In the B. S. course twelve hours of French, German, or Spanish above 
the elementary course are required. 

A student is not permitted to enter courses 11 and 12 in French and 
Spanish until both semesters of the A course have been satisfactorily 
completed. Likewise a student will not be admitted to courses 21 and 
22 in French and Spanish until 11 and 12 have been completed. 

Under no condition will a student be permitted to begin French and 
Spanish the same year. 

A student should consult the professors in charge before planning to 
take more than two modern languages. Any course not already counted 
may be used as a junior or senior elective. 

FRENCH 

A-1, A-2. Elementary French. — An elementary course in which special 
attention is given to pronunciation. Three hours credit for each 
semester. Miss Craig. 

11-12. Intermediate French. — The methods of French A-1 and A-2 will 
be continued according to the needs and aptitudes of the class. A 
review of grammar will be used as a text for the study of grammar and 
composition. The semester will be devoted to the careful reading of 
texts from nineteenth century prose. Special attention will be paid to the 
irregular verbs, idioms, and pronunciation. Prerequisite: French A-1 and 
A-2. Three hours credit for each semester. IMiss Craig. 

21-22. Survey of French Literature. — An anthology is used which con- 
tains selections illustrating the development of the literature from 
its beginnings to the present time. An outline history of French literature 
is also used. Three hours credit for each semester. Mr. Sanders, Miss 
Craig. 

31. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. — A more intensive 
study of French literature of the eighteenth century than is offer- 
ed in French 22. Three hours credit, first semester. Mr. Sanders. 



74 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

32. French Romanticism. — Chateaubriand, Hugo, and the French lyric 
poets of the nineteenth century. Three hours credit, second se- 
mester. Mr. Sanders. 

41, French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. — Three hours credit, 
first semester. Mr. Sanders. 

42. Composition and ConTersation. — Three hours credit, second se- 
mester. Mr. Sanders. 

SPANISH 

The requirements for admission and for graduation in Spanish are 
the same as those in French. Two entrance units in Spanish will be re- 
quired for admission to course 11. 

A-1, A-2. Elementary Spanish. — An elementary course in grammar and 
reading with constant oral practice. Three hours credit for each 
semester. Mrs. Cobb. 

11-12. Intermediate Spanish. — This course is devoted to the reading of 
modern Spanish prose. A Spanish review grammar is used, and 
special attention is paid to the irregular verbs and to idioms. Practice 
is given in reading Spanish at sight. Prerequisites Spanish A-1 and A-2. 
Three hours credit for each semester. Mr. Sanders, Mrs. Cobb. 

21-22. Survey of Spanish Literature. — An anthology is used which con- 
tains selections from some of the most important authors of the 
Renaissance and Golden Age periods. In the second semester an anthology 
is read which contains selections from recent and contemporary authors. 
An outline history of Spanish literature is used. Three hours credit for 
each semester. Mr. Sanders. 

31. Recent and Contemporary Spanish Dramatists. — Three hours credit, 

first semester. Mr. Sanders. 

32. Golden Age Dramatists. — Part of the semester is devoted to a 
survey of Spanish lyric poetry. Three hours credit, second semester. 

Mr. Sanders. 

41. Spanish Romanticism. — Espronceda and Becquer. Three hours 
credit, first semester. Mr. Sanders. 

42. Composition and Conversation. — Three hours credit, second se- 
mester. Mr. Sanders. 

61-62. Survey of Spanish-American Literature. — A brief outline of the 
literature of the Spanish-American countries with some attention 
to historical and cultural backgrounds. Colonial and revolutionary peri- 
ods. In the second semester, Spanish-American literature from the first 
third of the nineteenth century on, with special emphasis on the 
Modernista Movement. Three hours credit for each semester. Mrs. Cobb. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 75 

XVIII. DEPARTMENT OP SOCIOLOGY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WHARTON ASST. PROFESSOR DOOLEY 

THe aim of this department is to do well a small amount of work 
rather than to cover a large field. While the courses offered are elemen- 
tarj' in their scope and nature, they will serve as a sound basis for further 
study in the field, and will be useful to those who seek to understand 
and improve our social life and institutions. 

31. Principles of Sociology. — A study of the factors and principles in- 
fluencing the social life of man and governing the social environ- 
ment in which he lives. Prerequisite: junior standing. Three hours credit, 
first semester. Dr. Dooley. 

32. Social Problems. — A survey of social problems and their adjustment 
in modern society. Emphasis is placed on problems of population, 

distribution of wealth and income, race relations, the family, crime, 
health, social control, and democracy. Prerequisite: Sociology 31. Three 
hours credit, second semester. Dr. Dooley. 

61. Rural Sociologj-. — A study of rural society and its problems. Special 
attention is given to the effects of a changing social and economic 

order on the rural family, church, and school. Not offered in 1943-'44. 
Three hours credit, first semester. Dr. Wharton. 

62. Public Welfare Administratioii. — A study of recent developments 
in planning, financing, and organizing local, state, and national 

programs for public welfare. Not offered in 1943-'44. Three hours credit, 
second semester. Dr. Wharton. 



76 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XIX. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Organization 

The School of Music is a distinct school within Millsaps College, 
subject to the general regulations governing the various departments. 
It makes and administers its own rules with reference to admission and 
graduation. 

Officers of the Faculty 

DR. M. L. SMITH President 

DR. W. E. RIECKEN Dean 

MRS. EVA MYERS ROBERTS ...Director 

MISS FRANCES GILL Secretary 

Faculty 

EVA MYERS ROBERTS 
Professor of Piano, Theory, and Composition 

ALVIN J. KING 
Chorus Director 

ARMAND COULLET 
Professor of Violin and Theory 

MAGNOLIA COULLET 
Professor of Voice and Theory 

SIBYL McDonald 

Professor of Public School Music and Theory 

ALBERTA TAYLOR 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

WIRT TURNER HARVEY 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

FRANCES GILL 
Assistant Instructor in Piano and Theory 

EVA MYERS ROBERTS, A.B., Mus.M. 
Professor of Piano 

A.B., Whitworth College; diploma in piano, Whitworth College; 
B.Mus., American Conservatory of Chicago; Mus.M., Chicago Musical 
College; piano with Silvio Scionti, advanced composition and orchestra- 
tion with Leo Sowerby, criticism and aesthetics, seminar and thesis with 
Carlton Hackett, repertoire in the master classes of Josef Lhevinne, 
special work with Madame Fannie Bloomfield-Ziesler pupil of Leschetizky, 
special work in piano literature with Mabel Osmer, class piano with 
Gail Martin Haake and Musical Training for Children with Louise Robyn; 
Sherwood Music School of Chicago: piano with George Kober, compo- 
sition with Walter Keller; advanced composition with Gustave Dunkel- 
berger, repertoire and ensemble with Percy Grainger. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

ARMAND COULLET, B.Mus. 

Professor of Violin 

Conductor of Symphony Orchestra 

Premier Prix (B.Mus.) in Violin, Harmony, and Conducting. Con- 
servatoire d'Alger (North Africa); Violin with Jules Sauvageot, Concert 
Master and Conductor, Algiers Municipal Opera House, and with Auguste 
Tessier of the Geneva Conservatory; conducting and orchestration under 
Camille Saint-Saens. First violin, Societe des Concerts Symphoniques 
under Saint Saens for two years; concert master and first violin in sym- 
phony orchestras in Paris, Marseilles, Algiers, Seville, and Casablanca. 
Private teacher in New York and Palm Beach, four years. 

MAGNOLIA COULLET, A.B., A.M., B.Mus. 
Professor of Voice 

A.B., Millsaps College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; B.Mus., 
Belhaven College; private instructor in voice, three years; concert and 
oratorio; graduate work, Conservatoire de Bordeaux with Mme. Bonnet- 
Baron of the Paris opera. 

SIBYL McDonald, b.mus. 

Professor of Public School Music and Theory 

B.Mus., American Conservatory, piano with Silvio Scionti and Edgar 
Brozelton; theory with Olaf Anderson; public school music with O. E. 
Robinson; organ with Mrs. Sarah Beals and Hugh Porter; master classes 
with Josef Lhevinne and Percy Grainger. 

ALBERTA TAYLOR, A.B. 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College; B.Mus. requisites, Millsaps College; American 
Conservatory: piano with Silvio Scionti, the Oxford Class-Piano course 
with Gail Martin Haake, Robyn System of Musical Training for the Child 
given by Louise Robyn; Chicago Musical College: piano with Silvio 
Scionti, master class work with Silvio Scionti and Rudolph Ganz, public 
school music and child-training courses with Frances Frothingham. 

WIRT TURNER HARVEY, A.B., M.M. 
Instructor in Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College; B.Mus. requisites, Millsaps College; M.M., 
Chicago Musical College: piano and conducting with Rudolph Ganz, 
musicology with Rosenwald, advanced composition and orchestration with 
John Wald, string ensemble with Sametini, special repertoire and master 
class work with Harold Bauer, Silvio Scionti, and Percy Grainger. 



78 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

FRANCES GILL, A.B. 
Assistant Instructor in Piano and Theory 

A.B., Millsaps College; B.Mus. requisites, Millsaps College; special 
work with Silvio Scionti; graduate work, Chicago Musical College with 
Rudolph Ganz. 

Requirements for Entrance 

The requirements for entrance and for graduation in the Millsaps 
School of Music are in accordance with the published regulations of the 
National Association of Schools of Music. 

The curricula of the School of Music are divided into three classi- 
fications, as follows: Preparatory, Intermediate, College. There are 
no requirements for admission to the preparatory department. Students 
are promoted to the intermediate division upon completion of the work 
of the preparatory department. 

Candidates for a certificate, diploma, or degree must meet the regular 
college entrance requirements as stated elsewhere in this catalog. 

Students may also be admitted to advanced standing on the presen- 
tation of a satisfactory transcript of record of work pursued in an ac- 
credited music school of college grade. 

A maximum of thirty semester hours of credit may be secured through 
examinations by students who have had work subsequent to high school 
graduation under competent private instructors. Examinations for ad- 
vanced standing must be taken within six weeks of the student's regis- 
tration. 

Special students are admitted without reference to entrance require- 
ments, but no credit toward a degree is allowed such students. Special 
students who can satisfy entrance requirements, however, and who desire 
credit for such work as they may take are subject to the same exami- 
nations and regulations as full course students. All credits earned are 
entered on the school records and may be used toward credentials at a 
later time, should the students eventually become candidates for gradu- 
ation. 



Requirements for Graduation 

No student will be granted a certificate or degree unless the residence 
requirement has been met. Residence may be established by a year of 
study (minimum of thirty-six weeks) in which at least twenty-four 
semester hours have been earned toward the last thirty hours for a 
degree. A six-weeks' summer session may be accepted as the equivalent 
of a quarter of a year, provided the student earns six semester hours 
during that period. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

A maximum of forty-two semester hours in the School of Music may 
be credited toward the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. 

The applicant for a Certificate in Piano must complete the four years 
of the course in piano and the first two years in the theory outlined in 
the curriculum for the Bachelor of Music Degree with a Major in Piano 
(not including the Liberal Arts courses), plus the Counterpoint required 
in the junior year of that curriculum. For final examinations candidates 
for this certificate are required to play a prelude and a fugue from the 
Well-Tempered Clavichord by Bach, a Sonata of Beethoven equivalent in 
difficulty to Op. 26 or Op. 31, No. 2, and two compositions by romantic 
or standard modern composers. 

The applicant for the Diploma in Piano must complete the four years 
of the course in piano and the first three years in the theory outlined 
in the curriculum for the Bachelor of Music Degree with a Major in 
piano, plus the Liberal Arts degree. Candidates for this diploma must 
be prepared to perform a program consisting of a prelude and fugue by 
Bach, a sonata of the more advanced type by either Beethoven, Schumann, 
or Chopin, and at least six compositions of the more advanced type by 
romantic and standard modern composers. 

The applicant for a literary degree with piano as major must be able 
to read well by sight and must present a public program, including a 
two-piano composition and a concerto or part of a concerto. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Music requisites with piano as major 
must present a public program, varied and well balanced, selected from 
the classic, romantic, and modern schools of music, including a two-piano 
composition and one movement of a concerto. 

Graduates of the School of Music are entitled to a professional teach- 
er's license from the state. 

Description of Courses 

The courses in this department are divided into three groups: (1) 
Theory of Music; (2) Music Education; (3) Applied Music. All courses 
continue throughout the year. 

THEORY OF MUSIC 

Tll-12. Harmony I. — Scales; intervals; elementary chord formation; 
melody writing; primary and secondary triads; harmonization of 
original melodies; harmonic analysis. Four hours credit. 

T21-22. Harmony U. — Ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords; altered 
chords derived from interchange of mode; Neapolitan sixth; aug- 
mented harmonies; transition; modulation; harmonic analysis. Four 
hours credit. 

T31-32, T41-42. Keyboard Harmony I and U. — A two-year course, to 

be taken in conjunction with the study of harmony, at the end of 

which time the student should be able to play all the cadences in four- 



80 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

part harmonization and to execute simple modulations at the keyboard. 
Two hours credit each year. 

T51-52, T61-62. Sight-Singing, Ear-Trainiiig, and Dictation I and n. — ^A 

two-year course, at the conclusion of which the student should be 
able to sing melodies at sight, to sing accurately any interval, and to take 
down from dictation melodies involving different problems. Two hours 
credit each year. 

T71-72. Music History and Appreciation I. — Biographical and appreci- 
ation studies of the lives and writings of the classical, romantic, 
and early modern composers. A general survey of the development of 
the art of music. Two hours credit. 

T81-82. Music History and Appreciation 11. — A more critical survey of 
the development of the musical arts, with emphasis on special 
movements and phases, such as notation, early contrapuntal schools, rise 
and development of opera, classical and romantic schools, modern music. 
Two hours credit. 

T91-92. History of Music. — An advanced course in the history of music, 
designed especially for students majoring in School Music and 
Composition. Six hours credit. 

TlOl-2. Counterpoint I. — The C clefs; the modes; simple counterpoint 
in strict style for two, three, and four parts; combined counterpoint 
in strict style for three and four parts; writing for more than four parts 
in strict style; applied strict counterpoint. Four hours credit. 

Tlll-2. Counterpoint 11. — Modern free counterpoint for two, three, and 
four parts, both single and combined, and in both instrumental and 
vocal styles; invertible counterpoint; canonic imitation; original writing 
in the less advanced contrapuntal forms. Four hours credit. 

T121-2. Counterpoint HI. — Further drill in all contrapuntal forms for 
the composer, with emphasis on more advanced original writing. 
Four hours credit. 

T131-2, T141-2. Form and Analysis I and II. — A study of musical form 
through analysis of homophonic and contrapuntal composition, 
which may be continued for one or two years. Two hours credit each 
year. 

T151-2. Composition I. — Analysis and practical written work in musical 
forms from the simple two and three part to the sonatina form. 
Four hours credit. 

T161-2. Composition II. — Analysis and practical written work in musi- 
cal forms, including variations, rondo, and a complete sonata. Four 
hours credit. 

T171-2. Orchestration I. — A study of the character of each instrument 
of the orchestra and of the scoring of the different combinations. 
Four hours credit. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

T181-2. Orchestration n. — Advanced study of orchestral writing leading 
to the scoring of a symphonic movement of some length and of 
original comp6sitions. Four hours credit. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Ell-12. Conducting I. — Baton technic; score reading; organization and 
management of high school orchestras; band repertoire for high 
school organizations. Two hours credit. 

E21-22. Conducting n. — The interpretation of the orchestral score 
and the realization of the music with orchestra and band. Two 
hours credit. 

E31-32, E41-42, E51-52, E61-62. Repertory and Interpretation. — The 

aim of these master classes is to promote a detailed as well as a 
general musical education and make for fine musicianship. The players 
receive constructive criticism. Concerted playing, as in two-piano work, 
is discussed and illustrated. Two hours credit each year. 

E71-72, E81-82. Ensemble Playing I and n. — To the modern student 
the ability to play together with others is an indispensable asset. 
This course includes the study of sonatas, concertos, and other two-piano 
literature. It may be taken for one or two years. Two hours credit 
each year. 

E91-92. School Music Methods I. — Aims and objectives of music edu- 
cation; material for use in kindergarten and primary grades. Four 
hours credit. 

ElOl-2. School Music Methods 11, — High school music. The develop- 
ment of chorus and glee club, with special attention to the selection 
and training of the adolescent voice. Four hours credit. 

El 11-2. School Music Methods III. — General supervision and manage- 
ment of the music program. Music tests and their use. Four hours 
credit. 

E121-2. Practice Teaching and Seminar. — Practical experience in the 
classroom under supervision. Class discussion of the problems 
arising from this experience. Six hours credit. 

E131-2. Piano Normal. — This course is designed to meet the problems 
of piano teachers, including the correct presentation of the rudi- 
ments of music, the principles of modern technique, teaching material, 
and pedagogical problems. Actual teaching will be demonstrated and 
teaching material will be on hand for inspection. Four hours credit. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Credit in applied music Is based on the number of hours of practice. 
One semester hour of credit is granted for each three hours per week of 
practice, plus the necessary individual instruction, with a limit of six 
semester hours per semester. Regular hours of practice are assigned 



82 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

to each student by the Director of the School of Music. The number of 
hours of daily practice required ranges from one and a half to four, 
depending on the classification of the student. Credit is not earned 
unless final examinations are passed. 

Piano 

For entrance to the college division the student should play all major 
and minor scales in rapid tempo, as well as broken chords in octave 
position in all keys, should have systematic methods of practice, and 
should have studied some of the standard etudes such as Czerny, Op. 
299, Book I, and Bach, Little Preludes, a few Bach two-part Inventions, 
and compositions corresponding in difficulty to Haydn, Sonata No. II, 
No. 20 (Schirmer) or Mozart, Sonata No. Ill, No. 13 (Schirmer). 

Pi. A. B. Preparatory and Intermediate. 

Pi. C. D. Fundamentals. — A special piano course for students majoring 
in violin and voice, giving them the fundamentals and enabling 
them to play accompaniments. 

Pi. 11-12. First Year. — Scales, major and minor; arpeggios in all major 
and minor triads. Czerny, Op. 740; Bach: Three-Part Inventions, 
French Suites; Beethoven sonatas of the difficulty of Op. 14, No. 1. 

Pi. 21-22. Second Year. — All major and minor scales with increased 
speed; arpeggios as 11-12 with increased speed; etudes of grade 
of dementi Gradus or special technical training. Bach: English Suites, 
Well-Tempered Clavichord; Beethoven sonatas. 

Pi. 31-32. Third Year. — Bach: Well-Tempered Clavichord; Chopin, 
Etudes; sonatas of Beethoven and others. 

Pi. 41-42. Fourth Year. — Bach: larger works, such as Chromatic Fan- 
tasy and Fugue, Italian Concerto; sonatas of Beethoven, Chopin, 
and others; concertos of Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, and others. 

Pi. 51-52. Group Piano. — This course is designed for students who find 
it impossible to have individual lessons. It comprises the playing 
of hymns, accompaniments, sight reading, and a continuation of reper- 
toire. Two hours credit. 

Violin 

Students are required to have mastered the forty-two Kreutzer Exer- 
cises before entering the senior year. 

Vi. A, B. — Preparatory Course. — A series of studies following a definite 
scheme, yet adapted to needs of individual students, for those not 
sufficiently advanced to take Vi. 11-12. 

Vi. 11-12. First Year. — Rode 24 Caprices; Viotti Concerto No. 22; 
Rode Concertos Nos. 7 and 8; DeBeriot Fantaisie Lyrique and Scene 
de Ballet; solo pieces by Godard, Dvorak, Massenet, and Svenson. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

Vi. 21-22. Second Year. — Studies by Rode, Rovelli; DeBeriot Airs Nos. 

5, 6, 7; DeBeriot Concertos Nos. 1 and 7; Spohr Concerto No. 2; 

solo pieces by David, Ries, Hubay, Leonard, Wieniawski, and Bazzini. 

Vi. 31-32. Third Year. — Studies by Mazas, Dont (Gradus and Par- 
nassum); solo pieces by Wieniawski, Vieuxtemps, Saraste, Brahms; 
concertos by Mendelssohn, Wieniawski, and Bruch. 

VI. 41-42. Fourth Year. — Studies by Wieniawski; Paganini Caprices; 
concertos by Beethoven, Lalo, Ernst, Vieuxtemps; solo pieces by 
Saraste, Saint-Saens, Wieniawski, and Vieuxtemps. 

Voice 

Before beginning the study of voice, the pupil should have some 
knowledge of the rudiments of music. The names of the notes and their 
position on the keyboard and the understanding of time and note values 
should be mastered before the pupil attempts the culture of the voice. 
Hence, the study of piano for at least one year is desirable for the voice 
student. 

Vo. 11-12. First Year. — Principles of correct breathing and support, 
study of tone placing, attack of tone, staccato and legato, enunci- 
ation. Major scales and arpeggios. Vocal exercises by Panofka, Sieber, 
Abt, Concone. Songs of easy grade. 

Vo. 21-22. Second Year. — Study of flexibility. Development of full 
range of voice, covered head tones, uniformity in color and quality 
of tone. Major and minor scales and arpeggios. Vocalises by Concone, 
Sieber, Lutgen, Lamperti, and others. Songs of medium difficulty in 
English and other languages. 

Vo. 31-32. Tliird Year. — Attention to embellishments, turns, mordents, 
and trills. Development of tone, color, and volume. Italian vocalises 
by Vaccai, Panofka, Bordona. Study of classics. Difficult songs in 
English, German, French, and Italian. 

Vo. 41-42. Fourth Year. — Continued study in advanced technique. Study 
of style and interpretation, beauty and finish of tone. Vocalises 
by Marchesi, Lutgen, Lamperti. Master songs by Schumann, Schubert, 
Brahms, Grieg, and others. Oratoria, arias from opera in English, 
Italian, French, German. 



84 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



CURRICULA 
For Bachelor of Music Requisites with a Major in Piano 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 11-12 8 

Mus. Tll-12 4 

Mus. T31-32 2 

Mus. T51-52 2 

Mus. T71-72 2 

Mus. E31-32 2 

Eng. 11-12 6 

ReL 11-12 6 



Junior 



32 
Hrs. 



Mus. Pi. 31-32 8 

Mus. TlOl-2 4 

Mus. T141-2 2 

Mus. T151-2 4 

Mus. E51-2 2 

Modern Language 6 

Psychology 6 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 21-22 6 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T41-42 2 

Mus. T61-62 2 

Mus. T81-82 2 

Mus. T131-2 2 

Mus. E41-42 2 

Eng. 21-22 6 

Modern Language 6 

32 

Senior Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 41-42 and Recital .... 12 

Mus. Tlll-2 4 

Mus. T161-2 4 

Mus. T171-2 4 

Mus. E61-62 2 

Mus. E131-2 4 

Music Elective 2 



32 



For Bachelor of Music Requisites with a Major in Composition 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 11-12 4 

Tll-12 4 

T31-32 2 

T51-52 2 

Mus. T71-72 2 

Mus. Vi. 11-12 4 

11-12 6 

11-12 6 



Mus. 
Mus. 
Mus. 



Eng. 
Rel. 

Chorus or Orchestra 2 

32 

Junior Hrs. 

Mus. T91-92 6 

Mus. Tlll-2 4 

Mus. T141-2 2 

Mus. T151-2 4 

Mus. T171-2 4 

Mus. E71-72 2 

Wind Instrument 2 

Music Elective 2 

Academic Elective 6 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 21-22 4 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T41-42 2 

Mus. T61-62 2 

Mus. T81-82 2 

Mus. TlOl-2 4 

Mus. T131-2 2 

Mus. Vi. 21-22 4 

Eng. 21-22 6 

Chorus or Orchestra 2 

32 

Senior Hrs. 

Mus. T121-2 4 

Mus. T161-2 4 

Mus. T181-2 4 

Mus. Ell-12 2 

Mus. E81-82 2 

Wind Instrument 4 

Music Elective 6 

Academic Elective 6 



32 



32 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



85 



For Bachelor of Mnsic Requisites with a Major in School Music 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 11-12 4 

Mus. Vo. 11-12 4 

Mus. Tll-12 4 

Mus. T31-32 2 

Mus. T51-52 2 

Mus. T71-72 2 

Eng. 11-12 6 

Psychology 6 

Chorus 2 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 21-22 4 

Mus. Vo. 21-22 4 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T41-42 2 

Mus. T61-62 2 

Mus. T81-82 2 

Mus. T131-2 2 

Eng. 21-22 6 

Education 6 



32 



32 



Junior Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 31-32 4 

Mus. Vo. 31-32 4 

Mus. TlOl-2 4 

Mus. T141-2 2 

Mus. T91-92 6 

Mus. Ell-12 2 

Mus. E91-92 4 

Mus. E131-2 4 

Music Elective 2 



Senior Hrs. 

Mus. Vo. 41-42 6 

Mus. T171-2 4 

Mus. E21-22 2 

Mus. ElOl-2 4 

Mus. Elll-2 4 

Mus. E121-2 6 

Academic Elective 6 



32 



32 



For Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Piano 

A. The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree as listed on page 36. 

B. The following musical studies: 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. Pi 11-12 4 

Mus. Tll-12 4 

Mus. T31-32 2 

Mus. T51-52 2 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 21-22 4 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T41-42 2 

Mus. T61-62 2 



12 



12 



Junior Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 31-32 4 

Mus. TlOl-2 4 

Mus. T131-2 2 



Senior Hrs. 

Mus. Pi. 41-42 4 

Recital 2 



10 



86 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



For Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Voice 

A. The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree as listed on page 36. 

B. The following musical studies: 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. Vo. 11-12 4 

Mus. Tll-12 4 

Mus. T31-32 2 

Mus. T51-52 2 

12 

Junior Hrs. 

Mus. Vo. 31-32 4 

Mus. T71-72 2 

Mus. 101-2 4 



10 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. Vo. 21-22 4 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T41-42 2 

Mus. T61-62 2 

12 

Senior Hrs. 

Mus. Vo. 41-42 4 

Mus. T81-82 2 



6 



For Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Violin 

A. The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree as listed on page 36. 

B. The following musical studies: 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. Vi. 11-12 4 

Mus. Tll-12 4 

Mus. T71-72 2 

Symphony Orchestra 2 



Junior 



12 
Hrs. 



Mus. Vi. 31-32 4 

Mus. T131-2 2 

Symphony Orchestra 2 



8 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. Vi. 21-22 4 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T81-82 2 

Symphony Orchestra 2 



Senior 



12 
Hrs. 



Mus. Vi. 41-42 4 

Mus. T171 2 

Symphony Orchestra 2 



8 



For Bachelor of Arts with a Major in School Music 

A. The minimum requirements for the B.A. degree as listed on page 36. 

B. The following musical studies: 



Freshman Hrs. 

Mus. E91-92 4 

Mus. Tll-12 4 

Mus. T31-32 2 

Mus. T51-52 2 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Mus. ElOl-2 4 

Mus. T21-22 4 

Mus. T41-42 2 

Mus. T61-62 2 



12 

Junior Hrs. 

Mus. E121-2 4 

Mus. T71-72 2 

Mus. T131-2, 141-2 4 



12 

Senior Hrs. 

Mus. B121-2 4 

Mus. T71-72 2 



10 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 87 

TUITION AND FEES 

Special fees are charged for all courses in the School of Music as 
follaws: 

Fees per 
Semester 

Piano 31. 32, 41, 42; Violin 31, 32, 41, 42, each course $75.00 

Piano 11, 12, 21, 22; Violin 11, 12, 21, 22; Voice 31, 32, 41, 42, 

each course 60.00 

Voice 11, 12, 21, 22, each course 50.00 

Piano A, each course 27.00 

Piano B, C, D, each course 36.00 

Mus. T91, 92, each course 30.00 

Mus. E91, 92, 101, 102, 111, 112. 121, 122, each course 20.00 

Symphony Orchestra 15.00 

Mus. TlOl, 102, 111, 112, 121, 122, each 12.00 

Piano 51, 52; Mus. Ell, 12, 71, 72, 81, 82, 131, 132; Mus. Til, 
12, 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, 71. 72, 81. 82, 131, 
132, 141. 142. 151. 152. 161, 162, 171, 172, 181, 182, each 

course 10.00 

Band School Course 10.00 

Mus. E31, 32, 41, 42, 51, 52, 61, 62, each 5.00 

The following additional fees are also charged: 

Piano practice, per hour 5.00 

Piano, private lessons, each 3.00 

Theory, private lessons, each 2.00 

Registration fee 2.00 

Certificate 2.50 

Diploma 5.00 

Special examination fee (one semester's work) 5.00 

For students taking work in the College of Arts and Sciences and 
also in the School of Music, the following fees are charged: 

Registration fee $ 23.00 

Student activities fee 15.00 

Library fee 6.00 

One academic course (including fees) 50.00 

Two academic courses (including fees) 90.00 

Three academic courses (including fees) 130.00 

Four or more academic courses Full tuition and fees 



88 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XX. DEPARTMENT OF ART* 

INSTRUCTOR HOLLINGSWORTH 

11-12. Design and Color Theory. — A study of elemental design and the 
various theories of color; the basis for all future work in art. 
Class and individual criticism. Tuition, per semester, $25.00. Three 
hours credit per semester. Mr. HoUingsworth. 

21-22. Water Color Painting. — Approach to water color as a painting 
medium. Study of methods, techniques. Pictorial design and 
composition emphasized throughout the work. Special encouragement 
made on developing individuality in water color painting. Painting from 
still life, and later, landscape, if the student wishes. Individual criti- 
cism. Tuition, per semester, $40.00. Prerequisite, Design 11-12, or 
equivalent. Three hours credit per semester. Mr. HoUingsworth. 

31-32. Advanced Design. Continuation of Design 11 and 12; advanced, 
with design applied practically. Introduction to principles of 
design in everyday uses. Tuition, per semester, $25.00. Prerequisite, 
Design 11-12, or equivalent. Three hours credit per semester. Mr. 
HoUingsworth. 

41-42. Composition. — Pictorial composition, using figure sketch, draw- 
ing, to make up completed pictorial organizations. Tuition, per 
semester, $25.00. Prerequisite, Design 11-12, or equivalent. Three 
hours credit per semester. Mr. HoUingsworth. 



•Twelve hours of Art maj' be counted toward a degree. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

SUMMER SESSION 
1943 

First Term June 2-July 6 

Second Term July 7-Aug. 10 

Third Term Aug. 11-Aug. 31 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

This year, as the Summer Session enters its fourth decade as an 
integrated part of the personalized service of Millsaps College, an ac- 
celerated program is being offered in order to meet more completely the 
demands of the national emergency. Three terms will be offered, not only 
in order that the regular student may complete his degree requirements 
in an appreciably shorter time, but also in order that the more mature 
individual may take advantage of periods of intensive study in order to 
train himself to serve his country better in time of war. 

The Summer Session courses are planned primarily to assist the 
groups of men and women to realize the aims as suggested below: 

1. Accelerating her schedule in order to serve more adequately the 
demands of the national emergency, Millsaps College now offers 
a program which enables the student to complete the college 
course in an appreciably shorter length of time. 

2. Teachers in service who wish, while teaching, to advance toward 
a college degree. 

3. Teachers who desire to secure, extend, or renew licenses. Millsaps 
College and its work are fully approved by the State Department 
of Education. 

4. College graduates who lack the required number of hours in 
Education for a teacher's license and who desire to make up 
some of these hours. 

5. Those who wish to do college credit work toward the under- 
graduate degree of A. B. and B. S. Many students who live in 
Jackson and vicinity but attend other colleges during the winter 
take summer work at Millsaps. In this way they can live at home 
and still carry on work toward a degree. 

6. Mature individuals who hold regular jobs in Jackson and who 
wish to add to their college work by taking an early morning 
class before going to work. 

7. All persons qualified to pursue with advantage any course offer- 
ed whether or not their other activities are primarily study or 
teaching. 

8. 1943 High School Graduates. 

An opportunity for High School graduates to start their 



90 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

college work is offered in the Millsaps College Summer Session. 
Although many High School graduates will not make plans to 
enter college until September, more and more students are con- 
sidering the Summer Session as an adjustment period between 
High School and College. 

The student may carry one or two subjects and have plenty 
of time for study; he learns what college work is like without 
carrying too heavy a load; he may lighten his freshman load from 
three to six hours a semester in the regular term. 3Iany 1943 
High School graduates plan to attend all three terms and thus 
complete a full semester's work toward the Bachelor's degree. 

Hours of Work Permitted 

The usual schedule of work is six semester hours during each of the 
two five-weeks terms and three semester hours during the third, or three- 
weeks term. 

Thus a student will find it possible to complete fifteen hours of his 
academic work during the summer months. 

Classes will meet each day, Monday through Saturday. 

Fees and Expenses 
Tuition 

Fee for four semester hours or less; each hour $5.00 

Fee for five or six semester hours $20.00 

Special Fees for All Students 

Matriculation fee $5.00 

Library fee $3.00 

Laboratory Fees 

In laboratory courses special laboratory fees amounting to $5.00 per 
semester course are charged. A laboratory breakage deposit of $1.00 is 
also required for each semester laboratory course. 

Room and Board 

Students can obtain comfortable room accomodations in the college 
dormitories for $10.00 per five-weeks term, or $6.00 per three-weeks 
term. The cafeteria is operated during the summer months and students 
can obtain excellent meals there for approximately $22.50 per five-weeks 
term, or $13.50 per three-weeks term. 

Those expecting to enter the Summer Session should make reservation 
of room by sending to the Bursar a deposit of $5.00. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



91 



SUMMER SESSION COURSES 



The following courses will be offered: 



Art-Design and Color Theory 

Art-Design 

Art-Water Color Painting 

General Zoology 

General Embryology 

General Physiology 

Organic Chemistry 

Qualitative Analysis 

Experimental Organic Chemistry 

Physical Chemistry 

Quantitative Analysis 

Introduction to Accounting 

Educational Tests and Measure- 
ments 

Special Methods of Teaching in 
the Elementary School 

General Methods of Teaching and 
Learning 

Educational Psychology 

English Literature 

Modern Drama 

American Literature 

Short Story 

Elementary French 

Intermediate French 

Survey of French Literature 

Lithologic and Dynamic Geology 

Historical Geology 

Intermediate German 

Advanced German 

Public Speaking 



History of the U. S. 

Problems in Modern European 

History 
Horace, Odes and Epodes 
Plautus 

School Library Administration 
Cataloguing and Classification 
Adolescent Literature 
Children's Literature 
College Algebra 
Plane Trigonometry 
Plane Analytical Geometry 
Differential Calculus 
Recreation Leadership 
Theory of Play 
Hygiene 
General Physics 
Pre-Medical Physics 
Intermediate General Physics 
General Psychology 
Psychology of Adjustment 
Personnel Administration 
Introductory Bible 
Church and Society 
The Art of Christian Living 
Typewriting 
Shorthand 
Elementary Spanish 
Intermediate Spanish 
Spanish Literature 



92 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT 

Buie, W. M., '36 Jackson 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

McClinton, Raymond, '36 Jackson 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Kimball, John, '34 Jackson 

WOMEN'S DIVISION 

PRESIDENT 

Jones, Arlene McGahey, '35 Jackson 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Smith, Mary Hanes, '41 Jackson 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Godbold, Marguerite Darden, '40 Jackson 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Huntley, M.C., '20 Term expires 1943 University, Ala. 

Cunningham, Rev. Jeff Term expires 1944 Oxford 

Mayo, Robert, '37 Term expires 1945 Pelahatchie 

Cook, Gilbert, '08 Term expires 1946 Canton 



CLASS OF 1942 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Ainsworth, James Miller Lauderdale 

Ball, Corinne Walker Jackson 

Blrdsong, Samuel Ernest, Jr Jackson 

Booth, Helen Pauline Kosciusko 

Brady, Judge Graham Jackson 

Burdette, Mary Cecilia Jackson 

Burris, Eva Tynes Liberty 

Burt, Cawthon Bowen Tupelo 

Chatham, AUie Ruth Montrose 

Clark, Lula Janette Pearson 

Crook, Clements Barber Jackson 

Daniels, Edwin Clyde Jackson 

DeCell, Florence Evangeline Vlcksburg 

Dent, Martha Louise Jackson 

Dickerson, Beverley McComb 

Doss, Wilford Cleve, Jr Houston 

Ethridge, Mark Emerson Jackson 

Flowers, Joseph Carruth., Jackson 

Gillis, Floyd Eugene, Jr Jackson 

Godbold, Ruth Alma Jackson 

Gregg, Virginia Dell... Jackson 

Grimes, Katherine Ann Jackson 

Hansen, Virginia Hale Aberdeen 

Hart, Ida Sylvia Jackson 

Herbert, Ann Elizabeth Jackson 

Hwa, Dora Zoen-Kwang Shanghai, China 

Irving, William Rector, Jr Electric Mills 

Jackson, Charles S., Jr Leakesvllle 

Johnson, Bindley Gowdy Jackson 

Jones, Haniel Mobile, Alabama 

Jones, Miriam Elma Okolona 

Khayat, Evaline Assad Jackson 

King, Janie Lou Angullla 

Laird, Maxine Lsverne Jackson 

Lauderdale, Richard Lynn Jackson 

Lloyd, Bettie Clyde Jackson 

Lloyd, William Baldwin Jackson 

Lofton, Margaret Aronelle Brookhaven 



MacFalls, Jeanette Eleanor.. ..Washington, D.C. 

Mansfield, Martha Jane Jackson 

Matheny, Robert Minor Waynesboro 

Mayo, Vera Laird Florence 

Moore, George Hyer, Jr Jackson 

Murphy, Georgia Elizabeth Belzoni 

McPherson, Carolyn Louise Pickens 

McRae, Mary Jackson 

Nordin, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Oliver, Howard Bufkin Sharon 

Oliver, Mrs. Howard Bufkin Sharon 

Peeler, Charlotte Elizabeth Ashland 

Pevey , Frances Virginia Forest 

Philp, William Avery Jackson 

Pitts, Troy Newton Wesson 

Powers, Grady H Jackson 

Rabb, Lawrence Wynne, Jr Lexington 

Rees, Helen Jackson 

Ricks, Helen Elizabeth Jackson 

Roby, Charlton Stevens Jackson 

Ross, William Dee, Jr Crystal Springs 

Schilling, Theodore Cleon, Jr Jackson 

Sheffield, Martha Frances Jackson 

Sheridan, Mary Louise Bogalusa, La. 

Sims, Roy Vernon Jackson 

Spengler, Ann Elizabeth Pickens 

Spengler, Thomas Lawrence, Jr Jackson 

Stone, Mary Alexia Jackson 

Sweany, Glenn Calhoun Minter City 

Sutphin, Felix A Warm Springs, Ga. 

Triplett, Nell Erwin 

Waring, Lawrence Albert Tylertown 

Watkins, Julia May Jackson 

Watts, David Eugene Jackson 

Welborn, J. B Electric Mills 

Whitehead, Hazel Marie Jackson 

Youngblood, Curtis, Jr Wesson 



I 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



93 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Bell, William Brandon Brooksvllle 

Boswell, Hugh Prlddy, Jr New Albany 

Brady, Frances Lee Lexington 

Dean, Guy Walker, Jr Shaw 

Douglas, Harold Jackson Greenville 

Fazakerly, William Bryan Jackson 

Fleming, Edward Swayze Minter City 

Hathorn, Thomas Quitman Jackson 

Herron, Carol Canton 

Hickman, Dwight Osier EUisville 

Holt, Helen May Jackson 

Horn, Edgar Bridges Magee 

Irby, Frances Emily Jackson 



Kellum, Thomas Boyd Greenville 

Landstreet, Elizabeth Jane Jackson 

Leggett, J. D Allen 

Martin, Raymond Shirley, Jr Jackson 

Matulich, Edward Joseph Columbia 

McAimy, Robert Wendell Sidon 

McFarlane, Graham Rogers Jackson 

Navarro, Louis Joseph Bllozl 

Rossie, Emmett Anthony Shaw 

Sanders, Albert Godfrey, Jr Jackson 

Sutherland, Benjamin Loyd Jackson 

Williams, Marshall Ney, Jr Raymond 



94 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1942-43 



SENIORS 



Armstrong, James Edgar Jackson 

Axtell, William Robert Madison 

Bagby, W. Woodrow Jackson 

Bailey, Hazel Tchula 

Barlow, Aden Wilmirth Jackson 

Barnett, Jean Kelly Jackson 

Beasley, Hettie Faye Benton 

Bending, Alice Constance Laurel 

Boswell, Barbara Sanatorium 

Brister, Hammond Harris Jackson 

Burdette, Genevieve Bruns Jackson 

Busby, Mary Lee Meridian 

Carr, George Robert, Jr Monticello 

Catledge, Richard Stover 

Craft, Dolores Jeanne Jackson 

Crisler, Henry Herbert, III Bay Springs 

Dawkins, Edwin Jackson 

Dickson, Nathan Andrew Jackson 

Doggett, Maye Evelyn Kossuth 

Ervin, Mary Emma Inverness 

Gayden, Martha Louise Brandon 

Gibbons, Ruth Jackson 

Guerry, Ester Virginia Schlater 

Harris, Charline Minter Canton 

Harrison, Cornelia Armistead Jackson 

Holcomb, Betty Jo Jackson 

Holder, James Hardy, Jr Winona 

King, Jack Victor Jackson 

Lampe, Millicent Ardis Jackson 

Liles, Louis Everette Jackson 

Martin, Althea Midnight 

Measells, Dewitt Talmage, Jr Morton 

Minyard, Virginia Jackson 

McGough, William Marion Catchlngs 

McKeown, Virginia Lewis Vicksburg 

Neill, Walter Ridgway Ellisville 

Nichols, Robert George, Jr Jackson 



Nicholson, Alene Dorcas Summit 

Ogden, James Hattiesburg 

Parker, Patricia Mildred Jackson 

Pearson, Robert Dodd Jackson 

Price, Frances Virginia Canton 

Richardson, Catherine Lawson Jackson 

Richardson, Lloyd Binford Bolton 

Ridgway, Walter Stevens Jackson 

Roberts, Sylvia Lucretia Jackson 

Rogers, Myrtle Jacqueline Jackson 

Ruoff, Helen Mae Jackson 

Rush, Clarlne Vaughan 

Sawyer, John Merrill Frisco City, Ala. 

Schultz, Alford Miller Forest 

Scott, Charles LeRoy Yazoo City 

Scott, Haywood Prattville, Ala. 

Scott, Tom Burkett, Jr Jackson 

Sells, Ellenita Jackson 

Simpson, Dorothy Dean DeKalb 

Smith, Eugene Franklin Jackson 

Stephenson, Hollis Watson Keiser, Ark. 

Stroud, PoUy Louise 

Stubblefield, Calvin Fort Yazoo City 

Stubblefield, Joe Murrah Brandon 

Stumph, Lou Ella Laurel 

Tatum, Frederick Edward Hattiesburg 

Thompson, Thelma Nell Jackson 

Trimble, Janice Natchez 

Turnage, Harold Yazoo City 

Ulmer, John Noel Rose Hill 

Whitaker, Mlrl Wesley Batesville 

Williams, Prank Bryan, II Jackson 

Williamson, James A Philadelphia 

Williamson, Walter Ellis Jackson 

Wilson, Edwin Craft Vicksburg 

Wroten, Frances Marion Columbus 



JUNIORS 



Ackley, Jean Money Jackson 

Adams, Arthur Ray Jackson 

Applewhite, Sara Jean Winona 

Barron, Beth Crystal Springs 

Bingham, Joseph Reid Gulfport 

Boger, Martha Porter Hattiesburg 

Boyles, Mary Alice Jackson 

Brackin, Bowman Duncan State College 

Brock, D. T., Jr Jackson 

Brown, Alma Carl Jackson 

Carmichael, Charles Ellis Jackson 

Chastain, James Garvin Jackson 

Childress, Gordon Rickitts Jackson 

Coffman, Vera Mae Jackson 

Conner, Lady Rachel Jackson 

Darby, James Wray Courtland 

Davis, Richard Nelon Terry 

Denser, John William Whitfield 

Dent, Charles Franklin Marked Tree, Ark. 

Dickson, Fitzhugh Lee Mt. Olive 

Dinkins, Suenette Jackson 

Duckworth, Betty Tucker Jackson 

Exum, Kinchen Williams Jackson 

Felder, Everett Rayner McComb 

Foster, Lane HoUandale 

Gainey, Emma Gene Tchula 

Greer, John Byrd Summit 

Gregory, Marianna Jackson 

Grubbs, Marie Elizabeth Philadelphia 

Guy, Telka Laverne Summit 

Guyton, Annie Marion Pickens 

Haeuser, Cecil Yvonne New Orleans, La. 

Hamilton, Clifton Jackson 

Harkins, George William Gloster 

Harper, Lois Maxine Brandon 



Harpole, David Jackson 

Henry, Betty Jones Yazoo City 

Hiwiller, Jack DeViney Jackson 

Hix, Mittie Floyd Jackson 

Holyfield, Robert Lee. Port Gibson 

Hurst, Adene Summit 

Hurst, Aylene Summit 

Ingram, Ruth McNair Bogalusa, La. 

Jackson, Van Reeves Decatur 

Jolly, Roger Eedes Meridian 

Jones, Glendell Asbury Florence 

Juraschek, Robert Franklin Chicago, HI. 

Keenan, Frances E Jackson 

Lacey, William Robert Kosciusko 

Lindsey, Mary Thornton Pelahatchie 

Lowe, Carroll Jackson 

Lowther, John Earl Florence 

Magee, Curtiss Bluitte Jackson 

Mayo, Mary Anna Hattiesburg 

Miller, Louise Alford Hazlehurst 

Mitchell, Harvey Carroll, Jr Plantersville 

Morrow, John Henry Picayune 

Morson, Mary Priscilla Jackson 

Murphree, Annie Doris Calhoun City 

Murphy, Marjorle Ann Jackson 

McCormack, Elizabeth Sue Corinth 

McCullen, Dan Milam Jackson 

McMillan, Gerald Magee McComb 

Nelson, Waudine Madison 

Newsom, Nan Cavett Jackson 

Payne, Doy Evelyn Gulfport 

Pickett, Ross Alan Kinder, La. 

Porter, Clara Matthews Jackson 

Purvis, William Norman Fannin 

Railsback, Lee Liegerot, Jr Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



95 



JUNIORS — Continued 



Ratliff, Cornelia Ruth Drew 

Raymond, Harry Carlisle Vicksbiu'g 

Raynham, Dorothy Irene Jackson 

Riddell, Katherlne Caruthers Jackson 

Robinson, Brewster Calhoun Bay Springs 

Ross, Maury Glenn Rome 

Shanks, William Ennls Jackson 

Sharp, Marshall Elton Jackson 

Sherman, Virginia Charleston 

Shipley , Elizabeth Canton 

Spann, Janie Sue Jackson 

StarJey, Kathleen Gamer State College 

Stokes, James Hunter Columbus 

Stuckenschnelder, James Theodore Columbus 

Vlck, Whitfield Bessemer City, N. C. 

Wasson, Julia Greenville 



Webb, James Jackson 

Wells, Clay Norris Jackson 

West, Annie Louise Jackson 

White, Martin Luther Jackson 

Williams, Elizabeth Buchanan Jackson 

Williams, M. J., Jr Jackson 

Wilson, Mary Louise Jackson 

Winner, Donald Jackson 

Woff ord , Jesse Lucius Drew 

Womack, Noel Catching, Jr Pocahontas 

Wood, Nell Ferris Jackson 

Wright, Dan A Jackson 

Wright, William David Jackson 

Young, Mary Frances Jaclison 

Zenfell, Alma Vicksburg 



SOPHOMORES 



Alexander, Helen Sherman Jackson 

Allen, Charles Irvln, III Hazlehurst 

Allen, Eustace Dorsey Smlthvllle 

Arant, Flora Mae Magee 

Baird, Madeline Xoulsvllle 

Barland , Elsie Utica 

Bass, William Phillips Wallace, Va. 

Bell, Ralph Bedford Star 

Bennett, William E Greenwood 

Berry, Eleanor Jackson 

Bingham, Charles Galloway GuKport 

Boggan, Bobby Thomas Jackson 

Brien, Sarah Elizabeth UUlington, Va. 

Buccl, Robert Joseph Vicksburg 

Buie, Robert Lowry Jackson 

Byrd. Gene Edwina Jackson 

Calloway, Elmer Dean Louisville 

Calloway, James Everette Louisville 

Calloway, Jean Mltchener Indlanola 

Carl, Joan Claire Jackson 

Carter, William Oscar, Jr Lexington 

Chatham, J. W., Jr Rose Hill 

Clifford, Richard Clark Quitman 

Cochran, Sara Elizabeth Atlanta, Georgia 

Craig, Herbert R Columbus 

Cravens, Mary Lena Boyle 

Cravens, Viola Elizabeth Boyle 

Crout, BlUle Jane Jackson 

Davis, Cliff Elder New Albany 

Day, Jean Memphis, Tenn. 

Dean, Garland Carlton, Jr Colfax, La. 

Doty, Corlnne Clyde Lexington 

Dycus, Mildred Merrill Jackson 

Field, Joseph Haney Jackson 

Prye, Harry Charles Jackson 

Garraway, Thomas Phillips Jackson 

Gaskin, M. Margaret Jackson 

Gayden, Dave Puckett Brandon 

Gelselman, Stanley Claytus Jackson 

George, Nick Jackson 

Glaze, Andrew Jackson Pelahatchie 

Green, Mary Ann Jackson 

Griffin, Bonnie Foote 

Gulon, Henry Donelson Benton 

Harris. Reba Loyce Mendenhall 

Hart, Edith M Jackson 

Hayes, Helen Kosciusko 

Hobbs, Henry Ware, Jr Jackson 

Holllngsworth, Robert T., Jr Itta Bena 

Holston, James E Wiggins 

Jones, Spaulden Ernest Bonham, Texas 

Kern, Jane Gordon Louise 

Lancaster, Miriam Sunflower 

Leach, Harry Swan Starkvllle 



Leavell, William Alfred, Jr Meridian 

Lemly. Matt C Jackson 

Lipscomb, Julian Edmund Jackson 

Longinotti, James Durant 

Lowe, Louise Jackson 

Magruder, Marjorle Jackson 

Ma Jure, Maud Ella Brandon 

Malone, John Thomas Jackson 

Mathls, Claude Hlllman, Jr Corinth 

Mathis. Shelby Curlee Jackson 

Maxwell, Brownell Georgetown 

Mizell, Don McGehee Jackson 

Montgomery, Virginia Marion Jackson 

Mounger, Marjorie Lynn. Jackson 

Myers, Carolyn Deemer 

McGehee, Mary Helen Jackson 

McKinnon, Norman Arnold Jackson 

McLaurln. Mike Ward Murphy 

Mc Williams, George Meldon Yazoo City 

Neilson, Alice Noel Lexington 

Phillips, Malcolm Edwin Lexington 

Pittman. Warren Eugene Picayune 

Poole, John Riley Jackson 

Posey, Sarah Kathleen Philadelphia 

Purvis, Mrs. W. Norman Fannin 

Ray, Franklin Wilson Sherman 

Reagan, Mary Harriett Durant 

Rhea, Charles S Holly Springs 

Rice, Dannie Laurel 

Russell, Wallace Ray Sardis 

Shackelford, William Giles Columbus 

Shrader. Nell Elizabeth Jackson 

Slngletary, Otis Arnold, Jr New Orleans, La. 

Spillman, James Harry White Lake, N. C. 

Stroud. Peggy Louise 

Sumner, Jacques C. R Duxbury, Mass. 

Taylor, Zachary Jackson 

Tharp, Elva Lambert 

Tlmberlake, Lady Betty Crawford 

Troy, Jerry Norton, Jr Tupelo 

Turnbough, Alan Vivrette Jackson 

Tyer, Peggy Jackson 

Van der Kroef, Justus Maria Jackson 

Walker, Charles E., Jr Sanatorium 

Walker, Parker Sanatorium 

Walling, Dell Charlotte Florence 

Watkins, Amelia Jackson 

Whitworth, Mary John Pickens 

Williams, Crawford Fortson. Greenville 

Willingham. Martha Nell Jackson 

Wood, William Hilton McComb 

Yarbrough, Robert Murrah Indlanola 

Youngblood, Donald MeadvlUe 



96 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



FRESHMEN 



Albriton, John Leslie Jackson 

Alexander, Prances McNair Jackson 

Andersen, Mamie Jean Jackson 

Applewhite, Kathryn Joyce Bassfield 

Ashley, Jane Alyce Greenwood 

Axtell, John Carl Madison 

Baas, John O'Hara Hazlehurst 

Bain, LeRoy Edward Jackson 

Ball, Carroll R Stringer 

Bane, John Roy Jackson 

Barnes, Norma Leona Greenwood 

Beall, Julia Dyer Lexington 

Berryhill, Edna Earle Greenwood 

Boggan, Jean Jackson 

Boykin, Mary Catherine Hattiesburg 

Brady, Boyer Moragne, Jr Jackson 

Brady, Robert Eldridge Jackson 

Brien, Olive Andrews Arlington, Va. 

Brooks, Jannie Vee Duncan 

Brown, Betty Jo Jackson 

Brown, Helen Frances Hattiesburg 

Brown, Howard Albert Jackson 

Bryan, James David, Jr Jackson 

Bryson, Carl Jackson Tupelo 

Buchanan, Anne Jackson 

Bufkin, Rebecca Louise Jackson 

Burnett, Marshall Emmett Jackson 

Burnham, Evelyn Dale Magee 

Burnham, Suzanne Jackson 

Burton, Toni Louise Clarksdale 

Byrd, Juanita Alamosa, Colorado 

Cannon, Jimmy Howard Jackson 

Carmichael, Virginia Jackson 

Cavett, Clinton Moore Jackson 

Champion, James Thomas Woodland 

Clarkson, N. E Jackson 

Conerly, Price Truly Tylertown 

Cox, James D Caledonia 

Craig, Nelle Jackson 

Crawford, Lennie Louise Jackson 

Crawford, Roberta Moreton McComb 

Dabbs, William Lewis Tupelo 

Davis, John Younkin Jackson 

Delbridge, Jayne Jackson 

Denham, Anne Deupree Hattiesburg 

Dent, Joelyon Grace 

Detwiler, Don Matheson Winter Park, Fla. 

Dewees, Sara Jane Madison 

Dillingham, Charles Mitchell Jackson 

Dilworth, Kay Frances Rienzi 

Dobbs, Gloria June Jackson 

Doggett, Thaddeus Hill Kossuth 

Dunn, Milton Dudley Duncan 

Durfey, John Russell Jackson 

Eckert, June Madeleine Jackson 

Evans, Carrie Pearl Mendenhall 

Evans, Houston Hewes Gulfport 

Ezelle, Jeanette Gulfport 

Fant, Gale Boyd Minter City 

Franklin, Ike Douglass Jackson 

Garbarino, Ramelle Canton 

Gerald, Lucy Leland 

Giordano, John Milton Jackson 

Glorioso, Mary Etta Itta Bena 

Gooch, Frances Marie Jackson 

Gulledge, Charlotte Dale Crystal Springs 

Hairston, Catherine Moseley Indianola 

Hairston, Thomas Wood Jackson 

Hampton, John Kyle, Jr Jackson 

Harkins, Mitchell Henry Jackson 

Harris, Wyatt Watts Chicago, 111. 

Harrison, Jere Dial Jackson 

Harrison, Joe Jackson 

Haughton, Fannie Carolyn Hattiesburg 

Henderson, Emily Hartman Jackson 

Herring, Frances Lynn Grenada 

Hewes, Laura Elizabeth Jackson 

Holden, Joel Darvin, Jr Jackson 

Howard, Hector Smythe Jackson 

Howorth, Carl Robert Jackson 



Hughes, Helen Frances Jackson 

Jehl, Doris Cecelia Memphis, Tenn. 

Jenkins, James Chaffin Jackson 

Johnson, Lavinia Millsaps Jackson 

Johnson, Lillian Jackson 

Jones, Charlotte Prentiss 

Jones, Lael Shama Mobile, Ala. 

Jones, Lewis Henry Alexander, Va. 

Jones, Margaret Anne Jackson 

Jones, R. C, Jr Carson 

Jones, Sara Ellen Tchula 

Keith, Jerry Purcell Yazoo City 

King, Evelyn Water Valley 

Kropp, Elizabeth Jane Jackson 

Lampton, William Alexander Tylertown 

Langford, Lewis Harmon Jackson 

Lauderdale, Dorothy Jackson 

Little, Wilda Marsh Rockport 

Lloyd, Connie Mary Jackson 

Madden, Maxyne Jackson 

Magee, Augustus Benton Jackson 

Mantz, Robert Franklin Brookhaven 

Martindale, Pearl Grenada 

Melvin, Dorothy Jackson 

Miazza, Lewis Anthony Jackson 

Miller, Anne Elizabeth Belzoni 

Miller, Earlyene Jackson 

Mitchell, Dorothy Carolyn Magee 

Moak, William Edwin Philadelphia 

Montgomery, Virginia Jackson 

Moore, Rasha Maurice Jackson 

Moore, Reuben Inman Long Beach 

Myers, Bruns McKie Jackson 

Myers, William Wayne Morton 

McBride, Betty Catherine Jackson 

McCormack, Sylvia Geraldine Corinth 

McKee, John Max Jackson 

McLeroy, Eugene Franklin Elizabeth 

McMillin, Bess Ann Louisville 

McMuUin, Joe Willie Jackson 

McNamee, Billy Jackson 

O Brien, Sally Ann Jackson 

Odom, Annie Eleanor Grenada 

Owen, Nina Jackson 

Owens, Alice Franklin Jackson 

Page, Madeleine Adair McComb 

Patterson, J. Warren Gulfport 

Peace, Robert Joseph Jackson 

Peets, Randolph Dillon, Jr Jackson 

Pettigrew, Jean Ragland Jackson 

Phillips, Mary Ann Holly Bluff 

Pierce, Billie Claude Jackson 

Pigott, Otho Keith Tylertown 

Platte, Patricia Jane Vicksburg 

Rathell, Ernest Franklin, Jr Lexington 

Rawls, Dorothy Hazel Jackson 

Reeves, Nina Hazel Yazoo City 

Reily, D. A Victoria, Texas 

Robinson, Ellen Hattiesburg 

Roell, Jack Albert Jackson 

Ross, Sara Margaret Crystal Springs 

Rusling, Van Jackson 

Sanders, Mary Lewis Jackson 

Seab, Charles Henry Roxie 

Seegers, Winnifred Shreveport, La. 

Seng, Barry Severn Greenwood 

Shannon, Kathryn Elizabeth Drew 

Shrader, Clifton Harvey Jackson 

Smith, Collie Chester, Jr Sardis 

Smith, Eula Mae Bentonia 

Smith, Peggy Elizabeth :. Jackson 

Smith, Silas David Jackson 

Speer, Sydnor M Jackson 

Springer, Elizabeth Sue Jackson 

Stainback, Rufus Putnam Minter City 

Stone, Robert Lafayette, Jr Jackson 

Stovall, Theo Kathryn Jackson 

Strohecker, Mary Lockwood Jackson 

Stubbs, James Carlton Magee 

Stuckey, Dreda Beryline Star 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



97 



FRESHMEN — Continued 



Summers, Margene Walnut Grove 

TannehlU, Eva Jackson 

Terrell, Perry Albert Collins 

Turnage, Robert Glenn New Hebron 

Valentour, Annie Marie Jackson 

Van Hook, Eleanor Lane Jackson 

Waring, Elton Marcus Tylertown 

Weathersby, William, Jr Jackson 

Webster, Dorothy Miller Kosciusko 

Webster, Lucia Jean Jackson 

Wellington, Walter Wallace Jackson 

Wells, Bradford Grenada 

Wells, Joanna Grenada 



White, Jack Clinton Jackson 

White, WUlie Nell Pelahatchle 

Wiggins, Joe Willie Cruger 

Wilkins, Sylvia Claire Clarksdale 

Williams, Robert Lee Jackson 

Woodward, Tommye Sue Jackson 

Wright, Marjorie Sue Jackson 

Wright, Richard Frederick Jackson 

Wroten, Joseph Eason Columbus 

Wynn, Flora Alyce Jackson 

Yellowley, James Edward Greenville 

Yelverton, Ivin Neil Bay Springs 



SPECIALS 



Anderson, Sandra Jackson 

Baldwin, Barbara Jackson 

Barge, Betty Jackson 

Barge, Charllne Jackson 

Berry, Mary Lou Jackson 

Buckley, Dewey Jackson 

Buckley, Mabel Jackson 

Bullock , Doris Jackson 

Bullock, Sue Jackson 

Carl, Danny Jackson 

Clements, Mary Nash Jackson 

Corley, Myra Jackson 

Corley, Nan Jackson 

Craig, Elizabeth Jackson 

Dampeer, Anne Jackson 

Davis, Barbara Jackson 

Dye, Lillie Hinton Jackson 

Ferguson, Earllne Jackson 

Flncher, John Albert Jackson 

Frazer, Harry Jackson 

Frazer, Mary Ann Jackson 

Gates, Montiece Jackson 

Hamilton. Catherine Jackson 

Hammett, Nell Jackson 

Harris. Nancy Jackson 

Hilton, Ann Jackson 

Hilton, Sara Jackson 

Hughes, Helen Brj-an Jackson 



Hughes, Virginia Ann Jackson 

Jackson, John Carl Carthage 

Kochtltzky, Carolyn Jackson 

Langford, Sara Louise _ Jackson 

Latham, Betty Jo Jackson 

Leftkowltz. Lois „ Jackson 

Litton, Gladys Boyle 

Moore , Powers Jackson 

Oswalt , Elaine Jackson 

Oxford , Boyne Jackson 

Oxford , Emery Jackson 

Porter, Ralph Jackson 

Powell. Joy Jackson 

Rankin, Thomas Woodrow Forest 

Rehf eldt , Virginia Jackson 

Rehf eldt , William Jackson 

Ricketts, Agnes Fairlie Jackson 

Rlecken, Ellnora Jackson 

Russell, Emily Jackson 

Sanders, Albert Godfrey, Jr Jackson 

Shores, Bettie Jackson 

Simmons, Juanita Jackson 

Simpson, Melvin Jackson 

Slater, Carolyn Jackson 

White, Beth Jackson 

Whyte, Jean Jackson 

Williams, Opal J Jackson 

Wright , Clara Lynn Jackson 



I 



SUMMER SESSION — 1942 



Adams, Arthur Ray Jackson 

Alnsworth, James Miller Shubuta 

Allen, Charles Irvin Hazlehurst 

Anderson, Chapman Levy Jackson 

Armstrong, James Edgar Jackson 

Ascher, Helene Rose Jackson 

Axtell, William Robert Madison 

Bailey, Hazel Tchula 

Bane, John Roy Jackson 

Barland, Elsie Utlca 

Barlow, Aden Wllmirth Jackson 

Barnett, Jean Kelly Jackson 

Baskin, Walter Malone Greenville 

Beasley, A. Joe Benton 

Bell, Ralph Bedford Star 

Berry, Eleanor Jackson 

Berry, Reba Magee 

Bingham, Charlie Galloway Gulf port 

Booth, Helen Pauline Kosciusko 

Boyles, Mary Alice Jackson 

Brady, B. M., Jr Jackson 

Brantley, Lonnie Lewis, Jr Walnut Grove 

Brett, Martha Ann Jackson 

Brister, H, Harris Jackson 

Brock, DeWitt Talmadge, Jr Jackson 

Brown, Howard Albert Jackson 

Buchanan, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Buie, Robert Lowry Jackson 

Burnham, Charles Russell Jackson 

Burnham, H. Jack Jackson 

Burt, Cawlhon Bowen Tupelo 



Burton, Philip PortervUle 

Busby, Mary Lee Meridian 

Cain, H. V Jackson 

Carney, Mrs. T. E.... Crystal Springs 

Carp, Leonard Picayune 

Carpenter, Frances Marion Drew 

Carr, George Robert, Jr Monticello 

Cavett. Clint M Jackson 

Chambers, Mary Lou Canton 

Chapman, John Darrington Yazoo City 

Chastain, James Garvin. Jackson 

Chatham, Allie Ruth Montrose 

Conerly, Price Truly Tylertown 

Coward, Mrs. Jodie Ludlow 

Craig. Elizabeth Jackson 

Crider, Louise Durant 

Crisler, Henry Herbert Bay Springs 

Dabbs, William Lewis Tupelo 

Dale. Mrs. Esther Dorothy Benton 

Daniel, Mrs. J. F Zachary, La. 

Davis. Carolyn Terry 

Davis, Dorothy Durant 

Davis. Neva Crecink Meadville 

Dawkins, Edwin Jackson 

Davitte, Bama Eloise Jackson 

Denser, John William Whitfield 

Dent, Charles Franklin Marked Tree, Ark. 

Dickson, Nathan Andrew Jackson 

Dillingham, Charles Mitchell Jackson 

Dilworth, Kay Frances Rienzl 

Dinkins. Suenette Jackson 



98 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



SUMMER SESSION — Continued 



Doggett, Thaddeus Hill Kossuth 

Dorman, Carolyn Davis Jickson 

Duke, Ann Kathrryne Jickson 

Eckert, June Madeleine Jickson 
Ellis, Rowena McCurdy Weslaco Texas 

Erickson, Mary Kathenne Yazoo City 

Estess, Rosa Elizabeth McComb 

Exum, Kinchen Williams Jackson 

Ezelle, Jeanette .. Gulfport 

Ferrell, Frances Rush Mendenhall 
Fink, Mary Alice Asheville, N. C. 

French, Gracie Mae Mendenhall 

Fyke, Frazier Earl Jickson 

Gayden, Dave Puckett, Jr Brandon 

Geiselman, Stanley Claytus Jackson 

Giffin, Felix Horton Louisville 

Godbold, John B Jickson 

Godbold, Ruth Alma Jackson 

Green, Gwynn Westbrook Jickson 

Green, Joshua ... Jickson 

Gregory, Marianna Jickson 

Griffin, Nina Sutherland Jickson 

Grubbs, Marie Elizabeth Philadelphia 

Hagaman, Frank Henry Jickson 

Hairston, Thomas Wood Jickson 

Hamilton, Clifton Merrill Jickson 

Harlan, William Eugene Jickson 

Harpole, David ... Jickson 

Harris, Charline Mmter Canton 

Harris, Reba Loyce Mendenhall 

Harrison, Cornelia Aimlstead Jickson 

Harrison, Joe Jickson 

Hart, Edith Madalyn Jickson 

Henry, Annie Tchula 

Hiwiller, Jack DeViney Knox, Penna. 

Holcomb, Betty Jo Jackson 

Holder, James Hardy Winona 

Holmes, John Barksdale Winona 

Hooe, Helen Providence, Ky. 

Hopkins, Marie Hall Jackson 
Horowitz, Reuben Mt Kisco, N. Y. 

Howie, Jeanne Hines Jickson 

Hughes, Helen Fiances Jackson 

Ingram, Ruth McNair Bogalusa, La. 

Johnson, LUlian Jickson 

Jolly, Roger Jackson 

Jones, Ann Miller Jackson 
Jones, Charlotte... Prentiss, Miss. 

Jones, Dick Owens Grenada 

Jones, Glendell Asbury Florence 

Jones, Haniel Mobile, Ala. 

Jones, Margaret Anne Jackson 

Jones, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Jones, Sidney Dinkins Jackson 

Kabbes, Josephine Mane Jackson 

Keaton, Joyce ... Canton 

Kennedy, Nell Dawn Fulton, Ky. 
Ketchum, Charles H , Jr Key West, Pla. 

King, Jack Victor Jackson 

King, Richard Lewis Jackson 

Lampe, Millicent Ardis Jackson 

Lampton, William Alexander Tylertown 

Lancaster, Louise Jackson 

Landstreet, Elizabeth Jane Jackson 

Langford, Lewis Harmon Jackson 

Langston, Kate Leggett Hattiesburg 

LaRue, Ruthie ... Jackson 

Leavell, William Alfred, Jr Meridian 

Liles, Louis Everett Jackson 

Lloyd, Betty Clyde Jackson 

Lloyd, Connie Mary Jackson 

Long, Florence M Jackson 

Longinotti, James Durant 

Lowe, Wynona Louise Jackson 

Magee, Curtis Bluitte Jackson 

Majure, Maud Ella Brandon 

Martin, Althea ... Midnight 

Martin, Lena Jemima Calhoun City 

Matthews, William Leslie Leland 

Matthews, Vera Pauline Mendenhall 



Miazza, Louis Anthony Jackson 

Minyard, Virginia Jackson 

Mitchell, Harvey Carroll, Jr Plantersville 

Mize, Virginia Jackson 

Moak, William Edwin Philadelphia 

Montgomery, Virginia Marion Jackson 

Morgan, Virginia Yvonne Hattiesburg 

Morrow, John Henry Picayune 

Moss, Frances Belle Jackson 

Murphree, Dorothy Jackson 

Murphree, Annie Doris Calhoun City 

Murphy, Wynnifred Jackson 

Myers, Rosa Mae Jackson 

McCarty, Betty Jackson 

McCormick, Charles Lewis Crystal Springs 

McDonald, Stella May CarroUton 

McGough, William Marion Catchings 

Mcintosh, Edith Roberts Mars Hill, N. C. 

McKeown, Virginia Lewis Vicksburg 

McLain, Mary Emma Crystal Springs 

McLeroy, Eugene Franklin Leland 

McMillan, Gerald Magee McComb 

McVey, Martha Elizabeth Lambert 

McWhorter, Susie Kite Weir 

Nail, Bettye Jackson 

Neill, Walter Ridgway Ellisville 

Neilson, Alice Noel Lexington 

Nelson, Waudine Madison 

Nichols, Robert George, Jr Jackson 

Nicholson, Dorcas Alene Wesson 

Ogden, James Hattiesburg 

Oliver, Elizabeth Robinson Jackson 

Oliver, H. Bufkin Jackson 

O'Neal, Winston James Saucier 

O'Reilly, Eliza Burrus Benton 

O'Reilly, Susie Vaughan 

Overstreet, Bobbie Kinnear Jackson 

Pearson, Robert Dodd Jackson 

Pigott, Otho Keith Tylertown 

Platte , Patricia Jane Vicksburg 

Porter, Gracealine Jackson 

Porter, Mamie Vossburg 

Prather, Harold Ernest Meadville 

Puckett, Mrs. E. P Crystal Springs 

Raney, Sara Maud Meridian 

Ray, Clifton Caroline Canton 

Raymond, Harry Carlisle Vicksburg 

Rees, Helen L Jackson 

Reily, D. A Waynesboro 

Rhymes, Ann Monticello 

Richardson, Catherine Lawson Jackson 

Richardson, Lloyd Binford Bolton 

Ricketts, Agnes F Jackson 

Ridgway, Walter Stevens Jackson 

Roberts, Sylvia Lucretia Jackson 

Robinson, Brewster Calhoun Bay Springs 

Roby, M. Emmett Yazoo City 

Rogers, Jacquelyn Jackson 

Ross, Mary Frances Jackson 

Ross, Maury Glenn Rome 

Ruoff, Helen Mae Jackson 

Rush, Clarine Vaughan 

Ryan, Mrs. Carol Howie Jackson 

Sanders, John Shipp Jackson 

Sawyer, John Merrill Frisco City, Ala. 

Scott, Charles LeRoy Yazoo City 

Scott, Tom Burkett Jackson 

Shanks, William Ennis Jackson 

Sharp, Ernest Freeman Brandon 

Sheridan, Mary Louise Bogalusa, La. 

Shipley, Elizabeth Ann Canton 

Simmons, Willie Belle Jackson 

Smith, Billy Hudson Ripley 

Smith, Eugene Franklin Jackson 

Smith, Eula Mae Bentonia 

Smith, Martha Elizabeth Columbia 

Smith, Silas David Jackson 

Springer, Elizabeth Sue Jackson 

Stacy, Rufus David Jackson 

Stanley, Kathleen Garner State College 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



99 



SUMMER SESSION — Continued 



Stephens, Carolyn Jackson 

Stephenson. HoUis Watson Keiser, Ark. 

Stodgehill. George Joseph Jackson 

Stroud, Polly Louise 

Stubblefield, Calvin Fort, Jr Yazoo City 

Stubblefield. Joe M Jackson 

Stuckenschneider, James Theodore Columbus 

Stuckey, Dreda Beryllne Star 

Summer, Charles Edgar Yazoo City 

Sykes, Minnie Campbell Jackson 

Tatum, Frederick Edward Hattiesburg 

Taylor, George Jesse, III Morton 

Taylor, Zach Jackson 

Thomasson, Mrs. Mary C Hattiesburg 

Thompson, Bobby Tennis Gulfport 

Touchstone, Alex Green Meridian 

Trimble, Cella Brevard Natchez 

Trimble, Janice Natchez 

Triplett, Nell Erwln 

Troy, Jerry Norton Tupelo 

van der Kroef, Justus Maria Jackson 

Walker, Charles Emmltt, Jr Sanatorium 

Walker, Parker Sanatorium 

Ware, Naomi Harpervllle 

Waring, Elton Marcus Tylertown 

Wasson, Kathryn Clarksdale 

Webb, James Jackson 



Weissinger, Sara Bolton 

Wells, Clay Norris Jackson 

West, Anne Louise Jackson 

White, wmie NeU Pelahatchie 

Whitworth, Mary John Pickens 

Wiggins, Lula K Jackson 

Williams, Crawford Fortson. Greenville 

Williams, James Arthur Indianola 

Williams, Marshall Ney, Jr Rajrmond 

WUliams, Proctor William Greenville 

Williams, Robert Lee, Jr Jackson 

Williamson, James A Philadelphia 

Williamson, W. Ellis Jackson 

Willingham, Martha Nell Jackson 

Wilson, Edwin Craft Vlcksburg 

Wilson, Mary Louise Jackson 

Wof f ord , Jesse Lucius Drew 

Womack, Noel Catching, Jr Pocahontas 

Wright, Charles Henry Jackson 

Wright. Dan Andrews Jackson 

Wright, Richard Frederick Jackson 

Wright, William David Jackson 

Wroten, Frances Marion Columbus 

Wroten, Joseph Eason Columbus 

Yarbrough, Robert Murrah Indianola 

Yelverton, Ivin Nell Bay Springs 

Young, Mary Frances Jackson 



EVENING DIVISION — 1942-'43 



Case, Mary Ellen Jackson 

Edwards, Dorothy Helen Louisville 

Flrebaugh, Mary Elizabeth Canton 

Frazer, Chalmers Fletcher Jackson 

Lester, Betty Alice Jackson 



Peyton, Mary Eloise Raymond 

Prather. Harold B^nest JUeadville 

Swain, Louie-Marie Jackson 

Young, Mrs. M. Doris Jackson 



100 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SUMMARY 

SENIOR — 

Men 38 

Women 35 73 

JUNIOR — 

Men 52 

Women 49 101 

SOPHOMORE — 

Men 62 

Women 45 107 

FRESHMAN — 

Men 87 

Women 98 185 

SPECIAL — 

Men 12 

Women 44 56 

UNCLASSIFIED — 

Men 

Women 1 1 

NIGHT SCHOOL — 

Men 2 

Women 7 9 

TOTAL — 

Men 253 

Women 279 532 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1942 — 

Men 138 

Women 138 276 

TOTAL — 

Men 391 

Women 417 808 

COUNTED TWICE — 

Men 94 

Women 56 150 

TOTAL ATTENDANCE — 

Men 297 

Women 361 658 



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104 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

1942 COMMENCEMENT MEDALS AND AWARDS 

Founders Richard Lauderdale 

Bourgeois Dolores Craft 

Buie Charles Summer 

Tribbett Janice Trimble 

fDean Calloway 

'^^^^^"^ Jjean Calloway 

John C. Carter J. D. Leggett 

Clark Essay Janice Trimble 

Chi Omega Elizabeth Peeler 

Pan Hellenic Evaline Khayat 



BACHELOR OP MUSIC (REQUISITES) 
Mary Joe Currie 

DIPLOMA IN PIANO 

Beverly Dickerson 

Estelle Hasty 

CERTIFICATE IN PIANO 
Carolyn McPherson 

DIPLOMA IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Eva DeCell 

Katherine Grimes 

Nell Triplett 



INDEX 



\ 



Page 

Absences, Class 42 

Academic Calendar 5 

Accreditation 3 

Administrative Committees 7 

Admission, Requirements for 29 

Units for 31 

Advanced Standing 30 

Alumni Association, Officers of 92 

Ancient Languages, Department of 47 

Art, Department of 88 

Athletics 22 

Attendance Regulations 42 

Band 25 

Baptist Student Union 22 

Biology, Department of 49 

Buildings and Grounds 14 

Cafeteria 32 

Calendar 4 

Carnegie-Millsaps Library 17 

Change of Registration 45 

Chapel 42 

Chemistry, Department of 50 

Christian Center 22 

Christian Council 21 

Committees of the Faculty 7 

Comprehensive Examinations 41 

Conduct 44 

Correspondence 2 

Cost of Attending Millsaps 32 

Courses, Description of 47 

Required for B.A. degree 86 

Required for B.S. degree 36 

Schedule of 102 

Suggested sequence for: 

Pre-engineering 38 

Pre-Iaw 38 

Pre-medical and Pre-dental 37 

Pre-ministerial 38 

Teachers 39 

Technicians 37 

Dean's List 44 

Debating 25 

Degrees, Conferred 1942 92 

Requirements for 36 

Delinquency 44 

Departments of Instruction 46 

Ancient Languages 47 

Art 88 

Biology 49 

Chemistry 5q 

Economics 52 

Education 54 

English 56 

Geology 59 

German 50 

Government 60 

History 61 



Page 

Mathematics 63 

Music 76 

Philosophy 65 

Physical Education 66 

Physics and Astronomy 67 

Psychology 68 

Religion 70 

Romance Languages 73 

Sociology 75 

Divisional Groupings 39 

Dormitories 14, 32 

Dramatics 24 

Economics, Department of 52 

Education, Department of 54 

Endowment 14 

English, Department of 56 

Enrollment, Summary of 100 

Entrance, Requirements for 29 

Units 30, 31 

Examinations, Course 43 

Comprehensive 41 

Expenses 32 

Extra Curricular Credits 40 

Faculty 8 

Fees 32 

Fraternities and Sororities 28 

General Information 14 

General Regulations 42 

Geology, Department of 59 

German, Department of 60 

Gifts to the College 16 

to the Library 17 

Government, Department of 60 

Grading System 42, 43 

History, Department of 61 

History of the College 12 

Honorary Degrees 106 

Honors 43 

Honor Societies 26 

Hours Permitted 43 

Excess 33 

Intramural Athletics 23 

Library 14, 17 

Loan Funds 19 

Majors, Requirements for 40 

Mathematics, Department of 63 

Medals and Prizes 20, 104 

Ministerial League 21 

Minors 41 

Music, Certificates Awarded 104 

Courses 79 

Curricula 84 

Faculty 76 



INDEX— Continued 



Page 

Fees 87 

Organizations 25 

Officers of Administration 6 

Other Officers 10 

Philosophy, Department of 65 

Physical Education, Department of 66 

Physics and Astronomy 67 

Placement Bureau 39 

Prizes 20 

Psychology, Department of 68 

Publications, Student 24 

Quality, Point System 42 

Register of Students 96 

Registration, Changes in 45 

Procedure 45 

Statistics 100 

Religion, Department of 70 

Religious Activities 21 

Religious Emphasis Week ^ 22 

Remedial English 42 

Reports to Parents 45 



Page 

Requirements, for Admission 29 

for Degrees 36 

for Majors 40 

Resources 14 

Romance Languages, Department of 73 

Schedule of Classes 102 

Scholarships 18, 104 

Secretarial Studies 53 

Sociology, Department of 75 

Sororities and Fraternities 28 

Special Students 30 

Student Activities Fee 34 

Student Assistants 11 

Student Organizations 24 

Summer Session 89 

Teacher Placement Bureau 39 

Transfer Students 30 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Withdravyals, from College 45 

from Courses 45 

Y. M. C. A. 21 

Y. W. C. A. 21