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Full text of "Millsaps College Catalog, 1959-1960"

140 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
SIXTY-EIGHTH YEAR 

1959-60 

SUMMER SESSION 19 59 

June 6 Registration 

June 8 First Term Classes Begin 

July 4 Holiday 

July 11 Final Examinations, First Term 

July 13 Second Term Classes Begin 

August 14 Final Examinations, Second Term 

FALL SESSION 

September 12 First Meeting of the Faculty 

September IS Dormitories Open for Students. 2 p.m. 

September 14 Orientation of New Students 

September 15 Registration of Seniors, Juniors, Transfers 

September 16 Registration of Sophomores, Freslimen 

Septe'mber 17 Classes Meet on Regular Schedule 

October 3 Last Day for Changes of Schedule 

October 3 Parents Day 

October 24 Homecoming 

November 13 End of First Half of Semester 

November 21 High School Day 

November 25 Thanksgiving Holidays Begin, 3:30 p.m. 

November 30 Thanksgiving Holidays End, 8 a.m. 

December 18 Christmas Holidays Begin, 3:30 p.m. 

January 4 Christmas Holidays End, 8 a.m. 

January 16-23 Final Examinations, First Semester 

January 23 First Semester Ends 

SPRING SESSION 

January 26 Registration of Seniors, Juniors, Transfers 

January 27 Registration of Sophomores, Freshmen, Transfers 

January 28 Classes Meet on Regular Schedule 

February 13 Last Day for Changes of Schedule 

March 25 End of First Half of Semester 

April 14 Spring Holidays Begin, 3:30 p.m. 

April 20 Spring Holidays End, 8 a.m. 

A-pril 25-30 Comprehensive Examinations 

May 20-27 Final Examinations, Second Semester 

May 20 Commencement Day 

SUMMER SESSION 1960 

June 4 Registration 

June 6 First Term Classes Begin 

July 4 Holiday 

July 9 Final Examinations, First Term 

July 11 Second Term Classes Begin 

August 12 Final Examinations, Second Term 



MiLLSAPS College 



;on, Mississippi 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 




-nintin session oegms 



FOREWORD 



Experience indicates that those who examine college cata- 
logs are usually interested primarily in finding the answers to 
the following questions : 

(1) What is the general nature, type, and standing of the college ? 
^2) What are the requirements for admission? 

(3) What is the cost of attending the college and what oppor- 
tunities are available for earning part of these expenses? 

(4) What subjects of study are provided and what are the re- 
quirements for graduation? 

(5) What rules does a student have to follow while attending the 
college ? 

(6) What other activities are provided outside the classroom? 

(7) What physical equipment and financial resources does the 
college have? 

In order to make this catalog easier to read, we have tried 
to arrange it so as to answer these questions in logical order. The 
first two questions, which are of concern primarily to prospec- 
tive students, are answered in Part I. The other questions are 
covered successively in Parts II-VI, as shown in the Table of 
Contents on the opposite page. In Part VII we have given the 
necessary information with regard to the trustees, officers, and 
faculty, and have listed the names of other staff personnel and 
of the members of the student body. 

This catalog is primarily a record of the 1959-60 session of 
the college. The academic calendar of 1960-61 session will be 
found in the back. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Foreword ._ - 2 

Table of Contents 3 

PART I Information for Prospective Students 5 

A. A Summary of Pertinent Information 7 

B. Millsaps College 8 

C. Requirements for Admission _ 10 

D. How to Apply for Admission _._ 12 

E. The Counseling Program 12 

F. Student Housing ._ .13 

G. Dining Facilities 14 

H. Student Health Program 14 

PART II Financial Information 15 

A. Cost of Attendance - — - 17 

B. Financial Regulations 19 

C. Scholarship and Loan Funds 20 

D. Opportunities for Part-Time Employment 25 

PART III The Curriculum ._ 27 

A. Requirements for Degrees 29 

B. Courses Required for Regular Students 33 

C. Suggested Sequence of Courses 33 

D. The Millsaps-Belhaven Cooperative Program 42 

E. The Washington Semester 42 

F. Divisional Groupings 43 

G. Departments of Instruction 43 

PART IV Administration of the Curriculum 87 

A. Grades, Honors, Class Standing 89 

B. Administrative Regulations 91 

PART V Campus Activities 95 

A. Religious Activities 97 

B. Athletics 98 

C. Social Organizations _ - -100 

D. Other Student Organizations and Activities 103 

E. Medals and Prizes 104 

PART VI Physical and Financial Resources 107 

A. History of the College 109 

B. Buildings and Grounds 109 

C. Financial Resovirces 110 

D. The J. Lloyd Decell Lectureship 110 

E. The Millsaps Library 110 

PART VII Register .. 113 

A. Board of Trustees 115 

B. Officers of Administration 116 

C. The College Faculty 117 

D. Other Staff Personnel 122 

E. Committees of the Faculty 122 

F. Officers of the Alumni Association 123 

G. Student Assistants - 123 

H. Enrollment Statistics - 125 

I. The Student Body 126 

J. The Sixty-Seventh Commencement _ 136 

K. Degrees Conferred 136 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 1960-61 

Academic Calendar 140 

Index 138 



THE PURPOSE OF MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Millsaps College has as its primary aim the development of men and 
women for responsible leadership and well-rounded lives of useful service 
to their fellow men, their country, and their God. It seeks to function as 
a community of learners where faculty and students together seek the 
truth that frees the minds of men. 

An as institution of the Methodist Church, Millsaps College is dedi- 
cated to the idea that religion is a vital part of education; that education 
is an integral part of the Christian religion; and that church-related 
colleges, providing a sound academic program in a Christian environment, 
afford a kind of discipline and influence which no other type of institu- 
tion can offer. The College provides a congenial atmosphere where per- 
sons of all faiths may study and work together for the development of 
their physical, intellectual, and spiritual capacities. 

As a liberal arts college, Millsaps seeks to give the student adequate 
breadth and depth of understanding of civilization and culture in order 
to broaden his perspective, to enrich his personality, and to enable him 
to think and act intelligently amid the complexities of the modern world. 
The curriculum is designed to avoid premature specialization and to 
integrate the humanities, the social studies, and the natural sciences for 
their mutual enrichment. 

The College recognizes that training which will enable a person to 
support himself adequately is an essential part of a well-rounded educa- 
tion. On the other hand, it believes that one of the chief problems of 
modern society is that in too many cases training as expert technicians 
has not been accompanied by education for good citizenship. It offers, 
therefore, professional and pre-professional training balanced by cultural 
and humane studies. In an environment that emphasizes the cultural and 
esthetic values to be found in the study of language, literature, philoso- 
phy, and science, the student at Millsaps can also obtain the necessary 
courses to prepare him for service in such fields as teaching, journalism, 
social work, and business or for professional study in these areas as 
well as in theology, medicine, dentistry, engineering, law, and other fields. 

As an institution of higher learning, Millsaps College fosters an 
attitude of continuing intellectual awareness, of tolerance, and of un- 
biased inquiry, without which true education cannot exist. It does not 
seek to indoctrinate, but to inform and inspire. It does not shape the 
student in a common mold of thought and ideas, but rather attempts to 
search out his often deeply hidden aptitudes, capacities, and aspirations 
and to provide opportunities for his maximum potential development. It 
seeks to broaden his horizons and to lift his eyes and heart toward the 
higher and nobler attributes of life. The desired result is an intelligent, 
voluntary dedication to moral principles and a growing social conscious- 
ness that will guide him into a rich, well-rounded Christian life, with 
ready acceptance of responsibility to neighbor, state, and church. 

— adopted by the Faculty and Board of 
Trustees of Millsaps College, 1955-56 



I 

Infomiatioii for Prospective 
Students 




THE CHRISTIAN CENTER 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



A SUMMARY OF PERTINENT INFORMATION 

Admission Kequirements : Graduates of an accredited high school with acceptable rec- 
ords will be admitted. Students who have not regularly prepared for college in an accredit- 
ed high school or whose records are not acceptable may be admitted by examination. For 
details see pages 10-11. 

Credit For IMilitary Service: Veterans are granted 4 semester hours of credit for basic 
military training. Half of this substitutes for the required course in physical education and 
the other half counts as academic credit. Additional credit is granted for educational ex- 
periences in the armed services in accordance with the recommendations contained in the 
Guide published by the American Council on Education. 

College Calendar 1960-61: 

Summer Session, June 4-August 12, 1960. 

Fall Semester, September 12, 1960-January 28, 1961. 

Spring Semester, January 31-May 28, 1961. 

For details see page 141 : 

Courses of Study : 

(1) General College Course leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree with a major in one of the 
following subjects: 

Biology Geology Physics and Astronomy 

Business Administration German Political Science 

Chemistry History Psychology 

Economics Latin Religion 

Elementary Education Mathematics Sociology 

English Music Spanish 

French Philosophy 



(2) Pre-Professional Courses: 

Pre-Dentistry 

Pre-Forestry 

Pre-Laboratory Technician 

Pre-Law 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Nursing 

Pre-Social Work 

Espenses: 

Tuition and Fees ._ 

Laboratory fee for Each Science Course 



(3) Professional Courses: 

Accounting 

Business and Economics 

Chemistry 

Engineering 

Geology 

Physical Education 

Preparation for Christian Work 

Teaching 



$250 a semester 

-$10.00 a semester 



Special fees are charged for courses in Fine Arts and Typewriting and for some courses 
in Education, Accounting, and Psychology. For details see pages 17-18: 

Living Arrangements: Dormitory rooms for both men and women are available at $63.00 
to $88.00 a semester. Board at the college cafeteria for students living on the campus is 
$162 a semester. 

Loans and Scholarships: See pages 20-25. 

Length of College Course: A regular student who does not attend summer school will 
normally complete the requirements for a degree in four years, but by attending summer 
school he can complete the same course in three years. 

Requirements for Degrees: 

(1) A total of 128 semester hours of work including the following: 

B.A. B.S. B A. BS 

12 12 Mathematics 6 6 

12 12 Philosophy 6 - 

6 18 Physical Education .2 2 

6 6 Major Field 24-30 24-30 

6 6 Free Electives 42-48 36-42 



English 

Foreign Language 
Natural Science ... 

History 

Religion 



(2) 120 quality points. Beginning with the graduating class of 1963, an over-all quality 
point index of 1.00 will be required. 

(3) A comprehensive examination in the major field. 

(4) An English proficiency examination. 

(6) 30 of the last 36 hours of academic work must be done in residence except by stu- 
dents who transfer back the final IS hours of work from graduate or professional 
school. 

For details see pages 29-33. 

Required Courses : All regular students are required to enroll for English, mathematics, 
and a foreign language each year until they have completed the degree requirements in these 
subjects. 

Transfer Students: Millsaps College normally allows full credit to transfer students on 
work taken at other accredited institutions. A maximum of 64 semester hours of credit is 
allowed from a junior college. For details see page 11. 



« MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

is a church-related college 

under the joint care and control of the Mississippi and North Missis- 
sippi Conferences of the Methodist Church. The college strives to be 
devoutly Christian. During tlie 19 5 9-60 session it numbered in its 
student body members of twenty-one denominations and in its faculty 
members of seven denominations. It is dedicated to the idea that education 
is an integral part of the Christian religion, that religion is a vital part 
of education, and that church-related colleges, providing a sound educa- 
tional program in a Christian environment, afford a special type of train- 
ing and influence which no other institution can offer. The existence 
side by side of educational institutions related to the church, the state, 
and private agencies, each with its own functions to perform, is not only 
evidence of democracy in our educational system, but is also the best 
possible guarantee of the preservation of democracy in our civilization. 
is a small college 

with enrollment limited to 9 50 students. The close personal relation- 
ship that exists among students, faculty, and administration in the small 
college is one of the most vital parts of the college experience. 
is a co-educational college 

with an enrollment approximately three-fifths men and two-fifths 
women. Boys and girls study together throughout grammar school and 
high school. Men and women work together throughout later life. They 
study and work together at Millsaps. 
is a liberal arts college 

with the primary aim of training its students for responsibile citizen- 
ship and well-rounded lives rather than for narrow professional careers. 
One of the chief curses of our modern society is that so many of our 
people are expert lawyers, or doctors, or business men, or brick layers, 
without at the same time being good citizens. More than any other 
institution, the liberal arts college can remedy this defect by training 
its students, in whatever field of specialization they may choose, to be 
community leaders in responsible citizenship. 
offers professional and pre-professional training 

balanced by cultural and disciplinary studies. The college recognizes 
that in the modern world training which will enable a person to support 
himself adequately is an essential part of a well-rounded education. There- 
fore, the student at Millsaps can, for example, obtain the necessary courses 
to prepare him directly for a business career or for service in education, 
the ministry, or social work; he can study music as preparation for pro- 
fessional work in the field, as well as for its esthetic and cultural value; 
he can become proficient in shorthand and typewriting while at the same 
time studying language and literature; and he can obtain thoroughly 
sound basic courses which will prepare him for professional study in 
medicine, dentistry, law, and other fields. Professional leaders in all 
fields are coming more and more to recognize that the most valuable 
members of their profession are those who have had something more in 
their background of training than the narrow technical study necessary 
for proficiency in that field. 



I 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 9 

selects its students carefully 

not on the basis of ability to pay or previous opportunity or cliarm 
of personality, but on ability to think, desire to learn, good moral char- 
acter, and intellectual maturity. The primary consideration in acting on 
all applications for admission is the ability to do college work in a measure 
satisfactory to the college and beneficial to the student. Tuition is kept 
low enough to make higher education available to all, but admission re- 
quirements high enough to include only those who can profit from it. 
has a cosniopolitan student body 

representing a wide geographical area. During the 19 59-19 60 session 
twenty-five states and. five foreign countries were represented in the stu- 
dent body. It is the policy of the college to encourage by scholarships and 
otherwise the attendance of foreign students, because of the mutual 
contribution this can make to international good will and understanding. 
is ideally located 

in the capital city of the state. Many educational advantages may 
be found in Jackson in addition to the courses offered at the college. 
The State Department of Archives and History, the State Library, the 
Library of the State Department of Health, and the Jackson Public 
Library provide research facilities found nowhere else in the state. The 
Jackson Symphony Orchestra, Jackson Little Theater, The Jackson Opera 
Guild, Inc., and numerous musical, dramatic, and sporting events staged at 
the City Auditorium add materially to the cultural advantages available. 
is fully accredited 

by all appropriate standardizing and accrediting agencies, both 
regional and national, and is recognized by the General Board of Educa- 
tion of the Methodist Church as one of the strongest institutions in the 
connection. 

Millsaps is approved by: 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
The American Association of University Women 
The University Senate of the Methodist Church 

Millsaps shares current educational thought by membership in: 

The Association of American Colleges 

The American Council on Education 

The National Commission on Accrediting 

The Council of Protestant Colleges and Universities 

The Southern University Conference 

The Association of Methodist Schools and Colleges 

The Mississippi Association of Colleges 

The American Conference of Academic Deans 

The American and Southern Assn. of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers 

The American and the Mississippi Library Association 

The Mississippi Academy of Sciences 

The Southern Association of College and University Business Officers 

The American Academy of Political and Social Science 

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators 

Mississippi Research Clearing House 

Mississippi Educational Association 

The American Alumni Council 

Modern Languages Association 

Association of College Unions 

Mississippi Historical Society 

American College Public Relations Association 



10 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

General Requirements 

Millsaps College will accept as members of its student body only young 
men and women who are well qualified to benefit from the kind of 
academic life offered by the college. All applicants for admission must 
furnish evidence of 

1. Good moral character 

2. Sound physical and mental health 

3. Adequate scholastic preparation 

4. Intellectual maturity 

Adinission to Preshman Standing 

Application for admission to freshman standing may be made accord- 
ing to either of the following plans: 

1. By Certificate. 

Graduates of an accredited high school or secondary school may 
be admitted to freshman standing on presentation of a transcript 
signed by the proper authorities of that school, showing the kind and 
amount of scholastic work done, provided that: 

(a) The student's record shows the satisfactory completion of at least 
sixteen acceptable units of secondary school work. 

(b) One-half of the units of secondary school work accepted for 
entrance must be in English, mathematics, and social studies or 
foreign language. These units should normally include four 
units of English, two units of mathematics, and at least two units 
of history, other social studies, or foreign language. 

(c) Not more than four vocational units may be included in those 
required for entrance. 

2. By Examination. 

Students who have not regularly prepared for college in a 
recognized secondary school may apply for admission by making 
complete statement regarding qualifications and training. Such 
students may be regularly admitted if they qualify in a battery 
of achievement examinations given at the college under the di- 
rection of the Office of Student Personnel. These examinations 
are given on the scholastic work covered by the list of secondary 
units approved by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

College Entrance Board Examination certificates or the high 
school level General Educational Development Test may be ac- 
cepted in place of high school certificates or examination by 
Millsaps College. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 11 

Admission To Advanced Standing 

1. Millsaps College normally allows full credit to transfer students on 
work taken at other accredited institutions. Some courses which are 
not regarded as consistent with a liberal arts curriculum, however, may 
not be credited toward a degree. 

2. Students with good records at non-accredited institutions may be ad- 
mitted on probation, and the work done at such institutions will be 
validated if the student makes a satisfactory record the first year at 
Millsaps. 

3. A maximum of 6 4 semester hours of credit will be allowed from a 
junior college. 

4. Full credit is allowed for all junior college academic courses of fresh 
man and sophomore level and full elective credit allowed for other 
courses, with the proviso that junior college transfers may be called 
upon to do extra work necessary to fulfill the requirements at Millsaps 
for majors, for pre-professional work, and for professional teaching 
licenses. 

5. After earning 64 semester hours of credit at a senior or junior college, 
a student will not be granted any additional credit toward a degree at 
Millsaps for work done at a junior college. 

6. Grades and quality points made by students at other institutions will 
be recorded on their records at Millsaps, but transfer students will bf 
required to include in the 120 quality points required for graduation 
quality points earned at Millsaps at least equal in number to the num- 
ber of hours of academic credit remaining on their graduation require- 
ment after the transfer credits are entered. 

7. In the case of students transferring to Millsaps with more tnan 3 but 
less than 6 hours credit in a required subject, the head of the depart- 
ment concerned is authorized to approve a 3-hour elective in that de- 
partment as a substitute for the remainder of the required course. 

8. Credit will not be given for work done by correspondence. 

Admission As Special Student 

1. A special student is one who enrolls for less than 12 hours of academic 
work per semester or one who has previously received a baccalaureate 
degree. Students in their senior year taking all the work required to 
complete a degree are not considered special students, even though 
taking less than 12 hours. 

2. For admission as a special student the candidate must be at least 21 
years of age and must present adequate proof of good character and of 
maturity of training. 

3. Special students may enroll for whatever courses they desire without 
regard to graduation requirements, but must in all cases meet the pre- 
requisites for the courses elected by them. 

4. No special student may be recognized as a candidate for a degree 
unless he completes all entrance requirements at least one year before 
the date of graduation. No college credit will be granted until entrance 
requirements are satisfied. 

5. Special students are not permitted to represent the college in inter- 
collegiate activities. 



12 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

HOW TO APPLY FOR ADMISSION 

All persons not in residence at Millsaps during the preceding regular 
semester must apply to the Admissions Committee and be accepted prior 
to registration for the fall and spring semesters. 

A prospective student should apply for admission well in advance of 
the date on which he wishes to enter, particularly if housing accommoda- 
tions on the campus are desired. The Admissions Committee begins act- 
ing on applications for the fall semester in February and on applications 
for the spring semester in November. 

In applying for admission a prospective student should follow the 
procedure described below: 

1. He should request an application blank from the Dean, who is chair- 
man of the Admissions Committee. 

2. He should fill out this application blank and return it to the Dean. 

3. He should have a letter of recommendation sent to the Dean by an 
appropriate official of the school or schools he has previously attend- 
ed, attesting to his character and ability. 

4. He should have his high school principal or college registrar send an 
official transcript of his credits directly to the Dean. A separate 
transcript is required from every secondary school or college attended, 
even though credits previously earned are included on the transcript 
from the school last attended. A student who has already earned some 
college credit, however, need not have a separate transcript of his 
high school credits sent if these are included on his college tran- 
script. 

If the prospective student is in school at the time he applies for ad- 
mission, he should have a transcript sent showing his credits up to that 
time. If he is accepted, a supplementary transcript will be required later 
showing the completion of his work. 

COUNSELING PROGRAM 

The fundamental objective of all counseling services is to assist each 
student to be ready and able to accomplish maximum success in his aca- 
demic work. Consequently, every member of the college community par- 
ticipates in counseling, and specialists from the community are used as 
referral resources when the nature of a student's problem requires highly 
specialized therapy. Basically, the divisions of the counseling program 
are as follows: 

1. Pre-Registration Counseling 

In order to assist new and prospective students to plan wisely in 
looking forward to their college careers, the college will provide on 
request counseling services to any prospective student who may desire 
to explore his vocational and educational objectives before he enters 
his classes in the fall semester. 

2. Orientation 

All new students (freshmen and transfers) are expected to be on the 
campus on September 12, 1960, to participate in the orientation pro- 



I 

ii 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 13 

gram. This program is developed and executed cooperatively by stu- 
dents and faculty for the purpose of assisting students to be adequately 
prepared for entering fully into the college program. 

3. Faculty Advisers 

Each new student at Millsaps is assigned to a member of the faculty 
who serves as the adviser for that student with respect to his aca- 
demic program. At the time a student chooses his major field 
of study, his major professor automatically becomes his faculty 
adviser. 

4. Personal Counseling 

Particular attention is given by the Office of Student Personnel to 
counseling students on such matters as vocational choice, selection 
of fields of study, study skills, reading skills, emotional adjustment, 
and similar college student problems. 

5 . Testing 

Each student entering Millsaps takes part in the entrance testing pro- 
gram, which is designed to provide information that will assist persons 
who counsel with him to work effectively in helping him plan his 
program and activities at the college. In addition, any student regis- 
tered in the college has available to him individual testing services 
to assist him in self-analysis and planning in terms of his individual 
aptitudes, interests, and personality characteristics. 

STUDENT HOUSING 

The housing program of the college is coordinated by the Dean of 
Students and the Dean of "Women in cooperation with the dormitory 
housemothers, counselors, and managers. Men students live in our three 
men's residence halls or in fraternity houses. Women students live in our 
four women's residence halls. The regulations by which resident women 
students are governed are formulated and administered by the Women's 
Council. 

All out-of-town students are required to reside in college housing 
facilities, unless they have received permission, in writing, through the 
Office of Student Personnel to live in approved off-campus housing. No 
first-semester freshmen are permitted to live in fraternity houses. Stu- 
dents who desire to live with relatives while attending Millsaps must make 
this a matter of record in the Office of Student Personnel. 

Room assignments are made in the order in which students' class- 
room reservation fees have been received. If any student indicates a 
specific preference for a particular room or dormitory, he will be assigned 
to that space if it has not been taken previously by some one whose eligi- 
bility for the room entitles him to it. Students desiring to room together 
should make every effort to forward their reservation fees at the same 
time and specify their desire to room together. 

After notification of room assignment, a student must accept or re- 
ject the assignment in writing within two weeks of the notification. Room 
rent cannot be refunded after the semester has begun. 



14 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Dormitories open for occupancy at 2 p.m. of the day preceding 
each term or semester and close at 5 p.m. on the last day of each term or 
semester. All dormitories close at 5 p.m. on the afternoon of the day 
that Christmas holidays begin and re-open at 2 p.m. on the day 
immediately preceding the day that classes resume following the holiday 
period. No students can be housed in the dormitories during the Christ- 
mas holiday period. 

DINING FACILITIES 

Boarding students eat their meals in the college cafeteria located 
in the Student Union Building. This dining room is under expert super- 
vision and furnishes wholesome food at moderate rates. Board may be 
paid in cash for each meal, in advance by the month, or in advance by 
the semester. The cost of board is considerably less when paid in ad- 
vance by the semester. Students rooming in fraternity houses are con- 
sidered boarding students. The college grill also is available for snacks 
and quick orders. 

STUDENT HEALTH PROGRAM 

The infirmary, conveniently located on the campus and supervised 
by a registered nurse, is available to all resident students. The services of 
the college physician are available through the infirmary. Students with 
minor illnesses are cared for in the infirmary. Any students having 
major illnesses or needing hospital services return home or are referred 
to one of the local hospitals for treatment on a private-patient basis. In 
connection with the college program of preventive medicine, each new stu- 
dent is required to have influenza immunization prior to enrollment and 
to have his family physician complete and mail in a health record and 
physical examination form. This form is a required part of the registra- 
tion procedure. 

THE MILLSAPS COLLEGE UNION 

The heart of a small college is the close relationship between stu- 
dents and faculty. From this relationship pulses the life-blood of the 
campus in the form of mutual confidence, mutual respect, and mutual 
concern for the welfare of the total membership of the college community. 
The Millsaps College Union makes a unique contribution to the College 
by serving as the "living room" of the campus where friends can meet 
for relaxation and enrichment through interpersonal contacts; by pro- 
viding a center for extracurricular activities; by providing a central 
location for the cafeteria, the grill, the post office, and the book store; 
by serving as a focal point for commuters and off-campus students; and 
by providing a general unifying influence for the entire campus. 



i 



Part II 
Financial Information 




MURRAH HALL 




SULLIVAN-HARRELL HALL 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 17 

COST OF ATTENDING MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SEMESTER EXPENSES — DAY STUDENTS 

Tuition ....$150.00 

General college fees* 100.00 

Due beginning each semester $250.00 

SEMESTER EXPENSES — BOARDING STUDENTS 

Tuition and fees as above $250.00 

Room (except Whitworth-Sanders, Franklin, Ezelle)** .. 63.00 
Board 162.00 

Total for one semester $475.00 

The twenty-five-dollar reservation fee paid in advance will apply on 
the above charges. 

It is appropriate to note that the semester tuition charge of $150.00 covers 
only about one-half of the actual educational cost for each student. Millsaps 
College assumes responsibilittj for the additional cost. 

It may be that some parents will desire to meet more of the cost of educa- 
tion than is covered in the minimum tuition charge. Additional payments may 
he made to Millsaps College and can be considered contributions. 

♦General college fees include registration, library, physical educa- 
tion, speech activities, music activities, and student association fees. 

**Housing rates each semester: 

Women: Founders $63.00, Whitworth-Sanders $75.50. 

Fae Franklin $88.00. 
Men: Burton $63.00, Galloway $63.00, Ezelle $75.50. 

SPECIAL FEES 
In addition to the regular costs listed above, students are charged 
certain fees per course per semester for special services. These fees ap- 
ply only to students registering for these particular courses: 

Fine Arts Fees 

Art courses, per semester 

Each course 530.00 

Music courses, per semester for private lessons 

One lesson per week $50.00 

Two lessons per week $90.00 

Special instruction for recital $45.00 

Note: The above includes use of college-owned instruments and prac- 
tice rooms. There is no fee for Band, Millsaps Singers, or Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Science Laboratory Fees 

Astronomy $10.00 

Biology (except 52) 10.00 

Biology 71, 72 (2 hours credit) 7.50 

Biology 71, 72 (1 hour credit) 5.00 

Chemistry (except 82) 10.00 

Geology (except 52) 10.00 



18 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Geology 61, 62 (2 hours credit) 7.50 

Geology 61, 62 (1 hour credit) 5.00 

Physics (except 31) 10.00 

Other Liaboratory Fees 

Economics 31, 32 36.00 

Economics 31A, 32A, 71 3.00 

Education 191 2.00 

Engineering 22, 41, 42 3.00 

Modern Foreign Language, each course 5.00 

Practice Teaching (Ed. 41, 42, 61, 62) each course 15.00 

Practice Teaching (Ed. 91, 101) each course 22.50 

Psychology 61, 71 3.00 

Typewriting 6.00 

Graduation Fee 

Diploma, cap, gown, commencement expense $18.00 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 
A special student is one who takes less than twelve semester hours of 
academic work for college credit or one who has already received a bac- 
calaureate degree. Special students pay the following tuition rates plus 
any laboratory fees Involved. 

Tuition per semester hour: 

1 to 11 semester hours inclusive, per hour $18.00 

12 or more semester hours Full tuition and fees 

Students taking only private music lessons or private art lessons 
for college credit pay a registration fee of $10 for each course plus the 
special fees for the courses taken. There is no other charge. 

EXCESS HOURS 
The normal student load is five subjects with either physical educa- 
tion or extra-curricular activities making a maximum of seventeen hours. 
Students registering for courses in excess of seventeen hours will be 
charged $10.00 for each additional hour per semester. , 

NON-RESIDENT OR OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS 

Tuition for non-resident or out-of-state students will be the custom- 
ary tuition plus $1.00 per semester hour. The low tuition at Millsaps Col- 
lege is possible in part because of the annual contributions of the two 
Methodist Conferences in Mississippi. It seems only fair, therefore, that 
students from other states wishing to utilize the educational facilities 
which these contributions help to provide should be asked to pay this ad- 
ditional amount above the regular tuition. 

Clarification of non-resident status: Students under twenty-one 
years of age use the legal residence of their families. Married students 
and students twenty-one years or over use the legal residence of their 
parents or guardians, or their legal residence immediately prior to regis- 
tration in a school in Mississippi. Children of parents stationed outside 
Mississippi but understood to be primarily residents or citizens of this 
state may be classified as residents. Aliens are classified as non-residents. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 19 

REVISION OF CHARGES 
Millsaps College reserves the privilege of changing any or all 
charges at any time without jirior notice. 

FINANCIAL REGULATIONS 

SOURCE OF INCOME. — Millsaps College receives income from these 
sources: endowment fund investments, 11%; Methodist Church support, 
14%; alumni support, 3%; business firms and foundations, 3%; tuition 
and fees, 54%; room rent and miscellaneous, 15%. 

PAYMENTS. — All charges are due and payable at the opening of 
the semester. No student will be marked present in his classes until 
payment has been made in the Business Office or satisfactory financial 
arrangements have been made with the Business Manager of the college. 

Any accounts due for any preceding semester must be paid before a 
student will be enrolled for the succeeding semester. The Registrar is 
not permitted to transfer credits until all outstanding indebtedness to 
the college is paid. 

No student will be allowed to graduate unless he shall have settled 
with the Business Office all his indebtedness to the college, including 
library fines and the graduation fee. 

VETERANS' PAYMENTS. — Veterans attending school under Public 
Law 550 (Korean Bill) will pay the same tuition and fees as regular 
students. The government will reimburse them by monthly payments. 

STUDENTS ROOMING IN FRATERNITY HOUSES. — Students 
rooming in fraternity houses eat in the college cafeteria. Rules re- 
garding payment of board and fees applicable to other students will be 
observed by the students rooming in fraternity houser. 

REFUNDS. — Room rent cannot be refunded after the semester has 
begun. Unused amounts paid in advance for board will be refundable. 
A student who withdraws with good reason from a course or courses 
within two weeks after the date of the first meeting of classes on regular 
schedule will be entitled to a refund of 80% of tuition and fees; within 
three weeks, 60%; within four weeks 40%; and within five weeks 20%. 
If a student remains in college as much as five weeks, no refund will be 
made except for board. 

The date of withdrawal from which all claims to reductions and 
refunds will be referred is the date on which the Registrar is officially 
notified by the student of his intention to withdraw. (See regulations 
relative to withdrawals.) 

The college reserves the right to cancel the registration of any stu- 
dent at any time. In such a case, the pro rata portion of tuition will be 
returned, except that students withdrawing under discipline forfeit the 
right to a refund for any charges. 

AUDITING OF COURSES. — Courses are audited only with approval 
of the Dean. There will be no charge to a full-time student except 
laboratory fee for auditing any course. Special students taking other 



20 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

courses may audit one course without charge except for the payment of 
a laboratory fee that may be involved. A person not enrolled in any 
courses for college credit will be allowed to audit one course without 
charge, provided he pays for one or more other courses at the rates for 
special students, plus laboratory fees; no other fees will be charged. A 
student auditing the classroom work of a course and not auditing the 
laboratory work will not be considered as having a laboratory fee in- 
volved. A student auditing a course in which the laboratory work and 
classroom work cannot be separated will be required to pay the labora- 
tory fee. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION FEE 

The Student Association fee is $6.75 per semester for each full-time 
student. The Student Senate distributes this fee among such organiza- 
tions as Christian Council, Purple and White, Bobashela, and Stylus. 

The Speech and Music Activities fee of $5.25 per semester for each 
full-time student enables these departments to have a full program of 
student activities and performances. This fee also entitles each full-time 
student to free admission to all performances of these departments. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FEE 
A carefully planned athletic, intramural, and physical education 
program is maintained by the college. In return for a fee of $8.00 per 
semester the student receives the advantages afforded by the golf course, 
tennis courts, gymnasium, and athletic fields. In addition the student 
is admitted to all home varsity athletic contests. Physical education 
students are furnished with towel and locker service. The intramural 
teams are furnished with game equipment and game officials. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS 

All applications for scholarship help and loans should be made to 
the Chairman of the Awards Committee. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 
High School Day Freshman Scholarships 

The Board of Trustees has authorized the annual awarding of scholar- 
ships ranging in value from $100 to $300 to selected graduates of Mis- 
sissippi high schools upon the recommendation of the Awards Committee. 
The awards are made on the basis of psychological examinations ad- 
ministered at the college on High School Day each year. Twenty such 
scholarships, having a total value of $2,300, were awarded for the 1959- 
60 session; forty scholarships with a total value of $4,800 will be 
awarded for the 19 60-61 session. 

Service Scholarships 

There are service scholarships in each of several departments, the 
holders of which are expected to aid the members of the faculty in some 
definite work. These scholarships are ordinarily open only to members 
of the upper classes. A few service scholarships in the library and women's 
dormitories are open to entering students. Application should be made 
to the Chairman of the Awards Committee. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 21 

The Tribbett Scholarship 

The student to whom the scholarship is awarded receives two hundred 
dollars, payable one-half at the beginning of the first semester and one- 
half at the beginning of the second. The award is subject to the following 
conditions: 

This scholarship is to be awarded at the end of each session to the 
member of the sophomore or junior class whose quality index is highest 
for the year, subject to the following qualifications: 

1. He must be a regular student with not less than thirty-two semester 
hours' work for the year, and must have made at least "C" in each of the 
subjects studied. 

2. He must be qualified for work assigned by the President of the 
college. 

The John Rnndle, Jr., Scholarship 

The John Rundle, Jr., Scholarship was created by his parents in 
memory of their son. This is a scholarship open to any student of 
Millsaps College. 

The Ricketts Scholarship 
The R. S. Ricketts Scholarship was created by Professor Ricketts' two 

sons and named for their father, a long-time member of the Mill- 
saps faculty. 

The W. H. Brewer Scholarship 

The W. H. Brewer Scholarship was created by his son, Mr. Ed C. 
Brewer, of Clarksdale, and is open to any student at Millsaps College. 

National Methodist Scholarships 

The National Methodist Scholarships provide tuition and fees for 
three Methodist students who have ranked within the upper fifteen per 
cent of their class. 

The James Hand, Sr., Scholarship 

The James Hand, Sr., Scholarship has been created by James Hand, 
Jr., honoring his father of Rolling Fork, Mississippi. 

The Sullivan Memorial Scholarship 

The scholarship was established in memory of Dr. W. T. J. Sullivan 
and in honor of the late Dr. J. Magruder Sullivan, for forty-five years 
professor of Chemistry and Geology. The scholarship is to be awarded 
to ministerial students only. Mr. C. C. Sullivan, son of Dr. J. M. Sullivan, 
has recently made a generous gift to this scholarship fund and is serving 
as a trustee of the scholarship. 

The Clara Barton Green Scholarship 

Clara Barton Green Scholarship was created by her husband, Wharton 
Green, of the Class of 1898, and their three children, Margaret G. Runyon, 
Clarissa G. Coddington, and Wharton Green, Jr. 



22 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Tlie Wharton Green '98 Scholarship 

On the 5 0th anniversary of his graduation, Mr. Green established a 
$5,000.00 fund at Millsaps College. This amount has now been sub- 
stantially increased. The income from this fund will be given annually 
to students selected by the Awards Committee of the faculty. Mr. Green 
was a Consulting Engineer in New York City for many years. 

The James Monroe Wallace, III, Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by the grandparents and parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. James Monroe Wallace, Sr., and Jr., of Como, Mississippi, 
in memory of the little boy who passed away when he was about five years 
old. Interest from the fund will go as a scholarship to some deserving 
Millsaps ministerial student. 

The Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Mars Scholarship 
The Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Mars Scholarship was created by Mrs. Mars 
and her three sons, Norman, Henry, and Lewis of Philadelphia, Mississippi, 
and daughter, Mrs. D. W. Bridges of Athens, Georgia. Scholarships from 
this fund are to be given to ministerial students. 

The Clyde W. Hall Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in 1953 by Mr. and Mrs. Clyde W. 
Hall of New Albany, Mississippi. The income from this fund is to be 
awarded annually by the Awards Committee of the faculty to a deserving 
student. 

The W. H. Watkins Scholarship 

This scholarship was created to help worthy students with their col- 
lege expenses. The income from the fund is awarded annually to a stu- 
dent selected by the Awards Committee of the faculty. 

The Dr. and Mrs. J. R. Countiss, Sr., Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by Dr. and Mrs. Countiss in 1950. 
Interest from the fund will go as a scholarship to some student chosen 
by the college. Dr. Countiss graduated at Millsaps in 1902, was for many 
years a member of its Board of Trustees, was a member of the North Mis- 
sissippi Conference, and was for twenty-four years President of Grenada 
College. 

The Willie E. Smith Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Willie E. Smith in 1951. 
Interest from the fund will go to some ministerial student selected by 
the college. 

The Josie Millsaps Fitzhugh Scholarship 

Mrs. Fitzhugh left the college a $35,000 fund to be established as a 
scholarship. Earnings from the fund will go into scholarships for deserv- 
ing students at Millsaps College. 

The Dr. and Mrs. C W. Crisler Scholarship 

This fund was established by Dr. Charles W. Crisler in memory of 
his wife. Interest from the fund will go as a scholarship to some student 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 23 

chosen by the college. Dr. Crisler was a Methodist minister and a mem- 
ber of the Mississippi Conference for more than fifty years. 

The Marvin Galloway Scholarship 

This scholarship was created for the purpose of aiding worthy stu- 
dents who need financial assistance. The income from the fund is given 
each year to a student selected by the Awards Committee of the faculty. 

Tlie Millsaps Ministerial Scholarship 

The Millsaps Club of the Mississippi Conference of the Methodist 
Church established this fund in 19 50. The income is awarded each year 
by the Awards Committee of the faculty to a ministerial student or stu- 
dents. 

The Harvey T. Newell, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship is being established by the friends of Harvey T. 
Newell, Jr., a 1933 graduate of the college. While a student at Mill- 
saps, Mr. Newell was prominent in school affairs and served as editor 
of the Purple and White. At the time of his accidental death in 1953, 
the prominent young business executive was on official business in his 
office as National President of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. 

The Sullivan Geology Teaching Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by gifts secured by the late Dr. 
J. M. Sullivan. It has been increased with other gifts since the death of 
Dr. Sullivan and has now become the Sullivan Geology Teaching Scholar- 
ship in memory of Dr. J. Magruder Sullivan. The scholarship was estab- 
lished to encourage students majoring in geology to go into the field 
of geology teaching. The recipient of this scholarship is to be a junior 
or a senior of Christian character and ambitious purpose; under the 
terms of the scholarship, the student selected may do a year of graduate 
work in geology. The Head of the Geology Department, the Dean, and 
the President of the college make up the committee to select the student 
who will receive the scholarship. 

The Alvin Jon King Music Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in December, 1954, by an anony- 
mous donor to honor Alvin Jon King, the director of the Millsaps Sing- 
ers, 1934-1956. Income from this fund is given each year to one or 
more students of music or music activities of the college. The recipient 
is chosen by the Awards Committee of the faculty. 

The Albert Burnell Shelton Scholarship 

This scholarship was established in the fall of 1955 by Mrs. A. B. 
Shelton of Lambert, Mississippi, as a memorial to her late husband, Albert 
Burnell Shelton. The income from this fund will be awarded each year 
to some worthy student or students selected by the college. 

The Dr. Elbert Alston Cheek and Son Scholarships 

The Dr. Elbert Alston Cheek and Son Scholarships have been estab- 
lished by the late Mrs. Mae Jack Cheek in memory of her husband, the 
late Dr. Elbert Alston Cheek, and their son, the late Elbert Alston Cheek. 



24 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Jr. Mrs. Cheek's gift is valued at $135,000. The gift is to be invested in 
government bonds, income from which investment will be awarded in 
scholarships of $500 each. The scholarship may be renewed if the stu- 
dent continues to qualify. In awarding the Cheek scholarships preference 
shall be given to any applicant or applicants descended either from Edward 
Jack of Brandon, Mississippi, or from Robert T. Cheek, Sr. of Millville, 
Mississippi, provided always that such applicants need financial assist- 
ance and qualify for the scholarships. 

The Billy Gulledge Memorial Scholarship 

The Billy Gulledge Memorial Scholarship was established in 195 7 
by Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Gulledge of Crystal Springs as a memorial to their 
son, James William Gulledge, an outstanding pre-medical student in the 
class of 1957 at Millsaps College. 

The scholarship is to be awarded to a Millsaps College student who 
has completed a minimum of four semesters of college work. The recipient 
of the scholarship, to be selected by the Awards Committee of the faculty, 
is to be a student of good moral character and of promise and usefulness. 
Preference is to be given to a student majoring in one of the Natural 
Sciences. 

The Mississippi Conference M.Y.F. Scholarship 

This scholarship was established during the 1957-58 school session 
by the Executive Committee of the Mississippi Conference Methodist 
Youth Fellowship. The award is made annually, but the amount of the 
financial assistance may vary from year to year. The recipient, selected 
by the Executive Committee of the Conference M.Y.F. upon recommenda- 
tion of the Millsaps Awards Committee, must be a dedicated Christian, 
an active member of the Conference M.Y.F., and must meet the general 
requirements for scholarship assistance set up by the Millsaps Awards 
Committee. A minimum of four hours work per week in the Conference 
M.Y.F. office is required of the recipient. 

The Dennis E. Vickers Memorial Scholarship 

This endowed scholarship was established in 19 59 by Mrs. Robert 
Price (nee Jessie Vickers) and Miss Eleanor Vickers as a memorial to 
their father, the Reverend Dennis E. Vickers. In the awarding of the 
scholarship preference is given to students preparing for a full-time church 
vocation. 

The Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Lester Scholarship Fund 

The Lester Scholarship Fund was established in 1959 by the will of 
the late Miss Daisy Lester as a memorial to her parents, the Reverend 
and Mrs. W. C. Lester. Recipients of Awards from this fund must be 
residents of Mississippi and must give evidence of need for financial 
assistance to pursue a college education. 

LOAN FUNDS 
The Kenneth Gilbert Loan Scholarship 

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Gilbert, Meridian, Mississippi, are endowing a 
loan scholarship as a memorial to their son, Kenneth, who lost his life 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 25 

in World War II. He received the B.S. degree from Millsaps in 1935 and 
■was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

The Graham R, McFarlane Loan Scholarship 

This scholarship was created by the McFarlane family to be used as 
a loan without interest to young people, preferably of the Christian 
Church, who are going into full-time religious work either as ministers 
or directors of religious education in that denomination. Graham was a 
Millsaps graduate and lost his life in the Texas City disaster in 1947. 
The scholarship will be administered by the administration of the college 
and the executive secretary of the Christian Churches of the state. 

The Paul and Dee Faulkner Loan Fund 

This fund was established in 19 57 by Mr. and Mrs. J. Paul Faulkner 
of Jackson. The gift is to be made available as a loan to any student or 
students regularly enrolled at Millsaps College. Preference is to be given 
to a member of the senior class. 

The National Defense Student Loan Program 

Beginning with the 19 58-59 session, Millsaps College has participated 
in the National Defense Student Loan Program, established by Act of 
Congress in September, 1958, Public Law 85-864, 85th Congress. Under 
the provisions of this act, and dependent upon availability of funds, 
qualifying students may borrow up to $1,000 per year for educational 
purposes. Loans are repayable over a period of 10 years, beginning one 
year after completion of education, at an interest rate of 3 % . Students 
in any field of study are eligible for such loans provided they meet the 
established requirements, but the law requires that special consideration 
be given to students with superior academic records or capacity in science, 
mathematics, engineering, and modern languages, or to students prepar- 
ing for a career in elementary or secondary school teaching. Detailed 
information concerning these loans and application forms can be secured 
from the College. 

The Methodist Student Loan Fund 

This is a loan fund established by the Board of Education of the 
Methodist Church and administered on the campus by the Director of 
Religious Life and the Academic Dean. Applicants must be members of 
the Methodist Church, full-time degree candidates, wholly or partially self- 
supporting, and must have maintained a grade average of C during the 
term immediately preceding application. 

PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT 
Opportunities exist on the campus and in the city for the employment 
of students who find it necessary to earn a part of their expenses. Stu- 
dents who want part-time work may register with the Office of Student 
Personnel. While such a registration is not a guarantee of employment, 
these students are given preference when calls for part-time employees 
are received. 




WOMEN'S DORMITORY: FAE FRANKLIN HALL 




MEN'S DORMITORIES: BURTON, GALLOWAY AND EZELLE HALLS 



Part III 
The Curriculum 




MILLSAPS-WILSON LIBRARY 




THE JAMES OBSERVATORY 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 29 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

1. Minimum Requirements for All Degrees: Sem. Hrs. 

English 11-12 and 21-22 12 

♦Foreign Language — 2 years in one language 12 

History 11-12 6 

Religion 11-12 6 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 6 

Physical Education 2 

Comprehensive Examination in major subject, taken in the senior 

year. 
English Proficiency Examination, given in the junior year. 

2. Additional Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree: 
**Natural Science (Biology 9-10, 11-12, 21A-22A; Chemi- 

istry 21-22; Geology 11-12; Physics 11-12, 11A-12A) .... 6 or 8 

Philosophy 6 

Electives to total 128 

3. Additional Requirements for Bachelor of Science Degree: 

Three of the following sciences: 

Chemistry 21-22 8 

***Biology 11-12 or 21A-22A 6 or 8 

Geology 11-12 6 

Physics 11-12 or 11A-12A 6 or 8 

Electives to total 128 

4. Art and Music Credit. 

A maximum of twelve hours of Art will be accepted toward a degree. 
A maximum of forty-two hours of Music will be accepted toward a degree. 

5. Residence Requirements: 

One year of residence is required for graduation from Millsaps, and 
30 of the last 3 6 hours of academic work must be done in residence. The 
only exception allowed to this rule is in the case of students leaving to 
enter graduate or professional school, who may transfer back the final 18 
hours of work. In this case, however, residence will be required at Millsaps 
for the second semester of the Junior year and the first semester of the 
Senior year. 

Three summer sessions will be considered as equivalent to the one 
year of residence required. 

6. English Proficiency Requirement: 

Before receiving a bachelor's degree each student is required to dem- 
onstrate proficiency in English composition and usage by passing an ex- 
amination given by the English Department. This examination is given in 
the first semester of the Junior year (or in the first semester of residence, 
in the case of students transferring to Millsaps at a later point in their 
college course). Those who fail to pass this examination are assigned to a 

*If a student has two high school units and continues the same language in college, he is 
required to take onlv the foreign language 11-12 courses (6 hours). 
**An six or eight hours in same course. 
***Biology 9-10 will be accepted for Geology majors. 



30 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

member of the faculty for supervision in acquiring the required degree of 
proficiency. 

7. Extracurricular Credits: 

The following extracurricular activities to a maximum of eight semes- 
ter hours may be included in the 128 semester hours required for gradu- 
ation: 

Physical Education (Required) 2 

Physical Education (Elective) 6 

Purple and White Editor 4 

Purple and White Business Manager 4 

Purple and White Department Editors (six) 6 

Purple and White Staff (six) 6 

Bobashela Editor 4 

Bobashela Business Manager 4 

Bobashela Editorial Staff (four) 4 

Bobashela Business Staff (four) 4 

Players 6 

Millsaps Singers 6 

Debate 6 

Typewriting 4 

Band 6 

(Only one semester hour in each activity may be earned In each semes- 
ter, except by the Editor and Business Manager of the Purple and White 
and the Bobashela.) 

8. Majors : 

In addition to taking the prescribed work for the degree, the student 
must major in one of the following departments: 

Biology. — A student majoring in biology is required to take Biology 
11, 12, 21A, 22A; one of 41, 52, or 62; and one of 81, 82, 83, 84, 103G, 
or 104G. The biology major who is a pre-medical student is required to 
take two of Biology 11, 12, or 41, and all of 21A, 22A, 42, and 61. All 
students majoring in biology will elect other courses in biology to total 
at least 26 semester hours. A Comprehensive seminar is required. Only 
three hours of 71-72 may be applied toward a major. 

Chemistry. — All majors are required to take Chemistry 21-22, 31-32, 
41 or 42, 61-62, (pre-med majors may substitute 61A for 61-62), 71, 
Physics 11A-12A, and it is suggested that they also take Physics 32. 
All majors except pre-medical students are required to take Mathe- 
matics through Integral Calculus. 

Economics and Business Administration. — An Economics major is 
required to take the curriculum described on pages 3 6-3 7. 

Elementary Education. — Students majoring in Elementary Education 
are required to complete the courses necessary to obtain the Mississippi 
Class A Elementary Certificate. 

English.- — An English major is required to take English 11-12, 21-22, 
and, in the first semester of his senior year, English 201, in which the 
required Senior Essay in English will be written. In addition the stu- 
dent must take eighteen semester hours of other courses in the depart- 
ment. English 61 will not count toward this requirement. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 31 

French and Spanish. — For students majoring in either of these sub- 
jects, no one course is required with more emphasis than the others. 
It is recommended that such students take every course offered in their 
major field of interest. A minimum of 24 semester hours is required 
heyond the A1-A2 series, although 3 hours is recommended. Should a 
candidate take only the minimum of required courses, 18 of these hours 
must be in the literature of his language of specialty. 

Geology — To major in Geology, a student must take Geology 11-12, 
21, 31, 32, 41, 51 and/or 22-92. Majors must take 9 semester hours of 
Mathematics or Math. 11-12 and two semesters of Engineering Drawing. 
Biology 12 and 21A are required. Three semesters of Chemistry are re- 
quired, 21-22, and either 41 or 71. Physics 11A-12A or 11-12 are required, 
and an additional semester of Physics or Astronomy. Physics 42 (Ad- 
vanced Light) is helpful. 

German. — To major in German, a student must take German 41-42 
and any other twenty-four semester hours in this department. 

Historj'. — To be accepted as a History major, a student must have a 
1.50 average in History and maintain this grade for his full course. History 
11-12, 21-22, and 301 must be included in the 24 semester hours of history 
required for a major in History. A preliminary test must be passed at 
least one academic year before the comprehensive examination. 

Latin. — To major in Latin, a student is required to take 24 semes- 
ter hours of Latin beyond the A1-A2 course. 

Mathematics. — ^For a major. Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12, 21-22, 31-3 2, 
and 9 semester hours selected from the other Mathematics courses must 
he taken. An additional course is strongly recommended. 

Music- — See listings under Department of Fine Arts, pages 5 9-61. 

Philosophy. — A minimum of 24 semester hours, including 12, 22, 
31, 3 2, 42, is required as a major. 

Physics and Astronomy. — Students majoring in these two subjects 
should take General Physics, Astronomy 11-12, and additional work in the 
department to make a minimum of 26 semester hours. Physical Chemistry 
may be counted toward a major. Majors are advised to take a minimum of 
12 hours of Mathematics and 14 of Chemistry. Students planning to do 
graduate work in Physics are urged to take Physics 61-62. 

Political Science. — Students intending to major in the department are 
required to take Political Science 21-22, 101-102, 301, and at least nine 
additional semester hours in the department. Students are advised to 
take related work in the Departments of Economics, History, Sociology, 
Philosophy and Psychology. 

Psychology. — Students majoring in Psychology are required to earn 
a minimum of 24 semester hours in the department, including 11 and 
112. Courses in Zoology, Physics, Sociology, and Philosophy are strongly 
recommended for Psychology majors. 

Religion. — Religion 11 and 12 are required of all students. Majors 
in Religion are required to take an additional 25 hours of courses in 
the department, including Religion 71, 72, and 112. Philosophy 41 may 
be counted as three hours on the Religion major if the student satisfies 
the Philosophy requirements with six additional hours of Philosophy. 



32 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Sociology. — Majors in Sociology are required to take a minimum of 
twenty-four hours in tlie department to include Sociology 11, 201, and 202. 
In addition the department strongly recommends that majors have a 
three hour course in elementary statistics (Economics 71 or its equiva- 
lent) and a minimum of three hours in Economics and Political Science 
and Psychology. The specific courses in these fields should be made in 
consultation with the student's major professor. Economics 71 does not 
fulfill the requirement of three hours in Economics. Majors are encourag- 
ed to take both elementary statistics and Sociology 201 in the Junior year. 

Students may be permitted to major in a subject only after careful 
consideration and with the consent of the head of the department. 

A major for each student must be approved by one of the department 
heads not later than the beginning of the junior year. Two cards will be 
signed by the major professor to show approval of the choice of a major, 
and these cards will be kept on file, one with the Registrar's Office and one 
with the major professor. 

No junior or senior registration will be accepted as complete by the 
Registrar's Office without the signed approval of the major professor. 

For failing to maintain a C average or for other good cause, a student 
may change his major or be advised by his major professor to change his 
major as late as October 1 of his senior year. He must submit to the 
Registrar's Office on regular form (obtainable from the Registrar's Office) 
the express permission of both the Dean and the head of the proposed new 
major department. 

Transfer credit will be accepted toward a major only with the ap- 
proval of the department. 

9. Comprehensive Examinations: 

Before receiving a bachelor's degree the student must pass a satis- 
factory comprehensive examination in his major field of study. This ex- 
amination is given in the senior year and is intended to cover subject mat- 
ter greater in scope than a single course or series of courses. The purpose 
of the comprehensive examination is to coordinate the class work with in- 
dependent reading and thinking in such a way as to relate the knowledge 
acquired and give the student a general understanding of the field which 
could not be acquired from individual courses. 

Regularly scheduled conferences between department heads and stu- 
dents majoring in the department will be held throughout the senior year. 
The comprehensive examination requires at least three hours and is part 
written and part oral, the division of time between the two to be at the 
discretion of the members of the department concerned. The oral exam- 
ination will be conducted by a committee composed of members of the 
department, and, if desired by the department, one or more members of 
the faculty from other departments or other qualified persons. 

A student may take the comprehensive examination only if the courses 
on which he has credit and in which he is currently enrolled complete the 
requirements in the major department. He may take the examination in 
the spring semester if he will be within 21 hours of graduation by the end 
of that semester. In cases of necessity, the examination will be given in De- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 33 

cember or January for students who meet the other requirements and who 
will not be in residence at Millsaps during the spring semester. 

The time of the comprehensive examination given in the spring semes- 
ter is the last week in April of each year. Comprehensive examinations 
will not be given during the summer except by permission of tlie Dean. 

Those who fail a comprehensive examination may have an opportunity 
to take another examination after tlie lapse of two months. If the student 
fails the second comprehensive, he may not have another until he has 
taken at least one additional semester's work in Millsaps College. 

10. Quality index required: 

A minimum of 120 quality points is required of all students. Be- 
ginning with the graduating class of 19 63, an over-all quality point index 
of 1.00 will be required of all students. The index is always calculated 
on total number of hours attempted. 

11. Application for a degree: 

Each student who is a candidate for a degree is required to submit 
a written application for the degree by March 1 of the year of his 
graduation. This date will apply also to students who plan to complete 
their work in summer school. Forms for degree applications are to be 
secured and filed in the Registrar's Office. 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR REGULAR STUDENTS 

A regular student will be required to enroll for English, Mathematics, 
and Foreign Language each year until he has completed the degree re- 
quirements in these subjects. This rule does not apply to the summer ses- 
sion, or to students entering the second semester if the appropriate courses 
are not offered at that time. 

SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

B. A. DEGREE B. S. DEGREE 

Freshmen: Freshmen: 

English 11-12 6 hr. English 11-12 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12.... 6 hr. Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. Foreign Language 6 hr. 

History 11-12 or Science 6 hr. Science 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. History 11-12 6 hr. 

Elective 6 hr. Physical Education 2 hr. 

Sophomores : Sophomores : 

English 21-22 6 hr. English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. Foreign Language 6 hr. 

History 11-12 or Science 6 hr. Science 6 hr. 

Elective 12 hr. Elective 12 hr. 

Juniors and Seniors: Juniors and Seniors: 

Philosophy 6 hr. Science 6 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Major Subject Major Subject 

Elective Elective 



34 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



PRE-MEDICAIi AND 
FRE-DENTAL 
Freshmen : 

English 11-12 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 

French or German 6 hr. 

Biology 21A-22A 8 hr. 

Chemistry 21-22 8 hr. 

or Physics 11-12 and 21-22... .8 hr. 

Sophomores : 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

French or German 6 hr. 

History 6 hr. 

Chemistry 21-22 or 41-71....8 hr. 

Biology 61-42 8 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Chemistry 31-32 10 hr. 

or Physics 11-12 and 21-22..8 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Major Subject 
Elective 



TECHNICIANS 

Freshmen : 

English 11-12 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 

French or German 6 hr. 

Biology 21A-22A 8 hr. 

Chemistry 21-22 8 hr. 

Sophomores: 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

French or German 6 hr. 

History 6 hr. 

Biology 41-42 8 hr. 

Chemistry 31 5 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Biology 51 and 62 8 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Physics 11-12 6 hr. 

Chemistry 71 4 hr 

Elective 



Freshman : 

English 11-12 6 hr. 

Political Science 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 

Speech 11-12 '. 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Sophomores: 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

History 11-12 6 hr. 

Political Science 

(elective) 6 hr. 

Sociology 11-12 6 hr. 

Speech 21 2 hr. 

Suggested Electives: 
Economics 31, 32, 42 
English 61, 81, 82 
History 91, 92, 21, 22 
Psychology 11 
Religion 51 
Sociology 81 



FRE-LAW B.A. 

Juniors: 



Economics 21-22 6 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

History (elective) 6 hr. 

Science 6 hr. 

Political Science 

(elective) 6 hr. 

Speech 21 2 hr. 

Seniors : 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Political Science 9 hr. 

Electives 15 hr. 

Speech 21 2 hr. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



35 



*PRE-]VnNISTERL!LL B.A. 



Freshmen : 

English 11-12 6 hr. 

Speech 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 

History 11-12 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Sophomores: 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Science 6 hr. 

Psychology 6 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Typing 2 hr. 



Juniors: 

Economics 6 hr. 

Sociology 6 hr. 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Religion 6 hr. 

Education 131 3 hr. 

Speech 41 3 hr. 

Elective 3 hr. 

Seniors: 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Religion 6 hr. 

Political Science 6 hr. 

Elective 10 hr. 

Music T92 3 hr. 



*This curriculum may be followed also by those planning to be Directors 
of Christian Education. 



PRE-SOCIAl. WORK B.A. 



Freshmen : 

English 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 
History 11-12 or Biology 

9-10 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Elective 6 hr. 

(Recommended elective: Speech 

11-12 or Typing 11-12 and 

Shorthand 31-32) 



Juniors and Seniors: 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Economics 21-22 or 41 6 hr. 

Political Science 21-22 6 hr. 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Major Subject (Sociology, Psychol- 
ogy, Economics, or Political Sci- 
ence) ; see departmental re- 
quirements. 

Electives 



Sophomores : 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Biology 9-10 or History 

11-12 6 hr. 

Sociology 11, 61 6 hr. 

Psychology 6 hr. 



Students who wish to prepare for a professional career in Social Work 
should plan a broad liberal arts program with a major in social science. 
Because of the widely varied opportunities in this field, no specific sched- 
ule of courses is recommended for the junior and senior years. Instead, 
each student is urged to consult with his faculty adviser to plan a schedule. 



36 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

EOONO]\nCS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

All students majoring in the department will take a basic core cur- 
riculum of required subjects in the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
They will then choose one of the four areas of concentration (Accounting, 
Economic Analysis, Finance, or General Business) and specialize in that 
area. They will be graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree with a 
major in either Accounting, Business Administration, or Economics, de- 
pending upon the area of concentration. 

For those interested in Accounting, the Millsaps curriculum offers 
the opportunity of taking courses in all the subjects covered in the CPA 
examination. Graduates of this curriculum are permitted by the State 
Board of Public Accountancy to take the CPA examination without the 
usual requirement of two years of apprenticeship experience. 

Transitional adjustments will be made for those already enrolled 
at Millsaps, but the program outlined below should be followed as exactly 
as possible. Those enrolled at other institutions and planning to transfer 
to Millsaps should plan their courses of study with this program in mind. 
Transfer students whose previous work does not conform substantially 
to this program may require additional time to meet degree requirements. 

Freshmen : Juniors : 

English 11-12 6 hr. Philosophy 11-22 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 6 hr. Science 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. **Economics 51-52 6 hr. 

Economics 11-12 6 hr. Economics or 

Economics 31-32 6 hr. Business Elective 12 hr. 

Economics 31A-32A 2 hr. 

Typing 2 hr. 

Sophomores : Seniors : 

English 21-22 6 hr. Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

♦History 11-12 or 21-22 6 hr. Psychology 3 hr. 

****Foreign Language 6 hr. Sociology 3 hr. 

Economics 21-22 6 hr. Speech 3 hr. 

Economics 71 3 hr. Economics or 

Political Science 3 hr. Business Elective 9 hr. 

Typing 2 hr. ***Free Elective 6 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

*Those choosing Accounting as the area of concentration should 
postpone this course until the Junior Year and substitute Economics 81-82. 

**Those choosing Economic Analysis as the area of concentration 
and planning to do graduate work in Economics should substitute Mathe- 
matics 21 for Economics 52. 

***Those planning to do graduate work in Economics should elect 
Mathematics 31-32. 

*'"**Not required for those students who have had two years of 
Foreign Language in high school and continue the same language in 
college. 






MILLSAPS COLLEGE 37 

Economics or Business Electives are grouped in four areas of con- 
centration as indicated below, one of which sliould be chosen by each 
student by the beginning of his junior year. 

Accounting 

Courses: 62, 81-82, 111-112, 141-142 
Economic Analysis 

Courses: 42, 61, 92, 101-102, 131-132 
Finance 

Courses: 41-42, 61-62, 91-92, 1S2 
General Business 

Courses: 61-62, 91-92, 121-122, 132 or 42 

TEACHER TRAINING 

A placement bureau for teachers is maintained under the direction 
of the Department of Education. It seeks to further the interests of 
teachers trained at Millsaps College and to be of service to school offi- 
cials who wish to secure efficient teachers. 

Students planning to teach in either the elementary or secondary 
school should follow exactly the appropriate sequence of courses outlined 
below. The requirements for teaching certificates are quite detailed and 
specific, and students must have the exact courses specified. The following 
course of study will meet the requirements for a Millsaps degree and at 
the same time qualify the student for the Class A Elementary Certificate 
and the Class A Secondary Certificate. 

Elementary Teachers 
Freshmen: Sophomores: 

English 11-12 6 hr. English 21-22 6 hr. 

History 11-12 6 hr. ^Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. Psychology 11, 22 6 hr. 

Biology 11-12 or 9-10 6 hr. Speech 11 3 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. Physical Education 

101 (Hygiene) 3 hr. 

Physical Education 1 hr. 

*If the student has credit for two years of language in high school 
and continues the same language in college, this second year of language 
is not required. 

Juniors ; Seniors : 

Geology 11 or Physics 11 3 hr. Philosophy 6 hr. 

Education 51-52 6 hr. Education 61-62 or 101 6 hr. 

Education 141 3 hr. Electives 18 hr. 

Education 151 3 hr. 

Education 161 3 hr. 

Education 171 3 hr. 

Education 181 3 hr. 

Education 191 3 hr. 

Elective 3 hr. 



38 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Secondary School Teachers 

The program for the Freshman and Sophomore years is the same 
as for elementary teachers. 

Juniors : Seniors : 

Geology 11 or Physics 11 3 hr. Education 41-42 or 91 6 hr. 

Education 31-32 6 hr. Philosophy 6 hr. 

•FMne Arts T32 3 hr. ** Specialized Education 

Psychology 21 3 hr. and Major Subject 18-24 hr. 

** Specialized Education 

and Major Subject 12-18 hr. 

*Any college course in Music or Art which carries with it three semes- 
ter hours of credit or three semester hours of credit in Band or Singers 
may be substituted for the Music Appreciation T32 course. 

**For secondary school teaching the student is required to major in 
some department other than Education and for endorsement to teach the 
subjects listed below, the specific courses listed under each are required 
In addition to those specified above for the Freshman and Sophomore 
years : 

**Business Education English 

Economics 21-22 6 hr. English 81-82 6 hr. 

Economics 31-32 6 hr. English electives 15 hr. 

Economics 31A-32A 2 hr. Speech 

Typing 11-12. 21-22, or evi- Speech 11-12 6 hr. 

dence of equivalent pro- Speech 31-32 6 hr. 

ficiency 4 hr. Dramatics ...3 hr. 

Shorthand 31-32, 41-42 8 hr. Oral Interpretation 3 hr. 

Secretarial Procedures 6 hr. Additional Course in 

Additional Economics courses English or Speech 6 hr. 

to complete major 16 hr. 

**In order to complete this entire program it will be necessary for 
the student to add Typing to the program of the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years and to add also Economics 21-22 in the Sophomore year. This 
will be possible only if the required grade-point average is maintained. 

Foreign Language 

Completion of the major requirements in any language will more 
than satisfy the requirements for teaching that language. It is recom- 
mended that the student also take two years of a second language. 

Mathematics 

Completion of the requirements for a major in Mathematics will more 
than satisfy the requirements for teaching Mathematics in the sec- 
ondary school. 

Music 

Students planning to teach Music in the public schools should ar- 
range their programs after consultation with the Music Department. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 39 

Science Social Studies 

Biology 9-10 or 11-12 6 hr. History 21-22 6 hr. 

Chemistry 21-22 8 hr. Economics, Sociology, 

Additional Chemistry 4 hr. Political Science 6 hr. 

** 'Physics 11A-12A 8 hr. Additional courses to corn- 

Additional courses to com- plete a major in History, 

plete a major in one of Economics, Sociology, or 

the sciences 12-18 hr. Political Science 12-18 hr. 

***This replaces Geology 11 or Physics 11 specified in other pro- 
grams for the Junior year and also makes it unnecessary to take Philos- 
ophy in the Senior year. The student will receive the B.S. degree. 

PRE-ENGTNEERING 

This program at Millsaps offers many opportunities for the student 
interested in engineering. 

3-2 Engineering B.S. Program: At present we have arrangements with 
three engineering schools — Columbia University, The University of Mis- 
sissippi, and Vanderbilt University — by which a student may attend Mill- 
saps for three years for a total of 110 hours or more and then continue 
his work at either of the three schools listed above, transferring back 
18 hours or less for a B.S. degree from Millsaps and at the end of the 
fifth year receive his engineering degree from the engineering school. 

4-2 Master's Program in Engineering: Columbia University also has 
a 4-2 program in which a student attends Millsaps for four years, com- 
pleting his degree requirements and then spending two more years at 
Columbia to obtain a Master's degree in Engineering. 

Columbia University offers degrees in Civil, Electrical, Industrial, 
Mechanical, Metallurgical, Mining, and Chemical Engineering. The Uni- 
versity of Mississippi offers B.S. degrees in Civil, Geological, Chemical, 
and Engineering Administration. Vanderbilt University offers Bachelor 
of Engineering degrees in Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Below is listed the course of study leading to the degrees listed above. 
The course is the same for all degrees at the three schools with the ex- 
ception of Chemical Engineering, and the substitute courses for it are 
also listed. 

For further information on these programs, write to Chairman, 
Mathematics Department, Millsaps College. 

Freshmen : 

English 11-12 (Composition) 6 hours 

Mathematics 11-12 (Algebra-Trigonometry) 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Chemistry 21-22 (Inorganic) 8 

Engineering 11-12* (Slide Rule-Orientation) 2 

Engineering 41-42* (Engineering Drafting) 4 

Physical Education 2 

Total 34 hours 



40 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Sophomores : 

English 21-22 (Literature) 6 hours 

Foreign Language 6 

Mathematics 21-22 (Plane and Solid Analytics) 6 

Physics 11A-12A (General Physics) 8 

Economics 21-22 (Principles and Problems) 6 

Chemistry 41 (Qualitative) 4 

Engineering 22* (Descriptive Geometry) 3 

Total 39 hours 
Juniors : 

Mathematics 31-32 (Differential-Integral Calculus) 6 hours 

Geology 11-12 (Physical-Historical) or 

Biology 9-10 (Fundamentals) 6 

History 11-12 (Survey of Western Civilization) 6 

Religion 11-12 (Old and New Testament) 6 

Engineering 31-32* (Analytic Mechanics) 5 

Electives and Major Subject 9 

Total 38 hours 
Three year total — 111 hours. 

*Not required for a B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Columbia University. 



SUBSTITUTE REQUIREMENTS FOR A B.S. IN CHEMICAL. 
ENGINEERING AT COLUMBIA 

Chemistry 71 (Quantitative Analysis) 4 hours 

Chemistry 31-32 (Organic) 10 

Chemistry 61-62* (Physical) 8 

♦Required of Chemistry majors at Millsaps and can be taken 
as Major Subject (as listed in Junior year). 

Three year total for Chemical Engineering — 110 hours. 

Note: In case of scheduling difficulties, History 11-12, Engineering 22 
and Engineering 41-42 may be interchanged. 

FORESTRY B. S. 

In cooperation with Duke University School of Forestry, Millsaps Col- 
lege now offers a course in Forestry. Under this program, a student plan- 
ning a career in Forestry will spend three years in residence at Millsaps 
College pursuing a liberal arts course with the basic sciences needed for 
forestry. At the end of the three years he will have earned at least 110 
hours. He will then transfer to Duke University School of Forestry for 
the next two years. By transferring back 18 hours, he will receive a B.S. 
degree from Millsaps College at the end of the fourth year and a degree 
in Forestry from Duke University at the end of the fifth year. Students 
will be recommended for continuation of this course at Duke University 
only if they have maintained a good average at Millsaps College. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



41 



Preshnien : 

English 11-12 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

Biology 11-12 6 hr. 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr. 

Chemistry 21-22 8 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 

Sophomores : 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

History 11-12 6 hr. 

Biology 21A-22A 8 hr. 

Physics 11A-12A 8 hr. 



Juniors: 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

Economics 21-22 6 hr. 

Philosophy 22 3 hr. 

Geology 11 3 hr. 

Mathematics 21-22 6 hr. 

Speech 11 3 hr. 

Biology 81-52 7 hr. 

Electives 8 hr. 



Freshmen : 

English 11-12 6 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 

Foreign Language 6 

Music Tll-12 S 

Applied Music 4 hr. 

Physical Education 2 hr. 



Sophomores 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

History 11-12 or Science 6 hr. 

Music T-21-22 8 hr. 

Applied Music 4 hr. 



APPLIED MUSIC B.A. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

History 11-12 or Science 6 hr. 

Music T51, TSl-82, 

T41-42, T93 13 hr. 

Applied Music 8 hr. 

Music Recitals 



hr. 
hr. 
hr. 
hr. 



Freshmen : 

English 11-12 6 hr 

Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12 ..6 hr 

Foreign Language 6 hr 

Music Tll-12 8 hr 

Applied Music 4 hr 

Physical Education 2 hr 



MUSIC THEORY B.A. 

Juniors and Seniors: 

Philosophy 6 hr. 

Religion 11-12 6 hr. 

History 11-12 or Science 6 hr. 

Music T41-42, T51, T61, 

T81-82, T93 18 hr. 

Applied Music 4 hr. 



Sophomores : 

English 21-22 6 hr. 

Foreign Language 6 hr. 

History 11-12 or Science ....6 hr. 

Music T21-22 8 hr. 

Applied Music 4 hr. 

Minor in Music Required: 

Applied Music (two full years) ..8 hr. 

Basic Theory 8 hr. 

Electives in Music 6 hr. 



42 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

MILLSAPS-BELHAVEN COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

students at Millsaps College are permitted to enroll for one or more 
courses at Belhaven College as a part of their regular program of studies. 
The two colleges are located only a few blocks apart, and the schedules 
have been coordinated so as to make possible this exchange of students 
between the two campuses. Courses at Belhaven College cost the student 
$18 per semester hour. 

THE WASHINGTON SEMESTER 

"The Washington Semester" is a joint arrangement between The 
American University, Washington, D. C, Millsaps College and other 
colleges and universities in the United States to extend the resources 
of the national capital to superior students in the field of the social 
sciences. The object is to provide a direct contact with the work of 
governmental departments and other national and international agencies 
that are located in Washington, thus acquainting the students with pos- 
sible careers in public service and imparting a knowledge of government 
in action. 

Under this arrangement qualified students of demonstrated capacity 
from the participating colleges will spend a semester at the School of 
Social Sciences and Public Affairs of the American University in Washing- 
ton. They may earn there fifteen hours toward graduation in their home 
colleges. In Washington the program is coordinated by staff members of 
The American University, assisted by a professor appointed for a single 
semester by one of the participating colleges. 

Millsaps will ordinarily send two students in each fall semester. These 
will be either juniors or first semester seniors and will be selected by a 
faculty committee in April of each year. During the 19 5 9-60 session the 
following Millsaps students attended the American University under the 
Washington Semester Program: Allen Bugg, Sue Cater, Edna McShane, 
and William Mooney. 

It is believed by the administration and faculty of Millsaps that this 
opportunity for first-hand study and observation of government in action 
Is unexcelled by any undergraduate program in education today. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 43 

DIVISIONAL GROUPINGS 

For administrative purposes, the departments of instruction at Mill- 
saps are arranged in three groups as follows: 

Humanities — 

Fine Arts, Languages, Philosophy, Religion, Speech. 

Natural Sciences — 

Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy. 

Social Sciences — 

Economics and Business Administration, Education, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, Sociology. 



NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Unless otherwise stated, the courses with odd numbers are offered the 
first semester and those with even numbers the second. 

Hyphenated numbers (e.g., 11-12) usually indicate that students are 
not admitted to the second semester without credit for the first. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

I Department of Ancient Languages 

II Department of Biology 

III Department of Chemistry 

IV Department of Economics and Business Administration 

V Department of Education 

VI Department of English 

VII Department of Fine Arts 

VIII Department of Geology 

IX Department of German 

X Department of History 

XI Department of Mathematics 

XII Department of Philosophy 

XIII Department of Physical Education* 

XIV Department of Physics and Astronomy 

XV Department of Political Science 

XVI Department of Psychology 

XVII Department of Religion 

XVIII Department of Romance Languages 

XIX Department of Sociology 

XX Department of Speech* 

♦Majors are not offered in these departments 



44 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

I DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

The Alfred Porter Hamilton Chair of Classical Languages 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JOLLY 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR COULLET 

The ideas and culture of Greece and Rome live on today in their con- 
tributions to the culture of Western civilization. Intimate contact with 
the very words which express the aspirations of those great spirits whose 
influence has been so abiding and formative in the modern world should 
help shape the student's character to fine and worthy purposes. Further- 
more, this undertaking affords a most rigorous exercise in the scientific 
method, producing habits and reflexes of accuracy, efficiency, and system. 

Credit is not given for one semester of the elementary course unless 
the other semester is completed. 

LATIN 
A1-A2. Elementary Latin. — Designed for students who have undertaken 
no previous study of the language. Mastery of declensions and con- 
jugations, of syntax and sentence structure; familiarity with the Latin 
thought order and the technique of translation. A large amount of easy 
reading is required. Vocabulary is enlarged and sight reading is practiced 
during the second semester. Six hours credit. Mrs. Coullet, Mr. Jolly. 

11-12. Intermediate Latin. — The first semester is given over to review of 
forms, syntax, and sentence structure, and their application in trans- 
lation and sight reading of moderately difficult Latin and the reading of 
Caesar is begun. The second semester is devoted to the translation of 
selections from Caesar, Plautus, and Ovid. Six hours credit. Mrs. Coullet, 
Mr. Jolly. 
Prerequisite: Latin A1-A2 or two units of high school Latin. 

21. Vergil and Ovid. — Two books of the Aeneid and selections from the 
Metamorphoses. This course is a continuation of Latin 11-12, and is 

designed to introduce the student to the great classics from the precise 
point he or she has reached in the study of Latin. Three hours credit. 
Mrs. Coullet, Mr. Jolly. 
Prerequisite: 11-12 or the equivalent. 

22. Horace, Odes and Epodes. — This course is designed to give the stu- 
dent an appreciation of the place occupied by the poet not only 

in his own environment and age but through the centuries, and to create 
an intelligent appreciation of his poetry. Three hours credit. Mrs. Coullet, 
Mr. Jolly. 

Prerequisite: Latin 11-12 or the equivalent. 

41. Mythology. — A study of the ancient myths of Greece and Rome and 
their influence on later literature. This course is conducted in Eng- 
lish, and is open to all students regardless of classification. Three hours 
credit. Mrs. Coullet. 

Offered fall semester, 1960. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 45 

42. Roman Private Life. — A course of study designed to familiarize stu- 
dents with the everyday life and habits of the Romans. Three hours 
credit. Mrs. Coullet. 
Offered spring semester, 1961. 

51. Roman Elegiac Poets. — Readings in Catullus, Propertius, and Tibul- 
lus. Three hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Latin 21-22. 

Offered upon demand. 

52. Lucretius. — Translation of the fifth book of the De Rerum Natura. 
Three hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Latin 21-22. 

Offered upon demand. 

61. Survey of Greek and Roman Civilizations. — Reading of literature In 
translation. Study of Greek and Roman remains as well as private and 
public life. Lectures and outside readings supplemented by lantern slides 
and films. Three hours credit. 

Offered upon demand. 

121-122. Latin Readings. — Additional readings in the classics are se- 
lected for advanced students. 
Prerequisite: 11-12, 21-22. 
Offered upon demand. 

GREEK 

A1-A2. Introduction to Greek. — Attention is paid to the thorough mas- 
tery of forms, vocabulary, and syntax, but emphasis is laid also upon 
the great contributions made by the Greeks to Western civilization in the 
fields of art, literature, and philosophy. Six hours credit. Mr. Jolly. 

11-12. Xenophon, Plato, and Greek New Testament. — Two books of the 
Anabasis and Plato's Apology and Crito are covered. Selections from 
the Greek New Testament are also read in this course. Six hours credit. 
Mr. Jolly. 
Prerequisite: Greek A1-A2. 

21. The Greek Orators. — Selected reading from the orations of Antiphon, 
Andocides, Lysias, Aeschines, and Demosthenes. Three hours credit. 

Mr. Jolly. 

Prerequisite: Greek 11-12. 

Offered upon demand. 

22. The Greek Historians. — Selected readings from Herodotus, Thucy- 
dides, Xenophon's Hellenica, and Plutarch. Three hours credit. Mr. 

Jolly. 

Prerequisite: Greek 11-12. 

Offered upon demand. 



4 6 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

II DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR CAPLENOR 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WARD 

DR. JOHNSON 

DR. RICKS MRS. CAVETT 

Biology serves (1) to present the basic principles underlying all life 
phenomena and to correlate these principles with human living; (2) to 
give students a panorama of the kinds of animals and plants which now 
inhabit the earth and the major features of their behavior; (3) to help 
students appreciate their living environments; and (4) to present a gen- 
eralized view of heredity and evolution. 

9. Fundamentals of Biology. — Study of many of the basic phenomena 

of life using historical and physiological approaches. Some principles 
treated are maintenance, reproduction, evolution, diversity, ecology and 
biogeography. The course is planned for the person not intending to major 
in a science. Two discussion periods and one two-hour laboratory a week. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Caplenor, Dr. Johnson. 

10. Fundamentals of Biology. — Continuation of Biology 9. Three hours 
credit. Dr. Caplenor, Dr. Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Biology 9. 

11. Botany. — Structure and physiology of seed-bearing plants. Two 
discussion periods and one two-hour laboratory a week. Three hours 

credit. Dr. Caplenor. 

12. Botany. — Life cycles and embryological relationships of plant groups 
from the most primitive to the highest. Two discussion periods and 

one two-hour laboratory a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Caplenor. 

21A. Zoology. — A study of invertebrate taxonomy, morphology, physi- 
ology, and natural history. Two discussion periods and two two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Four hours credit. Mr. Ward. 

22A, Zoology. — A study of vertebrate taxonomy, morphology, physiology, 
and natural history. Laboratory study and dissection of five repre- 
sentative vertebrates. Two discussion periods and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Four hours credit. Mr. Ward. 

41. Elementary Bacteriology. — Preparation of media, culture methods, 
sterilization, isolation, staining, and identification of micro-organisms. 

Two recitations and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Four hours 
credit. Dr. Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Biology 11 or 12, or permission of the instructor. 

42. Comparative Anatomy. — A comparative study of typical vertebrate 
forms. Laboratory study and dissection of the Amphioxus, lamprey, 

dogfish, salamander, and cat. Two discussion periods and two two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Four hours credit. Mr. Ward. 
Prerequisite: Biology 21A-22A. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 47 

51. Histology.-^Study of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate animals 
with emphasis on basic tissues. Two discussion periods and two 

two-hour laboratories a week. Four hours credit. Mr. Ward. 
Prerequisite: Biology 42. 

52. Genetics.- — Principles of inheritance In plants and animals. Three 
recitations a week. Three hours credit. Dr. Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Biology 11-12, 21A-22A, or permission of the instructor. 

61. Embryology. — A study of the comparative embryology of the verte- 
brates. Laboratory study of the embryos of the frog, chick, and pig. 

Two discussion periods and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Four 
hours credit. Mr. Ward. 
Prerequisite: Biology 21A-22A. 

62. General Physiology. — A study of the constituents, properties, and 
activities of protoplasm. Two discussion periods and two two-hour 

laboratory periods a week. Four hours credit. Dr. Caplenor. 

71-72, Special Problem's. — One to three hours credit for each semester. 

Staff. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

81. Plant Taxonomy.- — Study of local plants with emphasis upon trees, 
shrubs, liverworts, and mosses. Attention is given to taxonomic 

systems, to elementary principles of plant ecology, and to plant geography. 
Two discussion periods and two two-hour laboratory or field periods a 
week. Four hours credit. Dr. Caplenor. 
Prerequisite: Biology 11 or 12. 

82. Plant Taxonomy. — A continuation of Biology 81 with emphasis upon 
local herbaceous flowering plants and ferns. Four hours credit. 

Dr. Caplenor. 

Prerequisite: Biology 11 or 12. 

83. Taxonomy of Invertebrate Animals. — A survey of the invertebrate 
animals exclusive of the insects. The course is designed for teaching 

basic field identification and for familiarizing the student with the life 
histories of the invertebrates. Two discussion periods and two two-hour 
laboratories a week. Four hours credit. Mr. Ward. 
Prerequisite: Biology 21A. 

84. Taxonomy of Vertebrate Animals. — A survey of vertebrate taxonomy 
including collection, identification, and instruction in methods of 

preparation of material for taxonomic utilization. Two discussion periods 
and two two-hour laboratories a week. Four hours credit. Mr. Ward. 
Prerequisite: Biology 22A and Biology 42. 

102. Entomology. — Collection, identification, and study of the life cycles 
of insects. One lecture and two laboratories a week. Three hours 
credit. Mr. Ward. 

103G. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. — Offered at Gulf Coast Research 
Laboratory during summer term. Six hours credit. 

104G. Marine Vertebrate Zoology. — Offered at Gulf Coast Research 
Laboratory during summer term. Six hours credit. 



48 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

III DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR PRICE ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CALLOWAY 

DR. JOHNSON 

The objectives of the Department of Chemistry are (1) to provide 
at least an introduction to the scientific method for non-science majors; 
(2) to equip science majors with the proper background for professional 
and graduate study; and (3) to provide terminal training for those stu- 
dents who go into industry as technicians. 

lsi-22. General Chemistry. — Fundamental principles of general inor- 
ganic chemistry and applications; nonmetallic elements and their prin- 
cipal compounds. Introduction to organic chemistry; chemistry of metals; 
introduction to qualitative analysis. Three lecture-recitations and one lab- 
oratory period per week through both semesters. Eight hours credit. 
Dr. Price. 

31-32. Organic Chemistry. — Aliphatic compounds, methods of organic 
analysis, and determination of formula. Aromatic compounds, and 
introduction to physiological chemistry. Three lecture-recitation periods 
and two laboratory periods per week through both semesters. Ten hours 
credit. Dr. Price. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22. 

41. Qualitative Analysis. — The theory and practice of inorganic qualita- 
tive analysis according to semi-micro methods. Mass action law, chemi- 
cal equilibrium, solubility product principle, and modern theory of elec- 
trolytes. Two lecture-recitation periods and two laboratory periods per 
week. Four hours credit. Dr. Calloway. 

42. Organic Qualitative Analysis. — Identification of organic compounds 
and mixtures of organic compounds. Two lecture-recitation periods 

and two laboratory periods per week. Four hours credit. Dr. Price. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 31-32. 

61-62. Physical Chemistry. A course designed for all chemistry majors 
except pre-medical students. A study of atomic structure, the proper- 
ties and laws of the three states of matter, thermodynamics, thermo-chemls- 
try, equilibrium, phase rule, electrochemistry, and kinetics. Three lecture 
periods and one laboratory period per week through both semesters. Eight 
hours credit. Dr. Calloway. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22. 71, and Calculus (may be taken concur- 
rently). 

61A. Pre-medical Physical Chemistry. — A one-semester introductory 
course designed to meet the needs of pre-medical students. Gas laws, 
properties of liquids, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, catalysis, 
electrochemistry, and colloidal solutions. Three lecture recitation periods 
and one laboratory period per week. Four hours credit. Dr. Calloway. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22 and 71. 

71. Quantitative Analysis. — Theory and practice of inorganic quantita- 
tive analysis. Gravimetric and volumetric methods with unknowns in 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 49 

acidimetry and alkalimetry; oxidation and reduction; iodimetry; and pre- 
cipitation methods. Two lecture-recitation periods and two laboratory 
periods per week. Four hours credit. Dr. Calloway. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22. 

72G. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. — Colorimetric, complexometric, 
and instrumental methods of analysis as applied to brackish water 
and coastal sediments. This course is designed as a part of the Gulf 
Coast Research Laboratory program. Two lecture recitation periods and 
two laboratory periods per week. Foar hours credit. Dr. Price. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 71 or its equivalent. 

82. Advanced Inorganic Theory. — A study of atomic structure, atomic 
power, and radioactivity; the periodic nature of the properties of the 
elements; the metallurgy, production, reactions, and uses of the elements. 
Three lecture-recitation periods per week. Three hours credit. Dr. Callo- 
way. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22. 

91. Biochemistry. — An Introduction to the fundamental principles of 
Biochemistry. A comprehensive treatment of the descriptive and 
dynamic aspects of the chemistry of living organisms. A discussion of 
the chemical and physical properties of the major constituents of living 
cells, including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids, enzymes, 
vitamins, and hormones. A survey of the major metabolic pathways 
common to all living cells with emphasis on the unity in Bio-chemistry. 
Four hours credit. Dr. Johnson. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 31-32. 

101-102. Special Problems. — An introduction to research, requiring the 
use of chemical literature. Open only to approved majors in their 
senior year. One, two, or three hours credit per semester. Dr. Price, Dr. 
Calloway. 

IV DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

PROFESSOR WALLACE 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WALLS MRS. HOLLOWAY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JOHNSON MR. MIAZZA 

The objectives of the Department of Economics are (1) to equip 
students with a more adequate understanding of modern economic society 
in order to assist them in becoming intelligent citizens of the communities 
in which they live; (2) to provide a thorough basic foundation for special- 
ized graduate or professional study; and (3) to give students who expect 
to enter the business world a broad background and some of the funda- 
mental information and viewpoints which will contribute to success and 
happiness in their later lives. In all courses the social viewpoint of the 
general welfare of society is emphasized, and the relationships among 
individual, group, and social welfare are pointed out. 

The core curriculum required of all students majoring in the de- 
partment consists of Economics 11-12, 21-22, 31-32, 31A-32A, 51-52, 



50 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

and 71, plus three hours each in Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, 
and Speech, in addition to the general college requirements. 

11. Introduction to Business. — A survey of the nature and role of busi- 
ness in our present-day economy. This course attempts to provide the 

student with an understanding and appreciation of the functions, respon- 
sibilities, and problems of business enterprise. Each week during the 
semester the student will visit a representative firm to observe it in 
operation. Not open to students who have previously received credit in 
Economics 21-22 or the equivalent. Three hours credit. Mr. Walls. 

12. Economic Geography. — A course in regional geography of the world 
with emphasis on the practical application of its techniques to social 

and economic problems. Special study is devoted to changing trends in the 
distribution of population, natural resources, and production facilities. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Johnson. 

21-22. Economic Principles and Problems. — This is the introductory 

course, designed to provide a general survey of the subject for those 

who take but one course in the field and to prepare others for advanced 

courses. Not open to Freshmen. Six hours credit. Dr. Wallace, Mr. Walls. 

31-32. Introduction to Accounting. — A lecture and laboratory course suit- 
able for both the general student of economics and business and the 
student who expects to do advanced work in Accounting. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Six hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 

31A-32A. Accounting Calculations. — An additional laboratory period of 
two hours per week to be taken concurrently with Economics 31-32. 
One hour credit per semester. Dr. Wallace. 

41. Personal Finance. — A non-technical course consisting of a study of 
the problems which every individual must face in managing his per- 
sonal income: budgeting; record keeping; savings and investments; life 
insurance; home ownership; installment buying and other forms of con- 
sumer credit; sources of information and protection in connection with the 
selection and purchase of commodities. Three hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 

42. Public Finance. — This course is concerned with the economics of 
government and public enterprise, and particularly with the objec- 
tives, methods, and effects of financing the public part of our economic 
system. The subjects to be considered include taxation, public expendi- 
tures, fiscal administration, and the public debt. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Walls. 

Prerequisite: Economics 21-22. 

Offered in alternate tjears, including 1960-61. 

51. Business Law. — This course is designed to acquaint students with 
the basic legal problems with which nearly every individual must at 
some time come in contact, to equip them to take elementary measures 
for protection of their legal rights in order to prevent litigation from 
arising, and to enable them to recognize situations in which the advice of an 
attorney is necessary. Topics covered include contracts, bailments, sales, 
real property, and personal property. Three hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 51 

52. Business Law. — A continuation of Economics 51. Topics covered in- 
clude agency, negotiable instruments, partnerships, and corporations. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 

Prerequisite: Economics 51. 

61. Money, Banking, and Credit. — A study of the institutional character- 
istics and historical development of our money and banking system. 

Emphasis is placed on the part played by commercial, investment, and con- 
sumer credit in production, as well as in the functioning of the pricing 
process in a capitalist economy. Reference is made to current monetary 
and banking conditions and problems. Three hours credit. Mr. Walls. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21-22. 

62. Business Finance. — A comparison of individual proprietorships, part- 
nerships, and corporations, and of the different types of corporate 

securities, with major emphasis on methods of providing fixed and work- 
ing capital for promotion, operation, and expansion of corporations. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21. 
Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 

71. Statistics. — An introductory course for students of the social sciences. 
A study of the techniques of tabulating data, graphic methods, com- 
putation of measures of central tendency, index numbers, variability, time 
series, and correlation. Three hours credit. Mr. Walls. 

72. Business Management. — A study of the management function con- 
sidering underlying principles and practices. This course analyzes 

the relation between management and enterprise organization, the determi- 
nation of objectives and the formulation of policy, and management pro- 
cesses and the solution of business problems. The principles studied will 
be of general applicability to both large and small business. Three hours 
credit. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

81. Intermediate Accounting. — A continuation of corporate account- 
ing with major emphasis on the content, valuation, and presentation 

of the principal balance sheet items, and analysis of financial statements. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Wallace. 
Prerequisite: Economics 31-32. 

82. Advanced Accounting. — A continuation of Economics 81, with major 
emphasis on accounting for consignments and installment sales, part- 
nership accounting, and consolidated statements. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Wallace. 

Prerequisite: Economics 31-32. 

91. Principles of Insurance. — A general survey course m insurance. This 

course considers the principles of risk and risk bearing, insurance 

carriers, the insurance contract, the major fields of insurance, administra- 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

tion, and regulation. This course will serve as a basis for the education of 
the prospective insurance buyer and also as a first course in preparing for 
an insurance career. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 
Offered in summer sessions. 

92. Business Cycles. — A general survey and description of changes in 
price levels and production. Past and current business cycle theories. 
Critical analysis of proposed plans for the control of economic fluctuations. 
Three hours credit. Mr. "Walls. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21-22. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

101. Intermediate Economic Theory. — This course is designed primarily 
for juniors and seniors who are majoring in Economics. A rigorous 

and critical study is made of modern income, value, and distribution theo- 
ries. Three hours credit. Mr. "Walls. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21-22. 

102. History of Economic Thought. — This course is designed primarily 
for juniors and seniors who are majoring in Economics. An historical 

study is made of principal economic theories through the writings of out- 
standing economists, with emphasis placed upon the development of ideas 
of present-day significance. Three hours credit. Mr. "Walls. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21-22 and 101 or consent of the Department. 

111. Cost Accounting. — A thorough consideration of the basic prin- 
ciples of cost accounting and their practical application, including pro- 
cess, job order, and standard cost procedures. Special attention is given to 
the use of cost information in the administration and management of 
business enterprises. Three hours credit. Mr. Miazza. 
Prerequisite: Economics 31-32. 

Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 

112. Auditing. — A standard course covering the theory and practice of 
auditing, with special attention to the preparation, organization, and 

interpretation of audit reports. Three hours credit. Mr. Miazza. 

Prerequisite: Economics 31-3 2. 

Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 

121. Marketing. — A study of marketing agencies, functions, and costs, 
with major emphasis on retail merchandising and the marketing of 
agricultural products. Some of the topics covered include channels of 
trade and transportation, competitive and monopolistic elements in mar- 
keting, market research, advertising, standardization of consumer goods, 
chain store distribution, and cooperative marketing. The viewpoint of 
society is stressed, and the course concludes with a critical appraisal of 
present marketing methods and a consideration of proposals for improve- 
ment of the existing marketing organization. Three hours credit. Mr. 
"Walls. 

Prerequisite: Economics 21. 
Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 53 

122. Labor Problems. — A general survey of the problems of the wage 
earner. Collective bargaining and trade unionism, labor legislation, 
and social insurance are discussed as means of dealing with these problems. 
Special consideration is given to the types and method of government in- 
tervention. Three hours credit. Mr. Walls. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21-22. 
Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 

131. Economic Systems. — An objective examination of the theory, pro- 
grams, and practices of the principal economic systems in the world 

today. A comprehensive study is made of capitalism, socialism, com- 
munism, fascism, and the consumer cooperative movement. Three hours 
credit. Mr. Walls. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21-22. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

132. International Trade and Economics. — Theory and history of inter- 
national trade and economics. International monetary movements, 

tariffs, and trade barriers will be studied. Emphasis will be on activities 

such as reciprocal trade agreements. World Bank for Reconstruction and 

Development, and other recent international attempts at stabilization. 

Three hours credit. Mr. Walls. 

Prerequisite. Economics 21-22. 

Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

141. Tax Accounting. — A study of accounting problems and procedures 
in connection with Federal and state income tax and social security 

tax laws, with emphasis on the preparation of required reports for indi- 
viduals, proprietorships, and corporations. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Miazza. 

Prerequisite: Economics 31-32. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

142. Governmental Accounting. — A study of accounting problems and 
procedures of governmental units, with particular reference to muni- 
cipalities, emphasizing the classification and use of funds, budgetary con- 
trol, and the preparation of financial statements and reports. Three hours 
credit. Mr. Miazza. 

Prerequisite: Economics 31-32. 

Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

SECBETARLAX. STUDIES 
11-12. Beginning TypeAvriting. — Development of basic techniques for 
control of the keyboard and machine parts. Some familiarity with 
office forms and office procedures is also acquired. Two hours extra- 
curricular credit. Mrs. Holloway. 

21-22. Advanced Typewriting. — Continued development in office forms 
and office practice. Greater speed and accuracy in use of th« key- 
board and machine parts are developed. Two hours extracurricular credit. 
Mrs. Holloway. 
Prerequisite: Course 11-12 or its equivalent. 



54 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

31-32. Introduction to Shorthand.— The simplified method of Gregg 
Shorthand is used in developing the fundamental principles of short- 
hand. A speed of eighty words a minute is attained by the end of the year. 
Four hours credit. Mrs. Holloway. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: Course 11-12 or its equivalent. 

41-42. Advanced Shorthand. — A continuous review of the fundamental 
principles is provided, and a larger vocabulary and greater speed in 
dictation and transcription are acquired. Four hours credit. Mrs. Hollo- 
way. 
Prerequisite: Course 31-32 or its equivalent. 

V DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

PROFESSOR HAYNES 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POWELL 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GOODMAN 

MRS. BYLER 

Courses in education are not open to freshmen. Professional training 
is offered in both the secondary and elementary fields and is designed to 
meet the requirements of the Division of Certification, State Department 
of Education for the Class A Certificates in both fields. 

Elementary Education. Students majoring in Elementary Education are 
required to complete the courses necessary to obtain the Mississippi 
Class A Elementary Certificate. 

21. Educational Psychology — A study of the applications of psychology 

to problems of learning and teaching. Same as Psychology 21. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Powell. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

22. Human Growth and Development. — A study of the growth and de- 
velopment of the individual from infancy through later childhood and 

adolescence. Same as Psychology 22. Three hours credit. Dr. Powell. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

31. General Methods of Teaching in the High School. — This course is 
designed to introduce the student to the fundamental principles of 

learning and teaching. Three hours credit. Dr. Powell. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

32. Principles of Secondary Education. — This course is designed to 
orient those students who are planning to teach in the high school to 

certain principles and problems of our modern high schools, including 
guidance. Three hours credit. Dr. Powell. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

41-42. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the High School. 

The student observes and teaches in an assigned classroom in the 
Jackson City Schools throughout the semester. Regular conferences are 
held with the instructor for planning, discussion, and appraisal of this 
classroom experience. Three hours credit for each semester. Dr. Powell. 
Prerequisite: C average and Education 31-32. 



MILLSAPri COLLEGE 55 

51. The Teaching of Reading in the Elementary School. — This course 
places special emphasis on the study of methods and materials of 

teaching reading in all the grades of the elementary school. Three hours 
credit. Mr. Haynes. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

52. Principles and Techniques of Teaching in the Elementary SchooL An 

introductory course designed to orient those students who are plan- 
ning to teach in the elementary school to certain principles, techniques and 
problems of our modern elementary schools. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Haynes. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

61-62. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the Elementary 
School. — The student observes and teaches in an assigned classroom 
in the Jackson City Schools throughout the semester. Regular conferences 
are held with the instructor for planning, discussion, and appraisal of 
this classroom experience. Three hours credit for each semester. Mr. 
Haynes. 
Prerequisite: C average and Education 51-52. 

91. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching in the High SchooL 

The student observes and teaches in an assigned class room in the 
Jackson City Schools throughout the semester. Regular conferences are 
held with the instructor for planning, discussion, and appraisal of thia 
classroom experience. Six hours credit. Dr. Powell. 
Prerequisite: C average and Education 31-32. 

101. Directed Observation and Practice Teacliing in the Elementary 
School.— The student observes and teaches in an assigned classroom 
in the Jackson City Schools throughout the semester. Regular conferences 
are held with the instructor for planning, discussion, and appraisal of 
this classroom experience. Six hours credit. Mr. Haynes. 
Prerequisite: C average and Education 51-52. 

111-112. Special Problems. — Open only to advanced students qualified 
to do independent study and research under the guidance and su- 
pervision of the instructor. One to three hours credit. Mr. Ha3Ties. 
Prerequisite: At least twelve hours in education and permission of the 
instructor. 

131, Alcohol Education. — A study of the alcohol problem and of the 
educational approach to it. Does not apply on a major in Education. 
Either semester. Three hours credit. Dr. Maddox. 

141. Science for the Elementary Grades. — This course covers the con- 
tent (subject matter), materials, resources, and methods of teaching 
and learning science in the elementary grades. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Haynes. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

151. Social Science for the Elementary Grades. — This course empha- 
sizes the subject matter, materials, and methods of teaching and 
learning the social studies in the elementary grades. Three hours credit. 
Mr. Haynes. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 



56 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

161. Arithmetic for the Elementary Grades. — This course presents a 
comprehensive survey of the subject matter, materials, and re- 
sources of arithmetic from a meaningful point of view. Instructional 
methods directed toward helping the learner to develop understanding 
of arithmetic are included. Three hours credit. Mr. Haynes. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

171. Cliildren's Literature. — This course emphasizes the subject mat- 
ter, materials, and methods of teaching and learning the various 
forms of literature suitable for children in the elementary grades. Three 
hours credit. Mrs. Goodman. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

181. Music for the Elementary Grades. — This course is intended for 
prospective teachers in the elementary school. It includes the sub- 
ject matter, materials, and methods of teaching music in the elementary 
grades. Same as Music Education 11. Three hours credit. Mrs. Byler. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

191. Art for the Elementary School. — This course is designed for teach- 
ers in the elementary school. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11, 22. 

VI DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

PROFESSOR WHITE 

PROFESSOR BOYD 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GOODMAN 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HARDIN 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MOREHEAD 

*MISS PARKER 

MRS. NEWSOME 

The objectives of the Department of English are (1) to give all 
students proficiency in the writing of clear and correct English, and to 
make them familiar with the master works which are the literary herit- 
age of the English people; (2) to give to all who wish to pursue electives 
in the department a deep understanding and appreciation of selected 
authors and periods of literature; and (3) to provide, for those who wish 
to teach or enter graduate school, adequate preparation and a thorough 
background for specialized study. 

11. Composition. — A concentrated study of fundamentals of composi- 
tion, weekly themes, and analysis of prose. Intensive reading and 

methods of study are stressed. Either semester. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Boyd, Mrs. Goodman, Mr. Hardin, Miss Morehead. 

12. Composition. — A continuation of the work of the first semester and 
the preparation of a research paper. Selections from literature are 

studied and analyzed. Three hours credit. Dr. Boyd, Mrs. Goodman, 
Mr. Hardin, Miss Morehead. 

ai. English Literature. — A survey of English literature from the be- 
ginnings to the eighteenth century. The course attempts a study of 



*0n leave, 1959-60. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 57 

the literature itself and of its historical development. Three hours credit. 

Dr. White, Dr. Boyd, Mrs. Goodman, Mr. Hardin, Miss Morehead, Mrs. 

Newsome. 

Prerequisite: English 11-12. 

22. English Literature. — A continuation of the study of English litera- 
ture from the eighteenth century through the nineteenth. Three hours 
credit. Dr. White, Dr. Boyd, Mrs. Goodman, Mr. Hardin, Miss Morehead, 
Mrs. Newsome. 
Prerequisite: English 11-12 and, preferably, 21. 

31. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of Macbeth and Hamlet. Lectures 
on the plays. Careful attention to Shakespearean diction, construc- 
tions, and customs. Ten of Shakespeare's plays are required as parallel 
reading during the semester. Three hours credit. Dr. White. 
Prerequisite or corequlsite: English 21-22. 

32. Shakespeare. — An intensive study of King Lear, Othello, and Henry 
IV, part one. A life of Shakespeare and ten more of his plays are 

required as parallel reading. Three hours credit. Dr. White. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: English 21-2 2. 

41. English Romantic Poets. — A study of the poetry and the prose of 
the great Romantic poets. Extensive library readings and a term 

paper on a special topic are required. Three hours credit. Dr. White. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: English 21-22. 

42. Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold. — A study of the poetry and prose 
of the great Victorian poets. Library readings and papers are re- 
quired. Three hours credit. Dr. White. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: English 21-22. 

■61. Creative Writing. — For students who have demonstrated some ability 

as writers. Three hours credit. Mrs. Goodman. 
Prerequisite: 11-12; 21-22; or consent of instructor. 

71. A Survey of English Drama. — An account of the origin and develop- 
ment of English drama is presented in lectures. Plays from the begin- 
ning of English drama to Shakespeare are studied for the detection of 
native, classical, and romantic influences. A few seventeenth and eighteenth 
century plays are read, and a survey of types is attempted. Three hours 
credit. Dr. White. 

Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

72. Modern Drama. — A study of British, American, and Continental 
drama since 1890. Approximately fifty plays are assigned for read- 
ing. Three hours credit. Dr. White. 

Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

SI. American Literature. — A survey of American literature from the 
early seventeenth century through the nineteenth century. Histori- 
cal background is presented as an aid to the understanding of American 
intellectual development. Emphasis on major movements and major au- 
thors. Three hours credit. Mrs. Goodman. 
Prerequisite: English 11-12. 



58 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

82. American Literature. — A survey of American literature in the twen- 
tieth century, with emphasis on developments and trends in the 
fields of poetry, prose fiction, and serious prose. Three hours credit. Mrs. 
Goodman. 
Prerequisite: English 11-12. 

91. Tlie Victorian Novel. — Readings in the major novelists of the Victo- 
rian era. Written reports. Lectures on types, movements, and authors. 

Three hours credit. Dr. White. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

92. Short Story Analysis. — Study of roots of fiction and a few early 
tales. Emphasis on modern stories. Three hours credit. Mrs. Good- 
man. 

Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

111. Literature of the Western World. — A chronological study of the 
literature of the Western World, by moods. Classicism, Romanticism, 
and Realism are considered in turn. Three hours credit. Dr. White. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

121. Modern American and British Poetry. — A survey of British and 

American poetry since 1900. Three hours credit. Dr. Boyd. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

131. Chaucer. — A brief introduction to Middle English language and 
literature, some attention to Chaucer's minor works, and an intensive 
reading of the Troilus and all the Canterbury Tales. Reading and reports 
from Chaucer scholarship and two papers: a minor one in translation 
and a major one in criticism. Three hours credit. Dr. Boyd. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

141. British Prose and Poetry of the Seventeenth Century. — A study 
of the works of the representative writers of the seventeenth century, 

exclusive of John Milton. Three hours credit. Dr. Boyd. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

142. British Prose and Poetry of the Eighteenth Century. — A study of 
British literature of the eighteenth century, selected from the works 

of the major writers. Three hours credit. Dr. Boyd. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

151. Milton. — An exploration of Milton's thought and art, including 
a reading of the important minor poems, selected prose, and all of 
Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. Reading and 
reports from Milton scholarship and a critical paper. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Boyd. 
Prerequisite: English 21-22. 

201. Research and Writing. — Required of all English majors in the 
first semester of the senior year, this is an advanced course in re- 
search and writing. Weekly individual problems in research techniques 
and procedures and three term projects: a considerable bibliography, a 
short scholarly review, and the Senior Essay, a research and critical 
paper in the field of the student's special interest. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Boyd. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 5» 

VII THE DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR LELAND BYLER 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SWEAT 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FAIRBANKS 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR LOWELL BYLER 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HUCKABAY 

MRS. BYLER MRS. CHITTIM 

MR. WOLFE MRS. WOLFE 

A major is offered in Music Theory, Organ, Piano, and Voice. 

A maximum of forty-two semester hours in Music and twelve hours 
in Art will be accepted toward a degree. Majors in Music are required to 
participate in a regularly scheduled music ensemble during each semester 
of residence. Candidates for the degree with a major in music must 
present one quality point for each semester hour earned in courses other 
than music. Attendance at recitals and/or repertoire classes is required 
of all students enrolled in applied music. 

Millsaps students enjoy the opportunities of participation in The 
Jackson Symphony Orchestra, The Jackson Opera Guild, The Jackson 
Little Theatre, and The Jackson Art Association. They can also buy tick- 
ets at special student rates for the concerts of The Jackson Symphony Or- 
chestra and The Jackson Music Association Series. 

Applied Music Major. Required: Sixteen hours in one field of ap- 
plied music; twenty-five hours of theory; Junior and Senior recital. 

Piano Requirements 

To enter the four year degree plan in piano, the student must have 
an adequate musical and technical background in the instrument. He 
should know and be able to play all major and minor scales. He should 
have had some learning experiences in all periods of the standard stu- 
dent repertory, such as the Bach "Two Part Inventions," the Mozart 
and Haydn "Sonatas," the Mendelssohn "Songs Without Words," and 
the Bartok "Mikrakomos." 

Organ Requirements 

To enter the four year degree plan in organ the student must have 
completed sufficient piano study to enable him to play some Bach two- 
part Inventions, Mozart Sonatas, easier Beethoven Sonatas and composi- 
tions by Mendelssohn, Grieg, Schubert, and Schumann. 

Voice Requirements 

To enter the four year degree plan in voice, the student must possess 
above average talent and evidence ability to sing with correct pitch, 
phrasing, and musical intelligence. He should possess some knowledge 
of the rudiments of music and be able to sing a simple song at sight. He 
should have had some experience in singing works from the standard 
vocal repertory such as Art Songs of the Romantic Period by Shubert 
or Schumann. 



60 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Music Theory Major. Required: Thirty hours in theory; twelve hours 
in applied music. Candidates in this field must present a minimum of 
eight hours in piano, but they may elect to take voice or organ for the 
remaining four hours required. 

I. Music Theory 
TH-12. Basic Theory. Technical study of the elements of music. Study 
of scales, intervals, and chords. Harmonic part-writing, sight-sing- 
ing and dictation, and keyboard harmony. Three lecture hours and two 
laboratory hours per week. Eight hours credit. 

T21-22. Advanced Theory. — Continuation of Tll-12. Harmonization of 
Chorales, modulation, altered chords, advanced sight-singing, har- 
monic dictation, and keyboard harmony. Three lecture hours and two 
laboratory hours per week. Eight hours credit. 

T32. Music Appreciation. — Biographical and appreciation studies intend- 
ed for the general college student. Three lecture hours per week. 
Three hours credit. 

T41-42. Counterpoint. — Study of the development of polyphony of the 
sixteenth century, mediaeval modes, the motet, and the writing of 
strict counterpoint. The second semester is devoted to the study of poly- 
phony of the eighteenth century, the writing of canon and fugue, and 
free counterpoint in contemporary styles. Two lecture hours per week. 
Four hours credit. 

T51. Form and Analysis. — Harmonic and formal analysis of basic musi- 
cal structures and study of advanced musical forms. Three lecture 
hours per week. Three hours credit. 

T61, Composition. — Training in the original composition of music, from 
the Scherzo and Trio to the Sonatina. Vocal forms are included. 
T21-22, T41-42 and T51 are prerequisite. Three lecture hours per week. 
Three hours credit. 

T71. Orchestration. — Practical training in scoring for orchestra and 
band, including a study of instrumental ranges, transpositions, and 
timbres. Two lecture hours per week. Two hours credit. 

T81-82, Music History. — A survey of the history and development of 
Music. The first semester includes music from antiquity to 17 50, and 
the second semester music to the present day. Three lecture hours per 
week. Six hours credit. 

T92. Music in Religion. — A survey of the development of religious music 
from antiquity to the present day. Practical training in the organiza- 
tion and administration of the Church music program is included. Open 
to non-music majors on consent of the instructor. Three lecture hours 
per week. Three hours credit. 

T93. Dii'ected Study In Music Literature. — Advanced surveys of a con- 
centrated area of music literature. The area studied depends upon 
the instrumental emphasis of the student. Two lecture hours per week. 
Two hours credit. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 61 

II. Music Education 

MEll. Public School Music. — A study of the administration and teach- 
ing of music at the elementary school level. The basic elements of 
music theory are included. This course is the same as Education ISl. 
Three lecture hours per week. Three hours credit. 

ME12. Oioral Conducting. — Basic training in conducting, score-reading, 
rehearsal techniques, diction for singers. Laboratory conducting of 
ensembles. Three hours lecture per week. Three hours credit. 

41-42. 61-62. Directed Observation and Practice Teaching. — (See Edu- 
cation Department). 

III. Applied Music 

Courses are designated by the first letter of the name of the instru- 
ment followed by the proper number from the following table: 

Freshnian 11-12, Sophomore 21-22, Junior 31-32, Senior 41-42. One or 

two lessons per week. Two or four hours credit. 

Junior 31R-32B. Two lessons per week and special instruction culmi- 
nating in a Junior recital. A special instruction fee is charged for 
this course. Six hours credit. 

Senior 41B-42R. Two lessons per week and special instruction culmi- 
nating in a Senior recital. A special instruction fee is charged for 
this course. Eight hours credit. 

ART 

11-12. Principles of Design, Composition, Color, and Techniques. — The 

principles of design, composition, color, and the traditional tech- 
niques of representation; drawing, painting, modelling, etc. are intro- 
duced in this course. These are the tools of the creative graphic and plas- 
tic arts. They are basic to a full understanding of the problems involved 
in most art forms, such as: architecture, industrial design, interior 
decoration, textile design, stage design, mosaics, lettering, illustration, 
"Fine" painting, sculpture, etc. Six hours credit. Mr. Karl Wolfe. 

21-22. Specialized Art Forms and Mediums. — In this course the student 
is encouraged to work toward specialization in the art-forms and 
mediums toward which his interest and natural abilities lead him. In 
both courses every effort is made to establish a sound and stimulating 
basis on which the student may fully develop his individual integrity, 
critical faculty and creative ability. The rate at which a student may 
develop these faculties is largely dependent on his own efforts. Six hours 
credit. Mr. Karl Wolfe. 

31. The History of Art — A study of the creative impulse in men as 
expressed in his architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor graphic 
arts. Three hours credit. Mrs. Mildred Nungester Wolfe. 



62 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

VIII THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

^PROFESSOR PRIDDY 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JOHNSON 

Geology at Millsaps is designed to offer the usual basic courses in 
physical, historical, structural, economic geology, and mineralogy. 
They are supplemented by Gulf Coast studies in stratigraphy and pe- 
troleum geology. Any student can enter physical geology. Subsequent 
courses require physical geology and introductory mathematics, chemistry, 
physics, and biology in order to prepare for advanced courses. It 
is necessary that the order of prerequisites be carefully chosen. Most 
courses require laboratory work, some of which is field work. 

11. Physical Geology. — This course is based on a study of the earth, the 
rocks which comprise its surface, erosional and depositional proces- 
ses, volcanism, deformation of the earth's crust, and economic deposits. 
One or two field trips. Two lecture hours and two hours laboratory. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Priddy, Mr. Johnson. 

Offered each fall semester and first term summer school. 

12. Historical Geology. — A study of the events leading to the present 
configuration of the continental masses, accounting for the kinds and 

distribution of surface rocks and minerals. The course includes an intro- 
duction to paleontology and several trips to fossiliferous areas easily ac- 
cessible to Jackson. Two lecture hours and two hours laboratory. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Priddy, Mr. Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Geology 11, or to be taken concurrently with Geology 11. 
Offered each spring semester and second term summer school. 

21. Mineralogy.- — The purpose of this course is to classify the common 
minerals and to study their modes of occurrence and economic uses. 

Students will classify hand specimens by crystal structure, hardness, cleav- 
age, color, luster, and specific gravity. The course is an interesting 
elective for chemistry, physics, and mathematics majors. Two lecture 
hours and two hours laboratory. Three hours credit. Mr. Johnson. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11 and Chemistry 21-22. Introductory mathe- 
matics courses are desirable. 
Next offered fall semester, 1961. 

22. Economic Geology. — A study of the chief economic minerals of the 
United States and other countries, with consideration of their strati- 
graphy, development, value, and use. Two hours lecture and two hours 
laboratory. Three hours credit. Mr. Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Geology 11-12 and 21. 
Next offered spring semester, 1962. 

31. Geology of Mississippi. — A course designed to acquaint the student 
with the stratigraphy, structure, and physiography of the Southeastern 
United States and especially of Mississippi. Studies will consist of strati- 
graphic and structural cross-sections, paleogeographic maps, index fossils, 
and assigned readings in Mississippi and regional literature. One two-day 



*On leave, second semester, 1959-60. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 63 

field trip and several short ones provide supplementary information. Two 

lecture hours and two hours laboratory. Three hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11-12, 32, and 41. 
Next offered fall semester, 1961. 

32. Structural Geology. — Structural features of the rocks comprising 
the earth's crust, their origin, and their relations to economic geol- 
ogy. Geological folios and reports on the structure of oil fields will be 
used in laboratory. Two lecture hours and two hours laboratory. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11-12. 
Next offered spring semester, 1961. 

41. Physiography (Geomorphology). — A more detailed treatment of 
land forms than provided in Geology 11. The physiographic pro- 
vinces and sections of the United States are studied systematically, but 
most emphasis is placed on the Coastal Plain. Topographic maps, aerial 
photographs, and geological folios are used in laboratory. Two lecture 
hours and two hours laboratory. Three hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11-12. 

Next offered fall semester, 1960. 

42. Petroleum Geology. — -A course designed to acquaint students with 
structure and stratigraphy as applied to petroleum geology. Special 

attention is paid to surface and sub-surface mapping, geophysical methods 
of exploration, and correlation of drillers and electrical logs. For practice, 
a Mississippi oil field will be followed through its various stages of ex- 
ploration and development. Trips are made to several drilling wells. Two 
lecture hours and two hours laboratory. Three hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11-12, 31, 3 2, and 41, and Chemistry 21-22. 
Next offered spring semester, 1962. 

51. Invertebrate Paleontology. — The principles of paleontology. Classi- 
fication of invertebrates with reference to their evolutionary history 

and adaptation to environment. Laboratory study of the morphology and 
distribution of fossils. Special attention will be paid to the diagnostic 
fossils of Mississippi geological units collected during field trips. An in- 
teresting elective for biology majors. Two lecture hours and two hours 
laboratory. Three hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 

Prerequisite: Geology 11-12 for geology majors, Biology 11-12 or 
21A-22A for biology students. 
Next offered fall semester, 1960. 

52. Vertebrate Paleontology. — A study of vertebrate fossil life, especial- 
ly that found in Gulf Coast units. An interesting elective for biology 

majors. Two lecture hours and two hours laboratory. Three hours credit. 

Dr. Priddy. 

Prerequisite: Geology 11-12 for geology majors. Biology 11-12 or 

21A-22A for biology students. 

Next offered spring semester, 1961. 

61-62. Special Problems. — Open to advanced students who have individu- 
al problems in the field or in laboratory. Subjects may include 



64 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

interpretation of aerial photos, micropaleontology, petrology, study of 
oil well cuttings, electric logs, and correlation of oil well logs. One to 
three hours credit for each course. Dr. Priddy, Mr. Johnson. 
Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of geology. 
Offered each semester. 

71. Field (Jeology. — A field course in one of the numerous summer geol- 
ogy field camps offering practical training in the standard methods of 
geologic field work. After completion of the field work a report is to 
be prepared by each student. Three to six hours credit depending on the 
duration of the camp. 

Prerequisite: To be determined by the college or colleges operating the 
course, the probable equivalent of Geology 11-12, 41, 32, and either Geology 
51-52 or 21-22. 
Offered each summer at the time designated by the camp operators. 

82. Petrography. — An introduction to the petrographic microscope, 
especially to the reflective, refractive, and polarizing properties of 
light. The petrographic microscope is used both for the identification of 
mineral fragments and minerals in thin section. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Geology 92 and Physics 42. 
Next offered spring semester, 1961. 

91. Sedimentary Petrology. — The classification, composition, deposition, 
and origin of sedimentary rocks. The course is designed for students 

in general geology but is especially important for petroleum geologists and 
for engineers. Hand specimens of sedimentary rocks will be studied, 
and there will be practice in mechanical analyses of unconsolidated sedi- 
ments collected during several field trips. A sedimentation trough will 
also be used to see how sediments are actually laid down. As a con- 
clusion of the course each student will make an oral and written report 
on a problem he has chosen. Three hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 
Prerequisite: Geology 11-12 and 21. 
Next offered fall semester, 1961. 

92. Lithology. — A study of the megascopic characteristics of igneous, 
sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and their use in rock classifi- 
cation. Practice is given in identification through the use of hand speci- 
mens. Three hours credit. Mr. Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Geology 21 or advanced standing for Chemistry and 

Physics majors. 
Next offered fall semester, 1960. 

101. Engineering Geology. — The applications of Geology to Engineering, 
for practicing engineers and geology majors. Kinds of rocks en- 
countered in excavations are studied, in both weathered and unweathered 
state. Conventional engineering tests are used. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Johnson. 

Prerequisite: Geology major or consent of the instructor. 
Next offered spring semester, 1962, 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 65 

HOG. Marine Geology. — A lecture and laboratory introduction to the 
general principles of the subject, with special reference to the Gulf 
of Mexico. This course is Geology 341 as taught at the Gulf Coast Re- 
search Laboratory, Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: IS hours of Geology including Geology 21. 
Offered at the Laboratory, second term summer school. 

112G. Problems in Marine Sedimentation, — Supervised research for 
advanced students in marine sedimentation. This course is Geology 
4 41 or 461 as taught at Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, 
Mississippi. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Geology HOG. 
Offered at the Laboratory, second term summer school. 

IX DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR HAMILTON 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GUEST 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR COULLET 

The German department courses have been set up to give those stu- 
dents taking their language requirement in this department a firm basis 
in grammar and an introduction to the literature of this language. For 
majors in the department courses have been designed to give the student 
a broad and basic conception of the great literature and history of 
Germany. Students are required to attend scheduled exercises in the 
language laboratory. 

Credit is not given for one semester of the elementary course unless 
the other semester is completed. 

A1-A2. Beginning (Jerman. — This course is designed to give beginners 
the fundamentals of grammar and a basic reading knowledge of the 
language. Six hours credit. Mrs. Coullet, Mr. Guest. 

11-12. Intermediate German. — Review of grammar. The student is in- 
troduced to some important writers of German literature. Six hours 
credit. Mr. Guest. 
Prerequisite: German A1-A2 or the equivalent. ' 

21-22. Advanced Intermediate German. — This course is designed to 
prepare the student for independent research and study. The stu- 
dent works with basic texts rather than with an edited text. Six hours 
credit. Mr. Guest. 

Prerequisite: German A1-A2 with a grade of A or B or with the pe' 
mission of the instructor. 

31-32. Conversation and Composition. — Exercises and practice in writing 
and speaking the German language. Six hours credit. Mr. Guest. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, 

41-42. Survey-History of German Literature. — Survey of German litera- 
ture up to Goethe, discussing authors, works, with oral and written 



66 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

reports by students. Laboratory sessions will be devoted to the art, 
music, and history of the period. Six hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

51-52. Goethe, Schiller. — The major poems and dramas and selected 
prose works of Goethe, together with the major dramas of Schiller 
will be read and analyzed. Six hours credit. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

61-62. Nineteenth Century German Literature. — Readings from the 
major figures of Romanticism and Realism, including Kleist, Hoel- 
derlin, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Heine, Meyer, Storm, Keller, and Fontane. Six 
hours credit. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

71-72. Modern Gerni'an Literature. — Readings in the major writers of 
the period, including Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Rilke, George, Hauptmann, 
Brecht, and Hofmannsthal. Laboratory sessions will be devoted to the 
art, music, and history of the period. Six hours credit. Mr. Guest. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

X DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

PROFESSOR MOORE 
PROFESSOR FERGUSON ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR LANEY 

Mr. ATTREP 

History courses have been so planned that the student may follow 
the causal relationship in human development. Upon a thorough factual 
foundation, emphasis is placed on the progressive organization of social, 
intellectual, and moral ideas of peoples and nations. In the approach to 
an understanding of historical phenomena, literature, religion, racial fac- 
tors, economic conditions, and social institutions, as well as forms of 
government, will be considered. 

11. Western Civilization to 1815. — A general survey of Western politi- 
cal, economic, and social institutions to the nineteenth century. 

Three hours credit. Dr. Moore, Dr. Ferguson, Dr. Laney, Mr. Attrep. 

12. AVestern Civilization since 1815. — A study of European expansion and 
world influence from the time of Napoleon to the present. Three 

hours credit. Dr. Moore, Dr. Ferguson, Dr. Laney, Mr. Attrep. 

21. History of the United States. — A general course in American history, 
covering the European background of colonial life, the Revolution, the 

Constitution, and the development of the nation through the Civil War. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Moore, Mr. Attrep. 

22. History of the United States. — The history of the United States 
from 18 65 to the present. Three hours credit. Dr. Moore, Mr. Attrep. 

41. The South. — Development of the southern region of the United 
States from the time of discovery to the close of the Civil War. Em- 
phasis is placed on the social and economic structure of Southern society 
before 1860. Three hours credit. Dr. Ferguson. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 67 

42. The South. — The effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the 
social, economic, and political structure of the South, and the develop- 
ment of the region's current problems. Three hours credit. Dr. Fergu- 
son. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

51. Problems in Modem History. — The nature and impact of such pres- 
ent-day problems in international relations as Nationalism, Imperial- 
ism, Militarism, and Propaganda. Three hours credit. Dr. Moore. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 

Not offered in 1 960-6 L 

52. Problems in Modem History. — A broad view of the history of Eur- 
ope since 1914. Not open to students who have credit in History 82. 

Three hours credit. Dr. Moore. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

61. America in the Twentieth Century. — A topical study of the history 
of the United States 1900-1933, with emphasis on political, economic, 

and social problems. Three hours credit. Dr. Moore. 
Prerequisite: History 22 or consent of instructor. 

62. America in the Twentieth Century, — A continuation of History 61 
from 19 33 to the present. Special reports will be required. Three 

hours credit. Dr. Moore. 

Prerequisite: History 22 or consent of instructor. 

81. Recent European History. — A survey of the major political, economic 
and social developments in Europe from 1870 to 1919. Late 19th 

century imperialism will be considered, and particular attention given 
to the origins of World War I. Three hours credit. Dr. Laney. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

82. Recent European History. — A continuation of History 81, covering 
the period since World War I. Principal attention will be given to 

the development of the major European states since 1918 and to the 
background of World War II. Students having credit for History 52 may 
not take History 82 for credit. Three hours credit. Dr. Laney. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

83. Russia in Modem Times. — Beginning with a brief survey of the 
origins of Russia and of her development in the Kievan period and 

under the Tatar Khans, primary attention will be given to the rise of 
Muscovy, her emergence as a European Power in the 17th century, and 
her development down to the death of Nicholas I in 1855. The growth 
of Russia's characteristic institutions under the Tsars, and her expansion 
into Asia since the 16th century will be considered. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Laney. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 



68 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

84. Russia in the Late 19th and 20th Centuries. — A continuation of 
History 83, tracing the general history of Russia since the 1850's. 
Special emphasis will be given to the growth of socialist and radical 
thought in the late 19th Century, to the revolutions of the 20th Century, 
and to the development of Russia under the Soviet regime down to the 
present day. Three hours credit. Dr. Laney. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 

91. Diplom!atlc History of the United States. — A detailed investigation 
of America's relations with other nations from the Revolution to the 

election of 1876. Emphasis upon the evolution of principles which have 
formed the basis of American foreign policy. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Attrep. 

92. Diplomatic History of the United States. — Continuation of History 
91. Foreign relations of the United States from 1876 to the present. 

Emergence of America as a world power. Emphasis will be throughout 
upon the role of the people in formulating the policies of the government 
of a democratic republic. Three hours credit. Mr. Attrep. 

101. The Far East in Modem Times. — A study of the history and 
development of the Far East from 150 to the beginning of the 20th 

century. Particular attention will be given to the impact of Western civi- 
lization upon the major states and peoples of the Far East, to colonialism 
and imperialism, and to the role of the Far East in international relations 
down to World War I. Three hours credit. Dr. Laney. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

102. The Far East in the Twentieth Century. — A continuation of His- 
tory 101, dealing with the recent period of Far Eastern history. 

Special attention will be given to developments in China, India, Japan, 
and the Indonesian area, and to their effect upon international relations. 
Problems in the post-World War II Far East will be considered. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Laney. 
Not offered in 1960-61. 

111-112. History of England. — A survey of English history from Roman 
times to the present. Political, social, and economic development will 
be considered, as well as the evolution of the British constitution and gov- 
ernmental system. The first semester will cover the period down to the 
Restoration of 1660. The second semester will continue the study from 
the Restoration to the present day, with some attention being given to the 
history and development of the British Empire. Six hours credit. Dr. 
Laney. 

301. Special Problems in History. — A study of how history is written 
and interpreted and of problems in American civilization. May be 

taken by students who have 6 sem. hrs. in History and is required of all 
History majors. Three hours credit. Dr. Moore. 

302. Current Problems. — Class discussion of current problems of nation- 
al and international importance. Open to students who have 6 sem. 

hrs. credit in History. Three hours credit. Dr. Moore. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 69 

XI DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR MITCHELL 

PROFESSOR REYNOLDS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR KNOX ASSISTANT PROFESSOR RITCHIE 

MISS LESTER 

I. AL4THEJMATICS 

The Mathematics courses at Millsaps are intended (1) to offer an 
experience in a sufficient variety of basic and liberal subjects to consti- 
tute the foundation of that general education which is regarded as essen- 
tial to balanced development and intelligent citizenship; (2) to meet the 
needs of four types of students — (a) those who will proceed to the usual 
academic degrees at the end of four years; (b) those who will enter profes- 
sional schools after three or four years; (c) those who are preparing for 
teaching, scientific investigation, or both; and (d) those who will take less 
than a complete academic program. 

An effort is made to show the student that there is an intangible 
worth to mathematics; that there is such a thing as mathematics as an art, 
mathematics for its own sake, mathematics for the sheer joy of comparing, 
analyzing, and imagining. 

R. Algebra. — A remedial algebra course for college students offered 
for those people who are not adequately prepared for college algebra 
but wish to become proficient enough in that field to complete the Math 
11-12 sequence. The number systems, operations with signed numbers, 
word problems, factoring and fractions, linear equations, graphs, expo- 
nents, roots and radicals, quadratic equations. No college credit but will 
be counted as part of a normal load. Three class periods per week. Dr. 
Reynolds, Mr. Knox, Mr. Ritchie, Miss Lester. 

9-10. Foundations of Mathematics.^ — ^A two-semester course for fresh- 
men designed primarily for the non-science majors. The basic 
principles of mathematics are studied as they apply to a number of 
topics including the following: ratio, proportion and variation, functions, 
equations, exponents and logarithms, probability and statistics, theory 
of sets, number systems, theory of numbers, logic. Six hours credit. Staff. 

11. College Algebra. — The notion of functional relation in two real 
variables; the equation; simultaneous linear, quadratic; determinants. 

Elementary series. Mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, complex 
numbers, theory of equations. Permutations, combinations, probability. 
Logarithms; partial fractions. Three hours credit. Dr. Reynolds, Mr. 
Knox, Mr. Ritchie. 

12. Plane Trigonometry. — Definitions of the trigonometric functions, 
properties, graphs, relations, identities, equations. Analysis. Solution 

of right and oblique triangles; logarithmic computation. Three hours 
credit. Dr. Reynolds, Mr. Knox, Mr. Ritchie. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

21. Plane Analytic Geometry. — Rectangular and polar coordinate systems. 
The straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, hyperbola. Transforma- 



70 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

tion and rotation of coordinates. The general equation of the second de- 
gree. Loci and higher plane curves. Three hours credit. Dr. Reynolds, 
Mr. Ritchie. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 12 or 9-10. 

22, Solid Analytic Geometry. — Rectangular coordinates in space, loci in 
space, lines, and planes. Surfaces and curves; the seventeen quadric 
surfaces. Transformations and matrices. Three hours credit. Dr. Rey- 
nolds. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

31. Calculus I. — The fundamental notions of limit, infinitesimal, in- 
finity, continuity. Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental 

functions. Applications. Differentials, curvature. Theorem of mean value. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Knox. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

32. Calculus 11. — Integration as an operation, integration as summation. 
The definite integral. Applications. Multiple integrals. Three hours 

credit. Mr. Knox. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 31. 

41. Calculus III. — Limits, continuity, infinitesimals, differentials, power 
series, partial and implicit differentiation, definite and line integrals. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Knox. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 32. 

61. College Geometry. — A triangle and its associated circles. Orthogonal 
circles and inverse points. Pole and polars. Coaxial circles. Isogonal 
lines. Similitude. Inversion. Brocard's figures. LeMoine circles. Three 
hours credit. Mr. Ritchie. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 22 or 31. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

72. Mathematical Theory of Statistics. — An introduction to statistical 
methods. Frequency distributions and curves, the mean, dispersion, 
index numbers, moments, and correlation. Three hours credit. Mr. Knox. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 32. 
Offered on demand. 

81. Differential Equations. — A first course in differential equations of 
the first and second orders, with applications to geometry, physics, 

and mechanics. Three hours credit. Mr. Knox. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 32. 

82. Theory of Equations. — Irrational numbers. Constructions. Algebraic 
solutions of the cubic and quartic equations. Symmetric functions of 

the roots. Determinants and matrices. Three hours credit. Mr. Ritchie. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 31. 

92. Modern Algebra. — Congruences, groups, rings, ideals, isomorphisms, 
and homomorphisms, fields, equivalence. Three hours credit. Dr. 
Reynolds. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 32. 
Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 71 

101. Synthetic Projective Geometry, — One-to-one correspondence. Ideal 
elements. Primitive forms. Duality. Dimensionality. Cross-ratio. Poles 
and polars. Construction of conies. Three hours credit. Mr. Ritchie. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 31. 
Offered on demand. 

II. ENGINEERING 

The following courses are offered for pre-engineering students 
for the purpose of preparing them for a course of study in the many 
fields of Engineering. 

11. The Slide Rule. — A method of efficient operation of the Duplex type 

slide rule in calculations. One hour credit. Mr. Knox. 

12. Engineering Orientation. — Orientation for freshman engineering stu- 
dents. Lectures by faculty on correlation of college studies with en- 
gineering practice. One hour credit. Dr. Reynolds. 

22. Descriptive Geometry. — Solution of problems of points, lines, planes, 
and surfaces of single and double curvature. Problems in intersec- 
tions and developments. Three hours credit. Mr. Ritchie. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 41-42. 

31-32. Analytic Mechanics. — The first semester includes statics, centro- 
ids, moments of inertia, work and energy. Rotary motion, D'Alem- 
bert's principle motion of a system of rigid bodies in space, and Euler's 
Equations are covered the second semester. Three hours first semester, 
two hours second semester. Dr. Reynolds. 
Corequisite. Mathematics 31-32. 

41-42. Engineering Drafting. — This basic course provides experience in 
the use of instruments, freehand lettering, dimensioning, orthogra- 
phic projections, sections, isometric, and oblique drawing and perspective, 
working drawings, and standard conventions. It includes practice in free- 
hand sketching and ink tracing. Two hours each semester. Mr. Ritchie. 
Corequisite: Mathematics 9-10 or 11-12. 

XII DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR FLEMING 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BERGMARK 

The courses in philosophy are designed to help the student develop 
a critical attitude toward life and an appreciative understanding of life. 

11. Introduction to Philosophy. — The course is designed to introduce 
the student to the field of philosophy, that he may learn how com- 
prehensive the field is. and learn also how philosophy is related to life 
as it is lived from day to day. Three hours credit. Dr. Fleming. 

12. Ethics. — A study of principles which should be used in the choosing 
of personal and social values. Three hours credit. Dr. Fleming. 

21. Esthetics. — An analysis of the esthetic experience, and a study of 
the place of art in life. This includes consideration of the creative 



72 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

impulse, of the art object, and standards of esthetic appreciation. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Fleming. 

22. Logic. — A study of the principles of valid reasoning, of how these 
principles are most commonly violated, and of how they can be ap- 
plied to the problems of life. Three hours credit. Dr. Fleming, Mr. 
Bergmark. 

31. History of Philosophy. — A survey of the development of philosophical 
thought to the Renaissance. Three hours credit. Dr. Fleming. 

32. History of Philosophy. — A survey of the development of philosophical 
thought from the Renaissance to the present. Three hours credit. Dr. 

Fleming. 

41. Philosophy of Religion. — A study of religious experience in its rela- 
tion to the whole of life. Three hours credit. Mr. Bergmark. 

42. Metaphysics. — A study of the basic categories of experience and real- 
ity. Three hours credit. Mr. Bergmark. 

51. Oriental Philosophy. — A study of the philosophies of the East. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Fleming, Mr. Bergmark. 

52. American Philosophy. — A study of the influences upon and the de- 
velopment of philosophical thought in America. Three hours credit. 

Mr. Bergmark. 

91. 92. Directed Study in Philosophy. — Either semester. One, two, or 
three hours credit. Dr. Fleming, Mr. Bergmark. 

XIII DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND ATHLETICS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MONTGOMERY, Basketball Coach 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SMITH, Head Football and Baseball Coach 

MISS EDGE, Director of Physical Education for Women 

The Department of Physical Education and Athletics operates on 
three levels to promote a well-rounded education for Millsaps College 
students. In academic and activity courses the student is provided with 
a background of carry-over activities that are applicable to teaching 
or personal use, both while in college and after graduation. The intra- 
mural programs attempt to promote leisure education, enrich social 
competence, develop group loyalties, and provide healthful exercise. The 
program of intercollegiate athletics provides the more skillful students 
an opportunity to compete against students of other colleges in supervised 
athletic contests. 

Two hours of physical education are required for graduation. These 
hours should be earned in Physical Education 11-12 courses. 

ACTIVITY COURSES 
All activity courses are co-educational. Students are required to 
furnish their own gym clothing which can be purchased at the bookstore 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 73 

for a nominal sum. The department will furnish locker and towel service 
and all materials needed for the courses. 

11-12. Basic Recreational Skills. — This course is designed to introduce 
the student to the most common recreational sports and to develop 
a measure of skill in playing them. Two hours each week for the entire 
year. One hour extracurricular credit per semester. Mr. Smith, Miss 
Edge, Mr. Montgomery. 

21-22 Golf. — Beginning and advanced study of golf. One hour extra- 
curricular credit per semester. Miss Edge, Mr. Smith. 

31-32. Teiinis and Badminton, — Beginning and advanced study of tennis 
and badminton. One hour extracurricular credit per semester. Miss 
Edge, Mr. Montgomery. 

ACADEMIC COURSES 
All academic courses are open to both men and women, with the 
exception of the coaching courses. 

41. Physical Education For the Elementary Grades. — This course is 
designed primarily for those preparing for the teaching profession. 
The characteristics of the elementary school child, activities suited to 
the physical and. mental levels represented, facilities, and equipment 
are considered. Three hours academic credit. Miss Edge. 

71. Theory of High School Coaching. — A specialized course open to men 
only who are preparing to enter high school coaching. This course 
is designed to prepare coaches of high school football and basketball 
to coach and operate full scale programs in these sports. Three hours 
academic credit. Mr. Smith, Mr. Montgomery. 

81. Athletic Officiating For Men. — Specialized courpe open to students 
who are interested in becoming football or basketball officials. This 
course includes a complete study of the rules, interpretations, administra- 
tion, ethics, and the mechanics of athletic officiating. Three hours aca- 
demic credit. Mr. Smith and Mr. Montgomery. 

101. Hygiene. — Personal health and care of the body; food, sanitation, 
diseases and contagion, vitamins, and hormones. Three hours lecture. 
Three hours academic credit. Mr. Smith. 

XIV DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

*EMERITUS PROFESSOR HARRELL 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GALLOWAY 

The courses in General Physics and General Astronomy are concerned 
largely with the fundamental facts, laws, and theories. These beginning 
courses serve as terminal courses for those students taking only one year 
of the subject and also lay an adequate foundation for subsequent study. 

The courses in Physics following the elementary course deal with the 
Tarious divisions of Physics and are arranged to meet the needs of (1) 



*Deceased, August 9, 1959. 



74 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

those planning to major in the field of Physics, (2) those majoring in re- 
lated fields such as Chemistry, Geology, or Biology, and (3) those planning 
to enter medical, dental, or graduate schools. 

Physics 

Physics 11-12 or 11A-12A is prerequisite for all other courses in Physics. 

11. General Physics. — An elementary treatment of mechanics, heat, and 
sound. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Three hours 

credit. Mr. Galloway. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 

12. General Physics. — An elementary treatment of magnetism, electrici- 
ty, and light. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 

Three hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 

IIA. General Physics. — A more detailed treatment of mechanics, heat, 
and sound than provided in Physics 11. Three lectures and one lab- 
oratory period per week. Four hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 

12A. General Physics. — A more detailed treatment of magnetism, elec- 
tricity, and light than provided in Physics 12. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Four hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11-12. 

21-22. — General Physics Laboratory. — A laboratory course designed to ac- 
company either Physics 11-12 or Physics 11A-12A to provide addition- 
al laboratory work to meet the needs of those students who expect to enter 
graduate or professional schools. One laboratory period per week. Two 
hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

31. Problems in Intermediate General Physics. — An intermediate prob- 
lem course dealing with the properties of matter, mechanics, heat, 

sound, electricity and light. Three hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

32. Modem Physics. — An introductory course in Modern Physics. Twa 
lectures and one laboratory period per week. Three hours credit. 

Mr. Galloway. 

Prerequisite: Ten semester hours of Physics (or consent of instructor). 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 21-22. 

41. Mechanics and Heat. — A further study of mechanics and heat with 
special attention given to thermodynamics, calorimetry, and the ki- 
netic theory of gases. The laboratory work will be devoted, in part, to the 
determination of the fuel values of different fuels. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Three hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 

42. Light. — This course treats of the principles and laws of reflection, 
refraction, interference, polarization, and color phenomena. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. Three hours credit. Mr. Gal- 
loway. 

Offered in alternate years, including 1960-61. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 75 

51. Electricity. — A study of electrical measuring instruments and their 
use in actual measurements, power stations and the distribution of 

power, lighting, and heating. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 

Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

52. Electricity. — This course is devoted to a study of the vacuum tube 
and the fundamentals of radio communication. Two lectures and one 

laboratory period. Three hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-6L 

61-62. Special Problems. — A laboratory course designed to give the stu- 
dent opportunity to do work on problems in which he has developed 
a special interest. One to three hours credit per semester. Mr. Galloway. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

81. Photography. — A study of developing, printing, enlarging, and lan- 
tern slides. One laboratory period per week. One hour credit. Mr. 
Galloway. 

Offered during the summer session. 

Astronomy 
11-12. General Astronomy. — This course is devoted to a study of the 
earth, moon, time, the constellations, the solar system, the planets, 
comets, meteors, the sun, the development of the solar system, and the 
siderlal universe. Two lectures and one observatory period. Six hours 
credit. Mr. Galloway. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11-12 and Physics 11-12 (or 
Physics 11A-12A). 

21-22. Practical Asti'onomy. — This course covers the subject of spherical 
astronomy and the theory of astronomical instruments with exercises 
in making and reducing observations. One lecture and one double labora- 
tory period per week. Six hours credit. Mr. Galloway. 
Prerequisite: Astronomy 11-12 and permission of the instructor. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

XV DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR MANLEY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BOWEN 

PROFESSOR MOORE ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WALLS 

The general objective of the Department of Political Science is to 
acquaint students with the theory and practice of government at the local, 
state, national, and international levels. Primary attention is focused 
upon the American political and administrative system. The student's 
attention is also directed to the problems encountered in international 
organization, politics and law. The development of political theories from 
Plato to the present day is an essential part of the department's course 
offerings. Methods of study include the descriptive, the historical, the 
legal, the comparative and the philosophical. 

Directing its effort to an intelligent understanding of the contem- 
porary world and of the responsibilities which are laid upon citizens of a 



76 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

democracy, the Department of Political Science shares the general ob- 
jectives of a liberal arts education. While the department does not aim 
at vocational education, the knowledge it seeks to impart should be use- 
ful to anyone contemplating a career in the government service, law or 
politics. 

21. American Government. — An introduction to the American system of 
government, including a study of the Constitutional basis of our 

government, federal-state relations, political parties and politics, and of 
each of the great powers of our national government- — legislative, execu- 
tive, and judicial. Three hours credit. Staff. 

22. State and Local Government. — A study of state and local govern- 
ments, their present organizations and subdivisions, and their re- 
lation to each other. Special attention is given to the government and 
administration in Mississippi. Three hours credit. Staff. 

32. Public Administration. — A study of the nature, scope, and develop- 
ment of the American administrative system, the theory or organiza- 
tion, staff and auxiliary agencies, the chief executive, administrative 
departments, independent regulatory agencies, government corporations, 
administrative relationships, science in administration, and recent re- 
organization plans. Three hours credit. Dr. Manley. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 21. 
Offered on demand. 

42. Public Finance. — Same as Economics 42. Mr. Walls. 

51-52. Problems in Modern History. — Same as History 51-52. Dr. Moore. 
Prerequisite: History 11-12. 

61. Ck)mparative Government — The Democracies. — A comparative study 
of modern political institutions with particular attention to European 

constitutional government and politics. Three hours credit. Dr. Manley. 

62. Comparative Government — The Dictatorships. — A study of Com- 
munist government in theory and practice with some attention to 

other recent European totalitarian governments. Three hours credit. 
Mr. Bowen. 

72. American Political Parties.- — A study of the historical development, 
organization, and methods of political parties in the United States. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Manley. 

80. International Relations. — A study of the terminology, issues, strate- 
gies, and organization of international politics. Three hours credit. 

Mr. Bowen. 

81. International Public Organization. — A study of the structure and 
functioning of the United Nations organs, of related specialized agen- 
cies and the Organization of American States. Three hours credit. Mr. 
Bowen. 

Offered on demand. 

82. International Law. — Elements of international law, particularly as 
interpreted and supplied by the United States; rights and duties of 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 77 

states with respect to recognition, state territories and jurisdiction, na- 
tionality, diplomatic and consular relations, treaties, treatment of aliens, 
pacific settlement of disputes, international regulation of the use of force 
and collective security. Three hours credit. Dr. Manley. 

101. Political Theory to the Eighteenth Century. — An historical survey 
and philosophical analysis of political theory from the time of the 

Greeks to the close of the seventeenth century. Required reading from 
the works of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke. Three 
hours credit. Mr. Bowen. 

102. Modem Political Theory. — A continuation of Political Science 101 
from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the presient. Re- 
quired reading from Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Mill, and Communist, 
Fascist, and Socialist theorists. Three hours credit. Mr. Bowen. 

121. The British Commonwealth. An analysis of the political relation- 
ships between the members of the Commonwealth and a comparative 
study of the governments of the Dominions, with particular reference to 
Canada. Three hours credit. Dr. Manley. 

131. American Political Thought. — A study of the development of an 
American political tradition and its relation to selected American 

political thinkers. Three hours credit. Mr. Bowen. 

132. American Political Institutions. — A study of the formation and de- 
velopment of institutions of the national government in the United 

States, with historical and analytical treatment. Among other topics this 
course is concerned with the Constitutional Convention of 178 7, the de- 
velopment of Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court. Three 
hours credit. Dr. Manley. 

141-142. American Constitutional Law and Theory. — A study of lead- 
ing principles of American Government, as developed through judicial 
interpretation of the Constitution. Six hours credit. Dr. Manley. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 21. 

201. Reading and Research. — This course is intended for those students 
majoring in the department who wish to pursue special programs of 
reading and research. The nature of the work undertaken will in each 
instance be agreed upon in advance by the student and the instructor con- 
cerned. Three hours credit. Dr. Manley. 

221. Washington Semester: Seminar in Governmental Processes. — Inde- 
pendent study program for junior and senior year students in coopera- 
tion with the American University and other institutions. Directed study 
of the processes of government in action. Reports, conferences, lectures, 
group and individual visits to various agencies and organizations. Enroll- 
ment restricted to group approved by faculty committee. 

301. Seminar (for Political Science majors.) — A schedule of reading, 
reports, and discussion designed to give a broad knowledge of the 
literature in the discipline of Political Science. Three hours credit. Dr. 
Manley. 



78 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

XVI DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

PROFESSOR LEVANWAY 

PROFESSOR MADDOX ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POWELL 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR McCRACKEN 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ALLEN 

The objectives of the Department of Psychology are (1) to assist stu- 
dents in gaining a better understanding of themselves and others with 
whom they live and work, and in developing more objective attitudes to- 
ward human behavior; (2) to provide a sound foundation for graduate 
study and professional training in psychology; and (3) to provide certain 
courses which are basic to successful professional work with people. 

11. Introduction to Psychology. — A survey of the field of psychology. 
The student is introduced to methods of studying behavior in the 
areas of learning, intelligence, maturation, personality, emotions, and 
perception. Three hours credit. Not open to freshmen. 

21. Educational Psychology. — Same as Education 21. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11; Psychology 22 desirable. 

22. Child Psycholog5'. — Same as Education 22, Human Growth and 
Development. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

31. Psychological Tests and Measurements. — A study of the theory, 
problems, and techniques of psychological measurement. A survey 

of both individual and group tests of ability, aptitude, interests, and 
personality. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 and 71. 

32. Adolescent Psychology. — A study of psychological development dur- 
ing the adolescent years. Three hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

41. Social Psychology. — A study of the principles of communication, 
group interaction, and human relations. Three hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

42. Psychology of Adjustment. — A laboratory course applying principles 
of sound mental health and adjustment. Practical experiences in 

the group process and in human relations are emphasized. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

51. Principles of Guidance. — A study of counseling and guidance. Special 
attention is given to the counseling problems in the work of teachers, 

ministers, social workers, and other professional workers who deal with 

the adjustment of people. Three hours credit. 

Prerequisite: A minimum of six hours in Psychology and consent of the 

instructor. 

52. Tlie Family. — Same as Sociology 52. 

61. Experimental Psychology. — A laboratory course in methods and 
techniques of psychological experimentation. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 and 71. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 79 

62. Dynamics of Human Behavior. — A study of personality development. 
Theoretical contributions to the understanding of personality will 
be discussed. Emphasis on normal development, with abnormal symptoms 
being treated as extremes of normal patterns. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 and Junior standing. 

71. Statistics. — Same as Economics 71. 

72. Psychology in Business and Industry. — Application of psychological 
tools and techniques to problems of industry. Attention is given to 

selection and training of workers, problems of morale, and the main- 
tenance of harmonious relationships within the organization. Three 
hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11. 

82. Motivation and Learning. — A theoretical approach to motivation and 
the learning process. Contributions of outstanding men in the field 
of learning are assessed. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 and consent of the instructor. 

91. physiological Psychology. — A study of the physiological processes 
underlying psychological activity, including physiological factors in 
learning, emotion, motivation, and perception. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11; Biology 21-22 or consent of the instructor. 

102. History and Systems. — An introduction to the historical develop- 
ment of the field of psychology. Emphasis is placed on the outstand- 
ing systems of psychological thought as exemplified by both past and 
contemporary men in the field. Three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 11 and consent of instructor. 

111. Special Problems. — Open only to advanced students qualified to 
do independent study and research under the guidance and super- 
vision of the instructor. One to three hours credit. 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

112. Seminar (for Psychology Majors). — An intensive reading course, 
giving the student a wide acquaintance with current psychological 

literature and systems of psychology. Designed to fill major gaps in a 
student's preparation in the field. Three hours credit. 

XVII DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

The Tatum Foundation 

PROFESSOR WROTEN 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ANDING 

MR. LEWIS 

The courses are designed to give the student an understanding and ap- 
preciation of the Bible and of the place of organized religion in life and 
society; to help students develop an adequate personal religious faith; 
and to prepare them for rendering effective service in the program of 
the church. 



80 MILLS APS COLLEGE 

11. The Story of the Old Testament. — A study of the story told in the 
Old Testament and of how the Old Testament came to be written. 

Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten, Mr. Anding, Mr. Lewis. 

12. The Story of the New Testament. — A study of the story told in the 
New Testament and of how the New Testament came to be written. 

Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten, Mr. Anding, Mr. Lewis. 
Prerequisite: Religion 11. 

21. The Teachings of Jesus. — An interpretative study of the life and 
teachings of Jesus. Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten, Mr. Lewis. 

Prerequisite: Religion 11-12. 

22. The Prophets. — An interpretative study of the Old Testament proph- 
ets. Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten. Mr. Lewis. 

Prerequisite: Religion 11. 

31. The Life of Paul. — A study of Paul's life, his writings, and his influ- 
ence. Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten, Mr. Lewis. 

Prerequisite: Religion 11-12. 

32. The History of Methodism. — A study of the development of the 
Methodist Church, and of its relation to other churches. Three hours 

credit. Dr. Wroten, Mr. Lewis. 

41. Teaching in Training Schools. — A study designed to prepare students 
to teach one of the training courses of the Methodist Church. The 

course to be taught is developed, and an opportunity is given to teach it. 
Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten. 

42. The Educational Work of the Church. — A study of the program and 
methods of Christian education in the church today. Projects in 

local churches are included. Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten. 

51. Church and Society. — A study of the function of the church in the 
present social order. Three hours credit. Dr. Wroten. 

52. Christianity and Science. — A study of Christianity and of the relation- 
ships between Christianity and scientific theories. Three hours credit. 

Dr. Wroten. 

61. Comparative Religion. — A comparative study of the origin and de- 
velopment of the living religions of the world. Three hours credit. 

Dr. Wroten. 

62. Biblical Theology. — A study of the origin and development of the 
main religious concepts in the Bible. Three hours credit. Dr. 

Wroten. 

Prerequisite: Religion 11-12. 

71. History of Christianity. — A study of the development of Christianity 
from Jesus to the Protestant Reformation. Three hours credit. Dr. 

Wroten, Mr. Anding. 

72. History of Cliristianity. — A study of the development of Christianity 
from the Protestant Reformation to the present time. This course in- 
cludes the study of modern Christian missions. Three hours credit. Dr. 
Wroten, Mr. Anding. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 81 

81. The Work of the Pastor. — A study of the problems and opportunities 
of the student pastor. Three hours credit. Mr. Anding. 

82. The Organization of the Church. — A study of the organizational 
structure of the Methodist Church with provisions for comparison 

with other church structures. The course is designed for both premin- 
isterial and lay students. Three hours credit. Mr. Anding. 

112. Seminar. — A study designed to help the student majoring in religion 
integrate his knowledge in terms of the total life. One hour credit. 
Staff. 

XVIII DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR SANDERS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BASKIN 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CRAIG ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HEDERI 
MRS. NORONA MRS. EZELLE 

This department offers courses in French and Spanish. The prepara- 
tory course (Course A) in each language is equivalent to two high school 
units. 

A student is not permitted to enter courses 11 and 12 in French and 
Spanish until both semesters of the A course or the equivalent have been 
satisfactorily completed. A student will not be admitted to courses 21 
and 22 in French or Spanish until 11 and 12 (or equivalent if transfer 
student) have been completed. Under no condition will a student be per- 
mitted to begin French and Spanish the same year. 

A student should consult the professors in charge before planning to 
take more than two modern languages. Any course not already counted 
may be used as a junior or senior elective. Credit is not given on one 
semester of the preparatory course as an elective, however, unless the 
other semester is completed. 

FRENCH 
A1-A2. Elementary French. — An Elementary course in grammar and 
reading with constant oral practice. A minimum of one hour per 
week is required in the language laboratory. Six hours credit. Miss Craig, 
Mr. Baskin, Mrs. Ezelle. 

11-12. Intermediate French — Concentrated review of grammar, reading 
of modern French prose, and special attention is given to irregular 
verbs and idioms. A minimum of one hour per week is required in the 
language laboratory. Six hours credit. Miss Craig, Mr. Baskin. 
Prerequisite: French A1-A2 or two years of high school French. 

21-22. Survey of French Literature. — A survey of French literature 
from its origins to the present day. An anthology is used. Instruc- 
tion and recitation principally in French. A minimum of one hour per 
week is required in the language laboratory. Six hours credit. Mr. Baskin. 
Prerequisite: French 11-12 or equivalent. 



82 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

31. Seventeenth Century French Literature. — A concentrated study of 
the Golden Age of French literature. Special attention is given to 

Corneille, Moliere, Racine, and La Fontaine. A minimum of one hour 
per week is required in the language laboratory. Three hours credit. 
Mr. Baskin. 
Prerequisite: French 21-22 or equivalent. 

32. Eighteenth Century French Literature. — An intensive study of 
French literature of the eighteenth century. An anthology of eigh- 
teenth century French readings is used. Extensive readings in Voltaire. 
A minimum of one hour per week is required in the language laboratory. 
Three hours credit. Mr. Baskin. 

Prerequisite: French 21-22 or equivalent. 

40-41. Nineteenth Century French Literature. — First semester deals 
with pre-Romantics, early Romantic prose writers, and the Romantic 
poets and novelists. A survey of French Romantic drama is also given. 
Second semester deals with Parnassianism, Symbolism, Realism, and 
Naturalism. A minimum of one hour per week is required in the language 
laboartory. Six hours credit. Mr. Baskin. 
Prerequisite: French 21-22 or equivalent. 

42-43. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. — First semester 
deals with Maeterlinck, Proust, Bergson, Gide, Peguy, and Claudel. 
Second semester deals with Breton and the Surrealists, Malraux, Girau- 
doux, Anouilh, Sartre, and Camus. A minimum of one hour per week is 
required in the language laboratory. Six hours credit. Mr. Baskin. 
Prerequisite: French 21-22 or equivalent. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1960-61. 

51-52. Conversation. — A course designed to give students some fluency 
in the use of the spoken language. Composition drill will also be 
given. Some emphasis is placed in the second semester on civilization. 
This course may be taken in addition to but cannot be substituted for 
French 11-12. A minimum of one hour per week is required in the 
language laboratory. Six hours credit. Miss Craig. 
Prerequisite: French A1-A2. 

SPANISH 
A1-A2 Elementary Spanish. — An Elementary course in grammar and 
reading with constant oral practice. A minimum of one hour per 
week is required in the language laboratory. Six hours credit. Mrs. 
Hederi, Mrs. Norona. 

11-12. Intermediate Spanish. — This course is devoted to the reading of 
modern Spanish prose. A Spanish review grammar is used, and 
special attention is given to the irregular verbs and to idioms. A mini- 
mum of one hour per week is required in the language laboratory. Six 
hours credit. Mrs. Hederi, Mrs. Norona. 
Prerequisite: Spanish A1-A2 or two units of high school Spanish. 

21-22. Survey of Spanish Literature. — This course offers a survey of 

Spanish literary history from its origins to the present day. The 

first semester considers the literature from the jarchas to the Golden Age 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 83 

drama. The second semester covers recent and contemporary authors. An 
outline history of Spanish literature is also used. A minimum of one 
hour per week is required in the language laboratory. Six hours credit. 
Mr. Baskin. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12. 

31. The Golden Age Drama. — Consideration of ten of the best known 
plays of the most representative Spanish dramatists of the Golden 
Age from Cervantes to Moreto. Reading and examination of the plays 
offering emphasis on fluency in the spoken language. A minimum of one 
hour per week is required in the language laboratory. Three hours credit. 
Mrs. Norona. 

33. Spanish Romanticism.— Study of the historical background and 
characteristics of this literary movement. Selections from Espron- 
ceda, Zorilla, Duque de Rivas, Garcia Gutierrez, Becquer, and Hartzen- 
bush. A minimum of one hour per week is required in the language 
laboratory. Three hours credit. Mrs. Norona. 

41. Spanish Regional Novel and Selected Brief Fiction. — The Spanish 
novel in the 19th century, its origins, antecedents, influence, and 

characteristics. Concentration on the works of Caballero, Valera, Galdos, 
and Blasco Ibanez. A minimum of one hour per week is required in the 
language laboratory. Three hours credit. Mrs. Norona. 

42. Cervantes. — A detailed study of the life and works of Miguel de 
Cervantes. Readings from the Novelas Ejemplares and the Qnijote. 

A minimum of one hour per week is required in the language laboratory. 
Three hours credit. Mrs. Norona. 

51-52. Spanish Conversation and Composition. — A course designed to 
give students some fluency in the use of spoken Spanish. Laboratory 
drill is incorporated in this course. This course may be taken in addition 
to but cannot be substituted for Spanish 11-12. A minimum of one hour 
per week is required in the language laboratory. Six hours credit. Mrs. 
Hederi. 
Prerequisite: Spanish A1-A2 and preferably 11-12. 

61-62. Survey of Spanish-American Literature. — A brief outline of the 
literature of the Spanish-American countries with attention to his- 
torical and cultural backgrounds. The first semester deals with the 
literature of the colonial and revolutionary periods. The second semester 
treats the literature from the second third of the nineteenth century. A 
minimum of one hour per week is required in the language laboratory. 
Six hours credit. Mrs. Hederi. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 and preferably 21-22. 

XIX DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR MADDOX 

PROFESSOR LEVANWAY PROFESSOR PRIDDY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ALLEN 

The offerings of the Department of Sociology are planned to meet the 
needs of a variety of students. The general student may find here 



84 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

knowledge about human group relationships which will be useful to 
him as person, parent, citizen, or worker. Other students will find courses 
which offer essential background for a career in social work. The De- 
partment also offers the basic undergraduate courses which are needed 
as a foundation for specialized graduate study of Sociology. 

11. Introduction to Sociology. — A survey of the field of sociology with 
special attention given to existing knowledge about social interaction, 

to basic concepts useful in the analysis of social interaction and to the 
application of these concepts in the analysis of social interaction. Three 
hours credit. Staff. 

12. Modern American Society. — A course at the introductory level de- 
voted to analyzing the structure and organization of the social system 

in the United States. It is helpful, but not necessary, for the student to 
have had Sociology 11. Three hours credit. Staff. 

41. Social Psychology. — Same as Psychology 41. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11. 

51. American Communities. — A study of the ecological, demographic, 
and institutional characteristics of communities in the United States. 

Attention is given to the analysis of social structure and organization 
in urban environments. Three hours credit. Miss Allen. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11. 

52. Marriage and the Family. — A study of marriage and kinship in the 
United States with special attention given to preparation for marriage 

and for adjustment to family living. An audio-visual program is an 
integral part of this course. A seminar in addition to regular course 
work is provided for sociology and psychology majors. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Maddox. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. 

61. Introduction to Social Anthropology'. — A study of the cultural and 
social origins of mankind and a comparison of major social institu- 
tions found in selected societies around the world. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Maddox. 

72. Industrial Sociology. — A study of work, workers and the social 
groups that affect work behavior. Attention is given to the social 
organization of work plants and the interrelationships of industry, com- 
munity, and society. Three hours credit. Dr. Maddox. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11. 

81. Deviancy, Delinquency, and Criminality. — A study of social deviancy 
with special attention given to juvenile delinquency and crime, 
methods of control, and the rehabilitation of deviants. Three hours 
credit. Miss Allen. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11. 

91. American Minorities. — A study of the ethnic composition of the 
population of the United States and of social interaction characteristic 
of dominant and minority groups in various regions. Three hours credit. 
Dr. Maddox. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11 or 61. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 85 

101. Social Stratification. — A study of the literature, theories, and 
empirical research pertaining to social stratification in the United 
States. Three hours credit. Staff. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

121. An Introduction to Social Work. — A study designed to give the 
student a broad view of the fields of social work and the social 
worker as a professional. Attention will be given to the history of social 
work and social work organization. Field trips will bring the student 
into contact with a wide range of social work agencies and with social 
workers. The course is especially recommended for the sophomore stu- 
dent who is exploring an interest in social work as a profession. Three 
hours credit. Miss Allen. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11 or Psychology 11. 

131. Public Opinion. — A study of the formation of social significance 
of and techniques for the analysis of public opinion. Attention is 
given to the application of information and techniques of analysis to 
special areas of interest in the various social sciences, such as advertising, 
vote analysis, and collective behavior. Three hours credit. Staff. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11 or Psychology 11. 

141. Experimental Social Psychology. — A course designed for the ad- 
vanced social science student who wishes to explore some of the 
research applications of social psychological theory. Each student per- 
forms one or more experiments with research problems which have some 
relevance for social interaction. Two lectures and one laboratory each 
week. Three hours credit. Staff. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 41 or Psychology 41. 

131. Rural Sociology. — A study of contemporary rural social systems 
in the United States with attention given to rural urban comparisons 
and to an analysis of social change. Field work in a nearby community 
will constitute an important portion of the course. Three hours credit. 
Staff. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 11 or consent of instructor. 

161. Physical Anthropologj'. — A study of man and his physical environ- 
ment. For example, man's geographic, geological, and climatological 
background will be considered. Three hours credit. Dr. Priddy. 

201. Seminar in Social Research Methods. — A schedule of readings, 
field work, reports, and discussion designed to acquaint the sociology 

major with social research methodology, techniques, and procedures. 
One to three hours credit. Staff. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

202. Seminar in Sociological Theory. — A schedule of readings, papers, 
and discussion designed to give the sociology major a broad knowl- 
edge of sociological literature and theory. Three hours credit. Staff. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

301-302. Directed Study. — A course of study designed for advanced stu- 
dents in sociology or other social sciences who desire a program of 
directed reading and research in special problems of sociology. In each 



86 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

case the program of study will be agreed on in advance by instructor and 
student. One to three hours credit. Staff. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

XX DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GOSS 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR COLLINS 

11. Speech Fundamentals: Public Speaking. — This course has as its 
basic concern the techniques of public speaking. The approach is a 

practical one in that each student will be required to deliver a minimum of 
five addresses which deal with progressively more difficult material and 
situations. Emphasis is given to development of correct breathing, proper 
pronunciation, accurate enunciation, and an effective platform manner. 
Individual attention and criticism are given at frequent intervals, and the 
work is further assisted by the use of electrical sound recordings. Three 
hours credit. Mr. Goss, Mr. Collins. 

12. Speech Fundamentals: Oral Reading. — This course bears upon the 
general field of interpretation and involves the reading aloud of 

various types of literature with a view of communicating its logical, imagi- 
native, and emotional content. Three hours credit. Mr. Goss, Mr. Collins. 
Prerequisite: Speech 11. 

21. Debate. — Principles and practices of intercollegiate debating. In- 
tensive preparation on the national debate subject for each year. 
Practice debates and intercollegiate competition. Two hours credit. May 
be repeated until a maximum of six hours credit is earned. Mr. Collins. 
Fall semester each year. 

31. Interpretation of Drama. — Includes the analysis and interpretation 
of dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks through the eighteenth 

century. Three hours credit. Mr. Goss. 
Prerequisite: Speech 11-12. 

32. Interpretation of Drama. — Includes the analysis and interpretation 
of dramatic literature from the nineteenth century to the present. 

Three hours credit. Mr. Goss. 

Prerequisite: Speech 31 or consent of instructor. 

41. Speech for Ministerial Students. — A one-semester course designed to 
meet the special needs of ministerial students. Includes concentrated 
work in the preparation and delivery of sermons and oral interpretation of 
the Scripture and other literature used in church services. Enrollment 
limited to twelve each semester. Three hours credit. Mr. Collins. 
Prerequisite: Speech 11-12. 

51. Phonetics. — This course has as its basic purpose a detailed analysis 
of English speech sounds. American regional pronunciations also are 
considered. Words are formed, discussed, and trancribed according to 
the International Phonetic Alphabet. Attention also is given to words 
which are widely mispronounced. Three hours credit. Mr. Collins. 



Part IV 

Administration of 

The CurriculuHi 




IN A BIOLOGY LABORATORY 




IN THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 89 

GRADES, HONORS, CLASS STANDING 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The grade of the student in any class is determined by the combined 
class standing and the result of a written examination. The examination 
grade is counted as approximately one-third of the grade for the semester. 
"A" represents superior work. 
"B" represents above the average achievement in the regularly prescribed 

work. 
"C" represents an average level of achievement in the regularly prescribed 

work. 
"D" represents a level of achievement in the regularly prescribed work of 

the class below the average in the same relationship as the grade of 

"B" is above the average. 
"E" represents a condition and is changed to a "D" if the grade in the 

other semester of the course is "C" or above, providing that the 

"E" precedes the higher grade on the student's record. 
"F" represents failure to do the regularly prescribed work of the class. 

All marks of "D" and above are passing marks and "F" represents 

failure. 
"WP" indicates that the student has withdrawn from the course while 

passing, and "WF" means that he has withdrawn while failing. 
"I" indicates that the work is incomplete and is changed to "F" if the 

work is not completed by the end of the following semester. 

QUALITY POINTS 
The completion of any academic course with a grade of "C" shall 
entitle a student to one quality point for each semester hour, the comple- 
tion of a course with a grade of "B" for the semester shall entitle a student 
to two quality points for each semester hour, and the completion of a course 
with the grade of "A" for the semester shall entitle a student to three qual- 
ity points for each semester hour. 

CLASS STANDING OF STUDENTS 
The following number of hours and quality points is required: 

For sophomore rating 24 hours; 12 quality points 

For junior rating 52 hours; 36 quality points 

For senior rating 90 hours; 72 quality points 

A student's classification for the entire year is on the basis of his 
status at the beginning of the fall semester. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

In determining honors and high honors, and all other awards based 
on scholarship, a quality index is arrived at by dividing the number of 
quality points by the number of academic hours taken. 

A student whose quality point index is 2.0 for his entire course shall 
be graduated with Honors; one whose quality point index is 2.7 and who 
has a rating of excellent on comprehensive examination shall be graduated 
with High Honors. 

To be eligible for Honors or High Honors, a student must have 
passed at least sixty semester hours in Millsaps College. Honors or High 



90 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Honors may be refused a student who, in the judgment of the faculty, has 
forfeited his right. 

In determining eligibility for Honors or High Honors in the case of 
students who have not done all their college work at Millsaps, the quality 
points earned on the basis of grades made at other institutions will be 
considered, but the student will be considered eligible only if he has the 
required index both on the work done at Millsaps and on his college courses 
as a whole. 

DEAN'S HONOR LIST 

Those meeting the following requirements are honored by inclusion 
on the Dean's List: 

1. Scholarship: 

(a) The student must carry not less than twelve academic hours 
during the semester on which the scholastic average is based; 

(b) The student must have a quality point average for the preced- 
ing semester of 2.00; 

(c) The student must have no mark lower than a C for the pre- 

ceding semester. 

2. Conduct: 

The student must be, in the judgment of the deans, a good citizen 
of the college community. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAM 

Juniors with outstanding academic performance may apply to their 
major department to read for Honors during their Junior and Senior 
years. This program includes the writing of an Honors Paper in addition 
to special examinations. Candidates who complete successfully the pro- 
gram receive at graduation special citations. 

REPORTS 

Reports are sent at the close of each nine weeks to the parent or 
guardian of each student. These reports indicate, as nearly as practicable, 
the nature of the progress made by the student in his work at the college. 

HOURS PERMITTED 

Fifteen academic semester hours is considered the normal load per 
semester. 

No student may take more than seventeen semester hours of aca- 
demic work unless he has a quality index of 1.5 on the latest previous col- 
lege term or semester. No student may take more than nineteen semester 
hours of academic work unless he has a quality-point index of 2.00 on the 
latest previous college term or semester and obtains permission from the 
Dean. No student may receive credit for more than twenty-one hours in a 
semester under any circumstances. 

Any student who is permitted to take more than seventeen semester 
hours of work will be required to pay at the rate of ? 10.00 for each addi- 
tional semester hour over seventeen. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 91 

ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE 
A student cannot change classes or drop classes or take up new 
classes except by the consent of the Dean, his faculty adviser, and all 
faculty members concerned. Courses dropped within the first two weeks 
of a semester do not appear on the student's record. Courses dropped after 
the first two weeks and before the middle of a semester are recorded as 
WP (withdrawn passing) or WF (withdrawn failing). Courses dropped 
after the middle of a semester are recorded as failures. If a student drops 
a course at any time without securing the required approvals, he receives 
an F in that course and is subject to further disciplinary action. 

WITHDRAWAL 

A student desiring to withdraw from college within any term must 
obtain permission from the Dean of the College. A withdrawal card must 
be filled out and must be approved by the Dean or the Registrar. No re- 
fund will be considered unless this written notice is procured and presented 
to the Business Office. 

Refunds upon withdrawals will be made only as outlined elsewhere 
in this catalog under the heading of "Financial Regulations." 

A student who withdraws from college with permission after the first 
two weeks of a semester is recorded as WP (withdrawn passing) or WF 
(withdrawn failing) in each course. A student who withdraws without 
permission receives a grade of F in each course. 

Enforced withdrawal is inflicted by the faculty for habitual delin- 
quency in class, habitual idleness, or any other fault which prevents the 
student from fulfilling the purpose for which he should have come to 
college. 

The college reserves the right to cancel the registration of any stu- 
dent at any time. In such a case, the pro rata portion of tuition will be 
returned, except that students withdrawing under discipline forfeit the 
right to a refund for any charges. 

No student who withdraws from college for whatever reason is en- 
titled to a report card or to a transcript of credits until he shall have 
settled his account in the Business Office. 

AUTOMATIC EXCLUSION 

To remain in college a freshman must pass in the first semester six 
hours of academic work. 

After the first half year a student must pass at least nine hours of 
academic work each semester to continue in college. 

The maximum number of semesters a student may be on academic 
probation without automatic exclusion is two. 

Students who are requested not to re-enter because of academic fail- 
ure may petition in writing for readmission, but such petition will not be 
granted unless convincing evidence is presented that the failure was due 
to unusual causes of a non-recurring nature and that the student will 
maintain a satisfactory record during the subsequent semester. 



9 2 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

PROBATION 

Probation is defined as follows: 
Academic Probation: — 

Students who pass enough work to remain in college but make in 
any semester a quality index of less than 0.5 will be placed on pro- 
bation. Restricted attendance privileges apply for all courses in 
which such students are enrolled. 

Students who are on probation may be removed by making a 1.00 
quality point index during a regular semester or during a summer 
session at Millsaps College in which the student is enrolled for at 
least twelve hours credit. A student is asked not to re-enroll at Mill- 
saps College if he is on academic probation more than two semesters 
during his college program. 

Disciplinary Probation : — 

Students guilty of serious infractions of the regulations of the college 
may at the discretion of the appropriate dean or faculty committee 
be placed on disciplinary probation. Restricted attendance privileges 
will apply for such a student in all courses in which he is enrolled. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 
Students at Millsaps College are expected to be prompt and regular 
in class attendance. Fundamentally, class attendance is the direct con- 
cern of the faculty member and the student in each classroom. The faculty 
member has responsibility for judging the relationship between absences 
and the quality of performance on the part of each student. Each student 
has the obligation to accept full responsibility for his own class attendance 
and for compliance with the spirit as well as the letter of attendance 
regulations. 

All absences are recorded, and excessive absences, as well as penalties 
for such excessive absences, are noted in the student's personnel records. 
When any student is absent to an extent that his grades and educational 
benefits are seriously affected, his instructor will notify him of this fact. 
Referral to any appropriate member of the faculty or administration will 
be in order to facilitate correction of this situation. If the student does 
not respond promptly to these actions in his interest, the instructor or 
the appropriate administrator shall recommend that the student be 
dropped from the course or receive whatever penalties and losses of 
credit may have accrued. 

Attendance is compulsory for all students in the following instances: 

1. attendance at all assigned tests and examinations; 

2. attendance on the two days preceding and the two days 
following vacation periods; 

3. attendance at laboratories, seminars, practice teaching, field 
trips, and similar scheduled commitments; 

4. attendance at chapel (one day each week). 

Students on academic probation or on disciplinary probation are 
subject to specified attendance regulations, with an obligation to ex- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 93 

plain each and every absence from class in writing. The only acceptable 
excuses for students under restricted attendance privileges are illnesses, 
emergencies, or fortuitous circumstances. Any student in the College 
may be placed under such attendance regulations upon request of 
an instructor at such time as his absences may reduce his effectiveness 
in a course. Students on probation or under restricted attendance privileges 
are subject to dismissal from a course or to whatever penalties may have 
accrued should his absences be considered excessive or unwarranted. 

In order to assure consistency in policy from year to year and to assist 
both students and faculty in maintaining a basic structure for suitable 
attendance practices, the College has established certain minimum regu- 
lations and procedures regarding class attendance. Each student is re- 
sponsible for becoming completely familiar with the general attendance 
policies and with the particular privileges or restrictions which pertain 
to him. These policies, privileges, and restrictions are stated in full in 
the student handbook, MAJOR FACTS. 

SENIOR EXEMPTIONS 

Seniors may be exempt from final examinations in all subjects in 
which they have maintained a grade of C. These exemptions are allowed 
only at the end of the semester in which they take the comprehensive exam- 
ination for graduation. It shall be understood, however, that this exemp- 
tion does not insure the student a final grade of C, since daily grades dur- 
ing the last two weeks shall count in the final average. Under no circum- 
stances may a student be exempt from any examination in more than one 
term or semester. 

Students may be exempt from final examinations only in the semes- 
ter in which they take their comprehensive, scholastic requirements being 
met. 

CONDUCT 

The rules of the college require from every student decorous, sober, 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, 
whether he be within its precincts or not. Because Millsaps students are 
well-known for their exemplary conduct, there are few stated restrictions. 

Secret marriages, gambling, and use or possession of beverage alcohol 
are violations of college policy. Additional policies relative to the conduct 
of students are found in the handbook. Students are expected to fami- 
liarize themselves with these regulations, since they are accountable for 
observance of them. 




THE MILLS APS PLAYERS: "LIFE WITH FATHER' 




ON THE TENNIS COURTS 



Part V 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 97 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Millsaps College, as an institution of the Methodist Church, seeks to 
be a genuinely Christian college. The faculty is made up of scholars who 
are Christians striving to fulfill the highest ideals of personal devotion and 
of community citizenship. The religious life of the college centers around 
the churches of Jackson and the campus religious program. 

Each week the administration, the faculty, and the students come to- 
gether for a chapel service in the Christian Center. This is a form.al wor- 
ship service. Each Sunday morning the Holy Communion is administered 
for the college community. 

The Christian Council is a student group made up of representatives 
from all the religious groups on the campus. The Director of Religious 
Life serves as counselor for the group. Many denominations are repre- 
sented in the student body. Each is given the opportunity to organize a 
group and given a time to meet. The YWCA and the YMCA are given the 
opportunity to organize and promote an interdenominational program. 

Students preparing for the Christian ministry may join the Minis- 
terial League, which provides programs and field work appropriate to the 
needs of students interested in Christian life work. Through its activities, 
the league provides opportunity for Christian service for its members and 
contributes much to the religious life of the campus, to the local churches, 
and to such institutions as the Methodist Children's Home and the local 
hospitals. 

A similar organization for young women going into full-time Christian 
work is the Women Christian Workers. Their program and activities 
also provide opportunity for worship and Christian service on and off the 
campus. 

There are other opportunities for worship such as morning watch, 
evening vespers, and organized prayer g'roups in the dormitories. These 
services provide opportunity for participation by all students. The worship 
services are planned by the students themselves. 

There are periods of special emphasis on religion, such as Pre-Easter 
services and Religious Emphasis Week. The annual Religious Emphasis 
Week is sponsored by all the religious groups of the campus, functioning 
through the Christian Council working with the Religious Activities Com- 
mittee of the faculty. For this week some outstanding religious leader, 
familiar with student life and problems, addresses the student body and 
various groups of students and professors and is available for private con- 
ference with individuals. Other discussion group leaders are brought in to 
participate in this program. This series has been enriched through the 
J. Lloyd Decell Lecture Foundation. Speakers of recent years have in- 
cluded Dr. W. A. Smart, Dr. Marshall Steel, Dr. W. B. Selah, Dr. Mack 
Stokes, Dr. Henry Hitt Crane, Dr. D. Elton Trueblood, Dr. George Baker, 
Dr. George Buttrick, Bishop John Wesley Lord, Dr. W. J. Cunningham, 
Dr. Peter Bertocci, Dr. W. C. Newman, Dr. Marjorie Reeves, the Rev. 
Joel D. McDavid, Dr. Roger Ortmayer, and Dr. Charles L. Allen. 



9 8 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

All administrators and faculty members consider it part of their 
responsibility to counsel with students about their religious life. This 
helps the student come to a mature interpretation of the total life experi- 
ence. Religion is considered a very necessary factor in this maturing 
process. 

The Town and Country teacher offers courses in the Religion De- 
partment bearing on the opportunities and responsibilities of the parish 
ministry. This teacher counsels with those students holding churches 
and those preparing to go into the active ministry. He helps them in 
setting up adequate programs in their parishes. He is interested also in 
the lay student who wishes to prepare better for active work in the 
church as a layman. 

Through the religious groups on the campus the students are encour- 
aged to participate in the program of the Youth Fellowship in local 
churches. They are also encouraged to attend important conferences, 
assemblies, and camps. Students also work on Youth Caravans and help 
In Vacation Church Schools in the summer months. 

Millsaps campus has become a conference center. Such groups as 
the Christian Vocation Conference and the Methodist Student Movement 
meet here from time to time. These groups bring religious leaders and 
young people to the campus. Campus students take advantage of such 
programs. 

ATHLETICS 

The athletic policy of Millsaps College is based on the premise that 
athletics exist for the benefit of the students and not primarily to enhance 
the prestige and publicity of the college. 

It is believed that competitive sports, conducted in an atmosphere 
of good sportsmanship and fair play, can make a significant contribution, 
in the same way as other student activities, to the complete physical, emo- 
tional, moral, and mental development of the well-rounded individual and 
that they are thus an integral part of a program of liberal education. 
Toward this end, an attempt is made to provide a sports-for-all program 
and to encourage as many students as possible to participate in some form 
of intramural or intercollegiate athletic competition. 

The entire program is under the supervision of the Faculty Commit- 
tee on Athletics. Specific policies are as follows: 

A. Intramural Athletics 

1. The program for men provides competition among campus organiza- 
tions in speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball, tennis, and golf. 
Rules are made and administered by the Intramural Council, com- 
posed of student representatives with the Intramural Director as 
an ex-officio member. 

2. The program for women is administered by a faculty Director, as- 
sisted by the Majorette Club, whose student members head the teams 
that compete in such sports as badminton, volleyball, tennis, basket- 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 99 

ball, and softball. Election to this club provides recognition for 
athletic participation. 

R. Intercollegiate Athletics 

1. The program for men includes football, basketball, baseball, tennis, 
and a limited program in golf. There is no intercollegiate program 
for women. 

2. The program is conducted on a purely amateur basis. This means 
specifically: 

a. No athletic scholarships are given, and athletes are not sub- 
sidized in any vs^ay. 

b. There is no discrimination for or against athletes in the awarding 
of scholarships and other regular financial aid given by the col- 
lege to worthy students as described in the college catalog. 

c. All such aid is administered by the Faculty Awards Committee. 
Athletic ability is not a factor in such awards, and no one is 
granted or denied aid because of athletic ability or participation. 

d. No student is required to participate in athletics as a condition 
for receiving or retaining any scholarship or other financial aid. 

e. No student who takes pay from any source or in any form for 
participation in intercollegiate athletics is eligible. 

f. No student who has participated in organized professional sports 
is eligible. 

g. No student may participate for more than four seasons in any 
sport, including participation in junior colleges or other senior 
colleges which the student may have attended. 

3. Only regularly enrolled full-time students are eligible for intercol- 
legiate competition. 

4. Those who participate in intercollegiate athletics are required to 
observe and maintain the same academic standards as other students. 

5. In scheduling games, preference is given first to members of the 
athletic conference to which Millsaps belongs, and second to other 
colleges that conduct an athletic program on an amateur basis similar 
to that at Millsaps. When necessary to secure an adequate schedule, 
games are played with schools that operate a subsidized program on 
a frank and open basis. Games are not scheduled with schools that 
attempt to conceal subsidization of athletes while professing ama- 
teurism. 

C. Athletic Facilities. 

1. The gymnasium provides a large playing floor for volleyball and 
basketball. It has dressing rooms for all teams, a room for visiting 
teams, trainer's room complete with equipment for injuries, a club 
room for wearers of the "M", a class room, and shower and locker 
rooms for girls. The gymnasium has become the center of activities 
for the students. 

2. The baseball diamond, separate from the football field, is also used 
as the intramural football field. There are also softball diamonds. 

3. Five tennis courts have been constructed near the gymnasium. 

4. A very fine nine-hole golf course is available for use by all students. 



100 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Social events play an important part in student life at Millsaps. The 
social organizations are founded on the belief that man is a social being 
and enjoys fellowship. They strive for high ideals and make a valuable 
contribution to the college and the individual in teaching students to live 
together. 

There are four fraternities, four sororities, and a women's inde- 
pendent group at Millsaps. The fraternities and sororities are all mem- 
bers of well-established national Greek-letter organizations which maintain 
chapters at Millsaps. The independent group is a member of the National 
Independent Student Association. 

The sororities are Beta Sigma Omicron, Chi Omega, 
Kappa Delta, and Phi Mu. 

The fraternities are Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha, and Pi Kappa Alpha. 

The women's independent group is the Vikings. 

Any student who desires to join the National Independent Student 
Association should indicate this desire to the officers of Vikings. Stu- 
dents not members of a sorority are eligible for membership. 

Policies governing sorority and fraternity life are formulated through 
the Panhellenic Council and the Interfraternity Council in cooperation 
with the Committee on Social Organizations. 

Fraternities and sororities select students for membership during 
a week of school known as Rush Week. At the end of Rush Week 
these organizations offer "bids" to the students whom they have selected. 
Eligibility for membership in sororities and fraternities is ' governed by 
the following regulations: 

A. General Conditions 

1. Only bona fide regular students (carrying at least 12 academic 
hours) may be pledged to a sorority or fraternity. 

2. A student may not be pledged to a fraternity or sorority until his 
official registration for classes has been cleared by the Registrar's 
Office. 

3. Each social organization shall secure a letter of scholastic eligi- 
bility of its prospective initiates from the Registrar prior to the 
initiation ceremonies. 

4. Only persons who are bona fide students of Millsaps at initiation 
time can be initiated into a sorority or fraternity, except by per- 
mission of the Social Organizations Committee. 

B. Scholastic Requirements 

1. To be eligible for initiation into a sorority or fraternity, a student 
must have earned in his most recent semester of residence as 
manj^ as twelve quality points, and in the same semester as many 
as tv/elve semester hours of academic credit, and must not have 
fallen below D in more than one subject. 



i 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 101 

2. A student who drops a course after the end of the half semester 
shall receive an F for sorority or fraternity purposes as well as 
for academic averages. 

3. The two terms of summer school combined shall count as one 
semester for sorority or fraternity purposes. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 
Eta Sigma Phi 

Eta Sigma Phi is a national honor fraternity, recognizing ability in 
classical studies. Alpha Phi, the Millsaps chapter, was founded in De- 
cember, 1935. 

Pi Kappa Delta 

The Millsaps chapter of Pi Kappa Delta offers membership to those 
who have given distinguished service in debating, oratory, or extempor- 
aneous public speaking. 

Chi Delta 

Chi Delta is a local honorary literary society fostering creative 
writing among the women students at Millsaps. Membership includes 
women members of the faculty and student body who are interested in 
writing. 

Kit Kat 

Kit Kat is a literary fraternity with a selected membership of men 
students and faculty members who have literary ambition and ability. 
Monthly programs consist of original papers read by the members and 
criticized by the group. 

Oniicron Delta Kappa 
Omicron Delta Kappa is a men's leadership fraternity with chapters in 
principal colleges and universities. Pi Circle at Millsaps brings together 
members of the student body and faculty interested in campus 
activities, together with a limited number of alumni and supporters who 
plan for the betterment of the college. Membership in Omicron Delta 
Kappa is a distinct honor. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 

Alpha Epsilon Delta is an honorary pre-medical fraternity, founded 
at the University of Alabama in 1926. Its purpose is to promote the in- 
terests of pre-medical students. Leadership, scholarship, expertness, 
character, and personality are the qualities by which students are judged 
for membership. Alpha Epsilon Delta strives to bridge the gap between 
pre-medical and medical schools. 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Effective participation in The Millsaps Players earns membership 
in Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic fraternity. This participa- 
tion may be in acting, directing, make-up, stage management, business 
management, costuming, lighting, or publicity. Each year the name of 
the outstanding graduating senior member of the organization is en- 
graved on a trophy, which is kept in the college trophy case. 



102 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Sigma Lambda 

Sigma Lambda is an honorary women's sorority recognizing leader- 
ship and sponsoring the best interests of college life. Sigma Lambda mem- 
bership is a distinct honor. Invitation to the group is based upon points 
gained through active leadership in certain campus organizations and 
must be with the unanimous vote of the regular members. 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 

Kappa Delta Epsilon, a professional education sorority, promotes 
the cause of education by fostering high scholastic standing and pro- 
fessional ideals among those preparing for the teaching profession. 

Theta Nu Sigma 

With the purpose of furthering general interest in the sciences, 
Theta Nu Sigma membership is offered to second semester sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors who are majoring in one of the natural sciences and 
who fulfill certain specified qualifications. 

Pi Delta Phi 

Pi Delta Phi is a national French honor society which recognizes 
attainment and scholarship in the study of the French language and 
literature. Its purpose is to honor those students majoring, or having 
earned a minimum of eighteen semester hours, in French who have also 
a high scholastic average in all subjects. Honorary members are chosen 
from among the faculty, alumni, and townspeople who have special in- 
terest in the activities of this organization. 

Psi Delta Chi 

Psi Delta Chi is a local honorary recognizing both interest and 
ability in the social sciences. Although honorary status is reserved for 
students of demonstrated ability, active membership is open to all in- 
terested students. 

Eta Sigma 

Eta Sigma, scholastic honorary, was founded at Millsaps during the 
1920's but became dormant toward the end of World War II because of 
limited civilian enrollment. Eta Sigma was re-established on Millsaps 
Campus in 1957. 

Social Science Forum 

The Social Science Forum, a local organization, was organized last 
year. Membership is typically composed of upperclassmen who have a 
high scholastic average and an interest in social sciences. 

Schiller Gesellschaft 

Schiller Gesellschaft was founded in order to give recognition to 
those students who have shown excellence in the study of German and 
in order to provide a forum for the further study of all aspects of German 
civilization. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 103 

OTHER STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Millsaps Student Association is governed by the Student Senate 
and officers elected by the student body. The president, vice-president, 
secretary, and treasurer are elected annually from the student body. 
Members of the Student Senate are chosen by the groups which they 
represent. 

Meetings of the Student Senate are held weekly, with other meetings 
called when the student body president considers them necessary. All 
members of the student body automatically become members of the Stu- 
dent Association. 

The duties and functions of the Student Senate are to act in the 
administration of student affairs, to cooperate with the administration 
in the orientation program of the college, to apportion the student activi- 
ties fee, to maintain understanding between students and faculty, and to 
work for the benefit of the student body and for the progress of the 
college. 

THE PURPLE AND WHITE 

A working laboratory for students with journalistic interests ia 
furnished in The Purple and White, weekly Millsaps student publicatioo 
Active staff work earns extracurricular college credit. 

THE BOBASHELA 
The Bobashela is the annual student publication of Millsaps College, 
attempting to give a comprehensive view of campus life. The 19 60 edition 
is the fifty-fourth volume of this Millsaps Book. (Bobashela is an Indian 
name for "good friend.") 

THE STYLUS 
Through Stylus, the college literary magazine, students interested 
in creative writing are given an opportunity to see their work in print. 
The publication comes out twice each year and contains the best poetry, 
short stories, and essays submitted by Millsaps students. 

THE MILLSAPS PLAYERS 

The dramatic club of the college is The Millsaps Players, which pre- 
sents three three-act plays and three one-act plays each year. Major pro- 
ductions for the 1959-60 session were "Life with Father" by Howard 
Lindsay and Russell Crouse, "Picnic" by William Inge, produced in-the- 
round in the old cafeteria in Galloway Hall, "Bells Are Ringing," book 
and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Jule Styne, 
and "Androcles and the Lion" by Bernard Shaw. 

The Millsaps Players Acting Awards are presented to the boy and 
girl who are judged to have given the best performances in any one of 
the major productions; three Junior Acting Awards are also presented. 
The Jackson Little Theatre Award goes to the student who has done the 
most outstanding work in the field of production for the year. 

Membership in The Players is open to all students, and effective 
participation in the productions earns one extra-curricular hour for each 
semester. 



104 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

THE MILLSAPS SINGERS CONCERT CHOIR 
The Concert Choir is open by audition to all students. The Singers 
represent Millsaps College in public performances, campus programs, and 
annual tours throughout the state. In recent years the choir has traveled 
west as far as Colorado and north as far as Indiana. Membership earns 
two semester hours of extracurricular credit for the year's work. 

THE MILLSAPS SINGERS CHAPEL CHOIR 
The Chapel Choir is open to all students evidencing sufficient mu- 
sicianship. This group joins with the other choral organizations on cam- 
pus in presenting oratorios such as The Messiah, The Mozart Requiem, 
and other larger choral works, as well as providing special music oc- 
casionally at the regular chapel services. Membership earns two semester 
hours of extracurricular credit for the year's work. 

THE MILLSAPS MADRIGAL SINGERS 
The Millsaps Madrigal Singers are selected from outstanding vocal 
musicians among the student body. This group of sixteen singers appears 
regularly in concert and on radio and television, featuring music of all 
eras for vocal ensemble. 

THE BAND 

The Millsaps Symphonic Band and the Millsaps Marching Band are 
open to all students who can qualify. The year's repertoire covers all 
phases of marching and symphonic music. Two semester hours of extra- 
curricular credit are given for the year's work. 

DEBATING 
Since the year the college was founded, debating has occunied an Im- 
portant place in its activities. Millsaps teams participate in about 300 de- 
bates each year, meeting teams from the leading institutions in various 
parts of the nation. The Millsaps Invitational Debate Tournament is held 
each winter and is recognized as one of the outstanding events of its kind 
in the South. Colleges and universities in fifteen different states have 
attended this tournament, which annually attracts from seventy-five to 
one hundred teams. 

Both curricular and extracurricular credit is offered for successful 
participation in debating, oratory, and extemporaneous public speaking. 

THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 
The International Relations Club of Millsaps College is an honorary 

organization which recognizes superior work in current history. 
Membership is elective. 
The club holds bi-weekly meetings at which timely world problems 

and events are discussed by student and faculty members. 

DEUTSCHER VEREIN 
Deutscher Verein was founded in order to provide an organization 
for the informal study of various aspects of German and Austrian cultural 
life. At Christmas the annual "Weihnachtsfest" has become already a 
campus tradition. 



I 



MILLS APS COLLEGE 105 

MEDALS AND PRIZES 

1. The Founder's Medal is awarded annually to the senior who has 
the highest quality index for his entire college course and has received 
a grade of Excellent on his comprehensive examination. Only students 
who have done at Millsaps College all the work required for the degree 
are eligible for this award. 

2. The Bourgeois Medal is awarded annually to the freshman, soph- 
omore, or junior who has the highest quality index for the year. Such 
student must be a candidate for a degree, and must have taken a minimum 
of thirty semester hours of college work during the year in which the 
medal is awarded to him. No student can win this medal a second time. 

3. The John C. Carter Medal for Oratory is awarded annually to the 
student who presents the best original oration in the oratorical contest. 
This contest, open to men and women students, is held in December of 
each year. 

4. The Clark Essay Medal is awarded annually to that student who 
presents the best and most original paper in an English elective course in 
Millsaps College. 

5. The Buie Medal for Declamation, open to freshmen and sophomores, 
cannot be awarded to any student more than once. The contest for this 
medal is held at Commencement each year. 

6. Chi Omega Award. Chi Omega sorority, seeking to further the inter- 
est of women in the social sciences, presents an award of $25.00 to the 
girl having the highest average for the year in the field of history, 
political science, psychology, sociology, economics, or other courses in 
the social sciences. 

7. The Charles Betts Galloway Award for the best sermon preached 
by a ministerial student of Millsaps College is presented on Commence- 
ment Sunday. This annual award, established by Mrs. E. H. Galloway 
and family in honor of the late Bishop Galloway, is a medal. 

8. Theta Nu Sigma awards annually a certificate to the member of 
the graduating class who has done outstanding work in the natural 
sciences. 

9. The Alpha Psi Omega Award, The Millsaps Players Acting Awards, 
and the Jackson Little Theatre Award are given each year to those stu- 
dents who are outstanding in dramatics. 

10. Alpha Epsilon Delta Award. The local chapter of Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, a national society for pre-medical and pre-dental students, awards 
annually a certificate of merit to the most outstanding member of the 
society in the graduating class. 

11. General Chemistry Award. The Chemistry Department presents 
annually to the student with the highest scholastic average in General 
Cliemistry a handbook of chemistry and physics. 

12. The Albert Godfrey Sanders Award in French was established in 
19 58 in honor of Albert Godfrey Sanders, Emeritus Professor of Romance 



106 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Languages, who retired as Chairman of that department in 1956. This 
award is given to a student in Intermediate French on the basis of 
academic excellence in the language and for general interest and contri- 
butions in the dissemination of French culture and civilization. The award 
is intended to encourage students on the intermediaVe level to continue 
their studies in the field of French literature, and it carries with its 
honor a certificate of excellence and a handsome volume, devoted to some 
aspect of French culture, donated by the Cultural Services of the French 
Embassy in New York. 

13. The Albert Godfrey Sanders Award in Spanish has the same purpose 
and qualifications for the student in Intermediate Spanish as the A. G. 
Sanders Award in French has for students of that language. The award, 
in addition to the honor conferred, consists of a certificate of excellence 
and a handsome volume devoted to some aspect of Spanish culture. 

14. The West Tatum Award is made annually to the outstanding 
pre-medical student selected by the faculty. This award is given anony- 
mously by an alumnus of the College as a memorial to the late W. O. 
Tatum, who was for many years a member of the Board of Trustees of 
the College. 

15. Awards in German. Each year, through the generosity of the 
West German Federal Republic and the Republic of Austria, the Depart- 
ment of German presents appropriate book prizes to students showing 
excellence in the German language and literature. 

16. Schiller Gesellschaft Prize. The Schiller Gesellschaft offers a 
prize annually to the graduating senior who has distinguished himself 
in the study of German at Millsaps. 



Resources 




GIRLS' DORMITORIES: WHITWORTH AND SANDERS HALLS 




BUIE GYMNASIUM 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 109 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Founded over sixty-seven years ago, Millsaps is one of the young- 
est colleges supported by the Methodist Church. It was in the late eighties 
that the Mississippi Methodist Conferences appointed a joint commission 
to formulate plans for a "college for males under the auspices and con- 
trol of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South." 

Among the members of this commission was Major Reuben "Webster 
Millsaps, Jackson businessman and banker, who offered to give $50,000 
to endow the institution, provided Methodists throughout the state 
matched this amount. 

Under the leadership of Bishop Charles Betts Galloway, the Method- 
ists met the challenge of Major Millsaps. The charter for the college was 
granted February 21, 1890, and the college opened its doors in the fall of 
1892. Coeducation was instituted in the seventh session. 

The growth of the college through the years has been made possible 
by gifts from innumerable benefactors. Beside the generous gifts of 
Major Millsaps, the college received large donations from W. S. F. Tatum, 
R. D. Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Ezelle, and 
the W. M. Buie Family. Other individuals have endowed scholarship and 
loan funds, which are described elsewhere in this catalog. 

First president of the college was William Belton Murrah, who served 
until 1910. Along with Bishop Galloway and Major Millsaps, Murrah 
is commonly thought of as one of the founders of the college. 

Other presidents have been D. C. Hull, M.A., (1910-1912); A. F. 
Watkins, D.B., (1912-1923) ; D. M. Key, Ph.D., LL.D., (1923-1938) ; M. L. 
Smith, Ph.D. LL.D., (1938-1952); and H. E. Finger, Jr., B.D., D.D.. who 
has been president since 1952. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The campus, covering nearly 100 acres in the center of a beautiful 
residential section and on one of the highest points in the city, is valued 
at nearly two million dollars. 

The administration building, Murrah Hall, was erected in 1914; the 
Sullivan-Harrell Science Hall in 1928; and the Buie Memorial Gymnasium 
in 193 6. The James Observatory provides excellent facilities for students 
of astronomy and is also made available on frequent occasions to the 
citizens of Jackson and surrounding areas. Recent grants and gifts have 
made possible the addition of completely modern equipment for the 
science laboratories. 

The Christian Center Building was completed in 1950. It was made 
possible by the gifts of Mississippi Methodist, alumni, and friends of 
the college. This building has an auditorium seating more than 1000 
persons, a small chapel, classrooms, and offices. 

In 19 55 the Carnegie-Millsaps Library was modernized and enlarged 
to three times its former size. It was the first building to be constructed 
with the Million-for-Millsaps funds and has been renamed the Millsaps- 
Wilson Library. 



110 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

A recently completed building, also financed from the Million- 
for-Millsaps funds, is the Student Union Building. This building houses 
the office of the Director of Religious Life, the food services, the book- 
store, the post office, the student activity quarters, and recreation area. 
This building was completed in 1957. 

Two new residence halls, Fae Franklin for women and Ezelle for 
men, were occupied for the first time in the fall semester of 19 58. The 
new dormitories were added to these five housing accommodations: 
for women Founders, Whitworth, Sanders and for men Burton, Galloway. 

The campus contains fields for football and baseball, a track, ten- 
nis courts, and a nine-hole golf course. 

FINANCIAL RESOURCES 

The productive endowment, according to the latest audit, amounted 
to $2,542,030.59. In addition to the income from this endowment, the 
college budget receives from the two Methodist Conferences in Missis- 
sippi $92,000 annually. The statement of total assets derived from the 
last official audit, June 1959, is as follows: 

Current Fund ...- -— ? 167,277.33 

Endowment Funds - - 2,542,030.59 

Plant Fund 4,094,379.70 

Total .. $6,803,687.62 

THE J. LLOYD DECELL LECTURESHIP 

This lectureship was established at Millsaps in 19 48 as a memorial 
to Bishop J. Lloyd Decell (1887-19 46). Bishop Decell took the lead in 
merging the three colleges of Methodism in Mississippi — Whitworth, 
Grenada, and Millsaps. He also set up the campaign for funds known as 
the "Million for the Master." The lectureship foundation of $50,000 was 
established by the college. The purpose of the lectureship is to bring to 
the college men of scholarship in the fields of literature, science, philoso- 
phy, and religion. Dr. Henry Hitt Crane of the Central Methodist Church, 
Detroit, Michigan, was the first lecturer on this foundation December 
5-7, 1950. Dr. D. Elton Trueblood delivered the lectures February 25- 
27, 1952. Dr. George C. Baker, of Southern Methodist University, was the 
speaker February 23-25, 1953. Dr. George Buttrick was the speaker May 
5-7, 1954. Bishop John Wesley Lord was the speaker February 21-23, 
1955. Dr. W. J. Cunningham was the speaker February 20-22, 1956. Dr. 
Peter Bertocci was the speaker February 4-6, 1957. Dr. Marjorie Reeves, 
noted scholar and historian of Oxford University, Oxford,. England, was 
the speaker March 25-26, 1958. The Rev. Joel D. McDavid was the speaker 
December 2-3, 1958. Dr. Roger Ortmayer was the speaker April 7-9, 
1959. Dr. Charles L. Allen was the speaker October 27-29, 19 59. 

THE MILLSAPS LIBRARY 

Near the close of the session of 19 5-0 6 Andrew Carnegie offered 
to give the college $15,000 for a library building if the trustees would 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 111 

provide an endowment of an equal amount. The endowment required 
was given by Major Millsaps. In 10 2 5 the Carnegie Corporation ap- 
propriated $50,000 for a new library building, which was completed in 
1926 and provided shelves for 50,000 volumes. The furniture for the read- 
ing rooms was given by the Enochs Lumber and Manufacturing Company. 
In 1944 the interior of the library was redecorated, and in 1946 additional 
furniture was purchased. 

Work began in September, 1954, on enlarging, remodeling, and 
modernizing this structure into what now appears to be an entirely new 
building. It is designed to accommodate a student body of 1,000 and to 
house approximately 85,000 volumes. Money for this construction came 
through the Million for Millsaps Campaign and the generosity of the H. 
J. Wilson family of Hazlehurst. The spacious, attractive building was 
formally opened and dedicated with fitting ceremony on September 29, 
1955, as the Millsaps-Wilson Library. 

A special grant of $10,000 for the purchase of books was made by 
the Carnegie Corporation during the five years 1931-36, and about 4,600 
volumes were added from this source. In 1944 the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion made a grant to the library of $15,000 for the purchase of books dur- 
ing the years 1944-48. This sum was matched by the college by a like 
amount to be used for the enlargement and equipment of the library 
building. The General Board of Education of the Methodist Church pro- 
vided $2,500 for the purchase of additional stacks and equipment. The 
income from the Martha A. Turner Fund of $1,000, founded by Mrs. J. R. 
Bingham of CarroUton, Mississippi, is used for the purchase of books in 
English literature. At the present time the library contains approximately 
43,000 volumes. 

Within the past year the library has received four substantial gifts 
of money: $50.00 from Mrs. Thomas F. Larche and Miss Aimee Wilcox, 
in memory of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Wilcox; $75.00 from 
Dr, and Mrs. Elmer Dean Calloway for books in Chemistry; $100.00 
from the Class of 19 59 as its gift to the college; and $500.00 from Mr. 
and Mrs. James Hand, Jr., for books of especial usefulness to ministerial 
students. 

Other contributions of money have been given for the purchase of 
books in memory of Mrs. J. T. Brown, Mrs. Rex I. Brown, Mrs. Mary B. 
Clark, Mr. John K. Foster, Professor George Lott Harrell, Rev. W. R. 
Liming, Mrs. Fred Mayo, Miss Lida Owens, Mr. Leslie J. Page, Mrs. 
Ailleen Becker Phillips, Mr. W. H. Phillips, Mrs. R. B. Rushing, Mr. L. C. 
Walker, and Mr. W. H. Watkins. In addition. Miss Mary Berry and Mr. 
H. Gaston Hall made contributions for the purchase of books in French 
literature. 

The library has received most gratefully single books of beauty and 
value but too numerous to list; books from the personal library of the 
late Professor G. L. Harrell presented by his family; the library of the 
late Rev. P. H. Fontaine which he bequeathed to the college; a file of 
"The Millsaps Collegian" and other interesting old magazines and books 
from the library of Mr. E. L. Calhoun, given by his family; excellent 



112 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

recordings of early American music from the Society for the Preservation 
of the American Musical Heritage; a long file of "The Methodist Quarterly 
Review" from the Rev. A. Y. Brown; books of value to the departments of 
Biology and Chemistry from the State Board of Health Library; and im- 
portant titles in their subject fields from the following members of the 
faculty — Professors Jolly, Knox, Price, and Wallace. A beautiful collec- 
tion of first editions of the work of George Washington Cable was given 
the library by Frank K. Mitchell, the first Millsaps alumnus to receive a 
Rhodes Scholarship. Mr. Mitchell has recently retired as a professor of 
English at Duke University. 

During the session of 1941-42 the Historical Society of the Mississippi 
Conference placed its valuable collection of books and papers relating to 
Mississippi Methodist history in a special room in the library. A collection 
of documents, manuscripts, and books on Methodism in Mississippi has 
been begun, and gifts of material related to this subject will be especially 
valuable. 

The library' hours are as follows: Monday through Friday, 8:30 
A.M. to 10:00 P.M.; Saturday, 9 to 12; 1 to 5:00; Sunday, 1:30 to 5:00. 
The library is closed for the Chapel Hour each week and during the 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Spring Holidays. 



Part VII 
Register 




A STUDENT-FACULTY MERIBER CONFERENCE 




THE GRILL: A PLACE FOR RELAXATION 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 115 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

M. A. FRANKLIN President 

B. M. HUNT Vice-President 

N. J. GOLDING Secretary 

A. B. CAMPBELL Treasurer 

Term Expires in 1965 
W. T. BROWN Greenville 

C. R. RIDGWAY ]ackson 

B. M. HUNT Hattiesburg 

J. W. LEGGETT, JR Jackson 

JOHN McEAGHIN Grenada 

W. L. ROBINSON Columbus 

BEN M. STEVENS, SR Richton 

J. T. HUMPHRIES Cleveland 

Term Expires in 1962 

R. G. MOORE Batesville 

JOHN EGGER Meridian 

N. J. GOLDING Greenville 

ROY N. BOGGAN Tupelo 

W. B. SELAH Jackson 

J. D. SLAY Laurel 

F. B. SMITH Ripley 

VIRGIL D. YOUNGBLOOD Brookhaven 

Emeritus Trustee 
R. L. EZELLE Jackson 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

1959-60 

Audit Committee: V. D. Youngblood. 

Buildings and Grounds Committee: C. R. Ridgway, Chairman; W. T. Brown, 
W. B. Selah, V. D. Youngblood, H. E. Finger, Jr., A. B. Campbell, R. L. 
Ezelle. 

Executive Committee: W. L. Robinson, Chairman; R. G. Moore, John Egger, 
John McEachin, A. B. Campbell, H. E. Finger, Jr., Fred B. Smith, Ben M. 
Stevens, Sr. 

Finance Committee: Webb Buie, Chairman; M. A. Franklin, J. W. Leggett, Jr., 
W. B. Selah, A. B. Campbell, H. E. Finger, Jr. 

Instruction: W. B. Selah, Chairman; N. J. Golding, J. D. Slay, J. T. Humphries. 



116 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



HOMER ELLIS FINGER, JR A.B., B.D., D.D. 

President 



JAMES SHARBROUGH FERGUSON A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Faculty and Dean of the Summer School 



ANNE FULMER PEEBLES A.B. 

Dean of Women 



JAMES EDWARD McCRACKEN A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of Students 



PAUL D. HARDIN A.M. 

Registrar 



ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS A.M., L.H.D. 

Librarian Emeritus 



BETHANY C. SWEARINGEN A.B., B.S. 

Librarian 



JAMES W. WOOD A.B., B.S. 

Business Manager 



JAMES J. LIVESAY A.B. 

Director of Alumni and Public Relations 



ROBERT E. BERGMARK A.B., S.T.B. 

Director of Religious Life 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 117 

THE COLLEGE FACULTY 

(The year in parentheses after each name indicates the 
first year of service at MUlsaps) 

BERNICE ANNE ALLEN ( 1959 ) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., A.M., Ohio State University; Advanced Graduate Work, 
Ohio State University and Cornell University 

ROBERT E. ANDING (1952) Assistant Professor of Religion; 

Director of Town and Country Work 
A.B., Millsaps College; B.D., Emory University 

ABRAHAM M. ATTREP ( 1959 ) Instructor of History 

A.B., Louisiana College; A.M., Tulane University 

WILLIAM HARRELL BASKIN, III (1958) Associate Professor of 

Romance Languages 

A.B., A.M., Uni\ersity of North Carolina; Advanced Graduate Work, 

University of North Carolina, Universite de Poitiers, 

Universite de Paris (la Sorbonne), Duke University, 

Alliance Francaise, Paris 

ROBERT EDWARD BERGMARK (1953) Associate Professor of Philosophy; 

Director of Religious Life 

A.B., Emory University; S.T.B., Advanced Graduate Work, Boston University 

DAVID REECE BOWEN, JR. (1959) . Assistant Professor of Politicial Science 

A.B., Harvard University; B.A., M.A., University of O.xford 

GEORGE WILSON BOYD ( 1959 ) Professor of English 

A.B., Murray State College ; A.M., University of Kentucky ; Ph.D., Columbia University 

C. LELAND BYLER (1959) Associate Professor of Music 

A.B., Goshen College ; M.M., Northwestern University ; Advanced Graduate Work, 
University of Michigan, University of Colorado 

LOWELL J. BYLER ( 1959 ) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S. in Ed., Goshen College; M.M., University of Michigan; Graduate Work, 
Colorado College ; Advanced Graduate Work, Northwestern University 

E. DEAN CALLOWAY (1958) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Alabama 

CHARLES DONALD CAPLENOR ( 1957) Professor of Biology 

B.S., A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers ; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University ; 
National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellow, University of Chicago 

EDWARD M. COLLINS, JR. (1958) Assistant Professor of Speech 

A.B., Millsaps College; B.D., Emory University; A.M., State University of Iowa 

MAGNOLIA COULLET (1927) Associate Professor of Latin and German 

A.B., Millsaps College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania; Graduate Work, 

American Academy in Rome ; University of Chicago ; B.M., Belhaven 

College ; Graduate Work in Voice, Bordeaux, France 

ELIZABETH CRAIG ( 1926) Associate Professor of French 

A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University ; A.M., Columbia University ; 

Diplome de la Sorbonne, Ecole de Preparation des Professeurs de 

Francais a L'Etranger, Faculty of Letters, University of Paris 

MARY ANN EDGE ( 1958 ) Director of Physical Education for Women 

B.S., M.S., University of Mississippi 

RICHARD J. FAIRBANKS ( 1957 ) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Westminster Choir College; Pupil of John Finley Williamson 

JAMES SHARBROUGH FERGUSON ( 1944 ) Dean; Professor of History 

A.B., Millsaps College; A.M., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina ; Ford Scholar, Yale University 



118 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

HOMER ELLIS FINGER, JR. ( 1952) President 

A.B., Millsaps College ; B.D., Yale University ; Advanced Graduate Work, 
Union Theological Seminary ; D.D., Centenary College 

NEAL BOND FLEMING ( 1945) Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., B.D., Emory University ; S.T.M., Ph.D., Boston University ; 
Ford Scholar, Harvard University 

CHARLES BETTS GALLOWAY (1939) Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Millsaps College ; A.M., Advanced Graduate Work, Duke University 

MARGUERITE WATKINS GOODMAN (1935) . Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Agnes Scott College; A.M., Tulane University 

LANCE GOSS ( 1950 ) Associate Professor of Speech; 

Director of The Millsaps Players 

A.B., Millsaps College; A.M., Advanced Graduate Work, Northwestern University; 

Special Study, The Manhattan Theatre Colony ; Summer Theatre, The Ogunquit 

Playhouse and the Belfry Theatre ; Cinema Workshop, The University of 

Southern California 

JOHN L. GUEST ( 1957) Associate Professor of German 

A.B., University of Texas ; A.M., Columbia University ; Advanced Graduate Work, 

Nev7 York University ; Ottendorfer Fellowship in Germanic Philology, Bonn 

University ; Fulbright Scholarship, University of Vienna 

ALFRED PORTER HAMILTON ( 1917) Professor Emeritus of Classical 

Languages and German 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College ; A.M., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania ; 
Graduate Work, University of Leipzig 

PAUL DOUGLAS HARDIN (1946) Registrar; Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Millsaps College ; A.M., Duke University : Advanced Graduate Work, 
University of Southern California 

"GEORGE LOTT HARRELL (1911) Professor Ementus of Physics 

and Astronomy 

B.S., M.S. D.Sc, Millsaps College ; Advanced Graduate Work, University of Chicago 

ROBERT RAYMOND HAYNES ( 1930) Professor of Education 

A.B., LL.B., University of Tennessee ; Vice Consul of the United States in Scotland 
and England ; A.M., Advanced Graduate Work, George Peabody College 

NELLIE KHAYAT HEDERI (1952) Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women ; A.M., Tulane University 

NANCY BROGAN HOLLO WAY (1942) Instructor of Secretarial Studies 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women 

WILLIAM HUCKABAY ( 1959) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Louisiana State University ; Advanced Work, Florida State University 

MARY KNETTLES JOHNSON (1958) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

WENDELL B. JOHNSON ( 1954) Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.S., M.S., Kansas State College; Graduate Work. Missouri School of Mines 

WILLIAM T. JOLLY ( 1959 ) Assistant Professor of Classical Languages 

A.B., Southwestern at Memphis ; A.M., University of Mississippi ; Advanced 
Graduate Work, University of Michigan 

SAMUEL ROSCOE KNOX ( 1949 ) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., A.M., University of Mississippi ; Graduate Work, University of Michigan 

FRANK MILLER LANEY, JR. (1953) Associate Professor of History 

A.B., University of Mississippi; A.M., Ph.D., University of Virginia 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 119 

RUSSELL WILFORD LEVANWAY (1956) Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Miami (Florida) ; M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

THOMAS WILEY LEWIS, III ( 1959 ) Instructor of Religion 

A.B., Millsaps College ; B.D., Southern Methodist University 

JAMES EDWARD McCRACKEN ( 1953) Dean of Students; 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Muskingum; A.M., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

GEORGE LAMAR MADDOX, JR. ( 1952) Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Millsaps College; A.M., S.T.B., Boston University; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University 

HARRY STOCKWELL MANLEY ( 1955 ) Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Westminster College (Pa.) ; LL.B., University of Pittsburgh School 
of Law ; Ph.D., Duke University 

BENJAMIN ERNEST MITCHELL (1914) . Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

A.B., Scarritt-Morrisville College ; A.M., Vanderbilt University ; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

JAMES A. MONTGOMERY ( 1959 ) Basketball Coach; 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
Advanced Graduate Work, George Peabody College for Teachers 

ROSS HENDERSON MOORE ( 1923) Professor of History 

B.S., M.S., Millsaps College ; A.M., University of Chicago ; Ph.D., Duke University 

MILDRED LILLIAN MOREHEAD (1947) Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women ; A.M., Duke University 

GEORGINA S. NORONA ( 1959) Instructor of Spanish 

Graduate, Provincial Institute of Santiago de Cuba ; Advanced Graduate Wwrk, 
University of Havana 

» 'SHIRLEY PARKER ( 1956) Instructor of English 

A.B., Millsaps College; A.M., Tulane Uni\ 3rsity 

ANNE FULMER PEEBLES (1958) Dean of Women 

A.B., Te.xas Christian University; Graduate Work, University of Virginia 

JAMES DAVID POWELL ( 1958 ) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Millsaps College; A.M., Ed.D., University of Alabama 

JOSEPH BAILEY PRICE ( 1930 ) Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Millsaps College ; M.S., University of Mississippi ; 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

'* 'RICHARD R. PRIDDY (1946) Professor of Geology 

B.S., Ohio Northern University ; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

THOMAS LEE REYNOLDS (1950) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Guilford College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

ARNOLD A. RITCHIE ( 1952 ) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Northeastern State College of Oklahoma ; M.S., Oklahoma A. & M. College ; 
Advanced Graduate Work, Oklahoma A. & M., and the University of Tennessee 

ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS ( 1919) Professor Emeritus of 

Romance Languages 

A.B., Southwestern (Texas); A.B., Yale University; Rhodes Scholar, 1907-1910; 
A.B., A.M., University of Oxford; L.H.D., Millsaps College 

MARVIN G. SMITH ( 1954) Head Football Coach; 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.B.A., A.M., University of Mississippi 



120 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

JONATHAN SWEAT ( 1958 ) Associate Professor of Music 

B.S., M.S., The Juilliard School of Music ; Advanced Graduate Work, 
Columbia University 

ELBERT STEPHEN WALLACE (1939) Professor of Economics 

and Business Administration 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College ; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University 

THURSTON WALLS ( 1957 ) Associate Professor of Economics 

and Business Administration 

A.B., A.M., University of Texas ; Advanced Graduate Study, University of Texas 

ROBERT PORTER WARD, (1956) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers ; Advanced Work, 
Michigan State University 

MILTON CHRISTIAN WHITE (1920) Professor of English 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

JAMES DAUSEY WROTEN, JR. (1946) Professor of Religion 

A.B., Millsaps College ; B.D., Southern Methodist University ; A.M., Ed.D., 
Columbia University 

PART-TIME FACULTY 
LOUISE ESCUE BYLER ( 1956) Music 

B.M., Belhaven College ; M.M.Ed., Louisiana State University ; Advanced Graduate 
Study, Northwestern University, University of Colorado 

CLARA PORTER CAVETT ( 1944) Biology 

B.S., Millsaps College 

xMARY COOK CHITTIM ( 1958) Music 

A.B., Blue Mountain College ; B.M., M.M., M.M.E., American Conservatory of Music ; 
Certificate in Music from the Mozarteum, Salzburg, Austria 

CHRISTINE STREBELLE EZELLE (1946) French 

A.B., Ecole Normale Moyenne De L'Etat Nivelles, Belgium 

EMMETT J. JOHNSON ( 1959 ) Biology 

B.S., Loyola University; M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University; National Research 

Council Fellovsr in the Medical Sciences, 1957-58, Stanford University 

School of Medicine, 1957-58 

ALVIN JON KING ( 1934 ) Retired Director of Millsaps Singers 

Oberlin Conservatory of Music ; Northwestern School of Music ; Christiansen Choral 

School ; Private Study with W. S. B. Matthews, Fannie Zeisler, and Power 

Symonds ; HH.D., Millsaps College 

ANNIE WALLACE LESTER ( 1959) Mathematics 

A.B., Millsaps College ; M.E., University of Mississippi ; Advanced Graduate Work, 
University of Chicago, Columbia University, Peabody College 

LOUIS A. MIAZZA ( 1959 ) Economics 

C.P.A., Special Study, St. Mary's College (Kentucky) ; International Accountants 
Society ; LaSalle Extension University ; Jackson School of Law 

STELLA WEATHERSBY NEWSOME ( 1959 ) English 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women ; A.M., University of Mississippi 

HENRY CROZIER RICKS, JR. ( 1959) Biology 

B.S., Millsaps College ; M.D., Jefferson Medical College 

KARL WOLFE ( 1946 ) Art 

B.F.A., Chicago Art Institute, William M. R. French Fellowship ; Study abroad for 
one year ; Study and teaching, Pennsylvania School of Art Summer School 

MILDRED NUNGESTER WOLFE ( 1957 ) Art 

A.B., Alabama College ; A.M., Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado Springs 

* Deceased, August 9, 1959. 
** On leave, 1959-60. 
*** On Sabbatical leave. Second Semester 1959-60. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 121 

LIBRARY STAFF 
ALBERT GODFREY SANDERS ( 1919) Librarian Emeritus 

A.B., Southwestern (Texas); A.B., Yale University; Rhodes Scholar, 1907-1910; 
A.B., A.M., University of Oxford; L.H.D., Millsaps College 

BETHANY C. SWEARINGEN ( 1951 ) Librarian 

A.B., Millsaps College: B.S., in Library Science, University of North Carolina; 
A.M., in English Literature, Columbia University 

'MRS. MARY BOWEN CLARK (1910) Assistant Librarian Emeritus 

M.E.L., Whitworth College 

MRS. KAY BRELAND COOLEY (1958) . Associate Librarian and Cataloger 

A.B., Louisiana State University ; B.S., in Library Science, 
Louisiana State University 

LOLA C. CALHOUN ( 1958) Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Millsaps College ; B.S., in Library Science, George Peabody College for Teachers 

MRS. xMARY LOUISE DUNN FLEMING (1957) Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Georgia State College for Women 

MRS. EFFIE WATKINS JOHNSON (1959) Secretary 

B.S., Mississippi State College for Women 

MRS. BETTY WRIGHT RICKS (1959) Assistant Librarian 

A.B., The University of Minnesota 

MRS. MARIE HEDRICK RUSSELL (1959) Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Mississippi State College for Women 

OTHER STAFF PERSONNEL 

MRS. GERALDINE S. ATWOOD (1958) Switchboard Operator 

MRS. MARY LOU BARNES (1956) Assistant, Registrars Office 

CARLA BOWMAN ( 1958 ) Manager, Bookstore 

SARA BROOKS ( 1955 ) Assistant, Registrar's Office 

SHIRLEY CALDWELL ( 1954 ) Editorial Asst., Public Relations Office Supvr. 

MRS. MAGGIE W. CATHEY (1956) Hostess, Franklin Hall 

MRS. C. F. COOPER ( 1928 ) Retired Hostess, Whitworth Hall 

MRS. HELEN DANIEL ( 1952) Hostess, Ezelle Hall 

MRS. MARTHA GALTNEY (1955) Secretary to Dean of Students 

LUCY HANSARD ( 1955 ) Secretary to the President 

GEORGIA M. HUTTON ( 1959) College Nurse 

MRS. JOHNNIE S. LAMPKIN (1958) Secretary, Public Relations Office 

MRS. WARRENE W. LEE ( 1955) Bookkeeper 

MRS. SALLIE MASSEY ( 1940) Hostess, Founders' Hall 

MRS. DOROTHY B. NETTLES ( 1947) Cashier 

MRS. MARY KAY NOTTAGE (1959) Assistant, Registrar's Office 

MRS. GLENN P. PATE ( 1957) Assistant, Alumni Relations 

CARL W. PHILLIPS ( 1953) Maintenance Engineer 

MRS. KATE ROBERTSON (1955) Hostess, Whitworth-Sanders Halls 

MRS. ELMER C. RUSSELL ( 1957) Manager, Cafeteria 

MRS. FRANCES SHELTON ( 1951 ) Secretary to the Dean 

MRS. JESSIE SMITH ( 1939) Dietitian 

MRS. MERLE VAUGHAN (1958) Hostess, Galloway-Burton Halls 

BARBARA WEBB ( 1959 ) Secretary to the Business Manager 



*Deceased, September 13, 19.59. 



122 MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
1959-60 

Chairman of Divisions: 

Humanities — James D. Wroten, Jr. 
Natural Sciences — Thomas L. Reynolds 
Social Sciences — George L. Maddox 

Academic (Administration) : 

Ferguson, Caplenor, Fleming, Hardin, Moore 

Administrative : 

Finger, Ferguson, Hardin, McCracken, Peebles, Wood 

Admissions: 

Ferguson, Hardin, McCracken, Wallace 

Advisory : 

Wallace, Anding, Holloway, Levanway, Morehead 

Athletics : 

White, Collins, Knox, Maddox, Priddy, Reynolds 

Awards : 

Laney, Cooley, Goodman, Haynes, Walls 

Commencement and Other Public Occasions: 

Bergmark, Coullet, Craig, Fairbanks, Fleming, Price, Senior Class 
Officers (Larry Marett, Pat Gilliland, Betty Dribben, Marler Stone) 

Curriculum (Study and Planning): 

Ferguson, Maddox, Reynolds, Wroten 

Development: 

Finger, Ferguson, Laney, Moore, Morehead, Price, Wallace 

High School Day: 

Moore, Livesay, Edge, Galloway, Powell, Ritchie, Smith, Ward 

Library : 

Johnson, Coullet, Guest, Laney 

Publications : 

Hardin, Goss, Swearingen, White 

Public Relations 

Priddy, Powell, Collins, Craig, Sweat, Wood 

Religious Activities: 

Caplenor, Hederi, Wroten 

Social Organizations: 

Manley, McCracken, Peebles, Morehead, Caplenor 

Student Personnel: 

McCracken, Bergmark, Hederi, Manley, Peebles 

Teacher Development (Recruitment and Research) : 

Fleming, Baskin, Calloway, Levanway, Knox 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



123 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 1959-60 

Dr. Noel C. Womack, Jr., President Jackson 

Reynolds S. Cheney, Vice-President Jackson 

Robert M. Mayo, Vice-President Clarksdale 

Dan A. Wright, Vice-President Jackson 

Miss Amanda Lowther, Secretary Jackson 

Zachary Taylor, Jr., Alumni Fund Chairman Jackson 

James J. Livesay, Executive Director Jackson 

H. Craig Castle, Jr., Past President Jackson 

Rev. Roy C. Clark, Past President Jackson 

O. B. Triplett, Past President Forest 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS FOR 1959-60 



Art: 

Awards Committee: 

Biology: 



Business Office: 
Chemistry : 



Economics: 
Education and 

Placement Bureau: 
English: 

Dean of 

Women's Office: 
French: 
Geology: 



German: 
History: 
Language Laboratory: 

Latin: 
Library : 

Mathematics: 



James G. Leverett, Jimmy Lee Miller 

Selma V. Earnest 

Martha Ann Downing, Sue Jean Downing, Elaine 

Everett, Charles A. Ozbom, Barbara Sue Magee, 

Gordon Lynn Miles, John E. Rawson, William N. 

Rushing 

Penelope M. Dickson 

Allen D. Bishop, Dale Caldwell, Gary B. Caldwell, 

Shirley Ann Carr, Robert Stanley GuUedge, WiUiam 

T. Harbour, David R. Steckler, William Barney 

Weems 

William F. Cooper 

Emily Fay Prevost, Carole Anne Shields 
Jo Ree Bamett, Walter Robert Brown, Claudia Nan 
Mabus, Wilma Sanderson, Mary Lee Stubblefield, 
Sarah Margaret Yarbrough 

Margaret Graeme Bennett 

James Douglas Brumfield 

James C. Brasher, James R. Langston, Reavis Hall 

Lindsey, Russell H. Lyons, Allen D. Phillips, James 

Eldridge Rogers, Don Ray Thompson 

Elbert F. Ward, Robert N. Leggett 

John T. Rush 

Ronald Breland, Donald E. Faulkner, Charles J. 

Becker, Raul Fernandez, John Greenway, Cherry Ann 

Kenesson, James G. Leverett, James C. Shepard 

Lucy Hamblin, Betty Jo Lawrence, Devada Wetmore 

Andre Clemandot, Sam Weeks Currie, Kathleen 

Dakin, Anne Mayberry, Wallace Vance 

Mary Janice Clark, Alfred D. Lasaine, Margaret Ann 

Merrell 



124 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



Music: 



Philosophy : 
Physical Education 
(Men) 



Physical Education 

( Women ) 
Physics and Astronomy: 

Political Science: 
Psychology: 

Public Relations Office: 

Registrar's Office: 

Religion : 

Religious Life Office: 

Sociology: 

Speech : 

Student Personnel Office: 
Women's Dormitories: 



Men's Dormitories: 



Neil Bowman, Marilyn Dea Herring, Louise Lock- 
wood Hutchins, Robert N. Leggett, Harmon Lewis, 
Lois Loucks, Jon Belton Walters 
Richard E. Creel, Mary on Gayle Graham 

Larry Aycock, James Harold Gray, Ryan Grayson, 
Wayland R. Clifton, FelLx Herring, Larry Marett, 
Harvey Ray, John S. Ruby, Davad Singleton, Da\dd 
Strong, Pete Tate 

Sue Hart, Judy Monk 

Donald E. Faulkner, Kurt Feldmann, Roger Kinnard, 
David Ulmer 
Ola May Hays 

Floyce Addkison, Pat L. Gilliland, Margaret Zoe 
Harvey, William E. McKnight 

Barbara Bratton, Elizabeth Box, Frank G. Carney, 
Carolyn P. Stames 
Bobbie Jean Ivy 

Nina L. Cunningham, Nancy Heritage 
Jeanie Wesley, Carolyn Shannon 
Ruby Allen Houston, Charles H. Ricker, Ruth M. 
Tomlinson 

Braxton Lange, Charles Eugene Phillips, John C. 
Sullivan, WilHam M. Watkins 
Ruth McAUister 

Matrons' Assistants: Else Marie Aurbakken, Nancy R. 
Brown, Sue Cater, Nancy Dunshee, Martha Ann 
Eldridge, Barbara Hemphill, Mary Lee Stubblefield, 
Diane Wallick 

Other Assistants: Hanne Brit Aurbakken, Peggy 
Chancellor, Sandra Fredericks, Gloria Haining, Bar- 
bara Himel, Kay Kirschenbaum, Lois Lawson, Carole 
Malone, Jean Parker, Betty Sue Shirley, Julia Slade, 
Elizabeth Walter, Nancy Worley 

Managers: Benjamin Goodwin, James Harold Gray, 
James Ray Hood, Charles A. Ozbom, Wayne Sher- 
man, Ralph Sowell, John E. Woods, David Strong. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



125 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 

Fall Semester 1959 Men Women Total 

Freshmen • 124 133 257 

Sophomores _ 110 102 212 

Juniors 124 94 218 

Seniors 95 75 170 

Unclassified _ 33 30 G3 

Spring Semester 1960 

Freshmen _ 102 133 235 

Sophomores _ 102 98 200 

Juniors 120 96 216 

Seniors 82 59 141 

Unclassified _ 26 26 52 

Total Registration, Regular Session 918 846 1764 

Deduct Duplications 

Number of Different Persons in 

Attendance, Regular Session 

Summer School 1959 > 552 479 1031 

Deduct Duplications 

Number of Different Persons 

Attending Summer School 

Total Number of Registrations 1470 1325 2795 

Total Number of Different Persons in Attendance 



Men Women Total 



920 



432 


412 


844 


918 


846 


1764 


399 


388 


787 


519 


458 


977 


552 


479 


1031 


224 


192 


416 


328 


287 


615 


847 


745 


1592 




FITZHUGH MEMORIAL CHAPEL 



126 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



THE STUDENT BODY 



SENIOR CLASS 1959-60 



Abi-aham, Robert Edward Vicksburg 

Addkison, Floyce Ann Jackson 

Allen, Frank Davis, Jr. Jackson 

Anderson, Jane Alice Jackson 

Aurbakken, Else Marie 

El Biar, Algiers, Algeria 

Bailey, Grady Sullivan, Jr. Lexington 

Barry, Charles Stewart Jackson 

Bartling, Grace Elizabeth Jackson 

Bates, Marilyn Dee Jackson 

Bennett, Margaret Graeme Madison 

Benson, Harry K. __ Jackson 

Bigner, Anita Dolores Jackson 

Bishop, Allen David Meridian 

Blaine, Sue Helen Hazlehurst 

Bookhart, Virginia Alice Jackson 

Bowman, Neil Brookhaven 

Boyd, Nancy Jean Jackson 

Bracken, Beverly Jo Newton 

Brackett, Charles Ray Jackson 

Bridges, Shirley Ann Crystal Springs 

Brock, Wilfred Gardner Jackson 

Brooks, Harold Bernette Mendenhall 

Brown, Albert Yeates, Jr. West Point 

Brown, Walter Umberger Laurel 

Brunson, Malese Webb Meridian 

Buford, Elizabeth Aldridge Jackson 

Bugg, Charles Allen Jackson 

Burke, Beatrice Ann Jackson 

Burnett, William Joseph Bay Springs 

Caldwell, Gary Blaine Flora 

Carruth, Edwin Ronald McComb 

Carter, Evelyn Grant Jackson 

Cater, Mary Sue West Point 

Caughman, Mary Carol Laurel 

Causey, Hubert Lacy Magnolia 

Champion, James Saxon Jackson 

Chapman, Glenda Faye Newton 

Clark, Mary Janice Brookhaven 

Clark, Nathan Lester, Jr. Hattiesburg 

Clark, Vic B. Jackson 

Clopton, Harold Havard, Jr. Wesson 

Cockrell, Joy Jackson 

Cole, Hunter McKelva Laurel 

Collins, Roy Parker Jackson 

Cooke, Stanley Strong -.Jackson 

Cooper, William Frank Pass Christian 

Currie, Sam Weeks Utica 

Davis, Albert Ellis Jackson 

Davis, Dorothy May Utica 

Downing, Sue Jean Jackson 

Dribben, Elizabeth Greenwood 

Earnest, Selma V. Slate Spring 

Edwards, Carolyn Ruth Banner 

Erwin, Gayle Dean Pascagoula 

Ervin, Raiford Hugh Crystal Springs 

Everitt, Elaine Prentiss 

Farmer, Willie Amanda Taylorsville 

Fatherree, Patricia Hopkins Jackson 

Ferrell, James Vernon Starkville 

Finn, Martha Jackson 

Frazier, Joan Lucille -, Louisville 

Frost, Grace Louise Natchez 

Gardner, Thomas Joseph, III Jackson 

Gatewood, John Sharp Mt. Olive 

Giffin, Jackie Rush Louisville 

Gilliland, Pat Lee Jackson 

Goodwin, Jo Anne Meridian 

Gordon, Valerye Eugene Jackson 

Gray, James Harold Grenada 

Gulledge, Robert Stanley, HI Jackson 

Harris, Joseph Bailey Jackson 

Harvey, Margaret Zoe Tylertown 

Hatchell, Clyde Augustus, Jr. Columbia 

Hays, Ola Mae Jackson 

Hemphill, Lydia Sue Gore Springs 

Hilton, Charles Eugene Jackson 

Hollingsworth, Hirough Rudolph, Carthage 



Holloman, Curtis Carson Batesville 

Hopkins, Donald Andrew Jackson 

Houston, Robert Merrill Philadelphia 

Houston, Ruby Jewell Grenada 

Howard, Douglas Turner Port Gibson 

Howard, Frank P. Jackson 

Howard, John McLemore Canton 

Howard, Martin L. Jackson 

Hudson, Barbara Sue Batesville 

Huffman, Robert M. Pelahatchie 

Humphries, James Lane Jackson 

Hunsucker, John Coleman Potts Camp 

Hutchinson, Helen Ray Perkinston 

Ivy, Bobbie Jean Jackson 

Jennings, Charles Rogers Kosciusko 

Johnson, Gwendolyn Harwell, New Albany 

Johnston, Brent L. Jackson 

Johnston, Dennis Ray Shannon 

Kennedy, William David Magee 

Kerr, Mary Frances Jackson 

Kinnard, Roger White Philadelphia 

Lambert, Joe C. Natchez 

Lampkin, William Robert Baldwyn 

Lange, James Braxton Jackson 

Langston, James Ronny Jackson 

Lasaine, Alfred David Chicago, 111. 

Lewis, Donald Duncan Louisville 

Lindsey, Reavis Hall Newburgh, N. Y. 

Lott, Mary Glynn Kilmichael 

Lowrance, Elizabeth Lockard __ Columbus 

Lundy, James William Vicksburg 

McArthur, Robert Eugene Jackson 

McAtee, James Edward Jackson 

McCarley, Mary Grace Cox Ripley 

McGuire, E. Jeannine McComb 

McKnight, William Edwin Jackson 

McMullan, David Malcolm Newton 

McShane, Edna Elizabeth Greenwood 

Marett, Lawrence Edwards Sardis 

Martin, Lester Frank Jackson 

Merrell, Margaret Ann Jackson 

Milwee, Richard Franklin-. Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Mitchell, Rita Ann . Meridian 

O'Brien, Jim Michael Jackson 

Ozborn, Charles Allen Union 

Paine, Ina Carolyn Jackson 

Pepper, Annis Julia Greenville 

Pepper, Jane Carol Picayune 

Pierson, Virginia Cowan Jackson 

Pillow, Lucile Greenwood 

Prince, W. Kent Newton 

Rawson, John Elton Jackson 

Ray, John Thomas, Jr. Hollandale 

Reeves, Martin Gladden ._• Jackson 

Revels, Anne Jackson 

Roberts, Sue Belle Hazlehurst 

Roberts, Wallace Eugene Meridian 

Rogers, Margaret Ann Jackson 

Rush, John Terrell . •- Lake 

Rushing, William Norvel Itta Bena 

Sanders, Mary Sue Columbia 

Sanderson, Wilma Laurel 

Satterfield, Charles William Canton 

Shearer, Jack Aubrey Jackson 

Shearin, Nancy Meridian 

Sherman, Wayne Winslow Vicksburg 

Smith, Betty Jean Yazoo City 

Snuggs, Lady Ann Jackson 

Steckler, David Robert __• Biloxi 

Stone, Clay Marler Jackson 

Strong, David Hill _ Crosby 

Stubblefield, Mary Lee Yazoo City 

Tate, Pete Baton Rouge, La. 

Taylor, Rebecca Jewel Starkville 

Thompson, Sandra Frances ,_■ Areola 

Tidwell, Hugh Hilton Jackson 

Tigrett, Katherine Strait Brandon 

Triplett, Oliver Beaman Forest 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



127 



Turnage, James Leslie Harrisville 

Wade, Lynn Douglas Jackson 

Walden, Jackie Elaine Jackson 

Walker, Julius Charles Laurel 

Walker, Virginia Helen McComb 

Walter, Elizabeth Inez Morton 

Ware, Bettye Jean Jackson 

Weaver, Annie Leon Natchez 

Weaver, David Robin Ackerman 



Wenger, Wanda Faye Grenada 

Wesley, Hilda Jean Columbia 

White, Mary Alice Jackson 

Wildmon, Don Ellis Ripley 

Williamson, Donald W., Jr. Meridian 

Woodall, Margaret Coffeeville 

Yarbrough, Sarah Margaret Indianola 

Young, Paul Winford Tupelo 



JUNIOR CLASS 1959-60 



Ainsworth, Carrie G. Florence 

Aldy, Martha Irene Jackson 

Alexander, Albert Hamilton DeKalb 

Jackson 

Banks, Carmine Marie Vicksburg 

Barfoot, Fred Allen Union 

Barlow, Robert David Wesson 

Barnett, Jo Ree Jackson 

Bean, Freddie Royce West Point 

Bellew, David Joseph El Dorado, Ark. 

Bilbe, Evelyn Grace Wilson, Ark. 

Blackwell, Claiborne Richard, Jr. 

Tylertown 
Blumenthal, Janice Davidson 

Trenton, N. J. 

Boone, Albert Gary , Laurel 

Boutwell, James Gary Shubuta 

Bowie, William Howard Lexington 

Bradshaw, Betty Louise Crystal Springs 

Bradshaw, Sara Lois Crystal Springs 

Briscoe, Helen Frances Senatobia 

Brown, Joseph Paul Jackson 

Brown, Mary Edith Meridian 

Brown, Thomas Leroy ■ Jackson 

Brumfield, James Douglas Jackson 

Buckley, Reginald Russ Jackson 

Burdine, Arthur Price Amory 

Burnett, John Robert Bay Springs 

Buskirk, Betty Ann Okolona 

Butler, Ella Lou Shuqualak 

Byars, Wilton Vance ._• Jackson 

Cain, Charles F. Jackson 

Callaway, Theodore George, Jr. Clinton 

Carney, Frank Godwin Crystal Springs 

Chandler, Larry Jackson 

Cheney, William Garner Jackson 

Cochran, Hilda Marie Poplarville 

Cooper, Linda Elizabeth Jackson 

Cooper, Nina Akers Corinth 

Copeland, Cecil Quincy, Jr. Jackson 

Copeland, Richard Gay Sonora, Texas 

Costas, Anthony John Greece 

Coulter, Lillian Nelle West Monroe, La. 

Crabtree, Eleanor Barry Jackson 

Craft, Charles Cooper Vicksburg 

Craig, Nancy Faith Prairie 

Crawford, Lynda Gayle Jackson 

Creel, Richard Earl, Jr. Biloxi 

Crews, Martha Ellen Jackson 

Criscoe, Glenice Nan Carthage 

Crisler, Jane Pearson Port Gibson 

Crosby, William Joseph Indianola 

Cunningham, Nina Lorine, Memphis, Tenn. 

Danks, Carolyn Carl Jackson 

TDaugherty, Robert Hicks, III 

Valley Stream, New York 

Dobbs, Flora Maxine Mathiston 

Dowling, Mildred Louise Jackson 

Duggar, Perry Neil Jackson 

Dunshee, Nancy Shirley Starkville 

Edwards, James Bryant Jackson 

Edwards, Marilyn Rodgers Jackson 

Edwards, Olive Gail ■ Lyon 

T]ldridge, Martha Ann DeKalb 

Ervin, James Oliver Jackson 

Fagan, Charles M. Jackson 

Faulkner, Donald Earnest Vicksburg 

Felder, Charles Bertram Liberty 

Telder, Hugh Robert Summit 

Feldmann, Kurt Lansing Clarksdale 

Telker, Henry Gerald Columbia 



Ferguson, Suzanne Beaumont, Texas 

Finger, Janie Lois Raymond 

Flowers, Howard Curtis Jackson 

Ford, Larry Evon Taylorsville 

Fortinberry, William Julian Jackson 

Fridge, Irene Elizabeth Magnolia 

Frost, Edwin Lee Media, Penn. 

Fulgham, Carroll Gaston Decatur 

Gammage, Emily Jo Perkinston 

Garner, Martha Jo Eupora 

Gates, Linda Fay Mendenhall 

Gieger, Edward Lee Laurel 

Gorday, John Coleman , Jackson 

Graham, Maryon Gayle Waynesboro 

Graves, Lawrence Jasper Prentiss 

Grayson, Ryan Crosby Moselle 

Greenway, John Langford 

Chevy Chase, Md. 

Griffin, Jean Avis Winterville 

Hamblin, Lucy Willis Jackson 

Hamilton, Mary Stewart Greenwood 

Hampton, Linda Wade Helena, Ark 

Harrigill, Donald Ray Brookhaven 

Harrington, Paul Brown Jackson 

Harrison, Winfred Blake Raymond 

Havens, Irma Lou Jackson 

Head, Charles Alva Jackson 

Hemphill, Barbara Nell Grenada 

Heritage, Nancy Greenville 

Herring, Marilyn Dea ,_Jackson 

Hertz. Nancy Jackson 

Higginbotham, John Avon Canton 

Himel, Barbara Helen Leland 

Hollingsworth, Ruby M. Carthage 

Houston, Fred Arthur Jackson 

Houston, Reuben Kidd, Jr. Bay Springs 

Huff, Lucy — Meridian 

Hughes, Charlie Emory Jackson 

Hutchins, Elizabeth Mae Jackson 

Jackson, Arnold Jerald West Point 

Johnson, Charles Robert New Albany 

Johnson, Janice D'Lo 

Jones, Betty Lynn Hollandale 

Kelly, Ann Ryland Yazoo City 

Kelly, Ralph Franklin Jackson 

Kenesson, Cherry Ann . Quitman 

King, Sally Erwin Winona 

Kirschenbaum, Barbara Kay Vicksburg 

Krohn, Bobby Jackson 

Kuntz, Arthur William, Jr. __Tupelo 

Larr, Edwin Thomas, Jr. Vicksburg 

Lawrence, Bettye Jo Brandon 

Lawrence, David Allen Greenville 

Lewis, Alexander Carter Liberty 

Libby, David Ray Louisville 

Lockhart, James Bishop, Jr. Jackson 

Long, Karolyn Ruth Florence 

Loucks, Lois Shelter Hesston, Kansas 

Loucks, Lonnie Darrell Canton, Kansas 

McAllister, Ruth Mitchell New Albany 

McAlpin, Clyde Mitchell Jackson 

McKinley, William Whitfield Jackson 

McLeod, Barbara Jean Louisville 

McMullen, Claudia Henry Brookhaven 

Mabus, Claudia Drew 

Magee, Barbara Sue Oakland 

Magee, Marshall Owen . Mendenhall 

Malone, Frances Carol Minter City 

Maloney, James Cornelius Jackson 

Martin, James Burke Summit 

Maynor, Robert Clayton, Jr. Jackson 



128 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



Mayoza, Mary Stoker Louisville, Ky. 

Miles, Gordon Lynn Memphis, Tenn. 

Mitchell, Janis Corinth 

Molpus, Billy Gene Philadelphia 

Montgomery, Byrd Pickens 

Mooney, William Boyd Meridian 

Morris, Royce Kosciusko 

Munsey, Stanley Edward Jackson 

Naylor, Robert Hammiell, II Jackson 

Newman, John Edward Enid 

Noble, Natoma Nash Hazlehurst 

Nobles, James Warren Jackson 

Nottage, Keith Sanford Jackson 

Ogden, Charlotte Glenn Macon 

Oliver, Ann Marie Jackson 

Orndorff, Mary Ann Jackson 

Patrick, Patricia Ann Tupelo 

Perkins, John Burton Terry 

Perry, John Killebrew Goodman 

Perry, Mary Jo Louin 

Pickering, Pauline Calhoun City 

Pittman, James Calvin, Jr. Newton 

Prevost, Emily Fay Boyle 

Pyron, Marvin Ross . Indianola 

Quinn, Ella Martha Jackson 

Rankin, Betty Ann Canton 

Ray, Harvey Vernon, Jr. Shaw 

Ray, Martha Adrienne Meridian 

Redding, Edwin Linfield Jackson 

Renfroe, Margaret Ann Meridian 

Reynolds, Lemuel H. Jackson 

Rhodes, Henry James, III Vicksburg 

Richardson, Harold Lamont Ripley 

Ricker, Charles Henry, Jr. Pascagoula 

Ridgway, Rayburn Hunter Jackson 

Roan, Kennth Leroy Jackson 

Robertson, Kenneth Barkley Pascaguola 

Robinson, George Horine, Jr. Jackson 

Robinson, Harold Doyle Booneville 

Rogers, Elizabeth Bissell Laurel 

Rogers, Grady Curtis Jackson 

Ross, Nell Newton Olive Branch 

Ross, Vernon Frank Olive Branch 

Royals, Thomas Edward Taylorsville 

Rueff, Charles Michael, Jr. McComb 

Russell, Wade Hampton Kosciusko 

Ryan, Jack H. Summit 



Sabatini, Sandra Jackson 

Sanders, William Riley Meridian 

Saucier, Gordon Albert Gulfport 

Saucier, Marion A. Gulfport 

Saxton, Bethel Lou Benton 

Schultz, John Thomas Tunica 

Sheely, Peter Mayrant Gulfport 

Shields, Carole Anne Grenada 

Shields, Emily Ruth Jackson 

Shirley, Vela Willis, Jr. Jackson 

Singleton, John David Forest 

Skates, Craig Barnwell Greenwood 

Smith, James Clinton Jackson 

Smith, Karl Dee Decatur 

Stacy, Donald Reagan Jackson 

Strauss, Harry Clarence Jackson 

Sturdivant, Harriet Ann Tupelo 

Sullivan, John Calhoun, Jr. Jackson 

Sullivan, John Lewis, Jr. Jackson 

Taylor, Paul Frederick Jackson 

Thomas, V/illiam Boyd Greenwood 

Thompson, Don Ray Jackson 

Thompson, Marianne Jackson 

Tickell, Bobby Ray Vicksburg 

Tilghman, Dorothy Jean Grenada 

Tomlinson, Ruth Marie Jackson 

Turnipseed, Gene Travis Jackson 

Ulmer, David E. McComb 

Vallas, Maria Theo Jackson 

Varner, Joseph Edwin Vicksburg 

Waits, Mary Elizabeth Sumrall 

Wallace, Elbert Charles Jackson 

Wallace, Rheta Ann Etta 

Walters, Jon Belton Jackson 

Ward, Elbert Frazier Jackson 

Watkins, William Marvin Jackson 

Watson, Mary Frances Jackson 

Webb, Sara Lucille Jackson 

Weems, William Barney Jackson 

Wesson, Betty Louise McComb 

Whiteside, Robert Ellis Noxapater 

Whitwell, Joe Warlick Senatobia 

Williams, David A. Jackson 

Williams, Richard Oliver Jackson 

Wilson, Lewis Hugh Jackson 

Woods, John Evans Mt. Olive 

Worley, Nancy Dunham Meridian 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 1959-60 



Adcock, James Donald Hattiesburg 

Ainsworth, Jerry Wayne Summit 

Aldridge, Robert Edward Brookhaven 

Aldridge, Sandra Leigh Mobile, Ala. 

Alexander, Jane Biggs ■ Jackson 

Alexander, Virginia Abigail Vicksburg 

Amelung, Alice Ann Greenwood 

Angle, Mary Frances Laurel 

Ash, Henry Allen Centreville 

Aurbakken, Hanne B. El Biar, Algiers, 

Algeria 

Aycock, Larry Booth Louisville 

Babb, James Laurens Jackson 

Bailey, Sandra Gayle — • Albany, Ga. 

Banks, Carmine Marie Vicksburg 

Barksdale, Mary Eleanor Jackson 

Batson, Susanne Delaney Clarksdale 

Becker, Charles Joseph, Jr. Jackson 

Beshear, Karen Kern Pascagoula 

Billups, William Alonzo Holcomb 

Brantley, Lillie Nell Richton 

Brasher, James Carroll Jackson 

Bratton, Barbara Anne .• Tupelo 

Bridgers, Havylen Jackson 

Britt, Jerry Denny Ruleville 

Brook, Judith Lynn JAmory 

Brown, Nancy Ruth Jackson 

Brown, Walter Robert ■ Meridian 

Brown, William Robert, Jr. Jackson 

Buchanan, John Thomas Jackson 

Bullock, Cal Wilson, Jr. Jackson 

Burgess, Georgie Ann Nettleton 

Burke, Diane Hattiesburg 



Burnett, Ivan Blackwell, Jr. Meridian 

Burns, Ellen Elise Jackson 

Byrne, Patricia Ann Brookhaven 

Caden, Jackie Lou Jackson 

Campbell, William Wallace Jackson 

Caraway, Carolyn Van Greenville 

Carr, Shirley Anne Tupelo 

Cater, Carole Virginia .._ Laurel 

Clemandot, Andre, Jr. West Point 

Clement, Jack Reese Jackson 

Coats, Mary Susan Columbia 

Coile, Billy R. Jackson 

Collins, William Lynn Laurel 

Cook, Wendell H., Jr. Meridian 

Couillard, Senith Ann Natchez 

Coullet, Armand Eugene Jackson 

Covington, Carol Jack Brookhaven 

Crossley, Marian Elizabeth Laurel 

Curry, Judith Conley Memphis, Tenn. 

Davenport, William Eugene ._ — Yazoo City 

Davis, Patricia Lynn Jackson 

Davis, Woody Dean Pachuta 

Dement, Frank Eugene Jackson 

Denton. Betty Katherine Raymond 

Dodd, Phyllis Ann Jackson 

Dorsett, Peter Elwood ._■ Lucedale 

Douglass, John Morgan, Jr. Prairie Point 

Drais, John Harlan New Orleans, La. 

Drane, William Donovan Jackson 

Dumas, James Russell Prentiss 

Dunn, Virginia Caroljrn Biloxi 

Edwards, George William, Jr. Tupelo 

Entrican, Louie Lamar, Jr. Brookhaven 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



129 



Fallin, Glen Marcus Brookhaven 

Feild, Robert Graham Jackson 

Fernandez, Jose Raul Jackson 

Ferrell, Margaret Ann Starkville 

Ford, Nancy Rebecca Jackson 

Fortenberry, Donald Peyton Summit 

Fulton, Thurman, Jr. Lyon 

Garrison, Martha Gail Batesville 

Gipson, John Frederick Philadelphia 

Glenn, Ralph Ewing Gulfport 

Godbold, Sandra Lynn Shelby 

Goodwin, Benjamin Mayfield, Jr. 

Meridian 

Goodyear, Barbra Kay Gulfport 

Gorum, Larry Austin Tyler, Texas 

Gresham, Eleanor Clarksdale 

Grice, Lynda Ann Tupelo 

Grisham, Nancy Irene Corinth 

Gunter, Van Douglas Jackson 

Haining, Gloria Earlyne Clarksdale 

Harris, Harley Jackson 

Hart, Sue B. Jackson 

Hawkins, Fred Edward ,.-■ Jackson 

Haynes, James Franklin Jackson 

Henking, Virginia White __Memphis, Tenn. 

Howell, William Brazil Jackson 

Huddleston, Martha Ann Tchula 

Jackson, Clara Frances Jackson 

James, Robert Earl Hazlehurst 

Jenkins, Linda Sue Jackson 

Johnson, Jerry Wayne Jackson 

Johnson, Phyllis Ruth Jackson 

Jolly, Faye Carol Jackson 

Jones, Charlotte Jackson 

Jones, Mei-ritt Eugene Centreville 

Keech, Maja Miami, Fla. 

Kennedy, Ann Katherine Danville, Ky. 

King, Patricia Mickeysue Brookhaven 

Kolman, Philip Jacob Jackson 

Landfair, Robert Lamar Jackson 

Langley, Alex William Laurel 

Lasky, Mary Golde : Aberdeen 

Lee, Lynda Gwen Laurel 

Leggett, Robert Nelson, Jr. Vicksburg 

Lemasson, Emily Ann Jackson 

Leverett, James Granison Monroe, La. 

Lewis, Clyde James Meridian 

Lewis, David Harmon Tylertown 

Libbey, Francis Martin Jackson 

Lipscomb, Nancy Louise Jackson 

Litchfield, Jerry Jackson 

Long, Patricia Ann Tupelo 

Lowry, Marcella Anne Woodville 

Lowry, Robert Wayne Laurel 

Lyons, Russell Herschell, Jr. Clinton 

McClinton, Ella Eloise Quitman 

McClung, George Vincent, Jr. Jackson 

McCollum, Kenneth Gene Vicksburg 

Mcintosh, Dan Anderson, III Mendenhall 

McLaurin, Eugenia Anderson Hollandale 

McMurray, Richard Oliver Jackson 

McNeese, Roger Allen Laurel 

Magruder, Frederick Augustine Jackson 

Martin, Newton Hall, Jr. Jackson 

Miller, Helen Cherry Woodville 

Mitchell, Joe Rhett Forest 

Mitchell, Thomas Jerry Jackson 

Mize, Susanna Jackson 

Monk, Judith Ann Jackson 

Mood, James Irvin Yazoo City 

Moore, Thomas Ebb Indianola 

Mounger, George Mart Calhoun City 

Mozingo, James Robert, Jr. Jackson 

Mullins, Sylvia Dees _Macon 

Mullins, Thomas Riddell Prairie Point 

Newman, Frederick John Jackson 

Noblin, John Thomas Jackson 

Noullet, Albert Jake Jackson 

Odom, Robert Charles Vicksburg 

Panagiotou, Angelo John Greece 

Park, Leland Ralph Ruston, La. 

Parker, Margaret Jean Quitman 

Peden, Rachael Ann Belzoni 



Peeples, Carl Alvin, Jr. Grenada 

Perry, Patricia Ann Crystal Springs 

Phillips, Allen Duane 

Phalanx Station, Ohio 

Phillips, Carl Keeton Quitman 

Phipps, Elizabeth Maudean Jackson 

Pitner, Carolyn Elizabeth New Albany 

Poole, Rex Darrel Gloster 

Potts, James Birkley Hollandale 

Prewitt, James Andrew Long Beach 

Prouty, Shirley Jean Jackson 

Pyron, Billye Dell Indianola 

Ransburgh, Marilyn Suzanne Sturgis 

Raper, L. Q., Jr. Jackson 

Rayner, James Whitney Jackson 

Regan, Barbara Anne Jackson 

Roberts, Peggy Sue Jackson 

Robertson, Charles Douglas Jackson 

Robinson, Robert George Whitfield 

Robison, Mary Carole Utica 

Rogers, Cecil A. Meridian 

Rogers, James Eldridge __Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Ruby, John Stricklin Jackson 

Sanders, Eleanor Sue Vicksburg 

Sanford, Charles Pat Jackson 

Sartoris, Brenda Eve Jackson 

Sawtelle, Gary Lawrence West Point 

Scott. Herbert Magee Vicksburg 

Scott, James Hugh Jackson 

Scott, Oscar Johnson Gunnison 

Shannon, Carolyn Cook Hattiesburg 

Shepard, James Crenshaw, Jr. 

Montgomery, Ala. 

Shirley, Betty Sue Bastrop, La. 

Simmons, Lowrey Garrett Pontotoc 

Simms, Lyman Moody, Jr. Jackson 

Smith, Joseph Aubrey Natchez 

Smith, Robert Lucean Union Church 

Sowell, J. Ralph Jackson 

Si)iers, Robert Herbert Picayune 

Spruili, William George Canton 

Stevens, Joseph Joshua Macon 

Stockett, Bethany Matilda Jackson 

Strickland, Mary Louise Minter City 

Sullivan, Alice Duff Port Gibson 

Summers, Judith Hermine, Memphis, Tenn. 

Swartzfager, Joi Adrian Laurel 

Taylor, Stanley Leroy, Jr. Natchez 

Terry, Maxie Ruth Hedgepeth, Monticello 

Thomas, Thad Nelson McComb 

Thompson, Barbara Sue Ackerman 

Thompson, Patricia Webb Greenwood 

Toney, James H. Mendenhall 

Tucker, James Burns Jackson 

Tynes, Elizabeth Louise Biloxi 

Underwood, James Aubrey Forest 

Vanlandingham, Calvin Lewis Houston 

Wade, Mildred Ann ._ Starkville 

Walcott, Kenneth Myles Hollandale 

Wallick. Diane Drew 

Walt, Katherine Caruthers Greenwood 

Wardlaw, Lee Lyle McComb 

Webster, Carol Joyce Vicksburg 

Webster, Ruth Margaret Starkville 

Wells, Alice Harriet Durant 

Wells, Hilda Louise ^_Jackson 

Wells, James Gipson Jackson 

Wentworth, Earl Cecil, Jr. Natchez 

West, Bettye Carr Yazoo City 

Westmoreland, Betty Jean Jackson 

Wetmore, Devada Greenwood 

White, Martha Louise Greenwood 

Whitten, Annie Letitia Jackson 

Wible, James Howard Pensacola, Fla. 

Wiggers, Alice Grey Indianola 

Wikstrand, Barbara Alice Gulfport 

Wilkerson, Amy Louise Jackson 

Wilkins, William Thomas Clarksdale 

Williams, Charles Otho Jackson 

Williams, Sam Kelly, Jr. Gulfport 

Woodall, Edward Eugene, Jr. Coffeeville 

Young, Nancy Caroline Bogue Chitto 



130 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



FRESHMAN CLASS 1959-60 



Addkison, William Lake Jackson 

Alexander, John W., Jr. Dallas, Texas 

Allen, Clyde Russell, Jr. Clarksdale 

Allen, Dorothy Virginia Aberdeen 

Allen, James Roberts Carthage 

Allen, Joan Gelinda Flemingsburg, Ky. 

Allen, Robert Hugh Aberdeen 

Antrim, Roy Lamar Jackson 

Arrington, James Duncan, Jr. Collins 

Ash, Ann Lowry Centreville 

Atkinson, Gary Frank Clinton 

Atkinson, George Oren, Jr. Jackson 

Ayres, John Hollis Columbus 

Baker, Johnny Robert Greenwood 

Ballew, James Edgar ,-McComb 

Berghorn, Roland, Lotzestrasse, Goettingen, 
West Germany 

Bishop, Josephine Anna Jackson 

Bishop, Sara Ann Sardis 

Black, Linda Kay Morton 

Blackmon, Nancy Gene Greenville 

Bledsoe, Priscilla Lou Smith Jackson 

Boothe, Sandra Jackson 

Boswell, Beverly Ridgway Jackson 

Bowman, Ann Valencia Lorman 

Box, Grace Elizabeth Prairie 

Boyd, Sharon O'Theal -_ Jackson 

Brantley, Will Davis, Jr. Jackson 

Breland, Ronald Hargrove New City, 

New York 

Brewer, Barbara Elise Marks 

Britt, Gary Lynn Ruleville 

Brooks, Marion Shirley Vicksburg 

Buckner, Virginia Kathro 

Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Bufkin, Billy Jack Wiggins 

Burdick, Kathryn Brockport, N. Y. 

Burgess. Edward Albei-t Jackson 

Burks, Brenda Orr Greenville 

Burt, Frances Evelyn Drew 

Burt, Martha Elizabeth Jackson 

Butler, Barbara Ruth Jonestown 

Butler. Dorothy Allen 1 Greenville 

Caldwell, Richard Dale Flora 

Callaway, Richard Benton Clinton 

Camp, Nath Thompson Anderson, S. C. 

Carmichael, Donald Brent Jackson 

Carr, Sarah Frances McComb 

Carr, Theodoi-e A. Jackson 

Carter, Linda Wood Woodville 

Catchings, Charles Evans Woodville 

Chambers, Billy Lee Clinton 

Chancellor, Peggy Joyce Brandon 

Clark, John Benton Tayloi-sville 

Clark, Sara Elizabeth El Dorado, Ark. 

Clayton, .Joann . Jackson 

Clifton, Wayland Ross, Jr. Kosciusko 

Glower. Bennie Ranee Sunflower 

Cockrell, Deborah Welles Jackson 

Cole, James Joseph, II . Natchez 

Coleman, Bonnie Jean Magnolia 

Comfort, Zelda Ann Kosciusko 

Cooper, Miriam Elizabeth Monticello 

Covell, Jan Estelle Jackson 

Cunningham, Judith Anne Greenville 

Dabney, Pamela Scott Crystal Springs 

Dakin, Kathleen O'Neal Cleveland 

Davis, Wilkes Henry, Jr. Jackson 

Davis. Willie Austin . Jackson 

Dawson, Julia Marie Pascagoula 

DeBrow, Jimmie Fay Hattiesburg 

Dennis, Frank Byron Jackson 

Dicks, Lillian Henderson, Baton Rouge, La. 

Dickson, Pauline - Mount Olive 

Dickson, Penelope Marcia Jackson 

Doss, Hester Kathryn Clarksdale 

Downing, Martha Ann Jackson 

Dribben, Gwendolyn Greenwood 

DuBard, Cynthia Anne Grenada 

Dunnaway, Phil Ray Ocean Springs 

Eikert, Kenneth Mayo Vicksburg 

Ellis, Charles William Jackson 



Erwin, Roberta Clara Atlanta, Ga. 

Evans, Donna Yvette Yazoo City 

Everett, Peter Case Jackson 

Everett, Robert Case Jackson 

Farris, Kathryn Ann Nashville, Tenn. 

Ferrell, Marilyn .Tanet Batesville 

Filby, Edward Jay Des Moines, Iowa 

Findley, Robert Dennis Jackson 

Fondren, Agnes Diane Jackson 

Fowlkes, Hal Templeton, Jr. Wiggins 

Fredericks, Sandra Elaine Biloxi 

Garland, Julia May ^..Jackson 

Garrett, Shirley Fay Jackson 

Gatewood, Alex Owen Doddsville 

Gibson, Bobby Joe Meridian 

Gilliland, Betty J. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Goodman, William Donald, Pelahatchie 

Gordon, Martha Winchester Florence 

Graves, Sandra Lee -_• Jackson 

Graves, William Ernest Crystal Springs 

Griffin, Barbara Ann Laurel 

Griffin, Waj^ne Talley Somerset, Ky. 

Grosskopf, Phyllis Ann Jackson 

Grubbs, Martha Alice _- --Memphis, Tenn 

Haining, Richard Wingfield Clarksdale 

Hall, William Roland, Jr. Natchez 

Hammonds, Rodney Gene Grenada 

Hand, Sara Ruth — Jackson 

Hardman, William Mark Curtis 

Pensacola, Fla. 
Harrell. Elizabeth Jean -_Palo Alto, Calif. 

Harrigill, Alan Howard Brookhaven 

Harris. Diane ■ Clarksdale 

Harrison, Edwina Faye Natchez 

Hasseltine, Lee Luther, Jr. Corinth 

Heard, Ann Sims Tupelo 

Hedgecock, David Emery Jackson 

Henderson, .Tames Alan Gulfport 

Hendricks. Patricia Ann Franklin, Ind. 

Herring, Felix L. Grenada 

Herrington, Juan Dean Jackson 

Hill, Patricia Ann Louisville 

Hinson, Margaret Ruth Aberdeen 

Holderfield, John Culley Jackson 

Hontzas, Connie Joe Jackson 

Hood, Stephen Thomas Jackson 

Hudson, Jan Elizabeth Natchez 

Hutchins, James Drummond, II 

New Hebron 

Hutchins, Louise Lockwood Jackson 

Hutton, Georgia Marie Vicksburg 

Hymers, Susan Helen Jackson, Tenn. 

Inkster, Arthur Ray Jackson 

Jackson, Charles Shei-man Clarksdale 

Johnson, Charlotte Virginia __ Senatobia 

Jones, Annette Justine Hattiesburg 

Jones, Huey Cannon Columbia 

Jones, Thomas Roper Saltillo 

Jones, Walter Webb, Jr. Jackson 

Jordan, Gerald Wayne Jackson 

Jordan, Miriam Locke Carthage 

Keller, Paul Charles Natchez 

Kelly, Nan Marie Jackson 

Kennedy, Joseph Martin Newton 

Kenny, Diane Maureen Jackson 

Kerr. Martha Kathryn Greenwood 

Kibler, Myra Lynn Meridian 

Killebrew, Charles Joseph Biloxi 

Kizzar, Jackie Don Heidelberg 

Lacy, Don Preston Jackson 

Lambropoulou, Nicky Nicholas Jackson 

Lammons, Georganne 

Greenbelt, Maryland 

Lane, Linda Moore Brandon 

Langford, Howard Charles, Jr. Marks 

Lautar, Matthew Joseph West Point 

Lawhon, Minnie Lawson Tupelo 

Lazarus, Herman Lee, Jr. McComb 

Lecornu, Laura Nell Vardaman 

Ledbetter, Ellen Diane Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



131 



Lee, George Robertson McComb 

Levi, Dempsey Meyer Ocean Springs 

Lewis, Clayton Taylor Philadelphia 

Lewis, Lynda Irene Canton 

Lewis, William Frederick Jackson 

Loflin, Mack Elzy Natchez 

Loper, Nancy Beth Ocean Springs 

Lott, Charles Webb, Jr. Columbia 

Lowe, Eugenia Smith Jackson 

McCullouch, Reba Elizabeth Louisville 

McDaniel, Henry Arwood, Jr. Jackson 

McDonnell, Mary Sue Hazlehurst 

McDougal, John Small Winona 

McEachern, Charles Malcolm Jackson 

McHorse, Thomas Steven Jackson 

Mclnnis, Sarah Beth Laurel 

Mclntire, Joseph Troy Leland 

McLain, William Gerald Corinth 

McLemore, James Gray, Jr. Forest 

Magee, Mary Elizabeth Jackson 

Magee, Patricia Jewel Jackson 

Mathews, Donald Lee 

Phalanx Station, Ohio 

Mathews, Horace Durward Yazoo City 

May berry, Ann Ethel Jackson 

Meadows. David Leigh Greenwood 

Meek, Nancy Bryan Forest 

Meisburg, Stephen Cardwell, Jr. _ Jackson 

Mendell, Annie Marie Jackson 

Miller, Grace Margaret _^New Orleans, La. 

Miller, Jimmy Lee Clarksdale 

Mills. Mary Bentley Gulfport 

Miner, Cora Treadaway Meridian 

Mitman, Mary Elizabeth Laurel 

Moncrief. Marvin Loy Brookhaven 

Moore, Willard Sutton Jackson 

Moseley, John Charles Meridian 

Mulhearn, Edwin Richardson Natchez 

Myers, Jerry Leon Magee 

Myers, Raymond Lee Parkdale, Ark. 

Nabors, Jackie Moore Tutwiler 

Netherton, Charles Ray Jackson 

Norton, Bennie Sue Brookhaven 

Nunn, Sandra Christine Washington 

Oliver, Janet Faye Drew 

Orr, Patsy Jane Ackerman 

Ott, Cobern Erwin Osyka 

Owen, Hilarie Anne Jackson 

Parker, Brenda Joyce Jackson 

Paterson, Malcolm Lang Shubuta 

Perkins, Linda Ruth Jackson 

Persons, James Brady Jackson 

Phillips, Charles Eugene Jackson 

Porter, Arthur Ray Roxie 

Pryor, Mary Ellen Laurel 

Purnell. Paul Tanner Jackson 

Reed, Nathan Keith Centi-eville 

Regan, Nancy Catherine Belzoni 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Alliston, Mary Ellen Williamson Jackson 

Beasley, James Monroe Calhoun City 

Bomar, Jo Ann Jackson 

Bonner, George Patrick Jackson 

Bowman. Carla Mae Jackson 

Calloway, Virginia Cartledge Jackson 

Cavett, Clara Porter Jackson 

Chandler, Kathleen Gore Jackson 

Chestnut, Mary Alice Jackson 

Clark, Clyde V. Jackson 

Costas, Mary Jackson 

Craig, Paul Moore Jackson 

Culver, Louise Meiere Jackson 

Dabbs, Wallace Doyle Jackson 

DeLoach, Luciel Jackson 

Ellis, Iris Doreene Jackson 

Evans, Jesse Franklin, Jr. Clarksdale 

Fleming, Claude LeRoy, Jr. Goodman 

Fountain, Deward Green, Jr. Jackson 

Frothingham, Rodney Edward, Jr. 

Jackson 
Grice, James Alton Jackson 



Richardson, Robert John, Jr. Jackson 

Roberts, James Beauregard Biloxi 

Robertson, Garnet Lorene Detroit, Mich. 

Robinette, Charles Harris, Jr. - Greenwood 

Robinson, Patricia Ann Batesville 

Ross, Johnnye Catherine Jackson 

Runge, William Louis Jackson 

Rush, Jeptha Thomas, Jr. Prentiss 

Scott, Martha Jean Leland 

Shaw, Harmon Dean, Jr. Hazlehurst 

Simmons, Penelope Vicksburg 

Sklar, Peter Luyster Jackson 

Slade, Julia Ann EI Dorado, Ark. 

Slade, Paula Janet Jackson 

Smith, Nell Carleen Vicksburg 

Sorrels, Laura Poyner Belzoni 

Stamps, Dennis Earl Prentiss 

Stanley, George Nathan Vicksburg 

Starnes, Carolyn Patricia Natchez 

Stout, Thomas Eggleston, Jr. _. Pascagoula 

Sumner, George Russell Hattiesburg 

Sweeton, Nancy Mae Forestville, Conn. 

Tew, Ronnie Wayne -Jackson 

Thompson, Michael Roily Pascagoula 

Throckmorton, Monica Anne 

Clermont Harbor 
Treadway, Marcus Alfred, Jr. „_Hollandale 

Underwood, James Murray Forest 

Unger, Sarah Louise Aurora, Indiana 

Utesch, Charlotte Dianne Jackson 

Vance, Wallace Ray Union 

Varjavandi, Ezzatullah Iran 

Walker, Elizabeth Lee McComb 

Walker, Martha Ellen Panther Burn 

Wallace, Martha Virginia Yazoo City 

Ward, Sandra Joanne Jackson 

Ward. Susan Marie Tuscaloosa, Ala 

Warren, Elizabeth Douglass Laurel 

Watkins, Lillie Janette Soso 

Wells, Gary Lee Friars Point 

Wheat, Linda Larue Jackson, Tenn. 

Whitaker, Dixie Lee Woodville 

White, John Eugene Ocean Springs 

Whiteside, Carole Dean Ashland 

Wideman, Sherry Gwendolyn __Hattiesburg 

Wilburn, James Cothran Leland 

Wilkerson, Miry Johnnette Pascagoula 

Williams, Bobbie Beth Jackson 

Williams. Charles Waggener Vicksburg 

Wnils, Henry Lamar Jackson 

Wilson, Joseph Rockne Moss Point 

Winders, Jo Kathryn New Albany 

Woo, Brian Belzoni 

Woods, Claudia Elizabeth Jackson 

Woods, Dale Maitland Jackson 

Woolly, Martha Ann Leland 

Yarborough, Doris Elizabeth Pickens 

Yates, Florilea Clinton 

STUDENTS 1959-60 

Harbour, William Thomas Meridian 

Haug, Ui'sula Barbara Jackson 

Hickman, Louise Menefee Jackson 

Hogue, John Walter, Jr. __Newellton, La. 

Hollingshead, Charles Aaron Ellisville 

Hood, James Ray Lambert 

Hughes, Herbert LaVerne Jackson 

Ingram, James Kyle Jackson 

Irby, Larry Smith Jackson 

Johnson, William Isom Jackson 

Kennedy, Donald Ray Jackson 

Kolb, Clarice M. Jackson 

Lee, Florence Pratscher Jackson 

Lord, Jane Wiggins Jackson 

McGregor, Dorsie Dimple Jackson 

McLelland, Wilma Floyd Jackson 

Macey, John W. Jackson 

Martin, Sharon Ruth Jackson 

Murphy, Betty Graves Jackson 

Nash, Dorothy Aline Jackson 

Notaro, Mildred Rawls Jackson 

Nowell, Jimmy Philadelphia 



132 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



O'Neil, Arthur Morse, Jr. Jackson 

Passons, Peyton Lamar, Jr. Jackson 

Powell, Elizabeth Ann Lampton __Jackson 

Reynolds, E. Guy Jackson 

Ritchie, Thalia Payne Jackson 

Robinson, Robert Wallace Meridian 

Rone, Robert Riley Ethel 

Schiesari, Nives Mary Jackson 

Shanks, Alice Crisler Jackson 

Smith, David Arnold Jackson 

Smith, Wensil Allene Jackson 

Smithson, Empress Hooper Jackson 

Spencer, Treadwell Harvey Greenville 

Stephenson, George Royster Jackson 

Stephenson, Robert Mills Fannin 

Stevens, Ann Herbert Jackson 

Stringer, Ollie Mae Jackson 

SUMMER 

Abraham, Robert E. Vicksburg 

Adams, Anita Frances Ethel 

Adcock, James Donald Hattiesburg 

Ainsworth, Carrie G. Florence 

Alexander, Charles Compton Jackson 

Alexander, Clyde Wayne Jackson 

Alexander, Mildred Louise Jackson 

Allbritton, Julie Nevarro Jackson 

Allen, Frank Davis, Jr. Jackson 

Allen, Gerald White Brandon 

Allen, Raymond Lee Vicksburg 

Allen, Susan Rebecca Canton 

Alman, Rex Jackson 

Aloe, Linda S. Cincinnati. Ohio 

Anderson, Virginia Helen Jackson 

Antrim, Roy Lamar Jackson 

Armstrong, Harold Benjamin Hazlehurst 

Arnold, Frank Steele, Jr. Jackson 

Aron, Carl W. Jackson 

Ashcraft, Larry Mitchell Jackson 

Ashley, Joe Ann Little Jackson 

Babb, James Laurens .1 Jackson 

Bailey, Hugh Coyt, Jr. Jackson 

Ballard, James Lee Tupelo 

Banks, Carmine Marie Vicksburg 

Barbour, J. F., Ill Yazoo City 

Barlow, Frances Jane Crystal Springs 

Barranco, Charles Edward Greenwood 

Barrett, Linda Kay Jackson 

Barry, Charles Stewart Jackson 

Bates, William Ellison Jackson 

Beatty, Shirley Jean Flora 

Bennett, Margaret Graeme Madison 

Benson, Harry King Jackson 

Berry, Christine Jackson 

Berry, Mary Josephine Jackson 

Biggs, Jane Wallis Jackson 

Bigner, Anita Dolores Jackson 

Billups, William Alonzo, Jr. Holcomb 

Blaine, Sue Helen Hazlehurst 

Blissard, Thomasina Jackson 

Blount, Richard Barrett Jackson 

Bolick, William Alonzo Greenwood 

Boone, Harriet Catching __ Memphis, Tenn. 

Bott, Jessie Norma Fort Myers, Fla. 

Bowman, Neil Brookhaven 

Bracken, Beverly Jo Newton 

Brackett, Charles Ray Jackson 

Bradford, Dolly Pace Jackson 

Brady, Frances Joan Jackson 

Brantley, Will Davis Jackson 

Brasfield, Steve Hodges Jackson 

Bridges, Shirley Ann Crystal Springs 

Brock, Wilfred Gardner Jackson 

Brockman, Ralph Wesley, Jr. Jackson 

Brooks, Harold Bernette Mendenhall 

Brooks, Marion Shirley Vicksburg 

Broom, James S. Jackson 

Broome, Larry Glen Bassfield 

Broun. Carol Elizabeth Jackson 

Brown, Albert Yeates, Jr. West Point 

Brown, Carolyn Earl Batesville 

Brown, Joseph Paul Jackson 



Swarthout, Kenneth L., Jr. Jackson 

Taylor, William Elton Jackson 

Thomas, Cecil Ray Jackson 

Thomas Esmer Joseph Jackson 

Thompson, Russell Douglas Jackson 

Trowbridge, Joyce R. Jackson 

Wall, Edith Octavia Jackson 

Walls, Mrs. Thurston Jackson 

Walton, James Morrow Jackson 

Ware, Durward Clifton, Jr. Jackson 

Welch, Alonzo D. Jackson 

Welch, Katherine Netterville Jackson 

Werkheiser, Nell McNeil Jackson 

Whatley, Milton Jones Jackson 

White, Paul S. Clinton 

Wilson, Jimmy Allen Jackson 

Wilson, Robert N. Jackson 

SCHOOL 1959 

Brown, Mary Edith Meridian 

Brown, Nancy Ruth Jackson 

Brown, Robert Larry Jackson 

Brown, Thomas L. Jackson 

Brumfield, James Douglas Jackson 

Brunini, Mary Bea Jackson 

Bufkin, Joseph Webster Jackson 

Buford, Elizabeth Aldridge Jackson 

Bullock, Cal Wilson Jackson 

Burdine, Arthur Price Amory 

Burnett, John Robert Bay Springs 

Burnett, William Joseph Bay Springs 

Burns, Charles W. Canton 

Burns, Ellen Elise Jackson 

Busby, Carol Ann Philadelphia 

Buskirk, Betty Ann Okolona 

Byrd, Bethany Marcille Jackson 

Byrd, Linda Jo Pascagoula 

Byrne, Patricia Ann Brookhaven 

Caldwell, Gary Blaine Flora 

Campbell, Jon C, Jr. Natchez 

Canizaro, Robert Host Jackson 

Carr, Myra Sue Louin 

Carr, Oswald Bernard, Jr. Magee 

Carre, Gary Lee Jackson 

Case, John Morrison Vicksburg 

Case, Kay Elizabeth Brookhaven 

Cavett, Woods Broyles Jackson 

Chamblin, Bettye Reed Jackson 

Chandler, Larry Jackson 

Chapman, Glenda Faye Newton 

Cheney, William Garner Jackson 

Cirlot, Linda Frances Jackson 

Clark, Bart Buford Jackson 

Clark, Clyde V. Jackson 

Clark, Mary Janice Brookhaven 

Clark, Nathan Lester, Jr. Hattiesburg 

Clift, Raymond Spencer Tupelo 

Clower, Bennie Ranee Sunflower 

Coats, Mary Susan Columbia 

Cockrell, Joy Jackson 

Cockrell, Julia Clare Greenwood 

Cofer, Pearle Gaskins Jackson 

Coker, V. Joan Yazoo City 

Cole, Donna Jean Jackson 

Cole, Joe Ann Hattiesburg 

Cole, Katherine Ogden Natchez 

Cooper, Linda Elizabeth Jackson 

Cooper, Miriam Elizabeth Monticello 

Cooper, William Frank, Jr. 

Pass Christian 

Coman, Robert Mason, Jr. Hazlehurst 

Corban, Alfred Durahm Jackson 

Coullet, Armand Eugene Jackson 

Coulter, Mary Parker Prentiss 

Covington, Carol Jack Brookhaven 

Cowan, Virginia "Bunny" Jackson 

Cowart, Joseph Ralph Lucedale 

Craig, Charlotte Anne Jackson 

Crawford, Lynda Gayle Jackson 

Creel, Richard Earl, Jr. Biloxi 

Crews, Martha Ellen Jackson 

Crick, Gene Ellis Minter City 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



133 



Criscoe, Glenice Nan Carthagre 

Crisler, Jane Pearson Port Gibson 

Crowell, Allene C. Jackson 

Crowell, Barbara Ann Jackson 

Culver, Louise Meiere Jackson 

Currey, Cynthia Vicksburg 

Currie, Sam Weeks Utica 

Dacus, Darwin Cooper Jackson 

Dale, Nancy Anne Jackson 

Davis, Albert Ellis Jackson 

Davis, Beverly Port Gibson 

Davis, David John Peckville, Penn. 

Davis, Dwigrht Douglass Brookhaven 

Davis, Patricia Lynne Jackson 

Davis. Richard Turner Jackson 

Davis, Wilkes H. Jackson 

Dear, Howard Davis, Jr. Jackson 

Deignan, Mai-y Ellen Jackson 

Dement, Frank E., Ill Jackson 

Dennis, Frank Byron __Bowling Green, Ky. 

Denson, Janet Grace Carthage 

Denton, Betty Katherine Raymond 

Dickerson, Catherine Jackson 

Dickerson, Donald Jean Jackson 

Dickerson, Doris Kay Jackson 

Dickson, Pauline Mt. Olive 

Dolton. Betty Jackson 

Donaldson, John Joel Jackson 

Dortch. Charles Eugene, Jr. Jackson 

Doss, Hester Kathryn Clarksdale 

Downing, Martha Ann Jackson 

Downing, Nannette Jackson 

Downing, Sue Jean Jackson 

Drake, Albert Nicholas Jackson 

DuBois, Claudette Jackson 

Dunaway, Donette Winter Park. Fla. 

Dungan, Thomas Frederick Jackson 

Dunn, Cynthia Ann Jackson 

Dunn, Virginia Carolyn Biloxi 

Dviperier, Frank Dauterive Jackson 

Dupuy, Marjorie Anna Jackson 

Earnest, Selma V. Slate Springs 

Eddleman, John L. Pass Christian 

Edmonson Richard Mack Magee 

Edmundscn, Cecil Scott Meridian 

Edwards, Carolyn Ruth Banner 

Edwards. James Bryant --Warrington. Fla. 

Eikert, Kenneth Mayo Vicksburg 

Elliott, McPherson Gregorie Jackson 

Ellis, Charles Gostling Jackson 

Elmore, Gary S. State Line 

Em.erson, Ralph Waldo Jackson 

Erwin, Jesse Matthew Pascagoula 

Evans, Charles R. Pensacola, Fla. 

Evans, James Parham Jackson 

Everett, Mrs. Charlotte M. D'Lo 

Ezell, Darwin Neal Decatur 

Faulkner, Mary Jack Belzoni 

Feldmann, Kurt Lansing Clarksdale 

Felker, Henry Gerald Columbia 

Ferber, Lee Jackson 

Ferguson, Suzanne Beaumont, Texas 

Ferrell, James Vernon Greenville 

Finn, Martha Jackson 

Fitzhugh, Emily Elizabeth Jackson 

Flowers, Howard Curtis Jackson 

Flurry, Sue B. Jackson 

Ford, Dennis Murphree Jackson 

Ford, Jo Jeff Newton 

Fox, Suzanne Canton 

Frederick, Fred Douglas Cleveland 

Frost, Edwin Lee Media, Penn. 

Frost, Grace Louise Natchez 

Gaby, Jean Jackson 

Gallagher, Dale Eugene Natchez 

Galloway, Peggy Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Gammill, Ruth Wallace Jackson 

Garland, Julia May Jackson 

Garland, Nancy Elizabeth Jackson 

Gauvin, Lloyd D. Ft. Walton, Fla. 

Gerard, Jean Winona 

Gerardy, Charlene Ella Vicksburg 

Geyer, Charles Henry Amory 



Gibbs, James Frederick Jackson 

Giffin, Jackie Rush Louisville 

Gilbert, A. Spencer, III Yazoo City 

Gillespie, Virgil Jackson 

Gipson, John Fredrick Philadelphia 

Givens, Roy A. Yazoo City 

Golden, Linda Lee Canton 

Gonzales, Elvie Lou Jackson 

Gorday, John Coleman Jackson 

Gordon, Martha Winchester Florence 

Gordon, Robert Hamilton McComb 

Graeber, Ann Yazoo City 

Graves, William Ernest Crystal Springs 

Gray, Isabel McCrady Jackson 

Green, Maart.ie Anne Jackson 

Green, Mary Frances Hazlehurst 

Greenway, John Langford 

Chevy Chase, Maryland 

Grice, James Alton Meridian 

Griffin, Barbara Ann Laurel 

Griffin, Dorothy Gayle Wiggins 

Guice, Charles Joseph Biloxi 

Gulledge, Robert Stanley, III Jackson 

Hansen, Edwin Leonard --Pensacola, Fla. 

Harbour, William Thomas Meridian 

Harrell, Alice O. Vicksburg 

Harrell, Audrey Nell Jackson 

Harrell. Sumpter Thompson Jackson 

Harrigill. Alan Howard Brookhaven 

Harrigill. Donald Ray Brookhaven 

Harris. Patsy F. Yazoo City 

Harrison, Mary Alice Jackson 

Harrison, Winfred Blake Raymond 

Hartley, Mary O. Pascagoula 

Harvey, Lucian Alston, Jr. Jackson 

Harvey, Margaret Zoe Tylertown 

Hathorn, Stan Hamilton Louisville 

Havens, Irma Lou Jackson 

Hawkins, Frederick Edward Jackson 

Haynes, James Franklin Jackson 

Hemphill, Lydia Sue Gore Springs 

Hendee, William Richard --Lansing, Mich. 

Henry, Mrs. Sara Jane Jackson 

Heritage, Nancy Greenville 

Herring, Mrs. Christine W. Brandon 

Herring, Marilyn Dea Jackson 

Hertz, Nancy Jackson 

Hester, Willis.m Stewart Jackson 

Hetrick, John Harold, Jr. Crystal Springs 

Hilburn. Breland Jackson 

Hill, Dorsey Annanette Drew 

Hill, John Edward Vicksburg 

Hilton, Charles Eugene Jackson 

Holliday. Elizabeth Dell Canton 

Hollowell, Virginia Jackson 

Hopkins, Donald Andrew Jackson 

Hopkins, Patricia Alice Jackson 

Hopson, James Anding Delhi, La. 

Howard, Frank Phil Jackson 

Howard, Martin Leonard Baldwyn 

Howell, Donald Arnold Biloxi 

Howerton, John Wallace 

Walnut Ridge, Ark. 

Hudson, Barbara Sue Batesville 

Huff, Laura Agnes Monroe, La. 

Huff, Lucy Meridian 

Huff. Marcia Forest 

Humphreys, Fisher Henry Columbus 

Humphries, James Lane Jackson 

Hunsucker, John Coleman Potts Camp 

Hunter, Norman Francis Jackson 

Hurdle, James Ernest, Jr. Shelby 

Hutchins, Elizabeth M. Jackson 

Hutchinson, Helen Ray Perkinston 

Hutto, Lillian Llewellyn Jackson 

Hutton, Georgia M. Vicksburg 

Hyman, Wesley Lea Jackson 

Ishee, James Gill Jackson 

Jabour, Fred Alexander Rolling Fork 

Jackson, Arnold Jerald West Point 

Jackson, Charles Sherman Clarksdale 

Jackson, Tommy Ellis Jackson 

Jenkins, Linda Sue Jackson 



134 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



Jennings, Charles Rogers Kosciusko 

Johnson, Barbara Jo Jackson 

Johnson, Charles D. Golden 

Johnson, Charles Robert New Albany 

Johnson, Eddie Ripley 

Johnson, Edward Jackson 

Johnson, Gayera Jackson 

Johnson, Janyce Crews Jackson 

Johnston, Brent L. Jackson 

Jones, Betty Lynn Hollandale 

Jordan, Mary Katherine Kosciusko 

Kavanaugh, Benjamin Hudson, Jr. 

Winona 

Keller, Paul Charles Natchez 

Kellogg, Kathryn Elizabeth Starkville 

Kelly, Ann Ryland Yazoo City 

Kelly, Ralph Franklin Jackson 

Kelly, Thomas Herman, Jr. Jackson 

Kennedy, Thomas, E. Jackson 

Kenney, John Joseph Jackson 

Kennington, Roy George Jackson 

Kerr, Mary Frances Jackson 

King, Patricia Mickeysue Brookhaven 

Kinnard, David Rush Philadelphia 

Kirschenbaum, Barbara Kay Vicksburg 

Krohn, Bobby Jackson 

LaBerge, Suzanne Ellen Laurel 

Lack, Betty Lou Terry 

Laird, Robert Myers Brandon 

Lambert, Joe C. Natchez 

Lampkin, Johnnie Swindull Jackson 

Landfair, Robert Lamar Jackson 

Lane, Robert D. Monticello 

Lange, James Braxton Jackson 

Langston, James Ronny Jackson 

Larr, Edwin Thomas, Jr. Vicksburg 

Lawrence, Bettye Jo Brandon 

Lawrence, Peggy Joanne Vicksburg 

Lawrence, Thomas Rainer Jackson 

Lawson, James Smith, Jr. Jackson 

Lee, Charles Leo Ludlow 

Lee, Emily Melene Jackson 

Lee, William Arthur Jackson 

Leggett, Gail . Jackson 

Lewis, Clyde William, Jr. Jackson 

Lewis, Glenda Carol Jackson 

Lewis, Lynda Irene Canton 

Leyes, Jon F. Vicksburg 

Libby, David Ray Louisville 

Liles, Dorothy S. Jackson 

Lindblom, Peter D. Miami, Fla. 

Lindsay, Joseph Lloyd Jackson 

Lingle, Mariella Crystal Springs 

Lipscomb, Mrs. Colleen Thompson.- Jackson 

Livingston, Madeleine Rebecca Prentiss 

Lockhart, James Bishop, Jr. Jackson 

Lockhart, Ruth Leech Jackson 

Lovett, Albert Myer Morton 

Lowe, Judith Ann Willcox 

St. Cloud, Minn. 

Lunday, Carolyn June Biloxi 

Lundy, Frank Jefferson, Jr. Jackson 

Lundy, James William Vicksburg 

Lynn, Judy Jackson 

McArthur, Robert Eugene Jackson 

McAtee, James Edward Jackson 

McCall, Charles Odis Jackson 

McCarley, Mrs. Louise W. Brandon 

McClinton, Ella Eloise Quitman 

McClung, George Vincent Jackson 

McClurkin, Celia Adair Jackson 

McCravey, Mildred Myers Forest 

McCraw, Harry Wells Jackson 

McDonald, Willard Swank Forest 

McGehee, Bettye Gwen Parchman 

McGehee, Donald Bernard Jackson 

McGehee, Roger Lane, Jr. Jackson 

McGuire, E. Jeannine McComb 

Mclntyre, Elmer Stuart Jackson 

McKinley, Lynda Wasson Kosciusko 

McLaurin, Sarah Stewart Natchez 

McLean, John Eugene Tupelo 

McLeod, James Norman, III Jackson 



McMullan, David Malcolm Newton 

McRaney, Kenneth Allen Florence 

McRee, Ruth McCluskey Senatobia 

McShane, Edna Elizabeth Greenwood 

MacDonald, William Charles, Jr. Jackson 

Macey, John W. Jackson 

Magee, Patricia Jewel Jackson 

Magruder, Harriet Eve Jackson 

Manning, William Palmer Jackson 

Marshall, George Matthews Natchez 

Mason, Margaret Anne Jackson 

Matheny, Nancy Elaine Fayette 

Mathews, Horace Durward Yazoo City 

Maxwell, Mignonne Russell Pickens 

May, Flora Victoria Jackson 

Mayoza, Mary Marlene Louisville, Ky. 

Mays, Thomas Shields Clarksdale 

Meek, Nancy Bryan Forest 

Miley, James Douglas Leland 

Mills, Betty Mae Jackson 

Mills, William Everett, Jr. Maiden 

Milwee, Richard Franklin 

Ft. Worth, Texas 

Minyard, Margaret Jackson 

Moak, Donald Lewis Jackson 

Moncrief, Halbert Bailey Brookhaven 

Montgomery, Whitney Johnson McComb 

Mooney, James Albert Miami, Fla. 

Moore, Earl P. Natchez 

Moore, Joe Kermit Jackson 

Moose, Lawrence Angelo, Jr. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Morehead, Genie Gray Wesson 

Morgan, William David Jackson 

Morrison, Jean Antoine Jackson 

Mosby, Ellen Dixon Starkville 

Mounger, George Mart Calhoun City 

Munn, Joye Jackson 

Munsey, Stanley Edward Jackson 

Murphree, Margaret Jackson 

Myers, Mary Preston Jackson 

Myers, Robert G. Canton 

Myers, Travis Belinda Jackson 

Nash, Dorothy Aline ^ Cleveland 

Naylor, Robert Hammiell, II Jackson 

Neely, William Thomas Jackson 

Nesmith, Malcolm Pattison 

Newcomb, Betty Lynn Jackson 

Noble, Phillip Burl Jackson 

Noblin, John Thomas Jackson 

Norsworthy, Fredna Faye Jackson 

North, Charles Hamilton, Jr. Jackson 

O'Brien, Jim Michael Jackson 

Odom, Robert Charles Vicksburg 

Olsen, Gerald Norman Jackson 

Orkin, Dianne Jackson 

Overby, Dorris Minada Brandon 

Patterson, Billy G. Jackson 

Peck, Lucy Bryant Jackson 

Pegg, J. Thomas Vicksburg 

Pennington, Jay Carroll Columbia 

Pennington, Sylvia Zee Sumner 

Pepper, Jane Carol Picayune 

Pepper, Lillard Dixon Jackson 

Perkins, John Burton Jackson 

Perry, John K. Grenada 

Perry, Mary Jo Louin 

Perry, Sarah Virginia Memphis 

Peters, Barbara Rae Jackson 

Pick, Albert Lester Jackson 

Pickering, Pauline Calhoun City 

Pitts, Ann Wright Jackson 

Poulette, Alex Jackson 

Puryear, James Burton Winona 

Quinn, Ella Martha Jackson 

Ragsdale, Janet Rae Canton 

Raines, Marcelle Jackson 

Ramsey, Robert Douglas, Jr. Jackson 

Rankin, Betty Ann Canton 

Rawson, John Elton Jackson 

Ray, Charles A. Meridian 

Ray, John Thomas, Jr. Hollandale 

Ray, Samuel Preston Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



135 



Ready, Carolyn Gay Jackson 

Redding, Edwin Linfield Jackson 

Reid, Mary Lynell Lexington 

Revels, Anne Jackson 

Reynolds, Rose Wells Jackson 

Rhodes, Henry James, III Vicksburg 

Ricketts, Mary Fairlie Jackson 

Rives, Welborn Moore, Jr. Jackson 

Roach, Lillian Anne McComb 

Robbins, Brannan Edwards 

Roberts, Peggy Sue Jackson 

Roberts, Sue Belle Hazlehurst 

Roberts, Wallace Eugene Meridian 

Robertson, Corinne Francis Louisville 

Robertson, Kenneth Barkley Pascagoula 

Robillard, James Lyle Meridian 

Robinson, Carol Ann Jackson 

Robinson, John Warren Meridian 

Robinson, Julianne Jackson 

Robinson, Robert Wallace Meridian 

Rockett, Rita Kay Jackson 

Rogers, Cecil Arthur, Jr. Meridian 

Rogers, Janice Lee Jackson 

Ross, Nell Newton Olive Branch 

Ross, Vernon Frank Olive Branch 

Ruby, John Stricklin Jackson 

Rush, Julian Bailey Meridian 

Russell, Franklin Howard Yazoo City 

Sanders, Mary Sue Columbia 

Sarphie, Bessie Kathryn McComb 

Sarphie, Sylvia McComb 

Satterfield, Charles William Canton 

Sawtelle, Gary Lawrence West Point 

Saxton, Bethel Lou Benton 

Scales, Mary Louise Portageville, Mo. 

Scarbrough, Bryan Thornton Vardaman 

Schultz, John Thomas Tunica 

Scott, Herbert M. Vicksburg 

Segrest, Jere Palmer Jackson 

Sharp, Maria Jo New Hebron 

Shaw, John R. Jackson 

Shearer, Jack Aubrey, Jr. _„ Jackson 

Sherrod, Edward Henry Jackson 

Shields, Carole Anne Grenada 

Shields, Emily Ruth Jackson 

Smith, Arthur Ward, Jr. Petal 

Smith, Betty Jean Yazoo City 

Smith, Carolyn Clodell St. Joseph, La. 

Smith, David Arnold Jackson 

Smith, Mrs. Hilda Carruth Jackson 

Smith, James Clinton Jackson 

Smith, Margaret Flowers Jackson 

Smith, Richard Russell Jackson 

Smith, Roy Lamar Benton 

Smith, Sarah Alice Magee 

Smith, William Lee Jackson 

Snell, Clyde Kent Jackson 

Snuggs, Lady Ann Jackson 

Southworth, Gaines Harold Roxie 

Spruill, Faye Gaddy Crystal Springs 

Stamm, Richard Jeffery Jackson 

Starnes, Thomas Albert Jackson 

Stennis, Hardy Roberts Macon 

Stephens, Clara Louise Laurel 

Stephens, Linda Louise Jackson 

Stevens, Barbara Lee Jackson 

Stockett, Bethany Matilda Jackson 

Stocks, Peter Konrad Jackson 

Stokes, Carolyn Jackson 

Strauss, Harry Clarence Jackson 

Stringer, Murra Jean Ridgeland 

Stubblefield, Mary Lee Yazoo City 

Sullivan, John Calhoun, Jr. Jackson 

Sullivan, Leonard Julian Meadville 

Summers, Judith Hermine 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Sunderman, Mary Anne Jackson 

Swartzfager, Jon Adrian Laurel 

Sweeney, Nancy Ann Harris Jackson 

Tarpley, Fred A., Jr. Jackson 

Taylor, Paul Frederick Jackson 

Taylor, Robert Edgar Jackson 

Taylor, Stanley Leroy, Jr. Natchez 



Taylor, William Elton Jackson 

Terry, Hazel Evelyn Bailey 

Thames, Jon Paul Jackson 

Thomas, Cecil Ray Jackson 

Thomas, Clifton Albert Jackson 

Thomas, Sawaya Norman, II Jackson 

Thompson, Elton Doyle Crystal Springs 

Thompson, James Grant, III Jackson 

Thompson, Marianne r Jackson 

Thompson, Maxine Belzoni 

Thompson, Robert Harvey, Jr. Jackson 

Thompson, Russell Douglas Jackson 

Thompson, Sandra Frances Areola 

Todd, Donald Ralph Jackson 

Torrey, James A., Jr. Meadville 

Triplett, Oliver Beaman Forest 

Tucker, Barbara Ann Jackson 

Turner, Charles Wesley Laurel 

Ulmer, David E. McComb 

Utesch, Charlotte Dianne Jackson 

Vallas, Maria Theo Jackson 

Vance, O. G., Jr. Jackson 

Vance, Wallace Ray Union 

Vaughey. Mary Byrnes Jackson 

Virden, Peter Lowber Greenville 

Wade, Lynn Douglas Jackson 

Wade, Patsy Ruth Jackson 

Walden, Jackie Elaine Jackson 

Walker, Lewis Herman, Jr. Jackson 

Walker, Nicki Evalyn Jackson 

Walker, Sarah Katherine Louise 

Walley, Rosie Jackson 

Walter, Elizabeth Inez Morton 

Walters, Carl Franklin, Jr. Jackson 

Walton, James Morrow Jackson 

Wamble, Johanna Louise Jackson 

Ware, Bettye Jean Jackson 

Ware, Frances Lee Jackson 

Warren, Joan Natchez 

Wasson, Lockett Alton, Jr. Lula 

Watkins, Billy Sanders Canton 

Watkins, Horace C. Quitman 

Watkins, Lillie Janette Taylorsville 

Watts, Mary Rebecca Jackson 

Weaver, A. Leon Natchez 

Weaver, David Robin Ackerman 

Weaver, Robert Jefferson Jackson 

Webb, Rosa I^ee Columbus 

Webster, Carol Joyce Vicksburg 

Wentworth, Earl Cecil, Jr. Natchez 

Wesley, Hilda Jean Columbia 

West, Vivian Ann Canton 

Westbrook, Margaret Ann Jackson 

Wetmore, Devada Greenwood 

White, Sidney Martin Jackson 

Whitten, Annie Letitia Jackson 

Whittington, Lynn Natchez 

Wikstrand, Barbara Alice Gulfport 

Wilburn, James C. Leland 

Wilkins, William Thomas Clarksdale 

Wilkinson, Ann Jackson 

Willey, Elizabeth Ann Forest 

Williams, Clyde V. Carthage 

Williams, David Allen Jackson 

Williams, Richard Oliver Jackson 

Williams, Sandra Gai Jackson 

Williamson, Donald W., Jr. Meridian 

Williamson, Stoney Tallulah, La. 

Wilson, Carole Lynn Lucedale 

Wilson, Richard Baxter, Jr. Jackson 

Wilson, Robert N. Jackson 

Windham, Homer Dale Jackson 

Wise, Betsy Jackson 

Wood, Shirley Gilma Brookhaven 

Woodruff, Jane Elizabeth Jackson 

Workman, Ernest Edwin Jackson 

Wright, Anne Jackson 

Yelverton, Eley O. Laurel 

Young, Eileen C. Tchula 

Young, Katherine C. Tchula 

Young, Nancy Caroline Bogue Chitto 

Youngblood, William Lamar Rose Hill 



136 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



10:00 A.M. 
10:00 A.M. 

8:00 A.M. 
9:00 A.M. 
10:55 A.M. 
2:00- 
4:00 P.M. 



SIXTY-SEVENTH COMiMENCEMENT 

Saturday, May 30, 1959 
Annual Meeting Board of Trustees....Millsaps-Wilson Library 
Meeting Senior Class Christian Center 

Sunday, May 31, 1959 

Holy Communion Fitzhugh Chapel 

Senior Breakfast 

Baccalaureate Service ....Galloway Mem. Methodist Church 



5:00 P.M. 



President's Reception for the Senior Class 

Fae Franklin Hall 

Graduation Exercises On the Campus 

MEDALS AND PRIZES AWARDED 

The Founder's Medal William Dwyer Balgord 

The Bourgeois Medal .James Douglas Brumfield 

The Tribbett Scholarship .Sarah Margaret Yarbrough, Ruby Allen 

Houston 

The John C. Carter Medal Margaret Ann Rogers 

The Charles Belts Galloway A^v^ard Robert Enoch Gentry 

The Clark Essay Medal Sarah Margaret Yarbrough 

The Chi Omega Award Allen Glover Walker 

The A. G. Sanders Award in French ...Rita Ann Mitchell 

The A. G. Sanders Award in Spanish ...Charles Joseph Becker, Jr. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta Award Jack Lawrence Ratliff 

Theta Nu Sigma Award William Richard Hendee 

Wall Street Journal Award Joseph Ralph Cowart 

Alpha Psi Omega Av^ard Barbara Webb 

Millsaps Players Acting Awards Julia C. Cockrell, 

John Lewis Sullivan, Jr. 

Millsaps Players Junior Acting Awards Jackie L. Caden, 

Ronald P. Willoughby 

Millsaps Players Backstage Av/ard Walter Vance Davis 

Jackson Little Theatre Award Vic B. Clark 

West Tatum Award Jack Lawrence Ratliff 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1959 

HONORARY DEGREES 



Richard Leonai-d Cooke D.D. 

John David Humphrey D.D. 



William Fitzhusrh Murrah LL.D. 

William Bryan Selah LL.D. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



*Edith Jeanine Adcock Jackson 

Richard Monroe Alderson, Jr. 

Dallas, Texas 

*Carolyn Justine Allen Magnolia 

Rex Alman, Jr. Jackson 

Tomie Randolph Aust Scooba 

Julia Ann Beckes Jackson 

Lillard Rhodes Bevill Jackson 

Bettye Brooks Blue :f^ Jackson 

Dolly Pace Bradford Jackson 

Elinor Gwin Breland Greenville 

Jack Ray Brock Meridian 

Arnold Arlington Bush, Jr. Laurel 

Cathy Sue Carlson Lumberton 

John Mitchell Carter Jackson 

John Morrison Case Vicksburg 

Dorothy Jack Casey West Point 



Woods Broyles Cavett __. Jackson 

Elizabeth Ann Clark Mt. Olive 

*Joseph Ralph Cowart Lucedale 

DaiTvin Cooper Dacus Kosciusko 

*Mary Ann Damare Jackson 

Donald Jean Dickerson Marshall, Texas 

Doris Kay Dickerson Jackson 

*Calliope Johnnie Dorizas Jackson 

John Philip Drysdale Hattiesburg 

Joseph Vardaman Dungan McComb 

Carol Ann Edwards Saucier 

Franz Ryan Epting Forest 

Charlotte Mangum Everett D'Lo 

Robert Enoch Gentry Vossburg 

Roy A. Givens __ Benton 

Theodore Allen Gowdy Clinton 

Charles Fred Grantham Jackson 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



137 



*Isabel McCrady Gray Jackson 

Mary Frances Huntington Green 

Hazlehurst 

Shirley Yvonne Habeeb Vicksburg 

David Ray Hamrick State Line 

Mary Opal Hartley Pascagoula 

Herman Lester Heath Jackson 

*Sybil La Verne Hester Jackson 

Joseph Miller Hinds, Jr. Greenville 

Laurie Smith Holmes Canton 

William Welsh Horlock Jackson 

Sandra Hviggins Waynesboro 

Fred Alexander Jabour, Jr. Rolling Fork 

William Taylor Jeanes Jackson 

Donald Malon Johnson Jackson 

*Elliott Anna Jones Mendenhall 

William Benjamin Kerr Greenwood 

*Ada Ruth Land Jackson 

Emmet Thomas Leonard Jackson 

Colleen Thompson Lipscomb Jackson 

Don Gardner Lisle Greenwood 

Cathryn Collins Lord Jackson 

*Ellen Jeanette Lundquist Jackson 

Mary Sue McBrayer Jackson 

Martha Jane Mclnvale Laurel 

Edwin Payne McKaskel Cleveland 

Shirley Jean McMullan Decatur 

*William Melton McNeill Jackson 

Kenneth Allen McRaney Florence 

William Charles MacDonald, Jr. 

Toledo, Ohio 

*Charles Edwin Majure Louisville 

♦William Palmer Manning Jackson 

Marjorie Anne Marler Forest 

Nancy Elaine Matheny Fayette 

Winona Melanie Matthews Raymond 

James Douglas Miley Leland 

*James Maxwell Miller Kosciusko 

Halbert Bailey Moncrief Brookhaven 

Jean Antoine Morrison Jackson 

*Ellen Dixon Mosby Vaughan 

Bobbye Sue Mozingo Jackson 

Lynda Gail Munson Mendenhall 

Nancy Carroll Neyman Greenville 

Linda Joyce Noble Jackson 

*William Arthur Pennington Amory 

BACHELOR 

Robert Luther Abney, III Bay Springs 

**William Dwyer Balgord Jackson 

Terrell Davis Blanton Jackson 

George Patrick Bonner Jackson 

Calvin Gotten Brister Jackson 

Benjamin Hal Brown, Jr. Jackson 

Joseph Webster Bufkin Jackson 

Jacquelyn Louise Felder Butler Summit 

*George Douglas Cain McCall Creek 

David Ivan Carlson Lumberton 

Eriene Brinson Conerly Jackson 

Duggar E. Cook Jackson 

Myrna Drew Cooper Jackson 

Thomas Edward Corley Moss Point 

Dudley Dean Culley, Jr. Jackson 

*Fred Benny Dowling Jackson 

Thomas Frederick Dungan Jackson' 

John Bowlus Echols Jackson 

John Louis Eddleman Pass Christian 

Joseph Eldridge Canton 

Leo Alexander Farmer McComb 

James Evans Finley Finley, Tenn. 

Judith Chloe Forbes Jackson 

Lloyd Irvin Fortenberry Columbia 

Frederick Joseph Groome, III __ Vicksburg 

*William Richard Hendee Lansing, Mich. 

Betty Loraine Home Jackson 

♦Willie Ree Allen Howell Mize 

Wesley Lea Hyman Jackson 

William Isom Johnson Yazoo City 

John Joseph Kenney Jackson 



♦Honors 

**H.gh Honors 



♦Sarah Virginia Perry Memphis, Tenn. 

James Allan Phyfer New Albany 

Gay Allee Piper Macon, Ga. 

Ann Elizabeth Porter Fayette 

Mary Charles Price Jackson 

Eleanor Marie Rasor Ocean Springs 

Mary Lynell Reid Lexington 

*Patsy Jean Robbins Jackson 

Julian Bailey Rush Meridian 

Betsy Ann Salisbury Jackson 

Bryan Thornton Scarbrough Vardaman 

Samuel Elgin Scott Sledge 

♦Peggy Ann Seay Batesville 

Maria Jo Sharp Newhebron 

♦Rose Elizabeth Shaw Jackson 

Mary Hammerly Sherrod Jackson 

Homer Lester Sledge, Jr. Cleveland 

Clara Irene Smith Natchez 

Judson Waller Smith, III Jackson 

Suanna Smith El Dorado, Ark. 

Carlton Ra.vmond Sollie Natchez 

Marvin Arnold Stanford Jackson 

Shirley Mae Stoker Grenada 

Elizabeth Jane Taylor Rienzi 

Vv^ord Guild Taylor Jackson 

John Edward Thomas, III Woodville 

Elton Doyle Thompson Crystal Springs 

Mary Emma Tumlin Tishomingo 

♦Allan Glover Walker Jackson 

James Milton Wall Jackson 

Richard Paul Walters Greenville 

Durward Clifton Ware, Jr. Jackson 

Barbara Ann Webb Jackson 

Thomas Clyde Welch Vicksburg 

Frances Furr Wesley Jackson 

Susan Sutton Wheeless Jackson 

Warren Winford Wilkins Holly Springs 

Clyde V. Williams Carthage 

♦Jon Edward Williams McComb 

♦Ronald Prescott Willoughby Columbia 

Jo-Ann Wilson Inverness 

Annie Lee Brooks Winstead Jackson 

Henry Gladstone Winstead, Jr. Burns 

Jane Elizabeth Woodruff Jackson 

♦Patricia Nell Wynn Goodman 

OF SCIENCE. 

Madeline Sharon Lancaster Sunflower 

Henry Leander Lewis, III Liberty 

♦William McArn McKell, Jr. Jackson 

James Franklin McMullin Jackson 

James Norman McQueen Natchez 

John Hampton Miller Jackson 

Edwin Sirns Mize, Jr. Jackson 

William Sylvester Mullins, III 

Prairie Point 

William Earl Noblin, III Jackson 

Lillard Dixon Pepper Jackson 

Cora Lenore Phillips Braxton 

Bobbie Jean Potts Olive Branch 

Wendell Morse Pou, Jr. Laurel 

Marion W. Reily Raidt Jackson 

William Murphey Rainey Macon 

Steve Smiley Ratcliff, Jr. Jackson 

William Wright Rhymes, Jr. Jackson 

Jesse Otho Snowden, Jr. Jackson 

James Conrad Stietenroth Jackson 

Peter Konrad Stocks Bottrop, Germany 

Raymond Clarence Swartzfager, Jr. 

Laurel 

Russell Douglas Thompson Jackson 

William Bailey Tull Jackson 

Phillip Harold Upton Laurel 

Robert Alvin Weems Jackson 

John Leonard Weissinger Gary 

Ray Lamar Wesson McComb 

Milton Jones Whatley Carrollton 

Charles David Woods Bentonia 

♦John Benjamin Younger Winona 



138 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



INDEX 



Page 

Absences, Class 92 

Examinations _ 92 

Academic Calendar 140 

Accreditation of College 9 

Activities _ 95 

Administration, Officers of 116 

Administration Committees ._122 

Admission, Application for 12 

Requirements for 10-11 

Advanced Standing 11 

Alumni Association, Officers of 123 

Ancient Languages, Department of 44-45 

Application for a degree 33 

Art _ 59-61 

Assistantships _ 123-124 

Astronomy - ■ 75 

Athletic Policy 98-99 

Athletics _ 98-99 

Attendance Regulations : 92-93 

Auditing of Courses 19-20 

Automatic Exclusion 91 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 29 ; 33 

Bachelor of Science Degree 29; 33 

Band _ ^. 104 

Belhaven Cooperative Program 42 

Biology, Department of 46-47 

Board of Trustees 115 

Bobashela ^ 103 

Buildings and Grounds 109 

Business Administration 49-54 

Calendar _ 141 

Change of Schedule 91 

Chapel 92 

Chemistry, Department of 48-49 

Christian Center 109 

Christian Council . 97 

Class Standing 89 

Commencement, 1959 136 

Committees of the Board of Trustees 115 

Committees of the Faculty 122 

Comprehensive Examinations 32-33 

Conduct 93 

Cost of Attending Millsaps 17-18 

Counseling of Students 12-13 

Courses by Departments 44-86 

Required for B.A. Degree 29 

Required for B.S. Degree 29 

Suggested Sequence for 

B.A. Degree 33 

B.S. Degree 33 

Business Administration 36-37 

Economics - 36-37 

Engineering B.S. 39-40 

Forestry _ 40-41 

Pre-law _ 34 

Pre-medical and Pre-dental 34 

Pre-ministerial _ 35 

Pre-social work 35 

Teachers _ 37-39 

Technicians _ 34 

Curriculum _ 27-86 

Dean's List 90 

Debating _ 104 

Decell, J. Lloyd, Lectureship 110 

Degrees, Conferred 1959 136-137 

Application for 33 

Requirements for 29-33 

Denominations of Faculty and Students 8 

Departmental Honors Program 90 

Departments of Instruction^ .. 43 

Ancient Languages 44-45 

Biology _ 46-47 

Chemistry _ 48-49 

Economics and Business 

Administration _ 49-54 

Education _ 54-56 

English _ 56-58 

Fine Arts 59-61 

Geology _ 62-65 

German _ 65-66 

History _ '. 66-68 



Page 

Mathematics 69-71 

Philosophy _ 71-72 

Physical Education 72-73 

Physics and Astronomy 73-75 

Political Science 75-77 

Psychology _ 78-79 

Religion 79-81 

Romance Languages 81-83 

Sociology _ 83-86 

Speech 86 

Dining Facilities 14 

Divisional Groupings 43 

Dormitories _ 110 

Hostesses for 121 

Dramatics _ 103 

Economics, Department of 49-54 

Sequence of Courses 33 

Education, Department of 54-56 

Employment, Part-Time 25 

Endowment _ 110 

Engineering _ 39-40; 71 

English, Department of 56-58 

English Proficiency Requirement 29-30 

Enrollment Statistics 125 

Entrance, Requirements for 10-12 

Examinations, Absence from 92 

Comprehensive _ 32-33 

Course _ 92 

Exemption of Seniors 93 

Excess Hours 18 

Expenses ^ 17-18 

Expulsion _ 91 

Extra-Curricular Credits _ 30 

Faculty _ 117-120 

Fees _ 17-18 

Financial Regulations 19-20 

Financial Resources 110 

Fine Arts, Department of 59-61 

Forestry _ 40-41 

Fraternities _ 100 

French „ 81-82 

Geographical Distribution of Students 9 

Geology, Department of 62-65 

German, Department of 65-66 

Gifts to the Library 111-112 

Grading System 89 

Graduation Fee 18 

Graduation Requirements 29-33 

Greek _ 45 

Health Program 14 

High School Day 20 

History, Department of 66-68 

History of the College .__109 

Honors _ 89-90 

Honors Program 90 

Honor Societies 101-102 

Hours Permitted 90 

Excess - 18 

Housing of Students • 13-14 

Independent Students 100 

International Relations Club 104 

Intramural Athletics 98-99 

Latin _ 44-45 

Length of College Course 7 

Library _ 110-112 

Majors, Requirements for 30-32 

Mathematics, Department of ,_•__ 69-71 

Medals and Prizes 105-106 

Military Service, Credit for 7 

Ministerial League 97 

Music Courses 59-61 

Fees _ 17 

Major _ 41 

Organizations _ 104 

Non-Resident Students 18 

Numbering System for Courses 43 

Officers of Administration 116 

Orientation _ 12-13 

Other Staff Personnel 121 

Out-of-state Students 18 

Philosophy, Department of 71-72 



I 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

INDEX 



139 



Page 
Physical Education, Department of 72-73 

Fees , 17; 20 

Physics and Astronomy, Depart- 
ment of 73-75 

Placement Bureau 37 

Players 103 

Political Science, Department of 75-77 

Pre-dental Course 34 

Pre-ei.gineering Course 39-40 

Pre-law Course 34 

Pre-medical Course 34 

Pre-ministerial Course 35 

Pre-Social Work Course - 35 

Prizes 105-106 

Probation _ 92 

Academic _ 92 

Attendance - 92 

Disciplinary 92 

Psychology, Department of 79-81 

Publications, Student 103 

Purple and White 103 

Quality Point System 89 

Refunds 19 

Register of Students 126-135 

Registration, Changes in 91 

Statistics ^ ^- 125 

Physics and Astronomy, Depart- 

Religion, Department of 79-81 

Religious Activities 97-98 

Religious Affiliation of Students 8 

Religious Emphasis Week 97 

Reports to Parents 90 

Required Courses 33 

Requirements for Admission 10-11 

For Degrees 29-33 

For Majors 30-32 

Residence Requirements 29 

Resources (financial) ■ 110 



Page 
Romance Languages, Depart- 
ment of 81-83 

Schedule Changes 91 

Scholarships and Loan Funds 20-25 

Secretarial Studies 53 

Senior Exemptions 93 

Sequence of Courses 33-41 

Shorthand _ 54 

Singers _ 104 

Sociology, Department of • 83-86 

Sororities _ 100 

Spanish _ 82-83 

Special Students 11 ; 18 

Speech, Department of 86 

Student Activities 95-106 

Student Activities Fee 20 

Student Assistants 123-124 

Student Association 103 

Student Body 

Denominations _ 8 

Geographical Distribution 9 

Names - 126-135 

Student Executive Board 103 

Student Organizations 95 

Summer Session 132-135 

Teacher Placement Bureau 37 

Teacher Training Program 37-39 

Transfer Students 11; 32 

Trustees, Board of 115 

Tuition 17-18 

Typewriting 53 

Veterans _ ■ 7; 19 

Vikings 100 

Washington Semester 42 

Withdrawals, from College 19 ; 91 

From Courses 19 ; 91 

Y. M. C. A. 97 

Y. W. C. A. 97 



140 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



June 4 
June 6 
July 4 
July 9 
July 11 
August 12 



vSeptember 10 
September 1 1 
September 12 
September 13 
September 14 
September 1 5 
October 1 
October 15 
November 5 
November 11 
November 19 
November 23 
November 28 
December 16 
January 3 
January 20-28 
January 28 



January 31 
February 1 
February 2 
February 18 
March 24 
March 30 
April 5 
April 24-29 
May 6 
May 19-27 
May 28 



June 3 
June 5 
July 4 
July 8 
July 10 
August 1 1 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
SIXTY-NINTH YEAR 

1960-61 

SUMMER SESSION 1960 
Registration 

First Term Classes Begin 
Holiday 

Final Examinations, First Term 
Second Term Classes Begin 
Final Examinations, Second Term 

FALL SESSION 
First Meeting of the Faculty 
Dormitories Open for Students, 2 p.m. 
Orientation of New Students 
Registration of Seniors, Juniors, Transfers 
Registration of Sophomores, Freshmen 
Classes Meet on Regular Schedule 
Last Day for Changes of Schedule 
Homecoming 
Parents Day 

End of First Half of Semester 
High School Day 

Thanskgiving Holidays Begin, 3:30 p.m. 
Thanksgiving Holidays End, 8:00 a.m. 
Christmas Holidays Begin, 3:30 p.m. 
Christmas Holidays End. 8:00 a.m. 
Final Examinations, First Semester 
First Semester Ends 

SPRING SESSION 

Registration of Seniors, Juniors, Transfers 

Registration of Sophomores, Freshmen, Transfers 

Classes Meet on Regular Schedule 

Last Day for Changes of Schedule 

End of First Half of Semester 

Spring Holidays Begin, 3:30 p.m. 

Spring Holidays End. 8:00 a.m. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Alumni Day 

Final Examinations. Second Semester 

Commencement Day 

SUMMER SESSION 1961 
Registration 

First Term Classes Begin 
Holiday 

Final Examinations, First Term 
Second Term Classes Begin 
Final Examinations, Second Term