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MILLSAPS 



2 2 - 2 3 Catalog 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/millsapscollegec2003mill 



Table of Contents 

Calendar for 2002-2003 4 

The Millsaps Purpose 5 

Information for Prospective Students 6 

History of the College 6 

General Information 6 

The Millsaps- Wilson Library 7 

Computing Facilities 7 

Buildings and Grounds 7 

Applying for Undergraduate Admission 8 

Orientation and Advisement 11 

Counseling Services 1 1 

Career Center 11 

Student Housing 12 

Medical Services 12 

Student Records 12 

Financial Information 13 

Tuition and Fees 13 

Financial Regulations 15 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 16 

Loan Funds 21 

Student Life 23 

Campus Ministry 23 

Public Events 23 

Athletics 23 

Publications 24 

Music, Theatre, and Dance 24 

Student Organizations 25 

Honor Societies 26 

Fraternities and Sororities 28 

Awards 28 

Curriculum 31 

Requirements for Degrees 31 

Pre-Medical and Pre- Dental 35 

Pre-Ministerial 36 

Pre-Law 36 

Pre-Social Work 36 

Programs for Teacher Licensure 37 

Cooperative Programs 37 

Special Programs 40 

International Study 40 

Adult Learning 42 

Graduate Programs 43 

Administration of the Curriculum 43 

Grades, Honors, Class Standing 43 

Administrative Regulations 46 

Departments of Instruction 50 

Division of Arts and Letters 51 

Division of Sciences 75 

Else School of Management 107 

Register 118 

Board of Trustees 118 

Officers of the Administration 120 

College Faculty 123 

Staff 130 



Calendar for 2002-2003 



August 23 
August 24 
August 24-26 
August 26-27 
August 26 
August 27 

August 29 
September 5 
October 1 8 
October 19 
October 23 
October 24 
November 1 
November 11-14 
November 27 

December I 

December 6 
December 9,10 
December 1 1 
December 12,13,14 
December 15 
December 17 
December 21 -January 1 



First Semester 

Fall Conference for faculty 

Residence halls open 9 a.m. for new students 

Orientation for new students 

Registration for class changes 

Evening classes begin 

All classes meet according to Monday schedule 

All evening classes meet according to Tuesday schedule 

* Opening Convocation 

Last day for schedule changes without grade 

Mid-semester grades due 

Mid-semester holidays begin, 8 a.m. 

Mid-semester holidays end, 8 a.m. 

Tap Day 

Last day for dropping courses with grade of W 

Early registration for spring semester 

Thanksgiving holidays begin 

Classes until noon; residence halls close, 3 p.m. 

Thanksgiving holidays end 

Residence halls open, 3 p.m. 

Last regular meeting of classes 

Final examination days 

Reading day 

Final examination days 

Residence halls close at 12 noon 

Semester grades due in the Office of Records 

College offices closed 



.lanuary 12 
January 13 

January 13 
January 23 
February 27 



Second Semester 

Residence halls open 9 a.m. 
Registration for class changes 

All classes meet on regular schedule 

Last day for schedule changes without grade 

Tap Day 



February 28 

March 7 

March 16 

March 21 

March 31 -April 10 

April 14-17 

April 18 
April 20 
April 24 
April 25 
April 28,29 
April 30 



Mid semester grades due 

Spring holidays begin, 3 p.m. 

Residence halls close, 3 p.m. 

Spring holidays end 

Residence halls open, 3 p.m. 

Last day for dropping courses with grade of W 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Early registration for fall semester 2003 

Good Friday - College offices closed 

Easter 

Awards Day 

Last regular meeting of classes 

Final examination days 

Reading day 



May 1,2,3 Final examination days 

May 5 Final grades for graduating seniors due 

May 7 All semester grades due in tlie Office of Records 

May 9 * Baccalaureate 

May 10 * Commencement 

Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 

* Formal Academic Occasion 



The Millsaps Purpose 

Founded in 1890, Millsaps College is a community committed to trust in disciplined learning and the ideals of a liberal arts 
education as keys to a rewarding life. 

\ln keeping with its character as a liberal arts college and its historic role in the mission of the United Methodist Church, 
Millsaps seeks to provide a learning environment that increases knowledge, deepens understanding of faith, and inspires the 
development of mature citizens with the intellectual capacities, ethical principles, and sense of responsibility that are needed 
for leadership in all sectors of society. 

The programs of the College are designed to foster the growth of independent and critical thinking; individual and 
collaborative problem-solving; creativity, sensitivity, and tolerance; the ability to inform and challenge others; and an 
appreciation of humanity and the universe. 

Millsaps College is committed to the following objectives through its academic program, support services, and outreach to 
the wider community; 

Academic Program 

to select well-prepared students of diverse social, ethnic, geographical, and age backgrounds; 

to provide for all undergraduates an integrated core curriculum that is designed to foster student development in reasoning, 
oral and written communication, quantitative thinking, historical consciousness, aesthetic judgment, global and 
multi-cultural awareness, and valuing and decision-making; 

to provide opportunities for study in depth and the development of disciplinary competencies in undergraduate programs; 

to provide a graduate program in business with a general management outlook that develops fiiture leaders and expands the 
body of knowledge in the practice of management; 

to foster a caring community that nurtures open inquiry and independent critical thinking; 

to structure opportunities for students to become competent in self-assessment of their academic progress; 

to recruit and retain a faculty well-qualilled to support the academic program; 

to provide faculty with resources for professional development in teaching, scholarship, and research. 

College Support Services 

to provide physical and financial resources sufficient to support the College mission; 

to support the personal development of students through a program of counseling, student organizations, and social activities; 

to provide activities and facilities for the enhancement of student physical well-being; 
to provide for the aesthetic enrichment of students through a program of cultural events; 



E.. 



to foster the religious development of students through a program of campus ministry; 

to provide libraiy and computer resources for student learning and research that adequately support the academic program; 

to foster a safe and secure campus environment; 

to maintain an organizational structure that supports participation in college governance by students, faculty, staff, alumni, 
and administration, subject to procedures and policies approved by the Board of Trustees; 

to assess as needed the ongoing activities and programs of the College and to use those continuing assessments in planning 
and implementing college policies and activities. 

College Outreach to a Wider Community 

to foster a mutually supportive relationship between the Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church and the 
College; 

to provide educational services to alumni and others in the Jackson area; 

to maintain mutually beneficial cooperative relationships with local communities, schools, colleges, and organizations; 

to involve alumni and other constituents of the College in college affairs; 

to participate in cooperative programs with other colleges and universities as well as academic and professional associations. 

Board of Trustees Charge to the President of Millsaps College 

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I charge you to fulfill the obligations vested in the office of President of Millsaps College 
by the Charter and By-laws of the College; to promote a learning environment that encourages open inquiry and independent, 
critical thinking; to engage the faculty, staff and students in forging a sense of community on campus and a commitment to 
communities beyond the campus; to support Millsaps Methodist affiliation interfaith religious life, and history of ethical 
commitment; to honor the vital heritage of Millsaps College, to institute new traditions for its future, and to undertake 
innovative programs in the pursuit of excellence. 

Information for Prospective Students 

History of the College 

Millsaps College was founded in 1890 by the Methodist Church as a "Christian college for young men." The philanthropy of 
Major Reuben Webster Millsaps and other Methodist leaders in Mississippi enabled the College to open two years later on 
the outskirts of Jackson, the state capital, a town of some 9,000 population. The beginnings were modest: two buildings, 149 
students (two-thirds of whom were enrolled in a preparatory school), five instructors, and an endowment of $70,432. Fifty 
years later, the student body numbered 599 and the faculty had increased to 33. Women were admitted at an early date and 
the graduation of Sing Ung Zung of Soochow, China, in 1908, began a tradition of the College's influence outside the state. 

By the time of its centennial celebration in 1990, enrollment at Millsaps had more than doubled with approximately one-half 
of the students coming from out of state. The quality of the liberal arts program was nationally recognized with the award of 
a Phi Beta Kappa chapter in 1988. A graduate program in business administration, begun in 1979, received national 
accreditation along with the undergraduate business program in 1990. 

Millsaps' first president, William Belton Murrah, served until 1910. Other presidents were David Carlisle Hull (1910-1912) 
Dr. Alexander Farrar Watkins (1912-1923), Dr. David Martin Key (1923-1938), Dr. Marion Lofton Smith (1938-1952), Dr.' 
Homer Ellis Finger, Jr. (1952-1964), Dr. Benjamin Barnes Graves (1965-1970), Dr. Edward McDaniel Collins, Jr. (1970- 
1978) and Dr. George Marion Hannon (1978-2000). Dr. Frances Lucas-Tauchar was named president in July of 2000. ! 

General Information 

The close personal relationship among students, faculty and the administration is one of the most vital parts of the Millsaps 
experience. A liberal arts college designed to train students for responsible citizenship and well-balanced lives, Millsaps 
offers professional and pre-professional training coupled with cultural and disciplinary studies. Students are selected on the 



basis of their ability to tliink, desire to learn, good moral character and intellectual maturity. The primary consideration for 
admission is the ability to do academic work satisfactory to the College and beneficial to the student. 

Millsaps' 1,400-member student body represents about 35 states and several foreign countries. Students come from 25 
religious denominations. All are urged to take advantage of the educational and cultural offerings of Mississippi's capital city 
of Jackson. 

Research facilities available to students include the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, the State Law Library, 
the Jackson/Hinds Library System, the Rowland Medical Library and a number of other special libraries unique to the capitol 
area. Together, they provide research facilities found nowhere else in the state. Cultural advantages include the Mississippi 
Symphony Orchestra, New Stage Theatre, Mississippi Opera Association, and musical, dramatic, and sporting events held at 
the City Auditorium and the Mississippi Coliseum. 

Millsaps is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern 
Lane, Decatur, Georgia .30033-4097; telephone number 404-679-4501) to award the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Business Administration, Bachelor of Science, Master of Accountancy, and Master of Business Administration. The College 
is approved by the American Association of University Women and the University Senate of the United Methodist Church. 
The Business programs offered by the Else School of Management, Millsaps College are accredited by the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. The Department of Chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society 
and the Department of Education is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Copies of 
any of these documents may be requested by writing the Vice President and Dean of the College. 

The Millsaps-Wilson Library 

The Millsaps-Wilson Library has a print collection of 200,000 volumes, with 650 print subscriptions, access to over 1,700 
electronic subscriptions and full-text titles, and a wide variety of electronic services, including both general and scholarly on- 
line databases. It provides seating for 350 in individual study carrels, tables and study rooms, as well as browsing and lounge 
areas. The library is open 88 hours per week in the fall and spring. There is a collection of audiovisual materials and facilities 
for their use. Special collections include the Eudora Welty Collection, the Lehman Engel Collection on performing arts, the 
Archives of the United Methodist Church in Mississippi, the Kellogg Collection of children's books, the Paul Ramsey 
Collection in Applied Ethics, the Harmon Smith Collection on biomedical ethics, the King R. Johnson History Collection, the 
Rare Book Room, and the Millsaps College Archives. There are more than 40 computers and terminals for student use of 
library and campus databases and WWW access. The library maintains agreements with other libraries on the local and 
national level for sharing of resources through interlibrary lending. Document delivery services from commercial services are 
also available. The library is a member of the SOLfNET/OCLC network, the Associated Colleges of the South, Central 
Mississippi Library Council and other organizations. 

Computing Facilities 

Millsaps has developed outstanding computing resources for teaching, learning and research. Computing facilities include 
multiple NT and VMS servers on a campus-wide Ethernet network with over 50 networked printers and nearly 600 College- 
owned personal computers. In addition to two special purpose labs, Millsaps provides four general access computer 
laboratories, each equipped with a varying number of computers, for the academic computing needs of the general student 
body. The College also offers full network access from all residence halls. Millsaps provides all users direct access to the 
Internet via a high-speed T3 connection, including electronic mail and personal web pages. 

Buildings and Grounds 

The college occupies a beautifiil 100-acre residential campus in the heart of Jackson, Mississippi, the state capital. Chief 
administrative offices are in the newly renovated James Boyd Campbell Administrative Center. Completed in 1994, the 
Center includes Whitworlh Hall and Sanders Hall. Murrah Hall, built in 1914, was renovated in 1981 to house the Else 
School of Management. Sullivan-Harrell Hall, built in 1928 and renovated in 1990, houses the departments of Computer 
Studies, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, Education, Psychology and Sociology. The Olin Hall of Science, dedicated in 1988, 
houses the departments of Biology and Chemistry. 

The Christian Center, completed in 1950, was built with gifts from Mississippi Methodists, alumni and friends. It has a 
1,000-seat auditorium, a small chapel, classrooms and offices. In 1967, the stage was renovated into a modem theatre stage. 

The Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, completed in 1971, includes a recital hall in which is located a 41-rank Mohler 
organ and two Steinway concert grand pianos. The complex houses Music, Art, Political Science, Computer Services, Office 



of Records, and the Office of Adult Learning. U also contains sky-lit art studios, a student computer terminal room, music 
practice rooms and classrooms. 

The Hall Activities Center provides space for a full range of physical activities that are available to all students. Constructed 
originally in 1974 and renovated and expanded in 2000, the Center includes a state-of-the art fitness center with a 
multipurpose court, cardio-theater and aerobics room, a full array of fitness and weight training equipment, handball and 
squash courts, additional locker room, team room and rehab facilities for men's and women's athletics, and office space for 
the athletics staff. Other athletic facilities include swimming pool, tennis courts, and fields for football, baseball, and soccer. 

The A. Boyd Campbell College Center was completely renovated and expanded in 2000. It includes a student dining area, the 
Leggett Special Events area, a coffeehouse with outdoor dining available, an enlarged bookstore, a post office, additional' 
space for student organizations, and renovated office space for student affairs personnel. 

A new pedestrian plaza links the Hall Activities Center, the College Center, and Olin hall and provides an exciting 
environment to relax, dine, work, socialize and linger. There is permanent seating with network connections to create outdoor 
dining and study areas in the information age. 

There are two single-sex women, one single-sex men and four coed residence halls. All dorms are centrally cooled and 
heated. 

The James Observatory is an historical landmark located on the northwest corner of the campus. 

Applying for Undergraduate Admissions 

Millsaps College accepts without regard to race, color, sex, creed or national origin qualified sUidents who will benefit from 
its academic program. 

First-Time Freshman Admission 

Students applying for admission as first-time freshmen should have participated in a strong high school college preparatory 
curriculum. Applicants' records should show progress toward high school graduation, with at least 14 units of English, 
mathematics, social studies, natural sciences and/or foreign languages. Four units of English should be included. Students 
who have not prepared for college may submit results of the General Educational Development (GED) Tests, along with a 
transcript of any high school work completed. Freshmen applicants may choose from two decision plans: 

Early Action 

Early Action is the most popular application option at Millsaps. It is for any student wishing to submit complete application 
credentials and learn of admission and scholarship early, without making an immediate commitment to enroll. The Early 
Action Plan does not require that Millsaps be a student's first choice college. The deadline for submitting Early Action 
applications is December I , and admissions decisions will be mailed by December 20. Students applying under the Early 
Action Plan are not required to make a commitment to enroll before May 1 , but are encouraged to notify the college as soon 
as a final college decision has been made. 

Regular Decision 

The Regular Decision Plan is for all applicants who wish to be considered for merit-based scholarship, and whose credentials 
are postmarked by February 1 . Students applying under the Regular Decision Plan are not expected to make a commitment to 
enroll before May 1 , but should notify the college as soon as a final college decision has been made. 

Any first-time freshmen applications received after February 1 will be considered on a space available basis. If you are 
applying after this date, please contact the Millsaps Office of Admissions at 60 1 /974-1050 or I -800-352-1050. 

Home Schooled Applicants 

Students who have been home schooled must follow the same procedures for admission as any other first-time freshman or 

transfer applicant. Additionally, an on-campus writing sample or scores from SAT II Subject Tests may be required for 

admission. 

Early Admission 

Students who are nearing high school graduation but choose to enter college before graduation may apply by following the 
same procedures as outlined for first-time freshman applicants. At least 12 units in English, mathematics, social studies, 
natural sciences, and/or foreign languages must have been completed. Normally, four units of English are required. 

8 



Application Procedures 

All applicants to Millsaps College must submit the following credentials: 

1 . A completed application for admission and scholarships form including the required essay and the secondary 
school evaluation (secondary school evaluation required for transfers only if applicant has graduated from high 
school within the last year). 

Millsaps' application is also available on-line at the main college web page. Additionally, Millsaps is a member 
of the Common Application Group, and as such, accepts that document in lieu of the Millsaps application for 
admission and scholarships. 

2. Non-refundable application fee of $25.00 (may be waived with written request from high school counselor). 

3. Official copy of high school transcript and/or GED (must be a final high school transcript for transfer students). 

4. Standardized test scores, either ACT (American College Test), or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). Scores 
appearing on the official high school transcript will be accepted. 

5. Official copy of all college transcripts. Transcripts issued to student are not acceptable. 

6. Official high school transcript indicating graduation and final grade point average. This document must be 
received prior to registration date at beginning of term of entry. Failure to comply with this requirement will 
result in possible forfeiture of state and federal financial aid. 

Transfer Admissions 

Transfer applicants to Millsaps must apply for admission under the Regular Decision Plan, but with an application deadline 
of March 1 . A transfer student is anyone entering Millsaps as a full-time student from another institution of higher learning. 
The following policies apply to transfer applicants: 

1. Full credit is normally allowed for work taken at other accredited institutions. Some courses which are not 
regarded as consistent with a liberal arts curriculum may not be credited toward a degree. 

2. After earning 64 semester hours at a junior or senior college, a student may not take additional work at a junior 
college and have it apply toward a degree from Millsaps. 

3. A final high school transcript and official ACT or SAT scores may be requested as part of the necessary 
application credentials for any transfer student who has completed less than two fiiU years of senior college 
work. 

4. A student must complete the work necessary to fulfill requirements for a major at Millsaps. 

5. Grades earned at another institution will ordinarily be recorded as they are on the other institution's transcript. 
Quality points earned at another institution will be recorded based upon the grading scale used by Millsaps on 
page 58 of the Millsaps catalog. An overall grade point index of 2.0 is required for graduation. Transfer students 
must also have a minimum grade point index of 2.0 on their Millsaps work. 

6. In the case of a student transferring to Millsaps with partial fulfillment of a core requirement, the registrar in 
consultation with the appropriate faculty committee may approve courses to substitute for the remainder of the 
requirement. Students should consult with the Office of Records for college policy on courses that will 
substitute. 

7. The student is subject to Millsaps regulations on advanced placement and credit by examination. 

8. Credit is not given for correspondence courses. 

Transfer student applications received after March 1 will be considered on a space available basis. 

Adult Degree Program Admission 

Students admitted to the Adult Degree Program, part of the Office of Adult Learning, may be part-time or full-time students, 
depending on their occupational and family responsibilities. Application forms, as well as information about the program, 
may be obtained from the Office of Adult Learning or from the Office of Admissions. Students seeking admission to the 
Adult Degree Program must submit the following: 

\. The completed Adult Degree Program application form. 

2. A nonrefundable application fee of $25.00. 

3. Official transcripts of all previous academic work. 

4. Two letters of recommendation. 

5. An essay introducing the applicant to the ADP Advisory Committee and stating the applicant's educational 
[.'f goals. 

All students admitted to the Adult Degree Program are degree candidates. 

9 



Part-time Admission 



;lr/l""'"7'"'''"' '' °"' '"'°"''' *" ' '^'^''' P''°S'"^ ''"' '""^'"S f^^^f 'han 12 hours. Requirements for admission and 
policies pertaining to part-time students are the same as those for fiili-time students. ""mission ana 

Non-degree Student Admission 

^r vI^m" '"i''^"' V"l ''''° '' '^"^"S ^ "^"""^ °' '^°"f^«s but who is not enrolled in a degree program. Applicants should 
stibmit the Non-degree Student Application Form along with the application lee ,o the Office of Adult Learning TransSs 
of all academic work attempted must be provided to the Office of Adult Learning within two weeks of enrollment The 
lollowing policies apply to non-degree students; 



1. 



Non-degree students are expected to be 21 years of age and must present evidence of good character and 
maturity. Age requirements may be waived. 

2. Non-degree students may enroll for courses without regard to graduation requirements but must meet 
prerequisites for courses chosen. 

3. Non-degree students wishing to apply for a degree program must re-apply, provide ftill credentials and meet 
admission requirements for degree students. 

International Student Admission 

Millsaps College welcomes students from all over the world and will evaluate applicants based on the educational system 
trom which they come. International students should submit their admission credentials well in advance of the semester in 
which they expect to enroll to allow time for official documents to be received through international mail systems. Required 
documents tor international applicants include the following: 

1. Completed admission forms. 

2. Official or certified true copies of transcripts fi-om each secondary and post-secondary school attended These 
should include a record of subjects taken and marks earned for each year of study. Documents must have the 
official signature and seal of a school official. A certified English translation must accompany all documents 
not in English. For placement purposes, course descriptions may be requested from international transfer 
students. 

3. Official or certified true copies of all national, public, or qualifying examinations that have been completed 

4. 1 wo letters of recommendation. 

5. TOEFL results for non-native English speakers. 

6. Statement of Financial Resources. 

7. A nonrefundable application fee of $25.00. 

International students are not required to submit SAT or ACT test scores. 

Leaves of Absence and Readmission 

wStv""? ^"''T X ' ^'^'''f!'^''"'^ f°^ - ft""r« ^-n^ester. A Leave of Absence cannot be granted in a semester in 
which any dasses have been attended. Before requesting a Leave of Absence from the College, students must meet w th the 
C aii Sthe eHT '? fT'' ^-"- (-''-^-duate), Dean of Adult Learning (ADP orNon-degreeTSle Ms stit 
A Lave of Absence nM "^ ^^"/^^'^^"'.(MBA or MAcc) to determine if a Leave of Absence is appropriate in their situation 
A Leave of Absence allows students to sit out for a semester. A Leave of Absence maintains a student's eligibility to retain 
a ad m,c scholarships; however they must reapply for need-based aid. Leaves of Absence are granted for one-semester 
although m unusual circum.stances a petition may be filed for an extension. 

Students who leave the College for one semester or longer without a leave of absence must apply for readmission by 
lT£lT "PP^P"'*" "PPJ'f °" ^"-l P^=^«"'i"g tf«"^=^'Pt= for all academic work attempted while away from Millsaps 
Students on approved leaves of absence are not required to apply for readmission. Those who are absent for moreThan four 

mriorror/er'to"" f° ^"1"'"^'°" -luirements in effect at the time of readmission or do additional wor in he r 
major in order to qualify for a degree. 

Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and Credit by Examination 

students entering Millsaps College may earn a waiver of certain requirements or college credit as a result of their 
performance on specif^^c examinations. The amount of waiver or credit is limited to two courses in any discipline and to seven 
courses overall, with the exception of the Adult Degree Program where the limits are three and eight courses respectively 

10 



International students may also be eligible for advanced placement depending upon the educational system completed (for 
example: 1 B, A-levels, Abiture, etc.). 

Scores on the appropriate Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate examinations. CLEP subject matter 
examination or CEEB achievement test should be sent to the Office of Records for evaluation. If a waiver of requirements is 
granted, the score on the examination used will be recorded on the suidenfs record in lieu of a letter grade. An administrative 
fee will be assessed for each course so recorded. (See the section on Special Fees.) 

A score of 4 or 5 is ordinarily required on an AP exam and a score of 5, 6 or 7 on a higher-level IB exam is required in order 
to receive academic credit. For information concerning scores necessary to attain credit for any AP examination, or for other 
exams such as IB or CLEP, students should consult with the registrar or Dean of the College, international students should 
contact the Center for International Initiatives with any questions about their advanced placement eligibility. 

Additionally, Adult Degree Program students may develop and submit appropriate portfolios for consideration for non- 
graded academic credit. Detailed information is available in the Prior Learning Credit Handbook, which is distributed during 
orientation to all ADP students. 

Orientation and Advisement 

Orientation and Perspectives are Millsaps programs designed to ease the transition to college life. Orientation occurs the four 
days before classes start. These days are filled with helpful and ftm activities, which prepare students for life on campus and 
introduce them to their classmates. Perspectives is a course for new students which explores the issues facing college students 
and the roles that they play on campus. This course, led by faculty, staff and upper-class students, gives new students a forum 
for discussion of key issues and concerns. 

Counseling Services 

Since counseling is a wonderful opportunity for personal growth, a wide array of counseling services are offered through 
Counseling Services. The counselor can assist students in improving academic performance by helping them improve study 
skills techniques such as time management, note taking, problem-solving, and test-taking. Help is also available for students 
wishing to engage in self-exploration and goal setting; to discuss relationships, stress reduction, or other personal concerns; 
and to obtain information on other community resources. Referrals to professionals or treatment programs off campus will be 
made when appropriate. 

Career Services 

Career Services offers a wide variety of services and programs for students and alumni in the area of academic and career 
development. These services assist students in achieving their academic goals, meeting the expectations set forth by the 
college, and planning for "life after graduation". Career services include; career/major exploration, internships, graduate 
school advisement and preparation, student employment, and job placement assistance. 

Students who are undecided regarding their major and/or career can attend the annual "Meet Your Major Fair," This event 
provides new students the opportunity to meet with faculty from all the academic departments on campus. Career testing and 
individual appointments are also available with the Career Services staff. Other options include a computerized career- 
planning program for individuals seeking a more comprehensive search that matches their interests, talents, and values with 
potential careers. 

The internship program is an excellent opportunity for students to explore a field of interest while gaining valuable 
professional experience. Student interns can earn academic credit on a credit/no credit basis. Students can participate in an 
internship as early as the second semester of their freshmen year and Euiy subsequent fall, spring or summer semesters. 
Information sessions are held throughout the year to prepare students interested in obtaining an internship. A wide variety of 
internships are offered both locally and nationally in the areas of education, the arts, government, health care, nonprofit, 
business, industry, and finance. New internship positions may also be developed witli the assistance of the Career Services 
staff. 

Other programs and services that assist students in exploring potential careers include: informational interviews, student 
employment, and community volunteer/service opportunities. Workshops and seminars are held throughout the year to help 
students further explore their career options and to prepare for and enter the world of work. 



11 



Graduate and professional school advisement is also available. The Career Resource Library offers graduate school guides 
and references, CD ROM's, and other electronic and printed resources on this topic. Information on GRE, LSAT, MCAT, 
GMAT and other graduate exams and preparation resources are available through the Career Services. 

Seniors and alumni can access fiill-time positions which are listed in the Career Resource Library. A resume referral service, 
on-campus recruiting, job search links, alumni network receptions, and mock interviews assist students with their career 
search. In addition, the annual "Job Fair" provides valuable infonnation and contacts for those preparing for their job search. 

Resident Living 

Student housing is an important service rendered by any college. However, Millsaps places a great deal of emphasis on the 
learning process that lakes place within the residence halls. The residential life program is administered by a team of 
professionals including the Director of Residence Life, two Assistant Directors of Residence Life, and a team of more than 
35 Resident Assistants. 

Housing assignments for new students are made by the Residence Life professional staff that can be found in the Division of 
Student Affairs. They assist students in determining their living situations by taking into account roommate choice, and 
several other factors. Questions regarding the assignment process should be addressed to the Director of Residence Life. 
Millsaps is a residential college based upon the belief that a significant amount of learning and growth takes place outside the 
classroom. As such, a residency requirement has been established. All students classified, by credit units, as freshmen or 
sophomores are required to live in college residence halls. Exceptions to this policy may be granted if the student is married 
or lives with his or her immediate family in Jackson or vicinity. Freshmen and sophomore students are not allowed to live in 
the fraternity house during the academic year. 

Residence hall rooms are designed to house two students each. Students should send the completed housing forms and 
housing deposit by the designated date. Students wishing to room together should .specify their desire to room together on 
their housing request. Room rent for new students cannot be refunded after the semester begins. 

Assignments for upper-class students are made in the spring. The process is arranged with Residence Life. Students should 
contact the RA for more information. 

Current students who have become academically ineligible and who have not been readmitted on petition by June 1 will be 
refunded the room deposit These students, if readmitted at a later date, must pay the room deposit and will be put on a 
waiting list for room assignments. 

Residence halls will be closed for Thanksgiving, winter and spring breaks. Dates and times of hall closings and openings are 
listed on the housing contract. Students may also obtain this information by calling Student Affairs at 974-1200 

Wesson Health Services 

Millsaps College offers a comprehensive health care program for its students. This program is administered through the 
College nurse. The nurse works with the school physicians to provide health and emergency care for students. The school 
physicians hold clinic on campus during the week. Students should contact the College nurse (974-1207) for appointments 
and for more information regarding the various services provided. 

Student Records 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 guarantees Millsaps students have the right to review, inspect, and 
challenge the accuracy of infonnation kept in a cumulative file by the institution. It also ensures that records cannot be 
released without the written consent of the student except in the following situations: 

(a) to school officials and faculty who have a legitimate educational interest, such as a faculty advisor; 

(b) Where the information is classified as "directory infonnation." The following categories of information have 
been designated by Millsaps College as directory information; name, address, email address, telephone listing, date 
and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height 
of members of athletic teams, photograph, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent 
previous educational institution attended by the student, and infonnation needed for honors and awards. Students 
who do not wish such information released without their consent should notify the Office of Records in writing prior 
to the end of the first day of classes; 

(c) violations of dnig and alcohol policies may be disclosed to parents of students who are under the age of 21; 

(d) disciplinary proceedings of violent crimes or non-forcible sex offenses may be disclosed to the victims of the 

12 



crime regardless of the outcome of the proceedings. They may also be disclosed to anyone where the accused was 
found to have violated the college's rules or policies; 

(e) to a court if a parent or student has initiated legal action against the college or if the college has begun a legal 
action against a parent of student. 

If students would like their parents to have access to their records, they must give written consent in the appropriate office: 
for academic records, the Office of Records; for financial records, the Business Office; for disciplinary records, the Office of 
Student Affairs. This con.sent must be renewed at the beginning of each academic year. 

Financial Information 

2002-2003 Tuition and Fees 

Millsaps College is an independent institution. Each student is charged a tuition which covers a part of the cost of an 
education. The balance is met by income from the endowment and by gifts from the United Methodist Church, alumni, 
trustees, parents, and other friends. 

Semester Expenses for Full-time Undergraduate Students 

Per Semester , 





Residence Hall 


Nonresident Hall 




Student 


Student 


Tuition 


$8,182 


$8,182 


Comprehensive Fee 


504 


504 


Room Rent 


1,749-2,295 




Meals 


1,433 
$11,868-12,414 




Total 


$8,686 



1 . Residence Hall rooms are ordinarily rented on a yearly basis according to the schedule below. This schedule of 
charges is for students who enter in the fall. Those students who enter second semester will pay half the annual rate 
for their type of occupancy. If the student changes type of occupancy during the year, the charge will be adjusted 
accordingly. See schedule of payment and residence hall options below. 

2. Room fees include a charge for the 2 1 meal per week plan. Off-campus students may purchase the meal plan for 
$1,238 per semester. 

Schedule of Payment for Rooms and Meals 

Meal Plan $1,365 per semester 

Rooms 
(Meal plan is required with campus housing) 





IstSem. 


2nd Sem. 


Total 


Double Occupancy: 








Bacot, Franklin, Galloway 


$1,749 


$1,749 


$3,498 


Ezelle, Sanderson North, Galloway 








single 


1,922 


1,922 


3,844 


Sanderson South, Goodman, New 








South-south wing 


2,180 


2,180 


4,360 


New South-north wing 


2,295 


2,295 


4,590 



\ 



All residence halls are air-conditioned. 

Semester Expenses for Part-time Undergraduate Students 

(fewer than 12 semester hours) 

13 



(most courses are 4 semester hours) 



1 semester hour $510 

Comprehensive Fee 27perhour 



MBA/MAcc Students 



12 per hour 




MLS Students 




$1,438 




108 per unit 




200 




(1st sem) $1,170 (2nd sem) $1,170 


(total) $2,340 


(1^'sein) $1,995 (2"'' sem) $1,995 


(total) $3,990 



I graduate hour 
Comprehensive Fee 



Per course with waiver 
Comprehensive Fee 

Dance and Music Fees 
Fraternity Houses 
Panhellenic Houses 

(Meal Plan is required) 

Reservation Deposits 

New Freshmen and Transfer Students - All fiill-time students must pay a reservation deposit of $100. This deposit is applied 
to tuition and reserves the student's space in the entering class. This deposit is refundable if such a request is 
received in the writing postmarked by the National Candidate's Reply Date of May I for fall enrollment. The deposit 
is not refundable after May 1 or for students entering in any term other than fall. 

ADP Students - All new Adult Degree Program students are required to pay a reservation deposit of $150. This deposit is 

applied to tuition and reserves the student's space in the entering class. This deposit is refundable if such a request is 
received in writing postmarked no later than two weeks prior to the start of the entry term. 

Returning Students- All returning students requesting campus housing must pay a reservation deposit of $100 by May 15 to 
be assured of a room. If a student decides to withdraw from college housing, this deposit is refundable if a written 
request for refund is received prior to May 15. 

Reservation deposits will be credited to the student s account upon enrollment. 

Comprehensive Fee 

Millsaps charges each full-time undergraduate student a comprehensive fee of $382 for the fall semester and $457 for the 
spring semester which includes a portion of the cost of student activities and student government, laboratory and computer 
usage, post office, parking and certain special instructional materials. Part-time undergraduate students will be charged a 
proportionate amount. 

Special Fees 

The general purpose of special fees is to allocate to the user at least a portion of the direct cost for providing special services, 
equipment and facilities. 

Course Overload Fee - A fee of $ 1 00 per hour is charged for course loads above 1 7 hours. 

Late Fee - A $25 late fee will be charged for both late payment and late scheduling of classes. The late fee will apply 
beginning the second day of classes each semester. 

Change of Schedule Fee - A $5 fee will be charged for each change of schedule authorization processed. Any change initiated 
by the College will have no fee. 



14 



Dance and Music Fee - A fee of $190 is charged for private dance and music lessons other than voice, piano, and organ per 
semester hour. 

Credit by Examination Fee - A $25 fee is assessed to record each course for which credit is allowed if the credit is not 
transfer credit or if the examination is not a Millsaps examination. 

Auditing of Courses - Courses are audited with approval of the instaictor of the course. Students must indicate their intention 
to audit at the time of registration. There will be no additional charge to a full-time student for auditing any course. 
All other students must pay regular tuition and fees for auditing courses, except that persons 60 and over may audit 
undergraduate courses for one-half tuition and fees on a space available basis. 

Senior Citizens - Qualified senior citizens (60 and over) enrolled in an undergraduate degree program pay one/half tuition for 
the first course taken each semester and full tuition for additional courses. All related fees will be paid at regular 
rates. 

Graduation Fee - The $75 fee covers a portion of the cost of the diploma, the rental of a cap and gown, and general 
commencement expenses. 

Financial Regulations 

Payments - All charges for a semester are due and payable two weeks prior to the first day of classes. A student is registered 
and eligible to attend cla.sses only after payment or other arrangements have been made with the Business Office. 

Any accounts due for any preceding semester must be paid before a student will be enrolled Jor the succeeding semester. 

Students must settle all financial accounts due the College before the final examination period begins. The registrar 
is not permitted to transfer credits until all outstanding indebtedness is paid. No student will graduate unless all 
indebtedness, including library fines and graduation fee, has been settled. 

Any student account that remains unpaid at the end of the semester and not paid within (30) days will be turned over 
to an outside collection agency for assistance in collecting. The student will be responsible for all collection costs 
and/or attorney fees necessary to collect these accounts. 

The Millsaps Plan is available for parents who prefer a flexible no-cost system for paying educational expenses in regularly 
scheduled payments over a period of months, instead of one lump sum payment at the beginning of each semester. 
For more information, write to: 

The Millsaps Plan 
c/o Business Office 
Millsaps College 
Jackson, MS 39210-0001 

Cashing Personal Checks - Personal checks for a maximum of $100 may be cashed in the Business Office and a maximum of 
$10 in the Bookstore upon presentation of a Millsaps identification card. 

Returned Checks • A charge of $1 5 will be made for each returned check. 

Refunds - Room rent cannot be refunded after the semester has begun. Unused amounts paid in advance for board are 
refundable. A student who withdraws with good reason from a course or courses will have seven days including the date of 
the first meeting of clas.ses to receive a reftind of 80 percent of tuition and fees; within two weeks, 60 percent; within three 
weeks, 40 percent, and within four weeks, 20 percent. If a student remains in college as long as four weeks, no refund will be 
made except for board. Students receiving Federal financial aid will be subject to the Federal guidelines with respect to 
withdrawal. Examples of the application of the refund policy are available in the Business Office. A student may obtain a 
refund of any overpayment on his or her account by making a request in the Business Office. 

The date of withdrawal from which all claims to reductions and refiinds will be referred is the date on which the registrar is 
officially notified by the student of the intention to withdraw. (See regulations relative to withdrawals.) 

The College reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student at any time. In such a case, the pro rata portion of 
tuition will be returned. Students withdrawing or removed under disciplinary action forfeit the right to a refiind. 

15 



Meal Plan - Students living in college or fraternity housing are required to participate in the College meal plan. 

Students Rooming in Fraternity Houses - Rules regarding payment of board and fees applicable to other campus residents 
will be observed by these students. 

Revision of Charges • Millsaps College reserves the privilege of changing any or all charges or financial regulations at any 
time without prior notice. 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 

Millsaps College offers assistance to students based on academic merit, special talents and financial need. In addition, the 
Office of Financial Aid awards State grants and Methodist aid. 

Academic and Performing Arts Scholarships are provided by Millsaps to undergraduate students who demonstrate 
outstanding academic and artistic talents or ability. These scholarships are awarded to qualified, admitted incoming students 
and require an annual renewal application. 

Need based Aid (institutional, federal and state grants, loans and work) is awarded to students who show financial need as 
indicated from results of the Millsaps Application for Scholarship Renewal and Financial Aid and the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The priority deadline for need-based assistance is March 1 and requires annual application. 

Federal Aid is awarded by the Office of Financial Aid after completion of required applications including the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid. Federal regulations and institutional policies may affect eligibility for these fiinds. 
Millsaps participates in the following federal programs. 

Federal Pell Grant is provided by the federal government. These funds are awarded to students who have 
exceptional financial need who, for lack of financial means of their own or their families, would be unable to obtain 
an education without such aid. 

Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG) is awarded to a limited number of Pell recipients who 
show exceptional financial need. 

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) has been established from the funds contributed by the federal government and 
the college to provide financial assistance through employment based on federal eligibility. 

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan Program is available to students who demonstrate need and are enrolled at least 
halftime. An undergraduate student may borrow up to $2,625 for the first year; $3,500 for their second year and 
$5,500 a year for the remainder of their undergraduate years for an aggregate amount of up to $23,000. A graduate 
student may borrow up to $8,500 a year for an aggregate total of $65,500 (including undergraduate loans). 
Application forms may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid. 

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program has the same terms and conditions as the Federal Subsidized Stafford 
Loan Program, except the borrower is responsible for the interest that accrues while the student is in school. The 
program is open to students who may not qualify fully or partially for the subsidized loan program. The student 
borrower does not have to show financial need for this loan. Independent students may have a higher loan limit if 
they show the eligibility for supplemental loan funds. 

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS) provides parents with additional fiinds for educational 
expenses. These loans may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid. The parent who borrows through this 
program will be able to borrow up to the difference between the cost of the institution and the financial aid the 
student receives for the loan period. There is not an aggregate limit. The parent must not have an adverse credit 
history. The student must be a dependent and be enrolled at least halftime. FPLUS borrowers do not have to show 
need to borrow under this program. 

Federal Perkins Loan Program is available to undergraduate students who demonstrate need. Students may borrow 
up to $ 1 5,000 for an undergraduate degree. Repayment and accrual of interest begin six months after the student 
drops below half-time enrollment status. Deferment and loan forgiveness may be available for community service 
work, full-time teachers in shortage fields, and full-time employees of public or private nonprofit child or family 
service agencies. More information and application forms are available from the Office of Financial Aid. 

16 



State Aid is awarded by the Office of Financial Aid based on application deadlines, academic requirements and other state 
regulations and institutional policy 

Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Program (LEAP) is provided by Millsaps, the state of Mississippi 
and the federal government. These funds are to help qualified students with substantial financial need. 

Mississippi Resident Tuition Assistance Grant (MTAG) is available for fijll-time students who are residents of 
Mississippi. When fully funded the maximum grant is $500 for freshmen and sophomores and $1,000 for juniors 
and seniors. 

Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant (MESG) is for residents of the state of Mississippi. When fully funded the 
maximum grant is $2,500 each year for four years. 

Millsaps Methodist Scholarships are competitive awards for students who are active in Methodist Church ministry, are pre- 
ministerial students, or dependents of United Methodist ministers. Completion of the Millsaps Applicafion for United 
Methodist Scholarships is required meeting the March 1 deadline. 

International Students may be eligible for financial assistance at Millsaps. With an American passport or residency card, the 
student may be eligible for both merit-based scholarships and need-based financial aid (refer to the previous section). If the 
student is not an American citizen or permanent resident, s/he may be eligible for merit-based scholarships but not need- 
based financial aid. Decisions for merit-based scholarship awards are made on the basis of information presented in the 
application for admission. No additional form is required. Most scholarships range fi-om $1,000 - $ 11 ,500 per year. 
Recipients of these awards must pay for the rest of their fees through their own funding sources. Students should budget at 
least $24,000 for one year of education at Millsaps. 

Institutional Scholarships 

Dependents of United Methodist Ministers serving in an appointment by a Bishop or an annual conference receive 

scholarship aid from the College. 
General Scholarship Funds are budgeted each year to help students who show financial need. 
United Methodist Ministerial Students annually receive a $ 1 ,000 scholarship, contingent upon at least one year's reciprocal 

service in ministry of the United Methodist Church. 
United Methodist Scholarships provide $500 each for several Methodist students who have ranked in the upper 15 percent of 

their class and exhibit financial need. 
Millsaps United Methodist Scholarships are a cooperative offer of the Methodist student's local church and Millsaps College. 

The local church provides $1,000 a year and Millsaps provides $2,000 a year for four years. 
Second Century Scholarships are awarded to students with outstanding academic records and significant school, church, and 

community involvement or leadership. 
Millsaps Awards are awarded to students with excellent academic records and outstanding leadership. 
Performing and Fine Arts Scholarships (a component of the Second Century Scholarship) are available to students planning 

to major in art, music, or theatre. Audition or portfolio required. 
Charles and Eloise Else Scholarships are awarded to students with excellent academic records who will major in accounting 

or business administration. 
Jonathan Sweat Music Scholarships are available to students who audition and plan to major in music. 
£./?. Summers Grants are awarded to students who legally reside in Attala, Choctaw, Carroll, Montgomery, or Webster 

counties of Mississippi. 
Ptii Theta Kappa Scholarships are awarded to community college transfer students who hold membership in the honorary 

and have 56 hours of academic work. 

Endowed and Sponsored Scholarship Funds 

The generosity of many individuals, families, corporations and foundations is directly responsible for the scholarship funds at 
Millsaps. The scholarships listed below provide the funding for our merit and need based institutional aid. By making 
application for admission and financial aid, students qualify for receipt of these funds. No separate application required. 

• The H. V. and Carol Howie Allen Endowed Scholarship Fund 

• Robert E. Anding Endowed Scholarship Fund 

• Annie Redfield and Abe Rliodes Artz Endowed Scholarship 

• Burlie Bagley Endowed Scholarship Fund 

17 



Violet KJiayat Baker Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Michael J. "Duke" Barbee Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Bell-Vincent Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Bergmark Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Dr. Robert E. Bergmark Endowed Scholarship Fund 
J. E. Birmingham Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Maj. Gen. Robert & Alice Ridgway Blount Drama Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The Roy N. and Hallie L. Boggan Sponsored Scholarship Fund 
Alfred Bourgeois Sponsored Scholarship 
Jesse and Ruth Brent Scholarship Fund 
Pet and Randall Brewer Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
W. H. Brewer Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Lucile Mars Bridges Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Rev and Mrs. A. M. Broadfoot Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Dr. T. M. Brownlee and Dan F. Crumpton Endowed Scholarship Fund 
C. Leland Byler Endowed Scholarship 
A. Boyd Campbell Endowed Scholarship 

The James Boyd Campbell Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Charles Noel Carney Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The Henry Elbert Chatham Environmental Studies Endowed Scholarship 
Dr. Elbert Alston Cheek and Son Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Rev. and Mrs. C. C. Clark Endowed Scholarship Fund 
G. C. Clark Jr. & Frances R. Clark Scholarship 
Coca-Cola Foundation Minority Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Kelly Gene Cook Sponsored Scholarship Fund 

Louise Vivian Cortright and Dorothy Louise Cortright Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Ella Lee Williams Cortright and Dorothy Louise Cortright Endowed Scholarship Fund 
George Caldwell Cortright Fund 
George Curtis Cortright Endowed Scholarship 
Ira Sherman and Dorothy Louise Cortright Endowed Scholarship 
Magnolia Coullet Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Dr. and Mrs. J. R. Countiss, Sr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Crisler Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. Lamar Daniel Scholarship Fund 
Helen Daniel Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Davenport-Spiva Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Charles W. and Eloise T. Else Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Endowed Art Scholarship 
The Endowed Minority Scholarship Fund 
Endowed Scholarship in Religion 
Maggie Flowers Ewing Sponsored Scholarship 
Robert L. Ezelle, Jr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Ben Fatheree Bible Sponsored Scholarship Fund 
Felder and Carruth Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Dr. Marvin J. Few Scholarship Fund 
Josie Millsaps Fitzhugh Scholarship 
Hal T. and Doris B. Fowlkes Endowed Scholarship 
Bishop Marvin A. Franklin Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Irene and S. H. Gaines Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Marvin Galloway Scholarship Fund 
Martha W. Gerald Scholarship Fund 
The Frances Holstein Gill Endowed Music Scholarship 
John T. Gober Endowed Scholarship Fund 
N. J. Golding Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Pattie Madgruder Sullivan Golding Endowed Scholarship Fund 

18 



Sanford Martin Graham PKA Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The Graves Family Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Clara Barton Green Scholarship Fund 
Warton Green Scholarship Fund 
S. J. Greer Scholarship Fund 
The John Guest Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Clyde and Mary Hall Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Maurice H. Hall, Sr, Endowed Scholarship Fund 
James E. Hardin Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Paul Douglas and Mary Giles Hardin Scholarship Fund 
W. Troy Harkey Endowed Music Scholarship Fund 
Martha Parks Harrison Endowed Scholarship Fund 
William Randolph Hearst Endowed Minority Scholarship Fund 
Karim E. Hederi Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Nellie K. Hederi Scholarship Fund 
J. K. Hegwood Sponsored Scholarship 
John Paul Henry Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Martha and Herman Bines Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Holloman Family Endowment 
Ralph and Hazel Hon Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Albert L. and Florence O. Hopkins Scholarship Fund 
Joseph W. Hough Sponsored Scholarship Fund 
Jonathan Huber Scholarship Fund 
Kenneth Humphries Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Harrell Freeman Jeanes. Sr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Rev. and Mrs. John Henderson Jolly Scholarship Fund 
The Beth Griffm Jones Adult Scholarship Endowment 
Dan and Rose Keel Scholarship Fund 

Rames Assad and Edward Assad Khayat Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Alvin Jon "Pop" King Endowed Music Scholarship Fund 
Samuel Roscoe Knox Endowed Scholarship Fund 
TTie Frank M. Laney Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Norma C. Moore Lawrence Memorial Scholarship 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. LeComu Endowed Scholarship Fund 
S. Herschel Leech Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Dr. John Willard Leggett, Jr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Fannie Buck Leonard Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Lester Scholarship Fund 
Mary Sue Enochs Lewis Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The James Livesay Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Forest G., Maude McNease, and Rex Loftin Endowed Memorial Fund 
Susan Long Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Jim Lucas Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The Mary Jane Mace Memorial Endowed Scholarship 
Linda Ellisberry Malone Scholarship Fund 
G. W. Mars Endowed Scholarship Fund 
Robert and Marie May Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The S. W. and Ella C. McClinton Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The McDonald Family Scholarship Fund 
Will and Delia McGehee Memorial Scholarship 
Joan B. McGinnis Endowed Scholarship 
James Nicholas McLean Scholarship Fund 
Meeks Ford Teaching Fellowship Fund 

Rev. Arthur C. Miller Pre-Engineering Endowed Scholarship Fund 
The Harold D. Miller, Jr. Sponsored Scholarship Fund 



19 



Ministerial Student Scholarship Aid 

Minority Student Scholarship Fund 

The Mitchell Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Mike and Estelle Mockbee Sponsored Scholarship 

Robert D. and Alma Moreton Endowed Scholarship Fund 

E. L. Moyers Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The Mary Miller Murry Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Cooper Neill Adult Degree Endowed Scholarship Fund 

J. L. Neill Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Robert G. Nichols, Jr. Endowed Scholarship 

Reverend Arthur M. O'Neill Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Marly Paine Endowed Scholarship Fund 

William H. Parker Endowed Scholarship 

Marianne and Marion P. Parker Endowed Scholarship Fund 

William George Peek Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Randolph Peets, Sr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Edward J. Pendergrass Scholarship Fund 

J. B. Price Endowed Scholarship 

Lillian Emily Benson Priddy Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Kelly Mouzon Pylant Memorial Scholarship Fund 

T. W. Rankin, Ford Fellowship Fund 

Jane Bridges Renka Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The Reynolds Family Sponsored Scholarship Fund 

R. S. Ricketts Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Ridgway Endowed Choral Music Scholarship Fund 

C. E. and Marjorie Risley Sponsored Scholarship 

Frank and Betty Robinson Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Velma Jerigan Rodgers Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Thomas G. Ross M.D., Pre Med Endowed Scholarship Fund 

H. Lowery Rush, Sr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 

James R. Rush & Mary B. Rush Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Richard O. Rush Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Silvio A. Sabatini M.D. Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Harrylyn Sallis ADP Scholarship Fund 

The Harrylyn G. and W. Charles Sallis ADP/Liberal Studies Sponsored Scholarship 

Scott Schild Scholarship Fund 

The Edith and Brevik Schimmel Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Charles Christopher Scott, III Endowed Scholarship Fund 

George W. Scott Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Mary Holloman Scott Endowed Scholarship Fund 

William E. Shanks Sponsored Scholarship Fund 

William Sharp Shipman Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Robert Emmert Silverstein Scholarship Fund 

Janet Lynne Sims Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Marion L. and Mary Hanes Smith Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Willie E. Smith Scholarship 

Dr. Thomas R. Spell Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The Rev. and Mrs. C. J. Stapp Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Dr. Benjamin M. Stevens Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Henry and Betty Pope Stevens Scholarship Fund 

Daisy McLaurin Stevens Ford Fellowship Fund 

E. B. Stewart Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The E. Edward Stewart Scholarship Fund 

Ferris B. and Lou Strain Scholarship Fund 

R. Mason Strieker Endowed Scholarship 



20 



Sturdivant Endowed Scholarship • 

Drs. W.T.J. & J. Magruder & C. Caruthers Sullivan Scholarship Fund 

Sullivan Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Edna Earle Sumerlin Sponsored Scholarship 

Charles E. Summer. Jr. Memorial Endowed Scholarship 

E. H. Sumners Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The Jonathan M. Sweat Music Endowment 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Tabb Endowed Scholarship Fund 

The Tatum Family Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Rowan Taylor, Sr. Endowed Scholarship Fund 

William H. Tribette Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Florence M. Trull Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Navy V-12 Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Dennis E. Vickers Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Vicksburg Hospital Medical Foundation Scholarship Fund 

James Monroe Wallace III Scholarship Fund 

Dolly Mae and Paul Adolph Warren Scholarship Fund 

W. H. Watkins Endowed Scholarship Fund 

John Houston Wear, Jr. Foundation Sponsored Scholarship Fund 

Mary Virginia Weems Endowed Scholarship Fund 

James Thompson Weems Endowed Scholarship Fund 

Dr. Vernon Lane Wharton Scholarship Fund 

Julian L. Wheless Endowed Scholarship 

Milton C. White Scholarship Fund 

Lettie Pate Whitehead Sponsored Scholarship Fund 

Julian and Kathryn Wiener Endowed Scholarship Fund for the Enhancement of remedial Education 

E. F. Williams Sponsored Scholarship Fund 

Loan Funds 
Federal Stafford Loan Program 

Federal Stafford Loans are available to students who demonstrate need and are enrolled at least halftime. An undergraduate 
student may borrow up to $2,625 for their first year; $3,500 for their second year and $5,500 a year for the remainder of their 
undergraduate years for an aggregate amoimt of up to $23,000. A graduate student may borrow up to $8,500 a year for an 
aggregate total of $65,500 (including undergraduate loans). Application forms may be obtained firom a commercial lender or 
from the Dean of Student Aid Financial Planning. 

Interest rate: There is a variable interest rate which changes annually on July 1 with a cap of 8.25%. 

Fees: There is a 3% origination fee and up to 1% guarantee fee. 

Repayment: Repayment of the loan begins 6 months after termination of education or anytime that the academic load drops 
below halftime. The loan may be repaid over 10 years. 

Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan Program 

This loan program has the same terms and conditions as the Federal Stafford Loans, except that the borrower is responsible 
for the interest that accrues while the student is in school. The program is open to students who may not qualify for the 
subsidized Stafford Loans or may qualify for only partial subsidized Stafford Loans. The student borrower does not have to 
show financial need for this loan. Independent students may have a higher loan limit if they show the eligibility for 
supplemental loan funds. 

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS) 

FPLUS loans provide parents with additional funds for educational expenses. These loans may be obtained from commercial 
lenders. The parent who borrows through this program will be able to borrow up to the difference between the cost of the 
institution and the fmancial aid the student receives for the loan period. There is not an aggregate limit. The parent must not 
have an adverse credit history. The student must be a dependent and be enrolled at least halftime. FPLUS borrowers do not 
have to show need to borrow under this program. Disbursement of the loan funds will be made co-payable to the borrower 

21 



and the school. 

Interest rate: There is a variable interest rate which changes annually on July 1, The FPLUS loan will not exceed 9%. 

Fee.s: There is a 3% origination fee and a guarantee fee up to 1%. 

Repayment and Deferment: Repayment of a FPLUS begins the date of disbursement. Borrowers should contact the lender for 
information concerning deferment of principal and capitalization of interest. 

Federal Perkins Loan Program 

Millsaps makes these loans available to undergraduate students who demonstrate need. Student may borrow up to $15,000 
for an undergraduate degree. Repayment and accrual of interest at the rate of 5% begin six months after the student drops 
below halftime enrollment status. Deferment and loan forgiveness may be available for community service work, for fiill- 
time teachers in shortage fields, and for full-time employees of public or private nonprofit child or family service agencies. 
Detailed information concerning this loan and application forms can be secured fi-om the Dean of Student Aid Financial 
Planning at Millsaps. 

Other loan funds include: 

W. P. Bagley Memorial Loan Fund 

Joseph C. Bancroft Loan Fund 

C.I.O.S. Foundation Loan Fund 

Coulter Loan Fund 

Claudine Curtis Memorial Loan Fund 

William Larken Duren Loan Fund 

Paul and Dee Faulkner Loan Fund 

Kenneth Gilbert Endowed Loan Scholarship 

Jackson Kiwanis Loan Fund 

Joe B. Love Memorial Loan Fund 

Graham R. McFarlane Loan Scholarship 

J. D. Slay Ministerial Loan Fund 

United Methodist Suident Loan Fund 

George R. and Rose Williams Endowed Loan Fund 

George W. Wofford Loan Fund 

Additional Financial Aid Opportunities 

The Federal Work-Study Program has been established from funds contributed by the federal 
government and the College to provide financial assistance through employment. 

State Student Incentive Grants are provided by Millsaps, the state of Mississippi and the 

federal government. These fijnds are to help qualified students with substantial financial need. 

The Federal Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant are 

provided by the federal government. These funds are supplemental grants to other aid to assist in making available 
the benefits of higher education to qualified students of exceptional financial need who, for lack of financial means 
of their own or their families, would be unable to obtain an education without such aid. 

Mississippi Grant Programs: 

Mississippi Tuition Assistance Grant is for full-time students who are residents of Mississippi. When fully funded the 
maximum grant is $500 for freshmen and sophomores and $1,000 for juniors and seniors. 

Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant is for residents of the state of Mississippi. When flilly funded the maximum grant is 
S2,500 each year for four years. 

There are application deadlines and academic requirements for each of these programs. Other state regulations may apply. 

International Students 

International students may compete for all Millsaps scholarship and loan programs with the exception of those ftmded by the 
US government. In addition, international students are eligible for on-campus employment opportunities. 

22 



Student Life 
Campus Ministry 

Religious life at Millsaps centers around the churches, synagogues and other faith communities of the city of Jackson and the 
campus ministry program coordinated through the Campus Ministry Team and the Office of the Chaplain. Churches provide 
communities of faith for students, faculty and staff. The campus ministry program attempts to provide experiences which 
explore the meaning of a life of faith for a college community. 

To accomplish this, a varied program is offered: sponsorship of special programs on ihe Millsaps Forum Series on social, 
religious and personal issues; field trips to various places, including the New York Semmar; faculty-student-staff programs 
addressing issues on campus and in the larger society; fellowship experiences; Bible studies; mentoring programs in 
neighboring schools; projects in the community working with disadvantaged populations; chapel and special services such as 
All Saints Day, Advent, Ash Wednesday and Maundy Thursday Services; emphases on such issues as AIDS; and many 
others. In addition, the campus chapter of Habitat for Humanity is very active and the Midtown Project involves a large 
number of volunteers in a city-wide effort to rehabilitate this historic area of the city which has suffered greatly fi-om drugs, 
violence and deteriorating housing. All of these experiences are meant to communicate an active understanding of the life of 
faith as it addresses crucial social needs. The campus ministry program at Millsaps has attracted national attention for its 
variety and effectiveness. 

In addition to the Campus Ministry Team, other programs operating on campus include Catholic Campus Ministry, 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes, the Wesley Fellowship, Baptist Student Union, Millsaps Christian Fellowship, Orthodox 
Fellowship and Habitat for Humanity (Ihe first campus chapter in Mississippi) In addition, the Episcopal Eucharist is 
celebrated each week on campus. All campus ministry is strongly ecumenical. In addition, the college is fortunate to have the 
services of a member of the Order of the Living Word, who works with the Catholic Campus Ministry. Persons fi"om local 
congregations work with other campus ministry groups and serve as resource persons for campus programming. 

The Office of the Chaplain serves as a liaison with churches, with The Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist 
Church, and with other denominations. Furthermore, a working relationship has been established with many community 
projects and agencies as vehicles for student involvement. 

Public Events 

The Public Events Committee receives funds from the student government and the College to sponsor programs of general 
interest to the campus and community. Its major activity is the Millsaps Forum Series - a continuing slate of speakers during 
the academic year. The objective of the series is to provide information and stimulate interest in current issues, to explore 
historical events, and to present differing perspectives on controversial subjects. Faculty members, local authorities and 
national experts are invited to present their thoughts on a variety of literary, cultural, scientific, political, religious and 
historical topics. 

In addition to the Forum Series, the Public Events Committee sponsors special events throughout the academic year. It 
provides funds to student organizations and academic departments interested in organizing programs open to the entire 
campus. These include films, guest speakers, and music recitals. 

All of these activities have to do with the true aim of liberal education: the liberation of the mind to grasp the world of nature 
and of human experience and action in all its richness and complexity, and to respond with awareness, sensitivity, concern, 
and mature judgment. 

Athletics 

The Athletic policy of Millsaps College is based on the premise that athletics exist for the benefit of the students and not 
primarily to enhance the prestige and publicity of the College. 

Competitive sports conducted in an atmosphere of good sportsmanship and fair play can make a significant contribution to 
the complete physical, emotional, moral, and mental development of the well-rounded individual. They are thus an integral 
part of a program of liberal education. An attempt is made to provide a sports-for-all program and to encourage as many 
students as possible to participate. Equity in Athletics Disclosure Form is available for review in the Office of Student Affairs 
as well as the Athletic Office. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

There are 14 varsity sports, seven for men and seven for women. The program for men includes football, basketball, baseball, 

23 



cross-country, tennis, golf and soccer. The women's program includes basketball, tennis, soccer, cross-country, volleyball and 
golf. 

The programs are conducted on guidelines established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association for Division III 
institutions and the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference, 

Those who participate in intercollegiate athletics are required to observe and maintain the same academic standards as other 
students. 

Campus Recreation 

The largest and most popular aspect of campus recreation at Millsaps is the intramural program. Intramurals have provided 
competition, exercise and recreation for men and women at Millsaps for many years. Activities include volleyball, tennis, 
soccer, basketball golf, tlag football, frisbee golf and Softball. 

Sport clubs continue to grow in popularity. These organizations are organized by faculty, staff and students with a common 
interest. Recent active clubs include cycling, dance, water skiing, indoor soccer and karate. 

The popularity of fitness has brought aerobics to campus. A variety of aerobics classes are offered in the new fitness building 

and a weight lifting room is also available for all students, faculty and staff. 

Publications 
The Purple and White, the official student newspaper of the College, is edited, managed, and written by students. The P & 
W provides coverage of Millsaps events, as well as serving as a campus forum. 

The Bobashela, the student yearbook of Millsaps College, gives an annual comprehensive view of campus life. Bobashela is 
an Indian name for good friend. 

Stylus, the student literary magazine, publishes twice a year the best poetry, short stories, essays, and art submitted by 
Millsaps students. 

Music, Theatre, and Dance 

The Department of Performing Arts offers many opportunities for students to study and perform dance, music, and theatre. 
Studio classes in dance and music are open to all students in the college for academic credit. The studio dance 
classes are taught through Mississippi Ballet, Mississippi's premiere professional ballet company. The studio music 
classes are private lessons in voice or instruments such as piano, organ, guitar, etc. Acting classes can be taken by all 
students at Millsaps College who have a keen interest in dramatic performance. 

Participation in productions of The Millsnps Players is offered to all students. Casting for all plays is by open audition. The 
Players typically produce four full-length plays each year, and senior theatre majors often direct one-act plays for 
their senior projects. Whether you like acting onstage or working backstage, there are wonderful dramatic 
opportunities with The Millsaps Players. Participation in Players productions can earn academic credit and also 
earns credit toward membership in Alpha Psi Omega, the national honorary dramatics fraternity. 

The oldest music performance organization at the college is The Millsaps Singers. Membership in The Singers is open to all 
students by audition. Each year this 70-85 voice choir performs a variety of accompanied and a cappella music for 
the college and community, and there is usually at least one performance with a professional orchestra. Music for 
Singers includes a highly diverse repertoire - masterworks, international and ethnic works, and recent additions to 
the choral repertory. Academic credit is awarded for participation each semester. 

The Chamber Singers is a relatively recent addition to the performing groups at Millsaps College. Membership is selected 
by audition from the Millsaps Singers. Membership in this 16-24 voice choir carries a performance scholarship in 
recognition of the travel and performance responsibilities of the ensemble. Recent tours have taken the Chamber 
Singers to San Antonio, Washington, D.C., Chicago, St. Louis, and Orlando. During the summer of 1998 the choir 
toured Germany, the Czech Republic, and Austria. Academic credit is awarded following the second semester of 
participation. 



24 



Membership in the Millsaps Wind Ensemble is open to all students who participated in a band in high school. Since the size 
of the ensemble is smaller than a full band, participation provides an intimate setting for practice and performance. 
Academic credit is awarded following the second semester of participation. 

Music majors and minors can become eligible for membership in Mu Phi Epsilon, an international professional music 

fraternity. (Professional fi-aternities are organized to promote professional competency and achievement within the 
field.) Mu Phi Epsilon promotes high scholarship, musicianship, and friendship through service to school and 
community. Members are eligible for scholarships, grants, and awards. 

Student Organizations 

Millsaps College currently has more than 70 registered student organizations. Organizations vary in their individual purposes 
but all serve to contribute to the educational mission and purpose of the college. Please contact the Division of Student 
Affairs if you would like to obtain a complete list of registered student organizations or to start a new student organization. 
A few of the organizations currently active on the campus are: 

Student Body Association 

All regularly enrolled undergraduate students of Millsaps are members of the Student Body Association. Those 
taking at least three courses or part-time students who pay the Student Body Association fee have full power of 
voting. The Millsaps Student Body Association is governed by the Student Senate, the Student Judicial Council, and 
the Student Body Association officers. The Student Senate is composed of 36 voting members elected from the 
Millsaps Student Body Association. Members of the Student Senate are chosen by the third Tuesday in September 
and serve their constituency the length of the academic year. 

Student Body Association officers of the Student Senate are elected at large from the Millsaps Student Body 
Association. The officers are president, first vice-president, second vice-president, secretary, and treasurer. The 
officers serve a term beginning and ending in January. 

Student Senate meetings are held on a regular basis with special meetings called by the secretary at the request of (1) 
the president of the Senate, (2) the Senate, (.1) seven members of the Senate, (4) the president of the College. 

The duties and functions of the Student Senate are to exercise legislative power over those areas of collegiate 
activity that are the responsibility of students and to speak for the Student Body Association on all matters of student 
concern. In addition the Student Senate is responsible for (1) apportioning funds collected by the College as Student 
Body Association fees according to college policies; (2) recognizing student organizations; (3) formulating policies 
regarding student life; (4) supervising student elections and (5) carrying out traditional class responsibilities. 

The Judicial Council 

The Judicial Council is composed often voting members. Members are appointed as follows: two faculty members 
appointed by the Vice President and Dean of the College with the approval of the President; and eight student 
members appointed by a committee composed of three student Judicial Council members and three Student Body 
Association officers and confirmed by the Student Senate. The Director of Residence Life serves as an ex-officio 
member of the Council. 

The Judicial Council has partial jurisdiction over student disciplinary cases. Limitations of its authority are 
delineated in the student handbook, Major Facts. 

Adult Student Association is open to all Millsaps adult undergraduate students 24 years of age and older. This organizafion 
assists adult learners in their re-entry to college life, provides a forum for sharing experience and knowledge and 
enhances career opportunities through networking with other students, faculty and administrative staff. The 
association meets once each semester. The ASA Newsletter is sent to all adult learners enrolled in academic courses. 

Black Student Association is designed to stimulate and improve the social and academic atmosphere for black students at 
Millsaps College. 

Circle K, established at Millsaps in 1984, provides opportunities for service and leadership training in service. Students of 
good character and satisfactory scholastic standing may be elected to membership. 



25 



MCA/Diversity Group, open to all members of the Millsaps community, endeavors to promote a sense of belonging for 

international and minority students by providing a forum for the exchange of cultural ideas, knowledge and values. 

English Club is open to anyone interested in literature and writing. Activities include guest speakers, social gatherings, and 
discussion groups. 

Financial Management Association Finance Club is open to anyone with an interest in finance. Activities include the 
Merrill Lynch Challenge Stock Market game and visits to or speakers from financial institutions. 

French, German and Spanish Clubs are open to anyone interested in the language and culture of these nationalities. Club 
activities include tutoring, discussions and a film series. 

IMathematics Club is opened to anyone interested in mathematics. Programs include guest speakers, discussions of career 
and graduate school opportunities, films, and other topics of interest. 

Millsaps Martial Arts Consortium, organized in 1992, is open to all students, faculty, and staff. The clubs meet to study 
and practice various forms of martial arts. 

Habitat for Humanity is open to all students who arc interested in pursuing the activities of Habitat, including the building 
of houses for the less fortunate and raising funds for these houses and overseas projects. 

Residence Hall Association is composed of and serves students living in the residence halls. RHA sponsors social events, 
forums and works with the administration to address student concerns. Elections are held in the fall semester. 

Society of Physics Students is open to all students interested in physics and related areas. Activities include visits to 
observatories, discussions, tleld trips, social events and professional contacts and speakers. 

E.A.R.T.H. is open to anyone interested in environmental preservation. Activities include service projects, guest speakers 
and field trips. 

Honor Societies 
Alpha Epsilon Delta is an honorary pre-medical fraternity. Leadership, scholarship, expertness, character, and personality 
are the qualities by which students are judged for membership. The organization seeks to bridge the gap between 
pre-medical and medical studies. 

Alpha Eta Sigma is a scholastic and professional accounting fraternity with the following objectives; promotion of the study 
and practice of accounting; provision of opportunities for self-development and association among members and 
practicing accountants; and encouragement of a sense of ethical, social, and public responsibility. 

Alpha Kappa Delta, an international sociology honorary, promotes the use ofthe sociological imagination in understanding 
and serving human beings. The chapter, Gamma of Mississippi, founded in 1984, is a joint chapter with Tougaloo 
College. 

Alpha Psi Omega, a national honorary dramatics fraternity, recognizes members of The Millsaps Players for their effective 
participation in acting, directing, make-up, stage management, costuming, lighting, or publicit>'. 

Alpha Sigma Lambda is a national honor society devoted to the advancement of scholarship and recognition of students in 
continuing higher education programs and recognizes superior scholarship and leadership in adult students. Mu Chi 
chapter at Millsaps is the first in the state of Mississippi. 

Beta Alpha Psi, is a national scholastic and professional accounting fratemity. Its purpose is to promote the study and 
practice of accounting; to provide opportunities for self-development and association among members and 
practicing accountants; and to encourage a sense of ethical, social, and public responsibilities. 

Beta Beta Beta, established at Millsaps in 1968, is a national honor fi-aternity for students in the biological sciences. Its 
purposes are to stimulate sound scholarship, to promote the dissemination of scientific truth, and to encourage 
investigation ofthe life sciences. 



26 



Beta Gamma Sigma is a national honor society dedicated to the principles and ideals essential to a worthy life as well as to a 
commendable business career. Election to memberships is the highest scholastic honor that a student in a school of 
business or management can achieve. 

Eta Sigma Phi is a national honor fraternity recognizing ability in classical studies. Alpha Phi, the Millsaps chapter, was 
founded in 1935. 

Financial Management Association Honor Society, established in 1984 on the Millsaps campus, serves to encourage and 
reward scholarship and accomplishment in financial management, financial institutions, and investments among 
undergraduate and graduate students, and to encourage interaction between business executives, faculty, and 
students of finance. 

Mu Phi Epsilon, established at Millsaps in 1998, is an international professional music fraternity. Its purpose is to recognize 
and promote scholarship, musicianship, and friendship through service to school and community. The Millsaps 
chapter. Delta Nu. offers many opportunities for personal and musical growth. 

Omicron Delta Epsilon is the international economics honorary society. It is dedicated to the encouragement of excellence 
in economics, with a main objective of recognizing scholastic attainment in economics. Delta chapter of Mississippi 
was formed at Millsaps College in 1981. 

Omicron Delta Kappa is a leadership society with chapters in principal colleges and universities Pi Circle at Millsaps 
brings together members of the student body, faculty and administration mteresled in campus activities, together 
with a limited number of alumni, to plan for the betterment of the College. Election to membership in Omicron 
Delta Kappa is a distinct honor. 

Order of Omega is a national leadership society which recognizes student achievement in promoting inter-Greek activities. 
The Millsaps chapter. Eta Kappa, was founded in 1986. 

Phi Alpha Theta is an international honor society in history founded in 1921 . Membership is composed of students and 

professors, elected on the basis of excellence in the study and writing of history. It encourages the study, teaching, 
and writing of history among all its members. 

Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest academic honor society, was installed at Millsaps in spring 1989. It recognizes and 

encourages e.xcellence in the liberal arts. The Millsaps chapter, Alpha of Mississippi, elects members from the senior 
class on the basis of broad cultural interests, scholarly achievement, and good character. 

Phi Eta Sigma is a national honorary society which recognizes outstanding academic achievement in freshmen. The Millsaps 
chapter was established in 1981. Membership is open to all full-time freshmen who achieve a grade-point average of 
3.5 in either the first semester or both semesters of the freshman year. 

Pi Delta Phi is a national French honor society which recognizes attainment and scholarship in the study of the French 
language and literature. 

Schiller Gesellschaft was founded in order to give recognition to those students who have shown excellence in the study of 
German and in order to provide a forum for the study of all aspects of German civilization. 

Sigma Delta Pi, the international Spanish honorary, was established at Millsaps College in 1968. This honor society 
recognizes attainment and scholarship in the study of the Spanish language and literature. 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon is a national geology honor society. Established in 1993, the organization recognizes achievement in 
Geological Sciences. 

Sigma Lambda is a leadership and service honorary society whose members are primarily sophomores selected on the basis 
of character, scholarship, and involvement in college and community activities. 

Sigma Pi Sigma, a national honor society in physics, was established at Millsaps in 1988. Its purpose is to honor excellence 
in physics. 



27 



Sigma Tau Delta is the national Englisli honor society. The purposes of the society are to confer distinction for high 

achievement in English language and literature, to promote interest in literature and the English language, and to 
foster the discipline of English in all its aspects, including creative and critical writing. The Zeta Sigma chapter was 
chartered at Millsaps in 1983. 

Theta Nu Sigma membership is offered to second semester sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are majoring in one of the 
natural sciences and who fulfill certain specified qualifications. Tlie purpose is to further general interest in the 
sciences. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

There are five fraternity and six sorority chapters at Millsaps. The chapters are all members of well-established national 
Greek-letter organizations. 

The sororities are Alpha Kappa Alpha, Chi Omega, Delta Sigma Theta, Delta Delta Delta, Kappa Delta and Phi Mu. 

The fraternities are Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Policies governing .sorority and fraternity life are formulated through the Panhellenic Council and the Interfraternity Council. 

Questions regarding the Millsaps Greek system, sororities, or fraternities may be directed to the office of Student Affairs. 

Eligibility for membership in sororities and fraternities is governed by the following regulations: 

A. General Conditions 

1 . Only bona tide regular students (carrying at least three courses) may be pledged. Activity classes do not count 
toward this requirement. 

2. A student may not be pledged to a fratemity or sorority until official registration for classes has been cleared by the 
Office of Records. 

3. Only persons who are bona tide students at Millsaps at initiation time can be initiated. 

B. Scholastic Requirements 

1 . To be eligible for initiation, a student must have earned in the most recent semester of residence credit for a 
minimum of three courses, must not have fallen below "D" in more than one subject, and must have earned a 2.0 
grade point average for the semester. 

2. A student who drops a course after the end of the half semester shall receive an "F" for sorority or fraternity 
purposes as well as for academic averages. 

3. The two terms of the summer session combined shall count as one semester for sorority or fraternity purposes. 

Note: Individual organizations may have higher standards for admission. 

Awards 
College Awards 
Founders' Medal. Awarded at commencement to the senior who has the highest quality inde,\ for the entire college course 

and has received a grade of Excellent on the comprehensive examination. Only students who have completed at 

Millsaps College all of the work required for the degree are eligible for this award. 

Tribctte Scholarship. Awarded to the member of the sophomore or junior class whose quality index is highest for the year. 

Henry and Katherine Bellamann Award. Presented to graduating seniors who have shown particular distinction in one of 
the creative or performing arts. 

Omicron Delta Kappa Award. Recognizes Outstanding Freshman Man and Woman of the Year and Leader of the 
Year. 

Bishop's Medal. Presented to the outstanding senior entering seminary that plans to pursue the pastoral ministry of the 
United Methodist Church. 



28 



Velma Jernigan Kodgers Scholarship Award. Presented to the rising senior woman student who has the highest grade 
point in the humanities. 

Janet Lynne Sims Award. A medal and stipend presented to a rising senior who is a ftill-time student in pre-med and has 
completed five semesters of work. Selection is made on the basis of academic excellence. A second award is given 
to an entering freshman. Selection is made on the basis of pre-medical interest and academic excellence. 

Dr. Thomas G. Ross Scholarship. Presented by the faculty to the outstanding senior pre-medical student. 

Frank and Rachel Ann Laney Award. Given each spring for the best reflective paper written to satisfy the Core 10 

requirement during the academic year. The award is intended to encourage students to reflect on the value of their 
education in the liberal arts. 

Arts and Letters 
Classics Awards 

Swearingen Prize for Excellence in Introductory Greek 
Swearingen Prize for Excellence in Introductory Latin 
Swearingen Prize for Excellence in Second Year Latin 
Presented to the students with the highest scholastic averages in Latin and Greek. 

magnolia Coullct Senior Classics Award. Presented to the senior who has best demonstrated excellence in and love for the 
classics. 

American Bible Society Award. Presented to an outstanding student in the study of Greek and religion. . . 

Dora Lynch Hanley Award for Distinguished Writing. Awarded annually to honor excellence in writing. 

Clark Essay Award. Awarded to a senior English major who presents the best and most original paper in an English course 
at Millsaps. 

Paul D. Hardin Senior English Award. Given annually to the outstanding senior major in English. 

Robert H. Padgett English Award. Given annually to the student who does the most outstanding work on the English 
comprehensive exam. 

Albert Godfrey Sanders Award in French. Presented to the outstanding student in French language and literature. 

Albert Godfrey Sanders Award in Spanish. Presented to the outstanding student in Spanish language and literature. 

Pi Delta Phi Intermediate French Award. Presented to the outstanding student in intermediate-level French. 

Sigma Delta Pi Intermediate Spanish Award. Presented to the outstanding student in intermediate-level Spanish 

Schiller Advanced German Award. Presented to the outstanding student in German language and literature. 

Schiller Intermediate German Award. Presented to the outstanding student in intermediate-level German. 

Ross H. Moore History Award. Presented to the outstanding senior history major. 

Senior Music Award. Presented to the senior music major who, in the opinion of the faculty, has been the most outstanding 
student in the Department of Music. 

Sweat Summer Studies Awards. Presented for excellence in music performance. 

Frank M. Laney, Jr. Award. Presented to a senior history major that has had an outstanding record in history at Millsaps 
and plans to pursue a graduate education in history. 



29 



Mu Phi Epsilon Senior Achievement Award. Presented to an outstanding senior member for excellence in scholarship and 
leadership as well as for participation in fraternity, school, and professional activities. 

Philosophy Award. Presented to a student show excellence in philosophy. 

William D Rowell Memorial Award in Art. Presented to the senior demonstrating a commitment to and growth in studio 
art. 

Excellence in Art History Award 

Art History Paper Award 

Outstanding Junior Studio Art Award 

Science and Mathematics 

Biology Award. Recognizes an outstanding biology major. 

Biology Research Award. Recognizes a biology major who has won recognition in biology on the basis of interest, 
.scholarship and demonstration of research potential. 

Tri Beta Award. Recognizes an outstanding member of the chapter who has demonstrated scholastic excellence and service 
in the field of biology. 

J. B. Price General Chemistry Award. Presented annually to the student with the highest scholastic average in general 
chemistry. 

Junior Analytical Chemistry Award. Awarded to the most outstanding junior enrolled in analytical chemistry. 

Senior Chemistry Award. Awarded to the senior with the most outstanding record in study and research. 

Chemistry Department Service Award. Awarded to the chemistry major who has demonstrated leadership and service 
among his fellow students. 

Computer Studies Award. Presented to the outstanding computer studies graduate. 

Geology Awards. 

Richard R. Priddy Award. Presented to the geology major with the highest cumulative scholastic average. 
Wendell B. Johnson Award. Presented to the geology student with the highest departmental average. 
Geologist of the Year 
Presented to geology majors of demonstrated ability and scholastic achievement. 

Samuel R. Knox Senior Mathematics Award. Presented to the outstanding senior mathematics major. 

Outstanding Freshman Mathematics Award. Presented to tlie outstanding freshman in mathematics. 

General Physics Awards. Presented to the two students with the highest scholastic averages in general physics. 

Physics Sei-vice Award. Presented to a physics student in recognition of service to the Department of Physics. 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Frances and L. B. Jones Award in Anthropology. Presented to the outstanding anthropology major. 

Award for Excellence in Elementary Student Teaching. Given to senior who demonstrates potential for outstanding 
contributions in teaching at the elementary school level. 

Award for Excellence in Secondary Student Teaching. Given to senior who demonstrates potential for outstanding 
contributions in leaching at the secondary school level. 

30 



Outstanding Scholarship Award. Given to the senior receiving teacher ceilification with the highest scholastic average. 

Mary Sue Enochs Lewis Endowed Scholarship. Presented to a woman in the junior class who has demonstrated academic 
excellence and leadership and who has definite plans to teach upon graduation. 

Reid and Cynthia Bingham Awards. Presented to the junior and senior scholars of distinction in political science. 

John F. Kennedy Award. Presented to the outstanding senior in political science demonstrating excellence in academics, 
personal integrity and commitment to the highest ideals of the public good in a democratic society. 

William James Award for Academic Excellence. Presented to the outstanding graduating senior(s) majoring in psychology. 

Mary Whiton Calkins Award for Outstanding Research in P.sychology. Presented for excellence in psychological 
research. 

Gordon Allport Award for the Application of Psychology. Presented for outstanding involvement in the application of 
psychological science to the public interest. 

Frances H. Coker Award in Sociology. Given each year to the outstanding senior majoring in sociology. 

Chi Omega Social Science Award. Presented to the outstanding female senior in the Social Sciences. 

Else School of Management 

Richard B. Baltz Award. Presented to the outstanding student majoring in economics. 

Financial Management Association Challenge Award. Presented to the student who has demonstrated high performance in 
investments. 

Wall Street Journal Award. Presented to the business administration senior who scores highest on the nationally normed 
field exam. 

Mississippi Society of CPA's Award. Presented to a senior accounting major who has compiled an outstanding record. 

Merrill Lynch Award. Presented to the student who has demonstrated high achievement in the area of finance. 

Charles W. and Eloise T. Else Scholars. Pre.sented to seniors in the Else School of Management who have distinguished 
themselves academically in their overall college work and in required junior-level course work. 

Curriculum 
Requirements for Degrees 

Requirements for All Degrees 

A total of 128 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Business 
Administration degrees. Of this total, at least 120 semester hours must be taken for a letter grade. 

Core Requirements for All Degrees 

All Millsaps students must complete ten core courses specifically designed to develop the general abilities of a liberally 
educated person. 

Core 1: Introduction to Liberal Studies 4 .sem. hours 

Core 2: Multi-disciplinary Topics in the Ancient World 4 sem. hours 

Core 3; Multi-disciplinary Topics in the Pre-modern World 4 sem. hours 

Core 4: Multi-disciplinary Topics in the Modern World 4 sem. hours 

Core 5: Multi-disciplinary Topics in the Contemporary World 4 sem. hours 

Core 6: Topics in Social and Behavioral Science 4 sem. hours 

Core 7: Topics in Natural Science with Laboratory 4 sem. hours 

31 



Core 8: Topics in Mathematics 4 jg^ ^,^^^5 

Core 9: Topics in Mathematics, Natural Science, or Computer Science 4 sem. hours 

Core 10; Reflections on Liberal Studies 4 sem. hours 

Courses that satisfy core requirements must be selected from an approved list published each semester with the class 
schedule. 

All incoming students are required to complete Introduction to Liberal Studies in the first year. Reflections on Liberal Studies 
must be completed during the senior year. All other core courses should be completed by the end of the sophomore year. 
Transfer students and Adult Degree Program students who cannot meet this schedule should try to complete their core 
requirements as early in their college careers as possible. 

Libera! Arts Abilities 

The Millsaps liberal arts education is intended to help develop these abilities: 

Reasoning - the ability to Ihink logically and reflectively, to analyze critically and constructively. 

Communication - the ability to express one's thoughts and feelings coherently and persuasively through written and oral 
communication and to work effectively in collaboration with others. 

Quantitative Thinking - the ability to understand, interpret, and use numerical and scientific data and the technology of the 
modern world. 

Historical Consciousness - the ability to understand the achievements, problems and challenges of the present with 
perspectives gained from a study of the past. 

Aesthetic Judgement - the ability to understand and appreciate creative responses to the world, and to develop one's own 
modes of creative e.xpression. 

Global and Multi-Cultural Awareness - the ability to understand and appreciate a variety of social and cultural perspectives. 

yaluing and Decision-Making - the ability to understand and appreciate differing moral viewpoints; to make carefully 

considered, well-reasoned decisions; and to make a mature assessment of one's own abilities, beliefs and values. 

Multi-Disciplinary Topics Courses Core 2-5 

Multi-disciplinary topics courses (core 2-5) use a thematic rather than survey approach. They take their focus from a 
particular field of knowledge - fine arts, history, literature, philosophy, or religion - but make explicit connections with 
other fields of knowledge. In this way students are encouraged to view human experience as a whole and to begin the process 
of making their own connections. Although a particular theme is chosen for each topic course, the themes are placed in their 
appropriate historical and global contexts and presented in such a way as to illustrate the process of historical change All 
multi-disciplinary topic courses include a substantial amount of writing, with an emphasis on analysis and critical thinking. 

Students should choose their topics courses in chronological sequence, beginnint; with the ancient world in the fall of their 
first year and proceeding to the contemporary world in the spring of their second year. Each topic course has either a primary 
or double disciplinary focus. Students must choose courses to meet this requirement which represent at least three different 
disciplinary focuses. 

The Heritage Program 

Heritage is a four-course, multi-disciplinary humanities program designed for freshmen as an alternative to the multi- 
disciplinary topic courses. It fulfills the requirements for core 2-5 and fine arts. 

Topic Courses Core 6-9 

Topics courses in the social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, mathematics and computer science (core 6-9) may be 
multi-disciplinary, but need not be. Courses meeting these requirements are designed to foster general abilities such as 
reasoning, quantitative thinking, valuing and decision making. They also include writing. Laboratory science courses 
introduce students to scientific method and to a representative body of scientific knowledge in a way that promotes an 
appreciation for the impact of science upon the contemporary world. 

32 



Fine Arts 

In addition to completing the requisite core courses, students must demonstrate proficiency in the fine arts in one of the 
following ways; 

1. completing the Heritage curriculum, or 

2. completing one of the following courses with a grade of C or higher, 
-FDS topics course with a tine arts focus 

-Art 2500, 2510, 2520. 2530, 2540, 2550, 2560. 2580, 2590, or any art studio course 
-Music 1000, 1010, 1100,2120 
-Theatre 1000. 1010, or 

3. demonstrating significant experience in creating art objects or demonstrating a prescribed level of competence in the 
performing arts by 

-completing four semesters of private study of voice or an instrument, or 
-completing 4 semester hours in studio art, or 
-completing 4 semester hours in Singers or a music ensemble, or 
-completing significant participation in four Players' productions. 

Writing Assessment Portfolio 

All students submit a Writing Proficiency Portfolio, consisting of seven papers written during their first two years at 
Millsaps, to be assessed at the end of the sophomore year to determine writing proficiency status. Demonstration of writing 
proficiency through this portfolio is a graduation requirement. If a student's writing is not found to be proficient, a student 
may be required to complete additional writing coursework, writing workshops, or writing tutorials. Traditional students who 
have not completed the Writing Proficiency Portfolio by their junior year will not be permitted to register for classes until the 
requisite papers have been submitted for assessment. Transfer and Adult Degree Program students must also submit seven 
papers written at Millsaps although the sequence for submission may vary according to the student's schedule of classes. All 
students will begin their Writing Proficiency Portfolio in their Introduction to Liberal Studies class. Submission of the 
remaining papers after LS is the student's responsibility. Students should consult the Writing Program Web page 
http;//www. millsaps.edu/dean/writing or the Writing Program Office in John Stone Hall for more information. 

Exemptions for Transfer Students 

With the approval of the Core Council, transfer students may substitute courses in history, literature, philosophy, or religion 
to meet from one to three of the core 2, 3, 4 or 5 requirements. Transfer students are required to take at least one core 2-5 
course at Millsaps. All four historical periods and at least three disciplines must be represented either by transfer credit or by 
course work at Millsaps in order to fulfill these graduation requirements. There must also be evidence of a significant amount 
of writing. Likewise, a student who completes a course in the natural sciences, mathematics, or social and behavioral sciences 
which presumes the skill and knowledge of a core course may be exempt from that particular core requirement. Once a 
student has enrolled at Millsaps, he or she will not ordinarily be permitted to use transfer credits to meet core requirements. 

64 Hour Policy 

After earning 64 semester hours at a junior or senior college, a student may not take additional work at a junior or community 
college and have it apply toward a degree from Millsaps. 

Residence Requirement 

To qualify for graduation from Millsaps, 32 of the last 40 semester hours of academic work must be done in residence as a 
degree-seeking student. An exception to this rule is the pre-engineering dual-degree program in which students may transfer 
back the equivalent of 32 semester hours. 

Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Proficiency at the intermediate level of an ancient or modern foreign language as demonstrated by satisfactory completion of 
a 2000 course taken at Millsaps, or the equivalent. (The number of hours required to complete this requirement will vary 
from 0-12 depending upon language placement.) 

Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree 

Students must complete Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. Students must complete four courses (ordinarily 16 semester 
hours) in at least three disciplines chosen fi-om the following list. At least two courses must be laboratory courses. Students 
may select four courses from group 1 or tltree courses from group 1 and one from group II. 

33 



Croup 1 

Biology any course that applied to the major 

Chemistry any lab course 

Geology any lab course 

Mathematics Analytic Geometry and Calculus II or higher 

Physics any lab course 

Computer Studies Computer Science I or higher 

Psychology Behavioral Neuroscience 

Group II 

Sociology-Anthropology Methods and Statistics 

Economics Econometrics and Applied Statistics 

Psychology Experimental Psychology II 

Additional Requirements for Bachelor of Business Administration Degree 

Students must complete, have prior credit for, or be exempt from Survey oFCalculus or higher level mathematics before 
taking sophomore-level course work in the Else School of Management. 

Al the sophomore level, students take: 

Principles of Economics 4 sem. hours 

Principles of Financial Accounting 4 sem. hours 

Principles of Management Accounting 2 sem. hours 

Introduction to Management Information 2 sem. hours 

At the Junior level, students take: 

Fundamentals of Marketing 4 sem. hours 

Principles of Corporate Finance 4 sem. hours 

Introduction to Management 4 sem. hours 

Operations Management with Computing 4 sem. hours 

At the senior level, students take: 

The Legal Environment of Business 4 sem. Hours 

Students must fulfill the requirements for an Accounting major or a Business Administration major. 

Majors: A major at Millsaps is a specialized course of study required of all students, offering the opportunity to focus in 
depth on a particular discipline. It usually consists of 32 to 48 hours of coursework specified by a particular department, in 
addition to the prescribed work lor the degree. A student must major in one of the following areas: Accounting, Art, Business 
Administration, Biology, Chemistry, Classical Studies, Computer Science, Economics, Education, English, European 
Studies, French, Geology, German, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, 
Religious Studies, Sociology-Anthropology, Spanish, or Theatre. 

Majors in accounting and business administration are only available with the BBA degree. The European Studies major is 
only available with the BA degree. All other majors are available with the BA or BS degree. 

Specific requirements for the major can be found under the appropriate department of instruction. Students may major in a 
subject only with the consent of the department chair. They are expected to declare a major by the end of the sophomore year. 
All work to be applied toward the major must be approved in advance by the department chair. 

A student may have more than one major by completing all of the requirements in the departments involved. 

Minors: While there is no requirement that students complete a minor as part of their degree, they may elect a minor in those 
departments which offer one. 

A student must have a minimum of 16 semester hours in a department in order to quality for a minor. A minimum of 8 
semester hours applied toward the minor must be taken at Millsaps. Specific requirements for a particular minor can be found 
under the appropriate department of instruction. 



34 



Areas of Concentration: In addition to the major and minor, a student may have an area of concentration within a particular 
discipline or among several disciplines. Areas of concentration within the major are not entered on the student transcript, 
hiterdisciplinary concentrations are treated like a minor and are entered on the transcript. 

Double Counting 

Courses taken to satisfy core requirements may also be used to satisfy either major requirements or additional degree 
requirements, but not both. Departments, however, may restrict the number of core courses that will count toward the major. 
Students should check with the chair of each department. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Before receiving a bachelor's degree the student must pass a satisfactory comprehensive examination in the major field of 
study. This examination is given in the senior year and is intended to cover subject matter greater in scope than a single 
course or series of courses. The purpo.se of the comprehensive e.xamination is to coordinate the class work with independent 
reading and thinking in such a way as to relate the knowledge acquired and give the student a general understanding of the 
field which could not be acquired From individual courses. 

The comprehensive examination requires at least three hours and is part written and part oral, the division of time between 
the two to be at the discretion of the members of the department concerned. The oral examination will be conducted by a 
committee composed of members of the department, and, if desired by the department, one or more members of the faculty 
from other departments or other qualified persons. The oral exam will ordinarily be given before December 1st in the fall 
semester and within the time period specified by the college in the spring semester. The written portion of the exam usually 
precedes the oral exam. 

Students may take the comprehensive examination only if the courses in which they have credit and in which they are 
currently enrolled are those which fulfill the requirements in their major department. They may take the examination in the 
spring semester if they are within one semester of graduation. The exainination may be given in the fall semester for students 
who meet the other requirements and who will not be in residence at Millsaps during the spring semester or who are pursuing 
a double major. 

The time of the comprehensive examination in the spring semester is published in the college calendar. Comprehensive 
examinations will not be given at any other time except by permission of the dean. Those who fail a comprehensive 
examination may have an opportunity to take another examination after the lapse of two months. Additional examinations 
may be taken at the discretion of the chairman of the student's major department with the consent of the dean of the college. 

Grade Point Index Required 

An overall grade point index of 2.00 is required for graduation. Transfer students must have a minimum grade point index of 
2.00 on their Millsaps work The grade point index is calculated on the total number of courses attempted, including courses 
repeated for a better grade. (See Section on Grades, Honors, Class Standing.) 

Application for a Degree 

Each student who is a candidate for a degree is required to submit a written application for the degree by November 1 of the 
academic year of graduation. This date also applies to students who plan to complete their work in the summer session. 
Forms for degree applications are available from the Office of Records. 

Requirements for a Second Degree 

In order to earn a second degree from Millsaps College a student must have a minimum of 32 semester hours beyond those 
required for the first degree and must meet all of the requirements for both the second degree and the second major. 

Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental 

Students interested in medicine, dentistry, osteopathy, optometry, podiatry, or veterinary medicine are urged to consult with a 
member of the Pre-medical Advisory Committee in designing a program that will fit particular needs, background, and 
interest. Members of the committee have references listing the requirements and admission policies of all American 
allopathic (M.D.) and most related schools. Information is also available for other medical programs, as well as nursing, 
occupational therapy, physical therapy, medical technology, and related fields. 

Early in the fall semester of the senior year, the student should arrange an interview with the Pre-medical Advisory 
Committee, which will evaluate the student's qualifications for medical study. This evaluation will be sent to the professional 
schools in which the student is interested. 

35 



It is the responsibility of the pre-medicai and pre-dental students to consult the catalogs of the schools to which they wish to 
apply for their specific requirements. However, the following courses generally fulfill the entrance requirements of medical, 
dental, and related schools: 

Biology 1 year 

General inorganic chemistry 1 year 

Organic chemistry 1 year 

Physics 1 year 

Mathematics 1 year 

Additional advanced science is often required. 

Many medically-related programs have more specific requirements. 

Millsaps College and the majority of medical and dental schools strongly recommend that the student obtain a baccalaureate 
degree in an area of interest. It is not required that this degree be in a science, and students are encouraged to achieve a broad 
background in the humanities and social sciences, although the above listed requirements are generally immutable. The new 
Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) emphasizes the desirability of a broad reading background, and also requires 
writing an essay. 

These requirements are further addressed in meetings of pre-health students held each semester. The pre-medical honorary, 
Alpha Epsilon Delta, also conducts meetings of interest to students in all health-related curricula. Interested students should 
avail themselves of these opportunities throughout their studies. 
Admission to medical and dental programs is highly competitive. Success involves: 

-grade point average (both total and science/math) 

-score on the appropriate professional exam (e.g. MCAT, DAT) 

-faculty and pre-med committee recommendations 

-outside activities (including both campus and work experience) 

-a successful interview with the professional school. 

Combined research/professional programs are offered by many of these schools. 

Pre-Ministerial 

There is no required program of studies for persons planning to enter one of the ministries of the Church. Undergraduate pre- 
seminary work at Millsaps should include significant work in the study of religion and philosophy and in the social and 
behavioral sciences. No one major is best. Students considering a ministerial career should consult with the chair of the 
department of Religious Studies or the college chaplain as early as possible. Given the special challenges of the practice of 
mmistry, students should plan to undertake professional education in a theological seminary. The best preparation for such 
professional education is an undergraduate education with breadth in the liberal arts. Pre-ministerial students may also want 
to consider the Concentration in Christian Education (listed under Interdisciplinary Programs). 

Pre-Law 

No particular major or sequence of courses is necessary for students planning to go to law school. Indeed, there is no ideal 
pre-law program applicable to all students. Instead, a student planning to attend law school should strive to attain and master 
the intellectual qualities that make one successful in the study of law: (1 ) the ability to think and analyze critically, and (2) 
the ability to write and write well. 

Different students will learn, practice and hone these qualities in different majors and in different courses all across the 
disciplines here at Millsaps. So, to build the most appropriate program of study, a student planning for law school should 
consult her or his major advisor, faculty that have been influential in her or his academic study thus far, and the pre-law 
advisor. 

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) should be taken in the spring semester of the junior or the fall semester of the 
senior year. So, at some point in the junior year, the student interested in law school should consult with the pre-law advisor 
to begin preparations for the LSAT and the law school admission process. 

Pre-Social Work 

Students who wish to prepare for a professional career in social work should plan a broad liberal arts program with a major in 
one of the social sciences, preferably sociology-anthropology. Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Anthropology, 

36 



Marriage and Family, and Social Stratification are essential. Other courses which are strongly recommended include 
Sociology of Human Interaction, Theories of Personality, and Social Psychology. Internships can provide valuable practical 
experience with community social welfare agencies. Students are urged to consult with their faculty advisers to plan a 
schedule. 

Programs for Teacher Licensure 

The Millsaps Teacher Education Program is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE). A student may pursue any degree offered by the College and qualify for teacher licensure provided all College 
major requirements are met and all teacher licensure requirements are met. The Teacher Education Programs offer 
certification in Elementary Education, Secondary Education, and in select areas (K-I2). In addition, Millsaps offers Dual 
Certification in Special Education. 

The licensure program is fully integrated within the liberal arts curriculum of the College, and our professors teach in the 
liberal arts core curriculum as well. The streamlined and field-based program maximizes student time and potential. Students 
are encouraged to proceed through the licensure process in a sequential manner. Teacher certification can be earned 
concurrently with any other major during the four-year undergraduate experience. 

There are certain entrance standards which must be met prior to being fully admitted in the Department of Education. 
Entrance requirements include: completion of the core curriculum (1-9), a minimum overall score of 21 on the American 
College Test (ACT) with no subscore lower than 1 8 upon entrance to college OR a minimum score of 860 on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT) upon entrance to college OR appropriate scores on the Professional Assessments for Beginning 
Teachers (PRAXIS), and a minimum grade point average of 2.5. Students must complete all application procedures with the 
Chair of the Department of Education. To receive the College's recommendation for teacher licensure, the student must 
maintain a 2.5 GPA or above, score at the appropriate level on specified PRAXIS tests, and complete the Portfolio for 
Comprehensive Examination with the Department of Education. 

Cooperative Programs 

Business Administration 
Major Plus Program in Business Administration: The Else School of Management offers a program designed to permit 
students pursuing degrees other than the BBA, particularly those working toward the BA, to complete the MBA at Millsaps 
with only one additional year of study beyond the bachelors degree program. The Major Plus program specifies certain 
courses from Else School offerings which students take as general electives during their bachelors program. These courses 
are: Principles of Economics, Introduction to the Legal Environment of Business, Business Statistics and Computing I and 11, 
Survey of Accounting, Introduction to Management, Operations Management with Computing, Fundamentals of Marketing, 
and Principles of Corporate Finance. A non-BBA student who successflilly completes all of the prescribed courses will be in 
a position to earn the MBA by completing only the upper-level courses pertinent to that degree program. This can normally 
be done in one additional year of study at Millsaps. For details of the Major Plus program, contact the Director of Graduate 
Business Admissions in the Else School of Management. 

Engineering and Applied Science 

This program at Millsaps offers many opportunities for the student interested in engineering, applied science, management 
and business administration. With this cooperative program the student can combine the advantages of a liberal education at 
Millsaps with the specialized programs of a major university The Arthur C. Miller Pre-engineering Scholarship Fund 
provides a scholarship based on financial need and academic progress for a student expressing an interest in engineering. 

3-2 BS Programs: Millsaps has agreements with four universities - Auburn, Columbia, Vanderbilt and Washington 
universities - by which a student may attend Millsaps for three years and then continue work at any of the schools listed 
above. The student then transfers a maximum of 32 semester hours back for a bachelor's degree from Millsaps and at the end 
of the fiflh year receives another bachelor's degree from the university. 

4-2 BS and MS Programs: The Columbia University Combined Plan also has 4-2 programs in which a student attends 
Millsaps for four years, completing degree requirements and then spends two more years at Columbia to obtain a BS or MS 
degree from the Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science. 

3-3 BS/MS and BS/MBA Programs: Washington University also has a combined Degree Program wherein the student 
spends three years at Millsaps and then spends three years at Washington University earning both the BS and MS fi'om the 

37 



School of Engineering and applied Science or both the BS from the School of Engineering and applied Science and the MBA 
from the Graduate School of Business Administration. 

A wide variety of programs are ottered by the four participating universities, including financial aid for qualified students. 
For detailed descriptions of programs and financial aid, the interested student is urged to consult u-ith the pre-engineering 
advisor. To be admitted to the programs listed below the student must fulfill certain minimum course requirements at 
Millsaps. For many programs, particularly those in engineering and applied science, the mathematics requirements are strict. 
To keep the 3-2 or 4-2 option viable, a student should plan to take calculus at the earliest possible time at Millsaps. 

For students interested in engineering, the general expectation of the cooperating engineering schools is that most, if not all, 
of the science, mathematics and humanities requirements for the engineering degree be taken at Millsaps. Students interested 
in a particular program, however, should consult the catalog of the appropriate university and the Millsaps pre-engineering 
advisor. Some programs have particular requirements, such as the Auburn University electrical engineering requirement of an 
ethics course, which students might wish to fulfill at Millsaps. 

The Dual Degree Progrnm at Auburn University includes bachelor of engineering degrees in aerospace, chemical, civil, 
electrical, industrial, material and mechanical engineering. It is also possible to obtain a BS in agricultural engineering. 

The Combined Plan Program at Columbia University offers BS and MS degrees in civil, electrical, industrial, 
mechanical, mining, nuclear, biological, chemical, metallurgical and mineral engineering. Other programs include computer 
science, engineering mechanics, applied mathematics (BS only), applied physics, materials science, operations research, solid 
state science (MS only), chemical metallurgy, applied chemistry and materials science. 

Vanderbilt University offers bachelor of engineering degrees in chemical, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Washington University offers BS and MS programs in bio-medical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical and mechanical 
engineering. Other programs include computer science, systems science and engineering, and business administrafion 
(MBA). 

Military Science 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps provides students an opportunity to earn a Presidential Commission as a Second 
Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserves, or the Army National Guard, concurrent with the pursuit of an academic degree. The 
objectives of the program are: 

• To produce the future officer leadership of the U.S. Army. 

• To provide an understanding of how the U.S. Army Reserve and Army National Guard fit into the National Defense 
structure. 

• To develop the leadership and managerial potential of students to facilitate their future performance as officers. 

• To develop the students' abilities to think creatively and speak and write effectively. 

• To encourage the development of mental and moral standards that are essential to military service. 

The Program of instruction includes developing self-discipline, physical stamina and other qualities that are cornerstones of 
leadership excellence. 

The ROTC Program is divided into a Basic Course of instruction (Freshman and Sophomore classes) and an Advanced 
Course of instruction (Junior and Senior classes). In addition to the course of instruction, students are required to attend a 
Leadership Laboratory Math. Enalis h. and Reading courses are offered through the ROTC Enhancement Skills Training 
Program. Three semester hours are e arned for enrollment in each Skills and Enhancement Course. These courses are listed as 
ENG 223 (English), RE 309 (Reading) and MATH 200 (Mathematics! Students enrolled in the junior and senior ROTC 
classes are also required to enroll in and complete one course in Psychology (PSY), Mathematics (MATH)(advanced level). 
Computer Science (CSC)(any level), and History of the Military (HIST 308) prior to commissioning. Three semester hours 
are earned for each course. 

All students complete an internship during the summer between their junior and senior years. Off-campus summer training in 
parachuting, helicopter operations, engineering and outdoor marksmanship are available to all ROTC students. 

Description of Courses 

MLSC 101. Fundamentals of Leadership and Management I. Teaches the basic stuicture of the United States Military 
with emphasis on the organization of the Army. Teaches leadership principles and traits, customs and courtesies of the 
services, drill and ceremonies, and introduction to map reading. 



38 



MLSC 102. Fundamentals of Leadership and Management II. Teaches leadership principles and traits, customs and 
courtesies of the service, drill and ceremonies, first aid, and introduction to land navigation. 

MLSC 200. Fundamentals of Arithmetic Systems (ROTC) Prerequisite: ROTC cadets only. See Mathematics 200. 

MLSC 201C. Advanced Applied Leadership and Management I (Compression Course). This course is designed for 
sophomore students who have not had previous military science classes, basic training, or high school JROTC. it teaches the 
basic structure of the United States Military with emphasis on the organization of the Army and explores the dynamics of 
effective leadership, leadership principles, traits and dimensions. 

MLSC 201. Applied Leadership and Management I. A study of military tasks and skills an officer must be proficient in 
during his/her career. It teaches written and oral communication techniques; presentation of Information briefings; prevention 
of heat and cold weather injuries; tactical operations; and development of leadership skills. 

MLSC 202. Applied Leadership and Management II. A study of the military tasks and skills an officer must be proficient 

in during his/her career. Teaches land navigation; using a map compass; role of non-commission officers; conduct of drill and 
ceremony; first aid; written and oral communication techniques; and procedures for public speaking. 

MLSC 202C. Advanced Applied Leadership and Management II (Compression Course). This course is designed for 
sophomore students who have not had previous military science courses, basic training, or high school JROTC. Teaches basic 
first-aid and small unit organization. Major focus is on mastering map reading and land navigation skills. 

MLSC 223. Practical Rhetoric (ROTC) Prerequisite: ROTC cadets only. See ENG 233. 

MLSC 300. Basic ROTC Camp. Prerequisites: Students must have a minimum of 2 years college remaining. ROTC Basic 
Camp is a six-week summer training and evaluation class conducted on an active Army base. Students learn fundamental 
military skills and develop the ability to lead others. Students earn approximately $761 .00 while learning fundamental 
leadership skills with hundreds of other college students from universities throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. This 
is a substitute course for MS 100, MS 1 02, MS 200, level courses. Qualifies students for MS 300 level courses. 

MLSC 301. Advanced i^cadcrship and Management I. Prerequisites: 10 hours, MS 100 and MS 200 level courses or MS 
300, or MS 201-04 or MS 202-04, or prior military service (active or reserve), or 3 years JROTC. Prepares students for rigors 
and challenges of being an Army officer. Includes introduction to leadership principles, assertiveness training, and self- 
evaluation. Advanced drill and ceremony, physical fitness training, individual tactical training, and advanced map 
reading/orienteering. Emphasis is placed on the application of leadership dimensions, oral and written communications. 
Qualified students receive $1500 stipend annually. Course includes mandatory field training exercises. 

MLSC 302. Advanced Leadership and Management II. Prerequisite: MLSC 301. Analysis and application of the leaders' 
role in directing and coordinating the efforts of individuals and small organizations in the execution of assigned missions and 
projects. Evaluates students' ability to lead, direct and influence others Qualified students receive $1000 stipend annually. 
Course includes scheduled field training exercises and is followed by a one-week mandatory training exercise at a Military 
installation. 

MLSC 309Z. Introduction to Reading (ROTQ. Prerequisite: ROTC cadets only. See RE 309. 

MLSC 400. Advanced ROTC Camps. Prerequisites: MLSC 301 and MLSC 302. Advanced Camp is a six weeks summer 
training and evaluation class conducted on an Active Army base. Cadets must attend advanced camp during the summer upon 
completion of MLSC 302. Students are placed in leadership positions and evaluated on their ability to plan, direct, and 
execute tasks while operating in challenging and stressful environments. Students will earn approximately $800 for 
attendance at Advanced Camp. 

MLSC 401. Seminar in Leadership and Management I. Prerequisites: MLSC 301 and MLSC 302. Students learn small 
organization administration, personnel management, staff procedures, and military justice. Included in these areas are 
problems solving, functions of the chain-of-command and officer/enlisted relationships. Emphasized throughout the course 
are effective oral and written communication skills. Qualified students receive $1500 stipend annually. 

MLSC 402. Seminar in Leadership and Management II. Prerequisite: MLSC 401. Teaches ethics and professionalism, 
basic logistical procedures, personnel performance counseling techniques, conduct of staff meeting, and military justice. 

39 



Students receive a review of military skills subjects, leadership training and final preparation for entering the respective 
Army career fields. Qualified students receive SI 500 stipend annually. 

Special Programs 
Ford Teaching Fellows Program 

The Ford Teaching Fellows Program provides an opportunity for upper-class students with an interest in college teaching to 
work closely with a faculty member in their area of academic interest. Primary teaching under faculty supervision is 
encouraged as well as research and scholarship. Each student must submit an application, completed jointly with their 
proposed faculty mentor, lo the program director early in the spring semester. Approximately twelve students are selected 
each year for participation in this program. 

The Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides an opportunity for .students of outstanding ability to pursue an advanced course of study which 
would ordinarily not be available. In the spring of their junior year and the fall of their senior year, honors students carry out 
a research project of their choice under a professor's direction. The project's final product, consisting wholly or partially of a 
written thesis, is presented before a panel of faculty members. In the spring of the senior year, students participate in an 
interdisciplinary colloquium which intensively examines a topic of broad interest. Students successfiilly completing all 
phases of the Honors Program receive the designation "with honors" in their field of honors work at graduation. Students 
interested in participating in the Honors Program should consult with the program director in the fall of their junior year. 

The Washington Semester 

The Washington Semester is a joint arrangement between American University, Millsaps College, and other colleges and 
universities in the United States to extend the resources of the national capital to superior students in the field of the social 
sciences. The object is to provide a direct contact with the work of governmental departments and other national and 
international agencies that are located in Washington, thus acquainting the students with possible careers in public service 
and imparting a knowledge of government in action. 

Under this arrangement qualified students of demonstrated capacity from the participating colleges spend a semester at the 
School of Government and Public Administration of the American University in Washington. They earn four courses of 
credit toward graduation. Two course credits are earned in a Conference Seminar, in which high-ranking leaders of politics 
and government meet with students. One course credit is earned in a research course, which entails the writing of a paper by 
utilizing the sources available only at the nation's capital. An additional course credit is earned in an Internship, in which the 
student is placed in a government or public interest organization office. 

Public Administration Internship 

With the cooperation of city, state, and federal agencies, students who have had the introductory public administration course 
may be placed in middle management level positions. 

School of Management Intern Programs 

Students have the opportunity of obtaining specialized training and practical experience in management through an 
established Internship Program. The program involves prominent regional and national business organizations and agencies 
of the state government. The student's training is conducted and supervised by competent management personnel according 
to a predetermined agenda of activities. Evaluation of the student's participation and progress provides the basis for granting 
appropriate academic credit. 

International Study 

Based on the belief that international experience is vital to successful leadership in all academic and professional fields, the 
Center for International Initiatives (CII) is dedicated to the promotion and development of international co-curricular 
opportunities for all members of the Millsaps community. International study typically takes place between the completion of 
a student's first and third year of study at Millsaps College. A student may arrange to study abroad for a semester, year or 
summer. The timing of study is determined, in part, by a student's academic program and progress toward completion of their 
degree requirements. 

Students interested in international study should contact the Cll as much as a year in advance of their intended tenn of 
departure for assistance in planning and program selection. Programs are located in every comer of the world, cover virtually 
all interest areas, and typically have one or more of the following foci: academic, fine arts, service, internship, language and 
teaching. The Study Abroad office provides information on programs sponsored by Millsaps College, in addition to those 
sponsored by other organizations. 

40 



Among Millsaps students, the most popular program choices are those designed, directed, and taught by Millsaps faculty 
each summer. Millsaps programs are located in France, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Europe (Business or Liberal Arts). 
Participants receive full academic credit for select core and major requirements without having to worry about transfer credit 
issues. 

Financial Aid for Study Abroad 

Students who receive or are eligible to receive federal financial aid may apply these funds toward the cost of study in an 
approved program. Unsubsidized federal loans for the purpose of study abroad are available for students who do not qualify 
for need-based aid. More information is located in the 'Financial Information' section of this publication. Millsaps academic 
scholarships may not be applied toward off-campus study. Students planning international study during the fall or spring 
semester must complete an official Leave of Absence petition in order to maintain eligibility to retain academic scholarships. 
However, it will be necessary to reapply for need-based aid. 

Academic Credit for Study Abroad 

To receive Millsaps academic credit in a non-Millsaps sponsored program; all courses must be pre-approved by the 
appropriate faculty members and submitted to the registrar's office prior to departure. Students seeking such credit should not 
make a fmal commitment to a program until such approval is received. 

Summer Program in London, Paris, Munich and Florence 

Millsaps College offers a summer European program based in London, Paris, Munich, and Florence, with opportunities for 
other European travel and cultural experiences built into the program. Students may choose courses offered by the Else 
School of Management, the Division of Arts and Letters, and the Division of Sciences. Millsaps faculty designs and teaches 
the courses, integrating experiences, field trips, and guest speakers that highlight the worldwide classroom. The program is 
open to graduate and undergraduate students. Course listings vary each year. 

Recent listings by the Else School of Management include History of Economic Thought; Issues in International Economic 
Policy; International Legal Environment; International Lessons in Leadership; Histoiy and Development of International 
Banking and Commerce; Marketing in a Global Environment and Emerging Issues in International Finance. 

Recent listings by the Division of Arts and Letters and Division of Sciences include The Evolution of Evolutionaiy Thought; 
Power Struggle in the American Colonies: Bourbons versus British; The Eye/I of Discover}': American Travel Writing in 
Context; Expatriate Writers in London and Paris; The Roman Conquest of the Etruscans and the Germans: Archaeology on 
the Edge of the Empire; and Medieval Art and Architecture. 

Millsaps Summer in Nice and Paris 

Open to any student who has at least a year of French, the program is designed for students wishing to perfect their language 
skills and learn the Gallic way of life. The first three weeks of the program are based in Nice; the last week in Paris. Classes 
are taught by Millsaps faculty and the staff of France Langue. They include Intermediate French; Contemporary French 
Culture; Provencal Literature & Civilization; and Advanced Grammar. The schools in Nice and Paris are centrally located in 
the heart Nice, very close to shopping avenues and just a 1 5-minute walk from the famous avenue Promenade des Anglais 
that runs alongside the beach, and, in Paris, close to the Arc de Triomphe. Students live with middle-class families carefully 
selected for their friendliness, patience, and support of foreign students. 

Living In Yucatan 

An environmental citizenship field experience exploring cultural and resource issues from the height of the classic Maya 
civilization through current trends in tourism and commercial development. The course comprises three research and study 
modules: Maya culture and archaeology; tropical deciduous forest ecology; and the impact of development on the Great 
Maya Coral Reef The Maya culture module explores current archaeological excavations and evaluates several major 
reconstructed sites. Additionally, students experience modern rural and urban culture from the Maya perspective. 

Tropical deciduous ecology is studied on the grounds of the historic Rancho Riuic, home to one of the oldest forests in the 
Puuc Region of Yucatan and an excellently preserved, as yet unstudied, major Maya city. Students collect data for a baseline 
species audit and collaborate with graduate students and faculty from Autonomous University of Yucatan (UADY). 

The final module examines the impact of tourism on the shallow marine environment and sea turtle habitat from Cozumel 
and Cancun to the coast of Belize. Students collect field data on the reefs and retrieve sediments for chemical analysis. 

41 



Participants live in a variety of cultural and ecological zones, including the capital city of Merida, major archaeological sites, 
the Caribbean, and a week at the reconstructed colonial hacienda Tabi, once the largest hacienda in the Yucatan, 

Millsaps Summer Program in Costa Rica 

Designed for students interested in Spanish, this program features courses taught by Millsaps professors and includes an 
excellent balance of cultural activities, educational tours, and recreational travel. Classes are held at the Instituto 
Centroamericano de Asuntos Internacionales (ICAl), an outstanding private academic institution located in San Jose', the 
capital of the most stable, progressive country in Latin America. Because participating students live with carefully selected 
middle-class families, they have an exceptional opportunity to experience Hispanic culture first-hand, as well as learn 
through on-site classes and field trips. The program is open to all students who have had at least a year of college Spanish or 
the equivalent. 

Spring Break For Cross Cultural Understanding In Saltillo, Mexico 

The Saltillo program enables participants to experience a rich culture, serve the physical needs of the poor, and share in the 
profound faith of the Mexican people. Students help distribute food, clothing, toys and other items to the nomadic Indians 
living there, as well as participate in daily worship. Sponsored by the Catholic Campus Ministry. 

Millsaps Institute of Central American Studies (MICAS) 

MICAS administers a program of research and educational opportunity in Central America specifically focused on the 
undergraduate research experience. The Center's research projects and other educational opportunities are designed to help 
undergraduate students experience, through hands-on, research-based inquiry, the anthropology and archaeology, culture, 
environment, geology and marine science of Central America. 

MICAS also provides opportunities for scholarly and cultural advancement to academic research groups and the cultures and 
societies of Central Ainerica. Field studies and research in various disciplines are supported by the laboratory, analytical and 
data processing facilities on the Millsaps campus. 

Global Partners Project 

The Global Partners Project is a collaboration of forty-one liberal arts colleges from three consortia: the Associated Colleges 
of the South, Associated Colleges of the Midwest and the Great Lakes Colleges Association. The goal of Global Partners is to 
reconceive existing study-abroad programs through collaboration among the 41 member institutions, increasing international 
opportunities for students and faculty. The project currently recognizes over 250 study abroad programs in 57 countries. 

Adult Learning 
The Office of Adult Learning 

The Office of Adult Learning coordinates and administers programs and services to adult learners. These include the Adult 
Degree Program, the Community Enrichment Series, Leadership Seminars in the Humanities, and Advanced Placement 
Institutes, as well as admitting and advising non-degree-seeking students. 

The Adult Degree Program 

The Adult Degree Program was established in 1982 to meet the needs of nontraditional adult undergraduates who wish to 
pursue a degree as full-time or part-time students. Students admitted to the Adult Degree Program are required to take Liberal 
Studies 1010 in order to take advantage of the features of the Adult Degree Program, specifically the opportunity for 
independent directed study and credit for prior learning. Adult Degree Program staff provides individualized academic 
advising and evaluation of previous college work. For more information, contact the Office of Adult Learning. 

Community Enrichment Series 

Since 1 972, Millsaps College has offered to the Greater Jackson community a variety of opportunities through the 
Community Enrichment Series. These are non-credit courses which require no prerequisites and no examinations. They cover 
a variety of special interest areas such as "Talking Your Way Through France," "Understanding the Stock Market," 
"Computer Basics," "Assertiveness Training," "Landscape Design," and "Pottery." Enrichment courses are available in the 
fall, winter and spring. 

Leadership Seminars in the Humanities 

Established in 1987 and made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Leadership 
Seminars in the Humanities bring together Millsaps professors in the humanities with corporate and professional leaders in 

42 



the community. These seminars, which carry graduate credit, offer an opportunity for serious engagement with intellectual 
issues affecting society and the individual. 

Advanced Placement Institutes 

Designed for teachers who teach Advanced Placement courses to high school students, Advanced Placement Institutes are 
offered each summer with instructors recommended by the College Board. Participants work with these master teachers to 
plan and prepare courses that will help students to become well prepared for college courses and to perform creditably on the 
Advanced Placement examinations. 

Principals' Institute 

The Millsaps College Principals' Institute provides personal and professional growth opportunities for principals and assistant 
principals of public, private, and parochial schools. The Institute h an effort to form partnerships between Millsaps College 
and the K-12 education community in orderto strengthen education in Mississippi. Administered by the Millsaps Education 
Department in collaboration with the Mississippi Department of Education, the Institute awards professional development 
credits to administrators who participate in its programs. 

Graduate Programs 
Master of Accountancy 

The Master of Accountancy degree is designed for students who intend to pursue professional careers in public accounting, 
business, and the government/non-protlt sector. The MAcc fulfills the educational requirements to sit for the CPA 
examination in states which have adopted the AlCPA's 150 credit hour requirement. The program involves a fifth year of 
study beyond the BBA degree. Students who plan to seek the MAcc degree should take the basic accounting major. For more 
details about the MAcc program, consult with a member of the accounting faculty, the Graduate Business Admissions office, 
or see the Master of Accountancy description under the Else School of Management portion of the catalog or see the Else 
School web pages. 

Master of Business Administration 

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree is offered in both daytime and evening classes. The Millsaps MBA 
program is particularly suited to students with a liberal arts background. A typical class includes men and women with a 
broad range of ages, and with backgrounds from engineering, the physical and social sciences, and the arts and the 
humanities, as well as from business. For further information about the MBA Program, see the Graduate Catalog, contact the 
Graduate Business Admissions office, or see the Else School of Management web pages. 

Administration of the Curriculum 

Grades, Honors, Class Standing 

The grade in any class is detennined by the combined class standing and a written examination as explained in the class 
syllabus. 

A represents superior work. 

B represents above average achievement. 

C represents a satisfactory level of achievement. 

D represents a less than satisfactory level of achievement in the regularly prescribed work of the class. 

P represents failure to do the regularly prescribed work of the class. All marks of D and above are passing 

marks, and F represents failure. 
^ indicates that a student has withdrawn from a course or has received approval to withdraw from the 

College. 
. indicates that the work is incomplete and will be counted as a F if the incomplete is not removed by the 

end of the following semester. 
IP indicates work in progress. 

CR represents passing work in a non-graded course taken for credit. 

NC represents no credit in a non-graded course taken for credit. 

NR indicates no grade reported. 

AU represents audit. 



43 



Grade Points 

The completion of any academic course sliail entitle a student to the tbllowing grade points for a semester hour: 



A 


4 


A- 


3.67 


B+ 


3.33 


B 


3 


B- 


2.67 


C+ 


2.33 


C 


2 


c- 


1.67 


D+ 


1.33 


F 






Grade points earned for a course are determined by multiplying the numerical value of the grade by the number of semester 
hours that the course carries. A grade point average is detennined by dividing the total number of grade points by the number 
of semester hours taken. o i- j 



The deadlme for submitting grade changes to the Office of Records will be no later than the date that midterm grades are due 
in the semester following the one that contains the error. The same deadline will apply to changes in grades for students who 
have already graduated. No changes will be made in class rankings or graduation rankings based upon grade changes for 
students that have graduated. Any changes in distinction will be posted to the individual's record. If a change in distinction 
occurs, the student must return the original diploma to the Office of Records. Once the original diploma is received, another 
diploma will be ordered with the correct distinction on it. 

It is the student's responsibility to inform the Office of Records of any possible errors and to work with the professor(s) 
involved. ^ ^ ' 



icies. 



This deadline does not apply to the grades of Incomplete and W, which have separate pol 

Class Standing 

The following number of courses is required: 

For sophomore rating 28 semester hours 

For junior rating 60 semester hours 

For senior rating 92 semester hours 

A student's classification is determined at the beginning of the fall and spring semester. 

Student Status 

Degree-seeking students taking 12 or more semester hours will be classified as full-time students. 

Degree-seeking students taking fewer than 12 semester hours will be classified as part-time students. 

A non-degree student is a mature person of ability and seriousness of purpose who enrolls for limited academic work and 
does not plan to seek a degree. Non-degree studems observe the same regulations concerning attendance, examination and 
proficiency as regular students. v,A<..iiMmiiuii <juu 

Credit/No Credit Grade Option 

With the approval ol^thc instructor, some courses may be taken for credit/no credit. Students must indicate their intention to 
ake a course for credit/no credit at the time of registration. Credit/ no credit grading requires flill participation of the student 
in all class activities. Credit signifies work of passing quality or above, though it carries no grade points. Core courses and 
courses taken to meet additional degree requirements may not be taken for credit/no credit. Courses required for a student's 
major ordinarily may not be taken for credit/no credit. No more than eight semester hours graded credit/no credit may be 
included in the 128 semester hours required for graduation. Courses taken for credit/no credit will not affect a student's grade 
point average. 

44 



Auditing Courses 

Courses may be audited if the instructor of tlie course gives written approval on the registration form. Students must indicate 
their intention to audit at the time of registration, and once a course has been registered for audit, it may not be changed. No 
credit is earned for courses that are audited, and the grade of audit does not affect the GPA. For information about fees 
associated with auditing courses, see the special fees section of the catalog (page 21). 

Repeat Courses 

A student may enroll in a course at Millsaps which has previously been taken. A course previously taken at Millsaps may 
also be repeated at another institution with the prior approval of the registrar in consultation with the appropriate department 
chair. When a course is repeated, no additional course credit is earned, but all grades are calculated into the cumulative grade 
point average. All grades reported for the course remain a part of the permanent academic record. Millsaps does not 
guarantee the availability of courses for repeat credit. 

Graduation With Distinction 

A student whose grade point average is 3.5 for the entire course shall be graduated Cum Laude; one whose grade point 
average is 3.7 shall be graduated Magna Cum Laude; and one whose grade point average is 3.9 and who has a rating of 
excellent on the comprehensive examination shall be graduated Summa Cum Laude. To be eligible for graduation Cum 
Laude, Magna Cum Laude or Summa Cum Laude, a student must have passed at least 64 semester hours in Millsaps College. 

In determining eligibility for distinction for students who have not done all their college work at Millsaps, the grade points 
earned on the basis of grades made at other institutions will be considered, but students will be considered eligible only if 
they have the required average both on the work done at Millsaps and on college courses as a whole. 

Graduation With Honors 

A student who successfully completes the Honors Program in a selected field of study, which need not be in the student's 
major, receives the designation with honors in that field at graduation. 

A degree-seeking student with junior standing and a 3.3 grade point average may apply to a faculty member for permission to 
undertake an honors project. In the fall semester of the junior year, the student submits an honors project agreement to the 
Honors Program director. Upon approval of the director, the student enrolls for the spring semester in a directed study course. 
Honors Research 1. For the fall semester of the senior year, the student enrolls in Honors Research 11, but completes the bulk 
of the work before that time in order to be able to defend the thesis to the student's defense committee in the fall. A letter 
grade is assigned for each of these two courses. For the spring semester of the senior year, the student enrolls in the Honors 
Colloquium, designed to bring together all students in the program for intellectual exchange. 

A student may voluntarily withdraw candidacy for honors at any time. Regular college regulations apply in the matter of 
dropping a course and receiving course credit. 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

The Phi Beta Kappa chapter at Millsaps elects members from the graduating class each spring. To be considered for election 
to membership in Phi Beta Kappa, a student must meet the following criteria: 

1 . Completion of requirements for a BA or BS degree with a liberal arts or sciences major. (At least three-fourths 
of the work required for the degree must be in the liberal arts and sciences.) 

2. A minimum of one-half of the work required for graduation completed at Millsaps. 

3. One course in mathematics, calculus or above, and one course in a foreign language at the intermediate level or 
above. 

4. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.7 based on seven or more semesters. (Grades earned in applied 
or professional work are not counted in computing GPA for the purpose of election to Phi Beta Kappa.) 

Transfer students must meet the required grade point average both on work done at Millsaps and on their college work as a 
whole. No more than 10 percent of the liberal arts and science graduates may be elected to membership from a graduating 
class. 

Election to Beta Gamma Sigma 

Beta Gamma Sigma is the national honor society for business prograins accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. Students are elected each spring. To be considered for membership in Beta Gamma Sigma, an 
undergraduate must: 

45 



1 . pursue the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, 

2. be of high moral character, 

3. be in the upper seven percent of the junior class or upper ten percent of the senior class, and 

4. be approved by the nominating committee. 

The cumulative grade point average is used to determine class rank. No more than 10 percent of the BBA graduates may be 
elected to membership from a graduating class. 

Dean's Scholars 

At the end of the fall and spring semester, the Dean's Scholars List is issued and consists of those students who for that 
semester: 

(a) earned at least 12 semester hours. 

(b) earned a grade point average of at least .3.5 for that semester. 

(c) earned grades of C or higher in each course. 

(d) met the standard, in the judgment of the dean, of being a good citizen of the College community. 

President's Scholars 

At the end of the fall and spring semester, the President's Scholars List is issued and consists of those students who for that 
semester; 

(a) earned at least 1 2 semester hours. 

(b) earned a grade point average of 3.85 for that semester. 

(c) earned grades of C or higher in each course. 

(d) met the standard, in the judgment of the Dean of the College, of being a good citizen of the College community. 

Course Load 

Sixteen semester hours per semester is considered the normal load for full-time students. In order to be classified as a full- 
time student, one must take no fewer than 12 semester hours. 

Students are not encouraged to register for more than 18 hours of academic work unless they have a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.0. No student may register for more than 20 hours in a semester without a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 
and permission of the Dean of the College. A student will ordinarily not be permitted to register for more than 22 hours in a 
semester. 

Administrative Regulations 
Schedule Changes 

No studexit can be registered for courses in another college while being enrolled at Millsaps without the written permission of 
the dean of the college. A student cannot change cUisses, drop classes or take up new classes except by the consent of the 
faculty adviser or the dean. If courses are dropped prior to the last day to drop courses without penalty, then the dropped 
courses will not appear on the student's record. Courses dropped after this date are recorded as W. There is a published date, 
following mid-term grades, after which it is no longer possible to drop a course without the approval of the dean. Students 
who drop a course without securing the required approvals will receive an F. 

Withdrawal 

In order to withdraw from the College within any term, an undergraduate student (except for ADP and Non-degree) must 
meet with the Director of Retention and Student Success for an exit interview and to obtain a withdrawal form. ADP and 
Non-degree students must meet with the Director of the Adult Degree Program. No refund will be considered unless the 
withdrawal form with appropriate signatures is completed and presented to the Business Office. Refunds will be made 
according to the policy outlined under the Financial Regulations section. 

A student who withdraws with permission after the first seven days of the semester will receive all W grades. Individual 
course drops that adjust a student's schedule are purged from the student's schedule and are not recorded on the academic 
record. 

A student who withdraws with permission after the first seven days, but before mid-semester will have grades recorded as W 
in each course. A student who withdraws without permission receives a grade of F in each course. 

46 



Students should complete all course withdrawals by mid-semester. The mid-semester deadline for completing course 
withdrawals is published in the college catalog. 

Students who wish to withdraw from one or more courses after the mid-semester deadlme must file a written petition with the 
Dean of the College. Petitions will not be approved unless students can show evidence that they are in extraordinary 
situations which warrant exceptions to the general policy of the College. 

Enforced withdrawal may result from habitual delinquency in class, or any other circumstance which prevents the student 
from fulfilling the purpose of the class. 

The College reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student. In such a case, the pro rata portion of tuition will be 
returned, except that students withdrawing under discipline forfeit the right to a refund. 

No student who withdraws is entitled to a grade report or to a transcript of credits until all accounts are settled in the Business 
Office. 

Medical Withdrawal 

Medical withdrawals are granted to students only in the rare case where their physical, mental, or emotional health prevents 
them from continuing studies at the college. 

It is the sole responsibility of the student requesting a medical withdrawal during any semester to complete and submit all 
required paperwork by the last day of classes in that semester as defined by the official college calendar. All requests for 
medical withdrawals must be accompanied by a medical professional's recommendation for withdrawal and documentation of 
illness. Students granted a medical withdrawal will receive the grade of "W" in all attempted classes. Medical withdrawals 
may only be granted for the current semester. Upon return to the college, students must present documentation from the 
medical professional that states the student has been treated by a medical professional and in his/her expert opinion tlte 
student's condition has improved to the point that he/she can handle the demands of college life. 

Academic Probation 

Students who earn in any semester a grade point average of less than 1.5 will be placed on academic probation. A student 
may be removed from academic probation by earning a 2.0 grade point average during a regular semester at Millsaps College 
provided that the student completes at least 12 semester hours and has an acceptable cumulative average. 

Academic Suspension 

A student on academic probation for nvo consecutive semesters will be placed on academic suspension. A student may also 
be placed on academic suspension if satisfactory progress has not been made toward a degree. Satisfactory progress is 
defined as maintaining: 

• 1 .5 cumulative grade point average when 28 semester hours have been attempted, or 

• 1 .8 cumulative grade point average when more than 28 semester hours and 60 semester hours or less have been 
attempted, or 

• 2.0 cumulative grade point average when greater than 60 semester hours have been attempted. 

Students who have been suspended may petition the dean of the college in writing for readmission. The first suspension will 
ordinarily be for the duration of one semester, the second suspension for a full academic year. Students seeking readmission 
should apply as soon as possible in order to assure sufficient time to fulfill whatever requirements may be necessary for 
readmission to be granted. If students take classes at another school while on suspension from Millsaps, those courses will 
not transfer back to Millsaps. 

Unsatisfactory Academic Progress 

A part-time student who makes a grade point average of less than 1 .5 in any semester will be notified that he or she is making 
unsatisfactory academic progress. To be removed from that classification the student must make a 2.0 grade point average 
during a regular semester or summer session. 

Class Attendance 

Irregular attendance indicates that the student may be having difficulties adju.sting to the course or to college. The primary 
responsibility for counseling students with respect to their absence rests with the faculty member; but, in the following 
circumstances, the faculty member is expected to report in writing the student's unsatisfactory attendance record to the Office 
of Records. 

47 



1. For a freshman - whenever the total absences are equal to twice the number of class meetings per week. 

2. For any student - after three successive absences for reasons unknown to the instructor, or when in danger of 
failing the course. 

The reporting of absences Is for coun.seling purposes only, and has no effect on the student's grade. 

Individual faculty members decide the manner and extent to which absences alone will affect a student's grade. Each faculty 
member is expected to outline the policy in writmg to each class at the beginning of the semester. This may extend to 
dismissal from the course with a grade of "F" for reasons solely of absence. 

Absences are e.xcusable only by the individual faculty member, but an excused absence does not excuse the student from 
bemg responsible for the course work. Explanation for a student's absence provided by a parent, medical doctor, or a member 
of the faculty or administration may be helpful to the faculty member, but such explanations are not in themselves excuses. 
This IS particularly important in the case of absences involving missed examinations, late assignments, laboratory sessions 
and similar scheduled commitments. Faculty members, however, may not excuse students from attendance on the two days 
preceding and the two days following vacation periods without the express permission of the dean. 

Each student is responsible for knowing general attendance policy of the College and the particular policies operative in each 
class. Further details relating to attendance are In the student handbook. Major Fads. 

Examinations 

Permission to make up an examination or alter the time for an e.xamination may be granted only by the instructor of the class 
for a specific student. If an Instructor wishes to change the time of a final exam for a class, he or she must obtain permission 
from the Dean of the College. 

No student should be required to take more than two final exams on one day. Students will be expected to take the initiative 
to resolve any conflicts with the appropriate faculty and If a resolution Is not reached the student will appeal to the Academic 
Dean. 

Senior Exemptions 

Students may elect to be exempt from final examinations only in the semester In which they complete their comprehensive 
examinations, and only In those courses in which they have a C average or better. It shall be understood, however, that this 
exemption does not ensure the student a final grade of C, since daily grades during the last two weeks shall count in the final 
average. Under no circumstances may a student be exempt from any examination In more than one term or semester. Seniors 
may be allowed one special examination in any subject taken and failed in the senior year. Permission for such examination 
must be secured from the dean or associate dean of the college. Students may request exemption from other requirements by 
petition to the Dean of the College. 

Honor Code 

Millsaps College is an academic community where men and women pursue a life of scholarly inquiry and intellectual growth 
The foundation of this community is a spirit of personal honesty and mutual trust. Through their Honor Code, members of the 
Millsaps community, faculty and students, affirm their adherence to these basic ethical principles. An Honor Code is not 
simply a set of rules and procedures governing students' academic conduct. It Is an opportunity to put personal responsibility 
and integrity into action. When students agree to abide by the Honor Code, they liberate themselves to pursue their academic 
goals in an atmosphere of mutual confidence and respect. The success of the code depends upon the support of each member 
of the community. Students and faculty alike commit themselves in their work to the principles of academic honesty When 
they become aware ot infractions, both students and faculty are obligated to report them to the Honor Council which is 
responsible for enforcement. The Millsaps Honor Code was adopted by the student body and approved by the faculty and 
Board of Trustees in 1994. 

Student Behavior 

Students at Millsaps, because they are members of an academic community dedicated to the achievement of excellence are 
expected to meet the highest standards of personal, ethical and moral conduct possible. The commitment of its faculty staff 
and students to these standards contributes to the high respect In which the Millsaps degree is held. Students must not destroy 
that respect by failure to meet these standards. 

The College has the responsibility and authority to establish standards for scholarship, student conduct and campus life 
Therefore, it cannot condone violations of local, state or federal laws or conduct detrimental to students or to the College. 



48 



Students, as adults, are presumed to know the law as to illegal conduct prohibited by municipal, state or federal law and are 
governed thereby. 

The College expects students to be concerned with the physical and psychological well being of others and cannot condone 
behavior which exploits another individual. Students and organizations are expected to comply with rules concerning the 
academic, social, and residential life of the College. They are expected to comply with directions of college officials. 
Students are responsible for the behavior of their guests while on Millsaps property and/or at Millsaps functions. 

The Millsaps Judicial System has been put in place to ensure the protection and preservation of the academic environment on 
campus where all students are free to pursue their educational goals. The system is educational in that it encourages students 
to become better citizens and live up to the higher standard of behavior expected of all Millsaps students. Millsaps students 
are expected to act with honesty and integrity in personal, social and academic relationships and with consideration and 
concern for the community, its members and its property. We emphasize education by focusing on growth and development 
of the individual student, encouraging self-discipline and fostering a respect for others. 

The Millsaps Judicial System is not intended to mirror that of any court system. The policies and procedures used are not 
meant to resemble those in the criminal process. There is a fundamental difference in the nature of student discipline and that 
of criminal law. Student discipline is meant to maintain a positive living and learning environment. The process is designed 
to help students make positive choices for themselves, choosing self-responsibility instead of submitting to peer-pressure, and 
to challenge them to accept responsibility for any negative choices. 

Alcoholic Beverages 

Millsaps College is an educational institution dedicated to a strong academic program and to providing a caring community. 
The College strives to help its students become self-directed, responsible citizens. The College's alcohol policy is intended to 
assist in the creation of a campus environment where students have the opportunity to learn how to deal responsibly, both 
individually and socially, with alcoholic beverages. 

Millsaps College does not encourage the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Members and guests of the Millsaps College 
community who are of legal drinking age (21 years old) and choose to consume alcoholic beverages are expected to do so 
responsibly and in consideration of the consequences to self, others, and the community-at-large. Any consumption of 
alcohol must be done within the limits of the applicable laws, and relevant college policies. 

All members of the campus community are expected to recognize the potential for alcohol abuse and that abuse of alcohol is 
absolutely at variance with the mission of the College. Persons who infringe upon the rights of others or who conduct 
themselves in an inappropriate manner which is caused by, or can be shown to be related to the consumption of alcohol, shall 
be held accountable for their actions, and subject to disciplinary and/or criminal action. 

The regulations and practices governing the use of alcoholic beverages apply to all members of the Millsaps College 
community. The primary responsibility for knowing and abiding by the provisions of the College's alcoholic beverage policy 
rests with each individual. 

Illegal Substances 

The College cannot condone violations of federal, state or local laws regarding any illegal daigs, narcotics and dangerous 
substances. The use, possession or distribution of such substances, except as expressly permitted by law, is not permitted. 

Disciplinary Regulations 

Students guilty of serious and/or multiple infractions of College regulations may be subject to disciplinary action including: 
social probation, disciplinary probation, disciplinary suspension or disciplinary expulsion. The Judicial Council may enact 
social probation or disciplinary probation and may forward a recommendation for disciplinary suspension or disciplinary 
expulsion to the President. The President and/or the Vice President and Dean of Students may enact any of these sanctions 
when warranted. 

Social Probation 

Social probation is a warning to a student regarding conduct standards. Its primary purpose is to serve as a period of time in 
which a student is asked to prove responsibility to himself/herself and the College. When a student is placed on social 
probation he/she is prohibited from participating in extracurricular campus activities such a fraternity /sorority social 
activities, intramural and varsity sports. In addition a student may hold no office of campus leadership. When an organization 

49 



is placed on social probation, the organization may not sponsor social activities in the name of the organization, or in a 
manner that could reasonably be interpreted as sponsorship by the organization, for the period of the social probation. 

Disciplinary Probation 

Disciplinary probation is the most serious penalty, short of suspension and expulsion, that can be incurred by a student. 
During a period of disciplinary probation any further infraction of college regulations will render the student liable to 
suspension or expulsion. 

Disciplinary Suspension and Disciplinary Expulsion 

Unfortunately there are times when a student's conduct is deemed to require the most serious penalty to be exacted by 

officials of the College. Tiiis action may result from a series of less severe actions or from a particularly egregious behavior 

as determined by the College officials. 

Disciplinary suspension is a decision to temporarily discharge a student. The student will receive grades of W for the 

semester and official notation will be made on the transcript. 

Disciplinary expulsion is a decision to permanently discharge a student. The student will receive failing grades for the 

semester and official notation will be made on the transcript. 

When student behavior warrants either disciplinaiy suspension or disciplinary expulsion, the student's financial status will be 

treated as if the student withdrew (see policy under Financial Regulations section). 

Departments of Instruction 
Academic Program 

The academic program of the College is organized into the following units: 

Division of Arts and Letters 

Division of Sciences 

Else School of Management 

Within these units arc the academic departments and programs through which the curriculum of the College is administered. 

Course offerings, together with major and minor requirements, are generally listed by department. Interdisciplinary courses 
and programs appear under a separate heading. 

Accounting 113 

Art 51 

Biology 76 

Business Administration 109 

Chemistry 79 

Christian Education 101 

Classical Studies 54 

Computer Science 82 

Economics 113 

Education 84 

English 56 

European Studies 102 

French 63 

Geology 86 

German 64 

History 59 

Interdisciplinary Core 106 

Interdisciplinary Programs 101 

Mathematics 88 

Modern Languages 62 

Music 66 

Performing Arts 66 

Philosophy 73 

Physics 90 

50 



• Political Science 93 

• Psychology 95 

• Religious Studies 74 

• Sociology - Anthropology 98 

• Spanish 65 

• Theatre 70 

• Women's Studies 106 

Course Numbers 

The first number indicates the class level with 1 primarily for first year students, 2 for sophomores and above, i for juniors, 
and 4 for seniors. 

The departmental structure primarily determines the second and third numbers. 

The fourth number indicates whether the course is 1/4, 2/4, 3/4 or a full course. A course number ending in: 

1 = 1/4 course, or 1 hour credit 

2 = 2/4 course, or 2 hours credit 

3 = 3/4 course, or 3 hours credit 

= 1 full course, or 4 hours credit 



Division of Arts and Letters 

David Davis. Associate Dean 

Art 

Professor: 

• Elise L. Smith, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor: 

• Collin Asmus, M.F.A., Chair 
Assistant Professor: 

• Sandra Smithson, M.F.A. 

Requirements for Major; Students may complete a major in art with a concentration in either studio art or art 
history (10 courses each) or a double concentration (14 courses). At least fifty percent of course work for the major 
must be taken at Millsaps. Students may count work up to four semester hour's credit toward the major for honors or 
internship in art. 

A. Studio Art concentration: Beginning Drawing; Beginning Painting or Printmaking; Beginning Sculpture; 
Intermediate Drawing; two other studio courses; three art history courses; and Senior Seminar. 

B. Art History Concentration: Beginning Drawing, Painting, or Printmaking; Beginning Sculpture; six art history 
courses, of which one may be a core topics course taught by art department faculty; Aesthetics (or an additional art 
history course), and Senior Seminar. 

C. Double Concentration in studio art and art histoiy: Beginning Drawing; Beginning Painting or Printmaking; 
Beginning Sculpture; Intermediate Drawing; two other studio courses; six art histoid courses, of which one may be a 
core topics course taught by art department faculty; Aesthetics (or an additional art history course); and Senior 
Seminar. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in studio art with Beginning Drawing; Beginning Painting or 
Printmaking; Beginning Sculpture; and one other studio course. Students may elect a minor in art history with four 
art history courses, of which one may be a core topics course taught by ait department faculty. 

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Studio Art Courses 
2200 Beginning Drawing (4 sem. hours). An introduction to observational drawing using gestural, contour, 
weighted line and structural line techniques. 

2210 Beginning Painting (4 sem. hours). OfFers technical training in the use of materials and in the basics of color 
and composition. 

2230 Beginning Printmaking (4 sem. hours). An introduction to printmaking techniques (including monotypes, 
collagraphs, mtaglio, woodcuts, and siikscreens), as well as issues related to two-dimensional design and 
content. 

2240 Beginning Photography (4 sem. hours). Explores the camera as a tool for self-expression while teaching 
fundamental dark room procedures. Requirement: 35mm. camera. 

2250 Beginning Sculpture (4 sem. hours). Explores a wide range of traditional sculpture media and techniques, 
mcluding carving, modeling, and casting, and introduces issues of three-dimensional design. 

2750-2752 Special Topics in Studio Art (1-4 sem. Hours). 

3300 Intermediate Drawing (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Beginning Drawing with a focus on figure drawing 
and on individual projects. Prerequisite: Art 2200. 

3310 Intermediate Painting (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Beginning Painting, emphasizing individual 
exploration and experimentation. Prerequisite: Art 2210. 

3330 Intermediate Printmaking (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Beginning Printmaking with more advanced 
techniques and more independent projects. Prerequisite: Art 2230. 

3340 Intermediate Photography (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Beginning Photography in which students 
develop skills in photography and gain historical and critical understanding of the field, with a 
concentration on content as well as advanced techniques. Requirement: 35mm. camera.' Prerequisite: Art 
2240. Offered occasionally. 

3350 Intermediate Sculpture (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Beginning Sculpture, in which students explore 
traditional as well as non-traditional materials, techniques, and approaches involved in the creation of 
three-dimensional works of art. Prerequisite: Art 2250. 

3400 Advanced Drawing (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Intermediate Drawing, in which students develop a 
thematic series of drawings based on their own personal issues and imagery. Prerequisite: Art 3300. 

3410 Advanced Painting (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Intermediate Painting, in which students develop a 
series ot paintings based on their own personal issues and imagery. Prerequisite: Art 3310. 

3430 Advanced Printmaking (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Intermediate Printmaking, with an emphasis on 
individual problems in printmaking and completion of a series of prints. Prerequisite: Art 3330. 

3450 Advanced Sculpture (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Intermediate Sculpture, with an emphasis on 
individual problems in sculpture and advanced work in a particular three-dimensional medium 
Prerequisite: Art 3350. 

3790 Junior Studio Art Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper level art history seminar focused on a difterent topic 
every tall semester, open to all students who have had a previous art history course and required of all 
senior art majors with a concentration in art history or a double concentration in art history and studio art. 

3800-3802 Independent Study in Studio Art (4 sem. hours). 

3850-3852 Internship in Studio Art (1-4 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works with a museum, art 
agency, business firm, or artist under supervision of the Millsaps Career Center or the Art Department. 
Prerequisite: Consent of Career Center and Department Chair 

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4790 Senior Studio Art Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper level art history seminar focused on a different topic 
every fall semester, open to all students who have had a previous art history course and required of all 
senior art majors with a concentration in art history or a double concentration in art history and studio art. 

Art History Courses 

2500 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art (4 sem. hours). A study of the development of art from prehistoric 
times through the late Gothic period. Offered in alternate years. 

2510 Ancient Art and Archaeology (4 sem. hours). A study of ancient art which focuses on the changing vision of 
humanity and the world, as well as the forms and techniques which artists evolved to represent that vision. 
(Same as Classical Studies 3300). Offered occasionally. 

2520 Northern Renaissance Art (4 sem. hours). A study of painting from the 15th and 16th centuries in Northern 
Europe, with special attention paid to the interpretation of symbolic images. Offeredin alternate years. 

2530 Italian Renaissance Art (4 sem. hours). A study of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th 
through the 16th centuries in Italy, set in the context of Renaissance thought and culture. Offered in 
alternate years. 

2540 Baroque Art (4 sem. hours). A study of European art of the 17th Century, with special attention paid to 
Italian, Flemish, and Dutch painting and sculpture. Offeredin alternate years. 

2550 Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuiy Art (4 sem. hours). A study of European art of the I8th and 19th 

centuries in (he context of an increasingly industrialized and middle-class society, with attention paid to 
issues of gender, class, and technology. Offered in alternate years. 

2560 Modern Art (4 sem. hours). A study of European and American art of the late 19th and 20th centuries. 
Offered in attentate years. 

2570 Images of Women in Art and Literature (4 sem. hours). A study of representations of women by male and 
female artists and writers from the 15tli through the 19th centuries. Offered in alternate years. 

2580 Women Artists (4 sem. hours). A study of the work of women artists fi-om the 1 5th through the 20th century, 
with particular attention to the Impact of sex and gender on artistic production. Offered iti alternate years. 

2590 Topics in World Art (4 sem. hours). A study of selected topics in the art of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, 
either surveying key periods of two or three cultures or focusing on one of these areas. Offered in alternate 
years. 

2760-2762 Special Topics in Art History (1-4 sem. hours). 

3780 Junior Art History Seminar (4 sem. hours). An upper level art history seminar focused on a different topic 
every fall semester, open to all students who have had a previous art history course and required of all 
senior art majors with a concentration in art history or a double concentration in art history and studio art. 

3810-3812 Independent Study in Art History (1-4 sem. hours). 

3860-3863 Internship in Art History (1-4 sem. hours). An internship in which a student works with a museum, art 
agency, business firm, or artist under the supervision of the Millsaps Career Center or Art Department. 
Prerequisite: Consent of Career Center and Art Department Chair. 

*3770 Junior Seminar (4 sem. hours). A seminar focused on selected topics related to the practice and theory of 
art making, art criticism, and art histoiy. 

*4770 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). A seminar focused on selected topics related to the practice and theory of art 
making, art criticism, and art history. 

53 



4790 Senior Arl History Seminar (4 scin. hours). An upper level an history seminar focused on a different topic 
every fall semester, open to all students who have had a previous art history course and required of all 
senior art majors with a concentration in art history or a double concentration in art history and studio art. 

*These courses can count as either studio art or art history. 



Classical Studies 

Professor: 

• Catherine Ruggiero Freis, Ph.D., Chair 
Associate Professor: 

• Michael Gleason, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor: 

• Thomas Kohn, Ph.D. 

• Holly M. Sypniewski, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in classical studies with 10 courses (40 semester hours) 
of which six courses (24 semester hours) must be in either Latin or Greek. The remaining hours may be distributed 
among offerings in Greek, Latin, Sanskrit or Classical Civilization, provided that two languages are represented to at 
least the 2000 level and that Civilization 2000 (Survey of the Classical World) is included. One core topics course, 
taught by a member of the department, may count towards the major. Students who intend to teach Latin in the 
secondary schools must take si,xteen hours above the introductory level for teacher certification. Those who intend to 
go to graduate .school in classics should take additional language courses in both Greek and Latin. Prospective 
majors should also consider otT-campus programs in the classics in Rome, Italy, or Athens, Greece. For further 
information, see Special Programs section and the chair of the department. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in classical studies with 20 semester hours, of which 12 must 
be in either Latin or Greek. The remaining hours may be chosen from offerings in Greek, Latin, Sanskrit or Classical 
Civilization, provided that Civilization 2000 (Survey of the Classical World) is included. One core topics course, 
taught by a member of the department, may count towards the minor. 

Classical Studies: Civilization 

The following courses are conducted in English; they are open to all students for elective and credit/no credit. 
Different courses in this sequence will be offered from year to year. 

2000 Survey of the Classical World (4 sem. hours). An examination of the major authors, genres, and artistic 
works of the classical world in a chronological and cultural survey from prehistoric times to late Roman 
antiquity. 

3000 Myth (4 sem. hours). A study of the symbols and motifs of mythology focusing on the myths of Greece and 
Rome, with comparative material introduced from near Eastern, Native American, Asian, African and 
Norse mythology. Offered in rotation. 

3100 Greek Tragedy (4 sem. hours). In this course, students will read the main surviving works of three great 

tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and close with two critical works, Aristotle's Poetics and 
Aristophanes' comedy about tragedy. The Frogs. A number of performances of Greek tragedy and an 
examination of ritual drama in contemporary Japan, China. India and Bali will be part of the course. 
Offered in rotation. 

3200 The Classical Epic (4 sem. hours). The class will begin by studying the Mesopotamian epic, the Gilgamesh, 
and then turn to a snidy of three great classical epics, the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid. Additional 
epic literature from India, Africa and China will be part of the course. Offered in rotation. 

3300 Classical Art and Archaeology (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on the changing vision of the world 
and human experience in ancient Greek and Roman art and the forms and techniques which artists evolved 

54 



to represent that vision. Tliere will be a field trip to the Museum ofClassicai Archaeology at the University 
of Mississippi, (Same as Art 2510) Offered in rotation. 

3400 Women in Antiquity (4 sem. hours). The study of the representation of women in art and literature situated 
within their relevant historical contexts. Offered in rotation. 

3500 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (4 sem. huui-s). A survey of ancient philosophy through the medieval 
period (same as Philosophy 3010). Offered in rotation. 

3600 Ancient History (4 sem. hours). A survey of ancient history from the beginning of civilization to the fall of 
Rome (same as History 3240). Offered in rotation. 

3700 Greek and RomHn Religion (4 sem. hours). A survey of cult and state religious practices as they were 
performed from Minoan culture through the birth of early Christianity. Offered in rotation. 

3850-3853 Special Topics (I to 4 sem. hours). 

4850-4853 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). 



Classical Studies: Greek 

Greek fulfills the language requirement for the B.A. degree and for Phi Beta Kappa. Courses numbered 2010-2750 
are suitable for third semester work. 

tOIO-1020 Introduction to Greek (4 sem. hours). Primary emphasis is on mastery of grammar, vocabulary, and 
forms with some attention to Greek literature and culture. Readings include selections from the New 
Testament, Greek philosophy and Homer. 

2010 Plato (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from the Dialogues. Offered in rotation. 

2020 Greek New Testament (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from The Gospels and Paul. Offered in rotation. 

2030 Homer (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from the Iliad. Offered in rotation. 

2040 Euripides (4 sem. hours). A reading of one of the plays. Offered in rotation. 

2750-2753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). Readings from selected authors. 

3750-3753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). Study of such authors as Homer, the lyric poets, Aeschylus, 

Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Demosthenes, Plato. Aristotle, New Testament writers, and Greek 
composition, prose or verse. 

4750-4753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem, hours). Study of selected authors for advanced students. 

Classical Studies: Latin 

Latin fulfills the language requirement for the B.A. degree and for Phi Beta Kappa. Courses numbered 21 10-2750 
are suitable for third semester work. 

1110-1120 Introduction to Latin (4 sem. hours). Primary emphasis is on mastery of grammar, vocabulary and 

forms with some attention to Latin literature and culture. Readings include selections from Latin prose and 

poetry. 

2110 Ovid (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from the Metamorphoses. Offered in rotation. 
2120 Virgil (4 sem. hours). Selected readings from the AeneiJ. Offered in rotation. 



55 



2130 Petronius (4 scm. hours). Selected readings from the Satyricon. Offered in rotation. 

2140 Catullus (4 scm. hours). Selected readings. Offered in rotation. 

2160 Cicei-o (4 scm. hours). Selected readings. Offered in rotation. 

2750-2753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). Readings from selected authors. 

3750-3753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). Study of such authors as Horace, the elegists, Lucretius, Sallust, 
Livy, Tacitus. Juvenal, Petronius, Tlautus, Terence and Latin composition, prose or verse. 

4750-4753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). Study of selected authors for advanced students. 



Classical Studies: Sanskrit 

1210-1220 Introduction to Sanskrit (4 sem. hours). Primary emphasis is on the learning the sounds of Sanskrit 
and their representation in devunagari script, as well as on basic grammar and vocabulary. Readings are 
taken primarily from the Bha^avad Gita. Offered in alternate years. 

2750-2753 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). Readings from Sanskrit literature. 

3750-3753 Special Topics (1 to 4 scm. hours). Readings from Sanskrit literature. 



English 

• Professors: 

• Suzanne Marrs, Ph.D. 

• Gregory Miller, Ph.D. 

• Associate Professors: 

• Anne MacMaster, Ph.D. 

• Auslm Wilson, Ph.D., Chair 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Eric Griffin, Ph.D. 

• Laura E. Francy, Ph.D. 

• Paula Garrett, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in English with ten courses in English. Required courses include 
Introduction to Interpretation. Introduction to British Literary History, I and II, and Senior Colloquium. The remaining six 
course requirements are as follows: students must select four courses, one focused on a particular literary period, one on an 
author, one on a genre or in literary theory, and one on cultural studies. The remaining two courses may be electives. One of 
these six courses must be from a period before 1 800. 

Students may fulfill one elective towards the English major in one of the following ways: (1) two semesters of Heritage, (2) 
one core topics course which has a primary emphasis on literature and which is taught by an instructor from the English 
department, or (3) one course cross-listed with another department. Students entering Millsaps in previous catalog years may 
exceed this limit but may not count towards the major additional courses taken in these categories after the spring of 1999. 

The Department strongly recommends proficiency in a foreign language to all majors. Students planning to pursue graduate 
study in English are advised that a reading knowledge of three foreign languages is generally required. A minimum of one 
year of Latin or Greek is recommended. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in English with five courses, including Introduction to Interpretation 
and Introduction to British Literary History, I and !I. One core topics course taught by an instructor from the English 
department and having a primary emphasis on literature may be used to meet this requirement. 



56 



Requirements for Concentration in Writing: Students who fulfill the requirements for a major or a minor in English may 
also take a concentration in writing upon the successful completion of the following courses; 
English 2400, Introduction to Creative Writing; 

- two courses designated by the English department as intermediate courses in creative writing, each focusing on a 
different genre; 

- English 3900, Senior Workshop in Creative Wrhing. 

Literary Studies 

1000 Introduction to Interpretation (4 sem. hours). This course is a prerequisite to most courses in the English 

department. It focuses on a variety of interpretive problems and on different kinds of texts, including films. 

2010 Introduction to British Literary History 1 (4 sem. hours). A history of British literature from the beginnings to 1800, 
with an emphasis on the meaning and development of literary history. 

2020 Introduction to British Literary History 11 (4 sem. hours). A history of British literature from 1800 to the present, 
with an emphasis on the meaning and development of literary history. 

3100 Studies in Medieval Literature (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of 

themes, genres, and texts written before 1 500. The specific topics will vary in different years, but may include the 
romance, women's spiritual autobiography, cycle plays, or religious writings. This course may be repeated for credit 
with a different topic. English 1000 recommended. This course or English 3300 offered in alternate years. 

3110 Studies in Renaissance Literature (4 sem. hours). This course will include the study of poets, playwrights, and prose 
writers of the Tudor, Stuart, and Commonwealth periods. This course may be repeated for credit with a different 
topic. English 1000 recommended. 

3120 Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on a variety of 
themes and topics in literature from the English Restoration through the eighteenth century. The topics, which will 
vary from year to year, will include satire, the novel, drama, and Johnson and his age. This course may be repeated 
for credit with a different topic. English 1000 recommended. Offered occasionally. 

3130 Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature (4 sem. hours). The specific content of this course will vary from 
year to year, with topics focusing on significant issues in romantic and/or Victorian literature. The course may be 
repeated for credit with a different topic. English 1000 recommended. 

3150 Studies in American Literature Before 1920 (4 sem, hours). A study of the literary history of the United States, 

focusing upon the poetry, drama, and/or fiction of the colonial and Federal period, on the American Renaissance, or 
on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Course content will vary from semester to semester. The course 
may be repeated for credit with a different topic. English 1 000 recommended. 

3180 Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature (4 sem. hours). Students will read, discuss, and write about British, 

American, South African, Caribbean, and other twentieth-century texts. The specific content will vary from year to 
year, but possibilities include such topics as modernism as a literary movement, the modem novel, modern and 
contemporary poetry, and twentieth-century drama. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. 
English 1000 recommended. 

3200 Special Studies in Literary History (4 sem. hours). This course will involve the study of the transformations, 

transitions, and continuities in literary history. Specific topics will vary, but possibilities include the transition from 
neoclassical to romantic literature, the move from the Victorian to the modern period, or the development of 
American autobiography. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. English 1000 recommended. 
Offered occasionally. 

3300 Chaucer (4 sem. hours). This course will consider Chaucer's major works, including The Canterbury Tales and Troilus 
and Criseyde, in the larger cultural context of the fourteenth century. Special attention may be given to Chaucer's 
experimentation with a wide variety of poetic forms. English 1000 recommended. This course or English 3100 
offered in alternate years. 



57 



3310 Shakespeare, and the Play of Genre (4 sem. hours). This course will explore tlie poetic and dramatic career of 

Will.am Shalccspeare from the perspective of contemporary critical approaches, with particular attention to literary 
genre. English 1000 recommended. 

3320 Milton (4 sem. hours). With a primary emphasis on Paradise Lost, this course will consider Milton's works and his 
career. English 1000 recommended. Offered in alternate years. 

3330 Shakespeare, and the Play of Culture |or Theory) (4 ,sem. Hours) While considering a different set of plays and 
secondary readings from those offered in English 3310, this course will explore the poetic and dramatic career of 
William Shakespeare within the context of time, with a particular focus on cultural studies and/or literary theory 
English 1000 and English 3310 recommended. 

3350 Authorial Studies (4 sem. hours). This course will be devoted to the works of one or more authors, focusin" on their 
texts in the conte.xt of their lives and cultures. Possible authors include Hawthorne, James, and Wharton- Joyce and 
Wooif; Faulkner and Welty: or Austen and Scott. The course may be repeated for credit with a different 'topic 
English 1000 recommended. 

3500 Studies in Genre (4 sem. hours). This course will be devoted to studying genres such as the novel, the lyric the short 
story, and the drama. The particular genre will vary from year to year; students may repeat the course for credit 
when the topic is different. English 1000 recommended. 

3540-3542 Film Studies (1,2 or 4 sem. hours). This course will consider the cultural and artistic significance of film The 
content of the course will vary, potentially emphasizing such issues as the relationship between film and another 
genre, films of a particular period or style, or the history of film. 

3550 History of Literary Criticism (4 sem. hours). This course includes an historical survey of major theorists and 

movements from the ancient world Ihrough postmodernism. English 1000 recommended. Off ered occasionally. 

3800-3802 Directed Study in English (2 or 4 sem. hours). If students wish to pursue a subject or problem beyond the 

standard curricular offerings, they must plan such a course with an instructor and obtain that instructor's permission 
to register for this option. 

3852 Internships in English (2 sem. hours). Under the guidance of an English department faculty sponsor students may 
elect to take up to two internships, (each worth 2 semester hours) working in such areas as public relations 
advertising, theatre, or journalism. 

4900 Senior Colloquium (4 sem. hours). All English majors are required to take this course in the spring of their senior 
year; this course is designed to help students consolidate and build on their studies. 

Literature and Culture 
2110 Southern Literature and Culture (4 sem. hours). This course involves a study of southern poets, dramatists and/or 
writers of fiction in the context of the southern culture out of which and about which they write. Content will vary 
Offered in alternate years. 

2120 Multicultural Literature (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on various aspects of African American Asian 

American, Chicano, Jewish, Native American, and/or other ethnic American literatures. Sometimes the focus will be 
comparative, and sometimes the focus will be on a particular tradition, such as African-American writing Offered 
in alternate years. 

2130 Women Writers (4 sem. hours). The particular writers, periods, and genres covered will vary, but the works of women 
writers will be read in the light of their cultural contexts and of current feminist methodologies. Texts will reflect the 
racial and ethnic diversity of women writing in English. Offered in alternate years. 

2440-2450 Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature (4 sem. hours). Courses in this category cross-disciplinary boundaries 
and are cross-listed with another department. Possibilities include literature and history, literature and art. literature 
and philosophy, or literature and religion. Offered occasionally. 

58 



3750 Special Topics in Literature and Culture (4 sem. Iiours). The specific content will vaiy, but this course will consider 
the interplay of texts and their cultural or multicultural contexts; the course may focus on such topics as new 
literature in English or on literature and popular culture in Victorian England. Offered occasionally. 

Rhetoric, Writing and Pedagogy 

2400 Introduction to Creative Writing (4 sein. Iiours). Students will study the forms, techniques, and processes of fiction, 
poetry, or script writing by reading models and by practicing their own writing. Students will discuss their own 
writing in the context of readings from traditional and contemporary works. The specific focus of the course will 
vary from year to year. 

2410 Expository Writing (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on the art of essay writing in various modes. Required 
readings will vary, but there will always be a substantial amount of writing and revising. Offered occasionally. 

l^lfi-l'ill Teaching Writing; A Practicum (1, 2 or 4 sem. hours). This course is a practical study of how people learn to 
write, with attention to the student's own writing, examination of the writing process and consideration of the theory 
and practice of teaching writing. Practice in tutoring in the Writing Center is an essential part of this course. 

2430 Journalism (4 sem. hours). This basic course teaches the skills of news writing and reporting, including the history 
and principles ofjournalism and the techniques of layout and copy writing. Offered occasionally. 

3400/3402 Writing and Reading Fiction (2 or 4 sem. hours). An advanced class in the reading and writing of fiction. 
Prerequisite: English 2400 or permission of instructor. Offered occasionally. 

3412 Writing and Reading Poetry (2 sem. hours). An advanced class in the reading and writing of poetry. Class time will 
be divided between discussing poems by writers outside the class and by students in it. Prerequisite: English 2400 or 
permission of instructor. Offered occasionally. 

3760-3762 Special Projects in Writing (1, 2 or 4 sem. hours). This course is designed for students who want to pursue an 
independent writing project beyond work done in one of the established courses. Students must obtain permission of 
the instructor to register for this option. 

3900 Senior Workshop in Creative Writing (4 sem. hours). Students writing in a variety of genres will work together to 
complete substantial creative projects. Prerequisites: English 2400 and two courses designated by the English 
department as intermediate courses in creative writing, or the consent of the instructor. 



History 

The Elizabeth Chisholm Chair of Arts and Letters 

Professors: 

• Robert S. McElvaine, Ph.D.. Chair 
Associate Professor: 

• David C. Davis, Ph.D., Associate Dean 

• Guiomar Duenas, Ph.D. 

• Sanford C. Zaie, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professors: 

• Amy W. Forbes, Ph.D. 

• William K.. Storey, Ph.D. 

• Kristen A. Tegtmeier, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in history with ten, four-semester hour courses, 
including both semesters of History of the United States, Europe since 1789, Senior Seminar, and one course each in 
the European and Non- Western areas. One core topics course taught by an instructor from the History Department 
may be used to meet the requirements of the history major. Heritage may be counted as one four-hour course toward 
the ten-course requirement. 

59 



Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in history with five, four-semester hour courses, including 
both semesters of History of the United States and European Civilization since 1 789. 

2100 Histoiy ofthc United States to 1877 (4 sem. hours). A survey of the cultures and history of the peoples that 
hved in the area that became the United States, from the Pre-Columbian era through European colonization, 
the introduction of African slaves, the American Revolution, the early Republic, the Civil War and 
Reconstruction. 

2110 History of the United States since 1877 (4 sem. hours). A survey of the main developments in the United 
States and how they affected American men and women from the end of Reconstruction through 
industrialization and urbanization, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the rise of a partial 
welfare state, and the Cold War, down to the present. 

2120 Women (and Men) in America (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of the history of women 
and the ways in which they have interacted with men and male-dominated institutions over the course of 
American history. The course will employ works of literature, art, film and music among its means of 
exploring the changing lives of women and men in America. Offered in allernale years. 

2130 The African-American Heritage I (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary snidy concentrating on the historic 
and contemporary experience of black people in America, from colonial times to 1 877. Offered in 
alternate yeiirs. 

2140 The African-American Heritage II (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary study concentrating on the historic 
and contemporary experience of black people in America, from 1877 to the present. Offered in alternate 
years. 

2210 European Civilization Since 1789 (4 sem. hours). This course is a survey of the major social, political, 
economic and intellectual developments in European history from the French Revolution of 1789 to the 
revolutions in Eastern Europe in 1989/1990. Lectures and discussion will be devoted to understanding the 
mfluence of ideology (liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism) on social and political life; the role 
of material factors (economic change, urbanization, the experience of warfare) in historical change; and the 
global expansion of Europe and the extension of European ideas and institutions to other peoples of the 
world. 

2310 African History and Society (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary survey of major themes in African history 
from the earliest records of human activity on the continent to the struggles for South Africa, Literature, 
music, art and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the complex contemporary issues 
faced by Africans. Offered in alternate years. 

2400 Middle Eastern History and Society (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary survey of major themes in Middle 
Eastern history from the advent of Islam to the Persian Gulf conflict and the Madrid Peace Conference. 
Literature, music, art and popular culture will be studied as ways of understanding the contemporary issues 
faced by men and women of this region. Offered in alternate years. 

3100 The Old South (4 sem. hours). A study of the development of the southern region of the United States from 
the time of discovery to the beginning of the Civil War. Offered in alternate years. 

3110 Civil War and Reconstruction (4 sem. hours). An examination of the political, economic, military 

diplomatic, and social aspects of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods. Offered in alternate years. 

3120 The New South (4 sem. hours). A study of the development of the South after the Civil War to the present. 
Offered in alternate years. 

3130 American Revolution and Establishment of Federal Union, 1754-1789 (4 sem. hours). An examination of 
the political, economic, social and cultural events which led to the American colonial revolt against Britain 
and the establishment of the Federal union in the Constitution of 1787. Offered occasionally. 

3140 Age of Jefferson and .Jackson, 1789-1848 (4 sem. hours). A continuation of American Revolution and 
Establishment of Federal Union, this course will examine the political, economic, social and cultural 

60 



history uf the United States from the Administration of George Washington to the conclusion of the 
Mexican War. Offered in alternate years. 

3150 American Social and Intellectual History (4 sem. hours). An exploration of aspects of American thought, 
values and society from the colonial period to the present, focusing on the ways in which Americans have 
viewed themselves and how American ideas and values have differed from those of other peoples. Offered 
occasionally. 

3160 Topics in American Culture (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary exploration of a particular topic in 

American culture. The history, literature, thought, music, art and popular culture of a period (such as a 
decade) or aspect of the United States will be studied. Topics will change from year to year, and a student 
may take the course more than once if the topics are different. Offered occasionally. 

3170 The Great Depression (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and culture 
during the era of the Great Depression (1929-1941), utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and 
photography, as well as more traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years. 

3180 The Sixties (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and cuhure during the 

1960s, utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and sculpture, as well as more traditional sources. Offered 
in alternate years. 

3190 Our Times: America Since 1970 (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of American history and 
cuhure from 1970 to the Present, utilizing literature, film, music, painting, and sculpture, as well as more 
traditional historical sources. Offered in alternate years. 

3240 Topics in European Culture and History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a particular 
topic, period, or region of European culture. Topics will change, and a student may take the course more 
than once if the topics are different. (Same as Classical Studies 3600) Offered occasionally. 

3250 European Women (4 sem. hours). This course examines the e.xperience of women and the meaning of gender 
in Britain, France, and Germany from the onset of industrialization through the period following the 
Second World War. Particular attention will be paid to the following questions; the impact of 
industrialization on the European family; the Victorian construction of separate spheres; the role of the state 
in defining gender roles and regulating sexuality; and the impact of war on gender relations. Offered 
occasionally. 

3260 Britain Since 1750 (4 sem. hours). A survey of Britain since 1750, this course charts the forging of a national 
identity through Britain's varied experiences of war, empire, religion, and consumerism. It has as its focus 
the centrality of empire to British domestic politics and culture. Offered in alternate years. 

3270 Introduction to Cultural History (4 sem. hours). This course explores the importance of culture in shaping 
modern European history. Students will examine various methodologies of cultural history and see how 
historians analyze key shifts in modern Europe by using diverse and (often bizarre) documents. In 
particular, the class will compare works on political culture, popular culture, and manufactured or 
commercial culture. Offered occasionally. 

3280 Europe Between the Wars (4 sem. hours). Europe between WWI and WWII was a place of both decay and 
renewal. This course uses a pastiche of sources to gain an understanding of the time period. The class will 
try to reconstruct the commitments and decadence, the idealism and sense of defeat that allowed for myriad 
political and cultural transformations. Offered occasionally. 

3290 History of Sexuality (4 sem. hours). A survey of historical developments from the eighteenth through the 
twentieth centuries, this course examines the codification and regulation of sexuality in European society. 
The class will explore the underlying politics of sexual knowledge, the structures of permission and 
prohibition, as well as the key debates that ranged on these matters. Offered in alternate years. 

3310 Topics in African History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, period, or 
region in African history. The topics, which include "The Shaping of South Africa, " and "Listening to the 

61 



. I African Past," will change from year to year. A student may take the course more than once if the topics are 

different. Offered occasionally. 

3410 Topics in Middle Eastern History (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary examination of a particular topic, 
period or region in Middle Eastern history. The topics, which include "The Twice-Promised Land " and 
"Islam in History," will change fi'om year to year. A student may take the course more than once if the 
topics are different. Offered in alternate years. 

3510 Ancient History (4 sem. hours). A survey of the Mediterranean world from the Bronze Age to c.200 CE, with 
a topical stress on Classical Greece, and the Late Roman Republic, and the Early Roman Empire, and with 
a methodological stress on reading, analyzing, and interpreting ancient sources in translation. Offered in 
alternate years. 

3520 The Middle Ages (4 sem. hours). A survey of the history of Western Europe fi-om c.200 to c.1300, with a 
topical stress on the religious, political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the High Middle 
Ages, and with a methodological stress on reading, analyzing, and interpreting medieval sources in 
translation. Offered in alternate years. 

3530 Renaissance and Reformation (4 sem. hours). A survey of Western Europe from c.1300 to c.1600, with a 
topical stress on the crises of the Late Middle Ages, the intellectual and artistic developments of the Italian 
Renaissance, and the religious and political developments of the Protestant Reformation, and with a 
methodological stress on reading, analyzing, and interpreting original sources in translation. Offered in 
alternate years. 

3540 Early Modern Europe (4 sem. hours). A survey of the history of Western Europe from the 16th century to 
1789, with a topical stress on the Scientific Revolution, Constitutionalism and Absolutism,>the 
Enlightenment, and the coming of the French Revolution, and with a methodological stress on reading, 
analyzing, and interpreting original sources in translation. Offered in alternate years. 

3750 Mythology and Southern History (4 sem. hours). An examination of the ways myths embody the values 

Southerners have most intensely cherished. The myths of class, gender, and race that emerged from the Old 
South and the New South will be discussed in an historical context. Offered in alternate years. 

4750 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). An examination of how history is written and interpreted and of particular 
problems in history. May be taken by students who have two courses in history and is required of all 
history majors. 

4760 Special Topics in History (4 sem. hours). This course addresses areas not covered in other courses. It may be 
repeated for credit with different topics. Offered on demand. 

4800-4802 Directed Readings (1, 2 or 4 sem. hours). 



Modern Languages 



Associate Professors: 

• Priscilla Fermon, Ph.D. 

• Robert J. Kahn, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professors: 

• Claudine Chadeyras, Ph.D., Chair 

• Yunsuk Chae, M.A. 

• Ramon Figueroa, Ph.D. 

• Veronica Freeman, Ph.D. 

• Angeles Rodriguez, Ph.D. 
Director of the Language Lab: 

• Gail Buzliardt, B.A., M.A. 



62 



Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in French, German, or Spanish by satisfying the language 
requirement and completing successftilly 2110 and a minimum of five courses beyond 2110. At least two of the five courses 
beyond 2110 must be literature courses taken at Millsaps. For the German major, two of the five courses beyond 21 10 must 
be taken at another institution, after approval from the department chair. Transfer of credit to be counted towards the major is 
subject to departmental approval. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in French, German, or Spanish by satisfying the language requirement 
and completing successfully 21 10 and a minimum of two courses beyond it. At least one of the two courses beyond 21 10 
must be a literature course. All courses beyond the intermediate level must be taken at Millsaps. 

Language Requirement and Placement Test: The Department of Modern Languages administers its own placement test. 
The test is compulsory for all those who wish to continue their work in a language they studied in high school. Students 
beginning a new language are not required to take the placement test. 

According to their placement test scores, students will either satisfy the language requirement or will be placed into 1000, 
1010, 2000 or 21 10. Academic credit will be awarded only for courses taken. Students may present transcripts verifying that 
they have completed the equivalent of Millsaps Basic and Intermediate language courses taken at other institutions, thereby 
satisfying the language requirement. 

To satisfy the language requirement, students must demonstrate proficiency at the intermediate level by successfully 
completing a course in 2000 or 21 10 or its equivalent. 

International Study: Before taking language courses abroad, students should consult with the department chair to ensure 
future transfer of credit. For further information about international study opportunities, see section on International Study. 



French 

1000 Basic French I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the essentials of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. 
Primary emphasis on understanding and speaking. Secondary emphasis on reading and writing. Intended for 
students with no prior study of French. A minimum of one hour per week in the language laboratory. 

lOtO Basic French II (4 sem. hours). Continuation of Basic French. A minimum of one hour per week in the language ' 
laboratory. Prerequisite: French 1000 or placement test score. 

2000 Intermediate French (4 sem. hours). Building on Basic French, this course focuses on the practical application of 

basic listening and speaking skills. Expands students' reading and writing skills. A minimum of one hour per week 
in language laboratory. Prerequisite: French 1010 or placement test score. 

2110 Contemporary French Culture (4 sem. hours). Providing the insights into customs and daily culture needed for 
interacting effectively with speakers of French, this transition course concentrates on reading skills in a 
conversational classroom environment. Taught primarily in French. Prerequisite: French 2000 or its equivalent or 
placement test score. Required for all further study in French. 

2120 French for the Professions (4 sem. hours). Designed to improve students' knowledge of a chosen field (such as law, 
medicine, education, banking, sociology, etc.) and their ability to communicate, especially in writing. Taught in 
French. Prerequisite: French 2110. Offered on demand. 

2751 French Across the Curriculum (1 sem, hour). Under a French instructor's guidance, students read and discuss texts 
related to a course in another discipline. Taught in French. This course may be repeated for credit with a different 
topic. Prerequisite: French 2000 and consent of the instructor. Offered on demand, 

3200 Survey of French Literature up to the Revolution (4 sem. hours). A close study of the major works produced in 

France from the Middle Ages to the Revolution. Taught in French. Prerequisite: French 21 10. Offered in alternate 
years. 

3210 Survey of French Literature after the Revolution (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works 
produced in France from the time of the Revolution to the present. Taught in French. Prerequisite: French 21 10. 
Offered in alternate years. 

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3220 French Civilization up to the Revolution (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the art, music, legends, history, 

literary accomplishments and cultural aspirations of French-speaking people up to the Revolution. Taught in French. 
Prerequisite; French 21 10. Offeredin alternate years. 

3230 French Civilization after the Revolution (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the art, music, film, history, literary 
accomplishments, and cultural aspirations of French-speaking people from the time of the Revolution to the present. 
Taught in French. Prerequisite: French 21 10. Offeredin alternate years. 

3750 French Film (4 sem. hours). This course integrates the history of French cinema with the study of film as an aesthetic 
form and cultural product. It includes critical evaluations of films. Taught in French. Prerequisite for French credit: 
French 2110. Offered on demand. 

4750 Special Studies in French (4 sem. hours). Advanced, in-depth study of specific aspects of French literature, language, 
or culture, such as Advanced Grammar, Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Seventeenth-Century Theater, 
Eighteenth- Century Narrative, Nineteenth-Century Novel, and Twentieth-Century Theater. Taught in French. This 
course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: French 2110 

4800-4803 Directed Study in French (1-4 sem. hours). For advanced students who wish to do reading and research in 
special areas under the guidance of an instructor. Prerequisite: French 21 10. Consent of the department chair. 

4900 Senior Seminar (1-4 sem. hours). In this capstone course, senior majors reflect on the role their undergraduate degree 
in French plays within the larger context of their liberal arts. Offered only in spring. 



German 

1000 Basic German I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the essentials of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. 
Primary emphasis on understanding and speaking. Secondary emphasis on reading and writing. Intended for 
students with no prior study of German. A minimum of one hour per week in the language laboratory. Offered only 
in fall. 

1010 Basic German 11 (4 sem. hours). Continuation of Basic German. A minimum of one hour per week in the language 
laboratory. Prerequisite: German 1000. Offered only in spring. 

2000 Intermediate German (4 sem. hours). Building on Basic German, this course focuses on the practical application of 
basic listening and speaking skills. Expands students' reading and writing skills. A minimum of one hour per week 
in language laboratory. Prerequisite: German 1010 or placement test score. Offered only in fall. 

2110 Contemporary German Culture (4 sem. hours). Providing the insights into customs and daily culture needed for 
interacting effectively with speakers of German, this transition course concentrates on reading skills in a 
conversational classroom environment. Taught primarily in German. Prerequisite: German 2000 or its equivalent or 
placement test score. Required for all further study in German. Offered only in spring. 

2120 German for the Professions (4 sem. hours). Designed to improve students' knowledge of a chosen field (such as law, 
medicine, education, banking, sociology, etc.) and their ability to communicate, especially in writing. Taught in 
German. Prerequisite: German 2110. Offered on demand. 

2751 German Across the Curriculum (1 sem. hour). Under a German instructor's guidance, students read and discuss texts 
related to a course in another discipline. Taught in German. This course may be repeated for credit with a different 
topic. Prerequisite: German 2000 and consent of the instructor. Offered on demand. 

3200 Survey of German Literature through the Enlightenment (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary 
works produced in German from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. Taught in German. Prerequisite: German 
2110. 

3210 Survey of German Literature from the Time of Goethe (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works 
produced in German from the Goethezeit to the present. Taught in Gerinan. Prerequisite: German 21 10. Offeredin 
alternate years. 

64 



3220 German Civilization (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the art, music, film, legends, history, literary 

accomplishments, and cultural aspirations of German-speaking people. Taught in German. Prerequisite; German 
2110. Offered in alternate years. 

3770 German Literature of the Early 20th Century (4 sem. hours). Close readings of representative texts by Mann, 
Kafka, Rilke, Hesse, and Brecht. Taught in German. Prerequisite: German 2110. 

3780 German Literature Since 1945 (4 sem. hours). Reading and discussion of texts by authors such as Borchert, Boell, 
Duerrenmatt, Wolf and Grass to increase understanding of society and politics in post-war Germany. Taught in 
German. Prerequisite: German 2110. 

4750 Special Studies in German (4 sem. hours). Advanced in-depth study of specific aspects of German literature, 

language, or culture. Taught in Gennan. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: 
German 2110. 

4800-4803 Directed Study in German (1-4 sem. hours). For advanced students who wish to do reading and research in 

special areas under the guidance of an instructor. Prerequisite: German 2110, and Consent of the department chair. 

4900 Senior Seminar (1-4 sem. hours). In this capstone course, senior majors reflect on the role their undergraduate degree 
in Gennan plays within the larger conte.xt of their liberal arts experience. 



Spanish 

1000 Basic Spanish I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the essentials of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. 
Primary emphasis on understanding and speaking. Secondary emphasis on reading and writing. Intended for 
students with no prior study of Spanish A minimum of one hour per week in the language laboratory. 

1010 Basic Spanish U (4 sem. hours). Continuation of Basic Spanish. A minimum of one hour per week in the language 
laboratory. Prerequisite: Spanish 1000. 

2000 Intermediate Spanish (4 sem. hours). Building on Basic Spanish, this course focuses on the practical application of 
basic listening and speaking skills. Expands students' reading and writing skills. A minimum of one hour per week 
in language laboratory. Prerequisite: Spanish 1010 or placement test score. 

2110 Contemporary Hispanic Culture (4 sem. hours). Providing the insights into customs and daily culture needed for 
interacting effectively with speakers of Spanish, this transition course concentrates on reading skills in a 
conversational classroom environment. Taught primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 2000 or its equivalent or 
placement test score. Required for all further study in. Spanish. 

2120 Spanish for the Professions (4 sem. hours). Designed to improve students' knowledge of a chosen field (such as law, 
medicine, education, banking, sociology, etc.) and their ability to communicate, especially in writing. Taught in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 2110. Offered on demand 

2751 Spanish Across the Curriculum (1 sem. hour). Under a Spanish instructor's guidance, students read and discuss texts 
related to a course in another discipline. Taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated for credit with a different 
topic. Prerequisite: Spanish 2000 and consent of the instructor. Offered on demand. 

3200 Survey of Peninsular Literature (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in Spain from 
the Middle Ages to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 10. Offered in alternate years. 

3210 Survey of Spanish-American Literature (4 sem. hours). A close study of the principal literary works produced in 
Spanish- America from the time of its discovery to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 
2 1 1 0. Offered only in fall 

3220 Spanish Civilization (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on the art, music, film, legends, history, literary 

accomplishments, and cultural aspirations of Spain. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 2110. Offeredin 
alternate years. 

65 



3230 Spanish-American Civilization (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on tiie art, music, film, legends, history, literary 
accomplishmenlb. and cultural aspirations of Spanish-speaking people in the Americas. Taught in Spanish 
Prerequisite; Spanish 2110. Offered in alternate years. 

3750 Advanced Conversation (4 sem. hours). A review and practice of the major problems faced In listening and speaking, 
faught primarily in Spanish. A minimum of one hour per week in the language laboratory Prereouisite- Soanish 
2\\Q. Offered ondemand. m h 

3760 Advanced Grammar (4 sem. hours). Systematic review and practice of the major problems faced by English-speakers 
in Spanish grammar and sentence structure. Taught primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 10. Offered on 
demand. 

3770 Modernism - Post Modernism (4 sem. hours). A comparison, contrast, and analysis of two main periods in modem 
Spanish American literature, focusing on modernist poetry and postmodernist prose. Taught in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 2110. 

3780 19th Century Hispanic Literature (4 sem. hours). This course examines major movements of nineteenth-century 
Spam and Spanish America, and it compares the two through the literature of that turbulent period. Taught in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 10. 

3790 Generation of 1898 (4 sem. hours). Focusing on Spanish intellectuals writing at the turn of the twentieth century, this 
course emphasizes the works of Miguel de Unamuno. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 10. 

4750 Special Studies in Spanish (4 sem. hours). Advanced in-depth study of specific aspects of Hispanic literature, 

language, or culture. Taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 2110. 

4760 Cervantes (4 sem. hours). A study of the life and works of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, including his short stories 
and plays as well as Don Quixote de La Mancha. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 10. 

4770 Golden Age Drama (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of representative theatrical works written in Spain between 
1550 and 1681 . Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 2110. 

4800-4803 Directed Study in Spanish (1-4 sem. hours). For advanced students who wish to do reading and research in 
special areas under the guidance of an instnictor. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 10 and consent of the department chair. 

4900 Senior Seminar (1-4 sem. hours). In this capstone course, senior majors reflect on the role their undergraduate degree 
in Spanish plays within the larger context of their liberal arts experience. 

Performing Arts 

• Professor: 

• Timothy C. Coker, Ph.D., Chair 

• Associate Professor: 

• Brent Lefavor, M.F.A. 

• Elizabeth W. Moak. M.M., Artist's Diploma 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Cheiyl W. Coker, D.M.M. 

• H. Lynn Raley, D.M.A. 

• Instructor: 

• Nash Noble, D.M.A. 



66 



Music 

Requirements for Major in Music: Students may complete a major in music with a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Business 
Administration, Bachelor uf Science degree. While Foundations of Music is a prerequisite for all theory courses, students 
with a good theory background may test out of this class. All music majors must complete a basic 32 hour, eight-course 
program that includes Masterworks of Music, Music History and Literature 1, II, HI, & IV, Concepts and Design in Music I & 
II, Common Practice Part - Writing Skills, Conducting I, Form and Analysis, and Music 1511, 1521, 2511. 2521 in Applied 
Music (these applied music requirements are for those who are not performance or church music concentrators). Participation 
in Singers each semester is required. All music majors must pass a keyboard proficiency. 

Requirements for Music Performance Concentration: Students may elect a performance concentration in piano, voice, 
and organ, or guitar and the orchestral instruments (the latter with special permission). Students may complete a performance 
concentration in music in tandem with a music major or any other major the College offers. The 20 hour, five-course program 
includes Music 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 in Applied Music, one course in the Applied Area Literature 
(e.g. Piano Literature or Vocal Literature for piano and voice concentrations), and one shared "half recital and one solo 
recital (the solo recital must come while enrolled in Music 4522). Voice concentrators must enroll in Singers each semester. 

Requirements for Church Music Concentration: Students may elect a concentration in church music in tandem with a 
music major or any other major the College offers. The 22 hour, five and one-half course program includes Choral 
Conducting I & II, Church Music Literature/Hymnology, a full course elective in religion, Music 
1511,1512,2511,2521,3511,3521 4511,4521 in Applied Music and Internship for Church Musicians. Church music 
concentrators must present one solo" full" recital (the recital must come while enrolled in Music 4521). Participation in 
Singers each semester is required. 

Requirements for Minor in Music: A student may elect a music minor in piano, voice, and organ, or guitar and the 
orchestral instruments (the latter with special permission). The 16 hour, four course program includes Foundations of Music, 
Concepts and Design I, Masterworks of Music, and four one semester hour applied music electives (two of which must be in 
one performance area). Participation in Singers for at least four semesters is required. 

Teacher Certification 

Candidates for BA or BS degrees can earn teacher certification in music by completing the following additional courses: 
Choral Conducting 1 & 11, Music Methods for Today's Schools, and the necessary courses in education, including Student 
Teaching. 

General Requirements for Students of Music 

All students studying applied music must attend weekly repertoire classes, attend all required recitals presented by the 
Department of Music, and take an examination before the faculty at the end of each semester. 

All keyboard concentrators are required each semester to accompany either a singer, an instrumentalist, or one of tlie vocal 
ensembles. 

Keyboard Proficiency 

All music majors must demonstrate keyboard proficiency in the areas of sight-reading, performance, technique, and 
functional skills. The exam will be administered by the end of the first semester of the junior year and take each subsequent 
semester until passed. Students must continue with piano lessons until the proficiency is passed. The exam must be passed as 
a whole. Students will not be allowed to pass portions at a time. 

Piano Concentration Requirements 

To enter the concentration program in piano, students should have an adequate musical and technical background and should 
be able to play all major and minor scales. They should have had some learning experience in all periods of the standard 
student repertoire, such as the Bach Two-Part Inventions, the Haydn and Mozart Sonatas, the Mendelssohn Songs Without 
Words and the Bartok Mikrokosmos. 

Organ Concentration Requirements 



67 



To enter the concentration program in organ, tlie student should have completed sufFicient piano study to play the Bach Two- 
Part Inventions, Haydn and Mozart Sonatas, and compositions by Chopin, Schumann or Mendelssohn. The student should be 
able to play all major and minor scales and arpeggios. 

Voice Concentration Requirements 

To enter the concentration program in voice, the student should possess above average vocal talent and evidence ability to 
sing with correct pitch, phrasing, and musical intelligence, should know the rudiments of music, and should be able to sing a 
simple song at sight. A student should have experience in singing works from the standard repertoire. 

Upper Divisional 

Performance concentrators are required to pass a special performance jury before being admitted to upper divisional status. 
This upper divisional exam, taken at the end of the fourth semester of applied study, consists of a twenty-minute program. 

1000 Foundations of Music (4 sem. hours). Explores music notation, scales, intervals, chords, rhythm, and introductory 
concepts about form in music. Since elementary understanding of the keyboard facilitates music learning, some 
practical keyboard drill is included. 

1100 Masterworks of Music (4 sem. hours). Introduces the accepted canon of musical masterpieces in different genres and 
the compositional devices composers have used to make unified artistic expressions. 

1501 Singers (1 sem. hour). Performs important choral works from all major style periods, often with orchestra. A cappella 
and accompanied presentations are balanced. : 

1501 Ensembles (1 sem. hour). Gives students opportunities to perform significant works for small ensembles. Vocal and 
instrumental are offered according to student needs. To receive academic credit for these ensembles students must 
enroll for both fall and spring semesters. Students enroll for audit credit during the fall. In the spring, enroll for 
regular one semester hour academic credit. 

2000 Concepts and Design in Music I (4 sem. hours). Explores the basic underlying principles and concepts related to 
musical abstraction. Students discover and apply thought processes utilized by composers. Independent creative 
activities which have expressive intent form the core of student work. Aural concepts are emphasized. 

2010 Concepts and Design in Music II (4 sem. hours). Emphasizes music conventions and constructs which shape and 
define music style. Modal, tonal, and serial approaches to composition are studied. Student compositions and 
performances provide focus for the study. Aural concepts are emphasized. Prerequisite: Music 2000. 

2110 Symphonic Literature (4 sem. hours). Studies significant symphonic works and their formal design which were 
written at the end of the eighteenth century through today. Prerequisite: Music 2000. Offered in alternate years. 

2130 Women and Music (4 sem. hours). Explores contributions of women to the art of music with special emphasis on 

women composers and performers beginning with Hildegaard von Bingen in the Middle Ages and concluding with 
contemporary composers and performers. 

3000 Common Practice I'art-Writing Skills (4 sem. hours). Examines part-writing procedures for chorale and related 
styles of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with emphasis on theoretical analysis. Student repetition of style 
characteristics provides focus for the class. Aural concepts are emphasized. Prerequisite: Music 2010. 

3002 Form and Analysis (2 sem. hours). Investigates the presentation, development, and relatedness of musical ideas 

through harmonic and structural analysis of music Ibrms. Student written analyses and class presentations are an 
integral part of the study. Prerequisite: Music 3000. 

3012 Counterpoint (2 .sem. hours). Probes eighteenth-century polyphony. Strict species counterpoint and period 

contrapuntal forms such as invention and fugue are studied. Drill and practice culminate in student contrapuntal 
compositions. Prerequisite Music 3000. Offered in alternate years. 

3022 Opera History (4 sem. hours). Explores the history of operatic form and literature from 1 600 to the present day with 
an emphasis on placing the art form in the context of social history. Offered occasionally. 

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3102-3112 Music History and Literature 1 <& II (4 scm. hours). Seeks to place music developments within the larger 
context of human history. The first half of the semester looks at music evolution from monophonic music of the 
ancient period through polyphony of the Renaissance, while the second half examines innovations and stylistic traits 
prevalent in the Baroque era. 

3122-3132 Music History and Literature III & IV (4 sem. hours). Examines music and its place in Western culture from 
the middle of the eighteenth century through the end of the twentieth century. The first half focuses on Classical 
period forms and their evolution during the Romantic period, while the second half explores eclectic forms and 
styles of major twentieth century composers. 

3S32 Choral Conducting 1 (2 sem. hours). Provides theoretical and practical background for leading a choral ensemble. The 
class functions as a laboratory for developmg conducting techniques. Prerequisite: Music 2000. Offered in alternate 
years. 

3542 Choral Conducting 11 (2 sem. hours). Provides additional support for developing conducting/analytical skills while 
utilizing significant choral literature. The class functions as a laboratory. Prerequisite: Music 3502. Offeredin 
alternate years. 

3591 Junior Recital (1 sem. hour). Junior performance concentrators only. 

4002 Orchestration and Computer Applications (2 sem. hours). Identifies idiomatic characteristics of instruments utilized 
in composition and e.xplores application of compositional techniques available on the computer. Student 
transcriptions and original compositions will be used in the class. Prerequisite: Music 2000. Offered occasionally. 

4102 Literature for the Piano (2 sem. hours). Surveys standard piano repertoire with emphasis on discovery of stylistic 
characteristics of major keyboard composers. Student research forms an integral part of the study. 

4110 Church Music Litcrature/Hymnology (4 sem. hours). Explores signilicant large and small forms of sacred music 
during the first half of the course. The second half examines hymnody with emphasis on English and American 
development of the form. Offered occasionally. 

4130 Literature for the Voice (4 sem. hours). Surveys solo song form of the Renaissance through the Twentieth Century as 
well as literature from oratorio and opera. The course emphasizes recital/concert program building from a historical 
perspective. Class performance is expected. Offered in alternate years. 

4200 Music Methods for Today's Schools (4 sem. hours). Explores strategies for teaching grades K - 12. Elementary topics 
include Suzuki, Dalcroze, Kodaly, and Orff techniques, while secondary topics emphasize choral methods. Offered 
in alternate years. 

4202 Piano Pedagogy 1 (2 sem. hours). Emphasizes techniques and materials used in teaching piano to children and older 
students in both private and class instruction. Papers on topics relating to piano teaching are expected. Offered 
occasionally. 

4220 Vocal Pedagogy (4 sem. hours). Explores the physical musculature and mechanics of singing, the use of technical 

exercises, and the psychology of vocal teaching. Investigation of basic repertoire for the beginning teacher forms an 
integral part of the course. Offeredin alternate years. 

4500 Conducting from the Organ Console and Service Playing (4 sem. hours). Emphasizes choral conducting techniques 
and literature for the church organist during the first half of the semester. The second half focuses on organ style for 
accompanying hymns and anthems. Offered occasionally. 

4592 Senior Recital (2 sem. hours). Senior performance concentrators only. 

4800-03 Directed Study (1-4 sem. hours). A student may elect to design a course that allows them to pursue an area of 
special interest not included in other courses. Faculty approval is required. 



69 



4852 Internship for Church Musicians (2 sem. hours). Provides the prospeclive church musician practical experience 

under the guidance of a practicing, full time church musician. Five to eight hours each week are spent in the church 
settmg. 

4862 Piano Pedagogy 11 (2 sem. hours). Continues work begun in Piano Pedagogy I. Actual teaching in an internship 
context is required. Offered occasionally. 

4900 Seminar in Music Literature (4 sem. hours). Provides a framework for placing major music genres such as opera, 

concerto chamber music, symphony, and art song into historical perspective. Student research and presentation are 
expected. 



70 



Applied Music 
Voice 1511, 1521, 2511, 2521, 351 1, 3521, 4511, 4521; 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (1 or 2 sem. 
hours). Private studio lessons for non-music and music majors. Employs basic vocal repertoire appropriate for 
individual vocal growth. Historical style development as well as breath support, posture, phonation, enunciation, 
articulation, and related singing skills are emphasized. Weekly repertoire class is required. 

Piano 1511, 1521, 251 1, 2521, 3511, 3521, 4511, 4521; 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522,3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (1 or 2 sem. 

hours). Private studio lessons for non-music and music majors. Introduces appropriate literature from the major 
style periods and technical drill to enable student growth in performance skills. Stylistic analysis is emphasized. 
Weekly repertoire class is required. 

Organ 1511, 1521, 2511, 2521, 3511, 3521, 451 1, 4521; 1512, 1522, 2512,2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (1 or 2 sem. 

hours). Private studio lessons for non-music and music majors. Provides keyboard and pedal technique needed to 
perform major organ literature. Sufficient piano background is necessary. Weekly repertoire class is required. 

Instrumental Study 1511, 1521, 251 1, 2521, 351 1, 3521, 4511, 4521; 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (1 
or 2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for non-music and music majors. Provides fundamental technique for 
performance on orchestral instruments. Literature appropriate for each student is utilized. 

Voice 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (2 sem. hours). Private sUidio lessons for voice concentrators. Covers 
a larger body ofliterature than elective voice. Intensive development of technique is approached through works of 
Vaccai, Shakespeare, Marchesi, Vennard, McCloskey, Miller, and others. Weekly repertoire class is required. 

Piano 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for piano concentrators. 

Explores piano literature in depth and aims toward rapid progress in technical proficiency. A major goal is to enable 
student to achieve successful performance. Weekly repertoire class is required. 

Organ 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for organ concentrators. 

Emphasizes literature and technique needed for church organists, performers, or teachers. Weekly repertoire class is 
required. 

Instrumental Study 1512, 1522, 2512, 2522, 3512, 3522, 4512, 4522 (2 sem. hours). Private studio lessons for instrument 
concentrators. Provides technique for performance on orchestral instruments at the level appropriate for a music 
minor. Literature to enhance student technique and musical development is employed. 



Theatre 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in theatre with a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Business 
Administration, or Bachelor of Science degree. All theatre majors must complete a basic 50 hour, twelve and a one-half 
course program that includes Page to Stage, Introduction to Acting, Production I, Production 1 Lab, Stage Makeup, History 
and Literature of the Theatre 1 and IL Introduction to Directing, and Senior Seminar and four semesters of Performance 
(significant participation in Players productions). Beyond the basic courses, theatre majors must complete an additional 
course in each of the following; acting, directing, and production. 

Requirements for Major in Theatre with Pre-Professional concentration: Students may complete a major in theatre with 
a pre-professional concentration by completing a 60-hour. 15 course program ( 10.5 at Millsaps College and 4.5 at New Stage 
Theatre). Courses at Millsaps include: all of the basic courses required for the major, as well as one additional course in the 
area of their concentration: acting, directing, production, or management. Upon completion of this additional course, students 
will qualify to take the pre-internship (3850 or 3852) at New Stage Theatre. After fulfilling the above requirements, students 
may apply to take the New Stage Internship (4850). Work done during the internship program will count as the Senior 
Project portion of Senior Seminar 4900. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may complete a minor in theatre by completing a 24 hour, six course program that 
includes Page to Stage, Introduction to Acting, and Production I with Lab. Students must complete two semesters of 
Performance (significant participation in Players productions). Also, students must complete two courses chosen fi^om the 
following: acting, production, directing, theatre history, or speech. 

71 



Speech 
1000 Speech Fundamentals: Pnblic Speaking (4 sem. hours). Students prepare and deliver several oral presentations using 
informative, persuasive and interpretive approaches in an extemporaneous style. Some presentations will use visual 
aids and some will be videotaped. The course emphasizes preparation for extemporaneous delivery, platform and 
breathing techniques, pronunciation and articulation. Individual attention, help, and criticism offered. 

1010 Speech Fundamentals: Oral Reading (4 sem. hours). Students prepare and deliver several oral presentations using 
interpretive approaches to literature. This course emphasizes text analysis, individual presentations of prose and 
poetry, group presentations ot choral speaking and readers' theatre. Individual attention, help, and criticism offered. 

Theatre 
1010 From Page to Stage (4 sem. hours). An examination of major figures and works in their social and cultural contexts 
ot dramatic movements and theatrical developments from the Greeks to the present. This course includes script ' 
analysis and practical exercises in the process of transforming texts into fully realized productions Fulfills the Fine 
Arts requirement. 

1401, 2401,3401, 4401 Performance (1 sem. hour). Practical experience in acting, directing, or technical work in 
productions by the Millsaps Players. Four performance courses will fulfill the Fine Arts requiremem. 

1801 Dance (1 sem. hour). Studio courses in ballet, modern and jazz taught by instructors of Ballet Mississippi Classes 

meet at Ballet Mississippi, the Art Center (Downtown) and on the Millsaps campus. For details see the Chair of the 
Department of Performing Arts. 

2000 Theatre in America (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of American theatre literature and history of the 19th and 20th 
centuries. Students explore the influences of major playwrights, and plays including the unique contributions of 
Atrican-American drama and musical theatre. 

2100 Introduction to Acting (4 sem. hours). A studio course in acting fijndamentals with an empha.sis on performance in 
the modem realistic style. Studems explore improvisational techniques, scene study, and character development 
This course includes a study of major llgures in modern acting theory. Fulfills the Fine Arts requiremem Offered in 
alternate years. 

2110 Acting Styles (4 sem. hours). A studio course in approaches and interpretations of acting in pre-modern and non- 
reahstic perfomiance styles. Students explore verse texts, historically oriented acting styles, and voice and 
movemem techniques. This course includes a study of the philosophies and practices of non-realistic approaches to 
performance. Prerequisite: Theatre 2100 or by consent of the instructor. 

2102 Improvisation (2 sem. hours). 

2112 Voice and Speech for the Theatre (2 sem. hours). 

2200 Production I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to production organization, management, and equipment- the basic 

theories and practices of scenic construction, rigging and shifting, mechanical drawing, and color theory are studied 
Must be taken concurrently with Production 1 Lab (2202) 

2202 P'-oJ-ction I Lab (2 sem. hours). Students work backstage a minimum of five hours per week constructing sets for 
Millsaps Players productions. Additionally, students head a crew (props, lights, sound, etc.) for one of the 
productions during the seme.ster. 

2210 Production IT (4 sem. hours). Theories and practice of theatrical production; areas of study include stage properties 

scene painting, lighting and sound. Must be taken concurrently with Production II Lab (2212). Prerequisite- Theatre 
2200 or consent of the instructor. 

2212 Production 11 Lab (2 sem. hours). See 2202 

2220 Design for the Actor/Director (4 sem. hours). Theories and practice of set, costume and lighting design Must be 
taken concurrently with Design Lab (2222). Prerequisite: Theatre 2200 or consent of the instructor Offered in 
alternate years. 

72 



2222 Design Lab (2 sem. hours). See 2202 

2252 Stage Makeup (2 sem. hours). The principles and sl<ills of applying stage maiceup. Students will work with a variety 
of media to create the following character types including, youth, middle age, old age, special effects, and 
prosthetics. Also, students are assigned to the makeup crew for one of the Millsaps Players productions during the 
semester. 

3000 History and Literature of the Theatre I (4 sem. hours). Examines dramatic theory, literature, criticism, and theatrical 
practices from the origins through the Renaissance; includes a study of Asian Theatre. A minimum of two plays are 
read, discussed, and analyzed for each period. Prerequisite: Theatre 1010 or permission of the instructor. 

3010 History and Literature of the Theatre II (4 sem. hours). Examines dramatic theory, criticism, and theatrical practices 
from the English Restoration to the present. A minimum of three plays are read, discussed, and analyzed for each 
period. Prerequisite: Theatre 1010 and 3000 or permission of the instructor. 

3102 Stage Movement (2 sem. hours). 

3112 Mask Technique (2 sem. hours). 

3200 Scenery and Lighting Design (4 sem. hours). Advanced design; areas of study include set and lighting design for 
interior and exterior productions, box sets, unit sets, and musical or multi-set productions. Prerequisites: Theatre 
2200 and 2220 or permission of the instructor. 

3212 Stage Management (2 sem. hours). Examines the role and duties of the stage manager in modem theatre. In addition 
to classroom work, the student is assigned to act as the stage manager for one of the Millsaps Players productions 
during the semester. 

3220 AutoCAD (4 sem. hours). Computer assisted drafting and design. Students study and practice a variety of techniques 
including geometric constructions, block diagrams, orthographic drawmgs, dimensioned drawings, sectional 
drawings, and some three-dimensional drawings. Admission only hy permission of instructor. 

3310 Introduction to Directing (4 sem. hours). A studio course in fundamentals of directing theory and practice with an 

emphasis on performance in the modern realistic style. Students present directed scenes in performance. This course 
includes a study of major figures in modern directing theory. Offered in alternate years. 

3320 Advanced Directing (4 sem. hours). A studio course in directing approaches focusing on pre-modem and non-realistic 
genres. Students present directed scenes in performance including those for non-proscenium and found spaces 
formats. This course includes a study of directors in the alternate and avant garde theatre. Offered in alternate years 

3850, 3852 Prc-lnternship (2 or 4 sem. hours). Serves as a bridge to the professional theatre. Students have the opportunity 
to apprentice at New Stage Theatre. Mississippi's only professional theatre. Students will work with a New Stage 
employee for 6-12 hours per week in order to develop professional skills in the student's chosen concentration. 
Acceptance to the pre-internship program is by interview/audition and approval of the faculty. 

4800- 4803 Directed Study (1-4 sem. hours). Designed to cover areas of special interest not included in other courses. 
Open only to approved students. 

4850 New Stage Internship (4-12 sem. hours). An immersion in professional theatre: a semester of work at New Stage 
Theatre in the student's chosen concentration. Acceptance to the Internship program is by interview/audition and 
approval of New Stage Theatre and Millsaps College faculty. Prerequisite: Theatre 3850 or Theatre 3852. 

4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). Students complete a senior project (approved by the faculty) that demonstrates their 

ability to study and present a dramatic text for production. Portfolios of written work and a comprehensive reflective 
paper that places the undergraduate degree in theatre within the larger context of the liberal arts experience is 
required. This course fulfills the Core 10 requirement. 



73 



Philosophy 

• Professors: 

• Steven G. Smith, Ph.D. 

• Associate Professors: 

• Theodore G. Ammon, Ph.D., Chair 

• Kristen M. Brown, Ph.D. 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Patrick D. Hopkins, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in philosophy with eight courses, including Logic, both semesters 
of History of Philosophy, and Senior Seminar. One core topics course taught by an instructor from the Philosophy 
Department may be used to meet the requirements of the philosophy major. At least one-half of the courses for the major 
must be taken at Millsaps. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in philo,sophy with any four courses from the Philosophy Department. 
At least one-half of the courses for the minor must be taken at MilLsaps. 

Philosophy-Religious Studies Major 
Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in Philosophy-Religious Studies with five courses in philosophy 
and five in religious studies. The philosophy courses must include Philosophy 3010,3020, 33 10, and one other upper-level 
course; the religious studies courses must include a tradition-descriptive course (2110, 2120, 2220, or 3110), a normative 
reflection course (2010 or 3 120), and the Religious Studies Seminar (3900 or 4900). At least one course taken must involve 
comparison of diverse religious traditions. Students pursuing this major will be given a specially adapted comprehensive 
examination by a committee of faculty from the two departments. 

Courses 

1210 Logic (4 sem. hours). Phis course will focus upon propositional logic and quantification, and to a lesser extent upon 

syllogistic logic. Attention will be given to scientific method and induction, and to informal analysis of arguments in 
language. Offered in alternate years. 

2000 Ways of Knowing (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the theories of knowledge from a variety of philosophical 

traditions, including feminism, pragmatism, mysticism, empiricism and rationalism. A central concern of the course 
will be the relationship between science and philosophy in the acquisition of knowledge. Offered occasionally. 

2010 Social and Political Philosophy (4 sem. hours). An inquiry into the basic principles of social and political 

organization, with special emphasis on the concepts of government, justice, punishment, family, property, work and 
peace. Same as Political Science 2500. 

2020 Ethics (4 sem. hours). A reasoned exploration of the nature of the best life for individuals and societies. Offered 
occasionally. 

2750 Special Topics (4 sem. hours). 

3010-3020 History of Philosophy 1 & II (4 sem. hours each). The first semester is a survey of western philosophy through 
the Medieval Period, and the second semester is a survey from the Renaissance through the nineteenth century 
Philosophy 3010 is the same as Classics 3500. 

3030 20th Century Philosophy (4 sem. hours). A consideration of some of the movements in 20th century philosophy. 
Offered occasionally. 

3150 Existentialism (4 sem. hours). A study of the basic works of thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, 
Sartre, Marcel and Jaspers. Qf/ererfoccav/o/m//);. 



74 



3210 Aesthetics (4 sem. hours). A study of the following question: What is the nature of art, aesthetic experience and 
aesthetic judgment? Offered in alternate years. 

3310 Philosophy of Religion (4 sem. hours). Investigation of issues arising from religious experience and beliefs, including 
the nature of the divine, evil and human destiny. Offered occasionally. Same as Religious Studies 3310. 

3610 Metaphysics (4 sem. hours). This course will consider traditional philosophical questions about "Being" such as, but 
not limited to: What is reality? Do 1 have free will? Is there a God? What kind of thing am 1? The course may either 
survey briefly the history of metaphysics or cover one or two philosophers in detail. Offered occasionally. 

3750 Special Topics (I to 4 sem. hours). 

4800 Directed Readings (1 to 4 sem. hours). 

4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). Intensive reading in selected issues, schools, and thinkers for senior majors. 



Religious Studies 

• Professor: 

• Steven G. Smith, Ph.D., Chair 

• Associate Professors: 

• lames E Bowley, Ph.D. 

• Darby K. Ray, Ph.D. 

• Assistant Professors: 

• John J Thatamanil. Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in religious studies with eight courses, including Introduction to 
Religious Studies and Religious Studies Seminar (Religious Studies 4900 is required of seniors and 3900 is recommended for 
juniors.) One core topics course taught by a member of the Religious Studies department may be counted toward the religious 
studies major. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in religious studies with any four courses from the Religious Studies 
department, including Introduction to Religious Studies and Religious Studies Seminar. 

Philosopliy- Religious Studies Major 
Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in Philosophy-Religious Studies with five courses in philosophy 
and five in religious studies. The philosophy courses must include Philosophy 3010,3020, 3310, and one other upper-level 
course; the religious studies courses must include a tradition-descriptive course (21 10, 2120, 2220, or 3110), a normative 
reflection course (2010 or 3120), and the Religious Studies Seminar (3900 or 4900). At least one course taken must involve 
comparison of diverse religious traditions. Students pursuing this major will be given a specially adapted comprehensive 
examination by a committee of faculty from the two departments. 

Concentration in Christian Education 

An interdisciplinary area of concentration in Christian Education is available to students. For specific requirements, see 
Interdisciplinary Studies. 

Courses 

2000 Introduction to Religious Studies (4 sem. hours). A wide-ranging exploration of the phenomenon of religion and of 
the various approaches to its study. 

2010 Ethics and Religion (4 sem. hours). A study of moral reasoning about personal and social issues in various religious, 
philosophical, and cultural contexts. Offered in alternate years. 

2110 Judaism, Christianity, Islam (4 sem. hours). A study of the history, literature, and thought of Judaism, Christianity 
and Islam with attention to their connections with each other. Offered in alternate years. 

75 



2120 South Asian Religions (4 sem. hours). A study of the history, literati.re and thought and practices of the rehgions of 
India and Tibet, mcludrng Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. Offered in alternate yean. 

2130 East Asian Religions (4 sen., hours). A study of the history, literature and thought and practices of the religions of 
China, Korea, and Japan, includmg Confucianism, Taoism. Buddhism, and Shinto. Offered in aUernate years. 

2210 Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the history, literature and thought and 
practices of ancient Israel. Offered in alternate years. 

2220 New Testament and Early Christianity (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the background and beginninss the 
earliest development and thought of Christianity. Offered in alternate vears. 

2400 The Meaning of Work (4 sem. hours). An investigation into the phenomenon that is arguably at the foundation of 

human civilization and the human psyche: work. Is work a primal curse, a saving grace, a human necessity? Which 
activities should count as work, and how should they be counted? Are certain kinds of work or ways of working 
better or more meaningftil than others? Who should benefit from work? This course will explore issues of value 
purpose, function, organization, and justice in relation to the meaning of work from a variety of perspectives 
including philosophy, theology, sociology, psychology, and management, 

2601-2602 Contemporary Religious Issues (I or 2 sem. hours). Discussion based on readings in current periodicals and 
books and on personal experiences. Offered occasionally. 

2750 Special Topics (4 sem. hours). 

31 10 History of Christian Thought (4 sem. hours). A study of formative figures and ideas in the history of Western 
Christianity. Offered in alternate years. 

3120 Modern and Contemporary Theology (4 sem. hours). An examination of major developments in theology from the 
bnlightenment to the present, with attention to such figures as Schleicrmacher, Earth, Tillich, Rahner the Niebuhrs 
Kuether, and McFague, and to contemporary movements such as the liberation theologies and global theoloav 
Offered in alternate years. 

3150 Religion, Science and Nature (4 sem. hours). An investigation of issues raised by the relationship between Western 
science and classic religious traditions, including the religious roots of science, the worldview revolutions caused by 
scientific theories, and environmental ethics and policy. Offered occasionally. 

3160 Religion and Literature (4 sem. hours). A study of religious approaches and themes in modern and contemporary 
Uteraxure. Offered occasionally. ' 

3170 Religion and Society (4 sem. hours). A study of the relationships between religious beliefs and values social 

structures, and political issues, drawing on social-scientific as well as religious resources. Offered occasionally. 

3310 Philosophy of Religion (also Philosophy 3310) (4 sem. hours). An investigation of issues arising from religious 

LThToTophy 3310 '■ '" "'' '"'"'' ^'""'' '''''"'• ''" '"" ^"'^'" '^"''"^- ^^^""'"' "'"^^"^'^y^"^^- Same 

3600 The Educational Ministry of the Church (4 sem. hours). An examination of the purpose and implementation of 
Christian educational ministry. Offered occasionally. 

3750 Special Topics (4 sem. hours). 

3900-4900 Religious Studies Seminar (4 sem. hours). Intensive reading and discussion of selected texts and issues of 

contemporary interest in religious studies. (Topics will be announced each time the course is offered' since topics 
change with each offering, the course may be retaken for credit.) 

4850-4853 Religious Studies Internship (1, 2, 3 or 4 sem. hours). An off-campus learning experience designed in 
consultation with a religious professional and a Religious Studies department faculty member. 

76 



Division of Sciences 

George J. Bey. Ill, Associate Dean 
Biology 

• Professors: 

• Sarah L. Armstrong, Ph.D., Chair 

• James P. McKeown, Ph.D. 

• Associate Professors: 

• Dick R. Highfill, Ph D. 

• Sarah Lea McGuire, Ph.D. 

• Robert B. Nevins, M.S. 

• Assistant Profcs.sors: 

• Deborah Mann, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: The Biology Department offers both the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees in 
biology. All majors must take Introductory Cell Biology, General Biology, General Zoology, and Senior Seminar, plus a 
minimum of five additional biology courses, including one from each of the three areas listed below: 

• Cellular and molecular processes; 

• Bacteriology 

• Genetics 

• Immunology & Virology 

• Molecular Cell Biology 

• Structure and Function: 

• Comparative Morphology 

• Entomology 

• Histology 

• Invertebrate Zoology 

• Comparative Physiology 

• Mammalian Physiology 

• Organisms and Environment: 

• Aquatic Biology 

• Evolution and Systematics 

• Ecology 

• Field Biology 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in biology with Introductory Cell Biology, General Botany, General 
Zoology, and at least two upper-level biology courses chosen from the list above. 

General Information 

No grade lower than a C will be accepted in any course to fulfill a major or minor in biology. For the major, at least four 
courses plus Senior Seminar must be taken in residence at Millsaps. For the minor, at least three out of the necessary five 
courses must be taken in residence at Millsaps. 

Students planning careers in the health professions should also take General Chemistry I, and 11, with labs; Organic 
Chemistry I, and 11, with labs; and College Physics I, and II, with labs. Many medical schools strongly recommend at least 
one semester of Biochemistry. 

Students planning further study in molecular biology are encouraged to take Biochemistry I and n. 

Students planning further study in ecology or environmental sciences are encouraged to take General Chemistry I and 11, with 

labs; Elementary Statistics, and Physical Geology. 

All courses numbered 2000 or higher require two previous college level biology courses or consent of instructor. 

77 



Courses 
1000 Introductory Cell Biology (4 sem. hours). An examination of cytological. physiological and biochemical features 
common to all cells: metabolism, genetics, growth, movement and reproduction. Laboratories will include basic 
instrumentation and concepts of quantification. Prerequisite for all other biology courses. Fulfills Core 7 or 9. 

1010 General Botany (4 sem. hours). Examines the structures, life processes, ecological interactions and evolutionary 
relationships among bacteria, protists. fungi and plants. Fulfills Core 7 or 9. Prerequisite: Biology 1000. 

1020 General Zoology (4 sem. houi-s). Comparative morphology and physiology of invertebrate and vertebrate animals 
Fulfills Core 7 or 9. Prerequisite: Biology 1000. 

1700 Genes and Society (4 sem. hours). Examines the fundamental principles of he-redity with the primary focus on human 
inheritance and genetics to industry and agriculture. Ethical questions raised by new technologies are considered. 
Includes a laboratory. Designed for non-science majors; does not fulfill requirements for B.S.'degree or for a major 
or minor in biology. Fulfills Core 7 or 9. 

1710 Human Evolution (4 sem. hours). History and nature of science. The various lines of evidence about human ancestty 
will be examined, including population genetics, paleontology, DNA & protein sequencing, "Mitochondrial Eve", 
chromosome structure, behavior, and linguistics. Current literature will be reviewed. This course includes a 
laboratory. For freshmen and sophomores only, except by permission of instnictor. Designed for non-science 
majors. Does not fulfill requirements for B.S. degree, nor for a major or minor in biology. Fulfills Core 7 or 9. 

2000 Genetics (4 sem. hours). Historical/developmental treatment of theories of biological inheritance with emphasis on the 
process of scientific discoveiy. Includes Mendelian, cytogenetic, bacterial and molecular approaches to questions 
about the nature and function of genetic material. Laboratory component consists of investigative experiences in 
Mendelian and molecular genetics. Prerequisite: Biology 1000. 

2100 Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4 sem. hours). Integrated course In vertebrate anatomy and embryology. 

Reproduction, organ systems, and a comparative study of the gross anatomy of the vertebrate systems Prerequisite- 
Biology 1020. 

2200 Ecology (4 sem. hours). In-depth study of relationships of organisms with other organisms and with their physical 

environment, including population, community and ecosystem dynamics. Prerequisites: Biology 10 10 or consent of 
instructor. 

2210 General Entomology (4 sem. hours). Identification, life history, ecology and evolutionary histories of the class 
Hexapoda. Prerequisite: Biology 1020. Offered on demand. 

2220 Evolution and Sysfematics (4 sem. hours). Evidence for, and mechanisms of, evolution, including population and 

molecular genetics, and paleontology. History, philosophy, and practice of taxonomy; nature of taxonomic evidence. 
Prerequisite: Biology 1000 and Biology 1010. 

3100 Histology (4 sera, hours). Microscopic anatomy of the different vertebrate systems, with an emphasis on basic tissue 
types. Prerequisite: Biology 1020. 

3110 Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (5 sem. hours). An integrated course in vertebrate anatomy and embryology. 
Reproduction, organ systems, and a comparative study of the gross anatomy of the vertebrate systems Prerequisite- 
Biology 1020. 

3120 Electron Microscopy (4 sem. hours). Theory and techniques of the electron microscope. Tissue preparation, handling 
and imaging with the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Permission of instructor is required. Does not 
fulfill any of the areas required for a biology major or minor. 

3200 Aquatic Biology (4 sem. hours). Physical and biological processes in aquatic ecosystems, both freshwater and marine. 
Emphasis is on natural ecosystems and the impact on them by the activities of humans. Prerequisite: Biology 1010. 



78 



3210 Field Biology (4 seni. hours). Environmental study trips throughout North America. Emphasis on ecology and 
community composition. Five-week summer program with approximately three weeks away from campus. 
Prerequisites: Biology 1010, 1020. Offered occasionally. 

3300 Molecular Cell Biology (4 sem. hours). An in-dcpth study of the molecular principles by which eukaryotic cells 

function, with emphasis on membrane structure/function, signal transduction, the cytoskeleton, and the cell cycle. 
The course is integrated with a survey of current molecular techniques for genetic engineering, DNA and protein 
analysis, and eukar>otic cell structure. Prerequisites: Biology 1000 and Chemistry 1213 and 1223. 

3400 Comparative Animal Physiology (4 sem. hours). Comparative e.xamination of selected organ systems in animals, 
from protozoa through chordates, with an emphasis on vertebrates. Laboratory employs current methods and 
instrumentation of experimental physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 3410. May be repeated as topics vary. 

3410 Mammalian Physiology (4 sem. hours). Lecture and laboratory experiences present the fundamental principles of the 
function of mammalian organ systems. Laboratory experiments include both human and animal models, employing 
contemporary methods and instrumentation of experimental physiology. Prerequisites: Biology 1000 and 1020 or 
consent of instructor. 

3500 General Bacteriology (4 sem. hours). Historical survey, bacterial structure, metabolism, genetics and taxonomy; role 
of bacteria in disease, industry, and ecology; common bacteriological techniques. Prerequisite: Biology 1010; 
Chemistry 1213 and 1223. Recommended: Organic Chemistry. 

3510 Immunology and Virology (4 .sem. hours). The physiology, biochemistry and genetics of the immune response; viral 
structure, function and relationship to host. Prerequisites: Biology 1010; Chemistry 1213 and 1223. Recommended: 
Organic Chemistry. 

3600 Invertebrate Zoology (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of the invertebrate phyla. Emphasis on morphology, life 
history, physiology, ecology and evolutionary histories. Three discussion periods and one three-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite; Biology 1000 and 1020. Offered on demand. 

3700-3703 Undergraduate Research (1-4 sem. hours). Students who are interested in doing research approach an 

instructor who either has an ongoing research program or who has a number of research problems identified that the 
student can choose from. 

3710-3712 Directed Study (2 or 4 sem. hours). Course is offered when a student needs a special discipline covered to meet 
some professional requirement or a student wants to work with an instructor in order to look more deeply into a 
particular aspect of a discipline. 

3750-3752 Special Topics in Biology (1-4 sem. hours ) 

3850-3852 Internship (2 or 4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, educational, 
governmental and business institutions. 

4911 Environmental Studies Seminar (I sem. hour) An interdisciplinary colloquium in which students share the results of 
the environmental research, internship or field course work they have undertaken as a requirement of the 
Environmental Studies Concentration. 

4902-4912 Senior Seminar (2 sem. hours). A sequenced, two-semester (2 hours per semester) capstone course for the 

biology major. Selected topics in the history and current literature of science, particularly biology, emphasizing the 
development of an integrated worldview from the standpoint of the sciences. Required for all biology majors. 
Prerequisite: senior standing. 



79 



Chemistry 



• Professors: 

• Charles Eugene Cain, Ph.D.. Emeritus 

• Jimmie M. Purser, Ph.D. 

• Timothy J. Ward, Ph.D., Chair 

• Assistant Professors: 

• L. Lee Lewis, B.S. 

• Kristina L. Stensaas, Ph.D. 

witra grdTof C°or^etter ^" ''"'''"'' "'"'"'"^ ' '''^''' '" '''""'"'^ """" '"""''"'" """ ^'°"°^'"S ''°"'''' '" '^^^'^i^'fy 

General Chemistry 1 & II and General Chemistry Laboratory I & II 
Organic Chemistry 1 & II and Organic Chemistry Laboratory I & II 
Quantitative Analysis and Applications of Quantitative Analysis 
Physical Chemistry I or Principles of Physical Chemistry 
Chemical Separations or Instrumental Analysis 
Organic Spectral Analysis 
Literature of Chemistry 
Chemistry Seminar 

Students pursuing a BS degree with a major in chemistry must satisfy two of their additional degree requirements with 
General Physics I & II and General Physics Laboratory I & II. 

The chemistry department is accredited through the American Chemistry Society to offer the American Chemistry Society 

Itn \ T!f- ''^'"^T'°"- ^^^ "'"""'^ '^'°''' P™^'*^*^' """'^ '" ''^P'h t^«i"i"8 for those students who wish to pursue 
gradt^ate studies m chem.stry or other advanced studies. To receive the ACS certification of a degree, the student must 

rov^" "^ ""'"^ ^'"''^^^^ '" chemistry and must take the following courses in addition to the requirements listed 

Analytical Geometry and Calculus II ,j 

Physical Chemistry I and II 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Instrumental Analysis 

Two additional chemistry courses numbered above 3000 from the following; 3110, 3310, 3610, 3620, 3730 

A grade below "C" will not be accepted for any of the above courses required of a chemistry major. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in chemistry by taking the following courses: 

• General Cheinistry I and II and General Chemistry Laboratory 1 and II. 

• Organic Chemistry I and U and Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II. 

• One additional four semester hour chemistry course numbered above 2000. 

Courses 

1213 General Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3 sem. hours). An introduction to the theory, practice and methods of Chemistry 
Development ot atomic theory, atomic and tnolecular structure, chemical bonding, periodicity of the elements, 
stoichiometry, states of matter and basic energy considerations. This course and Chemistry 1211 fulfill core Tor 9 
Corequisite: Chemistry 1211 

1211 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 sem. hour). A coordinated course (with General Chemistry I) 

emphasizing chemical techniques, skills, and methods for qualitative and quantitative analysis of laboratory data and 
their limitations. I his course and Chemistry 1213 fulfill core 7 or 9. Corequisite; Chemistry 1213. 

80 



1223 General Inorganic Chemistry II (3 scm. hours). An introduction to the states of matter, solution and descriptive 

chemistry, equihbrium, thermodynamics, Ivinetics, oxidation and reduction, and electrochemistry. This course and 
Chemistry 1221 rultill core 7 or 9. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1213. Corequisite Chemistry 1221. 

1221 General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 11 (I sem. hour). A coordinated course (with General Chemistry 11) to 
develop chemical techniques and includes introductory qualitative and quantitative analysis. This course and 
Chemistry 1223 fulfill core 7 or 9. Prerequisite: Chemistry 121 1. Corequisite Chemistry 1223. 

2110 Organic Chemisti7 1 (4 sem. hours). First in a two-semester program in the application of chemical principles to 

organic compounds and the elucidation of their chemical and physical properties. Development of theoretical 
principles including stmcture determination, reaction mechanisms, kinetics, bond stability, experiment design, 
stereochemistry, and strategies of organic synthesis. Prerequisite; Chemistry 1223. Corequisite: Chemistry 2111. 

2111 Organic Chemisti7 Laboratory 1 (1 sem. hours). A coordinated one-quarter course (with Chemistry 2110) 

emphasizing organic synthesis, separation techniques, spectral analysis, and testing of mechanism theory and 
relative rates. Corequisite: Chemistry 2110. 

2120 Organic Chemistry FI (4 scm. hours). Second part of a two-semester program, a study of the more common oxygen, 

nitrogen, sulfur, and halogen derivatives ol' carbon. Emphasis is on their structure, stereochemistry, preparation, 
chemical reactions, and physical properties and their relation to the properties of bio-molecules. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 21 10. Corequisite: Chemistry 2121. 

2121 Organic Chemisti7 Laboratory II (1 sem. hour). A coordinated one-quarter course (with Chemistry 2120) 

emphasizing more advanced syntheses and use of instruments for separation techniques and spectral analysis. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 2120. 

2310 Quantitative Analysis (4 sem. hours). This course will cover the use of basic statistical methods to treat sample data. 
Theories and concepts studied include solution equilibria, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, complexation and 
solubility equilibria. An introduction to potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1223. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 2312. 

2312 Applications of Quantitative Analysis (2 scm. hours). Gravimetric, titrimetric and volumetric methods along with 
statistical methods to evaluate data are presented in the laboratory. Various unknowns are detemiined utilizing the 
basic techniques described above. The laboratory will also introduce potentiometry and UV-Visible spectroscopy. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 2310. 

3110 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4 sem. hours). An in-depth study of major organic mechanisms, along with selected 
topics such as symphoria, heterocyclics, polymers and molecular orbital modeling. Stereo-chemical and mechanistic 
applications are discussed including their application to bio-molecules. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2120. 

3122 Organic Spectral Analysis (2 scm. hours). Theory and practice of instrumental analysis of organic compounds. 

Emphasis is on interpretation of data from modern instrumentation. Capabilities and limitations of spectral analyses 
are considered. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2 1 20 

3210 Advanced Inorganic Chemisti-y (4 sem. hours). A course designed primarily for students who are pursuing the 
American Chemical Society accredited degree in chemistry. This course is an overview of the principles of 
advanced inorganic chemistry including applications of group theory and symmetry, molecular bonding theories, 
nomenclature, kinetics and mechanisms, organometallics, polymers, and advanced inorganic laboratory techniques. 
The course has a lecture and laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2310, Mathematics 2310. Prerequisite 
or corequisite: ChemLstry 3410. 

3310 Principles of Chemical Separations (4 sem. hours). Techniques covered include crystallization, distillation, gas and 
liquid chromatography, counter current chromatography, micellar chromatography, electrophoretic techniques, and 
field flow fractionation. This course will also examine general transport theory, formation and properties of 
Gaussian zones, diffusion, zone broadening, concepts of plate height, resolution, and peak capacity. A laboratory 
section is included in the course. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2310. 

3320 Instrumental Analysis (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the basic design and theory of operation for modern 
instrumentation. Topics to be covered include tlame spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence and 

81 



phosphorescence, IR, NMR, potentiometry, mass spectrometry, and an introduction to electroanalytical techniques 
Ihis course will emphasize the practical apphcations and limitations of each technique. Included in the course is a 
laborator>' period. Prerequisite: Chemistry .1400 or 3410. 

3400 Principles of Physical Chemistry (4 sem. houi-s). This is a non-calculus-based course designed for the general 

chemistry major and those pursuing careers in the health sciences. Topics covered include structure of matter gas 
laws, properties of liquids and solutions, thermodynamics, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, catalysis and properties 
of macromolecules. An integrated laboratory is included in the course. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2310. 

3410 Physical Chemistry I (4 sem. hours). Physical thermodynamics, equilibrium, properties of solutions of 

nonelectrolytes, phase rule, and states of matter. The integrated laboratory includes experiments in the above areas 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 220. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 23 1 0. 

3420 Physical Chemisti-y II (4 sem. hours). Kinetics, nuclear chemistry, quantum chemistry, molecular bonding and 

structure, and surface chemistry. An integrated laboratory is included in the course. Prerequisite- Chemistry 7310 
Mathematics 2230. } - , 

3610 Biochemistry I (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the structure, dynamics and fijnction of macromolecules- proteins 
nucleic acids, and complex lipids. Topics include enzyme kinetics, mechanisms of enzyme action, biological 
membranes, and protein biosynthesis. Prerequisites: Chemistry 2120, Biology 1000. 

3620 Biochemistry II (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the basic concepts and design of metabolism. Topics include the 
generation and storage of metabolic energy, control of gene expression, and the application of biochemical 
principles to physiological processes. Prerequisites: Chemistry 2120, Biology 1000. 

3700-3703 Undergraduate Research (1 - 4 sem. hours). Library and laboratory research in special areas under the guidance 
of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

3730 Geochemistry (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the application of chemical principles to geologic systems- carbonate 
equilibria, clay colloidal chemistry, Eh-pH diagrams, chemical weathering, organic materials in sediments and phase 
diagrams. Prerequisite: Chemistry 3400 or 3410. 

3750-3753 Special Topics in Chemistry (1 - 4 sem. hours). Special areas of study not regularly offered for an organized 
class ot interested students. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

3800-3803 Independent Study (1-4 sem. hours). Following the basic courses this offering will permit a student to pursue 
an advanced topics under the direction of the appropriate chemistry staff member. 

3850-3853 Internship (T - 4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, educational 

governmental, and business institutions. Credit/no credit grading only. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

4910 Literature of Chcmistt^ (4 sem. hours). Processing and managing information from the chemical literature with oral 
and written presentations. History of chemistry and the proper use of chemical literature are included. Prerequisites 
or corequisites: Chemistry 2120, 3310, or 3320, 3410, or 3400. 



Computer Science 



Professors: 

• Jimmie M. Purser, Ph.D. 

• Robert A. Shive, Jr., Ph.D 

Assistant Professors: 

• R.W. McCarley, M.S. 

• Donald R. Schwartz, Ph.D., Chair 

• Dennis Dance, Ph.D. 



82 



Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in Computer Science witli a concentration in either 
computer science or computer information systems. Tlie computer science concentration is intended to prepare 
students for graduate studies or technical careers in computing, while the concentration in computer information 
systems prepares students for careers that involve the applications of computing. All students pursuing the major 
must take 1 1 courses (44 semester hours), including Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Computer 
Organization and Machine Programming, Data Structures and Algorithms, and both semesters of Seminar. In 
addition, majors must take courses specific to their concentration as described below. 

A. Computer science concentration: One of: Computer Graphics, Computer Architecture or Theory and Design 
of Operating Systems; two Computer Science courses numbered 3000 or higher; two additional computer 
science or mathematics courses numbered 3000 or higher; Mathematics 2310: Introduction to Advanced 
Mathematics. 

B. Computer information systems concentration: Systems Analysis and Design, Math 1 150: Elementary 
Statistics; two computer science courses numbered 3000 or higher; two additional courses fi"om the following 
list; any computer science or mathematics course numbered 3000 or higlier. Accounting 2000, Management 
3000, Quantitative Management 3000. 

A minimum grade of C is required for any Computer Science course required for the major. All requirements for the 
major not taken at Millsaps must be approved in advance by the department chair. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in Computer Science with Computer Science I, Computer 
Science II, and at least two computer science courses at 2000 level or above. A minimum grade of C is required for 
any computer science course required for the minor. 

Courses 

1000 Problem Solving With Computer Software (4 sem. hours). Introduction to the use of computer software and 
hardware including introduction to operating systems, editors, electronic mail, word processing, 
spreadsheets, relational databases, and statistical packages available on the campus network. This course 
emphasizes problem solving in the utilization of computer resources. 

1010 Computer Science 1 (4 sem. Iiours). An introduction to algorithms and computer programming. Basic 

programming constructs, data structures, recursion, and graphical user interface construction. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 1 100 (College Algebra) or equivalent 

1020 Computer Science 11 (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Computer Science I. Topics include linked lists, 

stacks and queues, trees and giaphs, sorting algorithms, algorithm analysis, data abstraction, and software 
engineering. Prerequisite; Computer 1010. 

2100 Computer Organization and Machine Programming (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the architecture 
and operation of a computer system. Includes data representation, assembly language programming, 
addressing methods, subroutines, assemblers, and linkers. Prerequisite: Computer 1020. 

2210 File Structures and Processing (4 sem. hours). A study of the methods used for organizing data on 

peripheral devices. Topics include sequential and random access techniques, searching, sorting, merging, 
indexed-sequential access and multiple key file organizations. The COBOL programming language is used. 
Prerequisite: Computer 1020. Offered occasionally. 

2300 Data Structures and Algorithms (4 sem. hours). Algorithm design, analysis and implementation. Topics 
include specialized trees and graphs, advanced searching and sorting, complexity analysis, and algorithm 
design techniques. Prerequisite: Computer 1020. 

2440 Multimedia Principles and Design (4 sem. hours). Principles and methods of muhimedia systems. Case 
studies, team exercises, and the use of multimedia development and authoring tools. Laboratory work 
focuses on multimedia courseware development. Prerequisite; Computer 1000 or Computer 1010. 

3100 Data Communications and Networks (4 sem. hours). Theoretical and practical factors in data 

communications including historical aspects, communications equipment, transmission media, protocols, 

83 



error effects, topologies, architectures and network strategies. Laboratory experience in network 
development and management. Prerequisite: Computer 1020. 

3110 Computer Architecture (4 sem. hours). Comparative ai-chitectures, systems structure and evaluation, 

memory and process management, resource allocation, protection, and concurrent processes, current trends 
in system design and operations. Prerequisite: Computer 2100. 

3210 Systems Analysis and Design (4 sem. hours). System development life cycle, CASE tools, decision tables, 
data collection and analysis, systems planning and design, computer system evaluation and selection, and 
implementation of systems. Prerequisite: Computer 2300. 

3220 Database Management (4 sem. hours). Database concepts, organization and applications, database 
management systems, and the implementation of various databases. Prerequisite: Computer 1020. 

3300 Theory and Design of Operating Systems (4 sem. hours). Multiprogramming and multiprocessing systems, 
mapping and binding of address, storage management, process and resource control, analysis of file 
structures and file management. Prerequisites: Computer 2100 and 2300. 

3310 Automata, Computability, and Compiler Theoiy (4 sem. hours). Automata, Turing machines, and theory 
■ , of computation, techniques of compiler design, lexical analysis and parsing, classification of grammars. 

Prerequisites: Computer 2300. 

3410 Computer Graphics (4 sem. hours). Design, construction, and utilization of interactive computer graphics. 
Device independent development of two and three dimensional transformations, clipping, windows, 
perspective, hidden lines, and animation. Graphics primitives and graphics libraries. Laboratory 
applications using diverse graphics hardware and software. Prerequisite: Computer 2300 and Mathematics 
1220. 

3420 Digital Image Processing (4 sem. hours). Hardware and software issues in image processing. Document 
storage and retrieval with particular emphasis on optical systems. COM/CAR, WORMS, compression 
techniques, OCR, scanners, networks, document processing software and laboratory applications of 
selected processes. Prerequisite: Computer 1010. 

3440 Multimedia Systems and Applications (4 sem. hours). An exploration into advanced features of multimedia 
and the Internet, including compression, event synchronization, storage and networked applications. Tools 
for multimedia design, development, and evaluation. The course contains a laboratory component. 
Prerequisites: Computer 1010 and Computer 2440. 

3500 Discrete Structures (4 sem. houis). Algebras and algorithms, lattices and Boolean algebras, graphs and 
digraphs, monoids and groups. Prerequisites: Mathematics 2310 (Same as Math 3560). 

3600 Software Engineering (4 sem. hours). Design, construction and maintenance of large software systems. 
Topics include project planning, requirements analysis, software design methodologies, software 
implementation and testing, maintenance and software metrics. Prerequisite: Computer 1020. 

3620 Rapid Application Development (4 sem. hours). Software development in the rapid development/rapid 
prototype realm. Topics include user-interface design strategies, software engineering, object-oriented 
programming, graphics and database access. Prerequisite: Computer Science 1020. 

3750-3753 Selected Topics (1-4 sem. hours). 

3800-3803 Directed Study (1 - 4 sem. hours). 

4902-4912 Seminar (2 - 2 sem. hours). Discussion of current problems and trends in computing. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 



Education 



84 



Professors: 

• Jeanne Middleton-Hairston, Ed.D. 

• Marlys T. Vaughn, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor: 

• Connie Schimmel, Ph.D., Chair 
Assistant Professor: 

• Eugene Vinson, Ed.D. 
Principals' Institute: 

• Beth Canizaro, Ed.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in elementary education with 52 semester hours, 
including the following courses in education: The Human Experience: A cross-cultural Perspective, Classroom 
Methods and Management, Literacy, Performance Assessment in Teaching and Evaluation. Field Research in 
Reading, Reading Instruction, Education of the Exceptional Popular, and Education Theory, Policy, and Practice. In 
addition, students must complete a computer course (Educational Technology is recommended), and a semester of 
Student Teaching. Student Teaching is the equivalent of four courses Satisfactory completion of the elementary 
education major also meets the requirements for Elementary Teacher Licensure. 

Millsaps does not offer a major in secondary education but does provide Secondary Teacher Licensure for students 
who major in an academic discipline and take the prescribed courses for licensure. These eleven courses include The 
Human Experience: A cross-cultural Perspective, a computer course (Educational Technology is recommended), 
Classroom Methods and Management, Performance Assessment in teaching ad Evaluation, Field Research in 
Reading, education for the Exceptional Population, Educational Theory, Policy, and Practice and a semester of 
Student Teaching. Student Teaching is the equivalent of four courses. 

****A11 students interested in seeking teacher licensure are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of 
Education for individualized advisement to expedite programs of study that can lead to double majors, 
minors, and licensure. Supplemental licensure in Special Education is also encouraged. 

All licensure programs arc accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE). 

Teacher Education Program 

The Teacher Education Program emphasizes leadership, scholarship, and research as service. The program is 
designed to help students become more deliberate in their thinking about the profession of teaching and the variety 
of opportunities the profession offers for challenge and service. The faculty in the Department of Education pays 
particular attention to the developmental needs of prospective teachers as they matriculate through the licensure 
program. Carefully crafted and well-supervised field experiences and internships are distinctive features of Millsaps 
College teacher education. The importance of the liberal arts in education, the need for reflection on teaching and 
professional practice, and the belief that the competent teacher education graduate is one who can think, act, and 
especially teach in a morally responsible manner are integrated throughout the Millsaps College Teacher Education 
Program. Teacher licensure can be earned concurrently with any other major or degree during the four year 
undergraduate experience. For a specific course of study leading to teacher licensure at the elementary or secondary 
level, please contact the Department of Education. 

There are certain entrance standards which must be met prior to achieving full status in the Teacher Education 
Program. The Mississippi Department of Education regulates licensure requirements, which are subject to change. 
The current entrance requirements include: completion of the core curriculum (1-9), a minimum grade point average 
of 2.5, and the appropriate score on the Praxis I examinations or a composite score of 21 on the American College 
Test (ACT) with no subscore lower than 1 8 or a score of 860 or above on the SAT. Students must also complete all 
application procedures with the Department of Education. Exit requirements include the Teacher Education 
Comprehensive Examination and appropriate scores on Praxis II and Specialty Area Examinations. Students are 
required to have copies of their scores sent directly to the Mississippi Department of Education. 

To receive the College's recommendation for teacher licensure, the student must maintain the 2.5 GPA, pass 
the Praxis II and Specialty Area tests no later than the semester prior to graduation, and complete the 
Portfolio for Comprehensive Examination with the Department of Education. 



85 



Courses 

IDS 1600 The Human Experience: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (4 scm. hours). Students explore and apply 
theories surrounding the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of human development The 
course demands an immediate and personal perspective for college students as they construct underlying 
frameworks for understanding human development. 

2100 Deaf Culture/American Sign Language (4 sein. hours). A study of the deaf community and beginning 
American Sign Language (ASL) skills. The course introduces students to various sign methods the 
linguistic structure of ASL, the experience of deaf people throughout history, and the impact and 
importance of ASL and deaf culture. 

3100 Literacy (4 sem. hours). A field-based study of developmentally appropriate practices in the acquisition of 
language, oral and written communication, and mathematics. Integrated instruction, the structure and 
properties of the number system (including the vocabulary and concepts of sets, algebra and geometry) 
literature, and other components of literacy will be examined. Education 3100 should be taken during 'the 
same semester as Education 3200. 

31 10 Performance Assessment in Teaching and Evaluation(4 scm. hours). A study of the concepts and statistical 
methods used in the assessmem of learning, including the construction and use of classroom assessmem 
instruments, standardized tests of intelligence and achievement, and the use of statistics in the assessment 
ot .student learning and data analysis for informed decision making. National professional standards provide 
the framework for program assessment. 

3120 Reading Instruction (4 scm. hours). A comprehensive study of the components of the reading process with 
emphasis on instructional methods appropriate to the cognitive and psychological needs of elementary and 
middle school students. A tleld-based component is incorporated in the course. 

3130 Education of the Exceptional Population (4 sem. hours). A study of the exceptional individual with special 
attention to the instructional needs of the child and adolescent. The course emphasizes the identification 
and remediation processes, differential diagnosis, lEPs, and etiologies. 

3200 Classroom Methods and Management (K-8) (4 sem. hours). A field-based study of effective instructional 

and behavioral management techniques appropriate for elementary, and middle school students with special 
attention to studem learning styles and teacher instructional styles. Mastery of the Mississippi Teacher 
Assessment Instrument (MTAF) is a component of the course. 

3210 Classroom Methods and Management (7-12) (4 sem. hours). A field-based study of effective instructional 
and behavioral managemem techniques appropriate for the secondary school level with special attention to 
student self-discipline, the relationship between school and society, and the mastery of the Mississippi 
Teacher Assessment Instrument (MTAI). 

3850 Field Research In Reading (4 sem. hours). A model for classroom research and remediation that fosters the 
development of teacher candidates as scholars, leaders, and researchers. The course involves a criterion 
reference approach to teaching utilizing pre-and post-testing procedures with experimental and control 
groups and the daily monitoring of student progress with continuous feedback and accountability under the 
direct supervision of college faculty. 

3860 Advanced Internship in Education II 

3870 Advanced Internship in Education IH 

3880 Advanced Internship in Education IV 

Advanced Internships II, III, and IV offer students the opportunity to further explore areas of interest within the field 
ot Special Education. Interns experiment with special emphasis on the chosen e.xceptionalities for dual 
licensure. Disciplinary tocus and field site placements are individualized. 



86 



4300 Educational Theory, Policy and Practice (4 scm. hours). The study of educational theory and the 

philosophies which underlie the development of curricula, instructional programs, and educational policy. 
Special attention will be given to the relationship between educational theory, policy development and 
modern educational practice. 

4500 Student Teaching (16 sem. hours). Intensive field experience student teaching all day for a minimum of 13 
weeks at an elementary, middle, or high school in the Metropolitan Tri-County area. 

4750 Special Topics (1 to 4 sem. hours). In-depth study of specific aspects of education, including Educational 
Technology. 



Geology 

• Associate Professors: 

• Delbert E. Gann, Ph.D. 

• James B. Harris, Ph.D., Chair 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Stanley Galicki. Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in geology with a concentration in either classical geology or 
environmental geology. Typically, a degree in environmental geology will lead to a career in environmental policy and 
planning, environmental law, or environmental project management. 

A. Classical Geology concentration: One introductory (1000-level) geology course, Plate Tectonics and Earth 
History, Applied Techniques in Mineralogy, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, Principles of 
Stratigraphy/Sedimentation, Invertebrate Paleontology, Petrology, Structural Geology, Applied Geophysics, 
Field Methods, and Field Geology. Classical geology majors must also take Analytical Geometry and Calculus 
I, General Chemistry I and II, and General Physics I and II. 

B. Environmental Geology concentration: Two introductory (1000-level) geology courses (one of which 
must be Environmental Issues of the 21st century), Plate Tectonics and Earth History, Physical and Chemical 
Mineralogy, Principles of Stratigraphy/Sedimentation, Petrology, Hydrology and Chemistry of Natural Waters, 
Structural Geology, Applied Geophysics. Field Methods, and Field Geology. Environmental geology majors 
must also complete General Chemistry 1 and II, two courses in biology, and either (a) Analytical Geometry and 
Calculus I for the Bachelor of Science degree or (b) Survey of Calculus and Elementary Statistics for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. General Physics 1 and 11 are highly recommended. 

Field Geology may be taken at Millsaps or another college or university. At least one major field trip per year is required. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in geology with a concentration in either classical geology or 
environmental geology as follows. 

A. Classical Geology concentration: One introductory (1000-level) geology course, Plate Tectonics and Earth 
History, Physical and Chemical Mineralogy, Principles of Stratigraphy/Sedimentation, and two additional 
geology courses (2000-level or above). 

B. Environmental Geology concentration: Two introductory (1000-level) geology courses (one of which 
must be Environmental Issues of the 21 st century), Plate Tectonics and Earth History, Principles of 
Stratigraphy/Sedimentation, Hydrology and ChemLstry of Natural Waters, and one additional geology course 
(2000-level or above). 

Courses 

1000 The Physical Earth (4 sem. hours). Study of the Earth, including Earth material properties, surface erosional and 
depositional processes, and Earth interior processes. Includes lab and one field trip. 

1100 Environmental Issues of the 21sl century (4 sem. hours). Examination of the facts underlying four major areas of 
environmental concern: 1) atmospheric pollution and deterioration, 2) water pollution and misuse, 3) population 
growth and resource availability, and 4) energy resources: availability, alternatives, and possible impacts. 

87 



2000 Plate Tectonics an.l Earth History (4 scm. hours). Study of successive events leading to the present confi.>uration of 
the continental masses, the evolution and development of life, and the kinds and distribution of rocks and minerals 
all viewed usmg the framework of the Theory of Plate Tectonics. Prerequisite: lOOO-level geology course. 

2100 Applied Techniques in Mineralogy (4 seni. hours). Techniques of mineral identification using the optical properties 
ot light and X-rays. An introduction to crystalline order and the crystal systems using crystals block models 
stereogranis, the petrographic microscope. X-ray diffractometer, and the scanning electron microscope. Prerequisite- 
lOOO-level geology course. 

2200 Physical and Chemical Mineralogy (4 sem. hours). Physical properties, origin, occurrence, geochemistry atomic 
structures, and uses of minerals. Lab emphasizes the physical identification of minerals in hand samples' 
Prerequisite: 1 000-level geology course. 

2300 Principles of Stratigraphy/Sedimentation (4 sem. hours). Rock sequences, lithologic and paleontologic facies of 

various parts of the United States and basic sedimentological principles. Prerequisite: 1 000-level "eology course and 
Geology 2000. 

3000 Invertebrate Paleontology (4 sem. hours). Classification and morphology of fossil invertebrates with reference to 

evolutionary history and environment. Field trips to collect representative fossils. Prerequisite- lOOO-level geoloev 
course and Geology 2000 or consent of instructor. 

3100 Principles of Ore Deposition (4 sem. hours). The chief economic rocks and minerals of the United States and other 
countries, with consideration of their stratigraphy, genesis, value, and use. Prerequisite: lOOO-level geology course 
Geo\ogy 2000, tind Geology 2200. Offered on deitmncl. 

3200 Petroleum Geology (4 sem. hours). The applications of geology to the petroleum industry, theories on origin 
problems in migration, oil traps, subsurface methods, and occurrence of oil and gas. Prerequisite- 1000-level 
geology course and Geology 2000. Offered OH demand. 

3300 Hydrology and Chemistry of Natural Waters (4 sem. hours). A comprehensive study of the occurrence distribution 
and geochemical processes of natural waters. Topics include: hydrologic cycle, Darcy's Law, groundwater flow in ' 
confined and uncontined aquifers, stream flow, the effects of common forms of pollution on the natural system 
current environmental regulations, and remediation technologies. Prerequisite: lOOO-level geology course. 

3400-3403 Special Problems in Geology (1 - 4 sem. hours). Open to geology majors and some non-geology majors who 
have an interest m pursuing individual field or laboratory problems. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

3500-3503 Directed Study in Geology (1 - 4 sem. hours). Open to geology majors and some non-geology majors who 
desire pursuing a directed course of study in geology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

4000 Petrology (4 sem. hours). Introduction to the genesis, global distribution, associations, compositions and 

classifications of rocks. Laboratory emphasis is on macroscopic and microscopic identification of igneous 
sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Prerequisite: Geology 2200 or consent of instructor 

4100 Geochemistry (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the chemical principles of geological systems: carbonate equilibria 
clay colloid chemistry, Eh-Ph diagrams, chemical weathering, organic materials in sediments, and phase diagrams 
Prerequisite: 1 000-level geology course, Geology 2000, and General Chemistry I and 1 1. Offered on demand 

4200 Structural Geology (4 sem. hours). Origin and classification of the structural features of the rocks comprising the 

barth s crust Lab emphasizes various techniques of structural analysis. Prerequisite: 1 000-level geology course and 
Geology 2000. 

4300 Applied Geophysics (4 sem. hours). Basic exploration geophysical techniques of seismic refraction, seismic reflection 
electrical methods, gravity and magnetics are studied and applied to environmental and engineering problems 
Prerequisite: 1 000-level geology course, and Physics I and II (concurrent enrollment acceptable). 

4350 Solid Earth Geophysics (4 sem. hours). This course will illustrate how different types of geophysical observations 

(seismic refraction, seismic reflection, earthquake seismology, gravity, magnetics, and heat flow) provide constraints 



on Earth's structure and composition. It introduces geology students with a basic grounding in math and physics to 
the fundamentals of various geophysical techniques. Specific observations illustrate how each technique constrains 
certain aspects of the plate tectonic framework that is fundamental to the study of Earth science today. 

4402 Field Methods (2 sem. hours). A course designed to introduce field geology and familiarize students with basic field 
mapping procedures. Prerequisite: lOOO-level geology course and Geology 2000. 

4506 Field Geology (6 sem. hours). Practical training in the standard methods of geologic field work and an introduction to 
regional geology. Prerequisite: to be determined by the college or university offering the course, but should include 
a lOOO-level geology course. Geology 2000, Geology 2300, Geology 4000, and Geology 4200. 

Mathematics 

• Professor: 

• Robert A. Shive, Jr., Ph.D. 

• Associate Professor: 

• Connie M. Campbell, Ph.D., Chair 

• Mark Lynch, Ph.D. 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Miguel Arellano, M.S. 

• Oayla Dance, M.S., M.A. 

• Joseph Palen, Ph.D. 

• instructor: 

• Tracy Sullivan, M.S. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in mathematics with ten mathematics courses which include 
Analytic Geometry and Calculus l-III, Introduction to Advanced Mathematics, Senior Seminar, Abstract Algebra, Advanced 
Calculus , and three courses numbered above 3000. A C grade or higher is required for each of these courses. Majors must 
also complete Computer Science I and a physics course with a lab or an intermediate level course in French or German. All 
requirements for the major not taken at MiUsaps must be approved in advance by the department chair. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in mathematics by completing Analytic Geometry and Calculus HI, 
Introduction to Advanced Mathematics, and at least two courses numbered above 3000. A C grade or higher is required in 
each of these courses. In addition. Computer Science I is required. 

Courses 

1000 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning (4 scni. hours). A topics course in mathematics covering a variety of real- 
life applications. An emphasis is placed upon problem solving and the development of problem solving skills. 
Topics include algebraic models, logic, geometry, finance and statistics. 

1 100 College Algebra (4 sem. hours). Topics include solving polynomial equations and inequalities, functions and their 
graphs, systems of equations, properties of logarithmic and exponential fiinctions, elementary analytic geometry, 
and applications of these topics. This course can be used as a single course preparation for Math 1210 or as the first 
in a two semester preparation for Math 1 220 (the second course in this sequence is Trigonometry). Credit is not 
allowed for both Mathematics 1 100 and Mathematics 1 130 or Math 1110. 

1110 College Trigonometry (4 sem. hours). The basic analytic and geometric properties of the trigonometric functions are 
studied. A preparatory course for the calculus sequence. Credit is not allowed for both Mathematics 1110 and 
Mathematics 1130. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 100 or departmental approval. 

1 130 Precalculus (4 sem. hours). This course covers topics included in College Algebra and Trigonometry. It is a one 
semester preparatory class for the calculus sequence. Credit is not allowed for both Mathematics 1 100, and 
Mathematics 1 1 30. 

1150 Elementary Statistics (4 sem. hours). Introduction to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include the 
Central Limit Theorem, confidence Intervals, chi square test of independence and goodness of fit, analysis of 

89 



variance, correlation, and regression analysis. Applications to business, education, and otlier disciplines are 
emphasized. 

T210 Survey of Calculus (4 seiti. hours). Topics include limits, the derivative, applications of the derivative with focus on 
applications in business and the social sciences, antiderivatives and applications of the definite integral Credit is 
not allowed for both Mathematics 1210 and Mathematics 1220. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1100 or 11 30 or 
departmental approval. 

1220 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (4 sem. hours). Topics include limits, continuity of functions, the derivative 

antiderivatives, integrals, the ftindamental theorem and applications. Course includes a computer-based laboratory 
Credit IS not allowed for both Mathematics 1210 and Mathematics 1220. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 100 and 
1 1 10, or 1 1 30, or departmental approval. 

2230 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (4 sem. hours). Integration techniques, applications of the integral, the properties 
of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonoinetric functions, indeterminate forms, improper 
integrals, and infinite series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1220 or departmental approval. 

2240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III (4 sem. hours). A continuation of Mathematics 2230. Partial derivatives 
multiple integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2230 or departmental approval. 

2310 Introduction to Advanced IMathematlcs (4 sem. hours). Topics include logic and proofs, set theory, relations, 

functions, cardinality, and an axiomatic development of the real number system. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2230 or 
departmental approval. 

3410 College Geometry (4 sem. hours). A study of advanced topics in Euclidean geometry, and an introduction to non- 
Euclidean geometries. Selected topics from tmite and projective geometries. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2310. 
Offered on demand. 

3540 Differential Equations (4 sem. hours). An introduction to ordinary differential equations, emphasizing equations of 
first and second order; linear ditTerential equations of higher order and applications to geometry, physics, chemistry 
and medicine. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2230. 

3560 Discrete Structures (4 sem. hours). Algebras and algorithms, lattices and Boolean algebras, graphs and digraphs 
monoids and groups. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2230 and 2310. (Same as Computer 3500.) Offered in allernale 
years. 

3570 Numerical Analysis (4 sem. hours). Solutions of non-linear equations and systems of linear equations- error analysis- 
numerical integration and differemiation; solution of differential equations: interpolation and approximation 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 2310. Offered in alternate yearx. 

3620 Number Theory (4 sem. hours). Prime numbers and their distribution; divisibility properties of the integers- 

Diophantine equations and their applications; theory of congruencies; Femiafs Theorem, Fibonacci numbers and 
continued tractions a.s well as the historical background in which the subject evolved. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
2310. Offered in alternate years. 

3650 Linear Algebra (4 sem. hours). Systems of linear equations with emphasis on the Gauss-Jordan technique- 
determinants; geometric vectors with applications to analytic geometi^ and physics; real finite dimensional vector 
spaces with applications through linear transformations; eigenvectors; eigenvalues; orthogonal diagonalization and 
symmetric matrices. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2230. 

3700 - 3703 Undergraduate Research (1 - 4 sem. hours). Research in special areas under the guidance of the instructor 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

3750-3752 Selected Topics in Advanced Mathematics (2 or 4 sem. hours). Topics chosen from areas such as applied 
mathematics, complex variables, graph theory, and combinatorics. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. 

4510 Mathematical Statistics (4 sem. hours). Topics include sample spaces; discrete and continuous probability 

distributions; independence and conditional probability; properties of distributions of discrete and random variables; 

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moment-generating functions; sampling distributions and parameter estimation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2240 and 
2310. Offered in alternate years. 

4620 Abstract Algebra (4 sem. hours). A rigorous treatment of groups, rmgs, ideals, isomorphisms, and homomoiphisms, 
integral domains, and fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2310. 

4630 Advanced Calculus (4 sem. hours). A rigorous treatment of limits, continuity, difTerentiation, integration, and 
convergence in n-dimensional Euclidean spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 23 1 and Mathematics 2240. 

4660 Topology (4 sem. hours). Consideration of topological spaces, including metric spaces, product spaces, and quotient 
spaces; separation axioms; connectedness; compactness; and continuous functions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2310. 
Offered on demand 

4800 Graph Theory (4 sem. hours). A theoretical study of trees, connectivity, eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, 

planarity, colorability, and extremal graph theory. Prerequisite; Mathematics 2310. Offered in alternate years. 

4810 Complex Analysis (4 sem. hours). Topics include: complex numbers, sets, and functions; limits and continuity; 
analytic functions; cauchy theorems and integrals; Taylor and Laurent series; residues; and contour integration. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 2310 and Mathematics 2240 or consent of the department chair. Offered in alternate 
years. 

4902-4912 Senior Seminar (2 sem. hours). Reading and research in advanced mathematics; group and individual 
presentations both oral and written; preparation for comprehensive examination; opportunities to expand 
understanding of topics of interest to the individual student. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of the 
instructor. 



Physics 

• Associate rrofessor: 

• AsifKhandker, Ph.D., Chair 

• Assistant Professor: 

• Gina Sonei, M.S. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in physics with ten courses, including General Physics I & II, 
General Physics Laboratory 1 & II, Modern Physics, Electromagnetism, Themial Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Advanced 
Laboratory 1-11, Electronics for Scientists, Similarities in Physics, and Senior Seminar. Prospective majors should take 
General Physics l-Il and General Physics Laboratory l-II no later than the sophomore year. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in physics with three courses beyond General Physics I-II, and 
General Physics Laboratory I-lI. The courses [nust be approved by the department chair. 



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Mathematics Requirements 

T.wZl"'^'T'^ '"' '™'"'^'"'"g 'he option of study in physics or related fields (e.g. pre-engineering) are urged to begin 

of Calc^^^^^^^^^ r n'^"""""?^' "'^ " """'^'^ '"' '' ^'^ '^'^^«' '^^^' P"-'"^- '' '^ -1--d 'hat a minimum 

of Calculus 1, II, III as well as Differential Equations be taken by all physics or pre-engineering majors. 

Courses 

1001 General Physics Laboratory I (1 sem. hour). Experiments to accompany General Physics I dealing mainly with 
mechanics and wave motion. Corequisite: Physics 1003 

1003 General Physics 1 (3 sem. hours). A broad introduction to general physics for students who have taken an introductory 
calculus course. Main areas covered are mechanics and waves. Specific topics include vectors, kinematics Newton's 
laws ot motion, rotation, equilibrium, wave motion and sound. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1220 or consent of 
instructor. Corequisite: Physics 1001. 

101 1 General Physics Laboratory II (1 sem. hour). Experiments to accompany General Physics II dealing mainly with 
electromagnetism and optics. Corequisite: Physics 1013. 

1013 General Physics II (3 sem. hours). The continuation of General Physics I. General topics covered are electricity 

magnetism and optics. Specific topics include electrostatics, current electricity, magnetostatics time varyins fields 
geometrical and physical optics. Prerequisite: Physics 1003. Corequisite: Physics 1011. 

1201 College Physics Laboratory I (I sem. hours). Experiments to accompany College Physics I dealing mainly with 
mechanics, waves and heat. Corequisite: Physics 1203. 

1203 College Physics I (3 sem. hours). Fundamentals of mechanics, waves, fluids and selected topics in thermal physics A 
non-calculus course intended primarily for majors in the biological and health sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
1 100. Corequisite: Physics 1201. 

1211 College Physics Laboratory II (1 sem. hours). Experiments to accompany College Physics 11 dealing mainly with 
current electricity, optics and modern physics. Corequisite: Physics 1213. 

1213 College Physics II (3 sem. hours). The continuation of College Physics 1. Fundamentals of electrostatics current 
electricity, magnetism, optics and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: Physics 1203 Corequisite- 
Physics 1211. ^ 

2000 Modern Physics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the special theory of relativity and its consequences Black body 

radiation and the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation. Fundamentals of quantum physics, introduction to the 
bchrodinger equation and simple applications. Prerequisite: Physics 1013. 

2010 Applications of Modern Physics (4 sem. hours). Application of elementary quantum mechanical concepts to explain 
physical phenomena occurring in atoms, nuclei and solids. Topics include lasers, molecular structure bonding in 

oooo^'^t '^^"'^; """^^^^ ''"'""'^' '■''«'i"''='i^"y ""c'ear fusion and elementary particles. Prerequisite: Physics 
^WO. UJf erect III alternate years. 

2750-27.S3 Special Topics or Laboratories in Physics (1 - 4 sen,, hours). This course deals with areas not covered in other 
physics courses or laboratories. It is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors at an intermediate physics level 
Prerequisite: Consent ot instructor. ^ ' 

3100 Classical Mechanics (4 sem. hours). Dynamics of a single particle, including Newton's laws, momentum energy 
angular momentum, harmonic oscillator, gravitation and central force motion. The Lagrano.an and Hai^iltonTan 
formulation will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: Physics 1013. Corequisite: Mathematics 3540.Offered in 
alternate years. •" 

3110 Electromagnetism (4 sen,, honrs). Fields, conductors, dielectric media, Laplace's and Poisson's equations. Direct and 
aitematmg currents, magnetic induction and forces, electromagnetic energy. Maxwell's equations with applications 
Prerequisite: Physics 1013. Corequisite: Mathematics 3540. Offeretl in alternate years 



92 



3120 Thermal Physics (4 sem. hours). An introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics with implications for 

thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases. Topics include, density of states, entropy and probability, partition 
functions, classical and quantum distribution tiinctions. Prerequisite; Physics 2000. Offered in alternate years. 

3130 Optics (4 sem. hours). Geometrical optics: reflection, refraction, ray tracing and aberrations. Physical optics: wave 
theory, absorption, dispersion, diffraction and polarization. Properties of light from lasers, photodetectors and 
optical technology. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: Physics 1013 or consent of instructor. Offered occasionally. 

3140 Quantum Mechanics (4 sem. hours). Postulates of quantum mechanics, operators, eigen fimctions and eigen values. 
Function spaces, Hermitian operators and time development of state functions. Schrodinger's equation in one 
dimension, harmonic oscillator, rectangular potential barrier and the WKB approximation. Problems in three 
dimensions, angular momentum, Hydrogen atom and theory of radiation. Matrix mechanics and spin. Prerequisite: 
Physics 2000, Matheinatics 3540. Offered in alternate years. 

3202 Advanced Physics Laboratory 1 (2 sem. hours). Experiments of classical and contemporary importance selected from 
various fields of Physics. Experiments often deal with topics that have not been treated in other courses. Some areas 
of experimentation include interferometry, microwaves. X-rays and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: Physics 2000 or 
consent of instructor. 

3212 Advanced Physics Laboratory IT (2 sem. hours). Continuation of Advanced Physics Laboratory I, with the 

understanding that students will be expected to acquire an appreciation of the significance of the experiments 
performed through independent study. Prerequisite: Physics 3202. 

3300 Electronics for Scientists (4 sem. hours). The emphasis of this course is on analog electronics, including DC and AC 
circuit analysis, diode circuits, semiconductor devices, amplifier circuits, operational amplifiers and oscillators. 
Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: Physics 1013 or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 

3700-3703 Undergraduate Research (1-4 sem. hours). The student may continue to study topics of interest through 
readings and research. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

3750-3753 Directed Study (1-4 sem. hours). The student may begin to study topics of interest through readings and 
research. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

3760-3763 Advanced Special Topics or Laboratories in Physics (1-4 sem. hours). Deals with areas not covered in other 
physics courses or laboratories. Aimed primarily at juniors and seniors at the intermediate or advanced level. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

3850-3853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours). Practical experience and training with selected research, educational, 
governmental and business institutions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

4902 Similarities in Physics (2 sem. hours). Analysis of the similarities that occur in many diverse fields of physics by oral 
and written presentations. Also includes presenting information processed from physical literature. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

4912 Senior Seminar (2 sem. hours). A continuation of the theme in Similarities in Physics. Emphasis is placed on a unified 
approach to problem solving. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



93 



Political Science 

Professor: 

• Richard Smith, Ph.D. 
Associate Professors: 

• Iren Omo-Bare, Ph.D., Chair 
Assistant Professor: 

• Christopher Bratcher, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in political science with nine courses, including 
Introduction to American Government, Comparative Government, International Relations, Political Theory, 
Research Methods in Political Science, Senior Seminar, and any three other courses in the department. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in political science with five courses, including Introduction 
to American Government, Comparative Government, and International Relations, Political Theory, and any two 
other courses in the department. 

One Core (Social and Behavioral Science) IDS course may be counted toward the major or the minor in political 
science with permission of the chair of the department. In general. Introduction to American Government is a 
prerequisite for all other courses in American politics, namely PS 2010, 2100. 2120. 2130, 2150, 3140, 3190, 3200, 
and 3250. Comparative Government is a prerequisite for all other courses in comparative politics and international 
relations, namely PS 2400, 3300, 3310, 3350, 3400, 3410, 4300, 4400, and 4500. Exceptions by permission of 
instructor. 

Courses 

1000 Introduction to American Government (4 scm. hours). A systems analysis of the American political 

environment and decision making agencies, including study of federalism, state and local government, 
political parties. Congress, the Presidency, and the judiciary. 

1300 Comparative Government (4 sem. hours). General comparative theory applied to developed and developing 
nations. 

2010 American Public Policy (4 sem. hours). Analysis of civil liberties and civil rights, and fiscal, regulatory, 
social, defense, and foreign policies. 

2050 Women and the Law (4 sem. hours). This course examines the development of the legal rights of women in 
American jurisprudence. Analyzing current issues affecting women, such as marriage, family, reproductive 
rights, employment, and sexual harassment, the course focuses on federal policy in the second half of the 
twentieth century. 

2100 The U. S. Congress (4 sem. hours). This course examines the roles and functions of Congress in American 
governance. Recruitment is analyzed, as are formal and informal structures and processes, interbranch 
relations, and legislative reform. Offered in alternate years. 

2120 The U.S. Presidency (4 sem. hours). This course analyzes the institutional nature, roles, and fijnctions of the 
American presidency. Questions of selection, the nature of leadership and executive power, formal and 
informal duties of office, evolution of the presidency, and performance evaluation are also explored. 
Offered in alternate years. 

2130 The U.S. .ludiciary (4 sem. hours). The nature and functioning of the judicial branch of American 
government is examined. From jurisprudence to the roles of courts, this course analyzesjudicial 
recruitment and selection, decision-making, and court organization and management in courts from the 
U.S. Supreme Court to the municipal magistrate. Offered occimonally. 

2150 Urban/Metropolitan Politics (4 sem. hours). The nature of urban, suburban, and metropolitan governance is 
examined. Questions of urban policy the future of cities, and quality of urban/metropolitan management are 

94 



explored. Policy questions such as community and economic development, housing, growth management 
and planning, etc. are analyzed. Offered occasionally. 

2200 Economic Policy Issues (4 sem. hours). The course investigates various aspects of the public policy regarding 
economic issues. Both macro and micro policy issues may be considered. Prerequisites: Economics 2000 
and sophomore standing. Same as Economics 2200. 

2400 International Relations (4 sem. hours). Consideration of issues, strategies, and theories of international 
politics including the concepts of national mterest and national defense, imperialism, balance of power, 
economics, and international cooperation and law. 

2500 Political Theory (4 sem. hours). An inquiry into the basic principles of social and political organization, with 
special emphasis on concepts of government, justice, punishment, family, property, work, and peace. Same 
as Philosophy 2010. Offeredin alternate yean. 

2550 Research Methods in Political Science (4 sem. hours).Examination of the fundamental issues involved in 
conceiving and executing a research project in the social sciences. Several research methodologies are 
covered; interviews, surveys, archival research, and case studies. Also includes introduction to statistical 
analysis of data. 

3140 Constitutional Law (4 sem. hours). An analysis, including historical background and philosophical 

evolution, of Supreme Court interpretations of Constitutional provisions relating to the structure of the 
federal government and relationships between the different branches and with the states. Prerequisite: 
Political Science 1000 and junior standing. 

3150 Civil Liberties (4 sem. hours). This course examines individual constitutional rights of expression, religion, 
"fimdamental rights" (such as privacy and travel) and equal protection as developed by the U.S. Supreme 
Court. Constitutional rights of the accused in the U.S. judicial system especially as developed through 
Supreme Court cases. The role of the Supreme Court in American government. 

3200 Political Parties and Interest Groups (4 sem. hours). Examination of history and current structure and 
functions of American political parties and interest groups in American politics. Offered occasionally. 

3210 Mass Media and Political Communication (4 sem. hours). This course examines the legal environment, 
history, and content of the press in America. The course covers several aspects of media law including 
patterns of media ownership and antitrust policy, prior restraint, libel, privacy, and hate speech. Media 
coverage of various topics such as U.S. elections, crime, foreign affairs, crises, and state and local issues 
are analyzed. 

3220 Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior (4 sem. hours). Examines approaches to the study of and the content 
of American public opinion on politics and selected issues; and examination of American voters- why they 
vote (or do not vote) the way they do. Offered occasionally. 

3250 Public Administration (4 sem. hours). Theory and application of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, 
coordinating, reporting, and budgeting in public agencies. Offered occasionally. 

3300 Western European Government and Politics (4 sem. hours). Examination of politics and government in 

Western Europe by means of country studies and comparisons. Sections of the course will be devoted to the 
general topic of European integration and related concepts like "regionalism," "functionalism," and 
"integration theory." Offered in alternate years. 

3310 African Government and Politics (4 sem. hours). Examination of politics and government in Africa by 
means of country studies and comparisons. Sections of the course will be devoted to the examination of 
issues of development and underdevelopment. Offered in alternate years. 

3350 The Politics of Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective (4 sem. hours). Examination of issues of 
race and ethnicity in selected countries. Sections of the course are devoted to the comparative study of the 
causes and consequences of ethnic and racial strife as well as the examination of race- and ethnic- specific 
policies in selected countries. Offered occasionally. 

95 



3400 U.S. Foreign Policy (4 sem. hours). Diplomatic, military, and economic aspects of foreign policy considered 
withm the context of current issues. Offered in alternate years. 

3410 International Organizations/Model United Nations (2 - 4 sem. hours). Examination of recent trends in the 
globalization ' and "regionalization" of political, social, and economic issues. A substantial part of the 
course will locus on the United Nations system. Through research and role-play (including participation in 
Model IJN situations) the course will e.xamine several different areas of the UN's work. 

3700-02 Directed Readings in Political .Science (2 to 4 sem. hours). Directed readings in political science (no 
more than one directed reading course may be included in the list of courses for the major.) 

3800-02 Political Science Internship (1, 2 and 4 sem. hours). 

4300 Developing Nations (4 sem. hours). Comparative theory applied to developing nations. Prerequisite: Political 
Science 1 300. Offered in alternate years. 

4400 Peace, Conflict Resolution and International Security (4 sem. hours). This course will focus on issues of 
peace and international security. The course will seek to stimulate a wider awareness and appreciation of 
the search for peaceful resolution to strife in all its forms. Offered in alternate years. 

4500 Political Sociology (4 sem. hours). This course will employ the political-economy perspective to examine the 
various political ideologies and the diverse economic systems in the contemporary world. The course will 
a so include an overview of theories of development and underdevelopment, and a discussion of social 
change within both specific societies and the world system. Offered occasionally. 

4600-02 Special Topics in Political Science (1, 2, 4 sem. hours). Areas of interest not covered in regular courses- 
unusual opportunities to study subjects of special interest. 

4900 Senior Seminar (4 sem. hours). Survey of historical development of the discipline; examination of 

contemporary issues in major sub-fields of the discipline; and examination of some examples of current 
uses ot political science knowledge. 



Psychology 

Associate Professors: 

• SlephenT. Black, Ph.D., Chair 
Assistant Professors: 

• Kurt Thaw, Ph.D. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in psychology with nine courses, including Introduction 
to Psychology, Experimental Psychology I and 11, Cognitive Psychology, History and Systems and four electives 
One elective must be taken from each of three areas: Clinical/Applied, Physiological/Leaming and 
Cognitive/Developmental. The fourth elective may be selected from any area. 

• Clinical/Applied 

• Abnormal Psychology 

• Love and Sexuality 

. The Sinister Side of the 20th Century: A Social Processes Analysis of War Terrorism and 
Genocide 

• Clinical Psychology: Theory and Method 

• Social Psychology 

• Industrial/Organizational 

• Forensic Psychology 

• Psychological Tests and Measurements 

• Physiological/Learning 

• Behavioral Neuroscicnce 

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• Learning 

• Drugs and Behavior 

• Animal Behavior 

• Perception 

• Cognitive/Developmental 

• Developmental Psychology 

• Adulthood and Aging 

• Psychology of Language 

• Decision Making 

• Psychology of Women 

• Theories of Personality 

Requirements for Minor: Students may elect a minor in psychology with five courses in the department including 
Introduction to Psychology but excluding Undergraduate Research. Directed Reading, and Internships. 

Courses 

1000 Introduction to Psychology (4 sem. hours). Behavior and mental processes, with an emphasis on methods, principles, 
and theories. Content selected from the following areas: learning/memory, emotion/motivation, 
psychopathology/psychotherapy, cognition/perception, developmenfpersonality, social psychology, and the 
biological basis of behavior. 

1100 Love and Sexuality (4 sem. hours). An examination of the biological, psychological, and social components of 
Human Sexuality. The course will explore the issues of love, intimacy, normal and abnormal sexual function, 
marriage, and alternative sexual lifestyles. 

1200 The Sinister Side of the 20th Century: A Social Processes Analysis of War, Terrorism, and Genocide (4 sem. 
hours). The violent events of the 20th Century are presented not as insane aberrations in the record of human 
behavior but as the result of understandable psychological and social processes. Through the study of these events 
we explore the analytical methods and theoretical orientations of three Social Science disciplines: Anthropology, 
Psychology, and Sociology. 

2100-2110 Experimental Psychology I & IT (4 sem. hours each). Ahvo semester sequence examining the empirical base of 
psychology, including introduction to philosophy of science; research design, analysis, and interpretation; statistics, 
both descriptive and inferential. Development of skills in technical writing, reviewing professional literature, and 
use of computer software will also be included. Required laboratory. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 

3020 Psychology of Women (4 sem. hours). A survey of the empirical evidence on gender differences and issues specific to 
women. Gender differences are examined from biological, developmental, social, and cognitive perspectives. Issues 
specific to women, such as discrimination and stereotyping, are also examined. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 
Offered in alternate years. 

3030 Forensic Psychology (4 sem. hours). Examines the application of psychological theory, method, and research to issues 
in the legal system. Topics covered include eyewitness testimony, jury selection, determination of dangerousness, 
assessment of competence, and treatment of offender populations. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. Recommended: 
Psychology 3 1 70. Offered in alternate years. 

3040 Industrial/Organizational P.sychology (4 sem. hours). Examines the applications of psychological theory, method, 
and research to issues in business, industry and organizational settings. Topics addressed include: Performance 
Appraisal, Personnel Section and Management. Work Motivation, Organizational Communication, Leadership, 
Group Dynamics and Ergonomics. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. Recommended; Psychology 3170. Offered in 
alternate years. 

3050 Decision Making (4 sem. hours). This course emphasizes the psychological processes utilized in making decisions. 
Topics covered include judgement, estimation, prediction and diagnosis, choice under certainty, heuristics and 
biases, risky decision making, and problem solving, as well as methods that have been developed to improve these 
processes. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. Offered in alternate years. 



97 



3060 Psychology of Language (4 sem. hours). Examines the perception, compreliension, and production of language 

Topics covered include psychological and linguistic aspects of phonology, syntax, and semantics; the brolo.'icai 
bases of language; reading; bilmgualism; language acquisition; and disorders. Prerequisite; Psychology 1000 
Recommended: Psychology 3 100. Offered in alternate years. 

3070 Adulthood and Aging (4 sen,, hours). This course describes the physical, sensory, cognitive, personality and social 
changes that occur in normal aging, Examines the dominant theories of developmental psychology from young 
adulthood through old age. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. Offered in alternate years. 

3080 Animal Behavior (4 sem. hours). Examines the significance and panerns of specific animal behaviors The wide 

variety of animal activities that result in successfiil mating, foraging of food, and defense against predators/enemies 
will be examined. Special attention will be paid to the modern and evolutionary importance of the behaviors 
covered. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. Offered in alternate years. 

3090 Drugs and Behavior (4 sem. hours). Study of the behavioral etTects of the most common legal and illegal drugs The 
various actions of each drug on the central nervous system are emphasized with a concentration on how these 
actions lead to behavioral changes. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. Recommended: Psychology 3180. Offered in 
alternate years. 

3100 Cognitive Psychology (4 sem. hours). Cognitive processes underlying memory, problem solving, and consciousness 
Systematic exploration of processes, mechanisms, and putative structures involved in encoding, storage retrieval 
and use of information. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 

3110 Perception (4 sem. hours). Mechanisms underlying immediate experience produced by stimuli, and the organization of 
these sensations into meaningful, interpretable experience. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000 Offered in alternate 
years. 

3120 Learning (4 sem. hours). Adaptive behavior, with an emphasis on processes, principles and theories related to 

behavioral change. Areas of reflexive adjustment, respondent conditioning, and operant conditioning, and their 
interactions will be examined. Laboratory component. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 

3130 Abnormal Psychology (4 sem. hours). Presents a psychological understanding and view of abnormal behavior The 
presently prevailing system for the clinical classification of abnormal behavior is highlighted Prerequisite- 
Psychology 1000. 

3140 Theories of Personality (4 sem. hours). Consideration of the whole spectrum of personality theories. Including 
Freudian, humanistic, existential, and behaviorist models. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 

3150 Developmental Psychology (4 sem. hours). Examines the general sequence of psychological development in the 

individual through adolescence and the dominant theories of developmental psychology. Special attention is devoted 
to the domains of physical, cognitive, linguistic and social development. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 

3160 Clinical Psychology: Theory and Method (4 sem. hours). Addresses the history, theory, and methods of clinical 

psychology. Major psychotherapeutic theories are considered. Prerequisites: Psychology 2100 and PsvcholoHV 3130 
Offered in alternate years. 

3170 Social Psychology (4 sem. hours). Integrates cuaent psychological theory, regarding communication, group dynamics 
aggression, and human relations, with its application in real-world settings. Laboratory component. Same as Soc- 
Anth 3710. Prerequisite: Psychology 1000. 

3180 Behavioral Neuroscience (4 sem. hours). Neurophysiologic and neuroanatomic correlates and substrates of behavior 
emotion, and cognition. Prerequisite; Psychology 1000. Offered in alternate years. 

3190 Psychological Tests and Measurements (4 sem. hours). Examines the history, methods, problems and social 
concerns associated with measuring and assessing human behavior and abilities. Common tests of ability and 
psychopathology are considered. The laboratory includes administration and scoring of the WAIS Prerequisite- 
Psychology 2110. Offered in alternate years. 

4700-4703 Undergraduate Research (1-4 sem. hours). Direct involvement of student in empirical research. 

98 



4750 Special Topics (4 sem. houi-s). Specialty courses over a wide variety of topics in Psychology. 

4800 Directed Reading (1-4 sem. hours). Independent pursuit of content area selected by student. 

4850-4853 Internship (1-4 sem. hours). Practical experience/training in professional settings. 

4900 History and Systems (4 sem. hours). The capstone course for senior majors, requiring written position papers and 
class discussion related to enduring theines in the history of psychology, and to contemporary controversies and 
issues within the discipline. Prerequisite: Psychology 2110 and approval of department chair. 



Sociology - Anthropology 

• Associate Professor: 

• George J Bey III, Ph.D., Associate Dean 

• Ming Tsui, Ph.D., Chair 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Carolee Larsen. Ph.D. 

• Michael L. Galaty, Ph.D. 

• Julian Murchison, M.A. 

Requirements for Major: Students may complete a major in sociology-anthropology with a concentration in either 
anthropology or sociology. A minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all required and elective courses is required for 
graduation. Ten courses are required for the major with either concentration, including the following: 

A. Anthropology concentration: Introduction to Anthropology or Introduction to World Prehistory; Methods and Statistics; 
Non- Western Societies or Archaeology of Selected Culture Areas; Social and Cultural Theory; Directed Research, 
Undergraduate Research Seminar, Internship or Honors; Senior Seminar in Anthropology; and four electives from the 
departmental offerings. 

B. Sociology concentration: Self and Society or Introduction to Sociology; Methods and Statistics; Class, Gender, Race: 
Social Stratification; Social and Cultural Theory; Directed Research, Undergraduate Research Seminar , Internship, or 
Honors; Senior Seminar in Sociology; and four electives from the departmental offerings. 

Students may complete both concentrations with thirteen courses which must include: Introduction to Anthropology or 
Introduction to World Prehistory; Self and Society or Introduction to Sociology; Methods and Statistics; Non- Western 
Societies or Archaeology of Selected Culture .'Xreas; Class, Gender, Race: Social Stratification; Social and Cultural Theory; 
Directed Research, Undergraduate Research Seminar, Internship, or Honors; both sections of Senior Seminar; and four 
electives from the departmental offerings. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may complete a minor either in anthropology or in sociology by taking four courses, two 
of which must be taken at Millsaps, including: 

A. Anthropology: Introduction to Anthropology or Introduction to World Prehistory; one of the following 2000 level 
courses: 2100, 2130, 2400, 2410; 2500; one of the following 3000 level courses: 3110, 3120, 3310; and one elective from the 
Anthropology concentration. 

B. Sociology: Self and Society or Introduction to Sociology; one of the following 2000 level courses: 2010, 2100, 2130; 
2200, 2500; one of the following 3000 level courses: 3220, 3300, 3310, 3500, 3710; and one elective from the Sociology 
concentration. 

Requirement for Transfer .Students: Transfer students may complete a major in sociology-anthropology by taking the 
required courses in sociology-anthropology at Millsaps. However, at the discretion of the department chair. Introduction to 
Sociology, Introduction to Anthropology, and Introduction to Archaeology taken at another institution of higher learning can 
substitute one of the introductory courses at Millsaps. 



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Courses 
1000 Introduction to Sociology (4 sem. hours). An introductory survey of social structure and human interaction The 

course offers an overview of all major sociological concepts, theories, and research methods; explores issues such as 
socialization, inequality, social order and social change; and examines the roles the family, religion, mass media 
and education play in our lives. 

1100 Introduction to Anthropology (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the basic concepts and approaches of the study of 
cultural and social patterns of human societies around the world. 

1110 Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory (4 sem. hours). An introductory archaeological survey of the 
world s prehistoric cultures, including those in both the Old and New World. 

1710 Human Evolution (4 sem. hours).. The various lines of evidence about human ancestry will be examined including 
population genetics, paleontology, DNA and protein sequencing, "Mitochondrial Eve," chromosome structure 
behavior and linguistics. Current literature will be reviewed. This course includes a laboratory. 

2010 Human Services (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the purpose, techniques, and organization of human services 
practice trom a social systems perspective. The roles of social workers in a variety of contexts: family practice 
community organizations, and public and private human service organizations. Offered occasionally. 

2100 Methods and Statistics (4 sem. hours). A critical introduction to issues in research design. Types of data analysis and 
collection covered include fieldwork. interviewing, coding qualitative data, survey design/execution/analysis and 
statistical analysis of numeric/coded data. Attention is also given to what inferences can legitimately be made from 
data. Prerequisite: Math 1150. 

2130 Marriage and Family (4 sem. hours). The anthropological and sociological study of human families from a cross- 
cultural perspective. Examines the origin of the human family and the nature of family life in a number of non- 
western societies and in the United States. Offered in alternate years. 

2200 Sociology of Human Interaction (4 sem. hours). An examination of human behavior from a social interactionist 

perspective. The course focuses on an examination of how social norms, institutions, race, class and gender strucUire 
social interaction. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 

2210 Archaeological Method and Theory (4 sem. hours). An introduction to the 

practice of archaeology. Provides a basic understanding of the ways in which archaeologists study and seek to 
understand past human behaviors. 

2250 Gender in American Culture (4 sem. hours).. An examination of gender in various aspects of American culture 

through a cultural studies approach. Topics include family, media, health, beauty, sex and popular culture Same as 
Women's Studies 2000. 

2400 Women and Men in Prehistory (4 sem. hours). An examination of cultural evolution from the appearance of homo 
sapiens until the rise of the first urban civilizations with an emphasis on exploring the contributions made both by 
women and by men to the process of human development as well as on the nature of gender in the prehistoric past. 

2410 Human Ecology (4 sem. hours). The anthropology of human ecosystems examines the relationship between culture 
and environment. The course includes research and theory on how pre-industrial societies adapt to their 
environments and on the ecological problems created by industrial society. Prerequisite: 1000 Soc-Anth 1000 1 100 
1 1 1 or permission of instructor. Offered occasionally. 

2500 Sociolinguistlcs (4 sem. hours). A comprehensive study of language and society and the social context of linguistic 
diversity. It bnngs together the perspectives of linguistics, anthropology and sociology to examine multilingualism 
social dialects, conversational interaction, language attitudes and language change. Prerequisite: Soc-Anth 1000 or 
1 100 or 1 110 or permission of instructor. 

3110 Archaeology of Selected Culture Areas (4 sem. hours). Explores the archaeological record of a selected prehistoric 
culture area. Emphasis is on reconstructing ancient lifeways and understanding the processes that create the 
archaeological record. 

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3120 Non-Western Societies (4 sem. hours). The course examines both the culture of selected non-western societies and the 
range of methodological and theoretical approaches used to understand them. 

3200 Religion, Society, and Culture (4 sem. hours). An anthropological and sociological investigation through primary 
texts and field experiences of the relationships among religious institutions and society and culture. 

3210 Urban Life (4 sem. hours). A critical anthropological and sociological examination of the theoretical and empirical 
literature on the social structure and cuUure of urban life: the development of cities, the life processes within cities, 
the relations between cities and other social and cuhural factors, making cities more livable. Offered occasionaUy. 

3220 Class, Gender, Race: Social Stratification (4 sem. houi°s). A sociological examination of the theoretical and 

empirical literature on the impact of social class, gender and race on the life course and life chances of people in 
selected societies. Prerequisite: Soc-Anth 1000 or 11 00 or 11 10 or permission of instructor. 

3300 Health and Illness (4 sem. hours). A sociological investigation of the social and cultural factors and those formal and 
informal organizations shaping health and illness. Prerequisite: Soc-Anth 1000 or 1 100 or 1110 or permission of 
instructor. Offered occasionally. 

3310 Deviance: A Comparative Approach (4 sem. hours). A critical anthropological and sociological examination of the 
social construction of norms, of rule-breaking acts and actors, and of responses to rule breaking, fi-om a cross- 
cultural, comparative perspective. Prerequisite: Soc-Anth 1000 or 1 1 00 or 1 1 10 or permission of instructor. Offered 
occasionally. 

3400 Native North America (4 sem. hours). This course examines the archaeology and histoiy of tlie North American 

Indians, with a special focus on contemporary issues. Various chronological periods and culture areas are explored 
through the analysis of artifacts, historical documents, and Native American myth, literature, and poetry. 

3410 Archaeological Field School (4 sem. hours). This course instructs students in the archaeological field methods. Taught 
at locations off campus. Generally 3-5 weeks. Students participate in the scientific investigation of an archaeological 
site through application of various survey and excavation techniques. 

3500 Sociology of Law (4 sem. hours). This course explores the relationship between law and society. Subject matter 

includes a survey of sociological theories of law, a social history of the U.S. legal system, and crhical examination 
of the limits and contradictions of certain areas of law as they pertain to issues of race, class and gender. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 

3600 Sociology of Education (4 sem. hours). This course examines multiple facets of the institution of education. It 

explores how this institution in its various manifestations is shaped through social, economic, and political forces, 
and looks at various debates, issues, and trends that affect education at all levels. 

3710 Social Psychology (4 sem. hours). Integrates current social and psychological theory regarding communication, group 
dynamics, aggression, and human relations, with its application to real-world settings. Laboratory component. Same 
as Psych 3170. Prerequisite: Soc-Anth 1000 or 1100 or 1 1 10 or permission of instructor. 

3800-3802 Directed Readings in Anthropology (2 or 4 sem. hours). 

3810-3812 Directed Readings in Sociology (2 or 4 sem. hours). 

4200 Social and Cultural Theory (4 sem. hours). Critical, comparative, and synthetic examinations of historical and 
contemporary sociological theory, including functionalism, conflict theory, phenomenology, and symbolic 
interactionism. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

4700 Directed Research (4 sem. hours). Research project proposed and conducted independently by a junior or senior, with 
report due at end of semester. 

4710 Independent Study (4 sem. hours). lnquir>' by a junior or senior capable of independent work with a minimum of 
supervision, with report due at end of semester. 

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4750 Special Topics in Anthropology (4 sem. hours). Areas not normally covered in other courses. 

4760 Special Topics in Sociology (4 sem. hours). Areas not normally covered in other courses. 

4770 Undergraduate Research Seminar (4 sem. hours). A seminar in sociological and anthropological research for majors, 
m which students learn advance research methods, develop and complete a research project in sociology, 
anthropology, or archaeology. Prerequisite: Methods and Statistics; Junior and Senior standing only. 

4850-4852 Internship (2 or 4 sem. hours). Practical experience and tleld-based training for majors working with selected 
organizations engaged in social research, human services, or community services. 

4900 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (4 sem. hours). A seminar in anthropological practice and theory in which students 
read key texts and reflect on their course of study, as well as their concentration. 

4910 Senior Seminar in Sociology (4 sem. hours). A seminar in sociological practice and theory in which students read key 
texts and reflect on their course of study, as well as their concentration. 

Interdisciplinary Programs 

American Studies 

American Studies is an interdisciplinary program focused upon the multi-faceted culture and civilization of the United States. 
The program integrates the study of fields such as history, literature, politics, art, philosophy, and religion in an effort to 
create a better understanding of the nation we call united. 

The concentration in American Studies is like a minor; but, unlike a minor that is contained in one specific discipline, the 
American Studies concentration is interdisciplinary. If you complete a concemration in American Studies, your transcript will 
reflect this upon graduation. 

Requirements for Area of Concentration: A student may elect an area of concentration in American Studies (along with 
his or her major) by completing the following requirements with a minimum grade of C. 

American Studies 2000: Introduction to American Studies (4 sem. hours). This course is an interdisciplinary introduction 
to the field of American Studies. In it, we explore several things; the questions raised by critical study of American 
experiences; the intellectual debates surrounding interpretations of American literature, arts, religions, philosophies, 
cultures and history; and -especially- the paradoxes inherent to American identity, whether we are defining "the" 
American individual or the nation as a whole. 

Electives: (16 sem. hours). In addition to the Introduction to American Studies, students must take the equivalent of four 

courses of approved American Studies classes with multidisciplinary breadth. (This means that at least one of these 
four electives must come from a different academic department than the others. All four courses cannot come from 
the same department.) 

Questions about American Studies? If you have any questions about the American Studies concentration, please contact 
Dr. MacMastcr in the English department or Dr. McElvaine in the History department. 

For more information: See Millsaps's American Studies Web-Site at http://www.millsaps.edu/ids/amstudies. 



Christian Education 



The area of concentration in Christian Education helps prepare students to plan, organize, lead, and teach in religious 
education programs. For further information, see the chair of the Religious Studies Department or the college chaplain. 

Requirements for Area of Concentration: 

1 Religious Studies 2000: Introduction to Religious Studies; 

2. Religious Studies 22 1 0: Hebrew Scriptures or RS 2220: New Te.stament and Early Christianity; 

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3. Religious Studies 31 10: History of Christian Thought or RS 3120: Modern and Contemporary Theology; 

4. Religious Studies 4850-4852: Religious Studies Internship 

5. IDS 1600: The Human Experience: A Cross-Cultural Perspective; 

6. Education 3200/3210: Classroom Methods & Management; 

7. Psychology 3 1 30: Abnormal Psychology or Education 3130: Education for the Exceptional Population; 

8. Psychology 3170: Social Psychology or Sociology 1010: Social Problems. 



Environmental Studies 



The area of concentration in Environmental Studies is an interdisciplinary program that may be pursued by students majoring 
in any discipline. The required course-work provides students the opportunity to consider the relationship between people 
and the environment from social, cultural, economic, political, ethical and scientific perspectives. 

Requirements for Area of Concentration: Seven courses are required: (1) Geology 1 100: Environmental Issues; (2) one of 
the field courses listed below or an internship course or research course approved by the director of the concentration; (3) two 
of the Humanities and Social Sciences courses listed below; (4) two of the Natural Sciences courses listed below; {5)Biology 
4911: Environmental Studies Seminar 

Field Courses: Sociology-Anthropology 3410 - Field Archaeology; Geology 3400- Special Problems in Geology: 
Yellowstone Field Study; Geology 3508- Directed Study in Geology: Living in the Yucatan; Geology 4506- Field Geology; 
Biology 3210- Field Biology. 

Humanities and Social Sciences: 

IDS 2500- Globalization and Technology; Philosophy 3750- Special Topics: Environmental Ethics; Religious Studies 3150- 
Religion, Science and Nature; Religious Studies 3750- Special Topics: Religion and the Environment; History 4760- Modern 
Environmental History; Political Science 1000- American Government; Political Science 2010- American Public Policy; 
Economics 2000- Principles of Economics; Sociology- Anthropology 1 100- Introduction to Anthropology; Sociology- 
Anthropology 1110- Introduction to Archaeology; Sociology-Anthropology 2410- Human Ecology. 
Natural Science: 

Geology 1000: The Physical Earth; Geology 2000: Plate Tectonics and Earth History; Geology 3300: Hydrology and 
Chemistry of Natural Waters; Chemistry 1213- General Inorganic Chemistry I and the Lab; Chemistry 1221 - General 
Inorganic Chemistry II and the Lab; Chemistry 3730/Geology 4100: Geochemistry; Biology 1010: General Botany; Biology 
2200: Ecology; Biology 3200; Aquatic Biology 

4911 Environmental Studies Seminar (1 .scm. hour). An interdisciplinary colloquium in which students share the results of 
the environmental research, internship or field course work they have undertaken as a requirement of the Environmental 
Studies concentration. Ordinarily taken in the senior year. Prerequisite or co-requisite: field course, research course or 
internship course approved by the director of the concentration. 



European Studies 

The program in European Studies is designed for those students who are keenly interested in European affairs. The major 
or minor in European Studies cuts across traditional departmental and divisional boundaries and allows the student to 
work with faculty to design a program of study which integrates those aspects of European affairs which best meet the 
student's interests. European art, business, history, languages, literatures, music, philosophy and political science are 
among the areas of study available to students in European Studies. 

Requirements for Major: Students complete a major in European Studies with a total of 40 semester hours, including 
the following four components. 

1. The Introductory Course (4 sem. hours). History 2210 (European Civilization Since 1789). 

2. The Language Component. Students are required to study one European language. In addition to satisfying the BA 
requirement in that language, the ES major must complete at least 1 2 semester hours beyond the BA requirement in that 
language. 



103 



3. The IVlultidisciplinai7 Component (20 sem. hours). Students will take 20 semester hours, beyond those described 
above, from a list ofelective courses provided by the director of the European Studies Program. No more than 12 
semester hours may be in the same department. No more than 4 semester hours may be from the core. No more than 8 
semester hours oflanguage courses, beyond those that are required for the European Studies major, may be counted as 
elective courses toward the major. 

4. The CoUoquiuin and Comprehensive Exams (4 sem. hours). Students will take written and oral examinations 
administered by the European Studies Committee. 

Requirements for Minor: Students may complete a minor in European Studies with a total of 20 semester hours, 
including the following three components. First, students are required to study one European language. In addition to 
satisfying the BA requirement in that language, the ES minor must complete at least 8 semester hours beyond the BA 
requirement in that language. Second, minors must complete the introductory course for European Studies (History 
2210; 4 sem. hours). Third, minors must take 8 semester hours, beyond those described above, from a list ofelective 
courses provided by the director of the European Studies Program. Those two elective courses may not be in the same 
department, and none of them may be from the core. 

4000 European Studies Colloquium (4 sem. hours). An interdisciplinary research forum in which students pursue an 
mdividual, directed reading and writing project within their areas of concentration. This project will lead to the 
completion, during the spring semester of the student's senior year, of an interdisciplinary senior thesis. 

Some form of financial aid may be available for certain European Studies programs. Students interested in financial aid 
for any of these programs should contact the Student Aid Financial Planning staff for more information. 



Human Services 

Human Services is an interdisciplinary program designed to provide students with academic experiences relevant to a 
number of postgraduate employment and graduate study opportunities such as: Social Work, Clinical and Counseling 
Psychology, Family Therapy, Child Protective services. Guidance and School Counseling, and Community activism. 
Students planning a career in Human and helping services will find the concentration invaluable. 

Requirements for Area of Concentration: 

The interdisciplinary Human Services Concentration consists of six courses. All students are required to complete IDS- 
1600: Introduction to Human Services. The Introduction to Human Services course provides an integrated 
interdisciplinary structure for connecting the various courses students can take to satisfy the concentration. 

Additionally, students must complete one semester (4 sem. hours) of internship, and four of the following courses from 
at least two disciplines. 

Internship: Approved and supervised by the concentration director 

Business: 

• ACCT 2000 - Principles of Financial Accounting 

• ACCT 2002 - Principles of Managerial Accounting 

• ECON 2000 - Principles of Economics 

• ECON 2200 - Economic Policy Issues 

• MGMT 2002 - Introduction to Management Information Systems 

• MGMT 3000 - Introduction to Management 

Education: 

• IDS 1600 - Human Experience 

• EDUC 2100 - American Sign Language: Deaf Culture 

• EDUC 3 1 30 - Educational for the Exceptional 

• EDUC 3200/3210 - Classroom Methods and Management 

Political Science : 

• POL SCI 2050 - Women and the Law 

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• POL SCI 2150 - Urban/Metropolitan Politics 

• POL SCI 3250 - Public Administration 

• POL SCI 3350 - Politics of Race and Ethnicity 

• POL SCI 4500 - Political Sociology 

Psychology : 

. PSYCH 3020 - Psychology of Women 

• PSYCH 3 1 30 - Abnormal Psychology 

• PS YCH 3 1 60 - Clinical Psychology: Theory and Method 

• PS YCH 3 1 70 - Social Psychology 

• PSYCH 3190 - Psychological Tests and Measurements 

• PSYCH 4750 - Developmental Disabilities 

Sociology/Anthropology: 

• SOC- ANTH 1 1 - Social Problems 

• SOC- ANTH 2200 - Sociology of Human Interaction 

• SOC ANTH 2250 - Gender in American Culture 

• SOC-ANTH 3220 - Religion, Society, and Culture 

• SOC-ANTH 33 1 - Deviance: A Comparative Approach 

• SOC-ANTH 3500 - Sociology of Law 



International Studies 

The Concentration in International Studies is designed to reward students who want to learn about contemporary global 

affairs in an interdisciplinary fashion. 

The Concentration in International Studies will require the following courses: 

Required Introductory Course (Choose One four-hour Course) 

■ IDS 2500 (Core 5): Globalization and Technology (Storey) 

■ POL SCI 2400; International Relations (Omo-Bare) 

Required Study Abroad: Students must participate in one study abroad program that is approved by the college. In 

consultation with faculty advisors, students may choose a program that takes place during a summer, a semester, or a year. 

The program must provide at least four hours of approved credit. Those credits may be used to fulfill the distribution 

requirements for the concentration. In case of programs that are interdisciplinary in nature, the Director of International 

Studies will determine, in consultation with the student, which disciplinary distribution requirements are fulfilled by that 

program. Additional requirements of the concentration, with the approval of the Director. 

Programs are available in almo.st every country and discipline. The Millsaps Study Abroad Office will assist students in 

identifying and selecting programs. Some of the best options are listed below, under distribution requirements. 

Financial aid is now available for study abroad. Students may apply for loans to support study abroad. The Study Abroad 

Office will work with students who are interested in applying for loans. Outside scholarships may also be available to 

students. 

Distribution Requirements : Students must choose courses worth 24 HOURS , in at least THREE departments , in at least 
TWO divisions . 

Courses are to be approved by the Director of International Studies, in consultation with the members of the faculty who are 
offering the courses in question. 

Approved courses will focus substantially on foreign, international, or cross-cultural issues that have developed since the 
beginning of the twentieth century. By "substantial" focus on this time period, we mean that at least half of the course will 
address the period since 1900. For example, the survey of modern European history begins in 1789, but typically students in 
the course spend half of their time studying the history since 1900. That course, and others like it, will count toward the 
concentration, in addition to courses that focus exclusively on the twentieth century. 

Eight hours of credit may be double-counted from the student's major department, provided that the courses being double- 
counted have a substantial focus on contemporary and international issues. 

"Special topics" courses not listed in the catalog may also be counted, provided that they also have a substantial focus on 
contemporary and international issues. 
Courses in the Arts and Letters 

■ Art 2560; Modern Art (Europe and U.S.) 

■ Art 2590: Topics in World Art 

105 



Courses 



Courses 



English 3180: Studies in 20th-century Lit. (Prereq. English 1000) 
French 3210: Survey of French Literature alter the Revolution 
French 3230: French Civilization after the Revolution 
French 3750: French Film 

German 3210: Survey of German Literature from the Time of Goethe 
Gennan 3220: German Civilization 

German 3770: German Literature of the Early Twentieth Century 
German 3780: German Literature since 1945 
History 2210: Modem Europe 
History 2310: African History 
Histoid 2400: History of the Middle East 
Histoiy 3310: South African History 
Religious Studies 21 10: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam 
Religious Studies 2120: South Asian Religions 
Religious Studies 2130: East Asian Religions 
Spanish 3200: Survey of Peninsular Literature 
Spanish 3210: Survey of Spanish- American Literature 
Spanish 3220: Spanish Civilization 
Spanish 3230: Spanish-American Civilization 
Spanish 3770: Modernism-Postmodernism 
Spanish 3790: The Generation of 1898 

Suitable "Special Topics" courses may also be used to fulfill the requirements. 
Courses taught through the Millsaps programs in Costa RJca, France, Yucatan, and Europe. 
Courses taught in the Millsaps direct exchange programs with the University of Ulstef and Queens 
University (Belfast, Northern Ireland) and with Kansai Gaidai University (Osaka, Japan). 
Courses taught in other approved study abroad programs. 
in the Sciences 



Geology 1 100: Environmental Issues of the 20th Century 
Political Science 1300: Comparative Government 
Political Science 3300: W. European Government and Politics 
Political Science 3310: African Government and Politics 
Political Science 3350: The Politics of Race and Ethnicity 
Political Science 3400: U.S. Foreign Policy 
Political Science 3410: International Organizations 

Political Science 4300: Developing Nations (Prereq. Political Science 3300) 
Political Science 4400: Peace, Conflict Res., and International Security 
Psychology 1700: Sinister Side of the 20th Century 
Sociology-Anthropology 1100: Introduction to Anthropology 

Sociology-Anthropology 3120: Non- Western Societies (Prereq.- Sociology-Anthropology 1000 1 100 or 
II 10) 

Suitable "Special Topics" courses may also be used to fulfill the requirements. 
Courses taught in the Millsaps programs in the Yucatan and in Europe. 

Courses taught in the Millsaps direct exchange programs with the University of Ulster and Queens 
University (Belfast, Northern Ireland) and with Kansai Gaidai University (Osaka, Japan). 
Courses taught in other approved study abroad programs 
in Business 



Management 4010: International Business (Prereq.- junior level BBA course) 

Economics 3040: International Economics. (Prereq.- junior standing, algebra. Economics 2000, also, 

calculus is recommended. 

Economics 3! 10: History of Economic Thought. (Prereq.- Economics 2000) 

Suitable "Special Topics" courses may also be used to fitlfill the requirements. 

Courses taught in the Millsaps program in Europe 

Courses taught in the Millsaps direct exchange programs with the University of Ulster and Queens 

University (Belfast, Northern Ireland) and with Kansai Gaidai University (Osaka, Japan). 

Credits earned through participation in other approved study abroad programs. 



106 



Women's Studies 

Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to promote the study of gender, of women's 
experiences, and of various feminist theories across the college curriculum. 

Requirements for Area of Concentration: A student may elect an area of concentration in Women's 
Studies (along with the major) by completing the following requirements: Introduction to Women's Studies, 
Senior Project, and three approved Women's Studies courses with multidisciplinary breadth. A minimum 
grade of C is required. 

2000 Introduction to Women's Studies (4 sem. hours). This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to 
the field of Women's Studies; to the questions raised by the study of women's experiences; to the 
intellectual debates surrounding the issue of gender; and to the role of Women's Studies in the 
various liberal arts disciplines. 

4000 Senior Project (4 sem. hours). This project consists either of an independent study with an Instructor 
in the student's major or a teaching practicum in the hitroduction to Women's Studies course. See 
coordinator of Women's Studies for information about this course. 



Interdisciplinary Core 

1000 Introduction to Libernl Studies (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to introduce students to the 
academic community, to provide opportunities for intellectual growth through cntical thinking and 
writing on subjects of general interest, and to initiate a process of self-reflection that will continue 
to graduation. It is a writing-intensive course that takes the place of English Composition. 



1050 Introduction to Liberal Studies (4 sem. hours). (Transfers Only) Liberal Studies 1050 is a 
seminar designed for students who are entering Millsaps College as transfers from other 
institutions. Students are assisted in developing their writing and critical thinking skills and 
introduced to the terrain of a liberal arts curriculum. 



1118-1128 Heritage of the West in World Perspective (8 -8 sem. hours). Beginning with the ancient 
period and continuing to the present, this program brings together history, literature, philosophy, 
religion and the arts in an integrated approach to the study of Western culture within a global 
context. It is the equivalent of eight semester hours each semester extending throughout the year. 
This course meets the requirements of Core 2-5 and the fine arts requirement. 

1200 Topics of the Ancient World (4 sem. hours). Courses with different topics address developments in 
the period from 1000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E. from a variety of perspectives, including history, 
literature, philosophy, religion and the tine arts. This course meets the requirement of Core 2. 

1300 Topics of the Premodern World (4 sem. hours). Courses with different topics address 

developments from 300 to 1600 from a variety of perspectives, including history, literature, 
philosophy, religion and the fine arts. This course meets the requirement of Core 3. 

1600 Topics in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (4 sem. hours). Courses with different topics address 
issues relating to society and the individual by applying the methods of psychology, sociology, 
politics, and economics. This course meets the requirement of Core 6. 

1700 Topics in the Natural Sciences with Lab (4 sem. hours). Courses with different topics address 

issues relating to the natural world by applying the methods of biology, chemistry, geology and 
physics. This course includes a laboratory and meets the requirements of Core 7 and 9. 

1710 Superscience! Exploring Your World Through Science (4 sem. hours). Superscience! Exploring 
Your World Through Science is an integrated 2-semester course sequence that encompasses 
physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and biology and emphasizes general principles and their 
application to real-world situations. It is designed to give non-science majors an understanding of 

107 



basic concepts necessary to attain a fundamental level of literacy in the natural sciences and an 
appreciation of how science allows us to understand and shape the world. Prerequisite: Freshman 
standing. 

1720 Superscience! Exploring Your World Through Science (4 scm. hours). Superscience! Exploring 
Your World Through Science is an integrated 2-seniester course sequence that encompasses 
physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and biology and emphasizes general principles and their 
application to real-world situations. It is designed to give non-science majors an understanding of 
basic concepts necessary to attain a fundamental level of literacy in the natural sciences and an 
appreciation of how science allows us to understand and shape the world. Prerequisite: Sophomore 
standing 



1800 Topics in Mathematics (4 sein. hours). This course is interdisciplinary in nature and is designed to 
show the place of mathematics within the liberal arts. (Same as Mathematics 1000). It meets the 
requirements of Core 8 for students pursuing the BA degree. 

1900 Topics in Science, Mathematics and Computer Science (4 sem. hours). Courses with different 

topics address issues relating to science, mathematics and computer science. This course does not 
include a laboratory and therefore does not meet the Core 7 requirement, but it does fulfill the 
Core 9 requirement. 

2400 Topics of the Modern World (4 sem. hours). Courses with different topics address developments 
iTom the 1600's to the 1900's from a variety of perspectives, including history, literature, 
philosophy, religion, and the arts. This course meets the requirements of Core 4. 

2500 Topics of the Contemporary World (4 sem. hours). Courses with different topics address 

developments in the twentieth century from a variety of perspectives, including history, literature, 
philosophy, religion, and fine arts. This course meets the requirements of Core 5. 

4000 Rcncctions on Liberal Studies (4 sem. hours). This course is designed to provide students with an 
opportunity to draw together the various strands of their education, to make connections among 
disciplines, and to reflect upon the meaning of a liberal arts education. Required for students in the 
Honors Program, this course meets the requirements of Core 10. Prerequisite: Senior status and 
completion of all other core requirements, including the writing portfolio requirement. 



Writing Program 
1000 Writing and Thinking (1 sem. hour). This course is designed to provide additional writing 

experience to students who have already taken Introduction to Liberal Studies (It may also be 
used by transfer students to meet Core I .) Prerequisite: Liberal Studies 1000 and recommendation 
of instructor. 

2001 Introduction to Teaching Writing (1 sem. hour). This course is designed to prepare prospective 
peer tutors to work in the Writing Center. It will introduce them to the writing process on a 
theoretical as well as practical level, and to theoretical and practical components of Writing Center 
work. Specific topics will include the role of the peer tutor, the rhetorical situation, types of 
academic writing, cultural perspectives, and approaches to talking about writing at various stages 
ol the writing process. Faculty recommendation required. 

3001 Advanced Teaching Writing (1 sem. hour). This course examines the theoretical and practical 

components ot the Writing Center work, paying particular attention to their reflexive nature, that 
IS, to the ways in which theories of collaborative learning challenge and extend Writing Center 
practice and the ways in which Writing Center practice interrogates and shapes Writing Center 
theory. The course will also further introduce students to aspects of Writing Center administration 
particularly the task of marketing the Writing Center on the Millsaps campus. Specific topics will ' 
include recent critiques of collaborative learning, approached to consultation, consultant roles, the 
role of grammar instruction in the Writing Center, consulting strategies for ESL students, and the 
use of computers in the Writing Center. Prerequisite: Writing Program 2001 . 

108 



Other Interdisciplinary Courses 

1000 Introduction to American Culture 1-IV (4-16 sem. hours). Tliis course is specially designed for 
international students to lielp them practice and refine their communication skills through the 
study of American history, literature and language. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

2000 Topics in Southern Studies (4 sem. hours). A course for the general student to be offered by the 

Eudora Welty Professor of Southern Studies. It may be cross-listed with one or more departments 
and may be repeated for credit with different topics. 



Charles W. and Eloise T. Else School of Management 

The Kelly Gene Cook, Sr. Chair of Business Administration 
The Hyman F. McCarty, Jr. Chair of Business Administration 
The J. Army Brown Chair of Business Administration 
The Selby and Richard D. McRae Chair of Business Administration 

• Professors: 

• Jesse D. Beeler, Ph.D., C.P.A. 

• W. Randy Boxx, Ph.D., Dean 

• Carl G. Brooking, Ph.D. 

• David H. Culpepper, Ph.D., C.P.A., C.V.A 

• M Ray Grubbs, Ph.D. 

. Walter P. Neely, Ph.D., C.F.A. 

• John D. Pilgrim, Ph.D. 

• Associate Professors: 

• Ajay K. Aggarwal, Ph.D. 

• Kimberly G. Burke, Ph.D., C.P.A. 

• Raymond A. Phelps, D.B.A. 

• Penelope J. Prenshaw, Ph.D. 

• Patrick A. Taylor, Ph.D. 

• Susan W. Taylor, Ph.D. 

• Assistant Professors: 

• Tammy Y. Arthur, Ph.D. 

• Diane F. Baker, Ph.D. 

• Bill M. Brister, Ph.D. 

• M. Blakely Fox, Ph.D. 

• James Kohlmeyer, Ph.D. 

• Boty McDonald, J.D. 

• Kevin P. Pauli, Ph.D. 

• Instructor: 

• Sanford D, Warren, M.B.A., C.P.A., C.Q.A. 

The Else School of Management offers undergraduate degree programs which lead to the BBA degree with majors 
in accounting or In business administration, and a program which leads to BA or BS degrees with a major in 
economics. The Else School also offers two graduate degrees: Master of Business Administration (MBA) and 
Master of Accountancy (MAcc). The MBA degree can be completed in one year beyond the bachelors degree for 
students who have completed the BBA program at Millsaps, or any other AACSB accredited institution, and non- 
business students who coinplete the Major Plus program. The Master of Accountancy generally requires one 
additional year of study beyond the BBA for students who have majored in accounting and wish to complete the 
educational requirements to take the C.P.A. examination. For details of the MBA, Major Plus, and MAcc, see other 
sections of this catalog and other college publications. The business programs offered by the Else School of 
Management, Millsaps College, are accredited by the AACSB/The International Association for Management 
Education. 

109 



Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) 

Educational Goals: The curriculum of the Bachelor otBusiness Administration degree (BBA) is designed to 
provide an educational base for a lifetime of learning to enable each student to realize his or her potential. To 
accomplish this mission, educational goals have been identified to develop in each student: 1) a management 
outlook toward organizations and the ability to work with others to accomplish common goals; 2) the Ability to 
organize mformation for analysis and decision making; 3) an understanding of the standards of professional 
behavior which are consistent with ethical precepts; 4) an awareness of the attributes necessary to attain positions of 
leadership; 5) an understanding of innovation and the importance of agents of change in society; 6) a global 
perspective; and 7) an understanding of the changing societal, political, legal, and cultural environments that 
organizations face. 

Degree Requirements: Students major in either accounting or business administration to earn a BBA degree. The 
BBA academic program is a three-year, integrated body of study. Since the program is integrated, the courses are 
sequenced so that each course is taught with the assumption that the students in the class have a common academic 
background. To insure educational diversity, at least fifty percent (usually 64 or more semester hours) must be non- 
business courses. Up to 9 semester hours of economics courses may be considered as non-business courses. 

Foundation Prerequisites: Students pursuing the BBA should complete College Algebra , Survey of Calculus (or 
Precalculus followed by Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1), during their freshman year. These courses will be 
completed before commencing junior-level courses. Elementary Statistics should be completed prior to the fall 
semester of the junior year. College Algebra and Survey of Calculus ( Precalculus, Analytical Geometry and 
Calculus 1 ) satisfy the Core 8 and 9 requirements respectively. Sophomore-level BBA core courses will be 
completed before commencing junior-level BBA courses. 

Curriculum: Nine core courses, two of which are one-half semester courses for a total of 32 semester hours, are 
required of ail BBA students in addition to the courses required for the particular major, business administration or 
accounting. The business administration major includes the BBA core courses plus Business Strategy and 12 
semester hours (typically three courses) of Else School electives which totals 48 semester hours. Students planning 
to complete degree requirements and leave the College at the end of a fall semester must take Management 4000: 
Business Strategy, in the spring of the preceding academic year. The accounting major includes the BBA core 
courses and 32 additional semester hours (8 courses) for a total of 64 semester hours. Courses should be taken in the 
sequence prescribed. The BBA core courses are: 

Sophomore Year 

• Fall Term: 

• Principles of Economics (4 sem. hours) 

• Principles of Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours) 

• Spring Term: 

• Principles of Managerial Accounting (2 sem. hours) 

• Introduction to Management Information Systems (2 sem. hours) 

Junior Year 

• Fall Term: 

• Introduction to Management (4 sem. hours) 

• Principles of Corporate Finance (4 sem. hours) 

• Spring Term: 

• Operations Management with Computing (4 sem. hours) 

• Fundamentals of Marketing (4 sem. hours) 

Senior Year 

• Fall Term; 

• The Legal Environment of Business (4 sem. hours) 

Requirements for the Business Administration Major: A minimum of 48 semester hours are required to earn the 
BBA degree in business administration. In addhion to the BBA core, students pursuing a major in business 

110 



administration must complete Business Strategy , to be taken in the senior year, and three Else School elective 
courses. 

Requirements for the Accoiintiug Major: Students pursuing the BBA with a major in accounting must complete a 
minimum of 64 semester hours, including the BBA core. Intermediate Accounting 1 and II , Cost Accounting , 
Federal Taxation of Income . Advanced Financial Accounting , Auditing , Business Law , and Senior Seminar in 
Accounting. 

Requirements for Minor in Business Administration : A student may elect a minor in business administration by 
completing Principles of Economics. Principles of Financial Accounting, Principles of Management Accounting, 
Introduction to Management, and any other one of the following Else School courses: Principles of Corporate 
Finance, Fundamentals of Marketing, or Operations Management with Computing. This is a total of 1 8 semester 
hours for the minor in business administration. Minors in accounting are not offered. 

Transfer Credit; Students may transfer from other schools and pursue the BBA at the Else School, but at least 
fifty percent of the BBA course work must be taken at Millsaps. For the administration major, this means at least 
24 semester hours of BBA coursework must be completed at Millsaps. For the accounting major, it means 32 
semester hours of BBA course work must be completed at Millsaps. Transfer students may receive credit for 
Principles of Accounting and Principles of Economics if they passed with a grade of "C" or better at their previous 
institution six hours of Principles of Accounting and Principles of Economics. They must, however, take the four 
junior-level BBA core courses at Millsaps. 

Credit for junior and senior-level courses taken at other four-year colleges will be evaluated on an individual basis 
by the Else School. For business administration majors. Business Strategy (Mgmt 4000) must be taken at Millsaps; 
and for accounting majors, at least 1 2 semester hours in accounting (."5 courses) required in the major must be taken 
at Millsaps. Ordinarily, course work taken more than six years prior to admission or re-admission to the Else School 
or academic work in which the student receives a grade below "C" must be repeated. The Academic Affairs 
Committee of the Else School will evaluate extenuating circumstances for exceptions to these standards. 

Millsaps students who wish to take BBA courses at the 3000 level or above at an institution other than Millsaps 
must do so at an AACSB accredited institution and have approval from the Dean of the Else School of Management. 
All students are required to complete at least fifty percent of their course work at Millsaps. 

Master of Accountancy Program (MAcc) 

The Else School offers the Master of Accountancy degree which is designed for students who intend to pursue 
professional careers in public accounting, business, and the government/non-profit sector. The MAcc fulfills the 
educational requirements to sit for the CPA examination in states which have adopted the AlCPA's 150 credit hour 
requirement. In general, the MAcc program involves a fifth year of study beyond the accounting major. Students 
who plan to seek the MAcc degree should pursue the basic accounting major as outlined above. For more details 
about the MAcc program, see any member of the accounting faculty and other college publications. 

Student's Guide to Earning a BBA 

The following is a four-year curriculum typical of Millsaps students majoring in business administration. Though 
this is representative of a B.B.A. student's four-year course of study, there are opportunities for individual variations 
including second majors and minors depending upon the student's particular interests. By the end of their sophomore 
year, BBA students will complete Core 1 through 9 as well as the mathematics courses which are the foundations for 
the BBA curriculum. It should be noted that a BBA student may choose to take more than the minimum of 48 
semester hours of Else School courses but at least fifty percent of total semester hours credit must be non- 
business courses. 

Suggested Curriculum for BBA in Business Administration 

Freshman Year - Topics Course Option 
• Fall Term: 

. Core 1 (LS 1000) 

• Core 2 (Ancient World) 

• Math (Algebra or Precal - Core 8) 

• Fine Arts elective, general elective or Computer 1 000 

111 



• TotalSein. Hrs. - 16 
Spring Term: 

Core 3 (Premodem World) 

Core 7 (Natural Science) 

Math (Survey or Cal. 1 - Core 9) 

Fine Arts elective, general elective or Computer 1000 

Total Sem. Hrs. -16 

Freshman Year - Heritage Option 

• Fall Term: 

• Core 1 (LS 1000) 

• Heritage (8 sem. hrs.) 

• Math (Algebra or Precal- Core 8) 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

• Spring Term: 

• Math (Survey or Cal. I - Core 9) 

• Heritage (8 sem. hrs.) 

• Computer 1000 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

Sophomore Year - Topics Course Option 

• Fall Term: 

• Core 4 (Modern World) 

• Principles of Economics (Core 6) 

• Principles of Financial Accounting 

• Elective or Core 7 

• TotalSem. Hrs. -16 

• Spring Term: 

• Core 5 (Contemporary World) 

• Elementary Statistics (Math 1150) 

• Principles of Mgmt. Accounting (2 hrs.) 

• Intro. Mgmt. Info. Systems ( 2 hrs.) 

• Elective or Core 7 

• TotalSem. Hrs. - 16 

Sophomore Year - Heritage Option 

• Fall Term: 

• Core 7 or Elective 

• Principles of Economics 

• Principles of Financial Accounting 

• Elective 

• TotalSem. Hrs. -16 

• Spring Term: 

• Core 7 or elective 

• Elementary Statistics (Math 1 150) 

• Principles of Mgmt. Accounting( 2 hrs. ) 

• Intro. Mgmt Info. Systems(2 hrs) 

• Elective or Core 7 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

Junior Year 

• Fall Term: 

• Introduction to Management 

• Principles of Corporate Finance 

• General elective 

• General elective 

112 



• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

• Spring Term: 

• Fundamentals of Marketing 

• Operations Management 

• General or Else School elective 

• General or Else School elective 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

Senior Year 

• Fall Term: 

• Legal Environment of Business 

• General or Else School elective 

• General or Else School elective 

• General or Else School elective 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

• Spring Term: 

• Business Strategy (Core 10) 

• General or Else School elective 

• General or Else School elective 

• General or Else School elective 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

Suggested Curriculum for BBA in Accounting 

Since the freshman and sophomore year courses are common to both business administration and accounting major 
BBA students, the following table illustrates a typical curriculum for the junior and senior years for BBA accounting 
majors. The fifth year of study leading to the Master of Accountancy degree (MAcc) which provides the additional 
course work necessary to qualifV to sit for the CPA exam is described in other college publications. 

Junior Year 

• Fall Term: 

• Introduction to Management 

• Principles of Corporate Finance 

• Intermediate Accounting I 

• General elective 

• Total Sem Hrs. - 16 

• Spring Term: 

• Fundamentals of Marketing 

• Operations Management with Comp. 

• Intermediate Accounting 11 

• Federal Ta.\ation of Income 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

Senior Year 

• Fall Term: 

• Auditing I 

• Cost Accounting 1 

• Legal Environment of Business 

• Advanced Financial Accounting 

• Total Sem. Hrs. - 16 

• Spring Term: 

• General elective 

• General elective 

• Senior Seminar (Core 10) 

• Business Law 

• TotalSem. Hrs. - 16 



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Accounting majors have the option of participating in a 8 semester hour, full-time residency program during the 
spring semester of the senior year. 

The Accounting Residency program allows selected undergraduate students to work full time for a Big 5, regional, 
or local accounting firm in the spring of their senior year. In the fall, accounting firms interview Millsaps accounting 
seniors for Spring Residency positions. Selected students work full time, receiving fiill pay in positions that foster 
professional growth and maturity. 



Economics Major 

Requirements for BA or BS degree with Major in Ecunomics: In addition to other stated degree requirements for the BA 
or BS degrees, the student majoring in economics will complete twenty semester hours in the core economics courses: 
Principles of Economics (Econ 2000), Intermediate Macroeconomics (Econ 3000), Intermediate Microeconomics (Econ 
3010), Econometrics (Econ 3030), Senior Thesis 1 (Econ 4901) and Senior Thesis II (Econ 4911), and the Senior Seminar in 
Economics (Econ 4902). In addition, the student must pursue one of three specialized tracks: Business Economics; 
Quantitative Economics; or Policy Economics. Additional economic courses and other courses required of the economics 
major depend upon the track chosen. All three tracks require an additional 28 semester hours in order to satisfy their 
minimum requirements for a total of 48 semester hours. 

Requirements for the Business Economics Track: The student choosing this track will take the economics core courses. 
Introduction to Finance (Fin 3000), one other business economics elective course, and one other economics elective course at 
the 3000 level or higher. In addition to these economics courses, student pursuing this track will also take either Survey of 
Calculus (Math 1210) or Calculus I (Math 1220) and Elementary Statistics (Math 1 150), Principles of Financial Accounting 
(Acct 2000), any other Else School course of 3000 or higher level. 

Requirements for the Quantitative Economics Track: The student choosing this track will take the economics core 
courses, Quantitative Economics (Econ 3060), and two other economics electives at the 3000 level or higher. In addition to 
these economics courses, students pursuing this track will also take Calculus 1 (Math 1220), and Calculus II (Math 2230), 
Elementary Statistics (Math 1 1 50), and Linear Algebra (Math 3650). 

Requirements for the Policy Economics Track: The student choosing this track will take the economics core courses, any 
two policy economics elective courses, and one other economics elective course at the 3000 level or higher. In addition to 
these economics courses, students pursuing this track will also take either Survey of Calculus (Math 1210) or Calculus I 
(Math 1220). and Elementary Statistics (Math 1 150), and any two courses from: Economic Policy Analysis (Econ 2200); 
Legal Environment of Business (Admin 4000); Introduction to Government (Pol Sci 1000); American Public Policy (Pol Sci 
3400); The Great Depression (Hist 3170); US History (Hist 2100); or History of the United States since 1877 (Hist 21 10). 

Economics Electives: Business Economics Electives: Money and Financial Systems (Econ 3020); Introduction to Finance 
(Finance 3000); Industrial Organization (Econ 3070). 

General Economics Electives: Quantitative Economics (Econ 3060) and History of Economic Thought (Econ 3110). 

Policy Economics Electives: Labor Economics (Econ 3120); Health Economics (Econ 3050): International Economics 
(Econ 3040); and Money and Financial Systems (Econ 3020). 

Requirements for a Minor in Economics: A student may elect a minor in economics with Principles of Economics (Econ 
2000), Intermediate Microeconomics (Econ 301 0) or Intermediate Macroeconomics (Econ 3000), and any other two 
economics courses at or above the 3000 level. The economics minor requires a minimum of twelve semester hours. Students 
pursuing the BBA degree and seeking the economics minor may not apply the three courses beyond Principles of Economics 
(Econ 2000) to satisfy BBA elective requirements. 

Accounting 

2000 Principles of Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours). The basic concepts, systems , and terminology of accounting data 
in decision modern accounting leading to the interpretation making by external users. The course emphasizes 
understanding of general-purpose financial statements. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 



114 



2002 Principles of Management Accounting (2 sem. hours). A survey of principles of management accounting and 
controllership principles including: cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, absorption and variable costing 
methods, budgeting and performance analysis. Prerequisite; Accounting 2000 

3000 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (4 sem. liours). A focus on the conceptual framework of financial reporting 

which emphasizes the accounting model, the rationale underlying generally accepted accounting principles, and the 
external disclosure consequences of corporate decisions. Prerequisite: Accounting 2000 and 2002. This course is 
offered during the fall semester. 

3010 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (4 sem. hours.)- A continuation of Intermediate Financial Accounting with a 
focus on issues relating to the financial reporting by public corporations, stockholders equity, long-term liabilities, 
cash flow, and income reporting. Prerequisite: Accounting 3000 . This course is offered during the spring semester. 

3020 Cost Accounting 1 (4 sem. hours). Basic managerial accounting concepts and terminology including development of 
information to be used by management in planning and controlling activities, understanding cost behavior and cost 
accumulation systems for manufacturing firms, and the application of textbook concepts to actual organizations. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 2000 and Accounting 2002. This course is offered during the fall semester. 

4000 Federal Taxation of Income (4 sem. hours). This course prepares students to examine the sources of tax law relating 
to individual taxpayers, and to gain orientation and practical experience in preparing tax forms and meeting filing 
requirements. Prerequisite; Accounting 2000 and Accounting 2002. This course is offered during the spring 
semester. 

4010 Auditing I (4 sem. hours). This course includes the environment of the auditing sector in business and the role of 
auditing in society. Topics include the legal and ethical responsibilities of accountants, professional auditing 
standards, the acquisition, evaluation and documentation of audit evidence and reports on the results of the auditing 
engagement. Prerequisite: Accounting 3010 . This course is offered during the fall semester. 

4020 Advanced Financial Accounting (4 sem. hours). Financial accounting and reporting for selected non-corporate 

entities, such as partnerships and governmental units, and for multicorporate or "consolidated" business enterprises. 
Selected accounting topics concerning multinational enterprises will be introduced. Prerequisite: Accounting 3010 . 
This course is offered during the fall semester. 

4030 Accounting information Systems (4 sem. hours). Exposes students to analysis, design, and evaluation of accounting 
systems with emphasis on transaction processing and the related internal controls for the major accoimting cycles. 
Also included is development of systems, flowcharting skills and exposure to advanced computerized accounting 
systems. Prerequisite: Accounting 3010 . 

4040 Advanced Taxation (4 sem. hours). A study of the taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts. 
Prerequisite: Accounting 4000 . 

4050 Senior Seminar: Contemporary Issues and Global Accounting (4 sem. hours). A seminar course exploring the 

current accounting environment and the major issues facing the accounting profession. The course also addresses the 
role accounting plays in the global economy. Includes group projects and oral presentations by students. 
Prerequisite; Completing of junior-level accounting courses and enrollment in Accounting 4000 and Accounting 
4010. This course is offered during the spring semester. 

4060 Governmental /Non-Pro fit Accounting (4 sem. hours). Principles and applications appropriate to Governmental and 
other non-profit institutions. Emphasis is on budgeting and fund accounting. Prerequisite: Accounting 3010 . 

Business Administration 

4000 The Legal Environment of Business (4 sem. hours). An introduction to legal systems and the business related 

provisions of the U. S. Constitution, to the common law of torts and business organizations, to administrative law 
and procedures, to regulatory programs involving labor, antitrust and securities, and to the impact of foreign and 
domestic laws on international business. Prerequisite or corequisite: Junior-level BBA core courses. This course is 
offered during the fall semester. 



115 



4020 Business Law (4 sem. hours). Emphasis on common law contracts and Uniform Commercial Code sections dealing 
with sales, commercial paper and secured transactions. Prerequisite: Business Administration 4000 . (Available to 
non-accounting majors with permission of instructor.) This course is offered during the spring semester. 

Finance 
3000 Principles of Corporate Finance (4 sem. hours). This course introduces corporate finance concepts. Emphasis is 
placed on financial decision-making within the corporation in such areas as capital investment, capital structure, 
working capital management, and financing the firm. The student is also introduced to bond and stock valuation and 
to the role of global financial markets including regulatory aspects. Prerequisite: Econ 2000 and Acct 2000. This 
course is offered during the fall semester. 

4000 Advanced Finance (4 sem. hours). An advanced course in corporate finance. Selected topics include working capital 
management, risk analysis in capital budgeting, financing, mergers and acquisitions, international financiafmarkets, 
derivative financial instruments, and capital market theory. Cases and projects are used in the course Prerequisite- ' 
Finance 3000 . 

4750 Topics in Finance ( 4 sem. hours). Several topics in finance will be considered on a rotational basis. Topics may 
include international finance, the financing of mergers and acquisitions, investments, speculative markets, 
international financial management, and the management of business risk. Prerequisite: Finance 3000 or permission 
of the instructor. Offered occaswnally. 

4900 Seminar in Portfolio Management (4 sem. hours). An advanced course in portfolio management and investments. 
Tlie course focuses on management of the General Louis Wilson Fund, the student managed portfolio. Analysis of 
securities and portfolio management are emphasized in the course. The course requires readings, cases, field trips, 
projects, student research and presentation. Prerequisite: Finance 3000. 



Management 
2000 International Business - Latin America (4 sem. Hours). This is an intense course that requires students to travel and 
live in Latin America for at least a two week period. Students are required to assess and understand geographic, 
environmental, economic, social-cultural, political and legal factors that impact the business environment of Latin 
America. The course includes 6 hours of formal classroom instruction at Millsaps College before departure for the 
region and an additional 38 hours of classroom instruction once in the region. In addition to the classroom 
instruction the course provides experiential learning opportunities by requiring students to participate in fieldtrips 
that expose them to the history and culture of the region as well as to various leaders of business, industry, and 
government. 

3000 Introduction to Management (4 sem. hours). Provides an introduction to the arts and sciences of management. 
Theories of organization structure, communication, and managerial decision making are addressed. Particular 
emphasis is given to organization behavior. Additionally, a detailed analysis is made of the planning, organizing, 
leading, and controlling functions. Prerequisite: Junior standing. This course is offered during the fall semester. ' 

4000 Business Strategy (4 sem. hours). Takes a searching look at the major components of strategy from an upper-level 
management perspective. Using case studies and simulations, this course provides a learning laboratory which 
integrates the knowledge and skills learned in the core courses of each function. Prerequisite: Admin 4000 and all 
four junior-level BBA core courses. This course is offered during the spring semester. 

4010 International Business (4 sem. hours). Focuses on issues and problems facing managers whose firms do business 
abroad. The strategic issues, operational practices, and external relations of multinational companies are analyzed 
through cases that bridge individual functional areas. Prerequisite: Junior-level BBA core courses. 

4020 Human Resource Management (4 sem. hours). This course addresses contemporary human resource challenges 

arising out of the social, economic and governmental environments in which organizations operate. Topics include 
the changing role of the human resource department in organizations, building and developing a competent 
workforce, issues in international human resource management, cultural diversity in the work place, the changing 
nature of labor relations, etc. 



116 



4750 Special Topics (4 scm. hours). Thiis is an elective course taken in tlie student's junior or senior year. It applies many of 
tiie concepts and tlieories learned in the student's first two years of study to the practices of the real estate industry. 
Offered occasionally. 



Management Information Systems 

2002 Introduction to Management Information Systems (2 sem. hours). Introduces students to the theory and practice of 
management information systems with an emphasis upon the strategic use of those principles and techniques. 
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1000. This course is offered during the spring semester. 

3010 Management Information Systems (4 sem. hours). This course focuses on breadth of coverage rather than depth in 
any particular area. The topics covered include: the strategic role of IT; discussion of MIS specific computer 
hardware and applications; managing IT-related organizational change; systems development and outsourcing; and 
the Internet and electronic commerce. Prerequisites: MGIS 2002 and junior standing or permission of the instructor. 

3020 E-Commerce (4 sem. hours). Course will explore the e-Coinmerce concept in the computer lab with focus on its 

business processes, opportunities, limitations, issues, and risks. Modules on creating web pages, working with XML, 
and web programming with Java will be included. Prerequisites: Computer Science 1010 or equivalent and at least 
junior standing. 

3110 Business Networks and the Internet (4 sem. hours). Provides those responsible for technology management, strategic 
planning, and various aspects of organizational management with an understanding of networking, electronic 
communications, and the Internet. Topics will be covered from the management perspective and will include LAN, 
WAN, hubs, servers, various systems configurations, and Internet technologies with emphasis on implications for 
management. Prerequisites: MGIS 2002 and junior standing. 



Marketing 

3000 Fundamentals of Marketing (4 sem. hours). Consideration of pricing, promoting and distributing products and 

services to satisfy buyers' needs in an ethical and socially responsible manner, with particular attention to the impact 
of demographic, economic, social, environmental, political, legal, regulatory, and technological forces on domestic 
and global organizational marketing systems. Prerequisite: Econ 2000 and at least junior standing. This course is 
offered during the spring semester. 

4010 Consumer Behavior (4 sem. hours). This course studies the process involved when individuals or groups select, 
purchase, use or dispose of products, services, ideas, or experiences to satisfy needs and desires. To consider the 
scope of consumer behavior, the course stresses the complex and interdependent relationships between marketing 
stimuli and the day-to-day lives of consumers. Prerequisite: Marketing 3000 . 

4020 Marketing Research (4 scm. hours) . The course imparts an understanding of and the skills to apply the methods and 
techniques required for gathering, recording, and analyzing information for making marketing decisions. 
Prerequisites; Marketing 3000. 

4030 New Product Development (4 sem. hours) .The object of this course is to familiarize the student with applications of 
relatively recent new product management, planning, and policy techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on 
creative problem solving, business analysis for new products, test marketing, and introduction. Prerequisite: 
Marketing 3000. 

4040 Sales Force Management (4 sem. hours) . This course studies the systems necessary for planning, organizing, 
directing, and controlling the efforts of a sales force; develops the concepts and heuristics to formulate and 
implement a strategic sales program; explores the body of sales management literature; and considers other topics in 
sales force management, including external issues. Prerequisite: Marketing 3000. 

Quantitative Management 

3000 Operations Management with Computing (4 sem. hours). The course addresses tools and techniques that can be 

used by production and operations managers in the areas of planning, designing, operating and controlling systems. 
Topics covered include decision making, forecasting, linear programming, aggregate planning, capacity planning, 

117 



just-in-time systems, material requirements planning, scheduling, project management, waiting lines, and quality 
assurance. Computer programs are used extensively to process data. Prerequisite: Econ 2000 and Math 1 150. This 
course is offered during the spring semester. 

4010 Applications of Ailificial Intelligence (4 sem. hours). The course focuses on the hasics of expert systems and neural 
networks with emphasis on developing useful business applications. E.xpert system shell(s) and neural network 
development software is used extensively in the course. 

4020 Quantitative Management in Spreadsheets ( 4 sem. hours). The course uses spreadsheets as the medium for teaching 
quantitative management concept. Coverage includes modeling, simulation, forecasting, decision analysis, Markov 
analysis, and optimization. Computers are used extensively throughout the course. 

Special Purpose Course Numbers 

4750-4752 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). 

4800-4802 Independent Study (1 - 4 sem. hours). 

4850-4852 Internship (1 - 4 sem. hours). 



Economics 
2000 Principles of Economics (4 sem. hours). An examination of basic micro and macro concepts of economics including 
the role of economics, supply and demand, price determination, demand and production theory, costs, competition, 
monopoly, the role of government in the economy, national income determination, the monetary system, and fiscal 
and monetary policy. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing is required and College Algebra ( or higher level 
mathematics); Survey of Calculus is recommended. This course is offered during the fall semester. 

2200 Economic Policy Issues (4 sem. hours). The course investigates various aspects of public policy regarding economic 
issues. Both macro and micro policy issues may be considered. Prerequisites: Economics 2000 and sophomore 
standing. Same as Political Science 2200. 

3000 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (4 sem. hours). The measurement of and determination of the level of national 
income and output, aggregate demand and supply, intlation, unemployment, the theory of money and interest rates, 
the causes of economic cycles, and national economic policy analysis. Prerequisite: Economics 2000 and junior 
standing. 

3010 Intermediate iVIicroeconomic Theory (4 sem. hours). Price and output determination in markets, equilibrium, market 
mtervention, externalities, the theory of value, production and cost theory, resource markets, and welfare and policy 
implications. Prerequisite; Economics 2000 and junior standing or consent of instructor. 

3020 Money and Financial Systems (4 sem. hours). A survey of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic aspects of 
financial systems, including market structure, behavior, and regulation of commercial banks and other financial 
intermediaries; the creation of money; central bank organization and monetary control, and policy issues. 
Prerequisite: Economics 2000 and junior standing. 

3030 Econometrics and Applied Statistics (4 sem. hours). A study of the general linear regression model and the 

considerations associated with using that technique. Prerequisites: Economics 2000, Math 1 150 or consent of the 
instructor, and junior standing. 

3040 International Economics (4 sem. hours). An extension and application of economic theory to international issues with 
an examination of world money markets, exchange rates, adjustment mechanisms, and issues. Prerequisite: 
Economics 2000 and junior standing or permission of instructor. 

3050 Health Economics (4 sem. hours). This course provides an introduction to the microeconomics of health, health care, 
and health policy. Its main goals are to apply economic principles to health related issues, to explain the social, 
political and economic contexts of health care delivery, to explore the changing nature of health care, and to analyze 
public policy from an economic perspective. Prerequisite: Junior standing and Economics 2000. 

118 



3060 Quantitative Methods (4 sem. hours). This course examines anal>'tical and statistical tools useful in economic 
decision making. Topics will include data collection, data analysis, advanced econometric models, and the 
communication of quantitative thinking. Additional topics may include constrained optimization and simulations. 
Prerequisite; Econometrics/Applied Statistics 3030 and Math 1 150, 

3070 Industrial Organization (4 sem. hours). The course addresses imperfectly competitive markets. Emphasis is on the 

structure, conduct, performance of and public policy toward markets in which power is concentrated in the hands of 
a few firms. Prerequisite: Economics 2000 and at least junior standing. 

3110 History of Economic Thought (4 sem. hours). Traces the development of economic thought from the classical school 
to the present time. Prerequisite: Economics 2000 . Offered occasionally. 



3120 Labor Economics (4 sem. hours). The course exammes the organization, functioning, and outcomes of labor markets. 
Topics include wage and employment determination, labor market discrimination, the economic impacts of unions, 
the worker's investment in human capital, and the effects of regulation on firms and workers. Emphasis is placed on 
the compensation and incentives of workers. Prerequisite: Economics 2000 and Junior standing. 

4901 Senior Thesis I (1 sem. hour). Initial preparation of a thesis on an approved topic in Economics that will be used as a 

part of the comprehensive examination for Economic Majors. Prerequisite; Senior standing, Economics 3000 and 
Economics 3010. 

4902 Senior Seminar in Economics (2 sem. hours). Discussion of selected topics in economics. Prerequisite: Senior 

standing. Economics 3000 and Economics 3010. 

491 1 Senior Thesis II (1 sem. hour). Final preparation of a thesis on an approved topic in Economics that will be used as a 
part of the comprehensive examination for Economic majors. Prerequisite; Senior standing and Economics 4901. 

Special Purpose Course Numbers 

4750-4752 Special Topics (1-4 sem. hours). 

4800-4802 Independent Study (1-4 sem. hours). 

4850-4852 Internship (1 - 4 sem. hours). 



119 



The Board of Trustees 



Officers 



E. B. Robinson, Jr Chairman 

Bishop Kenneth Carder Vice-Chairman 

J. Herman Hines Secretary/ Treasurer 



Term expires in 2002 

Elaine Crystal Jackson 

Gale L. Galloway Austin, Texas 

Warren A. Hood, Jr Hattiesburg 

Earle F. Jones Jackson 

James S. Love HI Biloxi 

Steven C. McDonald Brandon 

Don Q. Mitchell Jackson 

Helen Meyers Naples, Florida 

E. S. Robinson, Jr Jackson 



Term Expires in 2003 

J. Thomas Fowlkes Emory, Virginia 

Richard G. Hickson Jackson 

Robert N. Leggett, Jr Great Falls, Virginia 

John L. Lindsey Greenwich, Connecticut 

William T. McAlilly Tupelo 

Vaughan W. McRae Jackson 

Luther S. Ott Jackson 

James A. Payne Ridgeland 

Marsha M. Wells Jackson 

Rebecca Youngblood Hernando 



Term Expires in 2004 

Paul Benton Biloxi 

Patricia L. Cook West Palm Beach, Florida 

Michael Culbreth Holly Springs 

R. Eason Leake Jackson 

J. Con Maloney, Jr Jackson 

Michael T. McRee Jackson 

John C. Vaughey Jackson 



Life Trustees 

Richard D. McRae Jackson 

Edward L. Moyers Naples, Florida 

LeRoy Percy Greenville 

120 



Nats. Rogers Madison 

Tom B. Scott, Jr Jackson 

Mike P. Sturdivant Glendora 

Rowan H. Taylor Jackson 

Honorary Trustees 

Carol Allen Jackson 

Martha H. Campbell Jackson 

Robert H. Dunlap Batesville 

Janice Trimble Chicago, Illinois 

Ruth W. Watson Poplarville 



Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees 

Executive Committee: E. B. Robinson, Jr.. Chairman; Bishop Kenneth Carder. Vice-Chairman; J. Herman Hines. 
Secretary/Treasurer; Maurice H. Hall, Jr., William R. James, William T. Jeancs; Tom B. Scott, Jr.; John C. Vaughey 

Academic Affairs Committee: John C. Vaughey, Chairman; Leila C. Wynn, Vice-Chairman; Gale L. Galloway; Earl F. 
Jones; Robert N. Leggett; John L. Lindsey; Joe W. May; Robert W. Pittman; Nat S. Rogers; Marsha M. Wells 

Business Affairs Committee: William R. James. Chairman; J. Herman Hines, Warren A. Hood, Jr., Robert R. Morrison, Jr.; 
John N, Palmer; Tom B. ScoU, Jr.; Mike P. Sturdivant 

Student Affairs Committee: William T. Jeanes, Chairman; Gene R. Barrett, Vice-Chairman; Paul Benton; Elaine Crystal; 
Michael Culbreth; John D. Durrett: James S. Love, III; William T. McAlilly; Helen Moyers; Luther S. Ott; Jimmy A. Payne; 
Rebecca Youngblood 

Development Committee: Maurice H. Hall, Chairman; Michael T. McRee, Vice Chairman; Patricia L. Cook; Carl W. 
Grubbs; Richard G. Hickson; R. Eason Leake, J. Con Maloney, Jr.; Steven C. McDonald; Vaughan W. McRae; Don Q. 
Mitchell; Edward L. Moyers; Rowan H. Taylor; Thomas Fowlkes 

Audit Committee: Tom B. Scott, Jr., Chairman; John C. Vaughey 

Responsibility Investor Committee: J. Herman Hines, Chairman; E. B. Robinson, Jr.; Tom B. Scott, Jr.. 



Ex Officio 

All Committees: E. B. Robinson, Jr., Chairman; Kenneth Carder, Vice Chairman; Frances Lucas-Tauchar, President 

Academic Affairs Committee: Vice President-Dean of the College, Student Representative 

Business Affairs Committee: Vice President for Administration, Treasurer, Faculty Representative, Student Representative 

Student Affairs Committee: Vice President-Dean of Students, Student Representative 

Development Committee: Vice President-Institutional Advancement, Alumni Representative 

Audit Committee: Treasurer 

Officers of the Administration 

Frances Lucas-Tauchar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

President 



121 



Richard A. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Vice President and Dean of the College 

John D. Pilgrim, B.A, Ph.D. 

Vice President for Administration 

Charles R. Lewis, B.M., IVt.M., Ph.D. 

Vice President for Jnstiliilional Advancement 

Todd Rose, B.B.A., M.B.A. 

Vice President and Dean of Students 



Martha H. Boshers 

Assistant Vice President of Advancement for Development 

W. Randy Boxx, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of Else School of Management 

George .James Bey III, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Dean for Sciences Division 

David C. Davis, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Dean for Arts and Letters Division 

Louise Burney, B.B.A., M.Acc., C.P.A. 

Assistant Vice President for Business Affairs and Controller 

John O. Gaines, B.A., M.Ed. 

Assistant Vice President and Director of Admissions 

Ann G. Hcndrick, B.A., M.S. 

Assistant Vice President and Director of Financial Aid 

Ron Jurney, B.A. 

Director of Athletics 

The College Faculty 
Emeriti Faculty 

John Quincy Adams (1965) 

Emeritus Professor of Political Science 

B.A., Rice University: M.A. . University of Texas. El Paso; J. D., University of Texas, Austin 

McCarrell L. Aycrs (1965) 

Emeritus Associate Professor of Music 

D.M., Eastman School oj Music, University of Rochester; M.M., Indiana University 

Richard Bruce Baltz (1966) 

Emeritus Professor of Economics 

A.A., Belleville Jr. College: B.B.A.. M.S., Baylor University: Ph.D., University of Arkansas 

Howard Gregory Bavender (1966) 

Emeritus Professor of Political Science 

A.B., College of Idaho, M.A.. University of Wisconsin 

Robert E. Bergmark(l953) 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Emory University: S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston University 

122 



Roy Alfred Berry, Jr. (1962) 

Emeritus Professor of Chemistry 

B S., Mississippi College: Ph.D.. University of North Carolina 

Allen David Bishop, Jr. (1967) 

Emeritus Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Mitlsaps College: M.S.. Louisiana Slate University: Ph.D., University of Houston 

Frances Blissard Boeckniaii (1966) 
Emerita Instructor, Catalog Librarian 
A.B., Belhaven College: A.M.. Mississippi College: M.L.S. University of Mississippi 

Billy Marshall Bufkin (1960) 

Emeritus Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B , A.M.. Texas Technological College 

C.LelandByler(l959) 

Emeritus Professor of Music 

A.B. Goshen College: M.M. Northwestern Univeisii}' 

Charles Eugene Cain (1960) 

Emeritus Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.. University of North Carolina: A.M., Ph.D.. Duke University 

Frances Heidelberg Coker (1967) 

Emerita Professor of Sociology 

AB., Millsaps College: M.S.T., Illinois Institute of Technology 

J. Harper Davis (1964) 

Emeritus Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., M.Ed.. Mississippi State University 

Kathleen A. Drude( 19X6) 

Emerita Professor of Mathematics 

B.S.. Southern Louisiana University: M.A., Ph D., University of Mississippi 

George Harold E/ell(1967) 

Emeritus Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Mississippi College: M.S., Florida State University: Ph.D., University of Mississippi 

John Lemuel Guest (1957) 

Emeritus Professor of German 

A.B., University of Texas: A.M.. Cuhtmhia University 

Floreada Montgomery Harmon (1972) 

Emerita Professor and Librarian 

A.B., Tougaloo College: MS.L.S.. Louisiana State University 

George M. Harmon (1978) 

President Emeritus 

B.A.. Southwestern at Memphis: MB. A., Emoty University; DBA., Haiyard University 

Nellie Khayat Hederi (1952) 
Emerita Professor of Spanish 
A.B., Mississippi State College for Women: A.M.. Tulane University 



123 



Donald D. Kilmer (1960) 

Emeritus Associate Professor of Music 
B.M., M.M., Indiana University 

Samuel Roscoe Knox (1949) 

Emeritus Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., A.M., Univer.sity oj Mi.s.ti.i.sippi; PhD., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Russell Wilford Levanway (1956) 

Emeritus Professor of Psycliology 

A.B.. University of Miami; M.S., Ph.D , Syracuse University 

Thomas Wiley Lewis III (1959) 

Emeritus Professor of Religion 

AS., Milisaps College; B.D., .Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., Drew University 

Herman L. McKcnzie ( 1 963) 

Emeritus Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Milisaps College; M.Ed., M.S., Univeisity of Mississippi 

Lucy Webb Millsaps( 1 969) 

Emerita Associate Professor of Art 

B F A . Newcomb College; M.A., Universit)' of Mississippi 

IVIichaelH. Mitias(1967) 

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Union College; PhD., University of Waterloo 

Caroline H. Moore (1968) 

Emerita Instructor, Order Librarian 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M., Radcliffe College 

Robert H.Padgett (1960) 

Emeritus Professor of Enghsh 

A.B., Texas Christian University; A.M., Vanderbtit University 

JamesF. Parks, Jr. (1969) 

College Librarian Emeritus 

A.B., Mississippi College; MLS.. Peahody College 

Lee H.Reiff( 1960) 

Emeritus Professor of Religion 

A.B.. B.D., Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

HarrylynG. Sallis(1981) 

Dean Emerita of Adult Learning 

B.M., Southwestern at Memphis; M.M., University of Kentucky, Ph.D., University of Mississippi 

W. Charles Sallis (1968) 

Emeritus Professor of History 

B.S., M.S., Mississippi State University; Ph.D.. University of Kentucky 

Jonathan Mitchell Sweat (1958) 

Emeritus Professor of Music 

B.S., M.S., The Juilliard School of Music; A. Mils. D., University of Michigan 

Edmond R. Venator(l967) 

Emeritus Professor of Psychology 

A.B., University of Buffalo; Ph.D., Emoiy University 

124 



Jerry D. Whitt(l980) 

Emeritus Professor of Management 

B.B.A.. M.B.A., Norlh Texas State University': Ph. D.. University of Arkansas 

Faculty 

AjayK. Aggarwal(1989) 

Associate Professor of Quantitative Management 

B.Tech.. Indian Institute of Technology: M.S., M.B.A.. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Slate University 

Theodore Gerald Ammon (1985) 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Mississippi State University: M.A., Ph.D., Washington University 

Miguel B. Arellano (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Matliematics 

D.A., Cornell College: M.S.. Mississippi State University 

Sarah L. Armstrong (1985) 

Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Texas: M.A.. University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D.. Duke University 

Tammy Y. Arthur (2002) 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.B.A., Millsaps College; Ph.D., Mississippi State University 

Jeffrey C.Asmus( 1 993) 

Associate Professor of Art 

B.F..4., Birmingham-Southern College: M.F.A., Louisiana State Universit)' 

Diane F.Baker (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S.. Concordia College: M.B.A., Ph.D., University' of Oklahoma 

Elizabeth A. Beck (1997) 

Assistant Professor, Librarian 

B.A., University oj South Alabama: M.L.S.. University of Southern Mississippi 

Jesse D. Becler ( 1 994) 

Professor of Accounting 

Hyman F. McCarty, Jr. Chair of Business Administration 

B.S., M.B.A.. Southwest Missouri State University: Ph.D., University of Texas. Arlington 

George .James Bey HI (1990) 

Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

B.A , University of New Mexico: M.A., Ph.D., Tulane University 

Stephen T. Black (1 989) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., University of California at Santa Barbara: M.S.. Ph.D., University (f California at Santa Cruz 

James E. Bowley (2002) 

Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A.. Grace College: M.Phil., Ph.D., Hebrew Union College 

W. Randy Boxx (1999) 

Professor of Management 

B S.. M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi: Ph. D., University of Arkan.sas 

125 



Christopher N. Bratcher (2000) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

BA., University of the South; Ph.D.. University of Texas at Austin 

BillM. Bristcr(1989) 

Assistant Professor of Finance 

B.S., M.S. A., University of Southern Mississippi: Ph.D., University of Arkansas 

Carl G. Brooking (1981) 

Professor of Economics and Quantitative Management 

B.S., Millsaps College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Kristen M. Brown (1995) 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A .Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D.. Vanderbitt University 

Kimberly G. Burltc (1995) 

Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A., M.S., Texas Tech University; Ph.D., Oklahoma University 



Connie M. Campbell (1992) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A.. Huntingdon College, M.S.. Ph.D.. University of Mississippi 

Claudine Chadey ras ( 1 988) 
Assistant Professor of French 
Licence, Universite de P/cardie, France; M.A., Ph.D. University of Iowa 

YunsukChae(2001) 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A., University of Hatvaii; M.A., Vanderbilt University 

Chei-ylW. Coker(1987) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.Ed., M.M.. University of Southern Mississippi; D.M.A. University of Minnesota 

Timothy C. Cokcr ( 1 984) 

Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M.. Ph.D., University oj Southern Mississippi 

David H. Culpepper ( 1 984) 

Professor of Accounting 

Kelly Gene Cook Chair of Business Administration 

B.S., Belhaven College; B.S., MBA., Millsaps College; PhD , University of Alabama 

Dennis Dance (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.S., University of Texas at Arlington; M.S., Ph.D. Texas A & M University 

GaylaF. Dance (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Texas; M.Ed., Texas A. & M. University; M.S., Mississippi College 

David C.Davis (1988) 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., William Carey College; M.A.. Baylor University; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Guioman Duenas (2002) 

126 



Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Xavier University; Bogota. Colombia: M.A.. Ph.D.. Univcnily of Texas 

Priscilla M. Fermon (1983) 

Associate Professor of Frcncli 

BA Lehman College: MA . Han'ard Umversily: Ph.D. University of Virginia 

Ramon Figueroa (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A., University of Massachusells: M. A.. Ph.D. Universit}' of Minnesota 

Amy W.Forbes (2001) 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Louisiana State University: M.A, University of Georgia: M.Ed., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Rutgers University 

M. Blakely Fox (2000) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.S.. PhD , University of Texas at Austin 

Laura E.Franey (1999) 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. University of California, San Diego; M.A.. Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

Veronica G. Freeman (2000) 
Assistant Professor of German 
B.A. Eckerd College: M.A.. Ph D., University of Florida 

Catherine R. Freis ( 1 979) 

Professor of Classics 

B.A., Brooklyn College: M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Michael L. Galaty ( 1 999 ) 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A, Grinnell College: MA. . Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Stanley J. Galicki (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.S., Wittenberg University: M.S., University of Memphis: Ph D., University of Mississippi 

DelbertE. Gann(1982) 

Associate Professor of Geology 

B.S., University of Missouri. Kansas City; M.S., Northeast Louisiana University: Ph.D.. Missouri .School of Mines and 

Metallurgy 

Paula K. Garrett (1990) 

Assistant Professor of English and American Studies 

B.S., M.A.. Baylor University: Ph.D., Louisiana Slate University 

Michael Gleason (1994) 

Associate Professor of Classics 
A.B , A.M., PhD.. Brown University 

Roane Grantham (2002) 

Instructor of Accounting 

B.Acc . University of Mississippi; M.D.A., Millsaps College 

EricJ. Grifnn(1998) 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Pomona College; MA., Ph D University of Iowa 

127 



Michael Ray Grubbs (1987) 

Professor of Management 

D.S.. Millsaps College; MB. A., Mississippi College; Ph.D., University of Mississippi 

James B.Harris (1995) 

Associate Professor of Geology 

B.S . Eastern Kentucky L/niversiry; B.S.. University of Houston; M.S.. Ph.D . University of Kentucky 

Thomas W. Henderson ( 1 997) 

Associate Professor, Librarian 

B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., FloriJa State University 

Dick R.Highfill (1981) 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A B., M.A., Universit}' of California at San Jose, Ph.D., University of Idaho 

Patrick D. Hopkins (2000) 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., University of Mississippi: M.A., Ph.D., Washington University 

Robert J. Kahn( 1976) 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Slate University of New York at Bujfalo; M.A.. Middlebury College; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

AsifKhandker(1985) 

Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Dacca (Bangladesh); M.S., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D.. Louisiana State University 

James Kohlmeyer (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.A , Cedarville College; M.S. A... Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of South Florida 

Thomas Kohn (2000) 

Assistant Professor of Classics 

BA., Carleton College; Ph D.. University of Minnesota 

Carolee A. Larsen (1996) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. M.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D. Northwestern University 

Brent W.Lefavor (1983) 

Associate Professor of Technical Theatre 

B.A., M.A., Brigham Young University; M.F.A., University of Southern Mississippi 

L. Lee Lewis (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., B.S., Mississippi College 

Frances Lucas-Tauchar (2000) 

Professor of Education 

B.A., Mississippi State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Alabama 

MarkJ. Lynch (1989) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Millsaps College; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 



128 



AnneC. MacMaster(199I) 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A , Rice University: M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Larry E.Madison (1999) 

Assistant Professor, Librarian 

B.S, Troy State University: M. LIS., University' of Southern Mississippi 

DeboraL. Mann (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Miami: M.S., Vanderbiit University: Ph.D., Clemson University 

Suzanne Marrs (1988) 

Professor of English ,. , 

B.A., Ph.D., Universit)' of Oklahoma 

Allison P. Mays (1 999) 

Assistant Professor, Librarian 

B.A , Rhodes College: M.i.S., Indiana University 

Robert W. McCarley (1984) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.A., Millsaps College: M.Ed., Mississippi State University 

Boty McDonald (1999) 

Assistant Professor of Business Law 

B.A., Millsaps College: J D , Albany Law School of Union University 

Robert S. McElvaine (1973) 

Elizabeth Chisholm Professor of History 

B.A., Ridgers University: M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton 

Sarah Lea McGuire (1995) 

Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A.. Mississippi College: M.S.. University of Southern Mississippi: Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine 

James Preston McKeown (1962) 

Professor of Biology 

B.S., University' of the South: M.A., University of Mississippi: Ph.D., Mississippi Slate University 

Jeanne M. Middleton-Hairston (1978) 

Professor of Education 

B.A., Millsaps College: M Ed., Harvard University: Ed.D., Harvard University 

David Gregory Miller (1991) 

Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbiit University: M.A.. Stanford University: Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Elizabeth W.Moak (1996) 

Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., MM., Peabody Conservatory of .Johns Hopkins: Artist 's Diploma, Consei-vatoire de Miisique 

Julian M. Murchison (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Kenyan College: M.A., University of Michigan 

Walter?. Neely( 1 980) 

Professor of Finance 

B.S., M.B.A., Mississippi State University: Ph.D. Universit}' of Georgia 



129 



Robert B. Nevins ( 1 967) 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Washington University; M.S., Universily of Missouri 

lrenOmo-Bare(l990) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A., M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., Louisiana State University' 

Joseph J. Palen (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.A.. University of Micltigan; Ph.D.. Universil)' of Michigan 

Kevin P. Pauli (2000) 

Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems 

B.B.A., University of Alasl<a; M.B. A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

Raymond A. Phelps IT ( 1 980) 

Associate Professor of Marketing 

A. A., University of Florida: B.B.A., M.B. A., Georgia State University; DBA., Louisiana Tech University 

John D. Pilgrim (1998) 
Professor of Economics 
B.A., Grinnell College: Pli.D., Vanderbill University 

Penelope J. Prenshaw ( 1 994) 

Selby and Richard McRae Chair of Business Administration 

Associate Professor of Marketing 

B.S., M.B. A., University of Southern Mississippi: Ph.D., University of Houston 

JimmieM. Purser (1981) 

Professor of Chemistry and Computer Science 

B.S., Millsaps College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

H. Lynn Raley (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Southern Methodist Universily; M.M., University of Cincinnati: D.M.A., Rutgers University 

Darby K. Ray (1996) 

Associate Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A.. University of the South; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderhilt University 

Angeles Rodrigucs (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Universily of Veracruz; M.A.. Ohio Universily; Ph.D. University of Michigan 

Ruth Conard Schimmel (1990) 

Associate Professor of Education 

B.A.. Vanderhilt University; M.A., San Francisco State Universily: Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Donald R. Schwartz (1997) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Services 

B.S., M.S., PhD , University of Southwestern Louisiana 

Robert A. Shive, Jr. ( 1 969) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 

B.A., M.S., Southern Methodist University: Ph.D., Iowa Stale University 

Molly J. Signs (2001) 

130 



Assistant Professor, Systems Librarian 
B.A., M.S., University of Washington 

EliscL. Smith (1988) 

Professor of Art History 

B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Vanderbilt Universtty, Ph.D , University of North Carolina 

Richard A. Smith (1997) 

Professor of Political Science 

A.B., WhittierColkge; M. A., Ph.D.. University of'Rochester 

Steven Garry Smith (1985) 

Professor of Philosophy and Religion 

B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph D , Duke University' 

Sandra Smithson (1999) 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Alfred University: M.F.A., Louisiana Slate University 

Gina Sonci (2002) 

Assistant of Physics 

B.S.. University of New Orleans; M.S., PhD . University of Wisconsin 

Kristina L. Stensaas ( 1 997) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.A , Ph.D., University of Wyoming 

Steven Stinnett (2000) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Lamar Univeristy; M.S., Ph.D., University of Alabama 

William K.Storey (1999) . ,. . ■ 

Assistant Professor of History 

A.B , Harvard Universit)\ M.A.. Ph.D., The John Hopkins University 

Tracy L. Sullivan (1993) 
Instructor of Mathematics 
B.A., M.S. University of Mississippi 

Holly M. Sypniewski (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.A,, University of Cinemnati; M.A., Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin 

Patrick A. Taylor (1984) 

Associate Professor of Economics 

B.B.A., University of Mississippi; M.B.A.. PhD. University of Alabama 

Susan W.Taylor (1992) 

Associate Professor of Economics 

J. Armistead Brown Chair of Business Administration 

B.A., B.S., Blue Mountain College: M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

John J. Thatamanil ( 1 998) 

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A., Washington University: M.Div., Ph.D., Boston University 

Kristcn A. Tegtmeier (2000) 
Assistant Professor of History 
B.A., Cornell College: M.A., State University nf New York; Ph.D., University of Te.xas 

131 



A. Kurt Thaw (1998) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Georgia Southern University: M.S.. Ph.D., Florida Stale University 

Ming Tsui (1992) 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A.. Honan Teacher's University', China; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New Yorii at Stony Brook 

Marlys T.Vaughn (1979) 

Professor of Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State University, Ph.D.. University of Southern Mississippi 

Eugene Vinson (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Education 

BS., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Ed., Mississippi College; Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi 

Timothy Joseph Ward ( 1 990) 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Florida: Ph.D., Texas Tech University 

Sanford D. Warren ('/995) 

Instructor of Accounting •' •■ 

B.S., MB. A., University of Southern Mississippi 

Leon Austin Wilson (1976) 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B.. Valdosta State College; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University oj South Carolina 

SanfordC. Zale(1995) 

Associate Professor of History 

B.S.F.S.. Georgetown University; M. A., Ph.D.. Ohio State University 

Staff 



Office of the President 



Frances Lucas-Tauchar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2000) 
President 

Patti Wade (2001) 

Special Assistant to the President 

Esther Baugh (1993) 

Executive Secretary to the President 

BishopClay F.Lee (2001) 
Bishop in Residence 



Office of the Vice President and Dean of the College 



Richard A. Smith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1997) 
Vice President and Dean of the College 

Nancy M. McKay, B.S. (1989) 
Assistant to the Vice President 

Barbara P. Young (1997) 

132 



Assistant to the Vice President 

Arts and Letters and Science Division 

David C. Davis, B.A., N4.A., Ph.D. (1988) 
Associate Dean of Arts and Letters 

George James Bey III. B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1990) 
Associate Dean of the Sciences 

Rebecca Cocl<rell (2001) 

Administrative Assistant & Choir Manager in the Department of Performing Arts 

Louise Hetriclc, B.A.. (1975) 

Associate to the Heritage Program Director 

Dora G. Robertson, B.L.S, (1998) 
Faculty Secretary 

Judy Willis (1997) 
Faculty Secretary 

Rlionda Wynn (2000) 
Faculty Secretary 

Pamela G. Savell, A.A. (2000) 
Secretary - Education Department 



Faith and Work Initiative 



Darby Ray, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1996) 
Director 



Raymond Clothier, B.A., LMSW, M.Div. (2002) 
Associate Director 



Center for International Initiatives 



Lyn Fulton-John, B.A., M.T.S. (1998) 
Director 



Writing Center 



Paula K. Garrett, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1996 
Director 

Katlii R. Griffin, B.A., MA. (1999) 
Assistant Director 

Janice O. Jordan, B.A. (1995) 

Administrative Assistant of Core and Writing Program 



Office of Adult Learning 



Nola Gibson, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1995) 
Director, Enrichment and Special Projects 

Janet Langley, B.A., M.L.S. (1991) 
Director, Adult Degree Program 

Wanda Manor, B.S.E., M.Ed. (2001) 
Administrative Assistant 



133 



Ranee Underwood (1999) 
Sccrelar)' 

Computer Services 

Elliott Bray, B.S., M.S. (2001) 
Director of Computer Services 

Debra Bagwell (1996) 

Coordinator for Coinpulin^ and Telecommunications 

PatCox, B.S. (1990) 
Administrative Assistant 

Jeanne Bodroii Hayes (1992) 
Help Desk Manager 

Barry Jackson (1999) 
Netivork and PC Technician 

Brian N.Jackson (1994) 
Systems and Network Specialist 

R. Gail Keller, B.M.E., M.M.E., BS (1987) 
Manager of Programming Services 

Curtis Kitchens (2000) 
Network and PC Analyst 

Lynne Montgomeiy (2000) 

User Support and ResNet Coordinator 

Dawn Nations (1994) 

User Support and Telecommunications Specialist 

Alton T.Parker (1995) 
Network Infrastructure Manager 

Michael Rutherford (2000) 
Hardware Technician 



JeffVenator, B.A. (1987) 
Unix System Administrator 



Tom Henderson, B.A., M.S. (1997) 
College Librarian 

Lynda McClendon, B.A. (1999) 
Assistant lo the Librarian 

Janice Allison B.A. (1994) 
Public Services Assistant 

Elizabeth Beck, B.A., M.L.S. (1997) 
Catalog Librarian 

Laverne Berry, B.S. (2002) 
Periodicals/ Acquisition Assistant 



Millsaps- Wilson Library 



134 



Judy Frascogiia, B.S. (1993) 
Acquisitions Assistant 

William (Rocky) H. Madden. B.A., M.A. (2001) 
Cataloging Assistant 

Larry E. Madison, B.S.. M. L.I. S. (1999) 
Instructional SenHccs Librarian 

Allison P. Mays, B.A., M.L.S. (1999) 
Collection Development Librarian 

Molly Signs, B.A., M.L.I. S. (2001) 
Systems Librarian 

Debra Mcintosh, B.S., MBA. (1992) 
College Archivist 



Judy L. Ginter, B.A., M.B.A. (1999) 
Registrar 

Vicki Stuart ( 1 996) 
Assistant Registrar 

Kathie Adams ( 1 996) 
Evaluation/Transcript Analyst 

Donna Bryan (1996) 
Records Analyst 

Nicole Skinner (2000) 

Records Analyst/ VA Certifying Official 

Tracy Pearson (200 1 ) 
Records Analyst 



Office of Records 



Else School of Management 



W, Randy Boxx, B.B.A., M.B.A.. Ph.D. (1999) 
Dean 

Naomi Freeman, B.S., M.B.A. (1993) 
Assistant Dean 

Carol E. Heatherly (1992) 
Administrative Assistant to the Dean 

Patrick A. Taylor, B.B.A., M.A.A., Ph.D. (1984) 
Director of Undergraduate Prngrum 

Penelope J. Prenshaw, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (1994) 
Director of MBA Program 

Kimberly G. Burke, B.B.A. , M.S., Ph.D., C.P.A. (1995) 
Director of Accounting Programs 



135 



Office of the Vice President for Administration 

John D. Pilgrim, B. A., Ph.D. ( 1 998) 
Vice President for Administralion 

Business Office 

Louise Burney, B.B.A., M.Acc, C.P.A. (1987) 

Assistant Vice President for Business Affairs and Cnntrnller 

Gail Waldrop.B.S. (1993) 
Assistant Controller 

Dana Lang, B.S., B.A. ( 1 995) 
Accounting Manager 

Julie Daniels (1991) 
Business Office Coorduiator 

Ruth T. Wilkinson, B.L.S.. C.P.P. (1992) 

Director of Payroll and Employee Sen'ices - ' ' •' 

LesHeC.Ivers, A.S. (1994) 
Loan Officer 

Regina Itallano A. A., B.S. (1997) 
Director of Accounts Payable 

Katie Gilmore, B.B.A. (2002) 
Accounts Payable Represenlalive 

Sharon Beasley, B.S. (2000) 
Student Account Representative 

Trish Bruce, B.S. (2000) 
Student Account Representative 

Ann Clark, B.A. (2002) 

Head Cashier/ Workflow Coordinator 

Office of Undergraduate Admissions 

John Gaines, B.A., M.Ed. (1998) 
Director of Admissions 

Rebecca Egolf (2001) 
Associate Director of Admissions 

Shane White, B.A. (1998) 
Assistant Director of Admissions 

Shannon Grimsley, B.A., M.Ed. (1998) 
Assistant Director of Admissions 

JaneHogue, B.A. (1997) 
Assistant Director of Admissions 

Lindsey Blackstock, B.S. (2002) 
Admissions Counselor 



136 



Sarah Katherine McNeil, B.A., (2000) 
Admissions Counselor 

Mickey Quinlan, B.S., M.A. (2002) 
A dmissions Counselor 

Betsy Perkins (2000) 
Admissions Counselor 

Connie Trigg, A. A. (1988) 
Office Manager 

Karen Cadiere, B.A. (1998) 
Communication Flow Coordinator 

Rebecca Baugh (1998) 
College Receptionist 

Angela Armstrong A. A. ( 1 999) 
Data Entry Coordinator 

Lyn Fulton-John, B.A.C., M.S. (1998) 
Director. Center for International Initiatives 

OfHce of Graduate Admissions 

Anne McDonald, B.A., M.B.A. (2000) 
Director of Graduate Admissions 

LauraNeil, B.A. (1998) 
Office Manager 



Office of Student Aid Financial Planning 



Ann Hendrick, B.A., M.S. (1988) 
Director of Financial Aid 



Patrick James, B.B.A., B.P.A. (1999) 
Associate Director of Financial Aid 

Wendy Hutchins, B.B.A. (2000) 
Financial Aid Counselor 

CheriGober(1981) 
Office Manager 



RonJurney, B.A. (1993) 

Director of Athletics 



Department of Athletics 



John Stroud, B.S., M.Ed. (1990) 

Head Coach, Men's Basketball Assistant Director of Athletics 

Jim Page, B.S.( 1986) 
Head Coach. Baseball 

BobTyler.B.S, M.Ed. (1999) 
Head Coach. Football 



137 



Robin Jeffries (2000) 

Head Coach, Women's Daskelhall/Seniur Women's Administrator 

Tim Wise, B.A.( 1998) 

Head Coach. Men's and Women's Golf/Assistant Men's Baskelball 

Peter Cosmiano, B.S., B.A. (1998) 
Head Coach. Volleyball 

Joe Kinsella, B.A. (2000) • ; 

Head Coach. Softball/Assistant Football Coach 

Greg Tripp (2000) 

Head Coach. Men's and Women's Tennis 

Paul Van Hooydonic, B.S., M.Ed. (2001) 
Head Coach. Men's Soccer 

Diane Rulewicz, B.S. (2000) 
Head Coach. Women's Soccer 

Murray Burch, B.S., M.A. (1993) 
Trainer 

Jason Page, B.S. (2000) 
Assistant Coach, Baseball 

Shea Taylor, B.S., M.Ed. (2000) 
Assistant Coach. Football 

Ronnie Gray, B.S. (2000) 
As.9istant Coach. Football 

Bill Evans (2000) 

Assistant Coach, Women's Basketball 

J. B. Coincon, B.A. (1997) 
M-Cluh Director 



138 



Physical Plant 



Richard W. Cell, B.S., M.S., P.E. (1988) 
Director of Physical Plant 

Sandra K.. Mobley (2000) 

Administrative Assistant, Work Control Coordinator 

David Wilkinson (1980) 
Maintenance Supervisor 

Johnnie Luckett, Jr. (1982) 
Housekeeping Supervisor 

DannyNeely, A.S. (1986) 
Grounds Super\'isor 



KarenDreiling, B.S. (1998) 
Bookstore Manager 

Carol Stewart (1998) 
Assistant Bookstore Manager 



Jackie Bean (1998) 
Post Office Supennsor 

Ruth Stewart (1996) 
Assistant Supervisor 

Jackie Bracy (1999) 
Postal Clerk 



Olivia White-Lowe (1983) 
Director of Food Sen'ices 

Steve King (1988) 

Associate Director of Food Services 

David Woodward (1990) 
Chef Manager 

Hope Edwards (1986) 
Administrative Assistant 



Bookstore 



Post Office 



Food Service 



Office of the Vice President 
for Institutional Advancement 



Charles Lewis B.M.. M.M., Ph.D. (2000) 
Vice President for Institutional Advancement 

Ann B. Harkins B.B.A. (1998) 

Adm. Assistant to the Vice President for Institutional Advancement 



139 



Alumni Relations 



Anna Walker B.S.Ed.. M.Ed. (2002) 
Director of Alumni Relations 

Luran L. Buchanan, B.A. (1993) 
Special Events Coordinator 

Tanya A. Newkirk, B.A.. M.A. (2000) 
Associate Director of Alumni Relations 

Margarita U.Schmid (1999) 
Coordinator of Alumni Relations 



Annual Giving 



Martha H. Boshers, B.A., J.D. ( 1 997) 

Assistant Vice President of Advancement for Development 

John A. Conway 111, B.A. (1997) 
Associate Director of Annual Giving 



Elizabeth H. Cooper, B.A. (1997) 
Administrative Assistant 



Kay B. Barksdale, B.A. (1986) 
Director of Church Relations 



Jon Parrish Peede. B.S., MA. (1997) 
Director of Communications 

Shelly D. Bass, B.S. (2000) 
Web Manager 

NicoleBradshaw, B.A. (1999) ' 
Associate Director of Public Relations 

Lewis Lowe, B.A. (2002) 
Associate Director of Publications 



Theresa G. Surber, B.S. (1994) 

Manager of Development Information Systems 

Cliequetta J. Magee (1993) 
Gift Administrator 



Church Relations 



Communications 



Donor Relations 



Major and Planned Gifts 



Laurence B. Wells B.A. (1992) 
Research Coordinator 

AlexP. Woods, B.S. (1986) 
Administrative Assistant 



140 



Office of Student Affairs 



Todd Rose, B.B.A.. M.B.A. (2000) 
Vice President and Dean of Students 

Don Fortenberry, B.A., M.Div.. D.Miii. (1973) 
Chaplain 

Janis C. Booth, B.A., M.S., Ed.D. (1986) 
Director of College Counseling 

Cynthia Strine, B.S., M.S.E. (1998) 
Associate Dean for Student Development 

Sherry! Elizabeth Wilburn, B.L.S. (1992) 
Director of Multicultural Affairs 

Jennifer Casey, B.A., M.A. (2000) 
Director of Residence Life 

WayneH. Miller, B.S.( 1980) 
Director of Campus Safety 

Donald Sullivan (19X1) 
Lieutenant, Campus Safety 

J.W. Hoatland(1994) 
Lieutenant. Campus Safet)> 

Martha Lee (1985) 

Event Scheduling Coordinator 

StanMagee, B.A. (1994) 
Projects Coordinator 

Patsy Brumfield, B.A. (2000) 
Publications Advisor 

Sharon Giumb, B.A., M.A (1992) 
Catholic Campus Ministries 

Betty Hulsey,A.A.( 1999) 
Administrative Assistant 

Sandy Rhymes (1995) 
Administrative Assistant 

Margaret "Gretchen" Blackston, R N. (2002) 
Coordinator for Health Services 



I 



141