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Full text of "Millsaps Collegian, 1901"

Millsaps - Wilson Library 



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122148 



DATE DUE 



ARCH LB 3311 M583 M'56x v". 3 
Millsaps College* 

The Hillsaps collegian 




ARCH LD 3311 M583 M56x v*3 

li i 1 1 saps Co 1 1 estfe * 

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Millsaps-Wilson Library 

Millsaps College 

Jackson, Mississippi 39210 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/millsapscollegia03mill 



THE MILLSAPS 

COLLEGIAN 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



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JUNE 

1900 






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Published by the Students of Millsaps College 




We shall again soon miss the bright 
faces of the Millsaps College boys ; 
but before you leave us for your va- 
cation, we wish to extend to you our 
heart felt thanks for your liberal 
patronageduring the present session ; 
though, while you are away enjoying 
your summer recreation, should you 
need a box of Iyowney's or Allegret' 
tis' candies, do not hesitate to send 
us your mail orders, for they shall 
receive our personal attention. 
Wishing you a most pleasant vaca^ 
tion, we remain, 



xxxx 



2J3 South State St. j» J> 



SHURLDS 



■I 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 



VOLUME 3 IUNE, 1900 NUMBER 2 



E. 


H. 


Galloway 


R 


B. 


RlCKETTS 


S. 


L. 


BURWELL 


vT. 


R. 


BEN NET 


T. 


W 


liOLLOJIAN 


C. 


N. 


GuiCE 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

Editor-in-Chief 
(B. S.'qS) Alumni Editor 
- - - Literary Editor 
- Y. M C A.. Editor 

- Exchange Editor 
Ivocal Editor 
R. T. LiDDELL, Business Manager 
H. G. Fridge and L. F. magruder ; Assistants. 



All remittances should be sent to R. T. Liddell, Business Manager 
also all orders for subscriptions, extra copies, or any other business 
communication. All mater designed for publication should be ad- 
dressed to E. H. Galloway, Editor-in- Chief. 



Issued the Fifth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription per annum, $i Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

In this issue of the Collegian, which is the last, allow 
us to urge the students to give more aid to the next edi- 
tors of the Magazine than this year. The publication is 
for the students and the matter which it contains should 
be contributed largely by them. Next session let the 
students help the editors out. 

Millsaps scored a great victory when we carried off 
the State Oratorical medal at Vicksburg on the eleventh 
of last month. Mr. J. B. Mitchell, the winner of the hand- 
some medal, received one of the highest grades on his 
manuscript $f any speaker that has ever entered the con- 
test. He has always taken a high stand in his classes, and 
has been an active member of his literary society. He is 
a loyal member of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Millsaps 
should be justly proud of this honor. 



122148 

3N LIBRARY 

WiU-SAPS COI I FCC »„ 



2 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

With the founder of our College, Maj. R. W. Millsaps, 
strongly in favor of inter-collegiate games there is no 
reason to doubt that the Board of Trustees will grant the 
students the privilege of enjoying these sports next ses- 
sion. The majority of the trustees are in favor of grant- 
ing this privilege and we are in hopes that they will take 
some decided action in the matter. 

* ^ 
The department of Mathematics of Millsaps College 
gratefully acknowledges a gift of seventeen dollars from 
Dr. A. M. Muckenfuss. This, and like gifts of his to the 
other science departments, amounting, during this ses- 
sion to $100 and perhaps more, indicate how great is the 
desire on his part to see these departments well equipped 
and thoroughly efficient. Such generosity and enthusi- 
asm encourage us to hope for a bright future in our 
science work. 



CLIPPINGS. 

They met by chance. 
No word was spoken when they met, 

By either sad — or gay — 
And yet one badly smitten was; 
Thus they remarked next day. 

They met by chance this autumn ere 
With neither glance or bow. 

They often come together so — 
A freight train and a cow. 



A little kiss, 

A little Miss, 

A little bliss, 

A wedding — that's splendid. 

A little jaw, 

A little law, 

Back home to Ma, 

And lo! the trouble's ended. — Ex. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 




T.E.Marshall spent a few days last week in Madison. 

Final examinations have come and gone. What did 
you make on chemistry? 

A. W. Fridge has been visiting- his brother, H. G. 
Fridge. 

Mr. F. M. Bailey will represent the Law Class in the 
contest for the Ligon medal. 

Miss Katie Gray is visiting- the Misses Cavett. Miss 
Gray is here for commencement. 

All of the Seniors passed. So far in the history of 
Millsaps College no Senior has ever failed to graduate. 

Messrs. Chambers and Hollomanhave been attending 
the commencement exercises of Whitworth College. 

Our commencement this year promises to be one of 
the most interesting commencements in the history of the 
College. 

The Law Class is at Raymond standing the State ex- 
amination for license. We are sure that each one of stu- 
dents will do himself, and the Law school, credit. 

Married: Box-Butts, at the home of the bride's par- 
ents, in Vicksburg, Miss., Rev. H. P. Lewis, Jr., '00, offi- 
ciating. 

On the night of June the eleventh the Kappa Alpha 
and Kappa Sigma Fraternities will have their annual re- 
ceptions. 

Mr T. W. Holloman, a prominent member of the 
Senior class, has just completed a very successful year 
with the Freshman Greek class. Mr. Holloman is very 
thorough in this branch and has succeeded well in impart- 
ing his knowledge to the cranium of the Freshman. By 
some mistake his name was left out of the catalogue, as 
one of the assisstants to the faculty. 



A 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

Belhaven commencement was a "howling - " success. 
The debate by the members of the Senior class was 
specially fine. Belhaven is one of our best Southern female 
colleges. 

On the evening- of June the fifth, Mr. E. H. Galloway 
entertained the members of the Senior Class to a very 
elegant dining. The courses were elegant and delicious. 
The following toasts were responded to: Our Class, W. W. 
Holmes; Our Future, T. M. Lemly; Our Ladies, C. N. 
Guice. Our Host was responded to by W. W. Holmes. 
The occasion was a most delightful one, and will always be 
remembered by the Class of 1900. 

Quite a number of the Belhaven girls are visiting 
friends in town. They will stay over for Millsaps com- 
mencement. 

E. H. Galloway and T. W. Holloman will have the 
pleasure of accompanying the State Press Association on 
their trip throug-h the west and east. 

Prof. E. L. Bailey has been elected superintendent of 
the Jackson public schools. Millsaps regrets to lose such 
an accomplished teacher. The Collegian extends con- 
gratulations and best wishes. 

Prof. J. P. Hanner has resigned his position. He 
will probably go to Germany to perfect himself in the 
Modern Languages. Millsaps hates to lose such a man. 
He goes from us with the best wishes of every student for 
seccess. 



Down by the edge of the cold, pink sea 

The grasshoppers sharpen their tusks all day, 

While the oysters chirrup from tree to tree, 
And the elephants swim and play. 

The lizzard-birds flap their glistening wings 
With the boa-constrictor's long-tailed cubs, 

And the fleet rhinocerous yaps and sings 
On the leaves of the bum-bum shrubs. 

O, take me away to the mucilage lands, 
Where the pink-whiskered sea serpent winks and 
moans 

And tha dolphins giggle and rub their hands, 
And chew on rhomboid stones. — Ex. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 




This issue ends the labors of the present staff, and, 
in closing - , the exchange editor wishes to say a few words. 
The Collegian, this session has been forced to pass through 
many vicissitudes. The long delay caused by yellow fever 
and the small student body have been serious drawbacks. 
The editor, in reading the various exchanges has been 
painfully impressed far too often of the deficiency of the 
Collegian. Her departments have been fairly good, but 
otherwise she always suffers by comparison. Under these 
circumstances the exchange editor is necessarily placed 
in an embarrassing position. We have appreciated the 
criticisms and trust that the Collegian has profited, and 
will profit in the future by them. We only ask that the 
unfavorable conditions which have this session, and for 
the one before, existed, will be considered by our many 
friends, both local, and those of college circles, in their 
final estimate of the Collegian. And the boys in the col- 
lege must remember that a perfect magazine cannot be 
expected when the editors have so little aid from the stu- 
dent body. We trust the conditions shall be differ- 
ent next seseion and believe that the Collegian will soon 
take a higher rank, its proper place, among College 
journals. 

In the Ei?iory Phanix for May we find a good article, 
"A Dissertation on Law," in which the author reviews 
the history of Law, its source and development, and shows 
how it has become a science and must, in the future have 
a complete triumph. The Exchange and Literary De- 
partments in this issue are especially good. There are 
two or three good poems among which one on "Morning" 
is the best. The toast on "College Friendships" deserves 
praise. An editorial on the "Marking System" completes 
the list of the best things among its contents. This is an 
interet. ing question and must be settled sooner or later in 
all colleges and universities which have not settled it 
already. His arguments are good. An experience of a 
few years will prove to any man that the Marking sys- 
tem which generally exist are injurious and tend directly 
to make an aborted man. We belieye that a complete 



6 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

change along - this line must be made for the sake of thor- 
ough education, and the sooner, the better. 

In the Ozark we find several poems of merit more or 
less. The one on "Evening" is decidedly the best and 
shows a depth of feeling quite consoling after reading a 
good deal of college poetry. On the whole, the Ozark is 
superior to the other exchanges of this month in poetic 
productions. "Bill's Tale" is readable and the Science 
Notes are of very great interest. 

The last issue of the Whitworth Clionian is easily the 
crowning issue of the session and well deserves its place. 
"We have watched with no inconsiderable interest the 
progress of the Clionian during the present session. 
Whitworth enjoys the distinction of being the only female 
college in the State where a magazine of any considerable 
merit is kept up, and the last issue is proof sufficient that 
she should be proudof the Clionian. The first story, "A 
Prophecy," is good and the review of "No. 5 John Street" 
is fine. There are several short stories scattered about 
of more or less merit, and the Exchange Department is 
good. We must say, however, that the Editorial Depart- 
ment is weak and more original poetry would be, we be- 
lieve, more representative of the spirit of the College. 

In the University of Mississippi Magazine, the article 
on "The Educotional Value on the Study of Law," by 
Prof. Somerville is worthy of careful attention. The 
poem, "What can a Woman Do?" is good and there are 
two long stories. The Editorial and Exchange Depart- 
ments are strong, but a Literary Department is wanting. 

The Buff and Blue for May is filled mostly with ora- 
tions delivered at Presentation Day exercises. Among 
these "The Spirit of Fairies," "Poetry" and "Nature in 
Virgil" are the best. We are glad to see so much space 
devoted to athletics. 

In the Hendrix College Mirror there is some good gen- 
eral reading. The comments of the Exchange editor are 
good, but his department is weak. A Literary Depart- 
ment would add much to the worth of the Mirror. 

The baseball news in the Reveille has been interesting - . 




THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 7 

We have had many other exchanges and all are wel- 
comed. We hope that next session, however, we may 
exchange with many more of our sister colleges. With 
wishes of success and prosperity to all, the present Ex- 
change editor lays by his quill. 

SENIOR CLASS ROLL. 



Stephen Luse Burwell Hbenezer 

William Thomas Clark ----- Yazoo City 
Morris Andrews Chambers - - - Brookhaven 

Ethelbert Hines Galloway Jackson 

James Ford Galloway ------ Calhoun 

Clarence Norman Gnice ------ Natchez 

Thomas Wynn Holloman Phoenix 

William Walter Holmes Kipling 

William Lee Kennon Jacksou 

Thomas Mitchell Lemly Jackson 

Henry Polk Lewis, Jr ------- Jackson 

Thomas Eubanks Marshall - - - - Carrollton 

James Boswell Mitchell Jackson 

James Asgill Teat - - Kosciusko 



History of the Senior Class. 

Stephen Luse Burwell, 

And, lo! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest. 

— Leigh Hunt. 
Morris Anthony Chambers, 

"Fool," said my muse to me, "look into thy heart 
and write." — Sidney. 

William Thomas Clarke, 

Thinking is but an idle waste of thought, 
And naught is everything and everything is naught. 

— Horace Smith. 
Ethelbert Hines Galloway, 

I find the medicine worse than the malady. 

— Flether. 
There shall be no love lost. — Jonson. 




8 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

James Ford Galloway, 

Doubt that the stars are fire, 

Doubt that the sun doth move; 
Doubt truth to be a liar, 
But never doubt I love. 

— Shakespeare. 
Clarence Norman Guice, 

He murmurs near the running brooks 
A music sweeter than their own. 

— Wordsworth. 
T. W. Holloman, 

And gladly would he learn and gladly teach. 

— Chancer. 
William Walter Holmes, 

Be she fairer than the day, 
Or the flowery meads in May, 
If she be not so to me, 
What care I how fair she be? 

—Wither. 
William Lee Kennon, 

I am no orator, as Brutus is; but, as you know me 
all, a plain blunt man, that loves my friends. 

— Shakespeare. 
Thomas Mitchell Lemly, 

Though I am young, I scorn to flit 
On the wings of borrowed wit. 

— Hobbes. 
Henry Polk Lewis, 

Write me as one who loves his fellow-man. 

— Leigh Hunt. 
Thomas Eubanks Marshall, 

Hunt half a day for a forgotten dream. 

— Wordsworth. 
James Boswell Mitchell, 

If a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see 
Fortune; for though she is blind, she rs not invis- 
ible. — Bacon. 
James Asgill Teat, 

Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law 
itself is nothing else but reason. — Coke. 



X 





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<£<4. 




J. B. MITCHELL 



No man has ever had a more 
brilliant career in Millsaps Col- 
lege than J. B. Mitchell, of Lees- 
burg-, Va. Coming- each year at 
the beginning of the second term, 
he has completed the required 
four years course in three years, 
gaining distinction in all his 
classes. 

He is the proud possessor of 
the Mississippi State Oratorical 
medal for 1900, also of the Gun- 
ning medal for scripture reading, 
and the Galloway-Lamar debators 
medal. 



Mr. T.W.Holloman, of Phoenix, 
Yazoo county, has always taken 
a high stand as a student. He 
entered Millsaps five years ago, 
and by his diligence and uniform 
courtesy has won the esteem of 
both faculty and students. 

He has been both orator and 
anniversarian of the Lamar Liter- 
ary Society, and was also one of 
the contestants for the Missis- 
sippi State Oratorical Medal. 

We predict for him a brilliant 
future. 




T. W. HOLLOMAN. 




MILLSAPS COLLEGE— THE FACULTY. 



D. H. BISHOP, M. A. 
Professor of English. 



J. A. MODRE, A. M.. Ph. D., 
Prof, of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



E. L. BAILEY, B. S., 
Ass't Master Prepratory Dept. 



A. M. MUCKENFUSS, A.M. .Ph.D., 
Irofes )r of Chemistry and Physics. 



Rev. W. B. MURRAH, D.D..LL.D . G.C.SWEARINGEN.A.M., 
President. Professor of Latin and Greek. 



R. S. RICKETTS, A. M., EDWARD MAYES, LL D., J. P. HANNER, JR., A. B.. 

Hea 1 Master— Preparatory Dept. Dean. Prof, of History and Modern Languages. 



' 




THE COLLEGIAN STAFF. 



L. F. MAGRUDER 

C. N. GUICE 

R. B. RICKETTS 



G. R. BENNETT 
R. T. LIDDELL 
H. G. FRIDGE 



S. L. BUR WELL 
T. W. HOLLOMAN 
E. H. GALLOWAY 




Millsaps College — Alpha Mu Chapter of Kappa Alpha. 



GUICE WILLIAMS 

FRIDGE EATON 

LIDDELL MILLER 

HYER TATUM 



CAMERON 


THOMPSON 


CLIFTON 


NALL 


BAILEY 


GADDIS 


BUIE 


JONES 


MANSHIP 


COOK 


m'leod 


HOLLOMAN 


ENOCHS 


TEAT 





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CLASS 1900. 

Clark E. H. Galloway Bui-well 

Mitchell, Holmes Guice Lemly 

Chambers Teat Holh m n Marshall 

J. F. Galloway Kennon Lewis 







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BOARD OF TRISTEES. 






THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 25 

History of the Junior Class. 

The class of 1901 consists of the following-: 
George Robert Bennett, 

"Villain and he be many miles apart." 
Robert Lee Cannon, 

"But first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers. " 
Robert Adolphus Clark, 

"I like not this man, he hath a lean and hungry look. ' ' 
Barney Edward Eaton, 

"This bold, bad man." 
John Sharp Ewing, 

"A proper man as one shall see in a summer's day. " 
Luther Watson Felder, 

"Ahorse! Ahorse! My kingdom for a horse." 
Angello Albert Hearst, 

"A yery valiant trencherman." 

Leon Catching Holloman, 

"He doth nothing but talk of his horse." 

Romulus Thomas Liddell, 

"I have not seen so likely an ambassador of love." 

Levin Freeland Magruder, 

"And then the lover sighing like furnace with woe- 
ful ballad writ to his ladies' eyebrows." 

Harvey Thompson Mounger, 

"I cannot see how sleeping should offend." 

James Thomas McCafferty, 

"God male him and therefore let him pass for a 
man." 

Robert Pierce Neblett, 

"Let the ladies look to their eyes for I will make 

■*hem weep." 
Edwin Burnley Ricketts, 

"Make all the money thou canst." 
Hamilton Fletcher Sivley, 

"When comes such another." 
Walter Anderson Terry, 

"Such stuff as greens are made of." 
Holland Otis White, 

"Man delights me not, no nor woman either." 



26 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

Ebbie Ouchterloney Whittington, 

"As true a lover as ever sighed upon a midnight 
pillow." 

Edwin B. Ricketts, Historian. 

Class Roll of the Boys of Nineteen-two. 

Compiled by "Sue," Your Historian. 
"Hell's Empty f the Devils Are all Here." 

Henry Lafayette Clark — "Pete" the ladies' man. 

William Larkiri Duren — The American beauty. 

Alfred Moses Ellison — The walking- journalist. 

Harry Greenwell Fridge — Somebody's darling. 

Geoige Marvin Galloway — The class May-pole. 

Leonidas Hart — "The Wandering Jew." 

John Blanch Howell — Hello! Central, Belhaven College, 

please. 
Charles Phelps Manship — For ladies only. 
Hamilton Gordon McGowan — Our laughing mascot. 
Joseph Anselm McLaurin — Munchausen's rival. 
John Hugh McLeod — Were I like him, I would be willing 

to die, even anxious. 
Robert Laron Miller — A La Quin of Pike. 
Clayton Duncan Potter — The man who brought the bear 

to town. 
Claude Mitchel Simpson — The heavy swell. 
James David Tillman — ' I never felt the kiss of love, or 

maiden's hand in mine." 
Allen Thompson — The wild and woolly man. 
James Albert Vaughn — The lean and hungry man. 
Richard Noble Whitfield— Thelastof his kind. We'reglad. 
Walter Albert Williams — Weary Willie. 

Our heads are crammed with Sophomore lore 
Swearingen, Bishop and Dr. Moore. 

All we want is an honest pass, 
Then we'll be in the Junior Class. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 27 

History of the Freshman Class. 

1. Charlton Augustus Alexander, Lamar Literary Soci- 
ety, Kappa Sigma Jackson 

2. Leonidas Birdsong Austin Oak Ridge 

3. William Jackson Baker Pocahontas 

4. Webster Millsaps Buie, Lamar Literary Society, Kap- 
pa Alpha, Class prophet Brookhaven 

5. Allen Smith Cameron, Kappa Alpha Meridian 

6. William Felder Cook, Galloway Literary Society, Kap- 
pa Alpha, Class president Hattiesburg 

7. John Isaac Covington, Galloway Literary Society, class 

essayist Coffeeville 

8. George Locke Crosby, Lamar Literary Society, Kappa 
Sigma, Y. M. C. A .'.Fayette 

9. Richmond Smoot Dobyns Jackson 

10. William Noah Duncan, Galloway Literary Society, Y. 
M. C. A Memphis, Tenn. 

11. Lucius Q. C. Lamar Easterling Brandon 

12. Don Carlos Emery, Galloway Literary Society, Jackson 

13. De Witt Carroll Enochs, Lamar Literary Society, 
Kappa Alph a, Class Poet Brandon 

14. Hugh Roscoe Enochs, Kappa Sigma Natchez 

15. Francis Marion Featherstone Jackson 

16. Lewis Rundell Featherstone, Lamar Literary So- 
ciety Jackson 

17. John Loyd Gaddis, Jr., Kappa Alpha Bolton 

18. Felix William Grant, Lamar Litei ary Society, Oak Ridge 

19. Eric Bowen Hyer, Kappa Alpha, Class Treas- 
urer Jackson 

20. Joel Franklin Johnson, Jr Jackson 

21. Eugene Ellis Johnston, Lamar Literary Society, Kappa 
Sigma Columbus 

22. Robert Ferrel Jones, Lamar Literary Society, Kappa 
Alpha, class secretary Cold water 

23. James Marion Lewis, Galloway Literary Society, Y. 
M. C. A Jackson 

24. Osmond Summer Lewis, Galloway Literary Soci- 
ety Jackson 

25 Estelle McFadin, Lamar Literary Society,... McComb 

26. James Ernest McNeill, Galloway Literary Society, 
Class Vice-President Binnsville 

27. Frederick Davis Mellen, Galloway Literary Society, 
Y. M. C. A Forest 

28. William McDonald Merritt Jackson 






2 8 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

29. Frank Lee Pollard Chester 

30. Emmet Savage Ray, Lamar Literary Society. ...Canton 

31. Charles Robert Ridgeway, Lamar Literary So- 
ciety Jackson 

32. West Oneal Tatum, Lamar Literary Society, Kappa 
Alpha, Class Historian Hattiesburg 

33. James Jackson Weaver, Galloway Literary Society, 

Chester 

34. William Lewis Wood, Lamar Literary Society, Y. M. 
C. A., Class Orator Brookhaven 

W. O. T., Historian. 

What Is a Kiss. 

A student of humanity has collected definitions of a 
kiss, from persons more or less competent to speak on this 
important subject. Here are some of the definitions: 

To a bashful man, the acme of agony. 

Woman's passport to her husband's purse. 

The poorest mother's richest gift. 

The safety-valve to exuberant feeling. 

Nature's volaput. 

The drop that causes the cup of love to overflow. 

Cupid's sealing wax. 

The sounding system used by the operator in sending 
a telegram to the heart. 

A woman's most effective argument. 

The soul's plenipotentiary. — Ex. 

Do you hear the ocean moaning, 

Ever moaning sad and low? 
'Tis because that fat old bather 

Stepped upon its undertoe. 

The dairy maid pensively milked the goat, and pout- 
ingly paused to mutter, "I wish, you brute, you'd turn to 
milk," — and the animal turned to butter. 

Irate Dutchman (to stranger who has stepped on his 
foot) — Mein frent, I know my feet was made to be walked 
on, but dot privilege pelongs to me. — Ex. 




Razors that will Shave, 
Pocket Knives that will Cut, 
Fountain Pens that will Write, 

.All ett, LrO^w-eeat F^aricsefe, 

GO TO 
THE WEST JACKSON BOOK STORE, 

344 West Capitol Street 
WE EDUCATE THE MASSES 

ON QUESTIONS OF 

and Kindred Lines 

ISADORE STRAUS & SON 

207^209 STATE ST, 



STUDENT'S HOME. 5 

Situated on the Campus. y$ Board $12 Per Month. % 



J. J. MOORE, g^S,%\%*t. 

CORNER BOOK STORE, 

I call attention of readers of this magazine, that I 
offer you at fair prices; school and college books, 
fancy Stationary, Etc. I have just received 
a full assortment of sporting goods, base balls 
and bats, tennis rackets and balls, and many 
other things too numerous to mention, Come 
and see. 






N. L. W//VGO, 

SPtC.AL PRICES TO ffcC ADTIQT ~* 

MILLSAPS BOYS. # ^ r\I\ 1 lOl, m\ 

wwwww w vwvwvwA 




'^WAMWYWJWUVW 



/? W MILLSAPS, President. E M PARKER, Cashier. 

CAPITAL STATE BANK, 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 
Capital $100,000. -:- Surplus $80,000. 



Does a legitimate banking business in all branches. All collections have care- 
ful attention. State, county and municipal bonds bought and sold. Correspond- 
ence solicited. Directors: R W. Millsaps, Samuel Virden, E. Watkins. Wirt 
Johnston, C. H. Alexander, E. M. Parker, Benj. Hart, I. Strauss, A. A. Green, W, C. 
Ellis, Dr. O M. Turner. 

HAVE YOUR SHOES FIXED J «n the neatest and 
AT J. A. HUBER'S AT THE BRIDG£ - 

On Capitol Street. 



Remember' 

you need any 
sbody has it fo 

HUNTER <& CO. 



When you need anything in the Drug Line 
that nobody has it for less than 



... GO TO ... 

EYRICH & CO. 

For new and second hand school books. They sell 
for cash, and consequently at very reduced prices. 



^ 



BROWN BROTHERS, 

Jackson, Miss., 

LIVERY, SALE & FEED STABLES 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring 
us up when you want a carriage or nice team. 
SPECIAL Attention to Orders from College Students 



DR. A. HILZIM'S 

DENTAL ROOMS, 

124 M South State Street. JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

Special Prices to College Students 
All the latest improvements in Dentistry 



J, P. BERRY, M. D. 




OFFICE AT ROGER'S DRUG STORE, 

OS \A/. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



OR. J. H. MAGRUDER, 

DENTIST, 
No. 108^ SOUTH STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 

GET OUR PRICES 

Before Buying Your Groceres. We carry the 
largest and best assortment to select from 
in Jackson. Respectfully, 

We use both phones. SHERMAN & HERRING. 



COUNCIL 



LUMBER, GOAL. AND 
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P 



Die Millsaps 
Collegian 



CONTENTS: 

Why the Jack of Clubs Goes 

Without a Beard - Page 1 
Gen. Grosvenor on the Negro 5 
Editorial Department - - - 7 
Millsaps College Successes - 8 
College Spirit ------ 9 

An Insult 9 

Literary Department - - - 11 
Exchange Department - - 16 
My Ladies' Handkerchief - - 18 
Alumni Department - - - 19 
Local Department - - - - 20 



NOVEMBER, 1900 












PUBLISHED BY 

Students of Millsaps College 



9- SHURLDS 





Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 




213 r— -v TJ T T Xi> T T - ^ * ^ JACKSON, 

South State St. s^JTX K^> XXL/J — ^O MISS. 



A Cordial Welcome 

«*f ^ >^* ^ w» w' <^ 

+%) ♦'V ^%f ■*%' **v ■*%> ♦v 

To our student friends always at 
our store, and the most complete 
line of stylish and up-to-date 

^ CLOTHING, HATS, SHOES AND FURNISHINGS 

At the lowest prices to be found in the city. We offer 
special inducements to the college trade, and ask 
comparison of our goods and prices before buying. 
Boys, give us a call, we will make it to your pecuniary 
interest, and dress you up in the very latest style. 

^THOMPSON BROTHERS^ 

348 West Capitol Street. 

Goods Delivered Free to Any Part of the City. 



to 

to 
to 







JACKSON, MISS. 



JDEAL LOCATION, combining all the advantages of the 
>j* city with the healthful conditions and immunities of the 
country. Convenient to electric car line. 




Literary and Law Departments Otter Special Advantages, 



FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

W. B. MURRAH, President., 




WHY THE JACK OF CLUBS GOES WITHOUT 
A BEARD. 




N route from Paris to Berlin good fortune threw 
me with a man who possessed the typical 
characteristics of a good companion. It was 
evident that he was no stranger to the points of 
interest on the continent, as his rich conversation showed. 
Our chat had touched on many and varied subjects, and as 
we finished a game of "hearts" we fell to discussing the 
origin of playing crrds. I held the opinion that cards 
came from the East and that the portraits as seen on the 
standard court cards were originally intended to represent 
personages of great notoriety, such as Alexander, Ceesar, 
and others. To establish my position I quoted from 
such authors as D'Ambly and Willshire. 

"I am unable to argue with you," my companion said. 
*'Anythingas to the history of cards must of necessity be 
mere speculation. This being the case I think I am 
entitled to a theory on the matter myself. It was quite 
recently that this very subject was forced on my attention. 
It happened in this way: While in an art exhibit in Berlin 
examining some of the most ancient specimens I came 
upon twelve portraits evidently by the same hand. The 
portraits were arranged four in a row and in three tiers. 
It was perhaps this arrangement that suggested to 
me the resemblance to the portraits on the court cards. 



2 The Mills aps Collegian 

"The more I examined the portraits the more con- 
vinced I grew that some relation exists between the 
pictures on cards and these portraits. In the first row 
were what I conceived to have been the kings, in the sec- 
ond the jacks, and the third the queens. 

"Quite snre that the faces were the same I passed to 
the details of position. Here I found an exact similarity 
between the portraits and the cards. I was now thor- 
oughly convinced that I saw before me the originals of 
those faces that are so commonly looked on in the hands 
of pleasure seekers. There was one peculiar point about 
the pictures on the court cards that I remembered. It is 
this: In all standard decks the jack of clubs is the only 
man who has no beard. I noted that this was the case 
with one of the portraits. So I have no longer any doubt 
that the cards we use were taken from these paintings. 

"Speaking of the jack of clubs' lack of beard suggests 
to mean old story connected with these portraits. It was 
told me by an old attendant in the art gallery, who 
observed my particular notice of the pictures. If you 
desire it, I will relate the story. " I assured my friend that 
I would be delighted to listen to him and he related to me 
the following: 

"As the tale goes, the twelve portraits represent the 
four sister queens who reigned jointly over a long ago 
defunct state, their consorts and four of the principal 
gentlemen of the realm. The exact situation of the state 
is not known, but it was long remembered for its thriving 
condition and the very genial dispositions of its inhabi- 
tants. Few domestic troubles occurred, but the neigh- 
boring states knew these people made bad enemies when 
disturbed. Knightly acoomplishments were encouraged 
here, and the skill and prowess of the men of this state 
with the lance and the broad sword were known through- 
out many countries. I doubt not there were many gallant 
knights who went from this country to share in the battles 
for the Savior's Tomb. 

"In this state the feature that determined the social 
rank of a man was nature's endowment of hair on his face. 
In no country was the man of beard more respected and 
looked to. The bearded men formed the nobility of the 
state and a natural division arose between the blondes and 
brunettes. The possessor of a dark beard always wore it 



The Millsaps Collegian 3 

full, while the blonde types wore the mustache alone. 
These two classes were of course jealous of one another 
and strived assiduously to gain the predominence of favor 
in the royal eyes. 

"Until now for many } T ears this country had not known 
a woman sovereign. No well founded complaint could be 
established against the sisters, but it was a departure 
from the old traditions. The impatience of the people 
was ill concealed. The ministers, observant of the dispo- 
sition of the people, often and forcibly urged the queens to 
select husbands from the nobility. The sisters were not 
loth to accept the advice, for the crowns rested heavily 
on such fair brows. But there was a difficulty which 
promised to g'ive no little trouble. Suitors from both classes 
of the nobility presented themselves and combined against 
one another to win the hearts of the queens. These 
aspirants to the royal consortship were the noblest gentle- 
men of the realm and each party had numerous supportors. 
The suitors paid their attentions to the queens with great 
diligence. Attempts to show themselves in the most 
becoming manner were in order at all times. Each party 
sought to gain the most conspicuous place in the queens' 
retinue on state occasions. At times there even arose 
contentions among the lower classes as to the relative 
merits of the suitors. 

"Affairs were coming to a desperate state and the 
poor queens were almost in despair when they appealed 
to their prime minister for a solution of the problem. 
This minister was a man of great wisdom and wide 
spread reputation. He was especially noted for the quick 
and perfect action of his fertile mind. Urged on by the 
hope of greater favor in the queen's eyes, he worked with 
•a will to formulate some plan to extricate the sisters from 
their unpleasant position. 

"After revolving many schemes in his mind the min- 
ister hit on one which he assured the sisters was 
beautifully simple and sure to be effective. This was 
what he proposed: To invite the suitors to a contest in 
the lists and choose the set who came off victorious for 
their consorts." 

"This plan proved perfectly agreeable to the queens 
and was selected. The contestants were notified and the 
day of the meeting fixed. This contest naturally caused 



4 The Mills aps Collegian 

great excitement throughout the state, and the people 
impatiently awaited the great day. The day finally came 
and the impatience of the people and anxiety of the suitors- 
was to be eased. The great arena was scarcely able to> 
contain the mass of excited humanty that had gathered. 
Citizens from remote parts of the state were present and 
there were many guests from the foreign courts. 

The hour for the contest arrived, the minister arose 

and pronounced the following terms for the victor: To. 

that knight and his companions will go the victory, the 

hands and hearts of the queens, the sovereignty over 

this nation, who first touches a hair of his opponent's head- 

"The signal was then sounded and the first two. 

knights rode at one another. They met with a jar and a 

clash but both received his adversary's lance on his body.. 

The second champions were called and there insued a. 

similar result. The third pair met and the same thing 

happened. There was only one chance left now, and if 

that should fail matters would be in a worse state than 

before. Great agitation was visible throughout the 

crowd and many faces showed their anxiety. The poor 

queens were fast losing hope. The last pair was called. 

The blonde was he who goes as jack of the clubs, the other 

I will call the "king." Both were splendid specimens of 

manhood and sat upon their charges with becoming grace. 

Their armors clanked with the restlessness of their 

mounts and reflected the rays of the down-coming sun. 

The jack bore an air of confidence and he looked a worthy 

knight with his great blonde mustache curling without 

his helmet. The start was sounded and down the lists 

they tore. Many anxions eyes watched them as they sped 

toward one another, and hearts stood still when they met. 

The "king's" lance seemed to have gone far from its. 

mark, and the "jack's" struck his opponent's shield. Here 

was indeed a disappointment, for nothing had been 

accomplised. The crowd Q jeered and the poor queens 

wept with shame. When all hope was about lost, the 

"king" slowly uplifted his lance, and dangling there on 

its end hung the "jack of club's" mustache." 

As my companion concluded the train stopped for our 
station and with many thanks on my part for my friend's 
interesting company, we parted. 

— Egdirf. 



The Millsaps Collegian 
GEN. GROSVENOR ON THE NEGRO. 



Gen. Grosvenor has offered to the southern people a 
solution of the negro problem, which is well and good. 
I3ut in discussing- the constitutional amendments in some 
of the southern States, their purpose and their injustice, 
he makes several statements which cannot be substanti- 
ated. He says that the purpose of these amendments is 
to insure the election of white men only to office, and in- 
deed this is true, at least it is true while the negro re- 
mains in his present state. He says also that the purpose 
is to prevent the negro from helping choose who of the 
white men shall hold the offices. This is only partially 
true. The southern people are waging a war against ig- 
.norence and vice, and, as the first and greatest means to 
that end, are prohibiting ignorance and vice from having a 
voice in election. Gen. Grosvenor says that the result of 
this elimination of the negro from popular suffrage will 
he his degradation to serfdom even worse than ante-bellum 
slavery, basing his claim on the argument that, whereas 
before the war the master had an interest in the negro, 
In this case he would have no interest in him and no obli- 
gation to protect or support him. Gen. Grosvenor forgets 
that a community of interests as great as that of slavery 
days exists between the white and the colored man to-day 
in the south, that of landlord with tenant, of employer 
with hireling. Nowhere else does there exist such peace- 
ful feeling between employer and employee as exists be- 
tween the white man and the negro. And the very way 
to disturb it is to allow the ignorant and beastly negro 
(and no one will deny that he is such) to go to the polling 
place w T ith his landlord, in order to cast his vote according 
to golden instruction. And if he votes for the same man 
with his employer, who, we will say, is the right man, he 
Is not the recipient of that benefit which the right of suf- 
frage claims to give — that of casting one's vote according 
~to one's belief. For the negro has no belief except that 
which is given to him accompanied with a bribe, or that 
"forced on him by the threats of an employer. These 
•amendments are not unjust, or at any rate the Mississippi 
amendment, which permits all who can read or under- 
stand when read any section of the Constitution to vote, 
provided, of course, they are of voting age. This will al- 



6 The Mill saps Collegian 

low the younger generation of negroes, in whose intelli- 
gence the north has so much confidence, to cast their 
votes, when they shall have attained to the necessary re- 
quirements. In answering the "negro domination" argu- 
ment of the southern people, Gen. Grosvenor calls atten- 
tion to ohe fact that Mississippi has no colored congress- 
men, and quotes that fact as proof that the negroes do not. 
wish to vote for one of their own color. In another part 
of his contribution he says that the constitutional amend- 
ments debar the greater part of the voting population of 
each southern state from voting. In other words he 
plainly stated that all the negro population of Mississippi 
is prevented from voting, and a moment after makes a 
statement implying that the negroes might elect their own. 
color to office if they wished. Surely for inconsistency, 
as well as other tricks that are vain, Gen. Grosvenor is 
peculiar. He closes with a verbal panorama of the bril- 
liant progress the south has made while the negro has en- 
joyed the privilege of voting. The truth is, as every 
southerner knows, that the south retrograded until she 
got rid of carpet-baggers and negro suffrage. Then he 
asks, "Cannot the south be patient while the transforma- 
tion is going on?" meaning by transformation the change 
of the negro into an intelligent being. Certainly, the 
south will not only be patient, but will help the negro on- 
ward, but before resigning herself to patience she will 
insure herself against rule or representation by ignorance 
the densest, and vice black as Egyptian darkness. 

H. O. White. 






THE 


MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 


VOLUME 3 


NOVEMBER, 1900 NUMBER 1 





Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E. Eaton, Editor'in'Chief H, O. White, Literary Editor 

T. W, Holloman, Alumni Editor W. L, Duren, Associate Editor 

J. B, Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

G, L, Crosby and D, C. Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances and business communications should be sent to 
Allen Thompson, Business Manager, flatter intended for 
publication should be sent to B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief, 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription } per annum, $/. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 



We take pleasure in again greeting- our friends, and 
trust that the pleasant relations that have heretofore ex- 
isted will continue, not only during the present session, 
but indefinitely. Possibly it might seem to be a depart- 
ure from the sphere of college magazine work to outline a 
plan of work, but without definiteness of purpose little is 
accomplished. We are of the opinion that college maga- 
zines have contracted too much their fields of operation, 
and have, consequently, neglected some important features 
of college training. One of these is, that the freedom to 
comment on current events, legislation, and the manage- 
ment of governmental affairs, is rarely ever exercised. 
We do not wish to be understood as advocating a distinc- 
tive political career for a college magazine, yet great is- 
sues are daily brought before the public that should be of 



8 The Mills aps Collegian 

great interest to every person, especially the college man, 
and nothing - would sooner awaken his interest in such 
matters than the discussion of them in his college jour- 
nal. The college men of to-day will soon be the leaders of 
the people in the different voca+ions of life; if not, then, 
they fail to perform the missions for which colleges and 
universities are designed to prepare them. The cultiva- 
tion of the mind being the distinctive work of a college, no 
student should finish his collegiate career without having 
aroused a desire to know and perform the duties of a cit- 
izen. The exercise of the privileges of citizenship de- 
mands a thorough knowledge of the responsibilities of a 
citizen, and an ideal government is that one where men 
think and act for themselves with the inevitable result 
that they no longer are worked as machines by the cun- 
ning manipulators of party organisms. Thus in addition 
to the contributions usually found in college magazines, it 
is our purpose, at times, to note those things of general 
interest and importance, with the hope that it will be the 
means of encouraging some students to prepare them- 
selves for the duties they soon must assume. 



MILLS APS COLLEGE SUCCESSES. 

The faculty and students of Millsaps College have 
cause to be proud of the achievments of their representa- 
tives in oratorical contests with other colleges of the State 
and South the past season. At the inter-collegiate con- 
test in Vicksburg Mr. J. B. Mitchell, whose speech will 
appear in the next issue of the Collegian, was the suc- 
cessful contestant. A few weeks later at Monteagle, 
Tenn., in a contest with the colleges of the southern states, 
he was again declared winner. Close upon these suc- 
cesses, Mr. T. Wynn Holloman, in a second contest be- 
tween the colleges of the state, at the Chatauqua at Crys- 
tal Springs, bore off the laurels. It is not with a feeling 
of boastfulness that we make mention of these things, but 
with a just pride for the splendid efforts of our represent- 
atives. The college, itself, comes in for a fair share of 
these honors, and, though just beginning its ninth session, 
is rapidly coming into favor and stands on no other merit 
than the efficiency of the work done. 



The Millsaps Collegian g 

COLLEGE SPIRIT. 

The frequent mentioning - of college spirit is likely to 

-produce an entirely opposite effect to that which is de- 

rsired, but it is well for the students to be reminded that 
there should be on awakening on this line. By college 
spirit we do not mean a narrow partisanship that magni- 
fies the glory of our own institution and at the same time 
minifies the merits of others, but we do mean that broad, 
liberal-minded disposition that prompts a student to enter 

•enthusiastically into whatever venture involves the repu- 
tation of the college as a whole. If our representatives 

.are to meet any other college in athletic contests, they 
should have all the aid possible from the whole student 
body. If we are to meet in oratorical contests, our repre- 
sentatives there should feel the inspiration that comes 
from a united effort. In the same way the effort to make 
the Collegian a success should be shared in by all. It is 

"well to remember that in the college world the character 
of the institution itself is largely determined by the char- 
acter of the college magazine, and that not the individuals 

;alone, who are the medium by which the magazine is got 
up, but the whole college suffers from its failure, It 
would not be said that the editors got out a good or worth- 
less journal any more than that Millsaps college got it 

•out. Then it can readily be seen that since all are held 
equally responsible for its successor failure, all should be 
equally zealous in its support. The managers of the 

■Collegian can not make it what it should be if those 
whose duty it is to support it criticise it the most harshly. 
We recognize the value of criticism and shall appreciate it, 
but we hope for a more substantial aid from the students 

<of our own college, and think that with them we can verify 
the maxim that "united we stand." 



AN INSULT 

"We noticed recently a criticism of the life and char- 
acter of General Robort E. Lee in one of the most promi- 
nent political papers of New York. Though the war has 
"been over more than a generation, and despite the fact 
"that the greatest efforts are being- made to obliterate all 



io The Millsaps CoUegia?i 

its traces from the minds of the American people, there 
still are some who delight to keep ablaze the sectional fires 
that smoulder in the bosoms of the Southerners. No bet- 
ter way to do this could be found than to cast reproach on 
the name of the greatest of the Southern generals, and 
not only the greatest of the Southern but the peer of any 
American. A man with such a nobility of character 
should be spoken of with respect even though he were an 
enemy. There are few men against whom no charge can 
be brought for having been, in some measure, unfaithful 
to a public trust, or having lived a life tarnished by some 
evil deed. Yet no such accusation can be brought against 
General Lee, whose life was one of faithfulness to duty 
and fidelity to the principles of right. Such a criticism* 
coming, as it does, from a great paper, is an insult that 
will be felt by the whole South. There can seem to be 
but one motive, and that the lowest — jealousy that 'such a. 
man should come from the South. There will be no need to 
preserve the memory of General Lee by placing him in 
the Hall of Fame. Enshrined in the hearts of the South- 
ern people it will last forever. 




The Millsaps Collegian ir 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT X 



Too often, we fear, the Literary Department has its 
full share of blame in that great fault of College Magazines, 
pedantry. And this is not strange; a department devoted 
entirely and exclusively to literature could hardly fail of 
blame in this respect. A review of a book or magazine 
article does not admit of that full, free flow of careless 
thought and lang-uage which we often allow to a thing of 
lesser importance, such as the description of a horse race 
or masquerade. We must confine our language within 
bounds, and express our thought in guarded, conservative 
language. We are not barred from lively description, 
however; the lives of the authors, living and dead, offer 
good opportunities for such, and these opportunities shall 
be made the most of. And the review and criticism of 
books shall not be dry, unreadable matter, so far as it is 
in our power to prevent it, but shall be at once entertain- 
ing and instructive. We shall not attempt the disdainful 
manner of Johnson nor the cutting style of Macaulay. 
The crtticism of youth may often be just as true as that of 
maturity; for if the college student has not the wide read- 
ing, ripe learning and varied experience of Macaulay, 
neither has he the cynic disposition which willfully mis- 
represents his fellow men, nor the unreasonable love of 
flne style which sacrifices truth to the sonorousness of 
balanced sentences. Our criticisms, when any are made, 
shall be put forth with a degree of diffidence proportioned 
to the sense of unfitness. Our duty to Southern writers, 
a duty common to all lovers of good literature, shall be 
faithfully kept in mind, and their names will appear fre- 
quently. The standard works of fiction, poetry and 
science shall receive the attention which their importance 
demands. Finally, we shall make this department just 
as attractive and just as helpful as we can. 



If the crudest criticism, often rspeated, can trouble a 
man, Alfred Austin, poet laureate of England, must be 
full of trouble. Not one single poem has he written that did 
not disgust the English people. He has been besought on 



12 The Mills aps Collegian 

every hand, if he will not resign, to at least cease writing". 
But his conduct would seem to show that the poet is either 
insensible to hostile criticisms or wofully stubborn. 
After every onslaught he rises, shakes himself as he was 
wont to do, and writes another poem. Sometimes he 
writes about the queen; sometimes he looks forward to 
the time "when Fame unrolls her scroll"- — that eternal 
scroll. In the first place when Tennyson died the English 
people hoped to see the choice fall on Swinburne, as the 
mantle of poesy had already done After a few months they 
were astounded by the appoitmentof Alfred Austin, a man 
who had written some lyrics, afew of which were passable 
It was generously supposed, however, that some great gift 
lay in him, hidden to ordinary eyes and evident only to the 
prime mini ster. So they waited. As he hymned of imperialism 
he sang of British arms and heroes, but Kipling excelled 
him. He turned his attention to classical poetry, but 
Swinburne overshadowed him. So the only thing left him 
to do was to make the queen ridiculous by singing odes to 
her, and to insult the other nations of Europe by his dis- 
gusting braggadocio manner. Writing with the Fashoda 
incident serving as inspiration he represents the Conti- 
nental powers as planning to strike England while, as they 
thought she slumbered. But, according to Mr. Austin, 
she arose, shook her mane, lashed her tail, and roared, 
"Where are my foes?" when straightway some slunk 
away, some cringed at her feet. Y^hen the Boer war 
began, Austin thought his opportunity had come, so he 
compared England, rich and powerful, strangling a few 
paltry commandos thousands of miles away, to poor and 
exhausted Rome, Hannibal and his victorious army at her 
gates. An English contributor to the August Critic 
makes fun of some lines of Austin's, especially this one: 
* 'Gleamed through the land, then over ocean wound." 
The poet laureate's jaded but stimulated imagination pre 
sented to his view an army which "over ocean wound," a 
sight surely unseen before. He tries to carry favor with 
the United States by singing of her love and respect for 
mother England, a very risky way, we should think. 
This contributor, after asking sorrowfully how long such 
shame shall endure, expresses the deep desire that Austin 
may soon, very soon, join the "Choir Inaudible." Surely 



The Mill saps Collegian ij 

Austin's ranting- verse must be galling - to the pride of a 
nation that can boast the swelling, sounding flow of Milton 
and the liquid lines of Tennyson. 



James Lane Allen has entered a new realm, and if the 
interest he has excited may be understood as sign of vic- 
tory, he has made a triumphant entry. In all his novels 
there enters a thoughtful, enquiring spirit, and in his 
latest novel he only g'oes a step further and writes about 
religion. In that delightful, because simple, love story, 
"A Kentucky Cardinal" is pictured the remorse conse- 
quent upon an inhuman deed. Georgiana, the heroine, is 
the embodiment of gentleness. To be sure, it is not easy 
for one acquainted with nowaday girls to understand and 
appreciate her motives sometimes. For iustance, she 
required that Adam should love the gentle biids too well to 
kill one even for her sake. Experience would warrant one 
in saying that much the greater number of girls would 
require the sacrifice of more than a little bird for their 
sake. We must accept Georgiana, however, as we accept 
other fictitious heroines — without a counterpart on earth, 
and very few equals in heaven. The whole story is 
sweetly told — Adam's quiet life disturbed by the location 
of a family just across the way, his unreasonable anger at 
the birds, the quarrel and the happy ending - . In the 
"Choir Invisible" he makes a perceptible advance. His 
characters have not that light, airy, fairy semblance which 
distinguishes those in "A Kentucky Cardinal." In the 
former book love is present, indeed, but there is a barrier 
which can't be gotten over nor gotten rid of. Love's only 
reward is love, but love faithful unto death. The woman, 
wedded to another man, would have died before she would 
reveal her love, but it was too soon discovered. Then sep- 
aration came. In his latest book, "The Reign of Law," it 
is said that he carries his hero from steadfast belief to- 
stubborn unbelief, although the heroine is a simple Chris- 
tian the whole thing - through. In such a case the book 
will, in many places, be criticised unfavorably. Whatever 
the motive and moral of the book be, and whatever success 
may attend it, we could wish that this charming writer 
had been willing still to tell us of the birds and flowers 
p nd streams of his native state. 



14- The Millsaps Collegian 

It must be admitted that we were never an admirer of 
George Elliot until recently. During- those sultry days of 
summer when one's mind cannot be engaged in external 
activity, and is therefore capable of studying more closely 
the mental and moral slates, we began the reading of 
"Romola." As the story advanced our interest increased. 
The gay and brilliant Tito held our attention, while the 
pensive, sweet, but strong minded Romola commanded 
our admiration. We grew absorbed as the steps of Tito's 
decline were traced by a master hand. Landing at Flor- 
ence, destitute and a stranger, he soon came to know 
Romola. At first the thought of his father left in slavery 
haunted him, but he soothed his troubled conscience by 
promising - himself that he would rescue him soon, and 
after awhile began to excuse himself for non-performance 
of duty by the probability of his father's death. He 
quickly won the love of Romola, and not long afterwards 
she became his wife. After this he could not afford to be 
tormented by the cries of a guilty conscience; his course 
lay plain before him. He had acquired influence and pop- 
ularity by his gifts and his graces. By a slow process his 
heart became hardened to tender thoughts of the father 
who was kind to him in his childhood and of a woman who 
loved him in his young manhood. To increase his polit- 
ical influence, he became the trusted friend of each of sev- 
eral parties in Florence and was a traitor to all. Romola's 
remonstrances were not heeded. His father suddenly 
appears, in ragged apparel, in the streets of the city and 
keeps watch on Tito, who steadily refuses to ruin his 
prospect's of fame by recognizing the old man whom he 
has so shamefully neglected. At last his ungratefulness 
and treachery uncloaked, his influence gone, deserted by 
Romela, dragged through the streets, he dies, dies with 
the fierce eyes of his avening father gloating over him. 
Tito's faults were very few and very innocent at first, con- 
sisting only of a too great desire for personal comfort and 
safety, and a supreme love of popularity, but these 
increased so greatly that they drove out all sense of honor. 
By disregarding the voice of duty, he ruined his own char- 
acter forever, and destroyed the happiness of beautiful 
and virtuous Romola for life. The story is splendidly 
told, and the moral is deeply impressed, namely to obey 



The Mills aps Collegian 15 

the slightest impulse of conscience without delay. The 
awful fate of Tito shows what will happen if we disregard 
it. We are forcibly reminded of those lines of Burns: 

"Its slightest touches, instant pause, 
Debar all side pretences; 
And resolutely keep its laws, 
Uncaring consequences." 

We have always had a decided preference for love 
stories. Very few novels, indeed, have met our approval 
that did not introduce that element. But in the course of 
our reading we do not remember to have read a love story 
which gave more genuine pleasure than "When Knight- 
hood Was in Flower." It seems that we have seen it 
described somewhere as silly trash, but we cannot, on 
that account, cease to appreciate it. There is doubtless a 
class of beings (not human surely) which either cannot or 
will not recognize beauty in such a book, persons who feel 
no throb of pulse, no thrill of the heart as they read of the 
desperate daring of a loving princess; we would be 
untruthful, however, were we to class ourselves in that 
way. We do steadfastly believe that such ungovernable 
love, such unreasoning devotion as are pictured in this 
book are not confined between book covers, else why do 
we love to read and linger over such scenes? In the book 
mentioned we find love inhabiting a beautiful temple and 
receiving the most acceptable sacrifices. The charm of 
the book lies partly in the intensity of the emotion arising 
from its continued repression: partly in the way the story 
is told, and partly for us, in the fact that the heroine is a 
princess, while the hero is nothing but a captain. And it 
ends happily. There is enough of trouble in this world 
for writers to cease adding: to it by wretched endings. 



l6 The Millsaps Collegian 



EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT X XX 



In assuming - the duties of Associate Editor of the 
Mii/isaps Collegian we extend to the public and to our" 
co-laborers of the staff a hearty greeting - . 

In this undertaking we fully realize the task to which. 
unskilled hands have been called, but we will endeavor to 
make up the lack in skill by earnest effort. 

Among other things the Exchange Department falls. 
to the Associate Editor. Thus to the disadvantages con- 
sequent upon working in an untried field is added the bur- 
den of writing criticism of the ideas and productions of: 
others. The limitations imposed by the very nature of 
the department impresses us with the fact that the ex- 
change editor is a purely negative factor. He may not 
impress himself upon the college world by a positive ex- 
pression of his own ideals, though they be ever so pure 
and ever so noble, and he may not express a thought upon, 
a subject of his own choosing, however much that thought 
might burn for utterance and whatever might be its value 
to the world, until another has opened the way. 

We are not unconscious of the magnitude of the task: 
that lies before us, if we are to form it conscientiously 
and honestly, and we realize, too, that in this department 
we are carried not only beyond the possibility of taking: 
refuge in those retreats into which timid and shrinking: 
dispositions are wont to hide themselves, but we are 
pitted against the best intellects of Southern college life» 
Notwithstanding all this we shall endeavor to make our~ 
criticisms, whether favorable or unfavorable, the expres- 
sion of candor, manly sincerity and honest judgement*, 
founded upon honest investigation. 

While we know our burden and our responsibility we 
have not become so absorbed in the one thought as to for- 
get that there is a real and a positive side. We fully ap- 
preciate the fact that in this department we come closest 
to those characters whose ideas and ideals, when robbed 
of the silt and unreality of youth and when crystalized 
shall find expression in the statutes of state and nation,, 
and in the choicest productions of our national literature* 



The Millsaps Collegian 17 

and shall influence every art and every science. Hence 
we deem it a privilege to stand upon such an eminence and 
view the century's promise, and perhaps, by some friendly 
criticism, even change the course of future events. 

Each year of a college man's life brings new exper- 
iences, opens new fields of usefulness and thus paves the 
way for the real service of life. We find ourselves upon 
the threshold of college journalism. Looking back over 
the past we find no paralell for this veuture, but instead a 
life made up of experiences quite different from those 
likely to be had as the result of this departure. So what- 
ever mistakes we may make in the performance of what 
we conceive to be "our plain duty, " we hope that a com- 
mon experience will enable our friends to place the blame 
where it justly belongs. 

Among the first to gladden our heart was the Emory 
and Henry Era. As to mechanical execution it is among 
the neatest that comes to our desk. The matter, too, is 
interesting, and reflects credit upon the students of 
Emory and Henry. The article entitled ''The Negro" is 
especially good. The author seems to grasp the true 
situation — the situation with all the environments of cir- 
cumstances — and he treats it in a practical and common- 
sense way. We have seen nothing sweeter than "A 
Southern Idyl, " contained in this same issue. 



We take great pleasure in acknowledging the receipt 
of the Tennessee University Magazine. It is full of mat- 
ter from cover to cover, and the subjects treated cover a 
broad field and the greater part of them show careful 
preparation. The editor-in-clief seems to be independent 
in the matter of securing verse, as the indications are that 
he takes his trouble to the muses. Let us cultivate our 
gifts in this respect more, that we may develop the highest 
degree of perfection possible. 

We have received the University of Mississippi Maga- 
zine, and no magazine holds a higher place in our esteem 
than this. The first issue is a jewel. The "Women of 
Shakespeare" is an excellent production. But that which 
pleases us most is the tone of its editorials. They are in 



18 The Millsaps Collegian 

some respects a departure from the beaten path. College 
editorials, in many cases, instead of being 1 expressions of 
thought are rather apologies for the absence of thought, 
and they have but one property of matter, viz: that of oc- 
cupying space, but this cannot be said of the editorials of 
our University brother. 

We are glad to welcome "Mississippi College Maga- 
zine. " Our nearness to each other and our common ties 
insure it not only the welcome but the good wishes of the 
Collegian. 

At the last hour we receive "The Emory Phoenix." 
We have not had time to examine it carefully, but from the 
partial examination we think the matter first-class. For 
this time we merely bid it welcome. 



We have received, as yet, but few exchanges, hence 
the space occupied by our comments will necessarily be 
very limited. 



MY LOVE'S HANDKERCHIEF. 



I stole my love's handkerchief 
And thus 'came a thief, 
I steal sweet mem'ries of her 
From it forever. 

It's perfume subtle and rare, 

As it lingers there, 

Sweetens each thought and each sigh 

Into rapture nigh. 

I'll keep it, love's little ward, 
For its past record 
Of love's dear sweet happenings, 
And the thoughts it brings. 

So if there's ever a wound 

I'll wrap it around, 

And ease the pain of my heart, 

Endurance impart. Egdirf. 



The Millsaps Collegian zp 




Of the class of 1900 there are six who are this year 
doing- post-graduate and professional work: Messrs. W. 
W. Holmes and C. N. Guice are studying theology at Van- 
derbilt, and Mr. E. H. Galloway is in the medical depart- 
ment of the same school. Mr. W. L. Kennon is working- 
for a master's degree at Millsaps and has a fellowship; 
Messrs. T. M. Lemly and T. W. Holloman are studying- 
law at Millsaps. Of the other eight, two are in the active 
ministry, Mr. J. B. Mitchell in the Indian Territory, and 
Mr. H. P. Lewis, Jr., on the South Vicksburg work. Mr. 
J. A. Teat is the junior member of the law firm of Teat & 
Teat, of Kosciusco. The senior member of this firm is 
Mr. G. L. Teat, of the class of 1898. Mr. Burwell took a 
course at Poughkeepsie, finishing a short while ago, and 
is now in business with his father at Ebenezer. Mr. W. 
T. Clark is book-keeper for Dan James, at Yazoo City. All 
acquainted with the genial and lenient nature of his em- 
ployer envy Clark his position. The other three are ped- 
agogues: Mr. M. A. Chambers is principal of the Blounts- 
ville high school, Mr. J. F. Galloway of the Montrose high 
school, and Mr. T. E. Marshall of the Carrolton high 
school. 



The Alumni Editor wishes in one issue to tell of all 
the Millsaps men who are lawyers, and in another of all 
who are doctors, etc. 

Mr. R. L. Miller, 1902, is principal of the Monticello 
high school. However he found time to visit the college a 
few days ago. 

Mr. Freeland Mag-ruder, 1901, is studying medicine 
at his home in New Orleans. 

TheAlumni Editor is forced to make his department 
rather short this time on account of space. 



20 The Millsaps Collegian 









X, LOCAL 


DEPARTMENT 




X, 


; 





"Don't view me with a critic's eye, 
But pass my imperfections by." 

With greetings we welcome both old and new students. 

The campus now presents a lively appearance with 
its two hundred Platos and its four graces. 

Gaily, the Troubadour touches his light guitar and 
harps the sweet strains, "O! for another Stephen." 

Mr. Lamar Hennington, a prosperous lawyer of Col- 
umbia, has been among our visitors. 

Student — "Professor, is brass plentiful?" 
Professor-^"Only a certain kind." 

On his return from Poughkeepsie, Stephen BurwelL 
'00, spent a few days with us. 

We are glad to greet Prof. Ricketts on his recovery 
from a severe illness. 

Thousand dollar reward — For a "prep" who defaced 
the college building. 

We are glad to welcome R. D. Clark back, who was 
compelled to go home on account of sickness. 

, On November 10 we will meet Tulane in New Orleans; 
on the 12th, Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. 

H. F. Sively is manager of the foot-ball team. The 
captain has not been elected. 

Dr. Dye and Prof. Hearst were welcome visitors dur- 
ing the past week. 

Prof. B. — "Why, Mr. Hart, was the tragedy called a 
goat song? 

Mr. H. — "Because one sings and the others answer.'* 

The appearance of (the campus, under Mr, Acker- 
land's care, has undergone great improvement. 



The Mill saps Collegian 2r 

The contest for freshman honors waxed hot. Why 
did each want a brick? 

It is not spring, but when Belhaven is seen a young- 
man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love. 

R. T. Liddell, the business manager of the Collegian 
during the session of '99- '00, was in the city on bus- 
iness(?). We wish you success, old fellow. 

The Black Gowned Ones are now seen in large num- 
bers, Belhaven having opened with as many students as 
could be accommodated. 

A member of the Junior Latin class wants to know 
what writer is especially gifted in love poetry. He sug- 
gests that it be used as a text instead of The Aneid. 
Poor fellow, some girl has his heart. 

The newly-elected officers of the Freshman class are 
as follows: L. C. Hinds, President; E. J. Coker, Vice 
President; H. A. Wood, Secretary; S. M. Graham, His- 
torian; E. Mohler, Poet; C. Brown, Prophet. 

We are pleased to note that Mr. G. R. Bennett, the 
president of our Y. M. C. A., who has been very ill, is 
convalescent. 

By certain machinations of the cruel seniors "Whit'* 
has lost his highly-cultured mustache. Don't grieve, my 
little fellow, they're gone, but not forever. 

The Sophomore class elected the following officers: 
D. C. Enochs, President; Miss Craine, Vice President; 
Miss Annai Hemingway, Secretary; H. F. Jones, Histor- 
ian; Noble, Poet; Gunter, Orator. 

Some of the students have been very ill of late. They 
are affected with enlargement of the heart. No wonder. 
They have subscribed for one copy of the Collegian and 
given one dollar to athletics. 

Millsaps has a new feature in the shape of a clock 
which now thinks and talks, and we are sure under the 
tutorage of Dr. Muckenf uess it will soon master chemis- 
tay and physics. 



22 The Millsaps Collegian 

The annual reception of the Y. M. C. A. was a grand 
success. An interesting - program was rendered. Delic- 
ious refreshments were served, for which we are indebted 
to Mrs. C. B. Galloway, Mrs. Murrah, Mrs. Holloman 
and Miss Cavetti. 

The officers of the Senior and Junior classes have not 
as yet been elected. 

The officers of the Chicken and Turkey club have 
been elected. Their names, as yet, are not made public. 
The president, in his inaugeral address, urged the com- 
mittee of location to have a full report as to the where- 
abouts of the best specimens for the Thanksgiving ban- 
quet. He wishes to make this anniversary the most de- 
lightful in the history of the club. Invitations to the fac- 
ulty and students who subscribe for the Collegian will 
be issued next week. 

Millsaps was victorious in every contest of oratory in 
which she participated last year. We secured the highest 
awards of the state at Vicksburg by winning the State 
Inter-collegiate medal. At the Chatauqua Mr. Holloman 
proved himself a successful speaker by taking that prize. 
Mr. Mitchell, our gifted orator, to cap the climax easily 
won the Gulf States medal, at Monteagle, thus giving to 
his state the victory, to his Alma Mater the proud position 
of first in the ranks of southern colleges. While we have 
had such signal successes, let us not sit idle and see our 
laurels lowered by any, but with renewed efforts seek to 
sustain our position. The Literary society fosters this 
spirit and gives to the college its orators and if we wish 
to maintain our standard it will be accomplised through 
this source. Therefore we heartily recommend and ad- 
monish each student to join either of the societies. 

The Literary societies are now in full force and each 
gives a very delightful and instructive program. The 
anniversary speakers and commencement debaters for 
the Lamar were elected the evening of October 25, result- 
ing in the following: H. F. Fridge, Anniversarian; G. L. 
Crosby, orator; A. Thompson and E. B. Ricketts, debat- 
ers. The Galloway chose the following able corps: W» 
L. Duren, anniversarian; H. O. White, orator; W. L. 
Felder and W. A. Williams, debaters. 



The Millsaps Collegian 23 

For the first time in the history of the college have 
the students been allowed inter-collegiate games. By 
this condescension of the trustees and faculy a great en- 
thusiasm has sprung up. Although this is the first year 
and we are supposed to be in our infancy, we hope to 
prove our ability both 011 the gridiron and the diamond, 
and that we may return from every field with victory. We 
have secured the services of Mr. Aby, one of the best 
foot-ball players and coaches in the south, and under his 
instructions hope to conquer our opponents. Witnout 
the co-operation of the students we can do nothing, and 
upon this the future prosperity of the teams rests. Every 
student should be a member of the Athletic association^ 
and after becoming a member should take all the interest 
possible in everything connected with college athletics. 
Think of it. The victories of the teams are your vic- 
tories; their defeat, yours. 

Foot-ball champion McLeod, anticipating the results 
of the Millsaps-Tulane game, very proudly declared that 
on the day following the game his likeness would appear 
conspicuously on the first page of the Times-Democrat. 
A by-stander cooly remarked, "Yes, I believe it is custom- 
ary to give the picture of the man who is killed in a game. " 
McLeod became seriously silent and thought on a future 
state. 

The following are those who have contributed to the 
Millsaps football team: 

Maxie McKee H. G. Fridge 

E. H. Galloway C. D. Potter 
Couprey Nugent T. W. Alford 

H. N. Carter Walter Robertson 

N. L. Wingo Lex Brame 

Albert Eyrich Taylor's Shoe Store 

Dr. W. N. Wright Hugh Gaston 

Leonard & Cooper Jeff Smith 

Jenkins' Laundry J. C. Holland 

John Cleary Brown Brothers 

Winston Campbell Garner Green 

F. R. Smith J. R. Stowers 
W. C. McWillie J. B. Lusk 
Chalmers Alexander Joe Martz 

J. J. Moore W. C. Wells 



24 



The Alill saps Collegian 



M. M. Chastine 
J. A. Voughn 
Dr. Magruder 
J. J. Evans 
Ed Yerger 
F. B. Heal 
George Hilzim 
Fred Nelson 
Logan Phillips 
D. B. Dubard 
Will Hemingway 
Lott & Porter 
Magee Porter 
Thomas Folkes, 
Allen Thompson 
Buck & Holder 
J. F. Robinson 
Lucius Mayes 



J. P. Matthews 

W. O. Green 

O. J. Waite 

J. B. Sterling 

Joe Power 

John Mosal 

W. W. Morrison 

S. L. Burwell 

O. C. Strauss 

J. F. Hunter & Co. 

James Jones 

W. M. Jefferson 

W. A McLeod 

Alec Montgomery 

A. J. McLaurin, Jr, 

Robert Henry 

E. B. Ricketts 

H. L. Whitffeld 



NOTICE. 



Every student at Millsaps College should feel duty- 
bound to patronize those who favor us by advertising in 
The Collegian. By so doing you prove to the advertiser 
that the money spent in advertising in our paper is not 
lost; this will help the Collegian, the College, and greatly 
oblige, Your Business Manager. 




If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham'S Drug Store, 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

Attend ^^^^^^^^Sk W - H « CATKINS, 

K*'j' ■ '•. '■",' v '' ' - : • - I '■-- . -U'^' ; '.I^r?1 A ptominent member of 

ttlG ^w$^sjjijffiffi?i ' '■/■ '.'■/- ■ ! ' "'■'•'' '" 

n i*-^- '■'"• ■■■-■..■';'■■!- 

,-'■;- i' .■■..■:.■ ■■■..... . ■-. > , , . ■ , . . 



@ t r^» i^r 1N.T t t r~^ r^> ts^t 






3 

• 
® 


Fine 


Watch and 


Jetv 


'Elry Repairing, 




O 

s 


8 
•4 


Eyrich's Book Store, 




JACKSON, 


Af/SS. 





»©@e>t5©5ss©e©ssea®®®® s 


ss= 


8®S@S©®6S8®e8@®8S969 



7HE - 

KNICKERBOCKER 

— CAF E 

FOR LUNCHES, FISH, OYSTERS AND GAME. 

The Nicest Dining Room in the City. The best line of 
Cigars. Huyler's, Rubel & Allegretti and Plow's Candy. 
Fresh Cakes and Candies always on hand at 

EVANS 6c BANKS. 

State Street. Jackson, Miss. 



Young Gentlemen 



When you need any Fancy Candies and Beautiful 
Fruits for your Sweet Girls. 

BEAR IN MIND 

that the Onliest Place to get them is from your 
friends, 

W. S. LEMLY & BRO., Who will please you. 

THOS. P. BARR, 

Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, p M1 -1 StrPPl 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. .reari street. 

OE>0. I*\ BAUER, 

StaplC Fa n ncv 6^18110$, W an°d e ^t e ail. All Kinds oi Feed Stuffs. 

'Phone No. 78. 203 West Capitol Street 

Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps , 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

E. B- JENKINS— +-^» 

Proprietor and Manager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi- 

/. D. LOTT JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

WEST JAGKSOU SHOE ST02E. 



Try a pair of our S3. 50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
Calf, Vici Kid and Enamel. They are the best shoes sold for the- 
price. Our $3 shoes are equal to any other $3.50 shoe on the markets 
We are headquarters for fine footwear. A hearty welcome and free 
shine always awaits you at 

300 West Capitol St r 



/ J^a/rt Jo*//* 7>aafe >W Jf/V/ Treat You Right, 

Call on me when you want anything - in my line. 

Your friend. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

John W. Patton J. Jay White 

Patronize Home People. 

PATTON & WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments. 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

313 CAPITOL ST. JACKSON. MISS, 

^\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\W^ 

Menrolraeiirat Tailor 

Jackson, Miss. 



: J. B. BOURGEOIS, ! 

t Jeweler and Graduate Optician • 

f Jackson, Mississippi. 



77/ tfs 0/? >W SHOES. 

Our $3.50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 
Date. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL KINDS OP SHOES. 

Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

C. CUMMINGS 6c SON. 



nB A iiftifti <ft ffh A iA 4 i <K i4A A^ A i^ l fr i A AAAAAA aa aaaaa a ^i*A^A^yy a^. 






► 



s . . Goonoia lumber, Goal anil Lime Company.' 1 , ► 

i E 

j Dealers In & 

4 

4 Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, 

4 ► 

Paints, Oils, Varn/shos, Brushes etc. 



■4 



•F=H01S3E: 178- 



► 



J. 7. LOWTHER, 

F^ruits and Candies 

Jackson, Miss. 



/V. /_. WINGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsaps Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



Jackson, Miss. 

CAPITAL $100,000. SURRLUS, $100,000. 

BROWN BROTHERS, 

JACKSON. MISS. 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring* us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for Celebrated Columbus Buggies. 



'* 



r ^iJ». 



.^-V i' :f: J: 



vsras -. '^E^St ij-ai. -^a " 



220 E. CAPITOL ST. 

I call attention of readers of this Magazine, that I offer 
you at fair prices, School and Colleg-e Books, Fancy Sta- 
tionery, Periodicals, Sporting- Goods, Picture Frames etc. 

Please make my store your loafing' place. 



:fm38gSiJgEinnJi8gE3iIH^ 



.On Questions of. 



WW 









■%ar ^a ^^^ih ^ \j 



AND KINDRED LINES. 



Isydore Strauss & Son. 



207-209 State Street. 
F<HifHaSflHifln»SiatBISfiliHBBIi8aiii»inEiBBlHiifli8IIIIHlIi 



WM. H. W ATKINS. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Harding Building jackson, nississippi. 



$To. 108>£ S. State St. Jackson, Miss 



DR. A. MLZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS 



I Special Rates to College Students. 
i All the latest improvements 
A in Dentistry. 



124^ South State St. 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AX FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



I Attorneys at Law, 




Also Fruit Stand, 
West Capitol street Jackson, Miss. 

fOr-^^ira. TT:r*^<s Hou.se. I 

I 
m Satisfaction guaranteed. $1 per day. | 

• West ^Capitol street - Jackson, Mississippi. ♦ 



The NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., is prepared to bind 
books in cloth, or make book covers for small offices at cheap 
prices. Get our prices before sending your binding away. 



To Students of Millsaps JTC 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug- 
line. 

^J. R HUNTER & CO. 



To The 




GENTS: I have just received a new 
line of Neckwear. Among 1 the lot you 
will find a neat 



lie 



with one end purple and the other white. 
They are strictly the Millsaps colors. 
I also have a line of Purple Caps, four-inch 
brims, with letters *'M. C." in pearl- 



white. 



L 



The People's Gents' Furnisher. 




WHEN YOU NEED. 



Fancy Stationery, Fruits, Fancy Candy, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, 
Cigars and Tobacco «■ 



Call On Your FViend 



I FEIBELW1AM BROS. f 

• 202-2G4- S, State St, § 

| . clothib:r^ . I 

• »©©«©.&<*®*'-©S>'»«^®*2>«>»®&«>©'B"»<8 ««€"*«« »»»<&»©»©»#«©«©#©*©©« 






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yfot/ Gents' Furnishings^ 

We have also a full stock of Shoes. 



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JOHNSON, TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

*^*-^ Groceries at Wholesale* ^r*^r 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 

Special Sale this Month of over 500 Men's Fine Fall Suits. 

$12 00 All Wool Suits at $8 00 

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Men's Cotton Fleece Lined Undersuits at 89c 

Men's Wool Fleece Lined Undersuits at 1 On 

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Men's Colored Stiff Bosom Shirts, with detachable cuffs and no 
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We can save you money on anything, 
JONES BROS. & GO. 

AGENTS FOR _ o-r* ir\ -r i * t • 

Atlantic $3.50 Men's Shoe. State & Pearl St., Jsckson, Miss. 



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Staph and Fancy Dry Goods, 



NOTIONS AND. SHOES. 



1 14 South State Street, Jackson, Mississippi. 



The Millsaps 
Collegian 



CONTENTS: 

A Son's Revenge 
Editorial Dep't 
Literary Dep't. 
Exchange Dep't 
Local Dep't - - 
Amor Autumnus 
A Kiss - - - 
On a Fly-Leaf in Sidney 
Lanier's Poems - 



Page 1 

• - 8 
. 12 

- 14 
- - 16 

• - 19 

- 19 



- 20 



DECEMBER, 1900 










i 


PUBLISHED BY 

Students of Millsaps College 



%■ SHURLDS -# 



Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 



South State St. >^ ITjL L> Jl^£ J_-^ L3 5^5 MISS. 



A Cordial Welcome 

^-> «^» »«/~ >^- w* -«^ <mf 

*/K ■#"%> 4t'K ♦V •♦'I' ■0'%f *%> 

To our student friends always at 
our store, and the most complete 
line of stylish and up-to-date 

*«#• GL0THIN6, HATS, SHOES AND FURNISHINGS 

At the lowest prices to be found in the city. We offer 
special inducements to the college trade, and ask 
comparison of our goods and prices before buying. 
Boys, give us a call, we will make it to your pecuniary 
interest, and dress you up in the very latest style. 

^THOMPSON BROTHER S^ 

348 West Capitol Street. 

Goods Delivered Free to An}?- Part of the City. 



to 
to 



ILLflMP 



J 



iMrES© 



X 
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JACKSON, MISS. 



gfjpEAL LOCATION, combining- all the advantages of the 
iff city with the healthful conditions and immunities of the 
country. Convenient to electric car line. 



'? 



! Mi 




rz 




L ''■ 



1 






Literary and Law Departments Otter Special Advantages, 



FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 



W. B. MURRAH, President. 



The Millsaps Collegian 



Vol. 3 JACKSON, MISS., NOVEMBER, 1900 No. 1 




A SON'S REVENGE. 

REAT Scott ! I thought we were the only fools 
in town, to get out in this blizzard, but look 
yonder! there's a woman; her business must 
be urgent to force her along the street in 
the face of this. Poor woman, she must be in trouble, 
It's a pity about these poor people, anyway. They are not 
clothed as well as others, and yet they have to live in this 
weather." The speaker and his companion were heavily 
muffled in furry great coats, and were almost in a run. 
The object of his notice was on the other side of the 
street, hastening along through the blinding sleet and 
snow with only a shawl, and that a little one, thrown over 
her shoulders. Every step was a struggle to her, and it was 
with the greatest difficulty that she forced herself through 
the storm. She looked thin and haggard, and shiver after 
shiver shook her frail, chilled body. The sleet and snow 
drove directly in her face with a fierceness which seemed 
born of purpose. But she fought bravely on, bending half 
forward, looking neither to the right nor to the left, but 
keeping her eyes fixed downward. House after house she 
passed, and did not stop till she stood near a pretty resi- 
dence. All looked cosy and warm inside of it, notwith- 
ing the cold without. After a time her numb fingers 
opened the gate, and it clicked with a frost} r , frozen sound. 
When she had shaken from her the clinging ice and snow, 
she was shown to a room, well lighted and warm. She 
seemed strangely out of place in that room, well furnished 
and orderly and comfortable, while she was cold and 
ragged. -On the farther side of the room near a fire, sat a 
man reading a newspaper. When the woman entered he 



2 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

looked up and stared at her in amazement, wondering who 
it could be that had braved the awful night. She slowly 
approached the fire, holding out her hands to it. Then 
she straightened up, took off her frozen bonnet and began 
in a sweet, though feeble voice: "Mr. Rose, I've come to 
see you about my boy. I'm in trouble." "Is the boy 
worse, madam?" he coldly interrupted, displeased at her 
coming. "No, sir, I did not mean that. He is not worse, 
but when he is well he will have no work to do." "I had 
rather you would not bother me about that. It is a matter 
which could not and can not be helped. Your son was 
hurt at a time when I needed all the men I could get. He 
was no sooner at home in bed than I had engaged a man to 
take his place. This man has proved to be a splendid 
workman, and I cannot give him up. My number is now 
complete, and I cannot employ more men. I am very sorry 
this has happened, but I am sure you can find a place for 
him somewhere in the city. " After a moment the woman, 
lifting her eyes from the fire to his face, said in still sweet, 
but trembling tones : " Mr. Ross, my son was hurt while 
he was working for you. He was carried home almost 
dead, and for these ten Weeks I have nursed him, and it 
will .still be several weeks before he can work. Unless he 
gets work soon we shall starve." 

"I am truly sorry," said he, "that things are as they 
are. If I had a place vacant, your son should have it. But 
can you expect me, when every place is full and the work 
going on nicely, to take out my best man and put a feeble 
boy in his place? Common sense should teach you, madam, 
that I would not be doing myself justice to do so." 

"Common sense, Mr. Ross, might, indeed, teach me 
so, but sense of right demands that a rich man take care 
of the person who was injured in his employ. Roy never 
once doubted that his work would be given back to him till 
he heard to-day that you had engaged a man permanently 
in his place. But now he is discouraged, and I fear it may 
cause him harm. There is no one but me to stay with 
him and nurse him, so how can I seek work for him ? He 
Will soon be well, and then can do his work as well as ever. " 

"Madam, I am very sorry we disagree, but I must be 
firm. All is running smoothly now, and to take a man out 
Would throw everything into disorder. I must look out 
for myself just as you do for yourself. I cannot afford to 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 3 

lose time. If a man falls out I find another to take his 
place. There must not be a lapse in labor. You surely 
exaggerate your situation. In a short while your 
son will have another place. However, that may be, I can 
not take him back. You are familiar now with my rea- 
sons." Then looking- out of the window into the night, he 
remarked significantly "You will have a bad way home." 
With this he took his paper again and resumed reading. 
The tears which had hardly been kept back, now came at 
last, and the poor woman sobbed as if her heart were 
broken. She did not linger, though ; she went out into the 
terrible night, moaning and crying to herself in agony, 
"What can we do? Oh, what can we do?" 

Andrew Ross, the wealthy mill owner, left to himself, 
began to think. "Will this eternal bother never cease?" 
he frowningly asked himself. "What business of mine is 
it to see after the families of my employes? When I pay 
them up weekly there my business with them ends. If 
j take care of them when they are sick, when will they 
ever repay me? I know the poor fellows have a tight pull 
sometimes, but what if I took particular care of them all? 
J would soon be penniless. I recognize the peculiar hard- 
ship in this case. The mother cannot leave her sick boy, 
nor can she support him. Yet the boy should have saved 
something from his earnings, in which case I doubt not 
all will come right. " With which soothing reflection he 
read again. Next morning he saw a little notice that read 
thus: "Died — At her home in the row of tenements on 
Park street, Caroline Dean, aged 39 years, 4 months, of 
exposure to cold on the night of January 4th. 

% * * ***** 

On a sunny day in May, twenty years after, along a 
dusty country road in a western State walked a man old and 
tottering. His steps were slow and a death pallor was on his 
face. He was clad meanly, and his whole appearance 
showed poverty and neglect. Off to the left he saw a beau- 
tiful cottage surrounded by shade. "If I could only get 
to it I would live, " said he. Leaning his whole weight on 
his staff and stumbling fearfully, he finally reached the 
place. But out in the yard some little children were playing ; 
inside the door sat a woman, stitching with nimble fingers; 
in afield beyond the house a man was at work. When the 
-old man came inside the yard, the woman quickly asked 



4 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

him in, and noting with surprise and alarm his pallor„ 
made him lie down, and set about preparing him food. 
Soon the husband came In and was so startled at seeing the 
aged face that he cried out roughly "Why, what are you 
doing here?" His wife, shocked at his abruptness, was 
about to remonstrate, when the old man, suddenly looking^ 
around, sat up in bed with a jerk, just as if he had been 
frightened in a dream. "My God I" he cried, "why did I 
come here? I must go again." And he would have gone 
had not the wife restrained him. "You must not go," she 
exclaimed. "You could not walk a hundred yards." 
He lay down again, too feeble and weary and faint 
to speak. The woman turned to her husband saying! 
"What on earth did you mean, Roy? Don't you see the 
man is nearly dead ?" "Jane, " began the man, slowly and 
thoughtfully, "that man murdered my mother." She gave 
a great start. "Twenty years ago I was working for that 
man, and was almost killed. While I was sick he gave my 
place permanently to another man. My poor feeble mother 
at once went to see him. It was an awful night — a night 
of snow and storm. He flatly refused to give me my place 
again. My mother came back chilled through ; and she 
was broken-hearted. That night she died. Now, are you 
surprised at my words?" "My husband, " she said ten- 
derly, "he has done wickedly, and he has reaped his re- 
ward already. See how poor and ragged he is — see how 
he is suffering. I know you will not turn him out. Look — 
he suffers for it now." They saw the old man sobbing. 
"Now, can't you let him stay? Her words had their 
effect. After a moment's thought, he said: "Well, it 
would be murder to turn him out, and I do not wish to kill 
him. Let the old man stay." 

And so he stayed, and the faithful nursing of the 
woman at last brought him back to health. He had suf- 
fered reverses — his mill had burned, he had lost all, and 
determined to come West to spend the rest of his days- 
He had fallen sick, and thus, by chance or Providence, had 
come to the home of the man he had injured. He spent 
his last days with them, striving to make a partial atone- 
ment for his cruelty to the mother by the constant care 
for the son and his family. And he succeeded. Roy came 
to love the old man, and the children might be seen any 
day clambering up into his lap, and clinging to his neck. 

OTIS WHITE. 



THE MIIXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 5 

THE TO WER OF SENTIMENT. 

The power of sentiment is one of the strongest agen- 
cies known in directing - human conduct. We read history 
and find it a very powerful motive among the ancients. At 
Thermopylae we see its wonderful effect. After two days 
of fierce fighting the Persians, through treachery, got into 
the rear of the Greeks. Leonidas sees that all is lost. He 
dismisses the allies, but for him and his band of gallant 
Spartans there could be no thought of retreat. Spartan 
courage had never quailed. They had been taught since 
infancy that Spartans were never conquered as long as a 
spark of life enabled one Spartan to do his duty. Just so 
long they fought the Persians. The noble inscription put 
upon the monument afterwards erected on the spot well 
expresses the sentiment that animated their lives: 
"Stranger, tell the Lacedaemonians that we lie here in obe- 
dience to their orders." 

Hannibal's career is a most remarkable exponent of 
this power. At the age of 9 with his hands upon the 
sacrifice he swore eternal hatred to the Roman race. He 
grew up with one object, one all-consuming determination — 
to obliterate Rome. It had been the one object of his 
father's life. Carthage seemed to have been created solely 
for this purpose. Most great generals have been spurred 
on by selfish and other motives. In Hannibal's case not 
only the consuming fires of his warlike genius would not 
sleep, but he himself declared that the sacred obligations 
of a vow that could not be broken urged him incessantly; 
and the grand result was the accomplishment of that most 
gigantic undertaking of ancient times — the crossing of the 
Alps; and it carried him to the very gates of Rome. 

So in mediaval times we find sentiment dominating 
the whole Christian world. The chivalric, generous senti- 
ment of the knights and troubadours of the Middle Ages 
made history for some hundreds of years. The spirit of 
chivalry was just rising. The old religous feeling that 
had been felt since the earliest of Christian times, that to 
visit the Holy City was the most pious of all pious acts, 
was at its height. Peter the Hermit fired the hearts of 
the multitude by his appeals and incited them to action, 
while Pope Urban II., that Demosthenes of the Middle 



6 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

Ages, inspired the leaders with his eloquence. The results 
are seen in crusades, those mighty popular outbursts of 
enthusiasm and feeling that shook Europe for two hun- 
dred years. Sentiment was supreme. 

Then we find sentiment stirring Europe to its founda- 
tions in the German Reformation, and later resulting in 
the mighty French revolution. 

Nor is this sentiment yet quenched, though in this 
day of commercial greed and political aggrandizement it 
would seem to have lost its potency. We have lately seen 
the effects of its power. The mighty heart of the Amer- 
ican people throbbed in sympathy with the trammelled 
Cubans, and the war for freedom and right was the result. 
No people ever showed a more generous, chivalric spirit 
than was showed by the American people in this war at all 
times and at all places. American history, indeed, is full 
of sentiment. Our fathers set up lofty ideals. The ex- 
ploits of our army and navy in the war for independence 
and other early wars have made a powerful tradition. The 
spirit of dauntless courage breathed into the American 
navy by John Paul Jones will never die. 

But sentiment alone is not sufficient. There must be 
labor. In all our examples we see that not sentiment 
alone, but sentiment joined with hard, efficient work made 
success. This is pre-eminently true with us. The sig- 
nal victory of the American fleet in Santiago bay shows 
this fact. The Spaniards doubtless had inspiring senti- 
ment enough, but their work was very insufficient. But 
not only in the public service do we find this true. We 
find the successes of the private citizen made by hard,, 
determined, efficient work, and the one thing that makes 
this work possible we find, in almost every case, is a strong, 
stirring sentiment, a healthy tradition. 

The American people should cherish and conserve 
this sentiment. We of the South feel it more, perhaps, 
than the people of any other portion of the Union. For 
the American home of this sentiment has ever been the 
South. Our genial climate and the peculiar nature of our 
history have fostered it and our sons have lived it. There 
beats not a heart in our whole Southland that does not 
throb with pride at the mention of our generous, chivalric 
JLee, or of our noble Jackson. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 7 

And we of the South, so imbued with this spirit and 
cherishing it so dearly, would have the American people as 
a nation to foster it. It will effect union as nothing else 
can. The citizenof Californiaand the citizen of Maine should 
treasure up the same traditions, and each should feel and 
love the healthful, inspiring sentiment that happily is felt 
with such power in the oldest parts of our country. And 
when this is true the American States will be, indeed, a 
Union. T. WYNN HOLLOMAN, 




THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 



VOLUME 3 DECEMBER, 1900 NUMBER 2 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief H, O. White, Literary Editor 

T. W. Holloman, Alumni Editor W. L. Duren, Associate Editor 

I, B. Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

G L. Crosby and D, C, Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances and business communications should be sent to 
Allen Thompson, Business Manager. Matter intended for 
Publication should be sent o B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription per annum, ■$!. Two Copies, per annum, $i.JO 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Inter-Collegiate Games. 

The results of our foot-ball games seem conclusively 
to show that the board of trustees acted wisely in grant- 
ing - inter-collegiate games, There has been an enthusiasm 
aroused among the students, which, if it existed, was 
never before shown. The loyalty and patriotism for his 
institution, the essential elements of a typical college 
student cannot, by any other means, be more successfully 
encouraged. The fervor and excitement incident to a 
game are the most unifying agencies possible, and the 
influences that give rise to them are love for the college 
and the desire to see it come off victorious from every 



THE MELLSAFS COLLEGIAN. 9 

contest. No one can doubt that these motives are most 
helpful and we believe that no one who has ever witnessed 
the intensity of feeling shown by a student body at a game 
can doubt that permanent good is the result. Inter- 
collegiate games, moreover, appeal strongly to those hav- 
ing an inclination for such sports, and who would, other 
things being equal, prefer the iustitution that has them to 
the one that does not. It is a mistaken idea, too, that this 
class of boys is undesirable, for even a partial inspection 
shows that many of our most intelligent and useful citizens 
were the most zealous participants in college games. It is 
erroneous, too, to think that the preparation for these 
games must be at the expense of regular literary work. 
No more time is required for practice than should other- 
wise be spent in gymnasium, or in some other manner of 
recreation. The notion that brutality is inseparably con- 
nected with inter-collegiate games is fast losing ground. 
There was a time when this was not so, but the reduction 
of games to a scientific basis and the adoption of sensible 
rules have entirely eliminated this objectionable feature. 
The fact is that inter-collegiate games are> but the out- 
growth of the spirit of rivalry among students, all of one 
college. The debates in literary societies lead to debates 
between them, and these in turn to oratorical contests 
between colleges. In like manner inter-collegiate games 
are but the developments of college athletics. If, then, 
what has been said is true, viz: that they are valuable in 
promoting the right kind of college enthusiasm; in unify- 
ing the student body and developing a social feeling in it 
without sacrificing useful time; and if they have no brutal 
tendencies, then nothing is at stake, and they should be 
encouraged as one of the necessary features of college 
life. 

Lack of Uniformity in Free-School Books. 

The present method of adopting books for the free 
school of the state seems to have caused general dissatis- 
faction. The confusion attending the change and the 
demoralization following it are enou a ;i to demand a new 
method. These things, however, constitute the least 
important reasons for a change. As the present method 
is, each county is the final arbiter in the selection of its 
books and the different kinds are limited only by the 
number of counties in state. Obviously, the task of main- 



10 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

taining a uniform curriculum, if not .impossible, is very 
great. Take for example one of the most important 
studies, grammar. There are an almost infinite number 
and some of them utterly worthless, while it is lamentably 
true that many of the boards of adoption are incapable of 
distinguishing the good from the bad. Then in selecting 
them, while some get the best, others undoubtedly get the 
worst. The same is true of the entire course. Thus 
while the intention of the law is to have the best books 
obtainable for the free school curriculum, any county 
while nominally maintaining it, may in reality fall far 
below it by selecting inferior books. This condition of 
affairs prevents the establishment of a uniform basis for 
the free schools and makes impossible any system of 
grading that could, otherwise, be instituted. It seems 
that a better way would be, for the State Superintendent, 
assisted by some of the most competent teachers of the 
state, to select them, and compel the use of them in all the 
counties. The system of graded schools as exists in most 
towns, could then be made general. Another advantage 
would be that book firms being able to supply a greater 
demand could supply it at the least possible cost while the 
state as a whole could better hold them to contracts than a 
single county. Finally, the greatest advantage would be 
that a greater degree of thoroughness coulc be had than is 
now given, and the elementary work could be made suf- 
ficiently accurate to support any super-structure. 

* The Case of the Boers. 

The reception given President Kruger on his arrival 
in France seems to indicate more than an admiration for a 
man who has struggled valiantly, though vainly for his 
country's liberty. Nor can it be said to be due to the 
excitability of the French people and their tendency to 
hero worship, but it is a part of the universal sympathy 
felt for the Boers — ? sympathy that has its origin in the 
inherent sense of ju- lice. The demands of England have 
been universally regarded as unjust, and notwithstanding 
the fact that the result of the struggle has never been in 
doubt, yet the world has looked on with the prayer that at 
the last extremity, something might save the country for 
its countrymen. If anything could effect this safety, it 
must be the sight of the venerable exile-president, of 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



11 



women and children dying - in their country's service, and 
the inauguration by the British of the reconcentrado pol- 
icy. The memory of the cruelties heaped on the Cubans 
by Spain, by means of this policy, is still fresh, and though 
the world would gladly forget them, the greatest empire 
on earth has started anew the system of warfare that 
would satisfy the most insatiate of savages. It will be 
remembered that England was among the first nations to 
denounce the practices of Spain and to defend the action 
of the United States. The wonderful inconsistency in 
Britain's conduct can be explained on no other ground 
than an inordinate greed of gain, and passion for conquest. 
If the intervention of the United States|in the Cuban war 
was just, then the re-establishment of those barbarities in 
the Transvaal by England, which compelled her to action 
should call forth the united efforts of all nations to prevent 
a capital crime from closing the century. 




12 



THE MHXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 





ED ROCK is a grand book. Its influence re- 
mains with you on and on after you have read 
it. It is not little, it is not frivolous ; it is great, 
it is earnest. Its effect does not owe its inten- 
sity to a manufactured excitation. To be entrancing it 
does not have to be enveloped in the mist of faraway colo- 
nial days. To be stirring it needs not the wars of the 
Crusades or the battles of the Revolution or the attacks of 
Indians. To bind you under its spell, it needs not to in- 
corporate oddities of scene or plot or language. You do 
not find in it the archaic language of "Richard Carvel." 
You do not find the mountains and gypsies of "Aylwin. " 
You do not find the "Mommy "and "Dadda"of "Janice 
Meredith." In short, you do not find any of the little de- 
vices to catch the attention which are so sought and prized 
by the authors of 1898 and 1899. The ability of an author 
seems to be measured to-day by the facility with which he 
discovers tricks and turns and the good taste with which he 
inserts them in his book. The point of a chapter lies in 
the happy turn of a sentence of a dialogue, in a witty re- 
tort, perhaps. The success of a novel lies in the fact that 
the author has found a strange theme and builded thereon 
a fabric half feeling and half folly. Thomas Nelson Page 
has chosen a period in the history of the South that is espe- 
cially attractive, not only to the descendantsof the old South- 
ern gentlemen, but to all who love chivalry in man, beauty 
and devotion in woman. For the old South was the home 
of chivalry and devotion and beauty. True, some there 
be who cannot feel the charm, who cannot un- 
derstand why the old times should linger with us 
yet. They are to be pitied. Let us forget, how- 
ever, that such exist; we can still enjoy the old stories and 
memories; for those who cannot we do not care. The 
times "before the war" are dear to us. They will ever be 
dear to us. We love the stories of hospitable mansions 
and broad plantations; of high-bred, chivalrous old men 
and gentle matrons; of handsome, daring youths and 
beautiful, cultured, loving maidens. Oh ! let us love those 



THE MILLS A PS COLLEGIAN. 13 

old times ! Sad day for us when, pressed by busy cares, 
we shun the pleasant memories of our past. A country 
so fruitful in statesmen and warriors and heroes ; so full 
of brave deeds, so rich in memories of knights who dared 
and maidens who loved, can never fail to be proud of its 
past. He who says that dwelling- on the past unfits a peo- 
ple for the duties of to-day speaks falsely. Across the 
line there are those who, their own affairs flourishing", 
wish to meddle. They claim that the South's great draw- 
back is the dreaming of the past, instead of attending to 
the present. Had the Southern people nothing to dream 
of except a Hartford Convention and a Salem Witchcraft, 
no doubt they would not dream. 

Mr. Page reproduces the old Southern life with a ten- 
der and loving hand. Therefore he reproduces it truly 
and perfectly. His characters lived and moved when our 
grandmothers were eighteen. He saw the old times 
through a mist which rendered what was lovely more 
lovely and concealed whatever small part was unlovely ; it 
may have been a mist of tears. After all, this is the spirit 
in which an author should approach his subject. He must 
be in love with it. And Mr. Page was in love with his sub- 
ject. In all fiction I suppose there is not a finer character 
than Dr. Cary, in "Red Rock" — a perfect gentleman, 
courteous, dignified, kind ; a model husband, a model 
father, a model friend ; a man who gives his life, not only 
for his friends, thus fulfilling the Scriptural ideal, but even 
for his enemies. He appears in prosperity as a kind mas- 
ter, a kind man; a genial host, a welcome guest. When 
the war passes and leaves him a ruined man, then his 
character shines forth in all his brilliancy. He stays 
among his neighbors, helping them to their feet, caring for 
them, healing them when sick, in fact, sacrificing himself 
for them. 

He distributes among the terribly poor the scanty 
sum he collects for his services from the poor. He will- 
ingly suffers what his neighbors suffer, even to insult and 
imprisonment. And he finally comes to his death in the 
act of saving the life of his and his neighbers' and the 
South's worst enemy, a carpet-bagger, a parasite. 

Dr. Cary does not dwell only in fiction. Such men 
there were before the war; such men there are to-day. 
And they are many. 



14 THE MnXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



During the month of November we received a number of 
magazines from the various institutions throughout the 
country. Some of these magazines are excellent in qual- 
ity, but some are very poor. In many cases, however, 
these deficiencies are due rather to a lack of means for 
the support of the magazine, than to a lack of college spirit 
or of capacity on the part of the students and staff. 

We gladly welcome the Hendrix College Mirror. On 
the whole it is a fairly good magazine, but we notice that 
in a "A Story of It Might Have Been," Longfellow is 
named as the author of the lines quoted, when in fact 
Whittier is the author. This should be a warning to those 
contributing matter for publication to let their quotations 
be accurately quoted and the right author named. The 
quotation itself may be so well known as to do no special 
violence to the interpretation of the production, neverthe- 
less it takes something away and at least enough to spoil 
its beauty. 

We note with pleasure the wonderful improvement in 
the A. & M. Reflector. It seems to us that with the large 
attendance there the Reflector ought to take rank among the 
best college magazines of the South. 

We do not hesitate to say that the Emory Phcznix and 
the -Emory and Henry Era are among the best of our ex- 
changes. We have not seen a poor copy of either and 
they have not fallen into that onesidedness which is a char- 
acteristic of some of our magazines. One magazine, for 
instance, devoted about one-half its space to locals, another 
almost all of its space to athletics. Now, we. are strongly 
in favor of these departments, and especially the depart- 
ment of athletics, but we do not think that any department 
should be allowed to exclude all other departments, but on 
the other hand we think that the magazine should be the 
mouthpiece of every department of college life. 



THE MHXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 15 

We are glad to place the Harvard Monthly on our ex- 
change list. It is the best college publication that we have 
ever had the pleasure to examine. 

The University Unit for November contains much mat- 
ter of real worth. Two productions, "The Aim of De- 
mocracy," and ''Robert Burns," deserve special mention. 

Shamrock for November is a delightful little magazine. 
True enough it is weak in some respects, but its one edi- 
torial is a crystalization of pure and noble sentiment. A 
plea for the preservation of purity — the priceless heritage 
of the American woman. May the sentiment live forever. 

Cap and Gown, though not as pretentious as some other 
magazines, is nevertheless a nice little publication. In 
the November issue the Alumnae Notes have a very appro- 
priate conclusion, viz: Hinds & Noble's ad. 

"We wish to acknowledge the receipt of the following 
magazines since our November issue: S. P. U. Journal^ 
Hampden-Sydney Magazine, Purple and White, The Washing- 
tonian, Blue and Gold, The Revielle, The Jeffersonian, The Crim- 
son M. S. U. Independent, The Buff and Blue, The Stetson Colle- 
giate and The Clionian. 




16 THE MELLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 




"We ring the bells and we raise the strain, 
We hang up garlands everywhere. 
And bid the tapers twinkle fair 
And feast and frolic and then we go 
Back to the same old lives again." 

Hurrah! Hurrah for Christmas! 

Warning". 

To the faculty, seniors and underclassmen: Don't 
stand with back to fire. Always face the devouring 
element. A Junior. 

H. P. Lewis, 'GO, who is pastor of South Vicksburg 
church, made a short visit to relatives. 

J. A. Teat, '00, one of Kosciusko's prosperous lawyers, 
spent a few days with club-mates. He is the same "Babe" 
Teat. 

Professor — "Mr. Clark, what is play upon words 
called?" 

Mr. Clark — "It is called pun, and very frequently 
found in the Bible." 

While on his way to conference, J. T. Lewis, '99, 
spent a few days with his many friends. He is always a 
welcome visitor. 

I wonder what attraction W. T. Clark finds near the 
campus. Why, he comes to see the ball games. 

That "clock" had a conflict the other day and 
"busted." 

Miss Minta Johnson, of Madison Station, is the charm- 
ing guest of Miss Katie Gray. 

W. L. Wood (Dusty) of Brookhaven, spent a day with 
college chums. 

Messrs. McLeod and Ligon of Hattiesburg, came up 
to witness the Thanksgiving game. 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



17 



Messrs. Addison and George Harvey, of Canton came 
down to witness our foot-ball game with L. S. U. Mr. A's 
interest and enthusiasm was encouraging to the team. 

Professor— ( Class on Enoch Arden) "Mr. H., what 
qualities in Annie do you most admire?" 

Mr. H.— (Not paying attention) "What Annie?" 

The following officers of the Junior class were elected 
at the last meeting: R. L. Cochran, President; Miss Mary 
Holloman, Vice President; A. Thompson, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Miss Millsaps, poet; J. B. Howell, Historian. 

Our observatory will be placed on the hill just north 
of the college. The site has been surveyed and work will 
begin immediately. The lens is being made in Germany. 
The telescope is a generous gift Mr. Dan James. 

Mr. H. — "My mind and Aristotle's run in the same 
channel." 

Mr. F.— " Yes, but Aristotle made the channel." 

Lieutenant Hobson was entertained by Alpha Mu 
Chapter of Kappa Alpha at a banquet given in his honor. 
The banquet hall was decorated with the fraternity 
colors and a delightful menu was served. 

The members and guests of Alpha Upsilon Chapter 
of Kappa Sigma were invited to the elegant home of Bishop 
and Mrs. Galloway to an annual Thanksgiving dinner of 
twenty-three covers. The decorations were of the fra- 
ternity colors and the favorite flower. The evening spent 
with this loyal hostess will ever be fragrant with pleasant 
memories. 

On his retnrn from the Vicksburg fair Lieut. R. P. 
Hobson was given a reception by the Stag Club. Many 
of the students and faculty had the pleasure of meeting 
this distinguished gentleman. 

Professor — "Women promise to obey, but they don't, 
do they?" 

Student — "I really can't say. I never had any 
experience." The Professor is a newly married man. 

The Y. M. C. A., in honor of the Louisiana State 
University team, gave a reception which was much enjoyed 
by all. Rev. J. T. Lewis extended the welcome. Some 
very fine selections were rendered by our quartette, after 
which refreshments were served. 



18 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

We here publish a part of a personal letter to one of 
our boys from a cadet of L. S. U. : "Your football team is 
composed of the most gentlemanly fellows that have ever 
invited us to play football. Every one, without a doubt, is 
a perfect gentleman." 

On the evening after the Greenville game all the 
students joined in celebrating the victory with a "phan- 
tom" parade. 

The "rooters" under the leadership of J. A. Vaugn 
have done magnificent work. The megaphone is a great 
addition to the efficiency of this body, which is so useful 
at all stages of the game. 

We appreciate the congratulations from our State 
University on our victory. 

We, the foot-ball team of Millsaps, are indebted to 
Mr. Haynes for a generous gift in the form of a splendid 
suit. 

The Stag club very hospitably entertained both the 
Louisiana and the Millsaps teams at a german. The 
evening was much enjoyed by all present. 

The first year of inter-collegiate sports! and the foot- 
ball team has covered itself with glory. Out of the four 
games played, we have lost two. Doubtless the team was 
criticized very severely after its two defeats while away 
on its trip. But, considering that our first game was with 
Tulane who has one of the strongest teams in the South, 
we feel highly delighted with the results. In our Thanks- 
giving game we wiped out the stains of one defeat by 
showing ourselvas able to conquer the Louisiana State 
University team, who had beaten us on their own gridiron 
only two weeks previous. After their return from this 
unsuccessful trip every man went to work with the deter- 
mination to do his part, and our coach left no stone un- 
turned. This excellent work was shown in the score of 
30 to against Greenville. While we were victorious in 
this, it inspired every man to greater things, and when 
time was called on November 29, the score showed Millsaps 
6; L. S. U., 5. With this issue Millsaps first football team 
bids adieu to its friends and thanks its many supporters 
for the munificent gifts and kind aid. We are proud of 
our record for the first year, but do not intend to cease 
our efforts until Millsaps shall take the stand among the 
foremost colleges in the South in athletics. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN, 19 

AMOR AUTUMNUS. 

'Twas through a wooded, flowered vale, 

Where leaves of autumn scattered he ; 
Or, tossing, frolic with the gale, 

We idly strolled, my love and I, 

Her cheeks were rosy as the west, 

Her eyes were bluer than the sky ; 
Her smile a witch's charm possessed ; 

Oh, we were glad, my love and I ! 

I long had loved, but ne'er could tell, 

Beyond a love-look or a sigh ; 
Her simple smile would seem to spell 

" We're only friends " — my love and I. 

But on this golden autumn day, 

When every zephyr whispered, " Try !" 
Uesolved I was to quit delay — 

So while we wandered, love and I, 

In tender tones I pleaded long — 
I saw the love-light in her eye ; 
Oh, Fortune fair our lives prolong 
To bless that day, my love and I ! 

OTIS WHITE. 



A KISS. 



'Twas a kiss — that was all — but within it, 
Bound together by love's golden cord, 

Was a woman's faith and woman's trust, 
And a woman's own richest reward 

Of an answering love and devotion 

That shall guard from the least carnal thought 
That priceless boon of a woman's love, 

With affection and confidence fraught. 

Then regret not, my sweet, that you gave it ; 

For 'twas hallowed by love's holy flame, 
And as sacred to me shall its memory be 

As to you is your dear mother's name. 

E. LEE CANNON. 



20 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

ON A FLY-LEAF LN SIDNEY LANIER'S POEMS. 

[Republished from the Vanderbilt Observer, issue of May, '97-] 

Oh poet, that didst with such tenderness 

And with such adoring lovingness 

Utter forth the thoughts of clover and of corn, 

Thou who didst translate the essence of the rose',6 odor 

Into sweetest speech,^- 

Who didst enshrine in thine own heart 

The spotless chastity which lilies 

In their snowy night robes symbolize, 

I here avow, I here do testify 

My soul's sincerest love for thee. 

This golden April morn, the dawn awoke 

With songs of larks and mocking-birds. 

A thousand trilling minstrels carolled forth 

The symphonies of meadows strewn with violets, 

Pastures with their lush-green grass dangling the crystal dew, 

And budding groves quivering in grateful ecstasy 

At the promise of the glad Spring-time. 

Oh nature ! thy sweet and mystic secrets 

I thirst and yearn to know, 

What fills this sea of trembling green with images angelic ? 

Who wrote the lyric music which yon glittering brook 

Sends straightway up to Heaven ? 

Oh, could I find the voice to utter 

One single thought that throbs to leave my heart, 

One faint suggestion of the hidden feelings 

Which thrill, yet pain my soul ! 

But poet ! Southern poet ! Hadst thou but seen this morn 

And felt its gracious sweetness 

Stirring joyless hearts and lifting 

To the buoyant skies souls weighted down with care 

And shedding life and hope and love and promise 

O'er all this fretful world; 

What songs, immortal! What visions, pure celestial! 

What heavenly flames of thought and feeling 

Wouldst thou have bodied forth 

In rapturous strains of melody sublime. 



Sou.th.ern College^. 

Near all of those which issue handsomely engrayed Anniversary and 
Commencement Invitations are having them done by a Southern firm 
who are doing very artistic work. We refer to 

wl. F». STEVENS, of Atlanta, Gi 

This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of 
high grade strel and copper plete engraving, and invitation commit- 
tees would do well to obtain their prises and samples before placing 
their orders. 

If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 



West Jackson. 



Fulgham's Drug Store, 

Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 



Attend 

the 

Best - coiALc^^m^ 



NAffFl/S' \ 



V. H. W ATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures on Com- 
mercial Law. 



THE- 



KNICKERBOCKER 



CAFE- 



FOR LUNCHES, FISH, OYSTERS AND GAME 



The Nicest Dining Room in the City. The best line of 
Cigars. Huyler's, Rubel & Allegretti and Plow's Candy. 
Fresh Cakes and Candies always on hand at 

EVANS & BANKS. 

State Street. Jackson, Miss. 



Young Gentlemen 



When you need any Fancy Candies and Beautiful 
Fruits for your Sweet Girls. 



BEAR IN MIND. 



that the Onleest Place to get them is from your 
friends, 

W. S. LEMLY & BRO., Who will please you. 

THOS. P. BARR, 
Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, p , „ 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. ir ean Street. 

staple Fa n nc y Groceries, *Sr£2di. ^^b^i^i^ 

'Phone No. 78. 203 West Capitol Street 

Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps , 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

Bowers IE3:r*o». 8c IDiiaeoxi.. 

E. B. JENKINS—*-*^* 

Proprietor and Manager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

Y. D. LOTT JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

WEST ££€KSON SHOE STORE. 



Try a pair of our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
Calf, Vici Kid and Enamel. They are the best shoes sold for the 
price. Our $3 shoes are equal to any other $3.50 shoe on the market. 
We are headquarters for fine footwear. A hearty welcome and free 
shine always awaits you at 

300 'Woat Capitol St. 



/ Want Your Trade And Will Treat You Right, 

Call on me when you want anything- in my line. 

Your friend, 

jackson, rviiss. 

John W. Patton J. Jay White 

Patronize Home People. 

RATTON <& WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments. 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 

Kimball Pianos. 

318 capitol st. jackson. miss. 

Jackson, Miss. 



| J. B. BOURGEOIS, 

♦ Jeweler and Graduate Optician 

f Jackson, Mississippi. 



BOYS I 

Try Us On Your SHOES. 

Our $3.50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 
Date. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL. KINDS OF SHOES. 



Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

C. .CUM MINGS- & SON. 



2 . . Council Lumber, Goat and Lima Company. 



< 

«<x 

Jj Dealers In. 



^ SasA, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. 

* 'PHONE 178 — 



J. T. LOWTHER, 

Jackson, Miss. 



N. L. W/NGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsaps Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



CAPITOL STATE BANK 



Jackson, Miss. 
capital $100,000. surplus, ^100,000. 

BROWN BROTHERS, 

JACKSON. MISS. 

UVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. RiDg us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for Celebrated, Columbus Buggies. 




\ 



220 E. CAPITOL ST. 



I call attention of readers of this Magazine, that I offer 
you at fair prices, School and College Books, Fancy Sta- 
tionery, Periodicals, Sporting Goods, Picture Frames etc. 

Please make my store your loafing place. 




AND KINDRED LINES. 



Isydore Strauss & Son. 



207-209 State Street. 

iUfflmnniinKiBttHHiHHimwBi immuwiw 



WM. H. WAT KINS. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 



Harding Building 



JACKSON, NISSI9SIPPI. 



Di~. J". IrL. lVTetgr-Ljicteir, 

No~. 10&#& State St. Jackson, Miss.. 



DR. A. HILZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS 

f?, e fi al , R f te . stoColleKe students - I i24j£ -South State St. 

All the latest improvements » - ' _ , 

in Dentistry. JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



J. P. BERRY. M. D. 

OFFICE AX FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



T- Attorneys at Law, 

JACKSON, MISS, 



TURNER'S BARBER SHOP 

Also Fruit Stand, 
West Capitol street Jackson, Miss, 

Greeir* Tree House. I 

Satisfaction guaranteed. $1 per day. 2 

WestgCapitol street - Jackson, Mississippi. I 



Rook-Binding For the Trade. 



The NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., is prepared to bind 
books in cloth, or make book covers for small offices at cheap 
prices. Get our prices before sending your binding away. 



To Students of MillsapsJSC 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug 
line. 

j*.*J. R HUNTER & CO. 



To The 

College Students&s 

GENTS: I have just received a new 
line of Neckwear. Among the lot you 



will find a neat 



Butterfly Tie 



with one end purple and the other white. 
They are strictly the Millsaps colors. 
I also have a line of Purple Caps, four-inch 
brims, with letters *'M, C." in pearl- 



white. 



LOG AH PHILLIPS 

The People's Gents' Furnisher. 



WHEN YOU NEED. 



Fancy Stationery, Fruits, Fancy Candy, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Cigars and Tobacc. 

Gall On Your Friend 

A E. GOOCH. 



• jotiist i^ioorc 



Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing, 



Eykich's Book Stork, 



JACKSON, MISS. 



FEIBELMAN BROS. 

202-204 S. Stats St. 

— CIvOTHIERS 



•» • • • » ♦ •« 



Our OJ^tr-i^tin^tei^ 



Of Holiday Goods is well worth your time whether you are 
are ready to buy or not. The stock is so large and varied 
that you are sure to find just what you want within yonr 
means. The assortment covers "EVERYTHING." 

T£t.« Rookery. 

We ask your inspection and approval. 



Go to Phillipps' Drug Store. 



for Fire Fire-works and Holiday Goods. 

300 Capitol St. , Corner Farish 



PROSandCONS 

COMPLETE DEBATES 

Our foreign policy, the 
currency, the tariff, im- 
migration, high license, 
woman suffrage, penny 
postage, transportation, 
trusts.department stores. 
municipal ownership of 
franchises, government 
control of telegraph. 
Both side* of the above 
and many ether ques- 
tfsVww completely debated. 
Directions for organizing 
and conducting a debat- 
ing society, with by-laws 
and parliamentary rules. 
Price, $1.50 Postpaid. 
Cloth— 469 Pages. 

HINDS & NOBLE 

4-5-6-13-13-14 Cooper Institute, N. Y. City 

Sehtoliooks ofall/ubluAers at one start. 




A WELCOME GIFT IN ANY HOME 




SONGS OF ALL THE COLLEGES 

Everyone Ekes a college song, and this book is an 
ideal gift to place on the piano for one's friends to> 
enjoy, even though one sings not at all himself 

CLOTH, IN TASTEFUL DESIGN FOB CHBISTKAS OB EIBTHDA* 

All the. ns w gongs '$1.50 postpaid- All the OLD songs 
AT ALL BOOK STORESand MUSIC DEALERS 

or sent on approval by the Publisher* 

HINDS & NOBLE. 4-14 Cooper institute. New York City 

Schoolbooks of mil publishers at one store 



JOHNSON, TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

^^ Groceries at Wholesale, ^*^ 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 

Speciil Sale this Month of over 500 Men's Fine Fall Suits. 

$12 00 All Wool Suits at $8 00 

14 00 All Wool Suits at ; 10 00 

15 00 and 16 00 All Wool Suits at.... 11 00 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS tIM U CM DERWEAR, 

Men's Cotton Fleece Lined Undersuits at 89c 

Men's Wool Fleece Lined Undersuits at 1 05 

Men's Pure Wool Undersuits, extra line, at $2, 2 50, $3 & 3.50 

Men's Colored Stiff Bosom Shirts, with detachable cuffs and no 
collar, "Wauchu'sett" make, at 50c, 75c and Si. 00. 

We can save you money on anything* 
JONES BROS. & CO. 

AGENTS FOR • ■ -, _ 

Atlantic $3.50 Men's Shoe. State & Pearl St., Jackson-, Miss. 






3 I, 






Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 






NOTIONS AND SHOES. 



1 14 South State Street, Jackson, Mississippi. 



The 
Millsaps Collegian 



-^ 




CONTENTS: 

The Woman in Black.. 1 

Biltmore , _ 2 

When Taps Sounds 

Editorial Department iJ 
Literary Department.. 14 |\ 
Exchange Department 17 
Alumni Department.. 19 

Local Department 22 

Poem- 25 




♦ SHURLDS « 

Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 

213 C^ ~f 1 T T T7> T T~^ *• ^ JACKSON, 

South State St. Oxl K> XXlviJO MISS. 



We Educate the Masses 

On Questioosof 



X FURNITURE X 
Isydore Strauss & Son, 

207-209 State Street 



to 

to 
to 




JACKSON, MISS. 

;DEAL LOCATION, combining- all the advantages of the 
; city with the healthful conditions and immunities of the 
country. Convenient to electric car line. 




Literary and Law Departments Otter Special Advantages. 

FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

W. B. MURRAH, President., 



The Millsaps Collegian 



Vol. 3 JACKSON, MISS., JANUARY, 1900 No. 3 



THE WOMAN IN BLA CK. 

I had come all the way from Chicago on the "Limited. " 

It left late that night, so I took a sleeper and saw noth- 
ing more of the passengers until the next morning. 

I did not get up until late, and when Ihad finished my 
toilet, I decided I would go to the "smoker," have a good 
smoke and get a morning paper. After my smoke I came 
back and sat down in an empty seat in one of the regular 
passenger coaches and began to scan over my paper, when 
my atteution was attracted by a lady sitting - diagonally 
across the car from me. She had with her a little boy 
who seemed to be in quite a playful humor; but she wore 
on her face a look which indicated to me that she had just 
passed through some trying ordeal. She wore a bandage 
about her head, and her long raven hair fell in two plaits 
about her shoulders. 

She was dressed in black, and from her general ap- 
pearance I decided that, so early in life, she had been de 
prived of the one whom she had chosen to be her life-long 
companion and protector. She was careworn and sorrow- 
ful, and the rose from her cheek had long been driven out 
by the cruel pangs of pain. But above all, there was in 
her face and expression something beautiful, something 
almost angelic. In the depths of her large black eyes there 
were unmistakable evidences of a lovable nature. It 
seemed to me that, in the merry disposition of the little 
boy, I could see a reflection of what the mother naturally 
was. About his dress there was every mark of neatness, 
and his beautiful black curls fell loosely in long ringlets 
about his shoulders. 

As he would laugh and talk to his mother, I could see 
that she was delighted to see him so playful, but was 
wholly unable to join him. I was sure she saw me watch- 



2 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

ing them and in a few minutes she stood him up on the 
seat and turned his face toward me. He began to laugh 
and jump up and down on the seat, and I saw, for the first 
time, a feeble smile play over her face. But it did not last 
long, and in a few minutes she laid her head back on a pil- 
low and seemed to want to rest. I knew a little rest, and 
sleep if she could get it, would do her good, but I did not 
see how she was to get it with that little fellow making 
things as lively for her as he possibly could. 

I decided it would be nothing amiss for me to slip the 
little fellow away from his mother and let her get the much 
needed rest. I thought I could play with him for awhile, 
at least. In a few minutes, when his mother was appar- 
ently asleep, I held out my hands for him to come over to 
me. He seemed perfectly willing to come, but had been on 
the train long enough to find out that he could not walk by 
himself. I just stepped across the car, picked him up, 
and set him down on my seat and we began to have quite 
a lively little game. In a few minutes his mother aroused 
herself to see that her boy was all right; as she had be- 
come accustomed to do on account of having no one to look 
after him for her. She saw that we had made friends, 
and laying back down on her pillow, seemed to give herself 
no further concern about his safety. 

I was never any great admirer of children, especially 
small ones; in fact, I had something akin to an aversion to 
coming into direct contact with them, but I must confess 
that this one had completely converted me, so far as he 
was individually concerned, at least. In so short a time I 
had really developed a fondness for the child. He was so 
light hearted and gay, so full of fun, and he seemed to im- 
part his joyful mood to all around, except his poor mother, 
who was wholly unable to enjoy what was attracting the 
attention of all the other people in the car. But I dare say 
even she was the better off for his mirth. 

After awhile his mother awoke and saw her treasure 
still in my hands. I could see that she wanted him, for in 
him she found her only remaining pleasure. 

I decided that I had had him long enough and had bet- 
ter carry him back to her, which I did. 

"You are very kind indeed, sir," she said, and I recog- 
nized an unmistakable culture in the clear, distinct accent 
of her voice. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 3 

"It has been quite a pleasure to me, I assure you. He 
is a lovely child. We have had quite a jollv time while you 
were resting. " 

So saying - , I resumed my seat across the car and con- 
tented myself with my paper and an occasional glance at 
the mother and her child. 

I had only a few more stations to pass until I should 
reach Brabston where I was to get off. I was wondering 
who she was, where she was going and things of that 
nature which a man's curiosity would naturally bring up 
about a person in whom he suddenly become interested. 
When the porter called out Brabston, I saw her making 
ready to get off, too. No one seemed to be assisting her 
in an3^ way, so I took her luggage and helped her off my- 
self. I called a cab for her and helped her -in it and started 
to leave her, when I saw she was growing pale and knew 
she should get quiet as soon as possible, I asked her 
where to direct the cabman, but she did not answer. 

She had fainted. 

I knew something should be done quick. I saw 815 
Chestnut St. on her grip and I asked the cabman how far 
it was. 

" Jis roun de corner, sir," he said, and I told him to 
drive there as quick as possible. I stepped into the cab 
and closed the door. 

In a few minutes the cab stopped, the cabman opened 
the door and said that was the place. 

The next thing was to get her in the house, and I saw 
only one way to do that and that was just to take her up in 
my arms and carry her in. It was a case of emergency 
and I did not hesitate to consider the propriety of such' an 
action, but simply proceeded to take her up in my arms 
and carry her in the house. 

In a few minutes I had succeeded in reviving her; I 
gave her a little stimulant and she seemed to be resting 
well, so I thought I could safely leave her and go to look 
after some of my own affairs. 

I started to go, when she said, " Wont you to give me 
your name please." 

I handed her one of my cards which had on it Dr. H. 
R. Richardson. 

"Doctor, you will come back again will you?" she said. 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

"Yes, if you wish, I will come again this afternoon at 
3:30; will that suit you?" 

"Yes, any time. " 

I closed the door, got into the cab and drove awaj'. 

Who was she? I did not even know that. I had 
promised to call again in the afternoon and I would surely 
find out. ' 

I remembered the street and number and I supposed 
I would have no trouble in finding the place again. 

I saw from their surroundings that they were fairly 
wealthy. The house was large with a long, deep portico 
of the old Colonial style supported by a row of massive 
columns. In front of the house there was a fountain and 
in the basin of the fountain water lillies were growing pro- 
fusely. On either side of the walk stood a large magnolia 
tree, under which, and also m the cozy nooks in the yard, 
were rustic seats. In all my life I think I have never seen 
a more majestic, inviting place. 

No doubt they were aristocratic and influential people 
and it is a wonder, I thought, her mother had not dismissed 
me and sent for the family physician, and I mig"h+ never 
have had an opportunity of knowing anything more of her, 
but, luckily for me, I would d uibtiess, as it was, become 
acquainted with the family and there was surelv nothing 
to be lost in cultivating the acquaintance of a family so 
prominent as they seemed to be, especially by a young 
physician out prospecting for a location. 

A few minutes before my appointed hour for calling* 
I began to think of something to carry around to her to 
cheer her up a little. I thought she needed something of 
that nature about as bad as anything else. But to save my 
life I didn't know what to carry. I thought, possibly, I 
would find something on the way around there which 
would be appropriate; which happily I did. It was only a 
bouquet of roses, but I thought if I was sick nothing would 
give me more pleasure than those roses, and if I could ap- 
preciate them I knew such a woman as she would. 

A servant met me at the door and ushered me in. 
She had told him of my coming and instructed him to in- 
vite me in as soon as I came. 

She was alone in the room when I went in and I saw 
she had been weeping. It touched me to see so lovely a 
creature suffer as she was and not be able to help her. It 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 5 

was my business to help people when they were suffering 
and I felt like I ought to help her. I could remedy physical 
ailments, but this was entirely out of my line, however, I 
had some hope that the flowers would be of some comfort 
to her. 

"See, I have brought you some flowers," I said, "I did 
not know what else to bring - , and I wanted to bring you 
something." 

"O; how kind and thoughtful of you! You are the only 
man in the world who Wvuld ever have thought to bring 
them t3 me. Do bring them here, I want to put my hands 
on them. They are so fresh and sweet. I know they will 
make me feel so much better." 

"I do hope so," I said, "I really think you are looking 
much better and you will soon be well and alright again. " 

"I hope so. I really think, if I had you to come to see me 
all the time and bring me flowers, I would soon get well 
sure enough. I am going to have you come to see me 
until I do get well if you will." 

Just then an elderly lady came in. 

Dr. Richardson, that is my mother, she said. 

I knew very little more then than at first, so I just 
proceeded to ask her her name which she said was Mrs. 
Ber on. I was still not at ease for I did not know the 
younger lady's name, and while I was in the business I 
determined to find out. 

"Must I call you Miss Berton?" I said turning to the 
younger lady. 

'"Y — Yes No, Hellen Newcomb is my name. I 

was sure you knew it, tho' I don't know why I should have 
thought so. I was so troubled I did not think to tell you 
and you so good to me, you onlv thought of my safety and 
welfare. I suppose that is why you never thought to ask 
me. I don't know what I should* have done had you not 
been so kind to help me, Mamma says she knows you are 
the only man on earth who would have ever thought to help 
a poor, sick, strange girl, and I am almost ready to believe 
it myself. Mamma don't put any too much confidence in 
men folks any way and I — well, I have put too much in them 
already." 

"I think what first attracted my attention was your 
little boy,"' I said. 



6 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

"1 cannot often play with little children, but I took a 
fancy to him at first and felt like I wanted to play with 
him. I could not help stealing him away. " 

"I must go now, you are tired and rest is what you 
need." 

"Remember, I want you to wait on me until I get 
well.' 

"I'll call again, then, in the morning. Good bye." 

I was not pleased at the way she was doing. It is true 
she was cheerful while I was there, possibly too much so. 
She was subject to a reaction. 

I saw signs of a continued illness and I had fears of a 
severer attack than either she or her mother had any idea 
of. I thought the best thing was not to alarm either in the 
least, if I could help it. 

(to be continued.) 



BIL TMORE. 



Almost every one has heard of "Biltmore," the country 
estate of George W. Vanderbilt, but one who has never 
been fortunate enough to see it, does not realize its vast- 
ness and extent. It is located in the most beautiful of the 
mountains of western North Carolina, two miles from 
the beautiful little mountain city of Asheville, the noted 
all-the-year resort. No more ideal place in America could 
have been chosen for Biltmore than these mountains of 
North Carolina, poetically called "The Land of the Sky." 
Though there are no mountains here of as great an eleva- 
tion as in the far West, yet where those of the West are 
rugged, barren, and forlorn looking, the mountains of 
western North Carolina are clothed in green-hued forests 
to their very summits. 

Formerly visitors were admitted to the grounds of 
Biltmore every day. But, as people so many times do, they 
so abused their privileges that things had to be changed. 

Now visitors are only admitted on Wednesdays and 
Saturdays of each week, and then only a hundred a week. 
Fifty tickets on each of the two days mentioned are di- 
vided up among the different liverymen of Ashville, from 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 7 

whom the tickets can be secured and carriages to drive 
over the place. 

Miles beyond count of splendid model roads have been 
built, which wind through beautiful visions of flowering 
plants and shrubbery collected from every part of the 
earth. 

The tract of a hundred thousand acres contains moun- 
tains that rise to a majestic height, surrounding magnifi- 
cent valleys through which beautiful streams flow merrily 
along over moss grown rocks. From the peak of the 
highest mountain the eye can not reach to the boundaries 
of the place. 

Time and money have not been spared to make Bilt- 
more model in every respect. Over $3,000,000 have been 
spent on the grounds alone and thousands are being spent 
every year to more improve the place. Over four hun- 
dred men are employed a day to keep it up. As you drive 
through you see men engaged on every side from sweep- 
ing the drives to the skilled landscape gardener superin- 
tending some work that will add to the beauty and com- 
pleteness of the place. 

There is a model dairy, where is collected the finest 
breeds of cattle in the world. In every line of agriculture, 
forestry, and floriculture there has been the highest de- 
velopment, under expert direction, not only to improve the 
place itself, but also to furnish a working model which 
would be an influential factor in raising the standard of 
the entire region and State. 

In our drive the guide pointed out an immense hill 
with large boulders jutting through the soil which looked 
as if it had been the work of ages. But this was a case 
where a "mountain was moved" literally. 

A hill was wanted in another place and it was simply 
made. A large patch of cabbages was thriving on the spot 
from which the "mountain" had been moved. 

There are numerous springs along the road from 
which crystal water flows as cold as ice. One of the main 
features of the drive for the sentimental person is to stop 
and take a drink from one of George Vanderbilt's springs. 

One of the most interesting spots on the whole place 
is the old cabin and little piece of ground of the old negro 
who refused to sell out to Mr. Vanderbilt when he offered 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 8 

him several thousand dollars for it at the time he bought 
Biltmore. 

Some man expecting- to make a "fortune," advised the 
old negro not to sell at the time, telling him that if he 
would hold his property for a while he would see that he 
got more for it. But when the colored gentleman and his 
"company" got ready to sell, Mr. Vanderbilt told the old 
negro that his place would not bother him at all and that 
he could continue to live in his cabin peacefully. 

So the old man still lives there in his humble home 
which he once could have sold and built for himself a 
"mansion, " which in his own estimation would have riv- 
aled the mansion of the lord of Biltmore. The little home- 
stead is a very picturesque sight, situated there in the 
valley surrounded by the mountains and in sight of the 
houses of more stately build. 

There is a private hunting ground stocked with all the 
kinds of game and animals that delight the sportsman; 
This, it is said, is one of Mr. Vanderbilt 's favorite sports 
and much of his time at Biltmore is spent here. 

The mansion, which was begun in 1890 and finished in 
1895, is said to have cost upwards of $3,000,000 and is the 
most costly private residence in America. Some one who 
stood spell-bound on the explanade of this magnificent 
chateau, remarked that he could well understand why Mr. 
Vanderbilt selected this spot of all others in America for 
the erection of a home which is as supreme among the 
houses of men as this spot is among the creations of na- 
ture. The building is rich in eveiw detail, and there is 
very free employment of decorative sculpture. On the 
front of the main tower is Mr. Vanderbilt 's monogram 
made of solid gold, the letters being some six or eight feet 
long. 

He has established a school for colored youth and it is 
doing splendid work. He has also built an Episcopal 
church on the place, which has a regular pastor, the mem- 
bers of it being mostly the people employed at Biltmore. 
Mr. Vanderbilt takes up the collection in the church when 
he is there and always waits for each one to put something 
in the plate. 

Biltmore approaches more nearly the idea of the old 
English estates than anything in America, and is truly a 
place worth seeing. A. W. DOBYNS, '99. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

WHEN TAPS SOUNDS BEFORE NIGHT. 



The jolliest company in the regiment was unusually 
sober. Not even the captain's pet ventured on any of his 
little cracks by which he usually kept a crowd at his heels 
in uproarous laughter. In the men's conversation there 
was a noticeable absence of the slang expressions devel- 
oped in the four months of camp. The quiet that pre- 
vailed through the company street was only now broken 
by the voice of the First Sergeant as he called : "Turnout 
Corporal Sparks!" 

The corporal immediately obeyed the command and 
was notified of his detail as commander of the funeral es- 
cort to attend the burial of Private Heniw C. Walton. 

This was company "M's" first death. We bad gone 
through the four long hot months of camp at Chickamauga 
and though every other camp had lost two to six men. un- 
til now we had kept our original number. Many mornings 
there were reported for duty scarcely enough men to 
make out the regular guard detail of six or eight privates. 
Typhoid, that ruthless ogre had stalked through the 
camp and every tent showed his victim. The sick report 
had swelled from a few names to full pages with the inva- 
riable prefix, typhoid opposite the names. Poor Walton 
had given up early in the game. Naturally of a meagre 
physique, he had lain in the hospital until he presented the 
appearance of a spectre. It seemed inevitable that he 
would go. But the hopeful news finally came that a gen- 
eral leave would be granted the regiment and we would 
soon be on our way home. This had a rallying effect. 
Slowly he gained strength and a few days before we were 
to break camp, he was able to report for duty. After 
reaching the state we were to remain in camp about two 
weeks preparatory to being given furloughs. It was here, 
back in our own State, after an absence of four months, 
that seemed like so many years, "Walton went into a re- 
lapse. Typhoid, the insatiable, had only given him a short 
furlough and now his time was up. It was a brief strug- 
gle. The first spell had sapped his small amount of 
strength and there remained little vitality with which to 
combat a second attack. 

The afternoon was sultry and as the sun fitfully ap- 
peared from behind floating masses of clouds, the atmos- 



10 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIA*. 

phere was left heavy and heated. We stood in the village 
grave-yard on the side of a pine wooded hill overlooking a 
sandy valley where the white tents of the camp spread out 
in graceful rows, and beyond appeared an old ante-bellum 
mainsion thrust in among a magnificent grove of oaks. My 
silent enjoyment of the scene was here interrupted by the 
appearance of the modest funeral carriage as it slowly ap- 
proached up the sandy hillside. A baggage wagon served 
in lieu of a hearse, and the small escort plodded along by 
its side. I fell to thinking of his first appearance in camp. 
He was above the ordinary height, with a small thin body 
and a long neck that supported a head slightly out of pro- 
portion. He had worn a rather seedy frock coat and his 
oddly shaped derby hat made him look taller than he actu- 
ally was In manner he was quiet and unassuming. He 
went about his duty silently and seldom joined in the 
horse play that was general throughout the company. It 
was only the day before that I learned he had left his wid- 
owed mother almost destitute, and perhaps now living far 
out in the country, she was yet unaware of her son's death. 
The wagon had arrived and the box was being carried 
toward the open grave when I came out of my reveries. As 
we stood about with uncovered heads the Chaplain went 
through the service and made a short prayer. Then the 
salute of three volleys was fired over the body, and after 
this came taps. As the tones came from the bugle mouth, 
clear and distinct, they seemed to drift almost traceable 
over the hillside, and the last lingering note left a silence 
that stole through the listeners hearts and produced a 
peaceful calm. This was the young soldier's last taps, 
his awakening reveille would be sounded through golden 
bugles, and from angels' lips. 




THE 


MILLSAPS 


COLLEGIAN, 


VOLUME 3 


JANUARY, 


1900 NUMBER 3 





Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E, Eaton, Editor '-in'-Chief H, O. White, Literary Editor 

T. W. Holloman, Alumni Editor W, L. Duren, Associate Editor 

T. B. Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

G. L. Crosby and D, C. Enochs, Assistants 



Re?nitta?ues and business communications should be sent to 
Altefi Thompson, Business Manager. Matter intended for 
Publication should be sent o B. E. Eaton. Editor-in-Chief. 



Issued the Tenth of each 7nonth during the College year, 



Subscription i per annum, $i. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



ED I TORI A L DEPA R TMENT. 



CONFERENCE ON INTER-COLLEGIATE GAMES. 

The action of the conference in regard to inter-colle- 
giate games has been the source of much regret and dis- 
appointment to our whole student body. We were of the 
opinion that the necessity of these games had been fully 
made known and that an investigation of the manner in 
which those games that our own team took part in, were 
conducted, would show conclusively that they are an al- 
most indispensable feature of the college life. We do 
not doubt the integrity of the members of the conference, 
or their conscientiousness, but we do think that their ac- 
tion was unwise, and that the college will suffer from it. 
The management of a college and the direction of its af- 
fairs requires as careful study as any other vocation that 
men are engaged in, while it is also essential to keep in 
touch with the movements throughout the college world. 
There was once a time when a study of the classics con- 



12 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

stituted the literary work of a university, and the mere 
proposal of a change was sufficient to bring- forth bitter 
attacks. Since then, the developments — following the 
change that had to be made — in scientific researches, lead- 
ing up to the most useful modern inventions, are so over- 
whelming in their importance, that now, to us, it is a mat- 
ter of surprise that the old idea was ever entertained. But 
together with the expansion of the literary courses, came 
that of college athletics, terminating in inter-collegiate 
games. They are now a permanent feature of the leading 
colleges and universities of the country, whether denomi- 
national or not, and even the suggestion of abolishing them 
would not be entertained. If they are hurtful to the best 
interests of the institutions where they exist, or to the 
students engag-ed in them, and if they have a demoralizing 
or an immoral tendency, is it not reasonable to think that 
those who are placed in the management of our great uni- 
versities, and who are eminently fitted for their work, be- 
cause of a long connection with, and study of it, would have 
discovered the mischief and discontinued the practice? 
The evil, if it exists, is so deceptive as to baffle the skill of 
our greatest college men. But to narrow the question it 
might be asked, what are the chief objections to mter-col- 
legiate games at Millsaps? They seem to be that inter- 
collegiate games are as a whole injurious, that they result 
in bodily injuries and lead to gambling. The first objec- 
tion seems to be answered by the fact that far the greater 
part of our colleges and universities have them and if they 
are bad, the delusion is general. To the second, it may be 
admitted that a few accidents occasionally happen, but so 
few in proportion to the number of games played, as to be 
insignificant. If an occasional accident condemns a prac- 
tice, then the gymnasium must be closed, for accidents, as 
many as in. a foot-ball game, occur there. Men would have 
to stop travel lest a wreck occur and the result is that we 
would have to lead a life of hopeless inactivity. To the 
third it may also be admitted that, among outsiders there 
may be a little betting on a game in which our own team 
might be engaged, but among our students, experiences 
have shown there would be none. If the abolishment of 
inter-collegiate games at Millsaps should be a decisive step 
in abolishing gambling, there would be no objection what- 
ever, but all must see the insignificance of a foot-ball game, 



THE BttLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 13 

and the fact, that without any, the opportunities for gam- 
bling' are still inexhaustible. We hope that the confer- 
ences will give the matter a careful study and then we feel 
confident that the resolutions recently passed will be re- 
scinded. 

CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS. 

The Christmas hilidays just past, have recorded more 
fatalities than the six months preceding. From almost 
every town, and especially from those that have open sa- 
loons, came the report of some drunken row, and in the 
cities murders were very frequent. It seems as if the an- 
niversary of our Saviour's birth is largely selected as a time, 
before all others, for unrestrained drunkenness and licen- 
tiousness. Men delight to roll in the mud, to indulge in 
the most obscene profanity and finally to murder, think- 
ing that, in this way only, are they appropriately celebra- 
ting and enjoying the season. The extent of the enjoy- 
ment is measured by the numberof timesor bythe length of 
timethey have been drunk. It is doubtless true that many 
families go destitute of a L'hristmas dinner, and that Santa 
Claus never gladdens the hearts of many little children 
because the father spends the earnings that should be 
given to these things, in his drunken carousals. This is 
not,, by any means, confined to the poor class alone, but 
perhaps the women and children of the poor feel its effects 
the most keenly. To many it seems to be a time when 
they should allow themselves a return of their brutish na- 
tures and animal instincts, to defy the authorities, to dis- 
honor the laws and then attempt to justify their conduct 
by saying that it is Christmas, a time for such things. 
They seem to have no conception of the significance of the 
occasion, for there could not be a more inharmonious blend- 
ing than lawlessness and the principles of our Saviour. To 
Him, it would be preferable never to have the anniversary 
of His birth celebrated, than to have it celebrated in such 
a manner. One of the duties of our age is to teach men to 
reverence, instead of desecrating this time, and to seek an 
inspiration from the greatness of the event it celebrates, 
rather than to defame it by debauchery. There can not 
be a proper observance of Christmas until men realize that 
to the birth of the Saviour are due the civilization of our 
time, the basis of governments and liberty, and greatest of 
all, the reconciliation of God to mankind. 



14 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 




Anybody who doesn't love Christmas time is unique — 
he is a strange creature under the sun. Aside from its 
primary and original significance which gives the day of 
Christ's birth its charm for the serious, it is a time of rest 
for the laborer, whether he labors for a support merely, or 
whether he is a student. There 's a reason for almost every 
idiosyncrasy, but for that which manifests itself in failure 
to love the Christmas-time there can surely be none. The 
person who does not love it must have fought and conquer- 
ed his better nature long a,go. It has always been a sea- 
son of rejoicing and merry-making among all nations that 
recognize Christ as the Son of God. Care has given place 
to mirth, the frown makes way for the smile, and hearty 
laughter completes the joy. Thoughts of business are 
banished, and all of life is happiness. Over in England 
the country 'squires make ready the feasts, and gather 
the boughs, and drag in the Yule-log and let it burn the 
whole night through. The musicians thrill the soul of the 
patriotic Briton with martial music, or please the gentle 
ladies with lays of love. The maidens doubtless long for 
the time when they shall try their hands at Christmas 
cake, and b3 r chance direct their steps straight under the 
fateful mistletoe. 

In our own land the anniversary of the birth of our 
Lord is celebrated in almost as many ways as there are 
people. Those who keep in mind what the day means, 
and feel its sacred influence, cannot but observe it with 
thankful hearts. To them it is a cherished remembrance 
of that event which meant more to the world than aught 
which has happened or can happen. They spend the day 
for the most part quietly, thoughtfully and prayerfully. 
Those of younger years, in whom there is less devotion 
than of deviltry, less of sobriety than of mirth, employ the 
time in fun and frolic. The school-boy, study-free, makes 
reparation for hours of torture by hours of pleasure. He 
drinks deep of soothing indolence or intoxicates himself 
with draughts of love. He takes a trip to the country, 
perhaps, and instead of probing the human mind he em- 



THE MILLSAPS COLLBGIAN. 15 

ploys himself more pleasantly in reading" Christmas carols. 
Instead of hastening- to the school or college building - he 
strolls through lanes beneath the evergreens and returns 
laden with holly. Instead of tampering - with combustion 
in the laboratory he frightens geese with fire-works. He 
sees and loves the silver sheen which the moon casts over 
the trees; he never thinks of calculating - the intensity of 
its heat or its lig-ht. 

He doesn't find the momentum of a moving ship ; he 
simply takes a boat-ride. His pleasures are not to be 
counted. 

But, sad to say, this is not all of Christmas. With 
some; it is a time of druken riot and shameful debauchery. 
The same air which carries the chime of the Christmas 
bells and the tidings of good things bears the incoherent 
mumbling of the inebriate. The streets abound in men 
whose veins are full of fire, whose vile tong-ues, locked at 
other times by law, are loosened. Surely, such things 
should not be. They not only offend polite society — they 
defy heaven. But in spite of misuse, Christmas is the 
gladdest time of the year. The school-boy finds it impos- 
sible to think of aught else, and the friends he makes dur- 
ing the holidays will be friends forever, we trust. 

It is truly a cause for gratulation, the love of reading. 
Those who have it ought to be thankful; those who have it 
not ought to try to get it. Of course, it can be abused. 
So can any other good thing. If we read and never put to 
use what we read, we are foolish; if we put it to bad use, 
we are criminal. But as a rule one whe loves to read will 
learn more quickly and easily. "Reading marketh a full 
man," and we must read if we would learn. It is not the 
lessons we recite daily that will do us good in after life. 
They are forgotten soon. But what we read remains with 
us, and in many places of difficult}' - lends itself to our aid. 
Reading is exceedingl} T helpful to us. With regard to 
those things nearby or connected with us, observation 
furnishes us with the most exact knowledge, but reading 
teaches us of foreign lands, which most people cannot see. 
And by reading we learn of the ancient world, its manners, 
its peoples, its history. The art of writing has improved 
so wonderfullyjthat there is now no excuse for a poor book. 
Descriptions are not now long and rambling, as they once 



16 THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

were. English phraseology is clear and compact. To 
confess oneself a non lover of literature is to confess to a 
serious deficiency. It is today a requisite, we may say, to 
g-ood breeding - . There are those, it is true, who read too 
much. On the other hand, it may be necessary to acquire 
a liking for literature. Nevertheless, the liking" is neces- 
sary to a perfectly well-bred person. When we speak of 
dislike for literature we mean a total disregard for all 
literature. A very little reading is much more beneficial to 
some people than a great amount is to others. In most 
cases very extended reading is hurtful. When it is all 
over, one wonders if he has not wasted his time. When 
one reads with profit, he knows he has not wasted his time. 
A rigid surveillance must be exercised overour reading-, or 
we will often find ourselves worse than wasting time. But 
to one who is cautious and sensible, reading is productive 
of the very greatest benefit. 




THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 17 




The exchange department of the Collegian extends a 
hearty greeting - to friends old and new, as we launch upon 
a new year and a new century. We feel that time never 
offered such an opportunity for making great resolutions, 
for just behind us are the glories of a century dimly lit by 
the sunset's amber glow, and just in front, bursting forth 
in glorious dawn, a century of measureless possibilities. 
Let us place our goal far beyond any achievement of the 
past, nor rest till we shall have found success. 

The December issue of Randolph-Macon Monthly is upon 
our table, and we found much pleasure in examining it. 
The oration — "The National Crisis," is very interesting, 
and aside from all sentiment and without disparagement 
of others we may say that it is a superb oration. 

Two other articles deserve mention also. "The Poe- 
try of Poe, " and "The Relation of Mathew Arnold to Chris- 
tianity." 

Arnold's departure from his early training leads us to 
remark that the churches should jealously guard the pu- 
rity of the college men and women, and to this end should 
fill the pulpits of college towns with their strongest men, 
for the same scepticism that Arnold met lurks in the shad- 
ows of the institutions of learning today,and if ruinous re- 
sults are to be prevented it must be by the overmastering 
force of logic. 

We notice from the Tulane University Magazine that Tu- 
lane is pressing forward. In the organization of a second 
literary society she proposes to know herself and by con- 
centration of effort in the matter of publishing a magazine 
she proposes that others shall know her. Thus far she 
does well, and the Collegian wishes her unbounded suc- 
cess. 

The S. P. U. Journal for December is up to the stand- 
ard, but, if we may say so without offense we think the ar- 
ticle, "Time, the Great Vindicator,'''' is the climax of 19th cen- 



18 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

tury achievement, for we do not remember to have seen be- 
fore this an article arranged to be read with a stereoscope. 

The Lanier memorial issue of the Emory Fhcenix is ex- 
ceptionally good. 

We admire the disposition to honor the literary genius 
of the South. We admire the spirit not from any desire 
for a selfish independence, but because of the conviction 
that Southern genius has never received just recognition. 

"A Newspaper Cut" is also interesting to us as Jack- 
son, Miss., is named as the arena of action. And it came 
to pass that the fame of the beauty, grace and purity of 
the Mississippi woman spread throughout all the regions 
round about, so much so that the youths of a far country 
dreamed of her. 

We are glad to place the University of Arizona Magazine 
on our exchange list. It is the same age as our own maga- 
zine, So, although our homes are divided by many a hill 
and dale, ours fanned by balmy breezes and theirs lit by 
the sunset's gold, we feel that we are near in purpose. 

We have other excellent magazines, and among these 
are two of more than ordinary merit, The University of Vir- 
ginia Magazine and The University of Mississippi Magazine. 
We have not the space to review separate contributions 
now so we pass them by until another time. 

In addition to those already mentioned, we desire to 
acknowledge the receipt of the following : The University 
Unit, The Reveille Emory and Henry Era, Buff and Blue, Vox 
Wesleyana, The Maroon and White, The Jeffersonian, The Pur- 
ple and Green, Blue and Gold, The Shamrock, The M. S. U. In- 
dependent, The Clionian, The Stetson Collegiate, A. & M, Re- 
flector, The Hampden-Sidney Magazine The Hendrix College 
Mirror, New England Conservatory Magazine, and Cap and 
Gown. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 19 





2ZK X 


ALUMNI 


DEPARTMENT 




X 




. 



The Alumni Editor takes pleasure in publishing' the 
following- resolutions of the Alumni Association passed at 
the meeting last commencement. They show the senti- 
ment and honest opinion of the Alumni. In publishing 
them we would remind all readers that these men have the 
welfare of the college at heart as no others can have, and 
that their views are worthy of conscientious consideration 
by those whose province it is to legislate for the college. 
The resolutions are as follows: 

We, the members of this Association, having severed 
our connection as active students, with the college, are in 
a position to view the matter from an unprejudiced point 
of view and, from our personal relations and contact with 
young men, both prospective and actual college students, 
we believe, in order to place Millsafis College in a position 
equally as inviting to new students and equally as appeal- 
ing to old students in all the phases of modern college life 
and in all the fields of mental and physical development, 
as is the case in the colleges and universities where such 
is allowed, that the material interests of the college de- 
mand .inter-collegiate athletic sports in part or in whole, 
the conditions and regulations to be prescribed by the fac- 
ult} r . Therefore be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Association that 
the Board of Trustees should take action granting to the 
faculty the right to prescribe certain rules and regulations 
under which the students of Millsaps College may engage 
with students of other colleges in athletic sports. 

Prof. G. L. Harrell, '99, who was last year Professor in 
Whitworth College, and was one of the authors of the above 
resolutions, is now Professor of Physics and Chemistry in 
Hendricks College, Conway, Ark. 

J. T. Lewis, '99, who has been a member of the North 
Mississippi Conference for a year, is now located at House 
Hill, Miss. 



20 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

H. B. Watkins, '99, joined the Mississippi, Conference 
at the December session at Brookhaven and has for the 
present year the Anding Circuit "over in old Yazoo." Her- 
bert has payed us several visits of late. 

All their friends at the College were delighted with the 
visits of Ethelbert Galloway and C. Norman Guice, both of 
the class of 1900, during the holidays. "Bert" was home 
from Vanderbilt, where he is studying medicine, to spend 
the holidays. Guice has been forced to quit his studies in 
the Theological Department of Vanderbilt on account of 
his health. He, too, joined the Mississippi Conference and 
is now located at Philadelahia, Miss. 

Dr. T. M. Dye, of Steen's CreeK, Miss., has made sev* 
eral visits to Jackson of late. 

Two occurrences of no little interest have occurred 
during the last month. A few days before the holidays, 
Mr. T. E, Stafford, '98, who has since his graduation stud- 
ied medicine at Tulane University, was married to Miss 
Pearl Parker, of Shubuta, Miss. The best happiness and 
success are our wishes to "Epp. " 

The other occurrence was the marriage of J. B. Mitch- 
ell, '1900, to Miss Mamie Scales, of Macon, Miss , January 
23, 1901. Mitchell, faithful to the prediction of the class 
prophet, has the distinguished honor of being the first 
benedict of the class of 1900. He is now in the active .min- 
istry at Guthrie, Oklahoma. In the name of the class of 
1900, the Alumni Editor wishes him the best to be had in 
life. 

Every two or three weeks we are greeted with the 
smiling face of W. T. Clark, 'i900, of Yazoo City. Madam 
Rumor, whispers softly of these frequent visits of "Bill's." 

A new shingle, with the words "Peyton & Rickets, 
Attorneys at Law," is now seen hanging out of the Hard- 
ing building. The junior member of this firm is R. B. 
Ricketts, B. S., '98, L.L. B., 1900, whom the writer had the 
honor to succeed as Alumni Editor of the Collegian. 

Mr. J. C. Hardy, L. L. B., '98, now President of the 
A. & M. College of Mississippi, spent the holidays at the 
home of his father-in-law, Judge A. H. Whitfield. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



21 



F. M. Bailey, L. L. B., 1900, is practicing law at Wi- 
nona, Miss. 

H. S. Stevens, '95, a rising - young 1 lawyer of Hatties- 
burg, Miss., paid the College a visit a short while ago. 

J. B. Allford, '98, now a pedagogue at McComb, Miss., 
passed through during the holidays on a pleasure trip to 
Yazoo. 

H. P. Lewis, Jr., 1900, is now a member of the Missis- 
sippi Conference, and is located at Anguilla, Miss. 

A. J. McCormick, '96, one of the most prominent young 
men of the Clarksville bar, passed through Jackson some 
time ago. 

George B. Power, '97, of the Natchez bar, spent the 
holidays at the home of his father, Col. J. L. Power, in this 
city. 

Both members of the law firm of Teat & Teat, of Kos- 
ciusko, have been in Jackson on legal business of late. 

Mr. Percy Clifton, '98, who is practicing law atBiloxi, 
spent the holidays at his father's home in this city. 




22 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 




Alas, after the holidays we have returned homesick, 
wishing - that Cristmas would last all the year. 

From their Christmas vacation, we are glad to note 
the return of our student body and, also to welcome many 
new faces; we wish for all a prosperous year. 

E. H. Galloway, '00, now of Vanderbilt, came home to 
spend the holidays with his parents and was most cordially 
welcomed by his many friends. 

Mr. Pope Jordan, after some months spent at the 
University of Missouri returns to Millsaps. Assuring- us 
by his presence that Millsaps is the place. 

Colds are the fad, and you might as well be out of the 
world as out of the fashion. So take a "grip." 

Mr. Hayes, of Euporia, is numbered among our recent 
visitors. 

Mr. J. H. Gardner from somewhere (?) on the Gulf 
and Ship Island spent a few days with friends. 

Miss Lewis, of Edwards, is the attractive guest of 
Miss Katie Gray. 

Miss Katie Redding has been the charming guest of 
her aunt, Miss Annie Linfield. 

The Faculty started the New Year in a horrible man- 
ner by making lessons twice as long. The man of the 
twentieth century is to be a wonder. 

A certain "Prep" has a little book in which he writes 
what he ought to buy and calls this his "autobiography." 

While on his way home from Vanderbilt C. N. Guice, 
'00, stopped over to see his many friends. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 23 

The senior class at their last meeting- elected the fol- 
lowing officers: J. T. McCafferty, President, A. A. 
Hearst, Vice President; W. L. Felder, Secretary; E. O. 
Whittington, Treasurer; J. A. Vaughan, Historian. 

The latest importation to the College is two hundred 
pounds of "glass." A specimen which will be quite an 
addition to the Law Department. 

H. B. Watkins, '99, on his return from the Mississippi 

Conference spent several days in Jackson with his mother 

nd friends. 
a 

W. L. Duren has been chosen by the Faculty to rep- 
resent Millsaps at the inter-collegiate contest, and we feel 
assured that in this wise selection our College will be 
creditably represented. 

G. R. Nobles has gone home tojrecuperate. We refer 
him to "Job" for comfort. 

Misses Cavett's visitors, after a delightful stay of some 
weeks, have returned home. They were the recipients of 
many social attentions. 

Some of our boys were most severly and vehemently 
charged with misconduct at the Capitol Street Church. 
We are glad to note that after thorough investigation they 
stand honorably acquitted by the Faculty. 

Since the close of the football season some interest in 
basket-ball has sprung up, but we find nothing that stimu- 
lates the students with enthusiasm as the "game of all 
games" — football. And we sincerely hope that the Con- 
ference will reconsider the action taken on this question. 
We feel that we ought to be able to compete with all col- 
leges in athletics, as well as curriculum. Let us be among 
the first or none. 



LAMAR LITERARY SOCIETY NOTES. 

During the past three months there have been many 
political contests in the Lamar Literary Society. Factions 
have been formed and the constitutionality of elections de- 
bated and passed upon, but every contest has been marked 
by friendliness and good will. 



24 THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

Mr. H. G. Fridge was elected anniversarian, and Mr. 
A. J. McLaurin, Jr., orator of the occasion. 

Messrs. Allen Thompson and Edwin Ricketts were 
elected commencement debators These gentlemen have 
proved their debating - qualities, and the society is confident 

of a victory next commencement. They are to uphold the 
affirmative side of the following question: 

Resolved, "That a higher civilization has no right to 
force itself upon a lower one, " against Messrs. Felder and 
Williams of the Galloway Society. 

The following are the officers now serving: H. G. 
Fridge, president; C. D. Potter, vice president; D. C. 
Enochs, recording secretary; L. R. Featherston, critic; 
H. A. Wood, treasurer; Hilburn, censor. 

Several weeks ago a public debate was held, and the 
question. Resolved, "That political parties are not neces- 
sary to a democratic government," was discussed. 

Messrs. Pitman and Potter represented the affirma- 
tive; Messrs. Lemly and Holloman the negative. "Bell- 
haven" and many of our young lady friends from town 
were present. The young ladies and teachers from Bell- 
haven were asked to serve as judg-es. Their decision was 
in favor of the affirmative. 

A word of praise for our society. We are proud of 
her record in the past, and her success in the future is 
assured. Why? Because she has taken a page in the 
Collegian? Not altogether, but because out of the four 
"Coeds," four have become Lamar's. 

C. D. Potter, 

Cor. Sec. L. L. D. 



THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 25 



WRITTEN ON THE FLY LEAF OF A XENEFJLON. 



A pony like Sapolio 

Both time and labor saves; 
It bears one o'er the rugged heights, 

It skims him o'er the waves. 

Then come my pony, come to me, 
With glad and gallant tread, 

And rest thy golden mane upon 
My tired and aching head. 

Take me upon thy spacious back, 
And through Greek mazes bear 

To those clear heights of joy serene, 
Above Hellenic Air. 

Not India's mines, uor Eden's groves 
Could tempt me now to leave, 

The gallant back, whereon I sit, 
To which I fondly cleave. 

Borne thus upon my flying steed 
I'll scorn the student's woes, 

And ride with flying colors through 
Examination's close. 



Young Gentlemen 



When you need any Fancy Candies and Beautiful 
Fruits for your Sweet Girls. 



BEAR IN MIND. 



that the Onliest Place to get them is from your 
friends, 

W. S. LEMLY & BRO., Who will please you. 

THOS. P. BARR, 

Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, „ 1 Q 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. irearl btreet. 

stiple sL, Groceries, ~i^. m^iw* 

'Phone No. 78. 203 W est Capitol Street 

Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps , 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

Bowers Bros. & DiixcDsri. 

H. B. JENKINS— +-^—* 

Proprietor and Mac ager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

Y D. LOTT JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

WEST ££<5KSON SHOE STORE. 



Try a pair of our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 

<"alf, Vici Kid and Enamel. The} are the best shoes sold for the 

trice. Our $3 shoes are equal to any other $3.50 shoe on the market. 

e are headquarters for fine footwear. A hearty welcome and free 

shine always awaits you at 

300 West Capitol St. 



©cxj.1:lTL<=sx-:rx Colleg* 



Near all of those which issue handsomely engrayed Anniversary and 
Commencement Invitations are having them done by a Southern firm 
who are doing very artistic work. We refer to 

«J. F>. STEVENS, of Atlanta, Ga. 

This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of 
high grade strel and copper plete engraving, and invitation commit- 
tees would do well to obtain their prises and samples before placing 
their orders. 



If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham's Drug Store 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

}r W. H WATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures on Com- 




the 



Best - COLLEGE>^3soN,Mg^ --^ 



THel 

KNICKERBOCKER 

=—=CAFE 

FOR LUNCHES, FISH, OYSTERS AND GAME. 

The Nicest Dining- Room in the City. The best line of 
Cigars. Huyler's, Rubel & Allegretti and Plow's Candy* 
Fresh Cakes and Candies always on hand at 

EVANS & BANKS. 

State Street. Jackson, Miss. 



/ Want Your Trade And Will Treat You Right, 

Call on me when you want anything in my line. 

Your friend, 

JACKSON, IVIISS. 

John W. Patton J. Jay Whitb 

Patronize Home People. 

RATTON & WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments. 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

313 OAPITOL ST. JACKSON. MISS 

Jackson, Miss. 

| J. B. BOURGEOIS, 

♦ Jeweler and Graduate Optician 

f Jackson, Mississippi. 



Try Us On Your SHOES. 

Our $3.50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 

Date. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL KINDS OF SHOES. 

Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

C. CUMMINGS 6c SON. 



^ AAAAAAA ifi A A *■»■*******■* a aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 



. . Council Lumber, Goal and Lime Company. 

Dealers In 



j Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. V 



< 'PHONE 178- 



J. T. LOWTHER, 

Jackson, Miss. 



N. L. WINGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsaps Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



CAPITOL STATE BANK 



Jackson, Miss. 

CAPITAL $100,000. SURPLUS, $100,000. 

BROWN BROTHERS, 

JACKSON. MISS. 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for Celebrated Columbus Buggies. 




220 E. CAPITOL ST. 

I call attention of readers of this Magazine, that I offer 
you at fair prices, School and College Books, Fancy Sta- 
tionery, Periodicals, Sporting Goods, Picture Frames etc. 

Please make my store your loafing place. 

20th Century Greeting ^^asm. 

To our student friends, and a Great 
Reduction in our Fall and Winter 
Clothing. A complete line of Shoes, Hats, 
and Furnishings always on hand at 
special prices. 



Thompson Bros 



For Girls and Young Ladies, Jackson, Miss. 

One of the best equipped schools in the south. Spring 
term begins February 3, 1901. For further infofmation 
and our handsome catalogue address, 

L. T. FITZHUGH, A. M., President. 



WM: H. W ATKINS. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Harding Building jackson, nississippi. 



Dar. J. I-i. Magruder, 

IZ> e in t i «s t 

No. 108^ S. State St. Jackson, Miss. 



BM WWWMa WaBB»WMI«M *BBaMB M BEa WMEaBraB»aaaB«««B38^ 

DR. A. HILZ1MS DENTAL ROOMS 

Special Rates to College Students. \ l24 l A South State St. 

All the latest improvements ' x ■ -. r 

in Dentistry JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI. 



J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AT" FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



I Attorneys at Law, 



JACKSON, MISS. 



CLEAR 

Strong l^iglril: «g^ 

The light from a Student Lamp is the kind that rests tired 
eyes. Nickle-plated ones cost, with shade, $3.25 to $5.50. 

Th|E ROOKERY 

For dependable light givers. 

Rook-Binding For the Trade. — **- 

The NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., is prepared to bind 
books in cloth, or make book covers for small offices at cheap 
prices. Get our prices before sending your binding away. 



To Students of Millsaps J3C 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything - you will probably need in the Drug- 
line. 

^*^J. E HUNTER & CO. 



STUDENTS 



We wish you one and all a prosperous 

i 

and happy new year and extend our 
thanks for your past patronage and hope 
to^merit a continuance of same in the 

present year. 

1 

LOGAN PHILLIPS \ 

s 

The Clothier and Gent's Furnisher. 



£ 



WHEN YOU NEED, 

Fancy Stationery, Fruits, Fancy Candy, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Cigars and Tobacc. 

Call On Your Friend 

A. E. GOOCH. 



• 


Fine 


T Tf^OTVT 






• 



• 
• 
• 


Watch 


and 


Jewelry Repairing, 




• 

: 


• 

• 
• 


Eyrich's Book Store, 




JACKSON, 


MISS. 


• 
• 



,- 



! ^EiBELMAN BROS. 




© 

® 



202-204 S, State St. 

CL^OTHIEF^S- 




1108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

We have our own Photograph Gallery 
for Half Tone and Photo Engraving. 



Fashionable Engraving 



AND 



Stationery 



LEADING HOUSE FOR 

Coi-i-eGe, School, and Wedding Invitations 

Dance programs. Menus 
before ordering elsewhere fine engraving of 

Compare Samples „,«,„« 

and Prices alu KINOa 



Translations 

Literal, 50c. Interlinear, $1.50. 147 vols. 

Dictionaries 

German, French, Italian, Spanish, 
Latin, Greek, $2.00, and $1.00. 

Completely Parsed Caesar, 

Book I. Has on each page, interlinear 
translation, literal translation, and 
every word completely parsed. $1.50. 

Completely Scanned and Parsed Ae- 

neid. Book I. §1.50. Ready August, igoo. 

HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers, 

4-5-6-12-13-14 Cooper Institute, N.Y. City. 

Schoolbooks 0/ all publishers at one store. 



in a hurry 



Wffm Ant * at New York prices, singly 

\gg^ or by the dozen, may be obtained 

z^^. second-hand or new, by any boy or 

((MM)))) P rl in tne remotest hamlet, or any 1 

\^^/ teacher or official anywhere, and ' 

O Delivery prepaid i 

/£p|^. Brand new, complete alphabetical 

M@y)j) catalogue,/rw,of school books of all I 

^^S? publishers, if you mention this ad. 

Jill HINDS & NOBLE / 

V^p/ Cooper Institute New York City ' 



JOHNSON, TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

^^ Groceries at Wholesalers*^ 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing 1 bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. " We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 

Special Sale this Month of over 500 Men's Fine Fall Suits. 

$12 00 All Wool Suits at..... $8 00 

14 00 All Wool Suits at 10 00 

15 00 and 16 00 All Wool Suits at.... 11 00 r 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS IN UNDERWEAR, 

Men's Cotton Fleece Lined Undersuits at..'. 89c 

Men's Wool Fleece Lined Undersuits, at ._ 1 05 

Men's Pure Wool Undersuits, extra fine, at $2, 2.50, $3 & 3.50 

Men's Colored Stiff Bosom Shirts, with detachable, cuffs and no 
collar, "Wauchusett" make, at 50c, 75c and $i.00. 

We can save you money on anything, 
JONES BROS. & CO. 

Atlantic A $3.5o S Men's Shoe. State & Pearl St., Jackson, Miss. 



9L4-* 



Staph and Fancy Dry Goods, 



NOTIONS AND SHOES. 



1 14 South State Street, Jackson, Mississippi. 




Ill II ''. 



The 
Millsaps Collegian 



CONTENTS: 



The Woman in Black '■» 1 
Shelley's Spiritual Outlook 5 
Practical Importance of 

Bacteria - - - %- - 9 
Editorial Department - 14 
Literary Department - 18 
Exchange Department - 27 
Local Department - - 29 




PUBLISHED BY 



THE STUDENTS OF MILLSAPS COLLEGE. 



SHURLDS 



Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 



South State St. v!^ ItA V_J JT^ J—^l_3i^ I [] ; 



We Educate the Masses 

On QuestioQsof 

a: furniture a: 

Isydore Strauss & Son, 

207-209 State Street. 



b 
* 
* 




JACKSON, MISS. 



£|DEAL LOCATION, combining- all the advantages of the 
©t city with the healthful conditions and immunities of the 
country. Convenient to electric car line. 




s. 



FOR CATALOGUE ADDKICSS 

W. B. MURRAR, President., 



The Millsaps Collegian 



Vol. 3 JACKSON, MISS., FEBRUARY, 1901. No. 4 



THE WOMAN IN BLA CK. 



[Continued.] 

It is not worth while for me to relate the events of the 
following week, suffice it to say that my evil forebodings 
were not without foundation, and during the week almost 
my whole time and attention were given to tending on my 
new patient. 

The time came when I was compelled to return home. 
In the meantime mind you, I had decided to try my luck at 
hanging out my little shingle at Brabston, and I was going 
home only to make preparations to permanentl} 7 return as 
soon as possible. 

I had, while Helen was sick, came to be on quite inti- 
mate terms with Colonel Berton.and, I feel quite sure, had 
won his confidence and esteem. I talked with him about 
the advisability of locating there and he gave me consider- 
able encouragement, saying that he thought there was a 
good opening there for a young man, like myself, who had 
the elements of success in him. (I wondered if he intend- 
ed to include the "like myself" in the last part of his sen- 
tence.) 

However that may be, in a short time I was a practic- 
ing physician in the town of Brabston; possibly the real 
situation would be more accurately represented should I 
say soliciting- physician. Whether or not I had embodied 
in me the elements of success I cannot say, but I can say 
that the end of the first year found me succeeding in a 
greater or less degree. I had made quite \ host of friends, 
more especially among the elder class of people. 

I knew they were the ones on whom I must depend for 
success or defeat. Sol thought it to my advantage to gain 
their confidence by attending to business in a business 



2 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

manner and then I could enter more social circles as the 
opportunity afforded. I was always fond of society and it 
was an undertaking - of no little difficulty for me to hold 
myself entirely aloof from social affairs and devote my 
time to taking - advantage of every opportunity which was 
afforded for me to gain the esteem of the people at large. 
Do not think, however, that during all this time I had 
failed to be an occasional visitor at the Berton residence. 
They assured me that I had a most cordial welcome at 
their home at any and all times, and I found so much 
pleasure in my little calls there that they gradually be- 
came more frequent. 

Colonel Berton had become my closest personal friend 
and adviser; indeed I never hesitated for a moment to 
seek his advice on any matter of importance. 

The time came when I thought I could give more re- 
gard to my social duties in which I found so much pleas- 
ure, and it was not an infrequent occurrence for Helen 
and me to drive out to the Springs and back in the after- 
noon. One afternoon sometime in June, I don't remember 
exactly when; no matter, we had driven quite a distance 
without either having said a word, just driving leisurely 
along a shady lane. I hardly think I shall ever forget it, 
at least not soon. 

The sun was getting low and it threw long shadows of 
the trees across the dusty road. There was a gentle breeze 
stirring which caused their leafy tops to cast dancing shad- 
ows on the ground. 

"Helen, what have you been thinking about so long?" 
I said, not thinking for a moment what it might be. 

She raised her eyes to mine and, giving me a long, 
searching glance, said: "You don't know about my 
troubles, do you?" 

"No, " I answered, "no one has ever mentioned the 
subject to me and I have never asked. I thought if you 
would like for me to know you would probably tell me 
sometime. I thought too, perhaps, you never liked to 
mention it." 

"No, I never speak of it," she said, "tho' I think of it 
a great deal; too much, I suppose. But if you would like 
to know I will tell you." 

I expressedmy desire toknow, and thena peculiar feel- 
ing came over me, a feeling that I had never experienced 
before. I felt that she, a poor, weak, helpless woman, had 



THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 3 

put confidence enough in me to open to me her very soul. 

"I will tell it to you as briefly as possible," she said, 
and began. 

"Papa sent me to a boarding school, and while I was 
there I met a young man at a ball one night who made love 
to me. I, a fickle young girl, thought I would just have a 
little fun, as we called it, and for that reason I gave him all 
the encouragement necessaiw. You know at the boarding 
school they kept us penned up like we were prisoners, and 
when we did get out we were literally wild sure enough. 

"Hewashandsome, well dressed and apparently a gen- 
leman in every respect, and arrangements were made for 
him to see me again. 

"Things developed until they became of a more ser- 
ious nature. I had really fallen in love with him and he 
with me, so he said, and I have no reason to doubt that he 
was then. He was lovely to me. 

"After awhile we became engaged. I was graduated 
that year and he came to see me several times after I went 
home. Mamma and papa were altogether very much 
taken with him and readily gave their consent to the mar- 
riage and, in short, we were married. 

"I was supremely happy for awhile. I did not know 
before that life could be so beautiful, even now I cannot 
doubt that he did love me then. But — a change came." 

She stopped and I looked up at her. Tears were in 
her eyes and that I could not bear. 

"I know the rest," I said. "The same old story of a 
mismated marriage." 

"Yes, " she said, "we were never quite happy after 
that night he was unkind to me. I have forgiven him all 
and I trust that God in heaven has too." 

She did not say anything more and I was truly glad of 
it. I have often wondered what it was that happened on 
the night that she spoke of, but would never ask her. 
AVhen we reached home it was nearly dark. 

"Do come in and take tea with us," she said," we 
would all be so glad to have you, especially papa and I." 

"No, I cannot this evening, but will tomorrow evening 
do as well?" 

"O, yes; any time vou wish. I will look for vou then. 
Good bye." 

Poor creature, I thought, she is too much like an angel 
for this earth. How could any man be brute enough to 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

be unkind to her. Really the question which presented 
itself to me was how could any man help loving her. 

The next evening - 1 went as I had promised, and found 
Helen and her sister Mary in the parlor waiting for me. 

Mary was playing a waltz, and when I entered I would 
not hear to her quitting. On this evening my soul was 
unusually responsive to the music, and in a short while 
Helen and I were floating about over the room in a manner 
most delightful, to me at least. 

With my great arms around her I felt strong enough 
to guard and protect her and love her too, if that should 
call for any physical strength, and I thought too, that my 
life would be supremely happy should I be allowed to do 
so. I knew I was in love with her and the next thing to be 
done was to win her love if possible, about which I confess 
I had my doubts. 

Soon Mary stopped playing and, of course, we stopped, 
else I think we should have been there yet. 

I think we all were in an unusually good humor that 
evening; I know I never heard Helen laugh and talk so 
freely, and Mary too, jolly little body that she is, was giv- 
ing her share of fun for the occasion. She has a wonder- 
fully comprehensive little mind and I can't help but be- 
lieve that she appreciated my feelings, for just at that 
time she ran out of the room, leaving us alone. 

"Harry," said Helen, as we sat down on a sofa, "you 
always make me feel so happy when you are here." 

"Tnen won't you let me make you happy all the time; 
you know that I love you?" 

"O, I did not mean it that way. I can never marry 
any one; I could never trust any man again. You know, 
Harry, that I trust you as a friend, but — " 

I remembered whatshe had told me about her mother, 
and fancied that she was like her in some respects. The 
only way that I saw to carry my point was to convince her 
that all men were not like her first husband, and in this 
case I, the defendant, had to do my own pleading. So I 
proceeded as best I could. 

"Helen, you know you do not distrust all men." 

"Yes— all." 

"You know there is one man whom you trust." 

"No, not one, I cannot. " 

"But I know there is one in whom you put the utmost 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 5 

confidence; you know that you trust your father." 

"O, I was not speaking of him. I know I can trust 
him, but he is the only one. You are always tripping me 
where I least expect it." 

"Now if there is one can't there be two?" 
A tear fell from her eyes. I knew I had won and, tak- 
ing her little hand in mind, I gently pressed it to my lips. 
A moment's silence prevailed, during which we both 
sat in deep study. 

"Harry," she said, after some minutes, "I cannot, I 
must not, I will not. If you wish us to remain as we are, 
the dearest of friends, then you will not mention this 
again, I cannot bear it." 

"Just let me ask you one more question, won't you. 
Then as you wish?" 

"Ic-e-s, one more if you want to." 
"Will you answer the truth to my question?" 
"Yes." 

"Then will you say that you do not love me?" 
"Harry, ) ou are beginning to be mean to me already." 
"It's only a means to a happy end," I said. 
I did not get an answer in words, but one that meant 
far more than words can express. I folded her to my 
bosom with all the sweetness of a first embrace. 

Helen says she doesn't believe yet that there are but 
two men in the world that can be trusted. They are her 
father and myself. She says little Fred will make a third 
one when he comes to be a man. But I tell her that I can 
convince her that there are more, in the same way that I 
convinced her that there were two. 

"No you can't," she says, "I am not in love with any 
more." 

Walter A. Williams. 



SHELLEY'S SPLRLTUAL OUTLOOK. 



Carry le's remark that: "It is well said in ever} 7 instance 
that a man's religion is the chief fact with regard to him," 
seems to be especially true of Shelley. Here not simply 
the profession and assertion of a creed is meant; but 
"religion" has a larger and higher sense, it means the 



6 THE MLLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

spiritual relation of a man to the Unseen World. This 
spiritual relation was more to Shelley than his poetry; in 
almost every instance his poetry was simply a record of 
his spiritualexistence. Hismindseemsnevertohave been at 
rest concerning this vital question. We see him dreadfully 
in earnest with himself and with the Universe. Although 
belonging to that class of minds, as Shelley's did, that de- 
rive their conceptions from impulses and have not that 
constant surveillance of the conscience, it, nevertheless, 
did not rest in an easy abandon of indifference and disre- 
gard. 

It would be difficult to conceive of a man more natur- 
ally fitted for a religionist. His face, his comportment, 
his every aspect, were those we would look for in the 
spiritually concerned nature. And yet how warped was 
this nature. How much at sea were his sensibilities. De 
Quincy says, "Can we imagine the case of an angel touched 
by lunacy? Have we ever seen the spectacle of a human 
intellect exquisite by its functions of creation, yet in one 
chamber of its shadowy house already ruined before the 
light of manhood had cleansed its darkness? Such an 
angel, such a man — if ever such there were — such a lunatic 
angel, such a ruined man was Shelley, whilst yet standing 
on the earliest threshold of life. " While still young he had 
"the vision" of sublime beauty and happiness and the 
ceaseless contemplation of the ideal world built for him a 
wall around the actual. Eyes fixed on the splendid ap- 
paritions with which he peopled space he went through 
the world not seeing the highway, the stumbling stones of 
the roadside. Seldom has a mind been seen that went so 
far above the actual. He lays aside the laws of nature and 
rushes into that spirit-peopled world where his shadowy 
apparitions flit about like their companions, the clouds 

Shelley's belief went through three stages; first, a 
gross materialism, then what might be called Nihilism, and 
later it showed the influence of Plato. During this first 
stage "Queen Mab,"his initial production of any conse- 
quence appeared, and here we see him in his bitterest 
mood, as if he felt himself the Guardian Angel of man, and 
shuddering at what he considered the disfigurement and 
desecration of man's greatest legacies, "dared to hurl de- 
fiance" at Christianty, Government and all established in- 
stitutions. He whirled and snapped at these "curses of 
man" like an enraged mother-eagle protecting her brood. 



THE MILLS APS COLLEGIAN. 7 

The degree of antagonism that this poem aroused in Eng- 
land was not calculated to sate his overpowering - wrath. 
People may forgive personal wrongs, but when their exist- 
ing- establishments that are gathered around them for the 
furtheranceof imperative needs are attacked, then there is 
no forgiveness. Such violent execrations backed up by 
such an uncompromising nature was a new spectacle to 
the English people and many naturally felt for the poet an 
increasing animosity that bids fair to continue with the life 
of his writings. Nothing is more singular than that a poet 
of this rank should have felt an almost fierce joy in the 
possession of opinions which, if true, would move a sensi- 
tive nature to the keenest and deepest melancholy. That 
this life is all; that this earth delivered of the oppressions 
of Religion and Government would be the reality of 
Heaven; that there is no God, but only atoms and a mould- 
ing breath; these were singular doctrines by which to pro- 
duce joy in the possessor. They could only have been re- 
ceived with joy by a wild imperious mind bursting with 
eager energy and unknown to any form or law. 

From this stage his mind passed to another, but not 
immediately to a greater belief. On the contrary it was 
the philosophy of Hume which succeeded the materialism 
of the first period. It is less difficult to see why Shelley 
accepted this view; for what Hume held, that there was no 
substantial thing, either matter or mind, but only "sensa- 
tions and impressions" inherring'in nothing and going no- 
where was almost natural of Shelley to believe. His mind 
of a swarm of ideas, thoughts, fancies, streaming on with- 
out his volition, in no definite plan or order; these clouded 
his intellect and prevented him from seeing the outer 
world. Shelley may be pardoned for thinking that these 
ideas, the fancies were all; for they were so much of the 
man himself. He pursued the study of this system of 
philosophy with zeal, and these speculations produced a 
ferment in his brain; they excited his wild nerves and ap- 
palled his imaginatton with their blank results. He at last 
was obliged to pause in the last fragment of one of his 
metaphysical papers, as he says, "overcome by thrilling 
horror." 

In this state of mind he began the study of Plato. 
Here again we see him naturally attracted. He's found a 
master in this great mind rising above the clouds of 
paganism that surrounded it. He already held that the 



8 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

all-apparent phenomena were unreal and that the idea was 
superior to the evidence cf the senses; and he craved to 
believe in something noble, beautiful and shadowy. He 
found delight in Plato's philosophy for its bold imprudence, 
its love of adventure and mystery. All his later writings 
are colored by this theory; though at times there is seen a 
momentary return to his old conceptions, as if a shadowy 
misgiving still lurked in his mind. He seems though, 
never to have accepted that part of Plato which forms the 
basis for the church to place him among the first prepara- 
tory preceptors of Christianity. In this, the highest state 
of spiritual existence to which he clearly attained, there 
seems to be no distinct conception of a creative being, so 
essential to a real religion. This "idea" which he 
acknowledged, he changes into a spirit, gives it life and 
motions but no more; and while he admires it, he yet fails 
to worship. 

It is difficult to estimate to what extent this self-en- 
closed, self-absorbed nature was influenced by outward 
life. A remarkable fact is, that no writer on Shelley men- 
tions in more than the briefest manner his mother, his re- 
lation to her, or what her influence over him might have 
been. There was nothing in common between him and 
his rather easy-going father. If he had, as a child, been 
reared to reverence religion, it would not have been so 
easy for him at the age of seventeen to address his "Neces- 
sity of Atheism" to heads of the colleges at Oxford. While 
still at Oxford he took an oath characteristic of the man. 
"Here I swear — and as I break my oaths may Infinity, 
Eternity blast me — here I swear that never will I forgive 
intolerance." 

Robert Louis Stevenson says of Shelley: "Chafing at 
the Church of England, he discovered the cure of all evils 
in universal atheism. When the torrent sweeps the man 
against a bowlder, you must expect him to scream, and 
you need not be surprised if the scream is sometimes a 
theory. Shelley was a young fool, but it is better to be a 
fool than to be dead. It is better to emit a scream in the 
shape of a theory than to be entirely insensible to the jars 
and incongruities of life and take everything as it comes 
in a forlorn stupidity." This theoroy of his was continu- 
ally advancing and let us be pleased to feel with one of his 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



commentators that if he had lived to a ripe age he would 
have cleared his mind of the shadows and eventually would 
have accepted what was best and truest in the Christian 
faith. Egdirf. 



THE PR A CTICAL I MP OR TANCE OF BA CTERIA. 



COMPILED BY W. L. EENNON, 1900. 

The following article is written in recognition of that 
increasing desire on the part of the people not only to ac- 
cept and welcome the discoveries and advancements of the 
scientific world, but to understand their true scope and 
bearing. And also to set aright many 'prevalent miscon- 
ceptions in regard to the science of bacteriology, which 
tend to deprive it of its true scientific bearing. 

This science may be classed among the many others 
which have had their birth during the 19th century, for 
the science of bacteriolugy was not thought of when Van 
Leenwenhoek turned the first microscope, the product of 
his own hand, into the abysses of the microscopic world. 

In order to understand the true scope and bearing of 
the science, it is necessary to consider two theories with 
reference to the facts in the case. The first of these, and 
the one which most naturally presents itself to us, con- 
siders that there are definite species of bacteria, each 
characterized by a constant form, which always remains 
the same. It further considers that every disease and 
fermentation are casually concerned with but one of these 
definite species, and the specific baccilus and disease are 
always found coincident. This theory is known as the 
"form genera, " or in popular language is what is gener- 
ally understood by the modern "germ theory." 

This theory is a very pleasant one to consider, as it 
appears to relieve us of all responsibility in regard to the 
contraction of disease, but when considered with refer- 
ence to the facts we find it wholy incompetent to explain 
them. According to the theory we find that every typical 
fermentation is caused by a definite species, but as a fact 
there have been discovered three distinct baccili capable 
of producing vinegar from^alcohol. 

The same thing is found to be true with respect to 



10 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

the ability of producing - disease. We find that a certain 
species of bacteria will produce disease in one person, 
while another will remain entirely immune. For example 
take the typhoid baccilus. A whole community may be 
exposed to this germ by the use of contaminated water, 
while only a small per cent ever contract the disease. The 
same thing is noticed in nearly every epidemic. Such con- 
siderations as these have shattered the very foundations 
of the theory of constant species. 

The ability of bacteria to cause disease as well as 
provoke fermentation is, as a matter of fact, variable; it 
may increase or decrease according to certain conditions. 
And since the bacteria depend on the conditions of health 
for the provision of their food and energy, we find that 
these are the conditions with which they vary. The bac- 
teria can remain the same only as long as these conditions 
do not vary So that bacteria must either adjust them- 
selves to the prevalent conditions, or form spores that will 
preserve the species until favorable conditions return. 
Thus the different species are not to be considered speci- 
fic in the natural history sense. 

We have been able experimentally, in our laboratories, 
to render many of the most virulent germs, such as chol- 
era, anthrox and tuberculosis, entirely harmless by sub- 
jecting them to unfavorable conditions, and by supplant- 
ing their original conditions to renew their original activ- 
ity. So we must consider the original "form species" as 
mere nutritional modifications. 

The ability of bacteria to provoke disease as well as 
cause fermentation, being as we have seen, only qualities 
of adaptation, makes it possible for us to discuss scientific- 
ally the cause and prevention of disease. 

In investigating the cause of disease we are confronted 
with the specific disease germ as entirety, as I have 
previously referred to in other words, that each disease is 
casually concerned with only one specific disease germ. 
Which in the light of our other theories appears impos- 
sible even if it could otherwise explain the phenomena, 
which it cannot do. 

The term "cause" is used here in its strictest scien- 
tific sense, that is, it is exactly equally to the effect it pro- 
duces. For example, in considering the effect produced 
by the exp 1 osion of a quantity of gunpowder, we might 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. ll 

either consider as the cause, the spark or external stimu- 
lus, which provoked the explosion, or the quantity of gun- 
powder present. 

In the first place we have as the cause something - ex- 
ternal and bearing" no quantilative relation whatever to the 
effect. In the second place we have something internal 
that is exactly concurrent and equal to the effect. We 
shall regard the latter as the true cause. 

Since whatever be the external conditions, the eye 
only perceives light and the ear sound, it is therefore in 
the internal conditions of the cells and tissues alone that 
determines the character of the effect. And this is found 
in our predisposition toward disease, which may be either 
inherited or acquired from the external conditions. Now 
as these external conditions vary, our predispositions vary 
and the predisposition toward disease may be transferred 
into disease by the application of the least external stimu- 
lus, which is to be found in the bacteria, much after the 
same fashion as the explosion, where the spark or exter- 
nal stimulus is represented by the bacteria, the quantity 
of powder by the predisposition, and the effect produced 
by the powder as the disease. Here we see that the dis- 
ease produced is just as dependent, on the amount of pre- 
disposition, so to speak, as the effect produced by the ex- 
plosion is dependent on the quality of powder present. 
Now since our predispositions vary and are dependent on 
the external conditions, we are forced on every hand to 
acknowledge our relation to the soil, water, food and social 
surroundings. 

To illustrate the foregoing principles by a concrete 
example let us consider some facts of our recent epidem- 
ics. Comparing the late epidemics with some of the pre- 
ceding ones, we find on the whole, that the}' are much less 
virulent. We also find that in the same epidemic, that the 
virulence varies greatly in different localities, and that in 
the individuals themselves some succumb almost instant- 
ly, others rapidly recover; while some remain entirely im- 
mune. 

How can these facts be explained? Certainly not by 
the "specific germ" theory, for in that event, if we con- 
sider the specific germ, which always remains constant as 



12 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

the cause of the disease, it could not vary with either time, 
place or individual. 

On the other hand, however, when we consider the 
relations of the germs, and of their adaptation to the pre- 
valent conditions, we find a full explanation of every de- 
tail. For we see that when the conditions for the cultiva- 
tion of the germ are favorable, that these conditions alone 
will decide the character of the disease, and we have found 
that these may vary at different localities as well as in dif- 
ferent epidemics. Now as to the individual, we see that 
his acquired predisposition decides the character of his 
disease and that the baccilus is only the spark which 
lights the internal fire, that so often consumes many a 
valuable life. 

Now as we see that all responsibility is thrown back 
on the individual, and we can no longer blame the bacteria 
for our own imprudences, the all important question 
presents itself for our consideration, namely, that in the 
same way that no fermentation can take place unless there 
is some fermentable substance, no disease can take place 
if there is no predisposition toward disease; can this fer- 
mentable substance or predisposition be removed and, if 
so, how? This question, although so important, is capable 
of very simple solution, in fact I am afraid that the sim- 
plicity of its solution has given rise to our recent trouble. 

There can be but one way to successfully combat dis- 
ease — that is to combat the cause, or remove the predis- 
position. This can be done by observing the strictest 
sanitary and hygeinic measures as well as putting our- 
selves through natural ways of living, and so modifying 
our social conditions that our predispositions may be en- 
tirely removed and we can no longer furnish the fuel for 
the fire of our own destruction. 

On the other hand if we neglect these measures, we 
not only accumulate the fuel, but we can also cultivate the 
spark to ignite it, for the most harmless bacteria, when 
subjected to the favorable health conditions, may be trans- 
ferred into the most virulent variety. 

The following consideration will show the full signifi- 
cance of the preceding facts: If a person contracts chol- 
era for example, then according to the prevalent concep- 
tions, the cholera baccilus only can be responsible. 

It is just this belief that has made the science of bac- 



THE MILLS APS COLLEGIAN. 13 

teriology so popular in the eyes of the unreflecting - multi- 
tudes and the many easy going physicians. We need no 
longer, it is supposed, be solicitous about our own mis- 
takes and imprudences. Come what may, we are morally 
protected and secure in the consciousness of our individ- 
ual merit; we can now lay all responsibility on the bac- 
teria. A fatal blow is dealt to these self-deceptions and 
illusions by simply pointing to the fact that the bacteria 
can provoke no fermentation unless there is some fer- 
mentable substance for it to come into contact with, and 
only tnen under the proper conditions. In the same way 
there can be no disease unless the predisposition exists. 
Where no susceptibility to disease exists, we may harbor 
the germs with impunity. We should revile the malicious 
bacteria no longer, but should mend our own ways and 
improve our conditions until the bacteria can find no lodg- 
ment in our systems. This, as I have said, can only be 
accomplished by putting ourselves through sensible ways 
of living. 

This is, in a few words, the practical lesson of bac- 
teriology, notwithstanding the many contrary conceptions 
and prejudices. 

It is a less comfortable doctrine, but it is nevertheless 
a more nearly scientifically correct one. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN, 



VOLUME 3 FEBRUARY, 1901, NUMBER 4 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E, Eaton, Editor-in-Chief H- O, White, Literary Editor 

T, W, Holloman, Alumni Editor W, L, Duren, Associate Editor 

I, B. Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

H, L, Austin and D, C, Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances and business communications should be sent to 
Allen Thompson, Business Manager. Afatier intended for 
Publication should be sent o B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief. 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription, per annum, $i. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



ED I TOE I A L DEPAR TMEN7 . 



TRASHY LITERATURE. 

If we judge from the amount of trashy literature that 
is being published, the extent to which it is read, we arrive 
at a surprising conclusion, and there is every reason to be- 
lieve it is being read, else the publication of it would be un- 
profitable and cease. In this, as in other things, the law 
of demand and supply holds good and the supply is gov- 
erned wholly by the demand. It is likely, though doubt- 
ful, that the per centage of readers has not increased over 
any other period and that the increase in the number is due 
only to the natural increase of population. Yet in spite of 
this, it seems strange that the number does not, each year, 
materially diminish. The most superficial observation is 
sufficient to bring out the pernicious effects of bad litera- 
ture. The mind can be developed, only when nourished 
by literature suggesting thoughts and ideals above its na- 
tive power of acquirement and it's to be remembered that 
the development of mind is the highest aim of reading. If 



THE MEXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 15 

the aim of literature were, solely to give pleasure and to 
furnish entertainment for a leisure hour, even then it re- 
quires a standard much above that of the current novel. 
The weak, insipid and sentimental characters of novels 
are but the prototypes of what their readers will become. 
It should be borne in mind, that it is not necessarily an 
originally weak intellect that reads them, for the truth is 
that the reading of them produces weakness. The differ- 
ence of level in the intellectual capacity of mind and the in- 
tellectual capacity of worthless novels cannot long be main- 
tained, and the hurtfulness is further seen from the fact 
that no increase in the level of the novels results from the 
corresponding decrease in the level of the mind. It is as 
senseless to say that a man is not influenced by his associa- 
tions, as to say that he is not influenced by the character 
of literature he reads. History proves this assertion, for 
a study of the literature of any nation at any period is an 
unfailing index to the social and moral customs of the time, 
and the reason simply is that the literature determines the 
character of the people. The tendency of the trashy 
novels of the present time is to take away the admirable 
characteristics of manhood, and to inculcate the idea that 
effeminacy is the highest virtue. 

THE IRWIN RUSSELL MEMORIAL. 

It is regrettable that the movement inaugurated a few 
years ago to erect a suitable memorial to Irwin Russell 
seems abandoned. There can be no doubt as to the pro- 
priety of the proposed memorial and when the question 
was being agitated, there seemed a general desire for the 
success of the undertaking. At this time, after the gen- 
eral study of Irwin Russell's poems, it seems useless to 
remind the people of the state, of their merit. Yet since 
it was proposed to erect the memorial on that basis, some- 
thing needs to be said that will prevent them from being 
again forgotten, as they were before interest was aroused 
in them. The people of the state have always been sen- 
sitive, when reproached with lack of respect for their truly 
representative men. They refer, with pride, to those men 
who achieved greatness in political and military fields, but 
to the only man of Mississippi, recognized by the educated 
at large as a literary man, they appear wholly indifferent. 
They seem to take no pride in the inauguration of a new 
literature, which at the time of its inauguration was wholly 



16 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

new, by a native of their own state. The same indiffer- 
ence shown the poet during- his short, sad life, the same 
failure to recognize his genius and the same unsympathe- 
tic feeling that permitted him to die in poverty seem to 
cling to his memory. Though Joel Chandler Harris and 
Thomas Nelson Page, both of whom are admired by Mis- 
sippians, and justly, are glad to ascribe much of their suc- 
cess to the works of Irwin Russell and his insight into the 
negro character, they yet fail to see that he did something 
worthy of preservation, or that entitles him to an open ex- 
pression of their esteem. Until the people of our state 
show a willingness to encourage literary men, we shall 
continue to hold the unenviable record of being the least 
valuable in the South 's production of literature. 

THE DEATH OF QUEEN VICTORIA. 

With the death of Victoria there passes from the 
councils of a great nation, the noblest of sovereigns. 
Though she has never shown a strong, decided will, such 
as was manifested by Elizabeth, yet she possessed a no- 
bility of character and a firmness for the right, that no 
other English ruler has had. Her counsels were always 
prompted by humanitarian motives and the record of her 
deeds shows none that should be hidden from the public 
gaze. Her reign encompasses, in all respects, the most 
brilliant period of English history, Art, science and use- 
ful inventions surpass any preceding age and the literature 
of her reign rivals the Elizabethon period. One of the 
notable events of her reign, however, has been the steady 
withdrawal of power from the crown, and it was a pathetic 
scene to see the aged queen pass away lamenting the 
prosecution, by her government, of an unjust war, that 
she was powerless to prevent. Now that the Prince of 
Wales has become Edward VII, it is probable that, when 
the novelty of the position vanishes, and he comes to the 
full realization of himself, he w T ill refuse to King only in 
name, and passively submit to the will of parliament. It 
does not seem in accordance with the nature of man, while 
nominally the head of the government, to pass before the 
world, a mere figure-head. That the power lodg- d in a 
president by a government like the United States, where 
the greatest freedom of government is claimed by its 
citizens, should far exceed the powers of the ruler of the 
greatest kingdom, seems paradoxical. But as Edward the 
VII has, perhaps, lived, so long in a state of alternating 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 17 

hope and despair, the final attainment of the throne may- 
satisfy his dreams of power and the high sounding title 
of King may be the limit of his aspirations. There may 
be no effort on his part to regain a part of the lost power, 
and, indeed, this seems more in accordance with his past 
behavior, which is a reminder of the times of convivil 
kings and courts. Perhaps he will permit the affairs of 
his kingdom to be managed by a premier who is answer- 
able to the people for legislative deeds. 

MOBS IN OTHER SECTIONS NOT DUE TO THE SOUTH. 

The Southern lynching has been put to shame by the 
fury of a recent Kansas mob, yet some of the Northern 
papers and magazines deprecate the expansion of Southern 
violence to the West, and look with fear and trembling to 
the time when it shall envelop the North and East. That 
mob violence is the greatest evil of the South is 
undeniable, and its prevalence justly calls forth the 
indignation and rebukes of those who believe in the 
the majesty of law, among whom is to be found, by far, the 
greater part of Southern men. But that mob violence is 
pre-eminently a Southern invention, and that lynchings in 
other parts of the country are due to the propagation of 
Southern sentiment and custom, is a charge to which a 
plea of not guilty must be entered. The only means of 
suppressing mob violence is by suppressing its causes, 
and whenever the causes existing in the South prevail else- 
where, there, too, will the mob always be found. The only 
reason that a greater number of lynchings happens in the 
South than in the North, East and West is that the negro 
population and the negro crimes are confined almost ex- 
clusively to this section. The spreading of the negro and 
the consequentspreadingof the crimes that cause lynching 
in the South, cause lynchings anywhere else, be it North, 
East or West. The passion and fury of men that lead 
them to defy law and order do not have to be assimlated. 
They are inherent qualities and but need the same stimula- 
tion to arouse them in one section, as arouses them in an- 
other. With reversed conditions and with comparative 
immunity from the causes of mob violence, the South would 
be as free from it as the North, and were the North forced 
in the same circumstances as the South, it is doubtful 
whether her conduct would not call forth the same indigr 
nation, she so freely bestows on us. 



18 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 




THE HA YHE~ WEBSTER DEB A TE. 



It seems to be the commonly accepted belief today, in 
the South as well as elsewhere, that in the celebrated de- 
bate between Robert Y. Hayne and Daniel Webster, in the 
senate of the United States, Webster came off more than 
conqueror. It might be objected that the best policy to 
pursue in regard to those old matters is to let them rest. 
But no Southerner who has a spark of that bold and fiery 
spirit which made Hayne resist to the uttermost any in- 
justice to his native state and his native land can for a mo- 
ment gain his own consent to accept any suspicious state- 
ment simply because it has been echoed from mouth to 
mouth and thus has acquired a familiar sound. We see 
and recognize no barrier beyond which our reason may 
not venture; we perceive no cause for which we should re- 
main silent on any subject, whether it be of a nature pleas- 
ant or painful to remember, whether it call for the smile 
or the tear. If we believe an injustice has been done any 
man or any cause, it is our duty to say so, and seek to 
have justice done. Besides this, human nature is wonder- 
fully easy to impose on, and Southern people are not 
shrewd overmuch. So, forgetting for the moment those 
time-worn sentences which closed Webster's speech, and 
which, by the way, were not his exact words as he spoke 
them in the senate, and forgetting Edward Everett's des- 
cription of the scene, let us bring the case before the trib- 
unal of reason, and get an opinion of our own, independent 
of any man's recorded opinion. The following were the 
circumstances which called for the debate, and the events 
which led up to it: 

On Dec. 29, 1829, Samuel A. Foote, of Connecticut, 
moved, in the senate of the United States, the adoption of 
a resolution to inquire into the quantity of public land then 
unsold, and to consider the advisability of limiting the sale 
of these lands. 

Now there was nothing in that resolution of itself to 
excite hostility in any quarter; the explanation takes us 



THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 19 

back to the early years of the century. Just after the war 
of 1S12, congress, in order to encourage manufacture in 
this country, placed moderately higm duties on imports. 
Calhoun supported this measure from a purely patriotic 
motive; Webster opposed it. Not content with this much 
aid, the manufacturers, who were greatly increased, 
clamored for more, and in 1824 they received it. By this 
time New England had discovered that her future pros- 
perity lay in manufacture; the South had discovered that 
she must depend mainly on agriculture. Calhoun began 
to oppose protective tariff, Webster to support it. In 1828 
was passed the "tariff of abominations." From this on 
the struggle waxed fierce between protectionists and non- 
protectionists. 

The West, which seemed to have no possible interest 
in one side more than the other, was invariably found on 
the side of the North. The explanation, Channing says, 
lay in this fact: By the heavy duties on imports the rev- 
enue was very greatly increased, so much so that there 
was a great surplus; this surplus was devoted to internal 
improvements, almost every one of which was found in a 
Western state. The West could well afford to support 
the East in return for these benefits. 

When the question of public lauds came up, the South- 
ern leaders thought they had the chance to separate the 
West from the East. So Hayne supported the charge of 
hostility to the West, first brought against the East b} r 
Benton of Missouri. Webster's friends thought him the 
proper man to respond, so he made his first speech — that 
on the Foote resolution. Thereupon Hayne made his 
great reply. 

Having- the main points of difference clear before us, 
we may proceed to the battle of the giants. We will notice 
each of Hayne's attacks and Webster's reply to it. We 
mvst remember that both men strayed far from the sub- 
ject under consideration. Both had minds and hearts full 
of things which clamored for utterance, and at this mo- 
ment Hayne discerned his opportunity, took his enemy by 
surprise, and launched the defiance of the South full at 
the North. He begins by disclaiming a hostile intention 
in his former speech, and boldly charges Webster with 
cowardice in shrinking from meeting Benton, his accuser, 
and directing his blows at himself (Hayne) instead. With 
a stroke of policy he assured Webster that the West need- 



20 THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

ed no aid to repel attacks. In reply Webster stated that 
he had replied to the man whose remarks he had 
heard. He refers contemptuously to Hayne's "matches 
and over-matches," declaring- that such words are out of 
place in the senate, a body of equals gathered for delibera- 
tion. Hayne next refers to the paternal care of the East 
for the West, and quotes the words of an Englishman of 
1775, "They have grown great in spite of your protection." 
Webster makes a good reply to this, showing the injustice 
of applyingwords spokenof a foreign enemy to a section of 
the same country and the same government. Hayne humor- 
ously deplores his ignorance of Nathan Dane, the great 
Solon whom Webster had praised so abundantly. Webster 
reaffirms the man's great deeds, and reproaches Hayne 
for his light mention of a name so honored. 

Hayne next contrasts Webster of 1825 with Webster 
of 1830. In 1825, Webster, like Hayne of 1830, favored 
the sale of the public lands, not for the money they would 
bring, but for the purpose of having them settled. In 
1830, Webster says that the public land should be treated 
as so much treasure. Hayne indignantly reproaches those 
who regulate their policies by the mone}^ standard. Then 
he asks, "Why, if you favor the retention of the public 
land as a treasure, do you consent to vote away immense 
bodies of it for particular purposes, such as canals, rail- 
roads, etc?" Webster answers that he does not believe 
that the public land should be held as a treasure (that is 
the only meaning, however, to be got out of his previous 
words). He evaded Hayne's question, only saying that he 
considered a canal in New York or a railroad in Ohio a 
benefit to South Carolina and the other states as well. The 
welfare of the South is as dear to him as the welfare of the 
North or the West. 

Next Hayne notices Webster's great professed love 
for the West, in common with that of the other Eastern 
leaders. He entangles Webster fast when he says, /'You 
bitterly reproach the South with hostility to the system of 
internal improvements, at the same time admitting that 
the South has conscientious scruples in regard to that mat- 
ter. Do you mean to imply that if you were in our place 
you would vote in violation of your conscience?" 

Next he traces the coalition of the East with the West. 
When he entered congress, the New England members 
were nearly all opposed to these same measures they now 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 21 

so cordially support. This consolidation was effected as 
the result of an agreement looking toward the reciprocal 
distribution of government favors (tariff and internal im- 
provements). In reply Webster said that the East had 
always been a friend to the West, and in 1820 had voted 
almost unanimously for the reduction of the price of land, 
a favor solicited by the Western states; the Eastern mem- 
bers had done it because they had thought it just. Hayne, 
in reply to Webster's wish that the national debt might ex- 
ist forever, if it would serve to bind the states together, 
declared that a moneyed interest in government is essen- 
tially a base interest, and is opposed to all the principles of 
free government. He deplores the expectation of pecuniary 
favors which binds whole sections to the government. 
Then like the impulsive Southerner that he was, he burst 
out in defiance of threats; he examines the origin "of the 
slave trade, and traces it to New England; he declares 
that since slavery is established in the South, the trust 
must be fulfilled. He denounces terribly those false phil- 
anthropists who send missionaries and tracts to the South, 
while they starve their own poor. He repudiates the 
charge of weakness, declaring boastfully that out of a half 
billion's worth of goods exported in ten years, two-thirds 
came from the South. He quotes a Northern authority as 
saying that the Eastern states made their money off the 
South, and yet did all in their power to injure her. He 
asks of the North simply to let the South alone and allow 
her to manage her own affairs. Then he breaks out into a 
splendid eulogy on the great men of the South, who lived 
and labored and became great while slavery existed. He 
declares that no other people have shown their devotion to 
their country in times of trial more nobly than those of the 
South. When it was for her own interest to remain at- 
tached to England, she boldly joined her sister colonies in 
resisting the mother country. He quotes from Burke to 
the effect that the Southerners, who owned slaves, had a 
nobler conception of liberty than those who lived to the 
northward. 

Hayne says the real difference between him and Web 
ster is the same as that which distinguished the Demo- 
cratic party of 1798 from the Federalist party of the same 
time; namely, the difference between the man who wishes 
the general government to be limited to some extent, in 
order that the states may not be entirely at its mercy, and 



22 THE MIIXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

the man who favors the strengthening - of the general gov- 
ernment, at the expense of the power of the states. la 
response, Webster endeavored to establish a distinction 
between the consolidation which the fathers of the repub- 
lic longed for and that which Hayne dreaded. In the very 
first part of his speech Webster took up Hayne's mention 
of slavery, and declared that he had made no attack on 
slavery. He disclaims any intention to interfere with it, 
since it is not an institution that touches him closely, al- 
though he thinks it is an evil. The place where Hayne 
strikes most effectively, though, is Webster's change on 
the tariff question. He reminds the senate of a meeting 
held as late as 1820 in Boston to protest against the tariff. 
He recalls Webster's denunciation of the tariff measure, 
and his doubts of their constitutionality. Next we find 
the great New Englanderin 1824, boldly championing free 
trade in the house of representatives. Here he met and 
routed the advocates of monopoly. But loh! in 1828 we 
find him supporting and voting for the "tariff of abomina- 
tion." In his reply Webster approaches this matter with 
an air of boldness and defiance, but he leaves it very 
abruptly. He says that his change of policy was not an 
inconsistency, but an advance made to suit new conditions; 
that he was disposed to vote for the tariff of 1828 in view 
of the many millions invested in manufactures in New 
England. He says that New England cannot now be ex- 
pected to work right against her own interests. He is 
evidently tired of the subject, and says, "No more of the 
tariff." No wonder it is unpleasant to his ears. It is 
here that Hayne comes seriously to the front, and ex- 
claims: "You say the tariff measure did not come from 
the East, and treat it as if the East had no interest in it 
(referring to Webster's first speech, of course); the West, 
through one of her representatives, refuses to acknowl- 
edge the tariff as her offspring, and declares it has noth- 
ing of benefit for that section; the South comes in and tells 
you in the most earnest manner, that the measure, 'of no 
value to the East or West,' is utterly destructive to her in- 
terests. We solemnly declare that we believe the whole 
system to be unconstitutional, and a violation of the com- 
pact between States and Union. Our brethren refuse to 
release us from a system which 'not enriches them, and 
makes us poor indeed,'" 

Hayne here bursts into a sublime declaration of war, 



THE MLLLSAPS COLLEGIA^. 23 

declaring his innocence of beginning hostilities, but de- 
voting himself, while God gives him breath, to defending 
his country, and driving back the invader discomfited. 
He glorifies his own state, showing his patriotism through 
the changing times of the revolution, and the perils of the 
w T ar of 1812. In vivid contrast to this conduct he points to 
the state of feeling in New England in 1812. He recalls 
how it was solemnly declared in the North that it did not 
become a religious people to rejoice at the victories of our 
army and navy; how it was resolved to "resist our own 
government, even unto blood;" how everything was done 
to cripple the resources of the government; how no loans 
were allowed to be made; how New England ships were 
supplying with provisions the very soldiers who were lay- 
ing waste our land; how in some places on the coast neu- 
trality was declared, and the enemy permitted to occupy 
the land until the close of the war; how some declared that 
the Union should be dissolved; how even the clergymen of 
Boston and other places pronounced a curse on those who 
should aid in any way their own government in this crisis. 
He says that the country that allows such sentiments to 
be proclaimed everywhere with impunity must certainly 
be disloyal. 

He then notices the Hartford convention, and pictures 
in the most effective way the disgruntled delegates, who 
were compelled to return to their homes proclaiming the 
success of our armies, while their hearts were black with 
treachery. He reminds the senate of the uproar in New 
England at the time of the Embargo Act. He quotes Jef- 
ferson's memoirs to the effect that he (Jefferson) had heard 
from Adams that the New England states, especially 
Massachusetts, were contemplating withdrawing from the 
Union, and were already negotiating with Great Britain in 
regard to commerce. On hearing these things, he thought 
it best to be rid of the Embargo Act, rather than break 
the Union. Hajme also quotes from a speech of Josiah 
Quincy, president of Harvard College, made in congress, 
on the purchase of Louisiana: "If this bill passes, it is 
virtually, in my estimation, a dissolution of the Union." 
And after Hayne had paid his respects to the New Eng- 
land traitors, "the war party in peace, the peace-party in 
war," he highly praised the firm democracy of that sec- 
tion, which, though surrounded by treachery, kept per- 
fectly pure from taint itself. At this point Hayne asks, 



24 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

"Who are the real friends of the Union?" He answers: 
"Those who would confine the federal government within 
the limits prescribed by the Constitution and preserve to 
the states those powers not expressly delegated; who 
would administer the government in a spirit of equal jus- 
tice, thus making it a blessing and not a curse." He takes 
up Webster's assertion that "it is a ridiculous notion that 
a state has any constitutional remedy" against a gross, 
palpable and deliberate violation of the Constitution. He 
brings into evidence the Virginia resolutions, and Mad- 
ison's report, in the latter of which it is expressly de- 
clared: "The states, then, being the parties to the Con- 
stitutional compact, and in their sovereign capacity, it fol- 
lows of necessity that there can be no tribunal above their 
authority to decide, in the last resort, whether the com- 
pact made by them be violated, and consequently that, as 
the parties to it, they must themselves decide in the last 
resort such questions as may be of sufficient magnitude 
to require their interposition. " He further calls up the 
resolutions of the Kentucky legislature, inspired by Jef- 
ferson, which declared that "each party has an equal 
right to judge for itself, as well of infractions as of the 
mode and measure of redress." He quoted Jefferson's 
opinion, as expressed in writing, of the high tariff and in- 
ternal improvements, and his belief concerning the point 
at which armed resistance should begin, and proved con- 
clusively that South Carolina had gone not a step further 
than Jefferson himself thought just. Thus Hayne showed 
that the South Carolina doctrine was the republican doc- 
trine of 1798, promulgated by the fathers of the faith, 
plainly recognized by the founders of the Constitution. 
Hayne declared that the doctrine of the federal govern- 
ment's being the exclusive judge of the extent, as well as 
of the limitations, of its own power, is utterly subversive 
of the sovereignty and independence of the states. It 
made but little difference, he said, whether congress or 
the Supreme Court are invested with this power. Such a 
government is a government without limitations of powers. 
He says that South Carolina has kept steadily in view the 
preservation of the Union by the only means possible, 
that is, by a manly resistance to tyranny. He says the 
principle involved is the chief ground of complaint, "a 
principle which, substituting the discretion of congress 
for the limitations of the Constitution, brings the states 



THE MELLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 25 

and people to the feet of the Federal government, and 
leaves them nothing they can call their own." Then he 
closes with that noble sentence: "If, acting on these mo- 
tives — if, animated by that ardent love of liberty which 
has always been the most prominent trait in the Southern 
character — we should be hurried beyond the bounds of a 
cold and calculating prudence, who is there, with one 
noble and generous sentiment in his bosom, that would 
not be disposed, in the language of Burke, to exclaim, 'You 
must pardon something to the spirit of liberty.' " To 
Hayne's charges against New England for treachery and 
disloyalty, Webster made a very weak reply. Indeed, the 
evidence was so overwhelming, both as to her conduct in 
1812 and 1809, that Webster could only refer to it con- 
temptuously and try to minimize its importance, claiming 
that all the sentiments Hayne had mentioned were the 
mere effusions of "warm heads in warm times." His 
raillery, however, could not destroy the significance of 
that shameful conduct. In reply to Hayne's contention 
for states' rights, he pointed out the confusion which 
would result from having as many judges as there were 
states, each one judging according to its own interest. He 
declared that the Supreme Court alone had the right to 
decide whether a law was constitutional or not. He noticed 
very briefly the authorities Hayne had introduced, but 
could not dispute facts. He closed with a fine appeal for 
Union. 

No one who examines closely the writings of Jefferson 
and the other founders of the "Republic and Constitution 
can doubt that Hayne represented their views exactly, 
however much Webster talked of the purpose of the fath- 
ers. The question was: "At what point of oppression 
must resistance begin, and to what length 
must it go?" Let each one answer as his 
reason dictates. Hayne and Calhoun thought the tariff 
measure of 1828 sufficient cause for resistance; Webster 
did not. No amount of reasoning could ever reconcile 
them. Hayne supported himself ably, and all Webster 
did was to state at great length, but very clearly, the sen- 
timent of his party and his section. As long, of course, as 
he confined his imagination to cases more or less inconsid- 
erable, he had the advantage; his doctrine of non-interfer- 
ence and submission worked very well. But Hayne was 
considering "a gross, palpable and deliberate violation of 



26 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

the Constitution. " The Supreme Court was to him the 
Federal government, and so it is today. He saw what 
chances for misrule lay in the future, and wished to de- 
stroy them, Webster exhausted a great portion of his 
time in proclaiming the paramount importance of the 
Union. It was very easy for him, who lived in the pros- 
pering part of the country, to talk thus. But, for Hayne, 
the evil was a present, pressing one. He, in common with 
the whole Southern people, felt the burdens of unjust tax- 
ation. Just as Hayne showed, human nature is much the 
same in Massachusetts and South Carolina. Injustice will 
be resisted, whether it be unjust taxation or injurious re- 
striction. So we may sum it all up thus: Hayne, by mas- 
terly argument, and by citation of the political fathers, es- 
tablished the constitutional right of a state to resist op- 
pressive measures. His minor work was to point out 
Webster's inconsistencies, and the equal blame of the 
North with the South. Webster made a clear exposition 
of the opposite view, that which favored strengthening the 
hands of the government, and pleaded for Union. This is 
all we can say. Webster did not shatter Hayne's argu- 
ment they were unanswerable. 

As Channing says, Webster's reasoning was histor- 
ically unsound. He did not correctly interpret the will of 
the makers of the Republic; he only gave the views of a 
party. A graver question was before the nation than was 
ever presented before. It could not be answered in words; 
it could not be unravelled by reasoning; it could not be 
settled by arbitration; some would say that only war could 
have settled it. But they are wrong. The question re- 
mains. The only way to preserve the Union is to employ 
even-handed justice. When one part of it is oppressed by 
the rest, no provision or law, even though it had been cre- 
ated with man, and had endured ever since, could make 
that people submit. It would not be right, and heaven 
would not permit it. 



^W^ 
^T^^ 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 27 




Since the last issue of the Collegian the Exchange 
Department has added some new magazines to its list, and 
among these are the Vanderbilt Observer, Martin College 
Crown The Academian and The Maroon and White . 

The Vanderbilt Obseraer, for January, has a criticism of 
"The Reign of Law," that is well written, and it seems to 
us that the writer has not only expressed his criticism in 
admirable language, but displays considerable ability as a 
critic and certainly a thorough knowledge of the subject 
under consideration. 

We notice, however, some expressions of disappoint- 
ment on the part of some of our exchanges as to the char- 
acter of The Observer as compared with what they had ex- 
pected from that institution, and we confess that the 
variety was not what we had expected, or even what it has 
been in former years, but be it said that that which ap- 
pears is well written, and our conception of merit is, that 
a little well written is infinitely better than much poor 
composition and poorer thought. 

We have received the first issue of The Martin College 
Crown ana The Academian, two girl college magazines just 
beginning their career. 

We gladly welcome them to our table and give them 
the assurance that The Collegian wishes that their career 
may be one continuous train of successes. 

The January number of The Clionian has a splendid 
article on ''The Twentieth Century Woman." 

We have no special complaint to register ag-ainst the 
woman of the past, but we desire to commend this article 
for what seems to us its foresightedness and its pure 
Christian sentiment. W r e verily believe with the writer 
that woman's influence in shaping life and character, 
whether of individuals or nations, shall count for vastly 
more in bending the boy than in polishing the man. 

The University of Mississippi Magazine has two excellent 



28 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

articles in the January issue, "Old Love Letters" and 
"The Legend of Lover's Leap." 

The subjects appeal to us all, for who ever truly loved 
and never saw one object of his affection drift from his 
arms and leave but a sacred glow, a memory where once 
had been the real. 

The last issue of The University of Virginia Magazine 
contains two splendid articles, one "The Hall of Fame," 
the other "The Stone Cross." 

The first named sets forth in plainterms the unwilling- 
ness on the part of the North to give just recognition to 
the genius of the South, and the second is a beautiful story 
of the time when the seeds were sown, from which this 
narrowness is the ripened fruit. 

In addition to those already mentioned we desire to 
acknowledge the receipt of the following exchanges: 

The University of Arizona Monthly, Tulane Collegian, 
Emory and Henry Era, Emory Phoenix, Southwestern University 
Magazine, Harvard Monthly, Hampden- Sidney Magazine , Ran- 
dolph-Macon Monthly f S. P. U. Journal, The Shamrock, The 
Washingtonian, The Stetson Collegiate, Buff and Blue, Missis- 
sippi College Magazine, University Unit, Purple and Gold, Bine 
and Gold, A. <5s° M. Reflector, The Reville, Hendrix College 
Mirror, Cap and Gown, Purple and Green, M. J. U. Independent 
and The Crimson. 




THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 29 



, 


3C 


X 




LOCAL 


DEPARTMENT 








1 



















"Act well your part, there all the honor lies." 

As intermediate examinations have been the absorbing- 
theme for the past two weeks our local material has been 
too much occupied to furnish items of interest. 

The distinguished visitors to our campus during the 
past month, were Dr. Goucher of Baltimore, Bishop Gal- 
loway and Major Millsaps. 

Mrs. Countes and beautiful little daughter, Minnie 
Low, are cordially welcomed as residents of Millsaps ad- 
dition. 

Mrs. Brister was the guest of Mrs. Quinn for several 
days the past ;week, having come over to visit her sons, 
"Ben" and "Hugh." 

Teacher — "Name the bones forming the skull?" 
Pupil — I've forgotten them for the moment, but have 
them in my head." 

'Tis with pleasure we welcome back J. Booth one of 
our former students. 

Mr. Lamar Hennington spent Saturday, the 26th, in 
Jackson and on the campus shaking hands with his friends. 

A problem to be solved: "Why is it a certain young- 
man finds his brother (?) at Terry so attractive." 

Miss Irene Featherstone, who is now teaching near 
Edwards, made a flying visit to home folks Sunday. 

Master Ralph Muchenf uss celebrated hissecond birth- 
day on February 2nd. He is a bright, bonny boy, the 
pride of fond parents and much beloved by many friends. 

Professor — "What is a planet?" 

Student — "A lot of earth and water made to fill up 
space." 

Mr. Cunningham has been home recuperating from a 



SO THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

threatened attack of pneumonia. We are glad to welcome 
him back. 

Mr. D. C. Hill, of Mississippi College, paid a visit to 
friends last week. 

Mr. George Crosby, one of our brightest and most 
highly esteemed young men, is now pursuing his studies 
at Columbian University. He carries with him the best 
wishes of a host of friends. 

We are glad to note that the site has been selected and 
the work on the James Observatory will soon begin. This 
will be a very handsome addition to Millsaps. 

We, the boys, wish that some generous lover of boys 
and their sports would donate enough to fit up our gym- 
nasium, thereby developing us physically. For without 
training of this kind we are afraid of becoming mental 
dwarfs. 

Mr. R. L. Cochran, in response to a telegram, left for 
home last week. We regret so much the necessity of his 
going for he was one of our best students. 

At the last meeting of the M. S. class the following 
officers were elected: William Lee Kennon, President; 
W. L. Kennon, Secretary and Treasurer; "Bill" Kennon, 
Historian and Liar. 

The Library is the recepient of a munificient gift in 
the form of a beautiful set of encyclopedias. The donor 
is our generous and much beloved benefactor, Major Mill- 
saps; 

Mr. Williams, State Secretary of Louisiana and Mis- 
sissippi Y. M. C. A. work, and, also, Mr. McElhany, rep- 
resentative of the International Colleges, spent several 
days here looking after this department of Christian work. 
These young men are doing a great and effective work. 

The address of Dr. Goucher. president and founder of 
the Woman's College, of Baltimore, was interesting and 
instructive; and we can assure him that the timely lesson 
given will prove of material benefit to all who heard him. 

Professor — "What is the difference between a phys- 
ical and chemical change?" 

Student — (of chemistry) — "A physical change is one 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 31 

prescribed by a doctor when you get sick. A chemical 
one performed in the laboratory." 

We regret the going home of H. AV. Jenkins. He was 
appreciated as a young man of true worth and for many 
sterling qualities. Come back, Jinks. 

Professor Ricketts has been absent for several days 
in attendance at the sick bed of his sister, Mrs. Woodside. 
With regret we chronicle her d^ath, and deeply sym- 
pathize with him in this sad bereavement. 

Professor Wm. Kennon very creditably and satisfac- 
torily filled the position of Professor Ricketts while ab- 
sent. 

The baseball team, of Millsaps, has received two chal- 
lenges. One from Tulane, desiring a game on April , 

the other from Chamberlain-Hunt Military Academy. 
Inter-collegiate games have already given us notoriety. 

LAMAR LITERARY SOCIETY NOTES. 

The most interesting debate of the past month took 
place January 25, 1901. Subject, Resolved, That the Ship 
Subsidy Bill is a political evil. The Affirmative was well 
discussed by Messrs. H. A. Wood, E. B. Ricketts and H. 
L/. Clark, while the Negative was ably upheld by Messrs. 
A. Thompson, P. M Harper and T. W. Holloman. The 
committee of judges rendered their decision in favor of the 
Negative. At the same meeting the following officers were 
elected to serve during the third quarter, viz: A. W. 
Fridge, President; H. A. Wood, Vice President; A. S.Cam- 
eron, Recording Secretary; O. W. Bradley, Corresponding 
Secretary; M, S. Pitman, Treasurer; H. L. Austin, Critic; 
Phelps, Door Keeper; A. M. Ellison, Censor; H. Hilburn, 
Chaplain, and Mr. F. R. Smith, Monthly Orator. 

Mr. C. D. Potter, of the Lamar Society, and Mr. J. T. 
McCafferty, of the Galloway Society, have been selected as 
debators in the Millsaps-Centenary Debate, which is to take 
place at Fayette, Miss., sometime in the near future. 

We are glad to welcome so many visitors at our meet- 
ings and hope there will be more in the future. 

O. W. Bradley, 
Cor. Sec, L. L. S. 



Young Gentlemen 



When you need any Fancy Candies land Beautiful 
Fruits for your Sweet Girls. 



BEAR IN MIND. 



that the Onliest Place to get them is from your 
friends, 

W. S. LEMLY & BRO., Who will please you. 

THOS. P. BARE, 

Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, -r, , n, < 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. .fearl Street. 

OE>0. F. BA.T_JE>Fe, 

StaPle Fancy GfOCeriBS, ^ntRifail. All Kinds of Feed Stuffs. 

'Phone No. 78. 203 West Capitol Street 



Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps , 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

Bowers Bros. 8c Dix:on. 

H. B. JENKINS— *-^s 



Proprietor and Manager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

Y. D. LOTT JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

WEST sJ£<5KSOH SHOE STORE. 



Try a pair of our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
Calf, Vici Kid and Enamel. They are the best shoes &old for the 
price. Our $3 shoes are equal to any other 53-5° shoe on the market. 
We are headquarters for fine footwear. A hearty welcome and free 
shine always awaits you at 8 

300 West Capitol S t 



Sou. tin earn Colleges. 




Near all of those which issue handsomely engraved Anniversary and i?3 
Commencement Invitations are having them done by a Southern firm 
who are doing very artistic work. We refer to 

O. F». STEVENS, of Atlanta, Ga. 

This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of 
high grade steel and copper plete engraving, and invitation commit- 
tees would do well to obtain their prices and samples before placing £ 1 
their orders. 



w*. H, W ATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures on Com- 
mercial Law. 



Neckwear, 

In the above we have just received a very 
swell line, embracing all the latest things in As- 
cots, Imperials, 4-in-hand, club ties and bows, in all 
the latest shades and colors ; also a pretty line of Pat- 
ent Leather Vici Shoes that we are putting on the 
market at $3.50. Your early inspection kindly re- 
quested. 

Logan Phillips, 

Clothier and Gents' Furnisher, 



/ Want Your Trade And Will Treat You Right, 

Call on me when you want anything in my line. 

Your friend, 



J*±. G. L^e^wis. 



JACKSON, IV1ISS. 



John W. Patton J. Jay White 

Patronize Home People. 

PATTON <& WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments. 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

313 CAPITOL ST. JACKSON. MISS 



Jackson, Miss. 



^Vl\\V(ra^\\\\TO\\\\V\VTO\VCTW«V\imTWV^ 



J. B. BOURGEOIS, 

Jeweler and Graduate Optician 
Jackson, Mississippi. 



J 



>♦»•<!>••••< 



I— 1 *• ^t «MM — — 



»M « 



BOYS! 



Try Us On Your SHOES. 

Our $3.50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 
Date. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL KINDS OP SHOES. 

Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

C. CUMMINGS & SON. 



«aaaaaaaaaahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaa 

4 



3 . . Council Lumber, Goal and Lime Company. 

Dealers In 

Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. ► 



■PHONE "IT'S » ► 



• ^▼Vf ▼▼??*»?? ¥■» V?V¥V T* VVVVVVVV TTT V TTV T T VV^?V fr 



J. T. LOWTHER, 

F^ar-cait^ and C&iraciie» 

Jackson, Miss. 



N. L. W/NGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsapa Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



CAPITOL STATE BANK 



Jackson, Miss. 

CAPITAL. $100,000. SURPLUS, $100,000. 

BROWN BROTHERS, 

JACKSON. MISS. 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for Celebrated Columbus Buggies. 



If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham's Drug Store 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

D,F, WHITFIELD & CO., 

SUCCESSOR TO 

A, E. GOOCH, 

Offer a 20th century greeting, and solicit the patron- 
age of the student body. 

Belhatfen College 

For Girls and Young Ladies, Jackson, Miss. 

One of the best equipped schools in the south. Spring 
term begins February 3, 1901. For further infofmation 
and our handsome catalogue address, 

L. T. FITZHUGH, A. M., President. 



WM. 


H. 


WATKINS. 


| 


ATTORNEY AT LAW. 


1 


Harding Building 




JACKSON, 


NISSISSIPPI. 1 



No. 108^ S. State St. Jackson, Miss. 



DR. A. HILZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS 



Special Rates to College Students. 
All the latest improvements 
in Dentistry. 



1 24^ South State St. 
Jackson, Mississippi. 



t\ 



iiimii*imi»uwi «nw»i>Ma»N>.\».v.v^v»M 



J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AT FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE. 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



t Attorneys at Law, 

JACKSON, MISS. 



CLEAR 

The light from a Student Lamp is the kind that rests tired 
eyes. Nickle-plated ones cost, with shade, $3.25 to $5.50. 

THE ROOKERY, 

For dependable light givers. 

Rook-Binding For the Trade. — 

The NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., is prepared to bind 
books in cloth, or make book covers for small offices at cheap 
prices. Get our prices before sending your binding away. 



To Students of Millsaps J3C 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug- 
line. 

jt^J. E HUNTER & CO. 



Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing, 



• Eyrich's Book Store, 



JACKSON, MISS. 




> 5zrfQt4& 



1108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

We have our own Photograph Gallery 
for Half Tone and Photo Engraving. 



Fashionable Engraving 

c »» p Stationery 

leading housb for 

College, School, and weddinq invitations 

Dancb programs. Menus 

before ordering elsewhere finn bnqravinq of* 

Compare Samples ... „,„_ 

and Prices alu I" 1109 



Completely Parsed Caesar 

Gallic War, Book I. 

BY REV. JAMES B. FINCH, M. A., D. D. 

cloth— $1. 50 Postpaid— 400 pages. 

The Latin words in the Latin order just as 
Caesar wrote them : with the exact literal 
English equivalent of each Latin word directly 
under it(interlined); and with a second, elegant 
translation in the margin: also with Footnotes 
in which every word is completely parsed, and 
all constructions explained, with References to 
the leading Latin grammars. Each page com- 
plete—Latin text, interlinear literal transla- 
tion, marginal flowing translation, parsing — 
all at a glance ■without turning a lea/t 

Completely Scanned and Parsed Aeneid, 1. Ready August, 1900. 

HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers. 
4-5-6-13-13-14 Cooper Institute, N. Y. City. 

Schoolbooks of all publishers at one store. 



JOHNSON-TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

-^^^ Groceries at Wholesale* ^r ^r 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing" bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 

Special Sale this Month of over 500 Men's Fine Fall Suits, 

■ $12 00 All Wool Suits at:.......... $S 00 

14 00 All Wool Suits at 10 00 

15 00 and 16 00 All Wool Suits at... 11 00 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS UM UNDERWEAR, 

Men's Cotton Fleece Lined Undersuits at S9c 

Men's Wool Fleece Lined Undersuits at - 1 05 

Men's Pure Wool Undersuits, extra line, at $2, 2.50, $3 & 3.50 

Men's Colored Stiff Bosom Shirts, with detachable cuffs and no 
collar, "Wauchusett" make, at 50c, 75c and $i.00. 

We can save you money on anything, 



Atlantic's? Men's Shoe. State & Pearl St., Jackson, Miss. 



1 



_.. -/__-•..- . ■ I '■: I ~ 



.?-*-- 






"Vy 



^SH» 



Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 






NOTIONS AND SHOES. 



1 14 South State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 



■' — "" ■ ?—» t j hj 






The 



Millsaps Collegian 



MARCH, 1901. 



# 



V 



N 



COXTEN 7 J\S. 



The Joker Joked - - - Page 1 
Ungwala - ■- ----- 10 

A Love Story in S'a - - - 11 
Editorial Department - - -12 
Literary Department - - 15 
Exchange Department - - 17 
Clippings ------- 18 

Local Department - - - - 20 

Lamar Literary Society - - 23 
Resolution of Thanks - - 24 



PUBLISHED BY 



THE STUDENTS OF MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



^ SHURLDS ^ 



Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 



South State St. t^S t~~l X_J X^ L< J_3 *^ MISS. 

We Educate the Masses 

On QuestioQS of 

X FURNITURE X 

.Airacl l<:i indited line®. 

Isydore Strauss & Son, 

207-209 State Street. 



The Millsaps Collegian 



Vol. 3 JACKSON, MISS., MARCH, , 1901. No. 5 



THE JOKER JOKED. 



It-was late at night. A still hush was settled over the 
old plantation at Shermanville. Nellie, the only daughter 
of the prosperous farmer, there in her own quiet little 
room, was alone — upon her bed she lay for a long - time, 
sleepless, now and again breaking the stillness of the night 
with a low, involuntary sob — yesterday her mother, the 
dearest friend of life, had passed away from earth forever. 
Today she had been laid to rest in the old family burying 
ground at the village church yard, and the loving hands of 
her father had led Nellie away from the little mound back 
to the old home — now so lonely, so deserted. Nellie's 
heart seemed all but breaking. That on which her heart 
had fastened, and that to which it had grown in love, 
tender and strong, had suddenly been torn from her and 
the wound seemed painful, more painful than she could 
bear. What could heal this hurt? What could drive away 
this sorrow and bring back the happiness once more to 
her heart? Her father was a man loving enough, I sup- 
pose, but he had not that natural sympathy which could 
help him be all in all to his child. She could not fly to his 
arms and in his love forget her terrible sorrow. And so 
tonight Nellie had lain for hours trying, m vain, to find re- 
lief from all her pains in sleep — only her sobs expressed 
the deep anguish of her heart. She fell finally asleep, her. 
body, tired with days and nights of weary watching, carry- 
ing her deep into the land of dreams. "And as she slept 
she thought she sat weeping in the garden near her 
father's home when there came to her side the tall, hand- 
some figure of a youth whose face was full of kindness and 
wiiose voice soothed her sorrow. 



2 THE RHLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

When Nellie awoke the sun was high in the heavens 
and looked brightly in at her window. For a moment she 
grasped the joy of her dream but then the real sorrow of 
her life swept over her and she was the same sad little 
girl as before. 

The scene changes. It is Friday morning of the 
week just preceeding commencement at Belhaven Female 
College. The lawn that stretched out before the College 
building was a scene of lively interest. The girls, the 
students of this popular institution, were preparing for a 
lawn fete to be given that afternoon, to which had been in- 
vited a large number of boys from the popular College just 
over the hill in the same little city. In groups were the 
girls scattered over the spacious campus, arranging tables 
and decorating for what was to them an all-important oc- 
casion. Their faces wore expressions of anticipated pleas- 
ure, both for what was to be theirs today in the delight of 
entertaining that jolly, handsome crowd of college fellows, 
and for what commencement was to bring them, followed 
by a happv return home, a place which the college girl 
learns to love as few people else do. I dare say that there 
is no one who can sing " Home, Sweet Home," that song 
which will never grow old but will live forever in the tender 
truthfulness of its sentiments, with more earnestness 
than the college girl. Or at least, my dears, it was thus 
when I knew about college girls, but that has been a very 
long time ago. 

But to our more immediate narrative: Around a large 
table near the center of the lawn was seated a group of 
girls arranging into bunches the flowers with which other 
girls were decorating the tables scattered here and there. 
In happy conversation they anticipated the coming of the 
guests and the joys of the evening. In merry jest they 
predicted whom each one would welcome the most heartily 
and which youth each maid would await with the greatest 
degree of impatience. 

"Ah, I shall get that talk with Steve that we have 
written of so long," laughed one merry little maid as she 
reviewed in her mind many a note received "on the sly." 

"And 'Old Wharton' shall tell me that joke he has 
had on me all this session, and which he never has had a 
chance to tell me," cried another while her black eyes 
flashed as tho' she had long since gussed what the "joke " 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. ^ 

was, but still was all the more eager to have him tell it to 
her — ( that was a way girls had when I was young, my 
dears. ) 

" Oh, I want to get even with Norman Sneed for the 
way he treated me at the K. A. reception the other even- 
ing. He knew that I expected to have him all to myself, 
and he had said that he wanted to talk to me alone. Well, 
instead of that he introduced me to a freshman and left me 
and I did not see him again during the whole evening." 

The speaker was one of "the specials" to whom ex- 
traordinary privileges, in the way of receiving visitors and 
going out with young men, were given. Her admiration 
for young Sneed was well known and had been a matter of 
comment among the students for several years. Nor had 
Norman seemed indifferent to her. She was bright and 
entertaining, and, moreover, was unusually pretty (just the 
sort of girl with whom the young men of my day loved to 
appear in public.) 

From freshman to senior had they gone together, and 
now toward the close of this, their last year in college, 
Ethel naturally expected that he would speak out and tell 
her of that love which she had many reasons to believe he 
felt for her. He was the only son of a wealthy Mississippi 
planter and his father was giving him every opportunity of 
gaining a first-class education, which opportunity Norman 
had used well, and now was on the eve of receiving his 
Bachelor's degree. Among his college mates he was 
spoken of as "the most popular fellow in college," and 
among the young ladies of the town and of the neighboring 
college he was an "especial favorite." Tall, handsome 
and commanding was he, and yet so truly gentle and court- 
eous, and his thoughtfulness of others around him was 
always apparent. 

How he could love Ethel Irwin, though, was ever a 
matter of wonder among the college girls, for those who 
knew them both intimately knew well that in disposition 
they were far different. That Ethel, though she seemed 
gentle and thoughtful when with him, was in reality far 
otherwise. Her extremely jealous nature had been often 
especially noted. Nevertheless she was popular in a way, 
and always succeeded in winning a crowd of assistants in 
any college scheme she undertook. She had been disap- 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

pointed at the Fraternity reception on that evening- re- 
ferred to in not having her much longed for talk with 
Norman, and it had seemed to her that he had slighted her 
intentionally — when ( truth to tell ! ) he had left the hall for 
awhile to go to the bedside of a sick friend and had not 
been able to return before Ethel left. Now she resolved 
to punish him, and she at once invoked the asfistance of 
the crowd of girls just then around her. 

"Girls, I want you to help me out," she said, and her 
eyes danced as she anticipated the fun it would be. "I 
am going to introduce him to that insignificant litttle Nel- 
lie Sherman this evening and I want you girls all to leave 
them alone for some time. What a joke it will be to see 
him try to talk to her, and how punished he will be for the 
way he treated me !" 

All the girls — though some with reluctance — consented 
and the preparations for the evening went merrily on. 

Nellie Sherman, the innocent party to this scheme, 
was a junior who had entered college but lately, (and 
whom, my dears, you will easily recognize as our little girl 
from the plantation.) During the time she had been here 
she had established a reputation among the girls fur two 
qualities which boys are said to shrink from specially, 
namely : those of quietness and homliness. She had made 
no intimate friends, and shrinking as she did from strang"- 
ers, none of the girls knew her well. She had seemed to 
them to suffer from great spells of homesickness, and had 
spent most of her idle moments entirely alone, sitting be- 
neath a shade tree on the campus or quietly alone in her 
room. 

And so the idea of this jolly, handsome college boy be- 
ing "cornered" with this quiet, homely maid promised 
endless amusement to the girls, and sufficient punishment 
for the slight "Mr. Sneed had done Miss Irwin." She, 
(cruel as were some girls in my day,) tingled with delight 
as she thought of it, and with what relief he would come 
back to her when she should see fit to relent and release 
him. 

And so the day passed and the shades of evening came 
silently on. The cards had borne the hour of six and at 
that time the expected guests began to arrive. The col- 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. O 

lege boys came in groups and were soon scattered over 
the lawn in happ) T conversation and in merry jest. It was 
a jolly company gathered there, and ever and anon through 
the years that refreshing, delightful scene of my college 
days comes floating back to me. 

The fresh, happy school girls, the center of a group 
of handsome college boys, seemed to be in their high- 
est spirit and made the air ring with merry laughter. 
Seated on benches or chairs, or even on the green carpet of 
grass; wandering at will o'er the wide-spread lawn; or 
grouped around the tables where "dainty and delightful 
refreshments were served," the boys and girls passed the 
evening away in a manner as merry, as happy, as jolly, as 
only the college boys and college girls of my day knew 
how to do. 

At an early hour young Sneed appeared. Dressed 
simply he appeared the very picture of healthy, handsome 
manhood, and attracted the attention of all eyes as he 
moved across the lawn. He was greeted cordially on all 
sides, which greetings he returned in his own courteous, 
friendly manner, and then turned to Miss Irwin, who made 
room for him upon a bench where she was sitting in the 
midst of quite a company of boys and girls. After a few 
moments of general conversation she said to him: 

"Norman, I have a little friend over here whom I am 
anxious for you to know," adding, "She has recently come 
to college and I think you will find her interesting." 

Norman was surprised at this, but said courteously. 
"I shall be delighted to meet any friend of yours, Miss 
Ethel, "and they moved off together, he not noting the 
titter that had followed him from the crowd. 

In the meanwhile little Nellie Sherman, who had only 
consented after much urging on the part of the teachers 
and pupils to attend the party at all, sat on the grass near 
the border of the lawn, listlessly watching the gay com- 
pany before her, on her face an expression of scornful sad- 
ness. Moreover, she appeared especially plain this even- 
ing. She was surprised to see Ethel Irwin approach her 
from the opposite side of the lawn, attended by one of the 
handsomest of the college boys. She was surprised be- 



6 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

cause Ethel had never spoken to her at all except in an oc- 
casional taunt and she expected attention from her now 
least of all, but there seemed something - strangely familiar 
to her in the face of the boy. She noted a surprised look 
on his face as it also rested on hers. However, there was 
no time for wonder, for even now Ethel was at her side, 
and said in her sweetest possible tone : 

"Miss Sherman, I wish to introduce to you my friend, 
Mr. Norman Sneed." 

A crimson flush overspread Nellie's face, and she ac- 
knowledged the presentation with a mere nod. An em- 
barassing pause followed, which was broken, however, by 
Ethel's saying further: "I know you two will find each 
other interesting." Then she moved leisurely across the 
campus, the eyes of both Nellie and Norman following her 
in utter amazement. 

The eyes of the whole company were turned upon 
them and peals of laughter were heard from all sides. 
Eihel seemed to enjoy her joke immensely and returning 
to her crowd she watched its progress from afar, and with 
eager impatience for the time to come when she might re- 
lease him and have him to herself once more. 

After an akward moment or so Norman caught on to 
the joke that was being practiced on him, and his face 
flushed with indignation as he saw that many of the guests 
were watching them and heard their [shouts of amused 
laughter. His pride for a moment was hurt that a senior 
should be submitted to any such treatment, and he felt 
humiliated at being the object of such a personal and 
public joke. He had noticed on approaching that the 
young lady was not at all attractive Rooking and so he 
guessed that she had been chosen as the fittest person to 
use in this joke on him. However he resolved to get out 
of it as easily as possible without being too rude. And so 
he turned to her, intending to talk for a few moments and 
then excuse himself and leave her. So he said in his most 
formal tone, "I am glad to meet you, Miss Sherman. You 
haven't been in college long?" He looked down on her as 
he spoke and his manly heart rebuked him when he saw 
that her face was the very picture of embarrassment, and 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 7 

that there were tears in her eyes which she was vainly 
trping to restrain. He knew then that she itoo realized 
that she was the obiect of a cruel joke, and he felt what 
must be her embarrassment. He yielded to his chevalrous 
impulse to protect her from it, even though it should spoil 
his whole evening. 

"Come now, " he said, and his voice was full of kindness 
"Thev can't joke us!" 

"Please go back to them," she pleaded, "I don't want 
you.' "I will if you insist," he said gently, "but why 
should we allow them to see they have teased us. I do not 
know why they should wish to tease you thus. I am only 
very, very sorry that you should be embarrassed on my 
account. Let me stay with you and I will be very, very 
good," he laughed, "if you will only talk to me." He threw 
himself back into a comfortable place on the grass by her 
side. In his own simple fashion he told her about their 
life at the college over the hill; about his home in the Mis 
sissippi hills and about his hopes and plans for the future 
After awhile she became interested and her face bright 
ened as he talked on giving her little time to reply. Then 
after a pause he asked her about her own home and about 
her future. She answered shyly at first, but finding him 
a sympathetic listener, she told him all about her home 
in the country, where she had passed all the days of her 
life; how happy ske had been under the protecting care of 
her parents. It was only when her mother had died some 
months since that her troubles began and she tried to tell 
him how lonely it was there after her sweet mother had 
been called away. Her father not knowing what else to 
do with ! t her had sent her here, where she declared it was 
tenfold more lonely to her than in her father's home on the 
plantation. All this she told him, and time and time again 
her face would seem almost pretty with enthusiasm for 
home, and then her eyes would droop with tears. 

Norman found himself so interested that he almost 
forgot the crowd around him and talked and listened, in- 
teresting and interested, 'til near an hour had passed 
away. 

Ethel and her companions felt themselves a little dis- 
appointed that Norman was taking the matter so naturally 



8 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

and that Nellie was actually talking away at a great rate. 
Ethel had just decided it was time to release him, when 
she was astonished to see Norman arise and lead Nellie 
across the campus to one of the tables where they had re- 
freshments, all the while engaged in "animated conversa- 
tion." She saw Nellie look up at him, her own eyes full of 
interest in what he was saying. She saw Norman look 
down into her face and she grew real jealous to see how 
entertained he seemed. When they had finished Ethel 
said to her friends, with an assumed gayety: 'Come, let's 
release poor Norman. Surely he is punished sufficiently.' , 

"Punished, the mischief! " said Steve Clark, "I never 
saw a man so interested." 

"Oh, that's all assumed," retorted Ethel. 

Just then this couple reached Nellie and Norman, who 
had retaken their former seats. They now saw what sur- 
prised them still more. Norman's handsome diamond-set 
"frat" pin adorned the breast of the homely maid, and on 
their faces were expressions of mutual confidence. Tho' 
the opportunity came more than once Norman did not try 
to leave her, and it was only when the departing hour had 
fully come that he pressed her hand in a reluctant fare- 
well. 

That night 'til a late hour three minds were sleepless 
and three hearts beat with more than ordinary emotion. 

Ethel Irwin's was filled with anger and disappoint- 
ment, but she still thought Norman only joking her. 

Norman Sneed lay awake and in his mind was a bright 
pair of brown eyes which looked sweetly and confidently 
down into his own. 

Nellie Sherman went away to her room, a new hap- 
piness in her heart. When she finally slept that night 
there came to her the same dream that she had had that 
sad night at home. There was at her side the same hand- 
some youth, who took her hand and in the same kind voice 
bade her weep no more — but this time she knew the youth 
was Norman Sneed. 

I remember, my dears, that our commencement 
came first that year, and on graduating night the girls 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 9 

were brought over to our college to hear and see it all. 
Two pairs of eyes watched Norman Sneed with especial 
eagerness as he walked up on the stage that night. Two 
pairs of ears were strained to catch every word of that 
eloquent graduating oration. And then when the Presi- 
dent announced that this year the Senior medal was 
awarded to Mr. Norman Sneed, two hearts thrilled for 
him. 

When it was all over the girls waited a moment for the 
crowd to pass out. I was standing near Nellie Sherman, 
with Erma Tucker. (The best girl friend I had in those 
days, my dears. God bless her ! she's married, too, now) 
so I saw and heard what happened. It was then that Nel- 
lie saw Norman come toward their crowd as if looking for 
some one. She saw him stop and receive the congratula- 
tions of Ethel Irwin and was surprised to see the look of 
eager search still linger on his face. A moment later he 
was ?t her side. It was then she thanked him, in words 
simple and full of earnestness, for his kindness of that 
day. It was then she congratulated him on today's suc- 
cess. It was then she offered to return his "frat" pin. 
But it was then that he told her how happy that evening 
had made him, and that he wanted her to keep the pin 'til 
he should come for it in the country. 

"And will you indeed come?" she asked. 

"I will come, Nellie, if you will promise me one thing," 
he said. 

"What is it?" she asked in a low voice. 

"Why yourself, Nellie!" 

For a moment she hesitated, but then looked up into 
his handsome face and said : "I must have given vou that 
at the fete last Friday, Norman, or maybe it was when 
you came to me in a dream at home, at any rate I am all 
yours now." 

As we watched them on the evening they met and as 
we watched them together just then, so we have watched 
them all along their pathway., and Erma and I are both 
sure that Nellie and Norman have got the best of the joke 
from then even 'til now. . 

" Ninety-Nine. ' ' 



10 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

UNGWALA. 



Check thy wild flight, O, tim'rous deer, 
Thy frightened mates enjoin not fear; 
Bend thy mild eyes in soft'ning way 
On yonder maid watching by day. 

Her lover is gone, 

Gone to his war hunt, 

Beyond the Chickasawha. 

Soft thy sad note, O, whippoorwill, 
Of darkness bred and evening still, 
Bring thy weird chant to tune more gay 
For heart that mourns this long delay. 

Her lover isthere, 

There on his war hunt, 

Beyond the Chichasawha. 

Whisper good word, O, knowing voice, 
To list'ning ears, and bid rejoice; 
Keep not mouth-tight, but fear allay, 
Lest silence would thus seem to say: 

Her brave will ne'er come, 

Come to his love trust, 

On the banks of Chickasawha. 

Slack thy swift flow O graceful stream, 
In measured drift, despondent seem; 
Show thy face smooth, reflect each ray 
That slanting strikes and leaps in play. 

Ungwala here mourns, 

Mourns for her lost love, 

Sadly, O, Chickasawha. 

Sing thy wind song, O, yearning pine, 
In mournful tune and solemn kind; 
Rock thy tall form in gentle sway, 
With sober leaf bestrew thy clay. 

Ungwala is dead, 

Gone to her deathbed 

In silent Chickasawha. 

Egdirf. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

A LOVE STORY IN S'S. 



Sturdy Sammie Simpson sought sweet Sallie Steven's 
society so soliciously, several social societies severally said 
senteniously, "Sallie's surely secured Sammie! Sallie 's 
Sammie's sweetheart! Sammie's Sallie's slave; society 
shall soon see something- startling ! 

Saturday Sallie sat sewing steadily, singing softly. 
Suddenly seeing Sammie's shadow, she siezed scissors, 
snipped savagely, still singing softly. 

Sammie said slyly : "Sweetheart, sing - Sammie some" 
thing sadly sweet." Sallie started, seeming surprised, 
saying "Sammie Simpson, stop saying such silly stuff, 
spoony sentiments sound softly; say something sensible." 
So Sammie straightway said : Sweetest Sallie set sometime 
soon." Sallie serenely said, " say Sunday." 

"Surely, surely," shouted Sammie, supremely satis- 
fied. 

Sequel — Sammie Simpson safely secured; Sallie 
Stevens settled; Sammie's suited. Society's satisfied. 

' { Bulletin. " 




THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



VOLUME 3 MARCH, 1901. NUMBER 5 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief H, O. White, Literary Editor 

T. W, Holloman, Alumni Editor W. L, Duren, Associate Editor 

I. B. Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

H. L. Austin and D, C. Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances arid business communicatioris should be sent to 
Allen Thompson, Business Manager. Matter intended for 
■bublication should be sent o B. E. Eato?i, Editor-in-Chief. 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription, per annum, $i. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 

THE OBSERVATORY. 

In another part of the Collegion will be found a set of 
resolutions of thanks to Mr. Dan. James, of Yazoo City, 
for his generous donation of a fine observatory and tele- 
scope to the College. Such substantial gifts add greatly 
to the institution's facilities, and insure it a greater de- 
gree of success and a larger field of usefulness than it has 
heretofore enjoyed. The constant need of a well-equiped 
observatory has been recognized since the very beginning 
of the institution's career, but it has been found impos- 
sible to provide fully for all departments, and so the de- 
partment of higher mathematics became the unfortunate 
one. This gift has been made by Mr. James as a mem- 
orial of his recently deceased father,the Hon. Peter James, 
who was, at the time of his death, a trustee of the College. 
This memorial should not be considered simply as a gift 
by those of us who are interested in the institution, and 



THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. Is 

who will derive the benefit of it, but also as indicative of the 
deep moral and religious character of him whom it com- 
memorates. Xo more worthy tribute of respect could be 
paid a father than that through the benevolence of his son, 
the work of the institution dearest to him should be ma- 
terially and permanently increased. 

ATHLETICS. 

The season of field and gymnastic sports is now on us' 
and we trust that our students will take advantage of every 
opportunity offered. Though the great stimulus may be 
lacking, there is yet a necessity to organize strong base- 
ball and tennis associations, and be ready for an emer- 
gency. Between the recreation of strolling to town, and 
the consequent forming of a bad habit, and that of taking 
part in some athletic diversions, the latter is decidedly 
the better. If the same interest is shown for field sports 
this Spring as was shown last fall, there will be nothing to 
to prevent us from having an interesting field da}'. In 
neither of the two past years has there been even a pre- 
tense of field-day, probably because through ldck of inter- 
collegiate games and college life, no enthusiasm could be 
developed. But now it would seem to be a case of sulking 
in tents were no field-day exhibitions given. Another 
feature of athletic opportunities that has so far been 
neglected is the gymnasium. The need of this is imper- 
ative. Some students, each year, through the mistaken 
idea that they have no time for exercise, so neglect their 
physical condition, and become so completely inervated 
that life itself seems partially gone. As a result their 
work does not fulfil their expectations, and they make the 
irreparable mistake of going home before the session 
closes, appearing to all as fugitives from final examina- 
tions. Or, if they do not go home it takes all the vacation 
for them to recuperate, and often they attach blame to the 
location and surroundings of the institution simply be- 
cause they have acted imprudently. 

SALOON SMASHING. 

Though the rash and lawless acts of Mrs. Nation 
could hardly be justified by any circumstances, yet the 
support given her in saloon smashing and the readiness of 



14 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

the prohibitionists to aid her, show how deep-rooted the 
sentiment against the sale of liquors is becoming. 

The rightfulness of a law in any State to protect a 
business that has for its aim the destruction of life, happi- 
ness and morality, might well be questioned. The great 
demand of the times is that some restraint must be put on 
the sale of liquors, if, indeed, the total abolition of it is not 
possible. Such crusades as those inaugurated by Mrs. 
Nation will arouse the temperance advocates all over the 
Union, and will doubtless lead to a more energetic war- 
fare in the future. 

Those whom the world dubs fanatics are often the 
ones most instrumental in bringing about reforms. It is 
not the rashness of the fanatics that leads to these results, 
but the incentives that create the rashness. 

If the moving cause is a worthy one, then when the 
whole people become thoroughly awake to the necessity of 
some action, its accomplishment usually proceeds quietly 
and so sets in unfavorable contrast, the methods of the 
inaugerator. But however beneficial the final results of 
saloon-smashing may be, it must be admitted that the in- 
iciatory measures are in their tendency productive of harm. 
In the particular cases in Kansas it is not unlawful, per- 
haps, except as disturbing the peace of the community, 
since the saloons are run in violation of the law, but in 
other States where saloons are run in accordance with 
law, saloon-smashing would, of course, be lawless. When 
men, in defiance of law, assemble and commit some deed 
in open violation of the law, they must be classed as mobs. 
It does not matter whether a mob deals swift punishment 
to a crimnal or whether it forcibly smashes a saloon, the 
tendency is the same, the dethronement of law and the de- 
struction of all avenues through which escape from any 
evil is possible. To destroy law is to give license to any 
man to do anything he may desire, and this is eminently 
worse than to have evils, even if they are but partially re- 
strained by the laws, yet subservient to them. The only 
means of dealing successfully with the whiskey forces 
are through the education of the people, and their realiza- 
tion of the enormous consequences involved, and then 
through lawful measures will relief be found. 



GOLDSMITH'S VIEW OF THE POOR. 



Oliver Goldsmith's prose is considered, and rightly 
considered, the high-water mark of excellence in the use 
of the English language, both in England and throughout 
Continental Europe. There is no purer and more melo- 
dious flow of English anywhere to be found than we have 
in his Letters. His comedies, too, are full of humor. His 
poetry, however, though very beautiful in places, and 
smooth throughout, gives expression to a spirit that seems 
to have clung to Goldsmith the spirit of discontent. 

Had this discontent ever alternated with satisfaction, 
w T e could forgive Goldsmith; nobody is contented all the 
time. But it was his normal condition. No matter what 
he looked at, his morbid melancholy colored it dark. Fur- 
thermore, he merely remarked the fault; he did not give a 
remedy. He did not even point to beauties which might 
outweigh imperfections. It seemed that he was blind to 
all save the bad. 

Take, for example, his view of the condition of the 
poor. In reading his poetry, one cannot but be struck 
with his many laments for the poor of England. They 
are ground by laws, "and rich men rule the law." The 
country swains, who formerly owned each his rod of 
ground, pressed by contiguous wealth, have sought a kind 
share. He pictures an old woman, the last of the original 
inhabitants of the Deserted Village, keeping alive her little 
spark of life, "picking" her wintry fagot from the thorn. 
Querulously he asks where poverty shall go to be freed 
from the pressure of pride. With immense exaggeration 
he describes the dangers of the New World, the diseases, 
the murderous attacks of savage men and savage beasts. 
Families, disposessed of all they owned, were forced across 
the Atlantic, and after wandering awhile amid the wilds of 
the New World, found a premature death. He betrayed 
his weakness incessantly. His descriptions of the poor 
would have better suited the peasantry of France, who 
for food were actually forced to pick the grass from the 



16 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

hillsides, while their earnings went to maintain the Grand 
Monarch and his court in the splendid palace of Versailles. 
The lot of the poor in England was immeasurably better 
than it was in the other nations of Europe. Even in Gold- 
smith's time the common people were beginning to take 
the place they now have and hold in England. Even then, 
the yeomanry was the bone and sinew of the British army. 
Even then the man who hoped to rise in the British politics 
had to pay much regard to the poor and middle classes. It 
is true, often the peasantry was taxed and in other ways 
oppressed beyond its endurance, till it must rise up, or 
perish from the earth. But the poor had their joys. When 
toil was done, at the falling of the shadows, they could eat 
their frugal supper with their devoted families, then sit 
around the firesides and talk of all they heard and all they 
saw. Goldsmith seems to have been a malcontent rather 
than a sympathizer. 

When a youth, he had been profligate and thriftless, 
and when, in maturity, he found himself constantly in 
misfortune, and his neightors well-to-do, he poured out 
foolish laments. 

He does not suffer with the poor their troubles; he only 
remarks and complains of them. Therefore, he is no real 
friend to humanity. 

By his complaints he could only inflame the poor 
against the rich. He could bew T ail forever, and not alter 
the state of things a particle for the better. It would be 
better for all concerned if such men would be silent on 
that subject, seeing they cannot possibly do good, but may 
do great harm. 






The February number of the University of Virginia 
Magazine is an excellent number. The article, "Two Ele- 
ments of a Literary Atmosphere, and Virginia's Claim to 
Them," is certainly one of the best we have seen in any 
college magazine. 

It is worthy of notice first for the care with which it 
was evidently prepared. The writer has very carefully 
investigated the influence of natural scenery and legend 
upon the literature of the old world, and then alongside all 
this he has placed Virginia's scenic and legendary resour- 
ces, and from this comparison he reasonably concludes 
that Virginia is rich in these two elements of a literary 
atmosphere. 

Beside this the article deserves notice for its beauty 
and grace of expression. Every part of it is well done, 
and we think it one of the best articles that we have had 
the pleasure of reading for some time. 

"An Uncalled for Revenge" in the last issue of The 
Clionian is, in our judgment ,the best production of the 
issue. Viola is a repulsive character to us, nevertheless, 
the story is a good one. The plot is splendidly conceived, 
and the story is true to its name. 

It seems to set forth the awful consequences of a girl's 
rash judgment from which fate saved all, but not until the 
happiness of one had been wrecked, a deluded husband 
had expired upon the bosom of a wife who needs must re- 
pent and pray forgiveness before she could imprint a kiss 
upon the brow of him whom she had sworn to love, and 
the delirious mutterings during the illness that followed 
had marshaled the jealous passions of Marion's heart for 
the overthrow of the happiness of her own home. 

If girls are the same the world over, it seems to us 
that it would be well to be sure that "Jack" is flirting, for 
fate does not always serve us as a beast of burden. 

We are pleased to add to the list of our exchanges The 
Oaklondite and Crimson and Gold. 

Our exchanges seem to be slow in making their ap- 
pearance this month. We do not know where the fault 
lies, but several of our best exchanges have not reached 
us vet. 



18 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

CLIPPINGS. 

The following lines were found inscribed on the fly-leaves of a 
student's (?) "handy literai." They are reproduced not for any merit 
that is in them, but just because — well — because they were needed to 
fill up space: 

If you want to ride this "Jack," 

Get right up upon his back; 

If you want to enjoy the ride, 

Ride no way except astride. 

Don't always be affirming the fact 

That you positively would not ride a "Jack." 

The way to do is to do it right, 
Thus you will get a better insight 
Than to be always in doubt 
As to what you are reading about. 
This advice is good you'll see, 
If a competent man you be. 

Always be just and honest in your acts; 

Don't go about saying you despise all "Jacks." 

Learn this truth, my dear young men, 

Ungarnished truth is a beautiful gem, 

So much better than hypocritical pride; 

Be simply truthfui and say, "I love to ride." 

—Titus Quintus Richardfilius. 

In S. P. U. Journal. 



Beauty's Mask. 

In gazing on thy mischief-loving face 
t Where wit and humor sparkle side by side, 
No faintest sign of conscience can I trace, 
So well does Beauty mask what she would hide. 

Yet in thy soul some tenderness must be, 
Like flowers which in hidden valleys grow; 

For little deeds that people tell of thee 
Reveal what lies beneath that "outward show." 

M. P. J. 
— In University of Va. Magazine. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



19 



"Hurry Up Bar, June." 

Oh, I's goin' home 'fore soon — 

Hurry up dar, June. 
Wid yer busy bees a-wingin', 
Wid yer flowers all a-springin', 
Andde skylarks sweet a-singin' 
Underneath de silver moon. 

Hurry up dar, June. 

Yes,I'se goin' home 'fore long — 

Hurry up dar, June. 
Want to hear my ma a-sayin' 
"Son, its long ye have been stayin' !" 
Want to hear my pa a-prayin', 
An' my sisters' evening song — 

Hurry up dar, June. 

Sure am goin' home 'fore quick — 

Hurry up dar, June. 
Den, I'll run fur de marshmallow 
O'er de new-ground field all fallow, 
Pas' de rock, below der shallow 
An' go swimmin' in de crick — 

Hurry up dar, June. 



Joe Hedgpeth. 
— In Emory Phoenix 




Socrates said, "Those who want fewest thing's are 
nearest to the Gods." 

Mr. Lampton of Magnolia, made a short visit to the 
college. 

L. F. Magruder, one of Millsaps former students, now 
associated with his brother in business in Yazoo City, 
stopped over on his return from Mardi Gras. 

Mrs. Dr. J. A. Moore, who has been quite sick is now 
improving, we are glad to note. 

Of what insect is a certain Belhaven senior most fond? 
Ants (Anse). '*•'•;,.". 

Mrs. Hawkins and attractive daughter, Miss Fannie, 
were the guests of Mrs. Warrel for a few day~ last week, 
enroute to their home in Milestone. 

Quite a number of ladies have graced our campus dur 
ingthe past month, among the number, Mrs. T. B. Hollo- 
man and Mrs. Emory. 

Rev. J. Tillery Lewis, now in charge of Hill House 
circuit was among our visitors. A cordial receptionalways 
awaits all former students. 

A senior, growing weary of his correspondence with a 

fair maiden, replied to her latest billetdoux. "Dr. M 

positively prohibits my writing^ to young ladies." 

Rev. Dr* Wells, pastor of the 1st Presbyterianchurch 
of Wilmington, N. C. , conducted the devotional exercises 
on the morning of the 20th. 

What subject in politics do the seniors of Belhaven 
most dislike to discuss? 
Senior — age. 

Mr. R. P. Neblett spent several days in Winona last 
month assisting, Rev. Mr. Mcintosh in a meeting 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 21 

Messrs. T. W. Holloman, Allen Thompson and Frank 
Smith were among - the carnival visitors. 
I . 

Mr. Sickens Harper made aOnying- trip home last 
week. 

Master Louis Brister and Julius McLaurin spent Sun- 
day, 24th, with their brothers at the home of Mrs. Ouinn. 

We are glad to see Mr. McGee up and on the campus 
after his attack of lagrippe. 

Professor — When the lector wished entrance into a 
house, he knocked on the door with his foot. 

Pupil, (emphatically) — My book sa}*s it was with their 
faces, (farces). 

H. T. Carley '99, now at Vanderbilt, after spending a 
few days at home recuperating, paid a visit to his many 
friends while on his return. 

T. C. Bradford, now principal of the Deaconville school 
made us a flying visit last week. While here he subscribed 
to the Collegian. That is the proper way for an Alumni 
to show his loyalty. , „ 

Professor — What is an absent-minded man? 
Student — A man whose mjjnd is absent. 

One of the most delightful functions of the season, was 
the chaffing dish party, given by Misses Cavett in honor of 
Miss Owen, the charming and attractive guest of Miss 
Maves. This evening is long to be remembered by all of 
those present. 

The snow was decidedly the most appreciated and 
popular visitor has had for sometime. All evidenced their 
pleasure by indulging in the old-fashioned game of snow- 
ball, and not a few went rabbit hunting. It was rough on 
the rabbit, but what fun! 

An old church member died, of whose goodness there 
was some doubt. However, the pastor posted this notice 
on the church door: "Brother Johnson departed for 
Heaven this a,m." Someone else, obtaining a telegram 
blank, filled in these words and tacked it alsoonthechurch 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

door: "Heaven, 6:30 p m: Johnson not yet arrived; great 
anxiety." — Ex. 

The inclement weather prevented Dr. Black from de- 
livering" his famous and interesting lecture on "Genesis 
and Geology" on the night of the 22nd. But he will favor 
us on March 8th. 

Bishop | Galloway's lecture on young; men as Christian 
patriots delivered on last Sunday night at the First Methodist 
church by request of the Y. M. C. A. of Millsaps college, was 
indeed a most eloquent and scholarly effort- This message 
from our g"ifted and beloved Bishop grave us a clearer insight 
on a great question which now confronts us, and through its 
influence and power we are assured young manhood will be 
better equipped to meet the coming issues. 

Bishop D. A. Goodsell, one of the most broad-minded 
and eloquent men in the Methodist Episcopal church, has 
accepted the invitation to preach the Commencement sermon 
onjune g, and to deliver the annual address June io. A hearty 
welcome awaits him at Millsaps. 

The Millsaps students have read with much zest and inter- 
est the very able argument given by Rev. R. W. Briggs in 
favor of football. We agree with him that the game inspires 
courage and manliness rather than inhumanity. He shows he 
realizes what football is and does not speak from heresay — 
condemning it because others do. 




THE MILLS APS COLLEGIAN. 23 




We have had some very interesting' debates in our 
society this year, but none so interesting- as the one given 
by the four "Coeds" Feb. 15. They discussed the follow- 
ing subject: Resolved, "That the works of art are more 
beautiful than the works of nature." The affirmative was 
well discussed by Miss Mary Holloman and Miss Crane, 
while the negative was ably discussed by Miss Millsaps 
and Miss Hemingway. The committee rendered their 
decision in favor of negative. It was indeed a treat to all 
who had the pleasure of hearing them debate. 

The Lamar Society will celebrate her ninth anni. 
versary April 19, 1901. The following program will be 
carried out: Anniversarian, H. G. Fridge; anniversary 
orator, A. J. McLaurin; annual address, Attorney General 
McClurg. We look forward to that occasion with pleasure* 
The following Invitation Committee was appointed: Messrs. 
H. A. Wood, Allen Thompson and Henry Wilburn. Also 
the following ushers: Messrs. H. V. Watkins, M.S. Pitman, 
W. O. Tatum, W. C. Brownman, C. A. Alexander and J. 
B. Howell. 

We have discussed several interesting questions th e 
past month. The question, Resolved, "That the South 
would be better off without the Negro," was ably pre- 
sented by both the affirmative and negative sides, but the 
committee decided in favor of the affirmative. In our last 
meeting it was proven that the United States would not be 
benefitted by the Nicaraguan Canal. Our men have shown 
themselves to be first class debators. 

O. W. Bradley, 

Cors Sec v L. L. S. 



24 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

Resolutions of Thanks. 



Millsaps College, Feb. 12, 1901. 

Wherereas, Millsaps College has long felt the need of 
better equipment in the department of Higher Mathematics; 

Whereas, Mr-. Dan James, of Yazoo City, through his 
generous gift in the erection of an Observatory with modern 
equipments as a memorial to his father and brother, has done 
much to meet the needs of and open new possibilities for this 
important department of the college work; and 

Whereas, we are not insensible of the great honor conferred 
upon us in making us the custodians and beneficiaries of this 
memorial, 

Therefore, Be it resolved by the students of the depart- 
ment of mathematics of Millsaps college, That Mr. James by 
his generous gift will not only have erected on Millsaps cam- 
pus a befitting monument to the memory of his father and 
brother, but that he will have erected a more enduring monu- 
ment in the minds and hearts or the host of young men whose 
names shall be entered upon our college roll. 

Be it further resolved, That as an evidence of our high 
appreciation of Mr. James' munificence we do hereby express 
our sincere thanks and heartfelt gratitude. 

Resolved third, That a copy of these resolutions be sent 
to Mr. James, and that they be published in the Millsaps 
Collegian. 

J. T. McCafferty, 1901, 

E. B' Ricketts, 1901, 
W. L. Duren, 1902, 
D. C Enochs, 1903, 

F. S. Gray, 1904, 

a: • Committee. 



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friends, 

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THOS. P. BARR, 

Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, Pm r1 o + ~ PP + 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. ireari Street. 



StaplC Fatcv GrOCOrlOS, ^ntRtail. All Kinds of Feed Stuffs. 

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Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
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Proprietors 

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Try a pair of Our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
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Sou-t:Ine>:rn College*^. 

Near all of those which issue handsomely engraved Anniversary and 
Commencement Invitations are having them done by a Southern firm 
who are doing very artistic work. We refer to 

*J. F». STEVENS, of Atlanta, Gi 

This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of 
high grade steel and copper plete engraving, and invitation commit- 
tees would do well to obtain their prices and samples before placing 
their orders. 



Attend 
the 
Best 



@Iil§fec 



Jackson -miss; 



W. H. W ATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures on Com 
mercial Law. 



Gents' 
Furnisher. 



a 



A 



f 

A Complete Line of Spring Styles Ready for 

Inspection, 



Logan Phillips. 



/ Want Your Trade And Will Treat You Right, 

Call on me when you want anything - in my line. 

Your friend. 

JACKSON, MISS. 

John W. Patton J. Jay White 

Patronize Home People. 

RATTON & WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

318 CAPITOL ST. JACKSON. MISS 

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Jackson, Miss. | 

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J. B. BOURGEOIS, 

,.,, , Jeweler and Graduate Optician 

% Jackson, Mississippi. 



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B 

Try Us On Your SHOES. 

Our $3.50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 
Date. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL KINDS OF SHOES. 

Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

G. CUM MINGS & SON, 



, . Council Lumber, Goal and Lime Company. , 

Dealers In £ 

Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, ► 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. ► 



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J. T. LOWTHER, 

F^ruits gltticL Cet.x~LcL±G^ 

Jackson, Miss. 



N. L. WINGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Alillsaps Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



CAPITOL STATE BANK 

Jackson, Miss. 

CAPITAL $IOO s OOO. SURPLUS, $100,000 

BROWN BROTHERS, 

JACKSON. MISS. 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring- us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for Celebrated Columbus Buggies. 



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DR. A. HILZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS 



Special Rates to College Students. 
All the latest improvements 
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1 24% South State St. J 

Jackson, Mississippi. f 



J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AT FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



I Attorneys at Law, 



JACKSON, MISS, 



CLEAR 

Strong Lij^lrit:. 

The light from a Student Lamp is the kind that rests tired 
eyes. Nickle-plated ones cost, with shade, $3.25 to $5.50. 

THE ROOKERY 

For dependable light givers. 

Rook-Binding For the Trade — ^ 

The NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., is prepared to bind 
books in cloth, or make book covers for small offices at cheap 
prices. Get our prices before sending your binding away. 



To Students of Millsaps J3C 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
. are. always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug- 
line. 

">jij. E HUNTER & CO. 



If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham's Drug Store 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

D« E WHITFIELD & CO., 

SUCCESSOR TO 

A. E. GOOCH, 

Offer a 20th century greeting - , and solicit the patron- 
age of the student body. 

Belhaven College 

For Girls and Young Ladies, Jackson, Miss. 

One of the best equipped schools in the south. Spring 
term begins February 3, 1901. For further infofmation 
and our handsome catalogue address, 

L. T. FITZHUGH, A. M., President. 



WM. H. W ATKINS. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Harding Building jackson, nississippi. 



No. 108^ S. State St. Jackson, Miss. 



• 




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Fine 


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Jewelry 


Rbpairing, 


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's Book Store, 






JACK SO i 




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1108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

We have our own Photograph Gallery 
for Half Tone and Photo Engraving. 



Fashionable Engraving 

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leading house for 

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Dance programs. Menus 

bek0re ordering elsewhere fine engraving of* 

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JOHNSON-TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

-^ -^ Groceries at Wholesale, *^r >^r 

To the Wholesale, Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing - bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To tl%e Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



a;i 



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MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 

Special Sale this Month ot over 500 Mens Fine Fall Suits. 

$12 00 All Wool Suits at $8 00 

14 00 All Wool Suits at ■<...,. »-. 10. 00 

15 00 and 16 00 All Wool Suits at... 11 06 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS llM UNDERWEAR, 

p., ;" i Mfcfi'si Cot toil Fleece Lined UiwerauitsJat ,- ;,.....:,.: 89c 

'< l v Men's Wool Fleece Lined Undersuits at - 1 0.) 

Men's Pusre Wool Undersuits, extra line, at $2, 2 50, $3 & 3.50 

Men's Colored Stiff Bosom Shirts, with detachable cuffs and no 
coliaiV; u -^V'a^chusett r ' make, at 50/r, 75c and Si.00. 

We can save jou money on anything/ 
JONES BROS. & CO. 

AGENTS FOR ,-v"* o t-» -t r», t i n r • 

Atlantic $3.50 Men's Shoe. State & Pearl bt., Jeckson, Miss. 






<L -4.V& m Wa /^ 



Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 



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NOTIONS AND SHOES. 



14 South State Street, Jackson- Mississippi 



IS MILLSAPS 
COLLEGIAN 




News Job Office. Jacksoa, Miss. 




SHURLDS 



Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 



South State St. i^5 X~A U l 4 ^ I •iJv^ MISS. 

We Educate the Masses 

On QuestioQsof 

A: FURNITURE X' 
Isadore Strauss & Son, 

207-209 State Street. 



fc 

K 
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JACKSON, MISS. 

;DEAL LOCATION, combining- all the advantages of the 
? city with the healthful conditions and immunities of the 
country. Convenient to electric car line. 




Literary and Law Departments .Otter Special Advantages. 

FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

W. B. MURRAH, President, 




IN THE FREE STATE OF COL TON. 



The days were gradually lengthening" and the occa- 
sional warm periods, coming in advance of Spring, showed 
a short life for the cold season; and this to the well shown 
pleasure of both the officers and the enlisted men of a 
brigade of Confederate Calvary. With their camp situated 
at a nearly central point between the river towns and the 
threatened points in the Great Raider's advance; they 
expected soon to receive marching orders. Mess call had 
sounded and the evening meal was over. In the company 
streets, some seated on old boxes and others squatted on 
the ground, the men in little groups were engaged in good 
humored conversation. Hardy oak branches furnished 
the fires that threw out a pleasant heat, killing the effect 
of the evening chill. They laughed and joked one another 
and discussed the probable operations of the army in the 
coming fighting season. The troop wit was not with- 
out his court and he kept an uproar of good, healthful 
laughter about him, while from the lower end of the 
streets, where the stables were, there came the pleasant 
sound of horses grinding the corn between their teeth. 

On Lieutenant Fred Warren, the beauty of this scene 
was entirely lost. He sat in his tent in the flickering light 
of a tallow candle with his hand thrust out holding a mini- 
ature daguerrotype so as best to catch the uucertain light 
on its surface, The distant look in his eyes told plainly 
that his thoughts were Dot on present surroundings. The 
picture showed the face of a girl, evidently just merging 
on real womanhood. While every feature presented the 
grace of approaching maturity, yet lingering in the rich 
brown depths of her eyes, there danced shadows of laugh- 
ter and challenge. Silky wavelets of soft light golden hair 
clung around her temples as if defying any restraint of 
art. Dan Cupid had never drawn his bow into a more 
graceful curve than the lines of her full red lips pre- 
sented. 



A THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

As Warren gazed on the face, memory slipped back 
over years to childhood's great realm of unbounded 
pleasure. How short seemed the days then, with the bed 
never unwelcome at night. The 'grove of large, heavy- 
armed oaks was their kingdom, and they never tired of 
their reig-n. Then the long rambles after blackberries. 
He could see her now, with the berries crowding over the 
rim of her basket and her little white hands all stained by 
the juice. He thought of when all this came to an end 
and the sorrow of leaving his playmate. 

Regularly through his years at college, he had written 
to her; but only honest, good, companionable letters And 
when he returned — what a change. In place of the com- 
panion of those years when thev held no secrets from one 
another, he found a grown woman. Her beauty fairly 
dazzled him, but he mourned for the old days. She seemed 
to have all the arts of a coquette and poor Warren often 
felt their sting. He was unable to account for his shyness 
in her presence until, on a sudden, he discovered that his 
little flame of friendship had sprung into a red blaze of a 
passionate love. And then the heartache. 

Shortly before he had come away, he grew bold and 
reproached her, told her that she was a flirt and delighted 
in seeing a man suffer from love for her. At this she went 
into a passion, and they parted in anger. His mother 
spoke of her continuously in her letters; but in the last 
from home he was told how the vicissitudes of war had 
ruined her family and that she had gone away to teach in a 
country school. This news had pained him, and in his 
big heart he mourned that he could not have prevented it. 

Here he became aware of a scratching on his tent front 
and in response called out: "Come in." 

An orderly pushed aside the fly of the tent and coming 
in saluted. 

"Lieutenant," he said, "The Colonel wishes to see you 
immediately." 

"Allright, orderly; going right away," Warren replied 
as the orderly again saluted and left the tent. 

Hastily arranging his uniform, he proceeded direct to 
regimental headquarters. There he found the Colonel 
awaiting him. 

"Lieutenant, " the Colonel said, after the usual saluta- 
tions, "I have received directions to send an officer into 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. i 

Colton County in the eastern part of this State. The peo- 
ple of this county resist the conscripting- officers and as a 
consequence of their opposition to the war, a great many 
deserters have gone there. A full report is desired and I 
have chosen you to go and investigate. You will leave in 
the morning - . I will not disguise from you that there is an 
element of danger and you had best pose as a civilhan. 

After more instruction as to the details, Warren left 
the Colonel, rather pleased to have a change from the 
monotonous camp life. He busied himself about his prep- 
arations for the journey and when everything was 
arranged he rolled in to get a good night's sleep. 

Next morning Warren was awakened by the lively 
thrilling notes of reveille, refreshed by his night's rest, 
and physically at his best, his appearance greatly changed 
from that of yesterday. 

In place of his close fitting gray uniform, he now wore 
the dress of a civillian in moderate circumstances of life. 
Though his coat ill fitted him, his shapely form defied it to 
conceal the grace of his erect carriage and well thrown 
back shoulders. His stocky neck and the curves of his 
muscles, where they showed, stamped him as an athlete. 
Of his 5 feet 10 he was every inch a man. A rather heavy 
chin, a nose, too large, yet well shaped, and honest blue 
eyes, gave to his face an agreeableness that was not ill 
pleasing. 

After bidding a group of brother officers goodbye 
and giving a last glance to his outfit, he took the reins of 
his horse from a waiting- orderly, and with an easy mount 
was in the saddle. On horseback he was thoroughly at 
home, and knew how to conform his position to the gait of 
his horse. As he passed along the country roads, he in- 
voluntarily spread his nostrils to get deep breaths of the 
fresh crisp morning air. All through the day he kept his 
horse at a steady gait and, when night came, rest at a farm 
house on the road side was welcome to both man and 
beast. 

The next day was much like the first, except that his 
thoughts dwelt more on his mission. His mind was unable 
to furnish him with a picture of the people who would 
desert the cause of his dear South. Already he was men- 
tally condemning them to whom he was sent. 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

As the afternoon wore past, the aspect of the country 
told him he was nearing - his destination. Instead of 
the diversified growth of the timber farther back, he 
now saw all about him great unbroken forests of pine. 
Their tall forms swayed with the wind's gentlest motion 
and the long needle leaves, as they softly stroked one 
another, gave forth a sort of sighing song. 

Afternoon gave place to evening and he was becoming 
concerned about a resting place for the night. He did 
not have to look long though, for soon he discovered at a 
short distance from the road a light coming from the win- 
dow of a low house. A loud call brought the owner of 
the place to his door, and after a short colloquy, the farmer 
invited him to dismount and accept what accommodations 
lie might find. 

Next morning while at breakfast he learned from the 
conversation that the county site of Colton County was a 
short distance. Too much public attention might prove 
disastrous to his purpose, so he proposed to his present 
host that he might be allowed to remain here while he was 
in the county. Depending upon the fact that few of the 
farmers had gone into service and that the farming would 
be little interrupted, he represented himself as a cotton 
speculator. In this his statements were all accepted with- 
out question and he spared no means to make himself 
agreeable to the people with whom he came in contact. 

A week or more was taken up in moving about, trying 
to make deals with the cotton owners he found. The 
people as a rule were in very poor circumstances and very 
illiterate. The farms were small and badly cultivated. 
They compared unfavorably with the farms Warren had 
been accustomed to, in bis own section of the state. From 
what he could ascertain scarcely a slave was owned in the 
entire county. 

It was now not so difficult for him to understand the 
indifference and opposition of these people to a cause in 
which they could not see themselves concerned. They 
were out spoken in their condemnation of the course taken 
by the State in the secession, and showed little love for 
either Confederate or Federal. 

Warren learned that the opposition of the people was 
soon to be expressed in material form. A mass meeting 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 5 

was to be held at the court house, in which meeting- the 
course the county would pursue was to be mapped out. 

"Warren had determined to attend this meeting-. So 
when the day arrived, he rode into town in company with 
his host. Only two building-s stood out in prominence, 
the court house and the hotel. Both were constructed of 
hewn log's with the openings between the logs filled with 
clay. Gathered around these were several country stores 
having high galleries on their fronts. The people were 
already coming in. Oxen were in evidence, yoked to heavy 
wheeled wagons in which women sat, while hardy sun- 
burnt children played around them. The wide galleries 
in front of the hotel and court house, and the adjoining 
grounds, were filled with groups of men. 

They were all engaged in earnest conversation, while 
occasionally one could be seen to pull out his wad of home- 
cured tobacco, and after biting off a goodly piece, send out 
from his lips long jets of yellow fluid. The meeting was 
in the court house and Warren had secured a seat near 
the rear, but in good position to see. The rather elderly 
man who assumed the chair called for the object of the 
meeting. 

A man from near the center of the room rose. At a 
casual glance his appearance was not uncommon; but as 
one looked closer, his sharp gray eyes, set over a hawk 
nose and the hard lines of his mouth, told of a possible 
desire to stand ever his fellows. His ungraceful bearing 
had with it a rude dignity uncommmon in a man of such 
surroundings and so young. 

As Warren regarded him, he thought of a snake. After 
a short pause, as if at a loss for proper words to begin, he 
commenced in a rough, but commanding voice, "Men, we 's 
come here today for a pupus. The State what we belongs 
ter has gone an' got herself into a scrape an' spects us 
whats got no fuss to raise, to hope her outen it. We haint 
erg-reed ter do what our State does; there haint no cause 
fer us to leave our homes and go away ter fight fer them 
stinking niggers. How many niggers is there in this 
county anyway? What man here's got a nigger whats his 
own? We haint got none, and we dont want none. Who 
asked the people in this here county if they wanted ter go 
erfiigtin' Yanks 9 Nobody; taint cause we's erf raid; ef 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 6 

them Rebs. think we wont fight, let 'em come over and 
meddle with us." 

The speaker's tones were gradually growing higher, 
and with each sentence his vehemence increased. The 
effect on his listeners was visible. As something said 
struck them, they nodded at one another, and squaring 
themselves back against the benches, they chewed more 
viciously on the "terbaccy. " 

'I know how yer all feel erbout it, " continued the man, 
"them big planters over in the yuther part of the State, 
whats got lots er land, and big gangs of niggers ter work 
it, wants ter keep their niggers. They go on a whole 
lot erbout fighting; but the} 7 's sta}ang at home themselves. 
Precious little the}^ wants to get a bullet shot inter them. 
While we here got ter work hard and don't live as good as 
them very niggers. Who you 'spose would work our 
farms so as ter keep up our families, if we went off ter 
fight? Ail of yous knows its hard ernough now gettin a 
livin out this pore ground. 

"What we oughter do now," and as he said this, he 
paused and looked his audience over as if to determine how 
they would take what he was next to say; the man was 
evidently satisfactory, for he continued, "is ter get a gov'- 
xnent of our own. We dont belong to them Yanks. And 
we haint gonter have nuthin ter do with the Rebs. Our 
State broke er loose from the Union, why can't we quit the 
old State? Why cant Colton County go it erlone, and let 
the others scrap ef they wanter? Whats the matter with 
us being the Free State of Colton? What says, yer 
men?" 

"Hurrah for the Free State of Colton; Thats it Bill; 
go erhead, we'li stay with yer," and other such exclama- 
tions went upfrom the crowd. They stood up on the benches 
and threw up their hats, while they cheered and hurrahed 
lustily. To Warren's more refined mind there uncon- 
sciously came the commonplace comparison of a crowd of 
children rejoicing in a bon fire; so simple minded were 
these men and so easily led to delight in the new position 
presented to them. To him the scene also embraced a 
minature Cromwell, a species of that type of men who 
possess a greater intellect than their fellow's and 
with a baser nature; and who do not fail to use these for 
their own advancement. His mental analvsis was inter- 



THE MH.LSAPS COLLEGIAN. 7 

rupted here by the former speaker calling - for silence. 
When this was obtained he again took up his theme, say- 
ing: "Every gov'inents got terhave somebody at the head 
of it; somebody's got to see how things is carried on. 
You've got ter choose somebody as your leader. Who'll 
it be?" 

Here the crowd broke in, in response to his question, 
they yelled: "You'll do; you'll be our Gov'ner." 

This wasaccpted by the speaker as a deserved and 
expected honor, and when silence was again restored, he 
assured them that he would prove worthy of their trust. 
Suddenly stopping in his speech, he seemed to be trying 
to remember something. He brightened up soon, and 
raising his voice said: "AYho'll swear ter stick ter the 
Free State of Colton through thick and thin? Everybody 
that'll swear, hold up their right hands." 

He looked around the room and finding all hands up, 
seemed well pleased until his gaze reached Warren sitting 
motionless. 

"Stranger," he said in an imperious tone, "them as 
aint with us, is ergin us. Will ver swear for The Free 
State?" 

Receiving no reply from Warren he continued: "Well 
what do yer be then, a Yank, or be yer a d n Reb?" 

Hitherto Warren had retained his composure, but at 
this he felt a hot blush passing over his face that seemed 
almost to burn. He struggled to his feet, not knowing 
what he v/as to say, nor how he was to say it. His heart 
beat wildly and the saliva came pouring into his mouth 
from the glands in streams. The few seconds in which 
he could not compel his vocal organs to obey his will, 
seemed an age; while in that time he stood glaring at his 
interrogator like a fine breeded hunter held at bay by a lot 
of curs that growled and showed their teeth. 

Popular fancy was not with the chief though in this 
case, for his move was lost. The men recognized the 
apparent injustice in his demands and even before Warren 
could speak, cries of "Let him alone," We'll see erbout 
him later;" were heard. The aggressor was forced to 
acquiesce and Warren regained his seat greatly relieved at 
the fortunate outcome. 

Egdirf. 
( To be concluded in next issue. ) 



VOLUME 3 APRIL, 1901. NUMBER 6 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E. Eaton, Editotvin'Chief H. O, White, Literary Editor 

T« W. Hollcman, Alumni Editor W, L« Duren, Associate Editor 

I, B. Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

H. L. Austin and D, C. Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances and business communications should be sent to 
Allen Thompson, Business Manager, Matter intended for 
Publication should be sent o B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief. 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription, per annum, $l. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 

THE NATION'S CHARGE TO HIE TWENTIETH 

CENTURY. 

SPEECH OF J. B. MITCHELL IN MISSISSIPPI INTER-COLLEGIATE 
ORATORICAL CONTEST. 



A nation, at the end of any period of its existence, is 
the embodiment of all the forces that have entered into its 
development; and the resultant of these forces determines 
the direction of its tendency. It is but proper then that 
nations should periodically make an inventory of those 
influences that are working- for their development, of 
those tendences that are shaping - their destinies, in order 
that they may check the bad and foster the good. 

Therefore in this the closing year of the Nineteenth 
century, amid the clash and din of modern mechanism, 
the whirl of commerce and the breath of war, we pause, 
and in the light of history, the chronicle of the births and 
deaths of empires, we demand of our own nation, 
"Whither tendest thou." 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 9 

Guizot, the great statesman and historian of France, 
in contrasting ancient and modern civilizations, deduces 
the following" law: ''Those nations are the most stable and 
long lived whose evolution is the result of several contend- 
ing principles, each struggling for the mastery, but no 
one of them completely dominating the others. On the 
other hand, that nation which is evolved in obedience to 
one overmastering- element either sinks into stagnant 
immobility or develops with rapidity and brilliancy only 
to decay as rapidly. " Applying- this law to the nations of 
today, Mr. Andrew D. White, minister to Germany, shows 
by unquestionable evidence that our great national devel- 
opment is the result, not of several co-equal principles, 
each struggling for the mastery, but of one predominant 
element w T hich he terms "mercantilism." Whether or 
not Guizot's law of national development, or Mr. White's 
application of it, be absolutely true, one fact we must 
admit, namely, that during these later years our nation 
has taken on a materialistic tendency that is manifesting" 
itself in an abnormal development of the mercantile spirit. 
Every department of our national life is beginning- to be 
permeated by this subtle and powerful influence. As 
evidence of this, the great political issues of today are no 
longer with reference to the mental and moral uplifting of 
the masses of our people, nor to the purification of our 
political life, nor to the perfection of our national govern- 
ment, but they are with reference to financial systems 
and commercial privileges. Again, this restless trade 
spirit, dissatisfied with the conservative policy of our 
fathers, is begetting- within our nation an insatiable greed 
for foreign territory. It is robbing our legislative halls of 
some of its strongest minds. The corruption of our 
municipal governments, and the difficulty that arises in 
empanelling a competent jury are evidences that this 
commercial spirit so monopolizes the time of our best 
men that they can give no attention to the administration 
of the affairs of state. This influence is making itself felt 
upon the curriculums of our colleges; there is a demand 
for the intensely practical education, and that course is 
the most popular which requires the shortest time for its 
completion, and which can be turned to account for the 
accumulation of wealth. Consequently our literary world 



10 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

must suffer, and the schools of poetry, philosophy and 
science must decline. 

This subtle, materialistic spirit would cross the 
threshold of the sanctuary, it would rob religion of its 
spiritual signrficence, it would measure the influence of a 
churcti by the amount of its wealth, it would dethrone 
God himself and set up in his stead a pitiful philosophy 
whose ultimate analysis is sensualism here and oblivion 
hereafter. 

This is the dangerous tendency that confronts us at 
the close of the Nineteenth century. Let the nation 
recognize it, and, in the name of the highest interests of 
our country, let it deliver a solemn charge to the Twen- 
tieth century: not that she should abate the industrial 
spirit, which with all has been a great blessing; but, in 
order that this blessing may not become a curse, that she 
should develop other elements of our national life until 
they shall wield co-equal power with the mercantile ele- 
ment. 

The first to receive the attention of the new century 
should be the religious element. Religion is one of the 
powerful forces that must be reckoned with in the phil- 
osophy of history. So completely is it interwoven into the 
life-fabric of every nation that to destroy it means de- 
struction to the nation itself. 

A nation's character is but the expression of its con- 
ceptions of God; and the strength of any people may be 
measured by the purity and vitality of their religion. 
Horace said to the Roman, "Thou dost govern because 
thou confesseth that the Gods are greater than thou.'' 
And in the higher and purer religious ideal of the early 
Roman we find an explanation of his superior national 
strength. Queers Victoria, when asked on one occasion 
how England had gained such pre-eminence and power, 
pointed with silent eloquence to the open Bible. In no 
nation has the religious element occupied a more promi- 
nent place than in our own. Who can estimate the influ- 
ence of Christianity upon the American commonwealth? 
It entered into its settlement and its development. The 
Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are 
based upon the principle of individual liberty and equality 
which first found expression in the teachings of Jesus 
Christ. So interwoven is the Christian relisHon with our 



THE MIIXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 11 

national life that to lower the tone of the one is to weaken 
the strength of the other. Therefore let the incoming 
century proclaim with renewed ardor the profound doc- 
trines concerning God. Over against the gross material- 
ism of the age let her posit the spiritual life of the Chris- 
tian religion. And upon the social and political problems 
of today let her bring to bear the ethics of the Man of 
Galilee^ 

The element that should nest claim attention is that 
of education. The welfare of a government wherein 
sovereignty is vested in the individual is subject, more or 
less, to the whims of a capricious populace; and a power- 
ful influence operating through the predjudices of the 
masses may serioush 7 endanger the public good. We 
have in the materialism of today a subtle element that 
appeals primarily to the physical and sensuous nature of 
man. Therefore if we would avert danger from this and 
other sources we must educate the people, for as you 
elevate and strengthen the mind of man you weaken the 
influence of that which appeals to his lower nature; you 
make him a nobler sovereign, and thereby you give sta- 
bility to government and streng-th to national character. 
Let the coming century then strive for the better educa- 
tion and upbuilding of the masses. Let it also build and 
equip g-reat institutions of learning which shall call men 
from the business walks of life and arouse within them 
the sleeping genius, till in response to powers heretofore 
latent, we shall have great fabrics of philosophical 
thought; poets, who shall immortalize this age by their 
sublimity and beauty of their themes; painters, who shall 
portray the noblest attributes of the soul; musicians, who 
shall catch their inspiration from the choir of heaven. All 
these shall touch the noblest sensibilities of the people 
and raise the nation above the influence of sordid gold. 

The political element should come next in this work 
of the Twentieth century. Revolutions and wars are the 
result of political corruption, and political corruption is 
brought about by incompetent and unscrupulous men — 
men who cannot withstand the influence of gold, but be- 
come the tools of corporations, monopolies and trusts. 
Let the century then call forth into the realm of politics the 
noblest sons of the nation. Let it teach them to respond 
no longer to the desire for w r ealth; no longer to the voice 



12 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

of selfish ambition, but to the higher and diviner call of 
patriotic duty. Let it build up a political aristocracy 
composed of men who believe that he who administers the 
affairs of state stands hand in hand with him who minis- 
ters for God; men who would spurn from their midst 
with unmitigated contempt one who would seek to buy a 
senatorship with his hoarded millions; men who could 
forget petty sectionalism and private interests and think 
only of the greatest good for the greatest number; men 
who would consider not the financial benefit of a measure, 
but would keep ever in mind the honor, dignity and moral 
standing of the nation. 

Finally, let the coming century conserve and cultivate 
the spirit of chivalry, that indescribable element whose 
components are nobility of soul, heroism and self-sacrifice. 
In this materialistic age, amid clanging of machinery, the 
rush of commerce and the mad race for sordid gold, let 
us not forget that spirit that speaks to us in the measured 
cadences of Homer's verse, that breathes in the wild song 
of the Scotish bard, that furnished the theme of the 
troubadour in ages past, that spirit which animated the 
ragged and half starved veterans of Valley Forge; the spirit 
that spoke in the vollied thunders of the guns at New 
Orleans; the spirit which prompted the noble heroism 
and self sacrifice which has crowned with such undying 
glory the women of our Southland. Can the spirit of 
chivalry die while there lives in the hearts of the people 
the memory of Johnston, of Jackson and of Lee? Let us 
bury forever all sectional bitterness and strife, but let us 
gather up the glorious deeds of the past and transmit 
them as a sacred and unperishable heritage to the sons of 
succeeding ages. 

O, my country! In the years to come ma.y thy great 
industrial arteries continue to throb under the mighty 
impulse of temporal prosperity; may thy hills be covered 
with temples and unpointed altars where God, e'en the God 
of our fathers, is worshipped in purity and in truth; may 
you feel the power of majestic mind and thought; may thy 
statesmen be men of uncorrupted character and unsullied 
honor; may the chivalrous spirit of thy illustrious fathers 
live again in the hearts of thy sons. Then, though the 
stars of other nations may one by one go down into the 
bosom of eternal night, the bright and glorious star of 
thy own immortal destiny shall shine on. 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 13 

EDITORIAL. 

COLLEGE MEN NOT IMPRACTICAL. 

So much has been, and is still being - said depreciatory 
of a college man's practical sense that it is regarded as a 
truism when some one sneeringly remarks that the vision- 
ary college man who thinks he will revolutionize the world 
will, after a trial, get the conceit knocked out of him, and 
come to a realization of his littleness. Most often the state- 
ment is made by those unable, properly, to estimate their 
own insignificance, but inflated with the assumed idea that 
they are intensely practical, and therefore of inestimable 
benefit to the world. It is not those who are sure of their 
foothold in life's struggle, but those who are not so perma- 
nently fixed, because of not having sufficiently prepared 
themselves for what they have undertaken, that decry 
others' worth, and attempt to excite prejudice against 
them. It may even be those who, after a trial of one or 
two years' work at college, gave it up, for the assigned 
reason of engaging in business of a more practical nature; 
but perhaps, the record of their work, while in college, 
might show that college work is decidedly so practical in 
the manner in which it has to be done, that the burden 
rested too heavily on their shoulders. 

The fact is, that college graduates are to some extent, 
lacking in that experience that comes from actual contact 
with the different professions or kinds of business, but in 
the essential requirement for success they are not lacking. 
The most impracticable man is that one who so underesti- 
mates the forces that are to be met and conquered in life's 
battles, that he thinks, without having to make any pre- 
paration, his experience and native wit will tide him over 
every crisis. It is only the few of those not acquiring a 
college education, who become eminent, that are pointed 
out by the practicalists as representative of self-acquired 
attainments. The great multitude who live and die, un- 
noticed and unknown, are completely lost sight of. On the 
other hand, the few of the college men who are failures, 
are pointed out as representative of college culture, while 
the great number who make the leaders in the professions 
and other vocations engaged in, are silently passed by. 
The evidence of a man's practical worth can not be judged 
at the moment of his graduation. Having been for several 
years engaged in a work of preparation, very different 



14 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

from that he espects to engage in permanently, it is not 
reasonable to suppose that he should be as familiar with 
details as a man who has been engaged in the identical 
work, perhaps, for years. The test comes, in the length 
of time required for him to master a profession, or busi- 
ness and the success he achieves after its mastery, in com- 
parison with those who have not taken a college course. 
The most exacting comparisons show that the college man 
is the one who has made the greatest success, in all places 
demanding- thoroughness and intelligence. The last an- 
alysis shows that college men put in operation the forces 
that give employment to the practical. 



A SUGGESTION TO THE TEACHERS' ASSOCIA- 
TION. 



The Teachers' Association soon to convene in Jackson 
should take some active steps towards reviving the move- 
ment begun by our late professor of English, Mr. W. L. 
Weber, to erect the Irwin- Russell memorial. Unless some 
definite plans are again inaugurated and systematic work 
carried on, nothing more will ever be done. It seems that 
this task is one that the Teachers' Association w r ould be 
glad to assume, and it comes properly within its sphere. 
The educational feature of the movement, awakening and 
interesting, the people of the state in the memorial was 
completed by Professor Weber, and there are doubtless 
but very few who do not appreciate the effort that was 
made, and who would not be in hearty sympathy with any 
further efforts to raise the amount of money necessary to 
finish the work. Those w T ho contributed the money al- 
ready collected, are becoming impatient, and it is but just 
that they demand that something be done. It would have 
been better not to have begun the work at all, than, after 
having begun it, and almost made it successful, let it fail 
because no one will assume the responsibility. 




THE MILLS APS COLLEGIAN. 15 

MY SWEETHEART. 



In memory's consecrated place 
I seem to see a well known form — 
A maiden sweet and fair of face, 
And unscarred by the passing- storm. 

I see her raven ring-lets play 
In the lig-ht of an Autumn sun, 
While by her side I seem to stay 
And swift the moments run. 

While I, my love sincere aver, 
Her lips half-parted seem to say; 
"Thoug-h chance and chang-e our hopes defer, 
I'll always love you as today. " 

Ah, those were blissful days of yore, 
Nor shall I soon their sweets forget; 
But that I squandered all my store 
Of tender names, I now regret. 

For chance did come and with it chang-e. 
She forgot her oft repeated vow — 
The story is as true as strang-e — 
She's married to another now. 

— D. 



WHAT I LOVE TO DO. 



When 'tis early in the morning, 

(Say half past five or six), 
And the golden day is dawning, 

And 'tis cold "to beat six-bits;" 

When the birds outside are singing, 
And the farmer goes to reap; 

I love to pull the cover up, 
And quietly drop asleep. 

C. A. Alexander, 1903. 









LITERARY 


DEPARTMENT 









After reading some of the very new novels, which con- 
trol interest mainly by their swift succession of events 
rather than by any characters therein, it is refreshing to 
find one that does make its characters living and true. 
Such a book we have found in '"Donovan," by Edna Lyall. 
Donovan, when we are introduced to him, is a boy at 
school, lately fallen into disgrace from a habit of card- 
playing. Always self-reliant, he asks no one to sympa- 
thize with or comfort him, but stands alone with his 
sorrow. 

Just at this time his father returns from abroad after 
an absence of years; returns to find his son disgraced. 
Both father and son feel it keenly, but the love between 
them triumphs over all, and when the father dies, a few 
days later, the poor boy feels that he is alone. 

His mother, a languid lady of fashion, had never 
seemed a mother to him; she had come far short of his 
ideal, constructed in his early boyhood. She was too ner- 
vous to trouble herself with the concerns of her children, 
so they grew up under the care of ignorant nurses, and 
at maturity found themselves ignorantof the very simplest 
principles of Christianity. 

Donovan went home to his mother and little invalid 
sister, whose love for him was worship. He loved her, too, 
and watched with maddening pain her life ebb away. His 
gloomy creed excluded all hope of an after-life, so he 
thought of his sister's coming separation from him as 
eternal. Yet, not for all the world would he have had his 
sister abandon the simple faith she had laid hold upon, her 
delusion, as he regarded it, since he saw it kept her cheer- 
ful. Long hours would he spend in thinking of the black- 
ness that awaited him ahead. Finally, after days of tor- 
ture, during which Donovan watched by the bedside, the 
little girl died and the poor fellow felt that his life might 
well end at the same time. For some days he was dazed 
with grief and when he awoke it was only to be thrus 
from his own home by his cousin who had married his 
mother in order to get his property. This cousin had 
previously destroyed the paper on which Donovan's father, 
dying, had willed his property to his son. 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 17 

Driven out into world the boy began to ask bitterly 
why some people were more fortunate than others; why 
other boys, when in childhood, were cared for by loving- 
mothers, while he had never known such care. He saw 
injustice in the world and sought whence and why it was. 
Why could he be turned out of his father's house by a man 
he hated? 

These thoughts deepened his gloom and in the dark- 
ness he wandered to London. AJi efforts to get work 
were fruitless, and, pressed by hunger, he became one of 
a trio of gambling-cheats, and followed the profession till 
he could no longer crush his conscience. Then he quit 
the work, and determined to seek the aid of a kind physi- 
cian who had been with his sick father. 

In this home he found a refuge. The mother treated 
him as an own son, and while she did not bother him with 
talk of Christianity, which he doubted; she showed him by 
her example that people can be good and kind and true. 
There was a lovely daughter, too, whose simple faith, so 
much like his dead sister's, greatly affected him. Accord- 
ing to the advice of the Doctor, Donovan returned to Lon- 
don as a medical student. There he fell under the influ- 
ence of a great, good man, an influence which changed his 
views entirely and drove away black doubts. 

Donovan had long ago discovered that he dearly loved 
Gladys, the Doctor's daughter, but noble boy that he was, 
he determined that he would endure the pain of separation 
rather than disturb her calm trust in Christianity. So he 
allowed the doctor and his family to believe a falsehood 
that had been told about him. But Gladys steadily refused 
to believe it, feeling sure that the nature of the boy was too 
noble to commit a crime. 

Donovan's step-father came to die, and the boy nursed 
him till his soul departed. He finally cast darkness from 
him and received light. Joy came to him at last, and he 
told Gladys of his love. She had loved him all the time, 
she said, and had waited and wondered if he would come 
to her. Thus a life was turned from evil to right by the 
silent influence of the example of one Christian family that 
was Christ-like indeed. 



^^J^ 



XXX EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT X X X 



"The Tulane University Magazine" for March has an 
excellent address by Mr. John Dymond on the subject, 
* 'How the Alumni Can Aid Tulane." It is an excellent 
address, and every sentence has the ring of loyalty to his 
Alma Mater. 

It is deplorable that so many of the Alumni of our col- 
leges and universities manifest so little concern for their 
institution when they have reached the place where they 
might be of the greatest service. 

If every alumnus would show his loyalty, (may I not 
say his gratitude and appreciation for what he has received 
at the hands of his institution?), it would tell not only in 
the progress of the institutions themselves, but in the 
higher order of our citizenship. Let each of us, as we 
shall leave our institutions, go forth full of the idea that we 
have received only that we may give to others, and that 
neither time nor separation releases us from the duty we 
owe to the college from which we graduate. 



In the March nuinber of "The Martin College Crown" 
we notice a short article on football. In this article the 
writer seems to be unwilling to enter an open protest 
against the practice of this sport, but rather chooses the 
Socratic method of attack. 

The question is asked as to whether the best intellects 
in the colleges take the lead in these so-called excessive 
games. We deem it sufficient answer to this to say that 
in the most successful football playing only those are al- 
lowed to play who make creditable grades, this is coming 
more and more to be a universal requirement. 

Next the question is asked, "Are the men who are 
blessing the world retired members of the club?" If schol- 
arship is made the basis upon which the members of team 
are chosen, and if a man's college standing is any indica- 
tion of his future, is it not reasonable to expect that these 
men will take their places along with the benefactors of 
the world? 

Next the question, "Is it the property of science, mathe- 
matics, literature, etc., etc., to show their highest out- 
come in the form of fast runners, high kickers, etc.?" It 



THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 19 

is not, but it is the expression of the life that tells every- 
where in the greatest and most useful scientific, mathe- 
matical and literary achievement. 

Finally the sweeping- question is asked, "Take these 
excessive games physcally, mentally and morally — have 
they done anything for the general good of the race?" Like 
every other form of athletics, football has contributed to 
the development of physical strength, mentally it stirs 
many a boy to exert greater energy that he may be eligible 
to a place on the team and thus raises the standard of his 
scholarship. Morally the regulations of the game and 
meeting the competitor upon the gridiron, teach boys to 
curb the baser elements of their natures. So even at the 
risk of being called an "extremist" we dare to assert that 
football makes its contribution to the good of the race. 



The March "Clionian" comes out in new and more at- 
tractive form. The exchange editor, we notice, makes 
some criticisms upon "The Collegian," to which we might 
reply in kind by pointing out violations of rules of taste, 
etc., typographical errors, and the fact that the copy be- 
fore us has a part of the matter twice, a part not at all, and 
a page of ads in the middle of the reading matter. But we 
willjnotdo so since we take the criticism in the spirit in which 
we believe it was offered, and in the belief that both of us 
will do better next time. 

We are glad to have the assurance of their willingness 
to co-operate in the "Russell memorial" matter. 



We are glad to add "The Student's Arena" to our list 
of exchanges. 

"The Vanderbilt Observer" for March has a splendid 
article on Maurice Thompson, and an excellent story in 
negro dialect, "Uncle Ross shoots a squirrel." 



See College Magazine printing advertisement of News 
Job Printing Office elsewhere in this issue. 







Lamar Literary Society Notes. 









Due to the fact of so many conflicting - entertainments, 
the societ} 7 has had but one regular meeting during the 
past month, therefore the corresponding secretary has 
very few items of interest. 

The society was very much disappointed that Dr. 
Black was prevented from giving his lecture on Genesis 
and Geology because of the inclement weather-, but hope 
that he will favor us at some later time. 

The subject that will be discussed soon in the Mill- 
saps Centenary debate at Fayette, Miss., was discussed 
in the Lamar society, March 22d. Subject: Resolved, 
That the English were just in their treatment with the 
inhabitants of the Transvaal. The affirmative was ably 
discussed by Messrs. T. W. Holloman, H. A. Hood and E. 
Giles, while the negative was well upheld by Messrs. D. C. 
Enochs, C. D. Potter, and L. M. Gaddis. These gentlemen 
made long and enthusiastic speeches, and after which the 
committee of judges rendered their decision in favor of 
the negative. 

We learn from the members of the invitation commit- 
tee, that they have selected a beautiful invitation for our 
anniversary, which is to take place in the near future. 
And I feel that I can say for the society that a cordial invi- 
tation is given to those who may feel an interest in our 
society. O. W. Bradley, 

Cor.Sec'y L. L.S. 

SPRING TIME. 
'Tis well said that the budding leaves, the flowers, the 
birds, and the spring poets come together. It takes'them 
all to make up the delightful season of springtime. And 
if the young Orlando inspired by the renewed life of na- 
ture, sees in a vision a beautiful maid about whom he 
yearns to write burning words, let him do it. Do not turn 
on him a volley of sarcasm, for the words that burn for ut- 
terance might, if suppressed, consume his own soul, when 
tossing about under the scorching heat of spring fever, 
give him the boon of turning into immortal verse the dainty 
hands, the pearly teeth, the dark brown eyes, the auburn 
hair and the bewitching smiles whose light he fondly be- 
lieves will guide him unto a happy day. 



«*■ v -r LOCAL DEPARTMENT ^ 



^, ^ ^i, LUL-/iL Utr/IK 1 iVJElN 1 -/^ «** «fe 



The buds of spring- beg-in to tip 

The willow and the ash, 
The boy of eighteen trims his lip 

To raise a fierce mustache. 

Don't fail to join the Buffaloes. 

Mr. George Bennett, of Madison, made a short visit to 
friends last week. 

Miss Josie Featherstone spent Sunday, March 31, 
with her sister at Edwards. 

"We are glad to note the return of E. Armstrong and 
that he is much improved by his visit home. 

Prof. H. (to a star gazer) — What are you doing? 
Prep — I'm viewing the anatomy. 

We are assured that there is a very charming attrac- 
tion for F. M. Glass at Durant, as he so frequently visits 
home-folks (?). 

A. L. Thompson, a former student of Millsaps, now 
attending the Memphis Medical College, made his friends 
a visit. 

Lamar Field spent a short while with clubmates dur- 
ing the past week. 

Mrs. W. B. Murrah, after a week delightfully spent in 
New Orleans, is now at home. 

When does a fellow display most faith? 

Chorus — In partaking of hash as a part of his diet. 

Mr. Bingham, of Carrollton, a member of the Board of 
trustees, made a visit of several days in the city, attending 
the meeting of the executive committee. 

Miss Katie Gray has returned from a pleasant visit 
to friends and relatives in Edwards. 

The Collegian extends its congratulations to Rev. H. 
P. Lewis, Jr., and lovely wife and wishes them a life of 
prosperity and happiness. 



22 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

Rev. 0'Brien,of the North Mississippi conference, con- 
ducted chapel exercises while here visiting 1 his son. 

•0} aous.TSpj p-Eq J 'suo sqj 3J 4 noj^ 

'noA" joj paxg s"ba\ ^dij; s 4 J3}ui.id siqj, 

•ssidssp }sora t u J33pns„ SAijismbui aqj, 

sapjs sq; q^-egiiaq suosasd aq} \ye jq 

L. F. Baily, of Alabama, representing 1 Underwood & 
Co., was with us for several days. 

E. H. Galloway, '00, after a year very profitably and 
creditably spent in the Medical Department of Vanderbilt 
is now at home on his summer vacation. 

It gives us pleasure to announce the marriage of W.A. 
Terry to Miss Lela Lewis. We tender them our best 
wishes. 

i 

Mr. McAnnally made the college a visit in the interest 
of the Y. M. C. A. work. 

A member of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey was 
here for two days making- observations. 

A Prep, after reading several stories, and noting 1 so 
often the words, to be continued, in a very decided manner 
said: "This fellow "Tobe Continued' writes lots of 
pieces." 

Prof. Morris Chambers, '00, who has been teaching 
school at Blountville for the past five months, spent a day 
with friends, on his return home. 

Dr. A. F. Watkins, president of Whitworth, paid Mill- 
saps a flying visit last month. Evidently he loves girls 
better than boys, or wouldn't have made his stay so limited 
We appreciate his taste. 

Dr. Murrah was in attendance at the inauguration of 
Pres. Alderman of Tulane University. 

The faculty, on account of cruelty to animals, both 
Greek and Latin bred, has granted an elective course. 
Thanks to the originator of this scheme, remarks the B. A. 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 23 

Millsaps considers herself very much honored in being 
allowed to entertain the Young - Men's Christian Associa- 
tion Convention of Mississippi and Louisiana. This is an 
honor that is rarely conferred upon a college association, 
therefore, we hope and will endeavor to prove ourselves 
worthy. 

Mr. Williams, secretary of the Student's Volunteer 
Movement, made us a visit of a few days, and while here 
delivered some instructive and interesting lectures con- 
cerning missions as operated by college students. This 
is a feature of the work that should be carefully con- 
sidered. 

On March 15th, Dr. Albion W. Small, the distinguished 
professor of sciology of the Universit} 7 of Chicago honored 
our college with a call. At ten o'clock he gave an address 
replete with interest, wit and sound advice. 

The literary societies were the recipients of a most 
delightful entertainment given in their honor by the young 
ladies of Belhaven on 23d of March. The following pro- 
gram was happily rendered; 

Ensemble Class — Misses Wesson, Alma Smith, Jordan 
and Compton. 

Paper — Lady of the Lake — Miss Brister. 

Duet — Misses Jordan and Joff rain. 

Instrumental Solo — Miss Docia Tucker. 

Reading — Extract From Two Gentlemen From Ken- 
tucky — Miss Tucker. 

Vocal Solo — Miss Carstarphen. 

Criticism of Ben Hurr — Miss Bertie Campbell. 

Instrumental Solo — Miss Canie Shaifer. 

Vocal Solo — Miss Alma Smith. 

Recitation — A Cuban Sea — Miss Hayes. 

Instrumental Solo — Miss Compton. 

Vocal Solo — Miss Berry. 

Ensemble Class — Misses Wesson, Alma Smith, Jordan 
and Compton. 

After which we bashful (?) boys were allowed to 
indulge in conversation, for a short while, with the fair 
ones. The cordial welcome we received from President 
Fitzhugh and the young ladies, will ever be recalled as one 
of the sweetest recollections of college days. 



ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT. 



The spring - sports are now on in earnest. As March 
has passed with its windy days kite flying - is at an end. 
Every student should now purchase a bag of marbles. 
You will be allowed to play on the campus without fear of 
protest. 

The following is an interesting explanation of how 
baseball started: The devil was the first coach. He 
coached Eve when she stole first. Adam stole second. 
"When Isaac met Rebecah at the well he was walking with 
a pitcher. Sampson struck a good many times when he 
beat the Phillistines. Moses made his first run when he 
slew the Egyptian. Cain made a base hit when he 
he killed Abel. Abraham made a sacrifice. The prodigal 
son made a hard run. David was a long distance thrower 
and Moses shut out the Egyptians at the Red Sea. — Ex. 



A SPRINGTIME IDYL. 



Before me lightly trod a maid so fair; 
Around me floated nearing springtime's air; 
Whilst bursting-buds bespokejgreen mantles new, 
And sweet wild odors drifting breezes blew 
My gaze I bent from what pure source to find; 
There came, a wild floweret or such in mind, 
When from the maid's white fingers so taper 
There dropped, ye gods, a chewing gum paper. 

Egdirf. 




Makers, caterers and dispensers of 

---- Hiefh=Class Confections, 



MA RTZ' 
FAM OUS 
CAN Dl E5.1» 






FRESH GUXTKER S CANDIES ALWAYS OX HAND. 

&&Yt%a 203 E. Capitol Street, 
V$§M? 



Jackson, Miss. 



" Fine feathers don't make fine birds" 

but they give them a fine appearance. 

We are showing trie finest specimens 
of Plumage for men in the city. Our 
Straw Hats will please the most" 
fastidious, and the Shirts we are sell- 
ing are simply charming and charing 
ingly simple. 

COME IN^zrn^ 

Let Us Fit You for Spring* 

THOMPSON BROS. 

348 W. CAPITOL ST. 




entlemen 



"When you need any Fancy Candies and Beautiful 
Fruits for your Sweet Girls. 



BEAR IN MIND. 



that the Onliest Place to get them is from your 
friends, 

W. 8. LEMLY & BRO., Who will please you. 

THOS. P. BARE, 

Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, p- ar1 o +t . pp+ 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. Jreari Street. 

GE^O. F. B^XJTE^Fi, 
Staple and PmnnrSflp Wholesale 



Fancy ItfOCeneS, "SfiKd. AU Kinds.! Peed S^ff.. 

'Phone No. 78. 203 West Capitol Street 

Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps , 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

Bowers Bros. & Dixon, 

H. B. JENKINS— +^r* 

Proprietor and Manager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

>. D. LOTT JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

WEST aSGKSOM SHOE STORE. 



Try a pair of our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
Calf, Vici Kid and Enamel. They are the best shoes sold for the 
price. Our $3 shoes are equal to any other $3.50 shoe on the market. 
We are headquarters for fine footwear. A hearty welcome and free 
shine always awaits you at 

300 West Capitol St 



Sou-tHern College®. 

Near all of those which issue handsomely engraved Anniversary and 
Commencement Invitations are having them done by a Southern firm 
who are doing very artistic work. We refer to 

J. F>. STEVENS, of Atlanta, Gi 

This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of 
high grade steel and copper plete engraving, and invitation commit- 
tees would do well to obtain their prices and samples before placing 
their orders. 



Attend F 




W. H. W ATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures Ion Com j 
mercial Law. 




We are showing the nobbiest line of 

CLOTHING, 

GENTS' FURNISHING, 

AND NECKWEAR 

for the Spring season ever brought to Jack- 
son. Beautiful line of Negligee Shirts in 
all colors just received. We would be 
pleased to show you through our line. 




Clothier and Gent's Furnisher. 
108 S. State and 314 W. Capitol St. 



i* T* Ts 



Sf R© 



/ iVant Your Trade And Will Treat You Right, 

Call on me when you want anything in my line. 

Your friend, 

JACKSON, !V5iSS. 



John W. Patton J. Jay White 

Patronize Home People. 



High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

313 GARITOL ST. JACKSON. MISS 



'b/L&x'cr'ineLin.t. Tailor 

I 

Jackson, Miss. 

J. B. BOURGEOIS, 1 

Jeweler and Graduate Optician « 

Jackson, Mississippi. | 



Try Us On Your SHOES. 

Our $3.50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 
Bate. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL KINDS OF SHOES. 

Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

C. CUMMINGS 6c SON. 




IAAAAAAAiAAAiAi*AAAili4A^lAAAAA A A A A A A A A A A A A A* 

. . Coiii Lumber, Goal end Lime Company. , ► 

.Dealers In > 

► 
>. 

Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles, Lath, ► 

► 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. ► 



'PHONE 178 — 



J. T. LOWTHER, 

F^r-ui-t^ and Candies 

Jackson, Miss. 



/V. L. WINGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsaps Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. 



W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



a XJ S_tf 



Jackson, Miss. 

CAPITAL. ^lOO.OOO. SURPLUS, ^100,000 



JACKSON, MISS. 



LIVERY, SALE AMD FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 



Agents for Celebrated Columbus Buggies. 



M8BP8BgBW88BliBegB8Wtn H!gaaBBgBBM WgBWBB»B8BM 



DR. A. HILZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS 



Special Rates to College Students. 
All the latest improvements 
in Dentistry. 



1 24^ South State St. 
Jackson, Mississippi. 

bmbs 



J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AX FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



i Attorneys at Law, 

JACKSON, MISS. 



Base Balls, Bats, Mits, Masks — 
Everything for play time. 

ThfE ROOKERY 



Walk in and look around. 

SCHOOL MAGAZINES^*^ 

Printed by the NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., in the 
most artistic and up-to-date style. Note the design of cover of 
this issue Prices are the very lowest possible. Express charges 
prepaid on each issue. Plate work unsurpassed. Let us make 
you estimate on next year's magazine. 

NEWS JOB OFFICE, 

Jackson, Miss. J. W. Tucker, Mgr. 



To Students of Millsaps^ 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug 
line. 

^J. E HUNTER & CO. 



If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham's Drug Store 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

D. E WHITFIELD & CO., 

SUCCESSOR TO 

A. E GOOCH, 

Offer a 20th century greeting, and solicit the patron- 
age of the student body. 



For Girls and Young Ladies, Jackson, Miss. 

One of the best equipped schools in the south. Spring 
term begins February 3, 1901. For further infofrnation 
and our handsome catalogue address, 

L. T. FITZHUGH, A. M., President. 





WM. 


H. 


WATKINS. 






ATTORNEY AT LAVJ. 


NISSISSIPPI. 


Harding 


Building 




JACKSON, 



3Z>ein-ti*»-t 

No. 108}^ S. State St. « • Jackson, Miss. 



I JOHN I^IGOIST 

© 



Fins Watch and Jewelry Repairing, 



Eyrich's Book Store, 



© 

JACKSON, MISS. © 



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1108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

We have our own Photograph Gallery 
for Half Tone and Photo Engraving. 



Fashionable Engraving 



-££5_Stationery 



leading house for 

College, School and Wedding Invitations 

Dance Programs, Menus 

BEFORE ORDERING ELSEWHERE p, NB ENGRAVING Of* 

Compare Samples 

and Prices all KINDS 



HI PIECES . FOR . PRIZE 
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JOHNSON-TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

^^ Groceries at Wholesale, *f§^^ 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



"The Store that saves you money on everything you buy." 




MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 



SPECIAL SALE THIS MONTH OF CLOTHING: 

315 Fine Suits at $8.50, $10, $12 and $14. 

260 Fine Serge Coats and Vests at $3. So, $5, $6 and $7.50. 

550 Pairs Fine Pants at $2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, and $4. 

1000 Pairs Best Bleached Drill Drawers, worth 50c, now 35c a pair 

The Genuine Scrimm, No. 50, Elastic seam Drawers at 5oc a pair. 



f 



<yMi%¥ ;> 



m 



Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 

NOTIONS AND SHOES. 



£&z 



Cor. President and Capitol Sts., Jackson, Miss. 



E2 MILLSAPS 
COLLEGIAN 




News Job Office, Jackson Miss. 




SHURLDS 





Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 




213 <• -* -TJ T T ti> T T~^\ WL JACKSON, 

South 8tate St. \3 XT! l^> JTX.A-^i_^^5 MISS. 

We Educate the Masses 

On Questions of 

2C FURNITURE 2£ 
Isadore Strauss & Son, 

207-209 State Street. 







« 

* 
« 



JACKSON, MISS. 



iJfDEAL LOCATION, combining all the advantages of the 
©r city with the healthful conditions and immunities of the 
country. Convenient to electric car line. 




Literary and Law Departments .Otter Special Advantages. 

FOR CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

W. B. MURRAH, President, 



MILL 

Vol. 3 




&4 1 *3 


C 


OL 


LEG! AN 

1901, No. 7 


JACKSON, 


MISS., 


MAY, 



THE GEOLOGICAL TRIP. 



On April 15th, the Senior class of Millsaps College, 
under the leadership of Dr. A. M. Muckenfuss, left Jack- 
son for the purpose of making geological investigations 
along the G. & S. I. railroad. 

About six miles south of Jackson a quantity of lime- 
stone was observable. This limestone belongs to the 
Vicksburg group, and is good for building material. As 
is common for limestone, it is the product of coral forma- 
tion. The country for several miles south of Jackson is 
remarkably level, having a black soil overlying yellow, cal- 
careous clay. 

The character of this clay is such as makes difficult 
the contruction of a foundation for a large building or for 
railroads. 

About twenty-five miles south of Jackson the country 
becomes hilly, showing that the nature of the soil changes, 
since the same denuding agencies that produce little 
effect on the country above mentioned covers this section, 
extending to the coast, into hills and valleys. Here also 
is the northern limit of the long leaf pine. 

The first stop made by the party was at Saratoga. 
Numerous outcroppings of the orangesand formation were 
found in the regions thereabout. This formation is char- 
acteristic of almost the entire state, the delta being the 
chief exception. 

A gravel bed known locally as "May's gravel pit" was 
investigated. The bed was unusually deep and of a good 
quality though slightly mixed with clay. The pebbles of 



2 THE RULLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

this bed were rather large. Another pit near by had 
much smaller pebbles, though in other particulars similar 
to it. The latter was somewhat inferior to the first bed. 

A remarkable spring is at Saratoga, with an outflow 
sufficient to supply a town of 5000 inhabitants. Though 
near a swamp, an analysis shows the water to be very 
pure, there being less ammonia than is usually found in 
springs far removed from swamp deposits. This spring 
is, perhaps, a natural artesian well. 

The second stop was made at Monroe, ten miles north 
of Hattiesburg. A gravel bed was investigated here also. 
The pebbles were very small and the gravel an inferior 
grade. Overlying the gravel is a layer of loam about four 
feet deep. This loam forms the surface and on it depends 
the fertility of the soil. It is the last sea deposit and is 
not connected with the orange sand deposit, which it 
slightly resembles. The depth of the loam gradually de- 
creases towards the coast, where it ceases entirely. 

Outcroppings of the Grand Guld formation were seen 
in the banks of Bowie river. Underneath this formation 
and forming the bed of the river was an impervious layer 
of mud and clay, resisting erosion remarkably well. The 
clay would be found! at other places to be cemented with 
the loam, which here was the overlying formation. 

The third stop was at Hattiesburg. The only inter- 
esting investigation made here was an artesian well This 
well is about 400 feet deep. The depth of artesian wells 
along the coast is from 700 to 800 feet, which shows that 
the impervious bed supplying the wells dips towards the 
coast. 

The fourth stop was at Bayou Bernardo five miles 
north of Gulfport. We were fortunate in finding here an 
outcropping of the formation known as the post tertiary. 
It has a black or gray color anditsodor shows thepresence 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 3 

of hydragen sulphide. It is evidently formed of swamp 
deposits, since fossils of leaves, roots, etc., were found in 
abundance. 

This formation underlying- the orange sand, and 
being, of course, deposited before it, makes the water 
along the coast undrinkable if the wells are sunk into it. 
It turns the water of the streams black. 

Rains and wind made ivestigation along the coast very 
difficult. 

The first fact, in regard to Mississippi Sound, was its 
shallowness. This, as all evidence goes to show, is due 
to the gradual upheavel of the coast. There are smaller 
channels of greater depth than the average in the sound, 
due to the natural dredging of the channel by the outgoing 
tide. The pier of the G. & S. I. railroad extends to one of 
these channels. It is safe to say that if the channel were- 
at some time dredged to a sufficient depth to admit ocean 
steamers, the tide would preserve it. 

The Bay of Biloxi owes its depth to the same force, for 
being narrow the tide sweeps through it with great force. 
A small island is situated off the mouth of the bay, about 
three miles distant, built up by the sediment brought from 
the bay. Bay St. Louis presents a remarkable contrast to 
Biloxi Bay, being both much wider and more shallow. 
The width probably aids in increasing its shallowness, 
since the waves here have no force from being compressed 
into a smaller space. As would be supposed, there is no 
island opposite its mouth since no sediment is swept out 
to form it. 

An effort was made to go to Cat Island, but the 
extreme shallowness of the sound prevented us from 
approaching nearer than a mile to the shore. This shal- 
lowness is not so marked at Ship Island, perhaps because 
the sediment of the Mississippi, such as is carried along 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

the coast of Mississippi first reaches Cat Island, which 
serves as a kind of reef for the other islands along the 
coast. 

The prolific oyster beds off the Mississippi coast are 
due to the sedimenti of the Mississippi. Oysters must 
have two things if they thrive, salt water not many 
fathoms deep, free from an influx of fresh water and mud, 
and some means of being supplied with food. The sedi- 
ment of the Mississippi, not sufficient to destroy them by 
an excess of mud, supplies them with nutriment, while its 
volume of water never reaches them. No other river 
of importance being near, they thus find off the coast of 
Mississippi an ideal home. 

In conclusion and in behalf of the class, |I wish to say 
that we feel deeply grateful to the people along the route, 
who showed us many kindnesses, and especially to the 
officers of the Gulf and Ship Island railroad, who gave us 
free transportation and made our trip in every other way 
as pleasant and profitable as possible. 




VOLUME 3 MAY, 1901. NUMBER 7 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E, Eaton, Editor-in-Chief H, O. White, Literary Editor 

T. "W. Holloman, Alumni Editor W. L. Duren, Associate Editor 

I. B, Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

H, L, Austin and D. C< Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances and business communications should be sent to 
Allen Thompson, Business Manager. Matter intended for 
Publication should be sent o B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief. 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year. 



Subscription, per annum, $i. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



ED I TORI A I DEPA R TMEN T 
Our Success. 



The whole college has cause to feel proud of the effort 
of its representative, Mr. W. L. Duren, in the inter-col- 
legiate oratorical contest at Meridian, May 3d. His 
victory aids materially, both in showing the thorough- 
ness of the instruction offered by this institution, and in 
bringing it prominently before the public. In fact Mill- 
saps College has had for the past year an almost phenominal 
success, having taken in succession two inter-collegiate 
medals and one inter-state medal. Quite naturally the 
people of the state will watch its future career, and it is 
obligatory on all connected with the institution^ both the 
faculty and students, to see that the reputation of the 
college does not suffer. Let it be thought by none that 



6 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

these successes are due only to the presence of a few men 
of ability, but rather that Millsaps College, because of the 
advantages it offers, can prepare men for such occasions. 
We do not wish to be understood as saying- that other 
colleges of our state are not equipped for the same purpose, 
but our desire is for the public to know what we are doing, 
and our aim is to encourage our students not to think the 
opportunity will find the man, but to prepare the man for 
the opportunity. 

Inter-Collegiate Games. 



The time is fast approaching that will either commit 
the college to a policy of progressiveness, or the Chinese- 
like policy of excluding modern ideas and methods of 
doing things. For a college to be behind-hand by failing 
to enter into the spirit of the college world and keep pace 
with it, is as much a state of retrogression as for a nation 
to tread along in the way of its forefathers while the rest 
of the world is moving onward with gigantic strides. It 
is, then, devotion to the college and a desire to see it main- 
tain its creditable standing among other educational 
institutions, that prompts us to urge the board of trustees 
to disregard the resolutions passed by the conference, and 
restore inter-collegiate games. We do not think it treason 
to advocate such action, since we think the conferences 
are mistaken as to what will be to the best interests of the 
college. 

Whether the old time argument about the danger of 
these games is sound, does not enter, since in spite of it 
the best colleges have them. We are simply forced to 
meet the issue and answer, for the good of the college, the 
question, "Shall we keep in touch with the progessiveness 
of the college world and make our influence felt, or shall 
we attempt to change the established order of things and 
not only fail in the attempt, but fade from public view?" 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 7 

If the granting- of these games lowered the standard of 
scolarship, no one would ask it. But instead of lowering 
it, the tendency is to increase the efficiency of the work by 
bringing enthusiasm to the students and developing strong 
physical men, those best able to work. There is plenty 
of energy in our college to meet other colleges in contests 
requiring skill, strength or knowledge, and to fail to use it, 
especially when it seeks use, is to fail to do its duty and to 
use honorable means in making itself known. The world 
is not preparing its easiest places for college men to 
occupy, and the effort to prevent their going up against 
men in all the many kinds of inter-collegiate games is an 
effort to take away the resolution and determination 
needed for the contests of actual life. The aim of a col- 
lege should not be to turn out intellectual weaklings. 

In making this appeal to the board of trustees, we do 
not mean to impeach the motive of the conference; on the 
contrary we appreciate it. But, believing that their inter- 
est is misdirected and that their zealousness is misguided 
and calculated to do the college greater harm than good, 
we ask them, as its directors and as the men best 
acquainted with its needs, to consider well before thev 
pass definitely and finally on this question. 



IN THE FREE STATE OF COL TON. 



(concluded) 

Later in the day as Warren rode silently along by his 
companion the scene in the court room would continually 
come before his mind. It was only natural for him to con- 
demn the action of these men, and yet, while he despised 
their low conceptions, he sincerely pitied them. Standing 
as they did, almost beyond the influence of enlightened 
refinement, it could scarcely be expected that they would 
be affected by the higher sentiments. Although Warren's 
habits of self command had served him in good stead but 



8 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

at the really crucial moment luck seemed to have taken 
things in charge and extricated him from what he men- 
tally denominated a "pretty ticklish situation." On 
account of this easy escape he had not fully realized the 
danger of his positson, and even before the farm house 
was reached he had entirely dismissed the morning's 
occurrence from his mind. 



When school hours were over Blanche Norman, feel- 
ing greatly depressed in spirits, gladly left the little 
school house and started on her walk to the place that 
served as her temporary home. Away off beyond the 
pine lands her thoughts drifted and dwelt upon her 
friends and happy associates of the dear past. The great 
pines overhead swayed and in their soft sighing sang an 
accompaniment to her memories. All of the strength of 
character of this delicately cultured girl was needed in 
this desolate place to keep her from becoming disheart- 
ened. Any comparison of her former pleasurable days at 
the old home and this dull routine of duty was painful. 
Relentless necessity had placed her in a community 
where anything approaching social intercourse was impos- 
sible and the continued self absorption of her mind was 
wearing on her. "When she arrived at home, and while it 
was still light, without removing her clothing she threw 
herself on her bed and her tired brain yielded to sleep. 

She had been asleep several hours when she was dis- 
turbed by the sound of men's voices coming from the 
adjoining room, and on suddenly awakening she was 
startled. The first words she heard, though, dispelled the 
after dullness of sleep and riveted her attention. Her 
heart beat so furiously that it seemed about to burst. 
Half risen from the bed she rested herself on one elbow 
and with her other hand clung to the rail of the bed and 
drank in eagerly every word. She immediately recog- 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. V 

nized the voice as that of the man who on the morning had 
put himself at the head of the embryonic republic. 

"I tell yer," she heard him say, "he's nothin' but er 
Reb spy, and we've got ter get rid of him. There hain't 
but one safe way, and thats ter kill him, and kill him ter 
night. The jobs yours, Dave Kanes, and if you's chicken 
hearted, you knows who aint. " 

Blanche Norman's mind grasped the meaning of what 
she heard with a woman's typical quickness. The stran- 
ger's presence in the community was not unknown to her 
and she had heard something of the occurences at the 
court house. She immediately identified the stranger as 
the subject of the speech she was listening to. A moment 
was sufficient for her to decide what she must do; she must 
warn him. But where was he? 

Even as she asked this question an answer came from 
the same source from which she had learned so much 
already. 

"Its erbout four mile over ter Hank Parker's house," 
she heard the voice continue, ''and by the time we get there 
every thing'll be quiet." 

Before this sentence was completed Blanche had 
slipped noiselessly from the bed and out into the open 
hall that ran the length of the house. From the gallery 
in front of the house she saw a group of horses hitched to 
the fence, and in less time than it takes to tell she was on 
one and tearing down the road. 

Only a moment behind her the men came out in time 
to hear the sounds as they came from the beats of her 
horse's hoofs. The missing horse and empty room con- 
firmed their suspicions already formed and they immedi- 
ately set out at full tilt in pursuit. 

Blanche's blind choice of horses proved a lucky one. 
She had heard her pursuers as they turned into the road 
and knew there was to be a race. Horse woman enough 
though to recognize good qualities in an animal when she 



10 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

was on him, she felt confidence in the one she now rode. 
The cool breeze fanned her hot cheek and blew the loose 
bits of golden hair in streamlets around her head. A wild 
sense of nervous pleasure, something like that she had ex- 
perienced back at her home when following the hounds, 
but far greater, came to her as she raced along between 
the high walls formed by the pines on either side of 
the road. 

Before she could realize that she had covered the four 
miles that were before her,|she recognizedjthejhouse which 
was her destination at a short distance in front. A single 
light shone from the window of a corner front room, and 
this she felt certain was the room of the man she had come 
to warn. 

As she leaped to the ground, she hastily threw the 
reins over a post in c the fence and then rushed across 
the yard and into the open hall. As she hesitated here 
for an instantja sort of fear overtook her, but she put it 
aside immediately and knocked boldly at the room door. 

Warren sat before an uncertain fire of pine logs 
dreaming, and the knock at his door operated as a sur- 
prise. He knew that he was the only one in the house 
awake, and rising to open the door, he wondered who it 
could be. As he opened the door and the light streaming 
through it revealed to his astonished gaze Blanche Norman 
all trembling and panting, he exclaimed in wonder : 
"Blanche, what on earth?" "Oh, is that you? lam so 
happy, " was her response in an equally surprised tone. 
"They will kill you Fred, " she went on, scarcely able to 
speak for want of breath, "They are just behind me." 

"Explain, Blanche, who wants to kill me, and where 
are they?" 

She quickly related to him what she had heard in the 
room adjoining hers and told him of her race with the men 
following close behind her; then grasping his arm she 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 11 

pulled him toward the door and in an anxious voice 
insisted: 

"Oh, don't lose any time; get your horse and join me 
in the road beyond the house." 

Fred, not fully comprehending - but feeling She had 
best do as she said, left her and went for his horse. After 
a very short time he joined her where she had said, and at 
the same moment they heard the approach of a party of 
of horsemen. They lost no time but struck out in a hard 
gallop. 

The men had evidently discovered them, for they did 
not leave the road at the house. Blanche's horse was well 
winded already, but having a good pacer in Fred's Ken- 
tuckian, he staid by nobly. They kept up their pace and 
as a consequence, after going several miles, lost the sound 
of their pursuers. It had been sometime since the last 
sounds of hoof beats behind them had|been heard, and 
they were checking the speed of their horses, when, as 
they suddenly turned a curve they saw close in front a 
squad of horsemen halted in the road. 

They were reining up their horses when one of the 
party called out: "Who's there?" 

This came to Warren with a happy welcome, for he 
immediately recognized the voice of one of his sergeants. 
"Its Lieut. Fred Warren, Sergeant, and he is awfully glad 
to see you at this time." 

The sergeant then told how it was that he came 
in such an opportune moment. Being out in this direction 
on a foraging expedition, on that day they had met a man 
from Colton County who told them something of Warren's 
predicament, and so they lost no time to get to him. 

The Colton County horsemen had evidently given up 
the chase as they heard no more of them, and at the sug- 
gestion of one of the troopers who had noticed a house near 
by, Warren, with Blanche at his side and his escort follow- 
ing, rode in that direction. 



12 THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

The next day Blanche and Warren rode side by side 
on their way to camp. The troopers came close behind, 
most probably discussing what a handsome couple their 
Lieutenant and the beautiful young lady made. Warren's 
thoughts were again back with the beautiful days of 
the past. 

Suddenly swinging in his saddle so as to face her, he 
broke what had been rather a long silence by saying: 

"Blanche, I have been thinking of that day when I left 
you, I hope you will forgive me for what I said then; I was 
very foolish; and if I had known then how I really loved 
you I could not have been so guilty. " 

She turned her head aside and a squirrel, perched 
somewhere up in a tree, barked sharply as if to>reprimand 
her for the two big tears that came in her eyes, while she 
softly replied to Warren: 

"Fred, I never was really very angry with you." But 
as if heeding the squirrel's protest, she continued in a dif- 
ferent tone: "I have been thinking sir, that I acted very 
wrongly in taking away this horse." Fred was not inter- 
ested in moral questions nor in horses at this time, so kept 
silent. 

Not noticing his failure to respond, she went on: 

"I suppose I will have to envoke the old adage of, 'All's 
fair in war.' " 

Fred had ridden close up by her side and before she 
realized what he intended he had [leaned [over and printed 
a kiss on her cheek. 

She turned on him in well assumed indignation and 
angrily exclaimed: "What do you mean sir?" 

Fred was prepared for this and quietly replied: 

"I only stole a kiss so as to share your guilt and to 
show the truth of the old adage you quote by giving an 
instance of what holds good under that part you left off. 
As you have stolen the horse and I a kiss, I'll do what lean 
do to expiate. Suppose we trade?" 



THE MTLLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



13 



Long - before this the troopers had ridden ahead and it 
cannot be definitely settled; but it is probable that a court 
in equity would have failed to determine in whom the title 
to the horse lay when they reached camp. 

Egdirf. 




A very good book is Mrs. Burnett's "In Connection 
with the DeWilloughby Claim." The DeWilloughby fam- 
ily is a prominent and aristocratic one, a type of the rich 
Southern family of ante-bellum days. The daughters are 
beautiful and graceful and accomplished; the sons are 
handsome, and courteous and vivacious — all but one; "big 
Tom DeWilloughby is the shame of the family. He is too 
large, his movements are too awkward to please the correct 
tastes of his parents and his brothers. The father, des- 
pairing of making a society man out of his son, tries to 
make a physician out of him, but poor Tom could not bear 
the sight of suffering and came back home in despair. 
His father raved, and at last, overwhelmed by reproach 
and angered beyond control, he left his father's house and 
made his way to a country village. 

Here he built a little store, became postmaster, and 
soon endeared himself to the people round about. They 
spoke lovingly of "big Tom" and considered him indispen- 
sable. He returned their love, and all lived in perfect 
bliss. 1 

But an event suddenly changed everything. Tom 
adopted a little child and brought it up under his own 
care. The love that he had in his great heart he gave to 
this child. She grew to girlhood, to womanhood, and 
always loved her benefactor. She came to love Tom's 
nephew, a handsome youth, but the most touching part of 
the story is the constant love and perfect agreement be- 
tween Tom and his adopted daughter. 

The two lovers, Tom, and an old negro man, the f am' 
ily's servant and friend, went to the national capital and 
worked for months to obtain redress for the ruin wrought 
by the Federals in their domain. They succeeded at last, 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 15 

and then all returned home, happy and assured of a life of 
peace and plenty to the end. 

Tom, the hero, inspires love for his manly qualities, 
his great heart, his genuine grief, his absorbing love for 
the girl he had adopted. His cheerfulness is never-failing 
and all his qualities together make him most lovable, and 
give him friends everywhere he goes. 



CLIPPINGS. 



AN IMPOSSILE GIRL. 



No matter what may be his zeal, it seems he ne'er can 

please her, 
Tho' many efforts he doth make at every time he sees her; 
And when he takes a tack and thinks that now he'll trv to 

tease her, 
A great indifference doth appear provokingly to seize her; 
And when she doesn't seem to know when he has tried 

to freeze her, 
He thinks it wouldn't be much worse if he had tried to 

squeeze her. 
But when he does the last-named thing we find he quickly 

frees her; 
And as he wonders where he's at, we hear him groan 

"Great Caesar." 

— D. G., inS. P. U. Journal. 



The April number of the Mississippi College Magazine is 
a splendid issue. We found much pleasure and entertain- 
ment in reading - , "The High School in Mississippi," 
"Southern Orators" and "Man's Freedom and Oppor- 
tunities." 

The Tulane University Magazine contains an excellent 
address on "The Nicaraguan Canal." It is a strong argu- 
ment for American construction and control of the canal. 
Everything points to the commercial supremacy of the 
South. The bitter jealousies of the past are dead and love 
for our common country lives instead. We are no longer 
exclusively agricultural, but everywhere factories add to 
worth and independence of the South, and the rapid 
growth of Southern commerce makes the canal a 
necessity. 

The University Unit has some good matter, but does 
not seem to be up to to the standard. We think it a serious 
mistake for a college magazine to copy selections from the 
leading newspapers and magazines of the country. It may 
be said that some college magazine might be wonderfully 
improved by magazine articles in place of the matter usu- 
ally found in them, and we readily grant it. But the pur- 
pose of a college magazine as we conceive it, is to develop 
in the student the ability to do for himself, and every selec- 
tion from The Critic or Youth's Companion has a tendency to 
defeat that very end. 

The Collegian is pleased to acknowledge the receipt of 
Vol. 1, No. 2, of Blue Mountain College Magazine. The de- 
partments are not defined as they should be, but on the 
whole it is a very creditable effort and we wish the maga- 
zine success, and gladly place it on our exchange list. 



THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 17 

The "Class Day Number" of The Whitworth Clionian 
is very interesting- to us. The historian introduces us to 
some remarkable characters, and then the Prophetess, 
with inspiration equatorially mounted, searches the utter- 
most parts of the earth for these characters after the 
wonderful transformations of college life. We think the 
issue the most delightful that we have received. 

"Some Phases of the American Short Story" in the 
April number of the University of Virginia Magazine is a 
splendid article, and in our judgment, a strong defense 
of the independence and originality of American char- 
acter. 



MY FRIEND. 



Give me the thing you hide, my dear, 

Not the heart you show the world; 
But the love that was lost, and the dream that died, 

And the hope with its young wings furled. 

For am I not thy poet, 

With heartstrings a lyre for thee, 
To wake the song that was silent, 

Left secret for God and me? 
The world will never know it, 

But that was the best of thee. 
— Mary Lillian Pierce, in Vanderbuilt Observer. 



xa;^ local department x x x 



Three cheers for Millsaps and her victories! 

Mr. Dan James, of Yazoo City was a welcome visitor 
to the College this past month. 

Mr. Andre, of Mississippi College, has been the guest 
of E. O. Whittington. 

Miss Bowan was the charming- guest of Miss Linfield, 
during the teacher's association. 

We were honored by a call from the Misses Ross, of 
Canton. Miss Mabel is the able assistant editor of the 
"Picket." 

Prof, (to Bible student)— What man worked seven 
years for his wife? 

Student — A man of Copiah county. 

Dr. Murrah left Monday, the 6th, for Nashville, where 
he will attend the meeting of the Educational Committee. 

Messrs. Simpson and White spent a few days in 
Madison very delightfully, the guests of the strawberry 
tarm. 

While enroute to New Orleans, Mr. J. R. Bingham, of 
Carrollton, accompanied by hislovely daughters, made Mill- 
saps a short visit. We cordially welcome him and appre- 
ciated his manifest interest. 

Prof. Ackerland will be prepared to give instructions 
in landscape gardening next session. Cultivation of bitter 
weed a specialty. 

Uncle Ned's definition of a "bully": He was very 
vivid in the verbal exercises but when it comes to actuali- 
ties, he was not so eager for conflict. 



THE MELLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 19 

Prof. J. F. Galloway '00, | principal of Montrose High 
School, spent several days on the campus, the guest of his 
cousin. 

We are glad to note the return and improvement of 
D. C. Enochs after the dislocation of his arm. 

Rev. Mr. Sharborogh, of Los Angeles, Cal., conducted 
devotional exercises on the morning of April 29. 

Laron Miller, principal of the Mcnticello High School, 
spent several days here standing the examination for ap- 
pointment to West Point, Knowing his ability, we are 
assured of success. 

Mr. Harwell, of Kansas City, was among our guests 
the past month. 

Dr. Miller, president of Hendrix College, while en 
route to New Orleans, stopped over for a few days, and 
was entertained at the home of our president. His lecture 
on missions was very much enjoyed. 

During the State Teacher's Association we were hon- 
ored with calls from a number of those in attendance. 

Mr. and Mrs. North, of Raymond, were in attendance 
at the reception of the Kappa Alphas. 

Messrs. McCafferty, Eaton, Holloman,|Ricketts and 
White, were chosen by the faculty to represent the Senior 
class as contestants for the Ligon medal, 

Messrs. G. R. Bennet and J. A. Teat were among our 
visitors, the guests of clubmates. 

Dr. P. M. Catchings, of Georgetown, made a flying 
visit to his son, Philip, during the past month. 



20 THE MUXSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

Dr. Alderman, president of Tulane University, who 
gave the opening address at the convention of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, which met here April 13-17, 
was the guest of Dr. Murrah. 

Misses Featherstone, after a week most pleasantly 
spent in New Orleans have returned. 

We sincerely regret to hear of the death of Prof. JB.E. 
Young's father and extend to him the heartfelt sympathy 
of the Collegian. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brister spent several days with their 
two sons during the past month. 

Theological Student, (to Belhaven lass) — As you are 
Presbyterian possibly you can tell "What is the chief end 
of man? 

Young Lady, (whose knowledge of the catechism is 
not so extensive as her power of observation) — So far as 
you are concerned, no one could be in the least doubt after 
seeing your feet. 

We are glad to note that Mr. Hilburn's father is much 
better and he has returned to his school work. 

W. L. Doss, of Centenary College, was one of our ap- 
preciated visitors, while here attending the Y. M. C. A. 
Convention. 

Messrs. Bennet and Duren attended the senior recep- 
tion at Whitworth and report a very pleasant visit. Mr. 
Bennet has a sister attending school there, and Mr. 
Duren has (?). 

Mr. A. Thompson was chosen by the faculty to be 
our representative at the Chatauqua contest, held at 
Crystal Springs in July. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 21 

The Anniversary of the Galloway Literary Society 
was a great success. The speakers for the evening- were: 
H. O. White, orator; W. L. Duren, anniversarian, and 
Governor Longino delivered an instructive and interesting- 
address. The program was interspersed with music which 
added much to the pleasure of the evening. 

On the night of April 26th, Alpha Mu Chapter of 
Kappa Alpha entertained theirOfriends most delightfully 
at their annual reception. The halls were beautifully 
decorated and delicious refreshments served. The mem- 
ory of this evening- will long linger. 

Millsaps has a due right to be proud of her records. 
For on the evening of May 3d we had the pleasure and 
honor of taking off two medals (all that were offered for 
that night.) W. L. Duren scored a victory by taking the 
State Oratorical medal at Meridian, and B. E. Eaton at 
Fayette in debate against Centenary, was awarded a very 
handsome medal. This is only the fifth intercollegiate 
medal Millsaps has won within the last twelve months. A 
large and enthusiastic number of students attended the 
contest at Meridian. 

On the afternoon of May 4th, we enjoyed a trolley ride 
which was given by the business men of Jackson and the 
manager of the car line. After two hours very pleasantly 
spent the participants repaired to Shurld's where delicious 
refreshments were served. We appreciate this courtesy 
and honor bestowed upon us by our friends in considera- 
tion of our victories and will Remember this evening with 
much pleasure. 

The Senior geological survey, under the direction of 
Dr. Muckenfuss, on their recent trip through the southern 
part of the State, made some remarkable discoveries 
which will add much to our museum and be of lastino- 



22 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 

benefit to the young geologists. Millsaps feels proud of 
these noble youths who risked their lives for the advance- 
ment of Science. The weather was extremely disagree- 
able and "Spider" caught one of those prehistoric colds 
which as yet he has not deposited in the museum. "Greedy 
Bob", while excavating found the nest of an Archaeopteryx 
being somewhat hungry, he devoured as many of the eggs 
as possible, and now the "egg-eater" after a severe sick- 
ness is a wiser and better boy. "Dr." Kennon, the scien- 
tist, had the fossil of an Elasmoramus of the Cretaceous 
period fastened with "pa's" strap, but alas for the strap. 
The three ladies men of the class secured from the fisher- 
man's wife remains of paradoxidesandtetrabranchita,very 
interesting specimens. Diamonds were exceeding rare and 
very few large ones were found. The members of the 
party are under lasting obligations to the manager of the 
Gulf & Ship Island railroad, who made this trip possible by 
the granting of 17 passes. 




THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 23 

I . . ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT. . . 



The boys since our last issue have been quite active 
and have exercised their vocal organs by yelling for the 
medal winners. We have had remarkably fine results 
from our continued practice in leap-frog and marble 
shooting. 



College Spirit Departed this College 
December, 1900. 

NOT DEAD BUT SLEEPING. 



The following prescription has been effective in all 
previous cases: 

For Millsaps College: 

Spirits of inter-collegiate football 4 g. 

Syrup of " baseball 5 g. 

Oil of " Oratory 4 c. 

Directions: Practice well before using, take one dose 
in fall, another |in spring and a third in the summer and 
college spirit will take on new life — Dr. J. B. H. 




son 




Makers, caterers and dispensers of 



SOLE MANU- 
FACTURERS OF 
M-ARTZ'S 
FAMOUS 



High=Class Confections. 



CANDIES. •V* J*Lj 



FRESH GUXTHER'S CANDIES ALWAYS OX HAND. 

"£$fo 203 E. Capitol Street, 
Jackson, Miss. 



'Fine feathers don't make fine birds/ 1 

but they give them a fine appearance. 

We are showing the finest specimens 
of Plumage for men in the city. Our 
Straw Hats will please the most 
fastidious, and the Shirts we are sell- 
ing are simply charming and charm- 
ingly simple. 

COME IN^*4>- 

Let Us Fit You for Spring^ 

THOMPSON BROS 

348 W. CAPITOL ST. 



©ou/tlnLex-n College®. 

Near all of those which issue handsomely engraved Anniversary and 
Commencement Invitations are having them done by a Southern firm 
who are doing very artistic work. We refer to 

«J. F». STEVENS, of Atlanta, Gi 
This house has a magnificently equipped plant for the production of 
high grade steel and copper plete engraving, and invitation commit- 
tees would do well to obtain their prices and samples before placing 
their orders. 



Attend 
the 



Best 




' COLLEGE>^swm£ 



W. H, w* ATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures on Coml 
mercial Law. 




We are showing the nobbiest line of 

CLOTHING, 

GENTS' FURNISHING, 

AND NECKWEAR 

for the Spring season ever brought to Jack- 
son. Beautiful line of Negligee Shirts in 
all colors just received. We would be 
pleased to show you through our line. 




Clothier and Gent's Furnisher 

108 S. State and 314 W. Capitol St. 



« AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.LAA AAAAAAAAAAAAA 



| . . Council Lumber, Coal end Lime Company. . . 



Dealers In. 



I 



Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. ► 



► 



'PHONE 178- 

J. T. LOWTHER, 

Jackson, Miss. 



N. L. W/NGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsapa Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W, M. Anderson, Cashier 



CAPITOL STATE BANK 

Jackson, Miss. 

CAPITAL $100,000. SURF=l_US, $100,000 

BROWN BROTHERS. 

JACKSON. MISS. 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for CelebratedColumbus Buggies. 



■ Mll l lllt l ll l MM IU IM I IR \\8BMM»ro»^YkW 

DR. A. HILZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS \ 



Special Rates to College Students. 
All the latest improvements 
in Dentistry. 



1 24^ South State St. 
Jackson, Mississippi. 



J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AX FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



I Attorneys at Law, 



JACKSON, MISS, 

F»LAY TIME: 



Base Balls, Bats, Mits, Masks — 
Everything for play time. 



Walk in and look around. 



THE ROOKERY 



SCHOOL MAGAZINES^**- 

Printed by the NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., in the 
most artistic and up-to-date style. Note the design of cover of 
this issue Prices are the very lowest possible. Express charges 
prepaid on each issue. Plate work unsurpassed. Let us make 
you estimate on next year's magazine. 

NEWS JOB OFFIOE. 

Jackson, Miss. J. W. Tucker, Mgr. 



To Students of MillsapsJ^ 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug 
line. 

jMJ. f, HUNTER & CO. 



THOS. P. BARE, 
Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Oil Lamps of Every Description, T> M1 .1 ^frP^t 

Oil and Gasoline Stoves. i^eari Street 





WM. 


H. 


WATKINS. 






ATTORNEY AT LAW. 




Harding 


Building 




JACKSON, 


NISSISSIPPI. 



Dir*. J, IHI. £vleig:r*u.cieiir, 

Dentist 

No. 108^ S. State St. Jackson, Miss. 

ohn W. Patton J. Jay White 

Patronize Home People. 

PATTON & WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

318 CAPITOL ST. JACKSON. MISS. 

WLGT-clrLeLY-Lt. Tailor 

Jackson, Miss. 



\vm^\viMNBNMSmn»MMBBinmKasnBBBC0«s^^ oaaMnNowoASKiamnaRoi 



J. B. BOURGEOIS, 

\ Jeweler and Graduate Optician 

t Jackson, Mississippi. 



If You Need PERFUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham's Drug Store 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

GE^O. F^. BAUBR, 
StaPle Fancy GrOCe^S, *SaiSwL Ml Kind, of Feed Stuff,. 

'Phone No. 78. 203 West Capitol Street 

Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

JESo^sTsr&x-^ Bros. 8c Dix:on. 

H. B. JENKINS—*-*^* 

Proprietor and Manager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

>. D. L07T JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

west asGKson shoe store. 



Try a pair of our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
Calf, Vici Kid and Enamel. They are the best shoes sold for the 
price. Our $3 shoes are equal to any other $3.50 shoe on the market. 
We are headquarters for fine footwear. A hearty welcome an i free 
shine always awaits you at 

300 V^est Cepltol st. 



BOYS I 



Try Us On Your SHOES. 



Our S3. 50 Shoes are Durable and Up-to- 
Date. Every pair guaranteed. 

WE REPAIR ALL KINDS OF SHOES. 

Shoe polish, 10 cents. Opposite Baptist Church at 

C. CUMMINGS & SON. 



•®©®©®®e®a®e©e®*©®@e®©@*® ©»®®®«s®€<®©®©©©®©®©® 

JTOI-ilN: IvIGON — > 

Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing, 

Eyrich's BookStore, JACKSON, MISS. 

®©®®©e®©©©©«®e9«©©©eo®9©9©©©©©®©©s®e®e©©©©o©© 







1108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

We have our own Photograph Gallery 
for Half Tone and Photo Engraving. 



Fashionable Engraving 

^_- ftwp Stationery 

LEADING HOUSE FOR 

College, School, and Wedding INVITATIONS 

Dance programs. Menus 

before ordering elsewhere fine engraving oi" 

Compare Samples „, , „.„__ 

AND PRICES ALL KINOm 



EFFORTS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Orations, addresses, es- 
says, valedictories, salu- 
tatories, class poems, ivy 
poems, class mottoes, 
af ter-dinner speeches, 
flag-days, national holi- 
days, class-day exercises. 
Models for every possible 
occasion in high-school 
and college career ; each 
and every "effort" being 
what some fellow has 
"stood on his feet" and 
actually delivered on a 
similar occasion. 
Price, $1.50 Postpaid. 
Cloth— 640 Pages. 

HINDS & NOBLE 

4*5-6-12-13-14 Cooper Institute, N. Y. City 

■^ Sckooliooks of cUljntblishers at on* start. . 




JOHNSON-TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

^^ Groceries at Wholesale, ^^ 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before you make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
ments of our Retail Establishment. We have taken particular 
pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

Will buy from one bale to ten thousand. 

Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
Strictly First Class Wholesale and Retail Store, we are, 

Yours sincerely, 

JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS. 



"The Store that saves you money on everything you buy." 



¥ 



MAMMOTH RETAIL STORES. 



SPECIAL SALE THIS MONTH OF CLOTHING: 

315 Fine Suits at $8.50, $10, $12 and $14- 

260 Fine Serge Coats and Vests at $3-5o, $5, $6 and $7.50. 

550 Pairs Fine Pants at $2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, and $4. 

1000 Pairs Best Bleached Drill Drawers, worth 50c, now 35c a pair. 

The Genuine Scrimm, No. 50, Elastic seam Drawers at Soc a pair. 






Stap/e and Fancy Dry Goods, 






NOTIONS AND SHOES. 

Cor. President and Capitol Sts., Jackson, Miss. 



21 MILLSAPS 
COLLEGIAN 




News Job OOice, Jackson, Miss. 



SHURLDS 





Again extends to the young men of Mills aps 
a hearty welcome, and invites them to make 
his place of business their headquarters as in 
the past. Yours truly, 




213 ^ -r_T T j TT> T T~^ <-^ JACKSON, 

South State St. O JlTL V_> Jt\L lw JL^J s^ MISS. 

We Educate the Masses 

On Questions of 

a: furniture <x 

/sac/ore Strauss & Son, 

207-209 State Street. 




THE JAMES OBSERVATORY, 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 




PS COLLEGIAN 



JACKSON, MISS., JUNE, 1901, No. 8 



Speech Welcoming the Class of Nineteen 
One As Members of the Millsaps College 
Alumni Association. 



My friend George Power wrote me sometime ago that 
he had recently paid a visit to his Alma Mater and that he 
did not enjoy his visit very much — his lack of enjoyment 
seems to have been caused by the fact that the members 
of this class whom he left in '99 occupying seats in yon 
Prep department, whom he had hardly deigned to look 
upon, had taken their seats with him that morning over 
here in the Senior row. While I have always had the 
greatest confidence in my friend George's veracity, I con- 
fess that that stunned me and my visit at this time is 
largely in order to see for myself how far this rumor is 
true, but I find it even so, or worse, for I find that you 
have not only spent this year in Senior section, but have 
also passed Dr. Moore with his obstructions in the way of 
analytics and logarithms, waded through Dr. Muchenfuss 
with his mechanical mixtures, chemical compounds, and 
sustained the shock of his varied explosives, and I hope 
closed satisfactory accounts with his "store" thatyou have 
successfully dealt with Dr. Murrah and his friends Plato* 
Lock and Des Cartes, and last, but not least, have ridden 
every mustang which Prof. Swearengen has put you on. 

I know you sit here today with sad feelings. Why it 
was either my faiend Harris Allen Jones or Edward 
Mabrey Brogan, I have forgot which, who, when he had 
walked down off this stage after graduation, sat down on 



4 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

occupations they are telling the tale of the greatness of 
our school. Yet we are still young. 

And so today as we come back to the verge of our 
active life to bid you welcome, the journey has not been a 
great one. A day's journey, methinks, has landed us in 
the midst of all the scenes we loved so well, and has uncon- 
sciously made us a part of the college life again. As we 
sat in chapel at prayers I saw a sober look on the face of 
Dobyns, which seemed to mean that he was unconciously 
wondering whether he could afford to cut Math, again. 
When the bell on the campus was rung,I looked round for 
my English and unconsciously hoped Prof. Weber's baby 
was sick, but I was brought back to the present by meet- 
ing Prof. Bishop in the hall. As I passed through the 
hall I stopped at the bulletin board to see if I was on de- 
bate, but the first name on the affirmative was "Miss 
Crane," and I came back with a start to the present and 
realized that after all the college in a year or so had made 
"wonderful progress!" and that she was way ahead of my 
day! For in my da.y Be /haven was the nearest approach 
to femininity, and we did not dare approach very near to 
that. Sustaining this shock I walked out to the Campus 
to breathe. I noticed a new building on the other hill, 
where we used to go at dinner time for persimmons, and 
I asked who ws.3 going to live over there. They said 
something about "fames Observatory.'''' I said nothing, but 
I did a whole lot of thinking, and I am going to find out 
who that fellow is before I go back to my Yazoo circuit. 

But I have heard the mocking bird at his song on the 
campus in the morning, I have seen the throng of stu- 
dents going to and fro at noontide, I have heard the hearty 
reverberations of a college yell at midnight and have felt 
entirely at home again here. It has been a pleasure to 
look into the faces of the faculty. It has been a delight to 
see the present prosperity of Millsaps. It has been a joy 
to grasp the hand of many a one of the "old fellows," and 




Alpha Mu Chapter of Kappa Alpha. 

Allen Thompson 

H. G. Fridge P. M. Harper 

F. W. Nail W. A. Williams 

L. Manship, Jr. J. M. Pearce F- Hyer, A. S. Cameron, T. W. Holloman 

W. O. Tatum R. F. Jones, C. P. Manship Yerger Clifton 

J. D. Magrnder B. F- Eaton R. S. Dobins, C. S. Brown 

A. W. Fridge W. M. Buie D. C. Enochs H. L. Whitfield Lloyd Gaddis 

Geo. Bennett, V. Watkins J. A. Teat W. F. Cook 

S. h. Field R. Saunders E. M. Gaddis 




rJOCE? 



Alpha Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Sigma. 

C. A. Alexander I,. C. Hines 

I,. C. Holloman H. I,. ClaiK 
J. R. Countiss 

J. M. McLean H. F. Sively 

J. S. Fwing A. J. Mcl^aurin, Jr. 

J. B. Howell J. T. McCafferty 

R. F. Bennett F. B. Rickety 

R, D. Clark W. B. Burwell F. S. Gray 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 5 

I assure you it is all enhanced by the exceeding - great pleas- 
ure it is to us all to welcome into our midst the splendid 
class of 1901. 

Had we come back to you after many years laden with 
rich experiences gathered up by a long, active life, I doubt 
not we should have used this occasion to pour out upon 
your heads a great deal of advice, but for several reasons 
I shall not do this. If it were intended that I should de- 
liver you the Baccalaureate address on this occasion in Dr. 
Murrah's place this fact has not been intimated to me. 
Moreover, I know very little advice to give you. If I 
should give any at all I fear it would be that gathered by 
hearsay rather than by experience. Moreover, advice is 
usually fruitless and experience is the best teacher. I 
have heard that young lawyers ought always to be as 
truthful as George Washington. I might advise those of 
this class to that effect. But much good would it do! And 
I have heard that young preachers ought not to get mar- 
ried for four years. I might advise these youthful minis- 
ters to this effect, but what a waste of words that would 
be. Moreover, I have received a hint that one of the mem- 
bers of this class is entirely beyond the possible effect of 
this advice and that several more of them are nearly so. 

So my duty is not to give advice, but meeting here we 
have "swapped a many a yarn" of Millsaps College's past 
and have told each other many encouraging things of her 
present, and then dipping into the future "far as human 
eye could see,' 1 we have spoken of her future and "all the 
wonder that should be." It is in this future of Mi7/saf>s that 
our relations as fellow Alumni chiefly lie, we are proud of 
her past, we rejoice in her present, but our hope is bright- 
est in her future. 

We welcome you today because you have by your 
years of hard work won a place among us and we rejoice 
to crown you with the honor that is }Our just due. 



6 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

We welcome you because you add new honor and 
brighter light and greater strength to our Association. 

We welcome you because you bring fresh zeal and 
fresh enthusiasm and fresh intelligence of the needs of 
our college, and the work of the Association will be to bet- 
ter advantage with the aid ot your council. 

We welcome you because we are brothers bound by 
the bonds of love for our nourishing mother, to whose 
future we look with pride and for whose interest we must 
work unceasingly. 

Whether it be infields of oratory, we shall ever cheer 
with one voice at her success, or whether it be upon ath- 
letic fields, on the diamond or gridiron, we shall rejoice 
with one voice at her victory, or in whatever phase of life 
it be, we will watch the success of her men, rejoicing 
with them is their joys, and weeping with them in their 
sorrows. We welcome you because we know you will join 
us in all these, because we are brothers in common cause. 

Let an occasional brutal father forsake his child. Let 
an occasional depraved child forget his mother. Let 
brother turn his back upon sister and husband upon wife, 
but let the instances be rarer yet that a Millsaps man 
shall forget his Alma Mater! 

We bid you all welcome and may God bless us every 
one. 

H. B. W ATKINS, '99, 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN. 



VOLUME 3 JUNE, 1901. NUMBER 8 



Published by the Students of Millsaps College 

B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief H. O, White, Literary Editor 

T. W. Holloman, Alumni Editor W, L. Duren, Associate Editor 

J, B. Howell, Local Editor 

Allen Thompson, Business Manager 

H. L, Austin and D. C. Enochs, Assistants 



Remittances and business communications should be sent to 
A Hen Thompson, Business Manager. Alatter intended for 
Publication should be sent o B. E. Eaton, Editor-in-Chief. 



Issued the Tenth of each month during the College year, 



Subscription, per annum, $i. Two Copies, per annum, $1.50 



ED I TORI A I DEBAR TAIEN T. 



With this issue the third year of the Collegian's life 
comes to a close. We are mindful of many failures and 
regret to deliver to our successors a work that we did but 
partially. The only merit claimed is that our purpose was 
to reflect our college life and to secure for the college the 
standing it deserves. Towards this end our best efforts 
have been directed in proportion as we have succeeded 
in accomplishing it. So far we have been successful. But 
as the experience gained from a now severed connection 
may never help us again in college magazine work, it is 
not amiss to say some things that might lessen the labors 
of the Collegian's next management. 

To the student body I would say, develop an enthusi- 
asm for all the college undertakings and have a pride in 



8 THE JVTILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

whatever involves its reputation. Let not the only words 
ever heard from you, be those earnestly laboring under 
difficulties perhaps, to meet the expectations of the faculty 
and friends of the college, be the severest sort of criti- 
cism intended more to discourage than to help. Another 
thing" to do is to contribute articles for the magazine. 

Remember that this is your magazine and entitled to 
your support. We managers are intended only to super- 
vise, not to supersede. 

Finally and most important of all, subscribe for the 
Collegian. With a small subscription and consequently 
with a limited fund, the managers begin their work with 
the certainty of non-support and with the knowledge that 
hampered by a lack of funds, they will be embarassed 
throughout the year. 

They will be limited to a certain number of pages, to 
a certain amount of reading" matter, hard to vary because 
of its littleness, and to the inevitable criticism that nothing 
is in the Collegian. 

We do not intend to complain of what we have received 
from the student body nor attempt lo shield ourselves by 
attaching blame to others, but we desire earnestly that all 
may work together for their common cause, viz. the pros- 
perity of the college and their own development. 

And now personally I wish to say that I have appreci- 
ated the position assigned me and that in later years the 
most pleasant reflections of my college life will be con- 
nected with what little work I may have done in furthering 
the mission Millsaps College was founded to fulfill. 




MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN STAFF- 1900-1901 

W. T. Holloman 
Allen Thompson 
W. Iy. Daren H. E. Austin 



H.'O.^White 
B. E. Eaton 



D. C. Enochs 

J .B. Howell 




W. L. DUREN — 1902. 

Mr. W. L. Duren entered Millsaps College in 1897, 
and has made for himself an enviable record. He stands 
high among the students, and commands the respect and 
admiration of the Faculty. While in Freshman Class he 
won the Freshman Declamation medal, and has been in all 
the contests within his reach. This year he won the 
place to represent Millsaps at the Intercollegiate Contest, 
which took place at Meridian. There he had an easy 
victory. This victory entitled him to the honored place of 
representing the State of Mississippi at the Inter-State Con- 
test to be held at Mont Eagle, Tenn., on the 28th of July. 
We are proud of Mr. Duren and the State at large should 
feel honored in having him as their representative. Mill- 
saps won this distinction at Mont Eagle last year, and 
we feel that history would be but reflecting itself if Mr, 
Duren wins. 



a; a: a: exchange department x a a: 



With this issue of the Collegian the session closes, 
and the labors of the present staff are finished. In re- 
viewing the work of the session we find that there have 
been rough places, but on the other hand there have been 
many and enough pleasant experiences to more than off- 
set the unpleasant recollections. 

The editor of the Exchange Department desires to 
make grateful acknowledgment to the friends of 
the The Collegian, both old and new, for the 
friendliness and good feeling, which they have 
manifested toward us during the year. We hope that 
the same pleasant relations may continue for years to 
come and that those who succeed the present staff may 
be so fortunate as to retain all the old friends and add 
many new ones to the list next session. 

Every magazine has been a source of pleasure and in- 
spiration to us. But among those that we regard as best 
we wish to make mention of The University of Virginia Mag- 
azine, Randolph-Macon Monthly, Tulane University Magazine, 
S. P. U. Journal, Emory Phocenix^ Vanderbilt Observer and 
University of Mississippi Magazine. 

The University of Arizona Monthly comes to us from the 
far West and we appreciate no magazine more than this. 
It is the neatest and best illustrated magazine on our list 
of exchanges, and it is always readable. 

Among our magazines from schools for young ]adies 
we have received and enjoyed The Clionian, The Shamrock, 
The Martin College Crown, The Academian, and others. 

The exchanges for May come while we were in ex- 
aminations or during commencement, so we have not had 
the opportunity to review them for this issue of The Col- 
legian, and we pass this work over to the next session. 



10 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 



ULCLE DANIEL'S TEMPTATION. 



Den dar hain't no use o'tryin' 
Case I jes' can't keep from sinnin', 
Wid dern apple trees a-kangin' 
So thick dey neesa-trinimin'; 
Wid dem watermelons growin'; 
Wid dem chickens still a-crowin'. 

Hain't no use o' talk to me 
About its being - wrong, 
Case I could 't lie and sleep 
When I hear dat rooster's song; 
Mought as well o' try to fly; 
Mought as well get sick and die. 

Guess ole massa's still asleep, 
And de dog's done eat de pizin'. 
Spec' I better hurry up 
Or dat moon'l soon be risin. ' 
So I'll tuk dis rooster fust 
Dow I know he'll yell de wust. 

Golly, dar done come ole massa 
Wid a new dog at his heel. 
Mought as well a-stayed in bed, 
An' a-died o' wantin' to steal; 
Case tonight I'se cotch dis chicken, 
An' tomorrer I'll get a lickin'. 

— University of Mississippi Magazine.. 



"Blessed are those who rest from their labors." Your 
local editor respectfully dedicates these words to the Col- 
legian staff of 1900-1901, who with this issue deliver up our 
dripping - quills. 

"Going;! Going!! Gone!!!" 
Echoes of the Campus. 

Judge F. M. Austin '95 made a short visit to his Alma 
Mater, while en his way to the North. 

H. R. Enochs, of Natchez, was up during the past 
month, the guest of club-mates. 

We are glad to record a visit from Rev. I. W. Cooper, 
President of Centenary College. He is always a welcome 
visitor from our sister college. 

Mr. Percy Clifton, 97, now a prosperous lawyer of 
Biloxi, was in attendance at the Alumni Celebration, 

Mr. Robert Kemp, of Durant, came down on the 10th 
to attend the reception of Kappa Sigma. 

Wanted — A girl for Tillman. 

A mustache for Catchings. 

A rest. — Howell. 

Rev. H. P. Lewis, '00, of Anguilla, is numbered among 
our Alumni commencement visitors. 

The many friends of Miss Ellison are glad to welcome 
her home after several months spent in Nashville. 

L. F. Magruder, while on his way to New Orleans, 
spent several days with friends. 

The meeting, conducted by Rev. Herman Knicker- 
bocker, at the First Methodist Church, during May, re- 
sulted in much good to the students. We desire that he 
will see fit to return soon. 



12 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

Rev. J. W. McLaurin of Gloster, made the College a 
short visit on the tenth. 

Ricketts says, "a man's home is where his heart is." 
His girl wants his address. 

At a recent meeting of the Y. M. C. A. Mr. Simpson 
was wisely elected as the delegate from our association to 
the Ashville conference in July. 

Mrs. Dr. Muckenfuss and beautiful children have left 
for South Carolina where they will spend the summer. 

Rev. T. L. Mellen, of Forest, came over to attend the 
closing exercises. 

The Y. M. C. A. acknowledges the gift of two hand- 
somely framed pictures presented by Mr. J. R. Bingham. 

S. L. Burwell '00 was present during the commence- 
ment exercises. He feels his importance as an alumnus. 

Messrs. Frank and John Holloman, on their return 
from Memphis, spent commencement week with their 
father. 

Misses Annie Laurie and Ethel Clark, of Yazoo City, 
have been the charming guests of Miss Katie Gray. 

Professor — (in Bible Class) — Who wrote the book of 
Hezekiah? 

Student, (hesitatingly) — I'm not prepared. 

Mrs. Felder and Miss Clark were the guests of Mrs. 
Ellison during the past week. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. F. Watkins, of Whitworth, were cor- 
dially welcomed at our exercises. They were the guests 
of W. H. Watkins. 

The Misses Redding were the welcome g - uest, of their 
aunt Miss Linfield. 

Of the board of visitors from Mississippi Conference 
Revs. N. B. Hannon and Shelby were present. 




o g 



U) v 

in ,■ 

O " 




Class of 1903. 

J. F- Gaddis, F. E. Gunter, A. S. Cameron, D. C. Enochs, F. R. Featherstone, F. Easterling, W. F. Cook, W. M. Merritt, 
Miss F. Crane, Miss A. Hemmingway, C. A. Alexander, R. F. Jones, A.'EHisyn, J. R. Countiss, W. O. Tatum, W. B. 
Burwell, F- M. Gaddis. 



THE MILLS APS COLLEGIAN 13 

H. T. Carley '99, President of the Millsaps Alumni 
Association, spent commencement week at the home of 
Bishop Galloway. 

George Power '98, now a successful lawyer of Natchez 
was present at the alumni meeting - . 

Mr. J. B. Mitchel, of Guthrie, Oklohoma, was elected 
by the Alumni Association to deliver the annual address at 
next commencement. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Tatum, of Hattiesburg, were 
among- our visitors for commencement. 

Mrs. Countiss and little daughter have gone to spend 
the summer with relatives and friends. 

Mrs. Whittington and attractive daughter, Miss Ger- 
trude, were the pleasant guests'of Mrs. Warrel for the 
past week. 

Messrs. Dobyns, E. H. Galloway, T. E. Marshall, 
Norman Guice, H. B. Watkins, and W. T. Clark were 
among our alumni visitors during commencement. 

Alpha Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Sigma, on the even- 
ing of May tenth, entertained its host of friends at a re- 
ception given in its chapter halls at the college. The 
handsome rooms were artistically decorated with the colors 
and flowers of the fraternity and all the while Leake's 
Orchestra, in the alcove, rendered music for the occasion. 
The refreshments were as usual delicious, and the enter- 
ment of this evening will ever be remembered as one of 
the most pleasant in the college circle. 

The saddest happening of commencement was the 
farewell address of President of the C. & F. Asso- 
ciation. He recounted the valiant deeds of the members 
and some of their mistakes. The one on which he dwelt 
most was the abduction of Tom, Dr. Murrah's old gray 
rooster. He was a noble bird; his gigantic stature, his 



14 THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 

sinewy legs, his iron sides and deep throated squak — no 
more of such eulogies. He was the'victor, a dentist's pet" 
We wish for our friends a happy vacation and much suc- 
cess with 3'our chickens. For another year we will be 
yours. 

Alpha Mu Chapter of Kappa Alpha held their com- 
mencement reception in the elegant and spacious home of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Saunders on the evening of the eighth. 
A large circle of friends were cordially received and at a 
late hour all returned home declaring this a delisrhtful 
evening. 

On Monday evening, June tenth Alpha Upsilon Chap- 
ter of Kappa Sigma was given a most enjoyable reception 
by Mr. and Mrs. W. Baker Sively at their lovely home. At 
the witching hour of twelve all reluctantly bade adieu to 
the hostess, each expressing that the evening spent had 
been replete with joy and pleasure. 

No student or alumnus of Millsaps College can express 
fully his delight, upon the granting of inter-collegiate 
games by the trustees. We are gratified to feel and know 
that we have a faculty and board who have the highest and 
best interests of the college at heart and who at all times, 
after weighing everything, will give a just and unbiased 
verdict. They perceive and know that a college to com- 
pete with its sister institutions must be fully equipped 
not in one point alone but must meet its opponents on all 
grounds. We believe in faculty legislation and a scholar- 
ship requirement and whatever restriction the faculty 
puts upon our games at Millsaps there will be none of that 
rebellion as in sister colleges for we have the highest 
regard for our President and Faculty and believe that 
whatever action is taken will be for our advancement in 
knowledge and morality. 



THE MILLSAPS COLLEGIAN 15 

COMMENCEMENT. 



On Friday, June seventh, the representatives of the 
Freshman class all delivered well selected declamations, 
but as only one medal was given, A. L. Hopkins cap- 
tured it. 

The debate between the societies was warmly con- 
tested and the question resolved was fully settled by each 
speaker. Messrs. Thompson and Ricketts upheld the 
affirmative and Felder and Williams the negative. The 
medal was awarded to A. Thompson and the question to 
the negative. 

Saturday morning we heard those great and illustrious 
men speak, the Sophomores. They settled all questions 
of State and Church. C. H. Alexander was awarded the 
Oscar Kearney Andrews medal for oratory. 

In the college chapel Sunday morning, Dr. Denny, 
professor of mental and moral science, in Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, delivered our commencement sermon. Dr. Denny 
is a forceful speaker and a sound reasoner. His sermon 
will be remembered and carry with it lasting benefit. 

The Alumni Association had charge of the exercises 
on Monday morning. H. B. Watkins, in a very pleasing 
and humorous way, welcomed the class of '01 into the As- 
sociation. R. A. Clark responded. President J. C. Hardy 
of A. & M. College delivered the annual address. 

Monday evening the observatory, a gift of Mr. Dan 
James, was presented. Mr. James Terriberry, of New 
Orleans, made the presentation address and Bishop Gallo- 
way responded, after which Dr. Black spoke on the subject 
of Astronomy. 

On Tuesday morning the Senior Oratorical Contest 
for the Ligon medal took place and K. B. Ricketts was 
chosen as the successful orator, after which twenty-seven 
youths were gladdened with diplomas and the world at 
large made to sorrow by just so much. 



!GH 



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Jackson, 



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Look us up when you arrive. It will be 
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^S^ped&l Attention Oi^v^^ara to ^M^&il 
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Thompson 
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High=Class Confections. 



SOLE MANU- 
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Jackson, Miss. 



John W. Patton J. Jay Whitb 

Patronize Home People. 

RATTON & WHITE 

High Grade Pianos, Organs, Musical Instruments 

We are State Agents for the Celebrated 
Kimball Pianos. 

318 CAPITOL ST. JACKSON, MISS. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 



Harding Building 



JACKSON, NISSISSIPPI. 



HARRIS' 



W. H, W ATKINS, 

A prominent member of 
the Jackson bar, gives 
weekly lectures on Com- 
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We are showing the nobbiest line of 

CLOTHING, 

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AND NECKWEAR 

for the Spring season ever brought to Jack- 
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all colors just received. We would be 
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08 S. State and 3U W. Capitol St. 



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Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shingles. Lath, 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes etc. 




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J. B. BOURGEOIS, 



2 Jeweler and Graduate Optician • 

• Jackson, Mississippi. • 



/V. L. WINGO, The Artist. 



Special Prices to Millsaps Boys. 



R. W. Millsaps, Pres. W. M. Anderson, Cashier 



Jackson, Miss, 
capital ^100,000. surf»l.us, ^100,000 

BROWN BROTHERS. 

JACKSON. MISS. 

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES. 

Buggies, Surries and Harness for sale. Ring us up 
when you want a carriage or nice team. 

Special Attention to Orders from College Students. 

Agents for CelebratedColumbus Buggies. 



DR. A. HILZIM'S DENTAL ROOMS 

l 



j Special Rates to College Students. 
| All the latest improvements 
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1 24^ South State St. 

Jackson, Mississippi. 



9 5 

J. P. BERRY, M. D. 

OFFICE AX FULGHAM'S DRUG STORE, 

W. Capitol St., Jackson, Miss. 



HARPER & POTTER 



t Attorneys at Law, 



JACKSON, MISS, 



FLAY TIME 
POINTERS 



Base Balls, Bats, Mits, Masks — 
Everything- for play time. 

THE ROOKERY 



Walk in and look around. 



SCHOOL MAGAZINES^**** 

Printed by the NEWS JOB OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., in the 
most artistic and up-to-date style. Note the design of cover of 
this issue Prices are the very lowest possible. Express charges 
prepaid on each issue. Plate work unsurpassed. Let us make 
you estimate on next year's magazine. 

NEWS JOB OFF/CE, 

Jackson, Miss. J. W. Tucker, Mgr. 



To Students of Millsaps^C 



We want to impress you with the fact that you 
are always welcome at our store, whether you 
buy or not. We are confident that we have most 
everything you will probably need in the Drug 
line. 

^J. F, HUNTER & CO. 



If You Need PEREUME, 

If You Need STATIONERY, 

If You Need TOILET ARTICLES, 

If You Need MEDICINES, 

If You Need A DOCTOR, Go To 

Fulgham's Drug Store 

West Jackson. Office of Dr. F. L. Fulgham. 

oe^o. f\ batlje;f£, 

StaplG Fancy GrOCeNGS, W a h n°d e Ret e ail. Ml Kinds of Feed Stuffs 

'Phone No. 78. 203 West Capitol Street 

Dry Goods, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, 

Gents' Furnishings, Men's and Boys' Suits. Mens $5 Shoes for 
$3 and $3.50. Best on earth at 

H. B. JENKINS—*-^* 

Proprietor and Manager Star Steam Laundry, 

Jackson, Mississippi. 

>. D. LOTT JOE A. PORTER 

Proprietors 

WEST aS(5KSOH SHOE STORE. 



Try a pair of our $3.50 Shoes, Patent Leather, Box Calf, Velour 
Calf, Vici Kid and Enamel. They are the best shoes sold for the 
price. Our $3 shoes are t-qual to any other $3.50 shoe on the market. 
We are headquarters for fine footwear. A heart}' welcome and free 
shine always awaits you at 

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We have our own Photograph Gallery 
for Half Tone and Photo Engraving. 



Fashionable Engraving 

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leading house for 
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g 
315 Fine Suits at $8.50, $10, $12 and $14. 

260 Fine Serg-e Coats and Vests at $3. So, $5, $6 and S7.50. 

550 Pairs Fine Pants at $2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, and $4. 

1000 Pairs Best Bleached Drill Drawers, worth 50c, now 35c a pair. 

The Genuine Scrimm, No. 50, Elastic seam Drawers at 5oc a pair. 



^Stf' 



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Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 



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NOTIONS AND SHOES. 



J2> 



Cor. President and Capitol Sts., Jackson, Miss. 



JOHNSON-TAYLOR 

AND COMPANY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Shoes, 

Clothing, Furnishing GodI Carpets, 
Matting, Rugs, Wall Paper, House Fur- 
nishing Goods and Art Goods 

^^ Groceries at Wholesale, ^^ 

To the Wholesale Trade: 

We cordially invite inspection of our immense stock. Hav- 
ing bought our goods at headquarters we are prepaired to offer 
you the very lowest possible prices on the most reliable goods. 
We ask the privilege of showing you our line and quoting prices 
before )'ou make your next purchase. 

To the Retail Trade. 

New and stylish goods of every description in all depart- 
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pains to have nothing but the newest and most popular goods 
for the retail trade. You will find many attractive novelties and 
choice bargains awaiting you. 



Special Attention Given to Mail Orders. 
Will pay the highest market price for cotton. 

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Assuring you of our unceasing efforts to maintain this as a 
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JOHNSON, TAYLOR AND CO. 

STATE ST., JACKSON, MISS.