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Full text of "Mineral land classification : aggregate materials in the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area"

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^ MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICAT 
I AGGREGATE MATERIALS 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

UC DAVIS 



IN THE 
SAN FRANCISCO-MONTEREY BAY AREA 



1987 



CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 




SPECIAL REPORT 146 
Part II 

Classification of 
Aggregate Resource Areas 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY 
PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION 



THE RESOURCES AGENCY 

GORDON K. VAN VLECK 
SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN 
GOVERNOR 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

RANDALL M. WARD 
DIRECTOR 




DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

JAMES F. DAVIS 
STATE GEOLOGIST 



SPECIAL REPORT 146 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION: 
AGGREGATE MATERIALS IN THE 
SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 

Part II 

Classification of Aggegate Resource Areas 
South San Francisco Bay Production-Consumption Region 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson 

Michael W. Manson 

and 

John J. Plappert 

Assisted by 

Edward J. Bortugno 

E. Levis 

Russell V. Miller 

Ralph V. Loyd 

Michael A. Silva 

Under the Direction of 
James F. Davis, Rudolph G. Strand, and David J. Beeby 



1987 



CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 

1416 Ninth Street, Room 1341 

Sacramento, CA 95814 



FOREWORD 

Special Report 146, "Mineral Land Classification of the San Francisco-Monterey Bay Area," is 
the first analysis of mineral resources in the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area to be developed by 
the Division of Mines and Geology under authority of the Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975 
(SMARA). This classification is provided to the State Mining and Geology Board for transmittal to 
the local governments which regulate land use in this region, and for consideration of areas, if any, 
to be designated as regionally significant. SMARA was enacted by the State Legislature to assure 
mineral resource conservation and adequate mined land reclamation. 

The Mining and Geology Board adopted Guidelines in June 1978 to be employed by the Division 
in its mineral resource classification. This report was prepared in conformance with those directives. 
The undertaking is of great importance in economic geology, because it deals with very specific mineral 
resource conservation issues in areas of intensive competing land use. 



James F. Davis 
State Geologist 



PREFACE 

Data presented in this report is accurate as of January 1983, at which time a preprint version 
of the report was circulated to lead agencies and made available to the public. Changes in reserves 
resulting from either the premature closure of mines active in 1983, or the permitting of new mines 
since that time, may have impacted forecasted depletion dates for the three production-consumption 
regions studied. However, the material presented and the fundamental conclusions of the report remain 
valid and useful. 



David J. Beeby 
Urban SMARA Program Manager 



CONTENTS 

FOREWORD iii 

PREFACE v 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (PART II) x i 

INTRODUCTION 1 

ESTABLISHMENT OF MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES 2 

Areas Classified MRZ-1 2 

Areas Classified MRZ-2 : 2 

Areas Classified MRZ-3 4 

Areas Classified MRZ-4 7 

EVALUATION OF AGGREGATE RESOURCES IN THE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

BAY P-C REGION 7 

Data Base 7 

Factors Considered in Calculation of Resources 7 

ESTIMATED AGGREGATE RESOURCES OF THE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

BAY P-C REGION 12 

Sand and Gravel Resources 12 

Crushed Stone Resources 22 

Resource Sectors Outside of the Urbanizing Areas 34 

Resource Sectors Within Parks 34 

ESTIMATED 50-YEAR CONSUMPTION OF AGGREGATE 38 

Population Records 39 

Per Capita Consumption Rates 40 

Factors Affecting Per Capita Consumption Rates 40 

ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF AGGREGATE 46 

Introduction 46 

Additional Sand and Gravel Resources - South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 46 

Deep Sand and Gravel Deposits within the Livermore 

Valley - Sunol Valley - Niles Cone Production District 46 

Additional Crushed Stone Resources - South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 46 

Marine Sand and Gravel Deposits of the San Francisco Bay Area 47 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES OF ADJACENT P-C REGIONS 47 

Resource Estimates 47 

Estimated Consumption of Aggregate 47 

Potential Aggregate Resources Outside of OPR Boundaries 47 

Sand and Gravel 47 

Crushed Stone 48 

CONCLUSIONS 53 

ALTERNATIVES 53 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 54 

REFERENCES CITED OR USED IN GEOLOGIC COMPILATION - PART II 54 

APPENDIX A - Principles of the Mineral Classification 

System of the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological 

Survey 57 

APPENDIX B - Summary of the Classification of MRZ-3 Areas, 

Construction Materials Only 65 



FIGURES 

Figure 2.1 Map of the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region showing location of the 

Livermore-Amador Valley Production District (Sector A) 15 

Figure 2.2 Map of the Livermore-Amador Valley Production District showing land owned or 

leased by aggregate companies as of July 1976 (Sector A) 16 

Figure 2.3 South San Francisco Bay P-C Region: population and aggregate consumption 

records for years 1953-80 41 

Figure 2.4 South San Francisco Bay P-C Region: sand and gravel, stone, and total 

aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80 41 



VII 



Figure 2.5 North San Francisco Bay P-C Region: population and aggregate consumption 

records for years 1953-80 42 

Figure 2.6 North San Francisco Bay P-C Region: sand and gravel, stone, and total aggregate 

consumption records for years 1953-80 42 

Figure 2.7 Monterey Bay P-C Region: population and aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80 43 

Figure 2.8 Monterey Bay P-C Region: sand and gravel, stone, and total aggregate consumption 

records for years 1953-80 43 

Figure 2.9 Annual per capita consumption of aggregate in the South San Francisco Bay, North 

San Francisco Bay, and Monterey Bay P-C regions for years 1954-1979 44 

Figure 2.10 Projected populations of the South San Francisco Bay, North San Francisco Bay, 

and Monterey Bay P-C regions to the year 2030 44 

Figure 2.11 Marine sand and gravel deposits in the San Francisco Bay Area 48 

TABLES 

Table 2.1 List of U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangles classified in the 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 3 

Table 2.2 List of possible lead agencies (county and incorporated city governments) 
and other affected agencies (special districts, State and U.S. 
government agencies) located within the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 4 

Table 2.3 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within Alameda County 5 

Table 2.4 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within Contra Costa County 5 

Table 2.5 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within San Francisco and San Mateo counties 6 

Table 2.6 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within northern Santa Clara County 6 

Table 2.7 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within Alameda County 8 

Table 2.8 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within Contra Costa County 8 

Table 2.9 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within San Francisco and San Mateo counties 9 

Table 2.10 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within northern Santa Clara County 9 

Table 2.11 Resource sectors in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 10 

Table 2.12 Reserves and resources within sectors in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 13 

Table 2.13 Sectors that contain proven P.C.C.-grade aggregate, their resources, 

and any reserves that may exist within their boundaries 16 

Table 2.14 Percentage of total aggregate consumption used for Portland cement concrete aggregate 

in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region during the period 1953 - 1980 39 

Table 2.15 Population, aggregate consumption, and per capita consumption of aggregate in the South 

San Francisco Bay P-C Region during the period 1953 - 1980 40 

Table 2.16 Population projections for Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo, and northern 

Santa Clara counties, 1980-2030 45 

Table 2.17 Projected aggregate consumption of the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, 1981-2030 45 



viii 



Table 2.18 Marine sand resources of the San Francisco Bay area 49 

Table 2.19 Reserves and resources within sectors in the North San Francisco Bay P-C Region 49 

Table 2.20 Reserves and resources within sectors in the Monterey Bay P-C Region 51 

Table 2.21 Projected aggregate consumption to the year 2030 for the South San Francisco Bay, North 

San Francisco Bay, and Monterey Bay P-C regions 52 



PLATES 

Plate 2.1 Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Sectors - Alameda County, South San Francisco Bay Production- 

Consumption Region. 

Plate 2.2 Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Sectors - Contra Costa County, South San Francisco Bay Production- 

Consumption Region. 

Plate 2.3 Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Sectors - San Francisco and San Mateo counties , South San 

Francisco Bay Production- Consumption Region. 

Plate 2.4 Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Sectors - Northern Santa Clara County, South San Francisco Bay 

Production-Consumption Region. 

Plate 2.5 Generalized geologic map, South San Francisco Bay Production- Consumption Region. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAPS 



Plate 2.6 Altamont Quadrangle 

Plate 2.7 Briones Valley Quadrangle 

Plate 2.8 Byron Hot Springs Quadrangle 

Plate 2.9 Dublin Quadrangle 

Plate 2.10 Hay ward Quadrangle 

Plate 2.11 Hunters Point Quadrangle 

Plate 2.12 La Costa Valley Quadrangle 

Plate 2.13 Las Trampas Ridge Quadrangle 

Plate 2.14 Livermore Quadrangle 

Plate 2.15 Milpitas Quadrangle 

Plate 2.16 Mountain View Quadrangle 

Plate 2.17 Newark Quadrangle 

Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle 

Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle 

Plate 2.20 Oakland West Quadrangle 

Plate 2.21 Redwood Point Quadrangle 

Plate 2.22 Richmond Quadrangle 

Plate 2.23 San Leandro Quadrangle 

Plate 2.24 Tassajara Quadrangle 

Plate 2.25 Antioch North Quadrangle 

Plate 2.26 Antioch South Quadrangle 

Plate 2.27 Benicia Quadrangle 

Plate 2.28 Brentwood Quadrangle 



Plate 2.29 Clayton Quadrangle 

Plate 2.30 Diablo Quadrangle 

Plate 2.31 Honker Bay Quadrangle 

Plate 2.32 Jersey Island Quadrangle 

Plate 2.33 Mare Island Quadrangle 

Plate 2.34 Port Chicago Quadrangle 

Plate 2.35 San Quentin Quadrangle 

Plate 2.36 Walnut Creek Quadrangle 

Plate 2.37 Half Moon Bay Quadrangle 

Plate 2.38 Mindego Hill Quadrangle 

Plate 2.39 Montara Mountain Quadrangle 

Plate 2.40 Palo Alto Quadrangle 

Plate 2.41 San Francisco North Quadrangle 

Plate 2.42 San Francisco South Quadrangle 

Plate 2.43 San Mateo Quadrangle 

Plate 2.44 Woodside Quadrangle 

Plate 2.45 Calaveras Reservoir Quadrangle 

Plate 2.46 Castle Rock Ridge Quadrangle 

Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle 

Plate 2.48 Los Gatos Quadrangle 

Plate 2.49 San Jose East Quadrangle 

Plate 2.50 San Jose West Quadrangle 

Plate 2.51 Santa Teresa Hills Quadrangle 



RESOURCE SECTOR MAPS 



Plate 2.52 Livermore Quadrangle 

Plate 2.53 Altamont Quadrangle 

Plate 2.54 La Costa Valley Quadrangle 

Plate 2.55 Niles Quadrangle 

Plate 2.56 Newark Quadrangle 

Plate 2.57 Milpitas Quadrangle 

Plate 2.58 Mountain View Quadrangle 

Plate 2.59 Hayward Quadrangle 

Plate 2.60 Oakland East Quadrangle 

Plate 2.61 Antioch South Quadrangle 

Plate 2.62 Clayton Quadrangle 

Plate 2.63 Richmond Quadrangle 

Plate 2.64 San Quentin Quadrangle 

Plate 2.65 San Francisco South Quadrangle 

Plate 2.66 Montara Mountain Quadrangle 

Plate 2.67 Mindego Hill Quadrangle 

Plate 2.68 Cupertino Quadrangle 

Plate 2.69 San Jose East Quadrangle 

Plate 2.70 Santa Teresa Hills Quadrangle 

Plate 2.71 Brentwood Quadrangle 

Plate 2.72 Byron Hot Springs Quadrangle 

Plate 2.73 Half Moon Bay Quadrangle 

Plate 2.74 Los Gatos Quadrangle 

Plate 2.75 Calaveras Reservoir Quadrangle 



Sectors A,B,C,JJ 

Sector C 

Sectors D,E 

Sectors E,F,G,H,J,K,KK,LL 

Sectors FJ.L^KK.MM 

Sectors l,J,K 

Sector J 

Sectors N,0 

Sectors P,T,U,V 

Sector Q 

Sectors R,S 

Sector W 

Sector W 

Sectors X,NN 

Sectors Y,HH 

Sectors Z,00 

Sectors Z,AA,BB,CC,DD,PP 

Sector EE 

Sector FF 

Sector GG 

Sector GG 

Sector HH 

Sector II 

Sector I 



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (PART II) 

The San Francisco-Monterey Bay area, with its population of over six million people, is the largest urbanized area in 
northern California. This region includes twelve counties that border on San Francisco or Monterey bays. Although 
substantial portions of the region have been developed, urbanization is still occurring at a rapid rate. 

In any urban development it is important that land-use decisions are made with full recognition of the natural resources 
of the area. Mineral resources, including aggregate, are limited within a given region. The object of this report is to convey 
information concerning the aggregate resources of the region and the expected needs of the region for such resources 
in the coming decades. For many years, the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area has been fortunate because adequate 
quantities of low-cost aggregate materials have been available locally. However, as more and more areas become 
urbanized, suitable sand, gravel, and stone deposits are being lost through urban development and are being diminished 
yearly by mining. 

The principal objective of this project is to classify land in the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area into Mineral Resource 
Zones (MRZs) based on guidelines adopted by the California State Mining and Geology Board. This classification project 
will assist the Board in designating lands that contain valuable mineral resources, as mandated by the Surface Mining 
and Reclamation Act of 1975. The objective of the classification and designation process is to insure, through appropriate 
lead agency policies and procedures, that mineral deposits of statewide or regional significance are considered for 
availability when needed. 

The Division of Mines and Geology has classified urbanizing lands within the South San Francisco Bay Production- 
Consumption (P-C) Region according to the presence or absence of significant sand, gravel, or stone deposits that are 
suitable as sources of aggregate. If a deposit contained more than $5 million worth of material suitable for at least sub- 
base aggregate, the deposit was classified MRZ-2. 

In the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area, classification was done with regard to the suitability of the underlying material 
for use as asphaltic concrete aggregate, road base, or subbase material, in addition to its use as Portland cement concrete 
(P.C.C.) aggregate. This classification project stands in contrast to the various P-C region studies underway in southern 
California, where only P.C.C. -grade deposits were classified. This approach is appropriate in the San Francisco-Monterey 
Bay area for two reasons: 

1. In the Los Angeles Basin almost all aggregate production is from deposits which meet P.C.C. specifications. The 
Bay area, in contrast, is not blessed with such large amounts of high quality sand and gravel, and about half the 
production comes from deposits which are not of P.C.C. quality. To accommodate this difference, all deposits in 
the Bay area containing suitable material for aggregate commodities higher than fill quality have been classified. 
Each deposit has been identified on the basis of sales records or test data as to its highest use. 

2. The Los Angeles Basin aggregate production is dominated by alluvial sand and gravel deposits with very little 
crushed stone production. The Bay area is much more dependent on crushed rock quarries (many of which do not 
meet P.C.C. specifications) to satisfy its aggregate demands. Therefore, crushed stone deposits have been segregat- 
ed from sand and gravel deposits in the San Francisco reports. 

The land classification within the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region is presented in the form of Mineral Resource Zones 
on 46 U.S. Geological Survey topographic quadrangle maps that accompany this report (Plates 2.6 - 2.51). Mineral 
resource zones were established on the basis of a sand, gravel, and stone resource appraisal which included the following 
actions: a study of pertinent geologic reports and maps,- field investigations and sampling at outcrops and active and 
inactive pits and quarries; and an analysis of water-well logs and drill records. Sixty-three areas were determined to contain 
significant aggregate deposits and were classified MRZ-2. In addition, there were 107 areas that contained mineral 
resources, but their significance could not be evaluated from available data; these areas were classified MRZ-3. 

In order to organize the volume calculations of the aggregate resources, the State Geologist has utilized the concept 
of 'sectors' to identify those MRZ-2 areas that have not been urbanized. The geometrical configuration of the deposit in 
each sector is fairly uniform, so that tonnage of the mineral resource present can be calculated with some reliability. Thus, 
for example, sector boundaries would be established between that part of a natural deposit formed on a fan, and that 
part within the confines of an adjacent modern stream channel and its flood plain. The sector concept is used for the 
convenience of arraying resource information, and is intended to convey accurate information regarding the locations and 
approximate tonnage of resources found in nonurbanized areas. 

In the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, 42 MRZ-2 areas with existing land uses that are compatible with mining 
qualify as sectors; they contain a total of 6.3 billion tons of resources. The sectors are described in detail in this report, 
and are shown on Plates 2.52 - 2.75. Some sectors encompass unimproved portions of dedicated parklands. It is recognized 

xi 



that dedicated parklands have special status as opposed to other current uses of sectorized land, consequently the 
resources within parks have been sectorized separately and the quantifications of those resources are presented separately 
in the tables. The quantification of resources within park sectors is expressed to a lower degree of accuracy rather than 
to the higher level of accuracy reflected in the resources calculations for other sectors. 

The South San Francisco Bay PC Region is dependant upon aggregate from both crushed stone and alluvial deposits. 
Because these two commodities are not entirely interchangeable, resource and reserve totals for each type have been 
identified separately. 

Reserves are aggregate materials that a company owns or controls, and for which it has a valid mining permit; resources 
are the total amount of available aggregate within the sector, including any reserves. The estimated resources within the 
16 sand and gravel sectors amount to 1.1 billion tons, of which 259 million tons are classified as reserves available for 
mining at the end of 1980. The estimated crushed stone resources within the remaining 26 sectors amount to 5.2 billion 
tons, of which 293 million tons are classified as reserves available for mining at the end of 1980. 

The total projected aggregate consumption through the year 2030 is estimated to be 1.5 billion tons, of which at least 
39 percent (580 million tons) must be of P.C.C. quality. Of the projected total demand, 552 million tons (35 percent) 
were available for mining at the end of 1980. Unless additional resources are permitted for mining or alternative resources 
are utilized, existing reserves will be depleted in 12 years (1999). To make the projections, production records and 
population figures were correlated for the past 28 years (1953-1980) to obtain an average per capita rate. The derived 
rate of 6.0 tons per year was used along with population projections to make the estimate of total consumption. 

The average annual per capita consumption rate for the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region may decrease, at a more 
or less steady rate, as the area becomes more urbanized until a steady state (urban maturity) is reached. Should 
unforeseen events occur, such as massive urban renewal, disaster reconstruction, or major recession, the per capita 
consumption rate could change significantly. The presence of several major active fault systems within the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region increases the chance for a damaging earthquake and the need for subsequent extensive 
reconstruction afterwards. 

Alternative sources of aggregate, in addition to those deposits classified MRZ-2 and MRZ-3, occur in areas within the 
South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, and in adjacent P-C regions. Some potential deposits lie outside the OPR urbanizing 
boundaries, but still within the P-C region boundaries. Included within the group of potential resources are the extensions 
of several deposits classified MRZ-2 or MRZ-3. In addition, sand and fine gravel occur in bars on the floor of San Francisco 
Bay, between the Golden Gate Bar and the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Except for the 
aggregate resources in adjacent P-C regions and marine sand deposits, too little is known about the physical and chemical 
qualities of most of the alternative sources to permit even crude resource estimates. 

If additional aggregate is needed in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region on a short-term basis, the most readily 
available material is located in the neighboring regions - North San Francisco Bay, Monterey Bay, and Sacramento-Fairfield 
P-C regions. On a short-term basis the active quarries in these P-C regions can send large amounts of aggregate into 
the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, but the delivered price per ton would be greatly increased by higher transportation 
costs and by any supply-demand conflicts. The long-term (50 year) resource picture is more uncertain. The North San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region is projected to have a deficit of P.C.C. -grade aggregate, while the Monterey Bay P-C Region 
appears to have a surplus of material. Projected aggregate needs and available supplies in the Sacramento-Fairfield P-C 
Region are currently being studied. 

As with many forecasts of economic activity, the forecasts in this report should not be viewed as offering unqualified 
predictions of how the future will unfold. The forecasts of this report are based upon assumptions concerning the accuracy 
of the basic data, and the continuation of the development trends of the past three decades into the five decades ahead. 

Assuming, however, the correctness of our forecasts for the consumption of aggregate, the following conclusions were 
reached: 

• The anticipated consumption of aggregate resources in the P-C region to the year 2030 is forecast to be 1.5 billion 
tons, of which approximately 39 percent or 580 million tons must be of P.C.C. quality. 

• Unless additional resources are permitted for mining, or oifernative resources are utilized, total existing reserves 
(both P.C.C. and non-P.C.C. aggregate) would be depleted by the year 1999, only 12 years from the publication 
of this report. About 552 million tons of permitted aggregate reserves exist in the P-C region. About 49 percent 
of the permitted reserves are sand and gravel, and 51 percent are crushed stone. In total, the 552 million tons amount 
to 37 percent of the anticipated consumption during the next 50 years. 



• Of the 552 million tons of permitted reserves, about 313 million tons are suitable for use as P.C.C. aggregate. This 
amounts to 54 percent of the anticipated P.C.C. aggregate consumption during the next 50 years. 

• The expected longevity of the existing reserves is based upon the assumption that mining of these reserves will 
continue to be permitted until the reserves are depleted. 

• P.C.C. reserves, because of their higher quality specifications will be the most difficult to replace as existing permitted 
deposits are depleted. 

• Of the 15 stratigraphic/lithologic units suitable for aggregate in the P-C region, only 7 are known to be suitable 
for P.C.C. aggregate. 

• A total of 6.3 billion tons of aggregate resources (including reserves) have been identified within the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region. One and one-tenth billion tons of sand and gravel and 5.2 billion tons of crushed stone 
compose the 6.3 billion tons of resources. Of this total, 2 billion tons are on parklands. 

• If all of the reserves suitable for P.C.C. aggregate are utilized for only that purpose, P.C.C. -grade reserves would 
be depleted in about 20 years (2007) . However, we can expect that some of the production from these reserves 
will be used for non-P.C.C. applications, consequently, the expected exhaustion of these reserves will occur 
considerably earlier. 

• Seven sectors containing about 489 million tons of P.C.C. sand and gravel do not have permitted mining or 
established reserves. 

• Of 34 aggregate production sites in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, 12 contain sand and gravel resources 
and 22 contain crushed stone resources. 



SPECIAL REPORT 146 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION: 
AGGREGATE MATERIALS IN THE SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY REGION 

Part II 

Classification Of Aggregate Resource Areas 
South San Francisco Bay Production-Consumption Region 



INTRODUCTION 



The Division of Mines and Geology has classified urbanizing 
lands within the South San Francisco Bay Production-Con- 
sumption (P-C) Region according to the presence or absence of 
significant sand, gravel, or stone deposits that are suitable as 
sources of aggregate. The land classification is presented in the 
form of Mineral Resource Zones (MRZ) - as described in Part 
I of this report - on 46 U.S. Geological Survey topographic 
quadrangles that accompany this report (Plates 2.6-2.51). 
Sixty-three areas are classified MRZ-2 (they contain significant 
aggregate deposits). Forty-two resource sectors containing a to- 
tal of 6.3 billion tons of resources have been identified within the 
MRZ-2 areas. The sectors are described in detail in this report, 
and are shown on 24 additional topographic quadrangles. 

Based on population records and projections and aggregate 
production records, the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 
will need 1.5 billion tons of aggregate during the next 50 years. 
Of this projected demand, 552 million tons (37 percent) were 
available for mining at the end of 1980. 

Several alternative sources of aggregate for this P-C region are 
discussed. Similar studies have been completed for the North San 
Francisco Bay and Monterey Bay P-C regions (Parts III and 
IV) and pertinent data are included herein for comparison. 

To assist the reader, the following "road map" through this 
report will be helpful. The classification process, which is de- 
scribed more fully in Special Report 146, Part I, occurs in seven 
separate but interrelated steps. Steps One and Two in the follow- 
ing list are described in Part I, but are restated merely for com- 
pleteness. Steps Three through Seven form the bulk of this report 
(Part II) and are described sequentially. Resource information 
is integrated in Table 2.12 and described on a sector-by-sector 
basis on pages 12 through 38. 

The classification process can be briefly summarized as occur- 
ring in the steps: 

1. Determination of Production - Consumption (P-C) Re- 
gion Boundaries: In this step, active aggregate operations 



are identified (Production) and the market area they 
serve is determined (Consumption). 

2. Determination of modified OPR Boundaries within the 
P-C Region: Only those portions of the P-C Region that 
are urbanized or urbanizing (based on determination by 
the State Office of Planning and Research, as modified by 
local lead agencies) are classified for their aggregate con- 
tent. Other areas may be classified with the approval of 
the State Mining and Geology Board (SMGB). This step 
determines which areas should be classified. 

3. Establishment of Mineral Resource Zones (MRZ): This 
step includes a geologic appraisal for aggregate deposits of 
all land within the modified OPR boundaries. 

4. Determination of Sectors: Only those portions of land 
classified MRZ-2 (in Step 3) that have current land uses 
considered to be compatible with mining are considered 
to be available as future resources for the P-C region. 
This step utilizes intensive field checking to make that 
determination. 

5. Calculation of resource volumes within Sectors: In this 
step, careful analysis of site-specific conditions is utilized 
to calculate total volumes of aggregate reserves and re- 
sources within each sector. 

6. Forecasting: In this step, anticipated aggregate demand in 
the P-C Region for the next 50 years is determined. This 
is done by correlating historic population and aggregate 
production data for the past 28 years to calculate an annu- 
al per capita consumption rate. This figure is used with 
projected population figures in the area to determine an- 
ticipated aggregate demand. Results of this analysis are 
compared with total volumes of permitted aggregated re- 
serves in the P-C Region. 

7. Alternative Resources: A variety of potential alternative 
aggregate resources are evaluated in this final step of the 
classification process. 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



ESTABLISHMENT OF 
MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES 

Mineral resource zones within the South San Francisco Bay 
P-C Region were established on the basis of a sand, gravel, and 
stone resource appraisal which included the following actions: a 
study of pertinent geologic reports and maps; field investigations 
and sampling at outcrops and active and inactive pits and quar- 
ries; analysis of water-well logs and drill records. Sixty-three 
areas were classified MRZ-2 (see below for a description of 
MRZ terminology). In addition, there were 107 areas that con- 
tained mineral resources, but did not possess all the qualifica- 
tions for classification as MRZ-2; these areas were classified 
MRZ-3. 

Due to the large amount of area classified in this report - 
portions of 46 quadrangles - the field and office work extended 
over a 7-year period. Field work was done during the following 
months: Alameda County - September 1978, January 1979, 
March 1979; Contra Costa County - January 1979, March 1979; 
San Francisco County - May 1979; San Mateo County - May 
1979; Santa Clara County - March 1979, April 1979, and May 
1979. Selected areas within these counties were revisited in Au- 
gust 1982, May 1983, and September 1984. 

Plates 2.6-2.75 are 1:48,000 scale copies of U.S. Geological 
Survey topographic quadrangles that cover the urbanizing 
portions of the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. Refer to 
Plate 1.1 (in Part I) or Table 2.1 for an index to quadrangle 
classified in the P-C region. A list of possible lead agencies 
and other affected agencies within the P-C region is presented in 
Table 2.2. 

Areas Classified MRZ-1 

Areas classified MRZ-1 are "areas where adequate informa- 
tion indicates that no significant mineral deposits are present, or 
where it is judged that little likelihood exists for their presence" 
(see Part I, Appendix A-3, page 25). The areas in the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region that have been classified MRZ- 1 are 
underlain by Quaternary alluvial material judged to contain too 
much clay and silt for use as aggregate. The data used in evaluat- 
ing these areas included available water-well logs and the best- 
available geologic and soil maps. 

Areas Classified MRZ-2 

Sixty-three areas within the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region are classified MRZ-2 (Plates 2.1-2.4, and 2.6-2.51). 
These are "areas where adequate information indicates that sig- 
nificant deposits are present, or where it is judged that a high 
likelihood for their presence exists" (see Part I, Appendix A-3, 
p. 25). 

The guidelines set forth two requirements to be used to deter- 
mine if land should be classified MRZ-2: 

1 . The deposit must be composed of material that is suitable 
as a marketable commodity. 

2. The deposit must meet threshold value. The projected 
value (gross selling price) of the deposit, based on the 
value of the first marketable product must be at least 
$5 million (1978 dollars). 

Although not specified in the guidelines, the following criteria 
were applied to each deposit to test its suitability for inclusion 



in a MRZ-2 zone: 

A. The presence of an operating quarry within the deposit 
is considered proof that Condition 1 has been met. 

B. An average value of $2.00 per ton (all aggregate types) 
and a conversion factor of 2,500 tons per acre-foot of 
material (0.065 tons per cubic foot with 10 per cent 
waste) requires a minimum amount of 1,000 acre-feet of 
material within the deposit, exclusive of overburden and 
fill material, to meet suggested threshold value. 

C. A deposit of aggregate material must have an overbur- 
den-to-ore ratio of less than 1 to 1 in order for mining to 
be economic at the present time. 

Specific criteria are discussed in the section "Estimated Ag- 
gregate Resources of the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region." 

In the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area, classification was 
done with regard to the suitability of the underlying material for 
use as asphaltic concrete aggregate, road base, or subbase materi- 
al, in addition to its use as Portland cement concrete (P.C.C.) 
aggregate. If a deposit contained more than $ 5 million 
worth of material suitable for at least subbase aggregate, the 
deposit was classified MRZ-2. This classification project stands 
in contrast to the various P-C region studies underway in south- 
ern California, where only the P.C.C.-grade deposits were classi- 
fied. This different approach is appropriate in the San 
Francisco-Monterey Bay area for two reasons: 

1 . In the Los Angeles Basin, almost all aggregate production 
is from deposits which meet P.C.C. specifications. The 
Bay area, in contrast, is not blessed with such large 
amounts of high quality sand and gravel, and about half 
the production comes from deposits which are not of 
P.C.C. quality. To accommodate this difference, all 
deposits in the Bay area containing suitable material for 
aggregate commodities higher than fill quality have been 
classified. Each deposit has been identified on the basis of 
sales records or test data as to its highest use. 

2. The Los Angeles Basin aggregate production is dominat- 
ed by alluvial sand and gravel deposits with very little 
crushed stone production. The Bay area is much more 
dependent on crushed stone quarries (many of which do 
not meet P.C.C. specifications) to satisfy its aggregate 
demands. Therefore, crushed stone deposits have been 
segregated from sand and gravel deposits in the San Fran- 
cisco reports. 

The following areas within the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
region have been classified MRZ-2 because they contain sand 
and gravel resources that meet the criteria outlined above: in 
Alameda County, much of the Livermore-Amador Valley, Ala- 
meda Creek (Sunol Valley and Niles Cone areas), and the pla- 
teau area immediately south of Mission San Jose; in Contra 
Costa County, a low hill near Antioch, and hills 3 miles west 
of Byron; in western Santa Clara County two areas near Cuper- 
tino that are underlain by conglomerate. By far, the bulk of the 
sand and gravel deposits within the classified areas occurs 
beneath urbanized land. Such areas are considered unavailable 
as sources for aggregate because present land uses are incompati- 
ble with mining (see "Calculation of Available Aggregate Re- 
sources" in Part I, p. 9). 

The following areas within the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region have been classified MRZ-2 because they contain stone 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



Table 2. 1 List of U.S. Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangles classified in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. Plates 
2.6 - 2.51 show the classification in these quadrangles. 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 



PLATE 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 



PLATE 



Altamont 


2.6 


Briones Valley 


2.7 


Byron Hot Springs 


2.8 


Dublin 


2.9 


Hayward 


2.10 


Hunters Point 


2.11 


La Costa Valley 


2.12 


Las Trampas Ridge 


2.13 


Livermore 


2.14 


Milpitas 


2.15 


Mountain View 


2.16 


Newark 


2.17 


Niles 


2.18 


Oakland East 


2.19 


Oakland West 


2.20 


Redwood Point 


2.21 


Richmond 


2.22 


San Leandro 


2.23 


Tassajara 


2.24 


SAN FRANCISCO - 




SAN MATEO COUNTIES 




Half Moon Bay 


2.37 


Hunters Point 


2.11 


Mindego Hill 


2.38 


Montara Mountain 


2.39 


Palo Alto 


2.40 


Redwood Point 


2.21 


San Francisco North 


2.41 


San Francisco South 


2.42 


San Mateo 


2.43 


Woodside 


2.44 



Antioch North 


2.25 


Antioch South 


2.26 


Benicia 


2.27 


Brentwood 


2.28 


Briones Valley 


2.7 


Clayton 


2.29 


Diablo 


2.30 


Dublin 


2.9 


Honker Bay 


2.31 


Jersey Island 


2.32 


Las Trampas Ridge 


2.13 


Mare Island 


2.33 


Oakland East 


2.19 


Port Chicago 


2.34 


Richmond 


2.22 


San Quentin 


2.35 


Walnut Creek 


2.36 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

Calaveras Reservoir 
Castle Rock Ridge 
Cupertino 
Los Gatos 
Milpitas 
Mindego Hill 
Mountain View 
Palo Alto 
San Jose East 
San Jose West 
Santa Teresa Hills 



2.45 
2.46 
2.47 
2.48 
2.15 
2.38 
2.16 
2.40 
2.49 
2.50 
2.51 



resources that meet the criteria outlined above: two areas near 
Clayton (Contra Costa County) that are underlain by Jurassic 
diabase and basalt or Franciscan Complex sandstone and green- 
stone; several areas in the Berkeley Hills (Alameda County) that 
are underlain by rocks of the Briones Formation, Franciscan 
Complex, Leona Rhyolite, or volcanic rocks of the Moraga For- 
mation. In western Santa Clara County, a series of northwest- 
trending masses of rock of the Franciscan Complex have been 
classified MRZ-2. Rocks of the Briones Formation in eastern 
Santa Clara County have also been classified MRZ-2. Creta- 
ceous quartz diorite near Half Moon Bay, and rocks of the 
Franciscan Complex located near Belmont, Daly City, Pacifica, 
San Carlos, and at San Bruno Mountain (in San Mateo County), 
and in San Francisco, also have been classified MRZ-2. Some of 
these areas are unavailable for mining, because they occur in 



areas presently urbanized or committed to uses that preclude the 
extraction of aggregate. 

As explained in Part I under the heading "Concept of Sec- 
tors," the State Geologist has identified as resource sectors those 
MRZ-2 areas with existing land uses that are compatible with 
mining (Part I, p. 9 and Appendix A-5, p. 41). In the South 
San Francisco Bay P-C Region, 42 areas qualify as sectors; they 
contain sand and gravel, or stone suitable for aggregate. Tables 
2.3, 2.4, 2.5, and 2.6 list the geologic units and formations under- 
lying the resource sectors, and show which sectors contain 
material that may be suitable for Portland cement concrete ag- 
gregate. Detailed descriptions of the individual sectors are in- 
cluded below in the section "Estimated Aggregate Resources of 
the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region." The identification of 
resource sectors has been done to inform lead agencies and oth- 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Table 2.2 List of lead agencies (counties and incorporated city governments) and other affected agencies (special districts, 
State and U.S. Government agencies) located within the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. Agencies with active aggregate 
operations within their jurisdictional boundaries are denoted by asterisks (*) . Agencies that have land classified MRZ-2 within 
their jurisdiction are denoted by plus signs ( -/- ) . 



*+ Alameda County 


+ 


* Alameda 


+ 


+ Albany 


+ 


+ Berkeley 


*. 


Dublin 




Emeryville 


*. 


*+ Fremont 


* 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Hayward 
Livermore 

Newark + 

*+ Oakland 

+ Piedmont 
*+ Pleasanton + 
Bay Conservation 
and Development Commission 



San Leandro 

Union City 

East Bay Regional Park District 

U.S. Navy 

U.S. Army 

State of California 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 



*+ Contra Costa 


County 




Lafayette 


San Pablo 


Antioch 






Martinez 


Walnut Creek 


Brentwood 






Pinole 


+ East Bay Regional Park District 


Clayton 






Pittsburg 


U.S. Navy 


+ Concord 






Pleasant Hill 


+ State of California 


+ El Cerrito 




*+ 


Richmond 


* Bay Conservation & Development 
Commission 




unty 


SAN FRANCISCO - SA1\ 


[ MATEO COUNTIES 


*+ San Mateo Co 




Half Moon Bay 


San Carlos 


Atherton 






Hillsborough 


San Mateo 


Belmont 






Menlo Park 


South San Francisco 


+ Brisbane 






Millbrae 


Woodside 


Burlingame 




*+ 


Pacif ica 


U.S. Department of Defense 


*+ Colma 






Portola Valley 


State of California 


Daly City 






Redwood City 


+ City & County of San Francisco 


Foster City 






San Bruno 
NORTHERN SANTA 1 


* Bay Conservation & Development 
Commission 

CLARA COUNTY 


*+ Santa Clara 


County 




Los Altos 


Saratoga 


Campbell 




+ 


Los Altos Hills 


Sunnyvale 


+ Cupertino 






Monte Sereno 


U.S. Navy 


Los Gatos 




+ 


Palo Alto 


State of California 


Milpitas 




*+ 


San Jose 


* Bay Conservation & Development 
Commission 



ers of resources that could be made available for mining by virtue 
of the present, generally undeveloped status of the land. It is 
recognized that dedicated parklands have special status as op- 
posed to other current uses of sectorized land, consequently the 
resources within parks have been sectorized separately and the 
quantifications of those resources are presented separately in the 
tables. The quantification of resources within park sectors are 
expressed to a lower degree of accuracy rather than to the higher 
level of accuracy reflected in the resource calculations for other 



sectors. The sectorization of any area is not an advocacy of 
mining in that area. 

Areas Classified MRZ-3 

One hundred seven (107) areas in the South San Francisco 
Bay P-C Region have been classified MRZ-3 (Plates 2. 1-2.4, and 
2.6-2.51). Areas classified MRZ-3 contain mineral deposits, but 
their significance cannot be evaluated from available data (see 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



Table 2.3 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within Alameda County. Those deposits chosen as sectors are identified 
by the letters A-MM. Present or potential sources of Portland cement concrete aggregate are identified with an asterisk (*). 
Geologic units shown without an asterisk are potential sources of non-P.CC aggregate. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


* 

u 

co e 

C 3 
I-l -H 
01 > 
4-> 3 
CO rH 

Or < 


* 

(3 
O 

4J CO 
60 rH 
C CD 
•H > 

I 2 


<u 

4J 

•H 
CO rH 

c o 

o >> 

CD Xi 

hJ Pi 


Briones 

Formation 

sandstone 


Franciscan 
Complex 

undifferentiated 
rock 


Franciscan 
Complex 
greenstone * 


Altamont 


c 












Hayward 













N,0 


La Costa Valley 


E 










D 


Livermore 


A,B,C, 

JJ 












Mountain View 


J 












Milpitas 


J,K 






I 






Newark 


F,J,L, 
KK 








M i MM 




Niles 


E ,F / J , 
K,KK 


G 




H,LL 






Oakland East 






p 









Table 2.4 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within Contra Costa County. Those deposits chosen as sectors are identified 
by the letters Q-GG. Present or potential sources of Portland cement concrete aggregate are identified with an asterisk (*) . 
Geologic units shown without an asterisk are potential sources of non-P.CC. aggregate. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


Domengine 
Formation 
sandstone 


Wolfskill 
Formation 
sandstone 


Moraga 
Formation 
basalt and 
andesite 


Franciscan 
Complex 
greenstone * 


Franciscan 
Complex 
sandstone * 


Jurassic 
diabase and 
basalt 


Antioch South 




Q 










Brentwood 


GG 












Byron 


GG 












Clayton 








R 




S 


Oakland East 






T,U,V 








Richmond 










W 




San Quentin 










W. 





DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Table 2.5 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within San Francisco and San Mateo counties. Those deposits chosen as 
sectors are identified by the letters X-NN. Present or potential sources of Portland cement concrete aggregate are identified 
with an asterisk (*). Geologic units shown without an asterisk are potential sources of non-P.C. C. aggregate. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


Franciscan 
Complex green- 
stone and Calera 
Limestone * 


Franciscan 
Complex 
sandstone * 


Montara 
Quartz Diorite 


Half Moon Bay 






HH 


Montara Mountain 


Y 




HH 


San Francisco south 




X,NN 





Table 2.6 Geologic units underlying resource sectors within Santa Clara County. Those deposits chosen as sectors are identified 
by the letters I -PP. Present or potential sources of Portland cement concrete aggregate are identified with an asterisk (*). 
Geologic units shown without an asterisk are potential sources of non-P. C. C. aggregate. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


Santa Clara 
Formation 
conglomerate * 


Franciscan 
Complex 
greenstone * 


Franciscan 

Complex 

sandstone 


Franciscan 

Complex 

serpentine 


* 

01 

c 
o 

CO 4-1 

l-i to 
01 01 

co -3 

U rJ 


Briones 

Formation 

sandstone 


Cupertino 


AA,DD, 
PP 


Z,BB, 

cc 






BB 




Los Gatos 






II 








Mindego Hill 




Z,00 










San Jose East 








EE 






Santa Teresa Hills 






FF 








Milpitas 












I 


Calaveras Reservoir 












I 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



Part I, Appendix A-3, p. 25). Geologic units and formations 
underlying areas classified MRZ-3 are given in Tables 2.7-2.10. 
A summary of MRZ-3 areas, by county and by quadrangle, is 
presented in Appendix B of this report (p. 65 ) . 

MRZ-3 areas located in valleys are generally underlain by 
Quaternary alluvial deposits containing sand and gravel, but 
resource calculations cannot be made due to inadequate subsur- 
face data (either the well-log data is unavailable or the available 
data is inconclusive). An area will be classified MRZ-3 if, based 
upon well- log data, sand and gravel are present that do not meet 
the criteria for MRZ-2 listed above. MRZ-3 areas in hilly or 
mountainous terrain are generally underlain by Tertiary sedi- 
mentary or volcanic rocks, or by Mesozoic sedimentary, vol- 
canic, or metamorphic basement rocks. Many of these areas are 
classified as such due to the lack of outcrops or accessible areas 
for field examination. 

Areas Classified MRZ-4 

Areas where available information is inadequate for assign- 
ment to any other MRZ category are classified MRZ-4 (Part I, 
Appendix A-3, p. 25) In the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region, all MRZ-4 areas are located in hilly or mountainous 
terrain underlain by Tertiary-age sedimentary or volcanic rocks, 
or Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary, igneous, or metamorphic 
rocks. The areas often are poorly mapped, have poor accessibili- 
ty, and may be underlain by rock units that have never been 
quarried for aggregate. 



EVALUATION OF AGGREGATE 

RESOURCES IN THE SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

BAY P-C REGION 



Data Base 

In order for any appraisal of a resource to have credibility, the 
basis for that appraisal must be described. If the data base is 
weak, the resource appraisal must indicate this fact; conversely, 
if it is strong, this should also be noted. Terminology used to 
reflect the confidence level of the data base for this project have 
been adapted from the U.S. Geological Survey 
Circular 831 (Appendix A of this report - p. 57 ). For this 
project, reserves represent tested material determined to be ac- 
ceptable for commercial use, that exists within properties owned 
or leased by an aggregate producing company, and for which 
permission allowing mining and processing has been granted by 
the proper authorities. Resources include reserves as well as all 
similar potentially usable aggregate materials which may be 
mined in the future, but for which no permit allowing mining has 
been granted, or for which marketability has not been estab- 
lished. 



Factors Considered in 
Calculation of Resources 

The resource estimates given here are limited to those re- 
sources present in nonurbanized portions of the areas designated 
by the Office of Planning and Research (OPR) as subject to 
urbanization within the near future (1990) as modified for this 



study by available information from county or city planning 
departments (Plates 2.6-2.51). 

Forty-two areas were chosen as resource sectors during the 
course of this study. The sectors are identified on 24 sector maps 
(Plates 2.52-2.75), which are 1:48,000 scale reductions of the 
U.S. Geological Survey quadrangles in which the sectors are 
located. The sectors are identified by the letters A through PP 
on the sector maps, in Table 2.1 1, and in the sector descriptions 
below. Reserves and resources within the sectors are shown in 
Table 2.12. 

Parameters used in determining locations and volumes of re- 
sources within the 42 sectors included the following items: 

1. The most detailed geologic and topographic maps avail- 
able were used for classification. Published and unpub- 
lished reports were used to locate and identify active and 
inactive quarries within the P-C regions. 

2. An operating quarry was considered sufficient evidence 
that commercial-quality aggregate was present in the 
deposit. 

3. All areas classified MRZ-2 and MRZ-3 were field- 
checked, and found to contain material similar to that 
occurring in active quarries. Material suitable only for fill 
was not classified MRZ-2. 

4. The lateral and vertical distribution of the resource was 
determined on the basis of geologic projections from sam- 
ple sites at quarries and outcrops, and on the basis of an 
understanding of the geological processes responsible for 
the formation of the deposit. The resource evaluation of 
the sand and gravel deposits are based in part on analyses 
of several thousand water-well logs. The logs describe the 
types of earth materials (clay, silt, sand, gravel) and bed- 
rock encountered at various depths, as interpreted by the 
well driller (who may have had little or no training in 
earth sciences). The quality of the descriptions range 
from bad to very good. Many water-well logs were unsuit- 
able because of the incomplete descriptions of the earth 
materials encountered in the well. In some instances the 
location of the well was vague. Only well logs that contain 
acceptable descriptions and locations were used in this 
study. 

5. Resource estimates for those deposits chosen as sectors 
are based on measurements of volumes made from base 
maps enlarged to scales of 1:6,000 or 1:12,000. Tonnage 
conversion factors are based on density tests of samples 
from the sectors or from quarries with material similar to 
the sector material. 

Included within the boundaries of many sectors are active 
commercial aggregate operations. Reserve and resource calcula- 
tions were done in 1977 for each significant quarry or sand pit 
in the five counties, as part of a study of the aggregate industry 
in the San Francisco-Monterey Bay region (Chesterman and 
Manson). These calculations were revised to 1980, the year of 
the most recent available production statistics, to accommodate 
resource depletion and other factors. County totals of commer- 
cial reserves and resources in the 3 P-C regions are included in 
Tables 2.12, 2.19, and 2.20 for comparison with the resources 
available in the sectors. 

Parameters used by Chesterman and Manson in making their 
calculations, largely of demonstrated reserves (see Appendix 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Table 2.7 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within Alameda County. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


M 

co a 
c 3 

M -H 

1) > 

4J 3 
CO iH 

s ri 


c 
o 

4-1 tO 
00 r-1 
C 0) 
•H > 
> CO 
M M 


cu 

M 
O 10 

M CU 
0) > 

> to 

•H M 
►J CJ 


CO 

M 

CO C 

rH O 

O -H 

4J 

CO to 

8 E 

CO o 
en fa 


cu 

4J 
•rl 
CO .-H 
C O 
O >> 
CU .C 
►J OS 


Moraga 

Formation 

basalt 


Briones 

Formation 

sandstone 


Cierbo 

Formation 

sandstone 


Niles Canyon 

Formation 

sandstone 


cu 

4-1 

n) 
M 
(U 

■o a 

c o 

CO i-l 
r-1 60 

^ G 
CO 

o o 


Franciscan 

Complex 

greenstone 


Franciscan 

Complex 

sandstone 


Jurassic 
intrusive 
rock (eabbro) 


Altamont 


X 




X 






















Briones Valley 












X 
















Dublin 


X 




X 








X 














Hayward 










X 




X 






X 


X 




X 


La Costa Valley 


X 




X 








X 


X 












Livermore 


X 




X 








X 














Milpitas 


X 






X 




















Newark 


X 


























Niles 


X 


X 


X 








X 




X 


X 








Oakland East 










X 


X 












X 




San Leandro 










X 
















X 



Table 2.8 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within Contra Costa County. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


U 

a e 

C 3 
h -H 
0) > 

U 3 

fl *H 

&1 


fl C 
C « 
U ID 

0) 

fl c 
3 3 
CTTJ 


-H /-v O 
■H « iH 

-* E *-> 
Wl fl fl 

OHO 
3 v tn 


fl 
^ c 

(0 

fl fl 4J 

tj tn fl 

c « i 

•H fl C 
Ki H 

O *-* fe 


c 


•H 

00 CO rH 

fl E fl 
O fl 


C 0) 

o c 

-H O 

>, 4J 4J 
•-) fl W 

o e -o 

U4 C c 
0> O fl 


C 01 

o c 
•h o 

O U U 

Xi fl 01 

Ij E -O 
4> C C 
-H O t0 

u i*. to 


C 01 

o c 

10 -H 
01 *J w 

C Q 91 
O B T> 

•h C e 

M to 

03 P- (fl 


San Pablo 
Formation 
(of Lawson) 
sandstone 


c c <u 
O c 

a -h o 

ai fl tn 

(0 o to 
Wl tn tO 


01 01 

c c 

■H O 

00 *-> 
C CO 

01 TJ 
B C 
O fl 
Q (0 


0) 

to 0) 
> u 

c 

u 0) 
fl 3 

o) cr 
M o> 
o w 


Antioch North 




X 






















Antioch South 




X 


X 
















X 




Benicia 












X 


X 


X 










Brentwood 




X 


X 
















X 




Br iones valley 
















X 










Clayton 


X 




X 






X 


X 












Diablo 








X 




X 


X 


X 










Dublin 








X 






X 


X 










Honker Bay 






X 






X 


X 












Jersey island 




X 






















Las Trampas Ridge 
















X 


X 








Mare island 












X 


X 


X 










Oakland East 










X 
















Port Chicago 






X 








X 










X 


Richmond 
















X 










Walnut creek 














X 




X 


X 







1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



Table 2.9 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within San Francisco and San Mateo counties. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


Quaternary 
Alluvium and 
Terraces 


>-l T3 

id c 
c id 
u in 

(U 
P 0) 

id c 

3 3 
O TS 


id 
U 
id c 

r-l 

U -H 
■P 

id id 

ts i 

id o 
W In 


c 



•H 

■0 -P 

a) Id 

g 1 

<u 


<u 

c 

o 

O 4J 

•h in 
OtXI 
B C 
Q id 


Franciscan 

Complex 

qreenstone 


Franciscan 

Complex 

qraywacke 


Franciscan 
Complex 
"sheared rocks" 


G 

o 

id -P 
U <n 
<U <D 

-< e 
id -h 
U iJ 


Franciscan 

Complex 

chert 


HI 

p 

-H 

u 

in o 

3 H 

■« 
<u 

O N 

id P 
■p u 
Q) id 
n 3 
U 0* 


o 
p 

•H 
C 

•H 
■P 
C 
IU 

o 


Half Moon Bay 


X 








X 












X 




Mindego Hill 






X 




















Montara Mtn. 


X 






X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Palo Alto 






X 






X 


X 






X 






San Francisco 
North 




X 






















San Francisco 
South 




X 




X 




X 


X 






X 




X 


San Mateo 








X 




X 


X 


X 




X 






Woodside 






X 






X 


X 


X 











Tofc/e 2. 10 Geologic units underlying areas classified MRZ-3 within northern Santa Clara County. 



QUADRANGLE 


GEOLOGIC UNIT 


u 

<o E 
c 3 

U -H 

0) > 
■U 3 
m rH 

ot < 


<o 
M 
<o c 

.H O 
O -H 

4J 

(0 (0 

■p £ 

c u 
a o 

w Pn 


Briones 

Formation 

sandstone 


1-1 

i-H 
■ri 

S -P 
0) <0 

tn w 
(B <o 


01 

-P 

m 

01 

Tl E 
C 
(0 i-l 

rH Ul 

.* c 
10 o 

o o 


Franciscan 

Complex 

graywacke 


Franciscan 

Complex 

greenstone 


Calaveras 
Reservoir 


X 


X 


X 




X 






Castle Rock 
Ridge 




X 








X 


X 


Cupertino 


X 


X 








X 


X 


Los Gatos 


X 


X 








X 


X 


Milpitas 




X 












Mindego Hill 




X 








X 


X 


Mountain view 




X 












Palo Alto 




X 




X 




X 


X 


San Jose East 


X 




X 




X 






San Jose West 


X 


X 












Santa Teresa 

Hills 


X 










X 





10 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Table 2. 1 1 Resource sectors in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. 



SECTOR 



QUADRANGLE 



CLASSIFICATION 



REFERENCE 
IN TEXT 



L 
M 

N 

P 
Q 
R 
S 
T 

V 
W 

X 
Y 



Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Altamont Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2 

La Costa Valley Quadrangle MRZ-2 

La Costa Valley Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Milpitas Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Calaveras Reservoir Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Milpitas Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Mountain View Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Milpitas Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Hayward Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Hayward Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Antioch south Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Clayton Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Clayton Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Richmond Quadrangle MRZ-2 

San Quentin Quadrangle MRZ-2 

San Francisco south Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Montara Mountain Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2 

Mindego Hill Quadrangle MRZ-2 



p. 


12 


p. 


17 


p- 


18 


p. 


22 


p- 


19 



p. 19 

p. 20 
p. 24 
p. 24 

p. 20 
p. 20 



p- 


20 


p. 


25 


p. 


26 


p- 


26 


p. 


26 


p- 


21 


p. 


27 


p. 


27 


p. 


28 


p- 


28 


p. 


29 


p. 


30 


p. 


31 


p. 


31 


p- 


32 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



11 



Table 2.11 Resource sectors in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region (continued) . 



SECTOR 



QUADRANGLE 



CLASSIFICATION 



REFERENCE 
IN TEXT 



AA 
BB 
CC 
DD 
EE 
PF 
GG 

HH 

II 
JJ 
KK 

LL 
MM 
NN 
00 
PP 



Cupertino Quadrangle 

Cupertino Quadrangle 

Cupertino Quadrangle 

Cupertino Quadrangle 

San Jose East Quadrangle 

Santa Teresa Hills Quadrangle 

Brentwood Quadrangle 

Bryon Hot Springs Quadrangle 

Half Moon Bay Quadrangle 
Montara Mountain Quadrangle 

Los Gatos Quadrangle 

Livermore Quadrangle 

Newark Quadrangle 
Niles Quadrangle 

Niles Quadrangle 

Newark Quadrangle 

San Francisco South Quadrangle 

Mindego Hill Quadrangle 

Cupertino Quadrangle 



MRZ-2(b) 


P- 


21 


MRZ-2(d) 


P. 


32 


MRZ-2(e) 


P- 


32 


MRZ-2(c) 


P. 


22 


MRZ-2(a) 


P. 


33 


MRZ-2(a) 


P- 


33 


MRZ-2(a) 


P« 


34 


MRZ-2(a) 






MRZ-2(a) 


P- 


34 


MRZ-2(C) 






MRZ-2(a) 


P- 


34 


MRZ-2(a) 


P. 


34 


MRZ-2(a) 


P. 


35 


MRZ-2(a) 






MRZ-2(c) 


P- 


35 


MRZ-2(b) 


P. 


36 


MRZ-2(a) 


P- 


37 


MRZ-2(b) 


P- 


37 


MRZ-2(b) 


P« 


38 



A), are site specific and reflect all conditions listed in the mine's 
use permit. These parameters may include some or all of the 
following items: 

1. Setbacks of excavation areas from property lines range 
from zero to 105 feet. Minimum setbacks usually occur 
when the excavation area is adjacent to other producers. 
Maximum setbacks are delineated along public roads. 

2. Pit-wall slopes are usually required to have a horizontal- 
to-vertical ratio of less than or equal to 1:1, 1.5:1, or 2:1. 
Quarry walls usually are required to be benched at specific 
vertical intervals and may have sloped connecting walls. 
When benching is required, the width of the bench, if 
specified, often is approximately equal to one-half the 
vertical interval. This design results in an approximate 
slope of 63 degrees. Occasionally, benches are forbidden 
and a smooth wall with a 2:1 or 3:1 slope is specified in 
the use permit. 

3. Maximum pit depth or minimum quarry floor elevation 
is indicated in many use permits. Depths of excavation 
range from 40 to 120 feet below ground surface. At 



present in the Livermore-Amador Valley area (Sector A), 
the aggregate producers may not excavate below the 
"second aquiclude." 

4. Densities of the in-place material vary considerably 
between individual deposits and from one rock type to 
another. Where aggregate is composed of sediments 
derived from the Franciscan Complex [as in the Liver- 
more and Sunol Valleys, Alameda Creek, and Mission San 
Jose (Irvington Gravels) areas] a factor of 14.50 cubic 
feet per ton (0.069 tons per cubic foot) is used in reserve 
calculations. This factor is derived from data supplied by 
producers in the Livermore-Amador Valley. The specific 
gravities of rock samples from individual quarries range 
from 2.13 to 2.70, yielding individual conversion factors 
from 0.06 to 0.08 tons per cubic foot. 

5. Waste factors vary from plant to plant, and considerable 
variations within a deposit often are shown by detailed 
sampling. Most sand and gravel plants have waste factors 
that range from 5 to 1 5 percent of gross tonnage. The 
rock quarries usually have no waste because the low grade 
material is sold for fill or topsoil. 



12 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



ESTIMATED AGGREGATE RESOURCES 

OF THE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY P-C REGION 

The available aggregate resources within the urbanizing por- 
tions of the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region are summa- 
rized by county and by sector in Table 2.12. The table identifies 
the sectors and lists the amounts of available aggregate within 
the sectors. In addition, Table 2.12 lists the amount of sand and 
gravel or stone reserves controlled by commercial aggregate 
companies within the five counties of this P-C region. In Table 
2.12, reserves are aggregate materials that a company owns or 
controls, and for which it has a valid mining permit; resources 
are the total amount of available aggregate within the sector. 
Unless noted otherwise, all resources are of the inferred category 
as described in Appendix A of this report (p. 57). 

The estimated resources within the 1 6 sand and gravel sectors 
amount to 1,122 million tons, of which approximately 259 mil- 
lion tons qualify as reserves available for mining at the end of 
1980. The sand and gravel sectors are distributed as follows: 
Alameda County has 1,014 million tons of Quaternary alluvium 
and Irvington Gravels; Contra Costa County has more than 5 
million tons of Wolfskill Formation sand and Domengine For- 
mation sand; Santa Clara County has more than 75 million tons 
of conglomerate of the Santa Clara Formation. Unapportioned 
holdings (proprietary data) amount to 28 million tons. 

The estimated resources within the 26 crushed stone sectors 
amount to 5,199 million tons, of which approximately 293 mil- 
lion tons qualify as reserves available for mining at the end of 
1980. Stone resources within the P-C region are distributed as 
follows: Alameda County contains 1,893 million tons of Briones 
Formation sandstone, Franciscan Complex sandstone, green- 
stone, chert, and shale, Jurassic diabase and serpentinite, and 
Leona Rhyolite; Contra Costa County has more than 1,012 mil- 
lion tons of Franciscan Complex sandstone, Moraga Formation 
basalt, and Jurassic diabase; northern Santa Clara County con- 
tains more than 361 million tons of Calera Limestone, Francis- 
can Complex greenstone, sandstone, and serpentinite, and 125 
million tons of Briones Formation sandstone; San Francisco and 
San Mateo counties have approximately 1.6 billion tons of Cre- 
taceous quartz diorite and Franciscan Complex sandstone, 
greenstone, and Calera Limestone. Unapportioned holdings 
(proprietary data) amount to 173 million tons. 

The estimated P.C.C.-grade aggregate resources (from both 
crushed stone and sand and gravel deposits) within all sectors 
amount to 2,100 million tons, of which approximately 313 mil- 
lion tons qualify as reserves available for mining at the end of 
1980. P.C.C. aggregate for the P-C region is obtained from three 
sources: the Livermore Valley-Sunol Valley-Niles Cone Produc- 
tion District; limestone quarries of Kaiser Cement Corporation 
and Quarry Products, Inc ; sand and crushed granite imported 
from the Monterey Bay P-C Region. Sand and gravel obtained 
from the production district supplies the bulk of the demand for 
P.C.C. aggregate in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. 
The deposits within the production district consist of stream 
channel and floodplain material, and form several aquifers in the 
valleys named above. Reserves of limestone at the Rockaway 
Beach Quarry of Quarry Products, Inc., are small and may soon 
be depleted. Crushed limestone from the Permanente Quarry of 
Kaiser Cement Corporation is a by-product of their Portland 
cement operations. The company would prefer to use as much 
limestone as possible for cement instead of for the lower priced 
aggregate, so the deposit cannot be considered a guaranteed 
source of P.C.C. aggregate. 



Table 2.13 lists all resource sectors containing proven P.C.C.- 
grade aggregate, their resources, and any reserves where active 
mines exist within their boundaries. 

Sand and Gravel Resources 

In the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, sand and gravel 
production, and sand and gravel resource sectors are restricted 
to three counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, and Santa Clara. The 
principal sand and gravel production occurs in two areas - the 
Livermore-Amador Valley and Sunol Valley - both in Alameda 
County. Relatively minor production occurs at Fremont, near 
Byron, and at Cupertino, and sand is dredged from marine 
deposits in the San Francisco Bay and the Carquinez Strait. 

Sectors A, B, and C are in the Livermore-Amador Valley 
Production District (Figure 2.1), which consists of gently-dip- 
ping alluvial gravel deposits (aquifers) that are separated by 
relatively impermeable clay beds (aquicludes) of varying thick- 
ness. The upper or first aquiclude caps Amador Valley and 
nearly the entire western portion of Livermore Valley. The soil 
zone and upper aquiclude have a combined thickness of up to 70 
feet. The upper aquifer, which contains most of the minable sand 
and gravel in the deposit, lies directly beneath the upper aqui- 
clude but is exposed at the surface in the southern part of the 
Livermore Valley. The upper aquifer consists of a permeable 
mixture of sand, gravel, and some silt, and ranges in thickness 
from about 25 feet near Pleasanton to over 100 feet near the 
active producers in Sector A (Figure 2.2). Beneath the aquifer 
lies the second aquiclude, which is similar to the upper aqui- 
clude. 

SECTOR A: QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - 
LIVERMORE-AMADOR VALLEY 

Plate 2.14 Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.52* 

Sector A consists of three parts: A-l, A-2, and A-3. The first 
two parts are owned in fee or are leased by three active sand and 
gravel producers: Kaiser Sand and Gravel, Lone Star Industries, 
and Rhodes-Jamieson, Ltd. Sector A-3 is north of Pleasanton 
and northeast of the San Ramon Valley branch of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad. This area (Figure 2.2) is underlain by a thick 
accumulation of sand and gravel (the upper aquifer) contained 
in part between the first and second aquicludes. Although recov- 
erable sand and gravel in some spots extends to depths or more 
than 150 feet below the surface, commercial mining is restricted 
by conditions in use permits to the upper aquifer. 

Available material remaining at the end of 1980 in the approx- 
imately 3700 acres owned or controlled by the three companies 
(Sectors A-l and A-2) is estimated to be 370 million tons. Of 
this total, 242 million tons are classified as reserves by virtue of 
existing mining permits. This figure is arrived at through use of 
proprietary data provided by the operators which cannot be 
discussed here. 

Sector A-3 contains the unurbanized remainder of a deposit 
not controlled by aggregate companies, but which is an extention 
of the aquifer mined in Sectors A-l and A-2. Hansen and Van- 
tine (1966, Plate 6) indicate that the area is underlain by 40 to 
60 feet of aquifer within the first 100 feet of depth. Available well 
log data shows that overburden is 20 to 45 feet thick. 

•Resource sectors have not been labeled as such on the 46 quadrangles ( Plates 2.6 
through 2.51) that accompany this report. Instead, they are individually identified 
under each heading in the text, in Tables 2.11 and 2.12, and on individual sector maps 
(Plates 2.52 through 2.75). For example. Sector A-l is within the area identified by the 
symbol MRZ-2(a) on Plate 2.14 and within the area designated 'Sector A-l' on Plate 
2.52. Many of the resource sectors do not occupy the entire area classified MRZ-2 due 
to some restrictions caused by urbanization. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



13 



Table 2. 12 Reserves and resources within sectors in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. The reserves (calculated through 
1980) are material that commercial aggregate companies control, and for which the companies have valid mining permits. 
Resources include the reserves and any other material within the sector. 



SAND AND GRAVEL 



CRUSHED STONE 



COUNTY 



SECTOR 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



Reserves Resources 



Alameda 



A 


242 


383 






B 




88 






C 




99 






D 








1,041 


E 


* 


142 






F 


* 


* 






G 


* 


* 






H 








112 


I 








299 


J 




32 






K 




63 






L 




188 






M 






* 


23 


N 






* 


* 









* 


* 


P 






* 


* 



Alameda Subtotal 



2590 



995+ 



20+# 



1,495# 



Parklands 



JJ 
KK 
LL 
MM 



7 
12 



316 
82 



Parklands Subtotal 



19 



398 



ALAMEDA COUNTY TOTAL 259# 



1,014+ 



20+# 



1,893# 



Contra Costa 



Q 
R 
S 
T 
U 
V 
W 
GG 



* 


* 


* 


683 




121 




94 




29 


* 


85+ 



CONTRA COSTA 
COUNTY TOTAL 



54# 



1,012+ 



* Proprietary data 

# Includes combined proprietary data 



(continued on next page) 



14 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Table 2. 12 Reserves and resources within sectors in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. The reserves (calculated through 
1980) are material that commercial aggregate companies control, and for which the companies have valid mining permits. 
Resources include the reserves and any other material within the sector (continued). 



SAND AND GRAVEL 



CRUSHED STONE 



COUNTY 



SECTOR 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



Reserves Resources 



San Francisco X 

& Y 

San Mateo HH 



* 
35 



San Francisco 

& San Mateo Subtotal 



35+ 



Park lands 



NN 



Parklands Subtotal 



1,600 



1,600 



SAN FRANCISCO 
& SAN MATEO 
COUNTIES TOTAL 



1,635+ 



Northern 
Santa Clara 



I 
Z 
AA 
BB 
CC 
DD 
EE 
FF 
II 



37 



27 


125 


* 


37 


* 


* 


* 


186 


* 


97+ 


* 


* 


* 


* 



Northern Santa 
Clara Subtotal 



37+ 



167# 



445+ 



Parklands 



00 
PP 



Parklands Subtotal 



38 



38 



41 



41 



NORTHERN SANTA CLARA * 75+ 
COUNTY TOTAL 


1671? 


486+ 


P-C Region Total 259+# 1,122# 


293// 


5,199// 








* Proprietary data 

# Includes combined proprietary data 





TOTAL RESERVES IN SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY P-C REGION = 552 MILLION TONS 
TOTAL RESOURCES IN SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY P-C REGION = 6.3 BILLION TONS 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



15 




BASE MAP BY U.S.G.S. 



10 

I 



20 MILES 

_l 



SCALE 



Figure 2.1 Map of the South San Francisco Bay PC Region showing location of the Livermore-Amador Valley Production District (Sector A). 



16 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 




Figure 2.2 Map of the Livermore- Amador Valley Production District showing land owned or leased by aggregate companies as of July 1976 (Sector A). 

Table 2.13 Sectors that contain proven P.CC.-grade aggregate, their 
resources, and any reserves that may exist within their boundaries. 



SECTOR 



MATERIAL 



RESOURCES 
(Million tons) 



RESERVES 



A 


S&G 


383 


B 


S&G 


88 


C 


S&G 


99 


D 


Stone 


1,041 


E 


S&G 


142 


F 


S&G 


* 


G 


S&G 


* 


J 


S&G 


32 


K 


S&G 


63 


L 


S&G 


188 


B8 


Stone 


* 


GG 


S&G 


* 


JJ 


S&G 


7 


KK 


S&G 


12 
Total 2,055+ 



242 



313 



♦Proprietary data 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



17 



Sand and gravel resources are given in the table below. They 
were calculated by successively adding the volumes of horizontal 
prisms, beginning below the overburden (at the top of the first 
aquifer) downward to the base of the deposit. This technique was 
used in all subsequent alluvial deposits. Factors used (which 
include both factual data and assumptions in this and all subse- 
quent sector tonnage calculations) in calculating resources in- 
cluded the following items: 

1. Resource material is Quaternary sand and gravel within 
Amador Valley. 

2. The sand and gravel present in the aquifer is suitable for 
P.C.C. aggregate. 



their physical nature over short distances and are no longer 
recognizable . There is a maximum of 80 feet of aquifer material 
(sand and gravel) within the first 100 feet below the surface. 
During the course of the classification process, over 100 well-logs 
from the Livermore and Amador valleys were examined, and 
the conclusions drawn by Hansen and Vantine were substantiat- 
ed. The gravel beds in Sector B have been the source of aggregate 
for at least two commercial operations (both presently inactive) . 
Both of these pits were field-checked, as well as several other 
areas within the sector, and the sand and gravel appear to be 
identical to the material being mined in Sector A. 

Resources of sand and gravel within Sector B are given in the 
tables below. Factors used in calculating the amount of resources 
included the following items: 



3. Waste is 10 percent of the total material. 

4. The ratio of overburden to aggregate is no greater than 1 
to 1, and overburden is no thicker than 50 feet. It is 
assumed that overburden has been stripped prior to the 
calculation of resources. Resource totals, therefore, do not 
include overburden. 



1. Resource material is Quaternary sand and gravel within 
the upper aquifer in the Livermore Valley. 

2. Sand and gravel present in the aquifer is suitable for 
P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. Waste is 10 percent of the total material. 



5. Wall slopes above the aquifer were not considered. 

6. Depth to water in Sector A is probably at least 70 feet. 

7. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used. This factor is based on detailed calculations made 
in 1977 during a previous aggregate study (Chesterman 
and Manson), and will be used for other alluvial deposits 
composed of sediments derived from rocks of the Francis- 
can Complex. 

8. Base map for resource calculations is the Livermore 7.5 
minute quadrangle (1980). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR A-3 



AQUIFER AREA 
INTERVAL (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



Top 

-50 feet 
-60 feet 



83.47 

83.47 
23.14 



83.47 X (50)(43,560)(,90 ) 

14.50 " 11,280,000 

53.31 X (10)(43,560)(.9Q ) = 1,440,000 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR A-3 ■ 12,720,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR A = 
383 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR A = 
242 MILLION TONS 



SECTOR B - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - 
LIVERMORE VALLEY 

Plate 2.14 Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.52 

Sector B consists of 6 parcels of unurbanized land underlain 
by stream channel alluvium and gravelly alluvial fan material 
situated along Arroyo del Valle at the southwest corner of Liver- 
more. According to Hansen and Vantine (1966, p. 17), the 
alluvium in the Livermore quadrangle is revealed in well-logs to 
be composed of overlapping, interfingering lenses, stringers, and 
sheets of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Individual layers are not 
extensive enough to be traced between wells because they change 



4. The ratio of overburden to ore is no more than 1:1, and 
overburden is no thicker than 30 feet. It is assumed that 
overburden has been stripped prior to the calculation of 
resources. Resource totals, therefore, do not include over- 
burden. 

5. Wall slopes above the aquifer were not considered. 

6. Depth to ground water in Sector B is not known. 

7. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used (see Sector A, item #7). 

8. Base map for resource calculations is a 4: 1 enlargement of 
the Livermore 7.5 minute quadrangle (1980). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR B 



AQUIFER AREA 

INTERVAL (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



Top 
-30 feet 
-40 feet 
-50 feet 
-60 feet 
-70 feet 



106.20 
106.20 
72.54 
49.36 
24.16 
5.22 



106.20 
89.33 
60.95 
36.76 
14.69 



(301(43, 560H .90 ) 

14.50 
(10)(43,560)(.90 ) 

14.50 



TOTAL SECTOR B-l 



8,610,000 

2,420,000 

1,650,000 

990,000 

400,000 

14,070,000 



SECTOR B-2 

Top 
-30 feet 
-40 feet 
-50 feet 
-60 feet 
-70 feet 



122.93 
122.93 
96.42 
65.32 
34.84 
7.40 



122.93 
109.68 
80.87 
50.08 
21.12 



x (30)(43,560)(.90) 

14.50 
x (10)(43,560)(.90) 

14.50 



X 

X 

TOTAL SECTOR B-2 



9,970,000 
2,970,000 
2,190,000 
1,350,000 
570,000 

17,050,000 



18 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



RESOURCES - SECTOR B (continued) 



AQUIFER 
INTERVAL 



Top 
-40 feet 
-50 feet 
-60 feet 
-70 feet 
-80 feet 



SECTOR B-4 

Top 
-30 feet 
-40 feet 
-50 feet 
-58 feet 



SECTOR B-6 

Top 
-30 fee 
-40 fee 
-50 fee 
-60 fee 
-70 fee 
-80 fee 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



152.15 
152.15 
147.73 
135.96 
103.42 
44.71 



152.15 


X 


(40)(43,560)(.90) . 
14.50 


16,450,000 


149.94 


X 


(10)(43,560)(.90) . 
14.50 


4,050,000 


141.85 


X 


- 


3,840,000 


119.69 


X 




3,240,000 


74.07 


X 


TOTAL SECTOR B-3 


2,000,000 




29,580,000 



37.02 
37.02 
19.57 

3.90 
.06 



37.02 


X 


(30)(43,560)(.90) . 
14.50 


3 


000,000 


28.30 


X 


(10)(43,560)(.90) . 
14.50 




770,000 


11.74 


X 






320,000 


1.98 


X 


(8)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR B-4 




40,000 




4 


,130,000 



SECTOR B-5 

Top 18.19 

-30 feet 18.19 

-40 feet 10.45 

-50 feet .80 



18.19 

14.32 

5.63 



x (30X43, 560H.90 ) 

14.50 
X (10)(43.560 ) (.90 ) 
14.50 



TOTAL SECTOR B-5 



1,480,000 
390,000 
150 ,000 

2,020,000 



151.86 
151.86 
120.24 
82.93 
48.38 
15.73 
3.67 



151.86 


X 


(30)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 


- 


12,320,000 


136.05 


X 


(10)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 


- 


3,680,000 


101.59 


X 


" 


- 


2,750,000 


65.66 


X 


- 


- 


1,780,000 


32.05 


X 


- 


- 


870,000 


9.70 


X 


TOTAL SECTOR B-6 


" 


260,000 




21,660,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR B = 
88 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR B = 
TONS 



SECTOR C - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - 
LIVERMORE VALLEY 

Plate 2.6 Altamont Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.53 
Plate 2.14 Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.52 

Sector C consists of several unurbanized portions of the allu- 
vial fan deposit that underlies the city of Livermore. The materi- 
al was transported along Arroyo Mocho and deposited by 
flood waters in interfingering lenses, stringers, and sheets of grav- 
el, sand, silt, and clay (see Hansen and Vantine, 1966, p. 17). 
According to data contained in Hansen and Vantine, there is a 
maximum of 80 feet of aquifer material (sand and gravel) in the 
first 100 feet below the surface. 

Resources of sand and gravel are given in the table below. 
Factors used in calculating resources in Sector C included the 



following items: 

1. Resource material consists of Quaternary sand and gravel 
in the Livermore Valley. 

2. The sand and gravel present in the aquifer is suitable for 
P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. Waste is 10 percent of the total material. 

4. The ratio of overburden to ore is less than 1 to 1, and 
overburden is no more than 30 feet thick. It is assumed 
that overburden has been stripped prior to the calculation 
of resources. Resource totals, therefore, do not include 
overburden. 

5. Wall slopes above the aquifer were not considered. 

6. Depth to water in Sector C is not known. 

7. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used (see Sector A, item # 7). 

8. Base map for resource calculations is a 4:1 enlargement of 
the Altamont and Livermore 7.5 minute quadrangles 
(1968 and 1980, respectively). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR C 



AQUIFER AREA 

INTERVAL (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



SECTOR C- l 

Top 145.95 

-60 feet 145.95 

-70 feet 128.33 

-80 feet 66.12 



145.95 
137.14 
97.23 



X (60)(43,560)(.90 ) 

14.50 
X (10)(43,5 60 )(.9Q ) 

14.50 
X 

TOTAL SECTOR C-l 



23,680,000 
3,710,000 
2,630,000 

30,020,000 



Top 


186.01 


-20 fee 


: 186.01 


-30 fee 


: 159.78 


-40 fee 


136.88 


-50 fee 


: 102.73 


-60 fee 


60.26 


-70 feel 


50.91 


-80 fee 


: 19.34 


SECTOR ( 


-3 



186.01 


X 


(20)(43 
14 


560)( 
50 


90) 


- 


10,060,000 


172.90 


X 


(10)(43 
14. 


,560)( 
>0 


90) 


- 


4,670,000 


148.33 


X 








" 


4,010,000 


119.81 


X 


- 






- 


3,240,000 


81.50 


X 








- 


2,200,000 


55.59 


X 


- 






- 


1,500,000 


35.13 


X 


TOTAL SECTOR C 


■2 


" 


950,000 




26,630,000 



Top 53.72 

-55 feet 53.72 

-60 feet 38.45 

-70 feet 7.06 



53 


72 


X 


(55X43, 560)(. 90) . 
14.50 


7,990,000 


46 


09 


X 


(5)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 


620,000 


22 


76 


X 


(10X43, 560X. 90) . 
14.50 
TOTAL SECTOR C-3 


620,000 




9,230,000 



SECTOR C-4 

Top 10.85 

-50 feet 10.85 

-60 feet 1.61 



10.85 
6.23 



X (50X43, 56 0X.90) 

14.50 
X (10X43, 560X.90 ) 

14.50 
TOTAL SECTOR C-4 



1,470,000 
170,000 



1,640,000 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



19 



RESOURCES - SECTOR C (continued) 



AQUIFER 
INTERVAL 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



Top 


150.37 


- 150.37 


-30 feet 


150.37 


136.25 


-40 feet 


122.13 








103.74 


-50 feet 


85.3* 


54.01 


-60 feet 


22.67 




SECTOR C-6 







(30)(43,560)(.90 ) 

14.50 
(10)(43,560)(.90 ) 

14.50 



TOTAL SECTOR C-5 



12,200,000 
3,684,000 
2,800,000 
1,460,000 

20,140,000 



Top 
-50 feet 



81.78 
81.78 



— 81.78 



x (50)(43,560)(.90 ) . 11,060,000 
14.50 



TOTAL SECTOR C-6 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR C = 
99 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR C = 
TONS 



SECTOR E - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - ALAMEDA CREEK 

Plate 2.12 La Costa Valley Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.54 
Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2(d) Sector Plate 2.55 

Sector E consists of a large portion of the floodplain of Ala- 
meda Creek within Sunol Valley. Two producers - Santa Clara 
Sand and Gravel Company and Mission Valley Rock Company - 
are active in this sector. Reserve figures for this sector are 
proprietary. This area is underlain largely by sand and gravel, 
with discontinous layers of clay. The aggregate is derived from 
rocks of the Franciscan Complex. Soil is very thin (approximate- 
ly 1 foot thick) along the eastern margin of the deposit, and is 
approximately 4 feet thick, with 20 feet of weathered alluvium, 
along the northwest edge. The few water -well logs available 
suggest that the sand and gravel thickens from 50 feet on the 
western edge of the valley (in the Niles quadrangle) to over 450 
feet near the Calaveras fault along the northeast edge of the 
valley (in the La Costa Valley quadrangle). 

Resources in Sector E are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating the resources included the following items: 

1. Resource material in Sector E is Quaternary sand and 
gravel. 

2. The entire area classified MRZ-2 contains sand and gravel 
suitable for P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. Waste is 10 percent of the total material. 



7. The water table is about 40 feet below the surface, and can 
be lowered at least 60 feet more by pumping. 

8. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used (see Sector A, item # 7). 

9. Depth of mining in 1979 varied from a maximum of 100 
feet at Mission Valley Rock Company to 40 feet at Santa 
Clara Sand and Gravel Company. 

10. Base maps used in resource calculations were 4:1 en- 
largements of the La Costa Valley 7.5 minute quadrangle 
(1968) and the Niles 7.5 minute quadrangle (1980). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR E 



AQUIFER 
INTERVAL 



AREA 

(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



SECTOR E-l 
Top 
-100 feet 



237.03 
160.30 



198 .67 X (100)(43,S60)(.90) 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR E-l 



53,710,000 



SECTOR E-2a 
Top 
-100 feet 



135.16 
97. 74 



116.45 X (100)(43,560)(.90) - 31,480,000 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR E-2a - 31,480,000 



SECTOR E-2b 

-40 feet 

-100 feet 



121.84 
121.84 



121.84 X (60)(43,560)(.90) . 19,770,000 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR E-2b - 19,770,000 



Top 
-75 feet 



106 . 12 
79.78 



92.95 X (75)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR E-3 



18,850,000 



SECTOR E-4 
Top 
-50 feet 



121.61 

— 111.74 X (50)(43,560)(.90) . 15,110,000 
101.87 14-50 

TOTAL SECTOR E-4 - 15,110,000 



SECTOR E-5 
Top 
-25 feet 



59.23 
42.47 



50.85 X (25X43, 560H.90 ) . 3,440,000 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR E-5 - 3,440,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR E = 
142 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR E = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



4. Overburden varies in thickness from about 25 feet at the 
western edge of the valley to 1 foot at the eastern edge. 
The overburden is considered as waste and is not included 
in the calculations. 



SECTOR F - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - ALAMEDA CREEK 

Plate 2.17 Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.56 
Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2 (a) Sector Plate 2.55 



5. Wall slopes have a ratio of 2:1 (horizontal to vertical). 

6. Thickness of sand and gravel is assumed to vary from 25 
to 100 feet, although 450 feet of sand and gravel are 
reported in a well- log from the east side of the deposit. 



This sector consists of the 26-acre property owned by Quarry 
Products, Inc. located on the Niles Cone, a large delta formed 
by Alameda Creek at the mouth of Niles Canyon. Numerous 
gravel pits have been operated along Alameda Creek since 1912 
(Huequin and Castello, 1920, p. 38). Pit material is light brown 



20 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



to tan, cobbly pebble conglomerate. Maximum cobble size is 
about 6 "The coarse material is composed of well-rounded disks 
and rollers. Approximately 75 percent of the gravel is Jurassic- 
age Franciscan Complex greywacke and red chert, with minor 
quartz and reworked sedimentary clasts from assorted Creta- 
ceous and Tertiary units in the hills east of Niles and south of 
the Livermore and Amador valleys. Material from this deposit 
is suitable for use as P.C.C. aggregate. 

Reserve data within Sector F are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR F = 

(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR F = 

(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR G - IRVINGTON GRAVELS - 
MISSION SAN JOSE 

Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.55 

This 700 acre plateau south and west of Mission San Jose is 
underlain by stream-deposited sands and pebble gravels collec- 
tively called the Irvington Gravels. Most of the material in the 
Pleistocene-age deposit is derived from rocks of the Franciscan 
Complex with minor reworked sedimentary material. One active 
and three inactive quarries are located on the west side of the 
deposit. A screening and washing plant for P.C.C. aggregate was 
previously operated at the Henry Sands Quarry (active). The 
deposit is bounded on the north, west, and south by Mission 
Creek, the Hayward fault and Canada de Aliso Creek. Available 
water-well logs indicate that large amounts of silt and clay exist 
along the margins of the deposit. Data from the three well -logs 
show that gravels occur from 190 feet to over 300 feet beneath 
the bed of Mission Creek. Exposures of gravel are visible in the 
deposit in a ravine east of the Henry Sands quarry. Overburden 
consists of soil, silt, and clay, which are exposed along the west- 
ern edge of the deposit. Few exposures were available to deter- 
mine the thickness of the overburden. 

Most of this deposit has been urbanized, with the resultant loss 
of resources. Practically all that remains available is the property 
owned by Henry Sands, who has an active permit for quarry 
operations. Reserve data within Sector G are proprietary and 
cannot be discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector 
are included with those of other company-controlled deposits in 
Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR G = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL PCC GRADE) 
TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR G = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTORS J,K,L - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - 
ALAMEDA CREEK 

Plate 2.15 Milpitas Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.57 

Plate 2.16 Mountain View Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.58 

Plate 2.17 Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.56 

Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.55 

These three sectors are portions of the same deposit: the Niles 
Cone, a large subaerial delta formed by Alameda Creek at the 



mouth of Niles Canyon. The material is derived predominantly 
from rocks of the Franciscan Complex, with minor reworked 
sedimentary and volcanic material. Numerous gravel pits (for 
example, Sector F, p. 19 , and Sector KK, p. 35 ) have been 
operated near these sectors since 1912 (Hueguin and Castello, 
1920, p. 38). The deposit has been traced below the ground 
surface by Ford and Hansen (1967), and Ford, et al (1975), 
using water -well logs. Within the areas encompassing the re- 
source sectors, the aquifers are between 30 and 140 feet in com- 
bined thickness, with less than 40 feet of overburden. 

Resources for the three sectors are given in the tables below. 
Factors used in calculating the available resources included the 
following items: 

1. Resource material is Quaternary sand and gravel lying 
within aquifers in the Niles Cone. 

2. All aquifer material within the sectors consists of sand 
and gravel suitable for P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. Waste is equal to 10 percent of the total material. 

4. Overburden thickness is no greater than 40 feet. It is 
assumed that overburden has been stripped prior to the 
calculation of resources. Resource totals, therefore, do not 
include overburden. 

5. Thickness of sand and gravel varies from 30 feet to more 
than 100 feet. 

6. Wall slopes above the aquifer were not considered. 

7. Depth to water table is assumed to be 55-60 feet. 

8. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in resource calculations (see Sector A, item#7) 

9. Base maps for resource calculations were 4:1 enlarge- 
ments of the Milpitas, Mountain View, Newark and Niles 
7.5 minute quadrangles (1980, 1973, 1980 and 1980, 
respectively) . 

RESOURCES - SECTOR J 



AQUIFER 
INTERVAL 


AREA 
(acres) 


AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 


X 


CONVERSION 
FACTORS 


- 


TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 


Top 
-A0 feet 


293.56 
293.56 


293.56 


X 


(40)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR J 


- 


31,750,000 




31,750,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR J = 
32 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR J = 
TONS 







RESOURCES 


- 


SECTOR K 




AQUIFER 


AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 




CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


INTERVAL 


(acres] 


(acres) 




FACTORS 


(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 


SECTOR K-l 












Top 


248.62 


— 248.62 


X 


(40)(43,560)(.90) 


26,890,000 


-40 feet 


248.62 


— 210.52 


X 


14.50 
(20)(43,560)(.90) 


11,380,000 


-60 feet 


172.41 






14.50 
TOTAL SECTOR K-l 






38,270,000 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



21 



RESOURCES - SECTOR K (continued) 



AQUIFER 


AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


INTERVAL 


(acres) 


(acres) 


FACTORS 


" (To nearest 
10,000 tons) 


SECTOR K-2 












Top 


155.82 


— 155.82 


X 


(40)(43,560)(.90) 


16,850,000 


-40 feet 


155.82 


— 150.77 


X 


14.50 
(20)(43,560)(.90) 


8,150,000 


-60 feet 


145.72 






14.50 
TOTAL SECTOR K-2 






25,000,000 



SECTOR L-3 

Top 
-40 feet 
-60 feet 
-80 feet 
-100 feet 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR K = 
63 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR K = 
TONS 



RESOURCES - SECTOR L 



AQUIFER AREA 
INTERVAL (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



SECTOR L-l 

Top 207.87 

-40 feet 207.87 

-60 feet 40.12 



207.87 
124.00 



v (40)(43,560)(.90) = 

1475(5 

X (20)(43,560)(.90 ) . 
14.50 



TOTAL SECTOR L-l 



22,480,000 
6,710,000 



SECTOR L-2 

Top 122.36 

-55 feet 122.36 

-60 feet 117.83 

-80 feet 48.21 



122.36 
120.10 
83.02 



X (55)(43 , 560) ( . 90 ) 
X 



14750 
(5)(43,560)(.90) 



14.50 
(20)(43,560)(.90 ) 
14.50 

TOTAL SECTOR L-2 



18,200,000 
1,620,000 
4,490,000 

24,310,000 



680.84 
680.84 
415.86 
288.68 
59.57 



680.84 
548.35 
352.27 
174.13 



(40X43, 560)( .90 ) 

14.50 
(20)(43,560)(.90 ) 

14.50 



TOTAL SECTOR L-3 



76,630,000 

29,650,000 

19,050,000 

9,420,000 

134,750,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR L = 

188 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR L = 

TONS 



SECTOR Q - WOLFSKILL FORMATION - SMITH DEPOSIT 
Plate 2.26 Antioch South Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.61 

Resource Sector Q encompasses a 56 acre sand deposit includ- 
ed as a part of the Wolfskill Formation (Brabb, et al, 1971). A 
portion of this deposit is currently being operated as the H. 
Smith Sand Quarry. The material is sold for fill sand, but appears 
suitable for higher uses. Reserve data is proprietary and is in- 
cluded with other company-controlled data in Table 2.12. 

Resources of sand are given in the table below. Factors used 
in calculating resources in Sector Q included the following items: 

1. The material is Wolfskill Formation sand. 

2. The sand appears suitable for asphaltic concrete sand. 



3. There is no waste or overburden. 

4. Base elevation of the quarry is 160 feet. 

5. The quarry site would be flat with no side walls. 

6. No ground water would be encountered. 



A conversion factor of 18.90 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used. This figure is approximately the density of dry 
sand. 



8. The base map used in calculating resources is the 1973 
edition of the Antioch South 7.5 minute quadrangle. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR Q 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



260 
200 
160 



2.00 
23.00 
56.00 



12 


,50 


X 


(60X43,560) 
18.90 




- 


1 


710 


,000 


59 


.50 


X 


(40X43,560) 
18.90 

TOTAL SECTOR 


Q 




3 


,640 


,000 




5 


,370 


,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR Q = 
5 MILLION TONS (ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 



TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR Q 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR AA - SANTA CLARA FORMATION - 
STEVENS CREEK DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.68 

Resource Sector AA is the area adjacent to Stevens Creek 
County Park that is underlain by conglomerate of the Santa 
Clara Formation. The unit in the vicinity of Sector AA has been 
folded into a syncline, the axis of which crosses the sector in a 
northwesterly direction. The strata of conglomerate are up to 30 
feet thick, and have a maximum dip of approximately 30 degrees 
to the northeast. The conglomerate is bluish-gray when fresh, 
and weathers to a tan color. It is composed of pebbles and 
cobbles derived from the Franciscan Complex, and has a soft 
matrix of sand or silt. 

Conglomerate has been quarried from several pits in the vicin- 
ity of Stevens Creek Reservoir. One inactive quarry is located in 
Sector AA. The active Stevens Creek Quarry (Sector DD) is 
located one-half mile west of this sector. Stevens Creek and 
Stevens Creek Canyon Road separate Sector AA from a north- 
west extension of the deposit. The northwest deposit is classified 
MRZ-3 due to the presence of weathered material suitable only 
for fill, and a lack of visible outcrops due to the heavy brush 
cover. 

Resources in Sector AA are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1. All of the material within Sector AA is conglomerate of 
the Santa Clara Formation. 

2. The unweathered conglomerate is suitable for asphaltic 
concrete and perhaps P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. Overburden and waste factors are lumped together and 
are considered to amount to 10 percent of the total, due 
to the lack of test data for the deposit. 



22 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



4. Wall slopes are approximately 2: 1 (horizontal to vertical) 

5. Minimum elevation for the quarry floor is 400 feet. 

6. Ground water is not expected to be encountered in the 
quarry. 

7. A conversion factor is 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used, due to the similarity of this material to the 
material found in the Livermore-Amador Valley. 

8. Base map for this resource sector is a 4:1 enlargement of 
the Cupertino 7.5 minute quadrangle (1973). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR AA 



CONTOUR 


AREA 




AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 




TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


FACTORS 




(To nearest 
















10,000 tons) 


920 


2.18 





















3.30 


X 


(40)(43,560)(.90) 


m 


360,000 


880 


4.42 








14.50 










— 


6.34 


X 




- 


690,000 


840 


8.26 


















— 


12.94 


X 




- 


1,400,000 


800 


17.62 


















— 


24.88 


X 




■ 


2,690,000 


760 


32.14 


















— 


37.34 


X 




■ 


4,040,000 


720 


42.53 


















— 


47.09 


X 




■ 


5,090,000 


680 


51.65 


















— 


54.06 


X 




- 


5,850,000 


640 


56.47 


















— 


57.39 


X 


" 


- 


6,210,000 


600 


58.31 


















— 


36.19 


X 


« 


- 


3,910,000 


560 


14.06 


















— 


14.75 


X 


- 


- 


1,600,000 


520 


15.44 


















— 


15.56 


X 


» 


" 


1,680,000 


480 


15.67 


















— 


14.98 


X 


« 


- 


1,620,000 


440 


14.29 


















— 


12.97 


X 


» 


- 


1,400,000 


400 


11.65 








TOTAL SECTOR AA 


- 






36,540,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR AA = 
37 MILLION TONS (ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 
TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR AA = 
TONS 



SECTOR DD - SANTA CLARA FORMATION - 
STEVENS CREEK QUARRY DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2(c) Sector Plate 2.68 

Sector DD consists of a portion of the area underlain by a 
northwest- trending, east-dipping belt of conglomerate of the 
Santa Clara Formation. Most of the area is owned by the active 
Stevens Creek Quarry, Inc. When this area was field checked in 
1979 only fill material was being sold, but in past years a crush- 
ing and screening plant produced aggregate suitable for asphaltic 
concrete. Due to lack of outcrops and the heavy brush cover, the 
MRZ-2 area could not be extended very far beyond the quarry 
property boundaries. 

Reserve data within Sector DD are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR DD = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR DD = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



Crushed Stone Resources 

In the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, crushed stone 
production and resources are found in four of the five counties. 
As shown in the following sector discussions, there is a large 
amount of stone suitable for aggregate in the P-C region, com- 
pared to sand and gravel resources. There are no large produc- 
tion districts for stone, but numerous small groups and scattered 
isolated producers. 



SECTOR D - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE - 
APPERSON RIDGE 

Plate 2.12 La Costa Valley Quad. MRZ-2 (b) Sector Plate 2.54 

Resource Sector D consists of Apperson Ridge, a conspicuous 
northwest-trending ridge underlain by greenstone (metamor- 
phosed basalt) of the Franciscan Complex. A thin, rocky soil 
covers the greenstone, and supports a sparce growth of grass. 
The greenstone is exposed in many outcrops and at a small test 
quarry. Where exposed, the material appears to be similar - a 
dense, hard rock which is suitable for P.C.C. aggregate (as 
demonstrated by test results from samples obtained at the quarry 
site). Layers of tuff, which are found interbedded with green- 
stone at several quarries in Santa Clara County and which are 
suitable only for fill material, were not found in this deposit but 
may be present. A drilling program would be needed to deter- 
mine if tuff exists here. 

Crushed stone resources in Sector D are given in the table 
below. They were calculated by successively adding the volumes 
of horizontal prisms, beginning below the overburden and 
weathered material (at the top of the deposit) downward to the 
base of the deposit. This technique was used in all subsequent 
stone deposits. Factors used in calculating resources included the 
following items: 

1 . All material in Sector D is greenstone of the Franciscan 
Complex; no tuff is present within the deposit. 

2. The unweathered greenstone is suitable for P.C.C. aggre- 
gate. Weathered greenstone is probably suitable for road 
base material. 

3. There is no waste material in this deposit. Since low qual- 
ity material commonly forms a very small percentage of 
the total deposit, and is sold for fill or topsoil, stone quar- 
ries usually have no allowance for waste in the resource 
calculations. 

4. Thickness of overburden is negligible. 

5. Wall slopes are no steeper than 2:1 (horizontal to verti- 
cal). Benches are drawn in at elevation 1400 feet in Sector 
D-l, elevations 1200 feet and 1400 feet in Sector D-2, and 
elevations 1200 feet, 1400 feet, and 1600 feet in Sector 
D-3. 

6. Minimum quarry floor elevation is 1200 feet for Sector 
D-l, and 1000 feet for Sectors D-2 and D-3. 

7. Ground water probably would not affect quarry opera- 
tions. 

8. A conversion factor of 10.68 cubic feet of material per ton 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



23 



was used. This factor is based on density tests performed 
on greenstone samples from Sector D. 

9. Base map used for calculations is a 4: 1 enlargement of the 
1968 edition of the La Costa Valley 7.5 minute quadrangle. 



RESOURCES - SECTOR D 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



RESOURCES - SECTOR D (continued) 



CONTOUR 
ELEVATION 



1200 
1160 
1120 
1080 
1040 
1000 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 

(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



111.34 
99.81 
89.02 
79.26 
70.08 
60.49 



L05.57 


X 


(40X43,560) 
10.68 


94.41 


X 




84.14 


X 


- 


74.67 


X 


- 


65.28 


X 





TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



17,220,000 
15,400,000 
13,730,000 
12,180,000 
- 10,650,000 

TOTAL SECTOR D-2 - 299,000,000 



SECTOR D-l 




1840 


2.18 


1800 


9.07 


1760 


15.55 


1720 


21.24 


1680 


28.18 


1640 


35.58 


1600 


42.47 


1560 


49.70 


1520 


56.36 


1480 


63.13 


1440 


72.14 


1400 


82.07 


Bench 




1400 


60.20 


1360 


67.49 


1320 


76.22 


1280 


86.89 


1240 


97.05 


1200 


107.50 



5.62 


X ( 


.0X43,560) 


920,000 






10.68 




12.31 


X 


" 


2,010,000 


18.39 


X 


. 


3,000,000 


24.71 


X 


" 


4,030,000 


31.88 


X 


- 


5,200,000 


39.03 


X 


- 


6',370,000 


46.09 


X 


. 


7,520,000 


53.03 


X 


- 


8,650,000 


59.75 


X 


- 


9,750,000 


67.64 


X 


- 


11,040,000 


77.11 


X 


" 


12,580,000 


63.85 


X 


. 


10,420,000 


71.86 


X 


- 


11,720,000 


81.55 


X 


. 


■ 13,300,000 


91.97 


X 


■ 


15,000,000 


102.27 


X 
TOTAL 


SECTOR D-l 


16,680,000 




■ 138,190,000 



SECTOR D-2 




1920 


17.56 


1880 


29.27 


1840 


38.85 


1800 


49.01 


1760 


57.85 


1720 


66.69 


1680 


74.84 


1640 


83.05 


1600 


89.65 


1560 


97.85 


1520 


105.60 


1480 


111.23 


1440 


116.79 


1400 

Bench 
1400 


118.63 
103.36 


1360 


94.01 


1320 


86.32 


1280 


79.78 


1240 


74.21 


1200 


67.72 



23.42 


X 


(40X43,560) 
10.68 


3,820,000 


34.06 


X 


- 


5,560,000 


43.93 


X 


- 


7,170,000 


53.43 


X 


• 


8,720,000 


62.27 


X 


- 


10,160,000 


70.76 


X 


■ 


■ 11,540,000 


78.94 


X 


- 


■ 12,880,000 


86.35 


X 


• 


■ 14,090,000 


93.75 


X 


- 


■ 15,290,000 


101.73 


X 


- 


■ 16,600,000 


108.41 


X 


- 


• 17,690,000 


114.01 


X 


■ 


18,600.000 


117.71 


X 


- 


■ 19,200,000 


98.69 


X 


. 


16,100,000 


90.16 


X 


" 


■ 14,710,000 


83.05 


X 


- 


■ 13,550,000 


76.99 


X 


- 


12,560,000 


70.97 


X 


. 


■ 11,580,000 



SECTOR D-3 




2200 


20.09 


2160 


27.78 


2120 


37.88 


2080 


48.90 


2040 


59.69 


2000 


71.22 


1960 


88.90 


1920 


111.46 


1880 


138.49 


1840 


156.62 



1760 


187.33 


1720 


194.33 


1680 


198.46 


1640 


201.56 


1600 


201.73 


Bench 




1600 


171.44 


1560 


170.74 


1520 


171.14 


1480 


168.62 


1440 


165.63 


1400 


160.19 


Bench 




1400 


153.69 


1360 


141.99 


1320 


135.22 


1280 


126.44 


1240 


116.85 


1200 


109.05 



1200 

1160 
1120 
1080 
1040 
1000 



105.89 
96.42 
85.46 
75.41 
63.82 
53.03 



23.93 


X 


32.83 


X 


43.39 


X 


54.29 


X 


65.46 


X 


80.06 


X 


100.18 


X 


124.97 


X 


147.56 


X 


165.12 


X 



(40X43,560) 
I5T68 



190.83 


X 


196.40 


X 


200.01 


X 


201.65 


X 


171.09 


X 


170.94 


X 


169.88 


X 


167.13 


X 


162.91 


X 


147.84 


X 


138.60 


X 


130.83 


X 


121.64 


X 


112.95 


X 



3,900,000 
5,360,000 
7,080,000 
8,860,000 
10,680,000 
13,060,000 
16,340,000 
20,390,000 
24,070,000 
26,940,000 

29,440,000 

31,130,000 
32,040,000 
32,630,000 
32,900,000 

27,910,000 
27,890,000 
27,720,000 
27,270,000 
26,580,000 

24,120,000 
22,610,000 
21,340,000 
19,850,000 
18,430,000 



01.25 


X 


- 




- 


16,500,000 


90.94 


X 


- 




- 


14,840,000 


80.44 


X 


• 




- 


13,120,000 


69.62 


X 


- 




- 


11,360,000 


58.43 


X 


TOTAL SECTOR 


D-3 


" 


9,530,000 




603,890,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR D = 
1,041 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR D = 
TONS 



24 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



SECTOR H - BRIONES FORMATION SANDSTONE - 
NILES DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2(c) Sector Plate 2.55 

Sector H is situated at the northern end of a deposit of Briones 
Formation sandstone located within the Niles District of the 
City of Fremont. The sandstone is fine-grained and well-indurat- 
ed; minor amounts of shale are interbedded with the sandstone. 
The strata have been folded into an anticline which is partially 
overlain by the Claremont Shale. This deposit was mined for 
subbase and fill at the Bellini Quarry (located at the southern end 
of the deposit) and at the inactive Serpa Quarry in Milpitas 
(Santa Clara County). 

Resources in Sector H are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating the resources included the following items: 



RESOURCES - SECTOR H (continued) 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



360 
320 



57.39 
51.88 



(40)(43,560) 
13.70 

TOTAL SECTOR H 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR H = 
112 MILLION TONS (ALL ROADBASE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES -SECTOR H = 
TONS 



SECTOR I - BRIONES FORMATION SANDSTONE 
SCOTT CREEK DEPOSIT 



1. Resource material is Briones Formation sandstone. 

2. The sandstone is suitable for roadbase and perhaps as- 
phaltic concrete aggregate. 

3. There is no waste, and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. Wall slopes have a 2:1 ratio (horizontal to vertical). 

5. Minimum quarry floor elevation would be 320 feet. 

6. Ground water is not expected to hinder quarry opera- 
tions. 

7. A conversion factor of 13.70 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used. This factor is based on the result of density tests 
performed on samples of Briones Formation sandstone 
from the Serpa Quarry . 



Plate 2.15 Milpitas Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.57 

Plate 2.45 Calaveras Reservoir Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.75 

Resource Sector I includes outcrops of Briones Formation 
sandstone within the Milpitas and Calaveras Reservoir quadran- 
gles. The sandstone is fine-grained and well indurated; minor 
amounts of shale are interbedded with the sandstone. The unit 
extends southward along the edge of the Santa Clara Valley and 
dips to the west at a 35 to 60 degree angle. Four companies are 
presently mining in the sector; the Curtner Quarry in Sector 1-1, 
the Raisch Quarry in Sector 1-2, the Swenson Quarry in Sector 
1-3, and the Winterbaur Quarry in Sector 1-4. The southern 
portion of Sector I extends outside the urbanizing portion of 
Santa Clara County. 

Resources in Sector I are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating the resources included the following items: 

1. Resource material is Briones Formation sandstone. 



8. Base map for resource calculations was a 4:1 enlargement 
of the Niles 7.5 minute quadrangle (1980). 



2. The sandstone is suitable for roadbase and perhaps as- 
phaltic concrete aggregate. 

3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 



RESOURCES - SECTOR H 



CONTOUR 
ELEVATION 



1000 
960 
920 
880 
840 
800 
760 
720 
680 
640 
600 
560 
520 
480 
440 
400 
360 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



.31 
.81 
12.21 
28.55 
50.16 
56.99 
72.53 
66.29 
63.88 
62.58 
58.68 
58.20 
66.68 
71.63 
68.52 
63.16 
57.39 



.56 

6.51 
20.38 
39.36 
53.58 
64.76 
69.41 
65.09 
63.23 
60.63 
58.44 
62.44 
69.16 
70.08 
65.84 
60.28 



(40)(43.560) 
13.70 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



70,000 
830,000 
2,590,000 
5,010,000 
6,810,000 
8,240,000 
8,830,000 
8,280,000 
8,040,000 
7,710,000 
7,430,000 
7,940,000 
8,800,000 
8,910,000 
8,370,000 
7,670,000 



4. Wall slopes have a 2:1 ratio (horizontal to vertical). 

5. Base elevation of the quarry floor varies from 400 feet to 
660 feet. 

6. Ground water is not expected to hinder quarry opera- 
tions. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 3.70 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used. This figure is based on density tests performed on 
sample of Briones Formation sandstone from the Raisch 
Quarry. 

8. Base map for resource calculations was the Calaveras 
Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle (1980) and a 4:1 en- 
largement of the Milpitas 7.5-minute quadrangle (1980). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR I 

CONTOUR AREA AVERAGE AREA - CONVERSION TONNAGE 

ELEVATION (acres) (acres) * FACTORS < To nearest 

10,000 tons) 

SECTOR 1-1 

T3TKS 



1280 
1260 



.92 
2.30 
3.04 



1.61 
2.27 



x (20X43,560) 
X 



13.70 



100,000 
140,000 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



25 



RESOURCES - SECTOR I (continued) 



RESOURCES - SECTOR I (continued) 



CONTOUR 


AREA 




AVERAGE AREA 




CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


X 


FACTORS 


(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 


1260 


3.04 




3.88 


X 


(20X43,560) 


250,000 


1240 


4.71 








13.70 








— 


6.32 


X 


■ 


400,000 


1220 


7.92 
















— 


11.25 


X 


■ 


720,000 


1200 


14.58 
















— 


17.37 


X 


- 


1,100,000 


1180 


20.15 
















— 


21.70 


X 


- 


1,380,000 


1160 


23.24 
















— 


24.45 


X 


- 


1,550,000 


1140 


25.65 
















— 


26.54 


X 


■ 


1,690,000 


1120 


27.43 
















— 


28.61 


X 


« 


1,820,000 


1100 


29.79 
















— 


31.17 


X 


■ 


1,980,000 


10S0 


32.54 
















— 


34.29 


X 


■ 


2,180,000 


1060 


36.04 
















— 


38.14 


X 


■ 


2,430,000 


1040 


40.23 
















— 


42.36 


X 


■ 


2,690,000 


1020 


44.48 
















— 


47.44 


X 


■ 


3,020,000 


1000 


50.39 
















— 


52.89 


X 


■ 


3,360,000 


980 


55.38 
















— 


59.00 


X 


■ 


3,750,000 


960 


62.62 
















— 


66.49 


X 


■ 


4,230,000 


940 


70.36 
















-- 


74.35 


X 


« 


4,730,000 


920 


78.34 
















— 


82.07 


X 


■ 


5,220,000 


900 


85.80 
















— 


89.68 


X 


■ 


5,700,000 


880 


93.55 
















— 


97.40 


X 


■ 


6,190,000 


860 


101.24 
















— 


105.55 


X 


' 


6,710,000 


840 


109.85 
















— 


115 . 10 


X 


■ 


7,320,000 


820 


120 . 35 
















— 


125.32 


X 


■ 


7,970,000 


800 


130.28 
















— 


135.93 


X 


■ 


8,640,000 


780 


141.58 
















— 


150.51 


X 


. 


9,570,000 


760 


159.43 
















— 


168.70 


X 


- 


10,730,000 


740 


177.97 
















— 


185.89 


X 


- 


11,820,000 


720 


193.81 
















— 


201.10 


X 


- 


12,790,000 


700 


208.39 
















— 


225.26 


X 


- 


14,320,000 


680 


242.13 
















— 


265.55 


X 


- 


16,890,000 


660 


288.97 
















— 


270.95 


X 


- 


17,230,000 


640 


252.92 
















— 


238.49 


X 


« 


15,170,000 


620 


224.06 
















— 


225.32 


X 


" 


14,330,000 


600 


226.58 
















— 


211.95 


X 


- 


13,480,000 


580 


197.31 
















— 


198.66 


X 


- 


12,630,000 


560 


200.01 
















— 


201.02 


X 


« 


12,780,000 


540 


202.02 
















— 


200.56 


X 


- 


12,750,000 


520 


199.09 
















— 


193.90 


X 




12,330,000 


500 


188.70 
















— 


137.74 


X 


- 


8,760,000 


480 


86.78 
















— 


86.26 


X 


- 


5,490,000 


460 


85.74 
















— 


76.76 


X 


m 


4,880,000 


440 


67.78 
















— 


65.23 


X 


- 


4,150,000 


420 


62.67 
















— 


59.23 


X 


- 


3,770,000 


400 


55.79 








TOTAL SECTOR 1-1 






■ 299,200,000 


SECTOR 1-2 














720 






















1.32 


X 


(40X43,560) 


170,000 


680 


2.64 








13.70 








— 


7.93 


X 


.. 


1,000,000 


640 


13.22 
















— 


15.87 


X 


» 


2,010,000 


600 


18.51 













CONTOUR 
ELEVATION 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



560 
520 
480 
440 



23.80 
29.09 
22.48 
13.22 



21.16 

26.45 X 

25.78 X 

17.85 X 

TOTAL SECTOR 1-2 



(40X43,560) 



680 


( 


640 


25.12 


600 


51.57 


560 


71.40 


520 


78.02 


480 


76.69 


440 


72.73 


400 


60.83 


SECTOR 1-4 



12.56 


X 


38.36 


X 


61.49 


X 


74.71 


X 


77.35 


X 


74.71 


X 


66.78 


X 


TOTAL 


SECTOR 1-3 



2,680,000 
3,350,000 
3,270,000 
2,260,000 

14,740,000 

1,600,000 
4,880,000 
7,820,000 
9,500,000 
9,840,000 
9,500,000 
8,490,000 

51,630,000 



800 
760 
720 
680 
640 
600 
560 
520 
480 
440 
400 



7.93 
39.67 
50.25 
54.21 
58.18 
58.18 
60.83 
56.86 
52.89 
47.60 



3.97 


X 


- 


500,000 


23.80 


X 




3,030,000 


44.96 


X 


- 


5,720,000 


52.23 


X 


. 


6,640,000 


56.20 


X 


" 


7,150,000 


58.18 


X 


- 


7,400,000 


59.50 


X 


" 


7,570,000 


58.84 


X 


„ 


7,480,000 


54.88 


X 




6,980,000 


50.25 


X 




6,390,000 




TOTAL 


SECTOR 1-4 - 


58,860,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR I = 
424 MILLION TONS (ALL ROADBASE GRADE) 



TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR I = 
27 MILLION TONS 



SECTOR M - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX - 
COYOTE HILLS DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.17 Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.56 

Sector M contains a portion of the Coyote Hills west of New- 
ark in Alameda County. This deposit of Franciscan Complex 
chert, graywacke, basalt, diabase, and Jurassic serpentinite con- 
tains one active quarry (Dumbarton Quarry Associates) and 
several inactive quarries. Reserve data for the active quarry is 
proprietary data and cannot be discussed here, but is included 
with proprietary data from other producers in Table 2.12. The 
deposit is divided into three parcels - North Hill, Central Hill, 
and South Hill. Sector M is limited to the southern half of 
Central Hill. North Hill and the northern half of Central Hill are 
included in the Coyote Hills Regional Park, and are discussed 
as Sector MM, p. 36 . South Hill is included in the San Francisco 



26 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Bay National Wildlife Refuge, and is also included in Sector 
MM. 

Resource calculations are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources in Sector M included the following 
items: 

1. The deposit consists of gray wacke, chert, basalt, and dia- 
base of the Franciscan Complex, and Jurassic serpenti- 
nite. 

2. Some of the material can be used for asphaltic concrete 
aggregate; the remainder can be used for road base, sub- 
base material, or fill. 

3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. Base elevation of the quarry floor would be 20 feet. Pit 
walls will have a 2:1 slope ratio (horizontal to vertical). 
There would be a berm left at elevation 40 feet. 

5. Ground water would not affect quarry operations. 

6. A conversion factor of 1 1 .54 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used. This factor is based on file data in a property 
report done during an earlier study by Chesterman and 
Manson. 

7. Base map used for resource calculations is a 2:1 enlarge- 
ment of the 1973 edition of the Newark 7.5 minute quad- 
rangle . 

RESOURCES - SECTOR M 



CONTOUR 
ELEVATION 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



260 


2.76 


— 


3.10 


X 


240 


3.44 












— 


5.28 


X 


220 


7.12 












— 


9.19 


X 


200 


11.25 












— 


13.43 


X 


180 


15.61 












— 


18.60 


X 


160 


21.58 












— 


23.88 


X 


140 


26.17 












— 


29.16 


X 


120 


32.14 












— 


34.67 


X 


100 


37.19 












— 


38.80 


X 


80 


40.40 












— 


42.01 


X 


60 


43.62 












— 


44.20 


X 


40 


44.77 








Berm 








40 


39.26 












— 


40.06 


X 


20 


40.86 









(20)(43,560) 

TTM — 



TOTAL SECTOR M 



230,000 
400,000 
690 ,000 
1,010,000 
1,400,000 
1,800,000 
2,200,000 
2,620,000 
2,930,000 
3,170,000 
3,340,000 

3,020,000 
22,810,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR M = 
23 MILLION TONS (MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 



TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR M 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR N - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE - 
LA VISTA DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.10 Hayward Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.59 

Sector N includes the active La Vista Quarry of East Bay 
Excavating Company. The sector is located near the southeast- 



ern end of a series of greenstone deposits that occur in a more-or- 
less continuous band stretching northwestward across the quad- 
rangle. The San Leandro Rock Company (Sector O) is situated 
at the northwest end of the group of deposits. The Hayward fault 
passes through the center of the La Vista Quarry ; it forms the 
contact between the greenstone on the west and sedimentary 
rocks of the Knoxville Formation on the east. A small body of 
Leona Rhyolite existed in the quarry area, but apparently was 
mined out before the quarry was visited in September, 1978. East 
of the Hayward fault the Franciscan greenstone underlies the 
Knoxville Formation. At this location the Knoxville Formation 
consists of soft, badly fractured shale and sandstone, and is 
suitable only for fill. 

Reserve data within Sector N are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR N = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 
TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR N = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR O - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE 
AND LEONA RHYOLITE - SAN LEANDRO DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.10 Hayward Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.59 

Sector O is limited to the property owned by the San Leandro 
Rock Company, at the northern end of the greenstone and rhyo- 
lite deposits described in Sector N above. The sector is bounded 
by Lake Chabot Road on the north and east sides, and the 
Hayward fault along the western edge. The greenstone and rhyo- 
lite are suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate, road base, and 
fill. 

Reserve data within Sector O are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR O = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR O = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR P - LEONA RHYOLITE 
BURKE QUARRY DEPOSIT 



GALLAGHER & 



Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.60 

Sector Pisa portion of an immense deposit of Leona Rhyolite 
that is situated between Oak Knoll Naval Hospital and Peralta 
Creek in the Berkeley Hills. The Leona Heights Quarry was 
operated for several years around the turn of the century; cur- 
rently it is the site of Merritt College. The Alma and Leona 
pyrite mines were active for approximately forty years during the 
first part of this century. The pyrite (iron sulphide) was used to 
manufacture sulfuric acid (Aubury, 1906, p. 311-315, and Da- 
vis, 1950, p. 305 - 307). Gallagher & Burke, Inc. have an active 
quarry near the southern end of the deposit. The rhyolite is 
suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate and road base material. 
Although most of Sector P is mapped as containing Leona Rhyo- 
lite, small outcrops of Cretaceous-age sedimentary rocks within 
the sector indicate that the deposit is not uniform throughout. 
The sedimentary rocks appear to be too soft for use as anything 
other than fill. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



27 



Reserve data within Sector P are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR P = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR P = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR R - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE - 
MOUNT DIABLO DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.29 Clayton Quadrangle MRZ-2(c) Sector Plate 2.62 

Sector R includes the quarry of Mount Diablo Rock and 
Asphalt Company, located southeast of Clayton in Contra Costa 
County, on the northern slope of Mount Diablo. Resources con- 
sist of greenstone and chert fragments and blocks up to 6 feet in 
diameter, which form an old landslide or talus deposit. The 
deposit has a maximum width of approximately 2,600 feet and 
extends upslope for approximately 3,200 feet. Depth of the land- 
slide debris is not known. The coarse material can be used for 
asphaltic concrete aggregate and road base material. 

Reserve data within Sector R are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR R = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR R = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR S - JURASSIC DIABASE - 
MOUNT ZION DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.29 Clayton Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.62 

Mount Zion is located northwest of Mount Diablo and east of 
Walnut Creek. Sector S encompasses Mount Zion (Sector S- 1 ) 
and a smaller adjacent hill (Sector S-2). Two sites, on the east 
and west sides of Mount Zion, are currently being quarried for 
asphaltic concrete aggregate, base material and rip-rap by Lone 
Star Industries and Kaiser Sand and Gravel, respectively. Re- 
serve data for the two quarries are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here, but are combined with data from other producers 
and shown in Table 2.12. The material consists of fractured and 
faulted massive greenish-gray diabase and pillow basalt of Juras- 
sic age. The diabase is younger than the rocks of the Franciscan 
Complex that underlie Mount Diablo. Several old adits and 
prospect holes are located on the south and east slopes of Mount 
Zion, which was a center of a "copper boom" in the 1860's. Some 
copper and insignificant amounts of gold and silver have been 
reported from this area (Davis and Goldman, 1958, p. 521). 

Resources in Sector S are given in the tables below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1. The material being quarried consists of Jurassic diabase 
and pillow basalt. 

2. The diabase and basalt are suitable for asphaltic concrete 
aggregate and perhaps P.C.C. aggregate if no sulphide 
minerals are present locally. 



3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. Wall slopes have a ratio of 2:1 (horizontal to vertical). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation in Sector S-l is 600 feet; mini- 
mum elevation in Sector S-2 is 800 feet. Benches are locat- 
ed at elevations of 800 feet and 1000 feet in Sector S-l. 

6. Ground water is not expected to hamper quarry opera- 
tions. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 1 .30 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
density tests performed on samples from the Lone Star 
Quarry on the east side of Mount Zion. 

8. Base map for resource calculations is a 4: 1 enlargement of 
the 1973 edition of the Clayton 7.5 minute quadrangle. No 
allowance has been made for material already quarried by 
Kaiser Sand and Gravel and Lone Star Industries, since 
their total production amounts to a very small percentage 
of the resources in the sector. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR S 



CONTOUR 


AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 


" 


TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


FACTORS 




To nearest 














10,000 tons) 


SECTOR S-l 
















1600 


1.03 


- 


2.50 


X 


(40X43,560) 
11.30 


- 


390,000 


1560 


3.96 


















— 


8.01 


X 


■• 


- 


1,240,000 


1520 


12.05 


















— 


15.99 


X 


- 


- 


2,470,000 


1480 


19.92 


















— 


23.46 


X 


« 


■ 


3,930,000 


1440 


30.99 


















— 


35.52 


X 




■ 


5,480,000 


1400 


40.05 


















— 


50.62 


X 


■* 


- 


7,810,000 


1360 


61.18 


















— 


69.85 


X 


M 


m 


10,770,000 


1320 


78.51 


















— 


87.93 


X 


" 


- 


13,560,000 


1280 


97.34 


















— 


105.35 


X 


" 


- 


16,240,000 


1240 


113.35 


















— 


121.33 


X 


" 


- 


18,710,000 


1200 


129.30 


















— 


136.05 


X 


" 


■ 


20,980,000 


1160 


142.79 


















— 


149.48 


X 


" 


■ 


23,050,000 


1120 


156.16 


















— 


162.91 


X 


** 


- 


25,120,000 


1080 


169.65 


















— 


176.65 


X 


" 


- 


27,240,000 


1040 


183.65 


















— 


191.14 


X 


" 


- 


29,470,000 


1000 


198.63 














Bench 
















1000 


182.22 


















— 


189.25 


X 


" 


- 


29,180,000 


960 


196.28 


















— 


202.48 


X 


" 


- 


31,220,000 


920 


208.67 


















— 


217.37 


X 




■ 


33,520,000 


880 


226.06 


















— 


234.04 


X 




- 


36,090,000 


840 


242.02 


















— 


249.14 


X 


" 


- 


38,420,000 


800 


256.25 














Bench 
















800 


235.07 


















— 


248.85 


X 


" 


- 


38,370,000 


760 


262.62 


















— 


273.24 


X 


» 


- 


42,130,000 


720 


283.86 


















— 


293.73 


X 




- 


45,290,000 


680 


303.60 


















— 


302.74 


X 


" 


- 


46,680,000 


640 


301.88 


















— 


303.34 


X 


» 


- 


46,770,000 


600 


304.80 








TOTAL SECTOR S-l 


. 






594,130,000 



28 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



RESOURCES - SECTOR S (continued) 



CONTOUR AREA 

ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



SECTOR S-2 
















1240 


1.89 


.. 


7.92 


X 


(40)(43,560) 

11. to 


. 


1,220,000 


1200 


13.95 
















— 


18.28 


X 


» 


- 


2,820,000 


1160 


22.61 


















— 


27.66 


X 




■ 


4,270,000 


1120 


32.71 


















— 


37.25 


X 


- 


- 


5,740,000 


1080 


41.78 


















— 


46.23 


X 


- 


- 


7,130,000 


1040 


50.68 


















— 


54.99 


X 


•• 


- 


8,480,000 


1000 


59.29 


















— 


62.76 


X 


- 


- 


9,680,000 


960 


66.23 


















— 


69.53 


X 


- 


- 


10,720,000 


920 


72.83 


















— 


76.79 


X 


- 


- 


11,840,000 


880 


80.75 


















— 


83.71 


X 


« 


- 


12,910,000 


840 


86.66 


















— 


92.03 


X 


- 


- 


14,190,000 


800 


97.39 






TOTAL SECTOR S-2 


- 






88,900,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR S = 
683 MILLION TONS (ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR S = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR T - MORACA FORMATION BASALT - 
SOUTH GUDDE RIDGE 

Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2(c) Sector Plate 2.60 

Resource Sector T contains basalt and andesite of the Moraga 
Formation. The volcanic rocks cover the ridgetop along the 
southeast half of Gudde Ridge within the city limits of Moraga. 
The northeast-dipping lava flows are underlain by sediments of 
the Orinda Formation. The basalt is dark gray when fresh and 
weathers to a reddish color. Crushed stone from the Moraga 
Formation has been a major source of roadbase and fill material 
in the local area. This deposit was quarried for base material and 
ballast by the Oakland, Antioch, and Eastern Railroad 
(predecessor to the Sacramento Northern Railroad), but at 
present there are no active quarries. Although not observed in 
the field, volcanic tuff and sedimentary rocks may exist within 
the deposit in significant amounts; this material would be suited 
only for fill. 

Resources in Sector T are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1 . Sector T contains basalt and andesite of the Moraga For- 
mation. It is assumed that tha lava flows are uniform in 
composition (no tuff or sedimentary rocks exist above the 
projected contact). 

2. The basalt is suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate and 
roadbase. 

3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. Wall slopes would have a 2:1 ratio (horizontal to verti- 
cal). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation would be 700 feet. 

6. Ground water would not pose a problem to quarry opera- 
tions. 



7. A conversion factor of 1 1 .45 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
density tests performed on basalt samples from Sector T. 

8. Base map for resource calculations is a 4: 1 enlargement of 
the 1973 edition of the Oakland East 7.5 minute quadran- 
gle. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR T 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION _ TONNAGE 
FACTORS ( To nearest 

10,000 tons) 



1060 


2.35 


















— 


3.79 


X 


(20(43,560) 


290,000 


1040 


5.22 








11 


.45 








— 


7.84 


X 






600,000 


1020 


10.45 


















— 


14.67 


X 




» 


1,120,000 


1000 


18.88 


















— 


22.87 


X 






1,740,000 


980 


26.86 


















— 


31.77 


X 






2,420,000 


960 


36.67 


















— 


42.04 


X 






3,200,000 


940 


47.41 


















— 


53.01 


X 




« 


4,030,000 


920 


58.60 


















— 


65.46 


X 




- 


4,980,000 


900 


72.31 


















— 


78.74 


X 




" 


5,990,000 


880 


85.17 


















— 


91.77 


X 






6,980,000 


860 


98.37 


















— 


104.94 


X 






7,980,000 


840 


111.51 


















— 


118.20 


X 




- 


8,990,000 


820 


124.88 


















— 


131.77 


X 




- 


- 10,030,000 


800 


138.66 


















— 


144.23 


X 






- 10,970,000 


780 


149.79 


















— 


155.50 


X 




» 


- 11,830,000 


760 


161.21 


















— 


167.15 


X 






12,720,000 


740 


173.09 


















— 


175.22 


X 




- 


- 13,330,000 


720 


177.34 


















— 


177.00 


X 




» 


13,470,000 


700 


176.65 








TOTAL 


SECTOR T 






- 120,670,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR T = 
121 MILLION TONS (MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR T = 
TONS 



SECTOR U - MORACA FORMATION BASALT - 
NORTH GUDDE RIDGE 

Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2(d) Sector Plate 2.60 

Resource Sector U is situated on the northwest half of Gudde 
Ridge and contains basalt and andesite of the Moraga Forma- 
tion. The basalt is dark gray when fresh, and weathers to a 
reddish color. As mentioned above in the description of Sector 
T, the volcanic rocks of the Moraga Formation have been used 
for ballast, road base and fill. Extensive quarrying has occurred 
in this sector, evidently in connection with the construction of 
Highway 24 and BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit), but there are 
no presently active quarries. Although not observed in the field, 
volcanic tuff and sedimentary rocks may exist within the deposit. 

Resources in Sector U are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1 . Sector U contains basalt and andesite of the Moraga For- 
mation. It is assumed that the lava flows are uniform in 
composition (no tuff or sedimentary rocks exist above the 
projected contact). 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



29 



2. The basalt and andesite are suitable for asphaltic concrete 
aggregate and road base. 



SECTOR V - MORAGA FORMATION BASALT 
ORINDA DEPOSIT 



3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 



Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle MRZ-2(e) Sector Plate 2.60 



4. Wall slopes have a ratio of 2:1 (horizontal to vertical). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation is 1060 feet. 

6. Ground water is not expected to present problems for 
quarry operations. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 1 .45 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
density tests performed on similar material from Sector T. 

8. Base map for resource calculations is a 4:1 enlargement 
of the 1973 edition of the Oakland East 7.5 minute quad- 
rangle. No allowance is made for material mined since the 
map was released, since it is small in comparison to the 
total resource, and would reveal proprietary data. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR U 



CONTOUR 
ELEVATION 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 

(acres ) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



1600 


.46 
















— 


.95 


X 


(20)(43,560) 


70,000 


1580 


1.44 








11.45 








— 


1.84 


X 




140 ,000 


1560 


2.24 
















— 


2.82 


X 


M 


210,000 


1540 


3.39 
















— 


4.22 


X 




320,000 


1520 


5.05 
















— 


6.83 


X 


» 


520,000 


1500 


8.61 
















— 


9.90 


X 


" 


750,000 


1480 


11.19 
















— 


12.69 


X 


« 


970,000 


1460 


14.18 
















— 


16.48 


X 


« 


1,250,000 


1440 


18.77 
















— 


21.58 


X 


" 


1,640,000 


1420 


24.39 
















— 


27.35 


X 




2,080,000 


1400 


30.30 
















— 


34.98 


X 


« 


2,660,000 


1380 


39.66 
















— 


44.08 


X 




3,350,000 


1360 


48.50 
















— 


53.18 


X 




4,050,000 


1340 


57.85 
















— 


61.78 


X 




4,700,000 


1320 


65.71 
















— 


68.47 


X 




5,210,000 


1300 


71.22 
















— 


75.02 


X 


" 


5,710,000 


1280 


78.82 
















— 


78.47 


X 


» 


5,970,000 


1260 


78.11 
















— 


78.89 


X 




6,000,000 


1240 


79.66 
















— 


79.29 


X 


" 


6,030,000 


1220 


78.91 
















— 


79.12 


X 


- 


6,020,000 


1200 


79.32 
















— 


79.26 


X 


« 


6,030,000 


1180 


79.20 
















— 


78.86 


X 


•• 


6,000,000 


1160 


78.51 
















— 


77.48 


X 


- 


5,900,000 


1140 


76.45 
















— 


74.67 


X 


« 


5,680,000 


1120 


72.89 
















— 


69.42 


X 


. 


5,280,000 


1100 


65.94 
















— 


55.90 


X 


•• 


4,250,000 


1080 


45.86 
















— 


38.60 


X 


« 


2,940,000 


1060 


31.34 








TOTAL SECTOR U 






- 93,730,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR U = 

94 MILLION TONS (MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR U = 

TONS 



Sector V encompasses a deposit of Moraga Formation basalt 
and andesite located on the hill south of Orinda and east of 
Highway 24. This deposit has been quarried in the past, probably 
in connection with the construction of Highway 24 and BART, 
but at the present time there are no active quarries. The basalt 
and andesite are suitable for ballast, asphaltic concrete aggre- 
gate, and road base material. Although not observed in the field, 
volcanic tuff and sedimentary rocks may exist within the deposit, 
and would be suitable only for fill. 

Resources in Sector V are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1 . Sector V contains Moraga Formation basalt and andesite. 
It is assumed that the lava flows are uniform in composi- 
tion (no tuff or sedimentary rocks exist above the project- 
ed contact). 

2. The basalt and andesite are suitable for asphaltic concrete 
aggregate and road base material. 

3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. Wall slopes would have a ratio of 2: 1 (horizontal to verti- 
cal). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation would be 780 feet. 

6. Ground water would not pose a problem to quarry opera- 
tions. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 1 .45 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
density tests performed on similar material in Sector T. 

8. Base map for resource calculations is the 1973 edition of 
the Oakland East 7.5 minute quadrangle. No allowance is 
made for material mined since the map was released, since 
it is small in comparison to the total resource, and would 
reveal proprietary data. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR V 



CONTOUR AREA 

ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AR£A 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



1200 


.34 





.95 


X 


1180 


1.55 












— 


2.27 


X 


1160 


2.98 












— 


3.56 


X 


1140 


4.13 












— 


4.97 


X 


1120 


5.80 












— 


6.95 


X 


1100 


8.09 












— 


9.21 


X 


1080 


10.33 












— 


11.60 


X 


1060 


12.86 












— 


14.44 


X 


1040 


16.01 












— 


17.97 


X 


1020 


19.92 












— 


22.62 


X 


1000 


25.31 












— 


27.15 


X 


980 


28.98 












— 


31.05 


X 


960 


33.12 









(20)(43,560) 
iT74l 



70,000 

170,000 

270,000 

380,000 

530,000 

700,000 

880,000 

1,100,000 

1,370,000 

1,720,000 

2,070,000 

2,360,000 



30 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



RESOURCES - SECTOR V (continued) 



CONTOUR 
ELEVATION 



AREA 
(acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 







_ 


34.50 


X 


(20)(43 
11. 


,560) 


- 


2,630,000 


940 


35.87 





36.76 


X 




„ 




- 


2,800,000 


920 


37.65 




36.62 


X 








. 


2,790,000 


900 


35.58 


.. 


33.81 


X 








. 


2,570,000 


880 


32.03 





28.87 


X 








= 


2,200,000 


860 


25.71 




23.48 


X 




„ 




. 


1,790,000 


840 


21.24 




19.15 


X 




- 




. 


1,460,000 


820 


17.05 


_ 


13.49 


X 




„ 




. 


1,030,000 


800 


9.93 


_ 


5.71 


X 




„ 




, 


430,000 


780 


1.49 




























TOTAL 


SECTOR V 


- 


29,320,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR V = 
29 MILLION TONS (MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR V = 
TONS 



SECTOR W - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX SANDSTONE - 
RICHMOND DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.22 Richmond Quadrangle MRZ-2(e) Sector Plate 2.63 
Plate 2.35 San Quentin Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.64 

Sector W consists of 3 portions (Sectors W-l, W-2, and W-3) 
of the 500-foot high ridge at the western end of the City of 
Richmond. This ridge contains sandstone and shale of the Fran- 
ciscan Complex, and has four existing quarries on it, three of 
which are inactive. The active quarry is the Point Molate Quarry 
of Quarry Products, Inc. (Sector W-2). Reserve figures for this 
sector are proprietary but are included with other company- 
controlled data in Table 2.12. Franciscan sandstone from this 
quarry is suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate and perhaps 
P.C.C. aggregate. 

Resources of Sector W are given in the tables below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1. The ridge forming Sectors W-l, W-2, and W-3 is under- 
lain by sandstone and interbedded shale of the Franciscan 
Complex. 

2. The sandstone is suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate 
and perhaps P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. There is no waste since the shale may be suitable for 
processing into lightweight aggregate (Burnett, 1965, p. 
13). 

4. Quarry floor elevation would be the 20 foot contour. 

5. Wall slopes would have a 2:1 ratio (horizontal to verti- 
cal). 

6. Ground water would not pose a problem to quarry opera- 
tions. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 1 .64 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
density tests performed on typical samples of Franciscan 
sandstone. 



8. Base maps for resource calculations are 4:1 enlargements 
of the 1973 edition of the Richmond 7.5 minute quadran- 
gle and the 1968 edition of the San Quentin 7.5 minute 
quadrangle. 

Sector W-2 - Quarry Products,lnc, - 
Point Molate Quarry 

Sector W-2 encompasses the property leased by Quarry 
Products, Inc. Reserve data within Sector W-2 are proprietary 
and cannot be discussed here. The amount of reserves in this 
sector are included with those of other company-controlled 
deposits in Table 2.12. 

Sector W-3 - Point Richmond Deposit 

This sector is bisected by an underground gas line owned by 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The resource calculations are 
based on the assumption that P.G. & E would prefer to leave the 
gas line in place. The resource calculations are divided into two 
tables; one for the east side, and one for the west side. An inactive 
quarry leased by Quarry Products, Inc. is located near the east- 
ern end of this sector. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR W 



CONTOUR 


AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 




TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


FACTORS 




(To nearest 


















10,000 tons) 


SECTOR 


W-l - 


• Point San 


Pablo 


Deposit 










320 




.69 























1.44 


X 


(20(43,560) 


- 


110,000 


300 




2.18 








11.64 












— 


3.24 


X 




- 


240,000 


280 




4.30 




















— 


5.71 


X 




- 


430,000 


260 




7.12 




















— 


8.96 


X 




■ 


670,000 


240 




10.79 




















— 


12.17 


X 




- 


910,000 


220 




13.55 




















— 


16.22 


X 




- 


1,210,000 


200 




18.88 




















— 


20.78 


X 


« 


" 


1,560,000 


180 




22.67 




















_ 


25.05 


X 


- 


. 


1,870,000 


160 




27.43 




















— 


30.02 


X 


» 


■ 


2,250,000 


140 




32.60 




















— 


35.30 


X 


» 


- 


2,640,000 


120 




37.99 




















— 


41.30 


X 


« 


- 


3,090,000 


100 




44.60 




















— 


48.99 


X 




- 


3,670,000 


80 




53.38 




















— 


57.37 


X 


" 


- 


4,290,000 


60 




61.35 




















— 


65.60 


X 


» 


- 


4,910,000 


40 




69.85 




















— 


75.25 


X 




- 


5,630,000 


20 




80.64 






TOTAL SECTOR W-l 


- 






33,480,000 


SECTOR 


W-3 - 


East side 


Of Sector W-3 










300 




2.98 


~ 


3.96 


X 


(20X43,560) 
11.64 




300,000 


280 




4.94 




















— 


5.86 


X 


H 




440,000 


260 




6.77 




















— 


7.86 


X 


.. 




590,000 


240 




8.95 





9.96 


X 






750,000 


220 




10.96 





12.08 


X 






900,000 


200 




13.20 





15.04 


X 






1,130,000 


180 




16.87 




















— 


18.54 


X 


■• 




1,390,000 


160 




20.20 





21.61 


X 






1,620,000 


140 




23.01 




















— 


23.65 


X 


- 




1,770,000 


120 




24.28 


_ 


24.83 


X 






1,860,000 


100 




25.37 















1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



31 



RESOURCES - SECTOR W (continued) 



CONTOUR 


AREA 




AVERAGE AREA 


CONVERSION 




TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 




FACTORS 




(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 


100 


25.37 








(20X43,560) 










— 


27.58 


X 


11.64 


- 


2,060,000 


80 


29.79 


















— 


30.25 


X 




- 


2,260,000 


60 


30.71 


















— 


31.43 


X 


» 


■» 


2,350,000 


40 


32.14 


















— 


32.80 


X 




- 


2,450,000 


20 


33.46 




TOTAL 


SECTOR 


W-3 (east side) 


" 






19,870,000 


SECTOR W - 


West side Of 


Sector W-3 










300 


2.35 





















5.02 


X 


(20X43,560) 


. 


380,000 


280 


7.69 








11.64 










— 


9.13 


X 


« 


- 


680,000 


260 


10.56 


















— 


12.08 


X 


- 


- 


900,000 


240 


13.60 


















— 


15.41 


X 


» 


- 


1,150,000 


220 


17.22 


















— 


19.12 


X 


.. 


- 


1,430,000 


200 


21.01 


















— 


23.11 


X 


« 


- 


1,730,000 


180 


25.20 


















— 


26.78 


X 




■ 


2,000,000 


160 


28.35 


















— 


30.82 


X 


•• 


- 


2,310,000 


140 


33.29 


















— 


35.16 


X 




- 


2,630,000 


120 


37.02 


















— 


39.12 


X 


M 


■ 


2,930,000 


100 


41.21 


















— 


44.00 


X 


. 


- 


3,290,000 


80 


46.78 


















— 


49.79 


X 


- 


- 


3,730,000 


60 


52.80 


















— 


53.72 


X 


» 


- 


4,020,000 


40 


54.64 


















— 


54.27 


X 


" 


- 


4,060,000 


20 


53.89 




TOTAL 


SECTOR 


W-3 (west side) 


. 






31,240,000 










TOTAL SECTOR W-3 




51,110,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR W = 

GREATER THAN 85 MILLION TONS 

(ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR W = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR X - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX SANDSTONE - 
SAN BRUNO MOUNTAIN 

Plate 2.42 San Francisco South Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.65 

This immense deposit of sandstone lies immediately south of 
the City of San Francisco. There is one active quarry (Quarry 
Products, Inc.'s Guadalupe Quarry ) , one active fill-sand pit 
(Colma Sand Pit), and several inactive quarries located around 
the mountain. Sandstone has been quarried from San Bruno 
Mountain for P.C.C. aggregate and asphaltic concrete aggregate 
since the turn of the century (Aubury, 1906, p. 323). 

Sector X is limited to the property owned by Quarry Products, 
Inc. Reserve data within Sector X are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR X = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR X = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR Y - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE AND 
CALERA LIMESTONE - ROCKAWAY BEACH 

Plate 2.39 Montara Mountain Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.66 

Sector Y consists of a west-trending ridge on the north side of 
Calera Valley in Pacifica (San Mateo County). The deposit 
contains greenstone of the Franciscan Complex and associated 
Calera Limestone. The limestone and greenstone are currently 
quarried for P.C.C. aggregate and asphaltic concrete aggregate 
at the Rockaway Beach Quarry of Quarry Products, Inc. Reserve 
data for this quarry is proprietary and cannot be discussed here 
but is included with other company-controlled data in Table 
2.12. An inactive quarry lies north of the Rockaway Beach quar- 
ry- 
Resources for Sector Y are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1. The deposit consists of Franciscan Complex greenstone 
and Calera Limestone. 

2. The material, when fresh, is suitable for P.C.C. aggregate 
and asphaltic concrete aggregate. 

3. There is no waste. 

4. All material above the 100-feet elevation would be quar- 
ried for aggregate. 

5. Ground water is not expected to pose any problems to 
quarry operations. 

6. A conversion factor of 1 1 .40 cubic feet material per ton 
was used. This factor is based on results of density tests 
performed upon samples from the Quarry Products, Inc. 
quarry in this sector. 

7. Base map for resource calculations is a 2:1 enlargement 
of the 1968 edition of the Montara Mountain 7.5 minute 
quadrangle. Allowance was not made for aggregate mined 
since the map was released since it is small in comparison 
to the total resource, and would reveal proprietary data. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR Y 



CONTOUR AREA 

ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
PACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



300 


3.03 


275 


8.88 


250 


17.70 


225 


28.44 


200 


39.67 


175 


54.00 


150 


69.15 


125 


88.57 


100 


109.09 



5.96 


X 


13.29 


X 


23.07 


X 


34.06 


X 


46.84 


X 


61.58 


X 


78.86 


X 


98.83 


X 



(25X43,560) 


■ 


570,000 


11.40 






" 


1,270,000 




- 


2,200,000 




- 


3,250,000 




- 


4,470,000 


" 


- 


5,880,000 


- 


- 


7,550,000 


- 


" 


9,440,000 


TOTAL SECTOR Y 


34,630,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR Y = 
35 MILLION TONS (MIXED AGGREGATE GRADES) 



TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR Y 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



32 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



SECTOR Z - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE 
NEARY QUARRY DEPOSIT 



SECTOR BB - CALERA LIMESTONE AND FRANCISCAN 
COMPLEX GREENSTONE - PERMANENTE DEPOSIT 



Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.68 

Plate 2.38 Mindego Hill Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.67 

Sector Z is located in the foothills on the west side of the Santa 
Clara Valley and is underlain by greenstone and metatuff of the 
Franciscan Complex. Patton Brothers, Inc. produces road base 
and fill material from this deposit at the Neary Quarry. Reserve 
data within Sector Z are proprietary and cannot be discussed 
here but is included with other company-controlled data in Ta- 
ble 2.12. The greenstone (altered basalt) is greenish-gray to dark 
gray in color and badly shattered by several northeast-trending 
faults that traverse the deposit. Several zones of green metatuff 
are contained in the deposit. 

Resources in Sector Z are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1. All resource material within Sector Z is assumed to be 
Franciscan Complex greenstone. 

2. The greenstone is suitable for road base material and 
probably for asphaltic concrete aggregate. 

3. There is no waste. 

4. Quarry wall slopes would have a ratio of 2:1 (horizontal 
to vertical). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation would be 600 feet. 

6. Ground water table elevation is approximately 350 feet at 
the Neary Quarry , so water would not pose a problem to 
mining. 

7. A conversion factor of 10.68 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
results of density tests performed on samples from Sector 
D (Apperson Ridge). 

8. Base maps for resource calculations are 4:1 enlargements 
of the Cupertino and Mindego Hill 7.5 minute quadrangle 
(1973 and 1968, respectively). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR Z 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
10,000 tons) 



880 


2.87 










— 


11.25 


840 


19.63 










— 


23.76 


800 


27.89 










— 


30.62 


760 


33.35 










— 


35.27 


720 


37.19 










— 


38.68 


680 


40.17 










— 


41.35 


640 


42.53 










— 


44.31 


600 


46.09 







(40H43.560) 


1,840,000 


10.68 




" 


3,880,000 




5,000,000 


- 


5,750,000 




6,310,000 


- 


6,750,000 




7,230,000 


TOTAL SECTOR Z 


36,760,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR Z = 
37 MILLION TONS (ALL ROADBASE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR Z = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2(d) Sector Plate 2.68 

Sector BB contains a large body of Calera Limestone with 
smaller bodies of greenstone of the Franciscan Complex. Most 
of the sector is owned or controlled by the Kaiser Cement Cor- 
poration, and the limestone is used in production of Portland 
cement. Limestone unsuitable for cement is crushed and sold for 
P.C.C. aggregate. Some of the greenstone is sold for road base 
material, although it appears suitable for asphaltic concrete ag- 
gregate. The weathered material and soil can be sold for fill. 
Although aggregate is a by-product of the cement operation, 
sufficient low-grade limestone is present to warrant an MRZ-2 
classification. Reserve data within Sector BB are proprietary and 
cannot be discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector 
are included with those of other company-controlled deposits in 
Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR BB = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR BB = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 

SECTOR CC - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX GREENSTONE - 
STEVENS CREEK QUARRY DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2 (e) Sector Plate 2.68 

Sector CC lies near the southern end of a large body of green- 
stone that extends northwesterly across the quadrangle. The 
greenish-black greenstone (altered basalt) of the Franciscan 
Complex, where exposed at several quarries, shows pillow struc- 
ture suggestive of submarine lava flows. No volcanic tuff, which 
is suitable only for fill, was found within the sector. Two active 
and at least three inactive quarries are found in the sector. Ste- 
vens Creek Quarry, Inc. is located at the southern end of Sector 
CC. A power-line easement passes diagonally across property 
owned by Stevens Creek Quarry, Inc.. Reserve data is proprie- 
tary and is included with other company-controlled reserves in 
Table 2.12. 

Resources in Sector CC are given in the tables below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1 . The material in Sector CC is greenstone of the Franciscan 
Complex. 

2. The greenstone is suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate 
and probably P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. There is no waste. 

4. Wall slopes would have a ratio of 2: 1 (horizontal to verti- 
cal). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation would be 800 feet. There 
would be a bench at elevation 1000. 

6. Ground water should not pose a problem to mining. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 1 .05 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
results of density tests performed on greenstone samples 
from Sector CC. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



33 



Base map for resource calculations is a 4:1 enlargement 
of the 1973 edition of the Cupertino 7.5 minute quadran- 
gle. No allowance is made for material mined since the 
map was released, since it is small in comparison to the 
total resource, and would reveal proprietary data. 

RESOURCES - SECTOR CC 



2. Sandstone within the melange is suitable for asphaltic 
concrete aggregate, while the sheared matrix of the me - 
lange and the serpentinite and silica carbonate rock are 
suitable for road base, subbase, or fill material. 

3. There is no waste. 



CONTOUR 


AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 




CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


4. 


Base level for the quarries 


would be at an 


elevation of 160 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


X 


FACTORS 


(To nearest 




feet. 




















10,000 tons) 


5. 


Quarry waf 


slopes would have a ratio o 




1600 


.63 












"2:1 (horizontal 


1560 


3.56 




2.10 
7.81 


X 
X 


(40)(43,560) 
11.05 


330,000 
1,230,000 




to vertical) 








1520 


12.05 





18.05 


X 


„ 


2,850,000 


6. 


Ground water would not be expected tc 


pose a problem 


1480 


24.05 





29.25 


X 




4,610,000 




to mining. 








1440 


34.44 






















1400 


46.03 




40.24 


X 




6,350,000 


7. 


A conversion factor of 13.50 cubic feet of material per ton 


1360 


55.50 


— 


50.77 


X 


- 


8,010,000 




was used in 


calculating resources. This factor is based on 


1320 


67.21 


— 


61.36 


X 


" 


9,680,000 




results of density tests performed on sam 


pies from Sector 






— 


72.43 


X 


~ 


11,420,000 




EE. 








1280 


77.65 




84.08 


X 


. 


- 13,260,000 












1240 
1200 


90.51 
101.24 


- 


95.88 


X 




15,120,000 


8. 


Base map for resource calculations is a 4:1 enlargement 
of the 1973 edition of the San Jose East 7.5 minute quad- 


1160 


100.89 


— 


101.07 


X 


" 


15,940,000 




rangle. An allowance was 


made for material that has been 






— 


100.69 


X 


- 


15,880,000 




mined from Sector EE-1 


since the map 


was released. 


1120 


100.49 





98.17 


X 


. 


- 15,480,000 












1080 


95.85 




92.03 


x 




14,510,000 












1040 


88.21 




83.68 


X 




- 13,190,000 




RESOURCES 


- SECTOR EE 


1000 


79.14 






CONTOUR AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 


CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


Bench 














ELEVATION (acres) 


(acres) 


FACTORS 


(To nearest 


1000 


75.82 




70.63 






11,140,000 










10,000 tons) 


960 


65.43 










SECTOR 


EE-l 












— 


59.20 


X 


- 


9,330,000 


400 


6.08 








920 


52.97 




47.92 


X 




7,560,000 






— 18.22 


T (20)(43,560) 


1,180,000 


880 


42.87 












380 


30.36 




13.50 











37.42 


X 


„ 


5,900,000 






— 44.40 


X 


2,870,000 


840 


31.97 












360 


58.43 















26.58 


X 




4,190,000 






— 70.60 


X 


4,560,000 


800 


21.18 












340 


82.76 


92.40 


X 








5,960,000 












TOTAL SECTOR CC - 185,980,000 


320 


102.04 


— 110.19 




7,110,000 




TOTAL RESOURCES - 


SECTOR CC 


— 


300 


US. 34 




186 MILLION TONS 


(ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 


280 


135.68 


— 127.01 


X 


8,200,000 




TOTAL RESERVES 


- SECTOR CC = 




260 


151.34 


— 143.51 


X 


9,260,000 






(PROPRIETARY DATA) 




240 


164.14 


— 157.74 


X 


- 10,180,000 

- 10,910,000 
















220 


173.90 


— 169.02 




SECTOR EE - FRANCIi 


200 


183.60 


178.75 


X 


- 11,540,000 


AND SERPENTINITE 


- HILLSDALE DEPOSIT 






188.51 


X 


12,170,000 
















180 


193.41 


— 197.63 


X 


- 12,750,000 


Plate 2.49 


San Jose East Quadrangle 


MRZ-2(a) 


Sector Plate 2.69 


160 


201.85 






























TOTAL SECTOR 


EE-1 - 96,690,000 



(Sectors EE-1 and EE-2) of the three Hillsdale Hills in south 
San Jose. The sector is underlain by melange of the Franciscan 
Complex and associated serpentinite and silica-carbonate rock, 
and each of the two hills contains an active quarry (A. J. Raisch 
Paving Company in Sector EE-1, and Hillsdale Rock Company 
in Sector EE-2). Reserve data within Sector EE-2 are proprie- 
tary and cannot be discussed here. The amount of reserves in this 
sector are included with those of other company-controlled 
deposits in Table 2.12. Sandstone within the melange is suitable 
for asphaltic concrete aggregate and the serpentinite is suitable 
for fill and perhaps subbase material. 

Resources in Sector EE-1 are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1 . Resource material within Sector EE- 1 consists of Francis- 
can Complex melange and associated serpentinite. 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR EE = 
MORE THAN 97 MILLION TONS, (MIXED NON-PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR EE = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR FF - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX SANDSTONE - 
SANTA TERESA HILLS 

Plate 2.51 Santa Teresa Hills Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.70 

Sector FF is located at the north end of the Santa Teresa Hills 
at the north end of Almaden Valley, and is the site of the active 
Piazza Quarry . Resource material in Sector FF consists of sand- 
stone and interbedded shale of the Franciscan Complex. The 
sandstone is suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate, while the 



34 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



shale and weathered sandstone are suitable for fill and perhaps 
subbase material. 

Resources at Sector FF are limited, as urbanization has en- 
croached on all sides of the quarry. The rock being mined is sold 
for riprap by Granite Construction Company. Reserve data 
within Sector FF are proprietary and cannot be discussed here. 
The amount of reserves in this sector are included with those of 
other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR FF = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 
TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR FF = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



Resource Sectors 
Outside of the Urbanizing Areas 

In the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region there are three 
significant quarries that lie outside of the OPR urbanizing areas. 
Since their production has been included in reserve projections 
for the P-C region, and these quarries meet threshold value, 
they have been included as sectors and are described below. 

SECTOR GG - DOMENGINE SANDSTONE - 
RIDGEMOOR QUARRY DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.28 Brentwood Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.71 
Plate 2.8 Byron Hot Springs Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.72 

This sector is located 3.5 miles south of Brentwood and 3 miles 
northwest of Byron, on the east side of Mt. Diablo. The property 
is underlain by sandstone of the Domengine Formation (Eo- 
cene), whose beds strike northwest and dip northeast in the 
sector. The sandstone is poorly consolidated, finegrained, and 
massive, with beds up to several tens of feet thick. Ridgemoor 
Development Company has operated the quarry since 1974. 
Products from the quarry are P.C.C.-grade sand, asphaltic con- 
crete sand, and fill. 

Reserve data within Sector GG are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR GG = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR GG = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR HH - MONTARA QUARTZ DIORITE - 
PILLARCITOS QUARRY DEPOSIT 



Plate 2.37 Half Moon Bay Quad. 
Plate 2.39 Montara Mountain Quad. 



MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.73 
MRZ-2 (c) Sector Plate 2.66 



Sector HH is located in Nuff Creek drainage, approximately 
2.5 miles northeast of Half Moon Bay and about one mile north 
of San Mateo-Half Moon Bay Road (State Highway 92). The 
quarry is operated by Lone Star Industries. The area is underlain 
by rocks that range from granite to quartz diorite. The rock is 
fractured, deeply weathered in the upper part of the quarry 
although relatively fresh at depth, and is locally massive. 
Products of this operation are sand (granite fines), base, sub- 
base, and fill. 



Reserve data within Sector HH are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR HH = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL ROADBASE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR HH = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 

SECTOR II - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX SANDSTONE - 
LEXINGTON QUARRY DEPOSIT 

Plate 2.48 Los Gatos Quadrangle MRZ-2 (a) Sector Plate 2.74 

This sector is located near Limekiln Canyon, about one mile 
south of Los Gatos via Highway 17, near Lexington Reservoir. 
The quarry lies within a large northwest-trending deposit of 
sandstone and siltstone of the Franciscan Complex. The quarry 
was first worked in 1 962, and is now operated by Hillsdale Rock 
Company. Although the sandstone may be suitable for asphaltic 
concrete aggregate, the rock products obtained from this quarry 
are mainly road base, quarry fines, and fill. 

Reserve data within Sector II are proprietary and cannot be 
discussed here. The amount of reserves in this sector are included 
with those of other company-controlled deposits in Table 2.12. 

TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR II = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA, ALL ROADBASE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR II = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



Resource Sectors Within Parks 

It is recognized that dedicated parklands have special status 
as opposed to other current uses of sectorized land, consequently 
the resources within parks have been sectorized separately be- 
low, and the quantification of those resources are presented sepa- 
rately in the tables. The quantification of resources within park 
sectors are expressed to a lower degree of accuracy rather than 
to the higher level of accuracy reflected in the previous sections. 

SECTOR JJ - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - 
ROBERTSON PARK 

Plate 2.14 Livermore Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.52 

Sector JJ consists of the undeveloped areas of Robertson Park, 
in southwestern Livermore. The sector contains two parts: JJ-1 
and JJ-2. Both sectors lie immediately south of College Avenue 
along Arroyo Mocho Creek, and are separated by Arroyo Road. 
This sector is underlain by alluvial sand and gravel typical of the 
Livermore - Amador Valley as described above in Sectors A and 
B. 

Resources of sand and gravel within Sector JJ are given in the 
tables below. Factors used in calculating the amount of resources 
included the following items: 

1. Resource material is Quaternary sand and gravel within 
the upper aquifer in the Livermore Valley. 

2. Sand and gravel present in the aquifer is suitable for 
P.C.C. aggregate. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



35 



3. Waste is 10 percent of the total material. 

4. The thickness of sand and gravel is 30 feet, and there is 
no overburden. 

5. Wall slopes would have a ratio of 2: 1 (horizontal to verti- 
cal). 

6. Depth to ground water in Sector JJ is not known. 

7. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used (see Sector A, item #7). 

8. Base map for resource calculations is the Livermore 7.5 
minute quadrangle (1980). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR JJ 



4. The thickness of sand and gravel is 40 feet, and there is 
30 feet of overburden. 

5. Wall slopes were not considered in Sector KK-1 (the 
former gravel pit area) but have a ratio of 2:1 (horizontal 
to vertical) in Sector KK-2. 

6. Sector KK-2 is divided into two pits; the larger pit is Pit 
A, and the smaller pit is Pit B. 

7. Depth to ground water in Sector KK is approximately 30 
feet. 

8. A conversion factor of 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used (see Sector A, item #7). 

9. Base maps for resource calculations are the Newark and 



DEPTH 
BELOW 
SURFACE 


AREA AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) (acres) 


TONNAGE 
X CONVERSION - (To nearest 
FACTORS 100,000 tons) 


Niles 7.5 minute quadranj 
RESOURCES 


;les (1980). 

- SECTOR KK 






44.08 

44.08 
44.08 

32.10 
20. 11 

64.74 

64.74 
64.74 

49.31 
33.88 


, ( 5)(43,560)(.90) . son, 000 

14.50 
X (25)(43,560)(.90) . 2.200.000 

14.50 




SECTOR JJ-1 
Surface 


DEPTH 
BELOW 
SURFACE 


AREA AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) (acres) 


X CONVERSION 
FACTORS 


TONNAGE 
■ (To nearest 
100,000 tons) 


-5 feet 
-30 feet 


SECTOR KK-1 
-30 feet 

-70 feet 


93.66 

93.66 
93.66 


X (40)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 
TOTAL SECTOR KK-1 




SECTOR JJ-2 


TOTAL SECTOR JJ-1 - 2,800,000 

X ( 5)(43,560)(.90) . 900.000 

14,50 
X (25)(43,560)(.90) . 3.300.000 

14.50 


10,100,000 


Surface 


- 10,100,000 


-30 feet 


SECTOR KK-2 
Pit A 
-30 feet 

-70 feet 

Pit B 
-30 feet 

-70 feet 


14.60 

11.16 
7.71 

6.89 

4.83 
2.76 


x (40)(43.560)(.90) 
14.50 
TOTAL 

X (40)(43,560)(.90) 
14.50 
TOTAL 
TOTAL SECTOR KK-2 






TOTAL SECTOR JJ-2 - 4,200,000 






TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR JJ = 
7 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR JJ = 
TONS 


- 1,200,000 




- 1,200,000 
500,000 




KK - QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM - 

\ CREEK QUARRIES REGIONAL PARK 

Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.56 
Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.55 




SECTOR 


500,000 
1,700,000 


ALAMED/ 

Plate 2.17 
Plate 2.18 




TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR KK = 
12 MILLION TONS (ALL PCC GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR KK = 
TONS 





Sector KK is located west of Mission Boulevard (Highway 
238) and north of Peralta Avenue (Highway 84) in the City of 
Fremont, and is part of Alameda Creek Quarries Regional Park. 
This sector is situated adjacent to Sector F on the Niles Cone, 
a large delta at the mouth of Niles Canyon on Alameda Creek, 
and includes several former gravel pits. The sector is divided 
into two parts, KK- 1 and KK-2, and includes both undisturbed 
material and the levees that separate the former gravel pits. See 
Sector F, p. 19 , for a description of the material. 

Resources of sand and gravel within Sector KK are given in 
the tables below. Factors used in calculating the amount of 
resources included the following items: 

1. Resource material is Quaternary sand and gravel lying 
within aquifers in the Niles Cone. 

2. All sand and gravel within the sector is suitable for P.C.C. 
aggregate. 

3. Waste is equal to 10 percent of the total material. 



SECTOR LL - BRIONES FORMATION SANDSTONE - 
MISSION PEAK REGIONAL PARK 

Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle MRZ-2(c) Sector Plate 2.55 

This sector contains the portion of Mission Peak Regional 
Park within the OPR zone, in the Mission San Jose District of 
the City of Fremont, and lies between Sectors H and I. All three 
sectors are underlain by the same material - Briones Formation 
sandstone - and are portions of the same large deposit. Sector LL 
consists of two parts, LL- 1 and LL-2. 

Resources in Sector LL are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating the resources included the following items: 

1. Resource material is Briones Formation sandstone. 

2. The sandstone is suitable for roadbase and perhaps as- 
phaltic concrete aggregate. 



36 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



3. There is no waste and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. Wall slopes have a 2:1 ratio (horizontal to vertical). 

5. Base elevation of the quarry would be 800 feet in Sector 
IX- 1, and 400 feet in Sector LL-2. 

6. Ground water is not expected to hinder quarry opera- 
tions. 

7. A conversion factor of 1 3.70 cubic feet of material per ton 
is used in resource calculations. This figure is based on 
density tests performed on sample of Briones Formation 
sandstone from the inactive Serpa Quarry in Milpitas 
(Santa Clara County). 

8. Base map for resource calculations was the Niles 7.5 
minute quadrangle (1980). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR LL 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 
(acres) 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
(To nearest 
100,000 tons) 



1200 
1000 
800 



1000 
800 
600 
400 



32.14 
172. 64 
154.27 

11.02 
54.18 
112.03 
117.54 



102.39 
163.46 



32.60 
83. 11 
114.79 



x (200X43,560) 

13.70 
X 

TOTAL SECTOR LL -1 



X (200X43,560) 
13. 7 



TOTAL SECTOR LL-2 



65,100,000 
103,900,000 

169,000,000 

20,700,000 

52,800,000 

73,000,000 

146,600,060 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR LL = 
316 MILLION TONS (ALL ROADBASE GRADE) 



TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR LL 
TONS 



SECTOR MM - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX 
COYOTE HILLS REGIONAL PARK 



3. There is no waste, and overburden can be sold for fill. 

4. The deposit would be quarried down to an elevation of 20 
feet. Quarry walls would have a 2:1 slope ratio (horizontal 
to vertical). 

5. Ground water would not present any problems in mining. 

6. A conversion factor of 1 1 .54 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used. This factor is based on file data in a property 
report for Sector M, which was done during an earlier 
study by Chesterman and Manson (In press). 

7. Base map used for resource calculations is a 2:1 enlarge- 
ment of the 1973 edition of the Newark 7.5 minute quad- 
rangle. 



RESOURCES - SECTOR MM 



CONTOUR AREA 
ELEVATION (acres) 



AVERAGE AREA 



CONVERSION 
FACTORS 



TONNAGE 
" (To nearest 
100,000 tons) 



SECTOR MM-1 (North Hill) 




200 17.91 




— 


28.13 


160 38.34 




— 


70.72 


100 103.09 




— 


162.91 


20 222.73 





(40)(43,S60) 

11.54 
(60X43,560) 

11.54 
(80X43,560) 

11.54 

TOTAL SECTOR MM-1 



SECTOR MM-2 (Central Hill) 
220 .21 

200 
180 
160 
140 
120 
100 

80 

60 

40 

20 



4,200,000 

16,000,000 

49,200,000 

69,400,000 







.49 


X 


11. 


J ' J — / 
54 




.76 
















— 


1.24 


X 


- 




100,000 


1.72 
















— 


2.17 


X 


- 




200,000 


2.62 
















— 


3.14 


X 


- 




200,000 


3.65 
















— 


5.75 


X 


- 




400,000 


7.85 
















— 


10.57 


X 


- 




800,000 


13.29 
















— 


16.01 


X 


- 




1,200,000 


18.73 
















— 


21.08 


X 


- 




1,600,000 


23.42 
















— 


26.18 


X 


- 




2,000,000 


28.93 
















— 


31.68 


X 


- 




2,400,000 


34.43 








T0TAI 


SECTOR MM-2 ■ 






8,900,000 



Plate 2.17 Newark Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.56 

Sector MM consists of the northern part of the Coyote Hills 
located in the western part of Newark. The sector contains three 
parts: MM-1 (North Hill), MM-2 (the northern half of Central 
Hill) and MM-3 (South Hill). Material in this sector is the same 
as within Sector M at the south end of the Coyote Hills: Francis- 
can Complex chert, graywacke, basalt, diabase, and serpentinite. 

Resource calculations for Sector MM are given in the tables 
below. Factors used in calculating the amount of resources in- 
cluded the following items: 

1 . Resource material is graywacke, chert, basalt, and diabase 
of the Franciscan Complex, and Jurassic serpentinite. 

2. Some of the material can be used for asphaltic concrete 
aggregate; the remainder can be used for road base or 
subbase. 



SECTOR MM-3 (South Hill) 
140 .46 



120 
100 
80 
60 

40 



2.30 
5.51 
7.81 
10.33 
12.17 

15.38 



1.38 


X 


(20X43 


560) 




100,000 






11. 


54 








3.91 


X 


" 








300,000 


6.66 


X 


" 








500,000 


9.07 


X 


- 








700,000 


11.25 


X 


- 








800,000 


13.78 


X 


TOTAL 


SECTOR 


MM-3 ■ 


■ 1,000,000 




3,400,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR MM = 
82 MILLION TONS (MIXED NON-PCC GRADES) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR MM = 
TONS 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



37 



SECTOR NN - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX SANDSTONE - 
SAN BRUNO MOUNTAIN STATE AND COUNTY PARK 

Plate 2.42 San Francisco South Quad. MRZ-2(a) Sector Plate 2.65 

Sector NN contains most of an immense deposit of sandstone, 
which lies immediately south of the City of San Francisco. There 
is one active quarry mining this deposit in the adjacent Sector 
X (Quarry Products, Inc.'s Guadalupe Quarry), one active fill- 
sand pit (Colma Sand Pit), and several inactive quarries located 
around the mountain. Reserve data is proprietary and cannot be 
presented here but is included with other company-controlled 
data in Table 2. 12. Sandstone has been quarried from San Bruno 
Mountain for P.C.C. aggregate and asphaltic concrete aggregate 
since the turn of the century (Aubury, 1906, p. 323). 

Sector NN is devided into five parcels: NN-1, NN-2, NN-3, 
NN-4, and NN-5. Resource calculations for the sector are given 
in the tables below. Factors used in calculating the resources 
included the following items: 

1 . Resource material is sandstone and shale of the Francis- 
can Complex. 

2. The sandstone is suitable for asphaltic concrete aggregate, 
and perhaps P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. There is no waste, since the shale may be suitable for 
processing into lightweight aggregate (Burnett, 1965, p. 
13). 

4. Wall slopes have a ratio of 2:1 (horizontal to vertical). 

5. Base elevations of the quarries in the five parcels is as 
follows: NN-1, 400 feet; NN-2, 400 feet; NN-3, 500 feet; 
NN-4, 300 feet; NN-5, 200 feet. 

6. A conversion factor of 12. 10 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is based on 
samples from Sector X. 

7. Base map for resource calculations is the San Francisco 
South 7.5 minute quadrangle (1968). 

8. Because Sector X must be mined before Sector NN-4 can 
be mined, resource totals calculated for Sector NN-4 in- 
clude all of the resources in Sector X. No allowance was 
made for material mined since the map was released, since 
it is insignificant in comparison to the amount of the total 
resource. 



RESOURCES - SECTOR NN 



RESOURCES - SECTOR NN (continued) 



CONTOUR 


AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 


(acres) 


FACTORS 


(To nearest 












100,000 tons) 


SECTOR NN-1 












800 


15.61 














— 71.63 


X 


(100)(43,560) 


25,800,000 


700 


127.64 






12.10 








— 155.65 


X 


.. 


56,000,000 


600 


183.66 














164 . 38 


X 


~ 


- 59,200,000 


500 


145.09 














— 121.68 


X 


. 


- 43,800,000 


400 


98.26 






TOTAL SECTOR NN-1 






- 185,000,000 



CONTOUR 


AREA 




AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


FACTORS 


(To nearest 
100,000 tons) 


SECTOR 


NN-2 
















1100 




18.37 




42.70 


X 


(100H43, 


560) 


15,400,000 


1000 




67.03 


_ 


95.96 


X 


12.10 




34,500,000 


900 




124.89 


_ 


153.82 


X 






- 55,400,000 


800 




182.74 




220.85 


X 






79,500,000 


700 




258.95 























271.35 


X 


H 




- 97,700,000 


600 




283.75 


_ 


271.81 


X 






97,900,000 


500 




259.87 


_ 


238.29 


X 






- 85,800,000 


400 




216.71 






TOTAL SECTOR 


NN-2 






- 466,200,000 


SECTOR 


NN-3 
















1000 




2.76 




8.26 


X 


(100X43, 


560) 


3,000,000 


900 




13.77 








12.10 












— 


17.91 


X 


. 




- 6,400,000 


800 




22.04 


.. 


28.01 


X 






10,100,000 


700 




33.98 





42.70 


X 






15,400,000 


600 




51.42 























73.46 


X 


.. 




26,400,000 


500 




95.50 






TOTAL SECTOR 


NN-3 






61,300,000 


SECTOR 


NN-4 
















1100 




16.53 




32.14 


X 


(100)(43, 


560) 


11,600,000 


1000 




47.75 


_ 


72.55 


X 


12.10 




26,100,000 


900 




97.34 




149.68 


X 






53,900,000 


800 




202.02 























230.03 


X 


- 




- 82,800,000 


700 




258.04 





289.72 


X 






- 104,300,000 


600 




321.40 























357.67 


X 


- 




- 128,800,000 


500 




393.94 




















— 


429.30 


X 


- 




- 154,500,000 


400 




464.65 


_ 


488.53 


X 






- 175,900,000 


300 




512.40 






TOTAL SECTOR 


NN-4 






- 737,900,000 


SECTOR 


NN-5 
















1000 




4.59 




12.40 


X 


(100)(43, 


560) 


4,500,000 


900 




20.20 








12.10 















29.85 


X 


m 




10,700,000 


800 




39.49 























48.67 


X 


- 




- 17,500,000 


700 




57.85 


_ 


68.41 


X 






24,600,000 


600 




78.97 


_ 


81.27 


X 






29,300,000 


500 




85.56 




















— 


85.40 


X 


. 




30,700,000 


400 




87.24 




















— 


88.62 


X 


- 




- 31,900,000 


300 




89.99 




















— 


89.99 


X 


- 




- 32,400,000 


200 




89.99 






TOTAL SECTOR 


NN-5 






- 181,600,000 



TOTAL RESOURCES - SECTOR NN = 
1.6 BILLION TONS (ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE GRADE) 

TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR NN = 
(PROPRIETARY DATA) 



SECTOR OO - FRANCISCAN COMPLEX 
GREENSTONE - FOOTHILLS PARK 

Plate 2.38 Mindego Hill Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.67 

Sector OO consists of the extreme western portion of the City 
of Palo Alto's Foothills Park, and is underlain by Franciscan 
Complex greenstone and metatuff, similar to material that was 
quarried for aggregate at the nearby Page Mill Quarry (presently 



38 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



inactive) . Several inactive quarries are located within this body 
of greenstone, which extends at least 10 miles to the southeast. 
The unweathered greenstone is suitable for roadbase material, 
and perhaps for asphaltic concrete aggregate and P.C.C. aggre- 
gate. Weathered greenstone and the metatuff are suitable only 
for fill material. The greenstone appears to extend east and 
southeast of the old Page Mill Quarry site. 

Resources in Sector OO are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1. The material within Sector OO is assumed to be green- 
stone of the Franciscan Complex. 

2. Greenstone is suitable for road base material and perhaps 
for asphaltic concrete aggregate and P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. There is no waste. 

4. Wall slopes would have a ratio of 2: 1 (horizontal to verti- 
cal). 

5. Minimum quarry elevation would be 600 feet. 

6. Ground water is not expected to pose a problem to min- 
ing. 

7. A conversion factor of 10.68 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used in calculating resources. This factor is derived 
from the results of density tests performed on greenstone 
samples from Sector D, and assumes that the material is 
uniform throughout the sector (the ratio of metatuff to 
greenstone is not known). 

8. Base map for calculating resources is the Mindego Hill 7.5 
minute quadrangle (1968). 



mation, and is adjacent to Sector AA (see p. 2 1 ) . See the discus- 
sion of Sector AA above for a description of the resource 
material and the deposit. 

Resources in Sector PP are given in the table below. Factors 
used in calculating resources included the following items: 

1 . All of the material within Sector PP is conglomerate of the 
Santa Clara Formation. 

2. The unweathered conglomerate is suitable for asphaltic 
concrete and perhaps P.C.C. aggregate. 

3. Overburden and waste factors are lumped together and 
are considered to amount to 10 percent of the total, due 
to the lack of test data for the deposit. 

4. Wall slopes would be approximately 2:1 (horizontal to 
vertical). 

5. Minimum elevation for the quarry floor would be 400 feet. 

6. It is assumed that the resources in Sector AA have been 
mined prior to excavation in Sector PP. 

7. Ground water is not expected to be encountered in the 
quarry. 

8. A conversion factor is 14.50 cubic feet of material per ton 
was used, due to the similarity of this material to the 
material found in the Livermore-Amador Valley. 

9. Base map for this resource sector is a 4:1 enlargement of 
the Cupertino 7.5 minute quadrangle (1973). 

RESOURCES - SECTOR PP 





RESOURCES - 


SECTOR 00 




CONTOUR 


AREA 




AVERAGE AREA 


X 


CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 














ELEVATION 


(acres) 




(acres) 


FACTORS 




(To nearest 




AREA 


AVERAGE AREA 




CONVERSION 


TONNAGE 


100,000 tons) 


CONTOUR 


















ELEVATION 


(acres) 


(acres) 


X 


FACTORS 


(To nearest 
100,000 tons) 


800 

760 


1.55 
4.71 


- 


3.13 


X 


(40X43. 560X 
14.50 


.90) 


300,000 


920 


.92 


— 1.38 


X 


(40X43,560) 
10.68 


200,000 


720 


11.31 


— 


8.01 


X 


" 




900,000 


880 


1.84 


— 11.94 


X 




1,900,000 


680 


25.14 


— 


18.23 


X 


" 




■ 2,000,000 


8A0 


22.04 


— 26.63 


X 


■ 


4,300,000 


640 


35.99 


— 


30.57 


X 


" 




• 3,300,000 


800 


31.22 


— 32.60 


X 


• 


5,300,000 


600 


47.41 


— 


41.70 


X 


- 




■ 4,500,000 


760 


33.98 


— 37.65 


X 


< 


6,100,000 


560 


57.28 


— 


52.35 


X 


" 




■ 5,700,000 


720 


41.32 


44.54 


X 


„ 


7,300,000 


520 


54.01 


— 


55.65 


X 


" 




■ 6,000,000 


680 


47.75 


— 47.75 


X 




7,800,000 


480 


48.44 


— 


51.23 


X 


" 




5,600,000 


640 


47. 75 


— 47.29 


X 




7,700,000 


440 


42.93 




45.69 


X 


" 




• 5,000,000 


600 


46.83 














— 


39.63 


X 


" 




4,300,000 










TOTAL SECTOR 00 


■ 40,600,000 


400 


36.33 








































TOTAL SECTOR 


PP 


37,600,000 




TOTAL RESOURCES 


- SECTOR OO = 










TOTAL RESOURCES 




SECTOR PP 







41 


MILLION TONS (ALL ROADBASE GRADE 


) 


38 BILLION TONS 


(ALL ASPHALTIC AGGREGATE 


GRADE) 




TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR OO = 
TONS 






TOTAL RESERVES - SECTOR PP 
TONS 





















SECTOR PP - SANTA CLARA FORMATION 
STEVENS CREEK COUNTY PARK DEPOSIT 



ESTIMATED 50-YEAR CONSUMPTION 
OF AGGREGATE 



Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle MRZ-2(b) Sector Plate 2.68 

Resource Sector PP is the portion of Stevens Creek County 
Park that is underlain by conglomerate of the Santa Clara For- 



The total projected aggregate consumption through the year 
2030 in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region is estimated 
to be 1,490 million tons. This figure was obtained by correlating 
production records and population data to compute a per capita 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



39 



consumption rate, then using this consumption rate and popula- 
tion projections to make the 50-year estimate. Comparison of the 
permitted reserves total and the estimated consumption shows 
that permitted reserves amount to only 37 percent of the future 
consumption. Based upon the per capita use rate, all existing 
aggregate reserves will be depleted by the year 1999, unless 
additional resources are permitted for mining or are imported. 

Since Portland cement concrete (P.C.C.) is a widely used 
construction material in our society, it is necessary that suitable 
aggregate be available in sufficient quantities. According to pro- 
duction statistics for the period 1953-1980, an average of 39 per 
cent of the total aggregate consumed annually in the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region was used in Portland cement concrete 
or concrete products (Table 2.13). Of this concrete aggregate, 
sand and gravel comprises 87 percent while the remainder is 
crushed stone. 

The total projected P.C.C.-grade aggregate consumption 
through the year 2030 in the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region is estimated to be 580 million tons. This is based on an 
average annual per-capita consumption rate for P.C.C.-grade 
aggregate of 2.3 tons per person per year (39% of total per capita 
consumption). As shown in Table 2.13, 313 million tons of 
permitted reserves in the region meet P.C.C. aggregate specifi- 
cations, which amounts to only 54 percent of the anticipated 
consumption. 



If all reserves suitable for use as P.C.C. aggregate are utilized 
for that purpose, P.C.C.-grade reserves will be depleted in 20 
years (2007). However, typical marketing practice in the aggre- 
gate industry shows that some of the P.C.C. production will be 
used for non-P.C.C. applications. It is probable that this practice 
will continue, and that P.C.C. reserves could be depleted in a 
shorter time period. P.C.C. reserves, because of their high quality 
requirements, will be the most difficult to replace as existing 
permitted deposits are depleted. 

It is important to realize that new P.C.C. as well as non-P.C.C. 
resources will need to come into production to meet the 50-year 
aggregate demands in this P-C Region. 

Population Records 

Population records were compiled and correlated with aggre- 
gate consumption records for the period 1953-1980 for the South 
San Francisco Bay P-C Region (Figures 2.3 and 2.4, Table 
2.15). Records of population and aggregate consumption for this 
period were compiled for two adjacent regions: North San Fran- 
cisco Bay and Monterey Bay P-C regions (Figures 2.5 - 2.9). 
Population records for the three P-C regions were compiled from 
publications of the California Department of Finance (no date, 
1969, 1977a, 1977b, 1980a, 1980b, 1981, 1982a, 1982b). Popula- 
tion projections for the years 1980-2020 were made using projec- 



Table 2. 14 Percentage of total aggregate consumption used for Portland 
cement concrete (PCC) aggregate in the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region during the period 1953-1980. 





P.C.C. 


TOTAL 


PERCENT OF TOTAL 




AGGREGATE 


AGGREGATE 


AGGREGATE CONSUMPTION 


YEAR 


CONSUMED 


CONSUMED 


USED AS P.C.C. AGGREGATE 




(Tons) 


(Tons) 




1953 


4,750,000 


10,684,000 


44.5 


1954 


4,604,000 


10,066,000 


45.7 


1955 


6,369,000 


13,343,000 


47.7 


1956 


7,421,000 


19,296,000 


38.5 


1957 


6,507,000 


14,363,000 


45.3 


1958 


6,871,000 


15,519,000 


44.3 


1959 


7,047,000 


16,066,000 


43.9 


1960 


6,004,000 


15,575,000 


38.5 


1961 


6,599,000 


16,659,000 


39.6 


1962 


6,508,000 


17,800,000 


36.6 


1963 


7,984,000 


22,250,000 


35.9 


1964 


8,350,000 


24,099,000 


34.6 


1965 


8,603,000 


25,603,000 


33.6 


1966 


8,590,000 


23,389,000 


36.7 


1967 


6,504,000 


24,645,000 


26.4 


1968 


9,932,000 


26,914,000 


36.9 


1969 


11,735,000 


30,517,000 


38.5 


1970 


10,088,000 


24,683,000 


40.9 


1971 


12,251,000 


29,615,000 


41.4 


1972 


8,719,000 


23,140,000 


37.7 


1973 


9,536,000 


24,751,000 


38.5 


1974 


10,941,000 


25,611,000 


42.7 


1975 


7,328,000 


17,684,000 


41.4 


1976 


7,996,000 


19,016,000 


42.1 


1977 


8,490,000 


19,892,000 


42.7 


1978 


6,913,000 


25,223,000 


27.4 


1979 


8,376,000 


30,428,000 


27.5 


1980 


Not Available 


21,539,000 





Average Percentage of total aggregate consumption used as P.C.C. aggregate = 38.9 X 
Percentage calculations may not replicate precisely due to rounding. 
P.C.C. = Portland cement concrete. 



40 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



tions from the State Department of Finance (1977b, 1980a, 
1981). 

Population projections for the 10 year period from 2020 to 
2030 were extrapolated by DMG staff from the data men- 
tioned above. Population projections for the South San Fran- 
cisco Bay P-C Region to the year 2030 are given on Table 2.16. 
Population projections for all three P-C regions to the year 2030 
are presented in Figure 2.10. 

Per Capita Consumption Rates 

The South San Francisco Bay P-C Region had an average per 
capita consumption rate of 6.0 tons per year during the period 
1953-1980 (Table 2.15). Due to the erratic nature of the annual 
aggregate production (see Figure 2.3), a three-year moving aver- 
age of the annual production was used with the annual popula- 
tion data to compute the per capita rates for the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region. The average per capita rate was 
combined with the population projections for the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region in order to estimate aggregate con- 
sumption for the period 1981-2030 (Table 2.17). Similar tech- 
niques were used to compute per capita rates for the North San 
Francisco Bay and Monterey Bay P-C regions, and these per 
capita rates are discussed below in the section "Aggregate Re- 
sources of Adjacent P-C Regions - Estimated Consumption of 
Aggregate." 



Factors Affecting Per Capita Consumption Rates 

Per capita consumption of aggregate has varied with time and 
is different in each P-C region. Several factors, such as changes 
in urban growth rates with time, relative degrees of urban matu- 
rity, and major construction projects (for example, freeways), 
may account for the variations and differences. Another factor 
may be possible incompleteness or inaccuracy of the production 
records compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines or of the popula- 
tion data compiled by the California Department of Finance. In 
addition, very high interest rates, such as existed in California 
during the period 1980-1982, tend to lower the amount of new 
construction in an area. 

The average annual per capita consumption rate for the South 
San Francisco Bay P-C Region may decrease, at a more or less 
steady rate, as the area becomes more urbanized until a steady 
state (urban maturity*) is reached. Should unforeseen events 
occur, such as massive urban renewal, disaster reconstruction, or 
major recession, the per capita consumption rate could change 
significantly. The presence of several major active fault systems 
within the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region increases the 
chance for a damaging earthquake and the need for subsequent 
extensive reconstruction afterwards (see Davis, and others, 1982). 



* Urban maturity is the point in the development of an area at which construction 
materials are used primarily to maintain what has already been developed rather 
than to supply further development. 



Table 2. 15 Population, aggregate consumption, and per capita consumption 
of aggregate in the South San Francisco Bay PC Region during the period 
1953-1980. 







AGGREGATE 




ANNUAL 






CONSUMPTION 


CONSUMPTION 


PER CAPITA 






(Rounded to near- 


3-YEAR 


CONSUMPTION 


YEAR 


POPULATION 


est 1000 Tons) 


AVERAGE (Tons) 


(Tons) 


1953 


2,588,500 


10,684,000 






19 5 A 


2,649,100 


10,066,000 


11,364,000 


4.3 


1955 


2,694,000 


13,343,000 


14,234,000 


5.3 


1956 


2,779,000 


19,296,000 


15,667,000 


5.6 


1957 


2,857,800 


14,363,000 


16,392,000 


5.7 


1958 


2,952,500 


15,519,000 


15,316,000 


5.2 


1959 


3,035,900 


16,066,000 


15,720,000 


5.2 


1960 


3,112,100 


15,575,000 


16,099,000 


5.2 


1961 


3,204,200 


16,659,000 


16,677,000 


5.2 


1962 


3,286,800 


17,800,000 


18,902,000 


5.8 


1963 


3,379,200 


22,250,000 


21,382,000 


6.3 


1964 


3,425,800 


24,099,000 


23,983,000 


7.0 


1965 


3,526,700 


25,603,000 


24,363,000 


6.9 


1966 


3,598,100 


23,389,000 


24,545,000 


6.8 


1967 


3,680,200 


24,645,000 


24,982,000 


6.8 


1968 


3,740,700 


26,914,000 


27,358,000 


7.3 


1969 


3,785,800 


30,517,000 


27,371,000 


7.2 


1970 


3,855,200 


24,683,000 


28,271,000 


7.3 


1971 


3,903,100 


29,615,000 


25,812,000 


6.6 


1972 


3,933,200 


23,140,000 


25,835,000 


6.6 


1973 


3,960,200 


24,751,000 


24,500,000 


6.2 


197A 


3,984,600 


25,611,000 


22,681,000 


5.7 


1975 


4,022,400 


17,684,000 


20,769,000 


5.2 


1976 


4,057,500 


19,016,000 


18,863,000 


4.6 


1977 


4,088,600 


19,892,000 


21,376,000 


5.2 


1978 


4,122,300 


25,223,000 


25,181,000 


6.1 


1979 


4,165,200 


30,428,000 


25,730,000 


6.2 


1980 


4,190,200 


21,539,000 







Average annual per capita aggregate consumption 1954-1979 = 6.0 tons. 
Percentage calculations may not replicate precisely due to rounding. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



41 



35 



30 



25 



10 

2 20 

_l 
_l 



15 











































































































































































































































































































































































AGGREGATE CONSUMPTION 
. (TONS) , 
































































































































































































' 


■ •£ 


























































































































































































POP 


ULAT 


ION 
























































































1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 

Figure 2.3 South San Francisco Bay P-C Region: population and aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80. 



1974 



1976 



1978 



1980 



35 


















































































































30 


















































































































?*S 


















































































/■ 


rOTA 
SGRE 


L 
GATE 


: COI 


MSUM 


PTIC 
























20 
























' A 


N 














































































15 


























































































/ 


v 


/ 


v 




















































/ 


\ 


/ 


\ 


/ 




















10 












*^SA 


W I 


iND < 


5RAV 


;l 




















\ 


/ 
















5 




































































SI 


ONE 












































n 



























































1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 

Figure 2.4 South San Francisco Bay P-C Region: sand and gravel, stone, and total aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80. 



1978 



1980 



42 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Z 

? 4 

























































































































































































































































/ 


p ---> 






















































\t_ 




\ 




















































' AGGREGATE CONSUMPTION 
(TONS) 


























































































































































































































































































































































































































































POP 


ULAT 


ION 





























1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 1978 1981 

Figure 2.5 North San Francisco Bay P-C Region: population and aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80. 



7 














1 




































































































6 


















































































































5 
























A 


•^-n 






































i 
















V- 




\ 






























z 








/ 












TOT/! 




f 


































t- 

u. 4 
o 
to 


L A( 


3GREGATE CONSUMPTION 










/ 














































o 

5 








/ 
























































// 




















EL 
































SAND / 


,ND GR6\ 






2 






\ 


/ 








































































STO 


*JE* 






















































































































































n 



























































1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 1978 1980 

Figure 2.6 North San Francisco Bay P-C Region: sand and gravel, stone, and total aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



43 



7 




















































































































6 


















































































































5 


















































































































z 

2 4 
_i 


















































































































2 
3 


















AC 


GREG 


ATE CONSUMPTION 
(TONS) 






















































































2 






































































































































































































































o 


























POPU 


LATI 


DN 





























1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 

Figure 2.7 Monterey Bay P-C Region: population and aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80. 



1972 



1974 



1976 



1978 



1980 



7 


















































































































6 


















































































































5 

w 

z 
o 

t- 

u- 4 

o 
in 

z 
o 
_l 
d 3 

2 


















































































































































































































































T( 


)TAL 


AGGF 


EGAT 


E CO 


MSUrv 


PTIO 


N * 


















































































2 




















































































STO 


NE 


































































/s/ 


^ND i 


\ND C 


RAVE 


:l 






































































o 



























































1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 

Figure 2.8 Monterey Bay P-C Region: sand and gravel, stone, and total aggregate consumption records for years 1953-80. 



1976 



1978 



1980 



44 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 













































NORTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY 












































P-C REGION 










































SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY 


12 




P-C REGION 


















s^ 




















MONTEREY BAY P-C REGION 


10 

z 
o 
















1 
i 


s 


\ 


N»^ 


















































1 
1 














\ 




























or 

UJ 

Q- 8 














\ ' 


1 y 














•^ 


V 








/ 


^ 


\ 
\ 








V 




































-*■" 


-V 


»—*"*' 




£** 




\ 


-^^J 




£-~ 


y 






or 

UJ 




§6 

l- 














1 
1 








• 
• 


+ 
+ 










\ 


— 


A 


*»^ 




















/ 


»" 





'^ 


1 






.*'" 


' 
























*^^ 

^ 






* 
* 






4 












/ 




































*^ 


X 












/ 





X*" 
















































2 


















































































































n 



























































1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 1978 1980 

Figure 2.9 Annual per capita consumption of aggregate in the South San Francisco Bay, North San Francisco Bay, and Monterey Bay P-C regions for years 
1954-1979. 




1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 



Figure 2.10 Projected populations of the South San Francisco Bay, North San Francisco Bay, and Monterey Bay P-C regions to the year 2030. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



45 



Table 2. 16 Population projections for Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo, and northern Santa Clara counties, 
1980 - 2030. 















NORTHERN 




YEAR 


ALAMEDA 


CONTRA COSTA 


SAN FRANCISCO 


SAN MATEO 


SANTA CLARA* 


TOTAL 


1980 


1,105,400 




660,900 


678,000 


588,900 


1,157,000 


4,190,200 


1985 


1,125,200 




732,400 


667,500 


609,900 


1,247,300 


4,38 2,300 


1990 


1,152,900 




799,800 


660,200 


630,800 


1 , 3 3 7 , 000 


4,580,700 


1995 


1,183,800 




645,400 


661,100 


646,000 


1,423,000 


4,759,300 


2000 


1,208,800 




881,300 


662,500 


651,500 


1 , 4 9 3 , 300 


4,897,400 


2005 


1,229,800 




911,900 


667,500 


652,000 


1,555,600 


5,016,800 


2010 


1,249,100 




943,100 


676,000 


651,800 


1,617, 700 


5,137,700 


2015 


1,266,600 




976,100 


685,400 


651,700 


1,682,500 


5,262,300 


2020 


1,280,200 


1 


,007,100 


694,100 


649,700 


1,74 5,700 


5 , 3 7 6 . 800 


2025 


1,293,800 


1 


,038,100 


702,800 


647,700 


1,761,200 


5,443,600 


2030 


1,307,400 


1 


,069,100 


711,500 


645,700 


1,776,700 


5,510,400 



♦Northern Santa Clara County is assumed to constitute 89% of Santa Clara County's 
total projected population. 

Source: California Department of Finance (1977b, 1981a). 

Population projected by DMG from data in California Department of Finance (Ibid) 
for years 1995 through 2030, inclusive. 



Table 2. 17 Projected aggregate consumption * for the 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, 1981 - 2030. + 

(Rounded to Nearest 100,000 Tons) 



Period 



1981-1985 
1986-1990 
1991-1995 
1996-2000 
2001-2005 
2006-2010 
2011-2015 
2016-2020 
2021-2025 
2026-2030 



6.0 Tons 
(Average) 
Per Capita 



128,200,000 
134,100,000 
139,700,000 
144,400,000 
148,300,000 
151,900,000 
155,600,000 
159,100,000 
162,600,000 
166,000,000 



50-Year Total 1,489,800,000 

•Aggregate consumption (tons) - 
Population (5-year average) z 5 year per capita consumption 

^Projections based on data in Tables 2.15 and 2.16. 



46 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



ALTERNATIVE SOURCES 
OF AGGREGATE 



Introduction 



Alternative sources of aggregate, in addition to those deposits 
classified MRZ-2 and MRZ-3, occur in areas within the South 
San Francisco Bay P-C Region, and in adjacent P-C regions. 
Some potential resources lie outside the OPR urbanizing bound- 
aries, but still within the P-C region boundaries. Included within 
the group of potential resources are the extensions of several 
deposits classified MRZ-2 or MRZ-3. In addition, sand and fine 
gravel occur in bars on the floor of San Francisco Bay, between 
the Golden Gate Bar and the confluence of the Sacramento and 
San Joaquin rivers. Except for the aggregate resources in adja- 
cent P-C regions and marine sand deposits, too little is known 
about the physical and chemical qualities of most of the alterna- 
tive sources to permit even crude resource estimates. A general 
discussion about the potential resources and their occurrences is 
included in this section. 



Additional Sand And Gravel Resources 
San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



South 



Several additional sources of sand and gravel occur within the 
South San Francisco Bay P-C Region. One such potential source 
in Alameda County is the geologic unit known as the Livermore 
Gravels. This formation has a stratigraphic thickness of 4,000 
feet, covers an estimated 75 square miles of area, and underlies 
the hills on the east and west sides of Sunol Valley (Hall, 1958; 
Huey, 1948). The Livermore Gravels exposed in the vicinity of 
Vallecitos Valley contain sand, gravel, and partially cemented 
conglomerate. Near Mission San Jose, a lithologically similar 
formation, the Irvington Gravels, has been mined for Portland 
cement concrete aggregate, and is classified MRZ-2 and MRZ-3 
in this report. Detailed mapping and sampling of the Livermore 
Gravels would be needed to delineate areas with suitable materi- 
al in commercial quantities. 

Another potential source in the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region (also just outside the OPR urbanizing boundaries) is the 
Santa Clara Formation. This formation has a stratigraphic thick- 
ness of more than 2,000 feet, and consists of conglomerate and 
interbedded sandstone, siltstone, and clay (Dibblee, 1966). The 
Santa Clara Formation extends along the lower foothills on both 
sides (east and west) of Santa Clara Valley. Little information 
is available about the quantity and quality of the sand and gravel 
in the Santa Clara Formation on the east side of Santa Clara 
Valley, since it has not been quarried there. The Santa Clara 
Formation on the west side of Santa Clara Valley extends in a 
northwest direction from near Los Gatos to Palo Alto. Sand and 
gravel have been recovered from the conglomerate at several 
sites near Monte Vista and Stevens Creek Reservoir. The Santa 
Clara Formation in this area has been classified MRZ-2 and 
MRZ-3. However, the Santa Clara Formation extends for some 
distance beyond the OPR urbanizing boundary where it has not 
been classified. One active quarry (Stevens Creek Quarry) lies 
inside the OPR boundary. The conglomerate occurs in discon- 
tinuous lenses or beds throughout the formation and, therefore, 
detailed mapping and sampling will be required to find suitable 
material. 



DEEP SAND AND GRAVEL DEPOSITS WITHIN THE LIVER- 
MORE VALLEY-SUNOL VALLEY-NILES CONE PRODUC- 
TION DISTRICT 

One of the most geologically promising alternative sources of 
high quality (P.C.C.-grade) sand and gravel occurs in the Liver- 
more Valley - Sunol Valley - Niles Cone Production District, 
below the current maximum permitted mining depth of existing 
gravel pits. The few deep water-well records available show lo- 
cally continuous deposits of sand and gravel to depths of more 
than 700 feet in the Livermore Valley, more than 400 feet in 
Sunol Valley, and more than 500 feet in the Niles Cone. The 
present level of available data is adequate only to classify these 
lower aquifers as MRZ-3 without additional drilling and testing. 

Before these deep deposits could be considered as resources, 
the thickness and continuity of interbedded aquicludes would 
require study, and the quality of the lower sand and gravel would 
need to be tested. However, since all materials in the several 
aquifers were derived from the same source rocks, and all of the 
deposits in the district are of approximately the same age, it is 
likely that rock quality would be high throughout the deposits. 

Pit depths down to 100 feet below the local water table are 
feasible with today's mining technology. Utilization of these 
deep alternative resources would require care to preserve present 
ground water quality, but would maximize recovery of valuable 
mineral resources in the P-C region. 

Additional Crushed Stone Resources - South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region 

The Mindego Hill Basalt, which underlies parts of Mindego 
Hill and Langley Hill in San Mateo County, is currently being 
quarried for aggregate. Expanded operations could supply 
material needed when other nearby quarries cease operations. 
Cretaceous granodiorite forms the bulk of Montara Mountain, 
which overlooks Half Moon Bay. Although much of the exposed 
material is weathered, the western slope of the mountain may be 
suitable for quarrying, and operations there could provide sub- 
stantial quantities of crushed stone. Large deposits of Franciscan 
Complex graywacke and greenstone occur in the mountains 
south of Los Gatos and east of San Jose, in Santa Clara County. 
Both areas are accessible by highways. 

Portions of the Niles Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) in the 
vicinity of Niles and Sunol (Alameda County) contain very hard 
sandstones. Sandstone of the Briones Formation has been quar- 
ried at a number of sites between San Jose and Antioch. Howev- 
er, because of the variation in hardness and silt content between 
sites, detailed field mapping and testing will be necessary to 
delineate areas where suitable material exists. 

The Calera Limestone, which is associated with rocks of the 
Franciscan Complex, occurs as a discontinuous zone of lime- 
stone bodies extending southeasterly from Calera Valley (Pacifi- 
ca) in San Mateo County, through western Santa Clara County 
to New Almaden. Individual masses of limestone are as much as 
a mile in length and range from 40 feet to 2,500 feet in width. 
The largest known body of limestone occurs at Permanente in 
Santa Clara County, where the Kaiser Cement Company oper- 
ates a large quarry to obtain limestone for the Permanente ce- 
ment plant. Limestone unsuitable for the manufacture of cement 
is crushed and used for Portland cement concrete aggregate. A 
large tonnage of rock suitable for aggregate is still available at 
the Permanente Quarry. Several inactive quarries are located in 
the Calera Limestone between Pacifica and New Almaden, and 
limestone suitable for aggregate may be present. According to 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



47 



Kupferman (1980, p. 112) development of the individual depos- 
its would probably be limited to aggregate quarries "due to the 
limited extent of each mass and the dispersion of chert interbeds 
throughout the limestone." 

Marine Sand and Gravel Deposits of the San 
Francisco Bay Area 

Sand and some gravel have been dredged from San Francisco 
Bay for many years. According to Goldman (1969, p. 22), sand 
occurs in or immediately adjacent to existing current channels 
at a number of places between the confluence of the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin rivers and the western edge of the Golden Gate 
Bar. The largest area of sand is on the bay floor, between Point 
San Quentin and the City of San Francisco, but deep water 
precludes dredging from much of this area. The largest potential 
source of sand outside of the Golden Gate is on the semicircular 
Golden Gate Bar. The general distribution of sand and gravel is 
shown on Figure 2.11. Other sand deposits that lie beneath a 
cover of younger bay mud have been dredged as sources of fill. 
The bulk of this sand is on the east side of San Francisco Bay 
between Point Richmond and Bay Farm Island. This sand lens 
is cut in several places by mud-filled channels and may extend 
southward beyond Bay Farm Island (Ibid, p. 33). In general, the 
areas from which sand is being excavated are operated under 
lease from the State Lands Commission, and are the shoal areas: 
Point Knox Shoal, southwest of Angel Island; Presidio and Alca- 
traz shoals, west and southwest of Alcatraz; Southampton 
Shoal, southwest of Point Richmond; and San Bruno Shoal, east 
of San Bruno. In 1971 and 1972, E.E. Welday and J.W. Williams 
of the California Division of Mines and Geology made a geologic 
reconnaissance of the marine mineral resources of the San Fran- 
cisco Bay region. Over 400 samples were collected, and samples 
that appeared to be of economic importance were analyzed. 
Welday (1975, p. 23) estimates that nearly one-half billion cubic 
yards of sand (predominantly medium-grained but with a sig- 
nificant coarse-grained fraction) is accessible to currently oper- 
ating dredges. If dredging is possible at depths to 100 feet, this 
tonnage could be increased at least 50 percent. The most valuable 
deposit is the Point Knox Shoal, as it contains abundant coarse 
material. This deposit is currently being dredged for P.C.C. sand. 
An estimate of the offshore sand resources of the San Francisco 
Bay area is presented in Table 2.18. 



AGGREGATE RESOURCES OF 
ADJACENT P-C REGIONS 

If additional aggregate is needed in the South San Francisco 
Bay P-C Region on a short-term basis, the most readily available 
material is located in the neighboring regions - North San Fran- 
cisco Bay, Monterey Bay, and Sacramento-Fairfield P-C regions. 
On a short-term basis the active quarries in these three P-C 
regions can send large amounts of aggregate into the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region, but the delivered price per ton would 
be greatly increased by inflated transportation costs and by any 
supply-demand conflicts (see Tables 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 in Part I 
of this report). The long-term (50 year) resource picture is more 
uncertain. As described in greater detail below, the North San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region is projected to have a deficit of aggre- 
gate or P.C.C.-grade aggregate, while the Monterey Bay P-C 
Region appears to have a surplus of material. Projected aggre- 
gate needs and available supplies in the Sacramento-Fairfield 
P-C Region are currently under study. 



Resource Estimates 

Resource estimates given in this report (Part II) for P-C 
regions near or adjacent to the South San Francisco Bay P-C 
Region represent data taken from Parts III and IV of this study. 
The North San Francisco Bay P-C Region has approximately 2.4 
billion tons of aggregate in its resource sectors (908 million tons 
of sand and gravel, and 1 ,449 million tons of stone) . At the end 
of 1980, commercial deposits within the P-C region contained 
108 million tons of sand and gravel reserves and 432 million tons 
of crushed stone reserves, for a total of 540 million tons. The 
Monterey Bay P-C Region has approximately 3.1 billion tons of 
aggregate within its resource sectors (more than 7 1 5 million tons 
of sand and gravel and more than 2,366 million tons of stone). 
At the end of 1980, commercially controlled deposits within the 
P-C region contained 195 million tons of sand and gravel re- 
serves and 591 million tons of stone reserves, for a total of 786 
million tons. Tables 2.19 and 2.20 list the resource sectors, avail- 
able tonnages, and commercial reserves for the North San Fran- 
cisco Bay and Monterey Bay P-C regions. 

Estimated Consumption of Aggregate 

Estimated 50-year aggregate consumption for nearby P-C re- 
gions is presented in Table 2.21. At the projected level of con- 
sumption (8.8 tons per person annually; 478 million tons over 
50 years), the North San Francisco Bay P-C Regions's reserves 
will be depleted in 49 years (2036). Thus, if the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region relies on these neighboring reserves, 
the projected North San Francisco Bay P-C Region P.C.C.- 
grade aggregate shortfall will occur much sooner. In contrast, 
the Monterey Bay P-C Region is projected to have a surplus of 
aggregate available for its 50-year needs. Based on an average 
annual per capita consumption of 7.7 tons, approximately 374 
million tons will be needed during the next 50 years, and 786 
million tons were available at the end of 1980. Sand and crushed 
stone are currently imported into the South San Francisco Bay 
P-C Region from the Monterey Bay P-C Region. This arrange- 
ment will undoubtedly continue under present economic condi- 
tions. 

Potential Aggregate Resources 
Outside of OPR Boundaries 

Several geologic units, which have not been classified as part 
of this overall study because they are located outside the OPR 
zones in the Monterey Bay or North San Francisco Bay P-C 
regions, may become sources of aggregate in the future. These 
units contain stone or sand or gravel; they appear to be suitable 
for aggregate, based on written descriptions in geological reports 
and limited field examinations. 

SAND AND GRAVEL 

The San Benito Gravels are a group of Plio-Pleistocene conti- 
nental deposits located south of Hollister (in San Benito County, 
Monterey Bay P-C Region). Although the gravels are not 
known to have been quarried, outcrops along Paicines Creek 
contain gravel that appears suitable. The following data are tak- 
en from Griffen (1967) . The unit covers an area of approximate- 
ly 1 50 square miles, and has a stratigraphic thickness of at least 
2,000 feet. The main body forms a northwest-trending belt two 
to five miles wide. The portion of the San Benito Gravels that 
appears suitable for aggregate is the "white sands" section, 



48 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 




5 km 



Figure 2.11 
dor pattern. 



Marine sand and gravel deposits in San Francisco Bay and Sacramento River— Delta (after E.E. Welday, 1 975). Known aggregate deposits are shown by 



which extends southeast from Tres Pinos to within a mile of 
Elkhorn Ranch, and is largely confined to the hills between Tres 
Pinos Creek and the San Benito River. The "white sands" sec- 
tion of the gravels covers over 20 square miles and has a max- 
imum stratigraphic thickness of at least 800 feet. Gravel forms 
20 to 25 percent of the "white sands" section, silt and clay form 
about 5 percent, and the remaining 70 to 75 percent is sand. 
A basal section at Tres Pinos contains approximately 30 feet of 
massive silt. Detailed mapping and sampling will be needed to 
locate suitable sites for quarry operations. 

CRUSHED STONE 

In the North San Francisco Bay P-C Region, basalt, andesite, 
and rhyolite of the Sonoma Volcanics, graywacke and green- 



stone of the Franciscan Complex, and Cretaceous conglomerate 
appear suitable for aggregate. Several deposits have been quar- 
ried for aggregate, building stone, or paving blocks. A reconnais- 
sance study of potential stone sites was undertaken in 1979 by 
R. Erickson and three assistants for the Sonoma County Plan- 
ning Department. Numerous deposits of sandstone, greenstone, 
and basalt were identified in the resultant report (Erickson and 
others, unpublished). Some of these deposits may be quarried in 
the future. Detailed geologic mapping and sampling will be need- 
ed to identify those deposits that contain sufficient material for 
economic operations. 

An enormous body of granite forms the northern portion of 
the Gabilan Range along the Monterey-San Benito County 
boundary (Monterey Bay P-C Region). The granite covers an 
area of approximately 12 townships (approximately 400 square 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



49 



Table 2. 18 Marine sand resources of the San Francisco Bay area. Data from 
Welday (1975, p. 24) . Numbers in parentheses are the equivalent tonnage 
at 1.5 tons per cubic yard. 



LOCATION 



VOLUME 
Million Cubic Yards 
(Million Tons) 



TOTAL 
Million Cubic Yards 
(Million Tons) 



Vicinity of Rio Vista 
to Antioch 

Steamboat Slough, 
Sacramento River 

Threemile Slough to Antioch 

Antioch to Benlcia 

Antioch to Chipps Island 
Chipps Island to Ryer Island 
Ryer Island to Benicia 

Benlcia to Angel Island 

Channel of San Pablo Bay and 
San Pablo Strait 

Channel Vicinity of 
Southampton 

Angel Island to the Golden Gate 

Point Knox Shoal 

Presidio Shoal 

San Francisco Bar (Inner) 



Tomales Bay 



15 
(22.5) 






40 
(60) 




55 
(82.5) 


40 
(60) 

40 
(60) 

50 
(75) 




130 
(195) 


20 
(30) 






20 
(30) 




40 
(60) 


25 (max. 
(37.5) 


depth 75 ft 


) 


30 
(45) 




55 
(82.5) 



165 (max. depth 75 ft.) 165 
(247.5) (247.5) 

(350 8 max. depth 100 ft.) 
(525) 



35 
(52.5) 



35 
(52.5) 



Total 480 
(720) 



Table 2. 1 9 Reserves and resources within sectors in the North San Francisco 
Bay PC Region. The reserves (calculated through 1980) are material that 
commercial aggregate companies control, and for which the companies 
have valid mining permits. Resources include the reserves and any other 
material within the sector. 



COUNTY 



SECTOR 



SAND AND GRAVEL 
AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



Marin D 

I 
J 
L 
M 

Marin Subtotal 



29 



29 



* Proprietary data 

# Includes combined proprietary data 



CRUSHED STONE 
AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



8+ 



(continued on next page) 



50 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



Table 2.19 Reserves and resources within sectors in the North San Francisco 
Bay P-C Region. The reserves (calculated through 1980) are material that 
commercial aggregate companies control, and for which the companies 
have valid mining permits. Resources include the reserves and any other 
material within the sector, (continued) 



SAND AND GRAVEL CRUSHED STONE 
AMOUNT AMOUNT 

COUNTY SECTOR (millions of tons) (millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources Reserves Resources 

MARIN (continued) 

Parklands V 31 

Parklands Subtotal 31 

MARIN COUNTY TOTAL 29 * 39+ 



Western G * 413 

Solano 



SOLANO COUNTY TOTAL * 413 



Napa H * 641 



NAPA COUNTY TOTAL 






* 


641 


Sonoma A 


* 


449 






B 


* 


405 






C 


* 


25 






E 






* 


* 


F 






* 


* 


K 






* 


151 


N 






* 


* 









• 


* 


P 






* 


* 


Q 






* 


* 


R 






* 


* 


S 






* 


* 


T 


* 


* 


* 


* 


U 


* 


* 






W 






* 


* 


X 






» 


* 


Y 






* 


* 


SONOMA COUNTY TOTAL 


108* 


879+ 


1800 


330# 


P-C REGION TOTAL 


108 1 


908+ 


432# 


1,449# 



TOTAL RESERVES IN NORTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY P-C REGION = 540 MILLION TONS 
TOTAL RESOURCES IN NORTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY P-C REGION = 2.4 BILLION TONS 



* Proprietary data 

9 Includes combined proprietary data 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



51 



Table 2.20 Reserves and resources within sectors in the Monterey Bay P-C Region. The 
reserves (calculated through 1980) are material that commercial aggregate companies 
control, and for which the companies have valid mining permits. Resources include the 
reserves and any other material within the sector. 



SAND AND GRAVEL 



CRUSHED STONE 



COUNTY 



SECTOR 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



Reserves Resources 



Monterey 



43+ 
208 



31 



Monterey Subtotal 



254+ 



31+ 



Parklands 



20 
4 



Parklands Subtotal 



24 



MONTEREY COUNTY TOTAL 



278+ 



31+ 



San Benito 



226 



395 



SAN BENITO 
COUNTY TOTAL 



226 



395 



Santa A 

Cruz B 

C 

L 

M 

Santa Cruz Subtotal 



1,004 



1,004+ 



Parklands 



Parklands Subtotal 



381 
555 

936 



SANTA CRUZ 
COUNTY TOTAL 



1,940+ 



* Proprietary data 

# Includes combined proprietary data 



52 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Table 2.20 Reserves and resources within sectors in the Monterey Bay P-C Region. The 
reserves (calculated through 1980) are material that commercial aggregate companies 
control, and for which the companies have valid mining permits. Resources include the 
reserves and any other material within the sector, (continued) 



SAND AND GRAVEL 



CRUSHED STONE 



COUNTY 



SECTOR 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



AMOUNT 
(millions of tons) 



Reserves Resources 



Southern 

Santa 

Clara 



25 
21 



SANTA CLARA 
COUNTY TOTAL 



46 



P-C REGION TOTAL 



195# 



715# 



591# 



2,366+ 



TOTAL RESERVES IN MONTEREY BAY P-C REGION = 786 MILLION TONS 
TOTAL RESOURCES IN MONTEREY BAY P-C REGION = 3.1 BILLION TONS 



* Proprietary data 

# Includes combined proprietary data 



Table 2.21 Projected aggregate consumption to the year 2030 for the South San 
Francisco Bay, North San Francisco Bay, and Monterey Bay P-C regions. 





SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 
BAY P-C REGION 


NORTH SAN FRANCISCO 
BAY P-C REGION 


MONTEREY BAY 
P-C REGION 




5 yr per capita consump- 
tion ■ 30.0 tons/person 


5 yr per capita consump- 
tion ■ 44.0 tons/person 


5 yr per capita consump- 
tion - 38.5 tons/person 


YEARS 


Average 
Population 
(millions) 


Aggregate 

Consumption 

(million tons) 


Average 
Population 
(millions) 


Aggregate 
Consumption 
(million tons) 


Average Aggregate 
Population Consumption 
(millions) (million tons) 


1981-1985 


4.38 


128.2 


.792 


33.2 


.704 26.1 


1986-1990 


4.58 


134.1 


.860 


36.4 


.760 28.2 


1991-1995 


4.76 


139.7 


.940 


39.4 


.830 30.6 


1996-2000 


4.90 


144.4 


1.015 


43.1 


.848 33.3 


2001-2005 


5.02 


148.3 


1.087 


46.3 


.967 35.9 


2006-2010 


5.14 


151.9 


1.161 


49.5 


1.039 38.6 


2011-2015 


5.26 


155.6 


1.234 


52.8 


1.110 41.4 


2016-2020 


5.38 


159.1 


1.303 


55.9 


1.177 44.1 


2021-2025 


5.50 


162.6 


1.373 


59.0 


1.243 46.6 


2026-2030 


5.61 


166.0 


1.442 


62.0 


1.310 49.2 


Total 


1,489.8 


478.0 


374.0 



* Aggregate consumption ■ Population (5-year average) x 5 year per capita consumption. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



53 



miles). The Southern Pacific Railroad traverses the Salinas Val- 
ley, which lies on the west side of the Gabilan Range. Large 
amounts of aggregate could be supplied by rail from this granite 
to nearby P-C regions. Similar material also is available in the 
Santa Lucia Range (Monterey County), but access is difficult. 
In Santa Cruz County, a large granite pluton near Felton and a 
smaller body north of Soquel are quarried for aggregate. Creta- 
ceous sandstone deposits along the east side of the Santa Clara 
Valley in the Monterey Bay P-C Region may contain suitable 
material, but have not been tested (Rogers and Williams, 1974, 
Plate 1). 



PERMIT EXPANSION OF EXISTING GRAVEL PITS AND 
QUARRIES 

Over one-fourth of the sectors in the P-C Region contain both 
permitted reserves and non-permitted resources. Permitted re- 
serves are often much less than the total resources within a 
sector. The amount of deep sand and gravel resources within the 
Livermore Valley-Sunol Valley-Niles Cone Production District, 
for example, could quite possibly be as great or greater than the 
calculated amount of resources within the upper aquifers. Min- 
ing of these deep resources would require care to preserve 
present groundwater quality but would maximize recovery of the 
valuable P.CC-grade resources within the P-C Region. 



CONCLUSIONS 

Within the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, 42 sectors 
have been identified that contain a total of 6.3 billion tons of 
aggregate resources (1.1 billion tons of sand and gravel resources 
and 5.2 billion tons of crushed stone resources). This resource 
total includes material suitable for Portland cement concrete and 
material suitable only for asphaltic concrete, road base, or sub- 
base. 

Based upon available production data and population projec- 
tions, the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region will need 1.5 
billion tons of aggregate during the next 50 years. Of this project- 
ed demand, 39 percent (approximately 580 million tons) must 
be suitable for Portland cement concrete. At the end of 1980, 
approximately 552 million tons of aggregate reserves existed 
within the P-C region, of which 313 million tons were suitable 
for use as P.C.C aggregate. Total aggregate reserves amount to 
about 37 percent of the projected demand, and P.CC-grade 
reserves amount to 54 percent of the projected P.C.C aggregate 
demand. Unless new resources are permitted for mining, or alter- 
native resources are utilized, existing reserves will be depleted by 
the year 1999, only 12 years from the publication of this report, 
and P.CC-grade material will have been utilized where lower 
quality aggregate would have been adequate. If a major earth- 
quake were to occur within the P-C region and extensive recon- 
struction was necessary, the depletion date could arrive in less 
than the projected 12 years. 



Alternatives 

The South San Francisco Bay P-C Region has five alternatives 
to cope with the projected deficiency of both total aggregate and 
P.CC-grade aggregate. Other alternatives are essentially combi- 
nations of the five discussed here. 

1. Permit expansion of existing gravel pits and quarries if 
additional resources exist within sectors containing active 
operations. 

2. Permit mining in previously unmined sectors. 

3. Encourage exploration and where feasible, development 
of deposits within areas classifed MRZ-3 or deposits out- 
side of the OPR areas. 

4. Rely upon imports of aggregate from outside of the P-C 

region. 



PERMIT MINING IN PREVIOUSLY UNMINED SECTORS 

Permitting mining within the previously unmined sectors 
would make available more than a billion tons of aggregate, 
including P.CC-grade aggregate. Because of the large volume 
of resources within these sectors, systematic long-range planning 
and development for the entire P-C Region would be possible. 

ENCOURAGE EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF 
MRZ-3 DEPOSITS 

Several deposits classified as MRZ-3 within the South San 
Francisco Bay P-C Region are good potential sources of aggre- 
gate. Other deposits lie outside of the OPR zone and were not 
classified (marine sand and gravel deposits) but may contain 
suitable material. In any of these deposits, a detailed exploration 
and testing program would be necessary to determine quality 
and extent of the aggregate deposit. The extraction of aggregate 
from MRZ-3 areas could provide an alternative to mining in 
designated areas that are deemed by lead agencies to be more 
suitable for purposes other than mining. 

RELY UPON IMPORTS OF AGGREGATE FROM OUTSIDE 
OF THE P-C REGION 

This approach, in the long run, would probably be the most 
expensive to the people living in the South San Francisco Bay 
P-C Region. When the reserves within this P-C Region are dep- 
leted, consumers would have to rely on outside imports. Supply- 
and-demand economics dictate that the price of scarce com- 
modities will probably rise. Aggregate should be no exception. 
Transportation costs would increase as haulage distances in- 
crease, and these higher costs would be borne directly or in- 
directly by all consumers within the P-C Region. 

Adverse environmental impacts would accompany this alter- 
native. These include increased air emissions and fuel consump- 
tion by haul vehicles, and increased wear to local highways and 
rail lines. 

While reliance on outside imports could alleviate any short- 
term deficit in the South San Francisco Bay P-C Region, adja- 
cent P-C regions cannot provide an unlimited supply of aggre- 
gate over the long term. Only the Monterey Bay P-C Region 
contains reserves in excess of its own 50-year needs, but this 
excess is insufficient to balance the shortfall in the South Bay. 
A long-term solution other than the import alternative is clearly 
needed. 

ENCOURAGE THE USE OF RECYCLED AGGREGATE 
MATERIALS 



5. Encourage the use of recycled aggregate materials. 



At present, some recycling of aggregate products does occur. 



54 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



Asphaltic concrete and Portland cement concrete are crushed 
and used for road base, subbase, and fill. Specifications for 
P.C.C. aggregate, however, do not allow the use of recycled 
aggregate materials. Recycling of aggregate should obviously be 
encouraged to lessen demands on limited natural resources. 
However, the low output of recycled aggregate cannot be expect- 
ed to make a significant impact on the almost one-billion ton 
deficit in the foreseeable future. Other alternatives will be neces- 
sary. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The California Department of Conservation's Division of 
Mines and Geology gratefully acknowledges the full cooperation 
of local government agencies and the aggregate producers called 
upon for information during the course of this study. Special 
thanks are extended to the Association of Bay Area Govern- 
ments, the planning departments of Alameda, Contra Costa, San 
Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara counties, East Bay Re- 
gional Park District, the California Department of Water Re- 
sources, and the California Department of Parks and Recreation. 
The Pacific Gas and Electric Company supplied maps of its 
natural gas and electric power distribution networks. 



Frederick C. Kruger, Mining and Economic Geologist, was 
retained as a consultant to review the methods and results of the 
study. Dr. Kruger's valuable commentary and suggestions were 
instrumental in completing this report. 

Many DMG personnel assisted the authors in completing 
this report. Ralph C. Loyd, Associate Geologist, helped prepare 
50-year population projections for the three P-C regions. Ed- 
ward J. Bortugno, Russell V. Miller, and E. Leivas, Associate 
Geologists, assisted with compilation of geologic maps and clas- 
sification work. Michael A. Silva, Geologic Aid, assisted with 
resource calculations in Alameda County. Typing and clerical 
support was supplied by Marianne Roja, Delores Abraham, Che- 
ryl Zeh, Fe Lozaro, Marchella Porche, Marilynn Hicks, Renita 
Stone, Solita Religiose Laura Gasner, and Darren White. Draft- 
ing was done by Richard Moar, Donald Anderson, Francis Rub- 
ish, Eleanor Taylor, Janet Smith , Jeffrey Tambert, Louise 
Huckaby, Edward Foster, and Anna Stratton.Word processing 
support was provided by the Department's Word Processing 
Center under the supervision of Debra Jackson. 

Guidance throughout the course of the study was provided by 
James F. Davis, Rudolph G. Strand, Paul K. Morton, and David 
J. Beeby. 



REFERENCES CITED 

OR USED IN 

GEOLOGIC COMPILATION 



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Association of Bay Area Governments, 1974, projections of the region's 
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Bonilla, M.G., 1971, Preliminary geologic map of the San Francisco South 
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Burnett, J.L., 1965, Expansible shale resources of the San Jose-Gilroy area, 
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California Department of Finance, 1980a, Interim population projections, 
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80 P-l. 3 p. 

California Department of Finance, 1980b, Population estimates of California 
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California Department of Finance, 1 98 1 , Interim total population projections, 
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California Department of Finance, 1982a, Preliminary intercensal estimates 
of the population of California State and counties: 1970-1980: Popula- 
tion Research Unit Report I 70-80, 2 p. 

California Department of Finance, 1982b, Population estimates for California 
counties- July 1, 1980 and July 1, 1981: Population Research Unit Report 

81 E-2, 3 p. 

California Division of Mines and Geology, 1983, California surface mining 
and reclamation policies and procedures: Special Publication 51, Second 
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Castello, W.O., and Huguenin, E., 1920, Alameda County: California State 
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Chesterman, C.W., and Manson, M.W., Aggregate in the San Francisco Bay 
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Davis, F.F., 1950, Mines and mineral resources of Alameda County, Califor- 
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Plate 58, scale 1:125,000. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



55 



Davis, F.F., 1955, Mines and mineral resources of San Mateo County, Califor- 
nia:California Journal of Mines and Geology, vol. 51, no. 4, p. 401-458. 

Davis, F.F., and Goldman, H.B., 1958, Mines and mineral resources of Contra 
Costa County: California Journal of Mines and Geology, vol. 54, no. 4, 
p. 501-583, Plate 5, scale 1:125,000. 

Davis, F.F., and Jennings, C.W., 1954, Mines and mineral resources of Santa 
Clara County, California: California Journal of Mines and Geology, vol. 
50, no. 2, p. 321-430, Plate 2, scale 1:125,000. 

Davis, F.F, and Vernon, J.W., 1951, Mines and mineral resources of Contra 
Costa County, California: California Journal of Mines and Geology, vol. 
46, no. 4, p. 586-587. 

Davis, J. F., Bennett, J. H., Borchardt, G. A., Kahle, J. E., Rice, S. J., and 
Silva, M. A., 1982, Earthquake planning scenario for a Magnitude 8.3 
earthquake on the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay area: 
California Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 61, 160 p., 
8 plates. 

Dibblee, T.W., Jr., 1966, Geology of the Palo Alto quadrangle, Santa Clara 
and San Mateo Counties, California: California Division of Mines and 
Geology Map Sheet 8, scale 1:62,500. 

Dibblee, T.W., Jr., 1972a, Preliminary geologic map of the Milpitas quadran- 
gle, Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California: U.S. Geological 
Survey Open-File Map, scale 1:24,000. 

Dibblee, T.W., Jr., 1972b, Preliminary geologic map of the San Jose East 
quadrangle, Santa Clara County, California: U.S. Geological Survey 
Open-File Report, scale 1:24,000. 

Environ, 1976, Reclamation plan for the Livermore-Amador Valley quarry 
area: unpublished draft report, 82 pages, 1 1 plates. 

Erickson, R., Demaree, R., Kautsky, M., and Thormalen, D., 1979, Reconnais- 
sance of potential hardrock quarry sites, Sonoma County, California — 
Part II of the Sonoma County Quarry Study: unpublished report for the 
Sonoma County Planning Department. 

Ford, R.S., and Hansen, W.R., 1967, Evaluation of groundwater resources — 
South Bay, Appendix A: Geology: California Department of Water Re- 
sources Bulletin 118-1, p. 16-32, 59-63, 103-107, Plates 3, 12, 14. 

Ford, R.S., and Hills, E.E., 1974, Evaluation of groundwater resources, Liver- 
more and Sunol valleys: California Department of Water Resources 
Bulletin 118-2, p. 4-28. 

Ford, R.S., Mitchell, W.B., Jr., Chee, L, and Barrett, J., 1975, Evaluation of 
groundwater resources: South San Francisco Bay-Northern Santa Clara 
County area: California Department of Water Resources Bulletin 118-1, 
vol. Ill, p. 36-39. 

Goldman, H.B., 1964, Sand and Gravel in California: California Division of 
Mines and Geology Bulletin 180, Part B - Central California, p. 35. 

Goldman, H.B., 1969, Salt, sand, and shells - mineral resources of San 
Francisco Bay, in Geologic and Engineering Aspects of San Francisco 
Bay Fill: California Division of Mines and Geology Special Report 97, 
pp. 33-35. 

Griff en, W. L, 1967, Provenance, deposition, and deformation of the San 
Benito Gravels, California, in Durham, D. L, Forrest, L.C., Pierce, R. L, 
and Polugar, M., eds.. Guidebook - Gabilan Range and adjacent San 
Andreas fault, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, pp. 61-73. 

Hall, C. A., Jr., 1958, Geology and paleontology of the Pleasanton area, 
Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California: University of California 
Publications in Geological Sciences, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 1-90, Figure 1, 
Plate 1, scale 1:48,000. 

Ham, C. K., 1952, Geology of the Las Trampas Ridge, Berkeley Hills, Califor- 
nia: California Division of Mines Special Report 22, 26 p., 2 plates, scale 
1:31,250. 

Hansen, W. R., and Vantine, J. V., 1966, Livermore and Sunol Valleys, 
Evaluation of ground water resources, Appendix A: Geology: California 
Department of Water Resources Bulletin 1 18-2, Appendix A, pp. 11-13, 
plates 2-6. 

Helley, E. J., and Brabb, E. E., 1971, Geologic map of late Cenozoic deposits, 
Santa Clara County, California: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous 
Field Studies Map MF-335, 3 sheets, scale 1:62,500. 



Herd, D. G., 1977, Geologic map of the Las Positas, Greenville, and Verona 
faults, eastern Alameda County, California: U. S. Geological Survey 
Open File Report 77-689, 25 p., 1 sheet, scale 1:24,000. 

Huey, A. S., 1948, Geology of the Tesla quadrangle, California: California 
Division of Mines Bulletin 140, 75 p., 3 plates, scale 1:62,500. 

Huguenin, E., and Castello, W. O., 1920, San Mateo County, California: 
California State Mining Bureau Report 17, pp. 177-179. 

Kupferman, S., 1980, Franciscan limestone geology and resources at Per- 
manente and New Almaden, Santa Clara County, California, in Loyd, 
R.C., and Rapp. J.S., eds., Mineral Resource Potential of California: 
Sierra Nevada Section, Society of Mining Engineers, AIME, pp. 104-1 12. 

Lajoie, K. R., Helley, E. J., Nichols, D. R., and Burke, D. B., Geologic map 
of unconsolidated and moderately consolidated deposits of San Mateo 
County, California: U.S. Geological Survey Basic Data Contribution 68, 

2 sheets, scale 1:62,500. 

Lawson, A. C, 1914, Description of the San Francisco District: U. S. Geologi- 
cal Survey Folio No. 193. 

Manson, M. W., 1977, Eugene Alves Construction Company: unpublished 
Mineral Property Report, California Division of Mines and Geology, 6 p. 

Pease, M. H., Jr., 1954, Geology of the Sobrante Anticline and vicinity: 
University of California, Berkeley, unpublished M. A. thesis. 

Radbruch, D. H., 1957, Areal and engineering geology of the Oakland West 
quadrangle, California: U. S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Geologic 
Investigations Map 1-239, 1 sheet, scale 1:24,000. 

Radbruch, D. H., 1969, Areal and engineering geology of the Oakland East 
quadrangle, California: U. S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle 
Map GQ-769, 1 sheet, scale 1:24,000. 

Radbruch, D. H., and Case, J. E., 1967, Preliminary geologic map and 
engineering geologic information: Oakland and vicinity: U. S. Geological 
Survey open-file report, 2 sheets, scale 1:24,000. 

Robinson, G. D., 1956, Geology of the Hayward quadrangle, California: U. 
S. Geological Survey Map GQ-88, 1 sheet, scale 1:24,000. 

Rogers, T. H., and Williams, J. W., 1974, Potential seismic hazards in Santa 
Clara County, California: California Division of Mines and Geology Spe- 
cial Report 107, Plate 1, scale 1:62,500. 

Saul, R. B., 1973, Geology and slope stability of the southwest quarter of 
the Walnut Creek 7.5 minute quadrangle, Contra Costa County, Califor- 
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1:24,000. 

Schlocker, J., 1974, Geology of the San Francisco North quadrangle, San 
Francisco and Marin Counties, California: U. S. Geological Survey Pro- 
fessional Paper 782, 109 p., 3 plates, scale 1:24,000. 

Sims, J. D., Fox, K.F.,Jr.,Bartow, J.A., and Helley, E.J., 1973, Preliminary 
geologic map of Solano County and parts of Napa, Contra Costa, Marin 
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Geological Survey Circular 831, 5 pages. 

Walker, G. W., 1950, The Calera Limestone in San Mateo and Santa Clara 
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P- 
Weaver, C. E., 1949, Geology and mineral deposits of an area north of San 

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p., 20 plates, scale 1:62,500. 
Welch, L. E., 1977, Soil survey of Contra Costa County, Califonia: U.S. 

Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, 122 p., 54 plates, 

scale 1:24,000. 
Welday, E. E., 1975, Marine mineral deposits in the San Francisco Bay 

region: California Division of Mines and Geology , unpublished , 27 p., 

3 plates, scale 1:125,000. 

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counties, 38 p. 



APPENDIX A 

Principles of the Mineral Resources Classification 

System of the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. 

Geological Survey (From U.S. Geological Survey Circular 831) 



57 



58 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



Principles of a 

Resource/Reserve Classification 
For Minerals 



By the U.S. Bureau of Mines and 
the U.S. Geological Survey 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY CIRCULAR 831 



A revision of the classification system 

published as U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1450- A 



1980 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



59 



Principles of a Resource/Reserve Classification 

for Minerals 



By the U.S. BUREAU OF MINES and the U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



INTRODUCTION 

Through the years, geologists, mining engineers, 
and others operating in the minerals field have 
used various terms to describe and classify mineral 
resources, which as defined herein include energy 
materials. Some of these terms have gained wide 
use and acceptance, although they are not always 
used with precisely the same meaning. 

Staff members of the U.S. Bureau of Mines and 
the U.S. Geological Survey collect information 
about the quantity and quality of all mineral 
resources, but from different perspectives and with 
different purposes. In 1976, a team of staff 
members from both agencies developed a common 
classification and nomenclature, which was 
published as U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 
1450- A- "Principles of the Mineral Resource 
Classification System of the U.S. Bureau of Mines 
and U.S. Geological Survey." Experience with this 
resource classification system showed that some 
changes were necessary in order to make it more 
workable in practice and more useful in long-term 
planning. Therefore, representatives of the U.S. 
Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines 
collaborated to revise Bulletin 1450-A. 

Long-term public and commercial planning must 
be based on the probability of discovering new 
deposits, on developing economic extraction proc- 
esses for currently unworkable deposits, and on 
knowing which resources are immediately 
available. Thus, resources must be continuously 
reassessed in the light of new geologic knowledge, 
of progress in science and technology, and of shifts 
in economic and political conditions. To best serve 
these planning needs, known resources should be 
classified from two standpoints: (1) purely geologic 
or physical/chemical characteristics -such as 
grade, quality, tonnage, thickness, and depth -of 



the material in place: and (2) profitability analyses 
based on costs of extracting and marketing the 
material in a given economy at a given time. The 
former constitutes important objective scientific 
information of the resource and a relatively un- 
changing foundation upon - which the latter more 
variable economic delineation can be based. 

The revised classification system, designed 
generally for all mineral materials, is shown 
graphically in figures 1 and 2 (see page 5); its com- 
ponents and their usage are described in the text. 
The classification of mineral and energy resources 
is necessarily arbitrary, because definitional 
criteria do not always coincide with natural boun- 
daries. The system can be used to report the status 
of mineral and energy-fuel resources for the Na- 
tion or for specific areas. 

RESOURCE/RESERVE DEFINITIONS 

A dictionary definition of resource, "something 
in reserve or ready if needed," has been adapted 
for mineral and energy resources to comprise all 
materials, including those only surmised to exist, 
that have present or anticipated future value. 

Resource. -A concentration of naturally occurring 
solid, liquid, or gaseous material in or on the 
Earth's crust in such form and amount that 
economic extraction of a commodity from the 
concentration is currently or potentially 
feasible. 

Original Resource. -The amount of a resource 
before production. 

Identified Resources. - Resources whose location, 
grade, quality, and quantity are known or 
estimated from specific geologic evidence. 
Identified resources include economic, 
marginally economic, and subeconomic com- 
ponents. To reflect varying degrees of geologic 



60 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



(Identified Resources - Continued) 

certainty, these economic divisions can be sub- 
divided into measured, indicated, and 
inferred. 1 

Demonstrated. -A term for the sum of meas- 
ured plus indicated. 

Measured. -Quantity is computed from 
dimensions revealed in outcrops, 
trenches, workings, or drill holes; 
grade and(or) quality are computed 
from the results of detailed sampling. 
The sites for inspection, sampling, and 
measurement are spaced so closely and 
the geologic character is so well de- 
fined that size, shape, depth, and 
mineral content of the resource are 
well established. 
Indicated. -Quantity and grade and(or) 
quality are computed from information 
similar to that used for measured 
resources, but the sites for inspection, 
sampling, and measurement are far- 
ther apart or are otherwise less ade- 
quately spaced. The degree of assur- 
ance, although lower than that for 
measured resources, is high enough to 
assume continuity between points of 
observation. 
Inferred. -Estimates are based on an as- 
sumed continuity beyond measured and(or) 
indicated resources, for which there is 
geologic evidence. Inferred resources may 
or may not be supported by samples or 
measurements. 
Reserve Base. -That part of an identified resource 
that meets specified minimum physical and 
chemical criteria related to current mining and 
production practices, including those for 
grade, quality, thickness, and depth. The 
reserve base is the in-place demonstrated 
(measured plus indicated) resource from which 
reserves are estimated. It may encompass 
those parts of the resources that have a 
reasonable potential for becoming economical- 
ly available within planning horizons beyond 
those that assume proven technology and cur- 
rent economics. The reserve base includes those 



■The terms "proved," "probable." and "possible", which are commonly used by in 
dustry in economic evaluations of ore or mineral fuels in specific deposits or districts, 
have been loosely interchanged with the terms measured, indicated, and inferred. 
The former terms are not a part of this classification system. 



(Reserve Base - Continued) 

resources that are currently economic 
(reserves), marginally economic (marginal 
reserves), and some of those that are currently 
subeconomic (subeconomic resources). The 
term "geologic reserve" has been applied by 
others generally to the reserve-base category, 
but it also may include the inferred-reserve- 
base category; it is not a part of this classifica- 
tion system. 

Inferred Reserve Base. -The in-place part of an 
identified resource from which inferred 
reserves are estimated. Quantitative estimates 
are based largely on knowledge of the geologic 
character of a deposit and for which there may 
be no samples or measurements. The estimates 
are based on an assumed continuity beyond the 
reserve base, for which there is geologic 
evidence. 

Reserves. -That part of the reserve base which 
could be economically extracted or produced at 
the time of determination. The term reserves 
need not signify that extraction facilities are in 
place and operative. Reserves include only 
recoverable materials; thus, terms such as "ex- 
tractable reserves" and "recoverable reserves" 
are redundant and are not a part of this classi- 
fication system. 

Marginal Reserves. -That part of the reserve base 
which, at the time of determination, borders on 
being economically producible. Its essential 
characteristic is economic uncertainty. In- 
cluded are resources that would be producible, 
given postulated changes in economic or tech- 
nologic factors. 

Economic. -This term implies that profitable 
extraction or production under defined invest- 
ment assumptions has been established, ana- 
lytically demonstrated, or assumed with 
reasonable certainty. 

Subeconomic Resources. -The part of identified re- 
sources that does not meet the economic 
criteria of reserves and marginal reserves. 

Undiscovered Resources. - Resources, the existence 
of which are only postulated, comprising 
deposits that are separate from identified 
resources. Undiscovered resources may be 
postulated in deposits of such grade and 
physical location as to render them economic, 
marginally economic, or subeconomic. To 
reflect varying degrees of geologic certainty, 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



61 



(Undiscovered Resources - Continued) 

undiscovered resources may be divided into 
two parts: 

Hypothetical Resources. -Undiscovered re- 
sources that are similar to known mineral 
bodies and that may be reasonably ex- 
pected to exist in the same producing 
district or region under analogous geologic 
conditions. If exploration confirms their 
existence and reveals enough information 
about their quality, grade, and quantity, 
they will be reclassified as identified 
resources. 
Speculative Resources. - Undiscovered re- 
sources that may occur either in known 
types of deposits in favorable geologic set- 
tings where mineral discoveries have not 
been made, or in types of deposits as yet 
unrecognized for their economic potential. 
If exploration confirms their existence and 
reveals enough information about their 
quantity, grade, and quality, they will be 
reclassified as identified resources. 
Restricted Resources/Reserves. -That part of any 
resource/reserve category that is restricted 
from extraction by laws or regulations. For ex- 
ample, restricted reserves meet all the re- 
quirements of reserves except that they are 
restricted from extraction by laws or regula- 
tions. 

GUIDELINES FOR CLASSIFICATION OF 
MINERAL RESOURCES 

1. All naturally occurring metals, nonmetals, 
and fossil fuels in sufficient concentration can be 
classified in one or more of the categories. 

2. Where the term reserves is used alone, 
without a modifying adjective such as indicated, 
marginal, or inferred, it is to be considered 
synonymous with the demonstrated-economic 
category, as shown in figure 1. 

3. Definitions of resource categories can be 
modified for a particular commodity in order to 
conform with accepted usage involving special 
geological and engineering characteristics. Such 
modified definitions for particular commodities will 
be given in forthcoming government publications. 

4. Quantities, qualities, and grades may be ex- 
pressed in different terms and units to suit 
different purposes, but usage must be clearly 
stated and defined. 



5. The geographic area to which any 
resource/reserve estimate refers must be defined. 

6. All estimates must show a date and author. 

7. The reserve base is an encompassing 
resource category delineated by physical and 
chemical criteria. A major purpose for its recogni- 
tion and appraisal is to aid in long-range public and 
commercial planning. For most mineral com- 
modities, different grades and tonnages, or other 
appropriate resource parameters, can be specified 
for any given deposit or area, or for the Nation, 
depending on the specific objectives of the 
estimators; therefore, the position of the lower 
boundary of the reserve base, which extends into 
the subeconomic category, is variable, depending 
on those objectives. The intention is to define a 
quantity of in-place material, any part of which 
may become economic, depending on the extrac- 
tion plans and economic assumptions finally used. 
When those criteria are determined, the initial 
reserve-base estimate will be divided into three 
component parts: reserves, marginal reserves, and 
a remnant of subeconomic resources. For the pur- 
pose of Federal commodity assessment, criteria for 
the reserve base will be established for each com- 
modity. 

8. Undiscovered resources may be divided in ac- 
cordance with the definitions of hypothetical and 
speculative resources, or they may be divided in 
terms of relative probability of occurrence. 

9. Inferred reserves and the inferred reserve 
base are postulated extensions of reserves and of 
the reserve base. They are identified resources 
quantified with a relatively low degree of certainty. 
Postulated quantities of resources not based on 
reserve/reserve-base extensions, but rather on 
geologic inference alone, should be classified as un- 
discovered. 

10. Locally, limited quantities of materials may 
be produced, even though economic analysis has in- 
dicated that the deposit would be too thin, too low 
grade, or too deep to be classified as a reserve. This 
situation might arise when the production facilities 
are already established or when favorable local cir- 
cumstances make it possible to produce material 
that elsewhere could not be extracted profitably. 
Where such production is taking place, the quanti- 
ty of in-place material shall be included in the 
reserve base, and the quantity that is potentially 
producible shall be included as a reserve. The 
profitable production of such materials locally, 
however, should not be used as a rationale in other 



62 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 



SR 146 



areas for classifying as reserves, those materials 
that are similar in thickness, quality, and depth. 

11. Resources classified as reserves must be con- 
sidered economically producible at the time of 
classification. Conversely, material not currently 
producible at a profit cannot be classified as 
reserves. There are situations, however, in which 
mining plans are being made, lands are being ac- 
quired, or mines and plants are being constructed 
to produce materials that do not meet economic 
criteria for reserve classification under current 
costs and prices, but would do so under reasonable 
future expectations. For some other materials, 
economic producibility is uncertain only for lack of 
detailed engineering assessment. The marginal- 
reserves category applies to both situations. When 
economic production appears certain for all or 
some of a marginal reserve, it will be reclassified as 
reserves. 

12. Materials that are too low grade or for other 
reasons are not considered potentially economic, in 
the same sense as the defined resource, may be 
recognized and their magnitude estimated, but 
they are not classified as resources. A separate 
category, labeled other occurrences, is included in 
figures 1 and 2. 

13. In figure 1, the boundary between subeco- 
nomic and other occurrences is limited by the con- 
cept of current or potential feasibility of economic 
production, which is required by the definition of a 
resource. The boundary is obviously uncertain, but 
limits may be specified in terms of grade, quality, 
thickness, depth, percent extractable, or other 
economic-feasibility variables. 

14. Varieties of mineral or energy commodities, 



such as bituminous coal as distinct from lignite, 
may be separately quantified when they have 
different characteristics or uses. 

15. The amount of past cumulative production is 
not, by definition, a part of the resource. Never- 
theless, a knowledge of what has been produced is 
important to an understanding of current re- 
sources, in terms of both the amount of past pro- 
duction and the amount of residual or remaining 
in-place resource. A separate space for cumulative 
production is shown in figure 1. Residual material 
left in the ground during current or future extrac- 
tion should be recorded in the resource category 
appropriate to its economic- recovery potential. 

16. In classifying reserves and resources, it is 
necessary to recognize that some minerals derive 
their economic viability from their coproduct or 
byproduct relationships with other minerals. Such 
relationships must be clearly explained in foot- 
notes or in an accompanying text. 

17. Considerations other than economic and ge- 
ologic, including legal, regulatory, environmental, 
and political, may restrict or prohibit the use of all 
or part of a deposit. Reserve and resource quan- 
tities known to be restricted should be recorded in 
the appropriate classification category; the quanti- 
ty restricted and the reason for the restriction 
should be noted. 

18. The classification system includes more divi- 
sions than will commonly be reported or for which 
data are available. Where appropriate, divisions 
may be aggregated or omitted. 

19. The data upon which resource estimates are 
based and the methods by which they are derived 
are to be documented and preserved. 



1987 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 



63 



RESOURCES OF (commodity name) 
[A part of reserves or any resource category may be restricted from extraction by laws or regulations (see text)] 
AREA: (mine, district, field, State, etc.) UNITS: (tons, barrels, ounces, etc.) 



Cumulative 
Production 



IDENTIFIED RESOURCES 



Demonstrated 



Measured 



Indicated 



Inferred 



UNDISCOVERED RESOURCES 



Hypothetical 



Probability Range 
(or) 



Speculative 



ECONOMIC 



MARGINALLY 
ECONOMIC 



SUB- 
ECONOMIC 



Reserves 



Inferred Reserves 



Marginal Reserves 



Inferred 
Marginal Reserves 



Demonstrated 
Subeconomic Resources 



Inferred 

Subeconomic 

Resources 



+ 



Other 
Occurrences 



Includes nonconventional and low-grade materials 



Author: Date: 

Figure 1.- Major elements of mineral-resource classification, excluding reserve base and inferred reserve base. 

RESOURCES OF (commodity name) 

[A part of reserves or any resource category may be restricted from extraction by laws or regulations (see text)] 
AREA: (mine, district, field, State, etc.) UNITS: (tons, barrels, ounces, etc.) 



Cumulative 
Production 




IDENTIFIED RESOURCES 


UNDISCOVERED RESOURCES 


Demonstrated 


Inferred 


Probability Range 

lr\r\ 


Measured 


Indicated 


\Or) 
Hypothetical , Speculative 






ECONOMIC 


Reserve 


Inferred 

Reserve 

Base 


4- 

i 

+ - 


MARGINALLY 
ECONOMIC 


Ba 


se 






SUB- 
ECONOMIC 









Other 
Occurrences 



Includes nonconventional and low-grade materials 



Author: 



Date: 
Figure 2. -Reserve base and inferred reserve base classification categories. 

5 A U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1980 O- 311-344/106 



APPENDIX B 

Summary Of The Classification Of MRZ-3 Areas, 
Construction Materials Only 



65 



66 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



AREAS CLASSIFIED MRZ-3 



A. ALAMEDA COUNTY: 

Plate 2.6 Altamont Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary alluvium (gravel facies) - Positions of boundary lines between MRZ-2 and MRZ-3 are 
based on the existence of detailed data in well-logs. 

(b) Livermore Gravels - Data regarding quality and quantity of material on the eastern edge of several 
low rolling hills near the western edge of the quadrangle is not available. 

Plate 2.7 Briones Valley Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 
(a) Moraga Formation basalt - small patches within OPR zone that may not meet threshold value. If 

the material within Charles Lee Tilden Regional Park is added, then the threshold value probably 

would be exceeded. 

Plate 2.9 Dublin Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Livermore Gravels and Quaternary stream channel gravels - This material is similar to that being 
mined at Mission San Jose and Livermore. There are no active quarries, and the deposit may not 
reach threshold value. 

(b) Briones Formation sandstone - Extensively quarried for crushed stone, but not within this quadran- 
gle. Subsurface data is lacking in the quadrangle. Some deposits may not reach threshold value. 

(c) Quaternary alluvium in Amador Valley and western Livermore Valley - DWR data indicates the 
possible existence of 40-60 feet of gravel, with overburden over 40 feet in thickness and with the 
amount of interbedded clay and silt over 25 percent. Inadequate well- log data to eliminate possibility 
of local deposits of commercial sand and gravel. 

Plate 2.10 Hay ward Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Leona Rhyolite - These areas are classified MRZ-3 due to lack of outcrops, inaccessability, or 
apparent lack of sufficient material to reach threshold value. 

(b) Jurassic gabbro intruded into rocks of Franciscan Complex - These areas are classified as MRZ-3 
due to serpentinization and fracturing of material, which renders it unsuitable for aggregate. 
Detailed mapping and drilling is needed to locate good material. 

(c) Oakland Conglomerate - No quarries within this quadrangle, and lack of subsurface data for 
classification. 

(d) Franciscan Complex greenstone - This material is covered by excessive amounts of overburden, and 
may not meet threshold value. 

(e) Briones Formation sandstone - There may be insufficient material within the urbanizing zone to 
attain threshold value. 

Plate 2.12 La Costa Valley Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Briones Formation sandstone - Sandstone is similar to that being quarried for crushed stone 
elsewhere. The deposit has not been previously quarried but may be suitable for aggregate. 

(b) Livermore Gravels - Material at this deposit appears to be similar to the Irvington Gravels, which 
have been extensively quarried for sand and gravel near Mission San Jose. 

(c) Cierbo Formation sandstone - Sandstone of the Cierbo Formation has been crushed and used for 
aggregate at several localities in Contra Costa County. Similar material may exist at this deposit. 

(d) Quaternary alluvium - Floodplain of San Antonio Creek. Local accumulations of sand and gravel 
suitable for aggregate may exist within this area. Well- log data is not available and there are no 
known quarries within the area. 



1987 MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 67 



Plate 2.14 Livermore Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary alluvium - 30-50 feet of gravel covered by 35-50 feet of overburden. 

(b) Quaternary alluvium (gravel facies) along eastern and western edges of Arroyo del Valle - less than 
30 feet of gravel. 

(c) Briones Formation - Sandstone of the Briones Formation has been quarried for aggregate near 
Milpitas. Similar material may exist at this locality, but subsurface data is lacking. 

(d) Livermore Gravels - The Livermore Gravels have not been quarried for sand and gravel, but 
significant deposits may be present. 

Plate 2.15 Milpitas Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary alluvium in the Niles Cone - Sand and gravel deposit with more than 40 feet of 
overburden. 

(b) Santa Clara Formation - No quarry activity in this quadrangle, but gravel beds near Cupertino have 
been extensively mined for aggregate. Subsurface data is lacking. 

Plate 2.17 Newark Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary alluvium in the Niles Cone - This material has an overburden-to-ore ratio of less than 
1:1 (non-economic at present). 

Plate 2.18 Niles Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary alluvium in the Niles Cone - There are 40 feet or more of sand and gravel with an 
overburden-to-ore ratio of less than 1:1 (non-economic at present). 

(b) Irvington Gravels and Quaternary landslide debris - This area may be underlain by Irvington 
Gravels, but there are no quarries or outcrops to confirm the presence of Irvington Gravels. 

(c) Oakland Conglomerate -There does not appear to be enough material to meet suggested threshold 
value. 

(d) Niles Canyon Formation sandstone - This unit was quarried for dimension stone only, not aggregate. 
A sampling program is needed to determine the extent of suitable material within the deposit. 

(e) Briones Formation sandstone with limestone - This unit has been quarried elsewhere but not in this 
quadrangle. Subsurface data is lacking. 

(f) Livermore Gravels - This unit has not been quarried, but may be of commercial-grade locally. 

Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Leona Rhyolite - These are small deposits that individually lack sufficient material to meet suggest- 
ed threshold value. 

(b) Franciscan Complex sandstone - There may be insufficient material to meet suggested threshold 
value, or no quarry activity to indicate quality of material. 

(c) Leona Rhyolite - Small deposit contains old quarry, but appears to have insufficient material 
remaining to meet suggested threshold value. 

(d) Moraga Formation basalt - This is a small deposit, with insufficient material to meet suggested 
threshold value, if quarried within urbanizing boundary. 

Plate 2.23 San Leandro Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Leona Rhyolite - These outcrops are part of a discontinuous belt along the ridgeline. No quarry 
activity within this quadrangle. The deposits are probably too small to meet threshold value. 

(b) Basic intrusive rock - There are several bodies of serpentinized gabbro, but no known quarry 
activity. Rock quality or overburden thickness are impossible to determine with existing data. 



68 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



B. CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Plate 2.25 Antioch North Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary dune sand deposits - Believed to be similar to those deposits along the San Joaquin 
River, the area is classified MRZ-3 because of the lack of underground data. 

Plate 2.26 Antioch South Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Wolfskill Formation - Locally, this unit may contain resources of aggregate. Insufficient data is 
available to justify a MRZ-2 classification. 

(b) Quaternary dune sand deposits - Meager well-log data indicates that it is doubtful that a site occurs 
within the area where sufficient sand could be commercially recovered to meet suggested threshold 
value. 

(c) Wolfskill Formation - These areas include a 100 acre quarry which was operated from the 1950s 
until the early 1970s. Material seen during a field examination was suitable only for fill. The area 
is given an MRZ-3 classification because better material may occur within the area. 

(d) Wolfskill Formation - This area includes an inactive quarry that is now a sanitary land fill. A field 
examination of the rock remaining at the site shows that the rock is suitable only for fill. However, 
because rock suitable for aggregate may occur elsewhere within the area, the area is classified 
MRZ-3. 

(e) Domengine Sandstone - This formation consists of sandstone with interbedded mudstone, siltstone, 
and conglomerate. Sand has been recovered from at least two inactive quarries in the area and is 
being mined at a nearby site. However, because of the local variation in quality of rock, the area 
is classified MRZ-3. 

Plate 2.27 Benicia Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Briones Formation sandstone - There are no active quarries within the area but rock appears to be 
similar to that quarried in Alameda County. 

(b) Neroly Formation sandstone and Cierbo Formation sandstone - Rock from both of these formations 
has been quarried for use as aggregate from nearby sites, but because of the apparent variation in 
quality, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

Plate 2.28 Brentwood Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Wolfskill Formation - This unit has been quarried for aggregate at several sites, but because of local 
variation in the quality of rock, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

(b) Quaternary dune sand deposits - These deposits are classified MRZ-3 because of the apparent 
variation in thickness and lack of available well-log data. All known commercial sand operations 
in the area are the first stage of a land leveling program needed to convert the dune areas from 
vineyard and fruit farming to truck farming. 

(c) Domengine Sandstone - This formation is being quarried for sand at a nearby site. However, because 
of the local variation in the quality of rock, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

Plate 2.7 Briones Valley Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(b) Briones Formation sandstone - These deposits appear to be similar to Briones Formation sandstone 
being mined and crushed for aggregate at several localities in Alameda County. The Hambre 
Sandstone is reported to occur as a narrow northwest trending belt near the center of this unit. 

Plate 2.29 Clayton Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary alluvium along Mount Diablo Creek - Well- log data is inconclusive as to whether or 
not commercial - size accumulations of sand and gravel exist. 

(b) Wolfskill Formation - Although the Wolfskill Formation has been quarried at several localities 
nearby, the material appears to be suitable only for fill. Because of the uncertainty of the quality 
of the material in this area, the area is classified MRZ-3. 



1987 MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 69 



(c) Neroly and Cierbo Formations - Both of these sandstone units have been mined nearby. The areas 
are classified MRZ-3 because of the apparent lack of sufficient material to meet threshold values. 

(d) Quaternary alluvium in Clayton Valley - This area is classified MRZ-3 because of uncertainty about 
the quality of the alluvium. 

(e) Franciscan Complex greenstone - Greenstone and chert similar to that being mined nearby may 
occur in this area. No data on extent or quality is available. 

Plate 2.30 Diablo Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Neroly Formation - This area includes the site of the former Souza and Lawrence Quarry. Because 
the material examined at the site appears to be suitable only for fill, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

(b) Briones and Cierbo Formations - Both of these sandstone formations have been quarried in the past, 
but insufficient material lies within the OPR urbanizing zone to meet suggested threshold value. 

(c) Orinda or Tassajara Formation - There are two inactive quarries nearby, but material appears to 
be suitable only for fill. 

Plate 2.9 Dublin Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(d) Briones and Cierbo Formation sandstone - Both formations have been mined for aggregate at nearby 
sites, but due to a lack of previous quarry activity in this area and lack of sufficient material within 
the OPR urbanizing zone to meet suggested threshold value, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

(e) Orinda or Tassajara Formation - Two inactive quarry sites are reported within this area, but field 
examination of the area indicates that only fill was recovered at the quarries. 

Plate 2.31 Honker Bay Quadrangle 
MRZ-3 

(a) Wolfskill or Tehama Formation - This unit consists of silty clay, sand, gravel, and interbedded 
volcaniclastic rocks. Sand and gravel is being mined elsewhere (Solano County) from the Tehama 
Formation. The only quarry within this area is producing bank-run fill. Because of the possibility 
that local accumulations of sand and gravel may occur within the area, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

(b) Neroly Formation sandstone and Cierbo Formation sandstone - Rock from both of these formations 
has been quarried for use as aggregate from several inactive sites within the area. But because of the 
apparent variation in quality, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

Plate 2.32 Jersey Island Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary dune sand deposits - These deposits appear to be similar to those being mined a few 
miles away. Available well-log data indicates that the deposits have a maximum thickness of 30 
feet. In order to meet suggested threshold value needed for an MRZ-2 classification, large areas 
would have to be quarried. Such areas probably do not exist; therefore, the area is classified MRZ-3. 

Plate 2.13 Las Trampas Ridge Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Sandstone of the San Pablo Formation of Lawson (1914) - Sandstone suitable for subbase and fill 
may occur in this area. An inactive quarry is located a few miles to the north, in rock that appears 
to be similar to material found here. The sandstone found at this site may be suitable for subbase. 

(b) Sandstone of the San Pablo Formation of Lawson (1914), and Briones Formation of Ham (1952) 
- The inactive Mulloy Quarry is located partially within this area. The area is classified MRZ-3 
because, based upon a field examination, some doubt exists that the rock is suitable for aggregate 
other than fill. 

Plate 2.33 Mare Island Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Briones Formation sandstone, with minor shale and siltstone - This unit has been quarried for 
aggregate a few miles to the south. Because the Briones Formation has not been quarried for 
aggregate in the Mare Island Quadrangle and its suitability for aggregate is unknown, the area is 
classified MRZ-3. 



70 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



(b) Neroly Formation and Cierbo Formation sandstones - These deposits have not been quarried but 
may be suitable for road base material. However, no data is available regarding the suitability of 
the rock for aggregate. 

Plate 2.19 Oakland East Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(d) Basalt and andesite of the Moraga Formation - This deposit has not been previously mined, and 
information is not available regarding the suitability of the rock for aggregate. The area is classified 
MRZ-3 because the rock appears to be similar to that mined elsewhere. 

(e) Basalt and andesite of the Moraga Formation -This is an extension of a body of basalt and andesite 
already classified MRZ-2. This narrow belt of rock may not contain enough material to meet 
suggested threshold value. 

Plate 2.34 Port Chicago Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Great Valley Sequence - This unit has been quarried at two sites within the Port Chicago Quadrangle. 
Based upon a field examination, the material appears to be too soft and weathered for any use except 
for fill. However, suitable material may be found in the deposits. 

(b) Wolfskill Formation - This area includes several inactive quarries but the material appears to be 
suitable only for fill. Because of the uncertainty of the quality of the material in this area, the area 
is classified MRZ-3. 

(c) Cierbo Formation sandstone - Rock from this formation has been quarried nearby for use as 
aggregate. However, data regarding quality of rock from this area is not available. 

Plate 2.22 Richmond Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Briones Formation sandstone - This unit has been quarried for aggregate a few miles to the south 
in Alameda County. The area is classified MRZ-3 because its suitability for aggregate is unknown. 

Plate 2.36 Walnut Creek Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) San Ramon Formation - This is a hard, fine - grained sandstone which may be suitable for aggregate. 
The sandstone has never been quarried, and no data is available regarding the suitability of the rock 
for aggregate. 

(b) Cierbo Formation of Saul (1973), and San Pablo Formation of Lawson (1914) - Sandstones from 
both formations are reported to be suitable for aggregate. The area is classified MRZ-3 because of 
inaccessibility and the lack of good exposures. 

(c) San Pablo Formation of Lawson (1914) - This area includes an inactive quarry in hard sandstone. 
Based upon a cursory examination of the area, it appears that at least part of the rock in the area 
may be suitable for aggregate. The area is classified MRZ-3 because of the lack of test data. 

C. SAN FRANCISCO AND SAN MATEO COUNTIES: 

Plate 2.37 Half Moon Bay Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary marine terrace, alluvial fan, and valley alluvium deposits along the coast - No active 
operations at present time to indicate the quality of the material. 

(b) Cretaceous quartz diorite - Accessible outcrops are weathered; there are no active operations within 
the OPR zone at this time. Data regarding rock quality and overburden thickness are lacking. 

(c) Lompico Sandstone (Miocene) - No active operation at present; the material is probably suitable 
only for fill. 

Plate 2.38 Mindego Hill Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(d) Santa Clara Formation - This is a small deposit that may not contain sufficient material to meet 
suggested threshold value. In addition, there has been no quarry activity within this body, so there 
is no data concerning the quality of the material. 



1987 MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 71 



Plate 2.39 Montara Mountain Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Franciscan Complex greenstone and Calera Limestone member - These deposits are similar to the 
deposit at Rockaway Beach, but may lack sufficient material to reach suggested threshold value, 
or have no previous quarry activity, so there is no data concerning the quality of the material. 

(b) Cretaceous quartz diorite - This is the same material that has been quarried at El Granada and Half 
Moon Bay. The deposits may lack sufficient material to reach suggested threshold value, or they 
lack exposures that would indicate the quality of the material. 

(c) Franciscan Complex greenstone, with minor deposits of limestone, chert, and serpentinite - This unit 
is presently quarried at several points along the Peninsula. These deposits probably will not attain 
suggested threshold value. 

(d) Merced Formation sand and sandstone - This unit is mined for fill at Colma, and has been mined 
near Millbrae. Although test data is lacking, the material may be suitable for aggregate other than 
fill. 

(e) Franciscan Complex "sheared rocks" with minor greenstone and serpentinite - Several quarries 
along the Peninsula have produced aggregate from this unit, but detailed mapping and sampling 
are needed to locate sufficient coarse material within the clay matrix. 

(f) Quaternary marine terrace - This zone includes marine terraces, beach sands, and valley alluvium 
along the coast between Half Moon Bay and Montara. No aggregate has been produced from these 
deposits, although asphaltic concrete sand was mined from beach sand deposits approximately one 
mile south of the quadrangle boundary. 

Plate 2.40 Palo Alto Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation - There is no data on location or extent of the conglomerate member of the 
formation. The conglomerate member is the source of sand and gravel being quarried a few miles 
to the south. 

(b) Page Mill Basalt - This material was formerly quarried in the quadrangle. Subsurface data necessary 
to confirm distribution and quality of the unit are lacking. 

(c) Franciscan Complex graywacke - This material has been quarried elsewhere for aggregate. Suitabili- 
ty of material at this locality is not known. 

(d) Franciscan Complex greenstone and chert - Part of this deposit is being quarried nearby, but data 
regarding the rock quality and overburden thickness are not available for this portion. 

Plate 2.41 San Francisco North Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Quaternary dune sand - Similar material has been mined for aggregate in the past in other quadran- 
gles. Test data to confirm the quality of the sand in this location are lacking, so the deposit is 
classified MRZ-3. 

Plate 2.42 San Francisco South Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Dune sand - This material has been mined for aggregate in the past. Lack of subsurface data 
precludes the classification of this deposit as MRZ-2. 

(b) Merced Formation sandstone - This material has been used for fill at the San Francisco Internation- 
al Airport. Although test data is lacking, the material may be suitable for aggregate other than fill. 

(c) Franciscan Complex graywacke, greenstone, or other members of the Franciscan Complex - Inac- 
tive quarries exist at these deposits, but remaining volumes of acceptable material cannot be 
calculated without data on waste and rock suitability. Threshold values may not be present. 

(d) Franciscan Complex greenstone, with minor deposits of limestone, chert, and serpentinite - This 
unit is presently quarried at several points along the Peninsula. These deposits probably will not 
attain suggested threshold value. 

Plate 2.43 San Mateo Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Franciscan Complex chert, graywacke, and greenstone - At least three quarries have been operated 
in this deposit (which extends into the Woodside Quadrangle) , but data on rock quality, distribu- 
tion, or overburden thickness are lacking. 



72 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



(b) Franciscan Complex "sheared rocks" (melange) - This deposit has two inactive quarries, but is 
classified MRZ-3 due to a lack of data on rock quality, distribution, or overburden thickness. The 
clayey matrix may contain enough large "knockers" to meet threshold value. 

(c) Franciscan Complex greenstone and chert at Coyote Point - This site contains a small, inactive 
quarry, and suitable material remains in place. However, there does not appear to be sufficient 
material to attain threshold value. 

(d) Merced Formation sandstone - This material has been used as fill at the San Francisco International 
Airport. Although test data is lacking, the material may be suitable for aggregate other than fill. 

Plate 2.44 Woodside Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation sand and gravel - A lack of both quarry activity and subsurface data within 
this quadrangle neccessitates the classification of these deposits as MRZ-3. 

(b) Franciscan Complex greenstone - The larger of these deposits has two inactive quarries, but the 
deposits are classified as MRZ-3 due to lack of data regarding the rock quality and overburden 
thickness. 

(c) Franciscan Complex graywacke, with minor siltstone and limestone - This deposit, which extends 
into the San Mateo Quadrangle, has been mined in the past, but contains no presently active quarries. 
A lack of data on rock quality, distribution, or overburden thickness makes it necessary to classify 
the deposit as MRZ-3. 

(d) Franciscan Complex "sheared rocks" (melange) - There may not be sufficient material in this 
deposit to attain threshold value. 

D. SANTA CLARA COUNTY: 

Plate 2.45 Calaveras Reservoir Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) There are possible sand and gravel resources in the fan at the mouth of Penitencia Creek, but the 
available data is inconclusive and comes from only one well- log. 

(b) Briones Formation sandstone - The deposit does not appear to meet suggested threshold value. 

(c) Oakland Conglomerate - This unit has not been quarried previously, but may be suitable for 
aggregate. 

(d) Santa Clara Formation - There is only one inactive quarry in the Santa Clara Formation on the 
east side of Santa Clara Valley, and there is no subsurface data available for the deposit. 

Plate 2.46 Castle Rock Ridge Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Franciscan Complex sandstone and greenstone - This deposit has not been mined, but is too small 
to meet suggested threshold value. 

(b) Santa Clara Formation - There is no data on the presence within the deposit of conglomerate 
suitable for aggregate. 

Plate 2.47 Cupertino Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation - This classification includes areas occupied by several inactive quarries. 
There is insufficient data available regarding areal extent and quality of conglomerate, and thickness 
or overburden. 

(b) Franciscan Complex greenstone - This area adjoins the presently active Neary Quarry, but a lack 
of information on rock quality and overburden thickness precludes the classification of this deposit 
as MRZ-2. 

(c) Franciscan Complex sandstone - There is insufficient material to attain suggested threshold value. 
This deposit is an extension of the MRZ-3 (c) area in the Mindego Hill Quadrangle. 

(d) Franciscan Complex greenstone - This deposit north of the Permanente plant of Kaiser Cement 
Company does not have sufficient outcrops nor are data on rock quality and overburden thick- 
ness available to warrant a classification of MRZ-2. Volcanic tuff may be present within the green- 
stone, as in the nearby Neary and Page Mill quarries. 

(e) Franciscan Complex greenstone - This deposit is an extension of Sector CC. However, a lack of 
exposures and data on rock quality and overburden thickness precludes the classification of this 
deposit as MRZ-2. 






1987 MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION, SAN FRANCISCO - MONTEREY BAY AREA 73 



(f) Quaternary fan deposit of Stevens Creek - This deposit is delineated on the basis of water-well logs 
in the files of DMG. However, three well- logs at the mouth of Stevens Creek Canyon show the 
existence of a large body of silt and clay, and detailed drilling and sampling will be necessary to 
resolve the problem. 

Plate 2.48 Los Gatos Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation - There are no active quarries in these areas, but conglomerate suitable for 
aggregate may occur within one or more of the areas given this classification. 

(b) Streambed and terrace deposits of Los Gatos and Guadalupe creeks - Once extensively mined, these 
deposits are now urbanized or used for ground water percolation ponds. Resources of sand and 
gravel may still be present along parts of Los Gatos Creek channel and terraces, but subsurface data 
is lacking. 

(c) Franciscan Complex greenstone, graywacke, and shale - Part of the area is urbanized, but suitable 
rock may exist at unurbanized sites. No data as to extent or quality is available. 

Plate 2.15 Milpitas Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(b) Santa Clara Formation - Some gravel is found within the unit on the west side of Santa Clara Valley, 
but no information is available regarding the presence or distribution of gravel in these deposits. 

Plate 2.38 Mindego Hill Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Franciscan Complex greenstone - this area has insufficient exposures to provide data necessary for 
a higher classification. 

(b) Santa Clara Formation - This region may contain sand and gravel resources, but subsurface data 
is lacking. 

(c) Franciscan Complex sandstone - This material was formerly mined at the nearby Adobe Creek 
Quarry , but there is insufficient material to attain suggested threshold value. 

Plate 2.16 Mountain View Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation - There are no known quarries in the area and no data on the quality of 
material in this quadrangle. The area is now completely urbanized. 

Plate 2.40 Palo Alto Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation - There is no data on location or extent of the conglomerate member of the 
formation. The conglomerate member is the source of sand and gravel being quarried a few miles 
to the south. 

(b) Page Mill Basalt - This material was formerly quarried in the quadrangle. Subsurface data nee - 
essary to confirm distribution and quality of the unit are lacking. 

(c) Franciscan Complex graywacke - This material has been quarried elsewhere for aggregate. Suita- 
bility of material at this locality is not known. 

(d) Franciscan Complex greenstone and chert - Part of this deposit is being quarried nearby, but data 
regarding the rock quality and overburden thickness are not available for this portion. 

Plate 2.49 San Jose East Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Guadalupe Creek sand and gravel - Deposit appears to be depleted, but resources may exist at depth. 

(b) Briones Formation sandstone - This material is similar to that being mined to the north, but 
insufficient data is available to justify classification as MRZ-2. 

(c) Coyote Creek sand and gravel - This deposit has been mined in the past, and some material may 
still be present, but subsurface data is lacking. 

(d) Oakland Conglomerate - This unit has been mined for aggregate, but no data is available on the 
suitability of the material at this site. In addition, there is insufficient material present to meet 
suggested threshold value. 



74 DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY SR 146 



(e) Buried stream channel deposits - These deposits have been delineated by the Department of Water 
Resources from well- logs. There is no data available on the suitability of material for aggregate. 

Plate 2.50 San Jose West Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Santa Clara Formation- Insufficient data available regarding location of conglomerate member of 
the formation. Material suitable for sand and gravel is found only in the conglomerate member of 
the formation. 

(b) Guadalupe Creek streambed - The southern end of the area has been quarried. Only limited 
resources remain, which appear to have less than threshold value. 

(c) Los Gatos Creek streambed and floodplain - This area was actively mined in the past. Limited sand 
and gravel resources may still remain, but subsurface data is lacking. 

(d) Quaternary fan deposit of Los Gatos Creek - This deposit is delineated on the basis of limited 
water-well logs in the files of DMG. Detailed drilling and sampling will be needed to verify the 
existence of the deposit. 

Plate 2.51 Santa Teresa Hills Quadrangle 

MRZ-3 

(a) Franciscan Complex sandstone and interbedded shale - Similar rock is found at the Piazza Quarry, 
but there is insufficient material to meet suggested threshold value. 

(b) Quaternary alluvial fan material - This material was deposited by Coyote Creek as it meandered 
over the Santa Clara Valley floor. Data regarding sand and gravel content, thickness of deposit, and 
thickness of overburden are not available. 

(c) Alamitos Creek sand and gravel - This zone includes an area mined in the past. Sufficient sand and 
gravel may be left to meet threshold value, but adequate data is lacking for classification as MRZ-2. 



I 



CO 

o 

I 

O 

z 

H 

m 

3D 

m 

-< 



CD 
> 

■< 

> 

m 
> 



CD 
00 
^1 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA— GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 
THE RESOURCES AGENCY— GORDON K_ VAN VLECK, SECRET AflY 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION— RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



SPECIAL REPORT 146 



C3 

ATE 2.1 A55 



WWSICttSWHCB 
UBWIM 

DC DAVIS 



STONE 
SAND o 



80 Map index numb 

See text for definitions ond explanations of Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Secto 



BASE MAP 8Y U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 




DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 
JAMES F OAVIS. STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA— GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 
THE RESOURCES AGENCY— GORDON K. VAN VLECK, SECRETARY 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION— RANDALL M WARD. OIRECTOR 



UC DAVIS 



|NZH 

A33 

SPECIAL REPORT 146 VP ■ f' ' 
PLATE 2.2 ptj.%, 2_ 




SAND and GRAVEL 



-SECTOR R 



STONE 



80 Map index number 

See text for definitions ond explanations of Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Sectors. 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES AND RESOURCE SECTORS 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 
South San Francisco Bay Production -Consumption Region 

BY M.C.STINSON, M.W.MANSON AND U.J.PLAPPERT 
1983 

SCALE 1 = 125 000 



_2_IO KILOMETERS 



BASE MAPBYUS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



2.63 
2.64 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 
JAMES F DAVIS, STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA— GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 
THE RESOURCES AGENCY— GORDON K VAN VLECK. SECRETARY 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION— RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



TM2"t 
A 33 

REPORT 146 . , ., 

PLATE 2.3^0. Ws-L 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONES AND RESOURCE SECTORS 

SAN FRANCISCO AND SAN MATEO COUNTIES 
South San Francisco Bay Production-Consumption Region 

BY MC.STINSON, M.W.MANSON AND J.J.PLAPPERT 
1983 

SCALE |:|25000 



EXPLANATION 



Boundary of area classified 

Mineral Resource Zone (MRZ) boundary 

County line 

P-C boundary (coincides with county line in part) 



MRZ- 2 




PTOCAi SCIENCES 
IIBRM 

UC DAVIS 



See text for definitions and explanations of Mineral Resource 
Zones and Resource Sectors. 








INDEX OF 


QUADRANGLES 




QUADRANGLE 




MAP NUMBER MRZ 


SECTOR 








PLATE NUMBER 


PLATE NUMBER 


HALF HOON BAY 




112 


2.37 


2.73 


HUNTERS POINT 




96 


2.11 




LA HONDA 




122 






MINDEGO HILL 




123 


2.38 




MONTARA MOUNTAIN 


103 


2.39 


2.66 


MOUNTAIN VIEW 




115 


2.16 




OAKLAND WEST 




68 


2.20 




PALO ALTO 




114 


2.40 




REDWOOD POINT 




105 


2.21 




SAS FRANCISCO 


NORTH 


87 


2.41 




SAN FRANCISCO 


SOUTH 


95 


2.42 


2.65 


SAN MATEO 




104 


2.43 




WOODS IDE 




113 


2.44 





BASE MAP BY U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY I22°30' 



DIVISION OF MINES AND GEOLOGY 
JAMES F. DAVIS, STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA— GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 
THE RESOURCES AGENCY— GORDON K VAN VLECK. SECRETARY 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION— RANDALL M WARD. DIRECTOR 



37°30'i^|iri 



CALAVERAS RESERVOIR 
CASTLE ROCK RIDCE 
CUPERTINO 
LOS GATOS 
MILPITAS 
MINDEGO HILL 
MOUNTAIN VIEW 
PALO ALTO 
SAN JOSE EAST 
SAN JOSE WEST 
SANTA- TERESA HILLS 



BASE MAP BY U.S.GEOLOGICALSURVEY 



TM24 
G3 

A33 

SPECIAL REPORT 146 [n, -1 

PLATE 2.4 K-0 • '^ < 



STONE 

134 Map index number 

See text for definitions and explanations of Mineral Resource Zones and Resource Sectors 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA— GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY— GORDON K. VAN VLECK, SECRETARY 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION— RANDALL M. WARD, DIRECTOR 



-TUiti 



Boy Mud , including monmode 



Cb 

SPECIAL REPORT 146 A a,?, 
PI ATF ? S ^ L ~ ~ 




n Rocks, includes 



Generalized Geologic Map of 5 -County South San Francisco 
Bay Production /Consumption Region 



10 15 20 25 30 35 Km 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 

UC DAVIS 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 
rsounces ACENCY-cjonoON k. van vleck, secretary for resoi 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M. WARO, DIRECTOR 




EPORT 146 PLATE 2 « 




; 






EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources. 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information in 



MRZ-2 Areas where adequate informafior 

that a high likelihood 'or their pre 
MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposi' 



i other MRZ zone. 
sxplanation of MRZ Sym 



ALTAMONT. CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C.Stinson, Michael W. Monson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

"/) 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

[ RESOURCES AGENCT-GOROON K VAN VLECK, SECRETART FOR RESOURCI 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSEHVATION-RANOALL M WARD. OIRECTOR 




MRZ-3(b) 






-t-MRZ-4 












''' " '; 







BRiONES VALLEV QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.7 




■MRZ-3(b) 




SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER 80UNOARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established trorn data supplied by the Office of Plannmi 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup 
plied by local government and other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-t Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 

judged that little likelihood exists for their presence 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 
deposits are present, or where it is judged 



MRZ-3 Are 
MRZ4 Are 



high li 



aining mineral deposits the significance of 

mailable information is inadequate 'or as- 
y other MRZ zone. 

explanation of MRZ Symbols. 



BRIONES VALLi i 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and Contra Costa Counties 

By 

Melvin C.Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Ploppert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 
/I 




STATE GEOLOGIST 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 
1 RESOURCES agenct-goroon k vanvleck. secretary for resources 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



ON HOT SPRINGS OUADRANCLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.8 



r 

i '> J ... I .1 ■ \ ■ r I 



»■■ 









■ / X 




MRZ-4 




J 



SAND& GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied by the Ollice ol Planning 
and Research with modifications developed Irom information sup- 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see teit (or discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or whore it is 
ludged :hat little likelihood exists for" i 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information inc 
cant mineral deposits are present, or > 



MRZ-3 Areas 



hiflt I 



ral deposits the signif 
which cannot be evaluated from available dai 
MRZ-4 Arfms where avrjii.it.i.. iNt.jrmMiion is inadequi 
Signmeni to any other MRZ zone 

See text lor additional e«planahon of MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundeties esiablished from data supplied by the OHice of Planning 
and Research wnh modlfii Blioru developed from information sup- 
plied by locaf governmeni end other sources 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 










Areas where adequele inlormation mdtceies thai no sig- 
judged :hat litile likelihood e*tsls lor Iheir presence. 






Arees where adequate information indicates that signifi- 


f Mtt?2 J 




cant mineral deposits are present or where it is judged 


\^ j / 


MRZ-3 


Areas containing mineral deposits the significance ol 
which cannot be evaluated from available data, 


STONE 


MflZ-4 


Arees where available information is inadequate for as- 
signment to any other MRZ zone 




See le 


t for additional explanation of MRZ Symbols. 



DUBLIN, CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda and Contra Costa Counties 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 
/I 





EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY Of AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Horn date supplied bv the Ollice ol Planning 
and Research with modulations developed from information sup- 
plied bv local government and other sources. 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MRZ-3 
MRZ-» 



ARD, CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

o 

E GEOLOGIST MAftCH 1,1983 



)*planalion ot MRZ Symbols 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANO ALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



HUNTERS POINT QUADRANGLE 

SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.11 




l'A_£M>jJ ■ 




\ 
\ 






S .1 N 



L*t;jji^£i^a.LjaTj a 



F It A N C I S C (I 






B A V 



-y 



MRZ- 



• 




J 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established trom data supplied by the Oflice ol Plenn.ng 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup- 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTlON REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 



MINERAL RESOURCE 20NE BOUNDARIES 






nificant mineral depo 


its ere present or wh 


re it Ts 




lodged that little likelihood exists lor Iheir pres 














cant minoral dripo'.iis 


re present, or where it i 






that a high likelihood 


or their presence exists. 








8Wd d f%mw. , ( lTbledai8 C 


ance of 






nlormation is madequat 






Btgnment lo any other 


MRZ zone 




See lex 


t (or additional e>plana 


on ol MRZ Symbols 





MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda and San Francisco Counties 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1 982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



STATE GEOLOGIS 



/^-t!&\ 



i, STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK. SECRETARY FOR RESOURCi 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSEHVATION-HANDALL M. WARO, DIRECTOR 



K COSTA VALLEY 
SPECIAL REPORT 




QUADRANGLE 
46 PLATE 2.12 



n 












EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from date supplied by the Office ol Planning 
and Research with modilicaiions developed from information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



AND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-l 


Areas where adequate 


nformation ,Ad.ca.es that no s.g- 














judged that little likelih 






MRZ-2 


Areas where adequate 




' MR2 2 1 




cant mineral deposits a 


e present, or where it is |udged 
r their presence exists 




MRZ-3 




al deposits the significance of 












MRZ-4 


Areas where available 


nformation is inadequate lor as- 



3 any other MRZ i 
See text lor additional explanation ol MRZ Symbols 



LA COSTA VALLEY, CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C.Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

/J 












! 


, 


* 


V- ■" 


1 




-// 







:ir 













MRZ-4 



TOPOGRAPHIC BASE MAP BY U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 
Reduced from 1:21.000 






J 



EXPLANATION 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUN0AHY 




signment 10 any other MRZ z< 
See text lor additional explanaiion o( MHZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and Contra Costa Counties 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



■ DAVIS. STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 



DEPARTMENT OF C 



: 

i 



x MRZ-4 

1 
/ 




. ..-(d) ■:* ... 







EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established (torn data supplied bv (he Office of Planning 
and Research with modifications developed Irom information sup 
plied by local government and other sources. 



SAND & GRAVEL 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




where i 



MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information 

judged that little likelihood exists ft 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information 

cent mineral deposits are present, or where il is judged 
that a high likelihood for thou presence exists. 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of 



jjtplanation of MRZ Symbols. 



LIVERMORE, CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C. Stlnson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plapperl 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




STATE GEOLOGIST 




EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTEH BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by the Olhce ot Planning 
and Research wilh modifications developed Irom information sup- 
plied by focal government end other sources. 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see ten tor discusston) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MRZ-1 Areas where adequate informaho 

judged thai little likelihood exists 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate mformatio 

thai a high likelihood lor their pn 
MfiZ-3 Areas containing mineral depos 

MRZ-4 Areas where 



MILPITAS. CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and Santa Clara Counties 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plapperl 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



Hfr-(0 



applanation ol MRZ Symbols 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from dale supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Research wuh modifications developed Irom information sup- 
plied by it 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-l Areas where adequate information im 



MRZ-3 Areas where adequai 
MfiZ:2 ) oor.1 mlner.l__dopo.lt. 



r where it is judged 



See texi for additional explanation of MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and Santa Clara Counties 

By 

Melvin C. Stlnson, Michael W, Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 
SI 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON K VANVLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M. WARO, DIRECTOR 




NEWARK QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.17 




EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by the Ollice of Planning 
and Research wiih modilications developed from information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PROOUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text for discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE 20NE BOUNDARIES 



SANO & GRAVEL 












nlfaMMmi 


? adequate inlormanon indicates that no sig- 
eral deposits are present, or where il is 








little likelihood e>ists for their presence 




MRZ-2 




$ adequate information indicates thai signifi 


f v WR^2' ; -- : '-J 




that e high 


deposits are present, or where it is judged 
ikehhood for their presence exists 


\ / -— ^ 


MRZ-3 


Areas com 


jining mineral deposits the significance Ol 


~/ " 


MRZ-4 


Areas wher 


b available information is inadequate 'or as- 


STONE 




signmenl tc 


any other MRZ *one 




Seete 


t (or additio 


al explanation of MRZ Symbols. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C. Slinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

E RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON K VAN VLECK. SECRETARY FOR RESOURC 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARO. DIRECTOR 




NILE5 QUADRANOLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 16 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by the Office of Plannim 
end Research with modifications developed fiom inlormaiion sup 
plied by local government and other sources 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda County 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-1 


Ateas where adequate information indicates that 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or wher 
ludged that little likelihood exists for their preseri 


io sig- 




MRZ-2 




signili- 






cant mineral deposits are present or where it is 




fc'AW&aP&y 








\ / ^y 


MRZ-3 


Areas containing mineral deposits the sigmlica 


ice o) 




MRZ-4 


Areas where available information is inadequate 




STONE 




signment to any other MRZ zone. 






See te 


t for additional explanation of MRZ Symbols. 





Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



H/y-t° 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN , GOVERNOR 

[ RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 

DEPARTMENT Of CONSERVATION-RANOALL M. WARD. DIRECTOR 




IT QUADR. 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 







EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY Of AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from dale supplied by the Olhce of Planning 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and Contra Costa Counties 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-I 


mficent mmeral deposits are present, or w 
ludged that Inile likelihood exists for their pre 


",T«1, 




MHZ-2 


Areas where adequate information indicates ih 




r ;; fez^ : J 




cam mineral deposits are present, or where it 
that a high likelihood for their presence exists 


s judged 


v ^y 


MRZ-3 


Afeas containing mineral deposits the signil 


cance of 


STONE 


MBZ-4 


Areas where available inlormalion 15 inadequa 
sionment to any other MRZ zone 


to for as- 




See.e 


r lor additional explanation of MRZ Symbols 





Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J Plapperl 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

//I 



STATE GEOLOGIST MARCH 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCr-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANOALL M WAfiO, DIRECTOR 




OAKLAND WEST QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 20 




MRZ- 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from dale supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Research wuh modifications developed from inlormetion sup- 
plied by 'oca! government and other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 




judged :hst little likelihood e>ists for their presence. 

MflZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present, or whBre it is judged 
that a high likelihood for their presence exists. 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance ol 
which cannot be evaluated from available data. 

MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 
signment to any other MRZ zone. 






ixplat 



I MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda County 
By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plapperl 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




STATE GEOLOGIST MARCH 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK. SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 

OEPARTMENT OF CONSERVAHON-RANDALL M. WARO, DIRECTOR 



REDWOOD POINT QUADRANGLE 
REPORT 146 PLATE 2.21 




REDWOOD POINT, CALIF 



SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Imm data supplied by the Ollice or Planning 
and Research with modi lie a lions developed Irom information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-l Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 

judged :hal little likelihood exists for their presence. 

MRZ-2 Areas whore adequate information indicates that signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 
that a high likelihood lor their presence exists, 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of 
evaluated from available data. 



MRZ-4 Areas where 



:> any other MRZ I 
See tern for additional explanation o( MRZ Symbols 



inadequate tor < 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and San Mateo Counties 

By 

Melvin C Stinson. Michael W, Manson, and John J. Plapperl 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



>jh 



M 



f1/-r(*> 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GOR0ON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANOALL M. WARD, DIRECTOR 




RICHMOND QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 22 




EXPLANATION 



SAND & GRAVEL 



iupplied by Ihe Office ol Planning 




PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see texl (or d.scussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-l Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or where it is 
judged that little likelihood exists tor their presence. 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates thai signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is lodged 
— ' " high likelihood lor their presence exists. 

containing mineral deposits (he significance ol 



MRZ-3 Areas 






RICHMOND, CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda and Contra Costa Counties 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



See text for additional explanation of MflZ Symbols 




STATE GEOLOGIST MARCH 




STATE OF CALtFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON * VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURC 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATlON-fiANOALL M. WARD, OIRECTOR 



SAN LEANDRO OUADRANGL 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLAT 




SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries establish 
and Research wtTh i 
plied by local gover 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text lot discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Arees where adequate information indicates that no sig- 

judged that little likelihood exists (or then presence 
MftZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present or where it is judged 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance ol 



SAN LEANDRO. CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1 982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



tyy-C*> 



iiplenelion ol MHZ Symbols 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN , GOVERNOR 

GENCY-CORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCI 
T OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M. WARD, DIRECTOR 



TASSAJARA QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.24 





















- 











! 



SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom dala supplied by ihe Olfice ol Planning 
and Research wiih modifications developed from information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see lext lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates lhal no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are presen 
ludged :hat little likelihood exists for t 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate mlormerion indicates 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the sigr 

e information is inadeq 
sr MRZ zone. 

T additional explanation ol MRZ Symbols. 



TASSAJARA, CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Alameda County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plapperl 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



tvrV 



STATE GEOLOG 




, ...... ... kl-3 I 

8 



SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO UR9ANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

sta supplied by the Office of Planning 
ins developed hom information sup- 
i other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information im 

judged that little likelihood exists for 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information in 



I deposits the significance of 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Contra Costa County 
By 
Melvin C. Stlnson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plapperl 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

n 



See tent (or additional explanation ot MHZ Symbols 





EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom daia supplied by The Office ol Planning 
end Research with modification a developed from information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information in. 



MflZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for ■ 
STONE signment to any other MRZ zone. 

See text lof additional explanation of MRZ Symbols 



ANTIOCH SOUTH, CALIF. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W, Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



'Ml 



a/y-Lo 



<m 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJtAN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES ACEnCt-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, OIRECTOR 



BEN1CIA QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.27 




SAND & GRAVEL 



EXPLANATION 

Dull hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries established Ik 

plied Ov 'ocal governmei 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see lext lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




MRZ-3 Areas contain' 
MRZ-4 Areas where e 



leral deposits the sigmf 

»ny oinsr MRZ zone 

il explanation of MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




iLOGIST MARCH 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN, GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GOHOON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOUflO 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATiON-RANOALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



BREMTWOOD QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.28 




SAND & GRAVEL 



EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom dais supplied by the Olfice of Planning 
end Research wiih modifications developed from information sup- 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNOARY 
(see text for discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




MRZ-3 Areas containing 



wnicn cannot De evaluated from 
MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequ 
signment to any other MRZ zone. 

See text for additional enplenation of MRZ Symbols 



ignificance of 



BRENTWOOD, CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



lii 



E GEOLOGIST 







EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIEO 

Boundaries established from data supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Hesearch with modifications developed from information sup- 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 





MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 


SAND & GRAVEL 










Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 
ludged lhat little likelihood exisls for their presence. 




MRZ-2 




f'YJi^2-'- : ' : j 




cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 


V t -^ 


MRZ-3 


Areas coniammg mineral deposils the significance of 


STONE 


MRZ^ 


Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 
signment lo any other MRZ zone. 




See la 


1 for additional explanation of MRZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J Plapperl 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

<n 





EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by ihe Oflice ol Planning 
and Research wiih modifications developed Irom information sup- 
plted by local government and other sources 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 










Areas where adequate information indicates thai no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or where it is 
judged That little likelihood exists (or their presence. 




MFIZ-2 


Areas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 


f -Kftfe£' v "J 




cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 
that a high likelihood lor their presence exists 


V . ./ 


MRZ-3 


Areas containing mineral deposits the significance ot 


STONE 


MRZ-4 


Areas where available inlormation is inadequate for as- 
signment to any other MRZ zone. 




Seeie 


t (or additional explanation ol MRZ Symbols. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




*&€'*. 



STATE GEOLOGIST 



evirt*> 




SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established irom data supplied by the Oflice of Planning 
and Research wiih modifications developed from information sup- 
plied by local governmen! and other sources. 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
{see text for discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-l Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 

judged '.hat little likelihood exists for their presence. 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information mdicnies lhat signifi- 
cani mineral deposiis are present, or where it is (udged 
that 8 high likelihood for their presence exists. 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of 
which cannot bo evaluated from available date. 

MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 
signment to any other MRZ zone. 

See iext for additional explanation of MRZ Symbols 



;, ( '„ cf , HONKER BAY. CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plapperl 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




bfi€* 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

IS AGENCT-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATlON-RANOALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




JERSEY ISLAND QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.82 




EXPLANATION 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




MRZ-3 Are 
MRZ-l Are 



high likelihood fo( II 

containing mineral deposils The signil 

where available information is inadequf 
ml to any other MRZ zone 

ditionai e»planation ol MRZ Symbols 



imiu JERSEY ISLAND. CALIF. 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



fit/t~V° 



STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

'. RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR HESOURCI 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




MARE ISLAND QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2. 33 




SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER. BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied by the Office of Plenmnt 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup 
plied by local government end Other sources. 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNOARY 
(see text (or discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate informalion indicates that no sig- 

nificam mineral deposits are present, or where it is 

judged that little likelihood exists for their presence 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that signili- 

cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 

' ■■-- ' "lood lor their presence exists 

I mineral deposit! 



MRZ-3 Areas 
MRZ-J Areas 



abta d 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvln C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



See text for additional eiplanation ol MRZ Symbols. 





EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom deta supplied by the Office ol Planmni 
and Research with modiliceiions developed Irom information sup 
plied by local government and other sources 

PROOUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



5AND & GRAVEL 
















ere adequate information indicates th 


a! nosig- 




MRZ-2 








(■■ toR2-;> J 




KaT 


eral deposits are present, or where it 


s |udged 




MRZ-3 


Areas c 


>niaming mineral deposits the signil 


cance of 


TONE 


MHZ-A 


Areas w 
signmen 


here available information is madequa 
to any other MRZ ^one 


te lor as- 




Seete 


t lor add 


tional explanation of MRZ Symbols 





MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Contra Costo County 



Melvin C.SIinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



•Al 



E GEOLOGIST MARCH 




EXPLANATION 



Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 
Boundaries establishe 

plied by local govern 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-l Areas where adequate information indicates thai no si 
ntficeni mineral deposits are present, or where it 
judged thai little likelihood exists lor iheir presence. 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates thai sigm 



MRZ-3 
MRZ-4 



; inadequate I 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plapperl 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



See text tor additional explanation ol MHZ Symbols 





STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

-: RESOURCES AGENCY-GOflDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANOALL M. WARD, DIRECTOR 



WALNUT CREEK QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.36 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY Of AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied bv the Office of Planning 



SAND & GRAVEL 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




WALNUT CREEK, CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Contra Costa County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W, Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



planelion ol MRZ Symbols. 



DIVISION OF MINES 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION- 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by (he Ollice Ol Planning 
and Research with modilicaiions developed Irom information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PROOUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text for discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MRZ-1 Areas where adequate inlorn 

MR2-2 Areas where adequate infom 
cent mineral deposits are pr< 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral d< 

MRZ^ Areas whe 



ALF MOON BAY, CALIF. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
San Mateo County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



* other MfiZ zone 
uplenstion of MRZ Symbols 




ty^C tVT-tv 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN. GOVERNOR 

RESOURCES AGENC-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESQURCI 

DEPARTMENT OF COHSERVATlON-RANOALL M. WARO, OIRECTOR 




MINDECO HILL QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 38 




SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



PROOUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see text lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates thi 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates thi 
cant minoral deposits ate present, ot where ii i 
ihal a high likelihood tor iheir presence exists 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the signific 
not be evaluated fi 



MfiZ-4 



See text lor edditi 



inlormation is inadeq 
r fvtRZ zone 

anon o( MRZ Symbols. 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Sanla Clara and San Mateo Counties 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




£ GEOLOGIST MABCH I, 




EXPLANATION 



T TO URBANIZATION 



PROOUCTIONCONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
ESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SANDS GRAVEL MRZ , AfM| 



iisnauor, of MflZ Syml 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
San Mateo County 



Melvln C. Stlnson, Michael W. Manson, and John J Plapperl 
1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4. SECTION 2761 



•fa fy-q tyri* 



JAMES f DAVIS, STATE GEOLOGI 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN. GOVERNOR 
DEPARTMENT OF O 




PALO ALTO QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.40 




la) 



MRZ-4 



MRZ-I 



MRZ- 



MRZ-3 
(0 



To 



MRZ-3 
) 




MRZ-4 



.MRZ-3 

m 



MRZ-3 



VMRZ- 



MRZ-4 






MRZ-4 



vMRZ-3 x 



MRZ-4 



MRZ-3 



MRZ-3 
(b) 



MRZ-3 
.(c) 



MRZ- 



MRZ-3 
.(d)- 



r MRZ-4 



MRZ-3 
'(c) 



MRZ-3 
(a) 



V\MRZ- 



MRZr3 

mm 



EXPLANATION 



SAND & GRAVEL 




Jia supplied by ihe Office ol Planning 
ms developed from intormation sup- 
J Other sources 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates that no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or where it is 
little likelihood e*isis for their presence, 
a adequate information indicates thai sigmli 
il deposits are present, or where it is judged 
likelihood for their presence e*isls. 
aming mineral deposits the significance of 
which cannot be evaluated from available data 
MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 
signment to any other MfiZ zone. 

See tent for additional explanation of MflZ Symbols 



MH2-,> Arr, 



MRZ-3 Are 



PALO ALTO. CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties 
By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



STATE GEOIOGIS 



Wrto 







• « ■> ■•' e I 
/ 



^ ° : 




SAND & GRAVEL 



EXPLANATION 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see 18>i lo> discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 




MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Son Francisco County 
By 
Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 
1962 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975. ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



<fn W^k. egis. 




SAND & GRAVEL 



EXPLANATION 

Drill hols 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 

AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from dole supplied 0y Iho Office of Planning 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see ten tot discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 







to any other MRZ lone 
lOnal explanation ol MRZ Sym 1 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

San Mateo and San Francisco Counties 

By 

Melvln C Stlnson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



>to W^L fl^r-C 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCI 
ARO, OIRECTOR 



MATEO OUADR 




46 PLATE 2.43 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied by the Oldce ol Planning 
and Research with moditicaiions developed trom information sup- 
plied bv local government and oiher sources. 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-1 t 



tere adequate information indicates thai no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits ere preseni. or where il is 
judged thai little likelihood exists tor their presence 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates thai signifi- 
cani mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 
that a high likelihood for their presence exists. 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance of 
which cannot be eveluatod from available data 

MHZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 
signmeni to an V other MRZ zone. 









f MfiZ Symbols 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
San Mateo County 

By 

Melvin C. Slinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

n 




STftTE OEOLOGIS 






I I i . I, jj 






























1 1 


( . 'l : '''. ; 








) Lo 






































» -7'r j 


















1 


' . 














































i 






1 ") 


, ■ 




I 






■ 


: 










II 1: 1! " ,11 ! 


I i, 



MRZ-4 









! 



EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established horn data supplied bv the Office ol Plannm, 
and Research with modifications developed Irom inlormalion sup 
plied by local government and other sources. 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-l 


XLTZ 


adequate information Indicates thai 
litlle likelihood exists (or their prose 


no sig- 




MRZ-2 




adequate information indicates tha 




FSiP'i 




lhai a h, 9 h 


fiood fo? .h*? p"e»n«" "si! " 




V /. —s 


MHZ-3 


Areas cont 


ming mineral deposits the signilice 


nee of 


STONE 


MRZ4 


Ateas whei 


available information is inadequate 
any Other MRZ lone 


lor as- 




S..ie 


t lor eddilior 


al explanation of MflZ Symbols 





WOODSIDE, CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
San Mateo County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Monson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

n 

E GEOLOGIST MARCH I, 1983 





STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 
Resources agency-goroon k van vleck. secretary for resource 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATtON-RANOALL M WARD, OIRECTOR 



wm. 

















SPECIAL F 


EPORT 


46 PLATE 2 45 








^ 


















F 
i 








-.„, — - 


i 
] 

! 
1 








i 

i 










EXPLANATION 



Drill hole 



OUTER BOUNOARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
ANO LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom dale supplied by ihe Olhce ol Plenmm 

and Research with morJitK.-iiioni i.l*vi<lQped Irom information sup 
plied by local government and other sources. 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
(see taxi lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNOARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 


MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information indicates thai no sig- 




nificant mineral deposits are present, or where it is 




judged ihat little likelihood exists lor their presence. 




MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 


rrf K i 


cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is judged 


\ ^/ 


MRZ-3 Areas conleinmg mineral deposits the significance of 


~y i 


MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate for as- 


STONE 


signment io any other MRZ zone 




See text for additional explanation ol MHZ Symbols. 



CALAVERAS RESERVOIR. CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Santa Clara County 

By 

Melvin C.Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

E GEOLOGIST MARCHI,I96J 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

E RESOURCES AGENCY-COROON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
OEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




CASTLE ROCK RIDGE QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.46 



r | 



S , 









I 



V 
Vj3 






^. 






MONTERy s 






im 



% 



'j 
















1 






V 

1 



- 















fi 


















1 ■ 



























. 




EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom dais supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources. 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

MfiZ-1 Areas where adequate inlormalion indicates that no sig- 
nificant mineral deposits are present, or where it is 
judged that little likelihood exists for their presence 

MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates that signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is |udged 
thai a high likelihood lor their presence exists. 

MRZ-3 Areas containing mineral deposits the significance Of 
which cannot be evaluated Irom available data. 

signment to any other MRZ zone 



CASTLE ROCK R1DOE.C 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 

Santa Clara County 
By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

n 

E GEOLOGIST MARCH 1.1985 



See text lor e 



1 MRZ Symbols 





STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN , GOVERNOR 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



(JUfERTINO QUADRANGLE 

SPECIAL flEPORT 146 PLATE 2.47 




CUPERTINO. CALIF 



EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established (torn data supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Research with modlfii alions developed I'om information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PRODUCTIONCONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 



MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 



SAND & GRAVEL 












Areas where adequate mlormation in 








nificani mineral deposits are prese 


it. or where it is 






judged that Itttle likelihood emsts (of 






MflZ-2 


Areas where adequate information in 




/ v , y i--:-y-A 




cam mineral deposits are present, or 
that a high likelihood lor their piesen 


where H is judged 




MRZ3 


Areas containing mineral deposits t 


tie significance ol 










/ 


MRZ-1 


Areas where available information is 


nadequale for as- 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 



By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 

RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

.,/! 



M. 



H/lrC 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCI 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANOALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




LOS OATOS QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.48 




SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied bv ihe Ollice or Planning 
and Research with modifications developed horn information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 

PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
[see text lor discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 

ludged that little likelihood exists lor their presence 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate mlormation indicates that signifi- 
cant mineral deposits are present, or where it is |udged 
that a high likelihood lor their presence exists 
^eas containing mineral deposits the significance of 



a any other MHZ zone 

nal explanation ol MRZ Symools 



a for a 



LOS GATOS. CALIF 

MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Santa Clara County 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



STATE GEOLOGIST 





MRZ-I 






I JOSE EAST. CALIF 



EXPLANATION 

Drill hole 

OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIED 

Boundaries established from data supplied by ihe OHice ol Planning 
and Research with modifications developed Irom information sup- 
plied by local government and other sources 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Santa Clara County 



SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-I Areas where adequate information in. 



judged that Mile likelihood exists for t 
MRZ-2 Areas where adequate information indicates thai signifi- 
cant, mineral deposits ere present, or where it is judged 
•"' - high likelihood lor their presence exists, 

containing mineral deposits Ihe significance of 

MRZ-4 Areas where available information is inadequate (or as- 
STONE aignment to any oiher MRZ lone 



MRZ-3 



See tent lor a 



il explanation of MRZ Symbols 



Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W, Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



pyy~£o 



STATE GEOLOGIST MARCH 




SAND & GRAVEL 




MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNDARIES 
MRZ-1 Areas where adequate information Irn 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Santa Clara County 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J- Plappert 

1 982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



MRZ-3 Areas containing 
MRZ-4 Areas where avai 



information is inadequate I 



r MRZ I. 
See text tor additional explanation ol MRZ Symbols 




STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN . GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K. VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANOALL M WARD. DIRECTOR 




SANTA TERESA HILLS QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2,51 







. 



SAND & GRAVEL 




EXPLANATION 



OUTER BOUNDARY OF AREAS SUBJECT TO URBANIZATION 
AND LIMIT OF AREA CLASSIFIEO 

Boundaries established Irom data supplied by the Office of Planning 
and Research with modifications developed from information sup- 



PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION REGION BOUNDARY 
{see text for discussion) 

MINERAL RESOURCE ZONE BOUNOARIES 

MRZ-f Areas wr 

judged thai little likeliho 

iere adequate information 
re present, < 



MRZ-J 



MRZ3 
MRZ4 



h.gh li 



ninfl r 






signment lo any other MBZ *■ 



MINERAL LAND CLASSIFICATION MAP 

AGGREGATE RESOURCES ONLY 
Santa Clara County 

By 

Melvln C. Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING AND 
RECLAMATION ACT OF 1V75, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




OIVlSION OF MINES * 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN , GOVERNOR 

RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD. DIRECTOR 



VERMORE QUADRANGLE 



146 PLATE 2.52 



K ^U 



-. I 











I 



< 
i 
i 
,,1 _ L ^J 



/ 



\ g 




LIVERMORE. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



ytMto twt m*° 



STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT Of CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, QIRECTOR 






SECTOR C-l * 

./SECTOR C-2 

SECTOR-CT-3 " 
■\ SECTOR C-4 






SECTOR C-6 




SECTOR C-5 





EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
'controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



ALTAMONT. CALIF 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 
I98E 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



/>^-7sk 



STATE OF CALtFORNIA-GEORGE 0EUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 

! RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCI 
OEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



t COSTA VALLEY QUADFANOLE 

SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.54 









.;. n 










i 6- s 



SECTOR D-3 















. COSTA VALLEY. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



I 

N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 
By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

; RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATlON-RANOALL M WARD, OIRECTOR 






N1LES QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 255 




Newark 


/" 










9 


v& t 






SECTOR K-l 




- 






SECTOR J 


i pa; 






EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 
Melvin C- Stinson, Michael W Monson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



SEPTEMBER I, 1982 




EWARK QUADRANGLE 

REPORT 146 PLATE 2 56 




NEWARK. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 





11LPITAS. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 
I982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF I975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 276I 



ntn Vt^AL tyr-tv 



: GEOLOGIST SEP 



'"[-- 



IS, STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENC Y-GOROON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURO 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




MOUNTAIN VIEW OUADPANGLE 
SPECIAL fiEPORT 146 PLATE 2 58 



F r .\ N C I S C i' 



, 



'.. 




' 








-■■ ■ 

- 


V 




s 
















MOUNTAIN VIEW 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Monson, and John J Plappert 
1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



i[yW* 



MES F DAVIS, STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




HAYWAPD QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.59 



i 




HAYWARD, CALIF 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 
1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



i n i'L ti/y~(*> 








1/ 


' 





















> EAST. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 
Melvin C Stinson, Michael W. Manson, and John J Plappert 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



tf£ 



W-rlL Ci/J-C^ 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 
OEPAflTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M. WARD. OIRECTOR 



'_'" J E j-J'iT*^' " " " " * 
















■:^' 



\ L e 



J 



ANTIOCH SOUTH, CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975. ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



'MJn \rA* tlr&J 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 

RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK. SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSEHVATION-RANOALL M WAHO, DIRECTOR 





CLAYTON QUADRANGLE 

SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.62 











CLAYTON. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



■Mj>f) tr-rlC St>>~t« 




RICHMOND. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



' M<x cf/y^° 




SAN OUENTIN. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 




I FRANCISCO SOUTH. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 
Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



fl££gg 







SECTOR HH 

J 



TOPOGRAPHIC BASE MAP B) U S GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



EXPLANATION 

-Sector boundary 
Properties owned or 

-controlled by oggreqote 
producers 

^Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Boy P-C Region 

8y 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plapperl 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



Ain 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

I RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 






: 















ms t 















i 



i 



1 1 












. 



- 















m \- l 







MINDEGO HILL QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 67 






L 




SECTOR Z 










'/"l~~'h "' l 












.. 














■■ J v A 




'l" L f':' 










\ 


•■ 




/ 


























• 




: ' 


i 


' .'' U 






.. 












I 1 


i 


J 



MINDEGO HILL. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 
By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 
1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



i N-/L d/M" 



EMeER I, 1982 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN . GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCl 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



CUPERTINO QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2 68 




CUPERTINO. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



'4)1 fa lv-4. fpr-(*> 



: GEOLOGIST SEPTEM 



.. STATE GEOLOGIST 



STATE Of CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

E RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON K VAN VLECK, SECHETART FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 



ST QUADRANGLE 






fe W--. s& 







SAN JOSE E ' 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stjnson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



K,y-Cv 







J 



SANTA TERESA HILLS. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



'Vtilto W-ALt 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSE«VAT<ON-HANDALL H WAWO, OIRECTI 




BRENTWOOD QUADRANGLE 
REPORT 146 PLATE 2 71 



pC ji: „r^^ 







BRF.NTWOOD. CALIF 




EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J Plappert 
1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLED, SECTION 2761 



lUfn ^nu tvr^ 



SEPTEMBER I, 1982 





state of california-george oeukmejtan , governor 

: resources agency-goroon k van vlecx, secretary for resour 

oepahtment of conservation-randall m. waro, director 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS OUADRANGLE 
6 PLATE 2 72 







SECTOR GG 



V 



! : i 3 





EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C- Stinson, Michael W Monson, and John J- Plapperl 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJ1AN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GOROON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCES 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M WARD, DIRECTOR 




HALF MOON BAY QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.73 




















EXPLANATION 

Sector boundary 

Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



ALF MOON BAY, CALIF 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 
Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 

E GEOLOGIST SEPTEMBER I , I9B2 




STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE DEUKMEJI AN, GOVERNOR 

THE RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCI 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATiON-RANDALLM WARD, DIRECTOR 







LOS OATOS QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.74 







EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 



Melvin C Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 



PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA-GEORGE OEUKMEJIAN , GOVERNOR 

: RESOURCES AGENCY-GORDON K VAN VLECK, SECRETARY FOR RESOURCI 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION-RANDALL M. WARD, DIRECTOR 




CALAVERAS RESERVOIR QUADRANGLE 
SPECIAL REPORT 146 PLATE 2.75 




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VERAS RESERVOIR. CALIF. 




EXPLANATION 



Sector boundary 



Properties owned or 
controlled by aggregate 
producers 

Depleted resources 



N 



Aggregate Resource Sectors 

South San Francisco Bay P-C Region 

By 

Melvin C. Stinson, Michael W Manson, and John J. Plappert 

1982 

PREPARED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE SURFACE MINING 
AND RECLAMATION ACT OF 1975, ARTICLE 4, SECTION 2761 



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