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CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU . 

FERRY BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO ' 

FLETCHER HAMILTON State Mineralogist 

San Francisco December, 1918 



Mines and Mineral Resources 



PLUMAS COUNTY 



By EHROL MAC BOYLE 



TA 



* • 
♦ • « 

* < 



CONTENTS. 



■ ; PAGB 

^'^ MINING DISTRICTS 1 

^^ BuTTB Valley 1 

' \ Crescent Mills 4 

^J Edmanton 8 

^»~ Genbsbb 12 

^ Granite Basin 18 

johnsvillb i 21 

'^ La I*ortb 27 

^(3 Light's CAfiJoN 31 

5« QuiNCY 36 

(^ Sawpit Flat 42 

Spanish Ranch 46 

Taylorsvillb 49 

MINES AND MINERALS 54 

Chromitb 54 

Copper . 54 

Gold 64 

Drift Mines 64 



'J 



f 



r Hydraulic Mines 89 

Lode Mines 94 

Placer Mines 172 

Dredging : 178 

Limestone 178 

Manganese 179 

Molybdenum 180 

Silver 180 

Stone Industry , 181 

INDEX 183 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



J View across Indian Valley showing Crescent Mills 5 

j^J*anoramic view from the head of the Plumas Eureka tramway 20 

View showing character of the country in vicinity of Gold Lake 23 

View near Round Lake mine 26 

"' View looking west from Quincy toward Spanish Peak 38 

^ View looking across the South Fork Feather River 44 

• Surface workings of the Crescent mine 110 

View showing the Green Mountain mine 123 

Outcrop of quartz vein near Shoofly Bridge 133 

- Plumas Eureka Mill ; EMreka Peak in background 155 

'^; Eureka Peak, taken from trail to the Plumas Eureka mine 156 

'^ View showing Round Lake mine ; glacial moraine in foregrounid 163 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 



MINING DISTRICTS. 



BUTTE VALLEY MINING DISTRICT. 
Including Sunnyside. 

Gold is the only metalliferous product of importance in the Butte 
Valley district. It has been produced from rich placer diggings in 
gravels of both recent and ancient streams. Considerable gold is also 
being recovered from quartz veins, and prospects for the future are 
promising. 

The settlement of Butte Valley (sometimes known as Butt Valley) 
is situated at an elevation of 4600', ten miles by stage from Crescent 
Mills on the Indian Valley Railway. It is about ten miles by trail west 
of Greenville, and about nine miles by stage road south of Prattville. 
Prattville is sixteen miles by stage northwest of Greenville, which is 
ten miles northwest of Keddie, a station on the main line of the 
Western Pacific Railroad. During the winter months heavy falls of 
snow and rain make transportation difficult. The roads are good 
during the summer. 

Timber consists of pine, fir, spruce and tamarack. Water is 
plentiful, since the North Fork Feather River, Indian Creek, Yellow 
Creek, and several small streams flow through the district. 

History of mining. 

A few relatively small deposits of ancient auriferous gravel have 
been mined in this district. Deposits of auriferous gravel occur in 
the recent beds of the North Fork Feather River, Indian Creek and 
Rush Creek. This gravel was once rich in gold, and was extensively 
mined. At some localities it has been worked over a number of 
times, and mining still continues. Very little mining of gold quartz 
deposits has been done, although there are several prospects. 

Topography. 

Dyer Peak, elevation 7400', in the northeastern part, is the highest 
point in the district. South of the peak there is a gradual slope to a 
broad-topped ridge, elevation 6400', lying between North Fork 
Feather River and Indian Creek. This ridge has a steep, north- 
westerly face where bordered by the North Fork Feather River, and 
is deeply cut by Indian Creek, which flows westerly. Red Hill rises 
to an elevation of a little over 6000' between North Fork Feather 
River and Indian Creek. The west side of Dyer Peak slopes pre- 
cipitously to Big Meadows, which is a broad, flat area, lying at an 
elevation of about 4300'. The streams in this area head in broad 
shallow valleys, but as they approach North Fork Feather River they 



2 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBCES. 

( ut deep canons. This whole region drains into North Pork Feather 
River, which heads in Big Meadows. Indian Creek drains all of the 
southern portion of the district and Yellow and Chip creeks western 
portions. 

Bibliography. 

TJ. S. Geol. Survey, Folio No. 15, 1895, Lassen Peak. U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 
No. 353, 1908, Geology of the Taylorsville Region, California, by J. S. 
Diller. 

Geology. 

In the northeastern portion of the district, on the slopes of Dyer 
Peak, diabase and porphyrite are exposed. They lie in contact on the 
north with basalt; on the west with the alluvium of Big Meadows, 
and on the south wdth quartz-porphyry. The formations southeast 
of here all strike northwest, being overlain by basalt to the northwest 
in the regions of Prattville, Longville, Yellow Creek and Chip Creek. 
The formations in succession from northeast to southwest are 
peridotite, Arlington formation, diabase, Calaveras formation, 
diabase, Cedar formation, peridotite and Calaveras formation. The 
igneous rocks lie in narrow bands between the sedimentary for- 
mations. 

The Grizzly formation is composed chiefly of slates ; it is of Silurian 
age and is the oldest fossiliferous rock yet discovered in northern 
California. A small area occurs along the south contact of the 
quartz-porphyry with the peridotite. The Arlington formation, sup- 
posed to be of Devonian age, is composed of gray sandstone, slate 
and conglomerate. The Calaveras formation, belonging to the Car- 
boniferous period, consists of comparatively small lenticular masses 
of quartzite, slate and limestone, cut by occasional auriferous quartz 
veins and areas of gabbro and other intrusive rocks. The Cedar 
formation, of the Juratrias period, consists of metamorphosed slates 
and limestone, in which auriferous quartz veins have been found. 

The diorite of this district usually contains plagioclase, hornblende, 
black mica and quartz, and belongs to the quartz-mica-diorite series. 
The sedimentary rocks in contact with diorite are greatly altered. 
Peridotite is an intrusive rock originally composed of olivine, and, in 
many cases, pyroxene. When pyroxene becomes the predominant 
mineral the rock is called pyroxenite. Since its intrusion the olivine 
and some of the associated minerals have been altered to serpentine. 
Diabase and porphyrite are the other intrusive rocks of the Juratrias 
period; they have been subjected to great pressure, accompanied by 
an alteration of their mineral constituents. Andesites, which are 
characterized by the predominance of pyroxene, are called pyroxene 
andesites; in like manner some of the rocks are called hornblende 
andesites. Generally the andesites are older than the rhyolites, 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 3 

dacites and basalts. The rhyolites of this district are light-colored, 
usually lithoidal, and occasionally composed of perlitic glass. Basalt 
is the most common and widely distributed lava of the district, 
having escaped from many volcanic vents towards the end of the 
Neocene period; it flowed down the canons cut in the older rocks, 
occasionally damming them up, and giving rise to fertile meadows. 

The relation of land and sea in northern California and Oregon, 
was essentially the same throughout the Silurian, Devonian, Car- 
boniferous and Juratrias periods; frequent oscillations of the land 
with reference to the sea level are recorded in the changes of sedi- 
ments. These strata, originally deposited horizontal, have since been 
faulted and metamorphosed; the fractures have been filled with 
auriferous quartz veins. The deformation did not all occur at the 
same time ; the first tilting took place before the oldest Triassic forma- 
tion was deposited. The rocks were again folded during the 
Juratrias, at the close of which period the great deformation occurred 
which raised the whole of northern California above sea. In this 
district there were active volcanoes during the Carboniferous and 
Juratrias periods. Many of these older eruptions have been folded 
and displaced along with the sedimentary rocks. Later volcanic 
action occurred during Neocene time. To the younger flows of basalt 
this district is indebted for the development of its agricultural and 
grazing lands. Lava in many places dammed up the canons, in which 
by gradual accumulation of gravel, sand, mud, infusorial earth and 
vegetable matter, beautiful meadows formed, as typified by Big 
Meadows, Humbug Valley and Butte Valley. 

Mineral deposits. 

By the disintegration of the auriferous slates of the Cedar and 
Calaveras formations gold has been furnished for placer mines in the 
Quaternary stream gravels of Indian Creek, Rush Creek, and the 
North Fork Feather Biver. The deposits in the region of Lot's 
diggings and Dutch Hill are typical occurrences of auriferous gravels 
of ancient streams. They have all been mined and the latter is said 
to have been rich. The gravel at Dutch Hill is about 1000' above the 
North Fork Feather River and at Lot's diggings near the latitude of 
the fortieth parallel, the gravel lies nearly 4000' above the level of 
the river where it cuts across the range. It is evident that there has 
been a great change in the drainage of the country since these gravels 
were deposited. 

Lode mines and prospects in this district are limited to the 
auriferous slates, of which the Cedar formation and the Calaveras 
formation have been the most productive. Intermingled with the 
auriferous slates are eruptive rocks, and it has been found that the 



4 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

most promising prospects of the district are located near the borders 
of these eruptive masses. The ore bodies may be in the auriferous 
slates or the eruptive rock, but in either case they are not far from 
the contact.. Among the quartz mines and prospects are the Saver- 
cool and Del Monte mines on both banks of the North Pork Feather 
River just to the north of Seneca, the Lictum and Plumas Amal- 
gamated quartz mines in the Calaveras formation between Seneca and 
Indian Falls, and the Elizabeth Consolidated in the Cedar formation 
to the east of Red Hill. Considerable quantities of gold have already 
been taken out, and the future is promising. 

CRESCENT MILLS MINING DISTRICT. 
Including Greenville. 

The leading mineral product of this district is gold, though some 
silver and copper are produced as by-products. The gold has come 
mainly from the Crescent Mills belt of quartz mines, but it has also 
been mined in the recent and ancient stream gravels. Exposures of 
iron ore occur in the district, but iron has not been exploited. 

Crescent Mills is in the north central portion of Plumas County. 
It is a station on the Indian Valley Railroad, ten miles from Paxton, 
the junction. Greenville lies nearly four miles northwest of Crescent 
MiUs. 

Staging is difficult during the winter, as the heavy precipitation of 
rain and snow renders the roads bad, but during the summer months 
traveling is quite good. 

The elevation of Crescent Mills is 3520', and that of Greenville 
3580'. Both are situated on the west side of Indian Valley. During 
the winter months cold, wet Weather is typical, but it is warm and dry 
as a rule during the summer. 

Considerable timber is found covering the slopes and ridges sur- 
rounding Crescent Mills. Yellow and sugar pine with some fir, spruce 
iind tamarack are common, and underbrush grows on the slopes. 

AVolf Creek, draining the country north of Greenville, Dixie Creek 
to the south, and Indian Creek, comprise the natural water supply. 
In addition, a large reservoir, called Round Valley Reservoir, is 
situated at an elevation of 4480', about two miles south of Greenville 
and west of Crescent Mills. 

History of mining. 

The principal producing mines have been the Crescent Mills, Green 
Mountain, Indian Valley and McGill-Standart, which lie in the 
Crescent Mills mining belt. In October, 1914, there were but two 
active producers. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 5 

Placer mines in the auriferous gravels of present streams have been 
worked for some years. Near Arlington Bridge and Shoofly Bridge, 
both on Indian Creek southwest of Crescent Mills, mining is still 
going on. The annual yield, including placers in Light's Cailon and 
above Flournoy on Indian Creek, is about $10,000. 

Some mining of auriferous gravels of ancient streams has been 
done. One placer, one-third of a mile northwest of Round Valley 
Reservoir, is said to have yielded $150,000. 

The total production of the Crescent Mills belt is stated to have 
exceeded $6,650,000. 

Bibliography. 

Dlller, J. a, Geology of the Tayloraville Region. Cal„ U. 9, Geol. Survey 
Bull. 353, 1908. Lindgren. W., Tertiary gravela ot the SEerra Nevada. 
U. S, Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages lH-116. U. S. Geoi, Survey 
Mln. Reaourcfs, 190B. page 180. U. S, Qeol. Survey Mtn. Resources, 1907, 
pt. I, page 219. U. S. Geol. Survey Mln. Resources. 190S, pt. I, page MS, 



Survey Topo. sheets, Indian Valley, Tayloraville. Honey I..ake, 
Topography. 

The district is situated on what is generally known as the Grizzly 
Mountain block, which lies at the northern end of the Sierra Nevada, 
northeast of the main crest, and between it and the Diamond Moun- 
tain block. 

The Grizzly block comprises the Grizzly Mountains and Keddie 
Ridge. In the Grizzly Mountains the crest line and escarpment are 
well marked, presenting a steep slope of over 3000' at the west end 
of Genesee Valley. The crest line sinks and curves toward the north- 
west; disappearing at Taylorsville into the Indian Valley, it rises 



6 MINES AND MINERAL RES0X7RGES. 

again in Keddie Ridge and curves back to its northwest course. The 
broad gap in the crest occupied by Indian Valley is more than a mile 
in width. Keddie Ridge, which carries the crest beyond Indian 
Valley, extends for about fourteen miles both extremities, ending in 
plains. 

The southwest slope of Grizzly Mountains is gentle. About 
Crescent Mills and Greenville, the block is broken down to the level 
of Indian Valley, which crosses the main crest. This gives especial 
prominence to the escarpment of Arlington Heights and Houghs Peak, 
which form a second crest. Beyond Round Valley Reservoir the slope 
is better preserved in the northwestern inclination of the divide 
I etween Indian Creek and the North Fork Feather River. 

Indian Creek, flowing in a general southwesterly direction from 
Crescent Mills, has cut a deep notch through the Grizzly block, both 
sides of which slope gradually to the crest. 

The district is completely drained by Indian Creek and its tribu- 
taries. Wolf Creek drains the northern portion, Dixie and Clear 
creeks the southern, and Houghs Creek the eastern part. 

Geology. 

In the northern portion of the district, extending from Keddie Peak 
westward, is a large exposure of Taylor meta-andesite. In contact 
with this on its southern width is an extensive area of meta-rhyolite, 
the latter completely enclosing the Greenville arm of Indian Valley. 
South of this meta-rhyolite is an exposure of Arlington formation 
having a northwest-southeast trend, and in contact on its northern 
edge with the meta-rhyolite and the alluvium deposits of Indian 
Valley. Bordering the Arlington formation on its southern edge, 
Taylor meta-andesite which trends generally northwest-southeast, is 
in turn bordered by a relatively large area of Shoofly formation. 
West of Indian Creek there are four small exposures of basalt and 
two of rhyolite. Two relatively small exposures of andesite are seen, 
one about one mile east of Arlington Bridge; one capping some 
auriferous gravels and in contact with the meta-rhyolite. Four small 
areas of serpentine, one on the northern edge of Round Valley Reser- 
voir, are enclosed by meta-rhyolite. The serpentine on the north of 
Round Valley Reservoir is in contact with an exposure of grano- 
diorite, which is fully enclosed by the meta-rhyolite. Another very 
small exposure of granodiorite is seen fully enclosed by serpentine in 
contact on all sides with the meta-rhyolite just to the northwest of 
Round Valley Reservoir. A fairly large area of Taylorsville forma- 
tion lies about two miles west of Greenville, and another lies two 
miles southeast of the town, in contact with the alluvium deposits of 



PliUMAS COUNTY. 7 

Indian Valley. Dikes of rhyolite are seen in two places, one about 
three-fourths of a mile diie north of Round Valley Reservoir in the 
granodiorite, and three smaller ones in the Taylorsville formation 
west of Greenville. A small exposure of auriferous gravels is seen in 
the Shoofly formation, west of Indian Creek ; another partially capped 
by andesite lies northeast of Greenville, and another is found about 
three miles northeast of Greenville in the meta-rhyolite. 

The meta-rhyolite is a massive gray siliceous rock generally con- 
taining phenocrysts of quartz or feldspar in a uniformly fine, compact 
ground mass. It is of pre-Silurian age, and the oldest rock in the 
district. The next oldest is the Taylorsville formation of fine sedi- 
ments, slates and thin-bedded sandstones of Devonian age. The 
Taylor meta-andesite is decidedly green in color aind porphyritic when 
unaltered. This great mass, comprising a lava flow, lies conformably 
between the Arlington and the Shoofly beds. The igneous rocks of 
the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous include serpentine, granodiorite 
and rhyolite dikes. Most of the material included under the desig- 
nation of serpentine is typical green serpentine. The rock called 
granodiorite is a light-colored and for the most part medium-grained 
rock, which looks like granite. The rhyolite dike rock varies from 
light gray to pale green and reddish brown, containing small pheno- 
crysts of quartz, but is rarely porphyritic. These are all later than 
the formations with which they are in contact, and the latter are 
later than the granodiorite. During the Tertiary period a flow of 
rhyolite of Miocene age took place. This is a siliceous lava, generally 
light-colored or brownish and more or less porphyritic, with grains of 
quartz and sometimes with scattered crystals of feldspar or -biotite. 
The andesite of the Pliocene period is a light gray lava more or less 
porphyritic in thin section. A felty dark gray ground mass encloses 
crystals of plagioclase, also hornblende, biotite and pyroxene in 
various proportions. The exposure east of Arlington Bridge is black, 
and breaks with irregular fracture. The andesite overljdng the 
auriferous gravel, a mile northeast of Greenville, is richer in augite 
and poorer in amorphous matter than that near Arlington Bridge. 
The basalt, seen on the ridge west of Shoofly, in part covering rhyo- 
lite, belongs to the Quaternary period. It is a lava wihich is darker 
colored, more compact, and heavier than andesite and frequently 
contains visible grains of yellowish-green olivine. 

On the valley border, one mile northeast of Greenville, there is a 
mass of gravel exposed along the road for over half a mile which may 
represent an early diversion of the Jura River. These gravels belong 
to the Quaternary period. The valley alluvium, also of the Quater- 
nary, is the sediment which fills Indian Valley. It contains some 



8 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

gravel, but sand ie more widely distributed and silt is the most 
common material, making an excellent soil for agriculture. 

Mineral deposits. 

Two types of auriferous gravels have been mined in this district: 
(1) the gravels of the present stream beds and the terraces near 
them; and (2) the gravels of ancient streams or high gravels. 

Under the head of present stream gravels are small workings on 
one of the benches near Shoofly Bridge by water taken out of the 
narrows and having a fall of nearly 100'. Placer mining has also 
been carried on along the upper course of Wolf Creek. 

A third of a mile northwest of Bound Valley Reservoir a placer 
mine on the slope toward the reservoir is said to have yielded 
i^l50,000. Its richness was attributed to residual material from the 
veins of the Standart-McGill mine. This deposit comes under the 
head of ancient stream gravels. 

The principal production from the district has come from the 
Crescent Mills belt, which extends from the neighborhood of Taylors- 
ville N. 50° W. through the Crescent Mills and Greenville dis- 
tricts to Wolf Creek, a distance of about fifteen miles, with a width 
of a little over a mile. In the Crescent Mills district the metalliferous 
deposits are confined chiefly to the igneous rocks in more or less well- 
defined quartz veins running through the granodiorite. The veins 
run generally parallel to the course of the belt, but in a few cases 
there are small veins nearly at right angles to the others. The oi?e is 
.auriferous pyrite, sometimes in small bodies, but generally dis- 
seminated in the narrow strip of sheared rock of the partially formed 
vein in which there is usually some quartz. The pyrite is nearly 
always changed to limonite, setting the gold free. In the Green 
Mountain mine, one mile west of Crescent Mills, one subordinate vein 
carries a small amount of chalcopyrite, but in general copper is 
absent. 

EDMANTON MINING DISTRICT. 

This district, including Meadow Valley, is typified by deposits of 
gold and manganese. The gold occurs both in river and lake gravels 
and also in vein deposits in a lode formation. The manganese is 
found in both vein and lode formations. 

The district is located in the west-central portion of Plumas 
County, Edmanton is about thirteen miles by road west of Quincy. 
The latter is connected by the Quincy Western Railroad to the 
Western Pacific Railroad at Quincy Junction (Marston). 

Road conditions, while fair in summer, are quite uncertain in the 
winter months, due to rain and snow. 



FLUliAS COUNTY. 9 

The elevation of Bdmanton is 4900', and the climate combines 
warm, dry summers with winters having considerable snow and 
rainfall. 

The district is included in the Plumas National Forest and contains 
tamarack, fir, spruce, yellow and sugar pine. 

The mineral of chief importance is gold, found in the Diadem lode, 
and also in auriferous gravels. Two veins of oxide of manganese 
are found near the Diadem lode, and also a well-defined vein of 
hematite and magnetite. 

Several lakes in the northern part of the district and the head- 
waters of numerous small tributaries to the North and Middle Fork 
of the Feather River assure a good water supply, while considerable 
uncut forest furnishes plenty of fuel and timber. 

History of mintng. 

The auriferous gravels of the Neocene period have been mined at 
the Monte Gristo claims, about two miles west of Edmanton, by 
means of a tunnel. Similar deposits have been noticed on the top of 
Spanish Peak, and also a mile and a half west of the peak. Two 
miles east of Buck's Ranch, pebbles like those at the Monte Cristo 
claim were noted, and about three miles southeast of Edmanton a 
large deposit of similar character is seen. 

The Pleistocene lake gravels in the vicinity of Grub Flat have been 
mined over by hydraulicking. 

The Diadem lode, composed of quartz veins in clay slate, containing 
rich selenides of gold and silver combined with lead and copper, has 
been exploited to a depth of over 300'. 

Bibliography. 

« 

Harder, E. C, Manganese deposits of the U. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 
No. 380, 1909, pages 270-271. Lindgren, W., Tertiary gravels of the Sierra 
Nevaxia, Prof. Paper No. 73, 1911, pages 98-99. U. S. Geol. Survey, 
Mineral Resources, 1907, pt. I, page 101. U. S. Oeol. Survey, Mineral 
Resources, 1909, pt. I, page 281. U. S. Geol. Survey, Folio 43, BIdwell 
Bar, 1898. 

Topography. 

The general character of the country in this district is mountainous. 
Edmanton is situated in Eagle Gulch, which traverses in a north- 
easterly direction a rather continuous range of high peaks trending 
northwest. 

Buck's Ranch, approximately four miles southwest of Edmanton, 
is located in this same canon, which has a gentle slope of about 300' 
downwards from Edmanton to Buck's Ranch. 

From Edmanton, to the northwest, there is a gradual rise for three 
miles to the top of Spanish Peak, elevation 7047'. From Spanish 



10 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Peak northwest to Mt. Pleasant, for three miles, the top of the ridge 
is nearly level, Mt. Pleasant being 7111' in elevation. 

On the eastern slope of the ridge, between Spanish Peak and Mt. 
Pleasant there is a chain of glacial lakes, connected by small tribu- 
tary streams, flowing into Silver Creek, which, in turn, drains into 
Spanish Creek, thence into Indian Creek and the North Pork Feather 
River. 

To the southeast of Edmanton there is a gradual rise to the top of 
a broad-topped plateau trending southeast. The general surface of 
this plateau is rather even, the few peaks being all of about 5500' 
altitude. As the plateau nears the canon of the Middle Fork Feather 
River, there is an even, but somewhat steep drop of about 2500' It 
is drained on the southern side by Bear Creek and smaller tributaries, 
which flow into the Middle Fork Feather River. On the northern 
slopes it is drained by Rock Creek and tributaries, which flow into 
Spanish Creek, Meadow Valley and Grub Flat, about three iniles 
northeast of Edmanton, having an average altitude of 3900'. Big 
Creek, flowing through Eagle Gulch, drains Meadow Valley and flows 
into Rock Creek and thence into Spanish Creek. 

Geology. 

The southern portion of the broad plateau region to the southeast 
of Edmanton, where cut through by the Middle Fork Feather River 
and Bear Creek, consists of the Calaveras formation. This extends 
northwesterly to Haskins Valley. North of the eastern portion of 
this belt of Calaveras fornaation is a broad capping of andesite of the 
Neocene period. This covers the broad plateau section to the south- 
east of Edmanton and extends north as far as Meadow Valley. West 
of the andesite capping and north of the, Calaveras formation is a 
strip of granite formation of the bedrock series nearly two miles in 
width and extending westward about three miles, where it broadens 
out to the north, covering Spanish Peak ridge as far north as Mt. 
Pleasant and all the country to the west excepting Buck's Valley, 
Haskins Valley and a strip about two miles long by one-half of a mile 
wide on the top of Spanish Ridge, which is covered by an andesite 
capping. 

On the north and east slope of Spanish Peak ridge is a series of fine 
moraines which form an area more than four miles long, as far south 
as Spanish Peak. 

East of this morainal deposit is a narrow strip of Calaveras forma- 
tion. This strip of Calaveras formation is in contact on the west with 
the granite from Spanish Peak southerly. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 11 

To the east of the last mentioned Calaveras formation is a strip of 
amphibolite schist, trending generally in a southeasterly direction. 
East of this comes a strip of Calaveras formation, and then serpentine. 

Meadow Valley and Grub Flat are composed of gravel beds of the 
Pleistocene period. 

The bedrock series embraces sedimentary rocks which were turned 
into a nearly vertical position during or before the post-Juratrias 
deformation, together with associated igneous rocks. The rocks of 
the Calaveras formation are metamorphosed sedimentary rocks of 
Carboniferous age. The amphibolites and amphibolite schists are 
metamorphosed igneous rocks. Serpentine comes under the head of 
the magnesian series, since magnesia is a prominent constituent. The 
granitoid rocks include the granites, granodiorites and quartz- 
diorites. 

The superjacent series consists of late Cretaceous, Eocene, Neocene 
and Pleistocene sediments lying unconformably on the bedrock series. 

During the Neocene period this district was a country of low relief, 
and the auriferous gravels were deposited by streams during this 
period. 

Under the head of the superjacent volcanic rocks may be classed the 
basalts and andesites. These are of the Neocene and later periods. 

There is a general fault zone trending to the southeast, running 
nearly six miles along the east side of Spanish Peak. There is also 
evidence of faulting along the Diadem lode at Edmanton; this is in 
the same general fault zone as that along Dogwood and Bear creeks 
and the east slope of Spanish Peak ridge. The displacements appear 
to have taken place after the last andesitic eruptions, either at the end 
of the Neocene or early in the Pleistocene. 

Mineral deposits. 

The gravel deposits of the district are mostly those of the Spanish 
Peak gravel channel. They are made up of pebbles of pyroxene- 
andesite, and were mined at the Monte Cristo claim at the south edge 
of the deposit. Another exposure is seen on the top of Spanish Peak 
itself, and again at a point one and one-half miles west of Spanish 
Peak, the gravel being capped by andesite breccia. Another exposure 
of gravel overlain by andesite breccia, is seen on the flat six miles 
southeast of Spanish Peak. The pebbles here are mainly of quartzite 
and other siliceous rocks. 

The gravel beds of Grub Flat and vicinity are made up of Pleisto- 
cene lake gravels. A large area of the lower gravel beds have been 
hydraulicked. Underlying the well-rounded gravel northwest of 
Grub Flat is some decomposed 'cement' gravel, made up of small 



12 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

round, red, brown and white particles, between which decomposed 
tuff has been deposited. 

The Diadem lode at Edmanton, with a strike of N. 37° W. and 
dipping 60° NE., has an average width of 60'. The vein matter 
is a highly ferruginous mass of material consisting of quartz, oxide 
of iron, chalcedony and manganese in clay slate. The lode has been 
exploited to a depth of 300'. Rich selenides of gold and silver com- 
bined with copper and lead are found. 

There is a well-defined vein of hematite and magnetite paralleling 
the Diadem lode 400' westerly, and conforming to it in dip and 
strike. It may be traced for more than two miles and varies from 
6" to 3' in thickness. 

A vein of oxide of manganese occurs near the Diadem lode, and 
another deposit three-fourths of a mile due south is known as the 
Penrose lode. The latter has been traced northwesterly as far as 
Eagle Gulch. The manganese is in the form of pyrolusite and 
psilomelane. 

About two miles west of Spanish Ranch post office and about three- 
lourths of a mile southwest of Meadow Valley bodies of chromic iron 
are found in place, and abundant pebbles of chromic iron are seen in 
the Meadow Valley Pleistocene conglomerate. 

GENESEE MINING DISTRICT. 

The mineral products of this district are gold and copper. Some 
placer mining for gold has been done in Tertiary gravels, but at 
present it is confined to the Quaternary stream gravels. Drift mining 
for gold and copper is carried on in the Genesee mining belt, extend- 
ing N. 22° W. from Ward's Creek to Lights Canon. 

Genesee is situated about fourteen miles, by stage, from Crescent 
Mills, in approximately the central portion of Plumas County. Cres- 
cent Mills is on the Indian Valley Railroad, ten miles from Paxton, a 
main line station on the Western Pacific Railroad, and about twenty- 
nine miles, by stage, southwest of Susanville, county seat of Lassen 
County. 

Travel by road during the winter months is difficult on account of 
heavy rain and snow fall, but during the summer months the roads 
are quite passable. 

Genesee is situated at an elevation of 3690' on the southern end of 
Genesee Valley. The climate in summer is warm and dry, in winter 
cold and wet. 

Timber is quite plentiful on the surrounding ridges. Spruce, fir, 
yellow pine, sugar pine and tamarack are found. The slopes are 
covered with brush, principally manzanita. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 13 

In the Genesee mining belt the ore, in some cases, is auriferous 
quartz and limonite, but in others it is chiefly bomite, chalcopyrite, 
ehalcocite, or copper carbonates. Placer mining for gold has been 
carried on to some extent in the auriferous gravels of both ancient 
and recent streams. 

Indian Creek, including its tributaries, assures a plentiful water 
supply to the whole district. Hosselkus Creek rising in the north 
and flowing southwesterly. Hungry Creek in the northeastern part, 
and Squaw Creek, Red Clover Creek, Wards Creek and Little Grizzly 
Creek, in the southern part, all of which flow into Indian Creek, cover 
the entire district. 

The forest growth furnishes sufficient mining timber and fuel. 

History of mining. 

During the great gold excitement in California prospectors found 
their way into the mountains about Indian Valley as early as 1850. 
Many locations followed the discovery of the ''Bullion Ledge," a 
short distance northwest of Greenville, in 1851. Gold was the 
primary object of search, but the discovery of rich copper ores in 
1865 led to the erection of a small furnace, which maintained a 
sporadic activity for four years. The Gruss mine along Wards Creek 
on the border of Genesee Valley has been in operation for over twenty 
years. This is in the Genesee mining belt, in which in 1904 there 
were five active mines. The belt extends from Wards Creek, N. 22'' 
W. to Lights Canon. Conservative estimates placed the production 
of the Genesee belt at $450,000 up to 1904. 

Bibliography. 

Diller, J. S., Mineral Resources of the Indian Valley region, U. S. Geol. Survey 
Bull. 260, 1909, pages 45-49. Diller, J. S., Geology of the TaylorsviUe 
Region, U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. (Jeol. Survey 
Mineral Resources 1905, page 180. U. S. Geol. Survey Mineral Resources 
1907, pt. I, page 219. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley. 
Genesee, Honey Lake. 

Topography. 

The district lies on the long and gentle southwest slope of the 
Diamond Mountain block, which extends from Honey Lake south- 
westward to the Grizzly Mountains. Its crest line lies close along its 
northeastern side, from McKesick Peak to Diamond Mountain. The 
slope to the southwest has the appearance of a plateau, the prominent 
features of Diamond Mountain block being the escarpment, the 
plateau slope and the valleys along its Western border. 

Kettle Rock Mountain is the greatest elevation in the district, being 
7850' high, or about 2000' above the general level, but it rises for the 
most part by such gentle slopes that it is not out of harmony with 
the peneplain. The upper portions of the streams are in broad 
shallow valleys, but as they approach the middle portion of the block 

2 — 46902 



14 MINES AND MINERAL EBSOURCES. 

they cut deeper and deeper until they flow in canons. The canons 
of Indian and Squaw creeks above Flournoy are examples, and they 
open into a broad alluvial valley below. The general trend of the 
valley belt along the border of the Diamond Mountain block is 
southeast-northwest from Genesee Valley to Mountain Meadows. 
Genesee Valley has a breadth of from one-third to three-fourths of a 
mile and a length of nearly six miles northeast and southwest directly 
across the general trend of the valley belt. It is a flat alluvial plain 
on both sides of Indian Creek, with an irregular border from jutting 
spurs and lateral branches running up Red Clover, Wards, Hosselkus 
and Little Grizzly creeks. Between North Arm and Genesee Valley, 
there is a gap forming a broad depression in the ridge crest that joins 
Mount Jura and Kettle Rock. This gap is a remnant of the old valley 
of the Jura River. Southeast of Genesee Valley there is a gradual 
rise to a broad-topped plateau, cut with rather deep notches by the 
eaiions of Little Grizzly, Wards and Red Clover creeks. 

All of the drainage of the district goes into Indian Creek ; Hosselkus 
Creek on the northwest, Indian Creek on the northeast, Red Clover, 
Wards and Little Grizzly creeks, on the south drain into Indian 
Creek, which in turn drains into the North Fork Feather River. 

Geology. 

The eastern portion of the district, except in the southeast comer, 
is composed of a large mass of granodiorite, which projects in on the 
north side of Genesee Valley to a point about two miles northeast of 
Genesee. A relatively large exposure of basalt is seen in the south- 
east. Lying north of Genesee Valley is a blunt wedge shaped area 
of Trail formation with a base about two miles in width along 
Hornfels Point. From Genesee Valley the Trail formation extends 
southeast to the basalt area above mentioned. Just to the south of 
this area of Trail formation is a small area of granodiorite. South of 
Genesee Valley, lying between Trail formation and basalt on its east 
and Robinson formation on its west, is a strip averaging about one- 
half mile wide of Kettle meta-andesite. North of Genesee Valley is a 
broad area of Kettle meta-andesite averaging about four miles in 
width and trending northwesterly. North of Genesee Valley and west 
of the granodiorite spur which lies north of Genesee Valley, is an 
exposure of Swearingen slate, in contact on its west with Robinson 
formation and Hosselkus limestone. South of Genesee Valley is a 
strip of Robinson formation, trending northwest and southeast, 
averaging a little less than one-half mile in width. North of Genesee 
Valley the Robinson formation is divided into two narrow belts by 
volcanic rocks, and is cut off by volcanic rocks about a mile south of 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 15 

X.ucky S. road, but reappears and shortly ends on the north side of a 
ravine leading down to Peters Creek. North of Genesee Valley, 
separating the Robinson formation, is a flow of Reeve meta-andesite 
trending northwest. This is a narrow belt with a considerable 
expansion about one and one-half miles north of Genesee Valley. It 
is cut off by Hull meta-andesite on the north. A second belt similar 
to the first, borders the Robinson formation on the west, but its long, 
slender, dike-like south end, penetrating the Taylor meta-andesite, 
does not reach Genesee Valley. South of Genesee Valley a small area 
of meta-andesite occurs east of Ward's Creek, in contact with Robin- 
son formation. On both sides of Genesee Valley, trending northwest 
to a point about a mile south of Lucky S. road, where it is cut oflf by 
Hull meta-andesite, is a strip less than one-half mile in average width 
of Taylor meta-andesite. South of Genesee Valley a dike of Hull 
meta-andesite cuts the Peale formation into two narrow belts for a 
distance of about a mile and a half. West of the Peale formation 
and on both sides of Genesee Valley is an exposure of Hull meta- 
iindesite. To the south of Genesee Valley it occupies a rather broad 
area in contact on the west with meta-rhyolite. North of Genesee 
Valley and lying to the east of the Hull meta-andesite is a deposit of 
Foreman formation, narrow near Genesee Valley and broadening out 
to a width of aboijt two miles to the north of Taylor diggings. It is 
again interrupted by North Arm, whence it continues northwest to 
Mountain Meadows. On the west it is in contact with the Hinchman 
sandstone. Several small areas of andesite are seen in this district. 
One, about a mile long and less than one-half mile wide in its widest 
portion, lies on Homfels Point; another, at the head of Foreman's 
Ravine, overlies a small area of auriferous gravels. South of South 
Fork Foreman's Ravine is an exposure of rhyolite, and another larger 
exposure occurs about a mile northeast of Taylor diggings. Several 
deposits of Tertiary auriferous gravels are seen: at Taylor diggings, 
a mile northeast of the summit of Mount Jura there is a relatively 
large exposure, and on the Lucky S. road a flat-topped mass of gravel 
caps the divide and main spur for over three miles. A small mass of 
«?ravel is seen on the Lucky S. road about two and one-half miles east 
of Hull diggings, and there are three flat-topped deposits at an eleva- 
tion of from 5500' to 5800' capping the divide between Wards Creek 
and Little Grizzly Creek, southwest of Genesee Valley. Another 
mass is seen on the divide between Wards Creek and Red Clover 
Creek. 

The oldest rock in the district, the meta-rhyolite, is a massive gray 
siliceous rock which generally contains phenocrysts of quartz or feld- 
spar embedded in a uniformly fine, compact groundmass. It is of 
pre-Silurian age. The Peale formation, belonging to the Calaveras 



16 MINES AND MlNEltAL R£SOUftCES. 

group of Carboniferous age, is a reddish to brown slaty shale, passing 
into tuflfaeeous sandstone and fine conglomerate. The Taylor meta- 
andesite, also of the Calaveras group, is a decidedly green rock and, 
in this district, has a pronounced porphyritic structure with pheno- 
crysts of plagioclase or augite. The meta-andesite dips southwest 
beneath the Peale beds. The Kettle meta-andesite of the late Car- 
boniferous is decidedly porphyritic, with many small phenocrysts of 
feldspar, some of hornblende and rarely quartz embedded in a 
reddish-brown or gray partially crystalline groundmass« The 
eruption of the great mass of Kettle meta-andesite probably occurred 
about the time the Robinson formation was deposited. The Reeve 
meta-andesite is composed of white crystals of plagioclase plentifully 
scattered in a compact dark groundmass. The relation of the Reeve 
meta-andesite to the Kettle meta-andesite is not clear, though it 
appears that the Kettle meta-andesite is the older. The Robinson 
formation includes a succession of variably sediments ranging from 
shale to conglomerate and composed chiefly of igneous material. The 
tuflfaeeous conglomerate and sandstone are composed almost wholly 
of volcanic material erupted in connection with the eflfusion of the 
mass of meta-andesite. It dips to the southwest between the Taylor 
meta-andesite, which was the source of its material. The Robinson 
beds evidently lie uncomforably beneath all the later formations with 
which they come in contact. The Hosselkus limestone is dark blue on 
fresh fracture, weathers light gray and contains a few veins of white 
calcite. It is evident that in the Taylorsville region there is a 
decided interruption between the Hosselkus limestone and the 
Robinson formation. It is possible that their contact is a plane of 
displacement. The Swearinger formation is chiefly a dark slaty 
shale, sometimes more or less calcareous and again decidedly siliceous. 
The Swearinger slate and the Hosselkus limestone are everywhere 
conformable, the general dip is to the southwest beneath the 
Hosselkus limestone and shows that in the Taylorsville region the 
Jurassic has been overturned. The Trail formation, of Jurassic age, 
includes a mass of strata composed largely of slaty shales with some 
interbedded sandstones and conglomerates. The general dip of the 
formation is southwest, at an angle ranging from 35° to 80° and it 
passes beneath the Swearinger slate and Hosselkus limestone. The 
horizon of the Trail formation appears to be unconformably over the 
Swearinger slate. The Foreman formation is a succession of shale, 
sandstone and conglomerate in which the sediment is for the most 
part derived from rocks which are not clearly volcanic. The general 
strike of the Foreman formation is northwest, and the dip is to the 
southwest immediately beneath the Hinchman formation and all the 
other formations of Mount Jura which have been overturned. The 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 17 

Hull meta-andesite of the late Jurassic is greenish to reddish in color. 
The prevailing type is essentially non-porphyritic and, in general, 
is only partially crystalline. The fact that it penetrates the Foreman 
beds to the northeast of Mount Jura, indicates that its eruption took 
place near the close of the Jurassic. The rock included under the 
head of granodiorite is a light-colored, and for the most part, medium- 
grained rock which looks like granite, composed chiefly of plagioclase 
and feldspar. Where the granodiorite comes in contact with the 
Swearinger slate and Trail formation, these have been converted into 
dark, flinty hornfels. The andesite is a light gray lava more or less 
I>orphyritic in thin section. It has a felty dark gray groundmass 
enclosing crystals of plagioclase and hornblende, biotite and pyroxene 
in smaller proportion. It occurs in sheets covering the older rocks, 
and is of Pliocene age. The basalt is a darker colored, more compact 
and heavier lava than the andesite, not plainly porphyritic, but 
frequently containing grains of yellowish green olivine. This basalt 
is made up of two lava flows of Quaternary age. The later basalt is 
dark gray, holocrystalline and rich in augite. The earlier is black 
and compact and contains much amorphous matter. Mount Ingalls 
was the vent for the flow in this district. 

Mineral deposits. 

The placer deposits of this district are of two kinds. Tertiary 
auriferous gravels and Quaternary stream gravels. Among the 
former are those of the Mount Jura divide, extending northeast from 
Mount Jura toward Kettle Rock. There are four areas, and the 
divide preserves a cross section of the ancient valley once occupied 
by Jura River. The two larger masses have been mined at Taylor 
and Hull diggings. These four areas were in all probability once 
connected. The gravels of the Mount Jura divide contain no pebbles 
of the Tertiary lavas. The pebbles of Tertiary rocks present are all 
of types that belong to the pre-Tertiary bedrock series. South of 
Genesee Valley, there are three flat-topped masses capping the divide 
between Wards and Little Grizzly creeks. These were mined at the 
old Peake diggings. In these gravels, pebbles of old rhyolite or 
quartzite like those of Grizzly Mountains are most abundant, with 
some of darker igneous rock and a few of granite. Pebbles 6'' to 10" 
in diameter are common, but boulders as large as 2' are rare. 
Mining has been carried on in the present stream gravels of Indian 
Creek above Flournoy, and on Little Grizzly Creek, one of the 
strongest streams of the region. The entire annual yield of the 
placer mines within and bordering on the Indian Valley quadrangle, 
is probably somewhat less than $10,000. 



18 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Under the head of lode-mining, the mines of the Genesee belt are 
important. The most continuous activity in the district has been 
along Wards Creek on the border of Genesee Valley, where the Gruss 
mine has been in operation for over twenty years. This mine is on 
both sides of the contact between the Kettle meta-andesite and the 
slaty shale of the Robinson formation. In the shale the partially 
formed veins follow narrow sheer zones, in which there is some 
auriferous quartz associated with limonite. The adjacent meta- 
andesite is often decidedly slaty and its ores chiefly chalcopyrite or 
bomite, with copper carbonates near the surface. Near by is the 
Mve Bears mine, in the Robinson slate, and this is much like the 
Gruss. The Green Ledge, Pilot, and others in the Kettle meta- 
andesite have small veins of quartz with bornite and some chalcoeite. 
The veins are generally less than 5'' in thickness. Across Genesee 
Valley is the Cosmopolitan mine on the contact of the granodiorite 
with the Hosselkus limestone and Swearinger slate. The ore is chal- 
copyrite and bornite, forming solid bodies up to 15' in thickness. On 
the surface the contact is marked by masses of garnet and epidote, 
which were not seen beneath, but in the Duncan mine the garnet and 
epidote are associated with the ore. The Bluebell mine is in the 
Hosselkus limestone near the contact, and from one of its shafts some 
tons of carbonate of copper have been brought up in connection with 
cave breccia. 

In the Taylor gravel diggings some years ago a bed of coal about 
five feet thick, lying nearly flat beneath the auriferous gravels, and 
resting directly on the upturned edges of Jurassic sandstone, was laid 
bare. About one ton was mined for blacksmithing purposes. 

GRANITE BASIN MINING DISTRICT. 
Including Buckeye, Gold Lake and Merrimac. 

The gold in this district is found principally in quartz veins in 
granite formations. Some gold has been taken from auriferous 
gravels of the Neocene period, both by hydraulicking and drift 
mining, and some from the gravel of the Little North Fork River. 

The district is situated in the western portion of Plumas County 
and the eastern portion of Butte County. Buckeye, approximately 
the center of the district, is on the boundary line between Plumas and 
Butte counties. Buckeye is about six miles by trail due east of Big 
Bar, a station on the Western Pacific Railroad, and about thirteen 
miles by stage, northeast of Berry Creek, another station on the 
Western Pacific Railroad. 

Considerable snow and a rather heavy rainfall in the winter months 
render the roads somewhat uncertain, but in the summer they are 
quite passable. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 19 

Buckeye is 5000' in elevation. Granite Basin is in the neighbor- 
hood of 4500', and Gold Lake and Merrimac 4250' and 3900', respec- 
tively. In the summer the climate is warm and dry, but the winters 
are quite rigorous. 

Mine timber and fuel are obtained from the surrounding forest, 
which includes tamarack, yellow and sugar pine, fir and spruce. 

The only mineral of importance is gold, which is mined both from 
gold-bearing quartz veins and by hydraulicking. At the Horseshoe 
mine, three miles southeast of Merrimac, the gravel of the Little 
North Fork River is washed. 

French Creek, Little North Fork, and their tributaries on the south 
and west of the district and tributaries of the North Fork Feather 
River on the north furnish a plentiful water supply to the district. 

History of mining. 

The Reynolds mine, three miles northwest of Merrimac, was worked 
for some time, a quartz vein in granitoid quartz-diorite containing 
the gold values; and narrow quartz veins in the granite area known 
as Granite Basin have been worked. Some hydraulicking has been 
done to the east of Buckeye and one drift mine has been worked at 
Buckeye in the auriferous gravels. 

Bibliography. 

U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, BIdwell Bar, 1898. 

Topography. 

Granite Basin in the eastern portion of the district is a small granite 
area formed by erosion, and lying mostly between 4500' and 5000' 
altitude. Sloping gradually up to the north, there is formed a chain 
of hills, chief among which is Frenchman Hill, about three miles 
northeast of Granite Basin with an elevation of 5993', and Soapstone 
Hill, about three miles northwest of Granite Basin, with an elevation 
of 5500'. The general trend of this chain of hills is northeast. To 
the west there is an easy raise to an elevation of about 5000', cut by 
the canon formed by Marble Creek, on the western part of which is 
situated Buckeye with an elevation of 5000'. About five miles due 
south of Granite Basin, two rather pronounced promontories are 
formed at the joining of Marble Creek, a tributary, and the Little 
North Fork River. East of the Little North Fork, which flows 
due south from Granite Basin, there is a fairly even slope to a broad 
low-sloping area in which is situated Gravel Range and China Gulch. 
West of the Plumas-Butte county line, the general slope of the whole 
district is to the southwest. The slope is even and slight to French 
Creek, which flows nearly due south throughout the district. This 
portion of the district is cut by numerous small tributary streams of 



20 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

French Creek flowing in a general westerly and southwesterly 
direction. 

The western portion of the district is drained by French Creek and 
its tributaries which flow into the North Fork Feather River. The 
northern part is drained by Grizzly Creek and tributaries, which in 
turn, flow into the North Fork Feather River. The Little North Fork 
and Marble Creek drain the southern and eastern portions, these 
flowing into the Middle Fork Feather River. 

Geology. 

Granite Basin is composed entirely of granite of the bedrock series. 
The exposure of this granite is somewhat circular with an average 
diameter of approximately two and one-half miles. It is surrounded 
by a wide area of araphibolite of the same series. In contact with 
the amphibolite to the northeast is a fairly large area of serpentine. 
Soapstone Hill, in the amphibolite area, is capped with serpentine, on 
the northeast of which is a small area of Calaveras formation. Bear 
Ranch Hill is capped with serpentine with a lens-shaped exposure of 
Calaveras formation about one-fourth of a mile by a mile and a half, 
to the east of and in contact with it. About a mile and a half to the 
east of Buckeye there is a small exposure of serpentine. 

In contact with the whole amphibolite area, except for a small part 
about a mile and a half to the north of Buckeye where there is an 
exposure of older basalt, is an area of serpentine about one-half of a 
mile in width, broadening out both to the east and the west to a con- 
siderable extent. In the southeastern portion of the district the 
serpentine is in contact with an area of Calaveras formation about 
two by four miles. In contact with the Calaveras formation on the 
west is a comparatively narrow exposure of amphibolite, trending 
northerly. In contact with and on the west of the amphibolite is a 
large exposure of granite comprising the balance of the district and 
all of that section to the southwest of Buckeye, Merrimac and Gold 
Lake. 

The older basalt is a sock-shaped exposure on the instep of which 
Buckeye is situated. There is another small exposure of this older 
basalt about one mile southeast of Buckeye. 

The rocks forming the bedrock series are the Calaveras formation, 
the amphibolites and amphibolite-schists, the serpentines of the mag- 
nesian series, and the granites, granodiorites and quartz-diorites. 
Two relatively small exposures of the older basalt of the Neocene 
period, and a few deposits of auriferous gravels comprise the super- 
jacent series. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 21 

Mineral deposits. 

Of the three exposures of auriferous river gravels in the district, 
the one at Buckeye has been mined by drift mining. The others, one 
a mile southeast, and one a mile and a half east of Buckeye, have 
both been hydraulicked. All are capped by older basalt. 

The Horseshoe mine, three miles southeast of Merrimac, is a present 
river gravel mine. A dam is built across the Little North Pork and 
the water turned into a flume. The gravel is then sluiced into the 
narrow gorge of the horseshoe, and allowed to accumulate during the 
summer. It is carried off during the winter months floods. 

In the granitoid-quartz diorite three miles northwest of Merrimac 
some quartz veins have been found to contain considerable gold. 
The Reynolds mine was worked for some time. 

In Granite Basin there are gold-bearing quartz veins that have been 
worked with profit. The veins have a general northeast-southwest 
trend. They are seldom over 2' in width and stand either vertical or 
at a high angle. The ore contains auriferous pyrite as well as galena 
and zinc-blende, and is said to run $20 per ton. These veins have 
been worked at the Coquette and Robinson mines. 

Limestone lenses found in the Calaveras formation east of Merrimac 
have not been exploited. 

JOHNSVILLE MINING DISTRICT. 
Including the region about Johns ville, Jamison, Mohawk and Long Valley. 

In the large area included in this district gold is found in lodes and 
in both Tertiary and recent placers. The vein gold comes from the 
notable region about Plumas Eureka, in a belt continuous with the 
quartz-porphyry belt to the south in the Sierra City district. Placer 
gold is found farther north in the valleys drained by the Middle Fork 
Feather River. 

The district is located in the south central portion of Plumas 
County. Johnsville is eight miles by road west of Blairsden on the 
Western Pacific Railroad, with which point it is connected by daily 
stage (except on Sunday) in good weather. The condition of the 
roads is fair in summer, but not dependable in winter. 

The elevation of Johnsville is 5200', and there is a heavy precipita- 
tion of rain and snow during the winter months, but the summers are 
warm and usually dry. 

The region is not far from the border of the Tahoe National Forest, 
in which the chief growths are yellow and sugar pine, tamarack, fir 
and spruce. 

Gold is the chief mineral product of economic importance at the 
present time. Many limestone masses and some marble occur within 



22 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

the district, and a little has been burned for lime. A deposit of 
magnetite occurs in the southern extremity of the district. 

The water supply is good. Mohawk is on the Middle Pork Feather 
River, whose numerous small tributaries run throughout the district. 
Glacial lakes occur west and south of Johnsville. 

Sufficient timber is furnished by the still uncut forest in the 
surrounding region. 

History of mining. 

The Pleistocene or recent river gravels in the Middle Fork. Feather 
River Valley were mined a long time ago, and in nearly all places 
were found to be rich in gold. 

Considerable hydraulic mining has been done on gravel occurring 
at the south end of a spur from the andesite-covered Grizzly Moun- 
tains and at the Cascade mine. Tertiary gravels have been 
hydraulicked. 

A gravel deposit four and one-half miles northeast of Johnsville 
was penetrated by Millers lower tunnel in the year 1890. 

Bibliography. 

Lindgren, W., Tertiary Gravels of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Geol. Survey, Prof. 
Paper 73, page 111, 1911. U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources 1905, 
page 180. U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources 1906, page 192. U. S. 
Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources 1907, pt. I, page 218. IJ. S. Geol. Survey, 
Mineral Resources 1908, pt. I, page 844. U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral 
Resources 1909, pt. I, page 281. U. S. Geol. Survey, Topo. sheet, Downie- 
ville. U. S. Geol. Survey, Geol. Folio 37, 1897. 

Topography. 

The general character of the country is mountainous. Johnsville 
and Plumas Eureka are situated near the base of the east slope of 
Eureka Peak, which has an elevation of 7490'. From Eureka Peak 
a ridge curves north for two miles and then northwest for four miles, 
the top being nearly level. South of Eureka Peak this ridge is 
broken by the canon of Jamison Creek, from which it rises again to 
form Bunker Hill, 7400' in elevation. The ridge continues south, 
curving into the Downieville district. 

East of Bunker Hill a number of highly elevated glacial lakes are 
connected by streams, which flow northeast into Jamison Creek, and 
thence into the Middle Fork Feather Kiver. 

For several miles east of Eureka Peak ridge the country flattens 
out, but is divided by many shallow stream depressions continuous 
with the canons higher up on the ridge. Separating this locality 
from Long Valley on the north is Big Hill, five miles northwest of 
eTohnsville, and 5700' in elevation. It is of very low slope from the 
south, but steeper on the north toward Middle Feather Kiver and 
Long Valley. Big Hill also forms the divide between Little Poplar 
Valley on the west and Jamison Creek on the southeast. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. ad 

East and north of Long Valley a high mountain chain runs in a 
northwest direction. The northern part of this chain is caUed the 
(jrizzly Mountains, of which the highest peak is 7777' in elevation. 
Several spurs radiate down to Long Valley. 

In the south the mountains are less steep. Happy Valley extends 
east of Long Valley, separating the Grizzly Mountains ridge into a 
widspread system of spurs to the south. Mt. Jackson and Penman 
■peak occur on this system, the elevations being respectively 6625' 
and 7280'. Mohawk Valley lies to the southwest. This is a broad 
level valley running northwest along the Middle Fork Feather River. 
The elevation of the valley is about 4500' above sea level. 

Gsology. 

The western portion of the district consists of folded slates and 
cfuartzites of Calaveras formation, generally of nearly vertical dip 
toward the east, and northerly strike, 

Kimning through Eureka Peak and Bunker Hill the contact 
between the Calaveras formation and the quartz-porphyry belt is . 
continuous with that in the Sierra City district to the south. Except 
for one small patch, this quartz-porphyry belt does not appear again 
north of Eureka Peak until the base of the Grizzly Mountains, just 
north of Long Valley, is reached. From here Ihe belt continues 
northwesterly, in contact with the Calaveras on each side. 

West of Eureka Peak a body of intruded gabbro occurs in contact 
with the quartz-porphyry. Another body further south is possibly 
connected with the first under the intervening glacial detritus. 



if ihe country south of Mount Elwell, ii 



24 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBGES. 

Augite-porphyrite extends north of Eureka Peak, in a belt super- 
ficially resembling the quartz-porphyry. This rock has a schistosity 
with a northwest strike and a dip of from 70° to 75° SB. It is in 
contact with the Calaveras formation on the west. Near Johnsville 
the belt is covered by glacial detritus, but south of Johnsville around 
Mt. Elwell and Long Lake it is five miles wide. 

The quartz-porphyry and augite-porphyry were extended in 
Juratrias time or earlier, but have been compressed somewhat with 
the Calaveras formation. The augitcrporphyry appears to be younger 
than the quartz-porphyry. 

An area of Robinson formation, composed of tuflf, trachyte, and red 
slate, occurs in the northern portion of the district, separated from 
the Calaveras formation by augite-porphyrite. The beds strike 
northeast and dip 60° E. 

In contact with this on the south near the head of Grizzly Valley 
is an intruded body of granite-diorite. Granite-diorite bodies also 
occur at the head of Little Long Valley Creek, in Happy Valley, and 
in various other places at the edge of the andesite cap covering the 
large area north and south of Grizzly Valley, and it is probable that 
the entire cap is underlain largely by granodiorite. 

An irregular shaped body of mica-schist is exposed near the upper 
end of Grizzly Valley, in contact with granodiorite and partially 
covered by alluvium and andesite. This formation is possibly a part 
of the Robinson, that has been thoroughly recrystallized to form 
schists. 

Andesite, and some rhyolite and basalt, cover the uplands north of 
Mohawk Valley. These lavas are not extensive about Johnsville, but 
cover the region four miles to the west, and the peaks west of 
Eureka Peak. 

A series of limestone masses occur on Eureka Peak and Bunker Hill 
in the Calaveras formation, crossing Nelson Creek Canon, and a body 
of crystalline limestone occurs in Little Long Valley Creek Canon. 

The Calaveras formation is of Carboniferous age. The Robinson, 
also Carboniferous, is deposited on top of the Calaveras. At the end 
of the Paleozoic era these sediments were raised out of the sea, folded 
and compressed. 

No sediments of the Juratrias period appear in the district, but 
during that time quartz-porphyry and augite-porphyrite were 
extended. At the end of the period these were folded and com- 
pressed with the previous sediments in the first great Sierra Nevada 
uplift. Extensive granodiorite intrusions, and also the gabbro, 
accompanied this movement. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 25 

Tertiary auriferous gravels accumulated in the Neocene epoch and 
toward its end separate flows of rhyolite, basalt and andesite took 
place. 

Another uplift, accompanied by faulting with the downthrow on 
the eastern side, followed the volcanic activity. One line of faulting 
probably runs through the Mohawk Valley. 

In early Pleistocene time scattered flows of basalt occurred, the 
lava following the river valleys eroded in the andesite. After this 
came a period of glaciation, shown by glacial detritus and lakes. The 
following period extends into the present time. 

Mohawk Valley is the remains of a lake that filled the valley in 
Neocene and Pleistocene times. The lake obtained its maximum 
development after the andesite eruption, which appears to have 
formed it. 

The rocks occurring within the district are Calaveras slate, 
quartzite, and limestone, Robinson tuflP and red slate, mica schist, 
augite-porphyrite, quartz-porphyrite, gabbro, granodiorite, andesite, 
basalt and rhyolite. 

Mineral deposits. 

The most important mineral is gold, which occurs in quartz veins 
in the southern portion of the region about Eureka Peak, and in 
gravels of both Tertiary and recent streams in the central and 
northern portions. 

On the steep eastern slope of the ridge four and one-half miles 
northeast of Johnsville, a large deposit of auriferous Tertiary gravel 
is exposed, surrounded by andesite breccia. Its altitude is about 
6500'. A gravel deposit under the andesite was penetrated by Millers 
lower tunnel in the year 1890. The gravel was subangular, con- 
taining small fragments of blackened wood, and was evidently a gulch 
gravel. The bottom of the channel is 400' vertically below the top 
of the ridge. 

A small deposit occurs at a point two and one-half miles northwest 
of Johnsville, on a bedrock of augite-porphyrite; some hydraulic 
mining has been done here. 

In the extreme northern portion of the district, gravel deposits 
occur on two spurs of the Grizzly Mountains, about two and one-half 
miles southeast of Tower Rock. They are in a channel continuous 
with one in Honey Lake quadrangle, farther north. Gravel in this 
channel is again exposed at the Cascade gravel mine, on Little Grizzly 
Creek Canon, thirteen miles north of Johnsville, and four and one-half 
miles southeast of Tower Rock. Calaveras formation composes the 
greater part of the bedrock, and rising ground to the south and west 
is covered by andesite breccia. Sandy layers are interstratified with 



26 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

the gravel. The deposit is 325' thick. Large granodiorite boulders, 
presumably from the granodiorite region to the south, are found in 
the gravel and indicate that the river flowed north. 

At the base of a spur from Grizzly Mountains on the northern slope 
of Little Long Valley there is another exposure of gravel, probably 
the southern continuation under the andesite of the Cascade mine 
channel. Prom the bedrock Calaveras formation and quartz-porphyry 
the elevation is 5600' to 6000'. On the south end of the spur a large 
area has been hydrsulicked. 

Under the andesite and rhyolite of Lava Peak between Little Long 
Valley and Long Valley creeks the gravel is again exposed. On the 
spur south of Long Valley Creek there is a similar, but more extensive 
deposit, the elevation of some of this gravel being only 5000'. 

The deposit of well-rounded gravel at the north end of Mohawk 
Valley, when in place, rests on Carboniferous slates. The low alti- 
tude, about 4500', of the portion about the mouth of Cedar Creek is 
probably due to landslides. On the south it is in immediate contact 
with the Mohawk Lake beds. This and the gravel of the northern 
part of the channel are composed of pebbles with coarse sand and 
very little fine sediment, so it is probable that this channel has a 
steeper grade than the one in the southwest of the Downieville 
quadrangle. 

The Plumas Eureka, one of the most notable lode mines in the 
Downieville quadrangle, occurs within this district on the eastern 
slope of Eureka Peak, one-half mile west of Johnsville. The vein 
matter in this mine is composed of firm white quartz containing a 
large percentage of pyrite, with galena and sphalerite. The gold 



d Lake Mine, showing lopoeraphy in Gold Lake diM 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 27 

occurs both free in the quartz and in the pyrite, in about equal 
amounts. This mine has been worked profitably for many years, but 
is now almost completely exhausted. The Little Jamison quartz 
mine is one and one-fourth miles south of the Plumas Eureka. The 
country rock in this neighborhood is quartz-porphyry, gabbro and 
augite-porphyry. Much of the surrounding region is covered by 
glacial drift. 

LA PORTE MINING DISTRICT. 
Including the region about La Porte and American House. 

This district has been the largest placer gold producer in Plumas 
County. The main Tertiary river channel west of the Neocene divide 
in the Downieville quadrangle runs through La Porte. As in the 
adjoining district, however, no gold is obtained from recent gravels 
or from quartz veins at present. La Porte is the principal shipping 
point of the region. It is estimated that at least $60,000,000 was 
forwarded from here from 1855 to 1871, including considerable gold 
obtained before 1855 from the present rivers. 

La Porte is located in the southwestern comer of Plumas County, 
near the Sierra County line. It is fifty-one miles northeast of Oroville 
on the Western Pacific Kailroad and the Southern Pacific Railroad in 
Butte County. A daily stage (except Sunday) runs from Oroville, 
omitting only the worst of the winter when the roads are not passable. 
There is also a daily stage from Marysville, sixty-five miles by road 
southwest of La Porte. Roads to the north connect La Porte with 
Quincy and with Clio. 

The winter months are characterized by heavy rains and snow, but 
the summers are tolerably warm and dry. La Porte has an elevation 
of 5000'. 

The district lies a short distance from the northern border of the 
Tahoe National Forest. Yellow pine, sugar pine, tamarack, fir and 
spruce compose the larger growths, and the steeper slopes are densely 
covered with manzanita and ceanothus brush. 

Gold alone constitutes the mineral production of the district. 

There is a good water supply. Slate Creek and its tributaries flow 
through the southern part, and the headwaters of the South Fork 
Feather River in the northern portion. 

Electricity at a moderate price is available as a source of power. 

History of mining. 

In the La Porte district the greater part of the auriferous Tertiary 
river gravels have already been mined away. Together with Spanish- 
town, 10,400,000 cubic yards of gravel had been excavated up to the 



28 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

year 1891 and 800,000 cubic yards remained at that time as ultimately 
available. 

The gravels of the entire region have been mined by hydraulicking 
and by drifting operations. In 1901 a tunnel was completed two 
miles northeast of La Porte, and the channel was mined successfully 
for some distance upstream. 

About three miles northeasterly from La Porte the Feather Pork 
Gold Gravel Company has opened the channel by a long tunnel, the 
elevation of which was determined from borings. The channel was 
profitably drifted upon to a point where it widened out so that the 
gold was not sufficiently concentrated. 

In 1905, La Porte produced $18,000 of placer gold; and in 1905, 
$6600 in Gibsonville. In 1909 La Porte and Gibsonville together 
produced $32,000. 

Bibliography. 

LIndgren, W., Tertiary Gravels of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Geol. Survey, Prof. 
Paper 73, page 105, 1911. U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources 1907, 
pt I, page 216. U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources 1908, pt. I, 
page 344. U. S. Geol. Survey, Mineral Resources 1909, pL I, page 281. 
U. S. Geol. Survey, Topo. sheet, Downieville. U. S. Geol. Survey, Folio 37, 
1897. 

Topography. 

The La Porte district is a sloping region of few hills, to the north- 
west of Slate Creek. 

La Porte is situated at an elevation of 5000' on a gently sloping 
ravine of a tributary that runs southeast into Slate Creek. The 
latter, a branch of the North Fork Yuba River, flows southwestward. 
Slate Creek Canon on the La Porte side is not steep, and is only about 
800' deep. 

North of La Porte the ground slopes gradually upward, until an 
elevation of 5500' is reached; then the grade increases to the top of 
Bald Mountain, 5918' in altitude and one mile north of La Porte. 
The southern slope of Bald Mountain forms a watershed for the creek 
running through La Porte, but on the northern slope tributaries of the 
South Fork Feather River flow north to meet the South Fork in Little 
Grass Valley. This broad level valley, running in a southwesterly 
direction, lies between the ridge west of Gibsonville and Whiskey 
Diggings on the southeast and Grass Valley Hill ridge on the north- 
west. The depth of the valley is about 800', and the distance between 
the ridges is two and one-half miles. 

Lexington Hill, in the Bidwell Bar quadrangle west of Bald Moun- 
tain, is a little over 5800' in elevation. The two hills form a con- 
necting link from Pilot Peak between the Gibsonville ridge and a 
similar continuous ridge in the Bidwell Bar quadrangle, on which 
American House is located. This ridge is parallel to the Mooreville 
ridge, but separated from it by Lost Creek Canon. 



PLUMAS COUNTY, 29 

Geology. 

The greater part of the district within the Downieville quadrangle, 
excepting the southern area, is covered by andesite breccia or Pleisto- 
cene alluvium deposits. The broad Bald Mountain and Grass Valley 
Hill ridges are covered by andesite, while alluvium occupies the 
bottom of Little Grass Valley. 

A belt of Calaveras slates and quartzites one mile wide runs north- 
westward, through the district. On each side it is in contact with 
amphibolite, the western contact passing a little east of La Porte. 
The Calaveras formation is again exposed in Little Grass Valley north 
of the lava cap. 

The amphibolite continues westward into the Bidwell Bar quad- 
rangle. Lexington Hill is formed of amphibolite. West of this area 
of sediments, the amphibolite body continues until it comes in contact 
with the serpentine and with the great body of granite which is so 
prominent in the Bidwell Bar quadrangle. A long belt of the Cala- 
veras formation, narrowing to less than one-fourth of a mile in the 
north, runs in a north-south direction one mile west of Lexington Hill. 

The amphibolite appears to have been originally augite tuflfs and 
surface lavas, but these have been altered, so that it now consists 
chiefly of green aluminous amphibole usually of the fine fibrous uralite 
type, but in part of a more coarsely fibrous, recrystallized variety. 

The amphibolite and Calaveras formation extend downward indefi- 
nitely, and are continuous with the same formations in the Port 
Wine district in the south. 

The Calaveras is the oldest formation in the district. During the 
Carboniferous period it was deposited as shale and sandstone. At the 
end of the Paleozoic era an uplift occurred which folded the strata 
somewhat, and at the end of the Juratrias the first great uplift of the 
Sierra Nevadas closely folded and compressed the sediments, and thus 
metamorphosed them into slates and quartzites. 

During the Tertiary period erosion was at first rapid, but in the 
latter part, in the Neocene epoch, the country had been worn low, and 
the velocity of the various streams reduced so that auriferous gravels 
accumulated. These and the surrounding region were then covered 
by a mud flow of andesite breccia. The andesite flow in places covers 
some older massive basalt which preceded the andesite, and the basalt 
occasionally covers the auriferous gravels, but the basalt flow was not 
extensive. 

At the end of the Neocene epoch the region was again elevated, the 
movement being accompanied by faulting and an increase in the rate 
of erosion. 

Glacial detritus, which characterizes the Pleistocene period, is not 
found in the La Porte district. 

3—46902 



30 MIKES AND MlNEll.\L RESOURCES. 

The rocks which occur are: amphibolite, Calaveras slates, and 
quartzite, andesite and older basalt. 

Mineral deposits. 

Placer gold in Tertiary river gravels is the only mineral product of 
the district. No gold is produced from the gravel of modern rivers 
or from quartz veins at the present time. 

The main river channel west of the old Neocene divide (Sierra 
Buttes) in the Downieville quadrangle runs through the district. 
The channel slopes southward from Hepsidam and Gibsonville, 
through La Porte and Secret diggings, then on to Scales, Indian Hill 
and Camptonville. 

At La Porte the well-exposed white quartz gravel lies on a bedrock 
of amphibolite and the Calaveras formation. It may have come from 
quartz veins immediately adjacent and now exposed in the old river 
bed where the gravel has been hydraulicked away. The lower 
gravels were quite rich, averaging from $2 to $20 per cubic yard. A 
bank of gravel 250' by 100' and' 30' high yielded gold at the rate of 
$20.87 per cubic yard. 

Auriferous gravel occurs at Secret diggings on the main channel, 
one mile south of La Porte, and at Bamards, one mile farther south- 
west. The bedrock is in each case amphibolite and there is no 
andesite in the vicinity. Both deposits have been hydraulicked. 

Dutch diggings are at the northwest end of the La Porte gravel 
deposit. Here the exposed channel is 500' wide, with steeply rising 
rims. On the southwest side the amphibolite rim rises several hun- 
dred feet probably without being influenced by faulting. Along the 
road northeast and southeast of Bald Mountain the amphibolite is 
exposed, showing that the northeast rim also rises sharply, in spite of 
the downthrow fault which occurs between here and Dutch diggings. 
The gravel banks show 80' of almost clean quartz gravel ; even next 
to the bedrock few boulders occur over 6" in diameter. Fifty feet of 
sands and clays occur above the gravel, the clay being partly car- 
bonaceous, evenly stratified and conformable on the gravel. Above 
the clays is a heavy cap of andesite tuff. Most of the gold was on 
bedrock or within 2' of it; that in the upper gravels was fine 
and flaky. 

Two miles north of La Porte the Halsey bore hole showed the 
following strata. Starting with the lowest first : 5' quartz gravel, 10' 
gravel and clay, 2' gravel, 14' gravel and clay, 98' quartz gravel, and 
316' of volcanic sand, clay and lava. 

Near the Clay Bank tunnel, half a mile southeast of La Porte, there 
was only 14' of gravel, covered by 167' of clay. Above the clay in 
places a heavy body of gravel lies with many pebbles of andesite and 



1.: 



PLUMAS CJOUNTY. 31 

l>asalt, representing an intervoleanie channel later than the Tertiary 
p:ravel channels. 

A small patch of Tertiary gravel occurs at American House, in the 
Bidwell Bar quadrangle. This deposit, lying in a sag 800' above 
Salt Creek, probably represents a tributary of the main La Porte 
channel. A capping of basalt covers the Calaveras bedrock east of 
the gravel patch. The bedrock to the west is amphibolite. 

On both east and west the bedrock rises several hundred feet, 
showing the old river valley. A considerable body of white quartz 
gravel underlies the alluvium deposit in Little Grass Valley, two miles 
northwest of Bald Mountain. This has been much exploited by 
shallow shafts, but, being lower than the South Fork Feather River, 
because of excess water it can not be profitably mined. The gravel 
is not thoroughly rounded, thus resembling that at La Porte and 
Richmond Hill. 

Above La Porte, the channel has been seriously disturbed by move- 
ments in a fault zone which is at least one mile wide and which has a 
general northwest direction. The total downthrow on the northeast 
side is probably 520'. The first fault is exposed in the bedrock at the 
upper end of the La Porte diggings ; here the downthrow on the east 
side is 55', and the gravel beds are bent over the nearly perpendicular 
fault scarp. 

Three*quarters of a mile southeast of La Porte on a bedrock of 
Calaveras formation a detached body of gravel lies abnormally 
depressed 200' below the level of the old channel. At this point the 
channel paralleled the fault lines, and several slices have been differ- 
entially dropped or elevated. The downthrow is 200' to the north- 
east, but there are several intermediate benches. The Clay Bank 
tunnel, portal elevation 4000', has been driven 3000' northwest to 
open a supposed channel, but no gravel of value had been found up to 
1901. It is probable that only a fragment of the northeast rim, cut 
off by a fault, exists here. 

At Dutch diggings, at the upper end of the La Porte gravels, the 
channel was drifted on northwestward for 500', and was* then found 
to be cut off by a body of lava. The relations suggest that a down- 
throw on the northeast side of at least 130' had been encountered. 
This is no doubt the continuation of the fault zone that caused the 
depression in the vicinity of Spanish diggings. 

LIGHT'S CAftON MINING DISTRICT. 

The mineral products of this district are gold and copper. Gold is 
obtained almost wholly by placering and hydraulicking the gravels 
of both recent and ancient streams. Copper is produced from the 



32 MIKES AND MINERAL BE80UBCES. 

mines in the northwestern part of the Genesee mining belt. Some 
noteworthy deposits of iron ore in the district have not, as yet, been 
exploited. 

Engels, about centrally located in Light's Canon district, is at the 
terminus of the Indian Valley Railroad, twenty-two miles from 
Paxton, on the Western Pacific Railroad. The district as a whole is 
in the north central portion of Plumas County and Taylorsville is 
approximately seven miles, by stage, from Crescent Mills, a station on 
the Indian Valley Railroad. The climate in winter is cold and wet, 
and heavy rains and considerable snowfall renders travel by road 
very difficult. In summer it is warm and dry, and the roads are 
quite good. 

Timber is plentiful throughout the district. The principal varieties 
are yellow and sugar pine, spruce, fir and tamarack. Manzanita and 
ceanothus brush cover the slopes. 

The district is drained by Light's Creek and its tributaries. 
Sufficient water for mining is obtained in the lower parts of the 
district, but due to their altitude it is almost impossible to obtain 
enough water for even a few weeks of each year to work the gravels 
which rest upon the summits. 

History of mining. 

As early as 1850, the country about Indian Valley was prospected 
for gold. In 1851 the * Bullion Ledge' was discovered a short distance 
northwest of Gibsonville, and many locations followed. Within ten 
years Greenville was an active mining camp. Copper ores were 
discovered in 1865, but their noteworthy development has taken place 
only within the last four or five years. No great mines had pre- 
viously been developed around Indian Valley, but many small ones 
contributed to a total output up to 1914, of about $7,700,000. The 
ores carry values in gold, silver and copper. Iron ore, coal, building 
stone and mineral springs are present, but have not yet become 
sources of revenue. About the head of Light's Creek, Mountain 
Meadows and Moonlight, ancient gravels have been mined in a small 
way for over twenty years, and the total yield has been approxi- 
mately $500,000. Placering of recent stream gravels has been carried 
on at a number of points, particularly in Cooks Canon and on Light's 
Creek, where rather persistent efforts have been made. The entire 
yield of the placer mines within and bordering on the Indian Valley 
quadrangle is about $10,000 annually. 

Bibliography. 

DlUer, J. S., Greology of the Taylorsville region, U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, 
1908. Lindgren, W., Tertiary Gravels of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Geol. 
Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets, 
Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 33 

Topography. 

This district lies in the northwestern end of the Diamond Mountain 
block on the gently sloping southwest side. The block gradually 
narrows beyond Lone Rock, loses its relative elevation, and dies out 
in a plain before reaching the head of Susan River. The upper 
courses of the stream are in broad, shallow valleys, but as they 
approach the middle portion of the block they cut deeper and deeper 
until they flow in canons. Light's Canon and Cook's Canon, opening 
into a broad alluvial valley below, are good examples. Running 
northeast, on the southwest side of the district is North Arm, a branch 
of Indian Valley, which extends up Light's and Cook's creeks for 
nearly five miles. Mountain Meadows, triangular in shape and from 
one-fourth to nearly one mile in width, lies to the northwest of the 
district. Widening to the northwest, it merges into the plains 
bordering the volcanoes about Lassen Peak. Along the eastern side, 
its margin is rather indefinite on the gentle slope of the Diamond 
Mountain block. . It has a general elevation of 4800', and is about 
1300' above the general level of Indian Valley and North Arm, from 
which it is separated by a low divide at the head of Cook's Canon. 

The drainage of this region goes into two separate systems, the 
Great Basin and the Sacramento River. The northwestern part of 
the district is drained by Willards, Williams and Cheney creeks into 
Susan River, and finally into Honey Lake, which has no outlet. The 
eastern and southeastern parts of the district are drained by the head- 
waters of Indian Creek and Lone Rock Creek, one of its tributaries. 
The southwestern portion is drained by Light's and Cook's creeks, 
thence into Indian Creek, which flows into North Fork Feather River. 

Geology. 

On the west of the district is an exposure of Foreman formation 
averaging about a mile and a half in width, trending northwesterly 
from North Arm to Mountain Meadows. The west side is in contact 
with meta-rhyolite, Robinson formation and Kettle meta-andesite, in 
the order of their occurrence. On the east it contacts with Kettle meta- 
andesite. Reeve meta-andesite and auriferous gravels. At the head of 
Cooks Canon there is an exposure of Reeve meta-andesite overlain by 
auriferous gravels to the north. East of the Foreman formation is a 
broad area of Kettle meta-andesite, trending in a general north- 
westerly direction with an average width of about two miles. Two 
small areas of Foreman formation, entirely isolated from the ma;in 
mass, are seen in the area of Kettle meta-andesite, one on Light's 
Creek and the other on Surprise Creek. Lying between the Kettle 
meta-andesite and the granodiorite is a long narrow strip of River 
meta-andesite running a little east of south from Moonlight to Light's 



34 MINES AND MINEBAL RESOURCES. 

Creek, where it bends, running into the Kettle meta-andesite. The 
balance of the district is composed of granodiorite, except where over- 
lain by andesite and auriferous gravels. Between Lucky S. mine and 
Lone Bock Creek is a mass of andesite, capping the granodiorite and 
the auriferous gravels. North of Moonlight there is a mass of 
auriferous gravels overlying Kettle meta-andesite and granodiorite; 
and between Diamond Mountain, Thompson Peak, Lone Rock Creek 
y.nd Lights Creek is a large area of auriferous gravels overlying the 
granodiorite. Two large areas of andesite on the north, two small 
ones in the west and east central portions cap the gravels. 

The oldest rock in the district, the Kettle meta-andesite of Car- 
boniferous age, is decidedly porphyritic, with many small pheno- 
crysts of feldspar and some of hornblende, and rarely a few round 
grains of quartz. These are embedded in a reddish brown or gray, 
partially crystalline groundmass, containing small grains of plagio- 
clase and quartz. The Kettle meta-andesite is clearly of volcanic 
origin. Its mass is made up of an extended series of lava flows and 
products of volcanic explosions, the individual sheets of lava and 
tuff being locally visible. The Reeve meta-andesite, an igneous 
eruption of the late Carboniferous, is made up of white crystals of 
plagioclase plentifully scattered in a compact dark groundmass, 
giving the rock a porphyritic structure. No phenocrysts of augite 
are present, and the dense groundmass appears largely amorphous 
and full of feldspar microlites. The Reeve meta-andesite occurs as a 
definite flow and tuff forming a long narrow belt running northwest. 
The relation of the Reeve meta-andesite to the Kettle meta-andesite is 
not clear, though it appears that the Kettle meta-andesite is the older. 
The Foreman formation of Jurassic age, is a succession of shale, sand- 
stone and conglomerate, in which the sediment is for the most part 
derived from rocks which are not clearly volcanic. In this district 
the Foreman beds come in direct contact with the meta-rhyolite and 
Robinson formation without any intervening Jurassic and Triassic 
.strata. The rock included under the head of granodiorite, of late 
Jurassic or early Cretaceous, is a light-colored and for the most part 
medium grained rock which looks like granite. It is generally a 
quartz diorite, but locally the orthoclase may increase and the rock 
passes into granodiorite. Most of the granodiorite is rich in quartz 
and hornblende and is fine grained. The quartz diorite is clearly 
younger than the Kettle meta-andesite and the meta-rhyolite which 
it intersects. 

The auriferous gravels of the district are patches of the main mass 
of Tertiary gravels spread over an area about twenty miles in length 
by nine miles in breadth. The Moonlight region, twelve miles north 



PliUltAS OOUNTT. 35 

of TayJorsville at the hoad of Surprise Creek, shows a total thickness 
of gravels of over 1000^ The lower 400' is chiefly sand, and the 
upper 600' is gravel or conglomerate. The latter is sometimes so 
firmly cemented that when the rock is broken the fracture passes 
through instead of around the pebbles. The deposit at the southeast 
head of Mountain Meadows is a body of well-rounded gravel which 
cavers the broad and low divide between Mountain Meadows and 
Cooks Canon. It is underlain by sand, and the whole mass is not 
over 20' in thickness. On the Sierra crest, near Diamond Mountain, 
at an altitude of 7000', there is a deposit of jgravel about 300' in 
thickness, resting on the granite. Southwest of Diamond Mountain, 
in the flat country drained by the headwaters of Indian Creek, the 
gravels are widely distributed in a heavy body. The andesite, of 
Pliocene age, is a lava usually light gray, which is more or less 
porphyritic in thin sections. Crystals of plagioclase are numerous, 
those of biotite, hornblende and pyroxene in various proportions are 
somewhat less abundant. The felty dark gray groundmass contains 
many minute microlites of feldspar and black grains of magnetite in 
a light brown glassy base. It occurs in sheets around the volcanic 
vent from which the flows and ejected material issued. The masses 
around Lone Rock and between Lone Rock and Indian Creek are of 
hornblende andesite, closely related to that north of Kettle Rock. 
The andesitic tuff and breccia which form Diamond Mountain are full 
of black bordered hornblende. It is evident that the eruptions of 
lava occurred within the gravel period, overflowing the earlier gravels 
and furnishing the material for the later ones. 

Mineral deposits. 

The auriferous gravels which have been mined in the district are 
of two kinds: (1) gravels of the present stream beds and terraces 
near them, and (2) the gravels of ancient streams, or high gravels on 
the mountain summits far above the streams of today. Placer mining 
has been carried on in the auriferous gravel of present streams in 
Cooks Canon and several other small streams, but the most effective 
and persistent effort has been made on Light's Creek. Here work is 
carried on for several months every year with giants and water under 
100' of pressure, but the amount of debris moved is small. 

The gravels of ancient streams are mined near the border of Moon- 
light, at the southeastern head of Mountain Meadows, and in Cook's 
Canon. Operations have been maintained for a month or more every 
year for twenty years, but the work is confined to the lower edges of 
the deposits. As the gravels rest upon summits, it is almost impos- 
sible to obtain water in quantities sufficient for ordinary mining even 
a few days or weeks each year. In the east branch of Light's Canon 



36 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBCES. 

the gravels have been prospected, and good values are said to have 
been found in bore holes which penetrate the andesite covering to a 
depth of 200' to 300'. 

Several mines in the southern portion of the Genesee mining belt 
are located in this district. In some deposits the ore is auriferous 
quartz and limonite ; in others the ore is chiefly bomite, chalcopyrite, 
chalcocite and copper carbonates. Quartz is the most common 
gangue mineral, but in one case barite appears and in another a 
irreen mineral like actinolite. A small vein of barite in the altered 
andesites at the old Indian Valley silver mine locally contains traces 
of copper ore. Near the northwestern end of the Genesee belt in the 
Superior mine, the gangue of the bornite is a green fibrous mineral, 
like actinolite. A number of parallel vertical veins are well exposed 
in the open cut and contain disseminated particles and nodules of 
bornite. The larger ore bodies are free from gangue. The wall rock, 
a fine-grained granodiorite, is the same on both sides, and the veins 
are sharply defined. 

A promising deposit of iron ore is located eleven miles north of 
Taylorsville at the southern border of Moonlight, in a broad valley at 
an elevation of 5600', where an area of about two acres occurs having 
led soil strewn with black chunks of hematite with some magnetite. 
Some of the fragments are 2' in diameter. No excavations have been 
made, but the ore on the surface and the color of the soil indicate a 
considerable body of iron ore beneath. 

About one-third of a mile wtest of this locality a small opening 
exposes a mass of hematite, in part breccia, over 4' thick. It strikes 
nearly east approximately in line with the area noted above, and dips 
about 45° S. 

A few degrees west of south from the two-acre area there are a 
number of small pits and fragments of iron ore in line to an old 
opening made by Hulsman, which exposes a vein-like mass of mag- 
netite and hematite. Some of the fragments have magnetic polarity, 
others are not magnetic at all. The opening is only about 10' deep, 
and the ore is said to run out at that depth. It is possible that there 
are two lines of iron ore deposits, one nearly north and south, and 
the other approximately at right angles. The two lines appear to 
meet in the two-acre area. 

QUINCY MINING DISTRICT. 
Including the region about Quincy, Elizabethtown and Wilson Point. 

Small amounts of gold have been produced from the alluvial 
deposits in American Valley and from a number of gold-bearing 
quartz veins located within this district. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 37 

Quincy, the county seat of Plumas County, is situated in the central 
part. By road it is sixty-one miles northeast from Oroville on the 
"Western Pacific Kailroad and Southern Pacific Railroad. The Quincy 
Western Railroad connects Quincy with Marston, now called Quincy 
Junction, on the Western Pacific Railroad about four and one-half 
miles northeast. Roads from Quincy run north to Crescent Mills, 
Taylorsville and Greenville, south through Gibsonville and La Porte, 
west through Spanish Ranch, and southeast to Cromberg and 
Mohawk. These roads are serviceable to ordinary traffic during the 
dry warm summer, but in the winter a heavy precipitation of rain and 
snow makes them often impassable. In the vicinity of American 
Valley, however, the snowfall is very light. 

The mountainous part of the district is covered with timber, con- 
sisting generally of yellow pine, sugar pine, spruce, fir and tamarack. 
Manzanita brush covers many of the steeper slopes. 

In American Valley the growing of alfalfa and dairy farming are 
profitable occupations. 

Water is plentiful. Spanish Creek runs along the eastern edge of 
American Valley and Thompson and Spring Garden creeks are 
branches to the mountains in the south. The Middle Fork Feather 
River, with its many tributaries, runs through the southern part of 
the district. 

History of mining. 

Some years ago a shaft was sunk in the middle of American Valley 
to reach the gold in the gravel deposits there, but little if any gold 
was taken out. 

,piacer gold has been mined, however, along the Middle Pork 
Feather River, principally at English Bar, and at another bank 
further to the east, and hydraulic mining has been carried on in con- 
nection with a deposit of late Tertiary gravel three-fourths of a mile 
northwest of Spring Garden Ranch. 

About half a mile west of Nelson Point a Tertiary gravel deposit 
has been hydraulicked, and three miles northeast at the New Nelson 
placer mine a channel has been followed under the volcanic capping 
by a tunnel. 

Bibliography. 

Lindgren, W., Tertiary Gravels of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Geol. Survey, Prof. 
Paper 73, pages 111-113. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheet, Downieville. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, 1897. 

Topography. 

In general, the district consists of the broad, flat American Valley 
lying between mountains to the north and south. 

American Valley is nearly two miles across at the widest point. 
At Quincy, on the south edge of the western part, its width is three- 



38 MINES AND MINERiU. RGSODBCES. 

fourths of a mile. Spanish Creek flows northeast along tli« 
northern edge. 

Quincy is at an elevation of 3407'. To the south a stream caoon 
divides a moderately sloping spur from Claremont Hill, three and 
three-fourths miles south of Quincy. This star-shaped hill is charac- 
terized by many spurs with moderate slopes along their axes, but 
whose sides drop steeply down to the intervening streams. Clare- 
mont Hill consists of several peaks, the highest of which has an 
elevation of 7014'. A level-topped spur extends southeasterly for one 



Pholo No. S. View looking wcit from Qumcy toward Spaniih Peak. 

mile to Crescent Hill, 6600' in elevation. From this point the ground 
slopes down steeply, forming part of the north side of Middle Fork 
Feather River Caiion. 

Prom Claremont Hill a broad, flat divide extends southwest. At 
the southern cd^e of this area is the steep Middle Fork Feather River 
Canon. Several tributaries, about one mile long, run down the canon 
sides to the river 1800' below. 

East of Claremont Hill a s-pur extends out that is joined at a little 
distance by a ridge of peaks running south to Limestone Point, 5811' 
in elevation, and 1800' above the river. 

The more gradual eastern slope of Limestone Point ridge is drained 
by "Willow Creek, a tributai-y of the Middle Fork Feather River. 
Further north, in Thompson Valley, Thompson Creek flows north in 
the opposite direction and joins Spring Garden Creek, the eastern 
branch of Spanish Creek. 

The streams forming Spanish Creek flow northeast through 
American Valley, and northwest from Thompson Valley at a nearly 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 39 

level grade. Uniting two and one-half miles northeast of Quincy, in 
Spanish Creek, the waters flow north into Honey Lake quadrangle 
where they join Indian Creek, which empties into the North Fork 
Feather River, and later into the Sacramento. 

Northwest of American Valley, in the vicinity of Elizabethtown, 
the ground slopes irregularly to peaks of less than 5000' elevation. 

Geology. 

The greater part of the Quincy district is composed of closely 
folded slate and quartzite of Calaveras formation. In the south- 
western portion a broad belt of serpentine continues up from the 
Sawpit district, and this is joined on the east by a body of amphibo- 
lite. The northwestern corner of the district is composed of a large 
mass of augite porphyrite. Claremont Hill and Crescent Hill are 
capped by basalt, and a large area of basalt occurs several miles east 
of Claremont Hill, covering andesite breccia, which runs eastward 
across the ridges. 

Serpentine occurs as a belt three miles wide along the Middle Fork 
Feather River, but it narrows somewhat in the north. 

West of Claremont and Crescent Hills the contact is with amphibo- 
lite schist. Further north the contact is with the Calaveras forma- 
tion. The serpentine and amphibolite schist extend from the surface 
downward indefinitely, as they represent intrusions of basic igneous 
rocks which have been metamorphosed to their present forms. North 
of Claremont Hill the amphibole schist lens, in contact on both sides 
with the Calaveras formation, narrows to a point. 

^ All the region from Claremont Hill to the northeast of Thompson 

Valley, including the rock under the alluvial deposit in American 

*' Valley, is composed of the Calaveras formation. 

^^ A recent fault occurs in the Calaveras formation a little southwest 

of Spring Garden Creek and parallel to it. 

^^"^ About one and one-half miles northwest of Spring Garden Ranch a 

body of quartz-porphyry is in contact with the Calaveras formation 

■ and the augite-porphyrite. This is schistose in the same direction 
and in the same degree as the augite-porphyrite. 

American Valley and Thompson Valley are covered by recent 
Pleistocene alluvial deposits. American Valley represents a basin 
filled with gravel, sand and other sediments deposited by large creeks 
emptying into it. The valley may have been a shallow lake bed. 

'-' The Calaveras formation was deposited in Carboniferous time, and 

'^ is the oldest formation in the district. These sediments were meta- 
jnorphosed to partly micaceous slates and to quartzites by land move- 
ments at the end of the Paleozoic era and again at the end of the 



a' 



isi 



it 



40 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Juratrias, the latter movement being the first great uplift of the 
Sierra Nevada. The rocks that later formed the serpentine and 
pyroxenite were intruded at about this time. Before this, during the 
Juratrias period, the rhyolitic lavas and the basic lavas and tuffs 
which were later compressed respectively to quartz porphyry and 
augite-porphyrite, were formed. The age of the gold-bearing quartz 
veins is probably early Cretaceous. During the later Neocene epoch 
of the Tertiary period of erosion, auriferous gravels accumulated in 
the Neocene rivers. Toward the end of the Neocene extensive mud 
flows of andesite breccia occurred following smaller flows of massive 
basalt. This was followed by an uplift which increased the rate of 
erosion. In early Pleistocene time scattered eruptions of massive 
basalt took place. No remains of the Pleistocene glacial period are 
found within the Quincy district. 

The youngest formation is the alluvial deposit in American Valley, 
which was formed in recent Pleistocene time. 

The rocks found within the district are: Calaveras slates and 
quartzites, serpentine, amphibolite schist, quartz-porphyry, augite- 
porphyrite, andesite-breccia and basalt. 

Mineral deposits. 

Qold forms the most important mineral deposit, occurring in both 
the Tertiary and present river gravels, in the Pleistocene gravels of 
American Valley, and in quartz veins. The only other mineral 
deposit is a lenticular mass of limestone at Limestone Point, two 
miles west of Nelson Point. 

The auriferous gravels occurring three-fourths of a mile northwest 
of Spring Garden Ranch belong to the volcanic period. Deposits 
from Pleistocene lake beds cover the ground about the gravels, but to 
the east they are covered by andesite. The bedrock is Calaveras 
formation. 

On the north side of the Middle Fork Feather River half a mile 
west of Nelson Point a gravel deposit now exposed was presumably 
at one time covered by the andesite breccia overlying the adjacent 
country to the north. The gravel rests on a bedrock of Calaveras 
formation and is only about 200' above the present river, at an eleva- 
tion of 4000'. 

Four miles northwest of Nelson Point on the south slope of Clare- 
mont Hill, at an elevation of 6400', there is a channel containing 
gravel composed chiefly of quartz and other siliceous rocks, largely 
subangular in character, thereby indicating a small watercourse. The 
gravel, which was covered by andesite breccia, contained a good deal 
of gold in spots. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 41 

The New Nelson placer mine is located three miles northeast of 
Nelson Point on the slope of the high ridge overlooking the Middle 
Fork Feather River. The channel is opened by a tunnel having an 
elevation of 4500', and has been followed under the volcanic cover 
toward the northeast; this channel may connect with the gravels at 
Spring Garden, three miles northeast, or with the channel found in 
a nearby tunnel of the Western Pacific Railroad. 

The gravels at Spring Garden are, however, at least 500' lower 
than at the New Nelson mine, due to an intervening fault running 
parallel to Spring Garden Creek. 

Auriferous Pleistocene gravel occurs at English Bar along the 
Middle Fork Feather River, a little over two miles east of Nelson 
Point. The deposit extends for a mile along the river. One mile 
east of English Bar there is a similar but less extensive gravel deposit. 

About one mile north of Nelson Point, on the west side of Willow 
Creek, there is a considerable deposit of early Pleistocene gravel. 
The western border of this area is 400' higher than the eastern side 
on Willow Creek. 

In American Valley Pleistocene gravels are found between Quincy 
and Meadow Valley, several hundred feet above the present canon 
of Spanish Creek on the north side of the stream. American Valley 
was a lake for a short time after the dislocation at the close of the 
Neocene period. Gravels indicating an outlet are found two and one- 
fourth miles northwest of Quincy, near Elizabethtown. The eleva- 
tion of the slate bedrock at this point is 3800', and at Quincy it is 
3407'. The gravels correspond to some small remnants of bench 
gravel about 500' above the present bottom of lower Spanish Creek 
and East Branch. This outlet was later abandoned by the stream. 

In the gulch from Elizabethtown to American Valley auriferous 
deposits of later channels are found draining towisird American 
Valley. 

These deposits, 50' to 100' below the present creek bottom, connect 
with the gravels buried below the alluvium of American Valley. No 
rich gravel was found in the latter. 

Quartz veins are abundant in the slates along Willow Creek east of 
Claremont Hill. Others occur near the serpentine belt contact, on 
the south side of the Middle Fork Feather River Canon, only a few 
hundred feet above the river, opposite Crescent Hill. The veins are 
part of the system which runs along the serpentine belt, similar to 
that about Onion Valley. They strike in a northwesterly direction. 



42 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

SAWPIT FLAT MINING DISTRICT. 

Including Sawpit, Onion Valley (Eclipse) and Last Chance. 

In this extensive area gold is produced chiefly from gravely of the 

old Tertiary rivers. Gold quartz veins are known, but few are 

developed, and the district may be classed as one of the smaller 

nroducers. 

ft. 

The district occupies a portion of the southern part of Plumas 
County. Sawpit is sixty-six miles by road northeast of Oroville on 
the Southern Pacific Railroad and Western Pacific Railroad, and 
fifty miles, by road, west of Clio on the Western Pacific Railroad. It 
is one and one-half miles northwest of Onion Valley, also known as 
Eclipse. Roads connect with Gibsonville and La Porte to the south 
and with Nelson Point (nine miles) and Quincy (twenty miles) to the 
north. The roads are fair and serviceable to ordinary traffic during 
the summer, but in winter they are often impassable, the winter 
months being accompanied by heavy falls of rain and snow. The 
summers are generally warm and dry. Elevation of Onion Valley 
6300'. 

The district lies about five miles north of the northern boundary of 
the Tahoe National Forest, and the vegetation includes yellow pine, 
sugar pine, spruce, fir and tamarack, with the steeper slopes covered 
by manzanita brush. 

Limestone deposits are known within the district, but none are 
utilized. 

Water is plentiful. South Fork Feather River and Onion Valley 
Creek have their sources within the district, and Nelson Creek flows 
northwest to the Middle Fork Feather River, whose many tributaries 
run throughout the northern part. 

History of mining. 

At Richmond Hill one-half mile southwest of Sawpit, auriferous 
Tertiary gravels are exposed, and have been mined by hydraulic 
operations. The Union Hill gravel mine, two miles to the east, on 
the slope of the intervening andesite ridge, has also been worked by 
the hydraulic method, as well as a deposit two and one-half miles 
northwest of Onion Valley, at the base of an andesite capping. 

Bibliography. 

Lindgren, W., Tertiary Gravels of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Geol. Survey, Prof. 
Paper 73, 1911, page 110. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheet, Downievllle. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, 1897. 

Topography. 

The district as a whole is quite mountainous. A number of 
irregular ridges extend in various directions, some with steeply 
sloping sides, others, like the one extending down to Grass Valley 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 43 

Hill, and the one on which Sawpit is located being more gradual. 
Sawpit, at an elevation of 6050', lies on an andesite-covered upland 
area trending in a northwest direction. On the north and west, 
where the area of low slope ends, the V-shaped Middle Fork Feather 
River Canon slopes down 1500' in one mile. Many tributaries, one or 
two miles in length, run down the slope at right angles to the river, 
Avhich here flows from east to west. 

Onion Valley Creek drains the south slope of Sawpit Flat, and runs 
west and then north, joining with the Middle Feather River in the 
Bidwell Bar quadrangle. 

This creek drains the northern slope of the ridge extending north- 
oast from Grass Valley Hill in the La Porte District. 

One and one-half miles south of Sawpit across the headwaters of 
Onion Valley Creek, the highest peak of the Grass Valley Hill ridge 
rises to an elevation of 6842'. The ridge continues eastward for a 
mile, to a saddle where the road crosses, and then the ground slopes 
first slightly and then much more steeply to the top of Pilot Peak, 
7505' in elevation, and a mile and a quarter southeast of Onion Valley. 
From Pilot Peak ridges radiate irregularly in various directions. 
The Gibsonville ridge runs southwest, the Grass Valley Hill ridge 
west ; the Sawpit Flat northwest, the Plumas-Sierra county boundary 
ridge southeast. North and east of Pilot Peak, several spurs extend 
for a mile or so, and then drop rather steeply to Nelson Creek. 
Poorman Creek, a branch of Nelson Creek, runs between two of these 
spurs, both of which have steep southern slopes. About four miles 
southeast of Pilot Peak, the steep Blue Nose Mountain ridge runs 
north from the Sierra-Plumas boundary ridge and forms the divide 
between the headwaters of Hopkins Creek and a branch of Nelson 
Creek. On the east side of Nelson Creek a long ridge with many 
Fpurs extends north from Eureka Peak in the south. To the north 
of the mouth of Poorman Creek, the slope from the ridge top down 
is quite moderate, being from 1 in 7 to 1 in 8. 

The drainage of the district in general is to the west and north, to 
the Middle Fork Feather River, which flows west and south, flnally 
emptying into the Sacramento River. In the southwest part of the 
district, the headwaters of the South Fork Feather River run south- 
west between Gibsonville and Grass Valley Hill ridges. 

Geology. 

The greater part of the district is composed of closely folded slates 
and quartzites of Calaveras formation and serpentine, both extending 
downward from the surface indefinitely. A body of amphibolite 
occurs in the region of Sawpit and to the south; this also has an 
indefinite downward extension. Andesite covers Sawpit Flat and 



44 illSES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Grass Valley Hill ridge. Small areas of glacial detritus occur at 
Onion Valley and a mile and a half southwest of that town. At 
Onion Valley it is partially covered by alluvium. 

In the extreme west, north of the andesite breccia and basalt 
rapping about Fowler Peak, the Calaveras formation extends nortii- 
ward in contact with serpentine on the east. Several long lenses of 
limestone occur, one along Last Chance Creek and another farther 
south. 



Photo Ho, G. Looking acroii Ihc South Poili Feather River. Duinpi of the TcfTt and Oddii 

The serpentine is extensively developed in this district, the belt 
varying in width from three to four miles. The serpentine on the 
broad flat interstream area northwest of Sawpit is covered by 
andesite. At the upper end of Bird Caiioii, about a half a mile north 
of Sawpit, a belt of amphibolite is seen in contact west and east with 
serpentine and covered by basalt and andesite in the north. This 
belt widens from one niile in the north to three in the south. The 
serpentine and amphibolite form part of the great serpentine belt 
which extends southward through the Downieville and Colfas 
<{uadrangles. 

The eastern contact between the serpentine and Calaveras forma- 
tion runs in a northwesterly direction through Onion Valley, and 
extends north under the andesite breccia cap, appearing again one 
and three-fourths miles north of Onion Valley. The Calaveras for- 
mation composes the remainder of the district from this contact 
eastward. About four and three-fourths miles northeast of Onion 
Valley the strata strike northwesterly and have a vertical dip; two 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 45 

and one-half miles further east, however, the strike is northeasterly 
and the dip 80° toward the southeast. 

The Calaveras formation is the oldest in the district, being of the 
Carboniferous period. At the end of the Paleozoic era and at the 
end of the Juratrias period the sediments were folded and compressed 
in uplift movements. The later movement was the first great uplift 
of the Sierra Nevada range. Basic rocks, such as diabase and 
pyroxenite, which were later metamorphosed to amphibolite and 
serpentine, were intruded at this time. The age of the gold quartz 
veins is early Cretaceous. During the later part of the Tertiary 
period, known as the Neocene epoch, auriferous gravels accumulated, 
and these were covered in a few places by flows of massive basalt and 
everywhere by mud flows of andesite breccia. Blue Nose Mountain 
ridge is covered by massive andesite, and there is evidence that lava 
issued from this region. 

The flows of volcanic material took place before the end of the 
Neocene. At the close of the epoch a movement, accompanied by 
some faulting, increased the grade of the western slope, and the rapid 
erosion which followed left the andesite only on' the high interstream 
areas. During Pleistocene time a period of glaciation occurred,' and 
glacial detritus remains in Onion Valley and in several patches to 
the south and southeast. 

The rocks found within this district are: More or less micaceous 
slates of the Calaveras formation, quartzites of the same formation, 
serpentine, amphibolite, andesite and basalt. 

Mineral deposits. 

The only mineral of present economic importance is gold. The 
entire production comes from placer mines in the old auriferous 
Tertiary river gravels, but gold is known to occur in quartz veins in 
the neighborhood of Onion Valley. Deposits of light gray limestone 
containing from 10% to 19.5% MgO are found at Last Chance, four 
and one-half miles northwest of Onion Valley. 

The Richmond Hill hydraulic gravel mine is located three-fourths 
of a mile southwest of Sawpit, on Onion Valley Creek, at an elevation 
of 5500'. Bedrock is serpentine on the west and amphibolite on the 
east. The white quartz gravel is well exposed and not covered by 
undesite breccia. It is not thoroughly rounded, thus resembling the 
gravel underlying Little Grass Valley and at La Porte. The channel 
may possibly run from Little Grass Valley to the Richmond Hill below 
the andesite capping on the intervening ridge. 

From the Richmond Hill mine the deposit is exposed for about a 
mile northeasterly and is then covered by andesite. A gravel deposit 
occurs on the same channel at the Union Hill mine, three-fourths of a 

4—46902 



46 MINES AND MINiSAL I^ISOURCES. 

mile farther east, on the east side of the ridge. This mine has also 
been worked by hydraulic operations. 

Less than one-half mile north of Sawpit white quartz gravel 
occurring under the black basalt has been drifted upon. The gravel 
at Sawpit is probably on the Richmond Hill-Union Hill channel. 

North of Sawpit the ridge is covered by andesite breccia. On the 
northern border of this capping, two and one-half miles northwest of 
Onion Valley, a deposit of gravel rests on serpentine bedrock. Imme- 
diately to the west is an area of Neocene basalt, extending further 
down the slope than the gravel deposit. 

Two masses of white quartz gravel also occur at the north and 
west base of Blue Nose Mountain, at the edge of the breccia capping, 
on bedrock of the Calaveras formation. 

Both deposits are about 500' below the Bunker Hill tunnel, 
a mile and a half northwest of Hepsidam, a drift mine in the Gibson- 
ville District. At the Bunker Hill mine the last of the La Porte 
channel was seen. It is possible that the two deposits at the base of 
Blue Nose Mountain represent downthrow portions of the Hepsidam 
deposit. Extensive faulting has occurred in this region, which was 
formerly, one of enormous volcanic activity. Lavas have issued here, 
much of which is massive andesite, in part dikes, occupying fissures 
in the bedrock. 

On the ridge north of Poorman Creek two and one-half miles north- 
east of Pilot Peak, the Blue Lead gravel mine is located. The white 
quartz gravel has a rubble of andesitic boulders on top, resembling 
the massive andesite immediately to the west. 

Gold-bearing quartz veins occur at Onion Valley near the contact 
between the serpentine and Calaveras formation. Veins also occur 
further east in fissures in the Calaveras. About three miles northwest 
of the town two or three veins occur in the Calaveras formation or 
near the contact. They ha"ve a northwesterly strike, and are part of 
a vein system that seems to run parallel or along the contact between 
the serpentine belt on the west and the Calaveras formation on 
the east. 

SPANISH RANCH MINING DISTRICT. 

This district, which includes most of Meadow Valley, is typifie^d by 
deposits of both Pleistocene lake gravels and those of Neocene rivers. 
Some chromic iron is found in place and pebbles of chromic iron are 
common in the lake and river gravels. 

The district is in approximately the west central portion of Plumas 
County, Spanish Ranch being seven miles by stage west of Quincy. 
Quincy is connected to Quincy Junction on the Western Pacific Bail- 
road by the Quincy Western Railway. 



The altitude of Spanish Ranch is about 3650^, and the cliinate is 
warm and dry during the summer months, with much snow and raifi- 
&11 m the winter. As may be expected, the condition of the roads in 
winter is not dependable, but in the summer they are quite good. 

The district is part of the Plumas National Forest, and it cont^ons 
fir, spruce, tamarack, yellow and sugar pine timber. The slopes arc 
usuaHy thickly covered with underbrush. 

The chief mineral is gold, found in Neocene river gravels and in 
Pleistocene lake deposits. Two deposits of chromic iron are found 
in place in the district, one about two miles to the west of Spanish 
Hftn^ Post Office, and the other about three-fourths of a mile south- 
west of Meadow Valley. 

Spanish Creek in the northwestern part of the district, Wapanse 
Creek in the northeastern part, Rock and Snake creeks in the 
southern part and several small lakes furnish a plentiful water supply 
throughout the year. 

-History of mining. 

The Meadow Valley Pleistocene lake gravels have been very exten- 
sively mined by the hydraulic method at Gopher Hill, a mile and a 
quarter east of Spanish Ranch. A large area of the lower gravel beds 
at Grub Plat, a mile and a half southwest of Spanish Ranch, have 
been mined, as well as some of the gravels three and a quarter miles 
east of Meadow Valley post office, on a branch of Slate Creek. The 
old mines known as Shores Hill and Badger Hill on the ridges east 
end west of Whitlock Ravine have been mined by hydraulicking. 

At the west edge of the lava area which caps Chaparral Hill is a 
deposit of Neocene river gravel which has been hydraulicked. There 
are several other patches of the same gravels, some of which have 
been worked to the east of Spanish Creek. The Bean Hill hydraulic 
mine is two miles northwest of Spanish Ranch. Two miles north of 
^anii^ Ranch the Pine Leaf channel has been worked underneath a 
capping of andesitic tuflE at the Pine Leaf and Knewil mines. 

Bibliography. 

Llnderep, W., Tertiary Gravels of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Gteol. Survey, Prof. 
Paper 73, pages 98-99, 1911. Turner, H. W., Further Contributions to the 
Geology of the Sierra Nevada, U. S. Gteol. Survey, Seventeenth Annual 
Report, pt. I, page 557, 1896. U. S. Geol. Survey, Min. Res. pt. I, 
page 218, 1907. U. S. Geol. Survey, Min. Res. pt. I, page 768, 1908. U. S. 
Geol. Survey, Topo. sheet, Bidwell Bar. U. S. Geol. Survey, Folio 43, l^ftS. 

Topography. 

To the east of Spanish Creek, which flows in a general southeasterly 
direction until it reaches Spanish Ranch, where it changes to an 
easterly direction, there is a ridge extending from Chaparral Hill, 
elevation 5500', in a general easterly direction throughout the district. 



48 MINES AiSTD MiNEtlAL BfeSOUROilS. 

The general slope of the ridge is slightly towards the east. It slopes 
gently to the south into Mieadow Valley, the elevation of which is less 
than 4000'. Two small hills of 4200' are seen in Meadow Valley east 
of Spanish Eanch. To the southeast of Meadow Valley the ground 
slopes in a gentle rise to another ridge extending in a general south- 
easterly direction. 

The whole district is drained by Spanish Creek and tributaries to 
it, whose waters flow into Indian Creek, which in turn, flows into the 
North Fork Feather River. Wapanse Creek, with headwaters at 
Smith Lake in the north of the district, flows southerly into Spanish 
Creek, draining Snake Lake Valley. Snake Creek and Bock Creek 
drain the southern portion of the district. 

Geology. 

Spanish Creek, from its headwaters down to Meadow Valley, cuts 
through a large area of serpentine. Chaparral Hill in the northwest 
part of this section is capped with a deposit of andesite tuff. Meadow 
Valley, Snake Lake Valley and several small areas, one to the east 
of Badger Hill diggings and three on the sides of Rock Creek Canon, 
are composed of Pleistocene lake beds. On the northern slope of the 
ridge north of Meadow Valley is an area of the Cedar formation, 
composed of little altered clay slates. This is in contact on the west 
with the serpentine forming the ridge, on the south with the andesitie 
tuff capping this ridge and on the east with the Calaveras formation. 
A small exposure of serpentine is seen in Meadow Valley just to the 
east of Spanish Peak. The ridge south of Meadow Valley is capped 
with andesitie tuff. 

The Meadow Valley lake beds of Pleistocene age are composed 
mostly of gravel. Some time late in the Pleistocene the rocky barrier 
between Meadow Valley and American Valley was cut through by 
Spanish Creek, thus draining the lake. 

The Cedar formation is of the Juratrias period, being the only area 
assigned to that period in this quadrangle. 

Of the bedrock series, only the serpentine and the Calaveras for- 
mation are present in this district. 

The andesitie capping, exposed on the ridges, is of the Neocene 
period and belongs to the superjacent series. 

Mineral deposits. 

Gold is found in auriferous gravels of two periods and of different 
modes of deposition. 

Several exposures of Pleistocene lake gravels are seen in and 
around Spanish Ranch. At Gopher Hill, a mile and a quarter east 
of Spanish Ranch, the gravels have been mined extensively by the 
hydraulic method. On the exposed cliffs there are two layers -of 
gravels, about 50' apart, of a light buff color, and from 1' to 5' in 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 49 

thickness. The pebbles are usually small, from 1" to 4" in diameter. 
There is but little doubt that all the isolated gravel patches were 
originally connected with the large Meadow Valley area of lake 
gravel. 

Of the Neocene auriferous gravels there is an exposure at the west 
edge of the lava cap which covers Chaparral Hill. This exposure was 
worked by the hydraulic method and was known as Fales Hill. To 
the southeast of this, on the same ridge, are other exposures of these 
&ame gravels, some of which have been worked. 

Two miles northwest of Spanish Ranch, at an elevation of about 
4600', is the old hydraulic mine of Bean Hill, containing quartz 
gravels of the oldest prevolcanic epoch. The Pine Leaf channel, two 
miles north of Spanish Ranch, has been traced northwesterly for 
about a mile. The channel is 200' wide, the gravel 4' thick, and it 
yielded about $1.50 per yard. 

TAYLORSVILLE MINING DISTRICT. 

The most important mineral in this district is gold, but some copper 
is produced as a by-product. Nearly all the gold has come from veins 
containing auriferous pyrite, found in the southern portion of the 
district in what is known as the Crescent Mills belt of quartz mines. 

Taylorsville is situated a little north of the central portion of 
Plumas County. It is about seven miles by stage northeast of 
Crescent Mills, a station on the Indian Valley Railroad, and about 
twenty-nine miles by stage southwest of Susanville, county seat of 
Lassen County. 

Owing to heavy precipitation of rain and snow during the winter 
months the condition of the roads is poor, but during the warm dry 
summer the roads are quite good. Taylorsville has an elevation of 
3550^ 

The ridges surrounding it are well covered with timber, chiefly fir, 
spruce, tamarack, yellow and sugar pine, and a liberal supply of 
underbrush covers the slopes. 

Gold is produced both from drift and placer mines. There is a 
deposit of pyprhotite a mile and a half south of Taylorsville, but it 
has not been exploited. 

Indian Creek, and Montgomery Creek, one of its tributaries, assure 
a plentiful water supply to the district. 

History of mining. 

As early as 1850 prospectors found their way into Indian Valley. 
Mining claims are more or less distinctly grouped in two belts, the 
Crescent Mills belt and the Genesee belt. The southern end of the 
Crescent Mills b^It lies southwest of Taylorsville and practically all 
the mining in this district has been done there. 



50 MINES ANI> MINEBAli KI80UR0ES. 

Dlller, J. S., Geology of the TaylorsvlUe Region, California, U. S. GeoL Survey 
Bulletin 353, 1908. tJ. S. Geol. Survey, Min. Res., page 180, 1906. IT. S. 
Geol. Survey, Min. Res., pt. I, page 213, 1907. U. S. Geol. Survey, Topo. 
sheets, TaylorsvlUe, Indian Valley, Honey Lake. 

Topography. 

The district lies in the Grizzly Mountain section of the Grizzly- 
Mountain block, the latter extending from the Diamond Mountain 
block to the main crest of the Sierras. The Grizzly Mountains have 
ft well-marked crest line and escarpment, which presents a steep slope 
of over 3000' to the west end of Genesee Valley. The crest line sinks 
and curves toward the northwest, running to Taylorsville, where it 
disappears in Indian Valley. A small notch is cut by Montgomery 
Greek across the north end of Grizzly Mountains, where it flows into 
Indian Creek, about two miles southeast of Taylorsville. The latter 
borders the district on the northeast edge and with Montgomery 
Creek and Houghs Creek comprises the drainage system of the 
district. 

Geo^lo^y. 

In the southeastern portion of the district is a large exposure of 
Hull meta-andesite, trending generally northwest, in which there is 
an exposure of Mormon sandstone about one-fourth mile wide by one- 
half mile long in the northern portion. West of this Hull meta- 
andesite is meta-rhyolite, trending generally northwest with a deposit 
of Grizzly formation in contact with it on the west. Two miles south 
of Taylorsville, a lens-shaped mass of serpentine has been intruded. 
Further south a larger mass of serpentine cuts through both the 
Taylorsville formation and the Grizzly formation and into the meta- 
rhyolite. On the west this serpentine is in contact with Taylor meta- 
andesite. Southwest of Taylorsville is a body of granodiorite, narrow 
at the ends and about one-half mile wide in the middle, trending in a 
northwest-southeast direction for nearly four miles in contact on the 
west with Arlington formation. There are three rhyolite dikes about 
two miles to the west of Taylorsville at the contact between Taylor 
meta-andesite and the Taylorsville formation, and three cutting the 
terpentine which lies about two miles to the south of TaylorsvlUe. 
Two small exposures of Hosselkus limestone are seen west of Little 
Grizzly Creek, in the Hull meta-andesite. In the Tant meta-andesite 
there are two exposures of Hardgrave sandstone, one lying on the 
contact with the meta-rhyolite and the other just to the northeast of 
it. Three exposures of Thompson limestone are seen, two in the 
Mormon sandstone and one just to the south of the contact between 
the Mormon sandstone and the meta-rhyolite. 

The pre-Silurian meta-rhyolite is the oldest formation in the 
district. It is a massive gray siliceous rock with occasional incon- 



PLUMAS CaUNTT. 51 

spicuons phenocrysts of quartz in a uniformly jSne, compact ground- 
mass. Gn the lower slope of Grizzly Mountains it has a decided 
seMstose structure, due to the compression and consequent shearing. 

The Grizzly formation of Silurian age is a gray, well-defined but 
thin-bedded quartzite overlain by lentils of limestone and inter- 
stratified with shaley, often siliceous slate (argillite) having irregular 
cleavage. The coarser beds of quartzite contain small pebbles of 
rhyolite. 

The Taylorsville formation of Devonian age is composed of fine 
sediments, chiefly slates and thin-bedded sandstones. Near the 
middle are Well-defined beds of light-colored quartzite, and at the 
base is locally a fine conglomerate. The general dip of the formation 
is to the southwest. 

The Arlington formation, belonging to the Calaveras group of 
Carboniferous age, is made up chiefly of fine, gray thin-bedded sand- 
stone, with some shale in part silicified and a few beds of con- 
glomerate. Along Houga Creek it is bounded by granodiorite. These 
bordering igneous rocks are younger and either penetrate or over- 
flow it. 

The Taylor meta-andesite, of the Calaveras group of Carboniferous 
age, is a decidedly green rock. Where not much altered it is 
porphyritic with crystals of augite. It is apparently an eruption 
interstratified with Carboniferous rocks. 

The Hull meta-andesite varies from greenish to reddish. Much of 
it is in well-defined sheets representing lava flows. The fact that it 
penetrates the Mormon sandstone indicates that its eruptions took 
place near the close of the Jurassic. 

The serpentine in this district is a typical green serpentine, varying 
greatly in composition. The most abundant form is composed almost 
wholly of a light-colored pyroxene with a small amount of dark 
green hornblende. The serpentine intersects the meta-rhyolite and 
all Paleozoic rocks, but does not come in contact with later sediments. 
In turn, it is cut by quartz diorite, and dikes of the later rhyolite, 
indicating that it belongs among the first eruptions of the late 
Jurassic or early Cretaceous. 

The rock included under the head of granodiorite is a light-colored 
and for the most part medium-grained rock resembling granite, com- 
posed chiefly of plagioclase feldspar and quartz. It is of late Jurassic 
or early Cretaceous age. 

The dike rocks of the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous vary in color 
from light gray to pale green and reddish-brown. Small pheno- 
crysts of quartz are always present, but they are rarely porphyritic. 



52 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The Hosselkus limestone, two small exposures of which appear 
directly in contact with the Hull meta-andesite, is of Triassic age. It 
is a dark blue on fresh fracture, but weathers light gray, and contains 
a few veins of white calcite. 

The Hardgrave sandstone is of Jurassic age and only two small 
exposures are seen in the district. It is red or gray in color, varying 
irom a fine shaley sandstone to conglomerate, and is almost wholly of 
tuffaceous character. 

The Fant meta-augite andesite is a greenish to reddish brown rock, 
more or less porphyritic, sometimes with augite, but often with 
plagioclase phenocrysts. The groundmass is made up of small 
crystals and grains of feldspar, augite and magnetite, generally with 
some amorphous matter. It is of Jurassic age. That portion lying 
on the lower slope of Grizzly Mountains includes fragments of Hard- 
grave sandstone, showing it to be a volcanic effusion in the interval 
between the deposition of the Hardgrave sandstone and the Thompson 
limestone. 

The Thompson limestone, of Jurassic age, is gray and somewhat 
shaley. On the lower slope of Grizzly Mountains are three isolated 
ledges lying along a line extending nearly east and west. This is 
later than the Fant meta-andesite to the west and seems to conform- 
ably overlie the Mormon sandstone. 

The Mormon sandstone, comprising a curved area on the lower 
slopes of Grizzly Mountains, is chiefly gray. 

Mineral deposits. 

The metalliferous deposits in this district are confined largely, 
through not wholly, to the igneous rocks, but they are not definite 
contact deposits. They are in more or less well-defined quartz veins, 
usually running parallel to the course of the belt, but in a few cases 
small veins run nearly at right angles to the others. The ore belt 
itself is in the narrow mass of granodiorite southwest of Taylorsville. 
The ore is auriferous pyrite, sometimes in small bodies, but generally 
disseminated in the narrow strip of sheared rock of the partially 
formed vein in which there is usually some quartz. The pyrite is 
nearly always changed to limonite, setting the gold free. 

Two-thirds of a mile south of Taylorsville at the old Pettinger 
mine, a small imperfect vein in the Taylorsville slate is impregnated 
with carbonates of copper, generally green but sometimes blue. 

A mass of pyrrhotite, one and one-half miles south of Taylorsville, 
lies in a narrow strip of sheared sandstone, running north and south 
near the horizon of the Montgomery limestone, but the largest body, 
ybout 10' in thickness, is at a point where the sheared sediments end 
against serpentine. 



PLDMAS COUNTY. 



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54 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

MINES AND MINERALS. 



CHROMITE. 

In the Quincy District three prospects were noted which had not 
made any production up to the end of July, 1918.^ 

L. Eddelbuttel and Thomas Hughs of Quincy had two locations in 
the inaccessible canon of Middle Fork of Feather Eiver. 

J. L. Foisie of Quincy had one undeveloped prospect three miles 
west of Spanish Peak Sawmill. 

J. Gifford of Meadow Valley had two locations which were under 
lease to F. E. Young and A. L. Smith of Quincy. Two men had 
started prospecting late in July, 1918, and hoped to produce a carload 
of ore. 

Jitney Chrome Mine.^ Owners, McCarty and Hughs, Quincy. 
Located in a very inaccessible part of the Quincy District on the east 
bank of Middle Fork of Feather River, in Sec. 14, T. 23 N., R. 9 B., 
ten miles southwest of Quincy. The group comprises two claims 
which were operated under lease by the Union Chrome Company. 

The principal orebody was a lens of solid chromite 6' wide in the 
center, and 80' long ; the southern 20' of the orebody had been offset 
a distance of 5' by a fault. This lens had a northerly strike and 
pitched 80° W. It was said to carry 46% CrgOg. 

It was developed by an open cut. At the end of July, 1918, 
175 tons had been mined and there was said to be no more in sight. 

The trail from this property raises about 3000' in ascending the 
mountain to the end of a road which, in turn, drops 3000' to Quincy 
in a distance of about six miles. 

Valley View^ chrome property is near Greenville. It is owned by 
W. P. Boyden and Fred Koenig of Greenville and was leased on 
royalty to A. E. Vandercook of Oakland, who is reported to have 
transferred his lease to the Western Ores Company. 

It is said that one car of ore was shipped in 1916 and two cars in 
1917, averaging 32% CrgOg. The property was idle in July, 1917. 

COPPER. 
Blue Bell Mining Company. (See under Gold.) 

Bullion. (See under Gold.) 

Copper King and Copper Queen Mines. Owners, Wm. H. Bacon, 
Lever M. Bacon, Eureka, Utah. 

Location: Sec. 21, T. 26 N., R. 15 E., 13 miles northwest of Doyle (W. P. Ry.) 
on Doyle and Squaw Valley Road. Elevation 6300'. 

This property contains four claims — ^the Copper King, Copper 
Queen, Easter, and Pioneer — a total area of 80 acres covering 3000' 

*From field notes furnished by U. S. Bureau of Mines. 
K:!al. State Min. Bur., Bulletin 76, August, 1918. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 55 

along the lode. It is situated on the ridge northeast of Last Chance 
Creek and there is a good stand of pine timber on the property. 

The claims are prospects, located in 1914, and only a limited amount 
of prospecting has been done. 

Development work at time of visit in 1913 consisted of a tunnel, 
40' long on the Copper Queen and a series of shafts 10' to 20' in depth. 

The deposit consists of a quartz vein capped with iron gossan 
between walls of diorite. It averages 2' in width with a maximum of 
4' ; strikes northwest, dips vertically and has a proven length on the 
surface of 3000'. The ore contains chalcopyrite and bornite. 

The Golden Horse Shoe group adjoins on the southwest. 

Cosmopolitan. (See under Gold.) 

El Dorado Group. Owners, Paul Sonognini and L. Dufay, Chilcoot. 

Location: Sec. 25, T. 24 N., R. 16 E., 8 miles north of Chilcoot <W. P. Ry.) 
by road. Elevation 6100'. 

This property consists of five claims: the El Dorado No. 1 and 
No. 2, Bear, Wild Cat and Napoleon, situated on the timbered ridge 
east of Last Chance Creek. It covers a length along the lode of 3000', 
and is 70 acres in area. 

The property was discovered in 1909 and has been worked off and 
on since that date. One car of ore, assaying 56% copper, was 
shipped. 

Development work consists of a crosscut tunnel 60' to the vein, 
cutting it 50' below the outcrop, and a drift easterly for 155'. 

The deposit consists of a series of quartz fissure veins in granite. 
The ore /is basic, containing chalcopyrite, bornite, malachite, and 
azurite. The main vein has a maximum width of 5' with an average 
of 3', strikes east, and dips 55° N., with a proven length on the sur- 
face of 3000'. There is an E.-W. vein 500' south of the main vein 
with a tunnel on it 25' long, which shows the vein to be 5' wide, 
and the ore to average 5% to 6% copper. 

Equipped with a whim only. 

Mohawk mines adjoin on the north. 

Engels Mine. Owners, Engels Copper Mining Company, 393 Mills 
Building, San Francisco; Henry Engels, president; E. E. Paxton, 
general manager. 

Location: Lights Caflon Mining District, Sec. 4 (and others), T. 27 N., R. 11 
E., on Indian Valley Railway, 22 miles from Paxton, the junction with 
the Western Pacific Railway. Elevation 5263'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260 and 353. Cal. State Min. Bur. 
Rept. XII, pages 68-69. Mining and Scientific Press. July 31, 1915. 
H. W. Turner and A. F. Rogers : A Grcologic and Microscopic Study of a 
Magmatic Copper Sulphide Deposit in Plumas County, Economic Geologry, 
Vol. IX, No. 4, 1914. L. C. Graton and D. H. McLaughlin: Ore Deposition 
and Enrichment at Engels, California, Economic Geology, Vol. XII, No. 1, 
January, 1917. Mines Hand Book, 1918. 



56 MINES AND MINEBAIi RESOURCES. 

The property contains 154 claims, of which 23 are patented. There 
are two groups, known as Engels and Superior mines, the latter being 
two and one-half miles south of the Engels mine. The lode is covered 
for about three miles; there are good outcrops on many of the claims, 
and the entire area is believed to be well mineralized. In 1917 the 
company claimed an ore reserve of not less than 3,000,000 tons of ore 
above the tunnel levels, and total probable reserves of not less than 
10,000,000 tons of 2^% copper ore. 

Diller mapped the country rock in the vicinity as granodiorite. 
Rogers describes the rock in which the ore occurs as norite-diorite. 
He notes granodiorite, some of it rich in biotite, as a differentiation 
product of the diorite. Graton and McLaughlin describe it as ' * noritic 
in character, being composed of plagioclase and slightly subordinate 
amounts of orthorhombic and monoclinic pyroxenes, and biolite." 
They observe that it is *' probably a basic differentiate of the great 
Sierra Nevada batholith of granodiorite.'' 

Turner and Rogers described the Engels mine deposit as a mag- 
matic segregation. According to Turner, the ore occurs disseminated 
through the fresh diorite, in which most of the fractures are post 
mineral. The metallic oxides and sulphides, as described in their 
article, appear to have crystallized out from the magma in the same 
way as the feldspar hornblende, pyroxene and biotite. Quoting 
Turner, *'the ore minerals are largely interstitial between the silicate 
minerals, and thus later in crystallizing out.'' In the Superior deposit, 
on the other hand, the ore minerals are largely deposited along joint 
planes, and are clearly of secondary origin-. These writers, particu- 
larly Professor Rogers, came to the conclusion that the development 
of chalcocite and some covellite by replacement of bomite is the work 
of ascending, heated alkaline waters. 

Graton and McLaughlin, as the result of later studies of the deposit 
and of many thin sections of the ores, took issue with the above 
findings. They concluded that: 

**1. The ores, instead of being magmatic in the sense that they were 
initial constituents of the dioritic rock in which they occur, were 
introduced after the rock had solidified and had suffered notable 
dynamic and chemical changes, and constitute replacements formed 
under pneumatolytic and hydrothermal conditions * * *. 

**2. Although the possibility of formation of a small amount of 
chalcocite from ascending solutions can not be absolutely excluded, 
no satisfactory evidence of chalcocite of replacement origin formed 
in this way, i. e., by upward secondary enrichment, has come under 
our observation. Most of the chalcocite and all of the covellite at 
Engels unquestionably result from replacement of earlier sulphides 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 57 

through the agency of descending meteoric waters and a competent 
explanation for all of the chalcocite is to be found in normal down- 
ward enrichment. ' ' The question of the origin of the rich chalcocite 
ore is of the utmost importance, as when once determined, it will 
throw much light on the future of the mine. 

The deposit was discovered in the middle '80 's by Henry Engels. 
At that time it was so remote from the railroad that production was 
nearly out of the question. Nevertheless, some high grade ore is said 
to have been shipped from the Superior group to Swansea. Assess- 
ment work was intelligently done, so that known ore reserves grew 
larger each year. In 1894 the Engels group, according to the State 
Mineralogist's Report, comprised three claims, developed by three 
tunnels, the longest then reported 425' long. In 1912 the same group 
was proven to a depth of 250', and the copper belt was described as 
being 1800' wide with a gossan outcrop 300' wide and 2000' long. 
Over 4000' of development work had been done in five years past on 
the Engels group, but only about 500' on the Superior group. 

In 1911 a 500-ton blast furnace was built, but was never operated 
on account of government objection to fumes. Early in 1914 the 
company was reorganized and a minerals separation flotation plant 
capable of treating a maximum of 225 tons daily, was built at a cost 
of $50,000. This plant was put in operation in February, 1915, and 
gave the mine the distinction of being the first to depend entirely on 
oil flotation for the recovery of copper sulphides. This process gives 
a much higher grade concentrate than ordinary water concentration, 
because of the presence of iron oxides in the ore. An extraction of 
77.6% was obtained from an ore said to average 3.8% copper. The 
concentrate that year averaged 33.82% copper. In ten months, 
8,724,494 pounds dry concentrate were made. Development cost 67^ 
a ton, mining 40ff, treatment $1.20, marketing $1.14 and general 
expense 78fJ. The capacity of the mill was doubled late in 1915. 

An electric plant with a maximum capacity of 400 horsepower was 
built and electricity was brought in over a line two miles long. This 
proved inadequate and had to be supplemented at once by distillate 
engines. The property at this time was twenty-six miles from the 
railroad and there was a grade of 1800' in the last two and one-half 
miles to the mine. The concentrate, carrying 5% to 6% moisture, 
had to be sacked and lowered on the tramway to the lower terminal, 
where it was picked up by trailers drawn by a Holt caterpillar 
tractor. This delivered it over the worst of the road to trucks which 
hauled it to Keddie for shipment to the Garfield smelter. 

During 1916 the Indian Valley Railway (broad guage) was built 
twenty-two miles from Paxton to the mine at a cost of $500,000. 



58 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

This road is owned principally by the Engels Copper Mining Com- 
pany. The same year the Great Western Power Company built at a 
cost of $150,000 an electric transmission line thirty-eight miles long 
from its Butte Valley plant to the mine. 

Over 14,000' of development work had been done to the end of 
1916 in the Engels group, and during that year the Superior group 
was also opened with very encouraging results. The ore bodies have 
been opened by tunnels and winzes, and further prov(^n to a depth of 
500' below the lowest working level by diamond drilling. The 
oxidized zone is covered in most places by 6' of soil, but where bare 
it shows a leached rock stained by malachite, limonite and chryso- 
colla. The oxidized zone is irregular in its lower limits, merging 
into mixed chalcocite and carbonates, the richer parts of which have 
been mined but are now inaccessil^le. Below this, is the zone of 
sulphide enrichment which has yielded considerable chalcocite carry- 
ing 16% to 20% copper. This zone was 25' thick and dipped gently 
southwest. This ore gives place to bornite at depths of 100' to 130', 
with some stringers of chalcocite extending deeper. The ore body 
has an average width of 40' and maximum of 150'. It strikes N. 
80° E. and dips 8° SW. Six tunnel levels have been opened. No. 1, 
the highest, was run 30' with a 50' raise; No. 2, 810' with 320' of 
crosscuts and a 75' raise; No. 3, 180' with 110' of crosscuts; No. 4, 
1500' with 970' of crosscuts and 260' of raises and winzes, with a 
stope 400' long, 40' wide and 10' high in 1916 ; No. 5, drift 1110' with 
650' of crosscuts, 200' of raises and a stope 300' by 40' by 70' ; and 
No. 6 the lowest level. Recent work has been on levels 4, 5 and 6, but 
the extent to which these have been carried to date is not known. 
The ore body has been proven on the surface and in the upper levels 
for 1500' on the strike, and had been opened to a vertical depth of 
700' at the beginning of 1919. 

In the Superior group, developments have been equally gratifying. 
A main tunnel and shaft are being driven, and it is planned to sink 
the latter to a depth of 1000'. A stope 500' long was started early in 
1919. The ore in the Superior occurs chiefly along joint planes and 
there are occasional small bodies of high grade. 

Pyrite is notably absent from the Engels ore and has been men- 
tioned as occurring at only one place in the Superior. This accounts 
in large measure for the high grade of copper concentrate obtained. 
The ore is now chiefly bornite averaging 2.3% copper as milled, 
giving a concentrate carrying about 25% copper. The total mill 
capacity of the two plants was said to be 1500 tons a day in April, 
1919, and subsequently it was planned to increase the capitalization 
of the company and bring the mill capacity to 2000 tons a day. The 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 



59 



production in 1918 was about 9,100,000 pounds of copper, costing 
16.5ff a pound to produce. This output made the Engels the largest 
single copper producing property in the state for the year. 

Fordham Copper Property. Owner, Dr. Leonie H. Fordham, Hotel 
Stewart, San Francisco. 

Location : 4 mile nortlieast of Gibsonville on road to Hepsidam. 

The property lies between the ridge which divides Plumas County 
from Sierra County and the high bedrock ridge which divides Slate 
Creek from Canon Creek. It is the bedrock of the gravel which was 
hydraulicked ofif Gravel Hill years ago. The length of the * copper 
outcrop' is 3000' and its width 600', The country rock is described 
as amphibolite schist. 

The following assays of samples from this property were made in 
June, 1917, by Walter L. Gibson (successor to Falkenau Assaying 
Company), Oakland, California: 





Ounces 
gold 


Ounces 
sUver 


Feroentase 
ct^per 


•Oxidized* _ 


.02 
M 
.02 
.02 
.02 


.80 

.28 

1.14 

.12 

JO 


8.2S 

G.80 

11.88 

.81 


'Ohalcopsnite' 

'OoveUite' _ _ _ 

'Chlorite 8chist» _ __ 


•Chlorite schist' _ 


.80 



No work has been done to develop the prospect. 
Polsom bM Hunter Group. Owners, W. F. Folsom and Robt. L. 
Hunter, Indian Valley. 

Location: Lights Cafion Mining District, 3 miles from Engels mine, thence 

28 miles southerly to Keddie (W. P. Ry.). 
BibUo^raphy: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 263. U. S. Geol. Survey, 

Topo. sheets, Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This deposit of copper ore was located early in 1916 about three 
miles from the Engels mine by Folsom and Hunter. The vein has 
been tapped at a deph of 30' by a tunnel and shows a width of from 
16' to 18'. Assays run as high as 14% copper, with a little gold 
and silver. 

Oolden Horseshoe Copper Mine. (Novak Copper Mine.) Owner, 
Jas. B. Novak, Eureka, Utah. 

Location: Sees. 21 and 28, T. 26 N., R. 15 E., 13 miles northwest of Doyle 
(W. P. Ry.) on Doyle and Squaw Valley Road. Elevation 6150'. 

This property embraces the Golden Horseshoe, Potosi, Mormon, 
French Cook, Despair, Incubus and Nightmare claims. There is an 
area of 140 acres, with a length along the lode of 3600'. It is situated 
on the slope of the ridge northeast. of Last Chance Creek and contains 
a good supply of timber, mostly sugar pine, fir and spruce. 



60 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The property was discovered in 1905 and has been worked off and 
on since that time. In 1915 it was under bond and lease to J. F. 
Cutler and four men were working, two on top and two in the mine. 

It is developed by a vertical shaft 120' in depth, from the bottom 
of which drifts have been run 25' south and 50' north. There is also 
a crosscut tunnel 125' long. 

The deposit is a fissure vein filled with quartz and schist cutting 
the diorite, and containing bornite, chalcopyrite and some magnetite. 
The ore runs 3% to 5% copper with about $1.20 gold and some silver 
values. Wall rocks of the quartz vein are altered to actinolite schist. 
The vein has a maximum width of 15', averages 4', strikes N. 20° W., 
dips 85° W., and has a proven length on the surface of 3600' The 
oxide zone has a depth of 35' and is capped by an iron gossan. 

Oil was being used for fuel in 1917, and a 25-horsepower steam 
hoist, a 40-horsepower boiler and a No. 5 Cameron pump are included 
in the equipment. 

The Copper King and Copper Queen claims to the north adjoin. 

Hinchmaii. (See under Gold.) 

Husslemaji and Shaw. (See under Gold.) 

Iron Dike. (See under Gold.) 

Little Gem. (See under Gold.) 

Mohawk Capper Mines. (Last Chance Copper Mines.) Owners, 
Donberg, Reno, Nevada.; Ludici, Vinta, California. 

Location: Sea 25, T. 24 N., R. 16 K, 9 miles north of Chilcoot (W. P. Ry.) 
by Chilooot and Last Chance road. Elevation 6250'. 

This property consists of 160 acres of patented ground, covering a 
length along the lode of 3000'. The claims are the Mohawk, and Last 
Chance, both situated on the west slope of Adams Mountain, and 
carrying a plentiful stand of pine timber. 

The deposit was discovered in 1905 and has been worked off and 
on since then. It is now under lease to F. J. Channing and C. N. 
Shaffer of Reno. In 1913 there was shipped to the Western Ore 
Purchasing Company a daily production of about eight tons, which 
runs 6% copper. The total production to date has been about 
1000 tons. 

The vein has been developed by a 180' shaft inclined at 80°, on 
which there are three levels: the 50', with a drift 125' north, the 
120' with a drift 125' north and the 180' with a drift 65' north, and 
about 240' of crosscuts. The vein has been stoped from the 120' level 
north to the tunnel level. 

The deposit consists of a series of parallel veins cutting a granite 
formation. The main (Mohawk) vein, has a filling of quartz and 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 61 

granite, and granite walls. The maximum width is 10', average 4'. 
It strikes N. 20° E., dips 80° W., and has a proven length on the 
surface of 3000'. One ore shoot developed 30' long and averaged 4' 
in width. The ore goes 6% to 8% -copper, 40^ gold and 2 ounces 
silver. There is some molybdenite associated. A northwest-south- 
east vein, with a dip of 50° E., was cut on the tunnel level. It lies east 
of the main vein, but probably intersects it in depth. The oxidized 
zone has a depth of 50'. 

Equipment comprises an 80-h.p. boiler, IngersoU-Rand compressor, 
a 25-h.p. single-drum hoist and a Knowles pump. Fourteen men were 
employed in 1917. 

Moonlight Copper Mine. Owners, E. C. Trask and Louis Coffer. 

Location : In Indian Valley two miles from the En gel mine and one mile from 
the Indian Valley Railroad. 

In June, 1918, a concentrating plant capable of 15 tons daily pro- 
duction was completed. In January, 1919, the company was employ- 
ing about a dozen men and was said to be shipping high grade con- 
centrate, which carries considerable silver. Ore of milling grade 
was reported to have been developed by a tunnel 500' long. Has 
been worked two years. 

Steam is used for power, wood costing $2 per cord used for fuel. 
Freight from the mine to Chilcoot costs $3 per ton. 

El Dorado group adjoins on the south. 

Murdock Copper Mines. Owner, Andrew Murdock, Reno, Nevada. 

Location: Sec. 25, T. 24 N., R. 16 E., 8 miles north of Chilcoot, 10 miles by 
wagon road north of Chilcoot station on W. P. Ry. Elevation 6500'. 

This property consists of 8 claims — the Last Chance Nos. 1, 2, 3, 
4 and 5, King George, King Edward and Copper King. There is a 
total of 160 acres, covering a length along the vein of 4500'. It is 
situated on the slope of the ridge northwest of Mt. Adams. Sugar 
pine and spruce are plentiful. 

The property was discovered in 1909 and has been worked inter- 
mittently to date. Six men were working in 1917, three on top and 
three in the mine. It produced 90 tons of 6% to 8% copper ore. 

Development work consists of a 104' shaft on Last Chance No. 1, 
from the bottom of which drifts run 38' southwest and 104' northeast. 
On No. 2 there is a shaft 42' deep, and on No. 3 a tunnel. There is a 
125' incline tunnel on No. 4 and on No. 5 a 300' tunnel. Ore is being 
stoped on the 40' level on No. 2 from an orebody claimed to be 60' 
long, 6' high and 40' wide. 

The deposit is a series of quartz fissure veins in granite formation. 
The average width is 4', strike N. 45° W., dip 15° W., and it has a 
proven length on the surface of 4500'. The ore is basic, containing 
malachite, azurite, chalcopyrite, bomite, chalcocite, and graphite. 

5—46902 



62 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

There are also lenses of molybdenite associated. It contains 636% 
copper, .03 ounces gold and .72 ounces silver. 

Equipment consists of a whim. Keystone drill, compressor and gaso- 
line engine. 

Sorted ore is shipped. The haul from mine to Chilcoot costs $3 per 
ton, and from Chilcoot to Hazen, Nevada, by railroad $4.30. 

NevadBrDouglas Copper Company. Owner, same. 

Location : Lights Canon Mining District. 

Twenty-seven copper claims in Lights Canon were filed for record 
at Quincy, in January, 1914. 

Pilot Copper Mine. Owners, Joseph and Albert Goodhue. 

Location : Near Indian Falls, between the Five Bears and Genesee mines. 

Reported in October, 1918, to have struck a 2' ledge of copper ore 
carrying gold and silver. Preparations were being made at that time 
to ship high grade ore. 

Peter. (See under Gold.) 

Polar Star Claim. Owners, Cox, Keasy and Cooksey. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 15, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 6 miles 

southeast of Taylor sville, thence 12 miles southerly, by good automobile 

road, to Keddie (W. P. Ry.). 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111, 121. U. S. Geol. Survey 

Topo. sheets, Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. Cal. State Min. Bur. 

Bull. 50. page 180. 

This property is opened by a tunnel and an open cut. The tunnel 
passes through the vein, which is 10' thick, and runs some distance 
ahead in the east wall. The open cut is in a body, or vein, of good 
peacock sulphide, and carbonate of copper ore, with considerable red 
oxide in seams and bunches. The mountain and adjacent country are 
heavily timbered with pine and fir. Water is plentiful. 

Shoofly Group. Owner, G. II. Goodhue, Quincy. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 32 and 33, T. 26 N., and 
Sees 3 4 and 10, T. 25 N., R. 9 E., 5 miles north of Keddie by good 
wagon road. Elevation 3000'-5000'. 

Bibliographv : Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. U. S. 
Geol Survey Topo. sheets. Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. Cal. 
State Min. Bur. Bull. 50, page 182. 

The 21 locations comprising the property, together with the Shoofly 
Ranch, patented, on which the first discovery of copper ore was made, 
extend in a general northeast direction, parallel with the strike of the 

underlying schists. 

Besides numerous surface cuts, the principal development on the 
property is a tunnel 80' long crosscutting the strata. It enters on the 
bank of Indian Creek within the boundaries of the Shoofly Ranch. 

The copper ore occurs disseminated in a quartz schist, with a nearly 
vertical dip ; with clay slates to the west and a series of igneous rocks, 
chiefly porphyrites to the east. The copper-bearing vein belt is 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 63 

believed to follow the center line of the locations with an average 
width of 80', and a copper content given as nearly 2%. The ores 
noted are generally bornite, with blue and green carbonates, the latter 
constantly forming at the surface from a leaching action. It occurs 
in minute sheets and lenses between the much contracted laminations 
of the schist, which everywhere exhibits the action of compressive 
force, and in general structure resembles strikingly the copper- 
bearing schists of Calaveras County. 

Walker Brothers Mine. Owner, International Smelting Company, 
Utah. V. R. Hart, manager. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 7, T. 24 N., R. 12 E., 22 miles 
northwest by wagon road, from Portola. Elevation 6500'-8000'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, 
J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 363, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Topo. sheets, Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

The property consists of 400 acres, 200 of which are patented. The 
patented claims are the Bullion, Bullion Extension, Copper Center, 
Copper Center Extension, Rob, Rob Extension, Walker, Walker 
Extension, Valley View and Valley View Extension. ' The holdings 
extend from the top of the mountain, south to Little Grizzly Creek, 
and the main workings are situated on top of the ridge about two 
miles south of Mt. Ingalls, at an elevation of 8000'. There is good 
timber on the property. 

Walker Brothers have held the property for the last five or six 
years. The mine has been favorably reported on by numerous engi- 
neers and the controlling interest has been purchased for a large sum. 
The company was pushing development work late in 1918. 

The vein has been developed by a 50' shaft and two 75' north and 
south drifts on the vein. A crosscut has also been driven 80' through 
the vein from the bottom of the shaft, and there are 300' of open 
cuts on the surface. 

The vein is a quartz vein 6' to 8' in width in an altered zone of a 
maximum width of 80' impregnated with sulphides containing copper, 
silver and gold. The ore of the quartz vein encountered in the shaft 
at a depth of 15', contains basic sulphides, bornite, chalcopyrite and 
tetrahedrite (gray copper). This shaft was inaccessible at time of 
visit, but the vein walls are said to be diorite. The strike is north- 
west and the dip is 65° NE. Ore on the dump is reported to run 7% 
to 12% copper, with unknown amounts of gold and silver. 

The mine is equipped with a sawmill, 7 thousand feet capacity, a 
15-horsepower boiler and hoist. A new 60-horsepower boiler and 
engine and a compressor were installed in January, 1914. There are 
three houses, including a new bunkhouse. 

The nearest mines are the Gruss and Mother Lode (Caiman). 



64 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

High grade ore assaying 12% copper was struck in October, 1915, 
in the 150' drift from the 125' level. Construction of a 4600' aerial 
tramway, a 100-ton flotation plant, and ore bins was progressing. 

Prospecting with diamond drills has proven an ore body for a dis- 
tance of 200' in the Walker mine. Assays average 7.20% copper, 
$1.11 gold and 2.7 ounces silver. This is an average of assays taken 
each five feet for 200' in a hole put down from the 65' level 250'. 
Further drilling is under way from the 125' level. Reserves are 
estimated at 20,000 tons. A crosscut at the 125' level averaged 6% 
to 8% copper and 3 to 4 ounces silver. A second crosscut now in 
400' will open the ore 75' below the shaft bottom and 800' in. The 
Leschen aerial tram, under construction, operates by gravity, and will 
handle 250 tons in 16 hours. 

A new flotation plant was completed in October, 1916. It had a 
capacity of 85 tons daily but was being enlarged to an ultimate 
capacity of 200 tons. The plant consists of Blake crusher, Marcy 
ball mill. Dorr classifier, Callow cells. Dorr thickener and Oliver filter. 
Daily output in summer of 1918 was said to be 18 tons of concentrate, 
and a recovery of 95% copper and 75% gold and silver was claimed. 
Electricity is used for power. Concentrate is shipped to Tooele. 
Cost per ton for milling during the first half of 1918 was said to be 
$2 a ton. 

Williams Qroup. Owner, J. D. Williams. 

Location : Genesee Valley Mining District, about 3 miles east of Grenesee, 

thence 18 miles west by good automobile road to Keddie (W. P. Ry.). 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 

sheets, Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. Gal. State Min. Bur. Bull. 50, 

page 184. 

About one-half mile west of Flournoy 's the mountain is covered by 
mining locations, comprising the Williams group. On this mountain 
the whole outcrop appears to be heavily mineralized by iron and 
copper in the form of oxides, carbonates and sulphides. So little 
development work has been performed that no estimate of the worth 
of the claims can at the present time be made, but it is doubtless the 
outcrop of an immense mineralized dike. 

GOLD— DRIFT MINES. 

Antlered Crest Mine. (See Sierra County also.) Owner, Geo. 
Sanborn, La Porte. 

Location: La Porte Mining District; Sees. 15, 14. 11, 12 and 3, T. 21 N.. 

R. 8 E. ; Sees. 7 and 6, T. 21 N., R. 9 E. ; Sec. 31, T. 22 N., R. 9 E.; 

3 miles nortliwest of La Porte. Elevation around 5000'. 
Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 105. 

U. S. Geol. Survey, Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property consists of the Sanborn, Hart No. 1 and No. 2, 
Antlered Crest, Fines No. 1 and No. 2, Thunderbolt, Socialist, Inde- 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 65 

pendent, Grizzly Bear, Chestnut, Grizzly, Lava Cap and Hardserabble 
claims, situated on Moonville Ridge. Patents have been applied for. 
The total acreage is about 2000 and it covers a length along the 
channel of five to six miles. 

The property was discovered about 1903 by Robinson & Mcintosh. 

Development work consists of a tunnel 500' long with 300' more 
to go to strike pay gravel. A lower adit was also being driven in 
1913 to cut the lower portion of the Moonville channel. 

The pay gravel in the old river channel at Coles is 100' to 300' 
wide and 3' deep. Bedrock is amphibolite schist and the gravel is 
20' deep • and capped by andesite. The course of the channel is 
southwest. 

Equipment consists of a blacksmith shop and boarding house. 
Four men are employed in the mine. South Fork Feather River is 
available for power. 

The same channel has been worked in the old Coles hydraulic mine 
adjoining. 

Australia Mine. (Erickson.) Owner, Peter Erickson,* Spanish 
Ranch. 

Location: Spanish Ranch Mining District; Sec 1, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 3 miles 
northeast of Spanish Ranch, 10 miles northwest of Quincy. Elevation 
3800' 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98, 99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of 80 acres, unpatented. It was worked in 
early days by the present owner, who still does assessment work. 

Two tunnels have been driven through slate, one 200' and the other 
500' in length. 

The country rock is slate and serpentine and the deposit is old 
channel gravel, part cemented and part free, with some large 
boulders. There is from 2' to 3' of pay gravel on slate bedrock 
with an overburden of 80' of gravel; no lava. A little water is 
encountered. 

Adjoining mines are the Bessie and Gopher Hill. 

Barker Hill Claim. Owners, Savercool Brothers, Butte Valley; 
Mrs. C. Lazarovich, Seneca. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 8, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 1 mile west 

of Seneca. Elevation 4600'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey, Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Beckwith Consolidated Mine. Owners, Beckwith Consolidated 
Mining Company; Ed. Kelsey, Beckwith; Wm. Smith, Jamison mine. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sees. 20 and 29, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 

9 miles west of Johnsville, 14 miles southwest of Blairsden by good wagon 

road. Elevation 6000' to 7000'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Rpts. XII, page 213; XIII, page 288. 

Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. 

Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 



♦Since the above was written this property has been sold to the Australia Placer 
Mining Company, Quincy, California. 



66 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The property consists of 480 acres of placer locations, situated on 
the ridge dividing Jamison and Nelson creeks. It was discovered in 
1884 by the Beckwith Company. Assessment work only was being 
done in 1913. 

Development consists of a 400' tunnel, 200' in slate and 200' 
through lava. The country rock is slate and andesite and the 
deposit is gravel, of the old river channel on the east rim of Queen 
channel, which has a southerly course. The length along the channel 
is two miles, and the gravels are capped by 600' of lava. 

Equipment consists of houses and a blacksmith shop. 

Adjoining mines are the Queen, Continental Consolidated and 
Sunnyside. 

Bellevue Mining Company. Formerly known as Bootjack, Volante, 
Edna and Bellevue Consolidation, Kenzie, Louise, Eureka Con- 
solidated, and Last Chance. Owners, Bellevue Mining Company; 
Sir James Bell, Glasgow, Scotland, and Sir Henry Bell, London, 
England, partners ; R. H. Kingdon, La Porte, staff. 

Location: Gibsonville Mining District, Sees. 23, 24, 25, 26. 27, 34, 35 and 36, 
T. 22 N., R. 9 E., 4i miles northeast of La Porte, 4) miles south of Gibson- 
ville and 54 miles from Oroville ; all hauling from Oroville. Elevation 
4784'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 106, 107. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The Bellevue Mining Company's holdings include the Louise, 
Feather Fork Gold mine, Chaleedonia, National, Eureka Consolidated, 
Blackie and Last Chance properties. The total area is 2000 acres 
with a length along the channel of three miles. It is located across 
a lava covered ridge on the steep west bank of Slate Creek. 

Work was carried on through the 400' Thistle shaft from 1890 to 
1896, but when the shaft was flooded in 1901 a lower tunnel was 
started. 

Development work consists of a 5400' tunnel, 8' by 8' in the clear, 
costing $14.50 per foot, not including overhead charges. Working 
upstream from the end of tunnel, 3000' were explored, 1300' breasted, 
and downstream 900' explored and 600' breasted. A new tunnel will 
start 4811' from the portal of the main tunnel, running N. 27°, 16' W. 
3060' to reopen the most northerly workings, which are about a mile 
south of Thistle shaft. Width of gravel deposit is 1400', prospected 
by tunnel in line with main tunnel. Area worked is 1700' by 120'. 
Tailings go into Slate Creek. 

The deposit is free Neocene channel gravel, coursing southwest, 
containing large quartz boulders. Country rock is amphibolite and 
slate ; the bedrock is slate. The gravel and sand is 150' deep, capped 
with andesite, the pay gravel being 120' wide and 4' deep, including 
G" of bedrock. Several faults were encountered j 600' north of the 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 67 

tunnel a vertical fault had a downthrow of about 10'. At a point 
1000' north of the first fault, a second occurred, the fault plane 
dipping northwest 30° with a downthrow of 30' to the north; and 
GOO' further there is a fault striking northwest and dipping 45° SW. 
The workings are timbered throughout with round timbers at 40^, 
7' caps 4^ff, lagging 3^^. Forty men were employed in 1915, six 
outside; miners getting $3.50 per day, muckers $3.25. Two to six 
cars of one cubic yard capacity per man per day were produced ; $4 to 
$10 a cubic yard is the total operating cost. Transportation charges 
are $1.25 per 100 pounds from Marysville. The mine is being worked 
at the present time, but with a small force only, on account of war 
conditions. 

Bessie Mine. (Murdock or Mendota Hill.) Owner,* W. J. Clinch, 
Quincy. 

Location : Spanish Ranch Mining District, Sec. 1, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 3 miles 
northeast of Spanish Ranch, 10 miles to the southeast by good automobile 
road to Quincy. Elevation 3800'. 

The property contains 80 acres and has a length along the channel 
of one-fourth mile. 

The mine was purchased by the present owner in 1900. Two men 
were working in 1912 and the spring of 1913. 

It is developed by a 375' tunnel, but the area worked is very small, 
about 30' square, the only equipment being sluice boxes. 

The country rock is slate and serpentine, the bedrock slate and the 
gravels are part cemented and part free with some boulders. The 
gravel has a depth of 80', of which 2' or 3' next to bedrock pays to 
drift. Not much water was encountered. 

Adjoining mines are the Australia (Erickson) and Gopher Hill. 

Blue Gravel Coiisplidated Mine. Owners, W. H. Spencer, Andrew 
Hewitt, Hector Forbes, Gibsonville; Lewis Hamm, Paterson, New 
Jersey. 

Location: La Porte Mining District, Sees. 21 and 22, T. 21 N., R. 8 E., 7 miles 

west of La Porte, thence 33 miles north to Quincy. 
Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 105, 

U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property, containing 230 acres, was discovered in early days. 

The channel courses southwest and is capped with andesite, the 
gravel being from 12' to 16' in depth. A house and some mine cars 
are the only equipment. 

The Coles hydraulic mine adjoining shows 16' of gravel, 100' of 
pipe clay, then lava capping. The Cole tunnel, 1500' long, was run 
200' through bedrock, the balance through gravel and pipe clay, but 
it was too high; 15 acres were worked by hydraulicking. 

The Antlered Crest mine also adjoins. 



♦since the above was written this property has been sold to the Australia Placer 
Mining Company, Quincy, California, 



68 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Bull Claim. Owner, Mrs. Reed, Berkeley. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles southeast 

of Quincy. Elevation 4500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downleville. 

Assessment work was being done when visited. A shaft 120' in 
lava and 25' in slate bedrock and a tunnel 140' in bedrock and gravel, 
striking the east rim of the channel, comprise the development on 
this property. 

Bunker Hill Mine. Owners, Wm. Metcalf , Jas. 'Brien, La Porte. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sees. 15 and 16, T. 22 N., R. 10 E.. 

Gibsonville is 6 miles southwest, Quincy 30 miles northwest via Nelson 

Point and Gibsonville by good road. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The Bunker Hill mine has worked the most northerly extension of 
the old Neocene channel that can be traced south from Bunker Hill 
through Gibsonville to La Porte. From 1875 to 1895 about a mile of 
this channel was worked under the lava-capped Bunker Hill ridge, 
the Niagara Consolidated Mining Company doing most of the work. 

Bushman Mine. Owner, Mrs. E. M. Hazzard, Quincy. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 25 N., R. 9 E., 5 miles north of 

Quincy by good wagon road. Elevation 3700'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, XI, page 328; XII, page 214; 

XIII, page 288. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of 120 acres of patented ground, charac- 
terized by broad ridges and a wide ravine at the head of the creek. 
It was originally located by Bushman in early days. In 1911 and 
1912 it was under bond to Capt. Henry Adams, but it has been idle 
since March, 1912. 

Development consists of a 1200' tunnel, 600' of which was run in 
early days. A vertical shaft 133' to bedrock was sunk by Adams, 
passing through alluvial wash composed of slate, decomposed clays, 
etc. The quantity of gravel worked in early days is not known, but 
the last company handled very little. 

The so-called 'Old ChanneP gravel is really an alluvial wash com- 
posed of angular fragments of slate and vein quartz that have been 
derived from the disintegration of the surrounding slates, which are 
cut by numerous stringers from a few inches up to veins 8' in width, 
with heavy gouge and well defined walls. The width of pay gravel 
is 40' with a depth of 18" to 3'. The deposit ranges from 30' to 100' 
in depth, is free and has no large boulders but contains fragments of 
slate 1' to 2' in length, lying on slate bedrock. A large amount of 
water is encountered, too much to handle by pumping, and all of the 
workings have to be timbered. 

The equipment consists of a Fairbanks-Morse gasoline hoist and a 
gasoline driven American Well Works pump, good houses and barn. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 69 

Adjoining mines are the St. Nicolas quartz and the Missing Link 
and Newton Plat drift mines. 

Cameron Mtne. Owner, A. N. Cameron, Seneca; bonded to Mr. 
Gilmer, Utah, July, 1914. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 16, T. 26 N., R. 8 E.. I mile 
northeast of Seneca, 33 miles from mine by good automobile road to 
Keddle. Elevation 3300'. 

Bibliography: U. S. GeoL Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The property consists of 160 acres of unpatented placer locations, 
covering the channel for one mile. It is situated on the west bank 
of the North Pork Feather River, on a steep slope. 

The claims were located in 1890 by different people and con- 
solidated by Cameron in 1892. The mine is idle at present, but has 
produced about $38,000. 

The development work consists of an 800' main tunnel, which cuts 
the front rim and a 35' upraise to gravel. Cost per foot $6. The 
area worked is 1100' by 35' by 6'. The workings are timbered, the 
timber coming from the property. The gravel is washed, the tailings 
going into North Fork Feather River, with a loss of some values. 

The deposit is of old river channel origin, following approximately 
the course of the present stream, in general southwest. The gravel 
contains *iron stain' and marbles of sulphide carrying $11.30 per ton 
of gold and fine sulphides, running $900 per ton, and lies on slate bed- 
rock. Pay gravel is 20' to 100' in width, 5' to 6' deep, and 1' of 
bedrock is mined. It is capped by 500' of lava. 

Adjoining are the Scott and Glazier mines. 

Carr or Brown Bear Mine. Owner, Brown Bear Mining Company, 
Santa Cruz, care Lawrence Carr. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 11, T. 24 N., R. HE. 10 miles by trail 

south of Genesee, 22 miles to Portola by wagon road. Elevation 6000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property is situated on Grizzly Creek, between Spring Garden 
and Genesee, near the Cascade mine. Drift mining is carried on in 
the supposed course of the Jura channel. 

Cash Entry Group. Owner, H. J. Patterson, Oroville. 

Location: Sees. 23 and 24, T. 25 N., R. 5 E., 6 miles west of Belden. Eleva- 
tion 5000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Claims patented. Very little work has been done in the last few 
years. Edison mines adjoin. 

Channel Peak Mining Company. Owner, Channel Peak Mining 
Company, 518 Grant Building, Los Angeles; A. J. Gootschalk, Los 
^Vngeles ; P. E. Daniels. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sees. 13 and 14, T. 24 N., R. 7 E., 
5 miles west of Meadow Valley, thence 9 miles east to Quincy, by good 
automobile road. Elevation 7000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99; 
U. S. Geol, Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar, 



70 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

This property consists of 820 acres, part patented, and part loca- 
tions, situated on the top of Spanish Peak. The company has been 
working for seven years and has driven 1500' of tunnels in lava and 
granite without developing any pay gravel. 

According to Turner (Bidwell Bar Folio), the gravel is composed 
of pre-Cretaceous rocks with some pebbles of white quartz. Lindgren 
says that the extent of the gravels in Spanish Peak is not great. The 
deposit depression, which contains a little gravel, is covered with 
40' of pipe clay, and capped by tuffaceous andesitic breccia. 

Olaybank Claim. Owjiers, J. H. Thomas, La Porte, et al. 

Location : La Porte Mining District. 

Development in the tunnel was progressing and a new shaft was 
to be sunk on Buckley Ranch channel, a southern extension of 
Bellevue channel. 

Continental Minin^f Company. Owner, Continental Mining Com- 
pany, Langdon, North Dakota; president, F. W. McLean, Langdon, 
North Dakota. 

Location: Johnsvllle Mining District, Sees. 7, 17, 18, 19, 29, 30, 31 and 32, 
T. 22 N., R. 11 E., Johnsville 9 miles east, Blairsden 14 miles by good 
automobile road. Elevation 6000'-7000'. 

Bibliograpliy : Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111; 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property comprises seven placer claims, namely, Anglo-Saxon 
Placer No. 1, 150 acres; Nos. 2 to 7, inclusive, 160 acres each. The 
total area is 1110 acres which cover a length along the channel of two 
miles, with the Queen property between. 

These claims were located in 1903 at the head of the west branch of 
Nelson Creek by the Continental people, and have been held in con- 
junction with the Queen, which was under option. This option has 
now reverted to the original owner and assessment work has not been 
performed on the claims for 1913. Last work was done in 1904 under 
B. L. Jones. 

The deposit is old river channel gravel, the same as the Queen 
channel, trending south. It is capped with 600' of lava and its depth 
is from 20' to 90'. The country rock is slate and andesite. 

Adjoining mines are the Queen and Sunnyside. 

Deadwood Mine. Owner, Walter Robinson, Meadow Valley. 

Location : Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 29, T. 24 N., R. 8 E. Meadow 
Valley is nearest town, lying 2 miles northeast. Quincy is 12 miles east 
by good automobile road. Elevation 4700'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99; 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property was formerly owned by A. Robinson. The ground is 
patented and no work has been done on the claim for the last five 
years or more. Deep ravines are characteristic of the surface. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 71 

The depth of gravel is 150' and the country rock is slate and ser- 
pentine. It is developed by a 300' tunnel. 

The Edman quartz mine is the nearest adjoining mine. 

Dominion Mine. (Salmon Falls.) Owner, A. McMillan, Green- 
ville. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 4, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 2 miles north 
of Seneca; Keddie 31 miles southeast, via Greenville, by automobile road. 
Elevation 4000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, XII, page 220; XIII, page 305. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property comprises five claims, all placer locations, totaling 
100 acres and covering the channel for three-fourths of a mile. It is 
on the east bank of the North Fork Feather River with a steep rise 
from the river to a 6000' ridge. 

The property was located by Jack Skinner in 1885 and relocated by 
McMillan in 1906. Work stopped in July, 1913, when the water gave 
out, but three men were working up to that time. 

Developments consist of a 650' tunnel, 475' in bedrock and 175' 
across the channel, costing $8.50 per foot. A 40' shaft extends 
through sandstone, slate and shale to bedrock. 

The country rock is slate and schist, the deposit being in the former 
old river channel of the North Fork. The course is north, with a 
depth of 40' of quartz and greenstone gravel with large boulders. 
The bedrock is slate. This channel can be traced southward where it 
crossed the North Fork above Seneca and has been encountered and 
worked in the Glazier, Cameron, Scott, San Jose, Wisbein and Sunny- 
side mines. The pay gravel is about 6' deep above bedrock. Above 
this occurs a false bedrock of cemented sand upon which is said to lie 
another 5' of pay gravel. No large amount of water encountered. 

Equipment consists of pumps, houses and blacksmith shop. 

Power can be had from North Fork Feather River under a head of 
400', 20" in season. 

The Pliocene, on the same channel, is an adjoining mine. 

Dutch Hill Mine. (Dutch Hill No. 11 and Barker Hill No. 10.) 
Owners, Savercool Brothers, Seneca or Butte Valley. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 8 and 17, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 
2 miles west of Seneca, thence 32 miles by good automobile road to Keddie. 
Elevation 4690'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, VIII, page 482 ; XII, page 215 ; XIII, 
page 292. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Pealc. 

This property includes five claims, namely, the Dutch Hill placer, 
the Barker Hill placer, the Banner placer, the Barker Hill quartz, and 
the Cummings Hill quartz claim. It is situated on top of a high 
ridge which lies west of the North Fork Feather River and covers 
4400' along the old channel. 

The deposit was worked from the early '50 's until 1873 as a drift 
mine. In that year the small claims were consolidated by C. W. Read 



72 MINES AND MINEEATi RESOURCES. 

of Sacramento and a thirty mile ditch was put in from Lassen Peak 
hi a cost of $500,000. This company is supposed to have tak^^n out 
about $200,000 from the hydraulic cuts. After hydraulic work was 
stopped, drifting was again taken up but after $175,000 had been 
taken from 24,000 cubic yards of gravel, the mine was closed down. 
A few years later the Savercool Brothers reopened the mine and 
worked it continuously for twenty years by drifting and hydraulick- 
ing, taking out about $200,000, $100,000 from the hydraulic pits and 
$100,000 by drifting, the gravel running about $10 per yard. It has 
now been idle for some years. 

The deposit is composed of gravels of Neocene age cemented in 
places and containing some large boulders, on bedrock of slate, sand- 
stone and quartzite, with a basalt capping. The total overburden is 
325' of gravel and lava. The course of the channel is north, and the 
width of pay gravel is 1600'. 

There are also two quartz veins on the property. The Barker Hill 
vein, opened by a tunnel 200' in length, is said to have averaged $4.50 
per ton. It strikes northwest and dips 60° southwest. The Cum- 
min gs Hill quartz vein, discovered in working the Cummings gravel 
deposit, was never assayed, but prospected well in the pan. It strikes 
northwest and dips southwest. Below these veins the gravel was 
very rich in rough quartz gold. The channel has been faulted at two 
points; the lower fault strikes north and the throw is said to have 
been 800' vertical, while the upper fault strikes east, with a throw of 
200'. The channel between for 2500' is unbroken. 

Thirty inches of water are obtained under a head of 90', but steam 
is used for power. The cost of mining is about 95ff a cubic yard. 

Adjoining properties are the San Jose and Sunnyside. 

Edison Claim. Owners, McLaughlin and Enslow, Oroville. 

Location: Sees. 23, 25 and 26, T. 25 N., R. 5 E., 6 miles west of Belden 

(W. P. Ry.). Elevation 5000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Claims patented. 

Cash Entry mine adjoins. 

Elizabethtown Plat Mine. Owner, A. E. Leavitt, Quincy. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles north of 

Quincy by good automobile road. Elevation 3500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property consists of 53 acres, with a length along the channel 
of 4000'. 

A main shaft was sunk 107' deep and from the bottom of it drifts 
were run north toward Emigrant Hill, a distance of 3000'. The 
channel was worked for a width of 40'. This gravel is said to have 
averaged $20 per day per man. The ground was heavy and had to be 
closely timbered, and a large amount of water was encountered. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 73 

The deposit is a free quartz gravel covered with an overburden of 
gravel, clay and wash, lying on slate bedrock. The depth of the 
gravel is 75', the pay gravel being 1' to 6' deep. The course of the 
channel is northwest. 

Assessment work only has been done for many years. 

Adjoining mines are the Newtown Flat and Bell mines. 

Emigrant Hill Mine. Owner, Mrs. Whiteney, Quincy. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 2, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles north of 

Quincy by good automobile road. Elevation 3600'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 479; XII, page 219; XIII, 

page 293. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property includes two claims, with an area of 40 acres. It is 
situated on Besty Gulch, tributary to Spanish Creek. 

The mine was worked in early, days by hydraulicking, and the 
ground is said to have been entirely worked out. 

The deposit was old channel gravel, some rounded gravel and local 
wash, on bedrock of slate. There is 180' of gravel to bedrock, free 
and with very few boulders. The width of pay varied from 20' to 50' 
and it had a depth of 3' above bedrock. 

The deposit was breasted by an 800' tunnel through the hill and an 
area 800' by 50' worked. 

Adjoining mines are the Newtown Flat and Elizabethtown Flat 
drift mines. 

Fairfield Claim. Owner, L. B. Fairfield, Belden. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 26 N., R. 7 E., 8 miles 

northeast of Belden (W. P. Ry. ). 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property is situated on the North Fork Feather River, one mile 
above the mouth of Mosquito Creek, near Caribou bridge. Said to be 
old river channel 100' to 150' above the present stream. It is lava- 
capped and resembles the Seneca channel. 

Fordham Drift Mines. Owner, Dr. Leonie H. Fordham, Hotel 
Stewart, San Francisco. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. __ , T. __ __., R. __ E., 20 miles 
from Quincy on the stage road to La Porte. 

There are eleven claims, total area 1186 acres. The channel on 
this property is in line with and said to be the continuation of, the 
La Porte channel, which was worked for twenty-five years up to 1914 
on the south, in the famous Belle view drift mine. The latter property 
is reported to have made an annual average output of $750,000. 

Both rims of the channel are well defined. The bedrock is slate 
and there is an overburden of from 150' to 1000' of andesitic material. 
The property has a good stand of timber on the higher ground and 
the water supply is said to be ample during the entire year. Exact 
data on the depth and width of channel are not available. 



74 MINES AND MINERAti RESOURCES. 

Development work done lately indicates the presence of two 
channels, one crossing Onion Valley Creek about one-fourth mile 
west of the mouth of Bird Creek, and the other at the mouth of 
Cement Creek; some think that the channel forks on this property, 
one fork continuing south to the Belleview and La Porte, while the 
other branch connects with the Grass Valley channel. 

W. de Varilla, in a report made in January, 1914, advised running 
a tunnel to strike the pay gravel in the channel at the lower end of 
the property to take advantage of gravity. He estimated a tunnel 
]000' long costing about $9000, would be required, and that the total 
cost of opening the property would be about $15,000. 

Glazier Mine. Owners, A. INIcMillan, J. *D. Baker, D. Mclntyre, 
Greenville, et al. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 9 and 16, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 
\ mile south of Seneca; Keddie is 31 miles southeast via Greenville, by 
automobile road. Elevation 3300'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, VIII, page 482; X, page 495; XIII, 
page 295. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The property consists of a patented placer claim, 160 acres in area, 
following the channel for three-fourths of a mile. It was located by 
McMillan in 1884, and is situated on the west bank of the North Fork 
Feather River, with a steep slope to the top of the ridge. 

It is developed by a tunnel 1450' long. There are 800' of raises, 
tour raises showing gravel lying on a steep rim. The tunnel is now 
in 125' beyond the last raise, and is expected to reach the channel in 
a short time. It passes through Calaveras slates and costs about $10 
per foot to drive. 

The deposit is composed of old river channel gravels, quartz gravel, 
free 'ironstone' and boulders, following the course of the present 
river, 250' above it. The depth of gravel varies from 18' to 30' 
between slate bedrock and a 500' capping of gravel and lava. 

The only equipment is a blacksmith shop. 

Adjoining mines are the Sunnyside, San Jose, and Scott, all 
working. 

Gloria Mundi Claim. Owner, J. Larison, Quincy. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sec. 26, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles south of 

Quincy. Elevation 4500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

Golden Ancient Channel Mining Company. Owner, same address, 
San Jose, care Mr, Smith. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District. Sees. 2, 3, 10, 11, 14, 15, 22 and 23, 
T. 23 N., R. 8 E., 15 miles southeast of Quincy; there is a good automobile 
road from Quincy to Meadow Valley, thence 4 miles south, by trail. Ele- 
vation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey P'olio 43, Bidwell Bar. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 75 

This company claimed 1460 acres by location, but a good deal of it 
is vacant, little assessment work having been done. The character of 
the surface is lava-capped ridges with steep descent to creeks. 

The deposit is auriferous gravel probably laid down by Pleistocene 
streams emptying into Meadow Valley. 

The latest work has been done in a shaft which is about 300' deep. 
Three men were working in July, 1913. 

Hope or Valentine Claim. Owner, A. H. Keese, Meadow Valley or 
Spanish Ranch. 

Location : Spanish Ranch Mining District, Sec. 5, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 5 miles 
northwest of Spanisli Ranch, by trail and wagon road, thence 7 miles to 
Qulncy, by good automobile road. Elevation 4500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of one location. It was owned by Val 
Roberts until relocated by Reese, who works it alone by sluicing. 
The deposit is free quartz gravel on slate and serpentine bedrock. 
The depth of pay gravel is d\ 

Adjoining mines are the Mountain House and Chaparral Hill, both 
belonging to the Plumai^ Investment Company. 

Indian Placer Mines. (Providence Hill and Miocene.) Owners, 
J. W. Adams, R. T. Adams, South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Jerry 
Curtiss, superintendent. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 2(?), T. 25 N., R. 8 E., 4 miles 
north of Twain, 6 miles by horse trail, thence 17 miles to Keddie by way 
of Greenville and Round Valley. Elevation 4800'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The property consists of three association claims, known as Indian 
No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3. There are 450 acres covering the channel for 
a mile and a half. Narrow ridges and steep ravines are surface 
characteristics. 

The placers were first worked in 1852. In 1883 the mine was 
worked by C. N. Reed. The present company began work in 1911, 
working with 12 men, 6 on day and 2 on night shift underground. 

Development consists of a main (4' x 6^ tunnel 1600' long, costing 
from $5 to $10 per foot^ average $8. About 20 acres was hydrau- 
jicked. Gravel is now being worked from the main channel near the 
rim, using sluice boxes 18" square, 150' in length with Hungarian 
riflfles. Sixteen cubic foot cars are used. Tailings are disposed of in 
Rush Creek. Workings are closely timbered with spruce from the 
property, costing 2^ per foot. 

The deposit is composed of w^ell-rounded free gravel on bedrock of 
slates and schists. There is 500' of gravel, sand and pipe clay strata. 
Fairly large amounts of water are encountered in the channel, which 
trends east, changing to north. The pay gravel contains boulders of 



76 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

rose quartz, the gold being heavy and well rounded. It varies in 
width from 40' to 50', and from 6' to 7' in depth above bedrock in the 
center. In 1883, the gravel is said to have averaged $4.50 per square 
foot of bedrock. 

A 100 acre reservoir and three ditches, namely Providence Hill, 
four miles, 500' head ; Rush Creek, two and one-half miles, 250' head, 
and Bullfrog, two and one-half miles, 400' head, are owned by the 
company. Transportation charges are 1^^ per pound from Keddie 
via Greenville. The property is just starting to produce. 

No adjoining mines are working. 

Jumbo Mine. (Little Jumbo.) Owner, Chris. Gunderson, Belden. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 18 and 19, T. 25 N., R. 7 E., 
2 miles north of Belden, by wagon road and trail. Elevation 3500'— 4000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property contains 100 acres of placer locations on the ridge 
between Yellow Creek and North Pork Feather River, covering 
(supposedly) 2050' along a channel. 

It was discovered in 1898 by J. Hall and purchased by the present 
owner. Total production to date about $1500. Assessment work 
only being done at present. 

Development work consists of a 192' shaft, which has caved. There 
are two tunnels, 143' through serpentine and slate and 55' in loose 
gravel. A few years ago a small area of gravel was found that was 
considered pay for a depth of 6' on bedrock. Area worked was 
40' X 40' X 6'. 

The country rock is slate and peridotite (serpentine). Blue gravel, 
part cemented with 'porphyry' and 'serpentine wash,' make up the 
deposit, which lies on slate bedrock. It is supposed to be an old river 
channel coursing southwest 1300' above the present North Pork 
Feather River. It is capped by 150' of basalt. No water was 
encountered and spring is the only possible time for washing. 

Kelly Mine. Owner, John Kelly. 

Location : Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 10 miles 
south of Quincy, in a direct line, but 20 miles by road via Nelson Point. 
Steep grades to within 1 mile of mine and then horse trail only. Eleva- 
tion 5700'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property comprises four claims, with a total area of 80 acres. 
It is located at the head of Washington Creek, two miles from North 
Fork Feather River on a lava-capped ridge. Steep canons are charac- 
teristic ; Washington Creek falls 2500' in the two miles to the Feather 
Kiver. 

The property was located by Kelly. Five men were working at 
time of visit and two large log cabins were being built preparatory to 
starting extensive development. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 77 

The deposit consists of old channel gravel on bedrock of serpentine 
cxnd is capped with basalt. It is probably an extension of the 
adjoining Golden Gate-Bainbridge deposit. 

King Solomon Mines. Owner, Lucky Strike Mining Company, 
Bacon Building, Oakland ; Joseph McArthur, Quincy, president ; H. L. 
Ross, Bacon Building, Oakland, secretary. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sees. 27 and 34, T. 23 N., R. 10 E, 
17 miles southeast of Quincy, by good automobile road to Nelson Point, 
thence 3} miles by trail on ridge between Dixon and Union creeks. Ele- 
vation 5500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Polio 37, Downievllle. 

This property embraces six claims, the Lucky Strike, King Solomon, 
King Solomon No. 1, No. 2, Philadelphia and Philadelphia No. 1. 
There is a total of 120 acres covering the channel for 6000'. Ridges 
and steep canons characterize the surface. 

The mine was discovered in 1909 by P. J. Faulkner and purchased 
from him by the present owners. Three men were at work in 1913 
except when stopped for lack of water. 

Development consists of opening the rims by shafts and open cuts. 

The deposit is supposed to be an extension of the Gibsonville- 
Hepsidam-Bunker Hill old river channel. It consists of free quartz 
gravel with few boulders on a bedrock of slate. The channel courses 
north and is capped by andesite. 

There are three houses on the property. 

The Bunker Hill mine adjoins. 

Lafayette Drift Gravel Mining Company. Incorporated with a 
capital stock of $50,000. Directors, L. J. Williams, F. J. Shields, 
F. W. Loehne, Byron Jakes of Marysville and F. J. Savage of Vallejo. 

This company was organized in June, 1915, to operate drift mines 
which have been worked for the last two years by Shields and 
Williams. 

Lava Bed Claim. Owner, M. Light Estate, Quincy. 

Location: Spanish Ranch Mining District, Sec. 2, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 2 miles 
north of Spanish Ranch by trail, thence 7 miles by good automobile road 
to Quincy. Elevation 4400'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 9S-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The property consists of one claim, not patented. No assessment 
work has been done for a number of years and the claim has prac- 
tically been abandoned. 

Adjoining mines are the Bean Hill and Pine Lead, owned by the 
Plumas Investment Company. 

Malvern Hill Claim. Owner, Frank Soroti, Susanville. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 18, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 2 miles west 
of Seneca, thence 31 miles southeast to Keddie, via Greenville, by good 
automobile road. Elevation 3550'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 300. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

6—46902 



78 MINES AND MINERAL. RESOX7BCES. 

Manhattan Mine. (Last Hesort.) Owners, Manhattan Gold 
Mining Company, C. E. Hegard, president; Geo. E. Bangle, Vallejo, 
secretary ; R. V. Whiting, Monadnoek Building, San Francisco, home 
office. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sees. 28 and 33. T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 5 miles 

southwest of Quincy by trail. Elevation 5000'-5500'. 
Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Sur\'ey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises 100 acres of patented ground and 350 acres 
in the following locations : Grand Prize, 110 acres ; Bryan and Jubilee, 
40 acres each, and Pasadena, 160 acres. It is situated on the divide 
between Rock and Deer creeks. 

The property was discovered by John Tucker in 1856 but was pur- 
chased by the present owners in 1890 from Bennett. Two men were 
working in 1913. 

Mine development consists of three tunnels, No. 1, 450' ; No. 2, 300', 
and No. 3 (main tunnel), 700'. There is an air shaft from the main 
tunnel through 48' of gravel and 40' of lava. Formations passed 
through are serpentine, slate and quartzite. Very little of the area 
lias been worked. 

The deposit is old channel gravels on bedrock of slate and ser- 
pentine. They are free, having very little cement, but a good many 
boulders. The gravel is about 5' in depth and capped by lava. 

Equipment consists of a blacksmith shop, bunkhouse for twelve 
men, and a mile and a quarter of ditch and flume from Rock Creek. 

The Gopher Hill mine lies four miles to the north. 

Mayflower Mine. (Washington and Mountaineer.) Owners, I. J. 
Mullen and Brothers, Eclipse ; J. M. and W. H. Smith. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sees. 31 and 32, T. 23 N., and Sec. 6. 

T. 22 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile north of Eclipse, Quincy 24 miles north by good 

automobile road, via Nelson Point. Elevation 6300'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Mln. Bur. Report XIII, page 301. U. S. Geol. Survey 

Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises two claims, the Mayflower and the May- 
flower Extension, with an area of 40 acres. It is on the lava-capped 
ridge on the west branch of Nelson Creek, with a steep drop to the 
ravine. 

The property was abandoned by the former owners and relocated 
by the Mullen Brothers. The channel was exposed on the east side 
of Union Ilill by hydraulicking in early days. The four owners are 
working the property themselves. 

Development consists of a 5' x 6' x 800' tunnel. A raise was being 
put up 35' to strike the channel. A former raise proved the existence 
of a channel of quartz gravel but cut the rim and the gravel yielded 
only a few colors. 

The deposit is an old lava-capped river channel that has not been 
tapped. Bedrock is slate and serpentine. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 79 

Mill Creek Mine. Owners, Clark Lee, Quiney; W. J. Clinch, 
Quincy; W. J. Miller, Quiney; under bond in 1913 to J. G. Steel, 
Quiney. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 3 miles southeast 

of Quincy by good wagon road. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This mine contains six claims, a total of 120 acres, covering the 
channel for 5000'. 

It was discovered in the early days and has been held by the present 
owners for seven years. A large area of the old channel has been 
worked. 

Development consists of a 100' shaft through an overburden of soil 
and gravel to bedrock and a number of tunnels. 

The deposit is old channel gravel, free, with some boulders, on slate 
bedrock. Considerable water was encountered. Pay gravel ranges 
from 30' to 40' in width and from 4' to 5' in depth. 

There is a hoist and machinery on the property. Water is obtained 
under 160' head. 

The Bull mine adjoins. 

J. G. Steel, in extending a bedrock drift tunnel in February, 1916, 
to develop an ancient channel under Claremont Hill, has shown that 
there is a large amount of coarse gold on the bedrock. 

Morning Star Consolidated Placer Mines Company. (Blue Nose.) 
Owner, Peter Spaich, Johnsville. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 12, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., 12 miles 
west of Johnsville, 20 miles west of Blairsden, via Johnsville, by good 
wagon road; mine is 3 miles from Johnsville road by trail. Elevation 
5500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111; U. S. 
Greol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

There are two groups of claims, the Morning Star and North Star, 
containing 760 acres, in this property. They lie on the north side of 
Blue Nose Peak, which rises to an elevation of 7300'. 

Development work consists of two tunnels, a crosscut tunnel 250' 
long passing through 50' of slate and 200' of lava, and a main tunnel 
driven 1600' from the north end of the Morning Star claim. A winze 
put down 65' from the end of the crosscut was abandoned on account 
of water. The main tunnel follows the course of the old channel, 
300' being driven through schist; 800' from the portal, a 30' raise 
encountered gravel and 15' x 12' x 6' was stoped. From this stope 
another 20' raise was put up and ground 40' x 40' x 60' was stoped, 
1000 cars yielding $1300. From the top of the last stope a drift was 
run 250' to the east, the first 50' in gravel, the rest in country rock 
and 3600 cubic yards were worked. Another tunnel has been started, 
200' below the crosscut tunnel. 



80 MESTES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The deposit is old river channel gravel, possibly a downthrown 
portion of Bunker Hill channel. The gravel is composed chiefly of 
quartz and andesitic tuff on slate bedrock. It is capped with 
andesite. The bedrock in all workings is said to be pitching west. 

Houses and a blacksmith shop make up the equipment. 

Assessment work only has been done in the past few years. 

Nelson Creek Gravel Company. Owner, C. M. Root, Nelson Point. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining: District, Sec. 22, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile south 
of Nelson Point, thence 11 miles northwest to Quincy by g^ood automobile 
road. Elevation 4000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 

Property consists of one claim of 20 acres. Two men were em- 
ployed in 1913 drifting on bench gravels and on the high bars above 
the former workings. 

Newtown Consolidated Placer Mines. (Fairstake, Keystone, 
Missing Link and Newtown Flat.) Owners, H. L., L. F. and D. R. 
Gate, Sam Leavitt, Quincy ; bonded from A. E. Leavitt. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 25 N. and Sec. 3, T. 24 N., R. 9 
E., 4 miles north of Quincy by good automobile road. Elevation 3700'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 

This property comprises 200 acres of locations, with an undeter- 
mined length along the channel of approximately 4000'. It is situated 
in a comparatively wide ravine at the head of several creeks. 

All of these claims, worked in early days as hydraulic and drift 
mines, were consolidated in July, 1913. The new company planned 
to start a tunnel from Litle Black Hawk Creek, on the Keystone 
claim, which is expected to cut the Jackass channel 200' in. This 
tunnel can also be extended to drain the Newtown Flat channel. 

Numerous old tunnels have been run, including the Jeffery tunnel, 
700' long. There is a new shaft, 90' deep, on the Missing Link. 

The deposit consists of water- worn gravel and a few large boulders 
under a capping of 75' of clay, gravel and debris. It lies on a bed- 
rock of slate, and the channel is supposed to course southwest. A 
large amount of water was encountered. As exposed in the Emigrant 
Hill hydraulic workings, pay gravel was 60' to 70' wide and from 
3' to 4' above bedrock. About 11^ acres on Fairstake has been 
worked by hydraulicking. 

The Buchanan, Bell and St. Nicolas quartz mines adjoin. 

Water is obtained from Plumas ditch. 

Newtown Plat Mine. Owner, A. E. Leavitt; now under bond to 
Cabe Brothers, and consolidated as Newtown Consolidated Placer 
Mines. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 24 N., R 9 E., 4 miles nortli of 

Quincy by good automobile road. Elevation 3700'. 
Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 

U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 81 

This property consists of one claim, with an area of 430 acres. It 
is situated on the flat near the heads of Little Black Hawk and 
Spanish creeks. 

The mine has been worked since early days. It was purchased by 
Leavitt in 1878 and bonded to Cabe Brothers and consolidated under 
the Newtown Consolidated Placer Mines in July, 1913. Five acres 
were worked about thirty years ago. 

Development consists of a number of shafts, averaging 70' to bed- 
rock through an overburden of clay and gravel. There is also a 500' 
tunnel. This part of the Newtown channel will be drained, it is said, 
by the new Cabe tunnel from Little Black Hawk Creek. 

The deposit is water- worn quartz gravel, free and with only a few 
boulders on a bedrock of slate. The course of the channel is north- 
erly. Considerable water was encountered. 

The Buchanan placer mine adjoins. 

Oliver Claim. Owner, J. H. Thomas, 2610 E. 14th street, Oakland. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 36, T. 23 N., R 9 E., 4 miles 
northwest of Eclipse. Quincy is 22 miles nortii by good automobile road. 
Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

Claims patented and no work has been done in the last ten years. 
Peter Henry Claim. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 8, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 2i miles 

northwest of Nelson Point. Elevation 4900'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

Formerly owned by E. Remington and Company of Quincy. 
Pioneer Mine. Owners, A. McMillan, Greenville ; W. P. Boyden. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 28 and 33. T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 

1 mile northwest of Indian Falls ; Keddie 6 miles south of Indian Falls by 

automobile road. Elevation 4500'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 

Lindgren. W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Topo. sheets, Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property comprises 110 acres of placer locations with a length 
along the channel of 1000' or more. The channel is in V-shaped 
ravines 400' above the present creek bed. 

The owner located the property in 1900. Assessment work only is 
being done and as yet not enough has been accomplished to prove the 
worth" of the property. 

A 150' tunnel has been driven through bedrock. 

The deposit consists of old river channel gravel on bedrock of 
Calaveras slates and quartzite. The gravel is made up of quartz and 
greenstone pebbles with big soft boulders. The channel courses north, 
is 20' in depth and is capped with lava. The pay gravel is from 20' 
to 60' in width and has a depth of 3' on bedrock. 

A cabin and tools mak€ up the equipment. 

The Kutzendorf quartz mine adjoins. 



82 MINES AND MINERAXi RESOURCES. 

Pliocene Mine. Owner, J. S. Bransford, Salt Lake. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 4 and 9, T. 26 N., R. 8 E.. 

1 mile north of Seneca; Keddie, 31 miles southeast of Seneca, via Green- 

vlUe Ry. and automobile road. Elevation 4060'. 
Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property is composed of 120 acres of patented ground with a 
length of three-fourths of a mile along the channel. It is situated on 
the steep slope of the east bank of the North Fork Feather Eiver. 

Bransford has owned the property for the last 20 years. It is 
developed by a 1200' tunnel, but no work has been done lately. 

The deposit is old river channel gravel of the same channel worked 
in the Dominion and Sunnyside mines. The gravel is made of up of 
quartz, 'ironstone' and greenstone boulders on a bedrock of slates 
and schists. The channel courses north, following the course of the 
present stream. It is capped by lava. 

The Dominion and Glazier mines adjoin. The Glazier is working 
at the present time, running a bedrock tunnel. 

Plumas Development Company. (Chips Creek.) Owner, J. D. 
Williams, Greenville. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 1, 2 and 12, T. 25 N., R. 5 E., 

8 miles northwest of Belden, by trail. Elevation 6000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Five claims of 160 acres each make up this property, namely, the 
Union, Plumas Union, Morning Star, Chips Creek, and Last Chance. 
A length of three miles along the channel is covered. 

The present owner located the property in 1893 and applied for 
patent in 1906. Two men were doing assessment work in 1913. 

Development consists of a tunnel 137' long in bench gravel, No. 2 
tunnel, 312' long in lava, and a lower tunnel 180' in length, 230' 
below No. 2. There are some old shafts. 

The deposit is old river channel gravel, the country rock being 
diorite and slate. The channel courses west, and is capped by 800' 
of lava. 

Equipped with cabins, blacksmith shop and mine cars. 

Adjoining mines are the Car, Lott, Motriss, Smith and Heller. 

Plumas Investment Company. Owner, Plumas Investment Com- 
pany, W. P. Hammon, 433 California St., San Francisco. 

Location : Spanish Ranch Mining District, 3 to 4 miles by wagon road north of 
Spanish Ranch. Elevation 4000'-5100'. 

The holdings of the company comprise three groups : 

Summit No. 61 claim contains a total area of 380 acres located in 

Sec. 34, T. 25 N., R. 8 E. The ground is patented. No work has 

been done on this claim in the last five years. 

Bolyar No. 86 claim is located in Sec. 2, T. 24 N., R. 8 E. No work 

has been done on this claim for a number of years. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 83 

Chaparral Hill No. 58, is an unpatented claim of 900 acres covering 
about 2000' of channel. It is located mamly in Sec. 30, T. 25 N., 
R. 8 E. The width of pay channel is said to be 30', The gravel is 
composed principally of rounded white quartz with a few larger 
boulders. Six men were at work in 1913 running a bedrock tunnel 
which v^as in 280'. Idle in 1918. 

Plumas Klondike Claim. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 7, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 3 miles 

northwest of Nelson Point. Elevation 4900'. 
Bibllogrraphy : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, DownievlUe. 

Reported to have been abandoned, no assessment work having been 
done for a number of years. 

Queen Group. (Centennial and Franklin Consolidated.) Owners, 
B. L. and Mrs. A. E. Jones, Quincy. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sees. 19, 20, 29 and 30, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 

9 miles west of Johnsville, 14 miles west of Blairsden, by good automobile 

road. Elevation 6000'-7000'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 295. Lindgren, W., 

U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, 

Downieville. 

This property embraces the following 670 acres of placer locations : 
Hampton Placer, 180 acres; Willow Placer, 90 acres; California 
Placer, 160 acres; Pacific Placer, 160 acres; and Alder Placer, 80 
acres. The length of channel covered is said to be two miles. It is 
situated on the east side of Nelson Creek from the creek to the top 
of the ridge. 

The present owner located the group in 1879. It was under bond 
to the Continental Mining Company at one time, but reverted to the 
original owner in 1912. Two men were working in 1913. The pro- 
duction to date has been about $3000. 

Development work consists of a 180' tunnel through gravel and 
pipe clay which cost about $10 per foot, a 260' tunnel in slate costing 
about $5 per foot, and two shafts, 99' and 80', both through gravel 
and pipe clay. The tunnels are timbered. Twenty feet of gravel 
600' X 200' has been hydraulicked. 

The deposit is supposed to be on the old *Blue Lead River Channel.' 
It is made up of tree quartz gravel with medium-sized boulders on 
slate bedrock. The channel courses south and is capped with 600' of 
lava. A good-sized flow of water was encountered. The pay gravel 
is 1000' wide and has a depth of 90' which it would pay to hydraulic. 

There are several buildings and equipment for ground sluicing on 
the property. 

Two ditches, the Porter Ravine ditch, one-half mile long, and the 
Prazier Creek ditch, one mile long, carry 800" of water each under a 
head of 180'. 

The Blue Nose mine adjoins. 



84 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Ray and Traynor Group. (Northern Placer Mining Company.) 
Owner, L. N. Pmgh, Sacramento. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 1, T. 23 N., R. 11 E., 3 miles north- 
east of Cromberg (W. P. Ry.). Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography : Cal. State Mln. Bur. Report XIII, page 302. Lindgren, W., XT. S. 
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37. 
Downieville. 

Assessment work done in 1913, 

Red Ravine and Red Rose Claims. Owner, John Bevilauqua. 

Location : Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., about 10 

miles by wagon road west of Johnsville. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio, Downieville. 

Red Slide Mine. Owners, Red Slide Mining Company; E, H. Hart, 
Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, San Francisco ; M. E, Sanborn, 
Yuba City. 

Location : Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 4, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile east 
of Eclipse, 24 miles by automobile road southeast of Quincy via Nelson 
Point to Eclipse. Elevation 6500'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey F'olio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of 50 acres of locations. The surface is 
characterized by lava-capped ridges and steep canons. Mine was 
idle in 1913, only assessment work having been done in the past 
five years. 

Over 3300' of drifts were driven under the lava capping in search 
of old channels, but practically no gravel was found. 

Rio Vista Mining Company. (Consolidation, X-Ray Mining Com- 
pany.) Owner, Rio Vista Mining Company, 603 California Pacific 
Building, 105 Montgomery street, San Francisco ; James De Fremery, 
president ; H. S. Elliot, secretary. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sees. 4, 5, 8, 9. 10, 15, 11 and 12, 
T. 23 N., R. 10 E. Nelson Point lies next to property, Quincy 11 miles 
northeast by good automobile road. Elevation 4100'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of 800 acres of patented ground and 1000 
acres held by location. The claims are located for a distance of five 
miles along the supposed course of an old channel. The steep caiion 
of the Feather River and also low ridges and wide alluvial deposits 
along Willow Creek make up the surface. 

The property is situated on a forest reserve, and a protest was filed 
on a portion of the ground which the company abandoned. The river 
bars and hydraulic mines were worked in early days. Nine men were 
employed at time of our visit. 

Work on the five miles of channel has been almost entirely confined 
to the Blue Gravel claim, where an incline 250' long was put down 
and 500' of drifts were run from the bottom of the incline across the 
course of the channel and three raises were put up. No information 
is obtainable as to the amount or value of gravel developed. A 200' 
shaft, sunk through lavj). is said to have reached the channel, but the 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 85 

present company has never had it unwatered. A small amount of 
gravel has been worked by hydraulicking. 

The deposit is old river channel lying on a bedrock of slate, sup- 
posed to be the former course of the Middle Fork Feather River. 
The gravel is nearly all free. In places it is capped with andesite 
and older basalts. A large amount of water was encountered in the 
workings. 

Equipment consists of houses and blacksmith shop. 

There are two ditches of two miles each which supply a small 
amount of water under a head of 100'. Labor costs $3.50 per day 
and transportation $5 per ton. 

English Bar mine adjoins. 

Riverdale Mine. Owners, Riverdale Mining Company, A. S. Mac- 
Donald, Mills Building, San Francisco. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., Qulncy is 1 mile 
south of mine by good automobile road. Elevation 3450'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 478; XII, page 215; XIII, 
page 292. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 

This property consists of 119 acres of patented ground, covering a 
length along the channel of 2500'. It is situated in a flat arm of 
American Valley. 

Discovered in 1852 and bought from W. W. Kellogg by the present 
owners in 1906. 

A number of shafts have been sunk and the channel has been 
worked for a distance of 500'. 

The mine consists of old channel gravels coursing southwest, said 
to be a continuation of the Emigrant Hill deposit. The gravel is 
free, being waterworn with angular local wash on bedrock of slate. 
There is about 140' overburden of sand and gravel. Large amounts 
of water were encountered, too much to handle, with a depth of pay 
of 4' above bedrock. It is estimated that there is still 2000' of virgin 
ground to be worked, the bedrock averaging $4 per square foot. 
The fact that the water can not be handled is a serious drawback. 

The Newtown Flat and the Newtown Consolidated drift mines 
adjoin. 

San Jose Mine. Owner, H. F. Kelly, Seneca, 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 17, T. 26 N., R, 8 E., 2 miles 
south of Seneca. Keddie is 31 miles southeast of Seneca by automobile 
road via Greenville, daily stage Keddie to Seneca. Elevation 3500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property consists of 10 claims, aggregating 200 acres which 
cover the channel for 2000'. It is situated on the west bank of a 
steep canon of the North Fork Feather River, with a rise to the top 
of the ridge of 800', and there is good timber on the property. 



86 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Kelly has owned this ground for the last 20 years. It has been 
surveyed for patent and bonded to W. W. Bobbins, 4115 Helena 
street, Spokane, Washington. Good pay was opened up in February, 
1914, and four men were working then. 

Development consists of a 5' x 6' tunnel, 1000' long, through 
quartzite and slate which cost $10 per foot. The last raise put up 
through 20' of slates struck a small amount of gravel and another 
raise to be put up is expected to encounter the center of the main 
channel. A small area of gravel has been worked by an old branch 
from the main tunnel. Hand drilling methods are used in working. 

The deposit consists of old river channel gravel with a northerly 
course, composed of quartz, ironstone' and greenstone boulders. 
The bedrock is slate and quartzite. There is a gravel overburden 
and different flows of lava, totaling 600'. A quartz ledge was 
encountered in a former bedrock tunnel carrying gold and chalco- 
pyrite and also some carbonates. No work was done on this vein. 
Quartz veins have also been encountered in the present tunnel, but 
no assays have been taken. A medium amount of water was 
encountered. 

The Sunnyside and Western mines to the south and the Scott, 
Cameron and Glazier to the north are all on the same channel. 

Fred Scott Mine. Owner, Chas. Emerson, Susanville. Leased to 
C. H. Grill, Seneca. ' 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 17, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 1 mile west 
of Seneca; Keddie is 31 miles southeast of Seneca via Greenville, by auto- 
mobile road. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property consists of 120 acres, unpatented, situated on the 
west bank of the North Fork Feather River, with a rise from the river 
to the top of the ridge of 600'. Good timber stands on the property. 

The mine was under lease, when visited, to C. H. Grill of Seneca, 
and four men were working. 

It is developed by an 800' tunnel passing through slates. 

The deposit consists of old river channel gravel, trending north- 
erly, a former course of the North Fork Feather River. The gravel 
is free and contains quartz, ironstone and greenstone on a bedrock 
of slates, with 600' of lava capping. Pay gravel runs about 100^ in 
width and 3' to 4' in depth. Considerable water was encountered. 

Equipment consists of a blacksmith shop. 

The Cameron and San Jose mines adjoin. 

Sunnyside Mine. Owner, Plumas Gold ]\Iining Company, Boston, 
Massachusetts; R. N. Costar, lessee. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 19, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 3 miles 
south of Seneca by wagon road, thence 31 miles southeast via Greenville 
to Keddie by good automobile road. Elevation 3500'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 306. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 16, Lassen Peak. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 87 

This property consists of 160 acres of patented ground, covering a 
length along the channel of three-fourths of a mile. It is situated on 
the west bank of the North Fork Feather Eiver. The tunnel and 
channel are 200' above the bed of the present river. Fair timber 
stands on the property. 

The mine is developed by an 800' tunnel with a 30' to 45' raise at 
the end of the channel. A large but unknown amount of gravel has 
been worked from the east rim in old workings. In the old workings 
all of the tunnels were too high to bottom the channel, and drifts were 
run along the east rim only. From these drifts winzes were put down 
and the ground breasted regardless of the large amount of water that 
had to be pumped. The gravel stands fairly well. It is breasted and 
the large boulders separated by a grizzly in the chutes, then trammed 
800' to the washhouse in one-ton cars. The old workings followed 
the east rim for half a mile, and the winzes that were sunk as deep as 
water would permit never reached the bottom of the channel. The 
Peterson crosscut 200' across the channel was 25' above the bottom, 
and a shaft put down 18' failed to reach bedrock. The center of the 
channel and the west rim are therefore supposed to be virgin ground. 
The present workings were also run too high. The main crosscut 
will have to be continued, and another raise put up to reach the 
bottom of the channel. 

The deposit is made up of old river channel gravel on a bedrock of 
slate with stringers of quartz in it. The channel courses N. 17° E. 
and has an overburden of 600' of gravel and lava. A large amount 
of water was encountered. Width of pay gravel is 100', depth 3' to 
4', above bedrock. Most of the gold occurs on bedrock. The pro- 
duction in the two years of 1913 and 1914 has been $20,000. The 
total production to 1913 is said to have been $150,000. 

A small amount of water under 300' head is available. The cost of 
running the tunnel averaged $10 per foot, and the cost of working 
the gravel is about $1 per ton, assuming four cars are produced per 
man per day. Three men have been employed for the last three years 
during the summer season, and two men will work all winter doing 
development work. 

There is a blacksmith shop and equipment on the property. 

The Dutch Hill, Western and San Jose mines adjoin, the two 
former being idle. 

Swiss Mine. Owner, B. Pizzoni, Seneca. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 18, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 2 miles 
west of Seneca, thence 31 miles southeast by good automobile road via 
Greenville to Keddle. Elevation 4500'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report; XIII, page 307. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 16, Lassen Peak. 



88 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

This property consists of 105 acres of placer ground and two quartz 
claims. There is a total area of 145 acres situated on the flat across 
the ridge that forms the west bank of the river back of Seneca, and 
it contains good timber. 

The deposit consists of surface placers and old channel, supposed 
to be a southern extension of Dutch Hill. The bedrock is slate, and 
the gravel is lava-capped. A 30' shaft was sunk in ore on a well- 
defined quartz vein in slates, developed on the property. A large 
dump from the shaft is said to average $8 per ton and is good-looking 
oxidized quartz. The vein strikes a little west of north and dips 
60° W. The gulch in which the shaft is located cuts across the vein 
and is said to have been very rich below the vein. This ledge was 
cut 115' below the outcrop by a bedrock tunnel and is reported to 
have been 12' to 29' in width, carrying a heavy percentage of 
auriferous pyrite and some free gold. 

The ground has been owned by Pizzoni for the last 20 years. The 
surface placers are said to have been rich. 

Assessment work only was being done in 1914. Tunnels aggre- 
gating 5000' in length have been run, but all are believed to have 
been too high. A large amount of pay gravel was developed on a 
bench where breasts are said to have been 100' in width, but no 
attempt is being made to open up the deep channel. 

Adjoining mines are the Dutch Hill, to the north, and the Sunny- 
side to the south, the latter in operation. 

West Elizabeth Mining CompaJiy. (Miller, Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Duquesne.) Owner, West Elizabeth Mining Company, 
Johnsville; R. R. Gumbert, Johnsville, manager. 

Location: Johns\'ille Mining District, Sec. 32, T. 22 N. and Sec. 5, T. 23 N., 
R. 11 E. ; 6 miles northwest of Johnsville by trail, 5 miles southwest of 
Cromberg (W. P. Ry.) by trail. Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property contains 510 acres of placer locations, as follows: 
Pittsburg, 160 acres; Pennsylvania, 160 acres; Miller, 130 acres; 
Duquesne, 60 acres. It is situated on the divide between the east 
branch of Nelson Creek and Poplar Creek, and supports a good stand 
of timber. 

The claims have been held by the present owners for over 15 years, 
but very little work has been done in that time. 

The Bigelow quartz mine adjoins. 

Western Mine. (Consolidation Alum Cove.) Owners, A. N. 
Cameron, Seneca; B. Pizzoni, Seneca. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 17, T. 26 N.. R. 8 E.; 1 mile 
south of Senecc% thence 31 miles southeast via Greenville to Keddie by 
good automobile road. Elevation 3300'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 89 

This property embraces 80 acres of placer locations covering from 
3000' to 4000' of channel. It is situated on the west bank of North 
Fork Feather River on a steep slope to the top of the ridge. The 
timber on the property is good. 

It is one of the oldest claims on the river, having been located by 
Nick Meadows in 1884. Bought by the present owners in 1900. It 
is idle, assessment work only being done. 

The deposit is made up of old river channel gravels with about the 
same southwest course as the present river. It contains ironstone 
and fine gravel with large boulders, and lies on a soft slate bedrock. 
Considerable water was encountered. There is 550' of basalt capping. 

The ground has been developed by a 200' tunnel through slates into 
rim gravel, but not reaching the main channel. The gravel worked 
was about 15' in width for 200' to 300' along the east rim. 

One cabin on the property. 

Adjoining mines are the Sunnyside to the south and the San Jose 
to the north. 

Wilson ClainL Owner, C. A. Wilson, Belden. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District : mine Is situated on North Fork 

Feather River, between Belden and Seneca, exact location not known. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

GOLD— HYDRAULIC MINES. 
Blue Gravel Claim. Owner, Rio Vista Mining Company. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., about 10 

miles by automobile road southeast of Quincy. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

Boimie. (See under Placer.) 

Boycott. (See under Placer.) 

Brown Bear Mine. (Jackson Mine.) Owners, C. W. Green, Cedar- 
ville, Modoc County ; Jackson heirs, Cedarville, Modoc County. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 1, T. 21 N., R. 12 E., 2 miles south 

of Clio by wagon road. Elevation 5200' to 5500'. 
Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 

U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property consists of eight patented claims, with a length along 
the channel of one mile. It is situated on a high ridge southeast of 
Mohawk Valley, and contains 160 acres. 

The mine was discovered by A. W. Jackson in 1872, and since that 
time has been worked by the Jackson family. Developed by placer- 
ing for a width of 40' and a length of about a mile. Hydraulicking 
had been done for a width of 300', when stopped by the anti- 
debris law. 

The gravels are free and angular, lying on bedrock of slate, 
quartzite, etc., near the southern border of Mohawk Lake beds. Gold 



90 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

in the surface placers of the present creeks was probably derived 
from erosion of the Haskel Peak Neocene river gravels. The course 
of the channel is N. 20° E., and the width of pay gravel is 300', with 
a depth of 18'. 

Eleven hundred inches of water under a head of 120' is obtained 
from Mohawk Creek. 

The nearest adjoining mine is the Agate Hydraulic mine in Sierra 
County. 

Cascade Mine. (Cascade Mining Company.) Owner, Mrs. Mary 
Turner, Vallejo, California. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sees. 11 and 14, T. 24 N., R 11 E., 10 miles 
by trail south of Genesee ; Portola 22 miles by wagon road. Elevation 
6000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Repts. XIII, page 290. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 37, Downieville. 

The Cascade consists of 800 acres of placer locations, developed by 
a 200' tunnel in the rim which has not struck pay gravel. 

The country rock is slate and greenstone and the gravel is medium 
sized, round, wash, with the bottom cemented, lying on granite bed- 
rock. There is a capping of lava. Hydraulicking, when stopped by 
the debris law, left a bank of gravel 100' to 200' high. 

Castle Bock Mine. Owner, Ed. Lindsay, Nelson Point. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile 
north of Nelson Point, about 10 miles southeast of Quincy by automobile 
road. Elevation 4800'. 

Assessment work is being done by ground sluicing, the owner 
working alone. 

Cleveland Claim. Owner, L. Soburo, Johnsville. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 4 miles north- 
east of Johnsville. Elevation 6000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of 120 acres of placer locations. Assessment 
work was done in 1913. 

Emigrant Hill. (See under Drift Mines.) 

Fordham Group. Owner, Dr. Leonie Fordham, Hotel Stewart, San 
Francisco. 

Location : Gibsonville District, at the head of Slate Creek, between Whiskey 
Creek diggings and North America mine, a mile and a half from Gibson- 
ville by good road. Elevation 5000' to 6000'. 

' The property consists of Star and Vermont claims (once known as 
the New York and Ophir), the Hepsi tailing claim, P. S. damsite 
and New York damsite. All of the Star claim is on the northeast 
end of the Gibsonville channel, which is a branch of La Porte channel. 
Part of the channel on this claim is lava-capped and part can be 
hydraulicked. The Vermont claim is cut in two by Whiskey Creek. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 91 

It is hydraulic ground. The channel was 800' wide on the adjoining 
North America. 

Application for permission to build a basket dam on the New York 
damsite has been made and the site approved. The site chosen is on 
the north branch of Slate Creek. About 1000 miner 's inches of water 
are said to be available. There is a storage lake on top of the high 
crest, a large reservoir, and a complete system of ditches. 

These claims were once held in common ownership with the higher 
ground on the North America. The tunnel driven to work the higher 
ground was too high to work these lower claims. It is said that 
ownership changed before the North America was worked out and 
the company had no occasion to undertake mining the lower ground. 
The new owners, known locally as the *San Jose Company,' began 
hydraulicking the Vermont claim in violation of law, and were 
stopped by injunction. They failed to pay their men, who next year, 
through their foreman, jumped the claims when the company failed 
to do assessment work. 

One rim of the channel has been reached by prospect shafts and an 
open cut which was driven from the northern branch of Slate Creek. 
The bedrock was found to be pitching away, dipping one foot in five, 
and the rim gravel was said to carry $1.80 a yard. It has been esti- 
mated that it will require 300' of drift to strike the bottom of the 
channel. The Hepsidam channel crosses the serpentine belt, which is 
held to make probable the occurrence of platinum. 

There is a camp with accommodations for 20 men, at an elevation 
over 6000'. 

Forest Grove. (See under Placer Mines.) 

Golden Gate Mine. (Bainbridge.) Owner, A. W. Robinson, La 
Porte. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 23 N., R. 10 E. Quincy is 
20 miles northwest of mine by good road via Nelson Point. Elevation 
6000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property is not patented, but assessment work is being done. 
It is situated on a lava-capped ridge, and after abandonment by the 
Bainbridge Company was relocated by Robinson, 

The deposit consists of quartz gravel, lava-gravel and boulders, on 
a bedrock of slate and serpentine, capped with basalt. 

The Kelly mine lies on the same channel to the west. 

Gold Mountain Hydraulic and Dredging Company. (Hydraulic 
King.) Owner, same; G, W. Pagg, manager, 201 Grant Building, 
Los Angeles. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sees. 14 and 15, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 3 miles 
south of Bucks Ranch, thence 20 miles by good automobile road to Quincy. 
Elevation 5400'. - 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 



92 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Holdings consist of 280 acres in section 14 and 160 acres in sec- 
tion 15, on the gentle east slope of Grizzly Hill. 

The property was discovered by Lavasse in 1854 and is said to 
have been worked steadily on a small scale. The Hydraulic King 
Company worked it from 1907 to 1909, and the present company since 
that date. 

The deposit consists of a large amount of silt and sand and a small 
amount of quartz on a slate and schist bedrock. The course of the 
channel is southeast, the depth of the gravel being from 6' to 24'. It 
is all said to carry gold. 

Equipment consists of six houses, blacksmith shop, bams and a 
sawmill of 8000 feet capacity. The water installation consists of two 
giants working with 300'' under a head of 120'. There are 7000' of 
24" pipe and two ditches, three miles and one and a half miles in 
length. 

The ground is worked by two giants, sluices 3' wide and 1500' 
in length and 1000' of tail races. Eight acres have been worked. 
Tailings are caught by a 20' concrete dam on Willow Creek. 

There were 18 men (two shifts), employed at wages of from $2.25 
to $3 per day and board, in 1914. Capacity is 1000 yards per day at 
a cost of 15ff per yard. In 1912 the production was 7500 yards 
valued at $4800. 

The New York, in section 15, is the nearest adjoining mine. 

Lett Oroup. Owner, C. F. Lott, Oroville. 

Location: Sec. 20, T. 25 N., R 6 E., 5 miles west of Belden. Elevation 5000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Claims are patented. No work has been done for a number of 
years. 

Maples Flat Consolidated Placer Mine. (Kanaka Flat Mine.) 
Owner, Parry R. Cole, Oxnard, Ventura County. 

Location: Spanish Ranch Mining District, Sec. 31, T. 25 N., R. 8 E., 6 miles 
northwest of Spanish Ranch, by trail and wagon road, 13 miles northwest 
of Quincy, via Spanish Ranch; good automobile road from Quincy to 
Spanish Ranch. Elevation 4800'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Mining Rpt. XIII, page 298. U. S. Geol. Survey, 
W. Lindgren, Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, 
Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of 1257 acres, for which patent has been 
asked. It was worked in early days by Wampler and Jack, and 
purchased in 1912 by the present owner. Some work was done 
in 1913. 

The pay is in a shallow deposit of free gravel, V to 3' in depth. 
The country rock is slate, serpentine and schists. 

Mountain House and Chapparal Hill are adjoining mines. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 93 

Plumas Imperial Group. (Including Hungarian Hill and Orr 
mines.) Owner, Towle Brothers Lumber Company. 

Location: Spanish Ranch Mining District, Sees. 17, 18 and 19, T. 24 N., 

R. 9 E., 4 miles west of Qulncy by good automobile road. Elevation 

3800'-4700'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Rpts. X, page 479; XII, page 219; XIII, 

pages 298-303. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 

98-99. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property was purchased by the present owners for the timber 
on the land and no attempt is being made to work the mines. Very 
little work has been done on it during the last ten years. 

Plumas Investment Company. Owner, Plumas Investment Com- 
pany, W. P. Hammon, 433 California Street, San Francisco. 

Location: Spanish Ranch Mining District. Elevation 3800'-4700'. 

The company's holdings comprise four groups: Gopher Hill No. 90 
located one mile ^ast of Spanish Haunch in Sec. 12, T. 24 N., R. 8 E. ; 
Bean Hill No. 85 located five miles northwest of Spanish Ranch in 
Sec. 3, T. 24 N., R. 8 E. ; Red Hill No. 60 containing forty acres located 
four miles northwest of Spanish Ranch in Sec. 33, T. 25 N., R. 8 E., 
and the Toland Langdon No. 253 situated two miles northwest of 
Spanish Ranch in Sees. 9 and 10, T. 24 N., R. 8 E. The gravel on 
the Toland Langdon No. 253 is said to be 20' thick. All four groups 
have been idle for a number of years. 

Queen Group. (See under Drift.) 

Scad Point Claim. Owner, AValter Robinson, Meadow Valley. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 28, T. 24 N., R. 8 B., 4 mile& south- 
west of Meadow Valley, Quincy 13 miles by good automobile road. Ele- 
vation 3550'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 4.3, Bidwell Bar. 

This property is patented and very little work has been done on it 
in the last fifteen years. 
. Edman quartz mine adjoins. 

Sinith Mine. (HoUoway.) Owner, J. Smith, Eclipse, via Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 11, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., 3 miles 
southeast of Eclipse: Quincy 2 8 miles northwest by automobile road, steep 
grade to Eclipse. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Rpt. XIII, page 297. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 37, Downieville. 

This mine was worked as a hydraulic mine on the west side of 
Blue Nose Peak where the channel appears to pass under the lava 
capping of Blue Nose. Steep canons are characteristic. The deposit 
consists of white quartz gravel, and, while it lies at an elevation 
500' below the channel at the Bunker Hill mine, Turner (Downieville 
Folio) considers that it may be a downthrown portion of the 
Gibsonville-Bunker Hill channel. 

The Bunker Hill is the nearest placer and the Oro Fino the nearest 
quartz mine. 

7—46902 



d4 MINES AND MlNERAXi RESOURCES. 

Star of Plumas Oroup. Owner, Star of Plumas Mining Company, 
care Victor Craig, Berkeley, California. 

Location : Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 8, T. 23 N., R. 8 E., 4 miles east of 
Bucks Ranch by trail, thence 17 miles northeast to.Qulncy by good auto- 
mobile road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Llndgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

Situated on the headwaters of Bear Creek. Assessment work is 
being done on the claims. 

Taylor Diggins Oroup. Owner, California Gold Mining and Invest- 
ment Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District. Sec. 29, T. 26 N., R. 11 E., 3 miles 

north of Genesee, thence 18 miles west, by good automobile road, to Keddie. 

Elevation 5500'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Rpts. XIII, page 289. Diller, J. &, U. S. 

Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 

253, pages 111, 121. U. S. (Jeol. Survey Topo. sheets, Indian Valley, Gtenesee, 

Honey Lake. 

This property embraces 200 acres of patented land containing good 
timber. It has not been worked for a number of years. 

GOLD— LODE MINES. 

Alhambra Mine. Owners, M. Mcintosh, Quincy; Jerry Curtiss, 
Twain, care Indian Mining Company. 

Location: La Porte Mining District, Sec. 15, T. 22 N., R. 8 E., 8 miles north- 
west of La Porte. Elevation 5500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The Alhambra mine embraces the Alhambra and Alhambra Exten- 
sion locations. Patents have been applied for and final papers were 
expected by January 1, 1914. The total area, which cover 3000' 
along the lode, is 40 acres. 

The mine is situated near the headwaters of the South Branch of 
the Middle Fork Feather River on the southwest slope of Franklin 
Hill. Deep caiions are characteristic of the surface. 

It was located in 1855, but assessment work only has been done in 
late years. The development work consists of an 85' vertical shaft 
in diorite, and a tunnel driven on the vein, whose length is unknown 
on account of caving. At the 60' level in the shaft a crosscut 12' 
long through diorite shows the vein to be 14' wide and at the 80' 
level another crosscut shows the vein to be 16' wide. There is one 
small stope on the latter level, and an open cut on the vein 100' long 
and 20' deep. 

The strike of the Alhambra vein is east, and the dip vertical. The 
south wall is diorite, the north wall 'porphyry' and the filling is 
solid quartz, varying in width from 6' to 8', with gouge on both 
walls. This quartz carries free gold, galena, pyrite, and chalcopyrite 
in small amounts. On the 80' level three samples taken across 16' 
of quartz assayed $9, but the ore is said to average only $5. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 95 

The nearest mine is the Butte Bar, on the Middle Fork Feather 
River. 

Altoona Mine. Owners, S. Firmstone, Greenville; J. Murray, J. 
Richards. 

Location : Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 14 and 23, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 
20 miles via Greenville by good automobile road to Keddie, 2 miles south- 
east of Greenville. Elevation 5000'. • 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 472 ; XII, page 213. Diller, 
J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114, 115. Lindgren, W., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114, 116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 
sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

The mine contains one patented claim, the Altoona, extending 1500' 
along the vein and 500' wide. It is situated on the flat top of the 
ridge between Crescent Mills and North Canon, near the Round 
Valley Reservoir, and is 16 acres in area. 

The mine was discovered by F. Emmons in 1870 and was bought 
by the present owners from the Emmons Estate in 1906. In 1912 it 
was bonded to A. N. Fauntenack of Seattle, and 12 to 14 men were 
employed, but during 1913 it was idle. 

The greatest depth reached on the vein is by a winze, 100' below 
the tunnel level, or 230' below the outcrop, and the length driven on 
the vein is 800'. There is also a crosscut 170' to the south. A stope 
30' X 5' X 150' extends from the adit level to the surface. 

The wall rock is 'porphyry,' probably decomposed meta-rhyolite 
or andesite, and the vein is a quartz-filled fissure and stringers, with 
an easterly strike and a dip of 45° to 60° S. Its average width 
is 5', the maximum 16', aijd the length of the pay shoot is 306', with 
a width of 5'. The vein filling is iron-stained quartz containing free 
£?old. In the upper workings the ore is oxidized, but at the bottom 
of the winze sulphides are found in places. It is said to plate $5 to 
$7 per ton in free gold. Both the country rock and vein are faulted. 

Equipment consists of one Fairbanks-Morse 32-horsepower crude 
oil engine, blacksmith shop, four new cabins and a Fairbanks 16-horse- 
power distillate hoist. The mill building is equipped with a Denver 
roller mill, patent electrical amalgamator, rock breaker and Card 
concentrating table. 

Adjoining mines are the Cherokee and Green Mountain, both of 
which are idle. 

Antelope Mine. Owner, C. M. Johnston, Mohawk. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 28(?), T. 22 N., R. 13 E., 2 miles 

east of Clio. Elevation 4500'-5000'. 
Bibliogrraphy : Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 

U. S. Geol. Survey F'olio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of eight claims, with a total area of 160 
acres. It is situated in the low hills on the east side of Mohawk 
Valley. 



96 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 



• 



The property was worked in early days, but was bought by the 
present owner in 1902. 

There are three veins in the lode — the Poorman, 3000'; Antelope, 
3000'; and Ilawkeye, 6000'. The Poorman vein has been developed 
by a 140' tunnel with a winze from the tunnel 110' deep and a drift 
20' in length along the vein on the tunnel level. The Antelope vein 
is developed by a 65' shaft, and short drifts. A crosscut now being 
driven will cut the vein 310' below the surface. The Hawkeye is 
opened by a 70' shaft and a 200' tunnel driven on the vein. 

Wall rock is ({uartzite in the Poorman and Antelope and a lime- 
stone foot-wall and granodiorite hanging wall in the Hawkeye. The 
Poorman lode is composed of stringers of quartz and country rock 
containing free gold and no sulphides. The vein is 14' wide, with 
2" stringers, and strikes north with a vertical dip. The Antelope vein 
is 5' wide and is composed of silicious oxidized ore containing free 
gold, malachite and azurite. It dips 30"^ E. with a northeast strike. 
The Hawkeye contains lenticular })odies of chalcopyrite and native 
copper in a zone 75' to 100' wide, striking northeast and dipping 
50° E. The ore runs $14 to $21 in the Antelope, and $5 to $40 iii 
copper, gold and silver in the Hawkeye. This mine is undoubtedly 
on the southern extension of the Genesee-Wa.lker copper belt, which 
seems to follow along the contact of the granodiorite wherever the 
overlying basalt and andesite have been eroded. 

Equipment consists of a cabin and blacksmith shop. 

The Bullion is an adjoining mine on which assessment work was 
done in 1913. 

Arcadian Mine. Owner, D. Mclntyre, Greenville. Bonded to an 
English company in August, 1914. 

Location: Greenville Mining District. Sees. 10 and 15, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 1 mile 
south of Greenville; Keddie 16 miles south by good automobile road. 
Elevation 3900'. 

Bibliography : Cal. State Min. Bur. Rept. XIII, page 305. Diller, J. S., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114, 115. Lindgren, W.. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Prof. Paper 73, pages 114, 116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian 
Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

The property consists of five claims, including the Arcadian. 
Antelope, Hongkong, Sunset and Sunrise, the last three being frac- 
tions. It contains 80 acres with a length of 3000' along the lode, and 
is situated on the steep slope of the ridge south of Greenville. 

The mine has been owned for over 20 years by the present owner. 

There are three veins in the lode, the Phoenix, Antelope and 
Savage. Development work on the Phoenix consists of a 3000' 
crosscut tunnel. On the Antelope a depth of 75' has been reached 
on the vein, and on the Savage a depth of 300' has been reached and 
300' driven on the vein. The Savage vein has been stoped from 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 97 

ray lor tunnel for a length of 600' from tunnel to surface, a distance 
of 60'. 

The country rock is granodiorite and meta-rhyolite, and the 
hanging and foot- walls are granite and porphrj^ • The ore is free 
milling and oxidized in the upper lev^el ; concentrates, 1^% sulphides, 
are worth $185 per ton. The Phoenix vein is quartz and porphyry, 
with quartz stringers with a northeast strike and 40° S. dip. 
The Antelope and Savage veins are of quartz, the former striking 
east and dipping 75° S., the latter striking north and dipping 60° W. 

Equipment consists of a lO-stAmp mill, 750-pound stamps, in good 
condition, using water from Round Valley Reservoir under 325' head. 

Adjoining mines are the New York, which is idle, and the Droge, 
across North Canon, which is working 25 men. 

Austrian Syr^dicate Mine. Owners, J. S. Wardell, J. Barcel, San 
Francisco; Dr. Ivanovich, Petaluma, R.F.D. No. 3. 

Location : Genesee Valley Mining District, Sees. 23 and 24, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 
3 miles southeast of Genesee and 21 miles via Genesee to Keddie by daily 
automobile stage. Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee and Honey Lake. 

t 

The property consists of six claims, all said to be patented. It 
comprises 120 acres with a length along the lode of 5000'. 

This mine has been worked at intervals for 16 years, but is idle 
at present. Fifty thousand dollars is said to have been taken from 
the shoot worked in early days in the Fissure vein (Queen of Genesee 
jedge), from ore reported to have averaged $20 in gold and to have 
carried a considerable amount of copper. 

The old works, consisting of a 60' shaft and numerous tunnels, 
100' to 300' in length, are caved, but some w^ork done by the Austrian 
Syndicate is in good condition. The property can be developed to 
a depth of 300' to 800' by tunnels from Robertson Ravine and to a 
depth of 1400' by a proposed Cooper Mountain tunnel. 

The country rock is meta-andesite and schists, in which there is a 
(juartz fissure vein containing bornite and gold, 8' wide, with andesite 
loot and hanging walls. It strikes northwest and dips 70° SW., and 
basa length proven on the surface of 5000'. There is also an ore- 
bearing zone in schists near their contact with porphyry. The ore 
contains bornite and carbonates and has schist hanging and foot- 
walls. An average width of about 2', with a maximum of 8', con- 
tains 2% copper and $3.10 gold. The strike is northwest and dip 
50° SW. Length on surface, 2000'. 

Adjoining mines are the Calnan and Five Bears mines, both idle 
at present. 



98 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Beetle Oraup. Owners, A. D. McMillan, W. P. Boyden, Greenville. 

Location : Lights Caiion Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 27 N.. R. 10 K, 7 miles 
north of Taylorsville, 20 miles by automobile stage to Keddie via Taylors- 
ville ; good automobile road to within 3 miles of mine.- Elevation 4000'. 

Bibliography : .Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353. Lindgren, W., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Gteol. Survey Topo. 
sheets Indian Valley, Genesee and Honey Lake. 

This property, consisting of the Beetle and Beetle Extension loca- 
tions, is 40 acres in area and has a length of 3000' along the lode. 

The mine was discovered in 1874, a shaft was sunk by J. Pord and 
ore was smelted in the old Genesee smelter. It was relocated in 1906 
by the present owners, who shipped one and one-half tons of ore. 
Assessment work only is done now. 

Workings consist of a 60' shaft, now inaccessible, and 50' drifted 
on the vein. The vein is proven on the surface for 50' only. 

The deposit consists of a fissure vein of quartz and calcite con- 
taining copper and gold. It is 12" to 18" wide, with 6" of ore. 
Strike N. 60° E., dip nearly vertical, between a foot-wall of con- 
glomerate, and hanging wall of porphyry. 

Equipped with a blacksmith shop only. 

Adjoining mines are the Hulsman and Engels. 

Bell Quartz Mine. Owner, Professor C. Bayless, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Location : Quincy Mining Listrict, Sec. 3, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles north of 

Quincy by good automobile road. 
Bibliography; Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 478; XIII, page 292. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 

The property consists of three claims in the Bell group, Bell, Iowa 
and Leavitt Extension, all of which are patented. The total area, 
about 60 acres, covers a length of 2000' along the lode. It is situated 
at the head of Elizabethtown Flat, where the ridge rises abruptly 
from the flat. 

The mine was discovered in early days by hydraulicking and in 
1879 the present owners erected a 10-stamp mill on the property. It 
is now idle. The ore is said to have averaged $15. 

Development work consists of two tunnels, an upper tunnel 500' 
long, and the lower tunnel 50' below, 600' long. There are numerous 
crosscuts in the lower tunnel, and it has been stoped to the extent of 
100' in length, 11' in width and 50' in height. On the north side of the 
hill, a tunnel has been run on the vein a distance of 75', then a winze 
sunk to a depth of 30' and a drift driven from the bottom, south, for 
a distance of 30'. Old workings have caved. 

The deposit is characterized by quartz veins and stringers in a 
siliceous dike 60' wide, with both hanging and foot-walls of slate. 
The vein is said to have been worked for a wddth of 11' to 15', the 
ore being free milling, with a small amount of pyrite and manganese. 
The strike is N. 15° W., dip 80° E., and it has a proven length on the 
surface of 1000'. 



PLUMAS oouNmr. 99 

Adjoining mines are, Newtown Flat and Elizabethtown Flat placer 
mines. 

Big ClifiF Mine. Owners, Genesee Valley Copper Company, Sioux 
City, Iowa ; A. L. Beardsley, president ; Melvin Smith, secretary. 

Location: Genesee Mining District, Sees. 25, 26, 35 and 36, T. 26 N., R. 11 E., 

4 miles northeast of Genesee, 22 miles by good automobile road via 

Genesee to Keddie. Elevation 4000' to 6000'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets 

Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

The property consists of 12 claims, viz, Genesee No. 1 to No. 12. 
The length along the lode is 6000' and the area 240 acres. The sur- 
face is characterized by precipitous cliffs on the north side of Genesee 
Valley. 

The mine was purchased in 1910 by its present owners, but the 
only work that has been done consists of cuts across the face of the 
elifl and two holes or tunnels 20' to 40' deep. Great masses of the 
cliff have been blown off and some of this rock shows small amounts 
of purple bornite. 

The lode is altered meta-andesite, porphyritic and impregnated 
with finely disseminated bornite. Not enough work has been done 
to determine the character of the vein, but the ore-bearing zone is 
claimed to be 80' to 400' in width, and gold and silver as well as 
bornite are said to occur. The country rock is meta-andesite and 
sandstone. 

Equipped with two cabins. 

Adjoining is the Reward, idle for a number of years. 

Bigelow Claim. Owner, John F. Bigelow, San Francisco. 

Location: La Porte Mining District, Sec. 32, T. 23 N., R. 11 E., 3 miles south- 
west of Cromberg by trail. Elevation 6000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property comprises one patented claim, having an area of 20 
acres and covering the lode for a length of 1500'. It is situated at 
the head of Poplar Creek, tributary to Middle Fork Feather River, 
and sharp V-shaped canons mark the surface. 

The claim has been held by the present owner since 1885. In 1913 
a small amount of work was done in cleaning out the tunnels. 

Development work consists of a 200' shaft, a tunnel of 300' crosscut 
to the bottom of the shaft, and a 300' crosscut adit. Fifty feet have 
been driven on the vein south from the shaft on the 200' level on 
stringers of quartz. 

The country rock is slate, augite-porphyrite and andesite, the 
deposit being a quartz vein striking N. 25° W. in slate, and containing 
iree gold. Quartz stringers are characteristic. The vein was 






100 MINES AND. MINERAL RESOURCES. 

followed by the shaft to a shallow depth and then lost, probably on 
account of a slide. 

Adjoining mines are the Lincoln and Gold Leaf. 

Black Bart Mine. (Frazier.) Owner, Joseph Peppin, Brush Creek 
post office. 

Location : Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 30 miles 
southwest of Quincy by good automobile road via Meadow Valley, Bucks 
Ranch and Letter Box ; also automobile road from Oroville. Elevation 
4775'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 293. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 43, Bid well Bar. 

The property comprises one claim, called the Black Bart, with an 
area of 20 acres. It covers the lode for 1500'. 

The mine was located by Peppin in early days, bonded to the 
Frazier Company and now reverted to Peppin. Assessment work 
only was being done in 1913. 

It is developed by a 600' crosscut adit which strikes the Black Bart 
No. 1 vein 200' from the portal on Frazier Creek, thence 300' is 
driven through granite to the Black Bart No. 2, thence 40' through 
granite to the Black Bart No. 3, and thence 30' to the Black Bart 
No. 4. The lengths driven on the veins are as follows ; B. B. No. 1, 
500' south and 50' north ; B. B. No. 2, 300' south ; and B. B. No. 3, 
1 50' north and 150' south. All ground developed has been stoped to 
the surface, which was 50' to 90' above the tunnel level. 

This deposit consists of fissure veins in country rock of granite and 
diorite. The foot and hanging walls are vein granite, the vein filling 
quartz and decomposed granite containing free gold and pyrite. The 
\eins are parallel, striking northeast and dipping 75° E., with a 
}>roven length on the surface of 500'. Short pay shoots occur in the 
veins at intervals. The width of the veins and values are as follows: 
B. B. No. 1, 1' to 2', $12; B. B. No. 2, 1' to 2', $20; B. B. No. 3, 
1' to 2', $8 to $10 ; B. B. No. 4, 1' to 2', values unknown. 

Equipment consists of houses and a Huntington mill and Triumph 
concentrator, operated by a 15-h.p. steam engine. 

Adjoining mines are the Robinson and ]\Iorning Star. 

Blue Bell Mine. Owners, Blue Bell Mining Company. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 2, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 2 miles 

northeast of Gont^see by good automobile road, thence 18 miles west to 

Keddie by automobile road. Elevation 4200'. 
Bibliography: Diller. J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. Cal. State 

Min. Bur. Bull. 50, page 180. 

A limestone belt passes through the country in a northwest and 
southeast direction, and the ore forms in limestone and slates near 
the contact with granodiorite. At the apex of a hill on the belt are 
some heavy croppings, under which the Blue Bell Mining Company 
ran a tunnel that intersected seven important veins. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 101 

Boyd Mine* Owners, 0. G. Boyd, Bucks Ranch ; A. G. Boyd, 1235 
Powell street, San Francisco. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 23 N., R.. 7 E , 20 miles south- 
west of Quincy by good automobile road via Bucks to within one mile of 
property. Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bid well Bar. 

This property consists of four claims, the Mammoth, Whip-poor- 
will, Jumbo and Jumbo Extension, located July 12, 1913. It con- 
tains 80 acres, with 2580' along the lode, and is located on a high 
7-idge of serpentine lying south of Haskins Valley. 

Development work consists of shallow surface cuts across the lode, 
which show the deposit to be auriferous for a width of 120'. The 
property contains a decomposed body of iron-stained talc and ser- 
pentine material, which strikes northeast. The gold-bearing zone 
lies near the contact of the serpentine and the Calaveras slates, and 
the ore is said to average $4 and $5 per ton for a width of 120'. 
Some coarse gold has been taken from this ground by panning on the 
surface, and it may be the source of the gold of the Gold Mountain 
Hydraulic and Dredging Company, whose property lies on the slope 
southeast of Boyd's. 

Water supply can be obtained from Haskins Creek, a tributary of 
Bucks Creek, also on the ridge at the headwaters of Willow Creek. 

Bullion Mine. Owner, A. L. Beardsley, Genesee. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District. Sec. 14, T. 26 N., R. 11 E., 7 miles 

, . northeast of Genesee by trail, 12 miles from Keddie to Taylorsville, then 

by Lucky S. road to within a few miles of mine. Elevation 5300'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49; Bull. 

353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, 

Gcenesee, Honey Lake. 

The property consists of seven claims, located in 1913 by the present 
owner, containing 140 acres and having a length along the lode of 
4500'. 

The deposit is porphyry impregnated with chalcopyrite in a 
country rock of meta-andesite, the ore containing chalcopyrite, 6 to 8 
ounces of silver and $1 gold. There is said to be 50' of ore, then a 
zone of leached material 200' in width, and then 50' more of ore, the 
lode striking N 70° E., and dipping 50° SE. Th^ length proven on the 
surface is 150'. There are also three quartz veins in the porphyry 4' 
to 5' in width, reported to carry free gold. 

Work consists only of open cuts. 

The Lucky Strike, an adjoining mine, has been idle for many years. 

Bullion Claim. Owner, ]\Irs. A. E. Hayden, Reno, Nevada. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 29, T. 22 N., R. 13 E , 2 miles east 

of Clio by good automobile road. Elevation 5000'. 
Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 

U. S. GeoL Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 



102 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Buster Group. Owners, Sol. Camp, Downieville; B. H. and 6. M. 
Smith, Quincy; Al. Dednon. 

Location : TaylorsvUle Mining District, Sec. 24, T. 25 N., R 10 E., and Sec. 19, 
T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 8 miles northeast of Marston (W. R Ry.) by old toll 
road, now a trail. Elevation 7000'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 253, pages 111-121. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Taylorsville, Indian Valley, Honey Lake. 

The Buster group consists of eight claims, Buster No. 1 to No. 8, 
inclusive, a total of 160 acres, covering a length along the lode of 
4500'. The claims were located May 1, 1914, on the divide between 
Genesee and Quincy Junction. Nos. 3, 4 and 7 are well timbered. 

The vein has been developed by a 30' open cut and tunnel. It is a 
deposit in limestone, 100' wide, dipping 45° SW., the hanging wall 
being limestone, the foot-wall porphyry. The surface ore is all 
carbonate. 

Butte Bar Mine. (Nelson.) Owners, E. L. Fensier, J. Guerbe, 
11 College avenue, Santa Rosa. 

Ijocation: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 35, T. 23 N., R 8 E., 17 miles south- 
west of Quincv by trail. Elevation 3000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property is situated in the steep canon of Middle Fork Feather 
River and consists of two patented claims, the North Butte Bar and 
the South Butte Bar, extending 1500' north and 1500' south of the 
river. The total area is 40 acres with a length along the lode of 
3000'. 

The vein was discovered in 1893 and high grade ore was taken out. 
A five-stamp mill was installed but it was destroyed by a landslide. 
Total production to date about $3000. 

Development consists of a 250' tunnel driven on the vein on the 
north side of the river and an 80' tunnel on the vein on the south 
side of the river. The greatest vertical depth reached below the 
outcrop is 300'. 

The vein is a quartz-filled fissure varying in width from about 6' 
to 15' at the crossing of the river, carrying free gold, galena, copper 
sulphide, and possibly tellurides. The foot-wall is a fine-grained 
diorite porphyry, the hanging wall a mica schist. It has a strike of 
S. 20° E. and a dip of 75° E. on the south side of the river and a 
strike of N. 40° W. and a dip of 70° E. on the north side of the river. 
Galena ore on mill test ran $12. Transportation costs are lOff per 
pound. 

Nearest adjoining mine is the Little Nell. 

Butte and Iron Lily Mines. Owner, Mrs. J. D. Williams, 617 Lin- 
coln street, Oroville. 

Location : Lights Canon Mining District, Sees. 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 14, T. 27 N., 
R. 10 E.. 14 miles north of Taylorsville, 25 miles northeast of Keddle, 
good automobile road from Keddie to Lights Cafton, then 6 miles by trail 
to mine. Elevation 6000'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353. Lindgren, W., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 
sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey I^ke. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 103 

This property consists of 43 claims, none patented, the Iron Lily 
No. 1 to No. 29 and Butte No. 1 to No. 14. It contains 800 acres, 
covering the* Butte lode system for 6000' in a northward direction, and 
the Iron Lily system for 12,000' in an eastward direction. Steep 
canons are characteristic of the surface. 

The claims were located by J. D. Williams in 1902. Two men were 
working in 1912 and one man in 1913. 

Development consists of a shaft 22' deep and 250' of open cuts, on 
the Iron Lily system. On the Butte system there are three adits, 
No. 1, 60'; No. 2, 130'; No. 3, 50', and from the latter a 250' crosscut. 

The deposit lies near the contact of granite and andesites, the 
country rock being slate and meta-andesite. The Butte system is 
composed of quartz and calcite veins, containing pyrite and chalco- 
pyrite, assaying 2^% copper, and gold as high as $14 per ton. The 
hanging wall is 'Birdseye' porphyry, and though the vein has been 
crosscut for 74' no foot-wall was encountered. The deposits in the 
Iron Lily system are lenticular. The ore is said to average 2^% 
copper, gold $1.50 and to carry a maximum of 39 ounces of silver. 

Wood fuel and steam power are used. 

There is a cabin and a blacksmith shop. 
' The Engels copper mine is the nearest neighboring property. 

Butterfly Group. Owners, Mrs. Mary Smith, Quincy ; F. N. Smith, 
Belden. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 25 N., R. 8 E., 4 miles north of 

Quincy by fair wagon road. Elevation 3500'-3900'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports XII, page 214; XIII, page 288. 

U. S. Geol. Survey F'olio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of five quartz claims, the Blue Point, and 
Blue Point Extension, Columbia, Hornet and Butterfly, totaling 92 
acres, and two placer claims, the Columbus placer, 160 acres, and 
Columbus Extension, 20 acres. The claims are on the ridge between 
Blackhawk and Butterfly creeks and cover the lode for 6000'. The 
surface is cut by deep ravines. 

The property was discovered by John Radley, but was purchased 
by A. Smith and has been held by the Smith family for over 20 years. 
Two men were working the mine in 1913. 

There a^e four veins on the property developed as follows: Gov- 
ernor vein developed by a 70' vertical shaft, a 60' crosscut and then 
40' drifted each way on the vein, and a drift from the bottom of the 
shaft 60' northwest. A 300' crosscut cuts the vein 100' below the 
C'Utcrop, 15' was driven on the vein, and 5000 tons of ore stoped. 
The Mound vein has an 80' vertical shaft and a total length of 20' 
driven on the vein. The Blue Point vein has a 75' shaft (caved) and 
a 250' tunnel on the vein. ]\Iining is by hand drilling, but the 
porphyry dike was hydraulicked 700' x 20' x 20', 



104 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

s 

Country rock is Calaveras slate and quartzite, the veins being true 
fissures. There is also a porphyry dike, decomposed and oxidized, 
with quartz stringers. The Governor is a quartz vein, carrying free 
gold and sulphides, with slate foot and hanging walls. It varies from 
8' to 20', strikes northwest and dips 45^ SW., with a proven length of 
1500' on the surface. The Mound vein is of decomposed quartz and 
gouge carrying free gold and sulphides, with slate hanging and foot 
walls. This vein varies from 2' to 8' in width with an average of 4', 
strikes N. 45° W., and dips 70° SW. It has a proven length of 300' 
on the surface. The Blue Point vein is quartz and heavy gouge, 
carrying free gold and a little sulphides, with a foot-wall of quartzite 
and a hanging wall of slate. Its average width is 6', and it can be 
traced for 1200' on the surface. The strike is N. 28° W., the dip 
80° SW. The porphyry dike, 4' to 40' in width, contains quartz and 
iron stringers carrying free gold. The walls are slate. It has a 
proven length on the surface of 800', with a strike to the northwest. 
The ore from the Governor is said to have averaged $20 but this is 
questionable. Assays from the surface of the Mound vein have been 
as high as $12 and ore from the Blue Point vein $8 to $10. 

Equipment consists of tw^o dwelling houses and a blacksmith shop. 
A tramway is being built to the St. Nicolas mill. 

Steam is used for power, though water might be obtained from the 
Plumas Investment Company. 

Nearest adjoining mines are the Buchanan and the St. Nicolas. 

Caldwell Mine. Owners, G. M. Sparks, Oroville ; Mrs. A. Parker. 

Location : Granite Basin Mining District, Sees. 25 and 30, T. 23 N., R. 6 and 
7 E., 30 miles by good automobile road via Bucks Ranch and Letter Box 
to Quincy; Oroville 50 miles by automobile road. Elevation 4600'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, B.idwell Bar. 

This property consists of one claim, patented by Caldwell. It is 
30 acres in area and covers the lode for 1500'. Low ridges are 
characteristic of the surface. 

The claim has been worked at intervals since early days. J. A. Hall 
is said to have an option on this property and to have grouped it with 
the New Century, Whidden, Jennie and Alameda claims. 

The deposit is a fissure vein of quartz in granite, varying in width 
from V to 3', striking N. 35° E. and dipping 80° E. The vein has 
been proven on the surface for 1000'. Small shoots of rich ore, going 
as high as $50, occur at intervals. It is free milling, containing only 
2% auriferous pyrites. 

Development work consists of two tunnels, the Upper tunnel 80' 
below the outcrop, and the Jupiter 40' below the upper one. The 
Jupiter tunnel is 170' long and 80' has been drifted on the vein. Two 
I'aises extend to the Upper tunnel, one on a 3' vein assaying $7, the 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 105 

other on a 14'' vein assaying $10. A crosscut adit has been started 
100' vertically below the Jupiter tunnel. This crosscut is now in 
500' but lacks 130' of cutting the vein. All of the ore has been stoped 
from the Upper tunnel to the surface and part of the ore between the 
Jupiter and Upper tunnels. About 450 tons of ore, which is said to 
average $8 in free gold and $2 in sulphides, remains between the two 
tunnels. Mining is done by hand drilling. 

The nearest adjoining mine is the Morning Star. 

California Group. Owner, C. H. Goodhue, Indian Falls, Plumas 
County. 

Location: Taylorsville Mining District, Sec. 33, T. 26 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile 
soutliwest of Taylorsville by good automobile road. Elevation. 4200'-5000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 289. DiUer, J. S., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 353. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheet, Taylorsville. 

The property consists of four claims, the California Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
a total area of 80 acres, covering 3000' of the main vein, and 3000' 
along a cross vein. It is situated on a high ridge offering excellent 
tunnel sites. 

The property was discovered by A. C. Light in 1872 and was bought 
by Goodhue from the Light Estate. Nos. 2 and 3 are known as a 
pocket mine. Only assessment work has been done for many years. 

On the main vein a 500' tunnel and a 215' crosscut (now inaccess- 
ible) have been driven. There is no drifting on the vein more than 
100' below the surface. On the cross vein there are 12 tunnels, all at 
present inaccessible except the lower one, which is a crosscut tunnel 
140' long with 70' farther to go to cut the vein. The cross vein has 
been stoped, all pockets being taken out. 

The country rock is granodiorite. The main vein is mixed quartz 
and country rock, carrying free gold and ^% sulphides. It is 42' 
between the walls, 6' going $4.10 and the rest $1. The strike is N. 
55° W. and the dip is 65° SW. It has a proven length on the surface 
of 1600'. 

The only equipment is a blacksmith shop. 

Cayot Mine. Owner, Frank Cayot, La Porte. 

Location: La Porte Mining District, Sec. 18, T. 21 N., R. 8 E., 10 miles north- 
east of Lampltin, fair road from Lampkln to Oroville. Elevation 4500'- 
5000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, XTI, page 214; XllI, page 290. 
Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 105. IT. S. Geol. 
Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property includes four claims, the Young America, America, 
America Extension and Union, situated on the steep slope of the west 
bank of Fall River. 

It covers a distance along the lode of 6000' and has an area of 
80 acres. 

Two tunnels, one 20' above the other, the lower one running nearly 
west and the other southwest, are driven to the vein, the former being 



106 MINES AND MINPJRAL RESOURCES. 

80' in length, and the latter 30', with 260' drifted northeast and 56' 
southwest on the ledge. Some ore was worked in the Fall River 
Consolidated mill. 

The vein is a quartz fissure vein carrying free gold (oxidized 
pyrite), pyrite and considerable ehalcopyrite. The foot- wall is 
l)orphyry, well defined, with 1' of gouge, and the hanging wall is 
granite. The vein varies in width from 18" to 5', the average being 
about 4'. It strikes N. 30° E. and dips 45° W. 

It has a length proven at intervals on the surface of 4500'. Ore 
from the upper tunnel averages $12, assays running from $3 to $500. 

Equipment consists of one cabin. 

Cherokee Group. Owners, Mrs. U. S. Webb, Sacramento; Mrs. 
E. M. Cornell. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 14 and 23, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 

2 miles west of Crescent Mills by wagon road; Keddie is 11 miles south 

via Crescent Mills. Elevation 4500'-5000'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 

Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. 

Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property embraces four claims, the Robinson, Valentine, 
Brewster, and Standard, for which patent applications are said to 
have been made. It is situated on the ridge west of Crescent Mills, 
near Round Valley Reservoir. 

The mine has been worked at intervals since early days, the last 
t'me about 1900. Very rich bunches of ore are reported to have been 
taken out of various veins and stringers near the surface. 

Development work consists of a 200' shaft, the bottom of which is 
stated to be in serpentine, a 400' drift on the vein from the 100' level 
in the shaft, and the Green ^lountain tunnel from the Crescent Mills 
side. This tunnel, after a circuitous course, is said to have reached a 
point within 400' of the bottom of the Cherokee shaft, and 1000' 
below it. The last 400' of this tunnel is reported to have been run in 
serpentine. A large amount of work has been done on the surface on 
\arious veins and stringers. 

The deposit is a quartz fissure vein carrying free gold and very 
little sulphide, and is supposed to be an extension of the Green Moun- 
tain fissure. It varies from 4' to 5' in w^idth, strikes N. 50° W. and 
dips 45° SW. The country rock is slate, granodiorite, serpentine and 
meta-rhyolite. 

Adjoining mines are the Green Mountain and Altoona. 

Chicken Plat Mine. Owner, P. Hansen, ]\Ieadow Valley. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Soc. 33, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 4 miles south- 
west of Meadow Valley; Quincy is 15 miles via Meadow Valley by good 
automobile road to within 2 miles of mine. Elevation 4450'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bid well Bar. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 107 

The property comprises one claim, upon which very little work has 
been done in the last ten years. The mine was reported to have been 
sold to Edman in 1913, but the sale could not be confirmed. 

There is one vein 40' in width striking N. 37^ W. and dipping 60° 
NE. The deposit is a replacement of dolomite, consisting of quartz 
lenses, chalcedony and iron oxide with a siliceous foot-wall and a 
schist hanging wall. It is said to be rich in free gold 200' below the 
surface and chalcopyrite and selenides of gold and silver are reported 
in small amounts. 

The Diadem mine adjoins. 

Chico Star Mine. Owners, R. K. Dunn, Mrs. C. Lazarvitch, Seneca ; 
J. P. James, Chico. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 9, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 1 mile north 
of Seneca, 31 miles northwest of Keddie via Greenville by good automobile 
road. Elevation 3300'. 

Bibliography : Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 290. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The property comprises two claims, the Chico Star No. 1 and No. 2, 
having an area of 40 acres and covering the vein for 3000'. It is on 
the east bank of the North Fork Feather River, on a steep rise toward 
the summit of the ridge. 

The property has been in the possession of the present owners for 
many years. It is now idle, assessment work only being done. 

There is one fissure vein of quartz and quartz-cemented breccia, in 
slate, carrying free gold in the oxidized zone, and pyrite and arseno- 
pyrite. The foot-wall is ' greenstone ' meta-andesite, the hanging wall 
slate. It varies from 14' to 20' in width, strikes N. 44° W. and dips 
25° SW., with a proven length on the surface of 600'. 

Development work is confined to an 80' crosscut tunnel, which 
strikes the vein at a depth of 150'. No drifting has been done on the 
vein but $1800 is said to have been taken from a pocket. 

Adjoining mines are the White Lily, Del Monte, and Savercool. 

Clara Mine. Owners, Ernest Leske, Herman Leske. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 5 or 7, T. 22 N., R. 7 E., fair 
wagon road to Bucks, 10 miles, tlien 17 miles by good automobile road to 
Quincy. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The property consists of one claim, 20 acres in area and covering 
the lode for 1500'. It is situated on Cold "Water Creek, steep ravines 
being distinctive features of the surface. 

It was discovered by the owner in 1901, but not located until 1910. 
Assessment work, which consists only of open cuts and a 20' tunnel, 
comprises the development. 

There is one vein, a brecciated and silicified dike with solid quartz 
on both walls. Free gold, galena and chalcopyrite are found in the 
stringers of quartz which have recemented the angular fragments of 



108 ' MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

the dike; one was probably shattered and then recemented and 
altered by the siliceous solution carrying gold. The foot and hanging 
walls are said to be slate. Its width is about 15', the maximum 
being 25', and it strikes northeast and dips 45° NW. 

No assays have been made but quartz near the wall pans well. 

The Coquette adjoins this property. 

Commercial Mine. Owner, W. ^Murphy, Brush Creek. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 23 N., R. 7 E.; nearest 
post office is Brusii Creek ; Qulncy is 30 miles nort]ieast by automobile 
road. Elevation 4700'. 

Bibliography: T^ S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The property consists of one claim, having an area of 20 acres. 
It was abandoned by J. Peppin in 1911 and relocated by W. Murphy. 
Assessment work only is being done. 

Development consists of a 140' crosscut adit and two 400' drifts 
on the vein, one north and one south. 

The vein is a quartz-filled fissure in decomposed granite and is 
from 1' to 2' in width. The strike is N. 35° E., and the dip is 
70° E. This property is credited with the production of $75,000, 
from the tunnel level to the surface, a distance of 100'. 

Capper King and Copper Queen Mines. (See under Copper.) 

Coquette Mine. Owner, Frank Douglas, Merrimac, Butte County, 
California. Under option to C. M. Carter, Oakland. 

I^ocation: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 32, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 8 miles 
south from Bucks Ranch, or 30 miles to Granite Basin, thence 2 miles by 
trail. Elevation 4700'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 291. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The Coquette mine comprises four claims, the Coquette placer loca- 
tion, Boulder placer location, Coquette lode location and the Quick 
Fortune lode location. The total area is 80 acres with a length along 
the lode of 1500^ Steep canons are characteristic of the surface. 

Development work consists of a 200' tunnel on the Coquette vein 
and a 20' shaft and open cuts in the Quick Fortune. 

Both veins are quartz fissure veins in granite, carrying free gold 
and sulphides. The Coquette vein varies from 6" to 4' in width, 
strikes east, and dips 70° S. It has a proven length on the surface of 
500'. The Quick Fortune vein varies in width from 6" to 3', strikes 
northeast, and dips 65° E. Equipment consists of an old lO-stamp 
mill. 

Adjoining are the Morning Star and Coyote (Darty mine). 

Cosmopolitan Mine. (Reward.) Owners, S. Emricjii, Reno, 
Nevada; Rosenthal, Rosenthal Shoe Company, San Francisco. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 25 N., R. HE.,- 2 miles 

northeast of Genesee by good automobile road ; Genesee is 18 mile^ east of 

Keddie by automobile road. Elevation 4200'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. Dlller. 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 

sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 109 

This property consists of four claims, all patented, having an area 
of 76 acres. It is situated on the ridge on the north side of Genesee 
Valley. 

The mine was discovered in 1860. In the early days the ore was 
smelted in the old Genesee smelter, or was shipped to Swansea, Wales. 
No work has been done for a number of years. 

There are several tunnels on the property. The main one is 500' 
3n length with a number of drifts run on stringers. It developed a 
5' vein of gold ore assaying $3.40. This vein, it is said, will cut the 
copper vein within 100' at a depth of 240'. Some ore has been 
stoped in the upper levels. The lower tunnel is in 270' in grano- 
diorite. The upper tunnel, 60' long, exposes 14' of chalcopyrite, and 
the middle tunnel, 120' long, shows 17' of ore averaging 6% copper. 

The first working was from a shaft 65' deep, now inaccessible. 

The country rock is slate, limestone and granodiorite. The ore 
forms in solid masses of bornite and chalcopyrite, in limestone and 
slates near the contact with granodiorite. 

Near the surface there is malachite and azurite. It is said to carry 
^•old and silver. The maximum width of the ore-bearing zone is 
200', with 15' lenses. It strikes northwest and dips 70° E. 

The Gruss mine lies to the south, across Genesee Valley. 

Coyote Group. Owner, A. E. Darty, Buck's Ranch. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 32, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 8 miles by 
horse trail south of Bucks Ranch, thence 18 miles to Quincy by good 
automobile road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey I^'olio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The property comprises two claims, the Coyote and Bald Eagle. 
It contains 40 acres and 3000' of the lode. Sharp V-shaped canons 
are features of the surface. 

Development consists of a tunnel on the vein 96' long, reaching a 
depth below the outcrop of 75' at the face. 

The ore body is a quartz vein, in granite, carrying free gold and 
some chalcopyrite, said to average $14. It varies in width from 
3' to 4'. 

The nearest mine is the Coquette. 

Crescent Mine. Owners, Crescent Mill and Mining Company, 556 
Mills Building, San Francisco; Mrs. M. J. McDonald, home office, 
556 Mills Building, San Francisco, care W. H. Hamilton. 

Location; Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 24, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 11.5 miles 
north of Keddie by good automobile road. Elevation 3500'-3700'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, VIII, page 481; X, page 469; XI, 
page 330; XII, page 214; XIII, page 291. Dlller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey 
Bull. 353, pages 114-115. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, 
pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, 
Honey Lake. 

The property embraces two patented claims, the Crescent and Pet, 
and two locations, the Miller and the Cole Fraction. It also includes 

8 — 46902 



110 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBCES. 

160 acres of timber in sections 14 and 15. It is situated on Indiaa 
Creek on the west side of Indian Valley at the base of a ridge which 
rises 1000' above the floor of the valley. 

The deposit was diseovered in 1864 and worked at intervals until 
1894, since which time it has bi'en idle. The surface workings are 
tiaved and iuaccessibti" and the 400' shaft is full of water. It would 
cost from $25,000 to .-fioO-OCO to reopen the mine. 

The country rocks are meta-andesite. andesitc and slate. Appar- 
ently there are a number of quartz veins and cross veins in the meta- 
andesite and meta-rhyolite. They carry free gold and a very small 



Photo No. 1. Surface working, of the Crescent Mine, CreMenl MiUi diMricl. 

amount of sulphides. The foot-walls are 'blue porphyry' and the 
hanging walls 'porphyry' (meta-rhyolite). The Horseshoe vein has 
a width of 17' of hard quartz and is 86' between the walls on the 
400' level. It strikes N. 70° W. and dips 72^ S., with a proven 
length of 400' on the surface. The Pet vein is 3' wide, strikes east, 
and has a vertical dip. The Crescent vein varies from 5' to 8', 
strikes northwest and dips 4.5° to 70° N, The ore stoped from the 
('rescent ledge from the 200' level to the surface is said to have 
_ averaged from +8 to iiil2 per ton for a width of 5' to 12'. On the 
200' level at the junction of the Pet and Hor.seshoe veins, the ore 
body was 15' wide and went from ^A to !|i5 per ton. On the 400' level 
an orebody 17' wide and 60' in length is said to have averaged $5 
per ton for the total width. 

Development work consists of a 400' vertical shaft, and two cross- 
cuts driven on the vein from the 400' level, 150' and 250' to the north 



PLUMAS COUNTY. Ill 

and south, respectively. In the crosscut to the south at a distance 
of 117' a vein was encountered which is said to have had 17' of quartz 
on the foot- wall and 76' of soft oxidized ' porphyry ' between the walls. 
The body of quartz was 60' long and apexed 60' above the 400' level. 
Ore was stoped from the Crescent ledge from the 200' level to the 
surface. 

The mine equipment is practically useless. The mill was torn 
down and sold for junk in May, 1918. 

Water for power was obtained from the Round Valley Reservoir, 
but any power in the future will probably be electric from the Great 
Western Power Company's Big Meadows project. Work begun 
under the supervision of Albert Burch in the summer of 1918, was 
discontinued because of war conditions. 

The Green Mountain, the nearest mine, was last reopened in 1901. 

Crescent Hill Gold Mining Company. Owner, Crescent Hill Gold 
Mines Company, W. E. Oddie, president and manager. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sees. 13 and 14, T. 23 N., R. 9 E., 6 miles 

south of Quincy. Elevation 5500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property is situated on the north slope of the Feather River 
Caiion, and lies at an angle of about 45°. 

The vein being worked is evidently an east- west vein in schist, 
which runs towards the contact of the schist and serpentine. 

Equipment consists of a rockbreaker, Lane mill, concentrating 
plant and a distillate engine. 

Crown Paint and Summit Group. Owner, W. H. Black, Greenville. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 11, T. 26 N., R. 9 E. ; Greenville 
is 2 miles north of mine; Greenville to Keddie is 17 miles by good auto- 
mobile road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliogrraphy : Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 
Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. 
Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property comprises two patented claims, the Summit, 750' by 
600', lying between the Indian Valley property and the Hibernia 
claim of Standart, and the Crown Point, 600' by 1500'. It contains 
30 acres and is situated on the top of the ridge south of Greenville. 

The holdings were purchased in 1876 from the Bank of California, 
but were not included in the sale of the Indian Valley mine. 

The country rock is granodiorite and meta-rhyolite. The veins 
are quartz-filled fissures containing free gold and sulphides, said to 
run $16. It is now idle. 

Development consists of a 600' tunnel driven on the Summit vein, 
which is also cut at the 1200' level by the Union tunnnel from the 
Indian Valley mine. The vein strikes N. 40° W., has a vertical dip 
and a proven length of 1500' on the surface. Considerable ore has 
been stoped from the Crown Point vein by two tunnels, one 150' long 



112 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

and the other 350' long. Tlie lower tunnel is 82' below the 600' 
crosscut and has 80' farther to go to cut the vein. 

Adjoining mines are the Indian Valley and Southern Eureka. 

Dabney Claim. Ow^ner, D. G. Dabney, Belden. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 26 N., R. 7 E., 8 miles 

northeast of Belden (W. P. Ry.). 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property is situated on the North Fork Feather River, above 
the mouth of Mosquito Creek near Caribou Bridge. 
Pioneer Mining Company's property adjoins. 

Dean and Yearin Mine. Owners, Col. J. Dean, J. Yearin, Nelson 
Point, via Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 23 N., R. 9 E. ; Quincy is 

18 miles north by wagon road. Elevation 5000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property embraces four claims, namely, the Hill Top, Black 
Bear, Western Slope and Sunnyside, 80 acres in all. Steep canons 
are characteristic of the surface. 

The deposit was located in 1911 and prospecting work was being 
done. 

A 40' shaft sunk on a vein is now inaccessible, and a crosscut tunnel 
has been started which is in 20'. It will have to be driven 100' to 
strike the vein 75' below^ the outcrop. 

The veins are of quartz, occurring near the contact of serpentine 
and Calaveras slates. The 40' shaft show^ed a vein 21" on the foot- 
wall and 12' on the hanging wall with a 'porphyry' horse between. 
This is probably a southern extension of the belt in which the Over- 
sight claims are located. 

Dean Mine. Ow^ners, Dean and Sons, Seneca; J. S. Williams, 
Greenville. Bonded to J. D. W^ilson. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 21, T. 26 N, R. 8 E., IJ miles 
south of Sereca. Keddie is 31 miles southeast of Seneca by automobile 
road via Greenville. Elevation 3500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property is situated on the steep slope on the east side of 
North Fork Feather River, and contains a quartz fissure vein in slate, 
carrying free gold and sulphides, including some arsenopyrite. 

A number of tunnels comprise the development. Two or three 
men w^ere doing assessment work in 1914. 

Adjoining mines are the Ilazzard, Dunn and White Lily. 

Del Monte Mine. Owner, company, represented by J. J. Riley, 
Reno, Nevada. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 9, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., Seneca is 
J mile south of mine, Keddie 31 miles southeast, via Greenville, by good 
automobile road. Elevation 3300'-5000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 113 

This mine is situated on the southern slope of the mountains on the 
cast bank of the North Fork Feather River. 

The Del Monte was in litigation with the adjoining White Lily 
mine, and no data could be obtained. 

Diadem Mine. (Edman and Red Point.) Owners, Edman Estate, 
Quiney. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 33, T. 24 N.. R. 8 E. Quiney is 
14 miles east by automobile road to point where Edman road leaves the 
main Buck's Ranch road. Good road to mine, but bridges gone. Eleva- 
tion 4750'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 486; XI, page 323; XII, 
page 214; XIII, page 291. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 
73, pages 98-99. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell B%t. 

This property comprises the Diadem and Red Point patented quartz 
claims and the Victor Fraction, 20( ?) acres in all, with a length along 
the lode of 3000'. It is situated on the southeast slope of Spanish 
Ridge, and steep ravines are characteristic of the surface. 

The property was located in 1865. It is now idle and very little 
work, development or otherwise, has been done in the last 10 years. 

There are three tunnels, the lower tunnel 1000' long cutting the 
\ein at a vertical depth of 300', the Arrastra tunnel 550' long, and 
No. 2 tunnel 300' long, together with numerous crosscuts and a shaft 
from the lower tunnel to the surface. Most of the ore taken from 
this mine was from a shoot 125' long which was worked from the 
Arrastra tunnel level to the surface, a distance of 250'. In early days 
the surface was worked as a placer mine. 

The lode is 60' in width, being a replacement of dolomite by silica, 
quartz, chalcedony and in the lower levels large amounts of silicified 
and altered dolomite. There is one vein, the Diadem, the filling 
being quartz lenses, chalcedony, iron oxide, siliceous dolomite and 
manganese, very rich in free gold 200' below the surface, with 
ehalcopyrite and selenides. The foot-wall is slate, the hanging wall 
schist. Its strike is N. 37° W., and the dip is 60^ NE., with a proven 
length on the surface of 3000'. Owing to the altered condition of the 
vein near the surface and the presence of oxides of manganese, there 
has probably been a surface enrichment to a depth of 250', below 
which point very little rich ore has been found. Pyrite concentrates 
go $110 a ton and compose 1% to 2% of the ore. 

Equipment consists of good buildings, shops, etc., and two old 
Huntington mills. Steam and water power were used. 

Adjoining mine is the Honeycourt. 

Dara Mine. Owner, Girard Piano Company, Oakland, California. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District. Sec. 34, T. 24 N., R. 7 E... 2 miles north 
of Buck's Ranch, Quiney 20 miles east, automobile road to Buck's, wood 
road to mine, 2 miles. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 9S-99, 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 



114 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

This property consists of the P. P. claim, a location on a gentle 
slope on the north side of Buck's Valley. 

It contains a flat quartz vein in granite, 4' to 6' in width, which 
lias been exposed on the hillside for a considerable area by open cuts 
and shallow shafts. The strike is east and the dip 20° N. 

Droege Mine. (Formerly known as Consolidation, Drury and 
Pacific, Standart and McGill, J. Bull, and East Phoenix.) Owner, 
O. E. Lindbloom, 611 Mills Building, San Francisco. Leased until 
May, 1919, to John W. Daley. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 9, 10, 15 and 16, T. 26 N., 
R. 9 E., li miles south of Greenville. Crescent Mills is Hi miles south by 
good automobile road. Elevation 4200'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, VIII, page 480; X, page 473; XII. 
page 217; XIII, pages 298-301. 

This property comprises nine claims, namely, the Summit, West 
Pacific, Bird, Pacific, Drury, Arctic, John Bull, Phoenix, and East 
Phoenix, the latter seven being patented. There are 180 acres cover- 
ing a distance along the lode of 4000', and 320 acres of timber land 
included in the property. The surface is formed of high ridges and 
steep canons. 

The property was discovered in 1869. It was purchased by Droege 
in 1905, and has been worked by Lindbloom since August, 1911. The 
Droege mine includes the John Bull and Phoenix claims, on which a 
considerable amount of work was done in early days. All work at 
present (1918) is on the Drury or Ellis vein. There has been a total 
production to date of about $300,000. 

Development consists of two adits, No. 2 adit being 2400' in length, 
and No. 3 adit 255' below No. 2, being 1900' in length. The latter 
cuts the vein at a vertical depth of 600'. A winze sunk from No. 3 
adit 1400' from the mouth, was put down 100' on the vein and drifts 
driven west 150' and east 200', where • a fault was encountered. 
The vein was again picked up by driving along the fault for a dis- 
tance of 98', and the adit was continued on the vein beyond the fault 
for 200'. Most of the ore above No. 3 adit level has been stoped to 
the surface. In some places two veins have been stoped with a horse 
of about 30' of country rock between. Short shoots have been and 
are being stoped, both east and west of the winze on the 100' level. 
The ore is run from stope chutes in small buckets, trammed 400' to 
the shaft, hoisted by a small electric hoist to adit No. 3, and dumped 
into bin; cars (1 ton) are hauled to the mill by horse, five cars to a 
train. Very little ore is blocked out. 

The deposit consists of lenticular fissure veins in country rock of 
meta-rhyolite, granodiorite and serpentine. The Standart-McGill 
vein is a crushed and oxidized quartz vein in ^porphyry' and green- 
stone, probably a diorite, containing free gold and black oxide of 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 115 

manganese on the walls. In the unoxidized portion of the vein the 
ore is said to carry from 2% to 59? of surphides. The foot- wall is 
heavy decomposed and altered rock, possibly meta-rhyolite. The 
hanging wall in some places is the same as the foot-wall and in other 
is greenstone (diorite). The vein varies from a seam to 12' in width, 
will probably average 4|', and strikes: east with a dip of 70° N. 
There are numerous faults, some being post mineral. 

The mine equipment consists of a 14" x 14" Rix compound com- 
pressor driven by a Pelton waterwheel; three 3" machine drills, and 
electric generator, 220 volts, 148 amperes, with direct connected 
Pelton enclosed wheel. The mill contains 25 Hendy stamps, weight 
1150 pounds, five Pindar concentrators (Buddie type), and amal- 
gamating plates. It is in good condition. 

Water is obtained from Round Valley Reservoir under a 300' head 
at the mill and the same water is used again at the compressor plant, 
300' below the mill. The number of men employed is 23 on top, 20 to 
25 in the mine, and 4 (3 shifts) in the mill. Labor was paid $3.50; 
mill men $4.50. The per cent extraction is 75%. Tailings run 40^ 
and are disposed of in North Caiion. 

Adjoining mines are the New York and Indian Valley, both idle for 
a number of years. 

[Ten stamps were in operation in June, 1918. The ore is said to 
average $5 with occasional rich shoots. Fifteeu men were employed. 
Cost of mining and milling, which was $1.50 a ton in 1914, had 
increased to $2.25 in 1918.] 

Duncan Mine. (Brooks.) Owner, W. C. Duncan, Oroville. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District. Sees. 17 and 18, T. 25 N.. R. 8 E., 
4 miles east of Twain ; Virgilia is across- the river, but no bridge. Ele- 
vation 2600'-3100'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 292. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The property consists of three claims containing 50 acres and 
having: a length along the lode of 3600'. They are probably patented 
as practically no work has been done since the XIII Report. 

The property lies on the north side of the east branch of the North 
Fork Feather River, and has been held for many years by the present 
owner. The surface along the river was placered in early days. 

The deposit consists of a quartz fissure vein in country rock of 
slate, serpentine and limestone, carrying free gold and small amounts 
of galena, pyrite and chalcopyrite. The foot and hanging walls are 
slate, and the strike is N. 45° W., and the dip 55° SW. The lode is 
shown to be 75' in width where the river cuts it, and there is a proven 
length of 700' on the surface. 

Adjoining mines are the Halstead and Elizabeth Consolidated, 



116 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Duncan Mine. Owners, J. B. Duncan, C. H. Hook, Genesee ; A. W. 
Whitney, Crescent Mills. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 31, T. 26 N., R. 12 E., 6 miles 

east of Genesee by wagon road, thence 18 miles by good automobile road 

to Keddie. Elevation 4000' to 5000'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 253, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey 

Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This property includes 12 claims, covering 240 acres and also a 
water right. It has been held by the present owners for a number 
of years, and developed by numerous tunnels aggregating 600' in 
length. A vertical depth of 150' on the vein has been reached by the 
lower tunnel and 150' has been driven on the vein. The contact can 
be developed to a depth of 1200' by a lower tunnel. Assessment 
work only is being done at present. 

A mineralized zone 200' wide containing high grade kidneys forms 
a contact deposit in country rock of granodiorite and limestone. 
The ore carries bornite, chalcoeite, $20 in gold, and 158 ounces of 
silver and is found in small bunches irregularly distributed. The 
orebody strikes east and dips 70° N. 

Equipment consists of cabins and blacksmith shop. Water power 
can be developed from Indian Creek. 

The Big Cliff is an adjoining mine. 

Elizabeth Consolidated Gold Mines. (Formerly known as Thomp- 
son placer mine, Lewis quartz mine, Patten quartz mine, Scheiser 
Ravine quartz mine consolidation.) Owner, J. M. Little, Twain, 
Plumas County, or 3621 Broadway, Oakland. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 1 and 12, T. 25 N., R 7 E., 
4 miles northwest of Virgilia by good wagon road. Elevation 3900'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bureau Report XIII, pages 299-300. U. S. Geol. 
Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property comprises the following claims: Thompson placer, 
Schafer quartz, Last Chance and Scheiser Ravine. Application for 
patent was made on the claims several years ago but the case was pro- 
tested and afterward appealed by the Bureau of Forestry, but Little 
has won in both cases, and expects patents in the near future. There 
is a total area of 107 acres, 60 acres being placer. The length along 
the lode is 3600'. High ridges and deep ravines are surface features. 

The property was worked as a placer in 1850, but all the workings 
do not cross the vein. It was first worked as a quartz mine by 
F. Lewis in 1880. Rich Gulch, when placered in early days, is said 
to have yielded $9,000,000, and the gold was undoubtedly derived, for 
the most part, from the erosion of the Halstead, Elizabeth, Cameron 
vein. 

The deposit is a fissure vein in slate, with well-defined walls. There 
is one quartz fissure vein composed of quartz and slate with gouge on 
walls, containing free gold, small amounts of galena, chalcopyrite 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 117 

and arsenopyrite. It strikes N. 66° W. and dips 80° SW., with a 
}>roven length on the surface of 3600'. The vein is supposed to be 
faulted at the south end of the Scheiser claim. 

Development work consists of three tunnels, the upper tunnel 
(elevation 39200, 279' through slate; the middle tunnel (elevation 
3750'), 530' through slate; and the lower tunnel (elevation 3620'), 
150' through slate, but not yet to the vein. There are drifts, cross- 
cutting the middle tunnel as follows : 94', 38' and 60', and a raise of 
30'. The middle tunnel cuts the vein at a vertical depth of 150'. 
There has been a total of 166' driven on the vein from the upper 
tunnel and 391' from the middle tunnel. All the ground has been 
stoped from the upper tunnel to the surface. The 391' of drifts, 
from the middle tunnel, on the vein are all in ore varying from 1' to 
5' in width, which is said to have an average value of $10 per ton. 

There were two men employed in 1914. 

The Halstead mine adjoins the Elizabeth on the southeast and the 
veins are supposed to be the same, a fault having thrown the vein a 
distance of 600' northeast at a point where Scheiser Ravine cuts 
across the strike of the lode. The country to the northwest, which 
comprises the Elizabeth mine, is badly broken and Scheiser Ravine 
may be the result of the dislocation. This lode can be traced from 
the East Branch North Fork Feather River, which it crossed near 
Virgilia where the outcrop was extensively worked by hydraulicking, 
through the Duncan, Halstead, Elizabeth Consolidated and Cameron 
claims, a distance of twenty-five miles. 

Fairplay Mine. Owner, F. E. Thomas, Quincy. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sees. 3 and 10, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles 

north of Quincy by good automobile road. Elevation 3600'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises two claims, the Fairplay and Fairplay 
Extension, the latter being a fraction (500' x 600'). In all, there are 
26 acres, having a length along the lode of 2000'. 

This ground was located by the present owner in 1897, but assess- 
ment work only has been done. The property is held in hopes that 
the adjoining Bell mine will be worked. 

Development consists of two tunnels, 90' and 50' in length, with a 
winze from the lower tunnel sunk 25' which reaches the vein 70' 
below the outcrop. Ore with an average width of 7' is said to 
average $10 per ton. 

This deposit is supposed to be a south extension of the Bell lode. 
There is one quartz vein in slate, varying in thickness from 6' to 8', 
striking N. 15° W. and dipping 80° E., with stringers from a few 
inches up to 3' in width. It is free milling and contains some pyrite. 



118 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Five Bears. (Centennial.) Owner, Five Bears Mining Company; 
J. D. Meidenger, Chicago, Illinois, president; G. H. Goodhue, man- 
yger, Indian Falls via Paxton. 

Location: Genesee Mining District, Sees. 23, 25 and 26, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 

3 miles southeast of Genesee, tlience 18 miles by good automobile road to 

Keddie. Elevation 3900'-5600'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, XII. page 213; XIII, page 290. 

Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-129. Diller, J. S., U. S. 

Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey Tope, sheets 

Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This property comprises 1 placer and 9 quartz, claims, namely, the 
Centennial placer, Centennial quartz. South Extension, Black Bear, 
Brown Bear, Polar Bear, Grizzly Bear, and Cinnamon; the latter 
being the only one unpatented. There are 204 acres in the tract, 184 
patented, and a length along the lode of 8100'. Deep gulches with 
steep slopes to the top of the ridge, affording fine tunnel sites, are 
characteristic of the surface. 

The property was discovered in 1876 by Geo. Brandt, and was later 
purchased by the Five Bears Mining Company. At present it is idle. 
The mill closed in December, 1912, but four men worked underground 
until May, 1913. Gold production to date about $32,000. 

The mine is developed by a tunnel, driven 1400' on the vein, its 
lace being 900' below the outcrop. In the timnel between stations 
909 and 1080 the vein is 9' wide and said to average 5^% copper, 
from stations 1127 to 1240 the vein is 13' with chalcopyrite averaging 
2.3%. At one point 350' from the mouth the vein is stoped 50' above 
the tunnel level. 

The deposit consists of orebodies irregularly distributed through a 
zone of slates and shales of Calaveras formation, following a narrow 
shear zone and forming imperfect veins. There are three veins but 
only the main vein (zone) is developed. The filling is a small amount 
of auriferous quartz, crushed slate and gouge. The oxidized ore 
contains limonite, manganese oxide and free gold (rusty) ; the sul- 
phide ore, chalcopyrite and chalcocite with a very small amount of 
quartz. A zone of slate and shale 400' wide occurs with altered and 
metamorphosed andesite on both foot and hanging walls, the andesite 
sometimes being porphyritic. The strike is north, the dip varying 
between 20° and 70°. 

Equipment consists of two Pelton waterwheels, one 18" and the 
other 48", a two-drill Giant air compressor, assay plant, blacksmith 
shop, five houses, stable, air pipes in tunnel, a 10-stamp mill, 700- 
pound stamps, feeders, and two Eccleston concentrators. 

Water from Weed Creek, 200" under 109' head, is used for power, 
but under 1200' head 500" can be developed. 

Cost of development work about $7 per foot, mining 60^ per ton, 
treatment 80^^, timber (own) 2^^ per foot, transportation 45^ per 100 
pounds from Keddie. Extraction of gold about 60%. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 119 

The Gruss mine, to the north, is in the same zone. Mines of the 
Genesee district will probably not be large producers until a branch 
road is put through Indian and Genesee valleys. 

[The property was idle in the summer of 1918. The ore yields 
principally copper in depth. When working, the output is about 
1600 pounds of concentrate a day, and this is shipped to a smelter.] 

Friendship Mine. 

Location: Granite Basin District, T. 23 N., R. 6 E , within 35 miles of Quincy 

by automobile road via Buck's Ritncli and Letter Box. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of two locations. A 1' vein in granite is 
developed by a 30' shaft and a 100' tunnel on the vein. There are 
two men at work and a 3-stamp (200-pound) mill is to be installed. 
Ore is claimed to go $20 per ton. 

Gold Leaf Mine. Owners, J. A. Grove, J. J. Lowry, Cromberg. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 5, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 3 miles nortliwest 

of Cromberg by trail. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of one claim of 20 acres, covering the lode 
for 1500'. 

A 600' tunnel and a 150' winze comprise the development work. 

There is one quartz fissure vein, called the Gold Leaf, carrying free 
gold and sulphides, with foot and hanging walls of slate. The width 
of the vein is 2' and it strikes northwest. Ore is said to average $20 
"with occasional assays as high as $1000. 

Gold Leaf Consolidated Mines Company. (Argentine and Heath.) 
Owner, Gold Leaf Consolidated Mines Company; Dr. H. Look, 491 K 
street, Sacramento, president; J. Hammock, Thos. Sutton, W. V. 
Gross, Spring Garden. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sees. 19, 20, 29 and 30, T. 24 N., R. 11 E., 
3) miles north of Spring Garden by trail, 5 miles by poor wagon road. 
Elevation 5045'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises six claims, having an area of 120 acres and 
a length along the lode of 1000'. The surface is characterized by 
steep ridges and V-shaped caiions near the headwaters of several 
creeks. 

It was bonded to the present company in 1907. 

The deposit occurs as quartz veins in country rock of Calaveras 
slates and porphyrite. There are two veins, the Gold Leaf and the 
Hobart, the former being a quartz fissure vein with small gouge on 
both walls; both contain free gold and small amount of pyrite and 
galena. The foot and hanging walls are porphyrite and schists. In 
width the Gold Leaf vein varies from 2' to 14', the strike is north, 
dip 70° W., and it has a proven length on the surface of 600'. The 
Hobart vein varies from 3' to 20', with an average width of 4', strikes 



120 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

east and dips 35° N. It has a proven length on the surface of 300'. 
The pay shoot is 200' long and averages 4' wide. 

A crosscut tunnel has been run 200' to the Gold Leaf vein, on which 
there is also a 35' shaft. Another crosscut tunnel has been run 650', 
cutting the Hobart vein 125' below the outcrop, and there is an incline 
shaft on the vein 100' in length. The Hobart vein has been stoped 
from the surface to 25' above the main tunnel for a length of 50'. 
The average value of the ore is $3 per ton, while that in the Gold 
Leaf vein is said to assay $6 to $19. 

Houses and a blacksmith shop comprise the mine equipment. The 
reduction equipment consists of an old 5-stamp mill (850-lb. stamps) 
in a new building. 

Power is obtained from 40" of water under a head of 150'. 

The Henri Gobert mine adjoins. 

Gold Stripes Mine. (Wolf.) Owners, F. J. Standart, Greenville; 
Mrs. C. Hamilton, Oroville. Under bond 1913 and was being worked 
by the Cliit Mining Company, vieo president, Grant Snyder, 414 Judge 
Building, Salt Lake City. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining: Distiict, Sec. 36, T. 27 N., R. S E., and 
Sec. 6, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 5 miles northwest of Greenville; Keddie is 21 
miles south of mine by g3od road. Elevation 5200'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 
Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of nine claims in all, three, the Jersey, Ever- 
green, and Wolf Creek, being patented. There are 180 acres covering 
a length along the lode of 3000'. 

The property vsras purchased by G. Standart, father of the present 
owners, in 1882. It was idle from 1911 to October, 1913, when it was 
reopened with 10 men employed in cleaning out. The mine has pro- 
duced to date about $750,000. 

The deposit is a lenticular fissure vein near a contact of slate and 
serpentine. The filling in both veins is quartz and slate, containing 
free gold and very little sulphide. The foot-wall of the Gold Stripe 
is serpentine, the hanging wall slate, but both the hanging and foot 
wall of the Wolf Creek vein are schist. The veins are parallel, 500' 
apart, and strike east, with a dip of 45° S., the lenses varying from 
5' to 10' in width. The Gold Stripe has a proven length on the sur- 
face of 4000' ; the Wolf Creek about 1000'. 

Development work on the Gold Stripe vein consists of a 300' 
crosscut adit which cuts the vein at a depth of 230', and 1000' driven 
on the vein. The Wolf Creek vein is developed by a 600' tunnel 
driven along the vein, 60' below the surface. In the Gold Stripe 
three shoots were stoped, No. 1, 300' x 80' high; No. 2, 220' long 
X 130' ; No. 3, 200' X 230' ; and in the Wolf Creek vein two shoots, 
No. 1, 60' X 60', and No. 2, 100' x 60' have been stoped. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 121 

Steam is used for power, the fuel used being wood. 

The nearest mine is the Droege, which is working 25 men. 

Gold Rim Mine. Owners, A. Hall, Quincy; Wm. Metcalf, Eclipse; 
H. D. Seman, Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sees. 10 and 15, T. 22 N., R. 10 E.. 
2 miles southeast of Eclipse; Quincy is 30 miles northwest, by fair road 
of 4 miles from mine to Eclipse, thence good automobile road to Quincy 
via Nelson Point. Elevation 6500'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises seven claims, namely, the Quincy Nos. 1, 
2, 3, Gold Rim, Gold Rim Extension, Spring Nos. 1 and 2 ; the Quincy 
No. 1 is 1300' X 600^ all others 1500' x 600'. The total area is 138 
acres, covering 4300' along the lode. Lava-covered ridges and deep 
canons with steep grades to the Feather River mark the surface. 

The ground was located by Hall in 1911, and assessment and 
development work consists of two open cuts 13' x 17' x 10' deep, also 
a 60' crosscut from Poorman's Creek, cutting the vein at a vertical 
depth of 30'. Some good assays have been reported but it is not 
known what the quartz will average. 

The deposit consists of quartz veins and stringers in slate, but 
development has not been sufficient to prove whether or not they are 
associated with an igneous dike. One vein can be traced through 
the Gold Rim, Gold Rim Extension and Quincy No. 1. Its filling is 
iron-stained schist containing free gold and arsenical pyrite with a 
foot and hanging wall of slate. The width varies from 6" to 24". 
It strikes N. 55° W., dips 80"" E. and has a proven length on the 
surface of 2500'. 

Adjoining are the Rose Quartz and the Oro Fino mines. 

Golden Grate Mine. Owners, W. Clinch, John Barker, Louis Smith, 
Quincy, California. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sees. 29 and 30, T. 25 N, R. 9 E., 7 miles 

nortliwest of Quincy, by good road. Elevation 4200'-4700'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downleville. 

This property comprises two claims, the Golden Gate and the 
Oolden Gate Extension. The area is 40 acres and it covers the lode 
for 3000'. 

It was discovered by Wagner, but was relocated in 1912 by the 
present owners, who were doing assessment work in 1913. 

It is a quartz vein, in slate, with gouge on both walls, containing 
free gold, and a small percentage of sulphides. The foot-wall is slate 
and quartzite, and the hanging wall slate. In width the vein is from 
2' to 10', the average being about 4'. It strikes northwest, dips 
35° NE., and has a proven length on the surface of 500'. 

Development consists of a crosscut tunnel 400' long, cutting the 
vein 75' below its outcrop. A 30' drift has been driven from this on 



122 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

the vein and there is a shaft 90' in depth, from the bottom of which 
a drift was driven 200' west. The latter is supposed to have cut the 
vein 40' from the shaft, but the drift was continued, in country rock, 
150' beyond. There is another shaft 50' in depth from which a drift 
has been driven on the vein for a distance of 30'. The vein was 
worked as an open cut 300' x 30' x 12' and the ore is said to have 
averaged $20. 

The Butterfly group of claims adjoins the property. 

Green Ledge Mine. Owners, J. C. Young, Taylorsville ; G. F. 
Brown. 

Location : Genesee Valley Mining District, Sea 23, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 3 miles 
southeast of Genesee, 21 miles east of Keddie, via Genesee and Taylors- 
ville, by good automobile road. Elevation 4100'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 296. Diller, J. S., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 
353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, 
Honey Lake. 

This property composes one claim, the Green Ledge, which is not 
patented. It is situated on the east bank of Ward Creek with a steep 
slope to the top of the ridge, and is 21 acres in area. 

It was one of the first claims w^orked in the Genesee Valley district 
and has been held by the present owners for over 20 years. From 
one shoot 90' long, :V to 8' wide and 90' high it is said that $25,000 
was taken, with an estimated loss in the tailings of $75,000 in 
auriferous copper sulphides. Assessment work is being done in a 
tunnel from the bank of Ward Creek 400' below the old workings. 

Mine development consists of a tunnel 340' long, a shaft 138' deep 
and a 24' crosscut at the bottom of the shaft. Eighteen feet of this 
ucsscut averaged $2.80 gold and 1^% copper. The shaft is full of 
water and the north adit has caved. 

There are two veins, the Green Ledge and the Pocket, parallel 
and distant from each other 240'. The country rock is slate, schist 
and meta-andesite. The Green Ledge vein is a quartz and porphyry 
fissure vein carrying free gold and copper sulphides. The foot-wall 
is andesite and the hanging wall schist. It varies from 3' to 8' in 
width, strikes N. 20° W., dips 80° NE., and has a proven length on 
the surface of 5000'. The Pocket vein is a quartz vein with hanging 
and foot- walls of schists, carrying chalcopyrite and chalcocite, which 
contain high values in gold and silver. It varies from narrow 
stringers to 4' in width, strikes N. 20° W. and dips 40° NE. Values 
are found in pockets. 

The only equipment is a blacksmith shop. 

The Five Bears and Colnan mines adjoin. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 



Green Mountain Mine. Owners. -I. D. Gootlman Estate, San Fran- 
cisco; B. L. Cornell, Yankee Hill; C. E. McLaughlin. Sacramento. 



Localion ; 


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This property consists of three patented claims, the Ruby, Brilliant 
and Emerald Fraction, and two locations, the North Star and Sarah 
.Tane. The two latter were relocated in 1913 hy G. A. Hall and others 
who claun that assessment work had not been done for a number of 
years. The mill and entrance of tunnels No. "> and No. 6 are situated 



"n the relocated claims. The t"tal area is 'lO acres, with a length 
along the lode of 4500'. The outcrop is on the ridge whicli rises to 
an elevation of lOCO' above Indian Valley, 

The mine was discovered in 18(iO and worked at intervals until 
1890 and is said to have produced to date $1,000,000 to $2,000,000. 
The tunnel was last reopened in 1901 and all workings are now caved 
Hnd inaccessible. It is estimated that $50,000 would be required to 
leopen this property. Very little ore whs develojied on the No. 6 
level, the orebodies having ap|i;irenti.v been lost by faulting between 
No. 5 and No. 6 levels. 

The deposit is a quartz vein near the contact of slate and altered 
igneous rocks, meta-rhyolite. slate and serpentine making up the 
country rock. The foot-wall is 'greenstone,' tlie hanging wall 
'porphyry,' probably altered rhyolite. It strikes \. 40° W., and 



124 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

dips 45° to 50° SW., with a proven length on the surface of 3000'. 
Ore from the Blake shoot was oxidized and free milling; that from 
the Sulphide shoot was mostly auriferous pyrite. 

There are six tunnels in all: No. 1 was 250' long; No. 2, 350' long; 
No. 3, 1500' long; No. 4, 520' below the apex, 3000' long; No. 5 was 
360' below No. 4 ; and No. 6, 480' below No. 5, was 6075' long. The 
No. 6 tunnel was driven 1100' as a crosscut to the vein, then continued 
for a distance of 1000' along the vein and then the hanging wall 
west of the vein was crosscut for a distance of 4000'; the last 400' 
being in serpentine. The end of this tunnel, when discontinued, was 
about 600' east of the Cherokee shaft. The Blake shoot was stoped 
200' above and 330' below No. 5 level and is said to have been cut off, 
both above and below, by faults. This shoot was 300' long, 8' in 
width and ran $10 to $12 per ton free milling. The sulphide shoot 
was stoped from the 500' level to the surface, a distance of 920', and 
is said to have been 8' to 40' in width. 

There is no mine equipment at present. An old 60-stamp mill is 
in ruins and worthless. 

Water under 800' head was obtained from Round Valley Reservoir. 

Adjoining mines are the Crescent, Altoona and Cherokee. 

Grubstake and Juniata Mines. Owner, Frank Tolands, Brush 
Creek. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 26, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 10 miles 
southwest of Buck's Ranch; Quincy is 28 miles northeast by good auto- 
mobile road from Quincy to Letter Box, thence •* miles, by good auto- 
mobile road, to mine. Elevation 4500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

Property was formerly owned by E. H. Benjamin. At present, 
assessment work only is being done. 

The development on the Grubstake consists of 1000' of tunnels and 
150' of drifting. On the Juniata there are 200' of tunnels and drifts, 
the greatest depth below the outcrop being 125'. 

Quartz fissure veins in granite comprise the deposit. On the Grub- 
stake property there are two veins, striking north, and dipping 70° 
E., varying in width from 1' to 3' with a foot-wall of granite and a 
hanging wall of ^porphyry.' The ore is quartz, carrying free gold 
and some chalcopyrite. On the Juniata there is one quartz vein 
averaging 15" in width. It strikes N. 22 "^ E. and dips 50° E. 

There is a small 5-stamp water power mill at the mine. 

Grass Mine. (Genesee.) Owners, Mrs. G. Gruss, San Francisco; 
G. IT. Gruss, Genesee; Dr. F. Gruss, 12 Geary street, San Francisco. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 14, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 2 miles 

southwest of Genesee, 22 miles east of Keddie, by good automobile road. 

Elevation 3800'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 476; XIII, page 294. 

Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, J. S., U. S. 

Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets 

Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 125 

This property includes three claims, the Genesee or Grass, and 
Genesee Extension, lode claims, and the Lebanon placer claim. It 
has an area of 60 acres with a length along the lode of 2700'. The 
vein occurs at the base of the ridge where Ward Creek enters Genesee 
Valley Flat. 

The mine was discovered in 1856 by Ward and Davis. It was 
I^urchased by Gruss in 1881 and since that time has been worked by 
the Gruss family, being credited with a total production of $460,000, 
of which amount $185,000 went to Gruss. 

The mine is developed by a 100' vertical shaft from which there are 
drifts 500' north and 300' south. The new 200' vertical shaft is 
connected by an incline raise on the vein of 183'. Prom the 200' 
level a crosscut runs 96' east from the shaft to the lode, then 150' is 
driven south but not on the vein, and from this two crosscuts are 
driven at 80' and 150', west 25' and 70', respectively, to the vein; 
and 30' is driven on the vein south from the latter crosscut. The 
ground has been stoped from the 100' level to the surface, a length of 
800' and an average width of 5'. A cross vein in what is known as 
north hill has also been stoped for 150'. Ore was being broken in 
1913, 50' below the 100' level, but very little ore has been stoped from 
the 300' to the 100' level. Ore then being broken near the top of the 
raise is drawn off at the 200' level, trammed 300' to the shaft, hoisted 
to the surface by a water-driven hoist, crushed in a Gates crusher in 
the head frame and fed directly into a 10-stamp Hendy mill. Tail- 
ings are dumped on the placer claim. 

The character of the deposit is crushed and brecciated shear zones 
in slates and schists near the contact of the slates and meta-andesite. 
There are no well-defined veins, but parallel stringers of quartz and 
calcite occur. The decomposed and altered rocks are iron-stained 
and the gold occurs in narrow seams and pockets containing limonite 
and manganese oxide. The foot-wall is altered schist and, in some 
places, slate, the hanging wall is black slate, altered and iron-stained 
near the vein. There are two parallel zones 20' to 30' apart, with an 
average width of 5' and a maximum of 20' each, striking N. 20° W. 
and dipping 45' to 60' W., with a proven length of 800' on, the 
surface. Most of the gold occurs in the oxidized veinlets in the shear 
zones, oxidized to a depth of 200'. On the 200' level sulphide ore- 
bodies have been encountered, containing bornite, tetrahedrite and 
ehalcopyrite following calcite seams in the altered schists. The gold 
in the oxidized zone is generally fine and * rusty' and difficulty has 
been experienced in the past in amalgamating. One per cent con- 
centrate ranges from $150 to $350 per ton in value. 

9 — 46902 



126 MINES ANB MINBRAL HBSOURCES. 

Mine equipment consists of a 25-horsepower Hendy water power 
hoist, small IngersoU Rand compressor (3 stope drills) driven by 
water power, water driven 10^" Cornish pump, making four strokes 
per minute, and a blacksmith shop. Reduction equipment consists 
of a 10-stamp Hendy mill, with amalgamating plates and home-made 
concentrator, also a No. 2 Gates crusher, all driven by water power. 

Water is obtained under 100' head from Sobrero for $10 per month. 
There were four men working, one on top, two in mine and one in 
mill. In summer seven are employed. Transportation costs $10 per 
ton to Eeddie. 

The Five Bears and Calnan are adjoining mines. 

Halsteod Quartz Mine. Owners, A. Halstead, Meadow Valley; I. 
Halstead, Blanchester, Ohio ; W. H. Halstead, Havana, Kansas ; Julia 
Batey, Elizabeth Vance, Frank Hill, Estate of H. A. Halstead, Quincy. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 12, T. 25 N., R. 7 E. and Sec. 7, 
T. 25 N., R. S E., 1| miles northwest of Virfirilia, by good wagon road. 
Elevation 3700'. 

Bibliography : Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports XI, page 326 ; XIII, page 297. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The property consists of four claims, including the Rich Gulch, 
Byers and Halstead. There are 80 acres, with a length along the 
lode of 6000'. The surface is characterized by steep ridges, giving 
excellent opportunities for development by tunnels. 

It was discovered in 1881 by Joe Halstead. Most of the develop- 
ment has been in the form of assessment work, and consists of two 
tunnels, the English, 200' long and cutting the vein 150' below the 
outcrop ; and the Blacksmith tunnel, 350' in length with two crosscuts 
in it. At present the mine is idle. 

The country rock is slate and serpentine. The deposit is quartz 
fissure veins following the general strike of the slates, associated with 
veins in a brecciated mass of altered and silicified rock which has 
been recemented by quartz carrying gold, galena, pyrite and small 
amounts of chalcopyrite. The walls are slate. Quartz veins are 3' 
and 4' in width, but the altered and silicified breccia* is 20' to 30'. 
The strike is N. 43° to 53° W., the dip 65° to 75° NE., and it can be 
traced at intervals for 6000'. There is a 200' pay shoot in the English 
tunnel. The ore is free milling and is said to average $3 to $4.50, 
but probably not for the whole width of the vein. 

Elizabeth Consolidated mines adjoin. 

Haezard Mine. Owner, C. D. Hazzard, Quincy. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 15, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., 1 mile east 
of Seneca, thence 31 miles via Greenville to Keddie, by grood automobile 
road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliogrraphy : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property consists of ten claims, namely, the North West 
Extension, Ridge, Imperial, Bear, Gulch, Junction, South East Exten- 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 127 

sion, Plumas, Kesmett and Seiieea Eureka. The total area of 200 
acres is characterized by a steep ridge running east. The ridge is 
very narrow, showing quartz on the surface, and the vein probably 
follows the course of the ridge. 

The original locators were Rickard and Mandeville. The property, 
then consisting of three claims, was purchased in 1893 by Hazzard. 
There is one man working. 

It is developed by two tunnels, the Ridge tunnel of 580' and the 
Bear tunnel of 230', and two crosscut tunnels on the Bear vein, below 
Bear tunnel, of 95' and 300'. Neither of the two latter have encoun- 
tered the vein, which is supposed to lie very flat. 

The deposit is apparently a dike of fine grained rock brecciated 
and reeemented by quartz carrying auriferous sulphides, pyrite and 
arsenopyrite. There is one main vein of quartz and dike rock, which 
has been folded into an anticline, the filling being quartz and 
cemented breccia with streaks of solid sulphides. Free gold occurs 
in the oxidized portions, but very little is found in the sulphide zone, 
which is near the surface. The foot-wall is composed of slate, the 
hanging wall of slate and schist. The width of vein is from 5' to 20' 
and strike east. It dips 40° S., the Bear vein on the other leg of the 
anticline, dipping 45° N. Values are very unevenly distributed in 
the sulphide ore, assays from the same sample varying by a wide 
margin. Partially oxidized arsenical ore assays from $6 to $25. 

Adjoins the Dawn, White Lily and Del Monte mines on the south. 

High Orade Glaim. Owner, L. A. Lambert, Brush Creek. 

Location: Granite Basin Mineral District, Sec. __, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., within 
35 miles of Quincy, by automobile road, via Buck's lUinch and Letter Box. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The deposit consists of a 3' quartz vein with a granite foot-wall 
and porphyry hanging wall. There is a 30' shaft and a 100' tunnel 
on the vein. Thirty tons of ore on the dump arc^ s^id to average 
$10 per ton. 

Hinchman Mine. (Polar or North Star.) Owner, Sierra Range 
Copper Company; A. L. Beardslee, president, Sioux City, Iowa; Melvin 
Smith, secretary. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 6, T. 2 5 N., R. 11 K., 2 miles 

northwest of Genesee, thence 16 miles, by good automobile road, via 

Taylorsville, to Keddie. Elevation 3800'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45, 49. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. IT. S. Geol. Survey 

Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of the Roosevelt No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 
claims. There are 60 acres in all with a length along the lode of 
3000'. 



128 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

It was discovered in 1860, and purchased in 1907 by the present 
owners. Ore was shipped from the surface in early days. 

The mine has been developed by 600' of open cuts and a shaft 20' 
deep. A crosscut adit of 400' will encounter the vein, within a short 
distance, 300' below the outcrop. One hundred tons of ore of two 
grades are on the dump, the best averaging 10% copper, $3 gold 
and $3 silver. 

The deposit consists of a fissure vein, near the contact of the sand- 
stone and meta-andesite country rock, containing bornite ore. The 
average width of the vein is 2', the strike N. 20° W. and the dip 
70° SW. 

Hobson Oraup. (Plumas National.) Owners, W. F. Roedde, 
Crescent Mills; Wm. Stampfle. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 29 and 30, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 

8 miles southwest of Crescent Mills, thence 11 miles, by good automobile 

road, to Keddie. Elevation 4500'-5500'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 

Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

• — ■ 

The Dewey, Hobson and Black Jack claims comprise this property. 
With an area of 60 acres, it covers a length along the lode of 4500'. 
The vein follows the course of a steep gulch from Soda Creek to the 
top of the ridge with a difference in elevation of 1000'. 

The mine was worked by J. S. Hall in 1875 and was then known as 
the Plumas National. Relocated by the present owners in 1903, it is 
now under bond to G. H. Hall, son of the former owner. When the 
sulphide orebody in the lower tunnel was encountered, a roaster was 
erected, and attempts were made to treat the ore in this manner, but 
only $12 of the $32, which the ore is said to have averaged, was 
recovered. The shoot was 600' in length and 6' in width. 

Development work consists of an upper and lower tunnel. The 
upper tunnel «uts a 6' vein 400' from the portal at a vertical depth of 
400'. The lower tunnel, at a distance in of 1540', cuts the vein at a 
depth of 1000'. There is no connection between the tunnels. 

The deposit is a quartz vein in slate, the country rock being slate 
and meta-andesite. There is one vein consisting of quartz, black 
talc gouge and black slate, containing free gold with some sulphides. 
The foot-wall is meta-andesite (altered) and the hanging wall is black 
slate (altered). The vein varies from 6' to 8' between vralls, but it is 
not all solid quartz. The strike is N. 40° W., the dip 45° S., and there 
is a proven length on the surface of 4500'. 

The Plumas Amalgamated adjoins this property, and Hall has a 
theory that the Plumas Amalgamated vein is a faulted portion of 
this vein. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 129 

Homestake Mine. (Basin Beauty.) Owners, Horace Waldron, 
Brush Creek; J. Young and (?) Smith, 310 Thirteenth street, Oakland. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 8 miles 
nortlieast of Merrimac, 24 miles soutliwest of Quincy, by automobile road, 
via Letter Box. Elevation 4875'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 297. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of four claims, the Basin Beauty, Homestake, 
Stevens and Happy Thought. Waldron also owns a half interest in 
the Snow Flower claims. 

Two tunnels on the property develop a vein 12'' to 12' wide for 
600', of which both walls are granite. Most of the ore has been 
stoped. The Franklin ledge, 6' to 8' wide, containing 6% sulphides 
but no free gold, is opened by surface cuts. 

A 5-stamp mill (259-pound stamps) was erected in 1912. 

Homestake Mine. (Highland Cliff.) (Mountain Chief.) Owners, 
Jas. Lesky, R: J. McKewen, Quincy. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sees. 25 and 26, T. 24 N., R. 9 E., 2 miles 

south of Quincy by trail. Elevation 4000'-4500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieyille. 

This property embraces four claims, the Homestake No. 1, No. 2, 
No. 3 and No. 4, an area of 80 acres containing 6000' of the lode. It 
is on the north slope of Claremont Hill near the summit of the ridge 
south of Quincy. 

The deposit was worked in the early days. After abandonment by 
the Colonial Mining Company, it was relocated by the present owners 
in 1910. Two men work during the summer. 

Developed by a main tunnel driven in quartzite 280' before 
encountering the orebody, then a 10' raise in the main tunnel on the 
Sulphide vein at a depth of 300', after which it is driven 25' in the 
orebody and 100' in slate. The Homestake vein is exposed by surface 
cuts 15' deep. 

The deposit includes the Homestake vein and the Sulphide lode. 
The country rock is Calaveras slate and basalt. The Homestake is a 
quartz vein containing free gold and a small amount of pyrite. The 
foot- wall is slate and the hanging wall is quartzite and lava. The 
vein is from 4' to 6' wide, strikes northwest, and dips 45"^ SW. It 
has a proven length on the surface of 4500'. The Sulphide lode is 
composed of quartz and slate containing free gold and sulphides, 
principally pyrite. The foot-wall is quartzite, and the hanging wall 
slate. It is 20' wide, strikes northwest and dips 45° SW. Con- 
centrates vary from $17 to $140 per ton in value. 

A minimum of 25" of water is obtained from Mill Creek under a 
head of 300'. 

Equipment consists of a blacksmith shop, cabin, cars, tools, etc. 

The Tefft and Oddie mines are two miles south. 



130 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Honeycomb Claim. Owner, Thos. Halstead, Meadow Valley. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 29, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 4 miles south- 
west of Meadow Valley, thence 10 miles, by good automobile road, to 
Quincy. Elevation 4500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
IT. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of one location on the southeast slope of 
Spanish Peak. The surface is characterized by steep ravines. 

The claim was formerly owned by C. Trybom, after whose death it 
was located by the present owner. Very little work has been done 
in the last ten years, assessment work only being done at present. 

Development consists of 500' of tunnels. 

The property contains a northern extension of the Edman lode, a 
vein 20' to 30' wide, which is a replacement of dolomite. It strikes 
N. 30^ W. and dips 60° E. 

The p]dman mine adjoins. 

Horseshoe Mine. Owners, R. 1). Hann, Quincy; Jerry Curtis, 
Twain. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 16, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., in Seneca, 

35 or 40 miles Seneca to Keddie, 15 miles to Belden, by trail. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

The mine is situated on a steep point on North Fork Feather River, 
and is developed by shallow shafts, 10' deep, 300' along the vein. A 
crosscut tunnel run 100' struck clay gouge, and a new crosscut in 
175' will have to be driven 20' more to strike the vein. 

The deposit consists of a 10' vein with stringers in slate. It strikes 
northwest, dips southwest and can be traced for 1000' on the surface. 
There is a 100' pay shoot. 

Equipment comprises a 3-stamp mill, 1250-pound Merrill stamps 
with individual mortars, driven by an 8' Pelton waterwheel. A 22" 
pipe line, ditch and water right supplying 500", are owned. 

Adjoining mines are the Dunn and Del Monte Consolidated. 

Hulsman Mine. Owners, AVm. Ilulsman and Brothers, Susanville. 

Location: Lights ("anon Mining District, Sec. 12, T. 27 N., R. 10 E., 17 miles 
nortli of Taylorsville, by good wagon road and trail, thence 12 miles, by- 
good automobile road, to Keddie. p:]levation 5000'. 

Hibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353. Lindgren, W., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 
sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

Development work consists of a number of tunnels on a quartz 
\ein, carrying gold, silver and copper sulphides, near the contact of 
granodiorite and meta-andesite. 

Engels copper mine is the nearest adjoining mine. 

Husslemen and Shaw Group. Owners, Husslemen and Shaw, 
Susanville. 

Location: Lights Canon Mining District, Sees. 1, 12 and 13, T. 27 N., R. 10 E 
and Sees. 6, 7 and 18, T. 27 N., R. 11 E., 10 miles north of Taylorsville, 
by wagon road and trail, thence 12 miles to Keddie (W. P. Ry.) by good 
automobile road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. Cal. 
State Min. Bur. Bull. 50, page 187. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian 
Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 131 

This groitp comprises thirty-one locations, on nearly all of which 
some development has been done. They are the Moonlight, Wasp, 
Grant, Hulsman, Sherman, Oregon, Olympia, Davenport, Edward, 
Sidehill, Sperm, Oak, Shough, Gentle Annie, Cabin Ridge, No 
Wonder, Dexter, Live Oak, Fair View, Stone Point, Fritz, Big 
Spring, Big Boo, Belmont, Claremont, Vermont, Pala Cedar, Orient, 
Mammoth and Crystal. The mountain side on which they lie is 
very abrupt. 

A tunnel has been started well down, so as to obtain 800' to 1000' 
of depth under the heaviest croppings. This is a crosscut tunnel 
and is in 150'. On the Mammoth claim several open cuts show sul- 
phide and carbonate ore, which can be traced northerly for 900'. 
On the Orient claim a tunnel has been driven 150'. 

The Gentle Annie claim is prospected with open cuts. On the 
Oregon there is a 13' shaft at the east end, and on the west end a 
superficial cut. Down the hillside from an outcrop on the Olympia 
claim is an 85' tunnel. There is a 20' open cut along the outcrop of 
the vein on the No Wonder claim. On the south hillside is the 
Palisades tunnel, which was driven to cut a ledge which crops 12' 
in width above it. This tunnel has a length of 197', but has not 
reached the ledge aimed at, although it has cut several small veins. 

The country rock is granodiorite and meta-andesite, the veins being 

quartz veins carrying gold and silver and copper sulphides. On the 

mountainside and following the course of a proposed tunnel are 

12 ledges. The widest vein is found near the apex of the hill and 

is about 13' wide. The character of the ore is carbonate with some 

sulphide. On the Gentle Annie claim there is a vein varying from 6' 

to 8' in width. The ore is siliceous, carrying red oxide, carbonates 

and pyrites, and can be traced for over 800'. A 13' shaft on two of 

the claims shows peacock copper ore in the bottom. Their width is 

unknown. Assays are reported as showing from 10% to 60% copper. 

The shaft on the Oregon claim is in green and blue stained ore, said 

to contain 20% of copper and to be rich in gold. Some copper 

glance is visible in the ore. The vein strikes south of west and the 

north wall is diabase, the south diorite. On the west end of the 

Oregon claim, a cut discloses some good carbonate and siliceous ore 

reported to assay 48% copper, $14 gold and 15 ounces silver. A 

vein parallel with the main one just described also shows good ore. 

On the Olympia claim a vein of carbonate ore outcrops and is exposed 

SO' in width by an open cut. The tunnel lower down the hillside 

cuts 30' of gray carbonate ore. The inclosing rock is a diabase, 

spotted with coarse crystals of feldspar. A vein of green carbonate 



132 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

ore, 8' wide, outerops on the No Wonder claim. Some copper glance 
can be seen in this ore. 

The Bngels copper mine is near. 

Imperator Mine. Owner, L. Hemsath, Brush Creek. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 13, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 1 mile 
southeast of Letter Box, tiience 22 miles to Quincy, by good automobile 
road, via Meadow Valley and Buck's Ranch. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property is a relocation of an old claim, name unknown. 
Old workings consist of 1000' driven on the vein, a crosscut tunnel 
of 200' and 'further drifts on the vein of 300'. 

The vein is in granite and varies from 3" to 3', averaging 18". 
Assessment work only being done at present. 

Independence Mine. (Seymore.) Owner, A. R. Seymore, Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 7 miles 
south of Quincy but 20 miles distant by automobile road to within 1 mile 
of mine. Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises four claims, Independence No. 1, No. 2, 
Emancipation and Gem. There is a total of 80 acres, covering 3000' 
along the lode. Lava-covered ridges and steep ravines are charac- 
teristic of the surface. Winters Creek flows north from Mt. Wash- 
ington, where the lava-capped 'Old Channel' is located. 

The property was located in 1911, and eight men were working 
until November, 1912. One hundred twenty tons of ore said to 
average $186 per ton were shipped to the Selby smelter. 

Development work consists of two inclined shafts, 50' apart, 30' 
and 55' deep. There is a 30' drift connecting the two shafts 25' 
below the surface, and two crosscuts 10' below the surface on the 
Emancipation-Gem vein. 

There are two veins, the Emancipation-Gem being 200' west of the 
Independence. Both are quartz veins associated with 'porphyry' 
dikes near the contact of serpentine, slate and schist. The Inde- 
pendence vein is composed of quartz and altered porphyry containing 
free gold and arsenopyrite in various stages of oxidation. The foot- 
wall is 'diabase schist,' possibly amphibolite, and the hanging wall 
slate: It varies from 3' to 10' in width, strikes N. 45° W., dips 
55° W. and has a proven length on the surface of 500'. The 
Emancipation-Gem vein is composed of quartz and altered porphyry 
containing free gold and pyrite. The character of the walls has not 
been determined. There is a zone 150' wide, 6' to 20' of which is 
claimed to be mineralized, which strikes N. 26° W., dips 55° E. and 
has a proven length on the surface of 3000'. These are supposed to 
be the southern extension of the veins worked in the Plumas Bonanza 
mine. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 133 

Indian Falls Mines. Owner, Indian Falls Development Company; 
C. A. Darmer, president, 754 St. Helena avenue, Tacoma, Washing- 
ton ; H. W. Tyler, secretary ; Q. H. Goodhue, Indian Falls, in charge. 

Location; Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 3, T. £S N.. R. 9 B., Indla.n 

Falls on property, 51 miles north of Keddle, by good automobile road. 

Elevation 3000'-<«00'. 
Bibliography; Dlller, J. S„ U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 3S3, pages IH-IIB. 

Llndgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prot. Paper 73, pages 114-llS. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsvllle, Honey Lake. 

This property contains twenty-one claims, a total of 577 acres, of 
which 148 acres are patented {agricultural}. It covers 12,000' along 
the lode. The property takes in the flat at the bend of Indian Creek 
and then rises rapidly. 

It was discovered in 1905 by (Joodhue and sold in 1908 to the 
present owners. 



Tunneling comprises the development work. The River tunnel, 
TO' long, cuts the Copper vein (No. 3) 300' below the surface. At a 
point 70' north and 30' above is a 40' tunnel cutting 6' of 5J% chal- 
copyrite ore, 2000' northwest on the vein, the 60' Rose tunnel cuts 
the top of a vein carrying J% copper and $2.80 gold, and 2100' 
northwest the 587' Emerald tunnel, cuts vein No. 2, and at 376' 
cuts the foot-wall of a copper vein. 

There are five veins in this property, the No. 1, Gold Contact vein ; 
No. 2, Gold; No. 3, Copper; No. 4, Shoofly, and No. 5. The country 
roek is slate and 'greenstone' (meta-audesite) . Vein No. 1 is 
stratified flint quartz carrying free gold and sulphides, striking 
northwest and dipping southwest. The No. 2 vein, 200' from No. 1 



134 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

vein, is made up of hard flinty quartz carrying gold and pyrite. It is 
from 22' to 80' wide, strikes northwest, and runs $2.80 gold. No. 3 
vein has slate hanging and foot walls. It outcrops as a cliff at the 
river, 250' x 100' high and 60' wide. The deposit ranges 60' to 100' 
in width, strikes N. 40° W. and dips 55° southwest, with a proven 
length of 10,000' on the surface. Near the foot-wall is 8' of quartz in 
silicified slate and slate bands. Open cuts show a pay streak 4^' 
wide, averaging 9% azurite and black oxides. A 70' tunnel crosscut 
from the river level shows 6' of quartz carrying $1.10 gold and a 
small amount of copper, with an 18" pay streak going 6.2% copper, 
$1 gold and 2 ounces silver; 40' in it cuts 5' of 3% copper ore.. No. 4 
vein is a solid quartz fissure containing free gold and sulphides with 
slate foot and hanging walls. It varies 14' to 60' in width, strikes 
N. 40° W., dips SW. and has a proven length of 8000' on the surface. 
No. 5 vein is made up of soft quartz and is 16' wide. 

Equipment consists of cars, track and a blacksmith shop. 

Power is obtained from 2500" of water under 249' head, to which 
the company has a right. There is a 6500' ditch. 

Indian Valley Mine. Owner, S. R. Prentiss, Bangor, Maine. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 10 and 11, T. 26 N., R. 9 E.. 

1 mile south of Greenville, thence 15 miles to Keddle, by good automobile 

road. Elevation 4000'. 
Bibliography : State Mln. Bur. Reports, X, page 473 ; XIII, page 298. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. '353, pages 114-115. Lindgren, W., U. S. 

Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Tope. 

sheets Indian Valley, TaylorsvIUe, Honey Lake. 

The property consists of the Comstock (fraction), Dominion, Union 
and Indian Valley, all patented claims, comprising about 100 acres, 
and having a length along the lode of 4500'. The ridge on which it 
is situated rises from Greenville (35S(y) to the top of Green Moun-. 
tain (5250'). 

The mine was first operated by Blood, Drake and Applegarth, who 
sold the property to Corbin of the Yale Lock Company, who after- 
ward sold it to Prentiss. It has not been worked for the last sixteen 
years. The total production to date is about $1,800,000. A con- 
solidation of a number of the properties in the vicinity, which 
includes the Indian Valley mine, was said to be progressing favorably. 

Development consists of a 700' vertical shaft and a total of 2300' 
driven on the vein. 

The deposit is a quartz fissure vein in meta-rhyolite. The ore is 
free milling, but contains sulphides. It varies in width from 7' to 
10', strikes N. 45° W. and dips nearly vertically. 

Water, under 300' head from Round Valley Reservoir, is utilized 
for power. 

Adjoining mines are the New York, idle, and the Droege, working. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 135 

Indian Valley Silver Mine. Owner, Roy Starks, Taylorsville and 
Williams. 

Location: Lights Caiion Mining District, Sec. 32. T. 27 N., R. 11 E., 7 miles 

northeast of Taylorsville, by wagon road, thence 12 miles to Keddie, by 

good automobile road. Elevation 4000'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. 

Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. 

Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This property comprises four claims, having 80 acres area and a 
length along the lode of 6000'. 

It was worked in the earh' days and relocated in 1910 by the 
present owner. Assessment work only being done at present. 

Development consists of a 200' tunnel on the vein and 6000' of 
open cuts at intervals. 

The vein is a quartz and barite fissure vein in meta-andesites. The 
ore contains malachite, azurite, galena and silver, the copper minerals 
being in small amount. The foot and hanging walls are of altered 
andesite. The vein is 2' in width, with a pay streak from 4' to 8'. 
It strikes northeast and dips 75° W. 

Iron Dike Mine. (Montgomery and Copper Bull.) Owner, Sierra 
Range Copper Company, Sioux City, Iowa; Melvin Smith, secretary; 
A. L. Beardsley, president, Genesee. 

Location: Taylorsville Mining District, Sec. 2, T. 25 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile south 
of Taylorsville, thence 12 miles to Keddie, by good automobile road. Ele- 
vation 3800'-5600'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Taylorsville, Indian Valley, Honey Lake. 

This property embraces eight claims, including the Mountain View, 
Waverly, Long Point, Snowclad, and Sulphide No. 1 and No. 2. 
There is a total of 160 acres covering a length along the lode of 6000'. 

It was operated in 1860 through the Pettinger shaft. Purchased by 
the present company in 1905. Idle at present, assessment work only 
being done. 

The main tunnel, now in 300', is 200' below the surface in partially 
oxidized material, and will give 1200' of backs when it encounters the 
vein. Other tunnels on the property aggregate 2000'. There is a 
60' shaft on the Pettinger vein. 

The deposit consists of two veins, the Pettinger and the Iron Dike, 
in country rock of sandstone, slates and serpentine. The Pettinger 
vein is an imperfect quartz vein in slate. The ore is malachite and 
azurite, averaging 12% copper. It strikes N. 54° W. and dips 50° 
SW., with a length proven on the surface of 2500'. The Iron Dike 
vein is a vein of solid non-nickeliferous pyrrhotite in a sheared zone 
of sandstone near contact with serpentine, and Montgomery limestone 
of the Grizzly formation and Taylor conglomerate. The hanging (?) 
wall is limestone, the foot(?) wall sandstone and fine conglomerate. 
The vein varies from 10' to 50' in width, strikes N. 13° W., dips 50° 



136 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBGES. 

SW., and has a proven length on the surface of 2500'. The two veins 
intersect. Ore occurs on both veins at intervals, but not in well- 
defined shoots. 

Jamison Mine. Owner, Jamison ]\Iining Company, 237 First street, 
San Francisco; Frank B. Peterson, San Francisco, president; Sam 
Cheney, San Francisco, secretary; Geo. S. Redstreak, Johnsville, 
manager. 

Ix)cation: Johnsville Mining District, Sees. 25, 26, 35 and 36, T. 22 N., R. 11 E.. 

IJ miles south of Johnsville, 7 miles southwest of Blalrsden, by automobile 

road. Elevation 5370'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, VIII, page 480; X, page 485; XI, 

page 330 ; XII, page 217 ; XIII, page 298. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey 

Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises in all 580.9 acres, two patented placer 
claims, 235 acres, one placer location, 160 acres, and nine quartz 
claims, all patented, 185 acres. Steep slopes are characteristic of the 
surface, but the veins are near the creek level and can not be 
developed by tunnels. 

The property was discovered in 1888 and bought by the present 
owners in 1889. From 47 to 50 men are usually working. Shut 
down in September, 1913, for lack of water, but reopened in January, 
1914. No dividends have been paid for the past three years, all 
money taken out being put in exploratory work which has so far 
developed little ore, and unless other orebodies are developed the 
mine will probably be shut down for good within a couple of years. 
It averaged a monthly production of 1900 tons worth $5500 to $7000. 
Bullion production to November 1, 1913, was $1,358,925, concentrates 
34,511 tons at $5. Fifty men working in July, 1915, with good ore 
coming from new workings. 

Development consists of the Haskins drain tunnel, 1800' long, 
driven S. 20° E., which strikes the shaft at the 165' level, then a 
( rosscut driven southwest 1150' from the bottom of the shaft, where 
the new vein was encountered by a raise of 170' from the crosscut. 
A drift was driven south on this vein for 1400' and the vein was 
btoped 50' above this level, where it was cut off by a fault. The 
main crosscut was then driven west 200' at an angle from its former 
course, and another raise of 100' was put up to the vein and a drift 
driven south about 1500'. No. 2 level: The ground has been stoped 
between this and No. 3 level, above. The crosscut was continued 100' 
and another raise was put up to the vein 50' above the crosscut and a 
drift was run south on the vein for 1160'. Most of the ore was stoped 
between this level and No. 2 level above. The crosscut was continued 
beyond the raise for a distance of 120', where it intersected the vein 
on its dip. From No. 3 drift a crosscut was run west and at a 
distance of 190' intersected a vein dipping 70° W. and some 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 137 

specimen ore was taken out. The hanging wall of this vein is a line- 
grained porphyry dike. The crosscut was continued through this 
porphyry dike, driven 450' in gabbro, and from the end a 490' raise 
at 45° was put up. The shaft is 325' deep. 

The deposit consists of fissure veins in gabbro. There are two, the 
old vein and new vein. The former is quartz containing free milling 
oxidized ore, and 600' of pay shoot has been worked. It averages 
10' in width and has no outcrop, having been discovered in placering. 
It strikes N. 20° W., and dips 25° E. The new vein is quartz carry- 
ing free milling gold and auriferous pyrite which contains a small 
amount of gold ($13). This vein averages 10' in width and has no 
outcrop, having been encountered in crosscutting. It strikes N. 15° 
W. and dips 30° W. There are four pay shoots, worked for 800'. 

Mine equipment consists of a 14" x 16" duplex Giant compressor, 
double drum friction hoist, buildings, office, bunkhouses, cottages, 
barn, etc., with a full equipment of drills and tools. The mill is a 
Pulton mill, erected in 1896, containing ten 1000-pound stamps and 
ten 900-pound stamps using No. punched screen. 

Water is obtained from Jamison, Wade and Grass lakes, and is 
used at the hoist under a 400' head and at the mill under 480' head. 

Costs per ton were as follows in 1915: development, 83^; mining, 
$1.68; treatment, 30^; general, 24ff. Average daily output, 70 tons. 
Tailings run from 50ff to 80^. Power costs 4^. Labor from $2.50 
to $3.25, and timber, 8^ to 12iff. 

The Plumas Eureka mine adjoins. 

Jennie Mine. (Senator Perkins Mine.) Owner, Senator Geo. 
Perkins, Oakland. (Grouped with the Caldwell and New Century by 
J. H. Hall, Brush Creek.) 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 30 miles 
southwest of Quincy, by good automobile road ; also good automobile road 
to Oroville, 50 miles. Elevation 4600'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Rept. XIII, page 305. 

The property consists of one claim, the Jennie, which is patented. 
It is 200' X 1500', covering the lode for 1500'. Low ridges and creeks 
are characteristic of the surface. 

Development consists of a 250' tunnel on the vein, from which ore 
has been stoped to the surface. 

The deposit consists of a small quartz fissure vein in granite, con- 
taining free gold and from 1% to 2% of sulphide. It varies in width 
from 2' to 25', strikes northeast, dips 80° E., and is said to average $5. 

Equipment consists of a blacksmith shop, houses and an 8-stamp 
mill erected in 1870. 

Water from Frazier Creek through one-half mile of ditch and 300' 
of 10" pipe furnishes power for the mill. It can be run eight months 
out of the year. 



138 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

This property adjoins and lies northwest of the Whidden fraction, 
which adjoins and lies northwest of the Caldwell mine. All of these 
properties have been grouped and are under the management of 
J. A. Hall. 

Joshua Moss Mine. Owners, Joshua Moss and Horace Waldon, 
Brush Creek. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 25, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 10 miles 
northeast of Brush Creek, 31 miles southwest of Quincy, by grood auto- 
mobile road, via Buck's Ranch and Letter Box. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The property consists of the Black Prince and Narrow Gauge 
claims. The Black Prince is an old producer formerly known as the 
Mexican mine. A tunnel 500' in length developed a vein of quartz 
V in width- in which a number of small, rich shoots occurred. The 
vein strikes northeast and both walls are granite. 

Justice Group. (Clear Creek.) Owner, Mrs. Isabel Williams, 
Oroville. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 26 and 35, T. 27 N., R. 8 E., 
10 miles northwest of Greenville, thence 18 miles to Keddie, by grood auto- 
mobile road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak, 

This property comprises ten locations, the Justice No. 1 to No. 5, 
Clear Creek No. 1, No. 2, Langford, Lookout and Mattie, with patent 
applied for on three. There are 140 acres with a length along the 
lode of 7000'. 

Development work consists of a 1000' tunnel driven on the Lang- 
ford claim cutting the vein at a depth of 255', from which a small 
amount of ore has been stoped. 

The deposit forms a zone 200' wide which is said to be a system of 
X)arallel veins. The country rock is quartz and iron gossan, generally 
oxidized but with some chalcopyrite and pyrite. The foot-wall is said 
to be serpentine, the hanging wall meta-andesite. It strikes N. 30° 
W., dips 35° SE., and has a proven length, by open cuts, of 7000'. 
The ore is reported to have a maximum value of $8 gold and $6 silver. 

Mine equipment consists of a cabin, blacksmith shop and barn. 
Wood fuel and steam are used. 

Work was stopped in April, 1913. 

The Gold Strike mine, now being reopened, adjoins. 

Kennebeck Mine. Owner, P. II. Bailey. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 26 N., R. 9 B., 1 J miles 
south of Greenville, thence 15 miles, by good automobile road, to Keddie. 

Bibliography: Uiller. J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 
Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

There are three veins, cut by a 600' tunnel run in early days, and 
by another tunnel 300' lower, driven a distance of 500'. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 139 

Bong Sidomoii BSne. Owners, Mrs. H. A. Cabe, H. L. Cabe, L. F. 
Cabe, and D. R. Cabe, all of Quincy. 

Location: Quincy Minins^ District, Sec. 25, T. 25 N., R. 10 E., 12 miles north- 
east of Quincy, by grood automobile road, 8 miles northeast of Marston, by 
good automobile road. Elevation 6500'-7000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 299. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 37, Dowjiieville. 

The holding consists of two claims, the Grand Prize and King 
Solomon. Patents applied for two years ago are as yet not granted. 
There are 40 acres situated on the ridge dividing the headwaters of 
Taylor and Squirrel creeks, with a length along the lode of 3000'. 

The property was discovered in 1885 by Compton and Cabe. 

Development consists of a 55' shaft with a 50' drift to the south, 
crosscutting the lode, also an inclined shaft 45' deep, 100' southwest 
of the vertical shaft. An 1100' tunnel cuts the shaft 10' above 
bottom. 

There is a lode 50' wide of quartz and stringers, then a horse of 
country rock, then solid quartz, striking N. 71° E. and dipping 
32° E. The vein filling is clear quartz, free milling and carrying 
pyrite and chalcopyrite. Foot and hanging walls are supposed to be 
meta-andesite, or augite-porphyrite. There is a sma;ll reserve of $4 
ore. Water power can be developed three or four miles from the 
mine. 

Iiaiura Claim. Owners, Mrs. E. Blood, Berkeley ; W. Blood, Green- 
ville. 

Location: Johiisvllle Mining District, Sec. 7, T. 22 N., R. 13 E., 2 miles north 
of Clio by good wagon road to within a short distance of property. Ele- 
vation 4500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S» Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises one claim, the Laura, which is patented. 
It has an area of 20 acres and a length along the lode of 1500'. 

The property has- been held by the present owners for the last 
20 years, but no work has been done recently. 

The nearest mine is the Bullion, three miles to the south. 



I^^ete Mine. Owner, B. F. Leete, Reno. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 14, T. 26 N.. R. 9 E., 1 mile 
northwest of Crescent Mills, thence 8 miles, by good automobile road, to 
Keddie. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 299. Diller, J. S., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. Lindgren, W.. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian 
Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This holding consists of 160 acres of patented timber land. It is 
situated on the ridge lying between Crescent Mills and Greenville and 
contains 1500' of the lode. 

The property has been held by the present owner for a number of 
years and several tunnels have been run, but no work has been done 
lately. It is included in a consolidation of mines now under con- 
sideration. 



140 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The deposit consists of fissure veins near the contact of meta- 
rhyolite and granodiorite, the southern extension of the Indian 
Valley, Southern Eureka and McLelland veins. 

Adjoining mines are the Southern Eureka and Indian Valley to the 
north and the Green Mountain and Crescent mines to the south. 

Lincoln Mine. Owners, W. W. and F. V. Gallagher, Johnsville. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District. Sec. 32, T. 23 N.. and Sec. 5, T. 22 N.. 

R. HE., 4 miles northwest of Johnsville; Cromberg or Sloat (W. P. Ry.) 

is 6 miles northeast by trail. Elevation 5200'. 
Bibliogrraphy ; Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 

U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of two claims, the Lincoln and Little Lin- 
coln, containing 40 acres and a length along the lode of 3000'. 

It was discovered by W. O. Wall in 1910 and purchased in 1911 
by Gallagher Brothers. 

There is a crosscut tunnel driven 300' to the vein, which it cuts at 
a depth of 100', and a 50' drift. 

The deposit consists of a quartz fissure vein near the contact of 
slate and augite porphyrite. It has an average width of 8', strikes 
north, and dips 45° W. The ore is oxidized, free milling, and said to 
run $30 per ton. 

There is a blacksmith shop and cabin on the property, and a 5- 
stamp mill may be erected in the spring. 

Adjoining mines are the West Elizabeth placer and the Plumas 
Mohawk quartz mines, both idle. 

Little California Mine. Owners, Lawrence Kittrick, Oroville ; J. H. 
Kittrick, Lumpkin ; A. Moore, OroviUe. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 6, T. 22 N., R. 8 E., 15 miles, in 
direct line, southwest of Quincy. Quincy is 18 miles by good road from 
Buck's Ranch, thence 8 miles by trail to mine. Elevation 3000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of one claim, 20 acres in area and covering 
a length of 1500' along the lode. Steep canons are characteristic of 
the surface. 

There is a small lenticular quartz vein, 2' wide, with granite foot- 
wall and greenstone hanging wall, developed by a 400' tunnel. It 
is low grade. 

A 5-stamp mill stands on the property. 

Little Qem Claim. 

Location : Genesee Valley Mining District, a few miles southeast of Genesee, 
thence 18 miles west, by good automobile road, to Keddie (W. P. Ry.). 

Bibliography: DlUer, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. Cal. State Min. Bur. Bull. 50, page 
184. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

The vein is from 6'' to 18" in width, and carries reported values of 
$17.96 gold, 31 ounces silver and 12.66% copper. It has been opened 
by a shaft. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 141 

Little Nell Mine. Owners, Sutherlan Murray, 412 Crocker Build- 
ing, San Francisco ; Tyndale Phipps, Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 35, T. 23 N., R. 8 E., 18 miles 

southwest of Quincy, by horse trail, poor in places. Elevation 3000'. 
Blbliogrraphy : U. S. Gteol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property comprises nine claims, namely. Little Nell, Little Nell 
No. 1 and No. 2, Bluebird, Budweiser, Budweiser No. 1 and No. 2, 
Union, and Union No. 1. There are 180 acres covering a length 
along the lode of 2000'. It is situated on a steep canon of the Feather 
River, rising 2500' in two miles. 

Two of the claims were located in 1900 by Hughlett, but the work 
up to the time the present owners took the property consisted only 
of open cuts. Two men were working in 1915. 

A crosscut adit is being run to cut the Little Nell vein 80' below 
the surface. No ore has been stoped but a number of rich pockets 
have been worked by open cuts. 

The two veins, the Bluebird and Little Nell, are of quartz associated 
with siliceous porphyry dikes, which have been altered by hydro- 
thermal agencies. They are solid quartz fissure veins, following 
dikes. The Bluebird vein contains free gold, varies from 6' to 8' in 
Avidth, strikes east, dips 30° N., and has a proven length on the sur- 
face of 400'. The foot-wall is slate, the hanging wall diorite. The 
Little Nell vein contains free gold and a small amount of galena and 
pyrite. It lies 450' west of the Bluebird and has a foot-wall of horn- 
blende schist and a hanging wall of amphibolite schist. It varies in 
width from 3' to 4', strikes S. 20° E., dips 61° E., and has a proven 
length of 200' on the surface. The Bluebird ore averages $6 to $8 
per ton, the Little Nell $6. 

There is a blacksmith shop and a cabin on the property. 

The Butte Bar mine adjoins, having a vein parallel to and 300' 
west of the Bluebird vein. It is idle at present. 

Lucky S. Group. Formerly owned by Mrs. S. Wagener, Livermore. 

Location: Lights Canon Mining District, Sec. 28, T. 27 N., R. 11 E., 10 miles 
northeast of Genesee or Taylorsville, 12 miles from Taylorsville to Keddie 
by good automobile road. Elevation 6478'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 467; XIII, page 300. 
Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. Lindgren, W., 
U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 
sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This property has been abandoned, it is claimed, as no assessment 
work has been done for a number of years. 

Lucky Strike Mine. (Darby Mine.) Owners, A. E. Darby, Buck's 
Ranch; C. Crane, Oroville. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sees. 4 and 5, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 2 miles 
west of Buck's Ranch, Quincy 17 miles east by good automobile road. 
Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43. Bidwell Bar. 

10—46902 



142 MINES AND MINERAL RESOUBOES. 

This property consists of one claim^ namely, the Lucky Strike, 20 
acres in area, and covering the vein for 1500'. Steep ravines are a 
feature of the surface. 

There is a tunnel 312' long which it is estimated will cut the vein 
40' farther at a depth of 75' below the outcrop. Surface cuts on the 
vein give a proven length of 1500'. 

The deposit is a quartz vein containing very little free gold but 
from 3% to 4% of sulphides and some chalcopyrite. It is in granite 
and said to be 4' wide and to strike N. 10° E., and dip 37° E. 

Assessment work only is being done. 

Magee Claim. (Hughes Mine.) Owner, J. Magee, Oroville. 

Location: Edmanton. Mining District, Sec. 27, T. 24 N., R. 7 E. ; Quincy. 20 
miles northeast by good automobile road to Bucks and trail 2 miles to 
mine. Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: Llndgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property is composed of one claim, 20 acres in area and cover- 
ing a length along the lode of 1500'. 

A tunnel 200' in length has been driven on the vein. 

It is a quartz vein in granite, varying in width from 1' to 2', 
striking northeast and dipping 80° E. Both walls are granite. The 
ore is said to run from $8 to $14 per ton. 

Malloy's mine is the nearest property. 

Magpie Group. Owner, A. L. Beardsley, Genesee. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sec. 24, T. 26 N., R 11 E., 5 miles 

northeast of Genesee by trail, thence 15 miles by good automobile road to 

Keddie. Elevation 5500'-6500'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey 

Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

The property comprises two claims, the Magpie No. 1 and No. 2, 
40 acres in area and covering 3000' along the lode. 

It was discovered in 1883 and has been held by the present owner 
since 1910. Assessment work only is being done. 

The only development is a 45' shaft on the vein. 

The latter is a fissure vein in meta-andesite, containing hematite 
with gold $2.50, silver 4 ounces and copper 4%. The meta-andesite 
walls are well defined. The width of the vein is 6', it strikes north- 
west, dips 45° NE., and has a proven length on the surface of 2500'. 

The Reward, idle for a number of years, is an adjoining mine. 

Main Spring Claim. Owner, T. B. Lofton, Buck^s Ranch. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 26, T. 24 N., R. 7 E., 2 miles north 
of Buck's Ranch, thence 18 miles to Quincy, by good automobile road. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., V. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of one location, called the Main Spring, with 
an area of 20 acres. It covers a length along the lode of 1500'. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 143 

The deposit is a quartz fissure vein in granite, 4' wide, free milling, 
and said to average $6 per ton in gold. The strike of the vein is 
northeast and the dip is 70° E. 

It has been developed by a 30' shaft and a 100' tunnel, 40' of 
which has been driven on the vein. The tunnel cuts the vein 40' 
below the outcrop. 

Assessment work only was being done in 1915. 

Malloy Mine. Owner, P. Malloy, Buck's Ranch. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sees. 28 and 33, T. 24 N., R. 7 E. ; 

Qulncy 20 miles northeast by good automobile road to Buck's and trail to 

mine. Elevation 5000'. 
Bibliograpliy : Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 

U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of one claim (possibly other locations) of 
20 acres, covering 1500' along the lode. Steep caiions to the west 
and low ridges to the northeast characterize the surface. 

Very little work has been done in the last few years. 

There is a fissure vein of white quartz, free milling and carrying 
from 2% to 3% sulphides. Value unknown. It strikes northeast 
in granite, and dips 75° E. . 

A small 4-stamp mill with boiler and engine is on the property, 
but the mill buildings are in poor shape. 

Magee's mine is the nearest mine in the vicinity. 

Megown Mine. Owner, II. B. Hardy, Meadow Valley. 

Location: Spanish Rancii Mining District, Sees. 31 and 32, T. 25 N., and Sees. 5 
and 6, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 5 miles northwest of Meadow Valley, 7 miles by 
fair wagon road to Spanish Ranch, thence 7 miles by good automobile road 
to Quincy. Elevation 5100'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 484; XI, page 324; XIII, 
page 301. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of one claim, called the Megown. It is 20 
acres in area and contains 1500' of the lode. Ridges are separated 
by comparatively wide ravines at the head of the creek. 

The property was discovered in 1876, and the surface to a depth of 
75' to 100' has been worked by hydraulicking. It was relocated by 
Hardy. Two men were working in 1912, but only assessment work 
was done in 1913. 

Development consists of a main adit 300' long, cutting the vein 
40' below the bottom of an open cut and 40' driven on the vein. In 
the tunnel a high grade stringer was encountered and some rich 
pockets were taken out. 

There is a quartz vein and stringers in Calaveras slates which lie 
between schists on the west and serpentine on the east. The quartz 
carries free gold and sulphides with heavy gouge. The walls are 
slate. The main vein varies in width from 3' to 4'. It strikes north- 
west and dips 45° S., with a proven length of 150'. The ore ranges 
from $250 to $500 per ton. 



144 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The Mountain House drift mine owned hy the Plumas Investment 
Company adjoins. 

Moreno Randolph Claim. Owner, Barbee. 

Morning Star Iffine. (Robinson Mine.) Owner, E. C. Robinson, 
First National Bank Building, Oakland, California. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sees. 30 and 31, T. 23 N., R. 7 E. : 
Quincy is 30 miles northeast via Letter Box, Buck's Ranch and Meadow 
Valley ; good automobile road to property. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 304. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property comprises two patented claims, the Morning Star and 
Trenton. There is a total area of 40 acres with a length along the 
lode of 3000'. Frazier Creek divides the property, cutting across the 
strike of the vein. There is an easy slope from the creek to the top 
of the ridges. 

The claims were located in 1876 by O'Brien and Sullivan. In 1890 
the property was purchased by Robinson, bonded in 1905 by Trow- 
bridge and in 1912 by Holbrooke and Cohn, San Francisco, who, it 
was reported, spent $10,000 and only succeeded in sinking the shaft 
10' before work was abandoned. Chas. Lyser was superintendent. 
It has been idle since the summer of 1912. 

Development work consists of a shaft 100' deep near the portal of 
the lower tunnel on the east side of Frazier Creek and a drift on the 
vein 150' to the northeast from the bottom of the shaft. There are 
also three tunnels on the vein — the upper tunnel, 75'; middle tunnel, 
300'; and lower tunnel, 300', northeast of the creek and 300' south- 
west of the creek. All groimd is stoped from the lower tunnel to the 
surface, and a small amount from the 100' level in the shaft. 

The deposit consists of a fissure vein near the contact between 
granite and diorite. The vein filling is quartz and in some cases 
decomposed granite and glass quartz crystals. The vein varies from 
2' to 4' in width, strikes N 41° E., and dips 80° E. The foot-wall is 
granite, the hanging wall diorite, and there is a proven length on the 
surface of 2000'. Several pay shoots 40' to 50' in length developed in 
the 600' opening. The ore is said to average $10 per ton, 2% sul- 
phides being worth $60 to $75 per ton. 

Water is obtained from Frazier Creek by a 1650' ditch under 94' 
head. Steam is also used. 

Equipment consists of steam and water power hoist capable of 
sinking to a depth of 500' and a 35 year old 20-stamp mill. 

Adjoining mines are the Frazier and Black Bart. 

Mother Lode Group. Owner, M. J. Calnan, Genesee.- 

Location: Gonesoe Valley Mining District, Sera. 14 and 15, T. 25 N., R 11 E-. 

3 miles southeast of Genesee, thence 18 miles, by good wagron road, to 

Keddie. Elevation 4000'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 2 60, pages 45-49. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. 

sheet Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 145 

This property embraces seven and a fraction claims, namely, the 
Baltimore, Little Joe, Mother Lode, Evening^ Star, Fine Friend, Key- 
stone, Gold Fish, and Home Rule. There are 150 acres covering a 
length along the lode of 4500'. It is situated in the caiion and on the 
ridges on both sides of Ward Creek. 

The property was discovered in 1902 by the present owner, who 
has been working it alone. 

A copper-bearing zone has been developed by numerous shallow 
shafts and superficial open cuts. There are two shafts on the Little 
Joe claim, 80' and 24' deep, and a shaft on the Gold Fish 30' deep. 
A tunnel has been started on a narrow stringer called the Keystone 
vein which is said to be an extension of the Gold Fish vein. On the 
Mother Lode claim a tunnel has been driven 110' through the 
andesite porphyry, 250' south of the Little Joe shaft. This will have 
to be driven 50' further. 

The deposit is composed of stringers and bunches of quartz and 
altered schist, the quartz carrjdng sulphides of copper and free gold 
in the oxidized portion of the different zones. The foot-wall and 
hanging walls are schist and andesite. There are a number of 
parallel shear zones, all of which show more or less indications of 
copper. The general strike is N. 30° to 40° W. All dip about 45° 
E. except the Gold Fish, which dips 45° W., nearly the dip of the 
slates which lie to the west of the Gold Fish claim. A lot of 13 tons 
of ore is said to have been shipped to Selby's which averaged $86 per 
ton (gold $6.36, silver 43 ounces, and the rest copper). This ore 
was taken from the Little Joe shaft and was hand sorted, ratio 
unknown. A lot of 300 tons on the dump is said to average $30 
per ton. 

Water power could be developed if necessary. 
Adjoining mines are the Five Bears and the Gruss. 

Mother Lode Mining and Reduction Company. (Cyanide Plant.) 
Owner, Mother Lode Mining and Reduction Company, 251 Russ 
Building, San Francisco; Geo. Newman, 251 Russ Building, San 
Francisco, president ; A. Altshuler, 251 Russ Building, San Francisco, 
secretary; C. A. Boydston, 2534 Grant street, Berkeley, staff. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 19, T. 26 N., R. 10 E., 11 miles 
north of Keddie by good automobile road; i mile east of Crescent Mills. 
Elevation 3400'. 

This cyanide plant of 200 tons capacity, was erected to treat the 
tailings from the Crescent and Green Mountain mines. Sampling 
showed that the tailings would average $1.50 per ton and that there 
were approximately 1,000,000 tons covering the flat. 

The method of working is as follows: the top sod is removed and 
the tailings underneath hauled to the plant by horse scrapers, 



146 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

elevated to a mill, slimed and agitated by air in small cone-bottom 
tanks. The slimes were dewatered by an Oliver filter and the gold 
recovered by zinc precipitation. 

The plant consisted of two galvanized iron buildings, one con- 
taining a 100-horsepower boiler and engine, and 50-h.p. com- 
l)ressor, the other the assay office, precipitation plant, storehouse, 
Dorr classifier, Oliver filter, tube mill (now removed) and agitation 
tanks. Wood was used for fuel. 

The plant has been idle since 1913, but experiments are now being 
carried on to find some economical method of treatment. Boydston 
expected that the plant \\^ould be altered and ready to run by 
January, 1914. 

The company operating this plant also owns the Plumas Amal- 
gamated mines. 

Mountain Lily Mine. (Mountain View.) Owners, N. Kertchen- 
dorf , Robert Martin, Indian Falls. 

Location : Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 32 and 33, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 
2 miles northwest of Indian Falls, thence 5 miles, by good automobile 
road, to Keddie ; wagon road from mine to Keddie by way of Crescent 
Mills, 17 miles. Elevation 4000'. 

This property consists of two claims, the Mountain Lily and 
Heatherbell There are 40 acres with a length along the lode of 
3000'. It is situated on top of the ridge northwest of Indian Falls. 

The mine was discovered by the present owners in 1895. The 
Wheeler Lumber Company tried to patent the ground but the patent 
was protested by Kutchendorf . The two owners worked the property 
in 1913. 

It is developed by a main tunnel driven at an angle from the foot- 
wall to the dike, across the dike to the hanging wall vein and a 
drift run 300' east on the vein. A winze is put down from the point 
where the tunnel cuts the ledge 45' on the vein, also a winze 275' 
from the crosscut is sunk 20' on the vein. Another tunnel started on 
the east end of the claim in the dike, if run 400' more will cut the 
vein 100' below the upper workings. 

The deposit is a dike of ' porphyry ' 70' in width with quartz veins 
on each wall. The dike is decomposed and full of small quartz 
stringers. The country is badly faulted. There are two veins, the 
hanging wall and the foot- wall vein. The former is characterized by 
quartz, with gouge on both walls, containing free gold and pyrite, 
partially oxidized. The foot-wall is the porphyry dike and the 
hanging wall slate. The vein varies from 4' to 11', strikes S. 87^ W., 
dips 60° to 70° S., and has a proven length on the surface of 1500'. 
The ore assays $2 to $7 per ton. The foot-wall vein is made up of 
quartz and clay carrying free gold and no sulphides. Its foot-wall is 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 147 

slate and the hanging wall is the porphyry dike. It dips and strikes 
the same as the hanging wall vein. 

Steam, or electric power from Indian Creek is used. 

Adjoining properties are the Plumas National, Plumas Amalga- 
mated and Indian Palls Development Company. 

Mountain Lion Mine. Owner, Sierra Range Copper Company, 
Sioux City, Iowa ; A. L. Beardsley, Genesee, president ; Melvin Smith, 
Sioux City, secretary. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sees. 15 and 22, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 

2 miles south of Genesee, thence 18 miles by good automobile road to 

Keddie. Elevation 5500'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-90. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Gteol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. Geol. Survey 

Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, HoneV Lake. 

The Mountain Lion Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 claims comprise this property. 
There is a total of 80 acres with a length along the lode of 6000'. It 
is situated on the steep slope from Ward Creek to Peele Ridge (4000' 
to 6000'). 

The property was discovered in 1902 and acquired by the present 
owners in 1905. It is idle at present, assessment work only being 
done. 

It has been opened on the surface by numerous trenches. A cross- 
cut tunnel 750' in length will have to be driven 50' farther to cut 
the vein. 

There is one vein, the Mountain Lion, from which white quartz 
came from some of the surface cuts carrying bornite, 'gray copper' 
(tetrahedrite), free gold $400, silver as high as 20 ounces and 6% 
copper. Both walls are meta-andesite. The vein varies from 5' to 6' 
in width, strikes N. 20° W., dips 75° SW., and has a proven length on 
the surface of 1100'. 

Adjoining mines are the Gruss and Five Bears. 

Mudhen and Minnie S. Group. Owner, Joseph Peppin, Brush 
Creek. 

Location : Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 7 miles nortli- 
east of Brush Creek ; Quincy is 30 miles northeast, by good automobile 
road, from Quincy to Buck's Ranch and Letter Box. Elevation 4700'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property is composed of four locations, namely, the Plumas, 
Oliver Quick, Mudhen and Minnie S. The Mudhen is a north exten- 
sion of the Minnie S., which is a north extension of the Morning Star. 
There are 80 acres covering a length along the outcrop of 3000'. 

The property was located in the early days by J. Peppin. Assess- 
ment work only was being done in 1914. 

The Minnie S. vein has been developed by shallow shafts and open 
cuts. A crosscut tunnel has been driven 700' through granite in 
doing the assessment work for the past 12 years and it is believed 
that the vein will be cut 160' below the outcrop, within a few feet. 



148 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBGES. 

Shallow shafts and open cuts comprise all that has been done on the 
vein covered by the Plumas claim. 

The Minnie S. vein strikes N. 37° E. and dips 80° E. Ore from this 
vein resembles the Morning Star ore and contains free gold, galena 
and ehalcopyrite in small amounts. The ore from the surface is 
reported to have run a? high as $90 per ton. The foot-wall is granite, 
the hanging wall diorite, and the vein is said to be 3' wide. 

Native Son Mine. Owner, Genesee Valley Copper Company, Sioux 
City, Iowa; A. L. Beardsley, Genesee, president; Melvin Smith, 
secretary. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District, Sees. 13 and 14, T. 25 N., R 11 E., 
3 miles east of Genesee by wagon road and trail, thence 18 miles by auto- 
mobile road, to Keddie. Elevation 6000'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, 
J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. TJ. S. Geol. Survey 
Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This property contains five claims, known as the Native Son No. 1 
to No. 5. It is situated on a high ridge south of Genesee Valley, and 
east of Ward Creek. 

The holdings were discovered in 1907 and purchased by the present 
owners in 1910. 

The mine has been developed by a 200' tunnel, a 45' shaft and open 
cuts, but assessment work only is now being done. 

There is one vein, a quartz stringer vein carrying ehalcopyrite, in 
a siliceous zone near the contact of slates and altered andesite. The 
foot-wall is slate and the hanging wall slate and andesite. The 
siliceous zone is said to be 100' in width. It strikes N. 30° W., dips 
70° SW., and has a length proven at intervals on the surface of 
4000'. It is said to be a continuation northward of the Walker 
Brothers deposit, but this is doubtful. 

The Gruss mine adjoins. 

New Century and Whidden Group. Owners, J. A. Hall, Brush 
Creek ; M. A. Whelden, Elks Club, Oakland. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District. Sec. 25, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 9 miles 
northeast of Brush Creek; Quincy is 30 miles northeast by automobile road 
from Quincy via Buck's Ranch and Letter Box; also automobile road from 
Oroville, 50 miles. Elevation 4500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property comprises 23 acres with a length along the New 
Century vein of 1500' and along the Whidden of 1200'. Not patented. 
The New Century location lies southwest of the Caldwell claim, and 
the Whidden Fraction location, 1200' x 100', lies northwest of the 
Caldwell, between it and the Jennie mine. Low ridges are charac- 
teristic of the surface. 

J. A. Hall is doing assessment work on the claims. 

The Whidden vein is developed by a 40' tunnel. The New Century 
has three adits, the upper adit 160' long, 25' below the outcrop, the 



FLUMAS COUNTY. 149 

middle adit 190' long, 60' below the upper tunnel, and the lower adit 
280' long, 90' below the middle tunnel. There is a raise from the 
middle to the upper tunnel, in which is said to be 60' of ore averaging 
$12 per ton, the limits being $8 to $40. Ore from the Whidden vein is 
said to mill $14. Concentrate to the amount of 2% assays $100 
per ton. 

The deposit consists of two small quartz fissure veins in granite. 
The New Century vein is free milling and contains 2% sulphides. It 
averages 18" in width, strikes N. 35° E., dips 70° B., and has a proven 
length on the surface of 5000'. The Whidden vein contains 2% 
sulphides and is free milling. It averages 16" in width, strikes north- 
east, dips 70° B., and has a proven length on the surface of 200'. 

The Caldwell and Morning Star mines adjoin. 

New York Iffine. Owners, J. D. Whitney, Greenville; Estate of 
L. M. Mcintosh, care R. C. Harrison, 640 Mills Building, San 
Francisco. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 10 and 15, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 

2 miles south of Greenville, thence 16 miles, by good automobile road, to 

Keddie. Elevation 3600'-5000'. 
Bibliography: Dlller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 

Lindgrren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. TJ. S. Geol. 

Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property embraces the following claims: New York placer, 
40 acres (patented), Buena Vista, Prospect, Plowboy (patented), 
New York (patented), Brooklyn, Luson placer, and 80 acres of 
timber. There is a total of 230 acres covering a length along the 
lode of 6000'. It is situated on the steep slopes from the canon to 
the top of the ridge, giving good tunnel sites. 

This mine was operated from 1872 to 1883 by Troleaven and May. 
It was reopened in 1898-1902 by J. D. "Whitney, but assessment work 
only, has been done in the last few years. The mine is said to have 
produced to date about $400,000. During the Whitney regime 12,000 
tons of an assay value of $70,000 yielded $43,000 bullion. 

The property is developed by three tunnels. No. 2 tunnel, 1800' 
in length, is 90' below the outcrop. It is driven as a crosscut for 
297' and then on the vein for 1350'. No. 3 tunnel, 190' below No. 2, 
has been driven 450' as a crosscut and will have to be driven 300' 
farther, to cut the first pay shoot. From 1872 to 1883, 600' along the 
vein from No. 2 tunnel to the surface was stoped. Under the 
Whitney management it was extended 700'. Stopes in that distance 
yielded 12,000 tons for a distance of 100' above No. 2 level, the 
average length of the shoots being 90' and width 12'. From No. 2 to 
the surface it is estimated that the ore resources are 75,000 tons, net 
value $261,000 (ore value per ton $7, working costs and metallurgical 
losses $3.50, net value per ton $3.50). It is also estimated that if 



150 MIN|:S AND MINERAL RB80UBCES. 

No. 2 tunnel is continued ahead for 800' and the lower tunnel is 
driven 1500' on the vein with the same results as in No. 2 tunnel, 
400,000 tons of additional ore will be blocked out. 

The deposit consists of the main New York vein, and two smaller 
veins, which have not been prospected. It is a quartz-filled fissure, 
the orebodies occurring as lenses in quartz and porphyry vein filling. 
Some of the ore is a recemeiited fault breccia. The ore is free milling, 
(•xidized near the surface, pyritic below. Both walls are quartz 
porphyry. The deposits are lenticular shoots 150' to 250' in length, 
40' to 50' apart and 8' to 18' in width. The strike is N. 21° W., dip 
63° SW., and it has a proven length on the surface of 6000'. Seven 
pay shoots averaged 90' in length and 12' in width. Minor faults 
are common. 

Equipment consists of blacksmith shop and tools, small hoist, 
sinking pumps, Giant air compressor (320 cubic feet free air per 
minute), belt driven from Pelton waterwheel, air drill, cars, houses, 
stable, messhouse, assay office, and an old 15-stamp mill built in 1871. 

Water from Round Valley Reservoir under a head of 320', but with 
an 800' head possible, is available. The ditch carries 600" and water 
costs 10^ per inch. 

Costs for mining $1.30 per ton, treatment $1.83 per ton (old mill). 
Loss in treatment per ton 52%, extraction 48%. Tailings $3.20 to $4. 
Total operating cost per ton $3. Concentrates 3% run $50. Labor 
cost $3.50 per day. Transportation charges San Francisco to mine 
1^ per pound. Good ore was encountered in the upper workings in 
November, 1915, and driving on No. 3 tunnel was to be immediately 
resumed. The operators planned to build a 10-stamp mill in the 
spring. 

Oro Pino Mine. Owners, H. W. Hewitt and Brothers, Eclipse. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 10, T. 22 N., R. 10 E. ; 4 miles 
southeast of Eclipse by wagon road, Quincy 30 miles northwest by good 
automobile road and fair wagon road. Elevation 5525'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downleville. 

There are eight locations, covering discoveries by Hewitt Brown 
in 1907 and 1910 in this property, a total of 160 acres with a length 
along the lode of 7500'. It is situated in deep V-shaped canons, one 
mile east of Pilot Peak, a lava-capped elevation 7500' high. 

An adit, 500' long, cuts the vein 100' below its outcrop, and there 
are two 10' crosscuts to the west wall 450' and 500' from the mouth 
of adit, also one crosscut to the east in slate for 50' and a raise of 
100' to the surface. One stope 50^ north of the raise ext^ids 60' 
above the tunnel level. This length may be the limit of the pay 
shoot ; the owners, however, claim that there are no well-defined zones 
of enrichment. All drilling is done by hand, and very little blasting 
is necessary as the material can, in most cases, be worked by pick 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 151 

and shovel. Ore is loaded in the tunnel from chutes, trammed to the 
adit mouth and lowered by ears to the mill 200' below. Tailings are 
disposed of in Hopkins Creek. 

The orebody consists of stringers of quartz in a decomposed dike, 
which is so altered in the present surface workings that it is impos- 
sible to determine its original character. There are two parallel 
veins 300' apart, of the same character, replacement and impregnation 
of dike by quartz, only one of which is developed. The ore is for the 
most part oxidized but some small bunches of partially oxidized 
{irsenopyrite have been found. The walls are Calaveras slates, and 
the decomposed dike material ranges from 10' to 15' in width. It 
strikes N. 13° W. Near the surface the vein dips 80° W. ; where cut 
by the tunnel 100' down it is nearly vertical, and it will probably dip 
east at depth. There is a proven length of 3000' on the surface. The 
ore is said to average $10 with assays as high as $100 probably from 
quartz stringers. As all of the workings are in the oxidized zone, 
it is impossible at present to tell the size and value of the orebody in 
the unaltered zone, but at depth the quartz veins will carry a large 
percentage of arsenopyrite. It is doubtful whether the unaltered 
dike rock will carry values throughout its entire width. The arseno- 
pyrite concentrates vary from $15 to $25 per ton in value. 

Water is used for power. Equipment consists of a blacksmith 
shop, good house and barn, and a 5-stamp mill (1059 pound stamps) 
with two Johnson concentrators. Transportation charges are 1^ per 
pound from Quincy. 

The Rose quartz is the nearest mine. 

Oversight Mine. Owners, August Binner, J. E. Wilson, Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. '24, T. 23 N., R. 9 E. ; 8 miles 
south of Quincy, good automobile road to within 3 miles of the property, 
then poor wagon road to point above mine, then 1 mile by trail ; total 
distance from Quincy, via Nelson Point, 20 miles. Elevation 4000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

There are two claims composing this property, the Oversight and 
the Oversight Extension, 40 acres in area and covering the lode for 
3000'. Steep V-shaped canons are distinctive features of the surface. 
The claims were located by the present owners in 1911. One man 
was working in 1914. 

The mine is opened by two tunnels, No. 1, 70' long, driven on the 
Big vein, and No. 2, 130' long, driven on the Stringer vein. Two 
winzes, 15' and 10' and two raises 10' and 25' from No. 2 tunnel, fol- 
low rich bunches of partially oxidized ore. 

The Big vein is a quartz vein in decomposed serpentine. The foot- 
wall is altered serpentine, the hanging wall schist. The ore is quartz 
with mariposite, and bright green chromiferous mica, probably 



152 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBOES. 

resulting from alteration of serpentine. It averages 6' in width, 
strikes north and dips 65° W. The gold is evenly distributed and 
the vein has a proven length on the surface of 200'. It is said to 
average $4.99 to $6 per ton. The Stringer vein is a 6" quartz 
stringer at right angles to the cleavage of the slates, containing 
arsenopyrite. Both walls are schist and slate. It strikes N. 3° W., 
dips 40° W., and contains rich pockets of oxidized ore. There is a 
fair prospect of developing good ore in the Big vein. The Stringer 
vein does not amount to a great deal but may enrich the Big vein at 
the point of intersection, approximately 100' below the present adit 
level. On the surface the Stringer vein lies about 200' east of the Big 
vein. 

Adjoining mines are the Crescent Hill Gold Mining Company, one 
mile north across Feather River Canon, and Plumas Bonanza, one 
mile east across the ridge in Winters Creek basin. 

Recent crushing (in 1916) showed an average of $15 per ton with 
some ore of higher grade. 

Peter Mine. Owner, W. F. Peter, Taylorsville. 

Location : Genesee Valley Mininp: District, Sec. 7, T. 26 N., R. 11 E., 17 miks 

northeast, by good automobile road, from Keddie (W. P. Ry. ). Elevation 

3600'. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey BuH. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, 

J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. Cal. State Min. Bur. 

Bull. 50, page 184. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, 

Genesee, Honey Lake. 

This mine is situated on the eastern border of the north arm ot 
Indian Valley at the foot of Indian Range. 

It has been worked intermittently as a gold mine ever since 1867, 
but the old mine openings have long since caved. Development 
during later years consists of two tunnels crosscutting the ledge, with 
various drifts, upraises and winzes totaling 1700' in length. 

The ledge runs from 5' to 15' in width, and has a well-defined 
hanging wall formed by a fault plane. It strikes N. 33° W., with a 
dip of 50° SW. The formation is chiefly felsite, and felsitic 
porphyry, occasionally becoming schistose; overlain to the east by a 
red metamorphic schist, probably of igneous origin. The ledge is 
evidently an impregnation deposit, with the strongest mineralization 
next to the hanging wall. Above the water level its original sul- 
phides of iron and copper are largely oxidized and the copper leached 
out, while the manganese silicate which abounds has originated 
various oxides, chiefly pyrolusite. Gold forms the principal value 
above the water level, with from 2% to 3% of copper, as bornite, 
copper glance and some carbonates of copper. The gold alone has 
so far been the object of development. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 153 

Pilot Peak Mine. (Pilot Hill.) Owners, Pilot Peak Mining Com- 
pany, P. F. Turner and McCall, Eclipse via Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 9, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile south- 
east of Eclipse, 25 miles southeast of Quincy; good automobile road Quincy 
to Eclipse, wagon road to mine. Elevation 6500'-7000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State MIn. Bur. Reports, XII, page 218; XIII, page 303. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property contains six claims, a total of 120 acres covering a 
length along the lode of 3000'. Lava-capped peaks and deep 
V-shaped canons mark the surface. 

It has been owned by Turner since 1900. Three men were working 
in 1914. 

A crosscut tunnel 500' in length was being driven which will 
intersect a vein and give 100' of backs. 

There are two veins on the property, one of which is developed. 
Slate, capped by lava, forms the country rock. The developed vein 
is a quartz-filled fissure with a large percentage of arsenopyrite and 
some free gold. It lies between a foot-wall of black slate, and a 
hanging wall of schist or slate. The vein varies from 4' to 6' in 
width, strikes northwest and dips east. Ore from this vein is said 
to average $15 for the whole width. It is mined by hand drilling. 

The Rose quartz mine adjoins. 

Pioneer Mining Company. Owners, J. N. Henry, Belden; H. G. 
, Fair Oaks. 

I^ocation: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 26 N., R. 7 E., 8 miles 

northeast of Belden (W. P. Ry.). 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Dabney property adjoins. 

Plumas Amalgamated Mines Company. (Monitor.) Owner, 
Plumas Amalgamated ]\Iining Company ; S. Altshuler, president ; 
251 Russ Building, San Francisco; C. E. Boydston, superintendent, 
2534 Grant street, Berkeley. 

Location.: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 29 and 30, T. 26 N., R. 9 E.. 

7 miles southwest of Crescent Mills, by fair wagon road, thence 11 miles to 

Keddie by good automobile road. Elevation 5200'. 
Bibliography: Dillor, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. Lind- 

gren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. 

Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This company holds nineteen claims, maps and names of which are 
not available. There are 380 acres in all, situated on the top of a 
flat ridge with a rapid fall to Soda Creek. 

The property was discovered in 1880 and was purchased in 1910 by 
the present owners. About 20 acres of the 'blanket' vein was stoped 
by former owners. Six men were working in 1917. 

All of the development work has been done under the blanket vein 
by a tunnel 275' below the top of the hill. This tunnel appears to be 
lower than any portion of the blanket vein and all of the ore has been 
developed by raises from different branch drifts. The main tunnel 



154 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

was driven a distance of 500' S. 10° W., at which point a drift was 
run 400' to the west. It was then continued 100' S. 10° W., and a 
drift was run 100' in an easterly direction. It turned and was 
driven nearly west for a distance of 200' and then in a southwesterly 
direction for 700', making? a total length of tunnel of about 1500'. 
From points 200' and 500' beyond the turn, drifts were run west for 
100' and 115', respectively. The work so far accomplished by the 
present owners has been in the nature of exploratory work only and 
no estimate of the ore reserves can be made. 

The deposit is characterized by quartz veins and stringers near the 
contact of slates and meta-andesite. The Monitor blanket vein lies 
nearly flat on the top of the hill and covers an area of about 60 acres. 
All of the ore is oxidized and free milling. The foot-wall is quartzite 
?nd greenstone, the hanging wall clay slates. It lies as a sort of 
synclinal fold, and dips both north and south with a maximum of 
20^^. The width of the stringers and slate varies 8' to 20' with the 
pay ore occurring in bunches. The Black Prince vein is a free milling 
quartz vein in greenstone. The foot-wall is greenstone (altered 
andesite), the hanging wall quartzite and greenstone. The vein is 
solid quartz 8' wide, striking N. 10° \V., and dipping 15° SW., with 
a proven length on the surface of 400'. 

The geology of this property is complex and a detailed study of 
the deposit would have to be made to arrive at any definite con- 
clusion regarding the origin and possibilities of the Plumas Amal- 
gamated deposit. 

The mine is equipped with a superintendent's house, bunkhouse 
and blacksmith shop. 

The mine was equipped in 1914 with ten 225-pound Straub stamps, 
operated by steam and having a capacity of 12 tons in 24 hours. 
Amalgamation only is used and recovery is said to be about 70%. 
The property was idle in 1918. 

Adjoining mines are the Plumas National, idle, and the Droege. 

Plumas Bonanza Mine. Owners, Chas. W. Reed, Belmont; F. W. 
Jordan, Pilots' Office, San Francisco; F. Roeder, 834 Market street, 
San Francisco ; W. A. Wall, Nelson Point via Quincy. 

Location : Sawpit Flat Mining District. Sec. 20. T. 23 N., R. 10 E. ; 6 miles, by 
road, to Nelson Point, thence IS miles to Quincy, by good automobile road. 
Elevation 42 00'. 

Bibliography: IJ. S. Geol. Survey F'olio 37, Downieville. 

The property embraces ten claims, a total of 200 acres, coverings 
length along the main vein of 8000'. High ridges and V-shaped 
canons are characteristic of the surface. 

John Kelly located these claims in 1906 and the property was 
purchased by the present owners in June, 1913. A crew of five men 
were working in 1914. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 155 

The mioe at that time was developed by a 50' shaft and 60' driven 
on the vein from the bottom of the shaft. No ore had been stoped, 
the mill being run on rock taken out in development work. 

The deposit consists of quartz veins cutting across the strike of 
states, probably following a siliceous dike. There are two veins, but 
practically no work has been done on the Creek vein. The vein 
filling is quartz, gouge and kaolin, the solid quartz outcrop showing 
15' wide in places. The quartz is free milling, with very little 
sulphide as the workings are in an oxidized zone. It varies from 
6' to 20' in width, averaging 8', strikes N. 85° W., and dips 30° to 
45° N., with a proven length on the surface of 3000'. The Creek vein 
is proven for 1500'. The ore averages $10 per ton, with assays 
reported as high as $100. 

The mine is equipped with log cabin, 2-stamp, triple discharge, 
Union Iron Works mill and concentration plant, the latter not being 
used at present, as the ore carries practically no sulphide. The mill 
is run by water power from Winters Creek. 

Tailings are disposed of in Winters Creek and Middle Pork Feather 
River. 

The Dearest producing mine is the Crescent Hill, two miles north- 
west across Feather River. 

Plumas Eureka Mine. Owner, Plumas Eureka Mining Company; 
Ijco. Phillips, New York, controlling interest; D, J. Lawton, Napa, 
\ice president; J. R. Stark, Jr., Johnsville, assistant superintendent. 



Location : Johnsville Mind 


ng Diatrlct. Sees. 2S and 26, T. 22 N., R. 11 E.. i mile 






ElevaUon 6600'-74bo- 




BlbllOKraphy : Cal. State 


Min. Bur, Repta VIII. page 476; X, page Sg2 : XI, 


page S30 : XII, page i 


!19 : XIII, page 303. Llndgren. W., U- S. Geol. Survey 


P^of. Paper 73, page 


111, U. S. Geol. Survey Folto 37, Downlevllle. 



156 HmES AND HINEBAL RESOUBCKS. 

Th«re is a total area, including timber rights, of 2500 acres in this 
property. It is situated on the east slope of Eureka Peak from 
Jamison Creek to the summit. 

The mine was located in 1850 and operations began in 1851, con- 
siderable work being done prior to 1875. It was closed down by the 
Sierra Buttes Company in 1897, then purchased by the Johnson 
Graham Mining Company and in 1909 by the present company. Onlj^ 
fjxploratory work was being done in 1915, 

The different veins have been worked for lengths varying from 
300' to 1000'. The Eureka vein was exploited by the 1500' Eureka 
tunnel and a 150' shaft, the '76' vein for 400', the North vein for 500' 



Photo No. 11. View of Eureka Peak ukcn from the trail to the '?«' tunnel of the 
Plumas Eureka Mine. 

and the Lawton has been sloped for 200' above the Eureka tunnel 
level. A very large area has been sloped on different veins, but it is 
impossible to describe the workings without maps. 

The deposit is made up of a complex system of quartz veins with 
well defined walls. The main vein is at or near the contact of quartz 
Iiorphyry and gabbro. At intervals flat floors of quartz are found 
lying nearly horizontal. All the veins are of white free milling 
quartz carrying varying percentages of sulphides, pyrite, chalco- 
pyrite, arsenopyrite and galena. The Eureka vein varies from 1' to 
6' in width, averaging 4', strikes southwest and dips 75° NW. The 
'76' vein varies from 1' to 4' in width, strikes southeast and dips 
25° S. The North vein averages 8' in width, varying from 1' to 20', 
strikes north and dips 45° E. The Lawton vein varies froBo-J'^ 8' 
in width, strikes south and dips 45° E. ' - V- 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 157 

Equipment consists of buildings and machinery. The mill building 
had 60 stamps. The present owners put in 20 new stamps, repaired 
the building and reconstructed 20 stamps of the old mill. 

Water power is obtained from Jamison Creek and Eureka Lake. 

The Jamison is an adjoining mine. 

After a brief idleness, work was resumed in July, 1915. A small 
crew is placing the main workin^fe in shape for mining, and a lower 
tunnel is being driven to open the property at a considerable depth 
below the present workings. 

On August 28, 1915, a voluntary petition of bankruptcy was filed 
in the United States District Court. Liabilities $133,633, assets 
$41,515. 

Plumas Jumbo and Little Jumbo Mines. Owner, A. E. Murdock, 
Reno, Nevada. 

Location: Sec. 25, T. 24 N., R. 16 E., 8 miles north of Chilcoot, 9 miles north 
of Chilcoot station on W. P. Ry., by Chilcoot and Last Chance wagon road. 
Elevation 6200'. 

The Little Jumbo and the Plumas Jumbo claims comprise this 
property. There is an area of 40 acres covering a length along the 
lode of 1500'. It is situated on the ridge southwest of Mt. Adams 
and contains a good stand of sugar pine and spruce. 

This property was discovered in 1901 and has been worked as a 
prospect off and on since that time. Idle at present. 

A tunnel 125' long reaches a depth on the vein of 50'. This, with 
a series of prospect shafts, makes up the development work. 

The deposit forms a series of parallel veins in granite. They are 
true fissure veins, with a quartz gangue impregnated with chalcopyrite, 
bomite, malachite and azurite. Th^ maximum width of the vein is 
6', the average being 2'. It strikes northeast, dips 45° NW., and has 
a proven length on the surface of 1500'. The ore is basic. 

Plumas Mohawk Mine. (Gallagher, Eossi and Grizzly Bear.) 
Owner, Plumas Mohawk Gold Mining Company, Johnsville; W. H. 
Mayfield, Johnsville, president; M. H. Bernheim, Johnsville, secretary. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 5 miles north- 
' west of Johnsville, 8 miles northwest of Blairsden by wagon road. Eleva- 
tion 5800'-6100'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, pages 294-297. Lindgren, W., 
U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, 
Downieville. 

This property comprises seven quartz claims, the St. Joseph, 
Roberts, Mayfield & Gallagher Extension No. 1 and No.' 2, Garabaldi, 
Eureka Ledge, and Rossi or Squirrel Creek; also the Grizzly Bear 
placer claim of 160 acres, making a total of 300 acres arid covering a 
length along the lode of 3000'. The surface offers good tunnel sites. 

Gallagher discovered the property in 1880, the claims being con- 
solidated and purchased by the present owners in 1906. The mill 

11—46902 



158 MINES AND MINKBAL BBSOURGES. 

was run in 1908 for a short time, 23 men working during that time. 
Only assessment work has been done since. 

Pocahontas Mine. Owners, J. A. Hall, Brush Creek ; 6. M. Sparks, 
Oroville. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sea 12, T. 22 N., R. 6 E., 7 miles 
northeast of Brush Creek. 35 miles southwest of Quincy, by automobile 
road from Quincy via Letter Box to Granite Basin, thence by trail 4 miles, 
automobile road from Oroville to Letter Box and Granite Basin 45 miles. 
Elevation 4200'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bldwell Bar. 

The property includes the three claims, Winona, Pocahontas and 
Minnehaha, covering 60 acres in area and a length along the lode of 
4500^ Steep canons characterize the surface. 

Locations were made in 1895 but only assessment work has been 
done since. 

This includes a 30' shaft and a 40' tunnel on the Pocahontas, and 
a 40' incline on the Minnehaha. Other work consists of seven open 
cuts at intervals of 100'. 

There is one quartz fissure vein with gouge on both walls. Samples 
taken from various openings are said to have averaged $5 gold, $3 
silver and $6 copper. The foot-wall is Calaveras slates, the hanging 
wall * porphyry' (possibly schists). It has an average width of 4', 
strikes northeast, dips 80° E., and has a proven length on the surface 
of 3000'. 

A minimum of 300 horsepower can be developed from Coldwater 
Creek Falls, within 1000' of the property. 

Transportation charges from Oroville are 1^ to 1^^ per pound; 
wages paid, $3 and board. 

The Morning Star, Granite Basin and Coquette mines adjoin. 

Premium Mine. Owners, P. A. Taylor, Taylorsville ; F. W. and R. 
Young, Crescent Mills. 

Location: Taylorsville Mining District, Sees. 32 and 33, T. 26 N., R. 10 E., 
IJ miles southwest of Taylorsville, thence 12 miles to Keddie, by good 
automobile road. Elevation 3700'. 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 111-121. U. S. 
Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of five claims, 100 acres in area and covering 
a length along the lode of 4500'. 

The mine was worked in the 70 's by G. Standart of Greenville and 
is said to have produced $180,000. One hundred tons of ore removed 
by underhand stoping below the Premium tunnel is reported to have 
yielded $816. The mine has been idle since 1898, assessment work 
only being done. 

The East and West veins are developed by open cuts only. The 
Premium tunnel, with a length of 460' on the vein, develops the 
Premium vein to a maximum depth of 135'. The Lower tunnel is 
350' below the Premium tunnel and will crosscut all three veins. It 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 159 

is already in 155' and has cut the East vein, which is 20' wide and 
assays $1.80. The tunnel will have to be driven 200' farther to cut 
the Premium vein. One shoot has been stoped to a height of 65' 
above the Premium tunnel for a width of 4' and another shoot has 
been stoped to the surface, 135', for a width of 8'. Ore is said to 
have averaged $11 per ton. 

The three veins in this property, namely, East, Premium, and West, 
are all quartz fissure veins in granodiorite, the vein filling being 
quartz and decomposed granodiorite. 

The ore is free milling, being oxidized and containing very little 
sulphide. The East vein is 20' wide, strikes N. 50° W., dips 70° SW., 
and has a proven length on the surface of 800'. The Premium is 
composed of two veins, 8' and 4' wide, striking N. 50° W., dipping 
80° SW., and having a proven length on the surface of 1000'. The 
West vein strikes N. 40' W., dips 70° NE., and is 3' wide. It has a 
length of 400' proven on the surface and one pay shoot 140' long has 
been developed. 

There is an old 5-stamp mill with 600-pound stamps on the property. 

Water is obtained from Crystal Lake under a 260' head, though a 
much greater head can be obtained, it being possible to secure a 
3300' head from Hough Creek. 

Prospect Claim. (Cabalan.) Owners, J. S. Carter, Mrs. Maud 
Neer, Crescent Mills. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 13, T. 26 N., R 9 E., 1 mile 
northwest of Crescent Mills, thence 11 miles, by automobile road, to Keddie. 
Elevation 3900'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 289. Diller, J. S., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey 
Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian 
Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of one patented claim of 20 acres, covering 
a length- along the lode of 1500'. It is situated on the ridge lying 
between Crescent Mills and Greenville. 

The Carter family has been the owner for the past 20 years. 

There is one vein, a quartz fissure vein, containing free gold 
developed by a 500' tunnel and several shorter ones. It is 12' wide 
and low grade, trending northwest, and dipping nearly vertical. The 
country rock is meta-rhyolite. 

No work has been done for some time. 

Adjoining mines are the Crescent and Green Mountain. 

Beising Bline. (Reising Placer Mine.) Owners, H. C. Plourney, 
Quincy; Jerry W. Uslenghi, Twain. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 9, T. 25 N., R. 8 E.. 3 miles north- 
west of Twain, Virgilia (W. P. Ry.) 4 miles southwest by wagon road 
and trail. Wagon road to Uslenghi Ranch, then 2 miles, by trail, up Rush 
Creek to mine. Elevation 3300'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 



160 MINES AND MINERAL RESOUBCES. 

This property contains the Oriental, Reising and Pennant quartz 
locations and the Reising and Rattlesnake placer locations. There is 
a total of 130 acres, 71 of which are placer locations. The length 
along the lode is 4215'. Narrow ridges and deep canons charac- 
terize the surface. 

The property was worked as a placer in early days, before the 
claims were relocated. Assessment work only is now being done, 
and so far it has been of little utility. It consists of an 80' tunnel 
from the creek, now caved in, another tunnel run in from the ravine 
east of the Reising house, which to all appearances is outside of the 
lode proper, and prospecting 15' above the creek by a shallow open 
cut 300' across the outcrop. 

The deposit consists of two large lodes. Upper lode, 123'; Lower 
lode, 157', with 150' of bedrock intervening. The lode itself consists 
of a highly metamorphosed quartzite, largely charged with sericitic 
mineral, and some calcite, impregnated with finely divided pyrite. 
In this vein matter irregular stringers of white quartz ramify in all 
directions and interbedded, well defined, large veins of quartz occur. 
Small fragments of slaty rock, generally well charged with pyrite, 
occur all through the vein matter, and pyrites are also found 
sparsely scattered through the vein quartz. The Upper lode is more 
irregular and disrupted and has less dear quartz visible. The gold 
seems to be associated with quartz, which may be of later origin 
than the quartzite as in some cases the 'vein^ quartz seems to cut the 
cherty quartzite. Samples taken along the outcrop on the creek 
averaged $1.16 for a total width of 114', and on the Lowjeir.lode $1.25 
for a width of 138'. These samples were taken from hard outcrop 
and there is no doubt but that the value of the ore could be materially 
increased by the selection of quartz showing greater mineralization 
than the whole body of the outcrop. Both the foot and hanging walls 
are schists and slates. These lodes have a general northerly trend 
and dip from 60° to 80° E. They have been traced on the surface at 
intervals for a distance of 3000'. 

Rush Creek furnishes a large and never failing water supply, 
probably not less than 500 cubic feet at the lowest stage and 
averaging over 1000 cubic feet. Good opportunities for the storage 
of water exist at the head of the creek. For a large power supply 
the waters of the river. East Branch of the North Fork Feather River, 
may be utilized by electrical transmission not exceeding three miles. 
A flume and ditch about 2500' in length belong to the property, with 
the water privileges pertaining thereto. 

The best gold prospects have been obtained from the quartz and 
stringers carrying pyrite, which have in some cases been oxidized, 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 161 

leaving cavities and iron-stained bands of quartz. The surface 
debris overlying the lower lode was sluiced off and a considerable 
quantity of angular gold, containing particles of quartz was 
recovered in the sluice boxes. The pieces of gold were in some cases 
quite large and the character shows that their migration has been 
slight, and that they were in all probability derived from the lode 
quartz. 

Robinson Mine. Leased to United States Exploration Company, 
617 Pacific Building, San Francisco. 

Location : Granite Basin Mining District, 35 miles northeast of OroviUe, 25 

miles southwest of Quincy. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

Posey and Miller, representing Colorado men, took a bond on this 
mine in September, 1915. By the middle of October the dismantling 
of the 20-stamp mill and the installation of Sears-Smith rotary mills 
with a capacity equivalent to 40 stamps was in progress. The shaft 
was to be deepened and a six mile road from the basin to Junction 
House on the Oroville road was to be built. This is the initial step 
toward the development of the Granite Basin District on a large scale 
by the United States Exploration Company. 

In the fall of 1918 it was stated that development had proven 
unsatisfactory and work had been suspended till after the war. 

Rose Quartz Mining Company. (Kelly Mine.) Owner, Rose 
Quartz Mining Company, Nicolaus Building, Eighth and )S. streets, 
Sacramento ; H. E. Weyl, lessee. Eclipse via Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., IJ miles 
east of Eclipse, thence 24 miles northwest by good automobile road, with 
steep grades via Nelson Point to Quincy. Elevation 6000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

• 

This property consists of nine claims, names unknown, none of 
which are patented. There is a total of 180 acres with a length along 
the lode of 3000'. High lava-capped peaks and deep V-shaped canons 
mark the surface. 

The main vein (No. 1) is developed by a 178' crosscut adit to the 
vein, cutting it 150' below the outcrop, and 60' driven along the vein. 
There is also a winze on the vein extending 30' below the tunnel level. 
The No. 2 vein is developed by a 60' shaft with a 50' crosscut from 
the bottom, and the Rose vein by a 259' crosscut adit, meeting the 
vein 100' below its outcrop, with 95' driven on the vein. Drilling is 
done by hand. The deposit consists of quartz veins evidently follow- 
ing a siliceous porphyry dike in slates. The workings are in the 
decomposed dike and no crosscuts have been run to true walls. 
Nos. 1 and 2 veins, parallel and 85' apart, are made up of quartz and 
decomposed porphyry containing free gold, auriferous arsenopyrite 
and galena. The foot-wall of No. 1 vein is not determined, the 



162 MINES AND MINERAL RESOUBCES. 

hanging wall is slate. It varies in width from 10' to 15'; strikes 
N. T" E., dips 70° E., and has a proven length on the surface of 
1000'. No 2 vein has slate walls, is 50' in width, strikes N. 10^ E., 
and dips east. The Rose vein is a quartz vein in slates with a filling 
(ȣ rose quartz. It varies from 3' to 6' in width, with an average of 
4' strikes north and dips east. It carries free gold and a very little 
galena and arsenopyrite. No. 1 vein averages $9; No. 2, where 15' 
wide, runs $4.80 a ton ; where 30' wide, it runs $3.50. The Rose mine 
is a very good looking prospect, and from panning of ore appears to 
be well worthy of extended development. Pinal judgment can not 
be passed until the veins are crosscut and developed at deeper levels. 
Masses of arsenopyrite are found, which can be burned and show a 
large amount of gold. Free gold also occurs in the center of hard, 
glassy looking qtiartz, not associated with sulphides nor a product of 
oxidation. Galena in appreciable quantities is associated with the 
arsenopyrite. 

There are on the property a blacksmith shop and cabins ; a 5-stamp 
Hendy mill, rock breaker and concentrator to be run by a distillate 
tmgine are being installed. A tramway will be installed from the 
mouth of tunnel No. 1 to the mill, a distance of 300'. 

Labor cost from $3 to $3.50 per day in 1914. Transportation 1^ 
per pound from Quincy. 

The Oro Fino, on Hopkins Creek, is the nearest mine. 

Bound Lake Mine. (Dixie Queen.) Owner, Round Lake Mining 
Company, Insurance Exchange Building, San Francisco ; M. H. Miller, 
president and manager; F. J. Mott, San Francisco, secretary. 

Location: Johnsvllle Mining District, Sec. 18, T. 21 N.. R. 12 E., 12 miles south 
of Blairsden by stage road with 4 miles of steep grade. Elevation 6500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111- 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of the Dixie Queen and the Dixie Queen 
Extension, locations. There is an area of 40 acres, covering a length 
along the lode of 3000'. The surface is characterized by rugged 

glaciated ridges. 

It was discovered in the early days, but no ore has been stoped as 
yet, though it is a prospect with good chances. 

There is a 300' shaft on the dip of the vein. A 100' drift east from 
the shaft, on the 150' level, shows the vein splitting. The main wall 
continues its regular course without quartz, while quartz stringers 
swing into the foot-wall until the strike is nearly north and the dip 
nearly vertical. On the 300' level, drifts are driven 100' east and 
160' west under the lake. There is a 40' raise from the 300' level, 
and considerable ore blocked out, but the quantity has not been 
<:;stimated. 



PLUHAB COUNTY. 163 

The vein is a solid quartz fisaure vein, oxidized in the workings so 
tar opened, with well deiined walls and a few inches of gouge on the 
foot-wall. It carries free gold and leas than 1% of sulphides. The 
walls are augite porphyrite, altered augite-andesite. In some places 
the vein is 15' wide, but the average is i' to 5', The strike is east, 
I'nd the dip is 45° N, Only a few feet have heen proven on the sur- 
face, it being covered by glacial drift and extending under Round 
Lake. Two shoots, 50' each in length and another under the lake, 
length unknown, have been developed. 



Photo No. 12. View ahowine Round Like Hint in center. Glacial moraine In foreground. 

Ten men were employed erecting a mill in 1915. It is being built 
i'or ten 1000- pound stamps, but only five are being installed ; no con- 
centrators. An IS-horsepower Western Distillate Gas Engine hoist 
is being used. 

The Oakland mine, now idle, adjoins. 

Saint Nicolaa Mine. {Bushman.) Owner, Nick Borentz, Quincy. 

Location; Quincy Mining District, Sec. 34. T, 25 N,, R 9 E., 6 miles, by fair 

wagon roaii. north oC Quincy. Elevation 3380'. 
Bibliography : Cal. State Mln. Bur. Reports, XI, page 32S ; XII, page S14 ; XIII, 

page 288. U. S. Gaol. Survey Folio 37, Downleville. 

This property consists of one claim, the Saint Nicolas, a location of 
20 acres with a length along the lode of 1500'. The surface is steep. 

The property was located by Bushman in 1894, but was relocated in 
1906 by Borentz, Three men are working at the present time. 

Very little development work has been done. A shaft has been 
sunk 24' on the vein and a tunnel 50' above the shaft has been driven 
GO' on the vein, but no ore has been stoped. 



164 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The deposit consists of small veins and stringers in slate, following 
the strike of the slates. There is one quartz vein on the surface with 
fhree parallel stringers about 6' apart. It is free milling with from 
2% to 3% pyrite which goes $58 a ton. In the drift from the bottom 
of the shaft the vein is 4' wide. It strikes N. 48° W., dips 80° S., 
and is proven on the surface for 300'. The 4' vein will average $10 
to $12 per ton. Assays from shaft are as high as $50. 

There are several houses on the property, and a 3-stamp mill, 
500-pound stamps, a 15-horsepower upright engine, but no concen- 
trator or rockbreaker. The mill was being repaired in 1913 prepara- 
tory to mining. 

Steam is used for power but it is the intention to install Water 
power. 
. The Butterfly or Smith mine adjoins. . : 

r Savercool Mine. Owners, J. R. Murray, Greenville;* W. T. 

■ ' ^ ", . • » » ' ■ • 

JTuleaven, 1913 As^l>y,aven\ie,' South Berkeley. ' . ;; . ' ' ;" _ 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 5, T. 26 N., R? 8 E., 2 miles 'horth 
of Seneca, by trail ; 25 miles southeast of Seneca, via Greenville, by auto- 
; mobile road. Elevation 4000'. 

I Bibliography: Cat- State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 493 ; XIII, page 305.^ U. S. 

* Geol. Survey Fdlio 15^ Lassen Peak. 

i This property consists of four patented clepiiis/with S length ^ong 
Ihe lode of 6000'. It is located on the steep bluflf on the west bank 
of the North Fork Feather River, and contains a fair stand of timber. 

The property was located in 1877. It ha&ibeen' idle for the last 16 
to 20 years, and the workings are either closed or inaccessible. 

It was developed by a series of adits — No. 1, 75' ; No. 2, 380' ; No. 4, 
260' ; No. 5, 75' ; No. 7, 500' ; No. 8, 128', and No. 9, 450' ; all driven on 
the vein. (From report of 1890, other work may have been done 
since.) The longest stope was in tunnel No. 4, 120'. 

The deposit is made up of a quartz vein and stringers in black slate 
near the contact with altered andesite, containing 3% of auriferous 
sulphides which go $83 per ton. The walls are slate*. The vein is 
8' wide, strikes northwest, dips 50° SW. and has at intervals a proven 
length on the surface of 6000'. Three shoots have been worked for 
p. 11 average length of 150'. 

Several cabins are on the property, and an old 40-stamp mill, now 
in ruins. 

Water was used for power, 75" under a 440' head being available. 

The White Lily and Del Monte mines adjoin. 

Southern Eureka Group. (Hibernia.) Owners, J. Standart, 
Greenville; Mrs. C. O. Hamilton, Oroville. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 11 and 14, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 
1 mile south of Greenville; Keddie is 16 miles south from Greenville, by 
good automobile road. Elevation 4580'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 297. Diller, J. S., U. S. 
Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages' 114-115. Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey 
Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian 
Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 165 

This property consists of five claims, the Atlantic, Pacific, Hibernia 
and the Green Mountain timber tract (160 acres), all patented, and 
the McLellan placer claim (160 acres), a location. There are 60 
acres of quartz claims and 320 acres of timber and placer ground, 
covering a length of 1500' on the Indiaii Valley vein and 3000' on 
the South Eureka vein. It is situated on the top of the ridge south 
of Greenville with good timber on the property. 

G. Standart purchased the group in 1890 and it has been held in 
the family up to the present time. Two men are working in the 
McLellan crosscut doing assessment work. Options have been given 
on this property and a number of properties adjoining and a con- 
solidation is said to be under way. 

The South Eureka vein has been devoloped by a crosscut 450' long, 
reaching a maximum depth of 80' and 400' driven on the vein. It 
has been stoped for a length of 400', a width of 12' and a depth of 
80'. A tunnel 100' long has been driven on the McLellan vein, 
leaching a depth below the outcrop of 350', and a crosscut tunnel 
300' long has been driven on the Hibernia vein and 200' x 20' x 120' 
of ore has been stoped. The Pennsylvania tunnel from the McLellan 
claim into the Hibernia, 500' below the surface, will have to be driven 
200' farther to cut the McLellan vein. It will also be extended to cut 
the South Eureka. 

The deposit is composed of three quartz fissure veins near a contact 
of granodiorite and meta-rhyolite. The vein filling of all the veins 
in quartz and gouge, the ore being oxidized and containing free gold. 
The South Eureka vein is 12' to 14' in width, strikes N. 30° W., inter- 
secting the Indian Valley vein, and dips 70° NE. The foot-wall is 
granodiorite and the hanging wall is * porphyry,' probably meta- 
rhyolite. It has a proven length on the surface of 3000'. Two pay 
shoots have been developed 80' and 450' in length, the ore, it is said, 
plating $6 to $8. The McLellan vein dips 65° E. Its walls are 
* porphyry' and it has a proven length on the surface of 3500', and 
two 100' pay shoots developed ore which is said to have averaged 
$6 to $7 per ton. 

A blacksmith shop comprises the only equipment. 

The property was idle in September, 1918. 

The Indian Valley and Droege mines adjoin, the former being idle, 
and the latter operating. 

Specimen Mine. Owner, Mrs. Sarah Jolly, Oroville. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 24, T. 23 N., R. 6 E., 10 miles 
nortlieast of Brush Creek ; Quincy 30 miles northeast from property ; good 
automobile roads from Quincy or Oroville via Letter Box. Elevation 4900'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, X, page 490; XIII, page 306. 

This property consists of one claim, the Specimen, a location, 20 
acres in area and covering a length along the lode of 1500'. Low 



166 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

hills are characteristic of the surface, and fair timber stands on the 
property. 

The mine was located in 1880 and has been worked at intervals 
since that time. It was under lease in 1913 to Len Hensath of Brush 
Creek, who, with an assistant, was repairing the mill. 

The Specimen vein has been developed by the Showshed adit of 
600', driven on the vein, and the West vein by an adit tunnel of 500' 
driven on it. Ore has been stoped from the tunnel levels to the sur- 
face. The Showshed adit reaches a maximum depth of 160'. 

There are two quartz veins in granite, the Specimen and the West, 
rather flat fissure veins, parallel and 300' apart. The ore contains 
rich specimens of free gold and also 1% of sulphides. The Specimen 
vein, which varies from 6" to 15", averages 1' in width, strikes north- 
cast, dips 30° E., and has a proven length on the surface of 1000'. 
The West vein varies from 1" to 15" in width and strikes northeast. 
Pay shoots are short, but one 10' in lei^gth produced $20,000. Ore 
averages $12 to $14 in both veins. 

Several houses furnish living quarters, and an old 4-stamp 750- 
pound mill, with Challenge feeder and a Gates crusher, operated by a 
Pelton waterwheel, comprise the reduction equipment. Water under 
100' head is supplied by a ditch one mile in length. 

The Robinson and Morning Star mines adjoin. 

Star Claim. Owners, Lakin Estate, Tonopah, Nevada. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 23, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., in town of 
Jolinsville, 8 miles west of Blairsden (W. P. Ry.) by good automobile road. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

About $1000 worth of work has been done on this property but no 
ore has been developed. 

The Plumas Eureka mine adjoins on the north. 

Summit Group. Owner, A. N. Cameron, Seneca. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 2, T. 25 N., R. 7 E., 8 miles west 
of Twain by trail, 4 miles northwest of Virgilia (W. P. Ry.) by trail. 
Elevation 2850'-5000'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property consists of five claims, the Summit, May, Gold Fleece, 
Argonaut and Bell Rose ; also 40 acres of placer claims, controlling 
tunnel, mill and water rights. There is a total of 100 acres with a 
length along the lode of 6000'. It covers the ridge between Red 
Gulch and North Fork Feather River and contains good timber. 

It was discovered in 1877 by Dan Bull, and abandoned later, to be 
purchased by the present owner from Lee in 1887. Assessment work 
only was being done in 1913. 

The property is developed by three tunnels. No. 3 tunnel (lower) 
crosscuts 180' and follows the vein 100' ; No. 2 tunnel, 350' above, is 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 167 

60' long and 50' below the surface at the face, and No. 1, following 
the vein from the Deadwood side of Redwood Mountain, is 150' above 
No. 2 and 180' long. No ground has been stoped. 

There are two veins, the Main vein and the Contact vein. The 
former is quartz and recemented breccia carrying free gold, galena, 
pyrite and some chalcopyrite. Both walls are slate. The vein varies 
from 20' to 60' between walls, strikes N. 45° W., and dips 70° NE. 
It has a proven length on this group of 2000', and also extends 
through other claims. The vein carries gold throughout the 2000', 
an average value of 14 samples taken from different places, being $7. 
The Contact vein is filled with quartz and calcite. It is 30' wide and 
strikes N. 45° W. Maximum assay value $7. 

Water power on North Fork Feather River up to 10,000 horsepower 
is available. 

The Elizabeth Consolidated and Halstead mines are extensions of 
the Summit vein to the southeast. The Duncan, Halstead and Eliza- 
beth Consolidated are now all under option to Camp and Snyder 
Brothers, Salt Lake City. 

T. 0. and 0. K. Claims. Owner, Professor C. Bayless, Dubuque, 
Iowa. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 25 N., R. 9 E., 3 miles north of 

Quincy by good automobile road. Elevation 3800'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property includes two patented claims, the T. C. and 0. K., 
40 acres in area and covering 3000' along the lode. There is fair 
timber on the ground. 

It has been held by the present owner since 1880, but no work has 
been done on the claims for many years and their value is prob- 
lematical. 

This deposit consists of one vein exposed in a 130' shaft, said to 
be the same as the Iowa vein of the Bell group. It is a quartz vein 
with stringers following a siliceous dike, containing free gold and 
pyrite. The foot- wall and hanging wall are made up of quartzite and 
slate. It strikes N. 15° W., and has a proven length on the surface 
of 600'. 

The St. Nicolas and White Oak quartz mines and the Bushman 
drift mine adjoin. 

Tefft Mine. Owner, J. U. Tefft, Quincy. 

Location: Quincy Mining District, Sec. 11, T. 23 N., R. 9 E., 9 miles by wagon 

road soutli of Quincy. Elevation 6000'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of the following locations : Mohawk, Banner, 
Providence, Amelia B., Crescent Eureka, Center Star, Baby Modoc, 
and Modoc Fraction. The total area of the claims is about 140 acres 
and they cover a length along the strike of the lode of 4500'. The 



168 MINES AND MINEIUL BESOUBGES. 

group is situated on the northern slope of the canon of Middle Fork 
Feather River, 2500' above the river. Though sparsely timbered, 
excellent timber can be had within one mile of the mine. The claims 
were located by Teflft in 1906 and two men are working at the 
present time. 

The vein has been developed to a depth of 170' by a crosscut adit 
240' in length. From the point where this adit encountered the vein, 
a drift was driven north within the vein for a distance of 105' and 
south for 225'. The above work blocked out 10,000 tons of ore 
averaging over $7 per ton. There are also 800 tons of ore on the 
dump. A lower tunnel started 180' below the upper tunnel was in 
a distance of 100' in 1913. It is estimated that this tunnel will have 
to be driven 250' farther to intersect the vein. If the oreshoot proves 
to be of the same length and width as on the level above, a drift on 
the vein will develop 20,000 additional tons of ore. 

The Teflft vein lies in a narrow belt of amphibolite schist between 
Calaveras slates on the east and a belt of serpentine on the west. 
The vein is a true fissure vein and cuts diagonally across the general 
strike of the schists and slates. Its course is nearly north and the 
dip is 60° W. The average width of the vein is 5', the maximum 
about 8'. Both walls are an altered schist, and a clay gouge is found 
on both. The vein filling is an oxidized, iron-stained 'sugar' quartz, 
which contains 'rusty' gold, and is free milling. There are three 
other veins on the property, which in 1913 had only been opened by 
superficial open cuts, but pan samples taken from these veins all 
showed free gold. The ground stands well and very little timbering 
has been necessary. There are five buildings on the property, which 
include a blacksmith shop and stable. An air compressor, was 
installed in January, 1914. 

If a mill is built, wood or oil will have to be used for fuel until 
such time as water power can be developed. Transportation costs 
Iff per pound from Quincy. 

The Crescent Hills Gold Mines Company of California (Oddie 
mine) adjoins. 

Valentine Claim. Owner, Neseman Estate, care E. N. Johnson, 
Mohawk. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 22 N., R. 13 E., li miles 
east of Clio on W. P. Ry., by good automobile road. Elevation 4700'. 

Bibliography : Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property is patented. and lies on the low ridge rising from 
Mohawk Valley on the north. There is fair mining timber on the 
property. 

No work was done in 1913 and only a little in 1912. 

The Bullion and Antelope mines adjoin. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 169 

Wardlow Mine. (Blaine.) Owners, J. F. Wardlow, Greenville; 
H. D. Wardlow, Greenville. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sees. 10 and 11, T. 26 N., R. 9 E , 

li miles south of Greenville, thence 15 miles south by good automobile 

road to Keddie. Elevation 4700'. 
Bibliography; Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114-115. 

Lindgren, W.. U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. 

Geol. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of four claims, the.Taft (formerly known as 
the Blaine), Blue Mule, Ladlee, and Roosevelt. There is a total of 
75 acres with a length along the lode of 3000'. The mine is situated 
on the ridge south of Greenville and there is a fair stand of timber 
on the property. 

It was worked in early days and was acquired by the present 
owners in 1903. Assessment work only is being done at present. 

The property is developed by tunnels. The Lower tunnel is a 
525' crosscut to the Ladlee vein, 600' below the surface, and 60' 
drifted on the vein. The Ladlee tunnel cuts the vein 100' below the 
surface, and is then driven 60' on the vein. The Blaine tunnel is a 
100' crosscut with 700' driven on the vein, 400' below the outcrop. 
A small amount of ore was stoped in the latter. 

The deposit is supposed to be made up of two veins, but it may be 
one faulted vein. It is a quartz fissure at the contact of meta-rhyolite 
and diorite, the filling being quartz and 'porphyry.' It is free 
milling and contains 1% of auriferous pyrite assaying $121 per ton, 
and some manganese oxide. Both hanging and foot walls are made 
up af 'porphyry' and granite. The vein varies from 10' to 25' in 
width, strikes east, and dips 80° S. It has a length proven on the 
surface, by open cuts, of 1500'. In the Ladlee tunnel the vein is 3' 
wide and assays $12.50. In the Blaine the vein is said to be 4' wide 
and to assay $14. 

Equipment consists of a cabin, blacksmith shop and tools. Water 
power is available from Round Valley Reservoir. 

The New York and Indian Valley mines, both idle, adjoin. 

This property, together with the Southern Eureka group, Hibernia 
and McLellan, was purchased in October, 1915, by Geo. D. Needy 
and associates of Spokane, Washington, who expected to push 
development. The Southern Eureka Mining Company was organized 
by Spokane people, with a capitalization of $2,000,000, to operate the 
properties. The group contains approximately 450 acres of mineral 
ground. Geo. D. Needy, E. F. Yaeger, M. D. DeHoflf, Hal J. Cole 
and H. R. Van Dreathen, all of Spokane, are directors. 

White Oak and Black Oak Claims. Owner, H. P. Wormley, Quincy. 

Location : Quincy Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 25 N., R. 9 E., 4 miles north of 
Quincy in a direct line, 5 miles by fair wagon road. Elevation 3700'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 288. U. S. Geol. Survey 
Fqlio 37, Downleville. 



170 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The property is situated on a ridge of gentle slope and consists of 
two claims, the White Oak and Black Oak, 40 acres in area and 
covering a length along the lode of 3000'. The timber was cut over 
in early days. 

Wormley has owned the property for a long time, but has been 
doing assessment work only in the past 15 years. 

A 200' tunnel has been driven on the vein and one crosscut to the 
east, near the face of the tunnel driven 30' through slate cut 
numerous quartz stringers, none, however, with well defined walls. 

One vein composed of small stringers of quartz following the strike 
of slates and not well defined, was worked. The filling is iron- 
stained quartz and gouge, with some pulverized quartz containing 
free gold. 

The stringers vary from 2" to 1', the general strike being northwest 
and the dip 80° E. There is a proven length on the surface of 3000'. 

The Bushman drift placer mine adjoins, in which the gold has been 
derived in part from the erosion of the veins and stringers on the 
White Oak quartz property. 

White Lily Mine. Owner, Seneca Mining and Milling Company, 
Seneca; A. P. Dunn, Seneca, president. 

Location : Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 9, T. 26 N., R. 8 E., h mile north 
of Seneca, thence 31 miles southeast via Greenville and Crescent Mills, 
by good automobile road to Keddie. Elevation 3700'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property embraces 110 acres of locations, namely, the White 
Lily quartz mine, Addie Bell quartz mine, Wedge Fraction, Whitloek 
placer (60 acres) and Madison placer (old Calliope claim). It covers 
a length of 3000' along the lode, and is situated on the east bank of 
North Fork Feather River with a steep rise to the top of a ridge. 
The property is well timbered. 

It was located in 1896 by P. K. Dunn and has been worked ever 
since by the Dunn family. Suit was brought by the Del Monte 
Company, in 1912, because of a drift passing through the side line 
of the White Lily into the Del Monte property, and the White Lily 
people have been prevented by injunction from removing ore. The 
total yield of the mine to date is about $225,000. Two men are 
leasing and working in a part of the mine not under injunction. 
Negotiations are now under way for the consolidation of the White 
Lily and Del Monte properties^ The owners are said to be anxious 
to sell and if satisfactory terms can be arranged there is apparently 
enough ore in sight to pay for the property. 

The vein is made up of quartz and quartz stringers in slates, schist 

and gouge in a badly shattered zone near the contact with altered 

meta-andesite and possible diorite. The vein filling is oxidized 

•rushed quartz containing free gold and very little sulphide, the ore 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 171 

being so crushed that very little powder is necessary for breaking it. 
The foot- wall is slate with clay gouge and the hanging wall is said to 
be diorite. In width the deposit varies from 30' to 60', 30' being the 
average width of the stopes! The strike is east and the average dip 
is said to be 35° N., but at the lower tunnel level the orebody appears 
to be lying nearly flat. Tailings are disposed of in North Fork 
Feather River. 

The mine equipment consists of houses, barns, blacksmith shop and 
electric hoist. The reduction equipment includes a complete new 
10-stamp 1000-pound Hendy mill. This was installed in the latter 
part of 1911 but on account of the suit was never operated. There 
is also an old 2-stamp mill which can be put into shape to run. 

Water from North Fork Feather River to the amount of 2500" 
under 30' head is available for turbines. Cost of treating ore with 
the old equipment was $2.50. Tailings vary from 50ff to $1,25. 

Whitney Group. Owner, A. W. Whitney, Crescent Mills. 

Location: Crescent Mills Mining District, Sec. 23, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., 1 mile 

west of Crescent Mills on Indian Valley Railroad. 
Bibliography: Diller, J. S.. U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 363, pages 114-115. 

Llndgren, W., U. S. Greol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U. S. 

GreOl. Survey Topo. sheets Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of four locations, the Jackson, Munro, 
Tunnel and Lizzie (fraction), a total of 70 acres, covering a length 
along the lode of 3000'. It is situated near the top of the ridge back 
of Crescent Mills, 1000' above the floor of Indian Valley. There is a 
fair stand of timber on the property. 

In early days rich pockets were taken out from the surface work- 
ings to a depth of 50'. It has been worked recently under bond by 
W. W. Robbins, but is idle at present. 

The vein is developed by a 60' crosscut adit, then a drift of 50' on 
the vein. Pocket mining has been done for a length of 100' and to 
an average depth of 50'. 

There is one cherty quartz vein, really a siliceous zone with no 
well-defined walls, impregnated with sulphides, marcasite, pyrite and 
a small amount of finely disseminated galena. Very little free gold 
has been found below the oxidized zone, a depth of 50'. Some ore 
containing as high as 5% sulphide, goes $200, but the best values are 
in ore containing galena. The walls are siliceous rhyolite. The ore 
zone varies from 8' to 10', but the sulphides are not equally dis- 
tributed. The strike is N. 32° W., the dip vertical and there is a 
proven length on the surface of 300'. No distinct pay shoots 
developed. 

There is a blacksmith shop at the mine. 

This district will be supplied with power by the Great Western 
Power Company from their Big Meadow project. 

The Green Mountain and Crescent mines adjoin. 



172 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBGES. 

Wolters Hme. (Fall River Consolidated Mine.) Owner, C. 
Wolters, Qibsonville. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec 24, T. 21 N., R. 7 E., 10 miles 
from Lumpkin, 9 miles west from La Porte. Elevation 4500'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, XII, page 216; XIII, page 293. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Polio 43, Bldwell Bar. 

This property consists of three claims, two of which are patented, 
containing 60 acres and having a length along the lode of 4500'. It 
is situated on the west side of Fall River and has good tunnel sites 
and a good stand of timber. 

It was discovered in 1888 by Jack Moore and purchased by Wolters 
and Company in 1889. There has been a total production of 
about $2000. 

The property is developed by a 700' tunnel to the first vein, which 
is then continued 150' to strike the second vein, on which there is a 
50' shaft, and drifts 100' south and 250' north. Two shoots of 50' 
and 100' were stoped for an average width of 4'. 

The deposit consists of quartz fissure veins containing free gold, 
chalcopyrite and pyrite. The foot-wall is porphyry, the hanging waU 
granite. The vein varies from 4' to 6', strikes northeast and dips 
45° W. There is a length proven at intervals on the surface of 700'. 
The pay shoots, stoped, milled $6 to $7 per ton; and carried 4% sul- 
phides assaying $50 to $150 per ton. Two hundred inches of water 
under 80' head are available from Fall River. 

Snow destroyed the 5-stamp mill three years ago. 

The Cayot mine adjoins. 

GOLD— PLACER MINES. 
Albion Claim. Owner, Edman Estate, Quincy. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 32, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 12 miles by 
automobile road southwest of Quincy via Meadow Valley. Elevation" 3500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98, 99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

Very little work has been done on this property, and it has prac- 
tically been abandoned. 

Bonnie Mine. (Eclipse.) Owner, Bonnie Hydraulic Mining Com- 
pany, care W. C. Moran, Berkeley, California. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 22 N., R. 10 E., 25 miles 
southeast of Quincy by good automobile road to Eclipse. Elevation 6500'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property contains 320 acres characterized by lava-capped hills 
and steep canons. 

It was formerly worked as a hydraulic and drift mine, and in 1913 
there were two leasers just starting to drift. „ 

The gold is found in recent (Pleistocene) and glacial gja-vels and 
is probably derived from the quartz veins occurring in the^ slates on 
the eastern slope of Pilot Peak. 



tttJMAS COUNTY. 173 

Water is obtained from Poorman's Creek, a tributary to Nelson 
Creek and North Fork Feather Kiver. 

Boulder West Mine. Owner, Frank Chapman. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 24, T. 23 N., R. 9 E., 8 miles due 
south of Quincy, with a total distance by wagon road via Nelson Point to 
ridge above mine of 20 miles, then 1 mile of fair horse trail. Elevation 
4500'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The holdings consist of one location 20 acres in extent, covering 
the creek for 1500'. Steep canons are characteristic of the country. 

Surface sluicing only has been done, the values being found in 
shallow present creek gravels on a bedrock of serpentine. Gold 
probably derived from quartz and ancient channels above. 

Water is obtained from Washington Creek and Middle Fork. 

Adjoining mines are the Oversight quartz mine and Bainbridge 
(now Golden Gate). 

China Gulch Mine. Owner, M. A. Chaplin, Bucks Ranch. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 34, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 5 miles 
south of Bucks Ranch by trail, and 30 miles froip Quincy. Elevation 
5600'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

The property consists of one claim of 20 acres. It is on the north 
side of the Middle Fork Feather River, and has been worked for a 
year by Chinese. One man is sluicing. 

Colombo Claim. Owner, G. Giamboni and Company, Oakland. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 14, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 1 mile west 
of Johnsville, thence 7 miles by good automobile road to Blairsden. Ele- 
vation 6000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property consists of a 20-acre location on glacial gravel. 
Some work was done on the claim in 1913. 

Denning Mine. Owner, Lee F. Denning. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 1, T. 22 N., R. 7 E., 7 miles 
. south of Buck's Ranch, by trail; thence it is 17 miles northeast to Quincy, 
by automobile road. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

Property is situated on a branch of Willow Creek, one mile from 
the North Fork Feather River. Owner working alone. 

English Bar Group. Owners, Pauly Brothers, Nelson Point, and 
Judge Moncure, Quincy. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 11, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 2 miles 

northeast of Nelson Point. Elevation 4050'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

At the present time these claims are under option and are being 
prospected by a company for dredging purposes. 



12—46902 



174 MINES AND MINERAL BESOUBOES. 

Fenton Group. Owners, R. L. Fenton and Wm. Dushman, Gapay, 
Yolo County. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 8, T. 23 N., R. 7 B., 19 miles 
southwest of Quincy, by good automobile road, via Buck's Ranch. Ele- 
vation 5300'. 

Bibliosrraphy : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bldwell Bar. 

Property consists of two claims, the Grizzly Gulch and Lava Gulch, 
both located in 1913. Assessment work only has been done, pending 
the securing of a right from the Forestry Bureau to run three-fourths 
mile of ditch from Lava GulcE . 

Flaanigan Bline. Owner, Wm. Flannigan, Belden. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sec. 28, T. 26 N., R. 7 E. 
Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

This property is situated on Soda Ravine, tributary to Mosquito 
Creek. The creek gravel carries smooth coarse gold and rough 
quartz gold. 



Forest Grove Mine. Owner, Jerry Curtiss, Twain. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 9, T, 22 N., R. 11 E., 5 miles west 
of Johnsville, 10 miles southwest of Blairsden by trail. Elevation 6000'. 

Bibliography: Llndgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 

This property comprises 20 acres, with a length of 2000' along a 
channel of bench gravel about 1000' above the present creek bed. 

It was located in 1884 by B. L. Jones, who took out $7000 by 
hydraulicking. Curtiss bought it in 1891 and has taken out $3000 by 
sluicing. One man was working all the time in 1914, but most of the 
available ground had been worked out. 

The deposit is bench gravel, which may have come from the country 
rock of slate and porphyry. It averages 8' in depth for a width of 
75', and has been worked for a length of 2000'. 

Equipment consists of cabin, tools, blacksmith shop, etc. 

Four hundred inches of water with an 80' head is obtained with a 
one and one-half mile ditch from a creek on the north side of Eureka 
Peak. 

The West Elizabeth is an adjoining mine. 

Fortuna Mine. (Diana.) Owner, W. Schield and Company, La 

Porte. 

Location: La Porte Mining District, Sees. 31 and 32, T. 22 N., R. 9 E., distant 
6 miles from La Porte by good wagon road and 35 miles from Quincy. 
Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 105. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downievllle. 

The property consists of 150 acres of unpatented land extending 
three-fourths of a mile along the present stream channel. 

The surface gravels have been worked at intervals since early days. 
It was worked by C. E. Gillette, relocated by Quigley, and in part was 
purchased by the present owners. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 175 

Development consists of two tunnels 150' and 145' in length, imder 
the lava, and a 22' shaft put down 150' beyond the end of the 
145' tunnel. 

The deposit represents present river gravels, eroded from rocks of 
the bedrock series and lava gravel, running east. Bedrock has not 
been reached, as too much water was encountered in the shaft. The 
deposit is capped with andesite and basalt. The gravel is fine, but 
has some large boulders in it. A portion lying on 'hardpan' to a 
depth of 7' is said to have averaged 16^ to 24^ per yard. No test 
pits or drilling have been done, and until some work has been done, 
the value, depth, etc., are problematical. Surface gravels can only 
be worked profitably by dredge or dragline scraper. 

• 

Garfield Claim. (Garibaldi.) Owner, P. Laurenzi, Sonoma City. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 4 miles north- 
west of Jolinsvllle. Elevation 5500'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 294. Lindgren, W., 
U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, 
Down lev ille. 

This property consists of 40 acres. Assessment work was done 
in 1913. 

Gard and Orr. (See Sierra County.) 

GreneraJ Harrison Mine. (Standard Mining Company.) Owner, 
Chris Radeovich, Johnsville ; C. A. Macomber, secretary, San Anselmo. 
One thousand acre location, dam and two-mile ditch. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 19, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., 9 miles west 
of Johnsville. Blairsden is 14 miles northeast by good wagon and auto- 
mobile road. Elevation 5000'. 

Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Reports, XII, page 216; XIII, page 294. 
Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. U. S. Geol. 
Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

The property embraces 40 acres, covering one-half mile along 
Nelson Creek, held by the present owner since 1882. The mine con- 
sists of present creek gravels on a bedrock of slate. It is now 
worked out. 

The Queen group adjoins. 

Oreenblower Group. Owner, H. J. Greenblower. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sees. 30 and 31, T. 23 N., R. 8 W., 
6 miles southeast of Bucks Ranch, by trail, thence 17 miles northeast to 
Quincy, by automobile road. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of a number of claims on the south slope of 
Mt. Ararat, two miles north of the Feather River. Owner working 
alone. 

Hellas Mine. Owner, Edman Estate, Quincy. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 33, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., 2 miles south- 
east of Meadow Valley, thence 9 miles by good automobile road east to 
Quincy. Elevation 3500'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property covers creek gravels, but it has practically been 
abandoned. 



176 MINES AND MINERAL BE60URCES. 

Jones Placer Kline. (Weaver.) Owner, David Jones, Waldo, 
Yuba County, California. 

Location: Edmanton Mining Distrkt, Sec. 7, T. 23 N.. R. 8 E., 2 miles east 
of Bucks Ranch, by good trail, thence 17 miles northeast to Quincy, by 
Ifood automobile road. Elevation 5200'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W.. V. S. Geol. Sur\'ry Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

One man, J. C. Kaiser, has been working on the claim, ground 
sluicing, for the past four years. 

Joseph Group. (Emerson and McMullin mine.) Owner, A. Joseph, 
Quincy. Bonded to R. C. Jackson. Folsom and Twenty-second 
streets, San Francisco. 

Location: Genesee Valley Mining District. Sees. 2 and 11, T. 24 N., R. 11 E., 

7 miles south of Genesee, by trail ; 22 miles northwest of Portola, by 

wagon road. Elevation 5280'. 
Bibliography: Cal. State Min. Bur. Report XIII, page 292. Diller, J. S., U. S. 

Geol. Survey Bull. 260, pages 45-49. Diller, J. S., U, S. Geol. Survey 

Bull. 353, pages 111-121. 

King Solomon Group. Owners, Lucky Strike Mining Company, 
H. 0. Howard, Lovelock, Nevada. 

Location: Taylorsville Mining District, Sec. 30, T. 25 N., R. 11 E., 6 miles 
southeast of Taylorsville, thence 12 miles southwesterly, by good auto- 
mobile road to Keddle (W. P. Ry.). 

Bibliography: Diller, J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 363, 1908. U. S. Geol. 
Survey Topo. sheets Taylorsville, Indian Valley, Honey Lake. 

The Kinji: Solomon group of six placer claims was acquired early in 
1915 by the above company. The company took a bond on the group 
in 1912 and has performed sufficient work to demonstrate the presence 
of rich gravel. The channel has been traced for a mile, and at places 
is 300' wide. Most of the work consists of shafts and open cuts, but 
preparations are being made for more thorough development. 

Little Star Mine. Owner, S. A. Pezzola, Johnsville. 

Location: Johnsville Mining District, Sec. 24, T. 22 N., R. 11 E., near border of 
Johnsville, 9 miles west of Blairsden, by automobile road. Elevation 5200'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren. W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, page 111. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

This property comprises 40 acres of locations in the creek bed just 
above Johnsville. It has a length along the channel of 3000'. 

The claims were relocated by the present owner in 1909. About 
20 acres of the property was worked in early days. Assessment work 
only being done at present. 

The deposit consists of free glacial and creek gravels, with some 
boulders. They are the surface gravel of Jamison Creek, the gold 
being derived from the erosion of the Plumas Eureka and Jamison 
'/eins. The channel courses north. 

The Jamison placer and Plumas Eureka quartz mines adjoin. 

McParlane Mine. Owner, Vernon Hammet. 

Location: Edmanton Mining District, Sec. 7, T. 23 N., R. 8 E., 3 miles east of 
Bucks Ranch by trail, thence 17 miles northeast to Quincy by good auto- 
mobile road. 

Bibliography : Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43. Bidwell Bar. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 177 

This mine is idle at present, owner working on the Star Plumas 
claim. 

Minerva Bar Claim. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 18, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 3 miles 

west of Nelson Point. Elevation 3800'. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

Formerly owned by Minerva Bar Mining Company. Last work 
done by Scott Beaser, in 1911. 

Nelson Creek Claim. Owners, E. C. Fish, Oroville; C. M. Root, 
Nelson Point. 

Location: Sawpit Flat Mining District, Sec. 22, T. 23 N., R. 10 E., 1 mile 
south of Nelson Point, thence 11 miles northwest to Quincy, by good auto- 
mobile road. Elevation 4000'. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 37, Downieville. 

Assessment work only being done. 

Nelson Creek Gravel Company. (See under Drift.) 

New York Mine. Owner, N. H. Fries. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 15, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., 2 miles 
south of Buck's Ranch, thence 17 miles northeast to Quincy by good auto- 
mobile road. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bldwell Bar. 

This property consists of 40 acres, with ground owned by Gold 
Mountain Hydraulic and Dredging Company. Owner working alone. 

Plumas Investment Company. Owner, Plumas Investment Com- 
pany, W. P. Hammon, 433 California Street, San Francisco. 

Location: Spanish Ranch Mining District. Elevation 3700'-3900'. 

The company's holdings comprise three groups: The Mountain 
House No. 59, four miles northwest of Spanish Ranch in Sec. 31, T. 
25 N., R. 8 E. ; the Pine Leaf No. 91, one mile north of Spanish Ranch 
in Sec. 11, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., and the Silver Star group containing 
six hundred acres in Sec. 15, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., about one mile west of 
Spanish Ranch. The latter group takes in Spanish Creek Valley, 
west of the town. No work is being done on any of these claims. 

Quartz Ravine Claim. Owner, II. Smith. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. __, T. 23 N., R. 7 E., south of 
Bucks Ranch, thence 17 miles northeast to Quincy, by good automobile road. 
Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

Owner is doing assessment work alone. Property is situated on 
Willow Creek. 

Red Saddle Mine. Owner, Mark A. Chaplin. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 3, T. 22 N., R. 7 E., 7 miles, by 
trail, south of Buck's Ranch, thence 17 miles northeast to Quincy, by good 
automobile road. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This deposit consists of creek gravels located south of China Gulch 
claim. 



178 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Bock Bim Mine. 

Location: Granite Basin Mining District, Sec. 2, T. 22 N., R. 7 E., 7 miles 
south of Bucks Ranch, by trail, thence 17 miles northeast to Quincy, by 
automobile road. 

Bibliography: U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bldwell Bar. 

Situated on Willow Creek, one mile from Middle Fork Feather 
River, near the China Gulch mine. Owner is doing assessment work 
alone. 

Woods Bavine Mine. Owner, R. Gifford, Spanish Ranch. 

Location : Spanish Ranch Mining District, Sec. 7. T. 24 N., R. 9 E., IJ miles 
northwest of Spanish Ranch, 9 miles to Quincy, by good automobile road. 
Elevation 3800'. 

Bibliography: Lindgren, W., U. S. Gteol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 98-99. 
U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 43, Bidwell Bar. 

This property consists of 40 acres in a ravine fed from the Badger 
and Gopher Hill mines and the tailings are reworked. No work has 
been done in the last few years. 



DREDGING. 

Gold Mountain Hydraulic and Dredging Company. (See under 
Hydraulic.) 

Mountain Meadow Dredging Company. Owner, same, Chicago; 
E. E. Stirling, in charge. 

Location : Crescent Mills Mining District, 8 miles from Susanville. 
Bibliography: Dlller. J. S., U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 353, pages 114, 115. 

Lindgren, W., U. S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 73, pages 114-116. U, S. 

Geol. Survey Topo. sheet Indian Valley, Taylorsville, Honey Lake. 

This property consists of 3000 acres located by Lloyd Baker of 
Chicago. It was reported that a dredge was to be installed during 
1915, but the project did not materialize. 

LIMESTONE. 

Pyramidal Placer Mine. Owners, H. C. Flournoy, Quincy; D. W. 
Johnson, 742 Market street, San Francisco ; C. J. Lee, Quincy. 

Location: Butte Valley Mining District, Sees. 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, 21 and 28, 
T. 25 N., R. 8 E., 4 miles northwest of Twain; Virgilia (W. P. Ry.) 
2 miles south. Elevation 3000'-5500'. 

Bibliography : U. S. Geol. Survey Folio 15, Lassen Peak. 

Property consists of 940 acres. High ridges with steep slopes to 
watercourses characterize the surface. 

The ground was first located in 1896, was relocated by the present 
owners in 1908. Assessment work only has been done. The deposit 
is crossed by the Western Pacific Kailway at Virgilia, and if it will 
average CaCog, as the sample shows, it is undoubtedly of commercial 
value. 

A 142' open cut across the deposit is the only work that has been 
done, and so far this has not encountered the west wall. 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 179 

The following analysis of the rock was made by F. C. Pioda of the 
Spreckels Sugar Refinery from a sample taken by Mr. Flournoy : 

SiOa 4.71% 

FCgOg and Al^ 0.37 

CaCOg 93.63 

CaS04 Trace 

MgCOs -98 

Undetermined .31 



100.00% 

MANGANESE.! 

Braito Mine. Owners, Fred E. Braito and T. J. Mason, Crescent 
Mills. Comprises one claim in Sec. 26, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., M. D. M., 
near Crescent Mills. 

The ore body lies in schist and strikes northwest. It is developed 
by open cuts and a tunnel, which showed mixed ore for a width of 
4' to T. 

During 1917 the property was under lease to the Noble Electric 
Steel Company. They employed 30 to 40 men and up to January 1, 
1918, had shipped 20 carloads of ore to their Heroult smelter. 

Burch and Woody Prospect is near the line of Sees. 21 and 28, 
T. 26 N., R. 9 E., four miles west of Crescent Mills. When the prop- 
erty was visited in 1917, a small amount of manganese oxide, which 
was too siliceous to sell, had been taken out. 

Crystal Lake Manganese Group, known also as the Mt. Hough, is 
owned by H. A. and R. L. Kloppenburg and H. S. Myton of Quincy 
and leased to Smith Brothers of Taylorsville, who bought the lease 
from Allen and Robinson. 

The group comprises three claims in Sec. 8, T. 25 N., R. 10 E., on 
Mt. Hough, five miles east of Indian Falls. Half a mile of road was 
required to reach the deposit. 

Allen and Robinson shipped ten cars of ore from the property 
before selling their lease. Smith Brothers report shipments of seven 
or eight carloads during 1918, and expect to keep up production 
during 1919. 

The ore could be traced for 200' along the strike, N. 42° W. When 
visited, an orebody 6' wide and pitching 80° SW., was exposed. It 
is said that the ore from this property carries from 50% to 54% 
metallic manganese, which would make it equal in grade to any in 
the state. It has been sought after for use in dry batteries. 



*From Bulletin 76, Calif. State Mining Bureau, August, 1918. 



180 MINES AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

Diadem Lode is one of a group of three claims which include 20 
acres in Sec. 33, T. 24 N., R. 8 E., fourteen miles southwest of Quincy. 
Manganese oxides and rhodonite are reported to occur in a quartz 
vein on this claim associated with iron oxide. The vein strikes N. 
37° W. and dips 60° NE. 

No development work for manganese had been done at time of 
visit and it is believed that the deposit is only superficial. 

Iron Queen Claim was located by Chas. Devlin and A. F. Smith in 
Sec. 8, T. 26 N., R. 9 E., about six miles northwest of Crescent Mills. 
Two small, short open cuts had developed a little good ore, bul most 
of the manganese oxide was too siliceous. 

The Penrofle Mine, on Mumford Hill, three miles southwest of 
Meadow Valley, near Edmanton, shows an occurrence of manganese 
oxides in the gossan of a quartz vein similar to that at the Diadem 
lode. The deposit is probably superficial. 

MOLYBDENUM.i 

The Dufay and Eyhi properties near the Mohawk mine (about eight 
miles northwest of Chilcoot) have been worked for copper ores which 
are said to carry some molybdenite. Some ore was shipped by Dufay 
in 1915, but apparently no use was made of the molybdenite con- 
tained. 

Mohawk Mine. The ore at this copper property, which lies eight 
miles by road northwest of Chilcoot, is said to carry a small amount 
of molybdenite, but none of it has been recovered separately. 

Murdock Mining Company. The property contains nine claims 
located nine miles northwest of Chilcoot and a mile beyond the 
Mohawk. Shoots of molybdenite ore occur here in quartz veins 
which carry principally bornite and chalcopyrite. Two tons of high 
grade molybdenite were picked out of the dump and shipped by lessees 
in 1916, but no production has been reported since. The vein prin- 
cipally developed is 3' to 4' wide, and it is said that it can be traced 
for over half a mile. A more detailed description of the mine is given 
under Copper. 

SILVER. 
Indian Valley Silver Mine. (See under Gold — Lode.) 



^From Bulletin 80, Tungsten, Molybdenum, Vanadium, Nickel. Cal. State Mining 
Bureau (in preparation). 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 181 

STONE INDUSTRY. 
The Chilcoot Granite Company. R. B. Myers, manager, 204 Bacon 
Block, Oakland, owns a granite quarry near Chilcoot on the Western 
Pacific Railroad, but it has not been operated recently. 

Paul Sonognini, at Chilcoot, has a granite quarry which he has 
operated in a small way for several years past, but it was idle in 1938. 

The Western Pacific Railroad, at several places along their right 
of way in Plumas County, but principally near Chilcoot, utilizes 
granite for rubble and ballast. A ditcher, Rodger's ballast, and flat 
cars are used. 



INDEX. 



Page 

Albion claim 172 

Alhambra mine _. , 94-95 

Altoona mine 95 

Alum Cove mine. ( See Western mine. ) 

American House District 27-31 

Analysis of limestone from Pyramidal 

placer mine 179 

Antelope mine 95-96 

Antlered Crest mine 64-65 

Arcadian mine 96-97 

Argentine and Heath mine. (See Gold 

Leaf Consolidated Mines Company.) 

Auriferous grra,vels 1, 3, 5, 8, 

9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 

25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 34, 35, 

36, 37, 40, 41. 42, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49 

Australia mine 65 

Placer Mining Company 65, 67 

Austrian Syndicate mine 97 

Bainbridge mine. (See Golden Gate 
mine.) 

Bald Mountain, elevation of 28 

Barite 36 

Barker Hill claim 65 

Hill No. 10 mine. (See Dutch 
Hill mine.) 
Basin Beauty mine. (See Homestake 
mine. ) 

Beckwith Consolidated mina 65-66 

Beetle Group 98 

Bell Quartz mine 98-99 

Bellevue Mining Company 66-67 

Bessie mine 67 

Bibliography, Butte Valley Mining 

District 2 

Crescent Mills Mining District— 5 

Edmanton Mining District 9 

Genesee Mining District 13 

Granite Basin Mining District 19 

Johnsville Mining District 22 

La Porte Mining District 28 

Light's Caflon Mining District— 32 

Quincy Mining District 37 

Sawpit Flat Mining District 42 

Spanish Ranch Mining District. _ 47 

Taylorsville Mining District 50 

Big Cliff mine 99 

Bigelow claim 99-100 

Black Bart mine 100 

Oak claim 169 

Blackie mine. (See Bellevue Mining 

Company. ) 
Blaine mine. (See Wardlow mine.) 

Blast furnace, at Engels mine 57 

Blue Bell mine 100 

Gravel claim 89 

Consolidated mine 67 

Nose mine. (See Morning Star 
Consolidated Placer Mines Com- 
pany. ) 

Bonnie mine 172-173 

BootjacK mine. (See Bellevue Min- 
ing Company.) 

Boulder West mine 173 

Boycott mine 89 

Boyd mine 101 

Braito mine 179 

Brooks mine. (See Duncan mine.) 



Page 

Brown Bear mine 89-90 

Bear Mining Company 69 

Buckeye, District 18-21 

elevation of town of 19 

Bull claim 68 

Bullion claim lOl 

mine loi 

Bunker Hill, elevation of 22 

Hill mine 68 

Burch and Woody Prospect 179 

Bureau of Mines, United States, cited 54. 

Bushman mine 68-69 

(See also. Saint Nicolas mine.) 

Buster Group 102 

Butt Valley. (See Butte Valley.) 

Butte and Iron Lily mines 102-103 

Bar mine 102 

Valley, elevation of town of 1 

Butte Valley Mining District 1-4 

bibliography of 2 

geology of 2-3 

history of mining in. 1 

mineral deposits of 3-4 

topography of : 2-3 

Butterfly Group 103-104 

Cabalan claim. (See Prospect claim.) 

Caldwell mine 104-105, 137 

California Gold Mining and Invest- 
ment Company 94 

Group 105 

Cameron mine 69 

Carr mine 69 

Cascade mine 90 

Cash Entry Group 69 

Castle Rock mine 90 

Cayot mine 105-106 

Centennial mine. (See Five Bears 
mine.) 

(See also, Queen Group.) 

Channel Peak Mining Company 69-70 

Chaparral Hill, elevation of 47 

Cherokee Group 106 

Chicken Flat mine 106-107 

Chico Star mine 107 

Chilcoot Granite Company 181 

China Gulch mine 173 

Chips Creek mine. (See Plumas De- 
velopment Company.) 

Chromite 12, 46, 47 

production of, 1880-1918 53 

mines 54 

(See also. Iron.) 

Clara mine 107-108 

Claybank claim 70 

Clear Creek mine. (See Justice 
Group. ) 

Cleveland claim 90 

Coal 18, 32 

Colombo claim 173 

Commercial mine 108 

Consolidation, Drury and Pacific, 
Standart and McGill, John Bull and 

East Phoenix. (See Droege 

mine.) 
Continental Mining Company 70 



184 



INDEX. 



Page 

Copper— 4, 8, 12, 13. 18, 31. 32, 36, 49, 52 
costs. (See Cost data.) 

mines 54—64 

production, 1880-191^ 53 

Copper Bull mine 135 

K.lng and Copper Queen mine8-54-55 

Coquette mine ' 108 

Cosmopolitan mine 108-109 

Cost data. 

milling at . alkcrs Brothers mine 64 

at White Lily mine 171 

mining, at Gold Mountain Hy- 
draulic and Dredging Company 92 

at Sunnycide mine 87 

operating, at Droege mine 115 

at Five Bears mine 118 

at Jamison mina 137 

at New York mine 150 

production of copper, at Engels 

mine, 1918 59 

Coyote Group 109 

Crescent Mills, elevation of town of__ 4 

Mills Mining District 4-8 

bibliography of 5 

geology cf 6-8 

history of mining in 4-5 

mineral deposits of 8 

topography of 5-6 

Crescent mine 107-111 

Mill and Mining Company 109-111 

Hill Gold Mining Company 111 

Crown Point and Summit Group — 111-112 

Crystal Lake Manganese Group 173 

Cyanide plant of Mother Lode Mining 
and Reduction Company 145-146 

Dabney claim 112 

Darby mine. (See Lucky Strike 
mine.) 

Deadwood mine 70-71 

Dean and Yearin mine 112 

mine 112 

Del Monte mine 112-113 

Denning mine 173 

de Varilla, W., cited 74 

Diadem mine 113 

lode 180 

Diana mine. (See Fortuna mine.) 

Diller, J. S., cited 56 

Districts. (See Mining Districts.) 
Dixie Queen mine. (See Round Lake 
mine.) 

Dominion mine 71 

Dora mine 113-114 

Dredging, gold 178 

Drift mines, gold 64-89 

Droege mine 114-115 

operating costs at 115 

Drury mine. (See Droege mine.) 

Dufay and Eyhi properties 180 

Duncan mine 115, 116 

Duquesne mine. (See West Eliza- 
beth Mining Company.) 
Dutch Hill mine 71-72 

Hill No. 11 mine 71-72 

Dyer Peak, elevation of 1 

East Phoenix mine. (See Droege 

mine. ) 
Eclipse. (See Onion Valley.) 
mine. (See Bonnie mine.) 

Eddelbuttel, L., chromite location 54 

Edison. claim ^ 72 



Page 
Edman and Red Point mine. (See 
Diadem mine.) 

Edman ton, elevation of town of 9 

Mining District 8-12 

bibliography of 9 

geology of — _ 10-11 

history of mining in 9 

mineral deposits of 11-12 

topography of 9-10 

Edna mine. (See Bellevue Mining 
Company. ) 

El Dorado Group 55 

Elizabeth Consolidated Gold Mines. 11 6-11 7 

Elizabethtown District 36-41 

Flat mine 72-73 

Emerson and McMullin mine. (See 
Joseph GrouD.) 

Emigrant Hill mine 73 

Engels mine 55-59 

blast furnace at 57 

copper production cost at 59 

flotation plant at 57 

production of, 1918 59 

English Bar Group 173 

Erickson mine. (See Australia mine.) 

Eureka Peak, elevation of 22 

Consolidated mine. (See Belle- 
vue Mining Company.) 
Eyhi property ^^^ 

Fairfield claim 73 

Fairplay mine 117 

Fairstake mine. (See Newtown Con- 
solidated placer mines.) 
Fall River Consolidated mine. (See 
Wolters mine.) 

Fenton Group 174 

Five Bears mine 118-119 

operating costs at 118 

Flannigan mine 174 

Flotation plant, at Engels mine 57 

at Walker Brothers mine 64 

Foisie, J. L., chromite prospect 54 

Folsom and Hunter Group 59 

Fordham copper property 59 

Drift mines 73-74 

Group 90-91 

Forest Grove mine 174 

Fortuna mine 174-175 

Franklin Consolidated mine. (See 
Queen Group.) 

Fred Scott mine 86 

Frazier mine. ( See Black Bart mine. ) 

Frenchman Hill, elevation of 19 

Friendship mine H^ 

Galena. (See Lead.) 
Gallagher mine. (See Plumas Mo- 
hawk mine.) 

Gard and Orr 175 

Garfield claim 17d 

Garibaldi claim. ( See Garfield claim. ) 

Gems, production of, 1880-1918 53 

General Harrison mine 175 

Genesee, elevation of town of — . 1- 

Minlng District 12-18 

bibliography of 13 

geology of 14-17 

history of mining in 13 

mineral deposits of 17-18 

topography of 13-14 



INDEX. 



185 



Page 
Grenesee mine. (See G-russ mine.) 

Valley Copper Company 99, 148 

Geology, Butte Valley Mining District 2-3 
Crescent Mills Mining District __» 6-8 

Edmanton Mining District 10-11 

Genesee Mining District 14-17 

Granite Basin Mining District 20 

Johnsville Mining District 23-25 

La Porte Mining District 29-30 

Light's Caflon Mining District— 33-35 

Quincy Mining District 39-40 

Sawpit Flat Mining District 43-45 

Spanish Ranch Mining District 48 

Taylorsville Mining District 50-52 

Giamboni and Company, G 173 

Gifford, J., chromite prospect 54 

Girard Piano Company 113-114 

Glazier mine 74 

Gloria Mundi claim 74 

Gold, production of, 1880-1918 53 

mines 64-178 

dredging 178 

drift 64-89 

hydraulic 89-94 

lode 94-172 

placer (surflcial) 172-178 

Gold Lake, District ^ 18-21 

elevation of town of 19 

Gold Leaf mine 1 119 

Consolidated Mines Com- 
pany 119-120 

Mountain Hydraulic and Dredg- 
ing Company : 91-92 

mining costs of 92 

Run mine 121 

Stripes mine 120-121 

Golden Ancient Channel Mining Com- 
pany 74-75 

Gate mine 91, 121-122 

Horseshoe copper mine 59-60 

Granite, production of, 1880-1918 53 

(See, also. Stone Industry.) 

Granite Basin, elevation of town of 19 

Basin Mining District 18-21 

bibliography of 19 

geology of 20 

history of mining in 19 

mineral deposits of 21 

topography of 19-20 

Graphite, in Murdock copper mines. _ 61 

Graton, L. C, cited 56 

Green Ledge mine 122 

Mountain mine 123-124 

Greenblower Group 175 

Greenville, District 4-8 

elevation of town of 4 

Grizzly Bear mine. (See Plumas Mo- 
hawk mine.) 

Grubstake and Juniata mines 124 

Gruss mine 124-126 

Halloway mine. (See Smith mine.) 

Halstead Quartz mine 126 

Heath mine. (See Gold Leaf Con- 
solidated Mines Company.) 

HazjBard mine 126-127 

Hellas mine 175 

Hematite. (See Iron.) 
Hibernia mine. (See Southern Eu- 
reka Group.) 
High Grade claim 127 



Pase 
Highland Cliff mine. (See Homestake 

mine. ) 

Hinchman mine 127-128 

Hobson Group 128 

Homestake mine 129 

Honeycomb claim 130 

Hope claim 75 

Horseshoe mine 130 

Hughes mine. (See Magee claim.) 

Hughes, Thomas, chromite location 54 

Hulsman mine 130 

Hungarian Hill mine. (See Plumas 

Imperial Group.) 

Hunter Group 59 

Hussleman and Shaw Group 130-132 

Hydraulic King mine. (See Gold 

Mountain Hydraulic and Dredging 

Company.) 

mines, gold 89-94 

Imperator mine 132 

Independence mine 132 

Indian Falls mines 133-134 

Falls Development Company 133 

Indian Placer mines 75-76 

Valley mine 134 

silver mine 135 

International Smelting Company 63-64 

Iron 4, 9, 12, 22, 32, 36 

(See, also, Chromite.^ 
Iron Dike mine 135-136 

Lily mine 102 

Queen claim 180 

Jackson mine. ( See Brown Bear mine. ) 

Jamison District 21-27 

mine 136-137 

operating costs at 137 

Jennie mine 137-138 

Jitney chrome mine 54 

John Bull mine. (See Droege mine.) 

Johnsville, elevation of town of 21 

Mining District 21-27 

bibliography of 22 

geology of 23-25 

history of mining in 22 

mineral deposits of 25-27 

topography of 22-23 

Jones placer mine 176 

Joseph Group 176 

Joshua Moss mine 138 

Jumbo mine 76 

Juniata mine 124 

Justice Group 138 

Kanaka Flat mine. (See Maples Flat 
Consolidated placer mine.) 

Kelly mine 76-77 

(See, also, Rose Quartz Mining 
Company. ) 

Kennebeck mine __ 138 

Kenzie mine. (See Bellevue Mining 
Company. ) 

Kettle Rock Mountain, elevation of 13 

Keystone mine. (See Newtown Con- 
solidated placer mines.) 

King Solomon mine 139 

Solomon mines 77 

Solomon Group 176 

Lafayette Drift Gravel Mining Com- 
pany 77