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Full text of "Mines register; successor to the Mines handbook and the Copper handbook ... describing the non-ferrous metal mining companies in the western hemisphere"

HE MINES HANDBOOK 



PENTARCO 

PINE 




OILS 



Take Note of These Facts: 

You want to feel assured that any flotation 
oil you adopt will always run uniform, always 
be available promptly and be dependable in all 
other respects. To be sure that the oil you 
select has these qualifications you must not 
only buy from the manufacturer direct but also 
select a manufacturer who has demonstrated 
his ability to make good on all these points. 

The steadily increasing use of PENTARCO 
oils is founded upon our ability to make good. 



Samples and Literature for the asking 



PENSHCOU TAR 8 TURPENTINE CO. 

GULL POINT, FLORIDA 
F. E. MARINER T. C. WILSON 

PRESIDENT TREAS. & MGR. 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




heFLOTA' ION PROCESS 




is entirely owned, controlled and managed by British and 
American citizens. 

The Corporation owns over fifty patents in the United 
States with corresponding Canadian and Mexican patents 
which include th* BASIC PATENTS and principal improve- 
ments covering and controlling 

THE NOW WORLD-FAMED FLOTATION 
PROCESSES 

for the concentration of metallic values from the ores of 
copper, zinc, lead, gold, silver, graphite, molybdenum, mer- 
cury, etcetera. 

The Corporation is prepared to grant licenses to all who 
wish to use its processes, and to give licensees all possible ad- 
vice and technical assistance. 

The licensed use of the processes will be encouraged in 
every respect with a view to securing the best possible results 
to users. 

No infringement can be permitted, and all infringers will 
be prosecuted. 

To those who have infringed the Corporation's patents, 
notice is given that a settlement for such infringement must 
precede the granting of license for the further use of same. 

No one is authorized to install or use our processes in the 
United States, Canada, Mexico or Cuba without direct written 
sanction or specific license from us. 

All applications to be made direct to 

MINERALS SEPARATION NORTH AMERICAN 
CORPORATION 

Head Office, Engineering Office, 

61 Broadway, 220-228 Battery Street, 

New York, N. Y. San Francisco, California. 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



BALL GRANULATORS 



For Every Condition 




The Ball Granulator as built by the Allis-Chalmers 
Manufacturing Company, represents the highest type 
of design, workmanship, and material in its con* 
struction. Every feature has been developed with 
a view to Economy in Operation and Efficiency. 
Every detail is worthy of your consideration. We 
will be pleased to furnish full descriptive matter of 
the special features which have proved so successful. 




Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. 

Mining Machinery Dept. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

OFFICES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES 



For Canadian Business: 
Canadian Allis-Chalmers, Ltd., Toronto, Ont., Canada 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




Superior Jaw Crusher 




Gt. Falls Type 
Copper Converter 




Superior-McCully 
Gyratory Crusher 




Laidlaw Duplex Motor 
Driven Air Compressor 



Meeting tbe Needs of 
Mine and Smelter 



Hundreds of plants on both American Con- 
tinents are getting the most in service from 

Worthington mining equipment the most 

from the standpoint of first cost, wear, 
capacity and power consumption. 

Worthington meets the needs of the mining 
industries with a complete line of products, 
from which you can select machinery to suit 
all of your requirements. 

Worthington Pump and 
Machinery Corporation 

115 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Air Compressors 
Ball Mills 
Blast Furnaces 
Classifiers 
Concentrators 
Converters (all types) 
Crushers 
Crushing Rolls 



Mine Pumps 
Oil Engines 
Sampling Machinery 
Screens 
Stamp Mills 
Station Pumps 
Track Pumps 
Tube Mills 



PUMPS, COMPRESSORS, OIL AND GAS 

ENGINES, MINING AND SMELTING 

MACHINERY 




CTON 




JOHN D. RYAN, 
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ANACONDA COPPER MINING Co., 

WHOSE BUTTE MlNES YIELD 10% OF THE WORLD'S COPPER SUPPLY. 




/ 
(, 






INTERNATIONAL EDITION 

THE MINES HANDBOOK 

AN ENLARGEMENT OF 

THE COPPER HANDBOOK 

Founded by Horace J. Stevens, 1900 

* \ 

A MANUAL OF 

THE MINING INDUSTRY OF THE WORLD 



BY 
WALTER HARVEY WEED, E.M. 

Former Geologist in the U. S. Geological Survey, 1883-1906; Member 

Institution of Mining and Metallurgy of America; Fellow 

Geological Society of America; Author: Copper 

Mines of the World; Geology of Butte, 

Montana; Nature of Ore 

Deposits, etc. 



VOL. XIV 

Supplementing Volumes I to XIII 

Price $15.00 




PUBLISHED BY 
W. H. WEED 
New York City 
1920 




COPYRIGHT, 1920 

BY 

WALTER HARVEY WEED 




PREFACE 

The present volume, covering the mining industry for 
1918, 1919, and first quarter of 1920, has been entirely re-written 
and descriptions of newly organized companies added. Statis- 
tical chapters covering all the metals are again given, and a 
glossary and chapter on ore minerals included. 

The list of obsolete securities, or so-called "Dead List," has 
been omitted to make room for the thousand or more new 
companies added. A complete list of obsolete mining stocks 
will be published in a separate volume. A full list of the iron 
mining companies of the Lake Superior district is given, and 
the many mining corporations of the lead and zinc fields of 
Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas are included. 

The year 1919 was a very dull one for the base metal min- 
ing industry, and the big companies curtailed their production, 
while the smaller mines were shut down. The present year 
will see a widespread and active demand for all the metals, and 
a corresponding expansion of mine work. 

The MINES HANDBOOK will hereafter be published annually, 
the delay in issuing the present volume being due to labor con- 
ditions and a shortage of paper. 

Mr. M. von Bernewitz and M. Stencel have again been my 
valued assistants in the preparation of the book. 

WALTER HARVEY WEED. 

Tuckahoe, N. Y., April, 1920. 



Vll 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




MINE HOISTS AND MACHINERY 



Years of experience in building ma- 
chinery have gradually developed meth- 
ods in both our engineering and produc- 
ing departments which enable us to ac- 
complish our aim to build machines that 
are mechanically reliable and humanly 
safe. 

These years of diversified engineering 
experience, and the skilled workmanship 
which pur extensive plants afford become 
yours in a very tangible and satisfying 



form when you purchase a Wellman- 
Seaver-Morgan Hoist. 

Send for our Bulletin F. 5, "Electric 
Mine Hoists," and get in closer touch with 
W-S-M equipment for your future needs. 

Haulages, operated by steam or electric 
power, Gravity Incline Machines, Cages, 
Skips, Sheaves, Headframes, etc., have a 
proportionate share in our engineering 
and building activities. 



ORE AND COAL HANDLING MACHINERY 




W-S-M Unloaders: All of the large 
modern ore docks constructed in the last 
six years have been equipped with W-S-M 
Unloaders. 

These machines have become a stand- 
ard for unloading iron ore and are equally 
well adapted to unloading coal. 

Besides W-S-M Unloaders, The W-S-M 
Company constructs complete Ore and 
Coal Handling Plants Re hand ling 
Bridges, Car Dumpers, steam and electric 
driven, Revolving Derricks, etc. 




HUGHES MECHANICAL 
GAS PRODUCER 

Hughes Producers have been 
in use for twenty years and 
more than one thousand of 
them are now in operation 
in various parts of the world. 

The New Jersey Zinc 
Company and other mining 
corporations are finding them 
a valuable asset. 

3,000 tons of bituminous 
coal per hour may be gasi- 
fied by each machine ; both 
the volume and quality of 
gas are highly satisfactory. 

Send for Bulletin F. 4. 




WATER POWER 
EQUIPMENT 

Hydraulic Turbines, ver- 
tical and horizontal settings 
for all heads up to 800 feet. 
Especially designed for high 
efficiency. 

Inquiries are invited and 
further information will be 
furnished gladly, by cata- 
logue, by bulletin or by letter. 



The Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Co., 

Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. 

Branch Offices: New York, Denver, Seattle 




Vlll 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Preface vii 

Alphabetical Index to Advertisers .' xxi 

Buyers' Index xxv 

Index to Maps xxxvii 

General Index xxxix 

Chapter I Glossary of Mining Terms 1 

Chapter II Mineralogy of the Ore Minerals 23 

Chapter III Statistics of the Mining Industry 31 

Production of Metals in the U. S 31 

Yearly Average Metal Prices 31 

Prices of Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc, 1850-1919 32 

Aluminum: 

Production and Prices in the U. S., in pounds 1883-1918 32 

Exports-Imports 33 

Antimony: 

U. S. Production 33 

Market 34 

Antimony Mines 34 

Arsenic: 

U. S. Production 34 

World's Production 34 

Occurrence and Uses 35 

Arsenic Producers ; 35 

> 
Bismuth: 

Occurrence 35 

Prices 35 

Uses 35 

U. S. Imports 36 

Bismuth Producers 35 

\ 

ix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



FULLER-LEfflGH COMPANY 

Successor to 
LEHIGH CAR, WHEEL AND AXLE WORKS 

Main Office and Works: 
FULLERTON, PENNA., U. S. A. 

Manufacturers of 

The Ftiller-Lehigh Pulverizer Mill 

For pulverizing various refractory materials 

Pulverized Coal Equipment, Including Pulverizer Mills, Dryers, 
Roll Crushers and Pulverized Coal Feeders 

Ball Mill Linings Chemical Castings 

Tube Mill Linings Gyratory Crusher Concaves 

Sprocket and Traction Wheels Roll Shells for Roll Crushers 

Car Wheels and Axles Muller Rings for Dry Pans 

Wire Rope Rollers and Track Plates and Perforated 

Sheave Wheels Screens for Dry Pans 

Roll Heads and Rings for Mixer Blades or Paddles 

Roller Mills Lining Plates for Chutes 

Conveyor Gudgeons and Repair Parts 

Bearings Gyratory Crusher Cone 
Jaw Crusher Plates Heads 

Special Castings in Green Sand or Loam 

Send for Catalogue No. 70 
Describing the Fuller-Lehigh Pulverizer Mill 

Send for Catalogue No. 50 
Describing Fuller Quality Products 

Send for Catalogue No. 72 
Describing Pulverized Coal Equipment 

NEW YORK OFFICE CHICAGO OFFICE 

50 Church Street McCormick Building 

SAN FRANCISCO SEATTLE 

719 Sheldon Bldg. ' 714 I r <; m ;th RU 

LONDON, ENGLAND 

25 Victoria St., GERMANY, HAMBURG 

Westminster, S. W. I. "Wallhof," Glockengressermall 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Cadmium: 

World's Production 36 

Carnotite: 

See under Radium 59 

Chromium: 

U. S. Production 36 

Occurrence and Use 36 

Cobalt: 

Canadian Production 37 

Cobalt Producers 37 

Copper: 

Copper Industry 37 

Costs 37 

Production in U. S., 1913-18 39 

High, Low, Average Prices, 1860-1919 39 

Production, Sale, Price, 1905-1916 41 

Copper Smelting Works of North America 41 

Electrolytic Refineries, U. S 42 

Grades of Copper 42 

Description of Copper 42 

Brands of Copper .'. . 43 

Production, U. S. since 1845 44 

World's Production, 1912-18 45 

World's Production, 19th Century and After 46 

U. S. Copper Smelter's Production 46 

Copper Consumers 46 

Copper Imports 47 

Gold: 

Production in U. S 47 

Production by States 48 

World's Production, 1860-1918 48 

Iridium. 

See under Platinum 53 

Iridosmine: 

See under Platinum 58 

Iron: 

Production in U. S., 1899-1919 49 

Prices (Bessemer Pig Iron), 1898-1919 49 

Steel Production in U. S., 1904-1918 49 

World's Production 50 

Production by Countries 50 

Iron Ore Production in U. S., 1902-1919 50 

Prices, 1904-1918 50 

xi 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



The 

Roessler & Hasslacher 

Chemical Company 

1 00 William Street, New York, N. Y 




Cyanide of Sodium, 96-98% 

Cyanogen Contents, 51-52% 



"CYANEGG" 

Sodium Cyanide, 96-98%, in egg form, each egg 
weighing one ounce 

Cyanogen contents, 51-52% 




WORKS : 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Niagara Falls, N. 
St. Albans, W. Va. 



\7 

I . 



XII 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Lead: 

U. S. Production, Price, Value 51 

Lead Prices in New York Since 1886 

Lead Smelters and Refineries in North America 52 

Manganese. 

Production in U. S., 1838-1918 55 

Manganiferous Ore Production 55 

Molybdenum: 

Production, Price, Uses 55 

Ore Buyers 56 

Nickel: 

Occurrence and Uses 56 

Canadian Production (Ontario) 56 

Nickel Producers 57 

Osmium: 

See under Platinum 58 

Palladium: 

See under Platinum 58 

Platinum: 

Production, Prices 57 

Uses 57 

Imports 57 

Platinum Metals: 

Iridium 58 

Palladium 58 

Osmium 58 

Pyrite: 

U. S. Production 58 

Imports 58 

Quicksilver: 

Sources 59 

Use 59 

Production and Prices in U. S 59 

Quicksilver Mines 59 

' f 
Radium, Uranium, Vanadium: 

Occurrence 59 

Production from Carnotite Ores 59 

Carnotite 60 

Producers of Radium 60 

Radium Mines . 60 



xm 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



FROM MINE TO METAL- 

TRAYLOR EQUIPMENT 




Tray lor "Bulldog" Gyratory Crushers 

with the Bend-Proof Shaft Hewes Spider excep- 
tionally large eccentric cut steel gears and per- 
fect force-feed lubrication insure the utmost of 
reliability and economy in every installation. 
Capacities from % to 3,500 tons per hour. Bul- 
letin GX-1. 



Traylor Heavy Duty Crushing Rolls 

eliminate corrugating and flanging of the 
roll shells by means of the "Fleeting 
Roll." The invariable result is greater 
tonnage of finished product per set of 
shells as well as per H. P. consumed. 
Bulletin R-2. 





Traylor "Bulldog" Jaw Crushers 

are the strongest and most efficient on the mar- 
ket. The new "Bulldog" Pitman and Toggle 
System eliminate 80% of the Blake type crusher 
friction load. Capacities from 2 \/2 to 1400 
tons per hour. Bulletin JX-1. 



Traylor Smelting Furnaces 

for copper or silver-lead ores, are built 
with Traylor patented water jackets and 
many other features that render continu- 
ous and economical service to a world- 
wide list of owners. Bulletin SF-1. 



Write for your Bulletin 

Traylor Engineering & Mfg. Co., 




Main Office and Plant: 



NEW YORK 
30 Church Street 



ALLENTOWN, PA. 

PITTSBURGH 
2 1 1 Fulton Building 



CHICAGO 
1414 Fisher Building 



LOS ANGELES 

Citizens Bank Building 



SPOKANE 
Mohawk Block 



xiv 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Selenium: 

Occurrence and Uses 60 

Recovery from Blister Copper 60 

Silver: 

Average Monthly Prices 60 

Production by States (1918) 61 

Production in U. S., 1880-1919 61 

American Silver-Lead Smelting Works 62 

Production of the World, 1882-1919 62 

Steel: > 

See under Iron 49 

Tin: 

Occurrence 63 

U. S. Production / .' . 63 

Prices Yearly Average, 1885-1919 63 

Titanium: 

Occurrence and Uses 63 

Tungsten: 

U. S. Production 64 

Uranium: 

Occurrence 64 

See under Radium 59 

Vanadium: 

Occurrence and Uses 64 

Producers 64 

Vanadium Mines 64 

Zinc (Spelter) : 

Spelter Prices, 1885-1919 65 

U. S. Production, 1873-1918 65 

Chapter IV Mining Companies and Mines of the U. S 69 

Page Page 

UNITED STATES 69 Connecticut 626 

Alabama 120 Georgia 626 

Alaska 121 

Arizona 165 Idaho 633 

Arkansas 408 Illinois 734 

Indiana 737 

California 413 

Colorado , . 496 Kansas . 737 



xv 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



BAHIA, BRAZIL 



DULUTH, MINN. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



The Diamond Drill Carbon Co, 

Importers of and Dealers in 
CARBONS, BORTZ AND BALLAS 




Panning for Carbons in Brazil 



Write or wire at our expense for prices 
and full information 



THE DIAMOND DRILL CARBON CO. 

55-59 Park Row (Pulitzer Bldg.), New York City, N. Y. 



XVI 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Maine 745 

Maryland 746 

Massachusetts 747 

Michigan 747 

Minnesota 857 

Missouri 874 

Montana 901 

Nevada 1007 

New Jersey 1227 

New Mexico 1228 

New York 1264 

North Carolina 1267 

Oklahoma 1270 

Oregon 1294 

Pennsylvania 1313 

Philippines 1867 

Porto Rico 1762 

South Carolina 1315 

South Dakota.. .1316 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



Page 
.1659 



Tennessee 
Texas 



Utah 1341 

Vermont 1467 

Virginia 1468 

Washington 1474 

West Virginia 1511 

Wisconsin 1511 

Wyoming 1519 

CANADA: 

Alberta 1530 

British Columbia 1530 

Manitoba 1586 

New Brunswick 1591 

Nova Scotia 1591 

Ontario 1593 

Quebec 1654 

Saskatchewan 1657 

Yukon Territory 1657 



MEXICO 1661 

Aguascalientes 1666 

Baja California 1666 

Chihuahua 1669 

Coahuila 1685 

Durango 1686 

Guanajuato 1690 

Guerrero 1694 

Hidalgo '. 1695 

Jalisco 1701 

Mexico, D. F 1705 

Michoacan 1709 

Nayarit 1710 

Nuevo Leon 1710 

Oaxaca . . . . 1711 

Puebla 1711 

San Luis Potosi 1712 

Sinaloa 1713 

Sonora 1714 

Tepic 1748 

Zacatecas 1748 

CENTRAL AMERICA: 

Costa Rica 1751 

Guatemala 1753 

Honduras 1753 

Nicaragua 1755 

Salvador 1757 

WEST INDIES: 

Cuba 1760 

Porto Rico 1762 

San Domingo, Hayti 1761 

SOUTH AMERICA. 

Argentina 1763 

Bolivia 1763 

Brazil 1768 

Chile 1770 

Colombia 1786 

Ecuador 1790 

Peru 1790 

Venezuela . 1799 



XVll 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



ROBINS CONVEYING MACHINERY 




ROBINS LABOR SAVING MACHINERY is handling material at many Mines, Mills 
and Smelters at a minimum of cost. Robins Conveyor Belts, when properly selected, 
will give the maximum of service and economy. Write for catalogue. 

ROBINS CONVEYING BELT CO., Park Row Bldg., New York. 
Old Colony Bldg., Chicago. Newhouse Bldg., Salt Lake City. 

Union Arcade Bldg., Pittsburgh. 
C. B. Davis Co., Birmingham, Ala. The Griff en Co., San Francisco 



THE 




WEIGHTOMETER 

Automatically Weighs 

COAL, ORES, FINES, 
CONCENTRATES 




on 



th< 



CONVEYOR 

Delivering or Transferring them 

at your Mill. It is entirely 

mechanical, continuous and 

accurate and needs no 

regular Weighman. 



Merrick Scale Mfg. Co, 

AUTUMN STREET, PASSAIC, N. J. 



XV111 



CONTENTS 



Page 
EUROPE: 

Finland 1802 

Germany 1802 

Great Britain 1804 

Greece 1809 

Italy 1810 

Norway 1811 

Portugal 1815 

Russia 1816 

Serbia 1818 

Spain 1818 

Sweden . 1829 



ASIA: 

China .' 1830 

Dutch East Indies 1832 

Fed. Malay States 1832 

India 1839 

Indo-China 1844 

Japan 1844 

Korea 1863 

Philippines 1867 

Siam 1870 

Siberia ,.1871 



Page 

AUSTRALASIA: 

Australia: 

New South Wales 1880 

Papua (New Guinea) 1888 

Queensland 1889 

South Australia 1894 

Tasmania 1895 

Victoria 1903 

Victoria 1903 

Western Australia 1905 

NEW ZEALAND ' 1911 

NEW CALEDONIA 1913 

AFRICA: 

Cape Colony 1914 

Congo 1917 

Egypt 1921 

Nigeria ..1921 

Portuguese E. A 1924 

Rhodesia 1925 

Southwest Africa 1930 

Transvaal 1931 

WEST AFRICA: 

Gold Coast Colony 1946 

Addenda and Errata 1949 

Index to Addenda . . . . cxviii 



xix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



HUFF ELECTROSTATIC 

DRY CONCENTRATING MILL 




Capacity 400 tons per day. Dust free. 

Designed, constructed and put into successful operation by Huff 
Electrostatic Separator Company, equipped with new type Electrostatic 
Separators and Dust Collecting System. 

ADVANTAGES OF THE 
HUFF PROCESS: 

Low Power Cost 
Low Operating Cost 
Low Repair Cost 
No Roasting 
Dust Free 







ffqc K . ....*%;/ VtV;*v\V 

Po ox CONDUCTOR'S GOOD C 



, ON DUG TO /tS. 

Tfie SEPARATION OF ORES By EL ECTRICITY 

USE HUFF ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATORS for the concentration 
of Zinc-Iron Middlings, Copper, Pyrite, Graphite, Silver, Scheelite, 
Manganese, Rutile, Chromium, Vanadium, Molybdenum, Monazite 
Sands, Coal, Abrasive Materials, Waste and By-Products. 

For Information Write 

Huff Electrostatic Separator Company 
CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

230 W. 13th Street Mystic and Summers Streets 



New York 



Arlington, Mass. 



xx 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

NOTE Roman numerals refer to pages in front of book and Arabic to pages 

in back of book. 



Ahmeek Mining Co 1980 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co 2 

Allouez Mining Co 1980 

American Atmos Corporation, xxxii 

American Cyanamid Co xxvi 

American Metal Co., Ltd 1977 

Anaconda Copper Mining Co. 1989 
Assayers Professional Direc- 
tory 1961 

B 

Bacon, Inc., Earle C xxii 

Balbach Sm. & Refining Co... 1984 

Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G xxii 



Calumet & Hecla Mining Co.. 1918 
Carbolineum Wood Preserv- 
ing Co xxxiv 

Centennial Copper Mining Co. 1980 
Cerro de Pasco Copper Cor- 
poration 1985 

Cons. Interstate - Callahan 

Mng. Co 1979 

Copper Handbook 1990 



Diamond Drill Carbon Co.... xvi 

Dobbins Core Drill Co., Inc.. 1983 
Dwight & Lloyd Sintering 

Co., Inc xxx 

E 

Engineers "Professional Di- 
rectory" 1961 



General Naval Stores C., The xxviii 
Georgia Pine Turpentine Co., 

of N. Y xxx 

Greene Cananea Copper Co... 1988 

H 

Hardinge Company cxx 

Hayden, Stone & Co 

323; 984; 1176; 1236; 1425 

Hillman Coal & Coke Co xxii 

Hornblower & Weeks xxxviii 

Huff Electrostatic Separator 

Co. xx 

Hughes & Dier 1991 

Hyatt Roller Bearing Co xxiv 



Inspiration Consolidated Cop- 
per Co Ixvi 

International High Speed Steel 

Co xxx 

International Nickel Co., The. 1982 

International Smelting Co.... 1989 



Ledoux & Co 



1984 



M 



Fuller-Lehigh Co 



Mackay School of Mines 1984 

MacMasters & Co., R. H 1987 

Macomber & Whyte Rope Co. xxxiv 

Magazine of Wall Street 1992 

Magma Copper Co 1986 

Merrick Scale Mfg. Co xviii 

Metallurgists "Professional 

Directory" 1961 

Miami Copper Co 1986 

Michigan College of Mines... 1984 



xxi 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 







C. G. BUCHANAN CO., Inc., 90 West St, New York 

TYPE C BUCHANAN CRUSHER TYPE B CRUSHER 

All-Steel, 24 sizes, 24x36 in. to 66x96 in. All-Steel, 14 sizes, 4x12 in. to 24x36 in. 

Buchanan 
Magnetic Separators 

Buchanan 
Crushing Rolls 

Revolving Screens 
Elevators, Conveyors 

Crushing Plants of 

100 to 5000 tons 

daily capacity, 

complete in all details. 



FARREL AND ROCK 

CRUSHE 

USED IN ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD. LARGE RECEIVING CAPACITY 
SPECIALLY DESIGNED AND CONSTRUCTED FOR HARDEST KIND OF WORK 

BACON'S 

CRUSHING 

ROLLS 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

EARLE C. BACON, Inc., Engineers 

26 Cortlandt St., New York. Works: Parrel Foundry & Machine Co. 



HILLMAN COAL AND COKE COMPANY 

First National Bank Building PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Standard Connellsville Coke 

Blast Furnaces Smelters Foundries Shipments 3,000,000 Tons Annually 

High Grade Pittsburgh Coals 

SPECIAL LOW SULPHUR. High and Low Volatile Coals for By-Product Coking. 
Prompt Shipment of Large Tonnages. ALL RAIL DELIVERY or Seaboard at 
New York, Philadelphia or Baltimore, U. S. A., FOR EXPORT IN OCEAN 
VESSELS. Prompt Dispatch in Loading. 

Cable Address "HILLMAN PITTSBURGH" Code ABC 



xxn 



ADVERTISERS 



Michigan Copper Mining Co.. 1978 

Minerals Separation North 

American Corp 1 

Mining Engineers "Profes- 
sional Directory" 1961 

Mohawk Mining Co 1978 



N 

Nichols Copper Co 



1985 



Pensacola Tar & Turpentine 

Co Inside Front Cover 

Phelps, Dodge Corporation... 1981 
Pitkin, Inc., Lucius 1985 



Quincy Mining Co 1985 



Ray Hercules Copper Co 1990 

Robins Conveying Belt Co... xviii 
Roebling's Sons Co., John A. . xxvi 
Roessler & Hasslacher Chem- 
ical Co xii 

Ruggles - Coles Engineering 

Co. xxiv 



Shattuck Arizona Copper Co.. 1986 



Traylor Engineering & Mfg. 

Co xiv 

U 

United Metals Selling Co 1982 

United States Corporation 

Co xxxviii 

United Verde Ext. Mng. Co.. 1986 



Vanadium Corporation of 
America 1983 

W 

Wah Chang Trading Corpora- 
tion xxxiv 

Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Co., 

The viii 

Winkelman & Co., L. L 1990 

Wolverine Copper Mining Co. 1978 
Worthington Pump & Machin- 
ery Corporation 3 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



ORE CARS THAT LAST 

HYATT ROLLER BEAR- 
ING equipped ore cars speed 
up production. They roll 
easily, travel faster and last 
longer than plain bearing 
cars. Hyatt Roller Bearings 
eliminate more than 50% of 
the friction of plain bear- 
ings, permit more cars to be 
hauled every trip, need 
lubrication but three or four 

times a year, and give many years of successful service. 
If you hand-tram, these advantages are multiplied. 
Lower your cost per ton, cut down repairs and delays and 

increase production equip your ore cars with Hyatt Roller 

Bearings. 

HYATT ROLLER BEARING COMPANY 

Industrial Bearings Division, New York, N. Y. 




HYATT BEARINGS FOR ORE CARS 



RUGGLES-COLES DRYERS 

FOR 

ORES, CONCENTRATES, COAL, 
SAND, CLAY, STONE, ETC. 

OUR 27 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN THE DESIGN 
AND BUILDING OF DRYERS IS AT YOUR SERVICE 




RUGGLES- 
COLES 

ENGINEERING 
COMPANY 

50 Church St. 

NEW YORK 



XXIV 






BUYERS' INDEX 

Agitators 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering and Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Amalgamators 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering and Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Antimony 

Wah Chang Trading Corporation, New York. 

Assayers 

Ledoux & Co., New York. 
Pitkin, Inc., Lucius, New York. 
See "Professional Directory." 

Ball Mills 

Hardinge Company, New York. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 

Bearings Roller 

Hyatt Roller Bearing Co., New York. 

Belting, Conveyor 

Robins Conveying Belt Co., New York. 

Books 

Copper Handbook. 

Bridges, Suspension 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 

Brokers, Bankers 

Hayden, Stone & Co., New York. 
Hornblower & Weeks, New York-Boston. 
Hughes & Dier, New York. 
MacMasters & Co., R. H., New York. 
Winkelman & Co., L. L., New York. 

Cableways 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 

Cages, Hoisting 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Carbons and Bortz 

Diamond Drill Carbon Co., New York. 
Car Trucks 

Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 
Cars, Ore, Quarry 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Chemicals 

Nichols Copper Co., New York. 

Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Co., New York. 
Chemists 

Pitkin, Inc., Lucius, New York. 



XXV 



I 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




CYANIDE 

Made from Air 



Aero Brand Cyanide was first made at 
Niagara Falls in January, 1917. The plant now 
has the largest cyanide producing capacity in 
the world. 

Thousands of tons have been used in Mexico, 
Canada and the United States for the reduction 
of gold and silver ores. The results obtained 
have proved that, pound for pound of con- 
tained cyanide, Aero Brand is equal in effi- 
ciency to any other grade. 

Aero Brand Cyanide is economically pro- 
duced by the simple fusion of two dependable 
raw materials, Cyanamid (air-nitrogen) and 




common sa 



It. 



"Aero Brand" is sold at a lower price, per 
pound of contained cyanide, than any other 
grade. 

Booklet with full details on request. 



AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY 



NEW YORK 





XXVI 



BUYERS' INDEX 

C~i 3.s s i fi c rs 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Coal, Coke 

Hillman Coal & Coke Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Compressors, Air 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Concentrators 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Converters 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Conveyors, Bearings for 

Hyatt Roller Bearing Co. 
Conveyors, Belt 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 
Robins Conveying Belt Co., New York. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Conveyor Gudgeons, Bearings 

Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 
Copper 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 
Balbach S. & R. Co., Newark, N. J. 
Nichols Copper Co., New York. 

Phelps Dodge Corporation, 99 John St., New York. 
Quincy Mining Co., New York. 
United Metals Selling Co., New York. 
Creosote 

Carbolineum Wood Preserving Co., New York. 
Crushers 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Bacon, Inc., Earle C., New York. 
Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 
Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 

Traylor Engineering and Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Cyanide 

American Cyanamid Co., New York. 
Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Co., New York. 
Diamonds, Black 

Diamond Drill Carbon Co., New York. 
Drills, Core 

Dobbins Core Drill Co., Inc., New York. 
Drums, Gravity 

Bacon, Inc., Earle C., New York. 
Dryers 

Ruggles-Coles Engineering Co., New York. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Electrostatic Separators 

Huff Electrostatic Separator Co., Arlington, Mass. 
Elevators 

Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

xxvii 



THE MIXES HAXDBOOK 




FLOTATION OILS 

PINE - HARDWOOD -COAL TAR 

EFFECTIVE OILS OF EACH CLASS 



Experience with the flotation process has shown 
the need for variety of oils. Not every ore will 
respond best to the same oils, so we offer with- 
out prejudice oils from each class, i. e., the most 
effective distillates from pine ivood, hardwood 
and coal tar. 



General Naval Stores Co. 

90 West Street - - New York 

1535 NINETEENTH STREET, DENVER, COL. 



XXVlll 



BUYERS' INDEX 

Engineers 

See Professional Directory. 
Engines, Gas, Steam, Oil 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Feeders 

Hardinge Conical Mill Co.. New York. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Filters, Presses 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Flotation 

Minerals Separation North American Corporation, New York. 
Flotation Machines 

Hardinge Conical Mill Co., New York. 
Flotation Oils 

General Naval Stores Co., of New York. 

Georgia Pine Turpentine Co., of New York. 

Pensacola Tar & Turpentine Co., Gull Point, Fla. 
Furnaces, Mechanical Roasting 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dwight & Lloyd Sintering Co., Inc., New York. 

Huff Electrostatic Separator Co., Arlington, Mass. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Furnaces, Smelting 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Gas Producers, Purifiers 

Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Co., The, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Grinders, Sample 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Hoists, Electric, Steam 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Hoisting Engines 

Bacon. Inc., Earle C, New York. 
Jackets, Water 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Jigs 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Lead 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 

Cons. Interstate Callahan Mining Co., New York. 

United Metals Selling Co., New York. 
Linings, Ball and Tube Mill 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hardinge Conical Mill Co., New York. 

Traylor Engineering and Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Magnetic Separators 

Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 
Metals 

See Ore, Buyers and Sellers 

xxix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



SINTER YOUR FINE ORES AND CONCENTRATES 

ECONOMICAL BLAST FURNACE OPERATION 

demands 
PRELIMINARY PREPARATION of FINE ORES 

The Dwight & Lloyd system of sintering fine ores is continuous and automatic 
and has fully demonstrated its effectiveness in many large plants in this and other 
countries. Applicable generally to copper, lead, zinc, and iron ores, and also to 
special metallurgical problems. 

LOW COST OF INSTALLATION AND OPERATION 

Process, Apparatus and Product Patented 

DWIGHT & LLOYD SINTERING COMPANY, INC. 

For details address the Licensor: 
29 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 
Cable Address: Sinterer, New York 



FRANKLIN S. CLARK, E. M., Ph. D., JOHN YANCEY, HALSEY K. SMITH, 

President. Vice-Pres. Sec'y and Treas. 

FLOTATION OILS 

Pure Pine Products 



TRADE 
MARK 




P.T.CO. 

~~ ^ 

If one of our oils does your work you will get the same oil every time 

We MAKE them 

Georgia Pine Turpentine Co., of New York 

156, 158, 160 and 162 Perry Street, New York 

WORKS: Fayetteville, N. C, Collins, Ga. 
WESTERN BRANCH: P. O. Box 1994, Salt Lake City, Utah 

S. S. SKELTON, Manager. 



Always Best BULL DOG 



Never Beaten 



ROCK A MINING 

DRILL ijjOL STEEL 

MADE IN U. S. A. | SOLID and HOLLOW 

___ ^^_____________ M Mark I __^ _ 

Jm V^v Keg 1 , m 

by ^ In tr. a- M All sizes and sections 
^5 Pat.Dst ^^ 

INTERNATIONAL fflGH SPEED STEEL COMPANY :-: NEW YORK 



XXX 



BUYERS' INDEX 

Metals, non-corrosive 

International Nickel Co., New York. (Monel Metal.) 
Metallurgists 

See Professional Directory. 
Mills, Ball, Tube, Concentrating, Pebble Chilean, and Pulverizer. 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 

Hardinge Conical Mill Co., New York. 

Huff Electrostatic Separator Co., Arlington, Mass. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Co., The, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Mills, Stamp 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 
Mining 

American Mining Congress, Washington, D. C. 
Mining Companies 

Ahmeek Mining Co. 

Allouez Mining Co. 

American Metal Co., Ltd. 

Anaconda Copper Mining Co. 

Balbach Smelting & Refining Co. 

Calumet & Hecla Mining Co. 

Centennial Copper Mining Co. 

Cerro de Pasco Copper Corporation. 

Consolidated Interstate-Callahan Mining Co. 

Greene Cananea Copper Co. 

Inspiration Consolidated Copper Co. 

International Nickel Co. 

International Smelting Co. 

Magma Copper Co. 

Miami Copper Co. 

Michigan Copper Mining Co. 

Mohawk Mining Co. 

Phelps Dodge Corporation. 

Quincy Mining Co. 

Ray Hercules Copper Co. 

Shattuck Arizona Copper Co. 

United Verde Extension Mining Co. 

Vanadium Corporation of America. 

Wah Chang Trading Corporation. 

Wolverine Copper Mining Co. 
Mining Schools 

Mackay School of Mines, Reno, Nev. 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton, Mich. 
Molybdenum 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 

Vanadium Corporation of America, New York. 
Motors, Electric 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Nickel 

International Nickel Co., New York. 

Nichols Copper Co., New York. 
Oils, Anthracene 

Carbolineum Wood Preserving Co., New York. 
Oils, Flotation 

General Naval Stores Co., New York. 

Georgia Pine Turpentine Co., of New York. 

Pensacola Tar & Turpentine Co., Gull Point, Fla. 

xxxi 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




BREATHING APPARATUS 



^jj^ffT * 




The use of rescue apparatus has come to be recognized as 
a necessary part of the safety work for metal mines as well as 
for coal mines. The small cost of installation and maintenance 
offers one of the most attractive insurance features against the 
spread of mine fires that can be secured by the mine manager. 

The Paul Breathing Apparatus is the latest development in 
mine rescue equipments. Mr. J. W. Paul, the inventor, was 
for seven years in charge of the mine rescue work of the 
United States Bureau of Mines. 

The Paul Apparatus has the official approval of the United 
States Bureau of Mines, having passed all tests required. 

Interesting descriptive matter submitted upon receipt of 
request. 



AMERICAN ATMOS CORPORATION 



WILKINSBURG STATION 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 



XXXll 



BUYERS' INDEX 

Ore, Buyers and Sellers 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 

Balbach Smelting & Refining Co., New York. 

International Smelting Co., New York. 

Nichols Copper Co., New York. 

Phelps Dodge Corporation, New York. 

United Metals Selling Co., New York. 

Vanadium Corporation of America. 

Wah Chang Trading Corporation, New York. 
Ores, Samplers of 

Ledoux & Co., New York. 

Pitkin, Inc., Lucius, New York. 
Oxygen Helmets 

American Atmos Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa. 4 ~ 

Power Transmission Machinery 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Preservative, Wood 

Carbolineum Wood Preserving Co., New York. 

Publications 

Magazine of Wall Street, New York. 
Mines Handbook, New York. 

Pulverizers, Coal, Ore 

Hardinge .Conical Mill Co., New York. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Pumps 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 

Registrars 

U. S. Corporation Co., New York. 
Roller Bearings 

Hyatt Roller Bearing Co., New York. 
Rolls, Crushing 

Bacon, Inc., Earle C, New York. 

Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Rope, Wire 

Macomber & Whyte Rope Co., Kenosha, Wis. 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 
Samplers 

Ledoux & Co., New York. 

Pitkin, Inc., Lucius, New York. 
Samplers, Ore 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Scales, Conveyor 

Merrick Scale Manufacturing Co., Passaic, N. J. 
Schools, Mining 

Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno, Nev. 

Michigan College of Mines, Houghton, Michigan. 
Screens 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 

Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Co., New York. 

xxxiii 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



HIGH GRADE 
TUNGSTEN CONCENTRATES, 70% and over 

W. C. C. ANTIMONY, 99.25% Standard Brand 
CHINESE TIN, No. 1 Guaranteed 99% 

Mine Owners and Smelters 
Importers and Producers 

Wah Chang Trading Corporation 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING NEW YORK CITY 




Wire ftope 




The Best Rope for Hoisting and Haul- 
age. Best for every use in Pit and 
Tipple. "Kilindo Non-Rotating" for 
Shaft Sinking. 

MONARCH Mine Car Hitchings 

MACOMBER & WHYTE ROPE CO., Kenosha, Wis. 

Offices and Warehouses : New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Birmingham, Portland, Tulsa. 
Distributors in all Principal Cities. 



WOOD PRESERVATIVES 

All grades of imported and domestic creosotes and anthracene oils. 
Protexol (formerly Avenarius Carbolineum) and other standardized 
grades for Brush, Spray and Open Tank Treatments. Cost estimates 
prepared. Detailed literature for special uses. Advise conditions to be met. 

Carbolineum Wood Preserving Co. 

(No Branches) 
31 Barclay St., New York, U. S. A. 

Works, Kenilworth, N. J. 



(Irotexolj 

I COAL TAR * K 




XXXIV 



BUYERS' INDEX 

Selenium 

Nichols Copper Co., New York. 
Separators 

Buchanan Co., Inc., C. G., New York. 

Huff Electrostatic Separator Co., Arlington, Mass. 
Skips 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Bacon, Inc., Earle C., New York. 

Traylor Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Allentown, Pa. 
Smelters 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 

Balbach Smelting & Refining Co., Newark, N. J. 

Beer, Sondheimer & Co., Inc., New York. 

International Smelting Co., New York. 

Nichols Copper Co., New York. 
Spelter 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 
Steel 

International High Speed Steel Co., New York. 
Tin 

Wah Chang Trading Corporation, New York. 
Tramways, Aerial, Wire Rope 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 
Transfer Agents 

U. S. Corporation Co., New York. 
Tungsten 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 

Vanadium Corporation of America, New York. 

Wah Chang Trading Corporation, New York. 
Turbines, Steam, Water 

Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Vanadium 

Vanadium Corporation of America, New York. 

Weighers, Ore 

Ledoux & Co.. New York. 

Pitkin, Inc., Lucius, New York. 
Wheels and Axles 

Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 
Wire Cloth, Rope Fittings and Slings 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 
Wire Rope 

Macomber & Whyte Rope Co., Kenosha, Wis. 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 
Wire Rope Rollers 

Fuller-Lehigh Co., Fullerton, Pa. 
Wood, Preservative 

Carbolineum Wood Preserving Co., New York. 
Wrenches 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A., Trenton, N. J. 
Zinc, Electrolytic 

United Metals Selling Co., New York. 
Zinc, Ore 

American Metal Co., Ltd., New York. 

Consolidated Interstate Callahan Mining Co. 



xxxv 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



ROEBLING 

WIRE ROPE 



FOR MINE HOIST AND HAULAGE 




JOHN A. ROEBLING'S SONS CO 



TRENTON, NEW JERSEY 



NEW YORK 
117-119-121 Liberty St. 

CLEVELAND 
701 St. Clair Ave. N. E. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
624-646 Folsom St. 

LOS ANGELES 
216 South Alameda St. 



BOSTON 
93-95 Pearl St. 
PITTSBURGH 

Sandusky & Robinson Sts., 

N. S. 

CHICAGO 

165 West Lake St. 



PHILADELPHIA 

223 Arch St. 

ATLANTA 

69 Walton St. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

487 Lovejoy St. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 
900 First Ave. South 



XXXVI 



INDEX TO MAPS 

Page 
ARIZONA: 

Bisbee District 181 

Globe 200 

Jerome 370 

Ray 321 

MISSOURI. 

Joplin District 875 

Southeastern Missouri 987 

MONTANA: 

Butte District 972 

NEVADA: 

Arrowhead District 1011 

Eastern Nevada District 1041 

Ely-Robinson 1 170 

Goldfield 1 190 

Rochester 1200 

Simon 1205 

Southeastern Nevada 1022 

Tonopah District 1214 

Tonopah Divide District 1163 

Yellow Pine 1022 

NEW MEXICO: 

Lordsburg District 1243 

OKLAHOMA: 

Miami-Oklahoma District 1271 

TENNESSEE: 

Eastern Tennessee ' 1328 

UTAH: 

Alta-Cottonwood District 1381 

American Fork 1386 

Bingham District 1421 

part of 1414 

Tintic 1445 

WASHINGTON: 

Northeastern Washington, Northern Idaho and B. C 1475 

BRITISH COLUMBIA: 

Xew boundary or Salmon River district 1531 

MANITOBA: 

Northern Manitoba 1587 

ONTARIp: 

Ontario 1594 

xxxvii 



HORNBLOWER & WEEKS 

ESTABLISHED 1888 

Members of New York, Boston and Chicago Stock Exchanges 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

DIRECT PRIVATE WIRES 



42 Broadway 
New York 

Chicago Detroit Providence Portland 




UMTED STATES CORPORATION 

COMPANY 

Executive Offices 65 Cedar Street, New York City 

Chicago, 30 N. LaSalle St. Philadelphia, 1011 Commonwealth 

St. Louis, Room 604 Carleton Bldg. Trust Building. 

Albany, N. Y., 93 State Street 

Acts as Transfer Agent and Registrar for 
Corporations in New York 

Under the instructions of Counsel 

FURNISHES PRINCIPAL OFFICES FOR CORPORATIONS 
IN DELAWARE, VIRGINIA, MAINE, AND OTHER CHAR- 
TER GRANTING STATES. SUPPLIES STATUTORY OR 
RESIDENT AGENTS FOR FOREIGN CORPORATIONS IN 
ALL STATES. 



XXXVlll 



INDEX TO 
MINING COMPANIES AND DISTRICTS 

See Addenda for latest information; index to same on page cxviii 



PAGE 

Aamdals Kobberverk, A. S. S. 

Norway 1811 

Abangarez Gold Fields of Costa 

Rica, Costa Rica 1751 

Abbontiakoon Mines, Ltd., West 

Africa 1946 

Abbott Quicksilver Co., Cal 413 

Abbott, Rebhoitz & Stewart Mng. 

Co., Kan 738 

A. B. C. Metals Co., B. C 1530 

Abe Lincoln Mining Co., Arizona. 236 
Abercrombie Copper Mines. Ltd., 

N. S. W 1880 

Abosso Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., W. A.1946 

Abundancia; Mina La, P. R 1762 

Abundancia Mine, Sonora 1714 

Abundancia Mng. Co., S. A., 

Sonora 1714 

Acacia Gold Mng. Co., Colo 591 

Accord Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. . . . 496 
Acme Cons. Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Wyoming 1519 

Acme Gold Mines, Ltd., Ontario. .1641 
Acme Lead & Zinc Co.. Okla...l273 

Acme Mine, Missouri 876 

Acme Mining Co., Utah 1381 

Acme Mng. & Red. Co., Ariz 281 

Adah Copper Co., Utah 1341 

Adams Goldfield Mng. Co.. Nev. . .1187 
Adams-Hicks L. & Z. Corp.. Mo.. 876 

Adams Mining Co., Arizona 265 

Adanac Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont . ..1612 

Addie Mining Co., Utah 1444 

Addison Copper Co 1476 

Adelphia M. & M. Co., Nevada. . . .1007 

Adirondack M. & M. Co., Mo 876 

Admiral Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

N. Mexico 1229 

Admiral Mining Co., Wash 1476 

Admiralty Z. Co., Kans-Okla. .738-1273 

Admiralty Zinc Co., Mo 876 

Adriatic Mining Co.. Minn 857 

Advance Mining Co., Idaho 673 

Advance Mining Co., Wash 1476 

Adventure Cons. Cop. Co., Mich. 748 
Aeolian Copper Cons. Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Idaho 634 



PAGE 

Aetna Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1123 
Aetna Mining Co., Wyoming. .. .1519 

Aetna M. & M. Co., Idaho 673 

Africa, Mines of 1914 

African Ore Cone. Syn., Ltd.. 

England 1804 

After All Mines Co., Nevada. ... 1211 
Afterthought Copper Co., Cal.... 413 
Aguacate Mines, Inc., Costa Rica. 1752 

Aguascalientes, Mines of 1666 

Ao-uila Cons. Mng. Co., Jalisco. . .1701 

Ah meek Mining Co., Mich 749 

Aichen Bee Silver-Lead Mng. Co., 

Washington 1477 

Aintram Mining Co., Mont 901 

Airedale Divide Mng. Co.. Nev... 1123 
Ajax Divide Mining Co., Nev.... 1123 

Ajax Gold Mng. Co.. Colo 591 

Ajax Metal Mining Co., Ariz.... 165 

Ajax Mining Co., Idaho 673 

Aio Cons. Copper Co., Ariz 281 

Aio Cornelia Cooper Co.. Ariz... 281 
Aio Gunsight Mining Co.. Ariz.. 281 

Ajo Pima Copper Co.. Ariz 281 

Ajuichitlan Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Puebla 1711 

Akron Mines Co., Colo 497 

Aksarben Mining Co., Kansas.... 738 

Alabama, Mines of 120 

Alabama Company (The). Ala... 120 
Aladdin Cobalt Co.. Ltd. (Alad- 
din Cobalt, Ltd.} 1612 

Aladdin Cobalt, Ltd., Ontario 1612 

Aladdin Divide Mining Co., Nev.. 1123 
Aladdin Mining Co., Arizona.... 335 

Alameda Mining Co., Idaho 674 

Alamo Concentrator, B. C 1530 

Alamo Gold Mng. Co., Ariz 392 

Alamo Lead Zinc Co.. Okla....l273 

Alaska, Mines of 121 

Alaska British Columbia Metals 

Co., British Columbia 1530 

Alaska-Chitna Exp. Co., Alaska. . 122 
Alaska Cons. Copper Co., Alaska. 122 
Alaska Cons. Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Alaska 122 

Alaska Copper Corp., Alaska.... 122 



XXXIX 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Alaska Dome Mining Co., Alaska. 123 
Alaska Douglas Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 123 

Alaska-Ebner (iold Mines Co., 

Alaska 123 

Alaska-Endicott Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Alaska 123 

Alaska Free Gold Mining Co., 

Alaska 123 

Alaska Gastineau Mng. Co. (Alas- 
ka Gold Mines Co.} : . 125 

Alaska Gold Belt Mng Co., 

Alaska 123 

Alaska Gold Hill Mining Co.. 

Alaska 124 

Alaska Gold Mines Co., Alaska. ... 124 
Alaska Hercules Mng. Co., Alaska 130 
Alaska Homestake Mining Co., 

Alaska 130 

Alaska Improvement Co., Nev...l007 
Alaska Industrial Co.,. Alaska. ... 130 
Alaska Juneau Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 131 

Alaska Metals Co.. Alaska 135 

Alaska Mexican Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 137 

Alaska Mines Corp., Alaska 135 

Alaskan Copper River Mng. Co.. 

Washington 1477 

Abska Pittsburgh Gold Mng. 

Co., Alaska 135 

Alaska Standard Copper Mng. Co., 

Alaska 135 

Alaska Tidewater Copper Co., 

Alaska 135 

Alaska Treadwell Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 136-138 

Alaska. United Copper Explora- 
tion Co.. Alaska 141 

Alaska United Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 136-140 

Alaska Westover C. Co.. Alaska.. 141 
Alaska Zinc & Copper Co., Alaska 142 

Albany Copper Co., Nevada 1007 

Albany Divide Mng. Co./ Nevada. 1124 
Albany Lead Mng. Co., Idaho.... 674 

Alberta, Mines of 1530 

Alberta Mining Co.. Utah 1381 

Albert Beacon Gold Mining Co., 

Colorado 591 

Albert Copper Co., Quebec 1654 

Albion Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1382 

Albion Mining Co.. Utah 1382 

Albro Ext. M. & M. Co., Colo. ... 497 

Alcade Mining Co., Cal 414 

Alcides Mining Co.. Idaho 674 

Alco Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo 497 

Alcyone Mining Co.. Arizona 265 



PAGE 

Alda Divide Mining Co., Nev 1124 

Alexander Lead & Zinc Co.. Okla.1273 

Alexo Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1593 

Algoma Custom Sm. & Ref. Co., 

Ltd., Ontario 1593 

Algomah Mining Co., Michigan... 752 
Algoma Manganese Co., Minn.... 857 

Algoma Steel Corp., Ontario 1593 

Algonkian Mines Co.. Arizona.... 335 

Algunican Dev. Co., Ontario 1594 

Alhambra Mng. Co., Ltd., Idaho.. 674 

Alhambra Mining Co., N. Mex 1229 

Alice Gold Mills Corp., CoU 497 

Alice Gold & Silver Mining Co., 

Montana : 959 

Alice Mine, Oregon 1294 

Alice Mining Co., Alaska 142 

Alice Mining Co., Idaho 675 

AHzone Silver Queen Mng. Co., 

Arizona 303 

Alkali Mines Co., Nevada 1184 

Alleghany Ore & Iron Co.. Va. . . .1468 

Allgrove M. & M. Co., Colo 497 

Alliance Copper Co., Montana.... 959 

Alliance Mining Co., Wash 1477 

Allied Divide Ext. Mng. Co., Nev.. 11 24 
Allied Divide Mining Co., Nev... 1124 
Allied Gold Mines, Ltd.. Ontario. .1594 

Allied Gold Mng. Co., Colo 497 

Allied Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.,1274 
Allied Mng. & Mlg. Co., Nev.... 1007 
Allie Island Copper Mine, Ont....l595 

Allie Mining Co.. Ltd., Idaho 634 

Allison Mining Co., Cal 414 

Allison Ranch Mine. Cal 414 

Allouez Mining Co., Michigan.... 753 
Almaden Mines Co., Colorado.... 498 
Almaden Quicksilver Mines Co., 

Spain 1818 

Alma Ray Mining Co., Idaho 675 

Almeda Mines Co., Oreeron 1294 

Almoloya Mining Co., Chihuahua. 1669 

Aloha Gold Mng. Co., Colo 592 

Alpena Copper Mng. Co., Mont. . . 901 
Alpha Copper Mng. Co., Ariz.... 282 
Alpha Divide Mng Co.. Nevada.. 1124 

Alpha Mine, Nevada 1007 

Alpha Quicksilver Co., Cal 414 

Alpine Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 634 

Alpine Divide Mining Co.. Nev. ..1124 
Alpine Galena Mner. Co., Utah.... 1407 

Alpine Mng. Co., Idaho 634 

Alpine Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Wash. . .1477 

Alta Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1382 

Alta Copper Mng. Co., Idaho.... 634 
Alta Cottonwood Mng. Co., Utah. 1383 
Alta Divide Gold Mng. Co., Utah. 1383 



xl 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Alta-Germania Mines Co., Utah.. 1383 
Alta-Idaho Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Idaho 634 

Altai Mines, Ltd., Siberia 1872 

Alta-Michigan Mines Co., Utah... 1383 

Alta Mines Co., Colo 498 

Alta Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho 634 

Alta Mng. & Dev. Co., Utah 1383 

Alta Mng. & Sm. Co., Arizona 303 

Alta Montana Mng. Co., Mont... 901 

Alta Prince Mining Co.. Utah 1383 

Alta Silver Mining Co., Nevada.. 1008 
Alta Superior M. & M. Co., Utah. 1384 
Alta Tiger Mining Co., Utah.... 1384 
Alta Tunnel & Trans. Co., Utah.. 1384 

Alta-Utah Mines Co., Utah 1384 

Aliens Kohbergruber, Norway. ... 1811 
Altezuma Gold M. & M., Colo.... 498 

Alto Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1125 

Aluminum Company of America 

United States " 69 

Aluminum Potash Co. of America, 

Utah 1341 

Alvarado Mng. & Mlg. Co., Chi- 
huahua 1670 

Alvarez Lead & Tim. Co. (Mc.vi- 

cana; Compan'ia Metahtrgica) . . 1662 
Alvin Development Co., Arizona. . 392 

Amador Mines Co., Cal 415 

Amajac Mines Co., Jalisco 1701 

Amalgamated Copper Co.. U. S.. . . 70 
Amalgamated Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1125 

Amalgamated Gold Mines Co., 

Washington 1477 

Amalgamated Mines Co., Ore 1295 

Amalgamated Pioche Mines & Sm. 

Corp., Nevada 1008 

Amalgamated Silver Mines Co., 

Montana 902 

Amalgamated Zinc (De Bavay's), 

Ltd., N. S. W ..1880 

Amalgamated Zinc & Lead Co., 

Missouri 876 

Amalgamated Zinc & Lead Co- 
Oklahoma 1274 

Amargo Mining Co.. Idaho 675 

Amargosa Copper Co., B. C 1530 

Amazon-Butte Copper Co., Mont.. 959 
Amazon-Dixie Mng. Co., Idaho.. 675 
Amazon-Dixie Mng. Co., Mont... 902 

Amazon Gold Co., Durango 1686 

Amazon-Manhattan Mine, Idaho. . 676 

Amazon Mine, Washington 1478 

Amber Mining Co., Kansas 738 

Ambergris Mines Co., Idaho 676 

Ambro Mining Corp., Idaho 635 



PAGE 
American Almaden Quicksilver & 

Gold Mng. Co., Ore 1295 

American Ballast Co. (A. Z., L. 

& S. Co.) ' 83 

American Base Ores Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Arizona 245 

American Bauxite Co., Ark 408 

American Boy Mine, Arizona.... 327 
American Boy Mining Co., B. C...1531 
American Celtic Copper Co., Ariz. 233 
American Chem. & Indst. Co., Va.1469 
American Commander M. & M. 

Co.. Ltd., Idaho 676 

American Cons. Copper Co., Utah. 1384 
American Cons. Mines Co., Utah. 1385 
American Copper Mng. Co., Mont. 902 
American Copper Mng. & Mlg. 

Co.. Utah 1341 

American Dev. Mng. & Red. Co., 

Idaho 635 

American Divide Mining Co., Nev.1125 

American Dredging Co.. Cal 415 

American Dredg. Co., Colo 498 

American Eagle Co., Arizona 392 

American Eagle Copper Mng. Co., 

Utah 1341 

American Engr. & Oper. Co., Chi- 
huahua 1671 

American Exploration Co., Okla.1274 
American Exploration Co., Ore... 1295 
American Explor. & Mng. Co.. 

Mev.-N. Mex 1229 

American Finance & Securities Co. 

(The). U. S 70 

American Eireproofing & Mng. 

Co.. Wyo 1519 

American Flag Mine, Wash 1478 

American Elag Mining Co., Utah. 1436 
American Elag Silver Mining Co., 

Arizona 245 

American Fork Exploration Co., 

Utah 1385 

American Gold, Copper M. & Sm. 

Co. N. Mex 1229 

American Manganese Mfg. Co., 

Minnesota 857 

American Metal Co., Ltd. (The), 

U. S. and Mexico 70, 1664 

American Metals Prod. Co., Colo. 498 
American-Mexican Sm. & Ref. 

Co.. Sonora 1714 

American-Mexico Mng. & Dev. 

Co., Durango 1686 

American Minerals Prod. Co., 

Washington 1478 

American Mines Co., Colo 498 

American Mines Syndicate, Utah. 1444 
American Mining Co., Cal 415 



xli 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

American Mining Co., Colo 498 

American Mining Co., Utah 1385 

American Mining Co.. Ltd., Idaho. 635 
American Mining Corp.. S. D....1316 
American Manganese Mfg. Co., 

Costa Rica . . 1752 

American Mng. Explor. Co.. Nev..l008 
American Mining & Power Co., 

Colorado 498 

American Molybdenite, Ltd., Ont.1595 
American Molybdenum Co., Ariz. 282 
American Prospecting Club, Nev. .1008 
American Reduction Co.. Wash.. 1478 
American Rutile Co.. Virgina. . . .1469 
American Silver Corp.. N. Mex..l229 
American Sisters Mines. Colo.... 499 
American Smelters Securities Co. 

(A. S. & R. Co.} 79 

American Smelting & Refining 

Co.. U. S . . 73 

American Standard Coalition M. 

Co. Nev.-Utah 1008-1341 

American Star Antimony Corp., 

Arkansas 408 

American Star Mining Co., Utah. 1444 
American Sulphur Royalty Co., 

Texas 1337 

American Tin & Tungsten Co.. 

South Dakota 1316 

American Tungsten Cons. Corp.. 

Washington 1478 

American Vanadium Co., Pa. 

Peru (Vanadium Corp.) .. 1314-1791 
American Venture & Mines Corp.. 

Georgia 626 

American Zinc & Chem. Co.. Pa. 1313 
American Zinc Co. of III. (A. Z. 

L. & S. Co.) 83-735 

American Zinc Co. of Tcnn. (A. 

Z., L. & S. Co.} 81 

American Zinc, Lead & Smelt. Co., 

United States 78-876 

.Imericnn Zinc Ore Separating Co. 

(A. Z., L. & S. Co.) ..83-1512 

American Zinc Products Co.. Ind.. 737 
American Zinc & Slate Co., Mo... 876 

Amparo Mining Co., Jalisco 1702 

Amulet Mine, Arizona 335 

Amy-Matchless M. & M. Co.. Ida. 676 
Amy Mng. & Dev. Co.. Idaho.... 676 
Amy T. Mining Co.. Oklahoma. .. 1274 
Anaconda Copper Group. Arizona. 179 
Anaconda Copner Mng. Co.. Mont. 959 
Anaconda Divide Mng. Co.. Nev.. 1125 
Anaconda Gold Mng. Co.. S. D...1316 
Anaconda Skookum Copper Group, 

N. Mex 1229 

Analee Mining Co., Mo 876 

xlii 



PAGE 

Anchorage Gold Mines Co., Alaska 142 
Anchor Divide Mining Co., Nev.. 1125 

Anchor Mining Co.. Idaho 677 

Archor Mining Co., Utah 1436 

Anchoria Copper Mng. Co.. Wyo..l519 
Anchoria Leland M. & M. Co.. 

Colorado 592 

Andayer Mining Co.. Kansas 738 

Anderson-Apache Copper Co.. 

New Mexico 1229 

Anderson & Birch, Arizona 335 

Andes Copper Co., Chile 1770 

.hides Copper Mng. Co. (Andes 

Copper Co.} ....' 1770 

Andes Silver Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1008 
Andrada Mines, Ltd., Portuguese 

East Africa 1924 

Andrew Bros. Mining Co., Kansas 738 

Andy Fitz M. & M. Co, Cal 415 

Angelica Mng. & Dev. Co.. Mont . . 902 
Anglo-American Corp. of S. A . 

Ltd., Transvaal 1931 

Anglo-Colombian Dev. Co. Ltd.. 

Colombia 1786 

Anglo-French Ticapampa Silver 

Mng. Co., Ltd., Peru 1791 

Anglo-Greek Magnesite Co., Ltd, 

Greece .1809 

Anglo-Newfoundland Dev. Co., 

Ltd, Newfoundland 1659 

Anglo Saxon Sm. & Ref. Co, Ariz. 335 
Animas Peak Gold Mng. Co., N. 

'Mexico , 1230 

Anita Copper Mines Co, S. A. 

Sonora 1714-1739 

Anita Mine. Durango 1686 

Anna Beaver Mining Co, Okla...l274 

Anna D. Mine, Missouri 877 

Annapolis Lead Co., Mo 877 

Annie Mining Co., Wyo 1519 

Antelope Gold Mine (Rhodesia). 

Ltd., Rhodesia 1925 

Antelope Group, Nevada 1009 

Antelope Mining Co, Arizona.... 303 
Antelope & Prince of Wales Mng. 

Co, Utah 1385 

Antelope Spring Mng. Co., Nev... 1009 
Antelope Star Cons. Mines. Utah. .1341 

Antelope Star Mng. Co.. Utah 1342 

Antimony Corporation, Hidalgo. .. 1695 
Antimony King Mine, Nevada. ... 1009 
Antimony & Silver Mines Co., 

Nevada 1009 

Antimony-Silver Mng. Co, Idaho.. 677 

Antimony Syndicate, Nevada 1010 

Anti-Periodic Group, Colo 499 

Antoine Ore Co, Michigan 846 

Anvil Leasing Co, Colo.. . 499 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Aotman Pioneer Gold Mines, 

Inc.. Arizona 265 

Apache Chief Mining Co., Ariz... 237 

Apache Mining 4 Co.. Wash 1478 

Apex Copper Co., Colo 499 

Apex Divide Mining Co., Nev... ; 1125 
Apex Ext. Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll25 
Apex Mining Co., Washington. . . .1479 
Apex Porcupine Mines, Ltd., Ont..l641 
Apex Standard Mng. Co., Utah... 1444 
Apollo Cons. Gold Mng. Co., 

Washington 1479 

App Mine, California 415 

Araca ; Compania Minera de, Boli- 
via 1763 

Aradium Copper Mng. Co.. Wash.. 1479 
Arados Copper Co., Chihuahua. . . .1671 
Aramayo Francke Mines, Ltd., 

Bolivia 1763 

Aramo Copper Mines, Ltd., Spain. 1819 
Arapahoe Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. . 499 
Arbuckle Mining Co., California. . 415 
Arcadian Cons. Mng. Co., Mich... 756 

Arcane Mining Co., Nevada 1010 

Arco Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Idaho.... 635 
Arctic Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd.. 

Idaho 677 

Arcubell Gold Mine Co.. Colo.... 499 
Argenta-Dillon Mng. Co.. Mont.. 903 

Argenta Mng. Co.. Arizona 335 

Argenta Mininsr Co., Ltd., Idaho.. 677 

Argentina. Mines of 1763 

Argentine Divide Mncr. Co., Nov.. 1125 
Argentnm Mng. Co. of Nevada. . . .1010 

Argo Mines Co.. Arizona 265 

Argo ATg. Drain. Transp. & Tunnel 

Co.. Colorado 499 

Aroo Mng. & Tunnel Co.. Colo... 500 
Argo Mng. & Tunnel Co., Ltd.. 

British Columbia 1532 

Argo Red. & Ore Purch. Co.. Colo. 500 

Argonaut Cons. Mng. Co.. Cal 415 

Argonaut Gold Mines, Ltd.. Ont. .1595 
Argonaut Hasbrouck Divide Mng. 

Co., Nev 1126 

Argonaut Mining Co., Cnl 416 

Argonaut Mng. & Sm. Co.. Utah. .1387 

Argonne Copper Co.. Ariz 335 

Argonne Divide Mng. Co.. Nev... 1126 
Argus Con. & G. Mng. Co., Ariz. 393 

Argyle Silver Mng. Co.. Mont 903 

Ann Cooper Co.. Michigan 1709 

Aristos Mining Co.. Missouri 877 

Arizona. Mines of 165 

Bisbee District 179 

Clifton-Morenci District. Green- 

lee countv . 233 



PAGE 

Cochise County 165 

Coconino County 190 

Gila County 191 

Globe District 199 

Greenlee County 231 

Jerome (Verde) District, Yavapai 

County 369 

Graham County 229 

Maricopa County 236 

Miami-Globe District, Gila County. 199 

Mohave County 245 

Oatman District, Mohave County. . 265 

Pima County ,. 281 

Pinal County 303 

Ray District, Pinal County 318 

Santa Cruz County 327 

Yavapai County 335 

Yuma County 392 

Arizona American Copper Co., 

Arizona 245 

Arizona-Bagdad Copper Co., Ariz. 336 
Arizona Base Ores M. & M. Co., 

Arizona 245 

Arizona Belmont Mining Co.. Ariz. 282 
Arizona Binghamton Copper Co., 

Arizona 336 

Arizona-Bisbee Copper Co., Ariz.. 179 
Arizona Bonanza Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 199 

Arizona Butler Mines Co., Ariz... 393 
Arizona & Butte Copper Mng. Co., 

Arizona ' 318 

Arizona-Butte Corporation, Ariz.. 199 

Arizona-Butte Mines Co., Ariz 245 

Arizona Cactilone Copper Co., 

Arizona 237 

Arizona California Mng. Co.. Ariz. 337 
Arizona-Celtic Copper Co., Ariz. . 231 
Arizona Central Gold Mines Co., 

Arizona 266 

Arizona Chloride Mng. Co., Ariz. . 245 
Arizona Commercial Mining Co., 

Arizona 199 

Arizona Cons. Copper Mines, Ltd., 

Arizona 231 

Arizona Cons. Copper & Mng. 

Corp.. Arizona 282 

Arizona Cop. Belt Mng. Co., Ariz. 337 
Arizona C. Co., Ltd., (The), Ariz. 233 
Arizona Copperfields, Inc., Ariz... 245 
Arizona Copper-Gold Mines Co., 

Arizona 337 

Arizona Copper Mines Corp., Ariz. 338 
Arizona Copper Mng. Co., Ariz... 282 
Arizona Copper & Mng. Corp., 

Arizona . . 338 



xliii 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



Arizona Copper Queen Mng. Co., 

Arizona 338 

Arizona Copper Shipping Mines 

Co., Ariz 165 

Arizona Cornelia Alines Co., Ariz. 282 
Arizona Coronado Cop. Co., Ariz. 303 
Arizona Divide Mng. Co., Nev. . . .1126 
Arizona Dixie Copper Co., Ariz.. 237 
Arizona Eagle Mining Co., Ariz. . 266 
Arizona-Eastern Mng. Co., Ariz.. 246 
Arizona Empire Copper Mines Co., 

Arizona 393 

Arizona Enterprise Mng. Co., Ariz. 393 
Arizona European Mng. Co., Ariz. 327 
Arizona Ext. Silver Mines Co., 

Xevacla 1010 

Arizona & Georgia Dev. Co., Ga.. 626 
Arizona-Globe Copper Co., Ariz.. 202 
Arizona Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Arizona 166 

Arizona Gold Star Mining Co., 

Arizona 266 

Arizona-Hancock Copper Co., Ariz. 303 
Arizona Hercules Copper Co., 

Arizona 303 

Arizona Hillside Dev. Co., Ariz. . 338 
Arizona Lead & Copper Co., Ariz. 237 
Arizona Mammoth Mines Co., 

Arizona 246 

Arizona-Mayflower Copper Co., 

Arizona 232 

Arizona McGinnis Copper Co., 

Arizona 393 

Arizona Merger Gold & Copper 

Co.. Arizona 339 

Arizona & Michigan Dev. Co., 

Arizona 166 

Arizona Middlemarch Copper Co., 

Arizona 166 

Arizona Molybdenite Consolidated. 

Arizona 246 

Arizona Molybdenum Co., Ariz... 283 
Arizona Mossback Mines Co.. Ariz 266 

Arizona Natl. Copper Co., Ariz 202 

Arizona Natl. Mng. Co., Ariz 339 

Arizona Ore Reduction Co.. Ariz. . 246 
Arizona Paymaster Mng. Mlg. 

Co.. Arizona 283 

Arizona Porphyry Copper Co., 

Arizona 394 

Arizona Portland Mines. Ltd.. 

Arizona 339 

Arizona "Rav Copper Co.. Ariz. . . . 283 
Arizona Revenue Conner Co.. Ariz. 394 
Arizona "Rex Mining Co.. Ariz.... 266 
Arizona Sampling & Reduction 

Co.. Arizona 237 

Arizona Silver Mine. Arizona. . . 339 



PAGE 

Arizona Silver Mines Co., Nev 1012 

Arizona Silver Queen Mng. Co., 
Arizona 303 

Arizona Smelting Co., Arizona. . . . 339 
Arizona Smelting & Power Co., 

Arizona 166 

Arizona-Southwestern Copper Co., 

Arizona 247 

Arizona Standard Copper Co., 

Arizona 394 

Arizona Superior Mng. Co., Ariz.. 304 
Arizona Syndicate Mng. & Dev. 

Co., Arizona 229 

Arizona Tellurium Mines Co., 

Arizona 247 

Arizona Tom Reed Gold Mines 

Co., Ariz 266 

Arizona-Tonopah Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 283 

Arizona-Tucson Copper Co., Ariz.. 283 
Arizona United Mining Co., Ariz. . 167 
Arizona Venture Corporation Ariz. 247 
Arizona Verde Copper Mng. Co., 

Ariona 369 

Arizona Victory Mng. Co., Ariz. 339 
Arizona Virginia Cop. Co., Ariz. 339 
Arizona Washington Mine. Ariz. 247 
Arizota Mining Co., Arizona. . . . 394 

Arkansas, Mines of 408 

Arkansas & Arizona Copper Co., 

Arizona 369 

Arkansas Copper Co., Mont 903 

Arkansas Mng. & Mer. Co., Ark. . 409 
Arkansas-Oklahoma Mining Co., 

Arkansas 409 

Arkansas Valley Smelter, Colo*. . . 616 
Arkansas Zinc & Sm. Corp. Ark. 409 
Arkansaw Leas. Corp., Idaho.... 636 

Ark Mines Co.. Washington 1479 

Arlington Alining Co., Idaho 677 

Arlington Mining Co., Mont 903 

Arlington Silver Mng. Co., Wash. 1479 
Arminius Chemical Co., Inc., Va.. .1469 

Armour Alining Co., Arizona 304 

Armstead Mines Inc 636 

Arnold Mining Co., Michigan.... 757 

Arnold Mininer Co.. Sonora 1714 

Arps Conner Co., California 416 

Arrow Mining Co.. Nevada 1012 

Arrowhead Annex Mnf. Co.. Nev. 1012 
Arrowhead Bonanza Mining Co., 

Nevada 1012 

Arrowhead Cons. Mng. Co., Nev. .1012 
Arrowhead Esperanza Mines Co., 

Nevada 1012 

Arrowhead Extension Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1012 

Arrowhead Afines Co., Utah 1342 



xliv 




INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Arrowhead Mining Co., Xevada. . 1013 
Arrowhead Silver Signal Mines, 

Nevada 1013 

Arrowhead Wonder Mines Co., 

Nevada 1013 

Arthur Iron Mining Co., Minn. . . . 857 
Asam Kumbang Tin Dredg., Ltd., 

Malaya 1832 

Ascot Mining Co., Quebec 1654 

Ashanti Goldfields Corp., Ltd., 

West Africa 1947 

Ashbed Mining Co., Michigan 758 

Ashboro Copper Mng. Co., N. C..1267 
Ash Creek Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co.. 

Arizona 191 

Ashdown Gold Mng. Co.. Nev....lOU 

Ash Iron Co.. Minnesota 858 

Ashland Mine, Michigan 846 

Ash Peak Extension Mng. Co.. 

Arizona 232 

Ash Peak Mines Co.. Arizona.... 232 

Asia, Mines of 1830 

Asientos Mng. Co.. Aguascalientes.1666 
Aspen Grove Amal. Mines, Ltd., 

British Columbia 1532 

Aspen Mine Co., Colo 500 

Aspen Silver-Lead Mines Co., 

Colorado 500 

Assets Realizing Mines Corp., Cal. 417 
Associated Goldfields Mng. Co.. 

Ontario 1595 

Assoc. Gold Mines of W. A.. Ltd., 

Western Australia 1905 

Associated Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.1274 
Assoc. Mines Devel. Co., Nev....ll99 

Atascadero Copper Co., Cal 417 

Athabasca Mining Co., Alberta. . . .1530 

Athletic Mng. & Sm. Co., Mo 877 

Atlanta-Home Gold Mng. Co.. Nev.1013 

Atlanta Mines Co., Idaho 636 

Atlanta Mines Co., Nevada 1187 

Atlantic Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1126 

Atlantic Mines Co., Mont 971 

Atlantic Mining Co.. Idaho 677 

Atlantic Mng Co., (Copper Range 

Co.) 784 

Atlas Copper Co., Arizona 229 

Atlas Copper Mng. Co., Wyo 1519 

Atlas Development Co.. Ariz 304 

Atlas Divide Mining Co.. Nev.... 1126 
Atlas Gold Mines. Ltd.. Ontario. . 1595 

Atlas Mining Co., Arizona 283 

Atlas Mining Co.. Yukon 1657 

Atlas Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Colo 500 

Atoka Mining Co., Oklahoma. . 1274 
Atolia Mining Co., California... 417 
A. T. S. Mining Co., Missouri... 877 
Atwood Copper Co.. N. Mexico. . .1230 



PAGE 

Aufeas Mines, Ltd., B. C 1532 

Augusta Metal Mng. Co., Colo 501 

August Gold Mng. Co., Mont.... 903 
Auk Bay Mng. & Dev. Co , Alaska. 142 

Aurelia Crown Co.. Wash 1479 

Aureola Mines Co., Nevada 1013 

Aurora Cons. Mines Co., Nev.... 1014 
Aurora Copper Mng. Co., Wash.. 1480 

Aurora Mines Co., Nevada 1014 

Aurora Mining Co., Oklahoma. . . .1274 
Aurora-Sampson Mng. Co., Idaho. 636 
Aurora Silver Mines Corp.. So- 

nora ' 1715 

Aurora y Anexas, Mineral La. S. 

A.. Chihuahua 1671 

Aurum Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1596 

Austerlitz Group of Mines. Ariz.. 327 
Austin- Amazon Copper Co., N. 

Mexico 1230 

Austin Dakota Dev Co., Xev 1014 

Austin Goldficld Mng. Co.. Nev.. 1014 
Austin Manhattan Cons. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1015 

Austin Mnnhattan Con sol. Silver 

Mines, Nevada 1015 

Austin Nevada Cons. Mines Co.. 

Nevada 1015 

Australasia. Mines of 1880 

Austral Malav Tin. Ltd.. Malaya. 1832 
Avawatz Cons. Mines, California. 418 

Avino Mines, Ltd.. Durango 1686 

A W. C. Minine Co.. Inc., Mo.. . 877 

A. Y. & Minnie M. & M. Co.. Colo. 616 

Azalia Mining Co.. Nevada 1015 

Aztec Cons. Mng. Co.. Sonora. . . .1715 
Aztec Copper Co., New Mexico. .. 1230 
Aztec Divide Mng. Co.. Nevada.. 1126 

Aztec Mines Co., Arizona 339 

Aztec Mines Co., Colo 501 

Aztec Silver Mng. Co., Sonora.. 1715 
Azure Mining Co., New Mexico. . .1230 

Azurite Copper Co., Wash 1480 

Azurite Mining Co., Nevada 1015 

Azurite Mining Co., Wyo 1519 

B. & A. Minine Co.. Arkansas.. 409 
Babilonia Gold Mines, Ltd., Nicara- 
gua 1755 

Babine Bonanza M. & M. Co.. B. C.1532 

Baca Mining Co., Colo 501 

Baca Ortiz : Compania Restaura- 

dora de, Durango 1687 

Bachelor Khedive Mines Co.. Colo. 502 
Bachelor Mountain Mine, Idaho.. 636 
Bachman-Merritt Metals Co.. Ariz. 328 
Bacis Gold & Silver Mng. Co.. 

Ltd., Durango 1687 

Backoff Leas. Co., Colo.. . 592 



xlv 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Backus y Johnston del Peru, Soc. 

Min. Peru 1791 

Badak Tin Syndicate, Malaya.. 1833 
Badger Mng. & Dev. Co., Kansas.. 738 
Bagdad-Chase Gold Mng. Co.. Cal. 418 
Bagdad Copper Co., Arizona. . . . 339 

Bailey Cobalt Mines, Ltd., Ont 1613 

Bailey-Northern Customs, Ltd., 

Ontario 1613 

Baja California, Mines of 1666 

Baker Lead Co., Missouri 896 

Baker Mlg., Sm. & Ref. Co., Okla.1274 

Baker Mines Co., Oregon 1295 

Balaghat Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., 

India 1839 

Balaklala Central Mg. & Sm. Co., 

California 418 

Balaklala Cons. Copper Co., Cal.. 418 

Balaklala Copper Co., Cal 420 

Balbach Sm. & Ref. Co., N. J....1227 
Bald Eagle Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo . 502 
Bald Mountain Mines Co., Colo... 502 
Bald Mountain Mining Co., Ore. . .1295 
Baldwin Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont.1636 
Balkan Butte Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 903 

Balkan Mining Co., Minnesota... 858 

Ballard Group, Arizona 237 

Ball Copper Co., Arizona 304 

Baltic Mine (Copper Range Co.).. 780 

Baltic Mining Co., Michigan 758 

Baltimore Copper Mng. Co., Mont. 903 
Baltimore Copper Sm. & Roll Co., 

Maryland 746 

Baluchistan Chrome Co., Ltd., In- 
dia 1839 

Bamar Copper Co., . Montana 903 

Bamberger Exploration Co., Nev..l016 

Bangnon Valley Co., Siam 1870 

Bangor Creek Dredg. Co., Alaska. 142 
Bangor Mining Co., Minnesota... 858 
Banker Divide Mining Co.,Nev. . . .1127 
Bankers Lead & Zinc Co., Mo... 877 

Bankers Mines Co., Utah 1387 

Bankok-Cora Bell Mng. Co., Col. . 616 
Bannack Gold Mng. Co., Mont... 904 
Banner & Bangle Mng. Co., Mont. 904 
Banner & Crown Point Mines, 

Idaho 636 

Banner Divide Mining Co., Nev..ll27 
Banner Gold Mng. Co., Colo.... 592 
Banner Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 247 

Banner-Idaho Mining Co., Idaho. 677 

Banner M. & M. Co., Idaho 636 

Banner State Gold, Silver & Cop- 
per Mng. Co., Colo 502 



PACK 
Bannie Mining Co., Arizona.... 339 

Baraba Mining Co., Wis 1512 

Barbarossa Mining Co., Cal 420 

Barnes-King Dev. Co., Mont 904 

Barnett Mining Co., Missouri 878 

Barney Copper Co.. Arizona 202 

Barranca Mines (Mexico), Ltd., 

Sonora 1715 

Barstow Mine. Colorado 502 

Bartlesville Zinc Co., Oklahoma. .1274 

Bartlett Mine, Colorado 616 

Barton Gulch Mng. Co.. Mont... 906 
Bartow Mng. & Mfg. Co., Ga... 627 

Basin Mining Co., Idaho 677 

Basin-Montana Mines Co., Mont. 906 
Bassick Mng. & Red. Co., Colo.. 503 

Bates Leasing Co.. Colo 503 

Batopilas Mining Co., Chihuahua. 1672 
Battle Mountain Mines & Dev. 

Co., Nevada 1016 

Battleship Mng. & Mlg. Co., X. 

Mexico 1231 

Bay State Mng. & Dev. Co., Utah. 1387 

Beach Mines, Inc., Ariz 284 

Beacon Mines Co., Colo 592 

Beal Lake Gold-Copper Mng. Co.. 

Washington 1480 

Bear Creek Mining Co., Idaho... 678 
Bear Creek Placer Co.. Mont.... 907 

Bear Divide Mining Co., Nev 1127 

Bear Gulch Mining Co., Mont 907 

Bearup Group, New Mexico 1231 

Beatson Copper Co.. Alaska 142 

Beaver Auxiliary Mines Co., Ont. 1596 
Beaver-Butte Copper Co., Utah . . 1 342 
Beaver Cons. Mines, Ltd., Ont... 1613 

Beaver Copper Co., Utah 1342 

Beaver Creek Mng. Co., Mont... 907 
Beaver Gold Mines Corp., Utah.. 1343 
Beaverhead Montana Copper Mnt>-. 

Co.. Montana 908 

Beaver Horseshoe Gold Mng. Co., 

Utah ' 1343 

Beaver Lake Gold Mng. Co., Sa>- 

katchewan 1657 

Beaver Lake Metals Co., Utah.. 1343 

Beaver Mines Co., Utah ) 343 

Beaver Mining Co., Montana 907 

Beaver Mountain Mining Co., 

Alaska 142 

Beaver Range Mine Co., Utah.... 1343 
Beck Tunnel Cons. Mng. Co.. 

Utah 1446 

Becky Sharp Mine, Colo 503 

Bee Bee Mining Co.. Utah 1344 

Beecher Gold Mng. Co., Wash .1480 
Bee Hive Gold Co., Arizona.... 339 



xlvi 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Beemer Cons. Gold & Copper Co., 

Arizona 340 

Belcher Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll27 
Belcher Ext. Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1127 

Belcher Mine, Arizona 340 

Belcher Mining Co.. Arizona.... 340 

Belcher Mining Co., Nevada 1016 

Belcher Mining Co., Wash 1480 

Belgium-Bohemian Mng. Co., Cal. 420 

Bell Boy Mine, Montana 908 

Bell Mining Co., Idaho 678 

Belle Union Mine, Arizona 247 

Belleview Div. Mines Corp.. Nev..ll27 
Bellevue Champion Mine, Colo.. 503 
Belle of the West Mng. Co., Idaho. 678 

Bell-Star Mine. Ga 627 

Belmont-Banner Mng. Co.-. Idaho. 678 
Belmont Big Four Mng. Co.. Nev. 1016 
Belmont-Canadian Mines. Ltd.. 

British Columbia 1532 

Belmont Divide Mining Co.. Nev.1128 

Belmont Milling Co., Nevada 1016 

Belmont Mining Co., Ltd.. Idaho. 678 
Belmont Shawmut Mng. Co., Cal.. 420 
Belmont Snrf Inlet Mines. Ltd.. 

British Columbia 1532 

Relmont Wagner Mng. Co., Colo. 503 

Belorophon Mining Co., Utah 1387 

Relzora-Bassick Mng. Co.. Colo.. 504 

Benack Mining Co., Colo 504 

Ben B. Mining Co., Missouri 878 

Ben Bolt Mng. Co.. Utah 1.446 

Bendene Mining Co.. Kansas 738 

Bender Metals Milling Co.. Wash. 1480 
Bendigo Amalgamated Goldfields, 

Victoria 1903 

Bendigo Mines Co.. California. . . . 421 
Ben Ezra Copper & Gold M. & S. 

Co.. Nevada 1016 

Bengal Tiger-Gordon Mine. Colo. 504 
Benguet Cons. Mng. Co.. P. T....1868 

Ben Harrison Mine. Oregon 1295 

Ben Hur Divide Ext. Mng. Co.. 

Nevada 1128 

Ben Hur Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll28 

Ben Hur Leasing- Co.. Wash 1481 

Ren Hur Mng. Co.. Ltd., Mont.. 90S 
Bennett Mining Co.. Minnesota. . 858 
Bennett- Stephenson M. & M. Co.. 

New Mexico 1231 

Ben Thomas Mn<r. Co.. Mont 90^ 

^enton Mining Co.. Idaho. ...... 678 

Benton - Radford - Smith Group. 

.Nevada 1017 

Beowawe Silver Mng. Co.. Nev. ..1017 
Rere^guela Tin Mines. Ltd.. Bo- 
livia ..1764 



PAGE 

Berkley Mine, Arizona 247 

Bernice Red Rock Mng. Co., Mont. 908 

Bertha A. Mining Co., Mo 878 

Bertha B. Mine, Colo 592 

Berundv Tungsten Mines Co.. 

Nevada .1017 

Bessie-Cora Mng. Co., Colo 504 

Best Chance Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida. 679 

Best Mining Co., Oklahoma 1274 

Bethel Mining Co., Oklahoma. . 1274 
Bethlehem Chile Iron Mines Co.. 

Chile 1771 

Bethlehem Copper Co. (Inc.), N. 

Mexico ' 1231 

Bethlehem Gold Mines, Ltd., Ida. 637 

Bethlehem Zinc Co., Kansas 738 

Betty Alden Mining Co.. Mont... 908 
Beulah B. Mining Co.. Oklahoma. 1275 
Beulah Lead & Zinc Co.. Okla.....l275 
Beulah Mining Co.. Missouri.... 879 
Reveridge Cons. Mines Co., Cal.. 421 
Bevis Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1128 
Be/ant Gold Mining Co.. Colo... 504 
B-G-M. Mining Co.. Missouri.... 878 
B. & H. Mines & Mlg. Co.. Mont. 908 
Big Ace Divide Mne. Co., Nev...ll28 
Big Baldy M. & M. Co., Idaho... 637 
Big Ben Mining Co.. Missouri... 878 

Big Bend Mining Co.. Wis 1512 

Big Bill Divide Mng. Co.. Nev..l128 

Big Blue Mining Co., Ariz 340 

Big Bug Copper Co., Ariz 340 

Rig Butte Copper Co.. Ari/ona... 340 

Big Casino Leasing Co.. Nev 1017 

Rig Casino Mining Co.. Nevada.. 1017 
Rig Chief Cons. Mines Co., Nev.. 1017 

Rig Chief Mining Co., Okla 1275 

Big Cliff Mng. Co.. Cal 421 

Rig Copper Chief Co.. Ariz 340 

Rig Cottomvood Coalition Mines 

Co.. Utah 1387 

Big Cottomvood Cons. Mng. Co., 

Utah 1388 

Big Cottonwood Copper & Gold 

Mng. Co.. Utah 1388 

Rig Creek Leasing Co., Idaho.... 679 
Big Creek Mining Co., Idaho.... 679 
Rig Creek Silver Mng. Co., Idaho. 679 
Big Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. ... 1129 
Rig Divide Mng. Co., Ltd., Idaho.. 679 

Rig Dome Mines, Arizona : . 341 

Big Eight Mine, Montana 909 

Big Eio-ht Mining Co.. Okla.... 1275 

Big Elk Mining Co., Kansas 739 

Rig Elk Mining Co.. Montana 909 

Rig Fifty Mine, California 421 

Big Five Copper Co., Wyo. . ; . . . 1520 
Rig Five Mining Co.. Colo. 504 



xlvii 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Big Five Mining Co., Idaho 680 

Big Foot Mng. Co., Mont 909 

Big Four Exploration Co., Utah.. 1436 

Big Hill Mining Co., Utah 1446 

Big Horn Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll29 
Big Hurricane Mine, Arkansas... 409 
Big Indian Copper Co., Utah.... 1344 

Big It M. & M. Co., Idaho 680 

Big Jerome Copper Co., Arizona 371 

Big Jim Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz 267 

Big Jim Gold Mng. Co.. Ariz 267 

Big Jim Mng. Co., Oklahoma 1275 

Big King Mining Co., Utah 1388 

Big Lead Mining Co., Kansas 739 

Big Ledge Copper Co., Ariz 341 

Big Ledge Dev. Co., Ariz 342 

Big Ledge Divide Cons. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1129 

Big Missouri Mine, B. C 1533 

Big Pine Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz.. 342 
Big Pine Mining Co., Nevada. .. .1018 

Big Reef Copper Co., Ariz 342 

Big Severn Group, Ariz 343 

Big Seven Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.1275 

Big Seven Mining Co., Mont 909 

Big Shot Lead & Zinc Co... Kan. 739 

Big Thompson Mine, Colo 592 

Big Three Mines, New Mexico.. 1232 

Big Three Mining Co., Okla 1275 

Big Toad Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Colo. 505 

Big V Mining Co., Okla 1275 

Big Vein Lead & Zinc Co., Okla. .1275 
Bilharz Mng. Co., O. M., Okla... 1275 

Billie Mack Mng. Co., Ariz 394 

Rilliken Alining Co., Oklahoma. .. 1275 

Billiton Company, Billiton 1832 

Bill Nye Mining Co., Nevada 1018 

Bi-Metallic Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1129 

Bi-Metallic Mine, Nevada 1918 

Bingham Amal. Cop. Co., Utah. 1407 
Biingham Anaconda Copper Co., 

Utah .1407 

Bingham Central Mng. Co., Utah. 1407 
Bingham Central Standard Copper 

Co., Utah 1407 

Bingham Coalition Mines Co., 

Utah 1407 

Bingham Copper Boy Mng. Co., 

Utah 1408 

Bingham Empire Mines Co., Utah. 1408 
Rinqluun & Gar field Railway 

(Utah Copper Co.} '.1432 

Bingham Mines Co.. Utah 1408 

Bingham-New Haven C. & G. 

Mng. Co., Utah 1412 

Bingham-Tooele Mng. Co., Utah. 1412 
Bingo Divide Mining Co., Nev...ll29 



PAGE 
Bipont Silver Mining Co., Utah.. 1344 

Birmingham Mining Co.. Colo 505 

Bisbee Ajo Copper & Dev. Co., 

Arizona 168 

Bisbee Copper Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Arizona 180 

Bisbee-Sonora Developing Co., 

Arizona 180 

Bisbee- Warren Copper Co., Ariz.. 180 

Biscuit Mining Co., Nevada 1018 

Bishop Creek Gold Mine, Cal.... 422 
Bishops Knoll Mining Co., Ariz... 191 
Bisichi Tin -Co. (Nigeria), Ltd., 

(The), Nigeria 1921 

Bismarck Mine, S. D 1316 

Bitter Creek Mng. Co., N. Mex..l232 
Bitter Root Mountain Mng. Co.. 

Idaho . .*. 680 

Black Barb Mng. Co., Idaho 637 

Black Bear Cons. Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 680 

Black Bear Mines Co.. Idaho 680 

Black Bear Mng. Co., Cal 422 

Black Bear Mining Co., Colo.... 505 

Black Bess Mining Co.. Ariz 284 

Blackbird Copper & Gold Mng. 

Co., Ltd.. Idaho 637 

Black Butte Quicksilver Mng. Co., 

Oregon 1296 

Black Canyon Mng. Co., Arizona. 343 
Black Chief Copper Co., Arizona. 343 
Black Cloud Mining Co., Colo... 505 
Black Copper Co., New Mexico.. 1232 
Black Diamond Copper Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1018 

Black Diamond Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Arizona 343 

Black Eagle Group, Arizona 328 

Black Eagle Mng. Co., Nevada. . . .1018 
Black Eagle Mng. Co., Oklahoma. 1275 
Black Friday Gold Mng. Co., 

Montana 910 

Black Giant Mines Co., Arizona.. 394 
Black Hawk Cons. Mines Co., N. 

Mexico 1232 

Black Hawk Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1129 

Black Hawk L. & Z. Mng. Co., 

Oklahoma 1275 

Blackhawk Leasing Co., Idaho.... 680 
Black Hawk Mine, California.... 422 
Blackhawk Mng. & Dev. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 680 

Black Hawk Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. 

Mexico 1232 

Black Hawk Tungsten Mining 

Corp., California 422 



xlyiii 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Black Hills Copper Co., S. D....1317 
Black Hills Tungsten M. & M. Co., 

South Dakota 1317 

Black Jack Cons. Mng. Co., Utah. 1344 

Black Metal Red. Co., Colo 505 

Black Metals Mines Co., Colo 505 

Black Metals Mines, Inc., Nev 1018 

Black Metals Mng. Co., Nev 1019 

Black Oak Mines & Mlg. Co, CaL 422 
Black Panther Ext. Mng. Co., Nev.1019 

Black Panther Mng. Co., Nev 1019 

Black Pine Mining Co., Idaho 638 

Black Prince Copper Co., Ariz. . . . 168 
Black Prince Metal Prod. Co., 

Arizona 284 

Black Range Mining Co., Ariz.... 267 
Black Range Tunnel & Mng. Co., 

New Mexico 1232 

Black Reef Copper Co.. Arizona. . 395 
Black Rock Copper Mng. Mlg. 

Co.. Utah 1344 

Black Rock (Ltd.), Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Arizona 237 

Black Rock Mine, Nevada 1019 

Black Rock Mining Co.. Idaho. . . . 681 
Blackstone Mining Co., Idaho.... 638 

Blacktail Mining Co., Idaho 638 

Black Traveler Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 910 

Blackwater Mines, Ltd.. New Zea- 
land 1911 

Blaine & Emmett Mng. Co., Ltd.. 

Idaho 638 

Blanche Rose Mining Co., Ariz... 284 

Bland Mining Co.. Arizona ,328 

Blanton Copper Mng. Syn., San 

Domingo 1761 

Blanton Gold Bullion Mine Co., 

Arizona 267 

Blewett Mining Co.. Illinois 735 

Blistered Horn Mine, Colo 506 

Blockhouse Mining Co.. Wis 1512 

Block Mines Co., Arizona 343 

Block 10 Misima Gold Mines, Pa- 
pua 1888 

Blue Bell Fxt. Copner Co., Ariz.. 344 

Blue Bell Mine, Arizona 344 

Blue Bell Minin^ Co.. Ltd., Idaho. 681 
Blue Bell Mng. & Red. Co., Ariz.. 395 

Bluebird Co. (The). Mont 971 

Bluebird Cons. Mng. Co.. Nevada. 1019 
Bluebird-Corbin Gold, Silver & 

Cop. M. Co.. Montana 910 

Bluebird Lode. Montana 910 

Blue Bird Mines. Colo 506 

Blue Bird Mining Co., Oregon. .. .1296 
Blue Bird Silver Mng. Co.. Ariz.. 304 
Blue Bonnet Mining Co., Okla. . . .1276 



PAGE 

Blue Diamond Mng. Co.. Kan.. 739 
Blue Dick Mining Co., Nevada. .. 1019 

Blue Eagle Mine, Ariz 328 

Blue-Eyed Nellie Mine, Inc., Mont. 910 
Blue Flag Gold Mng. Co.. Colo... 592 

Blue Goose Mng. Co., Okla 1276 

Blue Grouse Mine, Idaho 638 

Blue Jacket Copper Co., Ltd., Ida. 638 
Blue Jacket Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1129 
Blue Jacket Mng. Co., Idaho.....' 638 

Blue Ledge Mine, California 423 

Blue Ledge Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Washington 1481 

Blue Light Copper Co., Nevada. .. 1020 
Blue Monster Copper Co., Ariz... 371 
Blue Mound Mining Co., Kansas. . 739 

Blue Mountain Mng. Co., Cal 423 

Blue Mountain Mining Co.. Ore. . . 1296 

Blue Pig Mng. Co., Arkansas 409 

Blue Ribbon Gold Mng. Co.. Utah. 1344 
Blue Ribbon Mines Group, Ore... 1296 
Blue Ribbon Mining Co., Idaho... 681 
Blue River Mines & Red. Co., 

Colorado 506 

Blue Rock Mining Co., Missouri. . 878 

Bluestar Mining Co., Wash 1481 

Blue Star Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 681 

Bluestone Mng. & Sm. Co., Nev... 1020 

Blue Vein Copper Co., Mont 910 

Blue Wing Mining Co., Idaho.... 681 
P.lue Wing Mining Co., N. C....1267 
Bluster Cons. Mng. Co., Nevada. . .1020 

B. M. & B. Mining Co.. Wis 1512 

Bobbie Anderson Group Mng Co., 

Idaho 681 

Bob Lee Cons. Mng. Co., Colo.... 506 

Bobs Farm Mining Co, Cal 423 

Bog Mining Co.. Utah 1388 

Bogoslovsk Mng. Co., Siberia 1873 

Bohemia Mining Co, Michigan. . . . 758 

Bohn Mine, Colorado 617 

Boise King Placers Co.. Idaho 639 

Boise Rochester Mng. Co. (Inc), 

Idaho 639 

Bolen Creek Mining Co., Oregon. 1296 
Boleo; Compagnie du, Baja Cali- 
fornia 1666 

Boley Mining Co, Utah 1388 

Bolivia, Mines of 1763 

Bon Ami Mining Co., Oklahoma. . 1276 
Bonanza-Butte Mining Co.. Mont. . 971 

Bonanza Dev. Co.. Colo 506 

Bonanza Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1129 

Bonanza Mine, Washington 1481 

Bonanza Mining Co., Idaho 639 

Bonanza Mining Co., Missouri .... 878 
Bonanza Mining Co., Nevada 1020 



xlix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

r.onan/.u Mng. Co.. Sonora. 1716 

Bouncy Cons. Coppc-r Co., X. Mcx.1233 
Bonnev Mining Co., X. Mexico. .1233 

Bonnie Mining Co.. Ari/ona 344 

Boo-Cira-Loo Mining Co., (The). 

Arkansas 410 

Boor Mining C'o.. Kansas 739 

Boras Leasing C'o., Arixona 180 

Borealts Cons. Mines Co., Cal . . . . 424 

Boreas Gold Mng. Co., Colo 506 

Boren Gulch Mng. Co., Colo 506 

Bor, Societe des Minas de, Serbia. 1818 
Boss Extension Mng. Co., Nevada. 1021 

Ross Cold M. Co., Nev 1021 

Boss Zinc Alining Co., Idaho 681 

Boston Acme Mines Corp., Utah.. 1436 
Boston & Alta Copper Co., Mont.. 911 
Boston-American Mng. Co., \Vash.l481 
Boston & Arizona Mines Co., Ariz. 304 
Boston & Brice Copper Co., New 

Mexico 1233 

Boston- Btitte Copper. & Zinc Co., 

Montana 974 

Boston-Colby Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 911 

Boston Corbin Mng. Co., Mont. 911 
Boston Creek Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1596 

Boston Development Co., Utah... 1389 

Boston Duenweg Co., Mo 878 

Boston-Elvins Lead Co., Mo 897 

Boston & Ely Cons. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1168 

Boston-Ely Mng. Co., Nevada. .. .1168 
Boston Emerald Mng. Co., New 

Mexico 1234 

Boston-Hecla Mng. Co., N. Mex..l234 
Boston-Idaho Gold Dredg. Co., 

Idaho 639 

Boston-Idaho Mining Co., Idaho.. 639 
Boston & Jerome Copper Co., Ariz. 371 
Boston & Lake Superior Mineral 

Land Co., Mich 758 

Boston Mine Leas. Co., Colo 507 

Boston Mining Co., Kansas 739 

Boston - Moctezuma Mining Co., 

Sonora .1716 

Boston & Montana Dev. Co., Mont. 911 
Boston & Montana Group (Ana- 
conda C. M. Co.} 960 

Boston Montana Mng. & Power 

Co., Mont 913 

Boston & Montana Red. W orks 

(Anaconda C. M. Co.) 961 

Boston-Parry Sound Copper Co., 

Ontario 1596 

on-Sierra Madre Mine Indus- 
try Co., Colo 507 



PAGE 

Boston Sonora Mines Co., Sonora.1716 
Boston & Tintic Mng. Co., Utah.. 1446 
Boston-Utah Mining Co., Utah... 1436 
Boston & Wyo. Copper Mng. Co., 

Wyoming 1520 

Boulder Canon Tungsten Co., Colo. 507 
Boulder County .Metal Mng. As- 
sociation, Colo 507 

Boulder County Mines & Tunnel 

Co., Colo 507 

Boulder Creek Gold Mng. Co., 

Oregon 1296 

Boulder Creek Mng. Co., Idaho... 640 
Boulder Creek M. & M. Co., 

Ltd., Idaho 681 

Boulder Mining Co., Mont 914 

Boulder Ore Sampling Co., Colo. 507 
Boulder Tungsten Prod. Co., Colo. 508 
Boundary Cone Gold Mines Co., 

Arizona 267 

Boundary Gold Co., YVash 1482 

Boundary Red Mountain Mng. Co., 

Wash 1482 

Bourkes Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1636 

Bovvena Copper Mines, Ltd., B.C. .1533 

Bowen Group, Colo 508 

Bowyer Gold & Copper Co., Ariz.. 395 
Boyer Copper Mines Co., Nevada.1021 

Bracuhy Falls Co., Brazil 1768 

Braden Copper Co. (Braden Cop- 
per Mines Co.) 1773 

Braden Copper Mines Co., Chile.. 1771 

Braden Mine, Oregon 1297 

Bradford Mine, Arizona 328 

Bradford Mines, Ltd., N. S 1591 

Bradley Lead & Zinc Co., Mo.... 879 
Bradshaw Coppermines Co., Ariz. 344 
Bradshaw Reduction Co., Ariz.... 344 
Brakpan Mines, Ltd., Transvaal. ..1931 

Branborg Mining Co., Utah 1389 

Brant Independent Mng. Co., Colo. 508 

Brant Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1614 

Brazil, Mines of 1768 

Brazil; Cia de Min. y Met. do, 

Brazil 1768 

Brazilevia, Companhia Metallur- 

gica, Brazil 1768 

Brazilian Iron Steel Co., Brazil. .. 1768 

Breece Mng. Co., Colo 617 

Breitung Hematite Mng. Co., Ltd., 

(Marquette Iron Co.) 852 
Breitung Iron Co., Michigan. . .846-852 
Breitung Mines Corp. of Dela- 
ware, Colombia 1786 

Brenz Mining Co., Kansas 739 

Brewer Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Utah 1344 

Brewster Mine, Oklahoma 1276 



1 



PAGE 

Bright Carbonate Mng. Co., Ore.. 1297 
Bright Diamond Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 508 

Briseis Tin & General Mng. Co., 

Ltd.. Tasmania-Vic 1895-1904 

Bristol Cons. Mines & Sm. Co., 

Nevada 1023 

Bristol Mining Co., Michigan 846 

Bristol Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho... 682 
Britannia Mng. & Sm. Co., Ltd., 

(Hoive Sound Co.) 1557 

British- Alberta Mng. Co., B. C...1533 
British-American Copper Mng. & 

Sm. Co., B. C 1534 

British American Mng. Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1534 

British - American Nickel Corp., 

Ltd., Ontario 1596 

British Broken Hill Prop. Co., 

Ltd., (The), N. S. W 1880 

British Canadian Silver Corp.,B. C.1534 

British Columbia. Mines of 1530 

British Columbia Copper Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1534 

British Columbia Iron Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1534 

British Columbia Manganese Co., 

B. C 1534 

British Columbia Phoenix Co., 

Ltd., B. C 1534 

British Columbia Silver Mines, 

Ltd., B. C 1534 

British Minerals Corp., Ltd., Que- 
bec 1654 

British Platinum & Gold Corp., 

Ltd., Colombia 1 787 

British South Africa Co. (The), 

Rhodesia 1925 

Briton Ferry Smelter (Cape Cop- 
per Co., Ltd.} 1915 

Broadfbrd Mine, Idaho 640 

Broadwater County Mining. Co., 

Mont 914 

Broadwater Mills Co., Utah 1436 

Broken Hill Assoc. Smelters Prop., 

Ltd., S. A 1894 

Broken Hill Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1130 
Broken Hill Junction Lead Mng. 

Co., N. S. W 1881 

Broken Hill Prop. Block 14 Co., 

Ltd., N. S. W 1881 

Broken Hill Prop. Block 10 Co., 

Ltd., N. S. W 1881 

Broken Hill Prop Co., Ltd.,N.S.W.1882 

Broken Hills Mine, Arizona 319 

Broken Hills Mng. Co., Nevada. . .1023 
Broken Hill South, Ltd., N. S. W..1883 



PAGE 

Broken Hill South Silver Mng. Co., 

N. S. W 1884 

Brooklyn Arizona Mng. Co., Ariz. 344 
Brooklyn Mining Co., California.. 424 
Brooklyn Mining Co., Manitoba. .1586 
Brooklyn Mining Co., Nevada, .. .1023 

Brooks Hill Mine, Arkansas 410 

Brotherton Iron Mng. Co., Mich.. 847 
B rougher Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll30 

Brown Bear Mng. Co., Cal 424 

Brownell-Arizona Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Arizona 305 

Brown & Head Zinc Co., Kansas. . 739 

Brown Leasing Co., Idaho 682 

Brown Mountain Sm. Co., Colo... 509 
Brown Whitlow Group, Arizona.. 305 
Bruce Cons. Mng. Co., Manitoba. .1586 

Bruce Creek Mines Co., Wash 1482 

Bruce Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1597 

Brunswick Cons. Gold Mng. Co., 

California 424 

Buchan's Mine, Newfoundland 1659 

Buck & Charley Mng. Co., Nev..l200 
Buckeye Belmont Mines Co., Nev..l211 
Buckeye Copper & Gold Mng. Co., 

Arizona 345 

Buckeye Eagle Mng. Co., Nevada. 1211 

Buckeye Group, Arizona 345 

1'uckeye Mines Co., B. C 1534 

Buckeye Mines & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 593 
Buckeye Mng. Co. of California.. 425 
Buckeye Tonopah Mng. Co., Nev.l?ll 
Buckhorn & Boulder Mng. Co., 

Arizona 238 

Buckhorn Mines Co., Nevada 1023 

Buckhorn Syndicate, Nevada 1023 

Buckshot Mining Co., Kansas 739 

Buckskin Divide Mining Co., Nev.1130 
Buckskin National Gold Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1023 

Buena Tierra Mng. Co., Ltd., Chi- 
huahua 1673 

Buena Vista Co., Utah 1345 

Buena Vista Gold Mng. Co., Chi- 
huahua 1673 

Buena Vista Mines Co., Mont.... 914 
Bufa Mng., Mlg. & Sm. Co., Son- 

ora 1716 

Buffalo Hump-Crystal Lake Mng. 

Co., Idaho 640 

Buffalo Iron Mng. Co., Michigan. 847 

Buffalo Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1615 

Buffalo Mining Co., Idaho 682 

Buffalo Mng. Co.. Okla.-Kan.. . 1276 
Buffalo Monitor Mine, Oregon. ...1297 
Buffalo-New Mexico Mines Co., 

N. Mexico 1234 

Buffalo Valley Mines Co., Nevada. 1023 



77//i MlXliS HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Bullard Mine, Ari/ona 395 

Bull Domingo Mng. Co., Colo 509 

Bullfinch Prop. (1919) Ltd., W.A..1905 
Bullfinch Prop. (W. A.), Ltd., 

W. A 1905 

Bullion Bar Mng. & Dev. Co., Ariz. 284 
Bullion-Beck & Champion Mn-g. 

Co. (U. S. S.,R. & M. Co.). 116-1446 
Bullion Divide Mining Co., Nev..ll30 
Bullion Hill Mines Co., Arizona.. 247 

Bullion Mining Co., Nevada 1023 

Bullion Mng. Co., Ltd., Idaho 640 

Bullion Mining Syndicate, B. C...1534 

Bullock Mining Co., B. C 1535 

Bullshead Mng. & Sm. Co., Nev..l024 
Bull .Valley Gold Mines Co., Utah. 1345 
Bull Valley Hassiampie Gold Mng. 

Co., Utah ....1345 

Bulhvacker Cons. Mines Co., Nev.1184 
Bullwhacker Copper Co., Mont... 974 

Bully Cave Co., California 425 

Bully Hill Copper Mng. & Sm. Co., 

California 426 

Bumble Bee Mining Co., Mo 879 

Bunker Hill Cons. Mng. Co., Cal. . 426 
Bunker Hill Copper Co., Arizona. . 305 
Bunker Hill Mines Co. (Phelps 

Dodge Corp.} 101 

Bunker Hill Mining Co., Kansas.. 740 
Bunker Hill Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Washington ..1482 

Bunker Hill Smelter (Bunker Hill 

& Sullivan M. & C. Co.} 684 

Bunker Hill & Sullivan M. & C. 

Co., Idaho 682 

Burgomaster Ore Co., Utah 1345 

Burke Mining Co., Idaho 684 

Burlington-Boulder Mng. Co., Colo. 509 

Burlington Mining Co., Idaho 684 

Burlington-Nevada Copper Co., 

Nevada 1024 

Burma Corp., Ltd., India 1840 

Burma Mines, Ltd., India (Burma) 1840 
Burniere Gold Mng. Co., B. C. .1535 

Burns M. & M. Co., Idaho 640 

Burnside Gold Mines, Ltd., Ont..l636 
Burnt River Dredging Co., Ore.. 1297 

Burr Mining Co., Illinois 735 

Burro Mountain Branch (Phelps 

Dodge Corp.) 101 

Burro Mountain Copper Co., N. 

Mexico 1234 

Burros Development Co., N. Mex.1234 

Burton Mining Co., Mo 879 

Bush-Baxter Mng. Co., Arizona.. 284 

Bush Mines, B. C 1535 

Bush Mines, Ltd., B. C 1535 

Butler Bros., Minnesota 858 



PAGE 

Butler Bros. Mng. Co., Mo 879 

Butler Divide Mining Co., Nev...ll30 

Butler's Tin Mine, N. S. W 1884 

Butte, Mines of 959 

Butte-Alex Scott Copper Co., 

Montana 974 

Butte & Anaconda Cons. M. & M. 

Co., Mont 974 

Butte-Argenta Copper Co., Mont.. 974 
Butte & Arizona Copper Mng. Co., 

Arizona 168 

Butte & Bacorn Mining Co., Mont. 974 
Butte-Ballaklava Cop. Co., Mont. 974 

Butte & Boulder Mine, Mont 914 

Butte Bullwhacker Mng. Co., Mont. 975 
Butte-Cable Copper & Gold Mng. 

Co., Mont 976 

Butte Central Copper Co., Mont. . 976 
Butte Central Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Montana 976 

Butte-Chewelah Cop. Co., Wash... 1482 
Butte & Coeur d'Alene Mng. Co., 

Idaho : 684 

Butte-Concordia Mng. Co., Mont.. 977 
Butte Cons. Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 914 

Butte Copper Co., Montana 977 

Butte Copper Czar Mng. Co., 

Montana 977 

Butte Copper King Mng. Co., 

Montana 977 

Butte Copper & Zinc Co., Mont... 977 
Butte & Corbin Cons. Copper Mng. 

Co., Mont 978 

Butte-Curtis & Majors Copper Mng. 

Co., Mont 979 

Butte-Deer Lodge Mng. Co., Mont. 979 
Butte-Detroit Copper & Zinc Mng. 

Co., Mont 979 

Butte Divide Mining Co., Nev 1130 

Butte-Duluth Mining Co., Mont... 979 
Butte East Slope Mining Co., 

Montana 980 

Butte & Elk Range Co., Mont 980 

Butte & Elliston Gold & Cop. Mng. 

Co., Mont 914 

Butte & Ely Copper Co., Nevada.. 1168 
Butte Exemption Cop. Co., Mont. . 980 
Butte & Georgetown Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Mont 914 

Butte & Great Falls Mng. Co., 

Montana 981 

Butte Hercules Mng. Co., Mont.. 981 
Butte Hill Copper Mining Co., 

Montana 981 

Butte-Jardine Metal Mines Co., 

Montana 914 

Butte- Kansas Mines Co., Kansas.. 740 



Hi 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Butte-Kansas Mng. Co., Mo 879 

Hutte & Kellogg Mines Co., Idaho. 685 
Butte - Knickerbocker Mng. Co., 

Montana 914 

Butte Lode Ext. Mng. Co., Mont.. 981 
Butte & London Cop. Dev. Co., 

Montana 981 

Butte Main Range Copper Mng. 

Co., Mont 982-1005 

Butte Metals Mining Co., Mont... 982 
Butte-Milwaukee Cop. Co., Mont. 982 
Butte Mine Exploration Co., Mont. 982 
Butte-Minnesota Mng. Co., Mont. 982 
Butte Monitor Tunnel Mng. Co., 

Montana 983 

Butte-New England Mine, Mont.. 983 
Butte-New York Copper Co., 

Montana 983-988 

Butte & Plutus Mining Co., Mont. 983 
Butte Ramsdell Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 983 

Butte & Red Eagle Copper Co., 

Montana 983 

Butte & Rocher de Bottle Copper 

Co., B. C 1535 

Butte Standard Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 983 

Butte-Summit Copper Co., Mont.. 983 
Butte & Superior Mng. Co.. Mont. 984 
Butte Vipond Gold M. & M. Co., 

Montana 914 

Butte & Yerington Copper Co., 

Nevada 1024 

Butte & Zenith City Mng. Co., 

Montana 989 

Butterfly Mine. Colo .' . . 509 

Butternut Mine (Big Ledge Cop- 
per Co.} ' 342 

Butters Divisadero Co., Salvador. 1757 
Butters Potosi Cons. Mines. Inc., 

Salvador 1757 

Butters Salvador Mines, Ltd., 

Salvador 1758 

B. V. N. Mining Co., New Mex..l234 
Bwana M'Kubwa Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Rhodesia 1925 

Cababi Mining- Co.. Arizona.... 284 
Cabin Branch Mining Co., Va....l469 
Cabinet Range Mng. Corp.. Mont.. 915 

Cable Cons. Mng. Co.. Mont 915 

Cache Creek Dredging Co., Alaska 142 
Cactus Cons. Mng. Co.. California. 427 
Cactus Cons. Silver Mines Co., 

Nevada 1024 

Cactus Hills Mng. Co., Mo 879 

Cactus Nevada Silver Mines Co., 

Nevada . ..1024 



PAGE 

Cactus Queen, Arizona 345 

Cadena de Cobre Mng. Co., Son- 

ora 1716 

Cadiz Mining Co., Colo 509 

Cahoon Mine, Wis 1512 

Calama; Compania de Minas y 

Fundicion de, Chile 1776 

Calamont Copper Co., Mont 915 

Cola ; Sociedad Anonima Minas de, 

Spain 1819 

Calavada Copper Co., California- 
Nevada .....427-1025 

Calaveras Cons. Syndicate, Calif.. 427 
Calaveras Copper Co., California. 427 

Calcutta Group, Arizona 285 

Caldo Mining Co., Utah 1345 

Caledonia Devel. Co., Idaho 685 

Caledonia Mining Co., Idaho 685 

Caledonian Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 509 
Calhoun Cons. Mines Co., Colo... 509 

California, Mines of ; . . . . 413 

California Comstock Cons. Mng. 

Co., Utah 1436 

California Cons. Mng. Co., Idaho. 686 
California Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll31 
California Gold Mg. & Dev. Co., 

California 429 

Calif. & Mass. Copper Mines Co.. 

California 429 

Cal. Metal & Min. Prod's Assn., 

Calofornia 429 

California Mining Co., B. C 1535 

California Rand Mines Co., Cal.. 429 
California & Tonopah Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1211 

California Treadwell Gold Mng. 

Co. Cal 429 

Callahan Zinc-Lead Co..'. . .687-1953 
Calliope Cons. Mng. Co., Colo.... 509 
Calumet & Algoma Mng. Co., Ont.1597 
Calumet & Arizona Mining Co., 

Arizona 180 

Calumet & California Mng. Co., 

California 429 

Calumet-Corbin Mines Co., Mani- 
toba 1586 

Calumet & Cornelia Dev. Co., Ariz. 238 
Calumet Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll31 
Calumet & Hecla Mng. Co., Mich.. 758 
Calumet & Jerome Copper Co., 

Arizona 372 

Calumet Mining Co., Utah 1345 

Calumet & Montana Cons. Mng. 

Co., Ontario 1597 

Calumet-New Mexico Mng. Co., N. 

Mexico . 1235 



liii 



Till- MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Cahunet & Sonora of Cananea 
Mng. Co. (Carnegie L. & Z. 

,) * 1/19 

Calumet & Verde Copper Co., Ari- 
zona 372 

Cnmburn Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont.1598 
Camelback Gold & Silver Mng. 

Co., Arizona 305 

Cameron-Johnson Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 142 

Cam. & Motor Gold Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Rhodesia 1926 

Campanario; Societe des Mines de 

Cuivre de, Spain 1820 

Camp Bird Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1131 

Camp Bird, Ltd., Colo 509 

Camp Bird Mng., Leas. & Power 

Co., Colo 593 

Camp Bird Tunnel, Mng. & Trans. 

Co. (Camp Bird, Ltd.} 511 

Canada, Mines of 1530 

Canada Copper Corp., Ltd., B.C.. 1535 
Canadian American Resources, 

Ltd., Ontario 1598 

Canadian Copper Co., Ontario 1598 

Canadian Exploration Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1598 

Canadian-Kirkland Gold Mines, 

Ontario 1636 

Canadian Klondyke Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Yukon 1657 

Canadian Mining Corp., Ltd., Ont.1616 
Canadian Mng. & Finance Co., 

Ltd., Ontario 1641 

Canadian Sm. & Ref. Co., Ont....l598 
Canadian Wood Molybdenite Co., 

Quebec 1654 

Cananea Cons. Copper Co., Sonora.1717 
Cananea Cons. Copper Co., S. A. 

(Greene Cananea Copper Co.) 1731 

Canario Copper Co., Sonora 1717 

Candelaria Mines Co., Nevada 1025 

Candelaria Mng. Co., Chihuahua. .1673 
Cane Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont....l598 
Canopus Iron Corp., New York.. 1264 
Canton Mining Co., Oklahoma. .. .1276 

Canton Mining Co., Utah 1389 

Canyon Mines Corporation Calif.. 429 
Canyon Mountain Mng. Co., Ore. 1297 
Cape Breton Copper Co., Ltd., 

N. S 1591 

Cape Colony, Mines of . . . . , 1914 

Cape Colony Mines (Cape Cop- 
per Co., Ltd.} 1914 

Cape Copper Co., Ltd., Cape Col- 
ony 1914 

Cape Copper Co., Ltd., India 1841 



PAGE 



Cape Nome Copper Mng. Co., 

AI ontana 915 

Capital Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. 1131 
Capital Gold M. & M. Co., S. D..1317 
Capital Mng. & Tunnel Co., Colo. 511 

Capitol Mining Co., Utah 1346 

Caracahui Mountain Copper Co., 

Ltd., Sonora 1717 

Carbonate Center Mng. Co., Idaho 640 

Carbonate Cons. Mines, Utah 1389 

Carbonate Group, Colorado 511 

Carbonate Hill Mng. Co., Idaho.. 686 
Carbonate King Mng. Co., Utah.. 1346 
Carbon-Emery Stores Co (U. S. S., 

R. & M. Co.) 117 

Carbonero Mine, Colorado 511 

Carbon Hill Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Montana 915 

Cardiff Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah... 1389 
Cardigan Copper Co., Arizona.... 285 
Carey Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wash.... 1482 
Caribel Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. Mex.1235 
Caribou Cobalt Mines Co., Ont.1616 
Caribou Gold & Copper Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 640 

Caribou Gold Mines Co., Idaho... 641 

Caribou Metals Co., Colo 512 

Caribou Mines & Mills Co., Colo.. 512 
Carisa Gold & Copper Mng. Co. of 

Maine, Utah.. 1446 

Carlisle Group, The (Utter, Geo. 

H.) 1262 

Carlisle Mining Co., New Mexico. 1235 
Carl Junction Community Dev. Co., 

Missouri 879 

Carman Cons. Copper Co., Sonora.1717 
Carman Creek Mining Co., Idaho. 641 
Carmean & Squires Mng. Co., Mo. 879 
Carmelita Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 238 
Carmen Copper Co., Durango. . . .1687 

Carmen Syndicate. Sonora 1717 

Carnegie Lead & Zinc Co., Sonora.1718 
Carnegie Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1276 
Carney Copper Co., Ltd., Idaho... 641 

Carney Mining Co., Arizona 238 

Carnotite Reduction Co.. Colo.... 512 
Carolina Copper Co., North Caro- 
lina 1267 

Carolina Mng. Co., Colo 593 

Carolyn Metal Co., Missouri 879 

Carrara Mng., Mlg. & Leas. Syndi- 
cate. Nevada 1026 

Carribean Trust Co., Colo 512 

Carribee Mng. Co., Ga 627 

Carrie Silver-Lead Mines Corp., 

Nevada 1026 

Carrizal ; Soc. de Minas y Fundi- 
eiones de, Chile 1776 



liv 




INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Carson Free Gold Mng. Mlg. 

Co., Nevada 1026 

Carson Hill Gold Mines, Inc., Cal. 430 
Carson Hill Gold Mng. Co., Calif. 430 
Carter Gold Mining Co., Arizona. 267 

Carter Mining Co., Colo.. 512 

Carthage Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1276 
Cart Lake Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont.1616 
Casa Belin Hermanos, Bolivia. 1764 
Casanega-Daly Mng & Red. Co., 

Arizona 

Cascade Mining Co., Michigan... 847 
Cascade Silver Mines & Mills, 

Montana 916 

Cascadia Mng. & Dev. Co., Wash.. 1483 

Case and West, New Mexico 1235 

Casey-Cobalt Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont.1616 
Casey-Cobalt Silver Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1616 

Casey Jones Mining Co., Arizona. 268 
Cash Boy Cons. Mng. Co., Nev...l211 

Cash Mine, Arizona 345 

Cashier Gold Mng. & Red. Co., 

Colorado 512 

Cass Copper Co., Michigan 771 

Cassiar Crown Copper Co., B.C.. 1538 
Castillo de Las Guardas ; Soc. Es- 

panola del, Spain ' 1820 

Castle Butte Mines Co.. Arizona.. 328 

Castle Copper Co., Arizona 345 

Castle Dome Development Co., 

Arizona 191 

Castle Mining Co.. Ontario 1616 

Castleton Copper Co., Mont 916 

Catastrophe Mine, Colo 513 

Catemou ; Societe des Mines de 

Cuivre de, Chile 1776 

Catherine Gold Mines, Ltd., Ont..l598 
Catherine Gold Mng. Co., Colo... 593 

Catharine Mine, Arizona 248 

Catholic Mining Co., Kansas 740 

Caucasus Copper Co., Russia 1816 

Cave Springs Lead & Zinc Co., 

Missouri 879 

Caylloma : Cons. Soc. Esplotadora 

de, Peru 1792 

Cayuga Development Co., Mont. . . 916 ' 

Cay wash Mining Co., Wash 1483 

C. B. S. Mining Co., Arizona 346 

Cedar Creek M. & D. Co.. Ltd., 

Idaho 686 

Cedar Ridge Mng. Co.. Utah 1346 

Cedar Talisman Cons. Mines Co., 

Utah 1346 

Celebration Svndicate. W. A 190c> 

Centennial Copper Mng. Co., Mich. 771 

Centennial Dev. Co.. Nevada 1169 

Centennial-Eureka Mng. Co.. Utah. 1447 



PAGE 

Center Creek Mining Co., Mo 880 

Central Alabama C. & L. Co., Ala. 120 

Central America, Mines ot 1751 

Central Butte Mining Co., Ariz... 168 
Central Chile Copper Co., Ltd., 

Chile 1778 

Central Cons. Mines Co., Calif... 430 
Central Cons. Tunnel Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Colo 513 

Central Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. 1131 
Central Eureka Mng. Co., Calif.. 431 

Central Lead Co., Missouri 897 

Central Lead & Zinc Co., Okla...l276 

Central Mining Co., Arizona 169 

Central Mng. & Inves. Corp., Ltd., 

Transvaal 1931 

Central South Yuba Copper Mine, 

California 431 

Central Standard Mines, Utah 1447 

Central States Lead & Zinc Co., 

Arkansas 410 

Central Zinc Mng. Co., Mo 880 

Centurion Arizona Mining Co., 

Arizona 169 

Century Mining Co., Oklahoma. .. 1276 
Cerbat Silver Mines Co., Arizona. 248 
Cerbat Silver Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 248 

Cerise Gold Mining Co., Calif.... 431 
Cerro de Pasco Cop. Corp., Peru. 1792 
Cerro de Pasco Ext., Inc., Peru.. 1796 
Cerro de Pasco Railway Co. 

(Cerro de Pasco Copper ~Corj>.). 1795 

Cerro Gordo Mines Co., Calif 431 

Cerro Verde Mine, Peru 1796 

Chamberlain Ore Co., Colo 513 

Chambers Ferland Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Ontario 1616 

Champion Copper Co., Michigan . . 773 
Champion Copper Co., New Mex..l235 
Champion Copper Mng. Co., Idaho 686 
Champion Divide Mining Co., Nev.1131 

Champion Mining Co., Colo 513 

Champion Mining Co., Idaho 641 

Champion Reef Gold Mng. Co. of 

India, Ltd.. India 1841 

Chanaral ; Societe des Mines et 

Usines de Cuivre de, Chile 1778 

Chanute Spelter Co.. Kansas. . . . 740 
Chaparral Mining Co., Arizona. 346 
Charcoal Canyon Mining Co., Ariz. 248 
Charcoal Iron Co. of America, 

Michigan 847 

Charleston Hill Gold Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1026 

Charleston Mining Co., Nevada.. .1027 
Charley Boy Mng. Co., Arkansas. 410 
Charter Divide Mining Co., Nev..ll31 



Iv 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Chariot Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll32 
Chase Creek Copper Co., Arizona. 232 
C huteaugay Ore & Iron Co., New 

York 1264 

Chattanooga Copper Co., Tenn....l328 

Chatterboy Mining Co., Wash 1483 

Chelan Cons. Copper Co., Wash.. 1483 
Chenumg Copper Co., New Mex..l236 

Chendai Cons. Ltd., Malaya 1833 

Chenderiang Tin D r e d g., Ltd., 

Malaya 1833 

Cheney Copper Co., Ltd., Ontario. 1598 
Cherokee Cons. Copper Co., Nev..l027 
Cherokee Copper Co., Michigan.. 775 

Cherokee Mng. Co., Ga 627 

Cherokee Mining Co., Wash 1484 

Cherokee Ochre Co., Ga... 628 

Cherry Creek Mines Co., Ariz.... 346 
Cherry Creek Silver Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1027 

Chestatee Pyrite & Chem. Corp., 

Georgia 628 

Chester Mng. Co., Ltd., Idaho 686 

Cheticamp Copper Co., Ltd., N. S.1591 

Chetko Copper Co., Oregon 1297 

Chewelah Copper King Mng. Co., 

Washington 1484 

Chewelah Grey Copper Mng. Co., 

Washington 1484 

Chicago & Alta Ext. Mng. Co., 

^ Montana 917 

Chicago-Boston Mng. Co., Idaho.. 686 
Chicago Copper Mng. Co., N. Mex.1236 
Chicago Copper Refining Co., 

California 432 

Chicago Explor. & Dev. Co., 

Sonora 1719 

Chicago ; La Mina, Colombia 1787 

Chicago Miami Lead & Zinc Co., 

Missouri 880 

Chicago-Miami Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1276 

Chicago Mines Co., Mo 880 

Chicago-Nevada Tungsten Co., 

Nevada 1027 

Chichasroff Mining Co., Alaska... 143 

Chief Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1447 

Chief Mountain Mng. Co., The, 

Colorado 513 

Chihuahua, Mines of 1669 

Chihuahua-Esperanza G. M. Co. 

(Dolores Esperanza Corf).} 1674 

Chihuhua Mining Co., Chihuahua.1673 

Chile, Mines of 1770 

Chile Copper Co., Chile 1779 

Chile Explor. Co. (Chile Copper 

Co.} 1780 



PAGE 

Chillagoe, Ltd., Queensland 1889 

China, Mines ot 1830 

Chino Copper Co., New Mexico. .1236 
Chino Del Norte Copper Co., N. 

Mexico 1240 

Chipeta Mng., Mlg. & Sm. Co., 

Colorado 513 

Chipps Creek Mining Co., Calif.. 432 

Chisos Mining Co., Texas 1337 

Chitina Kuskulana Copper Co., 

Alaska 143 

Chloride Cerbat Copper Co., Ariz. 248 
Chloride Gold Mining Co., Ariz.. 248 

Chloride Hill Mng. Co., Wash 1484 

Chloride Mining Co., Arizona.... 248 
Chloride Queen Mining Co., Ariz. 249 
Chloride Samoa Mines Co., Ariz.. 249 
Chloride & Telluride Mng. & Leas. 

Co., Arizona 249 

Chloride X-Ray Mining Co., Ariz.. 249 
Choctaw Chief Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1277 

Choix Cons. Mng. Co., Ltd., Sin- 

aloa 1713 

Cholla Copper Co., Arizona 192 

Chollar Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1027 

Chosen Gold Mines, Ltd., Korea.. 1863 
Christina Copper Co., California.. 432 
Christmas Gold Mng. Co., Colo.. 513 
Christmas Mng. Co., Inc., Utah... 1346 
Chrome Co., Ltd., New Caledonia.,1913 
Churchhill Milling Co., Nevada.. 1027 

Church & Mabon Mine, Okla 1272 

Cieneguita Cons. Mines, Sonora.. 1719 

Cinco Minas Co., Jalisco 1702 

Circle Peak Mining Co., Ariz 346 

City Deep, Ltd., Transvaal 1932 

City Rocks Mining Co., Utah 1347 

C. K. & N. Mng. Co., Colo 593 

Clara Cons. Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Arizona 395 

Clarence Ray-Buffalo Hump Gold 

Mng. Co., Idaho 642 

Clarinda Copper Mng. Co., Idaho. 642 
Clarissa Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz... 268 

Clarke Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1132 

Clarksburg Clinkering Co., W. Va.1511 

Clark Mine, Michigan 776 

Clark Montana Realty Co., Mont.. 989 
Clayton Mng. & Sm. Co., Idaho... 642 
Clear Creek-Gilpin Ore Co., Colo. 513 

Clear Peacher Mng. Co., Mo 880 

Clearwater Gold & Copper Co., 

Idaho 642 

Cleaveland & Weatherhead Co., N. 

Mexico 1240 

Cleopatra Copper Co., Arizona. . 372 



Ivi 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Cleopatra Copper & Gold Mines 

Co., Arizona 249 

Cleveland & Aurora Mineral Land 

Co., Mo 880 

Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. (The), 

Michigan-Minn 847-858 

Cleveland Mining Co., Idaho 642 

Cleveland Mining Co., Wash 1484 

Cleveland Mining Co., Wis 1512 

Cliff Mining Co., Michigan 776 

Cliff Mining Co., Utah 1347 

Clifford Ext. Iron Co. (Marquette 

Iron Co.) 852 

Clifton Porcupine Mines, Ltd., Ont.1641 

Climax Mining Co., Arizona 346 

Climax Mining Co., Oklahoma. .. .1277 
Climax Molybdenum Co., Colo.... 513 
Climax Silver - Lead Mng. Co., 

Idaho 686 

Clinton Copper Co., Arizona 328 

Clinton Divide Mng. Co., Nev....ll32 

Clipper Mining Co., Utah 1347 

Clipper Mountain Gold Mng. Co., 

California 432 

C. M. & H. Mining Co., Mo 881 

C. & O. Mng. & Mlg. Co., New 

Mexico 1240 

Coahuila, Mines of 1685 

Coahuila Lead & Zinc Co.. Mo. . . . 881 
Coahuila Mng. & Sm. Co., Ltd., 

Coahuila 1685 

Coalition Divide Mines & Dev. Co., 

Nevada 1132 

Coast Copper Co., Ltd., B. C 1538 

Coates & Tweed, Minnesota 859 

Cobalt Comet Mines, Ltd., Ont 1616 

Cobalt-Frontenac Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1598 

Cobalt Provincial, Ontario 1617 

Cobalt Reduction Co., Ltd., Ont... 1617 
Cobar-Gladstone Mng. Co., N.S.W.1884 

Cobrita Mines Co., Arizona 396 

Cobrita Verde Copper Co., Ariz.. 396 
Cobriza Mines Dev. Corp., Ariz... 169 
Cochise Development Co., Ariz... 186 
Cock's Pioneer Gold & Tin Mines, 

Victoria 1904 

Cocopah Copper Co., California... 433 
Coco River Mining Co., Nicaragua. 1755 
C. O. D. Cons. Gold M. & D. Co % 

Colorado 594 

C. O. D. Cons. Mng. Co., Nevada. 1187 
C. O. D. Leasing Co., New Mex..l240 

C. O. D. Mining Co., Arizona 250 

Coeur d'Alene Antimony Mng. Co., 

Idaho 686 

Coeur d'Alene Champion Mng. Co., 

Jdaho . . 687 



PAGE 

Coeur d'Alene Crescent Mng. Co., 

Idaho 687 

Coeur d'Alene Dev. Co. (Stewart 

Mining Co.) 729 

Coeur d'Alene Empire M. & M. 

Co., Idaho 687 

Coeur d'Alene Explor. Co., Idaho.. 687 
Coeur d'Alene Pacific Mines Co., 

Montana 917 

Coggins & Smith Mng. Co., Ga... 628 
Colburn-Ajax Gold Mng. Co., Colo. 594 

Colby Mine, Minnesota 859 

Coldwater Copper Mng. Co., Colo. 514 
Cole Development Co., Arizona... 202 

Cole Mng. Co., Colo 514 

Colley Mine, Georgia 628 

Collinsville Zinc Corp., Illinois... 735 
Collinwood Mining Co., Idaho.... 643 

Coloma Mng. Co., Colo 514 

Colombia, Mines of 1786 

Colombian Corp., Ltd., Colombia.. 1787 
Colombian Mng. & Explor. Co., 

Ltd., Colombia 1787 

Colonel Sellers Mine, Colo 514 

Colonial Copper Co., Arizona 285 

Colonial Group, B. C 1538 

Colonial Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho. . 643 

Colorado, Mines of 496 

Cripple Creek District 591 

Leadville District 616 

Colorado Blue Bell Mng. Co., 

Colorado 514 

Colorado-Carr Mng. Co.. Colo... 514 
Colorado Central Mng. Co., Colo. 514 

Colorado Cone. Co.. Colo 515 

Colorado & Conn. Gold Mng. Co., 

Colorado 515 

Colorado Cons. Mines Co., Utah.. 1448 
Colorado Fuel & Iron Co., Colo... 515 
Colorado-Gilpin Gold & Radium 

Co.. Colo 515 

Colorado Metal Mng. Assoc., Colo. 516 
Colorado Metals & Chem Co., 

Colorado 516 

Colorado Mineral Sep. Co., Colo.. 516 

Colorado Mining Co., P. 1 1869 

Colorado Mining Co., Utah 1448 

Colorado Mng. & Dev. Co., Colo.. 516 
Colorado Mng. Land & Inves. Co.. 

Colorado 516 

Colorado-Nevada Mng. & Mlg. Co.. 

Nevada 1027 

Colorado Payrock Silver Mines 

Co., Colorado 516 

Colorado Pitchblende Co.. Colo. 516 
Colorado Superior Mng. Co., Colo. 517 
Colorado Tungsten Gold & Silver 

Co., Colorado 518 



Ivii 



'////: MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Colorado-Utah Minos Qper. Co., 

Colorado 51S 

Colorado Vanadium Co., Colo... 518 
Colquitt-Tigner Quicksilver Mine. 

Texas 1337 

Columbia Cons. Mines Co., Calif.. 433 

Columbia Copper Co., Wash 1484 

Columbia Copper Mining Co., Ida. o43 
Columbia Copper Mng. Co., Ont..l5 v > l) 
Columbia Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1132 
Columbia Cold Mining- Co., Ore.. 1297 

Columbia Mines Co.. Calif 433 

Columbia Mining Co., S. D 1317 

Columbia Red Metal Mining Co., 

Alaska 143 

Columbia Silver & Cold Mug. Co., 

Colorado 518 

Columbus Lxt. Mug. Co.. Ctah. . . . 130 

Columbus Mines Co., Colo 518 

Columbus M. & D. Co., Kansas... 740 
Columbus-Rexall Cons. Mines Co., 

Ctah 1390 

Colusa-Leonard Lxt. Copper Co., 

Montana 989-1005 

Colusa-Parrot Mug & Sm. Co.. 

Montana 990 

Comacaran Cold Mug. Co., Salva- 
dor 175S 

Combination Divide Mining Co., 

Nevada ' 1132 

Combination Mine, Idaho 643 

Combination Mug. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 518 

Combined Metals. Inc., Nevada. . . .1027 
Comet Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Idaho 687 

Comet Mine, Arizona 328 

Comet Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Mont. ... 917 
Commerce Mng. & Royalty Co., 

Kansas-Oklahoma ....'... .'. .740-1277 
Commercial Gold Mng. Co.. Wyo. .1520 
Commercial Mines & Miling Co., 

Nevada 1027 

Commercial Mining Co., Arizona.. 250 
Commercial Mining Co.. Oregon.. 1297 

Commodore Mine. Minnesota 859 

Commonwealth Dev. Co., Arixona. 328 
Commonwealth Extension Mng. 

Co.. Arixona 169 

Commonwealth Iron Co.. Wis....l512 
Commonwealth Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1277 

Commonwealth Mines Co., Utah.. 1347 
Commonwealth Mng. Co.. Colo... 518 
Commonwealth Mining Co., Idaho. 643 
Commonwealth Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 169 

Commonwealth Tungsten Gold & 

Silver Co.. Colorado. . . 519 



PAGE 



Como C'ons. Mines Co.. Nevada .. 1028 
Como Croup Mining Co.. Nev....l028 
Comstock Copper Mng Co.. Ltd.. 

Idaho (.87 

Comstock Divide Mng. Co., \e\..l 
Comstock l ; racture Mines Co., 

Nevada 102, 

Comstock Leasing Co., Nev 1028 

Comstock- Phoenix Mining Co.. 

Nevada ' 1028 

Comstock Superior Mng. Co., Nev.l02 l > 
Comstock Tunnel Co.. Nevada. . 102^ 
Concord Mining Co., Missouri.. SSI 

Cone Mng. & Mlg. Co.. An/ 2o8 

Confederate Mine, Arkansas 410 

Confidence Divide Mng. Co.. Nev. 1133 
Confidence Gold Mines Corp.. Cal. 433 

Congo, Mines of 1 1 M7 

Congo Mining Co., Wyoming 1520 

Congor Gold & Copper Mng. Co.. 

Utah 1412 

Congress Copper Co.. Nevada 102*> 

Congress Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1133 
Congress Gold \ Copper Co., Colo. 5'.') 

Congress Mine, Colorado 51 l) 

Coniagas Mines. Ltd.. Ontario ... lo* 7 
t '('/;/(/ i^iis AY</. C'c.. Ltd. (Conin(HJS 

Mines. Ltd.} ...1618 

Conkling Mining Co., Ctah 143.) 

Connecticut, Mines of 626 

Connecticut 7.mc Corp.. Missouri.. 88l 
Connecting Link Mng. Co.. \\"is...!512 

Connerappe Mines. Ltd.. l>. C 1538 

Conqueror Mng. Red. & Po\\er Co., 

Colorado 519 

Conqueror Zinc Co., Missouri.. 881 
Conrey Placer Mng. Co.. Mont... 917 
Consolidated Alaska Co., Alaska.. 143 
Consolidated Amador Mng. Co., 

Cali fornia 433 

Cons. Arixona Copper Co.. Arix. . 32 l > 
Cons. Arizona Sm. Co., Arizona... 346 
Cons. Calif.-Nevada Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1029 

Cons. Central Hutte Copper Co., 

Mont 917 

Cons. Colombia Platinum & Gold 

Mines. Ltd., Colombia 1788 

Cons. Copper Co.. Washington . . . . 1484 
Cons. Copper Co. of Parry Sound, 

Ontario .' 1599 

Cons. Coppermines Co.. Nevada. .. 1169 
Co"s. Copper M., M. & Sm. Co., 

Colorado 519 

Cons. Corte/ Silver Mines Co., 

Nevada 102^ 

Cons, first Thought Mines Co., 

Washington 1485 



OiV 

,32 

028 



Iviii 




INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Cons. Cold l-'id'N of Xe\\ Zealand. 

New Zealand 1911 

Cons, Cold Fields of S. A.. Trans- 

vaal 1932 

Cons. Homestead Mines. Inc., Arix. 348 
Cons. fnterstate-Callahan Mm/. < 

Idaho 687 

Cons. Interstate Mng. Co., Mo.... 881 
Cons. Kansas City Sm. & Kef. Co., 

Texas 1338 

Cons. Kansas City Sm. & Ret. Co., 

Tex a- 1338 

Cons. King Dev. & Columbia Cop- 

Mng. Co., Arixona 373 

Cons. Langlaagte Mines, Ltd., 

Transvaal 1933 

Consolidated Lead & /in'' Co., Ok- 
lahoma 1277 

Cons. Lead & Zinc Co., \Vi- 1512 

( "on-. I ( 'olo 519 

Cons. Main Reef Mine, & Hst., 

Ltd.. Transvaal 1933 

Cons. Mayflower .Mines Co., Xev. .1030 

Consolidated Mine^ Co.. Calif 433 

Cons. Mines Co., Wash 14X5 

Cons. Mine-. I )< < 520 

Cons. Mines & Red. Co.. Coir,.... 594 
M. \- nada, Ltd.. 

I'.ritisli Columbia 1538 

Cons. Nevada-Utah Corp., Nev..l030 

Cons. Ores Co.. Utah 1347 

Cons. Realty & Inve-t. Co., Colo.. 520 

Cons. Silvers, Inc.. Xev 1031 

Cons. Sonora Mine- Co., Sonora. . 1720 
Cons. Spanish Belt Silver Mng. 

Co.. Xev ...1031 

. Specie Payment Mng. Co., 

Colorado " 520 

Cons. VennilHon & Ext. Co., Minn. 859 
Cons. Virginia MIVJ. Co., Xev.... 1031 
Cons. West Kxt. Simon Mines Co., 

Xevada 1204 

Cons. Wilshire Mng. Co.. Calif. . . . 433 
Cons. Zinc Mines Co.. Arkansas. . 410 
Cons. Zinc & Sm. Co. of Okla..l277 
Constancia-Siempre Viva Mines. 

Xicaragua 1755 

Constitution Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Idaho 691 

Constitutional Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1277 

Consuelo A/_A'.. A////. ^ I'v^'cr Co. 

( Do! fires I'-.spcrtinza Corp. } 1675 

Burners Mining Co.. Mo 882 

Consumers Ore Co., Minnesota. . . . 859 
Contact Copper Co.. Michigan.... 777 

Contact Copper Co.. Xevada 1032 

Contact Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Calif.. 434 



PAGE 

Contact Silver Mng. Co., Nev....l20'> 
Continental Cons. Copper Co., Ariz. 250 
Continental Copper & Cold Mng. 

... Arixona 396 

Continental Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1133 
Continental Mines Dev. Co., Cal. . 434 
Continental Mines, Power & Red. 

Co.. Colo 520 

Continental Mng. Co., Coahuila, .1685 

( Continental Mng. Co.. Colo 520 

Continental Mining Co., Oregon. 1298 
inenlal-Morris Copper Mng. 

Co.. Wyo 1520 

Continental Zinc Co.. Arkansas.. 410 

Continental Zinc Co., Mo 882 

ke Mnir. & Red. Co.. Mont.. 918 
Cook X- McCullough Mng. Co., 

Kansas 740 

Co-operative Mng. Co., X. Me\..1241 
Co-operative Mng. & Leas. Co., 

Colorado 594 

Copete Cons. Cooper Co.. Sonora . 1 720 

Copete Mining Co.. Sonora 1720 

Copm-r Age Ldison Mng. < 

Montana 918 

Copper Ape Mine Arixona 250 

Copper Hdsin Hrtinch ( f'hclps 

Dodge Corp.'} 102 

Copper Basin Mine. Idaho 643 

Copper Basin Mng. Co., Idaho.... 644 
Copper licit Silver & Copper Mng. 

Co., X. Mex 1241 

Copper Bottom Mng. & Mlg. ' 

Wyoming 1520 

Copper Bntte Mines Co.. Ariz.... 285 
Copper Bnttc Mining Co., Utah.. 1347 
Copper Unite Mining Co., Wash. 1485 
Copper Canyon Mng. Co.. Xev. ..1032 
Copper Chief Mine \rix.... 396 

Copper Chief Mng. Co.. Arix 373 

Copper Chief Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Idaho 644 

Copper Cliff Copper Mng. Co., 

Washington 1485 

Copper Creek Mng. Co., Colo.. 521 
Copper Crown Mng Co., Mich.. 777 
Copper Dog Mng. Co., Ariz.... K9 
Copper Dyke Mng. Co.. Oregon. 1296 
Copper Exploration Co.. Arix.... 192 
Copper Export Association, I*. S. 84 
Copper Fame Mng. Co.. Arix.... 250 
Conperfield Porphyry Copper Mng. 

Co., A rizona 251 

Coper f;j;mt Mining Co.. Idaho.. 644 

Copper Hill Croup. Ariz 348 

Copper Hoard Mng. Co.. Wash.. 1485 
Copper King Mines Products Co.. 

Colorado 521 



lix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PACK 

Copper King MIIK. Co., Calif.... 434 
("upper King Mng. Co., Mont.... 918 
Copper King Mng. Co., Oregon.. 1298 
Copper King Mng. Co., Wash. ... 1485 
Copper King Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Idalio 691 

Copper Knob Aline. N. C 1268 

Copper Knob Mining Co., Wash.. I486 
Copper Leaf Mining Co.. Utah.. 1448 
Cupper Lode Mines Co., Ariz... 348 
Copper Metal Mines Co.. Nev...l032 
Copper Mill Mng. Co., Ltd., Mont. 918 
Copper Mines of Copiapo Ltd., 

(The), Chile ...1783 

Copper Mountain Cons. Mng. Co., 

California 435 

Copper Mountain Mine. Utah 1348 

Copper Mountain Mines Co.. Ariz. 349 
Copper Mountain Mg. & Dev. Co.. 

British Columbia 1543 

Copper Mountain Mng. Dev. 

Mont ...919 

Copper Mountain Properties 

(Canada Copper Corp., /./</.).. 1536 
Copperopolis Mining Co.. Utah. 1348 
Copper Peak Alining Co., Nev...l033 
Copper Prince Cons. M. & M. Co., 

Idaho 692 

Copper Prince Mining Co:, Nev..l033 

Copper Pyrites Corp., Tenn 1328 

Copper Queen Branch (Phelps 

Dodge Corp.} 102 

Copper Queen Cons. Mng. Co., 

Arizona 187 

Copper Queen Gold Mng. Co., 

Arizona 349 

Copper Queen Midland Mng. Co., 

Utah 1348 

Copper Queen Mine. California. . 435 
Copper Queen Mining Co., Wash. 1486 
Copper Queen Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Idaho 692 

Copper Queen Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Idaho 644 

Copper Ranch Cons. Mng. Co., 

Utah 1348 

Copper Ranch Mining Co.. Utah.. 1348 
Copper Range Company. Mich... 778 
Copper Range Cons. Co. (Copper 

Range Co.) 780 

Copper Range Railroad Co. (Cop- 
per Range Co.} 780 

Copper Reef Consolidated Mines, 

Arizona 229 

Copperrox Mining Co. of Ariz... 170 
Copper Shield Mng. Co., Nev. ...1033 

Copperside Mine, Nevada 1033 

Copper & Silver Zone Mines, Ariz. 203 



PAGE 
Coppersmith Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Montana 919 

Copper Springs Mng. Co., Ariz... 203 
Copper State Mng. Co., Ariz.... 192 
Copper & Uranium Mng. Co., Ida. 644 
Copper Valley Mng. Co., Ariz.... 349 
Copper Vault Mng. Co., Ariz.... 305 
Copper World Ext. Mng. Co., 

Washington 1486 

Copper World Gold Mg. & Sm. 

Co., Washington 1486 

Copper World Mining Co., Ariz. . 251 
Copper Zone Mining Co., Utah. 1348 

Corbin Copper Co., Mont 919 

Corbin-Copper King Mng. Co., 

Montana 920 

Corbin Metal Mng. Co., Montana. 920 
Corbin- Valparaiso Copper Mng. 

Co., Mont 920 

Corby Lode Aline, Idaho 692 

Cordoba Copper Co., Ltd., Spain. 1820 

Cordova Copper Co., Ariz 203 

Cordova Mines, Ltd.. Ontario. .. .1599 
Corella Copper Co.. Queensland. . 1889 
Cork-Province Alines. Ltd., B. C..1543 
Corncob Mng. & Dev. Co., Ariz.. 285 
Cornelia Ajo Copper Co., Ariz.. 285 
Cornelia Cons. Copper Co., Ariz.. 285 
Cornelia West Mng. Co., Ariz.... 286 
Cornforth Bellehelen Silver Mine, 

Nevada 1033 

Cornucopia Divide Mng. Co., Nev. 11 33 

Cornucopia Mines Co.. Ore 1298 

Cornucopia Mng. Co., of Nev... 1206 
Corocoro de Bolivia, Compania, 

Bolivia 1764 

Corocoro United Copper Alines, 

Ltd., Bolivia 1764 

Corona Mining Co., Idaho 644 

Corona Mng. & Mlg. Co., Calif... 435 
Coronado Copper & Silver Alng. 

Co., Arizona 305 

Coronado Alining Co., Ariz 235 

Corrv City Mines, Colo 521 

Corsica Iron Co.. Minnesota 859 

Cortez Associated Mines, Hidalgo. 1696 
Cortez Mining Co., Oklahoma. .. 1277 

Cosmos Mining Co.. Okla 1277 

Cossack Alining Co., N. Alex 1241 

Costa Rica, Mines of 1751 

Costa Rica ATanganese & Alng. 

Co.. Costa Rica 1753 

Cottomvood Atlantis Alng. Co.. 

Utah 1391 

Cottomvood King Mng. Co., Utah.1391 
Cottonvvood Metal Min'ing Co.. 

Utah ; 1391 

Cowan-Banners Dev. Co.. Ark.... 410 
Cowbov Mine. California.. . 435 



Ix 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Cowboy Mng. & Sm. Co.. Ariz .... 286 

Cow Creek Mng. Co., Mo 882 

Cowden & Deegan Mng. Co., Nev.1033 

Craven Copper Co., Nev 1034 

Crawford Mng. Co., Colo 521 

Creede Exploration Co., Colo.... 521 

Creede United Co., Col 521 

Creedmoor Mines Corp., Utah.... 1349 
Creole Copper Mines Co., Utah. ..1349 

Creole Mining Co., Utah 1349 

Crescent Gold Mine, Calif 435 

Crescent L. & Z. Corp.. Mo 882 

Crescent Mining Co., Ariz 268 

Crescent Mining Co.. Ltd., Wash. 1486 
Cresson Cons. Gold M. & M. Co., 

Colorado 595 

Cresson Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1133 
Creston Colorado Co. (Dolores 

Esperanza Co'rp.) 1675 

Crete Mining Co., Minnesota 859 

Crimora Manganese Corp., Va....l469 
Crinple Creek Deep Leas. Co., 

Co., Colo 595 

Cripple Creek Drain. & Tunnel 

Co.. Colo 596 

Cripple Creek Gen. Mng. & Exp. 

Co., Colorado 596 

Cripple Creek Gold Mng. Co., 

Colorado 596 

Critic Mine, Arizona 397 

Croesus Divide Mng. Co., Nev. . . .1133 
Croesus-Eureka Mng Co., Nev. . . .1185 

Croesus Ext. Mng. Co., Nev 1185 

Croesus Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Idaho 645 

Croesus Gold Mines. Ltd., Out. . . .1599 
Croesus Mining Co., California.. 436 

Croesus Mining Co., Idaho 645 

Croesus Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1277 
Croesus Mining Co., Utah. ...* ...1449 

Croff Mining Co., Utah 1349 

Crown Charter Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada .' 1133 

Crown City Gold Mines Co., Ariz. 268 
Crown Divide Mng. Co.. Nev.... 1133 
Crown Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1034 

Crown Mines, Nevada 1034 

Crown Mines, Ltd., Transvaal. ... 1934 
Crown Mountain M. & P. Co.. Ga. 629 
Crown Point Gold & Silver Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1034 

Crown Point Leas. Co., Idaho.... 692 

Crown Point Mng. Co., Utah 1449 

Crown Prince Cons. Mng. Co., 

Colorado 521 

Crown Reserve Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario . ,.1619 



PAGE 

Crucible Steel Co. of America, 

Colorado 522 

Cruse Cons. Mng. Co., Mont 920 

Crystal Copper Co.. Mont 990 

Crystal Gold Mining Co., Alaska.. 143 

Crystal Mine, Washington 1486 

Crystal Mining Co., Oklahoma. .. 1278 

Cuba, Mines of 1760 

Cuba Copper Co., Cuba 1760 

Cubana Cons. Copper Co., Sonora.1720 

Cube Mining Co., Alaska 143 

Cuchara Mining Co.. Tepic 1748 

Cuchilla Company. N. Mexico 1241 

Culbert Lead & Zinc Co., Mo.. 883 
Cullowhee Mng. & Red. Co.. N. C.1268 
Cumberland Divide Mining Co., 

Nevada 1134 

Cumberland Mining Co., S. D 1317 

Cumbre Mng. Co., Colo ^522 

Cunapah Mng Co., Nevada 1*034 

Cupel Mining Co., Arizona 251 

Cupric Mines Co., Utah 1349 

Cuprite Copper Co., Arizona.... 232 

Cuprite Copper Co., Nevada 1034 

Cuprite Copper Mng. Co.. Mont. . 920 
Cuprite Investment Co., Arizona.. 397 

Cuprite Sulphur Corp., Nev 1034 

Curlew Mine, Montana 921 

Curry Mining Co., Arizona 306 

Curtz Cons. Alines Co., Calif.... 436 
Cushman Manganese Co., Ark.... 410 

("usi Alining Co., Chihuahua 1674 

Custer Cons. Mng. Co., Idaho.... 692 
Custer Peak Copper Co., S. D....1317 
Custer Slide Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Idaho 645 

Cutting Alining Co., S. D 1317 

Cuyahoga Alining Co., S. D 1318 

Cuyuna Duluth Iron Co., Minn... 859 
C'uyuna Mille Lacs Iron Co., Minn. 860 
Cuyuna Alinneapolis Iron Co., 

Minnesota 860 

Cyanide Gold Alining Co., Idaho. 645 

Cyclopic Aline, Arizona 251 

(Vgni Alining Co., Missouri 883 

Cymru Copper Co., Alaska 144 

Daddy Mining Co., Idaho 692 

Dahl Placers, Nevada 1034 

Dailey Copper Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Montana 921 

Daily Arizona Cons. Copper Co., 

Arizona 286 

Dairy Earm Mining Co., Calif.... 436 

Daisell Mining Co., Arizona 251 

Dakin Mine, California 436 

Dakota Continental Copper Co.. 

S. D.. ..1318 



Ixi 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Dallas Mining Co., Missouri 883 

Dallas-richer Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1278 

Daly Judge Ext. Mng. Co., Utah.. 1437 

I X-ily-Judge Mining Co., Utah 1437 

Daly Mining Co., Utah 1437 

Paly West Mining Co., Utah 1437 

Dana Mining Co., Colo 522 

Dandy Divide Mng. Co., Nev....ll34 
Daniel Boone Mng. Co., Okla....l278 

Dante Gold Mng. Co., Colo 596 

Darby Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mont.... 921 

Darkey Mine, Nevada 1034 

Darwin Lead & Silver Mines Dev. 

Co., California 436 

Davidson Cons. Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1641 

Davidson Gold Mines, Ltd., Ont..l642 
Davidson Mining Co., Nevada. . .1035 
Davidson Ore Mining Co., Mich.. 848 

Davis-Daly Copper Co., Mont 991 

Davis Sulphur Ore Co., Mass.... 747 
Dawson Metallurgical Co., Ariz. . 286 
Day Bristol Con. Mines Co., Nev.1035 

Daylight Mining Co., Ariz 287 

Days Fork Mining Co., Utah 1392 

Day Star Mines Co., Colo 597 

Dayton Placer Recovery Corp., 

Nevada 1035 

D. & B. Mines Co., Utah 1449 

D. C. & E. Mining Co., Mo 883 

Deadwood-Heidelberg Mng. Co., 

S. D 1318 

Deadwood Lead & Zinc Co., S. D.1318 

Dead wood Leas. Co., Colo 597 

Deadwood Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. 

Mexico 1241 

De Armond Mining Co., Kansas.. 741 
De Beers Cons. Mines, Ltd., Cape 

Colony 1916 

Deebook Dredging, Siam 1870 

Deep Creek Copper King Co 1350 

Deep Creek Copper M. & M. Co., 

Utah 1350 

Deep Mining Co., Arkansas .. 410 

Deer Creek Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ida. 645 

Deer Trail Mining Co., Utah 1350 

Deer Trail No. 2 Mines, Wash 1486 

Defender Mine, California 436 

Defender Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1278 
Degge-Clarke Tungsten Mill, Colo. 522 
Delaware Mining Co., Nevada. ... 1035 

Delhi Mines Co., California 436 

Dellie Mng. & Mlg. Co., B. C 1544 

Deloro Sm. & Ref. Co., Ltd., Ont..l600 

Delsa Mining Co., Utah 1350 

Delta Cons. Gold Mines Co. (The), 

California . 437 



PAGE 

Delta Copper Co., B. C 1544 

Delta Lead & Zinc Co., Mo 883 

Demijohn Cons. Mng. Co., Nev...l035 

Demming Mines Co., Idaho 645 

Democrata Cananea Sonora Cop- 
per Co., Sonora ; 1720 

Denbigh Silver-Lead Mines Co., 

Colorado 522 

Denn-Arizona Copper Co., Ariz... 170 
Dennemora Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Ltd., Mont 921 

Denver-Boulder Tung. Prod. & 

Dev. Co., Colorado 523 

Denver Copper Co., Idaho 646 

Denver Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ark.... 410 
Denver Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo... 523 
Derry Mng. & Land Co., Colo.... 617 
Derry Ranch G. Dredg. Co., Colo. 617 
Descubridora Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Chihuahua 1674 

Deseret Mount. Mines Co., Utah.. 1449 
Desert Chief Cons. Mng. Co., Nev.l!88 
Desert Klondyke Mng. Co., Nev.. 1134 
Desert Mng. & Dev. Co., Ariz.... 397 
Desloge Cons. Lead Co., Missouri. 897 
Desperation Mng. Co., Oklahoma. 1278 
Detroit & Colo. Mng. Co., Colo. . . 523 
Detroit Copper Co. (Phelps Dodge 

Corp.) 109 

Detroit Copper Mng. Co., Utah... 1350 
Detroit Copper Mng. Co. of Ariz. 235 

Detroit Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1134 

Development Co. of Amer., Ariz.. 349 
Devil's Head Copper Mng. & Dev. 

Co., Colo 523 

Dew Drop Mining Co., Okla 1278 

Dewey Silver Copper Co., Utah. .1350 
Dexteretta Mines Co., Nevada. .. .1035 

Dexter Gold Mng. Co., Colo 597 

Dexter-Union Mines Co., Nevada. 1036 
Diadem Mining Co.. California... 437 
Diamond Cons. Mng. Co., Colo... 523 
Diamondfield Black Butte Reorg. 

Alng. Co., Nev 1188 

Diamondfield Daisy G. Mng. Co., 

Nevada ' 1188 

Diamondfield Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Xevada 1188 

Diamondfield Triangle Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1188 

Diamond |oe Mng. Co., Okla 1278 

Diamond R. Mining Co., Wash... 1487 
Dickey, \\ . A. Cop. Co., Alaska.. 144 

Dio-doM Mil-. Co., Colo 597 

Diplomat Mining Co., Kansas.... 741 
Discovery Mng. & Pow. Co., B. C.1544 
Distaff Chloride Mng. Co., Ariz.. 251 
Divide Annex Mng. Co., Nev.... 1134 



Ixii 



1XDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Divide Boy Mng. Co., Xev 1134 

Divide Charter Mng. Co., Nev. ..1134 

Divide City Mng. Co., Nev 1134 

Divide City Townsite Co., Nev... 1135 
Divide Cons. Mng. Co., Nev.... 1135 
Divide Contact Mng. Co., Nev... 1135 

Divide Ext. Mng. Co., Nev 1135 

Divide Fraction Mng. Co., Nev... 1136 
Divide Gold Dyke Mng. Co., Nev. 1136 
Divide Leader Mng. Co., Nev.... 1136 
Dividend Mining Co., Montana... 921 
Dividend Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. M..1242 
Divide Syndicate Mng. Co.. Nev. ..1136 

Dixie Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1137 

Dixie Girl Mng. Co.. Arkansas.... 410 
Dixie Queen Mng. Co., Arkansas. 411 
D. L. & W. Mng. & Red. Co., Colo. 523 

Dobie Mines. Ltd.. Ontario 1642 

Doctor Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1137 

Doctor Jack Pot Mng. Co.. Colo.. 597 

Doe Run Lead Co., Missouri 898 

Dolcoath Mine. Ltd., England 1805 

Dold Mining Co., Colo 617 

Dolly Varden Mines. Colo 524 

Dolly Varden Mines Co., B. C....1544 
Dolores Esperanza Corp., Chihua- 
hua 1674 

Dolores Mine. San Luis Potosi. . .1712 
Dolores Mines Co. (Dolores Es- 

peranza Corp.} 1676 

Dolores Mng. & Dev. Co., Sonora.1721 

Dolphin Mine, Arizona 349 

Domado Lead & Zinc. Co.. Okla.. 1278 

Dome Ext. Mng. Co.. Ontario 1642 

Dome Lake Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ont.1642 

Dome Mines. Ltd.. Ontario.. 1643 

Dome Mining Co., Arizona 268 

Dominion G. Mng. Co.. Manitoba. 1588 

Dominion Mining Co., N. S 1591 

Dominion Molybdenite Co.. Ont..l600 
Dominion Molybdenite Co., Que. .1654 
Dominion Nickel-Copper Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1600 

Dominion Red Co., Ltd., Ont 1620 

Dominion Silver Lead Co., Wash. 1487 
Donna Dora Mng. Co., N. Mex..l242 

Donohtie Mines. Ltd., P.. C 1544 

Donora Zinc Works. Pa 1314 

Dora Cons. Mng. Co., Colo 524 

Dorothea Gold Mines Co., Ore... 1299 

Dorothy Bill Mng. Co., Okla 1278 

Dos Cabezas Gold Ridge Mng. Co., 

Arizona 287 

Dos Estrellas, Compania, Mexico, 

I). F 1705 

Dos Oris Mines, Arizona 349 

Doty Manganese Co. (The), Colo. 617 
Double Eagle Mng. Co., Wash.... 1487 



PAGE 

Double Header Mng. Co., Wash.. 1487 
Doughboy Divide Mng. Co., Nev. 1137 

Douglas Copper Co., Arizona 306 

Douglas Copper Co., Michigan.... 784 

Douglas Copper Mine, Maine 745 

Douglas, Lacey & Co., New York. 1264 

Douglas Mining Co., Idaho 693 

Douglas Mountain Cop. Co., Colo. 524 
Douglass Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1137 
Douthat Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1278 
Down Town Mines Co., Colo.... 618 

Doyle Cons. Mines Co, Colo 524 

Doyle Mining Co., Nevada 1036 

Dragon Cons. Mng. Co., Utah .... 1449 
Dragon Mng. & Dev. Co., Ariz... 238 
Dragon Mountain Mng. Co., Ariz.. 171 
Dreadnaught Mng. Co., Idaho.... 646 
Drilling Development Co., Idaho.. 646 
Dripping Springs Cop. Co., Ariz. 306 
Dropner Mlg., Mng. & Trans. Co., 

Colorado 525 

Druid Gold Mng. Co., Colo 525 

Drum Lummon Mines, Ltd., B.C. 1545 
Dry Canyon Con. Mng. Co., Utah. 1350 

Du Bois Mining Co., Idaho 693 

Dubuque Mng. & Tunnel Co., Colo. 618 
Ducktown Sulphur, Copper & Iron 

Co., Ltd., Tenn 1329 

Dudley Milling Co., Oklahoma. .. .1278 
Dugway Copper Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Utah 1350 

Dugway Smelting Co., Utah 1351 

Duluth-Lemhi Mng. Co., Idaho.... 646 
Duluth-Miami Mng. Co., Okla... 1278 
Duluth-Minneapolis Mng. Co., Ida. 693 
Duluth-Moctezuma Mining Co.. 

Sonora 1721 

Duluth-New York Mng. Co., Mont. 992 
Dnluth-Sonora Cop. Co., Sonora.. 1721 
Dultuh & Utah Dev. Co., Utah.... 1351 
Dumont Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Colo.. 525 
Duncan Lead & Zinc Co., Okla. . . .1278 
Duncan Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. Mex.1242 
Dundee- Arizona Cop. Co., Ariz... 373 

Dundee Mining Co., B. C 1545 

Dunderland Iron Ore Co., Ltd., 

Norway 1811 

Dunkin Mng. Co., Colo 525 

Dunlap Copper Mine, Nevada. ... 1036 
Dunn Iron Mng. Co., Michigan... 848 
Duplex Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1137 
Duplex Mining Co., Nevada. ^ . . . .1036 
Dupont Copper Mines Co., Nev... 1036 
Duquesne Mining Co., Arizona... 203 

Duquesne Mining Co., Mo 883 

Duquesne Mng. & Red. Co., Ariz. 329 

Durango, Mines of 1686 

Durango Smelter, Colo 525 



Ixiii 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Durant Mng. & Sm. Co., Mont 921 

Durias Mine, Colo 525 

Dutch East Indies, Mines of... 1832 

Dutchman Mine, Arizona 397 

Dutch Miller Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Washington 1487 

Dutch-Sweeney Mining Co., Calif. 437 
Dyke Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. . .1137 

Eagan Copper Mng. Co., Idaho. 646 
Eagle & Blue Bell Mng. Co., Utah. 1409 

Eagle Copper Co., California 437 

Eagle Copper Mng. Co., Utah 1351 

Eagle Gold & Cop. Mng. Co., Ariz. 232 

Eagle Hill Mine, California 437 

Eagle Metallic Copper Co., Pa 1315 

Eagle Mine, Colo 526 

Eagle Mining Co., Montana 992 

Eagle Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo 526 

Eagle Mountain Copper Co., Ariz.. 306 

Eagle Ore Co., Colo 598 

Eagle Pass Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 526 
Eagle Peak Cop. Mng. Co., Wash.,1488 
Eagle-Picher Lead Co., Mo.-Okla..l279 
Eagle River Mining Co. Alaska. . . 144 
Eagle Rock Tung. Prod. Co., Colo. 526 
Eagle Shawmut Mine, California.. 438 

Eaglewood Mining Co., Mo 883 

Earl & Eagle Mng. Co., Utah 1392 

Early Bird Lead & Zinc Mng. Co., 

Oklahoma 1279 

Early Mine, California 438 

East Alameda Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida. 693 

East Antelope Mng. Co., Utah 1351 

East Black Range Mng. Co., Ariz. 268 
East Butte Cop. Mng. Co., Mont.. 992 
East Butte Ext. Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 994 

East Caledonia Mines Co., Idaho.. 693 
Jiast Camp Group (Utter, Geo. 

//.) 1262 

East Canada Sm. Co., Ltd., Que. .1654 
East Coeur d'Alene Mng. Co., 

Montana 921 

East Crown Point Mng. Co., Utah. 1450 
East Divide Ext. Mng. Co., Nev..ll37 
East Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. .. 1137 

Enstern Bell Mng. Co., Mont 922 

Eastern Canadian Copper Corp., 

Ltd., X. B 1591 

Eastern Cananea Dev. Co., Sonora.1721 

Eastern Copper Co., Nevada 1037 

Eastern Mining Co., California... 438 
Eastern Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Quebec. 1654 
Eastern Prince Gold Silver Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1037 

Eastern Star Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1037 



PAGE 

East Hecla Mng. Co., Utah 1392 

East Hercules Ext. Mining. Co., 

Idaho 693 

East Pacific Mng. Co., Mont 922 

East Pool & Agar, Ltd., Eng. ...1805 
East Rand Prop. Mines, Ltd., 

Transvaal 1934 

1 uist side Group (N or t h Butte 

Mng. Co.) 998 

East Snowstorm Mng. Co., Idaho. 694 
East Spring Hill Mng. Co., Mont. 922 
East Standard Mng. Co., Idaho... 694 
East Standard Mng. Co., Utah... 1450 
East Term. Mng. & Dev. Co., Tenn.1331 

East Tenn. Zinc Co., Tenn 1331 

East Tintic Coalition Mng. Co., 

Utah 1450 

East Tintic Develop. Co., Utah. . . .1450 

Echo Gold Mng. Co., S. D 1318 

Echo Silver-Lead Mng. Co., B.C. 1545 

Eclipse Argo Mng. Co., Mont 922 

Eclipse Cons. Mg. & Invest. Co., 

Washington 1488 

Eclipse Leas. Co., Colo 598 

Eclipse Mng. Co., Idaho 694 

Eclipse Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. Mex..l242 
Economic Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. M..1242 
Economy Gold Mines Co., Mont. . 922 

Ecuador, Mines of 1790 

Eden-Crescent Mng. Co., B.C.... 1545 

Eden Mng. Co., Nicaragua 1755 

Edgar Zinc Co., Missouri 883 

Edison Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. Mex.1242 

Edith Mine, Arkansas 411 

Edna May Gold Mng. Co., W. A. .1906 

Edna Mng. Co., Colo 618 

Edwards Mng. Co., Missouri 883 

E. & F. Mng. Co., Nevada 1038 

Effanjay Gold Mng. Co., B. C. . . .1545 

Egypt, Mines of 1921 

Egyptian Mng. Corp., Colo 526 

Eight Friends Mng. Co., Okla 1279 

Eighty-Five Ext. Cop. Co., N. M..1242 
Eighty-Five Mng. Co., N. Mex...l243 
Ei Amparo Mine, Ltd., Venezuela. 1800 
El Canario Copper Co., Sonora. . . 1721 
El Centro Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. M.1244 
El Cliff Mng. Co., N. Mexico. .. .1244 

Elcosa Mng. Co., Oklahoma 1279 

El Cttbo Mng. & Mlg. Co., Guana- 
juato 1690 

Eldorado Banket Gold Mng. Co., 

Ltd. (The), Rhodesia 1926 

Eldorado Cop. Mng. Co., Ore... 1299 
Eldorado Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll38 
Eldorado Enterprise G. Mng. Co., 

Nevada . .-1038 



Ixiv 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Eldorado Exploration Co., Calif.. 438 
Eldorado-Flagstaff M. & M. Co., 

Nevada 1038 

Eldorado Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1351 

El Dorado Gold Star Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1038 

Electric Point Mng. Co., Wash... 1488 

Electro Copper Co., Colo 526 

Electrolytic Copper Co., Wyo 1520 

Electrolytic Ref. & Sm. Co. of 

Australia, Ltd. (The), N.S.W.1884 
Electrolytic Zinc Co. of Australia 

Prop., Ltd., Tasmania 1896 

El Eden ; Compania Minera y 

Beneficiadora, Zacatecas 1748 

Elenita Dev. Co.. Sonora 1722 

Elenor Manganese Co., Tenn 1331 

Elenor Mines Co., Wyo 1521 

Elephant Head Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 329 

Eleven O'Clock Mng. Co., Okla...l279 

F.I Favor Mng. Co., Jalisco 1703 

El Fuerte Mng. & Sm. Co., Sinaloa.1713 
Fle:in-Bellehelen Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevadi 1138 

El Globo Mng. & Mlg. Co., Sonora.1722 
Elizabeth Gold Hill Mng. Co., 

Washington 1489 

Elk Gold Mining Co., Mont 995 

Flkhart Alines Co.. Arizona 251 

Flkhorn Copper Mng. Co., Wyo.. 1521 
Flkhorn Queen Mng. Co., Mont.. 923 

Elkhorn Tungsten Co., S. D 1319 

Elk Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo 526 

Klk Mountain Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 526 

Elk Mountain M. & M. Co., S. D. .1319 

Flko Mining Co., Nevada 1038 

Elko Prince Leasing Co., Nev.... 1038 

Elko Prince Mining Co., Nev 1038 

Elkoro Mines Co., Nevada 1039 

Elkton Cons. M. & M. Co., Colo.. 598 
Elkton Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. 1138 

Ellamar Mng. Co., Alaska 144 

Elliott-Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1636 

Ellis Mine 34. Texas 1338 

Ellis Silver Mng. Co., Ltd., B.C.. 1545 
Ellsworth Mng. Co., Oklahoma. . .1280 
Fl Magistral Copper Co., Sinaloa.1714 

Flmore Copper Co.. Idaho 646 

Kim Orlu Mining Co., Mont 995 

El Norte Copper Co., N. M... 1240-1244 
El Orito M. & Mlg. Co., Durango.,1688 
I.' Oro Mng. & Railway Co., Ltd., 

Mexico, D. F 1705 

Fl Paso Cons. Gold M. Co., Colo.. 599 



PAGE 

El Paso Ext. Corp. of W. Va., 

Colorado 600 

El Paso Gold King Mine, Colo... 600 
El Paso Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. M. . .1244 

El Paso Smelter, Texas 1338 

El Potosi M. Co., Chihuahua. 1558-1678 
El Progreso Silver Co., Sonora. . .1722 
El Progresso, Compania de Plata 

(El Progreso Silver Co.) 1722 

El Rayo Mines Co. (Dolores Es- 

peranza Corp.) , 1677 

El Salvador Silver Mines Co., Inc. 

Salvador 1758 

El Tiro Copper Co., Arizona 287 

El Triunfo Cons. M. Co., Sonora.1723 
El Van Copper Co., S. A., Sonora. 1724 
Ely Amalgamated Cop. Co., Nev.. 1173 

Ely Bell Mng. Co., Nevada 1173 

Ely Cons. Copper Co., Nevada. .. .1173 

Fly Copper Co., Nevada 1173 

Ely Copperfield Associates, Vt....l467 
Ely Giroux Copper Co., Nevada. .. 1173 
Ely-Mizpah Copper Co., Nevada.. 1173 

Ely Northern Copper Co., Nev 1173 

Ely Revenue Copper Co., Nevada. 1173 
Ely Valley Mng. & Mlg. Co., Nev. 1174 
Ely Verdi Copper Co., Nevada. .. .1174 
Ely Witch Copper Co., Nevada. . . .1174 
Emancipation Mng. Co., Ltd., B.C. 1545 
Emancipator Divide M. Co., Nev.. 1138 
Emerald Isle Copper Co., Arizona. 252 

Emerald Mining Co., Utah 1351 

Emerald Mining Co., Wyo 1521 

Emerson Mine. Arizona 252 

Fmery-Whitcomb Tungsten Co., 

Arizona 287 

Emma Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1392 

Emma Copper Co. (Emma Cons. 

Mng. Co.) '. 1392 

Emma Gordon Mng. Co., Okla...l280 

Emma Silver Mines Co., Utah 1392 

Empire Copper Co., Idaho 646 

Empire Cop. & G. Mng. Co., Ariz. 171 
Empire Gold Dredg. & Mng. Co., 

Oregon 1299 

Empire Mines, California 438 

Empire Mines Co., Utah 1450 

Empire Mining Co., Sonora 1724 

Empire Mng. & Mlg. Co., Calif... 438 
Empire Molybdenite M. & M. Co., 

Washington 1489 

Empire-Nevada Copper Mng. & 

Sm. Co., Nevada 1040 

Empire State Mines & Red. Co., 

Colorado 527 

Empire State Mining Co., Ariz... 171 

Empire Zinc Co., Colo 527 

Fmpresa Avicaya, Bolivia 1766 



Ixv 



Till': MINES 1 1. 1 \ 




PACK 
Emprc.sa Xueva Penny & Duncan, 

Bolivia , 1766 

Empresa Soux Hernandez, Bolivia. 1766 
Empress Copper Mng. Co., Arix... 238 

Fncinitas Copper Co.. Calif 438 

Fngels Copper Mng. Co., Calif.... 439 

Engineer Mines, B. C 1546 

English Crown Spelter Co., Ltd., 

Italy 1810 

Knterprise Gold Mng. Co., Calif.. 440 

Enterprise Mng. Co., Idaho 694 

Enterprise Mng.. Dev. & Power 

Co., B. C 1546 

Enterprise Mg., Red. & Im. Co., 

Arizona 252 

Equator Mng. & Sm. Co., Ariz.... 350 
Equity Cop. & Gold Mng. Co., Ore. 1299 
Equity Creede Mng. Co., Colo.... 527 
Ernestine Mng. Co., New Mexico. 1244 
Erupcion Mng. Co., Chihuahua. . . .1679 
Esmeralda Copper Co., Sonora. . . .1724 
E-meralda Copper Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Ra.ia Calif 1668 

Esmeralda Cop. & Silver Co., Nev.1040 
Esmeralda: Xegociacion Minera, 

Zacatecas 1748 

F'-peranza Copper & Sulphur Co., 

Ltd.. Spain 1822 

Esperanza Exploration Co., Ariz.. 268 

Esperanza. Ltd., Mexico, D. E 1706 

Esperanza Mine, Arizona 287 

Esprranza Mng. Co.. Baja Calif. 1668 
F.sl>cr<nizn MIUJ. Co. (Esheranza, 

Ltd.) ' 1707 

Esperanzas Mng. Co.. Durango. . 1688 
Esquer y Cia : Alexander, Sonora. 1724 

Essential Producing Co., Okla 1280 

Estahrook Dredging Co.. Calif.... 440 

F'staca Mining Co., Sinaloa 1714 

F.staleah Cerbat Silver Mng. < 

Ari/ona 252 

Esielle Mining Co., Calif 440 

Ethel Gray Alining Co., Missouri.. 883 

Flna Quicksilver Mine, Calif 441 

Etowah Dev. Co., Ga 629 

Et'.wah Mlg. & Power Co.. Ga . .. . 629 

Etta Mav Mining Co., Utah 1393 

Eureka Bullion Mng. Co., Utah... 1450 
Eureka-Climax Mng. Co.. XVvada.1185 
Eureka Copper Mines. Ltd.. K. C..1546 
Eureka-Croesus Mng. Co.. Xev...ll85 
Eureka CroesUS Mng. Co. of X. Y., 

Utah 1451 

Eureka Develop. Co., Ltd.. Idaho.. 647 
Eureka Divide MIIL \ev....ll38 
Eureka Gold \- Cop, M. Co., Ariz.. 350 
Eureka Mill Mining Co., Utah.... 1451 
Eureka-Holly Mng. 1186 



PAGE 

Fureka King Mining Co., Utah 1451 

Eureka Lilly Mining Co.. Utah... .1451 
Eureka Manganese Co., Arkansas. 411 
Eureka Metallurgical Co., Utah... 1452 

Fureka Mine, Colo 528 

Eureka Mines Co., Utah 1452 

Eureka Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., Ida. 694 
Eureka Mng., Sm. & Power Co., 

Oregon 1300 

Eureka-Xevada Mng. Co., Xev....ll86 

Eureka Ophir Mine, Utah 1352 

Eureka Standard Mng. Co., Utah. 1452 

Europe, Mines of 1802 

Eustis Mining Co., Quebec 1654 

Euterpe Mining Co., Kansas 741 

Eva May Mine, Mont 923 

l r .va Mining Co., .B. C 1546 

Evand Hall Soy Mng. Co., Mo 884 

Evans-\Yinn Syndicate, Colo 528 

(".veiling Star Dev. Co., Mont.... 923 
Evergreen Bluff Mng. Co., Mich... 785 
Evergreen Gold & Cop. Mines Co., 

olorado 528 

Evergreen Mines Co., Colo 528 

Everton Mng. & Dev. Co., Ark... 411 
Excelsior Gold & Cop. Co., Ariz.. 397 

Excelsior Mng. Co.. Idaho 694 

Excelsior Mng. & Dev. Co.. X. M . 1244 
F'xcelsior Mng., Mlg. & Elec. Co., 

'loraclo 600 

Excelsior Mountain Cop. Co., Nev.1040 
Exchequer Leas. & M. Corp., Nev.1040 
Expansion Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

B. C 1546 

Expert Pros. Dev. Co., Ga 629 

Explor. Co. of England & Mexico, 

Ltd.. Mexico 1661 

Exploration Co.. Ltd., Mexico. ... 1661 
Exploration Syndicate Xo. 2. Xev.1040 

Fagan Cons. S. Mines Co., Xev...l206 
Fagan Ext. Mng. Co., Xevada. . . . 1206 

Fagan Junior Mng. Co.. Xev 1206 

Fairbanks Gold Mng. Co., Alaska. 145 

Fairlidd Mine, Colo 528 

Fairhaveu Power & M. Co., Alas.. 145 

Fair Mope Mining Co., Mo 884 

Fairview Ext. Mng. Co., Xev 1042 

F; irview Gold & Copper Co., Ariz. 350 

Fairvicw Mine, Colorado 618 

Fairview Minim. 'alifornia. . 441 

Fairvicw Red Rock Cons. Mines 

. Xevada 1042 

Fair\ie\\ Round Mountain Mines 

. Co., Xevada 1042 

Falcon Mines. Ltd.. Rhodesia 1926 

Falk Mining Co., Utah 1352 

Falls Creek Cop. Mng. CM.. B. C.1547 



Ixvi 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Falls Creek Alining Co., Idaho.... 648 
Famatina Co., Ltd., Argentina. .. .1763 
Fanny Rawlings Mng. Co.. Colo.. 618 
Faretta Cinnabar Mine, Nevada.. 1043 
Farmers' Lead & Zinc Co., O Ida. 1280 
Farmington Mining Co.. Okla. .'. ..1280 
Farncomb Hill Gold Dredging Co., 

Colorado 529 

Farfagut Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.. 1452 

Farrell Copper Co.. Montana 923 

Farrell-Divide Mining Co., Nev. ..1138 
Farwell Mountain Cop. Co., Colo. 529 
Fauntleroy Gold Mng. Co., Colo.. 600 
Favorite G. & C. Mng. Co.. Wash.1489 
Fay-Cananea Copper Co.. Sonora.1724 
Fay Exploration Co., Nevada. ... 1043 

Fearless Mining Co.. Wis 1512 

Feather River Copper Co.. Calif.. 441 
Federal Cons. Mng. Co.. Minn... 860 
Federal Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1139 

Federal Ely Copper Co., Nev 1174 

Federal Lead Co., Illinois-Mo.. 735-898 
Federal Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.. 1280 
Federal Lead & Zinc Co., Que...l655 
Federal Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.. 1352 
Federal Mng. & Sm. Co., Tdaho- 

, Kan.-Okla 694-741-1880 

Federal Mng. & Sm. Co.. Okla. . . .1280 
Federal Syn. Copper Co.. Mich.. 785 
Federated Malay States, Mines 

of 1832 

Feigh Mine, Minnesota 860 

Ferber Copper Co.. Utah 1352 

Ferch Mining Co., Mo 884 

Ferguson Group (Aztec Group 

or -Logos Mine). Arizona 350 

Ferguson Mines Co., Ltd.. B. C..1547 
Fern Quicksilver Mng. Co., Ida. 648 
Ferreira Deep, Ltd., Transvaal ... 1935 
Ferris-Haggarty Copper Mng. Co., 

Wyoming 1521 

Ferrobamba. Ltd.. Peru 1796 

Fessenden Gold Mng. Co.. Ariz... 269 
F. and F. Mining Co., Oklahoma. 1280 
F. H. & C. Gold Mng. Co., Wash.. 1489 
Fidalgo-Alaska Cop, Co., Alaska.. 145 
Fidelity Gold Mng Co., Colo.... 619 

Field Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wis 1513 

Fife Mines, Ltd., B. C 1547 

Fifteenth Street Mng Co., Mo... 884 
Fifty Gold Mines Corp., Colo.... 529 
Fifty-Six Copper Mine. Nevada. . 1043 

Findley Mines Co.. Colo.- 601 

Fink Mining Co., Missouri 884 

Finland, Mines of 1802 

Finnish- American Mng. Co , Fin- 
land 1802 

Fire Valley Gold Mng. Co., B. C..1547 



PAGE 

First National Copper Co., Calif.. 441 

First National Mng. Co., Okla 1280 

First Thought Mng. Co., Wash.. 1489 
Fish Creek Mining Co., Alaska... 145 
Fisher Maiden Mining Co., B. C..1547 
Fissures Exploration Co., Utah. 1393 
Five Bears Mining Co., Calif.... 442 

Five Pines Mining Co., Calif 442 

Flagstaff Mine, Oregon 1300 

Flag Tunnel Mng. Co., N. Mex..l244 
Flannery Zinc Co., Missouri.... 884 
Flatheacl Development Co., Mont. 923 

Flin Flon Syndicate, Manitoba 1588 

Flint Mill & Furnace Co., Wis.... 1513 
Florence Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1139 
Florence Goldfield Mng. Co., Nev. 1188 
Florence Iron Co. (The), Wis.. 1513 
Florence Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho. 698 
Florence Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.. 1352 
Florence-Rae Copper Co.. Wash.. 1489 
Florence Sil. Mng. Co., Ltd., B. C.1547 

Flower Mng. Co., Ga 629 

Flower of the West Gold Mng. 

Co., Colorado 601 

Flux Mine, Arizona 329 

Flynn Group Mng. Co.. Idaho.... 698 

Koch Mining Co.. Oklahoma 1280 

Folclal Copper & Sulphur Co., Ltd., 

Norway 1811 

Ford Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1139 

Ford Gold. & Sil. Mng. Co., Ariz.. 350 

Ford Mining Co., Arizona 350 

Forest Queen Group, Colo 529 

Forest Queen Mines Co., Colo... 601 
Forks of Salmon River Mng. Co., 

California 442 

Fort Hall Mm?. & Mh?. Co., Ltd.. 

Idaho 648 

Fort Schellbourne Alne'. & Mlg. 

Co.. Nevada ..1043 

Fort Smith Spelter Co.. Arkansas 411 
Fortuna Cons. Mng. Co., Arizona. 306 
Fortuna Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1139 
Fortuna Gold Queen Mng. Co., 

Utah 1352 

Fortuna Grubstake Mng. Co., Nev.1043 
Fortuna Independence Mines Co., 

Utah . 1352 

Fortuna Mines Corp., Arizona.... 397 

Fortuna Mining Co., Arizona 307 

Fortuna Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.. 1412 
Fortuna, S. A. ; Compania Minera 

La, Aguascalientes 1666 

Fortune Mine. Colorado 619 

Fortune Mining Co., Ariz 350 

Fort Worth L. & Z. Co., Okla... 1280 
Forty Mile Pow. & Dred. Co., 

Alaska . . 146 



Ixvii 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Forty- Nine Mng. Co.. Ltd.. (The), 

I'ritish Columbia 1548 

Forum River (Nigeria )Tin Co., 

Ltd., Nigeria 1921 

Foster Gold Mng. Co.. Calif 443 

Foster Mining Co., Ontario 1620 

Fountain Head Mine. Arizona.... 252 

Four Mile Mining Co., Okla 1280 

Four Timbers Mng. Co., Idaho... 698 
Fox Den Mng. Co.. Arkansas.... 411 

Fox & Doxvlcr Mine, Ga 629 

Frances Copper Mng. Co. of Cal. 443 
Franco-American Cop. Co., Ariz. 351 
Franco Contention Mng. Co., Cal. 443 
Frank Hough Mng. Co.. Colo.... 529 
Frank Mining Co., Washington. .. 1489 
Franklin Mining Co., Michigan. . 785 

Franklin Mining Co., Mo... 884 

FYanklin Mining Co., Montana. . . . 923 
Free Coinage Cons. Mines Co., 

Colorado 601 

Free Coinage Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1393 

Freedom Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Colo.. 529 
Free Gold Pigot Bay Mng. Co., 

Alaska 146 

Freehold Oil, Gas & Mng. Co.. Mo. 884 
Freeland Cons. Mng. Co., Ore... 1300 

Freeman Mine, Ga 630 

Freeport Sulphur Co., Texas. .. .1338 
Fremantle Trad. Co., Ltd., \V. A.. 1906 
Fremont Cons. Mng. Co., Calif... 443 

Fremont Fraction, S. D 1319 

French Gulch Dred. Co., Colo.... 529 
Fresnillo Mng. Co.. Zacatecas. . . . 1748 
Fresno Divide Mng. Co.. Nev. ..1139 
Friday Copper Mines Co., Calif.. 444 
Friday-Lowden Cop. Co., Calif.. 444 

Friend Mng. Co., Idaho 699 

Frisco Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1139 

Frisco Gold Mines Co., Ariz 252 

Frontier Mng. Co., Ill.-Wis.. .735-1513 
Fnmtina & Bolivia (S. A.) Gold 

M. Co., Ltd., Colombia 1788 

Fujita M. & S. Co.. Ltd.. Japan... 1844 

Fuller, MacCulloch Co., Colo 529 

Furnace Creek Oxide Copper Co., 

Montana 923 

/'urukdU'a Gomel Kaislui ( I'uni- 

kwa & Co.}, Japan 1848 

Gabrielle Mines. Ltd.. Manitoba. 1588 
Gadsden Copper Co.. Arixona.... 374 

Gage Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Mo 884 

Gaika Gold Mng. Co.. Ltd., Rho- 
desia 1927 

Galena Bay Mining Co.. Alaska... 146 
Galena Farm Mining Co., Wash.. 1489 



PAGE 

Galena Lead & Zinc Co., Kansas 741 
Galena Mng. & Dev. Co., Okla... 1280 
Galena Mng. & Mlg. Co., B. C. .. .1548 
Galena Mt. Gold & Sil. Co., Colo. 530 
Galena Park Mining Co., Utah... 1352 
Galiuro Molybdenum Co., Ariz... 306 

Garbutt Leas. Co., Colo 619 

Gardella Dredging Co., Calif 444 

Gardner-Hill Mng. Co.. N. C 1268 

Garfield Chem. Mfg. Corp., Utah. .1353 

Garfield Mining Co., Colo 530 

Garfield Smelting Co., Utah 1353 

Gar ford Syndicate, Arizona 351 

Garnet Copper Co.. New Mex....l244 
Garretson-Sahauaripa Co., Sonora.1724 
Garrison-Monster Mng. Co., Utah. 1353 
Gates Ajar Mining Co., Arizona. . 252 
Gatico ; Compania Minera de, 

Chile 1783 

Geduld Prop. Mines, Ltd., Trans- 
vaal 1935 

Geevor Tin Mines, Ltd., England. 1806 

Gem Cons. Mines Co., Colo 530 

Gem Divide Mining Co.. Nevada. .1140 
Gem Five Mines Co., Nevada. ... 1043 

Gemini Mining Co., Utah 1452 

General Development Co.. U. S... 87 
General Exploration Co., Utah. . . . 1353 
General Exploration Co., Utah... 1412 

General Grant Mine, Nevada 1043 

General Metals Co.,, Arizona 252 

General Mines Co., Arizona 351 

General Mines Co., Nevada 1043 

General Mg. & Finance Corp., 

Ltd., Transvaal 1936 

General Mng., Mlg. & Leas. Co., 

British Columbia 1548 

General Wash. Dev. Co., Nev... 1189 
Genesee Mining Co., Ltd., Ont. .. .1620 
Genesee Valley Copper Co., Calif. 444 

George Ball Mining Co., Mo 884 

Georgetown Tun. Trans. Co., Colo. 530 

Georgette Mining Co., Mo 884 

Georgia, Mines of 626 

Georgia Copper Co., Ga 630 

Georgia Iron & Coal Co., Ga 630 

Georgia Manganese Co., Ga 631 

Georgia Mining Co., Arizona 253 

Georgia Mng. Co., Ga 631 

Georgia Pyrites Co., Ga 631 

Georgia River Mng. Co., Ltd.. 

British Columbia 1549 

Georgia Slide Mining Co., Calif.. 444 
Georgia & Tenn. Copper Co., Ga. . 631 

German Copper Co., Arixona 203 

Germany, Mines of 1802 

Geronimo Mining Co., Arizonia. . 230 
Gertie Mining Co.. Idaho 69 Q 



Ixviii 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Gethin Leroy United Mines Co., 

Utah .1353 

Giant Copper Co., New Mexico.. 1244 

Giant Divide Mining Co.. Nev 1140 

Giant-Eclipse Cons. Mines Co., 

Colorado 531 

Giant Ledge Gold & Copper Co., 

California 444 

Giant Ledge Mng. Co., Idaho.... 699 
Giant Mng. & Dev. Co., Idaho. ... 699 
Gibraltar Cons. Gold Mng. Co., 

California 444 

Gibraltar Sil. Hill Mng. Co., Nev.. 1045 
Gibraltar Silver Mines Co., Nev.. 1045 
Gibson Cons. Copper Co., Ariz.. 204 

Gibson Copper Co., Ari/ 205 

Gibson Hill Mng. Co., Colo 531 

Gibson Mining Co., B. C 1549 

Gibson Mining Co., Missouri 884 

Gila Canon Cons. Cop. Co., Ariz.. 194 
Gila Canyon Copper Co., Ariz.... 194 
Gila Copper Sulphide Co., Ariz... 194 
Gila County Cinnabar Mng. Co., 

Arizona 239 

Gila County East Verde Mng. & 

Sm. Co., Arizona 195 

Gila Development Co., Ariz 307 

Gila Monster Mining Co., Ariz... 205 

Gilligan Mine. Colo 531 

Gilmore Mining Co., Idaho 648 

Gilpado Mining Co., Colo 531 

Gilpin-Eureka Mines Co., Colo... 532 

Gil pin Giant Mines, Colo 532 

Gilpin Mlg. & Red. Co., Colo 532 

Gilpin Mines & Red. Co., Colo... 532 
Gilpin-Orion Gold Mng. Co., Colo. 532 
Gilpin Tungsten Prod. Co.. Colo.. 532 

Gilt Edge Mines Co.. Ariz 269 

Gilt Edge Mines & Sm. Co., Colo. 532 
Gilt Edge Mining Co.. Missouri.. 884 

Ginza Copper Co. Utah 1354 

Giraffe Mng. & Mlg. Co., Oregon. 1300 
Girard Copper Co., Montana.... 924 

Girard Mining Co., Arizona 269 

Giroux Cons. Mines Co.. Nev.- 

X. Mexico 1175 

Gish Chrome Mine, Montana 924 

Glacier Creek Mng. Co., Ltd.. B. C.I 549 
Gladstone Mine? & Red. Co.. Mont. 925 
Gladstone Mountain Mining Co., 

Washington 1490 

Gladstone United Metals Co.. Ariz. 253 

Glance Mine. Arizona 288 

Glance Mining Co., Arizona 288 

Glasgow & Western Explor. Co., 

Ltd., Nevada 1045 

Glen Allen Mining Co.. Utah 1354 

Glcndalc Mng.. Mlg. & Power Co.. 

Nevada ..1045 



PAGE 

Glen Lake Cobalt Mines, Ltd., Ont.1620 

Glenwood Mining Co., Utah 1393 

Globe Bullion Mining Co., Ariz. . . . 205 
Globe Commercial Cop. Co., Ariz. 195 

Globe Cons. Lease, Inc., Calif 444 

Globe Cons. Mng. Co., Calif 444 

Globe Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1394 

Globe Dominion Copper Co., Ariz. 205 
Globe & Lost Gulch Silver-Copper 

Mines Co.. Ariz .' 206 

Globe-Miami Copper Co., Ariz... 206 

Globe Mining Co., Arizona 206 

Globe Mining Co., Michigan 788 

Globe & Phoenix Gold Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Rhodesia 1928 

Globe Sm. & Ref. Co., Colo 533 

Gloria Mining Co., Arkansas 411 

Glory Hole Bonanza Mines Co., 

Arizona 398 

Godiva Mining Co., Utah ,.1453 

Golconda Consolidated, Arizona. . . 253 
Golconda Extension Mng. Co., 

Arizona 253 

Golconda Gold Ledge Mng. Co., 

^ Nevada .' 1045 

Golconda Mine, Arizona 253 

Golconda Mine, Oregon 1300 

Golconda Mining Co., Okla 1280 

Golconda Nevada Mng. Co.. Nev.. 1046 

Gold Back Mining Co., Ariz 253 

Gold Bank Divide Mng. Co., Nev. 1140 
Gold Bar Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1140 

Gold Bar Mine, Oregon 1300 

Gold Bar Alines Co., Arizona.... 239 

Gold Bar Mining Co., Calif 445 

Gold Bell Mng. Co., N. Mexico. 1245 

Gold Belt Mng. Co., Colo. . . 533 

Gold Blossom Mng. Co., Ariz.... 351 
Gold Bond Cons. Mines Co.. Colo. 602 
Gold Bond Explor. Co.. Colo.... 533 
Gold Bond Leas. Dev. Co., Colo. 602 
Gold Bond Mne. & Mlg. Co.. Utah.1354 
Gold Bullion Mining Co., Alaska. 146 
Gold Buttes Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Ariz.-N. Mex 230-1245 

Gold Camp Svn., Colo 602 

Gold Canyon Dredging Co., Nev.. 1046 

Gold Centre Mines, Ltd.. Ont 1645 

Gold Chain Mining Co., Utah 1453 

Gold Circle Buick Mng. Co.. Nev.1046 
Gold Circle Coalition Co.. Nev.... 1046 
Gold Circle Queen Mng. Co., Nev.1046 
Gold Cliff Explor. Co.. Arizona... 269 
Gold Coast Colony, Mines of.. .1946 
Gold Coin Mng. & Leas. Co.. Colo. 602 
Gold & Copper Deep Tunnel M. & 

M. Co., N. Mexico 1245 

Gold Cord Mining Co.. Alaska.... 146 
Gold Creek Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ida. 649 



Ixix 



Till: MINES ILtXnriOOK 



PAGE 

Cold Creek Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ore. 1300 

<.<>ld Crown Mng. Co., Colo 533 

(iold Crown Mng. Co., Ltd.. Mont. 925 
Gold Crown Mng. Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1354 

Gold Cup Mng. Co., Colo 533 

Gold Cure Mng. Co., B. C 1549 

Gold Deposit Mug. Co., Nevada.. 1046 
Gold Dollar Cons Mng. Co., Colo. 602 

Gold Dollar Mine. S. D 1319 

Gold Dust Mining Co., Arizona.. 269 
Golden Age Junior Mng. Co., Ida. 649 
Golden Age Mn. & Red. Co., Colo. 534 

Golden Bell Mining Co.. Ariz 307 

Golden Canyon Gold & Silver Mng. 

Co., Ltd., B. C 1549 

Golden Center Mining Co., Calif.. 445 
Golden Chariot Mng. Co., Nev...l047 
Golden Chariot Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Oregon 1300 

Golden Chest Mine. Idaho 649 

Golden Crest Mining Co., S. D...1319 
Golden Cross Metals Co.. Ariz.. 253 
Golden Curry Cons. Mng. Co.. 

Montana 925 

Golden Cycle Mng. & Red. Co., 

Colorado 603 

Golden Eagle Group. Colo 534 

Golden Eagle Mng. Co., Okla 1280 

Golden Eagle Mng. Co., Oregon.. 1301 
Golden Eagle Mng. & Mlg. Co.. 

Montana 926 

Golden Edges Mine, Colo 534 

Golden Emma Mining Co., Utah.. 1354 
Golden Empire Mng. Co., Colo.... 534 
Golden Gate Exploration Co.. Cal. 446 
Golden Gate Mining Co.. Oregon. .1301 
Golden Gate Placer Mines, Idaho. 650 
Golden Glow Mining Co.. Idaho.. 650 

Golden Hammer, Arizona 254 

Golden Horse Shoe Estates, Ltd., 

W. A 1906 

Golden Link Co., New Mexico.. 1245 
Golden Pen Cons. Mng. Co., Nev.1047 
Golden Reef Cons. Mng. & Dev. 

Co., Utah 1354 

Golden Reef M''nes Co.. Arizona.. 239 
Golden Relief Mining Co.. Utah. .1354 
Golden Reward Cons. Gold M. & 

M. Co.. S. D 1319 

Golden Rod Mng. & Sm. Corp., 

Oklahoma 1281 

Golden Rule Cons. M. & M. Co., 

Oregon 1301 

Golden Rule Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Mo. H 
Golden Spike Mining Co., Okla... 1281 
Gulden Standard Mng. Co., Ore. 1301 
Golden Star Divide Mng. Co., Nev.ll' 
Golden Star Mines Co., Ariz 398 



Golden State Mining Co., Okla... 1281 
Golden Triangle Mng. Co., Colo.. 535 
Goldenville Cons. Mng. Co.. Ltd., 

Nova Scotia 1591 

Goldenville Mng. Co., Ltd., N. S. .1592 
Golden West Mining Co., Calif. ... 446 
Golden Wonder Group, B. C....1549 
Goldfield Blue Bell Mng. Co., Xev.1189 
Goldfield Bull Dog Mng. Co., Nev.1189 
Goldfield Com. Fract. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1190 

Goldfield Cons. Explor. Co., Nev.1190 
Goldfield Cons. Mines Co., Nev...ll90 
Goldfield Development Co., Nev..ll92 
Goldfield Divide Mng. Co.. Nev..ll40 
Goldfield Great Bend Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1192 

Goldfield Merger Mines Co., Nev.11.93 
Goldfield Mng. & Ore Red. Co., 

Nevada 1140 

Goldfield Oro Mng. Co.. Nev...ll93 
Gold Fields American Development 

Co., Ltd., U. S 87 

Goldfield Shale Mng. Co., Nev....ll93 
Goldfield Sunrise Gold Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1193 

Gold Fields of Venezuela 1800 

Goldfield-Tule Canyon Placer Co., 

Nevada ." 1193 

Gold Flotation Dev. Co., Idaho.. 649 

Gold Hill Cons. Co.. N. C 1268 

Gold Hill & Iowa Mines Co., Ida.. 649 
Gold Hill Manganese Co., Ore.... 1301 

Gold Hill Mine, Montana 925 

Gold Hill Mines Dev. Co., Utah.. 1394 

Gold Hill Mng. Co., Colo 533 

Gold Hill Quartz Mng. Co., Ore.. 1301 
Gold Hill United Mines Co., Colo. 533 
Gold Hunter Mng. & Sm. Co., Ida. 699 

Gold Key Mng. Co.. Ariz 270 

Gold King Ext. Mines Co., Colo.. 534 

Gold King Leas. Co.. Colo 534 

Gold King Mininer Co., Alaska... 147 

Gold King Mng. Co., Ariz 352 

Gold King Mn?. Co., Colo 602 

Gold King Mng. Co.. S. D 1320 

Gold Alines Co., Idaho 649 

Gold Mountain Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Nevada 1047 

Gold Ore Mng. Co.. Arizona 270 

Gold Pan Mining Co., Manitoba. . .1589 

Gold Pen Mines Co., Nevada 1047 

Gold fr Platinum Mines Co.. Ore. .1301 
Gold Point Cons. Alines. Inc.. Cal. 445 
Gold Prince M. & L. Co.. Nev...l047 

Gold Queen Mng. Co., Colo 534 

Gold Range Development Co., Ariz 270 
Gold Range Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 270 
Gold Reed Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 270 



Ixx 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Gold Reef Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1140 

Gold Reef Mng. Co., Ont 1600 

Gold Ridge Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1141 
Gold Road Annex Mng. Co., Ariz. 270 
Gold Road Bonanza Mng. Co., 

Arizona 271 

Gold Road Mines Co., Ariz 271 

Goldsmith Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1141 
Gold Sovereign Mng. & Tun. Co., 

Colorado 602 

Gold Standard Mining Co., Ore. . . 1301 

Gold State Mining Co, Calif 445 

Goldstone Mining Co., Calif 446 

Goldstrike Bonanza Mng. Co., 

^ Utah 1355 

Goldstrike Cons. Mng. Co., Utah.. 1355 
Goldstrike Mng. & Leas. Co., Utah. 1355 

Gold Top Mining Co., Nevada 1048 

Gold Trail Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1141 

Gold Trail Mng. Co.. Ariz 271 

Gold Trails Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 271 
Gold Warrior Mng. Co., Ariz.... 352 
Gold Wedge Divide Mng Co., 

Nevada .1141 

Gold Wedge Homestake Mng. 

^ Co., Nev 1141 

Gold Zone Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1142 

Golinsky Copper Co., Calif 446 

Golinsky Mining Co.* California. 446 
Goldzona-Scotchman Mng. Co.. 

Arizona 398 

Good Chance Mng. Co.. Okla.... 1281 

Goodeagle Mng. Co., Mo 885 

Goodeagle Mining Co., Okla 1281 

Good Hope Mng. Co., Arizona... 352 
Good Morning Gold Mng. & 

Invest. Co.. Colo 535 

Good Springs Anchor Co., Nev.. 1048 
Goodsprings Mining Co., Xev....l048 
Good Will Copper Co., Calif.... 446 
Gooney Manor Copper Co., Inc., 

Virginia 1470 

Gopeng Cons.. Ltd.. Malaya ....1833 
Gordon Bay Mines, Ltd., B. C...1550 

Gordon Copper Co., Ariz 288 

Gordon Mining Co., Minnesota.. 860 
Gorham-Garbett Co., Minnesota. 860 
Gould & Curry Mining Co., Nev. 1048 

Gould Mlg. Leas. Co., Wyo 1521 

Gould Property, Arizona 288 

Gov. Gold Mng. Areas. (Modder- 
fontein) Cons., Ltd., Transvaal. .1936 

Governor Mine, Colo 535 

Gmvganda Copper Co., Nev 1048 

Grace Mining Co., Missouri 885 

Grace Walker Mng. Co., Kansas. 741 
Grafter Copper Mng. Co., Yukon. 1658 
Granadena Mng. Co., Hidalgo. ... 1697 



PAGE 

Granberg Sil. Mines Corp., Ariz. 254 
Granby Cons. Mines Co., Okla... 1281 
Granby Cons. M. S. & P. Co., 

British Columbia 1550 

Granby-Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario .1637 

Granby Mng. & Sm. Co. of Mo. 

(A. Z., L. &> S. Co.) 83 

Grand Central Mng. Co., Utah 1453 

Grand Gulch Mng. Co., Ariz 254 

Grand Island Mng. Co., 'Ariz 374 

Grandma Cons. Mines Co., Nev... 1193 
Grandma Mining Co., Nevada. .. .1194 
Grand Pacific Cop. Co. of Ariz.. 307 

Grand Reef Mine, Arizona 230 

Grand River Placer Co., Utah 1355 

Grand Traverse & Arizona Mng. 

Co., Arizona 239 

Grand View Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Montana 926 

Granite Bi-Metallic Cons. M. Co., 

Montana 926 

Granite Copper Co., Utah 1355 

Granite Gold Mng. Co., Alaska 147 

Granite Gold Mng. Co., Colo 603 

Granite Hill Copper Mine, Nev... 1049 
Granite Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah. . . .1355 
Granite Point Silver - Lead Mng. 

Dev. Co., Arizona 254 

Granite Tunnel Co., Colo 535 

Grant Cons. Cop. Mng. Co., Wash.1490 
Grant County Copper Co., N. M..1245 

Grant Aline. New York 1264 

Granville Mng. Co., Ltd., Yukon.. 1658 

Graphic Mine, Colo 535 

Grass Valley Bullion Explor. Co., 

California 447 

Grass Valley Cons. Gold Mines Co., 

California 447 

Grater Cons. Mines Co., Utah 1394 

Gratiot Mining Co., Michigan 787 

Gray Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida.. 650 

Gray Eagle Copper Co., Calif 447 

Gray Eagle Mining Co., Nev 1049 

Grayson Mine, Missouri 885 

Great Boulder Perseverance G. M. 

Co., Ltd., W. A 1907 

Great Boulder Prop. Gold Mines, 

Ltd., W. A 1907 

Great Bras D'Or Mng. Co., N. S..1592 

Great Britain, Mines of 1804 

Great Britain Group, Alaska 147 

Great Butte Copper Co., Mont 996 

Great Cobar, Ltd., N. S. W 1884 

Great Copper King M. Co., Utah. 1394 

Great Dane Mng. Co., Nevada 1142 

Great Divide Mfnes Co., Utah 1412 

Great Divide Mng. Co.. Nev 1142 



Ixxi 



THE MIM'.S ILIXDBOOK 




PAGE 

Great Dunker M. & M. Co., Idaho. 700 
Great Eagle Mng. Co., N. Mex...l245 
t.n-at Eastern Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida. 700 
Greater Ajo Copper Co., Arizona. 398 
Greater Miami Copper Co., Ariz.. 307 
Great. Falls-Barker M. Co., Mont. 926 

Great Falls Mine, Maryland 746 

Great Fitzroy Mines, Ltd., Queens- 
land 1889 

Great Lake Mng. & Mlg. Co., B. C.1553 
Great Metals Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Washington 1490 

Great Northern Cop. Co., Minn... 860 
Great Northern Cop. Co., Mont... 926 
Great Northern Cop. Co., N fid... 1659 
Great Northern Devel. Co., Alas. 147 
Great Northern Iron Ore Proper- 
ties, Minn 860 

Great Northern Mng. Co., Wash... 1490 
Great Ohio Copper Mine, B. C. . . .1553 

Great Ray Copper Co., Ariz 319 

Great Scott Mng. Co., Mo 885 

Great Sulphide Co., Manitoba 1588 

Great Verde Ext. Cop. Co., Ariz.. 375 
Great Western Cons. M. Co., Nev.1211 

Great Western Cop. Co., Ariz 171 

Great Western Divide M. Co., Nev.1142 
Great Western G. & C. Co., Utah.1394 
Great Western Gold & Silver Co., 

Arizona 172 

Great Western Lead Mfg. Co., 111. 736 
Great Western Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1281 

Great Western Mine, Colo 536 

Great Western Mines Co., Utah... 1394 
Great Western Mines Syn., Colo.. 536 
Great Western Mng. Co., Idaho... 700 
Great Western Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Montana 927 

Great Western Smelt. Corp., Ariz.. 352 
Great Western Sm. & Ref. Co., 111. 736 

Greece, Mines of 1809 

Greenback Copper Co., Calif 447 

Greenback Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Oregon 1302 

Greenback Mng. Co., Colo 619 

Greenback Mining Co., Oklahoma. 1281 

Greenblower Mining Co., Calif 447 

Grecndale Exploration Co., Mont. 997 
Greene-Cananea Coo. Co., Sonora.1725 
Greenfield Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.,1281 
Green Hill Cleveland M. Co., Ida. 700 
Green Horn Mountain Copper Co., 

California . . ! 447 

Greening Mng. & Sm. Co., Okla...l281 

Green Monster Mine, Nevada 1049 

Green Monster Mng. Co., Ariz.... 375 



PAGE 

Green Mountain Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah .......................... 1355 

Green Quartz Gold Mng. Co., Ariz. 271 
Greenwater Copper Mng. & Sm. 

Co., Nevada .................... 1211 

Green Zinc Co., Oklahoma ........ 1281 

Grenville United Alines, Ltd., Eng.1806 
Greyback Copper Mines, Ore ..... 1302 

Grey Eagle Develop. Co., Ariz..., 271 
Gribbell Island Copper Co., B. C..1553 
Griffith Lead & Zinc Co., Mo ...... 885 

Grijalva Nueva Mng. Co., Ariz.. 352 
Grimes Divide Mng. Co., Nev....ll42 

Grizzly Flats Gold Mng. Co., Calif. 447 
Grizzly Mining Co., California.... 448 

Groom South End Mng. Co., Nev.1049 
Ground Hog Mining Co., Mo ..... 885 

Growler Mines, Arizona .......... 288 

Grunow Mining Co.. Wis ......... 1513 

Gruss Mining Co., California ..... 448 

Grutli Mining Co., Utah .......... 1454 

Guanajuato, Mines of .......... 1690 

Guanajuato Cons. M. & M. Co., 

Guanajuato ................... 1690 

Guanajuato Dev. Co., Guanajuato.. 1691 
Guanajuato Red. & Mines Co., 

Guanajuato .................... 1692 

Guanacevi Tunnel Co.. Durango. .1688 
Guatemala, Mines of .......... 1753 

Guayacan, Fundicion de, Chile. .. .1783 

Guelph Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., Ida . 700 
Guening Mining Co., Oklahoma. . .1281 
Guerrero, Mines of ............. 1694 

Guerrero Mining Co., Sonora ..... 1731 

Guggenheim Exploration Co., U. S. 88 
Gulf Copper Co., Baja Calif .... 1668 

Gulf States Steel Co., Alabama ____ 121 

Gunnison Copper Co., Colo ....... 536 

Gunsight Detroit Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona ....................... 288 

Gunsight Gold & Tungsten Mng. 

Co., Arizona ................... 288 

Gunsight Mine, Arizona ........... 288 

Gwin Aline & Devel. Co., Calif. ... 448 

Gwinn Mining Co., Wash ........ 1490 

sy Queen Mining Co., Nevada. 1213 



Hackberry Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz. 254 
Maggarty Copper Mng. Co., W3 r o.l521 

I Tahnevvald Leas. Co., Colo ....... 604 

II aim's Peak Gold Mng. & Mlg. 
Co., Colorado ................... 536 

Male Development Co., Minn ..... 862 

Hale Mine, Minnesota ............ 862 

Hale Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz ...... 352 

Male & Xorcross Mng. Co., Nev..l049 
Malt" Aloon Cop. Co., Ariz ........ 352 

Halifax Tonopah Mng. Co., Nev..l213 



Ixxii 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Hall Creek M. & M. Co., Wash... 1491 
Hamburg-American Cop. M. & M. 

Co., Idaho 701 

Hamburg Mines Co., Nevada 1049 

Hamilton Mining Co., Idaho 650 

Hamilton-Montana Gold Mng. Co., 

Montana 927 

Hamilton Power Mng. & Transp. 

Co., Nevada.. 1049 

Hamlet Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo... 536 

Hammond Mining Co., Wash 1491 

Hampden-Cloncurry Copper Mines, 

Ltd., Queensland 1889 

Hampton Celebration (W. A.), 

Ltd.. W. A..... 1907 

Hampton Cons. Mines Co., Colo.. 536 
Hampton Gold Mng. Areas, Ltd., 

W. A 1908 

Hampton Properties, Ltd., W. A. .1908 
Hampton Uruguay, Ltd., W. A... 1908 
Hanauer Smelting Works, Utah.. 1356 
Hancock Cons. Mining Co., Mich.. 788 

Haney Copper Co., Arizona 353 

Hanna & Co., M. A., Mich.-Minn.. 849 
Hanna Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.... 537 
Hanna Ore Mng. Co., Minnesota. . 862 
Hannapah Divide Ext. Mines Co., 

Nevada 1050 

Hannapah Mine, Nevada 1050 

Hanover Bessemer Iron & Copper 

Co., N. Mexico 1246 

Hanover Copper Co., N. Mex....l246 
Hanover Lead & Zinc Co., Okla. . .1281 
Happy Jack M. & Red. Co., Ariz. 330 
Harclenberg Mining Synd., Calif. . 448 
Hardscrabble Alining Co., N. Mex.1246 

Hardshell Mine, Ariz 330 

Hare Mng. & Mlg. Co., Okla 1281 

Hargrave Cons., Ontario 1621 

Hargrave Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont.1621 
Harmill Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll42 

Harmony Mines Co., Idaho 650 

Harney Group, Nevada 1050 

Harper-Larson Dev. Co., Colo.... 537 
Harqua Hala Ridge M. & M. Co., 

Arizona 399 

Harrisbnrg M. & Mlg. Co., Okla.. 1282 

Harris Copper Co., Arizona 239 

Harris Copper Co., Sonora 1731 

Harrison Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ark.. 411 
Hartford-Arizona Copper Mng. 

Co., Arizona 172 

Hartford Mining Co., Mo 885 

Hartford M. & Mlg. Co., Sonora.. 1731 
Hartley Mng., Mlg., & Red. Co., 

Xevada 1049 

TTartwig Mining Co., Idaho 651 

Harvard Mine, Inc., California... 448 



PAGE 

Harvey Lease, Wisconsin 1513 

Hasbrouck Comstock Divide Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1143 

Hasbrouck Divide Annex Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1143 

Hasbrouck Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1143 
Hasbrouck Ext. Mng. Co., Nev... 1143 

Hasbrouck Mine. Nevada 1143 

Hauck Mine, Ga 631 

Hauxhurst Mine, Arizona 240 

Havalina Mining Co., Arizona.... 330 

Hawk Mining Co., Oklahoma 1282 

Hawkins Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.. 1282 
Hayden Development Co., Ariz... 353 

Hayes Co., Idaho 701 

Hayes & Gracey Syndicate, Ariz.. 172 
Hayes Mining Co., Mich-Wis. 850-1513 

Haynes Copper Co., Arizona 375 

Haynes Mining Co., Oklahoma... 1282 

Haynes-Stellite Co., Idaho 651 

Haystack Mines Co., Inc., Nev 1050 

Hayti and Santo Domingo, 

Mines of 1761 

Hayti Mines Co., Hayti 1762 

Hazel Gold Mng. Co., Calif 449 

Hazel Mng. & Mlg. Co., Texas. .. .1339 
Headlight Mng. Co., Ltd., Idaho 701 
Healdton Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1282 

Heaton & Hodges Mine, Mo 885 

Hecla Cons. Mines Co., Wyo 1521 

Hecla Cons. Mining Co., Ore 1302 

1 lecla Copper-Silver Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Wash 1491 

Hecla Divide Mining Co., Nev 1143 

Hecla Mines. Montana 927 

Hecla Mininu Co., Idaho. .. 701-1953 
Hecla Mining Co. (The), N. Mex.1246 

Hector Mine, Minnesota 863 

Hedley Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., B. C. 1553 

Hegeler Zinc Co., Illinois 736 

Helena Mng. Bureau, Inc., Mont. 927 
Helen Fraction Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1143 

Helens Dome Mining Co., Ariz... 172 

! lelen Zinc Co., Virginia 1470 

Helmer Iron Mine, Minn 863 

Helvetia Copper Co., Ariz 289 

H. E. M. Mining Co., Idaho 703 

Hembrillo Copper Mng. Co., N. 

Mexico t 1247 

Hemlock River Mining Co., Mich. 850 
Hemlock Silver-Lead Mng. Co., 

Montana 927 

I Temple Copper Mining Co., Alas. 148 
Henley Cons. Copper Mines, Wyo. 1522 
Hennessy Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1143 
Henrietta Copper Mng. Co., Colo. 537 
Henrietta Explor. Co., Idaho 703 



Ixxiii 



77/7: MINES II.IXDBOOK 



PAGE 

Henrietta Leas. Co., Idaho 703 

Henrietta Mine (Big Ledge Cop- 
per Co.) 341 

Henrietta Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 537 
I fenry Aclney Gold Mng. Co., 

Colorado 604 

Henry Ford Mine, Arizona 330 

Heppner Mining Co., Oregon 1302 

1 Terb Lake Gold Mines, Ltd., Man- 
itoba 1589 

Hercules Dev. Co., Kansas 741 

Hercules Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll44 

Hercules Mining Co., B. C 1555 

Hercules Mining Co., Idaho 703 

Hercules Mining Co., Wis 1513 

Hcrmina Mining Co., Ontario 1600 

Hermit Mining Co., Idaho 651 

Hermosa Copper Co., New Mex..l247 
Hermosillo Copper Co., Sonora.,1731 
Hernandez Quicksilver Co., Calif. 449 

Hershel Mining Co., Ariz 172 

Hess Mining Co., California 449 

Hewitt-Lorna Doone Mines, B. C. 1555 

Hidalgo, Mines of 1695 

Hidalgo Copper Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Hidalgo 1697 

Pi id den Creek or Any ox Mines 

(Granby Cons. M. S. & P. Co.) .1551 
1 lidden Treasure Gold Mng. Co., 

Oregon 1302 

Hidden Treasure Group, Mont... 928 
Hidden Treasure Mng. Co., Calif. 450 
Hidden Treasure Mng. Co., Okla.1282 
I lidden Treasure Mining Co., S. D.1320 
I lidden Treasure Mng. & Leas. 

Co., Colo 537 

Hider Nevada Mining Co., Nev..l050 
Ifiggins & Bielenberg Mine (H. 

& B.), Mont 928 

I liggins Leasing Co., Arizona 187 

Higgins Mine, Arizona 187 

High Divide Annex Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1144 

High Divide Ext. Co.. Nevada. .. .1144 

( ligh Divide Mining Co., Nev 1144 

High Five Mining Co., Mo 885 

High Grade Silver & Cop. Mng. 

Co., Washington 1491 

Highland Boy Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Utah 1413 

Highland Chief Gold Mng. Co., 

Arizona 272 

Highland Cons. Mng. Co., Mont.. 928 
Highland Copper Co., Ltd., Mont. 928 
Highland Mary Mines Co., Colo.. 537 

Highland Mine, Oregon 1302 

Highland Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz.. 255 



PAGE 

Highland Surprise Cons. Mng. Co., 
Idaho 704 

Miuhlnrd Valley Mng. & Dev. Co., 
B. C 1555 

I ligh Top Mng. Corp., Va 1470 

Hi Henry Mng. Claims, Ariz 399 

Hilarity "Mining Co., Idaho -705 

Hilda Gold Mng. Co., California.. 450 
Hill City Mng. & Dev. Co., S. D..1320 
Hill City Tungsten Producers Co., 

S. D 1320 

Hillcrest Mining Co., Minn 863 

Hill Lead & Zinc Co., Mo 885 

Hill Alines Co., Minnesota 863 

Hill Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho 705 

Hillside Development Co., Ariz... 353 
Hilltop Extension Mines Co., Ariz. 172 
Hilltop Metals Mining Co., Ariz.. 172 
Hilltop Mlg. & Red. Co., Nev.... 1050 

Hilltop Mines. Arizona 173 

Hinman Mining Co., Utah 1356 

Hinsdale Tunnel & Red. Co., Colo. 537 
Hischa Mines of Porcupine, Ltd., 

Ontario 1645 

Hobart Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1144 

Hobart Iron Mining Co., Minn... 863 
Hobson Silver Lead Co., B.C.... 1555 
Hoch Alining Co., Minnesota..... 864 

II olden Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 
Washington 1491 

Holdeii Mng. Milling Co., Nev.. 1050 
Hollinger Cons. Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1645 

Holloway Aline, Virginia 1470 

Holly Mining Co., Nevada 1186 

Holmes Midnight Mines Co., Ariz. 255 
Holmes Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wis.... 1514 

Holte Aline, Idaho 651 

llomebuilder M. & D. Co., Idaho.. 651 

Home Copper Co., Arizona 230 

Homelode Mng. & Mlg. Co.. S. D.1320 
Home Pastime Mine, Arizona.... 255 

Home Run Copper Co., Nev 1051 

I I'ome Run Copper Mng. Co., Wyo.1522 
Homestake Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1144 

Homestake Alining Co., Mont 928 

Homestake Alining Co., Okla 1282 

Homestake Alining Co., S. D 1321 

Homestake T. & C. Co., Utah.. ..1356 
Homestead Copper Co., Wash.... 1491 
?Tomestead-Iron Dyke Alines Co., 

Inc., Ore 1303 

1 Fondo Gold M. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 604 

Honduras, Mines of 1753 

Honest Dollar Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 537 

Honest Endeavor Mng. Co., Nev. .1051 
Hoosac Tunnel & Mng. Co., Colo.. 537 



Ixxiv 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Hop Canyon Mng. & Sm. Co., N. 

Mexico 1247 

Hope Cons. Mng. Co., Nev 1186 

Hope of Israel Mining Co., Utah.. 1356 
Hope Lead & Zinc Co., Oklahoma . 1282 
Hope Mines Devel. Co., Calif.... 450 
Hope Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho.... 651 
Hope M., Mlg. & Leas. Co., Colo. 537 

Hopkins Mine. Oklahoma 1282 

Hopkins Mining Co. (Marquette 

Iron Co.) 852 

Hornitos Gold Mng. Co., Calif.... 451 

Horn Silver Mines Co., Utah 1356 

Horn Silver Mng. Co., Utah 1357 

Horse Mountain Copper Co., Calif. 451 
Horse Mountain M. & M. Co., 

Colorado 538 

Horseshoe Basin Gold Mng. Co., 

Arizona 289 

Horseshoe Copper Co., Idaho 652 

Horseshoe Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1145 

Horse Shoe Mine, Montana 928 

Horseshoe Mining Co., Idaho 705 

Horsfal Mine, Colorado 538 

Horst-Powell Copper Mng. Co., 

Idaho 705 

Hosey Group. Arizona 330 

Hough ton- Alaska Exploration Co., 

Alaska 148 

Houghton Copper Co., Michigan.. 790 

Hovvell Mining Co., Utah 1395 

Howe Sound Co., B. C 1556 

Huachuca Tungsten Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Arizona 330 

Htianchaca de Bolivia, Compania, 

Bolivia 1766 

Huayua-Potosi y Milluni, Com- 
pania, Bolivia 1766 

Hubbard-Elliott Copper Co., Alas. 148 

Huchang Mining Co., Korea 1863 

Hudson Bay Mines, Ltd., Ont 1621 

Hudson Bay Zinc Co., Ltd., B.C.. 1559 
Hudson Cons. Mining Co., Calif.. 451 

Hudson Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1145 

Huelva Copper & Sulphur Mines, 

Ltd., Spain 1822 

Hughes Arizona Copper Co.. Ariz. 255 
Hugo Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 928 

Hulhert Mining Co., Michigan.... 791 
Hull City Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1145 

Hull Copper Co., Arizona 376 

Humholdt Cons. Copper Co., Ariz. 353 
Humboldt Cons. Mines Co.. Nev.. 1051 
Humholdt Copper Co., Michigan.. 791 
Humholdt Copper Mng. Co., Calif. 451 
Humboldt County Tungsten M. & 

M. Co., Nev.i ,.1051 



PAGE 

Humboldt Mines Co., Colo 538 

Humboldt Ore Co., Arizona 353 

Humboldt Trinity Gold M. & M. 

Co., Nevada 1051 

Humbug Mining Co., Utah 1454 

Hunter Mine, Nevada 1052 

Huntingdon Cop. Mine,, Quebec.. 1655 
Huntoon-Kirkland Co., Ontario. 1637 

Huronian Belt Co., Ltd., Ont 1600 

Hurry-Lip Mining Co.; Mo 885 

Hussey-Howe Mining Co., Mich. 792 
Huttig Lead & Zinc Co., Mo.- 

Okla 885-1282 

Hyatt Syndicate, Colo 538 

Hydro-Electric Sm. Co., Nf Id.. 1660 
Hydro Sixes Mines Co., Oregon.. 1303 
Hypotheek Mng. Mlg. Co., Ida. 705 

Ibapah Gold Mng. Co., Utah. 1357 

Ibex Gold Mng. Co., Utah 1454 

Ibex Mine, Oregon 1303 

Ibex Mng. Co., Colorado 619 

Ibex Mining- Co.. Idaho 706 

Tee Plant Mining Co.. Mo 885 

Idaho, Mines of 633 

Coeur d' Alene Region 673 

Idaho- Almo Mine. B. C 1559 

Idaho Antimony-Mining Co., Ida. 652 
Idaho Bride Mng. & Mlg. Co.. 

Colorado 538 

Idaho Carbonate Hill Cons. Mng. 

Co., Idaho 706 

Idaho Cons. Placer Mng. Co., 

Idaho 706 

Idaho Continental Co., Idaho.... 652 
Idaho Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho '.... 707 

Idaho Copper Mng. & Sm. Corp., 

Idaho 652 

Idaho Exploration Co., Idaho.... 653 
Idaho Giant Mng. Co., Idaho.... 653 

Idaho Gold Coin Co., Idaho 653 

Idaho Gold & Ruby Mng. Co., 

Idaho 653 

Idaho & Los Angeles M. & M. Co., 

Idaho 653 

Idaho-Maryland Mines Co., Calif. 451 
Idaho Miner.il Mining Co., Idaho 653 
Idaho Mines Syndicate, Idaho... 654 
Idaho Mng., Red. & Trans. Co., 

Colorado 539 

Idaho-Montana Amal. Mng. Co., 

Idaho 654 

[daho-Montana Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho-Montana 929 

Idaho-Nevada Explor. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 654 

Idaho Northern Mineral Co., Ida. 654 



Ixxv 



7V//: .U/Y/:.V 1 1, 1 XPHOOK 



PAGE 

Idaho-Seattle Mining Co.. Idaho. 654 
Idaho Standard Mines Co., Ida.. 655 

Idaho Tungsten Co., Idaho 655 

Ideal Copper Co., Nevada 1052 

Idora Mining Co.. Ltd., Idaho... 655 
Ignacio Rodriquez Ramos. S. A.; 

Compania Minera, Chihuahua. 1679 

Ikeda Mines, Ltd.. B. C 1559 

Illinois, Mines of 734 

Illinois Arizona Copper Co.. Ariz. 399 
Illinois Copper & Silver Mng. Co.. 

Washington 1491 

Illinois Exploration Co.. Ariz.. 256 
Illinois Gold Mnsr. & Mlg. Co., 

Mont 929 

Illinois & Saratoga Mines, N. M..1247 

Illinois Zinc Co.. Illinois 736 

Tma Cons. Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ida. 655 

Tmnaha Mine, Oregon 1303 

Imperial Cons. Mng. Co., Colo.. 539 

Imperial Copper Co.,' Ariz 289 

Imperial Copper Co.. S. D 1324 

Imperial Cop. & Gold Mng. Co., 

Wyoming 1522 

Imperial Development Co.. Okla.1282 
Imperial Eagle Mining Co., Ore. 1303 
Imperial Lead Mng. Co.. Utah. ..1357 

Imperial Mining Co.. Idaho 707 

Imperial Mining Co.. Oregon. ... 1304 

Imperial Zinc Co., Missouri 885 

Incline Mining Co.. Mo 886 

Tncreible, Compania Anonima Mi- 
nera L", Venezuela 1800 

Independence Copper-Gold-Silver 

Mmr. Co.. Montana 929 

Independence Cop. Group. Mont.. 929 
Independence Gold Mng. Co., 

Alaska 148 

Independence Lead Mines Co., 

Idaho 707 

Independence Mng. Co., Ark 411 

Independence Mng. Co.. Idaho... 655 
Independence Mng. Co., Utah. ...1454 
Independence Mntr. Co., Wyo...l522 
Independent Copper Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Idaho 707 

Independent Dev. Co., Idaho 708 

Independent Sheelite Co.. Nev...l052 

Index Mining Co.. B. C 1559 

India, Mines of 1839 

Indiana, Mines of 737 

Indiana Mine, Colorado 539 

Indiana Mine. Michigan 850 

Indiana Mining Co.. Mich 792 

Indian Chief Mining Co.. Okla...l282 

Indian Mines Co.. Ltd.. B. C 1559 

Indian Mound Mner. Co.. Wis 1514 

Indian-Peninsula Mng. Co.. Ltd.. 

Quebec 1655 



PAGE 

Indian Queen Cons. Mng. Co., 

Utah 1357 

Indian Queen Mining Co., Okla.,1282 
Indian Queen Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Montana 929 

Indian Springs Mine, Calif 452 

Indian Springs Mining Co., Nev.1052 
Indo-China (French), Mines of. 1844 
Industrial Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1145 

Ingalls Leasing Co.. Colo 539 

Ingalls Mine. Nevada 1052 

Ingomar Mine, Nevada 1053 

Inguaran ; Companie d', Michoa- 

can 1709 

Inland Copper Co., Ariz 399 

Inland Empire Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Idaho 708 

Inland Mining Co., Ltd., B. C....1559 

Inland Steel Co., Minnesota 864 

Inspiration Centl Mng. Co.. Ariz. 230 
Inspiration Cons. Cop. Co., Ariz. . 206 
Inspiration Extension Copper Co.. 

Arizona 210 

Inspiration-Miami Copper Co., 

Arizona 211 

Inspiration Miami Extension Cop- 
per Co., Arizona 211 

Inspiration Mining Co., Kansas.. 741 
Inspiration Mining Co., Okla....l282 
Inspiration Needles Copper Co.. 

Arizona 21 1 

Insurgent Gold Mining Co., Wash. 1492 
Intercolonial Copper Co.. N. B...1591 
Inter-Mountain Companv. Mont.. 930 
Tntermountain Copper Mng. Co., 

Mont 930 

Tntermountain Mng. & Industrial 

Association, Utah .1413 

International Agricl. Corp., U. S. 88 
Tnternationnl Co-Operative Hold- 
ing Co., Mexico 1661 

International Copper &- Mng. Co., 

Arizona 353 

International Copper Ore Corp.. 

Sonora 1732 

International Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1145 

International Explor. & Dev. Co., 

British Columbia 1560 

International Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Chihuahua 1679 

International Gold Mng. Co., 

Washington 1492 

International Harvester Co., Minn. 865 
International & Intercontinental 

M. & R. Co., Nevada 1053 

International I. cad Ref. Co. (In- 
ternational Sm. Co.) 92 



Ixxvi 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

International Metals Selling Co., 

United States 88 

Intern. Mines Dev. Co., Sonora.,1732 
International Mng. Co., Bolivia. .1766 
International Mining Co., Mont. . 930 
International Mng. & Metals Co., 

Idaho 655 

International Molybdenite Co., 

Ltd., Ontario 1600 

International Nickel Co., Ontario. 1601 
International Ore Co., Coahuila. . 1686 
International Properties Syndi- 
cate, Nevada 1053 

International Smelting Co.. U. S. 88 
International Smelting & Refining 

Co., U. S 93 

International Syndicate of Mines 

& Smelters, Arizona 353 

International Tungsten Corpora- 
tion, Arizona 289 

Interstate Cons. Mines Co., Nev.1053 

Inter-State Iron Co., Minn 865 

Interstate L. & Z. Co.. Okla 1282 

Interstate-Sullivan Mng. Co., 

Washington 1492 

Inyo Copper Mines Corp., Calif. . 452 

Tnyo Gold Mng. Co., Calif 452 

Iowa Copper Mng. Co., Utah 1395 

Iowa Mining Co., Oklahoma. ... 1283 
Iowa-Montana Dev. Co.. Montana. 930 

Iowa Tiger Mng. Co., Colo 540 

Ipoh Tin Dredg., Ltd.. Malaya. . .1834 
Irish Creek Tin Mines, Inc.. Va..l470 
Iron Blossom Cons. Mng. Co., 

Utah 1454 

Iron Blossom Mng. Co.. Wyo....l522 
Iron Cap Copper Co.. Arizona... 211 
Iron Creek Mining Co., Wash... 1492 
Iron Crown Divide Mines Co., 

Nevada ...1145 

Trondike Mining Co., Nevada 1053 

Iron Dyke Copper Co., Oregon. .. 1304 

Iron King Mining Co., Utah 1454 

Iron Mask Lead Mng. Co., Mont. 930 

Iron Mask Mine, B. C 1560 

Iron Mask Mng. Co.. Idaho 655 

Iron Mountain Copper Co.. Calif. 452 

Iron Mountain Ltd., B. C 1560 

Iron Mountain Tunnel Co., Mont. 931 
Iron Queen Mng. & Sm. Co.. Ariz. 354 

Ironside Mine. Montana 931 

Ironsides Mining Co., Nevada. .. 1053 

Iron Silver Mng. Co.. Colo 619 

Iron Spar Copper Mng. Co., Ida.. 708 

Troquois Copper Co., Nevada 1054 

Iroquois Mining Co.. Washington. 1492 

Irtysh Corp., Ltd.. Siberia 1873 

Irvinebank Mng. Co., Ltd., 
Queensland 1890 



PAGE 

Irvington Sm. & Ref. Co.,' N. J . . 1227 

Isabella Cop. Mng. Co., Calif 452 

Isabella Leas. Co.. Colo 604 

Isabella Mines Co., Colo 604 

Island Copper Co., Calif 453 

Island Copper Co., Michigan 793 

Isle Royale Copper Co., Mich.... 793 
Itabira Iron Ore Co., Ltd,, Brazil. 1768 

Italy, Mines of 1810 

Itmay Copper Mng. Co., Wyo....l523 
Ivanhoe Cons. Mines Co., Ariz... 272 
Ivanhoe Gold Corp., Ltd., W. A.. 1908 
Ivanhoe Gold Mng. Co., Reorgan- 
ized, Arizona 272 

fvanhoe Mine, Arizona 330 

Ivanhoe Mining Co., Idaho 708 

Ivanhoe Mining Co.. Wash 1492 

I. X. L. Gold Mng. Co.. Ltd., Ida. . 656 

Jacket - Crown Point - Belcher 

Mines Co., Nevada 1054 

Tack Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. Mex..l247 
Jack Pot Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Wyo. .1523 
Jackson Basin Zinc Co., B. C....1560 
Jacks Peak Tramway & Mng. Co., 

N. Mexico " 1247 

Jack Waite Ext. Mng. Co.. Ida.. 656 
Jack Waite Mining Co., Ltd., Ida. 656 

Jalisco, Mines of 1701 

James Robertson, Ltd.. Ontario. .1603 
Jamestown Exploration Co., Calif. 453 

Japan, Mines of 1844 

Japan-Flora Mines & Tun. Co., 

Colorado 540 

Jarbidge Central Mines Co., Nev.1054 
Jardine Gold M. & M. Co., Mont. 931 
Tarilla Cons. Copper Co., N. M..1247 
Jarilla Copper Syn., Inc.. N. Mex.1247 

Jason Mine, Colorado 621 

Jasper County Land & Mng. Co.. 

Missouri 886 

Jay Hawkes Mng. Co., Utah 1357 

J. Bennett Smith Mng. Co., Minn. 865 
J. & C. Mining Co.. Arkansas.... 411 
Jeannette Copper Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Utah. 1357 

Tefferson Gold & Silver Mng. Co.. 

Nevada 1054 

Jefferson Mng. Co., Oklahoma. .1283 
Je Person Montana Copper Mines 

Co., Montana 931 

Jemison Mines Co., Arizona 256 

Jennie Sample Cons. Mng. Co., 

Colorado 605 

Jerome Bisbee Copper Co., Ariz. . 376 
Jerome Central Mng. Co.. Ariz.. -377 
Jerome Congor Mng. Co., Ariz..- 377 
Jerome Copper Mng. Co.. Ariz. . . 377 
Jerome Daisy Copper Co., Ariz. 377 



Ixxvii 




PAGE 

Jemme Del Monte Cop. Co.. Ariz. 377 
Jerome Grande Copper Co,, An/. 378 
Jerome Xe\v York Copper Co., 

Arizona 378 

Jerome-Oatman Mng. Co., Ariz.. Ill 
Jerome-Pacific Kxt. Mng. i 

Arizona 378 

Jerome-Pacific Mug. Co.. Ariz... 378 
Jerome Portland Cop. Co., Ariz. . 378 
Jerome Prcscott Copper Co.. Ariz. 354 
Jeromc-St. Louis Copper Mng. 

Co., Arizona 379 

Jerome Superior Cop. Co., Ariz. 379 
Jerome Verde Copper Co., Ariz... 379 
Jerome- Victor Ext. Copper Co., 

Arizona 380 

Jerome-Wenden Copper Co., Ariz. 400 
Jerome Yeager Copper Co.. Ariz. 380 
jerry Johnson Gold Mng. Co.. 

Colorado 605 

Jersey Cons. Copper & Gold Mng. 

Co.". Nevada 1055 

Jersey Valley Mines Co., Nev....l055 
Jessie Belle M.. M. & Sin. Co.. 

California 453 

Jessie Mine, Colorado 540 

Jewel-Denero Mines, Ltd.. B. C...1560 
Jewel Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Ltd.. 

Montana 931 

Jewell Mines & Red. Co., Colo... 540 

Jib Mining Co., Montana 931 

libutil (Anantapur) Gold Mines 

Ltd. India 1841 

Jim Blaine Silver Syn.. Ltd., Ida. 708 
Jim Butler Tonopah Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1213 

Jim-Crow-Imperial Mines, (Utter, 

Gco. H.) 1262 

Jim's Divide Mining Co., Nev....ll45 

Joan Mining Co., Minn 865 

Joe Bowers Mining Co., Utah.... 1454 

Joe Creek Copper Co., Calif 453 

Joe Dandy Leas. Co., Colo 605 

Johannesburg Cons. Invest. Co., 

Ltd.. Transvaal 1937 

John Doyle Mng. & Mlg. Co.. 

Colorado 540 

John Hampshire Company, Ore... 1302 

Johnnie Mine. Nevada 1055 

Johnny Bull Mine. Xew Mexico.. 1247 
Johnson Copper Development Co., 

Arizona 173 

Johnson Mng. & Dev. Co.. Kan. 741 

Jolly Jane Leasing Co., Nev 1055 

Jones & Laughlin Ore Co.. Mich. 850 
Joplin-Kentucky Lead & Zinc Co.. 

Missouri 886 

Joplin Ore & Spelter Corp., Kan.. 741 



PAGE 



Joplin Separating Co.. Illinois.... 736 
Joplin Zinc Metals Corp., Mo.... 886 
Jose- Davis Mng. & Mlg. Co., Nev. 1055 
Fosevig-Kennecott Copper Co.. 

Alaska 149 

Jos Tin Area (Nigeria), Ltd., 

Nigeria 1922 

Joyce Mining Co., Nev 1055 

Jualin Alaska Mines Co.. Alaska. 149 
Juanita Mining Co., S. A., Sonora.1732 
Juanita Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz... 354 

Judge Mng. Sm. Co., Utah 1438 

Judson Mining Co.. Michigan 850 

Julia Cons. Mining Co.. Nev 1056 

Julia Mng. Co., Colo 621 

Julian Mining Co., Mo 886 

Julian Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah. .. .1395 
Juliet Iron Co. (Marqnette Iron 

Co.} 852 

Jumbo Copper Mountain Mng. 

Co., Nev ..1056 

Jumbo Ext. Mng. Co., Nevada. ... 1194 
Jumbo Junior Mng. Co., Nev... 1194 

Jumbo Mining Co., Idaho 709 

Jumbo Mining Co., New Mexico. 1248 
Jumper California!! Gold Mines 

Co.. California 453 

Junction North Broken Hill Mine. 

N. S. \V 1885 

June Bug Development Co., Inc., 

Nevada 1056 

June Bug Mine, Colorado 540 

June Lake Iron Co., Minn 865 

Juniata Gold & Copper Co. Ariz.. 400 

Juno-Echo Copper Co. Wash 1493 

Juno Mine Arizona 256 

Jupiter Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1146 

J upiter Lead Co., Wash 1 493 

Jupiter Mines, Ltd., Ont 1647 

lustice 'Gold Mining Co.. Nev.... 1056 
Justice Gold & Sil. Mng. Co.. Nev. 1056 

just Time Mining Co., Wash 1493 

I 

Kaibab Copper Co., Arizona... 190 
Kalgurli Gold Mines. Ltd., W. A.. 1909 
Kalispell-Troy Mng. Co.. Mont.. 932 

Kamloops Copper Co., B. C 1560 

Kamloops Mines, Ltd., B. C 1561 

Kampong Kamunting Tin Dredg.. 

Ltd., Malaya '. 1S34 

Kamunting Tin Dredg.. Ltd.. 

Malaya 1834 

Kanabauk (Burma) Wolfram 

Mines, Ltd.. India 1842 

Kankakee Mining Co.. Wash 1493 

Kanok Metals Co., Oklahoma. . 1283 

Kanoma Zinc Co., Kansas 742 

Kansas, Mines of 737 



Ixxviii 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Kansas City-Joplin Mng. Co., Mo. 886 
Kansas City-Nevada Cons. Mines 

Co., Nevada 1057 

Kansas Line Mining Co., Okla...l283 
Kansas Nevada Mining Co.. Nev.1057 
Kansouri Mining Co., Kansas.... 742 

Kapegi Leasing Co., Colo 540 

Kapi Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo 540 

Kara Burtm Mercury Syn., Ltd., 

Anatolia (Asia Minor) 1830 

Kate Hardy Mines Co., Calif 453 

Katinka Gold Mng. Co., Colo... 621 

Kattenhorn Mine, Nevada 1057 

Katy Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mo 886 

Kay Copper Co., Arizona 240 

Kay Mine Sm. Co., Virginia. . . 1471 
Keane Divide Mng. Co.. Nevada.. 1146 
Kearns-Keith Mining Co., Utah.. 1439 
Keating Gold Mining Co., Mont.. 932 

Keen Mine, Colorado 621 

Keeno Mining Co., Oklahoma. . 1283 
Kellogg Galena Mng. Co., Idaho.. 709 
Kellogg Sunnyside Mng. Co., Ida. 709 
Kellogg United Mines Co., Ida... 709 

Kelly Mining Corp., Calif 453 

Kelly Silver Mine, Calif 454 

Keltner Mining Co., Oklahoma. . 1283 
Kelvin-Sultana Copper Co., Ariz.. 308 
Kenai- Alaska Gold Co., Alaska.. 149 
Kendall Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll46 
Kenehec Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont.1622 

Kenefick Zinc Corp.. Mo 886 

Kennan Mining Co., Idaho 709 

Kennebec Cons. Mng. Co., Utah. 1395 

Kennebec Mining Co., Utah 1395 

Kennecott Copper Corp., Alaska. 149 
Kennedy Cons. Mng. Co., Nev. . . .1057 
Kennedy Gold M. & M. Co.. Colo. 540 
Kennedy Mng. & Mlg. Co., Calif. . 454 
Kenneth Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1146 

Keno M. & M. Co., Utah 1357 

Kensington Mining Co.. Alaska.. 154 
Kentex Mining Co.. Oklahoma. . . . 1283 
Kent Placer Gold Mng. Co., Idaho 656 
Kentuck Mng. Co. of Nevada. . .1058 
Kentucky - Douglas Mining Co., 

Utah * 1358 

Kenyon Copper Mines, Ltd., Ont.1603 
Kernick Divide Mng. Co.. Nevada.1146 

Kerr Lake Mines, Ltd., Ont 1622 

Kerr Lake Mining Co., Ont 1622 

Kerr Lake Mng. Co., Ltd., (Kerr 

Lake Mines, Ltd.,} 1623 

Kershaw Mining Co., S. C. ...:. .-1315 
Ketahoen. Mynibouw, Sumatra. .. 1832 
Kewanas Ext. Mng. Co.. Xev....ll94 
Kewanas Mining Co., Nevada. ... 1194 



PAGE 

Keweenuw Copper Co., Mich 796 

Keweenaw Land Assoc., Ltd., 

Michigan 798 

Keystone Chrome Mng. Co., Nev. 1058 
Keystone Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz.. 256 
Keystone Cons. M. & M. Co., 

Colorado 541 

Keystone Copper Mng. Co., Arix.. 173 
Keystone Development Co., Ariz. 308 
Keystone Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1146 
Keystone Ext. Mng. Co.. Utah... 1413 
Keystone Mines Corp., Idaho.... 709 

Keystone Mining Co., Calif 454 

Keystone Mining Co., Jalisco. .. .1703 

Keystone Mining Co., P. 1 1869 

Keystone Mining Co., Utah 1439 

Kickapah Divide Mines Co., Nev.1147 
Kill Buck Mng. Co., Ltd.. Idaho. 709 

Kimball Mng. Co.. Wyo 1523 

Kimberly Cons Mines Co., Nev.. 1058 
Kimberly Shipper Mng. Co., Nev.1058 

King Bee Mining Co.. Okla 1283 

King-Brand Mining Co., Kansas- 
Oklahoma 742-1283 

King Copper Co., Arizona-New 

Mexico 174 

King Copper Mining Co., Utah... 1358 

King David Co., Idaho 656 

Kins David Mining Co.. Utah. ... 1358 
Kingdon Mng., Sm. & Mfg. Co., 

Ltd.. Ontario 1603 

King Edward Mine. Ont 1603 

King Edward Mines. Ltd. B. C.. .1561 
King of the Hills Mine, Utah.... 1358 
King Island Scheelite Co., Tas- 
mania 1896 

Kingman Zinc Mining Co. Ariz.. 256 

King Mining Co. Wash 1493 

King & Queen Copper Co., N. M..1248 
King & Queen Mining Co., Mont. 932 
King Solomon Copper Mng. Co., 

Ltd.. British Columbia 1561 

King Solomon Mine, Calif 455 

King Solomon Mng. Co., Montana 932 
King Solomon Tunnel & Dev. Co., 

Colorado 541 

Kings Quicksilver Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Calif 455 

King William Mining Co., Utah.. 1454 
Kinsley Development Co., Nev... 1058 
Kinta Tin Mines, Ltd., Malaya. . .1835 
Kirchen Mines Corp., Nevada. ... 1058 

Kirkham Group. Idaho .. 657 

Kirkland Lake Explor., Ltd., Ont.. 1637 
Kirkland Lake Gold Mng. Co.. 

Ltd., Ontario .... .-. .1637 

Kirkland Lake Proprietary, Ltd., 
Ontario -1637 



Ixxix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Kirkland-Porphyry Gold Mines, 

Ltd., Ontario 1638 

Kirk Mine. Nevada 1058 

Kirkwood Mining- Co.. Missouri. 886 

Kishman Leas. Co., Colo 541 

Kitchigami Gold Dcv. Co., Ont...l638 
Kitsalis Mountain Cop. Co., B. C.1562 
Kittie Lane Gold Mng. Co. (The), 

Colorado 605 

Kittimac Mines Co., Colorado.... 541 

Kitty Mng. & Mlg. Co., Okla 1283 

K. & K. Mng. Co., Colo 541 

Klamath Mng. & Mlg. Co., Nev. . .1059 

Klar Piquette Mng. Co., Wis 1514 

Kleinsorge Mine. California 455 

Klondike Imperial Divide Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1 147 

Klondyke Divide Mng. Co.. Nev.. 1147 
Klondyke-Portland Mines Co., 

Nevada 1 147 

Klondyke Standard Divide Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1147 

Knight Investment Co., Utah 1455 

Knights Deep, Ltd.. Transvaal. ... 1937 
Knights Island Alaska Copper Co., 

Alaska 155 

Knob Hill Mining Co., Wash 1493 

Knox Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1147 

Kobold Mine, Colo 541 

Koehler Mine. Oregon 1304 

Komat Mng. Co., Colo 606 

Kootenay Belle Gold Mine, B. C. .1562 
Kootenay Bonanza Mines, Ltd., 

British. Columbia 1 562 

Kootenay Gold Explor. Co., B. C..1562 

Korea, Mines of 1863 

Korncob Mng. & Dev. Co., Ariz.. 308 

Kramat Pulai, Ltd.. Malaya 1835 

Kromona Mng. & Sm. Co.. Wash. 1494 

Krueger-Mills Mng. Co., Ark 411 

Knhara Mng. Co., Ltd., Japan. ... 1856 
Knhara Trading Co., Ltd., (Ku- 

hara Mng. Co., Ltd.} 1856 

Kusa Spelter Co., Idaho 657 

Kusa Spelter Co., Oklahoma 1283 

Kyshtim Corp., Ltd., Russia 1816 

La Anozira Gold Mng. Co., Ariz. 257 
La Belle Kirkland Mines, Ltd , 

Ontario 1638 

La Belle Mining Co. Arizona.... 400 
Lackawanna Mng. & Red. Co., 

Colorado 542 

Laclede Lead & Zinc Co., Okla. . . . 1283 

Laclede Mining Co., Idaho 709 

La Cobriza de Cobre. Sonora. . . .1733 
La Cobriza Mining Co., Sonora. .1733 
Ladd Mining Co., Kansas 742 



PAGE 

La Dura Mill & Mng. Co. (Do- 
lores Esperanto Cor/'.) 1678 

Ladysmith Cop.. Mng. Co. Mont. 933 
Ladysmith Smelting Co., Alaska. 155 
Ladysmith Sm. Corp., Ltd., B.C.. 1562 
Lady Washington Cons. Co., Nev.1059 
La Exposicion Mng. Co., Sonora.. 1733 
La Fe Mining Co., Ltd., Zacatecas.1749 
La Fleur Mount. Cop. Co., Wash.. 1494 
La Fortuna Mng. Co., Oaxaca. . . .1711 

La Grange Gold Co., Calif 455 

La Grange Mining Co., Calif 455 

Lahat Mines, Ltd., Malaya 1835 

Lahontan Mines Co., Nevada 1059 

La Jara Gold Mines Co., Tepic. . . .1748 

Lake Copper Co., Michigan 799 

Lake Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., N. S. 1592 
Lake Copper Proprietary Co., Ltd., 

Sweden 1829 

Lake George Dev. Co., Colo 542 

Lake Mlg., Sm. & Ref. Co., Mich.. 801 

Lake Mine, Colorado 542 

Lake Shore Mine, Arizona 308 

Lake Shore Mines, Ltd., Ontario. .1638 

Lake Shore Mining Co., Mich 802 

Lake Superior & Arizona Mng. & 

Smg. Co.. Arizona 508 

Lake Superior Dev. Co., Mich.... 802 
Lake Superior Iron & Chemical 

Co., Michigan 851 

Lake Superior Ophir M. Co., Colo. 542 
Lake Superior Sm. Co., Michigan. 802 
Lake Superior & Western Mng. 

Co., Arizona 355 

Lakeview Metals Co., Idaho 657 

Lakeview Mining Co., Utah 1358 

Lake View & Oroya Explor., Ltd., 

W. A 1909 

Lakina Copper Co., Idaho-Wash. . 657 
Lakina Kennecott Mng. Co., Alas.. 155 
Lakinaw Tagish & Moira Mines 

Co., Alaska 155 

La Leona Silver M. Co., Oaxaca. 1711 
Laloki (Papua) Copper Mines, 

Papua .1889 

La Luz Copper Co., New Mexico.. 1248 
La Luz & Los Angeles Mng. Co., 

Nicaragua 1756 

La Mina Mexico, Sonora 1733 

La Mine d'Or Huronia. Ltd., Ont.1603 
Lampazos Sil. Mines Co., Sonora.. 1733 

Lanark Mining Co.. B. C 1563 

Landlock Bay Copper Mng. Co., 

Alaska 155 

Langlaagte Estate & Gold Mng. 

Co., Ltd., Transvaal 1937 

I.anita Mining Co., Sonora 1733 

La Nora Mining Co., Mo 887 



Ixxoc 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Lanski Mine, Ga 632 

Lanyon Starr Smelting Co., Okla.,1283 
Lanyon Zinc & Acid Co., R. H., 111. 736 
La Plaisance M. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 542 

La Regina Mining Co., Jalisco 1703 

La Reina Union Mng. & Red. Co., 

Sonora 1733 

La Rose Cons. Mines Co., Ont 1623 

La Rose Mines, Ltd., Ont 1624 

Larsh Lead & Zinc Co., Okla 1284 

La Sal Copper-Silver M. Co., Colo. 542 

La Salle Copper Co., Michigan 798 

La Salle Mining Co., Oklahoma. . .1284 
Las Animas Peak Gold Mines Co., 

New Mexico 1248 

Lasqueti Island M. Co., Ltd., B. C.1563 
Last Chance Cop. Mng. Co., Mont. 933 

Last Chance Mine, Oregon 1305 

Last Chance Mining Co., Utah.... 1395 
Last Collar Gold Mng. Co., Colo.. 606 
Las Vegas Gold- Silver Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1059 

Las Vigas Mining Co., Chihuahua. 1679 
Latah Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida. 657 
Latest Out Mng. & Sm. Co., Ida. . 657 
La Toska Mining Co., Nevada. . .1059 
Latouche Copper Mng. Co., Alas.. 156 
Latouche Island Copper Mng. Co., 

Ltd.. Alaska 156 

Laughlin Mining Co., Sonora 1733 

La LInion Cons. Cop. Co., Sonora. 1733 
Laura Lee Mng. cS: Leas. Co., Colo. 542 

Laura Mines, Ltd.. Manitoba 1589 

Laurel Group, S. D 1324 

Laurier Mining Co., Wash 1494 

Laurium Mining Co., Mich 802 

Lavell Gold Mining Co., Ariz 195 

La Vore Gold Mines Co., Utah. . . .1359 

Lawler; Estate of John, Ariz 355 

Lawrence Mines Co., Wis 1514 

Lawrence Mining Co., N. Mex....l248 
Lawrence Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wash. 1494 
Lawrence Mng." & Mlg. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 658 

Lawson Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1624 

Lawyers Mining Co., Kansas 742 

Layman Syndicate, Arizona 331 

Lazy Boy Gold Mines Co., Ariz . . . 272 

L. C. H.' Corporation, Okla 1284 

Lead Boy Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1284 

Lead King Mng. Co.. Idaho 658 

Lead King Mng. & Mlg. Co., Nev.1059 

Lead Trust Mine, Wash 1495 

Leadville Arizona Mines Co., Ariz. 400 
Leadville Basin Mines Co., Colo.. 621 
Leadville Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll47 

Leadville Mines Co., Nevada 1059 

Leadville Mining Co., Arizona.... 174 



PAGE 
Leadville & Mosquito Range M. 

M. Co., Colo 542 

Lead & Zinc Co., Wash 1495 

Lecora Copper Co., Arizona 212 

Lee Mountain Mine, Mont 933 

Leesburg Gold Dust M. Co., Ida.. 658 
Leesburg Mng. & Power Co., Ida.. 658 

Leetonia Mining Co., Minn 865 

Legal Tender Mng. Co., Mont 933 

Lehi-Tintic Mining Co., Utah 1455 

Leighton-Wyoming M. .Co., Wyo..l523 

Leland Mng. & Dev. Co., Colo 606 

Lemhi Gold Mining Co., Idaho 658 

Lenabee Mining Co., Kansas 742 

Lena Goldfields, Ltd., Siberia 1874 

Lenk Pat Mng. Co., Arkansas 411 

Lennan Zinc & Lead Co., Okla 1284 

Lenskoie Company, Siberia 1875 

Leo Mining Co., B. C 1564 

Leonard Copper Co., Arizona 174 

Leonora Mining Co., Okla 1284 

Leonora Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.. 1359 

Le Roi, No. 2, Ltd., B. C 1563 

Le Roy Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll48 
Leroy Gold & Cop. M. Co., Mont.. 933 

Leslie Copper Co., Idaho 710 

i eszynsky Copper Mine, Arizona. 235 
Levant Tin Mines, Ltd., England. . 1806 
Leviathan Copper Mine, Calif.... 455 
Leviathan Gold Mng. Co., Mont... 933 

Leviathan Mines Co., Arizona 257 

Lewis & Clark Mng. Co.. Idaho... 710 
Lewis & Clark M. & M. Co., Ore.. 1304 

Lewis Mine Co., Colo 542 

Lewis Mng. & Leas. Co., Colo 542 

Lewis Mountain Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 543 

Lexington-Arizona Mg. Co., Ariz.. 272 
Lexington Gold Mng. Corp., Colo. 606 

Libertad, La Mina, Colombia 1788 

Liberty Bell Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1148 
Liberty Bell Gold Mng. Co., Colo.. 543 

Liberty Bell Group, Idaho 658 

Liberty Copper Co., Mont 934 

Liberty Copper Mines, Ariz 355 

Liberty Copper Mng. Co., Wash.. 1495 

Liberty Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1148 

Liberty Gold Mines Co., Nev 1059 

Liberty Group, Nevada 1060 

Liberty Lead & Zinc Co., Arkan.. 412 
Liberty Leas. & Mill. Co., Colo... 543 

Liberty Metals Co., Mont 934 

Liberty Mining Co., Minnesota... 866 

Liberty Mining Co., Mont 934 

Liberty Mng. & Red. Co., Colo 543 

Liberty-Montana Mines Co., Mont. 934 

Liberty Pyrites Co., Ga 632 

Liberty Silver Mines Co., Ariz.... 290 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Libiola Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Italy 1810 

Liuhtrninu Creek ( iold (iravels & 

Drain Co.. Ltd., B. C 1564 

Light foot O. & M. Co., Okla 1284 

Lightncr Gold Mng. Co., Calif 456 

Lilian Mine. Colo 621 

Lilly Mine-. Utah 1455 

Lincoln Consolidated, Calif 456 

Lincoln Divide Mng. Co.. Nev 1148 

Lincoln Gold & Cop. Mng. Co., Ga. 632 
Lincoln Group Mines Co., Colo... 544 
Lincoln Hill M. & Mlg. Co., Nev.. 1060 

Lincoln Mines Co., Oregon 1304 

Lincoln Mines & Red. Co., Colo.. 606 
Lincoln ville Lead Zinc Co., Okla.1284 

Linden Group, Arizona 355 

Linfor Copper Co.. Idaho 710 

Lion Hill Cons. Mines Co., Utah.. 1455 

Lion Mining Co., Oklahoma 1284 

Listen Lake Gold Mng. Co., Ore.. 1305 
Listen Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho... 710 
Little Ajo Copper Mng. Co., Ariz. 290 
Little Bell Cons. Mng. Co., Utah.. 1439 

Little Bill Mng. Co., Mo 887 

Little Billy Operating Co., B.C... 1565 
Little Bobbie Mining Co., Ariz... 319 
Little Bully Hill Mng. & Sm. Co., 

California 456 

Little Cove Mng. Co., Wash 1495 

Little Egypt Cop. Mng. Co., Ariz. 356 

Little Four Leas. Co., Colo 544 

Little Giant Gold M. & M. Co., 

Colorado 544 

Little Giant Mine, Ariz 400 

Little Goldie Mine, Mont.., 935 

Little Hatchet M. Co., N. Mex...l249 
Little Jewel Mining Co., Okla.. 1284 

Little Johnnie Mine, Arizona 356 

Little Kingdom Mng. Co., Colo... 544 

Little Martha Corp., Mo 887 

Little Mary Mining Co., Mo 887 

Little May Mining Co., Utah 1455 

Little Montana Mng. Co., Colo 544 

Little Nellie Mng. Co., Calif 456 

Little North Fork Copper M. & 

M. Co., Ltd., Idaho 658 

Little Platte Mining Co., Wis 1514 

Little Valley Mng. Co., Utah 1359 

Liverpool Silver Mines Co., Mont. 935 
Llallagua Tin Co., Chile & Bolivia.1766 
Lluvia del Oro M. Co., Chihuahua.1679 

L. & N. Group, Arizona 240 

Locey-Pabst Gold Mines Co., Ariz. 356 

Logan & Co., W. & H., Okla 1284 

Logan Metal Co., Colo 544 

Log Cabin Mining Co.. Mo 887 

Logger Mining Co., Utah 1396 



PAGE 

Logos Mines Co., Arizona 356 

Loma Copper Co., Arizona 356 

Loma Prieta Mines Co., Ariz.... 356 

Loma Verde Mine, Arizona 356 

Lomhardy Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Ida.. 711 
London-Arizona Cons. Copper Co., 

Arizona 196 

London-Arizona Copper Co., Ariz.. 196 

London & Cape Co., Alaska 156 

London Mines & Mlg. Co., Colo. . 544 
Lone Elm Dev. & Mng. Co., Mo... 887 
Lonely Reef Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Rhodesia 1928 

Lone Mountain Divide Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1148 

Lone Mountain Mng. Co., Xev 1060 

Lone Mountain Silver Mines Co., 

N. Mexico 1249 

Lone-Pine Surprise Cons. Mng. Co., 

Washington 1495 

Lone Star Cons. Cop. Co., Ariz... 231 
Lone Star Cons. Mng. Co., Nev... 1194 
Lone Star Copper Mng. Co., Wash.1496 
Lone Star Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.1284 
Longacre-Chapman Mng. Co., Mo. 887 
Longfellow Extension Cop. Mng. 

Co., Arizona 235 

Longfellow Gold M. & M. Co., 

Xevada 1060 

Longyear, E. J. & Co., Minn 866 

Longyear-Michigan Explor. Co., 

Michigan 802 

Lookout Copper Co., Ariz 356 

Lookout Divide Mng. Corp., Nev. 1148 
Lookout Mountain M. & M. Co., 

Idaho 711 

Loon Brook Mng. Co., Ltd., N. S.1592 
Loon Lake Bluebird Copper Co., 

Washington 1496 

Loon Lake Copper Co., Wash 1496 

Lorane Mng. & Royalty Co., Okla.1284 
Loretto Copper Mng. Co., Calif.. 456 

Loretto Iron Co., Michigan 851 

Lorimer Minerals Co., Wyo 1523 

Loring Nevada Mines Co., Nev... 1060 
Loring Treasure Hill Mines Co., 

Xevada 1060 

Lome Mine, B. C 1565 

Lorrain Cons. Mng. Co., Ont 1624 

Los Angeles Gem Co., Ariz 257 

Los Cerros Copper Co., Cuba 1760 

Los Conquistadores Mining Co., 

Arizona 174 

Los Platanos Mng. Co., Sinaloa. . .1714 
Lost Cabin Mining Co., Idaho.... 711 

Lost Cabin Mining Co., Wyo 1524 

Lost Packer Mining Co., Idaho.., 659 
Lost Packer Mng. & Sm. Co., Ida.. 659 



Ixxxii 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 
Lost Ranch & Tunnelsite Mine, 

Montana 935 

Lost Trail Mine. Oklahoma 1284 

Lost Treasure Mining Co., Ariz.. 273 
Louis Creek Placer Gold M, & D. 

Co., B. C 1565 

Louis d'Or Gold Mining Co., Ariz. 212 
Louis d'Or M. & M. Co., Ariz.... 212 

Louise Mining Co., Sonora 1734 

Louise Mining Co., Utah 1396 

Louisiana - Arizona Copper Mng. 

Co., Arizona 174 

Louisiana-Colorado M. Co., Colo.. 545 
Louisiana Cons. Mng. Co., Nev...l060 

Louisiana Develop. Co., Calif 456 

Lovelock Willard Mines Co., Nev.1061 

Lowell Gold Mng. Co., Ariz 290 

Lower Bisichi( Nigeria) Tin Mines, 

Ltd., Nigeria 1922 

Lower California Metals Co., Ariz. 331 

Lower Level Mng. Co., Mo 887 

Lower Mammoth Mng. Co., Utah. 1455 
Lowland Tunnel Water & Trans. 

Co., Utah 1359 

Lowney Manganese Assn., Nev..l061 

Lucia Mining Co., Durango '1688 

Lucile Gold & Copper M. Co., Cal.. 456 

Lucin Copper Co., Utah 1359. 

Lucky Bart Group, Oregon 1305 

Lucky Bell Mining Co., Mo 887 

Lucky Bell Mining Co., Okla 1284 

Lucky Boy Cons. Mng. Co., Nev..l061 
Lucky Boy Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll48 
Lucky Boy Gold Mng. Co., Idaho.. 659 

Lucky Boy Mng. Co., Colo 545 

Lucky Boy Mng. & Cone. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 660 

Lucky Boy Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 273 
Lucky 3oy Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.1360 
Lucky Calumet Copper Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Idaho 711 

Lucky Deposit Mng. Co., Nev 1062 

Lucky Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1149 

Lucky Dozen L. & Zinc Co., Okla. 1285 

Lucky Five Mining Co., Wis 1514 

Lucky Four Mining Co., Idaho. ... 711 
Lucky Friday Mining Co., Idaho.. 712 

Lucky Girl Mines Co. of Colo 545 

Lucky Girl Mining Co., Kansas... 742 

Lucky Group, New Mexico 1249 

Lucky Jack Mining Co., Kansas. . 742 

Lucky Jem Mng. Co., Okla 1285 

Lucky Jenny Mining Co., Kansas.. 742 
Lucky Jew Lead & Zinc Co., Kan. 742 
Lucky Jim Mining Co., Kansas... 743 
Lucky Jim Zinc Mines, Ltd., B.C. 1565 

Lucky Joe Mining Co., Okla 1285 

Lucky Kid Mining Co., Okla 1285 



PAGE 

Lucky Mining Co., Missouri 887 

Lucky O. K. Mining Co., Kansas.. 743 
Lucky Pat Mining Co., Kansas. . . . 743 

Lucky Sam Mining Co., Ariz 273 

Lucky Seven Gold Mng. Co., Ariz. 273 

Lucky Six Mining Co., Wis 1514 

Lucky Star Copper M. Co., Utah.1360 
Lucky Star Mug. Co. (Marquette 

Iron Co.).... 852 

Lucky Stone Mining Co., Idaho... 712 
Lucky Strike L. & Z. Co., Okla.1285 

Lucky Strike Mine, Alaska 156 

Lucky Strike Mng. C6., Ariz 357 

Lucky Swede Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Idaho 712 

Lucky Syndicate Co., Okla 1285 

Lucky Tiger Combination Gold 

Mng. Co., Sonora 1734 

Lucky Tiger Mining Co., Mo 887 

Lucky Twelve Mining Co., W r is...l514 

Luema Mng. Co., Colo 622 

Lukens-Hazel Mng. Co., Mont.... 936 

Lump Gulch Mng. Co., Mont 936 

Lump Gulch Silver Mines Co., 

Montana 936 

Liming Cons. Silver Mines Co., 

Nevada 1062 

Luning Divide Mines Co., Nev.... 1149 

Liming Gold Mines Co., Nev 1062 

Luning-Idaho Mng. Co., Nev 1062 

Lupfer Mining Co.. Mont 936 

Lycoming Co., Minnesota 866 

Lynn Big Six Mng. Co., Nev 1062 

Lynn Creek Zinc Mines Co., B.C. 1566 
Lyon Copper Co., Arizona 35? 

Mabel Mng., Mlg. & Power Co., 

Alaska 156 

Mace Iron Mng. Co., Minnesota.. 866 
MacFarlane Divide M. Co., Nev. .1149 

Mackay Mining Co., Wis 1515 

MacNamara-Crescent M. Co., Nev. 1215 
MacNamara M. & Mlg. Co., Nev.. 1216 
Madden Scratch Gravel Mines Co., 

Montana 936 

Madera Enterprise Mines & Land 

Co., California 456 

Madera Gold Mng. Co., Calif 457 

Madizelle Mining Co., Ariz 357 

Mad Mule Mining Co., Calif 457 

Maggie Murphy Copper Co., Wis. .1524 
Magistral-Ameca Cop Co., Talisco.1704 
Magistral, S. A. ; Negociacion Min- 

era del, Zacatecas 1749 

Magma Chief Copper Co., Ariz. . . . 308 

Magma Copper Co., Arizona 309 

Magma Extension Copper M. Co., 

Arizona , . 310 



Ixxxiii 



TIH- MIMES HANDBOOK 



PACK 

Magma Queen Copper Co., Ari/... 310 
Magma Ray Copper Co., Ariz.... 311 
Magma-Superior Copper Co., Ari/. 311 
Magma Surprise Mining Co., Ariz. 311 
Magmatic Copper Co., Arizona. ... 311 

Magnate Copper Co., Arizona 290 

Magnet Silver M. Co., Tasmania. 1896 
Magnolia Lead & Zinc Co., Arkan. 412 

Mahatmah Mining Co.. Mo 888 

Malmomen Mug. Co., Minn 866 

Mahoning Ore & Steel Co., Minn. . 866 

Mahutska Mining Co., Okla 1285 

Maine, Mines of 745 

Maine-Standard Mining Co., Ida.. 712 
Main Range Mine (Tuoliiinnc 

Copper Mng. Co.) 1005 

Majestic Copper Co., Ariz 311 

Majestic Copper Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Utah 1360 

Majestic Mines Co., Utah 1360 

Majestic Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho.. 712 
Major Evans Mining Co., Utah... 1396 
Majuba Silver, Tin & Copper Co., 

Xevada 1063 

Malayan Tin Dredg., Ltd., Malaya.1836 

Malcona Mining Co., Mo 888 

Malmo Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.... 545 
Maloney-Blue Lead Copper M. & 

S. Co., S. D 1324 

Mammon Gold & Copper Co., Ariz. 400 

Mammoth Collins Mine, Ariz 311 

Mammoth Cons. Mng. Co., Calif.. 457 
Mammoth Cop. Mng. Co., Utah. .1361 
Mammoth Copper M. Co. of Maine, 

California 457 

Mammoth Development Co., Ariz. 311 
Mammoth Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll49 

Mammoth Gold Mng. Co., Ney 1063 

Mammoth Gold, Silver & Platinum 

Mines, Colombia 1788 

Mammoth Mining Co., Mont 936 

Mammoth Mining Co., Utah 1455 

Mammoth Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. M.1249 
Mammoth Molybdenite Co., Ltd., 

X. S. W 1885 

Mammoth No. 2 Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1456 

Mandarin Mines Corp., Idaho 660 

Mandy Mining Co., Manitoba 1589 

Manganese Association, Inc., Nev.1063 

Manganese Metals Co., Ore 1305 

Mangan Iron & Steel Co., Minn... 866 
Mangas Development Co., N. M...1249 
Manhattan Big Four M. Co., Nev.1063 
Manhattan Cons. Mines Devel. Co., 

Nevada 1064 

Manhattan Copper Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Nevada 1064 



PAGE 

Manhattan Development Co.. Ariz. 174 

Manhattan Dev. Co., Sonora 1735 

Manhattan Dexter Mng. Co., Xev.1064 
Manhattan Explor. Co., Sonora. .. 1735 
Manhattan Morning Glory Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1064 

Manhattan Mustang M. Co., Nev.1064 
Manhattan Red Top Mining ' 

Reorg., Xevada 1064 

Manhattan Sunrise Mng. Co., Nev.1064 
Manhattan Union Amal. Mines 

Syn., Xevada. 1065 

Manifest Copper & Sil. Co., Ariz.. 311 
Manila Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wish. ...1495 

Manitoba, Mines of 1586 

Manitou Hill Copper Co., Ariz.... 312 
Mansfeld Copperschist Mng. Co., 

Germany 1802 

Mansfield Mng. & Dev. Co., Mo.. 888 
Mansfield Mng. & Sm. Co., Ariz.. 331 

Man to Aline, Sonora 1735 

Many Peaks Copper Mng. Co., 

Ltd.. Queensland 1890 

Manzanata Mine, California.... 457 
M.apes-Johnston Silver Mines Co., 

Ontario 1604 

Maple Leaf Mng. Co., B. C 1566 

Marguerita Mng. & Sm. Co., Ariz. 331 

Maria Mining Co., Sonora 1735 

Maricopa Mines Co., Ariz.-Xev.240-1065 

Marie Mng. Co., Colo 545 

Marinette M. & M. Co., Nev. . 1065-1149 
Marinette Nevada Mng. Co., Nev. 1065 
Marion Mines & Mills Co., Colo.. 546 
Mariposa Commercial & Mng. Co., 

California 457 

Mariposa Mining Co., Texas 1339 

Marjory Stewart Mng. Co., Kan.. 743 
Markstein-Dorn Mng. Go., Ga.... 632 

Mark Twain Mine, Arizona 358 

Marmatite Mng. & Leas. Co., Colo. 546 
Marne Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1149 

Marquette Iron Co., Michigan 851 

Mars Consolidated Co., Arizona. .. 241 
Marshall & Russell Gold M. M. & 

T. Co., Colo 546 

Marsh Mines Cons., Idaho 712 

Martin Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., Que.1655 
Martin Gold & Sil. M. Co., Utah. 1439 
Martin Mng. & Power Co., Colo. . , 546 
Maryana Mng. & Leas. Co., Colo.. 607 

Mary Ann Mining Co., Okla 1285 

Mary Charlotte Mng. Co. (Mar- 

quette Iron Co.} 852 

Mary Ellen Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.1396 

Maryland, Mines of 746 

Maryland Chrome Corp., Md .746 

Maryland Mines & Red. Co., Colo. 546 



Ixxxiv 




INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



Mary McKinney Mng. Co., Colo.. 606 
Mary Murphy Gold M. Co., Colo. 547 
Mary Xevin Gold Mng. Co., Colo. 607 
Marysville Dredging Co., Calif.... 457 
Marysville Gold Mng. Co., Mont.. 937 

Mascota Copper Co., Jalisco 1704 

Mascot Copper Co., Arizona 175 

Mascot Mining Co., Arizona 175 

Mascot Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho. . . 660 
Mascot Silver Mining Co., Nev. .. .1065 

Mason & Barry. Ltd., Portugal 1815 

Mason Valley-Bluestone Ext., 

Mines. Nevada 1065 

Mason Valley Ext. Mng. Co., Xev.1066 
Mason Valley Mines Co., Nevada. .1066 
Mason-Yerrington Mines Co., Xev.1067 

Massachusetts, Mines of 747 

Mass. Consolidated M. Co., Mich. 803 
Massey Station M. Co., Ltd., Ont.1604 

Master Key Mng. Co., Colo 548 

Master Key Mining Co., Utah.... 1361 

Mastodon Mining Co., B. C 1566 

Matachewan Gold Mines Co., Ont.1604 

Matahambre Mines, Cuba 1761 

Mataquescuintla Mng. Co., Guate- 
mala 1753 

Matchless Mng. & Leas. Co., Colo. 622 
Matehuala Sm., San Luis Potosi.,1712 
Marheson Lead Co., New York. . . .1265 
Matliison Lead Co. (National Lead 

Co.] ..: 96 

Matrix Mines Co., Colo 548 

Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Co., 

Illinois 736 

Mattie B. Mining Co.. Colo 548 

Mattie May Mng. Co., Arkansas. 412 
Matt Perry Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 291 

Maurice Mining Co., Okla 1285 

Maurine Mining Co., Okla 1285 

Maverick Copper Co., Arizona.. 312 

Mavis Mine, Arizona 401 

Mau'chi Mines, Ltd., India (Bur- 
ma} 1842 

Max Mining Co.. Tenn 1331 

Maxfield Mine, Utah 1396 

Maxine Mining Co.. Oklahoma. .. 1285 
May Day Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.1456 
Mayer Ore Purchasing Co., Ariz.. 358 

Mayer Smelter Corp., Ariz 358 

Mayflower Bullfrog Mng. Cc.. 

Nevada 1195 

Mayflower Leas. Co., Colo 548 

Mayflower Mine. Alaska 156 

Mayflower Mining Co., Mich 805 

Mayflower Mng. & Dev. Co.. Ida. . 714 
Mayflower-Old Colony Cop. Co., 

Michigan 805 

May Mining Co., Arizona 358 



PACK PAGE 

May Queen Leas. Co. Colo 622 

Mazapil Copper Co. Ltd., Zaca- 

tecas 1749 

Mazatzal Mining Co., Ariz 197 

McAlpine Mines Co., Calif 458 

McBride Mining Co., Mo 888 

McCarthy-Hidden Treasury Mng. 

Corp., Colorado 548 

McConnell Mines Co., Nevada. ... 1068 
McCoy West Divide Silver Mines 

Co., Nevada 1149 

McCracken Silver-Lead Mines Co., 

Arizona 257 

McCurdy Bros. Mng. Co.. Okla... 1285 
McCurry Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ark. 412 
McDonald-Ely Copper Co., Nev.. 1175 
McGuire Kirkland Gold Mines, 

Ltd., Ontario 1604 

Mclntyre Ext. Mines, Ltd., Ont...l647 
Mclntyre-Jupiter Mines, Ltd., Ont.1647 

McTntyre Mng. Co., Colo 548 

Mclntyre-Porcupine Mines. Ltd.. 

Ontario 1648 

McKinley-Darragh-Savage Mines, 

Ltd., Ontario 1625 

McKinley Gold Mines Co., Idaho. 660 

McKinley Mines, Ltd., B. C 1566 

McKinley Mng. & Dev. Co., Ariz. . 359 

McKinley Placers, Alaska 156 

McKinney Steel Co., Mich.-Minn.. 852 

McMahan Group, Arizona 359 

McMillan Zinc Co., Wis 1514 

McMillen - Stonewall Mng. Co. 

Arizona 197 

M. & D. Mining Co. Nevada 1068 

Meadow Mining Co., Mich 806 

Mecca Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1149 

Media Mining Co., Missouri 888 

Medical Mining Co., Oklahoma. . .1286 
Melcher Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho. . 661 

Melczer Mining Co., Sonora 1735 

Melones Mining Co., Calif 458 

Melrose Mining Co., Okla 1286 

Melrose Mining Co., Wash 1497 

Melvina Mine. Colorado 549 

Memphis & Idaho Springs Gold M. 

& M. Co.. Colorado 549 

Memphis Mining Co., N Mexico. 1249 
Memphis Red River Mng. Co., N. 

Mexico 1249 

Mcndha-Nevada Mining Co.. Xev.1068 

Mendota Mining Co., Ariz 241 

Mercer Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont...l626 

Merchants Finance Co. Cal 459 

Mercury Mining Co. Nevada 1068 

Merger Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho.. 661 

Merrill Mining Co., Kansas 743 

Merrill Silver-Lead Co., Nevada. .1068 



bcxxy 



Tllli Ml .V/-.V HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Merrimac Aline. Ari/ona 257 

Merrimac Mining Co., Minnesota. 867 
Merritt Development Co., Minn.. 867 

Mesabi Iron Co., Minnesota 867 

Mesa Rica Gold Co., Sonora 1735 

Messaba-Cuyuna Iron Land Co., 

Minnesota 867 

Messina (Transvaal) Dev. Co., 

Ltd., Transvaal 1937 

Metaline Oriole Mng. Co., Wash.. 1497 
Metallurgical Co. of America, 

United States 93 

Metals Chemical, Ltd., Ontario. . . .1604 
Metals Exploration Co., Calif.... 458 
Metals Milling Co., Oklahoma. . .1286 
Metal States Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1361 

Metals Tunnel Co., Colo 549 

Metalurgicia y Refinadora del Pa- 

cifico, S. A., Compania (Pacific 

S. & R. Co.) 1739 

Methow Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Washington 1497 

Metta Mining Co. Idaho 661 

Mcxarko Mining Co. N. Mexico. .1250 
Mexican- American Sm. & Rcf. 

Co. S. A. (Pacific M. & S. Co.) .1739 
Mexican Corporation Ltd. (The), 

Mexico 1662 

Mexican Explor. & Mng. Co.. 

Sonora 1735 

Mexican Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1069 

Mexican Lead Co. (Mexicana; 

Compania Metalurgica) 1662 

Mexican Metals Co., Sonora 1735 

Mexican Milling Co.. Nevada. .. .1069 
Mexican Mineral Raihvay Co. 

(Mexicana; Compania Metalur- 

gica ) 1662 

Mexican Properties (Howe Sound 

Co.) 1558 

Mexican Sm. & Ref. Co.. Calif v . . 459 
Mexicana; Compania Metalurgica, 

Mexico 1661 

Mexicana Dessaralladora de Minas 

(Mexican Dev. & Mng. Co.). 

Sonora 1735 

Mexicana Mining Co., Jalisco. ... 1705 

Mexico, Mines of 1661 

Mexico-Coeur d'Alenes Mng. Co., 

Montana 937 

Mexico, D. F., Mines of 1705 

Mexico Mines of El Oro, Ltd., 

Mexico, D. F 1708 

Mexico Mng., Ref. & Explor. Co., 

Sonora 1 736 

Miami-Ada Mng. Co., Okla. ..... 1286 

Miami Cons. Mines Co.. Ariz... 213 



PAGE 

Miami Copper Co.. Ariz 214 

Miami Development Co., Ariz.... 218 

Miami Merger Co., Ariz 218 

Miami .Metals Co., Oklahoma. . . 1286 

Miami Mining Co., Okla 1286 

Miami Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz.... 218 
Miami Mother Lode Mng. Co., 

Arizona 218 

Miami National L. & Z. Co., Okla.1286 
Miami Needles Copper Co., Ariz.. 218 

Miami Royalty Co., Okla 1286 

Miami Smelter (International Sin. 

Co.) 89 

Miami Sunrise Mining Co.. Okla.. 1286 
Miami-Texas Mining Co.. Kansas. 743 
Miami Volunteer Mng Co.. Okla.1286 

Miami-Waco L. & Z. Co., Mo 888 

Miami Wonder Mng. Co., Okla.. 1286 

Miami Zinc & Lead Co., Okla 1286 

Miami Zinc Syndicate, Okla 1272 

Michigan, Mines of 747 

Michigan Copper Mines 748 

Michigan Iron Mines 846 

Michigan & Arizona Dev. Co., 

Arizona 291 

Michigan-Colorado Copper ( 

Colorado 549 

Michigan Copper Mng. Co., Mich. 806 
Michigan Gold Mng. Co.. Wash .. 1497 
Michigan Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Colo. 550 

Michigan Smelter Co.. Mich 808 

Michigan-Utah Cons. Mines Co., 

Utah 1396 

Michigan Verde Copper Co., Ariz. 380 

Michoacan, Mines of 1709 

Michoacan Railway & Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Michoacan ' 1709 

Mid-Colorado Mines Co., Colo.... 550 
Middle Golconda Mines Co.. Ariz. 257 
Middlemarch Copper Co., Ariz. . . . 175 

Middleton Mine, Inc.. Ariz 291 

Midget Cons. Gold Mnsr. Co., Colo. 607 
Midland Chief Mines Co., Colo... 550 
Midland Copper Co., Arizona.... 291 
Midland Divide Mng. Co., Nev.llSO 

Midland Mining Co., Wis .1515 

Mid-Nation Iron Prod. Co., Mo. 898 

Midnight Mining Co., Idaho 714 

Midway Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll50 
Midway Mng. & Mlg. Co. Ariz. .. 273 
Midway Summit Mng. & Mlg. Co.. 

Ltd.,' Idaho 714 

Mid-West Metal Mng. & Hold. 

Co., Colorado 550 

Mike Horse Mng Co.. Mont 937 

Mildred Gold Mng. Co.. Ariz.... 359 

Mile Wide Copper Co., Ariz 291 

Mil ford Copper Co. of Utah 1362 

Milford Magnolia Mines Co., Utah. 1362 



bcxxvi 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

.Military Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 662 

Millasier Mines Corp., Colo 607 

Mill City Tungsten Co., Nev....l069 
Millerette Silver Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1626 

Miller Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 622 

Miller Hill Mng. Co., Utah 1362 

Miller Independence Mines. Ltd., 

Ontario 1604 

Miller Lake O'Brien Mine, Ont...l626 

Miller Mines Dev. Co.. Utah 1397 

Miller Mng. & Sm Co., Utah. ... 1398 

Mill Gulch Mng. Co., Colo 550 

Milltown Ext. G. Mng. Co.. Nev.1195 
Mina Cop. Silver Mng. Co., Nev. 1069 
Min a Gold Mines Co., Nevada. . . . 1206 
Mina Gold Mng. Ext. Co., Nev...l207 
Minaker Kirkland Gold Mines. 

Ltd.. Ontario 1639 

Mina Mexico Mng. Co.. Sonora. .1736 
Mina Reward Gold & Silver Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1069 

Minas de Mexico, Compania de, 

Sonora 1736 

Mine La Motte Co., Missouri.... 898 
Mine Operators Co. of America, 

Arizona 197 

Minera Cons. Los Aztecas, S. A., 

Compania, Sonora 1736 

Mineral Bell Mng. Co.. Nev 1207 

Mineral Creek Dev. Co.. Alaska.. 156 
Mineral Dci\ Co. (Proprietary 

Mines Co. of America} 1694 

Minerales y Metales, Compania de, 

Mexico " 1664 

Mineral Farm Mining Co., Idaho. 714 
Mineral Flat Ext. Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Utah 1398 

Mineral Flat Mining Co., Utah... 1398 
Mineral Hill Cons. Copper Co., 

Arizona 292 

Mineral Hill Cons. Mines Co., 

Nevada 1069 

Mineral Hill Mng. Co., Now Mex.1250 

Mineral Lands Co., Utah 1413 

Mineral Mining Co.. Mich 854 

Mineral Mountain Mng. Co., Utah. 1362 
Mineral Point Zinc Co., Illinois- 
Wisconsin 736-1515 

Mineral Products Corp., Utah 1362 

Minerals Recovery Co., Colo 550 

Minerals Separation & De Bavay's 

Processes Australia Proprietary, 

Ltd., N. S. W 1885 

Minerals Separation, Ltd., 'Eng. .1807 



PAGE 
Minerals Separation N. A. Corp.. 

United States 93 

Mineral Zone Divide Mng. Co.. 

Nevada 1150 

Mineral Zone Mng. Co.. Idaho.... 662 
Minerva Tungsten Corp., Nev... 1070 
Mines Co. of America, Chihuahua, 

Sonora 1679-1736 

Mines de Chodien, Tonkin 1844 

Mines Development Co., Mont.... 937 
Mines Development Co. of Nev. . .1070 
Mines & Development Corp., Ariz. 175 
Mines Dev. & Leas. Co.. Idaho. . . . 662 
Mines Explor. Syndicate, U. S... 95 
Mines Holding & Operating Co.. 

New York 1265 

Mines Operating Co., 'Mont 997 

Mingus Mountain Cop. Co., Ltd., 

Arizona : 359 

Mining Corp. of Canada, B. C...1566 
Mining Corp. of Canada, Ltd., 

Ontario 1626 

Mining Dev. Co., Colorado 607 

Mining & Devel. Carp., U. S 95 

Minneapolis Copper Co.. 1737 

Minneapolis & Texada Copperite 

Co.. Ltd.. B. C 1567 

Minnehaha Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 551 
Minnesota-Connor Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Arizona 258 

Minnesota, Mines of 857 

Minnesota-Nevada Copper Mines 

Co., Nevada 1070 

Minnesota Nevada Inv. Co.. Nev.1071 
Minnie Moore Mines Co., Idaho. . 662 

Minong Copper Co., Mich 808 

Mint Mining Co., Oklahoma 1286 

Mio Mining Co., Oklahoma 1287 

Mirasol ; Compania Minera del. 

Chihuahua 1680 

Mississippi Queen Mng. Co.. Kan. 743 
Missoula Copper Mng. Co., Idaho. 714 

Missouri, Mines of 874 

Joplin District 874 

Southeastern Missouri 896 

Missouri Cobalt Co.. Missouri 898 

Missouri Copper Mountain Mng. 

Co., Missouri 

Missouri Lead & Zinc Co.. Mo 888 

Missouri Metals Corp., Mo 899 

Missouri Mine, Montana 937 

Missouri-Mohave Mng. Co., Ariz. 258 
Missouri Mule Mng. Co., Okla. . . .1287 
Missouri Zinc Mines Co.. Mo.... 888 
Mitsubishi Kogyo Kaishi; Ltd. 

(Mitsubishi Mng. Co., Ltd.}, 

Japan 1856 

Mitsui Mining Co.. Ltd., Japan... 1860 



Jxxxvii 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Mizpah Cons. Copper & Gold Mng. 

Co., Nev 1071 

Mi /pah Copper Mng Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 662 

Mi/pah Divide Mng. Co., Nov.... 1150 
Mi/pah Ext. Co. of Tonopah. Nov.1216 

M. K. & T. Mining Co.. Mo 889 

Mostczntna Copper Co., (Phelps 

Dodge Corp.) 107 

Modderfontein B Gold Mines, 

Ltd., Transvaal 1938 

Modderfontein Deep Levels, Ltd., 

Transvaal 1939 

Modoc Cons. Mines Co., Colo.... 608 

Modoc Mines Co., Calif 459 

Modoc Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.... 608 
Moffat Tunnel & Trans Co., Colo. 608 

Moffit Group, Montana 937 

Mngollon Mines Co.. N. Mex 1250 

Mogul Mng. Co., Nev.-N. C. 1071-1269 

Mogul Mining Co., Okla 1287 

Mogul Mining Co., S. D 1324 

Mohave Molybenum Co., Ariz... 258 
Mohave United Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

California 459 

Mohawk Central Mng. Co., Ariz.. 274 
Mohawk Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1150 
Mohawk Mining Co., Alaska.... 157 
Mohawk Mining Co., Michigan... 809 

Mohican Copper Co., Ariz 401 

Mojave Annex Tungsten Mng. Co.. 

California 459 

Mojave Tungsten Co., Calif 460 

Mojave Tungsten Co., Colo 551 

Moline & Arizona Copper Co., Ariz 218 
Mollie Groves M. & M. Co., Colo. 551 

Molly B. Mng. Co., Colo 551 

Molly Gibson-Chloride Min^s Co., 

Arizona 258 

Molly Gibson Mining Co., B. C. ..1567 
Mololoa Mining Co., Ltd., Jalisco. 1705 
Molybdenum Mining Co., Ariz... 292 
Molybdenum Mng. & Red. Co.. 

Ltd., British Columbia 1567 

Molybdenum Products Co., Ariz. . 293 
Molybdenum Products Co., Colo.. 551 
Molybdenum Products, Ltd.. Qnt..l605 
Monarch Cons. Mines Co., Utah . . 1363 
Monarch Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1150 

Monarch Mines Co., Utah 1398 

Monarch Mng. & Pow. Co., Mont. 937 
Monarch Mng. & Sm. Co.. Ariz.. 241 
Monarch Pittsburg Mng. Co.. Nev.1217 

Monaton Mining Co.. N. C 1269 

Mond Nickel Co., Ltd., Ontario. . .1605 

Monetaire Mining Co.. Utah 1398 

Monitor-Belmont Mining Co., Nev.1071 
Monitor Cons. Copper Mng. Co., 

Idaho . 662 



PAGE 

Monitor Silver, Lead & Zinc M. 

cX: M. Co., N. Mex 1250 

Monitor Tunnel Co., Montana... 938 

Monjaras Co., Nayarit 1710 

Monmouth Zinc Mng. Co.. \Yis...l515 
Mono Development Co., Utah.... 1456 

Monon Mng. Co., Colo 551 

Monroe Copper Mine, Ariz 359 

Monster Chief Mng. Co., Arizona. 381 
Montague Goldfields, Ltd., N. S..1592 

Montana, Mines of 901 

Butte District 959 

Montana- Arizona Cop. Co., Ariz... 401 
Montana-Bingham Cons. Mng. Co , 

Utah 1413 

Montana-Clinton Cop. Co., Mont.. 938 
Montana Cons. Copper Co.. Mont. 938 
Montana Cop.-Silver Co.. Mont.. 938 
Montana Gold Hill Mng. Co., 

Montana 939 

Montana-Idaho Copper Co.. Idaho. 662 
Montana-Illinois Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 939 

Montana Manganese Co., Mont.. 939 
Montana Mines Co., Montana. . . . 939 
Montana Morning Mng. Co.. Mont 939 
Montana Orewav Mng. Co., Mont. 939 
Montana Radersburg Mng. Co., 

Montana 939 

Montana Scotch Bonnet C. & G. 

M. Co.. Mont 940 

Montana Silver-Lead Mng. Co.. 

Montana 940 

Montana So. Ry. (Boston & Mont. 

Dev. Co.) 913 

Montana States Mng. Corp., Mont. 940 
Montana-Tonopah Mng. Co., Nev.1217 
Montana United Mng. Co., Mont. 941 
Montana Yerington Copper Co., 

Nevada 1071 

Monte Cristo Gold Mines Co., 

Idaho 662 

Monte Cristo Mines Co., Nev 1071 

Monte Cristo Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 360 

Monte De Cobre Co., Ariz 360 

Monte Mayer Mines, Inc., Salva- 
dor 1759 

Monterey Mng.. Sm. & Ref. Co., 

S. A., Nuevo Leon .1710 

Monterey Sm. & Ref. Co., Nuevo 

Leon 1710 

Monte Rico Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. 

Mexico 1251 

Montezuma Cons. Sil. Mines Co., 

Co., Colorado 551 

Montczuma Lead Co. (Mexicans; 

Compania Metalwrgica) 1662 



Ixxxviii 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Montezuma Mines & Mills Co., 

Colorado 552 

Montezuma Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 360 
Montezuma Mng. & Red. Corp., 

California 460 

Montezuma Sil.-Lead Mines, Ltd., 

Colorado 552 

Montezuma Silver Mines " Corp.. 

Nevada 1072 

Montezuma & The Whizzers Mine, 

South Dakota 1324 

Montgomery-Shoshone Mines Co.. 

Nevada 1072 

Montoro Mining Co., Arizona.... 258 
Montreal Mining Co., Minnesota. 868 
Montreal Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1287 

Montreal Mining Co., Wis 1515 

Monzonite Silver & Copper Co., 

Utah 1363 

Moonlight Mining Co., Idaho.... 715 

Moore Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Colo 552 

Moose Mines, Colo 552 

Mo'renci Branch (Phe1f>s Dodge 

Corp.'} '.. 109 

Morgan Argentine -Mining Co.. 

Utah 1363 

Morgan Crescent Mng. Co.. Utah. 1363 
Morgan-Galena Mng. Co., Utah.. 1363 
Morning Glory Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada ....".... 1150 

Morning Glory Mine, Ariz 331 

Morning Glory Mine, Colo 552 

Morning Star Mine, California... 460 

Morning Star Mng. Co., Ark 412 

Morococha Mining Co., Peru.... 1797 
Morris Svndicate Mines. Nevada.. 1072 
Moscow Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Utah.. 1364 
Mosquito Gulch Silver Mines Co.. 

Colorado 552 

Moss Mines Co., Arizona 274 

Mother Lode Coalition Mines Co., 

Alaska 1 57 

Mother Lode Copper Mines G ., of 

of Alaska, Alaska 157 

Mother Lode Sheep Creek Mng. 

Co., British Columbia 1567 

Mountain Chief Mng. Co., B. C. . .1567 
Mountain Cons. Copper Co., S. A. 

Sonora 1737 

Mountain Cons. Mng. Co.. B. C...156P 
Mountain Cons. Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 197 

Mountain Copper Co.. Ltd., Calif. 461 
Mountain Driver & Calamity Jane 

Mines. Arizona 360 

Mountaineer Mines Cons.. Calif.. 463 
Mountain Flower Gold M., M. & 

P. Co., Colorado 553 



PAGE 
Mountain Gem Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Oregon 1305 

Mountain Girl Mng. Co., Idaho... 663 
Mountain King Mining Co., Calif. 462 
Mountain Monarch Gold Mng. Co., 

California 463 

Mountain Top Mng. Co., Colo.... 553 
Mountain View of Johnston 

Group. Mont 941 

Mount Andrew Iron & Copper Co., 

Alaska .' 157 

Mt. Bischoff Ext. Tin Mng. Co., 

Tasmania 1897 

Mt. Bischoff Tin Mng. Co., Tas- 
mania 1897 

Mt. Booralong Molybdenite Mines, 

N. S. W 1885 

Mt. Boppy Gold Mng. Co., N. 

S. W 1886 

Mt. Champion Mng. Co., Colo... 622 
Mount Cuthbert, N. L., Queens 

land 1890 

Mount Elliott, Ltd., Queensland. 1891 
Mount Gaines Mng. Co., Calif.. 460 
Mt. Kelso Mng. Co., Colorado... 553 
Mt. Lyell Consols Wallaroo Cop. 

Mines, N. L., S. A 1894 

Mount Lyell Mng. & Railway Co., 

Ltd., Tasmania 1898 

Mount Morgan Gold Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Queensland 1892 

Mount Nebo Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma 1287 

Mt. Read & Roseberry Mines, 

Ltd., Tasmania 1902 

Mount St. Helens Cons. Mng. 

Co., Washington 1497 

Mount Sicker & B. C. Dev. Co, 

Ltd., B. C 1568 

Mt. Thompson Gold M. & M. Co., 

Montana 941 

Mt. Tory Mining Co., Inc., Va. .1471 
Mt. Turnbull Copper Co., Ariz.. 312 
Mt. Vernon M. & M. Co.. Nev.. 1072 

Mowry Mining Co., Arizona 332 

Movie Gold-Copper M. & M. Co., 

Ltd., Idaho 663 

Mozambique Co. (Corn-pa nhia de 

Mocambique}, Port. E. Africa. 1924 

M. & T. Mining Co., Mo 887 

Mudersbach Mine, Ariz 401 

Mudsill Gold-Silver Mines Co., 

Colorado 553 

Mullan Mining Co., Idaho 715 

Mulock Mine, Michigan 811 

Multiplex Mng., Mlg. & Pow. Co., 

Ltd.. B. C. ..1568 



Ixxxix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PACK 

Multnomah Mng. Mlg., & Dev. 

( "o., Washington 1498 

Mutnmc Alining Co., Ariz 332 

Muncy Creek Mining Co., Nev.. 1072 
Mnngana Mng. Co., Ltd., Queens- 
land 1893 

Munro Iron Mining Co., Mich.... 854 
Mtirdock Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Ariz. 274 
Murray Hill Mining Co.. Idaho.. 715 
Murray - Mogridge Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario . 1606 

Muskogee Lead & Zinc Co.. Okla.1287 
Mutual Chem Co. of Canada, Ltd., 

Quebec 1656 

Mutual Co-Operative Mng. Co., 

Colorado 554 

Mutual Divide Mining Co.. Nev. 1150 
Mutual Iron Mining Co.. Minn.. 868 
Myra Divide Mining Co., Nevada. 1151 
Mysore G. Mng. Co.. Ltd.. India.1842 

Nabob Cons. Mng. Co., Idaho.. 716 

Nabob Mining Co., Idaho 716 

Nacozari Cons. Cop. Co.. Sonora.1737 

Xaildriver Mining Co., Utah 1439 

Naltagua : Societe des Mines de 

Cuivre de. Chile 1783 

Xamaqua Copper Co.. Ltd., Cape 

Colony 1917 

Nancy Hanks & Montana Mng. 

Co., Mont 941 

Nancy Lee Mining Co., Ariz.... 259 

Napoleon Mining Co., Calif 463 

Napoleon Mining Co.. Mo 889 

Xaraguta (Nigeria) Tin Mines, 

Ltd., Nigeria 1922 

Narragansett Copper Co., Ariz. . 293 

Nassau Copper Co., Calif 463 

Natick Copper Co.. Mich 811 

National Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz.. 293 
National Copper Co., N. Mex..l251 
National Copper Mines Co., Ida.. 663 
National Copper Mng. Co., Ltd.. 

Idaho . ., 716 

Xational Cop. Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Pennsylvania 1315 

Xational Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1151 
National Finance & Holding Co.. 

Colorado 554 

Xational Gold Mines. Calif 464 

Xational Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

New Mexico 1251 

National Lead Co., U. S 96 

National Lead Co. of Argentina.1763 
National Lead-Silver Co.. Wash. 1498 

National Leasing Co.. Nev 1072 

National Metallurgical Co.. San 

Luis Potosi ..1712 



PAGE 

National Mines Co., Nev 1073 

National Mines, Ltd., Ontario... . 1607 
National Mines & Smelter Co.. 

Durango 1688 

Xational Mining Co., Mich 811 

National Mining Co., Minn 868 

National Mng. Corp 1807 

Xational Mng. & Dev. Co., Idaho . 663 
National Nevada Mng. Co., Xev.1073 
National Radium Institute, Colo. 554 
National Radium Mines Co., Utah. 1364 
National Radium Products Co., 

Colorado 554 

National Smelting Co., Zacatecas.1749 
National Tin Corporation, S. D..1325 
National Treasure Mines Co., 

^Xevada 1073 

Xational Tungsten Co.. Arizona. 293 
National Tungsten & Silver Mng. 

Co., Mont 942 

National. Zinc Co., Tll.-Kans... 736-743 
Xational Zinc & Lead Co.. Mo... 889 
Xational Zinc Separating Co.. 

Wisconsin 1515 

Native Copper Co., Michigan.... 811 
Native Copper Mng. Co., Calif.. 464 
Xatomas Co., of California. Calif. 464 
X T aumkeag Copper Co.. Michigan. 811 
Navajo Mines Corp., of Ariz.... 401 
Navy Group M. & M. Co., Ariz... 274 

Nayarit, Mines of 1710 

Nazareno y Alicante, S. A. ; Com- 

pania Minera, Zacatecas 1750 

X T earby Mining Co., Mo 889 

Xebo Silver-Lead Mng. Co., Utah.1364 
Xebraska &Arizona Copper Co., 

Arizona 176 

Xechi Mines (Colombia), Ltd., 

Colombia 1789 

Xeck City Mining Co., Mo 889 

X'ederland-Beaver Tung. Mng. Co., 

Colorado 554 

Xeedles Mng. & Sm. Co., Ariz 259 

Xegaunee Mine, Michigan 854 

Xeihart Cons. Silver Mng. Co., 

Montana 942 

Xeil Mining Co., Kansas 743 

Xellie teloom Mining Co., Idaho. . 663 
Nellie Gold Mining Co., Arizona. 274 

Xellie Mining Co., Arizona 274 

Nellie Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho.... 717 

Xelson Mining Co., Arizona 360 

Xemo Mining Co., Kansas 743 

X en/eel Crown Point Mining Co., 

Nevada 1073-1200 

Xenzel Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... .1151 
Nueva Dinero Mining Co., Kan . . 743 
Xeva Mining Co.. Utah 1398 



xc 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Nevada, Mines of 1007 

Divide (or Gold Mountain) Dis.1122 

Ely District 1168 

Eureka District 1184 

Goldfield District 1187 

Rochester District 1 199 

Simon District 1204 

Tonopah District, Nye County.. 1211 
Nevada-Arizona Mines Co., Ariz. 275 
Nevada Austin Mines Co., Nev...l073 
Nevada Birch Creek M. Co., Nev..l073 
Nevada Black Hawk Silver Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1074 

Nevada Bonanza Copper Co., Nev.1074 
Nevada & Boston Copper Co., Nev.1074 
Nevada-Bullion Mines Co., Nev..l074 
Nevada Bunker Hill M. Co., Nev.1074 

Nevada-Butte Mng. Co., Nev 1075 

Nevada-Calumet Copper Co., Nev. 1075 
Nevada-Calumet Copper Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1075 

Nevada Calumet Mine, Nevada. .. 1075 
Nevada Central Copper Co., Nev. 1075 
Nevada Champion Cop. Co., Nev. .1076 
Nevada Cons. Copper Co., Nev.. 1175 
Nevada Cons. Mines & Selling Co., 

^ Nevada ^. . . 1076 

Nevada Co-Operative M. Co., Nev. 1076 

Nevada Copper Co., Nevada 1076 

Xevada Copper Hills M. Co., Nev.1076 
Nevada Copper Mng., Mlg. & Pow. 

Co., Nevada 1077 

Nevada Croesus Silver Mines Co., 

Nevada 1077 

Nevada Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1151 
Nevada-Douglas Cons. Copper Co., 

Nevada 1077 

Nevada Ext. Mng. Co., Nev 1151 

Nevada Gold Mines Co., Nev 1079 

Nevada Gold Mines Co., Ltd., Nev.1079 
Nevada Golden Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1151 

Nevada Hills Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1080 
Nevada Hills Mng. Co., N. Mex..l251 
Nevada Humboldt Tungsten Mines 

Co.. Nevada 1080 

Nevada Lead Mining Co., Nev... 1080 
Xevada Lincoln Mng. Co., Nev... 1080 
Nevada Loring Mines Co.. Nev... 1080 
Nevada Mining Co., Michigan.... 854 

Xevada New Mines Co., Nev 1081 

Nevada Ophir Mng. Co., Nev.... 1081 
Nevada Ore & Copper Co., Nev.. 1081 
Nevada Pacific Mines Co., Nev... 1081 
Nevada Packard Mines Co., Nev. 1200 
Xevada Progressive Gold Mining 

Co.. Inc.. Nevada 1081 

Nevada Queen Copper Co., Nev.. 1082 



PAGE 

Nevada Quincy Mining Co., Nev. 1082 
Nevada Rand Mines Co., Nev.... 1082 
Xevada Regent Mines Co., Nev.. 1082 

Xevada Scheelite Co., Nev 1082 

Nevada Silver Cons. Co., Inc., 

Xevada 1083 

Nevada Silver Cons. Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1083 

Xevada Silverfields Co., Nev 1083 

X^evada Silver Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Nevada 1083 

Xevada Silver Shield M. Co., Nev.1083 
Xevada Simon Mines Co., Nev... 1207 
Xevada Sm. & Mines Corp., Nev.1083 
Xevada Standard Cop. Co., Nev. .1084 
Xevada Stewart Mng. Co., Idaho. 718 
Nevada Superior Mines, Co., Nev. 1084 
Xevada Union Copper Mines Co. 

(The), Nevada 1085 

Xevada United Mines Co., Nev. ..1184 
Nevada United Mines L. Co., Nev.1184 
Nevada United Mng. Co., Nev... 1085 
Xevada-Utah Mines & Smelters 

Corp., Xevada 1085 

Xevada Volcano Alines Co.. Nev.. 1085 
Xevada Wilson Mng. Co., Nev... 1085 
Nevada Wonder Mng. Co., Nev... 1085 

Xevada Zinc Co., X T evada 1086 

Xever Sweat Mng. Co., Okla 1287 

Xevv Almaden Co., Inc., Calif.... 465 
New Arcadian Copper Co., Mich.. 812 
Xew Arizona Ray Cop. Co., Ariz.. 319 

New Baltic Copper Co., Mich 812 

Xcw Bonanza Comstock Mines 

Co., Xevada 1086 

New Brunswick, Mines of 1913 

Xewbury Mng. Co., Arizona. ..... 312 

New Caledonia, Mines of 1591 

Xew California & Tonopah Mng. 

Co.. Nevada 1217 

Xevv Callao Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Venezuela 1801 

New Canadian Metal Co., B. C 1568 

Xew Chicago Mine. Oklahoma 1287 

Xew Chuquitambo Gold Mines, 

Ltd., Peru 1797 

Xew Comstock Mining Co., Ariz.. 259 
Xew Copper Silver Co., Montana. 942 
Xew Cornelia Copper Co., Ariz.. 293 
Xew Crystal Mng. Co., Wash.... 1498 
Xew Currency Mng. Co., Wash... 1499 
New Dominion Copper Co., Ariz.. 219 
X T ew Dominion Copper Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1568 

New Dominion Mines Co., Ariz.. 219 
Xew Eldorado Mng. & Red. Co., 

Oregon 1305 

Xew Ely Central Cop. Co., Nev... 1184 



xci 



7V//: MINES HAtfDBOOiK 



PAGE 

Xew Empire Goldtield Mines Co., 

Xevada 1195 

New England & Clifton Copper 

Co., Arizona 235 

Xew England Explor. Co. (The), 

Colorado 554 

\e\v England Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Utah 1415 

Xew England Mining Co., Mass.. 747 
New England Zinc Corp., Mo.... 889 

\e\v Era Mines, Colo 555 

Xew Era Mining Co., B. C 1568 

Newfoundland, Mines of 1659 

Xew Geronimo Mng. Co., Mo.... 889 
Xe\v Gold Dollar Mng. Co., Colo. 608 
Xew Golden \\ est Mines Co., S. D.1325 
Xew Goldfield Sierra M. Co., Nev.1195 
Xew Goldfield Simmerone Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1195 

Xew Gold King Mines, Colo 608 

Xew Guadalupe Mng. Co., Calif.. 465 

New Guinea, Mines of 1788 

Xew Haven Copper Co., Conn.... 626 
Xew Hazleton Gold-Cohalt Co., 

B. C 1568 

Xewhouse Tunnel Co., Colo 555 

Xew Idria Quicksilver Mng. Co., 

California 465 

New Jersey, Mines of 1227 

Xew Jersey Mines Co., Nev 1086 

Xew Jersey Mining Co., Ariz.... 259 
Xew Jersey Z. Co., U. S.-N. J.. 97-1227 
New Kleinfontein Co., Ltd., Trans- 
vaal 1939 

Xew La Paz Gold Mng. Co., Ariz. 402 
Xew Life Tunnel & M. Co., Colo.. 555 
X'ew Lyell Consols. Copper Mine, 

S. A 1894 

X'ew Mabel Mng., & Power Co., 

Alaska 158 

X'ewman Leasing Co., Colo 555 

Xew Marian Cons. Mng. Co., Colo. 622 

Xew Mescal Mng. Co., Ariz 381 

New Mexico, Mines of 1228 

X'ew Mexico Zinc & Copper Co., 

X. Mexico 1251 

Xew Modderfontein Gold Mng. 

Co., Ltd., Transvaal 1939 

Xew Monarch Mng. Co., Colo 623 

Xew Planet Copper M. Co., Ariz.. 402 
Xew Porcupine Imperial Mines, 

Ltd., Ontario 1649 

Xewport Mining Co., Michigan... 854 
X'ew Providence Gold Mng. Co., 

Cali f ornia 466 

Xew Puritan Mining Co., S. D....1325 
X'ew Quincy Mining Co., Utah. . . .1440 
Xewray Mines, Ltd.. Ontario 1649 



PAGE 

New Reliance Gold Mng. Co., S. D.1325 
Xew Silver Queen Mng. Co., S. D.1326 
New South Wales, Mines of. ..1880 
Xew State Areas. Ltd., Transvaal. 1940 

Xew State Mining Co., Okla 1287 

Xew State Mng. & Red. Co., Ariz.. 332 

Xew Stockton Mng. Co., Utah 1364 

Xew Sutherland Divide Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1151 

Xew Tuscarora Mng. Co., Xev....l086 
Xew United Verde Copper Co., 

Arizona 381 

Xew Utah Bingham M. Co., Utah. 1416 
Xew Victor Empire M. & M. Co., 

Montana 942 

Xew Vulcan Mining Co.. Mont... 942 
Xew Willard G. Mines Co.. Xev..l087 
New Year's Gift Group. N. Mex..l251 
Xew Yerington Copper Co., X T ev..l087 

New York, Mines of 1264 

New York-Arizona Gold & Cop- 
per Co., Ariz 231 

Xew York Bingham M. Co., Utah. 1416 
New York Bonanza M. Co., Utah. 1440 
New York Cons. Mng. Co., Mich.. 812 
Nev York Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1151 
X T . Y. & Honduras Rosario Mng. 

Co., Honduras 1753 

X T ew York & Montana Cop. Mng. 

Co.. Montana 944 

New York-Montana Mines Co., 

Montana 942 

New-York-Montana Test. & Eng. 

Co., Montana 944 

New York-Orient M. Co.. China.1830 
Xew York Pyrites Co., New York.1265 
Xew York-Seattle Copper Mng. 

Co., Washington 1499 

Xew York Verde Cop. Co., Ariz.. 382 

New Zealand, Mines of 1911 

Niagara Copper Co., Arizona 360 

Xidgara Mining Co. (U. S. S. } R. 

& M. Co.).: 116 

Niangua Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1287 

Xihlack Copper Co., Alaska 158 

Nicaragua, Mines of 1755 

Xicaragua Mining Co., Nicaragua. 1757 
Nichols Chemical Co., Ltd., Ont..l607 
Xichols Copper Co., New York... 1265 

Xickel Plate Mng. Co.. Idaho 664 

Nicklas Mining Co., Nevada 1087 

Nigeria, Mines of 1921 

Nigerian Tin Corp, Ltd.. Nigeria. .192? 
Xight Hawk Leasing Co., Ariz... 187 
Xikolai Butte Copper Mng. Co., 

-Alaska 158 

Nil Desperandum Mines Co., Colo, 556 
Nipissing Ext. Mines, Ltd.. Ont..l628 



xcn 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Xipissing Mines Co., Ontario 1628 

Xipissing Mines Co., Ltd., Ont 1629 

Xipissing Mining Co., Ltd., Ont... 1629 

Xipsic Mining Co., Idaho 713 

Xisi Prius Cons. Mng. Co., Colo.. 623 

Xivloc Mining Co., Nevada 1087 

Nixon-Nevada Mng. Co., Nev 1087 

Noble Five Mining Co., B. C 1569 

X'ome Divide Mining Co., Nev 1152 

X T onpareil Copper Mng. Co., Ida. 718 

Nonpareil Mining Co., Nevada 1088 

Noonday Mines Co., B. C 1569 

Xorfolk Smelting Co., Virginia. . .1471 

Norman Alines Co., Wash 1499 

Norman Silver Mng. Co., Nev 1207 

X T orrie-Aurora Mine, Mich 855 

Norris Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1152 
Norsemen Exploration Co., B.C.. 1569 
Xorth American Iron Mng. Co., 

Minnesota 868 

X T orth American Magnesite Co., 

Ltd., Quebec 1656 

North American M. & M. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 718 

North American Zinc Co., Mo.... 889 
Xorth Anantapur Gold Mines, Ltd., 

India 1843 

North Beck Mining Co., Utah.... 1457 
Xorth Beck Mng. Co. of Spanish 

Fork, Utah 1364 

Xorth Ben Hur Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1152 

North Bingham Cons. Mng. Co., 

Utah 1417 

Xorth Broken Hill, Ltd.. N. S. W..1886 
Xorth Bunker Hill Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 718 

North Butte Ext. Dev. Co., Mont. 997 
North Butte Mining Co., Mont... 997 

North Carolina, Mines of 1267 

North Davidson. Ontario 1650 

Xorth Divide Mining Co.. Nev 1152 

Xorth Dome Mng. Co., Ontario. .1650 
Xorth Dominion C. Mng. & Dev. 

Co., Arizona 219 

Northern Aluminum Co. (Alumi- 
num Co. of America} 69 

Northern Arizona Mng. & Elec. 

Power Co., Arizona 190 

Xorthern Customs Cone. Ltd., Ont. 1630 
Xorlhern Light Copper Co., N T ev..l088 
Northern Light Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Idaho 719 

Northern Manitoba Mining. Co., 

Manitoba 1590 

Xorthern Manitoba Mng. & Dev. 

( o., Manitoba 1590 

Xorthern Minn. Ore Co., Minn.. 868 



PAGE 

Xorthern Ore Co., New York. . . .1265 
Northern Pyrites Co., Ontario. .. .1607 
Xorthern Sierra Madre Mng. Co., 

Sonora 1738 

Xorthern Velley Mng. Co., Mont. 944 
Xorth Fairview Mining Co., Ore. 1305 

Xorth Fork Mng. Co., Calif 467 

North Franklin Mng. Co., Idaho. 719 
North Hill-Top Extension Mng. 

Co., Arizona 176 

Xorth Homestake Mng. Co., S. D.1326 
Xorth Lake Mining Co., Mich.... 812 
Northland Cop. -Gold Group Alas. 159 
North Laramie Peak Copper M. 

Co., Wyoming 1524 

North Midas Copper Co., Alaska. 158 
Xorth Mountain Mining Co., Nev. 1088 
North Nevada Mines Co., X T ev...l088 

Xorth Pinal Mng. Co., Ariz 312 

Xorthport Sm. & Ref. Co., Wash.,1499 
Xorth Scranton Mng. Co., Utah. ..1457 
North Standard Mining Co., Utah.1457 

Xorth Star Mines Co., Calif 467 

Xorth Star Mining Co., Arkansas. 412 
Xorth Star Mining Co., Nevada.. 1088 
Xorth Thompson (Assoc.) Gold 

Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1650 

Xorth Tigre Mng. Co., Sonora. . . .1738 
X'orthwest Divide Mng. Co., Nev. .1152 
Northwestern Dev. Co., Idaho.... 664 

Northwestern Iron Co., Wis 1516 

Northwestern Leas. & Dev. Co., 

Arizona 403 

Northwestern Metals Co., Mont... 944 
Northwestern Mining Co., Idaho. 664 
Xorth western Mining Co., Illinois. 736 
Northwest Inspiration Cop. Co.,.. 220 
Northwest Magnesite Co., Wash.. 1499 
Northwest Mines Dev. Co., Wash. 1499 
Northwest Mng. Assoc., Wash... 1500 
North Woods Mng. Co., Ontario. . 1650 

Norton, A. O., Quebec 1656 

Norway, Mines of . 1811 

Xoitrse Mines, Ltd., Transvaal. . .1940 

Nova Scotia, Mines of 1591 

Nova Scotia Molybdenum Co., 

Ltd.. X. S 1592 

Xovember Mining Co., N. Mex...l251 

Xueva Dinero M. Co., Kan 743 

Nuevo Leon, Mines of 1710 

Nugget Gold Mines, Ltd., B.C.... 1569 

Number One Mine, B. C 1570 

Nundydroog Co., Ltd., India 1843 

Nyman Cons. Mines Co., Calif.... 468 
Nymo Zinc & Lead Co., Inc., Mo.. 889 

Oak Mine, Oregon 1306 

Oaks Co. (The), New Mexico. ... 1251 



xcin 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Oatman Crescent Mng. Co., Ariz.. 275 
Ontniun (iold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Ari/.ona 275 

Oatman Gold Top Mine, Arizona. . 259 
Oat man-Jumbo M. & M. Co., Ariz. 275 
Oatman North Star Mines Co., 

Arizona 275 

Oatman Southern M. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 275 

( \-itman Syndicate Mng. Co., Ariz. 276 
Oatman United Gold Mng. Co., 

Arizona 276 

Oatman United Mines Co., Ariz.. 276 

Oaxaca, Mines of 1711 

O'Brien Mine (The), Ontario. .. .1630 
Occidental Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Wyoming 1524 

Oceanic Quicksilver Mine, Calif.. 468 

Ocean Wave Mng. Co., Colo 608 

Ocoee Copper Co., Tenn 1331 

Ocotillo Copper Mng. Co., Ariz. . 176 

Octave Mines Co., Arizona 360 

Octo Mining Co., New Mexico. . .1252 

Odanah Iron Co., Wis 1516 

Ofer Mining Co., S. D 1326 

Offin River Gold Estates, Ltd., 

Xigeria 1922 

O. F. & L. Mining Co., Mo 890 

Ogden-Tintic Leasing Co., Utah.. 1457 
Ogle Mountain Mining Co., Ore.. 1306 
Ohimo Mining Co., Oklahoma. .. .1288 
Ohio Arizona Copper Co., Ariz... 312 
Ohio & Colorado Sm. & Ref. Co., 

Colorado 556 

Ohio Copper Mng. Co., Utah 1417 

Ohio Keating Gold M. Co., Mont. 944 

Ohio Mine, Colorado 556 

Ohio Mines Co., Arizona 361 

Ojibxvay Mining Co., Michigan.... 813 
O. K. Kxt. Mng. & Red. Co., Utah. 1364 

Oklahoma, Mines of 1270 

Oklahoma-Kansas Mng. Co., Ark.. 412 

Oklahoma Mining Co., Mo 890 

Oklahoma Woodchuck Zinc Lead 

Co.. Oklahoma 1288 

Okla Lead & Zinc. Co., Okla 1288 

Oko Lead & Zinc Co., Okla 1288 

O. K. Silver M. & M. Co., Utah.. 1365 

Olaf Sein Mine. S. D 1326 

Olalla Copper M. & Sm. Co.. B. C.1570 
Old Colony Copper Co.. Mich... 814 
Old Cowboy Mining Co.. Calif.... 469 

Old Dominion Co., Arizona 220 

( )ld Dominion Copper & Sm. Co., 

Ari/ona 225 

( )ld Dominion Ex. Cop. Co., Ariz. 224 
Old Dominion Extension Mining 

Dev. Co.. Arizona.. 224 




( )ld Dominion Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Washington 1500 

Old Emma Leasing Co., Utah.... 1398 

( )ld Emma Mines Co., Utah 1399 

Old Eureka Mng. Co., Calif 469 

Old Evergreen M. & T. Co., Utah.1399 
Old Glory Gold Mining Co., Ore.. 1306 
Old Hickory Copper Co., Ariz. ... 296 
Old Hickory Mng. Co., Idaho.... 719 
Old Hundred Mng. Co., Colo.... 556 
Old Imperial M. & Mlg. Co, Nev..l088 
Old Pueblo M. & Mlg. Co.., Ariz.. 296 

Old Reliable Mng. Co., Okla 1288 

Old Susan Mining Co., Utah 1457 

Old Timer Divide Mng. Co, Nev.1152 
Old Town M., M. & Trans. Co., 

Colorado 556 

Old Vesuvius Mine, Arizona 361 

Old Veteran Mining Co, Idaho... 719 

Old Yuma Mine, Arizona 296 

Olive Creek Mining Co, Ore.... 1306 
Oliver Iron Mining Co., Minn.- 

Wisconsin 868-1516 

Olivia Group, Idaho 664 

Olla de Oro (Bolivia) Gold Mine, 

Ltd., Bolivia 1766 

O-Lo-Lim Copper Co., Wash 1500 

Olympia Mining Co, Montana.... 944 

Olympic Mines Co, Nevada 1207 

O. & M. Mines Co, Mont 945 

Omaha Iron Co, Minnesota 870 

Omaha Lead & Zinc Co, Okla.... 1288 
Onahman Iron Co, Minnesota.... 870 

Onamena Mining Co, Mo 890 

Once More Mining Co, Mo 890 

Oneca Copper Mng. Co., Mich 814 
Oneida Mines Co., Minnesota. . . . 870 
Oneida-Stagg M. & M. Co, Colo. 557 
Onondaga Copper Co., Michigan.. 815 

Onondaga Mines Co, Colo 557 

Onondago Mines Corp., Nevada.. 1088 

Ontario, Mines of 1593 

Cobalt District 1612 

Kirkland Lake District 1636 

Porcupine District 1641 

Ontario - Kirkland Gold Mines, 

Ltd.. Ontario 1639 

Ontario Mining Co., Utah 719 

Ontario Silver Mining Co., Utah.. 1440 

Ontario Smelting Co., Okla 1288 

Ontario Tiger & Green Mtn. Leas. 

Co, Colorado 623 

Onwatta Mining Co., Arkansas... 412 
Oom Paul Cons. Mng. Co, Idaho. 720 
Ooregum Gold M. Co, Ltd, India.1844 
Operator Divide Mng. Co., Nev..H53 

Opex Cons. Mines Co, Utah 1457 

Ophir Cons. Co, Colo 557 



xciv 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Ophir Gold Mines, Mlg. & Power 

Co., Colorado 557 

Ophir Gold Mines & R. Co., Colo.. 557 
Ophir Hill Cons. Mng. Co., Utah. .1457 
Ophir King- Gold Mng. Co., Utah. .1458 
Ophir Mayflower Mine, Oregon. ..1306 

Ophir Metals Co., Utah 1458 

Ophir Queen Mining Co., Utah... 1458 
Ophir Range Gold Mng. Co., Colo. 557 
Ophir Silver Mines Co., Utah.... 1458 
Ophir Silver Mining Co., Nev....l089 
Ophir-Utah Mining Co., Utah.... 1458 
Oploca de Bolivia ; Cia Minera y 

Agricola, Bolivia 1767 

Opohongo Mining Co., Utah 1458 

Opp Mine, Oregon 1306 

Opportunity Cons. Gold Mng. Co., 

Colorado 558 

Optimo Mining Co., Wis 1516 

Orange County Copper Mine, Vt.1467 
Orange Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mo.... 890 

Ord Copper Mine, Calif 469 

Ore Chimney Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont.1607 

Ore Cone. Co., Ltd., England 1807 

Ore Ext. Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont....l607 

Oregon, Mines of 1294 

Oregon & B. C. M. & D. Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1570 

Oregon Gold Mines Co., Ore 1306 

Oregon-Idaho Invest. Co., Ore 1307 

O'Reilly Gold Mng. Co., Colo.... 558 
Orford Nickel-Copper Renn., N. J.1227 
Organizers Cons. Gold Mines Co., 

Nevada 1089 

Organ Mount. Mng. Co., N. Mex..l252 
Organ Ore Co., New Mexico. ... 1252 
Oriental Cons. Mng. Co., Korea.. 1863 
Oriental Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll53 
Oriental Gold Mining Co., Calif.. 469 
Oriental Granite & Iron Co., Minn. 870 

Oriental Mng. Co., Nevada 1218 

Orient Golden Rock M. Co.. Wash. 1500 
Orient Gold Mines, Ltd., Wash.. 1501 
Orient Metals Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Washington 1501 

Original Amador Cons. Mines Co.. 

California 470 

Original Bannack Mng. Co., Mont. 945 
Original Bullfrog Mines Syndi- 
cate, Nevada 1089 

Original Klondyke Divide M. Co., 

Nevada 1153 

Original Mng. Co., of Manhattan, 

Xevada 1089 

Original Mng. & Mlg. Co., Calif.. 470 

Orion M. & M. Co., Arizona 276 

Orizaba Mining Co., Arizona 361 



PAGE 

Orizaba Mng. & Dev. Co., Nev 1089 

Orkla Grube-Aktiebolag, Norway. 1812 
Orleans Mng. & Mlg. Co., Nev... 1090 
Oro Amigo Platino M. Co., Nev.. 1090 
Oro Belle Cons. Mines Co., Calif. 470 

Oro Belle Dev. Co., Arizona 361 

Oro Belle & Gray Eagle Group, 

Arizona 361 

Oro Belle Mines Co., Calif 470 

Oro Cobra Mng. Co., Arizona.... 403 
Oro Divide Mng. & Dev. Co., Nev.1153 

Oro Fino Mining Co., Calif 470 

Orogrande Gold Mining 'Co., Ida. 664 
Oro Grande Mines Co., Arizona.. 241 

Oro Hondo Mine, S. D 1326 

Oro Iron Co., New Mexico 1252 

Oro Mine, Arizona 332 

Oronogo Circle Mng. Co., Mo 890 

Oronogo Mutual Mng. Co., Mo... 890 

Oro-Plata Mine, Arizona 259 

Oroville Copper Co., Wash 1501 

Oroville Dredging, Ltd., Calif.... 470 

Oro Zona Mines Co., Nevada 1090 

Orphan Boy Mining Co., Utah.... 1365 

Orr Gold Mines, Ltd., Ontario 1639 

Orsk Goldfields, Ltd., Siberia. .. .1876 
Oruro; Compania Minera de, Bo- 
livia .. 1767 

Osage Mining Co., Missouri 890 

Osborn Cons. M. & M. Co., Utah. 1399 
Oscar Creek Cons. Mng. Co., Ore. 1307 

Osceola Cons.Mng. Co., Mich 815 

Oshkosh-Wyoming M. Co., Wyo..l524 

Oston Leas. Co.. Colo 608 

Otavi Mines & Railway Co., South- 
west Africa 1930 

Otego Mining Co., Wyo 1524 

Otero Copper Co., New Mexico.. 1253 

Otis Mining Co., Mo 891 

Ottawa Metal Co.. Oklahoma 1288 

Ouray Cons. M. & Red. Co., Colo. 558 

Ouray Sm. & Ref. Co., Colo 558 

Ouro Preto Gold Mines of Brazil, 

Ltd.. Brazil 1769 

Outsider Mine, B. C..... 1571 

Overland Mining Co., Arizona. . . . 198 
Overlook Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1153 
Overlook Mng. & Dev. Co., Idaho. 664 
Oversight Mining Co., Nevada. .. .1218 
Owl Head Copper Co.. Arizona... 312 

Owosso Mining Co., Mo 891 

Oxford Cobalt Silver Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1631 

Oxford Cons. Mng. Co., Utah.... 1459 

Oxide Copper Co., Arizona 313 

Ozark Lead & Zinc Co., Okla....l288 
Ozark Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Arkansas. 412 
O/.nrk Sm. & Mng. Co., N. Mex..l253 



xcv 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Pachuca; Compania Beneficia- 

dora de, Hidalgo 1697 

Pacific Coast Gold Mines Corp., 

California 471 

Pacific Copper Co., Michigan 818 

Pacific Copper Co., Ltd., Guerrero.1694 
Pacific Copper Mng. Co., Arizona. 262 
Pacific Copper & Pyrites Co., Guer- 
rero 1695 

Pacific Deep Mine, California.... 471 
Pacific Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co., Cal- 
ifornia 472 

Pacific Gold M. & Mlg. Co., Utah.,1399 

Pacific Mines Corp., Calif 471 

Pacific Molybdenum Mines, Inc., 

Oregon .". 1307 

Pacific Sm. & Mng. Co., Sonora.,1738 
Pacific States M. & Mlg. Co.. Nev.1090 

Pacific Tungsten Co., Nevada 1091 

Packard Ext. Mines Co., Nev....l201 
Packard North Ext. M. Co., Nev..l201 
Packard Silver Mines Co., Nev..l201 

Packer Co. (The), Idaho 664 

Pack Saddle Gold Mines Co., Nev.1091 

Paga Mng. Co., Ga 632 

Pahang Cons. Co., Ltd. (The), 

Malaya 1836 

Palative Lead & Zinc Co., Okla...l289 

Palisade Copper Co., Nevada 1091 

Palmarejo & Mexican Gold Fields, 

Ltd., Chihuahua. 1680 

Palmer-Paine Mng. Co., Ontario. .1631 

Palmetto Cons., Inc., Nevada 1091 

Paloma Ext. Mng./ Co., Utah 1365 

Paloma Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

Utah 1365 

Palo Verde Copper Co., Arizona.. 362 
Panama Canal Mng. Co., Nevada. 1092 

Panama .Mine, B. C 1571 

Panama Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.. 1365 
Pan-American Mng. Co., Arizona. 362 
Pandora Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 720 

Pandora Group, Alaska 159 

Panther City Minijig Co., Nev 1092 
Papua (New Guinea), Mines of. 1888 
Paradise Gold Mng. Co., Arizona. 242 

Paradise Mine, California 472 

Paradise Mines. B. C 1571 

Paradise Mining Co., Arizona.... 176 
Paragon Cons. Mng. Co., Idaho... 720 
Paragon-Hitchcock Mines, Ltd.. 

Ontario 1608 

Paragon Mng. Co., Colo 559 

Paragon Mining Co., Mo 891 

Parcionera Cons. Mng. Co., Chi- 
huahua 1680 

I ardee-Meier Company, Alaska... 159 




Park City King Mng. Co., Utah.. 1441 

Park City Mines Co., Utah 1441 

Park Copper & Gold Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Idaho 665 

Parker Group of Mines, Colo.... 559 

Park Gold Mng. Co., Wyo 1525 

Park Tunnel M. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 559 

Park Utah Mining Co., Utah 1441 

Parrot Mining Co., Idaho 720 

Parry Sound Copper Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Ontario 1608 

Pas Cons. Mines, Ltd., Manitoba. .1590 
Passiflora Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 559 
Patagonia Mines & Dev. Co., Ariz. 332 
Patagonia-Superior Cop. Co., Ariz. 332 

Pathe Mining Co., Utah 1399 

Patino; Simon I., Bolivia 1767 

Pato Alines (Colombia), Ltd., Co- 
lombia 1789 

Patricia Syndicate, Ontario 1608 

Patrick Mining Co., Nevada 1092 

Patriquin Quicksilver Mine, Calif. 472 
Patsy Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1153 
Patten Co-Operating Co., Alaska. 159 
Patterson-Bradley Leas. Co., Colo. 608 

Patuxent Mining Co., Idaho 720 

Pay Divide Mining Co., Nevada.. 1153 
Paymaster Silver-Lead Co., Ariz. 296 
Pay Rock Silver Mines Co., Colo. 559 

Payroll Mine, Arizona 260 

Pay Roll Mining Co., Nevada. .. .1092 
P. !). Extension Copper Co., Ariz. 235 
Peabody Alaska Cop. Corp., Alas.. 159 
Peabody Cons. Copper Co., Ariz.. 176 
Peabody Development Co., Alaska. 159 

Peacock Mining Co., Wis 151^ 

Pearl Lake Gold Mines, Ontario. .1650 

Pearl Mining Co., Oregon 1307 

Peck Cons. Silver Mines, Arizona. 362 
Pecos Copper Co., New Mexico.. 1253 
Pecos Mines Co., New Mexico. . .1254 

PC-COS Mining Co., Texas 1339 

IVdrazzini Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

Minas, Sonora 1740 

Peer Gold Mining Co., Nevada. , .1092 
Peerless Cons. Copper Co., Colo.. 559 

Peerless Mining Co., Nevada 1092 

Peerless Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 559 
Pelican Mng. & Mlg. Corp., Colo 560 
Pena Copper Mines. Ltd., Spain.. 1823 
Penarroya, Societe Miniere et 

Metallurgique de, Spain 1824 

IViitfkalen, Ltd., Malaya 1837 

Peni Mining Co., Wis 1516 

Petin Canadian Mines, Ltd., Ont..l631 

Penn Iron Mining Co., Mich 855 

Penn Mining Co., California 473 

Pennsylvania, Mines of 1313 



xcvi 



PAGE 

Pennsylvania Mng., Power & Red. 

Co., Colorado 560 

Pennsylvania Molybdenum Mines 

Co., Colorado 560 

Pennsylvania-Tonopah Gold Mng. 

Co.," Nevada 1154 

Pennuva Copper Co., Utah 1365 

Penn-Wyoming Copper Co., Wyo.1525 
Pcnolcs Mng. Co. (Cia M in era dc 

Petioles) , Durango 1689 

Pcregrina Mn. & Ml. Co. (Guan- 
ajuato Dev. Co.} 1691 

Perigo Mines, Colo 560 

Perseverance Mines Co., Ltd., Nev.1092 
Pershing Divide Ext. Mng. .'Co., 

Nevada 1154 

Pershing Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll54 

Perth Amboy Smelter. N. J 1228 

Peru, Mines of 1790 

Peruvian Cons. Mng. Co., Utah... 1399 
Peruvian Copper & Sm. Co., Peru. 1797 
Peruvian Mng. & Dev. Syn., Ltd., 

Missouri 891 

Peterson Lake Silver Cobalt Mng. 

Co., Ltd.. Ontario 1631 

Peterson Mine. Alaska 159 

Pewabic Co., Michigan 855 

Pfaeffle-Kelly Mine, Mo 891 

Pharmacist Gold Mng. Co., Colo. 609 
Phedora Silver-Lead M. Co., Ida.. 721 
Phelps Dodge Corporation, U. S. 99 
Phelps Dodge Mercantile Co. 

(Phelps Dodge Corp.} Ill 

Philadelphia Explor .Co., Calif... 474 

Philadelphia Mines Co., Colo 560 

Philadelphia Mines Leas. Co., Col. 561 
Philadelphia Mining Co., Arizona. 363 
Philippine Islands, Mines of. ... 1867 
Philippine Dredges. Ltd., P. T....1869 

Philipsburg Mng. Co., Mont 945 

Phoenix Cons. Copper Co., Mich.. 819 
Phoenix Cons. Mines Co., Calif.. 474 

Phoenix Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1154 

Phoenix Gold & Copper M. & M. 

Co.. Washington 1501 

Phocni.r Mines (Granbv Cons. M. 

S. fr P. Co.} 1551 

Phoenix Mining Co., Mo 891 

Phoenix Mining Co.. Utah 14J8 

Phoenix Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 721 

Pi radio Mng. Co. (Cia. Miner a 

dc Picacho}, Sonora 1740 

Picher Lead Co., Missouri 891 

Picher-Oklahoma Mng. Co.. Okla.,1289 

Pickands, Mather & Co., Minn 871 

Piedras Verdes y Anexas ; Com- 

pania Minera, Sonora 1740 



PAGE 

Piermont Mines Co., Nevada 1092 

Pike Hill Mines, Vermont 1467 

Pilgrim Gold, Silver & Copper M. 

& M. Co., Colo 561 

Pilot Butte Mining Co., Mont 1001 

Pilot Copper Co., Nevada 1093 

Pilot Divide Mining Co., Nevada. 1154 

Pilot Knob Group, Nevada 1093 

Pilot Peak Silver Mng. Co., Nev.. 1093 
Pilot Simon Silver Mng. Co., Nev.1207 

Pi ma Mng. & Sm. Co., Ariz 297 

Pinal Development Co., Arizona. . 313 

Pinar Copper Co., Cuba 1761 

Pine Canyon & Bingham Tunnel 

Co.. Utah 1418 

Pine Creek Dev. Co., Idaho 721 

Pine Creek Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ida. 721 
Pine Creek Tungsten Mine, Calif. 474 

Pine Martin Mng. Co., Colo 561 

Pingrey Mines, Colorado 561 

Pingnico Mines Co. (Guanajuato . 

Dev. Co.} 1691 

Pinion Queen Mining Co., Utah. .1459 
Pinos Altos M. & M. Co., N. Mex.1254 
Pintado Cons. Copper Co., N. Mex.1254 
Pioche-Bristol Mng. Co., Nevada. 1093 

Pioche Metals Co., Nevada 1093 

Piokee Mining Co.. Oklahoma. .. .1289 
Pioneer Chief Gold M. Co., Calif.. 474 
Pioneer Cons. Mines Co., Nev.... 1195 

Pioneer Exploration Co., Nev 1094 

Pioneer Exten. Mines Co., Nev... 1094 
Pioneer Lead & Zinc Co., Okla...1289 

Pioneer Mine, B. C 1571 

Pioneer Mining Co., Alaska 159 

Pioneer Mining & Ditch Co., Alas. 159 
Pioneer Mng., Mlg. Power & Tun- 
nel Co., Colo 561 

.Pioneer Mng. & Sm. Co., Ariz.... 297 
Pioneer Tin Mng. Co., Tasmania. .1903 

Piscataquis Iron Co., Maine 745 

Pitt Iron Mining Co., Minnesota.. 871 
Pittsburgh Cons. Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1399 

Pittsburgh Divide Mng. Co., Nev. 1154 
Pittsburgh-Dolores Mng. Co., Nev.1094 
Pittsburgh-Ely Copper Co., Nev... 1094 
Pittsburgh-Idaho Co., Ltd.. Idaho. 665 
Pittsburgh Iron Ore Co., Minn... 871 
Pittsburgh-Jerome Cop. Co., Ari^. 382 
Pittsburgh Lead Mining Co., Ida. 665 

Pittsburg Liberty Mine, Calif 474 

Pittsburgh and Lorrain Syndicate, 

Ontario 1632 

Pittsburgh-Miami Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma .1289 

Pittsburgh Mine, Colorado 561 

Pittsburg Mng & Mlg. Co., Ariz... 276 



xcvn 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Pittsburgh & Mount Shasta Gold 

M. & M. Co., Calif 475 

Pittsburgh & Northern Ont. Expl. 

& Dev. Co., Ont 1608 

Pittsburg- Silver Peak Gold Mng. 

Co., Calif 475 

Pittsburg Silver Peak Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1095 

Pittsburgh Steel Ore Co., Minn... 871 

Pittsmont Copper Co., Mont 1002 

Piute Mine, California 475 

Placer Creek Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Idaho 721 

Planetary Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah. 1366 
Plata-Fina M. & Dev. Co., Sonora.1740 

Platino Mines Corp., Nevada 1095 

Platinum Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wyo.1525 
Playter Bros. M. & Realty Co., Mo. 891 
Pleasant Valley Mng. Co., Mo.... 892 

Plumas Basin Mines Co., Calif 476 

Plumas Eureka Corp., Calif 476 

Plumed Knight Mine, Arizona 297 

Pluto Gold & Cop. Mng. Co., Wyo.1525 

Plutus Mining Co., Utah 1459 

Plymouth Cons. Gold Mines, Ltd., 

California 476 

Plymouth Mining Co., Mich 855 

Pocahontas Copper Queen Mng. 

Co., Arizona 363 

Pocahontas Mining Co., Cal 476 

Pocatello Gold & Copper Mng. Co., 

Idaho 666 

Poderosa Mining Co., Ltd., Chile. 1785 

Poland Mining Co., Arizona 363 

Polaris Gold & Silver Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1095 

Polaris Mine, Montana 945 

Polaris Mining Co., Arizona 260 

Polaris Mng. & Dev. Co., Idaho.. 721 

Pole Star Copper Co., Utah 1366 

Policeman Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll54 
Pomeroy-Prudential Copper Co., 

Arizona 313 

Ponderay Mng. & Sm. Co., Idaho. 666 

Ponsardin Mine, Colo 623 

Ponupo Manganese Co., Cuba.... 1761 
Pony Mng. & Mlg. Co., Montana. 945 

Poor Man Mng. Co., Colo 561 

Pope-Shenon Copper Co., Idaho.. 666 
Porco Tin Mines. Ltd., Bolivia. . .1767 
Porcupine Crown Gold Mng. Co., 

Ontario 1650 

Porcupine Excelsior M. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1651 

Porcupine Keora Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1651 

Porcupine Mines Syndicate Ont... 1651 



PAGE 
Porcupine Premier Gold Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Ontario 1652 

Porcupine Vipond Mines, Ltd., Ont.1652 
Porcupine V. N. T. Gold Mines, 

Ltd., Ontario 1652 

Porcupine Whelpdale Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1652 

Porphyry Cons. Copper Co., Ariz.. 225 

Porphyry Copper Co., Ariz 225 

Porphyry Dike Gold M. Co., Mont. 945 
Portage Lake & Bisbee Mng. Co., 

Arizona 187 

Portland Canal Tunnels, Ltd., B. C.1571 
Portland Cons. Copper Co., Wyo.1525 
Portland Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll54 
Portland Gold Mng. Co., Colo.... 609 
Portland Lead & Zinc Co., Okla. . .1289 

Portoma Mining Co., Idaho 721 

Porto Rico, Mines of 1762 

Porto Rico Mng. Co., Mo 892 

Portugal, Mines of 1815 

Portuguese East Africa, Mines 

of 1924 

P. O. S. Mine, Colo 623 

Potomac Copper Co., Montana.... 946 
Potosi Gold & Silver M. Co., Nev..l09S 
Potosi & Rio Verde Railway Co. 

(Mexicana; Compania Metalur- 

gica ) 1662 

Potosi Zinc Co., Oklahoma 1289 

Potrerillos Raihvav Co. (Andes 

Copper Co.)....'. 1771 

Potts Canyon Mining Co., Ariz... 313 
Powder River Gold Dredging Co., 

Oregon ...1307 

Powers Gulch Develop. Co. Ariz. 198 
Powers M., M. & Leas. Co., Colo.. 562 

Pozo Gilpin Mng. Co., Colo 562 

Prairie Flower Devel. Co., Nev. ..1095 
Prairie Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.... 1289 

Precious Metals Corp., Colo 562 

Premier Mining Co., Ltd., B.C... 1571 
Premier (Transvaal) Diamond 

Min. Co.. Ltd., Transvaal 1940 

Premier Zinc Co., Oklahoma 1289 

Presidio Mining Co., Texas. ..,. .1339 

Prestea Block A, Ltd., W. A 1948 

Preston East Dome Mines,, Ltd., 

Ontario 1652 

Price Mining Co., Utah 1400 

Prickly Pear Mng. Co., Montana. . 946 
Pride of Cripple Creek Mng. Co., 

Colorado 610 

Pride of the West Mine, Colo 562 

Primes Chemical Co., Colo 562 

Primos Exploration Co. (Primos 

Chemical Co.} 563 



xcvni 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Primes M. & M. Co. (Primos 

Chemical Co.) 563 

Prince Albert Mine, Colo 610 

Prince Albert M. & M. Co., Ariz. 364 
Prince Cons. M. & Sm. Co., Nev..l095 
Princemont Mining Co., Idaho- 
Montana 666-946 

Princess Copper Co., Nevada 1184 

Princeton Mng. & Dev. Co., B.C. 1572 
Prince of Wales Mining Co., Utah. 1400 

Prize Mng. Co., Colo 563 

Producers Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.1289 
Progress Mines of New Zealand. 

New Zealand 1911 

Progress Mng. Co., N. Mexico. . .1254 
Progress Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 564 
Progressive Mining Co., Utah. .. .1366 
Promontory Mining Co., Utah.... 1366 
Proprietary Mines Co., of Ameri- 
ca. Guanajuato 1693 

Proskey Regent Mng. Co., Nev...l096 

Prospecting Co., The, Russia 1817 

Prospect Mountain Mines & Ex- 
ploration Co. (The), Colo 623 

Prospector's Dev. Co., Ltd., Ont. .1608 

Prosperity Mlg. Co., Mo 892 

Protectora y Anexas ; Compania 

Minera La, Zacatecas 1750 

Providence Ext. Gold M. Co., Nev 1096 
Proiidcncla M. & Mlg. Co. (Pro- 
prietary Mines Co. of America) .1694 
Provident Iron Co., Minnesota 872 

Provo Mining Co., Utah 1459 

Prudential Copper Mng. Co., Ariz. 364 
Prudential Mineral Co., Okla ..... 1289 

Ptarmigan Mines, Ltd., B. C 1572 

Puebla, Mines of 1711 

Pueblo Smelter. Colo 564 

Puebla Sm. & Ref. Co., Puebla. . .1711 
Puget Sound Copper Co., Wash.. 1501 

Puritan Mine, Colo 564 

Puritan Mining Co., Idaho 721 

Puritan Mining Co., S. D 1326 

Puzzle Leasing Co., Colo 564 

Pyramid Divide Mines Co., Nev.. 1154 
Pyramid Milling Co., New Mexico. 1254 
Pyrargyritc Mining Co., Wash.... 1501 

Q. S. Cupper Co., Wash 1502 

Q. S. Mining Co., Wash 1502 

Quadmental Mines Co., Utah 1366 

(Juaker Gold Mines Co., Arizona. . 364 
Quaker Mill Blue Lead Mines Co., 

California 477 

Quaker Valley Mining Co., Kan.. 743 
Quapaw Jack L. & Zinc Co., Okla.1289 
Ouapavv Mining Co., Oklahoma. . .1290 
Quatsino Copper Co., B. C 1572 



PAGE 

Quebec, Mines of 1654 

Quebec Alining Co., Oklahoma. .. 1290 

Queen Bee Mine, Arizona 260 

Queen Bess Mine, B. C 1572 

Queen Bess Mine, Colo 610 

Queen Bess Mines Co., B. C 1572 

Queen of Bronze Mine, Oregon.. 1308 
Queen Calumet Copper Extension 

Co., Arizona 187 

Queen City Mng. Co., Oklahoma. .1290 
Queen Copper Mng. Co., Arizona. . 313 
Queen Creek Copper Co., Arizona. 314 
Queen Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1154 
Queen Esther Mining Co., Kansas. 744 

Queen Esther Mining Co., Mo 892 

Queen Gold Mng, Co., Colo 611 

Queen Isabella Mines Co., Utah.. 1459 

Queen Leasing Co., Utah 1400 

Queen Mine, California 477 

Queen Mines, Inc., B. C 1573 

Queen Regent Merger Mines Co., 

Nevada 1096 

Queen of Sheba Mng. Co., Utah. . .1367 

Queensland, Mines of 1889 

Queen of the West Mines Co., Ore.1308 
Quequena ; Compania Minera de, 

Peru 1798 

Quesnel Forks G. M. Co., B. C.. . .1573 

Quick Seven Mng. Co., Mo 892 

Quicksilver Invest Co., Inc. (The), 

California 477 

Quicksilver Mines Co., Nevada. . .1097 

Quicksilver Mining Co., Calif 477 

Qnilp Gold Mng. Co., Wash 1502 

Ouinby Mining Co., California.... 477 

Ouincy Mining Co.. Michigan 820 

Quinn & Co., Clement K., Minn.. 872 

Quintent Mng. Co., Colo 564 

Ouintera Mng. Co.. Ltd., Sonora.,1741 
Quo Vadis Gold Mng. Co., Nev... 1097 

Rabbit Foot Mining Co., Idaho. 666 

Radiant Mng. & Red. Co., Colo 565 

Radium Co. of America, Colo.... 565 
Radium Co. of Colo. Inc., Colo. . . . 565 

Radium Mines Co., Arizona 225 

Radium Ore Sampling Co.. Colo.. 565 
Rae-Wallace Mining Co., Alaska.. 160 
Rainbow Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1155 
Rainbow Lead & Zinc Co.. Okla.. 1290 
Rainbow Lode Dev. Co., Mont... 1002 

Rainbow Mine, Oregon 1308 

Rainbow Mining Co., Texas 1340 

Rainbow Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., 

Idaho 722 

Rainbow Mtn. Mng. Co., Arizon. 260 
Rainier Mercury Co., Oregon. ... 1308 



XC1X 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 




PAGE 

Kakha Hills Mine (Cape Copper 

Co., Ltd.} 1915 

Ralston Mining Co., Nevada 1218 

Ramage Mines, Missouri 892 

Ramage Mining Co., Oklahoma ... 1290 
Rambler-Cariboo Mines, Ltd., B. C.1573 
Rambler Cons. Mines Corp., Wvo.1526 
Rambler Copper & Platinum Co., 

Wyoming 1526 

Rambutan, Ltd., Malaya 1837 

Rampart Mountain M. Co., Mont. 1003 
Ramsey-Rutherford Gold Mng. Co. 

Alaska 160 

Ramshorn Mng. & Sm. Co., Idaho. 666 
Rand Divide Mining Co., Calif... 478 
Rand Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1155 
Randfontein Central Gold M. Co., 

Ltd., Transvaal 1941 

Rand Minerals Co., California.... 478 

Rand Mines, Ltd., Transvaal 1941 

Randolph-Gemmill Dev. Co., Ariz.. 364 
Randolph Gold M., M. & T. Co., 

Colorado 565 

Ranier Development Co., Ariz.... 403 
Ranier Mines Corporation, Ariz.. 403 
Rankin Creek Placer Mines Co., 

Idaho 667 

R. A. P. Gold Mng. Co., Ontario. .1609 
Rapp Mng. Dev. & Pros. Co., Ont..l609 

Rare Metals Co., S. D 1326 

Rare Metals Ore Co., Colo 566 

Raritan Copper Works (Interna- 
tional Sm. Co.} 91-1228 

Rashgo Mining Co., Missouri 892 

Rathfon Reduction Works, Wash. 1503 
Ratrut Basin Tin Dreg. Co.. Siam.1870 
Rattlesnake Jack Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

S. D 1327 

Raven & Beacon Hill Gold M. Co., 

Colorado 611 

Raven Copper Co., Montana 1003 

R.awley Mng. Co., Colo 566 

Ray-Arizona Copper Co., Arizona. 319 
Ray Boston Copper Co., Arizona.. 320 
Ray Broken Hill Mng. Co., Ariz. . 320 
Ray Central Copper Co., Arizona. 198 
Ray Central Copper M. Co., Ariz.. 320 
Ray Cons. Copper Co., Arizona... 322 
Rayfield (Nigeria) Tin fields, Ltd., 

Xigeria 1923 

Ray Hercules Copper Co., Arizona. 325 
Ray- Jefferson Mng. Co., Idaho.... 722 

Ray-Kelvin Co., Arizona 326 

Raymond Cons. Mines Co., Colo.. 566 
Raymond-Illinois Mng. Co., Utah. 1460 
Ray Silver Lead Mng. Co., Ariz.. 326 
Ray Verde Copper Co., Arizona.. 326 
Ready Bullion Mine, Alaska 160 



PAGE 

Ready Cash M. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 566 
Real Del Monte v Pachuca, Com- 

pania de (U. S. S., R. & M. 

Co.} 118-1697 

Reardon Copper Co., Wash 1503 

Rebecca Mining Co., Kansas 744 

Reco Divide Mining Co., Nev 1155 

Reco Mng. & Mlg. Co., B. C 1573 

Record Lode Mining Co., Ariz... 276 

Record Mining Co., B. C 1574 

Red Bell Mining Co., Utah 1400 

Red Bird Mng. & Sm. Co., Idaho. 667 

Red Boy Mines Co., Oregon 1308 

Red Boy Mng. & Dev. Co., Ore... 1308 
Red Chief Mining Co., Arizona... 314 

Red Cliff Mining Co., B. C 1574 

Red Cloud Cons. Mines Co., Ariz, 404 

Red Cloud Mining Co., Utah 1400 

Red Eagle Mining Co., Oklahoma.1290 
Redemption Copper Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Arizona 260 

Red Gap Gold Mines Co., Ariz... 260 
Red Granite Copper & Water Pow. 

Co., Oklahoma 1290 

Red Hill Florence Mng. Co., Nev..ll95 
Red Horse Mining Co., Ltd., Ida.. 667 
Red jang Lebong Mynibouw. Su- 
matra 1832 

Red Ledge Copper Mine, Idaho... 667 
Red Lion Cons. Mines Co., Nev.. 1196 

Red Lion Mining Co., Ariz 277 

Red Metal Copper Co., Ariz 404 

Red Metals Co., Nevada 1097 

Red Monarch Cons. Mng. Co., Ida. 722 
Red Mt. Cons. Copper Mines Co., 

Inc., Arizona 242 

Red Mountain Copper Mng, Co., 

Arizona 333 

Red Mountain Develop. Co., Ariz.. 177 
Red Mountain Mines Co., Colo... 566 
Red Peaks Copper Co., N. Mex...l254 

Red Rose Mining Co.. Okla 1290 

Red Rover Copper Co., Ariz 242 

Red Rover Mining Co., Ariz 242 

Redskin Mining Co. Kansas 744 

Red Skin Mining Co., Okla 1290 

Red Stone Gold Mng. Co.. Colo... 567 
Red Streak Copper Mng. Co., Nev.1097 

Red Top Mining Co., Nevada 1097 

Red Warrior Mining Co., Utah... 1367 

Red Wasp Mng. Co., Mo 892 

Red, White and Blue Mine, Ore.. 1308 
Redwood Copper Mng. Co., Wash. 1503 
Redwood Copper Queen Mng. Co., 

California 478 

Reed's Peak Mining Co., Utah.... 1400 
Reeves-Dobie Mines, Ltd., Ont...l609 
Regal Mines Co., Alaska 160 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Reid-Newfoundland Co., Nfld 1660 

Reindeer Lead & Zinc Co., Mo.... 892 
Reindeer Queen Mng. Co., Idaho. 723 
Reiniger Freeman Mng. Co., Ariz. 297 
Reliance Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mont.. 947 

Relief Mining Co., B. C 1574 

Renfrew Gold Mines, Ltd., N. S..1592 
Reno Divide Mng. Co., Nev. . '. . . .1155 
Renong Tin Dredg Co., Ltd., Siam.1870 
Reno Silver Hills Mng. Co., Nev.. 1097 
Reno-Yerington Copper Co., Nev.. 1098 
Reorganized Atlanta Mines Co., 

Nevada 1196 

Reorganized Blue Bull Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1196 

Reorganized Booth Mng. Co., of 

Goldfield, Nevada 1197 

Reorganized Cracker Jack Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1197 

Reorg. Diamondfield Triangle Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1198 

Reorg. Kewanas Gold Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1198 

Reorganized Pioneer Mines Co., 

Xevada 1098 

Reorganized United Mines Co., 

Nevada-Arizona 1201 

Republic Cons. Mines Corp., Wash.1503 
Republic Iron & Steel Co., U. S... Ill 
Republic Alines Co., New Mexico.. 1254 
Republic Mining Co., Oklahoma.. .1290 
Repnl.lie Mng. & Mfg. Co.. Ga.... 632 
Republic Mng. & Mlg. Co., N. Mex.1254 
Requa-Savage Mines Co., Colo.... 611 
Rescue-Eula Mining Co., Nevada.. 1218 
Reservation Hill M. & M. Co., Nev.1098 

Resolute Mng. Co., Colo 567 

Reva (iold Mng. Co., Colo 611 

Revelation Divide Mng. Co., Nev. 1155 
Revenue Cons. Mng. Co., Mont... 947 

Revenue Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1367 

Revenue Mines Co., Colo 567 

Revere Copper Co., Mass 747 

Revert Divide Mng. Co.. Nevada.. 1155 
Revias Creek Mng. & Power Co., 

Montana 947 

Revils Mng. & Invest. Co., Colo... 567 
Reward Gold Mines Synd., Calif.. 478 
Rexall Silver & Copper Mng. Co., 

Utah 1401 

Rex Cons. Mng. Co., Idaho 723 

Rex Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. ... .1156 
Rex (iold Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 567 

Rex Mining Co., Idaho 723 

nolds-Alaska Devel. Co., Alas. 160 

Rey Silver Mines Co., Colo 567 

Re/ende Mines, Ltd., Rhodesia 1928 

Rhode Island Copper Co., Mich... 825 



PAGE 

Rhodesia, Mines of 1925 

Rhodesia Broken Hill Dev. Co., 

Ltd., Rhodesia .1929 

Rhodesia Chrome Mines, Ltd., Rho- 
desia 1929 

Rhodesia Copper & Gen. Explor. 

& F. Co., Ltd., Rhodesia 1929 

Rialto Mining Co., Kansas. ....... 744 

Richards Copper Co., Arizona.... 364 

Rich Charter Oak Cop. Co., Wyo..l526 

Richfield Copper Co., Sonora 1741 

Rich Hill Mine, Alaska 161 

Richland Mines Co., Nevada ..1098 

Richmond & Anaconda Cons. M. 

Co., Utah 1460 

Richmond-Eureka M. Co., Nev.117-1186 
Richmond Hill Mng., Mlg. & Leas. 

Co., Colorado 567 

Richmond Iron Co., Michigan.... 855 
Richmond Mng., Mlg. & Red. Co., 

Montana 947 

Rich Strike Mine, Oklahoma 1290 

Rico Argentine Mng. Co., Colo... 568 

Rico Cons. Mines Co., Colo 568 

Rico Cons. Mining Co., Arizona. . 260 

Rico Exploration Co., Arizona 260 

Rico Mng. Co., Colo 568 

Rico- Wellington Mng. Co., Colo. . . 568 
Ridge & Valley Mining Co., Utah. 1460 

Ries Mining Co., Wash, 1503 

Right Good Mining Co., Kansas.. 744 
Right of Way Mines, Ltd., Ont...l632 

Rilla Mng. Co., Colo 569 

Rio Grande & Dolores Silver Mng. 

Co., Ltd., Guerrero 1695 

Rio Plata Mng. Co., Chihuahua. . .1680 

Rio Tinto Co., Ltd., Spain 1824 

Rio Tinto Copper Co., Chihuahua. 1680 
Rio Tonto Copper Mng. Co., Ariz. 364 
Ripple Cons. Mng. Co., Montana. . 947 

Rito Seco Gold Mine, Cold 569 

Rival Mining Co., New Mexico. .. 1255 

Riverside Mining Co., Idaho 667 

River Sm. & Ref. Co. (National 

Lead Co.} 96 

R. & N. Kansas Line M. Co., Kan. 744 
Roanoke Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 570 
Roanoke Ore & Iron Corp., Va...l471 
Roberta Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho.. 724 
Robert Emmet Copper Co., Mont.. 948 
Robinson Deep, Ltd., Transvaal. ."1943 

Rob Roy Mining Co., Utah 1368 

Robust Group, Nevada 1099 

Rocher de Boule Copper Co., B. C.1574 
Rochester Buck & Charley Mines 

Co., Nevada 1202 

Rochester Combined Mines Co., 

Nevada ..1202 



ci 



PAGE 

Rochester Elda Fina Mng. Co., 

Xcvada .1202 

Rochester Home Trail Mines Co., 

Nevada 1202 

Rochester Lincoln Hill Mng. Co., 

Xcvada 1202 

Rochester Merger Mines Co., Nev.1202 

Rochester Mines Co., Nevada 1202 

Rochester Nev. S. Mines Co., Nev.1202 
Rochester Octopus Mines Co., Nev.1203 
Rochester Raven Mines Co., Nev. .1203 
Rochester Treasure M. Co., Nev.. 1204 
Rochester United Mines Co., Nev. 1204 

Rock Hill Placer Co., Nev 1099 

Rock Rose Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mont. 948 
Rocky Mountain Goldfield Mng. 

Co., Colorado 570 

Rocky Mountain Mines Co., New 

Mexico - 1255 

Rocky Point Cons. Mines Co., Cal. 478 
Rogers Brown Iron Co., Minn.... 872 
Romance Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1156 
Romero Mng. Co., New Mexico.. 1255 

Rominco Mines Co., Ontario 1609 

Ronpibon Extended," Siam 1870 

Ronpibon Tin, Siam 1870 

Rooiberg Minerals Dev. Co., Ltd., 

Transvaal 1943 

Roosevelt Divide Mng. Co., Nev., 1156 
Roosevelt Lake Copper Co., Ariz.. 243 
Roper Group Mining Co., N. Mex.1255 

Ropp Tin, Ltd., Nigeria 1923 

Rosalie Copper Co., Arizona 364 

Rosalind Divide Mng. Co., Nev. .1156 
Rosebery Surprise Mng. Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1575 

Rose Cons. Mng. Co., Montana. . . '948 
Rosemont Copper Co., Arizona... 298 
Rose Nicol Gold Mng. Co., Colo. . 611 

Rosetta Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1156 

Rosiclare Lead & Fluorspar Co., 

Illinois 737 

Rossland Kootenay Mng. Co., Ltd., 

B. C 1575 

Ross Mining Co., Wis 1516 

Ross Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo 570 

Rostvangen Aktieselskabet, Nor- 
way 1812 

Round Mountain Mining Co., Nev.1099 
Rowley Copper Mines Co., Ariz. . 243 

Roxbury Mining Co., Calif 478 

Roy Mine, Sonora .1741 

Royal Basin Mining Co., Mont... 948 
Royal Cons. Cop. Co., Nev.-Ariz..llOO 
Royal Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., 

M ontana 949 

Royal Copper Mng. & Mlg. Co., 
Washington 1503 



PAGE 
Royal Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1156 

Royal Gem Mng. Co., Colo 570 

Royal Gold Mines Co., Calif 478 

Royal Mine, Oklahoma 1290 

Royal Mining Co., Mont 949 

Royal Shell Mng. Co., Kansas.... 744 
Royal Silver Mines, Ltd., Bolivia. 1768 

Royal Tiger Mng. Co., Colo 570 

R. & S. Molybdenum Mines Co., 

N. Mexico 1256 

Ruby & Columbia Mines Co., Mont 949 

Ruby Copper Co., Arizona 333 

Ruby Copper Mng. Co., Calif.... 478 
Ruby Gold & Copper Co., Ariz... 404 

Ruby Gulch Mng. Co., Mont 949 

Ruby Hill Development Co., Nev..ll87 
Ruby King Copper Co., Calif.... 47 

Ruby King Group, Colo 570 

Ruby Mining Co., Washington. . .1503 
Ruby Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo..... 612 

Ruby Silver Co., Arizona 365 

Ruby Silver Mng. Co., Calif , 479 

Ruby Silver M. & Dev. Co., Nev.. 1101 

Rudolph Land Co., Wis 1516 

Rukuba (Nigeria) Tin Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Nigeria 1923 

Rural-Buckeye 'Mines, Arizona... 261 

Rush & Brown Mine, Alaska 461 

Russell Ball Copper Co., Alaska. . 162 

Russia, Mines of 1816 

Russian Mng. Corp., Ltd., Russia'. 1817 

Russo- Asiatic Cons., Siberia 1876 

Russo-Asiatic Corp., Ltd., Siberia. 1876 
Russo-Canadian Dev. Corp., Ltd., 

Siberia 1876 

Ruth Cons. Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ida. 724 

Ruth Mines, Ltd., B. C 1575 

Ryan Davis Divide M. Co., Nev.. 1156 

Rye Patch Mines Co., Nevada 1101 

Rye Patch Mng. & Leas. Co., Nev.1101 

Sacajewea Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Montana 949 

Saco de Oro Mng. Co., Colo 570 

Sacramento Copper Co., N. Mex.1256 

Sacramento Mining Co., Utah 1368 

Sacramento Valley Cop. Co., Calif. 479 
Saddle Mountain Mng. Co., Ariz. 314 
Safeguard Mining Co., Oklahoma. 1290 

Safford Copper. Co., Nevada 1101 

Sagamore Mines Co., Calif 479 

Saginaw Copper Co., Montana 949 

Sahuaro Copper Co., Arizona 298 

Saint Anthony Mines Co., Nev... 1101 
Saint Anthony Mining Co., Nev. .1101 
Saint Anthony Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Arizona 314 

St. Croix Cons. Copper Co., Wis.. 1516 



en 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

St. Croix Cons. Mines, Utah 1368 

St. Croix Mines Co., Utah 1368 

Saint Francois Lead Co., Mo 899 

St. George Mng. Co., Mo 892 

St. James Mine, Minnesota 872 

Saint James Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ida. 725 
St. Joe Gold-Copper M. & M. Co., 

Montana 950 

St. John Del Rey Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Brazil 1769 

St. John Mines (Colo.), Ltd., Colo. 571 

Saint Johns Mines Co., Calif 480 

St. Joseph Lead Co, Mo 899 

St. Joseph Mining Co., Okla 1290 

St. Lawrence Copper Mining. Co., 

Montana 950 

St. Lawrence Pyrites Co., N. Y. .1266 
St. Louis-Colorado M. Co., Colo.. 571 
St. Louis Copper Co., Michigan.. 826 
St. Louis Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.. 1291 
St. Louis Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mont.. -950 
St. Louis Sm. & Ref. Co., Okla... 1291 
St. Louis Sm. & Ref. Wks., Mo... 901 
St. Mary Mining Co., Utah. ..... .1368 

St. Mary's Mineral Land Co., 

Michigan 826 

St. Maurice Mines Co., Ltd., Que.1656 

St. Nicholas Zinc Co., N. Y 1266 

St. Patrick Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1157 
St. Patrick Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah.1401 

St. Paul Mine, Minnesota 872 

St. Paul Mng. & Red. Co, Colo. . . 571 
St Paul Montana Mng. Co, Mont. 950 
St Regis Copper Mng. & Mlg. Co, 

Montana 950 

St. Regis Mng. & Sm. Co., Mo... 892 

Salisbury Copper Co, N. C 1269 

Salmon Bear River Mining Co, 

^B. C... 1576 

Salmon River Mining Co, Nev...ll01 

Salt Chuck Mine, Alaska 162 

Saltcse Cons. Mng. Co, Mont 950 

Saltese Mng. & Mlg. Co, Mont... 951 
Saltillo. S. A. ; Compania Minera 

del, Sonora 1742 

Salt Lake-California Copper Co, 

Cali f ornia 480 

Salt Lake Copper Co, Utah 1368 

Salt Lake Tungstonia Mines Co., 

Xcvada 1101 

Salvador, Mines of 1757 

Sambo Mine, Oklahoma 1291 

Sampson Co, Ltd., Oregon 1308 

San Aguilar de Cananea, S. A.; 

Compania Minera, Sonora 1742 

San Antonio Copper Co, Sonora.. 1742 

San Antonio ( Mng. Co, Colo 572 

San Carlos Mining Co, Arizona.. 243 



PAGE 

San Cayetano Mines, Ltd., Guana- 
juato 1694 

Sandoval Zinc Co, Illinois 737 

Sandstorm - Kendall Cons. Mines 

Co, Nevada 1198 

San Felipe Mining Co, Jalisco. . .1705 
San Francisco del Oro Mng. Co., 

Ltd, Chihuahua 1681 

San Francisco Mines of Mexico, 

Ltd, Chihuahua 1681 

Sanger Gold Mines Co.; Oregon.. 1309 
San Geronimo Mines & Metals 

Corp, Sonora 1742 

San Jose; Cia Minera de, Bolivia. 1768 
San Juan & Anexas, Mina, Chi- 
huahua 1682 

San Juan Mines, Chihuahua 1682 

San Juan Queen Group, Colo 572 

San Juan Reduction Co, Baja, 

California 1669 

San Lazarus Mines Co, N. Mex..l256 
San Lucas Copper Co, Sinaloa.,1714 
San Luis; Cia. Beneficiadora, Gua- 
najuato 1694 

San Luis Mining Co, Durango . . . 1689 

San Luis Potosi, Mines of 1712 

San Martin y Anexas, S. A. ; Com- 
pania Minera, Oaxaca 1711 

San Mateo, S. A.; Cia Minera, 

Durango 1690 

San Miguel Copper Mines, Ltd, 

Spain 1827 

San Pedro Copper Co, S. A., 

Sonora 1742 

San Pete y alley Coal Co. (U. S. 

S., R. & M. Co.} 117 

San Roberto Mining Co, Zacate- 

cas 1750 

San Simon Copper Co, Arizona. . 177 
Santa Fe Gold & Copper Mng. Co, 

N. Mexico 1256 

Santa Fe Mining Co, Oklahoma. .1291 
Santa Gertrudis Co, Ltd, Hidalgo.1698 
Santa Maria de La Paz y Anexas ; 

Negoc. Min de San Luis Potosi .-1712 
Santa Maria Gold & Copper Mng. 

& Red. Co, Utah 1369 

Santa Maria Mexico Mng. Corp, 

Chihuahua 1682 

Santaquin Chief Mng. Co, Utah.. 1369 
Santaquin Cons. Mines Co, Utah. 1369 
Santaquin King Mng. Co, Utah.. 1369 
Santa Rita Copper Mng. & Sm. 

Co, Arizona 298 

Santa Rita M. & Mlg. Co, Wash.. 1503 
Santa Rosa Mining Co, Calif.... 480 
Santa Rosa Mining Co, Ltd., Za- 
catecas , ,.1750 



cm 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Santiago Cons. M., M. & T. Co., 

Colorado 572 

Santiago Mining Co., Chile 1785 

Santo Domingo, Mines of 1761 

San Toy Mining Co., Chihuahua. .1682 
San Xavier Copper Co., Sonora.,1742 
San Xavier Ext. Copper Co., Ariz. 298 
Saratoga Mining Co., Arizona.... 365 

Saratoga Mng. Co., Colo. 572 

Sarita Mines Co., Calif 480 

Sasco Smelter, Arizona 314 

Saskatchewan, Mines of 1657 

Saunders Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll57 
Savanna Copper Co., New Mexico.1257 
Saxon Tin & Wolfram Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Germany 1804 

Scarlett Copper Mine, N. C 1269 

Sceptre Mines & Mills Co., Colo.. 572 

Scheelite Mines, Ltd., N. S 1592 

Schlesinger Radium Co., Colo.... 572 

School House Mining Co., Mo 892 

School Mine, Tennessee .1331 

School Section Leasing Co., Colo. 612 
Schumacher G. Mines, Ltd., Ont..l653 
Schuykill Mining Co., Arizona.. 261 
Scoop Divide Mines Corp., Nev..ll57 

Scotia Mining Co., Utah 1401 

Scott Eagle Mining Co., Okla....l291 

Scott Mining Co., Mo 893 

Scottish Gympie Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Queensland 1893 

Scranton Leasing Co., Utah 1460 

Scranton Mng. & Sm. Co., Utah.. 1460 
Scratch Gravel Gold Mng. Co., 

Montana 951 

Sea Bee Mining Co., Mo 893 

Seaboard Copper Co., Virginia. . .1472 
Sea Coast Mining Co., Alaska... 162 
Seafield Exploration Co., Mo. ... 872 
Seaton Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 572 
Seattle-Alaska Copper Co., Alaska. 162 
Seattle-Boston Copper Co., Wash. 1504 
Seattle Contact Mng. Co., Nev...ll02 
Seattle Mng.. Mlg. & Pow. Co., 

Nevada 1102 

Secret Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah... 1401 
Secret Pass Gold Top Mng. Co., 

Arizona 277 

Section Thirty Mng. Co., Minn.. 872 

Security Copper Co., Wash 1504 

Sedalia Copper Co., Colo. . 573 

Seemann Invst. & Fin. Co., Colo.. 612 

Selby Sm. & Lead Co., Calif 480 

Selby Smelting Works, Calif.... 480 

Sells Mining Co., Utah 1401 

Selma Mines Co., Utah 1460 

Selway-Bond Cop. Group, Mont. 951 
Seminole Copper Co., Utah 1369 



PAGE 

Seminole-Regent Mng. Co., Nev..ll02 
Senate Silver Alining Co., Ariz.. 261 

Senator Mining Co., Idaho 725 

Seneca Cons. Gold Mines Co., Cal. 481 
Seneca Copper Corp., Michigan.. 827 
Seneca Mining Co., Michigan.... 829 
Seneca Superior Sil. Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1633 

Senorito Copper Corp., N. Mex..l257 

Seoul Mining Co., Korea 1865 

Serbia, Mines of 1818 

Sesame Copper Co., Arizona 299 

Seven Devils Copper Co., Idaho. . . 667 
Seven Metals Mng. Co., Colo.... 573 
Seven Troughs Buckhorn Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1102-1103 

Seven Troughs Coalition Mng. 

Co.. Nevada 1102 

Seyler-Humphrey Gold Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1103 

Shada Mining Co., Minnesota.... 872 

Shafter Mng. Co., Colo 573 

Shafter Silver Mine, Texas 1340 

Shamrock Cons. Mines, Ltd., Ont.1633 
Shamrock Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1157 

Shamrock Mining Co., Ariz 404 

Shamrock Mining Co.. Wis. . . . . .1516 

Shamva Mines, Ltd.. Rhodesia 1929 

Shannon Copper Co., Arizona 235 

Shasta Belmont Mng. Co., Cal. ... 481 
Shasta Copper Explor. Co., Cal... 481 
Shasta-Kennett Copper Co., Cal.. 481 
Shasta May Blossom Copper Co., 

Cons., California 481 

Shasta Monarch Mng. Co., Cal... 482 
Shasta National Copper Co., Cal. 482 
Shattuck-Ariz. Copper Co., Ariz... 187 

Shawgo Mining Co., Mo 893 

Shawnee Copper Mng. Co., Wyo.1526 

Shea Copper Co., Ariz 382 

Sheepherder Mine, Nevada 1103 

Sheep- Ranch Mine (Golden Gate 

Explor. Co.)... 446 

Sheep Rock Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1370 

Sheils & Ironside M. & M. Co., 

Montana 952 

Shelden & Col. Cop. Co., Mich.. 829 
Sheldon Mining Co., Arizona.... 365 

Shelikof Mining Co., Alaska 162 

Shenandoah Mines Co., Calif 482 

Shenango Furnace Co., Minn 873 

Shepherd Mng. Co.. J. C., Ark. . . . 413 
Shepherd Silver Mng. Co., Nev.1103 

Sheridan Mining Co., Texas 1340 

Sheriff Mining Co., New Mexico.1257 
Sherman Development Co., Idaho. 725 
Sherman Lead Co., Idaho 725 



civ 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Shill Gold Mining Co., Ariz 365 

Shipper Copper Mining Co., Nev..ll03 
Shipper Gold Mng. Co., Wash.... 1504 

Shipsey Mining Co., Cal 482 

Shirley Mng. Co., Ga 632 

Short Creek Zinc & Lead Co., Mo. 893 
Shorty Hope M. & M. Co., Ore.. 1309 
Shoshone Polaris Mng. Co., Nev.1103 

Siam, Mines of 1870 

Siamese Tin Syn., Ltd., Siam 1871 

Siberia, Mines of 1871 

Siberian Proprietary Mines, Ltd., 

Siberia : . . . . 1877 

Siberian Syndicate, Ltd., Siberia.. 1877 
Siderurgic Mineira, Companhia, 

Brazil 1770 

Sidney Mining Co., Idaho 725 

Sierra Alaska Mining Co., Calif.. 482 
Sierra Cons. Mines, Chihuahua. . .1684 
Sierra Cons. Mng. Co., N Mex..l258 
Sierra Divide Mng. Co., Nev....ll57 
Sierra Mng. Co., S. A. (Sierra 

Cons. Mines) 1684 

Sierra Nevada Cons. Mng. Co., 

Idaho 725 

Sierra Nevada Mining Co., Nev.1103 

Sierra Range Cop. Co., Cal 482 

Signal Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1157 

Signal Point Mng. Co.. Ariz 177 

Silgoled Mng. Co., of Nev., Nev.. 1103 

Silverado Mining Co., Idaho 725 

Silver Antimony Mng. Co., Wash. 1504 
Silver Basin Mng. Co., Wash.... 1504 
Silver Bell & Alpha Cons. Mines 

Co., Nevada 1104 

Silver Bell Divide Mng. Co., Nev. 1157 

Silver Bell Mine, B. C 1576 

Silver Bell Mng. Co., Wash 1504 

Silver Belt Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz. . 365 
Silver Bow Divide Mng. Co.. Nev.1157 
Silver Buttes Mining Co., Ariz... 198 
Silver Cable Mining Co., Mont.. 952 
Silver Canyon Mng. Co., Colo... 573 
Silver Center Mining Co., Nev. ,.1104 

Silver Chief Miming Co., Nev 1104 

Silver City Mng. Co., Colo 574 

Silver City Mining Co., Idaho... 668 
Silver Cliff Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Ltd.. Idaho 726 

Silver Comet Mining Co., Nev... 1104 
Silver Creek Mines. Ltd.. B. C..1576 
Silver Creek Mn. & Mlg. Co.. 

Washington 1505 

Silver Crown Mining Co., B. C...1576 
Silver Crown Mng. Co., Ariz... 365 
Silver Crown Mining Co., Okla. .1291 

Silver Cycle Mng. Co., Ariz 366 

Silver Dale & Big Hill Mng. Co., 

Idaho 726 



PAGE 

Silver Divide Mines Co., Nevada. 1158 
Silver Dyke Div. Mng. Co., Nev.1158 
Silvered-Copper Mng. Co., B. C. .1576 
Silverfields Ajax Mines Co., Nev.1104 
Silverfields Mining Co.. Ltd., Nev.1104 
Silver Fissure Mng. Co., Mont.. 952 
Silver Fissure Silver Mng. Co., 

Montana 952 

Silver Flat Mining Co., Utah.... 1402 
Silver Fox Lead & Zinc Co., Okla.1291 
Silver Fox Mng. Co., Kansas.... 744 

Silver Gem Mng. Co., Colo 574 

Silver Glance Group, New Mex.1258 
Silver Glance Mng. Co., Colo.- 

Nevada 574-1105 

Silver Gulch Mining Co., Nev.... 1105- 
Silver Gulch Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 574 

Silver Hill Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1158 
Silver Hill Mng. & Mlg. So., Ariz. 261 

Silver Hoard Mng. Co., B. C 1576 

Silver Horn Mng. Co., Nev 1105 

Silver Keystone Co., Ariz 261 

Silver King of Ariz. Mng. Co., 

Arizona 314 

Silver King Coalition Min^s Co., 

Utah 1441 

Silver King Cons. Mng. Co., Utah. 1442 
Silver King Div Mng. Co., Nev.1158 
Silver King Mines, Ltd., B. C....1576 
Silver King Mining Co., Mont. . . . 952 

Silver King Mining Co., Ore 1309 

Silver Knight Mine, Ariz 261 

Silver Lake Mines, Colo 574 

Silver Lead Mng. Co., Guatemala.1753 
Silver Leaf Mining Co., Idaho... 668 
Silver Leaf Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont..l633 

Silvermane Mines Co., Colo 574 

Silvermines Corp. (The), Nevada.1105 
Silver Mng. & Red. Co., Colo.... 624 
Silver Moon Mining Co.. Utah... 1402 
Silver Moon Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida.. 726 
Silver Mountain Mng. Co., Colo. 574 
Silver Mountain Mng. Co., Ltd.. 

Idaho 727 

Silverpah Cons. Mines Co., Nev.. 1105 
Silverpah Ext. Mines Corp., Nev. 1105 

Silver Paint Mines Co., Colo 575 

Silver Peak Mining Co.. Utah.... 1370 
Silver Pick Cons. Mines Co., Xev.1198 
Silver Plume Cons. M. Co., Colo. 575 
Silver Plume Red. Co., Colo.... 575 
Silver Reef Cons. Mines Co., 

Utah - 1370 

Silver Reef Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1158 

Silver Reef Mine, Arizona 315 

Silver Reef Mines Co., Nevada. . .1105 
Silver Seal Mng. Co., Sonora 1742 



cv 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Silver Shield Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1419 

Silver Side Mining Co., Utah.... 1402 

Silversmith Mines, Ltd., B. C 1577 

Silver Spur, Ltd., Queensland. ... 1893 
Silver Standard Mng. Co., B. C.1577 
Silver Standard Mng. & Extr. Co., 

Nevada -. 1106 

Silver Star Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1158 
Silver State Div. Mng. Co., Nev.1158 
Silver Tip Mining Co., Idaho.... 668 
Silver Tip Mining & Power Co., 

Washington-B. C 1505-1578 

Silverton Mines, Ltd., B. C 1578 

Silver Top Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1159 
Silver Trail Mng. Co., Mont.... 953 

,Silver Trail Mng. Co., Wash 1505 

Silver Tungsten Mng. Co., Nev..ll06 
Silver Virginia Mng. Co., Ariz.. 299 
Silver Wedge Divide Mines Co., 

Nevada 1159 

Silver Zone Div. Mines Co., Nev.1159 
Silverzone Ext. Mng. Co., Nev..ll06 

Silverzone Mines Co., Nev 1106 

Silverzone Mohawk Co., Nev 1106 

Similkameen Cons. Cop. Co., B. C.1578 
Similkameen M. & S. Co., Ltd., 

British Columbia 1578 

Simmer Deep, Ltd., Transvaal. ...1943 
Simmer & Jack Proprietary Mines, 

Ltd., Transvaal 1944 

Simon Anchor Mng. Co., Nev.... 1207 
Simon Annex Mng. Co., Nev.... 1208 
Simon Central Mng. Co., Nev... 1208 
Simon Contact Ext. Mng. Co., 

Nevada ,-.-' .1208 

Simon Contact Mines Co.. Nev.. 1208 
Simon District Mines Co., Nev... 1208 
Simon Divide Mng. Co. r Nev... 1208 
Simon Douglass Mng. Co., Nev.. 1208 

Simon Ext. Mines Co., Nev 1209 

Simon Fagan Honeymoon Co., 

Nevada 1209 

Simon Fagan Mines Co., Nev.... 1209 

Simon Gold Mng. Co., Nev 1209 

Simon Junior Silver Lead Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1209 

Simon Lead Mines Co., Nev..... 1209 
Simon Lead & Silver Mines Ext. 

Co., Nevada 1209 

Simon Mina Mng. Co., Nevada. . .1210 
Simon Silver Bell Mng. Co., Nev.1210 
Simon Silver Lead East Ext. M. 

Co., Nevada 1210" 

Simon S : lver Lead Ext. M. Co., 

Nevada 1210 

Simon Sil. Lead Mines Co., Nev. .1210 
Simons Jackpot Mng. Co., Nev... 1209 



PAGE 
Simon Triangle Mng. Co., Nevadal211 

Sinai Mining Co., Ltd., Egypt 1921 

Sinaloa, Mines of 1713 

Sinaloa Sm. & Ref. Co. (Pacific 

M. & S. Co.) 1739 

Sinclair Cons. Silver, Inc., Utah.. 1370 

Sinden Zinc Co., Okla 1291 

Sinker Tunnel Mining Co., Idaho. 668 

Sioux Cons. Mng. Co., Utah 1461 

Sioux Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1159 

Sioux Mines Co., Utah 1461 

Siskiyou Syndicate, California.... 483 
Sissert Company (The), Siberia. . 1877 
Sitting Bull Mining Co., B. C.. ...1578 

Sixes Mining Co., Oregon 1310 

Sixteen To One Mining Co., Calif. 483 

Skelton Mining Co., Okla 1291 

Skidoo Mines Co., Calif 483 

Slate Range Minerals Co., Calif.. 483 
Slick Bros. Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 576 

Slide Gold Mng. Co., Colo 576 

Slocan Star Mines, Ltd., B. C 1578 

Slocum Copper Co., Ariz 243 

Small Hopes-Boreel Mng. Co.. 

Colorado 624 

Smith Valley Mines Co., Nev.... 1106 
Smokehouse Mining Co., Mont.. 1003 
Smokev Development Co., Nev... 1184 

Smoky Bullion Group, Idaho 668 

Smuggler Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1159 
Smuggler Leas. Co. (The), Colo. 576 

Smuggler Mine. Colo 576 

Smuggler Mine & Mlg. Co., Colo. 576 
Smuggler Union Mng. Co. (The), 

Colorado 577 

Snake & Opportunity Mines Co., 

New Mexico , 1258 

Snake River Cons. Mng. Co.. Wyol527 
Snow Creek Mining Co., Ore.... 1310 

Snowshoe Mining Co., Idaho 727 

Snowstorm Apex Mng. Co., Idaho 727 
Snowstorm Ext. Copper Mng. Co., 

s Idaho 7 727 

Snowstorm Group, Alaska 162 

Snowstorm Mines Cons., Mont. . . . 953 
Snowstorm Mining Co.. Idaho.... 727 
Socorro Mng. & Mlg. Co.. N. M.1258 
Soffe Silver Mining Co.. Utah... 1370 
Sombreretc Mng. Co. (Mc.ricana; 

Compania Metalnrgica} 1662 

Sombreretillo Mng. Co., S. A.. 

Sonora 1 743 

Sombrero Development Co., Ariz.. 198 

Sonora, Mines of 1714 

Sonora Central Mines Co., Sonora.1743 
Sonora Chief Mng. Co., Sonora.. 1743 
Sonora Copper Mng. Co., Sonora.1743 
vSonora Copper Sm. Co., Sonora.. 1743 
Sonora Development Co., Sonora.1743 



CVl 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Sonora Exploration Co., Sonora.1744 
Sonora Mexican Silver Mines, 

Ltd., Sonora 1744 

Sonora Mng. & Dev. Co., Sonora.1744 
Sonora Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho.. 727 
Sonera-Pacific Mng. Co., Sonora.1744 

Sons of Gwalia, Ltd., W. A 1909 

South America, Mines of 1763 

South American Cop. Syn., Ltd., 

Venezuela 1801 

South American Dev. Co., Ecua- 
dor 1790 

South American Gold & Platinum 

Co., Colombia 1790 

South American Metal Co. (The). 

Chile 1786 

South Australia, Mines of 1894 

South Butte Mining Co., Mont 1003 

South Cardiff Mining Co., Utah.. 1402 

South Carolina, Mines of 1315 

South Chandler Mine, Minn 873 

South Crofty, Ltd., England 1808 

South Dakota, Mines of 1316 

South Divide Mines Co., Nev.-. . . .1159 
South Easter Mining Co., B. C. .1578 

Southeastern Mng. Co.. Xev 1107 

Southeast Missouri Mng. Corp.. 

Oklahoma 1291 

Southern Agric. Chem. Corp., 

Tennessee 1331 

Southern Aluminum Co. (Alumi- 
num Co. of America ) 69 

Southern Arizona Mng. Co., Ariz. 333 
Southern Arizona Sm. Co., Ariz.. 299 
Southern California Gold Dredg. 

Co., California 483 

Southern Divide Mng. Co., Nev...ll59 
Southern Eureka Mng. Co., Calif. 484 
Southern Idaho Dev. Co., Idaho.. 669 
Southern Lead & Zinc Co., Kan.. 744 

Southern Leas. Co., Ga 633 

Southern Manganese Corp., Ga... 633 
Southern Manganese Corp., Tenn.1332 
Southern Pacific Gold & Copper 

M. & M. Co., Utah 1370 

Southern Swansea Mng. Co., Utah. 1371 
Southern Zinc & Mng. Co., Inc., 

Tenn.-Va 1332 

South Eureka Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

California 483 

South Eork Gold Gravel Co., Cal. 483 

South Eork Mng. Co., Idaho 669 

South llecla Ext. Mng. Co., Utah. 1402 
South llecla Mining Co., Utah... 1403 
South Iron Blossom M. Co., Utah. 1461 
South Kalgurli Cons., Ltd., W. A. 1910 
South Keystone Cons. Mng. Co., 

California . 483 



PAGE 

South Lake Mining Co., Mich.... 829 
South New Moon Gold Mng. Co., 

Victoria 1904 

South Park M. & Dev. Co., Utah. 1403 
South Range Mining Co., Mich.. 830 
South Ray Copper Mng. Co., Ariz. 326 
South Side Mining Co., Kansas... 745 
South Side Mining Co., Mich.... 830 
South Standard Mng. Co., Utah.. 1461 

South Star Mining Co., Utah 1371 

South Urals Mng. & Sm. Co., Ltd., 

Russia 1818 

South Utah Mines & Smelt., Utah.1371 

Southwest Africa, Mines of 1930 

Southwest Africa Co., Ltd. (The), 

Southwest Africa 1930 

Southwest Comstock Ext. Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1107 

Southwestern Copper Co., Ariz... 262 
Southwestern Leas. & Dev. Co., 

Arizona 198 

Southwestern Miami D. Co., Ariz. 225 
Southwestern Mines Co., Nevada. 1107 

Southwestern Mng. Co., Colo 577 

Southwestern Nevada Mines Co., 

Nevada 1107 

Southwest Inspiration Copper Co., 

Arizona 315 

South Yuba Mng. & Sm. Co., Cal.. 483 

Spain, Mines of 1818 

Spanish Belt Ext. Silver Mines 

Co., Nevada 1107 

Sparks Divide Mng. Co., Nev....ll59 

Sparta Mining Co., Nevada 1107 

Spassky Cop. Mine, Ltd., Siberia. 1878 
Spearhead Gold M. Co. (Reorg.), 

Nevada 1198 

Specie Payment Gold Mng. Co., 

Colorado 577 

Speculator Group (North Butte 

Mng. Co.) 999 

Spelter Mining Co., Okla 1291 

Spence Mineral Co., California... 484 

Spiral Lead & Zinc Co., Mo 893 

Spokane Cons. Tung. Co., Wash.. 1505 

Spokane Copper Co., Wash 1505 

Spokane Lead Co., S. D 1327 

Spokane Mng. & Dev. Corp., B. C. 1579 
Spokane-Montana Mng. Co., Mont. 953 
Spokane Rocher de Boule Mng. 

Co., B. C 1579 

Spokane Tin Mines Co., Wash... 1505 
Spokane Tin & Tung. Co., Wash. 1506 
Spotted Horse Mining Co., Mont. 953 
Spring Gulch M. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 577 
Springs Mines, Ltd., Transvaal. . .1944 

Spring Valley Iron Co., Mich 856 

Spruce Monarch Mining Co., Nev.1107 



evil 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Square Deal Gold Mng. Co., Colo. 578 
Square Deal Mng. & Royalty Co., 

Missouri 893 

Squaw Peak Copper Mng. Co., 

Arizona 366 

Squires Mining Co., C. W., Kan., 745 
Stag Canon Fuel Co. (Phelps 

Dodge Corp.) Ill 

Stag Mining Co., Kansas 745 

Stampede Mines Co., Utah 1372 

Standard Amalgamated Ex. Corp., 

California 484 

Standard Chem. Co., Colo.-Utah.. 578 
Standard Chewelah M. Co., Wash.1506 
Standard Copper Mines Co., Alas. 162 
Standard Divide Ext. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1159 

Standard Divide Mng. Co., Nev..ll60 
Standard Gold-Bearing M. & M. 

Co., Colorado 578 

Standard Metals Co., Arizona 334 

Standard Metals Co., Nevada 1108 

Standard Metals Corp., Nevada. . .1108 

Standard Minerals Co., Ariz 262 

Standard Silver Lead Mng. Co., 

B. C 1579 

Standard Tungsten Co., Calif 484 

Standard Zinc Lead Mng. Co., 

Oklahoma 1291 

Stanley Mines Co., Colo 578 

Stanley Mining Co., Idaho 728 

Star Antimony Co., Idaho 728 

Stargo Silver Belt Mng. Co., Ariz. 233 
Star Lake Gold Mines, Ltd., Mani- 
toba 1590 

Starless Mine, Utah 1419 

Star Mining Co., Idaho 728 

Star Mng. & Mlg. Co., B. C 1580 

Starr King Mine, Inc., Calif 484 

Stars Cons. Mng. Co., Colo 624 

Star Tunnel & Mng. Co., Colo.... 578 
Star of the West Mng. Co., Nev.. 1108 
Statehood Mines Co., N. Mexico. 1259 
States Mutual Cons. Mines Co., 

Xevada 1108 

Stearns & King Mine, Mont 954 

Steckner Gold Mng. Co., Idaho... 669 
Steel & Tube Co. of America 

(The) , Wisconsin 1516 

Steeple Rock Dev. Co., N. Mexico.1259 
Steifer Mining Co., P. B., Calif.. 485 

Stene Cons. Copper Co., Ariz 262 

Steptoe Valley Sm. & Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1109 

Sterling Copper Co., Arizona 177 

Sterling Divide Mng. Co., Nevada. 1160 
Sterling Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho.. 728 
Sterling Silver-Lead Co., Wash... 1506 



PAGE 

Sterling Silver Mountain M. Co., 

Idaho 728 

Stevens Copper Mng. Co., Ariz... 236 

Stevenson Mine, Minnesota 873 

Stewart Mining Co., Idaho 728 

Stibnite Mining Co., Utah 1419 

Stockholders Mining Co., Calif... 485 
Stockton Standard Mng Co., Utah.1372 
Stockwell Gold Mng. Syn. Cal... 489 

Stoddard Milling Co., Arizona 366 

Stoddard Mines Co., Arizona 366 

Storm Cloud Mine, Arizona 366 

Stratton Cons. Copper Co., Ariz.. 299 

Stratton Copper Co., Arizona 29*) 

Stratton Cripple Creek M. & D. Co., 

Colorado '. 612 

Stratton's Independence, Colo 612 

Strong Gold Mng. Co., Colo 612 

Study Butte Mining Co., Texas... 1340 

Sturdy Gold Mining Co., Ariz 243 

Success Mining Co., Ltd., Ida 730 

Sudan Gold Field Co., Ltd., Egypt. 1921 

Sulitelma Aktiebolag, Norway 1812 

Sullivan Copper Dev. Co., 'Ariz... 178 

Sullivan Zinc Mng. Co., Mo 893 

Sulphide Corp., Ltd., N. S. W. . . .1887 
Sulphuret Mng. & Red. Co., Colo. 579 
Sulphur Mining & Railroad Co., 

Virginia 1472 

Sultan Mine, Nevada 1109 

Sultana-Arizona Copper Co., Ariz. 327 

Sultana Mines Co., Minnesota 873 

Sultana Silver Mines Co., Nev 1109 

Sumitomo Copper Co., Japan 1860 

Summit Copper Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Colorado 579 

Summit Development Co., Mont.. 954 
Summit Grout) (Utter, Geo. H.).l263 
Summitville Ore Cone. Co., Ltd., 

Xew York 1267 

Sumpter Gold Dredging Co., Ore. 1310 
Sunbeam Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1160 
Sunburst Cons. Mines Corp., Colo. 579 

Sunday Lake Iron Co., Mich 856 

Sun Dial Gold Mng. Co., Ariz 277 

Sunloch Mines, Ltd., B. C 1580 

Sun-Moon Leasing Co., Colo 580 

Sunny Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1160 

Sunny side Copper Co., Calif 485 

Sunnyside Gold Mines Co., Colo.. 580 

Sunnnyside Mining Co., Ariz 277 

Sunnyside M. & M. Co., Colo. .117-580 
Sunset-Banner Mng. Co., Idaho... 731 

Sunset Copper Co., N. Mex 1259 

Sunset Copper Co., Wash 1506 

Sunset Copper Mng. Co., Ariz.... 315 

Sunset Mining Co., Idaho 669 

Sunset Mng. & Dev. Co., Nevada. 1109 



cvin 



INDEX TO MINfNG COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Sunshine Cons. Mng. Co., Idaho.. 731 
Sunshine Mining Co., Ltd., Idaho. 731 

Sun Tungsten Co., Colo 580 

Superior Arizona Cop. Co., Ariz.. 316 
Superior-Bonanza Mng. Co., Ariz. 316 
Superior Bonanza M. Co., Sonora.1745 
Superior & Boston Cop. Co., Ariz. 226 
Superior Copper Co., Michigan... 830 
Superior Copper Co., Ltd., Ont...l609 
Superior Copper Mines Co., Wis. .1517 
Superior & Globe Copper Co., Ariz. 228 
Superior Ray Copper Co., Ariz... 316 
Superior Saffofd Cop. Co., Ari.. 317 
Superstition Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz. 317 

Surf Inlet Gold Mines, B. C 1580 

Surprise Mine, B. C 1580 

Susquehanna Mng. Co., N. Mex.. 1259 
Sutherland Divide Annex M. Co., 

Nevada 1160 

Sutherland Divide Ext. Mng. Co., 

N'cvada 1160 

Sutherland Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1160 

Sutter Creek Mng. Co., Calif 485 

Swansea Cons. Gold & Cop. Mng. 

Co., Arizona 404 

Swansea Cons. Mng. Co., Utah... 1461 

Swansea Ext. Mng. Co., Utah 1461 

Swansea Lease, Inc., Arizona 405 

Swarthmore Cons. Mng. Co., Colo. 580 

Swartz Mining Co., Mo 893 

Swastika Development Co., Ariz.. 366 

Swastika Mining Co., Mont 954 

Swastika Mining Co., Utah 1404 

Swastika Silver & Copper Co., 

Arizona 366 

Sweden, Mines of 1829 

Swedish-Canadian Gold M. Corp., 

Ontario 1609 

Sweepstake Mining Co., Alaska... 163 
Swisshelm Gold-Silver Co., Ariz.. 178 
Sylvanite Gold Mines, Ltd., Ont..l639 
Symmes-Young Silver Mines, Ltd., 

"Ontario 1610 

Syncline Gold-Silver-Copper Mng. 

.,., Nevada 1109 

Syndicate Copper Co., Mont 1003 

Syndicate Copper Mng. Co. (Tuo- 

lumne C. M. Co.) 1005 

Syndicate Mining Co., P. 1 1869 

Syndicate Mining Co., Utah 1372 

Syndicate Mng. & Explor. Co., Ida. 731 
Syndicate Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. . 581 
Syndicate Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah. 1372 
Syracuse- Mining Co., Minn 873 

Table Mountain Cop. Co.. Ariz.. 317 

Table Rock Mng. Co., Calif 485 

oma Smelter, Wash 1506 



PAGE 

Tacoma Steel Co., B. C 1580 

Tajo ; Minas del, Sinaloa 1714 

Takilma Smelting Co., Oregon. .. .1310 

Talisman Cons., Ltd., N. Z 1912 

Talisman Cons. Mng. Co., Utah.. 1373 
Talkeetna Mining Co., Alaska.... 163 

Talladega Iron Co., Alabama 121 

Tamarack & Custer Cons. Mng. 

Co., Idaho. 731 

Tamarack Mining Co., Mich 832 

Tama Silver Mining Co.', Texas. . .1340 

Tanalyk Corp., Ltd., Russia 1818 

Tanganyika Concessions, L t d., 

Congo ...1917 

Tank Pass Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz.. 405 

Taos Mining Co., N. Mexico 1259 

Taquah Mng. & Explor. Co., Ltd., 

West Africa 1948 

Tar Baby Mining Co., Utah 1404 

Tarbox Mining Co., Montana 954 

Tar Creek Mng. Co., Mo 893 

Tarheel Copper Co., Ltd., B.C... 1581 
Tar River Mining Co., Oklahoma . 1292 
Tash-Orn Mines, Ltd., Ontario. . .1610 
Tasinan & Crown Lyell Ext. Mines, 

Tasmania 1903 

Tasmania, Mines of 1895 

Tasmania G. Mine, Ltd., Tasmania.1903 
Tassoo Mng. & Srn. Co., Ltd., B. C.1581 
Taunton-New Bedford Copper Co., 

.Massachusetts 747 

Taylor Mng. Co., Ltd., B. C.I. . . .1581 
Taylor Molybdenite Mine, Ont...l610 
Taylor Mountain Mng. Co., Colo.. 581 

Teacup Mining Co., Nevada 1110 

Techatticup Mine, Nevada 1110 

Teck-Hughes G. Mines, Ltd., Ont..l640 
Tecoma Cons. Mines Co., Nev...lllO 
Tecoma Cons. Mng. Co., Utah.. ..1373 

Tecopa Cons. Mng. Co., Calif 486 

Teddy Bear Group, Colo 581 

Teddy Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., Ida. 732 

Tedoc Mining Co., Calif 486 

Tehidy Minerals, Ltd., England. . .1808 
Teikelt Gold Mining Co., Alaska.. 163 

Tejon Mining Co., Ariz 178 

Tekka Limited, Malaya.- 1838 

Tekka-Taiping, Ltd., Malay 1838 

Tek Mng., Mlg., & Leas. Co., Colo. 581 
Telephone Girl Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1161 

Telescope Mountain M. Co., Colo.. 581 
Telluride Chief Mng. Co., Ariz... 263 
Telluride & Chloride Leas. M. & 

M. Co., Arizona 263 

Telluride M., M. & Dev. Co., Ariz. 277 
Tcmiskaming & Hudson Bay Mng. 

Co., Ltd., Ontario 1633 



cix 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Temiskaming Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont 1633 

Temple Mining Co., Arkansas 413 

Tenaho Mill & Mng. Co., Nev....lllO 

Tenas Mining Co., Wash 1507 

Tenderfoot Hill Cons. Mng. Co., 

Colorado-S. Dakota 612 

Tennesee, Mines of 1328 

Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad 

Co., Alabama 121 

Tenn. Copper & Chemical Corp., 

Tennessee 1332 

Tennessee Copper Co., (Tenn. Cop. 

& Chein. Corp.) 1333 

Tennessee Manganese Co., Tenn.. 1337 
Tennessee Zinc & Lead Co., Mo.. 893 

Tennessee Mine, Arizona 263 

Tennessee Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. 582 

Tepee Mng. & Dev. Co., Colo 582 

Tepic, Mines of 1748 

Terra Nova Properties, Ltd., Nfld.1660 
Terrible Dunderberg Mng. & Pow. 

Co., Colorado 582 

Terrible Edith Mine, Idaho. ...... 732 

Teter-Stone Azurite M. Co., Ariz. 178 

Texan Mining Co., Utah 1404 

Texas, Mines of 1337 

Texas Almaden Mng. Co., Texas.. 1340 
Texas-Arizona .Copper Co., Ariz.. 299 
Texas Canyon Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

N. Mexico 1259 

Texas Copper & Refining Co., Tex. 1340 
Texas Dev. & Mng. Co., Texas.. 1340 
Texas Gulf Sulphur Co., Texas... 1340 

Texas Mining Co., Oklahoma 1292 

Teziutlan Copper Co., Puebla 1712 

Teziutlafi Copper M. & S. Co., 

Puebla 1712 

Tharsis Sulphur & Cop. Co., Ltd., 

Spain 1827 

Tharsis-York Co., Sonora 1745 

Third Venture Mng. Co., Colo.... 582 
Thomas Cruse Mng. & Dev. Co., 

Montana 954 

Thomas-Culross Mining Co., Alas.. 163 
Thomas Furnace Co. (The), Wis.1517 

Th. >mas Iron Co., N. J 1228 

Thompson Divide Mng. Co., Nev.1161 
Thompson-Quincy Cons. Mng. Co., 

I'tah " 1461 

Thompson-Walsh Mines Co., Nev.llll 

Thor M ining Co., Utah 1404 

Thousand Member Gold M. Assoc., 

Nevada 1111 

Three Buttes & Consumnes Cop. 

Mines, California 486 

Three Forks Cop. Mng. Co., Mont. 955 
Three Kings Cons. M. Co., Utah. 1443 
Three Kings Silver M. Co., Utah. 1444 



PAGE 

Threelodes Mining Co., Oregon. . .1310 
Three Man Mining Co., Alaska... 163 

Three R Mine, Arizona 334 

Three Star Mining Co., Ontario. . .1610 
Thumb Butte Cons. Mines Co., 

Arizona 366 

Thunder Creek Mng. Co., Wash.. 1507 

Thunder Mining Co., Ltd., Ont 1610 

Ticon Mining Co., Montana 955 

Tidewater Copper Co., B. C 1582 

Tiffany Mining Co., Wis 1517 

Tiger Gold Mng. Co., Ariz 367 

Tiger Lead & Zinc Co., Okla 1292 

Tiger Mining Co., Nevada 1111 

Tightner Mine, California 486 

Tigre Mining Co., S. A., Sonora. .1745 

Tillicum Dev. Co., Wash 1507 

Tillie Starbuck Mines Co., Ariz. . 367 
Timber Buttc Mining Co. (Elm 

Orlu Mng. Co.) 996 

Times Mining Co., Ariz 277 

Tin Areas of Nigeria, Ltd., 

Nigeria 1923 

Tincroft Mines, Ltd.. Eng 1808 

Tin Fields of Northern Nigeria, 

Ltd., Nigeria 192-J 

Tintaya Mine, Peru 1799 

Tintic Bullion Mng. Co., Utah 1461 

Tintic Central Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Utah 1461 

Tintic Chief Mng. Co.. Utah.... 1462 
Tintic Coalition Mines Co., Utah.. 1462 

Tintic Comb. Mng. Co., Utah 1462 

Tintic Co., Utah 1462 

Tintic-Davis Mng. Co., Utah 1462 

Tintic Delaware Mng. Co., Utah.. 1462 
Tintic Delmar Mining Co.. Utah.. 1462 
Tintic Drain Tunnel Co.,. Utah... 1463 
Tintic Empire Mining Co., Utah.. 1463 

Tintic Milling Co., Utah 1463 

Tintic Mine, Arizona -. 263 

Tintic Mng. & Dev. Co., Utah.... 1463 
Tintic Paymaster Mines Co., Utah. 1463 
Tintic Prize Winner Mng. Co., 

Utah ! 1464 

Tintic Quadrangle Mng. Co., Utah. 1464 
Tintic Standard Mining Co.. Utah. 1464 

Tintic Star Mining Co., Utah 1464 

Tintic Tunnel Co., Utah 1464 

Tintic Union Mining Co.. Utah... 1465 
Tintic Winchester Mng. Co., Utah. 1465 

Tintic Zenith Mng:. Co., Utah 1465 

Tintic Zinc Co., Utah 1465 

Tipperary Mining Co., Arizona. , . . 263 
Tip Top Cons. Mng. Co.. Ariz... 367 

Tip Top Copper Co., Ariz 299 

Tip Top Mine, Ontario 1610 

Tiro General de Charcas Mine, 

San Luis Potosi 1713 



ex 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Tiro General ; Cia Minera del, San 

Luis Potosi 1713 

Tisdale Gold Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont.1610 
Titanic Copper Mountain Mng. 

Co., Cal 486 

Todd Mining Co. R. B., Nev 1111 

Tod-Stambaugh Co., (The), Minn. 873 
Toggery-Divide Mng. Co., Nev. . . .1161 
Toggery Ext. Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1161 

Tohoqua Mining Co., Nev 1111 

Toltec Mine, Michigan .. . . 832 

Tomboy Divide Mng. Co., Nev. . . .1162 
Tomboy G. Mines Co., 'Ltd., Colo. 582 

Tomboy Mines, Arizona 244 

Tombstone Cons. Mines Co., Ltd., 

Arizona 1 78 

Tom Moore Group. Utah 1419 

Tommy Burns Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Nova Scotia 1592 

Tommy Burns Gold Mng. Co., Ont.1653 
Tom Reed Apex Mining Co.. Ariz. 277 
Tom Reed Gold Mines Co., Ariz.. 277 
Tom Reed, Jr., Mining Co., Ariz. . 279 
Tongkah Harbour Tin Dredg. Co.. 

Siam .../ 1871 

Tonopah Bankers Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1162 

Tonopah Belmont Dev. Co., Nev. 1218 
Tonopah Bonanza Mng. Co., Nev. . 1220 
Tonopah Divide Junior Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1162 

Tonopah Div. Mng. Co.. Nev.l 162-1956 
Tonopah Dividend Mng. Co.. Nev. 1164 
Tonopah East End Dev. Co., Nev. 1220 

Tonopah Ext Mng. Co., Nev 1220 

Tonopah Gold Mountain Mng. 

Co., Nevada .1165 

Tonopah Gold Zone Mng. Co., Nev. 1221 
Tonopah Hasbrouck Ext. Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1 165 

Tonopah Hasbrouck Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1165 

Tonopah Kawich Mng Co., Nev.. 1111 
Tonopah Midway Mng. Co., Nev. 1222 
Tonopah Mng. Co., of Nevada .. 1223 
Tonopah Nicaragua Co., Nicara- 
gua 1757 

Tonopah North Star Tun. & Dev- 

Co.. Nevada 1224 

Tonopah Placers Co., Colo 583 

Tonopah 76 Cons. Mng. Co., Nev.. 1224 
Tonopah Victor Mng. Co., Nev... 1225 
Tonopah Western Cons. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1225 

Too Close Mining Co., Nevada. .. 1111 
Toock> Gold Hill M. & M. Co., 

Utah 1373 

Tooele Smelter (Intern Sin. Co.} . 90 



PAGE 

Topeka Cons. Mng. Co., Colo, . . . 583 
Torch Lake Mining Co., Mich.... 832 

Toronto Mng. Co., Colo 584 

Torpedo Divide Mng. Co., Nev... 1165 

Torpedo Mine, New Mexico 1260 

Torreon, S. A. ; Compania Metal- 

urgica de, Coahuila 1686 

Tortillita Copper Co., Arizona.... 317 
Totoral ; Sociedad Estanifera, Bo- 
livia '. 1768 

Tottenville Copper Co., Inc., N. Y.1267 
Tough-Oakes Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1640 

Tough-Oakes Mng. Co., Ltd., Ont.1640 

Towne Mining Co., Ariz 263 

Trade Dollar Div. Mng. Co., Nev. 1165 

Trail Creek Mining Co., Cal 487 

Trail Smelter, B. C 1582 

Transvaal, Mines of 1931 

Transvaal Copper Mines Co. of 

Utah, Sonora 1745 

Treadwell Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1165 
Treasure Divide Mng. & Leas. Co., 

Nevada 1165 

Treasure Mining Co.. Cal 487 

Treasure Mountain Mng. Co., B. C.1582 
Tremont & Devon Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Michigan 832 

Trench Cons. Mines Co., Ariz. . . . 334 
Trenton-Sonora Mng. Co., Sonora. 1747 

Trephine Mining Co., Utah. 1373 

Tres Senores Mng Co., Zacatecas.1750 
Tretheway Sil. -Cobalt Mine, Ltd., 

Ontario 1635 

Triangle Mines Co.. Oklahoma. . . .1292 

Triangle Mining Co.. Utah 1404 

Triangle Mng. & Dev. Co., Mont. 955 
Tri-Bnllion Sm. & Dev. Co., N. M.1260 
Trilby Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1166 
Tri-Metallic Mining Co., Ltd., 

Idaho '. . . . 669 

Trimountain Mining Co., Mich. 782-832 
Trinidad Mng. & Sm. Co., Wash. 1507 

Trinity Copper Co.. Cal 487 

Trinity Divide Mng. Co., Nev.... 1166 
Trinity Gold Mng. & Red. Co., Cal. 489 

Tri-State Chrome Co.. Ore, 1310 

Tri-State Company, Oklahoma. . . .1292 

Trojan Mining Co., S. D 1327 

Tronoh Mines, Ltd., Malaya 1838 

Trout Creek M. & M. Co., Oregon.1310 
Troy Arizona Copper Co., Ariz.. 317 
True Fissure Mn. & Mg. Co.. B. C.1583 
Tucker Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho.. 732 
Tucker Mountain M. & M. Co., 

Colorado 584 

Tutson Arizona Copper Co., Ariz. 300 
Tucson Cons. Copper Co.. Ariz. . 300 



CXI 



PAGE 

Tularosa Copper Co., N. M 1260 

Tulloch Gold & Copper Co., N. M.1261 
Tulsa-Pittsburg Mng. Co., Mo.... 893 
Tulsa-Sapulpa-Miami Ass'd Mines 

Co., Okla ....1292 

Tungsten Co., of America, Conn. . . 626 

Tungsten Explor. Co., Colo 584 

Tungsten Girl Co., Colo 584 

Tungsten Hill Mining Co., Idaho. 670 

Tungsten Metals Corp., Colo 584 

Tungsten Mines Co., Calif 489 

Tungsten Mountain Mines Co., 

The, Colorado 585 

Tungsten Prod. Mng. Co., Colo.. 585 
Tungsten Prod. Mng. Co., Colo. 586 
Tungsten Reef Mining Co., Ariz. 179 
Tuolumne Copper Mng. Co., Mont.1003 
Tuolumne Giant Gold Mines Co., 

California 490 

Turret Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo. ... 585 
Tusa Peak Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., N. Mex 1261 

Tuscarora-Nevada Co., Nev 1111 

Tuscumbia Mining Co., Idaho.... 732 
Tuscumbia Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ariz. 367 

Twenty-One Mng. Co., Cal 490 

Twin Butte Mng. & Sm. 'Co., Ariz. 301 

Twin Cities Mng. Co., Mo 893 

Twin City Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mont. 955 
Twin -Edwards Copper Mine Co., 

North Carolina 1269 

Twin Ports & Empire Mng. Co., 

Colorado 585 

Two Lakes Copper Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario 1610 

Two Peaks Mining Co., Ariz 179 

Tyee Copper Co.. Ltd., B. C 1583 

Tyler Mng. & Mlg. Co., Ltd., Ida. . 732 
Tyndale Copper Mng. Co., N. M.1261 
Tyrone-El Paso Copper Co., N. M.1261 
Tzarena Group, Montana 1005 

Ubchebe Copper Mines & Sm. 

Co., California 490 

Umatilla-Tonopah Mng. Co., Nev.1225 

I 'na Mining Co., Idaho 670 

Uncia ; Compania Minera de, Bo- 
livia 1768 

I'nde Sam Cons. Mng. Co.. Utah. 1465 

Underwriters Land Co., Okla 1292 

Unevida G. Mng. Co.. Nev.-Utah.1373 

Union Amal. Mng. Co., Nev 1111 

Union Basin Mining Co., Ariz... 263 

Union Chief Mining Co., Utah 1374 

Union Cons. Mining Co., Nev.... 1111 

Union Copper Co., Nev 1112 

Union Copper Land & Mng. Co., 
Michigan 832 



PAGE 

Union Copper Mine, N. C .'1269 

LInion Corp., Ltd., Transvaal 1944 

Union Dev. Co., California 490 

Union Divide Mng. Co., Nev 1166 

Union Hill Mines, California 490 

Union Leas. Co., Colo 613 

Union Metal Mines Co., Mo 893 

Union Metals Corp., Ariz 263 

Union Mines Co., Nevada 1112 

Union Mines Co., Wash 1 507 

Union Miniere du Haut Katanga, 

Congo 1919 

Union Mining Co., B. C 1583 

Union Ore Co., Minnesota 874 

Unionville Mining Co., Nevada. . .1112 
United Alkali Co., Ltd., Spain .... 1828 
United Arizona Cop. Mng. & Sm. 

Co., Arizona 367 

United Bingham Copper Co., Utah. 1420 
United Comstock Pumping Assoc. 

Nevada 1112 

United Cons. Mines Co. of Tintic, 

Utah 1466 

United Copper Co., Oregon 1311 

United Copper Co., U. S 112 

United Copper Gold Mines Co., 

Oregon 1311 

United Eastern Mng. Co., Ariz.. 279 
United Globe Mines, Arizona .... 229 

United Gold Mines Co.. Colo 613 

United Gold Mining Co., Ore.... 1311 
United Greenwater Copper Co., 

California 490 

United Jerome Copper Co., Ariz.. 382 
United Kirkland Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1641 

United Lead Co., Colo 586 

United Lead Co., Idaho 670 

United Magma Mines Co., Ariz.. 318 

United Metals Co., Alaska 164 

United Metals Mng. Co., B. C...1583 
United Metals & Power Corp.. Ida. 670 
United Metals Selling Co.. N. Y. . .1267 
United Mexican Mines, Sonora. . .1747 
United Mines Co.. Guanajuato ...1694 

LTnited Mines Co., Idaho 670 

United Mines Co., U. S 112 

United Mines Co., of Ariz 406 

United Mining Co., Nevada 1112 

United M. M. & Copper Sm. Co.. 

Maryland-Pennsylvania 746 

United North Mines Co., Ariz 280 

United Promontory Mining Co.. 

Utah 1374 

United Silver Copper Mng. Co.. 

\Vashington 1508 

United Smelters, Railway & Copper 

Co., Wyoming 1527 

United Sm. & Ref. Co., Mont.... 956 



cxn 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

United States, Mines of 69 

United States Continental Mines 

Co., Arizona 368 

United States Copper Co., N. M..1261 
United States Copper Mng. Co., 

Montana 956 

U. S. Explor. Co., Cal 490 

United States Fuel Co. (U. S. S., 

R. & M. Co.} 116 

U. S. Gold Corp., Colo 586 

U. S. Lead & Zinc Co., Mo 894 

U. S. Manganese Co., Va 1472 

U. S. Manganese Corp.. Mont... 1006 

U. S. Metals Red. Co., Utah 1374 

United States Metals Red. Co., 

Utah 1374 

t'n-itcd States Metals Refining Co. 
(American Metal Co., Ltd.) .... . 71 

United States Mng. Co., Colo 613 

United States Platinum Co., Ariz. 191 

U. S. Red. & Ref. Co., Colo 613 

United States Smelting Co., Kans.- 

Oklahoma 745-1292 

U. S. Sm.. Ref. & Mining Co., 

United States 112 

U. S. Sm., Ref. & Mng. E.vplor. 

Co. (U. S.S., R. & M. Co.}.... 118 
United States Steel Corp., U. S.. 118 
United States Stores Co. (U. S. S., 

R. & M. Co.} 117 

U. S. Tungsten Corp., Nev 1112 

United States Vanadium Dev. Co., 

Arizona 327 

United States Zinc Co., Colo 586 

United Tintic Mng. Co., Utah.... 1466 

United Tungsten Cop. Mines, Cal. 491 
United Verde Cons. Co., Arizona.. 382 
United Verde Copper Co.. Ariz.. 383 
United Verde Ext. Mng. Co.. Ariz. 386 
United Verde Jr.. Co., Ariz...... 389 

United Western Mines Co., Ariz.. 280 
United Zinc Smelting Corp., Mo.. 894 

Unity Gold Mines Co., Idaho 671 

Unity Mining Co., Mo 895 

Universal Ore Prod. Syn. Colo... 586 
University Mines, Ltd., Ontario. . .1635 
U. P. R. Mlg. & Mng. Co., Colo.. . 586 
Utacala Explor. Co.. California... 491 

Utah, Mines of 1341 

Alta-Cottonwood & American Fork 

Districts 1381 

Bingham District 1407 

Park City District 1436 

Tintic Mining District 1444 

( 'tali-Apex Mining Co., Utah 1420 

Utah-Arizona Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Arizona 263 

Utah Baltimore Cons. Co., Utah.. 1374 
Utah Bellevue Mines Co., Idaho. . 671 



PAGE 

Utah Centennial Mining Co., Utah.1404 
Utah Cons. Mines Co. of Tintic, 

Utah 1466 

Utah Cons. Mining Co., Utah 1423 

Utah Cons. Mn. & Ml. Co., Utah. 1466 

Utah Copper Co., Utah 1425 

Utah & Eastern Cop. Co., Utah... 1374 
Utah Lead & Copper Co., Utah.. 1375 

Utah Leasing Co., Utah 1375 

Utah Metal & Tunnel Co., Utah . . 1433 
L T tah Minerals Concentration Co., 

Utah 1466 

Utah Mining Co., Utah 1375 

Utah Mng., Mlg. & Trans. Co., 

Utah 1374 

Utah-Missouri Mines Co., Mo 895 

Utah National Mines Co., Utah... 1376 
Utah-Oregon Mines Co., Utah.... 1376 

Utah Ore Sampling Co., Utah 1376 

Utah Placer Mining Co., Utah. . . .1376 

Utah Quicksilver Co., Ore 1311 

Utah Railway Co. (U. S. S., R. 

& M. Co.y. -... 117 

Utah-Reliance Mining Co., Utah.. 1376 
Utah Revenue Mines Corp., Utah. 1376 
Utah Silver Lead Mines Co., Utah.1377 
Utah-United Copper Co., Utah... 1377 
Utah-Yerington Mng. Co., Nev. . . .1113 

Utica Gold Mng. Co., Cal 491 

I'tica Mines, Ltd.. B. C 1583 

Utica Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo 587 

Utopia Mng. & Mlg. Co., Wyo....l527 

Utter, Geo. H. New Mexico 1262 

I'vada Copper Co., Nevada-Utah. 1113 
Uvada Tungsten Co., Nevada ....1113 

Vacas; Compania Minera Las, 

Chile 1786 

Vacation Mining Co., Mo 895 

Yaldez Creek Placer Mines, Ala. 164 

Valdez Gold Co., Alaska 164 

Yaldez Island Copper Co.. B. C..1583 

Valdor Dredging Co., Cal 491 

Valentine Mining Co., Mont 956 

Valley Forge Mng. Co., Mont... 956 

Valley Group, Ariz 301 

Valley Magnesite Co., Wash 1509 

Valley Mining Co., Wash 1509 

Valley View Mining Co., Utah.. 1377 
Vanadium Corp., of Am., Peru.. 1799 
Van Anda Copper & Gold Mines 

Co., Ltd., B. C 1584 

Vancouver Mng. Dev. Syn., B. C.1584 
Vandor Mining Co., Montana... 956 
Van Dyke Copper Co., Ariz.... 229 
Vanguard Gold-Copper Co., Ore. 1311 

Van Roi Mining Co.. B. C 1584 

Vantage Mining Co., Oklahoma. .1293 



cxin 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Yasi-o Mng. Co., Colo 587 

Yelie Mines Corporation, Okla...l293 

Venezuela, Mines of 1799 

Venture Mill Mng. Co., The, Ariz. 389 
Verde Apex Cop. Mng. Co., Ariz. 390 
Verde Central Mines, Inc., Ariz.. 390 
Verde Combination Copper Co., 

Arizona 390 

Verde Grand Copper Co., Ariz.. 391 
Verde Hub Copper Co., Ariz... 391 
Verde Inspiration Mining Co., 

Arizona 391 

Verde Monster Cop. Co., Ariz.. 391 
Verde Queen Copper Co., Ariz. .391 

Verde Queen Mng. Co., Ariz 391 

Verde Squaw Copper Mng. Co., 

Arizona ,. 391 

Verdi Divide Mining Co., Nev...ll66 

Verdun Mining Co., Utah 1444 

Verk Isetz Corp., Siberia 1879 

Vermillion Silver & Lead Mng. 

Co., Mont 956 

Vermont, Mines of 1467 

Vermont Copper Co., Vermont. 1468 
Vernal Divide Mng. Co., Nev. ..1166 
Vernal Mng. Co. of Goldfd, Nev.1199 

Vernon Mng. Co., Colo. 587 

Verona Mining Co., Michigan.. 856 
Veronica Gold Mng. Co., B. C..1584 
Vesuvius Mines Co.. Oregon. ... 1311 

Vesuvius Mining Co., Mo 895 

Viceroy Mining Co., Arizona... 334 
Vicksburg G. & Cop Co.. Utah. 1377 
Victor & Belle Crown Mng. Co., 

Arizona 406 

Victor Cons. Mng. Co., Utah... 1377 
Victor Copper Co.. Arizona.... 392 

Victor Gold Mng. Co., Colo 613 

Victoria, Mines of 1903 

Victoria Cons. Mng. Co., Utah. 1409 
Victoria Cop. Mines Co.. Nev. ..1113 
Victoria Cop. Mng. Co., Mich.. 833 
Victoria Gold Mng. Co., Utah.. 1466 

Victoria Mng. Co., Colo 587 

Victoria Mng. & Sm. Co., N. M.1263 
Victoria Nevada Mng. Co., Nev. 11 13 
Victor Land & Mineral Co., Cal. 491 

Victor Mining Co., Okla.. 1293 

Victor Mining Co., Utah 1405 

Victor Mng. & Sm. Co., Sonora.1747 
Victor Power & Mng. Co., Cal.. 491 
Victor Silver Leaf Mg. Co.. B C.I 584 
Victor Sm & Mng. Co., N. Mex.1263 

Victory Copper Co, Wash 1509 

Victory Cop. Mng. Co., Alaska. 165 
Victory Divide Mng. Co., Nev.. 1166 
Victory Gold Mines Co., Nev. ..1113 
Victory Gold Mng. Co.. Colo... 613 



PAGE 

Victory Mining Co., Oklahoma. 1293 
Vienna-International Mng. ( 

Idaho 732 

Viking Copper Co., B. C 1584 

Village Main Reef Gold Mng. Co. 

Ltd., Transvaal 1945 

Vincent Creek G. & C. Qo... Ore. 1312 
Vindicator Cons. Gold Mng. Co., 

Colo.- Wyo 614-1 527 

Vindicator Div. Mng. Co., Nev. 1166 
Vindicator Mines & Tunnel Co., 

Colo 588 

Vindicator Mng. Co.. Arizona.. 407 
Vinegar Hill Mining Co., Kan.. 745 
Vinegar Hill Zinc Co.. Illinois- 

Wis 737-1517 

Vipont Mining Co., Utah 1377 

Virgin Copper Co., Pa 1315 

Virginia, Mines of .'....' 1468 

Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.. 

Virginia .1472 

Virginia Cons. Gold Mng. Co., 

Idaho 671 

Virginia Copper Mine, Va 1473 

Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke Co., 

Va 1472 

Virginia Lead & Zinc Corp., Co. 1473 
Virginia Louise Mng. Co., Nev. 11 13 

Virginia Mining Co., Va 1474 

Virginia Mining Co., Wash.... 1509 

Virginia Smelting Co., Va 1474 

Virginia Zinc & Chemical Corp.. 

Ltd., Va 1474 

Virtue Mines Devel. Co., Ore... 1312 
Vivian Mining Co., Arizona.... 280 
Volunteer Mining Co., Utah.... 1378 

V 7 Mining Co., Nevada 1114 

Vulcan Cons. Mng. Co., Ariz 301 

Vulcan Mines & Sm. Co.. Colo. 588 
Vulcan Mng., Sm. & Ref. Co., 

Nev. 1114 

Vulture Mines Co., Arizona 244 

Vulture-Wonder Mines ( 

Nev 1114 

Wachman Mng. Co., Ltd., Out. .1611 

Waco Mining Co., Missouri 895 

Wade Mng. & Mlg. Co., Mo... 895 
Wah Chang Mng. & Sm. Co., 

Ltd.. China 1830 

U'ali Chain; Trading Corp. (Wah 

Chang M. & S. Co., Ltd.} 1831 

Waihi Gold Mng. Co., Ltd. N. Z.1912 
Waihi Grand Junction Gold Co., 

Ltd., N. Z 1913 

Wakefield Iron Co., Michigan.... 856 
Waldo Corporation, Oregon. . .1312 
Waldo Mine, Oregon.... " 1312 



cxiv 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Waldo Sm. & Ref. Co., Oregon. 1312 
Waldron Mining Co., Arizona. 264 
Walker Cons. Mng. Co., Calif.. 492 

Walker Mining Co., Calif 492 

Walker Mining Co., Oklahoma. 1293 
Walker Mng. & Dev. Co., Okla.1293 
Walker River Cop. Co., Nev. ..1114 
Wallace Mng., Mlg.. & Realty 

Co., Ida. 732 

Wallapai Chief Mng. Co., Ariz.. 264 
Wallaroo & Moonta Mng & 

Sm. Co., S. A 1894 

Walla Walla Copper Mng. Co., 

Wash 1509 

Wallowa County Mng. & Dev. 

Co., Oregon ' 1312 

Wallower Mill. Mo 895 

Wall Street Copper Co., Nev. ..1115 
Walnut Creek Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 264 

Wariakah Mng. Co., Coio 588 

Wandering Jew Mine, Arizona. 334 
War Baby Lead & Zinc Co., 

Oklahoma .1293 

Ward Gold Coin Mng. Co., Colo. 588 
Ward Mng. & Mlg. Co., Colo.. 588 
Ward Mng, & Mlg. Co., Okla.,1293 
Wardner Leasing Co., Idaho... 733 
Wardwell Osborne Copper 

Mines Co., Arizona 408 

War Eagle Cons. Mines Co., 

Colo 616 

War Eagle Gold & Copper Mng. 

Co., Mont 956 

War Eagle Mng. Co., Oregon. 1312 
War Horse Cop. Mng. Co., Ariz. 179 
\Yarmack Gold Mng. Co., Xcv..lll5 
Warren Realty & Devel. Co., 

Arizona 189 

Warrior Copper Co.. Arizona.. 198 
Wasapika Gold Mines, Ltd., 

Ontario 1611 

Wasatch Bonanza Mining Co., 

Utah ' 1378 

Wasatch Colo. Mng. Co., Colo. 588 

Wasatch Mines Co.. Utah 1405 

Wasatch Utah Mng. Co., Utah. 1406 

Washington, Mines of 1474 

Washington - Arizona Copper 

Co., Arizona 264 

Washington Copper Mines Dev. 

Co., Wash 1509 

Washington Copper Mng Co., 

Michigan 836 

Washington Gold Quartz Mng. 

Co., Nev 1115 

Washington-Iowa Copper Mng. 

Co., Wash 1510 



PAGE 

Washington Iron Co. (Marquette 

Iron Co.) 852 

Washington Land & Mng. Co., 

Mo. 896 

Washington Mine, Colo 588 

Washington Mine, Montana.... 956 
Washington Mine, Ltd., B. C...1585 
Washington Mines Dev. Co., 

Sonora 1747 

Washington Tungsten Mines 

Co., Wash 1510 

Washoe Copper Co., Nevada. .. 1115 
Was/we Red. Works (Anaconda 

C. Mug. Co.) 960 

Washougal Gold & Cop. Mng. 

Co., Wash 1510 

Wasp No. 2 Mng. Co., S. D 1327 

Waterville M. & M, Co, Nev.. .1115 
Wava Mng. & Mlg. Co., Idaho. 671 
Wawbeck Mining Co., Minn.... 874 
Waxahachie Mng. Co.. Okla. ..1293 
Wayland Mining Co, Kansas.. 745 

Wayne Dev. Co, Arizona 302 

Weardale Lead Co, Ltd, Eng..l809 
Weaver Mng. Co, Oklahoma. . .1293 
Webb City-Carterville Dev. Co, 

Mo. 896 

\Ycdge Copper Co., Nevada 1116 

Wedge Gold Mng. & Mlg. Co. 

(The), Utah 1378 

Weedon Mng. Co, Ltd, Que...l656 

Weiler Mine, Idaho 672 

Weimer' Copper Co, Idaho 672 

Welch Mining Co, Okla 1293 

Weiler Gold Mng. Co, Colo... 588 

Wellington Mines Co., Colo 588 

Wenatchee G. Mng. Co., Wash. 1510 
Wenden Copper Co, Arizona... 407 
Wendendale G. Mng. Co, Ariz. 407 
Wentworth Cop. Co, Ltd, N. S.1593 
Wentworth Mines Co, Colo... 589 
Weringer Mines Co., California 492 

West Africa, Mines of 1946 

West Arrowhead Mines Co, 

Nevada 1116 

West^ Coast Mines Co, Idaho.. 672 
'West Coast Mines Co, Oregon. 1313 
West Coast Mng. & Sm. Co, 

Sinaloa 1714 

West Divide Ext. Mng. Co, 

Nevada 1 167 

West Divide Mng. Co., Nevada.1167 
West Dome Cons. Mines, Ont.1653 
West End Chemical Co, Calif.. 493 
West End Cons. Mng. Co, Nev. 1225 
West End Ext. Mng. Co, Nev.. 1226 
West End Opoteca Mines Co, 

Honduras 1754 

Western Arizona Co., Ariz 408 



cxv 



PAGE 

Western Australia, Mines of... 1905 
Western Belle Mug. Co.. B. C..1585 
Western Copper Co., Arizona.. 368 
Western Cop Mng. Co., Wash. 1510 

Western Dev. Co.. Colo 589 

Western Divide Mng. & Mlg. 

Co., Nevada. .1167 

Western Mercury Co., Inc. Cal. 493 
Western Metals Co. (Merchants 

Finance Co.) 459 

Western Mine Explor Syn. B. C.1585 
Western Mines Corp., Calif.... 493 
Western Mines Dev. Co., Nev. .1116 

Western Mng. Co., Colo 624 

Western Mng. & Dev. Co., B. C.1585 
Western Mng. & Dev. Co., N. 

Mex 1263 

Western Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utali.1435 
Western Ore Concentration Co., 

Arizona 264 

Western Ore Purchasing Co., 

Nevada 1116 

Western Pacific Cop. Co., Utah. 1378 
Western Pacific Mines Co., 

Utah 1378 

Western Res. Mng. Co., Mont. 956 
Western Silver Mines Co., Nev. 1116 
Western Slope Copper ,Mng & 

Sm. Co., Colo 589 

Western Sm. & Pow. Co., Mont. 957 

Western Sulphur Co., Wyo 1528 

Western Tunnel Mng Corp., 

Colo 590 

Western Union Mng. Co., Ida.. 733 
Western Utah Cop. Co., Utah.. 1378 
Western Utah Extension Cop- 
per Co., Utah 1379 

Western Zinc Co., Utah 1379 

Western Zinc Oxide Co., Colo. 624 
West Gold Road Mng. Co., Ariz. 281 
West Gore Antimony Co., N. S.1593 
West Hecla Mng. Co., Idaho... 733 

West Hill Mng. Co., Wash 1511 

West Hill Mining Co., Wis 1517 

West Hunter Mining Co.. Idaho 733 

West Indies, Mines of . . 1760 

West Indies Mines Dev. Co., 

Cuba 1761 

West Jordan Smelter, Utah 1379 

West Kirkland Gold Mines. 

Ltd., Ontario 1641 

West Kootenay Power & Light 

Co., Ltd., B. C 1585 

West Mercur Mines Co., Utah. 1379 
West Mexico Mines Co., Baja 

California 1669 

West Minn. 'Mng. Co., Mich... 836 
West Nine Mile Mng. Co., Ida.. 733 
Weston Judkins Co., California. 493 



PAGE 
West Side Gold & Silver Mng. 

Co., Oregon . : 1313 

West Side Mng. Co., Colo 590 

West Spanish Belt Silver Mng. 

Co., Nevada 1116 

West Springs, Ltd.. Transvaal. . 1945 
West Toledo Mines Co., Utah.. 1406 
West Tonopah Mng. Co., Nev. .1227 
West Tree Mines, Ltd., Ont...l611 
West United Verde Copper Co., 

Arizona 392 

West Virginia, Mines of 1511 

West Virginia Lead & Zinc Co.,. 

Oklahoma 1293 

West Virginia Mng. Co., Kan. . . 745 
Wetterhorn Land Co., Mich.... 837 
Wettlaufer-Lorrain Silver Mines, 

Ltd., Ontario 1635 

Whale Mining Co., Nevada. .... 1116 
What Cheer Mining Co., Mo... 896 
Whealkate Mining Co., Mich... 837 
Whirlwind Cons. Mng. Co., 

Utah 1406 

Whitcomb Mng. & Mlg. Co., 

Arizona 302 

White Bird Mng. Co., Okla....l293 
'White Caps Ext. Mines Co., 

Nevada 1116 

White Caps Mng. Co., Nev.... 11 17 
White Chief Cop. Co., Mont... 957 
Whited Mining Co., Oregon. ... 1313 
White Gulch Mining Co., Calif. 493 
Whitehall Mng., Mlg. & Dev. 

Co., Mont 957 

White Hope Syndicate, W. A.. 1910 
White Iron Lake Iron Co., Minn. 874 
White Knob Copper & Dev. Co., 

Calif 494 

White Metals Mng. Co., Ariz... 318 
White Mng. Co.; Wm Foster, 

Oklahoma 1294 

White Oaks Mines 'Cpns., Inc., 

N. Mex 1263 

White Pine Copper Co., Mich.. 837 
White Pine Copper Co., Nev... 1117 
White Pine Ext. Cop. Co., Mich. 838 

White Pine Mng. Co., Calif 494 

White Pine Mng. Co., Nevada.. 1117 
White Pine Sil. Mines Co., Nev.1118 

White Raven Mines, Colo 590 

White Reserve Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Ontario ' 1611 

White Rock Mine, California... 494 

White Rose Mine, Wis 1517 

White Star Mining Co., Utah.. 1379 
White-Victor Copper Mng. Co., 

Arizona 302 

Whitewater Mines, Ltd., B. C...1585 
Whitlach Gold Co., Montana... 957 



CXVl 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Whole Channel "Mines Co., B. C.1585 

W. H. P. Leas. Co,. Colo 616 

Wickenburg Copper M. & R. 

Co., Arizona 368 

Wickes - Corbin Copper Mng. 

Co., Mont 957 

Wickwire Mining Co., Michigan 856 
Wide West Mng. Co,. Colo.... 590 
Wigg Manganese Mines. Brazil.. 1770 
Wig Mountain M. & M. Co.. Utah. 1380 
Wilbert Annex Mng. Co., Idaho 672 

Wilbert M. Co.. Ltd., Idaho 672 

Wilcox Mine, Minnesota 874 

Willard Metals Mng. Co., Nov.. 11 18 

Willard Mines Co., Nevada 1118 

William Patrick Mng. Co.. Xev.lllS 
Williams Lunian Mg. Co., Wyo. 1528 
Willie Rose Cop. Mng. Co., An'/.. 17 ( 
Willow Creek Devel. Co., Alaska 1(>5 
Willow Creek Mines. Alaska... 165 
Willow Creek Mng. Co., Mont.. 958 
Willow Valley \In- Co., Cal., 4'H 

Wilmot Mining Co., Mich 

Wilshire Bishop Creek Co., Cal. 4 ( >4 
Wil- MS. Mn I" tali.. 1380 

Wilson Divide Mng. > v.,1167 

Wilson Mng. X- Sin. Co., Mont 
Wilson-N'evada Mng. Co.. Nev.. 1118 
Wilson Silver Mines Con 

Xevada 1118 

Winch- Id Mng. Co., An'/. 

Windfall Placer Mng. \ Dev. ( 

Montana 958 

Wingfidd Mng. Co., Mo.-()kla.896-1294 
Winnemucca Mountain Mng. Co., 

Xevada 1119 

Winnie-Lawson Zinc Co.. Mo... 896 
Winona Copper Co., Michigan.. 839 
Win on a (i old-Copper Mtm\ & 

Mlg. Co.. Wyo 1528 

Win-U-Will M. & M. Co., Colo. 590 

Wisconsin, Mines of 1511 

Wisconsin-Georgia Coal & Iron 

Co., Ga 633 

Wisconsin Mining Co., Idaho... 734 

Wisconsin Montana M. Co., Mont. 958 

Wisconsin Steel Mines, Minn... 874 

onsin Zinc Co. {A. Z. L. & 

S. Co.) 82-737-1517 

Wise Boy Group, Idaho 673 

Wistar Mining Co., Minnesota.. 874 

Witherbee, Sherman & Co., N. Y.1267 

Wolf Arizona Cop. Co., Ariz.... 368 

If Creek Mining Co., Ariz.. 369 

Wolf Group, B. C. . 1585 

Wolf Mountain Cop. Co., Utah. 1380 
Wolfram Mng. & Sm. Co., Ltd., 

Portugal 1815 



PAGE 

Wolfton Mining Co.. Oklahoma. 1294 
Wolftone Ext. Mng. Co.. Nev... 1119 
Wolf Tongue M. & M. Co., Colo.. 590 
Wolverine & Ariz. M. Co., Ariz. 189 
Wolverine Copper Co., Nevada. 1119 
Wolverine Cop. Mng. Co., Mich. 842 
Wolverine M. & D. Co., B. C.....1585 
Won bah Molybdenite Mng. Co., 

Ltd., Queensland 1894 

Wonder Divide Mng. Co., Nev. .1167 

Wonderful Mine. B. C 1585 

Wonderful Mng. Co., Ltd., Ida. 734 
Woodbury Copper Co., Arizona 244 
Woqd-Kirkland Co., Ontario. . .1641 
Woodlawn Cop. Mng. Co., Utah. 1407 
Woodman Mining Co., Utah... 1380 
Wood Placer Mng. Co., Mont.. 959 
Woodward Iron Co., Alabama.. 121 
World's Fair Mine. Arizona.... 334 
Wright-Hargraves M. Co... Ont..l636 
Wrigley Exploration Co., Ariz.. 264 
Wyandot Copper Co., Michigan 845 

Wyoming, Mines of 1519 

Wyoming C. & G. M. Co., Wyo. ..1529 
Wyoming Cop. Mng. Co.. Wyo. '1529 
Wyoming Mng. & Mlg. Co.. Nev. 1119 
Wyoming-Nevada C. Co.. Nev... 1119 

Yahk Valley M. & M. Co.. Mont. 959 
Yak Mng.. Mlg. & T. Co., Colo... 624 
Yale Dev & Constr. Co., B. C..1586 

Yale Alining Co., Mo 896 

Yankee Boy Mng. Co.. Idaho.. 734 
Yankee Cons. Mng. Co., Utah.. 1466 
Yankee Divide Mng. Co., Nev. .1167 
Yankee John Dev. Co., Calif... 494 
Yaqui Canyon Cop. Co., Sonora.1747 

Yaqui Copper Co., Sonora 1747 

Yaqui Mining Co., S. A. (Paci- 
fic M. & S. Co.} 1739-1748 

Yaqui Sm. & Ref. Co., S. A., 

Sonora 1748 

Yavapai Cons. Gold-Silver-Cop- 
per Co., Arizona - . . 369 

Yellow Aster Divide Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1168 

Yellow Aster M. & M. Co., Calif.. 495 
Yellow Bird G. Mng. Co., Colo. 616 
Yellow Jacket Gold Mng. Co., 

Idaho 673 

Yellow Jacket G. & S. Mngt. - 

Co, Nev 1119 

Yellow Pine Ext. Co., Nevada.. 11 19 

Yellow Pine Mine, Colo 591 

Yellow Pine Mng. Co., Nevada. 1120 
Yellow Pine Quicksilver Mng. 

Co., Idaho 673 

Yellow Rose Mng. Co., Ark 413 



cxvn 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 



PAGE 

Yellow Tiger Cons. Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1199 

Yellow Tiger Mng. Co., Nev. ...1199 
Yerington Bullion Mng. Co., 

Nevada 1120 

Yerington Cons. Cop. Co., Nev. 1121 
Yerington Malachite C. Co., Nev.1121 
Yerington Mines & Explor. Co., 

Nevada 1121 

Yerington Mountain C. Co., Nev.. 1122 
Ymir-Wilcox Dev. Co., Ltd., B. 

C 1586 

York Harbour Mine, Nfld 1660 

York Iron Mng. Co., Minn 874 

Yosemite Dredg. & Mng. Co., 

Calif 496 

Yosemite Mines Co., Utah 1411 

Young Mines Co., Ltd., Ariz... 244 
Youngstown-Gilpin M. Co., Colo. 591 

Y. P. Mining Co., Arizona 369 

Yuanmi Gold Mines, Ltd.. W. A.1910 
Yuba Cons. Gold Fields, Calif... 496 

Yuba Copper Co., Arizona 392 

Yuba Leas.& Dev. Co., Nev.... 1122 
Yucca-Arizona Cop. Co., Ariz.. 264 
Yyicca Tungsten Mng. Co., Ariz. 264 
Yukon Cop. Co., Ltd., Yukon.. 1658 
Yukon Divide Mng. Co., Nev. ..1168 




PA 



Yukon Gold Co., U. S., Ida.. 118-734 

Yukon Territory, Mines of 1657 

Yuma Cons. Mng. Co., Arizona. .. 407 

Yuma Mine, Arizona 302 

Yuma Warrior Mng. Co., Ariz. 407 
Yuruari Company, Venezuela. . .1801 
Y-Water (Emmaville) Tin Co., 
N. S. W 1887 

Zaaiplaats Tin Mng. Co., Ltd., 

Transvaal 1946 

Zacatecas, Mines of 1748 

Zambesia Exploring Co., Ltd., 

Rhodesia '. 1930 

Zambona Dev. Co., Sonora 1748 

Zanzibar Mining Co., Nevada.. 1122 
Zaruma Mn. Corp., Ltd., Ecuador. 1790 

Zeigler Property, Ga 633 

Zenda Mining Co., California... 496 
Zinc Concentrating Co.. U. S... 120 

Zinc Corp., Ltd., N. S. W 1887 

Zinc Hill Mining Co., Wis 1518 

Zinc Lead Corporation, Okla... 1294 
Zinc Producers' Assoc. Prop., 

Ltd., N. S. W 1888 

Zoro Gold & Copper Co., N. M..1263 
Zuma Mng. & Mlg. Co., Utah . . 1466 
Zuni Mine, Colorado 591 



INDEX TO ADDENDA AND ERRATA 



PAGE 

Ahmeek Mining Co., Mich 1953 

Alaska Gold Mines, Alaska 1950 

Alaska Sulphur Co., Alaska 1950 

Allouez M. Co., Mich .....1953 

American Metal Co., Ltd., U. S..1949 
American S. & R. Co., U. S.1949-1952 
American Z., L. & S. Co., U. S.1949-1954 

Anaconda C. M. Co., Mont 1955 

Arcadian Cons. M. Co., Mich- 1953 

Argonaut M. Co., Calif 1952 

Arizona Commer. M. Co., Ariz. .1950 
Arizona Copper Co., Ltd., Ariz. 1950 
Arizona Silver M. Co., Nev 1955 

Barnes-King D. Co., Mont 1955 

Barramia M. & Ex., Egypt 1959 

Beaver Cons. Mines, Ont 1958 

Benguet Cons. M. Co., P. 1 1959 

Bingham Mines Co., Utah 1957 

Blue Ledge Mine, Calif 1952 

Bluestone M. & S. Co., Nev 1955 

Bon Alaska Mining Co., Alaska. 1950 
Boston & Arkansas M. Co., Ark.. 1952 



PAGE 

Boston & Montana D. Co., Mont. 1955 

Bradford Mines, Ltd., U. S 1957 

Bunker Hill & Sullivan M. & C. 

Co., Idaho 1953 

Butte Copper & Zinc Co., Mont.. 1955 
Butte & Superior M. Co., Mont. 1955 

Callahan Zinc-Lead Co.. Idaho... 1953 
Calumet & Arizona C. Co., Ariz.. 1950 
Calumet & Hecla M. Co., Mich.. 1953 

Canario Copper Co., Sonora 1958 

Carson Hill Gold M. Co., Calif.. 1952 

Central Copper Co., Ariz 1950 

Central Eureka M. Co., Calif... 1952 
Cerro de Pasco M. Co., Peru... 1958 

Chile Copper Co., Chile 1958 

Chino Copper Co., N. Mex 1956 

Colorado Fuel & Iron Co., Colo.. 1952 

Cons. Ariz. Sm. Co., Ariz 1950 

Copper Export Association, U. S.1949 
Cresson Cons. Gold M. & M. Co., 
Colorado ,...1952 



cxvni 



INDEX TO MINING COMPANIES 



PAGE 

Daly West M. Co., Utah ...1957 

Davis-Daly C. Co., Mont 1955 

Eagle & Blue Bell M. Co., Utah.. 1957 

Eagle-Picher Lead Co., Mo 1954 

East Butte C. M. Co., Mont 1955 

El Fuerte M. & S. Co., Sonora..l958 
Elm Orlu M. Co., Mont 1955 

Feather River Copper Co., Calif.. 1952 

Federal M. & S. Co., Idaho 1953 

Franklin M. Co., Mich 1953 

Gifford-Cobalt Mine, Ont 1958 

Gold Bullion Mine, Alaska 1950 

Golden Cycle M. & R. Co., Colo. .1952 
Gold Zone Divide M. Co., Nev..l955 
Granby Cons. M., S. & P. Co- 
British Columbia 1957 

Greene Cananea C. Co.. Sonora.,1958 
Gruss Mining Co., Calif 1952 

Hancock Cons. M. Co., Mich 1953 

Hecla M. Co., Idaho..' 1953 

Helvetia Copper Co., Ariz 1950 

Hercules M. Co., Idaho 1953 

Homestake M. Co., S. D 1956 

Indiana M. Co., Mich 1954 

Inspiration Cons. C. Co., Ariz.... 1950 

Iron Cap Copper Co.. Ariz 1951 

Isle Royale C. Co., Mich 1954 

Jerome Grande Copper Co., Ariz. 1951 
Jifn Butler Tonopah M. Co., Nev.1956 
Judge M. & S. Co., Utah 1957 

Keeley Silver Mines, Ltd., Ont.. 1958 
Kennecott Copper Corp., Alaska. 1950 

Kennedy M. & M. Co., Calif 1952 

Kerr Lake Mines, Ont 1958 

Keweenaw Copper Co., Mich 1954 

King Kirkland G. Mines, Ltd.... 1958 
Kirkland Lake G. M. Co., Ont.... 1958 

La Rose Mines, Ont 1958 

Leadville Leas. Corp., Colo 1952 

Little Jonny Mine, Colo 1952 

Mandy M. Co., Manitoba 1957 

Mass. Cons. M. Co., Mich 1954 

Mayflower-Old Colony C. Co., 

Michigan 1954 

Miami Copper Co., Ariz 1951 

Mile-Wide Copper Co., Ariz 1951 

Minerals Sep. N. Am. Corp., U. S.1949 

Mohawk M. Co., Mich 1954 

Moscow M. & M. Co., Utah 1957 

Mt. Bischoff T. M. Co., Tas....l959 

Nabob Cons. M. Co., Idaho 1953 

National Lead Co., U. S 1949 

National Tin Corp., S. D 1956 

Natomas Co. of California, Calif. 1952 



PAGE 

Naumkeag C. Co., Mich 1954 

Nevada Cons. C. Co., Nevada. ..1956 
Nevada Pacific Ex. Co., Calif ... .1952 

New Cornelia C. Co., Ariz 1951 

New Idria Quicksilver Co., Calif. 1952 

New Jersey Zinc Co., U. S 1949 

New King of Ariz. M. Co., Ariz. 1951 

North Butte M. Co., Mont 1955 

North Star Mines Co., Calif 1952 

Old Dominion Co., Ariz 1951 

Ontario Smelters & Refiners, Ont.1958 

Osceola Cons. M. Co., Mich 1954 

Phelps Dodge Corporation, U. S..1949 

Portland G. M. Co., Colo. . 1952 

Quin "B" M. Co., Wyo 1957 

Quincy M. Co., Mich. 1954 

Ray Cons. Copper Co., Ariz 1951 

Red Hill Florence M. Co., Nev..l956 
Rochester Nev. Sil. M. Co., Nev.1956 

St. Joseph Lead Co., Mo 1955 

St. Mary's M. L. Co., Mich 1954 

San Juan Silver Syn. Colo 1952 

Seneca C. Corp., Mich 1954 

Shannon Copper Co., Ariz 1951 

Shattuck-Arizona C. Co., Ariz... 1951 

Shea Copper Co., Ariz.. 1951 

Silver Islet Mine^ Ont 1958 

Silver King Cons. M. Co., Utah. 1957 
Silver King of Arizona, Ariz.... 1951 
Simon Sil.-Lead Mines Co., Nev.. 1956 

South Lake M. Co.,- Mich 1954 

Sunnyside M. & M. Co., Colo .... 1953 
Superior & Boston C. Co,, Ariz.. 1951 

Superior C. Co., Mich 1954 

Tennessee C. & C. Corp., Tenn 1956 
Thompson-Krist G. M. Co., Ont.. 1958 
Tonopah Belmont D. Co., Nev.. 1956 

Tonopah Divide M. Co., Nev 1956 

Tonopah M. Co., Nev 1956 

Tonopah Placers Co., Colo 1953 

Trojan M. Co., S. D 1956 

Underwriters Land Co., Mo 1955 

United Ariz. Ext. M. Corp., Ariz.1951 
United States S., R. & M. Co., 

United States 1949 

United States Steel Corp., U. S..1949 

United Verde C. Co., Ariz 1951 

United Verde Ext. M. Co., Ariz.. 1951 

United Zinc Sm Corp., Mo 1955 

Utah Cons. M. Co., Utah 1957 

Utah Copper Co., Utah 1957 

Victoria C. M. Co., Mich 1954 

Vindicator Cons. G. M. Co., Colo. 1953 

Winona C Co., Mich 1954 

Wolverine C. M. Co., Mich. ... .1954 
Yukon Gold Co., U. S 1950-1953 



CX1X 






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cxx 



THE MINES HANDBOOK 

(Descriptions of Mining Companies begins in Chapter IV) 



CHAPTER I 
GLOSSARY OF MINING TERMS 

The following glossary of mining, milling, and trade terms will be 
found useful by many readers. 

Acicular. Needle-shaped. 

Acid. An acid of silicious rock is one in which bases are combined 
with silica. The antithesis of basic. 

Adit. A level mine opening driven into a hill or mountain. 

Adobe. Sun-dried brick used in all Latin-American .countries. 

Air-blast. A violent explosion caused by the escape of air compressed 
by the settling down of rocks in the upper workings of a mine. 

Air-Compressor. A machine for condensing air to a pressure sufficient 
to actuate machinery. The compressed air is forced through pipes to 
various parts of the mine, or surface plant, and used in the same way as 
steam for driving drills, pumps, hoists, etc. 

Air-doors. Doors built in mine passageways to stop air currents. 

Air-drill. A drill driven by the elastic pressure of compressed air. 

Air-shaft. A shaft used to provide ventilation for deep workings. Two 
shafts, one opening on slightly higher ground than the other, will provide 
natural ventilation underground, when connected by a drift, the longer 
shaft becoming a chimney, and the shorter an inverted syphon, down which 
the air is sucked with great force. 

Alkali. Potash and soda are the common alkalis. An alkali is the op- 
posite of an acid; it turns red litmus blue, and forms salts with acids. 

Alloy. Two or more metals united mechanically, but not chemically 
by fusion. 

Alluvium. Soil or broken rock deposited by the action of water. 

Altered. An altered rock is one that has undergone changes in its 
chemical and mineralogical structure since its original deposition. 

Aluminous. Containing aluminum. 

Amalgam. An alloy of mercury with another metal such as gold, sil- 
ver or copper. Mercury will not amalgamate with iron. 

Amalgamation. The process of extracting gold and silver from crushed 
ores by amalgamation with mercury. The quicksilver is expelled later by 
heat, and recovered for further use. 

Amorphous. Without form. 

Amygdaloid. A trap rock, containing vesicles or small rounded cavi- 
ties filled by mineral matter such as calcite, agate, etc. Rock is spotted 
and in outcrop often pitted as amygdules weather out, leaving cavity. In 
the Lake Superior district copper-bearing amygdaloids frequently show 
native copper in the cavities left by the leaching out of the soft minerals 
originally therein. 

Analysis. A determination of the constituents of a chemical substance. 

Anhydrous. Devoid of water. 

1 



2 GLOSSARY 

Anode Copper. Copper from a converter, cast in molds into plates 
with ears, and used in cells of electrolytic refineries. 

Anticline. An arch or fold of rock-strata bulging upwards, in U shape; 
is the reverse of syncline. 

Antigua. In Mexico, is a mine worked by Spaniards or Mexicans at 
a time so remote from 50 to 300 years that particulars have been forgot- 
ten; sometimes valuable, but "every antigua is not a bonanza." 

Antimonide. An ore of any metal chemically united with antimony. 

Apartado. Aparatado de correos is Spanish for postoffice box; usually 
abbreviated to Ap. 

Apex. The top or uppermost part of a vein. In the United States the 
ownership of the outcrop or apex carries the right to follow the vein down- 
ward beneath another's ground, if within one's end lines extended. 

Arastra. A circular rock-lined pit in which broken ore is pulverized 
by stones attached to horizontal poles fastened in a central pillar and 
dragged around by mules. 

Arenaceous. Sandy; carrying silica as sand. 

Argentiferous. Silver-bearing. 

Argillaceous. Clayey. 

Aroba. A Spanish weight of -25. 36 Ibs. avoirdupois; Portugese, 32.38 
Ibs. 

Arroya. A gulch. 

Arsenide. A mineral composed of arsenic combined with another metal. 

Arsenopyrite. A mineral composed of arsenic sulphur and iron; often 
carries gold or silver also. 

Assay. A test or ore or metal to determine the exact amount of any 
metal or metals contained in it. Usually fire assay; smelting on a small 
scale. 

Assessment Work. The work required annually by the U. S. govern- 
ment, on an unpatented mining claim to keep title. 

Attle. Cornish term for waste rock. 

Auriferous. Containing gold. 

Back. The rock above mine opening like the ceiling of a room. The 
part or section of a vein between two levels or between a level and the 
surface. 

Bad Air. Air vitiated by powder fumes, noxious gases or insufficient 
ventilation. 

Ball Head or Stamp. A steam stamp, named after its inventor. 

Barilla (De Cobre). Spanish term for particles of native copper, 
cleaned (concentrates). Equivalent to the "mineral" of Lake Superior 
mines. Used mainly in Bolivia among tin producers. 

Barranca. A deep gulch or canyon, with precipitious sides. 

Barrel Work. Masses of crude native copper, picked out by hand 
before ore passes beneath stamp. Was formerly shipped in barrels to the 
smelter. 

Barrow. A wheelbarrow. 

Basalt. A dark colored heavy igneous rock, carrying much iron; a 
trap rock. 

Base. Impure; an alkaline element. 

Base Bullion. Copper or lead carrying much gold or silver. 

Base Metal. Any of the non-precious metals. 

Basic. Low in silica; containing more than enough iron and lime to 
form a good slag. 

Basin. A syncline; a trough in the earth's surface. 

Battery. A set of stamps, usually five in a stamp mill. 

Bearing. The course of direction, as that of a mineral outcrop in 
degrees, east or west of, north (meridian). 

Bed. A seam or layer of stratified rock. Used in some mineral dis- 
tricts for flat veins or lodes. 

Bed Rock. The solid rock underlying stream gravel or rock. 




BEDDED VEIN BREAST 3 

Bedded Vein. One parallel with the bedding of the country rock. 

Bells. Signals for lowering and hoisting the bucket, skip or cage in 
a shaft usually are given by bells, the number of strokes indicating the 
nature of the load, the place for stopping, etc. 

Bit. The cutting end of a boring tool. A steel drill; a short hollow 
cylinder of soft steel, used in diamond-drilling. The diamonds are set 
around the inner and outer edges of the bottom of the bit, and cut into the 
most refractory rocks when the bit is rotated. 

Black Copper. Impure copper, smelted, but containing impurities re- 
quiring refining. 

Black Jack. Sphalerite, zinc blende of dark color. 

Blanched Copper. Copper containing a large amount of arsenic, prac- 
tically forming an alloy. 

Blast. (N.) Air forced through tuyeres into a blast furnace or Bes- 
semer converter. (V.) to explode gunpowder or dynamite. 

Blast-Furnace. A cupola furnace in which ore is smelted, with the aid 
of air pumped in under pressure. 

Blasted. A blasted miner is one who has been injured by the explosion 
of dynamite or gunpowder. 

Blasting. The breaking of rock by means of high explosives, inserted 
in holes bored in the rock for the purpose. 

Blende. Zinc-blende or sphalerite; sulphide of zinc. 

Blind Drift. A drift connected with other workings of the mine at one 
end only; a cul de sac. 

Blind Lode. A lode not outcroping at surface. 

Blister Copper. Copper of 96 to 99% purity; applied to product of 
Bessemer converter. 

Blocking Out. Exposing the ore in a mine so that it can be extracted 
by stoping. Properly speaking, ore is not blocked out for stoping until 
opened on three sides. 

Blossom. The oxidized, softened outcrop of an orebody altered by 
weathering. 

Blout. A mass of quartz, often mineralized, that is often isolated and 
not connected with a vein; an abbreviation of blow-out. 

Blower. A fan used to force air into a mine; a blowing engine. 

Blowing Engine. An engine for forcing air into blast furnaces under 
pressure, often about one pound avoirdupois per square inch. 

Blowing In. A smelting furnace is blown in, when charge is ignited, 
fusion begins and the process of reduction by fire is begun. 

Blowing Out. A smelting furnace is blown out when the metal and 
slag are tapped out, and the fires are allowed to die out. 

Blowout. An outcrop larger than the orebody beneath; see blout. 

Bluestone. Copper sulphate. 

Bonanza. Spanish for pay-ore. Usually applied in United States to a 
body of exceptionally rich ore, especially in silver mines. 

Bonnet. The cover or roof of a cage; also a steel casting connecting 
the piston-rod with the upper end of a stamp-shaft. 

Bostonite. A light colored igneous rock composed mainly of potash 
feldspar. 

Bore Hole. A drill hole bored for test purposes. 

Bort (Bortz). A form of crystallized carbon between the diamond and 
the black diamond. 

Botryoidal. Resembling a bunch of grapes. 

Bottom. A mass of impure copper formed below the matte, in matting 
copper ores. 

Boulders. Loose, rounded masses of rock, larger than cobbles. 

Box Canyon. A canyon closed at one end. 

Branch. A vein branching off from the main orebody. 

Brattice. A screen for the regulation of air currents in a mine. 

Breast. The face or innermost end of a mine working. 



4 GLOSSARY 

Breccia. A rock formed of angular fragments cemented together. 

Brecciated. Broken into angular fragments partly or wholly cemented 
together. 

Broken. A vein is broken when dislocated by faults. 

Broken Ground. Rock strata where the walls are poorly defined and 
the general formation shattered. 

Bucket. An iron or steel bucket used for hoisting men or ore in a 
mine. In a vertical shaft a bucket swings free, but in an incline shaft the 
bucket runs on a skidway of plank timbers. 

Buddie. A conical table on which ore is dressed; formerly use4 in 
Cornwall, etc., and recently applied to a new concentrator. 

Bulkhead. A wooden or masonry partition walling off part of a mine 
or protecting it against soft or creeping ground; also a damming back water. 

Bullion. Includes any of the base metals containing gold and silver; 
also mixture of gold and silver. 

Bullion Bars. Unrefined gold and silver melted and cast into bars. 

Bunch. A small mass or pocket of exceptionally rich ore. 

Bunchy. An orebody containing small scattered masses or bunches 
of ore. 

Cable. The steel wire rope used in shafts for hoisting buckets, skips 
or cages. 

Cage. The elevator used in vertical shafts for hoisting ore and rock, 
and for lowering men, timber, etc. 

Calcareous. Limey. 

Calcine. To drive off sulphur, carbonic acid gas, or other volatile con- 
stituents of an ore by heating. 

Calcining Furnace. A furnace for roasting ore to drive off sulphur, 
previous to smelting; also for heating cement materials. 

Calcite. Crystallized calcium carbonate. 

Cam. A double-curved tooth, fixed on a shaft, for lifting gravity 
stamps. 

Camp. A mining town. 

Canyon. A deep gorge with precipitous walls. 

Cap. The top piece of a framed set of mine timbers; copper caps con- 
taining fulminate of mercury, used to explode dynamite in blasting rock. 

Capping, or Cap-Rock. The rock or other ground above a mineral 
deposit. 

Captain. In most mining fields where Cornishmen are employed the 
foreman in charge of mining work is termed a captain. 

Carbonaceous. Any mineral in which carbon and oxygen are chem- 
ically united. 

Carbonates. A term commonly applied in the western part of the 
United States to oxidized lead ores, usually argentiferous. 

Carboniferous. Rocks of the coal age of geological eras. 

Carga. A Mexican weight of 300 Ibs. avoirdupois. 

Cartridge. Dynamite put up in cylindrical cases of oiled paper to fit 
the holes bored by drills. 

Casing. The wooden lining of a shaft; an iron pipe put down outside 
of a diamond drill hole when passing through soft or broken ground, to 
prevent the hole becoming clogged by matter intruding from outside. 

Casting Copper. Impure copper better suited for casting into various 
forms than for drawing into wires or rolling into sheets. 

Cave. A natural opening or vug in a rock formation; the part or com- 
plete falling in of a mine. 

Caving System. A plan of mining, by which the worked out upper 
levels and surface are allowed to subside gradually, as the mine workings 
are deepened. 

Cement Copper. Regulus; the loose and usually impure copper de- 
posited on iron by copper-bearing waters. 

Cerro. Spanish for a mountain or hill showing rock outcrops. 



CHALYBEA TE CONCRETION 5 

Chalybeate. Iron-bearing waters. 

Chamber. A large stope. 

Change House. Building where miners change their clothing before 
entering a mine. 

Change Day. The day when miners are transferred from day shift to 
night shift, or the reverse. 

Chapeau de Per. French term for an oxidized iron outcrop; gossan 
or iron hat. 

Charge. The amount of ore. flux and fuel fed to a smelting furnace. 

Chert. A coarse impure chalcedony or flint. 

Chile Bars. Bars of Chilean blister copper, weighing about 200 Ibs 
each. 

Chilean Mill. A grinding apparatus with three heavy wheels running 
around in a circular pan. 

Chimney. An orebody or pipe shape in an approximately vertical 
position. 

Chloride. A mineral (or ore) of any metal united chemically with 
chlorine; usually applied to hornsilver ore. 

Chloride. (V.) To work the oxidized part of an ore deposit on a lease 
or tribute; a term used in the western part of the United States. 

Churn Drill. A drill having a churning motion, used for boring oil 
wells, test-holes, etc. 

Chute. A hole, usually lined with planks, used for dropping ore or 
waste to a lower level of a mine. 

Claim. The area of 600' x 1,500', or 20 acres of U. S. public land staked 
off and claimed by a prospector or miner. Size of claims varies in differ- 
ent countries. 

Classifier. A machine which separates mineral particles according to 
their weight. 

Clay Gouge. A thin seam of clay separating ore, or ore and rock. 

Clay Slate. An argillaceous slate. 

Clean-Up. The collection or gathering together of accumulated ore 01 
metal in a mill or smelter. 

Cleavage Planes. The more or less regular lines along which slates 
and other metamorphic rocks break into slabs or leaves. 

Coarse Jigs. The jigs used to handle the larger sizes and heavier 
grades of ore or metal. 

Coarse Metal. Matte resulting from the first smelting in old-style 
smelting of oxidized copper ores. 

Cobbing. Breaking masses of ore into lumps by hand hammers and 
sorting ore out. 

Collar. The top of a shaft; surface timbering of a shaft. 

Colloids. Non-crystalline materials. 

Compartment. Mining shafts usually are divided into two or more 
compartments or sections, separated by framed timbers and planking. 

Concentrate. The ore or metal, after part or complete elminination of 
gangue rock. 

Concentration. The process of separating the metallic part of an ore 
from the waste rock or mineral in which it has been enclosed. It involves 
crushing to free the metallic particles. The separation may be by gravity, 
either dry or in water ; by oil or froth flotation, or magnetic separation. 

Concentrating Table. A table on which a stream of finely crushed ore 
and water flows downward and the heavier metallic minerals lag behind 
and flow off in a separate compartment. 

Concentrator. A plant where ores are concentrated; a jig or machine 
for separating ore or metal from gangue-rock, the process usually employ- 
ing a rocking or oscillating motion, aided by jets of water, whereby the 
worthless gangue is carried off and the heavier mineral remains. 

Conchoidal. Breaking with a curved or shell-like face, or fracture. 

Concretion. A rounded mass or nodule formed of mineral matter 
gathered about a center. 



6 GLOSSARY 

Conductivity. Electrical conductivity is measured by the resistance 
offered to the passage of an electrical current. 

Conglomerate. A rock formed of pebbles and rounded boulders ce- 
mented together. Sedimentary conglomerates are ancient shore deposits 
whose pebbles and sands are hardened into rock. Volcanic conglomerates 
are formed of rounded masses ejected from volcanic vents cemented together 
by volcanic sand or ash (tuff) rock. 

Construction Account. Many mining companies summarize their 
finances so that the cost of operation is divided into two classes, one being 
for general working expense and the other for construction, sometimes 
classed as capital account. It includes new buildings and machinery on 
surface and frequently new mine openings. 

Contact. The junction of two dissimilar bodies of rock, as limestone 
and porphyry. 

Contact Deposit. A mineral deposit found between two unlike rocks, 
usually applied to an orebody at the contact between a sedimentary rock, 
limestone, shale or sandstone, and an igneous rock. 

Contract. In mining applies to an agreement between operator and 
workman to pay latter so much per foot for excavating drift or stope. 
These men are known as contract miners and are usually skilled workmen. 
They work harder than men on wages, due to the incentive of higher 
earnings. 

Copper Ore. Rock carrying copper mineral or minerals. See detailed 
descriptions of copper-bearing minerals in Chapter III. 

Core. A drill core. 

Cornish Pump. A form of mine pump actuated by long rods reaching 
from surface down mine shafts. 

Costeaning. Proving an ore deposit or vein by trenching across its 
outcrop at approximately right angles. 

Counterbalance. Hoisting plants usually are worked in counterbalance 
for deep shafts. The weight of the descending cage or skip is used to 
partly offset the weight of the ascending cage or skip. 

Counter Vein. A cross vein running at approximately right angles to 
the main orebody. 

Country Rock. The predominant rock about an ore deposit. 

Course. The direction or strike of a vein; a stretch of mineralized 
matter in a vein. 

Crab. A hand winch. 

Creeping. The slow movement of the rock in mine workings caused 
by the pressure of super-incumbent and adjacent rock masses. 

Cretaceous. A geologicalage characterized by chalky beds in England. 
The limestones of Arizona and Mexico are largely of Cretaceous age, and so 
are the coal-bearing beds of the Rocky Mountain region. 

Cribbing. Close-set round timbers supporting an underground roof, 
or lining a shaft. 

Croppings. Outcrops. 

Cross-Course. An intersecting vein. 

Crosscut. A mine opening, similar to a tunnel, that is driven across 
the rocks at approximately right angles to the orebody; a drift follows the 
lode or vein. 

Cross Vein. An intersecting vein. 

Crucible. A vessel of refractory material in which ores and fluxes are 
melted. 

Crystals. Geometrical forms, with plane faces, of infinite variety, as- 
sumed by the majority of minerals. 

Cupola. An upright furnace used in smelting. 

Cupriferous. Copper-bearing. 

Cut. To intersect an orebody; the portion of a working face of min- 
eral removed at one operation. 

Cwt. A hundredweight, or 112 Ibs avoirdupois. 



CYANIDE DRIFTING 7 

Cyanide. (V.) To treat crushed rock with a weak solution of cyanide 
of potash or of soda, dissolving the gold and silver, which is recovered by 
precipitating it with zinc (or aluminum for certain silver ore). 

Datum Level. The. level (usually sea-level or mean level of nearest 
considerable body of water) from which altitudes are measured in surveys. 

Dead Roasting. Sulphide ores are dead roasted when all the sulphur 
possible to drive off by roasting has been eliminated. 

Dead Work. Underground work which is not in ore; the opening of 
new shafts, drifts, and winzes preliminary to the stoping of the mineral 
bodies. 

Debris. Broken down rock material; the fragmental material broken 
off by frost, etc., from rock exposures; talus. 

Decomposed. Rock or ore altered and leached by air and water. 

Decrepitate. To break into fragments with violence, under the blow- 
pipe or great heat. 

Dendrite. A moss or fern-like mineral stain or film usually of man- 
ganese or iron oxides. 

Denouncecment. In Mexico, the formal filing of a claim to mineral 
land. 

Denudation. The uncovering of rock or an ore deposit by the weather- 
ing of wind and water, or glaciation. 

Dessication. Drying out; loss of water from any given substance. 

Detritus. Debris; broken down rock, usually applied to gravel, etc., 
moved and deposited by streams or glaciers. 

Denouncement. In Mexico, the formal filing of a claim to mineral 
ore deposit and to open up new and further amounts of ore. 

Diabase. A dark trap rock composed largely of a felt of lathe shaped 
crystals of plagioclase feldspar, plus ferro-magnesian minerals, etc. 

Diamond-Drill. A machine used for boring holes in rocks, with a hol- 
low cylinder for a bit, whose end is set with black diamonds or bort. 

Die. The iron block in a mortar, onto which ore is fed for crushing 
by a stamp. 

Dike. A vein of igneous rock; locally, a reef or wall of rock project- 
ing above the ground; also applied to the hardened waste material filling 
fissures. 

Diorite. A crystalline granitic rock with predominant plagioclase feld- 
spar. 

Dip. The inclination or angle at which a lode or vein pitches down- 
ward into the earth. 

Dip Compass. A compass having the needle fixed to swing in a vertical 
plane, so it can be readily deflected by magnetic rocks. 

Dirt. Frequently used to designate ore broken underground; for in- 
stance, in Joplin district, Missouri. 

Disintegration. The breaking down of rock through weathering. 

Disseminated Ore. Ore carrying fine particles of metallic minerals, 
usually sulphides, scattered through rock or gangue matter. 

Disturbed. An orebody is disturbed when lacking defined walls and 
settled character. 

Dolomite. Magnesian limestone; carbonate of calcium and magnesium 

Donkey. A small auxiliary hoisting engine, usually operated under- 
ground and actuated by compressed air, or used far preliminary work at 
new shafts or exploring pits. 

Downcast. A shaft having a downward air current. 

Draftage. An arbitrary allowance claimed by some British smelters to 
cover loss of weight in transport. 

Dress. To separate ore from gangue rock by hand or machinery. 

Dressing Floor. A floor where ore is sorted by cobbing and picking. 

Drift. A horizontal passage in a mine following the lode or vein. 

Drift Copper. Native copper found in gravel and clay, far from original 
orebody, from which it has been carried by glaciers. 

Drifting. Opening drifts; driving. 



8 GLOSSARY 

Drill. A steel bar with chisel shaped end used for boring in rock; is 
struck on the other end by a hammer, or is forcibly driven against rock by 
air piston. 

Drill-Core. Solid, cylindrical cores of rock cut out by a diamond drill. 
These form a record of the strata through which the drill has passed. 

Driving. Extending a drift horizontally. 

Drum. The cylinder of a hoisting engine, around which the rope is 
wound. 

Druse. The crystallized crust lining a cavity in rock or ore. 

Dry Ore. Argentiferous ores containing insufficient lead for fluxing in 
a smelter. 

Ductile. That which is capable of being extended in length by tension, 
as into wire. 

Ductility. The capacity of a metal to elongate, when under pull from 
the ends, without cracking or breaking. 

Dump. A place for depositing rock taken from a mine; a pile of ore 
or rock. 

Dyke. See dike. 

Dynamite. Nitro-glycerine held in wood pulp, infusorial earth, or some 
similar article, to render it safer in use. Strength varies according to per- 
centage of nitro-glycerine contained. 

Eisener Hut. German for iron hat. or gossan, occurring above an ore- 
body. 

Electrolyte. The solution in which electrolytic separation of metals is 
carried on. 

Electrolysis. The separation and redeposition of metals by electroyltic 
action. 

Electrolytic. Applied to copper means copper made from impure metal 
by electrical decomposition and redeposition. The bar of impure copper is 
gradually dissolved and the pure metal redeposited at the opposite pole 
of the battery, while other metals fall as black slime to the bottom of the 
tank in which the solution (electrolyte) is held. 

Elvan. Cornish name for dikes of greenstone, porphyrite and granite. 

Erosion. The wearing away of surface masses of rock and soil by 
the elements, or by glacial action. 

Eruptive. Igneous rocks, brought to the earth's surface or outer crust 
by volcanic activity. 

Escarpment. A rock wall, nearly or quite vertical. 

Exfoliation. The separation of thin leaf-like layers from a rock mass. 

Exploders. A fulminating cap for setting off high explosives. 

Exploitation. The productive working of a mine or ore deposit. 

Exploration. Prospecting work; looking for ore. 

Face. The inner or working end of any mine opening. A face of ore 
is the ore shown at the extreme end of a drift, stope, or tunnel. 

Fahlband. A zone or band of crystalline rock, carrying finely dis- 
seminated metallic sulphides. 

Fall of Ground. Rock falling from the roof into a mine opening. 

False Set. A temporary set of timber. 

Fan. A machine for forcing or sucking air into or out of a mine. 

Fathom. Six feet. In stoping, a fathom is a cube of six feet. 

Fault. Dislocation of a vein or of a rock stratum. 

Feeder. A branch or small vein joining a larger one. 

Ferruginous. Containing iron. 

Filling. The waste material used to fill up old stopes or chambers; 
allowing a mine to fill with water. 

Filter. A machine for removing the solution or moisture from crushed 
ore, either by forcing it under pressure or sucking it through canvas or 
cloth, leaving the muddy ore behind. 

Fines. The finer particles of ore or metals saved in concentrating 
processes. 




FINISHER JIGS GALLOWS FRAME 9 

Finisher Jigs. The jigs used to save the smaller particles of ore in a 
concentrator or stamp mill. 

Fire. The miner's warning cry when a blast is to be set off is "fire." 

Fissile. Splitting easily into plates. 

Fissure Vein. A fissure in the earth's crust filled with mineral matter 

Flake Copper. Very thin scales of native copper. 

Float. Loose ore or rock, away from its parent mass, on the surface. 

Float Copper. Drift Copper. 

Float Ore. Loose ore, often water worn ore, found at a distance frorr 
its outcrop. 

Flocculent. Resembling tufts; cloudy masses of slightly coherent ma- 
terial floating in a liquid. 

Floor. The floor of a drift or other horizontal mine opening; the rock 
bed beneath an orebody. 

Flour Copper. Very fine scaly native copper that floats on water and 
is difficult to save in milling. 

Flotation. A process of concentrating or separating out the valuable 
metallic sulphide minerals of an ore, by mixing the pulverized ore with 
acid and oil and' agitating it by air or paddles to make a scum or froth 
that takes up the metallic minerals and floats them off, leaving the waste 
behind. 

Flume. A launder or conduit for carrying water. 

Flux. Substances used in furnaces to form a fusible compound with 
the waste matter and make slag. In assaying, borax, soda, salt, etc., are 
used; in smelting, limestone, ironstone, etc. 

Fluxing Ore. An ore containing appreciable metallic minerals, but 
smelted mainly because containing fluxing agents required in the reduction 
of richer ores. 

Foliated. Having a laminated structure. 

Foot. The foot-wall. 

Foot-wall. The rock wall under a vein or underlying inclined mineral 
deposit. 

Fork. The branching of a vein, 

Formation. A term used by miners for any particular body of rock, 
as a granite formation, a sandstone formation. Geologists limit term to 
groups or rock beds of similar age. 

Founders Shares. The few shares issued to the individuals organizing 
a stock company. In companies owned outright by other companies, 
founders shares are issued to as many individuals as are required to incor- 
porate and hold the offices required for corporate management, as the laws 
do not permit a corporation, which is an artificial person, to form another 
corporation, or to serve as a director of another corporation. 

Free. A metal is free when virgin or native, and not combined chem- 
ically with any other element. 

Free Milling. An ore that readily yields metallic contents by simple 
means, such as amalgamation or cyanidation. 

Freeze. A furnace freezes when the molten charge vsolidifies. 

Friable. That which may be pulverized or broken up easily. 

Froth. Foam; a mass of bubbles. 

Furnace. A structure for the smelting or roasting of ore. 

Fuse. A cotton cord with a gunpowder core, so made as to carry fire 
to an explosive. 

Fusible. That which may be melted. 

Fusion. Melting; alloying metals while liquid, through heat. 

Gabbro. A rock composed mainly of plagioclase feldspar and iron 
magnesia minerals. 

Gad. A small steel wedge or chisel. 

Galena. Lead sulphide; see Mineralogy. 

Gallery. A drift or level. 

Gallows Frame. The timber or steel framework over the mouth of a 



10 GLOSSARY 

shaft, carrying a sheave-wheel, over which the hoisting rope passes to the 
engine; now commonly called head frame. 

Gangue. The waste rock or mineral in which ore or metallic particles 
are held. 

Gash Vein. A gash-shaped fissure vein, rapidly pinching downward. 

Geode. A hollow crystal-lined cavity, or the rounded mass containing 
such a cavity. 

Geological Horizon. Rocks of one geological age. 

Geology. The science of the formation of the earth and the rocks of 
which it is made. 

Giant Powder. Dynamite. 

Girt (or Girth). A horizontal brace in direction of a drift in mine 
timbering. 

Glaciation. The erosive effect produced by glaciers. 

Glance. A metallic sulphide showing a bright shining surface. Cop- 
per glance is chalcocite; silver glance is argentite. 

Glory Hole. A large open pit from which ore is or has been extracted. 

G. M. B. Good Merchantable Brands, an English grade of refined cop- 
per. Term replaced by "Standard." 

Gneiss ("pronounced nice). A banded coarse-grained rock often formed 
of the same minerals as granite, often in patchy and irregular arrange- 
ment. May be a diorite gneiss, granite gneiss, etc. 

Gob. Waste used to fill worked-out openings. 

Gophering. Prospecting work confined to digging shallow pits or 
starting adits. Term used from similarity of this work to the crooked 
little holes dug in the soil by gophers. 

Gossan. Iron hat; is the leached capping, usually quartzose, showing- 
yellow to reddish brown iron stains found overlying veins. 

Grade. The percentage, or value of ore and partly refined metals: 
the percentage of rise in roads or mine openings driven on an approximately 
horizontal plane. 

Gram. A metric weight of 15.4 grains or 1-500 of a pound avoirdupois. 

Granite. A dense, granular rock of igneous origin, composed of vary- 
ing proportions of quartz, feldspar and mica. 

Granulated. Tn the form of grains. 

Gravity Stamp. A stamp, usually set in batteries of five, in which the 
piston is raised by a cam, the stamp crushing the charge in the mortar by 
its weight, when allowed to fall. 

Greenstone. An altered basic porphyry; usually andesite or diorite. 

Grizzly. A screen or grating of heavy iron rails or steel bars, through 
which the smaller pieces of rock or ore fall through. 

Groundsill. The bed-piece of a set of mine timbers. 

Guides. Perpendicular square wooden strips or stringers for guiding 
cages in vertical shafts. Cables or steel rails are used instead in some 
mines. 

Gut. To rob. or extract, only the rich ore of a mine. 

Hade (American). Inclination or dip of a vein, measured from the 
vertical, while dip is measured from the horizontal. Becoming obsolete, 
and should not be confounded with rake of an ore-shoot. 

Hanging. The hanging wall; the rock on the upper side of a mineral 
vein or deposit. 

Hardinge Mill. A cone-shaped cylinder, resting horizontally and half 
filled with pebbles, which fall and crush ore when mill is revolved. 

Haulage Plant. A mechanical installation for the underground tram- 
ming of rock, operated by ropes, compressed air, or electricity. 

Head or Heading. An underground level or airway in a mine; also 
water pressure. 

Head Frame or Gallows Frame. A framework of 2 or 4 legs, made of 
wood or steel, fitted with sheaves, over the mouth of a shaft. 

Heap-Roasting. Burning the sulphur out of ores piled in heaps, with 
a small amount of wood or other fuel. 



HEAVE KINDLY 11 

Heave. A horizontal dislocation of a vein or bed caused by a fault. 
Also applied to the rolling out of line of a lode in making depth. 

Hectare. An area 100 meters on each side; called pertenencias in 
Mexico; equals 2.471 acres. 

Hoist. An engine for raising ore from a mine and for lowering men 
and material. 

Holing Through. A drift or other mine opening is holed through when 
a connection is made between two separate sections working toward each 
other. 

Horizon. The sky-line, commonly used in the sense of absolutely flat, 
as shown by a spirit level. Geologically, all rock strata of the same geo- 
logical period. 

Horse. A mass of country rock enclosed in a mineral vein or deposit. 

Horsepower. A measure of power of an engine. One horsepower is 
rated as equivalent to raising 33,000 Ibs. avoirdupois to a height of one foot 
in one minute. 

Horse-Whim. A windlass operated by horses. 

Hot Blast. Heated air supplied to a blast-furnace. 

Hungry. Nearly or quite barren. 

Hunt & Douglass Process. A leaching process, using chloride of iron 
and salt, to dissolve oxide ores of copper. 

Huntington Mill. Somewhat similar to a Chilean mill. 

Hutch. See Jig. 

Hydrated, Hydrous. Containing water combined chemically. 

Hydro-Metallurgy. The reduction of ores by wet processes. 

Igneous. Rocks consolidated from a molten state; includes not only 
volcanic rocks but those deep-seated rocks, hardened under cover, which 
have been exposed to view by erosion, or artificial openings. 

Impregnated. Containing metallic minerals, scattered or diffused 
through the mass ; properly used in referring to Country rock carrying min- 
eral similar to that in the vein. 

Incrustation. A solidified coating, usually crystallized. 

Infiltration. The deposition of mineral matter from percolating waters. 

Ingot. A mass of metal cast in a peculiarly formed mold; applied only 
to gold, silver, or copper. Iron and lead are cast in pigs. 

In Place, In Situ. Rock or ore that is in the position where deposited 
by nature. 

Intrusive. Igneous rock masses pushed up through other and older 
rock formations. 

Iridescent. Showing the colors of the rainbow. 

Iron Hat. Gossan; outcrop of iron-stained material over an ore deposit 
or vein. 

Jack. A miner's term for sphalerite; is called black jack, ruby jack, or 
rosin jack, according to color. 

Jig. A machine for concentrating ore; i. c., separating the metallic 
mineral from the waste, by means of oscillatory or vibratory motion, aided 
by jets of water. The heavier minerals sink, and the lighter rock or gangue 
is carried off by the current. 

Jump. To locate and take possession of mineral lands held or claimed 
by another party. 

Kaolin. China clay. 

Keweenawan. Pertaining to or of the Keweenaw formation or rocks 
in which the Lake Superior copper veins occur. 

Kibble. A bucket used for hoisting material in a shaft. 

Kilo or Kilogram. A metric weight of 2.2046 Ib. 

Kilometer. 0.621376 miles. For rough computations may be figured as 
3/5 of a mile. ^ ]. 

Kin. A Japanese weight of 1.31 Ibs. avoirdupois. 

Kindly. The appearance of rock carrying or promising to carry 'good 
mineral value. 



12 GLOSSARY 

Ladderway. The series of ladders giving ingress and egress to a mine; 
the compartment in which the ladders are located. 

Lagging. Timber, usually of small diameter, placed over the cap-tim- 
bers of incline shafts and drifts, to prevent damage from falling rock. 

Lamina. A thin plate; plural is laminae. 

Lamellar. In thin sheets of laminae. 

Lander. The top man at the mouth of the shaft who receives signals 
from below, and attends to the unloading of rock sent up in buckets, skips 
or cages. 

Launder. A wooden flume or sluice, used to convey water, or tailings 
held in suspension in water. 

Lava. Rock from volcanoes. 

Leach. To dissolve metals out of ore by water or acid, or both. 

Leaching. The process of extracting a metal from its ores or salts by 
treatment with a solvent, such as weak acid. 

Lead, (pronounced leed). A mineral body. 

Leader. A small vein running into a larger one. 

Ledge. The solid vein or lode. 

Leg. An upright timber supporting the cap of a set of timber. 

Lens. An orebody of lenticular form. 

Lenticular. Having the shape of a double convex lens. 

Level. A horizontal opening in a mine, usually connected with a shaft. 
Levels are commonly opened at stated intervals as depth is gained usually 
at 100 feet in modern mining practice. The word "level" frequently is used 
interchangeably with the word drift, but is more comprehensive. Both 
drifts and crosscuts may be opened on a level, though a crosscut is not a 
level, 

Limestone. A rock composed of lime carbonate. 

Lixiviation. The process of leaching out the metallic contents of ores. 

Locate. To locate a -mining claim is to file a notice claiming owner- 
ship, at the point where mineral is discovered, and to put up stakes or monu- 
ments at the corners of the rectangular area claimed. 

Location Work. Labor required by law to be done on mining claims 
within 60 days of location, in order to establish ownership. 

Lode. A metalliferous vein. In Lake Superior region refers to the 
mineralized beds; is used generally as synonymous with vein; used by 
geologists as meaning an aggregation or congerie of mineralized veins. 

Long Ton. An English ton of 2,240 Ibs. avoirdupois. 

Low Grade. Ore whose recoverable value yields but slight profit per 
ton. Carrying mineral value but sparingly. 

Magma. An originally molten mass of rock coming to the earth's crust 
from depth. 

Magmatic Segregation. The process by which the different constituents 
of molten rock masses crystallize at varying temperatures with a tendency 
to - separate themselves, so far as circumstances allow, from the other com- 
pounds. 

Malacate. A horse whim with vertical drum used for hoisting in Mex- 
ico. Sometimes is called a Zacatecas malacate. 

Mass. Copper; a solid chunk of native metal. 

Massive. Rock without defined lines of cleavage; ore occurring with- 
out appreciable gangue, as contra-distinguished from ore disseminated 
throughout a gangue. 

Matrix. The rock between imbedded objects, such as a particle or mass 
of ore or native metal. More rarely a metallic mineral is the matrix cement- 
ing together rock particles. 

Matte. A furnace product composed of copper and iron sulphides, pro- 
duced by shaft or reverberatory fusion. Usually contains 30-40% copper, 
but varies from 20-60%. Is blown to blister copper 98-99% fine in bessenier 
converters. 

Matting. The process of smelting sulphide ores into matte. 

Mesa. Spanish for tableland or plateau. 




MESH MOUTH 13 

Mesh. The size of openings in a screen. 

Metalliferous. Carrying metal. 

Metallurgy. The science and practice of reducing metals from ores and 
minerals. 

Metamorphic. Rock that has been changed from its original condition 
by pressure, chemical action, heat, or other causes. 

Metamorphosis. The process by which changes in structure are af- 
fected in a rock form by heat or percolating waters. 

Metasomatic. Replacement, particle by particle, so that original struc- 
ture is often preserved. 

Meter or Metre. 39.37 inches. 

Metric Ton. A weight of 2.204.6 Ib. avoirdupois. 

Mica. A scaly transparent mineral. Biotite is brown or black mica; 
muscovite or isinglass is the clear mica used in stoves, lanterns, electric 
apparatus, etc. 

Mill. Works for treating ores without smelting. 

Milling. Dressing ore in a mill; also dumping ore in a winze to be 
drawn off into cars or wheelbarrows on a lower level. 

Mill Run. The treatment of a definite quantity of ore in a mill; also 
the result or yield thereof. 

Mill Test. The determination of the metallic contents and recoverable 
values in any given ore by the milling of a sufficient quantity to afford 
average milling conditions. 

Miner. In strict construction, the man that does the drilling and 
blasting in a mine. In a broader sense, all men working underground. 

'Mineral. Ore or rock containing metal. In the Lake Superior district 
the' term mineral has a special use, being employed to designate the concen- 
trate of native copper, with its small amount of admixed amygdaloid or 
conglomerate, as it comes from the mill, before going to the smelter. 

Mineral Belt. The strip or zone of mineralized territory in a given 
formation or district. 

Mineral Right. The ownership of mining rights under the surface of 
land owned by another holder. Mineral rights sometimes are reserved irt 
selling land in some districts. 

Mineralized. Carry metalliferous minerals. 

Miner's Inch. The amount of water that will flow through an opening 
one inch square under a six-inch head, which is 2,274 cubic feet in 24 hours,, 
or 94-)4 cubic feet per hour, equal to 655 wine gallons or 593 imperial gal- 
lons hourly. 

Mining Engineer. Graduates of technical mining schools are given the 
degree of engineer of mines and sign the letters M. E. after their names. 
The letters M. E. stand for mechanical engineer, when given by a school, 
but are often used by men engaged in mining, who lack scholastic degrees, 
as an abbreviation for mining engineer, or mining expert. 

Missed Hole. A drill hole, charged with explosives, which fails to be 
set off by the fulminating cap. 

Moil. A steel bar, like a drill, except that it is sharpened to a point 
instead of having a cutting face. 

Molybdenite. A graphite-like, flaky lead-colored mineral found in 
some ores; composed of molybdenum and sulphur. 

Momme. A Japanese weight equal to 3.75 grams or 2.4113 penny- 
weights. 

Monocline. Upturned beds of rock that have a practically uniform dip. 

Monzonite. A granitic rock intermediate between diorite and granite. 

Morgen. A South African land measure 2.1165 acres, or 1.44 claims. 

Mortar. An assayer's mortar in which rock or ore is crushed with a 
pestle. A mortar is the box, about the stamp of a mill, in which the ore 
is stamped and crushed. 

Mother Lode. The main lode of the district. In America applies to 
the mineralized belt of the principal California gold region. 

Mouth. The surface entrance or opening of an adit, tunnel or shaft. 



14 GLOSSARY 

Mucker. Ore shoveller, who loads the mine cars and in most mines is 
also a trammer, pushing the cars to the shaft or tunnel mouth. 

Mullock. Australian for waste rock broken underground. 

Mundic. Pyrrhotite, magnetic pyrite; iron sulphide. 

Mynpacht (South Africa). A part (10%) of a farm, which the owner 
has the first right to locate or peg out, when the farm is proclaimed a pub- 
lic goldfield. 

Nickeliferous. Carrying nickel. 

Nodule. A small concretionary, rounded mass of mineral matter. 

Non-Conformable. Rock strata not associated originally in the posi- 
tion now occupied. 

Nugget. A lump of native metal; usually applied to gold. 

Open-Cast, Open-Cut. A mine worked as a quarry, or pit open to 
the sky. 

Ore. Metallic minerals; mineralized material or rock, holding metallic 
minerals. Called pay ore when it can be profitably worked; low-grade ore 
when it yields but slight profit. 

Ore-Car. A mine car for carrying ore or waste rock. 

Ore-Chute. An opening in ore or rock through which ore is dropped 
downward. Also used for ore bins and pockets. 

Ore Dump. A heap or pile of ore at the tunnel mouth or top of shaft. 

Ore-Shoot. An orebody or portion of a vein carrying high-grade, or 
payable ore. Usually has a vertical or diagonal dip on the plane of the dip 
of the vein. 

Orthoclase. A white, or pale-colored feldspar composed of silicate of 
potassium and aluminum. Occurs as white crystals or spots in porphyry. 

Outcrop. The apex, or part of a vein or mineral deposit that is ex- 
posed at the surface of the earth. 

Outlier. An isolated mass of rock or group of rocks lying at a dis- 
tance from the main body, and separated therefrom, on the surface by a 
different rock formation. 

Output. Production. 

Overburden. Waste material, usually drift or alluvium above the solid 
rock, or orebody. 

Overhand Stoping. Removing ore in ascending steps. 

Oxide. An ore of any metal or metals chemically united with oxygen. 

Oxidize. To unite with oxygen. Many minerals and most metals oxi- 
dize with greater or less rapidity when exposed to air or water. 

Panning. To wash gravel, etc.. in a pan, so that the sand and gravel 
is loosened and thrown out and the gold or heavy metallic minerals left 
in the pan. 

Patent. A deed given by the Government, to mineral lands. 

Patio. A walled yard with paved floor in houses and mine plants, in 
Mexico and other Spanish countries. 

Paystreak. The rich band, part, or zone in a vein or ore deposit which 
carries the profitable, or pay ore. 

Pegmatite. Very coarsely grained granite; a giant granite. 

Penthouse or Pentice. A shed-roof erected in the bottom of a shaft, 
when sinking, to protect miners from accidental fall of rock, timber or 
tools from above. 

Peroxide. The oxide of any metal containing the greatest proportion 
of oxygen. 

Pertenencia. The unit of a mineral claim in Mexico; 100 meters square, 
or one hectare, 2,471 acres. 

Peter Out. To pinch out, or feather out and end: 

Petrology. The study of rocks by thin sections and microscope. 

Phosphate. An ore of any metal or metals with which phosphorous 
and oxygen are chemically united. 

Picul. A Chinese weight of 133-; lb.; commonly used in the Orient. 

Pillar. A section, or block or ore left in place to support shafts or 
roofs. 



PINCHING QUARTZ CLAIM 15 

Pinching. The narrowing of a vein. 

Pinching Out. The narrowing of a vein to extinction. 

Pipe Vein. An orebody of chimney form. 

Pitch. The angle and direction of dip or take of an ore-shoot in a 
vein. If a vein dips east, an ore-shoot may pitch at a flatter angle than the 
vein, to the N. E. or S. E. 

Plain. A flat or nearly level country. 

Placer. A deposit of metal-bearing gravel or alluvium. 

Plant. The machinery equipment of a mine or reduction works. In 
general use the term includes buildings, housing, machinery. 

Plat. To draw to scale. In Lake Superior and Australian usuage it is 
the station or enlargement of a level, to give extra space for loading and 
unloading the cage, skip, or bucket. 

Plumbiferous. Carrying lead. 

Plutonic. Rocks of deep-seated, igneous origin. 

Pocket. An orebody of small extent; a natural underground reser- 
voir of water; a cavity cut in the rock underground to hold ore; a bin at 
shaft house or mill, in which ore, flux, or fuel is stored. 

Pockety. Carrying only occasional bunches of good ore. 

Poling. The process of deoxidizing molten copper and tin in a rever- 
beratory furnace by stirring with long poles of green timber. 

Poll-Pick. A tool having a pick on one end, and a poll, or hammer 
head, on the other. 

Pood. A Russian weight of 36.112 Ib. avoirdupois. 

Poppet-Head. Framework or gallows frame over a shaft, for sheave- 
wheel and hoist rope. 

Porphyritic. Carrying isolated crystals in a ground mass, like plums in 
a pudding. 

Porphyry. Properly, is any igneous rock showing phenocrysts, i. e., 
distinctly isolated crystals in a dense or crystalline matrix. Porphyry may 
be granite, quartz, or one of several other rocks. 

Pound. The troy pound alone is used for gold, silver, and platinum 
only. It is 0.82286 of an avoirdupois pound. A pound of gold weighs 12 
troy ozs. or 5,760 grains and the avoirdupois pound 7,000 grains. 

Primary. The first; primary ores are those first or originally formed 
in an ore deposit, before alteration began. Also applies to the oldest rock 
formations. 

Prop. A heavy timber placed with its foot against the floor of a mine 
opening, and its top against the roof, to support the rock above. 

Prospect., To seek for mineral; a new mining property that has not 
yet been developed enough to be called a mine. 

Prospector. A searcher for mineral deposits. 

Protoxide. The oxide of any metal containing the least proportion of 
oxygen. 

Puddingstone. A coarse conglomerate showing rounded pebbles. 

Pulp. Pulverized ore or concentrate. 

Pulverize. To crush to powder. 

Pulverulent. That which may easily be reduced to powder. 

Pyrrhotite. Iron sulphide, often called mundic or magnetic pyrite. 

Pyrite. Iron disulphide; fool's gold. 

Pyrites. A local term for pyrite and for sulphide ores; more properly^ 
iron disulphide. 

Pyrolusite. A black manganese ore containing 63% manganese. 

Quarry. An open pit, of varying size, sometimes several acres, from 
which stone or ore is mined. 

Quarter-Section. In the United States a quarter of a square mile; 160 
acres, laid out in a parallelogram, each side of which is one-half mile in 
length. 

Quartz. Crystalline silica; any hard silicious ore, in miners' usage. 

Quartz Claim. In the United States mining claims are of two classes: 




16 GLOSSARY 

placer claims, carrying mineral, usually gold, in alluvium; and quartz lode 
claims, any prospect carrying metalliferous bodies in place. 

Quartzite. An altered (metamorphosed) crystalline sandstone. 

Quartzose. Rock having much quartz in its composition. 

Quicksand. Fine sand, which flows easily when wet. 

Ragging. Cornish for rough cobbing; broken lumps of ore of medium 
size. 

Raise or Rise. A shaft or winze that is being opened from below. 
Sometimes called upraise or uprise. 

Rake. The pitch of an ore-shoot on the plane of the vein. Also ap- 
plied to cross veins, which are sometimes called rake, or counter veins. 

Range. A mineral belt; also in many American states a surveyor's term 
for describing and locating lands. The state is surveyed in sections, towns, 
and ranges. A township comprises 36 sections and is a square of six miles. 
Each township receives a double number, one for the town and one for the 
range. The towns are numbered consecutively from south to north, and 
the ranges are similarly numbered from east to west. Thus T. 2 N. f R. 5 W. 
means Township 2 north or 12 miles north and Range 5, or 30 miles west 
of the State meridian. 

Reamer. A tool like a bit, used to enlarge a hole previously drilled. 

Reduction. The separation of metals from their ores. 

Reef. A quartz vein or lode; a projecting ledge or inclined wall like 
an outcrop. The gold deposits on the Rand are termed reefs. 

Refining. The elimination of impurities from crude metals, or separa- 
tion of metallic alloys obtained in the reduction of ores. 

Refractory. A refractory ore is one that cannot be smelted or other- 
wise treated by ordinary metallurgical processes. A refractory stamp-rock 
is one that is pulverized with unusual difficulty. 

Regulus. The metallic material that separates and settles in the bot- 
tom of a pot of molten matte, or slag. 

Reniform. Kidney-shaped. 

Reserves. The amount of payable ore, developed and ready for extrac- 
tion, or blocked out ahead of immediate requirements. 

Reverberatory Furnace. A smelting furnace in which the flame from 
the grate below is reflected back by the roof on the charge of ore. 

Rise. A raise or opening driven upward. 

Roasting. Driving off sulphur and other volatile elements from ore. 
by heat. When done in a furnace, under great heat, the process is called 
calcining. 

Rob. To remove pillars and other supports from a mine for their min- 
eral content, regardless of the future of the property. 

Rock. Lake Superior; applied to ore mined and ready for the stamp 
mill. In English practice ore is called "Stone." More properly applied to 
the stony matter surrounding ore, or constituting the earth's crust; is a 
synonym for stone. 

Rock-Crusher. A machine for reducing rock or ore to smaller sizes. 
Crushers are of two types, the jaw and the gyratory. The jaw-crusher 
works by means of swinging jaws; the gyratory operates on the plan of 
a coffee-grinder, only that the motion is somewhat eccentric. 

Rock-Drill. A power drill. 

Rock Filling. Waste rock, used to fill up worked-out stopes to sup- 
port the roof. 

Rock-House. Lake Superior; the building (usually the one over the 
shaft) where copper-bearing ore from the mine is dumped from the ore 
skip (or bucket), is screened, crushed and stored in a bin, ready for ship- 
ment to the mill. 

Rolls. Heavy steel rolls, worked in pairs, like a clothes wringer, for 
crushing rock and ore. 

Roof. The rock overhead in a mine opening. 

Room. Similar to a stope; term usually applied to mines working 
mineral bodies lying nearly horizontally. 




ROYALTY SHOOT 17 

Royalty. A percentage of the ore or value thereof paid to the land 
owner by the lessee of the mine; often a fixed sum for each ton of ore 
extracted. 

Run. See mill run. A bar or course of ground better or worse than 
the average value of the mine. 

Running Ground. Superincumbent material that breaks off readily and 
falls into the mine openings. 

Saddle. Depression or U-shaped fold; the reverse of an arch or anti- 
cline. 

Safety Cage. A cage furnished with automatic appliances to stop its 
descent in case the cable breaks. 

Salting. Placing rich foreign ore, minerals or substances .in a mine to 
deceive intending purchasers or other interested parties. 

Sample. A specimen of ore from a mineral deposit. A selected sam- 
ple is misleading because containing far above average value, and splendid 
samples frequently come from the poorest mines. An average sample is 
what its name purports if it be an average sample. 

Sampling. Cutting a representative part of an ore deposit, which 
should truly represent its average value. Most usually a trench-like cut 4 
inches wide and 2 inches deep, cut into the clean face of ore and across its 
course. Honest sampling requires good judgment and practical experience. 

Sand Pump. A pump, usually centrifugal, designed to lift water carry- 
ing large quantities of coarse tailings or sand in suspension. 

Sand. Tailings from the stamp mills of Lake Superior copper mines: 
in fact, from any mills. 

Sand (or Tailings) Wheel. A large wheel, having buckets on its inner 
perimeter, for elevating water carrying stamp-sand. 

Scale Copper. Copper in very thin flakes. 

Schist. A crystalline, usually micaceous rock of foliated structure, 
made up of superimposed flattened particles. 

Scoria. Slags from copper smelters; volcanic ash. 

Scoriaceous. Of the nature of scoria. 

Scram. To search for ore in a mine that is apparently worked out 
and to extract it. 

Screen. A grating of perforated metal or woven wire. 

Seam. A thin layer of rock or ore. 

Secondary Enrichment. An enrichment of a vein or an orebody by 
material of later origin, often derived from the oxidation of decomposed 
overlying ore masses. Nature's process of making high-grade out of low- 
grade ores. First discovered by Weed and announced by publication in 
Geol. Soc. of America program, Dec. 8, 1899. Confirmed by Emmons and 
by Van Hise, Feb., 1900. 

Sectile. Easily cut. 

Section. A field or district; also, in the U. S. a square mile of land. 

Sedimentary. Rocks formed by deposition from water, as contra-dis- 
tinguished from rocks formed by igneous action. 

Selvage. A clay seam along which parting occurs; also called fluccan. 

Set. A framed form of timber, used for supporting ground in a mine. 

Shaft. A pit or deep mine opening. 

Shaft-House. A building at the mouth of a shaft, where ore or rock is 
received from the mine. 

Shale. A hardened clay with fissile structure. 

Shear-Zone. A belt in which the rocks are crushed by many parallel 
fissures. 

Sheave. A grooved wheel, notched to carry rope; an open pulley. 

Shift. A miner's work period of 8 to 10 hours' time; a force of men 
employed on one turn. 

Shift Boss. A mine boss, or under-captain, in charge of a gang or 
shift of miners. 

Shoot. See ore-shoot. To fire or explode dynamite in holes drilled 
for that purpose. An erroneous spelling for chute. 




18 GLOSSARY 

Short Ton. A weight of 2,000 11). avoirdupois. 

Shot. A blast of some explosive. 

Shot Copper. Small rounded particles of native copper, somewhat 
resembling small shot in size and shape. 

Shrinkage Stoping. Taking out ore by blasting it down on a heap of 
broken ore. Working space for drilling is kept open by drawing out part 
of the ore from an opening beneath. Is a method of overhead stoping. 

Silica. Quartz, a compound of oxygen and silicon. Ordinarily sand is 
composed largely, if not wholly, of silica. 

Silicate. A mineral composed of any metal or element chemically 
united with silica. 

Silicious. Containing much silica or quartz. 

Sill. The floor-piece of a set of mine timbers. 

Sinking. The process of deepening a shaft or winze. 

Sinking-Pump. A movable pump, usually vertical, hung in a shaft, and 
lowered, as the shaft is deepened. 

Skip. An iron box, open at the top, running on guides, on four wheels, 
and hauled by a cable; used for hoisting ore and rock, and for lowering 
timber. 

Skip-Road (or Way). A track of T-rails, spiked to wooden sleepers, 
on which a skip runs. 

Slag. The melted rock or waste separated from the metal in a smelt- 
ing furnace. 

Slice. To remove ore in mine in pillars, or by successive slices. 

Slickenside. A polished rock surface, showing striations produced by 
the opposing walls of a fracture rubbing and grinding against each other 
in the movement produced by earth stresses. 

Slide. A bedding fault, or slipping caused by the subsidence of the 
overlying rock formation; also applied to masses of loose rock, or ore on a 
mountain slope. 

Slime. Exceedingly small particles of rock and mineral held in sus- 
pension in water. This mud is called slum. 

Slime Table. A circular revolving table, on which slim flows and 
minute particles of mineral are saved. 

Slip. A fault. 

Sludge. The mixture of rock and water, or slime, formed by a dia- 
mond-drill. 

Sluice. A wooden trough, box, flume, or launder. 

Smelter. Works where ores or crude metals are reduced by fusion. 

Soapstone. Steatite; a soft unctuous rock. / 

Soft Ground. Heavy ground; rock about underground openings that 
does not stand well and reouires heaw timbering. 

Sollar. A platform or ladder landing in a shaft. 

Spathic. Containing carbon dioxide; a carbonate. 

Specimen. A sample of mineral selected because typical, unusual or 
exceptionally rich. 

Soeiss. Impure metallic arsenides produced in copper smelting; ore 
particles finely disseminated through a rock, usually occurring as impregnations. 

Spelter. The common term for metallic zinc. 

Sphalerite. Zinc blende; zinc sulphide; the most common zinc ore 
mineral ; is often found associated with galena and chalcopyrite. 

Soile. Lagging driven ahead of the regular timbering in treacherous 
ground. 

Spitzkasten. Pyramidal boxes wherein ores are concentrated and sized 
by a jet of water fed from below. 

Spoon. A long-handled spoon, used to scrape out drill holes. 

Sprag. A prop or cross-timber set to secure the hanging wall in a 
stope. A short piece of wood used to block the wheels of a mine car. 

Spur. A short, small branch from a vein. 

Square Sets. A frame of mine timbers with mortised and tenoned sill, 
top piece and uprights of equal length, joined at right angles. 



SQ UIBS WAB STICK 19 

Squib. A fuse. 

Squeeze. The slow settling down of the root in mine workings with- 
-cmt fracture. 

Stack. The chimney of a furnace; usually employed to designate a 
number of furnaces, when used in the plural. 

Stamp-Mill. A mill for crushing and concentrating minerals by stamps 
and jigs, etc. 

Stamp-Rock. Ore containing fine copper that must be crushed and 
jigged to recover the metal. Use restricted to Michigan. 

Stamps. Machines to crush rock or ore by heavy blows. 

Stamp-Shoe. The heavy chilled iron casting attached to the lower end 
of a stamp piston, and does the actual crushing of rock in a stamp-mill. It hits 
against a round steel block called a die. 

Stanniferous. Tin-bearing. 

Station. A chamber in a shaft, cut out for pumps, landing place, etc. 

Station-Pump. A mine pump permanently placed, as distinguished 
from a movable sinking-pump. 

Steatite. Soapstone; a greasy mineral, having a talc base. 

Step-Fault. A series of faults, rising like steps. 

Stockwerk. A mass of rock penetrated by numerous small stringers 
of ore, the entire mass averaging sufficiently rich in metallic material to warrant 
its mining and treatment. 

Stone. See Rock. 

Stope. (V.) To mine or extract ore. (N.) The workings between 
levels or drifts, in which ore is broken down in a series of chambers and taken 
away for treatment. 

Stoping. Breaking down the mass of pay-rock or ore above a drift. 
When stoping in an orebody of average width, miners can break rock much more 
quickly and cheaply than when driving the drifts. 

Stoping Ground. Part of an orebody opened by drifts and raises and 
ready for breaking down. 

Strata. The successive beds or layers of sedimentary rocks. 

Stratified. Having regular layers of varying rock varieties. 

Stratum. A layer or bed of rock. 

Streak. The color given by a mineral when scratched or wheji rubbed 
on porcelain. 

Strike. The horizontal direction of a vein, measured by the points of 
the compass ; a discovery of ore. 

Stringer. A thin seam of ore. 

Strip. To remove the overburden of waste, drift, or alluval soil over- 
lying an orebody. 

Stripping. The waste or overburden above an orebody. 

Structure. The form of a mineral, whether granular, crystalline or 
amorphous. 

Stull. The top-piece of a set of mine timber. A timber prop sup- 
porting the roof of a mine opening. 

Sulphate. A chemical compound (or a mineral) of a metal combined 
with sulphuric acid; an ore of any metal or metals with which sulphur and 
oxygen are united chemically. 

Sulphide. A mineral or ore of any metal or metals with which sulphur 
is combined chemically. 

Sulpho-antimonite. A mineral in which sulphur and antimony are 
united chemically with a metal. 

Sulpho-arsenite. An ore mineral of any metal or metals with which 
sulphur and arsenic are united chemically. 

Sulphuret. A sulphide; term becoming obsolete, but used in California. 

Sump. The pit at the bottom of a shaft, where water collects; also in 
cyanide plants. 

Surface Rights. The ownership of the surface of lartd only, where 
mineral rights are reserved. 

Swabstick. A stick used to clean out drill-holes. M : jt 



-hole 

. e 

- *-\ 4- 4- f\ 



20 GLOSSARY 

Syncline. Canoe or U-shaped fold of rock layers; the reverse of an 
anticline. 

Table. A concentrating machine for separating finely crushed particles 
of ore from gangue. 

Table Land. A plateau. 

Tailings. The sandy and gravelly residue or refuse matter from a con- 
centrating mill. 

Tamp. To closely pack clay or other sticky earth into a drill-hole 
above the cartridges, to give greater force to the blast. 

Tap. To draw off molten metal or slag from the vent of a furnac< 

Taper Off. Cornish for stopping work temporarily. 

Tenor. The percentage or average metallic content of an ore, matte, 
or impure metal. 

Terrero. Spanish for heaps of partly leached ore. 

Tertiary. The third great geological period preceding the present 
Quarternary period. 

Test-Pit. A shadow pit sunk to look for mineral. 

Texture. A rock structure; is fine or coarse grained, porphyritic, etc. 

Throw. The displacement of a vein caused by faulting. 

Timber. The wooden logs and sticks used for underground supports. 

Timberman. One who works at timbering a mine. 

Ton. Long, 2,240 lb.; metric. 2,204 lb.; short, 2,000 Ib. 

Tonelada. Spanish for long ton. 

Township. Abbreviated T. or Twp.; see Range. 

Trachyte. A light-colored volcanic rock made of alkaline feldspar 
with black mica and hornblende. 

Tram.. To load rock or ore in cars and push same to the shaft, a tramway. 

Trammers. Men who load and tram the broken rock underground. 

Trap. A dense gray, blue or greenish rock of volcanic origin; usually 
an old and altered basaltic rock. 

Trend. The general direction of a mineral body. 

Trestle. A frame-work of timbers, carying tram-tracks. 

Tribute. The money per ton or percentage of ore extracted which is 
paid by lessees to owners for the privilege of working a mine. 

Tripod. The three-legged iron frame on which the working parts of 
a power-drill rest; a three-legged vyooden frame over the mouth of a pit- or shaft. 

Trommel. A revolving cylindrical sieve for sizing ore. 

Troubled. A vein is sometimes called troubled when disturbed or faulted, 

True Fissure Vein. All mineralized fissures are true fissure veins. 
Term commonly used as meaning a fissure vein with promise of holding to great 
depth, in contra-distinction to a gash vein. 

Tsubo. A Japanese measure of 6 feet square, equalling 36 square feet. 

Tube-Mill. A steel cylinder half lined with flint pebbles or steel balls, 
which crush ore when the tube is revolved. 

Tufa. A limestone formed by spring waters. Name frequently used in 
place of tuff. 

Tuff. Volcanic ash, cinder, and lapilli, ejected from volcanic vents and 
deposited in layers from air or water and solidified by time and superincumbent 
pressure. Name also used for coarser volcanic debris, including breccia and 
conglomerate. 

Tunnel. A practically horizontal opening entirely through a hill or 
mountain. Term is commonly used instead of adit, which is a horizontal gallery 
having only one opening to surface. 

Turbine. The most efficient form of water-wheel; also a new form of. 
steam-engine in which the entire movement of the power-producing parts is 
rotary instead of reciprocating. 

Tuyeres. The pipes in a furnace wall by which air is supplied undc-r 
pressure, to either blast furnaces or bessemer converters. 

Unconformable. With a break between rock beds lying at different 
angles or with erosion surface between. 



UNDERHAND STOPINGZN. 21 

Underhand Sloping. Cutting out ore from the floor of an opening. 
Removing ore in descending steps. 

Underlay, Underlie. The downward extension of a vein or bed beneath 
the ground. Is technically the horizontal departure of a vein from the vertical 
measured in feet, per fathom (or 100'). Mineral bodies lying under a given tract, 
though not outcropping on surface. 

Unpatented. Mining claims to which a deed from the U. S. Govt. has 
not been received. They are subject to annual assessment work, in order to 
maintain ownership. 

Unstratified. Rock that is not bedded in layers. 

Unwater. To free from water; to pump out or drain a mine. 

Upcast. A shaft having an upward air current. 

Upraise. A raise, an upward opening in a mine. Term almost obsolete, 
"raise" being preferred. 

Van. To wash ore on a shovel, like panning. 

Vanner. A concentrating table or machine for dressing ore by means 
of vibratory motion, aided by jets of water to carry away waste rock. 

Vara. A Spanish-American measure of length, of 33 inches. 

Vein. A rock fissure filled with mineral matter; a mineral body having 
defined walls. See contact vein and fissure vein. 

Veinstuff. Vein filling; also used for gangue. 

Vertical Shaft. One sunk at an angle of 90 with the horizon, or 
directly downwards toward the center of the earth. 

Virgin. Native metal occurring elementally, as distinguished from ore 
minerals, which are chemical compounds. 

Vitreous. Of a glassy nature. 

Volatile. That which can be driven off as vapor, by heat. 

Vug. A cavity in the rock; usually lined with a crystalline incrustation. 

W. The chemical symbol for tungsten. 

Wall. The side of a mine opening or drift. The waste or country rock 
on each side of a vein. 

Wall-Plates. Are the two side pieces of a set or frame of shaft tim- 
bers, as distinguished from the end pieces. 

Water-jacket. An outer casing for a blast-furnace, in which water 
circulates, to keep the metallic furnace-walls from melting because of the Intense 
heat of the charge. 

Water-Level. The level above which water does not rise, when a mine 
is allowed to fill. The water-level is often the point below which altered and 
enriched ores are succeeded by base unaltered sulphides. 

Weathered. Changed by long exposure to air and water. 

Wet Process. Leaching or lixiviation. 

Wheal. Cornish for mine. 

Whim. A windlass with a vertical drum revolved by horse-power and 
used for hoisting. 

Whip. A fixed pulley with hoisting rope passed through it and pulled 
by a horse or mule. 

Wilfley. A Wilfley concentrating table; about 20,000 in use throughout 
the world. 

Winch. A windlass. 

Winding. Hoisting with rope and drum. 

Windlass. A device for hoisting from a pit or shaft, by means of coil- 
ing a rope or cable around a drum, with crank handles. 

Winze. A shaft, usually short, extending downward from the floor of 
a mine opening. 

Wire Bars. Refined copper cast into bars for wire drawing. 

Workings. The underground openings of a mine. 

Wulfenite. See molybdenum in minerals. 

Zinc Blende. Sphalerite; sulphide of zinc. 

Zinckiferous. Carrying zinc. 

Zinc Sulphide. A compound of zinc and sulphur. See minerals. 

Zn. The chemi-cal symbol for zinc. 



CHAPTER II 

MINERALOGY OF THE ORE MINERALS 

ORE MINERALS: 

Ores as mined are very seldom composed entirely of ore minerals, usually 
consisting of a mixture of quartz, or other non-metallic mineral, or of altered 
rock and metal-bearing minerals. The mixture constitutes ore when it contains 
enough value, in one or more metals, to pay for the cost of mining, concentrating, 
transportation, smelting, and marketing. As this cost varies with each mine and 
locality, and the price of every metal, save gold, also fluctuates, there is a wide 
range of value to ore. The Alaska gold quartz mines operating on a gigantic 
scale can mine, mill, and extract their product for less than $1 per ton, whereas 
many smaller mines cannot make a profit on $3 ore of similar character. Copper 
ores show a much greater margin, between the costs at the Utah Copper Co. and 
those of small vein mines. 

In the following pages I have given a list of the more important ore minerals 
of each metal. It is intended only for general reference, the minerals being 
arranged under the name of the metal. For sight tests and recognition of ore 
minerals, see "Practical Field Mineralogy," Farrell-Moses, 1912. 
ALUMINUM. 

Bauxite. 74% alumina. Hydrated alumina. Regarded as a hot spring 
deposit. Occurs in pockets in clay in Arkansas. 

Corundum. 53% aluminum. A bluish-gray, brown or white mineral 
which is harder than and will scratch any other mineral except diamond ; will 
scratch steel. The clear red is the gem ruby and the blue, sapphire, found in 
many basic igneous dikes in Montana, especially in the sapphire mines at Yogo. 

Cryolite. 12.8% aluminum, sodium alumina fluoride. A Greenland ore, 
essential to aluminum reduction. 

Gibbsite. 65.4%alumina. Hydrated alumina, derived in Arkansas de- 
posits from decomposition of a granite rock (Elaeolite syenite). 
ANTIMONY. 

Stibnite. Antimony glance 71.4% antimony. Is the common ore; a 
sulphide of the metal. Is in process of deposition at Steamboat Springs, Nevada. 
Antimony occurs in many silver ores. Is common in tetrahedrite or silver- 
bearing copper minerals. Antimony ores are mined at Pine Creek, near Wardner, 
Idaho. Specific gravity, 4.5. 
ARSENIC. 

This metal is largely derived from arsenopyrite deposits, from nickel or 
cobalt arsenides, common at Cobalt, from enargite, copper arsenide, at Butte. 

Arsenopyrite, or Mispickel, a sulpharsenide of iron, with 45% arsenic, 
which looks like iron pyrite, but emits a garlic odor when struck. Occurs in 
fissure veins, with gold ores. Ruby, silver and other minerals rich in silver also 
contain arsenic. Gravity, 6. 

Bismuthinite. Bi 2 S 3 , 81.2% bismuth, a sulphide of bismuth. Gravity, 
6.4. The metal is a subordinate constituent of many gold, tin, and silver ores, 
especially those of Leadville, Colo. It is obtained mainly as a by-product from 
gold-silver and lead ores and not from ores mined for this metal itself. 
CADMIUM. 

Greenockite. Is the only important ore mineral, the yellow sulphide, 
which occurs with zinc (sphalerite) ores in the Mississippi states. 
CHROMIUM. 

Chromite. FeO, Cr 2 O :) , or chrome iron ore, with 68% chromium, is 
the sole ore of commerce. Gravity, 4.5. It resembles magnetite, the black iron 
oxide ore. 

23 




24 MINERALOGY 

COBALT. 

Cobaltite, or cobalt sulpho-arsenide, with 35.4% cobalt. 
Erythrite. A cobalt bloom, 37.4% cobalt, a creamy raspberry red min- 
eral, formed by oxidation ; a hydrated arsenious oxide. 

Smaltite. Cobalt arsenide with 28.2% arsenious oxide. A silver-white 
mineral, harder than cobaltite; garlic odor when struck. Gravity, 6.5. 
COPPER. Cu. Native copper. The chemical symbol Cu is an abbre- 
viation of cuprum, the Latin word for copper. The metal, native or refined, 
has the following names in modern languages; kupfer in German; koppar in 
Swedish; kobber in Norwegian; cobre in Spanish and Portuguese; cuivre in 
French, rame in Italian. 

Atomic weight, 63.2. Belongs in the first group and is the leader of the 
fifth series of Mendeleef's Periodic System. The group is as follows: 1, 
hydrogen; 2, lithium; 3, sodium; 4, potassium; 5, copper; 6, rubidium; 7, silver; 
8, caesium; 9, unknown (possibly terbium, atomic weight 160); 10, gold; 11, 
unknown. The fifth series, of which copper is the basic leader, is as follows : 1, 
copper ; 2, zinc ; 3, gallium ; 4, germanium ; 5, arsenic ; 6, selenium ; 7, bromine. 
The three metallic elements falling between series four and five in Mendeleef's 
table are iron, cobalt, and nickel. The frequency with \yhich these three elements 
are found associated with copper, and the ease with which all four metals replace 
one another, is notable. The general resemblance between copper, silver and gold, 
which form ascending steps in the same group, is readily apparent. 

System of crystallization, isometric. Tetrahexahedronal forms are the most 
common, with much twinning. Crystals often show cavernous faces and occa- 
sionally elevations, are often distorted and pass gradually through distortions 
into filiform and arborescent forms. Native copper also occurs massive, in 
granular form, and in laminae. In the Lake Superior mines the metal occurs in 
all observed forms and sizes, including lamellae from microscopic flakes up to 
sheets of immense size and weight, crystals of greatly varying form and size, 
grains from microscopic size to considerable nodules, and druses, often of con- 
siderable size, show various filiform and aborescent shapes. The finest particles 
are grains and exceedingly minute flakes, occurring in an upper sandstone of the 
Keweenawan series, while the largest masses, weighing upwards of 500 tons, 
have been found in contact and fissure veins. 

Cleavage, none; fracture hackly; tenacity, second only to that of iron. Is 
perfectly sectile and highly ductile and malleable, ranking in these particulars 
with the precious metals. Electrical conductivity, 931, as compared with 1,000 
for silver, which possesses the most perfect electrical conductivity of any known 
metal or alloy. Conductivity for heat, 898, as compared with 1,000 for gold, the 
most perfect conductor of heat. 

Hardness, 2.5 to 3. Specific gravity, in vacuo, at degrees Centigrade (equal 
to 32, or freezing point, Fahrenheit) ; when chemically pure and devoid of 
porosity, is 8.945. Specific gravity of the ordinary copper of commerce, none of 
which is free from impurities, varies from about 8.75 when cast, to about 8.95 
when rolled, hammered or drawn, the exact gravity depending upon how handled, 
as well as upon the extent and nature of the impurities contained. 

Lustre, metallic. Color, copper-red. Streak, copper-red, metallic, shining. 
Tarnishes upon exposure to air to brownish red, and is liable to form a coating 
of verdigris or oxide upon long exposure to air. Atmosphere laden with moisture 
and carbonic acid is especially favorable to the formation of verdigris. 

Fusibility: Copper is fusible at approximately 2,000 Fahrenheit, or a trifle 
less than 1,100 Centigrade. Color, when fused, sea-green. Copper becomes 
volatile under the high temperature of the electric arc. 

Solubility : Copper is soluble in nitric acid, aqua regia, and strong boiling 
sulphuric acid, also, slowly, in dilute hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, with 
admission of air. When in solution in nitric or sulphuric acids will deposit 
metallic copper on iron immersed therein. 

Affinities: Copper has a greater affinity for sulphur than for any other 
element, possessing also marked affinities for oxygen, carbon dioxide, arsenic, 
antimony and bismuth, and unites with many other elements. 

Alterations : Native copper alters on exposure, especially in damp air, to 




AZURITE CHALCOPYRITE' 25 

the simpler oxide and carbonate ores, such as cuprite malachite and azurite, 
and occasionally, in time, to the more complex ore forms. 

Occurrence : Native copper occurs, usually in small quantities, in most of 
the principal copper districts of the world. The native metal is* mined upon a 
considerable scale only in Lake Superior, TJ. S. A., and Bolivia. The Lake 
Superior native copper carries considerable silver, mechanically admixed, though 
not alloyed, but carries no gold. In districts outside of Lake Superior and 
Bolivia the metal occurs most frequently in connection with the oxide and car- 
bonate ores, and occasionally with the secondary sulphide ores. 

Impurities : Native copper frequently contains silver, arsenic, bismuth, anti- 
mony, zinc and occasionally mercury. Commercial copper, refined from ores, 
may contain any of the elements already named, and also gold, tin; lead, selenium 
and tellurium, the latter two elements in very minute quantities. 

Azurite. 2CuCO 3 Cu( / OH) 2 . A basic copper carbonate containing 
53.3% copper. Common names, blue carbonate of copper, blue malachite, azure 
copper ore. Crystallization, monoclinic. Fracture, conchoidal. Tenacity, brittle. 
Hardness, 3.5 to 4. Gravity, 3.77 to 3.83. Lustre, vitreous. Color, azure blue. 
Streak, lighter blue. Is subtranslucent to transparent. Occurs frequently in 
the oxidized zone of copper ore bodies, almost invariably with malachite, but is 
much less common than malachite. Is a valuable commercial ore of copper. 

Bornite. CusFeSs. A copper and iron sulphide, containing- 55.5% 
copper, 16.4% iron, 28.1% sulphur. Common name, peacock copper ore. Crystal- 
lization, rare isometric, with many hexagonal penetration twins. Structure, 
granular or compact. Fracture, small con.choidal to uneven. Tenacity, brittle. 
Hardness, 3. Gravity, 4.9 to 5.4. Lustre, metallic. Color, copper red to bluish 
brown, quickly tarnishing to irridescence, often most brilliant. Streak, pale 
grayish-black. Is soluble in nitric acid, with separation of sulphur. Is a primary 
mineral, at Butte and in contact metamorphic ores, but also occurs as the first 
alteration product from chalcopyrite among the secondary copper sulphides, and 
often carries nodules and occasionally larger masses of chalcocite. Is one of the 
most important ores of copper. 

Bournonite. 3(Pb, Cu.)S.Sb 2 S 3 . A lead and copper sulphantimonite, 
containing 13% copper and 42.5% lead. Crystallization orthorhombic. Structure, 
massive, granular and compact. Cleavage, imperfect. Fracture, subconchoidal to 
uneven. Tenacity, rather brittle. Hardness, 2.5 to3. Gravity, 5.7 to 5.9. Lustre, 
brilliant metallic. Color and streak, steel-gray, inclining to blackish gray or 
iron-black. Fuses easily on charcoal and is soluble in acids. Occurrence : in 
many copper fields. 

Brochantite. 4CuO SO,,3H 2 O. A basic copper sulphate containing 
56.2% copper. Crystallization, orthorhombic. Fracture, uneven. Hardness, 3.5 
to 4. Gravity, 3.9. Lustre, vitreous. Color, emerald-green to blackish green. 
Streak, paler green. Is translucent to transparent. Is found in many copper 
fields, and is an important commercial ore in the Clifton district, Graham county, 
Arizona, and Chuquicamata, Chile. 

Chalcanthite. CuSO 4 +5H 2 O. A hydrous copper sulphate contain- 
ing 25.4% copper. Common names, blue vitriol, bluestone, copper sulphate. 
Crystallization, triclinic. Structure, massive, stalactitic and reinform, sometimes 
fibrous. Fracture, conchoidal. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness, 2.5. Gravity, 2.12 
to 2.30. Lustre, vitreous. Color, sky-blue. Streak, uncolored. Is translucent to 
subtransparent. Is soluble in water. Occurs as deposits from mine water in 
most sulphide copper mines, and is found in impure state, in beds, in Chile. 

Chalcocite. CtioS. A copper sulphide carrying 79.8% copper. Com- 
mon names, copper glance, cuprous sulphide. Crystallization, orthorhombic ; also 
occurs massive, with structure granular to compact and impalpable. Cleavage, 
indistinct. Fracture, conchoidal. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness, 2.5 to 3. Gravity, 
5.5 to 5.8. Lustre, metallic. Color and streak, blackish lead-gray, tarnishing to 
dull green or blue. Is soluble in nitric acid. Occurs in all copper districts, fre- 
quently in large quantities. Is the richest commercial ore of copper and yields 
more than one-half of world's copper .supply. 

Chalcopyrite. Cu.S Fe S 3 . A copper and iron sulphide containing 
34.5% copper and 30.5% iron. Is the primary ore of copper. Crystallization, 




26 MINERALOGY 

tetragonal, sphenoidal, often twinning, also frequently massive and compact 
Fracture, uneven. Hardness, 3.5 to 4. Gravity, 4.1 to 4.3. Lustre, metallic. 
Color, brass-yellow, often tarnishing to iridescence. Streak, greenish black. Is 
soluble, except .gulphur, in nitric acid, and, on being heated, yields a portion of its 
sulphur. On exposure to moisture and heat becomes hydrated, and copper and 
iron change readily to sulphates. Alters to azurite, malachite, melaconite, chal- 
cocite. covellite, bornite, brochantite, chrysocolla, tetrahedrite, and tennantite. Is 
found in practically every copper field in the world, and is second only to chalcocite 
in importance among the commercial ores of copper. 

Chrysocolla. CuSiO 3 +2H 2 O. A hydrous copper silicate carrying 36% 
copper. Common names, mountain green and mountain blue. Structure, crypto- 
crystalline, enamel-like, sometimes botryoidal. Fracture, conchoidal. Is brittle 
and somewhat sectile. Hardness, 2 to 4. Gravity, 2 to 2.24. Lustre, vitreous to 
earthy. Color, mountain green, bluish green and sky blue to turquoise-blue, with 
impure varieties brown to dull black. Streak, white, from pure green and blue 
varieties. Is opaque to translucent. Is decomposed by acids, without gelatiniza- 
tion. Commonly occurs with carbonate ores in the oxidized zones of copper ore- 
bodies, and is a commercial ore of value in many districts. 

Covellite. Covelline. CuS. A beautiful bright blue copper sulphide 
containing 66.4% copper. Chemical name, cupric sulphide. Crystallization, hexa- 
gonal ; also occurs massive. Is flexible in thin layers, with basal cleavage. Hard- 
ness, 1.5 to 2. Gravity, 4.6. Lustre, submetallic on crystals, dull when massive. 
Color, indigo-blue. Streak, lead-gray to black, shining. Occurs in most sulphide 
copper districts, as a secondary ore and is a valuable commercial ore of copper, 
when found in sufficient quantities as in Butte, Mont, Utah, Wyoming and 
elsewhere. 

Crednerite. 3CuO 2Mn 2 O 3 . A copper manganate containing 34.4% 
copper. Crystallization, monoclinic. Cleavage, basal, perfect, less distinct in 
other directions. Hardness, 4.5. Gravity, 4.9 to 5.1. Lustre, metallic. Color, 
iron-black to steel-gray. Streak, brownish black. Is soluble in hydrochloric acid. 

Cuprite. CiuO. A copper oxide, containing 88.8% copper, being the 
richest copper ore. Chemical names, cuprous oxide, copper protoxide. Common 
names, ruby copper, red glassy copper ore, octrahedral copper ore. Crystallization, 
isometric, commonly in octohedrons ; also occurs massive, granular and sometimes 
earthy. Fracture, conchoidal. Is brittle. Hardness, 3.5 to 4. Gravity, 5.85 to 
6.15. Lustre, adamantine to earthy. Color, light to dark red; when fresh, usually 
ruby-red, but fades to duller red. Streak, brownish red, shining. Is subtrans- 
parent to subtranslucent. Occurs in most copper districts in the upper oxidized 
zone, frequently shading into crystals of native copper. 

Enargite. 3Cu 2 .As 2 S-,. Enargite grades into famatinite. A copper 
sulpharsenite containing 48.3% copper. Crystallization, orthorhombic ; also occurs 
massive and granular. Fracture, uneven. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness, 3. Gravity, 
4.45. Lustre, metallic. Color and streak, grayish-black to iron-black. Is soluble 
in aqua regia and fusible on charcoal. Occurs in many copper fields, notably at 
Butte, Montana, where it is a common and valuable ore. 

Epigenite. Formula probably 4Cu 2 S.3FeS. As 2 S ; . A copper and iron 
sulpharsenite, carrying about 41% copper. Crystallization, orthorhombric, in short 
prisms. Fracture, uneven. Hardness, 3.5. Lustre, metallic. Color, steel-gray. 
Streak, black. Is soluble in nitric acid. Occurrence : Wittichen, Baden, Germany. 

Famatinite. 3Cu.S.Sb 3 S. A copper sulphantimonite carrying 43.3% 
copper. Crystallization, orthorhombic ; is isomorphous with enargite ; also occur 
massive. Fracture, uneven. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness. 3.5. Gravity, 4.57. 
Color, gray with copper-red tinge. Streak, black. Is fusible on charcoal. De- 
crepitates in closed tube. Occurrence: Sierra de Famatina, Rioja, Argentina; 
and Cerro de Pasco, Junin, Peru. 

Glance. Common name for sulphide ores with dark metallic lustre. 
Copper glance is chalcocite. 

Malachite. 2CuO.CO 2 H 2 O. A basic copper carbonate carrying 57.5% 
copper. Common names, green copper carbonate, basic cupric carbo- 
nate. Crystallization, monoclinic. Commonly inasive. but frequently incrus- 
tive and sometimes granular or earthy, and disseminated as stains. Fracture, 



MELACONITE NATIVE GOLD 27 

subconchoidal to uneven. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness, 3.5 to 4. Gravity, 3.9 to 
4.03. Lustre, of crystals, adamantine, frequently with concretionary bands of 
varying shades from pistachio-green to bluish-green. Streak, green. Is opaque 
to translucent. Is soluble in nitric acid. Occurs in most copper districts, in the 
upper portions of the oxidized zones of ore bodies, and frequently is an important 
commercial ore. When massive and beautifully marked is' a semi-precious stone, 
used for table tops, etc. 

Melaconite. Massive, compact, shining or earthy dull, black copper 
oxide of same composition as tenorite. 

Mohav/kite. ( Cu, Ni, Co) M As. A copper, nickel and cobalt, arsenide, 
carrying 63 to 69% copper. 3 to 7% nickel and 0.5 to 2% cobalt, usually somewhat 
argentiferous. Crystallization, hexagonal, by synthesis, no crystals being found 
in nature. Cleavage, indistinct. Fracture, uneven. Tenacity, slight. Hardness, 
4. Gravity, 8.05. Color, light gray on fresh fractures, tarnishing to purple or 
brassy yellow. Streak, gray. Is soluble in nitric acid. Occurrence: Mohawk 
mine, Keweenaw county, Michigan. 

Tennantite. 4Cu. J S.As 2 S :) . A copper sulpharsenite containing 57.5% 
copper when pure, but shading into a great number of varietal forms. Common 
name, gray copper ore, in common with tetrahedrite, to which tennantite is closely 
related and joined by a chain of rather obscure minerals shading gradually from 
tennantite into tetrahedrite. The many varietal forms of this mineral are brought 
about by part replacement of copper by silver, lead, zinc, iron, mercury, cobalt, 
nickel, tin, and platinum, with a marked tendency toward mutual substitution of 
the antimony of tetrahedrite for the arsenic of tennantite, and vice versa, render- 
ing the tetrahedrite-tennantite group unusually prolific. Crystallization, isometric ; 
also occurs massive and granular, compact. Cleavage, none. Fracture, subcon- 
choidal. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness, 3.5 to 4.5. Gravity, 4.4 to 5.1 Lustre, 
metallic. Color and streak, flint-gray to iron-black. Diaphaneity, opaque to sub- 
translucent in small splinters. Is soluble in nitric acid and fusible on charcoal. 
Occurrence : at numerous points, being found in greater or less profusion in most 
copper districts. Is not regarded usually as a commercial ore, except where 
argentiferous, which is commonly the case. 

Tenorite. Earthy form is known as melaconite. CuO. A copper 
oxide, containing 79.8% copper. Common names, Black Copper, Black 
Oxide of Copper. Chemical names, copper monoxide, copper peroxide, 
cupric oxide. Crystallization, monoclinic; also occurs massive, pulverulent and 
earthy. Fracture, conchoidal to uneven. Hardness, 3 to 4. Gravity, 5.8 to 6.25. 
Lustre, metallic. Color, dull grayish-black when massive, steel-gray in flakes. 
Is soluble in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Is found in most copper districts, and 
is a valuable ore of copper when occurring in quantities, but much of what has 
been considered tenorite in the past really was chalcocite, for which it is easily 
mistaken when disseminated. Found in very thin, long, flexible, minute scales 
of glistening gray color in Vesuvian lavas. 

Tetrahedrite. 4Cu 2 S. Sb 2 S 3 . A copper sulphoantimonite containing 
52.1% copper. Shades into tennantite, which see, for reference to protean forms 
nf these two closely related and frequently indistinguishable minerals. Common 
name, gray copper ore. Crystallization, isometric; also occurs massive and 
granular, coarse to fine, compact. Cleavage, none. Fracture, subconchoidal to 
uneven. Tenacity, brittle. Hardness, 3.5 to 4.5. Gravity, 4.4 to 5.1. Lustre, 
metallic, brilliant. Color, flint-gray to iron-black. Streak, grayish-brown to 
cherry red. Opaque in quantity, but occasionally sub-translucent in very thin 
splinters, giving cherry red transmitted light. Is soluble in nitric acid and fusible 
on charcoal. Occurrence : in most copper districts, but commonly is not regarded 
as a commercial ore, except when argentiferous, which frequently is the case. 
GOLD. 

Calaverite. A pale bronze yellow telluride of gold with 40% gold, 
1-2% silver and balance tellurium. Breaks with uneven fracture and scratches 
easily. If burned in a forge gives beads of gold. Common at Cripple Creek and 
Kalgoorlie, Western Australia. 

Native. As clean metallic gold; as rusty and mustard colored gold, 
and as pale colored electrum, an alloy with silver. 



28 MINERALOGY 

Petzite. Tellurides of gold and silver, a steel or iron gray metallic 
lustered mineral easily scratched with knife, slightly scaly, 20% to 25% gold; 
18% to 25% silver. 

Pyrite is the commonest gold-bearing mineral. 

Sylvanite. A silvery telluride of gold and silver, with brilliant metallic 
lustre, very soft, and carries 26% gold, 12.5% silver. Common in Cripple Creek, 
Colorado, ores. 
IRON. 

Hematite. 70% iron; black to brick red color; 5.5 to 6.5 hardness; 
4.9 to 5.3 gravity. Mined in enormous quantities in Lake Superior region. 

Magnetite. 72.4% iron; a black, sandy material or as coarse and fine- 
grained masses ; is magnetic ; 5.5 to 6.5 hardness ; 4.9 to 5.2 gravity. 

Pyrite. 46.7% iron; 53.4% sulphur; brass color; occurs frequently in 
crystalline masses; 6 to 6.5 hardness; 4.9 to 5.2 gravity. Rarely used as a direct 
source of iron. 
LEAD. 

Galena. The common ore of lead; lead sulphide, 8.6% lead, a steely, 
silvery mineral that crystallizes in cubes, occurs massive, resembling pig iron, or 
with sheeted structure. Breaks with perfect cleavage. Is often silver-bearing. 
Gravity, 7.5 to 7.7. 

Cerussite. White lead ore, lead carbonate, 77.5% lead, a white or gray 
brittle mineral with waxy lustre. Is the most common oxidized ore of lead and 
effervesces with acid. Gravity, 5.5. 

Anglesite. Lead sulphate, 73.6% lead; a brittle, colorless, or white min- 
eral, often coating a kernel of galena and mixed with cerussite ; very common 
Gravity, 6.3. 

Pyromorphite. Lead phosphate, 76.30% lead, a green, gray or brown 
mineral fusing easily to crystalline globules. Occurs in six-sided crystals and 
mossy fibres. 

Jamesonite. Feather ore, lead sulpho-antimonide 50.8% lead, 29.5% 
antimony, 19.7% sulphur, steel gray, metallic hairs and needles, also compact. 

Bournonite. Lead copper sulphide. See Copper. 

Vanadinite. A lead chloro-vanadinite, containing 18.7% lead oxide, 
19.4% vanadium oxide, 2.5% chlorine, a bright yellow, orange or brown mineral, 
occurring in small, sharp hexagonal crystals; fuses easily. 

Wulfenite. See molbydenum. 
MANGANESE. 

Ores to be valuable must contain at least 40% of the metal. Only the oxide 
ores are valuable. 

Braunite. 69.6% manganese. Occurs as brown and black bands in clay 
in Arkansas. 

Franklinite. See under zinc. 

Psilomelane. 77% manganese; earthy manganese. 

Pyrolusite. 63.2% manganese; black manganese ore resembling limon- 
ite. Is the common form of the Virginia deposit. 

Wad. A soft earthy brown or black ore of variable composition, gen- 
erally 20 to 45% manganese, also 10 to 25% water, and oxides of iron and copper. 
MERCURY. 

Cinnabar. 86.2% mercury. Sulphide of mercury, a red mineral, which 
is easily decomposed by heat. 
MOLYBDENUM. 

Molybdenite. The sulphide carries 60% molybdenum. Is a soft, lead 
colored, scaly metallic mineral resembling graphite, but malleable and giving a 
greenish streak on unglazed porcelain. Easily scratched by finger-nail. Gives 
sulphurous odor when heated, thus distinguishing it from graphite. 

Molybdite. Oxide with 66.7% molybdenum. Is an earthly yellow pow- 
der, formed by oxidation, but has never been found in commercial quantity. 

Wulfenite. Lead molybdate, contains 39.3% molybdic oxide. It usually 
occurs in flat, resinous, lustered, yellow, orange or red crystals, in the oxidized 
parts of lead deposits. Arizona has several deposits. 



NICKEL SCHEELITE 29 

NICKEL. 

Niccolite. Arsenical nickel, copper nickel, 43.6% nickel, 56.4% arsenic; 
somewhat resembles native copper. Has brownish, black scratch; metallic lustre 
and melts on heating. 

Millerite. Sulphide of nickel, 64.4% nickel, a brass yellow, easily tar- 
nished mineral, easily scratched by a knife. 

Pyrrhotite (magnetic iron pyrite). Contains 2 to 6% nickel at Sudbury, 
Ont. Sulphur content is about 30%. 
PLATINUM. 

Metallic. In America is found in the black sand of gold placers, also 
at the Boss mine in Nevada, and as minute crystals of sperrylite in Sudbury, 
Canada, nickel ores. 
RADIUM. 

Carnotite. See Uranium. 

Pitchblende. See Uranite (uranium). 
SILVER. 

Argentite. Silver glance; 85% silver; a silver sulphide of leaden-gray, 
metallic apeparance ; scratches with thumb nail. 

Embolite. Silver bromide, 67% silver; resembles horn-silver. 

Frieslebenite. Gray silver; 22% silver, 30% lead, 28% antimony, 18% 
sulphur. Resembles gray copper ore (tetrahedrite), but contains silver. 

Galena. Lead sulphide. Is usually silver-bearing in our Western ore 
deposits. 

Hornsilver. Cerargyrite; 75.3% silver, 24.7% chlorine. When pure 
res.embles wax and cuts like it. A fragment put on zinc and wetted turns black 
and is reduced to silver. 

Polybasite. 50.6% silver. A brittle, metallic mineral formed of silver 
and copper, combined with arsenic and antimony; often shows triangles on. 

Proustite. Light red or ruby silver, with 65% silver; also called ar- 
senical silver ; a brilliant red or ruby colored mineral that is sub-translucent, and 
is bright red, when powdered. 

Pyrargyrite. Dark ruby; 60% silver; antimonial silver; a dark red to 
black metallic lustered mineral with brilliant red streak, or purplish powder. 

Stephanite. Brittle silver, 68.5% silver; an antimonial sulphide of sil- 
ver with iron black color and streak. 

Tetrahedrite. Gray copper ore, often rich in silver, with up to 17% 
silver. Usual composition, copper, 30-40% ; antimony, 15-25% ; sulphur, 20-25%. 
Brittle iron gray to black metallic mineral; an important silver ore. See under 
Copper. 
TIN. 

Cassiterite. Oxide of tin, 78.67% tin. Is the common ore of tin; when 
weathered, looks like wood, but is very heavy. 

Stannite. Tin sulphide, rare. 
TUNGSTEN. 

Wolframite.. Iron manganese tungstate, 76.4% tungstic acid (WO 3 ). 
Has a hardness of 5 ; gravity 5, and a dark brown streak. The name covers all 
transitions and variations of iron-manganese tungstate from iron tungstate fer- 
berite to manganese tungstate hiibnerite. 

Occurs in long, dark brown crystals, or short, stoutish columnar masses, 
varying to black, brilliant, lamellar masses in quartz and pegmatite. The brown 
varieties are softer and more brittle than the blacker form, whose thin flakes are 
deep red in transmitted light. Is the most common ore of tungsten. 

Ferberite. Iron tungstate, 76.3% tungstic acid. A dull, coal black min- 
eral, sometimes in an aggregate of cubic crystals, more often massive in black, 
sooty looking material in veins in pegmatite. Is thus far only found commer- 
cially in Nederland district, Boulder Co., Colo., and is a desirable ore. 

Hiibnerite. Manganese tungstate, 76.6% tungstic acid. A light brown 
mineral often in needle-like crystals of hair brown color, in quartz. 

Scheelite. Tungstate of lime, 80.6% tungstic acid. Hardness 4.5, grav- 
ity 6. Streak white, gray or pale brown, very heavy mineral with peculiar glitter 
to fractured surfaces. Occurs massive, and as crystals imbedded in quartz, and 



30 MINERALOGY 

also in garnet (Hawthorne, Nev., and Bishop, Calif.)- Also in gold ores, as at 
Grass Valley, Calif. ; Seoul, Korea ; Murray, Idaho ; and in New Zealand. 

The field test for tungsten is to crush the specimen and "pan" it, to get the 
heavy residue; powder a part of the residue and put it in a glass or porcelain 
dish; add a half ounce (tablespoon full) of muriatic acid and heat to near boiling 
for fifteen minutes. Then add a few drops of nitric acid and boil one minute. 
Set aside a moment to settle and pour off liquid into a large tumbler of cold 
water. Also add cold water to residue and stir. Set aside both dishes a few 
minutes to settle, then pour off liquid. Canary yellow sediment in dish shows 
tungstic acid. 

The more common test is to wrap tin foil about the specimen and boil hard 
in hydrochloric (muriatic) acid for 15 minutes, remove foil; a blue color indicates 
tungsten, but the test does not always show the color. 
URANIUM. 

Carnotite. 52 to 57% oxide of uranium. A vanadate of uranium and 
potassium ; a canary yellow powdery mineral occurring in large bedded deposits 
of impregnated sandstone in southern Utah and southwestern Colorado. Is the 
chief ore of uranium. 

Uraninite. Pitchblende. 65%-80% uranium. A black to dark brown. 
olive green, very heavy mineral, found in Connecticut, Texas, Colorado, South 
Dakota, and in Austria. (See Bull. 70, U. S. Bureau of Mines, for description 
of mines.) 
VANADIUM. 

Carnotite. (See above.) 18% vanadium. 

Roscoelite. 21%-29% vanadium; a scaly green to brown micaceous 
mineral mined at Vanadium, Colo., by the Primos Co., and also found in Cali- 
fornia quartz mines. 

Vanadinite. 19.4% vanadium oxide. See under lead minerals. 
ZINC. 

Calamine. Hydrated zinc silicate, 67.5% zinc oxide, balance water and 
silicon; gravity, 3.9. 

Is also the trade name for oxidized zinc ores. Often occurs in clay. Is 
yellow to brown, rarely pale blue or green. 

Franklinite. An iron manganese zinc mineral with 5.54% zinc, 51.8% 
iron and 7.5% manganese ; found at Franklin, N. J. 

Smithsonite. Zinc carbonate, 64.8% zinc oxide. Dry bone, the white 
carbonate of zinc, differs from calamine by effervescing in acid; hardness, 5. 

Sphalerite. Blende, black jack, zinc blende, 67% zinc. Is the chief 
source of the metal; varies from brown to black, rarely clear resinous. Gravity, 
4. Hardness, 3.5-4. Knife scratch, brown to yellow. 

Willemite. Zinc silicate, with 72.9% zinc oxide. Is a greenish yellow 
to applegreen mineral with resinous lustre. Is only important as an ore mineral 
at Franklin, N. J. 

Zincite. Red zinc ores, 80.3% zinc. Occurs at Franklin, N. J. 



CHAPTER III 



RESUME OF THE MIXING INDUSTRY 



In this chapter, the essential, vital facts concerning the mining industry, both 
<j( the United States and of all countries of the world are presented in a series 
of tables, giving price and production with trade statistics, covering all the dif- 
ferent metals. A list of smelting plants and refineries and their capacities and 
outputs is also given. 

From 1900 to 1914 the total value of the metal production of the United 
States varied between $513,700,000 and $904,000,000 per annum. The total value 
of the metals produced for each of the last five years is: $691,000,000 in 1914; 
$991,730,000 in 1915; $1,620,500,000 in 1916; '$2,086,200,000 in 1917; and 
$2,153,100,000 in 1918. 

The 1919 production was lower as a result of a general curtailment and 
preliminary figures are : 1,278,000,000 Ib. of copper, $58,488,000 of gold, 29,700,000 
tons of iron, 425,000 tons of lead, 55,285,000 oz. of silver, and 446,000 tons of 
/cine. In the following table the output of the principal metals is summarized : 



PRODUCTION OF METALS IN THE UNITED STATES 



Metal 1915 1916 

Aluminum, pounds 99,000,000 (e) 139,000,000 

Copper (a), pounds 1,423,698,160 1,941.900,586 

Ferro-manganese, long 

tons 239,824 415,534 

Gold (&), dollars 101,035,700 92,316,400 

Iron, long tons 29,916,213 39,434,797 

Lead (c) short tons. ... 535,922 583,498 

Quicksilver, flasks 21,033 29,932 

Silver (ft), Troy ounces. 74,961,075 72,883,800 

Zinc (rf), short tons 489,519 667,456 



1917 1918 

(e) 124,000,000 (e) 122,500,000 
1,886,120,721 1,908,533,595 



260,225 
83,750,700 
38,612,546 

548,450 

36,159 

71,740,362 

584,597 



306,076 
68,493,500 
38,230,440 

539,686 

32,883 

67,879,206 

492,405 



(a) Production from ore originating in the United States, (fr) The statistics 
are final, reported jointly by the directors of the Mint and the U. S. Geological 
Survey, (c) Production of refined lead from ore and scrap originating in the 
United States; antimonial lead is included, (rf) Total production of smelters, 
except those treating dross and junk exclusively; includes spelter derived from 
imported ore. (e) Estimated. 



METAL PRICES 

The price of each metal (gold excepted, which is fixed by law at $20.674- 
per fine ounce) is based upon averages of daily market prices current at New 
York for silver, copper and lead, and at St. Louis for metallic zinc or spelter. 
The prices used by the U. S. Geological Survey for calculation of values for 
vears 1850-1918, inclusive, are as follows : 



31 



Year 
1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 



MINING INDUSTRY 
YEARLY AVERAGE 

PRICES OF SILVER, COPPER, LEAD, AND ZINC 



Silver Copper Lead Zinc 
Fine oz. Pound Pound Pound 




$1.32 
1.34 
1.33 
1.35 
1.35 
1.34 
1.34 
1.35 
1.34 
1.36 
1.35 
1.33 
1.35 
1.345 
1.345 
1.337 
1.339 
1.33 
1.326 
1.325 
1.328 
1.325 
1.322 
1.297 
1.278 
1.24 
1.16 
1.20 
1.15 
1.12 
1.15 
1.13 
1.14 
1.11 
1.11 



$0.22 $0.05 
.166 .05 
.22 .05 
.06 
.06 
.07 
.066 



.22 
.22 
.27 
.27 
.25 
.23 
.22 
.23 
.22 
.22 
.34 
.47 



.21 

.19 

.166 

.186 

.214 

.182 

.191 

.165 

.13 



.06 

.06 

.055 

.056 

.05 

.06 

.06 

.07 



.3925 .066 

.3425 .07 

.2537 .065 

.23 .065 

.2425 .06 

.2118 .06 

.2412 .06 

.3556 .064 

.2800 .06 

.2200 .06 

.227 .058 



.061 

.055 

.036 

.041 

.05 

.048 

.049 

.043 

.037 



0.055 



.139 



.07 

.072 

.06 

.049 

.052 

.055 

.052 

.053 

.045 

.044 



Silver Copper Lead 


Zinc 


Year 


Fine oz. Pound Pound 


Pound 


1885..., 


,.. $1.07 


$0.108 $ 


50.039 


$0.043 


1886.... 


.. .99 


.111 


.046 


.044 


1887..., 


. . .98 


.138 


.045 


.046 


1888..., 


, . . .94 


.168 


.044 


.049 


1889.... 


. . .94 


.135 


.039 


.05 


1890.... 


.. 1.05 


.156 


.045 


.055 


1891.... 


. . .99 


.128 


.043 


.05 


1892.... 


.. .87 


.116 


.04 


.046 


1893..., 


, . . .78 


.108 


.037 


.04 


1894..., 


, . . .63 


.095 


.033 


.035 


1895..., 


, . . .65 


.107 


.032 


.036 


1896.... 


.. .68 


.108 


.03 


.039 


1897.... 


.. .60 


.12 


.036 


.041 


1898.... 


. . .59 


.124 


.038 


.046 


1899..., 


... .60 


.171 


.045 


.058 


1900.... 


.. .62 


.166 


.044 


.044 


1901 .... 


. . .60 


.167 


.043 


.041 


1902..., 


,.. .53 


.122 


.041 


.048 


1903.... 


.. .54 


.137 


.042 


.054 


1904..., 


, . . .58 


.128 


.043 


.051 


1905..., 


, . . .61 


.156 


.047 


,059 


1906.... 


. . .68 


.193 


.057 


.061 


1907..., 


, . . .66 


.20 


.053 


.059 


1908..., 


, . . .53 


.132 


.042 


.047 


1909..., 


, . . .52 


.13 


.043 


.054 


1910.... 


, . . .54 


.127 


.044 


.054 


1911..., 


, . . .53 


.125 


.045 


.057 


1912..., 


, . . .615 


.165 


.045 


.069 


1913..., 


, . . .604 


.155 


.044 


.056 


1914..: 


, . . .553 


.133 


.039 


.051 


1915..., 


, . . .507 


.175 


.047 


.124 


1916... 


, . . .658 


.272 


.068 


.134 


1917... 


. . . .824 


.273 


.087 


.102 


1918... 


. . . .968 


.247 


.071 


.091 


1919.... 


1.111 


.189 


.581 


.739 



ALUMINUM 

Aluminum Production and Prices of the United States, in Pounds 



1883. 
1884. 
1885, 
1886. 
1887. 



83 

150 

283 

3,000 

18,000 

1888 19,000 

1889 47,468 

1890 61,281 

1891 150,000 

1892 259,885 

1893 333,629 

1894 550,000 

1895 920,000 

(a) Consumption. 



1896.... 1,300,000 

1897 4,000,000 

1898 5,200,000 

1899 6,500,000 

1900 7,150,000 

1901 7,150,000 

1902 7,300,000 

1903 7,500,000 

1904 (a) 8,600,000 

1905 (a)ll,347,QOO 

1906 (a) 14,910,000 

1907 (a) 17,211,000 

1908 (0)11,152,000 



STATISTICS 



33 



Aluminum Production and Prices of the United States in Pounds Continued 



1909 (a)34,210,000 

1910 (a)47,734,000 

1911 (a)46,125,000 

1912. ... v (a)65,607,000 

1913 (Z>)72,379,000 



Per Lb. 
23.18c 
22.97 
20.34 
22.52 
23.63 



1914 (6)79,129,000 

1915 99,000,000 

1916 (c) 139,000,000 

1917 (c) 124,000,000 

1918 (r) 122,500,000 



Per Lb. 
18.595 
31.90 
34.00 
37.00 
33.60 



Total 



941,366,779 



(a) Consumption, (b) American Metal Market figures. In 1919, virgin 
metal, 98 to 99% pure, ranged from 28 to 33 cents per pound, the average being 
32.14 cents. Aluminum dust, us'ed in recovery of silver, etc., was steady around 
60 cents per pound. This is also used in- the explosive 'ammonal.' 

EXPORTS OF ALUMINUM OF UNITED STATES PRODUCTION 



1908 $330,092 

1909 567,375 

1910 949,215 

1911 1,158,603 

1912 1,347,621 

1913 966,094 



1914 $1,546,510 

1915 3,682,117 

1916 15,419,134 

1917 14,586,467 

1918 10,869,388 

1919 (8 months) 2,587,237 



Imports in 1919, to September, were valued at $2,920,163. 



ANTIMONY 

ANTIMONY PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES, 
IN SHORT TONS, 



Contained in anti- 

monial lead of 

domestic origin 



Year 


Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


1903 


. . 2,558 


$445,092 


570 


1904.... 


. . 2,571 


443,598 


(a)486 


1905.... 


. . 2,747 


588,354 


493 


1906 


. . 1,362 


544,800 


(b)404 


1907 


. . 1.561 


508,886 


(&)3S1 


1908 


. . 2,246 


359,360 


(c} 


1909..T. 


. . 1,617 


252,252 




1910 


, . 1,598 


263,431 


.... 


1911 


. . 1,543 


264,780 


* 


1912 


. . 1,224 


209,059 




1913 


. . 2,204 


375,562 


..... 


1914 


. . 2,530 


(rf) 529,740 


B B 


1915.... 


. . 3,425 


1,735,105 


2,100 


1916.... 


. . 3,496 


1,775,968 


1,770 


1917 


. . 2,759 


1,142,226 


390 


1918 


. . 2,566 


646,632 


50 


1919.... 









Antimony produced 
from domestic ore 



Value 
$103,341 
61,926 
117,433 
58,149 
77,300 
(i) 



1,063,860 



Recovered from Average 
old alloys, scrap, price 
dross, etc. per 
Quantity Value pound 


L556 

2,779 
2,369 
2,506 
2,705 
2,645 
3,100 
4,480 
4,961 












20.00c 
6.30 
8.00 
7.80 
8.24 
8.58 
8.54 
8.52 
10.50 
25.33 
25.37 
20.69 
12.58 
8.16 






$242,736 
457,979 
406,520 
428,025 
460,932 
(d) 555,450 
1,811,568 
2,270,016 
2,061,700 





(a) Estimated from the average content of the ore. (&) Figured as 60% of 
domestic ores only, (c} None produced from domestic ore. Figures not collected 
for foreign ores, (rf) Includes actual marketed value of a few tons of antimony 
made as a by-product in the electrolytic refining of copper. 

The average price for the 30 years preceding 1914 was 7.5 cts. per pound. 

The antimony deposits of the U. S. may be classed as those containing 

antimony only, and those whose antimonial content is a valuable by-product. 



34 



MINING INDUSTRY 




Though many deposits of stibnite are known, they cannot be worked with 
normal prices, because in ordinary years the Chinese and Japanese smelters can 
supply it cheaper than we can produce it, and because the market is limited 
and easily glutted, resulting in still lower prices. The domestic production has 
therefore come almost entirely from the electrolytic refining of antimonial 
lead and copper metal. 

The entire world's consumption up to 1914 was less than ^ that oi tin or 
3% of that of zinc or copper. Antimonial ores to be valuable must be free from 
arsenic, zinc, and lead. 

The Market for Antimony. The principal uses of antimony, the de- 
mand for which continues to increase, are in making type metal, babbit and other 
anti-friction bearing metals, battery plates, siphon tops, cable sheating, white 
metals for the foundation of silver-plated ware, and other plated ware, such as 
clock-cases, table-ware, coffin trimmings, and toys. In 1915-16 a great demand 
was created by the use of antimony in making shrapnel bullets, but this fell off 
somewhat due to the use of high explosive shells. 

Its compounds are used in enamels, rubber vulcanizing, pigments, glass 
making, and safety matches. 



ANTIMONY MINES 



Antimony Corp Mexico 

Antimony Silver Mining Co Idaho 

Benton Mining Co Idaho 

Coeur d'Alene, Antimony Co. . . .Idaho 
Homelode Mining Development 

Co So. Dakota 

Howell Mining Co Utah 



Idaho Antimony Mining Co Idaho 

Merchants Finance Co. (Western 

Metals Co.) . Calif. 

Pomana Antimony Mine .Nevada 

Stanley Mining Co. (no recent 

production) Idaho 

Star Antimony Co Idaho 

Wah-Chang Mining & Smelting 

Co. . . .China 



ARSENIC 



U. S. PRODUCTION OF WHITE ARSENIC, As 2 O 3 , IN SHORT TONS 



1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 



Quantity .Value Year Quantity Value Price per llx.c. 

300 $18,000 1910 1,497 $52,305 3.06 

. 1,353 81,180 1911 3,132 73,408 3.01 

611 36,691 1912 3,142 190,757 3.48 

36 2,185 1913 2,513 159,236 4.37 

. 754 35,210 1914 4,670 313,147 3.77 

737 63,460 1915 5,498 302,116 4.30 

. 1,751 163,000 1916 5,986 555,186 5.70 

1917 6,151 1,118,313 9.05 

1,214 52,946 1918 11,323 2,112,550 9.40 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF ARSENIC, BY COUNTRIES, IN 

SHORT TONS 



1913 

Great Britain, white arsenic 1,716 

Canada, white arsenic 1,538 

France (arsenopyrite) 70,613 

Germany, oxide and sulphide 5,008 

Japan, white arsenic 

Portugal, ore 925 

United States, white arsenic 2,158 



1914 

2,007 

1.576 



1915 

2,536 

2.174 



15 
4'990 



1916 

2575- 



983 



5,430 



STATISTICS 35 

The occurrence of arsenic in metal-bearing . ores is so common as to be 
practically universal. This is shown at the smelters treating lead, copper, and 
zinc ores, which emit over 20.000 tons of arsenious trioxide yearly into the 
atmosphere in the form of smelter smoke or fume. A small amount is saved 
at the Anaconda, Mont, smelter, and at the Ontario smelters treating Cobalt 
ores, and also in Mexico by the Mapimi smelter of the American Metal Co. 
Allison Butts, in The Mineral Industry for 1916, states that the amount lost 
yearly from the Anaconda smelter is greater than the American production. 

With such an enormous wastage, it is foolish to attempt to work arsenical 
ores for the arsenic alone. The chief use of the metal is in glass-making and 
for insecticides in agriculture ; the glass industry uses about half 'of the amount 
produced in this country. 

ARSENIC PRODUCERS 

American Smelting & Refining Co. Xipissing Mining Co., Ltd Ontario 

Canadian Smelting & Refining Co. Puget Sound Reduction Co Wash. 

Deloro Mining & Reduction Co. Ontario U. S. Smelting, Refining & Mining 

Metals Chemical Co. . . . Ontario Co. Utah 

BISMUTH 

Occurrence. Bismuth ores are comparatively rare, though the metal 
occurs in many of the lead ores of the Rocky Mountain regions. The U. S. 
production comes entirely from electrolytic lead refineries at Grasseli, Ind., 
Omaha, Neb., and a few other plants. The world's supply comes mainly from 
Bolivian mines owned by Aramayo Francke Mines, Ltd., at Chorolque and Tasna. 
Another producer is the Seoul Mining Co., Korea. New South Wales and 
Tasmania produce a moderate amount. Occasionally lots of gold-silver or lead 
ore containing from 10 to 20% bismuth have been marketed in the West, but 
buyers gave nothing for the bismuth contained. 

Prices. The price for bismuth in America, ordinarily about 65 cents a 
pound, was $2.75 per Ib. at the beginning of 1915; toward the end of the year 
it sold to $4 per Ib. This declined to $3.25 later on. In London the price was 
from 10s to 11s. ($2.40 to $2.64) per Ib. in 1916. During 1917, 1918, and 1919 the 
price fluctuated between $3 and $4 per pound. 

The price and market for bismuth ores and metal were both artificial, prior 
to the war, being fixed by a combination of English and German firms, who 
absolutely controlled the market and shut out competition by most drastic and 
inquisitorial methods. Were American production constant, domestic producers 
could have secured the American market. At present the A. S. & R. Co., and 
U. S. S. R. & M. Co., are the main producers and dealers. 

The Anaconda smelter dust carries over 1% bismuth, equal to a daily pro- 
duction of 1,580 Ibs., and this plant will probably be a factor in the market. 

Uses. Metallic bismuth is employed in making low-fusing alloys or 
cliche metals which are used in automatic fire sprinklers, fuses for electric wiring, 
and solders. Some of the salts have a smooth, unctuous feel, and are used in 
face and toilet powders, and in medicinal preparations. It is also employed to 
a small extent in making optical glasses. 

U. S. IMPORTS OF METALLIC BISMUTH IN POUNDS 

Year Quantity Value Year Quantity Value 

1904 185,905 $339,058 1912 182,840 $316,440 

1905 148,589 318,007 1913 117,747 213,257 

1906 254,733 318,452 1914 90,505 165,208 

1907 259,881 325.015 1915 34,237 72,587 

1908 164,793 257,397 1916 64,821 155,925 

1909 183,413 286,516 1917 69,250 142:300 

1910 198,174 332,668 1918 135,700 277,273 

1911 172,093 311,771 



36 



MINING INDUSTRY 
BISMUTH PRODUCERS 



American Sm. & Ref. Co. 

U. S. Metals & Refining Co N. J. 

Anaconda Copper Mining Co. .Montana 



Wilson Cons. Mining Co Utah 

Seoul Mining Co Korea 

San Gregorio Mine Peru 



Australia produced 37 tons in 1916, 30 tons coming from New South Wales 
deposits. 

CADMIUM 

The bulk of the world's supply of cadmium used to come from the zinc 
smelters of Upper Silesia, Germany, with some from American zinc furnaces, 
as follows : 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF CADMIUM 



1913 54,198 Ibs. 

1914 91,409 " 

1915 91,415 



$0.77 Av. price 
0.89 
1.19 



1916 135,212 

1917 207,408 

1918 127,164 



1.56 
1.47 
1.48 



In addition to the above metallic output, the United States produces over 
50,000 Ibs. of cadmium sulphide per annum, selling for almost the same as the 
metal. 

A recent use for cadmium is as a substitute for tin in solder. 

CHROMIUM 

The chromium produced in the U. S. all comes from chromite or chrome ore. 
U. S. CHROMITE PRODUCTION* (Long Tons) 




Year 


Quantity 


Value 


Price 


Year 


Quantity 


Value 


Price 


1880 


2 288 


$27,808 


$12.15 


1899 








1881.... 


2,000 


30,000 


15.00 


1900 


140 


1,400 


10.00 


1882.... 


2,500 


50,000 


20.00 


1901 


368 


5,790 


15.73 


1883.... 


3,000 


60,000 


20.00 


1902 


315 


4,567 


14.50 


1884.... 


2,000 


35,000 


17.50 


1903 


150 


2,250 


15.00 


1885.... 


2,700 


40,000 


14.81 


1004 


123 


1,845 


15.00 


1886.... 


2,000 


30,000 


15.00 


1905 


22 


375 


17.05 


1887.... 


3,000 


40,000 


13.33 


1906 


107 


1,800 


16.82 


1888.... 


1,500 


20,000 


13.33 


1907 


290 


5,640 


19.45 


1889. . . . 


2,000 


30,000 


15.00 


1908 


359 


7,230 


20.14 


1890.... 


3,599 


53,985 


15.00 


1909 


598 


8,300 


13.88 


1891.... 


1,372 


20,580 


15.00 


1910 


205 


2,729 


13.31 


1892.... 


1,500 


25,000 


16.67 


1911 


120 


1,629 


13.58 


1893.... 


1,450 


21,750 


15.00 


1912 


201 


2,753 


13.70 


1894.... 


3,680 


53,231 


14.46 


1913 


255 


2,854 


11.19 


1895.... 


1,740 


16,795 


9.65 


1914..... 


591 


8,715 


14.75 


1896. . . . 


786 


6,667 


8.48 


1915 


3,281 


36,744 


11.20 


1897.... 








1916 


47,035 


726,243 


15.44 


1898.... 









1917 


43,725 


1,049,400 


24.00 


*U. 


S. Geol. Survey. 


1918 


82,350 


3,937,991 


47.82 



Chromic-iron ore is sold on the basis of 40% chromic oxide and 80% silica. 
Production is almost entirely from California and Oregon. The output during 
1916 was 13 times greater than in 1915. 

Occurrence. The chief producing areas are the belts of serpentine in 
the Sierra Nevada and Coast ranges, the foothill regions being the important 
producers. Most of the orebodies are small and lenticular in shape, containing 
only from 1 to 200 tons ore. Others are very irregular. An interesting occur- 
rence is the disseminated ore such as near Red Bluff. This has to be concentrated. 



STATISTICS 37 

Preliminary Report No. 3, Sept., 1917, entitled 'Manganese and Chromium, 
issued by the California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, gives the names 
of all the chrome mines in that State. 

Use. Chromic iron ore is used in the manufacture of ferrochrome and 
steel for high-speed tools, armor plate and projectiles, bichromates of soda and 
potash, chromic acid, chrome alum and chrome tannage, and refractory brick. 

COBALT 

No cobalt is produced from domestic ores. That used in, making high- 
priced steels and stellite is generally reduced from the imported oxide. (Stellite 
is an alloy, 75% cobalt and 25% chromium, valuable for making high-speed steels 
and non-tarnishable cutlery.) Experimental work has shown that cobalt may 
be substituted for nickel in plating. Canadian production, mainly from Cobalt, 
Ont, is as follows: 
Year Metallic Cobalt Cobalt Oxide Total Metal 

1914, pounds ; , 242,572 899,027 871,891 

1915, 211,610 379,219 477,063 

1916 , " 215,215 670,760 841,859 

1917,* 295,866 276,769 

From Preliminary Reports, Mineral Resources of Canada. * 9 months. 

COBALT PRODUCERS 

Beaver Mt. Mining Co. (Idle) . .Alaska Independence Mining Co. (Small 

Canadian Sm. & Refining Co. .Ontario quantities) Wyoming 

Cobalt Comet Mines Co Ontario Metals Chemical Co Ontario 

Coniagas Mines Ltd Ontario Mine La Motte Co Missouri 

Coniagas Red. Co., Ltd Ontario Nipissing Mining Co., Ltd Ontario 

Deloro Mining & Red. Co Ontario Peterson Lake S. C. M. Co Ontario 

Pittsburgh & Lorrain Synd ... Ontario 

COPPER 

The Copper industry shared the very great War prosperity of the country 
early in 1917, but the fixation of the price by the government, September 21, 1917, 
at 23 l / 2 cts., did not give the industry the same ratio of profit granted other 
industries, and the raise to 26 cts. on July 2, 1918, was so tardy a recognition of 
this condition that the entire advance was taken up in advanced freight, smelter 
and labor costs. 

A report by the Federal Trade Commission on the cost of producing copper, 
presents a very interesting summary of costs. This commission, whose methods 
have been called arbitrary and un-American, made a notable step in the stand- 
ardization of production and cost. 

It was ascertained, as a result of standardization, that the average cost of 
85 companies for the year 1918 was 16.167 cents per pound. The range extended 
from below 12 cents, where two companies turned out over 122,000,000 pounds 
jointly, to over 34 cents above which level five small concerns produced approxi- 
mately 7,000,000 pounds. 

Several small Michigan companies which came into being during the regime 
of high prices were the highest cost properties, as five of them, contributing in 
all 6,975,960 pounds, had an average cost of 34.614 cents a pound, thereby showing 
a big loss from- the fixed prices of 23^ and 26 cents. 

The analysis or sub-division of the items making up the average cost is as 
follows : 

Cents per Pound % of Total Cost 

Mining 6.94 42.97 

Depletion of ore .72 4.45 

Purchases of ore .51 3.19 

Transportation of ore .83 5.18 

Reduction of ore 5.89 36.44 



MINING INDUSTRY 



Trans, to refinery 

Refining 

Administrative 

Selling expense 

Credits for precious metals, 
Total . 



Cents per Pound 

.85 

1.02 

.89 

.18 

1.71 

16.17 



% of Total Cost 
5.28 
6.36 
5.56 
1.16 
10.59 



The above averages are reckoned against an output of 2,258,234,125 pounds 
of copper by 85 producers. The costs by producing districts are as follows : 

Arizona & New Mexico 15.175c 

Utah, Nevada and California 16.801 

Montana, Idaho & Washington 17.245 

Michigan 17.622 

Other United States 19.910 

Mexico, Cuba & South America 15.648 

Canada and Alaska 16.263 

Another highly interesting analysis is that showing amounts expended 
directly' 'for labor, materials, etc. In this table we have : 

Cents per Pound % of Total 



Labor 

Materials and supplies, 

Overhead 

Depreciation , 

Depletion , 

Tolls 

Credits . 



5.30 
3.76 
2.14 
.94 
.72 
4.99 
1.71 



32.83 

23.28 

13.27 

5.85 

4.45 

30.91 

10.59 



The largest companies as .a rule were the cheapest producers. The average 
of the porphyry group for 1918 was 14.886 cents. 

The allocation of production of copper in 1918 according to cost per pound 
may be found in the following compilation of the Federal Trade Commission : 



Range of Cost 
Cost less than 12 cents 
Cost between 12 and 13 cents 



Cost over 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



26 cents 



Cos. 
2 
4 
4 
4 
2 
8 
9 
3 
5 
5 
9 
3 
5 
1 
3 
18 



Production 

122,245,051 

208,571,191 

314,553,177 

359,617,743 

98,307,293 

460,528,645 

255,399,696 

72,373,388 

28,491,436 

36,871,193 

135,538,602 

60,861,465 

44,919,772 

6,230,694 

7,605,224 

46,119,555 



% of Total 

5.41 

9.24 

13.93 

15.92 

4.35 

20.39 

11.32 

3.20 

1.26 

1.63 

6.00 

2.70 

1.99 

.28 

.34 

2.04 



Total all companies 85 2,258,234,125 100.00 

The above figures include companies that buy and sell ores so that a duplica- 
tion approximating 63,700,000 pounds is involved. Of the 85 companies used in 
the above tabulation 75 are in the United States; one in Alaska, and the remain- 
ing nine in Canada, Cuba, Mexico and South America. 

Up to the year 1917, few companies reported depletion as a cost; whereas 
practically all companies now include such a charge based on the re-valuation 
of their mineral land. This is one of the largest single factors accounting for 
the large increase in the cost of producing copper in the last year or two. 

Depreciation appeared on the books of mining companies at about the same 
time as depletion and for the same reason. Unfortunately the rates are not 
based on the life and residual value of particular assets; but are more often 



STATISTICS 



39 



arbitrary amounts based sometimes on what will be allowed as deductions on 
tax reports and sometimes on the best judgment and opinion of officers or 
directors. 

The commission did not attempt to equalize depreciation for the various 
companies, usually accepting the depreciation charges as made by the company. 
In some instances, however, the cost of shafts, tunnels, openings, and under- 
ground equipment charged to cost in prior years has been set up on the books 
and depreciation again charged into cost. The commission did not allow depre- 
ciation of this nature, the amounts in any case being but small. 

PRODUCTION OF COPPER IN THE UNITED STATES, IN 1913-1918 
(Smelter output, in pounds fine, U. S. G. S. figures.) 



Alaska 


1913 
23,423,070 


1914 
24,985,847 


1915 
70.695.286 


1916 
113,823.064 


1917 

84,759 086 


1918 
67 081 648 


Arizona 


404,278,809 


382,449,922 


432,467,690 


694,847 307 


719,035,514 


769,521 729 


California 


32,492,205 


29,784,173 


37.658,444 


43,400,876 


44 933 846 


44,150 761 


Colorado 


9,052,104 


7,316,06(5 


7,272,178 


9,536,193 


10,054,951 


7,591,570 


Georgia 








803,694 


930,691 


397,078 


Idaho 


8,711,490 


5,875,205 


6,217,728 


7,248,799 


6,446,224 


5,836,795 






12,248 


15,426 


126,965 


291,501 




Michigan 


. 155,715,286 


158,009,748 


238,956,410 


269,794,531 


268,508,091 


231,096,158 


Missouri 


576,204 


53,519 


306,406 


377,575 


407,141 


232,073 


Montana 


. 285.719,918 


236,805,845 


268,263,040 


352,139,768 


276,225,977 


326,426,761 


Nevada , 


85,209,536 


60,122,904 


67,757,322 


100,816,724 


115,028,161 


106,266,603 


New Jersey . . 








4,119 






New Mexico 


50,196,881 


64,204,703 


62,817,234 


79,863,485 


107,593,615 


96,559,580 


North Carolina . . 
Oregon 


180 
77,812 


19,712 
5,599 


38,383 
797,471 


5,961 
2,433,567 


125,004 
1,105,097 


79,200 
2,630,499 


Pennsylvania 


245,337 


422,741 




904 


115,000 


34,500 


South Carolina . . 










210 000 




Tennessee , 


19,489,654 


18,661,112 


18,205,308 


14,556,278 


16,093,757 


15,053,568 


Texas 


39,008 


34,272 


38,971 


86,463 


2,061,129 


13,851 


Utah 


. 148 057 450 


160 589 660 


175 177 695 


232 335 950 


227 840 447 


230 964 908 


Vermont 


5,771 




23,995 


324,400 


102,522 


896,630 


Virginia 


' 46,961 


17,753 


50,008 


1,066 143 


146,912 


1,248 


Washington 


732,742 


683 602 


903 661 


2 473 481 


2 051,416 


2 330*568 


Wyoming 


362 235 


17 082 


3.">1 871 


1 784 351 


2 019 767 


866,698 


Undistributed. . . . 


51,385 


65,479 

























T..M1 1,224,484.098 1,150,137,192 1,388,009,527 1,927,850,548 1.886,120,721 1.908.533,595 

From imported . 

ores ;ind mattes, 

etc 390.583,684 383,644,202 246,194,921 331,536,767 542,425,450 523,851,695 

Secondary metal.. 37,222,759 31,926,980 59,574,690 104,423,807 79,116,896 43,692,111 



Grand total. . .1,652,290,541 1,565,708,374 1,693,779,138 2,363,811,122 2,507.663,067 2,476,077,401 
Average price, 

cents per pound. 15.5 13.3 17.5 24.6 27.3 24.7 

In considering the copper production of America it is worth while remem- 
bering that a very large part of the : silver production of the United States and 
a respectable part of the gold output come from our copper mines. In the last 
year, several copper companies have also become zinc producers. The new 
metallurgy has made the recovery of the latter metal profitable in ores formerly 
worthless because of the presence of zinc. Thus the copper mines around 
Kennett, Calif., yielded 315,549 tons copper ore in 1915 with a value of $17.97 
per ton, made up as follows : gold, $1.51 per ton ; silver, $1.26 per ton ; copper, 
$11.96 per ton; zinc, $3.24 per ton. A perusal of statements of several companies 
at Butte, in another part of this volume will show the advance made along 
this line. 

HIGH, LOW AND AVERAGE PRICES OF COPPER 

Year Highest Price Lowest Price Average 

1860 Prices per cts. per Ib 24.000 January 19.750 December 22.875 

December 17.500 July 

November 20.750 

December 29.000 

July 

January 



1861 27.000 

1862 32.875 

1863 38.750 

1864 Highest 55.000 

1865 50.500 

1866.. . 42.000 



January 



39.000 
28.000 
26.500 



May 
July 
January 

July 

November 



22.250 
21.875 
33.875 
47.000 
39.250 
34.250 



40 



MINING INDUSTRY 



HIGH, LOW AND AVERAGE PRICES OF COPPER Cotninued 
Year Highest Price Lowest Price Average 



1867 


29.250 


January 21.500 


December 


25.375 


1868 


24.500 


December 21.500 


January 


23.000 


1869 


27.000 


February 21.500 


December 


24.250 


1870 


23.375 


November 19,000 


March 


21.188 


1871 


27.000 


December 21.250 


April 


24.125 


1872 


44.000 


April 27.125 


January 


35.563 


1873 


35.000 


January 21.000 


Vovember 


28.000 


1874 


25.000 


January 19.000 


August 


22.000 


1875 -. 


23.875 


September 21.500 


January 


22.688 


1876 


23.250 


January 18.750 


August 


21.000 


1877 


20.500 


February 17.500 


December 


19.000 


1878 


17.625 


January 15.500 


October 


16.563 


1879 


21.750 


November 15.500 


January 


18.625 


1880 


25.000 


January 17.875 


Tune 


21.438 


1881 


20,375 


December 16.000 


Jub 


18.188 


1882 


20.375 


January 17.875 


April 


19.125 


1883 


18.125 


January 14.875 


November 


16.500 


1884 


15.000 


December 11.000 - 


December 


13.000 


1885 


11.875 


February 9.800 


May 


10.838 


1886 


12.125 


December 10.000 


May 


11.063 


1887 


17.750 


December 9.950 


May 


13.850 


1888 


17.600 


November 15.850 


January 


16.775 


1889 


17,500 


January 11.000 


September 


13.490 


1890 


17.250 


July 14.000 


March 


15.600 


1891 '.., 


15.000 


January 10.250 


December 


12.760 


1892 


12.375 


December 10.500 


February 


11.560 


1893.... 


12.500 


January 9.600 


August 


10.750 


1894 Lowest 


10.250 


January 9.000 


June 


9.250 


1895 


12250 


August 9.375 


April 


10.730 


1896 


12.000 


June 9.750 


January 


10.980 


1897 


12.000 


January 10.750 


November 


11.360 


1898 


13.250 


December 11.000 


January 


12.050 


1899 


19.375 


April 13.250 


January 


17.760 


1900 


17.250 


April 16.000 


February 


16.650 


1901 


17.000 


January 13.000 


December 


16.720 


1902 


13.500 


February 11.000 


January 


12.160 


1903 


15.375 


March 12.000 


December 


13.720 


1904 


15.375 


November 12.250 


February 


13.010 


1905 


18.875 


December 15.000 


May 


15.890 


1906 


24.000 


December 17.875 


February 


19.616 


1907 


26.250 


March 12.500 


October 


20.004 


1908 


14.750 


December 12.500 


February 


13.500 


1909 


14.750 


January 12.500 


March 


13.480 


1910 


14.125 


January 12.500 


July 


13.125 


1911 


14.250 


December 12.250 


June 


12.779 


1912 


18.000 


October 14.250 


January 


16.695 


1913 


17.250 


October 14.500 


July 


16.695 


1914 


14.491 


February 11.739 


November 


13.602* 


1915 


20.133 


December 13.641 


January 


17.275 


1916 


33.075 


December 24.100 


January 


28.170 


1917 


36.000 


23.500 




29.180 


1918 


26.000 


23.000 




24.680 


1919 


23.500 


14.750 




18.905 


* 9 months. No quotations 


in Aug., 


Sept., Oct., 1914. 






The following table (from 


the Eng. & Mng. Journal) 


gives the essential 



figures of the Copper Industry for the past twelve years. The column headed 
"Pounds reported" represents the sales of the eight largest producers aggre- 
gating 40% of the United States production, so that the prices given may be 
considered as representative of the entire industry. 



STATISTICS 



41 



Production, Sale and Price of Copper for 12 Years 



Year 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 



* 15 producers. 



Total 

Production 

219,000,000 

224,071,000 

220,317,041 

222,267,444 

226,602,134 

221,400,864 

216,412,867 

1,228,333,298 

1,406,448,665 

1,342,634,206 

1,411,652,418 

2,300,000,000 



Pounds 

Reported 

82,372,955 

113,411,645 

66,316,025 

125,949,248 

136,005,773 

126,710,763 

135,329,098 

552,155,308 

658,533,402 

566,687,750 

619,832,987 

1,217,014,743* 



Average 
Realized, 
Cents 
15.597 
19.146 
18.043 
13.348 
13.211 , 
12.960 
12.657 
15.841 
15.222 
13.458 
17.299 
25.710 



Quotational 
Average, 
Cents 
15.699 
19.616 
20.661 
13.424 
13.335 
13.039 
12.634 
16.341 
15.269 
13.602 
17.275 
27.202 



COPPER SMELTING WORKS OF NORTH AMERICA 



] 

Company Situation of Works 

American Sm. & Ref. Co. . . .Aguascalientes, Mex.... 
American Sm. & Ref. Co.... Perth Amboy, N. J 


Blast Annual Reverb. Annual 
Fur- Capac- Fur. Capac. 
naces ity naces ity \ 

10 800,000 
1 90,000 


Con- 
't'rs 

4 
3 
2 
3 


Ann'l 
Capac- 
ity 
in Ore* 

t 
t 
t 
t 


American Sm. & Ref. Co. . . .Omaha, Neb 


American Sm. & Ref. Co.... El Paso, Tex 


3 
3 


300,000 
325,000 


3 


435,000 


American Sm. & Ref. Co Matehuala, S.L.P., Mex. 
American Sm. & Ref. Co. . . .Hayden, Ariz 


2 
6 
1 


290,000 
875,000 


3 
6 
7 


t 
t 
t 


American Sm. Sec. Co Garfleld, Utah 


4 
2 
3 
3 
2 


800,000 
375,000 
250,000 
1,750,000 
280,000 


American Sm. Sec. Co Tacoina, Wash 


American Sm. Sec. Co Velardena, Dgo., Mex... 




Anaconda C. Mg. Co Anaconda, Mont 


9 
2 
3 
1 


1,750,000 
330,000 
360,000 
52,500 


7 
2 
3 
2 


105,000 
49,000 


Anaconda C. Mg. Co Great Falls, Mont . . . 




Balaklala Cons. Cop. Co.ft- .Coram, Calif 


3 

8 
3 

2 

7 
8 
4 


630,000 
650,000 
912/500 
649,500 
1,020,000 
868,000 
438,000 




Compagnie du Boleo Santa Rosalia, Mex 




Brit. Col. Cop. Co .Greenwood, B. C 


4 
2 
2 
6 

2 

3 


/v 
486,566 

300,000 
153,000 


2 
6 
5 
6 




Calumet & Ariz. Mining Co. Douglas, Ariz 


33,500 
43,200 
35,000 




Cananea Cons. Cop. Co .Cananea, Son 


Cerro de Pasco Copper Co. ..'La Fundicion, Peru 
Cons, Ariz. Sm. Co .Humboldt Ariz 


150,000 
275,666 


2 

7" 
3 


10,000 

34,160 
7,578 


f'ons. Mg. & Smg. Co Trail. B. C 
I'helps Dodge Corporation . .Douglas, Ariz! 
Detroit Copper Mng. Co Morenci, Ariz 


r> 
10 
1 
2 
2 
8 
4 


450.000 
1,225,000 
132,657 
171,500 
350,000 
1 440,000 
1 080,000 


Ducktown Sulph., C. & I. Co. Isabella, Tenn 


East Butte Cop. Mng. Co...Butte, Mont 
GranbyCon. M., S. & P. Co.. .Grand Forks, B. C 


'5 
3 


525,000 

420.0IHI 


3 
4 
3 
5 

3 
3 
2 

2 


5,000 
7,000 
28,000 
14,000 

7,000 


Granby Con. M., S. & P. Co...Anyox, B. C 


International Srng. Co .Tooele, Utah 


International Smg. Co .Miami, Ariz... 






Mt. Lyell M. & R. Co Queenstown, Tasmania.. 
Mt. Morgan G. M. Co Mt. Morgan Queensland 


3 
2 

5 
2 

4 
3 












Mammoth Cop. Mng. Co. . . '.Kennett, Calif 


730,000 
800,000 

250,000 
630.000 


" ' 


........ 


28,500 
22,000 


Mason Valley Mines Co. ft- -Thompson, Nev 


Mazapil Copper Co. ft Cbncepcion del Oro Zac 


Mex 


Mond Nickel Co .Coniston, Ont 


3 

5 


900',000 


3 
2 
4 
2 
2 
1 
3 


70.000 
** 

40,000 


Mountain Cop. Co Martinez, Calif 


Nevada Cons. Cop. Co McGill, Nev 


1 
2 
1 
5 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
2 


175,000 
94,500 
140,000 
502.500 
94,500 
50,000 
60,000 
45,000 
190.000 
1.000,000 
350,000 


Nichols Copper Co Laurel Hill, N. Y 


Norfolk Smelting Co West Norfolk Va 


'2 


"96,666 


4,200 
6.002 


Old Domin. C. M. & S. Co. . Globe, Ariz 
Orford Wks., Int. Nickel Co.Constable Hook, N. J... 
I'l-nn Mining Co .Oampo Seco. Calif 





Pioneer Smelting Co .Corwin, Ariz 


Santa Fe G. & Cop. Co San Pedro N. M 










Swansea C. G. & C. M. Co.tt-^ onsp . Ariz 







2 
4 
8 




Tennessee Copper Co Copperhill, Tenn 


15,000 


Te/intlan C. M. & S. Co.ft. . Teaiutlan, Peubla. Mex. 



42 MINING INDUSTRY 

COPPER SMELTING WORKS OF NORTH AMERICA Continued 

Blast Annual Reverb. Annual Aun'l 

Company Situation of Works Fur- Capac. Fur- Capac- Con- Capac- 

naces ity naces ity v't'rs ity 

i in Ore* 

Cia. Metal, tie Torreou Torreon, Coah., Mes 2 175,000 2 

Tyee Copper Co. ft Ladysmith, B. 2 175,000 

U. S. Metals Refining Co. .. Chrome, N. J 2 200,000 2 t 

U. S. Smelting Co. tt Midvale, Utah 6 670,000 1 40,000 4 36,000 

United yerde Copper Co... jClarkdale, Ariz 4 720,000 3 324,000 5 54,000 

1'nited Verde Extension 

Mining Co Jerome, Ariz 

Wanakah Mining Co Ouray, Colo 2 105,000 

Western Sm. & P. Co,$... ..Cooke, Mont 1 

* Raw ore smelted as flux, f Included in furnace tonnages. J Under construction. Penn. 
Min. Co. has 2 reverberatories, each with capacity of 48,000 tons per annum, but only one is run 
at a time. ** No raw ore charged, ft Not in operation, but being overhauled during 1917. 



ELECTROLYTIC COPPER REFINERIES OF THE UNITED 

STATES 



Capacity in Poundsf 

Name Location 1915 1916 

Nichols Copper Co .Laurel Hill, N. Y 400,000,000 450,000, 000 

Raritan Copper Works Perth Amboy, N. J 400,000,000 460,000,000 

Baltimore Copper Smelting & Refining Co.Canton, Md 354,000,000 600,000,000 

American Smelting & Refining Co Perth Amboy, N. J 240,000,000 240,000,000 

U. S. Metals Refining Co Chrome, N. J 200,000,000 250,000,000 

Kalbach Smelting & Refining Co Newark, N. J 48,000,000 48,000,000 

Anaconda Copper Mining Co. (old) Great Falls, Mont 65,000,000 65,000,000 

Anaconda Copper Mining Co. (new) . . Great .Falls, Mont 180,000,000 

Tacoma Stnelting Co Tacoma, Wash 120,000,000 130,000,000 

Calumet & Hecla Mining Co Calumet, Mich 65,000,000 65,000,00^ 

Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co Trail, B. C 13,000,000 

Tottenville Copper Co Tottenville, N. Y 100,000,00^ 






Total . .1,892.000,000 2,601,000,00m 

t All of the figures were officially furnished. 
(Engineering and Mining Journal). 

GRADES OF COPPER 

'LAKE. Copper from the native copper mines of the Lake Superior dis- 
The standard range of conductivity is 99.5%. 

ELECTROLYTIC. Copper refined by the electrolytic process and running 
99.93% upwards for cathodes. Conductivity to 103%. 

CASTING. Copper analyzing 99 to 99.75% made from ore and scrap. Used 
for casting purposes. 

BEST SELECTED. British copper averaging 99.75% fine. Largely used 
in 'the British brass trades. 

TOUGH. British copper largely used for casting, rolling, and drawing. 
Runs about 99.25%. 

CHILE BARS. Copper smelted in Chile, running 95 to 99% pure, and in 
some cases carrying bullion. 

STANDARD. Practically anything running from 96% upwards dealt in 
on London Metal Exchange. 

MATTE. A semi-metallic compound made from ores and usually running 
from 25 to 55% copper ; an intermediate product between the ore and the finished 
copper. 

DESCRIPTION OF COPPER 

WIRE BARS. About 3 to 4" square and 3 to 7' long. Average weight 135 
to 175 Ibs. Used for wire drawing. 

fXGOTS. Average weight about 18 to 20 Ib. Notched. Used for casting. 
INGOT BARS. Notched bars for casting. Weight about 55 to 60 Ib. 



STATISTICS 43 

CAKES. Weight 100 Ibs. and upward. Used for rolling. 

ANODES. About 2 by 3', and \ l / 2 " thick, weighing 250 Ib. Crude copper 
used by electrolytic refiners. 

CATHODES. About 2' by 3' but thicker at the top than the bottom. Refined 
copper from the electrolytic tanks which is run down to wire bars, etc. From 
American Metal Market. 

BRANDS OF COPPER IN UNITED STATES 
Lake Superior 

Refined at:- Branded 

Adventure Hancock, Mich Adv. C. Co. 

Atlantic Houghton, Mich A. 

Calumet & Hecla Hubbell, Mich ' C. & H. M. Co. 

Centennial Hancock, Mich C. C. M. Co. 

Copper Range Houghton, Mich C. R. 

Franklin Hancock, Mich F. M. Co. 

Isle Royale Dollar Bay, Mich I. R. C. Co. 

Mass Hancock, Mich Mass. 

Michigan Houghton, Mich M. C. 

Mohawk Houghton, Mich M. M. 

Osceola Dollar Bay, Mich T. O. 

Quincy Hancock, Mich Q. M. Co. 

Tamarack Dollar Bay, Mich T. O. 

Victoria Hubbell, Mich .V. C. 

Winona Hubbell, Mich W. A. 

Wolverine -Houghton, Mich W. 

Electrolytic 

Refined at: Branded 

American S & R. Co Perth Amboy. N. J P. A. 

Balbach S. & R. Co Newark, N. J Bb. 

Baltimore Copper Works Baltimore, Md B. E. R. 

Boston & Montana Co Great Falls, Mont B. & M. 

Chicago Copper Ref . Co Blue Island, 111 C. C. R. 

Copper Queen Laurel Hill, L. I C. * Q. 

Miami Laurel Hill. L. I A. L. S. 

Nichols Copper Co Laurel Hill, L. I L. N. S., 

Orford Copper Co Chrome, N. J O. E. C. 

Raritan Copper Works Perth Amboy, N. J X. E. C. 

U. S. Metals Ref. Co Chrome. N. J D. R. W. 

United Metals Selling Co Laurel Hill, L. I R. M. C. 

Casting 

Refined at : Branded 

Balbach S. & R. Co Newark, N. J N. B. C. 

Boston & Montana Co Great Falls, Mont M. A. 

Chicago Copper Ref. Co Blue Island. Ill C. C. R. 

Duquesne Reduction Co Pittsburgh, Pa D. E. C. 

\ichols Copper Co Laurel Hill. L. I C. N. C. 

Phelps. Dodge Corporation Laurel Hill, L. I . P D. 

Tottenville Copper Co Tottenville. N. Y C. T. C. &k 

U. S. Metals Ref. Co Chrome. N. J..... , . . .D. S. 

White & Bro.. Inc Philadelphia, Pa; ,W. B. 

Above table from American Metal Market. 



MIXING INDUSTRY 
PRODUCTION TABLES 



PRODUCTION OF COPPER IN THE UNITED STATES 

SINCE 1845 



Year 
1845. 
1846. 
1847. 
1848. 
1849. 
1850. 



1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 



1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867, 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 



1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 



Production 


Increase 


Pounds 


Pounds 


Per Cer 


224,000 . 


i 




336,000 


112,000 


50.1 


672,000 


336,000 


100.0 


1,120,000 


448,000 


67.0 


1,568,000 


448,000 


47.0 


1,456,000 


112,000 


7.1 


2,016,000 


560,000 


38.4 


2,464,000 


448,000 


22.2 


4,480,000 


2,016,000 


81.8 


5,040,000 


560,000 


12.5 


6,720,000 


1,730,000 


33.3 


8,960,000 


2,240,000 


33.3 


10,752,000 


1,792,000 


20.0 


12,320,000 


1,568,000 


14.6 


14,112,000 


1,792,000 


14.5 


16,128,000 


2,016,000 


14.3 


16,800,000 


672,000 


4.1 


21,160,000 


4,360,000 


26.0 


19,040,000 


2,120,000 


10.0 


17,920,000 


1,120,000 


5.9 


19,040,000 


1.120,000 


6.3 


19,936,000 


896,000 


4.7 


22,400,000 


2,464,000 


12.3 


25,984,000 


3,584,000 


16.0 


28,000,000 


2,016,000 


7.7 


28,224,000 


224,000 


.8 


29,120,000 


896,000 


3.2 


28,000,000 


1.120,000 


3.8 


34,720,000 


6,720,000 


24.0 


39,200,000 


4,480,000 


12.9 


40,320,000 


1,120,000 


2.9 


42,560,000 


2,240,000 


5.6 


47,040,000 


4,480,000 


10.0 


48,160,000 


1,120,000 


2.4 


51,520,000 


3,360,000 


7.0 


60,480,000 


8,960,000 


17.4 


71,680,000 


11,200,000 


18.5 


90,646,232 


18,966,232 


26.5 


115,526,053 


24,879,821 


27.4 


144,946,653 


29,420,600 


25.5 


165,875,766 


20,929,113 


14.4 


156,735,381 


9,140,385 


5.5 


180,920,524 


24,185,143 


15.4 


226,361,466 


45,440,942 


25.0 


226,775,962 


414,496 


.2 


259,763,092 


32,987,130 


14.5 



Average Annual 
Increase, by Decades 
Pounds Per Cent. 



246,400 50.0 




1,472,200 28.5 




1,209,600 6.2 



3,225.600 8.2 






18,928,949 14.8 



STATISTICS 



45 



PRODUCTION OF COPPER IN THE UNITED STATES 
SINCE 1845 Continued. 



1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 



Production 
Pounds 

284,121,764 
344,998,679 
329,354,398 
354,188,374 
380,613,404 
460.061,430 
494,078,274 
526,512,987 
568,666,921 
606,117,166 



Average Annual 

Increase Increase, by Decades 

Pounds Per Cent. Pounds Per Cent. 



24,358,672 


9.4 ] 


60,876,915 


21.4 


-15,644,281 


4.5 


24,833,976 


7.5 


26,425,030 


7.4 


79,448,026 


20.0 


34,016,844 


7.4 


32,434,713 


6.6 


42,153,934 


8.0 


37,450,245 


6.6 



34,635,407 



9.4 



1901 602,072,519 

1902 659,508,644 

1903 698,044,517 

1904 812,537,267 

1905 888,784,267 

1906 917,805,682 

1907 868,996,491 

1908 942,570,721 

1909 1,092,951,624 

1910 1,080,159,509 



4,044,647 


7 ] 


57,436,125 


9.5 


38,535,873 


5.8 


114,492,750 


16.4 


76,247,000 


11.0 


15,897,839 


1.7 


48,809,191 


5.3 


73,074,230 


8.4 


150,380,903 


15.9 


12,792,115 


1.2 



47,404,234 6.1 



191 1 1,097,232,749 17,073,240 1.6 

1912 1,243,268,720 146,035,971 13.3 

1913 1,224,484,098 18,784,622 1.5 

1914 1.150,137,192 74,346,906 6.1 

1915 . . ., 1,388,009,527 237,872,335 20.7 

1916. . .;. 1,927,850,548 539,741,021 28.0 

1917,. : 1,886,120,721 41,729,827 2.21 

1918V 1,908,533,595 22,412,874 1.17 

1919* 1,278,000,000 630,533,595 



Total.. , 28,396,128,493 

* Estimated. 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF COPPER 
(In Metric Tons) 



Country 

United States 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Canada 

Australasia 

Peru 

Chile 

Bolivia 

Japan 

Russia 

(Jormany 

Africa 

Spain and Portugal. 
Other countries. . 



1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


563,200 


555,990 


525,529 


646,212 


881,237 


842,013 


852,675 


73,617 


58,323 


36,337 


30,969 


55,128 


46,752 


74,336 


4.393 


3,381 


6,251 


8,336 


7,816 


10,150 


12,142 


34,213 


34,880 


34,027 


47,202 


47,985 


49,826 


51,860 


47,772 


47,325 


37,592 


32,512 


35,000 


37,498 


33,303 


26,483 


25,487 


23,647 


32,410 


41,625 


44,899 


44,094 


39,204 


39,434 


40,876 


47,142 


64,636 


81,786 


84,493 


4,681 


3,658 


1,306 


3,000 


4,000 


3,937 


3,937 


62,486 


73,152 


72,938 


75,415 


81,280 


109,498 


94,286 


33,550 


34,316 


31,933 


34,918 


31,500 


15,747 


4,922 


24,303 


25.308 


30,480 


34,918 


45,000 


44,289 


39,268 


16,632 


22,870 


24,135 


27,327 


34,572 


44,424 


30,614 


59,873 


54,696 


37,099 


46,200 


42,000 


41,336 


40,352 


29,555 


27,158 


25,176 


' 25,000 


25,000 


24,605 


24,605 



Totals 1,020,022 1,005,978 923,888 1,082,059 1,396,779 1,396,760 1,390,991 



46 



MINING INDUSTRY 




WORLD'S CO: 

t 

Decade 
1801 to 1810 


PPER PRODUCTION FC 
AND AFTE 
(Long Tons 
Average World's 
Price Cents Produc- 
of per tion of 
Rough Pound each 
Copper Decade 
160 30.31 91,000 
130 28.14 ^96,000 
101 21.87 135,000 
94 20.35 218,400 
83 17.97 291,000 
111 24.03 506,999 
87 18.84 900,000 
79 17.10 1,189,000 
60 12.99 2,373,398 
52 11.26 3,708,901 


>R NINETE 
R 

) 
Increase of 
Produc- 
tion over 
Previous 
Decades ea 


:ENTH a 

Average 
Annual 
Produc- 
tion for 
.ch Decade 
9,100 
9,600 
13,500 
21,840 
29,100 
50,699 
90,000 
118,900 
237,339 
370,890 


:NTURY 

Increase of 
Average 
Annual 
Produc- 
tion 


1811 to 1820 


5,000 
39,000 
83,400 
72,600 
215,999 
393,001 
289,000 
1,084,398 
1,335,503 


500 
3,900 . 
8,340 
7,260 
21,599 
39,300 
28,900 
108,439 
133,550 


1821 to 1830 


1831 to 1840 


1841 to 1850 


1851 to 1860 


1861 to 1870 


1871 to 1880 


1881 to 1890 


1891 to 1900 


Totals & Averages 
1901 to 1910 


i 96 
65.55 
74.56 


14.76 
17.01 


9,507,298 
6,968,000 
6,277,320 




95,073 . 
696,800 


361,790 
563,250 


5,632,497 


1911 to 1916.. 



U. S. COPPER SMELTERS' 

N. American Foreign 
Ore Ore 

1916 1,928,000,000 73,391,517 

1915 1,612,450,828 44,749,105 

1914 1,327,488,479 50,101,308 

1913 1,438,565,881 55,803,202 

1912 1,489,176,562 53,701,307 



PRODUCTION. 
Scrap 



37,380,759 
29,827,203 
20,894,559 
22,427,889 
11,949,348 



To Foreign 
Henneries 
38,423,577 
39.734,120 
36,765,920 
36,682,605 
45,735,673 



(In Pounds) 

Crude Total 

Imported Crude 

171,391,347 2,431,068,910 
140,415,341 1,787,708,357 
1,492,843,502 
1,649,430,236 



131.125,076 
169,315,869 
144,480,144 



1,653,471,688 



Above statistics from Engineering and Mining Journal. 

The following table, listing the largest copper consumers in the United States, 
compiled by the Boston News Bureau, is of value. 

Monthly Per annum 

Ib. lb. 

American Brass Co 25,000,000 300,000,000 

Buffalo Brass Co 12,000,000 144,000,000 

Chase Rolling Mills 12,000,000 144,000,000 

National Conduit & Cable Co 10,000,000 120,000,000 

Detroit Copper & Brass Co 8,000,000 96,000,000 

Scoville Manufacturing Co 8,000,000 96,000,000 

Roebling Sons Co 6,000,000 72,000,000 

Standard Underground Cable Co 6,000,000 72,000,000 

Bridgeport Brass Co 6,000,000 72,000,000 

Rome Brass & Copper Co 6.000,000 72,000,000 

American Electrical Works & Phillips Insulating. . . . 6,000.000 72,000,000 

Waclark Manufacturing Co 4,000,000 48,000,000 

Baltimore Copper Smelting & Rolling Co 4,000,000 48,000,000 

Seymour Mfg. Co 3,500,000 42.000,000 

American Steel & Wire Co 2.500,000 30,000,000 

Michigan Brass Co , 2,000,000 24,000,000 

Plume & Atwood 1,500,000 18,000,000 

Bristol Brass Co 1,250,000 15,000,000 

Baltimore Tube Works 1,000,000 12,000,000 

Tannton-New Bedford Copper Co 1,000,000 12,000,000 

Randolph Clowse 1,000,000 12,000,000 

( -. (;. Hussey Co 1,000,000 12,000,000 

Stamford Rolling Mills 1,000,000 12.000,00(1 

Hendricks Brothers 750,000 9.000,000 

Miscellaneous , 6,500.000 78,000,000 



Total.. 136,000,000 



1,632,000,000 



STATISTICS 



47 



AMERICAN COPPER IMPORTS (In Pounds) 

The following table, showing imports of copper, in various forms, into the 
United States, is summarized from the official figures of ''the United States 
Government. The Government statisticians have seen fit to vary the methods 
employed in presenting these figures, from time to time, but the present plan of 
giving contents in fine copper of imported ore and matte is preferable to the 
old plan of giving actual weight of imported ore and matte : 



Copper Contents 

Year Ore and Matte 

1890 3,448.237 

1891 8.391,554 

1892, 7,669,978 

1893 7,256.015 

1894 4,804,614 

1895 5,300,000 

1896 5,900.000 

1897 12,000,000 

1898 19,750,000 

1899 23,800,000 

1900 36,380.000 

1901 64,000,000 

1902 40,000,000 

1903 32,000,000 

1904 38,947,772 

1905 50,105,300 

1906 49,034,891 

1907 59,718,787 

1908 56,481,343 

1909 ,.. 81,087,393 

1910 85,224,975 

1911 68,626,778 

1912 104,871,703 

1913 108;710,105 

1914 104,801,324 

1915 114,331,441 

1916 174,787,854 

1917 

1918.. 



Raw 
Copper 
5,189 
2,556 
22,097 
554,348 
606,415 
7,979,322 
9,074,379 
12,646,552 
5,892,944 
64,282,583 
62,404,489 
71,001,713 
112,420,253 
133,472,398 
142,344,433 
156,358,243 
176,558,390 
192,901,267 
162,224,144 
240,713,722 
259,210,796 
265,980,760 
305,369,592 
300,068,849 
201,549,503 
201,367,008 
287,548,126 



Old 
Copper 

284,789' 

134,407 
71,485 
59,375 

160,592 
1,336,901 
2,422,554 
1,780,390 
1,986,133 
6,678,145 
3,354,756 
2,818,757 
2,119,031 
3,235,597 
4,000,000 
4,561,142 
6,487,226 



Total Fine 

Copper 

3,960,053 

11,472,436 

8,066,647 

11,045,297 

11,445,441 

14,616.223 

17,396,933 

28,923,098 

73,916,467 

95,722,340 

105,176,808 

137,826,406 

194,501,757 

168,707,995 

181,292,205 

210,724,685 

225,843,281 

252,620,054 

218,705,487 

321,801,115 

344,435,771 

334,607 S38 

410,240,295 

408,778,954 

306,350,827 

315,698,449 

462,335,980 

556,420,297 

575,805,115 



GOLD 

GOLD PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES IN OUNCES 



Year 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
'1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 



Quantity 
1,741,500 
1,678,612 
1,572,187 
1,451,250 
1,489,950 
1,538,373 
1,686,788 
1,603,049 
1,604,478 
1,594,775 
1,588,877 
1,604,840 
1,597,098 
1,739,323 
1,910,813 



Value 


Year 


Quantity 


$36,000,000 


1901 


3,805,500 


34,700,000 


1902 


. 3,870,000 


32,500,000 


1903 


3,560,000 


30,000,000 


1904 


3,892,480 


30,800,000 


1905 


4,265,742 


31,801,000 


1906 


4,565,333 


34,869,000 


1907 


4,374,827 


33,136,000 


1908 


4,574,340 


33,167,500 


1909 


4,821,701 


32,967,000 


1910 


4,657,018 


32,845,000 


1911 


4,687,053 


33,175,000 


1912 


4,520,717 


33,015,000 


1913 


4,299,783 


35,955,000 


1914 


4,572,976 


39,500,000 


1915 


4,887,604 



Value -- 
$78,666,700 
80,000,000 
73,591,700 
80,464,700 
88,180,700 
94,373,800 
90,435,700 
94,560,000 
99,673,400 
96,269,100 
96,890,000 
93,451,500 
88,884,400 
94,531,800 
101,035,700 



48 



MINING INDUSTRY 



GOLD PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES IN OUNCES Cow. 

Year Quantity Value Year Quantity Value 

1895 2,254,760 46,610,000 1916 4,465,807 92,316,400 

1896 2,568,132 53,088,000 1917 4,051,440 83,750,700 

1897 2,774,935 57,363,000 1918 3,313,373 68,493,500 

1898 3,118,398 64,463,000 1919 2,829,395 58,488,800 

1899 3,437,210 71,053,400 

1900 3,829,987 79,171,000 Total. 122,400,334 $2,440,247,500 

The following table, compiled by the Bureau of the Mint, shows the American 
production of gold during 1918 : 

State or Territory Fine ounces Value 

Alaska 440,622 $9,108,500 

Alabama 36 700 

Arizona 278,647 5,760,200 

California . . . .' 832,389 17,207,000 

Colorado 621,791 12,853,500 

Georgia 169 3,500 

Idaho 30,764 636,000 

Illinois 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Missouri 10 200 

Montana 153,375 3,170,600 

Nevada 322,276 6,662,000 

New Mexico 30,871 638.200 

North Carolina 38 800 

Oregon 60,951 1,260,000 

Philippine Islands 44,202 913,700 

South Dakota 328,305 6.786,700 

Tennessee 263 5,400 

Texas ' 5 100 

Utah 152,018 3,142,500 

Vermont '. . 47 800 

Virginia 20 40Q 

Washington 16,556 342,300 

Wyoming 18 400 

Total 3,313,373 $68,493,500 

The above total may be compared with previous years in the table preceding 

this one. 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF GOLD (U. S. G. S.) 



I860.. $134,083,000 
1861.. 122,989,000 
122,989,000 
122,989,000 
122,989,000 
122,989,000 
129,614,000 
129,614,000 
129,614,000 
129,614,000 
129,614,000 
115,577,000 
115,577,000 
96,200,000 
90,750,000 



1875..$ 97,500,000 



1862 

1863.. 

1864.. 

1865.. 

1866.. 

1867.. 

1868.. 

1869.. 

1870.. 

1871.. 

1872.. 

1873.. 

1874.. 



1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880, 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
"1887. 
1888. 
1889. 



103,700,000 
113,947.200 
119,092,800 
108,778,800 
106,436,800 
103,023.100 
101,996,600 
95,392,000 
101,729,600 
108,435,600 
106,163,900 
105,774,900 
110,196.900 
123,489,200 



1890.. $118.848,700 
1891.. 130,650,000 
1892.. '146,651,500 
1893.. 157,494,800 
1894.. 181.175,600 
1895.. 198,763,600 
1896.. 202,251,600 
1897.. 236,083.700 
1898.. 286,879,700 
1899.. 306,724.100 
1900.. 254,576.300 
1901.. 260,992.900 
1902.. 296.737,600 
1903.. 327.702.700 
1904.. 347,377,200 



1905 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



..$380,288,700 

.. 402,503,000 

. . 412,966,600 

.. 442,476,900 

.. 454,059,100 

.. 455,239.100 

.. 461.939,700 

.. 466,136.100 

.. 454,942,211 

.. 453.000,000 

.. 478.500,000 

.. 454,000,000 

. . 424,000,000 
373,000,000 



Tot. .$12,986,820,811 



STATISTICS 49 

IRIDIUM See Platinum. 
IRIDOSMINE (osmiridium) See Platinum. 

IRON 

The United States produced more pig iron than the remainder of the world 
combined in 1918; while in a normal year, say 1913, the domestic output is 40% 
of the total. From 1820 to 1865, production increased irregularly from 20,000 to 
1,000,000 tons per annum; from 1866 to 1898 it gained from 1,205,663 to 11,773,934 
tons per annum, after which were the following yields : 

Year Tons Year Tons 

1899 13,620,703 1910 27,303,567 

1900 13,789,242 1911 33,649,547 

1901 15,878,354 1912 29,726,937 

1902 17,821,307 1913 30,966,301 

1903 18,009,252 1914 23,332,244 

1904 16,497,033 1915 29,916,213 

1905 22,992,380 1916 39,434,797 

1906 25,307,191 1917 38,612,546 

1907 25,781,361 1918 38,230,440 

1908 15,936,018 1919 29,700,000 

1909 25,795,471 

Pig iron production is generally considered a good barometer of a country's 
prosperity, as the above table will show. 

Prices of Bessemer pig iron at Pittsburg ranged from $18.96 to $9.98 per 
ton from 1886 to 1897, then : 



Per ton Year Per ton 

1898 $10.31 1909 $16.53 

1899 18.89 1910 16.20 

1900 18.84 1911 14.81 

1901 15.73 1912.. 15.09 

1902 20.07 1913 16.19 

1903 18.64 1914 13.98 

1904 13.66 1915 14.87 

1905 15.48 1916 22.93 

1906 18.48 1917 42,63 

1907 21.74 1918 35.48 

1908 16.14 1919 29.91 

Steel production of the United States, including all grades, is as follows for 
13 years: 

Year Tons Year Tons 

1904 13,859,887 1912 31,251,303 

1005 20.023,947 1913 31,300,874 

1906...: 23,398.136 1914 23,513,030 

1907 23.361.946 1915 32,151,036 

1908 14,023,247 1916 42,773.680 

1909 26.094,919 1917...: , 45,060,607 

1911 23,676,106 1918 : 44.462,432 

The U. S. Steel Corporation produced 42% of the pig iron and 44% of the 
steel made in 1918. 



50 



MIXING INDUSTRY 




Iron production of the world was 4,401,415 tons in 1850; 26,994,904 tons in 
1890; 40,181,865 tons in 1910; then: 



Year Tons 

1911 63,210,720 

1912 73,529,920 

1913 79,395,472 

1914 62,844,609 

* Estimated. 



Year Tons 

1915 64,515,928 

1916* 72,000,000 

1917*.., 70,583,000 



The principal producing countries are as under : 



METRIC TONS 




Country 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1910 


Australia 














*200,000 


Austria 


2,010,000 


2.095,000 


2.312,689 


2,369,864 


2,020,000 


1.960,000 




1'elgium 


1,852,090 


2,046.280 


2,301,290 


2.484,690 


1,560 000 






Canada 


726,471 


832,376 


920,636 


1,024,424 


710,481 


828.920 


1,060,787 


France 


4,032,459 


4,426,469 


4,871,992 


5.311,316 


5,025,000 


4,750,000 




Germany 


14,793,325 


15,280,527 


17,852,571 


19.291,920 


14,389,547 


11,790 190 




Italy 


215,000 


302,931 


379,987 


426,775 


385,114 


377.510 


454.923 


Russia 


3,042,046 


3.521,000 


4,197,638 


4.548.376 


4,261,008 


3 696 560 




Spain 


367,000 


408,667 


403.243 


424,773 


435,000 


419 000 




Sweden 


604,300 


(S3, 800 


701,900 


735,000 


635,100 


767,600 




United Kingdom. 


10,380,723 


9,718,638 


8,751,464 


10,481,917 


9,005,898 


8,793,659 


9,047,983 


United States... 


27,636,687 


27,027,94?) 


30,202,568 


31,482,406 


23,721,115 


30,414,817 


40,092,043 


Others 


525.000 


535.000 


540,000 


550,050 


495,000 


480,000 




.* Present rate. 















Iron-ore production of the United States from 1810 to the end of the 1919 
season approximated 1,400,000,000 long tons. By 1886 the year's output was 
10,000,000 tons, then a gradual increase to 19,433,716 in. 1898, followed by con- 
siderable gains to 28,887,479 in 1901. From then the figures we're as follows: 



Year Tons 

1902 35,554,135 

1903 35,019,308 

1904 27,644,330 

1905 42,526,133 

1906.... 47,749,728 

1907 51,720,619 

1908 35,983,336 

1909 51,294,271 

1910 57,014,906 

* Estimated. 



Year Tons 

1911 ;-.;V;: s -:Y::..V 43,786.552 

1912 55,150,147 

1913 61,980,437 

1914 41,439,761 

1915 55,526,490 

1916 77,870,553 

1917 75,573,207 

1918 72,021,202 

1919* 60,000.000 



The Lake Superior region (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) con- 
tributes 80% of the American total output of iron ore, followed by Alabama with 
1'0%. The U. S. Steel Corporation mines about 60% of the country's iron ore,, 
through its subsidiary, the Oliver Iron Mining Co., whose operations, with other 
iron companies, are described elsewhere in this volume. 

Prices of Mesabi ore were $2.50 per ton for Bessemer and $1.75 for non- 
Bessemer at Lake Erie docks, in 1894. Up to 1903 prices rose irregularly to 
$4 and $3.50 per ton, after which were the following: 



Year 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 



Bessemer 
.. $2.75 
. . 3.50 
. . 4.00 
. . 4.75 
. . 4.25 
. . 4.25 ' 
. . 4.75 
4.25 



Non- 
Bessemer 

$2.35 
3.00 
3.50 
4.00 

"3.50 
3.50 
4.00 
3.50 



Year 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Bessemer 
.. $3.50 
. . 4.15 
. . 3.50 
. . 3.45 
. . 4.20 
. . 5.70 
6.08 



Non- 
Bessemer 

$2.85 
3.40 
2.85 
2.80 
3.55 
5.05 
5.43 



51 



The lead production of the United States comes largely from three states, 
Missouri, Idaho and Utah. 

The great bulk of Missouri's output comes from the south-eastern part of 
the State, where a half-dozen companies work on 3 to 4% disseminated ore. 
The characteristic of this district is that lead alone, without zinc, is produced. 
Idaho's production comes from the lead-silver-zinc ores of the Coeur d'Alene 
district, which in some years leads all others. Utah's production comes mainly 
from the silver-lead ores of Park City, Alta Cottonwood, and Bingham, and the 
mixed ores of the Tintic district. 

Xext to the United States, the important lead-producing countries of the 
world are Spain and Australia. 

The vital figures of the industry are given in the following tables : 
U. S. LEAD PRODUCTION (SHORT TONS), PRICE AND VALUE 



From 


domestic 




Desilver- 


Soft 


Total 


ores 




ized 


Lead 


Produc- 


and 


Year 


Lead 




tion 


base 










bullion 


1720-1868 


* * 


755,400 


755,400 


755,400 


1869 




17,500 


17,500 


17,500 


1870 




17,830 


17,830 


17,830 


1871 


970 


19,000 


19,970 


19,790 


1872 


5,220 


20,500 


25,720 


25,720 


1873 


19,559 


22,381 


41,940 


41,940 


1874 


27,674 


23,556 


51,230 


51,230 


1875 


33,859 


24,731 


58,590 


58,590 


1876 


36,519 


26,421 


62,940 


62,940 


1877 


49.228 


31,152 


80,380 


80,380 


1878 , 


62,360 


26,770 


89,130 


89.130 


1879...., 


. 62,710 


28,130 


90,840 


90,840 


1880 


68,035 


27,690 


95,725 


95,725 


1881 


83,725 


30,770 


114,495 


114,495 


1882 


100,765 


29,015 


129.780 


129,780 


1883 


118,497 


21,800 


140,297 


140,297 


1884 


116,365 


19,932 


136,297 


136,297 


1885 


104.217 


21,975 


126,192 


126,192 


1886 


111,389 


20,800 


132,189 


127,189 


1887 


131,482 


25.148 


156,630 


141,630 


1888 


146,925 


29,090 


176,015 


147,379 


1889 


149,099 


29,258 


178.357 


151,787 


1890 


126.493 


31,351 


157,844 


139,720 


1891 


166.966 


31,397 


198.363 


174.511 


1892 


176,545 


31,678 


208,223 


168,266 


1893 


191,807 


32.513 


224.320 


158,969 


1894 


175,964 


37,686 


213.650 


153,911 


1895 


195,932 


39,890 


235,822 


159,649 


1896 


213,950 


43.537 


257,487 


179,749 


1897 


238.616 


43,553 


282,169 


198,498 


1898 


259,369 


42,779 


302,148 


202,203 


1899 


257,481 


40,566 


298,047 


202,121 


1900 - 


319.752 


48,021 


367,773 


260,918 


1901 


313,134 


57.898 


371,032 


258,610 


1902 


293.842 


74,050 


367,892 


267,286 


1903 


285.495 


83.444 


368,939 


280.615 


1904 


304,283 


89,169 


393,452 


297,602 



Price 

From From at 
foreign foreign New 
ores bullion York 



Value 







$79,829,200 




$0.065 


2,275,000 




.063 


2 246 580 




.061 


2,436,340 




.063 


3,240 720 




.063 


5,284,440 




.060 


6,147,600 




.059 


6 913,620 




061 


7 678 680 




.055 


8,841,800 




.036 


6,417,360 




.041 


7,448,880 




.050 


9,572,500 




.048 


10,991,520 




.049 


12 718,440 




.043 


12 065,452 




.037 


10,085,978 




.040 


10,095,360 


5,000 


.046 


12 161 388 


15,000 


.045 


14,096,700 


28,636 


044 


15,489,320 


26,570 


039 


13,911,846 


18,124 


045 


14 205,960 


23,852 


.043 


17,059.218 


39,957 


.041 


17,074,286 


65,351 


.037 


16,599,680 


59,739 


.033 


14 100 900 


76,173 


.032 


15,092,608 


77.738 Lowest 
83,671 


.030 
.036 


15,449,220 
20,316 168 


99,945 


.038 


22,963,248 


95,926 


045 


26,824,230 


106855 


.044 


32,364024 


112,422 


043 


30,908 752 


100,606 


.041 


30,167,144 


88,324 


.042 


30,990,876 


95,850 


.043 


33,836,872 



52 MINING INDUSTRY 

U. S. LEAD PRODUCTION (SHORT TONS), PRICE AND VALUE Con. 



Year 



Desilver- 
ized 
Lead 



1905 302,852 

1906 313,886 

1907 313,588 

1908 295,552 

1909 329,751 

1910....... 328,954 

1911 331,032 

1912 339,646 

1913 330,593 

1914 383,903 

1915 388,594 

1916 406,119 

1917 459,947 

1918 329,724 



From 
domestic 

Soft Total ores 
Lead Produc- and 
tion base 
bullion 

85,455 388,307 307,514 

90,860 404,746 336,200 

99,801 413,389 352,381 

101,012 396,564 311,666 

117,158 446,909 352,839 

141,318 470,272 375,402 

155,947 486,979 391,995 

141,248 480,894 392,517 

131,867 462,460 411,878 

158,219 542,122 512,794 

161,461 550,055 507,026 

165,015 571,134 558,200 

188,503 610,769 548,450 

209,962 639,694 539,686 



From From 
foreign foreign 
ores bullion 



80,793 




28,803 


39,743 


24,041 


36,967 


11,509 


73,389 


21,754 


72,316 


18,065 


76,805 


10,764 


84,220 


11,572 


76,805 


13,223 


37,356 


7,639 


21,689 


9,853 


33,176 


7,157 


11,598 


15,872 


46,447 


15,052 


84,956 



Price 

at 

New 
York 

.047 
.057 
.053 
.042 
.043 
.044 
.045 
.045 
.044 
.039 
.047 
.068 
.087 
.075 



Value 

36,500,858 
46,141,044 
43,819,234 
33,311,376 
38,434,174 
41,383,936 
43,828,110 
43,280,460 
40,696,480 
42,285,516 
51,705,000 
78,816,000 
94,333,000 
76,635,000 



LEAD PRICES IN NEW YORK 



Yearly highest, lowest and average prices of pig lead in New York. 




Yiear High 


Low Average 


1886 


4.95 


4.00 


4.63 


1887 


5.15 


4.15 


4.50 


1888 


5.25 


3.60 


4.42 


1889 


4.10 


3.62^ 


3.93 


1890 


5.25 


3.77^ 


4.48 


1891 


4.62y 2 


4.05 


4.35 


1892 


4.22*/ 2 


3.72^ 


4.09 


1893 


4.15 


3.22^ 


3.73 - 


1894... 


3.65 


3.02^ 


3.29-;x 


1895 


3.55 


3.02^ 


3.23-' 


1896 Lowest.. 


3.25 


2.67H 


2.98 


1897 


4.40 


3.00 


3.58 


1898 


4.12J4 


3.55 


3.78 


1899 


4.77^ 


3.92^ 


4.47 ' 


1900 


4.75 


3.75 


4.41^ 


1901 


4.37^ 


4.00 


4.36 


1902 


4.15 


4.00 


4.10 


1903.. 


4.70 


4.10 


4.26 



Year 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



High Low Avera'ge 

4.60 4.10 4.32 

6.25 4.45 4.70^4 

6.35 5.35 5.66 

6.35 3.-50 5.35 

4.60 3.65 4.23J4 

4.75 3.95 4.30 

4.75 4.37y, 4.49 

4.60 4.25 4.46 

5.15 4.00 4.48^ 

1913 4.85 4.00 4.40 

1914 4.15 3.50 3.87 

1915. 7.62H 3.70 4.6K 

1916 7.67 5.80 6.80" 

1917 12.25 5.50 8.71 

1918 8.05 < 6.25 7.46 

1919 7.50 5.00 5.81 

- 
Average price for 32 years 4.19 

Lead Smelters and Refineries in North America in 1917 
I'XITKI) STATES 

Arizona: 

Mowry Consolidated Mines, Smelter & Transportation Co. (Idle.) 
California: 

Keeler Four Metals Mining & Smelting Co. (Idle.) 
Needles U. S. SITU Ref. & Mng. Co. (Idle.) 

Selby Selby Smelting Works. Refinery also. American Smelters Se 
ties Co., controlled by A. S. & R. Co. 




STATISTICS 53 

Colorado : 

Denver Globe plant, American Smelting & Refining Co. (Idle.) 
Durango Durango plant. American Smelting & Refining Co. 
Georgetown Western Metals Co. Malm dry chlorination process. 
Leadville Arkansas Valley plant, American Smelting & Refining Co. 
Pueblo Pueblo plant, American Smelting & Refining Co. 
Salida The Ohio & Colorado Smelting & Refining Co. 
Idaho: 

Kellogg Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining & Concentrating Co. 
Clayton Red Bird Smelting Co. 

Enaville North Fork Smelting & Mining Co. (Idle.) 
Ponderay Idaho Smelting & Refining Co. (Idle.) 
Sea Foam Greyhound Mining & Milling Co. (Idle.) 
Illinois: 

Aurora Aurora Metal Co. Secondary metals, but some ore also. 
Chicago Goldsmith Bros.' Smelting & Refining Co. Secondary lead, 

but some ore. 
Chicago Great Western Smelting & Refining Co. Secondary lead, 

but some ore. 
Chicago National plant, American Smelting & Refining Co. Refinery 

only; smelter dismantled at end of 1914. 
Collinsville St. Louis Smelting & Refining Co. Refinery also. Nat'l 

Lead Co. 

Federal Federal Lead Co. Am. Smelters Sec. Co. 
Granite City Hoyt Metal Co. Smelts secondary lead, but also some 

ore. 
Indiana: 

East Chicago International Lead Refining Co. Refinery only. In- 

tern'l Sm. & Ref. Co. 
East Chicago L T . S. Reduction Co. Smelts secondary lead and some 

ore. 
Grasselli United States Metals Refining Co. Refinery only. Betts 

electrolytic process. 
Iowa: 

Dubuque J. W. Walters. Not operated for some years. 
Kansas: 

Galena Galena Smelting & Manufacturing Co. Controlled by Eagle- 

Picher Lead Co. 
Missouri: 

Desloge Desloge Consolidated Lead Co. 

Granby Granby Mining & Smelting Co. 

Herctilaneum St. Joseph Lead Co. 

Joplin Eagle-Picher Lead Co. 

Valle Mines Valle Mining Co. Not operated for some years. 

Webb City Webb City Smelting & Manufacturing Co. Controlled by 

Eagle-Picher Lead Co. 
Montana: 

Cooke Western Smelting & Power Co. (Idle.) 

East Helena East Helena plant. American Smelting & Refining Co. 

Helena Northwestern Metals Co. Dry chlorination process. (Idle 

1915.) 
Nebraska: 

Omaha Omaha & Grant Smelting Co. Refinery only. Betts electro- 
lytic process. Am Sm. & Ref. Co. 
Nevada. 

Nelson Santa Barbara Searchlight Mining Co. (Idle.) 
Spruce Black Forest Mines & Smelting Co. (Idle.) 
New jersey: 

Newark Balbach Smelting & Refining Co. Refinery also. 

Perth Amboy Perth Amboy plant. American Smelting & Refining Co. 

Refinery also. 




54 MINING INDUSTRY 

New Mexico: 

Deming National Mining & Smelting- Co. (Idle.) 
Pennsylvania: 

Carnegie Pennsylvania Smelting Co. Refinery also. 
Texas: , 

El Paso-Kansas City Consolidated Smelting Refining Co. (Am. Sm. 

Ref. Co.) 
Utah: 

Midvale United States Smelting Co. ( Subsid. U. S. Sm., Ret" & 
Mng. Co.) 

Murray Murray plant, American Smelting & Refining Co. 

Silver City Tintic Smelting Co. (Idle several years.) 

Tooele International Smelting Co. 
Washington : 

Keller Keller & Indiana Consolidated Smelting Co. (Idle several 
years.) 

Northport Northport Smelting & Refining Co. 
Wisconsin : 

Dodgeville Blue Mounds Mining & Smelting Co. (Idle.) 

Waukesha Northern Smelting Co. (Idle.) 

CANADA 

British Columbia: 

Trail Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd. Refinery 

also. Betts electrolytic process. 
Ontario : 

Kingston North American Smelting Co., Ltd. 




Aguascalientes : 

Aguascalientes American Smelting & Refining Co. 
Chihuahua. 

Chihuahua American Smelting & Refining Co. 

Uruachic Uruachic Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd. 
Coahuila: 

Saltillo Mazapil Copper Co., Ltd. 

Torreon Compania Metalurgica dc Torreon. 
Durango: 

Asarco (Velardena) American Smelters Securities Co. 

Mapiini Compania Minera de Penoles. (Am. Metal Co.) 
Guerrero : 

Campo Morado Reforma Mining & Milling Co. (Idle.) 
Nuevo Leon: 

Monterey American Smelting & Refining Co. 

Monterey Compania Minera, Fundidora y Afinidora. S. A. Rei 

also. 
San Luis Potosi: Plant wrecked by revolutionists, 1914. 

Matehuala American Smelters Securities Co. (National Metallurgical 
Co.) 

San Luis Potosi Compania Metalurgica Mexicana. 
Sonora: 

Guayinas Pacific Smelting & Refining Co. (Mexican-American Smelt- 
ing & Refining Co.. Ltd.) (Idle and never operated.) 

Ures Yaqui Smelting & Refining Co.. S. A. Refinery also. (Idle.) 
Zacatecas : 

Chalchihu'ites National Smelting Co. (Idle.) 





STATISTICS 
MANGANESE. 



55 



Manganese ore, to be saleable, must contain 35% or more manganese, 
and for ferro-manganese or ferro, 4% or better, with less than 8% silica, 
and not over 0.2% phosphorus. As 90% of the manganese ore used in the 
United States goes into ferro, the demand is chiefly for high-grade ore. For 
dry batteries, the ore must contain a minimum of 50% manganese, present 
as the dioxide, and less than 1% iron or J^% copper, nickel or cobalt. 



MANGANESE ORE PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES 



Long tons 

1838-1879 43,860 

1880 5.761 

1881 4,895 

1882 4,532 

1883 6,155 

1884 10,180 

1885 23,258 

1886 30,193 

1887 34,524 

1888 29,198 

1889 24,197 

1890 19,287 

1891 22,452 

1892 13,613 



Long tons 

1893 7.718 

1894. 6,308 

1895 9,547 

1896 10,088 

1897 11,108 

1898 15,957 

1899 9,935 

1900 11,771 

1901. 11,995 



1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905, 
1906, 



7,477 
2,825 
3,146 
4,118 
6,921 



Long tons 

1907 5,604 

1908 6,144 

1909 1,544 

1910 2,258 

1911 2,457 

1912 1,664 

1913 4,048 

1914 2,635 

1915 9,709 

1916..... 27,000 

1916 31.474 

1917 129,405 

1918 305,869 



Total. ...920,830 

The above does not include manganiferous-iron, manganiferous-silver. 
or manganiferous-residuum ores. Minnesota produces over 1,000,000 tons of the 
first-class mentioned, and Colorado over 100,000 tons of the second-class. 

: . . ' ' , ' 

MOLYBDENUM 

. : ' -n n F) ^ MtT . rrrO ,-. ; }xr 

The amount of molybdenum produced in die U'; S. never exceeded a 
few tons a year until 1915, but from thence onward the output increased 
rapidly, as shown below : 

Sales Jl). 



Year. Sales Jb. Value. 

1914 ;?,, 1,297 $1,297 

1915 : 181,769 114,866 

1916 ....:..... 206,740 205,000 

1917 ' 350,200 495,350 

1018 861,637 1,257,000 



Price per Ib. 
. $1.00 
0.63 
0.98 
1.41 
1.46 



The price during- 1910 has varied from 60 cents to $1 per pound. 

In U. S. Bureau of Mines. Bulletin 111, by F. W. Horton, the American 
deposits are fully described. Six Western States contain large low-grade 
deposits that can be concentrated. 

Uses: Molybdenum has rather limited uses and while it can be used 
instead of tungsten in high speed steels and in the manufacture of ordinance, 
such use was practically prohibited in the U. S. by the Halcomb patent. The 
metal is also used in electric resistance furnaces, as supports for filaments in 
electric light bulbs, and Roentgen ray tubes and in alloys such as stellite. 
The salts have a limited use in chemical technology. 

As noted above the use of molybdenum by American steel manufac- 
turers has been greatly retarded if not prohibited by the Halcomb patent, 
issued in 1903, and held by the Crucible Steel Co. This controls the manu- 
facture of the best grades of molybdenum-steel, using quantities of 6 to 15% 
molybdenum, less than 1.2% carbon and 2% silicon; the patent also controls 
the use of chromium in practicable amounts in conjunction with steels of 



56 



MINING INDUSTRY 



the composition specified. France and Germany make large quantities of 
molybdenum steel. The results in those countries make it certain that when 
the Halcomb patent expires, the use of molybdenum in America will be 
quickly extended and its production receive a sudden stimulus. The metal 
is more abundant than tungsten. 
Ore Buyers: 

The following firms are users and buyers of molybdenite: J. T. Baker 
Chemical Co., Phillipsburg, N. J.; Baker & Adamson Chemical Co., Easton, 
Pa.; Foote Mineral Co., 107 N. 19th St., Philadelphia, Pa.; Metal and 
Thermit Co., 120 Broadway, New York ; Primes Chemical Co., Primes, Pa. ; 
S. Schaaf-Regelman, 21 State St., New York; Henry E. Wood & Co., 1734 
Arapahoe St., Denver, Colo., York Metal & Alloys Co., York, Pa.; Electro 
Metallurgical Co.. Niagara Falls, N. Y. ; General Electric Co., Schenectady, 
N. Y. ; Imperial Munitions Board, Ottawa, Ont. ; International Molybdenum 
Co., Orillia and Renfrew, Ont.; and the Tivani Steel Co., Belleville, Ontario. 



NICKEL 

Nickel ore, as such is not mined in the United States, though nickel is 
saved as a by-product in electrolytic refining of copper, and marketed both 
in the form of sulphate and as the metal; it collects in the electrolyte slime 
and is obtained from there. 

Nickel occurs in small amounts in many copper ores, being found in 
blister copper (in pounds per hundred tons), from the following smelters. 
Anaconda, Mont., 22; Great Falls, Mont., 68; Garfield, Utah, 40; Steptoe. 
Nev., 64; Omaha, Neb., 644; Mountain, Cal., 172; Tacoma, Wash., 770; 
Aguascalientes, Mex., 132; Cerro de Pasco, Peru, 32; Mount Lyell, Tas- 
mania, 166. 

The world's supply comes mainly from Ontario and is imported into 
the United States, in the form of copper nickel matte, or as Monel metal 
from the International Nickel Co.'s smelter at Copper Cliff, Ont.. from ores 
mined at Sudbury, Ont. The refineries are at Constable Hook, Bayonne 
N. J., and Port Colborne, Ont. A much smaller quantity of rich matte has 
also been imported from Belgium and refined at New Brunswick, N. J., by 
-the United States Nickel Co. The British-American Nickel Corporation 
had its reduction works and refinery near Sudbury, Ont. 

Canada also produces nickel from the silver ores of the Cobalt dis- 
trist and those of the Alexo mine at Temiskaming. 

Use: large amounts of nickel are used in the manufacture of armor 
plate which requires 3 to 4% nickel; it is used in bridge and structural 
steel; in automobile manufacture, in axles, steering gear, etc.; in the manu- 
facture of German silver, and is a constituent of Monel metal, the con- 
verter product of the Sudbury ores which carries 67% nickel, 28% copper, 
and 5% other metals. Coinage also consumes a large amount of the metal. 



XICKEL PRODUCTION OF CANADA (ONTARIO) 

(2.000 POUNDS) 



IN TONS 



Ore Ore 

mined smelted 

1911 611,511 610,834 

1912 737,584 725,065 

1913 784,697 823,403 

19J4 1,000,364 947.053 

1915 1,364.048 1.272.283 

1916. 1,566,333 1.521,689 

* Estimated. 



Bess. 


Copper 


Nickel 


Value of 


matte 


in matte 


in matte 


matte 


32,607 


8,966 


17,049 


$4,945,592 


41,925 


11,116 


22,421 


6,303,102 


47,150 


12,938 


24.838 


7,076,945 


46.396 


14.448 


22,759 


7,189,031 


67,703 


19.608 


34.039 


10,352,344 


80.010 


22.450 


41.298 


* 14.000,000 






STATISTICS 



57 



NICKEL PRODUCERS 



American Smelting & Refining Co. 

Athabasca Mining Co Canada 

Baltimore Copper Smelting & 

Rolling Co (Refinery) . .Maryland 
Beaver Mt. Mining Co (Idle) 

Alaska 
British American Nickel Corp. 

Canada 

Canadian Copper Co Ontario 

Canadian Smelting & Refining 

Co.) Ontario 

Cobalt Comet Mines, Ltd.. Ontario 
Coniagas Mines, Ltd Ontario 



Coniagas Reduction Co., Ltd. 

Ontario 
Deloro Mining & Reduction 

Co Ontario 

Hecla Consolidated Mines Co. 

(Idle) Wyoming 

Independence Mining Co. (small 

quantities) Wyoming 

International Nickel Co. 

U. S. and Canada 

Metals Chemical Co.' Ontario 

Missouri Metals Co Missouri 

Mond Nickel Co Ontario 

Nipissing Mining Co., Ltd. Ontario 



PALLADIUM See Platinum. 
PLATINUM 

The United States production of platinum is very small; Russia and 
Colombia are the largest producers. The domestic output of crude metal 
was 390 oz. in 1910; 628 in 1911; 721 in 1912; 483 in 1913; 570 in 1914; 742 in 
1915; 750 in 1916; and 605 oz. in 1917. Prices for the corresponding years 
were: $32.70 per oz.; $43.12; $45.55; $44.88; $45.14; $49.63; $83.40; $102.82 
and $105.95 in 1918. During 1919 the price remained around $105, until August, 
when it rose, and by November it had stood at $130 for several weeks. 

Use: One of the most important uses of platinum is as a catalyzer 
in the manufacture of fuming sulphuric trioxide; in this use it is technically 
known as "contact mass," some of which contains as much as 7 to 8% of 
platinum. The loss in good practice is small. Platinum dishes and utensils 
are a necessity in chemical laboratories. Its use in the electric industry 
and in dentistry is becoming less each year, nichrome replacing it in elec- 
trical appliances. The increased use of silica-ware is also reducing the con- 
sumption of platinum in concentration of sulphuric acid and for other 
purposes. The consumption of platinum in jewelry is increasing fast, especially 
during the last 5 years. 



PLATINUM IMPORTS 



1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 

1911 
1912 
1913 

1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Ore or -crude 

Unmanufactured, etc 

Ore or crude 

Unmanufactured, etc 

f Ore or crude 

) Unmanufactured, etc, 

) Ore or crude 

| Unmanufactured, etc 



Quantity, 

Troy, oz. 

93,912 

137,928 

74,292 

50,844 

118,853 

1 18,280 

34,412 

. 88,339 

45,280 

59,526 

48,942 

69,551 

f 72,032 

61,438 
53,484 
26,146 
45.833 



Value 
$1,985,107 
3,601,120 
2,508,991 
1,095,754 
2,557,596 
3,320,699 
1,278.239 
3,445,250 
1,781,585 I 
2,552,978 f 
1,863,406 \ 
3,086,110 t 



Retorts, etc. 
$188,156 
187,639 
175,651 
134,119 
416,352 
333,965 

142.718 




2,341,476 
3,138,396 
2,095,390 
4,144,740 



18,923 
4,170 
9,129 



Total 
$2,173,263 
3,788,759 
2,684,642 
1,229,873 
2,973,948 
3,654,664 

4,866,207 
4,503,682 
5,040,210 
2,934.080 

5.202,120 
2,415,155 
4.952,522 



The embargo placed upon the export of platinum from Russia at the begin- 
ning of the war and the revolution were the cause of the greatly reduced imports 
since 1914. 





58 



Iridium. The price of iridium remains much higher than that of plat- 
inum. It is a frequent mistake of the platinum miner to speak of iridos- 
mine as "iridium." Iridosmine is an alloy of osmium and iridium, with 
osmium varying from 17 to 49%. There is practically no market for osmium, 
except the use as pen points; iridosmine is valuable for the iridium content 
only. The extraction of osmium is both very costly and dangerous, on 
account of the poisonous character of the osmium vapor. By Oct., 1919, 
the price had soared to $290 per ounce. 

Palladium: The marketable supply increased on account of the 
greater care taken by the copper refineries in extracting it from the elec- 
trolytic slimes in which it occurs with gold, silver, etc.. particularly in 
the slime of Canadian matte, and the base bullion from Australia and else- 
where. The use of palladium as a catalyzer is well know r n, and is largely 
used as an alloy for platinum, as it renders the platinum lighter and of a 
more brilliant white. By Oct., 1919, the price had risen to $120 per ounce. 

Osmium: The supply of this metal of the platinum group exceeds 
the demand, tungsten having replaced it in electric light bulbs, and its use 
in medicine a'nd in silk dyeing being slight. 

PYRITE 

Pyrite mining is an important industry at several localities in the 
United States, its sole use being for sulphuric acid manufacture. The mar- 
ket is limited by transportation costs and by the competition of the copper 
and zinc smelting plants, at which such acid is made, the principal ones 
being at Anaconda, Montana; Garfield, Utah; Douglas, Arizona; Trail, B. C. ; 
Ducktown, Tenn., and Hillsboro, Danville, Peru, La Salle, Springfield and 
East St. Louis, all in Illinois; Langeloth and Donora. Penn.; Argentine, 
Kansas, and Clarksburg, and Moundville, W. Va. The bulk of the pyrite 
consumed in America still comes from Spain. Domestic pyrites and pyrr- 
hotite deposits have been exploited of late, also the utilization of "coal brasses." 




Production in Long Tons 



1882. 


. 12,000 


$72,000 


1895. 


. 99,549 


$322,845 


1908. 


.222,598 


857,113 


1883. 


. 25,000 


137,500 


1896. 


.115,483 


320.163 






1.028,157 


1884. 


. 35,000 


175,000 


1897 


, . 143,201 


391,541 


1910. 


.241,612 


977,978 


1885. 


. 49,000 


220,500 


1898. 


. 193,364 


593,801 


1911. 


.301,458 


1.1 64,87 1 


1886. 


. 55,000 


220,000 


1899 


..174,734 


543,249 


1912. 


.350,928 


1,334,259 


1887. 


. 52,000 


210,000 


1900. 


.204,615 


749,991 


1913. 


.341,338 


1,286,084 


1888. 


. 54,331 


167,658 


1911. 


*244.691 


1,257,579 


1914. 


.336,662 


1,283,346 


1889. 


. 93,705 


202,119 


1902 


,*207.874 


947,089 


1915. 


.304,124 


1,674,933 


1890. 


. 99,854 


273,745 


1903, 


,*233,127 


r.109,818 


1916. 


.423,556 


1,965,702 


1891. 


. 196.536 


338,880 


1904, 


.207,081 


814,808 


1917. 


.462,662 


2.485,435 


1892. 


. 109,788 


305,191 


1905 


..253,000 


938,492 


1918. 


.45'5,432 


2,903,786 


1893. 


. 75.777 


256,552 


1906. 


.261,422 


931.305 








1894. 


.105.940 


363,134 


1907. 


.247,387 


794.949 








* 


Includes 


production 


of natural sulphur. 



IMPORTS OF PYRITE, CARRYING LESS THAN 3*/ 2 % COPPER 



1910 803,551 long tons 

1911 1,006,310 " 

1912 970,785 " 

1913 850,592 " 

1914 1,026,617 " " 



1915 964,634 long tons 

1916 1,244.662 " 

1917 967,340 " 

1918 496,792 " 



STATISTICS 59 

QUICKSILVER 

Most of the domestic supply' of quicksilver comes from California and 
Nevada, Texas producing the remainder, as Arizona has as yet only a small 
output. In recent years much of the Californian output has been from 
old mines, whose richest ore was extracted long ago, and which are now 
difficult to operate profitably, except when the price is high. 

Beside the new supply each year there is also recovered an annual out- 
put of old quicksilver in the clean-up of old amalgamation mills, and from 
other sources; this supply has but little effect, on the market. Austria, 
Italy, and Spain furnish 5/6 of the world's supply. 

Quicksilver is used mainly in the manufacture of fulminate of mercury 
for explosive caps, of scientific and electric apparatus, of drugs and in the 
recovery of precious metals; the latter use is gradually diminishing. It is 
also used in manufacturing paints for protective coatings. 

The primary domestic market for quicksilver is San Francisco; the price 
is averaged from the market quotations published in the Mining and Scientific 
Press. Prices are given in dollars per flask of 75 Ib. 

Production and prices in this country have been as under: 

Year Flasks Average Price 

1914 16,548 $49.05 

1915 21,033 8579 

1916 29,932 125.89 

1917 36,159 106.34 

1918 32,883 123.46 

1919 (3 months) 5,960 86.44 

During Aug., Sept., and Oct., 1919, "the price was very erratic, jumping 

up to $105 per flask, then settling back to $80, rising to $100 in December. The 
average for the year was $91.26. 

QUICKSILVER MINES 

Alpine California New Alamaden Quicksilver 

Chisos Mining Co Texas Mines California 

Colquitt-Tigner Quicksilver. ..Texas New Idria Quicksilver Mining 

Goldbanks Nevada Co., California 

Guadalupe California Oceanic Mine California 

Kings Quicksilver Mining Co., Patriquin Quicksilver Mine. ... Calif. 

Ltd California Quicksilver Invmt Co Calif. 

L. & N. Group Arizona Quicksilver Mining Co. . .California 

Mercury Mining Co Nevada Ruby King Copper Co California 

Nevada Cinnabar Co Nevada St. Johns Mines Co California 

RADIUM (See Uranium, Vanadium.) 

Radium, uranium, and vanadium are closely connected in occurrence 
and always found together in an ore. Colorado and Utah contain the 
largest known radium-bearing deposits of the world, but Europe has been 
the chief market for the ore, which accounts for the greatly reduced output 
for 1915. 

PRODUCTION FROM CARNOTITE ORES 

Uranium oxide Radium, Vanadium. 

Year tons grams tons 

1918 105.5 21.7 276 

1917 

1916 8 to 10 

1915 23.4 6 635 

1914 87.2 22.3 435' 

1913 41 10.5 

1912.. 26 6.7 



60 



MINING INDUSTRY 




Carnotite is a complex ore consisting essentially of vanadium oxide or 
with potassium as double silicate, and associated with or loosely combined 
with uranium oxide. A ton of ordinary carnotite ore assaying about 2 l /2% 
uranium oxide contains only 12.5 milligrams radium, or one part out of a 
hundred million, recoverable radium. The following firms are producers of 
radium: 

Standard Chemical Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

W. L. Cummings Chemical Co., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Radium Company of America, Sellersville, Pa. 

Radium Co. of Colorado, Box 1316, Denver, Colo. 

Carnotite Reduction Co., 2600 Iglehart Court, Chicago, 111. 

Pittsburgh Radium Co., Denver, Colo. 

Chemical Products Co., Denver, Colo. 




RADIUM MINES 



National Radium Mines Co. 
(Uranium and Vanadium) ..Utah 

National Radium Products 
Co Colorado 

Penna. Mining, Power & Re- 
duction Co. (Ore contains 
uranium and vanadium) .... Colo. 



Radium Mines Co. (Vanadinite 
not found in commercial 

quantities) Arizona 

Rare Metals Co. (Operates a 

custom mill) Colorado 

Government mines in Bohemia 

Austria 



SELENIUM 

The commercial supply of selenium is obtained from the slime or mud 
resulting from the electrolytic refining of blister copper. 



SELENIUM RECOVERED FROM 100 TONS OF BLISTER COPPER. 



Smelter supplying Selenium 

blister copper: pounds 

Garfield; Utah 56 

Steptoe, Nevada 110.1 

Omaha, Nebraska 26.0 

Mountain, California.... 36 



Smelter supplying Selenium 

blister copper: pounds 

Tacoma. Washington 42 

Aguascalientes, Mexico... 170 
Cerro cle Pasco, Peru.... 13.7 
Mount Lyell, Tasmania... 42 



Eilers, A., Notes on the occurrence of some of the rarer metals in 
blister copper: Am. Inst, Min. Eng. Trans., vol. 47, pp. 217-218, 1914. 



can 



SILVER 

Average monthly prices of silver per ounce, as published by The 
Metal Market: 



1910 

January 52.37 

February 51.53 

March 51.45 

April 53.22 

May ,..53.87 

June 53.46 

July 54.15 

August 52.91 

September 53.30 

October 55.49 

November 55.64 

December 54.43 

Average 53.49 53.30 00.83 59. 79 % 54.81 49.69 65.66 81.40 96.77 111.11 



1911 
53.79 


1912 
56.22 


1913 
62.93 


1914 
57.56 


1915 

48.89% 


1916 
56.77 


1917 
75.14 


1918 

88.72 


1919 
101.12 


52.22 


59.04 


61.64 


57.50" a 48.48 


:>6.7r> 


77.54 


85, 


79 


101.12 


52.74 


58.37 


57.87 


58.07 


50, 


24 


57.93 


74.13 


88. 


11 


101.12 


53.33 


59,23 


59.49 


58.52 


50. 


25 


64.41 


72.51 


95.35 


101.12 


53.31 


60.88 


60.36 


58.18 


49. 


01% 


74.27 


74.61 


99. 


50 


107.23 


53.04 


61.29 


58.99 


56.47 


49. 


03 


65.02 


76.44 


99 


50 


iio.r.n 


52.63 


60.66 


58.72 


54.68 


47 


.52 


62.94 


78.92 


99, 


,62 


106.31! 


52.17 


61.61 


59.29 


54.34 


47, 


18 


66.08 


85.40 


100. 


31 


111.35 


53.43 


63.08 


60.64 


53.29 


48, 


68 


68.51 


100.73 


101, 


12 


113.92 


53.34 


63.47 


60.79 


50.65 


I'.l 


.381/2 


(ii.sr, 


87.38 


101 


.12 


119.10 


55.72 


62.79 


58.99 


49.10 


51 


.71 


71.00 


85.97 


101 


.12 


127.57 


54.90 


63.37 


r,7.7ti 


49.38 


54 


.97 


75.76 


85.94 


101 


.12 


131.97 



STATISTICS 



61 



The silver output of this country during 1918, as compiled by the Bureau 
of the Mint, is as follows: 

State or Territory Fine ounces Value 

Alaska 796,836 $796,836 

Alabama 2 2 

Arizona 6,771,490 6,771,490 

California 1.555,417 1,555,417 

Colorado 6,982,313 . 6,982,313 

Georgia 41 41 

Idaho 10,188,056 10,188,056 

Illinois 8,939 8,939 

Maryland .' 164 164 

Michigan 491,939 491,939 

Missouri 40,948 40,948 

Montana 15,341,793 15,341,793 

Nevada 10,113,405 10,113,405 

New Mexico 763,758 763,758 

North Carolina 9 9 

Oregon 150,207 150,207 

Philippine Islands 12,597 12,597 

South Dakota 165,865 165,865 

Tennessee 131.931 131,931 

Texas 612,436 612,436 

Utah 13,439,811 13,439,811 

Vermont 5.117 5,117 

Virginia 2,967 2,967 

Washington 302,446 302,446 

Wyoming 719 719 

Totals 67,879,206 $67.879,206 

* $1 per oz., the price paid by the Government. 

The output in 1919 was 55,285,196 oz., valued at $61,966,412. 



SILVER PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES, IN OUNCES. 



Year 
1880.... 

1881 

1882.... 
1883.... 
1884.... 
1885.... 
1886..., 
1887.... 
1888. . . . 
1889.... 
1890.... 
1891.... 
1892.. .. 
1893.... 
1894.... 
1895.... 
1896.... 
1897.. .. 
1898.. .. 
1X99.... 



Quantity 

30,318,700 

33,257,800 

36,196,900 

35,732,800 

37,743,800 

39,909,400 

39,694,000 

41.721,600 

45,792.700 

50.094,500 

54.516,300 

58,330,000 

63,500,000 

60,000,000 

49,500.000 

55,727,000 

58,834,800 

53.860,000 

54,438.000 

54.764,500 

57.647,000 



Commercial 

Value 
$34,717,000 
37,657,500 
41,105,900 
39,618,400 
41,921,300 
42.503,500 
39,482.400 
40,887,200 
43,045,100 
46,838,400 
57,242.100 
57,630,000 
55.662,500 
46,800,000 
31.422,100 
36.445,500 
39,654,600 
32,316,000 
32,118.400 
32,858,700 
35,741,100 



Year 

1901.... 

1902.... 

1903 . . . . 

1904.... 

1905.... 

1906.... 

1907.... 

1908.... 

1909.... 

1910.... 

1911 

1912.... 
1913.... 
1914.... 
1915.... 
1916.... 
1917.... 
1918.... 
1919.. 



Quantity 

55,214,000 

55,500,000 

54,300,000 

57,682,800 

56,101,600 

56.517,900 

56,514,700 

52,440,800 

54.721,500 

57,137,900 

60,399,400 

63,766,800 

66,801,500 

72,455,100 

74.961,075 

74,414,802 

71.740,362 

67,879,206 

55,285,196 



Commercial 

Value 
$33,128,400 
29,415,000 
29,322,000 
33,456,000 
34,222,000 
38,256,400 
37,299,700 
28,050,600 
28,455,200 
30,854.500 
32,615,700 
39.197,500 
40,348,100 
40.067.700 
37.397,300 
48,953,000 
59.078,100 
67,879,206 
61.966,412 



Total. 2,175,414,441 $1,615.630,518 



MJNJNG INDUSTRY 
AMERICAN SILVER-LEAD SMELTING WORKS 




Company 

American Smelting and Refining Co., 
American Smelting and Refining Co. 
American Smelting and Refining Co. , 
American Smelting and Refining Co., 
American Smelting and Refining Co., 
American Smelting and Refining Co. 
American Smelting and Refining Co. 
American Smelting and Refining Co. 



Fur- 
Place naces 

Chicagof 1 

Denver 7 

^Durango 4 

East Helena 4 

El Paso 6 

Leadville 10 

Murray . . . . 8 

Omahat . 



American Smelting and Refining Co... . Perth Amboyf 4 

American Smelting and Refining Co.. . . Pueblo 7 

Bunker Hill & Sullivan M. & C. Co Kellogg, Idaho 3 

International Smelting Co Tooele, Utah 5 

Xeedlcs Smelting Co. . Needles, Cal.$ 2 

Northport Smelting, and Refining Co. . . Northport, Wash... 3 

< )hio & Colorado Smelting Co Salida, Colo 4 

Pennsylvania Smelting Co Carnegie, Pa 2 

Sel'by Smelting Works Selby . 3 

United States Smelting Co Midvale, Utah 6 

Totals. United States 78 

American Smelting and Refining Co.. . . Monterey 10 

American Smelting and Refining Co... . Aguascalientes .... 1 

American Smelters Securities Co Chihuahua 7 

Compania Metalurgica Mexicana Velardena 3 

Compania Metalurgica de Torreon San Luis Potosi. ... 10 

Torreon 8 

Compania Minera de Penoles. MapimiJ 6 



Annual 
Capacity* 

36,000 
510,000 
210,000 
306,000 
380:000 
510.000 
057,000 

82,000 
170,000 
380.000 
200,000 
525.000 

70.000 
300,000 
345.000 

60,000 
210,000 
500,000 



4,951,000 

584,000 
40.000 
400,000 
150,000 
250.000 
360.000 
325,000 



(Report of the Director U. S. Mint) 



Totals, Mexico '. . 45 2,109,000 

Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. . Trail. B. C 4 140,000 

* Tons of charge, f Smelt chiefly refinery betvveen-products. J Not 
operated in 1914 and 1915. Plant being remodeled. 



Value 

$103,806,700 

86,264,700 

90,552.200 

95,233,300 

105,113,700 

111,721,100 

121,577,100 

108,655,100 

110,364,400 

119,727,000 

122.143,800 

137,883,800 

135,246,400 

116.849,900 

93,292,315 

115,763,914 

132,700,000 

174,000,000 

190,000.000 



Quantity 

1882..... 86,472,091 

1883...:. 89,175,023 

1884..... 81,567,801 

1885....: 91,609,959 

1886 93,297,290 

1887 96,123,586 

1888..... 108.827,606 

1889 120,213,611 

1890 126,095,062 

1891 137,170,000 

1892 153.151,762 

1893 165,472,621 

1894..... 164,610,394 

1895;.... 167,500.960 

1896..... 157,061,370 

1897 ...... 160,421,082 

1898 169,055,253 

1899 168,337.452 

1900.. 173.591.364 



Value 

$98,232,300 

98,984,300 

90,785,000 

97,518,800 

92,793,500 

94,031,000 

102,185,900 

112,414,100 

131,937,000 

135,500,200 

133,404,400 

129,119,900 

104,493,000 

109.545.600 

105,859,300 

96,252,700 

99,742,600 

101,002.600 

107,626,400 



1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919 



Quantity 
173,011,283 
162,763,483 
167,689,322 
164.195,266 
172,317,688 
165,054,497 
184.206,984 
203,131,404 
212,149,023 
221,715,763 
226,192.923 
224,310,654 
223,907,845 
211,339,749 
179,753.987 
175.933.000 
168,000,000 
180.000,000 

170.000,000 



STATISTICS 



63 



TIN 

Very little tin is produced in this country, and the most of it comes from 
Alaska, which yielded 68 tons metal during 1918. In 1914 South Dakota 
furnished a few hundred pounds of stream tin, and there are promises of a 
revival in lode mining in that State. Workable deposits exist near Deeth, 
Nevada; El Paso, Texas; and on Irish Creek, Virginia. Practically all the 
tin used in the United States is brought from the Straits Settlements and 
Bolivia, the latter ranking second to the former as a tin producer. 

UNITED STATES TIN PRODUCTION (U. S. GEOL. SURVEY) 



Year 
1918. 
1917. 
1916. 
1916. 
1914. 
1913. 
1912. 



Tons Concentrates Percent Tin 



130 
141 
232 
200 
157.5 
84 
147 



60 
60 
66 
66 
66 
60 
60 



Value 
$118,000 
111,000 
122,000 

'66,560 

36,970 

124,800 



Secondary tin recovered in the United States: 
Year Tons Value 

1917 19,400 $23,920,200 

1916 17,400 15,131,040 

1915 , 13,650 10,544,180 

1914 . .' 12,447 8,887,158 

The United States is the largest user (50% of the world's output) of 
tin among the countries of the world, and hence a large importer of the 
metal. The U. S. Steel Corporation is the greatest single user of the metal. 

Tin Prices in New York 

Extreme fluctuations and yearly average prices of Pig Tin in New York: 



Yt-ar 


Highest 


Lowest 


Aver. 


1885.. 


.... 23.50 


16.10 


19.50 


1886.. 


. ... 23.25 


20.45 


21.55 


1887.. 


.... 37.25 


21.90 


24.85 


1888.. 


. ... 37.25 


16.90 


26.20 


1889.. 


.... 22.25 


19.50 


20.93 


1890.. 


.... 25.10 


19.50 


21.42 


1891.. 


.... 22.00 


19.50 


20.25 


1892.. 


.... 22.15 


19.40 


20.60 


1893.. 


. ... 21.25 


18.'15 


20.14 


1894.. 


. ... 20.45 


13.45 


18.08 


1895... 


.... 15.15 


13.00 


14.06 


1896... 


. ... 13.70 


12.62^ 


13.24 


1 807 . . . 


.... 14.12^ 


13.00 


13.60 


isos.. 


. ... 19.00 


13.70 


15.64 


1899.. 


.... 33.12^ 


19.87^ 


27.19 


1900.. . 


.... 35.00 


25.20 


30.00 


1901 . . 


. ... 33.50 


23.12^ 


26.94 


From 


The American Metal 


Market. 



Year Highest 
1902....... 30.62^/2 

1903 30.80 

1904 30.12^ 

1905 36.45 

1906...... 50.00 

1907 44.10 

1908 J 32.37^ 

1909...... 34.12K- 



During 1919, owing to Government 
held at around 72 cents, but by October 



1910 38.75 

1911 48.50 

1912 51.05 

1913 51.00 

1914 65.00 

1915 57.00 

1916 56.00 

1917 86.00 

1918 110.00 

1919 71.00 

Average price for 39 years 
restriction, the price of 



Lowest 
22.60 
24.95 
25.75 
28.65 
35.65 
26.00 
26.45 
27.30 
31.75 
37.60 
42.05 
36.75 
28.50 
32.00 
37.50 
42.50 
70.00 
52.12 



tin 



Aver. 
26.95 
28.19 
2.8.08 
-31.55 
39.82 
38.43 
29.54 
29.76 
34.27 
.42.68 
46.43 
44.32 
.35.70 
38.66 
43.48 
61.65 
86.80 
62.14 
30.48 
was 



it had dropped to 55 cents. 



TITANIUM 



Titanium is obtained from the two minerals ; rutile, titanic oxide 60% 
titanium: and ilmenite or titanic iron. FeOTiO 2 , with 31.6% titanium. The 



64 



MINING INDUSTRY 




supply of rutile comes from Virginia, being mined by the American Rutile 
Co. at Roseland, Nelson county. Its output in 1914 was 94 tons of rutile. 
containing 95% oxide, and 89 tons of ilmenite, with 55% oxide. 

Rutile is used for making ferro-titanium, used in cast iron and steel, in 
electrodes for arc lamps, in dyeing leather and wool and in chemicals. A 
little ilmenite has been used in making ferro-titanium and arc lamp 
electrodes. 

TUNGSTEN 

Prior to 1914, the domestic output of this valuable mineral, used mainly 
in tool-steel and incandescent lamps, varied from 1,100 to 1.800 tons of con- 
centrate per annum, since when the yield has been as below: 



Year 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons 
1,821 
1,139 
1,330 
1.537 
900 
2,332 
5,923 
6,144 
5,041 



Per unit 

$7.62 

5.97 

6.28 

7.30 

7.31 

29.33 

33.97 

18.40 

22.48 



Total value 

$832,992 

407.985 

502,158 

672,118 

435,000 

4.100,000 

12,074,000 

6,783,000 

6,802,000 



URANIUM 



As uranium is the source of radium, the production of uranium ore has 
already been given under radium. Uranium ores occur in many places in 
the United States, but are found in greatest abundance in the Paradox Val- 
ley region of Colorado and Utah. 

VANADIUM 

Vanadium occurs with uranium in carnotite, the mineral of greatest 
commercial importance. When vanadium is 14% and uranium but 3% the 
mineral is a dark olive green; when the uranium content is 20%, the mineral 
is a beautiful yellow. The ore is usually low-grade, 2 to 4%, but of wide- 
spread occurrence, the sandstone looking as if dusted with sulphur. 

The Vanadium Corporation of America is said to control 92% of the 
world's vanadium supply. The demand is for vanadium steel, used in air- 
plane construction, in automobiles, for military helmets, and wherever ex- 
treme strength and lightness are required. American production in 1918 
was 276 tons of vanadium from 18,860 tons of ores. 

The three principal producers in the United States are: 

Primes Chemical Co., Primes, Pa. Mines at Vanadium, San Miguel 
County, Colo. 

Standard Chemical Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. Mines in Colorado. 

Vanadium Corporation of America, Pittsburgh, Pa. Minas-ragra, Peru. 

VANADIUM MINES 



Vanadium Corporation Peru 

Primes Chemical Co.. Colorado (etc.) 
Shattuck-Arizona Copper Co. Arizona 



Standard Chemical Co... . Colorado- 
Utah 



ZINC (Spelter) 

This is one of the important metals mined in the United States, this 
country containing several of the largest mines in the world. 



STATISTICS 



65 



Spelter Prices in New York 

Highest, lowest and average yearly prices of spelter 
Year Highest Lowest Average Year Highest 



1885 


.. 4.62Hc 


1886.... 


.. 4.60 


1887.... 


.. 5.62'/ 


1888.... 


.. 5.50 


1889.... 


.. 5.40 


1890.... 


.. 6.17^ 


-1891 


.. 6.00 


1892.... 


.. 4.90 


1 893 


.. 4.50 


1894.... 


.. 4.00 


1895.... 


.. 4.35 


1896.... 


.. 4.25 


1897.... 


.. 4.35 


1898.... 


.. 5.30 


1899.. .. 


.. 7.00 


1900.... 


.. 4.80 


1901.... 


.. 4.50 


1902.... 


.. 5.62^ 



4.00c 


4.34c 


1903... 


... 6.25 


4.25 


4.40 


1904... 


. .. 6.\2y 2 


4.40 


4.62^/2 


1905... 


. . . 6.65 


4.50 


4.91 


1906... 


. . . 6.85 


4.62y 2 


5.02 


1907... 


. .. 7.25 


5.00 


5.55 


1908.. . 


. .. 5.17/ 2 


4.65 


5.02 


1909.. . 


. .. 6.50 


4.35 


4.63 


1910... 


. . . 6.35 


3.55 


4.08 


1911... 


. . . 7.00 


3.25 


3.52 


1912... 


. .. 7.65 


3.10 


3.63 


1913... 


. .. 7.35 


3.60 


3.94 


1914... 


. . . 6.20 


3,75 


4.12 


1915... 


...27.50 


3.87^ 


4.57 


1916.. . 


...21.17 


4.45 


5.75 


1917... 


...11.05 


4.10 


4.40 


1918... 


. .. 985 


3.90 


4.08^ 


1919... 


. .. 9.00 


4.10 


4.90 







in New York: 
Lowest Average 



4.70 

4.75 

5.30 

6.00 

4.35 

4.35 

4.75 

5.'25 

5.50 

6.45 

5.10 

4.75 

5.70 

8.37 V 2 

7.67 K 



6.00 



5.62 
5.17 
6.00 
6.27^ 

6.20H 

4.74 

5.52 

5.66 

5.91 

7.11 

5.80 

5.30 
14.44 
13 7S 

o 1 1 

8.31 
7.04 



Average price for 32 years, 5.88 cents. 
From American Metal Market. 



Annual Production of Spelter in the United States from Domestic and 

Foreign. Ores, in Short Tons.* 

From From 

Foreign Domestic 

Year Ore Ore 

1873 .............. 7.343 

1875 .............. 15,833 

1880C Census) ...... 23,239 

1882 ....... - ....... 33,765 

1883 .............. 36,872 

1884 .............. 38,544 

1885 .............. 40,688 

1886 .............. 42,641 

1887 .............. 50,340 

1888 .............. 55,903 

1889 .............. 58.860 

1890 .............. 63,683 

1891 ........... : .. 80,873 

1892 .............. 87.260 

1893 .............. 78,832 

1894 .............. 75,328 

1895 .............. 89,686 

1896 .............. 81,499 

1897 .............. 99,980 

1898 .............. 115,399 

* U. S. Geological Survey. 







From 


From 








Foreign 


Domestic 




Total 


Year 


Ore 


Ore 


Total 


7,343 


1899 




129,051 


129,051 


15,833 


1900 




123,886 


123,886 


23,239 


1901 




140,822 


140,822 


33,765 


1902 




156,927 


156,927 


36,872 


1903 




159,219 


159,219 


38,544 


1904 




186,702 


186,702 


40,688 


1905 




203,849 


203,849 


42,641 


1906 


25,076 


199,694 


224,770 


50,340 


1907 


... 26,115 


223,745 


249,860 


55,903 


1908 


. . . 19,675 


190,749 


210,424 


58,860 


1909 


, . . 25,535 


230,225 


255,760 


63,683 


1910 


. . 16,705 


252,479 


269,184 


80,873 


1911 


, . . 14,905 


271,621 


286,526 


87,260 


1912 


. . . 14,899 


323,907 


338,806 


78,832 


1913.... 


. . . 9,424 


337,252 


346,676 


75,328 


1914 


9,631 


343,418 


353,049 


89,686 


1915 


... 31,384 


458,135 


489,519 


81,499 


1916 


... 104,005 


563,451 


667,456 


99,980 


1917 


. . 84,976 


584,597 


669,573 


115,399 


1918 


, . . 25,522 


492,405 


517,927 



MINES OF THE UNITED STATES 



CHAPTER IV 

THE MINING COMPANIES AND MINES 
OF THE UNITED STATES 



Those of other countries are in separate chapters. See alphabetical index 

in front of book. 

The descriptions of the active and most of the inactive mining corporations, 
and operating mines of the various States are arranged by States and often 
grouped by counties and towns. The arrangement permits ready identification 
of companies whose exact title may often be difficult to recall and it enables the 
reader to tell what companies are operating near each mining center. 

The descriptions of foreign mining companies are grouped under the name 
of each country, arranged alphabetically by countries and by companies. 



UNITED STATES 

% 

A complete index in the front of the book makes quick reference possible 
if the name of the company is known. 

The companies given under this general heading, operate properties in so 
many districts that the descriptions cannot be properly given under any one 
state. References are, however, given in the appropriate places to the local 
holdings. 
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF AMERICA. 

Offices: Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa., and 120 Broadway, New York. 

Officers: Arthur V. Davis, pres.; G. R. Gibbons, v. p.-sec.-asst. treas.; 
R. E. Withers, treas.-asst. sec., Pittsburgh, Pa. ; with D. L. Gillespie, Roy A. 
Hunt, Alvah K. Lawrie, A. W. Mellon, George V. Clapp and R. B. Mellon, 
directors. 

Inc. 1888 in Pa., as the Pittsburgh Reduction Co.; name changed to 
present title, Jan. 1, 1907. Cap. authorized, $20,000,000; $100 par; outstanding, 
$19,000,000. Debentures, $12,000,000, 6% serial gold notes dated March 1, 1919, 
and maturing $4,000,000 annually from March 1, 1921 to 1923 inclusive. These 
notes are a direct obligation of the company. Dividends: 1906, Z%%; 1907, \\%', 
1908, \%; 1909, 2%; 1910-1913, 4% yearly; 1914, 6%; 1915, 6*/ 2 % ; 1916, S%; 
1917, 8% ; 1918, W%. 

Controls the St. Lawrence River Power Co., the Northern Aluminum 
Co., the St. Lawrence Transmission Co. and the Tallassee Power Co. On 
Nov. 1. 1915, acquired control of the Southern Aluminum Co., with its un- 
finished hydro-electric and aluminum manufacturing plants near Whitney, N. C. 
This company was controlled by French interests until the outbreak of the 
European war in 1914. The plants were to have cost upward of $10,000,000. The 

69 




70 UNITED STATES 

Aluminum Co. of America formed the Tallassee Power Co., capital $1,000,000 
to complete both plants. 

Company owns extensive bauxite deposits in Saline Co., Ark., from which 
it secures most of its aluminum ore. About 6 tons of ore yields one ton of metal. 
Kquipment at the property consists of crushing and drying machinery. The 
bauxite is shipped to a refining plant at East St. Louis, 111., where the impurities 
arc removed. There are also reduction works at Niagara Falls and Massena, 
N. Y., xvhere there is a wire and cable mill, and at Maryville, Tenn. The com- 
pany has a general fabricating plant at New Kensington, Pa., also a plant for 
the manufacture of aluminum bronze powder and aluminum foil. 

The Northern Aluminum Co. is a Canadian corporation, which has a reduc- 
tion plant and wire mill at Shawinigan Falls, Que., and a fabricating plant at 
Toronto, Out. 

Production : about 80% of the total aluminum product of the U. S., which, 
in 1918, was about 122,000,000 Ibs. Annual capacity of all plants estimated at 
175,000,000 Ibs. 
AMALGAMATED COPPER CO. 

Company dissolved in 1916. Fully described in previous issues of this book. 
Vols. XI and XII. 
AMERICAN FINANCE & SECURITIES CO. (THE) 

Involuntary petition in bankruptcy filed June 22, 1915. Adjudicated bank- 
rupt, May 15, 1916. Henry J. West, Camden, N. J., trustee. See Mines Hand- 
book, Vol. XII. 
AMERICAN METAL CO., LTD (THE) 

Offices: 61 Broadway, New York; Oliver Bldg.. Pittsburgh, Pa.: 
Boatmens Bank Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. ; Foster Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Officers: Berthold Hochschild, New York. Chairman of the Board: 
C. M. Loeb, pres. ; Otto Sussman, Henry Bruere, Julius Loeb, Ludwig Vogel- 
stein, and Harold K. Hochschild,' v. p's. ; Julian Beaty, treas. ; Julius Goldman, 
sec., with Henry V. Putzel, S. Roos and M. Schott, directors. 

Trustees: Henry Morgenthau, Berthold Hochschild, J. F. Guffey. F. L. 
Crocker, C. B. r de Camp, J. P. Grier, and Ludwig Vogelstein. 

Inc. 1887 in New York, as refiners, exporters, importers, and dealers 
in metals and chemicals. Cap., $25,000,000: $100 par: 70.000 issued. The 
capital in 1891 was $200,000. 

For an analysis of the ramifications and connections of this company, ref- 
erence should be made to the report made by the Alien Property Custodian in 
April, 1919. This includes the partnerships with Aron Hirsch & Sohn ; Beer, 
Sondheimer & Co.: The Metallgesellschaft and Vogelstein & Co., the last- 
nnmed being absorbed by American Metal Co. in December, 1919, thereby con- 
trolling the U. S. Metals Refining Co., which see below. 

When the Alien Property Custodian seized the 34,644 shares of German- 
owned stock, these shares and all but 200 of the American held shares were put 
into a five-year voting trust. This voting trust does not include 16,736 shares 
belonging to H. R. Merton & Co.. The German-owned shares sold at public 
auction for $5,750,904, were bought by a syndicate, by which Ludwig Vogelstein 
acquired a 20% interest of 14,000 shares, making him the largest individual 
stockholder. The Cerro cle Pasco Copper Corporation owns 4,500 shares ; L. T. 
Haggin. 1,000; J. Horace Harding, 1,000: H. C. Frick, cst. 1.000: C. D. Barney. 
1,200. and E. H. Clark, 1,500 shares. 

The American Metal Co. owns the following companies: American Zinc & 
Chemical Co.. Langeloth, Pa. : Bartlesville Zinc Co., Bartlesville and Blackwell, 
Oklahoma: Clarkesburg Clinkering Co., Bridgeport, West Virginia; Chanute 
Spelter Co., Cherokee county, Kansas ; Metallurgical Co. of America, American 
Metal Transport Co. American Metal Co. has large interests in the following: 
Ohio & Colorado Smelting & Refining Co., Salida, Colorado; Balbach Smelt- 
ing & Refining Co., Newark, New Jersey ; Nichols Copper Co., Laurel Hill, Long 
Island. N. Y. : South American Metal Co. (The), Chile; Fundicion de Guayacan, 
Guayacan, Chile ; Compania de Minerales y Metales, Mexico ; Providencia Mines, 
Zacatecas, Mexico ; Parrena Mining Co., Coahuila, Mexico ; Cia. Mineral Paloma 
y Cabrillas, S. A. Higueras, Coahuila, Mexico ; Compania Minera Penoles, 
Durango, Mexico; Compania Metallurgica de Torreon, Torreon, Mexico; Fundi- 
dora y Afinadora Monterrey, S. A., Monterrey, Mexico. 



AMERICAN METAL CO. 



71 



The corporation, through its subsidiaries and allied companies, owns or 
controls the following products, the average annual quantities produced being as 
indicated below : 

Electrolytic copper, pounds 100,000,000 to 125,000,000 

Zinc (spelter), all grades, tons 75,000 " 100,000 

Lead, bonded (Mexican), tons 60,000 " 75,000 

Lead, domestic, tons 12,000 " 15,000 

Sulphuric acid, tons 80,000 " 100,000 

White arsenic, tons . 4,000 " 6,000 

Coal in Pennsylvania, tons 350,000 " 400,000 

Coal in Mexico, tons 500,000 " 600,000 

Silver, ounces 12,000,000 " 15,000,000 

Zinc oxide (Polar and Arctic brands), tons 7,000 ' 10,000 

Zinc-dust (American extra pure and Zenith brands), tons 3,000 " 4,000 

Antimonial lead, tons 1,000 " 1,500 

Molybdenum concentrate, tons 500 " 1,000 

In addition to its own production of metals, the company buys and sells 
metals in the open market and also contracts to take the entire output of various 
mines, smelters and refineries in the United States, Canada, Mexico and South 
America. 

The company has contracts with large mines in North America calling for 
their entire production, totaling 159,000.000 Ibs. of copper per annum. Copper 
received during 1918 from these and others amounted to 141,398,982 Ibs. Re- 
fineries in which the company has an interest, treated this metal. The entire 
yearly turnover of the company, in copper, is 250,000,000 Ibs. 

Contracts with zinc mines called for 546,919,000 Ibs. of ore during the year 
ended June 30. 1917. This was treated at the company's smelters. In 2 years, 
ended June 30, 1917, the zinc ore purchased amounted to 1,700,000,000 Ibs., plus 
585,000.000 Ibs. of spelter bought in the open market. 

The lead turnover in 1917 was 168,000,000 Ibs. 

The growth of the company is indicated by the following statistics ; 

Total sales and net earnings of the corporation, after deducting all expenses, 
profit-sharing, taxes, fixed charges, etc., during the past 10 years, have been as 
follows (year ending July 1) : 



1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 



Capital 
Stock- 
Out- 
standing 
.$3,120,000 
. 3,500,000 
3,500.000 
. 3,500,000 
. 3,500,000 
, 3,500,000 

(a) Half year 

(b) Half year 



Total , Net 

Sales Earnings 
$64,274,040 $ 854,719 



84,402,083 

68,519,484 

57,060,048 

79,243,602 

68,835.488 

ending Dec. 31. 

ending June 30. 



685,334 
842,780 
1,365,816 
1,001,895 
1,088,770 



1915.... 
1916.... 
1916(a) 
1917(a) 
1918(a) 
1919(b) 



Capital 
Stock 
Out- 
standing 
3,500,000 
3,500,000 
3,500,000 
7,000,000 
7,000,000 
7,000.000 



Total 

Sales . 

$68,468,179 

153,796,848 

82,615,281 

149,216,409 

106,166,089 

29,268,252 



Net 

Earnings 

$2,498,639 

7,638,336 

4,899,750 

2,892,387 

832,157 

330,004 



The company's operations have hitherto been kept closely guarded, but a 
more liberal policy is apparently now to be followed. The company is really one 
of the few big metal companies of the world, and its operations are matters of 
great public importance. Such information concerning its subsidiaries as is 
obtainable is given under their respective titles. 

United States Metals Refining Co. 

Formerly owned by U. S. S. R. & M. Co., but control secured by Ameri- 
can Metal Co. in Dec., 1919. 

Officers: Ludwig- Vogelstein. pres.; F. Y. Roberston, v. p. and gen. mgr.; 
Otto Sussman. v. p.; J. P>. Beatty. sec.-treas.. with 1. A. Schloss, K. ' H. 




72 UNITED STATES 

Clark, and A. G. Todd, directors. R. E. Empey, controller and asst. treas. ; 
E. H. Probst, asst. sec. 

Staff: R. W. Deacon, gen. supt.; B. B. Hood, asst. supt; F. R. Pyne, 
asst. plant supt. ; C. L. Colbert, smelter supt. ; M. A. Koechert, production 
supt.; W. C. Smith, met.; L. V. Reese, chief eng. ; H. D. Greenwood, chief 
chemist; Sidney Rolle. supt. of dept. of indus. relations; W. W. Conner, 
power supt; C. E. Smith, purch. agt. ; Jacob R.oth. chief clerk; J. C. Clark, 
supt. of silver refinery; H. W. Thorn, supt. of yards; H. M. Green, supt. of 
tank-house; August Marks, supt. of casting dept.; Harry Moorecraft, supt. 
of weighing and sampling. 

Inc. in New Jersey. Cap., 20,000 pfd. shares and 20,000 com. shares, 
both $100 par value. 15,500 shares of each kind are issued, of which the U. S. 
S. R. & M. Co. owns 10,433 pfd. and 10,800 com. 

Works: The U. S. M. R. Co. owns electrolytic copper refinery, having 
a capacity of refining 240,000,000 Ib. of copper annually, a copper smelter, con- 
sisting of two blast-furnaces, with an annual capacity of smelting 200,000 tons of 
charge. The copper smelter purchased its ores under long contracts with mines 
in Canada, Spain, Cuba, and the western coast of South America ; and con- 
sequently, is assured a long life, as it is not dependent on any one mine. The 
refinery enters into long time contracts for the refining of other copper besides 
that produced by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. These two plants are located on 
159 acres of ground at Chrome, N. J. This property is at tide-water, permitting 
ocean-going steamers to discharge direct into the plant, and is also connected 
with the Central Railroad of New Jersey. 

The smelter has two 42x186" blast furnaces, 3 converter stands using 84x120" 
basic-lined converters, two 60x6' rotary kilns for sintering fine material, and 
one Dwight-Lloyd sintering machine. The smelter is further equipped with a 
500' steamship dock, with berth for 2 steamers, the most modern type of Fair- 
banks scales, having a sensitiveness of 10 Ib. on a load of 200,000 Ibs., and a 
very complete automatic sampling mill equipped with Brunton samplers. 

The refinery has two 225-ton and two 175-ton anode furnaces and three 
225-ton wire-bar furnaces, equipped with charging cranes, casting wheels, waste 
heat boilers and the most modern devices for mechanical handling. The tank 
house has 1,228 tanks arranged on the Walker system. The weighing is done 
on tandem Fairbanks scales, sensitive to 1 Ib. in 15,000 Ibs. 

The power house is steam-driven and arranged for highest economy with 
economizer and superheater equipment, 3 compound condensing units and 2 
triple expansion units, using exhaust steam turbines for the third expansion. 
Current is generated at the rate of 11,000 amperes. Three circuits are carried 
in the tank house with a voltage of 115 volts each, 1 power unit being carried in 
reserve. 

The anode slimes are refined by the usual processes, the dore bullion pro- 
duced being parted electrolytically. Some of the rarer elements are recovered 
as by-products. 

A new $100,000 laboratory with the most modern equipment was completed 
in 1917. 

The new laboratory at Chrome is described in the ''Eng. & Min. Jour." of 
March 9, 1918. 

The company also owns a lead refining plant, with an annual capacity of 
72,000,000 Ib. of lead. This plant is at East Chicago, Indiana, on 70 acres of 
land. Wm. Thum, supt. It is connected with the following railways : Indiana 
Harbor Belt, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore & Ohio Terminal. It utilizes the 
Betts electrolytic lead refining process, by which the purest quality of lead is 
produced. The process also permits the recovery of bismuth and other by- 
products in the bullion. 

The plants of the United States Metals Refining Co. are strictly modern in 
design and equipment and are noted for the technical excellence of their practice 
and the purity of their commercial products. 



73 

AMERICAN SMELTING & REFINING CO. 

Gen. Offices: 120 Broadway, New York; Corporate office: 15 Exchange 
Place, Jersey City, N. J. ; City of Mexico office : Edificio 'La Mutua' Despacho 
No. 200, Mexico, D. F. Valparaiso office: Casilla 12, Valparaiso, Chile. 

General Officers: Simon Guggenheim, pres.; Jos. Clendenin, J. K. Mac- 
Gowan and F. H. Brownell, v. p.'s; Isaac Guggenheim, treas.; F. W. Hills, 
compt.; L. A. Chapin, asst. treas; W E. Merriss, sec.; R. P. Reese, aud. 

Directors. L. Newhouse, chairman; Simon Guggenheim, Jos. Clendenin, 
Chas. Earl, Leopold Frederick, Isaac Guggenheim, F. W. Hills, Wm. Loeb, Jr., 
John K. MacGowan, W. S. McCornick, W. S. Morse, Walter T. Page, H. A. 
Prosser, E. B. Schley, John N. Steele, C. W. Whitley, F. H. Brownell, C. A. H. 
de Saulles, Roger W. Straus, W. M. Drury, L. G. Eakins, H. A. 'Guess, W. E. 
Merriss, F. R. Raiff, and H. R. Wagner. 

Executive Committee: Simon Guggenheim, chairman; Jos. Clendenin, 
Chas. Earl, F. W. Hills, Wm. Loeb, Jr.. J. K. MacGowan, W. S. Morse, 
E. L. Newhouse, H. A. Prosser, F. H. Brownell, H. A. Guess and H. R. 
Wagner. 

Finance Committee: F. H. Brownell. chairman; Simon Guggenheim, 
and E. L. Newhouse. 

Legal Committee: J. N. Steele, cons, counsel; F. H. Brownell, gen. 
counsel ; F. R. Foraker and Charles Earl, associates counsel. 

Operating Officials: Wm. Loeb, Jr., managing director labor and 
welfare dept. ; E. R. Reets, purch. agt. ; F. R. Raiff, traffic mgr. ; G. H. Cole, asst 
traffic mgr.; E. L. Carpenter, fuel agt.; C. W. Whitley, gen. mgr. Utah dept.; 
C. A. H. de Saulles, gen. mgr. Colo, dept.; H. A. Guess, managing director mng. 
dept: ; W. M. Drury, mgr. mng. dept. ; C. L. Baker, gen. mgr. Mex. dept. ; 
R. T. White, gen. mgr. Chile ; Kuno Doerr, gen. mgr. S. W. dept. ; Samuel 
Metzger? mgr. ins. dept. ; E. A. Behr, sales agt. lead dept. ; H. M. Brush, asst. 
mgr. copper sales dept. 

Foreign representatives: W. A. Price and Geo. T. Ewart, fin. agts., 
El Paso, Texas ; R. E. Mora, gen. rep., and J. A. Hendry, asst. treas. for Mexico. 

On January 15, 1919, Daniel, Murry, and S. R. Guggenheim retired from 
the directorate, after 18 years' active participation in the company's varied opera- 
tions. Since 1901, when they became connected with the company, the annual 
turn-over increased from $82,000,000 to $390,000,000, and the profit and loss account 
from $2,900,000 to $27,000,000. 

Inc. April 4, 1899, in New Jersey. Cap., $115,000,000. with $65,000,000 
common and $50,000,000 cumulative 7% preferred stock, $100 par. Original 
capitalization was $54,600,000, increased to $100,000,000 and again increased 
Jan., 1911, by $15,000,000 common stock authorized to exchange for 6% debenture 
bonds of American Smelters Securities Co. at any time before Aug., 1918, that 
bonds may sell at par. Annual meeting, first Wednesday in April. Has about 
11,000 shareholders. 

Transfer agt., Ralph M. \Leonard, New York; registrar, Chase National 
Bank, New York. 

The A. S. & R. Co. owns all the common stock of the American Smelters 
Securities Co. and, $30,000,000, 80% of pfd. B and 35% of pfd. A. This was 
acquired by giving its 1st mtge. 5% bonds in exchange for the series B, 5% 
preferred stock of the Securities Co., par for par. The 5% cumulative-preferred 
stock, series B, of the Securities Co. is guaranteed by the Smelting Co., both as 
to interest and principal, and is, therefore, an obligation of the Smelting Co., 
prior to its preferred stock. 

Consolidated Income Account 

1919* 1918 1917 

Net earnings, smelters, etc $5,285,698 $13,234,711 $24,125,685 

Net earnings, mining properties 428,081 2,686,840 4,069,243 

Other income, net 307,905 2,390,017 3,407,688 



Gross income $6,021,684 $18,311,568 $31,602,616 



74 



I'XJTIiD STATES 



Charges Against Gross Income 



Administ.. research, exam., exp. 

Corporate taxes 

interest, amort., discount bonds, 

Deprec., depict., ore res 

Appropriation, bonus, pension.. 
Miscellaneous . 



$522,691 
412,355 
796.793 

2,140,686 



$1,305.934 

1,252,356 

1,616,109 

5,439,631 

250,000 

740,038 



$1,482,458 

3.849,971 

1,234,248 

4,954,482 

600,000 

985,831 



Total charges $3,872,524 $10,604,068 $13,106,990 



Xet income $2,149,160 

Dividends on pfd. stock 2,124,664 



Balance 

Dividends on com. stock 



$24,496 
1,219,960 



Balance transferred to snrplust.. $1,195,464 
Previous surplus 27,060,229 



$7,707,500 
4,247,774 

$3,459.726 
3,354,890 

$104,834 
26,955,394 



$18,495,626 
4,712,666 



$13,782,960 
,4,269,860 

$9,513,100 
23,442,295 



Total surplus $25,864,765 

Special appropriations . 



$27,060.228 



$32,955,395 
6,000,000 



Profit and loss surplus $25,864,765 $27,060,228 $26,955,395 

* Half year, f Deficit. For previous years, see Vol. XIII. 

Consolidated General Balance Sheet 

ASSETS 



Year 
1919*.. 

1918 133. 24. r >. 835 

1917 130.797.47C, 

1910 141.1 (;.). 084 

1915 141.442.99S 



Net Value 

Property In\-si incuts Metal Stocks 

SI 32.074,323 .1=1.558.057 $46.433.509 

1.742.0(14 40.921.155 

1.057.313 3(5.339.500 

827.277 27,477.650 

039.067 23.018.802 




Working: 


Current 


Special 




Assets 


Assets 


Funds 


Tot H! 


8, 884,410 


.$19,538,398 


$1,368,623 


$210.457,320 


'.(.070.477 


35.530.070 


1 .3(59.338 


221.S80.OK.-, 


8.009.234 


32.280.808 


1.373.423 


221,857.754 


4.601.312 


42.430.207 


823.003 


217.325,133 


3.312.877 


31.147.388 


1.054.55'.) 


201.810.351 



Current assets and special funds ;ire mostly cash; working assets are mostly supplies. "Half 



Year 
1919*. 
1918. . 
1917. . 
1910.. 



LIABILITIES 

Pfd. Stock Coin. Stuck Honds Current 

Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding Liabilities 



$62,926,500 $00.998.000 

03. 175. 000 00. 998.000 

(53. (574. 800 (50.99S.OOO 

!0. 15S.SOO 51.299.000 

96.049.800 50.108.000 



$32.210.300 $20.398,010 

31,901.700 30,054.731 

31,881.400 27,094.805 

6.699,000 27,408.288 

12.012.500 16.750.117 



Res. and P. and L. 

Sus. Accounts Surplus 

$8 . 059 . 740 $25 , 804 . 705 

8.030.324 27.0(50.228 

10,053,294 2(5,955.395 

8. 957. 750 23,442.295 

(5.135.497 19.500,339 



Total 

$210.457.320 
221.88(5.085 
221.857.754 
217.325,133 
201.810,351 



Current liabilities arc mostly accounts payable, and dividends payable. *Ilalf year. 

Statement for the half-year ended June 30, 1919, shows the following posi- 
tion: Xet income. $2,149,160. after paying depreciation, ore depletion, and bond 
interest. Preferred shares received, $2,124,664, and common, $1,219,960, the 
pi-riod ending with a deficit of $1,195,464 owing to cessation or reduction of 
output due to lack of demand for metals. Profits from Mexico increased. Cur- 
rent assets totaled $19,538.398. and current liabilities, $20,398.016. 



Dividends Common Shares: 

Year % Year 

1919 (to Dec. 15).... 4 1914. 

1918 6 1913. 

1917... 7 1912. 

1916 6^ 1911. 

1915... 4 1910. 



Year 
1909. 
1908. 
1907. 
1906. 
1905. 
1904. 



5 

7 1 / 

7 



AMERICAN SMELTING & REPINING 



75 



Preferred shares received "7% per annum from Oct., 1899, up to the current 
vear. In 1900. an additional J/g O f \% was paid to cover the period of April 11 
to 30. 1899. 



Volume < 
RE< 
Balance from previous year : 
Cash, loans, Liherty bonds. . . .-. 


af Business 

:EIPTS 
1918 
$18,320,968 
360,060,487 
10,117,969 
14,006,145 
2,390,017 

5,426,537 


1917 
$19,941,492 
405,616,167 
8,788,455 
22,785,294 
3,407,688 

3,382,698 


1916 
$18,642.460 
330,297,952 
5,661,198 
. 16.304,914 
2,818,082 

3,035,690 


Sales of metals 


From mining profits 


From manufactured products 


Miscellaneous 


Bankers' accep., special funds, dec. net 
current assets, etc 


Total cash to be accounted for . 

PAY 

For ore and bullion purchased, expenses, 
taxes 


$410.322,123 

MENTS 

$376,970,009 
4.887,990 
325,569 
129,400 
1.915,469 
7,602,664 

18,491,022 


$463.921.794 

$426,017.668 
6.586,274 
857,282 
672,207 
2,484,868 
8,982,525 

18,320,967 


$376.760,296 

$335,851,619 
8,175,743 
1,041,686 
2,615,922 


Expended on property, net 


For investments acquired, etc., net.... 
For A. S. C. Co. pfd. stock bought, net. 
A. S. & R. bonds purchased, interest, etc. 
Dividends paid 


9.133,834 
19,941,492 


Balance at end of year : 
Cash and Liberty bonds 


Total 


$410.322,123 
g Statistics 
1917 
24,698 

$24,497,836 
$3.31 
706,875 
5,918,924 
787,890 
592,765 
1,560,535 
3,032.908.373 
2.318,925 
259,499 
186,107 

Products 

2.496,693 
69,841,061 

1,597 
275,266 
916.974,000 
52,522,000 
682,715 
12,130,000 
66,174,000 
9.132.000 


$463.921,791 

1916 
21,073 

$17,047,944 
$2.70 
677,460 
4,789,474 
724.595 
454,468 
1,107,285 
2,130.460.328 
1,638.566 
224.807 
140,%1 

2,662,011 
71,868,451 

868 
279,144 
789,438,000 
47.807,"547 
1,224,328 
3,262,000 
25,842,000 
9.090.000 


$376,760.296 

1915 
15,556 

$11.392.503 
$2.44 
579,080 
4.153.092 
604,204 
401,511 
829,304 
1.071.593.000 
1.578,611 
235,222 
120,660 

2,672,702 
76.117,453 

693 
296,986 
551,798,000 
36.154.000 
1.120,556 


Operatin 

1918 
Men employed, exclud- 
ing Mexico 21 765 


Total wages and salaries, 
excluding Mexico $25.516,467 
Average per 8-hour clav. $3.91 
Bullion refined, tons..... 680099 


Charge smelted, tons... 5.658,232 
Coal used, tons 765,124 


Coke used, tons 545.063 


Fuel-oil used, bbls 1 659 337 


Gas used, cubic ft 2.372,000.103 
Ore mined, tons 2,525 280 


Coal mined, tons 168140 


Coke produced, tons 171,245 

Metal 
Gold, m 1 994 01 S 


Silver, or. 72 572 506 


Platinum and palladium, 
oz 1,516 


Lead, tons 260 192 


Copper, Ib 868,540,000 


Spelter, Ib 41,238000 


Nickel, Ib 626085 


Tin, Ib 19,868,000 


Sulphuric acid, Ib 87,338 000 


34,124,000 
7?69000 


Arsenic. Ib. . 7.837.063 



76 



UNITED STATES 
Metal Products Continued 



Copper sulphate, Ib 

Byproduct metals, Ib... 
Copper and brass mfd., Ib. 
Test lead and litharge 

sold, Ib 

Loaded cartridges sold, 

number 

Sheet lead, pipe, etc., 

sold, Ib 

Mixed metals sold, Ib... 



5,164,000 
1,870,662 



7,598,000 

4,131,709 

39,767,274 

426,472 
14,180,000 

13,678,245 
5,188,045 



13,046,000 

5,671,827 

31,597,489 

417,898 
15,338,000 

21,713,331 
2,831,617 




8,366,000 
2,229,887 
8,763,480 

355,229 
12,898,000 

9,638,205 
2,566,255 



The business of the company is so varied that it almost defies analysis, save 
by a certified accountant. It mines gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc ores and coal. 
It smelts its own ores of all these metals, and also most of the ore produced by 
the lesser mines of America. It refines not only these five metals, but manu- 
factures them into copper sheets, rods, tubes, etc., at Baltimore; makes white 
lead, sheet lead, etc., at Selby ; zinc white, etc., at its zinc smelters ; sulphuric acid 
at Perth Amboy, N. J., and Garfield, Utah, and coke at its mines. It refines and 
sells bismuth, cadmium, arsenic, nickel and platinum, palladium and selenium 
largely from the slime of its electrolytic refineries, and makes blue vitriol ; also 
smelts tin ore and concentrate from Bolivia. 

It owns and operates over 30 mines in Mexico and a number of railways 
under the title of the Mine Lines of Mexico, and the Mexican Union R. R., and 
owns and operates the following smelting plants, etc. 



Lead Smelting 



Plant Location Manager 

Giobe Denver, Colo L. G. Eakins F. 

Pueblo Pueblo, Colo L. G. Eakins G. 

Durango Durango, Colo P. C. Gilbert M. 

Ark. Valley ^eadville, Colo W. B. McDonald B. 

Murray Murray, Utah .C. W. Whitley W. 

Helena Helena, Mont C. W. Adams B. 

Perth Amboy jVIaurer, N. J H. H. Alexander G. 

Omaha Omaha, Neb Walter T. Page W. 

El Paso El Paso, Tex Kuno Doerr J. 

Monterey }lonterey, Mex C. L. Baker J. 

Ohilhuahua Chihuahua, Mex C. L. Baker 

Selby Belby, Calif F. B. Braden E. 

Federal Federal, 111 Rudolph Porter O. 

Velardena Asarco, Mex C. L. Baker L. 



Furnaces 



Supt. 

Roeser 1 

A. Marsli 7 

H. Kaufman. . . 3 

Hogarty 10 

W. Norton 8 

L. Strobcl 4 

G. Griswold... 4 

P. Olds 3 

Heggie 6 

R. Enlow 10 

5 

N. Engleharclt. 4 

Ohnsorg 3 

B. Harrison. . 3 



Copper Smelting 



ivrth Amboy Maurer, N. J H.H.Alexander. ...J. F. Austin 1 

Kl Paso El Paso, Tex Kuno Doerr J. Heggie , 3^) ( 

Aguas Cal's Aguas Cal's M-x C. L. Baker A. McL. Hamilton 8 

Matehuala Matehuala, Mex C. L. Baker C. A. Grabill 3 

Hayden Hayden, Ariz H. E. Eye J. J. Ormsbee.... 2 

Tacoma Tacoma, Wash H. Y. Walker W. V. Morse 2 

Garfleld Garfleld, Utah C. W. Whitley R. F. McElveny. . 4(a) / 

Sasco ^. . Silverbell, Ariz R. B. Green 6(b) ) 

Velardena Asarco, Mox C. L. Baker L. B. Harrison.. 3 



(c) 
c) 

Tons 

1,600 

1,300 

550 

1,700 

1,900 

900 

600 

750 

1,200 

1,600 

900 

800 

270 

450 



300 



2,000 
600 
900 

1,500 



750 



(a) Blast furnaces, (b) Reverberatory furnaces, (c) Daily capacity. 

Zinc Smelters 

i 

r.l.'ii<l- Blende, Colo C. A. H. DeSaulles. . . J. D. Thomas 8 100 

Sand Spgs Sand Spgs., Okla C. A. II. DeSaulles. . .F. F'. Lannon 10 130 

Ht-nryette HVnryette, Okla U. A. H. DeSatilles. . .F. 1'. Lannon 



' 



AMERICAN SMELTING & REFINING 
Tin Smelters 



77 



Perth Anilioy 



Yearly Cap. 
. . . Maurer, N. J 18,000 tons 

Refining Plants 



Yearly Capacity 

Gold Silver Lead Copper 

Plant Oz. Oz. Tons Tous 

Omaha Omaha. Nob 500,000 36,000.000 180,000 

. W. T. Page, mgr. ; E. B. Lefferts, 
supt. 

Perth Amboy Maurer, N. J 500,000 48,000,000 108,000 120,000 

H. H. Alexander, mgr. ; G. Griswold, 
supt. 

Selby Selby, Calif 2,400,000 18,000,000 36,000 

E. B. Braden, v. p.; E. N. Engel- 
hardt, supt. 

Federal Federal, 111 ; 60,000 

Rudolph Porter, iugr. ; O. Ohnsorg, 
supt. 

Baltimore Baltimore, Md 300,000 30,000,000 240,000 

W. H. Pierce, mgr. ; C. N. Sapping-, 
\ ton, supt. 

Tacoma Tacoina, Wash 72,000 

H. Y. Walker, mgr. ; (i. A. Kerr, supt. 
supt. 

The smelting and refining capacity of the company is equal to 1,150,000,000 Ib. 
of electrolytic copper per annum. 

The Mining Properties of the company are under the general charge of 
W. M. Drtiry, general manager; R. F. Manahan, assistant. The operating mines 
are as follows : 

Imperial mine, Julius Kruttschnitt, mgr., Ed. Thornton, supt., Silverbell, 
Arizona ; Blue Hill mine, Douglas, Hancock county, Maine ; George Copper mine, 
Portland Canal division, British Columbia, bonded in 1919 for $100,000; Silver 
Lake mine, L. R. Clapp, supt., Silver Lake, Colo.; Premier (Bush) Silver mine, 
near Stewart, British Columbia, in which 1,000,000 tons of $30 ore is exposed. 
A 40% interest was acquired in Oct., 1919. 

The Imperial was acquired early in 1918, after being operated by the A. S. & 
R. Co. under lease from the trustee in bankruptcy of the Imperial Copper Co. 

Production : 1918, 120, 320 tons ore, 2.8% copper, ; 1917, 123,729 tons ore, 3.0% 
copper ; 1916, 73,729 tons ore, 3.0% copper. For full description of property, see 
Vol. XIII of this book. 

The Douglas mine was acquired in 1917. It contains 60,000 tons of ore, low 
in copper, but high in sulphur. Concentrate is sent to Perth Amboy, N. J. 

The Revenue, near Ouray, Colorado, held under option, was abandoned in 
November, 1919. It has yielded $16,000,000 in silver and lead. 

The Mexican mines owned or controlled by the company can produce 2,500,000 
tons of ore per annum. In August, 1919, they were operating at 80% capacity. 



State 



Mexican Properties of the A. S. & R. Co. 
Unit 



Mine 



Chihuahua, 



r Mina Vieja. Sin Nombre, 
Sta. Eulalia (W. J. Deavitt,J Velardena, San Antonio, 

supt.) (^ Santo Domingo. 

Magistral Orizaba, La Union, etc. 

Calera Prieta and Buena Vista. 

.<(' Dolores (E. E. Reyer, supt.,) Jibosa. 

Cordero La Luz and Parcionera. 

Parral Guadalupe. 

Sta. Barbara (W. P. Schu- ( Tecolotes and Montezuma, 

macher, supt.) 1 San Diego and Alfarena. 

Veta Grande j Veta Grande, Veta Colo- 

1 rado, etc. 



78 UNITED STATES 

Mexican Properties of the A. S. & R. Co. Continued 
State Unit Aline 




'olcan 



r u -i i Sierra Mojada (VV. B. j San Jose, Trinidad, V 

Coahulla 1 Gates, supt. ) \ Dolores. 

j Velardena (R. E. Adams, j San Lorenzo. , Sta. Maria, 

Lirango 1 supt.) ? Copper Queen, Sta. Juana. 

Aguascalientes. . . . Asientos Sta. Francisca. 

,,. , J Anganaueo (A. W. Edelen, j 

supt.) J San Cristobal, Carmen, etc. 

c . T-, . \ Charcas (S. F. Shaw, supt.) \ Tiro General. 
San. Luis Potosi. .. J NIatehltala p _ 1 Dolores 

Zacatecas Bonanza Bonanza. 

American Smelters Securities Co.'s properties are all included in the above ; 
the same applies to the National Metallurgical Co., the Tacoma Smelter, the 
Baltimore Copper S. & R. Co., the Selby Smelting Works, the Federal Lead Co., 
and the Garfield Smelting Co. 

The Federal Smelter is supplied with ores principally from the company's 
mining operations in southeast Missouri. At present the output of ore is, roughly 
speaking, 1.500,000 tons per annum, which is concentrated into approximately 
75,000 tons of concentrates, containing about 60,000 tons of lead. About $750,000 
has been spent in enlarging the milling and smelting works, and extending the 
development of mines of the company in Missouri. The production of pig lead 
has been increased from 42,000 tons at the beginning of 1916 to 66,000 tons per 
annum. 

The installation of an electrolytic zinc plant at the Murray. Utah, smelter, 
and construction of a 200-ton sulphuric acid plant, using the chamber process, at 
Garfield. Utah, show that the company is still in the fore in its metallurgical 
practice. 

None of the Mexican smelters were operated during 1916. In the first half 
of 1917, the Aguascalientes. Matehuala, and Monterrey plants were started, con- 
tinning through 1918. Four of the five were in blast early in 1919, and were 
sufficient to smelt the product of the mines listed above, excepting copper ores 
at Chihuahua. By August, 1919, all smelters were in blast. 

The company, during 1916, entered the mining and smelting business in Chile 
and bought the Caldera smelter including many mines imperfectly developed 
and the stock of the Carrizal smelter. 

The tin plant has a capacity of 18,000 tons of pig tin per annum. 

The American Smelting & Refining Co. is the largest general smelting and 
metallurgical enterprise in the world. The company will continue to expand and 
prosper because of its superior metallurgical and business ability, backed by large 
and modern works and adequate capital. 

In 1917 the company suffered from the entire lack of economic law. as the 
value of its metal products were fixed by the Government, while the cost of 
labor and supplies mounted high, the latter from 50 to 150% above normal. 
In 1918, the company obtained no direct advantage from the increased value 
of the metals, and. on account of the complexities of the ore and metal markets. 
a conservative program had to be maintained, so that dividends were not 
increased beyond 6%. The high costs of smelting and refining have been dis- 
couraging, but these items have lately been lowered: and although pre-war 
c<>-:ts may never be realized again, the directors expect that pre-war profits per 
ton of ore smelted will be obtained as soon as normal business is resumed. 

The company is keen on safety and welfare work among employees. The 
accident rate for' 1918 was 28% less than in 1917. 

The company is a dominating factor in the lead business of the United 
States, handling nearly 50% of the domestic output of primary lead. The 
company practically makes the price of lead, the St. Joseph Lead Co. being the 
only other concern that makes an independent price. The company's policy is 
to make exclusive contracts for the smelting of lead ores. In April. 1918. a 
hitter dispute over smelling contracts with the Bunker Hill & Sullivan company 



AMERICAN ZINC, LEAD & SMELTING CO. 79 

was settled out of court, after the B. H. & S. company had erected a smelter 
at Kellogg, Idaho. The contract between these companies was for a period of 
25 years, from 1905, but provided fixed terms for only the first 5 years, covering 
such of the B. H. & S. output as contained between 30 and 75% lead. The 
agreement did not require the B. H. & S. to put its ore through a mill, and as 
the ore from the mine averaged less than 15%, it was possible to contend that 
none of the ore came within the limits specified. The B. H. & S. actually did 
concentrate most of its ore, and at times nearly a third of its total output was 
a concentrate carrying over 75% lead. These, and other points, coupled with 
competition of the B. H. & S. and A. S. & R. for local ores, treatrnent rates, etc., 
lead to final cancellation of the contract. 

The A. S. & R. Co. also smelts a great deal of custom copper ores in various 
States, but many mine-owners protest against its methods of payment, especially 
when the market is erratic. 

American Smelters Securities Co. United States & Mexico. 

Office: 120 Broadway, New York. 

Inc. March 25, 1905. in New Jersey, and name changed to present title. 
May, 1905. Cap.. $77,000,000, shares $100 par, in $17,000,000 Series A cumula- 
tive 6% pf.d. stock; outstanding, July 1, 1919, $15,814,000; $30,000,000 series B 
cum., 5% pfd. stock and $30,000,000 com. stock. Series A has preference as to 
dividends, and both preference series have equal rights as to assets, both having 
priority rights to assets and dividends over common stock. A sinking fund, 
started July 1, 1914, provides for the calling each year of the original $17,000,000 
preferred A shares outstanding, and an additional sum equal to 6% of the 
aggregate amount of the issues previously retired. Financial statement is 
consolidated with that of the A. S. & R. Co. 

Company owns, in fee, mines in different districts in Mexico, and copper and 
lead smelting and refining plants in the United States. Tt also owns all or a 
controlling part of the stock of a large number of subsidiary companies. 

AMERICAN ZINC, LEAD & SMELTING CO. 

General Offices. 55 Congress St., Boston, Mass. Sales office: 120 
Broadway, New York. Operating office : 1012 Pierce Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 
Corporate office : 85 Exchange St., Portland, Maine, H. P. Sweetser, clerk. 

Officers: C. W. Baker, chairman of directors; W. A. Ogg, pres.; L. A. 
Coolidge, C. A. Might, P. E. Coyle, W. F. Rossman, J. N. Houser, and H. A. 
Wentworth, v. p.'s ; F. W. Batchelder, sec-treas. ; M. A. Donovan, asst. sec.-treas. ; 
H. L. Smith, comptroller; "H. 1. Young, mgr. Missouri mines; C. D. Strachan, 
supt. Tennessee mines; A. \Y. Uodd, mgr. of sales. 

Directors: term expires 1919, L. A. Coolidge. B. P. Bole, C. A. Hight, 

F. 1 1. Goff, and H. S. Kimball. Term expires 1920 E. P. Brown, E. A, Clark, 

G. L. Stone, and W. A. Ogg. Term expires 1921 C. W. Baker, W. H. Coolidge, 
J. N. Lovell, F. \Y. Batchelder, and C. D. Spalding. Transfer agents : the 
company, at 55 Congress St., Boston, Mass., and Guaranty Trust Co., New York. 
Registrars : First National Bank, Boston, Mass., and Bankers Trust Co., New 
York. 

Inc. Jan. 26. 189-. in Maine-. Cap. $500,000; $25 par; increased on 
April 22, 1889, to $2,500,000; on October 16. 1906, decreased to $1,250,000; on 
December 18. 1906, increased to $3,750,000; on April 10, 1912, increased to 
S7.500.000; outstanding December 31, 1915, $4,828,000. At the annual meeting in 
April, 1916, the authorized capital stock consisting of $7,500,000, divided into 
300,000 shares of the par value of $25, was classified as follows : 100,000 of the 
authorized shares unissued and in the treasury at that date were classified as 
pfd. stock, and the remaining 200,000 shares were classified as common stock, 
so that the present authorized capital consists of 100,000 shares of pfd. stock 
;md 200,000 shares of common stock, of which 96,560 and 193,120, respectively 
;ire outstanding. Stock is listed on Boston and New York Stock Exchanges. 
Annual meeting, second Wednesday in April. 



80 



UNITED STATES 
Earnings 




1918 

Price of spelter, cents 7.89 

Net profits from operations 
Sale of zinc and lead ores and metals, oxide, 

acid, and royalties $857,193 

Miscellaneous profit 54,223 



1917 



Deduct settlement with Minerals Separation 



8.73 



$1,694,551 
85,613 

$1,780,164 
250.000 



1916 



12.63 



$9,161,211 

146,757 



Total profits $911,416 $1,530,164 $9,307,968 

Surplus at end of previous year 4,546,943 4,792,906 5,855.,641 



Total $5,458,359 $6,323,070 $15,163,609 

Less dividends on : 

Preferred shares 482,637 483,237 2,670,649 

Common shares 386,240 

Applied on Granby purchase 3,282,644 

Paid to Granby Company 2,300^000 

Depletion and deprec. reserves 554,000 859,094 2,006,000 



Surplus at end of year $4,421,722 $4,594,497 $4.904,316 



Consolidated balance sheet: 



Assets 



Year Property 

1918 $11,552,060 

1917 11,993,732 

1916 12,310.404 



Advances to Deferred 

Investments Subsidiaries Current Charges 

$2,206,393 $ $5,112,156 $ 159,798 

2,477,896 5,748,092 141,660 

1.679.569 300,000 6,230,781 71.087 



Sinking 

Fund Total 
27.350 $19,057,757 

20,361,380 

20,591,841 



Liabilities 

Year Cap. Stock Bonds Reserve Funds Current Net Surplus Total 

1918 $7.242,000 $1,782,500 $4,889,038 $ 722,507 $4,421,721 $19,057,757 

1917 7,242,000 1,900,000 5,203,413 1,421,469 4,594,497 20,361,380 

1916 7,242,000 2,000,000 4,603,864 1,841.661 4,904,316 20,591,841 

Dividends: $2 in 1899, $1 in 1900, $1.25 in 1907, $1.50 in 1910, $2 in 1911 
and 1912, and $1 in 1913. In June, 1916, a stock dividend was declared, each 
share of com. stock issued received one-half share of pfd. stock, equivalent at 
par to $12.50. In 1917 the com. shares received $2. The pfd. stock is entitled 
to cumulative dividends of $6 per annum. In the event of any liquidation or 
dissolution of the company, holders of the pfd. stock are entitled to be paid $100 
per share and accrued dividends. During 1916, $3 per share was paid on the 
pfd., $6 in 1917, $6 in 1918, $4.50 in 1919; and $1 in 1920, on Feb. 2. 

The A. Z. L. & S. Co. is an operating and holding company, owning the 
following: American Zinc Co. of Tenn., American Zinc Co. of 111., American 
Ballast Co., American Zinc Ore Separating Co., and 649,774 shares of 925,000 
shares issued of the Wisconsin Zinc Co. These Companies are listed under 
their own title but are described below. 

For the first quarter of 1919 the company made a loss of $651, against a 
profit of $18,278 in the last period of 1918, while the second quarter resulted in 
a loss of $13,950. The third quarter showed a loss of $6,300, which was converted 
into a profit of $367,568 by the sale of Carson Hill stock. 

The American Pipeline Co., another subsidiary, was sold in 1917 with its 
lands, wells, pipelines, etc., to the Cities Service Co. of Kansas, for $870,000 of 
its 6% cum. pfd. stock. 

In 1916 company purchased all the assets of the Granby Mining & Smelting 
Co., consisting of about 30,000 acres of mineral lands in the Joplin district, 
Missouri, 10,000 acres of coal lands in Illinois, a zinc smelter at East St. Louis, 
111., a zinc smelter at Neodesha, Kan., and a lead smelter at Granby, Mo. All of 
the above are described below. 



AMERICAN ZINC CO, OF TENNESSEE 81 

In August, 1919, company sold at a profit of $430,000 the 28,000 shares of 
Carson Hill Gold Mining Co. it held, having received this as a bonus for the 
loan of $600,000 made to the Carson Hill for its development. The latter paid 
off the loan in October. 

Property: in the Joplin district, Mo., the company owns 32,160 acres 
of mineral land. The principal operations are at the Davey mines on the 655-acre 
Davey property, the Vogey mine on a 40-acre tract in the Porto Rico district, the 
Klondike, Mascot, and Golden Rule mines near Granby, Mo., a 600-ton custom 
mill near Granby, Mo., and the B. & H. mine near Joplin. There are 4 mines in 
the Davey group, 2 worked out and 2 producing. 

The company had 3 smelters in the gas belt at Caney, Bearing, and Neodesha, 
Kan., but on account of exhaustion of the gas supply, the last two mentioned 
were dismantled during 1918. At Caney there are 6,080, at Bearing there were 
4,480, and at Neodesha, 3,760 retorts; combined yearly capacity was 150,000 tons 
of concentrates. The company also leases from the Owen Zinc Co. at Caney, 
Kan., two blocks of furnaces, and in 1916 added one furnace block, making a 
total of 1920 retorts. The life of these smelters depends upon the fuel-supply 
of natural gas, now obtained from the Oklahoma-Kansas field. 

The company owns a lead smelter with a yearly capacity of 10,000 tons of 
ore at Granby, Mo. 

American Zinc Co. of Tennessee 

O. C. Burrell, mgr., Mascot, Term. 

Inc. Feb. 24, 1911, in Maine. Cap. $10,000; $1 par, all owned and issued 
by A. Z. L. & S. Co. 

Principal mining operations of the Tennessee Co. are at Mascot, Knox 
county, where the company owns 2,400 acres, and in Jefferson county, adjoining 
Knox on the east, where company owns 400 acres of land. 

Orebodies of the Mascot mines occur in the Knox dolomite, dip 15 to 30 
south and strike north of east, in lenses of varying sizes and in well-defined 
brecciated areas which lie in certain recognized zones or bedding planes. The 
ore is a light colored sphalerite. The zinc formation may be followed for many 
miles from Knoxville, in an easterly direction. In 1910 the company obtained 
an option on the Holston property, started drilling and proved up a large ton- 
nage of pay ore. A 3-compartment shaft, mine No. 1, was sunk in 1911 and the 
orebody developed in 1912. The main orebody is developed on the 280' level, 
and. as' exposed, is 1,300' long, 700' to 880' wide, and 30' to 40' thick. Limits of 
the orebody have not been reached. In 1913, a 4-compartment shaft, mine No. 2, 
was sunk 2,000' east of No. 1, and a second orebody developed with length of 
1.500', thickness of 40' to 125'. width of 300' and limits not yet reached. Average 
grade of ore as shown by drill records is 5% to 5%% zinc. Greatest depth of 
workings, 800', is at mine No. 2. A tramway connects No. 2 mine with No. 1 
mill. Bevelopment has shown the ore to be continuous between No. 1 and No. 2 
orebodies. Further drilling 3,000' east of eastern limits of mine No. 2 has indi- 
cated a third orebody ; this will not be developed until some future time. 

Mining methods at the Mascot mines are described by H. A. Coy and H. B. 
Henegar in the Sept.. 1917, Bulletin of American Institute of Mining Engineers. 
Costs totaled 70c per ton. 

From the east to west the ore development as now shown is 7,900' in 
length. There has been blocked out 4,000,000 to 5,000,000 tons of ore, which will 
average 4% zinc. 

In May, 1913, mill No. 1, with 1,000 tons daily capacity, was completed. 
Additions to this mill were finished in July, 1915, bringing its daily capacity up 
to 2,200 tons. It is now treating over 2,400 tons daily. On the Roseberry property 
adjoining the Holston on the west, Mascot No. 3 mill has been completed having 
a daily capacity of 700 tons. Mill equipment at Mascot consists of crushers, 
rolls, jigs and tables, followed by flotation treatment of slime and fine sand. 
Mascot No. 1 mill was enlarged by addition of 55 tables, jigs, etc. 

Power is obtained from the Tennessee Power Co. 

Mascot concentrates average about 60% zinc and are of high quality, in fact, 



82 UNITED STATES 

the lowest lead and iron of any produced in quantity in the U. S.. the spelter 
produced therefrom commands a substantial premium per pound over Prime 
Western quotations. 

The company has developed tin- town of Mascot, owning 350 houses, a 
company store, and hotel. 

Mossy Creek mine at Jefferson City was opened during 1916, and ore is 
being shipped to Mascot No. 1 mill for treatment. 

A modern plant was built near No. 1 mill during 1916 to prepare agri- 
cultural limestone, asphalt-filler and fertilixer. from tailings from the Moscot 
concentrating mills. 

Wisconsin Zinc Co. 

A. M. Plumb, mgr., Platteville, Wis. 

Inc. June 27, 1908. in Maine. Cap., $1,000,000; $1 par, issued 025.000 
shares, owned by A. Z. L. & S. Co., 649,774 shares. 

Property: in S. W. part of the State. The ore deposits exist in the 
forms of flats and pitches, the flats being horizontal deposits along the bedding 
planes of the rocks, while the pitches are dipping crevices. The chief deposits 
lie in the lower part of the Galena limestone at a depth of 100' to 200' and vary 
in length from 1,000' to 5,000'. in width from 30' to 300', and in height from 12' 
to 60'. The ores consist of the sulphides of /.inc. lead and iron, the latter in the 
form of marcasite. 

The principal operations in the Wisconsin field are as follows : 

Champion property, 434 acres, on which there has been developed an orebody 
1,500' long, 800' wide, and 40' high. A mill of 500 tons daily capacity is in 
operation. 

Winskell mine, operated on leased land, 10% of gross output going to the 
land owners. A mill of 450 tons daily capacity is in operation. Total produc- 
tion to end of 1914 was 31,089 tons zinc concentrates, averaging 36.51% zinc, 
and 1,073 tons lead concentrates, averaging 76.28% lead. 

The life of the Champion property, with its surrounding leases, as estimated 
at present, is from 5 to 10 years. 

Longhorn property, operated on leased land at 10% royalty, has ore reserves 
of 175,000 tons high grade ore. The 350-ton mill is in operation. 

The Thompson mine, operated on leased land at 10% royalty, has ore reserves 
of 200,000 tons high grade ore; equipped with 350-ton mill. 

Company owns a number of other leases in the district on which valuable 
ore reserves have been proved by drilling. The Copeland property will be 
developed by shaft and equipped with mill in the near future. 

The life of the Champion property, with its surrounding leases, as estimated 
;it present, is from 5 to 10 years. 

The policy of the company is to maintain a drilling campaign for new ore- 
bodies, with the purpose of keeping 5 to TO years' production in sight. 

The low grade of concentrates in the Wisconsin district necessitates treat- 
ment by means of part roast and magnetic separation. The company has a plant 
for this purpose, equipped with a 7-hearth roaster of the Skinner type near the 
Champion property. This plant has 200 tons daily capacity, producing a finished 
concentrate assaying 58 to 60% zinc. 

American Zinc Co. of Illinois. 

Inc. Aug. 15, 1911. in Maine. Cap. $10,000; $1 par. all issued and owned 
by the Am. Z. L. &. Sm. Co. 

Property: at Hillsboro. 111., consists of 600 acres, on which has been 
built a modern smelter plant of 4,800 retorts furnace capacity, capable of dis- 
tilling 48.000 tons of concentrates per year: 3 Hegeler muffle-kilns, pottery. 
machine-shop, warehouse, ore storage bins and sulphuric acid plant producing 
45,000 tons of 60 acid annually; also a zinc-oxide plant of 24 furnaces, enlarged 
during 1918. 

East St. Louis property consists of 143 acres, on which is a modern smelter 
plant of 5,600 retorts capacity, capable of treating 54,000 tons of concentrates 




AMERICAN ZINC OF ILLINOIS GRANBY MINING & SMELT. 83 

annually; Hegeler and De Spirlet roasting kiln, pottery, sulphuric acid plant, 
oxide plant of 8 furnaces, with auxiliary buildings. Sulphuric acid plant produced 
50.000 tons 60 sulphuric acid annually,. but was enlarged in 1918. 

American Zinc Ore Separating Co. 

Inc. Oct. 13. 1908. in Maine. Cap. $25,000; $5 par; all issued and owned 
by A. Z. L. & S. Co. This company owns certain patents for the separating of 
zinc ores by the Huff electrostatic methods. Its business is to lease machines 
constructed under these patents on a royalty basis. 

American Ballast Co. 

Mascot. Tenn. Inc. Nov. 9, 1911. Cap. $2.000; $1 par; 5 shares issued 
and owned by A. Z. & L. S. Co. The company disposes of mill tailings of the 
Mascot mill of the American Zinc Co. of Tenn. Table and flotation tailings are 
sold for fertilizing purposes ; other tailings are sold for railroad ballast, road 
construction, etc. 

Granby Mining & Smelting Co. of Missouri 

Granby, Newton Co., Mo. Inc. in 1864. In June, 1916, net quick as- 
sets exceeded $2,750,000, of which nearly $1,000,000 was in cash; current liabilities, 
less than $300,000. Reported in June that company had declared a dividend of 
$2,000,000 in the form of 10-year. 5% bonds, secured by mortgage of its real 
estate, and the company subject to this mortgage, had been taken over by the 
Granby Co. of Maine, to be then taken over by the American Zinc, Lead & Smelt- 
ing Co. Purchase price, $8,000,000. The $2,000,000 bond issue has been taken as 
part payment : and it is proposed to furnish $2,000,000 additional by an issue of 
40,000 shares of common stock of the A. Z. L. & S. Co., to be offered stockholders 
at $50, stock to be underwritten without commission ; remaining $4,000,000 to be 
paid for out of earnings. Value and earning capacities of properties based on a 
5-ct. spelter market. 

Property: owns in fee simple about 30,000 acres of land in the zinc 
district of southwestern Missouri. For nearly 50 years its revenue has come 
from royalties paid by lessees operating on these lands. It has developed a large 
tonnage of rich ore near Granby. Company has been a dividend payer almost 
from its inception, and has, out of earnings, acquired 10,000 acres of coal land 
in Illinois; built a new coal zinc smelter and sulphuric acid plant in East St. 
Louis ; bought and improved a gas zinc smelter at Neodesha, Kansas, and acquired 
a small lead smelter at Granby. All the sulphuric acid output has been sold up 
to and through 1920. 

The ore, sulphides of lead and zinc, occurs in bands between the barren zones 
of flint that comprise the Grand Falls chert. It is from this formation that the 
term 'sheet-ground mines' is derived, and in it the ore is generally uniform in 
character and covers large areas. In the Davey mines, 124 acres have been 
mined out in one continuous chamber. Ore faces are from 14 to 20' in height. 

Development is by means of 6 vertical 2-compartment shafts, all in the ore 
formation. Two shafts are used for mining purposes, and 4 for ventilation. 
The ore level is at 250' depth. The ore is very low grade, zinc concentrates 
recovered representing 1.79% and the lead concentrates 0.67% of ore treated. 
Ore output has been approximately 50,000 tons ore per acre, from 15 to 20% ore 
being left as pillars. Reserves are about 1,500,000 tons. Timbering is not neces- 
sary. The blanket formation permits of development, in wide areas, average 
yearly advance on all faces in the mine is 125'. 

There are two mills on the property, No. 3 mill of 1,200 tons, and No. 4 of 
1.000 tons daily capacity. 

The Yogey mine is similar to the Davey. Operations have been irregular, 
depending on price of zinc and lead concentrates. Zinc concentrates recovered 
represent 1.76% and lead concentrates 0.20% of rock hoisted. There is a mill 
on the property, with daily capacity of 1,000 tons. 

The Klondike, Mascot, and Golden Rule mines are in sheet-ground forma- 
tion. Recovery in zinc concentrates represents from 2 to 4% of rock hoisted. 
The Klondike is developed by 3 shafts and equipped with a 1,000-ton mill: the 



84 UNITED STATES 

Mascot, by 3 shafts, and a 350-ton mill; the Golden Rule by 1 shaft and a 300-ton 
mill; the B. & H. mine, near Joplin, by 1 shaft and a 250-ton mill. All mills are 
operated by electric power, with the exception of the B. & H., which has a 
steam plant. 

There are also many mines being operated under lease on a royalty basis 
on the company's lands in the Granby district. An extensive drilling campaign 
is being carried on to determine values and possibilities on these holdings. 

Operations of the smelting properties purchased from Granby M. & S. met 
expectations during 1919, but production and ore developments were not satis- 
factory. 
COPPER EXPORT ASSOCIATION U. S. A. 

Office: 60 Broadway, New York City. 

Officers: Simon Guggenheim, chairman of the board; John D. Ryan, 
pres.; Walter Douglas, 1st v. p.; R. L. Agassiz, 2nd v. p.; C. W. Welch, 
sec-treas. 

Directors: Murry Guggenheim, Simon Guggenheim and F. H. 
Browncll for A. S. & R. Co.; John D. Ryan, Cornelius F. Kelley and Benj. 
B. Thayer for Anaconda Copper Mng. Co. and Inspiration Cons. Copper 
Co.; Chas. Hayden, Chas. M. MacNeill and D. C. Jackling for Utah Copper 
Co., Nevada Cons. Copper Co., Ray Cons. Copper Co. and Chino Copper 
Co.; Walter Douglas and Jas. McLean for Phelps Dodge Corporation 
R. L. Agassiz and Jas. MacNaughton for Calumet and Hecla Mng. Co. ; 
Stephen Birch, for Kennecott Copper Corporation; Wm. A. Clark for 
United Verde Copper Co.; Archibald Douglas for United Verde Extension 
Copper Co.; Gordon R. Campbell for Calumet & Arizona Mng. Co. 

Selling Committee: Jos. Clenclenin, A. S. & R. ; T. Wolf son, U. Metals 
Selling Co.; C. A. Austin. Phelps Dodge Corpn.; F. S. Gourley, Calumet 
& Hecla Mng. Co., H. M. Brush, secretary; Edward Mosehauer, representa- 
tive in Germany. 

Inc. December, 1918, in Delaware. Cap. 2,500 shares. 7 per cent Pfd.. 
par $100, also 500 shares common, no par value. Annual meeting May 13th. 

The object of this corporation is to handle export sales of copper on 
a basis "whereby orders for export copper will be allocated to members 
according to production and at the same price f. p. b. seaboard. All pro- 
ducers of copper, large or small, are invited to join on the same terms. 
It is stated over 80% of the U. S. production, amounting to 1,800,000,000 Ib. 
copper during 1918, is represented by membership in this corporation. 

The members own the indicated percentage in the plants named. 
ANACONDA COPPER MINING CO. 
Smelters : 

100% Tooele smelter, International. Utah (Intern. S. & R. Co.) 

100% Miami, Arizona (Intern. S. & R. Co.) 

100% Washoe smelter, Anaconda. Mont. 

100% Anaconda smelter, Great Falls, Mont. .. 
Refineries: 

100% Great Falls, Mont. 

100% Raritan Copper Works, Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Metal Selling Agencies. 

100% United Metals Selling Co. 
Copper Mining Companies: 

100% large holdings at Butte, Mont. 

41-3% Inspiration Copper Co. (50,900 shares). 

100% Ancles Copper Mng. Co., Chile. 
80% Santiago Mining Co., Chile. 
AMERICAN SMELTING & REFINING CO. 
Smelters: 

100% American Smelters Securities Co. 

100% Hayden, Ariz. 

100% Perth Amboy, Maurier, N. J. 
,100%> Cons. Kansas City S. & R. Co., El Paso. Tex. 

100% Garfield Sm. Co.. Garf.eld, Utah. 






COPPER EXPORT ASSOCIATION 85 

100% Sasco Plant, Silverbell, Ariz. 

100% Tacoma Smelting Co., Tacoma, Wash. 

100% Velardena M. & S. Co., Velardena, Dgo, Mexico. 

100% National Metallurgical Co., Matehuala, Mexico. 

100% Aguascalientes, Mexico. 

100% Caldera, Chile. 

95% Soc. de Minas & Fundiciones de Carrizal, Chile. 
Refineries: 
Omaha, Neb. 
Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Selby, Calif. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Tacoma, Wash. 
Copper Mining: 

100% Velardena M. & S. Co.. Velardena. Dgo. Mexico. 
100% Caldera, Chile. 

Chile Copper Co., Chile. 

Kennecott Copper Co., Alaska (30% given A. S. & R. stock- 
holders). 
77% Neg. Minera de Jesis Maria, Mexico. 

95% Soc. de Mines y Fundiciones, Carrizal, Chile. 
INSPIRATION CONSOLIDATED COPPER CO. 

100% Mines at Miami, Arizona. 
GREENE CAXANEA COPPER CO. 
Smelter : 

100% Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. 
Copper Mining: 

100% Greene Cananea (30,748 acres) Cananea, Mexico. 
RAY CONSOLIDATED COPPER CO. 

No interest in other companies. Ore purchased and smelted by A. S. 
& R. Co., at Hayden smelter. 
CHINO COPPER CO. 

No interest in other companies. 
NEVADA CONSOLIDATED COPPER CO. 
Smelter: 

100% Steptoe smelter, McGill, Nevada. 
UTAH COPPER CO. 
Copper Mining: 
100% Utah Copper. 

50% Nevada Con. Copper Co. 
PHELPS DODGE CORPORATION. 
Smelters : 

100% Copper Queen smelter, Douglas, Arizona, smelter at Morenci, 

Arizona. 
Selling Agents: 

for the various Phelps Dodge companies and smelters. 
Copper Mining. 

Large holdings at Bisbee. Morenci, Tombstone, Copper Basin, Arizona; 
Burro Mountain, N. M.; Moctezuma Copper Co., Mexico. 
Directors personally control and own large holdings in Old Dominion 
Co. 

CALUMET & HECLA MINING CO. 
Smelters : 

Torch Lake, Centennial Copper Co. 
Refinery: 

Torch Lake, Centennial Copper Co. 
Copper Mining: 

1(X)% Tamarack Mining Co. 
100% Laurium Mining Co. 
50% Ahmeek Mining Co. 
41% Allouez Mining Co. 



86 



UNITED STATES 



36% Centennial Copper Mng. Co. 
48% Cliff Mining Co. 
50% Gratiot Mining Co. 
22% Isle Royale Copper Co. 
50% La Salle Copper Co. 
35% Osceola Cons. Mining Co. 
42% White Pine Copper Co. (common). 
55% White Pine Copper Co. (preferred). 
KENNECOTT COH'ER CORPORATION 
Copper Mining: 

99% Braden Copper Co., Chile. 
38% Utah Copper Co. 

Alaska Dev. & Mng. Co. 

A. LEW1SOHN & SOX: GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CO. 
Copper Mining: 
25% Miami Copper Co. 

Controls: New Cornelia Copper Co., Ariz. ; San Cayetano Mines, 
Ltd., ivlex.; Xaumkeag Copper Co., Mich.: New Planet Copper 
Co., Ariz.; Bagdad Copper Co., Ariz.; Tennessee Copper Co. and 
others. 

UNITED VERDE COPPER CO. 
Smelter: 

Clarkclale. Ariz. 
Refinery: 

Clarkdale. Ariz, (converter plant). 
Copper Mining: 

Hull Copper Co. 
UNITED VERDE EXTENSION MINING CO. 

(Closely connected through stockholders with Phelps Dodge Corp'n.) 
Smelter. 

Verde, Ariz. 
Refinery : 

Verde. Arizona (converter plant). 
Copper Mining: 

Interest in other companies $1.614,837 (December, 1918). 
U. S. SMELTING, REFINING & MINING CO. 
Smelter: 

1007; U. S. Smelting Co., owning copper smelters at Midvale, Utah; 

Kennett, Calif.; Chrome, N. J. 
Refinery : 

At Chrome, N. J. 
Copper Mining: 

Minority interest in several small producers. 
CALUMET & ARIZONA MINING CO. 
Smelter: 

100% at Douglas, Ariz. 
Copper Mining: 

Mines at Bisbee, Ariz. 
76 l /2% New Cornelia Copper Co. 

70% Gadsden Copper Co., Jerome. Arizona (under option). 
UNITED METALS SELLING CO. 
Selling Agents: 

Anaconda Copper Mining Co. and allied interests. 
TENNESSEE COPPER CO. 
Smelter. 

Ducktown. Tenn. Treats own and custom ore. 
Sales Agents: 

Represented by A. S. & R. Co. 
ARIZONA COPPER CO., LTD. 

Owns and operates its own mines and smelter in Clifton-Morenci dis- 
trict, Arizona. 




GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CO. GOLD FIELDS AM. 87 

CONSOLIDATED COPPERMINES CO. 

Owns and operates mines and smelter under own name near Ely, 

Nevada. 
Copper Mining: 

Controls 79% Butte & Ely Copper Co. 
INTERNATIONAL SMELTING CO. 

Owned by Anaconda Copper Mug. Co., which see. 
NEW CORNELIA COPPER CO. 

Subsidiary of Calumet & Arizona Mng. Co. 
Refinery : 

Electrolytic refinery. Ajo, Ariz. 
NORTH BUTTE MINING CO. 

Owns and operates own mines at Butte, Mont. 
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CO. 

Office. 61 Broadway, New York. 

Officers: Aclolph Lewisohn, pres. ; J. Parke Channing, v. p. -cons. engr. ; 
Theo. L. Herrmann, sec.; Sam A. Lewisohn, treas. ; preceding officers, 
Samuel Untermeyer, Herman Sielcken, D. M. Hyman, W. T. Rosen, A. S. 
Rossin, J. H. Susmann, E. H. Westlake, Arthur Lehman, B. Hochschild, 
F. W. Estabrook and S. S. Rosenstamm, directors. 

Inc. 1906, in Delaware. Cap. 12,000,000, increased to $2.500,000, in- 
creased 1909 to $2.600,000, and again increased, 1913, to $3,000,000; $25 par, 
120.000 issued. Equitable Trust Co. of New York, registrar. Dividends 
paid 1908, l l / 2 %, 90% in 1909, 15% in 1910; \y 2 % in 1913; 6% in 1915; 23% 
in 1916; 28% in 1917, and 11% in 1918. 

Company is a securities holding corporation, which owns nearly one 
share of Miami stock for each issued share of its own, and also owns a 
large block of dividend paying Kerr Lake stock, and of New Cornelia 
Copper. It also controls, through stock ownership the Colorado Gold 
Dredging Co., San Cayetano Mines, Ltd., and Naumkeag Copper Co. The 
increase of capitalization, 1913, was to finance the merger of the Silver 
Mines Exploration Co., the corporation which developed and promoted 
the Kerr Lake and Wettlaufer-Lorrain companies of Cobalt, Ont. Com- 
pany has extensive stock interests in New Planet Copper Co., Bagdad Cop- 
per Co., with other mining interests in the United States, Canada, and 
Mexico. 

In 1918, the San Cayetano Mines in Mexico, required $10,000 for 
payment of taxes and protection while General Development Co. was 
a creditor to the amount of $67,000, but as subscriptions to the fund of 
$10,000 were so small the property became subject to sale by the Mexican 
authorities. 

The General Development Co. is a parent corporation examining, 
developing and financing mining properties which, when they have reached 
the self-supporting producing stage, are turned over to operating com- 
panies. It is a powerful factor in the copper industry, and with the wide 
experience and astute guidance of Adolph Lewisohn, combined with the 
technical skill and great ability of J. Parke Channing, its consulting engi- 
neer, promises to become increasingly important. 
GOLD FIELDS AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT CO., LTD. 

Offices: 233 Broadway, New York, and 8 Old Jewry. London, vE/C.," 
England. 

Officers: S. Christopherson. chairman; E. S. Birkenruth. I^brd Bra- 
bo.urne. Lord Harris, J. C. Prinsep, and H. L. Sapte, directors. Advisory 
committee in America: J. McDougall, Alfred de Ropp, and" H. H Webb 
Inc. March 10. 1911. in England. Cap. 2.500,000; 1 par: 
2.000,000 issued, 1.000.000 being fully paid and 1,000.000 with 10s. called. 
Reports arc only issued to shareholders. 
Dividends: 5% paid in June. 1918. 

Company acquired from Consolidated Gold Fields of South Africa. 
Ltd. (which see) latter's interests in America, including shares in Natomas 
Consolidated, Oroville Dredging, Sierra Pacific Electric, Mississippi River 



88 UNITED STATES 

Power Co., Yuba Consolidated Gold Fields. Granville Mining, Vera Cruz 
Mexican Oil, Trans-continental Consolidated Oil, International Petroleum 
Co., Foreign Mines Development, La Grange Mining, American Trona 
Corp., and others. The mining companies named herein will be found 
described under their respective titles, excepting the last named, which is 
essentially a chemical producer, extracting potash, borax, and other salts 
from the brine of Searles Lake, California. A large sum of money has 
been spent there in erection of extensive equipment. Reserves are enor- 
mous; at least 4,000.000 tons of potash remains. The output in 1918 was 
24,00 tons of salts. 
GUGGENHEIM EXPLORATION CO. 

Dissolution completed in 1916. See previous volumes for past opera- 
tions, also American Smelting & Refining Co., Braden Copper Co., Chile 
Copper Corporation, and Kennecott Copper Corporation. 
INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL CORPORATION 

Office: 61 Broadway, New York City. 

Officers: S. B. Fleming, pres.; Albert French, v. p.; J. J. Watson, 
Jr., v. p.-treas.; F. F. Ward, v. p.-asst. sec.; J. R. Floyd, sec.-asst. treas.; 
with F. P.Garvan, E. B. Sweezy, T. W. Lament, W. Schmidtmann, D. E. 
Pomeroy, F. M. Weld, and A. H. Wiggin, directors. 

Inc. June 14, 1909, in New York. Cap. authorized 7/r cumulative pre- 
ferred $18,000,000 and $18,000,000 common. Issued $13,055,500 pfd.. $7,260.600 
com., and $10,275,600 in bonds. 

Results have been as follows, years ending June 30: 

Gross Operating Net Surplus Current Current 

Year profit profit profit for year assets liabilities 

1918 $4,504.583 $2,595,723 $1,944,933 $1,168,270 $10.336,947 $4,961.641 

1917 2,851',408 1,894,003 636,812 7,07:5,523 3,845,338 

1916 2,793,898 2,051,303 1,034,054 1,279,832 5,201,549 1,863,274 

Dividends: Pfd. shares received 7% per annum until January, 1913. 
but none since, and none on common shares. 

Company has 15 large acidulating and fertilizer plants, mostly in the 
South, a large number of distributing plants, and holds 50% interest in 
some German potash mines. 

Property: 42,226 acres of phosphate lands in Florida; also extensive 
areas in Tennessee. In 17,000 acres explored, reserves are estimated at 
41,500,000 tons. In all properties there is supposed to be nearly 100,000,000 
tons. To make this rock soluble, sulphuric acid, bought from the Ten- 
nessee Copper Co., and Ducktown Copper, Sulphur & Iron Co., is mixed 
with it. A contract with the former, until December 31, 1920, calls for 
175,000 tons of acid a year at $4.81 per ton, also any excess at that price. 
During 1918, an arrangement called for 225,000 tons at $4.81, all above that 
to be paid up to $10 per ton. 

The company is included herein, because it is carrying on extensive 
mining operations, and has important relations with large mining companies. 
INTERNATIONAL METALS SELLING CO. 

Subsidiary of the U. S. Smelting, Refining & Mining Co. and was managed 
by Vogelsteiri & Co., 42 Broadway, New York, which was absorbed in Dec.. 
1919, by the American Metal Co., Ltd. 
INTERNATIONAL SMELTING CO. 

Office: 42 Broadway, New York. 

Officers: Cornelius F. Kelley, pres.; Wm. D. Thornton. 1st v. p.; L. D. 
Ricketts, 2nd v. p.; Albert H. Melin, treas.; with C. E. Mills, Benj. : 
Thayer, and John D. Ryan, directors. David B. Hennessy, sec. J. B. 
Whitehill, ore purchasing agent. 

Inc. in Montana. Cap. $15,000,000. Stock entirely owned by Anaconda 
Copper Mining Co. Company is a reorganization of the International Sin. 
& Ref. Co. 

Company operates smelters at Tooele, Utah, and Miami, Ariz., the 



89 

Raritan Copper Works at Perth Amboy, N. J., ^and the smelter of the 
International Lead Refining Co., at East Chicago, Ind. 

Miami Smelter 

The Miami smelting plant, Miami, Ariz., C. E. Mills, gen. mgr. ; L. 
R. Wallace, supt., built primarily to smelt the concentrates produced by the 
mills of the Inspiration Cons. Copper Co. and the Miami Copper Co., is 
equipped to handle custom ores. The plant is situated about a mile E. of 
Miami and 6 miles W. of Globe, on the Inspiration Co.'s industrial railway 
connecting with the Arizona Eastern R. R. at Miami. 

The smelter is essentially a reverberatory plant, which on account 
of the high copper content of the concentrates treated has been built 
to minimize losses in the handling of material from one department to 
another, and the prevention of dust losses, as far as possible. 

Material from both Miami and Inspiration mills is largely flotation 
concentrate hauled to the smelting plant in 60-ton steel cars especially 
designed to handle sticky, fine material of this nature. 

Bins: concentrates are first bedded in three 3,000-ton V-bottom bins 
with the necessary limestone, pyrite, first-class ore and secondaries to give 
a proper smelting mixture. First-class ores go to receiving bins with capacity 
of 1,350 tons. 

Crushing and Sampling Plant: 22'x40', 5-stories high, contains: 
18"x30" Blake crusher; 1 set 54"xl6" rolls; 3 sets 42"xl6" rolls; 16" Snyder 
sampler; three 27" Snyder samplers; two 24"x8" rolls. 

Steel storage bins of 1,500 tons capacity are provided for the storage 
of crushed ore and fluxing material. 

Roaster and Dryer Plant: 67'x97' and 93' high, contains 5 Wedge 
roasting furnaces, 22'6" in diam., each having 5 regular hearths and a 
dryer hearth. Oil burners operating in combustion chambers supply the 
heat for drying. No roasting is permitted, as the sulphur content of the 
concentrates is so low that it is necessary to add pyrite to keep matte down 
to a proper grade. 

Each furnace is fed from 190-ton storage bin directly over it. The 
gases pass directly to a header flue, and then into Cottrell treaters lo- 
cated above the charge floor. The Cottrell treaters in this plant prac- 
tically prevent the loss of any flue dust. 

Reverberatory Plant: the reverberatory building, 134'xl76', contains 
3 reverberatory furnaces with hearth areas of 2l'xl20'. The furnaces are 
oil fired and discharge their gases through Stirling boilers, according to 
the usual practice. There are seven 712-h. p. waste heat Stirling boilers. 

Converter Plant: is 58'x380'x49' to the top of crane rail. Two 40- 
ton magnet switch controlled electric traveling cranes are provided. 

The plant contains 5 converter stands of 12' electrically operated 
Great Falls type converters; 2 straight line casting machines with 5'6"xl6'6" 
tilting furnaces, 1 skullbreaker, etc. Silica bins filled by belt conveyors 
discharge into weighing hoppers, which measure out a pre-determined 
charge, delivering it directly into the mouth of the converter through 
pivoted spout. 

The gases from the converters are passed through Cottrell treaters, 
before being discharged into the chimney, which give a high recovery 
of the precious metal values contained in the gases. 

Power Plant: at the smelting works is operated by the Inspiration 
Co., the smelting plant selling its steam to, and purchasing its power 
from the Inspiration company. The power plant buildings are of steel 
and reinforced concrete construction throughout. The main units con- 
sist of three 6,000-k. w. turbo-generators and 3 cross-compound, 15,000 
cu. ft. blowing engines, switchboard, etc. Modern auxiliary apparatus is 
provided for condensing, automatically measuring steam and feed water, 
recording temperatures, pressures, etc. The boiler houses contains six 
712-h. p. oil fired Stirling boilers equipped with superheater and econo- 
mizer. 



90 



UNITED STATES 



The plant operates at high efficiency. 

Shops, Offices, Etc.: a steel shop building, equipped with travelin^. 
.crane, is divided into four departments, viz., machine, blacksmith, boiler, 
electrical and carpenter shops, all well equipped with modern tools. 

The warehouse building and general office and laboratory buildings 
are of reinforced concrete throughout and there are 8 -reinforced con- 
crete cottages at the smelting plant for its staff. Water for the plant is 
obtained from the Inspiration Co.'s water main. 

On account of the high copper contents of the concentrates which 
the plant receives, it has a production capacity of 16.000,000 Ibs. of copper 
per month, with spare reverberatory furnace and converter stand. 

Production: 

Concentrate Ore Copper Gold 

Year tons tons Ib. oz. 

1918 332,644 45,290 173,043.136 4,256 

1917 242,936 26,839 138.762,41 1 2,954 

1916 295.075 37,891 181. -5 18,396 2,882 




Silver 

oz. 
252,437 
201.860 
257.543 




Tooele Smelter 

Tooele Smelter: Win. Wraith, gen. mgr., Kearns Blk., Salt Lake City, 
Utah. The smelter is 6 1 /? miles from Tooele Junction on the main lino 
of the Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad, where connection is made with 
the Tooele Valley railroad, and plants and yards cover one-half square 
mile. 

Crushing and sampling 5-story building. 2 complete sections using 
the Brunton system of sampling, contains 8 Blake type crushers. 9 to 
12"xl5" to 24" in size and 8 rolls, 12 to 15" wide and 26". 42", and 48" diameter. 
Each sampling section contains 4 Brunton sample cutters. In the copper 
plant ore is crushed to %", conveyed from sample mill to roaster storage 
bins (5,000 tons capacity) by belt conveyor, thence to roaster feed hoppers 
by belt conveyor. 

Copper Department: The McDougall roaster building contains 2 sec- 
tions, each 64x162' holding 32 furnaces. These furnaces are 16' in diam- 
eter, 18' high and have 6 hearths. Roaster gases pass through a 120x140' 
hopper bottomed brick dust chamber 30' high above hoppers, containing 
two 4' banks of wires; thence through brick flue 255' long to stack. The 
brick stack is 350' high and 25' inside diameter at the top. The reverbera- 
tory plant receives the calcine by electric tram system. It contains 5 coal- 
fired furnaces, Anaconda type, 1 with 19'x90' hearth, 4 with 19'xl02' hearths. 
Each furnace is equipped with 750-h. p. waste-heat Stirling boiler. Gases go 
through a brick flue 1,360' long to stack. 

The converter plant has 5 electric-driven stands for 96x150" shells and 
a 60-ton crane. Converter shells are lined with magnesite brick. Copper 
is cast in steel moulds by 30-ton crane. Slag is cast in beds and broken 
up and sent to the lead blast furnaces. Gases from plant go through a 
steel flue to a 50x126' brick bag house containing 960 31xl'6" woolen bags. 
From the bag house the gas is discharged through a 150' stack 15' in 
diameter at the top. 

The power house contains 2 Corliss engines direct-connected to 250- 
k. w. 500-v.d.c. generators; 2 vertical triple-expansion engines direct-con- 
nected to 750-kva. 2,200-v. generators : 2 converter blowing engines, 15 Ibs. 
air; 1 steam-driven 90 Ib. air compressor; 1 electric-driven 90 Ib. air com- 
pressor; 2 No. 10 Roots blowers, direct-connected to tandem compound 
Corliss engines; one 750-k. w. Westinghouse-Parsons turbo-generator: and 
2 Leblanc condensers and necessary auxiliaries. Condensing water is 
cooled in natural draft cooling tower. In addition to the waste-heat boilers. 
there are 3 hand-fired 350-h. p. Stirling boilers. 

Lead Department: The lead plant contains blast furnaces, sinter plant 
and charge bins. There are 26 double steel bins with a capacity of 10,000 
tons of ore and concentrate, receiving material from the crushing plant 
by belt conveyor. Fine concentrates and ores already sampled can be 



RARITAN COPPER WORKS 91 

dumped direct. Charges for blast furnaces and sinter machines are weighed 
in scale hoppers and dropped into charge cars, going direct to furnaces, 
but sinter charges go by car to a hopper-feeding belt conveyor delivering to 
sintering machines. 

The sinter plant contains 10 Dwight-Lloyd machines, 42x264", rated 
capacity 100 tons per day per machine. Sinter from machines goes to 
blast-furnace charge bins by standard railway cars. 

The blast-furnace plant is a steel and concrete building with two 
45x180" and two 60x180" furnaces whose daily capacity averages 250 tons 
of charge. Gases pass to brick bag house containing 1,440 bags, lead to 
dressing plant and the lead-copper matte to the converter plant. A slag 
settling furnace is being erected. The dressing plant has four 30-ton 
kettles and uses a Howard press. 

Tooele Valley railway has 7 miles of main line; 1 locomotive, 6-wheel 
switching type, 57 tons weight; 1 locomotive Mogul type. 60^ tons weight; 

2 locomotives, Consolidation type, 96 tons ; 30 steel hopper-bottom ore cars ; 

3 flat cars and 4 passenger coaches. 

This plant has a fully-equipped assay office and laboratory, shops, 
weather observation department, emergency hospital, offices, etc. 

Industrial equipment consists of four 18-ton and four 12-ton electric 
locomotives, with necessary slag trucks, matte trucks, calcine and coal 
cars. All buildings are of steel and concrete construction. 

The smelting practice of copper ores largely follows Anaconda 
methods. The sulphide fines are roasted with a certain amount of silicious 
ore added upon the fifth hearth of the roasters to heat the ore and keep the 
temperature at the right point. The ore is roasted down to 0.7% sulphur 
corresponding to a matte fall of 15 to 18 tons per day. The reverberatory 
slag, carrying 40 to 42% silica, is tapped at the back of the furnace and 
the matte, carrying 20 to 30% copper, conveyed in ladles to the converters. 
The converters, when operated only on day shift, are kept hot over night 
by filling them with cinders from the reverberatory furnaces. Silica is 
applied to the converter in lump ore, 2 boats to each 8-ton charge. The 
bag-house dust from the smelter fumes is removed by reversing the fan 
and direction of current, drawing the dust into the chamber beneath. 

The Utah Metal Mining Co.'s 11,000' tunnel, completed in 1913, gives 
direct connection with the Bingham mines. 

Production: 

Copper ore Lead ore Copper Lead Gold Silver 

Year tons tons Ib. Ib. oz. oz. 

1918 262,723 297,847 21,821,657 62.034,920 36.317 5,827.135 

1917 320,510 334,274 17,385,090 84,726.315 31,495 4,439,290 

1916 442,756 421,197 20,041,089 117.976,091 40,009 5,549,777 

Raritan Copper Works 

E. C. Clark, supt., Perth Amboy, N. J. The works on New York harbor, 
completed 1899, and since enlarged repeatedly, is one of the largest and most 
modern electrolytic copper refineries in the world. 

The smelting department consists of one 200-ton, one 150-ton and one 
100-ton furnaces for casting anodes, and two 225-ton, one 150-ton and two 
100-ton furnaces for casting wire bars, ingots and cakes. 

The electrolytic refinery includes 2 tank houses with their respective 
power houses; power consumption being about 7,000 k. w. The department 
lias special shears for trimming cathode sheets and Morrow loop machines 
for attaching copper lugs to the cathode starting-sheets. 

The tank house No. 1 has 1,800 tanks and a capacity of 22.000.000 Ib. 
per month. The general arrangement and method of operation is very 
similar to that in No. 2 tank room. This room is 210x582'. 

No. 1 power house, which furnishes power for No. 1 tank room, con- 
tains four 1,000-k. w. Nordberg triple-expansion Corliss engines and Allis- 
( halmers barometric condensers. The engines are direct-connected to 



92 



UNITED STATES 




Copper 


Gold 


Silver 


Ib. 


oz. 


oz. 


394,968.011 


132,254 


21,440,611 


411,933,742. 


137,465 


19,938,375 


462,666.262 


167.024 


18,606,866 




1,000-k. w. electric generators, 2 being furnished by the General Electric 
Co. and 2 by the Crocker-Wheeler Co. 

No. 2 tank house has 3 bays running lengthwise, with two 10-ton 3- 
motor Whiting cranes in each bay, equipped with special devices for hand- 
ling an entire tankful of anodes or cathodes at 1 load. There are 3 elec- 
tric circuits running lengthwise, 1 in each bay, each circuit of 396 tanks 
being handled from the power house by an electric generator. Current 
is 7,500 amperes, giving a current density of 20 amperes per sq. ft. The 
main conductor has a cross-sectional area of 12%". There are 1,188 de- 
positing tanks arranged in 108 nests of 11 cells each, with electrode ar- 
rangement on the Walker system. 

Production : 

Bullion Silver 
Year treated tons treated oz. 

1918 222,628 7,016.213 

1917 209,557 5,806,924 

1916 233,956 4,531,771 

International Lead Refining Co. 

Wm. Wraith, gen. mgr; G. P. Hulst, supt. 

An extensive plant located at 151st St. and McCook Ave., East 
Chicago, Ind., with 64 acres of ground. Construction work started April 20, 
1912, and plant was in operation Oct. 3, 1912. Plant comprises main re- 
finery building, all steel and concrete, with 3 standard-gauge tracks entering 
the building. There are 2 crane runways running the full length of the 
building, with 3 traveling cranes. A change-house, of brick, is equipped 
with toilets, shower-baths, steel lockers, and a dining room. Bag-house is 
constructed of brick and concrete, divided into 4 compartments of 114 bags, 
30'xl8". 

Equipment: consists of one 12,000-ton battery Parkes process, two 
300-ton softeners, four 60-ton desilverizing kettles, one 300-ton refining 
furnace, and one 200-ton molding furnace. The bullion comes in on a 
high track, is charged into furnace with charging machine and flows by 
gravity through the plant. Lead is hand-molded and trucked into cars. 
Sampling is done in two 40-ton kettles and bullion pumped into softeners 
with centrifugal pump. Residues are worked up in three 30-ton reverber- 
atory furnaces. There are two 40-ton blast furnaces. 1 for antimonial slag, 
and 1 for by-products and ores; 8 retort furnaces for treating zinc skim 
and two 5-ton cupels for treating high-grade retort metal. 

Common lead is double refined by crystallization in kettles in the 
corroding lead plant. Refining plant is in complete operation. All fur- 
nace gases except softeners and retorts are drawn through a sheet flue 
700' long and passed through the bag house. 

According to Mr. Hulst (Bull. 153 Sept., 1919, A. I. M. & M. E.) the 
works are able to treat both oxide and sulphide ores of antimony. All sil- 
ver-bearing antimony ore is heated in the residue furnace, while antimony 
slag, produced was low enough in silver to warrant being smelted in two 
42" round blast furnaces to antimonial lead. W^hen the domestic output of 
antimony ore increased in 1916, the International was ready to treat it. 
The two furnaces reduced from 60 to 90 tons of lead and antimonial ma- 
terial daily, producing 30 to 35 tons of metal carrying 13% antimony, 86.1% 
lead, 0.15% copper, and 0.75% arsenic. 

Power is supplied by the Northern Indiana Gas & Electric Co. Two 
waste-heat boilers supply steam for compressors and refinery. High-pres- 
sure air is supplied by centrifugal air compressor and air for blast fur- 
naces is supplied by a Connersville blower. A 50,000-gal. tank elevated 
50', and 100,000-gal. sump tank, waste running back into sump tank and 
pumped into the 50,000-gal tank, the elevated tank being connected with 
the East Chicago Water Co.'s mains. Oil storage capacity, two 12,000- 
gal, oil tanks. 






INTERNATIONAL S. & R. CO. MINERALS SEP. CORP. 93 

Production: 

Lead Other 

bullion ore Com. 

treated and bill- and corrod- Antimonial Gold Silver 

Year tons lion tons lead Ib. lead Ib. oz. oz. 

1918 31,766 34,119 113,074,263 13,018,043 36,361 7.004,176 

1917 41,682 23,558 117,922,724 11,525,365 24.673 5,259,738 

1916 58,769 6,148 108.009,116 15,682,151 20,580 4,468,775 

The International is not burdened by old smelters acquired at ex- 
orbitant prices, but has new and up-to-date plants, capable of handling ore 
as cheap, if not cheaper, than any of its competitors and is a big factor 
in the mining world. It is in strong and competent hands, both technical 
and financial, and its profitable operation is assured. 
INTERNATIONAL SMELTING AND REFINING CO. 

Properties and assets: purchased 1914 by Anaconda Copper Mng. 
Co. for $10,392,709. Company dissolved and properties transferred to In- 
ternational Smelting Co., and described thereunder. 
METALLURGICAL COMPANY OF AMERICA 

Office: 61 Broadway, New York. 

Officers: C. M. Loeb, pres.-gen. mgr.; B. Hochschild v. p. Julian B. 
Beaty, treas. : with Otto Sussman, Harold K. Hochschild and Edw. Randolph, 
directors: Julius Goldman, sec. 

Inc. May 19, 1904, in New Jersey. Cap. $100,000; $100 par. Annual 
meeting second Tuesday in April, at Jersey City, N. J. 

Company is controlled by American Metal Co., Ltd., and was organized 
for the purpose of carrying on experiments in metallurgy, perfecting and 
improving metallurgical processes, and holding all metallurgical patents in 
which the A. M. Co. was interested. It is now merely a department of 
the A. M. Co. 
MINERALS SEPARATION NORTH AMERICAN CORPORATION 

Offices: 61 Broadway, New York City; engineering office and testing 
laboratories, 220 Battery Street, San Francisco, Calif.: experimental and 
research laboratories. Long Island City, New York. 

Officers: Dr. S. Gregory, v. p.; with Frank Alts.chul, Alfred A. Cook 
and F. Perry, directors; Chester B. Allen, sec.; chief engineer, Edward H. 
Nutter. 

Inc. in Maryland, Dec. 1, 1916. Cap. $500,000 shares of no par value; 
all stock placed in voting trust. The voting trustees are Dr. S. Gregory and 
Frank Altschul. 

Dividends: May 29, 1918. $1.50 out of capital assets and 50c out of 
current earnings; July 1, 1919. $1.50 out of capital assets and 50c out of 
current earnings; both distributions made in U. S. Government Liberty 
Loan bonds. 

Company owns all United States, Canadian, Mexican and Cuban patents 
for flotation processes of ore concentration originally owned by Minerals 
Separation, Ltd., of London, England. Rights to use processes are licensed 
on a royalty basis, licensees being given privilege of electing any one of 
four different methods of royalty payments applicable to their ores, 
namely. (1) Flat Rate based on payments per ton of total ore milled (this 
is limited to straight copper ores) ; (2) Unitage Rate based on payments 
per unit of various metals recovered from total ore milled; (3) Percentage 
Rate based on percentage of value of all metals recovered from total ore 
milled; (4) Poundage Rate based on payments per pound (or per ounce, 
in case of precious metals) of all metals recovered from any material 
treated by flotation. Details of these royalty payments will be found in a 
24-page booklet published by the company in 1919. 

Ore treated by licensees in North America during 1915, was about 
4.500,000 tons; in 1916, about 12,000,000 tons; in 1917, about 22,000,000 tons; 
in 1918, about 28,000,000 tons. It is estimated that during 1918 between 



94 UNITED STATES 

55,000,000 and 60.000.000 tons of ore was treated in whole or in part by 
flotation, of which about one-half was treated by 110 licensees of Minerals 
Separation, the remaining one-half by somewhat over 400 unlicensed users. 
Licensees of the company include Anaconda, Inspiration. Arizona Copper. 
New Cornelia, Greene Cananea, Consolidated Coppermines, Calumet & 
Hecla and affiliated companies, Phelps Dodge Corporation. Federal Mining 
Smelting, American Zinc Lead & Smelting, Elm Orln, St. Joseph Lead. 
Doe Run Lead. Britannia Copper (B. C). and many others, totaling about 
115 active users in 1919. 

The flotation processes are now used extensively throughout the world 
for treating various ores of copper, zinc, lead, gold, silver, graphite and 
molybdenum. Their economic value for treatment of base-metal orevS is 
firmly established. 'Although not universally applicable to all ores, flota- 
tion is an invaluable adjunct to almost every concentrating plant. At 
Calumet & Hecla it has insured the recovery of the very fine metallic- 
copper and. combined with a special method of leaching it has practically 
created a large new and profitable source of copper in that company's old 
dumps. In several important mills, notably Inspiration, substantially all 
sulphide recoveries are effected by means of flotation. In other mills, the 
coarser minerals are roughed out by gravity concentration methods and the 
fines recovered by flotation. Differential flotation is finding a wider range 
of application in the treatment of complex sulphide ores. By means of 
this modification, close separations are made as between exceedingly fine 
lead and zinc sulphides, or between valuable copper pyrites and relatively 
worthless iron pyrite. The Consolidated Interstate-Callahan (Idaho) and 
the Sunnyside (Colorado) mills afford excellent examples of the great 
economic value of this development in the process. 

If the various alleged infringing methods of flotation were allowed 
to be used unchallenged, Minerals Separation would lose large sums due 
as royalty for the use of its patents. Litigation over United States patents 
was first provoked by the installation made in 1911 by James M. Hyde 
(formerly an employee of Minerals Separation, Ltd.) at the mill of the 
Butte & Superior Mining Co. In that suit (Minerals Separation v. Hyde) 
the District Court at Butte. Montana, sustained U. S. Patent No. 835.120 
and found infringement as to 7 claims. In 1914. the Ninth Circuit Court 
of Appeals, at San Francisco, reversed this decision, but on writ of cer- 
tiorari the U. S. Supreme Court on Dec. 11, 1916, unanimously adjudged 
this basic patent for air-froth flotation valid as to 10 of its 13 claims. The 
remaining 3 claims, which specified the use of "a small quantity of oil," and 
which the court held to be invalid, have since, by disclaimer, been brought 
within the scope of the Supreme Court's decision. 

Following this decision of the Supreme Court in the Hyde case, the 
Butte & Superior began using oil in minimum quantities of V 2 of 1%, con- 
tending that this relieved it of liability for infringement. This issue was 
tried in the suit of Minerals Separation v. Butte & Superior, and on May 
4, 1917, the United States District Court at Butte, Mont, found validity 
and infringement as to the 10 claims (3 modified by disclaimer) pre- 
viously litigated. On May 13. 1918, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals at 
San Francisco partly reversed this decision, holding the patent limited to 
Y Z of 1% of oil on the ore. The United States Supreme Court reviewed 
this case on writ of certiorari, and on June 2, 1919, partly reversed the de- 
cision of the Circuit Court of Appeals, holding that the patent extended 
to and covered the \i$e of oils in amounts equal to any and every fraction 
of 1% on the ore. Pursuant to this decision, the District Court of Montana 
entered its decree on July 19, 1919, issued a permanent injunction against 
the Butte & Superior, and held it to account for all profits made by reason 
of its infringement. This accounting was set for October 27. 1919. 

In the suit of Minerals Separation v. Miami Copper Co., before United 
States District Court at Wilmington, Del., three patents were involved, 
namely 835,120 for air-froth flotation, 962.678 for soluble frothing agents.. 



MINES EXPLORATION MINING & DEV . CORP. 95 

and 1,099,699 for the use of aromatic hydroxy compounds in cold circuit. 
Tn September, 1916, the Court found the first two patents valid and in- 
fringed, except as to one claim of 835,120. which has since been modified by 
disclaimer, but held the third patent to be void. On appeal to the Third 
Circuit Court of Appeals at Philadelphia, this decision was affirmed except 
a.-> to the third patent, which was also held to be valid and infringed. 
Miami did not appeal from this decision, and the District Court issued a 
permanent injunction against that company. Accounting proceedings are 
now being held before a Master in Chancery, who is also trying out numerous 
variations of alleged infringements which the Miami company has used since 
being placed under injunction. 

It results from these litigations that infringement of Minerals Separa- 
tion's main patent, No. 835.120. cannot be avoided by any variation in the 
form of apparatus so long as a mineral-bearing froth is produced by the 
use, at any stage of the operations, of less than \% of oil on the ore. The 
type of apparatus, character and extent of agitation are held to be im- 
material. Tn addition to this, the validity of patent No. 962,678 precludes 
the use of soluble frothing agents in any form or amount whatsoever, 
except under license from Minerals Separation, as the Third Circuit Court 
of Appeals held that the Miami company infringed this patent when using 
oils that were partly soluble in water. This point is especially important 
because most of the effective oils used in flotation operations have soluble 
compounds. This seems to place Minerals Separation in an exceedingly 
strong position and appears to exhaust the possibilities of successfully 
evading its patents. 

In September, 1919. Minerals Separation brought suit against Nevada 
Consolidated Copper Co., alleging infringement of its patents claiming 
damages, and seeking an injunction against further infringement. Also 
against Ray Hercules Copper Co. and Magma Copper Co., and a further case 
against Miami in November. 

The above review is apropos in The Mines Handbook, inasmuch as 
hundreds of the companies listed herein are using flotation in some form, 
and their future profits depend largely on their use of flotation methods. 
MINES EXPLORATION SYNDICATE 

Office: Makeever Bros., mgrs., I/O Broadway, New York. Operating 
dept.. 1553 Harvard Ave., Salt Lake City, Utah. Walter Neal, engineer. 

Organized Aug., 1916, "to investigate and develop worthy mining properties." 
Over 200 mines were examined but only 3 taken over for development, at last 
accotmts. 

Property: Lookout mines in Montana, the Herb Lake (Rex) mines 
in Northern Manitoba, Can., and the Candelaria mines in Jalisco. Mex. 

The Lookout group of 3 claims in Montana (location not stated) is said to 
show a series of veins carrying gold-silver-copper values. Average values are 
given as $14.52 to $26.41 per ton based on 60c silver and 25c copper. About 500' 
of work is reported done on 3 tunnels, a road built and necessary buildings put up. 

The Rex mine on Herb Lake. Manitoba, Canada, is developed by a 60' shaft 
and vein is reported to average 48" in width. Average assay is given as $48.60 
gold. Makeever's engineer estimated that ore extracted in shaft sinking and on 
dump totaled $5,054. and also assumed that a stope of such ore 100' long by 100' 
high will pay for the mine, development, mill, equipment, operation and metal- 
lurgical loss. A 30-ton mill to be installed. 

The Candelaria mine, Jalisco, Mex., is an old mine credited with past pro- 
duction of rich ore. In August. 1919, it was under development. 
MINING & DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 

Address. K. O. Holter and H. P. Henderson. 60 Broadway. New York. 

Officers: Kdwin O. Holter, pres.: Harold Kingsmill, v. p.; Howard D. 
Smith, v. p.; Robert Frese. sec.-treas.. with Norman B. Holter, directors. 

Inc. Feb. 1918. in Maine. Cap. 3.000 shares of no par value. 

An exp1oratic>n company having varied interests in thr United States, 



96 UNITED STATES 

Mexico, and South America. $300,000 is to be spent on the Richmond-En reka 
Alining Co. (which see), at Eureka, Nevada. 
NATIONAL LEAD CO. 

Main office: 1 Exchange Place, Jersey City, N. J. Executive ami trans- 
fer office: 111 Broadway, New York. 

Officers: E. J. Cornish, pres.; Geo. O. Carpenter, R. P. Rowe and N. B. 
Gregg, v. ps. ; M. D. Cole, asst. to the pres. ; Chas. Davison, sec. ; S. A. Miller, 
asst. sec. ; Fred R. Fortmeyer, treas. ; Chas. Simon, asst. treas. ; Alexander & 
Green, gen. counsel; Executive committee: E. J. Cornish, chairman; E. V. Beale, 
R. P. Rowe, J. R. Wettstein and G. D. Dorsey. 

Directors: Edward F. Bealc, Geo. O. Carpenter, Fred M. Carter, R. R. 
Colgate, E. J. Cornish, G. D. Dorsey, Chas. E. Field, Geo. W. Fortmeyer, E. C. 
Goshorn, Morris B. Gregg, R. P. Rowe, W. N. Taylor, Walter Tufts, J. R. 
Wettstein, and G. W. Thompson. 
Committees: 

Manufacturing C. P. Tolman, chairman; L. T. Beale, H. P. Cavarly, 
Evans McCarty and G. W. Thompson. 

Sales: O. C. Harn, chairman; L. T. Beale. C. C. Foerstner. (). H. 
Greene and W. N. Taylor. 

Metal: E. J. Cornish, chairman; S. A. Miller, secretary; W. H. Bakor, 
L. T. Beale, W. C. Beschorman, A. F. Curtis, G. D. Dorsey, S. E. Lindsley, H. J. 
McBirney, Sheldon Thompson, C. F. Wells, Jr. and J. R. Wettstein. 
Departments: 

Advertising: O. C. Harn, manager. 

Laboratory: G. W. Thompson, chief chemist and A. H. Sabin, consult- 
ing chemist. 

Metal: A. B. Hall, manager. 

Flaxseed. Charles T. Nolan, manager. 

Insurance: I. M. Stettenheim, manager. 

Traffic: W. S. Mellen, manager. 
Branches of National Lead Co.: 

Atlantic, R. P. Rowe, mgr, 111 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Buffalo, Sheldon 
Thompson, mgr., Buffalo, N. Y. Cleveland, C. C. Foerstner, mgr., Cleveland, 
Ohio. Cincinnati, E. C. Goshorn, mgr., Cincinnati, Ohio. Chicago, Chas. E. 
Field, mgr., Chicago, 111. St. Louis, Geo. O. Carpenter, mgr., St. Louis, Mo. 
John T. Lewis & Bros. Co., Edward F. Beale, pres., Philadelphia, Pa. National 
Lead & Oil Co., of Pennsylvania, W. N. Taylor, pres, 316 Fourth Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. National Lead Co., of Massachusetts, Walter Tufts, treas., 131 State 
Street, Boston, Mass. National Lead Co., of California, Jas. B. Keister, v. p., 
Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco, Cal., and National Lead Co. of 
Argentina, G. D. Dorsey, pres, 25 de Mayo, No. 158, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

The National Lead Co. is interested through ownership of all or part of 
the capital stock in the following : 

Baker Castor Oil Co., F. C. Marsh, pres., New York. Bass-Hueter Paint 
Co., Norris B. Gregg, pres., manufacturers of mixed paints, varnishes, and paint 
specialties, San Francisco, Cal. Carter White Lead Co., Fred. M. Carter, pres., 
white lead corroders, Chicago and Omaha. Cinch Expansion Bolt & Engineering 
Co., Grafton D. Dorsey, pres., manufacturers of expansion bolts, New York. 
Heath & Milligan Manufacturing Co., Norris B. Gregg, pres., manufacturers of 
paints and colors, Chicago. Magnus Co., Inc., H. H. Hewitt, ^pres., brass founders, 
New York. Matheson Lead Co., W. J. Matheson, pres., white lead corroders and 
manufacturers of oxides of lead, Long Island City, N. Y. River Smelting & 
Refining Co., Edward J. Cornish, pres., smelters and refiners of zinc, St. Louis, 
Mo. St. Louis Smelting & Refining Co., J. A. Caselton, 2nd v. p. and sec., 
miners, smelters, and refiners of lead, St. Louis, Mo. United Lead Co., J. R. 
Wettstein, pres., manufacturers of all products of lead, smelters of drosses and 
residues. New York. United States Cartridge Co., Paul Butler, treas., manu- 
facturers of metallic and sporting ammunition, Lowell, Mass. Williams Harvey 
& Co., Ltd., Richard F. Pearce, managing director, smelters and refiners of tin, 
Liverpool, England. Williams Harvey Corp., Edward J. Cornish pres., smelters 
!rul refiners of tin, New York. 



NEW JERSEY ZINC CO. 



97 



Inc. Dec. 7, 1891, in New Jersey. Cap. $25,000.000 common and $25,- 
000,000 preferred stock; $100 par; $20,655,400 common stock and $24,367,600 
preferred stock outstanding. Listed on New York Stock Exchange. Bankers 
Trust Co.. New York, registrar. Annual meeting, third Thursday in April. 
Company had 6,640 stockholders in 1916; 7,152 in 1917; and 7.286 in 1918. 

Comparative General Balance Sheet: 



ASSETS 



Plant 

Year Invest. 

1918 $41,933,059 

1917 25,229,672 

1916 23,805.234 

1915 23,785,822 

1914.. 23.768,789 



Other 
Invest's. 
$10,153,095 
18,753,768 
17,982,307 
17,520.916 
16.963,718 



Stock 
On Hand 
$15,027,156 
8,222,782 
7,320,170 
6,267,772 
7,164,475 



Other 
Current 
$20,263,936 
6,517,408 
6,058,190 
5,884,460 
4,467,083 



Total 
$87,376,245 
58,722,630 
55,163,901 
53,458,970 
52.364,065 



LIABILITIES 



Year 
1918. 
1917. 


Capital 
Stock 
$45.023,000 
45,023,000 


Insurance 
Fund 
$1.400,000 
1 400.000 


Bonds 
of Subs. 
$9.7 15. 000 


Reserves 
$8.103,467 
3,293,241 


Current* 
$7.874,871 
664,820 


Surplus 
$16,659.907 
8,341.564 


Total 
$87,376,245 
58,722,630 


1916. 


45,023,000 


1.200.000 




700.000 


2,057,788 


6.183.113 


55,163,901 


1915 


45 023 000 


1.100.000 




300,000 


1 .298.608 


5.737 362 


r.3.458 f)7< 


1914. 


45,023,000 


1,000.000 






988,835 


5,352,230 


52,364,065 



















" Includes accounts audited but not duo subsidiaries. 

Comparative Income Account: 



Net 
Income 

1918 $4,692,815 

1917 4,896,953 

1916 2,977,699 

1915 2.710.526 

1914 2,476,293 

1913 2,458.306 

Dividends: 



Dividends 



Pfd. 

$1,705.732 
1.705.732 
1.705,732 
1.705,732 
1.705,732 
1.705,732 



Com. 

$1,342,601 

1.032,770 

826.216 

619,662 

619,662 

619,662 



Surplus 

Year 

$1,644,482 

2,158,450 

445,751 

385,132 

150,899 

132,912 



P.&L. 
Surplus 
$16,659,907 
8,341,564 
6,183,113 
5,737,362 
5,352,230 
5,201,331 



1!18 1917 1910 1911-15 1910 1908-9 1907 1906 1901-5 1898-00 1896-7 

Preferred 7 7 7 1 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 

Common 6Va 5 4 3 4 5 4% 2 . . 1 

Present rate : preferred 7%, payable quarterly, March 15, etc. ; common 
3%, increased to 4% March, 1916, payable quarterly, March 30, etc. 
NEW JERSEY ZINC CO. 

Offices: 810 Broad St.. Newark. N. J., 160 Front St., New York. 

Officers: Edgar Palmer, pres. ; A. P. Cobb, v. p.; J. E. Hayes, v. p.; 
A. B. Schultz, sec. ; H. S. Wardner, treas. ; G. T. Wolff, comptroller. 

Directors: Edgar Palmer, C. W. Cox, August Heckscher, T. D. Jones, E. S. 
Marston, J. J. Riker, E. M. Squier, W. P. Hardenbergh and A. B. Schultz. H. 
G. Clopper, gen. sales mgr. ; E. V. Peters, asst. gen. sales mgr. ; H. Hardenbergh, 
gen. purch. agt. ; W. J. Lee, purch. agt. ; Arthur Thacher, Western mgr. 

Inc. Oct. 30, 1880, in New Jersey as the New Jersey Zinc & Iron Co. 
Name changed 1897 to present title and capital 'increased from $3,000,000 to 
$10,000.000. Stock increased to $35,000,000 by payment of stock dividend of 
250% July 7, 1915. Cap., $35,000,000; $100 par; all outstanding. Transfer office: 
160 Front St., New York. Registrar: Farmers Loan & Trust Co., N. Y. 

Bonded debt: the unretired balance of bonds authorized Oct. 1, 1901, 
due Oct. 1, 1926, First Gold, 4%. Original authorized issue, $10,000,000, of 
which $4,000,000 were issued, the balance to be issued only for the purchase of 
new property, stock of new corporations, the erection of new plants, etc. Of 
the $6,000,000 of unissued bonds, $3,400,000 had been retired up to Jan. 1, 1919, 
leaving a present authorized amount $6,600,000. The mortgage provides for the 
cancellation of $200,000 of unissued bonds yearly on Oct. 1, beginning 1902, the 



98 U \ITED STATES 

authorized amount of bonds to be reduced accordingly, and after all such unissued 
bonds have been canceled, the company is required to pay to the trustee, annually, 
on Oct. 1, $200,000 as a sinking fund for the purchase or redemption of out- 
standing bonds at not exceeding par and interest. 

Dividends: regular quarterly at rate of 20% per annum have been paid 
from 1906 to July, 1915, and quarterly at rate of 2%% in Aug. and Nov., 1915. 
On Feb. 10, 1916, and regularly since, quarterly at rate of 16% per annum. 

Extra distributions: 10% in 1907, 5% in 1909, 10% each in 1910 and 1911. 
10% each 3 times in 1912, 10% each 3 times in 1913, 10% each twice in 1914. 5% 
each twice in 1914, 2%, 10% and 30% in 1915, 250% stock dividend in July, 1915, 
10% each 4 times and 5% 4 times in 1916, 10% in Jan., and 4% each Mar., April, 
June, July, and Sept.,1917; 4% July, 1918, and 2% July, 1919. 

No balance sheets are available, but the following gives an idea of general 
results : 

Year Net Income Dividends Surplus 

1919* $6.272,682 $4,200,000 $2,072,682 

1918 11,904,759 7,000,000 4,094.759 

1917 19,086,601 12,600,000 6,486,601 

1916 34,488,239 26,600,000 7,888.239 

*9 months. Last quarter of 1919 returned $2,675,412 net. 

Property: the famous zinc mines at Franklin, New Jersey. The dif- 
ferent original holdings were consolidated as a result of litigation and to effect 
better mine operations. It was upon the economies due to a single control of 
the great orebody and to the discovery by J. P. Wetherill of a process for treat- 
ing the manganese-zinc ores that the fortunes of the company were built. For 
geology of mine see Lindgren's "Ore Deposits," p. 709 ; also U. S. Geological 
Survey Folio, No. 161. 

Company owns the New Jersey Zinc Co. of Pa., with operating plants 
at Palmerton and Freemansburgh, Pa. ; operating mines near Benton and High- 
land, Wis. (Mineral Point Zinc Co.) ; many other producing properties and 
reduction works, including the Empire Zinc Co. of Mo., not operating any 
property at present, the Empire Zinc Co. of Colorado, and mines at lola, Kansas. 

The Franklin mine in New Jersey produces the high-grade ore from which 
the Horsehead brand of spelter is made. The reserves are unofficially reported 
to be in blocked out ore, sufficient for a thirty-year supply at the present rate. 
Custom ores are also bought for treatment. The products include oxide of zinc, 
spelter, sheet zinc, zinc dust, spiegeleisen, sulphuric acid, lithophone, and zinc 
chloride. 

Production: no reports are published, but it is known that the company 
has a yearly smelting capacity of 160,000,000 to 170,000,000 Ib. of spelter, and 
the 1917 production is estimated at 250,000,000 Ib. of zinc, besides other products. 
One mine alone, the Franklin, is credited with 119,736 tons, or 16.9% of the 
country's total output during 1917. 

During 1917 the following papers were published in the Engineering and 
Mining Journal : "Hoist Record at Palmer Shaft," by H. H. Hodgkinson. This 
shaft is 1,510' deep at an angle of 47, and has 4 compartments. Two 22x48" 
duplex, direct acting hoists are used, with ore loading pockets at 800 and 1,150'. 
On July 14, 1916, one engine hoisted 3,079 tons in 10 hours. This shaft has pro- 
duced 76,018 tons in one month. In the issue of Sept. 8, the company's Franklin 
laboratory was described by D. Jen'kins. A paper prepared for the A. I. M. E. by 
W. R. Ingalls. in issue of Sept. 15, discusses "Zinc Burning as a Metallurgical 
Process," covering in part work of New Jersey Zinc. In Sept. Bulletin of the 
A. I. M. E., G. C. Stone discusses "Oxide of Zinc," as made by the New Jersey 
company. In the Oct. Bull, of the A. I. M. E. "Zinc Mining at Franklin, N. J.," 
was the title of a 106-page article by C. M. Haight and B. F. Tillson. Company 
publishes a monthly organ entitled "Zinc." 

Company apparently carefully conceals its vast financial operations from a 
curious public, but it is well if somewhat "closely" managed, and is doing 
excellent educational work in spreading knowledge of the uses and properties 
of zinc. 



P HELPS DODGE CORPORATION 



99 



PHELPS DODGE CORPORATION 

Office: 99 John St., New York. 

Officers: Walter Douglas, pres.; Cleveland H. Dodge. Arthur Curtiss 
James, v. p.'s. ; with Geo. B. Agnew, Francis L. Hine. " Wm. Chu-rch Osborn 
and E. Hay ward Ferry, directors ; P. G. Beckett, gen. mgr. ; Geo. Notman, 
sec.-treas. ; C. W. Parsons, asst. sec-treas. ; W. K. Flora, asst. sec. ; A. T. 
Thomson (New York), assts. to president; John Macnair, comptroller; T. H. 
O'Brien, mgr. dept. of indus. relations ; H. Kenyon Burch, cons. eng. ; Gerald 
Sherman, cons. min. eng. 

James Douglas, through whose efforts and foresight the company attained 
its present importance as a metal producer, died in 1918, a loss to the entire 
mining profession. 

Phelps Dodge Corporation assumed all the assets and liabilities on April 1, 
1917, of Phelps, Dodge & Co., Inc., and continued the business of the former 
company with the same board of directors and official staff. 

Phelps, Dodge & Co., Inc., was the holding company for its subsidiary 
companies. Under the new plan the .name of the Copper Queen Cons. Mining 
Co. was changed to the Phelps Dodge Corporation, its capital stock increased, 
and the properties of the Detroit Copper Mining Co., the Burro Mountain Copper 
Co., and the Stag Canon Fuel Co. were transferred to it, also stocks of the 
Moctezuma Copper Co., Bunker Hill Mines Co., and the Phelps Dodge Mercan- 
tile Co., together with the remaining assets of Phelps, Dodge & Co., Inc. This 
gives direct ownership and operation by a single company. The former com- 
panies are known as branches, with the exception of the Moctezuma Copper Co. 
and the Bunker Hill Mines Co. 

Phelps, Dodge & Co., Inc., was organized as the successor of the firm of 
Phelps, Dodge & Co., which had a history of nearly a century, its founder, Wm. 
Earle Dodge, having been one of the great pioneer merchants of America and a 
noted philanthropist. 

Inc. Aug. 10, 1885, in New York. Cap. $2.000,000; $10 par; increased 
to $50,000,000 in March, 1917; $100 par; $45,000,000 of which is now outstanding, 
having been exchanged share for share for stock of Phelps, Dodge & Co., incor- 
porated,- Dec. 14, 1908, in New York. The capital stock was issued for the 
purchase of the entire stock of the Copper Queen Consolidated Mining Co., at 
$135 for each $10 share, $27,000,000; Moctezuma Copper Co., at $307 9/13 for 
each $100 share, $8,000,000; Detroit Copper Mining Co. of Arizona, at $150 for 
each $25 share, $6,000,000; Stag Canon Fuel Co., at $800 for each $100 share, 
$4,000,000; held for future issue, $5,000,000; total, $50,000,000. Stock listed on 
New York Stock Exchange. Annual meeting, first Tuesday after first Monday 
in April, at 99 John St., New York. Books close 10 days before and reopen day 
after annual meeting. Stock transferred at office of the company. Farmers' 
Loan & Trust Co., New York, registrar. 
Comparative General Balance Sheet: 



Year 
1918.. 
1917.. 
1916 


Property 
and Equip. Investments 
$198,551,420 $3,657,214 
195,405,392 3,129,481 
39 268 558 


1915 


38 550,942 . 


1914.. 


49.392.281 



ASSETS 

Deferred Cash 

$ $12,985,403 

13,775,628 

2,763,213 7,746,519 

2,130,583 5,889,305 

264,076 4,891,697 



Other 

Current Total 

$26,238,391 $241,432,428 

20,057,238 232,367,739 

15,735,612 66,513,903 

11,375,526 57,946,356 

4,687,999 59,236,053 



Year Capital Stock Current 

1918 $45,000,000 $15,463,003 

1917 45,000,000 9,523,198 

1916 45,000,000 5,826,777 

1915 45,000,000 4,608.492 

1914 45,000,000 7,224,944 



LIABILITIES 

Reserve for deplet. 



and deprec. 
$49,589,707 
45,947,694 


Surplus 
$131,379,717 
131,896,846 
15,687,126 


Total 
$241,432,428 
232,367,739 
66,513,903 




8,337,864 


57,946,356 




7.011,109 


59,236,053 



100 



UNITED STATES 




Recent earnings: $6.025,740 in 1909; $9,099,910 in 1910; $7,283,509 in 
1911; $10,411,535 in 1912; $9,581,494 in 1913; $6,891,651 in 1914; $10,981.512 in 
1915; $24,030,904 in 1916. 
Income Account: 

Sales of 

metals, etc, Expenses, incltid 
Supplies, etc. taxes 

$43,537,525 
39,805.279 



Year 

1918 ....... $59,483,208 

1917 ....... 62,262,186 

Dividends: company pays a regular quarterly dividend 
share and also extra dividends these were $2 per share in 1909, 



Profit 
$15,945,683 
22,456,906 



Dividends 
$10,800,000 
10,800,000 



Surplus 
for year 
$5,145,683 
11,656,906 
of $2.50 pet- 
1910, 1911; $5 



ni 1912; $6.50 in 1913; $4 in 1914; $10 in 1915; $22.50 in 1916; $14 in 1917; $14 
in 1918; $7.50 in 1919, and $2.50 in 1920 to Jan. 2. The grand total is $83,471,527. 

Company controls through personal holdings of its officers, the Old Dominion 
Co. and Commercial Mining Co. Members of the old firm also control the 
El ?aso & Southwestern railway, a road that, while built originally as an outlet 
for the Copper Queen mine, has expanded steadily and bids fair to develop 
eventually into a transcontinental trunk line. The same interests are very large 
shareholders in the Rock Island and Great Northern railways. 

The company controls some of the richest and most productive copper mines 
in existence, all able to make copper at unusually low costs, as is evidenced by 
the great increase in dividends of subsidiaries in 1910 over 1909, in a year when 
decreased dividends were the rule with a great majority of the large copper 
producers of the world. 

Production: comparative statement of total production, of company's 
branches, years ending Dec. 31 

Tons of Ore ^ 

Charge Co. Ore 

Year Extracted Milled Smelted Smelted Copper, Ib. Silver oz. Gold. ox. Lead, Ib. 

1919 .......................................... 110.000,000 .... ....................... 

1,797,161 1,400,911 1,168,882 169,035,687 1,772,119 30,434 1,683,113 

1,581.293 1,339,464 ......... 153,974,692 1,524,632 24,423 8,136,356 

1,422,468 1,389,192 1,200,090 152,263,729 1.642.055 28.S73 10. 404.341 

800,600 1,129,766 1,016,746 140,478,003 1,655,669 31.696 9,525,584 

1,046,728 917,204 855,594 131,662,324 1,769,626 28,518 8,936,074 

1,122,372 1,035,367 856,520 155,665,712 1,870,162 31,141 5,701,628 

......... 1,051,315 953,741 148,678,889 1,689,152 27,687 ......... 

1,017,352 930,331 822,647 134,149,627 1,794,895 27,154 ......... 

Company also took over the metals selling agency of the old firm, and in 
addition to marketing the product of its own mines, acts as sales agent for the 
Calumet & Arizona and other producers. 
Comparative Statement of Copper Sales: 



1918 2,684,701 

1917 2.756,587 

1916 2,305,072 

1915 1,583,364 

1914 1,777,243 

1913 1,978,892 

1912 1,893,244 

1911 1,841,210 



Year -Total 

1918 294,237,716 

1917 290,522,569 

1916 247,303,587 

1915 194,925,668 

1914 188,687,378 

1913 201,489,796 

1912 192,297,374 

1911 180,301,965 

1910 194,138,698 



Own 
Comp. 
153,541,647 
156,114,518 
138,968,320 
139,351,785 
134,553,404 
151,080,018 
139,759,515 
131,327,002 
139,297,409 



Outside 

Product 

on Comm. 

140,977,101 

134,408,051 

108,335,267 

55,573,883 

54,133,974 

50,409,778 

52,537,859 

48,974,963 

54,841,289 



Domestic 

Trade 
214,237,716 
185,131,891 
176,468,527 
97,122,436 
80,978,884 
83,552,432 
98,267,037 
69,483,782 
100,819,254 



Foreign 
Trade 

80,281,032 
105,390,678 

70,835,060 

97,803,232 
107,708.494 
117,937,364 

94,030,337 
110,818,183 

93,319,444 



Aver. 

Price 

Cents 

24.55 

26.67 

24.48 

16.079 

13.57 

15.37 

15.51 

12.36 

12.826 



Phelps Dodge Corporation, is one of the few new companies in the copper 
mining industry that is under-capitalized rather than over-capitalized, and this 
is but a detail in a general business policy that, while thoroughly progressive and 
abreast with the times, retains the fundamentally sound and conservative policies 
developed by the old firm in nearly a century of honorable and markedly successful 
business life. 

Branches and Subsidiaries 

Burro Mountain Branch. 
Bunker Hill Mines Co. 
Copper Basin Branch. 




PHELPS DODGE CORPORATION 101 

Copper Queen Branch. 
Moctezuma Copper Co. 
Morenci Branch. 
Phelps Dodge Mercantile Co. 
Stag Canon Branch. 

BUNKER HILL MINES CO. 

Mine office: Tombstone, Ariz. 

Officer. John H. Davis, supt. 

Inc. to take over and operate the property of the old Tombstone Cons. 
Mines Co. at Tombstone, discovered in 1878, and at one time one of the largest 
producers of gold-silver-lead ore in the Southwest. At a depth of 560' the 
volume of water became so great all attempts to handle it were unsuccessful 
and operations were discontinued until Phelps Dodge Corp. acquired possession. 

Development: extensions were 5.049' in 1915; 8,177' in 1916; 11,598' in 
1917; and 2,996' in 1918. Results from prospecting in the old workings and 
in new ground have not yet shown orebodies of great size or commercial 
importance. Lessees were granted blocks of ground in 1918, shipping 1,000 tons 
monthly. 

The old cyanide plant of the Tombstone Cons, was converted into an 
experimental plant for the testing of Tombstone ores and was put into operation 
in June, 1915. Flotation of the gold-silver-lead ore was unsatisfactory. Half 
of the plant is utilized in concentrating manganese ore, producing for steel 
plants and silver-bearing tailing for the smelter at Douglas. 

Power is supplied by a central plant. 

Production : 

Ore Gold Silver Lead Copper Manganese 

Year Tons Oz. Oz. Lb. Lb. Lb. Employees 

1918 19,312 1,335 276,007 448,616 39,209 834,337 103 

1917 69,418 2,872 397,253 1,049,445 13,357 3,930,901 386 

1916 59,299 3,950 343,453 983,983 131,546 1,061,409 403 

1915 10,746 1,373 109,783 269,303 23,760 1,171,509 297 

BURRO MOUNTAIN BRANCH 

Mine office: Tyrone, Grant Co.. New Mexico. E. M. Sawyer mgr. ; E. 
F. Pelton, supt. 

Property: 60 claims, 1,000 acres, bought 1906, from Southwestern Cop- 
per Co. The Savanna Copper Co.'s holdings of 2,600 acres were added in 1915, 
bringing the total acreage up to 4,464 acres. Property shows 36 porphyry dikes, 
carrying 5 orebodies of disseminated ore having 2 to 5% copper. The old mine, 
15 claims, known as the St. Louis, is said to have produced upwards of $1,000,000 
worth of ore, under former ownership, shipping ores ranging 15 to 25% in copper. 

Geology: property contains a number of large orebodies of dissemi- 
nated chalcocite, so-called porphyry ore, that are genetically dependant upon 
intrusions of monzonite, in pre-Cambrian granite, both rocks being shattered and 
faulted. The largest orebody is entirely in porphyry, the next largest in a 
brecciated zone, associated with dikes of aplite and dark felsite (phases of the 
porphyry), cutting through granite. Actual stoping and milling operations began 
in March, 1916. The East orebody is mined by milling the ore into 55 chutes 
going down to the 4,700' Niagara tunnel, where it is loaded directly into standard 
gauge railway cars. The Breccia orebody is mined through No. 3 shaft, hoisted 
in 2-ton skips, dumped on an inclined belt conveyor, and discharged on a hori- 
zontal conveyor loading by tripping device into railway cars. Company has 5 
Star churn drills, one electrically-driven. 

The Burro Mountain and Chemung mines have been united by the Niagara 
haulage tunnel, starting at the Tyrone terminus of the Burro Mountain branch 
of the A. T. & S. Fe railroad; this tunnel, 8x9 / , was driven to Leopold, a distance 
of about 1 mile, and serves the double purpose of drainage and haulage. While 
driving this tunnel the so-called Bison orebody was found. Development increases 
its size, but the oxide content is high. 



102 UNITED STATES 

Lands include a complete town, improved with waterworks, electric light, sub- 
stantial buildings, numerous dwellings, bank, store, theatre, etc. 

Development: in 1914-15, work consisted mainly in completing opening 
by underground work and churn drilling of orebodies already known. At the 
end of 1914, thirteen holes, with an aggregate of 11,571', had been drilled. This 
work continued throughout 1915 and 1916, the holes being rather widely scattered 
and no effort being made to define ore limits, so that estimates of tonnage are 
not yet possible. The orebodies on the Mohawk and Thistle claims have been 
considerably extended as a result of drilling during the year. An unusual 
feature is the prospecting of the Mangas valley where several holes passed through 
as much as 1,000' of recent valley gravel before reaching bed rock. 

In 1917, there were 52 holes drilled an average depth of 587'. Discoveries 
were satisfactory. The Azure Mining Co.'s ground, held under option, was also 
partly drilled, so far 'without encouraging results. To open the Thistle and 
Mohawk deposits, widely separated, considerable work was started for their 
extraction. 

In 1918, drilling was done in 23 holes to an average depth of 489'. Nothing 
important was found. Although development decreased by 7,519', reserves were 
increased by 235,000 tons. The cost of ore extraction was reduced by the better 
condition of stopes and to increased drawing from the broken ore reserves in 
shrinkage stopes. The caving system is employed successfully. 

The old concentrator, built 1905, and twice remodeled, has been dismantled. 
A standard-gauge 18-mile spur was built in 1913, at a cost of $350,000, from the 
main line of the Santa Fe railroad to the mine and mill. A central power plant 
equipped with four 1,000-h. p. Diesel engines, was built at Tyrone, near the collar 
of No. 2 shaft. Labor is almost exclusively Mexican, only the bosses being 
Americans. The concentrator at Tyrone, of daily capacity of 1,700 tons, with 
flotation equipment, went into operation April 12, 1916. It consists of two units 
and is 3 miles from the portal of the haulage tunnel. It is an all-steel concrete 
structure covering 500 sq. ft. There are 5 floors, all equipped with the Kahn 
ventilation system. With the two units, which can be later raised to four, the 
estimated cost of the plant was about $1,000,000. J. T. Hall is superintendent. 
Production : 

Ore Con- 

milled, Copper, centrate, Copper, Recovery, Copper Silver 
Year tons % tons % % Ib. oz. 

1918 585,083 1.928 53,146 14.875 70.232 15,188,619 43,150 

1917 473.443 1.972 45,681 14.775 72.258 13,139,053 39,403 

1916 253,782 2.117 26,362 13.937 68.390 7,510,674 20,763 

Leaching of all old partly sulphatized dump ore was started early in 1917. 
During that year, 280,090 Ib. of copper, equal to 25% of the original metal, was 
extracted, while in 1918, another 8.9% was extracted, making 33.9% in two years. 

COPPER BASIN BRANCH 

A. B. Peach, acting manager, Prescott, Arizona. 

Property: the Copper Basin mine at Copper Basin and Snoozer gold 
mine near Prescott, Arizona. The past two years results may be tabulated as 
under : 
Year Development Ore Shipped Copper 

1918 1,320 ft. 38,323 tons 1,907,205 Ib. 

1917 1,250" 17,299 " 934,781" 

The ore was smelted at Clarkdale, Douglas, Humboldt, and Verde. 
COPPER QUEEN BRANCH 

Operating and works office: Douglas, Cochise Co., Ariz. Mine office: 
Bisbee, Ariz. 

Officers: G. H. Dowell, mgr. ; W. H. Webster, asst. nigr. ; H. H. Stout, 
supt. of reduction works; P. B. Butler, asst. supt. of works; Arthur Notman, 
supt. of mines; G. B. Lyman, geologist. 

The Copper Queen Consolidated Mining Co., retaining its charter, has 
changed its name to Phelps Dodge Corporation. Its properties in Bisbee and 
Douglas, Ariz, are now known as the Copper Queen Branch of that corporation. 



PHELPS DODGE CORPORATION 103 

The company was operated for many years as a close corporation, but is said 
to have paid from 1888 to 1907, inclusive, dividends aggregating $30,000,000 or 
more. Recent dividends: $3,000,000 in 1908; $4,025,00 in 1909; $6,300,000 
in 1910; $5,200,000 in 1911; $5,707,351 in 1912; $5,700,000 in 1913; $4,500,000 in 
1914; and $7,000,000 in 1915. 

Property, comprises the Copper Queen and other mines at Bisbee. 
a large smelting plant at Douglas, on the Mexican border, 30 miles from the 
mines. Mineral lands in the Warren, or Bisbee district, comprise 176 patented 
claims, 2,298 acres. 

The Copper Queen, one of the best known copper mines of the world, was 
opened 1880, on an outcrop of oxidized copper ore in massive limestone, opposite 
the Copper Queen hotel in Bisbee. The original orebody, now represented by a 
large cave, averaged 23% copper. The ore was smelted in a 30" water-jacket 
furnace, with English coke, brought via San Francisco. This orebody was 
exhausted in 3 or 4 years and the mine experienced many vicissitudes, until addi- 
tional orebodies were developed, by following seams and stringers of ore leading 
to further large and rich deposits. 

Geology: the ore-bearing formation of the Copper Queen and other 
mines of the Bisbee district, consists of thickly bedded limestone beds, dipping 
to the southward and cut by intrusive porphyritic dikes. Until 1902, the prin- 
cipal orebodies were found at the base of the carboniferous limestone beds, which 
are broken by igneous rocks, that evidently have a strong genetic bearing upon 
deposition. The ore deposits occur as pockets, lenses, chimneys, bunches, shoots, 
veins, stringers and seams, the larger bodies being connected, in most cases, by 
small veins, or mere knife-blade seams. The limestone and its included ore- 
bodies have a general gentle dip to the southeast; necessitating deeper shafts as 
distance is made toward the southeast. Extensive bodies of high-grade ore 
have been found, since 1902, in the deeper levels driven in the older limestones 
(Cambrian), and developments prove these underlying orebodies to be persistent 
to great depth. The oxidized part of the mines shows beautiful caves, lined 
with calcite crystals and stalactites and wonderfully fine crusts of azurite, mala- 
chite and cuprite ; some of these caves are of considerable size. Many of the 
shafts are bottomed in sulphide ores of high-grade, but like the oxide orebodies, 
they are flat or have a gentle S. E. dip, and a thickness of 50 to 200' or so. New 
orebodies are developed yearly and the ultimate lateral limits of payable ore are 
unknown. 

In the Copper Queen mine, the majority of the ore has occurred in a zone 
encircling the west boundary of the porphyry intrusion of Sacramento hill. It 
has a width varying from 800 to 1,200', and a thickness of about 400'. It reaches 
the surface in the older part of the mine to the N. W., but dips to the S. E., 
where it is reached at 1,400' below the Czar collar, in its farthest extension at 
present developed on Copper Queen ground. There is one major extension from 
the N. W. end of the zone toward the west along the Czar fault, and others of 
minor importance. 

Individual orebodies are scattered through the zone in an eccentric manner, 
only matched by their own irregularities of form and size. Their most general 
characteristics are the softness of the ore and their great horizontal rather than 
vertical extent. It has been estimated that the average vertical thickness of ore 
in the Czar and Lowell divisions is between 30 and 35'. It is calculated by assum- 
ing it to be uniformly distributed over its horizontally projected area. 

In this zone, and for some distance above it, the ground has been subjected 
to intense alteration and intense but irregular oxidation. It has resulted in an 
enormous quantity of earthy or clayey material, which may be either ore or 
waste, which, when wet, is both heavy and tenacious. Below alteration, the 
ground is fairly hard, and the limestones contain primary ores differing from 
those heretofore considered typical of the camp, and which have not yet been 
thoroughly exploited. 

Development: the Copper Queen mine has 7 shafts, all connected on 
the even numbered levels. The entire output is concentrated at and hoisted from 
the 1,700' Sacramento shaft. The mines are opened ahead for several years, 
development averaging about 1 mile monthly of new workings, or at the rate of 



104 UNITED STATES 

1 linear foot of new work for 10 tons of ore extracted, which figure is proven 
by past experience to maintain practically constant ore reserves, while avoiding 
excessive advance openings that require useless maintenance cost. The stopes 
are filled throughout and the mines are timbered with square sets, mainly Wash- 
ington fir, an average of 30' in timber, board measure, being required for each 
ton of ore won in the oxidized zone. 

The underground haulage plant is very extensive, with 21 miles of tracks, 
covering every second level from the 4th to the 16th, inclusive, ore from the 
intermediate levels being dropped through chutes, and all ore hauled to the 
Sacramento shaft for hoisting. The haulage system includes electric locomotives 
and side-dumping ore cars. Chutes have been installed throughout the mine 
for loading the cars, which discharge into large storage bins at the Sacramento 
shaft, through which all ore is hoisted. The system is fully described by Gerald 
Sherman, supt., in Trans. A. I. M. E v Sept., 1915, p. 1837. In order to com- 
plete the undergrounnd traction system, it was necessary to open many lateral 
drifts and crosscuts, which were located in solid ground, wherever possible, as 
the electric tram lines are the arteries of the mine. 

Great attention is paid to fire prevention and ventilation, these systems being 
improved continually. 

The Uncle Sam mine has an old shaft, and a new ihaft, sunk in 1908, of 224' 
depth. This mine is connected with the Czar, Holbrook, and Sacramento shafts, 
and has a large orebody, discovered 1913, that compares favorably with the 
bonanza deposits of the adjoining Shattuck mine. 

The White Tail Deer mine lies across the range on the edge of the mesa 
near Don Luis, being reached by wagon road through a detour of several miles. 
It is being worked, developing a good grade of ore and may become an important 
producer. 

The 4-compartment Sacramento shaft, 1,700' deep, concreted, handles the 
entire output of the mines. There are loading bins on the even-numbered levels 
from 400 to 1,600', reached by the electric haulage lines from all other workings 
of the mine. The shaft was sunk in rock for practically its entire depth, insuring 
as great a degree of immunity from drawing as is possible in this district. The 
Sacramento shows some rich ore, discovered 1913, on the 1,500' level near the 
Hoatson claim line. Exploratory work, in the porphyry stock of Sacramento 
Hill, which is the geological keystone of the Bisbee ore deposits, has shown up 
a large tonnage of concentrating ore. x 

The hoist at the Sacramento is a powerful Nordberg tandem-compound 
engine, having 7' drums with 5' face, operated by steam, with 6 auxiliary engines, 
actuated by oil, under 150 Ibs. pressure. Hoisting is done in 3-ton skips, and the 
hoist can raise a skip each minute, giving the shaft a capacity of fully 4,000 
tons daily. 

The Sacramento shaft has, perhaps, the most elaborate and ingenious system 
for mixing and loading ores to be found at any copper mine. This is fully 
described by Sherman in the paper already noted. The ventilation of the whole 
property with its 6 downcast and one upcast (Lowell) shafts is well described 
by Chas. A. Mitke, in Bull. A. I. M. E., Sept., 1915, p. 1941. 

The central power plant near the Sacramento shaft, includes a boiler house, 
haying four 400-h. p. Stirling water-tube boilers, furnishing steam direct to the 
hoists at the nearby Sacramento and Gardner shafts, the hoists at the other 
shafts being operated by compressed air. Equipment of the engine house includes 
three 500-k. w. turbo-generators, 3 air compressors, of about 100 drills aggre- 
gate capacity, a 70-drill Nordberg air compressor, the largest in the Southwest, 
and a 7,000 cu. ft. Nordberg compressor. Fuel is Texas and California petroleum, 
with large tanks for oil storage. All of the shafts, and the principal mine build- 
ings, are reached by spurs of the El Paso & Southwestern railway. 

New Mine: during the past few years, churn drilling has developed in 
Sacramento hill, a large tonnage of concentrating ore known as the East and 
West orebodies, containing respectively, over 14,000,000 and 7,660,000 tons. The 
latter carries 2.2% copper. Removal of overburden commenced in Jan., 1917. 
There were 290,771 cu. yd. stripped in that year, and 1,099,660 cu. yd. in 1918. 
In mining the West orebody, 3,407,148 yd. of ore and 10,383,997 yd. of waste 



P HELPS DODGE CORPORATION 105 

must be moved. The West orebody, because of its nearness to the surface will 
be mined by steam-shovel. A 90-ton t st mill was built in 1914, the best saving 
being effected by combined gravity concentration and flotation methods. Tests, 
on a working scale demonstrated that 1.3% of copper will make ore, and it is 
probable that \% material can be worked. Based on the results of this experi- 
mental work, a 3,000-ton concentrator will be built on the flat west of Douglas. 
Excavations were completed in 1918. 

Geology: the ore is disseminated and lies in the intrusion of the prop- 
phyry between the Final schist on the north and the limestone on the south. 
There are two orebodies, separated by a strip of ore, too low-grade to be worked. 

The following articles are available on the subject: Arthur Notman, on 
drilling, in Trans. A. I. M. E., Vol. 52, Sept., 1915 ; Courtenay De Kalb, Sacra- 
mento Hill disseminated copper deposit, 'Min. and Sci. Press,' April 20, 1918; 
and R. T. Banks, drilling, *Eng. and Min. Jour.,' April 19, 1919. 

New work in the mines, exclusive of Sacramento hill, was 80,853' in 1916; 
55,518' in 1917, and 58,360' in 1918. Reserves were increased, especially in the 
Limestone mines. 

Reduction Works 

The Reduction Works, Douglas, Ariz., 28 miles from the mine and one-half 
mile from the Mexican border, treat 3,000 tons daily, handling the output of the 
Copper Queen mines, that of the Burro Mountain branch and that of the Moc- 
tezuma Copper Co., as well as doing a general custom-smelting business. The 
works occupy a site of 320 acres and are served by a very complete standard- 
gauge railroad system, reaching every building. The plant was blown in March, 
1904, since which time there has been almost continuous enlargement, the works 
costing fully $4.000,000, smelting about 3,000 tons daily, there being no concen- 
trator to eliminate part of the tonnage from the final furnace charges. The 
plant is described by J. Moore Samuel, in Bull. A. I. M. E., June, 1916, p. 1079, in a 
paper on dust losses. 

Water for the works is secured from artesian wells, of about 300' average 
depth, the water rising nearly to the surface, with 1 well, of about 1,000' depth, 
flowing 200 gal. per minute. A large reservoir and cooling tower have been 
built in connection with the water supply. 

The ore-bedding system consists of 5 pits, each 40x800' in size, and 11' deep, 
having an aggregate storage capacity of 90,000 tons. Ore, received from the 
mine in side-dumping steel cars, is discharged into the pits, which are lined with 
white tufa rock. The pits are filled with the different grades of ore required to 
constitute a norm il furnace mixture, and the ores mixed by a mechanical plow. 
Ore is removed, as required by the furnaces, with steam shovels, running on 
permanent tracks laid upon the floor of the pits. 

The blast-furnace building, 150x900' in size, of steel frame, also covers the 
converter department. Three 60-ton traveling cranes, 60' span, run the entire 
length of the building. There are ten 400-ton blast furnaces, each 44x240" with 
forty 4" tuyeres, and 16' in height from the tuyeres to the charging floor. The 
10 furnaces are set 15' apart, in a single row, with a 10x20' settler between each 
pair, the lower half lined with chrome brick and the upper half with ordinary 
brick. Ore is charged on either side, alternately, charging being done from trains 
of twenty 2,500-lb. cars, hatlled by 13-ton electric locomotives. Slag flows from 
the settlers into 18-ton slag cars, hauled by electric locomotives. The slag dump 
is 1.700' long, and is kept trim by a special leveling machine, operated by electric 
power. The blast-furnaces consume 350 to 400 tons of coke daily. 

The dust chamber is of steel frame with brick and tile walls, roofed with 
reinforced concrete supported by steel trusses and has a bottom of tiled hoppers. 

Molten matte is taken from the blast furnace to the converters by 60-ton 
electric traveling cranes, each having two 15-ton auxiliary hoists. The con- 
verter department has 7 stands, operated hydraulically, with 10 shells, of the 
(ircat Falls type, basic lined. Copper is poured in a Walker casting machine, 
and product is blister copper of about 99% tenor, with considerable gold and 
silver values. The converter plant has a flue, taking the gases from the 7 stands 
to a dust flue 11' in diameter at the hoods and 13' at the dust chamber. 



106 



UNITED STATES 




The 260' steel stack of the blast furnace building is 30' in diameter at the 
base and 25' at the top. 

The calcining and reverberatory plant is 100x850' in size, of steel frame. 
Ore is brought in over an elevated railway track on steel trestles, 400' in length, 
and dumped into concrete storage bins, and drawn, from the bins to the roasters 
by belt conveyors. There are three 100' reverberatory furnaces and sixteen 
7^-ton McDougall calciners. A slag tunnel, 30' wide, 15' deep and 276' long, 
has electric cars, connecting with the slag tracks. The tunnel is lined with 4' 
concrete walls, with a 2' separating wall in the center. The reverberatory fur- 
naces are next to the old building, succeeded by the slag tunnel, on top of which 
there is a battery of four 400-h. p. water-tube boilers, followed by a dust cham- 
ber; the McDougall roasters occupy the northern end of the building. The 
reverberatory department has a separate 300' stack, of 22' inside diameter, built 
of special hollow bricks, with walls 42" thick at the bottom and 12" at the top, 
requiring 1,250,000 brick and standing on a base of 60' diameter requiring 1,100 
en. yd. of concrete. A pulverizing plant, for making powdered coal for one 
reverberatory was finished early in 1919. 

The power house, of steel and brick, was enlarged to transmit electric 
energy 72 miles to El Tigre mine, in northern Mexico. The power plant has 
about 20 units, of various sizes and types, aggregating more than 6,000 h. p. 
Equipment includes 4 Nordberg cross-compound blowing engines, each direct- 
connected to a 400-k. w. 250-volt direct-current generator; Nos. 9 and 10 Con- 
nersville blowers, set staggering; a cross-compound 2-stage condensing air 
compressor, with piston capacity of 2,000 cu. ft. of free air per minute, at 100 
Ibs. pressure, for running the pneumatic tamping devices, operating charging 
doors of the blast furnaces and pumping water; 3 triplex motor-driven pumps, 
delivering water into compression tanks, at 350 Ibs. per square inch, with auto- 
matic regulation ; four 400-k. w. 250-volt direct-current generators, supplying 
power for cranes, slag locomotives and electric lights; two 750-k. w. turbo- 
generators and a number of minor engines and dynamos. The power plant is 
equipped with a complete set of gauges and meters, keeping record of the distri- 
bution of power to every department and sub-department. 

The steel boiler house has six 500-h. p. and four l,000'-h. p. Stirling water- 
tube boilers, with a Green fuel economizer, and a Foster superheater with 
capacity of 90,000 Ib. of steam per hour. The stack of the boiler house is of 
brick, 177' high and 13' in diameter at the base. Boilers are arranged to burn 
either coal or petroleum, but latter is used exclusively, consumption of Cali- 
fornian and Texan petroleum, at the mine and works, amounting to about 500,000 
gal. monthly. Oil for fuel is at present cheaper in first cost, easier and cleaner 
to handle, and effects a great saving in the wages of 3 daily shifts of stokers, 
formerly required at every boiler plant. 

A limestone quarry, at Lee station, 7 miles east of Douglas, has a large 
crusher and storage bins, the smelter requiring 400 to 500 tons of limestone daily 
for flux. A saw mill is operated, in the forests of the Chiricahua mountains, 
though the bulk of the timber and lumber requirements of the mine and works 
are met by the importation from the Pacific coast. 
Production : 
Year Tons Mined Lb. Copper Oz. Silver Oz. Gold Lb. Lead 

1918 770,524 90,988,156 558.433 16,409 1,234,497 

191.7 800,585 93,618,409 828,665 19,156 6,870,128 

1916 951,978 102.685.722 1,096,136 24,030 9,421,562 

1915 783,21 1 88,551,180 943,368 18.974 9,388,418 

1914 732,829 86,066,143 1,036,672 15,769 8,889,175 

1913 867,481 97,181,725 919,138 16,213 5,701,628 

1912 786,368 88,280,908 1,027.130 18,023 2,953,685 

191 1 619,132 74,489,728 1,227,453 16,895 5,658,930 

1910 596.193 76,428.908 608,096 12,430 696,118 

1909 84,802,147 601,828 8,674 437,601 

1908 82,533,145 530,492 8,352 182,677 

1907 66,916,972 338,723 4.197 

1906.. 79,536,416 332,723 7,573 



PHELPS DODGE CORPORATION 107 

Smelter production, including custom ores: 

Ore treated, Gold, Silver, Copper, 

Year tons oz oz. lb. 

1918 1,311,742 32,709 2,307,307 192,063,212 

1917 1,276,817 32,331 2,042,263 191,581,131 

1916 1,304,523 32,832 1,794,854 171,893,880 

1915 1.063.329 29.840 1.388.149 125,144,027 

1914 835,016 26,259 1,405,301 119,957,017 

There were employed 3,671 men in 1916; 3,773 in 1917, and 3,910 in 1918. 

MOCTEZUMA COPPER CO 

Mine office: Nacozari, Sonora, Mexico. J. S. Williams, Jr., gen. mgr.; 
H. T. Hamilton, asst. gen. mgr. ; C. I. Schultz, gen. supt. 

Inc. 1896, in West Virginia. Cap. $3,000,000; issued. $2,600.000. Is 
controlled through entire stock ownership by Phelps Dodge Corporation, and 
holds direct title to lands through Moctezuma Copper Co., S. A. 

Inc. Feb. 4, 1896, in Mexico. Cap. 500,000 pesos. Dividends: were 77% 
or $2,262,000, 1902-07; none in 1908; $998,000 in 1909; $468,000 in 1910; $754,000 
in 1911; $2,118,569 in 1912; $1,950,000 in 1913; $1,170,000 in 1914. 

Property: about 2,500 acres of mineral land in the Moctezuma and 
Arizpe districts of Sonora, including the Pilares de Nacozari mine 6 mines east 
of Nacozari. Company also owns the Juarez and Nicolas ranches of about 
35,000 acres, which carry considerable valuable timber. Examined in 1911 by J. 
M. Boutwell. 

Geology: the Pilares mine lies in a high and precipitous country near 
the divide of the Yaqui and Oposura rivers. The ore deposit is an oval shaped 
brecciated mass of latite having a major axis of 2,000' and a minor axis of 1,000', 
formed by two parallel systems of faults, one coursing nearly N. and S. and the 
other nearly E. and W. The N. and S. faults dip about 80 to the east. There were 
two flows of latite ; the first while cooling was interrupted by the second causing 
the partly cooled mass to break up into the bombs and fragments which are 
barren of mineral and which are cemented together by the second and mineral 
bearing flow. The latite gives way to andesite and this to monzonite with depth. 
A "caliche" dike from 4' to 10' wide runs through the entire west side of the 
mine. The ore occurs mainly on the border of the breccia "pipe," but lesser 
bodies are found inside it as well. The ore carries chalcopyrite with pyrite and 
some bornite, chalcocite and some covellite, the ore being mostly of concen- 
trating grade, averaged about 3.39% copper as mined, in 1918. There is a 
"chimney" outcrop with carbonate ore, but croppings are mainly brown, a dull 
red-stained porphyry, carrying hematite. The leached zone is about 20' in depth 
only, with payable ore coming in at depth of about 60'. 

Geology and mining methods at the Pilares mine was discussed by W. R. 
Wade and Alfred Wandtke in Bull. 152 of the A. I. M. & M. E., Aug., 1919. 
They summarize by saying that the Pilares ore deposit is of the pyrite-chalco- 
pyrite type, and occurs in latite and andesite breccias, perhaps of early Tertiary 
age. The ores are genetically related to monzonitic intrusives. Enrichment of 
commercial importance is confined to the upper 200' of workings, but primary 
ore of excellent grade continues downward to the deepest workings. 

In addition to the Pilares mine, the company owns a number of other prop- 
erties that have been operated for several years past by lessees, including the 
Churunibabi, Bella Union, Fortuna, San Francisco, El Vaquero, El Promontprio 
(about exhausted), La Caridad, and San Pedro. The Bella Union has high- 
grade ore, including oxides and native copper, shipments assaying up to 39% in 
copper tenor, with small gold and silver values. The Churunibabi property, 
yielding $100,000 worth of silver ore to the lessees, from a rich gold-silver-copper 
orebody struck July, 1913, has been operated by the company for the past few 
years. During the year the main tunnel was driven 828' to connect with the 
Estrella shaft. 




108 I'XITED STATES 

Development at Pilares mine include 4 shafts; three 3-compartment 
main working shafts, the Guadalupe 918'; Pilares 1,200' and Esperanza 1,355' 
deep. The Guadalupe shaft is an underground shaft running from the 500' level 
to the 1,400' level. The Pilares and the Esperanza shafts are on the extreme 
ends of the ore body and run from the surface, 100' level to the 1,300' level. The 
new 5-compartment Pilares shaft is 400' S. W. of the old one, and is down 700', 
fully equipped with electrically-driven hoist, compressors, etc., similar to that 
at the Esperanza. 

The mile long Porvenir tunnel opens the deposit 600' below surface; 25-ton 
narrow gauge railway cars run from Nacozari into the tunnel direct to the 
mine ore chutes. The tunnel has storage bins in a 25x100' chamber, to which 
ore is milled down from the upper workings, no ore being hoisted, all ore as 
broken being sent in chutes to the tunnel. 

Two methods of ore extraction are employed, the room-and-pillar with 
waste filling as work progresses, and shrinkage stoping with waste filling after 
all the ore has been extracted. 

The mine has some enormous stopes, the 646 stope is 60' wide by 600' long. 
The ground stands very well and the systems of extraction used give minimum 
timber requirements at a cost of only a few cents per tons of ore mined. No 
water is hoisted above the Porvenir tunnel level and very; little water is raised 
from the workings below. The mine is well ventilated and is equipped with 
electric lights. 

New work in the mines totaled 23,252' in 1916; 33,823' in 1917, and 33,833' 
in 1918. The outside properties were operated as usual, but results have been 
irregular in the Caridad, Churunibabi and Promontorio. 

Ore reserves in the Pilares deposit were estimated Jan. 1, 1916, as 3,220,000 
tons; for Jan. 1, 1917, a decrease was reported due to inadequacy of hoisting 
facilities on lower levels. Such exploration as has been done the management 
reported as having been distinctly encouraging and much ore encountered, 
especially during 1918, when reserves were increased. 

Equipment: includes electric hoists, two 25-drill air compressors, and 
two blacksmith shops, one at Pilares and one at Esperanza. There is an 
emergency steam plant at the mine having 2 boilers held in reserve in case of 
accident, but electricity is used throughout. 

The power plant, at Nacozari, built in 1908, has 435-h. p. Stirling water- 
tube boilers, equipped with Green fuel economizers, Foster super-heaters and 
Rooney stokers (burning New Mexican coal), and a 196' reinforced concrete 
stack. The plant has three 1,000-k. w. Curtis turbo-generators giving a 6,600- 
volt current, and an auxiliary 50-k. w. steam turbo-generator set is used as an 
exciter. Current is transmitted at 6,600 volts to the mine and mill and at the 
mine is stepped down to 230 volts for the pumps, while the hoists and electric 
locomotives use a 250-volt direct current. Two 5-cylinder Nordberg-Carels 
Diesel engines were to be installed in 1919. 

The mine is connected with the mill by a 6-mile 30" gauge railway. Rolling 
stock includes four 60-ton locomotives and twenty 30-ton Ingoldsby steel side- 
dumping cars. 

The 2,000-ton concentrator, designed and built by H. Kenyon Burch, at a 
cost of about $1,000,000, is one of the most complete and efficient in existence. 
The crushing plant receives ore from the mine in 6,000-ton bins, whence it is 
fed by 2 automatic ore feeders, of special design, to grizzlies, with bars set 2y 2 fr 
apart, oversize, going to a No. 8 gyratory crusher, and undersize to a belt- 
conveyor, meeting material from the crusher, and going by belt conveyor to two 
4x10" manganese trommels, with l 1 /^" perforations. Undersize from the trom- 
mels goes to belt conveyors and oversize from the trommel goes to No. 5 
gyratory crushers, breaking the material to 1" cubes, which joins the material 
from the trommels and is sent by belt conveyors to 4,000-ton storage bins. 

Each 1,000-ton unit of the mill is equipped with 6 coarse and 12 fine jigs, 3 
sets of rolls, Swain classifiers, Callow screens, 44 Wilfley tables and 72 Johnson 
vanners. From the storage bins the ore is fed by a portable ore feeder to a belt 
conveyor, passing over an automatic weighing machine and sampler, delivering 
it to an 18-mm. trommel. This trommel screens the ore, the coarse pieces going to 



P HELPS DODGE CORPORATION 109 

bull jigs and undersize to 11-mm. trommels; the latter feed oversize to coarse 
jigs and undersize to 7-mm. trommels. These trommels in turn feed oversize to 
intermediate jigs and undersize to 4-mm. trommels, whose oversize goes in its 
turn to 2-mm. trommels; oversize from latter goes to fine jigs. The undersize 
from the 2-mm. trommels goes to 22-mesh Callow screens and thence to Wilfley 
tables handling oversize and undersize. 

Slimes from the Wilfleys go to the vanner settling tanks and middlings; 
from the Wilfleys go to the Chilean mills by elevators. Tailings from the bull 
jigs, coarse jigs and intermediate jigs go to either of 3 sets of 42x16" rolls, then: 
by elevator to the mixing-box at the head of the trommels. Tailings from the 
fine jigs go to de watering machines, and overflow from dewatering machines- 
goes to vanner settling tanks, dewatered material going to the jig tailings bin 
and thence to Chilean mills, crushing to pass a 2*/2-mm. screen and thence to- 
Callow screens of 22-mesh. Product is a concentrate of about 12% copper 
tenor, about 85% of the assay value being saved. 

Re-grinding, flotation, and filtering machines were first installed during 1916,. 
and have been added to each year since, a large pneumatic unit being erected in 
1919. Flotation has improved the recovery. 

An aerial tramway carries tailings from the concentrator to a dump on the- 
hillside, far above the river level. 

.Water is pumped from a well sunk at the side of the river by\ 1 triplex: 
and 3 Worthington pumps, of 500 gal. capacity per minute, to 500,000-gal. tanks 
at the mill. Wash water from the concentrates is settled and re-used. A large 
dam 3 miles east of Nacozari, 90' in height, stores water sufficient for 2 years 
steady operation of the mill. 

The company built and owns the town of Nacozari, and a town at the Pilares 
mine. At Nacozari the company maintains both English and Spanish schools 
for the children of employees, a well-equipped hospital, free library, and amuse- 
ment hall. 

Production: 

Moly- 

Milled, Copper, Concen. Rec. Copper, Gold, Silver, denum, 
Year tons % tons % Ib. oz. oz. Ib. 

1918 762,089 3.392 173.128 85.575 42,875,355 11,103 923,922 7,024 

1917 750,897 3.179 156.067 81.190 38,186,451 2,677 511,738 35,630- 

1916 715.070 3.273 143,939 80.500 37,709,310 1,310 471,867 6,162 

1915 22,889,885 599 331,836 

1914 29,591,658 1,006 435,482 

1913 36,598,132 

Forces normally are 1,300 men at the mine and mill, of which the great 
majority are Mexicans, with a few Japanese, no American labor being employed 
at the mine aside from shift-bosses and timbermen. Mining has been done 
under contract at 7 to 11 pesos per foot, and the larger part of the tramming 
is done by contract also, the mine proper employing about 200 miners, 300 muckers, 
80 carmen and 75 contractors. 

The Moctezuma is one of the world's really great copper mines and the 
management is of the best. 

MORENCI BRANCH 
(formerly known as Detroit Copper Co.) 

Mine and works office: Morenci, Arizona. 

Officers: J. P. Hodgson, mgr.; W. M. Saben, asst. mgr. ; F. W. McLean, 
mine supt. ; G. E. Hunt, mill supt. ; V. P. Hastings, smelter supt. ; J. A. McDougall, 
power supt. ; G. M. Robinson, chief engineer. 

Property: is extensive, including the Ryerson, Arizona Central, Copper 
Mountain, Yankee, W. Yankee, Montezuma and Santa Rosa mines, at and near 
Morenci. 

Geology: The mines of this company work varied types of copper 
deposits, all dependent upon and co-extensive with a big intrusive body of quartz 




110 UNITED STATES 

porphyry and its dikes. The ores are chalcocite, chalcopyrite and pyrite with 
various oxidized products occurring either in altered limestones, or as fissure 
veins in the impregnated rocks adjacent to them, or in large masses of altered, 
impregnated, shattered porphyry. The geologic relations are fully treated in a 
monograph by Waldemar Lindgren, Prof. Paper 43, U. S. Geo. Surv. ; see also 
Weed, "Copper Mines of the World," page 287. 

Ores are mainly sulphide with slight gold-silver values and high silica and 
alumina contents. The oxidized and limestone ores are still produced in small 
quantities, but 98.8% of the ores mined consists of small particles of chalcocite, 
associated with chalcopyrite and pyrite, in a leached and whitened, decomposed 
porphyry, averaging 2.39% copper. The high-grade ore from fissure veins 
carries 6 to 18% copper. 

Development: is very extensive, with numerous shafts and long cross- 
country connections. The workings have thus far been shallow, 400' being for 
many years the greatest depth. In 1912, development on the 600 and 700' levels 
of the Yankee mine, north of the Yankee fault, opened 194,939 tons of 2.36% 
ore and similar deep exploration in the Arizona Central mine upset previous 
ideas that ores would not go deeper. Total amount of development work in 
1914 was 26,375'; in 1915, 14,709': in 1916, 20,513'; while abnormal conditions in 
1917 and 1918 prevented much being accomplished. 

About 90% of the output is now mined by the slicing system, costing about 
21% of the square set and fill cost, which is necessarily still used in some parts 
of the mine. .Block caving is still cheaper, uses but little timber, and costs but 
54.8% of the square set and fill method, but like the gopher and fill method, 
which is slightly cheaper, can only be used where favorable conditions prevail. 

The New England mine has 2 shafts, deepest 750', and a 2,000' tunnel. The 
Clifton mine has 7 shafts, of 70 to 315' depth, with tunnels of 220'. 450', 700'. 
800', 1,000' and 1,700'. 

The Copper King mine is as yet but slightly developed, but has been claimed 
to show 40,000 tons of ore. An aerial tram from the Copper King mine was 
completed in 1909. 

Of the 465,807 tons mined in 1918, the Ryerson contributed 43% ; the Yankee, 
20%; the Copper Mountain, 11%, and the Arizona Central, 20%. 

Equipment: includes power house, of steel frame on concrete founda- 
tions, with one steam-driven blowing engine, 9,000 cu. ft. per min., one gas- 
drjveri blowing engine, 6,000 cu. ft. per min., one motor-driven No. 10 Con- 
nersville blower and one No. 9 Connersville blower driven by a 200-h. p. gas 
engine, two steam-driven air compressors, one of 4,000 cu. ft. capacity, the other 
of 1,300 cu. ft., one 600-k. w. turbo generator delivering 2,300 v., 2-phase, 60-cycle 
current, four 250-k. w. and one 100-k. w. belted generators driven by gas engines, 
delivering 230 v., 2 phase, 60-cycle c'urrent, running in parallel with turbo gen- 
erators through transformers. 

Recent additions to the power-plant were three 1,000-h. p. Diesel engines, 
direct connected to generators, and one 3.700 cu. ft. Diesel air compressor. 

The concentrator, designed by H. Kenyon Burch, has proved remarkably 
successful, running 95% of the time. It consists of two 650-ton units, is 166x240' 
in size, and cost about $1,000,000. Equipment includes Chilian mills, 6 sets of 
16x42" rolls, 28 revolving screens, 80 Erue vanners, 40 Wilfley tables, and Deister 
tables, the mill putting about 7 tons into 1. 

A re-grinding and flotation plant was started in 1916. being enlarged in 
successive years. The mill power plant has 3 gas engines of 200-h. p. and 2 of 
175-h. p. each, in conjunction with electric motors driven from the smelter 
power house. During 1918, the gas engine drive was changed to electric. 

The concentrator uses about 500 gal. of new water per ton of ore treated, the 
balance being obtained by reclamation of water from the tailings in a series of 
concrete tanks with Dorr mechanism. The water is purchased from the Morenci 
Water Co.. which has a pumping plant about 6 miles distant on Eagle river. This 
also supplies the town and practically all of the mines of the district. Tailings 
are conducted from a slag lined launder along the walls of Chase Creek canyon 
to a point below bunkers 14,000' away where it is stored in impounding reservoirs 
in the small canons which empty into Morenci canon. 



REPUBLIC IRON & STEEL 111 

The smelter has one 44x396" blast furnace, and 3 stands of small basic 
lined converters. Flue dust is mixed with concentrate residue before being 
re-charged into the furnace. About 70% of the total charge of new metal bear- 
ing material in 1918 was concentrates. The smelter has 2,000-ton ore bins, sur- 
mounted by a steel railroad trestle. 

A 36" gauge railway connects the mines and smelters with the Arizona & 
New Mexico railroad, at Guthrie. A tunnel through Longfellow hill, completed 
1909, gives direct rail connection with the mill. 

The company operates an excellent hotel, and maintains a library and club 
room for its 1,200 employees. 

Production: 

Year Tons Milled % Copper % Recovery Tons Smelted Copper, Ib. 

1918 449,990 1.91 76.22 154,216 17,130,209 

1917 312,225 2.33 70.78 118,596 13,203,401 

1916 451,395 2.39 71.25 140,938 17,541,258 

1915 376,604 2.83 15,333,976 

In Sept., 1919, it was announced that $2,500,000 was to be spent in new 
construction at the Detroit. This included a new 5-compartment shaft, hoist, 
tramming equipment, 2,000-ton mill, remodeling of the smelter, and extensive 
development work. 

PHELPS DODGE MERCANTILE CO. 

\Y. A. Meyer, gen. mgr., in charge of 644 employees. G. E. Crysler iir 
_charge at Tyrone, and C. H. Hyde at Morenci. 

Production: 

^'ear Gross Sales Merch. on Hand Net Profit, % 

1918 $10,408,913 $2,622,161 7.98 

1917 9,789,639 2,123,820 8.42 

1916 8,406,636 1,648,355 10.38 

STAG CANON FUEL CO. 

\Y. D. Brennan, mgr.; J. B. Morrow, supt. of coke department. Employees, 
1,693 men. 

Production: 

Year Coal mined, tons 

1918 1,339,292 

1917 1,406,079 

1916 1,439,904 

REPUBLIC IRON & STEEL CO. 

Offices. 15 Exchange Place, Jersey City, N. J.; 17 Battery Place, New 
York; Youngstown, Ohio, and Birmingham, Ala. 

Officers: J. A. Topping, chairman; T. J. Bray, pres.; H. L. Rownd and 
J. W. Deetrick, v. p's. ; R. Jones, Jr., sec.; H. M. Hurd, treas.; F. J. Webb, mgr. 
of the northern, and C. T. Fairbairn, mgr. of southern divisions; L .L. Wilcox, 
chief engineer. 

Cap. $30,000,000 com.. $25,000.000 pfd.; $100 par; $27,191.000 com. and 
$25,000,000 pfd. outstanding. Funded debt outstanding, $16,346,000 ten to thirty- 
yen r sinking fund mortgage gold 5s. 

Dividends: 1%% quarterly on pfd. and \ l / 2 % on com. stock. 

Property: includes the following iron mines in Michigan. Minnesota 
mid Alabama, which yielded a total of 1,693,450 tons in 1916; 1,706,555 tons in 
1917, and 1,512,071 tons in 1918. 





112 UNITED STATES 

Mine Range Mine Range 

Cambria No. 1 Marquette, Mich. Pettit Mesabi, Minn, 

Cambria No. 2 Schley 

Lillie Victoria 

Franklin Alfretta Group Birmingham. Ala. 

Minckler Houston 

Sherwood Raimund Group 

Bray Mesabi, Minn. Spaulding '. . . . . 

Gordon Tannehill 

Kinney 

Ore reserves are 43,740,121 tons in the northern mines and 68,928.936 tons 
in the southern group, a total of 112,669,057 tons. Lands in Wisconsin, near 
Hurley, have been under investigation by drilling and shafts. 
UNITED COPPER CO. 

Dead. Fully described Vol. XT, Copper Handbook. 

The preferred stockholders' protective committee of the United Copper Co. 
stated Aug., 1915, that it had been unable to obtain any offer from the holders of 
the company's pledged assets which justifies the committee in continuing its 
efforts either to formulate a reorganization plan or redeem the pledged assets : 
that $750,000 would have to be provided to redeem assets, which would require 
a cash assessment of about $20 per share, which it is believed could not be raised 
under existing conditions. Committee also stated that it had considered pos- 
sibility of instituting proceedings to recover wasted assets, but decided that there 
were no reasonable prospects of obtaining substantial results in such proceedings. 
Preferred stockholders were notified that stock deposited with the committee 
would be returned on presentation of certificates of deposit to the Central Trust 
Co. of New York. 

Explanation is yet to be made as to what became of the cash and assets of 
the United Copper Co. treasury, both before and after the Assets Realization Co. 
Ijecame entangled with it. Reported in April, 1918, that the receivers had aban- 
doned the search for a trace of the $10,500,000 received from sale of its property 
to the Red Metal M. Co., which was later absorbed by the Anaconda Copper M. Co. 
UNITED MINES CO. 

Address: C. J. Walker, Boatmen's Bank Bldg.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Officers: C. T. Walker, pres.; Jesse F. McDonald, 1st v. p.; J. C. C. 
Waldeck, 2nd v. p*. ; E. T. Cash, sec.; H. W. Mann, treas., with T. T. -Nardin, 
directors. 

Inc. Aug. 23, 1919, in Delaware. Cap. 115.000 pfd. shares, $10 par, and 
235,000 com. shares of no par value, of which 15,000 and 35,000 respectively, have 
been issued. No public offering is to be made. 

President advises us, company represents "the efforts of a group of men that 
is mainly interested in the Down Town Mines Co. at Leadville, Colorado, to 
find something worth-while in the way of metal mines, on which effort con- 
siderable work has been done with fair promise of satisfactory results." 
U. S. SMELTING, REFINING & MINING CO. 

General office: 55 Congress St., Boston. Mass.. Corporate Office: 85 
Exchange Place, Portland, Maine. New York office : 120 Broadway. 

Officers: C. G. Rice. v. p.; S. J. Jennings, v. p. in charge of exploration 
and min. investment ; D. S. Calland, v. p. and gen. mgr. of operations in Mexico ; 
F. Y. Robertson, v. p. and mgr. of sales ; N. W. Rice, 2nd v. p. ; F. W. Batchelder, 
sec.-treas. ; John Laurie, comptroller ; A. P. Anderson, cons. min. eng. ; C. F. 
Moore, cons. eng. 

Directors: S. L. Bartlett, R. T. Edwards, J. J. Phelan. C. G. Rice, E. P. 
Brown, C. F. Brooker,' B. P. Clark, C. A. Hight, S. J. Jennings, R. T. Paine. 2nd, 
E. P. Bayley, A. W. Preston, D. A. Ritchie, and S. W. Winslow, Jr., R. S. Bradley, 
J. J. Storrow, H. B. Endicott, E. V. R. Thayer, and D. G. Wing. 

Executive committee: B. P. Clark. C. J. Rice, J. J. Storrow, D. C. Wing, 
and S. W. Winslow, Jr. 

Operating officials. C. E. Allen, v. p. and gen. mgr. of Western opera- 
tions; G. W. Metcalfe, eng.: D. D. Muir. Jr., mgr. of mines, Utah; A. P. Ander- 
son, cons. min. eng. : C. F. Moore, cons. eng. G. W. Gushing, traffic eng. 



U. S. SMELTING, REFINING & MINING 



113 



Inc. Jan. 9, 1906, in Maine. Cap. $75,000,000; $50 par, in $37.500,000 of 
7% pfd. cum. stock and $37,500.000 com. stock; 486,350 pfd. and 351,115 com. 
snares issued. 

National Shawmut Bank, Boston, and Guaranty Trust Co., New York, 
registrars ; Old Colony Trust Co., Boston, and Bankers Trust Co., New York, 
transfer agents. Annual meeting in May. Listed on Boston and New York 
Exchanges. Company had 9,499 pfd., and 2,634 com. stock holders at end of 1918. 

Bonded debt: $12.000,000 six per cent convertible gold notes, dated 
Feb. 1, 1916, due same date in 1926, interest payable Feb. 1 and Aug. 1 of each 
year. First National Bank, Boston, trustee; First National Bank, Boston, and 
Guaranty Trust Co., New York, registrars. Principal and interest payable at 
first mentioned, and Hanover National Bank, New York. 

The U. S. Metals Refining Co. was absorbed by the American Metal Co. in 
December, 1919. 

Dividends: rate is 7% on preferred stock, payable quarterly (Jan., 
April, July, and Oct.), first Dividend paid April 15, 1906. Dividends on common 
stock are given in the table below. 



Year 
1920. 
1919. 
1918. 
1917. 
1916. 



3 

10J4 
10 
10 



Year 
1914. 
1913. 
1912. 
1911. 
1910. 



Year 
1915. 
1909. 
1908. 
1907. 
1906. 



l/ 2 

4 

4 

None 



Financial Statement: 



Year 
1918. 
1917. 
1916. 
1915. 
1914. 
1913. 
1912. 
1911. 
1910. 
1909. 
1908. 



Net 

Earnings 
$7,249,533 
5,769,391 
9,737,664 
7,579,184 
2,932.519 
4,555,122 
5,497,965 
3.961,103 
3,551,387 
3,956.608 
3,359.222 



Deprec. 
& Reserve 
$2,474,443 
1,571,576 
2,839.200 
986,859 


Previous 
Surplus 
$13,004,970 
12,957,455 
8.253,455 


666878 




969,536 




1,265,000 




1 120,690 




1,067069 




810248 


- 


311.632 





Pfd. 

Dividend 
$1.702,225 
1,702,225 
1,702,225 
1,702,225 
1,702,222 
1,702,145 
1.702,120 
1,702,120 
1,701,701 
1.700,963 
1.700,801 



Com. 
Dividend 

$1,755,575 
1,755,575 
1,492,239 



Net Final 
Surplus 

$14,322,260 
13,004,970 
12.957,455 



Net earnings for 1919 were estimated at $9,410,000. 
Comparison of current assets and liabilities of all companies : 

' ASSETS 



Year Cash 

1918 ^ $2.045.948 

1917 1,641.126 

1916. . 5.105,678 



Notes and 

Accts. Rec. 

$3,100.533 

2.967,837 

3,794,475 



Metals, Ores 

Supplies, Etc. 

$13,329,710 

12.884,424 

10,852,098 



Total 
$18,476,191 
17,493,387 
19,752,251 



LIABILITIES 



1918. 
1917. 
1916. 



Xotes 
Payable 
$1,470,000 

900,000 
5.000 



Accounts, Drafts 
Payable 
$2.091.145 
3,125.765 
2.609.648 



General 
Reserves 
$3.568.746 
3.897.828 
3.116.301 



Dividends 

Payable 

$864,450 

864,450 

864,450 



Total 
$7,995,341 
8,788.043 
6,595.399 




114 rxiTRD STATUS 

Production: ore from all properties, including Mexico, was as und 

Value of Metal Contents 

Year Tons Copper, % Lead, % Zinc, % Silver, % Gold, % 

1918 1,220,722 10 10 7 61 12 

1917 1,129,678 28 10 13 39 10 

1916 1,022,306 39 8 15 28 10 

Year Zinc, Ib. Copper, Ib. Lead, Ib. Silver, oz. Gold, oz. 

1918 18,771,684 20,359,378 96,567,485 15,337,465 137,315 

1917 53,590,446 29,043,242 107,519,570 13,000,187 109,612 

1916 64,584,001 28,888,093 103,855,451 11,647,205 129,273 

1915 34,105,471 26,923,674 87,102,179 12,071,863 196,481 

1914 17,946,659 64,443,260 9,936,237 124,719 

1913 20,239,973 58,116,504 13,089,708 148,372 

1912 21,152,620 56,385,769 12,059,829 140,183 

1911 22,199,141 49,022,791 10,285,150 118,703 

1910 28,430,423 51,450,985 10,776,465 113,246 

1909 36,672,605 41,627,995 9,637,119 128,393 

1908 32,803,603 27,304,347 8,340,566 128,208 

Average prices received: 

Copper, cents Lead, cents Silver, cents Zinc, cents 

Year per Ib. per Ib. per oz. per Ib. 

1918 25.273 7.424 97.081 8.289 

1917 27.201 8.558 81.765 9.353 

1916 27.297 6.676 65.386 12.327 

1915 18.183 4.546 49.965 14.964 

1914 13.404 3.827 55.564 

1913 15.433 4.396 60.503 

1912 16.237 4.529 61.291 

The United States Smelting, Refining & Mining Co. owns and operates the 
following : 

Properties covering a large number of patented and unpatented claims near 
Bingham, Utah, J. F. Barnard, supt, Bingham mines. These are in one block, 
and produce lead, silver, copper, gold, and zinc ores. They are connected by 
means of the Niagara tunnel with the Garfield-Bingham railway, which permits 
of the delivery of the ore produced to any of the smelters in Utah. These mines 
have been operated since 1899 under the present control, and since about 1870 by 
earlier ownership. In 1918, they produced 177,921 tons of ore of an average net 
value of $8.292 per ton at the mine, at mining cost of $5.424 per ton. Owing to 
the fact that the ore bodies occur in limestone, which economically precludes the 
blocking out of large reserves, only from two to three years of ore are in sight, 
but the unexplored territory is large and the probability of continuing the find- 
ing of valuable orebodies for a long period of time is good. 

A lime quarry at Topliff, Utah, which produced 136,836 tons during 1918. 

Lead smelter and a lead and zinc concentrating mill at Midvale, Utah. L. D. 
Anderson, chief engr. ; Ambrose Nord, cashier, Salt Lake City. These plants 
are situated on a area of 235 acres, and are connected with the Denver & Rio 
Grande and the Oregon Short Line systems. The smelter and mill not only 
treat the ores produced from the company's own mines, but purchase ores on 
the open market and by contract in all the inter-mountain States, thus making of 
this unit a permanent custom lead smelter and concentrator. 

The smelter has 7 blast-furnaces and has a capacity of 481,800 tons of 
charge per year. It is equipped with the most modern type of blast and roasting 
furnaces and charging apparatus, and a system of baghouses to filter the smelter 
fumes. The primary object of the baghouses was to prevent the smoke becoming 
n nuisance, but their installation has permitted the company to recover as 
by-products arsenic and cadmium on a profitable scale. 

The concentrating mill has a capacity of 210,000 tons o'f ore per year. Jt 
produces lead concentrates containing gold and silver, which is reduced in the 



U. S. SMELTING, REFINING & MINING 115 

adjoining lead smelter, and a zinc-iron middlings product. This latter is sepa- 
rated in the dry mill by means of the Huff electrostatic process into a zinc con- 
centrate and an iron-silver-gold concentrate. The latter is smelted at Midvale ; 
the former is under contract to a zinc smelter. By means of this concentrating 
plant, complex ores, which formerly could not be profitably handled, are now 
treated so as to yield a profit both to the mine and smelter. 

A number of patent and unpatented claims and 85 acres of agricultural 
ground for water-rights at Eureka, Utah. The geology of the district has been 
fully described by the U. S. Geological Survey. The deposit consists essentially 
of a replacement in limestone, the ore-shoots making along north and south and 
also northwest and southeast fracture-zones. The ore produced from them can 
be delivered either to the Denver & Rio Grande or to the Salt Lake Route. The 
claims have been worked since the year 1887 and have produced a great quantity 
of high-grade ore. The recent developments have shown an ore of much lower 
grade, and although the possibilities of finding much ore, especially below water- 
level, have not been exhausted ; these mines are no longer depended upon as a 
large source of ore supply for the Midvale smelter. During 1918, the Centennial- 
Eureka produced 29,559 tons of ore of an average net value of $16.97 per ton, 
at a cost of $8.65 per ton. This was 60% of the quantity for 1917. It has a 
shaft 2,300 ft. deep, with levels at approximately 100-ft. intervals. It is equipped 
with hoisting engine and compressor plant sufficient for a production of 120,000 
tons per year. All this equipment is kept in first-class condition. A. P. Mayberry, 
supt.. Centennial Eureka mine. 

In Shasta county, California, is the company's Mammoth mine, one of the 
most important in the State, but its end is not far off as reserves are only about 
115,000 tons. R. E. Hanley, gen. supt. Mammoth mines. 

A copper smelter at Kennett, California. O. J. Egleston, mgr. Mammoth 
plant. It has five furnaces, three of which are in operation, and has a capacity 
of 450,000 tons of charge per year. From 1905 to 1919 it treated 3,420,410 tons of 
ore. The smelter is equipped with a converter plant from which the blister 
copper is shipped to the refinery of the U. S. Metals Refining Co. at Chrome, 
N. J. Besides the usual auxiliaries, the smelter is supplied with a large baghouse, 
the purpose of which is to render the emissions of the smelter harmless to 
agricultural interests. By reason of this baghouse, it- is the only one of the 
smelters in Shasta county which is permitted to operate, such permission having 
been obtained by a decree of the Federal Court. The smelter treated the whole 
output of the operating mines, and is easily reached from any part of the mining 
territory in Shasta county which the company is exploring. The smelter is also 
treating custom copper ores originating in northern California, and silicious ore 
from California. Nevada, and Oregon. There are frequently found in the 
'Mammoth group of mines copper-bearing orebodies that carry a high percentage 
of zinc. The smelter is equipped with a sorting plant for these ores, which turns 
out a high-grade zinc product. The smelter is liberally equipped with a power- 
plant, machine-shop, boiler-shops, round-house, etc., to allow an uninterrupted 
and economical operation. During 1917, the quantity of ore reduced was 345,990 
tons, 164,540 tons coming from the Mammoth mine; and in 1918, a total of 413,082 
tons, the Mammoth supplying 77,695 tons. 

A milling plant at Needles, vSan Bernardino county, California. This is a 
concentrating plant of 125 tons daily capacity, equipped with crushers, jigs, tables, 
and a flotation plant, the latter for the recovery of zinc from tailings. 

A number of patented claims and water-rights at Goldroad, Arizona, held 
by the Gold Roads Co. D. R. Muir, mgr. Gold Road and Needles properties. 
The ore is a gold-bearing quartz, occurring in a fissure vein, which strikes 
easterly and westerly. The claims cover 1^4 miles along the vein. The record of 
production prior to its purchase by this company in 1912 was a good one, the 
stoping operations having been carried down to the 500-ft. level. On taking 
control the U. S. Co. extended development on the strike of the vein and also 
down to the 900-ft. level. The assay-value of the ore diminished with depth 
compared with that previously mined, only a small percentage of the ore found 
on the 800-ft. level being of pay grade, though the vein continues strong and 
persists. 




116 I'XITJ'J) STATES 

The mine is worked through two shafts ; one reaching 800 and the other 900-ft. 
level, equipped with cages and skips. The precious metals are recovered by 
cyanide process in a mill of 300 tons daily capacity, located within a few hundred 
feet of the mine. The property is fully supplied with power house, air-com- 
pressor, shops, warehouse, dwellings and other accessories required by the opera- 
tion. The motive power at the Gold Road mine is electricity, purchased from a 
power plant at Kingman, Arizona. Little work was done in 1917 and none in 
1918, save that part of the mill was leased. 

Zinc mines and mills in Kansas and Oklahoma. The zinc smelter at Checotah, 
Okla., uses natural gas as fuel, and is equipped to treat both carbonate and sul- 
phide ore containing precious metals. 

Niagara Mining Co. 

G. W. Heintz, gen. mgr. ; C. E. Ellen, mgr. 

Inc. in Maine. Cap. 1,000,000 shares. $1 par, 650,005 shares issued. Of 
these, the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. owns 572,605 shares; of the balance, 38,498 are 
held by other shareholders, and 38,902 are held in the treasury of the Niagara 
Mining Co. 

Property: company owns several patented and unpatented mining 
claims adjoining the mines of the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. at Bingham, Utah. The 
property is being worked through the Niagara tunnel, which connects at its 
portal with the Bingham & Garfield Railroad for delivery of ores to the Salt 
Lake Valley smelters. The property is now being developed to connect the 
known orebodies with the Niagara tunnel haulage-system, and is prospecting for 
new orebodies in hitherto undeveloped areas. The property is fully equipped for 
mining operations. 

Bullion-Beck and Champion Mining Co. 

Inc. in Utah. Cap., 100,000 shares, $10 par, 63,787 issued; 54,824 shares 
being owned by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. Lessees are doing most of the work. 
Production in 1917 was 5,700, and in 1918, 2,072 tons. 

United States Fuel Co. 

S. J. Jennings, pres. ; Moroni Heiner, v. p. ; R. M. Magraw, gen. supt. ; E. R. 
Gibson, auditor. 

A Utah corporation. 
Capital, $10,000,000, of which $3,000,000 is pfd., par $1, and $7,000,000 com., 
par $10 ; 2,355,690 pfd. and 700,000 com. issued. 

Bonds: This company has outstanding $3,636,300 first and refunding 
6% bonds, of which $3,424,800 are owned by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. 

The U. S. S. R. & M. Co. owns 1,359,619^4 pfd. shares, and 700,000 com. shares. 

The U. S. Fuel Co. has acquired the properties of the Castle Valley Coal Co., 

Black Hawk Coal Co., Consolidated Fuel Co., Panther Coal Co., and has assumed 

the joint first mortgage bonds of the Consolidated Fuel Co. and Southern Utah 

Railroad Co., par value $303,000. 

The U. S. Fuel Co. also owns all the outstanding capital of the following 
companies : 

Shares. 

Utah Coal Sales Agency 7,500 

Mohrland Mercantile Co 18,000 

Southern Utah Railroad Co 749 

Castle Valley R. R. Co 10,000 

Price Reservoir & Irrigation Co 20,000 

The Utah Coal Sales Agency owns all the outstanding capital of the Western 
Fuel Co 361 shares. 

By acquisition of the above properties, the U. S. Fuel Co. owns and controls. 
four coal mines, each equipped with haulage system and separate tipples. The 
joint output of these mines in 1918 was 1,272,081 tons. 





U. S. SMELTING, REFINING & MINING 117 

United States Stores Co. 

J. H. Horlick, mgr. ; R. T. Walker, mgr. of Ore Purchasing Dept. at Salt 
Lake City. 

Is the purchasing department of the U. S. S. R. & M. Co., organized under 
the laws of the State of Utah. Authorized capital of 500 shares; all issued and 
owned by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. 

Utah Railway Co. 

G. W. Heintz, pres. ; G. S. Anderson, v. p. and gen. mgr. 

A corporation organized under the laws of the State of Utah. 

The funded debt of Utah Railway Co. is $4,500,000 in 5% gold coupon notes, 
maturing April 1, 1922, all of which are owned by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. 

Cap., 35,000 shares, $100 par ; 30,652 issued and owned by the U. S. S. R. & 
M. Co. 

Property: company owns and operates 45.56 miles of track, and has track- 
age rights over 52 miles of road (double track entire distance) of the Denver 
& Rio Grande company, between Thistle, Utah, and Utah Railway Junction, Utah, 
aggregating 98.56 miles of road operated exclusive of other trackage rights, yard 
tracks, and sidings. All the coal produced by the U. S. Fuel Co. and other mines 
along the road is hauled by the company which is fully equipped with the latest 
type of engines and coal cars. 

Carbon-Emery Stores Co. 

A corporation organized under the laws of the State of Utah. Authorized 
capital, 30,000 shares, par value $5, of which 27,000 shares are issued and owned 
by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. 

San Pete Valley Coal Co. 

A corporation organized under the laws of the State of Utah. Authorized 
capital, 2,000 shares, par value $10, of which 1,877 shares are owned by the U. S. 
S. R. & M. Co. 

Richmond-Eureka Mining Co. 

G. W. Heintz, gen. mgr.; C. E. Allen, mgr. 

Inc. in Maine. Cap., 360.000 shares, $10 par, 309,397^ issued, 182,213 
of which are owned by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. 

Property: several patented and unpatented claims situated at Eureka, 
Nevada. The geology of the district, and of the deposit is fully described in a 
monograph of the U. S. Geological Survey. Mining began in 1869, and con- 
tinued with minor interruptions up to 1910. In February of that year the Eureka 
& Palisade Railway, which connects the mine with the Southern Pacific and also 
Western Pacific Railway at Palisade, was washed away. When the railway was 
repaired, the high freight demanded made the ore, all of it low-grade, unprofit- 
able. Regular mining operations have not yet been resumed. A little speiss has 
been shipped from the dumps to the U. S. S. R. & M. Co.'s plants for experi- 
mental treatment. 

The mine is equipped with hoists, pumps, and compressors, shafts, and drifts. 
It has never been prospected below the water-level and there remains a large 
section of ground above that level also unexplored. Whenever the railway puts 
in a rate approximating the former one mining can be resumed, and the possi- 
bilities of the ground determined. 

See this company in Nevada. 

Sunnyside Mining & Milling Co. 

Inc. in Maine. Cap., 18.000 shares, $100 par, all issued, of which the 
U. S. S. R. & M. Co. owns 9,001 shares. 

Property: Several patented and unpatented claims at Eureka, Colorado, 
at an elevation of 12,000'. Control was secured in 1917. The ore carries zinc, 
lead, silver, and gold. Reserves are estimated at 850,000 tons. Workings on 8 
levels aggregate 12,000' of openings. A fire in 1919 destroyed part of the sur- 
face works, delaying production thereby. The mill is a 500-ton flotation plant. 

See this company in Colorado. 




118 UNITED STATES 

United States Smelting, Refining & Mining Exploration Co. 

Offices: 55 Congress St., Boston, Mass.; 120 Broadway, New York; 
920 Newhouse Bldg., Salt Lake City; 1504 Hobart Bldg., San Francisco, 
California. 

S. J. Jennings, v. p. in charge of exploration and mining investment ; C. E. 
Allen, v. p. and gen. mgr. of Western operations. 

A corporation organized under the laws of the State of Maine. Authorized 
capital of 1,000 shares; $50 par value; 900 of which are issued and owned by 
the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. The Exploration Co. was formed for the purpose of 
developing new properties, which, when acquired, would be turned over to the 
U. S. S. R. & M. Co. 

Some of the many properties examined and developed were the Ebner in 
Alaska working on a small scale), Fryer Hill basin at Leadville (abandoned after 
doing considerable work), Stowell copper claims in California, the Sunnyside 
in Colorado (put on a 500-ton daily output), Keystone claims in California (ore 
found by drilling), silver-lead property in Idaho, and options on ground in 
Mexico. 

Compania De Real Del Monte Y Pachuca 

S. M. Cancino, pres. ; D. S. Calland, director. 

A Mexican corporation with authorized capital of 2,554 shares, of which 
2,535 shares are owned by the U. S. S. R. & M. Co. It operates a large number 
of claims in the districts of Pachuca and Real del Monte, State of Hidalgo, 
Mexico, producing gold and silver, and also owns large agricultural tracts. This 
company owns two cyanide plants, one of 1,000 tons daily capacity in the Real 
del Monte district, the other of 1,800 tons for the Pachuca district. About 20% 
of the total recovered metals are in the form of concentrates, which are shipped 
to custom smelters; the remainder, in the form of bullion, is exported. A third 
mill, for treatment of ore from the New vein, which contains large reserves of 
rich ore, is contemplated. 

In Aug.. 1919, the Santa Ana property, of 200 acres, in the extreme western 
part of the Pachuca district, was acquired. This gives a solid block of 300 acres 
in that area. The eastern section of Santa Ana contains part of the famous 
Viscaina vein. The mine has been producing silver ore for several years. A 
large body of rich ore is available. An aerial tram a mile long is being erected 
to carry to Santa Ana ore to the Loreto mill. See this company in Mexican 
mines. 

United States Smelting, Refining & Mining is ably managed and in the 
hands of experienced, yet courageous, executive officials, so that an even more 
prosperous future is assured. 
UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION 

Through its subsidiaries this company controls about 140 iron mines in 
Alabama, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The most important are de- 
scribed under their respective titles. Recent production : 

Year Tons Year Tons Year Tons 

1918 28,332,939 1917 31,781,769 1916 33,355,169 

YUKON GOLD CO. 

Controlled by the Yukon-Alaska Trust, Incorporated. 1916, to take over the 
residuary assets of the dissolved Guggenheim Exploration Co. 

Office: 120 Broadway, New York. 

Trustees: William Loeb, Jr., C. K. Lipman. Charles Earl, and R. W. 
Straus. 

Officers: Wm. Loeb, Jr., pres.; C. K. Lipman, v. v.-sec. ; C. H. Munro, 
acting cons, engr.-gen. mgr., with Daniel, Isaac, Morris, S. R. Guggenheim, E. 
L. Newhouse. F. R. Foraker, Charles Earl and O. B. Perry, directors; L. Fred- 
rick, treas. ; W. E. Bennett and C. E. Moran, asst. sec. : M. M. Van Keuren, 
comptroller; O. L. Myers, gen. and.; F. R. Raiff. traffic mgr.: E. R. Reets, purch. 
agent : E. E. McCarthy, mgr. at Dawson, II. C. Perring, mgr. at Oroville. 



YUKON GOLD 



119 



Inc. Feb. 28, 1907, in Maine. Cap., $25,000,000 reduced, Jan., 1915, to 
$17,500,000; $5 par; all issued; $14,213,125 stock owned by the Yukon Alaska 
Trust. Guaranty Trust Co., New York, registrar; D. A. Crockett, 120 Broadway, 
New York, transfer agent. Listed on New York and Boston Curb. Annual 
meeting 2nd Monday in January, at Augusta, Me. 

The Guggenheim Exploration Co. had loaned the Yukon Gold Co. $5,000,000, 
at 5%, covered by 8 serial notes for $625,000 each, one of which was payable 
each year for 8 years, from Feb. 1, 1917. When the first note was due, re-payment 
was extended one year from the date of maturity of the last of the series of 
8 notes. In 1917, it was calculated that earnings from the holdings would be 
insufficient to meet the notes and continue dividends. The second note became 
due on Feb. 1, 1918, but was extended to 1926. No. 3 note, due Feb. 1, 1919, 
was paid. 

Dividends: 8% (40c. per share), quarterly from Sept., 1909, to Dec.. 
1911; 6% (30 cents) annually from April, 1912, to Dec. 31, 1917; and \% (5 
cents) in 1918. Payments were suspended in Sept., 1918, on account of abnormal 
conditions. 

Comparative General Balance Sheet 



Property 

Year & Invest's 

1918 $2,492,818* 

1917 2.878,416* 

1916 12,311,019 

1915 11,569,474 

1914 11,524,181 

* On basis of re-valuation. 



Equip. 
$2,857,471* 
3,323,752* 
8,312,943 
7,039,902 
7,036,424 


ASSETS 

Def'd 
Charges 
$158,542 
434,144 
501,094 
548,532 
600,066 


Bullion 
&Cash 
$1,392,282 
1,279,003 
2,046,748 
469,729 
195,283 


Other 
Current 
$2,550,339 
2,207,454 
1,735,985 
1.357,015 
1,509,654 


Total 
$9,451,453 
10,551,082 
24,907,780 
20,984,652 
20,856,608 



LIABILITIES 



Capital 

Year Stock 

1918 $17,500.000 

1917 17,500,000 

1916 17,500,000 

1915 17.500,000 

1914 17,500,000 



Yukon-Alaska 

Trust 
$5,000,000 
5,000,000 
5,000,000 
1.500.000 
1,675,000 



Current Deprec. Surplus 

$195,877 $ $4,255,576* 

244,985 5,306,097 

189,614 1,567,822 650,344 

158,078 1.223,740 602,834 

134,729 987,995 567,884 



Total 

$9,451,453 

10,551,082 

24,907,780 

20,984,652 

20,856,608 



* On basis of re-valuation. 
Comparative Income Account: 



Net 

Operating 
Year Income 

1918 $325,455 

1917 1.738,239 

1916 2.101,701 

1915 2.121,031 

1914.. 2.213.126 



Royal- Amort- Int. Ch's. Total 

ties Paid ization Exp's, etc. Deduct's 

$61,020 $ $218,536 $279,556 

119,217 245,876 365,094 

362,852 250,647 390.691 994,191 

542,241 248,037 245,803 1,036,081 

489,169 534,073 61,577 1,084,819 



Surplus 

$45,898 
1,373,146 
1,107,510 
1,084,950 
1,128,307 



Property: includes 650 claims in the Klondike, Yukon Territory; 24 
claims on Flat and Greenstone creeks, Iditarod district, Alaska ; considerable 
areas on the American, Feather, Trinity, and Yuba rivers, and Butte creek, 
California; lease on property of the Coeur d' Alene Mining Co., Prichard creek, 
near Murray, Idaho; and the Long Hike, O. K. and Starlight lode claims, in 
the Jarbidge district, Elko county, Nev., the last three operated by the Elkoro 
Mines Co., which see. 

The new properties acquired by purchase or lease contain gold estimated 
to be worth $8,000,000, of which the company's proportion will be $3,500,000. 



120 



ALABAMA 






The Idaho property, early in 1918, was reported to contain 10,600,000 cu. yd. of 
giavel and $1,530,000 in gold. 

Heretofore Yukon Gold has confined its operations to placers, but the lode 
property in Nevada marks a departure from this policy. 

Equipment: at Dawson, Yukon, 7 large dredges, 70 mile ditch, power 
plant, steam thawing apparatus and hydraulicking plant ; on 5 rivers in Cali- 
fornia, one dredge on each ; in Idaho, one 7*/ 2 cu. ft. dredge ; and at Elkoro 
mines, Nev., 100-ton cyanide mill. 



Production: 



Alaska (1 dredge).. 
Klondike (5 dredges) 
Klondike (sluicing)., 
California (5 dredges) 
Idaho (1 dredge) 



Total quantity. .11,358,283 





1918 






1917 


1 


field 


Cost 




Yield 


Yards 


Cts. 


Cts. 


Yards 


v Cts. 


644,125 


83.06 


75.72 


1,135,177 


91.5 to $1.17 


2,767,058 


30.87 


34.36 


4,583,326 


37.87 


2,054,390 


16.00 


8.40 


2,143,444 


21.47 


4,444,404 


7.00 


6.00 


6,161.941 


8.40 


1,448,306 


12.97 


7.30 

















Cost 
Cts. 

48.1 to 53.2 

25.81 

11.80 

3.71 




1916 



1915 



Alaska (2 dredges) . . 
Klondike (dredges) . . 
Klondike (sluicing) . . 
California (3 dredges) 



Yield Cost 

Yards Cts. Cts. 

1,222,428 86.7 to 95.6 80.6 to 39.8 
5,433,052 41.89 23.32 

2,245,084 19.40 11.90 

4,032,476 10.27 3.94 





Yield 


Cost 


Yards 


Cts. 


Cts. 


926,956 


91.30 


38.70 


5,041,075 


48.73 


26.46 


3,031,647 


13.60 


7.00 


3,818,127 


11.46 


4.51 



Total quantity. 12,933,040 



12,817,804 



The boats in Alaska have worked out their ground, and have been dismantled. 
Company's financial and technical direction is excellent. 

ZINC CONCENTRATING CO. 

Office: L. N. Godfrey, pres.; 60 Congress St., Boston. Mass. 

Company controls the Campbell system of magnetic separation and the Dings ? 
magnetic separators used by the Linden Zinc Co. and the Wisconsin Zinc Co. 



ALABAMA 

ALABAMA COMPANY, THE ALABAMA 

Office: H. W. Coffin, gen. mgr., Birmingham. Ala. 

Inc. 1913 in Del. Cap., $2.000.000 com.; $600,000. 7% cumulative 1st pfcl.; 
$1,500,000, 7% non-cum. 2nd pfd. ; par $100. Bonds $2,256,000, all issued. 

Dividends: July, 1917, paid back dividends in full on 1st pfd. amounting 
to 21%. On 2nd pfd. initial 7% paid Dec., 1917. On common 1st dividend, 
Dec., 1917. 

Property: includes 10,164 acres of iron orelands in Ktowah. Tallade^ 
and Jefferson Counties, Ala. ; and in Polk Co., Ga. Also owns 4 blast-furnaces, 
capacity 300,000 tons ; coal mines and coke ovens in Alabama. 

Ore: production for the last 4 years was. 135.3W. 166.582. 257,958 and 
336,135 tons, respectively. 
CENTRAL ALABAMA C. & I. CO. ALABAMA 

Office: Jenifer, Ala. 

Reported, 1919, that company would rehabilitate the Jenifer iron furnace 
plant, erect hot blast stove and machine shop, install complete electrical equip- 
ment, add 50 coke ovens at coal mine, and build additional washery at brown pre 
mines near furnace. The Thomas Furnace Co. will probably operate the plant. 



GULF STATES WOODWARD IRON 121 

GULF STATES STEEL CO. ALABAMA 

Offices: Brown-Marx Bldg., Birmingham, Ala.; 55 Cedar St., New 
York City. 

Officers: James Bowron, pres.; N. Sanborn Smith, v. p.; C. A. Moffett. 
v. p.-gen. mgr. ; A. R. Forsyth, v. p.-treas. ; W. H. Moore, sec: Wm. H. Cover- 
dale, cons. eng. 

Inc. Nov. 1. 1913, in Del. as reorganization of Southern Iron. & Steel 
Co. Cap., common stock authorized $10,639,200; issued $8,139,200; 1st pfd. 
7% cum., authorized, $3,000,000. issued $2,000,000; non-cum. 6% pfd., authorized 
$1.860,800, issued $860,800. Bonds $210,000. 

Dividends: Feb., 1916, accumulated dividends of 15 1/6% p?id on 1st 
pfd.; regular quarterly dividend of 1$4% P a id since. On 2nd pfd. initial dividend 
of \ l /2% paid Aug., 1916, regular quarterly dividends since, also extra of \ l / 2 % 
paid Nov., 1916. On common, initial quarterly dividend paid Jan., 1917, con- 
tinued regularly with extras. Common received a 25% stock dividend, June, 1918. 

Property: owns and operates blast-furnaces, steel plants and rolling 
mills at Alabama City ; red-ore mines 5 miles S. of Birmingham ; 401 acres of 
limestone and 15,277 acres of coal land in Jefferson county; also coal lands 
near Bessemer, Ala. ; by-product coke-ovens, etc. 
REPUBLIC IRON & STEEL CO. ALABAMA 

See same title in U. S. section. 
TALLADEGA IRON CO. ALABAMA 

Property reconstructed by Japanese capital. In May, 1918, the furnace was 
about ready for operation though it was reported that the U. S. Government had 
refused export license. 
TENNESSEE COAL, IRON & RAILROAD CO. ALABAMA 

Office: Brown-Marx Bldg., Birmingham, Ala. 

Officers: G. C. Cramford. pres.; H. C. Ryding, v. p.-gen. mgr.; L. T. 
Beecher, sec.-treas. 

Inc. 1860 in Tenn. as Tenn. Coal & Ry. Co.; name changed 1881. Cap., 
com. $50,000,000; issued $32,528,698; and $108.200 8% cum.-pfd., par $100. The 
U. S. Steel Co. owns all but $66,092 of the common stock. 

Property: Owns or controls coal mines and iron ore mines (in Bir- 
mingham district) and shipping plant, coke ovens, steel mills, etc., in the Ensley 
district, Ala. In 1918, the Chichran Shipbuilding, Co. near Mobile, and the Fair- 
Held Steel Co. were organized as subsidiary companies. 

Production: not published, but is probably about 3,000.000 tons; this 
State yields 5,000.000 tons annually. 
U. S. STEEL CORP'N ALABAMA 

See same title in U. S. section. 
WOODWARD IRON CO. ALABAMA 

Office. Woodward, Ala. 

Officers: A. H. Woodward, pres R. H. Banister, v. p.; D. E. Wilson, 
treas. ; H. E. Smith, sec. 

Inc. Nov., 1911, in Del. Cap. $10.000,000 com. and $3,000,000 6% cum. 
pfd.; par $100; all issued. 

Property: owns and operates 5 blast furnaces with annual capacity 
about 450,000 tons of pig iron, by-product coke ovens and coal and iron mines 
near Birmingham, on one of which the E. J. Longyear Co., is said to be sinking 
a 14x22' shaft 1,400' deep. 



ALASKA 

Metal production of this Territory during 1918 was valued at approximately 
$29,000,000, $12,000,000 less than in 1917. The copper product was $17,180,000; 
gold, $10,000,000 and silver, $870,000. Chromite, tungsten, antimony, etc., totaled 
$117,000, and tin $90,000. Since 1880 the total copper output has been $106,000,000, 
and gold $302,000,000. Mines are arranged alphabetically in this Territory. 

The total output in 1919 was $18,850,000. 




122 ALASKA 

Prince William Sound region, in which most of the copper mines occur, 
includes Ellamar district on eastern shore, and Knight Island on western part 
of sound. The rocks of the region are mainly metamorphosed sedimentaries, 
dominantly graywacke, argillite, slate and conglomerate, with very minor amounts 
of limestones, chert or jasper. They are folded and intruded by large bodies of 
basic igneous rocks now altered to greenstones, and by still more recent granite 
stocks. 

There are two periods of mineralization, the copper ores being- associated 
with the greenstones while the later gold-bearing quartz lodes are genetically 
related to the granite. The copper deposits are replacements and impreg- 
nations of sheared and shattered zones in the greenstone or adjacent rocks. 
The ores contain chalcopyrite, chalmersite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, galena, 
pyrite, arsenopyrite, gold, silver with associated epidote, quartz, calcite and 
chloride. 
ALASKA-CHITNA EXPLORATION CO. 

Reported to have bought the Westover group in southwestern Alaska, from 
Louis C. Dillma of Seattle, Wash., in 1917. 
ALASKA CONSOLIDATED COPPER CO. ALASKA 

See Alaska Copper Co. 
ALASKA CONSOLIDATED MINING & SMELTING CO. ALASKA 

Mines at Copper Mount, Sulzer P. O., Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. 

Officers: Geo. H. Crosby, pres.-gen. mgr., Lonsdale Bldg., Duluth, 
Minn.; A. M. Sellwood, v. p.; I. M. Lennan, sec., with A. L. Warner and Henry 
W. Armstrong, directors. Thos. Wright, supt. 

Inc. Oct., 1912, in Ariz. Cap. $2,500,000; $5 par; $1,500,045 outstanding. 

Company purchased of the Alaska Copper Co. at sheriff's sale. Property : 
23 claims, 18 patented and 5 being patented, with 15 -acre mill site, known as the 
Copper Mountain group, situated on Copper Harbor, Prince of Wales Island, 
Alaska. 

Geology: mine covers a contract metamorphic zone between granite 
and limestone with a porphyry intrusion along the contact. Orebodies are from 
3 to 50' wide with mineralized zone 900' wide and quite attractive surface show- 
ings. Development : by 4,600' of tunnels and several shallow shafts. 

Equipment: includes smelter, sawmill, tramway and many buildings, put 
up before sufficient ore had been found to keep smelter in operation. Re- 
ports made by W. H. Weed and other engineers on file in company's office. 
No ore shipped since 1907. Idle. 

ALASKA COPPER CORPORATION ALASKA 

Office: 25 Pine St., New York. Mine office: Strelna, Alaska. 

Officers: Frederic B. Bard, pres. ; Alvan Markle. treas.; Edward Barr. 
sec. Directors: Samuel D. Warriner, Alvan Markle. John W. B. Bausman, 
W. F. B. Stewart, George R. Bedford, Edwin Barr, Frank P. Lauer, Frederic 
B. Bard and D. George Dery. Angus McLeod, supt. 

Inc. November, 1912, in Delaware. Cap., $10,000.000; $5 par; 1,740,000 
shares issued. Bonds: Authorized and issued in 1917, joint mortgage bond 
for $1,000,000 with Alaska Consolidated Copper Co. at par, of which 1,137, 6% 
$500 10-year Gold Bonds convertible into stock of the Alaska Copper Corpora- 
tion have been subscribed and paid for to March, 1919. Proceeds expended in 
and about the enterprise. Guaranty Trust Co., New York, transfer agent; 
Columbia Trust Co., New York, registrar. Annual meeting, third Tuesday in 
February. 

Company controls by ownership the majority of the capital stock of the 
Alaska Consolidated Copper Co. and holds an operating lease for 99 years from 
the latter company. 

Property: 35 claims, 700 acres; eleven claims patented and balance in 
process of patent. Holdings comprise Nuggett group, situated about 18 miles 
from railroad station of Strelna, on the Copper River and North Western R. R., 
at an elevation of about 3,500'. 

Geology: property is crossed by a series* of parallel fault fissure veins, 
in amyglaloidal greenstone, containing mostly bornite and some chalcopyrite, in 



ALASKA DOME MINING ALASKA GOLD BELT 123 

a siliceous limestone gangue. The several parallel veins dip 83 N. W. and 
strike N. 40 E. One vein system has been followed on the surface along its 
strike for 3,500', by means of test pits sunk at frequent intervals. Ore said to 
average 7 l /2% copper per ton. In March, 1918, a carload shipment of hand- 
picked ore was reported to have averaged 15.61% copper and 4 oz. silver per ton.- 

Development: by about 5,500' of workings. 

Equipment: includes three 30 h. p. of the N-S-O type of fuel oil engines. 
The air compressors are direct connected, furnishing 500 cu. ft. air per minute, 
at 100 Ibs. pressure. 

The general equipment includes small experimental mill with crusher, jigs 
and Wilfley tables; a Leyner sharpener, oil furnace for heating steel, four 
Tugger . hoists and several pumps. During summer of 1917, a 19-mile motor 
truck road from the mine to rail at Strelna, was constructed and motor trucks 
and trailers purchased. Employs 25 men. 

In 1918 shipments amounted to 131 tons concentrates and hand picked ore; 
smelter returns were 77,000 Ib. copper and 800 oz. silver. 

Property considered meritorious, but further work necessary to determine 
size and value of orebodies. 
ALASKA DOME MINING CO. ALASKA 

U. G. Myers, representative, Eagle, Alaska; Rufus Buck, mgr. Placer 
ground on Dome Creek, Eagle district. Report completion of dam, enlarging 
6-mile ditch and laying of 2,000' of pipe preparatory to hydraulicking. 
ALASKA DOUGLAS GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Idle. Office: 809 Electric Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

Officers: F. W. Bradley, pres.; F. A. Hammersmith, sec-treas. 

Cap. $100,000; $1 par; all issued. 

Property on Douglas Island, Alaska. Assessment work only being done. 
ALASKA-EBNER GOLD MINES CO. ALASKA 

Property, sold under bondholders' foreclosure for $225,000, to A. W. Middle- 
ton, former treasurer, acting for a bondholders' protective and re-organization 
committee. Company's best asset was 100,000 shares Ebner Gold Mines Co. stock. 
Now being operated by the United States Smelting, Refining & Mining Explora- 
tion Co. Litigation described, Mines Handbook, Vol. XII. 
ALASKA-ENDICOTT MINING & MILLING CO. ALASKA 

Address: C. W. Mason, pres.; Juneau, Alaska or 402 Tacoma Bldg., 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Re-opened 1919, and report crosscutting on an 18' vein in tunnel 800' long, 
with a strong vein continuing in line with tunnel. A mill is proposed for 1920. 
ALASKA FREE GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Originally organized as a stock company, now operated under an 8-year 
lease from 1912. Wm. Martin, lessee, 206 Collins Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Property: 22 claims, surveyed for patent, in Fishhook Creek Valley, 
Willow Creek district, south-central Alaska. It was on this property the first 
gold quartz of the district was discovered in 1906. Two orebodies have been 
opened on two different veins, that are sharp, clean fissures in quartz diorite, 
traceable for several hundred feet on surface. Ore treated in the mill has 
averaged about $36 per ton. Development : by tunnels, maximum length 500' 
with some stoping. 

Equipment: includes 3 aerial tramways, mill, cyanide plant and com- 
pressor. Sixty men employed. Production to date is reported by company as 
$540,000. Operating costs are high, due to short season of 100 to 150 days each 
year, and the isolated position of property. District will be made easily accessible 
by the Gov't railroad from Seward to Fairbanks, construction of which is under 
way. See U. S. G. S. Bull. 607, page 60. Installation of electric power planned. 
ALASKA GOLD BELT MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: 170 Broadway, New York. Mine office: Juneau, Alaska. 

Officers: Sanford Makeever, pres.; A. B. Dodd, v. p.; M. M. Makeever, 
sec. ; J. Makeever, treas. ; preceding officers and D. C. Bard, directors ; A. B. 
Dodd, supt. 




124 ALASKA 

Inc. 1915, in Alaska. Cap., $1,000.000; $1 par, none outstanding Pel 
3, 1916. 

Property: 93 lode claims, 13 tunnel claims and 18 wharfage claims, 
total area 2,500 acres, located 4 miles south of Juneau and adjoining property of 
the Alaska Gastineau on the southeast. They cover the extension of the Juneau 
gold belt and the ore is supposed to be of the same general character as that of 
the Alaska Gastineau. 

Development work was started in the summer of 1915 on the Lott-Nelson 
group of 30 claims, located in the upper Sheep Creek basin. Roads were built, 
buildings constructed, and an air compressor put in, preparatory to driving a 
3,000' exploratory and development tunnel in Sheep Creek mountain to cut upper 
part of orebody. In July, 1916, this tunnel had been driven 2,880' and $100,000 
is said to have been spent thus far on the development work. Did some diamond 
drilling in an attempt to cut the Gould & Curry vein, supposed to be the main 
orebody of the property. At last accounts, April, 1916, this drill hole had reached 
a depth of 1,575' in a horizontal hole without results. Company planned to 
drive a 9,000' tunnel at sea-level to cut the orebody at depth, and to build a mill 
on the beach south of that of the Alaska-Gastineau Co. No work reported done 
since September, 1916. 

ALASKA GOLD HILL MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: A. E. Rucker, Valdez, Alaska. 

Property: a gold mine in the Black district on west side of Valdez bay. 
In October, 1919, it was reported that a rich shoot had been revealed in a new 
tunnel. 

ALASKA GOLD MINES CO. ALASKA 

Office: 25 Broad St.. New York. Mine near Juneau, Alaska. 

Officers: Chas. Hayden, pres.; D. C. Jackling, v. p.; C. W. Peters, 
treas.; K. R. Babbitt, sec.; directors, Chas. Hayden, D. C. Tackling, K. R. 
Babbitt, C. M. MacNeil, Sherwood Aldrich, F. H. Goff, E. A. Clark. B. L. 
Thane, mgr. director, F. L. Ames, and J. B. Harden. 

Inc. Aug., 1912, in Maine. A holding company, owning $11.756,100 of 
the $12.000,000 capital stock, and $3,269,000 of the" $3,500,000 bonds of the 
Alaska Gastineau Mining Co. Property is described under title of Alaska 
Gastineau Mining Co. 

Cap. $7,500,000, increased Jan., 1915, to $10,000.000; $10 par, outstanding 
$7,500,060. Of the unissued stock, $5(X),000 is reserved for conversion of 
10-year, 6% debentures. Transfer agents: Guaranty Trust Co., New York, 
and National Shawmut Bank, Boston. Registrars: Bankers Trust Co., 
New York, and First National Bank, Boston. Listed on the New York 
and Boston Stock Exchanges. 

Bonded debt: $2,999,800, consists of $1,500,000 10-year, 6% convertible 
gold debentures, series A; dated March 1, 1915; due March 1, 1925; int M. 
& S. 1, at Guaranty Trust Co., New York, Trustee, and $1,500,000 10-year 6% 
convertible gold debentures, Series B; dated March 1, 1916, due March 1. 
1926: Coupon, $100, $500 and $1,000; principal may be registered. Au- 
thorized, $1.500,000. These bonds were sold for purpose of. providing funds 
for increasing the mining and milling operations of the Alaska Gastineau 
Mng. Co. Convertible at any time into stock of the company at $30 per 
share. Subject to call as a whole, or in part, at 110 and interest at any 
time on. or after 3 years from their date. Company agrees that it will 
not, while any of these debentures are outstanding, mortgage or other- 
wise encumber any of its assets. Company is not, however, prohibited 
from issuing other debentures similar to series A and series B, at any 
time and to any amount, provided that said debentures shall not be given 
priority over series A, and series B. debentures. Normal income tax 
deducted from interest. 



ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING 



125 



A comparative consolidated balance sheet of Alaska Gold and Alaska 
Gastineau shows the following, years ending Dec. 31: 

Assets: 1918 1917 1916 

Property $14,370,921 $14,363,371 $14,355,438 

Development, construction, plant 8,041,080 8,064.524 7,953,109 

Current - 692,476 896.082 941.027 

Deferred charges to operation 481,420 535,403 746,256 



Total assets $23,585.897 $23,859,380 $23,995,830 



Liabilities : 

Alaska Gold Mines Co.: 

Capital stock issued 

Debenture bonds A and B 

Alaska Gastineau Mining Co.: 

Capital stock held by public 

First mortgage bonds 

Current 

Deferred liabilities (interest accrued, 

etc.) 

Reserves for depreciation and in- 



surance 



Surplus 



$7.500,060 
2.999,800 

243.900 
231,000 
498,677 

322,005 

642,605 
11,147,850 



$7,500,060 
2,999,800 

256,400 
231,000 
635,495 

128,145 ' 

325,045 
11,783,435 



$7,500,060 
2,999,800 

556,320 
231,000 
918,498 



11,790,152 



Total liabilities $23,585,897 $23,859,380 $23.995,830 

Notes payable by Alaska Gold were reduced from $650,000 to $500,000 



in 1917 and to $400,000 in 1918. 
debenture bonds was not paid 

Comparative Consolidated 
Dec. 31: 

1919* 

Revenue $1,052.035 

Expenditure 1,240,916 

Profit or loss 188,881 

Sundry income 1,678 

Operating profit or loss.... 190,559 

Interest paid and accrued 

Final profit or loss 190,559 

* 9 months. 



Interest due March 1, 1918, on the A and B 
there being insufficient funds. 
Profit and Loss Account, years ending 



1918 

$1,136,223 

1,233.168 

96.945 

19,621 

116.565 

219,685 

336.250 



1917 

$2.009,632 

1,724.474 

+285,158 

12,071 

4-270,826 

228,552 

+42,274 



1916 

$1.837,291 

1,543,908 

+293.383 

+37,198 

+330.581 

217.747 

+ 112,833 



Shares in Nov.. 1919, sold around $2.50, compared with $40 in 1915, and 
$1 early in 1918. Dividends are a long way off. but those in charge are 
doing everything possible to increase the profits. 

ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING CO. 

Operating company for Alaska Gold Mines Co. 

Address: Thane, Alaska. 

Officers: G. T. Jackson, mgr.; D. J. Argall. mine supt; Roy Hatch, 
mill supt.; W. T. Tolch, chief engineer; Wm. Carlberg, railroad supt.; E. M. 
Gastonguay, chief electrician; H. E. Biggs, auditor. 

Inc. Jan. 14, 1911, in New York. Cap. authorized and outstanding, 
$12.000,000: $5 par. Is controlled by the Alaska Gold Mines Co., which 
owns $11,756,100 of the outstanding stock. 

Bonded debt: $3.500,000 (entire issue) first gold 6%; dated Feb 1, 1911, 
due Feb. 1, 1931. The Alaska Gold Mines Co. owns $3,269,000 of the issue. 

Properties: in the vicinity of Juneau, Alaska, in what is known as the 
Jniu-au Gold Belt, comprise a net area of 2.166 acres, consisting of 1,672 
acres of lodes, 219 acres of placers, and 275 acres of millsites and home- 




126 ALASKA 

steads. The mining claims consist principally of 4 groups, formerly owned 
and operated independently of each other, locally known as the Alaska 
Perseverance, Ground Hog, Silver Bow Basin, and Sheep Creek groups. 
They cover the so-called Gold Creek lode system of ore deposits, across a 
low spur of mountains from Gold creek to Sheep creek and extending into 
the basin of each stream, total length of lode system so covered being in 
excess of 2 miles. The company owns a 310-acre mill site near the mouth 
of Sheep creek, on the Gastineau channel. In addition to the above the 
company owns and controls lands, reservoir sites, power plant sites and 
rights-of-way on Salmon creek, emptying into Gastineau channel, in con- 
nection with its principal water power development; and also on Annex 
creek and Carlson creek, streams emptying into the Taku inlet about 10 
miles east of the mill, and on Granite creek, Gold creek and Lurvey creek. 
The property of the Alaska Juneati Gold Mng. Co. adjoins the Alaska Gas- 
tineau on the west. 

Geology: The mineralized zone dips 70 E., in the main has a slate 
or a schist hanging wall and greenstone foot-wall. It is cut in a number 
of places by metagabbro dikes, intrusive into the vein. Gold-bearing quart x 
is irregularly distributed through the zone in the form of veinlets, stringers, 
and masses. The height of vein measured on the dip above Sheep creek 
tunnel and for the length of zone developed on No. 10 level is almost 2.00U' 
with a length of 5,000'. Thickness of the main vein, as used for estimates 
of tonnage, is 70'. A solid block of ore this size would contain more than 
50,000,000 tons. This vein is known as the Perseverance block. It served 
as a basis for the purchase of the property. Another orebody known as 
vein No. 2, has been opened up for several hundred feet, with an average 
width of over 100'. It is about midway of the length of the Alexander 
crosscut. On Jan. 1, 1915, the estimated tonnage was 21.000,000 tons of 
fully-developed ore, whose average assay was estimated at $1.75 per ton, 
but which actual operations have shown to be about $1.05 as milled. Costs 
were calculated at 75c and tailing loss at 25c per ton. A third orebody, 
the Ground Hog or Footwall orebody, has been developed in a few places, 
principally on the Sheep Creek tunnel-level, where it was opened for 1,500' 
in driving the tunnel. At this point its width and value are as large as 
those of the Perseverance vein, lying immediately north. The ore zone, 
known as No. 1, and lying between the Footwall vein and No. 2 vein, con- 
tains two, and possibly three, distinct veins, ranging in width up to 200' 
or more. 

The several orebodies opened thus far in the Perseverance block, art- 
composed of schist, slate, and metagabbro and slate, with the highest grade 
ore found to date, occurring in the schist; it has averaged in excess of $2 
per ton; No. 2 east stope on the 5th level averages $2.70 per ton. This ore- 
body has a strong rake to the east appearing further away from the central 
shaft and workings on successively deeper levels, until on No. 10 level it is 
first found east of No. 2 shaft. The slate orebody is the lowest grade so 
far developed; west of No. 1 shaft the vein widens out to twice and three 
times the width of the original development of 70'; this widening of the 
ore zone has resulted in a decrease in assay value. East of No. 1 shaft and 
below No. 5 level the slate orebody is narrower and higher grade, $1.50 
to $2.50 per ton. West of No. 1 shaft and below No. 9 level the orebody 
is made up of meta-gabbro and slate, the meta-gabbro dike replacing the 
foot-wall and making up a larger percentage of the orebody. This section 
so far as sampled and opened, is higher grade than the slate orebody west 
of the shaft, but lower grade than the schist orebody; it will furnish ore 
of an average grade. 

Development: by Perseverance, or No. 1 shaft, 1,544' deep; No. 2 shaft 
extending from the 5th to the 10th level, with an oreway from the 10th to 
13th .level at this point; the Sheep Creek tunnel, or No. 13 level; and the 
Akxander or No. 10 level. The 8' by 10' Sheep Creek tunnel with length 
of 9,178' from the bottom of the Perseverance shaft to the portal near 



ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING 127 

Sheep creek, was started Nov., 1912, and finished April 1, 1914. The tunnel 
was driven both for the purpose of developing the property longitudinally 
and at depth, and to provide a transportation outlet for delivery of ores 
to the new mill. It is driven parallel to and in the foot-wall of the principal 
or Perseverance vein. At certain points, irregularities of the orebody 
threw portions of the vein into the direct course of the tunnel; at such places 
the ore was found to be of good value. The Alexander crosscut, 10th level, 
700' above the Sheep creek tunnel and 1,300' from the surface on the dip of 
the vein, runs from the Perseverance mine camp to No. 1 shaft, which is 
vertical and connects No. 13 level with the top of No. 5 level. It is used 
only for men and supplies, has a reinforced concrete shafthouse and is 
equipped on the 13th level, with an air-driven hoist, which- operates two 
cages. Between the 10th and 5th levels the mine is opened by levels 
spaced 200' apart. The ore is dropped from the different levels through ore- 
ways to the 13th, or main haulage-level. Sheep creek tunnel. No. 1 oreway 
extends from No. 5 level to No. 13 level, parallels the vein and is almost 
wholly in the foot-wall. On No. 9 level there is a timber bulkhead which 
is used to break the fall of ore. It is hinged and can be pulled but of 
the way when not required. Oreway No. 2 extends from the 9th to the 
13th leveK It is expected to put these oreways in at 2,000' intervals. 

Two methods of mining are used, shrinkage stopping in the gabbro 
where the back is so hard it must be drilled and blasted, and a caving 
system in the slate. Full size stopes are 400' long with 40' pillars between. 
A 2-compartment raise is carried through the middle of each pillar, half of 
it being used as a manway, the other half as a skipway through which sup- 
plies are delivered from the level below by means of an air hoist. Stopes 
are started from the tops of chutes run along the. footwall, a slice being 
taken across the lode at right angles to the dip. In order to start move- 
ment in the lode a cut is driven along the length of the stope and in the 
foot-wall. No attempt is made at sorting, the mining being done on a 
large scale and everything extracted put through the mill. 

Blasting in the Perseverance mine is described in 'Eng. & Min. Journal' 
of May 19, 1918, by R. L. Healy; No. 3 stope east, 6th level, had been mined 
to the 5th level. The upper stope/No. 2 east, 5th level, had been worked 
out and emptied, except for the compact ore built up on the floor of the 
stope between the chute raises. The purpose of the blast was to knock out 
and shatter the floor pillar (level bottom) allowing the ore to drop into 
the stope below. Tunnels and short crosscuts (225 ft.) were driven in 
which to place the explosive (5,850 Ib.) There was 30.000 tons of ore 
broken at a cost of lOc per ton. 

Mining: the Perseverance ore is discussed Bull. 153, Sept., 1919, of the 
A. I. M. & M. E. The cost of driving drifts is $13.55 per foot in slate, $15.12 
in gabbro, and $15.59 in schist. These drifts are 7x8x9 ft., with 24x24 in. 
ditch on footwall side. Raising runways costs $10.54, $16.13, and $13.06 per 
foot in these respective rocks. Stoping costs from 13.567 to 28,476 cents 
per ton, and 7.46 cents for bulldozing large rocks. The average cost of 
underground work and delivering ore to the mill was 47.859 cents per ton, 
representing 6.523,873 tons in 4 years. 

Haulage on the different levels is done in 4-ton cars of the Granby 
type, by means of 6-ton Baldwin storage-battery locomotives, thus eliminat- 
ing the trolley-wire. The locomotives are operated for 16 hours, then 
charged for 8 hours. On the main haulage-level four 12-ton cars can be 
loaded at the same time. Haulage to the mill is done over a narrow-gauge 
railroad by electric locomotives of the trolley type. The railroad to the 
mill runs through Sheep Creek tunnel for 10,000'. then along the north 
side of Sheep creek for 6.000' to the coarse crushing plant. When the 
mine and mill are running at full capacity this railroad can handle from 
10.000 to 12,000 tons of ore daily. 

Machinery at the mine includes a main geared hoist, driven by com- 
pressed air. 5 compressors of 9,000 cu. ft. per minute, total capacity, 48 




128 ALASKA 

motors for all purposes using 2.852-h. p.; water-Leyner and jackhammer 
drills, and completely equipped repair shops. 

Recent work: extensions for 1918 are not published in the company's 
report; they were 4,897 ft. during the first quarter, but for the year must 
have been less than 15,472 ft. of 1917 and 24,562 ft. in 1916. Diamond-drilling 
in the two last mentioned years were 12.754 and 15,675 ft., respectively. 
Total workings are over 20 miles. No new orebodies of importance were 
encountered and development operations proved a great disappointment. 
The recovered value per ton has been remarkable in its percentage but the 
amount has been much less than expected. There is but slight promise of 
an improvement in average grade in the Perseverance block until the ore 
now broken is milled and new mining methods can be used. Samples dur- 
ing 1916 by moil and diamond-drilling numbered 20,880. 

Coarse, free gold rendered checks difficult to agree. It has been found 
that (1) sampling of the slate zone would not check with actual mill re- 
turns because it is difficult to define the limits of the orebody that will 
cave in mining, also on account of peculiarities in this deposit; (2) sampling 
of the orebody consisting of either schist or metagabbro was more satis- 
factory and uniformly averaged with actual milling results, due to the more 
even texture of the rock, better cores and moil samples and definite boun- 
daries to the orebodies that could be maintaind in mining; (3) on account 
of its greater width and irregularity the slate zone in the west section of 
the mine averaged uniformly lower grade than had been calculated; (4} the 
higher grade sections as developed lay east of the shaft where the schist ore- 
bodies had been encountered and opened; and (5) the slate zone west of the 
shaft showed a decrease in values beginning with No. 9 level and extend- 
ing up to No. 6, where better values continued to the surface. 

At beginning of 1915 the minimum estimate of fully developed, partly 
developed, and probable ore, was from 75.000.000 to 100,000,000 tons having 
a recoverable value of $1.50 per ton. Allen H. Rogers reported in 1916, 
that tonnage developed and partly developed, amounting to 5.500,000 tons 
would average about $1.45 gross, and that after the newer areas are de- 
veloped and contribute their proportion of milling ore, the mine should 
be able to supply the maximum capacity (10,000 tons) with ore that would 
yield a profit of 45 to 50c per ton. 

During 1917, the principal work was on the block of ground between 
No. 1 and 2 shafts on No. 6, 7, 8. 9, 10 and 13 levels. The object was 
further exploration of the schist ore-zone, which had originally shown good 
ore as on No. 5 and 10 levels from which a large quantity of good ore had 
been milled. Other work was east of No. 2 shaft, between No. 10 and 13 
levels west of No. 1 shaft, and on No. 2 vein west of the Alexander crosscut. 
No new orebodies were found, east of No. 2 shaft, but the work of 1916 in 
the schist orebody was confirmed. In the block between No. 1 and 2 shafts, 
from No. 5 to No. 13 level, it was estimated that there was available 
9,000,000 tons of $1.06 ore. Of this, 2.357,588 tons were broken, 2.398,242 
tons prepared for stoping, and the remainder prospected, but not prepared. 

During 1918, the principal work consisted in preparing stopes on Xo. 
11 level. Above No. 9, all mining of the orebody in the west section of the 
mine, and the east section for 1,000 ft. e^ast of No. 1 shaft was practically 
finished. In order to recover ore in the shaft pillar, containing 1.500,000 
tons of $1.15 ore, No. 1 shaft was abandoned above No. 9 level. The broken 
ore in the mine at the end of 1918 was 2,000,000 tons. The quantity in re- 
serve, between No. 2 shaft and the west end of the mine above No. 13 
level, is 6,323,117 tons, worth $1.02 per ton. 

The mill was designed to treat 1,500 tons daily in each of its 4 sections. 
Since starting operations Feb. 15, 1915, it has been demonstrated that the 
mill will handle from 10,000 to 12,000 tons of ore per day, necessitating a 
larger mine output. The mill is essentially a concentrator, accompanied 
by a separate small plant for retreatment of concentrates produced. It 
differs greatly from the conventional type of amalgamating gold mill, in 



ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING 129 

that the main milling plant produces nothing but concentrates, at a ratio 
of about 60 to 1. A novelty has been introduced by crushing with rolls in- 
stead of stamps. In the retreatment plant the coarser gold containing some silver 
is separated from the concentrates and reduced to gold and silver bullion; 
this separation produces a small tonnage of lead concentrates containing 
gold and silver that is shipped to Pacific coast smelters. The residual por- 
tions of original concentrates, consisting chiefly of iron and zinc sulphides, 
are finely ground and amalgamated for gold and silver, resultant iron-zinc 
tailing being discarded. In 1918, a hearth furnace was erected to reduce the 
high-grade concentrate, which carries most of the coarse gold. 

The mill is built upon a very steep slope, the bottom floor, is 192' above 
Ga.stineau channel, the crushing plant 685' above the water. Supplies to 
the mill are handled over an inclined tramway, while supplies for the 
crushing plant or the mine are handled over a longer tramway to a loading 
station on the ore railroad. The course of the ore through the coarse 
crushing plant is as follows: From the mine cars to the rotary dump, 
capable of handling four 10-ton cars at once, to grizzly; oversize to two 
36" by 42" rolls set to 5"; over caterpillar feeders to stationary inclined 
screens with I 1 /'" square openings; oversize to two No. 8 gyratories set to 
2"; to ore pocket beneath the crushing plant. This pocket is cut in solid 
rock, is 30' by 50' in cross-section and 225' in height, 110' of which is the 
ore-pocket proper. Remaining 115' is a raise connecting the ore-pocket 
with the crushing plant. The bin has a capacity of 10,000 tons of ore. 
At the bottom of the bin 8 feeders supply ore to a 42" belt-conveyer, 608' 
long, that runs through a tunnel to the coarse ore-bins in the mill. From 
the bins the ore goes to stationary inclined screens, \ l / 2 " square openings; 
oversize to 72"x24" rolls set to %": undersize to 54"x24" rolls set to 
%". Rolls are run on choke-feed and crush dry, and are of heavy design, 
having the large pulley in the form of an 8,000-lb. flywheel. Bearings are 
water-cooled. Roll shells are 6" thick and are shrunk onto the roll-cores. 
Five-ton skips, working in balance, raise the roll product 115' to a series 
of 10-mesh impact screens; undersize goes to concentrator; oversize is 
returned to the 54" rolls. Each of the 4 sections contains 15 impact screens, 
and there are two 54" rolls for every 12 screens. The two 72" rolls serve 
the entire 4 sections of the mill. Seven sets of skips are used; one set for 
each 72" roll, and one set for each of the 5 pairs of 54" rolls. Exhaust 
fans carry away the excessive dust caused by dry crushing. 

The concentrating department has a primary set of 10 double-deck 
Garfield tables and 10 Wilfley tables per section. Products are tailings 
and a concentrate that assays nearly 50% lead, which is shipped. Tailing 
goes to a 4-spigot Janney classifier; product of first 3 spigots to tube-mills. 
Tube-mill product goes to a secondary set of 10 double-deck Garfield tables, 
followed by 10 Wilfley tables using as wash water the 4th spigot product 
of the classifier. Each primary Garfield table can handle 300 tons per 
day. A 15-h. p. motor drives 10 tables. 

Hydro-electric power is used. The chief sources of supply at present 
are the Salmon Creek plants, 2 miles northwest of Juneau, and the Annex- 
Carlson Creek plant furnishing 4,000-h. p., these furnish a minimum of 
6.000-h. p. Ultimate capacity of the Annex Creek project will be 12.000-h. p. 
The Salmon creek project necessitated the building of a concrete dam 165' 
high and 700' long on its crest. Base of dam is 1.000' above sea-level. In 
order to get maximum benefit from the water available 2 power plants 
were built. No. 2 is a mile below the dam and operates under- a head of 
600'. Power plant No. 1 is on the shore of Gastineau channel, near the 
mouth of Salmon creek. Water discharged from upper plant is conveyed by 
a 10,000' flume to No. 1 plant and there used under a head of 500.'. Power 
plants No. 1 and No. 2 are each equipped with two 1,500-k. w. generating 
units with total capacity of 6,000-k. w. or 8,000-h. p. Office buildings, 
machine-shops sawmill, six 50-men bunk-houses, mess-house, and dock 



130 



ALASKA 




been built on the beach below the reduction plant. Operating costs are 
very low, averaging $0.00174 per k. w. hr. during the last 4 years. 

Production: the first ore was run through the mill Feb. 15, 1915. To- 
wards the end of the year a daily capacity of 6,000 tons was reached, but 
the grade of ore falling for a time, this tonnage was reduced to 4,000 tons 
daily. 



Tons Gross 

Year Milled Value 

1919* .......... 2.251.654 $0.820 

1918 ............ 1,285,445 1.090 

1917 ............ 2,240.346 1.110 

1916 ............ 1,892,788 1.193 

1915 ............ 1,115,294 1.156 



Value Oper. Exp. Profit 

Extrac- Recov- less or 

Tails tion % ered Misc. Inc. Loss 

$0.180 77.30 $0.640 $0.800 $0.160 
0.210 81.10 0.880 0.970 0.09 
0.210 81.32 0.900 0.780 +0.12 
0.222 81.33 0.970 0.796 +0.174 
0.219 81.06 0.937 0.688 +0.249 



* 12 months tonnage, but 6 months for averages. 



ALASKA 



ALASKA HERCULES MINING CO. 

Mail returned March, 1918, stamped "Out of Business." 

Address: J. A. Hannon, pres., Cordova, Alaska. 

Property: 15 claims on Shoups Bay. near Valdez, acquired 1917 from 
the Sea Coast Mining Co., and said to show 6 gold quartz veins in graywacke 
and argillite. Developed by tunnels, 400' of drifting on the vein. Equip- 
ment: included a 10-stamp mill, with 2 tables, hydro-electric power plant, 
1,800' aerial tram, air compressor, etc. Mill and power plant sites are 
near the landing, while the mine workings are at elevations from 1,750' to 
2,600'. See U. S. G. S. Bulletin 622, p. 178 and Bull. 662, p. 191. 
ALASKA HOMESTAKE MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Crary Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Officers: Edw. Eckern. pres.-mgr.; S. A. Pepper, v. p.; Edmund Smith, 
sec., with L. L. Bair, directors. 

Inc. May, 1916, in Washington. Cap. $1.000,000; $1 par; 800,000 shares 
outstanding. 

Property: 2 claims, about 40 acres, at Port Wells, Prince William Sound, 
said to show shoots of gold-silver-lead ore, 12"-36" wide, in a contact deposit 
in granite, averaging $50 per ton. Developed to depth of 250' by tunnel, in 
300', Jan., 1919. About 7,000 tons of ore reported blocked out. 

Equipment: includes gas hoist, 20-ton concentrating plant and 
compressor. About $25,000 expended in development work to date. Mill. 
started Jan., 1919, was stated to be producing concentrates worth $10,000 
per month. Values practically all in free gold. 
ALASKA INDUSTRIAL CO. ALASKA 

Office: 115 Broadway, New York. Mine office: Sulzer, Prince of Wales 
Island, Alaska. 

Officers. Col. A. S. Bacon, pres.; S. I. Frankenstein, v. p.; Samuel F. 
Grossman, sec.; S. B. Thomas, treas.; Charles A. Sulzer. lessee. 

Inc. in Washington. Cap. $1,000,000; $1 par. Annual meeting, second 
Saturday in January. 

Property: The Jumbo group of 35 claims, patented, area 700 acres, also 
60 acres in mill sites and miscellaneous properties. Main holdings are near 
the head of Hetta inlet, 2 miles from the beach and 1,500 to 2.000' above 
tidewater. 

The Jumbo mine has a mineralized contact metamorphic zone up to 
1,000' in width, with granite foot and limestone hanging, ore fading into the 
lime. Property shows 7 lenses and irregular masses, ore being mainly 
chalcopyrite, with some bornite and a little tetrahedrite in a gangue of mag- 
netite, garnet, epidote and other contact minerals, together with occasional 
molybdenite. Ore averages 4 to 5% copper, with $3 gold and silver per ton; 
Average recovery said to be 100 Ib. copper per ton of rock. 

Development: mainly by tunnel, with 4 shallow shafts and numerous 
open cuts. The tunnels are in series, lowest 500' vertically below the 



ALASKA JUNEAU GOLD MNG. CO. 



131 



highest, all connected by winzes, and the mine has over 3 miles of workings; 
greatest depth of workings is 100'. The ore stands well, requiring little 
timbering, even in stopes up to 50' in width. 

Equipment: includes 200-h. p. electric hoist and duplex air compressor, 
electrically driven. Buildings include a 35x40' warehouse, 30x35' power- 
house, smiths, store, office, dwellings, bunkhouses and various smaller 
buildings. 

The property carries an available water power, rated at 5.000 h. p.. and 
this has been partially developed by a 36" Pelton wheel, taking water from 
Beaver creek and actuating a 6-k. w. generator, and a 16" Pelton wheel tak- 
ing water under a 330' head from Jumbo creek, through a 10" pipe line of 3,000' 
length, this actuating a 55-k. w. 3-phase 2,300- volt 60-cycle generator, current 
being stepped down to 220 volts for lighting and pow r er. Mine is equipped 
with electric fans, blowers and Temple-Ingersoll electric drills. 

A 9,000' Riblet aerial tram has 14 wooden towers with 22 half-ton 
buckets, operated by gravity with a 600' auxiliary tram. Capacity of tram 
line is 10 tons per hour. The main tram has small bins at the mine and 
4,000-ton storage bins at tidewater, where there is a 200' wharf. 

Production: begun 1907, now aggregates 137,000 tons. All profits have 
gone back into the property for development and permanent improvements. 
Shipping about 1,000 tons monthly to the Tacoma smelter. 

Property considered valuable and management good. 
ALASKA JUNEAU GOLD MNG. CO. ALASKA 

Office: Crocker Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. Mine office: Juneau, Alaska. 

Officers: F. W. Bradley, pres.; Wellington Gregg, Jr., and A. B. Davis, 
v. p.; G. D. Abbott, sec.-treas.; J. S. Wallace, asst. sec.; directors, Eugene 
Meyer, Jr., Seeley W. Mudd, F. W. Bradley, Wellington Gregg, jr., A. B. 
Davis. C. A. Norris. and F. A. Hammersmith; P. R. Bradley, gen. supt.; 
John Richards, mine supt. 

Inc. Feb. 17, 1897, in West Va. Cap. $150,000, consisting of 1,500,000 
shares, increased April, 1915, to $15.000,000; $10 par; outstanding, 1,400,000 
shares. 

Bonds authorized: $3.500,000, 7%, dated March 15, 1919, payable same 
date in 1929, unless redeemed at option of company prior to maturity at 
110% of face value thereof with accrued interest. Denominations are $1,000 
and $500. On April 30. 1919, $989,000 were outstanding. Sinking fund to 
be provided for purchase of outstanding bonds. This issue is for paying 
indebtedness and re-modeling of the mill. 

Registrar, Metropolitan Trust Co., New York; transfer agent, Central 
Union Trust Co., New York. Listed on the New York Stock Exchange. 
Annual meeting first Tuesday after first Monday in April. 

General Balance Sheet: years ending Dec. 31 

Assets 



Year Propert 
1918... $9,617,79 
1917... 9,612,24 
1916... 9,645,48 
Liabilities 

Year 
1918 


Const. & Other P. & L. 
y Devel. Equip. Cash Current Surplus 
3 $1,552,925 $2,945,856 $6,628 $878,487 $563,625 
6 1,201,304 2,813,254 22.561 1.038,752 +563,625 
;9 994,240 2,180.760 361,289 330,318 563,625 

Capital Notes Accounts Deprec. 
Stock Payable Payable Reserve 
$14,000,000 $1.427,500 $131.235 $6,576 
14,000,000 1,100,000 149.172 2,570 
14,000,000 . 75 723 


Total 
$15,565,311 
15,251,742 
14.075,723 

Total 
$15,565,311 
15,251,742 
14,075,723 

Loss 
$325,500 
220,573 
147.456 


1917 


1916 


Profit and 
Year 
1918 


loss Total 
Income 
$460 322 


Operating 
Expense 
$621.901 
624,255 
230.474 


Interest 
General, Etc. 
$163,921 
86,367 
68.367 


1917 


490,049 


1916.. 


149.744 



132 ALASKA 

On April 1, 1919, the company's indebtedness, less cash assets totaled 
$1,580,000, which includes $943,000 of bonds sold of the new $3,500,000 issue. 
Property: the mineral area of the company covers a tract of land 
adjoining the property of the Alaska Gastineau Mng. Co. on the west and 
that of the Ebner Gold Mng. Co. on the east, one mile inland from Gas- 
tineau channel. In addition the company owns a large tract of land 
stretching along the east side of the channel south of Juneau. Thi* 
area, used as the mill site, is connected with the large mineral area by 
two narrow strips of land, one along Gold creek and the other farther 
south through which a long transportation tunnel connected the mine and mill. 
Geology: The mining lands include the first quartz claims located on 
the wide vein called 'the Juneau gold belt/ and are supposed to be in the 
center of the mineralization of the belt. The property owned by the 
Alaska Juneau covers the outcrop of the vein or mineralized zone, for over 
a mile in length. The lode has a width between walls of 900' and dips 70 
east. The orebody is composed of slate with gold bearing quartz, irregu- 
larly distributed through it in the form of veinlets, stringers and masses. 
Meta-gabbro dikes, intrusive into the vein, carry gold bearing quartz simi- 
larly distributed. The quartz distribution is not regular, but where the 
gold content of the entire vein is too low to pay, sorting can be resorted 
to and profitable grade of mill feed obtained. Associated with the gold in 
the quartz is pyrite, pyrrhotite, galena and a little sphalerite. The foot- 
wall is greenstone, the hanging wall schist. 

The vein was mined in a surficial way for a great many years. Deep 
development was first planned in 1899, started in 1909, but not actively 
pushed until 1910, when a main working crosscut, 8'xlO'. called the Gold 
Creek tunnel, was commenced at an elevation of 425' above sea-level, start- 
ing from a point immediately behind the town of Juneau. At 6,540' from 
the portal, where the surface could be reached in the shortest possible dis- 
tance, an 800' inclined raise in the hanging-wall was put through to sur- 
face. In driving the tunnel that portion of the vein lying west of the 
Silver Bow fault was crosscut diagonally for 650', disclosing orebodies of 
average assay values slightly less than $2 per ton. The true width of the 
vein where cut is 500' with average assay value close to $2 per ton. Although' 
this is better than shown by any surface developments, it was believed this 
width and assay value would persist for considerable distances logitudinally 
and vertically. This belief was based on the result obtained from a 30- 
stamp mill working 5 months each year, from 1896 to 1914, on ore mined 
by open-pit work along the outcrop of the vein. During this time, 295,807 
tons were milled, yielding $2.26 free gold per ton, obtained by milling 63% 
of ore mined. The rejected vein matter was gold bearing, but of lower 
grade. No attempt was made to save the gold in the sulphides, which 
would have added about 20c per ton. 

Ore extracted from the Gold Creek tunnel and the intermediate level 
opened from the incline raise at an elevation of 495' above the tunnel was 
milled in the new 40-stamp mill on Gastineau channel. A total of 50,000 
tons milled up to Dec. 1, 1914, averaged $1.36 per ton, the low value being 
due to the dilution of ore with waste attendant upon the opening of the 
two levels preparatory to stoping. In Dec., 1914, there was milled 9,657 
tons of average assay value of $1.74 per ton; in Jan., 1915, there was milled 
12,000 tons of average grade of $2.09 per ton. 

Confidence in the persistence of the vein and its value is also derived 
from records of the 100-stamp Perseverance mill, now part of the Alaska 
Gold Mines Co., and the results obtained by a small mill operating on the 
Kbner. property. 

The mine development work as outlined was designed to give a daily 
tonnage of not less than 8,000 tons, making available for caving 'and ex- 
tracting 7,500,000 tons of ore in one section of the vein. All tunnels are 
double-tracked and so equipped^ that 16.000 tons of ore daily can be trans- 
ported from the mine to the mill. 



ALASKA JUNEAU GOLD MNG. CO. 133 

Selective mining was originally contemplated and wholesale mining may 
have to be abandoned, if the mine is to become a dividend payer. Mining 
methods are concisely described by F. W. Parsons in the Engineering and 
Mining Journal of Aug. 4, 1917. 

To the end of 1918, mine development had cost $1,552,945, opening 
81,564' of workings. 

Briefly, the milling plant included: two revolving tipples, 2.000-ton 
coarse-ore bin, four 60" apron-feeders, four 8x5' grizzlies, with 8" openings, 
two 36x48 jaw-crushers, four 4x8' grizzlies with 3" openings, four No. 9 
Gates gyratory crushers, four 30" conveyors, 4 distributing boxes, two 36" 
shuttle conveyors, twenty-four 30" apron feeders, twelve 8x6'' ball mills, 12 
revolving screens, 12 V-shaped tanks, 12 mechanical distributors, 48 rough- 
ing tables, 24 classifiers, 12 shovel wheels, twelve 6x12' tube-mills, 24 settling 
tanks, 24 mechanical distributors, 96 finishing tables, and 12 Wilfley tables. 
There is a retreatment department containing two 5x5' ball-pebble mills, 
pumps, classifiers and tables. Power-plant contains four 825-h. p. Stirling 
water-tube boilers, with economizers, and forced draft apparatus, one 9-stage 
Curtis 6,000-k. w. turbo-generator, condensers, and auxiliaries. Electric in- 
stallations at the property were described in the "Salt Lake Mining Review" 
of Nov. 30, 1919, by F. S. Rice. 

The railway between mine and mill cost $167,144. This plant is to be 
altered considerably at a cost of $500,000. To the end of 1918, construction 
and equipment had cost $2,945,856. 

Results since March, 1917; at the new mill trouble started, in the 
ball-mills. In May, the daily capacity was only 1,200 tons, and 3,274 in 
December, the highest being 3,833 in November, less than half that ex- 
pected. The cost of milling was 40c per ton during the last 4 months of 
1917, and all costs 70c. The recovery from 82c ore was 75%, so that a 
loss of 8c per ton was recorded. F. W. Bradley, president of the com- 
pany, issued the following statement to the shareholders, with the annual 
report for 1917: 

The new mill has been in combined process of completion and opera- 
tion since March 31, 1917, and the best it has so far been made to accom- 
plish is less than one-half of its promised capacity, at an operating cost per 
ton of over twice the expected cost. By installing machinery for an ad- 
ditional stage of crushing, the capacity of the mill can be increased, and 
by making other costly additions to and changes in the mill it would be 
possible to reduce the present high operating costs; but the real problem 
has been to keep as much waste as possible out of the fine-grinding end of 
the mill-work. It is estimated that two-thirds of the feed to the mill has 
been straight waste, and that the cost of fine grinding it is greater than 
the cost of fine-grinding ore. 

The new mill was designed with the plan in view of both 'wholesale' 
mining and 'wholesale' milling; but as the layout of the pre-mining work 
has resulted in a caved mixture of an undue proportion of waste with 
ore, the wholesale plan of milling what has turned out to be (as far as the 
original pre-mining caving system is concerned) an uncontrolled mixture 
of waste and ore has had to be abandoned as unprofitable. Therefore in 
order to operate at a profit, the mine and mill operations are being re-ad- 
justed to the 'sorting' plan of working which was interrupted nearly three 
years ago when the 'wholesale' plan was decided upon. 

The payable values in the vein are carried in quartz stringers that, so 
far as developed in the Alaska Juneau property, have averaged about $6 
in gold per ton, in addition to their lead and silver values, and are susceptible 
of being partly sorted out from their enclosing vein-matter. This is not 
only because of the marked difference in color between the quartz and 
vein-matter, but because the quartz is much more friable than the vein- 
matter and thus lends itself to a partial mechanical separation, both when 
mined and when subjected to coarse crushing in the mill. Monthly crush- 




134 ALASKA 

ings of several thousand tons each during the 16 years' operation of the old 
30-stamp mill have given free-gold yields varying from a minimum of 35c. 
for low-grade vein-matter up to a maximum of $6.21 for sorted-out quartz. 
In addition to its recoverable gold, the ore also carries recoverable lead 
and silver values. Many milling-tests in the old 30-stamp mill on ore 
sorted from the surface workings in the vein, and also milling tests in the 
pilot mill on ore sorted from the deepest workings in the vein have given 
recoveries of over $5 free gold per ton from all the ore so sorted. During 
the first six months of 1915, 23,286 tons of mixed sorted quartz and vein- 
matter made an average mill-feed for the pilot mill of $3.22 gold assay- 
value per ton. The sorted ore thus milled was obtained by mining three 
tons of vein-matter, of which two tons were left in the stopes as waste- 
filling and the remaining ton of about equal portions of sorted quartz and 
vein-matter was sent out of the mine as mill-feed. Because the pre-mining 
system as carried out has left no control over the quantity of waste mixed 
with ore, the mill-feed for the new mill during 1917 averaged a gold assay- 
value of 87. 5c., or 3.74c. less than the gold assay-value of the mill-feed to 
the pilot mill for the year 1916. This lack of control has resulted in send- 
ing such a large proportion of waste with ore to the mill that of the rock 
over 12 inches in size fed to the mill, probably 90% has been straight 
waste, as distinguished from low-grade vein-matter. 

To overcome this waste dilution and thus place the property on a profit- 
earning basis, an installation is being made, as outlined in the accompanying 
report of the general superintendent, to mechanically reject as much 
coarse waste as possible between the Blake and gyratory crushers. Also a 
new stope is being opened on another section of the vein where physical 
conditions promise a dilution of less waste with the ore and consequently a 
higher grade of feed for the mill. Up to March 10, 1918, this new stope 
had been cut out in vein-matter for an area of 25,482 sq. ft., with an average 
gold assay-value for that area of $1.56 per ton. 

In June, 1918. the company decided to start the old pilot stamp-mill, as 
the new plant could not be run economically on a 1,000-ton basis. The 
process was to crush coarsely, stamp the ore, convey it from stamps to 
tube-mills in the new plant, side-stepping the ball-mills. 

During 1918, new work in the mine amounted to 5,501', mostly on No. 

3 and 4 levels, preparing No. 410 stope. The assay-value of all develop- 
ment and preparatory mining work 'muck' samples (6921) taken between 
January, 1913 and December, 1918, averaged $1.041 per ton. Including 409 
moiled samples taken since 1912 the average becomes $1.075. 

An endeavor was made to force the mill to its rated capacity during 
January and February. 1918, but the best daily average was 3,832 tons, 
less than half of that expected. As wholesale mining and treatment was 
unprofitable at that time, sorting of the ore was done in March, April, and 
May; but because the 400 stope produced a lower grade and sorting was 
on so small a scale, there was no resultant economic advantage, therefore 
this work was stopped. The daily average during these three months was 
1,828 tons of 70.5-cent ore. During the next five months, when better ore 
was available, milling was reduced to the quantity of this material that 
could be mined with the labor available. The average daily run was 747 
tons of $1.414 ore. The 50-stamp mill was incorporated into the flow-sheet, 
doing the work of the ball-mills. The stamps produced a Vi-inch product, 
which went to the tube-mills Many improvements were made during this 
period. In the last three months of the year, when the 410 stope was 
yielding more ore, 1,094 tons of $1.08 ore was treated daily. On December 

4 the mill resumed work with three shifts. Alterations to the plant are to 
cost $500,000; these are expected to bring the daily capacity to 8,000 tons. 

During 1918 there was spent $104,675 on the new mill, $30,508 on the 
power plant, and $10.806 on the stamp-mill. 



ALASKA METALS ALASKA TIDEWATER COPPER 135 

Production: from the old and new mills 
Year Tons Value Recovery, % Costs 

1918 574,285 $0.875 .... $1.1329 

1917 .... 

1916 180.113 0.9124 71.4 2.7363 

1915 179,892 1.4797 80.0 2.8530 

1914 60,026 1.4326 80.9 

The Alaska Juneau, like Alaska Gold has proven that gold ore cannot 
be mined by the large scale methods, used by the Porphyry Coppers. 

ALASKA'METALS co. . ALASKA 

Idle. Mine office: Bruce, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Harry Cor- 
bin, supt., at last accounts. Property on the west coast of Prince of Wales 
Island, formerly known as the Corbin mine, and the Copper Mountain 
mine. No recent returns secured. Slightly developed 

ALASKA MEXICAN GOLD MINING COMPANY. (See Alaska Tread- 
well Gold Mining Co.) 

ALASKA MINES CORPORATION ALASKA 

Address: Box 1853, Seattle, Wash. 

Officers: Jas. Gayley, pres., 81 Broadway, New York; T. S. Cram, v. p.; 
W. S. Reed, sec.-treas., with August Heckscher, M. W. Newton, Louis 
Eisenlohr and E. E. Powell, directors. John H. Miles, mgr. 

Inc. June, 1916, in Virginia. Cap. $10,000,000; $1 par; $3,743,818 out- 
standing. Transfer office Empire Trust Co., New York. Stock listed on 
New York and Boston Curbs. 

Property: about 2,200 acres of mineral land at Nome, owned outright 
and partly controlled by option to purchase. Diamond drill operations re- 
ported to have proved the existence of a large yardage of gold-bearing 
gravel. 

Equipment: includes electric power plant, machine and repair shop, 
and two dredges. Property was examined in 1919 by the Hammon En- 
gineering Co., of San Francisco. No production figures are obtainable. 
ALASKA PITTSBURGH GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: 702 Arrott Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. Mine office Valdez, Alaska. 
Officers: B. C. Wiltse, pres.; A. L. Miller v. p.; O. A. MacVay, sec ; Wil- 
ber Galbraith, treas., with V. H. Chlebus and W. E. Flick, directors. 

Inc. in Delaware. Cap. $1,000,000; $1 par. 425,000 shares outstanding. 
Annual meeting, first Tuesday in March. 

Property:. 8 claims, 160 acres, known as the Dailey-Bennett mine, on 
Bettles Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska. Ore, carrying gold and silver, 
occurs in a porphyry dike, cutting through slate. Course is northerly, with dip 
of 20. The orebody has been opened up for about 5,000' at surface, showing 
galena, sphalerite and arsenopyrite, also free gold. Mill tests reported to average 
$13.59 p. t. Developed by 400' tunnel. Ore reserves estimated by management at 
18,000 tons. Probably idle. 

ALASKA STANDARD COPPER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: suite 921; 115 Broadway, New York City. M. L. Hewitt, pres.; 
John L. Steele, mgr. Mail returned unopened. 

Inc. in South Dakota. Cap. $2,000.000; $1 par; 700,000 shares issued. 
Security Transfer & Registrar Co., N. Y., transfer agents and registrar. Com- 
pany held a 3^2-year lease, with option to purchase at $500,000, on the Standard 
mine of the Standard Copper Mines Co., at Landlock Bay, Prince William Sound, 
about 30 miles from Valdez. 

Property: 7 patented claims and a mill-site, 150 acres, said to carry a 6' 
vein of copper-gold-silver ore. 

Development: by 3 tunnels to depth of 430', reported to have proved 
300,000 tons of 4% ore and 10,127 tons of 8% ore. Fourteen men employed at 
last accounts. Is a Marcus L. Hewitt promotion. One thousand shares were sold 
at auction in New York on July 16. 1919, for $23 the lot. 

ALASKA TIDEWATER COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Office: 602 Alaska Bldg.. Seattle. Wash 



136 ALASKA 

Officers. W. E. Hall, pres.; F. G. Swann, v. p.; R. C. Hill, sec.-treas., 
with W. W. Sweet and Roy Wliitcomb, directors; R. W. Sweet, Craig, Alaska, 
supt. 

Inc. 1916, in Washington. Cap., $1,000,000; $1 par; 532.184 shares out- 
standing. 

Property: 8 claims, 5 owned and 3 held under lease in the Ketchikan 
mining district, Prince of Wales Island. Ore carries a quartz vein, traversing 
diorite and limestone, having a pay shoot of chalcopyrite ore 3-7' wide, said to 
carry gold, silver, copper and iron values, with average assays of 7.5% copper. 

Development: by 700' tunnel, 120' vertical shaft and drifts. Equipment 
includes an aerial tramway and compressor plant. Production in 1916 amounted 
to 134,949 Ibs. copper, averaging 7.17%. Shipments were made to the Tacoma 
smelter. Management reports property idle since 1917, but was planning sale of 
more stock and resumption of work during 1919. 

ALASKA MEXICAN GOLD MINING COMPANY, 1 

ALASKA TREADWELL GOLD MINING COMPANY ALASKA 

ALASKA UNITED GOLD MINING COMPANY, 

The affairs of these three Douglas Island companies are so interlocked that 
to be logical, they must be discussed together, particularly so since April 21, 

1917, when the Treadwell, 700, and Mexican mines were flooded by the sea, 
leaving only the Ready Bullion mine intact. This disaster is described in the 
account of the Alaska Treadwell mine. Financial particulars of the three com- 
panies are given under the respective titles, but mine development will be con- 
sidered as a whole. The report of F. W. Bradley, president of the three com- 
panies, made October 23, 1918, says : 

"Future developments in the Ready Bullion mine will determine the fate of 
the others. It is 3,600' east of the flooded workings, with a direct connection 
with them on its 1,350' level, but was saved from flooding by a strong concrete 
bulkhead. Unlike the other mines of the group, the Ready Bullion workings 
extend beyond the shore-line and are under the deep water of Gastineau channel. 
In order to remove all risks it was decided to fill with waste the cavities left in 
the mine as the broken ore and caved pillars were drawn and hoisted for the 
mill. In order to secure waste for this purpose, an Alaska Juneau type of caving 
stope was cut above the 450' level, 600' inland from the shore line. It cost $120,000 
to prepare for this waste filling, and filling will continue at a cost of 15c per 
ton of waste. The shaft was sunk and a cross-cut started for the 2,800' level. 
Development continues at 2,600', the stopable area being 29,025 sq. ft., averaging 
$2.59 per ton. This compares fairly well with the 14 levels above it. Ore 
reserves in the Ready Bullion total 2,300,000 tons to the 2,800' level. Of these, 
1.400,000 tons will be recovered, giving 5 years' supply to the mill, or 3 years with 
the Mexican mill. If the 2,800' level finds an orebody of profitable size and 
value, the shaft will be deepened to 3,000 and 3,400'. If this last level should 
also open ore, it will be driven westerly along the ore-channel to prospect any 
continuation in depth of the Treadwell-700-Mexican lodes. If these were of 
sufficient value, the high tides of Gastineau channel would be dammed off from 
the break on surface, and the workings pumped out. This may be in 5 to 10 years' 
time. The combination shaft is in solid ground, and could be used for future 
operations in the Treadwell-700-Mexican orebodies." 

The Ready Bullion mine is now working at a profit, that for September, 

1918, being $7,298. From Jan. 1, 1917, to Sept. 30, 1918, the output was $724,686 
from 328,990 tons. The cost was $826,819, including $54,692 for shaft sinking, 
shaft-house, and head-frame ; also $126,429 spent in safeguarding the mine 
against saltwater leaks. 

In an effort to secure new mining property tributary to Douglas island, 
many prospects were examined. Finally a molydenum deposit was taken up at 
Shakan, Prince of Wales island, 180 miles by water from Treadwell. Reserves 
were estimated at 100,000 tons of 1.58% and 6,270 tons of 2.28% MoS 2 ore. The 
2-ton Heroult electric furnace at Treadwell is to be used in making ferro-molyb- 
denum from the Shakan ore. 



ALASKA MEXICAN ALASKA TREADW ELL ALASKA UNITED 137 



The three hydro-electric plants on Douglas island have been tied-in with 
the steam plant of the Alaskan Juneau company on the mainland opposite. The 
revenue from this source was $62,687 in 1917 and $15,494 for first half of 1918. 

Dismantling and marketing saleable equipment continues, the quantity sold 
to June 30, 1918, being $294,398, with $209,950 awaiting sale. All three com- 
panies benefit from this salvaging. The mercantile department of the Treadwell 
makes a good profit, supplies on the above date being valued at $538,039. 

The following table gives the results of thTe interlocked operations of the 
three companies during 1917 and the first half of 1918: 



Mexican 

Receipts $212,924 

Expenditures ... 149,680 

Profits 63,243 

Loss . 



1917 (full) 
Treadwell 
$2,370,800 
1,999,179 
371,621 


United 
$771,554 
861,789 


Mexicai 
$35,033 
37,934 



90,235 2,900 



1918 .(half) 
Treadwell United 
$441,719 $190,499 
418,006 284,622 

23,712 

94,123 



Alaska Mexican Gold Mining Co. 

Address: Mills Bldg., San Francisco. Calif. Mine office: Douglas 
Island, Alaska. Under same management as the Alaska Treadwell, which see. 

Inc. April, 1892, in Minnesota. Cap. $1.000,000 in 200,000 shares, $5 par; 
120,000 of which went to pay for the Alaska Mexican Gold Mine, and 60,000 
were issued to the public by the Exploration Co., Ltd., of London. Annual 
meeting in May. Registration & Security Co., of San Francisco, registrars. 

Comparative General Balance Sheet: 



Assets- 
Property 

Year & Plant Cash 

1918 (June 30). $606,459 $56,884 

1916 733,235 47,775 

1915 674,195 5,175 

1914 785,692 6,955 

Liabilities 



Ore 
Reserve Bullion Accounts Subject to 

Fund Suspense Rec., etc. Depletion Total 

$93,909 $188,873 $986,923 $1,933,049 

$93,909 143,798 2,046,896 

93,909 15,314 146,332 934,926 

93,909 20,532 12,298 919,386 



Year Capital Stock 

1918 (June 30) . .$900,000 

1916 900,000 

1915 900,000 

1914 900,000 



Accounts 

Pay., etc. 

$10,233 

12,079 

24,736 

8,572 



P.&L. 

Account 

$35,893 

74,426 

10,190 

10,814 



Ore 

Surplus 
$986,923 



Total 

$1,933,049 

2,046,896 

934,926 

919,386 



Comparative Income Account (for later years see joint statement): 



Total 
Income 

1916 $330,654 

1915 401,761 

1914 513,318 

1913 496,007 



Operating 

Constr'n, etc. 

$266,417 

302,284 

343,298 

324,210 



* Including balance from previous year. 



Net 
Profit 
$64,236 
99,477 
170,020 
171,797 



Divid's Deprec. 



$90,000 
144,000 
180,000 



$10,101 
25,451 

21,552 



Balance 

$74,426 

10,190* 

10,814* 

10,213* 



Property: Located on the east side of Douglas Island, between the 
700' claim of the Alaska United on the west and the Ready Bullion mine of 
that company on the east. For a general description see Alaska Treadwell Gold 
Mining Co. 

Development: includes the 1,570' Mexican shaft, devoted to general 
use, while all ore is hoisted through the 2,817' Central shaft, on the 700' claim 
of the Alaska United, adjoining on the west. The orebody has been opened by 
levels from the 110' level to the 2,300' level; distance between levels is 110'. 



138 



ALASKA 




During 1916 development work done by the A. M. Co. amounted to 776' on its 
own property, 10' on the adjoining 700' claim of the A. U. Co., and 3,714' done 
jointly with the A. T. and the A. U. Cos. 

Samples totaling 1,592, taken on five levels, averaged $1.63 per ton. From 
the 1,100' downward ore has assayed as follows: $3.60, $3.02, $2.63, $1.23, 64c, 
$1.23 and 79c per ton, the last being at 2,100'. 

On July 27, 1916, surface evidences of a hanging-wall subsidence near the 
Treadwell 700 Ft. Claim boundary became apparent, and to protect the Tread- 
well, 700 Ft., and Mexican mines, heavy drawing of reserves of caved and broken 
ore was stopped. The Mexican mill only worked 279 days. From Aug. 1, 
1916, the 240-stamp mill and half of the 300-stamp mill of the Treadwell was 
stopped. Salt water began to flow into the mine, and due precautions were 
taken. In April, 1917, the Mexican, Treadwell, and 700 Ft. mines were flooded 
and shut down indefinitely. For details see the Alaska Treadwell. 

Ore reserves: Estimated Dec. 31, 1916, 157,000 tons ore in sight, average 
grade $1.80 per ton ; against 1,188,866 tons of $1.87 ore in 1915. 

The company has a 120-stamp mill that, in 1916, operated 34% of the time 
with steam power and 66% of the time with water power. Duty per stamp per 
day was 5.24 tons, 1 Ib. of chrome shoe crushed 2.31 tons ore, and 1 Ib. of Tread- 
well die crushed 5.15 tons ore. Mill sands are used for filling stopes. 

A cyanide plant is owned and operated jointly by the Alaska Mexican, 
Alaska Treadwell and Alaska United G. M. Cos., the A. M. Co. owning 20% 
of the plant. Power plants are in conjunction with those of the Alaska Tread- 
well, which see. 

Average number men employed daily in 1916 was 122, with average wage 
paid each $3.61. Miners received $3.50 per day. 

Production and profits since 1909 are as follows : 



19l7f... 


Tons 
Crushed 


Yield 
Free Gold 


Concentrates 
Tons 
Treated Yield 


Total 
Yield 
p. Ton 


Oper. 

Costs 
p. Ton 


Oper. 
Profits 
p. Ton 


Div. 
Paid 


1916.... 


175,476 


$119,163* 
190,980 
238,756 
225.369 
307,951 
323,965 
390,198 


4,398 
4,769 
3,340 
4,795 
4,956 
5,150 
4,166 


$155,860 
188,816 
270,267 
264,327 
371.169 
353,442 
375.523 


$1.57 
1.75 
2.18 
2.15 
2.91 
2.98 
3.50 


$1.51 
1.29 
1.45 
1.39 
1.58 
1.84 
1.76 


$0.06 
0.46 
0.73 
0.76 
1.33 
1.14 
1.74 


10% 
16% 

20% 
25% 
14% 
38% 


1915.... 


.. 216,428 


1914.... 


.. 233,457 


1913... . 


.. 227.112 


1912 


.. 233,299 


1911. ... 


. . 227.081 


1910.!. . 


.. 218,960 







t Mine flooded since April. 

* Including $27.855 from copper plates. 

Costs per ton for 1916 were : Mining, 91c ; milling, 39c ; cyaniding same as 
Alaska Treadwell. Mining costs include" charges for 1.050' of development at 
$21.38 per ft., and stoping 69,285 tons at $1.04 per ton. Milling costs include 
crushing, 5.7c ; tramming, 1.7c; stamping, 23c ; concentrating, 8.7c. 

As the Mexican may not produce any more ore, its total output may be 
given from 1894 to 1917: 4,445,807 tons, averaging $2.61 per ton at cost of $"l.67. 
Out of profits, $4,161,657, dividends absorbed $3,507,381, or $19.47 per $5 share. 

Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining Co. 

Address. Mills Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. Mine office: Douglas Island, 
Alaska. Officers: F. W. Bradley, pres.; A. B. Davis, v. p.; F. A. Hammer- 
smith, sec.-treas. Preceding officers : E. W. Hopkins, H. S. King, directors ; P. 
R. Bradley, cons. eng. ; R. G. Wayland, gen. supt. 

Inc. June 1, 1890, to take over the property of the Paris mine on 
Douglas Island, where operations had been conducted since 1882. Pur- 
chase price was $5,000,000 in fully paid shares. Cap. $5,000,000; shares $25 
par. Metropolitan Trust Co., New York, registrar and transfer agent 



ALASKA MEXICAN ALASKA TREAD WELL ALASKA UNITED 139 



Cash 
$275,695 
245,023 
365.365 
295.587 


Other 
Current 
$1,347,162 
956,034 
603,961 
558,053 


Supplies 
$538,039 
789,012 
565,337 
599,471 



Comparative General Balance Sheet: 

Assets 

Property 
& Plant 
1918 (June30)$3,531,054 

1916 3,942,947 

1915 3,775,173 

1914 3,685,306 

* Ore subject to depletion. 

Liabilities 

Capital Accounts Draft 

Stock Pay, Etc. Account 

1918 (June30)$5.000,000 $280,365 $4,239 

1916 5,000,000 474,224 9,885 

1915 5,000,000 524,926 3,438 

1914. '. 5,000,000 394,520 5,182 



Other 

Assets* Total 
$7,886.262 $13,578,212 

8,439,607 14,372,623 
308,618 5,618,454 
309,965 5,448,382 



P. & L. Ore 

Account Surplus Total 

$411,575 $7,886,262 $13,578,212 

498,209 14,372,623 

90,090 5,618,454 

48,680 5,448,382 



Comparative Income Account (for later figures, see joint account) : 



Earnings 



Net 
$658,119 
706,610 
1.314,933 
1.286,498 



Other Construe. 

Income & Repair 
$90,090 
177,399 
67,813 



62,592 



$24.822 
31,343 
38,599 



Divid's Deprec. Balance 

$250,000 $498,208 

650,000 $167,777 41,410 

1,100.000 250,953 450 

1,000,000 487,261 176,770f 



Gross 

1916. $1,604,737 
1915. 1,828,723 
1914. 2,367,562 
1913. 2.358,423 

t Deficit. 

Dividends to Jan., 1917, aggregate $78.93 per share. 

Property: The Treadwell group of mines, consisting of the Alaska 
Treadwell, the Alaska Mexican and the Alaska United, which operates the 700' 
mine and the Ready Bullion, are under one management and are located on the 
east side of Douglas Island near the shore of Gastineau Channel. The A. T. 
property is farthest west. Geological conditions are the same in the mines of 
the 3 companies. Hanging wall of Treadwell is 1,000' distant from present shore 
line, while that of the Ready Bullion lies for the most part under tidal water. 
Though several orebodies have been found, the mines are all situated on the 
same lode and ore is practically of identical origin throughout. In the Alaska 
Treadwell, 700', and Alaska Mexican mines, the lode has been developed con- 
tinuously for 3,500'. Between the Mexican and Ready Bullion mines is an 
undeveloped interval of 2,500. Width of orebodies is from 300' to 400'. 

Geology: the orebodies consist mainly of mineralized albite-diorite oc- 
curring- in the form of intrusive dikes in black slate, whose structure they 
closely follow. They strike N. W.-S. E. and dip 50 degrees toward the N. E. The 
slates are metamorphosed shale. The ore-bearing dikes belong to a series of 
intrusives that appear interruptedly along the strike for a distance of about 3 
miles in a zone 3.000' wide. Next to the shore of Gastineau Channel the border 
is defined by a heavy bed of greenstone that forms the hanging wall of both the 
orebodies and the intrusion zone. Many of the dikes of albite-diorite at a distance 
from the hanging wall have been greatly altered and impregnated with pyrite 
and no workable orebodies have yet been found in them. The ore consists 
mainly of rock impregnated with sulphides, principally pyrite, and in part shat- 
tered and filled by veins of calcite and quartz, which also contain sulphides. 
The ore-bearing dikes are considerably mineralized throughout, and often the 
whole mass can be mined. The characteristics of the deposit are believed to 
indicate that it was formed by ascending waters, with little, or no subsequent 
secondary concentration. If this is correct there is little doubt that the ore will 
continue to a much greater depth than has been reached, and the limit of mining 
will probably depend finally upon increased costs, attendant upon operating at 
great depth. 



140 



ALASKA 




The production, condition of the property, its history, development, equip- 
ment, etc., are fully described in Vol. XIII of this work. The mine has been 
flooded since April, 1917, and is practically a total loss. 

Alaska United Gold Mining Co. 

Address: Mills Bldg., San Francisco, Calif. Mine office: Douglas 
Island, Alaska. Under same management as the Alaska Treadwell. 

Inc. Aug. 6, 1895. Cap. $1,000.000, shares $5 par, issued $901,000. 



Comparative General Balance Sheet: 
Assets 



Property 

& Plant Cash 

1918(June30)$880,773 $9,129 

1916 910,120 7,991 

1915 726.180 10,192 

1914 634,000 4.663 



Reserve Bullion Accounts 

Fund Suspense Rec., Etc. 

$106,327 $ $289,022 

201,810 4,296 28,921 

201,810 50,245 3.900 

201.810 51,924 34,171 



Ore 

Subject to 
Depletion 
$2,141,206 

2,654,222 



Liabilities 

Capital Accounts P. & L. Ore 

Year Stock Pay., Etc. Account Surplus 

1918 (June 30). $901,000 $384,442 $ $2,141,206 

1916.. 901,000 $243,236 8,902 2,654,222 

1915 901,000 55,312 36,015 

1914 901,000 10,411 15,160 



Total 

$3,426,647 

3.807,361 

992.327 

926,572 



Total 

$3,426.647 

3,807,361 

992,327 

926.572 



Comparative Income Account (see later figures see joint account). 



Total 
Income 

1916. .$1,111,697 
1915.. 1,072,412 
1914.. 975,329 
1913.. 1,054,018 

(d) Deficit. 



Operating 
Constr'n, Etc. 

$1,094,749 
705,162 
727,391 
668,953 



Net 

Profit 
$26,947 
367,250 
247,938 
385,065 



Divid's 

$54,060 
252,280 
162,180 
414.460 



Deprec. 



$94,115 
81,153 
30,050 



Balance 
$8,902 
20,855 
4,605 
59,445 (d) 



Dividends to Jan., 1917, aggregate $11.35 per share. 

Property: Located on the east side of Douglas Island, includes the 700' 
mine, lying between the Alaska Treadwell and the Alaska Mexican properties, 
and the Ready Bullion mine east of the property adjoining the Mexican. 

As the mine is flooded and property apparently lost, further description is not 
needed. See Vol. XIII of Mines Handbook for full description of property. 

Recent production: (1) Ready Bullion mine, (2) 700-ft. Claim mine. 



Tons 
Crushed 

1917-18.... 328,990 
(21 months) 

1916 286,078 

1915 252,154 

1914 233,100 

1913 222,992 

1912 216,454 

191 l(b)... 223,663 



Yield 
Free Gold 



Concentrates 
Tons 
Treated Yield 



(D 



$237,715 


6,630 


272,274 


5.621 


282,036 


5.700 


268,444 


5,651 


317,970 


6,128 


278,034 


5,461 



$724,686 

338,534 
249,638 
252.370 
242,947 
300,188 
241,248 



Total Oper. Oper. 
Yield Costs Profits Div,% 
p. Ton p. Ton p. Ton (a) 



6% 
28% 
18% 
46% 
36% 

9% 



$2.11 
2.07 


$1.52 
1.31 


$0.59 
0.76 


2.29 


1.47 


0.82 


2.29 


1.45 


0.84 


2.85 


1.50 


1.35 


2.32 


1.71 


0.61 



ALASKA UNITED COPPER ALASKA WESTOVER 141 

(2) 

1917f 

1916 262.850 $180,603 5,342 $260,375 $1.73 $2.37 $0.64(c) 

1915 281,265 263,319 5,934 256,943 1.85 1.31 0.54 

1914 225,214 230,509 4,409 200,874 1.91 1.62 0.29 

1913 225,435 284,097 4,495 248,055 2.36 1.44 0.92 

1912 234,339 282,180 4,704 294,951 2.46 1.38 1.08 

1911 (b)... 224,968 284,430 4,477 244,193 2.35 1.56 0.79 

t Aline flooded since April. 

(a) Total for both mines, (b) Dec. 16, 1910-Dec. 31, 1911. 

(c) Loss, due to heavy development charge. '**'' 

Costs per ton for Ready Bullion mine in 1916 were: Mining, $1.00; milling, 
34.4c ; cyaniding, same as Alaska Treadwell. Mining costs include charge for 
2,366' of development work at $12.66 per ft., and stoping 377,547 tons at 44.7c. 
per ton. Milling costs include crushing, 2.6c. ; tramway, 2.2c. ; stamping, 22.6c. ; 
concentrating, 7c. Costs per ton for 700-Foot Claim in 1916 were: mining, $1.81 ; 
milling, 39.4c. ; cyaniding, same as Alaska Treadwell. Mining costs include 
charges for 7,771' of development work at $20.40 per ft., stoping 284,566 tons 
at 81. 7c. per ton. Milling costs include crushing, 5.8c. ; tramming, 1.8c. ; stamp- 
ing. 24.2c. ; concentrating, 7.6c. 

Alaska United is the only mine now being operated on Douglas Island. On 
April 21, the 700-Foot Claim, Treadwell, and Mexican mines were lost by flooding. 
The Ready Bullion mine is some distance away from these mines and escaped. 
From 1898 to 1917 the 700-Foot Claim yielded 2,400,868 tons of $2.05 ore, at a 
cost of $1.66 per ton, giving a profit of $946,259. The Ready Bullion produced 
3,967,135 tons of $2.08 ore at a cost of $1.56 per ton, and total profit of $2,049,406. 
Of combined profits, $2,995,664, $2,045,270 was paid in dividends. 
ALASKA UNITED COPPER EXPLORATION Cp. ALA.SKA 

Office: 551 Coleman Block, Seattle, Wash. Mine office: Dan Creek, 
Copper River district, Alaska. 

Officers: L. C. Dillman, pres.-gen. mgr. ; Jas. A. Munday, v. p.; E. V. 
Dillman, sec. ; W. A. Mears, treas, with A. Ingraham, W. Hughes, Frank L. 
Huston, Jas. J. O'Keane and Thos. M. Dunn, trustees; C. C. Jones, cons. engr. 

Inc. Nov. 14. 1906, in Washington. Cap., $12,500,000. $1 par. Deben- 
tures, $150,000 6% bonds. Annual meeting, first Monday in January. 

Property: 23 claims, 460 acres, comprising the Finch, Dillman and 
Porcupine groups, five miles from the Copper River railroad, on branches of the 
Chitina and Xizina rivers, in the Copper River district, Alaska. 

Exploratory work has been done on the various groups by small tunnels 
and numerous trenches and open cuts, showing copper ore (bornite and chal- 
cocite), said to average 35%. 

The company is primarily a holding company, prospecting and developing 
properties in its possession for sale to other parties. 

Company controls the Alaska Westover Copper Co., which see. 
ALASKA WESTOVER COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Office: 551 Coleman Block, Seattle, Wash. Mine, 18 miles from Copper 
River railroad in the Chitina district. 

Officers: L. C. Dillman, pres., W. A. Mears, sec. -treas., with F. B. 
Whiting, F. J. Ferine, F. B. Chandler, trustees. 

Property: the Westover group on Boulder creek, title to which was 
transferred from the Alaska United Copper Explor'n Co., 23 claims, about 460 
acres, covering a contact between limestone and greenstone. The contact lies 
horizontally and the ore outcrop is from 6 to 14' thick and 43' long in a perpen- 
dicular bluff at 4,990' elevation. 

Development: 1,000' of tunnels. One tunnel started at the south end is 
reported to have shown 4 to 20' of ore for 45' in a S. E. direction, and a crosscut 
on the ore body shows 2' of glance claimed to assay 50% copper. It widens to 
14' for about 36'; is then cut off by a fault, but continues about 12' to the north. 
Bornite, chalcocite and chalcopyrite have replaced limestone along irregularly 
distributed fissures. 




142 ALASKA 

ALASKA ZINC & COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Office: Green Bldg., Seattle. Wash. 

Officers. M. O. Goodner, pres.-treas.; A. Goodlier, v. p. -sec. 

Inc. Jan. 3, 1917 in Washington. Cap. $1,000,000, $1 par; 800,000 issued; 
650,000 in escrow for two years with H. C. Loup & Co., New York. U. S. Corpo- 
ration Co., agent. Listed o.n New York Curb. 

Property: a prospect, showing zinc, copper, gold and silver ores in 
claims on Prince William Sound, Alaska. 
ALICE MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Valdez, Alaska. 

Property: consists of the Alice mine, situated at sea level on west side 
of Shoup bay, \}/2 miles N. W. of the Cliff mine. The vein, found in 1910, is a 
well-defined fissure, strike N. 60 W., dip 70 S., width from a few inches to 2^'. 
Ore minerals include gold, pyrite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and sphalerite. The 
country rock is composed of graywackes, slates and green schists. 

Development: by 247' tunnel, a two-compartment shaft, 170' deep, and 
100' of drifting at the bottom of the shaft. 

Equipment: includes 100 h. p. boiler, 3-drill air compressor. 50-light 
dynamo, 5 h. p. steam engine, steam hoist, pumps, blacksmith shop, mess house 
and bunk house. 

Small shipments were made in 1913 and 1916. Assessment work only done 
in 1915 and 1916, but nothing reported since. See U. S. G. S. Bull. 622 and 662. 
ANCHORAGE GOLD MINES CO. ALASKA. 

Officers: Byron Bartholf, pres.; Sidney Anderson, v. p.; K. N. Culbert- 
son, treas. ; A. G. Thompson, sec. 

Cap. $100,000, shares $1 par. 

Property: prospects in Archangel creek. Willow creek district! (de- 
veloping). 
AUK BAY MINING & DEVELOPMENT CO. ALASKA 

Address: P. J. Wiley, mgr., Juneau, Alaska; Henry Brie, sec. -treas. 

Property: 19 claims, 380 acres, at Auk Bay, 12 miles N. of Juneau, 
Harris mining district, said to show a contact vein in diorite, containing gold 
and silver values. Has a small testing mill of 12 tons daily capacity. Property 
idle on account of high cost of supplies and materials. 
BANGOR CREEK DREDGING CO. ALASKA 

Address. Union Construction Co., 604 Mission Street. San Francisco; 
or Nome, Alaska. 

Property: placer ground near Nome, carrying gold bearing gravel. 

Equipment: includes a dredge with 3*/ cu. ft. buckets, run by semi- 
Diesel engines. 
BEATSON COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Entire property, assets and liabilities acquired by the Kennecott Copper Cor- 
poration, and company dissolved Oct. 4, 1915. 
BEAVER MOUNTAIN MINING CO. ALASKA 

Idle. Mine office: Sulzer, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Henry 
Miller, pres. ; George Comer, mgr., at last accounts. Lands : on the southern 
side of Beaver mountain, Hetta inlet. Development : by tunnels, showing ore 
carrying copper, nickel and cobalt. Operations confined to annual assessment 
work. 
CACHE CREEK DREDGING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Seattle, Wsah., or Thos. D. Harris, Marigold, California. 

Inc. Feb.. 1914, in Washington. Cap. $150,000, $1 par. 

Property: a lease on placer ground of the Cache Creek Mining Co., 
on Cache Creek, Yentna mining district. A 7' bucket dredge has operated with 
good results, reported showing as high as 75c. per yard. 

Company also owns a coal mine 2 miles from dredging property. 
CAMERON-JOHNSON GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Reorganized in 1916 as Valdex Gold Co., which see. 



CHICHAGOPF MINING CUBE MINING 143 

CHICHAGOFF MINING CO. ALASKA 

Chichagoff Island, Alaska. Controlled by Hugh C. Wallace and W. R..Rust 
of Tacoma, Wash. James L. Freeburn, supt. 

Property: the Chichagoff mine, 60 miles from Sitka, 170 miles from 
luneau. carries high-grade, free milling quartz. 

Equipment: 30-stamp mill with tube mill section and daily capacity of 
110 tons of ore. A flotation unit was recently installed. Company has hydro- 
electric plant with dam at Rust Lake. 150 men employed. See U. S. G. S. Bull. 
504, p. 22. 
CHITINA KUSKULANA COPPER CO. , ALASKA 

Louis Kleyle, mgr. 

Property: War Eagle group, near the North Midas, Kuskulana, Copper 
River district. Ore is chalcopyrite. 

Development: by tunnels on War Eagle and Calcite claims. 

Equipment: 120 h. p. boiler, 100 h. p. steam engine, electric generator 
and air compressor. 
COLUMBIA RED METAL MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: 1109 First Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

Officers: Win. Uder, pres.-treas.; A. D. Thompson, v. p.; O. Roberts, 
sec., with W. E. Smith, C. C. Elwood, gen. mgr., C. H. Voll and R. J. McChesney, 
directors. 

Inc. 1917 in Wash. Cap. $3,500,000; $1 par; divided into 1,500,000 shares 
common, all issued and paid to owners for property, and 2,000,000 preferred, out- 
standing 222,650 shares. 

The secretary reported July 1, 1919, that 272,000 shares had been sold at 
5, 10, 15 and 20c., and a 30c. price was to take effect July 15th. Company has m> 
debts and with funds due on stock contracted for and under option, sufficient 
funds will be available for present requirements. 

Property: 9 claims, on Glacier bay, Prince William sound, 8 miles from 
tidewater, Valdez district. Management reports a vein averaging 16' in width, 
showing chalcopyrite, in greenstone, varying from concentrating ore to 24% 
smelting ore, with some gold and silver. 

Development: by tunnels. Reserves are estimated at 50,000 tons. 

Equipment: includes sawmill of 12,000' capacity, cable, supplies, cabins, 
tents and 20-ton tug-boat. A tractor and trailers are required. Ten men 
employed. 

Company issued a statement made by five stockholders just returned from 
the property, that they "found the ground as good, if not better, than repre- 
sented. We found three big ledges which contain immense quantities of ship- 
ping ore . . ." 
CONSOLIDATED ALASKA CO. ALASKA 

Idle. Is a successor of Alaska Bonanza Mng., Trading and Trans. Co, 
reorganized 1900. Owned property at Nome, Alaska. 
CRYSTAL GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Owners, Bernard Heins, and partners, Snettisham, Alaska. 

Property: 6 claims near Snettisham, containing gold quartz veins in 
diorite, course S. E., dip 40. Ore shoots are 4%' wide, 60-70' long. Ore 
averages about $8.50 per ton as sulphides. 

Development: by shaft and 400' tunnel; underground workings, total 
4,000'. 

Equipment: includes 5 stamp mill and 2 Frue vanners. 

Stated to have produced about $67,000 to date. 
CUBE MINING CO. ALASKA 

Jeff Devinney and M. F. Hendrickson, Valdez, have a bond on the Three- 
in-One claims, Port Valdez district, one mile W. of Gold Creek. The country 
rock is schistose graywacke, and argillite, cut by quartz vein running N. 30 W., 
with dip 50 to 80 W. It averages 2' wide and contains chalcopyrite, sphalerite, 
galena, and arsenopyrite, with gold values. 

Development: by 800' tunnel on vein, 11' wide, with raises, giving depth 
of over 1,000'. 




144 ALASKA 

Equipment: 3 semi-Diesel engines, Hardinge conical mill, amalgama- 
tion and concentration plant. Employs about 15 men. 
CYMRU COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Idle. Mail returned unclaimed in 1919, from former office, \\7 l /2 South 
Tenth St., Tacoma, Wash. Mine near Baldwin, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. 
J. M. Miller, Jr., pres. ; F. P. Hicks, v. p. ; Frank D. Nash, sec.-treas. 

Inc. 1905, in Washington. Cap. $50.000, $1 par. 

Property. 6 claims, 100 acres, on Moira sound, shows 3 lenticular ore- 
bodies, reported by company as of 40' aggregate width, assaying 6 to 10% copper, 
4 to 6 oz. silver and $2 gold per ton, mainly from chalcopyrite ores. Mine has a 
100' shaft and a 187' tunnel, with hoist and a 6-drill air compressor. A 4,000' 
surface tram conveys ore to a 1,000-ton ore bin. 

Shipments in 1906 were 3,000 tons of copper ore, returning 4^% copper and 
$1.25 in gold and silver. Idle since 1907, owing to litigation among the stock- 
holders ; last reported under bond to a stock company organized by Geo. V. 
Bland, of Ketchikan, Alaska. 
DICKEY, W. A. COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Taken over by Ladysmith Smelting Co., which see. 
EAGLE RIVER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address : care B. L. Thane, Crother Bldg., San Francisco, Calif. G. T. 
Jackson, mgr, Amalga, Alaska. 

Property: the Eagle River, a group of gold quartz claims 4 miles from 
Echo Harbor and 25 miles from Juneau, Alaska, has been consolidated with 
the Yankee Basin adjoining and on the same belt as the Cottrell group. Ore 
occurs in 8 small shoots in black slate zone, broken by an elaborate faulting 
system and reported to average $20 per ton. 

Development: by tunnel, 2,000' long, that tapped ore at a depth of 700'. 
In 1915, 2,000' of diamond drilling in 7 holes was done. Property worked since 
1903, producing upwards of $500,000, according to reports. Only annual assess- 
ment work has been performed of late due to abnormal conditions. 
ELLAMAR MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: 211 American Bank Bldg., Seattle, Wash. Mine office: L. L. 
Middlekamp, supt, Ellamar, Prince William Sound, Alaska. 

Officers: F. M. Jordan, pres.-treas.; C. S. Packer, sec., with W. R. Rust 
and Chas. de Steigure, directors. 

Inc. 1900, in Washington. Cap., $10,000.000; $100 par. Reorganized 
in 1916 with $2,500,000 capitalization; shares $5 par. Controlled by F. M. 
Jordan, Seattle. 

Property: 14 claims, patented, known as the Ellamar mine, at Ellamar. 
on Virgin Bay, 20 miles S. W. of Valdez. 

Ore: occurs in a lens 80x200' and lies wholly within the slate, pinching 
out 30' below the 500' level. Ore is mainly chalcopyrite associated with pyrite, 
pyrrhotite, and sphalerite in a gangue of slate, graywacke, and quartz, assaying 
from 3 to 25% copper, 3 oz, silver, and up to $50 gold. Mine was the first 
copper producer in Alaska, beginning shipments in 1901. A cofferdam has been 
built to permit mining orebody outcropping on the beach, below sea-level, and 
from 1910 to 1913 mining was confined to that part of orebody between surface 
and 200' level. Geology fully described, p. 90, U. S. G. S. Bull. 605, 1915. During 
1916, the water level had been lowered to the 500' level. Ore is mined by 
underhand stoping. 

Development: by 600' three-compartment vertical shaft, with levels at 
100' intervals, and 3 miles of workings, said to block out about 250,000 tons of 
ore for stoping. 

Equipment: includes 300 h. p. steam plant, with 3 boilers 1,200 cu. ft. 
Xordberg compressor, a 12x25" Nordberg engine, and 60 h. p. hoist. In 1914 
u 200-ton per hour aerial tram and new loading dock were completed. The 
tram conveys ore from mine bunkers a distance of 2.200' across shallow water to 
the loading dock, having 25' of water at low tide. Buildings include a machine- 
shop, smithy, laboratory, mess-house, and 12 other buildings. 



FAIRBANKS GOLD MINING FISH CREEK MINING 145 

Costs are said to be about $3 per ton, for ore loaded on vessels, with about 
$3 transportation charges to the Tacoma smelter. 

Production: 

Year- Tons Copper, % Gold, oz. Silver, oz. 

1918 27,184 2.03 0.14 0.52 

1917 54,759 1.74 0.17 0.70 , 

1916 46,000 2.83 0.15 0.60 

1915 36,000 2.18 0.17 0.61 

1914 31,000 

1913 25,000 

1912 22.000 2.50 0.30 0.90 

1911 16,000 6.00 0.24 0.80 

By June, 1919, monthly output was 2,000 tons ; 40 men employed. 
FAIRBANKS GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Property, placer ground on Fairbanks creek, Fairbanks district. Dur- 
ing 1918, reported to have ordered dredge. 
FAIRHAVEN POWER & MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: H. L. Mead, care John Hays Hammond, 120 Broadway, New 
York City. 

In Sept., 1919, it was reported that a syndicate had been formed to under- 
write 200,000 shares. Company has a placer property in Alaska, endorsed by 
the above engineer. 
FIDALGO-ALASKA COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Address: Ellamar, Alaska. Thos. Donahue, pres. ; L. A. Levensaler, 
nigr. ; E. D. Reiter, supt. 

Property: 24 claims, about 15 miles from Ellamar and one-half mile east 
of Irish cove, on the southern side of Fidalgo bay, an inlet of Prince William 
sound. 

Development: includes a 650' main tunnel following a well-defined frac- 
ture zone, in slate, carrying 2 lenticular ore-shoots, said to be 5x50' in cross- 
section, cut at 200' and 300' from portal, with many small stringers. Report 
good ore in outcrops about 300' \Y. of the old workings. 

Ore: mainly chalcopyrite, said to give average assays of about 10% 
copper, occurs as cementing material of fractures, irregular stringers, dissemi- 
nated grains and as lenticular replacements of country rock, the fracture zones 
being very erratic in size and extent. 

Equipment: includes 1.000' aerial tram, ore bins and wharf, besides 
several mine buildings. During 1916 installed a 36" Pelton wheel operating 
under 400' head, driving single-stage air-compressor. Company employing 16 
men at last reports and management plans further development. Shipped several 
hundred tons of ore during 1916. Geology described on page 118, U. S G S 
Bull. 605. 
FISH CREEK MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: 558 Empire Bldg.. Seattle-, Wash. 

Officers: \V. R. Tonkin, v. p.-treas., Seattle: W. J. Palmer, sec.. New 
York city, with J. Arthur Hall, directors. 

Inc. 1918, in Washington. Cap., 600,000 shares; par 25c; 300.000 shares 
in treasury. 

Property: 17 claims with two mill-sites about 7 1 /, miles from tide- 
water, on same mineralized zone \ l / 2 miles south of the Premier mirie, and on 
U. S. side of the International boundary. 

Ore: contains silver sulphides accompanied by a little galena and chal- 
copyrite, occurring in 4 well-defined veins. 

Development: by several tunnels aggregating 1,000', with greatest 
depth of 250'. 

Production: several small shipments of ore mined in development work, 
sent to Tacoma smelter, varied from 78 oz. silver per ton, with 10% lead, $10 



146 ALASKA 

gold and \ l / 2 % copper, up to 200 oz. silver, $20 gold, 16% lead and 2 l / 2 % 
copper. 

Is a very promising prospect. 
FORTY MILE POWER AND DREDGING CO. ALASKA 

Office: Chas. L. Peabody, v. p., 10 Wall Street, New York City. 

Officers: John A. Stedman, pres. ; Chas. L. Peabody, v. p.; E. R. Hol- 
lenbeck, sec.-treas. Satterly, Canfield & Stone, 49 Wall St., attorneys. Wallace 
G. Clark, 149 Broadway, cons, engineer. E. R. Cooper, mgr. 

Inc. 1918 in Del. Cap. $5,000,000, $1 par; about 3,500,000 issued. 

Property: report controlling 119 miles of gold placer ground on Forty 
mile river in Alaska and Yukon Territory, from which $152,000 was recovered 
in 149 days by dredging, also state having sunk 5,000 test pits, proving a block of 
1,500,000 cu. yds. averaging 60c. with other extensive areas of pay gravel. Both 
dredging and hydraulicking used. 

FREE GOLD'PIGOT BAY MINING co. ALASKA 

Address: W. R. Millard or C. B. Smith, Valdez. Alaska. 

Inc. Aug., 1919. Cap. $350,000, $1 par. 

Property: on Pigot bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska. 
GALENA BAY MINING CO. ALASKA 

Offices: 540 Orchestra Bldg., Chicago, 111., and L. C. Smith Bldg., Seat- 
tle, Wash. Mine office: Valdez, Pr'mce William Sound, Alaska. 

Officers: J. B. Carter, pres.; Albert Barge, sec.; J. S. Jurey, asst. sec.; 
L. T. Rusk, treas. ; Chas. Simenstad, supt. 

" Inc. 1906, in Washington. Cap. $500.000, $1 par, 486,001 outstanding. 
Trustees: J. B. Carter, Arthur W. Cutten, E. C. Badenoch, R. E. Tearse, B. G. 
Proctor, L. J. Rusk, C. A. Hayes and John S. Jurey. Annual meeting, second 
Tuesday in October. 

Property: controls the Nikolai Mining Co. The company's holdings 
proper, acquired in 1907, are all on Galena Bay, about 30 miles from Valdez, and 
include the Sunnyside, Copper Crown, Starvation, Sheep Run, Vesuvius, and 15 
other claims, all patented. 

Development: by 2,200' adit on the Starvation, 400' on the Sunny- 
side, with only surface work and diamond drilling on the Copper Crown and 
Sheep Run Claims. Ore occurs in lenses of chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, quartz and 
calcite, 4-5' long and up to 14" in width. On the Copper Crown a 4' vein of 
solid sulphide ore was opened up in a N. E. shear zone, assaying $3-$4 gold per 
ton. Geology fully described, p. 100, U. S. G. S. Bulletin 605. Only necessary 
assessment work done since 1912. 
GOLD BULLION MINING Cp. ALASKA 

Operated by Willow Creek Mines, which see. 

Address: M. D. Leehey, Alaska Bldg., Seattle. Wash.; A. J. Budd, 
mgr. ; N. D. Bothwell, supt.. Wasilla, Alaska. 

Property: 8 claims the Willow creek mines on the S. E. wall of Craig ie 
Creek valley, 4 miles above mouth of creek, in Willow Creek district, south- 
central Alaska. 

Ore: gold quartz in vein from 2' to 14' wide. 

Development: by several tunnels. Vein is said to be proven for a 
length of 3,500'. 

Equipment: includes 2 aerial tramways, the longest 3,253'. with a rise of 
850'; 12-stamp mill and small cyanide plant. Plan installation of Dorr con- 
tinuous decantation plant. Water power is used. Aerial tram 1 mile long con- 
nects mine and mill. 

Operating costs in the Willow Creek district are high, due to short season 
of 100 to 150 days each year, and the isolated location of property. District 
will be made accessible by the Government railroad from Seward to Fairbanks, 
now being built. See U. S. Geol. Survey Bull. 607, pp. 66. 71. 
GOLD CORD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: 602 S. Kingslcy Drive, Los An-rles. Calif., and Willow Creek, 
Alaska. 



GOLD KING MINING GREAT NORTHERN 147 

Control purchased during 1918 by Frank Bartholf, of Billings, Mont., John 
Smith, pres., Los Angeles, Calif., and J. B. Swan, of Henrietta, Okla. William 
Martin of Anchorage, operating under a short term lease. 

Ore: gold values in vein said to be 10' to 14' wide. Mill test on 40 
tons reported to have yielded $70.46 per ton and tailings assaying $12 were 
reduced to 80 cents in the cvanide plant. 
GOLD KING MINING CO. ALASKA 

Probably dead. Described, Vol. XII. 
GRANITE GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Valdez, Alaska. Officers: B. F. Millard, pres.-treas.; W., R. Millard, 
1st v. p.: O. S. Larsen, 2nd v. p.; Miss Shanstrom, sec., with Jafet Lindeberg, 
directors. 

Inc. 1913, in Alaska, upon purchase from original locators for $50,000. 
Cap. $500.000, $1 par; outstanding, 430.000 shares. Annual meeting, first 
Tuesday in October. Transfer office: Alaska Bldg., Seattle. Wash. 

Company claims to have spent $330,000 to March, 1916, on the property, 
and to have had a total production of $277,000. Surplus March 1, 1916, $21,000. 
Initial dividend, 2 cts. per share, paid April 10, 1916, and 2 cts. paid in May. 

Property: 3 claims, 60 acres, unpatented, on the west side of Port Wells. 
on the coast between Hobo Bay and Harrison Lagoon. Two veins course N. 
60 W.. dip 58 N. Country rock consists of interbedded slates, graywackes and 
argillites cut by large masses of granite. Present development is said to show 
a third vein on the 210' level. Metallic ore minerals are gold, and the sulphides 
of iron, zinc, lead and antimony. Ore said to run from $6 to $50 with average 
of $12 per ton. See U. S. G. S. Bull. 622, pp. 136-138. 

Development: 200' incline shaft and tunnels, with 4 levels opened up 
from 300' to 700' in length. Total underground workings, over 5,000', all worked 
through 800' tunnel at mill level. Three stopes in ore, April, 1919. 

Equipment: former machinery sold with exception of 10-stamp Hendy 
mill, crushers and concentrators, as company plans installing 160 h. p. hydro- 
electric plant to furnish power. 

Production: 1916. averaged 60 to 70 tons per day, yielding about $20,000 
gross per month. 

Reported, May, 1917, that mill had closed down on account high cost of 
material : intends to resume when costs become lower. A mistake seems to 
have been made in estimating ore reserves, and further development was being 
done to open ore. The last 7 months' production was reported to have been 
$70,000. 
GREAT BRITAIN GROUP ALASKA 

Owned by a Vancouver and Victoria syndicate. Property: at Whalebone 
Cove, on the western shore of South Valdez Island, Alaska, comprises 4 claims, 
showing bornite. tetrahedrite and chalcocite ore, occurring in the contact between 
limestone and altered lime. 

Development: by 3 tunnels, showing 4 to 12% copper ore. Ore blocked 
out estimated at 1.800 tons by F. J. Crossland. Shipments of 700 to 800 tons 
have been made to the Tacoma smelter, said to average 3% copper. A 500-ton 
hunker was being erected on the beach for loading shipments on vessels. No 
recent information. Probably idle. 
GREAT NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT CO. ALASKA 

Operating office: Valdez. Alaska. Mine and works office. Philips, 
Alaska. Also controls the Regal Mines Co., which see. 

Officers: Jas. Phillips, Jr., pres.; E. F. Gray, v. p.; Walter M. Briggs, 
sec.-treas. ; Edwin F. Gray, gen mgr., with J. C. Fairchild, H. F. Knoblauch and 
H. I. Gaskill, directors. 

Inc. 1906, in Maine. Cap. $1.000,000. $10 par; issued, 70,100. Is a hold- 
ing company. Annual meeting, first Tuesday in November, Petley, Morse & Co., 
auditors. 43 Exchange Place, New York. 

Property: a solid tract of about 165 claims, about 3,000 acres in process 
of patenting, on the south bank of the Kotsina river, below the mouth of Roaring ' 



148 ALASKA 

Creek, near the Copper River Railroad, and about 60 miles from the Bonanza 
mine, of the Kennecott Co. Ore is greenstone containing chalcopyrite in small 
amount. 

Development: work totals 8,000', and is said to have opened up a large 
tonnage of low grade ore. 
HEMPLE COPPER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Valdez. Alaska. Mine office: Landlock, Alaska. Officers: S. A. Hem- 
pie, pres., treas. and gen. mgr. ; S. I. Hemple, sec., with Arthur Lang and I. J. De- 
venney, directors. 

Inc. March, 1910, in Alaska. Cap. $1.000,000, $1 par. 

Property: 6 claims, 4 patented, 120 acres, with a 2-acre mill site, all tim- 
ber, near the Standard and Three Man mines, at Landlock Bay. Shows green- 
stone, slate and quartzite, carrying 3 veins with 5 or 6 shoots, said to be 24' wide in 
places and traceable for 3000', carrying chalcopyrite, giving average assays of 3 
to 6% copper. Mine is opened by tunnels of 50', 300', 575' and 800', with about 
3,000 of workings. On 350' level, vein showed width of 24' in 3 crosscuts. 
The vein has also been opened at depth of 800'. There is no power plant, but 
property has 6 buildings and gasoline engine. Working two shifts, 1919, in the 
expectation of opening up the orebody on the 700' level. 
HOUGHTON-ALASKA EXPLORATION CO. ALASKA 

Company dissolved and property sold. Fully described in Vol. XII. 
HUBBARD-ELLIOTT COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Offices: 35 N. Dearborn St., Chicago. 111.; 10 Wall St., New York; 657 
New York Blk., Seattle, Wash; Elliott Creek, Chitina district, Alaska. 

Officers. H. P. Elliott, pres.; R. Reichardt, 1st v. p.; T. J. Dolan. 2nd 
v. p. ; A. J. Elliott, sec. ; J. T. Evans, treas. ; L. G. Hinckle, supt. 

Inc. Jan., 1911, in Washington. Cap. $3,500.000, $1 par; 1,500,000 
shares issued in exchange, share for share, for stock in the old Hubbard-Elliott 
Copper Mines Development Co. of Alaska ; 2,000,000 shares treasury stock. 

Property: 35 patented claims, 5 mill sites with U. S. government titles 
and 84 unpatented claims, over 2,500 acres, covering 6 miles in Elliott Creek valley. 
Acquired an 8-12 interest in the adjoining U. G. I. group of 8 claims, 1917. Elliott 
creek is an affluent of the Katsina river, about 15 miles above junction of the 
Kotsina with the Copper river. 

Geology: Copper ore occurs in fissure veins and associated replace- 
ment orebodies in greenstone, with limestone beds above it. The prominent out- 
crops are practically all on the north side of Elliott creek, near the contact, which 
runs N. 75 W. and dips 80 N. All outcrops are in the greenstone underlying the 
limestone beds except on the Leland and Lawton claims, which are in a well- 
defined porphyry dike. Above the limestone is found a heavy capping of con- 
glomerates. 

The principal ore minerals are bornite, glance and chalcopyrite. The total 
absence of surface oxidation due to glacial action is notable, and sulphides occur 
in a calcite matrix in the veins and with a greenstone matrix. 

Development: by tunnels. 

Equipment: includes compressor, drills, etc. Hydro-electric power 
plant and concentrating mill. 

A stockholders' meeting to be held at Seattle on February 2, 1920, will act 
on an agreement with the "Hubbard-Elliott Development Syndicate." This pro- 
posed syndicate is to have a capital of $500,000 in 5 series of shares at $100,000 
par for each, to exploit and develop the property. When operations reach the 
productive stage, the Syndicate will either continue or will organize a new com- 
pany to be called the Elliott Creek Copper Co., in Delaware, with a capital of 
not less than $8.500.000, nor more than $10,000,000. In 1920, $100,000 is needed 
for transportation, equipment and development. 
INDEPENDENCE GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Seward, Alaska. Property: 5 claims and a mill site, in process of 
patent, in Fishhook Creek Valley, on the east slope of Granite Mountain, Willow 
Creek mining district. Mine located in 1907, and formerly owned and oper- 
ated by the Alaska Gold Quartz Mining Co., show 2 veins. The Granite Mtn.. or 



JOSEVIG-KENNECOTT KENNECOTT COPPER CORP. 149 

main vein, from 2"-4' thick, occurs in quartz diorite, showing native gold, pyrite 
and chalcopyrite; strike N. 14 to 20 W., with dip 2 to 20 S. W. Developed 
by open cuts, stopes and several tunnels, longest 386' follows vein for 265', 
and at the face has an incline 480' deep on the vein. The Independence, or 
upper vein, 620' vertically above and running parallel to the Granite Mtn., 
has strike N. 12 W., with average dip of 42 W.. averages 12" thick and is 
only slightly developed. 

Equipment: includes 3-stamp mill, with one Nissen stamp and concen- 
trator, 2 aerial trams connecting mine and mill. Production in the past has been 
mainly from the Granite Mtn. workings. Probably idle since 1917. 
JOSEVIG-KENNECOTT COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Address: W. H. Seagrave, mgr., L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Officers: D. K. McDonald, pres.; J. B. MacDougall, v. p., with M. E. 
Hay, W. L. Gazzam and T. W. Roberts, directors. 
'Inc. in Washington." Cap. $2,500,000. $1 par. 

Property: 19 lode claims, 1 placer claim, 7 miles from Kennecott, Alaska. 
Glowing reports were made regarding this property by the promoters, which 
appear to have been a misrepresentation of fact. One statement is said to have 
claimed that the mine was superior to the Kennecott Copper Corporation. More 
conservative estimates made by the consulting engineer give a very small tonnage 
of ore, averaging about 3>4% copper. Due to location, transportation difficulties, 
small amount and grade of ore, etc., the future of this property is very uncertain. 
No work being done now on account of litigation and internal dissension between 
the promoters and the board of directors. Investors brought suit against the 
promoters for misrepresentation, and in April, 1918, were offered a settlement of 
37^ cents a share for stock sold by subscription between Nov. 26 and Dec. 13, 
1916. Stricken from New York Curb May, 1918. On October 3, 1919, G. F. Rowe, 

D. McDonald, G. E. Snyder. W. B. Hancock, J. P. Gearon and Christian Josevig. 
all of Seattle, were indicted by the Federal Grand Jury on charges of having 
used the mails to defraud and of conspiracy. These men are alleged to have 
sold worthless shares, receiving $400,000 therefrom. 

JUALIN ALASKA MINES CO. ALASKA 

Company is a subsidiary of the Alguncian Development Co. Jean Vanop- 
hem. pres., 16 Rue de Turin, Brussels, Belgium ; C. G. Titus, mgr., Juneau, Alaska. 

Property: 30 claims on the north shore of Berners Bay, in the Juneau 
region, developed by 360' main shaft, crosscuts and drifts. A drainage-tunnel to 
be 7,800' long when completed has been driven 2,000'. 

Ore reported to be 90% free milling. 

Equipment: includes 5^-mile tram, connecting the mine with the wharf. 
450-h. p. compressor and hydro-electric plant and 4 semi-Diesel engines of 150-h. p. 
each. Plans are under way for increasing the mill capacity from 40 to 150 tons 
daily. 

Production, under former owners said to total 50,000 tons of $11.20 pet- 
ton gold ore. Property was closed in Aug., 1914, but reopened in May, 1915. To 
May, 1917, the output was 22,366 tons of $11.10 ore. Reported production in 1918 of 
$200,000 from ore extracted in driving the tunnel and treated in the 10-stamp 
mill. 

KENAI-ALASKA GOLD CO. ALASKA 

Jas. Hayden, mgr., Seward, Alaska. Property: on Great Falls Lake, ad- 
ining the Skeen-Lechner. shows a 2' vein, cut on the 260' level, which is said 
to carry ore mining better than $25 per ton. 

Developed: by 1.700' of tunnels and stopes. 

Equipment: includes 5-stamp mill, and 8,000' aerial tram connecting 
mine and mill. 
KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION ALASKA 

Office: 120 Broadway, New York. 

Officers: W. C. Potter, chairman; Stephen Birch, pres.; W. P. Hamil- 
ton, v. p. : C. T. Ulrich, sec., with S. J. Clarke, H. O. Havemeyer, Seward Prosser, 

E. A. and H. F. Guggenheim, directors ; E. T. Stannard, gen. mgr. ; E. S. Pegram, 
treas. ; J. N. Steele, gen. counsel; E. R. Reefs, purch. agent. J. C. Lane. met. supt. 



150 



ALASKA 



Inc. April 29, 1915, in New York. Cap. $6.000,000; increased May, 1915, 
* to $15,000.000, in 3,000,000 shares; 2,787,059 5-13 outstanding Jan. 1, 1919. There 
\vere 20.000 shareholders early in 1920. 

Bonds: authorized (June 1, 1915), $10,000,000 6 per cent, ,10-year con- 
vertible sinking fund gold bonds. In April, 1917, all outstanding bonds of this 
issue had been converted into stock. 

On Mar. 21, 1917, company issued $16,000,000 of two-year, 6% notes, to 
finance purchase of more Utah Copper snares. Of this amount, $7,150,000 had 
been retired by Dec. 31, 1917, and $12,000,000 a year later, leaving $4,000.000 out- 
standing. This amount was due Mar. 21, 1919. 

On Mar. 1, 1919, a new issue of $12,000,000 one-year 6 l / 2 % notes was author- 
ized, in order to finance further development, to enable the company to carry 
its accumulation of copper, over 50,000,000 Ib. at that date, and to retire the 
$4,000,000 notes due. 

On January 25, 1920, company sold $15,000,000 of 7%, 10-year, convertible 
notes, secured by 500,000 shares of Utah Copper Co., now $75 each. 

D. A. Crockett, 149 Broadway, transfer agent; Bankers' Trust Co., New York, 
registrar. Annual meeting first Tuesday in May. Stock listed on New York 
Stock Exchange. 

In 1918, Kennecott secured control of the Mother Lode Coalition Mines Co.. 
whose property adjoins it. 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities Dec. 31, 1916. 



Assets. 



Property Accounts : 



1916 



Mining property, net book values $17,578,355 

Less depreciation 392,248 



1917 1918 

$27,002,050 $20,744,877 
745,694 1,136,927 



Construction and equipment 


$17,186,107 
1,463,407 


$26.256,356 
2,371,249 


$19,607,950 
2,632,077 


Investments : 
616,504 (182,000 added in 1917) Utah 
per shares 




$18,649,514 

Cop- 
. $3.1160787 


$28,627,605 

$51.994,081 

39,472,813 
57,459 
8,653,608 
1 
2,385,412 

5,021 


$22,240,027 

$50,606,947 
39,475,890 


2.565,691 (1,041 added in 1917) Braden 
shares 39 45fv1 54 


500 Katalla shares 


57,459 


$23.020,000 par C. R. & N. W. Ry. bonds. 


9,801,417 


8,078,108 
1 
2,385,412 

62,480 


48,174 C R. & N W Ry shares.. 


. .. 1 


23,854 1-8 Alaska S. S shares 


2,385,412 


500 (490 added in 1918) Alaska 
and Min. Co. shares 


Dev. 
5,021 


Current and Working Assets : 
Metals on hand 




$84,866,251 
$9648,513 


$102,568,395 

$1,619.441 
112,292 
766,030 
3,342,400 
56,482 
1,359,236 
4,024,914 


$100,608,839 

$2,421,485 
128,739 
935,600 
2,389,185 
67,064 
2,336,591 
2.695,534 


Ore and concentrates 


137,089 


Materials on hand 


438,397 


Accounts collectible 


1 893 105 


Deferred accounts 


. . . 30,073 


Marketable Securities 


2,970,000 


Cash 


4117,934 


Total current assets 




$19235,111 


$11,280.796 
$142.476.795 


$10,974,198 
$133.823.064 


. Grand total. . 


..$122.750.877 



KENNECOTT COPPER CORP. 
Liabilities. 



151 



Stock (without nominal or par value) : 

Authorized 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 

Unissued . . 213,320 12/13 212,971 12/13 212,940 8/13 



Outstanding 2786,679 1/13 2,787,028 1/13 2,787,051 5/13 

1916 1917 1918 

Stated capital $15,000,000 $15,000,000 $15,000,000 

Capital surp. (from conv. bds. and ex. of stk) 86,687,146 86,703,085 86,706,162 
Prop, surplus (from mines acquired, less 

cap. distributed) ,... 21,421,922 15,847,833 



Total $101,687,146 $123,125,007 $117,553,995 

Notes payable. 8,850,000 4,000,000 

Current Liabilities : 

Accounts payable t 165.830 187,197 224,909 

Accrued taxes and deferred accounts 624,108 730,562 603,133 

Treatment, refining and delivery charges 

(not yet due) 924,154 590,660 1,045,172 



Total current liabilities $1,711,092 

Development reserves 437,411 

Undivided profits 18,915,228 



$1,508.419 $1,873,214 

396,927 396,496 

8,596,444 9,999,360 



Grand total $122,750,877 $142,476,797 $133,823,065 

Income Account Year Ended December 31. 

Operating Revenue : 

1916 1917 1918 

Copper $28,042,396 $15,372,765 $14,418,357 

Silver 710,462 653,340 662,569 



Total $28.752,858 $16.026,105 $15,080,926 

( Operating expense 6,292,338 4,208,909 5,649,635 



Net operating profit $22,460,520 $11,817,196 $9,431,292 

Misc. income at mines 79,917 9,016 loss 41,156 



Net income for period $22.540,437 $1 1,826,212 

Operating Expenses Detail : 



$9,390,136 



1916 

Mine and mill $1,595,452 

Freight to smelter 2,695,573 

Smelting and refining 1,506,522 

Selling commission 287,065 

Marine insurance 159,451 

( K-neral expense 48,275 

Delivery on refined copper 



1917 



1,110,910 
143,313 
72,798 
140,966 
372,676 

Total as above.. $6,292,338 $4,208,909 $5,649,635 



1918 

$1,317,500 $2,162,033 
1,574,771 1,646,938 
864,657 
158,635 
97,044 
196,302 



Other Income : 

Utah Copper Co. dividends $4,854,048 $7,147,801 

Alaska Steamship Co. dividends 941,858 190,833 



Interest, discount, etc 



216,266 



118.634 



$4,777,906 
238,541 
265,689 



$6.012,172 $7.457,268 $5,282,136 
Total income $28.552.608 $19.283.481 $14,672,272 



152 



ALASKA 



Deduct : 
Accrued taxes, interest on bonds, adm'n . . . 



667,985 1,318,579 



898,307 



Net income $27,884,623 $17,964,902 $13,773,965 

Undivided Profits 

Balance forward . $6,573,797 $18,915,227 $8,569,444 

Net income for year 27,884,623 17,964,902 13,773,965 

$34,458,420 $36,880,129 $22,370,409 

Less depletion charge 11,552,539 



Net income $34,458,420 $25,327,590 

Depreciation of plant 222,909 353,446 

Dividends 15,320,283 10,311,665 

Depletion 6,066,036 



$22,370,409 

541,232 

5,574,089 

6,255,728 



$8,596,444 $9,999,360 



Balance forward $18,915,226 

The net revenue in 1919 was $6,293,000. 

Dividends: initial on Mar. 31. 1916; $5.50 in 1916; $5.70 in 1917; $4 in 
1918, and $2 in 1919. The grand total is $46,936,613. 

Property: Alaskan holdings include the Kennecott and Beatson mines; 
also 17 patented claims, 216 acres, at Latouche, and 11 lode claims bought in 1916. 
During 1918, 39 new claims were located. 

The Kennecott group, 3 miles from Kennecott. on the C. R. & N. W. 
R. R., includes the Bonanza and Jumbo mines, with 23 additional patented lode 
claims and 14 patented placer mines, 2.314 acres. 

The Bonanza mine had one of the most remarkable ore bodies ever 
found by a prospector. A great mass of high-grade ore, much of which carried 
over 60% copper, outcropped on the crest of precipitous mountain overlooking 
the Kennecott river, a tributary of the Chitina, which, flows into Copper river. 

There were no large masses of oxides or carbonates present, as glacia- 
tion and active erosion prevented the formation of an oxidized capping. The 
ore outcrops were massive chalcocite averaging about 50% copper and 0.2 oz. 
silver to each per cent, copper. 

Geology: the claims show Nicholai greenstone, consisting of a number 
of basaltic flows of lava, a hard close grained rock considerably altered and in 
places amygdaloidal, overlaid by massive beds of Chitistone limestone of Triassic 
age, with bedding planes parallel to the flow planes of the lava, the limestone 
being of a bluish color, weathered to gray at the surface. There also are diabase 
and andesite intrusions and dikes. 

Ore occurs in irregular replacement masses more or less parallel to vertical 
planes of a fault zone, ore following to some extent, minor fault planes, as well 
as the bedding planes of the limestone making stockwerks and irregular masses 
in the crushed limestone. The outcrop is 20 to 40' wide, and over 400' in length, 
the southern half showing 2 nearly parallel bands of chalcocite, 4 to 10' in width, 
separated by about 10' of limestone. At the northern end of the outcrop the 
chalcocite bands give place to stringers and interlacing seams of ore which thin 
out northward and fade into barren limestone. 

In addition to the Bonanza outcrop there was a large amount of ore in the 
talus, or slide rock, broken off from the outcrop. This mass of broken ore and 
rock was about 300' wide, extending for about 500' or more down the slope from 
the outcrop, varying from 3 to 20' in depth. A number of test-pits, sunk to the 
outcrop, snowed an average of 4' depth, with an average assay of 13% copper, 
this including both boulders of chalcocite up to 200 Ibs. in weight and barren 
limestone. Ore is extracted from the slide by a system of cuts. Two grades of 
ore were mined, with 70% and 15% copper, respectively. 

Further notes on the geology, ore, and mining were published in "Min. 
Sci. Press," June 8, 1918, and Jan. 11, 1919. 

Development: to depth of 1,130' is by tunnels. 




KEXNECOTT COPPER CORP. 153 

Underground openings at all the company's mines during 1916 were extended 
15,340'; 10,770 ft. at Kennecott in 1917, and 11,790 ft. in 1918. 

The most important recent developments includes the discovery of orebodies 
on the 600-ft. level of the Bonanza mine, and on the 900-ft. level of the Jumbo 
mine, both about 400 ft. northwest of the main Assuring. In 1918-19 a new two- 
compartment shaft was completed to 800 ft. at the Bonanza, and at the Jumbo 
a two-compartment incline was sunk to 500 ft. Orebodies on the 500' lowest 
level are larger and higher grade than on the upper levels. 

The Bonanza mine is connected- with the mill at the lower camp by a 
Blejchert aerial tram, in 2 sections, the upper of 7,000' and the lower of 8,000', 
with a drop of 4.000'. The tram line has 40 towers, longest span 1,500', with 
ore bins at both terminals, and has an estimated daily capacity of 600 tons. A 
5.000-ft. aerial tram has been erected to connect the Jumbo mine with the Glacier 
mine, so that ore from the latter will be available for the mill. The lower camp 
has the mine buildings, power plant, and mill. 

Equipment: includes steam plant and air compressor. Buildings in- 
clude a bunk house, mess-house, assay office and 10.000' sawmill. 

The 700-ton concentrator is equipped with Blake and Symons crushers. Han- 
cock jigs, bull iigs, rolls. Wilfley and Deister tables, and 600-tqn ammonia leaching 
plant. (Described by L. Eddy in "Eng. & Min. Journ.," June 28. 1919.) 

Guggenheim interests constructed the Copper River & Northwestern railway, 
at a cost of about $20.000.000. this line of 195 miles length starting at Cordova, on 
the sea, and ending at the lower camp. Results have been as follows: 

Year Revenue Profit 

1918 $1.846,585 $581,329 

1917.. 2.496,670 1,210,304 

1916 ..: 2.911,207 1,768,671 

The Alaska Steamship Co. is also controlled by Kennecott. It carries ore 
to the smelter at Tacoma and returns with supplies for the mines. Recent results 
are as under: 

Year Revenue Profit Dividends Surplus 

1918.. .$3,733,938 $429.190 $450,000 $176,530 

1917.. 4,018,667 979,524 360,000 513,239 

1916 3.816.087 1.366,666 1.740,000 130,216 

The Beatson mine comprises 17 patented claims, 268 acres, about 3 
miles from the northern end of Latouche island, within one-half mine of tide- 
water, where there is a good natural harbor. Mine was located, July 4, 1897, 
by the late Andrew K. Beatson, and began shipping, 1903. Country rock is 
slate ; ore is chalcopyrite. pyrite and pyrrhotite, occurring in brecciated portions 
of the country rock. The orebody is a large lens ; total length developed is 
about 800' witn an average width of 100'. Ore assays up to 30% and as snipped 
returns 7.23% copper and 2 oz. silver per ton. 

Development: includes over 20,000' of underground workings. The 
ore is mined in an open pit and dropped through to the main tunnel level. Mine 
and mill are connected by an aerial tram. A 700-ton concentrator, employing oil 
flotation and completed Feb., 1915, was enlarged in 1918 to treat 1,500 tons a day. 
Buildings include rooming, mess and change houses, office, store and a hospital. 

Situation, geology, ore, mining and milling methods and leaching of copper 
tailings with ammonia, were briefly described by H. M. Lawrence in the "Eng. & 
Mng. Journal." Nov. 3, 1917. A 300-ton plant was erected 1917, and one of 800- 
ton capacity is under construction. Four 30' diam. leaching tanks with dome 
tops, hold 500 tons of tailing per charge in a depth of 15'. 

The following figures show past production, costs and profits of the two 
Alaska companies prior to their acquisition by the Kennecott Corporation : 



154 



ALASKA 




Kennecott Mines Co. : Net Lbs. Copper 

1916 101,410,000 

1915 (5 months) 14,240,412 

1914 13,988,273 

1913 14,621,834 

1912 22,366,478 

1911 (9 months) 21,007,096 



Cost per Lb. (a) Profit 



Beatson Copper Co. : 

1916 

1915 (9 months) 

1914 

1913 

1912 

1911 (9 months) 

(a) Includes selling. 

Production: 



6,872,000 
1,970,947 
5,286,667 
5,178,629 
3,254,858 
3,078,444 



S.10c. 
4.00c. 
5.78c. 
5.48c. 
4.43c. 
4.19c. 



S.lOc. 



8.75c. 
8.36c. 
9.74c. 
7.44c. 



$20,525,384 
1,522,747 
1,104,645 
1,424,635 
2,633,568 
1,656,205 



$1,390,893 
122,504 
241,895 
353,239 
221,116 
163,939 



Year 
1916 


. Bonanza a: 
Ore, Tons 
f 48,855 
I 19,271 


nd Jumbo 
Copper, % 
67.90 
15.60 


1917 


[229,717 
265,579 


8.49 
13.78 


1918. . 


262.377 


10.59 



Bealson 
Ore, Tons Copper, % 
184,411 2.30 

6,608 7.23 



273,523 
397,851 



2.44 
2.02 



Summary of Operations 



Ore, etc., to smelter, tons... 
Copper, per cent 


1916 
Kennecott 
48,855 1 
19,271 > 
703 ) 
67.9 j 
15.6 V 


Latouche 
6,608 

7.23 


Kennecott '. 
89,799 

38.57 


Latoucht 
49,141 

11 48 


Ore milled, tons 


9.9 i 
229,717 


177,803 


206252 


253 805 


Copper, per cent 


8 49 


2 12 


8 92 


2 06 


Concentrate, tons 


29,949 


20,701 


29,559 


29 423 


Copper, per cent 


53. 6 


14 2'. 


.13 r>2 


14 20 


Recovery, per cent 


82.27 


78.91 


85.98 


80.28 


Tailing leached by ammonia, 
tons 


62,450 . . . 




98,074 




Copper, per cent 


1.48 .... 




0.90 




Recovery, per cent 










Copper, pounds 


108 


372,785 


78 


211 429 


Average price, cents 




25.88 




27.02 


Silver, ounces 


1 


101,733 




933 573 


Average price, cents 




64.48 




95.85 


Cost of copper sold, cents 
per pound 




5 1 




7 4 


Metallurgical efficiency (cop- 
per in ore and products 
shipped) per cent 








84.53 


Output for 1919 was 

Kich ore and concent r, 


40,700,000 Ib. 
sites are sent 


hi Tacmi'ii, 


Wash., for 


ft'diictioi 



1918 
Kennecott 

71,888 



36.09 

218,819 

7.82 

27,174 

r3. on 

84.19 

132,304 
0.94 
73.5 



Latouche 



52,427 



12.42 

395,524 

2.00 

49,915 

12.8(1 
80.70 



60,994,757 

24.43 

684,779 

95.29 

9.2 



1(3.33 

and refill inir. 



Copper production was at its highest by mid-1916, when the yield was 
10,750,000 Ib. in July. From then on, there was a steady drop to 5,500,000 in 
Sept., 1918. After that, the published output includes Braden with Kennecott, 
thus concealing individual outputs. Despite the depletion of its very rich ores, 
Kennecott has a profitable future in the treatment of low grade ores. (The 
Braden and Utah companies are Described under their respective titles.) 
KENSINGTON MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Juneau, Alaska. 

The Kensington has been idle for years. 



K XI GUTS ISLAND LAND LOCK BAY 155 

KNIGHTS ISLAND ALASKA COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Address: J. J. Dieringer, Valdez, Alaska. 

Property: on eastern arm of Drier Bay, Knights Island district. 

Geology: a sheared zont, 20' to 50' wide, crosses greenstone, with a 
strike X. 15 E. shows slight mineralization with chalcopyrite, sphalerite and 
pyrrhotite for several hundred feet. 

Development: by a 650' crosscut tunnel, with three short drifts and 
some shallow surface pits. 

LADYSMITH SMELTING CO. ALASKA 

(Formerly the W. A. Dickey Copper Co.) 

Office: 31 Nassau St., New York. Mine office: Ellamar, Alaska. W. A. 
Dickey, pres.-gen. mgr. ; Duncan Edwards, v. p.-treas. ; H. C. Bryan, sec. 

Cap., $50,000. Is a close corporation. 

Property: 2 miles from tide water at Irish Cove, Prince William Sound, 
is developed by tunnels and over 1,000' of workings. Ore contains chalcopyrite 
in lenses along shear zones, in greenstone, with gold and silver; lenses of gold 
ore have been developed to a depth of 300'. Shipping ore said to average 12% 
copper. Last shipment to Tacoma smelter was made April, 1916. Now idle, 
awaiting improved shipping conditions. 

Company bought the Mason-Gleason group, on Fidalgo Bay, for $15,000. 
The latter group shows high-grade ore, but nearest shipping point is Irish Cove, 
3 miles distant. 

LAKINA KENNECOTT MINING CO. ALASKA 

(Formerly owned by the Lakina Copper Co.) 

Address: E. A. Patrick, v. p., Eagle Bldg., Spokane, Wash. 

Directors: E. A. Patrick, J. J. Kinnan, E. J. Hurley, E. E. Younge, T. 
A. Brady, V. C. Hill, J. S. Ross, and T. E. Coleman. 

Cap. $2,000.000; $1 par; 770,000 outstanding; 750,000 owned by Lakina 
Copper Co. of Idaho. 

Reported sold under a six-year bond for $500,000; 25% of all ore shipped to 
apply on purchase. 

Property: 30 claims and a millsite on headwaters of Lakina river, Chit- 
tina district, S. E. Alaska, about 12 miles from the holdings of the Kennecott 
Copper Corporation. 

Geology: a well-defined shear-zone in greenstone, running N. 10 W, 
dip 70 W. has evidences of leaching and is traceable up the mountain for a 
distance of over 1,000' vertically. The ore is bornite, although chalcocite occurs 
along fracture planes with a calcite gangue. Some native copper is also found. 
See U. S. G. S. Bull, 662, page 161. 

Development: by 235' tunnel driven near the mouth of Mill creek, elev. 
2,100', and by numerous open-cuts. 
LAKINAW TAGISH AND MOIRA MINES CO. ALASKA 

Address: Carcross, Y. T. and Cymru mine, Moira Sound, via Ketchikan, 
Alaska. Holds bond on Cymru mine (which see) and on Portland (or West- 
lake King) group. Company is working the Yukon properties, formerly held 
and operated by the Conrad Consolidated Mines, now dead. 

At the Cymru a 100' shaft has been sunk and the mine equipped with 3-drill 
compressor and gasoline hoist. A mile long tram with gasoline motor connects 
mine and shipping wharf. 

The Portland Group, near Mineral Lake, is 1^2 miles from the Cymru. It 
shows a 4' vein carrying silver-zinc-lead and copper values, zinc being predominant. 

Development: by 130' shaft. The ore is transported by 1,000' aerial tram 
to Mineral Lake, from there by scows to the Cymru. No recent returns. 
LANDLOCK BAY COPPER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: Valdez, Alaska. Mine office: Landlock, Alaska. Dr. W. A. 
Rystrom, pres.-mgr. 

Inc. 1907. Cap. $1.000.000; $1 par; 750,000- issued. 

Property: 7 claims, 140 acres, on a small peninsula, with tide water on 
both sides, has 2 tunnels on the western side, besides a shallow shaft, 500' of 




156 ALASKA 

drifts, a winze and raises, showing chalcopyrite, sphalerite and pyrrhotite ore 
assaying 7 l />% copper. Only assessment work done during 1916. Geology fully 
described, p. 97, Bull, 605, U. S. G. S. 1915. 

LATOUCHE COPPER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Latouche, Latouche Island, Alaska. George Barrach. mgr. 
Property: 7 claims, about one-half mile N. of the Beatson-Bonanza 
mine of the Kennecott Copper Co., at the northern end of Latouche Island. The 
vein has been traced about 750', by trenches and pits, and is developed by a 750' 
tunnel, showing chalcopyrite, associated with pyrite and pyrrhotite, having small 
gold and silver values. There is an 1,175' ground tram to a shipping wharf. 

Was under development by W. A. Dickey, 1917. Shipment of 300 tons of 
sorted ore, August, 1917, reported made to the Tacoma smelter. 
LATOUCHE ISLAND COPPER MINING CO., LTD. ALASKA 

Office: 330 Burke Bldg., Seattle, Wash. Mine office: Latouche. Latouche 
Island, Alaska. 

Officers: Jas. A. Murphy, pres.; L. G. Wheeler, v. p.; A. E. Fraser, 2nd 
v. p. ; C. P. McCormick, sec. ; A. L. Cohen, treas., Tenning Carlson and H. J. 
Jacobs, directors. 

Inc. in Washington. Cap. $5,000,000; $5 par. 

Property: 42 claims, with about 4 miles of tidewater frontage, on the 
N. E. shore of Latouche Island, 60 miles S. of Valdez. The mine has 3 prac- 
tically parallel N.-S. shear-zone veins in graywacke of 5 to 15' estimated average 
width, with dip of 65, proven by trenches for about 3 miles. 

Ore carries bornite and chalcopyrite, with quartz gangue, averaging about 
4% copper, with some gold-silver values. It closely resembles that of the Beatson 
mine, and is said to be amenable to flotation. 

Development: by shallow shaft and 4 short tunnels. 

Equipment: includes small hydro-electric plant with water wheel and 
an air compressor. 

Little progress has been made during the past few years, but considerable 
development is planned for 1920. 

LONDON AND CAPE CO. ALASKA 

Property:. 14 patented claims near Trail creek, Chitina district, S. E. 
Alaska. Copper stains found along fracture planes in quartz diorite in 245' 
tunnel. Property reported idle for several years. 

LUCKY STRIKE MINE ALASKA 

John Hirshey, owner, Hope, Alaska. 
Property: on the Kenai peninsula. 

Ore: free gold, occurs in quartz fissure vein, averaging $75, per ton. 
Amalgamation recovers 60%. 

Development: by 400' of tunneling. 
A 400-lb. prospectors' stamp-mill is used. 

MABEL MINING, MILLING & POWER CO. ALASKA 

Fully described Vol. XIII. Succeeded by New Mabel M. M. & Power Co., 
which see. 

MAYFLOWER MINE ALASKA 

Address: G. F. Johnson and J. McConneU, Strelna, Alaska. 
Property: 3 claims, 60 acres, 2 l /2 miles above foot of Kuskulana glacier 
and 18 miles by wagon-road from Strelna on Copper River railroad, shows a 
quartz vein in greenstone, cut by a prominent fault. Main copper exposure is 
1,000' above the glacier, on east side of a deep gulch. Copper minerals are 
bornite and glance. 

Development: by 75' tunnel, opening 100 tons of 30% copper and 18 oz. 
silver ore. A prospect. See U. S. G. S. Bull. 662, p. 159. 
McKINLEY PLACERS ALASKA 

(See Valdez Creek Placer Mines Co.) 

MINERAL CREEK DEVELOPMENT CO. ALASKA 

Property: Hercules and Millionaire claims on Mineral creek. Port Val- 
dez district, Prince William Sound. Country rock is graywacke. Numerous 
short tunnels with drifts have opened up a vein about 20" wide carrying gold, 



MOHAWK MINING MT. ANDREW 157 

galena, sphalerite, pyrite. Strike N. 80 W., dip 70 N. A small mill has been 

built to treat the ore. Season is short, from March to October. 

MOHAWK MINING CO. ALASKA 

Reported driving tunnel 200' long, 1,000' below upper tunnel. 
MOTHER LODE COALITION MINES CO. ALASKA 

Offices: 120 Broadway, New York, and Kennecott, Alaska. 

Officers: Charles Earle. chairman of board of directors; John K. Mac- 
Gowan, pres. ; Judd Stewart, v. p. ; C. T. Ulrich, sec., and F. W. Hills, treas. 

Inc. Apr. 17, 1919, in Delaware. Cap. 2,500,000 shares of no par value, 
of which Kennecott Copper Corporation interests receive 1,275,000, equal to 51% 
and Mother Lode Copper Mines Co., 1,225,000, or 49%. The directors consists 
of 4 and 3, respectively, from these companies. Shares exchanged on basis of 
1 ($10 par value) of Mother Lode Copper Mines for 1.63 in the Coalition Co. 
The Coalition Co. paid off the Mother Lode Copper Mines Co.'s $500,000 bonds, 
and provides working capital not exceeding $1,000,000, to develop the property 
on a large scale. The Coalition Co. has a contract with the Kennecott Copper 
Corporation for the treatment of its ores, and is to have the benefit of the same 
milling, smelting, refining, freight and selling charges enjoyed by the Kennecott 
Copper Corporation. 

The property owned by the Mother Lode Copper Mines Co. was deeded May 
20, 1919, to Mother Lode Coalition Mines. 

Property: 83 lode and placer claims, about 1,640 acres, including the 
Smith-Haglund Sail group, adjoins the Bonanza Mine of the Kennecott Copper 
Corporation, in the Copper River district. 

The Houghton- Alaska Exploration Co.'s property to the east and adjoining 
the Jumbo mine of the Kennecott Corporation was acquired in Nov., 1916. It 
consists of 12 lode and 1 Association placer mining claims. 

Geology: conditions at this property, according to Herman Keller, are 
similar to those at Bonanza mines. The base of the mountain is formed of 
amygdaloidal basalt, highly altered and called the Nicolai greenstone. This is 
covered by thick beds of Chitina limestone, dipping north. The ore-shoots occur 
in the limestone, and exploration has shown that contrary to general belief, the 
ore does not occur along the greenstone contact, but in a favorable bed 90' 
above it, and then only in connection with the Bonanza fault, or shear-zone. 
This shear-zone. 20 to 24' wide, cuts both greenstone and limestone and the ore 
is found in chimneys, and as irregular bunchy masses along the zone and as 
impregnations in the limestone walls. The ore consists of nearly pure glance 
with minor and unimportant amounts of covellite and very little malachite, etc. 
Principal copper mineral is chalcocite. Like the Bonanza ore, it carries gold and 
silver. 

Development: Xov. 24. 1918. consisted of 12.789 ft. of tunnels, shafts, 
crosscuts, raises, etc. A 1,400-ft. tunnel has been driven to connect the Mother 
Lode and Kennecott workings. Electric locomotives are used on this level to 
haul ore to the Kennecott tramway. 

Property has been fully and favorably reported on by Herman A. Keller, 
Arthur W. Jenks, and Alan M. Bateman, and is a prospect of merit. Under 
the new arrangement profits and costs should be satisfactory. 
MOTHER LODE COPPER MINES CO. OF ALASKA ALASKA 

Merged into the Mother Lode Coalition Mines Company, which see. 

MOUNT ANDREW IRON & COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Former Office: Empire Bldg., Seattle, Wash. W. J. Rogers, supt., 
Ketchikan, Alaska, at last accounts. 

Property: held under lease from the Mount Andrew Mining Co., on 
Kcisaan Peninsula, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. 

Geology: ore carries chalcopyrite disseminated in magnetite, with horn- 
blende gangue, and is practically unaltered at surface, masses of sulphide ore 1 
even showing glacial striations. Ore averages about 3.75% copper and $1 to 
$1.60 per ton in combined gold and silver values. The orebody has been stripped 



158 ALASKA 

for about 2 acres and is developed by tunnels of 300' and 700', with a 70' blind 
shaft from the tunnel, and 10 small glory-holes, opened upwards to surface from 
the tunnels. 

A 4,600' aerial tram of 40 tons hourly capacity leads from a 50-ton loading 
bin at the mine to a shipping bunker 500' from tide water. 

Equipment: includes two 50 h. p. boilers.with 5-drill and 7-drill air com- 
pressors. Buildings include office, boarding house, bunk-house and smithy. 

In Sept., 1917, reported shipping 1,000 tons high-grade copper ore per month 
to the Tacoma smelter. 
NEW MABEL MNG., MLG. & POWER CO. ALASKA 

Office: Loveland, Colo. 

Officers: Carlton E. Clark, pres. : J. J. Henderson, v. p.; L. R. Rinker. 
sec.; J. R. Handy, treas., with F. G. Barthold and Mary B. Sutherland, directors. 

Inc. 1917. in Colorado. Cap. $100.000; par $1; in treasury. 25,000 shares. 
Annual meeting, Sept. 1. 

Property: 4 claims. 82 acres in Willow Creek mining district, formerly 
owned by Mabel M. M. & Power Co., described Vol. XIII. 

Ore: occurs in vein in granite, dipping 45 degrees, and said to yield $46 
in gold per ton. Developed by 132' tunnel. Continuing development work. 1919. 

Production: $12,000 in 1916, and $10,000 from May 28 to June 26. 1917. 
Seasons are short, with probably not over 120 days available for surface work. 
NIBLACK COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Niblack anchorage, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. A. A. Wakefield. agent. 
Property formerly worked by the Niblack Copper Development Co. afterwards 
the Niblack Copper Co., is reported to have reverted to the Geo. M. Wakefield 
Mineral Land Co. Fully described in Vol. VIII. Copper Handbook. No work- 
done on the property since 1912 and 1913 save annual representation. Niblack 
Copper Co. is said to still have a corporate existence. 
NIKOLAI BUTTE COPPER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Officers: Harry F. Goetz, pres.; Fred E. Grimmer, v. p.; H. G. 
Twomey, sec., Old Natl. Bank Bldg., Spokane, Wash. ; Gus F. Eilers, treas.. with 
A. P. Witherspoon, directors. C. A. Bode, gen. mgr., McCarthy, Alaska. E. F. 
Wann, cons. eng. 

Inc. Dec. 15, 1916, in Washington. Cap. $2,500,000; par $1; 1, 500.000 
issued. Annual meeting, July 25, in Spokane, Wash. 

Property: 20 claims on Dan creek, Chitina district, about 15 miles S. K. 
of Kennecott Copper Corp. High grade copper ores carrying bornite. chal- 
cocite and chalcopyrite said to occur at contact of greenstone and limestone. 

Development: in February. 1917. commenced a tunnel to open up ore 
body stated to be 18' wide, averaging 35% copper. No recent return. 
NORTH MIDAS COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Office: 50 Congress St., Boston, Mass. Mine Office: Strelna, Alaska. 

Officers: Willis D. Rich, pres.; F. A. Ball, v. p., James F. Crane, sec.- 
treas., with A. S. Nye, W. L. Hall, J. E. Kelley, and G. M. Wheeler, directors. 

Inc. 1915 in Maine. Cap., $1,500,000; $1 par; 1,250,000 outstanding; no 
funded debt. Stock listed on Boston Curb. Annual meeting first Tuesday in 
June. Old South Trust Co., Boston, transfer agents. 

Property: copper, gold and silver claims, including 16 lode and 7 placer 
claims with mill site, near the Kuskulana river, in the Chitina district. Copper 
River region. Twelve mile wagon road connects with the railroad at Strelna on 
the Copper River and Northwestern R. R., 146 miles from the terminus at 
Cordova. Silver-gold occurs in 5' vein in porphyry, dip 45, said to average $35 
gold per ton. The copper claims have not developed much ore. Principal min- 
eral is chalcopyrite; gold and silver occur with iron pyrite. 

Development: by 5 tunnels and incline shaft, aggregating 2,300'. No. 1 
tunnel cut a series of alternating limestone beds and porphyritic intrusions. 
Cupriferous pyrite in small quantity appears in the tunnel face. Above this, 
another tunnel has exposed copper pyrite. A tunnel N. E. of the others has 



NORTHLAND COPPER-GOLDPIONEER MINING 159 

I 

been driven 555' and an open cut below it shows quartz 1 to 4' thick, said to assay 
$35 per ton in gold and silver. Ore reserves reported at 200,000 tons, averaging 
$30.00. 

Equipment, includes compressor. 4500' aerial tram. 10-ton cyanide plant, 
water power, etc. Twenty men employed. 
NORTHLAND COPPER-GOLD GROUP ALASKA 

Letters returned from last address, 518 Hinckley Bldg., Seattle, Wash., in 
1917. See Vol. XIII. 
PANDORA GROUP ALASKA 

Address: Ellamar, Alaska. Geo. Valentine, Chas. Wallace, James Mc- 
Pherson, owners. 

Property: 6 unpatented claims, on Bay of Isles, Knights Island, Prince 
William sound, showing small lenses of chalcopyrite ore in a sheared zone 2' 
to 20' wide in greenstone, said to assay 3% copper. Developed by 90' shaft with 
400' of workings. Developing only, owing to lack of funds. 
PARDEE-MEIER COMPANY ALASKA 

Address: Fairbanks, Alaska. 

Property: 14 claims on Steel creek, 14 miles from Fairbanks. Several 
narrow veins showing scheelite, a tungsten mineral and molybdenite with copper, 
lead, gold, silver and antimony. 

Development: by open cuts and short tunnels. Strike of lode system 
N. 20 W., dip 30 E. 

Reported idle since Feb., 1918. 
PATTEN CO-OPERATING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Valdez, Alaska. W. K. Patten, mgr. 

Cap., $100,000; $100 par. 

Property: 23 claims, 475 acres, in Valdez mining district. Ore occurs as 
contact deposit in shale and bornite, carrying gold, silver and nickel values. 

Development: by 400' of underground workings. 

Equipment: includes compressor, steam power, pump, tramway. Man- 
agement plans installing electric power and erecting a 150-ton smelter. 
PEABODY ALASKA COPPER CORPORATION ALASKA 

Office Chas. L. Peabody, Room 707, 10 Wall St.. New York City. 

Property: 33 claims known as the Addison-Powell group, on Sulphide 
Gulch, Valdez district, 4 miles from Lowe River, near Granby Cons. M. S. & P. 
Company's property. Said to have shear zone 1,000' wide of green schist impreg- 
nated with chalcopyrite. 

Development: by short tunnels and prospect pits. 

Reported optioned to an English syndicate; if sold, the corporation will be 
dissolved. 
PEABODY DEVELOPMENT CO. ALASKA 

Office: Chas. L. Peabody. 10 Wall St.. New York City. 

Inc. 1913 in Del. Cap., $700.000: par $1; fully paid. 

Property: several unpatented claims on Passage Canal, Valdez district, 
stated to contain a gold quartz vein 3' wide, in slate and graywacke. 

Development: 113' tunnel and crosscuts. 

Reported in litigation. 
PETERSON MINE ALASKA 

Address: P. O Box 198. Juneau. Alaska, or Amalga. Alaska. 

Owners: Mrs. J. G. Peterson, Miss I. M. Peterson, Miss M. W. Peterson. 

Property: 12 unpatented claims, 40 miles N. W. of Juneau, in the Har- 
ris mining district. Gold associated with arsenopyrite occurs in streaks in a 20' 
\rin in jj.-ibbro. Ore averages $6 gold per ton. 

Development: 60' vertical shaft with tunnels 127' and 360' long. 

Equipment: 4 mile tramway, small 3-stamp mill, Wilfley concentrator, 
etc. Concentrates reported to assay $86 per ton. Examined by H. S. Brockunier. 
PIONEER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Sec Pioneer Mining & Ditch Co. 
PIONEER MINING AND DITCH CO. ALASKA 

Formerly Pioneer Mining Co. 



160 ALASKA 

Office: 509 Balboa Bldg;, San. Francisco, Cal., and Nome. Alaska. 

Officers: Jafet Lindeberg, pres. -mgr. ; E. O. Lindblom, v.p.; J. E. Chil- 
berg, sec. ; G. W. Campbell, treas., with W. H. Metson and J. L. Hagelin, 
directors. 

Inc. Dec. 27, 1901. in Washington. Cap., $2,500,000; $1 par; all issued. 

Profit for year ended Dec. 1, 1916, was $242,904, of which $100,000 was paid 
as No. 17 dividend. Surplus at end of year was $240,153. No recent returns. 

Dividends: 8% in 1902; 11% in~1906; 12% in 1907; 3% in 1908; 9% in 
1909; 6% in 1910; 3% in 1911; 2% in 1915, and 4% in Jan., 1917; a total of 
58% or $2,900,000. 

Property: placer areas in the Nome district. Alaska, worked by hy- 
draulicking since 1899. They are fully equipped and plant stands in accounts as 
worth $57,428. Company controls the Miocene Ditch and United Ditch companies. 
RAE-WALLACE MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Don S. Rae, mgr.. Anchorage. Alaska. Mine in the Willow 
Creek district, Alaska, reported under development, Sept., 1917. 

RAMSEY-RUTHERFORD GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Valdez, Alaska. Inc. in Sept., 1913. 

Property: 10 miles N. E. of Valdez at an elevation of 3,500'; trail to the 
mine goes over Valdez glacier, making transportation difficult. 

Ore: free milling gold quartz in fissure veins in graywacke. 

Equipment: includes several gasoline engines, air compressor and a 5- 
stamp mill, which cannot be operated during the winter. In 1916 company 
employed 20 men on development work and stoping on the 100', 150', 225' and 
300' levels, and was reported to have considerable ore blocked out. Mill closed 
from January to May on account of weather. See U. S. G. S. Bull, 642, p. 190. 

READY BULLION MINE ALASKA 

Address: Hollis, Prince of Wales Island. Alaska, formerly called the 
Puyallup mine. 

Ore: free milling, occurs in quartz vein, averaging width 6" to 7" and 
in places 3' wide, having well defined walls, inclosed in quartz-diorite. 

Development: by three tunnels about 300' feet long and 1160' tunnel 
driven along vein, stoped for length of 1,000', to an average height of 150' to 250' 

Equipment: includes Pelton wheel, compressor, electric-light plant, 5- 
stamp mill. See U. S. G. S. Bulls. 642 and 662, pp. 79 and 65. 

Produced both bullion and concentrate. 

READY BULLION MINE ALASKA 

See Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining Co. 
REGAL MINES CO. ALASKA 

Subsidiary of the Great Northern Development Co., which see. 

Office: 77 Franklin St., Boston, Mass. Mine Office: Kennecott, Alaska. 

Officers: Walter M. Briggs, pres. : H. I. Gaskill. sec.-treas.; James 
Phillips, Jr., C. Hartman Kuhn, Chas. S. Farnum, Mulford Martin, E. F. Gray, 
W. M. Briggs, J. M. Satterfield, directors; E. F. Gray, gen. mgr. 

Inc. 1912 in Maine. Cap. $250,000; $5 par; issued $28,011. Annual meet- 
ing, November 2. 

Property: 17 claims, unpatented. 340 acres, near Kennecott, Copper 
River district. Developed by 115' shaft sunk on a contact between limestone 
and greenstone and showing copper glance ore. Assessment work only in recent 
years. 
REYNOLDS-ALASKA DEVELOPING C9. ALASKA 

Office: 1182 Broadway, New York. Mine office: Latouche, Latouche 
Island, Alaska. 

Officers: Marvin F. Butler, pres.; H. M. Coffin, v.p.; J. Frank Birdsell. 
sec.-treas. ; preceding, with A. E. Austin, Hon. J. G. Brady, F. A. Reynolds, W. 
C. Gilbert, John Yule, O. C. McGilvara, Geo. K. Hinds and G. B. Wrigman, 
directors. F. A. Hancock, Latouche, supt. 

Inc. 1903 in Washington. Cap. $3,000,000; $1 par; in $1,000,000 cumula- 
tive 6% preferred stock and $2,000,000 common stock. Authorized March 3, 



RICH HILL RUSH & BROWN 161 

1908, a $500,000 twenty-year 6% gold bond issue; issued, $125,000. Annual 
meeting, first Tuesday in April. 

Property: 102 claims, about 2,000 acres, in Valdez district, Prince Wil- 
liam Sound. Company was in receiver's hands until June, 1910, when discharged 
by court order. Former management fully described in Vol. X, Copper Handbook. 

The Boulder Bay group of 31 claims, 620 acres, is on the mainland at eastern 
side of Prince William Sound. Claims shows a contact deposit between green- 
stone and slate, carrying chalcopyrite said to assay up to 11% copper and $3 
gold per ton, but averaging 2 to 4% copper. Developed by 2 tunnels. Equipment 
includes a 60 h. p. boiler and a 5-drill air compressor. 

The Iron Mountain group of 62 claims includes the Duchess and Duke 
properties, on Horseshoe Bay, Latouche Island. The footwall in both prop- 
erties is black slate; graywacke forms the hanging wall. The ore consists of 
chalcopyrite with pyrite and pyrrhotite. The Duke mine has a 4' vein of ore, 
formerly claimed to average 7% copper, slightly developed by a shaft now filled 
with water. 

The Duchess mine, last worked in 1911, when 400' of drifting was done on 
the lower tunnel, is developed by 2 tunnels, the upper a 375' drift tunnel, and 
the lower having 500' of drifts on the orebody, which has an average width of 
25'. This group shows massive sulphide ore, estimated by the management to 
average about 3% copper. Assessment work only has been done since 1911. 

In 1916 the Duke shaft was unwatered and sunk to depth of 110' and the 
orebody reported to show a maximum width of 27' along a length of 140' of 
undeveloped ore. Drifts are 300' below the lower Duchess tunnel. Ore is of 
similar character and value to that in the Duchess. Estimated ore opened 
above this tunnel is said to be over 600,000 tons, averaging 2% copper, $2 gold, 
40% iron and 43% sulphur ; maximum width of orebody in last completed crosscut 
was 124', with average width of 25' for a developed length of 500'. 

Equipment: includes a 200 h. p. hydro-electric installation, with a flume 
and steel pipe leading from Big Falls Greek to a Pelton wheel, direct-connected 
to two 40 k. w. generators; a 50 h. p. hoist and 2 air compressors, of 5 drills 
aggregate capacity, with 6 air drills and 10 electric drills. See U. S. G. S. BulL 
662. pp. 206-208. 
RICH HILL MINE ALASKA 

Owner and Operator. Henry Andrews, Kasaan, Alaska. 

Property: 5 claims containing a fissure vein in lime and granite, devel- 
oped by 54' shaft and 130' tunnel. Ore is chalcopyrite with some gold and silver. 
Gross production 1918, $14,036; expenses, $6,548. 
RUSH & BROWN MINE ALASKA 

Address: Kasaan, Prince of Wales Island. Alaska. U. S. Rush, owner 
and operator. 

Property: 9 claims, 180 acres and two 5-acre millsites. near the head of 
Kasaan Bay, 8 miles N. W. of Kasaan. The claims show greenstone intruded by 
granodiorite and carry three orebodies, 2 in E. W. shear zones in the greenstone, 
the third orebody along the greenstone-diorite contact. The latter carries 
magnetite-chalcopyrite ore in a body of unknown extent, but opened for 200' 
in length, width of 63' and to a depth of 120'. 

One shear zone contains the sulphide body. The ore occurs as massive 
chalcopyrite in stringers, bunches and lenses, and also as a commercial impreg- 
nation of the greenstone and chloritic schists. The massive chalcopyrite, without 
waste, assays 20% to 30% copper, with $12 to $18 gold. The lenticular shoots 
of the clean ore run with the shear zone, and are as much as 7' thick. Pyrite, 
quartz and calcite are practically absent. The sulphide body, in which this ore 
occurs has an average width of 14', varying from 8' to 20' between walls, with dip 
of 55. 

On the footwall side, and at a distance of 30' from the hanging wall, a parallel 
vein, evidently in the same shear zone, has been exposed for 45' on the 200' level. 

Development: includes 177' vertical shaft connecting by drift with in- 
cline shaft to 440' depth, with drifts at 50' intervals. On 400' level drift is 260' 
long. 




162 ALASKA 

Equipment: includes a steam plant with hoist, ne.cessary mine buildings 
and 528 cu. ft. compressor. Ore is taken over a 3-mile private railway of 42" 
gauge to Venus Bay. 

Production: for 1918, 403,512 Ibs, copper, 3,460 oz. silver, 609 oz. gold. 
Mine considered promising. 
RUSSELL BALL COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Property: a group of claims on the south side of Drier Bay, Knights 
Island. 

Geology: a vein of solid sulphides about 8" thick, occurring along an 
iron stained shear zone in greenstone, developed by a short tunnel. The shear 
zone varies from 10" to 10' in thickness with a strike of N. 10 W. and dip of 
70 E. Minerals present, are chalcopyrite, chalmersite, pyrrhotite with quartz. 
Property believed to be idle. 
SALT CHUCK MINE ALASKA 

Owner: J. E. Chilberg, 1414 Alaska Bldg., Seattle, Wash. F. Chapman, 
mgr. ; C. H. Bannerman, supt, Kasaan, Alaska. 

Property: located on Kasaan Bay, Ketchikan district. The ore contains 
bornite and chalcopyrite with epidote in a gabbro country rock. 

Equipment: includes 150 h. p. hydro-electric plant, 60-ton mill, consist- 
ing of crusher, ball mill, drag classifier and flotation unit. First shipment, Jan., 
1918, reported assaying 44% copper, 2 oz. gold, 14 oz. silver and some platinum. 
SEA COAST MINING CO. ALASKA 

Holdings taken over by Alaska Hercules Mining Co., which see. 
SEATTLE-ALASKA COPPER CO. ALASKA 

Office: 638 New York Blk., Seattle, Wash. Mine office: Latouche, La- 
touche Island, Alaska. 

Officers: E. Sparks, pres.; Geo. W. Terwilliger, v. p.; Geo. J. Hodge, 
sec.; Jos. Bjorn, treas., and O. B. Hess, directors. 

Inc. in Washington. Cap. $1,000,000; $1 par. 

Property: 35 claims, about 700 acres, near Montgomery Bay, in the 
southern and central part of Latouche Island. Claims are in 2 groups, one of 10 
claims on tide water, with another of 25 claims about a mile from the harbor, 
latter said to carry the extension of the Beatson-Bonanza vein. 

Development: by 287' tunnel, on the Delta claim, showing a vein of 4 
to 6' width; ore, when sorted, assays 11 to 22% copper. The Santa Clara No. 1 
claim has a 101' shaft, with a 140' tunnel and an 85' crosscut, showing 2 veins, 
one of v 4' width. Ore is chalcopyrite with gold occurring in shear zone in green- 
stone. 

Equipment: includes steam power, Pelton wheel and air compressor. 
Shipments were intermittently made to the Tacoma smelter. Mill dismantled in 
1916 and only 3 men were said to be working. 
SHELIKOF MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Kodiak, Alaska, and 701 New York Blk., Seattle. Wash. 

Officers and directors: Z. T. Halferty, pres.; F. S. Golding, v. p.; Car- 
roll Hendron, sec.-treas. 

Inc. Jan., 1916, in Washington. Cap. $500,000; $1 par; 105,000 issued. 
Annual meeting in April. 

Property: 7 claims, 154 acres, on Alaska peninsula, in the Katmai reser- 
vation. Claims show a contact deposit, carrying copper in granite and diorite. 
Shoots said to be 10' wide, assaying 36% copper. Openings by tunnels. 
SNOWSTORM GROUP ALASKA 

M. B. Anderson, owner, Ellamar, Alaska. 

Property: 6 claims, at Unakirk Bay, Prince William Sound. 

Ore: occurs in quartz vein in limestone, carrying gold, silver, copper 
and some zinc. A 65' tunnel has opened ore to a depth of 40'. A prospect. 
STANDARD COPPER MINES CO. ALASKA 

Idle. Office: 68 William St., New York. Mine office: Landlock, S. E. 
Alaska. 



SWEEPSTAKE MINING THREE MAN 163 

Officers: Morris B. Mead, pres. ; John L. Steele. v. p.-engr. ; E. F. 
Bourke, sec. ; J. O. Molander, treas. ; Jas. A. Bourke, gen. mgr., with Thos. R. 
Manley and Chas. Williams, directors. 

Inc. Feb. 2, 1906, in New Jersey. Cap., $300,000; $100 par; issued $220,000. 
Bonds, $300,000 issued. Is operated as a close corporation. Annual meeting, 
third Saturday in December. 

Property: 13 claims, at Thorn Arm, on Landlock Bay, Prince William 
Sound. The lands, which are very precipitous, show country rock of greenstone, 
reported to carry 17 fissure veins, of which 4 carry lenticular shoots of ore 
estimated to average 6% copper, 1 oz. silver and 90 cts gold per ton. 

Development: by shaft and tunnels of 290', 175', 85' and 660', with about 
1.300' of workings, said to show 20,000 tons of ore with 12.000 tons blocked out 
for stoping. 

The mine is connected with 500-ton ore bunkers on a wharf at tide-water 
by a 3,300' aerial tram, in 2 sections, 1 of 912' and 1 of 2,526' length. 

Was reported leased for four years to the Alaska-Standard Copper Mining Co. 
SWEEPSTAKE MINING CO. ALASKA 

Property: Harriman Fiord. Port Wells district. Prince William Sound, 
reported developing during 1917 and completing a two-stamp mill. 
TALKEETNA MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: Wasilla, Alaska. Reported under lease to W. R. Hocking, of 
Seattle, Wash. 

Officers: D. M. Fulton, pres.; E. H. Barthoff, v. p.; C. T. Hatcher, sec.; 
K. J. Fulton, mgr.-treas., with H. McGregor, directors. 

Inc. Sept. 25, 1915, in Washington. Cap. $1,000,000; $1 par; 800,000 is- 
sued. Annual meeting 1st Monday in October. 

Property: 8 claims in Willow Creek district, about 40 miles N. of 
Anchorage, said to show a 2' quartz vein in diorite, carrying gold ore assaying 
$10-$200 per ton. 

Development: by several tunnels, longest 130'. 

Equipment: includes 2 aerial tramways and 15-ton mill. Further devel- 
opment planned. Reported 1918 production, $10,000. 
TEIKELT GOLD MINING CO. ALASKA 

Address: E. E. Ritchie, Valdez, Alaska. 

Is a development company working on a small scale. 
THOMAS-CULROSS MINING CO. ALASKA 

H. H. Cowley, trustee, Port Wells, Alaska. 

Property: on Culross Island, Port Wells district. 

Developed by two shallow shafts and a 150' crosscut tunnel, with 250' of 
drifts. A Lane mill installed in 1916 to treat the gold ore. Employs five men. 
THREE MAN MINING CO. ALASKA 

Office: 31 Nassau St., New York. Mine office: Landlock, Prince Wil- 
liam Sound, Alaska. 

Officers: W. A. Dickey, pres. -gen. mgr.; H. C. Bryan, sec.; Duncan Ed- 
ward, treas. ; officers are the directors. 

Inc. in New York. Cap. $1,000; $100 par; fully issued. Is a close cor- 
poration, having only 3 shareholders. 

Property: 43 claims, 10 patented, 812 acres, on tidewater, at Landlock 
Bay, in the Valdez mining district of Alaska, giving the company nearly a mile 
along a great shear zone, only one end of which has been developed. The 
property, which has been under continuous development since 1903, is said to 
show 10 orebodies with a general E.-W. strike, occurring as fissure veins and as 
replacement deposits in shear zones in greenstone and slates. Orebodies reported 
to average 8' in width and to carry chalcopyrite ore in lenticular shoots averaging 
10% copper. Low-grade ore is continuous, with rich ore found mainly on the 
footwall in paystreak of 1 to 8' width, the largest shoot carrying massive chal- 
copyrite, assaying 10% copper, 1 oz. silver and 50 cts. gold per ton. The quantity 
of low-grade ore of concentrating tenor is very much greater than that nf the 
smelting ore, but it is not available for present use. 



164 ALASKA 

Development: by tunnels, with 6,000' of workings. Six levels have been 
opened tip on one orebody, giving a little over 600' of stoping depth on the ore. 
Another orebody has been opened up on 3 levels, giving about 500' of stoping depth. 
No stoping has been done, all ore produced having been extracted from levels 
and upraises. Company claims to have over 200,000 tons of 3% copper ore 
developed. 

The mine has no machinery or power equipment, owing to development by 
tunnel, but has 14 buildings, with ore bunkers on a wharf at tidewater, connected 
by a short ground tram with the portal of the 5th level. 

Production: about 600 tons of 10% ore were shipped, 1910, to the Ta- 
coma smelter, yielding 120,000 Ib. fine copper, and over 3,000 tons of 10% ore 
yielding 610,000 Ib. fine copper in 1912. No shipments were made in 1913, 1914 
and 1916, but in 1915, 300,000 Ib. copper was produced. Over 5,000 tons of 10% 
ore have been shipped. Total production to date is about 1,000,000 Ib. copper, 
shipments being under name of W. A. Dickey and not the company. Property 
considered promising. 
UNITED METALS CO. ALASKA 

See Alaska Metals Co. Property is the Corbin mine, near Coppermount. 
VALDEZ CREEK PLACER MINES ALASKA 

Office: 705-8 Newport Bldg., Boston, Mass. Mine office: McKinky, 
Alaska. 

Officers: G. W. Sias, pres.; F. E. Nye, v. p. and sec.; R. B. Griffin, treas.; 
also trustees. 

Inc. Nov. 1, 1911, as Express Trust Co., in Massachusetts. Cap. $2,500,- 
000; shares of no par value, non-assessable.; 2,408,186 issued. Bonds: $500,000 
authorized, of which $454,100 are outstanding. 

Property: placer claims on Valdez Creek, headwaters of Susitna River, 
Alaska. Examined by Forbes Rickard and Pierre Bouery. A large quantity 
of gravel awaits hydraulicking, for which ditches, piping, power plant, etc., have 
been constructed. The property is in a remote district and the cost of securing 
supplies is high, 4.8 cents per Ib. from Chitina, a distance of 240 miles. The 
season is short also. 

Production: in 1916 was 36,000 cu. yds. of 62-cent gravel. Since company 
acquired property it has yielded $69,880. Prior to this about $300,000 was 
recovered by simple methods. 

Reported Jan., 1919, to have defaulted on payment of interest on $500,000 
bonds and on $731,481 notes. Company to be re-organized as the McKinley 
Placers. Present bond holders to get $560,000 in 8% preferred stock in exchange 
for their bonds and coupons thereon up to Jan. 1, 1919. In exchange for notes 
held, it is proposed to issue a second 8% pfd. stock. Shareholders to get one 
share of common stock, par $5, for every 5 shares of Valdez Creek stock. Henry 
A. Cutter, Nashua, N. H., is counsel. 
VALDEZ GOLD CO. ALASKA 

Formerly Cameron-Johnson Gold Mining Co. 

Office: Yakima, Wash., and Valdez, Alaska. 

Directors: Geo. S. Rankin, W. A. Bell. Geo. Ker. Alex. Miller, Chas S. 
Mead, J. M. Bruce, and H. Y. Saint. J. D. McDougall, supt. 

Cap. $750,000; 50c par; $600,000 outstanding January, 1919. 

Property: 26 claims on the right side of Shoup Glacier, N. W. of Valdez, 
which show fissure veins in graywacke and argillite. 

Ore: free milling gold quartz. About 3% of the ore is said to be sul- 
phides of iron, lead and zinc. 

Development: several hundred feet of tunnels. The upper workings are 
mainly on the Treasury Note vein, said to show from 3" to 36" ore. Lower 
workings are chiefly on the Mazuma claim, said to have the largest vein, as well 
as lowest grade on the property. 

Equipment: includes a 3,850' aerial tram, 5-stamp mill, a 7' Lane mill, 
concentrator and bunkhouse. Power is supplied by a No. 3 Pelton water wheel 
operating under a 240' head. Fifteen men are employed on the property. See 
U. S. G. S. Bull. 662, p. 192. 



VICTORY COPPER ARIZONA COPPER 165 

VICTORY COPPER MINING CO. ALASKA 

Inactive, and letters returned from company's last office, 817 Alaska Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. Mine office : Ketchikan, Gravina Island, Alaska. 

Officers: M. McTernan, pres.; E. D. Fisher, v. p.; Maurice D. Leehey, 
sec. ; J. R. Kelley, treas. Dr. C. O'Connor, C. J. Cronin and E. F. Tiernan, 
directors. 

Inc. March, 1901, in Washington. Cap. $1,500,000; $1 par; fully issued. 
Annual meeting, first Monday in September. 

Property: 14 claims, 99 patented, 260 acres, on Seal Bay, Gr.avina Island, 
22 miles S. of Ketchikan, extends from sea level to 4,000' above the beach. 
Lands show granite, greenstone and limestone reported to be cut by 11 veins of 
which 4 were developed by 2,100' tunnel. 
WILLOW CREEK DEVELOPMENT CO. ALASKA 

Mine office: Anchorage, Alaska. 

Officers: Chas. Herron, pres.: Judge David, treas.; T. Bedell, sec. 

Organized 1917. 

Property: a bond on the Isaacs group, on Reid creek. Willow Creek 
district. 
WILLOW CREEK MINES ALASKA 

Office: 620 Alaska Bldg., Seattle. Wash. Mine office: \Vasilla P. O.. via 
Seward, Alaska. 

Officers: L. C. Thompson, pres.; H. Doheny, v. p.; Archibald Beck, 
treas. ; M. D. Leehey, sec. ; N. B. Bothwell, mgr. 

Company leases and operates the Gold Bullion mine (which see), one of the 
largest gold producers of the Willow Creek district. 

ARIZONA 

Arizona leads all other states in copper production. In 1918, the mines of 
the state yielded: 777,000,000 Ib. copper; $5,550,000 gold; 13,000,000 Ib. lead; 
6,800,000 oz. silver: and 1,800,000 Ib. zinc. The output of copper and gold was 
increased, that of the other metals, especially lead and zinc was less. Dividends 
paid amounted to over $45,000,000. For 1919, there will be a large decrease in 
metal production due to a general curtailment of operations. Dividends were 
nearly $27,000,000 in 1919. 

Mines are arranged by counties and under principal districts. 

COCHISE COUNTY. 
AJAX METAL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 312 Cooper Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Officers: Nat P. Wilson, pres.; W. H. Wilson, v. p.; S. O. Foxworthy, 
sec.-treas., with C. S. Campbell, M. E. Peters, directors. M. H. Wilson, mgr., 
1440 Stanley Ave., Hollywood, Calif. 

Inc. Oct.. 1916, in Arizona. Cap. $1.500.000; par $1; issued $824,897. 
Transfer office and registrar: Peters Trust Co., Omaha, Nebr. Annual meet- 
ing, first Tuesday in October. 

Property: 24 claims, totalling 498 acres. California mining district, 
Chiricahua Mountains, Cochise county. Said to show "disseminated" ore occur- 
ring in a porphyry dike 220' wide. Values reported to average 8% copper, 9% 
lead, 6 oz. silver. 

Development: by 210' shaft and 3000' of workings; will sink to a depth 
of 650' in near future. 

Equipment: includes electric hoist, compressor and pumps. Manage- 
ment proposes to erect a flotation mill. 
ARIZONA COPPER SHIPPING MINES CO. ARIZONA 

Officers at last accounts: E. E. Wiseman, pres.; C. E. Cummings, v. p; C. 
F. Elliott, sec.-treas. 

Inc. 1910. Cap. $1,000,000; $10 par; issued $620.000. 

Property: 8 patented claims, 160 acres, 2 miles N. E. of Dragoon, Cochise. 
county, shows limestone crossed by numerous veins, averaging 2 to 12' in width, 




166 ARIZONA 

said to carry 4 to 7% copper, 1 to 6 oz. silver and a trace of gold. 

Development: by several pits and shallow shafts, deepest 130'. with 
about 600' of workings. Is a prospect. Idle and apparently dead. 
ARIZONA GOLD & COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Clerk's office: Burlington, Vt. Mine office: Gleeson, Ariz. L. V. Hast- 
ings, v. p. ; Hamilton S. Peck, sec. 

Inc. July 28,1911, in Vermont. Cap. $100,000; $5 par; as successor of the 
Vermont & Arizona Copper Co. 

Property: 11 claims, 220 acres, 4 miles from Gleeson, Cochise county, in 
the Turquoise district, on the western slope of the Dragoon mountains, show 2 
gold and silver veins and several copper veins, giving average assays of $6 gold 
and 3% copper per ton. 

Development: by 230' main shaft and 2 tunnels, longest 125'. Company 
claims to have developed a large body of low-grade milling ore. 

Equipment: includes steam power and 12 h. p. hoist. Property idle, 
owing to lack of funds. 
ARIZONA & MICHIGAN DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned unclaimed, March, 1919. Property taken over August, 1919,. 
by Mines & Development Co., which see. 
ARIZONA MIDDLEMARCH COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Middlemarch, Pearce, Ariz. 

Officers: W. A. Potter, pres.; D. E. Wellcome, v. p.; E. D. Elson, sec.- 
mgr., with F. C. Austin, Judge D. R. Weller, H. Hi. Bones, A. Sidney Jones y 
T. H. Powell, J. W. A. Off, all of Los Angeles, Calif., directors. B. M. Snyder, 
cons. engr. 

Inc. Dec., 1916, to take over the property of Middlemarch Copper Co., 
under lease and bond. Has since acquired eight additional claims adjoin- 
ing. Cap. $1,000,000; $1 par; 700,000 shares issued April 1, 1919. 

Property: 43 claims, over 860 acres, in Dragoon Mts., 9 miles west of 
Pearce. Sedimentary rocks are intruded by granite stocks and quartz porphyry 
dikes of great width, making contact zones of garnet, epidote, pyroxene, etc., 
with limonite, hematite, copper oxides and carbonates. Most of such outcrops- 
are undeveloped, but commercial ore is shown on the Cobrelona and Missouri 
claims. 

Development: the Cobrelona workings show a contact vein between 
granite and slate, with commercial ore along a drift over 200' in length. Vein 
is 2 to 6' in width. Principal development is on Missouri claim, which shows a 
chimney of contact metamorphic ore, increasing in area with depth. Stopes on 
fifth level are 40 to 50' in diameter. Oxidized ore was high-grade, but below 
a thin zone of enrichment primary chalcopyrite ore of approximately 2% copper 
was encountered. A 250' incline shaft has drifts at 50' intervals; a 300' vertical 
shaft is sinking. High silver values were encountered on the seventh level 

Equipment: includes compressor, hoist and steam pump. Mill is a 
straight flotation plant of 125 tons daily capacity erected in 1917 and operated 
as steadily as the limited water supply would permit. Water now sufficient for 
operating mill part time. 

The ore is crushed to \ l /2" max., then fed to 6' by 6' ball mill in closed 
circuit with an Akins classifier, pulp going to 2 Launder flotation machines. A 
K. & K. flotation machine is used as a cleaner. Tailing from roughers goes to a 
Dorr thickener for recovery of water. Power for mill and 25 k. w. alt. current 
generator is obtained from a 200 h. p. oil engine. Mill makes recovery of 90% 
of copper content, concentrates averaging 16% copper and 6 oz. silver per ton. 

Shipments to April, 1919, total 51 cars concentrate and 3. cars crude ore. 
Enlargement of mill contemplated when mine development warrants. 

Management appears to be energetic and capable. 
ARIZONA SMELTING & POWER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Benson, Cochise county, Arizona. 

Officers: C.E. Goetz, pres.; Martin Fishback, gen. mgr.-sec.; R. L. Lee r 
supt. 



ARIZONA UNITED MINING 167 

Inc. in Arizona. Cap. 100,000 shares; $5 par. Company was organized 
to purchase the old lead-silver smelter at Benson, and engage in the reduction 
of copper-silver-gold ores from nearby districts. 

Property: 60-acre site formerly occupied by a smelter that was oper- 
ated 30 years, treating ore from Mexico, sent in via Nogales. These opera- 
tions produced 75,000 tons of neutral slag, now available for resmelting by this 
company. It carries 5 oz. silver, 50 cents gold, and 15 Ib. copper, equal to $8 per 
ton. The net profit on this slag is estimated at $3 to $5 per ton. 

Equipment: modern 200-ton blast-furnace for copper ore, 32 by 100 in. 
at tuyeres; a No. 7 Connersville blower, 250-ton mechanical sampling plant of 
the Vezin type to handle car lots, crushers, boilers, engines, water-supply, etc. 

Ore supply for the plant is principally from Johnson, 27 miles east; Rose- 
mont and Helvetia, 27 miles west; Patagonia, 60 miles south, and several other 
smaller centers. It is reported that the ore already developed and available in 
these places will necessitate expanding the plant to 1,000 tons daily capacity in 
less than 3 years. A local smelter is needed for these districts, as they have 
heretofore been unable to find a market. The position of the smelter with 
respect to rail connection, labor supply, water, and other conditions, is said to 
be favorable. Future earnings are estimated at $10,000 per month, mostly from 
the slag mentioned. 

This seems to be a project whose weak point is that the company has no 
mines of its own on which to fall back for a steady supply of ore. The plant 
was ready to be blown-in early in September, 1919. 
ARIZONA UNITED MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 1420 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mine office: Johnson, 
Cochise county, Ariz. 

Officers: Alfred S. Miller, pres.; Alfred C. Harmer, Jr., v. p. -gen. mgr. ; 
David H. Ross, treas. ; Alfred H. Miller, sec., with Chas. B. Cox, Geo. E. Barnett, 
M. D. Brown, W. M. Houston, J. N. Stetson, J. K. Kane, G. M. Jones and Earl 
P. Mendenhall, directors. J. M. Libby, mgr. Kirby Thomas, cons. engr. 

Inc. Aug. 12, 1910, in Arizona, as successor to Arizona United Mining 
Co. of Delaware. Cap., $5,000,000 ; $1 par ; $2,500,000 outstanding. 

Dividends: 1% quarterly, begun October, 1916. Company is a close 
corporation. 

Treasurer's statement, Jan. 1, 1919, for year 1918, showed total receipts of 
$208,247, including $161,541 from ore shipments. Disbursements totalled $192,270, 
including $25,000 paid on purchase of lease from Goodrich-Lockhart Co. Cash 
on hand, Dec. 31, 1918, $15,976. 

A 10-year lease on the property given to the Goodrich-Lockhart Co. in 1913, 
was surrendered July, 1918, for $75,000, property reverting to the company. 
During the life of the lease the Arizona United paid all debts, including the 
mortgage, and distributed $100,000 in dividends from its 45% of net earnings 
received. The $75,000 payment to the Goodrich-Lockhart Co. was also paid 
out of royalty under the lease. These earnings came from ore containing 4% 
or more copper. 

Property: 45 claims, 30 patented, about 1,000 acres, 7 miles N. E. of 
Dragoon, in the Johnson mining camp. Land includes the Mammoth, Republic, 
Copper King and Southern group of claims. Principal development is on the 
Republic claim, opened by a 1,500' shaft, with about 1,200' of workings. The 
most important ore deposit developed after the company resumed control was 
between the 900' and 1,100' levels, where there has been exposed a deposit 150' 
long, 11' average thickness, 150' on the dip, with the bottom not reached; assays 
from this deposit are said to average 6.2% copper. Another deposit, but of 
lesser importance, has been opened on the 900' level At the time of suspending 
operations, Feb. 1, 1919, on account of low price of copper, company states it 
had enough ore blocked out to give a daily output of 200 tons for sixty days. 
In addition an ore deposit on the Mammoth claim has been opened up by lessees. 
The mine has a considerable tonnage of low grade ore opened up. 

Equipment: includes a 200 h. p. oil-burning boiler, with hoists at the 
Republic and Mammoth mines, an electric plant, 4 electric drills and an a'ir 



168 ARIZONA 

compressor. Transportation is by a standard-gauge railway from Johnson to 
Dragoon, connecting with the Southern Pacific Railway. 

During first 6 months of 1918 lessees shipped 24,902 tons of ore, with a 
value of $290,216, and in last 6 months the company snipped 18,041 tons, value, 
$174,223, while the Mammoth furnished 2,480 tons ore with net smelter value 
of $38,196. 

BISBEE AJO COPPER & DEV. CO. ARIZONA 

Officers: W. E. Holm, representative, Bisbee, Arizona; Ed. Sweeney, 
pres. and gen. mgr. 

Cap. increased during 1917 from $650,000 to $3,000,000. 

Property: said to be two groups. The first of 9 claims. 5 miles from 
the Mexican border, has a shaft 140' deep ; assays are said to have shown from 
3% to 73% copper; shales and porphyry predominate. The second group of 26 
claims, south of the town of New Cornelia, is undeveloped. 

BLACK PRINCE COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 420 Gas & Electric Bldg., Denver, Colo. Mine office: Johnson, 
Cochise county, Ariz. 

Officers: Robt. N. Bell, pres. -gen. mgr., Denver, Colo.; J. C. Thompson, 
v. p. ; J. B. Wright, sec-treas., with M. A. Hoag and F. T. Henry, directors. 

Inc. May 10, 1901, in Arizona. Cap. $1,500,000; $1 par; issued 1,320,100 
shares. Annual meeting, last Wednesday in May. 

Property: adjoins Peabody mine and comprises 8 patented claims, 147 
acres, showing replacement deposits in limestone. Mine has a 950' two-com- 
partment shaft, sunk in limestone and showing copper oxides and carbonates, 
bornite and chalcopyrite, with silver, on various levels. 

Equipment: includes two 100-h. p. boilers, 175-h. p. steam hoist, com- 
pressor, gas engine, 3 pumps and electric generator. 

BUNKER HILL MINES CO. ARIZONA 

Owned by the Phelps Dodge Corporation, which see. 

BUTTE & ARIZONA COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 619 Hennessy Block, Butte. Mont. Mine near Hereford, Cochise 
Co., Ariz. 

Officers: B. H. Dunshee, v. p.; A. S. Nichols, sec.; John C. Adams, treas.; 
with L. O. Evans, Chas. S. Shoemaker, A. P. Henningson, C. B. Mosely, John E. 
Corette and D. M. Watts, directors. 

Cap. $1,250,000; $1 par. 

Property: 14 claims, 11 patented, costing considerably over $60,000, was 
exchanged for $450,000 stock. Property is in the Huachuca mountains, 35 miles 
S. W. of Bisbee, and about the same distance north of Cananea. 

Geology: claims show an ochrous gossan of 10 to 300' width, covering a 
contact vein between syenite and limestone carrying occasional copper oxides, 
carbonates, pyrite and argentiferous gray copper, and chalcocite of fair tenor, 
though not in large quantities. ) 

Development: by a long main tunnel cutting several small veins giving 
assays up to 18% copper with an average of 4.5% tenor, mine having upwards 
of 3,900' of workings. Main vein, 350' from mouth of tunnel, is claimed to 
show 39' of 6% chalcopyrite, which is an overestimate. 

Nearest railroad is 15 miles, with a fair wagon road. Has steam power and 
an air compressor. Idle since end of 1908. Company reported to have no debts, 
considerable treasury stock and is being carried by* the directors, who are ad- 
vancing the money required to pay taxes and maintain the property. 

CENTRAL BUTTE MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Box 973, Douglas, Ariz. 

pfficers: A. H. Struthers, pres.-mgr.; F. F. Williams, v. p.; Z. T. 
Phillips, sec.-treas., with A. J. Thompson and Chas. M. Seaman, directors. H. W. 
Evans, supt. 

Inc. 1917, in Arizona. Cap. $750,000; 50c par. 

Property: 145 acres, in the Pearce mining district, Cochise county, 4 
iniles south of Pearce. Shaft 180' deep. Has shipped some copper ore from 



CENTRAL MINING COPPER DOG 169 

the 70' level, from a stoping length of 42' on the vein. Ore carries from 1 to 10% 
copper, with some gold and silver. 

Have installed an oil-driven air compressor and expended $25,000 on prop- 
erty. 

CENTRAL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: E. A. Ely, Dos Cabezos, Cochise Co., Ariz. 
Inc. 1919 in Arizona. 

Property: 16 claims, 18 miles W. of Willcox, adjoining property of the 
Mascot Copper Co. Surficial exposures are said to be good. 
CENTURION ARIZONA MINING CO. , ARIZONA 

Dragoon, Cochise Co., Ariz. 

Officers: J. P. Richardson, pres.-gen. mgr.; Samuel Bennett, v. p.: 
H. A. Morgan, sec.-treas., with H. C. Arnold, J. W. Angle , W. H. Purdy, M. S. 
Richardson, E. F. Woodworth, directors. Willcox Bank & Trust Co., treas. 

Inc. July 26, 1906.. in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000; $1 par; issued 789,186. 
Property: 23 claims, 430 acres, in two groups, 1st group about 2 miles 
N. W. of, and 2d group about 5 miles N. E. of Dragoon, in the Dragoon mountains, 
shows a contact deposit between pre-Cambrian limestone and altered schist, aver- 
aging about 15' in width and carrying azurite and malachite, associated with 
hematite. Ores carry an average of 2.7% copper. 

Development: by a 660' incline shaft, several shallow shafts ranging 
from 40 to 100' in depth, and a 2,000' tunnel, with about 4,500" of workings, esti- 
mated by management to show 165,000 tons ore in sight. Work on the 600' level 
said to be in 8.12% ore for 50'. 

Equipment: includes a 15 h. p. gasoline hoist, good for 800% a small air 
compressor, machine shop, smithy and other necessary mine buildings. Water 
encountered on 600' level has somewhat retarded development, but shaft is to 
be deepened when conditions permit. New pumping plant needed. Property con- 
sidered promising. 

COBRIZA MINES DEVELOPMENT CORP. ARIZONA 

Company had a lease on property of the Arizona United Mining Co., but this 
was given up in 1918 and company has gone out of business. Described in 
Vol. XIII. 

COMMONWEALTH EXTENSION MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned unclaimed from Pearce, Ariz., March, 1919. 
Officers: J. S. Metcalf, supt; C. W. Hicks, pres. Control held in Bis- 
bee, Arizona. 

Property: a tract adjoining the Commonwealth mine on the E. and 
S. E. shows a mineralized contact that carries high-grade ore in the adjacent 
mine. 

Development: a 250' shaft sunk in andesite with 230' level, equivalent to 
7th level of the Commonwealth and corresponding to the water level of the dis- 
trict. 

Equipment, includes steam plant, hoist and compressor. 

COMMONWEALTH MINING & MILLING CO. ARIZONA 

Property: the Commonwealth silver mine, at Pearce. Cochise Co., Ariz., 
closed down in 1917, and complete 350-ton equipment sold to Commonwealth 
Dev. Co. Although some rich shoots were found at depth, none persisted, and 
operations became unprofitable. See Vol. XTT for description and other data. 
COPPER DOG MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned unclaimed Feb., 1919. 

Office: A. Graydon, 1649 York St.. Denver, Colo. 

Officers: A. Graydon, pres.; G. J. Peterson, v. p.; H. J. Potter, sec.- 
treas. 

Cap., $1,000.000, $1 par; issued 500,000 shares. 

Property: 12 undeveloped claims in the Huachuca district. Cochise 
county, held under bond and lease. Ore is gold, with some silver and copper. 
Values as high as $90 per ton are reported in a narrow vein. 




170 ARIZONA 

COPPERROX MINING COMPANY OF ARIZONA ARIZONA 

Office: Mail returned unclaimed June, 1919, from 96 Harris Ave., Provi- 
dence, R. I. Mine near Courtland, Cochise county, Ariz. 

Officers: T. F. Gilbane, pres.; Geo. F. Wordley, 1st v. p.; Thomson E. 
Going, 2nd v. p. ; Hon. G. W. Esterbrooks, sec.-treas. 

Inc., Jan. 17, 1910, in Arizona, as successor of the Arizona Copper Syn- 
dicate of Providence. Cap., $1,000,000, $1 par. 

Property: 28 claims, 18 patented, and 2 mill sites, patented, in the Dra- 
goon Mountains, 3 miles from Courtland. 

Development: by 236' shaft and about 500' of tunnels on a contact said 
to be traceable 3 miles, with surface ores carrying gold, copper and manganese,, 
said to assay up to 16.5% copper. President reported, 1916, that a manganiferous 
"mother-lode" has been opened up by 'recent work. Company a holding con- 
cern that will lease or sell controlling interest. 
DENN-ARIZONA COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Bisbee, Cochise County, Ariz. Officers: Martin Pattison, pres.; 
Lemuel C. Shattuck, treas. ; J. G. Williams, sec.; Byron M. Pattison, Thos. Bar- 
don and H. L. Mundy, directors. Arthur Houle, supt. 

Inc., Jan. 14, 1907, in Minn., as successor of Denn-Arizona Develop- 
ment Co. Cap., $3,500,000, $10 par, fully issued; increased June, 1917, to 
$5,000,000, and 55,000 shares new stock offered for sale, at $10. Listed on Boston 
Curb. 

Property: 13 claims, patented, 200 acres, immediately east of the Junc- 
tion shaft of the Superior & Pittsburgh. The Dividend fault traverses the com- 
pany's ground for about 4,500', and big orebodies have been found on adjoining 
properties near this fault. 

Development: by 1,800' shaft, started in conglomerate, but penetrating 
limestone at 840', with over a mile of workings. The 1,000' and 1,100' levels show 
considerable leached ore, with little commercial ore, though carrying occasional 
small bodies of rich cuprite. The 1,250' and 1,350' levels also show large areas 
of leached ore, with some low-grade sulphides on the 1,250' level, and a little 
native copper on the 1,350' level. The 1,600' level has a little ore of 12 to 15% 
copper tenor. The leached ore bearing zone is about 300' wide, containing ore 
in the form of oxides and carbonates. 

Management estimates the average tenor of ore developed almost exclusively 
oxides and carbonates, at 8% copper. Apparently some good orebodies may be 
developed at 1,800', or deeper, though the ore is erratic. The mine is wet, and, 
has two 1,000-gal. triple-expansion pumps on the 1,000' level and five 800-gal. 
sinking pumps. 

In Aug., 1919, No. 11 crosscut at 1600' had opened chalcocite and chalco- 
pyrite; No. 6 at 1700' was in high-grade ore, and a new orebody was opened at 
200'. 

Equipment: includes a 1,600 h. p. steam plant, with 6-drill and 25-drill 
air compressors and an 18x36" Ottumwa Corliss first-motion hoist, raising double- 
deck cages. There is a railroad spur to the mine. 

Production: 1909. was 99.222 Ib. fine copper and 41 oz. gold. Develop- 
ment work was energetically carried on, despite very heavy pumping expenses^ 
until 1912, when an unusual influx swamped the pumps and the mine was 
closed down. Operations were resumed in Sept., 1917, and development is pro- 
ceeding rapidly. Over $1,000,000 has been expended in development work since 
1917. 

Production from development reported about 2 cars ore daily, more than 
300,000 Ib. copper per month. 

The Denn has an excellent chance of making a big mine, the claims covering 
an extension of the big ore zone of the camp, but the ore horizon at this point 
is lower than on the other properties. The deep development of the Junction, 
C. & A., and Saginaw properties will drain this ground as well as prove it, and 
further exploration will be easily and cheaply done. There is strong probability 
'that this company and the Shattuck will be merged at some future time. Prop- 



DRAGOON^ MOUNTAIN GREAT WESTERN 171 

erty is a splendid prospect. It may be several years before it makes a mine, -but 

eventually, we believe, will be a very valuable one. 

DRAGOON MOUNTAIN MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mine office: Johnson, Cochise County, Ariz. 

Developed: by 300' vertical and 400' inclined shafts. Reported to have 
.shipped 11 cars of ore in Aug., 1918. 
EMPIRE COPPER & GOLD MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned unclaimed Sept., 1918, from Office: 510 Bradbury Bldg., 
Los Angeles, Cal. Mine address, Dragoon, Cochise Co., Ariz. 

Officers: Leon V. Shaw, pres.-treas.; P. E. Woods, v. p.; Chas. R. Van 
Tilburgh, sec., with M. J. Gress, H. Hermanson, C. J. Nordquist, R. W. Pigeon, 
C. R. Lawrence, directors. 

Inc. Jan. 31, 1905. in Arizona. Cap., $1,500.000, $1 par; issued 953,814. 
Annual meeting, second Monday in October. 

Property: 3 separate groups of claims, near Johnson and Dragoon, on 
the Southern Pacific Railway. The Empire group, 16 claims, 2 miles S. E. of 
Johnson, shows limestones and quartzite cut by porphyry and traversed by 
N. W. fissures carrying ore. 

Development: by the 380' Empire 2-compartment incline shaft, with 
about 500' of drifts, so wet that it was abandoned, temporarily; also the 125' 
Bridge, 158' Copper Whale and a 2,000' tunnel shaft started. Mine shows 
auriferous and argentiferous copper ore. 

In May, 1913, machinery and supplies were moved from the Empire group 
6 miles south to the Princess group, said to have attractive surface showings 
of iron gossan and copper carbonate and to be opened only by shallow shafts. 
Company also owns the Cowboy group of 8 claims, partly developed, showing 
veins in limestone near porphyry contacts. 

Equipment: includes a 25 h. p. hoist and 1-drill air compressor. Build- 
ings include an engine house, smithy, bunk house and boarding house. 

No recent returns. Probably idle. 
EMPIRE STATE MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 182 Buick Ave.. Utica, N. Y. Mine office: Bisbee, Cochise Co., 
Ariz. 

Officers. R. E. King, pres. ; F. L. Guillaume, v. p.-treas.; E. M. Penny, 
sec. ; W. A. Fenn, Geo. P. Langford, John A. Losee, John A. Urschel, direc- 
tors. John A. Collins, gen. mgr. and purch agt. ; .O. P. Zane, cons. engr. and 
supt. ' 

Inc. June 27. 1904, in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000. $1 par; 813,000 shares 
issued. Annual meeting in June. 

Property: 11 claims, 230 acres, near the Modern mine, about 5 miles 
N. W. of Bisbee, is developed by a 1,400' tunnel, said to show about 150' of low- 
grade copper ore, slightly auriferous and argentiferous, estimated to average 
about $8 per ton. Ore is found in small stringers, typical of the district, and 
property is not considered well located. Idle since June, 1914. 
GREAT WESTERN COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Courtland. Cochise County, Ariz. Wm. J. Youner, Jr.. pres.; 
Edward A. Young, sec. ; C. H. Young, treas., all of Clinton, Iowa ; F. J. Gibbons, 
gen. supt. 

Inc. Oct. 22. 1900, in Arizona. Cap., $1.000,000. $10 par; fully issued. 

Property: 23 patented claims, 407 acres, in the Turquoise district, ac- 
quired 1899. 

Geology: Limestone is intruded and altered by monzonite and quartz- 
monzonite porphyry. The Humboldt, first opened, yielded high-grade ore from 
the surface to 150', where it apparently ended. In 1908, good ore was opened 
in the Mary to 200', and high-grade ended here also. Five diamond-drill holes 
during 1918 failed to disclose ore at depth, but a 6th encountered good ore in 
virgin ground. On this a 265' prospect shaft was sunk and a 250' crosscut 
opened up a body of chalcopyrite and bornite ore. Lessees are mining ore from 
the Mary, Humboldt, Maine and Chance claims. Sulphide ore was opened in 
the Mame in 1909, and produced until 1914. 



172 ARIZONA 

Development: 2,600 of workings from 5 shafts, 310', 3(Xy, 430', 200' and 
265' deep, respectively. 

Equipment: includes a 150 h. p. electric plant driven by steam power 
and having one 150 k. w. generator, a 600 cu. ft. air compressor, 2 electric hoists, 
electric pump, etc. Additional machinery was put in during 1919. 

Production: 1916, 1.197,920 lb., 1917. 1.935,563 lb., and 1918, 1,201,893 Ib. 
In Oct., 19,19, the daily output was a carload of ore. There were 30 men employed. 
GREAT WESTERN GOLD & SILVER CO. ARIZONA 

Idle for years. Dragoon, Cochise Co., Ariz. 

Inc. about June, 1908. 

Property: in the Dragoon Mountains, shows lead and copper ores with 
gold and silver. 
HARTFORD-ARIZONA COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Hamburg, Cochise Co., Ariz. Henry Hamburg, pres. and mgr. 

In Sept., 1913, the Arizona Corporation Commission authorized the company 
to incur a $100,000 6% bond issue, for further mine development. 

Property: the Wisconsin group in the Huachuca Mountains. Surveyed 
a line for tramway to wagon-road and planned shipping to Hereford or to a 
point on Fort Huachuca branch of the El Paso & S. W. R. R. Developed by 
tunnels, has steam plant and compressor. Company employed 30 men at last 
accounts. No recent returns secured. 
HAYES & GRACEY SYNDICATE ARIZONA 

M. P. Hayes and T. H. Gracey, Los Angeles, Cal., owners. Succeeds the 
Dragoon Copper Mining & Smelting Co., now dead. 

Property, the Christmas and Eureka claims, carries replacement de- 
posits with silver-lead-copper ores. 

Development: by a 550' shaft. 

Equipment: includes steam power and air compressor. Presumably idle 
as no returns have been secured for years. 
HELENS DOME MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Operating company holding bond and lease. 

Owner: T. J. Quillin, Bowie, Cochise Co., Ariz. 

Property: 18 claims, 14 miles S. of Bowie in Apache Pass, Paradise 
district. Ore contains gold, silver and lead with 2% copper. Hoist and small 
mill on property. 
HERSHEL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Douglas Gray, mgr., Tombstone, Ariz. 

A silver-lead property in the Charleston district which was to ship some ore 
during 1919. Reported to have shipped some ore worth $5,000 per car. Small 
mill on property. 

The high price of silver has helped this and many other small properties to 
resume operations. 
HILLTOP EXTENSION MINES CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Box;B. B., Douglas, Ariz. Mine office: Rodeo, N. M. 

Officers: W. E. Hawley, pres.; J. G. Erickson, v. p.; F. H. Fisher, sec.- 
treas. J. Blumberg, mgr. 

Inc. in Arizona. Cap., $750,000, $1 par; 250,000 shares are promotion 
stock. 

Property: the Lily and Whale groups in the Chiricahna Mountains, 
Cochise county, 18 miles N. W. of Rodeo, N. Mexico, claimed to have the N. W. 
and S. E. extensions of the Hilltop veins. 

Developed by 750' tunnel, vein said to be 3' wide, shipping ore carrying 60% 
lead with 50 oz. silver. Molybdenum is also reported. 
HILLTOP METALS MINING CO. ARIZONA 

R. O. Fife, trustee-mgr., Rodeo, N. Mexico. 

Formerly the Hilltop Mines (not incorporated). 

Office. 1321 Otis Bldg., Chicago. 111. Mine Office: Rodeo. N. M. 

Officers: J. O. Fife, pres.; P. J. Kasper, v. p.-treas. with F. A. Rehm, 
J. R. Scott, Phil HofTman, C. H. Putnam, F. J. Kasper, O. Kastrup, Jr., directors. 
A. C. Jones, sec. 



HILLTOP MINES KEYSTONE COPPER 173 

Inc. 1916 in Arizona. Cap., $10,000.000, $1 par; outstanding 2.000,000 
shares. 

Property: 42 unpatented claims, 800 acres, in California mining district, 
Chiricahua Mountains, Cochise county, said to show copper-lead-silver ore in 
quartz veins and contact deposits ; strike N. W.-S. E., dip 60 S. W. Ore-shoots 
reported as 2' to 50' wide, and 30' to 110' long, averaging 1 to 3% copper and 
6 to 10 oz. silver. Examined by L. D. Hutton, Walter Vidler, and Charles 
Berkey. 

Development: by 4 tunnels, 800', 1,500', 1,700' and 2,000' long; giving a 
depth of 1,100' below the outcrop. Total workings, 15,000'. No ore blocked out,, 
but developments show large probable tonnage. No shipments "made in 1918. 
Co-operation with the Hilltop Extension was being arranged late in 1919, and 
doing considerable development. 

Equipment: includes a 300-h. p. engine and an 1.000 cu. ft. compressor.' 
Contemplated construction is a railway from the mine to Rodeo, in New Mexico,. 
there to connect with the El Paso & Southwestern ; also a mill and smelter. 

It is to be hoped that this heavily capitalized company will actually block 
out ore reserves before attempting further ambitious equipment schemes. 
HILLTOP MINES (not Inc.) ARIZONA 

Now property of the Hilltop Metals Mining Co., which see. 
JOHNSON COPPER DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Frankfort, Ky. Mine address: J. T. Tong, mgr., Johnson, Co- 
chise Co., Ariz. 

Officers: Henry S. Krug, St. Louis, Mo., pres.; Ralph R. Wilson, v. p.; 
E. H. Elliott, sec.-treas. ; preceding, with P. S. Head, Hon. A. A. Hazelrigg, 
Hon. Baily D. Berry, Hon. A. C. Van Winkle, R. O. Duncan, and H. P. Hubbell, 
directors. 

Inc. March 13, 1908, in Arizona. Cap., $2,000,000. $1 par; issued 
1.568,000. Annual meeting, second Monday in October. 

Bonds: $100,000 5-year 6% 1st mortgage gold bonds authorized, interest 
payable annually on Dec. 21. Principal due Dec. 21, 1921. $43,000 worth of 
the bonds have been sold. 

Property: 8 claims. 3 fractional, unpatented, 125 acres, known as the 
Climax group, in center of the Johnson camp, between the Peabody, Peacock, 
Republic and Black Prince mines. Claims show granite and limestone, with 
replacement deposits carrying malachite, chrysocolla, bornite and chalcocite, 
averaging 4% copper and 5 oz. silver per ton for the several thousand tons thus 
far developed. Orebody has a flat dip, averaging 32, and is about 2' wide on; 
the 250' level. 

Development: by 240' shaft giving a depth of 740' on the orebody, with 
total of 2,500' of workings. Shaft reported to be bottomed in bornite dissemi- 
nated in limestone. The 100' level has about 500' of crosscuts and drifting, much 
of it in ore, but ground is leached and broken. The 250' level has N. and S. 
drifts, 500' of workings, on a 2' vein. A 500' winze was sunk from the S. drift. 
Development is said to show large bodies of low-grade carbonates near the 
surface and some sulphides at 400' depth. A good grade of ore recently on 
650' level. Only work done in 1919 was a crosscutting toward the Republic 
mine on the 740' level. 

Equipment: includes a 40 h. p. gasoline hoist, 5-drill compressor and 5 
buildings. 
KEYSTONE COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Newton, Kans. Mine at Johnson, Cochise Co., Ariz. 

Officers: W. W. Miller, pres. -gen. mgr.; A. Bannow, v. p.; T. C. Miller,, 
sec. : W. J. Trousdale, treas. ; Doane Merrell, state agt. ; U. R. Miller, supt. 

Inc. 1908, in Ariz. Cap., $900.000, $1 par; 823,000 shares outstanding. 

Property: the Bannon group, 16 unpatented claims, surrounding the St. 
George claim and 1^ miles from the Arizona United property, said to show a 
large deposit of iron ore and to have cut several veins dipping 38. 

Development: by 635' shaft, to be sunk deeper; 3.000' underground 
workings said to block out 500,000 tons of sulphide ore, including orebody 26' 




174 ARIZONA 

wide and 150' long, that runs 2% to 10% copper, with about $4 to $5 gold p 
ton. 

A mill was proposed in 1919. Six men were working on 600' level late i 
1919. 
KING COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: W. F. Dreher, sec., 536 First Natl. Bank Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Mine office: Rodeo, N. M. 

Officers: N. P. Wilson, pres.-mgr. ; C. E. Welch, supt 

Inc. 1917, in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000, 50c par. 

Property: about 1,000 acres in the Paradise district, Cochise county. 12 
miles north of Rodeo, N. M. Company says a 200' dike crosses property, also 
several fissure veins. Assays as given are 5.2% copper, 8.6% lead, 2.5 oz. silver 
per ton. 

Development: by 2,000' and 300' shafts and numerous tunnels. Good 
grade ore reported on 300' level. 

Equipment: includes 200 h. p. gas engine, 700 cu. ft. compressor and 
concentrating mill. 
LEADVILLE MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Courtland, Cochise County, Ariz. 

Officers: Wm. Holmes, pres.-gen. mgr.; W. D. Monmonier, sec.; Pearce, 
Ariz. ; Calvin Glenn and W. A. Stilson, directors. 

Inc. 1905, in Arizona. Cap., $600.000, $1 par. 

Property: 13 claims, 199 acres, patented, in the Turquoise district, in- 
cludes the Leadville and Maid of Sunshine mines, showing contact deposits be- 
tween monzonite and limestone. Ores are mainly malachite, azurite, and chry- 
socolla, with some chalcopyrite, and pyrite showing in the Maid of Sunshine 
mine. The orebodies said to carry an average of about 8% copper. Company 
is developing the Lower group on the 300' level. There are 5 shafts, deepest 
365', and^a 60' tunnel. 

Equipment: includes a 250 h. p. steam plant, 2 hoists and air compressor. 
Company resumed active operations, Oct., 1915. 

Shipments: about 15 tons of 8% copper ore daily, and management esti- 
mates 100,000 tons ore in sight. 

Property was under bond, 1916-17, to the Needles M. & S. Co., for $600,000, 
and extensively churn-drilled, but bond given up in July, 1917. No reports 
received since then. 
LEONARD COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Gleeson, Cochise County, Ariz. J. W. Bennie, Clifton, Ariz., 
mgr. ; J. E. Penberthy, supt., Gleeson. 

Inc. 1910 by interests closely connected with the Shannon Copper Co. 
and property is under lease to that company. 

Property: the Copper Belle mine, 8 claims, in the Turquoise or Court- 
land district, is opened by a vertical shaft and about 1 mile of workings, develop- 
ing several orebodies on 3 different contacts. Ore is nearly! solid pyrite, with 
considerable chalcopyrite and some bornite. 

Equipment: includes steam plant with 2 hoists, compressors, repair shop, 
etc. Output 150 tons per day, loaded directly into railway cars at mine and 
shipped over the A. E. & S. P. Railroad to Clifton. 

LOS CONQUISTADORES MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Benson, Ariz. 

Property: about 14 miles N. of Benson, developed by 3 shafts. 80'. 115' 
and 118' deep. Gold quartz ore, in places, said to be 30' wide, occurs in diorite, 
pegmatite and schist dikes. It is stated that 600 tons on the dump will assay 
from $15 to $50 per ton. 

LOUISIANA-ARIZONA COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: R. A. Clampitt. Bisbee. Ariz. 

A silver-lead prospect, 6 miles west of Bisbee, Cochise county. 
MANHATTAN DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Post Office Blk., Houghton, Mich. A. O. Koppes, supt.; J. H. 
Rice, pres. ; W. G. Rice, sec.-treas. 




MASCOT COPPER MINES & DEV. CORP. 175 

Inc. March, 1905, in Arizona. Cap., $200,000, $10 par; $5.50 paid in.. 

Property: 37 claims, 600 acres, owned in fee, in the California district, 
near Paradise, Cochise county, carries upwards of 2 miles of the outcrop of a 
mineralized zone lying W. and N. of the holdings of the Chiricahua Develop- 
ment Co. 

Development: by several shallow shafts, deepest 80', and a 450' cross- 
cut tunnel, latter showing leached ore and a little high-grade ore, with indica- 
tions of persistent values at greater depth. 

In 1913, company purchased the Arnold Mining Co. property, near Santa 
Cruz, Sonora, for $88,000. This property is developed by a 300' shaft and has 
shipped 12% ore to the Cananea smelter. The company's previous operations 
have been mainly in the Yaqui region of Sonora. 
MASCOT COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Harris Trust Bldg., Chicago. Mine offices: Dos Cabezos, Co- 
chise Co., Ariz. 

Officers: T. N. McCauley, pres.; R. V. Dixon, A. J. Baldwin, H. J. 
Gilbert, J. W. Phillips and D. S. Stevenson, directors. J. W. Prout, Jr., supt. 

Inc. July, 1907, in Arizona. Cap., $15.000,000, $10 par; outstanding, 
1,200,000 shares. 

Property: 56 claims,^ 22 patented, 1,100 acres, about 800 acres being 
classed as mineral lands, in the Dos Cabezos district. Company also owns a 
town site near Dos Cabezos, and miscellaneous lands, including placer claims, 
total holdings over 1,100 acres. 

Property shows limestone near a granitic area, intruded by diabase dikes 
and quartz porphyry with a covering of rhyolite, on part of the ground. The 
limestone shows in the lower hills on the south. Granite constitutes the two- 
pillars known as Dos Cabezos. . 

The ore occurs in lenses in contact deposits between altered lime and diabase.. 
In many instances chalcopyrite is found in the diabase magma and shows a 
metasomatic replacement. Ores carry chalcopyrite in a gangue of contact min- 
erals with 3 to 20% copper, the average being 5%, and small gold-silver values. 

Development: by the 450' Oregon shaft, and '2 tunnels, longest the 
1.800' Consolidated tunnel, connecting with the shaft at the 4th level. Total 
underground openings aggregate 29,000', and ore in sight is estimated by the 
company at about 1,000,000 tons, containing 5% copper. About 30,000' of diamond 
drilling has been done in various parts of the property. Recent results reported 
as good, ^specially at depth of 700'. Sinking new shaft. 

Equipment: includes two 250-h. p. distillate engines, two 12-drill air 
compressors, machine shop, electric lighting plant, smithy, telephone system and 
boarding house, with about 80 buildings. The company finished building the 
Mascot & Western R. R., a 15-mile line connecting the town of Mascot with the 
S. Pac. R. R. at Willcox, Arizona. A 10,000' aerial tram, capacity 1.200 tons 
per day, is used for carrying ore and supplies from mine to railway. A con- 
centrator is contemplated. 

Production: 1918, 13,276 tons containing 3% copper and 0.5 oz. silver. 

The mine management is good and property is reliably reported as prom- 
ising. The A. S. & R. Co. relinquished its lease on April 1, 1918. 
MASCOT MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Last address: 1318 Majestic Bldg.. Detroit, Mich. Company not favor- 
ably regarded. See Copper Handbook, Vol. XI, for full description of proper* 
ties. Letters neither answered nor returned. Presumably idle. 
MIDDLEMARCH COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Now Arizona Middlemarch Copper Co., which see 
MINES & DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION ARIZONA 

Address: Martin Fishback, mgr., Johnson, Ariz. 

Property: the Arizona & Michigan Development Co's. group of 7 pat- 
ented claims, 140 acres in Cochise county, taken over in Aug., 1919. 

Principal formations are porphyry and limestone. Claims said to carry 4 
orebodies, one opened by vertical and incline shafts and tunnels, showing a 5' 
vein with poorly defined walls and impregnations in the limestone hanging and 




176 ARIZONA 

porphyry footwall. Has a 450' two-compartment main shaft with 24 openings 
showing cuprite, malachite and copper sulphides said to give average assays up 
to 12% copper, 18 oz. silver, and $1 gold per ton. 

Equipment: 60 h. p. gasoline engine with double-drum hoist, 200 h. p. 
boiler and compressor. Company owns a short railroad connecting with the 
Southern Pacific Railway at Dragoon. In Sept., 1919, announced that a mill 
would be built. 
NEBRASKA & ARIZONA COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Mail address : Paradise, Cochise Co., Ariz. W. K. Morrow, supt. at last 
report. 

Inc. Jan., 1910, and merged June 25, 1910 with the California & Para- 
dise Mng. Co., in the California & Paradise Cons. Mng. Co. 
NORTH HILL-TOP EXTENSION MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: San Simon, Ariz. 

Officers: F. P. Crane, pres.; W. W. Howard, v. p.; G. H. Ebson. sec.; 
Jas. M. Hall, treas,, with R. D. Hall, J. L. Hill and C. J. Olden, directors. 

Inc. June, 1917, in Ariz. Cap., $2,000.000, $2 par. 

Property: 30 unpatented claims, in California mining district, 20 miles 
S. W. of San Simon, said to show silver-lead ore in a number of veins. 

Development: several open cuts and test-pits only. 

Is a speculative proposition. 
OCOTILLO COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 502 Corby-Forsee Bldg., St. Joseph, Mo. Mine office. Bisbee, 
Arizona. 

Officers: R. A. Grant, pres.; C. A. Blair, v. p. T. G. Sorter, scc.-treas. 

Inc. "under the common law" in Ariz. Cap., $2,000,000. $1 par; 1.000.000 
shares in treasury. Stock offered the public, 1917, at 35c. a share, either on 
the installment plan or with a 10% discount for cash. 

Property: 16 claims, about 320 acres, 4 miles from. Bisbee. Cochise 
county. Formation said to be lime and granite-porphyry. 

Development: a shaft is being sunk on a vein near the lime-porphyry 
contact on the Lucky Tramp claim. Material is impregnated with iron and 
carries some gold and copper. Assays of the ore at 10', 20' and 40' in depth are 
given as $2, $5, and $40 per ton. 

Company's prospectus devoted mostly to the big producing mines of Arizona, 
their dividend records, etc., advises investment in the Ocotillo mine, which, it 
states, "will prove as good as any of the large paying mines surrounding us, 
such as the Copper Queen, C. & A., Shattuck, and the Sacramento." Company 
is "going to spend $650,000, as fast as conservative management can place it 
We get the money from London. The price is 50c. a share, but we will raise it 
to $1 as soon as we hear from the London office again, wihich will be in one 
week. . . ." (written in July, 1919). This prospect, for it is not even a near- 
mine, is in an unpromising area outside of Bisbee. Investors are warned to 
await results of development to at least 100' in depth. 
PARADISE MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Paradise, Cochise Co., Ariz., was controlled through ownership of 60% of 
stock, by Bisbee-Sonora Development Co., fully described in Vol. XII. 
PEABODY CONSOLIDATED COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 111 Broadway, New York. Mine office: Johnson. Cochise Co., 
Ariz. 

Officers: Leo Schlesinger. pres.; Alex T. Wells, v. p.; I. Miner sec.; J. 
Born, treas., with Jos. B. Mayer, Morgan J. O'Brien, Jr.. Herbert R. Limburg, 
G. M. Minzesheimer and Jas. Muir, directors. John H. Banks, cons. engr. 

Inc. in Ariz. Cap., $1,500.000, $5 par. Empire Trust Co., New York, 
transfer agent. Listed on New York Curb. 

Property: 12 claims, 5 patented 230 acres, covering 2,000' along the ore 
belt at the Johnson camp, bought of the Bonanza Belt Copper Co., includes the 
Peabody mine, located 1879. Mine has a contact deposit between diabase and 
limestone and replacement veins, all within a 100' belt. Mine is credited with 
a production of about $411,970. Ore is a mixture of zinc blende and chalco- 



RED MOUNTAIN STERLING COPPER 177 

pyrite in a garnetized lime gangue and is oxidized to a depth of 200'. The ore 
snipped claimed to run 4-6% copper, with 5% iron, 15-20% lime and 55% 
insoluble; silver averages l /t oz. to each percent, copper. 

Development: by a 350' shaft, with crosscuts on the 200 and 300' levels, 
No ore reserves reported. 

Equipment includes 90 h. p. power plant, compressor and hoist. 

Shipments: in 1917, 300 tons per month were shipped to the Cons. Kan- 
sas City S. & R. Co. (El Paso smelter), a subsidiary of the A. S. & R. Co., under 
a 3-year contract. 

Prospectus issued by company was regarded as rather unduly optimistic. 
Property is an old one, having been operated intermittently for 20 years. Pre- 
sumably idle, 
RED MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Office: P. O. Box 3007, Lowell, Ariz. 

Officers: Frank Briggs, pres., treas.-gen. mgr.; Wm. Hawley, v. p.; 
E. J. Briggs sec. 

Inc. Oct. 5. 1908. in Arizona. Cap., $1,000.000. $1 par. 

Property: 17 claims. 340 acres, crossed by the Southern Pacific Railway, 
shows schist, porphyry and limestone, with a vein claimed to be 130' wide and 
traceable 2 miles, carrying copper and lead ores, including copper oxides and 
chalcopyrite. 

Development: consists of a 100' shaft. Idle owing to lack of funds 
since 1917. 
SAN SIMON COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Marquette, Mich. Mine office: Paradise. Cochise County, Ariz. 

Officers: Nathan M. Kaufman, pres.: Hon. Norman W. Haire, v. p.: 
S. R. Kaufman, sec.-treas., with Thos. F. Cole, John A. Duncan, Wm. G. Rice 
and Thos. H. Collins, directors. 

Inc. 1907, in Arizona, as a reconstruction of the Chiricahua Development 
Co. Cap., $2,500,000, $10 par. 

Property: 40 claims, 7 patented, about 750 acres. 16 miles from nearest 
railway, at Rodeo, N. Mex., previously operated by Capt. Thos. Burns as a silver 
mine. 

Development: a 750' crosscut tunnel with a 100' winze 700' from the 
portal, cutting 50' of leached ore, apparently the apex of a sulphide orebody. 
Also the 400' Mars shaft, bottomed in chalcopyrite ore of 2 to 4% copper tenor. 
The 400' Planet shaft has drifts on the 4th level. 

Equipment: includes two 150 h. p. boilers, two 2.COO' double drum hoists, 
and a 16-drill air compressor. Idle ; only assessment work done in recent years.t- 
SIGNAL POINT MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 40 First National Bank Bldg., Douglas, Ariz. 

Officers: G. E. Hemphill, pres. -gen. mgr.: E. G. Richards, v. p.; Z. T. 
Phillips, sec.-treas.. with E. A. Hemphill and Charles Stephens, directors. 

Inc. July 10, 1915, in Arizona. Cap., $600.000, shares 50c par; 800.000 
issued. 

Property: 19 claims. 12 miles E. of Douglas, near International Boun- 
dary. 

Development: one shaft 120'. another 150' deep, equipped with gaso- 
line hoists. No. 1 shaft was sunk on an iron dike, showing traces of copper 
and silver, and up to $3 gold per ton. This shaft was to be sunk to 300', followed 
by crosscutting. No. 2 passed through 40' of gold, silver, copper, lead ore into 
a leached zone. Churn-drills are to be used for prospecting other areas. Evi- 
dently idle, no recent returns. 
STERLING COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned from last address: care Judson A. Elliott, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Mine office: Dos Cabezos, Ariz. 

Officers: J. W. Thomas, pres.; L. C. Elliott, sec.; D. E. Nelson, treas.; 
with E. A. Congdon and J. A. Elliott, directors. C. H. Bean, supt 

Inc. 1906, in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000. $1 par: 482,600 shares issued 




178 ARIZONA 

Property: in the vicinity of Dos Cabezos, Cochise county, is devel- 
oped by short tunnels and a 125' shaft, following a limestone porphyry contact, 
snowing copper and lead ore which is said to average 5% copper. There has 
been about 1,000' of work done and $3,000 spent in development. Property is 
a prospect. No recent returns. 
SULLIVAN COPPER DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Office: care P. H. Nelson, pres., 610 Lonsdale Bldg.. Duluth, Minn. 

Mine office: Paradise, Cochise Co., Ariz. Geo. H. Crosby, sec.-treas. 

Property: 14 claims, 6 patented. 4 miles west of San Simon, Chiricahua 
Mts., has opencuts, showing leached copper ore and a little very rich ore, and 
has a 60' tunnel showing lead ore. Management considered good and property 
promising. Idle, except for annual assessment work, since 1917. 
SWISSHELM GOLD-SILVER CO. ARIZONA 

Address: 32 South Stone Ave., or P. O. Box 188, Tucson, or Robt. Ran- 
dell, supt, Webb, Cochise Co., Arizona. 

Officers: F. J. Heney, pres.; Ben Heney, v. p. -gen. mgr. ; G. H. Smalley, 
sec. ; Byrd Brooks, treas. 

Inc. 1907, in Arizona. Cap., $300,000, 50c par; 300,000 shares escrowed; 
300,000 in treasury ; non-assessable. 

Property: over 313 acres in the Swisshelm range. Cochise county, 12 
miles by road to railroad, 30 miles N. of Douglas; said to have a contact meta- 
morphic deposit between limestone and andesite, with gold-silver-lead ore. 

Development: 300' incline shaft, 250 and 300' tunnels, with total work- 
ings of 1,750'.. Claims 5,000 tons of ore blocked out, averaging $25 per ton. 

Management states that lead content of ore has hindered satisfactory 
smelter contracts, but in 1918 $6,265 was realized from ore sales. Gross earn- 
ings are given as $9,247. A new smelting contract was arranged in Nov., 1919, 
whereby the C. & A. works at Douglas will take the ore provided it contains 
over 70% silica. As the El Paso smelter had too much silicious ore, it penalized 
the excess silica. A saving of $1.50 per ton on freight will be made' by shipping 
to Douglas. 

Property has been examined by W. R. Ramsdell and others. He thinks 
that the above estimate of reserves is too low. The superintendent "considers the 
ore potentialities or probabilities so immeasurable and so immediate" that he 
disliked to estimate ore reserves. The circular of Dec. 1, 1919, contains a number 
of optimistic and extraneous matters. 

TEJON MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Bakersfield, Calif. L. I. Thiers. supt., Gleeson. Cochise Co., 
Ariz. 

Inc. in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000, shares $1 par. 

Property: 8 patented claims, 150 acres, at Gleeson, in the Turquoise or 
Courtland district, Arizona, adjoining the Copper Belle mine of the Leonard 
Copper Co. mine, shows heavy bedded limestone dipping steeply ^eastward into 
the mountain ridge and cut by intrusive bodies of monzonite and later quartz 
porphyry. Ore occurs as a contact deposit. Average assays reported at 5% 
copper, 6 oz. silver, 0.07 oz. gold per ton. 

Development: by the 500' Teion shaft, and by several old tunnels with 
extensive drifts and stopes in oxidized ore. 

Equipment: modern and complete, includes electric and steam power, 
compressor, etc. Railway is close at hand. Property appears meritorious and 
management good. Reported closed down, February, 1919. 
TETER-STONE AZURITE MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Dr. D. W. Teter, pres. 

Property: 3 miles south of Dragoon, Cochise county, has a 4 to 10' 
contact deposit, between limestone and granite, showing outcrops of azurite 
and malachite, with some sulphide ore in a tunnel. Operations suspended, 1913, 
owing to a heavy inflow of water. No later information. 
TOMBSTONE CONSOLIDATED MINES CO., LTD. ARIZONA 

Controlled by Development Co. of America, which see. 



TUNGSTEN REEF ARIZONA BISBEE 179 

TUNGSTEN REEF MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Officers: A. J. Clark, pres.-treas.; L. E. Porte:, v. p. -sec.; G. D. Kis- 
lingbury, supt. 

Property: group of claims in Huachuca Mountains. 40 miles S. W. of 
Bisbee, and 16 miles S. of Hereford. Ore is said to contain a high percentage 
of tungsten with some gold. During the past winter deep snows have hindered 
work except on construction of a concentrator. 
TWO PEAKS MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Turner, Ariz. 

Officers: W. G. Gilmore. pres.; J. C. Akard. v. p.; E. P. A. Larrieu, sec.- 
treas., with J. S. Trowbridge and T. D. M. Larrieu, directors. 

Inc. Jan. 4, 1916, in Arizona. Cap., $2.500,000, $2.50 par; 432,054 issued. 

Property: 45 claims, 1,012 acres, at S. end of Whetstone Mts., Cochise 
county, said to show a contact with a mineralized shear-zone striking S. 48 W., 
through the overlying monzonite porphyry, below which is limestone. Ore occurs 
as lenses in sheeting planes and through the porphyry mass, and according to 
company carries 3.16% copper, 0.034 oz. gold and 2 oz. silver per ton in shear 
zone. Minerals are chalcopyrite in shear-zone, and bornite and chalcopyrite in 
contact deposit. Carload in 1916 averaged 4.03% copper. 

Development: by shafts 36, 55, 60, and 100' deep, and by 270 to 280' 
tunnels. Workings to depth of 150'; total, 1,500'. No recent information. 
WAR HORSE COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned, 1918, from former address, Bacher & Stelsel, 412 Mills Bldg., 

TV J Pjiso TcXelS 

Cap., $1,000,000, shares $1 par. 

Property: 15 claims in the Tombstone district, Ariz., 23 miles N. W. 
of Bisbee. 

Development: 508' shaft and other openings. At 265' there was said 
to be 5 l / 2 ' of ore assaying 8% copper, 16 oz. silver and $1 gold per ton. At 400' 
the vein was reported to be 27' wide and considered to run through 6 claims, a 
distance of 9,000'. Development probably disappointing as no recent returns 
have been received. 
WILLIE ROSE COPPER MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned, 1918, from former address, J. W. Sterling, mgr., Bowie, Ariz. 

Property: the Willie Rose mine, near Triangle Springs, 13 miles S. of 
San Simon, Cochise county, Ariz., was operated under 10-year lease from 1914. 
Developed by 188' shaft said to be bottomed in a 12' vein carrying slightly 
argentiferous chalcocite, of about 2% copper tenor. Ore occurs in lime-porphyry 
contact, veins running E.-W., showing copper glance at slight depth. Made 
several shipments of $12 per ton ore to the El Paso smelter. 

Equipment: includes hoist, oil engine, compressor and air-drills. 

Probably idle. 

BISBEE DISTRICT, COCHISE COUNTY 

ANACONDA COPPER GROUP ARIZONA 

Owner: D. W. Arte, P. O. Box 741, Bisbee, Ariz. 

Property: 11 claims. 3 patented, in Warren mining district, stated as 
being on the S. W. contact of lime quartzite, 2,600' west of the Shattuck, 1,600' 
west of the Higgins, and adjoining the Copper Queen on S. E. and N. W. A 
35' shaft has been sunk in the crystallized lime quartzite. Assays along contact 
reported to carry $1.30 gold and 1.65% copper. 
ARIZpNA-BISBEE COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Mine office: Bisbee, Ariz. 

A Phoenix corporation fathered by Mr. Ned Creighton and others formerly 
interested in the Higgins lease. 

Property: 19 claims S. W. of the White Tail Deer property of the Cop- 
per Queen. Sinking a two compartment shaft. At 200' level will explore the 
fault for ore. Reported to be well equipped with machinery and money for all 
work planned. 



180 

BISBEE COPPER MINING & DEVELOPING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Bisbee, Ariz. 

Officers: Daniel B. Seed, pres.-mgr. ; Joseph Waters, v. p.-supt.; W. 
Hubbard, treas. ; A. H. Livingston, sec.-mgr., with Jack Sheldon, directors. 

Inc. 1916, in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000; $1 par; 600.000 issued. U. S. 
Corporation Co., transfer office ; Empire Trust Co., registrar. Annual meeting, 
first Saturday in September. 

Property: 21 claims, 12 patented, 273 acres in Warren mining district, 
comprising the Arizona and Winwood group and other claims, located y 2 mile 
north of Lowell and a mile east of Bisbee. Lands are north of the Denn 
Arizona. They are not near the Copper Queen mines, as has been claimed, but 
are north of the Dividend fault and lie outside of the recognized ore beltl 
Claims are said to show iron outcrops and some copper carbonate ore, but the 
U. S. Geological Survey map shows that schist and a very small acreage of 
porphyry occur on the southerly claims, but most of the group is covered by the 
barren Cretaceous rocks. 

The tract shows some 2-6 l /2% oxidized ore probably deposited by surface 
waters, as the Cretaceous rocks do elsewhere in the district, but in such cases 
the ore is only surficial, and rapidly fades out at a few yards or so in depth. It 
may be added that company's officers make affidavit to such ore being 50' wide 
and going down to bottom of a shaft 12' deep. Although one drill-hole was 
down over 892' July, 1917, sampling of the drill cores failed to show any com- 
mercial value. 

Equipment: a 10x12 electric hoist. 

In our opinion the claims are entirely out of the mineralized area and have 
little, if any, chance of becoming profitably productive. 

A New York Curb house sent out very attractive-looking advertising matter 
regarding Bisbee and the Bisbee Copper Mining & Dev. Co., which contains many 
misleading statements. The property is not in the "heart of the Bisbee Copper 
Camp," and such gross misrepresentation cannot be too strongly condemned. 
Development on the property is quite insufficient to predict its becoming a 
"second Calumet & Arizona" and an "early dividend payer," and the public buying 
stock on such promises is doomed to be disappointed. Apparently the manage- 
ment based all its hopes of developing a mine on its geographical position in 
utter disregard of geologic conditions. 

No work has been done for some months, according to reliable information 
from Bisbee, late in Oct., 1919, and no pay-ore was found either in the shaft 
or drill-hole. 
BISBEE-SONORA DEVELOPING CO. ARIZONA 

Company owned several mining locations southwest of Bisbee in 1906-7, 
but failed to do assessment work and lost property. No meeting was held for 
over 4 years, and company is insolvent. 

H. C. Beumler, pres., Douglas, Ariz., wrote in 1917: "Company out of 
business." Was the holding company for Badger Hall, Bisbee & Duluth M. & 
D. Co. and Paradise Mng. Co. Fully described, Vol. XII. 
BISBEE-WARREN COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Bisbee, Ariz. 

Inc. in Arizona. Application for patent made March, 1918, for 12 cop- 
per-silver-gold claims, about 200 acres, in the Warren district. 
BORAS LEASING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: care Phelps Dodge Corporation, Bisbee. Ariz. 

Property, a lease on part of the Copper Queen ground at Bisbee. ad- 
joining the Xight Hawk Leasing Co. Work at present is at 300' depth, where 
high-grade ore was opened in August, 1919. Six men employed. 
CALUMET & ARIZONA MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Calumet, Mich. Mine office: Warren. Cochise County, Ariz. 
Works office : Douglas, Cochise Co., Ariz. 

Officers: Chas. Brig.es, pres.; Capt. Jas. Hoatson. v. p.; Capt. Thos. 
Moatson, second v. p.; Gordon R. Campbell, sec.; Peter Ruppe, treas.; preceding, 
with Thos. F. Cole, Walter B. Congclon, Chas. d'Autremont, Jr., William B. 



CALUMET & ARIZONA MINING 



181 



Mershon, and Geo. E. Tener, directors; Henry B. Paull, auditor; John C. Green- 
way, gen. mgr. ; E. E. Whitely, mine supt. ; D. M. Rait, asst. mine supt. ; H. A. 
Clark, smelter supt.; R. H. Dickson, engr. ; J. B. Rawlings, purch. agt. John 
Hooper, supt. at Jerome, and M. Curley, supt at Ajo. 




Shafts derto/vd thus 9 



NACO 



PROPERTY MAP OF BISBEE DISTRICT, ARIZONA 



DOUGLAS. 



Inc. March, 1901. in Arizona. Cap., $2,500,000; shares $10 par, increased 
Feb. 15, 1911, to $6,500,000; shares $10 par; issued 642,519 shares; held for 
exchange, 273 shares. The company, which already controlled the Superior & 
Pittsburgh Copper Co., through ownership of 1,494,333 shares out of a total of 
1,499,792 shares issued, in Feb., 1916, took over the property. All S. & P. assets 
were transferred to the C. & A. Co., effective Dec. 31, 1915, basis of exchange 
being 3 l / 2 shares Superior & Pittsburgh for 1 Calumet & Arizona, and a bonus 
of $1 per share for quick delivery of stock. American Trust Co., Boston, and 
Mechanics and Metals National Bank, New York, registrars ; State Street* Trust 
Co., Boston, and Bankers' Trust So., New York, transfer agents. Stock is listed 
on the New York and Boston Stock Exchanges. Annual meeting, second Mon- 
day in April. 



182 ARIZONA 

Balance sheet of Dec. 31, 1918, gave quick assets of $10,116,545, including 
cash, $3,681,392; copper, silver and gold in process, $2,484,381 ; notes and accounts 
receivable, $1,307,052; supplies and items in suspense, $1,291,220; Liberty bonds, 
$1,352,500; accounts payable are $781,182. 

Total surplus $35,272,186. Total earnings on copper, gold and silver were 
$14,471,130; interest, $509,820 ; expenditures were $9,905,176; net income, $4,086,238. 

Dividends: $2 in 1903; $6.50 in 1904; $8.50 in 1905; $13 in 1906; $16.50 
in 1907; $4 in 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911; $4.25 in .1912; $5 in 1913; $3 in 1914; $3.25 
in 1915; $9 in 1916; $11 in 1917; $8 in 1918, and $3 in 1919 to Dec. 22. The total 
is $43,037,837. 

In 1911 the company took an option on the New Cornelia claims, 243 acres 
in the Ajo district, 42 miles south of Gila. The C. & A. was to receive treasury- 
stock of the New Cornelia Copper Co. (described under its own title), for all 
money expended in development work on the property. It exercised its option 
in 1913 and now owns 1,229,741 shares, or 68.3% of the stock of the subsidiary 
company on which dividends of $306,935 was received during 1918. It built 
jointly, with the E. P. & S. W., the 43 mile Tucson, Cornelia and Gila Bend Rail- 
road, running from Gila Bend to Cornelia. The New Cornelia Co. entered the 
producing class in June, 1917. 

The C. & A. also took an option on 70% of the $1,000,000 capital stock of 
the Gadsden Copper Co., at Jerome, Arizona, in October, 1916, and is obligated 
to spend $100,000 in exploration work on the property. Property consists of 
39 claims adjoining the United Verde Extension Mining Co. on the south. In 
April, 1919, property was fully equipped, shaft was down 1,200' where develop- 
ments showed favorable geologic conditions. There were 60 men employed in 
October, 1919. 

Property: includes the original claims at Bisbee. claims formerly owned 
by the Superior & Pittsburgh C. Co., bought Dec. 31, 1915; the American Saginaw 
group, bought in 1912; the Calumet & Bisbee group and the Higgins group, 
bought in 1913 ; total area of about 2,068 acres, patented, within the mineral zone 
of the Warren district, Ariz. 

Side-line agreements with the Copper Queen Cons. Mng. Co., the Denn- 
Arizona Mng. Co. and the Shattuck Arizona Copper Co., insure freedom from 
litigation, and continuance of the friendly feeling and neighborly co-operation 
existing from the very inception of this company. 

Geology: the mine is opened in limestone, near a porphyry contact, 
with occasional porphyritic intrusions. The surface gives small indications of 
values, showing but small and infrequent outcrops, the existence of the original 
orebodies in the Irish Mag claim, farthest to the north, having been inferred 
from underground work in the adjoining territory of the Copper Queen, after 
careful study of the general geological conditions of the district. Ore occurs 
in highly irregular bodies, the mine having native copper, cuprite, melaconite. 
azurite, chalcocite, bornite and chalcopyrite, usually with a talcose gangue, and 
with considerable hematite and manganes.e ores, the latter carrying malachite in 
small disseminated nodules, frequently averaging 10 to 18% in copper. The ore, 
which is practically self-fluxing, averages about 2 oz. silver and 0.05 oz. gold 
per ton, as smelted. 

Development: diamond-drill borings to depth of 1,800' have penetrated 
limestone strata to that depth. The orebodies are extensively developed, but 
are not largely blocked out, owing to the constant shifting of the ground, caused 
by the creeping of the mountain above, as is the case at the neighboring Copper 
Queen mine, requiring very heavy timbering, with frequent bulkheading, and 
constant care for all openings, which renders it prudent to keep costs down by 
blocking out ore but a comparatively short time ahead of actual stoping require- 
ments^ 

There are 6 main working shafts in operation, from which a rhomboidal 
area a mile long is being actively developed' and worked. These shafts are the 
1.390' Irish Mag, 1,375' Oliver, 1,480' Cole, 1,630' Briggs, 1,680' Hoatson and 



CALUMET & ARIZONA MINING 183 

1,837' Junction shafts. Underground work totals about 144 miles, 50% of 
which is open and in use. New openings in 1918 amounted to 99,355', including 
16,281' of diamond drill holes. During 1918, it required one foot of development 
work to open up 8.5 tons of ore. Alines have electric traction on the 1,400', 
1,600' and 1,800' levels. 

The 4-compartment Irish Mag shaft, sunk on a single 20-acre claim, was 
the original mine, and the shaft is sunk in hard limestone throughout, except 
where occasional orebodies were cut, rendering it unusually safe from drawing. 
The Irish Mag has yielded some of the best copper ever mined, including some 
entire stopes of 30 to 40% copper. The Irish Mag shaft has a 78' steel headgear, 
a 114' ore bin and a 250 h. p. electric hoist, raising 3-decked cages. The shaft 
is 1,390' deep and was retimbered to the 900' level in 1916. The Oliver shaft, 
4 compartments, 1,375' deep, is equipped with 600 gal. Nordberg electric pump 
and hoist. It develops both of the Senator and Buckeye claims, cutting ore at 
710'.' Sulphide ore averaging about 5% copper is being mined from orebodies on 
the 1,150', 1,250' and 1,350' levels. Oxidized ore is being mined on the 850' and 
enriched sulphide ore on the 950' and 1,300' levels. 

The Powell shaft, started Nov., 1908, is on the line between the Hope and 
\Yagner claims, which lie 2,000' S. W. of the Irish Mag shaft. This ground was 
explored by a crosscut from the Irish Mag that traversed 600' of the Copper 
Queen ground,' stopping about half way across the group, showing nothing of 
value. This shaft, about 600' deep, has an electric hoist. 

The area below the 1,350' and 1,450' levels was diamond drilled, 1911, show- 
ing a downward extension of the mineral zone, several hundred feet to the 
bottom of the limestone, but without disclosing commercial ore. 

The Washington, Angel and Old Republic claims lie on the porphyry side 
of the gulch, and were secured mainly as a possible smelter site, then being 
considered of little promise for ore. 

In 1915, 5,165' of churn drilling on this group developed a substantial tonnage 
of low-grade disseminated ore in an irregular body from 170' to 450' below the 
surface. 

The Cole shaft handles the output from the southwestern part of the com- 
pany's holdings. The greater part of the recent production has come from a 
body of oxide ore of great size between the 800' and 1,100' levels. Smaller 
bodies have contributed sulphide ore from the 1,000' to 1,400' levels. This shaft 
has Prescott and Cameron station pumps caring for a flow of 225 gals, of water 
per minute. 

The Congdon shaft, on the Black Bear claim, only 650' from the Mag, is 
1,267' deep, but has been out of commission for several years, as the territory 
can be worked to better advantage through the Cole shaft. Surface equipment 
includes a 300-h. p. steam plant, with a 12x36" double-drum hoist. 

The Hoatson shaft, on the Del Norte claim, 2,500' from the Briggs, has 5 
compartments, and is 1,680' deep. Ore is being mined from a large body on the 
1,300' level. This ore is taken by electric haulage to the Junction and Briggs 
shafts, where it is hoisted. Equipment at the Hoatson shaft includes a steel 
headgear, double-drum hoist, good for 2,000' depth. Power plant has 6 boilers. 

The Junction shaft has 5 compartments and is 1,837' deep, being the deepest 
of any shaft in the Bisbee district. Shaft is concreted to bottom level. The 
Junction is the main hoisting shaft of the Briggs-Hoatson-Junction division, and 
virtually the entire production of the 3 mines, about 2,000 tons daily, is hoisted 
through it. Ore is hoisted in 5-ton skips, crushed in Allis-Chalmers gyratory 
crusher, and loaded by belt conveyor into railroad cars. 

Large bodies of both oxide and sulphide ore have been opened up from the 
1,300' to the 1,800' levels. Development of the 1,600', 1,700' and 1,800' levels 
was started in 1915, and valuable orebodies have since been found. The most 
important recent development is on the 1,400' and 1,600' levels from the Junction 
shaft south towards the Denn where indications are favorable for the develop- 
ment of important orebodies. In addition to the ore of shipping grade developed, 
immense bodies of solid pyrite, carrying between 1% and 2% copper, have been 
found on the 1,400', l,500'"and 1,600' levels. 



184 ARIZONA 

The Junction shaft drains the entire Calumet & Arizona and Copper Queen 
group of mines. Water pumped during 1918 was 1,664,518,500 gals. 

Pumping plant has been much simplified by the installation of a 1,500-gal. 
electric pump on the 1,800' level of the Junction. They are now handling 1,500 
gals. p. m. from the 1,500' and 1..900 gals. p. m. from the 1,800' levels. 

Surface plant consists of thirteen 250 h. p. Marine boilers, a 4-cylinder Nord- 
berg, double-reel main hoist, good for 2,500' depth, and a Sullivan single-drum 
hoist, used as an auxiliary hoist for handling men and timber. 

There is a 5,000' Nordberg compressor" having compound air cylinders driven 
by a four-cylinder triple expansion steam engine. This machine has an attached 
air pump and condenser. In addition, there is a 3,500' Nordberg compressor, 
having compound air cylinders, driven by a cross compound steam end. 

The Briggs shaft, about 3,000' south of the Junction shaft, is 1,630' deep and 
3,000' east of the Lowell shaft of the Copper Queen. Large bodies of enri-ched 
sulphide ore of much greater horizontal than vertical' extent, averaging about 
S l /2% copper, have been developed between the 1,200' and 1,400' levels. A sub- 
stantial tonnage of oxide ore of good grade is being mined from the 900' to the 
1,400' levels from nearly vertical fracture zones. On the 1,400' level, 500' south 
of the shaft, an important sulphide orebody 300' long by 30' wide was developed. 
Ore from this mine is handled by electric haulage on the 1,400' level to the 
Junction shaft and hoisted. 

Equipment at the Briggs shaft includes steel gallows frame. Power plant 
has 2 boilers of 250 h. p. each, burning crude petroleum, with a powerful hoist. 
The Campbell shaft, recently started on the Regular Claim, about 2,000' 
east of a point midway between the Junction and Briggs shafts, was stopped in 
1917 on account of labor shortage. By December 31, 1919, it was 1,400' deep. 
This shaft will develop an extensive and hitherto unprospected territory. 

The Copper Giant group, at Copper Creek, Graham County, Ariz., includes 
35 claims, known as the Scanlon or Clark-Scanlon property, 16 miles northeast 
of Mammoth. This property, bought Sept., 1908, has been extensively tested 
by diamond drills, giving good cores, and has a 600' two-compartment working 
shaft, with several levels opened, and considerable medium to high-grade sulphide 
ore is blocked out. A 15-mile railway will be required to render this property 
a producer. 

Equipment: surface equipment is very complete. The original machin- 
ery plant was clustered about the Irish Mag shaft, on a steep hillside, where 
limited room was secured by grading, but the principal plant is now at the Oliver 
shaft, including five 280 h. p. marine boilers, burning crude petroleum, with 
storage tanks. 

The principal compressor plant, at the Oliver, has a 35-drill Sullivan Corliss 
cross-compound 2-stage air compressor, with 17x34" steam cylinder and 20x34" 
air cylinder, having a piston displacement of 6,600 cu. ft. of free air per minute. 
There also are 3 Sullivan straight-line air compressors. Much of the ore is so 
soft that it can be bored with a breast auger, thus reducing requirements in the 
way of air for power drills. Electricity is used extensively on surface and also 
for pumping. The electric power plant at the Oliver shaft has 1,000 k. w., 500 
k. w. and 300 k. w. Westinghouse-Parsons 2,200-volt, 60-cycle, 3-phase turbo- 
generators, two 220 k. w. 2,200-volt 60-cycle 3-phase motors, direct-connected 
with the steam turbine, a 300 k. w. General Electric rotary converter, transforming 
a 2,200-volt alternating current to a 550-volt direct current, for operating the 
street-car line to Warren. 

The steel-frame machine shop is divided into two 60x48' parts, for the 
machine shop and smithy. Adjoining is a plate shop, 40x128', of steel frame, 
with corrugated iron roof and siding. There is a framing mill at the Irish Mag 
shaft, also a warehouse and office building. A 60x125' administration building 
is planned to be erected at Warren, the town site adjacent to the Calumet & 
Arizona. A hospital with an efficient staff is maintained for the employees, and 
a model changing house has hot and cold running water, tub and shower baths 
and- lockers for 500 men. Fire protection is furnished by direct pipe lines to 



CALL' MET & ARIZONA MINING 185 

large storage tanks, all hose couplings being made to connect with those of the 
Bisbee fire department. An automatic telephone system has stations under- 
ground and on surface, and is connected with the smelter at Douglas. 

The company's smelter is located at Douglas, 25 miles from the mine, receiving 
ore over the El Paso & Southwestern Railway, at a very favorable freight rate. 
The original smelter was blown in Nov. 15, 1902, and has been twice enlarged, 
giving the old works a capacity of nearly 3,000 tons daily. 

The Smelter 

The new smelter, completed 1913 at a cost of about $2,000,000, was designed 
by C. H. Redpath and built and equipped with the able assistance of Messrs. 
Greenway and Wood. It is fully described by Richard H. Vail, in* the "Eng. and 
Min. Journal," Vol. 98, p. 102, July 18, 1914. The works consist of a sampling 
mill, crushing plant, calcining plant, reverberatory, blast furnace and converter 
departments and 6 mixing beds, each of 10,000 tons capacity, together with a 
5.000-ton coke storage bed. 

The crushing and sampling plant, 40x84' on the ground and 5 stories high, 
is built of steel and concrete throughout, and is divided into 2 sections, operating 
independently of each other. Each section has a crushing and sampling depart- 
ment. Ore from the crushers at the receiving bins is delivered over an incline 
conveyor to the crushing and sampling plant, where the large sizes are screened 
out for the blast furnaces. The sampling department, equipped with Snyder 
automatic samplers, cuts the ore 4 times, making a sample weighing 1.6 or 3.2 
Ibs., as desired, per ton of ore passing through. The plant is flexible and ore 
may be crushed and screened and discharged at any desired size. 

The material from the sampling and crushing plant is passed to mixing beds 
similar to those in use at the Cananea smelter, there being 3 beds for coarse and 
3 for fine ore. The coarse ore mixed with coke is conveyed directly to the coke 
charge bins over the blast-furnace charge floor, the fine ore going directly to the 
calciner, or roaster plant. 

The roaster plant has twenty-four 258" Herreshoff roasters, having a 
capacity of approximately 80 tons of fine ore per day. The plant is equipped 
with a tile and steel dust chamber, 60x140x70' high, equipped with baffles aiifd 
wires and roofed with copper, discharging into a brick-lined steel chimney, 20' 
inside diameter by 279' high. 

Twelve of these roasters were completed early in 1917, and are being used 
in connection with a newly constructed sulphuric acid plant, which is furnishing 
200 tons of 60 degree Baume acid to the New Cornelia Copper Co. 

A 222x460' building, of steel frame, sheathed with iron, covers the blast 
furnace, reverberatory, converter, and copper-casting departments. The blast- 
furnace department consists of two 48x40' blast furnaces, and has a steel dust 
chamber, 60x180x70' high, equipped with suitable baffles and wires. The gases 
from the converters will also pass through this chamber and be discharged into 
a brick-lined steel chimney, 25' inside diameter by 305' high. Ore and coke is 
discharged directly from the bin over the charge floor into cars resting upon 
platform scales, the charge car being propelled from the scales to the charge 
doors of the furnace- by an electric motor. 

The reverberatory department contains 4 reverberatory furnaces, 19x100' in 
size, with a foundation and building for a fifth furnace in place. Each furnace 
is equipped with two 712 h. p. Stirling boilers. Steam at 80 Ib. pressure is gen- 
erated by using waste heat, driving a 3,000 k. w. turbine alternating-current 
generators. The furnaces are charged directly from the calcine cars running 
on a track overhead. Matte is tapped into 20-ton pots, and transferred by 
cranes to the converters, slag being skimmed directly into 25-ton pots, running 
on tracks underneath and just in front of the skimming end of the furnaces. 

The converter department, having a main converter aisle 55' wide, and two 
40-ton electric traveling cranes, has stands for 6 Great Falls type converters. 
There are also 2 straight-line casting machines and other necessary equipment. 
The converter slag is poured directly into the reverberatory furnace. 

The power house, formerly 80x160' in size, was increased, 1907, by the build- 
ing of a transverse section 100x100' in size, the new building being divided through 



186 



ARIZONA 




the center by a row of columns into 2 bays, each 50' wide, and each served by a 
10-ton hand-power traveling crane. Equipment includes two 14 & 28x36 Allis- 
Chalmers Tandem Corliss engines, all driving No. 10 Connersville blowers. One 
22 & 48 & 52 & 52x48 and one 22 & 42 & 48 & 48x48 Nordberg cross compound 
Corliss blowing engines, and one 20 & 40 & 44 & 48 Allis-Chalmers blowing 
engines. 

There are also a 750 k. w. and a 500 k. w Allis-Chalmers steam turbine, 
driving 440-volt, 60-cycle, 3-phase generators, and one 165 k. w. and one 200 k. w. 
motor generator sets for converting alternating current to direct current for 
cranes and locomotives. 

There are also 2 triple expansion steam pumps, size 8 & 12 & 20 & 22x24* 
and 3 motor-driven centrifugal pumps for water service; also two 14 & 25 & 
2-36x24 Prescott steam condensers. Steam is supplied from the boilers over the 
rever-beratory furnaces and the old boiler plant is closed down. 

The smelter plant includes a machine-shop and smithy, both of steel frame, 
and a considerable number of dwellings. The whole plant is fully described in 
"Mining and Scientific Press" of August 10, 1918. 

A sulphuric acid plant, to produce sulphuric acid for leaching the Ajo ores, 
was designed by the Process Engineering Co., and put into operation during 
1917. K. B. Thomas is supt. It is complete and modern in every respect. 
Capacity is 186 tons 60% B. acid per day, of which Ajo uses about 75%, the 
balance finding a ready market with other mining companies and with the farmers. 
The works were fully described by Courtenay D'e Kalb in "Min. & S. Press" of 
March 30, 1918. 

The Safety Department, organized in 1915, has been effective, though costly. 
Ore reserves: October, 1916, are given as 1,976,815 tons of 4.99% ore, 
compared with 1,610,264 tons in 1915. 

Production: since 1910 is as follows: 

Year Lb. Copper 

1911 49,945,905 

1912 53,108,628 

1913 52,987,383 

1914 52,667,929 

1915 65,268,910 

1916 74,898,788 

1917 62,397,017 

1918 51,357,154 

1919 46,450,000 



Oz. Silver 
453,947 
594,319 
880,915 
922,143 


Oz. Gold 
18,114 
22,881 
18,989 
24,122 


Net Cost 
Copper (a) 
7.34 cts. 
7.02 cts. 
7.65 cts. 
8.19 cts. 


Selling Price 
Copper 
12.49 cts. 
16.25 cts. 

15.57 cts. 


1,381,077 


35,264 


8.00 cts. 




1,863,149 
1,257,081 


46,377 
37,130 


9.04 cts. 
13.00 cts. 


24.70 cts. 


1,133,801 


33.868 


15.50 cts. 





(a) Per pound copper, after crediting gold and silver. 

During 1918, 676,888 tons of ore were mined, dry weight. There were 
shipped 105,074 tons of ore to various smelters. Smelter treated 850,894 tons of 
dry ore, of which 245,443 tons were custom ores. 

Production for 1918 was somewhat hampered by labor shortage and a decrease 
in labor efficiency, estimated at fully 30% less than in normal time. Since the 
signing of the armistice, production has been greatly curtailed. 

New Cornelia is a big property and will pay dividends for years to come. 
COCHISE DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Bisbee. Cochise county, Ariz. 

Officers. Lemuel C. Shattuck, pres.; Chas. L. Jones, v. p. -gen. m^r. ; 
T. O. McGrath, sec. ; Jos. M. Muheim, treas. 

Inc. Aug. 1, 1905, in Arizona. Succeeding the Cochise Copper Mining 
Co. Cap., $1,000,000; $10 par. Annual meeting, second Tuesday in January. 

Property: 16 claims, 176 acres, abutting on the Holbrook mine of the 
Copper Queen Consolidated, and lying north of the Dividend fault and Dubacher 
gulch. 

Development: by a 900' three-compartment shaft. Drifts on the 300', 
600', and 900' levels show small bunches of sulphide ore. 



COPPER QUEEN SHATTUCK-ARIZONA 187 

Equipment: includes a 100 h. p. boiler, a 10x30" first-motion double-drum 
hoist, good for 1,200'. and a 6-drill straight-line air compressor. Buildings are 
an engine house, boiler house, 20x40' carpenter shop, 20x30' smithy, and a coal 
trestle. Idle since 1907. 
COPPER QUEEN CONSOLIDATED MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Company merged into Phelps Dodge Corporation, which see. 
HIGGINS LEASING CO. ARIZONA 

Inc. 1912, to prospect the -Higgins property for silver-lead and copper 
ores. Lease has expired and property reverted to owner, Thos. Higgins, of 
Los Angeles, in 1916. See Higgins Mine. 

HIGGINS MINE ARIZONA 

(Formerly Higgins Copper Co.) 

Owner: Thos. Higgins, Higgins Bldg.. Los Angeles, Calif. Mine office: 
Jas. J. Flanagan, mgr., M. F. Ryan, supt., Bisbee, Ariz. 

Property: 200 acres in the Western end of the Bisbee district lying 
between the Copper Queen property on the E. and W. and the Wolverine- 
Arizona on the S. Shaft is 300' deep. In 1918, lessees were extracting 3 to 5 
cars of manganese weekly from surface workings. An important strike of 
copper ore was made during 1918, dimensions of orebody are given as 8' by 
350' by 450', assaying 2.5 to 50% copper. Daily shipments of rich ore to smelter 
are reported. 

Production: copper. 1916, 1,250,452 lb.; 1917, 951.368 lb.; 11 months 
1918, 3,013,000 lb. ; about 12,000 oz. silver, and about 300 oz. gold yearly. 
NIGHT HAWK LEASING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: James Z. McKenna, supt., Bisbee, Ariz. 

Property: a lease, until 1923, on the Night Hawk mine of the Phelps 
Dodge Corporation, in the Warren district. 

Development: under way to depth of 650'. In September, 1919, it was 
reported that a shoot of rich copper ore had been opened on the bottom level, 
presumably an extension of that worked at 450'. The main orebody said to 
average 10%. 

Ore is shipped to Douglas for smelting, but no figures are available. 
PORTAGE LAKE & BISBEE MNG. CO. ARIZONA 

Office: care John Funkey, Hancock, Mich. Mine address: Bisbee, Ariz. 
Chas. Lewis, treas. 

Inc. April, 1903, in Arizona, succeeding Portage Lake & Calumet De- 
velopment Co. Cap., $1,000,000; $1 par. 

Property: 12 claims, 3 fractional. 191 acres, several patented, 3 miles S. 
E. of Bisbee, S. E. of Warren Dev. Co., showing limestone, with a porphyry 
contact. The mine has a 2-cpmpartment 302' shaft, with a small compressor, 
Worthington pump, 75 h. p. hoist, etc. Inactive many years. 
QUEEN CALUMET COPPER EXTENSION CO. ARIZONA 

Address: 121 So. Central Ave., Phoenix, Ariz., or Bisbee, Ariz. 
Officers: Jas. Wood, pres.; P. L. Woodman, v. p. -gen. mgr.; J. F. Cleave- 
land, sec. ; Chas. A. McDonald, treas., with A. K. Stacy, W. W. Perkins and W. 
W. Searles, directors. 

Inc. Dec. 12, 1916, in Ariz Cap., $1,500,000; shares $1 par. 
Property: the Don Luis group of patented claims, about 421 acres and 
the Gold Knob group of 253 acres in the Warren mining district, Cochise county. 
Structural geological conditions said to warrant drilling. 

SHATTUCK-ARIZONA COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 120 Broadway, New York. Mine office: Bisbee, Cochise county, 
Arizona. 

Officers: Thos. Bardon, pres.; H. L. Mundy, v. p.; Thos. Bardon, Jr., 
v. p.; E. R. Early, v. p.; Norman E. LaMond, v. p. and sec.; Archibald M. Chis- 
holm, treas. ; Lemuel C. Shattuck. gen. mgr. ; Arthur Houle, supt. ; T. O. McGrath, 
auditor. 

Inc. March 22, 1904. in Minnesota. Cap., $3,500,000; $10 par; non- 
assessable ; fully issued. Company is closely connected, in ownership and man- 
agement with the Denn-Arizona Copper Co. National Shawmut Bank, Boston, 



188 ARIZONA 

and Bankers' Trust Co., New York, registrars ; Old Colony Trust Co., Boston, 
and Guaranty Trust Co., New York, transfer agents. Shares listed on the Boston 
and New York Stock Exchanges. Annual meeting, third Saturday in February. 
Dividends: $2 in 1910; $1 in 1911; $1.50 in 1913; $1.50 in 1914; $2.50 in 
1915; $4.75 in 1916; $5 in 1917; $4 in 1918, and $1.25 in 1919, making a total of 
$23.50 per share. 

Annual report for 1918 shows net income, of $784,658, as compared with 
$1,477,500 in 1917. Net profits in 1918 were $243,467, compared with $713,641 
in 1917. Operations during the first half of 1919 resulted in a deficit of $256,998. 

Property: 8 claims, patented, 109 acres, lying in the northeastern por- 
tion of the Bisbee camp, about one-half mile south of the original workings of 
the Copper Queen, and to the north of the Calumet & Arizona. The property 
shows carboniferous limestone, with intrusive porphyry dikes, and a big fault, 
covered with a silicious gossan of 30 to 50' width. Ores carry copper and lead 
with gold, silver and vanadium values, and are oxidized down to 800', with low- 
grade sulphides at depth. 

The orebodies occur as irregular replacements along certain bedding planes, 
and along dike contacts. 

Development: the mine is opened by a 935' three-compartment shaft 
15x4' 6" in size, connected with the Uncle Sam shaft of the Copper Queen on 
the 800' level, with the Powell shaft of the Calumet & Arizona on the 600' level, 
and with the workings of the Wolverine & Arizona on the 200' level. Mining 
work was begun Aug., 1904, and ore shipments started Sept., 1906, continuing 
until Nov., 1907, when the panic put a stop to all work for some months. Pro- 
duction was resumed Dec. 4, 1908. The mine is opened by levels at 100' intervals, 
from 100' to 900' inclusive. 

Development during 1918 totalled 15,125', making 27 miles in all. Work was 
done on all levels from 100' to 900', inclusive, and company's report for that 
year notes the following results of new work. 

On the 100' level two small orebodies produced a good tonnage of copper 
ore; one is important because it proves continuation of ore bearing territory in 
west side of property. Work on 200' and 300' levels was mainly to block out 
low-grade silver lead ores. On 400' level a body of carbonate ore was found, 
4' to 8' in width and 180' long. On 500' level a new block of ground was opened 
up with encouraging results. Development work on 600' level did not open up 
any new ores of consequence. On 700' level an ore-shoot was developed that 
was the most important as to tonnage and copper contents found during the 
year. Over 900' of development work on 800' level did not disclose any ore of 
commercial grade. No important finds were made on the 900' level, but between 
the 800' and 900' levels a large body of primary sulphides was exposed, high in 
iron and sulphur, assaying approximately 2% copper. There is still a large 
unexplored area of limestone geologically favorable for ore deposition. 

The milling plant for low-grade lead ores began operations on a limited 
scale July 1, 1918. Tonnage milled amounted to 27,851 wet tons, average assay, 
6.6% lead, 8.1 oz. silver and 0.07 oz. gold; 3,930 tons concentrates were shipped to 
lead smelters at El Paso. Recovery did not equal the results obtained from the 
experimental mill operations. In Jan., 1919, the mill was closed down to wait 
for a better price of lead. Total expense for construction and equipment of the 
mill was $294,902. The amount of lead ore available is approximately 1,000,000 
tons, assaying 10% to 12% lead and $1 gold and 6 oz. silver per ton. Experi 
ments indicate a profit of at least $4 per ton can be realized on this ore at normal 
market prices for lead and silver. Many of these orebodies are only partly 
developed. January 1, 1916, the total and partly developed reserves were estim- 
ated as 921,968 tons, containing approximately 56,600,000 Ibs. copper, 70,000,000 
Ibs. lead, and $4,000,000 in gold and silver. 

The ore is smelted by the Calumet & Arizona Mining Co., at Douglas, 
Arizona, under contract in effect to July 1, 1923. During 1918, 550 tons of copper 
ore was shipped daily, returning about 5% copper, with appreciable gold and 
silver. 



WARREN REALTY & DEV . WOLVERINE & ARIZONA 189 

Equipment: 12 mine buildings, includings, including machine shop, car- 
penter shop, smithy, boiler house, engine house, warehouse, sawmill, and a 
change house with accommodations for 300 men. 

The 750 h. p. steam plant has five 150 h. p. boilers. The main hoist is an 
18x48" duplex double-drum engine, working under 125 Ibs. steam pressure, with 
2 drums, each carrying 1,500' of \ l /&" round steel cable, capable of handling 
continuously a 15,000-lb. unbalanced load at a vertical hoisting speed of 2,000' 
per minute. The air plant includes a 40-drill cross-compound air compressor. 
Fuel is petroleum, with a normal yearly consumption of about 20,000 bbl. 

A 3,300' aerial tram of 500 tons daily capacity, with average grade of 18%, 
supported by 14 towers of 12 to 40' height, built of 12" timber and set on 
concrete foundations, leads from a 1,000-ton ore bin near the shaft to the El 
Paso & Southwestern Railway, the buckets discharging loads direct into 50-ton 
ore cars. 

Recent production: 

Copper Lead Silver Gold Copper Per Lb. 

Lb. Lb. Oz. Oz. Cost Sold 

1919 2,111,841 4,477.228 22.4 22.2 

1918 9,081,959 2,420,690 233,925 2,061 14.635c. 25.66c. 

1917 11,935,317 2,010,145 154,344 1,542 13.242 28.317 

1916 18,161,763 3,413,445 314,718 4,721 8.71 23.18 

1915 11,154,211 2,345,342 201,869 3,151 (b)8.44 18.5 

1914 10,846,918 198,419 2,444 (b)8.47 14.13 

1913 13,219,756 236,000 2,033 7.22 

(b) Under curtailed production from Aug. 14 to Oct. 23 when shipments 

were discontinued, resumed in April, 1915. 

On Feb. 22, 1919, fire broke out between the 700' and 800' levels in the old 
workings and the mine was flooded to the 700' level to extinguish the fire; this 
was finished in May. As a result of this misfortune report for first quarter 1919, 
shows a deficit of $163,988. Output amounted to 1,000,844 Ib. copper, 678,914 Ib. 
lead, 160 oz. gold, and 44,129 oz. silver. 
WARREN REALTY & DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Property sold in 1917 to Phelps, Dodge & Co., and company liquidated. For 
description, see Vol. XII. 
WOLVERINE & ARIZONA MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Calumet, Mich. Marc Bailey, mine supt., Bisbee, Ariz. 

Officers: John Daniel, pres. ; Paul P. Roehm, v. p.; Edw. Ulseth, 2nd 
v. p. ; W. Frank James, treas. ; Chas. Chynoweth, sec., with Jos. Bosch, W. H. 
Brophy and Fred C. Smith, directors. 

Inc. March, 1905, in Arizona, as successor of Wolverine & Arizona De- 
velopment Co. Cap., $3.000,000: $15 par; issued 118,674 shares, par value 
$1,457.340, subject to assessment, and 21,792 shares, par value, $326,880, of full- 
paid stock. Levied 25-cent assessments March 19, 1906; Sept. 17, 1906; June 17, 
1907; Nov. 18, 1907. Annual meeting in April. 

Receipts for fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 1918, totaled $262,673, including 
$97,175 from 1917, and $162,004 ore sales; with total disbursements of $119,145, 
including $58,745 for mining and $29,699 for dividends. Cash on hand, Sept. 
30, 1918, $140,861. 

Dividends: 10 cts. per share, in Dec., 1914; 25 cts. per share, in Dec., 
1915; 25 cts. in 1918. 

Property: 9 claims, 152 acres, known as the Cairo. Memphis. Kentucky, 
Georgia, Louisiana, Chicago, Warren, George and Broken Promise. The Georgia 
claim lies 600' from lands of the Calumet & Arizona, and is about 3,000' from 
the Irish Mag shaft of that company, and from the Spray and Holbrook shafts 
of the Copper Queen. The Uncle Sam and White Tail Deer claims of the Copper 
Queen are adjacent to the Wolverine & Arizona. 

Development: claims lie along the high limestone ridge W. of Bisbee, 
extending westward to the open valley, and the first development was begun on 
the farthermost side of the group. The Broken Promise shaft, 700' deep, with 



190 ARIZONA 

3 compartments, cut mineralized limestone showing considerable, iron but no ore 
in commercial quantity. A drift on the 500' level, running 850' toward the Pitts- 
burg & Duluth group (Cal. & Ariz.) cut leached ore and ledge matter, carrying- 
traces of copper. Drifts running in other directions showed leached ore, but not 
in encouraging quantities, and work in this area was suspended, 1909. 

Exploratory work on the western claims proving disappointing, the east- 
ernmost claims were prospected in 1906 by diamond drill and a hole 410' deep 
passed into 50' of 4 to 10% oxidized copper ore near the Shattuck mine. This 
orebody being inaccessible from the Broken Promise shaft, the use of the Hig- 
gins tunnel was acquired and the ore opened up from the Bisbee side of the 
mountain. The tunnel was extended 310' to the Wolverine boundary and then 
southerly to intersect the orebody on the Wolverine ground. Orebody proved to 
be a replacement deposit of rich oxidized ore, lying within the limits of the 
Warren claim, about 2,700' from the tunnel portal. After working out the oxi- 
dized ore down to the Shattuck boundary, exploration upward was begun and 
a fine body of sulphide ore was developed in the footwall limestone above the 
oxidized zone. This was exhausted in 1918. 

A tunnel to explore the Shattuck fault, which crosses the property, has been 
put in. In year ending Sept. 30. 1918, work on Broken Promise claim, amounted 
to 1,769', including shaft sinking from 2nd to 4th level, at depth of 386'. Ore 
from this claim came from an orebody on southeast end line of claim ; develop- 
ments here look promising. Tonnage shipped during the year came from the 
Broken Promise, and Warren claims, and amounted to 10,597 tons of 6.19% ore. 

The mine has been a small but steady shipper of high-grade ore to the 
Douglas smelter, this ore paying all working expenses and building up a small 
surplus. It formerly averaged about 10% copper, but the sulphide ore is of 
lower grade. The mine has about 5,000' of workings and its orebodies connect 
downward with great stopes in the Shattuck mine, the deposit being the top of one 
of the ore-shoots of that property. The mine is connected underground with 
the Uncle Sam mine of the Copper Queen Co., as well as with the workings of 
the Shattuck mine. 

Equipment: includes a 250 h. p. steam plant, 2 single-drum hoists and 
a 6-drill air compressor, all at the Broken Promise shaft and all unused for 
several years. 

Production: 2,524 tons, netting $37,962 in 1910; 984 tons, netting $11,873 
in 1911; 762 tons, netting $12.861 in 1912. The output for fiscal year ending 
Sept. 30, 1915, yielded $130,370, or $17.13 per ton. In 1915-16 the output was 
1,193 tons, averaging $23.96 per ton, equal to $28,588, and in 1917-18, 10,597 tons, 
yielding $162,004. 

The property is excellently handled. 

COCONINO COUNTY 

KAIBAB COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Owners: Cyrus A. Phelps, John J. Kamm. Los Angeles, Calif. Mine 
address: Fredonia or Ryan, Coconino county, Ariz. 

Property: a copper mine on Buckhorn or Kaibab plateau, north of the 
Colorado river, about 154 miles from Lund. Utah, the nearest rail point. Freight 
is taken into Ryan by way of Hurricane, Utah. 

In July, 1919, company was remodeling its old mill, buildings, laying pipe- 
line, and preparing to start running. Regarded unfavorably. 
NORTHERN ARIZONA MNG & ELECTRIC POWER CO. ARIZONA 

Address. Prescott, or Supai, Ariz. 

Officers: W. I. Johnson, pres., with Geo. Brookshea, W. P. Burke, 
W. C. Miller and F. Blucher, directors. 

Inc. 1916. in Arizona. Cap., 1,000,000 shares; 50c par; pre-organization 
stock offered on the installment plan for 10 c. per share. 

Property: 5 claims, 100 acres, in Cataract Canyon district, Coconino 
county, said to show deposits of lead-silver ore, with some vanadium in lime- 
stone. 

Development: by tunnels, with total workings of 1.000'. 



U. S. PLATINUM CASTLE DOME 191 

Equipment: includes a 20-ton mill, to be enlarged, giving concentrate 
assaying 65% lead and 25 oz. silver per ton. 

Management claims the water-rights are worth $100,000, that 20,000 tons of 
lead-silver ore blocked out will net more than $100,000, and that $25,000 in 
vanadium ore has been opened up, all of which remains to be proved. 
UNITED STATES PLATINUM CO. ARIZONA 

A "war-baby," born in 1918, presumably died the same year. 

See Philadelphia North American, for August 22, 1918. 

Address: 1006 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Officers: Ralph H. Cameron, pres.; H. N. Williams, sec.-treas. 

Property: in the Grand Canyon of Arizona. The U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey in a Press Bulletin, issued in Jan., 1919, says : 

"From time to time the supposed presence of platinum ore in the Grand 
Canyon has received new advertisement, and recently stock in a company or- 
ganized to exploit the alleged deposits was offered for sale in an alluring pros- 
pectus wherein were published assays of the so-called ore that showed as much 
as 2.4 oz. of platinum to the ton. . . . The supposed platinum-bearing deposits 
are beds of green and red ferruginous sandstone that constitute a subordinate 
part of the geologic formation known as the Bright Angel shale, of Cambrian age." 

In 1911. F. L. Ransome of the U. S. Geological Survey, and, in 1915, H. G. 
Ferguson, of the Survey, examined claims near Indian Garden that were being held 
as platinum-bearing ground. In 1918. Mr. Ransome again examined the supposed 
platinum deposits. The Press Bulletin says, "As a result of these investigations 
it may be safely stated that the supposed platinum deposits in the Grand Canyon 
do not contain platinum certainly not enough to be of any value." 

The ground was also examined by John M. Boutwell, who stated that he 
made a geologic study and took 275 samples. As the result of careful duplicate 
and triplicate assays, special chemical work, and duplicate concentration tests, 
"platinum ore has not been found in the ground examined in form and grade 
of commercial value." 

The U. S. Platinum Co. should now apologize and disband. 

GILA COUNTY 

ASH CREEK GOLD MINING & MILLING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Winkelman, Ariz. 

Officers: E. W. Childs, pres.; J. H. Pool, v. p.-mgr. ; F. M. Pool, sec.- 
treas., with Dr. P. M. Butler and E. Rargel, directors, at last accounts. 

Inc. in Arizona. Cap., $1,000.000; $1 par; 150.000 shares outstanding 

Property: 10 claims, 200 acres, 5 miles E. of Winkelman, Gila Co., Ariz. 

Ore: occurs in fissure vein, 4' wide, in andesite, diorite and diabase, said 
to show a 30" shoot of sulphide ore, assaying 0.42 oz. gold and 2,. 13% copper. 

Development: by tunnels and shaft, totaling 600'. Property reported on 
by R. W. Hollis, Los Angeles, who recommended development at depth, and 
erection of a small mill. 

BISHOPS KNOLL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Main and mine office: Payson. Gila county, Ariz. 

Officers: E. B. Simanton, pres.; John McCormick, v. p.; Mrs. E. M. 
Simanton. sec.; A. J. Hammons, treas. 

Inc. 1917, in Arizona. Cap., $3,000.000: $1 par; 1,000,000 issued. 

Property: 50 unpatented claims. 1,000 acres. 15 miles south of Payson. 
Ore said to contain copper sulphides, gold and silver in quartz veins occurring 
in porphyry and diabase; dip 45. 

Company is developing and prospecting the property. 
CASTLE DOME DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Address: 100 Broadway. New York City. 

Officers: Mulford Martin, pres.; Garrett Mott. v. p.; E. C. Curnen. sec.- 
treas., with H. A. Tingley, John Kasser, S. D. Wright and L. B. Pearson, directors. 
T. R. Drummond, gen. mgr. ; J. E. Owen, supt. 

Inc: in Maine. Cap., 600,000 shares, $5 par. 



192 ARIZONA 

Property: 34 unpatented claims, in Castle Dome group; owns 97% of 
the outstanding capital and has bond and lease on the Inspiration Extension 
Copper Co. (which see) ; also owns four adjacent claims, located five miles west 
of the Inspiration Cons. Copper Co., Miami, Gila county. 

Development: by a tunnel and by churn-drills reported to show a dia- 
base intrusion 10' wide in porphyry, course N. 50 E., dip 18. Company has 
developed a substantial deposit of copper ore on its main property. Ore runs 
from 1 to 3^2% copper, with some gold and silver. Further prospecting with 
churn-drills under way. 
CHOLLA COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned unclaimed, March, 1919, from former office : Winkelman, Ariz. 

Officers: E. R. Rice, J. F. Shaw, D. R. Williamson, R. J. Rice and A. 
Williamson. 

Inc. Jan., 1917, in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000; shares $1 par. 

Property: Henry Owen group of 12 claims, about 18 miles from Haydcn. 
Values are in copper and gold. 
COPPER EXPLORATION CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 8 West 40th St., New York City. 

Officers: David K. Jeffries, pres.; Geo. B. Leighton, 1st v. p.; Chas. E. 
Finney, 2nd v. p. ; J. M. Simonton, sec. ; Jacob Schafer, treas. David K. Jeffries, 
Geo. B. Leighton, C. E. Finney, J. H. Banks, P. G. Cogan, H. D. Critchfield, Wm. 
L. Detmore, Edward L. Hearn, J. S. Jenkins, R. P. Marshall, Wm. L. Martin, 
Geo. F. Shurtleff, directors. Transfer agents, Security Transfer & Registry Co., 
N. Y. Registrars, Metropolitan Trust Co., N. Y. Annual meeting, first Monday 
in August. 

Inc. 1918, in Delaware. Cap. $1,000,000 cum. 8% pfd.;~$ 1,000,000 com. 
shares, $10 par; outstanding $398,340 pfd., and $1,000,000 common. 

According to the company statements, the aim is "to purchase an interest 
in a (mining) corporation, to hold that interest during the period of development, 
and later to sell with a view to using the money to assist in the development of 
some other enterprise." 

Property: holds stock interests in several mining companies including' 
London-Arizona, Cons. Copper Co., Ball Copper Co., London Range, Owl Copper 
Co., 100,000 shares Canario Copper Co. ; 100,000 shares, Cia Cobre Mexicana, 
S. A., equal to 80%. 

This is evidently a scrambling of various Cameron Michel and outside corpo- 
rations in which several companies that have failed to make good, are combined 
with others whose properties show more promise of becoming producing mines. 
COPPER STATE MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 936 Plymouth Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Officers: Martin E. Tew, pres.; John A. Nelson 1st v. p.; E. E. Mc- 
Carthy, 2nd v. p.-treas. ; S. H. Hudson, sec., with Otto Hanson, A. M. Anderson 
and Walter De La Hunt, directors. 

W. C. Steubing, mgr. ; Geo. S. Croyle, supt. and electrician; Gilbert O. Tew, 
store mngr. Mine address : Copper Creek, Ariz. 

Inc. 1915 in Ariz., as a successor to the Calumet & Copper Creek Mining 
Co., the Old Reliable Copper Co., the Copper Creek Mining Co. and other com- 
panies. Cap., $7,500,000; $2,000,000 issued. All stock certificates held in 
trust under a pooling agreement until the financing of the company has been 
completed. 

The president, Mr. Tew, informs us that "all stock is still pooled. No officer 
or director receives salary or cash commission and all the money raised in 1918-19 
has come from business men who have visited the property. The manager is 
trained both technically and by experience." 

Company is controlled (51%) by Chemical Copper Recovery Co. The loss 
of company's quasi-title to the Sombrero Butte property by adverse decision of 
the Court, ends that controversy, but does not affect the principal holdings of 
the company on Copper Creek. 

Property: 55 claims, unpatented, including 100 acres mill and smelter- 
sites, and 100 acres miscellaneous lands; also 28 patented claims under option, 



COPPER STATE MINING 193 

making total area 1,500 acres in the Copper Creek, or Bunker Hill district, 
Graham and Final counties, Ariz. Properties are in the Copper Creek basin, on 
the western slope of the Galiuro Mountains, 31 miles S. E. of Winkelman and 
Hayden, on the Arizona Eastern R. R. Claims include the Sycamore Flat, Cum- 
berland, Sioux Chief, Silver Reef, American Eagle, Copper Giant and Old 
Reliable groups. 

Geology: country rock in lower basin is diorite, with porphyry intrusion, 
showing a large -number of orebodies, there being several different breccias and 
oxidized zones carrying mineral, orebodies usually being elliptical, but sometimes 
occurring in chimneys. Outcrops, of which there are more than 50, are promi- 
nent. Oxidized ores, including chrysocolla, are found at and near the surface, 
sometimes in commercial quantities, giving place, at shallow depth, to sulphides, 
chalcopyrite, bornite and chalcocite, associated with pyrite, in altered and brec- 
.ciated diorite, some native copper showing in flakes and grains along shear zones. 
Company reports that one orebody 300' wide and 420' long has been developed to 
342' depth, in a porphyry breccia. 

Development: the Old Reliable mine has an orebody with the second 
largest outcrop in the district, same having a sectional area of 147,000 square feet, 
or about 3*/2 acres. Development is by an 800' upper tunnel, with back of 775' 
and 13 crosscuts ; a 258' shaft from the surface to the tunnel ; and a lower tunnel 
800', with about 3,800' of workings, and 2 connecting winzes, estimated by man- 
ager to show 250,000 tons of 3% ore on each level. Most of the work at this 
property has been done on the Old Reliable. 

The American Eagle group has 3 prospect tunnels, a 1,025' working tunnel, 
and a 300' three-compartment shaft, with about 3,500' of workings, showing 
oxidized ores at surface, with an orebody reported to be developed for about 
50x100'. This mine is estimated by company to have developed about 60,000 
tons of ore, averaging 3.78% copper and 8 oz. silver, with a trace of gold. 

The Prince mine, under option, is developed by a 300' shaft and drifts on 
3 levels. Company claims 300,000 tons of ore averaging 3.56% copper in this 
mine. On the Globe mine a shaft has been sunk 650' and 100,000 tons of 3.08% 
ore are said to be blocked out on the 150', 250' and 450' levels. The Copper Giant 
mine, said to have an outcrop of nearly 4 acres, has a 200' shaft connecting at 
depth of 124' with a tunnel from which 2 drifts several hundred feet in length 
have been driven into the ore breccia. In the Silver Reef, Kimbro, Lead Car- 
bonate, Cumberland, Velasquez, and several other claims belonging to the com- 
pany, copper ore has been exposed by short tunnels and shallow shafts. Hand- 
sorted ore from these workings has been shipped to smelters, giving returns of 
12% to 30% 'copper and $5.50 to $27 gold and silver per ton. 

Equipment: electric hoist, compressors, drills, smithy, machine-shop, 
etc. A 150-ton concentrating mill was built several years ago. Power plant 
consists of two 100 h. p. boilers, a 200 h. p. engine, a 160 k. w. 2,300-v. dynamo. 
A 3-phase transmission line, 4 miles long, supported by steel towers, connects 
power plant with mill and 3 of the mines. Water supply system includes 5 miles 
of 2}/ 2 " pipe, and a concrete dam 26H' high and 131' across the canyon, creating 
a reservoir holding 8,000,000 gal. of water. Company also owns and operates a 
2^2-mile narrow gauge railroad, connecting the Old Reliable mine with the mill, 
equipped with 18-ton Porter locomotive and 8 cars ; a 31-mile telephone line 
connecting the mine with Mammoth, Winkelman and Hayden, and a store, used 
as a commissary and office building. Other improvements are assay office, ice- 
making plant and 25 buildings for employees. Additional eqi^ment installed 
1917, includes a 285 h. p. Diesel engine with direct-connected generator, a 5-drill 
air compressor, a 5x6' Marcy ball-mill and Callow flotation cells. 

Production: by former owners in 1914 was 8,400 tons of ore, making 758 
tons of concentrates averaging 28.26% copper, or a total of 428,421 Ib. copper. 
Production from Nov., 1916, to Jan. 1, 1918, was 746 tons of concentrates, aver- 
aging 24% copper, from ore extracted in development work. The total output 
has been 8,000 tons of 3% and 12,000 tons of 1.75 to 2.5% ore, yielding 650,000 Ib. 
of copper, equal to 1.6% recovered. This product was hauled 31 miles by wagon, 
and then 400 miles by rail. 




196 ARIZONA 

sedimentary series has been distorted, faulted and intruded by a series of quartz 
porphyry and rhyolite porphyry dikes. Ore is gold and copper bearing and 
occurs as flat lenses or beds, replacing limestone and shale mainly along a bedding 
plane, but also as veins along contacts of quartz porphyry dikes and in places 
along fissures in limestone near dikes. The usual ore is gold-bearing, next in 
importance being copper-lead-silver ore. 

Development: by 12 tunnels, from 40 to 350' long, and 6 shafts from 10 
to 35' deep, on the Apex claims. No. 3 is in 320' and is said to have opened ore 
250' long and 60' at the widest point. Forty samples averaged about 1 oz. gold, 2 
to 10 oz. silver, and 7 to 35% lead. Above No. 3 tunnel is a 100' raise and below 
it a 200' winze. Ore reserves given as 500,000 tons. Shipments to El Paso said to 
yield about $50 per ton. Plan erection of second 50-ton unit to be added to the 
dry concentration mill. 

Property seems to have merit and the promotion to be conservatively handled. 
LONDON-ARIZONA CONSOLIDATED COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Option for control of company held by Copper Exploration Co., which see. 

Office: 1005 Title Insurance Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. Mine office, 
Chilito, Gila Co., Ariz. 

Officers: Chas. E. Finney, pres.; F. B. Pugh, v. p.; Edw. W. Brooks, 
v. p. ; Robert J. Simpson, sec.-treas., with B. P. Cheney, D. C. Kurtz and S. F. 
Parrish, directors. Edward W. Brooks, cons, erigr. and geologist. Harry Scott, 
supt. 

Inc. Sept. 18, 1913, in Maine, as a merger of the London Arizona Cop- 
per Co., London' Range, London Shamrock and Ball Copper companies. Cap., 
$12,000,000; $5 par; 920,500 shares outstanding. Bonds: $253,000 6% out- 
standing. Commercial Trust & Savings Bank, Los Angeles, trustee. U. S. 
Corporation Co., 65 Cedar St., N. Y., registrar. Annual meeting first Tuesday 
in October. Company says funds for necessary equipment and development 
work have been arranged for with Copper Exploration Co., a Cameron Michel 
& Co. organization. 

Property: 132 claims, 2,100 acres, in the Banner mining district (Ray 
quadrangle), 5 miles N. of Hayden. Claims form a compact group covering an 
extensive, well-mineralized area. 

Geology: the tract shows a series of 1,500' of well-bedded limestone, 
quartzite and shales resting on a laccolithic mass of diabase ; these rocks are 
broken, faulted and later intruded by dikes and sheets of diorite porphyry, 
presumably the offshoots of an underlying batholithic mass of granite material. 
The ore occurs in contact metamorphic deposits and replacements, especially in 
the limestone. Much of the ore consists of garnet (andradite, the lime and iron 
species) intergrown with specular hematite copper sulphides and a variety of 
iron-magnesian lime silicate minerals. The copper ore occurs largely in "blanket" 
deposits, but also in fissures and vertical contacts. The main ore outcrop is 10 
to 30' wide and about three-fourths of a mile long, lying between beds of lime- 
stone and quartzite. 

Silver-lead ores do not occur in the contact deposits, but are found in lime- 
stone along the dike contacts where contact alteration is not noticeable. 

Development: includes the 300' Curtain and 182' Arizona shafts devel- 
oping the copper and the 90' O'Carroll shaft developing the silver-lead deposits. 
Total development aggregates 11,000'. The O'Carroll ore bed has been opened 
by 60 shallow tunnels, covering a distance of 2,000' along the outcrop, and man- 
agement states ore has been extracted from practically all of them, sulphide ore 
having been encountered in four. 

Production: to date from development, 15,443 tons copper ore, 1.016 
tons lead ore, 51 tons zinc ore, 14,437 oz. silver. 

The ores are shipped to the Hayden plant of the A. S. & R. Co. 
LONDON-ARIZONA COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: 1005 Title Insurance Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Officers: Chas. E. Finney, pres.; F. B. Pugh. v. p.; Robt. T. Simpson, 
sec.-treas.. with Edward W. Brooks, D. C. Kurtz, S. F. Parrish, R. E. Sloan, 
B. P. Cheney directors 



MAZATZAL MINING MOUNT AIN CONS. 197 

Inc. 1907, in Arizona. Cap. $10,000,000; $10 par; 592.260 outstanding. 
^ September, 1913, the company transferred title to its property to the London- 
Arizona Cons. Copper Co. for 753,045 shares of stock of the London-Arizona 
Cons. Copper Co., which it now holds in its treasury. For description of prop- 
erty see London-Arizona Cons. Copper Co., also Volume XI. 

MAZATZAL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Globe, Ariz. 

Officers. W. C. Stanley, pres. ; A. J. Crossley, sec.-treas., with G. B. 
Peart and W. Thomas, directors ; R. H. Bradley, mgr. 

Inc. Jan. 25, 1917, in Arizona. Cap., $3,000,000; $1 par; 1,029,000 issued. 

Property: 65 unpatented claims, 1.300 acres in Mazatzal district. Gila 
county, said to show gold-silver-copper deposits in granite, schist and porphyry. 
Veins dip 70 N. E., and pitch N. W. Ore is both oxide and sulphide. 

Development: by 1,000' tunnel, in which 3 fissure veins were cut vary- 
ing from 1 to 3' in width, and showing copper ore assaying from $4 to $125 per 
ton. Plan sinking 500' shaft. Reserves reported to be fairly large. 

McMILLEN-STONEWALL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: Globe, Gila county, Ariz. V. Y. Smith, pres. -gen. mgr.; C. N. 
Lightle, sec.-treas. 

Inc. March 27, 1907, in Arizona. Cap., $1,000,000; shares $1 par. 

Property: 34 claims, in the Richmond basin, 16 miles N. E. of Globe, Gila 
county, carry 3 miles of the strike of the Stonewall Jackson vein, of 25 to 35' 
average width. 

Property: includes the Stonewall Jackson mine, worked 1876-83, with 
an estimated production of about $500,000 of silver ore, of high average grade. 

Development: by the 300' three-compartment McMillen shaft and the 
old 600' Stonewall Jackson shaft, latter showing no stoping done below 230'. 
The mine is said to have considerable ore carrying 5 to 50 oz. silver per ton, 
with about 40,000 tons of discarded silver ore on the old dumps. 

Equipment: includes an old stamp mill and a small cyanide plant. A 
full and favorable report on the property was made May, 1912, by R. B. Wagner. 

In 1914, property was bonded to G. H. Hayes and explored by diamond- 
drilling, which proved unsatisfactory owing to the broken nature of the ground. 
No recent reports, mail unanswered. Probably idle. 
MINE OPERATORS CO. OF AMERICA ARIZONA 

Address: Wm. D. Steadman, Miami, Ariz. 

Incorporators: W. D. Steadman. W. J. Scott, of Miami, Ed. Arhelger, J. 
Cubitto, J. H. Mayer, F. W. Rolando of Globe, Ariz. 

Inc. 1918 in Arizona. Cap., $3,750,000; $5 par. 

Property: low-grade copper-manganese mine near the Independence, 
Bellevue. 

A prospecf. Company regarded with disfavor. 
MOUNTAIN CONSOLIDATED MINING & MILLING CO. ARIZ. 

Letters returned unclaimed, 1919, addressed to Box 1899, Globe, Ariz., and 
G. B. Reed, Payson, Ariz. 

Officers: G. B. Reed, pres.; J. W. Reed, v. p.; W. B. Haynie, sec.; A. T. 
Hammons, treas., with W. H. Shenk, A. C. McKillop and J. Nugent, directors. 

Inc. March 22, 1917, in Arizona. Cap., $3,000,000; $1 par; 1,285,000 
issued. 

Property: 66 claims, 1,260 acres, in Payson and Brown's districts, Gila 
county, said to show gold-silver-copper-lead-vanadium quartz veins in schist, 
slate and diorite. Ore occurs as veinlets. Copper minerals are sulphides. 

Development: by 214' shaft and 270' tunnel. Estimated reserves are 
36,200 tons, but as only 98 feet of lateral work had been done to June, 1917, this 
amount must include probable ore based largely on outcrops. The Black Rattler 
claims in the Brown district are reported to have a silver-copper vein 10,500' 
long and from 40 to 100' wide, in a slate-schist contact, which outcrops from 50 
to 75' above the surrounding country. Presumably idle. 



198 ARIZONA 

OVERLAND MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Mine near Winkelman, Ariz., adjoins the London Range mine of the London 
Arizona Copper Co. and "79" mine on the south and west. Claims said to carry 
an extension of the main dike system of the London range, showing metamorphic 
contact orebodies. Hayden Junction is the nearest railway point. Mine reported 
under lease to M. H. Murphy and W. E. Dunlap, of Kingman, in 1915. 

No recent returns. 
POWERS GULCH DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Idle. John Matson, supt., at last accounts. 

Property: 23 claims in Powers gulch near Globe, Gila county, is said 
to show a vein carrying bornite and chalcopyrite ore associated with pyrite. 
Mine idle for a long time, was reopened in 1915 and a strike of tungsten ore 
reported in April, 1916. 

Development: by 2 shallow shafts and 2 short tunnels. 

RAY CENTRAL COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Formerly the Finney Copper Co. 

Address: Box 488, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Officers: E. O. Petro, pres.; A. G. Dulmage, v. p.; H. T. Weldon, sec.- 
treas.-mgr., with W. O. Temple, directors. 

Inc. May 20, 1916. Cap., $150,000; lOc par; 700,000 outstanding. Annual 
meeting first Tuesday in May. 

Property: 13 claims, 260 acres in Banner mining district, Gila county, 
said to show gold-silver-copper ore in a contact deposit in diabase and lime. 

Development: by 165' shaft; and drift on the lowest, or 165' level. A 
prospect. Probably idle. 

SILVER BUTTES MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Address: C. P. Crawford, 121 South Central Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. 

Inc. in Arizona. Cap., $1,200,000; shares $1 par; 503,839 issued. 

Property. 12 claims in Mazatzal mountains, Gila county. Geological 
conditions are said to be similar to those of Jerome. According to a report by 
A. F. Muter, there are two vein systems in diorite, really fault fissures con- 
taining ore, especially at junctions of the two. All ore near the surface shows 
intense leaching. An incline shaft was recommended on the N.-S. vein, which 
can be traced on surface for 3,000'. The Butte vein, 2 to 7' wide, is said to 
contain from 25 to 300 oz. silver per ton, $2 to $15 gold, and 2 to 12% copper. 
Some rich ore has been shipped. 

In Sept., 1917, work was reported resumed. No recent report, presumably 
idle. 
SOMBRERO DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Houghton National Bank Bldg., Houghton, Mich. Mine office: 
Globe, Gila Co., Ariz. Dr. Lucius L. Hubbard, gen. mgr. Company is a syndi- 
cate, not incorporated. 

Property: on Cherry creek, west of Sombrero Butte, and about 50 miles 
north of Globe, is slightly prospected by adits. The mine has a small water- 
driven plant. Inactive. 

SOUTHWESTERN LEASING & DEVELOPMENT CO. ARIZONA 

Care of Henry Snell, Globe, Ariz. Company inactive. 
WARRIOR COPPER CO. ARIZONA 

Office: Brown Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. Mine office: Black Warrior, 
Gila Co., Ariz. 

Officers: Spencer D. Wright, pres.; Philip Godley, v. p.; Geo. H. 
Buchanan, treas. ; D. H. Paris, sec., with Ernest L. Tushin, H. B. Hopper, J. K. 
Kane, W. W. Doughten, T. A. Blythe, C. Gallagher, G. B. Walker and Thos. 
D. Martindale, directors. 

Inc. March 10, 1905, in Delaware, as successor of Black Warrior Copper 
Co., Amalgamated, which came to grief. Cap., $1,600,000; shares $10 par; 
in $750,000 cumulative 7% preferred stock and $850,000 common stock. 

Property: 50 claims, 46 patented, about 800 acres, including the Black 
Warrior group and the Lost Gulch group, near the Inspiration mine. The 



ARIZONA BONANZA ARIZONA COMMERCIAL 199 

principal property is the Black Warrior mine, a producer since 1904, located about 
7 miles N. W. of Globe. 

Geology: the Black Warrior property shows slightly altered schist, 
dacite tuff, diabase, and conglomerate, the greater part of the area being covered 
by schist, which is the oldest formation. The diabase occurs as intrusive dikes, 
and the dacite is a surface How over both schist and diabase. The Black 
Warrior vein is a fault zone 30 to 60' wide, filled with crushed mineralized 
dacite for about 300', with a breccia of schist and some diabase below. The 
vein has a generally E.-W. trend, and W. pitch. The ore averages about 50 to 
60' in width, though a width of 100' is known at a number of 'points. This 
property includes the Montgomery group, with the Montgomery and Dadeville 
claims, developed by tunnels of about 1,000' and 1,200' length, developing exten- 
sive bodies of copper silicates and hydrated copper oxides of excellent average 
value. 

The Lost Gulch claims show a highly altered monzonite-porphyry covering 
the larger part of the area, with extensive outcrops of dacite and limestone and* 
smaller ones of diabase, general geological conditions being much the same as at 
the Black Warrior. 

Development: the Black Warrior mine is developed by the Winnie 
shaft, 500' from the western boundary, and tunnels of about 1,000' and 1,200' 
length, opening the mine to a depth of 300', with 5 levels spaced at 50' intervals. 
The mine has yielded a large tonnage of high-grade ore, giving assays of 6 to 
25% copper, between the 200' and 300' levels. Considerable churn drilling was 
done, 1910-11, 1 hole in the vicinity of the Winnie shaft being sunk 506' in schist, 
showing mineralization, and a 580' drill hole proved the existence of chalcopyrite, 
disseminated in schist, though not of commercial value. The western portion of 
the property was tested without favorable results by churn drill, May, 1911. 

Equipment: includes a steam plant, burning petroleum. Buildings in- 
clude an assay office, engineering office, smithy, carpenter shop, several dwellings, 
and a 300-ton shipping bin. No further disclosures are available. 

MIAMI-GLOBE DISTRICT, GIL A COUNTY 

ARIZONA BONANZA MINING & MILLING CO. ARIZONA 

Mail returned unclaimed, March, 1919, from former address: Miami, Ariz. 

Property: 10 claims. 5 miles N. E. of the Inspiration Consolidated, only 
slightly developed and said to carry ore assaying from 5-30% copper and $6 gold 
per ton. Company sold stock at 25c. per share to provide development funds in 
1917. 
ARIZONA-BUTTE CORPORATION. ARIZONA 

Address: Columbia National Bank Bldg\, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Officers: Wm. Schafer, pres. ; E. R. Schafer, v. p.; Wm. Perry, sec.- 
treas., with C. S. Jamison, Jas M. Rae, A. C. Held, Jr., and j. H. Faught, 
directors. 

Inc. April. 1917. Cap., $1,000,000; $1 par. National Security Co., New 
York, transfer office. 

Property: 15 claims, 300 acres, 8 miles west of Miami and 4 miles from 
the R. R., said to show numerous veins in granite, with pyrite, chalcopyrite, and 
bornite. Veins said to average about 5' in width. 

Development: one vein has a 600' tunnel with a 240' winze here the 
vein is said to be 23' wide and 700' lower is a tunnel 1,700' long which was 
expected ^to cut the vein within the next 100'. 

Equipment: includes a 100-ton concentrator, which will need remodel- 
ing before being able to treat the several thousand tons of medium grade ore 
that the management claims is opened up 
ARIZONA COMMERCIAL MINING CO. ARIZONA 

Offices: 50 Congress St., Boston, Mass., and 188 Middle St., Portland, 
Me. Mine at Globe, Gila Co., Ariz. 

Officers: Chas. S. Smith, pres.: Harry M. Stonemetz, v. p.; C. H. Alt- 
miller, treas., with E. S. Goulston, G. T. Rice, Chas. Sumner Cook, clerk, and 
Wm. E. Chandler, directors ; Robert R. Boyd, supt. 



200 



ARIZONA 




Inc. April 4, 1912, in Maine. Cap., $1,500,000; $5 par; 265.000 issued. 
Listed on Boston Stock Exchange. Annual meeting second Wednesday in April. 
Company is successor of the Arizona Commercial C. Co., bondholders of the 
old company receiving 70 shares of new stock for each $500 bond held and 
the stockholders being privileged to subscribe, share for share, for fully-paid 
stock in the new company upon payment of $3 per share. 

Accounts for year ending Dec. 31, 1917, showed cash and loans on hand, 
$398,051; supplies, $42,450; accounts receivable, $135,154; and accounts payable, 
$79,722. Net earnings were $464,750 in 1917. Balance surplus, Dec., 1917, 
$2,713,563. In 1918, the revenue was $862,307; operating expenses, $560,784; 
dividends of $530,000, and depreciation and depletion, $188,277. Current assets 
were $785.796, and liabilities. $577,971. 




PROPERTIES AT GLOBE, ARIZONA 

Dividends: initial of 50c per share was paid Oct. 31, 1916; similar pay- 
ments were made each quarter from April, 1917, to