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Mines statement 

New Zealand. Mines Dept 



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APRtgn 

NKW ZEALAND. ■■• 



PAPERS AND REPORTS 



RELATING TO 



MINERALS AND MINING 



COMPRISING 



STATEMENT BY THE MINISTEK OF MINES. 
REPORT ON THE GOLDFIELDS. 
REPORT ON COAL-MINES. 
STATE COAL-MINES. 




WELLINGTON. 

BY AUTHORITY: JOHN MACKAY, GOVERNMENT PRINTER. 

1905. 



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1906. 
NEW ZEALAND. 



MINES STATEMENT 

BY THE HON. JAMES McGOWAN, MINI8TBR OP MINES. 



Mr. Speaker, — 

In presenting my annual Statement to Parliament I have to record a falling- 
off as regards the production of precious metals and kauri-gum during the year 
1904, as compared with the previous year (1903), when the production of gold was 
greater than it had ever been since 1871, the highest recorded export of gold from the 
colony being made in that year. It is, however, worthy of note that the gold-export 
for 1904 exceeded that of 1902 by upwards of £36,000 and had not the condition of 
the rivers in Otago militated against gold-dredging being conducted to the best ad- 
vantage, the production of gold for last year would undoubtedly have been greater. 

The output of coal and other minerals has increased. The increase in the case 
of coal is very considerable, and, as will be seen in the remarks dealing with the 
coal-mining industry, is actually more than double as compared with the increase 
recorded for the year previous. 

MINERAL PRODUCTION. 

The annexed Table No. 1 shows the quantity and value of gold, silver, and 
other minerals (including kauri-gum) exported during the year ending the 31st 
December, 1904, and also the quantity of native coal consumed in the colony during 
the same period. The amount of gold entered for export was 520,323 oz., valued 
at £1,987,501, and of silver, 1,094,461 oz., valued at £112,875, making a total value 
of gold and silvef amounting to £2,100,376, this being a decrease of £28,952 as com- 
pared with the export returns for the previous year. 

Other minerals, including coal, lignite, and kauri-gum, represent a valuejf'of 
£1,338,858, or a decrease of £62,468 as compared with that of the previous year, g 

The quantities and values of the chief mineral products for thejpast two years 
are summarised for comparison as follow : — 

Year ending Slat December, 1904. Year ending Slat Deoember, 1908. 



Product. 


Quantity. 


Valne. 
1,987,601 


QuMitity. 


Valoe. 
2,037,831 


Gold 


520,828 oz. 


533,314 oz. 


Silver 


1,094,461 „ 


112,876 


911,914 , 


91,497 


Copper-ore 


< . < 


«.. 


6 tons 


123 


Manganese-ore 


196 tons 


670 


70 . 


210 


Mixed minerals 


1.404 „ 


10,168 


626 „ 


7.014 


Colonial coal exported, includ- 










ing that used by Home 










steamers 


165.220 . 


189,898 


162,332 , 


128,927 


Haematite... 


7 „ 


96 


... 


1 


Colonial coal consumed in New 










Zealand 


1.372.618 „ 


686,309 


1,267,861 „ 


638,931 


Kauri-gum 


9,203 „ 


601,817 


9,367 . 


631,102 


Shale (treated in New Zealand) 


ralue of production 


for 1903 ... 


36 , 


18 


Total ^ 


£3,630,654 




1904 ... 
Total decrease ... 


... ... 


3.439,284 




£91.420 



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The total value of gold, silver, coal, and other minerals (including kauri-gum), 
produced up to the 31st December, 1904, was £89,262,474. 

From the following table (which is compiled from returns by the Customs) 
it will be seen that for the six months ending the 30th June, 1905, there is a decrease 
in the value of gold and silver exported as compared with the corresponding period 
of the previous year. 



CoMPABATiVE STATEMENT of GoLD and SiLVBR entered for Export during the First Half of the 

Years 1904 and 1905. 




Half-vear ending 80th June, 
1904. 


Half-year ending SOtb June, 
1905. 


DiffeienM for First Half of 
1906. 




Quantity Valae. 


Quantity. Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Gold 
Silver ... 


Oz. 
267,305 
622,335 


£ 
1.024,082 
64,149 


Oz. 
260,617 
537,310 


1,011,323 16,688 
65,418 14,976 


12,769 
1,269 




789,640 


1,078,231 787,927 


1.066,741 


Decreased value £11,490 



GOLD EXPORT. 
The quantity of gold entered for exportation through the Customs for the year 
1904 was as follows : Auckland, 223,010 oz. ; Marlborough, 473 oz. ; Nelson, 5,049 oz.; 
West Coast, 122,310 oz. ; Otago and Southland, 169,478 oz. : total, 520,320 oz., 
valued at £1,987,501. 

GOLD-MINING. 

Quartz. 

The winning of gold from quartz reefs is carried on in various parts of the colony, 
the chief centres of this branch of the mining industry being the Ohinemuri, Thames, 
and Coromandel Counties in the North Island, and the Inangahua County in the 
Middle Island. 

Taking the Northern Goldfields, it may be said that the production of gold 
is greatest in the Ohinemuri County, in which the extensive mines of the Waihi 
Gold-mining Company, as well as those of other companies at Karangahake and 
Komata are situated. The output from the Waihi Gold-mining Company's mines 
for the year 1904 was 259,978 tons of quartz, from which bullion to the value of 
£673,101 18s. 4d. was obtained. The severa^ mills are provided with modern plant for 
the extraction of gold and silver from the ore, the actual crushing-power being 330 
heads of stamps. Over 1,200 persons are employed, and dividends amoimting to 
£297,544 4s. were paid during the year. It is very satisfactory to note that the ore- 
bodies continue to maintain their characteristic sizes at the lowest levels yet sunk to, 
and give promise of yielding a very large output for several years to come. At the 
adjoining property of the Waihi Grand Jimction Gold-mining Company preparations 
are being made for the output and treatment of quartz, a modem mill comprising a 
forty-stamp battery with cyanide plant being in course of erection. This is an indica- 
tion that in the near future an increase in the amount of bullion produced at Waihi may 
be looked for. Active work has also been in progress during the year with a view to 
proving the continuation of the reef-system beyond the Waihi Grand Junction Com- 
pany's holding, and also for the purpose of testing the ground near Waihi Beach. 
For the purpose of treating accumulations of tailings in the bed of the Ohinemuri 
River, a plant has been erected near Waihi. For some time operations were neces- 
sarily of an experimental character, and have, it is understood, been so satisfactory 
as to warrant the extension of the present plant, and the proposal to erect one of much 
larger capacity lower down the river. 

Mining at Karangahake is now. carried on by the New Zealand Crown Mines 
(Limitod) and the Talisman Consolidated (Limited), the latter company having 
taken over the Woodstock Mine at which active operations by the former proprietary 
ceased early last year. The acquisition of the Woodstock property will facilitate 
very materially the working of the Talisman Mine at lower levels. Some 430 persons 
are employed by the two companies named, and bullion to the value of £137,468 
was obtained during the year 



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At Waitekauri only a limited amount of productive mining wae dore during the 
year, about forty persons being employed in all classes of work on lihe sev< ral pro- 
perties in this locality. 

Prospecting on the Waitekauri Gold-mining CJompany's property has not resulted 
in any fresh discoveries being made. 

The Komata reefs — ^which give employment to one hundred persons — have 
been successfully worked, and good dividends earned. 

Mr. Hardy's mines at Waiorongomai, near Te Aroh?^, Piako Coimty, have been 
taken over by a company. For a considerable portion of the year the properties 
were non-productive in consequence of alterations to, and extensions of, the plant 
being carried out. 

Iji the Thames CJounty the principal new work has been at the Golden Belt Mine, 
Neavesville, where a low-level adit was in course of driving during the year, and a 
battery of forty heads of stamps with cyanide plant was also being erected. The 
Tairua- Broken Hills Mine has not maintained the steady output which characterised 
previous operations, the output and relative value of the ore having decreased. 
During the latter part of the year work was commenced with a view to opening up 
the mine at a lower level. With the exception of the discovery (made near the end 
of 1904) of some good gold-bearing stone at the Waiotahi Mine, there is little change 
to note as regards the industry at the Lower Thames. Mining is being carried out 
at a number of properties, none of which are worked on a large scale. Boring opera- 
tions, which were conducted with the object of prospecting at greater depth than 
has been reached by any of the shafts hitherto sunk, have not given the satisfaction 
which was anticipated. This was owing in a great measure to a succession of mishaps, 
and the question of the existence or otherwise of payable reefs at considerable depth 
has yet to be settled. Shaft-sinking and extensive crosscutting will, in all probability, 
be necessary to effect this. 

The pumping plant at the Queen of Beauty shaft, Thames, which was in the 
first instance subsidised and finally secured by the Government, was, after standing 
for a period of some three years, overhauled and put to a working test under the direc- 
tion of the Inspecting Engineer to the Mines Department in October last. Sub- 
sequently an arrangement was entered into with the Thames Drainage Board for the 
working of this plant for the drainage of the field hitherto effected by the old Big 
Pump. 

Mining in the Coromandel County during the year 1904 was much the same 
as during the preceding year ; work was conducted on a comparatively small scale 
at a number of claims, the Royal Oak of Hauraki Mine, at Tokatea, employing the 
largest number of persons. A somewhat serious drawback to the mining industry 
exists in connection with the drainage of mines near the lower township, work at 
levels below that at which natural drainage can be effected having been suspended 
in consequence of owners of adjacent properties failing to agree as to the proportionate 
costs of pumping which each should bear. It has been suggested that a consoli- 
dation of interests would probably afford the most practical solution of the difl&culty, 
and enable the mines to be worked more economically. A proposal has been made 
to the Department relative to prospecting the Tokatea Big Reef, and a subsidy 
at the rate of pound for pound up to £300 promised for this purpose. At Kuaotunu 
the Waitaia Mine is the principal producer. Other properties in the locality are 
also worked, but only on a very small scale. Two small mines are also worked in 
the neighbourhood of Gumtown. 

In the Middle Island quartz-mining has been successfully carried on in the 
West Coast Inspection District. In the neighbourhood of Reefton (Inangahua 
County) gold to the value of over £200,000 has been won during the year by 
the registered companies operating in the locality. Mining is also carried on by 
private parties in various places in the County, the mines being mostly on a small 
scale. In Buller County quartz -mines are being worked near Lyell and Westport. 
also at Taitapu (Collingwood County). 

Some attention has recently been directed to the quartz reefs near the head of 
the Wilberforce River on the dividing-range between Canterbury and Westland, 
and, although the disco ery of a reef of considerable size has been reported, there 
is^not as yet sufficient information available to warrant any statement as to the 
probable extent of this hitherto unworked field. 



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In Marlborough the only work done during the year so far as quartz-mining 
is concerned was at Top Valley, near Blenheim, operations being practically con- 
fined to the driving of a low-level tunnel to enable the lodes to be worked to greater 
advantage. 

The Otago Mining District is more largely productive of alluvial gold than 
that won from reef-raining, but gold is obtained from the working of quartz reefs 
in the Nenthom, Barewood, and Wakatipu sub-districts, although none of the 
mines are at present conducted on a large scale. There appears little doubt that 
the existing facilities for working auriferous alluvial deposits without very great 
capital cost have militated, to some extent at least, against the more extensive 
development of quartz reefs in the Otago goldfields, and it is only a matter of 
time when the question of reef-mining must be more fully recognised than is at present 
the case. 

Hydrauuc and Alluvial Mining. 

This branch of the gold-mining industry is carried on in the several goldfields 
of the Middle Island, and is well established. There have not been any new develop- 
ment's of material importance during the year but the work, as a whole, may be 
said to give steady and remunerative employment to a considerable section of the 
mining community. It is, however, to be noted that year by year auriferous alluvial 
deposits in various parts of the Island are getting worked out, and, as a natural 
consequence, the yield of alluvial gold must gradually decrease unless other areas 
of gold-bearing country are discovered and opened up. In some known instances 
payably auriferous ground exists, but so far has not been systematically worked 
owing to the scarcity of water locally for sluicing purposes, although supplies are 
feasible by the expenditure of capital in the construction of water-races, dams, &c. 

During the last few years the extension of hydraulic-mining methods has been 
somewhat neglected in consequence of the adaptability of dredges for working on 
alluvial flats. Experience has, however, proved that under certain conditions 
the hydraulic system of mining is preferable to dredging, and in a few cases it has 
been found necessary to revert to the former method. 

Dredge Mining. . 

The number of dredges at work at the end of the year 1904 was 186, a decrease 
of about fifteen as compared with the number in commission at the corresponding 
period of the preceding year. The reduction in the number is mainly due to the 
fact that during some four years immediately preceding, a large number of dredges 
were placed on claims either unsuitable for dredging, owing to their natural features, 
or too poor to admit of the machines being profitably worked. As a natural result 
the industry is now being worked on commercial rather than speculative lines, and 
although there is very little probability of the number of working dredges being 
increased, this branch of alluvial mining will continue to add to the colony's pro- 
duction of gold for some years to come. 

The experiment of tree-planting (referred to in my Statement of last year 
as having been instituted in Southland) on a river-flat area which has been dredged 
appears to have been very successful, and a suggestion has been made* that where 
swamp lands have been turned over by dredges the cultivation of native flax might 
be advantageously adopted. 

PROSPECTING. 
The sum of £2,569 lis. 8d. was expended in subsidies for the year ending the 
31st March, 1905, to prospecting associations and parties of miners actually engaged 
in prospecting. 

THE CYANIDE PROCESS OF GOLD-EXTRACTION. 
The royalty obtained by Grovemment in respect to the purchase rights of this 
invention now amounts to £9,356, or practically 93^ per cent, of the sum originally 
paid. The balance will, in the natural course of events, be received during the 
present year, and thereupon all further royalty charges for the use of the cyanide 
process in New Zealand will cease. 

* See report of Inspeotixig Engineer, page 16. 



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WATERCOURSES FOR TAILINGS, ETC. 



The sum of £1,880 Ss. 5d. was paid during the year as compensation to land- 
owners in respect to rivers and streams which have been proclaimed as watercourses 
into which tailings and mining debris may be discharged. 



SCHOOLS OF MINES. ] 

The various schools of mines continue to prove valuable institutions for the 
education of mining and metallurgical students, several of whom qualify, year by 
year, for responsible positions in connection with the working of mines and reduction- 
works. 

Including the grants made to the School of Mines in connection with the Otago 
University at Dunedin, the expenditure on behalf of schools of mines in the colony 
jiuring the last year was £2,381 5s. 5d. 



COAL-MINING. 

A very marked increase in the production of coal and lignite is recorded for the 
past year, the total output being 1,537,838 tons, as compared with 1,420,229 tons 
produced during the year 1903. The increase for the year 1904 was 117,609 tons 
as against that of 55,189 tons recorded for the previous year, the output of the 
several districts being shown in the following table of comparisons. 



GoicPARATSVE Statebcbnt of CoAL and LiONiTB raised daring the Years 1908 and 1904. 





Output for 1908. 


Inoxeaaa for 
1908 over 1903. 


Output for 1904. 


Inorease for 
1904 over 1908. 


Northern District 
West Coast District 
Southern District 


Tons. 
209,796 
781,032 
429,402 


1 
Tona. Tons. 

17.760 242,517 

27,216 836,950 

10,223 468,371 


Tons. 
32,722 
55,918 
28,969 


Totals ... 


1,420,229 55,189 1,537,838 

i 


117,609 



The comparative tonnage of the various classes of coal, &c., for the years 
1903 and 1904 is summarised as follows : — 



OlMS of Goal, &o. Outpnt for 1908. Output for 1904. 


Inoreaae for 1904. 


BituminouB and semi-bituminous coal 

Pitch-ooal 

Brown ooal 

Lignite 


Torn. 
879,891 

21,116 
441.814 

77,408* 


Tons. 
938,618 

24,506 
488,868 

90.966 


Tool. 
68,627 

3,390 
42.044 
13.648 


Totals 


1,420.229 


1,637,888 


117,609 



* Including 36 tons of oil-shale. 



The total recorded output of the various classes of coal, lignite, and oil-shale 
is now upwards of twenty millions of tons. 



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The following statement shows the production for the year 1904 by the 
principal coal-mine owners or lessees (i.e., those having an output of upwards of 
10,000 tons) :— 



Name of Produoera. 



LooaUty. 



I Oaftpat for 
, 1904. 



Inspection Dit- 
trict. 



Westport Coal Company (Limited) 

New 2ieaiand Coal and Oil Company (Limited) 

Taapiri Coal-mines (Limited) 

New Zealand State Coal-mines 

Blackball Coal Company (Limited) 
Greymouth-Point Elizabeth Railway and Coal 

Company (Limited) 
Hikurangi Coal Company (Limited) 
Nightcaps Coal Company (Limited) 
Tyneside Proprietary (linrited) 
Northern Collieries Company (Limited) 
Allandale Coal Company (Limited) 

Christie Bros. ... 

Taratu-Eaitangata Railway and Coal Com- 
pany (Limited) 

Lovell's Flat Coal Company 

Freeman's Coal Company 

Lowden and Howarth (Jubilee) 

Union Collieries Company (Limited) 

Ngunguru Coal Company (Limited) 

J. Dean 

Eiripaka Coal Company ... 

Paponga Gold and Coal-mining Company, 
New Zealand (Limited) 

Alexandra Coal Company (Limited) 

Cromwell and Bannockbum Collieries Com- 
pany (Limited) 

J. and J. Smyth 



Westport 

Eaitangata 

Hontly 

Seddonville (Westport) and 

Greymouth 
Blackball (Greymouth) ... 
Brunner (Greymouth) . . . 

Hikurangi (Whangarei) . . . 
Nightcaps (Invercargill)... 
Bnmner (Greymouth) ... 
Hikurangi (Whangarei)... 
Shag Point (Palmerston 

South) 
Saddle Hill (Mosgiel) ... 
Kaitangata 



Abbotsford (Green Island) 

Fairfield (Green Island)... 

Mercer 

Eiripaka (Whangarei) ... 

Glentunnel (Malvern Mills) 

Eiripaka (Whangarei) ... 

Puponga (Collingwood) ... 

Alexandra South 
Bannockbum (Cromwell) 

Gore... 



Tons. 
534,008 
119,094 
116,461 

94,063 

86,628 
54,939 

44,974 
43,118 
38,406 
26,719 
21,604 

21,284 
20,293 

19,414 
17,210 
17,187 
16,342 
14,367 
13,447 
12,604 
12,430 

11,069 
11,063 

10,268 



West Coast. 
Southern. 
Northern. 
West Coast. 



Northern. 
Southern. 
West Coast. 
Northern. 
Southern. 



Northern. 

» 
Southern. 
Northern. 
West Coast. 

Southern. 



A very large number of small coal and lignite mines are worked in various pcurts 
of the colony purely for the supply of local requirements, the outputs of these varying 
from a few tons produced to meet the necessities of a farmer having a deposit of 
lignite on his own land up to nearly 10,000 tons per annum. 

The total number of mines returned as having been at work during the^year 
is 168, the average nimiber of persons employed being 3,288. In comparison^with 
the returns for the previous year it is to be noted that the number of mines worked 
shows a decrease of ten, but the number of persons employed is increased by 436. 
The decrease in the number of working mines is due to the stoppage of a few at which 
the output has been very limited. 

It is pleasing to note that during the past few years there has been a very 
marked improvement in the ventilation of the underground workings of coal-mines 
in New Zealand, the old methods of natural ventilation, and ventilation by imperfect 
and inefl&cient furnaces having given place at the more important mines to a system 
of ventilation by mechanical methods whereby very much greater volimies of fresh 
air are being circulated through the mines. By this means the health of the workers 
is enhanced, and the atmospheric conditions under which they pursue their calling 
rendered much superior to those in which a great manv operatives labour at work- 
shops and factories. 

New Zealand State Coal-mines. 

Development-works were carried out at both Seddonville and Point Elizabeth 
Collieries during the year 1904, and coal from the last-named property was sent to the 
Port of Greymouth for shipment as soon as the railway- works wete sufficiently advanced 
to.perm t of this being done. In common with all new undertakings of this character 
a considerable amount of necessary work has had to be undertaken at both collieries 
(since the coal was reached) for the purpose of opening out the seams sufficiently 



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7 G.—l 

to enable a reasonable output to be procured, and in other arrangements for dealing 
with the coal on the surface as well as provision for effectively carrying on other 
work incidental to colliery operations. The production for the year was as follows : 
Seddonville Colliery, 33,808 tons; Point Elizabeth Colliery, 60,255 tons: total, 
94 063 tons. 

Mr. A. B. lindop, the Greneral Mining Manager, died suddenly in the early part 
of^the year. He was succeeded by Mr. James Bisho >. 

Details as to the working of the State^Coal-mines and the financial results attained 
will be found in the reports of the management and the balance-sheet respectively. 

fACXJTOBNTS IN MINES. 
It 18 pleasing to note that the number of accidents of a fatal character were 
fewer durmg'the yjar 1904 than was the case during the year immediately preceding. 
The following statement shows the fatalities in each branch of mining- work : — 



ClaBs of Mining. 



Gk>ld-minin^ — 

Quartz-mines .. 

Hydraulic and alluvial mines 

Dredges 
Coal-mines 



Number of Persons 
employed. 



4,767 

;;; j[ 6.i4i 

•l! I 3,228 



14,126 



Fatalities during 
1904. 



6 
5 
4 
4 



19 



Rate per 1,000. 



1*26 
1-46 
1-23 



1-36 



Each of the foregoing accidents, as well as others of a serious though non-fatal 
character, were duly inquired into by or on behalf of the Department, and it may be 
added that very careful investigation is made into the cause of every serious or fatal 
accident required by law to be reported to the Department. 

KAURI-GUM. 
The export of kauri-gum for the year was returned at 9,203 tons, having a value 
of £601,817, or an average value of £54 10s. O^d. per ton. Compared with the returns 
for the year 1903 (when the highest output was reached and value obtained after 
the fall in demand and values obtained of four years ago) these figures denote a 
decrease of 154 tons in quantity and of £12 18s. 4|d. per ton in value. 

8CHEELITE. 

The demand for this minera is increasing. Hitherto t has been prepared for 
the market almost, if not quite, exclusively by Messrs. Donaldson Bros., of Macrae's, 
Otago, but the demand being now more than they can supply, action is being taken 
by other mine-owners in the same locality with a view to meeting requirements. 

Inquiries for scheelite containing a fairly high percentage of tungstic acid have 
reached the colony from England and elsewhere. It is evident that a ready market 
is available for a steady supply of this mineral. 

HEMATITE PAINT. 
Paint is still manufactured at Thames and Parapara from haematite, and the 
mineral is also obtained at Mataura (Southland), where it is used at the local paper- 
mills for colouring purposes. 

IRON. 
The lease for working the deposits of iron-ore at Parapara referred to in the 
Statement of last year has been executed and a deposit of £1,000 lodged with the 
Public Trustee as a guarantee that the conditions of the lease will be carried out. 
As it is provided in the lease that this deposit shall be forfeited imless the sum of 
£1,000 is expended within the first year of the term in mining operations, with further 
provision for expenditure up to £50,000, it may reasonably be expected that active 
operations for working the deposits of iron-ore at Parapara will be commenced at 
an early date. 



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0.— 2. 8 

ROCK PHOSPHATE. 
This material is being quarried near Milton^ Otago, the output for 1904 being 
2,678 tons. It is calcined near the quarries, and subsequently treated at Bumside 
Chem'cal Works, Dunedin, prior to its being sold for fertilising purposes. 

PBTROLBUM. 
Boring has been in progress at Moturoa, near New Plymouth, and oil was recently 
met with at a depth of nearly 2,300 ft. below the surface. It is premature as yet 
to make any statement as to the probable quantity of oil available, but from present 
appearances it is quite likely that the success which has lately been attained may lead 
to the development of a new industry in this colony. 

COPPER. 
Comprehensive prospecting operations have been in progress in the vicinity 
of Nelson, the results, according to latest accounts, being of a satisfactory character. 
Deposits of copper-ore are known to exist in other parts of the colony, and a syndicate 
has been formed with the object of testing those at Moko Creek, Lake Wakatipu. 

OTHER MINERALS. 
A small quantity of platinum is obtained at Round Hill, Southland. 
Prospecting operations have been in progress for tin at Stewart Island ; green- 
stone at Milford Sound ; and m^l (for cement-making) at Burnside, near Dunedin. 

ROADS AND TRACKS. 
The expenditure on roads and tracks during the financial year amoimted to 
£26,112 4s. 2d., this being a decrease of £19,481 18s. lid. as compared with the ex- 
penditure of the preceding year. The sum of £593 6s. 5d. was paid in subsidies to 
local bodies, and roads constructed by direct grants have absorbed £26,518 17s. 9d. 
During the past twenty-three years the sums expended in subsidies and grants amount 
to £691,631 3s. lOd. 

DEPARTMENTAL. 

The work of the Department has been carried out by the Head Office staff in 
Wellington, and by the Inspectors of Mines and other officers at various centres 
in a painstaking and satisfactory manner. The inspection of mines, is, I have every 
reason to believe, systematic and thorough, and as frequent as is either necessary 
or desirable. Over-inspection is as much to be deprecated as the opposite extreme. 
It is found that managers of mines are almost invariably willing to meet all reasonable 
requests of Inspectors of Mines in matters concerning the safety and well-being of 
persons employed. 

Early m the present year the (Jeological Branch of the Mines Department was 
reorganised, Mr. J. M. Bell, Ph.D., F.R.G.S., being appointed Director of the Geological 
Survey. Dr. Bell has commenced a systematic geological survey of the colony, 
and has a staff of assistants acting under his supervision. 

MINING BUREAU. 
The publication of the New Zealand Mines Record has been continued during 
the past year by the Secretary of the Mining Bureau. The applications made by 
public institutions and mining and engineering societies in Great Britain, the United 
States, and other countries to be supplied with copies of the Record is evidence of its 
wide appreciation, whilst the references frequently made to the articles appearing 
in its columns in the mining and technical press show that mining matters in New 
Zealand are constantly brought under the notice of investors. Amongst the subjects 
dealt with of particular interest to the mining community in this colony may be 
mentioned the exhaustive reports as to the prevention of ankylostomiasis and phthisis 
amongst the miners in Cornwall and the Transvaal, and the suggestions made by 
competent authorities as to the best methods to be adopted for combating the dust 
from rock-drilling operations. All the available literature on these subjects has 
received the attention which their paramount importance warranted. 



Digitized by 



Google 



9 



C.'^2. 



No. 1. 

Table ahowing Goupabibon in Quantitt and Value of Gold entered for Exportation, also 
the Quantity and Value of other Mineralb for the Years ended the Slst Deoetober, 
1903 and 1904, a,% well as the Total Value since the Ist Janaary, 1853. 



Nftm« of MetAl or Miner&l. 


For Year ending the 
3l8t December, 190B. 


For Tear ending the 
Slat DecemberJSOA. 


Total from the 

1st Janaary, 1863, to the 

8l8tDeoember.l904. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


value. 


PreoiouB metals — 


Oe. 


£ 


Oe. 


£ 


Ob. 


£ 


Gold 


683,814 


2,087,881 


520,828 


1,987,501 


16,626,144 


65,136,648 


Silver .. 


911,914 


91,497 


1,094,461 


112.875 


5,308,518 


657,153 


Total gold and silver 


1,445,228 


2,129,828 


1,614,784 


2,100,876 


21,982,667 


65,798,801 


Mineral produce, including kauri-gum— 


Tons. 


£ 


Tons. 


£ 


Tons. 


£ 


Copper-ore 


6 


128 






1.417J 


18,211 


Ohrome-ore 






. . 




5,869 


88,002 


Antimony-ore 






. . 


, , 


3,648 


52,598 


Manganese-ore .. 


70 


210 


196 


570 


19,277J 
76i 


61,626 


HsBmatite-ore 


, , 


1 


7 


96 


439 


Mixed minerals . . . . 


625 


7,014 


1,404 


10,168 


24,277 


182,295 


Ooal (New Zealand) exported 


152,882 


128,927 


165,220 


189,898 


1,899,390 


1,755,591 


Ooke exported 










16,870 


24,804 


Ooal, output of mines in colony (less exports) 


1,267,861 


633,981 


1,872,618 


686,809 


18,201,851 


9,008,809 


Shale 


86 


18 


, , 




14,422 


7,211 


Kaurigum 


9,867 


681,102 


9,208 


601,817 


256,282 


12,359,087 


Total quantity and value of minerals 


1,480,287 


1,401,826 


1,548,648 


1,338,858 


20,441,875^ 


23,458,678 


Value of gold and silver, as above 


•• 


2,129,828 


•• 


2,100,876 


•• 


65,798,801 


Total value of minerals, including 














gold and silver . . 


•• 


8,580,654 




3,439,234 


•• 


89,252,474 



2— C. 2. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C— 2. 



10 



No. 2. 

Tablv showing the Quantity and Valub of Qold entered for Exportation from New 
Zealand for the Tears ended the Slst December, 1904 and 1903, and the Total Qqantitt 
and Value from 1857 to the Slst December,. 190 4. 













Increase or 






Tear 


endinc 


Year 


111^,1908. 


Decrease for Tear 






Slst December, lOOA. 


81stDeo( 


ending Slst 


Total Quantity and Value 


Dlitriot and Comity or Borooitb. 










Deoeml 
Increase. 


»er, iwft. 
Decrease. 


from January, 1887. to 
Slst December. 1901 




Qtukntity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 




Auckland — 


0«. 


£ 


Os. 


£ 


Os. 


Ox. 


Ox. 


k 


County of Coromandel 


2,910 


12,223 


9,689 


40,722 1 


, , 


6.779 








County of Thames 


6,487 


21.785 


9,781 


89,490 , 


• . 


4,844 








County of Oliinemnri 


44,814 


156,189 


54,449 


194,800 




10,185 








County of Piako .. 


189 


776 


1,117 


4,708 


.. 


928 








County of Manukau 


• • 


.• 


.. 


• » 


.. 


.. 








County of Marsden 


.. 


• . 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 








County of Whangarel 


. . 


. . 


8 


10 


. . 


8 








Borough of Thames 


2,009 


8.008 


8,571 


14.788 . 




1,562 








Te Arolia Town District . . 


a 


10 


1 


4 , 


2 


.. 








Gr^Ht Barrier Island 


210 


727 


26 


91 


184 


.. 








County of T'i'iraiiga 






8 


12 


, . 


3 








Boiougb of VVaibi 


167,988 


591,861 


154,041 


537.709 


13.897 


•• 










228,010 


791,529 


232,681 


832,834 


•• 


9.671 


3,464,706 


12,858,706 


Wbixxhotoii 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


.. 


• . 


188 


706 


Marlborouoh— 


















County of Marlborough 


478 


1,890 


972 


8,845 


•• 


499 


89,099 


847.214 


Nelsoh— . 


















County of Waimea 
County of Collingwood 


5,049 


20,141 


7,962 


81,710 


•• 


2,918 


.. 






6,049 


20,141 


7,962 


81,710 


• • 


2,918 


1.706,166 


6.759.859 


West Coast— 


















County of BuUer . . 


10,588 


42,125 


12,696 


50.798 




2,168 








County of Inangahua 


62,716 


250,825 


59.288 


237,151 


8,428 


. . 








County of Grey .. 


83,007 


132,023 


88.239 


132.990 




232 








County of Westland 


14.378 


57,479 


17,066 


68.846 




2,698 








Kumara Borough.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 








Hokitika Borough 


67 


271 


209 


836 


.. 


142 








Boss Borough 


1,614 


6,454 


2.748 


10.969 


•• 


1,129 










122,310 


489.177 


125,241 


501.090 


•• 


2.981 


5.023,226 


19,993,821 


Cantbbbubt— 


















Couniy of Ashburton 


• • 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


99 


387 


Otaoo-- 
County of Taieri .. 


1,818 


7,811 


8,159 


12.728 




1.846 






County of Tuapeka 


89,820 


161.139 


46.544 


187.949 




6,724 








County of Vincent 


62.09b 


250,979 


57,620 


229,410 


4,478 


.. 








County of Maniototo 


7,031 


28,260 


8,132 


32,715 


.. 


1.101 








County of Waihemo 


2,563 


10,870 


4.027 


16,823 


.. 


1,464 








Couniy of Waikouaiti 


. . 


















County of Waitaki 


2.618 


10.531 


2,024 


8,114 


594 










County of Bruce . . 


949 


8,815 


688 


2,759 


261 


• • • 








County of Lake . . 


5.882 


23.571 


7.053 


28.565 


.. 


1,221 








County of Wallace 


8.405 


33.869 


7.495 


30,205 


910 










County of Fiord .. 


819 


1.279 


515 


2,067 




196 








County of Southland 


38.020 


158,600 


28.952 


117,019 


9,068 










County of Cliitha . . 


10 


40 


249 


998 


.. 


239 








Borough of Alexandra 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 








Dunedin.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 










Borough of Mataura 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 










169.478 


684,764 


166.458 


668,852 


8.020 




6,348,451 


26,175.181 


Unknown 


.. 


.. 


■ .. 


• • 


•• 


* 


207 


824 


Totals .. 


320,820 


1,987,501 


533,314 


2,087,831 




12,994 


10.626,141 


65,186.648 



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Mo. 6. 

ftsTUBM showing the Qu&mtitt and Valub of Coai« ihpobtbo lato New Zbalakd daring th« 

Quarter ended the Slst March, 1905. 



Ooontry whence imported. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


New South Walee 
Violoria 

Uoifeed Kingdom 

United SUtes of America 


Tons. 

146,616 

487 

143 

3 


187,427 

487 

236 

8 


Total* .. .. 


147.196 


188,098 



No. 6. 

Ta&lb showing the iNdBBASB or Dbobbasb in the Pboduotion of Coal in the Colony, and 

Importbd, Year by Year, daring the last Twenty-seven Years. 









Coal raised in the Colony. i 


Coal imported 




Tear. 
















Tone. 


Tearlv Increase ' 
or Decrease. 


Tons. 


orMinuB. 


Increase and 
Decrease. 


1878 .. 




162,218 




174,148 






1879 .. 






281,218 


69,000 


168,076 


— 


16,072 


1680 .. 






299,928 


68.706 


128,298 


— 


38,778 


1881 .. 






887,262 


87,339 


129,962 


+ 


6.664 


1882 .. 






878.272 1 41,010 


129,682 




880 


1888 .. 






421,764 


48,492 


128,640 


- 


6,042 


18B4 .. 






480,881 


59,069 


148,444 


+ 


24,904 


1886 .. 






611,068 1 30,232 


180,202 


— 


18,242 


1886 .. 






684,368 


28,290 


119,878 


~ 


10,829 


1887 .. 






668,620 


24,267 


107,280 


~ 


12,648 


1888 .. 






618,896 


66,276 


101,841 


— 


6,889 


1889 .. 






686,446 


27,450 


128,068 


+ 


26,722 


1890 .. 






687,897 


50,962 


110,989 


— 


17,124 


1891 ., 






668,794 


81,897 


126,318 


+ 


14,879 


1892 .. 






678,816 


4,621 


126,468 


+ 


186 


1898 .. 






691,648 


18,288 


117,444 


— 


8,009 


1894 .. 






719,6i6 


27,998 


112,961 


— 


4,488 


1896. .. 






726,664 


7.108 


108,198 


— 


4,763 


1896 .. 






792,861 


66,197 


101,766 


~ 


6,442 


1897 .. 






840,718 


47,862 


110,907 


+ 


9,161 


1896 .. 






907,088 


66,820 


116,427 


+ 


4,620 


1899 .. 






976,284 


68,201 


99,666 




16,772 


1900 .. 






1,098,990 


118.766 


124,088 


+ 


24,878 


1901 .. 






1.239,686 


146,696 


149,764 


+ 


26.781 


1902 .. 






1,866,040 


126,864 


127,868 


— 


21,911 


1908 .. 






1,420,229 


66,189 


168,928 


+ 


86.070 


1904 .. 






1,687,888 


117,609 


147,196 




16,727 

















No. 7. 

Tablb showing the Output of Coal from the various Mining Districts, and the Comparative 
Inobbasb and Dbobbasb, for the Years 1903 and 1904, together with the Total Appbozt- 
MATB Quantxtt of CoAL produced since the Mines were opened. 







Outpat of Ck>al. 


Plus 
or MiHU$. 

1 


Increase or 
Decrease. 


Approximate 
Total Output of 


Mame ox j/mu'ioi). 


190B. 


1904. 


Coal up to 

Slst December, 

1004. 




Tons. 


Tons. 


) 
1 


Tone. 


Tons. 


Kawakawa and Hiknrangi 


71,684 


79.248 


+ 1 


7,564 


1,401.356 


Whangarei, Kamo, Ngonguru, and Whau- 


29,835 


26,971 




2,864 


656,680 


Waikato 




96,666 


116,676 


+ ' 


21.120 


1,566,027 


Mokau 




6,160 


4.280 




1.870 


44,214 


Mixanda 
Patoros 




6,670 


16.842 


+ 1 


8.772 


26,885 
711 


WMt Wanganni 




1,102 


12,430 


+ ' 


11,828 


68,716 


Weitport 




671,806 


670,278 


— 


1,088 


5,861,691 


Reafton 




10,188 


16,119 


+ 


4.986 


124,808 


Oreymouth 




198,441 


239.128 


+ 


40,687 


3,737,461 


Canterbury. 5^; 




28,627 


26,120 

•• 


+ 


1,693 


467,676 
10,667 


Otago 




807.662 


320,681 


+ 


18.119 


5,299,212 


Southland 




98,818 


112,670 


+ 1 


14.267 


972,480 


Totals . 





1.420,229 


1,687,838 


+ ' 

1 


117.609 


20,116,668 



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14 



No. 8. 

Tablk showing the Diffkbbnt Glasses of Goal from the Mines in the Colony. 



*DMnaM. 



Name of Oo*l. 


Oatpnt of Goal. 


Approximate Total 
iDorease. dutput of Coal 
np to the 
31st December. 1904. 


1903. 


1904. 


Bituminous and semi* bituminous 

Pitch 

Brown 

Lignite 

Shale.. 


Tons. 
879,891 

21,116 
441,814 

77,872 
86 


Tons. 
988,518 

24,506 
488,858 

90,956 


Tons. 
58,627 
8,890 
42,044 
18,584 
86* 


Tons. 

11,865,282 

1,888,578 

6,076.948 

776.488 

14.422 


Totals 


1,420,229 


1,587,888 


117«609' 


20,115,668 



Tablb showing the Nttmbbb of 



No. 9. 

Coal-mines in Operation, the 
and the Output of Coal per Man. 



NuMBEB of Men employed, 



Number of Mines ! Number of Men employed at Total Nnmber of 1 Ontpnt of Coal 
working. each Mine. i Men employed. dnrlagl904. 

1 1 1 


per Man. 


99 
85 
10 
24 


1 

lto4in6aoh ..1 180 

5 to 10 , . . . . 1 280 

11 to 20 « 158 

21 and upwards .. 2,720 


Tons. 

79,762 

120,818 

68,654 

1,268,604 


Tons. 

' 448 

525 

485 

466 


168 


8,288 

I 


1,587,888 


467 



No. 10. 

Bbtubn showing the Quantity and Value of Coal impobted into and exported fbom New 
Zealand daring the Year ended the Slst December, 1904. 



Imported. 


Exported. 


Ooontries whence imported. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Countries to which exported. 


Quantity. 


Value. 




Tons. 


£ 




Tons. 


£ 


United Kingdom .. 


142 


226 


United Kingdom . . 


91,983 


«7,022 


New South Wales . . 


146,615 


187,427 


New South Wales 


28.275 


19,962 


Victoria .. 


487 


487 


United States of America— 






United States,of America . . 


2 


8 


On the West Coast 


1,384 


1,779 








Fiji Islands 


5,197 


8,474 








South Sea Islands 


7,849 


4,186 








Hongkong 


38,075 


21,497 








Tasmania 

Totals .. 


8,847 


2,176 


Totals .. 


147,196 


188,098 


165,560 


140.096 



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15 



C— 2. 



No.lL 

NuuBBB of MiMBBS BMFLOTBO daring the Tears ended Slst December, 1903 and 1904. 





AUnTial Bfiners. 


Qoarts-miners. 


Totals. 


Grand Totals. 


District. 


















Buxopean. 


Chinese. 


Bnropean. 


Chinese. 


European. 


Chinese. 


1903. 


1904. 


Auckland— 1 


















Ooromandel 


. , 


, , 


220 


, . 


220 


, . 


240 


220 


Thames 


2 


, , 


278 


, , 


280 


. , 


880 


280 


Paeroai.. 


, , 


, , 


1,905 


, , 


1,905 


, , 


636 


1,905 


Te Aroha 


, , 


, , 


28 


, , 


28 


, , 


27 


28 


Tauranga 


. , 


, . 


1 


.. 


1 


. , 


5 


1 


Walhl 


•• 


•• 


1.800 


•• 


1,800 


•• 


1,250 


1,800 




9 


.. 


8,782 


, , 


8,734 


.. 


2,538 


8,784 


Mablbobouob— 
Havelook 


















52 


.. 


.. 


., 


52 


.. 


68 


62 


Blenheim 


6 


, , 


" 4 


, , 


10 


, , 


29 


10 


OuUensviUe .. 


10 


•• 


•• 


•• 


10 


•• 


18 


10 




68 




4 




72 




110 


72 


NxLSOxr— 
Wangapeka and Sherry .. 


















15 


.. 


, , 




15 


, , 


14 


15 


Takaka 


20 


, , 


, , 


, , 


20 


, , 


20 


20 


Collinffwood 
Motueka 


85 


, , 


64 


, , 


149 


. , 


172 


149 


4 


. 


, , 


, , 


4 


, , 


4 


4 


Nrflson 


10 


, , 


, , 


, . 


10 


. , 


. , 


10 


Inangahua 


256 


120 


668 




919 


120 


1,130 


1,039 


Ahaura 


850 


100 


50 


, , 


400 


100 


479 


500 


Charleston 


87 




, , 


, , 


87 


, , 


125 


87 


Westport, including Addison's, 


















Northern Terraces, Waimanga- 


















roa, North Beach, Mokihinui, 


170 


, , 


10 


, , 


180 


, , 


180 


180 


Karamea, and Lower BuUer 


















Valley 


















Lyell 


75 


2 


86 


, , 


111 


2 


69 


113 


liarcbison 


95 


25 


•• 


•• 


95 


25 


130 


120 




1,167 


247 


828 


.. 


1,990 


247 


2,323 


2,237 


Wbstlahd— 
Ross .. 


















180 


2 


.. 


.. 


130 


2 


70 


132 


Stafford and Goldsborough 


200 


40 


, , 




200 


40 


250 


240 


Hokitika and Kanieri . . 


220 


25 


12 


. . 


232 


25 


231 


257 


Kumara 


205 


22 


. , 




205 


22 


239 


227 


Greymouth .. .. \ 
Arnold .. .. I 


753 


172 


.. 




753 


172 


920 


925 


Okarito 


80 


1 


•• 


•• 


80 


1 


21 


81 




1,538 


262 


12 


, , 


1,550 


262 


1.731 


1,812 


Otaoo— 
Hindon 


















20 


1 


21 


.. 


41 


1 


42 


42 


Tuapeka 

Olyde, Roxburgh, Black's, and 


530 


100 


16 




546 


100 


560 


646 


700 


65 


10 


, , 


710 


65 


898 


775 


Alexandra 


















Oromwell 


800 


25 


10 


. , 


810 


25 


352 


835 


Tapanui 


5 


, , 


, , 




5 




6 


5 


Waikaia 


160 


80 






160 


"so 


180 


190 


Wyndham 


8 


, , 


. , 


8 




10 


8 


Waiau and Orepuki 
Preservation Inlet 


98 


20 


. . 




98 


"20 


3 


118 


, , 


, , 


8 




8 




171 


8 


Athol, Te Anau, and Manapouri . . 


3 




, , 


, , 


3 






3 


Roundhill, Riverton, and Oolao Bay 


48 


" 8 






48 


" 8 


**61 


56 


Wakatipu Goldfie Ids— Arrow, 


15 


6 


45 




60 


6 


176 


66 


Macetown, Cardrona, Kawarau, 


















Bracken's, and Motatapu 


















Queenstown 


87 


18 


20 




107 


18 


193 


125 


Naseby \ 


















St. Bathan's . . . . i 
Hyde 


289 


81 


56 


• 


295 


81 


466 


876 


Macrae's j 


















Maerewhenua and Kurow 


, , 


, , 


. , 


, , 


. , 


, , 


90 


., 


Pembroke 


, , 


. , 


, . 


, , 


, , 


, . 


42 




Gore .. 


280 


8 


. , 


. , 


280 


3 


258 


288 


Stewart Island . . 


6 


. , 


. , 


. , 


6 


, , 


, , 


6 


Campbell Island 


1 


•• 


•• 


•• 


1 


•• 


•• 


1 




2,500 


357 


186 


, , 


2,686 


857 


3,508 


3,043 


SnXXABT. 
AUCKt^ND 


















2 


, , 


3,732 


, J 


8,734 


.. 


2,588 


3,734 


MARLBOBOnOB 


68 


, , 


4 


, , 


72 


, , 


110 


72 


Nelson .. 


1,167 


247 


823 


, , 


1,990 


247 


2,323 


2,237 


Wbstland 


1,538 


262 


12 


. . 


1,550 


262 


1.731 


1,812 


Otaoo .. 


2,500 


357 


186 


•• 


2,686 


357 


3,508 


8,043 


Totals.. 


5,275 


866 


4,757 


•• 


10.032 


866 


10,210 


10.898 



dppromlmaU Coat of Paper.«->Preparation, not given ; printing (8.400 oopies), £1S 16b. 



Prie$&d.} 



By Authority: Jobn Maojut, Government Printer, Wellington.— 1905. 



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C.«2. 



DIAGRAM ,5i<mh^IOIAL QUANTITY U VALUE of GOLD eaparU^ £^>tn,J1EW ZEALAND, 

for ihB y^eSTS /867 h> 1304-. 


•CffKOpS "" Jr*l L _L' j-i 1 li — . - — 




«,.. 1 ^oA^ -Cfc5,136,'iJ^- ^ L.~r 


^ v*^. - .-- 1 — r-- -- -|-^-|-^ |-""l-rT'T r^:'"' — 

'T\ "/"' It 1 i fK-ZM r fj^ ^"[T^t 1;-./ 

I -TT-- 7 +4 — r^"^""h H-H'*f ^''T^T r 1 — 

■"-■T"V 1-- \-\ -,-]-. -h;-J-h ':; -v t" 

_-V,_' 1 11 1 1 1 1 ! ^ 1 1 


1 -5 1 .S 1 -S 1 -^ 1 



DIAGKAM ahowmH TOTAL QUANTITY U VALUE oT KAURI GUM ex^orUd Iram NEW ZEALAND , 

— fer^e yeara I85S -io I304-. 



^ii \ — Y -\ -| \A- -1 — r- -i-H^ rf- 

i 
y. . _ .. _ ,_ . \ ^^ ._.- 










■ ioJ 1 :"" uT"T^ 'P Kh -J [ 


4 jj4 1-., Ii....i..:-I.,i.......p.-L J 

■ *^^y « L "1 v/ * ^ ^" —1 _j 4. ' 4 1-4- 

L" Lv/'Y' IIj _i ' l ' r xlil 1 ill J L 


,^ 1 .5 1 ,^ 1 .58 1 ,i5 § 



s 



DJA<3-ILAM Aar^4 TOTAL OUTPUT afCQAL AauMZMmSS. 
£ar -die. -years IQ7Z -ta (904-. 


TOM*. 
t.SOOjOOO 

1^^.000 

IS00.9O0 

t.mo0^00 

30^000 

000.000 

700000 

900000 
^ t0O00» 


-- 


- 


-- 


— 


— -\ 


1 




— 


■- 


mam 


^ 


'f 


J^ 


P^ 


H^ 


?^ 


-- 

"- 




N^ 


■- 


-- 


— 

... 


i^ 


v;, ^ 
, 


-- 


- 


• -*- 


c «/ ^ttn40r PMLi. 


L ^ m^ 


f^ 



5 



I 





$ 



.» 



By Amtkority : John Mmekmy, Govtmmoni PrmUr. 



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C— 3. 



NEW 



1905. 
ZEALAND. 



THE GOLDFIELDS OF NEW ZEALAND:' 

REPORT ON ROADS, WATER-RACES, MINING MACHINERY, AND 
OTHER WORKS IN CONNECTION WITH MINING. 



Presented to both Houaei of the General Assembly by Gommand of His Bxcelleney. 



IISTZDEX. 



Pa«e. 

Aooidenfts .. .. 19,48,55,61,72,82 

Allavial Mining*— 

Marlborough, Nelson, and West Ooast 9, 48 

Ofcago and Southland . . . . 11, 62 

Antimony .. .. 61 

Battery Saperintendents — 

Examination Papers 120 

Holders of Certificates . . . . . . 124 

Building Sand 61 

Cinnabar .. ..20,61 

Copper . . . . . . 19, 66, 61 

Dredge Mining* — 

Marlborough, Nelson, and West Coast . . 14, 62 

Otago and Southland . . . . 15, 72 

Gillespie's Dredginglink Shoe . . 17 

Roberts's Silt-elevator for Dredges . . 16 

Restoration of Dredge Land . . 17 

Watt and Nesbit's Bucket-link Stopper . . 17 

Blackwater Dredge- screen 18 

Improvements in Dredges . . . . 16 

Holders of Dredge-master's Certificates . . 125 
Examination Papers — 

Battery Superintendents 120 

Fireclay .. .. .. 61 

Geoioeist (Report) .. 119 

Qold-dredging (see Dredge Mining). 

Gold-mining Industry, The .. .. 2 

Greenstone .. .. .. ..20,61 

Haematite .. .. .. 19,56,61 

Hydraulic Mining*— 

Marlborough, Nelson, and West Coast 9, 48 

Otago and Southland .. .. ..11,62 

Improvements in Hydraulic Elevating Plants 18, 71 

Inspecting Engineer (Report) 1 
Inspectors of Mines (Reports)-- 

Mr. Coutts, Thames . . . . 80 

Mr. Green, Dunedin . . . . 55 

Mr. Tennent, Westport . . 44 

Marl .. .. .. .. 61 

Mine-managers — 

Holders of Certificates . . . . . . 122 

Petroleum .. .. .. .. 20 

Platinum .. .. ..19,61 

Prosecutions . . . . . . . . 55 

Prospecting for Gold . . . . 2 

Prospecting Operations . . 20 

Production of Gold . . . . . . 8 

Quartz-mining* . . . . 3 

North Island . . . . 8, 80 

Otago and Southland . . . . . . 9, 55 

West Coasc, &c. . . 7, 44 

Inspectors' Reports . . 80, 44, 55 

Machines employed . . . . . . 172 

Quartz crushed, and value .. .. 180 

Reports— 

Government Geologist . . • . 119 

Inspecting Engineer . . . . 1 

Inspectors of Mines . . 180, 44, 55 

Managers of Water-races . . 112 
Wardens 82, 88, 90, 92. 102, 108, 104. 106, 107, 111 

Water-conservation Engineer . . 118 

Roads constructed by direct Grants . . . . 2 

Roads and Tracks subsidised . . 1 

Rock Phosphate . . . . 19, 61 

Soheelite .. ..19,61 



Schools of Mines 

Coromandel 

Karangahake ... 

Nelson 

Otago 

Reefton 

Thames 

Waihi 

Westport 

Expenditure on Schools 
Statistical Tables— 

Gold Duty credited to Local Bodies 

Gold Exported, 1857-1904 

Gold Exported, Comparative Return, Years 
1903-1904.. 

Gold Exported, 1857 to 8lBt March, 1905 

Gold Exported, Comparative Return for Quar- 
ters March, 1906. and March, 1904 

Goldfields Revenue, Quarter ending dlst March, 
1905 

Goldfields Revenue, Comparative RetVim, Quar- 
ters 81st March, 1904, and 81st March, 1906 

Goldfields Revenue, Comparative Return, 
1908 and 1904 

Goldfields Revenue, Year ending 81 st Decem- 
ber, 1904 . . 

Gk>ld purchased by Banks 

Machines employed 

Mining Leases 

Price of Gold, &c. 

Prices of Provisions 

Quartz crushed 

Quartz-crushing Machines 

Rates of Wages 

Statement of Affairs of Mining Companies . . 

Summary of Works constructed . . 

Wardens' Court Tables and Cases . . 

Water-races, &o. 

Water- races. Results of Working . . 

Works completed on 81st March, 1905 

Works in progress on 81st March, 1905 
Subsidised Koaas and Tracks 
Tin 

The (Jold-mining Industry 
Valpy Bros., improved Method of Hydraulic 

Elevating .. 
Wardens' Reported — 

Mr. Burgess, Clyde 

Mr. Bush, Thames 

Mr. Cruickshank, Dunedin 

Mr. Cruickshank, Lawrence 

Mr. Day, Hokitika 

Mr. Warden. Auckland 

Mr. Keddell. Oamaru . . 

Mr. Kenrick, Greymouth 

Mr. Riddell. Inveroargill 

Mr. McEnnis. Naseby .. 

Mr. Robert^. Tauranga. . 

Mr. Scott-Smith. Blenheim 

Mr. Kenny. Nelson 
Water-conservation Engineer's Report 
Water-race Managers' Reports — 

Mr. Aitken. Kumara .. 

Mr. Murray, Nasebv . . 



'"Si 

22 
24 
25 
27 
26 
20 
28 
26 
29 

166 
167 

167 
168 

168 

164 

168 

165 

163 

188 

172 

175 

169 

170 

180-138 

126-129 

171 

176 

184-188 

163, 174 

178 

162 

142-161 

139 

1 

20,61 

2 

18 

107 

88 

104 

106 

102 

82 

103 

92 

111 

104 

90 

90 

90 

118 

112 
118 



i -O. 3. 



* See alRO reports of W araeuR. 



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G.—B. 



1905. 
NEW ZEALAND. 



THE GOLDFIEFiDS OF NEW ZEALAND: 

REPOET ON ROADS, WATER-RACES, MINING MACHINERY, 
AND OTHER WORKS IN CONNECTION WITH MINING. 



Presented to both Houses of the General Assembly by Command of His ExeeUehcy, 



Mr. John Hayes, F.S.Sc., Inspecting Engineer, to the Hon. James McKJowan, Biinister of Mines. 
Sib,— Mines Department, Wellington, 22nd May, 1905. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report, together with those of other departmental 
officers, Inspectors of Mines, Wardens, managers of water-races, &c., for the year ending the 31st 
December, 1904. 

In accordance with the usual practice, the tables showing expenditure through the Mines Depart- 
ment on roads, bridges, tracks, prospecting operations, &c., are for the period covered by the financial 
year— viz., from the 1st April, 1904, to the 31st March, 1905. 



SUBSIDISED ROADS AND TRACKS. 

The expenditure (as subsidies) and the liabilities on outstanding authorities for the year 
ending the 31 st March, 1905, are as follows : — 



Name of Local Body. 



Expenditure for the 

Year ending 

Slst March, 1905. 



Liabilities on 

Aathorities on 

Slst March, 1905. 





£ s. d. 


£ B. d. 


Coromandel County . . 


130 


••• 


Piako County 


100 


... 


Westland County 


22 8 7 


40 


Grey County 


36 10 


... 


Roads Department ... 


121 17 6 


2,128 2 6 


Contingencies 


124 18 4 


... 


Compensation for accidents . . 


57 12 


... 


Totals 


593 6 5 


2,168 2 6 



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ROADS CONSTRUCTED BY DIRECT GRANTS. 
The following statement shows the expenditure and liabilities on authorities issued on roads 
from direct grants to the several local bodies during the year ending the Slst March, 1905 : — 





Expenditure for the 


LikbiUtiek on 


Name of Looal Body. 


Year ending 


Aatboritiei on 




81st March, 1905. 


Slit Marob, 1906. 




£ B. 


a. 


£ 8. d. 


Coromandel County 


3.312 16 


4 


2,838 9 2 


Thames County ... 


1,759 1 





2,606 7 7 


Thames Borough ... 


200 





100 


Ohinemuri County 


1,162 19 


8 


2,105 6 


Pelorus Road Board 






850 


Takaka County ... 


117 2 


10 


1,201 6 6 


Collingwood County 


828 11 


7 


126 


Waimea County ... 


400 





1,480 5 8 


BuUer County 


3.191 12 


6 


3,858 7 6 


Inangahua County 


1.917 16 


4 


2,256 15 3 


Grey County 


820 





1,490 


Brunner Borough 


276 11 


4 


... 


Westland County 


1.293 13 


8 


1,746 7 6 


Tuapeka County ... 






1,164 


Vincent County ... 


306 7 


6 


1,574 2 6 


Lake County 


438 9 





630 


Southland County 


260 





760 


Makarewa - Hedghope River Board ... 


. .. 




400 


Wallace County ... 


44 11 


9 


200 


Stewart Islfiuid County 






450 


Roads Department 


5.234 8 


4 


2,577 10 1 


Public Works Department ... 


3,976 3 


4 


2,190 1 6 


Totals ... 


25,518 17 

1 


9 


29,994 18 2 











PROSPECTING FOR GOLD. 
The following statement shows the expenditure and liabilities on authorities issued m sub- 
sidies to prospecting associations and parties of miners in the different counties for the year end- 
ing the 31st March, 1905 :— 





Name of County^ 


Expenditure for Year 


LiabUities on Aatborities 




ending Slst Harob, 


1905. 


on 8l8t March, 1905. 






£ s. d. 




£ 8. d. 


Coromandel 




227 




72 


Thames ... 




1,967 11 1 




1,198 18 3 


Buller 




28 18 6 




126 1 6 


Grey 




62 12 6 




• *. 


Westland ... 




283 9 7 




217 17 9 


Takaka ... 


... 






18 


Totals 


2,669 11 8 




1,627 17 6 



THE GOLD-MINING INDUSTRY. 

The return of gold exported for the year ending the 31st December, 1904, shows a falling-o£E in 
value (as compared with that of the previous year) of £50,330, the figures being £1,987,501 for 1904, 
as against £2,037,831 for 1903, when the highest mark for many years was reached. The value returned 
for the year 1904 is, however, in excess of that of 1902 by £36,068. 

In comparing the returns of the several districts it is found that the northern goldfields show the 
greatest decrease. This may be accounted for by the reduced output of the Crown Mines at Karanga- 
hake and several small mines on the Hauraki Peninsula. The decrease reported from the Marlborough, 
Nelson, and West Coast districts is principally due to the gradual exhaustion of some of the areas where 
gold is won from alluvial deposits by sluicing, and also to a number of dredges having ceased operations 
on account of the value of gold won not being sufficient to meet all working-expenses. 

On the other hand, the Southern District (Otago and Southland) shows an increase, valued approxi- 
mately at £15,912, as compared with the export returns of 1903. This increase would undoubtedly 
have been greater still had the conditions as to water-supplies for hydraulic mining and the state of 
the rivers for gold-dredging been fully up to the average. 

The total value of gold exported from the year 1857 to the end of last year, 1904, was £65,136,648. 

The several branches of the industry in the various districts are referred to under their several 
headings. 



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PRODUCTION OF GOLD. 

The following comparative statements show the quantity and value of gold entered for exporta- 
tion for the last two calendar and financial years : — 



N*me of Distriok. 



Year ended Slat December, 
1904. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Year ended diet December, 
1908. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Increase for 
1904. 



Decrease for 
1904. 



Auckland 
Marlborough 
Nelson ... 
West Coast 
Otago ... 


Oz. 

223,010 

478 

5,049 

122,310 

169,478 


791,529 

1,890 

20,141 

489,177 

684,764 


Os. 
232,681 
972 

7,962 
125,241 
166,458 


£ 

832,884 

3,845 

31,710 

501,090 

668,852 


Ob. 

. . . 

3,620 


Ob. 
9,671 

499 
2,913 
2,931 


Totals 


620,320 


1,987,501 


533,314 


2,037,831 


3,020 


16,014* 



Name of District. 



Year ended Slst March, 
1905. 



Year ended Slst March, 
1904. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



Increase for 
1905. 



Decrease for 
1905. 



Auckland 
Marlborough 
Nelson ... 
West Coast 
Otago ... 

Totals 



Oz. 
222,652 
166 

6,461 
119,646 
170,388 



519,212 



815,499 

662 

25,814 

478,050 

688,551 



2,008,676 



Oz. 

233,271 

1,279 

8,222 

126,184 

171,489 



540,446 



£ 

834,070 

6,073 

32,819 

504,845 

690,141 



Oz. 



2,066.948 



Oz. 
10,619 
1,113 
1.761 
6,639 
1,101 



21,233t 



* Total net decrease, value £50,330. f Total net decrease, value £58,372. 



QUARTZ-MINING. 
NoBTH Island. 

The Northern District continues to be the chief field for quartz-mining — in fact, the gold-mining 
industry of this part of the colony is exclusively confined to the mining of quartz and the extraction 
therefrom of the precious metals — silver being also incorporated in the quartz — as distinguished from 
the more varied methods of gold-mining practised in the South Island, where aUuvial gold is extensively 
worked in addition to the gold contained in quartz ree&. 

As usual, the Waihi Oold-mining Company's mine is responsible for the largest output of quartz, 
which for the year amounted to 259,978 tons. Of this amount 141,200 tons was treated with cyanide, 
direct from the stampers, the balance of 118,778 tons being passed over amalgamating- tables prior to 
treatment by cyanide. The production of bullion and the values of concentrates and slag-tailings 
shipped amounted to £673,101 8s. 4d., which represents an ore-value of £2 lis. 9'3d. per ton. Dividends 
to the amount of £297,544 4s. were paid during the year. The gross sum so paid now totals 
£1,552,687 lis. 6d. 

At the mine the erection of the large new pumping plant (referred to in last report) has been 
completed, and is successfully at work. A new pair of winding-engines, having cyUnders 18 in. diameter 
by 3 ft. stroke, geared 2 to 1 to a drum 9 ft. in diameter, have been erected at No. 1 shaft. This 
increase of pumping and winding power wiU enable the management to further develop the property 
to a considerable extent. Underground the development-works keep pace with requirements, so that 
there is always an ample area of ground opened up to allow of an output of ore being steadily main- 
tained, equal in amount to the combined crushing-capacity of the several mills. These latter contain 
an aggregate of 330 heads of stamps, as under : — Heads. 

Waihi Mill, Waihi . . 90 

Union MiU, Waihi . . 40 

Victoria Mill, Waikino . . 200 

Total ..330 

Extensive additions have been made, at the mills, in plant connected with the treatment of ores, 
and include coal-hoppers, additional boiler-power, vats for sands and shmes, turbine, elevator-wheel, 
and tube mills. These latter are used for grinding concentrates, which, after being ground, are sub- 
jected to treatment by cyanide solution and aeration (compressed air being used) for the recovery 
of gold and silver. The adoption of the process of tube-mill grinding and subsequent treatment enables 
the extraction of buUion from concentrates to be carried out at the mills, and obviates the necessity 
for their shipment to smelting-works outside the colony. 




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A very complete foundry has been erected at the Victoria Mill, Waikino, so that the company can 
now make their own ordinary castings — a saving in point of time, at all events, when urgent repairs or 
renewals are necessary. This additional convenience to the mechanical department, which previously 
comprised good smith's and machine shops, sawmill, kc, will doubtless prove a valuable adjunct. 

The company employed an average of 1,236 persons during the year in connection with the several 
branches of work at the mine and mills. 

Encouraged by the success which has attended the operations of the Waihi Oold-mining Company 
(Limited), other companies in the locality have displayed marked activity during the year. This was 
especiaUy so at the Waihi Grand Junction Mine, the management of which has conducted development- 
works, resulting in a fairly large body of quartz being met with. A comparatively new forty-stamp 
battery and cyanide plant (used a short time at the Kauri Freehold Grold Estates Company's property 
at Opitonui) have been purchased and removed to Waihi for erection near the mine. 

In view of the production of ore at an early date, the machinery in and about the mine has been 
overhauled and the plant and buildings added to. I hope that next year it will be my pleasure to report 
the Orand Junction Mine having entered the list of productive concerns. 

A considerable amount of prospecting-work was carried out in the Waihi Extended Mine. This, 
so far, appears to show that the quartz reached is practically the cap of the reef, and that sinking to a 
greater depth will have to be undertaken to get a good body of ore. Present indications appear favour- 
able in this direction ; and, should subsequent operations verify the supposition, the Waihi Extended 
Mine may be looked to as one of the productive properties of the future. 

A small quantity of ore has been treated from the workings of the Waihi Gladstone Mine, but the 
results, so far, are not remunerative. Further developments may possibly prove something better. 

At Waihi Beach, a new mine belonging to the Waihi Beach Gold-mining Company is bemg opened 
up, shaft-sinking, &c., having been in progress during the year. 

Boring operations, having for their object the location of the reef system believed to extend beyond 
the boundaries of those properties in which it has already been definitely proved, have been carried 
on during the year on the claims of the Waihi Consolidated Gk)ld-mining Company (Limited) and the 
Waihi Consols Gold-mining Company (Limited), and it is possible that other mining companies may 
dopt a similar course. Operations of this class, if successful in their object, will do much to extenda 
the mining industry of the locahty and the general prosperity of the district. t^ 

Some prospecting has been done during the year on claims to which protection has been granted 
to give time to raise the necessary capital for their development. 

Mining at Karangahake is represented by two companies — ^viz., the New Zealand Crown Mines 
Company (Limited) and the Talisman Consolidated Company (Limited). Since my last report the 
Woodstock Mine and property have been taken over by the Talisman Consolidated Company. Ox>era- 
tions at the Crown Mines have not been so successful during the year as was the case for some years 
previously, a result attributed to the decreased value of the ore worked — viz., an average of £1 19s. Sfd. 
per ton, as against £2 12s. OJd. for the previous year, and also to the conditions met with in the lower 
levels. The ore-bodies have not been found so good or continuous as was expected in the shaft work- 
ings, the reef system being, to a certain extent, disturbed by faults. It is understood that a scheme 
for the further development of the property will be carried out, and hopes are entertained that the 
mines will shortly be in a position to maintain their former jfrestige. At the Talisman Mine operations 
have been very steady throughout the year, and a considerable amount of development-work carried 
out, resulting in the opening-up of considerable areas of quartz. The acquisition of the Woodstock 
Mine is of considerable benefit in the working-arrangements of the Talisman Mine, providing, as it does, 
an outlet at a lower level and increased facilities for ventilation. GeneraUy speaking, the outlook for 
the present year is regarded as good, the operations of last year showing that the Talisman reef 
maintains its size and value as it goes down. The average value obtained from the ore treated during 
the year was £1 17s. 9^d. per ton. 

Some two or three claims are held in this locaUty, upon which little has been done during the year 
beyond what comes within the definition of prospecting, and three others are under protection. 

Mining at Waitekauri may be said to be practically at a standstiU. Extensive boring operations 
were conducted by the Waitekauri Gold-mining Company (Limited) at their Golden Cross Mine in 
addition to other prospecting- works on their property, but the results obtained are far from encouraging. 
An exception must, however, be made in favour of the work done in the Old Waitekauri section, where 
stone has been obtained to the value of £4,612 18s. Id., giving an average value of £2 15s. 11^. per 
ton. Work has been carried on at other claims in the neighbourhood, but there is no discovery of 
material value to report at present. It appears probable that some efforts may be made during the 
present year to ascertain the existence or otherwise of payable ore (at greater depth than that com- 
manded by the adit-levels) at one of the properties in this locality. 

At the Komata Reefe Mine operations have been steadily carried on, the output of ore being 
returned at 15,800 tons, value £32,559 17s. 3d., equal to an average of £2 Is. 2j^. per ton, or 9s. per 
ton lower than the average of the previous year. The sum of £6,666 13s. 4d. was paid in dividends. 
The battery plant has been added to, a small tube mill being adopted for grinding the coarser sands. 
The plant, though not large, is very complete, and answers its purpose very weU. 

On the Ohinemuri River there are accumulations of tailings which are considered to carry sufficient 
gold and silver to warrant treatment for the extraction of bidlion. A plant for this purpose has been 
erected near Waihi, and it is understood that the initial difficulties — such as are usually experienced 
in new undertakings of a somewhat experimental character — have been successfully overcome. This 
being so, we may look forward to the recovery of precious metals which would otherwise be lost, and 
the establishment of a payable, if somewhat Hmited, industry. 

In my last report mention was made of the probability of Mr. Hardy's mines and battery at Wai- 
orongomai, near Te Aroha, being taken over by a company. This has since been done, and the new 



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proprietary is known ad Hardy's Mines (Limited). Since the company took possession in April, 1904 
a considerable amomit of new work in connection with the mine and battery has been accomplished, 
which will admit of an increased output of ore being dealt with. As a matter of course, these new 
works and the reorganization of previously existing arrangements practically stopped the ordinary 
work of the mine and battery, hence this concern does not show more than a mere nominal production 
for the year ; but as everything was getting into good working-order on the occasion of my last visit 
to the property, an increased tonnage and yield of bullion may be expected this year. 

At and in the locality of Hikutaia there is a possibility of' a revival of active mining, recent opera- 
tions on a small scale having given very promising results. A little work was done at Puriri and Omahu, 
but without payable results. Operations have therefore been suspended. 

Important works have been in progress at Neavesville during the year. Encouraged by the results 
obtained at an adit driven from near the level of the Puriri to Tairua track, adjacent to the Neavesville 
accommodation-house, a new low-level has been commenced from the gully, which will enable the 
work to be carried on, level free, for upwards of 100 ft. below the adit named ; the latter — after an 
underground connection has been made — ^giving a second outlet and return airway. Further down 
the valley a battery installation, comprising forty stamps, concentrators, and cyanide plant, was being 
erected at the time of my last visit to the district. Connection between the mine-mouth and the 
battery will be made by an aerial tramway. It is expected that the low-level will be completed, the 
aerial tramway erected, and the battery put into working-trim about the middle of this year (1905). 
The returns from this property will be looked forward to with interest. 

The output at the Tairua Broken Hills Mine for 1904 was only 3,700 tons, having a value of 
£10,287 Is. lOd., or an average of £2 15s. 7^. per ton. As compared with the returns of the previous 
year this is a decrease (a) in quantity of 2,655 tons, (6) in value of £10,859 16s. lOd., and (c) in average 
value per ton of 10s. 11 Jd. The reduced tonnage is accounted for by the reef above adit-level becoming 
largely exhausted during the early part of the year. At my inspection in October last a winze was 
being sunk for the purpose of opening out the ground at a lower level. At the Coronation Mine (adjacent 
to that of the Tairua-Broken Hills Company) an adit has been driven into a peculiar and hard formation 
carrjring gold. Very good prospects can be obtained simply by panning the rock which has been broken 
up to a small size in the ordinary work of tunnelling. Portions of this rock have been classed as the 
equivalent to *' clinkstone " (so called from the clinking sound produced when pieces are knocked 
against each other), a rock found in some of the gold-mining districts of America. I forwarded a sample 
to the Grovemment Oeologist, Mr. McKay, who classed it as rhyolite. A small battery is to be erected 
to test the value of this stone on a commercial scale. 

The Chelmsford Mine (also in the Tairua locality) was idle for some time, but during the latter 
part of the year operations were resumed for the purpose of further developing the property. 

A very promising outcrop of quartz has been discovered between Hikutaia and Whangamata, 
a sample lot treated at the Thames School of Mines showing a value of something like £42 per toD. A 
company, known as theiWaimangu Oold-mining Company (Limited) has been formed for the purpose 
of workmg the claim. There is some prospect of the Mananu Mine, Whangamata, being again worked. 

Prospecting operations, which for some time were being vigorously carried out at Te Puke, have 
been indefinitely suspended. 

Mining at and adjacent to Thames was very quiet throughout the year, but shortly before Christmas 
the discovery of good gold-bearing stone, from 15 ft. to 20 ft. in width, at the Waiotahi Mine caused 
the owners of neighbouring mines to give more consideration to the question of prospecting on some- 
what comprehensive lines. Mr. Coutts, Inspector of Mines for the district, reports that the first 50 tons 
of general ore, together with 516 lb. of picked stone, yielded a return of bullion worth £1,667 4s. lid., 
or, roughly speaking, a value of £33 per ton, inclusive of picked stone. If there is a considerable body 
of stone of this character in the locauty, the mining industry of Thames will revive very considerably. 
It is regretted generally that the boring operations which were undertaken in the hope of proving the 
deep ground had, from various causes, to cease before their object was fulfilled satisfactorily one way 
or the other. The nature of the ground drilled through makes it appear that the only way to satisfac- 
torily prove the deep levels at Thames will be by sinlmig, and then driving a long cross-cut to intersect 
the various lines of reef below what has been termed '' the barren zone." 

Several small mines in the locality have been working throughout the year with varied results ; 
but with the exception of the discovery at the Waiotahi Mme, already mentioned, there is nothing of 
importance to speciaUy comment upon. Some of the properties in the locality have been taken over 
by a local syndicate, and small companies formed for the purpose of working the mines. At Mr. Jjidd's 
tailings plant, bullion to the value of £1,947 198. 6d. has been obtained from tailings on the foreshore. 

Acting on your instructions, I made a careful examination in October last of the large plant at 
the Queen of Beauty shaft (formerly the property of the Thames-Hauraki Company, but now belonging 
to the New Zealand Grovemment), which had been idle for a period of about three years. 

After a careful warming-up of the boiler-flues preparatory to raising steam, examination of valve 
faces on the engines, necessary cleaning of bearings, glands, ^., the engines and pumps were put to 
work for a couple of days, everything being in as good condition as when work was suspended. The 
whole pumping-plant worked most efficiently. A run of a few hours' duration was also made with 
the air-compressing plant, which was equally satisfactory. After the trial the working-parts were 
well lubricated, bright work coated with vaselene to prevent rust, and the plant left in order so that 
it could be put to work at short notice should occasion arise. This was considered possible in view 
of the age and condition of the old Big Pump worked under the control of the Thames Drainage Board. 
The pump at the Queen of Beauty shaft has, since the early part of the present year, been used by the 
Drainage Board under arrangement with the Gk>vemment, and is, I understand, satisfactorily efEecting 
the dnonage of the field. 



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After being idle for some time operations have been recommenced at the Tararu Mine, Tararu 
Creek. These have so far taken the form of development-work, for the purpose of winning more ore 
and gaining increased facilities for handling the same. It is to be hoped that mining in t^is part of 
the field will be again vigorously and profitably carried on. In the Eclipse Mine the low-level tunnel 
has been extended during the year, with the object of reaching' ore below workings from a higher level. 
Some good stone has been cut, a crushing at the end of the year resulting in a return showing an average 
value of £6 10s. 5'4d. per ton. 

In my last report, the Monowai Mine at Waiomo was stated to have been closed down. During 
the year it was taken over by a local syndicate, and on the occasion of my official visit to the district 
in October last I found that operations had been resumed, the low-level tunnel being cleaned up and 
put into good working-order. I understand that a contract has since been let for driving on the reef. 
The ores here are of a refractory character, and require special treatment, as compared with the general 
character of the quartz in the Thames portion of the goldfield. 

It is to be regretted that the results of operations at the Mahara Royal Mine, Tapu, have not been 
nearly so successful as they appeared to promise some two years ago. The stone has been found to 
be patchy, the shoots very variable in width, and — ^judging from the battery returnB— decidedly poor 
in quality, the average value of stone crushed during the year being only 198. 0}d. per ton, compared - 
with £1 14s. 2d. as that of the previous year. Grold-saving has been by amalgamation, and, although 
concentrates are separated from the sands, no information as to their value is given. 

The Sheridan Mine (in the same locality) was worked by a company for a short time. Results 
not proving satisfactory, the property was disposed of to a small private party. Sixteen tons of quartz 
was crushed during the year, giving a bullion value of £115 12s. lid., equal to an average of £7 4b. 6-6d. 
per ton. 

Coming to the Coromandel portion of the Northern Gk)ldfields, very little of a really encouraging 
character can be said as regards the operations carried on and the amount of precious metals produced 
during the past year. Mining in the locality has hitherto been, and still is, practically confined to 
small lodes, many of which have been found to carry very rich gold in places ; small lots of " speci- 
men " stone, rather than the general average tonnage of quartz produced, yidding the best payable 
returns. The late Mr. Francis Hodge, M.E., has, on more than one occasion, expressed to me his opinion 
that the large body of quartz which is to be seen outcropping along the road-side going up Tokatea 
Hill from Coromandel is the '' mother-reef " of the locality, and that the various lodes and leaders 
upon which mining has so far been carried out are simply branches and sub-branches of this large 
reef. His views as to the desirability of proving the stone at depth formed the subject of a letter to 
me a few months previous to his death. This, together with a copy of a plan and section showing 
his proposals for proving the continuation of this large body of ore — which he calls " the Tokatea Big 
Xteef " — and its supposed position in relation to the several claims in the neighbourhood of the Upper 
Township, will be found in my report of last year. I may remark that in the letter referred to the late 
Mr. Hodge stated that '" it is a well-known fact that this Big Tokatea reef is not payable down to the 
datum-line of sea-level. In width it varies from 20 ft. to 60 ft. It is assumed by many that this Big 
Reef would, in depth, be proved to contain highly payable gold-ore, and the most economical method 
of testing the accuracy or otherwise of this theory would be by diamond bores." 

In view of the known extent of this large body of stone from surface exposures, it would, in my 
opinion, be a desirable course of action to have its continuity and value determined to a considerable 
depth below sea-level. Should it be found to live down, to maintain a good size, and carry even very 
moderate values, the working of this big reef and the treatment of the ore would do for Coromandel 
primarily, and the colony generally, a vast amount of good. The matter is not one for a small party : 
it would have to be taken up on comprehensive and thoroughly modem lines even as regards pre- 
liminary prospecting, and the question of the interests of existing claimholders as to this large reef — 
which they do not work in any case — through whose areas the reef may be found to run, settled in the 
first instance. As this would be an entirely new thing, and existing holders of claims have done nothing 
practically to prove this reef at depth, the withdrawal of their rights in respect to it would be quite 
equitable. 

Early in the present year a proposal was made to the Department lor prospecting this reef at the 
joint expense of the local public and the Gk)vemment. After inquiry, it was decided to subsidise the 
work at the rate of £1 for £1 up to £300 through the Coromandel County Council. 

Actual operations during the year have been conducted on the Hauraki Block below the township 
at the Old Hauraki, Bunker's Hill, Hauraki Freeholds, Golden Pah, and Success Mines. At the first- 
mentioned mine a pumping-plant is installed, and during the year the mine was unwatered from the 
220 ft. level down to the bottom, or 410 ft., level. At this lowest level very little work has hitherto 
been done, and it was considered that the development of the mine at this depth might prove satis- 
factory. The work of repairing the shaft below the 220 ft. level and the installation of a new plunger 
at the bottom was both arduous and costly. Pumping from this low level was alleged to be of material 
benefit to the adjoining mines, the owners of which failed to satisfactorily recognise the position, and 
declined to contribute to the cost of drainage by the pumping operations at the Old Hauraki Mine. 
In consequence of this, the proprietors of the Old Hauraki Mine suspended the work of pumping, the 
result being that after a few days the workings of the Bunker's Hill Mine were flooded, and work there 
had to stop so far as operations from the shaft were concerned. Although the Hauraki Freeholds 
Mine was not nearly so much affected as was the Bunker's Hill Mine, the property is to some extent 
suffering in consequence of the water trouble. A mutual agreement as to the proportionate charges 
to each mine for pumping would get over the difficulty, but, failing an amicable understanding bemg 
arrived at, the only way appears to lie in the formation of a Drainage Board, or, as an alternative 
(and, considered from a working standpoint, the more practical method), a consolidation of interests. 



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The value of gold won in the Hauraki Block during the year was £4,989 Is. lOd., and fifty persons 
were employed. 

Bullion to the value of £701 48. 8d. was obtained at the small tailings treatment plant of Messrs. 
Shepherd and Patterson near the beach. This plant gives employment to three persons, and affords 
a good illustration of what can be done with old tailings without a very great capital outlay. 

In the Tokatea portion of the Coromandel locality, mining has provided employment for eighty 
people, and bullion has been won to the value of £9,967 Is. lid. Of these totals, the Royal Oak Mine 
is responsible for the employment of forty-six persons, and a bullion yield of £9,110 Is. 7d. in value. 
It will thus be seen that during last year the production of other small mines was very limited. 

Mining in the neighbourhood of Kennedy Bay has been carried on at the Four-in-hand Mine and 
the Old WTiangapoua and Exact Claims, fourteen persons being employed and bullion to the value 
of £1,220 15s. 3d. obtained. At the New Four-in-hand Mine, a new low-level tunnel is being driven 
from the Waikoromiko Creek to cut the Tainui and Four-in-hand reefs considerably below the present 
and former workings. The country-rock through which this tunnel is being driven is of a somewhat 
different character to the overljdng andesite common to the district. I therefore submitted a sample 
to the Colonial Analyst for his analysis. This is as follows : — 

Per Cent. 
Silica .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 56-3 



AlllTniTlA. 

Calcium-carbonate 

Magnesia 

Alkalies 

Iron-sulphide (iron-pyrites) 

Moisture 



20-4 
8-2 
2-4 
4-4 
6-0 
2-3 



100-0 

If it is found that the reefs live down into this lower rock and maintain their values (the average 
for last year from higher leveb being £3 IBs. 2d. per ton), the company have a very good property. 
A much lower level opening than the present one is practicable from the valley of Waikoromiko Creek, 
and should the size and quality of the reefs continue satisfactory, a very considerable amount of ore 
can be won without the necessity of hoisting or pumping appliances. 

At Cabbage Bay, a small leader has been worked on at the White Star Claim by two men. 

The principal mining operations in the neighbourhood of Kuaotunu are being carried on at the 
Waitaia Mine, the returns for 1904 showing an increase in the value of bullion produced of £1,526 8s. 6d. 
as compared with the production of the previous year. During the period under review the output 
of milling quartz was 1,119 tons, which gave an average value of £5 8s. 3'4d. per ton. Most of the 
stone is being obtained from leaders. Development-work for the purpose of opening up the mine at 
a lower level will have to be shortly undertaken. 

A small amount of work has been done on other properties in the locality, the most productive 
of which was at the Otama Mine. From this property gold to the value of £410 12s. 9d. was obtained, 
the average being equal to £3 14s. ll*8d. per ton of stone treated. 

At Gumtown, two small mines — the Kopowai and the Big Beetle — have been worked to some extent 
during the year for a combined total output of 688 tons of miUed quartz, value £1,803 15s. 4d., equal 
to a general average of £2 12s. 6-7d. per ton. 

On the Great Barrier Island, work at the Barrier Reefs was confined to the treatment of tailings, 
resulting in a bullion value of £2,380 18s. 3d., two men being employed. At the Sunbeam Mine, develop- 
ment-work is in progress. A small battery plant for the treatment of the ore is abo in course of erec- 
tion. 

The reports of Mr. Coutts, Inspector of Mines, Thames, and Mr. Warden Bush deal very fully with 
gold-mining on the Hauraki Peninsula, within the boundaries of which the industry is (with slight 
exceptions) confined so far as the North Island is concerned. 

Middle Island. 

There is practically nothing of importance to report as regards quartz-mining in the Marlborough 
Province. Company reconstruction has been effected for the working of the Jubilee Mine at Top Valley, 
near Blenheim, and work for the development of the property at a lower level put in hand. The pro- 
prietary is now known as the Wairau Gold-mining Company. 

Some prospecting on behalf of a Wellington syndicate was also undertaken in another part of a 
the district. It is understood that capital will be forthcoming if the results of prospecting operations 
are su£Biciently promising. 

At Taitapu (West Wanganui) the Golden Ridge (Taitapu Gold Estates) Mine had a much smallw 
tonnage output than that of the previous year. The average value of the ore treated was £4 15s. per 
ton. The other mine in this locality, the Golden Blocks, is returned as showing an increase in the amount 
of gold obtained in comparison with the yield of the previous year, the value per ton working out at 
£3 12s. 8Jd., or an advanced value of 4s. 4^6.. per ton milled. The total value of gold obtained from 
the two properties is ^ven as £11,833 14s. 2d., and 3,057 tons of quartz was crushed. 

Only one small mine in the vicinity of Westport produced gold during the year — ^viz., the Brit- 
annia lifine, near Waimangaroa. The quantity of stone treated was 765^ tons, from which a gold 
value of £2,506 15s. lOd. was obtained. Average value, £3 5s. 6d. per ton ; dividends for the year, 
£333 68. 8d. The Red Queen Mine, Mokihinui, has been let on tribute, the tributers being engaged on 
development-works during the year. 



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' At the Alpine Extended Mine, Lyell, a good deal of development- work has been done during the 
last few years, (with disappointing results as regards the amount of payable quartz won, and the ex- 
perience gained during the past year has not been of an encouraging character, the stone pinching out 
in various places. The value of the ore is approximately £2 per ton, extraction being by amalgamation 
and cyanide. Kelly and party (four men), who are working the old United Italy Claim above Lyell, 
have done a considerable amount of development-work during the year, and also won gold to the value 
of about £600. 

In the neighbourhood of Boatman's (Capleston) the Welcome Mine was worked on tribute during 
the early part of the year, the output of stone sent to the mill (382 tons) giving an average value of 
£4 10s. 4-8d. per ton ; 225 tons of tailings, jrielding £1 6s. 3-9d. per ton, was silao treated by cyanide. 
At the expiration of the tribute agreement the tributers would not enter into a fresh contract, not- 
withstandmg the payable character of the ground worked. The mine was consequently closed down 
for the time being pending the decision of the Home directorate, protection for a period of six months 
being obtained. 

In the same locality, Knight and party have taken up some mining claims at Italian Oully, and 
are opening out an old crosscut to win. a quartz reef which was prospected several years ago. A small 
battery plant will be erected. Samples of the stone (which I recently saw at the claim) look very 
promising. The reef is about 2 ft. 6 in. wide. 

At Kirwan's Reward Claim (Victoria Range) loose broken quartz and mullock are quarried on 
the surface, and sent down to the battery on an aerial tramway having a fall of some 1,800 ft. in, say, 
three-quarters of a mile. As there are no underground-mining expenses, and the battery is driven by 
water-power at a minimum of expense, the peld of £1 4s. lOd. per ton on the material crushed during 
the year leaves a very substantial margin of profit, the value of gold obtained being £7,764 16e. lid., 
and dividends paid to the amount of £2,800. From present appearances, this property is likely to 
prove a profitable concern for several years to come. The locality is one which offers considerable 
inducement to bona fide prospectors, and it may be remarked that since the commencement of the present 
year a very promising reef has been discovered by Mr. Kirwan on the opposite watershed of, and adjacent 
to, the Waitahu River. This discovery is known as Kirwan's New Find. 

Mining work in the vicinity of Reefton is very fully described in the reports of Mr. Tennent, In- 
spector of Mines, and Mr. Warden Kenrick. The principal productive properties at present worked 
are those under the control of the Consolidated Gk)ldfields of New Zealand (Limited), the Progress 
Mines of New Zealand (Limited) — which^Junder the same general management — ^and the Keep-it- 
Dark Mine. 

The Wealth of Nations Mine at Crushington, and the Gk>lden Fleece Mine at Black's Point, are 
worked by the Consolidated Groldfields Company. At the former, 12,748 tons of ore was raised, and 
yielded £14,666 16s. 8d. by amalgamation and £5,941 5s. Id. by cyanide treatment ; slimes and con- 
centrates to the value of £1,068 5s. 3d. were also disposed of ; the total value obtained being 
£21,676 7s., or equal to an average of £1 14s. per ton. The working-costs are returned at 
16s. 4*88d. per ton. Future developments at this property will be from the Energetic shaft, which is 
simk below the bottom level of the Wealth of Nations Mine, and connected thereto. At this shaft a 
fine modem steam winding-plant has been installed, together with air-compressor and electric 
light. The winding-engines have a pair of 18 in. cyhndera, and the drums are on the crank shaft, 
no intermediate gearing being used. 

The output of the Golden Fleece Mine for the year was 12,930 tons of ore, from which the following 
values were obtained : By amalgamation, £21,040 17s. 6d. ; by cyanide process, £3,011 7s. 5d. ; 
slimes and concentrates, £1,940 3s. 7d. ; making a total of £25,992 8s. 6d., or an average value of 
£2 Os. 2-4d. per ton. The returns show a slight decrease compared with those of the preening year. 

The Progress Mines at Progress Hill, and the 65-8tamp battery with cyanide and chlorination 
plants on the Inangahua River above Crushington, comprise the principal gold-mining property at 
which lode-mining is carried on, and the ore treated, in the Middle Island. (Connection between mine 
and battery is made by an aerial tramway, the power employed in working it being that due to gravi- 
tation. During last year 59,908 tons of ore was mined for a total yield of £110,371 2s. lOd., giving 
an average value of £1 16s. 10*16d. per ton, the total working-costs being returned at 19s. 5*52d. per 
ton. A profit of £58,290 13s. 7d. was made. Nearly three hundred persons are employed at the 
company's mines and works. 

At the Keep-it-Dark Mine at Crushington (one of the oldest and most consistent dividend-pa3ring 
mines in the locality) the shaft has been sunk an additional 300 ft. The output of quartz was 12,300 
tons, treatment (after crushing) by amalgamation and cyanide jrielding gold to the value of £20,688 9s. 9d., 
apart from concentrates shipped, the value returns for which are not yet to hand. 

The output of the New Inkerman Mine has not been great, 7,639 tons being mined during the 
year. A considerable expenditure was incurred a few years ago in opening up the mine at and above 
adit level, and a considerable amount of ore was proved. This is of low gnule. An inchne shaft was 
subsequently put down to ascertain the value of the stone at greater depth, and a proposal to extend 
this to a depth of 400 ft., or thereabouts, and also to prove at depth the possibilities of a large body 
of stone which is exposed on the surface and known as the Big Blow, has been made to the Home 
directorate. A continuous reef of the size seen at the surface, or approximating thereto, should, even 
at a very moderate average value per ton, be a good paying asset. 

Very little productive work of any importance has been done at the Gk>lden Lead, Industry, or 
New Scotia Mines, and quartz-mining in the vicinity of Merrijigs is practically at a standstill. 

The Victoria and Inglewood properties are owned by Mr. P. N. KingsweU, of Reefton, who has 
carried on mining operations throughout the year, and erected a cyanide plant for the treatment of 
sands from the battery. 



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9 C— 3. 

At the Big River Mine, gold to the value of £3,653 Ts. 6d. was obtained from 988 tons of ore. This 
is equal to an average of practically £3 14s. per ton. The shaft has been sunk to a deeper level, and 
cross-cutting put in hand to win the ore at greater depth than where already worked. Some prospecting 
in the district has been undertaken by a syndicate, whose operations have resulted in a small reef being 
found. 

With the exception of the Garden Gully Claim, no work of any moment has been done on the 
Paparoa Ranges. At the property named, driving underground (for the purpose of obtaining proper 
ventilation) has been carried out, and several surface works have been undertaken. These, when com- 
plete, will allow of the conveyance of water for power purposes and the transport of ore to the (pro- 
posed) battery. 

Attention has of late been directed to the reefs at the head of the Wilberforce River (near Brown- 
ing's Pass), on the dividing range between the Canterbury Plains and the West Coast. Some work 
was done here on a limited scale several years ago, but the value or otherwise of the reefs does not seem 
to have been definitely ascertained. Work has been put in hand for the purpose of proving the size, 
extent, and value of the quartz reefs of this locality. 

In the Southern Inspection District (which comprises Canterbury, Otago, and Southland) quartz- 
mining has been decidedly quiet during the past few years ; but there is little doubt in my mind that, 
as the alluvial deposits become worked out, more earnest attention will be devoted to the further pro- 
specting for, and development of, the quartz reefs in the south part of the Middle Island. So long, 
however, as there are areas carrying alluvial gold which can, as a general rule, be opened up and worked 
with comparatively little capital, it is hardly likely that local investors in mining properties will specu- 
late in reef-mining, notwithstanding the fact that in the past quartz-mining in this part of the colony 
has, in many instances, proved a very remunerative investment. It is, of course, well known that 
in some localities the quartz worked to considerable profit several years ago was of such a nature as 
jdelded up its gold by amalgamation, but at deeper levels became more refractory, thus necessitating 
the adoption of some chemical process. As the cyanide treatment was not then perfected or available, 
capital was naturally diverted from quartz-mining to alluvial mining, and thus the former branch of the 
gold-mining industry naturally fell o5. In my last report reference was made to the fact that a prac- 
tically straight line from near the head of Lake Wakatipu (on the west) to a short distance north of 
Oamaru (on the east) passed through the mines at BuUendale (Skipper's), Macetown, Bendigo (west 
side of Dunstan Range), and the quartz veins at Balruddery. It is probable that this line may repre- 
sent the general trend of a reef system, and it is certainly worth the attention of prospectors to search 
for quartz reefs along, Or adjacent to, the line mentioned between those places at which the reefs are 
actually known to exist. A feature well worth consideration is that if the northern boundary of the 
alluvial goldfield be traced out it will be found a little to the north of, and approximately parallel to, 
the line given, whilst to the south are the extensive alluvial goldfields of Otago and Southland. 

None of the quartz-mines now being worked in Otago are on an3^hing approaching a large scale. 
Those on the productive list for the year are the Shotover (Old Gallant Tipperary) near Skipper's Point, 
the Premier-Sunrise Mine at Macetown, Bendigo Mine near Cromwell, Barewood ; also at the Carrick 
Range, the Old Man Range above Bald Hill Flat, Macrae's, and Nenthom. 

At BuUendale, the Mount Aurum Gold-mining Company have acquired the property formerly 
held by the Achilles Gold-mines Company, and are opening out higher levels than those worked by the 
late proprietary on other parts of the property. This work is to a great extent of a prospecting character, 
and will, if successful, give new life to this once flourishing locality. Prospecting work, some of it 
showing very encouraging features, has been carried out in the neighbourhood. 

There appears a probability that several claims near Macetown will be worked by an English 
company. These claims have been noticed in previous reports, and the most advantageous way 
to operate them would be by the rights to the several claims being consolidated and a mine opened 
out on a comprehensive basis. Prospecting in this locality has had attention, and the discovery of 
a 2 ft. reef is reported, giving a return of about £8 per ton on a bulk sample of 25 tons. 

The O.P.Q. Mines at Waipori are now idle and the plant largely dismantled, but it is expected 
that the property will be again taken up and worked. 

Mining on the Canada Reef, near Milton, appears to be coming to the fore again ; trial crushings 
have given most encouraging results. 

In the neighbourhood of Nenthom, Macrae's, and Mount Highlay, there are several small mining 
properties, at some of which scheelite (as well aa gold) is associated with the quartz, and as this mineral 
is greatly in demand at the present time, the industry is marked by an increased activity as compared 
with that of the last few years. 

Nothing of any moment is being done at Preservation Inlet. 

It is satisfactory to note that increased attention is being given to prospecting for quartz reefs in 
different parts of Otago, and for other minerals on Stewart Island. 

Details of the several quartz-mining operations in the Southern District will be found in the report 
of Mr. E. R. Green, Inspector of Mines. 



HYDRAULIC AND ALLUVIAL MINING. 

With the exception of a little work on Stewart Island this class of mining is confined to the Middle 
Island, alluvial goldfields being known and worked in all the provinces. Canterbury may be excepted, 
generally speaking, as the known deposits of alluvial gold in this part of the island are very limited. 
The principal fields are those of the West Coast, Otago, and Southland, in which districts operations 
are extensively carried on. There is, however, very little change to comment upon, as the bulk of the 

2— C. d. 



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claims now working have been in operation for some considerab^ time, and their features and plant 
very fully described in previous reports. 

In the Marlborough Province a little mining is carried on at Mahakipawa, Wakamarina, Deep 
Creek, and Onamalutu. A race is being constructed to bring in water to work ground in the last-named 
locality, the party doing this being satisfied that good results will be obtained. 

Hydraulic mining, near Takaka (Nelson), is being successfully conducted, and prospecting carried 
out (further back from the coast) in the Upper Anatoki neighbourhood. Fairly extensive operations 
by hydraulic power continue to be carried on at Parapara by the Parapara Hydraulic Sluicing Company 
(Limited). The ground here is very heavy and steep, great care being required to carry out the work 
with safety and efficiency. Future prospects appear good. 

At Quartz Ranges (ColUngwood Goldfield), a claim was opened out a few years ago by a company, 
who incurred considerable capital expenditure in bringing in an adequate water-supply. Subsequent 
operations by this proprietary were not commercially successful, and the property was taken over by 
Mr. C. Y. Fell, of Nelson, who let it to a party of tributers. I understand that the working-results 
are satisfactory. The works of the Slate River Sluicing Company (near Collingwood) have been 
improved as regards the water-supply, increased returns of gold won resulting therefrom. 

In the vicinity of Westport alluvial mining cannot be generally considered a flourishing industry. 
About a dozen men make small wages on the beach north of the Orowaiti River, and a few others for 
similar results at and about German Creek. Some very fair results are being got at Cook Terrace, 
Fairdown. The gold won gives good average wages, and from present appearances this condition of 
affairs is likely to continue. Prospecting and tunnel-driving are being carried out in the locality. At 
Addison's several parties are worlang successfully. The outlook for this part of the field is considered 
good for a few years to come. Both alluvial wash and cemented sand are worked locally, the latter 
being crushed by light stamper batteries and the gold recovered by amalgamation. 

The most extensive works in the neighbourhood of Charleston are those of the Charleston Beach 
Sluicing Company and of Messrs. Powell. These claims are close to each other, and work the sand- 
deposits near the beach by hydraulic sluicing and elevating, the sand being washed over a large spread 
of amalgamating-tables for the extraction of the gold. These two properties give employment to 
about sixteen persons. Other parties are extending their operations, both as regards sluicing and 
cemented-sand crushing ; whilst the small beach claims — of which there are quite a number — appear 
to give good average wages. Taken all round, the industry in and around Charleston may be said 
to be more active than has been the case during the last year or two. 

On the Buller River alluvial -mining works are carried on near Lyell. Below the township, the 
New Lyell Sluicing Company have taken over the claim formerly held by the Lyell Hydraulic Sluicing 
Company, and have been constructing a water-race for the more effective working of the property. 
Above the township, the Newton River Sluicing Company have added to their plant and increased 
their facilities for carrying out the work more efficiently. In the neighbourhood of Murchison several 
claims are being successfully worked. The water-supply as a whole being deficient, water-race con- 
struction and pipe-line installations have been undertaken by some of the claimholders for the purpose 
of obtaining a larger and more regular supply of water. Recent prospecting in this locality appears to 
have been satisfactory. The results are shown in further steps being taken in the direction of opening 
out other claims. 

In the valley of the Grey River alluvial mining is carried on much on the usual lines, about sixty persons 
(one-half of them being Chinese) making a living in the vicinity of Blackwater, and about thirty persons 
(one-third being Chinese) find employment at and adjacent to Ahaura. A similar number, with 
approximately the same proportion of Chinese to Europeans, are engaged at Red Jack's and Kangaroo 
Creeks, abo some twenty persons at MoonUght, and a fair number of diggers still make a living at Nelson 
Creek and No Town. These are independent of those employed in connection with gold-dredges. There 
are no extensive plants lor alluvial mining in the locaUties mentioned. At Montgomery's Terrace 
and Healy's Gully hydraulic-sluicing operations are being conducted with moderate results. 

Along the coast north of Greymouth Messrs. McKay and White are working on a fairly extensive 
scale at Barrytown with profitable results. No other claims in this section of the goldfield have been 
worked to any extent during the year. 

The richest portions (so far as known) of the alluvial deposits at Kumara and Dillmanstown are 
fast being worked out, and the returns for last year show a gradual reduction in the number of men 
employed and the amount and value of gold obtained. Talang the areas at Kumara, Waimea, and 
adjacent localities commanded by the Government water-races (Waimea-Kumara), and from which 
the supplies of water for sluicing purposes are drawn, the following schedule affords a comparison 
between the average number of persons employed and the quantity and value of gold won for the 
periods named below : — 

Financial year 190^-4 
1904-5 

Decrease .. 2042 1,646 7,689 8 

There are about a dozen men working with water obtained from a private race whose returns are 
not included in the above figures. A proposal has been made to drive another tailings-tunnel to enable 
ground as yet unworked to be sluiced, and at the end of the year some attempts to prospect this were 
commenced. No information has reached me as to the prospects obtained. Details of work in this 
locality will be found in the report of Mr. Aleiumder Aitken, manager of the Waimea-Kumara Water- 
races. 



Average Number 

of Men. 
. . 7700 
. . 66-58 


Ounoee of 
Gold won. 

7,712 

6,166 


Valae. 
£ 8. d. 

27,736 16 
20,147 8 



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At Stafford the Wheel of B*ortune Claim is now being worked by a small local company, who antici- 
pate making a paying concern of it. An increased water-supply is desirable. At my last visit the 
new proprietors were engaged on their first wash-up. I noticed that an electric current was utilised 
for the removal of the black sand left after streaming down. 

The Minerals Gold-mining Company have sunk a new shaft and effected repairs to their water-race. 
The layer of wash being operated upon is not thick, but is looked upon as capable of being worked to a 
profit. 

Humphrey's Gully sluicing-ciaim, owned by the Consolidated Groldfields of New Zealand (Limited), 
is being worked on tribute with fairly good results. There are no really large alluvial mining works 
in the vicinity of Hokitika except that at Humphrejr's Gully, but several small claims are being worked 
within a few miles of the town, affording remunerative employment to a number of men. Some 
remarks respecting the proposal to bring water on to Seddon's Terrace appear in the report of Mr. 
Warden Day. 

Alluvial mining at Ross is principally represented by the operations of the Mont d'Or Company, 
who won about £41,000 worth of gold during the year. Extensive preliminary works in the shape of 
cutting water-races, building dams, laying pipe-lines, &c., have been undertaken by the McCloud Terrace 
Sluicing Company, sixty men being employed. It is to be hoped that this new undertaking will prove 
successful. Practically nothing of any importance was done further south of Ross during 1904 in the 
class of mining under consideration, the claims at Waiho being under protection at the end of the year. 

Details as to the work of most of the claims in the West Coast District appear in the report of 
Mr. R. Tennent, Inspector of Mines. 

In the Southern District the completion of the siphons in connection with the Mountain Hut Water- 
race, by which water is brought on to the diggings at Maerewhenua, North Otago, has enabled ground 
to be worked and employment given to upwards of thirty men. It is considered that some of the 
claims may be worked out in about three years and that others will last for seven years. During part 
of the year there was a shortage of water, due mainly to breaks in the upper portions of the race. The • 
opinion that some definite steps will have to be taken within the next five years to open the endowed 
lands at Maerewhenua — known to be auriferous — for mining purposes is freely expressed by miners in 
the locality. At present these lands are simply used as a sheep and cattle run. Comparatively little 
mining is being done at Livingstone. 

At Manuka Creek, Waitahuna, Wetherstone's, and Waipori there is very little change to note ; 
the hydraulic claims are being steadily worked, and are generally understood to yield good payable 
returns. Including Chinese, about 130 people are employed in these localities, exclusive of those 
employed on dredges 

The extensive works of the Blue Spur and Gabriel's Gully Consolidated Gold-mining Company 
(Limited), near Lawrence, have been worked on the usual lines. The results of last year's work are 
reported to be the least remunerative in proportion to the cubic measurement of the ground sluiced 
since operations were conmienced in 1891, the average value of the cemented wash worked 
being 7d. per cubic yard ; 203,000 cubic yards being broken up, sluiced, and elevated for a return of 
1,524*8 oz., having a value of £6,062 6s. 2d. ; this being a decrease of 144*68 oz., representing a value 
of £570 13s. 7d., as compared with the jrield of the previous year. The expenditure in wages, stores, 
repairs, &c., for the year was £4,558 4s. 3d., as against £4,375 5s. lOd. for the year preceding, thus show- 
ing that, although revenue decreased by over £570, working-expenses increased over £183. The general 
manager, Mr. J. Howard Jackson, has supplied a very full account of the working-results for the year, 
which is embodied in the report of Mr. E. R. Green, Inspector of Mines. 

A similar class of cement wash to that at Blue Spur is being worked at Munro's Gidly on the opposite 
watershed, three claims being at work with payable results. 

Tuapeka Flat is likely to become one of the centres of hydraulic mining. Three claims have been 
taken up for this purpose. In connection with one of these claims a new departure is proposed from 
the ordinary method of obtaining water for sluicing purposes where such is obtainable at higher eleva- 
tions. In this case it is intended to generate electric power at Blackcleugh Stream, convey the current 
to Tuapeka Flat, and utilise it for the purpose of pumping the sluicing- water. Mechanically there should 
be no difficulty in doing this, but the commercial side of the undertaking will be watched with much 
interest. 

At Beaumont the Champion Company's claim continues to be worked by hydraulic sluicing and 
elevating. It was commenced on these lines by a small local company some seven years ago. Subse- 
quently the present company put a dredge on the claim, but evidently this was not so successful as the 
hydraulic method, and the dredge has since been disposed of and removed to Southland. 

The Island Block Claim has also been jointly worked by the hydraulic and dredging methods, the 
latter being considered very efficient. Good results have been obtained by sluicing and elevating. 
The dredge is admittedly on the small side for the work required, and is at present closed down. The 
company employ twenty men. 

Messrs. Eadie and Kirkpatrick's and^Messrs. Curton and Whelan's claims at Tallaburn have been 
amalgamated, the new proprietary being registered as the Tallaburn Hydraulic Sluicing Company 
(Limited). 

In the neighbourhood of Miller's Flat the alluvial deposits in the Clutha River and its banks are 
worked almost entirely by dredges, the exception being that of the Golden Rim Company, who work 
by hydraulic sluicing and dredging. It is intended to work the two methods in combination, using 
the hydraulic plant to strip the surface in advance of the dredge's operations. 

At Roxburgh alluvial mining on an extensive scale is earned out by the Roxburgh Amalgamated 
Mining and Sluicing Company (Limited), the method being hydraulic sluicing and elevating, and the 
results obtained are considered good. The company employ eighteen men. Between this claim and 



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(3.-3. 12 

the end of the gorge near Coal Creek there are three or four other hydraulic claims, employing in the 
aggregate some twenty persons, and a number of individual diggers make a living in the district, most 
of them working on or adjacent to the river-bank. Dredging is the principal method of alluvial mining 
carried on in the vicinity. 

Bald Hill Flat continues to maintain a steady output of gold. There are three hydraulic claims 
here, worked respectively by Messrs. Carroll and Lynch, the Last Chance Hydraulic Sluicing and 
Elevating Company, and Messrs. Ewing and Dowdall. All these claims are reported to yield payable 
results. 

Near Alexandra Mr. James Rivers is working a claim at Richmond Hill, about two miles &om 
the town. To conserve water for the requirements of this claim a dam has been built in Speargrass 
Creek (a branch of the Manorbum Stream), about twelve mDes from Alexandra, of which photographs 
are, by the courtesy of Mr. Rivers, reproduced. The grant for this dam admits of its being carried up 
to a height of 63 ft., but it is as yet only built to a height of 47 ft. 6 in. When photographed the water 
was 17 ft. deep at tho dam, which is built of masonry (set in cement) on a rock foundation. Mr. Rivers 
has entered into an agreement with the Alexandra Borough Council to supply one sluice-head of water 
to the borough reservoir for public purposes, a pressure due to a vertical head of 350 ft. being obtained. 
It is intended to rai^e the dam another 15 ft., and so conserve a very much larger body of water for 
mining and public purposes, the exceptionally dry summer of 1904-5 having demonstrated the necessity 
for thj5 work. The extra storage gained by the completion of the dam will be very great, and is con- 
sidered ample to meet the requirements of mining, irrigation, and domestic purposes. 

The Alexandra Bonanza Company have been working their claim at Galloway Flat by sluicing, 
but results are not very encouraging, the groimd being rather poor. This company have a fine supply of 
water, which is conserved by a massive masonry dam across the Manorbum Stream at the foot of Green- 
land Swamp, and brought down to the claim partly in gullies, and for some sixteen miles in a large 
water-race. The reservoir area is granted for 1,500 acres, but the present dam (not yet carried up to 
its full height) impounds water over an area of, say, 800 acres, with an average depth of 8 ft. When 
completed to full height it is estimated the dam would throw the water back covering an area of 1,400 
acres by 11 ft. deep. This information is supplied by the manager of the claim. The altitude at which 
the main race discharges the water into a rocky gorge overlooking the Galloway Flat is sufficient to 
admit of its extension for the purpose of working known auriferous ground extending for several miles — 
(a) along the side of the hills up the Valley of the Manuherikia to beyond the Township of Ophir, and 
even to cross the saddle between Cphir and Ida Valley, being thus available for sluicing the deposits 
in the locality known as Black's No. 3 ; and (6) in the opposite direction towards Alexandra, where 
fairly extensive prospecting operations were being conducted early in the present year by the Manor- 
bum Gold Syndicate. 

In making an examination early this year of the locaUties which can be commanded by the water 
just referred to, I was much impressed with the possibihties of a revival of remunerative mining work 
in the neighbourhood of Ophir especially, provided that water is brought on to the ground ; but in 
the locality of the terraces above Galloway Flat there are also evidences of alluvial wash having been 
mined and carted to water for washing. It is quite clear that where this sort of work will enable a 
man to make a Uving the ground woidd pay handsomely with plenty of water for sluicing purposes. 
Without water nothing can be done, but if this can be made available to parties of miners working 
small claims, there is not the sHghtest doubt that every drop of available water would be bought, and 
the industry in the locaUties named flourish for many years to come. 

HydrauUc mining at Matakanui is still conducted on very satisfactory hnes, the Undaunted Gold- 
mining Company, the Tinkers Gold-mining Company, the Matakanui Gold-mining Company, and 
Messrs. Symes and Sons all doing well. The Devonshire and Drybread diggings are not much worked, 
owing to water not being available in any quantity during the lifetime of the claims at Matakanui. 
About thirty-five men are employed. 

At Cambrians the principal claim being worked is thai) of the Vinegar Hill HydrauUc Sluicing 
Company. Mr. Ewing's claims at Cambrians and Shepherd's Flat have been let to parties of working 
miners. Some three other claims in the locaUty are being worked on a small scale. 

At St. Bathan's the principal imdertakings are those of the United M. and E. Company at the 
township, and the Scandinavian Water-race Company at Surface Hill, about thirty men being employed 
by the two companies. 

Two other small claims are also worked in the vicinity. About seventy men are employed in alluvial 
mining at St. Bathan's and Cambrians. 

Blackstone Hill and Ida Valley suffer from insufficient water-supply. This is owing largely to their 
altitude. Only a few miners can, therefore, find employment, notwithstanding the good quaUty of the 
aUuvial deposits. 

At Idabum very Uttle work is now being done. 

For mining purposes at Naseby most of the water is suppUed from the Govemment water-races, 
and during the financial year 1904-5 the value of gold won by parties using Govemment water was 
£7,442. A few claims are also worked by water from private races. The shallow and more easily worked 
ground in the locaUty is becoming rapidly exhausted, but in aU probabiUty the water-supply will, later 
on, be concentrated on other gold-bearing areas which may require to be worked on a more compre- 
hensive scale than has hitherto characterised mining operations in this neighbourhood. 

HydrauUc mining is conducted at Patearoa with good results, also to a smaU extent at Hamilton's. 
At Deep Stream the operations are on a fairly good scale, and working is carried on with profitable 
results. 

The working of aUuvial mines (dredging claims excepted) in the vicinity of CromweU — including 
Kawarau Gorge, Bannockbum, Lowbum, and Quartz-reef Point — ^is somewhat on the decrease, but 



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QOLDEN BEACH DREDQE, ALEXANDRA. REPAIRING ON ICE. 




MR. RIVERS DAM AT SPEARORASS CREEK, NEAR ALEXANDRA, OTAGO. OUTER FACE OP WALL. 

ISee also Report of Mr. Warden Burgess, 



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13 C— 8. 

at the several places named there are small claims which afford remunerative employment to a number 
of men. 

At Luggate, Matatapu, Criffel Face, and Cardrona alluvial mining is being carried on much as 
usual ; nothing sensational is reported, but the several claims — at none of which can the operations be 
classed as extensive — appear (with a few exceptions) to give their holders a fair living. 

On the Arrow River between Arrowtown and Macetown there are a few small claims in addition 
to one of 25 acres held by the Arrow Falls Sluicing Company. The latter company employ seven men. 
The other claims are worked by small parties, one of whom uses the Smith jet-pump elevator. 

In the locaUty of Queenstown the working of alluvial deposits by hydrauUc methods is not carried 
out an3nw'here on a very extensive scale, although there are several claims of comparatively small 
extent, and work is in progress at Twelve-mile Beach, Arthur's Point, Lower Shotover, and Moonlight, 
as well as at Glenorchy. 

On the Shotover River above Arthur's Point there are, in addition to the larger works of the Skip- 
per's Sluicing Company and Mr. Davis, a number of smajl claims (many of them being worked by 
the Smith jet-pump elevator) yielding returns which place their owners in very comfortable circum- 
stances. These claims are usually worked to the best advantage in winter time when the river is low, 
and extend for several miles beyond Skipper's Point. In this upper reach of the river some prepara- 
tions have been made for working on a scale more on a parallel with that of the Skipper's Sluicing Com- 
pany than has hitherto been practised above Skipper's Point. ^ 

At Nevis and Upper Nevis a considerable amount of work is being done at the several alluvial 
mines, hydraulic sluicing and elevating being the principal methods of work adopted. Although a 
few of the claims have not turned out successful undertalangs, the bulk of them appear to be payable 
concerns. 

The Nokomai Company's claims in the Nokomai Valley continue to yield payable returns. These 
claims are worked on a comprehensive scale by hydraulic sluicing and elevating. Lower down the 
valley the Lion Claim (which is also equipped with hydraulic plant) has been worked, but unfortunately 
not with success so far. The property changed hands during the year, and I understand it is intended 
to give the claim another good trial. There are a few other claims in the locality, and the high terraces 
between the Nokomai Valley and Parawa undoubtedly carry good auriferous gravels, which will be 
worked in the future as water becomes available. 

Alluvial mining at Waikaia is now chiefly represented by the dredging branch of the gold-mining 
industry. The Argyle Claim, which has been so successfully worked by hydraulic sluicing and elevat- 
ing, is to be workwl by a water-power dredge. The Winding Creek Claim and plant have been pur- 
chased, and will be worked on behalf of the Round Hill Company, the owners of the claims at Round 
Hill, near Riverton. 

In the western portion of the southern goldfield, the Roimd Hill Gold-mining Company's works 
at Round Hill are the most extensive, and their sluicing, hydraulic-elevating, and gold-saving appUances 
about as perfect as any to be foimd in the colony. The gold in this field is very fine, and saved by amal- 
gamation after streaming down over a plush-covered table. Value of gold, £4 per ounce. The ground 
operated upon is about 40 ft. deep, part of it being heavy and containing buried timber. During last 
year the average yield of gold won was at the rate of £1,000 per acre, and the cost of winning equal to 
£2 17s. 6d. per ounce of gold obtained, or 2d. per cubic yard of ground sluiced. The Durawera Gold- 
mining Company's claim adjoining continues to be steadily worked under similar conditions to those 
at the Round Hill claims, but operations are on a smaller scale. This company has been very success- 
ful and the property pays well. The Smith Gold-mining Company are abo working on a small scale 
in the same locality. Including about a dozen Chinese, an average of seventy-seven persons are em- 
ployed about Round Hill. 

Mining operations at Orepuki continue to afford steady employment to about a hundred Euro- 
peans and thirty-five Chinese, who are engaged in sluicing, underground mining, and beach-combing ; 
but it is evident that as the present areas get exhausted miners will have to go further afield, and the 
prospects of mining at Pahia and also west of the small claims near the Waiau River will have to be 
practically considered. 

A little alluvial mining is being done at Preservation Inlet and also at Stewart Island. 

More details of operations in the Southern District will be found in the report of Mr. E. R. Green, 
Inspector of Mines, and those of the several Wardens. 

Improvements in Hydraulic-elevating Plants working under Low-water Pressure 

(Messrs. Valpy Bros.' Method). 

When in the Southern District early this year I was informed that Messrs. Valpy Bros., of Glen- 
orchy, Lake Wakatipu, had effected considerable improvements in connection with hydraulic-elevating 
plants. Other engagements not permitting of my visiting the claim (as I had purposed doing) in order 
to see the improv^ plant at work, a request was made to Messrs. Valpy Bros, for particulars of it, and 
I have to acknowledge their courtesy in forwarding the following statement : — 

" We send full description of the elevating plant with which we elevated 1 ft. for every 3i ft. pres- 
sure. To secure the best results it ib absolutely necessary to have large pressure-pipes ; ours were 
12 in. for 4^ heads of water, with HI ft. pressure, pipe-line short and steep. The last 20 ft. of piping 
and right-angle bend were 9 in. in diameter, jet 3 in., goose-neck 8 in., throat 5 J in. tapering to 6| in., 
o" nearly cylindrical for 15 in. An old throat, 6 in. in diameter, was placed abo\ e the new one to lengthen 
the taper as much as possible. Above that was a taper pipe 3 ft. in length and running from 7 in. to 
8J in., from this to the boic, 27 ft. of 9 in. pipes. The suction-pipe lifted 4 ft., making a total of 38 ft. 
lift for 141 ft. pressure ; the length of suction-pipe greatly handicapped the lift, but was unavoidable 
under the circumstances. The uptake was almost perpendicular, and the jet was throwing absolutely 



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C.—S. 14 

true up the centre of the pipe. These two pointa^ together with large pressure-pipes and large jet, are 
most important, especially to those who wish to utilise the available power to the fullest extent. 

** The main difference, however, between our plant and those in general use is in the size of the up- 
take in proportion to the down-pipe and jet. The great object we had in view was to maintain the 
speed of the whole mass of water and gravel (as it passed through the throat) as far up the pipe as pos- 
sible. It is perfectly obvious that a large proportion of the power of the jet is used in so concentrating 
the sluicing-water and gravel that it passes tlm>ugh the throat at a terrific speed in the form of an en- 
larged jet. Now, to suddenly turn this loose (so to speak) into a large space filled with water, as a 12 in. 
or 15 in. pipe would be, is to lose a large amount of the advantage already gained. By using a very 
long taper, and much smaller pipes on the top of it, the velocity is kept up, the whole of the moving 
mass being exactly in the path of the jet. The diameter of the pipe is only increased sufficiently to 
avoid excessive friction, and to aUow for increasing bulk due to lessening speed. With such an up- 
take, when the water rises above the intake through a sudden rush in sluicing, there is never any need 
to allow air into the pipe, as it always clears itself very quickly without turning off any water. 

" We found that even lifting 1 ft. in 3^ ft. the elevator never choked from above, although lifting 
sufficient sand at times to block the upper tail-race 20 in. in width, paved with wood blocks, and carrying 
over six heads of water with 8 in. fall in 12 ft. According to the Miners^ Guide the capacity would be 
over 36 cubic yards per hour. The elevating- water was 4^ heads, and the sluicing-water (entirely separate) 
was obtained partly from leakage and partly from a stream on ground-level. We use a temporary 
plain board tail-race with a faU of 1 'in 12 from the face to the elevator, and find that half the water 
required to blow the stuff in is sufficient to carry it by this method without the necessity for scraping 
or shovelling. Sheets of 10 gauge steel about 20 in. wide on the bottom and 6 in. or 8 in. up the sides, 
overlapped | in. and weighted down, are far better, and, though costing more, will stand years of wear. 

" We have arrived at these conclusions and adopted these methods after a considerable amount 
of practical experimenting, and quite fail to see the use or reason for the usual large space in the intake 
casting, as in several smaU elevators we made a much smaller space in proportion was more satisfac- 
tory. We might mention that we found that when the throat and uptake were too large a certain 
amount of water was coming down all round the jet with considerable force." 

Messrs. Valpy Bros, also inform me that they are using a very simple but exceedingly effective 
home-made winch and crane for dealing with large stones in the claim. 

This plant, which is very cheaply constructed, is said to be able (when using about one sluice-head 
of water under a pressure due to a vertical head of 45 ft.) to Hft 2^ tons, or roll 6 tons in an open pad- 
dock, and generally do the work of five men. It has a lift of 20 ft. and a radius of 18 ft. The crane 
can be moved forward by the power of the winch, which ib set some distance behind. The firm regret 
not being able to send a photograph of this in time for inclusion in this year's report, but I hope next 
year to be able to give more detailed information of the plant and an illustration of the same. 



DREDGE MINING. 



The following statement shows the numerical strength of the fleet of gold-dredges in the colony 
at the end of the year as nearly as can be ascertained : — 



District. I Working. 



Standing. 



TT-j , Under Re- ^ . 

EnoUon ^^^^l^'' di«^"tL Total. 
Enotion. RebuUding. <^«n»otled. 



I I 

Marlborough, Nelson, and West 34 15 3 3 ... 55 

Coast I ! 

Otago and Southland ... ... i 152 15 ... 5 12 184 



Totals ... .. I 186 ' 30 ' 3 , 8 I 12 239 



The number of working dredges will represent direct employment to upwards of thirteen hundred 
people, and if the coal-carters, coal-miners hewing coal for use on dredges, and mechanics engaged 
on repairing-work for dredges, as well as other men incidentally employed be also taken into con- 
sideration, the dredging industry of the colony will be found to provide full employment to considerably 
over two thousand people. 

As compared with the previous year, the foregoing figures show a decrease of fifteen worlang 
dredges. This is to be attributed chiefly to the West Coast District, where, during the boom of some 
four or five years ago, the impatience of companies to have dredges placed on their claims did not, 
in many instances, admit of the nature of the ground to be worked being properly and fully ascer- 
tained, nor of time being allowed engineers to design suitable machines for the work requir^. The 
natural results of all this were that (a) dredges were put on to claims which, from th*eir very nature, 
were more suited to being worked by hydraulic methods, and (6) dredges much too light for the work 
required were adopted, and, as might be expected, the anticipated success was not attained. 

Taking the West Coast District as a whole, it b not nearly so well suited for dredging as the 
Southern District is. The alluvial deposits are much rougher — containing a far larger proportion of 
large stones — and the wash is not nearly so free. These conditions require very much more digging- 
power and greater strength in the materials which go to make up the machinery of the dredge than 
are necessary on dredges working in the southern goldfields. Buried timber is also an occasional source 



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16 C— 3. 

of trouble. Dredges properly designed and built for the work would, in many places in the West Coast 
District, doubtless give very good results, but the capital cost of such machines would be undoubtedly 
greater than the general run of the dredges now employed. There are, however, under existing con- 
ditions, some dredging concerns on the West Coast which are very profitable undertakings. The 
commercial side of the subject is dealt with by Mr. Warden Kenrick so far as dredging operations 
throughout his sub-district are concerned, and as there are more dredges in that part of the West Coast 
goldfields than in any other, the average results obtained by them may be accepted as a very 
fair criterion for the remainder. 

In the Southern District dredging is being very steadily carried on with, on the whole, very good 
results. The most phenomenal returns were obtained by the Electric Company's dredges, the No. 2 
having won 1,265 oz. and the No. 1 1,273 oz. of gold for one week's work in each instance. This latter 
is the highest yield yet recorded for a single week. These dredges work at the low end of the Kawarau 
River, near CromweU. A short distance below the confluence of this river with the Clutha is the claim 
of the Hartley and Riley dredge, which has on different occasions obtained very large returns, and for 
some time held the record in this respect for the entire colony. 

The upper part of the Clutha River, for a few miles above Cromwell, has of late come to the front. 
Some dredges were placed on this section of the river a few years ago, but experience proved them 
to be too small and light for successful work. The present dredges are much larger and more powerful, 
and whilst not obtaining such large weekly returns as has been the lot of dredges on richer portions of 
the same river below Cromwell (and also on the Kawarau River), they have the advantage of not being 
nearly so much subject to stoppage by floods or troubled with such quantities of travelling drift. 

Alexandra is still the chief centre of the dredging industry of Otago, a large number of dredges 
being at work on the Clutha River and at the adjacent banks. 

Dredges are also at work in the gorge below Alexandra, but as the water in flood time is deep and 
the current very strong, these dredges can only work to advantage during a portion of the year. In 
this respect they are at a disadvantage in comparison with others above the town, where some of the 
claims comprise both river and bank areas, the latter being generally available for work at times when 
operations on the river cannot be conducted under favourable conditions. Below the gorge a number 
of dredges are at work on the river above and below Roxburgh ; also several others lower down in the 
neighbourhood of Miller's Flat. 

On the Waipori field nine dredges (giving direct employment to sixty men) were at work when I 
visited the locality early this year. Some of the dredges in this locality are worked by water-pressure. 

In Southland, the valley of the Waikaka River has been proved a good payable field for dredging 
operations. The wash is not rough or unduly tight, nor the groimd very deep as compared with some 
of the areas on the Clutha River, consequently the dredges do not need to be quite as large and powerful, 
and the capital cost is correspondingly less. Similar working-conditions apply to the other areas in 
Southland where dredging operations are carried on, and more particularly at Chatton, Charlton, and 
Waimumu. At Waikaia the groimd generally is perhaps not quite so easy, but, taken all roimd, it 
does not present any working difficulties of moment. Dredging operations were attempted some few 
years ago in this locality without its potentialities for this class of mining being properly known, but, 
as a result of the success which characterised the industry in other parts of Southland, groimd away 
from the river was well prospected, and found to be payably auriferous as well as suitable for being 
worked by dredges. At the end of the year there were about a dozen dredges at work or under erection 
in this neighbourhood, and approximately double that number in the Waikaka Valley, the total number 
of working dredges for the Southland goldfields being forty-six. 

With very few exceptions, steam is the motive power used for driving the machinery on board 
gold-dredges, locomotive and return-tube boilers being general, and the engines usually of the horizontal 
cross-compound type. In a few instances — where water under pressure is available — ^the machinery 
is worked by water through the medium of a Pelton wheel, dredges so equipped being successfuly 
operated at Waipori and Cardrona, whilst a similar arrangement is being adopted at one of the Waikaia 
claims. Electricity has not come into use to the extent which might have been expected, probably 
owing to the fact that when the state of the Clutha River is most suitable for dredging — viz., in the 
winter months, when there is no water coming from melting snow — the water-supply, usually snow- 
water from the mountains, for driving dynamos for the generation of electrical current could not be 
depended upon. In the neighbourhood of Alexandra the Eamscleugh No. 3 dredge (a very large and 
powerful machine) is electrically driven, the current being generated by a water-driven dynamo, and 
I understand that the success which has attended this installation has resulted in the decision of the 
owners to similarly equip another large dredge. There appears little doubt that in such localities as 
Waikaka and Waikaia, in Southland, as well as Alexandra, Cromwell, Roxburgh, and Miller's Flat, in 
Otago, electric energy could be cheaply produced by steam-power plants, which might be erected at 
a convenient lignite-pit. Fuel would thus be handy and cheap, and the most modem and economi- 
cally worked steam-plant could be adopted, the electrical current being conveyed to the dredges by 
cables in the usual way. Such an arrangement could not fail to prove more economical than the present 
system, under which heavy expenses in cartage of coal (as well as loss of time in handling the same) 
and the wages of a stoker are necessarily incurred. If dxedge-owners in the districts referred to would 
form electrical-power companies for the purpose of meeting their own requirements, there is every 
reason to think that such undertakings would be commercially successful. 

In one instance, where coal-carting was very costly, the installation of oil-engines was decided 
upon by the owners. 

The question of stripping off the surface soil and overburden above the auriferous wash where 
dredges are working on flats (e.g., the Southland, Waipori, and a few other dredging-fields)^ha8 not, 
to my mind, received anything like the amount of practical attention to which it is, by reason of its 



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C— 3. 16 

importance, entitled. There is no gainsaying the fact that the present practice of passing soil, clay, 
and gravels down the sluice-boxes at one and the same time is capable of being very materially improved 
upon with considerable advantage. It is well known that in the localities alluded to the gold is fairly 
fine, and in many instances may be classed as " very fine " when considered by the standard usually 
applied to alluvial gold. AVhen buckets come up laden with a mixture of clay, puddle, and auriferous 
gravel, and the whole lot are washed down the sluice-box together, some of the gold adheres to the 
plastic or serai-plastic material, the result being that, instead of being separated and recovered, this 
gold is carried off and deposited among the tailings, and therefore lost. 

The extent of this loss is not recognised so fidly as it might be, but if dredge-owners will go to a 
little trouble in the matter they can easily ascertain what the loss is. I submit the following sugges- 
tion : Make a square box 3 ft. long, 3 ft. broad, and 3 ft. deep ; inside measurements. When level- 
full, the contents will be exactly a cubic yard. Half fill it with water, and then, say, once in every 
hour, throw in a dish of tailings, repeating this until the box is quite full and the surplus water has 
run off. The tailings, settling in the water, will be very compact by the time the box is full, but con- 
solidation may be aided by ramming to some extent. Now cradle these tailings carefully, and weigh 
the gold saved by the cradle. This will be a fair index of the loss which is constantly going on, and 
I may remark that, acting on a suggestion of this kind some time ago, one dredgemaster in charge of 
a dredge working gravels overlaid by a bed of clayey matter made the experiment, and found the average 
loss to be 2 gr. per cubic yard. 

A Uttle calculation will show how a loss of this kind works out : Suppose a dredge is lifting 50 
cubic yards per hour for an average of twenty hours per day, and allowing for holidays, stoppages for 
repairs, &c., we take four and a half working-days per week all the year round. This gives 4,500 cubic 
yards of ground moved per week, and, assuming the loss to be 2 gr. per cubic yard, the weekly loss is 
18 oz. 15 dwt. of gold, which, at the moderate rate of £3 15s. per ounce, represents the sum of £70 6fl. 3d. 
Assuming, however, that the loss is only half the quantity stated, at 1 gr. per cubic yard it means a 
weekly loss of £35 to an average-sized dredge, and I have very little doubt in my own mind that there 
are dredges now at work at which something like fifty pounds' worth of gold per week will be found 
to be going over the tail shoots, if careful tests of the tailings are made somewhat on the lines suggested. 

What I wish to convey is this : That (a) in the light of gold-saving alone, it will, in my opinion, 
pay to strip the overburden — where such is of a clayey nature — off the top of the auriferous wash, and 
(6) the land can be restored to a much better state than is now being done. There has been an outcry 
in some quarters about valuable land being destroyed for agricultural purposes by gold-dredging opera- 
tions. This has undoubtedly been the case in a few instances, but in others, where swampy marsh land 
has been dredged, the effect has been to drain and sweeten it, and it is now growing sweet grass and 
clover where rank sour grass and rushes grew before. At the same time, it cannot be claimed that this 
land has been left in anything like so good a condition as it might have been had advance stripping 
been practised, and the soil and subsoil, &c., deposited on the gravel tailings instead of their all being 
mixed up as at present. 

At Waikaka, Southland, trees have been planted on the tailings left by one dredge working on 
private land. At my last visit to the locality I carefully inspected this plantation, and found the young 
trees healthy and growing well. The idea of planting some of the tailings-areas which were formerly 
swamp lands with native flax suggested itselfjto my mind, and I submit this as offering a means of 
profitably^jutilising the ground from which thepalluvial gold has been won. 

Improvements in Dredges. 
Roberls*8 SiU-devator for Dredges. 

This elevator was designed to obviate the great wear-and-tear which takes place with the ordinary 
bucket or " baby " elevator which was originally first introduced by Mr. Edward Roberts, C.E., of 
Dunedin, on the dredge " Moa," at Alexandra, and which has been largely adopted by other engineers. 
It is well known that any piece of machinery having a number of separate parts working in sand, or 
water heavily charged with sand, very quickly wears out, and this has been the case in a marked degree 
with silt-elevators on dredges. Mr. Roberts early foresaw this, and in 1899 patented the wheel-elevator, 
claiming in the patent to receive the sand in any manner at the bottom of the wheel, and discharging 
it at the top, so that the wheel would be adapted for dipping the material from a trough or receiving 
it direct from the sands-shoots as in the plan illustrated. The latter plan is for many reasons the best, 
but principally because there is no friction in moving the wheel through a body of sand and water, 
and the wheel may be stopped at any time without any danger of silting up and the breakages con- 
sequent on the restarting of the wheel. 

In the design illustrated (which is similar to the wheels used on the Grolden United, Sullivan's 
Lead, and Grolden Rim dredges), the wheel A is fixed in a framework alongside the main elevator, and 
is capable of being raised and lowered with the elevator-frame. It is driven by gearing and belting 
from the main elevator countershaft and runs at a slow speed. The wheel-rim is formed " trough 
shape " with internal buckets. The sand and water from the tables being deUvered by the sand-shoot 
C into the lower part of the wheel, and, the wheel revolving at a sufficient speed, the water and sand 
is taken away as fast as it is delivered from the sand-shoot, and there is consequently no boiling. It 
is then carried up slowly, the sand settling in the buckets and the surplus water being caught off the 
Ups of the buckets by a collector B having suitable vanes and delivering the water at the bottom into 
the paddock. By the time the buckets reach the top of the collector the last of the water is discharged 
and the sand begins to deliver on the apron or shoot D, sliding down this shoot into the main elevator- 
buckets in a continuous stream. There are no moving parts except the wheel and shaft, and no wear. 
The wheel also, being suspended freely, and having no parts in frictional contact with the material, 
can be of very light construction, 



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17 C— 3. 

WaU and Niabet'^s Patent Stopper for the Prevention of Losing of Buckets on Dredges. 

This is a simple contrivance set upon a bucket-ladder of a dredge, placed at right angles with the 
ladder, and consists of a shaft working in three bearings. On the shaft are secured two " bell-crank " 
levers, having a light and a heavy end. These crank levers are so placed on the shaft as to come exactly 
between the connecting-links, and in a line with the centre of the bucket-link. The light end of the 
bell-crank being uppermost and working against the under-side of the bucket-link, the lower or heavy 
end of the bell-crank is made sufficiently heavy to bring it to a position of rest as shown in full lines 
on plan. When in this position it wiD arrest the runaway buckets before they have travelled more 
than 8 in. or 10 in. The dotted lines show the chain of buckets having travelled a distance of 8 in., 
and it will be seen that the bell-crank has assumed a horizontal position, and is on the point of release 
from the bucket-links. There should not be less than two sets placed on each ladder, so that one set 
will always be in position to arrest the runaway buckets. 

The arresters are placed in the centre of the ladder and at or near the lower end ; the centre ladder- 
roller must be a flanged one, so as to guide the bucket-chain centrally. 

By reference to the plan it will be easily seen that the " tumblers " or " cranks " shown in full 
lines are at rest, and shown in dotted lines, marked, not only the advance of the buckets, but the tumblers 
on the point of release, the buckets having advanced that distance. A set further up the ladder would 
be at the point of release at the end of the bucket-link, and the set lower down would just be coming 
into contact with the front end of the bucket-link. By this means there is always one in position to 
arrest the buckets ; but, should the chain break, one or more will immediately fly into position. 

There are disengaging-levers not shown on the plan, these levers are to disengage any one or all 
of the bell-crank tumblers. They are placed within easy reach of the winchman. 

Qillespie^s Dredging4ink Shoe, 

Mr. Thomas Gillespie, dredgemaster of the Happy Valley Dredge, Happy Valley, Lawrence, Otago, 
has patented a very simple arrangement by which the working-life of an ordinary dredge-bucket *' runner" 
can be greatly prolonged, and at the same time effect considerable diminution in the ordinary costs 
of repairs. 

Hitherto, the bucket runners have been subjected to enormous friction, and when somewhat worn 
down have been reversed until worn down at the other side to such an extent as to become useless. By 
the adoption of the improvement under notice, the runner itself is relieved from wear by a shoe of f in. 
angle steel, secured to the runner by a couple of rivets, which are easily removable when it is necessary 
to remove the old shoe and substitute a new one. In the case of old buckets which have been at work 
in the ordinary way, shoes of angle steel can be fitted to cover the worn part of the runner, which thus 
becomes virtually equal to new. 

It is claimed that the cost of fitting a set of buckets with these shoes is not a quarter of the cost 
of replacing a full set of runners, and also that the loss of time in fitting or renewing the shoes is trifling 
compared with that of entirely renewing a set of runners, thus effecting a double saving. 

This invention was brought under my notice at my last visit to Lawrence ; and I understand the 
invention has been adopted on some of the dredges in the locality, and has given entire satisfaction. 




Restoration of Land after being worked by OM-dredges, 

Mr. F. W. Payne, Consulting Engineer, Dunedin, has kindly supplied a drawing and description 
of a dredge (ELnewstubbs' system) so designed as to strip off the surface soil, &c., overl3ring the gravel 
wash in advance of the dredging- work proper and to deposit the soil on the tailinss well behind the 
dredge. The invention comprises a new form of sluice-box, for which patent rights nave been applied. 

The replacement of the top soil or overburden on the gravel is carried out by a simple arrangement 
of combined sluice-box and soil-shoots, as shown in plan. The two outside shoots carry the soil, and 
these, being longer than the sluice-box, convey the soil to a much greater distance than the tailings, 
and naturally deposit the soil on the top of the latter. In working the dredge, operations are conducted 
alternately in the soil and the gravel, the work of stripping being carried on without lifting the auriferous 
gravel The drawing shows the dredge in a position ready for receiving the buckets to strip the top 
soil to a depth just sufficient to allow flotation of the pontoons. Stripping is carried on across the 
whole width of the paddock-face and as far forward as the buckets can conveniently work, the soil 
being carried over and deposited on the gravel- tailings by means of the soU-shoots until the point B is 
reached. The dredge is then dropped back and the gravel- wash dredged separately. 

8— C. 3. 



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C— 3. 18 

When the top soil is being worked the doon AA are shown by dotted lines asVlosing the Bluice-box, 
and diverting the material to each of the side shoots. When the dredge is put to work on the gravel 
these doors are moved so as to close ofi the side shoots and open the sluice-box. The side or soil shoots 
are preferably lined with flat plates, and, when the gravel is being treated, serve as platforms for the man 
attending to the sluice-box. 

I. It is recognised that, in addition to the great advantage of replacing the soil on the tailings, the 
treatment of the wash by itself — instead of being intermixed with soil, clay, kc,, as is usual — is materially 
conducive to the saving of gold now lost by the ordinary methods. 

i [jjThe Blackwater River Grold-dredging Company (Limited) have adopted a novel method of giving 
the gravel a shaking in its passage down the screen. Instead of the periphery of the screen being truly 
circular as is usual, there are four " set-offs " of 4 in. each at regular intervals, the design being to give 
the gravels four drops of 4 in. each in every revolution, and thus prevent the material which is being 
screened from sliding down the screen in lumps. The effect would naturally be to assist in the dis- 
integration of gravels which might be held together by any cementing-materiaL This arrangement 
is illustrated by accompanying sectional sketch. 




ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES. 

During the year 1904 there were a total of fifteen fatalities in connection with gold-mining operations 
as compared with nineteen for the previous year. The whole of them, as well as others which were not 
fatal but considered at the time to be sufficiently serious to be reported to the Department, have been 
fully inquired into. 

One accident in particular, which was somewhat unique in its character, may be especially referred 
to. This occurred on the 14th March last, at the Energetic Mine, Reefton. This mine is worked in 
conjunction with the Wealth of Nations Mine, but the shaft of the former is sunk to a greater depth 
than the lowest level of the latter. Some four months prior to the accident a winze had been sunk 
from the Wealth of Nations Mine, and at the time was partially filled with water. A level was driven 
from the Energetic shaft from a depth lower than the bottom of the winze referred to, and when this 
had reached a sufficient distance, a rise was put up for the purpose of tapping the water in the winxe and 
subsequently holing through for ventilation. When the machine-drilled borehole desired to let off 
the water was pricked through by the drill into broken ground at the bottom of the winze, the water 
came away very gently (the drill being left in the hole), and either gave off, or carried with it, a noxious 
gas, which suffocated the two men working in the rise and also a third man who was engaged in rescue- 
work. The lights used by the men were not, so far as is known, appreciably affected, but the gas had 
all the effects on explorers usually experienced by persons inhaling sulphuretted hydrogen, and also 
blackened metal watch-cases and similar articles. These facts point to the gas liberated being to a 
great extent, if not entirely, sulphuretted hydrogen, and its presence may probably be accounted for 
by chemical action resulting from the decomposition of p3rrites in the water being at such a stage as 
to produce the gas. Had the connection been made months before or after, no disastrous results might 
have occurred, as on the one hand sufficient time would not have elapsed for the necessary chemical 
changes to have taken place, and on the other hand, time would doubtless have admitted of the com- 
pletion of the change and of the gases gradually escaping or being neutralised. It is well enough known 
by seamen that water conveyed in casks or tanks will frequently get so bad as to be unfit for use, but if 
left alone will come all right again. This is mentioned as a possible parallel to the condition of the 
water which had accumulated in the winze. It has been a common-enough thing in this and other 
mining districts to tap water contained in winzes by boreholes from lower levels without any ill effects 
whatever, and such a practice might be carried out for a century or more without any accident. In 
my own experience and practice it has been found necessary in several instaflces to drain very large 
areas of old workings — in comparison with which the accumulated water in a winze is a mere drop in 
a bucket — ^by boring from lower levels, no other means beingjavailable, and this, too, has been accom- 
plished without the slightest danger of any kind. 

The accident referred to has caused suggestions to be made for legislative action requiring 
accumulations of water to be first baled or pumped, and the place where such accumulation existed 
to be ventilated before being holed into. Really practical men of experience of course recognise 
that such suggestions |are not applicable in all cases — in fact, it is often absolutely impossible tot 
their being given effect to — and that legislation in the! direction indicated would be ineffectual. The 
Inspectors of Mines have been instructed to draw the attention of mine-owners or managers to the 
question, and to require, where such a course i3 reasonably practicable, that places containing accu- 
mulations of water shall be baled out and ventilated before other workings are holed into them. 



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19 



C— S. 



It IB ]U8t aspikely that the men employed in baling accumulated water would suffer from poiBonous 
gas Jas those men did|at the accident under notice, provided that similar conditions exist as regards 
chemical action. 333 

^The following tabulated statement shows the number of fatal and serious non-fatal accidents which 
iirere reported to the Department during the year : — 



Olaw o{ Mining. 


Northern 
DUtriot. 


WertOoait 
District. 


Sontham 
DUtriot. 


Total. 




Fatal. NoD-fatal. 


Fatal. Non-fatal. 


Fatal. JNon-iatal. 

! 


Fatal. iNon-faUI. 


Qaartz 

Hydraalio and alluvial 

T>redging ... 


3 


2 


3 


4 


5 
i 


1 
3 
5 


6 
6 
4 


7 
3 
8 


Totals 


3 


2 


3 


7 


9 


9 


15 


18 



MINERALS OTHER THAN GOLD. 

SOHBELITE. 

This mineral is found associated with quartz at Top Valley, near Blenheim, and at Macrae's, Mount 
Highlay, Bendigo, and Glenorchy, in Otago. At present it is only being worked in the vicinity of 
Macrae's and Mount Highlay, Messrs. W. and G. Donaldson alone having in the past made a commercial 
product of the mineral, which they separate from the quartz sands by concentration. 

As the demand for scheelite containing not less than 60 per cent, of tungstic acid is steadily increasing, 
and much greater quantities than have hitherto been available are now being inquired for, the matter 
is receiving greater attention in the district, and it appears more than probable that the export of this 
mineral wUl show a decided increase within the next few years. 

Platinum. 

Small quantities are obtained at the Round Hill Gold-mining Company's works at Round Hill, 
Southland. A little is also reported as being present in the wash at the Takaka hydraulic claim, but up 
to the present no attempt has been made to save it commercially. 

HSMATTTE. 

Hflematite paint is made from the iron-ores of Parapara, and also at Thames. The crude mineral 
is also supplied from a deposit at one of the Southland Ugnite mines for use as a pigment for colouring 
paper at the Mataura paper-mills. 

Rock Phosphate. 

The rock-phosphate deposits near Milton, Otago, are being worked, and the stone, after calcination, 
is treated at the Bumside Chemical Works and put on the market as a fertiliser. 

Copper. 

Mr. T. A. Tumbull, the mining engineer in charge of the works now being carried on by the Mineral 
Belt Copper-mining Company, Nelson, has furnished the following particulars of the undertaking : — 

'* The Mineral Belt Copper-mining Company (Limited) commenced operations upon the Aniseed 
Valley section of their property in January, 1904. The area is almost identical with that held by the 
old C9iampion Copper Company, and comprises about 1,000 acres on what is known as the * mineral 
belfc.' At their United Mine No. 2 level has been cleared out and the ore-deposits and indications noted. 
Levels 3 and 4 had collapsed, as had also No. 5, but the latter has been cleared and retimbered for 360 ft. 
For 300 ft. this level is but a shallow one, but for 160 ft. it follows the cap of what seems to be an ex- 
tensive ore-deposit. This level is being extended into the hill, and the ore found in No. 2 level has 
apparently lived down, though much disturbed by an intrusion of diabase rock. The disturbed ground 
has been driven through, and the Company are well satisfied with their prospects at this level. At 
150 ft. below No. 5 the company are putting in a drive to develop the ore cut in the levels above, and to 
prove its extent and value. So far as can be judged at present they should have no trouble in main- 
taining a fair grade of output, as assays range from 5 to 26 per cent, of copper, and the ore-bodies are 
anythmg from 2 ft. to 10 ft. wide. At Jackson's Lode, on fche opposite side of the valley, high-grade ore 
has been found and traced by trenching, but very little development-work has been done here. The 
United Norfch (formerly known as the Stinking Lode) and fche Mount Claud Lodes are practically un- 
touched. At the head of the valley the Monster Lode is being tested by a crosscut being put in 105 ft. 
below the outcrop. In one place on the surface it can be seen ikat this lode, since its deposition, has 
been fractured transversely, and the fissure has been filled by a redeposition and concentration of ore 
assaying 27 per cent, of copper. The company are proceeding cautiously, and taking steps to obtain 
reliable data as to the ore-deposits before going to the expense of erecting smelting-works. Twenty 
men are employed at present." " 

Deposits of copper-ore are known to exist at several places in both Islands, but their extent and value 
are, generally spealang, as yet unproved. A syndicate has been formed for the purpose of exploiting 
the deposits at Moke Greek, near Queenstown, Otago. 



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C— 8. 



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Pbtboleum. 

A borehole has been put down at Hotoroa, near New PlTmonth Breakwater, to a depth of 2,100 ft 
Before reaching this depth a blower of natural gas and water was met with, and later on the strata 
drilled through gave evidence of the ground carrying crude petroleum to some extent, the triturated 
material brought up being quite oily and having a strong smell of petroleum. In consequence of the 
capital being exhausted work was stopped when the depth mentioned was attained. Since then the 
work has been visited by the Director of the (^logical Survey and myself, and at the time of 
writing is being continued for a distance of 300 ft. or thereabouts under Government subsidy. The 
hole is cased with wrought-iron tubing 6 in. in diameter. 

CiNNABAB. 

The property near Waitahuna (Otago) has changed hands, and the new proprietary contemplate 
further prospecting and development. 

Pbospectino Opbbations. 

Tin is being prospected for near Pegasus Bay, Stewart Island, and a discovery of greenstone at 
fifilford Sound is reported. 

SCHOOLS OF MINES. 

These institutions have been carried on during the year much on the usual lines, and the instruction 
given has been of considerable service to a number of students whose ambition is to qualify for responsible 
positions in connection with mining and metallurgical work. The annual reports of work done, &c., 
at the various schools during the year 1894, follow. 



THAMES SCHOOL OF MINES. 
The Director, Mr. 0. G. Adams, A.O.S.M., reports as under : — 

I have the honour to report as follows on the work done at the Thames School of Ifinee during 
1904. 

The depressed state of the mining industry in this district has been responsible for a rather low 

attendance at the school, but those who did attend did good work. Towards the end of the year the 

attendance improved, and at the time of writing this report — February, 1905— -the attendance has 

very materially increased, so that there is every promise of a busier and more successful year to follow. 

The attendances are given below in tabulated form. 

Firat Term. Seoond Term. Third Term. 
Class attendances ..52 51 58 

Saturday science class .. ..32 25 28 

Total attendances ..84 76 86 

Registered students ..18 19 25 

During the year several excursions were made in connection with the mining, surveying, and 
geology classes. The Easter holidays were spent at Earangahake and Waikino, where, through the 
courtesy of the several mine and battery managers, the students were enabled to inspc^ct the under- 
ground workings and the batteries. 

The results of the Schools of Mines Examinations held in December are as follows : — 



Name of Smdeiii. 



5 

a 
a 

9 

6. 

si 

I*- 



1^ 



St 
i II 



i 
a 

ll 

i- 

I* 




I 



If 



£« 

P 



= ; 1 



"2 fl 

1 il 

i-S So 



a 

i 
'I 

fa 
3" 



^1 



- I 



L. Andrew*! 

Y. Booker 

C. N. Turner . . 

L. Kikohing 

Q. W. Davies . . 

A. J. Alexander 

L. Adams 

A. Baker 

J. Rickard 

N. WvUe 

8. Gngg 

A. Wylie 

H. Baker 

O. Wright 

J. G. Poulgrain 

P. Williams 

F. Kneebone 

J. Panl 

M. Grigff 

£. G. EUiB 

E. L. Trower . . 

8. C. Beid 

T. Mangan 

E. Thornton 

W. J. Palerson . , 

P. Payne 

A. Strong 

O. L. Thorbom 



68 



44 



46 
64 



70 



8S 



57 



61 
6S 



64 



42 



81 



78 

76 



79 



78 75 46: 

.. 87 .. 

.. ..84 

65 88 58 



89 



74 



78 



6S: 

t 



* Sobolanhip oandidate. 



f Fails. 



; Senior. 



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C— 3. 




DERRICK AT ^fOTUROA PETROLRUM COMPANY S WORKS, NEAR NEW PLYMOUTH. 
BORINC FOR PETROLEUM OIL. 




INTERIOR OF DBRIlICK HOUSE, MOTUROA PETROLEUM COMPANY'S WORKS, NEAR NEW PLYMOUTH. 



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21 



C— 3. 



There were thirteen first-class passes, fourteen second-class, and fifteen third-class. 

During the year 200 assays were made in the assay department by the staff. This is an increase 
of thirty-five over the number in 1903. This number does not include all the assa3rs and analyses made 
in connection with the experimental plant. Of the 200 sixty-nine were done for the Mines Department. 
A tabulated list of these follows :— 













Beeult 


Nc 


Deaoriptioii. 


LocaUty. 


Sender. 










* 








Gold per Ton. 


SilTerper 
Ton. 


Valae 
per Ton. 












Oz. dwt. gr. 


08,dwt.gr, 


£ s. d. 


8127/8 


(1) 


Black flinty stone 


Ruamahunga River 


Mr. Hogg, M.H.B. .. 


Trace 


Trace .. 


Nil. 


* 


12) 


Yellow flinty stone 


• 


m # • • 


m • • 


* • • 


m 


• 


<8) 


Green flinty stone 


m 


• m ' • 


* 


2 2 


m 


8128/1 


.. 1 White quaru.. 


Wairau Valley .. 


Mr. D. Robertson . . 


1 16 


1 16 


6 10 


8188/1 


•• 


•• 


Beef Hill, Master- 

ton 
Hokitika Prospect. 


Mr.Hogg,M.H.R. .. 


Trace 


Trace . . 


Nil. 


8187/21 


(1) 


Feldspar rook.. 


The Warden, Hokitika 


20 


7 18 


4 






1 ing Association 












(2) 


Greensandstone .. Ditto . . 


m m 


20 


12 14 


4 7 




i3) 


Aotinolitc 


m m 


, , 








i4) 

I5i 


Ferro-magnesian mineral 


m m 
m m 


Trace 


70 


6' 8 




161 

I7i 


m m » . . . . 

Oreisen 




6' 10 


12' 14 


8* 1 




81 


Chlorite rook . . 


m » • • . 


m m 


, , 








(91 


Quarts 


m • • • • 


m „ 


9 5 


12' 14 


1 18* 1 




(10 1 


Tourmaline rook 


M • • . • 


m m 


, , 


, , 


, , 




(111 


Igneous decomposed rock 


: » 


m m 










(12 1 


Ferro - magnesian rook 
(decomposed) 


m • • • • 


m 


Trace 


7 


8 




(18) 
(Ui 


Garnets and iron-oxide . . 


m 


^ ^ 


10 


1 7 17 


2 5 




Ferro magnesian rook . . 


m • « » . 


m m 




, , 






(15) 


Quarts and ferromag- 
nesian rook 


- 


m m 


6*10 


12 14 


'3 1 




(16) 


Feldspar and talc (de 
composing) 





n 


•• 


•• 


•• 




(17) 


Quarts, coloured by iron 


• • • • • 


m m 


10 


1 4 


8 8 




1I81 


Magnetite 
Feldspar 


m • • • • 


m m 


Nil 


Nil .. 


Nil. 




a9» 


m 


m m 


, , 




, , 




2O1 

|2lA) 


Tourmaline in rock 


m . . • • 


m m 




. , 


, , 




Pyrites in ferro - mag- 


m . . 


m m 




, , 


, , 






nesian rook 












^ 


(2lB) 


Magnetite grains in rook 


m . . . . 


m m 


, , 


, . 


, , 


8140/1 




Lead-ore 


Wangapeka Dis- 
trict 
Napier District . . 


Mr. H. Owen 


7 13 


88 11 7* 


5 7 8 


8145/2 


< 


^) 


Quartz 


Mr. James Hay 


Traces 


2 12 


Nil. 


^ 


' 


2) 


g . . . . 


* • » 


* . • 


• • • 


8 8 


^ 


8155/8 


' 


Ol 


m • • • • 


Wilberforoe District 


Mr. A. H. Richards 


1 6 


Traces 


5 


• 




81 


• . . • . 


• 


m 


6 7 


Trace . . 


15 2 


• 


W 


m • • • • 


m 


^ 


1 17 19 


5 1 


7 11 8 


8161/1 




m • • • • 


Te Puke 


Mr. J. A. Clark 


8 9 


1 17 19 


1 17 2 


8168/8 


(1) 


m • • 


Macrae's Flat . . 


Mr. W. Donaldson . . 


18 20 


8 8 


2 15 8 


^ 


12) 


Gonoentrates .. 


M • • 


• . • 


2 12 


16 


10 2 


» 


|3 


Tailings 


If • . 


m 


16 


17 


5 


8182/4 


<1) 
(2) 


Quartz 

« . . . . 


Takaka, NeUon . . 


Mr. W. Baird 


Traces 


Traces 

m 


Nil. 


• 


<3) 
(4) 


• . . • . 




m • . 






I 


3183/1 




m • • • • 


Takaka. . 


Mr. J. W. Soper 




^ 




8185/5 


(1)' 




Mangonui 


Mr. Houston, M.H.R. 




^ 


^ 


• 


|2) 


m • • • • 


m . . 


• 


Slight traces 


m 


m 




(6) 


m • • • • 
m • • • • 


m • • 
m . . 


* 


Traces 


m 


m 


^ 


m • • • • 


m • . 


m 


* • • 


m 


^ 


3195/1 




m ♦ • • • 


Marlborough 


Mr. M. Lyons 


10 2 


8 18 


2 8 


8206/8 


(1> 


White quarts . . 


Wangapeka 


Mr. R. McGregor . . 


Traces 


Traces 


Nil. 


m 


It! 


Quarts and country 
Nodule of pyrites 


• 


m * • 


m • • 


* 


^ 





m 


m • • 


Small amount 


• 


m 


8209/1 




Gonoentrates .. 


Wangapeka 


Mr. H. Owen 


Traces 


8 10 14 


7 


8218/12 


1^' 


Flint 




Beattie, Lang, and Co. 


Nil 


Nil .. 


NU. 


m 


Gritstone 






Traces 


Traces 


^ 


w 


(8) 


Jasperoid quarts 


.. 






m • • 


m 


m 


m 


(4) 


Quarts 


.. 






• . . 


^ 


m 


m 


(6) 


Jasper 


.. 






Nil 


Nil .. 




. (647) 


Basalt 


.. 






m . . 






^ 


^ 


(8) 


Flinty quarts . . 


1 




« . • 






m 


* 


|9) 


Basalt 


1 




• . . 






m 


• 


(10) 


Flinty quarts . . 


. . 4 




m 






m 


m 


111) 
(12) 


Basalt 


• • 1 




w . . 








m 


Flinty quarts . . 


< 




m . . 








8215/8 


(1) 


White quartz . . 


Renwiok . . Mr. B. McGregor . . 


Traces 


Traces 


^ 


m 


(2) 
(8) 
(1) 


- 


Marlborough 


. 


• 


m 


8216/2 


m » • . . 


Queen Oharlotte 

Sound 
Ditto . . 


Mr. J. Hebberley \\ 


m • • 
m . . 


m 


• 
* 




(2) 


m . . • • 




• . • 


m 




322IL/I 




Quartz and pyrites 


Greymouth 


Mr. J. MoAulay \ 


m . • 


m 


m 



* Galena 12^ per cent. 



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22 



EZPERIHBNTAL PlAMT. 

A table of tho parcels of ore treated in the battery foirovs : — 



1 


1 


1 
Weighl,' i^^y BulUon 




Peroentage eaved. 


{Si^'5^ Da-cription. 


Locality. 


Bender. 


Value 
per oi. 




Dry. 


par Ton. i •*^^- 


















Gold. 


SUTer. 


Value. 










Lb, 


£ 8. d. 


Os.dwt. 


S. d. 








P. 186 


Quarts, with some 
mioeral 


WaimanguS.C, 
Wbangamata 


J. Richard.. 


4,222 


49 17 


188 8 


12 5 


90-5 


72 


88 


P. 188 


White quarts, clay, 
iroD-oxides, black 
maoganese-ozide 


Huanui Claim, 
Waitekanri 


J. Campbell 


4,770 


5 14 4 


20 15 


11 8 


97-6 


87-7 


95-9 


P. 190 


Quarts, wiih iron- 


Lord Plunket 


T. Barron . . 


1,400 


3 4 


1 8 


11 2 


86 


24 


84 




oxides 


Claim, Wha. 
















P. 191 


Ooarse sand from 
buddies 


ngapoua 
liCaratoU) 


W. B. Styak 


1,960 


5 12 


22 11 


4 21 


99 


96-6 


97-6 



Lot P. 190 was treated by cyanide, the others by amalgamation. Three other lots were received 
for treatment : one was too poor to proceed with, and the other two were ashes, old pots, ko.^ from 
smeltings, and were treated in the berdan. The percentage'extraction was not determined on these. 

Gk>vERNiNO Body. 

The annual general meeting was held at the School of Biines on Wednesday, tiie 15th February, 
1905. The President, Mr. M. Paul, presided. 

t^^^The following officers and members were elected for 1905. President, Mr. William Baker; Vice- 
president, Mr. G. S. Clark ; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. E. F. Adams ; members of Council — Messrs. Oeorge 
Comer, John Ensoll, Henry Lowe, Matthew Paul, Oeorge Wame, E. F. Murphy, and R. W. PowelL 
Mr. Albert Bruce b permanent Hon. Secretary. 

The staff, consisting of Mr. A. H. V. Morgan, M.A., assistant lecturer ; Mr. E. G. Wright, lecturer 
on electricity ; and Mr. T. J. Mountain, licensed surveyor, drawing-master, have all performed their 
duties in a most efficient manner. My thanks are due to them for this, and for the hearty support 
they have afforded me. 

Thb^Museum. 

This is well stocked with exhibits, and is open to the public every Thursday afternoon during the 
school session. Visitors to the district are admitted at all reasonable hours, on application at the 
school. 

COROBfANDBL SCHOOL OF MINES. 
Report op the Council. 

Your Council have much pleasure in submitting the following report upon the past year's 
operations : — 

The number of enrolled students may be regarded as satisfactory under existing conditions, the 
students generally have evinced a keen and intelligent interest in the various class-worl^ and the results 
of the December examination show they have a thorough grasp of the subjects. 
I^^During the past year the school apparatus has been materially added to by the acquisition of a 
complete set of appliances for illustrating the science of electricity and by the purchase of a first-class 
microscope for the benefit of students especially in the subjects of petrology and geolog} ; these purchases 
were made out of a special grant made by the Mines Department for the purpose. A dynamo was pur- 
chased at the same time and the class-room, laboratory, balance-room, and premises generally installed 
with electric ligut out of ordinary funds ; the complete installation serves a two-fold object : by 
giving students ocular demonstration of how electricity is generated for practical purposes, and by 
lighting the premises at a minimum cost. The school is now well equipped for providing instruction 
in all subjects embraced by the very wide syllabus we have adopted, and students enjoy the greatest 
advantages for the acquisition of knowledge in most scientific subjects. 

As a means of bringing the public at large more in touch with the institution your Council arranged 
a series of free popular lectures ; the first was given on the 2nd August, when the public were afforded 
an opportunity of witnessing the first electric light in Coromandel, and the Director (Mr. D. V. Allen) 
gave a short lecture upon the subject of the electric light. The second lecture eventuated on the 23id 
August, when Mr. Allen delivered a most instructive address upon electricity and magnetism. On 
the 15th September, Mr. John Reilly, B.A., C.E., delivered a most interesting lecture upon "The 
Metric System of Money, Weights, and Measures." The final lecture of the series was delivered on 
the 7th November, by Mr. John Hayes, Inspecting Engineer of the Mines Department, upon " The 
Ventilation of Mines." The Council tender their thanks to the gentlemen named for their able and 
instructive lectures, and consider it would be a wise step to arrange another series during the winter 
months. 

One of the drawbacks which students have laboured under in the past has been the absence of a 
good reference library, but it is hoped this disability will be removed in the near future. The executive 
of the late Gold Jubilee Exhibition donated a substantial balance to the school for the object named, 
and your Council has ordered a number of works of reference, there being at least one dealing with each 
subject of instruction, which should shortly arrive and fill a much -felt want. 

The outlook for tl^e coming year is encouraging, as a number of new students have enrolled ; and 
there is evidence of an increased interest in the institution, which it is hoped will be maintained. 

It is with regret that we have to record a vacancy in the office of Vice-president by the death of 
Captain Hodge, who did much for the welfare of the school during many years ; and his memory 
should be revered as a benefactor of the school. It is likewise with regret that we have to intimate the 



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28 



C— 8. 



loss of the services of our fealons Secietaiyy Mr. W. Thomas^ who, having removed to another district^ 
has resigned office. 

i^We have jpleasure in heartily congratulating onr Director, Mr. D. V. Allen, upon having passed 
the^degree of Bachelor of Science at the New Zealand University Examination held in November last. 
And likewise Mr. Colin Fraser, an old student of this institution, upon having attained the distinction 
of being the first Coromandel-bom Doctor of Science, as the result of a thesis upon the geology of Waihi, 
written by him. 

Report of the Director, Mr. D. V. Allen, B.Sc. 

In reviewing the past year's work, it affords me pleasure in stating that the'school has again passed 
through a fairly successful year ; and considering the depressed state of local mining, the results may 
be taken as satisfactory. The school opened on the 3rd February, the attendance being well maintained 
throughout the year, as may be seen by the following figures : — First term — number of students 20, 
class-attendance 34 ; second term — number of students 19, class-attendance 34 ; third term — number 
of students 18, class-attendance 32. 

The subject of electricity, which was introduced into the syllabus for the first time, attracted several 
students. Instruction was also given in the following subjects : viz., mathematics, mining, &c., land 
and mine surveying, theoretical chemistry, practical chemistry, and assaying (senior and jimior). The 
usual practical work in the field was carried out in connection with the surveying class, while in the 
laboratory considerable experimental work was done. 

The annual Oovemment examinations for schools of mines took place in December last, when 
eleven of our students presented themselves, obtaining four first-class, eight second-class, and three 
third-class certificates. Two students were successful in passing last year's examination for first-class 
mine-managers. For the recent examinations, held in January, one student sat for first-class mine- 
manager, and one for battery-superintendent. 

The electric light has been installed in the school buildings, the dynamo having an output of 440 
watts when running at 2,300 revolutions per minute. The motive power is provided by a 12 in. Pelton 
wheel, with a { in. nozzle, working under a water-pressure of 85 lb. per square inch. A splendid 
binocular microscope, replete with all modem accessories, has been obtained, but owing to the fact 
of our having to send to England for a polarising prism, little headway was made with petrological 
work. The prospects for the present year are assuring, twenty-one students having already enrolled. 

Battery. 

During the year thirty-one parcels of ore were crushed and treated at the battery. These repre- 
sented 25| tons of general ore, 16 cwt. of slags, &c., and 713 lb. of picked stone, the total yield of bullion 
being 550 oz. 12 dwt., valued approximatelv at £1,650. It is our intention to have both the engine 
and the single stamper thoroughly overhauled at the first opportimity. 

A detailed scheme to work the battery by water-power was submitted to the Minbter of Mines for 
consideration, but intimation was received that the cost of the project was too great to be entertained 
at the present time. 

WAim SCHOOL OF MINES. 

Mr. Percy Morgan, M.A., Director, reports as follows : — 

I have the honour of submitting the following report on the Waihi School of Mines for the twelve 
months ending the 31st December, 1904 : — 

During 1904 the attendance at the school, though below the record one of 1903, was very satis- 
factory, the average number of registered students being fifty-eight. The average attendance in 1903 
was sixty-eight, in 1902 it was fifty-one, and in 1901 forty-seven. A feature which was very noticeable 
both last year and in former years was the fluctuating personnel of the students. During each term 
a number dropped out, and fresh pupils took their places, so that somewhere between eighty and ninety 
individuals joined the classes at some time or other during the year. A majority of our students, how- 
ever, attended steadily throughout the three terms, and, as might be expected, nearly all made ex- 
cellent progress in their studies. 

The following table shows the subjects taught, and the attendance for each term in the various 
classes: — 

Table of Attendances for the Year 1904. 



Name of Subject. 


First 
Term. 


Second 
Term. 


Third 
Tatm. 


Avenge. 


Junior mining 

Senior mining 

Mathematics 

Junior theoretical surveying 

Senior theoretical surveying 

Practical surveying ... 

General and mining geology 

Theoretical chemistry 

Practical chemistry ... 

Wet and dry assaying 

Metallurgy ... 

Drawing 

Electricity ... 




7 

6 

26 

9 

6 

13 

9 

21 

20 

21 

12 

7 

28 


1 

6 

19 

I 

9 
4 
13 
18 
23 
11 
7 
19 


1 

6 

11 

6 

5 

9 

3 

13 

14 

21 

7 

9 

13 


3 
6 
19 
7 
5 

10 
6 
16 
17 
22 
10 
8 
20 


Totals 


184 ^ 141 

* 


116 


147 


Individual r< 


^gistered students ... 


61 68 


54 


68 



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As usual, a large number of new students joined the school at the beginning of the year. Most 
of them were employed in the local batteries, and of the others several were mine-carpenters, engine- 
drivers, &c. ; but it is a matter which, personally, I much regret that the list included only two or three 
men who could fairly be described as practical miners, and had it not been for the students who continued 
their attendance from last year, the mining side of the school would have been very poorly attended. 

As in former years, the instruction given in the morning classes was repeated in the evening, thus 
enabling those who were working on changing shifts to obtain regular lessons in every subject. This 
arrangement, while greatly increasing the labour of the teaching stafP, was, it is almost needless to say, 
of great benefit to the students. 

Examinations. 

It is a matter for gratification that a greater proportion of the students than in past years came 
forward at the annual examinations. Thirty-two students presented themselves, and between them 
gave in sixty papers. The resiilts, which are just to hand, are very satisfactory in nearly every respect, 
and show that twenty-two first-class, eighteen second-class, and eleven third-class certificates were 
obtained. The marks in metallurgy, mathematics, and explosives were particularly good, every can- 
didate obtaining over 75 per cent. 

Gh>VBBNMBNT CERTIFICATES. 

During 1904 three of our students obtained first-class mine-managers' certificates, and four w^e 
successful in obtaining battery-superintendents' certificates. Two others obtained partial passes. In 
all eighteen first-class mine-managers', two first-class coal-mine managers', and nineteen battery-super- 
intendents' certificates have been obtained by regular students of this school during the past seven 
years, besides some ten or a dozen certificates gained by ex-pupils who were either attending other 
schools of mines, or had been in the Waihi School too short a time to be counted as regular students. 
To these figures must be added a number of second-class mine-managers' certificates, winding-engineers' 
certificates, kc. 

Laboratory. 

During the year a large amount of public work was done in the school laboratory, including 69 
fire assays for gold and silver, 4 determinations of copper, 3 of lead, 1 of zinc, 2 analyses of iron-ore, 
1 of scheelite, 1 of coal, 1 of coke, 1 of oil-shale, and 1 of clay. The total number of separate determina- 
tions was 174. Practically all of these were performed in duplicate, and in many instances three or four 
estimations were made. In addition, a number of minerals and rock-specimens were examined and 
named free of charge. 

Mineral Collection. 

This has again been largely increased during the year. A collection of 200 specimens has been 
bought by the Council, and the members of the staff have collected many rock-specimens, most of which 
have been sliced and microscopically examined. Mr. L. Cramer-Roberts and Captain Newdick (both 
old students) have sent a fine collection of ores and minerals from Rhodesia ; Mr. John P. Fuller has 
donated a number of interesting specimens from the Redjang Lebong Bfine (Sumatra), and Mr. W. J. 
Hill has given several rare specimens of Bolivian tin, silver, and bismuth ore. We are indebted also 
to the Grand Junction Grold-mining Company for representative samples of cores from the borehole 
put down from the 600 ft. level to a further depth of 780 ft. Among other donors may be mentioned 
Messrs. J. L. Cilmour, £. 6. Banks, R. B. MacdufE, W. Morrison, W. Newdick, and H. Cramer-Roberts. 

Petrolooical Microscope. 

During the year a long-felt want was supplied by the purchase of one of J. Beck and Sons' petro- 
logical microscopes, at a cost of £25. 

Library. 

The small library attached to the school has been much used and appreciated by the students. 
A few books have been purchased during the year, but, in order to increase its usefulness and bring it 
up to date, further expenditure is very necessary. 

Electrical Plant. 

Since the starting of an electrical class, the need of a power-driven dynamo has been very apparent. 
Aided by a subsidy from the Mines Department the Council has bought a 4-horse-power oil-engine, and 
a 3-kilowatt dynamo, together with aU the wire, lamps, and other material required for lighting the^ 
school by electricity. The machinery has been placed in a substantial building, and the students of 
the electrical class, under the direction of Mr. Wright, have completed a great part of the wiring, &c. 
The total cost of the installation will somewhat exceed £200, but, besides giving the students an inmght 
into electricity from a practical point of view, it is expected that the cost of lighting will be somewhat 
lessened. 

KARANGAHAKE SCHOOL OF MINES. 
The Council has pleasure in presenting this (the sixth annual) report on the work done and result^ 
obtained by the school for the year ended the 31st December, 1904. 

Attendance. 

The attendance for the year has been slightly below that of the former one, an average of twenty 
students taking forty-five subjects, or a little over two classes per student. 



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26 C— 8. 

Examinations. 

At the annual class examinations 11 students sat for 26 subjects, from which were obtained 10 
first-class, 8 second, and 7 third-class certificates, only one paper failing to obtain a certficate, whilst 
no failures were recorded. In five subjects students were first in New Zealand — viz., mining, wet and 
dry assapng (senior), mineralogy, and jimior theoretical chemistry. 

The average number of marks of all the papers sent in by members of the local school was 64-3 per 
cent, nearly — a much higher percentage than any other school in the colony. 

President's Medal. 
Mr. Charles Harsant obtains the President's gold medal, with an average of 74*2 per cent, in five 
subjects. He was first in the colony in four out of five subjects. The medal was to be gained by 
the student who obtained the greatest number of marks when his aggregate was multiplied by his 
average. 

Positions held by Present and Past Students. 

By attending the school quite a number of students have been enabled to obtain good positions 
in various parts of the world : the undernoted are a few of them : (1) Mr. B. A. Barry, battery-superin- 
tendent. Pilgrim's Rest, South Africa ; (2) Mr. G. A. Chappell, chief assayer, Talisman Consolidated, 
Karangahake ; (3) Mr. C. Ansley, member, Bewick, Moreing's staff, Avoca, Victoria ; (4) Mr. D. Sheehan, 
mine-manager, Tairua Broken Hills Gold-mining Company (Limited) ; (5) Mr. J. C. Maynard, assistanat 
engineer, irrigation- works, Johannesburg ; (6) Mr. Tasman Hogg, battery-superintendent, Gladstone 
Grold-mining Company (Limited), Waihi ; (7) Mr. Bain Hogg, battery-superintendent, Mildura, Western 
Australia ; (8) Mr. Frederick Cordes, sampler and assayer. Western Africa ; (9) Mr. John Christie, 
assistant assayer. Talisman Consolidated, Karangahake. 

In the four years that the school has been in operation 106 class certificates in all have been awarded, 
and in the first three years, eighteen first-class mine and battery-superintendents' certificates have been 
obtained ; two other students have to pass in one subject only. There have been no failures in the 
mine-managers, and but two in the battery-superintendents' examinations. Added to which, one 
student has been successful in obtaining His Majesty's Customs Certificate in bullion-assaying, and 
another has been granted a second-class stationary-engine driver's certificate. 

Elbotbical Classes. 

By the kindness of the Thames and Waihi Schools of Mines we were fortunate enough to obtain the 
services of Mr. Wright as instructor, and the class opened with thirteen students. The balance of 
electrical appliances ordered from Home should shortly arrive and be the means of adding to the 
interest alreiakdy shown. 

Auckland School of Mines. 

The Council notes with pleasure that a school has been formed in Auckland, which should be of great 
benefit to students at this end of the Island, and hopes to see the day when entrance to the course in 
mining engineering may also be obtained through the schools of mines, without having first of aU to 
pass a Matriculation Examination. 

CONFBRBNCB OF DlRBCTOBS. 

Several suggestions have been forwarded to the Government by the respective directors of schools 
in this district, amongst them being a recommendation to reduce the number of marks to 70 per cent, 
in each, or an average of 75 per cent, in all subjects for a scholarship examination ; and, secondly, 
that each school should teach from the same text-books, so as to arrive at a uniform syllabus. 

The Government adopted the local school's standard in marking for class certificates — viz., 
70 per cent, or over for first-class, 55 per cent, or over for second-class, and 40 per cent, or over for 
third^^lass. 

Installation of Gas. 

During the year gas has been installed throughout the school, making a great improvement. 

In conclusion, the Coimcil feels that too much cannot be said in favour of the work of the Director, 
Mr. Macduff, and the members feel that much of the success that has been obtained is due to the indi- 
vidual interest he takes in each student. 

NELSON SCHOOL OF MINES. 
The instructor, Mr. W. F. Worley, submits the following report : — 

Mineralogy and Blowpipe Analysis Class. 

This class, with the exception of a break of two weeks, was in session from the 11th February 
till the 15th December. The work undertaken was similar to that of previous years, but rather more 
attention was devoted to the study of mineralogy. There were fifteen boys in this class, and each boy 
was taught to identify by means of the blowpipe — with sometimes a confirmatory chemical test — 
ores of antimony, tin, lead, bismutii, zinc, copper, chrome, iron, nickel, cobalt, and manganese. 
Several tests were also made for arsenic, sulphur, sodium, potassium, strontium, barium, and calcium. 
Panning off auriferous black sand for the recovery of the gold was also practised. 

In mineralogy the class was taught to determine the hardness and the specific gravity of minerals ; 
and also to observe the colour, streak, lustre, and fracture. Ores of iron, lead, copper, and chrome 
were then systematically studied, attention being given to the base element in the ore as well as to the 
important metal 

4— C. 3. 



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C— S. 26 

Twice during the year this class was taken out for field-work. Once to the Dun Mountain, where 
specimens of iron, copper, and chrome were collected for subsequent treatment, and once to the Lea 
VflJley for the study of stratified deposits and the work done by rivers. 

Chemistry 
One student — ^a lady preparing for an examination in dispensing — took a preliminary course of 
twelve lessons in elementary chemistry. The instruction given was both theoretical and practical, 
and, as far as possible, intimately interwoven. The subjects taken up were few in number, but a good 
foundation was laid upon which future instruction will be built. ThSs student intends to continue her 
studies in this subject for about two years, when she wiU present herself for examination. 

ASSATINO. 

In all twenty-seven assays were made for the public. These comprised twenty-two assays for 
gold ; three samples of coal ; one sample of copper-ore which was assayed for copper and gold ; and 
one sample of argentiferous galena which was assayed for gold, silver, and lead. With the exception 
of the coals, all the foregoing were of poor quality, and not likely to be of any commercial value. Several 
of the as8a3rs for gold were made on Parapara ironstone, which only yielded traces of gold. 

A white cr3rstalline substance sent from the Owen Junction by Ifr. Win proved upon analysis 
to be native epsomite. Mr. Win reported that those who found this substance were made ill by drinking 
tea made from water near where it was got. No wonder ! 

For many years past I have had to work in a wretchedly small laboratory, and the amount of 
work I could undertake has been considerably curtafled thereby. Now, at my own expense, its capacity 
has been more than doubled, and if my health will permit, I hope to increase the amount of work hitherto 
done here. 

REEFTON SCHOOL OF BCINE& 

The Director, Mr. J. Henderson, reports as follows : — 

I have the honour to submit the following report for the year 1904 : — 

Classes were started in the middle of March and maintained regularly throughout the year. The 
attendance has been up to the average, although (considering the importance of the district) rather 
disappointing. During the first term the number of students on the roU was 37, with an average atten- 
dance of 24'6. For the second term the figures were respectively 47 and 26*3 ; for the third term 43 
and 21. Besides the usual classes in chemistry, metallurgy, assaying, mining, drawing, and surveying, 
I attempted to start one in geology, but the encouragement was so small that the class was abandoned. 

At the annual December examinations for schooLs of mines, students obtained six firsts, one second, 
and four thirds. I understand that six students intend to sit jfor the examination for mine-manager8\ 
and three for battery-superintendents', certificates. 

During the year seventy-six assa3rs for gold and silver were made for the public ; eleven analyses 
(more or less complete) of minerals and alloys ; six complete anal3rses of mine-air ; and also gold was 
extracted from one large and seven small parcels of ore, kc. 

Fortnightly meetings of the Mining Students' Association were held throughout the winter, and 
several interesting original papers read. 

Some seventeen pounds' worth of books on mining, metallurgical, and science subjects were pur- 
chased and added to the library of this institution. Besides this, standard periodicals on mining, &c., 
were taken. 

In conclusion, I have to thank the committee for their support, and more especially the secretary. 

WESTPORT SCHOOL OF BONES. 

The Director, Mr. Sidney Fry, reports as under : — 

I have the honour to funiish herein the report on the Westport School of Mines for the past year. 

The same classes have been held as in the previous year — ^vi£., chenustry (theoretical and practical), 
assaying, mineralogy, and mine and land surveying, though I regret to say that the average attendance 
is slightly lower that than for the previous year. It is as follows : Theoretical and practical chemistry, 
8*7 ; mineralogy, 8*4 ; surveying, 4*8 ; and assaying, 7*5. 

In addition to carrying on these classes the Director has visited Denniston once every week and 
taught the following subjects, with average attendance as follows : Mining, 3*5 ; mathematics, 1 ; 
steam and steam-engines, 2*5. The steam class has now been discontinued for lack of attendance, and 
a class in mechanical drawing held instead. 

At the end of the year we held the examinations in school-of-mines subjects as is done by the other 
schools, the results being fairly satisfactory, considering that the majority of our students are boys 
of from twelve to fifteen years of age. The President's gold medal, presented by Mr. James Bradley, 
President of the School Council, for the student gaining the highest aggregate marks was won by Master 
James liilligan, of Denniston, with the total of 211 marks for three subjects, while the silver medal 
for juniors was taken by Master Walter Hallahan, of Westport. 

One of our students, Mr. Will (Rowans sat at examination at Reefton last year for a first-class colliery- 
manager's certificate, and was successfulBn passing. Mr. Alex. Marshall, of Denniston, another student, 
has also passed at the examinations heldpast January. 

Some considerable number of assays and analyses have been done during the year, comprising 
twenty-one of coal, thirty-five for gold, and eighteen for metals other than gold, as well a9 a number o{ 



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27 C— 8. 

experimental tests by chemical and other treatment of ores. A goodly number of minerals were also 
identified, amongst them the most interesting being, — ^ 

(1.) A black mineral brought from Arahura Valley by Mr. A. H. Richards, which proved to be 
magnetite. This gave assays of gold from 5 dwt. up to 1 oz. 6 dwt. per ton ; a tsit prospect could be 
obtained by powdering and panning off in a dish. 

(2.) A black vitreous mineral from Karamea. Senders of this were under the impression that 
it was pitch-blende, but tests confirmed our supposition — viz., that it was obsidian, or volcanic glass. 

(3.) A mineral occurring in quartz leaders in the Paparoa Range, near Gre3anouth. This mineral, 
which somewhat resembles graphite, and has often been mistaken for it, was proved to be the sulphide 
of molybdenum (molybdenite). An analysis of a specimen in quartz gave Mo. 9*2 per cent. = Mo 8a. 
15*3 per cent. 

(4.) Sample of hydrous iron-ore from the Hidden Treasure Mine, Nelson District. The mean of 
two assays gave--gold, 2 dwt. 23 gr. ; silver, 8 dwt. 2 gr. per ton. This ore seems to be auriferous 
throughout the district, although generaUy of a very low grade. The mean of eight assays of the ore 
from the vicinity of Messrs. Washbum*s paint- works at Parapara was gold, 1 dwt. 3 gr. ; silver, 1 dwt* 
1 gr. per ton : while another set of ten assays from the same locality averaged gold, 6 dwt. 13 gr. ; silver, 
3 dwt. per ton. Our experience has shown that, as a rule, the more siliceous portions of the ore are the 
highest in gold-contents, but out of over thirty assays only two were devoid of gold. Some of the samples 
of this ore also contained a little platinum. 

(5.) Sample of concentrates from Jameson's and party's cement claim, Bradshaw's Terrace. On 
analysis for the rare earths, this gave — ^thoria, 0*2 per cent. ; ceria, oxides of lanthanum, &c., 0*42 per 
cent. These concentrates have a yellowish-brown tint, and under the magnifying-glass show a number 
of semi-transparent yellowish and clove-brown particles, leading us to think that they might contain 
monazite. This discovery is, of course, imimportant economically, but may be of interest from the fact 
that it is the first discovery of the compounds of cerium and thorium in New Zealand. 

In order to raise money to erect a building for the School of Mines, our council decided to hold 
a Mining and Industrial E^bition during the Christmas week, and a committee was organized com- 
posed of the Mayor, Mr. F. F. Munro, and a number of citizens, to all of whom we beg to tender our 
heartiest thanks. The exhibition was held in due course, the Mining Court being a very interesting 
feature, judging by the attention paid to it by the public. In this portion of the exhibition we were 
greatly assisted by a loan collection of mining models from the Otago School of Mines, and loan collections 
of minerak from the Mines Department and the Waihi School of Wnes^ to which institutions great thanks 
are due. The Exhibition, besides being a source of amusement and instruction during Christmas week, 
was financiaUy successful, the profits amounting to £112. 

It is our intention to form a library of works of reference, and the Council have purchased a few 
volumes to start with ; we have also to thank Mr. Neve for the gift of two works on assaying and elec- 
tricity, and we hope others will see fit to follow his example ; we have abo to acknowledge with thanks 
the various publications sent to us by the Mines Department, and complete yearly issues of the Engineer' 
ing and Mining Journal, presented by Mr. A. D. Ba3rfeild. 

During the year we have augmented our collection of minerals by the purchase of a set of the rare 
minerak, by a number of Tasmanian ores, presented by Mr. John Barrowman, of Nelson ; also by a set 
of forty-three minerals and rocks kindly given by the Waihi School of Mines. 



OTAGO UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OP MINES. 
The Director, Professor James Park, F.6.S., submits the following report : — 
The mining school for the year ending the 31st March, 1905, showed the satisfactory attendance 
of forty-seven students, comprising thirty-four registered students for the full course and thirteen for 
one subject only, namely, twelve in geology and one in surve3dng. The persistent rumours in the 
past year or two that the mining school would be closed or removed from Dunedin created a feeling 
of uncertainty as to the future which has already caused a marked decrease in the number of new students 
for the session of 1905. It will, doubtless, be some time before we again reach the satisfactory attend- 
ance of the past four years. 

Diplomas granted in 1904. 

Diplomas were issued to students on production of the necessary certificates of practical work, 
as follows : D. M. Tomlinson, diploma in metallurgy ; J. BaiUe Macdonald, diploma in mining ; A. Reed 
.Graham, diploma in metallurgy ; A. R. Andrew, diploma in mining ; G. W. Eaton Turner^ diploma in 
metallurgy ; J. Allan Thomson, diploma in mining ; W. Brand In^^ diploma in mining ; John Mc- 
Eonlay, diploma in metallurgy. 

Annual Examinations. 

Forty-two students presented themselves for examination in thirty-four subjects, and of these 
only three failed, namely, one in mathematics, one in physics, and one in surveying. 

New Zealand University Examinations. 

Bxhibiti&n Scholarshipy 1851. — Two mining students competed for the 1904 scholarship— namelyi 
Arthur R. Andrew, B.Sc., and James Allan Thomson, B.Sc., The geologiccd theses sent m by these 
students were reported by the English examiner to be equal and excellent. The Senate of the University 
of New Zealand at its annual meeting in Wellington, in February, 1904, awarded the scholarship to 
Mr. Andrew, who in the same year had won first-class honours in physics and second-class honours in 
geology. Mi, Thomson had gained first-class honourp in geology, and for this and his excellent thesis 



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the Senate recommended the 1851 Exhibition Commissionen to award him a second Exhibition Scholar- 
ship. The Commissioners acceded to the request, and awarded llr. Thomson a scholarship, which he 
resigned in favour of the Rhodes Scholarship. 

The Rhodes Scholarship for 1904.— Mr. J. Allan Thomson, was elected the first Rhodes Schohir 
for New Zealand by the Selection Committee sitting in Grovemment House, Wellington, in Hay, 1904. 
He was a distinguished scholar and prominent athlete. His academic career represented a standard 
of excellence rarely equalled by a graduate of the University of New Zeahmd. He has eiumed our 
most hearty congratulations. 

Honours in Natural Science. — Charles Norton Boult, B.Sc., first-class honours in geology. 

Senior Scholarship, — Robert A. Farquharson, senior scholarship in geology. 

Mining Engineering, — Passed first examination in mining engineering, P. H. McDouall ; com- 
pleted first examination in mining engineering, A. Gordon BfacDonald, Hugh R. BfacDonald, William 
McCullough ; passed second examination in mining engineering, William Gibson ; and E. T. H. Webb ; 
passed second examination in metallurgical engineering, W. A. Given, M.A. 

Orey Scholarship, — Robert A. Farquharson. This scholarship has now been won by a mining student 
for three years in succession. 

Robinson Medals,--¥oT mining and surveying, J. E. Menzies ; for quantitative chemical analysis, 
J. T. Mosley. 

Ulrich Medal,--¥oT petrography and mineralogy, R. A. Farquharson. 

Labobatobt. 

During the year eighty-four samples of ore were assayed for the public at schedule rates, and in 
the same period the Director furnished reports on thirty-seven samples of rocks and minerals free of 
charge. 

Geodesic Station on Tanna Hill. 

Last October and November the Director completed the observations needed to connect Tanna 
Hill with the Government Meridional Greodesic Station at Observation Point, Port Chalmers. The 
latitude and longitude of the station on Tanna Hill have been computed, and an azimuthal bearing 
in terms of Observation Point meridian thrown on to an iron standard in the quadrangle in the Uni- 
versity grounds. 

A true bearing has also been thrown on to the illuminated clock in the Town Hall tower which 
provides the necessary referring light for night observations without cost or charge to the Council. 

The surveying students will now be able to conduct their surveys on true meridian instead of on 
an artificial or magnetic meridian as in former years, check the error in azimuth of their traverse meridian, 
and take rounds of angles to the sun and circumpolar stars for the determination of meridian, latitude, 
and time. 

Chain Standabd. 

Of late years field-measurements have been made by surveyors and engineers with 500-link steel 
bands, but up till now there has been no standard provided in Otago for checking the accuracy of the 
bands. It is a pleasure to report that a 5-chain standard is now being laid down by the General Survey 
Department of New Zealand under the direction of Mr. D. Barron, Chief Surveyor, in the University 
grounds near the mining school for the use of the professional surveyors, engineers, and mining students. 

AssooLkTES OF Mining School. 

The diploma of Associate was first issued in the year 1887. The diplomas granted in the several 
divisions of the school since that date are as under :— 

Division. 

Mining 

Metallurgy . . 
Geology 

Totals .' *.. ..114 8 122 

In 1902 the standard of instruction for the Associate diplomas was raised to that of the B.Sc. 
requirements of the New Zealand University in mining engineering. Prior to that date mining graduates 
took the ordinary B.Sc. Since that date some take the B.Sc. in mining or metallurgical engineering, • 
but some still prefer the ordinary B.Sc, as the requirements in respect to keeping terms are easier than 
for the former. 

The mining graduates who have taken the ordinary and engineering B.Sc. are as follows : Ordinary 
B.Sc. prior to 1902, 3 ; ordinary B.Sc. since 1902, 5 ; engineering B.Sc. since 1902, 3 : total, 11. 

Occupations op Old Students. 

Among the appointments secured by old students during 1904 are the following : (1) E. Graham, 
Acting Director, Charters Towers School of Mines ; (2) W. A. McLeod, B.Sc., general manager mining 
company. Charters Towers; (3) G. Ulrich, Assistant Surveyor, Waihi Company; (4) W. Baker, 
B.Sc., lecturer. West Australian School of Mines ; (5) T. H. B. Wayne, metallurgist, General Mining 
and Finance Corporation, Johannesburg ; (6) H. E. Allen, assistant metallurgist, Linpaards Vlei, 
Transvaal ; (7) P. Fitzgerald, Manager, Vivien Mine, Western Australia ; (8) W. M. Fulton, general 
manager, mining company, Johannesburg ; (9) E. A. de Latour, mine-manager. Magnet Mining Com- 



Issued from 


Issued in 


Trtfa 


1887 to 1903. 


1904. 




70 


4 


74 


32 


4 


36 


12 


.. 


12 



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Eany, Waratah, Tasmania ; (10) G. H. Royse, appointed to stafiE of Fenerira Deep Mine, Johannes- 
urg; (11) G. Aubrey Qow, Manager, Progress Cyanide-works, Reefton. Besides these, six have 
received appointments as cyaniders, assayers, and assistant surveyors. 

The students who have secured lucrative positions in connection with mining at salaries ranging 
from £200 to £1,000 a year in the four years 1901 to 1904 inclusive are as under: 1901,8; 1902,7; 1903, 
8; 1904, 11: total, 34. 

MmiNO-scHOOL Buildings. 

I regret to report that the class-rooms and laboratories, with a single exception, are in a ruinous 
and dilapidated condition, thereby adding considerably to the discomfort which must always attend 
lecturing and laboratory work in a corrugated-iron building — at best a mere shell — in a rigorous climate 
like this. 

A new, up-to-date, and commodious building has now become a matter of common necessity. 
The attendance and results last year formed a record in the history of the school. No faculty con- 
nected with the University of New Zealand has provided through its diplomas the same lucrative 
employment for its graduates, and none is so badly housed — none could be worse. 

Conclusion. 

My acknowledgments are due to Dr. Marshall, Mr. Waters, Mr. Armstrong, lecturers, and Mr. 
Algernon Spencer, demonstrator in surveying, for the zeal they displayed in canying out their duties 
during 1904. 

EXPENDITURE ON SCHOOLS OF MINES. 
The following table shows the expenditure by the Government on schools of mines since their 
inauguration, exclusive of subsidies paid to the University of Otago towards the School of Mines in 
connection with that institution' : — 



Flnanoial 
Years. 


Sabsidies towards 

the Ereotion of 

Schools of Mines, and 

Maintenance. 


Cbemioab 

and Apparatus, 

also Mineralogical 

Specimens 
supplied to Schools 

of Mines. 


Sobolar- 
ships. 


Salaries of Teachers, 
and Travelling- 
expenses, &c. 


Total Snm paid 
by the Depart- 
ment towards the 
Sohools of 
Mines. 


! 


li 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 


£ a. d. 


£ 8. d. 


1886-86 


... 


36 19 9 




1,223 9 10 


1,260 9 7 


188e-87 


267 16 6 


409 1 4 




2,716 9 3 


3,383 7 1 


1887-88 


283 16 9 


263 14 1 




1,714 9 6 


2,221 19 4 


188a-89 


42 10 


6 12 9 


... 


1,139 4 1 


1,188 6 10 


1889-90 


142 2 


181 14 10 




716 3 10 


1,040 8 


1890-91 


217 6 6 


54 8 




620 9 9 


892 4 3 


1891-92 


181 14 




... 


689 6 9 


870 19 9 


1892-93 


312 3 4 




' 


670 1 


982 4 4 


1893-94 


197 6 




... 


868 19 4 


1,065 19 9 


1894-95 


390 


45 10 10 




773 17 8 


1,209 8 6 


1895-96 


820 




50 


849 3 


1,719 3 


1896-97 


352 14 11 


68 18 6 


100 


834 12 8 


1,346 6 1 


1897-98 


1,089 18 6 


29 19 9 


100 


780 19 


2,000 17 3 


1898-99 


740 15 2 


32 19 7 


60 


729 10 11 


1,563 6 8 


1899-1900 ... 


990 3 4 


24 8 8 


60 


52 16 3 


1,117 3 3 


1900-1901 ... 


866 10 11 


66 3 4 


96 


77 7 10 


1,098 2 1 


1901-1902 ... 


1,155 12 3 


68 5 1 


49 


69 16 4 


1,337 13 8 


1902-1903 


1,879 16 6 


134 18 8 


168 


111 


1,783 14 2 


1903-1904 ... 


1,575 16 3 


88 18 8 


92 


109 16 10 


1,866 9 9 


1904-1905 ... 


1,401 2 11 


17 3 


100 


362 19 6 


1,881 5 6 


Totals ... 


12,866 17 3 


1,494 11 10 


847 


16,100 11 4 


29,809 5 



The above statement shows the amount expended on the different schools of mines throughout 
the colony ; but, in addition to this, the sum of £11,053 6s. 2d. has to be added, as that has been paid 
to the school of mines attached to the University of Otago, £500 being paid last year towards main- 
taining the school, which makes the total expenditure up to the 31st March last to be £40,862 6s. 7d. 
This expenditure has extended over a period of twenty years. 



The appendices which follow contain (a) the reports of Inspectors of Mines, Wardens, Managers 
of Water-races, Engineer for Water-conservation, and Government Geologist ; (6) the questions used 
at the last examinations of candidates for certificates enabling them to act as managers of mines and 
superintendents of batteries; (c) a list of persons to whom certificates as mine-managers, battery- 
superintendents, and dredgemasters have been issued ; and {d) the usual statistical returns. 

I have, &c., 

John Hayes, 
The Hon. the Minister of Mines, Wellington. Inspecting Engineer. 



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APPENDICES. 



REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF MINES. 

Mr. Jajos CouTTfl, Inspector of Mines, Thames, to the UvDBB-SBCurrAmT fob Mots, Wellington. 

Sib,— Office of Inspector of Mines, Thames, 18th February, 1905. 

I have the honour to furnish herewith the following report on the gold-mining industry in 
the Hanrald District for the year ended the 31st December, 1904. 

There is a decided improvement in some of the mines on the Thames. In an especial manner 
the new discovery at the Waiotahi Mine has given encouragement to shareholders in the other mines 
in the immediate neighbourhood, and will be the means of causing more development-work to be done 
in the future than has been done for some time past. 

The boring operations recently carried out at Thames, are, I am sorry to say, finished. They have 
not resulted in any fresh discoveries being made. 

In the Coromandel District mining is at a very low ebb, the prospects being anything but encourag- 
ing — the Waitaia Mine at Kuaotuna excepted — ^but, still, as the rich gold is mostly found in patdies* 
a new discovery may be made in the district at any time. 

In the Ohinemuri district the Waihi Company's mine is holding^ts reputation, there being a slight 
increase in the output of bullion during 1904 as compared with the previous year. 

Ohotmubi Distbict. 

Waihi Gold-mining Company. — The operations in this mine are considerable, as wiU be seen by 
the various works herein enumerated and the large number of men that are employed by the company 
in connection with the mine and the mills for the winning and treatment of the ore. 

No. 7 level. — Royal Lode, north section : Driving was started in May last on the course of this 
cross-lode in order to lower the mine- water, and, up to the present, 312 ft. has been driven north and 
215 ft. south, making a total of 527 ft. Driving was intermittent, owing to large quantities of water 
met with. At 212 ft. south of No. 5 shaft, the Royal Lode was^intersected ; the north face is within 
38 ft. of No. 4 shaft. At 30 ft. north of No. 5 shaft, Lloyd Pass was connected with No. 6 level, and 
is now used as a travelling-way. 

No. 6 level. — Crosscuts : No. 2 shaft south-east crosscut was extended 537 ft. to No. 5 shaft, 
making a total length of 1,010 ft. No. 1 shaft north-west crosscut was advanced 150 ft., making a 
total of 289 ft. from No. 1 shaft ; at 276 ft., the No. 2 reef was intersected and is from 2 ft. to 3 ft. in 
width ; several small sulphide leaders were passed through in this crosscut. No. 1 shaft south-east 
crosscut was driven 21 ft. from shaft where Albert Lode was intersected 4 ft. wide. Paul : south-east 
crosscut was driven a total length of 121 ft. from Empire Lode ; at 31 ft. quartz 3 ft. wide was met ; 
at 87 ft., Princess Lode, 2 ft. 6 in. was intersected. Martha Lode, north section : Bullson No. 2 Pass 
sunk 80 ft. ; Bullson Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Carterson Pass sunk 98 ft.—at 80 ft. down, a lode 22 ft wide ; 
Wheelson No. 2 Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Wheelson Pass sunk 99 ft. ; Britson Pass sunk 55 ft. ; Fosterson 
Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Longson Pass sunk 92 ft. ; Tremson Pass sunk 84 ft. ; Camson Pass sunk 7 ft. ; Leo 
Pass sunk 100 ft. ; Venus Pass sunk 64 ft. ; Plummer Pass sunk 103 ft. ; Pile Pass sunk 106 ft. ; Man- 
ning Pass sunk 48 ft. ; Juno Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Jove Pass sunk 81 ft. Martha Lode, south section : 
Lumb Pass sunk 87 ft. Regina Lode : Jones Pass sunk 90 ft. ; Ready Pass sunk 103 ft ; Price Paas 
sunk 90 ft. ; Nut Pass sunk 80 ft. No. 2 Reef : west of No. 6 shaft crosscut, the level on course 
of lode has been extended 255 ft., making a total length of 520 ft. opened up on lode ; the average 
width for the length developed during the year is 3 ft. Winzes : Rickard Pass sunk 118 ft. ; White 
Pass sunk 109 ft. ; Black Pass sunk 26 ft. Albert Lode : North of Harris's north-west crosscut the 
level has been driven on course of lode 103 ft., making a total of 206 ft. north of above crosscut ; the , 
lode proved to be 4 ft. wide ; the north end of lode junctions with Regina Lode. Empire Lode : Peter 
Pass sunk 80 ft ; Hicks Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Muir Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Paul Pass sunk 101 ft. ; Connor Pass 
sunk 15 ft. ; Harris Pass sunk 89 ft. ; Rolker Pass sunk 80 ft. Royal Lode : After driving south on 
north section of this lode, attention was directed to intersect this lode at 635 ft. south from No. 4 shaft ; 
now 420 ft. has been driven east and 370 ft. west on its course, making a total of 790 ft. opened up ; 
the average width is 15 ft. Winzes : Nite Pass sunk 118 ft. ; Snail Pass sunk 80 ft. ; Moran Pass sunk 
78 ft ; Slug Pass sunk 86 ft. Princess Lode : A total length of 281 ft. has been opened up on course 
of this lode west of Paul's south-east crosscut ; the average width is 3 ft. 3 in. J Reef : A total of 120 ft. 
hai been opened up on course of lode west of Empire junction ; average width 1 ft. 6 in. 

No. 5 level.— Crosscuts : No. 1 shaft, north-west crosscut, was advanced 77 ft, making a total 
of 207 ft. from No. 1 shaft ; a connection was made to No* 2 filling-shaft. No. 1 shaft, south-east 
cross-cut, was driven 30 ft. from No. 1 shaft where Albert Lode, 3 ft. wide, was met. A crosscut 
was also driven from north section, Royal Lode, to Royal filling-shaft, a distance of 158 ft. 
Martha Lode, north section, east of No. 1 shaft, north-west crosscut : The level was extended 44 ft., 
making a total of 837 ft. east of above crosscut. No. 2 Reef, west of No. 6 shaft, north-west crosscut : 
The level has been advanced 189 ft. on course of lode making a total of 454 ft. from No. 6 shaft ; the 
lode averages 3 ft. in width. Winzes : White and Black Passes have been sunk to No. 6 level ; Red 
Pass was risen to No. 4 level. Regina Lode, east of No. 1 shaft, north-west crosscut : The level has 
been driven on course of lode 148 ft., making a total of 198 ft. east of the above crosscut. Albert Lode, 
north of Empire junction, has been driven on from 447 ft. to 679 ft. ; average width, 6 ft. Foy and 
Swan Passes were sunk to No. 6 level. K Reef was driven on 34 ft west of No. 2 shaft, south-east 
crosscut. Princess Lode, west of No. 2 shaft, south-east crosscut has been driven on from 77 ft. to 
230 ft. Royal Lode, west of No. 5 shaft, south-east crosscut : The lode has been driven on from 



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31 C— 3. 

441 ft. to 606 ft. ; east of north section junction the lode has been driven on from 129 ft. to 370 ft. 
Winzes : Snake, Slug, Worm, Nite, Snail, and Frog Passes have been sunk to No. 6 level. 

No. 4 level. — Crosscuts : No, 1 shaft north-west crosscut was advanced from 168 ft. to 263 ft. 
from No. 1 shaft and a connection made to No. 2 filling-shaft ; Skinners south-east crosscut was ex- 
tended from 462 ft. to 676 ft, from Welcome Lode. Martha Lode, north section : A level was driven 
on this footwall of lode from 153 ft. to 461 ft. east of No. 1 shaft, north-west crosscut. 

No. 3 level. — Crosscuts : A north crosscut was driven from Royal Lode to Royal filling-shaft a 
distance of 225 ft. Martha Lode, north section : The level has been advanced from 209 ft. to 267 ft. 
east of No. 2 shaft, north-west crosscut, on the footwall of lode ; east of No. 1 shaft, north-west crosscut, 
the level has been advanced partly in the country and partly in the sulphide ore for 279 ft. ; Bulkon 
Pass sunk to No. 4 level ; Bullson Pass was also risen to No. 1 level. Empire Lode west of Albert 
junction : 151 ft. was driven on course of lode ; Hicks, Perry, and Jo Passes were sunk to No. 4 level. 
I Lode, east of No. 2 shaft, south-east crosscut : A length of 100 ft. was opened up ; Dunstan and 
Martin Passes have been sunk to No. 4 level. L Lode, north of No. 2 shaft, south-east crosscut : A 
length of 185 ft. was opened up ; Benny's Pass was simk to No. 4 level. Victoria Lode, north section : 
The east face has been connected with the Surprise Level. 

No. 2 level. — Crosscuts : A crosscut was run from Martha Lode to No. 2 filling-shaft, a length of 
39 ft. Empire Lode : The west face of level was advanced 95 ft. ; Jo Pass was connected to No. 3 
level. Albert Lode : The north face has been advanced from 130 ft. to 271 ft. north of J Lode junction ; 
Menzie Pass has been connected to No. 3 level. Victoria Lode, north section : The east face has ad- 
vanced 75 ft. from Truscott Pass. 

No. 1 level. — Crosscuts : South-east crosscut from Martha Lode near Bell Pass was driven a total 
distance of 161 ft. during the year ; at 17 ft., quartz 18 in. wide was intersected ; at 123 ft. a reef 12 in. 
wide was driven through ; at 143 ft. quartz 2 ft. wide, at 160 ft. quartz 3 ft. 6 in. wide, and at 177 ft. 
quartz 12 in. wide. North-west crosscut from Welcome Lode near Scott's Pass has been driven a total 
of 51 ft. Martha Lode, west of Merrie's Pass, has been driven on from 582 ft. to 660 ft. Bell Pass was 
risen to upper smithy level. Welcome Lode : Come's No. 2 and Twomey's Passes have been risen to 
surface. Empire Lode west of Muir's Pass : The lode was driven on 155 ft. ; Jo Pass was connected 
to No. 2 level. 

Adit level. — Martha Lode : Footwall section of lode was driven on 33 ft. east and 26 ft. west of 
No. 2 shaft, north-west crosscut. 

Upper smithy level. — Martha Lode, south branch, has been driven on east of western side of Martha 
Hill from 186 ft. to 502 ft. ; (Gordon Pass was sunk 65 ft. ; Ward Pass was risen to No. 1 drive ; Bell 
Pass has been risen to surface ; Fugill Pass has been risen 55 ft. ; right-hand branch of Welcome Lode 
has been driven on 240 ft. 

Surface cuts. — The following filling-passes have been sunk : — No. 2 filling-pass, situated opposite 
No. 1 shaft in footwall of Martha Lode, has been sunk vertically a total of 473 ft., or 23 ft. below No. 5 
level ; this is now in use. Kerz Pass, situated in Albert Lode, has been sunk 243 ft. and is now in use. 
Royal filling-pass, situated 120 ft. south of No. 5 shaft, has been sunk 434 ft. ; this is now in use. 

Shafts. — No. 1 shaft : Sinking was resumed on the 15th October, and, up to the end of the year, 
a further depth of 81 ft. was sunk, making a total depth of 653^ ft. from surface, or 98 ft. below No. 6 
level ; at 69 ft. below No. 6 level, quartz came in from south side of shaft and exists at bottom ; the 
new winding-engine (two 18 in. by 36 in. cylinders, geared to one 9-ft. -diameter drum) has been in use 
since June. A new brace of 9 ft. above old one has been erected. No. 2 shaft : No sinking has been 
done ; the bottom is now free of water (732 ft. from surface) ; steel helical spur-and-pinion wheels have 
been placed on the winding-engine. No. 4 shaft : Sinking was resumed on the 5th November, and, up 
to the end of the year, a further depth of 70 ft. was sunk, making a total depth from surface of 631^ ft., 
or 87 ft. below No. 6 level ; at 80 ft. below No. 6 level, the Empire Lode came in, dipping 1 in 2 north, 
and is 4 ft. wide where quartz is exposed ; at 32 ft. below No. 6 level the shaft enters the solid reef-bear- 
ing andesite rock ; steel helical and pinion wheeb have been placed on the winding-engine. No. 6 shaft : 
Sinking was resumed on the 19th July and stopped on the 15th October, and, during this period, 110 ft. 
was sunk, making a total depth of 555^ ft. from surface, or 10 ft. below No. 6 level ; this shaft is only 
used for sending down filling-material for the Martha east-end stopes. No. 5 shaft : No sinking has 
been done ; " C " pump was started in April ; a travelling-way from Nos. 6 and 7 leveb has been made 
through Lloyd Pass ; a large volume of water was struck on the 14th September, and both '' B " and 
" C " pumps were run together until the 22nd October, when " C " pump was siifficient. 

Mine-development and deadwork. — Crosscuts through country, 2,819 ft. ; on course of lode, 
6,249 ft. ; crosscuts in lode, 1,099 ft. ; winzes sunk, 10,083 ft. ; shafts sunk, 261 ft. : total number 
of feet, 20,511 ft., or 39 miles. 

Report of milling operations during 1904. — Product : A total of 259,978 tons of quartz (dry weight 
of 2,240 lb. per ton) has been crush^ during the year, which exceeds by 28,655 tons the total of 
231,323 tons crushed during the year 1903. Tbe whole of this has been wet-crushed. The product was 
928,050*2 oz. bullion, exclusive of concentrates and slag tailings, which were shipped. Five shipments of 
slag tailings, amounting to practically 39^ tons in all, have been made during the year : the total assay 
value of these five shipments amounted to £1,542 18s. lid. A total of 1,992*19 tons of concentrates 
was treated at the Victoria Mill and produced 149,915 oz., of a value of £53,835 16s. 8d. 778,1352 oz. 
of bullion (excluding concentrates and slag-tailings shipped), £599,654 lOs. 4d. ; 149,915 oz. of bullion 
(making a total of 928,050*2 oz.) from concentrates plant, Victoria Mill, £53,835 168. 8d. ; assay value 
of 367*§D tons on concentrates shipped, £18,068 2s. 5d. ; assay value of 39*46 tons slag tailings shipped, 
£1,542 8s. lid. : total, £673,101 8s. 4d. A total of 118,778 tons was passed over amalgamated copper 
plates and vanners before being cyanided, a further 141,200 tons was cyanided direct, making a total 
of 259,978 tons. 



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C— 3. 32 

Reduction- works.— The tonnage croBhed at the three milk were reepectirely as foUowa : Waihi Mill 
(90 stamps), 70,806 tons ; Victoria MiU (200 stamps), 162,924 tons ; Union MiU (40 stamps), 26,248 
tons : total, 330 stamps, 259,978 tons. The total average number of stamps running during the year, 
exclusive of Sunda3rs and the period at Christmas during which the mills were stopped, was 320,285, 
out of a total of 330 stamps, an increase of 2,815 stamps compared with the average total running 
during 1903. The total average duty per stamp per diem was 2*657 tons, an increase of 0-251 tons com- 
pared with the previous year. 

Waihi Mill (90 stamps).— The total rainfall for the year amounted to 83-05 in., which is practically 
the same as during the preceding year. Substantial coal-hoppers have been erected alongside the 
boiler-house and connected with the main tram-line by a new branch line. It was decided to ^d three 
tube-mills to the crushing plant at this mill The necessary excavation-work has been completed, 
concrete foundations put in, and the mills have been erected in position, the necessary building is in 
course of erection, and the puUeys have been ordered. An additional Babcock and Wilcox boiler with 
automatic chain-grate stoker attached has been added to the steam-power plant. Four wrought-iron 
vats 25 ft. diameter by 6 ft. in depth have bten erected to provide additional sands-treatment vats 
which will be required when the tube-mills are at work. Two additional slime-settling vats, 32 ft. 
in diameter by 14 ft. in depth, were required. One of these has been erected and brought into use ; 
the necessary excavation for the second one has been made, and the vat should be received shortly. 
Two rectangular treatment- vats have been added to the treatment phint. 

Victoria Mill (200 stamps). — The work in connection with the foundry which was in hand at the 
end of 1903 was completed, and the foundry was brought into use early in the year. The fourth elevator- 
wheel has been brought into use for lifting the pulp from the mill to the treatment phint. Two additional 
sand-treatment vats, 33 ft. in diameter by 7 ft. in depth, have been added. A breaking-down saw 
and building have been added to the sawmill plant. 

Union Mill (40 stamps). — A LefiEel wheel has been obtained for thb mill 

An average of 1,236 men were employed by the company. The hirge sum of £297,544 4s. was 
paid in dividends during the year ; making the total of £1,552,687 lis. 6d. since commencing work. 

Waihi Grand Junction Mine, — The company has during the year directed its full energy in develop- 
ing the Qrand Junction, or eastern portion of their property. The Junction shaft is now sunk to a depth 
of 775^ ft. and timbered throughout ; the third plunger-set installed, and the rising column of pipes 
put into position and connected with the cisterns above, and may now be looked upon as a permanent 
pumping-shaft. The No. 2 level east of the crosscut has been extended on the lode for a distance of 
644| ft. close up to the Waihi Extended Company's boundary ; that company then made a connection 
with the end of the drive, which as a natund consequence gave excellent ventilation to the mutual 
advantage of both companies. From the bottom of this level (along the distance the lode has been 
driven on) nine winzes have been sunk whose depth on the aggregate amount to 508 ft., and a winze 
is being sunk to the west of the crosscut, and is now down 10 ft. This is being done with a view to 
opening up more ore in this section. No. 3 level : A crosscut drive has been driven at this level for a 
distance of 449^ ft., resulting in the intersection of what is termed the Martha and No. 2 Lode, the widths 
of which are 28 ft. and 7 ft. respectively. A contract has been let for rising and driving on the lode 
to connect with the bottom of the winzes sunk from No. 2 level. The quartz (so far as the lode has 
been driven and sunk upon) is said to be of a payable character. There has been added during the 
year to the phint an electrical-lighting plant for the effectual lighting of the several departments, working 
the stone-breaker, driving electrical drills, small pumps, and hoists. The forty-stamp mill purchased 
from the Kauri Freehold Estates Company has been delivered on the property, and rapid progress 
is being made with the earthwork-excavations on the battery-site. In addition to the above 
work, several buildings have been erected, including shed for dynamo plants extension of carpenters' 
and blacksmiths' shops, &c. An average of forty-six men were employed on the property. 

Waihi Extended Mine, — The work carried out in this company's mine during the past twelve months 
was principally at the 500 ft. level ; driving in a southerly direction was in progress at the end of the 
previous year. This drive was driven to the boundary, but as no ore-bodies were met with it was decided 
to drive in a north-north-westerly direction along the boundary, where it was anticipated that the 
reef being driven upon in the Qrand Junction Mine would be intersected ; and when a distance of 240 ft. 
had been driven, a reef was cut which proved to be the one worked upon in the Qrand Junction Mine. 
A connection was made with the drives of both mines, which has given good ventilation. This ree^ 
when cut through, was 18 ft. wide, the last 6 ft. or footwall portion being very heavily mineralised. 
Samples of ore taken from different parts of the reef when assayed gave very encouraging results. A 
drive on the footwall portion of the reef was driven for a distance of 120 ft., the quartz gradually going 
underfoot, and only the formation of the reef continuing ahead. This leads the mine-manager to bdieve 
that the drive is virtually on the cap of the reef. A winze was also sunk upon the reef for a depth of 
40 ft., the ore-body continuing strong downwards. Samples of ore taken from here when assayed gave 
very encouraging results, therefore there is every likelihood of its being of good value at a lower depth. 
Seeing that there was little or no quartz overhead, work was stopped for the time being at this level, 
and preparations for sinking the shaft were taken in hand. This work being completed, the sinking of 
the shaft was proceeded with and will be continued to an additional depth of 130 ft. before opening 
out for another level. During the past twelve months there has been 620 ft. of driving, 40 ft. of amking, 
and other necessary work accomplished. Eight men were constantly employed. 

Waihi Odd Reefs Syndicate (Gladstone), — In May last it was decided to erect a cyanide plants and 
when this was completed 3(X) tons of ore were mined and treated. The extraction not being satisfactory, 
it was decided to erect a Union vanner to concentrate the ore before treatment by cyanide. On com- 
pletion of erection of vanner, mining and crushing will be proceeded with. The plant consists of a 
five-stamp battery (9001b. stamps), ore-breaker. Challenge ore-feeder, a cyanide plant oonsisting of 



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33 C— 3. 

three sand-vats 20 ft. by 4 ft., two agitators, 12 ft. by 8 ft., two slime-collectors, 12 ft. by 6 ft., two 
precipitating-boxes, two solution-sumps with pumps and elevator, driven by IS-horse-powerfjTangye 
oil-engine. Eight men were employed during the year. 

Waihi Consols. — Thb claim was imder protection during the first part of the year pending the 
resumption of boring operations, which was arranged to be done by the Diamond Drilling Company. 
The boreholes are to be put down a distance of 1,250 ft. for the purpose of locating the reefo which 
traverse the Waihi Company's property, and from which splendid returns are being obtained. Some 
four boreholes have previously been commenced ; but there was always something breaking, or the 
hole filling in after a few hundred feet had been drilled. These mishaps prevented the holes from being 
bored down the depth where it was expected gold-bearing country would be met with ; therefore they 
did not prove what they were intended to do, nor yet give satisfaction to the shareholders. In the 
month of Septemberljthe Diamond Drilling Company resumed boring what is termed No. 5 borehole, 
and this hole reached a depth of 1,225 ft. when the Consols Company"stopped it, although it was arranged 
to bore it to a depth of 1,250 ft. ; the reason for doing this was that the cores obtained near the bottom 
were considered not to be of a favourable description for gold. The shareholders then decided to locate 
a borehole to the south of the one just finished ; and it is intended to put this hole down 1,250 ft. at an 
angle of 1 in 7, which is consider^ will be more likely to penetrate the country favourable for gold. 
From seven to nine men were employed on the boring operations during the latter part of the year.'^^ 

Waihi South Company, — This property adjoins the Waihi Consols ground, and has been closed down 
for a considerable period, no work having been done on it during the year. The company have decided 
to prospect the property by boring, and have been awaiting the opportunity of getting the Diamond 
Drilling Company to do the work. This, I am informed, has been arranged for, and a commencement 
made to put the hole down to a depth of 1,000 ft. 

Waihi Consolidated Oold-mining Company {Limited). — In the early part of the year a contract was 
let to the Diamond Drilling Company, who undertook to put down a borehole on a site selected to a 
depth of 1,200 ft., but after spending a considerable amount of time and money in tr3mig to drill through 
the boulder formation (which evidently extends downwards to a great depth in this locality) and meeting 
with continuous obstacles until a depth of 600 ft. was attained, the drilling company decided to surrender 
their contract, and made arrangements with the owners of the claim to be allowed to remove their drilling 
plant. A surface-prospecting drive was then started to the north-east of the main shaft, on a piece of 
rising ground, which was driven a distance of 132 ft., but the country not being of a favourable descrip- 
tion for gold, it was stopped and an application made to the Warden for six months' protection, which 
was granted, to enable the owners to place the property on the London market and thereby raise suffi- 
cient capital to develop the mine. Seven men were employed for a time. 

Pride of Waihi. — There has been little or no work done on this property during the year. It 
was fully expected that as soon as the Waihi Extended Company effected communication with the 
Qrand Junction workings driving would be commenced at the 500 it. level for the purpose of extending 
a crosscut to tap the water in the Pride of Waihi ground ; but as the Waihi Extended Company are at 
present sinking their shaft, they are are unable to allow the commencement of this drive until their 
work is completed. The company have applied for protection to give time to enable the raising of suffi- 
cient capital to erect a plant and sink in their own ground. 

Waihi Beach United Gold-mining Company. — ^l^e principal work carried on in this mine during 
the year was confined to sinking the shaft, which was done by hand-power until a depth of 100 ft. was 
attained, when the company decided to erect a 14-horse-power Tangyc engine and boiler. These have 
been placed in position, and will enable the sinking of the shaft to be pushed on more expeditiously. 
The ^Laft is 12 ft. by 4 ft., and is to be sunk to a depth of 150 ft. before the first level is opened out, 
where the reef will be intersected in 130 ft. of driving. The reef is 4 ft. wide at the outcrop on the 
coast-line, and the quartz treated from here at various times is said to have given good payable values ; 
therefore the shareholders are sanguine the mine will prove, when the ore is operated on, to be a pay- 
able concern. An average of six men employed. 

Ohinemuri River Syndicate. — ^The result of the work done in 1903 having proved unsatisfactory, 
the proprietors decided that it was necessary to possess a more efEectual method of grinding their ore 
material, which consists of quartz tailings deposited in the Ohinemuri River. With this object they 
erected in the early part of the year (1904) a small tube or flint mill. A second-hand rotary roasting- 
fumace was purchased and four sections of it (of a total length of 13 ft. 6 in.) converted by themselves 
into a mill, which has proved by subsequent work a most efficient grinding-machine, the product — 
amounting to 100 tons per week — being so finely ground that from 90 to 95 per cent, would pass through 
a 200-mesh seive, the bulk of it practically slimed. A serious difficulty arose in the treatment of this 
exceedingly fine material in the cyaniding-tanks, perfect agitation being necessary to efEect a high 
extraction of bullion. Several months were spent in experimenting to devise the best method of doing 
this and finally, after considerable work, trouble, and expense, a system was evolved which the pro- 
prietors are satisfied is superior to any other up to the present. The tanks used by the S3mdicate are 
the invention of the proprietors, and further patent-rights with the agitation process in connection 
have been applied for in New Zealand, Australia, United States of America, Mexico, and Transvaal. 
Two thousand tons of tailings has been treated by the improved process, and the extraction of bullion 
has been highly satisfactory. It Jb now proposed to increase the capacity of the present plant on the 
syndicate's Waihi claims to 50 tons per diem, and to erect another and larger plant capable of dealing 
with 100 tons on its Paeroa claims. The whole of this work|will, it is hoped, be completed and in full 
work before the end of the year 1905. Ten men were employed during the year. 

There are also a number of leases held in the vicinity of Waihi which occupy a very large area of 
ground on which little or no work is being done. 

5— C. 3. 



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O.S. 84 

WAirsKAURi Dmtriot. 

Waiteka^ OM-miniitg Company (Ltrnt^.— (Jolden Cross Section.— In order to insure a cheaper 
and speedier system of testing the position below No. 7 level a diamond drilling-macliine has been 
employed during the year. No. 7 level : Boring operations were commenced on the 14th July, 19M, 
from this level. No. 1 borehole chamber was constructed in No. 2 crosscut east, 197 ft. from the main 
north drive, and continued for a distance of 810 ft. at an angle of 18° from the vertical in a west-north- 
west course. The country penetrated was of a very similar character to that existing at No. 7 level, 
as revealed by the crosscuts, and it was necessary to case the hole. Owing to unsettled country at 
places it was deemed expedient to cement the hole. Although veins of calcite were encountered there 
was no indication of the existence of a massive body such as exbted at Nos. 5 and 7 levels. At 800 ft. 
a much harder class of andesite appeared, but on submitting this for a geological test it was found that 
the core obtained was identical in nature with that obtained at the beginning of the hole, only instead 
of being soft and broken, it changed into a harder and more brittle rock at depth. This hole &iled to 
reveal any continuation of the reef system. No. 2 borehole was projected from No. 2 west crosscut 
at a point 140 ft. west of the main north drive at an angle of 36° from the vertical and continued for 
a distance of 360 ft. This hole, in conjunction with No. 1 hole, covered the supposed formation for a 
total width of 335 ft. No. 3 borehole was commenced from the end of No. 2 crosscut west, and con- 
tinued in a westerly direction at an angle of 35° from horizontal for a distance of 192 ft. The object 
of this hole was to ascertain whether by any possibility parallel reefs existed in the western walL 
Nothing new was elicited by this work. After the completion of these holes it was decided to transfer 
the drilling-machine to the surface and conduct further boring operations from there. No. 4 borehole 
was set out at an angle of 37° from vertical (on the surface) so as to intersect the reef system at a point 
260 ft. north of the main shaft at a depth of 500 ft. below No. 7 level. This hole has been beset by 
difficulties from its commencement, owing to the distinctly unfavourable class of country existing, and 
in which there is no evidence of improvement down to its present depth — via., 1,105 ft. It may yet 
be necessary to abandon this hole and commence another one from the surface. No. 1 level : A pro- 
specting crosscut was undertaken at a point 1,000 ft. north-east of the main crosscut from No. 1 shaft. 
309 ft. was driven, making a total of 321 ft. from the main north drive. A decomposed class of andesite 
was penetrated for the full distance driven and no discovery was made. This work has been sun>ended. 
Empire Section.— Empire Reef : Considerable prospecting-work has been performed by trenching on 
the Empire Reef on the surface. The outcrop proved valueless, but it was decided to further test the 
reef by means of a drive from a crosscut 80 ft. below the surface. A total distance of 327 ft. was driven 
on the course of the lode — 216 ft. north and 111 ft. south. Crosscuts were also put out to prove the 
full width, but nothinglpayable was discovered. Realm Reef : With a view of instituting exploratory 
work on what was known as the Realm Reef, which was exposed some years ago by a crosscut, the 
work of renewing this crosscut was undertaken. At 350 ft. the reef was discovered and drives were 
commenced thereon. A total distance of 208 ft. was driven — 158 ft. north and 50 ft. south, from 
2 ft. to 3 ft. of quartz being exposed. Only traces of gold were obtained by assay, and it was decided 
to discontinue the work. Waitekauri Extended Section.— No. 3 level : The main drive south on the 
reef, which had been previously driven 235 ft. from the shaft, was resumed and increased in length to 
462 ft. In the course of this extension two crosscuts were made to prove the full width of the forma- 
tion, which was ascertained to range from 20 ft. to 29 ft. The grade of the ore, however, is low, the 
assay-results indicating a value of only a few shillings per ton. Surface Prospecting.— Dunng the year 
four men have been employed (on an average) in prospecting over the surface in the various sections. 
Considerable driving and trenching has been done in testing the known reeb. This work is still being 
proceeded with. Old Waitekauri Section. — Prospecting has been proceeding at and above the Horn 
Level during the year. As a result thereof a block was opened above the Queen Level, which produced 
1,652 tons of ore worth £2 15s. 11^. per ton. Prospecting is now being continued above the smithy 
level. Milling and treatment : 1,652 tons of ore was crushed for a return of 2,989 oz. of bullion, valued 
at £4,612 18s. Id. An average of nineteen men employed. 

The New Zealand Jubilee Odd-mining Company (Ltmitei).— During the past year operations in 
the Jubilee Mine have been mainly confined to the company's low-level tunnel, where the work of driving 
and crosscutting has been continuously carried on. The actual amount of driving (south) done during 
the year is 520 6., also about 200 ft. of crosscutting. This makes the total length of the tunnel 4,350 ft. 
More than 3,000 ft. of this has been driven on the reef. Work is still in progress at this level, but has 
of late been rendered slow and costly owing to the heavy flow of water to be contented with. Horn 
Level : In this level 140 ft. has been driven, 80 ft. on the hanging-wall reef, and 60 ft. on the footwall 
portion. Work has been suspended here for the past six months. Extended Section : In this section 
an old crosscut near the surface (known as *' Redwood's Crosscut ") has been opened up and extended 
a further distance of 230 ft. Three reefe have been cut, the largest (main reef) 8 ft. in width. Results 
have not been encouraging, and it is probable operations will be discontinued here at an early date. 
No machinery has been erected during the year 1904. As to contemplated operations during 1905 
no definite scheme has been formulated. The company's directors are considering the advisability of 
testing at a greater depth, probably by diamond-drilling, and steps are being taken in London to raise 
further capital. Beyond small sample shipments to London no ore has been treated. Nine men were 
employed during the year. 

Huanui Claim. — This ground, on which a good deal of prospecting had been previously done by 
the original owners, is at present worked on behalf of a syndicate, who have had two men emplo3red 
opening up and testing the reef at No. 2 level, from which encouraging prospects are obtained. This 
level is in a distance of 500 ft., the greater portion being on the line of reef, which is very irregular in 
size, varying from 3 in. to 6 ft. in width. The shareholders consider it would pay if a small battery 
were erected in a suitable position on the property, so as to reduce the cost of treating the ore. With 



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36 0.— 3. 

this end in view they have taken an option of purchase over the (rolden Cross 10-head stamp-battery, 
owned by the Waitekauri Qold-mining Company (Limited), with the intention of having it removed 
to the mine. 

Scotia Claim — This claim (which is situated west of the Waitekauri Township, and on which a 
good deal of prospecting-work had been previously done) was recently taken up on behalf of a syndicate* 
represented by Messrs. Morgan and Collins who have been carrying on prospecting operations. They 
were successful in discovering a small leader from which some very rich stone was obtained, but^as it 
was very small — varying from ^ in. to 3 in. in thickness — the amount of crushing-dirt obtained up to 
the end of the year was limited. Two men were employed. 

Maori Land,— This ground, which was formerly known and worked as the " Young New Zealand," 
and on which a good deal of work had been done, was taken up early in the year by a syndicate repre- 
sented by J. M. Haslett, who had previously been in charge of the operations of the old company. He 
considered that the ground should get a further trial by extending the No. 2 level to a point where it 
was expected the Welcome Lode would be intersected. Sufficient capital having been raised, a contract 
was let to a party of six men ; and, after driving a short distance, the reef was intersected. It was 
found to vary &om 1 ft. 6 in. to 3 ft. in thickness, and, although no gold has been seen, sufficient work 
has not yet been done to prove its value. The ventilation became so defective that it was found 
necessary to give instructions to the manager to have it improved before proceeding further. Six 
men have been employed. 

OWHABOA, 

Rising Sun Gold-mining Company, — During the first part of the year operations were confined to 
prospecting the lode at difierent points, a winze being sunk from the low level to a depth of 43 ft. to 
ascertain its value. The prospects met with not being considered payable, and the funds of the company 
becoming eidiausted, protection was asked for, and granted, to enable the company to raise further 
capital. Prom two to three men were employed during the year. 

May Bell (late Waitekauri King) and Eclipse Falls have employed two men each, but nothing of 
importance has been unearthed in either. 

Eabangahake. 

The New Zealand Crown Mines {Limited). — The result of operations carried on in this mine for the 
pastjyear has not, I am sorry to state, so far proved to be of as satisfactory a nature asjmight be desired. 
The returns for the period under review show a considerable falling-off on the previous year's output. 
This is accounted for by the disappointing nature of the developments in the lower levels and a general 
falling-ofi in ore-values throughout the mine, which necessitates reducing the crushing-capacity of the 
battery and the discharge of a number of employees in the mine. The main incline shaft (which is 
down a depth of 506 ft. below the Waitewheta Tunnel) has been at a standstill during the year, and 
although a large Worthington pump has been fitted up at the No. 4 level to assist the 12 in. plunger 
lift, it has not been considered advisable by the management to open out the No. 5 level from the 
bottom^of the shaft, or to sink the shaft to a greater depth. The present pumping plant is considered 
insufficient to cope with the large influx of water; but this question is, I am informed, at present 
engaging the attention of the company, the erection of a more powerful pumping plant being proposed. 
If this proposal is carried out the prospecting and development of the property at deeper levels can be 
undertaken. On the success of this work the permanence of the mine in a great measure depends. No 
doubt the cost of winning the ore from deeper levels (should this work be undertaken) will be materially 
increased by the extra expense of pumping and winding to the Waitewheta (or output) level in com- 
parison with the expense previously existing in winning the ore, a greater portion of which was obtained 
from the higher levels water-free. One of the principal works in hand at present is the opening-up 
and prospecting a block of ground (a considerable distance south of the main incline shaft) from the 
bottom of a winze which was sunk from the No. 3 level to a depth of 242 ft., and on which a small 
winding and pumping plant driven by compressed air has been erected. This is opened out on the 
same level as the No. 5 of the incline shaft, which at some future time will be connected ; then the 
trucking will be done at this level and raised up the main incline shaft, instead of up the present winze. 
From the bottom of this winze the reef (which varies from 3 ft. to 9 ft. in width) was driven on in a 
southerly direction for a distance of 217 ft., when the great fault was met with which practically cut 
out all the quartz. The level was continued on the course of a small formation through the fault and 
disturbed country for a distance of 606 ft., when the main reef was again picked up, with slightly better 
values. At present a connection is being made by rising and sinking on the reef to the No. 3 level a 
height of about 240 ft., which will enable the value of the ore between these levels to be ascertained, 
and also be the means of ventilating these workings. No. 3 level south : This level has been extended 
330 ft., making the total distance from the shaft 2,276 ft., the average width of the reef being 3 ft., from 
which 477 tons of quartz was obtained, yielding bullion to the value of about £1,124. At the close of 
the previous year a fault was intersected in the level about 2,043 ft. south of the shaft ; up to this point 
the value of the ore varied from £3 to £4 per ton. When the reef was again found on the western side 
of the fault the value of the ore had fallen to about £1 per ton, and no improvement took place in 
values until June, when good ore was cut into. This proved to be a rich patch giving an average value 
for the month of about £5 per ton. In July the value of the ore dropped to IBs. 6d. per ton and the 
following month to 15s. per ton. The average gross value of all the ore mined during the company's 
financial year was £1 19s. 8}d. per ton or 128. 3^. per ton less than the previous year. In the higher 
levels above Waitewheta tunnel a few parties of tributers are employed working on some of the smaller 
leeis and leaders, some of whom have obtained payable returns from crushings which were treated 
at the company's battery. Two hundred and four men have been employed during the year. 



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0.— 3. 86 

The Talisman Consolidated (limited). — This company purchased the Woodstock (}old-mimng 
Company's property, and now hold an area of 506 acres. This has given excellent facilities for opening 
up both sections, and the ground can be worked to better advantage than hitherto. In the Talisman 
section a large amount of (kiving and stoping has been done during the year, and with excellent results. 
•The No. 8 level was extended to a point 1,010 ft. south of the shaft, where the ore-shoot in the Bonanza 
section was intersected early in the year, and considerable development- work has since been done here, 
with favourable results. No. 10 level : The main drive has been extended to a point 701 ft. south of 
shaft. This level also has intersected the Bonanza ore-shoot, the reef being larger than in the upper 
levels and giving payable results. The west crosscut from No. 10 level towards the Tailsman Extended 
ground is now in 638 ft. without cutting anything of value. No. 11 level : The north drive has been 
driven 145 ft. from shaft and has reached the boundary of ore-shoot worked in the upper levels. The 
south drive measures 289 ft. from shaft. It has reached the boundary of ore-shoot and is being con- 
tinued until it gets into the Bonanza section. Shaft : the shaft is now 183 ft. below river level (Wood- 
stock No. 5), having been sunk and timbered from No. 10 level (350 ft.) during the year. Work for 
1905 : It is intended to continue driving No. 8 level until it reaches the Dubbo section. No. 10 level 
will be advanced until it reaches south boundary of Bonanza ore-shoot. In shaft a station has been 
cut for No. 12 level, 178 ft. below river level and driving north and south from same will shortly be in 
progress. As soon as drives on No. 12 level are fairly away from shaft, sinking will be again resumed. 
The general outlook for next year's work is much more favourable than it was a year ago. During the 
year 1904 the mill crushed 44,888 tons of ore yiekling bullion valued at £84,826 10b. 6d. During the 
year 225 men have been employed. 

Comstock Claim. — This ground is situated on the western side of the Talisman and is held by 
W. Tregoweth, who has been employed with two other men in extending the low level. A body of 
quartz has been intersected which is underlying very flat and canying a good deal of mineral, although 
no rich assays have yet been obtained. It is a good locality, and a shoot of payable ore may be found 
in driving. Three men were employed. 

Shotaver Claim, — This ground is worked by C. Miller and party, who have been employed for some 
time in following up a trail of loose gold with the expectation of locating the reef from which it was 
shed, but so far have not been successful A Uttle loose gold is obtain^ by mecms of a rocker and 
ripples, which they have fitted up, but nothing payable so far has been obtained. 

Te Aboha District. 

Hardifs Mines (Limited), Waiorongomai. — In the early part of the yearjthis^mine was worked 
and owned by Mr. Hardy, but subsequently a company was formed for the purpose of purchasing the 
property and more fully developing it. The property was taken over and operations were started on 
behalf of the company in the month of April. The work since completed has been the doubling of the 
capacity of the water-race, retimbering and lining fire-tunnels, cutting of various watercourses, erection 
of trestles and fluming and building new dam and sluice-gate. The battery has been extensively enlarged 
and improved. The work comprises a tram-line from battery store-room to county tramway, a com- 
modious store-room, circular-saw house, four sets of grizzlies, one rock-breaker, two 50-ton hoppers, 
four automatic Challenge ore-feeders, twenty stamps of 800 lb. each, four electro-copper silver phites 
each 6 ft. by 5 ft., four Watson-Denny grinding and amalgamating continuous-discharge pans, eight 
Union Gwynne Head 6 ft. vanners, two Wilfley tables, six berdans, sluice-tables, electric-light dynamo, 
lathe, and drilling-machines. Three Pelton wheeb drive stamps and pans, rock-breaker, and vanners, 
under a head of 240 ft. of water. The plant is capable of closely saving the values of the ores of this 
district, and has been specially constructed to save all minerals by concentration preparatory to smelting 
at Dapto, New South Wales. Operations at the mines are entirely confined to the opening-up of the 
reef in the lowest level, from which it is intended to connect with the various sections of the company's 
property. The lode at present being worked is about 15 ft. wide, but the drive is confined to about 5 ft., 
from which large masses of heavily mineralised ore containing gold, silver, lead, copper, and zinc are 
being extracted. By selecting the better portions from the battery ore-feeders, ore worth by assay 
over £12 per ton can be easily obtained, but it is intended, after due trials, to save handling by rough 
grading at the mine. The battery treatment is purely mechanical and, so far, has proved to be well 
able to save a high percentage of concentrates values. Formerly heavy penalties were imposed by 
smelters on ores carr3dng zinc, but at present no penalty attaches to zinc up to 10 per cent. Above 
that, Is. per unit percentage is charged, against which is credited the value of the copper and lead con- 
tents, on a most reasonable scale. In order to facilitate the mine- work, a line of piping 1,500 ft. long, 
giving a fall of over 300 ft. with a 6 in. pipe is being laid down. Meantime a fall of 85 ft. works two 
small fans and a quartz-hoisting winch designed by the supervisor. The county tramway has been 
leased for five years. During the coming year work will be vigorously carried on, both in driving and 
on the reef, in preparation for the more expeditious method of extracting the ore by stoping. The 
preliminary work in mining is always tedious, but any curtailment of what is warranted by the excellent 
appearance of the mine to-day wiU only lead to confusion and the sacrifice of the best interests of the 
mine. During the year twenty-eight men have been employed. 

Cadman Mine. — This property, which has been worked and owned for some time back by T. Qavin 
and party with fair results, has, I am informed, been recently taken over by a company. It is intended 
to provide sufficient capital to thoroughly open up and develop the property. 

KoMATA District. 

Komata Reefs Mine. — With the exception of extending the No. 4 level northwards into the Te- 
ao-Marama Section practically no other work has been done here during the year. Te-ao-Marama 



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C 3. 




NEW ZEALAND CROWN MINES, KARANGAnAKB. — VIEW OP CONCRETE 
BOILER-HOUSE, BUILT ON SIDE OF CLIFF NEAR MINE MOUTH. 




V|BW OF NEW RAILWAY-LINB AND TUNNEL, ALSO REDUCTION WORKS, NEW ZEALAND CROWN MINE8» 

KAKANGAHAKE. 



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37 C— 3. 

Section : A good deal of development-work has been done during the year on both No. 1 and No. 2 
leeia in Nob. 2, 3, 4 leveb, as well as the extension of No. 4 level (Komata Reefe Section) to a point 
underneath the main shaft, where a rise is in progress to connect with bottom of shaft. The various 
workings have opened up a large amount of payable ore. Stoping has been carried on from the hopper, 
smithy, and Nos. 2, 3, and 4 leveb. The total number of fathoms broken out was 816 /, which produced 
13,004 tons of ore. Development-work produced 2,796 tons, making a total tonnage of 15,800 tons 
worth £36,140 8s. 7d. Battery : During the past year several minor additions have been made to the 
battery, the chief being a small tube mill used for regrinding the coarse sands from the stampers. Steam- 
power has been used for about six months in the year. The tonnage treated for the year was 15,800 
tons from which bullion to the value of £32,559 17s. 3d. was extracted, which enabled the directors to 
pay £6,666 13s. 4d. in dividends. The average number of men employed during the year was one 
hundred. 

A little prospecting has been carried on in the district, but up to the present no payable dis- 
coveries are reported. 

HiKUTAiA District. 

New Maratoto Mine. — This mining property was unworked for some considerable time, but was 
purchased about six months ago, and a company formed to carry on operations. The new proprietary 
lost no time in trying to find out the value of the quartz broken out and the tailings at the battery. 
The first work undertaken was the treatment of 100 tons of tailings through the cyanide- vats, which 
gave a return of 383 oz. of bullion, valued at £90 Os. 2d. This, I am informed, is highly satisfactory, 
and it has now been decided to put in agitators, which will enable a larger extraction of the precious 
metal to be obtained than by the ordinary vat-treatment alone. Six men have been employed. 

Waimunga Claim. — This claim is situated on the side of the Hikutaia- Whangamata Track, on the 
fall of the hill towards the east coast. Very rich ore was obtained on the outcrop of the reef. A trial 
lot of 4,222 lb. of quartz was taken from here and treated at the Thames School of Mines plant for 
a return of 133 oz. 3 dwt. of gold, valued at £82 13s. 3d. A company was then formed and capital raised 
to work the ground. A drive is now being put in to intersect the reef about 50 ft. above the outcrop. 

Omahu District. 

Klondyke. — The company did some work in the early part of the year, and crushed 120 tons of ore 
for 13 oz. 5 dwt. of gold, valued at £40 9s. 2d. ; but as the gold obtained was not sufficient to pay the 
expenses of mining the ore the mine was stopped and protection again appUed for. An average of 
two men employed. 

PuRiRi District. 

Puriri Gold Estates. — A little work has been done here during the year, but as operations were not 
successful the mine has been closed down. 

Miners^ Right Claim. — Two men have been engaged here during the year, but have met with very 
little success. 

Bast Coast District. 

Tairua Broken Hills. — The company's attention for the first six months of the year was directed 
to operating on the blocks of ground opened up over the main adit level, the quartz obtained from here 
yielding good payable returns of gold ; but as these blocks became exhausted it was found necessary 
to open up new or undeveloped portions of the reefs, and a winze was at once started and sunk on the 
Blucher Reef to a depth of 80 ft. from the bottom of the main adit level. Here a small engine is erected 
for pumping water and raising and lowering material as required ; and near the bottom of the winze 
a drive was extended on the Blucher Reef a distance of 100 ft. to the westward of the winze and 15 ft. 
eastward. A few feet to the westward of the winze 50 ft. has been driven on the Night Reef, from where 
it junctions with the Blucher Reef. During the year 3,700 tons of ore was treated at the company's 
mill for 6,728 oz. 4 dwt. of bullion, valued at £10,287 Is. lOd. An average of fifty men employed. 

Chdmsford Mine. — This mine was under protection for the first six months of the year, but latterly 
the company raised sufficient funds to give the ground another trial. The development- work is at present 
being durected in extending the upper levels on the reef, where encouraging prospects are being met 
with, and the manager is sanguine that payable blocks of ground will be opened up here. Eighty tons 
of ore was lately treated at the company's mill for 44 oz. 7 dwt. of gold, and 109 tons of tailings for 
117 oz. 8 dwt., the total value of which was £249 7s. 5d. An average of six men employed. 

Coronation Mine. — An adit level has been driven into the hill for about 200 ft. This, I am in- 
formed, passed through some 50 ft. of rock carrying gold, and to prove the value of it a five-stamp 
battery is in course of erection and will be completed in a few weeks' time. I carefully examined the 
rock which is to be treated, but could see no indication of its being a definite lode, and it is the hardest 
material I have seen that is supposed to carry payable gold. An average of two men have been em- 
ployed in the mine. 

Neavesville District. 

Golden'\BeU Mithe. — This company's attention to the work in the mine has been chiefly directed 
to extending the low level, which is now in a distance of 1,000 ft., and there is still a little over 300 ft. 
to be driven to reach the point under the payable ore met with in what may be termed the road level. 
When this driving is accomplished, a rise is to be put up a height of 120 ft. to connect with the level 
above, and will serve a double purpose — in aflording the means of ventilating this part of the mine, and 
as a pass for the quartz to be put down to the low level, along which it will be trucked out to the bin. 



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C.—S. 88 

From here the ore will be conveyed direct to the mill by an aerial tramway. The battery, which is 
in coarse of erection and approaching completion, will consist of forty stamps. The ore will be treated 
partly by amalgamation and partly by the cyanide process. It wUl take about another six months 
before all the connections between the mine and mill are finished, and the crushing plant (which will 
be a complete and up-to-date one) fairly started. An average of twelve men have been employed. 
There has been a Uttle prospecting carried on in the NeavesviUe locaUty, and it is said a find of some 
importance has been made in a claim formerly known as the '* Brothers Claim." 

Whangamata District. 

Mananu Mine. — I am informed this mine has been pruchased by a syndicate, and that a company 
will shortly be formed with a view of raisinglcapital to again work the ground, which is considered well 
worth a trial, seeing that a large quantity ol^gold was obtained by the previous owners. 

Thames District. 

New Moanataiari, — In the early part of the year this mine was a part of the Albumia Mine ; then 
the Moanataiari Section was again tdcen over by a separate company. The opening-up and develop- 
ment-work was directed to that portion of the mine near the main shaft on what is known as the Cambria 
Reef. Very encouraging prospects were met with underneath the 400 ft. level, a winze being sunk 
on the reef to a depth of 65 ft., carrying payable ore all the way down. 582 tons of ore was broken 
out around the winze and treated at the company's battery (formerly May Queen) for a return of 407 oz. 
12 dwt. of gold valued at £1,118 12s. lOd. As all the quartz had to be hauled up by a windlass to the 
400 ft. level it was deemed advisable to stop the work on the reef here until a low level could be put 
in, when it could be worked to better advantage. The work in progress in the meantime is confined 
to driving on the course of the Cambria Reef westward at the 400 ft. level, where there is a piece of virgin 
ground unprospected on the strike of some of the Waiotahi and Prince Imperial Lodes, and it is 
fully expected an important discovery will be made. An average of fifteen men have been employed. 

Kuranui Caledonian. — During the past year the above mine has been chiefly worked by tributers, 
who have won 1,600 oz. 10 dwt. of gold, valued at £4,345 4s. 9d., principaUy from small leaders which 
must drop on to the Cambria Reef at No. 4 level. The fact of these smaU leaders carrying such rich 
stone, and the recent rich find made in this reef by the Waiotahi Company (in the same channel of 
country, at their No. 4 level, right opposite this point) has been the means of the Kuranui Caledonian 
Company reconstructing, with the object of raising sufficient capital to drive a crosscut for this reef 
from No. 4 level, which is 120 ft. below the Waiotahi No. 4 level. In order to intersect this reef it will 
be necessary to drive 600 ft. At about this point connection will be made with a winze, which two men 
have been engaged sinking for the past six months. This winze has been sunk on the Red Queen lead, 
and colours of gold have been seen for the whole distance — viz., 92 ft. When a connection is made 
ample ventilation will be provided, and allow the opening-up and developing of this reef to be carried 
on with despatch. What is known as the Waiotahi Reef in the Waiotahi Mine is, according to plans, 
identical with the Cambria Reef. There is a considerable area of this well-knovm reef untouched running 
through the Kuranui Caledonian ground. With the recent find in the Waiotahi, and the excellent 
mineral indications met with by the Moanataiari Company, there is every reason to beUeve that this 
will prove a valuable block of ground, and be the means of giving this old mine a new lease of life. Ven- 
tilation will be provided by means of an air-fan, driven by steam and erected on the surface. The air 
will be conducted through 10 in. by 12 in. air-boxes down the shaft and into the working- face. It is antici- 
pated that this will provide ample ventilation, and keep the workings free from gas. A borehole was 
put down a depth of 1,500 ft. near the mouth of what is known as the Long Drive tunnel, but the pro- 
spects were of a very disappointing nature, and boring operations on behalf of this company have 
been discontinued for the present. During the year thirty-eight tributers and five wages-men were 
employed. 

Old AUmrnia. — The principal work in this mine has been the main Moanataiari tunnel, which has 
been driven a distance of 710 ft. In this tunnel the No. 1 and No. 2 reefe were intersected and driven 
on for a distance of 390 ft. The kindly appearance of the quartz and the assay tests made from time to 
time led the management to believe that the reef on the back of the level would pay to crush, and, in 
consequence, some of it was stoped out and sent to the battery for treatment, but proved disappointing, 
as, after putting 136 tons of ore through, it gave a return of only 20 oz. 2 dwt. gold, valued at £58 148. 2d. 
This work was stopped, and the extension of the main timnel was again resumed. 585 tons of quartz 
was treated by the tributers for 764 oz. 7 dwt. of gold, value £2,049 18s. Id. An average of twelve 
wages-men and forty-four tributers were employed in the mine. 

Vidoria Mine. — During the first eight months of the year operations in the mine were chiefly carried 
on by tributers, who did a considerable amount of driving and stoping on the various leaders in diflerent 
parts, but none of them were successful in discovering anything of a sensational character. During 
the latter part of the year the directors decided to carry on some development-work on the Mariner's 
Reef, in the Victoria Section, where blocks of the reef had been left in by the previous owners. Nothing 
payable was discovered up to the end of the year, but as rich gold was formerly found adjacent to the 
place where the work is now in progress it is fully expected that gold will be found in payable quantities. 
Boring operations on behalf of the company (on that section of the property known as the Foreshore) 
were also carried on with a view to ascertain what depth the solid rock or gold-bearing country would 
be met with on the seaward side of the beach shde, but after the borehole had attained a depth of 1,016 ft. 
through broken country, the Goldfields Diamond Drilling Company decided that it would not pay 
them to proceed further with the hole, and in consequence this (and any other boring that was contem- 
plated by the Victoria company) was stopped for an indefinite period. One hundred and seventy- 



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39 0.— 8. 

four loads of ore were treated by the tribnters, which gave a return of 117 oz. 7 dwt. of gold, value 
£311 17b. An average of nine men employed. 

Kuranui Mine, — This mine has been continuously worked with six men. In the early part of the 
year the operations were directed to opening up the tributers' lode, which carried a large quantity 
of mineral of a favourable description for gold, and the management fully expected that a payable 
chute of ore would be met with. After working on this lode for some time, and finding nothing payable, 
the company decided to try some of the leaders which had been previously intersected in the Shellback 
tunnel on the eastern side of the Moanataiari slide. Work has been in progress here for several months, 
but nothing payable so far has been discovered. Thirty-four loads of quartz were treated for 36 oz. 
13 dwt. of gold, value £101 12s. 8d. 

Waiotahi Mine. — For the first four months of the year the work was carried on (as previously) on 
small leaders, which contained gold in suflficient quantities to pay; but, as in other mines, these leaders were 
eventually worked out. Then it was decided to open up and develop the mine at deeper leveb. The first 
work undertaken was opening out a chamber on the back of the old No. 4 level from the shaft, then 
a crosscut was driven in an easterly direction, with the object of intersecting the Waiotahi main reef, 
and connecting with a winze sunk on the foot- wall portion of the reef from the level above, and thus 
assist the ventilation in this part of the mine. When the crosscut drive had advanced 80 ft. from the 
chamber, the hanging-wall portion of the main reef was met with, and very rich gold was at once dis- 
covered in a highly mineralised portion near the hanging- wall. The reef, when cut through, varied from 
15 ft. to 20 ft. in thickness. It yet remains to be seen whether it will prove to be only a patch or a chute 
of rich gold, either going downwards or upwards ; but the first 50 tons of general dirt and 516 lb. of 
picked stone gave the excellent return of 617 oz. 11 dwt. of gold, valued at £1,667 4s. lid., which created 
a good feeling in the Thames district. There was a good deal of work necessary to be done before 
operations were undertaken at the lower levels — viz., new poppet-legs had to be erected and the shaft 
repaired. A total^of 335 tons of ore and 516 lb. of picked stone were treated during the year for 
1,236 oz. 13 dwt. of gold, valued at £3,364 5s. 4d. During the year an average of twelve men were 
employed. 

Fame and Fortune Mine, — The company have done no work in the mine during the year. That 
done has been entirely carried out by tributers, who have for some time past directed their attention to 
working on various leaders carrying gold, but were not successful in finding anything of a really payable 
character. During the year fifty-one loads and 51 lb. picked stone were treated for 90 oz. 16 dwt., 
valued at £255 12s. 4d. Eleven men have been employed. 

We^ Coast Claim, — This claim is still owned by John Northey, who has continuously worked the 
mine, but unfortunately he has not met with much success during the year. Nineteen and a half loads 
of general dirt were treated for 18 oz. 4 dwt. of gold, valued at £47 158. 6d. 

Ballarat Claim, — This mine has been continously worked by the owners (John Brett and party), who 
have done a considerable amount of work in driving a level in from the side of the hill to open up a leader 
which they considered would pay to work, and have been successful in getting gold ; but whether it 
will pay them for the extra work they did remains to be seen. They had 52 tons treated for 107 oz. 
12 dwt. of gold, valued at £333 lis. lOd. Three men were employed. 

Nonpareil Mine, — This mine has been entirely worked by tributers, the work being confined to 
driving and stoping on the Liverpool Boys and Wade leaders, which vary from 2 in. to 10 in. in thickness. 
On the former leader, 150 ft. of driving was done, and stoping 150 ft. in length and 30 ft. in height ; also 
imderhand stoping was done under the level for 100 ft. in length and 10 ft. in depth. The quantity of ore 
treated by the various parties employed amounted to 155 loads, which yielded 232 oz. 17 dwt. of gold, 
valued at £645 10s. 3d. Nine men have been employed. 

New Saxon Mine, — This ground was formerly a portion of the May Queen Hauraki, but in the early 
part of the year it was taken over by a separate company, who have confined their operations to work 
on the No. 2 level from the Saxon shaft in the Cardigan Section. A leader, 8 in. in thickness, has been 
driven on for a distance of 400 ft. east from the crosscut leader. There has been no quartz crushed yet 
from this leader, but in breaking down gold has been frequently seen, which leads the manager to believe 
that it will prove payable when opened up. A large extent of this leader is intact both above and below 
the level named, and work is to be pushed on with all possible speed to develop it, and a rise put through 
to the surface. This will be the means of ventilating this part of the mine. Two hundred and twenty- 
one tons of ore was treated from other leaders worked, giving a return of 138 oz. 7 dwt. of gold, valued 
at £370 138. An average of eight men were employed. 

New May Queen Mine, — This mine is situated in the Waiokaraka, and comprises an area of 93 acres. 
It was formerly part of the May Queen Hauraki property, but has recently been taken up by another 
proprietary. Work was immediately commenced and directed to the repairing of No. 3 level on the 
No. 4 lode, with the object of reaching the Old May Queen shaft, for the purpose of securing ventilation. 
When this is accomplished, it is the intention of the company to drive a crosscut easterly to intersect 
the St. Hippo reefs. Should the water be pumped out low enough in the Queen of Beauty shaft to 
unwater the reefs at a lower level than that already worked, extensive works will be undertaken to 
open up blocks of ground on the No. 4 and North-west lodes. Four men were employed during the latter 
portion of the year. 

New May Queen Extended Mine, — For the first eight months of the year the operations were con- 
ducted on the Marion Reef, which varied from 1 ft. to 4 ft. in thickness. On this reef a considerable 
amount of driving and stoping was done, but as this did not prove payable, work here was stopped 
for a time. When work was again resumed a crosscut was iriven along the boundary of the New 
Una and this company's mine for a distance of 150 ft. Three leaders were intersected — the first cut 
through was 6 in. thick, and in breaking out the quartz colours of gold were seen ; the second, being 
No. 7 Reef (which was from 1 ft. to 5 ft. in thickness), was driven on for a distance of 60 ft., the prospects 



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C.—S. 40 

met with being very encouraging ; several pounds of picked stone were obtained. The third leader is 
about 18 in. thick, but no driving has yet been done on it. One hundred and sixty-six loads^of Tquartz 
were treated for 97 oz. 10 dwt. of gold, valued at £268 3e. Seven men have been employed. 

New Una Mine (formerly known as the Success). — The work in hand at the commencement of 
the year was the extension of the low level, which was driven in an easterly direction with the object 
of passing through the Moanataiari main slide to intersect the Loyalty and other lodes known to exist 
in this portion of the company's mine. At a distance of 690 ft. from the entrance of the level named, 
a lode-formation was met with. This showed gold, and was operated upon in a northerly direction. 
Twenty-five loads of general dirt and 50 lb. of specimens were obtained, which, when treated, gave a 
return of 89 oz. 4 dwt. of gold, valued at £224 28. 6d. A drive was then extended on the lode-formation 
for 125 ft., and a rise put up on it to a height of 115 ft., but owing to a strong stream of water being met 
with in the rise, and no more payable gold found, work here was discontinued, and the main drive was 
extended through the main slide, which proved to be 80 ft. thick, and composed of a clay and rubbly 
formation. After passing through this, a reef 18 in. in thickness was discovered showing colours of 
gold, but after driving 100 ft. on it in a northerly and 50 ft. in a southerly direction without finding 
gold in sufficient quantities to pay, the work was stopped. It was then decided to apply to the May 
Queen Extended Company for permission to use the Adelaide No. 3 level, the face of one of the drives 
being nearly up to this company's boundary. Permission being granted, the extension of the drive 
named was at once commenced, with the result that three leaders were intersected, within 109 ft of 
driving, all of which carried gold. The No. 2 leader is being driven on along the boundary, where very 
encouraging prospects are being obtained in the May Queen Extended ground. The No. 3 leader, 
which is 48 ft. inside of No. 2 leader, is being worked by the company, and varies from 15 in. to 18 in. 
in width. This has been driven on for 60 ft. in a westerly direction, and in breaking out the quartz 
gold IB frequently seen. A leading stope is now being carried along on it on the back of the drive, which 
latter has been securely timbered up, and it is fully expected that the block willjprove payable. Five 
men have been employed. 

TJie ArundeU Syndicate (Limited) embraces the Gloucester Extended and George TumbuU Claims, 
and is situated up the Karaka Creek. The operations carried on by this company in the mine during 
the year have been principally in the nature of devlopment-work. In addition to this, a five-stamp 
battery with three berdans has been erected, and water-race and tramway constructed, the whole 
of which will be connected with the mine in the course of a month or two, when crushing will be com- 
menced. The machinery will be driven by a semi-portable engine of 65-horse power. An average of 
eight men have been employed at the mine and mill. 

Golden Drop Claim, — The work in this mine has been confined to sinking a winze on what is termed 
a " dropper," driving 80 ft. on it and stoping out the block to the level above. As the prospects are 
encouraging going down, the shareholders intend to drive a low level to open up another block of ground. 
Four tons of ore were treated for 46 oz. 16 dwt. of gold, valued at £122 13s. 5d. Two men have been 
employed. 

Claremonl Claim, — This claim is situated up the Karaka Creek, and comprises a small area of 
groimd owned by George Bryant, who treated 50 lb. of specimens for 29 oz. 12 dwt. of gold, valued at 
£79 18s. 

Fortuna Mine. — Very little work has been done in this mine during the year. 

Mascotte Mine, Otanui, — This claim comprises an area of 100 acres, and is held by a syndicate 
who have worked the ground continuously during the year. The operations were directed to sinking 
a small shaft to a depth of 50 ft. for the purpose of proving the value of the lode at a deeper level than 
that already worked, and from which a large amoimt of gold was obtained some years ago. When the 
lead was met with in the drive and opened out, at 50 ft., a large amount of water was tapped, and gave 
considerable trouble to keep down by hauling with buckets. It was then decided to put in a 4^ in. 
diameter plimger pump to raise the water to the surface, and this has answered the purpose admirably 
and at a small expense. Some very rich specimens were obtained in the lead intersected at the level 
named, and the prospects met with are such as to give the shareholders encouragement to sink the shaft 
another 50 ft., where the mine will be opened up by driving, &c., to more advantage. One and a half 
tons of quartz and 21 lb. of picked stone were treated for 12 oz. of gold, valued at £32 7s. 5d. Four 
men have been employed. 

Tararu Mine, — ^Work in this mine has been confined to development pure and simple, and includes 
the reopening of the workings in the Day Dawn Reef and sinking a winze on same ; driving a new 
low level in the Sunbeam Section and putting up a rise on the reef ; abo putting up from the battery 
level a new rise to connect with the old Sunbeam rise. The old rise from 50 ft. to 110 ft. having caved 
in it was deemed best to make a new connection above the bad part ; this has been holed through, 
and, when the timbering is completed, the company will be able to handle stuff from the Simbeam 
Reef without trouble. The Day Dawn crosscut at the battery level has been extended to the boundary, 
and it is now intended to drive on the reef so as to get under the lowest workings on the Day Dawn 
and Norfolk Reefs, and then open up these veins from 240 ft. to 350 ft. below the old leveb. 

Edipse Mine, — The work in this mine was directed to extending the low level to a position under 
the run of gold worked from the level above. The country passed through in this drive was very change- 
able, some parts being very soft and ground subject to swell, thus requiring to be closely timbered. 
When the required distance was reached a connection was made between the two leveb by rising and 
sinking on the reef. Just over the back of the low level very rich specimens were obtained, and 
stoping b now in progress. The reef here varies from 2 ft. to 8 ft. in thickness, and the first crushing 
of 133 tons treated at the end of the year produced 300 oz. of gold, valued at £867 lOs. The prospects 
of the mine for the new year look exceedingly prombing. An average of eight men have been employed. 



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41 C— 3. 

Waiomo District. 

New Monowai Mine, — This mine, which was fonnerly known as the Monowai, has been nnworked 
for the greater portion of the year. It was recently bought by a syndicate who formed a new com- 
pany under the title of " The New Monowai Gold and Silver Mines (Limited)." The company has 
let a contract to drive 1,000 ft. on the reef, to prospect the same, and get under the run of rich ore 
formerly worked by the old company. A small quantity of rich quartz which had slipped oft the cap 
of the reef has recently been obtained on the surface. No ore has been treated during the year. Three 
men have been employed for three months of the year. 

Tapu District. 

Mahara Royal Mine. — The operations in this mine were chiefly confined to sinking two winzes 
below the floor of the main adit level on the reef and stoping out from those winzes. In driving from 
the bottom of the first winze sunk, the reef pinched out in the drive, and after stoping out the small 
block upwards work here was discontinued. Then the second winze was sunk from the bottom of the 
same level, but nearer the crosscut. The reef in the winze was 6 ft. thick, and carried a fair amount 
of mineral amongst which gold was frequently seen, but as will be seen by the returns it is low-grade 
ore ; the reef is very irregular, opening out and pinching in suddenly. 1,874 tons of ore was treated 
for 585 oz. 7 dwt. of gold, valued at £1,785 6s. 7d., an average of ten men were employed. 

Sheridan Mine. — This mine was worked in the early part of the year by a company, but not being 
successful in finding payable ore, the company decided to dispose of the property, and it was sold to 
Plummer and party, who are working the ground with two men. 

Gumtown District. 

Kapouxii Mine. — This mine is owned and worked by M. O'Connor. In the early part of the year 
he had a small crushing of 45 tons taken out which yielded 38 oz. 16 dwt. of gold ; this convinced him 
that the lode formation would pay to work if there was a cheaper and better method of getting the 
quartz from the mine to the mill. He at once commenced and put down a self-acting tramway from 
the battery up the hill to near the level of the lowest drive, then a groimd tramway from the top of 
the self-acting tramway mentioned to the mine. This has been a great saving in the conveyance of 
quartz to the mill, and for the last four months of the year 485 tons of quartz was treated for 474 oz. 
4 dwt. of gold, valued at £1,087 17s. 6d., which is said to have paid handsomely. 

Twelve men were employed. 

Big Beetle. — This mine was worked by the company for the first seven months of the year with 
eight men, but as it could not be made to pay working-expenses absolute protection was applied for 
and granted. Latterly the mine and battery were let to a party of tributers, who informed me that 
from the appearance of the mine and the ore they had treated it would pay them good wages. Two 
hundred and three tons of ore was treated during the year for 280 oz. 16 dwt. of gold, valu^ at £715 
17s. lOd. Three men are now employed. 

COROMANDEL DISTRICT. 

Old Hauraki Mine. — During the past twelve months the actual mining underground has been very 
much handicapped on accoimt of the magnitude of the work in cleaning out and repairing the shaft, 
and pumping out the water to the bottom level (400 ft.), and putting in a new plunger at that level 
with all the necessary gear required. This was a long and expensive job. The shaft had been stripped 
and all the timber aUowed to go down the shaft, which made it very difficult to get through and repair. 
The draining of the adjoining mines and the surroimding country occupied from the 12th May until 
October, with a considerable staff of men, which materially reduced the number of men available for 
actual mining. However, a considerable amount of work has been done at the 100 ft., 160 ft., and 220 ft. 
levels, such as driving on the various leads, rising, sinking, and stoping on the same. From these 171 
tons of ore was selected, which produced 315 oz. 9 dwt. of melted gold, of a total value of £953 8s. 3d. 
There was also a considerable amount of crosscutting and prospecting done at the levels above-mentioned. 
As soon as the water was out at the 400 ft. level, preparations were made to prospect and develop the 
mine at the deep levels. The north drive was cleaned out and repaired, and a tram-line laid for a dis- 
tance of 500 ft. A rise was put on No. 1 cross lead, some of the stone exposed showing a kindly appear- 
ance. There was also an intermediate level driven midway between the 300 ft. and 400 ft. leveb, a 
distance of 56 ft on No. 7 lode, and a rise put up 40 ft. on the same lode. This was|practically aU 
the work done at that level. Pumping was expensive, and none of the owners of adjoining mines would 
contribute towards the expense of keeping the pumps going. Consequently, this company decided 
to stop the pump and allow the water to rise, so as to prove which mines were benefited by the company's 
pumping. This was done on the 19th November, a week later the adjoining mine was drowned out, 
and operations had to be suspended. In fact, all the surrounding mines have abandoned their lower 
workings and have started work in shallow ground above the water-level. In the Hauraki Mine work 
is at present being carried on in the 100 ft. level, driving a crosscut to prospect and develop a large 
section of ground situated between the Union Beach and Hauraki rich chutes of gold. So far this 
section has had little or no work done on it. Being in the golden belt the chances are that good payable 
ore may be discovered, and if proved so the ground ofEers scope for extensive work, as it is intact in all 
the deeper levels. The surface portion of the mine is divided into fair-sized sections. Five sections 
are let on tribute, emplojring twenty men. The water is now up to within 6 ft. of the 100 ft. leveL 
Twenty men have been employed. 

Bunkers HiU Mine. — The operations in the early part of the year were directed to stoping on the 
Jona leader above No. 2 level ; but as this leader pinched out going up, and was cut ofi by a break near 

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C— 3. 42 

the Hauraki Freeholds boundary, work here was discontinued. The men were then employed to sink 
a winze and in stoping on a leader which produced some very rich stone and good crushing dirt. Owing 
to a disagreement with the Hauraki Company in regard to pumping the water out of the mines, and 
that c mpany subsequently stopping the pumps, the water rose in this company's workings and all 
work here ceased. The work in hand in the latter part of the year was driving an adit level into the 
hill from the seaward side, into what is said to be untried ground ; but so far no leaders of any ina- 
portance have been met with. Thirty -three tons of general ore and 110 lb. of specimens were treated 
during the year, for 189 oz. 5 dwt. of gold, valued at £581 Is. 6d. Ten men have been employed. 

Hauraki Freeholds Mine. — In the early part of the year the work in the mine was confined to 
working on the lona leader from the Bunker's Hill shaft, but work here was suspended in the month of 
April, and the company's attention was directed to unwatering the northern part of the mine which, 
owing to a fault running nearly east and west, prevented the water from finding its way into the Bunker's 
Hill side of the fault. Therefore it was found necessary for this company to start raising the water 
(which had collected) at the Welcome Find shaft by their own machinery. The water was soon lowered 
below the No. 1 level, where development- work was commenced and was carried out with varied success. 
Finding the method of raising the stuff to the surface and winding the water with the engine was incur- 
ring a large amoimt of expense, it was deemed advisable to erect a brake and run a water-tank down 
an inclined tramway, and by this means (a revival of the old water-balance method of winding) raise 
the quartz up an old shaft a height of 80 ft. The method appears to answer the purpose, and has effected 
a considerable saving. During the year 103 tons and 314 lb. of picked stone were treated for 922 oz. 
17 dwt. of gold, valued at £2,698 Ss. 9d. Fourteen men have been employed. 

Success Mine. — Two miners had this mine on tribute, and had 147 tons of mullock or tippings 
crushed for 84 oz. 6 dwt. of gold, valued at £202 4s. 4d., but the owners, not getting enough out of it 
to pay the interest on the cost of the battery, had it taken down and removed to the township. 

Golden Pah Mine. — During the year this mine was solely worked by tributers, who obtained from 
various leaders 38 tons of ore, which gave a return of 184 oz. 14 dwt. of gold, valued at £554 28. Four 
men have been employed. 

Golden Sfark Mine, — This company is carrying on operations in the mine from a low level on the 
side of the creek above Scotty's battery. The country is hard and the leaders small. In the early 
part of the year the company were not getting sufficient gold to pay and had partly stopped the work, 
when Mr. Daldy said he was confident he would find payable gold if they would allow him to drive some 
30 ft. to cut a certain leader. This was eventually done, with the result that gold has been got out to 
pay expenses under Mr. Daldy's supervision. Seven tons has been treated for 60 oz. 5 dwt. of gold, 
value £160 156. Two men are employed. 

Harbour View Mine. — The principal work for the past year has been driving a crosscut from Har- 
bour View No. 4 level, with the double object of prospecting this section of the mine and also to inter- 
sect the leaders in the Associated portion at a depth. This drive is in a distance of 527 ft. A further 
distance of 30 ft. should intersect the first of the above leaders and will be approximately 104 ft. deeper 
than the lowest of the Associated workings. A considerable amount of work has also been done on 
different leaders on both Harbour View and Associated Sections, but the results have been practically 
nil. I may mention that the above undertaking has been a very costly one, owing to the light nature 
of the country met with. Nine men have been employed. 

Kapanga Special Quartz Claim. — There has been but little done in the development of this mine 
during the year. A party of men have it on tribute and are only directing their attention to selecting 
and crushing mullock-tips. Two men were employed, who treated 115 tons for 66 oz. 1 dwt. of gold, 
valued at £158 lOs. 4d. 

New Hero Mine. — The shareholders in this mine did a good deal of practical work, but were very 
unsuccessful in finding anything of a payable character. From one of the leaders 8 tons of ore was 
broken out and treated for 8 oz. 10 dwt. of gold, value £25 lOs. Two men were employed. 

West Tokatea Mine. — In the early part of the year this mine was under protection, but operations 
were again resumed under the management of Mr. R. Harrison, who directed the work to opening up 
the various leaders, with a fair amount of success, the mine having paid its way and left a small margin 
of profit for the last four months of the year. Twenty-seven tons of ore and 176 lb. of stone were treated 
during that time for 167 oz. 9 dwt. of gold, valued at £470 178. 3d. Ten men have been employed. 

Monte Christo Mtn€.— This claim is situated on the top of the Tokatea Hill and was formerly called 
the Queen of the North. During the past year the works carried on have been driving the No. 1 cross- 
cut for a distance of 153 ft., and No. 2 crosscut has been extended 130 ft. ; several ree& have been cut 
through varying in thickness from 3 in. to a 1 ft. Five hundred pounds of stone from these were treated 
at the Public Battery, which yielded 8 oz. 5 dwt. of gold, value £18 178. 3d. In November protection 
for three months was obtained for the purpose of raising capital to extend the Ida tunnel a distance of 
400 ft., with a view of cutting the Swedish Crown, Queen of the North, Day Dawn, Peep of Day, and 
Cross reefa, from all of which rich stone had been obtained in the early days. The tributers who are 
working in the Masonic section of the ground are seeing gold in a small leader about 5 in. in width. Nine 
men have been employed. 

Royal Oak Mine. — The operations during the year have been chiefly directed to that portion of 
the mine where a large amount of gold has been obtained from time to time^om the Tokatea Reet 
and from what may be termed " droppers " or leaders. The Tribute leader is the principal one worked 
this year between the No. 4 and No. 6 levels, a total of 1,000 ft. having been driven on it, and 5,472 ft. 
of stoping done on the leader, from which 1,027 tons of ore was treated for 3,339 oz. 17 dwt. of gold, 
valued at £9,110 Is. 7d. This would appear as a highly payable return, but the country is of a very 
hard nature, consequently the cost of getting the ore is necessarily high, and therefore only a small 
margin of profit is left. The blocks of ground being worked here are nearly exhausted, and the manager 



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43 C— 3. 

is now directing his attention to various other works — viz., opening up ground and exploring the leaders 
at the intermediate levels below No. 6, and also repairing and carrying on development-work at No. 7 
level. Forty-six men have been employed. 

Four in Hand. — During the last twelve months the new low level has been extended a distance of 
233 ft., making the total distance of the tunnel 588 ft., and there yet remains some 500 ft. to be driven 
to complete it to the point under which the rich run of gold was obtained in the upper workings. On 
the Tainui Reef 32 ft. has been driven, 44 ft. of sinking done, 12 ft. of rising, and a block 20 ft. by 10 ft. 
stoped out. On the Four in Hand a block has been stoped out 92 ft. by 72 ft., and in the No. 4 level, 
130 ft. of driving has been accomplished upon the Footwall Reef ; the various works in progress are to 
be pushed on with all possible speed. Two hundred and fifty -three tons of ore was crushed for a return 
of 340 02. 13 dwt. of gold, valued at £989 8s. 6d. An average of ten men were employed. 

Cabbage Bay District. 

White Star, — This company had two men employed during the greater part of the year, but the 
ground being hard and the leader small only a limited amount of quartz was obtained. 1 ton 5 cwt. 
of ore was treated for 27 oz. of gold, valued at £75 5s. 3d. 

KuAOTUNU District. 

Waitaia Mine, — During the year this mine has been steadily worked, but work has been principally 
confined to stoping on the various leaders opened up over the back of the low level, from which 1,1 19 tons 
of ore was broken out and crushed at their own mill for a return of 2,033 oz. 1 dwt. of gold, value 
£6,063 10s. 9d., this being an increase of £1,526 Ss. 6d. as compared with the previous year. There has 
been very little development- work carried on for some time past, and as the blocks of ground now operated 
upon will in time become exhausted, the company contemplate putting in a low level at an early date to 
open up new ground at depth. They anticipate this will prove to be richer in gold than that worked 
out at any of the upper levels. Twenty-one men have been employed. 

Handsworth Mine, — This ground is still worked by two men, but the year's operations did not prove 
as remunerative as those of former years ; but the owner is sanguine of dropping on payable ore during 
the coming year. 

Otama Mine. — This mine adjoins the Handsworth Claim, and has been worked continuously during 
the year with three men who did a large amount of driving and stoping on the leader in the early part 
of the year. Some very rich stone was obtained in the low level, and it was fully expected that a payable 
block of ground was being opened up. On rising it proved very disappointing, as the gold did not carry 
up as good as on the level ; still the proprietors are in hopes of coming on a payable chute of gold again. 
One hundred and eleven tons of ore was treated for 167 oz. 19 dwt. of gold, valued at £410 12s. 9d. 

Great Mercury Mine, — In the early part of the year the low level was extended a further distance 
of 70 ft., making the total distance of the drive 600 ft. In consequence of gold not being found the ex- 
tension of this drive was stopped for a time. The owners then commenced driving on the reef penetrated 
in the main crosscut, which is now in a distance of 250 ft. The country passed through is very hard, 
and no gold being found makes it very discouraging to the shareholders, who went in with good hopes, 
believing there would be no difficulty in finding payable blocks of ore. Two men are now employed. 

The following mines have been worked with one and two men, but nothing of any importance 
discovered : Hauraki No. 2, South Kapanga, Vaughan, Prospero, Rangitara, Exact, Whangapaoa, 
Owera, and others. 

Great Barrier Island. 

The Barrier Reef, — The only work carried on in this property during the year was confined to 
treating the tailings at the battery. 3,119 tons were put through for 10,646 oz. 18 dwt. of bullion, 
valued at £2,380 18s. 3d. Two men employed. 

Sunbeam Gold and Silver Mine, — This mine comprises an area of 99 acres and is situated at Blind 
Bay, Great Barrier Island. The development- work carried out during the year was the extending 
of the No. 1 level a distance of 437 ft., and for the whole of that distance good payable ore has been 
unearthed. Battery-site : A battery -site has been purchased on freehold property, the necessary amount 
of excavation done, and the building erected. A five-stamp mill, three Frue vanners, twelve vats, 
towers, sumps, and all necessary gear have been purchased, also engine and boiler, and will be erected 
as soon as possible. 

Accidents. 

During the year three fatal accidents happened in this district, as against eight in the preceding 
year. 



Date. 



Jane 21 
October 7 . . 
Deoember 10 



Name. Name of Mine. I Cause. 



Ar&hur E. L. Matbias . . Waibi Gold-mining Company | GraBhed by collapse of cribbing in pass. 
Jans G. N. Dahl . . I Waihi Qold-mining Company Killed by fall of mullock in stope. 



James Mann . . . . Moanataiari 



Killed by a fall of rook from hanging-wall 
of reef in stope. 



I have, &c., 

James Coutts, 

Inspector of Mines. 
The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. 



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C— 3. 44 

Mr. KoBBRT Tbnnbnt, Inspector of Mines, Weetport, to the Undbr-Secbbtabt for Mihrs, 

Wellington. 

Sir, — Inspector of Mine's Office, Westport, 3rd April, 1905.j^ 

I have the honour to report as follows on the gold-mines in the Marlborough, Nelson, and 
Westland Districts for the year ended the 31st December, 1904. 

, QUARTZ-MINING.} 
Blenheim. 

Wairau Gold-mining Company, — This company is a reconstruction of the Jubilee, Luck at Last, 
and the Wellington Mine proprietaries. Since operations were resumed under the new title a contract 
has been let to extend the Jubilee low level a further distance of 300 ft., in addition to the 160 ft. for- 
merly driven by the late company. At the termination of the original driving, the lode was intersected 
and stoped to the surface, and provision made to maintain a securely timbered pass for ventilation 
purposes. 20th January, 1905 : Driving was extended 110 ft. on the new contract, but according to 
the distance calculated to intersect the main lode, a further driving of 800 ft. will be required, ma^ng 
the approximate length of tunnel 1,260 ft. 

Mr. J. H. Evans (late manager of the Jubilee Mine) has three men employed prospecting in the 
Patriarch district on behalf of a Wellington syndicate, who intend to introduce foreign capital, provided 
the results obtained afiord sufficient inducement to carry out more comprehensive development. 

Arm Chair Creek, — According to information received from the Mining Registrar at Blenheim, 
all quartz-mining privileges have been surrendered in the Arm Chair district. 

Havelock. 

The Golden Bar and Yorkshire Federated, — These respective areas of 46 and 34 acres, are the only 
leases now held in the Wakamarina district. The neglected appearance of these properties does not 
say much for their prospects. Work is at a standstill 

Mining on the Wakamarina Valley is still confined to a few old^fossickers, who rake the river- 
bed in very low water. 

COLLINOWOOD. 

Golden Ridge (Taitapu Grold Estates — James Carroll, Mine-manager). — Operations are continued 
on the Anthill and Ridge Sections of the property. The ore-bodies operated on being notably short, 
economy in operations is necessary to make ends meet. In the AnthiU Section the surface stopes are 
practically exhausted and connection completed with the lower level to facilitate ventilation and the 
passing of ore, whilst the Ridge district is worked from a flat winze sunk in the underlay for a distance 
of 120 ft., the stopes being opened from the winze in order to efiect the simplest method of conveying 
the mined ore on the flat gradient, whilst the exhausted ground is efficiently packed with the surplus 
debris as the face is advanced. The principle of working these thin flat lodes compares favourably 
with the system of longwall, so successfully worked in thin coal-seams. The stone milled — 646 tons 
— yielded buUion to the value of £3,069 Is. 5d., which shows a decrease of £5,294 15s. lOd. as compared 
with the values won in the previous year. 

Golden Blocks (Taitapu). — Mining operations continue to be actively maintained and the 
varied developments connected therewith are kept well in advance of battery-requirements. 
The No. 3 or low level has, after considerable driving through very doubtful ground, intersected 
a thin lode which gives payable results, whilst connection was readily effected for ventila- 
tion and passing through a winze from No. 2, the mined ore from the upper levels being thus passed 
direct to the main hopper, and conveyed by horse tram-line to the milling plant, which consists of 
eight head of automatic-feeding stamps. In connection with the mining privileges recently acquired 
from the Taitapu Gold Estates at Friday Creek, there are five miners regularly employed in carrying 
out an^effective system of prospecting, which so far appears to afford considerable promise of a valuable 
addition to the property. Timbering and ventilation are special features in the working operations, 
and the plant is maintained in good order. 2,411 tons of ore was milled, yielding bullion to the value 
of £8,764 12s. 9d., which, when compared with the values of the previous year, show an increase of 
£534 12s. 9d. 

Westport. 

Red Queen (Mokihinui). — This energetic tribute party of three men, after a lengthened period of 
dead-work, have exposed more favourable prospects, the lode showing considerable increase in size 
and value. 

Lady Agnes (Mokihinui). — This property is abandoned. 

Britannia Mine, — Mining continues to be actively pushed — the milled stone (765*5 tons) yielded 
635 oz. 12 dwt. 13 gr., with a bullion- value of £2,506 15s. lOd. Output continues to be mined from 
Nos. 4 and 5 levels, which are extending more into the hill country, the reef showing a more defined 
character. Operations in the face are very securely timbered and packed with the surplus dMms as 
the work is advanced, the system being favourably suited to keep the ventilation up to the face. 

Stony Creek, — This property is abandoned, and the company under Uquidation. 

Ltell. 

Alpine Extended (Frederick W. Prince, Mine-manager). — The varied mining operations which 
continue to be actively and persistently carried out north and south on No. 12 levels fail to 
unearth profitable values. In extending No. 12 south a further distance of 69 ft. the developments 
did not win stone of any commercial importance, the ore being of very low grade, whilst driving the 



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46 C— 3. 

intermediate level between Nob. 11 and 12 a further 60 ft. on the bottom of the lode it eventually pinched 
out, when the block was stoped to No. 11. Driving north was then extended 100 ft., and connections 
completed with an old winze from No. 11, when a short block 83 ft. in length was stoped to 60 ft., the 
lode cutting out. Crosscutting was continued into the foot- wall in No. 7, but the unfavourable cha- 
racter of country did not warrant further expenditure in that direction. In view of proving the^f ormation 
between Nos. 10 and 7 levels. No. 10 south was driven 160 ft., and surveys completed to rise and connect 
with a winze which was sunk from No. 7 about five years ago. This work is now operative, and the 
calculated rising is approximately 233 ft. Ventilation will be effected by compressed air. It may be 
stated that the old winze (after standing under water for five years to a depth of 115 ft.) was baled out, 
the water containing no indications of gas or stench of a poisonous nature. Workings are securely 
timbered and well ventilated. Temperature in shade at noon was 54°, and the return airway 56°. 
The stone mined yielded — by amalgamation (2,630 tons) and cyanide (2,225 'tons) — a bullion- value of 
£5,76 lis. 7d. 

The Italy Syndicate (late Tyrconnel). — Kelly and party of four men continue to work this property 
on very successful lines, care being taken to keep development well in advance ; but a proper road is 
much wanted to convey mining-material. 

Boatman's. 

Wdcome, — This mine was let on tribute to O'Leary and party for a term of three years, commenc- 
ing from the latter end of 1903. From date of starting they continued to work the property with excep- 
tional success until May last, when, notwithstanding the very liberal inducements offered in the form 
of future development, they abandoned the tribute. During the period worked, they milled 382 tons 
of ore for a return of 435 oz. 14 dwt. 21 gr. of gold valued at £1,726 15s. 9d., besides which 225 tons of 
tailings was treated, yielding bullion to the value of £396 4s. 4d. The company carried out develop- 
ment-work for some time after the tribute was abandoned, and then obtained six months' protection 
to enable the wishes of the London office to be consulted. 

KirwafCs Reward, — In connection with the development of this property more than usual energy 
has been exercised to open an important section of the working to the south-west, this section of the field 
having always been looked forward to with favour, and more especially as the ore-bodies, exposed in 
the four faces now being worked, give promise of yielding values considerably in excess of anticipations. 
The extension of the aerial tramway across the plateau will also facilitate operations and put IJie com- 
pany in a very comfortable working position for some time to come. During the year 6,250 tons of 
ore was treated, yielding 1,949 oz. 19 dwts. 15 gr., giving a bullion-value of £7,764 16s. 7d. 

Lady of the Lake (Owner, A. McKenzie). — The rise level intersected a small block of stone at 50 ft. 
from day, but although of fair value the block is very short and does not extend upward. Its values 
have not yet been proved on lower levels. The ground b securely timbered, and since holing was 
effected with some old workings the ventilation has been very good. 

Reefton. 

WeaUh of Nations. — Development-work has been practically at a standstill during the year. Main- 
tenance of main roads, &c., has been well attended to. Stoping has been carried out on levels 2, 3, 4, 
5, and 6, whereby all the quartz developed on Nos. 4 and 5 levels has been exhausted, the reserves of 
mill-rock in the mine being now confined to levels Nos. 3 and 6, and the new level recently opened 
firom the Energetic shaft. The tonnage milled, 12,748 tons, yielded bullion to the value of £14,666 
16s. 8d., or 5 dwt. 16 gr. per ton, while the concentrates and slimes shipped to the smelter realised 
£1,068 5s. 3d. At the cyanide- works, 8,710 tons, representing 69*8 per cent, of the total crushed, 
yielded bullion to the value of £5,941 5s. Id. at a working-cost of 16s. 4'88d. per ton milled. This 
rate of cost includes mining, milling, and concentrating^ cyaniding, assay offices, and bullion and general 
charges. 

Energetic Mine, — Since sinking operations were completed to No 8 level the various underground 
works effected have been purely of a development character, the execution of which must have 
entailed very considerable expenditure. The reef system was opened on level No. 7 at 267 ft. from 
the shaft, and driving was extended north 45 ft. and south 698 ft. Whilst rising from the north drive 
to connect with a winze sunk from No 6 Wealth of Nations a serious accident occurred, which resulted 
in the deaths of three miners, who were suffocated by the effects of poisonous gases, presumably 
liberated from the stagnant water which had accumulated in the winze prior to connection being 
effected with the rock drill. On the whole, this level has proved a great disappointment, for not only 
did the quartz open out in very limited ^quantity, but the assay-values were of very low grade. 
Diamond drilling : There were four diamond-drill holes pierced from No. 7 level, hoping to locate 
and intersect a parallel ore-body. Of these, three were non-productive, while the other borehole 
located a thin band of stone, the value of which will shortly be proved. Shaft : During October a 
contract was let to sink the shaft to No. 8 level, a distance of 125 ft. This contract was finished in 
February of 1905, and driving commenced to open out at a depth of 1,502*5 ft. from the surface. 
Surface plant : The first direct-coupled Tangye winding-engine erected in the district started to hoist 
from the bottom of the shaft in March last, and has continued to run in a satisfactory manner. A small 
electric-light plant has been installed, which efficiently lights the surface works and the chambers at 
the different levels. 

Oolden Fleece. — Mining and milling have been continuous during the year, with the exception 
of the time required to thoroughly overhaul and retimber the winding-shaft between Nos. 10 and 11 
levels. Further sinking has not been effected in the main shaft, but in levels Nos. 11, 12, and 13, 
extensive developments have been extended north, making in all 1,539*5 ft. of development-work. 



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C— 3. 46 

The stopes have continued to maint4»in their previous characteristioa, thus proving the irregularities 
in the reef-formation, which tends to largely increase the cost of stoping. It is proposed to sink the 
main shaft from No. 13 to No. 14 a vertical distance of 125 ft., at an early date. During the year 
12,930 tons of quartz was crushed, yielding bullion by amalgamation to the value of £21,040 17s. 6d., 
while the concentrates and slimes shipped to the smelter realised £1,940 3s. 7d. Cyanide : 8,610 tons 
of sands, representing 66*589 per cent, of the tonnage milled was cyanided, yielding bullion to the value 
of £3,011 7s. 5d., equal to a return of 6s. 11 -94 Id. per ton treated. Compared with values of previoos 
year the bullion shows a decrease of £798 9s. 2d. Temperature at noon in the shade, 65^. at No. 11, 53^, 
at No. 12, 65^ return airway, 70°. 

Progress Mint. — The various works in connection with this property have been continuously 
carried on, and the developments so efficiently and energetically effected at levels Nos. 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 
and 10 have resulted in opening out a large tonnage of quartz, of which a considerable percentage is 
of very low grade. The total footages driven, ibc., comprise driving and croescutting 3,442 ft., and 
rising and sinking 1,311 ft., at a cost of £7,030 lOs. Stoping has been carried out on Nos. 4, 5, 8, 9, 
and 10 levels, the stopes calling for no special comment except the east stopes on Nos. 4 and 5, where, 
owing to an increased percentage of antimony, a larger portion of the quartz has had to be used for 
filling. During the latter half of the year the developments were watched with a great amount of 
interest on No. 10 level, as an ore-body was developed which at first sight appeared to be of considerable 
magnitude. This body of stone was driven on in all directions, and the stone on the level mined out, 
leaving an area 120 ft. long by an average of 20 ft. wide standing on timber. The quartz in this block 
contained only a small portion of ore having a good value ; but taking the values throughout the average 
was very moderate. In rising from No. 10, stone was carried for about 70 ft., and evidently connection 
was completed to No. 9 on good reef- formation. Diamond drill : During eight months and a half 
the drill was steadily worked and valuable information was obtained, the combined borings amounting 
to 2,125*5 ft., but owing to the soft character of the ground in the vicinity of the reefe, difficulty was 
experienced in procuring reliable cores. The surface equipment at the mine has undergone no material 
alteration, and the machinery connected therewith continues to maintain its former standard of 
efficiency. At the battery the only alteration of importance was the erection of an additional 25-ft.- 
diameter treatment-tank, the plant now comprising fourteen tanks of equal diameter. During the 
year the sixty-five-stamp mill ran 303*73 days, leaving only 8*27 days lost time for the whole 
year, which includes all incidental stoppages, such as monthly clean-ups, daily scrapes, Ac. The 
tonnage crushed exceeds that of any previous year by 2,794 tons. The 59,908 tons crushed yielded 
bullion by amalgamation to the value of £88,641 15s. 3d., equal to 7 dwt. 3*93 gr. per ton. 1,093 tons 
of concentrates was treated in the chlorination-works, yielding 2,750 oz. 14 dwt. 5 gr. of gold, valued 
at £11,020 7s. 7d. At the cyanide-works 31,735 tons of coarser sands was treated, yielding bullion to 
the value of £8,674 188. 5d. The treatment-cost amounted to 2s. l*77d. per ton, and the profit to 
3s. 3*82d. per ton, making the yield equal to 5s. 5'6d. The pyritic slimes shipped to the smelter realised 
£2,034 Is. 7d. A general summary of the aggregate working-cost, yield, and resulting profit in milling 
59,908 tons, and cyaniding 31,735 tons, for 1904, is as follows : Total working-cost (exclusive of capital 
and development expenditure) incurred in mining, transporting, milling and concentrating (including 
bullion charges and office and general expenses) £48,671 198. 3d., or 16s. 2*987d. per ton milled ; 
cyaniding, £3,408 lOs., or Is. l-655d. per ton milled : totals £52,080 9s. 3d., or 17s. 4*642d. per ton 
milled. Profit on mining, transporting, milling and concentrating, and chlorinating (including bullion 
charges and office and general expenses) £53,024 58. 2d., or 178. 8'423d. per ton milled ; cyaniding, 
£5,266 88. 5d., or Is. 9*098d. per ton milled : totals, £58,290 13s. 7d., or 19s. 5*521d. per ton milled. 
Summary : total working-cost, £52,080 98. 3d., or 178. 4*642d. per ton milled ; profit, £58,290 13s. 7d., 
or 19s. 5*521d. per ton milled : yield, £110,371 28. lOd., or £1 16s. 10163d. per ton milled. A slightly 
lower-grade quartz has been milled during 1904 than previously, and this will probably again be the 
case in 1905, otherwise the management look forward to another successful year. With regard to the 
underground work, mine-development will be energetically pushed, also the main shaft will be sunk to 
another level. 

Keep'il'Dark (owners : Keep-it-Dark Gold-mining Company (Limited) ; Edwin Bray, Manager).— 
The various works in connection with mining, milling, and cyanide extraction at the mine and battery 
have been steadily maintained at their usual standard of efficiency. Development-work is kept well 
ahead, the safety of men and property well attended to, and the plant generally is kept in good order. 
In addition to the ordinary work done the winding-shaft was sunk to a further depth of 300 ft., the 
cost (including the cutting and timbering of two suitable chambers) being £1,428 14s. 4d., which sum, 
when rated on the depth sunk, gives an average cost of £4 lOs. per foot. Stone for milling was chiefly 
stoped from levels Nos. 4 and 5. The lode on the former level continued to maintain uniformity in 
width and quality, but more adverse conditions exist on No. 5, where the formation is somewhat irregu- 
lar, the underlay being found to take a strong veer to the east when stoping had proceeded to 40 ft. in 
height. This disappointing change of formation is attributed to the irregular position of the lode inter- 
sected on No. 5 crosscut at 252 ft. from the main shaft. To effect connection for ventilation and the 
future development of No. 6 block, sinking was commenced and continued on the 252 ft. stone to a 
depth of 116 ft., when holing was successfully effected by rising from No. 6 crosscut at 382 ft. from 
the shaft. Shortly afterwards, the main lode was cut at 9 ft. in width, showing fair prospects of gold. 
The stone mined and milled— 12,300 tons— yielded 3,641 oz. 15 dwt. 5 gr. from amalgamation : value, 
£14,756 16s. 2d., giving an average rate per ton of 5 dwt. 22 gr. The working-costs for mining and 
raising the tonnage milled, were £7,904 lis. lOd., or an average of 12s. lOd. per ton, while the cost of 
milling and other incidental expenses were £1,501 5s., or a fraction over 2s. 4d. per ton. The extraction 
by cyanide continues to show improved results as compared with those of the previous year, the yield 
of bidlion being 1,873 oz. and 13 gr., valued at £5,911 138. 7d. This gave an extraction value of a 



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47 C— 3. 

fraction over 98. 7'25d. per gross ton milled ; while the cost of treatment, including labour, all material 
used, royalty, &c., was £2,270 12s. 8d., or 3s. 8*25d. per ton, this being a profit of 3s. lOd. per ton on 
the milled tonnage. Two improved Wilfley concentrators were added to the battery plant. The 
results obtained for the five months worked gave a weekly average of 2 tons of concentrates, with an 
assay value of nearly 6 oz. per ton. Comparing the total values against the year 1903, an increase of 
£195 Ts. 7d. is shown in favour of 1904, notwithstanding the ore milled shows a decrease of 268 tons. 
Temperature at brace 65°, at No. 3 chamber 60°, No. 6 chamber 65°, dead end 70°. 

New Inkerman Mine (Norman Dudgeon, Attorney). — The operative works in connection with 
this property have made active progress, and the gross tonnage mined and delivered at the mill was 
7,639 tons. Of this total, 6,500 tons was stoped on the 100 ft. level off the incline shaft, while the other 
1,139 tons was stoped above the main level. The works throughout are kept in good order, timbering 
and ventilation being well maintained at the face. At the end of May the crushing-power was increased 
to twenty head of stamps, crushing 8,139 tons of quartz, together with 1,690 tons of old tailings, which 
yielded by amalgamation 1,854 oz. 3 dwt. 9 gr., valued at £7,678 48. 2d. ; also 5,882 tons of coarse 
sands were treated by cyanide, yielding 769 oz. 6 dwt. 22 gr., or bullion-value equal to £2,396 Ss. 5d., 
and the concentrates smelted yielded bullion equal to £1,104 17s. lid. The total working-costs, 
including development-work, capital expenditure, management, and office expenses, &c., were £1 Is. 
l*04d. per ton. The cost of stoping, including delivery of ore at battery, was 8s. 6-496d. per ton. 
Milling, including repairs, coal, &c., 5s. 57 Id. per ton. Cyaniding, 28. 4-252d. per ton cyanided. For 
the working of the ore-bodies known to exist in the property it is proposed to sink on the reef now 
being operated upon in the incline shaft to an approximate depth of 400 ft. below the adit, also to locate 
and explore the lode locally known as the " Big Blow." These important works are now under the 
consideration of the mine-owners, but at time of writing no definite advice as to their decision had 
come to hand. 

The United GM-tnining Company is a reconstruction embracing the Golden Lead and the Industry 
proprietaries. Referring to the Industry Mine, the conditions mentioned in my report of last year 
relative to the disappointing and crushed character of the ground, have been fully borne out. The 
new company considered it advisable to suspend operations and withdraw all movable material. 

New Scotia. — As mentioned in my report of last year, the hoisting-engine and boiler were removed 
from the old Drake shaft and re-erected to facilitate sinking on an outcrop from the Gallant rise level. 
Sinking was proceeded with on the underlay to a depth of 135 ft. and driving was extended on the reef 
north and south, but owing to heavy water to contend against and the low grade of the ore mined, 
operations were suspended. Practically speaking, the Merrijigs district is now a dead letter in the 
mining industry. 

Victoria and Inglewood (owner, P. N. Kingswell). — Operations have been continuous, and the 
various works for the underground and surface developments are actively pushed to maintain efficiency ; 
whilst the general working-arrangements are kept in good order and condition. Stoping was chiefly 
directed to No. 3 level and connection completed to No. 4, whereby ventilation is very efficiently 
provided. The battery and power plant have been thoroughly overhauled, and a well equipped and 
proportioned cyanide plant erected, suitable in every way to meet future requirements. The general 
aspect of the property augurs favourably towards a promising future for the owner. Temperature 
on surface at noon 56°, in the stopes 62°, return airway 60°. 

Big River. — The various works in connection with this mine were actively carried on during the 
year, and the general equipment and working-conditions are well maintained, timbering and ventilation 
being very satisfactory. Stoping was continued on No. 7 level, and the stone milled— 988 tons- 
yielded 902 oz. 6 dwt., valued at £3,653 7s. 6d. The winding-shaft was sunk, securely timbered, and 
laddered for a further section, making the total depth 1,000 ft. from adit, and from brace 1,200 ft. 
The chamber has been cut and crosscutting on No. 8 level is in active progress. Temperature on surface, 
11 a.m., 70° ; and at 1,000 ft. in depth, 70°. 

Searchlight Syndicate. — This sjmdicate's property is situated about a mile south of the Big River 
battery. The party — two men — are prospecting along the line of outcrop, but the stone so far developed 
only shows thicknesses of 6 in. and 16 in. 

St. George. — There is only one man working on a very small leader. 

Last Chance. — In the early part of the year, Morris and Fleming developed a payable leader from 
the level of the Merrijigs Road, but eventually it nipped out. The party then suspended further ex- 
ploration and withdrew all portable plant. A five-stamp mill and cyanide plant remain on the pro- 
perty. 

Golden Lead. — Further driving on this prospecting-tunnel has been suspended, and Mr. McMasters 
(manager) is employed in surface prospecting. 

Ulster Mine, Reefton. — This property, owned by a local company, is situated in the Painkiller dis- 
trict, and the ore- body now prospected is supposed to be the continuation of the old Welcome Lode. 
To procure reliable iniormation relative to the true position of the lode at depth, prior to sinking a 
main shaft, driving, sinking, and rising have been actively carried out, but the auriferous values so 
far proved fail to give satisfactory promise towards warranting increased expenditure in sinking and 
battery construction. 

Taffy. — This property has been shut down during the last year, but Mr. Neilson, of Blackball, 
informed the Assistant Inspector that he was hopeful of developing a payable lead, and would open 
the mine early. 

Mount Paparoa Gold-mining Company (late Croesus). — All operations are suspended. William 
Luke, caretaker, is in charge of the property. 

Minerva. — All work suspended on this property, with no person in charge. 



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C— 3- 48 

Garden GvUy GM-^mning Company (W. 6. Mouat, Mine-manager). — OperationB have been confined 
to driving north 75 ft^ and south 75 ft. on the line of reef, and rising 15 ft. from level No. 1, to con- 
nect (and effect ventilation) with No. 2, the ventilation being now supplied by fan driven by water-power, 
which will be further assisted by water-blast. To increase the carrying-capacity of the tramway it is 
being reconstructed, and a wider rail-gauge adopted. The various works in connection with the erection 
of a battery are in active progress. These include the construction of water-races, hoppers, and other 
necessary works, but when the mine was inspected the company had not decided on the purchase of the 
battery plant. 

WiAerforce. — This quartz-body was formerly reported on, and a company formed to 'devdop it 
about twenty years ago. At that time samples to the extent of 4 tons were taken from the reef and 
treated, but the results obtained cannot now be given with any degree of certainty, there being no 
reliable informarion available respecting the true values. The stone, 60 ft. in length and 15 ft. in width, 
outcrops about 500 ft. from the cap of the range, and one mile northward from Browning's Pass, and, 
with the exception of securing samples, nothing has been done on this property for many years. A 
low-level tunnel had been driven westward to intersect the reef, but as it is now practically closed, 
ingress is quite impossible. If future developments prove the existence of this large ore-body to be 
continuous, water for motive power and other purposes can be easily obtained, as can also a suitable 
battery-site, but scarcity of timber for mining may be considered a serious hindrance. Road-con- 
struction is completed £rom Glentunnel Railway-station (on the Canterbury side of the main range) 
to within 5 chains of the proposed battery-site, and with an additional expenditure of £200, the 5-chaui 
section could be made servicable for wheeled traffic. 

General REifARxa. 

In comparing the bulUon-values earned for the year under review against the year 1903, there is 
an increase of £18,714 7s. 8d. in favour of Reefton and Lyell, whilst the total increase earned over the 
whole inspection district was £13,599 4s. 7d. This fall of £5,115 3s. Id. in the gross earnings of other 
portions of the district is chiefly due to depreciation of output from the (Golden Ridge (Taitapu Estates), 
the Inglewood, Inkerman, Alpine Extended, and Big River being responsible for the increase in favour 
of Reefton. 

Notwithstanding that the earnings from the Progress Mines are the highest yet recorded for any 
yearly period, the gross earnings from the whole system under the control of the Progress Mines and 
Consolidated Groldfields show a decrease of £805 15s. 8d. This decrease is attributed to suspension 
of operations at the Welcome Mine. Guided by the advanced state of the developments in progress, 
the general aspect of the mining-fleld compares favourably with former years, and continuance of 
profitable values and efficiency in operations are fairly assured. 

HYDRAUUC AND ALLUVIAL BIINING. 
Mahaktpawa. 

King Solomon Syndicate. — The intermediate shaft has been sunk to the 86 ft. level, and connection 
complet^ with the Old King Solomon shaft workings, but owing to the excessive soakage pa*colating 
through the open strata underlying the creek-bed the 6 in. pumps were overpowered, and this necessi- 
tated suspension of operations on the 86 ft. level. However, in view of reducing the heavy inflow of 
water, the work of fluming the creek was commenced from the Hibernian shaft, and continued past 
the Intermediate. This work is now completed, but the work done has, so far, failed to unwater the 
deep levels. Meanwhile operations are confined to driving on a false bottom on the 40 ft. level, wit^ 
the expectation of picking up the Hibernian lead. The workings are securely timbered, and in good 
order. 

In the Mahakipawa Valley, Harris and party (three men) were successful in their last wash-up 
in obtaining three nuggets, 1 oz., 2*5 oz., and 3 oz. in weight respectively, but their good luck did not give 
wages. 

Coady and party (two men) continue to work on the river-bed with varied results, while further 
up the creek Morton, Nelson, Coombes, and Rochfort are fossicking. 

King and party (two men) continue to trench for reefe on the dividing-range, the results being 
confined to small leaders. 

Wakam^rina and Deep Creek. — Joseph Styx and party (four men) are carr)mig out a system of 
diving to clean out the deep holes in the creek-bed. When last visited, work was suspended awaiting 
slight repairs to the diving-dress, and one of the party informed the Assistant Inspector that at low 
water sufficient gold was won from the crevices to pay more than current wages. 

Mr. Delamannte, caretaker at the Gorge Claim, is stiU hopeful that sufficient capital will yet be 
available to clean out the gorge. 

Caines and party continue to prospect a branch of the Deep Creek, with satisfactory results. The 
gold gives a coarse sample. 

Davis and party (four men) are now doing very well after a lengthened spell of rather indifferent 
success. 

Charles Nelson and party (four men) are engaged bringing in a water-race from the All Nations, 
a distance of two miles, to sluice a district known as the Sydney Flat. 

At the commencement of the year the creek was very low, and quite a number of miners were 
carrying out a system of clearing out the crevices. Some nice nuggets are picked up at times. 

OnamaliUu District. — Smith and party (five men) are bringing in a water-race to work some ground 
which they formerly opened about two years ago. The party are satisfied that with the prospects 



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49 C— S. 

obtained in the first working, profitable results will be maintained with an efficient water-supply. This 
is the only mining party in the district. 

Ericon Hydraulic Sluicing Company. — This property continues to be shut down. 

Takaka. 

Bu'Bu Hydraulic Sluicing Company (Charles Campbell, Manager). — The deep-level face is now 
exhausted southward, and operations have been opened and continued on a section of slightly rising 
groimd to the north. The face shows a varied depth of wash, intermixed with large boulders, which 
latter tend to increase the labour in keeping the face clear. Pipe-line installation and other important 
works directly coimected with the claim are carefully and efficiently maintained. The values won 
c'ontinue to maintain their former standard. 

Upper Anatoki. — A subsidy of £13 has been approved, through the Takaka Miners' Association 
(at the rates prescribed by the regulations. Class 1, on the usual conditions as to reports on the work), 
to enable Messrs. Lloyd and McGrath to prospect for three months in the Upper Anatoki District. 

COLLINOWOOD. 

Parapara Hydraulic Sluicing Company (James Bassett, Manager). — During the year operations 
in the Glenmutchkin face were discontinued, and an extensive face opened and worked continuously 
at the Hit or Miss, all the available water being utilised for the purpose. The returns show very con- 
siderable promise. The company contemplate working their deep level freehold at West's Flat by 
elevating. Free drainage would necessitate very considerable expenditure in order to be effective 
over the deep areas, hence elevating will be resorted to. It is anticipated that the ground will yield 
very handsome returns. 

Quartz Ranges (C. Y. Fell, Nelson). — This property was not visited. . [ 

Rocky River, — Nothing further has been done in this district since my last report. 

Slate River Sluicing Company. — The vafious works recently effected to raise and strengthen the 
storage-dam having largely increased the conserving-capacity, sluicing operations are now more con- 
tinuous, and the returns therefrom obtained show an increase of £464 10s. 4d., as compared with the 
previous year. Considering the efficiency of developments in water-storage and the facilities for getting 
rid of tailings, continuance of favourable returns may be fairly anticipated. 

Westport. 

On the German Creek and its tributaries mining shows no improvement, the only parties left to 
struggle for an existence being Milgate, Porter, and Jamieson, who are sluicing old tailings, which give 
very poor returns. Milgate's party had a considerable slip at their claim, which covered their boxes 
to a depth of 15 ft. Jamieson and Porter (who have worked in this locality for fifteen years) continue 
to drive occasionally on a thin bed of cement of poor value. 

Cook TerracCy Fairdown. — Gardiner and party's subsidised tunnel has turned out a very lucrative 
concern, the party having sold gold during the year equal to £3 per week per man, and there is every 
evidence of its continuance. The ground is tunnelled in the vicinity of the Great Exploration Com- 
pany's claim. 

Fairdown. — Messrs. Young and McKay are driving a subsidised timnel in Rochfort Terrace. 

Christmas Terrace. — Charles Findlay and W. Crawford have lodged an application for a subsidy 
to drive a tunnel from 900 ft. to 1,200 ft. 

Waimangaroa River, — A few resident parties continue to fossick and tunnel along the river-banks, 
with varying results. The gold won is a very nice coarse sample. 

Golden Basin Prospecting Association have done nothing further to prove the deep leads at the base 
of the Rochfort Terrace. 

Shamrock and Virgin Flat Properties are still standing. 

Carmody and party (Addison^s) continue to carry on their sluicing and elevating operations with 
lucrative results, although these have been somewhat reduced during the recent dry weather. Drainage- 
outlet and general equipment are kept in good order. 

Neil and party (six men) are working their hydraulic sluicing and elevating claim, with satisfactory 
results. The property is very tidily worked, and the plant is kept in good order. 

McCan and party : The intermittent water-supply is rather against this party, but, notwithstanding 
the shortage of water, the gold won has been satisfactory. 

O'Toles and Swearer (six men) : This sluicing and elevating party consider the wages earned are 
better than swagging or contracting under the co-operative system. The party share alike and work 
very agreeably. 

Gould and party (six men) : Scarcity of water on this sluicing and elevating claim is a factor much 
felt, as eight heads are required to work the ground with any degree of success. 

Cement-working, 

Halburg and party (three men) have recently opened a cement-face, 5 ft. in thickness, situated 
about 5 chains to the west of the ()olden Sand property. The cement is conveyed on a horse tram- 
line to the battery, which consists of four heads of stamps driven by a 20-ft. -diameter overshot water- 
wheel. So far they have not cleaned up. 

Milligan and party (five men) : The cement-bed worked on this claim is about 7 ft. in thickness, 
giving an average value of 4s. per yard, while the crushing-power consists of a ten-stamp mill driven by 
Pelton wheel. 

7— C. 8. 



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C— 3. 50 

Charlsstoh. 

Charleston Beach Sluicing Company. — Operations have been somewhat irregular during the year. 
When the claim was recently inspected two men were employed on each shift. The sands operated on 
do not appear to be rich. 

Powdl's Sluicing and Elevating Claim. — Operations continue to be persistently and systematically 
carried on. The pUnt and other details of the property are kept in thorough working-condition. When 
recently visited there was no person on the claim, the party being engaged effecting repairs on the water- 
race. 

Argyle Water-race is let to Walsh and party for a period of twelve months. Recently, the lower 
valve leading from the dam to Deep Creek was obstructed, but by the prompt action of the County 
Engineer in securing the services of a diving party the obstruction was removed. In order to effect a 
more efficient distribution of the water-supply, 15 chains of fluming are required, at a cost of £10 per 
chain, which cost is considered by the County Council to exceed their total revenue derived from the 
district or the rental received from the lessee. With the probable advantages to be gained on com- 
pletion of the proposed work, it is considered the increased effectiveness of the water-supply would 
then be sufficient to give emplojrment to an additional twenty miners. 

Mining in the Charleston district seems to have experienced revival of late, both as regards sluicing 
and cement-crushing, thirty miners being actually employed. Morris and party have just completed a 
new hydraulic elevator, while Higgins and party have just completed the erection of a small battery 
for cement-crushing, and Walsh and party are opening out a sluicing claim on a branch of the Nile. 

MUBCHISOH. 

Maruia Sluicing Claim. — Since this property was opened for mining purposes dearth of water 
has been a decided drawback to developments. The ground being proved of a favourable character, 
the company are now considering the advisability of constructing a permanent water-supply at a cal- 
culated cost of £6,000. Meanwhile, sluicing operations are confined to a deposit of recent formation, 
located in a small gully. The gold won is fine, and is deposited chiefly on the sides and bottom. 

Morris Brothers continue to sluice further down the Matakitaki River with success. 

Thomson and party (three men) have made satisfactory progress towards the construction of their 
new water-race, a length of a mile and a half being completed. The total completed length will be 
three miles. During the recent heavy rainfall the party had a very nice wash-up. 

Six-mile Hydraulic Sluicing Company (Matakitaki River. T. Maine, Manager). — The gravels 
operated on yield profitable results, but the intermittent water-supply (practically supported by rainfall) 
is the chief drawback. Three men employed. The various works are in good order. 

Horse Terrace Sluicing Company (C. Belby, Manager). — Prior to this company acquiring possession, 
the ground was formerly worked by small parties, who, being unable to raise sufficient capital to effect 
profitable development, willingly sold out, although they were confident that high auriferous values 
existed in the property. During the limited period (six months) during which the company has been 
actively engaged, 230 chains of water-race have been constructed to a width of 6 ft. by 4 ft. in depth, 
with a supply-capacity of 35 heads of water. Connecting with the race is a 22-in.-pipe line, laid for 
a length of 800 ft., and junctioned with two main branch lines of 350 ft., while each branch is fitted 
with 7 in. delivery Giant nozzles. It is further contemplated, in view of running the works continuously 
night and day, to instal electric light Over the whole system. Timber is also sawn by the company's 
own plant, thus effecting considerable saving in the various developments. 

Hunts Freehold, recently purchased by a Wellington syndicate, has been prospected with such 
satisfactory results that detailed surveys were made and rights acquired for water-race construction 
on a large scale. 

A Wellington company has employed Evan Brothers to prospect a section of auriferous ground 
located in the central Buller, prior to permanent works being undertaken. 

New LyeU Sluicing Company (Thomhill Cooper, Mine-manager). — Since this company acquired 
possession of this property (formerly owned and worked under the title of the Lyell HydrauUc Sluicing 
Company), operations have been confined to the construction of a high-level water-race, and extending 
preparatory works to open a new face at a lower level of the river, so as to enable sluicing to be com- 
menced from the lowest level of the ground, and at the same time admit of a tail-race with sufficient 
fall to carry away tailings from the sluicing of the gravels on the higher levels without hindrance to 
future operations. 

New Creek Syndicate. — Work has been confined to the operations of one man, who was employed 
in carrying out a system of surface trenching with a view to picking up the quartz outcrop which shed 
the rich stone now found on the surface The results have been so far unfruitful. 

Newton River Sluicing Company. — This company having expended £6,000 in water-race and tail- 
race construction, general equipment, and electric-light installation, a lucrative and well-ordered property 
has been established. In order to concentrate operations the main road was deviated for a distance 
of 23 chains, and the grades are much reduced as compared with those on the old road. 

Boatman's. 

Apart from the dredging industry, alluvial mining is confined to a few old pensioners, who do a 
little fossicking at their leisure, 



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61 C— 3. 

Obey Vallby. 

Blackwater, — Mining conditions are practically unchanged in this district. Blackwater dredge 
has obtained fair returns, while the Greymouth Lagoons dredge changed ownership, the purchasers 
being an Ikamaiaa syndicate Flaherty's subsidised tunnel has been driven the authorised distance, 
with unfavourable results. Alluvial mining is confined to about thirty Europeans and an equal number 
of Chinese. Craighead's subsidised tunnel (four men) has proved a profitable concern. 

Ahaura. — This practically exhausted district continues to find employment for about twenty 
Europeans and ten Chinese. The number of Chinese has gradually diminished. 

Red Jack* 8 and Kangaroo Creeks furnish employment to about an equal number with the Ahaura — 
viz., twenty Europeans* and ten Chinese. 

Moonlight. — The fame of this once-noted mining district has dwindled down ; only about ten parties 
of two men each are now engaged in the locality. 

Shrives and party have opened fresh ground^inTthe locaUty of the Montgomery Terrace claim, 
but the water-supply is wholly dependent on the rainfall 

Repyblic Sluicing Company, — The various works. in connection with the water-races and plant 
are in good order, and the returns have shown a decided improvement during the year. 

Montgomery Terrace, — Operations have been considerably afiected by heavy landsUps along the 
line of the water-race, and these have tended to retard profitable employment. The steep and broken 
hillside along the Blackball Creek is a constant source^of^trouble, otherwise the ground is considered 
of fair value. 

Hillier and party (four men), and Hyndman (four men), who draw their water-supplies from the 
Republic subsidised water-race are making a living wage. The sluicing-country continues to keep 
very rough, large boulders being considerably in evidence. 

No Town. — Since dredging was commenced in this locaUty, alluvial mining has been confined 
to about ten Europeans and seven Chinese. 

Ndson Creek. — In this old alluvial district mining is now almost confined to the dredging industry. 

EUMABA. 

According to the Assistant Inspector's reports, the sludge-channels, deep levels, dams, and other 
operative works have been duly inspected and found in good working-order, also the general equipment, 
pipe-lines, &c., were found in a satisfactory state of efficiency. 

Kdly^s Terrace Drainage-tunnd. — During the year extensive repairs have been effected from the 
incline shaft and past the Nos. 1 and 2 vertical shafts, including general repairs to the shafts and ladder- 
ways. The works recommended are now completed, and the channel is m an efficient state of repair. 
There are no sluicing parties at present taking advantage of this drainage-channel. 

Wheel of Fortune Hydraulic Sluicing Company (Thomas Hahon, Manager). — This new syndicate 
(local) having purchased the plant and mining privileges in connection with the property, are working 
continuously with fifteen men, but shortage of water-supplies is a serious drawback. Electric Ught 
is suitably installed over the whole works and plant, and other conditions about the claim are kept 
in an efficient state. 

Beroz and Mills (five men) : This subsidised party having completed their tunnel, opened out on a 
line of wash which at first only gave poor results, but soon improved, and now yields very profitable 
returns. The ground is well timbered, and rising is commenced to provide ventilation. 

Johansen and Case are blocking out, but the results are not encouraging. 

Holtz and party (two men) are also blocking out, with unfavourable results. 

Ryan and Son (two men) are continuing to block out the wash, with imfavourable results. 

Wame and party (two men) have completed repairs to their tunnel, and are now driving ahead. 

CaUaghan's District. — Manzoni and party (four men), Hunt and party (three men), Darby and Hunt 
(two men), Rochitti and party (two men), Bassi and party (two men), Bumerson and party (two men) : . 
Manzoni and Hunt are supplied with night water from the Government water-races ; the others are 
entirely dependent on the rainfall for water to work their claims. 

Minerals Gold-mining Company. — The various works effected have been chiefly confined to develop- 
ment, and include the sinking of a main shaft (10 ft. 4 in. by 4 ft., divided into three compartments), the 
renewal of six miles of water-race to carry 4 heads of water, and the erection of a water-balance for 
winding purposes. A prospecting-tunnel was driven in view of picking up a lead of washdirt which 
does not exceed 1 ft. 6 in. in thickness, but according to the pan prospects it is considered payable. 
The works and plant are in good order, and mining is proceeding satisfactorily. 

HOKITIKA. 

Humphreffs OuUy (Mr. Greenbank, Manager). — Sluicing operations continue to be carried out 
on a large scale by a party of tributers, while the earnings won give satisfactory promise to both parties 
ooncerned. Developments have not been further extended during the year. Water-races and all 
working plant are efficiently maintained. 

Craig* s Freehold. — Operations are still continued on tribute by three separate responsible parties, 
whose term expired on the 31st October last. Irvine and party of six men having nearly exhausted 
their section will have a considerable amoimt of prospecting to undertake should fresh arrangements 



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C— 3. 52 

be completed, also Chessman's party are closing their section, while Goudy' and party have prospected 
during the past four months without any yield. The results from this property show a serious decline, 
and the owners are not sanguine enough to advance further capital towards prospecting. 

McQuilkin and party on driving their subsidised tunnel 200 ft. struck payable wash, which they 
ar^ now working by underground mining, but scarcity of water is much felt on the high terrace land 
where a permanent water-supply is not easily available. 

R. A. Harcourt's drainage-tunnel has been completed at a driven distance of 666 ft. 

Back Creek. — With the exception of a sample of 275 yards, which yielded 3*5 dwt. per yard. Cooper 
and party have done no work of any importance to prove the values of the Brighton wash. The work 
done by this party consists of driving and crosscutting 48 ft., and putting up a rise 12 ft., from which 
they have driven 40 ft. on an average wash of 4 ft. thick. The lead would seem to run north-west 
and south-east, but it is not yet determined how far it runs into the terrace. 

Ryan, Knight, and Spence, having sunk a shaft to a depth of 8 ft. and driven 36 ft., were so satisfied 
with the results that they determined to drive a low level. 

Hartridgen and party (three men) had one washing of 18 dwt. from 17 yards of washdirt (which 
they consider encouraging), and have started to drive a low level, which is now within 40 ft. of the 
wash. 

Brook and party (two men) have struck the wash 4 ft. in thickness, showing fair prospects, but 
they will not be in a position to commence washing until a paddock and other requisites are com- 
pleted. 

Stewart Johnston and party's (six men) subsidised tunnel is yielding very satisfactory retumi. 
The workings being fairly extensive are kept in good order, and well ventilated. 

Seddon's Terrace, — Cooper and Harris obtain very good results. The property is well kept. 
Knight and Spence : The wash shows decided improvement, affording an increase in values. 

Ross. 

Mont d^Or (John McKay, Mine-manager). — Operations have been actively maintained, and the 
gold won amounted to 1,019 oz. 13 dwt. The washdirt treated was of poor quality generally, the best 
layers being too deep for the operative tail-race. Plant and general equipment are in good working- 
onler. 

United Ross, — The Mont d'Or Company lately acquired possession, but further work in the deep 
level and elevating claim has been abandoned, and the plant partly withdrawn. A tribute party who 
sluice the terrace part of the claim are sometimes fortunate in striking some very rich patches of coarse 
gold which lies cWefly in pockets. 

McCloud Terrace Sluicing Company (Fergus McCloud, Mine- manager). — This company has sixty 
men employed in connection with the various branches of water-race and dam-construction, also pipe- 
laying. The developments being now in an advanced state of completion, sluicing is expected to com- 
mence at an early date. The tail-races and other preliminary works are completed. 

Donnelly's Creek, — Smith and party having completed their subsidised water-race and dam are 
now in possession of a fair water-supply, and although returns are not of a lucrative nature hope is 
entertained that values will improve as the face is extended into the terrace. 

Waiho. 

The Waiho Sluicing Company has applied for protection. 

The re-erection of the late Leviathan Freehold dredge on the Five-mile Beach has been sus- 
pended. 

Mr. Earnshaw has applied for further protection of his dredge and mining privilege at Gillespie's 
Beach. 

The dredge at Saltwater Beach is standing, so that mining matters in the Waiho district are not 
encouraging. 

DREDGING. 

Concerning the gold-dredging industry on the West Coast the most notable feature connected 
therewith is the gradual decline in the values won, also the corresponding decrease in the number of 
dredges now in operation. This depreciation may be largely attributed to the recklessness which cha- 
racterized the boom of some four years ago, companies commencing operations in some instances without 
first making proper efforts to obtain definite knowledge as to the probable values of the auriferous 
deposits, and the local and natural conditions of the ground to be operated on. The prevailing rule 
was to get a dredge on the claim, notwithstanding the resultant consequences. The influence of the 
dredge-building engineer did not assist to abate the existing evil, for, in view of making the most of 
a favourable opportunity for business, dredges were constructed without, in many instances, being 
designed to suit the ground. Consulting engineers did not, as a rule, have time given them to correctly 
ascertain the conditions under which the machines were to operate, so great was the anxiety of com- 
panies to get dredges on the claims ; hence the ruinous breakdowns in machinery and the excessive 
delays in subsequent operations. Deficiency in strength of engine-power, together with limited gold- 
saving space, have been the chief disadvantages experienced on the West Coast dredges, while the 
estimated productiveness was based too much on the lifting-capacity, and the treatment of the sands 
for the recovery of gold not sufficiently considered. Reviewing the whole position, revival of the 
industrv must await the future 



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C— 8. 



MINERAL9 OTHER THAN GOLD. 

Capfer-mines^ Nelson, — Mr. TurnbuU, manager, kindly supplied the following information : The 
company having effected a persistent and general style of prospecting of ore-bodies on this property, 
have decided to concentrate future expenditure on the United Section, where they have cut three chutes 
of ore. The " Monster," although firstly considered a doubtful and irregular formation, has been ultimately 
intersected and proved to be a well-defined lode of low grade. The Champion Mine will not be worked 
in the meantime. Plans and reports have been prepared for Mr. Wood (chairman), who intends to leave 
for the Home-coimtry in April, and during his absence £1,500 will be expended to effect further develop- 
ment, and if satisfactory results are obtained a larger company will be floated. 

Mr. TumbuU and others have appUed for 1,000 acres of copper-bearing country at D'UrviUe Island. 
Samples of the ore obtained and assayed gave 17 per cent. Cu. Mr. Turnbull intends to closely examine 
this property shortly, and if the ground is approved a Sydney syndicate will provide the necessary 
capital. 

Hidden Treasure^ Takaka. — Comment on the working of this property, either from commercial 
or scientific standpoints, would be practically useless. To all appearance the works are shut down 
definitely. Inquiries were made relative to infringement of section 193, " The Mining Act, 1898." 

Washboume Brothers* HcBmatite-paint Works fail to show their former activity. 

PROSECUTIONS. 

23rd June, 1904. — Warden's Court, Reefton : The New Inkerman Mines pleaded guilty to breach 
of " The Sunday Labour in Mines Prevention Act, 1897." Fined £2 and costs. 

14th October, 1904. — At the instance of the Inspector of Mines proceedings were instituted against 
the Consolidated Ooldfields of New Zealand (Limited) under section 211, Mining Act, relative to housing 
the slime-tables at the Golden Fleece Mine. The Court (Arbitration) having visited the plant and heard 
the evidence of the battery-manager and other employees considered the housing complained of was 
not necessary, and that the Act did not provide for such. 

ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES. 

Quartz-mines. 

I regret to record the sad fatality which occurred at the Energetic Mine on the 14th March, 1904, 
whereby three miners were suffocated by gas Uberated from poisonous water whilst rising to hole a 
winze. As this matter was fully dealt with at time of accident, further comment may be deemed un- 
necessary. 



Date 


Name. 


Name of Mine. 


Cause. 


March 14, 1904 
. 14, 1904 
, 14, 1904 


George Eslick 
ThomaH Lindsay . . 
William Eenoard . . 


Energetic ] 




Suffocated by gas liberated from poisoned water whilst riilDg 
to hole a winse. 



Progress Mine. — 14/1/04 : Robert Haste, miner, sustained fracture of arm and leg by fall of 
quartz in the face. 

New Inkerman Mine, — 3/3/04 : Walter Mattock, miner, sustained fracture of both thighs by 
fall of quartz in the face. 

Progress Mines Cyanide-works. — 11/7/04 : Aubrey 6ow had his arm broken in belting. 

Oolden Ridge, Taitapu — 4/10/04 : E. McNamara, miner, sustained injury to the eye by an ex- 
plosion of gelignite while charging a shot-hole. No after effects. 

Dredges. 

Mokoia, Butler. — 8/6/04 : J. Dalton, dredgemaster, had both ankles dislocated while uncoiling 
a rope. 

A 1, Reedman's Creek. — 2/4/04 : Fred Cullman, engine-driver, was severely bruised while oiling 
the machinery in motion. 

Old Diggings, BvfUer. — 3/6/04 : Albert GiUstrom, master, had arm sprained in belting. 
There were no fatal or really serious dredging accidents during the year. 

I have, &c., 

R. Tennent, 
The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Inspector of Mines. 



Mr. E. R. Green, Inspector of Mines, Dunedin, to the Under-Secretary for Mines, Wellington. 
Sir, — Office of Inspector of Mines (Southern District), Dunedin, 8th April, 1905. 

I have the honour to forward the accompanying reports on quartz-mines, hydraulic sluicing, 
and alluvial mines, and gold-dredges in the Otago and Southland Districts for the year ending the 
SlBt December, 1904. 

QUARTZ.MINING. 

Canterbury. 

Wilberforce Reefs. — The Wilberforce quartz reefa are situated at a high altitude at the head of the 
Wilberforce River, on the Canterbury side of tne range of mountains dividing the Provinces of Canter- 
bury and Westland. It is understood that a few tons of quartz had been taken out of a low-level 



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C— 3. 66 

tunnel, which had been driven westward to intersect the reef some twenty years ago, but, as the tunnel 
is now practically closed, ingress is impossible. The outcrop of quartz is seen to be 60 ft. in length 
by 15 ft. in width, about 500 ft. from the cap of the range, one mile northward from Browning's Pass. 
Should future development prove the existence of this large outcrop to be continuous and of a payable 
character, water for motive power and other purposes could be easily obtained, also a suitable battery- 
site, but there is a scarcity of timber for mining purposes. A road has been formed from the Glen- 
tunnel Railway -station to within 5 chains of the proposed battery-site, and the road could be made 
serviceable for wheeled traffic by an expenditure of £200. 

Messrs. Hyndman and Cameron, prospectors, during 1903 took out a parcel of 9 cwt. of quartz, 
which, on being crushed at the Al Battery at Reef ton, yielded at the rate of 2 oz. of gold to the ton 
of stone. Owing to the severity of the winter weather and the difficulty of obtaining supplies, work 
was suspended during the winter. A number of claims having been taken up, several parties from 
the West Coast set out in the spring of 1904 with the object of thoroughly prospecting the reef. 

Wilson's Reward or Prospector's Claim (100 acres) : Four men are employed driving a tunnel, 
which has been driven 180 ft. and is expected to cut the reef at another 50 ft. 

James Billett's Lease, south of Wilson's : One man employed in testing the outcrop, which has 
been proved satisfactory. 

H. Baucke and partner are prospecting on their mining privilege with favourable results. 

James Morris and Fleming are prospecting a 200-acre mining privilege also with favourable results. 

There are, in all, about 800 acres pegged out to the southward of Wilson's Reward, and 300 acres 
to the northward, on which latter there is no one working at present. Altogether, there were thirteen 
men on the field. 

Mr. James Martin, Mine-manager for Progress Gold-mining Company, Reefton, with three others, 
spent three days on the ground, and was well satisfied. Mr. Martin gave his opinion that all that was 
necessary to make the field a success would be brains and capital. 

I am indebted to the Assistant Inspector of Mines, West Coast District, for the above informa- 
tion. 

Albury^ South Canterbury. 

Chamberlain SetUement, Opauw.— -Gold-bearing quartz reported by Mr. Nicholson, a farmer, on 
examination proved to be nothing more than pyrites in the joints of the slate rocks of the district. 

Several assays have been made which prove that while there was no gold in the rock itself, still, 
the pyrites carry a small percentage of gold to the value of about Is. 3d. per ton of stone. Assay— 
8 gr. of gold to the ton of stone with pyrites. 

Otago. 

Shotaver, 

Mount Aurum Oold-mining Company, BuUendale (F. T. Ware, Mine-manager). — 25/11/04 : The 
Achilles Gold-mines were purchased in 1903 by Messrs. Robert Lee and party, and prospecting opera- 
tions were commenced in the early part of the year 1904. On the British- American line of reef two 
drives, from which Rodgers and Southbridge stoped a good block of stone some years ago, have been 
reopened and are being pushed ahead on the hanging-wall. As good results are expected from this sec- 
tion of the property, an aerial tramway is to be constructed to convey the quartz to the battery in 
Skipper's Creek. Other prospecting-work has been carried out, but no stone of a permanent nature 
met with. The battery is being overhauled and 10 head of stampers put in repair ; motive power 
is to be supplied by Pelton wheel instead of electricity as in the past. The property is to receive 
thorough trial. Eleven men are employed in and about the mine and battery. At the end of the year 
the battery having been overhauled and 10 head of stampers put in good working-order, a start was 
made to crush stone from the prospecting-drives. 

Shotover Quartz-mining Company, Shipper* s (T. 0. Bishop, Mine-manager). — 25/11/04: The 
late manager, Mr. F. T. Ware, having taken charge of the Mount Aurum Gold-mining Company's pro- 
perty at Bullendale, Mr. Bishop has been appointed to the management of the Shotover Mine. Stoping 
is being continued in the rise section of the mine, and the uprise heading is also being continued to meet 
the upper level in the old workings for the purposes of ventilation. A winze has been sunk 50 ft. below 
the adit level, and a block of quartz has been stoped out. As the future of the mine depends upon its 
further development, the adit level, which has been stationary for some considerable time, should be 
advanced. The mine-workings are in good order. Timber is well used in the level and in the stopes. 
The explosives are kept in a suitable locked magazine and are well handled. The ventilating-fan supplies 
fresh air, which is conveyed to the working-faces in pipes. All the tailings are being saved with a view 
to future treatment by cyanide. A few tons of quartz were taken from Cleave's Reef on the eastern 
bank of the Shotover River and crushed in the company's battery, but the results obtained did not 
warrant further attention being given to that line of reef. Fifteen men were employed on this date in 
and about the mine and battery. 

AspinalTs Reef, Packer's Point, Shipper's, — 26/11/04 : Nothing has been done on this reef through- 
out the year. 

Crystal Reef, Skipper's.— 2^/ \\/0i : Operations have been at a standstill during the year. 

Reefton United Quartz-mining Company, Shipper's Point.— 26/11/04: : Since the completion of 
the prospecting undertaken by this company, mining operations have been at a standstill in connec- 
tion with this reef. Satisfactory results, both as to quantity and quality of the stone, are said to have 
been obtained. Latest information from Reefton is to the effect that the company will take the^neces- 
sary steps to erect a suitable battery at an early date and further develop the mine. Since Jmy^visit, 
I learn that the license has been cancelled and a new party have taken over the mine and intend to 
proceed with further development. 



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57 C.-3. 

WiUiam Keating' s Prospecting Claim^ Upper iSAaeoucr.— 26/11/04 : At the time of my visit a 
shaft had been sunk to a depth of 12 ft. on the side of the Sandhills Track, where it crosses the Blue 
Slip. Nothing of a permanent or profitable nature has been accomplished. 

Alpine Reef, Skipper's Point (Owners, W. L. Davies and J. Henderson).— An area of 20 acres is 
held by this party, but no work has been done on the property throughout the year. As is the case 
with other known gold-bearing reefs in the Skipper's District, want of capital hinders the immediate 
development of this reef. 

Glenorchy, 

A Gre3rmouth syndicate sent out two prospectors— A. Macinroe and J. McKay— for a few months 
to prospect a reef at Mopoke Creek, Lake Wakatipu. Assa3rs of the quartz did not come up to expec- 
tations, and the prospectors returned to Greymouth. 

George Reid, Queenstown, holds a prospecting-license over a large area in Caples Valley, Green- 
stone, Wakatipu District, over which prospecting operations are to be carried out. 

Macetown. 
Premier Sunrise (New Zealand) Gold-mining Company, Macetown (William Patton, Mine-manager). 
— 9/11/04 : On this date operations at the mine were not very brisk and work was confined to driving 
the incline tunnel ahead and to stoping in the rise section. The mine was in good order generally while 
natural ventilation, assisted by the water blast, provided a suitable current of air in the working-faces. 
Timber was well used throughout the mine. The payable chute of stone has cut out in the dip, and 
the main dip is being pushed ahead in an effort to pick it up again. Privy accommodation for the 
men has been provided in a stope in the return airway. The manager, Mr. William Patton, reports 
as follows on the work done for the half-year ending the 31st December, 1904 : " Work in the mine 
has been carried on continuously during the half-year, the average number of men employed in the 
mine during that time was 11*5, including miners' electrician and truckers. The operations consisted 
of extending the incline, mining, prospecting, and repairing. Incline : During the half-year the incline 
has been driven 66 ft., at a cost of £3 4s. 3d. per foot ; the nature of the country passed through was 
mostly of a hard class, and was consequently expensive driving. The formation consisted of haiS slate 
and a small vein of pug, which continues to follow the hanging-wall. There is no quartz of any kind 
in the face, we had an increase of water here lately, which has tended to delay the work to a certain ex- 
tent. Mining : I regret to say that mining has only been carried on during the months of July, August, 
and September, between passes 35 and 37, where the reef gave out. There has been a great failling-off 
in the quality of the ore for at least six months previous to the reef cutting out, and the absence of 
P3nrites and other minerals usually found in the stone was very noticeable. The reef was cut out by a 
fault which occurred in the formation, in the shape of a hard wall, which almost crossed the reef-Une 
and cut out the reef. There has evidently been a great disturbance in the country here, as part of the 
vein was sometimes found to be underlying the wrong way between 35 and 37 passes. I hope the reef 
wiU soon be discovered, as the work of prospecting is very expensive owing to the class of country we 
have got to deal with. Prospecting : A considerable amount of prospecting-work has been carried 
out at 37 and 38 passes, and now at 39 pass. The No. 37 rise was carried up to a height (from the floor 
of the incline) of 62 ft. ; there was also a considerable amount of crosscuttmg carried out — principally 
into the foot-wall. A vein of stone was discovered which at first looked very promising, it being over 
2 ft. in width and of good appearance, but only v^y poor prospects could be obtained. We therefore 
decided to discontinue for the present, the stone not being payable. No. 38 pass : Being of opinion 
that the reef might have taken a jump down here, we thought it advisable to drive a crosscut into the 
foot- wall on the incline level. A distance of 32 ft. was reached ; the reef formation was passed through, 
but no favourable indications being met with we decided to push on the incline and as soon as possible 
start No. 39 rise. No. 39 rise : This rise has now been carried up to a height above the floor of the 
incline of 17 ft., at which point a crosscut has been started for the purpose of again driving through the 
line of reef. This work we are now pushing ahead as fast as possible ; a distance of about 15 ft. will 
require to be driven before the line of reef is reached, and will take at least two or three weeks to com- 
plete. I have hopes that we may discover the reef here, as we are now over 90 ft. ahead of where the 
reef cut out, and at least 150 ft. past where the payable gold gave out. Prospecting at No. 15 pass : 
A large amount of prospecting-work was carried out here ; the gold-bearing tract of country was dis- 
covered, and the veins of stone met with were of fair quality in places, but not well defined, and on 
being driven on, cut out. Work was continued here until we were convinced that nothing payable 
was likely to be discovered, thus proving that the blank which occurred in the reef here was from 160 ft. 
to 200 ft. in length. Repairing incline : The incline has given us a considerable amount of trouble 
during the last six months, owing to the old timbers in places having become very much decayed and 
giving way. Consequently they had to be renewed. Only the most pressing work is being carried 
out just now, owing to the great expense attending it. We have got such a great extent of old tunnel- 
ing to keep open that we find it very troublesome to attend to. If we were on payable stone, however, 
we would not notice it so much. I trust, however, that before long ore of a payable character will be 
discovered, and the mine will be in a paying position. The great depth to which the mine has reached 
is, of course, very much against us, as the stone will require to be of good quality to pay. Milling : 
During the half-year 358 tons of quartz has been crushed and 130 oz. of smelted gold has been obtained, 
valued at £520 (approximate). Owing to no ore being obtained from the mine, the mill was not worked 
during the months of October, November, and December. Cyanide : Twenty-one tons of concen- 
trates have been treated for a 3rield of 33 oz. 15 dwt. 10 gr. bullion, being at the rate of 1 oz. 11 dwt. 
per ton. Financial result :|frhe financial position for the half-year has not been so good as usual, owing 
to the payable stone having pinched out, and^ having no gold-returns, I was obliged to call upon the 

a— c. 3. 



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tM:u»*l.r. — 2^/ I', ^H : T^ pvopoettfT vj* i>rr::^^rt v^ p. *r :ia*? fr-r„ Mr W J F^rr^ mH hi§ mming 
njtv*^ *jr:.yrj^A .i tiro ff««^ rinTjt of Lj< a^.r's i r-xifia ii p^ 1^ ^ t-i^ M*c«tovii Duttict. 
A I'/uvritT v«i *\ \.j rettmred 57 th* >:j»I r ara^geT to pro* ^**i »:t^ t-,-^ » .r*: of ^^n.^ *p %iA derelop- 
XT^ tvt pfyp-trtT, Ot tfie date ©f ujipecti^rfi fre rE<en w*rf enzr.j**! A inre h-ki beet pet in 300 fL 
t4 t£^ r^ ^xA veZ tin-.MScd. haUmt in^jraoatiiofi m to ti« ^ifer.t liar o-r.^ :« so=je deiar in comple- 
t40& '/f tr>5 trif.*f*T fA tie pT»>p<ftT operauooi at tL^ r-^ije Ilat^ b*?*?fi »^*r-^i**i ji tbe iL«actzme. 

iUJkori B^UJCm Qmmnt dnmk, Jfaatani.— Mr. lU^ s. Lm i>^<!^ pr-^p-n/i^ a r^f in CakdoniaD 
(jTkLj, hall a n:«> east erf tie Tippetarj Miije. A lerei vaa dnT«: i'^ h. to •: r. 1::* reef viidi. at this 
poir.t, pr«yr«d to be 2 ft. ia widtc;, aj>i to iaTe a& aaaar TaL:ae of ^ 01. ^ dv^ to tbe toe:. A cmsiisg 
of 25 torj vevtilted in a jieid of 52 os. of retorted goid- F^rtier d-tT^kpz^r.t of the propertj is being 
proceeded witi. 

Amierwoi^, Hammak^ amd Pmtf, Mme Oa m m , — Tt^ P^tr bare tak^c ^ ac area oc tbe same fine of 
reef ar/1 %d/Ardng Bakb*s area. Tbe reef is being opened up, and pfospettB are saisd to be encoaragiiig. 

Beafe ar>i partj a&d sereral other prospectors are ^rosp^.tu^ a Iil^ of reef parallel to that on idiich 
Biki is voriang. Bakh's d i s c or e ty has thos giren an impetas to prospecting for parable reefs in 
tae dj-ftrkt, 

P^nek Barr&m*$ Qmart z mime ^ Arrow River. — (Area, 4 acres;. — Mr. Barron ha^ goce to coosidar- 
able troir;!e to profpect thk quartz reef, bat he is mach hampered bv the vant of a good road and the 

E'keral ioaeceasibditj of tbe mine, which is atoated at a co::^derable elevation above tbe Arrow 
rer, 

Crom m eB . 

Crnmwdl Mine 8fndiest^$ Qmartz-wnrnt, Bemdigo (W. T. Talbo^v aad D. B. Waters, Trustees).-- 
T-.is S7iylirate has seoned the p i op ei ty of the Cromwell ProprietarT Goki-mining Companr (limited). 
Sioce the porchase was eompleCed no p t ogi e asi fe woria have been andertak«i with regard to prospecting 
or deTelopir4^ tbe mine. The tiibnting party, Edwards and Pascoe, have crushed sereral parceb of 
good 9Une ukfoi from different places on the lease. This tribute agreement has now expired, and aD 
rnirj^^ operations are at a standstill at present. 

B^ndi/jo Tailing Syndicaie^ Bemdigo. — ^This syndicate haTing gone into liquidation the cyanide 
pUr^t has been idle throu^^iOQt tbe year. 

AUa Mine, Bendigo, — ^A considaable amount of prospecting was done oto this lease during the 
j^tr by one man. This work was discontinned towards tbe e^ of the year, and the mine closed 

QOirtL 

A psrty of prospectors have been prospecting a line of reef for some time at the bead of Boundary 
Creek, Leaning Rock Range. It is too eariy yet to say what success has attended thdr efforts. 

Anuiodbovm. 

Oo-By Quartz-mine, Carriek Range (J. B. HoUiday, owner). — The owner has been prospecting 
this property for the past seven years, and has completed a considerable amount of work upon it. Latest 
information from the mine is to the effect that fair stone has been opened out, and that it is the intention 
of the owner to proceed at once to develop the mine and to erect the necessary crushing plant. 

Me$$r$, Lawrence Bros,, Carriek Ranges. — About 100 tons of quarta has been crushed in the 
Star of the East battery by Messrs. Lawrence Bros. 

There have been no further developments in quartz-mining on the Carriek Ranges. Operations 
are still suspended pending a satisfactory method being discovered of treating tbe refractory ore. 

Nevis, 

A party of prospectors were engaged during the summer months prospecting an extensive area 
of country at the Upper Nevis. I understand that they failed to locate any payable ree&. 

Bald HiU Flat, 
Whites Reef, Bald HUl Flat (R. P. Symes, owner.)— Mr. Symes still continues to prospect this pro- 
perty, in which he has great confidence. Two men are employed driving a level and rising at intervals 
to prospect the ground overhead, and also to secure ventilation. Small quartz leaders are met with 
daring the progress of the work. The quartz is stacked and then crushed in a five-head stamper- 
buttery. 



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69 0.-3. 

BoDcdswr Mine, Bald HiU Flat (Thomas Holden and B. Gray, ownen)^ — Two men have been en- 
gaged in this mine throughout the year. Work has been carried out on the usual lines, but with ap^^ 
parently unsatisfactory results. The mine is situated on the Old Man Bange^ The quartz is crushed 
m a three-head stamper-battery. 

CampbetTs Gully, Obdisk Range.Some attention was given to this locality recently. There are 
several Imown reefs on this range, but the inaccessible nature of the country for the greater part of 
the year hinders their development. D. H. Parker has applied for and been granted a special quarts 
claim of 100 acres. 

Alexandra. 
Conroy's Oully Reef, Alexandra.-^Two prospectors, J. Robertson and M. Padgett, struck a small 
surface leader carrying good gold, and they are now engaged prospecting. A shf3t has been simk to 
a depth of 40 ft. on the leader, which at this depth has a thickness of 18 in. Gk>ld-bearing stone can 
be picked up over the surface in the alluvial deposits. There was a battery on this line of reef some 
thirty years ago. Until further development-work is carried out it is difficult to form an opinion 
regarding the permanency or value of this latest discovery. 

Rough Ridge. 

Rough Ridge Quartz Reef, Rough Ridge (F. H. Perry). — This mine and battery have been idle through- 
out the past year. 

Wavpori. 

O.P.Q, {Waipori) Gold-mining Company (Limited). — This mine continues to be shut down. Lately 
a sale of the winding, pumping, and cruslung machinery resulted in several lots being purchased and 
removed to other parts of the Otago District. It is understood that the property will be taken up by a 
smaller company, and the mine opened out on a scale of lesser magnitude than heretofore. The close 
proximity of electrical generating plant at the Waipori Falls should enable some of the low-grade reefs 
in the Waipori district to be worked at a profit. During the year quartz-mining in the Waipori district 
has been absolutely at a standstill. 

Milton. 

Last Chance Quartz-mine, Canada Reef (Thomas Park, owner). — The mine is situated about one 
mile eastward of that worked by the late Mr. Lawson. Some prospecting and shaft-sinking had been 
done several years ago, when the reef was pronounced unpayable. 

Recently Mr. Park and others took it up again when the quartz (which is highly oxidized) was proved 
to be very payable, battery results yielding 1 oz. to 3 oz. of gold per ton of quartz. A low level has 
been driven about 200 ft. on the lode, and a shaft sunk from the plateau affords ample ventilation. 
Timber in use in the level is too light, and may not be expected to resist the pressure which is bound 
to come as the result of stoping operations when the mine is more fully developed. However, an ex- 
perienced mine-manager has been appointed, and improvement may be expected. A ten-head battery 
has been erected at the mine. Ten men are employed. 

Maorae*8. 

Bonanza Mine, Macrae^s (L. 0. Beal, jun., owner). — ^Mining operations at this mine were suspended 
during the year, but the owner informs me that the property wUl receive further development in the 
near future. The results obtained from previous operations justify a further trial being given to this 
mine. 

Mills's United, Macrae's (H. N. Mills and Sons, owners). — 16/6/04 : The stone obtained from the 
reef on Horse Flat proved to be too low grade to pay for extraction of the gold by the ordinary quick- 
silvered battery-plates. Work was therefore discontinued, and the complete crushing plant sold for 
removal to a property near Mount Highlay. 

Malheson's Run Reef, Mount Highlay. — A syndicate composed of Hyde and Macrae's residents 
have taken up an area on the Mount Highlay line of reef. The reef is said to prospect well, both in 
regard to the gold-contents and to the scheelite associated with the quartz. Preparations are now being 
made to develop the mine and erect the necessary crushing machinery with gold-saving plates and 
concentrating appliances for saving the scheelite. 

Mount Highlay Quartz-mine. — ^Mr. Charles Munn is engaged prospecting on the line of reef to the 
north of the Morebum Creek, near to where the battery is situated. The older workings are abandoned, 
and there is no present prospect of their being gone on with, although from indications there is no apparent 
good reason for suspension of the work. 

Oilivern Mine, Dunback HiU, Stonebum (Alfred G. Davies, owner). — 16/6/04 : Three men are 
employed quarrying surface stone from various points on freehold property. The quartz is carted 
to and crushed in a five-head battery, power for which is supplied by a Ransome portable steam boiler 
and engine. The tailings are still being saved with a view to their future profitable treatment by 
cyanide. 

GUmour and Party, Dunback HiU, Ston«bum. — 16/6/04 : A considerable amount of prospecting- 
work by driving was done on this area, but the results obtained did not justify further expenditure 
of time and money. This party have now bought Mill's United Battery, which they intend to shift 
and re-erect on a lease taken up on the Mount Highlay line of reef. This plant should therefore shortly 
be in operation. 

Ociden Bar Gold-mining Company, Stondmm (D. Peddie, mine-manager). — 15/6/04 : This mine 
is in good working-order. Timber is well used in the stopes and levels. Ventilation, good. Rules 



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posted ExpkmreB are stond in a mtAoie mj^KDce, acd cwcfxiilT hiwtlfrf Sine mea mre em* 
plojed ifi aoi aboot tbe mice ac^l b«tt«rT. TVe tailm^ from the twtterf ksre bees WT«d for sohm 
ttme with a riew to rh^atjtai tnaxmax. The riidkt to treat these tailiii^ br e y aa ade for exIZKtm 
of their ^/M<onsU:LU wm ternred bj Mr. W. A. Riddle, aod at the eod oC the j«ar he ww |»i w jwliM g 
to erect the nnfwmrj pla^t. 

C^^i^flM PotMl ^H«r^.i»»ii«, (Mim fmwA, Mmcrmei fW. DocaUMtu Mme-maBa^er).— 16 '6 01 : A 
new krW'lerel croH-^^it haa been dnren 2dO ft. to a ponrt 30 ft. beiow the red A riw has been pvt 
up (rorn this point to the reel acd itopir^ operatiooa rcAoiDed. A steam engine and boder hare been 
iniitalkd to prcAyle m/^tive poser for the battery when wAter ia aearce darinf the dry aeaaon. The 
nulling operatioca are w^^L rM>i i/ited. Timber m well awd thronghoot the mine ; eJipluates are well 
•trwed a&d carefuilj ha/^lkd. Roiet posted. At the end of the rear the mine had been weO developed, 
aol tweatT'three nwn; were empiored in aod aboot the mine acd batterj. Schee&e is alao a product 
of tbM mjr^, being taved either at pu:k<d «tof^ in the mine or in the form of coooentratea from the 
Woodbury ^haJac4r'tan>, 

(Junee fUef, Mm^'$ Crefti, Hoero^i /Spiers and Rosa, Owners). — When this locality was visited 
the mine wu i/l>. Tbe ieaae saJMe^oentiy lapsed, and the area wss secored by Mesan. W. lidstone. 
Jamea BrT':e, ar>l Jaccea Mclr^nea. Work was at once cominenf^ in the stopes where the previous 
tributers had .eft ofL T:;ere is a waaM perr:entage of scbeelite associated with the gold-bearing quartz, 
and the owners intecd to take steps to save this v&hiable mineral. 

ManiajM Rtef, f}diem PrAnl. Macrae $ OL Q. McGill, owner).— As this battery depends ior modre 
power upon WAter, operations were inspended daring the dry sesaon. Work has now been resumed, 
and quartz is \f^'>% xuiu^A and crushed. Two men are employed. As constant work is hampered by 
shortage of water a nine brake horae-power oil-engine has been installed to supply motive power daring 
dry weather. A Fme vanner has been obtained to e&ct a saving of concenteatea. 

Quartz-minizig haa progressed steadily in and around the Macrae's district during the year. This 
progressive movement has been assisted to a certain degree by the present value of scbeelite, which is 
associated in payable quantity with the quarts at various points along this extensive tine of reeL Pro- 
spectors are turning their attention towards opening up the reef at Uie various pmnts with s view to 
ascertaining the permanency in value of the quarts. 

.VealAofit. 

Nothing of a progressive nature has resulted in this district during the past year. The aectioiis 
held by Alexander Ewart and Samuel Stevoia were surreodered abaotntely dazing the year. Hugh 
Adam was granted a special quartz claim in Section 3, Block VII., Nenthom District. Alexander 
Sligo was also granted a special quarte claim in Section 2, Block I., and Section 3, Block V., Nenthora 
District. 

Bartwwd. 

Barewood GoU-mimng Company, Barewood (W. E. Hitchcock, Mine-manager).— 16/3/04 : The 
mine-workings are now confined to the 188 ft. level. Nine men are engaged taking out leading stopes and 
timbering the level and stopes. The goM-bearing chute of stone clings to the hanging- wall, and varies 
from 10 m. in width to 4 ft. All the stoped-out ground to the rise is filled up, and there is no ground 
standing open except the ventilating levels and passes. Ventilation good throughout the mine, ex- 
plosives weU stored and carefully handled, rules posted. The new battery-framing is being erected, and 
the machinery is on the ground. The tailings are being saved with a view to future treatment by 
cyanide. All the surface plant is in good condition. 

12/7/03. — (H. 8. Molineaux, Mine-manager) : Opening out stoping-ground in level west from 
crosscut No. 2 flat. Reef at level-face 5 ft. in thickness, but the line of reef somewhat interfered with 
by a fault or slide. Country standing well. In the levels good manuka timber is in use and well set 
Air excellent ; second outlet and return airway by passes to No. 1 level The erection of a new ten- 
head stamper-battery has been completed. Motive power is supplied by an S-horse-power oil-engine, 
aod the plant is working smoothly. Ck)ncentrates are saved and shipped for treatment to the Cw;kle 
Creek Smelting-works, New South Wales. About 3,000 tons of tailings is stacked awaiting treatment 
by a cyanide plant, which is under course of erection. 

Southland. 
Stewart Idand. 

CafnvoaU Prospecting Claim, Pegasus District (J. R. Thomson, Own«r).— This mine is still b«ng 
prospe<;ted, with a view to working for tin and wolfram. A crosscut is being driven to reach the lode. 
Four men are employed. 

flannings' Mineral License, Pegasus District. — This mineral license has been granted to search for 
all minerals and raetals other than gold. 

J. W. Thomson and J. W. Murdoch, Special Mineral Claim, Pegasus District,— TY^ area has been 
taken up to search for tin and wolfram. 

Baden-Powell Quartz-mine, Stewart Island. — A registered company which had been formed to 
exploit the country has become defunct owing to want of funds. 

Preservation Inlet and South-west Coast op Otaoo. 
There is nothing of importance to record during the year. The New Star Quartz-mine has been 
sold, and it is understood that operations are to be continued. This lease of 77 acres (equipped with 
a ten-head battery and fourteen berdan pans) was ofEered for sale by auction in March, 1904. The pro; 
p<^rty was bought for £85 by Mr. McCreath. There are valuable water-rights and an aerial tramway 
attached to the property. 



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AOCIDBKT. 

8/8/04 (non-fatal) : William Thompson, miner, Premier Mine, Macetown, sustained fracture of 
two ribs by fall of rock from roof of tunnel. 

OTHER MINERALS. 

CiNNABAB. 

Wailahuna Cinnabar Company. — Owing to lack of funds to further develop this property the mine 
has been idle throughout the year. The original company went into voluntary liquidation, and the 
property was purchased by Messrs. R. A. Ewing and P. Miller, directors of the late company. I under- 
stand that it is the intention of the owners to form a small company to further develop the mine. 

SCHEBLITE. 

Twenty-one tons are returned as having been produced and exported during the year from the 
Macrae's district. Attention is being given to the deposit which exists at Glenorchy, Lake Wakatipu, 
and mining operations there may be resumed in the near future. Deposits of this mineral are also 
known to exist at the Alta Reef, Bendigo, and in the Lammerlaw Ranges. 

Antimony. 

Lodes occur at Alexandra, Waipori, Moimt Stoker, and the Carrick Ranges, none of which are 
at present being worked. 

Platinum. 

8 oz. 11 dwt. 10 gr. is returned as having been recovered in conjunction with the gold at the Round 
Hill Gk>ld-mining Company's Sluicing claims. 

COPPBB. 

Lodes occur at Reedy Creek, Upper Waitahuna, and Moke Creek, Wakatipu District. 
An area has been taken up on this latter deposit by a Dunedin syndicate. A quantity of copper- 
ore has been taken out and parcels sent to Dunedin and ike Thames for valuation of ihe ore contents. 

Qrbenstone. 

Extensive greenstone-deposits were discovered and proopected at Milford Sound, Otago. Opera- 
tions were carried on at about 1,400 ft. above sea-level by trenching and driving. A seam of greenstone 
was located and a tunnel was driven to crosscut on to the reef, from which some good samples of green- 
stone were obtained. 

Phosphatb Rock. 

Operations have been steadily conducted during the year, and 2,678 tons of rock produced for 
treatment at the chemical works at Bunudde. 

Tin. 

Prospecting operations are being conducted in the Pegasus District, Stewart Island. 

FiBBCLAY. 

Used for manufacture of fireclay goods, bricks, and sanitary pipes. 

The following outputs have been returned : Springfield CoUiery, Springfield, Canterbury, 414 tons ; 
Homebush Colliery, Glentunnel, Canterbury, 209 tons ; C. Austin, Sheffield, Canterbury, 590 tons ; 
P. MoSkimming, Benhar, Otago, 2,100 tons : total, 3,313 tons. 

HiBMATITE. 

One hundred and eleven tons have been taken out by Messrs. McGilvray, Mataura, for use by 
the Mataura Paper-mills. 

Deposits exist in various localities — vis.. Table Hill, Waitahuna, Clyde, Ac. 

Mabl. 

A deposit of clay-marl was discovered at Bumside, near Dunedin. An examination of the deposit 
by Mr. L. 0. Beal, jun., engineer to the Proprietary Syndicate, proved at least 15| acres of marl-bearing 
country. The marl-deposit is overlaid by volcanic clays. The amount of easily procurable marl is 
estimated at 1,600,000 tons. The material is uniform in texture, and carries from 15 per cent, to 50 per 
cent, of lime. A company has been formed with a capital of £10,000, and inquiries are now being made 
with regard to the supply of the necessary machinery. Tests of the marl and of the cement made there- 
from were made by the Public Works Department and by several leading building firms, all -of which 
were considered satisfactory. 

BUILDINO-SAND. 

13»33d tons of building-sand had been produced from the Green Island Coalfields for use in Dunedin 
and surroimding districts. 



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C— 8. «2 

[HTDBAULIC 8LUICIHO AHD ALLUVIAL MIKIVO. IKCLCTXIHO GOLD-DBEDGIBa 

Otaoo. 
Maerewhemma DittwteL 

Aided bj tha contmnoiis supply of wster supplied by the Monntmin Hut Wmtcr-nce, the Mmae- 
whennA Digi^ngi have progiMScd duzing the yeu, sDd good wsges weie obtained by the contzibiitocm. 
On the ground having proved payable there has been a strong d«nand for the available tve heads 
of public water. 

Glkvoex. 

iUuvial mining is at a standstill in this district. There were two dredges in <q>eratioci dnzing 
the year. 

Mamuka Creek. 

Manuka Creek Minimg Campamf {Limited^, Mammka Creek (Adam McCodindale» Manager). — 
This company has secured Stewart's sluicing claim on Mannka Hill. The water-supply has been con- 
siderably improved, and better results are now expected from this claim. The taiimgs are utilised 
for ballast by the Government Railways. Seven men are employed. 



Wa 

German Flat HydrauUe Sluieing and Elevating Company^ German Flat. — ^This company's water- 
race is now being diverted to work a claim in Waitahuna Gully. 

Vfyper German Flat Hydravlie Sluicing Claim (S. Johnston and M. Girvan, owners). — Hie resuhs 
obtained from this claim are said to be satisfactory to the working shar^okiers. Hiree men are 
employed. 

Waitakuna Gully. 

City of Dublin Sluicing Claim (J. Ferris and party). — Ground-sluicing operations are still being 
carried on in the cement-face. 

Quilter and Sons Hydraulic Elevating Claim (Hu^ M. Quilter and Sons) — Two men find employ- 
ment in iMs claim of 2 acres. The water-supply is poor. 

Thompson and Party {Norwegian Company) (C. Thompson, Manager). — ^Area of claim, 30 ac^es. 
Operations are being carried on in the cement-face, which is first broken up by blasting-powder and then 
sluiced to the elevator Five men are generally employed. For particulars of accident whereby John 
Liitgens was killed and John Larsen injured, 12th April, 1904, see list of accidents appended. 

Sailor's GuUy (Waitahuna) Gold-mining Company (Limited) (A. Barr, Manager). — ^Area of claim, 
66 acres. Operations are being conducted in the cement-deposit, which, after being broken up, is sluiced 
to and raised by the elevator. Four men are generally employed. 

WaUahuna Gold^redging Company's Claim (W. Adams and party). — ^The German Flat water-race 
has been purchased and an extension of the race is under construction to bring the water on to this 
claim, which is to be worked by hydraulic sluicing and elevating. The hard and uneven schist bottom 
had proved unsuitable for bucket dredging. 

Dredging. — Three privatdy owned dredges are at work in this district, and yield satisfactory 
returns. Two dredges were removed from the district during the year. 

Wetkerstone^s. 

Golden Crescent Hydraulic Elevating Comfany (W. F. Smyth, Manager). — Sluicing operations 
have been carried on throu^out the year successfuUy. Area of clahn, 90 acres, comprised of terrace 
and flat ground. Eight men are employed. 

Golden Rise Hydraulic Elevating Company (F. Whelan, Manager). — ^Area of claim, 45 acres. The 
mode of carrying on operations in ^is claim does not vary, and sluicing is fairly continuous. Six men 
are employed. 

Local Industry Gold-mining Company (Greorge Dunnett, Manager, Wetherstone's). — ^A large area 
of shallow ground has been turned over during the year, and sluicing operations have been steadily 
carried on. Four men are employed. 

Dredging. — The Happy Valley dredge having worked out its claim was closed down, and will probably 
be removed to a chum on tihe Pomahaka River, below Kelso. 

Tuofeha 

Blue Spur and GabritFs GuUy Consolidated Gold-mining Company (Limited)^ Blue Spur (J. H. Jack- 
son, General Manager ; J. Wren, Mine-manager). — The cement face is brought down by heavy bUsts 
of roburite and sluiced away to the elevators, gold being saved in the tail-races which are paved with 
jasperoid boulders which occur in layers in the claim and are generally associated with gold-bearing 
strata. The low accidents-rate in this claim is an indication of the care exercised by the management 
and the employees in working the high cement faces. Mr. Jackson has kindly supplied the following 
particulars : " Only two paddocks have been in operation during the year under review, and their relative 
value has been reversed as compared with last year. The product of No. 1 has fallen off in value 1*92 gr., 
or 3'796d. per cubic yard. No. 2 has increased 0*804 gr. or l*58d., a mean decrease of 1*095 gr. or 
2*168d. per yard on the aggregate of the cement treated, sufficient unfortunately to render the past year 
the least remunerative since work was commenced on the cement-deposits in 1891. During the year 
203,000 cubic yards of cement, containing only 8^ gr. (7d. in value) per yard, have been blasted from 
the working-faces, broken up by hand, sluiced through tail-races over 20 chains, elevated on No. 1 
side 118 ft., on No. 2 side 70 ft., and finally stacked and distributed in Gabriel's Gully, and have left^— 



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68 C— 3. 

an infinitesimal, certainly, but still a profit on the cost of working. The output for the year has 
decreased as under ; total gold won 1903-4, 1,669-48 oz., value £6,632 19s. 9d. ; 1904-5, 1,52480 oz., 
value, £6,062 68. 2d. : a decrease of 14468 oz., and £570 138. 7d. Total expenditure in 1903-4, £4,375 
5s. lOd. ; in 1904-5, £4,558 48. 3d. : an increase of £183 4s. 3d. The mean value of the cement treated 
this year as compared with last shows a serious falling-ofE, amounting to 1*095 gr. (2*168d.) per yard, 
whUe the cost of winning the gold increased from last year £2 12s. 6d. per ounce or 65*96 per cent, of 
its value, to this year £2 198. 9|d. per ounce or 75*19 per cent, of its value — an increase of 9 J per cent. 
The pump used for unwatering the mine in place of the last drain having been altered and improved 
on lines suggested by experiments made by the mine-manager, Mr. John Uren, during last year has 
worked very satisfactorily and at a much higher efl&ciency than previously, the percentage of water 
abstracted from remunerative work for the purpose of pumping being reduced by more than one-half. 
The record shows 605,061,000 cubic feet used for sluicing and elevating, and 21,260,300 cubic feet used 
for pumping — a total of 626,321,390 cubic feet of water for all purposes. The ratio of pumping water 
is therefore 3*391 per cent, against 7*787 per cent, last year, a substantial saving of 4*396 per cent. 1 
do not anticipate that this ratio can be lowered. Last year's work produced 5 dwt. 7gr. (£1 Os. lid.) 
per hour ; this year's work produced 4 dwt. 7 gr. (168. 8d.) per hour — a very serious reduction of 1 dwt. 
2 gr. (4s. 3d.) per hour. Pumping, 555 hours at 168. 8d. per hour, £463 68. ; less 75 per cent., £347 
9s. 6d. : leaving the cost of pumping, £115 16s. 6d. Cost last year, £250 138. lid. : a saving of £134 
17s. 6d. for the year. Wages paid, 1903-4, £2,675 14s. 8d. ; 1904-5, £3,001 Is. 2d. : an increase of 
£325 6s. 6d. It was found impossible to keep down the wages to last year's level. Unless an 
ample quantity of cement is broken to keep the sluicing-nozzles and elevators employed at their 
full efficiency while working, waste of time is unavoidable and loss consequently occurs, while 
inefficient working entails loss of water — the unpardonable sin in hydraulic mining. The head races 
have not proved either troublesome or expensive for maintenance. Water-supply for 1903-4, 
686*9 eight-hour days ; 1904-5, 903*5 eight-hour days : an increase of 316*6 eight-hour days. 
Pumping 1903-4, 1,382*6 hours (172 days) ; 1904-5, 555 hours (69*4 days) : an increase of 
827*6 hours (103*4 days). Water used in mine for sluicing and elevating : No. 1 Division — 1903-4, 
3,769 hours (471*1 days) ; 1904-5, 4,525 hours (565*6 days) : No. 2 Division— 1903-4, 1,726*5 hours 
(215*8 days) ; 1904-5, 2,703 hours (337*9 days) : total, 1903-4, 5,495*5 hours (686 9 days) ; 1904-5, 
7,228 hours (903*5 days). An increase over last year of 1,732*5 hours (216*6 days), but less than 1902-3 
by 275*5 hours (34*3 days). The total increased supply due to variations in the rainfall, &c., as com- 
pared with last year amounts to 904*9 hours (113*2 days). The following is a statement of work and 
values for the year 1904-5 : No. 1 Division — hours sluicing, 4,525 ; cement, 113,125 cubic yards ; gold, 
941*01 oz. ; value per cubic yard, 3*9927 gr. (7*88d.) : No. 2 Division — hours sluicing, 2,703 ; cement, 
90,010 cubic yards ; gold, 583*79 oz. ; value per cubic yard, 3*1132 gr. (6*14d.) : total— hours sluicing, 
7,228 ; cement, 203,135 cubic yards ; gold, 1,524*8 oz. ; value per cubic yard, 3*603 gr. (711d.). Mean 
value, 3*603 gr. or 7* lid. per cubic yard." 

KiUo and Party* 8 Hyiraulic Sluicing and Elevating Claim, Munro*8 Oidly. — The cement is brought 
down as usual by large blasts. It is then broken up and sluiced through a long nm of boxes. Nine 
men are employed. 

E. Brown and Party*8 Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Claim, Munro^s OuUy (lately Mills and 
party). — An improved water-supply has been obtained, and sluicing operations are still being carried 
on in the bei of Tuipeki Ore 3k with fair success. 

P. P. Thomas arid Party^s Claim, Munro^s Gully. — A large area of terrace ground has been sluiced 
away during the year with payable results. 

W. Hogg and Party, Tuapeka Flat. — Area of claim, 30 acres, comprising terrace ground in the 
valley of the Tuapeka River. The necessary arrangements for putting plant on the claim are not yet 
completed. 

A. N. Wakefield and Party, Tuapeka Flat, — It is proposed to generate electricity at the Blackcleugh 
Stream and transmit the current to th6 claim, where it will be utilised to drive pumping plant in order 
to elevate water on the Tuapeka terraces for sluicing purposes. 

John Roach and Party, Tuapeka Flat. — This party holds a claim on Tuapeka Flat which it is intended 
to work by hydraulic sluicing and elevating. A water-race from Gabriel's Gully has been applied for 
and granted subject to compensation being paid to freeholders en route. Pending settlement of these 
claims operations have not been commenced. 

Dredging, — Three dredges continue steadily at work in this district, while two were dismantled 
during the year. 

Waipori, 

WiUiam Brown and Party's Sluicing Claim, Buthgtoum Flat, — Sluicing operations have been con- 
tinued throughout the year, but the plant being small and the water-supply poor only a limited area 
of ground has been turned over. 

Golden Padlock Hydraulic Elevating Claim, MitcJidTs Flat (J. Qare and party). — Four working 
shareholders find remunerative employment in this claim. 

Reef Creek Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Claim, MiichdPa Flat (F. Sandager and party). — 
Sluicing operations were commenced during the year and continued for some time. The results obtained 
not being satisfactory the owners have sold the property to F. W. Knight, of Waipori. 

FarrdTs Deep Lead Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Claim, — This claim is now being worked on 
tribute by Richard Cotton, who has remov^ the sluicing plant to a portion of the claim on the Lammer- 
law Creek. The ground is easily worked and, since starting, operations have been conducted with 
success. 



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C— 3. 64 

Latnmerlaw Creek Hydraidic Odd-mining Company (W. E. CaudweU, Hanmger). — Sluicing ha* 
been steadily carried on at this claim, and a large area of ground haa been worked during tbe year. 

Sew Kew and Party, Lammerlaw Creek. — This is a special claim of 40 acres worked by hydraulic 
sluicing and elevating, with satisfactory results. Four men are employed. 

Bakery Flat Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Company, Upper Waipori (J. T. Johnson, Manager). 
— Johnson's submerged-jet dredge started operations on this claim during the year, and proved itself 
capable of elevating and treating a Urge amount of material. The dredge started work on a poor 
portion of the claim, and satisfactory results were not obtained. For this jeason hydraulic sluicing 
and elevating has again been resorted to on a payable portion of claim. 

Oolden Point Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Upper Waipori (D. O'Brien, Manager). — Four men have 
been continuously employed throughout the year in this claim. Sluicing operations have yielded 
payable results. 

Post-office Creek Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Lower Waipori (J. R. Parker, Manager).— This claim 
has provided employment for four men during the year, but operations were not attended with great 
success. The water-supply is inadequate and the ground continues difficult to work. 

Munro and George's Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Lower Waipori. — Sluicing operations in this claim 
have again advanced to the solid face, and when the claim was inspected it was found necessary to 
caution the men against approaching or working under the high faces. Four men are employed. 

W. McMillan's Alluvial Claim, Post-office Creek, Lower Waipori. — This cUim has been extensively 
worked for many years, during which time a considerable area of gold-bearing wash was blocked out. 
The claim has now been abandoned. 

Ah Yefs Hydraulic Ground-duicing Claim above Big Flat, Lovoer Waipori. — This claim continues 
to be worked on the same lines as in former years. 

There are several fossickers scattered about the Lammerlaw Ranges in the creeks and gullien. 

Ten dredges are still in active operation in the Waipori district, while two have been dismantled 
and removed from the district. One dredge has been idle throughout the year. O'Brien's application 
of hydraulic power to dredges has proved a boon in this district where ooal is costly. 

Beaumont. 

Champion Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Company {Limited), Beaumont (J. Fahey, Manager). — 
Area of claim, 18 acres. The head race was extended half a mile, and the line of pressure-pipes was 
then shifted to command the upper section of the claim. Since the completion of these improvements 
sluicing operations have been steadily conducted, although hampered somewhat by the drainage-inflow 
from the river and by the buried timber. Seven men are employed in the claim. During the year 
the oompan3r's dredge was sold for removal to a claim at Waikaka. 

Dredging. — Two privately owned dredges have been at work in the district on the Clutha River 
during the year with var3ring results. 

Island Block. 

Island Block Odd Dredging and Sluicing Company, Island Block (A. C. Perkins, Dredgemaster ; 
D. Weir, Sluicing Manager). — The sluicing plant has continued to work steadily throughout the year, 
whilst the dredge was also in operation the greater part of the year. Late in the year the dredge was 
beached and the paddock pumped out. The bottom was then elevated and cleaned up as a test of the 
efficiency of the dredge in dealing with the hard uneven schist-rock bottom. The results were said to 
be favourable to the efficiency of the dredge, which has not yet, however, resumed operations. 
Twenty men have been employed by the company during the year. 

Undaunted Odd-mining Company's Claim, Tallabum (J. Kirkpatrick, Manager). — Sluicing was 
carried on during the greater part of the year by the proprietors, Messrs. Edie and Kirkpatrick. In 
October the claim was sold to the Tallabum Hydraulic Sluicing Company. 

Tallabum Hydraulic Sluicing Company (Limited), TalUium (John Whelan, Manager). — This 
company was formed to acquire the interests of Messrs. Edie and Kirkpatrick, and of Messrs. Whelan 
and Curtin. These claims were amalgamated and sluicing operations were resumed in November. 
Six men are employed in the claim. 

B. Curtin and F. Whdan^s Sluicing Claim, Currie*s Flat. — The water-supply on this claim being 
inadequate very little sluicing was done on this property. This claim has now been amalgamated 
with the Undounted to form the Tallabum Hydraulic Sluicing Company's claim. 

Ounton's Beach Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Horseshoe Bend. — Having to combat with a poor water- 
supply and low pressure the owners of this claim are unable to conduct operations on an extensive 
scale. 

Dredging. — In addition to the Island Block dredge, already mentioned, there is one other dredge 
in operation in this district on the Clutha River. 

MiOer^s Flat. 

Odden Run Hydraulic Sluicing and Dredging Claim, Miller's Flat. — Area of dredging claim, 81 
acres. Area of sluicing claim, 52 acres. The company's dredge has been in operation throughout the 
year. The elevating plant has now been removed from the sluicing claim on the western bank of the 
river, and will be used to strip ground ahead of the dredge. The work of relaying the pipe-line to com- 
mand the ground to be stripped, and of suspending the pipes across the Clutha River, is now being 
carried on. Twelve men have been employed during the year. 

Dredging. — Nine dredges have been steadily at work during the year, while two dredges of the older 
type have been supersedeid by up-to-date machines. 



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66 C.-^ 3 

Kdso. 

McKenzie and Party's Hydratdic Sluicing Claim, Lower Pomahaka. — Area of claim, 5 acres. The 
ground is shallow and easily treated. Three men are employed. 

The only other form of mining in this district is dredging. The Ardmore dredge, a privately owned 
concern, is working at Scrubby Flat, Greenvale, on freehold land. A claim has been taken up below 
Kelso, on the Pomahaka River, to which a dredge is under course of removal. The Qreenvale dredge 
lies sunk in the Pomahaka River. 

RoThurgh. 

Hercules Sluicing Claim. — This claim and plant are still idle, but the scheme to utilise the water- 
power on a large scale to generate electricity and also to work Anderson's Flat by hydraulic sluicing 
and elevating is still being promoted. The claim is at present held under protection. 

Roaiburgh AmalgamtUed Mining and Sluicing Company (Limited) (J. H. Waigth, Manager). — The 
extensive mining operations in this claim are conducted on the same lines as in the past with due regard 
to the efficient working of the mine and to the safety of the men employed. A good body of gold- 
bearing wash, evidently old river-bed, has been opened out in the present working-paddocks, and this 
insures profitable operations being carried on for some time. For particulars of accident whereby 
(}eorge Taylor and John McNab were accidentally killed see list of accidents appended. Eighteen 
men are employed in connection with the claim and water-races. The manager has invented a simple 
appliance for regtdating the feed to the elevator. A vertical box with central division and sides 6 in. 
apart are bolted up and inserted alongside the lift so that stones of more than 6 in. diameter are kept 
back from the buried elevator-throat when opening up a paddock. 

Ladysmith Gold-dredging Company {Limited) (W. Donnelly, Manager). — Area of claim, 60 acres. 
This company's claim is still being worked by hydraulic sluicing and elevating. The water-supply has 
been improved and the pressure increased, thus enabling a larger amount of material than formerly to 
be turned over. The sluicing plant is operating on a highly payable seam of wash, and the prospects 
before the company are bright. Eight men are employed. 

Commissioners Flat Sluicing Claim (Coulter and party ; R. Qeorge, Manager). — With the increased 
water-supply a greater amount of material is treated. The heavy overling burden is swept off into 
the river, and the lower material is elevated and passed over boxes fitted with gold-saving appliances. 
Pour men are employed. 

Golden Gate Sluicing Claim (Manuel Bros.). — This claim is worked on a small scale by hydraulic 
sluicing and elevating. Three men are employed. 

Pleasant Valley Gold-mining Company, above Coal Creek Flat. — Some improvements were effected 
to the water-supply and to the line of pressure-pipes, and operations were resumed during the year. 
The mine has recently changed ownership again, the purchaser being Mr. A. McPherson, of Coal C^eek. 
The new proprietor intends to still further improve the condition of the plant, and thus give the claim 
a thorough trial. 

Butterfly Sluicing Claim, Tetnot (Weatherall Bros.). — Two men find employment in this ground- 
sluicing claim. 

There are several minen in this district working along the banks of the Clutha River. 

Dredging. — There are six dredges in this district in active operation on the Clutha River when 
the river is favourable for dredging, three of which are privately owned. 

Bald HiU Flat. 

Carroll and LyncVs Sluicing Claim. — ^The owners of this claim continue to work on the usual lines 
and to obtain payable results during the sluicing season. 

MitchdTs Sluicing Claim, — This ground-sluicing claim affords employment for one man. 

J. Swing and J. DowdalTs Hvdraulic Sluicing Claim (W. McNeish, Manager). — Operations during 
the sluicing season continue to yield satisfactory results to the owners. 

Last Chance Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Company (J. McNeish, Manager). — Area of claim, 
96 acres. Ten men are generally employed in this claim, in which operations are being conducted 
on the usual lines, with payable results. 

Stringer and MiUer, Fourteen-mile Beach. — These two men are engaged stripping on the river beaches. 

Dredging. — ^There were three dredges on the Clutha River in the gorge below Bald Hill Flat. As 
a very sl^ht rise in the river prevents successful operations, the past season has not been favourable 
for continuous work. 

Naseby. 

Mining- work in this district continues much the same as last year. It is to be noted that the easier- 
worked ground ia becoming exhausted, and larger volumes of water are becoming concentrated upon 
the deeper class of ground, by which means the average number of men employed is maintained. Work 
this year has been somewhat irregular, owing to the dryness of the season. There are considerable 
areas of auriferous ground in the district outside present mining operations, which may be expected 
to be utilised as the water on present workings becomes liberated. 

Dredging. — Roberts's Naumai dredge. Upper Kyeburn, which is now the only one in this district, 
has been idle during the^latter part of the year. 

Hamilton's. 
Perseverance Sluicing" Claim. — Henry Horn and Guy Hooper continue to work this claim. Three 
men are employed. 

Messrs. Roberts^Bros. have a sluicing claim in this^Jdistrict. 

A few men are employed on this field sluicing with the small supply of water available. 

9— C. 3. 



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C— 8. 66 

PaUa/roa. 

PaUaroa Hydraulic Sluicing Claim (D. C. Stewart, MAnAger).~Thif claim is owned by a pnvate 
sjmdicate, and has been worked steadily during the year. It is intended to work the flat pofrtaon of Uiia 
claim by dredging. Recently some very rich wash has been stmck in this claim. Area of claim, 18 acres. 

There are a few other parties sluicing in this district in proximity to the Taieri River. 

Vj>per Taieri River, 

Canadian Flat Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Claim, — No movement has been made in connectioQ 
with this property during the year. It is quite probable, however, tiiat the works in connection with 
the development of this claim will be completed in the near future, and sluicing operations commenced. 

Messrs. McCoU Bros, have discontinued working their hydrauUc sluicing claim on the Upper Taien. 

Fortification Hydraulic Sluicing Company, Red Swamp, Lammeriaw IUmges,--The necessary plant 
was erected on the claim, and an area of ground was worked. The results obtained did not ccMne up 
to expectations, but I understand further prospecting-work has been gone on with. 

Serpentine. 

Mining matters in this district are very quiet. I understand that Messrs. Ounton Bros, have 
discontinue working in their sluicing claim. There are a number of f ossickers scattered over the Lam- 
meriaw Heights during the summer season. 

Deep Stream. 

Deep Stream Amalgamated Hydraulic Sluicing Company {Limited), Deep Stream (A. C. Bucklaxui 
Manager). — This sluicing and elevating daim continues to be systematically worked, with results which 
are satisfactory to the shareholders. Fifteen men are employed during the year. 

Sutton. 

Hibemia Claim, — The claim has been sold, and is now being worked by a party of working-minen. 
The reef is rising, and water-pressure available is a gradually decreasing quantity. 

*Roek and Pillar, 

Rock and Pillar Sluicing Company (N. Bfaloney and party). — Three men are employed in this aBuvial 
sluicing claim. 

Idabum. 

Wheeler and Party^s Sluicing Claim, — Ght>und sluicing. Two men. 

Btackstone HiU, 

Rackstone HUl {including Ida Valley.) — About fifteen men find emplo3rment in various parts of 
this district. The wash is usually highly auriferous, but the water-supply ia poor. 

Dredging. — The Caimtrodlie dredge, owned by the Wallis Syndicate, Gk>re, is the only dredge in 
operation in the Ida Valley. 

St, Bathan's. 

Eagle and Oray*$ Sluicing Claim, — No work has been done on this property during the year. The 
claim is, in the meantime, held under protection, awaiting the deepening of the main sludge-channeL 

Scandinavian Water-race Company, Surface HiU (N. Nichobon, Manager). — The various claims 
held by this company comprised a total acreage of 100 acres. Sluicing operations are conducted on 
an extensive scale. An average of twenty men were employed during the year. 

United M. and E, Water-race Company (P. T. O'Regan, Manager). — Area of claim, 24 acres. Nine 
men are employed in this claim, in which sluicing operations are conducted on an extensive scale. 

P, Hanrahan's Sluicing Claim, — This claim is worked by hydraulic sluicing and elevating with 
water rented from the Scandinavian Water-race Company. 

Shamrock Odd-mining Company, Hawkdun Station. — The claims had been sold, and operations are 
being continued on similar lines to heretofere. 

Kildare HiU, St, BathaWs, 

No work has been done here for some time, owing to the sludge-channel not being deep enough 
in the meantime to carry away the tailing?. 

Cambrian^s, 

Shepherds Flat Claim, — This claim and water-race have been rented by the proprietor (Mr. John 
Ewing) to Messrs. P. McCarthy and Gilbert O'Hara, who are working on a small scale. 

Cambrian's Claim, — This water and water-race have also been rented by the proprietor (Mr. John 
Swing) to two small parties — Owen Jones and party and Rees Hughes and party, who are working 
on a small scale. 

R. Jones and Morgan continue ground-sluicing at the Lauder. 

O. Jones and Son are ground-sluicing at Cambrian's. 

Vinegar HiU Hydraulic Sluicing Company, Cambrian^s (T. Morgan, Manager). — Area of claim, 
62]acre8. This company still continues operations at Vinegar Hill. A large body of water under high 
pressure is brought on to the claim, and a considerable amount of material is treated. Since the com- 
mencement of work at this claim the results have not been satisfactory, but recently an improved seam 
of wash has been opened out. Seven men are employed. 



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67 C— 3. 

Fordhatn and Gay^s Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, CambriaWs. — This party continue to work their claim 
on a small scale^ with apparently satisfactory results. 

OanncntkS Alluvial Sluicing Claim, Vinegar Flat, Cambrian^ s, — This claim of 16 acres is the property 
of the Bank of New South Wales, and is worked by Mathew Gkumon« 

Maiakanui. 

Undaunted Ocld-^nining Company, Matakanui (T. C. Donnelly, Manager). — Area of claim, 114 
acres. The mode of working this claun is by hydraulic sluicing and elevating. The company has had 
a successful year. Nine men are employed. 

Tinker's Odd-mining Company, Tinker^s (J. Naylor, Manager). — The operations of this company 
have also been attended with success during the year. Six men are employed in the claim, which is 
worked by hydraulic sluicing and elevating. 

Matakanui Odd-mining Company (H. Norman, Manager). — Area of claim, 45 acres. Gk>od results 
have been obtained from this claim during the year. Seven men are employed. 

J, Symes and Sons* Sluicing Claim^ Matakanui. — The owners still continue sluicing operations 
on the flat below the Matakanui Township. 

Drybread Diggings. 

As all suitable water-supplies are concentrated on Tinker's Gk>ldfield, these digging9 are still aban- 
doned to a few fossickers. 

Devonshire Diggings. 

As at Drybread, these diggings are almost deserted by miners. 

Ophir, 

There is still very little mining in this district, although there are large areas of auriferous ground 
awaiting suitable water-supply. Some ground has recently been taken up in the district for drodging 
purposes. 

Springvale. 

Springvale Sluicing Claim, near Alexandra South (J. (hartley, Manager). — Sluicing operations on 
a small scale are still being carried on at Springvale. 

Dredging. — The Olrig dredge continued to work steadily during the year, and to yield satisfactory 
results. The Chatto Creek dredge has been inactive throughout the year. 

Alexandra South. 

Alexandra Bonanza Gold Dredging and Sluicing Company, QoUoway Flat (J. Matthews, Manager). — 
Ground-sluicing has been carried on during the greater part of the year, but the area worked did not 
3rield large results. From 16 to 18 heads of water are delivered to claim under pressure of 80 ft. vertical, 
the ground averaging 20 ft. in depth. 

Tucker HUl Sluicing Claim, Alexandra South (Rivers and Gartley, Owners). — This claim on 
Tucker Hill has been worked out, and the water-race cut round to Richmond Hill. 

Richmond HUl Sluicing Claim, Alexandra South (Jhxnea Rivers, Owner ; Qeorge Campbell, Manager). 
— Area of claim, 10 acres. This ground-sluicing claun is worked with the water and mining plant trans 
ferred from Tucker Hill. Six men are employed. 

Manorbum Odd-mining Syndicate, Oalloway Station. — A large area of auriferous terrace ground 
is at present held by this syndicate. Two men are engaged prospecting the area by shaft-sinking and 
by driving. Though not at present available, water under suitable pressure could be brought to com- 
mand this ground. 

Odden Bend Odd-mining Company, near Alexandra South. — Shaft-sinking operations on this claim 
were seriously interfered with by floods in the Manuherikia River, which caused a stoppage. Work 
has been resumed, and the claim is now in full working-order. 

Several parties are engaged groimd-sluicing around Blackman's, Conroy's, and other gullies at the 
foot of the Obelisk Range. 

Dredging. — Alexandra may be considered the centre of river-dredging in Otaso. There are six 
dredges in active operation on the Clutha River, in the gorge below Alexandra Bndge, and eighteen 
dredges are at work on the river and in the banks above the bridge. The majority of these dredges are 
on the dividend-pa3dng list. As in the Miller's Flat district, it is noticeable here that the dredges of 
smaller type are being replaced by larger and more efficient machines, with which it is possible to rework 
ground already turned over and extract therefrom profltable returns. The electrical installation 
in connection with the Eamscleugh No. 3 has proved a success, and it is now proposed to equip a second 
dredge with this power at an early date. 

There are also two privately owned dredges at work on the Manuherikia River. 

Clyde. 

Individual mining is practically a thing of the past in this district. About three men are engaged 
in alluvial mining, l^e Shepherd's Flat dredge is at work on the Fraser River. 

Dredging. — There were five dredges on the Clutha River near Clyde working when the river was 
favourable. A further trial will be given to that stretch of the river above the Clyde Bridge, which 
so far has not justified the amount of money expended in placing dredges thereon. 



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C— 3. 68 

CnmiwtL 

A party of Chinamen have obtained good returns for many years from a claim on the banks of the 
Kawaran River, above Cromwell Township. In December, 1904, the claim was abandoned, owing to 
loss of fall for discharge of tailings. Sluicing operations are also conducted on a small scale around 
Lowbum and Quartz Reef Point 

Dreiging,— On the length of river horn Waenga to Cromwell Township there are five dredges 
which|operate during the winter season, while the three dredges owned by the Junction Electric Gkdd- 
dredging Company are now at work on the Kawarau above its confluence with the Clutha River. 
During the past two years, considerable attention has been given to the Clutha Basin, between Low- 
bum and Cromwell. There are now six dredges in active operation in this locality, aU obtaining good 
returns of gold. The ground is deep and heavy to work, and requires machines of an efficiency equal 
to that of the Rise and Shine and Rising Sun dredges. 

Amnocibftfim. 

A. T. AiikerCa Claim.^A ground-sluicing claim of 2 acres, in which two men find employment. 

Crabbe Bras,' CZaim.— This claim is still being worked by ground-sluicing with water brought in 
from Shepherd's Creek in the Wealth of Nations water-race. Three men are employed. 

Oair and Murray's Sluicing Claitn.—Tvro men are employed sround-sluicing in this claim. 

There are several other miners in this locality holding small areas and working wiUi intermittent 
water-supplies. 

Kawarau Oarge: Boberimm^s Terrace, 

Last Chance Claim,— T. Craig holds a claim of 5 acres, on which he is engaged driving out the 
auriferous washdirt. 

Mining on this terrace isjnow almost at a standstill, owing to the patchy nature of the auribrous 
wash and the scarcity of water for sluicing. 

There are several fossickers earning a living in Kawarau (Jorge. 

Dredging, — The stretch of the river for three miles above Bannockbum Bridge over the Kawarau 
River has proved phenominally rich, as proved by the operations of the Cromwell and Electric Gold- 
dredging Company^ s dredges. The Cromwell claims became worked out during the year. 

Cardrona. 

Walter Liltle^s Hydraulic Sluicing Claim^ Cardrona Valley (Ed. Barker, Manager).— Operations have 
been steadily continued during the duicing season with moderate success. Owing to the heavy class 
of material operated on progress is slow. Six men are employed in the claim. 

A. Loft and party have discontinued driving out the wash in the valley above Cardrona Town- 
ship 

Magnus Henderson and party continue sluicing on'Branch Creek. 

E. Barker and party hold a claim on Branch Creole, but have not yet constructed the water-race 
or procured sluicing plant. 

Courtney and Fleming are still sluicing on|Criffel Face. 

There are three dredges at work in this district, two of which are workedjby^O'Brien's application 
of water-power for dredges. 

Luggate. 

There are several sluicing claims in the locality which are worked on a small scale. 

Dredging,— The Albertown dredge, owned and worked by working shareholders with moderate 
means, is the only dredge at work in tUs locality. Knewstubb's Upper Clutha dredge lies sunk above 
Luggate Ferry 

Matatapu, 
McLaren BrasJ* Hydraulic Sluicing and ElewUing Claim. — Sluicing operations are still being carried 
on in this claim with a moderate degree of success. 

Arrcwtown. 
Fealey and Hay Bros.* Sluicing Ctaim^ Arrow River.— Tbjm is the only claim at work in the nei^- 
bourhood of the township. It is worked on Smith's jet principle of elevating material. 

Arrow River. 

Arrow Falls Sluicing Company (J. A. Millar, Manager).— Area of claim 25 acres. The work en* 
tailed in opening out this claim was of considerable magnitude, but operations have been carried beyond 
the gorge into the flat and steady work may now be expected. Progress is, however, retarded by 
occasional floods in the Arrow River. Seven men are employed. 

Bremer's Claim^ Bracken's Oully,—TbiB claim has been worked throughout the year on behalf of 
an Arrowtown S3mdicate, which had purchased it. The claim}has^an area of 2 acres, and is worked 
by ground-sluicing. 

Robert S. Cooper and party. Bracken's Oully,—A ground-sluicing claim of 3 acres. 

Peter Henderson and party. Bracken's OuUy.—k ground-sluicing claim of 4 acres. 

In the Arrowtown district there are a number of fossickers on Whitechapel Flat and at the junction 
of the Arrow and Kawarau Rivers. 



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69 C— 8. 

MaoeUnon. 

Anderson and party^ Eight-mile Hill, — Three men are employed in this sluicing claim, from which 
fair returns are obtained. 

WiUiam Reid and party. Red HiU. — This is a ground-sluicing claim on the terrace above the Arrow 
River. 

There are still a number of fossickers, principally Chinese, on the creeks and in the* gullies around 
this district. 

Glenorchy. 

Valpy Bros.'' Claim, Glenorchy (Head of Lake Wakitipu).,— Three men find employment in this 
hydraubc-sluicing and elevating claim. 

There are several other small claimholders in this district. 

Queenstoum. 
^ Reid and Lee, Ttoelve-mile, Lake WakaUpu, — Sluicing operations have been conducted on the usual 
lines during the year. 

Arthur's Point. 

Arthur's Point Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Company, Arthur's Point, Shotover River. — This 
claim is now beiag worked by James McMullan and party. Area of claim, 10 acres. Five men are 
employed. 

Dredging,— The Wakatipu (}old-dredging Company's dredge (late New Prince Arthur) was in 
operation during the year, but sunk while lying idle during a flood in the Shotover River. 

Loufer Shotover, 

James Tyrell and others, Kawarau i^fver.— Sluicing and elevating operations have been carried on 
during the year, but have been hampered by the heavy drainage from the Kawarau River. As the 
claim is considered a payable one, a proposal is under consideration to abandon sluicing in favour of 
dredging. 

Moonlight, 

Moonlight Sluicing Claims Nos, I and 2, Moonlight Creek, Queen^totm.— These claims are now 
being worked on a small scale by tributing parties. 
There are a few fossickers in this neighbourhood. 

Shotover River, 

The various sluicing claims in this district continue to be worked, with payable results. 

Reisder and McCormack, below Long OuUy, — This claim is situated in the bed of the Shotover River, 
and is worked during the winter season when the river is low. 

Ward and Smith, bdow Long Gully,— -This is also a claim in the bed of the Shotover River, worked 
by the Smith's jet-pump system of hydraulicking. 

Thompson and Robertson, — The proprietors of this claim have persevered for several years in an 
attempt to work the bed of the Shotover River, and, during the season, were well rewarded for their 
efforts. An exceptionally rich patch of gold-bearing wash was struck, yielding close upon 1,000 oz. 
of gold. 

Coulter, Son, and Sainsbury, continue to work their claim below Deep Creek. 

Boomerang Terrace, 

Three Chinamen are sluicing here. 

Blue Jacket Sluicing Claim, Deep Creek (J. S. Collins).— Three men are employed in this claim 
sluicing terrace groxmd during the summer months. In the winter (when the Shotover^River is low) 
the bed of the river is worked by Smith's jet-pump principle. 

B. Sainsbury has a small sluicing claim at Maori Point. 

Davis's Sluicing Claim, Stoney Creek Terrace, Skipper's (W. L. Davis, Owner).— Extensive ground- 
sluicing operations are still carried on in this claim, in which four men are employed. 

Robert Johnstone's Sluicing Claim, Pleasant Creek Terrace, Skipper's,— The owner of this claim does 
not operate on an extensive scale. 

Sorrer^son and Henderson, Pleasant Creek Terrace, Skipper's,— Two men are engaged driving out 
(he wash in this terrace. 

Skipper's Sluicing Company, Londonderry Terrace, Skipper's (John Corbett, Manager).— Sluicing 
has been steadily carried on in this claim throughout the season. The material treated is rough, but 
a considerable amount is sluiced away, with satisfactory results. The tail-race tunnel continues work- 
ing satis&ctorily. 

Stevenson and AspinalTs Sluicing Claim, Skipper's Point.— The owners of this claim continued 
to work with a poor water-supply, but still obtain payable returns. 

Dredging,— The Maori Point dredge continued operations during the year, although hindered by the 
high state of the river and the numerous smaller floods to which the Shotover River is liable. 

Upper Shotover River, 

Smith and Sons' River-bed Claim, above Skipper's Point.— Dunng the summer months work in this 
claim is confined to ground-sluicing on the terrace section. In common with the other river claims 
in this district, the bed of the river is worked by Smith's jet-pump S3rstem of hydraulicking during the 
winter months when the river is low. 

Rogers and Johnston have transferred their mining plant to a claim on Jenkins Terrace. 



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C— 3. 70 

Peet and Helms continue working the bed of the river at the foot of Ballarat Hill, with satisfactory 
results. 

William Palmer, Shotover, has afsmall ground-sluicing claim. 

M(mk*8 Terrace Sluicing Claim, upper Sholaver (J. Lynch, fiianager). — Qround-sluicing operations 
are continued on this terrace during the sluicing season. Four men are employed. 

0. Strahle has a river-bed claim which is worked by Smith's jet-pump system. 

Mank*8 Creek Syndicate, Upper Shotover, — Sluicing has not yet been commenced on this claim. 

Sandhills Hydraulic Company, Upper Shotover (Hamilton and party).— An expensive plant was 
procured, and a water-supply brought in to work a river-beach claim. Four men are employed. 

Davis Bros,^ Claim, Upper Shotover,— This plant is still at work on Guy's Terrace. Three men 
employed. 

William McLeod works a small elevating claim on Sloan's Flat, with moderate success. 

Sunny Terrace Sluicing Claim, Upper Shotover.— The Muddy Creek Sluicing Claim was purchased 
by Mr. H. Mills during the year. The new owner started to develop it on an extensive scale. A large 
amount of material was sluiced away with a good body of water, but the returns obtained were not 
satisfactory. Five men were employed. 

R. Anderson continues to work his sluicing claim on Muddy Creek Terrace, Upper Shotover. 

Dwan, Costelloe, and Cummings, Muddy Creek Terrace. — Three men continue to find employment 
in this ground-sluicing claim. 

Southland. 
Nevis. 

Our Mutual Friend Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Company (Masters and Adie Bros.).— This 
claim continues to be worked on the usual lines with moderate success. Four men are employed. 

Robertson and party^s Hydraulic Sluicing Claim. — Four men find employment in this privately 
owned claim, from which payable returns are obtained. 

Keep-it-dark Gold-mining Company, Galvin^s Terrace. — This property has been idle throughout 
the year. 

Glenore Claim (Rip and Tear), Nevis.— Ab no returns were obtained for money expended and work 
done, this claim is closed down. 

Thomas Shaw, Lower Nevis, has a ground-sluicing claim of 2 acres. 

Robert Ritchie, Lower Nevis, continues to work his claim by ground-sluicing. 

Dredging.— The five dredges in operation in this district continue to work during the sununer season, 
with satisfactory yields of gold. 

Upper Nevis. 

Upper Nevis Sluicing Claim, Cinnabar Flat.— Owing to the poor water-supply, operations are not 
carried on continuously in this claim. 

Joe Parks's Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Upper Nevis.— The results ^obtained from^thiajsluicing 
claim are said to be satisfactory, and the work is carried on in the usual way. 

Edward McMillan's Sluicing Claim, Cameron's Gully, Upper Nevis. — This claim is worked by 
hydraulic sluicing and elevating. Four men are employed. 

McDonald's Hydraulic Sluicing and Elevating Claim, Upper Nevis (R. McDonald, Manager).— 
Mining during the past season has been profitably carried on in the shallow ground. Six men are em- 
ployed. 

G'ConneU and Graham^s Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Upper Nevis.— This privately owned claim 
continues to yield satisfactory returns. Operations are conducted on good lines. Seven men are 
employed. 

Undaunted Sluicing Claim, Upper Nevis (R. Kitto, Manager).— A new water-face was brought in, 
and the sluicing plant transferred to work the upper flat, on which sluicing operations were commenced 
during the past season. It has been found necessary to still further improve the water-supply. 

Dredging. — There is one dredge here, but it has been idle throughout the year. 

Nokomai. 

Lion Hydraulic Sluicing Claim (Hannah P. Soper, Owner, Oarston). — The original company went 
into liquidation, and the claim, plant, and water-rights were purchased by Mrs. Soper. Under the 
new ownership, shallow ground has been worked, but it is intended to attack the deep ground in the 
near future. In view of this, the water-race and sluicing plant are being put in good working-order. 
Six men are employed. 

Nokomai No. 1 Sluicing Claim, Nokomai (J. Robertson, Manager).— There is nothing fresh to report 
in connection with this claim, which continues to be steadily worked on good lines, and to give good 
results. 

Nokomai No. 2 Sluicing Claim, Nokomai. — The ground worked in this claim is shallow and very 
rough, but with the improved water-supply, a large quantity of material is sluiced away during the 
season, and satisfactory results are obtained. 

J. Copland continues to work his terrace claim with overflow water from the Nokomai water- 
race. 

Victoria Gold-mining Company (James France, Manager).— This claim is situated in Victoria Gully, 
a tributary of the Nokomai Creek. Under the present ownership, several improvements have been 
effected in connection with the water-supply. Three men are employed. 

Waikaia. 

Alluvial mining by means of gold-dredging has quite recently been revived in Waikaia Valley. 
Two dredges are at work near the township and eleven lower down the valley. Gold won by dredging 
had exce^ed the returns usually obtained by land dredges in other districts ; as high as 100 oz. of 



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71 



0.— 3. 



gold per week of 140 hotin having been recovered by several of the dredgee on difierent occasions. 
The majority of the claims had been reUably prospected prior to expenditure on dredges. Several 
properties are now being prospected with a view to their being taken up for dredging if proved payable. 

Argyh Hydraulic Sluicing Company, Winding Creek (J. Stewart, Manager). — During the year 
all sluicing operations were suspended and a dredge, to be worked by water-power, is being erected 
on the claim. 

Winding Creek Hydraulic Sluicing Claim, Waikaia, — This property has been purchased by the 
Round £011 Grold-mining Company, Southland. 

Gow^s Creek, Waikaia, — There are a few fossickers in this locality. 

Upper Waikaia and WhUecombe Districts, — There are a few small claimholders scattered over 
this district. 

Gore. 

Alluvial mining in and around this district is confined to dredging. There are two dredges on the 
Mataura River, near Gore, one of which is at work. The total number of dredges on the Waikaka 
dredging-field is twenty-nine, of which number twenty-seven are in active operation, with payable 
results. 

Three new dredges were brought into the district and erected during the year. Powerful up-to- 
date machines are being placed on this ^eld, special attention being paid to providing large bucket- 
capacity with good delivery. This was rendered necessary by the heavy nature of the clay overlying 
the auriferous washdirt. 

Ibbotson's dredge is at work on the Chatton Mining Reserve. 

In the Charlton Valley five dredges have operated durin^the year successfully. As in the Wai- 
kaka field the heavy clay overlying the auriferous washdirt — sometimes to a depth of 10 ft. — hinders 
rapid working of the ground, and is no doubt responsible for loss of gold. 

There are five dredges operating in the Waimumu Valley, with satisfactory results. One dredge 
has been idle throughout the year, and one has been removed from the locality. 



Round Hill. 

Round Hill Gold-mining Company (A. Reynolds, General Manager ; F. Hart, liine-manager). — 
Operations are being steadily conducted. Heavy preliminary works having been successfully over- 
come, the several claims are now fairly well opened out, and the company has recently been placed on 
the dividend-paying list. A large paddock of about 8 acres has been sunk in the flat and the Ourawera 
Stream forced over on to worked groimd^ thus liberating an area on the southern side of the stream 
of about 60 acres of virgin ground, which is all available to the present plant. There are two elevators 
in the paddock. No. 1 elevating 67 ft. 6 in., main ripple run doubled, 70 ft. in length from tip-box, dis- 
charging on to side tables doubled, each 26 ft. by 18 ft. ; forty-eight mats, twenty-four on each side, 
six pens, and four mats to a pen ; then 36 ft. of tail ripples. No 2 elevating 68 ft. 6 in. The tables 
are a duplicate of No. 1, except that the double nm of ripples from tip-box to side tables is 130 ft. in 
length. . At each lift there are a double set of pipes used as pump or dirt pipes alternately as the water 
suits. The pipes are expanded from 13 in. diameter at the bottom to 15 in. to 18 in. at the top, and 
were made in the blaclsBmith's shop on the ground. Elevator jet 4 in. diameter working at 120 lb. 
pressure. A new service pipe-line, 70 chains in length, has been laid down, 42 chains 27 in. diameter, 
and the balance, 28 chains 26 in. diameter, leading from Port's race to the Ourawera. The claim is 
in good working-order and improving, there being more room in the paddock for tailings-dump. The 
old bed of the Ourawera Stream is bared and the shaft of the Sludge Gold-mining Company is exposed 
to view, containing steam pumping-pipes and dredge bucket-ladder of an abortive attempt to win the 
precious metal by that method with the aid of steam. Average depth of ground, 40 ft. ; quantity of 
material treated for the year, 522,720 cubic yards ; average value of ground worked, £1,000 per acre ; 
value of gold, £4 per ounce ; cost of winning gold, £2 17s. 6d. per ounce ; cost per yard in wages, includ- 
ing maintenance of water-races, repairs to plant, working-expenses, management, and salaries, 2d. 
per cubic yard. 

Sketches by Mr. A. Reynolds showing improved hydraulic elevator «* T " piece with centre 
deflector ; also elevator throat-liner as adopted and used by the Round Hill Mining Company, and 
described in my report. (See page 81 G.-8, 1904.) 




Moc/^tiec*, €rvJ^ Z" ^orrvt top 
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Se^dz/orveiL ULtA/aobiorv oT 

/or HlmuatJbor- tktocub Xii'vmr, 
Jtoxj^tL Hill a 3^CS. 



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C— 3. 72 

Oiiraic»era^0oU-i9ifnffi9 Compom^ (J&mes Coulling, Mine-manager). — ^Hydraulic slmcing and elevat- 
ing : Gk>od reeults have been obtained for the year's work, and dividends are declared regularly. 

Orepuki GMfieli$, 

Gk>ld-mining continues to employ practically the same number of men as for several years past. 

As the claims in the immediate neighbourhood of the township are becoming worked out the atten- 
tion of the miners is being diverted in the direction of Pahia and Round Hill. The surface of tlie 
country is heavily overgrown by forest, which renders prospecting more or less difficult, but as the 
limited supply of water becomes available the auriferous nature of the alluvial surface is becoming 
gradually recognised. It is to be noted that gold to the value of 1,000 oz. per acre has been recovered 
on this field. 

Beach-combing. — Sea-beach claims have proved more than usually remunerative duiing the last 
year. 

Waiau River, 

Several small sluicing claims have been maintained on the river-terraces lying to the west of the 
Waiau River mouth. Small prospecting parties have ventured from time to time further west^ but 
the difficulties of travelling and working in dense bush, together with the intermittent nature of food- 
supplies, have militated against success. 

Two men reported the discovery of a rich quartz reef in the bush, but proved themselves unable 
to locate the reef on a second attempt. 

SUwart Idand. 
Treeeder and Ooodger, McFadyen^i Creeks Pegasus, — Ground-sluicing for tin and gold in the old 
creek-bed in the terraces. 

Eraser and Ford^ Pegasus. — Oround-sluicing for tin and gold in the terraces of a bnCnch of 
HcArthur's Creek. 

Preservation Inlet and South-west Coast of Otago. 
A few parties are engaged ground-sluicing upon the mainland and on Coal Island, with varying 
results. 

Accidents. 

hydrauuc and alx.uvial mines. 
Fatal. 

6/4/1904. — Joseph Walker, fossicker, Waitahuna, was found buried under a fall of earth in his 
claim* 

12/4/1904. — John Liitgens, miner, Norwegian Claim, Waitahuna Oully, was killed by premature 
explosion of powder while stemming a charge with an iron scraper as tamping-bar. 

11/6/1904. — Lye How, miner, Fitzmaurioe and Smith's Sluicing Claim, Round HiU, was killed 
by fall of earth from side of tail-race. 

24/9/1904. — George Taylor and Andrew McNab, miners, Roxburgh Amalgamated Sluicing and 
Mining Company's Claim, Roxburgh, were killed by a fall of rock while assisting to repair a break in 
the water-race. 

Nonfatal. 

12/4/1904. — John Larsen, miner, Norwegian Claim, Waitahuna Gully, was severely burnt about 
the face by premature explosion of powder while stemming a charge with an iron scraper as tamping- 
bar. 

22/10/1904. — John Mellor, nozzle-man, Undaunted Gold-mining Company's Claim, Matakanui, 
sustained fracture of two ribs by fall of clay from the face. 

22/10/1904. — William Kenny, sluicer, Scandinavian Water-race Company's Claim, St. Bathan's, 
while inserting scrub behind the elevator uptake pipes, fell a distance of 20 ft. into the elevator well- 
hole,^and sustained fracture of two ribs. 

GOLD-DREDGING. 

At the end of December, 1903, the total number of dredges in Otago and Southland was 200. At 
the end of December, 1904, this number had dropped to 184. During the year there was a decrease 
of 6 working dredges in Otago, and an increase of 3 working dredges in Southland. The total number 
of dredges in Otago was lessened by 13. Of this number, 10 were dismantled and not re-erected. One 
was removed to the West Coast, 1 to Victoria, and another to Southland. In Southland 2 dredges were 
dismantled and not re-erected. On account of the number of dredges for sale the building of new 
dredges in the Otago and Southland Districts has been at a complete standstill. A number of registered 
companies which had been in operation part of the year were liquidated, and, in some cases, the dredges 
were started to work again by new companies. In other cases the dredges were dismantled after sale 
and not re-erected, or were sold for removal to other claims. 

Improvements in dredges have been of a minor nature, chiefly relating to improvements in general 
practice. An appliance to prevent the loss of the buckets and links in case of the pins breaking has 
been patented by Mr. C. L. Watt, consulting engineer, Dunedin. O'Brien's application of hydraulic 
power to dredges has proved successful in districts where water is available under sufficient pressure, 
and modifications of the application of this system are being adopted. Johnson's submerged-jet 
principle of dredging, or, rather, elevating, was tried and proved capable of practical results^ but has 
not been in operation throughout the year. 



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C— 3. 




SHOTOVER QUARTZ MINE AND BATTERY, SKIPPER S POINT, OTAGO. 




MACGEOROE BROS.' NO. 1 DREDGE, WAIKAKA, SHOWING EXTENDED RLTTICE-BOX. THE HEAVY MATERIALS 
ARK SEEN PALLING AT THE FIRST DROP, WHILE THE FINE MATERIALS ARE BEING CARRIED OUT AND 

SPREAD ON THE SURFACE. 

[See also Report of Mr. Warden Cruickshank. 



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Summary of Dredges in Southern Mining District. 



District. 






At 31it Oeeei 


nber. 


Working— 
'^ In Otago 
In Southland 


.. 


.. 


. . 106 
. . 46 


152 


Standing— 

In Otago . . 
In Southland 


.. 


.. 


.. 13 
2 


15 


Removing— 
In Otago 
In Southland 


• • • • 




2 
3 


5 


Dismantlings 
In Otago 
In Southland 


Total . . 




.. 10 
2 


12 
184 


Decrease of working dredges— 

Otago 
Increase of working dredges — 

Southland .. 




.. 


6 
3 




ACCIDBVTS 


and Fatautibs. 








Gk)LD 


-DREDGES. 







Fatal. 

11/1/1904. — John Charles Conroy, fireman, Enfield dredge, Waipori, was found drowned in the 
dredge-paddock. There was no evidence to show how he had got into the water. 

29/2/1904. — Donald Hunter, fireman, New Prince Arthur dredge, Shotover River, Arthur's Point, 
was drowned through falling into the river while attempting to go ashore from the dredge on the coaling- 
line. The dredge had stranded, and the side mooring- lines had carried away owing to flood in the 
river. 

14/5/1904.— Frank Duthie, cadet. New Lafranchi dredge, Cardrona, was found drowned in the 
dredge-paddock. There was no evidence to show how he got into the water. 

9/9/1904. — James King, winchman, New Halfway House dredge, Clyde to Cromwell (Jorge, Clutha 
River, was killed by being struck by a sling of coal which was being lowered from the bank to the dred|^ 
on a wire'rope. 

Non-fatal, 

29/4/1904. — William O'Connell, winchman, Alexandra Lead dredge, Alexandra ; broken rib hj 
falling over one of the hatches. 

23/7/1904. — Donald McDonald, winchman. First Chance dredge. Alexandra, fingers of one hand 
badly crushed while oiling the ladder-lifting gear. 

9/9/1904. — Fred Resta, Ngapara No. 2 dredge, Nevis, bruised leg. While crossing the elevator 
in motion, leg jambed between elevator driving-pinion and the housing. 

26/9/1904. — W. Nicholson, dredgemaster, Moa dredge, Alexandra : Injured head and shoulders 
by trestle supporting coaling-line falUng on him. 

5/11/1904. — W. McVey, winchman, Moa dredge, Alexandra, finger crushed by winch-brake. 

I have, &c., 

E. R. Green, 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Inspector of Mines. 



REPORTS OF WARDENS. 

Mr. H. S. Wardell, S.M. (Acting Warden), Whangarei, to the Under-Secretary for Mines, 

Wellington. 

Sir,— Magistrate's Office, Whangarei, 2nd February, 1905. 

I have the honour to report that in the Puhipuhi Mining District no mining operations are being 
carried on ; the industry appears dead. I have, &c., 

H. S. Wardell,»^S.M., 
The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. j}ro Warden. 



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Mr. Warden Bush, Thames, to the Undbr-Secrbtabt voiL Mines, Wellington/ 
Sib,— Warden's Office, Thames, 5th May, 1905. 

I have the honour to transmit herewith the usual annual report on mining matters within 
the Hauraki Mining District for the year ending the 3^1st December, 1904. 

I regret that I am not in a position to report a general revival all over the field. In some 3)arts 
of it very little mining has been done, simply owing to the results of the operations in hand being so 
unsuccessful, consequently the return of gold produced in these parts has fallen off very much ; but in 
other portions of the field the returns have so increased that, notwithstanding the shrinkage referred 
to, the yield on the whole is annually increasing. This is proved by the returns for the first three months 
of the present year showing an increase of some £70,000 over the same period of last year. 

The Kapanga Mine at Coromandel, which may be termed the oldest mine on the Peninsula, no longer 
exists in its former condition, the machinery connected with it having been removed and sold, and 
the mine abandoned by its former proprietors. A small portion of the old area is, however, still held 
by a few persons who took it up after the old company relinquished their holding. 

The Waiotahi Mine at the Thames, a small property which has been a dividend-payer for years, 
has excelled itself this year owing to its good fortune in unearthing some good ore, from which very rich 
stone has been obtained, thereby materially increasing the returns from this mine. It is to be hoped 
the ore at present being worked is there in a large quantity, and that the find may lead to others in 
other parts of the field. The industry here requires some rich discoveries to give it new life. 

The recent boring operations have not proved of much help in indicating the location of^any new 
eef-system at the lowest depths to which they were prosecuted. 

Various old mining companies have become defunct, and the properties held by them have been 
acquired by a syndicate of persons represented by Mr. H. H. Adams. These gentlemen have subdivided 
these properties into smaller holdings, and locally floated companies are being worked by this syndicate 
to the best of their ability. The properties referred to are the Moanataiari, the May Queen, the Al- 
bumia, the Eclipse, the Mahara Royal, the Saxon, the Golden Belt, and the Tairua Broken Hills. These 
properties^are all being worked by the syndicate already mentioned. It is to be hoped these enter- 
prising gentlemen will presently be successful in unearthing some really good mines. 

The dry season has proved very trying to the up-country mining operations. The want of water 
in the Ohinemuri River has been much felt by all the companies in that locality, and their crushing 
operations have, in consequence, been retarded to some extent, some of the reduction-works having 
been compelled to hang up half of their crushing machinery though in a position to supplement their 
water-power with steam. This has been a great drawback to several of the active- working mines, and 
should such dry seasons occur frequently, the want of water caused thereby will interfere considerably 
with the mining industry of this district. 

Waihi. — Mining activity still continues in this portion of the district, the number of claims having 
increased from fifty-eight to sixty-eight since my last report, additional areas amounting to 1,200 
acres having been applied for during the year. A considerable stir was caused about July last in conse- 
quence of the Waihi Extended Company finding a reef in their property and the Grand Junction Com- 
pany also securing their reef at a lower level and proving it to contain gold of good value. These 
discoveries have raised the hopes of the community in some measure, and caused them to take greater 
interest in mining than was being taken previously. These finds naturally have made things look 
brighter in this locality than they have done for some time past. The Waihi Company are also finding 
their reefs improving, and becoming more valuable at increasing depths. 

The Waihi Consols and the Waihi South Companies have been endeavouring (with the assistance 
of the Diamond Drilling Company, with whom they entered into contracts to bore) to locate some one or 
other of the lodes being worked by the Waihi Company, but so far the boring operations have not 
resulted in any new discoveries being made. 

The Waihi Beach Company are sinking with a view to pick up the reef kno\vn to exist injtheir 
property, and are making steady progress. 

The future prospects of Waihi appear to be brighter than eVer. The population is steadily increasing 
as the different mines are employing more labour. In consequence of this, there is a great demand 
for residence-sites, and those in the township and its near proximity are practically now all taken up. 

The Waihi Gold-mining Company have carried on their operations very vigorously during the 
past year, having eniployed more men than previously in connection with their works and increased 
the output of ore with a corresponding increase of bullion. The prospects of this company still con- 
tinue to improve. As the workings go deeper the reefs appear to get larger and to be of greater value, 
and as the company are only working on 150 acres of their ground, out of the 850 acres they hold, they 
should, supposing the balance of their area is as highly auriferous as that at present being worked, have 
a long period of prosperity before them. They have crushed 29,000 tons more quartz during this 
year than last ; the total number being 259,978 tons, which produced £673,101 worth of gold, 
as against £650,687 recovered during the previous twelve months. During the year 1,236 men have 
been employed on this company's mining operations. The total amount of work done in feet is 20,511, 
which, if placed in a straight line, would reach three miles. This work consists chiefly of driving, 
crosscutting, winze-sinking, and shaft-sinking. Many additions have been made to the crushing plants, 
both at Waihi and Waikino. The company's mill at Waikino in particular is becoming most extensive, 
and presents a busy and thriving appearance. 

The Waihi Grand Junction Company have been developing the eastern portion of their property, 
with very satisfactory results. The work consists of 658 ft. of driving, 567 ft. of sinking, and 1,230 ft. 
have been removed in rises. During the year the company employed thirty-four wages-men and 
twenty- two on contract- work, besides a number excavating the site for the proposed battery shortly 
to be erected. Driving on the No. 2 level was continued to the boundary of the Waihi Extended 



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Claim, and communioation effected with that company'^ ground, good ventilation being thtw seemed 
for both mines. At the No. 2 level the Waihi Company's Martha Lode was intersected, and found to 
be 28 ft wide. The Waihi Company's No. 2 reef was also cut, and proved to be 7 ft. wide. The values 
of both reeb were fully maintained for the whole distance driven. An electricaMighting plant has been 
installed, and sevend buildings which were necessary have been completed. During the year the 
company purchased the forty-stamper mill which was used for a comparatively short time by the Kauri 
Freehold Gold Estates Company (Limited) at Opitonui. This mill has been taken down and conveyed 
to Waihi, where it is to be ^re-erected. The prospects of this company seem very encouraging at 
present. 

The Waihi Extended Gold-mining Company (Limited) : About the middle of last year this company 
was fortunate in unexpectedly finding the reef they were looking for at the 500 ft. level, which proved 
to be 18 ft. wide. The values of the reef arc, however, very low, and it has been decided to sink another 
135 ft in the hope that at that level the reef upon which the Grand Junction Company are working 
may be struck. The reef was driven on for a distance of 100 ft., and a winze sunk to a depth of 40 ft 
If the reef should turn out to contain gold in payable quantities the company will have a valuable 
property. Twelve men have been employed on this company's ^ound during the year. 

The Waihi Gladstone Gold-mining Company (Limited) : This company have fitted up a cyanide 
plant, and commenced treating the ore obtained from the ground, but so far have failed to secure payable 
results. They are still experimenting, and hope before long to be able to extract the gold in sufficient 
quantities to recompense them for the labour and expense they have gone to. 

The Waihi Beach Gold-mining Company (LimitcKl) have been engaged sinking a shaft, and daring 
the year a distance of 100 ft. was completed. It is proposed to continue sinking to 265 ft., and then 
drive at the 250 ft. level, the estimated length of crosscut required to get the reef being about 190 ft. 
from the shaft. While sinking, a small leader about 18 in. wide was met with. A winding plant and 
a 14-hor8e-power engine have been erected on the ground. 

The Waihi ConsoUdated (}old-mining Company (Limited) : Th-s company have been prospecting 
by boring for a considerable time, having entered into a contract with the Diamond Drilling Company 
to bore to a depth of 1,200 ft. After reaching 600 ft. the country became so difficult that the drill 
would not work satisfactorily, and operations had to be suspended. Nothing further has been done 
up to the present, although the company are trying to arrange matters so that further boring may be 
proceeded with. The drilling company's operations on this field have not altogether been a great 
success, nor have the borings so far been of much advantage to the field. 

The Waihi Consob Gk)ld-mining Company (Limited) : This is another company who have endea- 
voured to find a reef on their ground with the assistance of the drilling company. The latter company 
have been engaged boring on the company's Haines Morrin Section to a depth of 1,225 ft. without 
striking a reef. Arrangements are again being made to put down another bore, about 100 ft. south of 
the former, to a depth of 1,000 ft. This is all the work that has been done on this company's ground 
during the year ; the other portions of the area held by them have been protected. 

The Waihi South Gold-mining Company (Limited) : This company's property has been under 
protection for a considerable period, but a contract has just been let to the Diamond Drilling Company 
to put down a bore, and the work will be taken in hand immediately. The chairman of directors has 
recently left for Home, and it is expected he will be successful in raising capital for development 
purposes. 

The Pride of Waihi Gold-mining Company (Limited) have employed two men on the Waihi 
Extended property during the year in accordance with an arrangement entered into with the latter 
company to allow the former to use its workings to facilitate the operations of the Pride of Waihi ; so 
far, however, the results of this arrangement have not disclosed anything of a startling character. 

The Waihi Alma Gold-mining Company (No Liability) : So far no work has been done by this 
company on their ground ; efforts are being made to raise capital in England with which to develop 
these claims, but so far nothing definite has been done. 

The Martha Hill Extended, the Martha North, the Waihi Reefs, the Waihi Proprietary, the Waihi 
Standard, the Three Cheers, the Romulus, the Remus, the Waihi East, and the six claims held by Mr. 
Walker have been protected for various periods. 

Besides the area held by the Waihi Beach Company, the only claims outside of Waihi are the Waihi 
Monument Nos. 1, 2, and 3. 

. The Waihi Queen, the Queen Alexandra, and the Waihi Main Leads : Only a little prospecting- 
work has been done on these. 

Karangahake.—The New Zealand Crown Mines Company (Limited) : The bulUon returns of this 
company have decreased very much, I am sorry to say, during the past year, mainly due to the disap- 
pointing nature of the developments in the lowest levels, and the general f alling-off in ore- values through- 
out the mine. The amount realised was £52,642, as against £80,468 the previous year. In conse- 
quence of this a thorough examination of the mine, on the Unes suggested by the general manager at 
Karanghake, has been made by a mining engineer expressly sent for the purpose of reporting upon 
those suggestions, and to furnish other information as might be deemed of advantage. After examining 
the whole mine this gentleman in the main concurred in the recommendations and suggestions of the 
general manager, with the result that instructions have been received to vigorously carry out the 
exploratory works suggested, and that is now being done. So far, the indications of the new works 
are very promising, some fairly good ore having been met with, and should this prove to be of any 
considerable extent, the mine will probably be as successful very shortly as it was in former years. 
It was at one time thought that the crushing plant would have to be shut down, but so far the necessity 
for doing this has not arisen, although the shortase of water in the Ohinemuri River—caused by the 
very long spell of dry weather — prevents tlie mill from working to its full capacity, indeed, seldom 



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C— 3. 




GENERAL VIEW OF KARANOAHAKE. SCHOOL OF MINES BUILDING IN THE FOREGROUND. 




BRIDGE AT ENTRANCE TO MAIN TUNNEL, NEW ZEALAND CROWN MINES, KARANGAHAKE. 

GORGE. 



WAITAWHBTA 



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96 C-rrf 

d^ it use more ihsax thirty, ^tampe, instead of the full oomplement of sixty. The directors of the 
company consider the situation critical, and do not in any way desire to minimise the gravity of tlie 
position. The work directed to be undertaken was immediately put in hand, and is being prosecuted 
as rapidly as possible, and the discoveries already made are most encouraging ; the ore met with is of 
good value, the quantity of it has, however, yet to be ascertained. At this stage it is difficult to make 
any prediction as to what will be the result of the work now in progress, but so far as it has proceeded 
it is very promising. The manner in which the ore- values in both the upper and lower levels of this 
mine simultaneously fell ofi in value is another instance of the disappointments of mining. In country 
such as that worked by this company, where faults and dislocations in the reef system are so common, 
there would be nothing surprising to find values making again after the barren zone had been passed 
through. This temporary misfortune which has overtaken the mining operations of this company 
has, of course, had the efiect of reducing the number of employees, a little over a hundred men only 
being employed at present ; but should the present explorations turn out as anticipated, and circum- 
stances warrant it, the number will soon reach that formerly engaged on this property. I hope ere 
making my next annual report this mine will not only have regained its former prosperous position 
but will have surpassed it. 

The Talisman Consolidated Company (Limited) : This company carries on operations at Karanga- 
hake, and have acquired the whole of the property of the Woodstock Company (also at Karangahake), 
it being intended to work the two properties together. During the year No. 8 level was driven to a point 
1,010 ft. south of the shaft. The ore-sheet in the Bonanza section was intersected early in the year 
by this level, and considerable development- work has since been done on the same, with favourable 
results. On No. 10 level main drive, the drive has been extended to a point 701 ft. south of the shaft. 
This level has also intersected the Bonanza ore-shoot, showing a larger reef, with payable values. The 
west crosscut from No. 10 level (toward the Talisman Extended ground) is now in 638 ft. without 
cutting anything of value. On No. 11 level, the north drive has been pushed forward 145 ft. from the 
shaft, and has reached the boundary of the ore-shoot worked in the upper levels. The south drive, 
which is 289 ft. from the shaft, has reached the boundary of the ore-shoot, and is being continued until 
it gets into the Bonanza Section. The shaft is now down 183 ft. below river-level, having been sunk 
and timbered from No. 10 level, a distance of 350 ft., during the year. It is intended to continue 
driving No. 8 level until it reaches the Dobb Section. No. 10 level will be advanced until it touches 
the south boundary of the Bonanza ore-shoot. In the shaft a station has been cut for No. 12 level 
178 ft. below river - level, and driving north and south from same will shortly be in progress. As 
soon as the drives on No. 12 level are fairly away from the shaft, sinking will be resumed. The general 
outlook for the current year's work is much more favourable than it was a year ago. During the vear 
1904 the mill crushed 44,888 tons of ore, yielding buUion valued at £84,826 10s. 6d. 

The Comstock United : This property is in the same condition as it was this time last year. The 
owner is still hopeful of unearthing something payable, which he says is there. Only about two men 
have been employed at work on this property during the year. 

The Shotover Special Claim : This claim has again been taken up by Messrs. Miller and Dilamore« 
who have been prospecting the ground with some success. 

The Gorge, Caledonia, and the Caledonia Extended Special Claims at Owharoa are at present 
under protection. 

The Rising Sun : The owners of this property have manfully stuck to this ground for several 
years without so far receiving any profit and with periods of protection carrying their mining opera- 
tions on from point to point, hoping for ultimate success later on. A considerable amount of money 
has been spent on this claim — no less a sum than £3,222 7s. 6d. A fairly good quantity of undergroimd 
work has been carried out since the ground was taken up. The property has always been held by local 
people, who will, it is to be hoped, shortly meet with some reward for their enterprise and pluck. 

Wailekauri. — The Waitekauri Gold-mining Company (Limited). — Golden Cross Section : Boring 
operations have been carried on from No. 7 level, the borehole was continued from the No. 2 crosscut 
for a distance of 810 ft. The country penetrated wafi similar to that existing in No. 7 level, as proved 
by the crosscuts. The hole had to be cased, and, from the unsettled nature of the ground, cemented, 
in several places. Veins of calcite were met with, but no indications of the existance of any body of ore, 
such as was found in Nos. 5 and 7 levels. At 800 ft. a harder rock was met with, somewhat brittle. 
This hole failed to locate any continuation of the reef system. Two other holes failed to disclose any- 
thing tangible, and it was decided to remove the boring machinery to the surface and continue pro- 
specting from there. The first hole was prosecuted to 1,100 ft. without any ore-body being met with. 
It may be necessary to abandon this hole and put down another from the surface. Other operations 
have been carried on on various sections of this property, but without any good results. On the old 
Waitekauri Section prospecting-work has been carried on. As a result, a block was opened up above 
the Queen level, which produced 1,652 tons of ore, which gave bullion valued at £4,612. Prospecting 
is being carried out above the South Level. There is a rumour afloat that this company intends dis- 
continuing operations on these properties. An average of nineteen men have been employed during 
the year. 

The New Zealand Jubilee Grold-mining Company (Limited) : The area held by this company is 
161 acres. During the past twelve months these properties have been under protection, though an 
average of ten men have been employed during the last six months in development- work. An endeavour 
is now being made to raise further capital in London for the purpose of sinking below the present low 
level, with a view to test the mine at a greater depth. 

The Huanui Claim : This is now held by a syndicate. Two men are employed in opening up and 
testing the reef at No. 2. level, from which encouraging prospects were obtained. The reef is, however. 



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very irregular in uze» varying from 1 ft. to 3 ft. in width. An option has be^n taken over ^e (SoUioi 
Gross battery, which it is^lntended to remove to the claim. Thb looks as if the owners of the property 
have some faith in its future. 

The Scotia Claim : This b another old claim, recently taken up by a sjmdicate who are'^prospectuig 
it, and have succeeded in discovering a small leader from which some rich stone was obtained. The 
leader is only about 3 in. thick. The amount of ore for milling is limited. Two men have been^^^em- 
ployed on these works. 

The Maori Land Claim : Another claim worked by a syndicate. A small reef, var3dngrfrom 18 in. 
to 3 ft., has been cut, but so far no gold has been seen in it. Two men have been employed. The 
May Bell and the Eclipse Falls have employed two men each during the year, but nothing of importance 
has been found in either. 

Ohinemuri River, — Messrs. Brown and Thompson own several river claims, which comprise a con- 
siderable area in the bed of the Ohinemuri River, extending from Waihi to Paeroa. A plant was erected 
near Waihi at considerable cost to treat the tailings from the bottom of the river. Experiments were 
made, but the working-results were not up to expectation, and alterations in the machinery became 
necessary, which has had the effect of delaying larger and continuous returns being made. The pro- 
prietors, however, are satisfied that they have now discovered the exact kind of plant required to treat 
the tailings successfully. To enable them to make the necessary alterations and additions to the 
machinery, it became incumbent upon them to raise further capital, and Mr. Brown, one of the owners, 
is at present in England for that purpose. The tests already made have demonstrated that bullion 
in sufficient quantities can be recovered to make the undertaking remunerative. This is quite a new 
industry on this field, and, should the venture realise expectations, it is possible river-mining may become 
a favourite occupation. 

Komata. — The Komata Reefs Gold- mining Company have been actively engaged throughout the 
year in their operations, a great amount of development- work having been carried out during that 
period. This is one of the properties which has consistently added to our gold-product during the 
past year. The year's work has resulted in 15,800 tons of quartz being put through the mill, which 
yielded bullion of the value of £32,559 17s. 3d. There is every prospect of this mine continuing to con- 
tribute its proportion of gold during the current year. 

There are one or two other claims in existence in this locality upon which some prospecting-works 
have been carried on, but nothing of importance has been discovered. Some of these claims, however, 
are tenaciously held, the owners evidently being of the opinion that something worth having may be 
discovered in the future. 

Hikutaia. — The new Maratoto : This property was idle for a considerable time, but was purchased 
by the present company some six months ago. This company put through 100 tons of tailings, result- 
ing in 383 oz. of bullion, valued at £90 Is. 2d., which is considered very satisfactory, so much so, that 
it has been resolved to add agitators to the reduction plant, which will be the means of materiallv 
increasing the extraction. Six men have been employed on this property. 

The Waimangu Claim is now held by a company. A trial crushing of 222 lb. of stone was made 
at the Thames School of Mines, which yielded 133 oz. of bullion, valued at £82. Many persons think 
this property may later on become prominent. 

Te Aroha, — When the last report was written certain properties which were then owned and 
worked by Mr. Hardy have since been taken over by a limited-liability company, and are now owned 
and worked by the Hardy's Mines (Limited). This company commenced operations in April last year, 
and a great many extensions and improvements have since been made. The capacity of the water-race 
has been nearly doubled, five tunnels have been enlarged and retimbered, earth-courses have been replaced 
by fluming, and trestling has been strengthened. The battery and premises have been much enlarged 
by additional buildings for concentrating, &c., and eight of the latest-type vanning-machines, ten 
stampers, electro plates, hoppers, store-rooms, and tramway to the main line added. The county 
tramway has been acquired on lease from the Piako County Council, and the sum of £360 is being 
expended in improving the same. At the mines, 1,500 ft. of 6 in. piping is being laid in the Premier 
Gully, giving 300 ft. of fall. The power obtained will be used for rock-drills, ventilating, forge-fans, 
and hoisting-machine. A considerable amount of driving and rising has been done. The lowest level 
of the whole property in the Colonist ground — giving access to the Premier New Find Sections — ^has 
been extended, and the reefs therein driven upon. The stone in this level, as well as in the upper level, 
is opening up well, and a large supply of ore is stacked for treatment. A trial has been made of the 
surface ore in the Premier outcrop (taken for a width of 20 ft.), 250 tons of stone having produced two 
hundred and thirty pounds' worth of bullion and fifty pounds' worth of concentrates. Further work 
will be done later on when conditions for milling and transport are more favourable ; in the meantime 
all available money '\s being expended upon the lowest level, where a large block of sulphide-ore has been 
discovered. A noticeable feature is its greater richness as the workings get deeper. The upper level 
show four parts of silver to one of gold in the concentrates, whereas the low level shows two and a hal 
parts of silver to one of gold. With the percentage of copper it is claimed that the assay value of thu 
bullion is £29 per ton. The next crushing will prove the value of the ore from both the upper and lower 
leveb, and have an important bearing upon the future operations. At present the outlook is exceed- 
ingly good. A sum of £9,000 has been spent in labour and material. An average of twenty-eight 
men have been employed. 

The Cadman Claim has been worked by a small party of owners, with fair results. A company has 
recently been formed, and it is anticipated some capital will now be available to further develop the 
mine. 

The Success Special Claim : This claim has been worked by the licensee, and trial crushings are 
said to have been satisfactory. 



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87 C— 8. 

There are two other claims in existence— viz., the Tui Silver-mines and the Kia Ora, both of which 
are under protection ^The area held under mining licenses in this portion of the district^totab 563 
acres. 

Coromandd.^ln this portion of the district mining during the past year has afforded no excitement. 
No new finds of a sensational nature have been made, consequently there is very little activity in mining. 
What is required is a real good discovery which would infuse new life to those engaged in seeking for 
the precious metal. Before any revival can be expected, a find on a fairly large scale will be necessary. 
Mo$t of the former bullion-producing mines have not been as successful as they were a year or two ago. 
More attention has, however, been paid to prospecting in the out-districts, and it is possible some new 
discovery may be made which will have the effect of restoring prosperity to thisjportion of the district 
at any moment. 

The Kauri Block : The rich surface patches in this locality apparently have been exhausted, and 
the cessation of pumping operations at the Old Hauraki shaft precludes work in it being carried on, 
or at the adjacent mines at the lower levels. It appears the several companies concerned cannot 
arrive at an amicable arrangement, and it is difficult to suggest a remedy. The establishment of a drain- 
age-area with a board of management might meet the case if there could be a guarantee of several 
companies working for a period sufficiently long to recoup the cost of necessary pumping plant and pay 
the expenses of pumping. In consequence of the water rising and flooding the worlangs of the Old 
Hauraki, the Bunker's IBll and the Hauraki Freehold Companies have been working entirely near the 
surface during the past year, with the result that little gold has been won. The Old Hauraki, however, 
crushed 171 tons of ore for a yield of 315 oz. of gold, valued at £953. 

The Bunker's Hill Company had several small but satisfactory returns prior to the stoppage of the 
pumps, and it is reported that rich gold was left in sight when the water rose and drove the men out 
of the workings. 

The Hauraki Freeholds was not so much affected by the stoppage of the Hauraki pumps, and during 
last year several payable yields were recorded, as well as a considerable amount of development-work 
carried on, but latterly the water difficulty has been a great block to gold-production. 

The Oolden Pah has been worked entirely by tributers for a considerable period, with varying 
results. This claim is at present protected. 

The Hauraki No. 2 Company have struggled on in a small way without tangible results. 

In the Belle Vue Mine a considerable amount of prospecting has been accomplished, and several 
tributers are at present employed on the property. 

The Tokatea Range has been very quiet of late. The Royal Oak Company's Mine has, however, 
been a steady gold-producer, and has employed a large staff of men. This property is one of those 
worked by Mr. H. H. Adams's syndicate. 

The Harbour View Company has been engaged in putting in a lengthy crosscut to admit of getting 
under the chutes of gold worked in the upper levels in times past, and it is hoped success will reward 
the enterprise displayed. 

The Golden Spark Company have been working away steadily and had several small crushings 
during the year, but so far the lower levels have not proved as rich as the surface portions of the mine. 

The Tokatea Consols Mine, owned by an English company, has latterly become a steady gold- 
producer as the result of development-works carried out in the early part of last year and of careful 
management. 

ifiie Monte Christo Claim (formerly the Queen of the North) has been worked in a small way, and 
several small crushings have been obtained. 

Ill the Ruby Mine a very considerable amount of development- work has been carried on, and the 
property is now well opened up. Attention is being directed to the smaller lodes at the present time, 
from which a parcel of ore was recently treated. 

The main Tokatea reef traverses the Harbour View and Ruby Mines and thence across country 
to the Success Mine, and an effort is being made to form a prospecting association to prove the value 
of this enormous ore-body. There are many who believe if this is good enough to work it will prove 
a new era in mining for Coromandel ; there is an unlimited supply of ore, and as it is known to carry 
a little gold it is well worthy of attention. 

Cabbage Bay.— This portion of the district has been neglected of late, the only mines working there 
being the Austral and the White Star. There is a little prospecting being carried on towards Mata- 
mataharakeke. On the White Star two men have been employed for the greater part of the year. 
Mining is slow on this ground, owing to the hardness and the smallness of the leader, but nevertheless 
from 1 ton 5 cwt. of stone 27 oz. of gold of the value of £75 was secured. 

Kennedy Bay has received some little attention at the hands of prospectors, and rich stone is occa- 
sionally found. A new find is reported by Cleaver and Sweeney upon a branch of the Omoho Creek. 
Several claims have in consequence been applied for, and development-works have been commenced 
in the Lena Special Claim ; but no mining of any importance founded on these discoveries has been 
produced during the year. 

Mercury Bay, — The Kapowai Mine is owned and worked by Mr. O'Connor, of Gimitown. In the 
early part of the year 45 tons of ore was crushed, which yielded 38 oz. 16 dwt. of gold. This convinced 
the owner that the property could be made remunerative, and measures were taken to construct a self- 
acting tramway with a view to save expense in getting the quartz to the mill. As a result of this wise 
action 485 tons was treated during the last four months of the year, producing 474 oz. of gold valued 
at £1,087 17s. 4d., a very satisfactory state of affairs which may at any time develop into something of 
much greater value and cause considerable mining activity in this locality. 

The Big Beetle : This mine was worked for the first seven months of the year by a company, but 
as it could not be made to pay expenses, protection had to be resorted to. More recently the mine and 



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battery were let to a party of tributers, who, judging from the appearance of the workings and the 
nature of the returns secured, are of opinion that they can make wages. Two hundred and three tons 
of ore were put through the mill, which produced 280 oz. 16 dwt of gold, valued at £716 17s. Three 
men have been employed. 

Kuaotunu. — The Waitaia Mines (Limited) : During the year this property has been steadily worked, 
the output being 1,119 tons of quartz ^delding 2,033 oz. of gold valued at £6,063, this being an increase 
of £1,526 on the last year's production. Twenty-one men have been employed. 

The Handsworth Mine : Two men are still employed on this claim, but the results for the year 
have not been as good as they were in the former one ; however, the owner is sanguine of better success 
shortly. 

The Otama Mine : This property, which adjoins the Handsworth, has been worked during the year 
with three men. Some very rich stone was secured in the low level, and it was expected that a payabk 
block was being opened up, but in rising a disappointment was met with owing to the gold not carrying 
up as good on the level. One hundred and eleven tons of ore was treated for 160 oz. 19 dwt. of gold, 
valued at £410 lOs. 9d. 

The Great Mercury Mine : Two men are all that are at present employed on this mine. The worics 
undertaken during the year have all proved disappointing, and so far nothing satisfactory has resulted 
from the labour e2q>ended, although 250 ft. of driving has been done in very hard country. 

Thames,— The New Moanataiari Gold-mining Company (Limited) : The new Moanataiari Mine 
was formerly part of the old Albumia, but is now worked by a separate company, called the New Moana- 
taiari. The main work in this mine for the past year has been opening up and prospecting near the 
shaft on the Cambria Lode. At the 400 ft. level very good prospects were met with, payable ore being 
found in a winze sunk 65 ft. A large quantity of ore was broken out from about this winze, and crushed 
at the company's battery. After working for some time it was decided to put in a low level, which wiH 
enable the reef to be worked at a greater advantage. Driving is being carried on on the Cambria Reef 
westwards to where there is a block of untried ground on the dip of the Waiotahi and Prince Imperial 
Lodes. 

The Kuranui-Caledonian Gold-mining Company (Limited) : During the year this mine has been 
worked mainly by tributers, only five wages-men being employed. The tributers took out some nice 
stone from the several leaders worked on. These leaders all bend towards the Cambria Lode, and tUs 
fact, coupled with the find in the Waiotahi Mine adjoining, has enabled the company to reconstruct and 
raise sufficient capital to put in a crosscut from No. 4 level 120 ft. below the Waiotahi No. 4 level. The 
crosscut will be driven 600 ft., and connection for air made by means of a winze which is now being 
sunk from the Red Queen shaft. Strong colours of gold have been seen in this winze. When this work 
is completed there is every reason to believe that the company will have a good payable block of nound, 
A borehole was sunk at the mouth of the Long Drive tunnel to a depth of 1,500 ft., butjnothing{o^ny 
importance was discovered. 

Old Albumia Gold-mining Company (Limited) : In this mine the main work has been the extension 
of the Moanataiari tunnel, which has been extended 710 ft. The kindly nature of the quartz met with 
in the No. 1 and No. 2 reefs induced the company to drive on them and send some 130-odd tons to the 
battery, but it did not turn out as well as was expected and driving the long tunnel was resumed, the 
driving of which to a position beneath where a good nm of gold-bearing ore was met with in the Albumia 
some years ago was the main object for which the company was formed. 

The Victoria Mine : Tributers worked this mine for the greater part of the year, but did not do 
very well. Lately the directors decided to do some work on the Mariner's Lode, but up to the end 
of the year nothing had been discovered of a payable nature. A borehole sunk on the foreshore to a 
depth of 1,016 ft. went almost wholly through broken country, and it was decided to cease boring. 
It was intended to bore on other parts of the ground, but the proposal has not been given effect to. 

The Kuranui Mine : Six men have been employed continuously on this ground opening up the 
Tributer's Lode and working on the leaders in the Shellback tunnel, but nothing payable has been 
found. 

The Fame and Fortune Mine : Eleven tributers have been employed in working on the various 
leaders, but were not very successful. 

The West Coast, BaUarat, and some other small claims have been worked in the vicinity, but 
nothing of any consequence has been discovered. I learn that the owners made a fair wage, and are 
content to continue working their respective properties. 

The Nonpareil Mine : Tributers only have been employed m tlus mine, working on the Wade and 
Liverpool Boys Reefs. They treated 150 loads of quartz for a return of £645 10s. 3d. 

The Waiotahi Mine : The prospects of this mine improved greatly during the last month of the year. 
When opening out a chamber at the back of No. 4 level, rich ore was met with. A crosscut was driven 
in an easterly direction for the purpose of intersecting the Waiotahi main reef, and to connect with a 
winze and thus supply air. About 80 ft. from the chamber the hanging-wall of the reef was stmdc, 
and found to contain very rich stone in the mineralised portion. The reef varies from 15 ft. to 20 ft 
in thickness. This discovery, if it proves a payable chute and not a patch, will have a great effect on 
the prosperity of the place ; in fact the closing days of the year were marked with a feeling of hopefulness 
not experienced for a good many years. 

The New Saxon Gold-mining Company (Limited) : The New Saxon Mine is composed of part of 
the May Queen Hauraki and the Cardigan. Work has been going on from the Saxon shaft in the Cardi- 
gan Section on a leader about 8 in. in thickness. Gold has been seen frequently when breaking down, 
but as yet no crushing has taken place, so that the value of the general dirt cannot be obtained. The 
manager is confident that it will prove payable. From other parts of the mine 221 tons was treated, 
and 138 oz, 7 dwt. obtained, valued at £339 10s. 



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89 C— 3. 

The New May Queen Grold-mining Company (Limited) : This property consists of the balance of 
the May Queen Hauraki. The company has commenced to repair the No. 3 level on the No. 4 lode 
for the purpose of connecting with the old May Queen shaft, and thus providing ventilation. When 
this has been accomplished a drive will be put in easterly to cut the leeh in the St. Hippo Section. When 
the water has been reduced low enough, extensive works will be carried out in opening up blocks of 
ground on the No. 4 and North-west lodes. The future of this mine depends to a great extent on the 
result of working operations of the Hauraki pumping plant. 

The May Queen Extended €k>ld-mining Company : For the greater part of the year operations were 
confined to the Marion Reef, and a considerable amount of driving and stoping done. The ore won not 
proving payable, work was stopped for a time. The prospects met with in the New Una Mine adjoining 
induced the management to drive a crosscut along the botmdary a distance of 150 ft. The small reef was 
cut and a few pounds of picked stone obtained. The prospects met with justify the manager in coming 
to the conclusion that he has a payable block of ground to work out. 

The New Una Gold-mining Company (No Liability) : The low-level tunnel has been driven on in 
an easterly direction, with the object of intersecting the Loyalty Lode. A lode-formation showing gold 
was met with 690 ft. from the entrance to the tunnel. This lode was worked northerly, and twenty-five 
loads of quartz and 501b. of specimens obtained, which, when crushed, yielded 89 oz. 4 dwt., value 
£224 2s. 6d. A drive was put in on the formation 125 ft., and a rise 115 ft. put up. A strong body of 
water was met with and work had to be discontinued. The main drive was then extended through 
the main slide, and a reef 18 in. in thickness cut on the other side. This lode was driven on both north 
and south, but payable ore was not found in sufficient quantities. By arrangement with the May 
Queen Extended Company work was commenced from the Adelaide tunnel in their ground. This 
work is now going on. In the May Queen Extended ground (on the boundary) encouraging prospects 
were met with, gold being frequently seen in the stone. 

The Arrindell Syndicate (Limited) : This is a Scotch company, and is working the late Gloucester 
and Oeorge TumbuU Claims. A five-stamp battery with three berdans has been erected, and a water- 
race and tramway constructed connecting the battery with the mine. Development-works are in 
progress, and it is intended to commence crushing in a short time. 

The Golden Drop Claim : The owners met with excellent prospects in a winze sunk on a leader, 
and intend to put in a low level and open up a block of ground which they have every reason to believe 
will be payable. 

Very little has been done in the Fortuna and Claremont Claims this year. 

The Mascotte Mine, Otanui, has been worked by a small syndicate, who are engaged in sinking a 
shaft for the purpose of proving the lode at depth. Grood gold was got in the upper levels some few 
years ago. Water considerably impeded the work of sinking, and a small pump had to be erected. 
The prospects are encouraging. 

The Tararu Mine : This mine is owned by an English lady, Mrs. A. G. Trower, and is under the 
management of Mr. R. W. Powell. The principal works have been the reopening of the workings on 
the old Day Dawn reefs, and sinking a winze, driving a new level in the Sunbeam Section, putting up 
a rise in the reef, and putting up from the battery level a new rise to connect with the Sunbeam rise. The 
old connection having caved in it was deemed best to put in a new one. When this is completed quartz 
from the Sunbeam Reef will be easily taken to the battery. 

The Eclipse Gold-mining Company (Limited) : The low level has been extended to a position under 
where the gold was found in the upper level, and a connection made by rising and sinking on the reef. 
Very rich specimens were obtained at the back of the low level, and stoping is now going on on the reef. A 
crushing of 133 tons gave a return of £867. The mine is looking exceedingly well. 

The New Monowai Gold and Silver Mines (Limited), Waiomo : The Waiomo Gold-mines (Limited), 
(the former owners), sold out all their rights in New Zealand and went into liquidation. The claims 
were purchased at auction by Mr. J. J. Craig, of Auckland, and the present company formed. A con- 
tract has been let to drive 1,000 ft. on the reef, to get under where a rich run of ore was worked by 
the former company. This work is now going on. 

The Mi^hara Royal (Limited) Tapu : The company has been engaged in sinking two winzes on the 
main reef at the main adit level and stoping out the reef. The reef was 6 ft. thick, and carried a large 
amount of mineral in which gold was frequently seen, but it was found to be of low grade, 1,874 tons 
of ore only yielding £1,785. 

The Sheridan and one or two small claims have been worked, but nothing of a payable character 
foxmd. 

The Waimangu Gold-mining Company (Limited), Whangamata : This is a new mine, the reef 
only having been discovered within the last few months. Very rich ore was met with on the outcrop 
of a reef by Messrs. Tilsley Bros. A trial crushing of about 2 tons gave a return of 33 oz. 3 dwt., valued 
at £82 13s. 3d. A drive is now being put in to intersect the reef. 

The Mananu Mine : This mine and almost all other mines in this vicinity have been closed down. 
I have heard that it is likely the Mananu will be taken up and worked again by a small Auckland company. 

The Klondyke Gold-mining Company and the Puriri Qold Estates (Limited), at Puiiri, have not 
done much work during the year, the ore found not being payable. 

Tairua. — The Tairua Broken Hills Gold-mining Company (Limited) : This mine has been vigorously 
worked during the past year. During the first half of the year operations were carried on in the blocb 
of ground which were opened up over the main adit level, and good payable quartz was obtained. When 
these^blocks were worked out, operations were commenced to open up the unexplored portion of the 
mine."" A winze was sunk on the reef to a depth of 80 ft. from the bottom of the level Water coming 
in, a small engine was erected to work the pump and raise material.^ A drive was put in at the bottom 
of the winze on the Blucher Reef 100 ft. westward and 15 ft. eastward.? This!blockrof^ground is now 
being worked. Ore won and treated, 3,700 tons, which yielded 6,728 oz. 4 dwt., value £10,287. 

12— C. 3. 



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C— 3. 90 

The Chelmsford Oold-mining Company (Limited) : This company are engaged in extending the 
upper levels on the reef, which, when first discovered, gave very good results. It is expected that a payable 
block of ground will be available. 

The Coronation Grold-mining Company (Limited) : This company's mine is on freehold property, 
Wharekawa Blocks, held by license issued under section 66 of " The Mining Act, 1898." A five-stamp 
battery has been erected and crushing is to be conamenced soon. The ore is of a peculiar nature, but 
is said to be payable. 

The Golden Belt Gold-mining Company (Limited) : The low level has been extended, and is now 
in' 1,000 ft. It is expected that another 300 ft. will bring the drive under that point where good ore was 
met in the Road Level. It is intended to put up a rise from the end of the level which will serve as a 
pass to send down the quartz, and also ventilate the mine. The quartz will be conveyed to the mill 
over an aerial tramway. A battery of forty stamps is being erected. It is confidently hoped that this 
mine will soon become a payable one. I have, kc,. 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. R. S. Bush, Warden. 



Mr. Warden Roberts, Tauranga, to the Undeb-Secretabt fob Mikes, Wellington* 

Sib,— Warden's Ofl&ce, Tauranga, 20th March, 1905. 

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your memorandum of the 27th January last, 
asking me to furnish you with a general report of the general condition of the mining industry in my 
district for the year ending the 31st December, 1904, and in reply thereto, have to inform you that during 
the past year mining operations totally ceased in the Tauranga portion of the Hauraki Biining District 
owing to lack of capital to carry out development- work. 

I return herewith the forms enclosed in your memorandum filled up as requested. 

I have, &c., 

J. M. Robebts, Wardea 
Tauranga portion of the Hauraki Mining District 
The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. 



Mr. Warden Smith, Blenheim, to the Undbb-Sbcbbtaby fob Mmss, Wellington. 

Snt,— Warden's Office, Blenheim, 15th April, 1906. 

There is practically nothing of any importance to report concerning mining matters in any 
portion of the Marlborough Mining District for the year ending the 31st December last. 

Quartz-mining was represented solely by the operations of the Wairau Valley €k>ld-mining Com- 
pany at Top Valley. This company, which has taken the place of the Jubilee Company, was engaged 
in extending the low-level tunnel, for which purpose a contract to drive 300 ft. was let. The contract 
had not been completed when the year closed. It was estimated that a distance of 1,300 ft. woukl 
have to be driven before the lode would be reached. 

Dredging was entirely at a standstill. Nothing was done towards replacing the Alpine dredge— 
whose misfortune was referred to in my last report — on the claim. Disaster again overtook the Golden 
Point dredge at Wakamarina, which sank while being shifted down the claim. The dredge has been 
dismantled and all the machinery removed from the claim 

iiJluvial mining is not conducted on a scale of any magnitude, and calls for no comment. 

Reference having been made in my last report to the formation of a company for the purpose of 
manufacturing cement near Picton, I might mention that the erection of machinery and buildings iot 
the purpose was in a very forward state at the close of the period under review, and that operations 
will shortly be commenced. 

Statistical returns are forwarded herewith. I have, kc,* 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. T. Scott Smith, Warden. 



Mr. Warden Eenky, Nelson, to the Unde^-Sbcbbtaby fob Mines, Wellington 

Sib,— Warden's Office, Nelson, 9th May, 1906. 

I have the honour to forward herewith statistical returns for the year ending the Slst 
December, 1904, together with a general report upon the mining districts under my administratioa 

The Slate River Sluicing Company (Limited), -Since the formation of this company in July, 1900, 
no less than £16,581 has been spent in plant, wages, working-developments, &c., and, during the 
period to which this report more particularly relates, some thousands of pounds have been spent m 
augmenting the storage of water, and extending the low-level-tunnel tail-race. Sluicing operations 
have been greatly hindered during several months of the year owing to shortage of water. 503 oz. 
5 dwt. 18 gr. were won for the twelve months ending the 3l8t December, 1904 

The Slate River Gold-dredging Company {Limited), — This b the only dredge now carrying on active 
operations in this district, and it is now in work upon a claim held by the company in the bed of the 
Aorere River. The worlang of the dredge was considerably hampered in the early part of the year 
by floods. For the period from the 1st May, 1904, to the 16th March, 1905, gold to the value of £2,670, 
or an average of fifty-nine pounds' worth of gold per week, was recovered. The ground over which this 
dredge has been working is ground that has been worked before by private individuals and parties, 
chiefly by that method commonly known as " blind stabbing," and it is confidently expected that when 
the dredge works her way on to £resh ground, highly satisfactory results will be obtained. 



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91 C— 3 

Parapara Hydraulic Sluicing and Mining Company {Limited), — Mining operations have been 
carried on by this company throughout the year, but in most cases, upon cleaning up, the results have 
not proved encouraging. This is owing chiefly to the difficulty in working, it being necessary to put 
a great quantity of non-gold-bearing material through the boxes before the rich wash which exists can 
be ^-orked. 

The Odden Blocks Tattapu (Limited). — This quartz-mine gives the most consistent return of any 
concern in the district. The quantity of quartz crushed for the period to which this report relates was 
2,41 1 tons, from which a yield of 2,222 oz. of gold was obtained. The company employ thirty men. 

One reason for this report being delayed so long is that I have been unable to obtain some infer* 
mation concerning the Taitapu Qold Estates (Limited), and have to omit it in the return. Had the 
statement of afEairs appeared in the New Zealand Gazette^ the information could have been got from 
that source ; but no statement has been published in the Gazette^ and my request through the Clerk 
of the Warden's Court at Collingwood to the attorney for the company for the facts required has not 
been complied with. So far as I can gather, this company has been carrying on operations at the 
Golden Ridge and Ant Hill Mines, but the returns have been very small. 

Quartz Ranges, — A party of tributers, working on the Quartz Ranges upon a claim formerly worked 
by the Collingwood Groldflelds Company (Limited), who erected a valuable plant, have obtained pay- 
able gold as a result of sluicing operatioQs carried on by them. 

Takaka Subdistrict. 

During the year fifteen applications were received and heard for mining privileges. 

At Bubu the Takaka Sluicing Company's claim still keeps up its reputation as a paying concern. 
During the past year there were 900 oz. of gold obtained and two dividends declared of £450 each, 
besides £450 retained as a reserve fund. The claim is worked by three shifts. The average amount 
paid in wages and incidental expenses has been about £100 per month. The last washing-up for a 
fortnight's work produced 58 oz. of gold. The ground on this claim has, I understand, been thoroughly 
prospected, and it would seem that the shareholders may reasonably look forward to good results for 
several years. This is really the only claim which is doing any good in this subdistrict. There are 
four others in the locality, but the returns obtained are, I am informed, extremely poor. 

The Anatoki, Jackson's, and Sheepy Flat Claims are lying idle. 

At Upper Anatoki a prospecting party has been formed and subsidised by some Takaka residents 
to thoroughly prospect that locality. This party at present are turning the river to enable them to 
work a bar. The great hindrance to working in this locality is the difficulty of procuring food ; all 
the necessaries of life have to be carried on men's backs for several miles. If a track were made to 
enable horses to pack supplies I believe it would be possible for a good many men to find remunerative 
work in this part of the country. There are two other men prospecting the reefs further up on the 
ranges on their own account, but with what result is not known. There is one old hatter working a 
claim on the Anatoki River. 

At the head of Waingaro River two men have gone to prospect. 

At Waitoi there are three fossickers working for very little. 

Wangapeka Subdistrict. 

Only three men are now working on the Rolling River (Blue and Nuggety Creeks), who are old 
hands. They have made themselves comfortable surroundings and are content to work for small 
returns. A little prospecting has been done for reefs during the summer months on the hills at the 
head of Rolling River, but as yet without any practical results. 

The Wangapeka Gold-dredging Company. — The dredge which has been working on this river during 
the year has now closed down, and the company has gone into liquidation. It is reported the average 
weekly earnings have been only about 3 oz. The company have expended £13,000 during its existence. 
There seems very little prospect of any further work being done here. In the opinion of experienced 
miners there was no chance of success from the first, as very little gold has ever been obtained from 
the lower reaches of this ^river, whilst the bed of the upper portion is too rough and rocky for 
dredging. 

Sherry Valley. — Only one man is at work, on private property. He has a complete hydraulic 
plant, and is said to be making fair average wages. 

The Baton. — This river has been practically deserted during the past year, only one miner, who 
is a settler in the district, putting in his spare time on the river, and this with very poor results. The 
demand for labour on the Tadmor-Motupiko Section of the Midland Railway has no doubt induced 
many old miners to work for regular wages on the railway-formation. 

MoTUBKA Subdistrict. • 

As far as 1 can ascertain, there are only four miners working on the table-land, and they are making 
a bare living. There are two water-races, one tail-race, and two dams in existence in this locality, 
but no gold-saving appears to have been effected by the owners of these rights. The holders of the 
prospecting licenses for asbestos have long since allowed them to lapse. 

Coal. 

This is becoming a most important industry. The Puponga Coal and Gold Mining Company 
(Limited), have made really considerable headway with the development of their colliery at Puponga 
during the twelve months, the output for that period being 12,042 tons. The output is now rapidly 
increasing owing to the further development of the mine, and it is now estimated to average 100 tons 



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C— 8. 92 

per day. It will be unnecesaary for me to go more into detail regarding this mine, because, through 
the IrindneBft of the company's manager, I am in a position to annex to this report a very full memo- 
randum, which contains much useful and interesting information. But, I may add that I hear on ex- 
cellent authority that it is the intention of the company to expend some capital in improving dieir 
harbour, which is at present a difficult one to work owing to the distance to which the sea retires at 
low water. 

Memorandum by the General Manager of the Puponga Colliery, — On the company's wharf, which 
is half a mile in length, storage-bins have been erected capable of holding 400 tons to facilitate the loading 
and despatch of shipping. From the wharf the narrow-gauge railway-line extends for a mile and a 
half to the mine, over which distance the coal is hauled by the company's locomotive. At the mine 
screens and more bins have been lately completed, and a coal-washing plant has been fitted up, so that 
the nuts are kept of the best marketable quality. A stationary haulage engine has been erected, which 
draws the coal from the dip workings on the direct-haulage system. During most of the year the coal 
has been chiefly worked from the level-free portion of the coalfield, but latterly the dip-haulage road 
has been pushed ahead, and the workings opening up therefrom are developing well, showing coal of 
excellent quality and of a good workable thickness, the height of the workings being 7 ft. 6 in. This 
is a rather important feature, when the general thin nature of the coal-seams in the Collingwood, Pa- 
kawau, and Puponga district is remembered. So far the water has not been very heavy, and has been 
drawn by the haulage engine by water-chest after work has ceased for the day ; but owing to the gradual 
increase of drainage from the strata, which is to be expected as the mine gets more extensive, a pump 
has just been obtained and is now being installed. To adequately ventilate the mine as the airways 
become longer and the workings extend, a fan capable of circulating 45,000 cubic feet of air per minute 
has been ordered, and is now being constructed by Messrs. Johnston and Sons (Limited), Invercaigill, 
while a Tangye engine to drive it has been obtained. The output has considerably increased during the 
year, and now exceeds 100 tons per day. The shallow- water conditions prevailing at the wharf and 
harbour prevent it increasing as it should, but the matter of an improved channel with greater depth 
of water and a swinging basin for steamers of moderate size is being considered. 

In addition to their own leaseholds the Puponga Coal Company have bought out the Cape Coal 
Company, and the respective areas are now amalgamated. A valuable bush-area has been acquired, 
from which all the mining-timber is obtained, and it is connected with the mine by two miles of tram- 
line laid with steel rails. Mr. N. D. Cochrane is the general manager and mining engineer for the com- 
pany, and has charge of the opening-up and development of the coalfield. Mr. McCa£Eery is mine- 
manager, and over eighty men at present find employment at the colliery and works. 

Motupipi. — The coal-deposits here are again being worked on a small scale, and it is stated that 
the coal obtained, though unsuited for steam purposes, is well fitted for domestic use. 

I regret that this report does not on the whole disclose a more satisfactory condition of the mining 
industry so far as gold is concerned. There are, I believe, two causes at the back of this state of things 
— an indisposition on the part of the present generation to prospect rough country as their fatheis 
did before them, and want of capital. I fear that there is no hope of seeing foreign capital invested 
in mining enterprises in this country whilst the deplorable war in the Par East continues to afflict 
mankind. I have, ^., 

H. Etbe Kenny, 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Warden. 



Mr. Warden Kbnrick, Oreymouth, to the Under-Secretary for BIines, WellingtoiL 

Sir,— Warden's Office, Greymouth, 14th April, 1905. 

Herewith I have the honour to forward to you the detailed reports on the several subdivisions 
of the mining district under my charge for the year ending the 31st December, 1904. 

Reefion-Inanoahua District. 

Mr. E. W. Spencer, general manager of the Progress Mines of New Zealand (Limited), the Con- 
solidated Groldfields of New Zealand (Limited), and the Welcome €k)ld-mining Company, furnishes 
the following reports on the operations of the various companies under his control during the year 
1904:— 

Progress Mines of New Zealand (Limited), — Development-work has again been energetically carried 
on during the year on levels Nos. 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, and 10, resulting in the opening-up of a large tonnage 
of quartz, of which a considerable quantity is of very low grade. The total footages driven, kc,, during 
the year are as follows — Driving and crosscutting, 3,442 ft.; rising and sinMng, 1,311ft.: total, 
4,753 ft. — at a cost*of £7,030 10s. Stoping has been carried out on Nos. 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 levels, the 
stopes calling for no special comment, except in the east stopes on No. 4 and 5, where on account of an 
increased percentage of antimony a larger portion of the quartz has had to be used as filling. During 
the latter half of the year the developments were watched with a great amount of interest on No. 10 
level, as an ore-body was encountered which appeared to be of large extent. This body of stone was 
driven on in all directions and the stone on the level taken out, leaving an area of 120 ft. long by an 
average of 20 ft. wide standing on timber. A small portion of this block is of good value, but generally 
speaking the quartz from end to end is of very medium grade. A rise was put through to No. 9, which 
carried up stone for about 70 ft., and eventually connected to No. 9 on good reef -formation. Diamond 
drill : The drill was kept steadily at work for about eight months and a half, and drilled 2,125| ft., 
gaining some valuable information ; but the ground in the vicinity of the reefs is too soft to obtain much 



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93 C— 3. 

core. On surface the equipment at the mine has not undergone any material alterations, and all the 
machinery has been maintained in a thorough state of efficiency. At the battery, the only alterations 
of importance consist of an additional 25-ft. -diameter treatment- tank which has been erected, making 
in all fourteen tanks of equal size. During the year the sixty-five-stamp mill ran 303-73 days, leaving 
only 8-27 days lost time for the whole year, to include all incidental stoppages, such as monthly clean- 
ups, daily scrapes, kc. The tonnage crushed exceeds that of any previous year by 2,794 tons. The 
59,908 tons crushed jdelded bulUon by amalgamation to the value of £88,641 15s. 3d., equal to 7 dwt. 
3-93 gr. per ton. 1,093 tons of concentrates were treated in the chlorination- works, yielding 2,750 oz. 
14 dwt. 5 gr. of gold, valued at £11,020 7s. 7d. At the cyanide-works, 31,735 tons of coarser sands were 
treated, yielding buUion to the value of £8,674 18s. 5d. The treatment-cost amounted to 2s. l-777d. 
per ton, and the profit to 3s. 3.828d. per ton, making the yield equjil to 5s. 5-605d. During the year 
a certain amount of pyritic slimes has been shipped to the smelter — ^these realised £2,034 Is. 7d. A 
general sununary of the aggregate working-cost, yield, and resulting profit in milling 59,908 tons and 
cyaniding 31,735 tons during the year 1904, is as follows : Total worlang-cost (exclusive of capital and 
development expenditure) — Incurred in mining, transporting, miUing, and concentrating, and chlori- 
nating (including bullion charges and office and general expenses), £48,671 19s. 3d., or 16s. 2*987d. 
per ton milled ; cyaniding, £3,408 10s., or Is. l-655d. per ton milled ; total, £52,080 9s. 3d., or 17s. 
4*642d. per ton niilled. Profit — mining, transporting, miUing, and concentrating, and chlorinating, 
including bullion charges and office^and general expenses, £53,024 5s. 2d., or 17s. 8-423d. per ton milled ; 
cyaniding, £5,266 8s. 5d., or Is. 9-098d. per ton milled : total, £58,290 138. 7d., or 19s. 5-521d. per ton 
milled. Summary— Total working-cost, £52,080 9s. 3d., or 17s. 4-642d. per ton milled ; profit, £58,290 
13s. 7d., or 19s. 5-521d. per ton milled : yield, £110,371 2s. lOd., or 368. 10163d. per ton milled. A 
slightly lower-grade quartz has been milled during 1904 than previously, and this will probably again 
be the case in 1905, otherwise we look forward again to another successful year. The same policy 
will be pursued with regard to the underground work, viz. — to push the mine-development ener- 
getically. The main shaft will also be sunk to another level during the year. 

Wealth of Nations. — Stoping has been carried out on levels 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereby all the quartz 
has been taken from levels 4 and 5. The reserves of mill-rock in the mine now being confined to levels 
Nos. 3 and 6, and the new level No. 7 opened from the Energetic shaft. During the year 12,748 tons 
of quartz was crushed yielding bullion to the value of £14,666 16s. 8d., or 5 dwt. 16*92 gr. per ton. The 
concentrates and slimes were shipped to the smelter, realising £1,068 5s. 3d. At the cyanide- works 
8,710 tons representing 69*803 per cent, of the total crushed, yielded bullion to the value of £5,941 5s. Id. 
The working-cost for the year amounted to 16s. 4*890d. per ton milled ; this figure includes mining, 
milling, and concentrating, cyaniding, assay office, and bullion and gene al charges. 

Energetic Mine. — A large amount of development-work has been done in this mine during the 
period under review. The reef system was encountered at 267 ft. from the shaft, and drives were put 
out 45 ft. to the north and 698 ft. to the south. In the north drive a rise was laid off to connect to the 
winze sunk from the level above this, and it was when this connection was being made that the sad 
accident occurred which resulted in the death of three men who were poisoned by the gas liberated 
from the stagnant water in the winze when the connection was made. This level on the whole was 
a great disappointment, as only a small amount of quartz was opened up, and even that was of low- 
grade quality. Diamond Drilling : Pour diamond-drill holes were nm out from No. 7 level, hoping 
to locate a parallel ore-body. Thjee were productive of no result ; the other located a small band of 
stone, and a crosscut is now being driven to mtercept it. Shaft : The Energetic shaft was let on contract 
during October to sink it down to No. 8 level, a distance of 125 ft. This was finished during February, 
1905, when a start was at once made to open out No. 8 level at a depth of 1,502.5 ft. from the surface. 
On surface : A direct-coupled Tangye winding-engine started to hoist from the bottom of the shaft 
in March last, and has since run in a satisfactory manner. A small electric-light plant was installed, 
which efficiently lights the surface and the chambers at the different levels. 

Oolden Fleece, — The shaft has not been sunk during the year, but a very considerable amount of 
development-work has been done in levels Nos. 11, 12, and 13, all of which have been extended north. 
In all 1,539^ ft. of development-work was undertaken. The stopes have fuUy maintained their pre- 
vious characteristics, proving the reef itself to be very irregular in width, thereby making stoping a 
very expensive item. The shaft is again about to be sunk from No. 13 to No. 14 level, a vertical distance 
of 125 ft. During the year 12,930 tons of quartz was crushed, yielding bullion by amalgamation to the 
value of £21,040 17s. fid. The concentrates and slimes were all shipped to the smelter, and realised 
£1,940 3s. 7d. Cyanide : 8,610 tons of sands, representing 66*589 per cent, of the tonnage milled, was 
cyanided yielding bullion to the value of £3,011 7s. 5d., equal to a return of 6s. ll*941d. per ton treated. 

Welcome GVoup.— The Welcome Mine was let on tribute to O'Leary and party for a term of three 
years from the latter end of the year 1903. They continued to work this property until May, 1904, 
when, although very handsome inducements were offered to them in the shape of a subsidy on future 
development- work done by them, they abandoned the tribute. Up to this time they had milled 382 tons 
of quartz for a return of 435 oz. 14 dwt. 21 gr. of gold, valued at £1,726 15s. 9d. ; besides which 225 tons 
of tailings was treated, yielding bullion to the value of £396 4s. 4d. The company did some more 
development-work after the tributers abandoned, and then obtained six months' protection to enable 
the wishes of the London office to be consulted. 

New Scotia Gcld-rnvning Company (Limited)^ (Merrijigs). ^The system of work determined upon 
at the end of 1903, that is, the removal of the winding plant and engine from the old Drake main shaft 
to Martin's winze, was carried into effect early in this year. The whole of the above plant was reinstalled 
there and placed in good working-order. In the middle of April sinking was again resumed on the lode 
from this winze, and continued until a total depth of 123 ft. was reached. The reef continued to im- 
prove in width as greater depth was attained. For the full distance it averaged from 2 ft. 6 in. to 3 ft. 



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C— 3. 94 

6 in. in width, but in the bottom of the winze when sinking was stopped it was 4 ft. 6 in. wide in the 
north end and 3 ft. 6 in. in width at the south'end, and the stone showed good gold. At 111 ft. down 
the winze (thus leaving 12 ft. for a well-hole) a chamber 8 ft. high, 10 ft. long, and 8 ft. wide was excavated, 
and a level extended both north and south along the reef. The result of this driving was that the lode 
was found to be 90 ft. in length at this point, and gave very strong indications of lengthening as deeper 
development proceeded. Stoping operations were then started on the roof over the 111 ft. level, and 
continued until the stone became too thin and the length of the block too short to be worked profitably. 
Altogether, 257 tons of stone was mined and milled for a return of 123 oz. 17 dwt. 20 gr. of gold valued 
at £474 Is. 8d., and 222 tons of tailings was cyanided for 65 oz. 10 dwt. of bullion valued at £151 10s. 
These combined values are equal to £2 8s. 8d., or 12 dwt. per ton milled. To enable all the stone raised 
out of this shaft to be sent to the battery cheaply, an aerial tramway 780 ft. in length, with 105 ft. 
of fall, thus enabling it to be worked by gravitation, was erected, and has performed the work required 
of it efficiently. After the stopes were exhausted a start was again made to sink Martin's winze on the reel 
Seventeen feet only was sunk when works were stopped in consequence of the company's capital being 
all called up, and steps are now being taken to raise additional capital or reconstruct the company. 
At the deepest present point in the winze the reef is 4 ft. 6 in. wide throughout, canying good gold 
from the foot-wall to the centre of the stone, and the remainder is payable. 

United GM-mines {Limited),— The work for the year has consisted chiefly of prospecting — 
endeavouring to trace a continuation of the block of stone on which the winze was being sunk from the 
Exchange top level. The stone cut out 21 ft. down from the level. The winze was continued down to 
a further depth of 50 ft., the sinking being on a well-defined reef-track with a good foot-wall all the 
way. Little pieces of broken quartz were often met with in the sinking, but nothing solid. At the 
bottom of the winze the lode- track was driven on both north and south ; also some crosscutting was 
done, but nothing payable was found. The remainder of the quartz under the level at the top of the 
winze was then stoped out and crushed at the New Scotia battery : 160 tons of stone producing 100 oz. 
3 dwt. of gold value £395 lOs. 5d., and by cyanide process the tailings produced 114 oz. 3 dwt. 11 gr. 
of bullion value £385 38. 7d., being a total of £780 14s. obtained from 160 tons, equal to £4 178. 7d. per 
ton 

Prospecting has since been continued, the object being to pick up a continuation of the same run 
of reef further south. About 200 ft. distant a reef has been driven through, giving small prospects 
of gold. The reef is lying very flat. It is intended to do further prospecting on this stone, as a few 
feet of driving might show a great improvement in its quality. 

Ulster Odd-mining Company (Limited) {Painkiller District).— ^&T\y in the year a company was formed 
under the above title to explore the Ulster lease, which had been under development by a small local 
syndicate. The new company started work last April, but owing to difficulty in getting goods, supplies, 
rails, timber, &c., conveyed to the mine, only a few men were employed, and, moreover, as a great deal 
of preliminary work had been done outside the mine, such as cutting out quartz paddock, laying tip 
and roads, erecting smithy, &c., the actual mining operations were greatly retarded. The level was 
then continued on the reef, but after 25 ft. had been driven the reef, which averaged from 1 ft. to 2 ft. 
wide, clean and solid, carrying good gold, got slightly broken, and continued so for a further distance 
of 55 ft., when driving of level was stopped. This cfrive is now in 320 ft. altogether, of which 135 ft. 
to 150 ft. is on solid stone. A winze was sunk 60 ft. in depth on the reef, and a prospecting drive carried 
along north on the stone for 38 ft. Another winze was then commenced on a surface outcrop of the 
lode at a point 420 ft. south of the first reef opened in the level. This winze is now down 35 ft., and 
is following a reef-formation 5 ft. or 6 ft. in width, largely composed of quartz, all of which carries^highly 
payable gold. 

The New Inkerman Mines {Limited), — Mr. Dudgeon, attorney for the company in New Zealand, 
reports as follows : " During the twelve months ending the 31st December, 1904, the following develop- 
ment-work has been carried out : 352 ft. of driving, 45 ft. of sinking, 116 ft. of rising, and 136 ft. of 
crosscutting — total, 649 ft. Stoping : During the twelve months under review 7,639 tons of quartz 
has been stoped and delivered at the battery, 1,139 tons from above the main level, and the balance, 
6,500 tons, from the 100 ft. level. Battery : At the end of May extra five heads of stamps were 
erected, increasing the plant to twenty stamps. 8,139 tons of quartz was milled and 1,690 tons of 
tailings was also put through the battery, yielding by amalgamation 1,854 oz. 3 dwt. 9 gr. buUion, 
equal to 1,680*212 oz. fine gold, value £7,768 4s. 2d. 5,882 tons of coarse sands was cyanided, yielding 
769 oz. 6 dwt. 22 gr. bullion, equal to 554*705 oz. fine gold, value £2,396 88. 5d. 152 tons 8 cwt. 15 lb. 
of concentrates and slimes were made during the year and shipped to New South Wales for treatment, 
yielding £1,104 178. lid. Working-costs : The total working-costs, including development- work, 
capital expenditure, management and office expenses, &c., were £1 Is. r04d. per ton. The cost of 
stoping, including delivery of ore at battery, was 88. 6'496d. per ton. Milling, including mill-repairs, 
coal, &c., 58. 5*7 Id. per ton. Cyaniding, 2s. 4'252d. per ton cyanided. Future operations : The 
question of carrying out further development-work on the ore-body which is now being operated upon 
by means of an incline shaft to be sunk to a depth of approximately 400 ft. below the main level, is 
imder consideration by the owners of the mine, and the advisability of locating and developing from 
the present main level the continuation of what is known as the ' big blow ' outcrop is also being con- 
sidered, but at present no decision has been arrived at." 

Big River Gold-mining Company {Limited), — Mr. Lee, manager of the company, supphes the follow- 
ing extracts from the annual report to shareholders for the year ending the 31st December, 1904: 
'* At the commencement of the period stoping was in progress on a reef over No. 7 level and also on 
another lode over the intermediate level situate about midway between Nos. 6 and 7 levels. Alto- 
gether 1,328 tons of stone (each of 22 cubic feet measurement) was won from both leeh and sent to the 
battery for crushing. The yield of gold was 1,355 oz. 8 dwt., valued at £5,489 lis. lid., from the 



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96 C— 3. 

battery only, and is equal to 1 oz. dwt. 10 gr., or about £4 28. per ton. The whole of the resulting tailings 
have been stored on the sand-dump for future treatment by cyanidation and other methods. The 
operations on the lodes were not so profitable to the company as had been anticipated, owing chiefly 
to the reef over No. 7 level diminishing in size and quality as the stopes advanced towards No. 6 level, 
finally giving out about 60 ft. over No. 7 level. Then the intermediate reef, although of good width, 
got reduced in length as stoping proceeded, and gave out about 30 ft. below No. 6 level. In addition 
to these drawbacks works in the mine were greatly hampered and, in fact, stopped for a short time 
last summer owing to defective ventilation, consequently it became necessary to effect considerable 
repairs to the old air-passages. Altogether 360 ft. of surface tunnel, No. 1 level winze-chamber, and 
200 ft. of winze, 400 ft. of No. 2 level winze-chamber, and 60 ft. of uprise were retimbered. Since 
these works were effected the ventilation is perfectly satisfactoryrthroughout the mine, and it is^antici- 
pated that further outlay in this direction will not be needed for some considerable time. With a view 
to augmenting the supply of quartz for crushing a large amount of prospecting was done in the east 
and west ends of No. 7 level and in the intermediate level, but without anything'of permanent value 
being discovered. In all 116 ft. of main driving, 134 ft. of crosscutting, 94 ft. of?an uprise, and 30 ft. 
of winze-sinking were done in these prospecting operations. At the conclusion of the stoping works 
it was decided to open up a deeper level (No. 8), but, before doing so, it was deemed advisable to prove 
the reef underfoot at No. 7 level by means of a winze. This latter was accordingly sunk on the extreme 
east end of the reef for a distance of 120 ft. The stone varied from 2 ft. to 4 ft. in width, and carried 
highly payable gold throughout. Its present size in the bottom of the winze is 2 ft. 6 in. wide. Judging 
from the indications found in No. 7 level and from the promising appearance of the lode in the winze 
there is every reason to believe that the extent of the reef in the new level will be greater and more 
permanent than in any of the upper levels. Contracts were let for sinking the main shaft 150 ft., 
excavating No. 8 chamber, and driving No. 8 level, all at reasonable prices, and the main shaft has just 
been satisfactorily completed. It is anticipated that about 400 ft. of driving will be required to intersect 
the line'^of reef. This should be complete towards the end of May next." 

Keep-it'Dark Quartz-mining" Company (Limited). — Mr. Hindmarsh, the manager of the company, 
supplies the following particulars : — " Mine Department : During the year stoping out quartz from 
No. 4 and No. 5 levels has been continued. In No. 4 level the reef has been fairly regular, keeping about 
the same size ; it is now getting well up to No. 3 level, and about seven stopes (45 ft.) yet remain to 
be taken out. In No. 5 level, so far as it is worked up, the reef has not been so regular, several breaks 
having occurred in the lode with mullock in between. From about 40 ft. up onejpart of the lode has 
taken a strike away to the east, and this accounts for the quartz which was met with 250 ft. from the 
main shaft when driving No. 5 crosscut the previous year. A winze has been sunk from No. 5 level 
at this point and the reef was carried down 116 ft. A crosscut to No. 6 level has been driven 328 ft. 
from the main shaft ; a rise has been put up 30 ft. and connected with bottom of winze from No. 5. 
About the middle of December the reef was intersected in No. 6 level ; it is 30 ft. into the foot-wall 
from where it was expected to be met with. The reef is 9 ft. thick, and shows very fair gold ; it will 
be some time before the extent of it will be known. For the year 12,313 tons of quartz has been raised 
and sent to the battery, the total cost of same, including driving of crosscut, two new winding-ropes, 
and all outlay in connection with the mine and winding-plant (except sinking the main shaft), being 
£7,904 lis. lOd., equal to 12s. lOd. per ton. The contract for sinking main shaft 300 ft. and constructing 
two chambers has been completed in a very creditable manner, the total cost being £1,438 16s. 4d., 
just a small fraction under £4 168. per foot. The company is now in a position to drive a crosscut from 
bottom chamber and open up No. 7 level at any time. Battery Department : With the exception 
of a few dajrs' stoppage early in the year the battery has been running fairly regular, 12,300 tons of 
quartz has been crushed, yielding 3,641 oz. 15 dwt. 5 gr. of gold, averaging a small fraction over 5 dwt. 
22 gr. per ton. The cost of the year's crushing, including maintenance of races and all renewals of crush- 
ing plant, has been £1,501 5s. ; deducting £59 5s. lid., which was expended in building extension of wall 
at head of the water-race, it makes the cost just a little over 2s. 4d. per ton. All the machinery and 
water-races are in good working-order, and for some time no stoppage for repairs will be necessary. 
Two improved Wilfley concentrators have been added to the battery plant. They have been working 
five months and are giving good results, producing about 2 tons of concentrates per week, assay value 
nearly 5 oz. per ton. The cost of concentrators, including erection, and shed for drying concentrates, 
amounts to £351 17s. 5d. Cyanide Department : In this department the extraction shows an improve- 
ment on the previous year, the amount of bullion obtained being 1,873 oz. dwt. 13 gr., value £5,911 
13s. 7d., giving an extraction of a Uttle over 9s. 7Jd. per ton on the gross tonnage crushed. The cost 
of treatment varies very Uttle from the former year, being £2,270 15s. 8d. This amount includes labour, 
all materials used, royalty, &c., the cost per ton being a fraction over 3s. 8Jd., thtis leaving a profit 
of 5s. lid. per ton on the gross tonnage. The first shipment of 24 tons of concentrates, together with 
a quantity of slimes, has been sent to Australia for treatment The net returns are not yet to hand, 
but it is anticipated that the result will be satisfactory." 

ElachwaUf River Oold-dredging Company (Limited), — Mr. A. Johnston Brown, secretary of the com- 
pany, submits the following report : " Dunng the year the company put into the dredge an electric- 
light installation. A worl^hop was also fitted up, and now includes lathe, drilling-machine, engine, 
and boiler. These items were all paid for out of profits, as also a new screen of novel construction 
designed to shake up the gravels by providing a 4 in. drop four times in each revolution. The highest 
return got in any one week was 87 oz. The dredge is a costly one to run, and the necessity of employing 
two or three men stumping and clearing ground adds materially to working-expenses. The dredge 
has[^lately been overhauled, and being at present on good ground it is hoped that dividends will in future 
be paid at regular intervals." 



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96 



IUe9es$* PrapriHanf GM^edgmg Campanif (Limiied). — Mr. H. A« Bruce, McreUrr of the oompMiy, 
suppliet the foUowing extracts from the snnual report to BhAreholden: — ^The working of the daim 
for the past year haa not been aa aucceasfnl aa waa anticipated. This reanh haa been broog^it about 
chiefly by the poor returns obtained from the No. 2 dredge, and the number of breakdowns which have 
occurred. However, the later returns from the No. 2 dredge have considerably increased. At the time 
the No. 2 dredge started No. 1 got off the goU and the retnms were much below the average for the 
preceding year. This dredge has, however, now got on to much better ground, and is giving payable 
returns. The position of d^e company during the past year was a very critical one, and in onier to 
carry it on the directors were compelled to issue 2,000 preference sluures. These shares were, with 
few exceptions, taken up by sharehokierB in the company, and the proceeds exp«ided in paying off 
the habiHties of the company and in keeping the No. 2 dredge at work until better ground was reached." 

IkamcUua Goid^redging Company (Limited). — Mr. T. W. Ponsonby, the local secretary to the com- 
pany, reports that the dredge has been run at a loss during the year, the amount of gold won being 
not even sufficient to pay wages. The company have been put to considerable expense for repairs to 
breakages. The dredge at present is stopped, having broken her tumbler. The instructions from the 
Sydney directors are to keep g<Hng in the hope of striking the same run of gold being worked by the 
Blackwater River Gold-dredging Company, and there is a chance of this. 

A 1 Gold^redging Company {Limited). — Mr. E. McRae, Uie (l&ristchurch secretary to the company, 
reports that from June to December the dredge was idle consequent on shifting machinery into new 
pontoons. Repairs and alterations being now effected, it is expected that about the avoage yiekl 
of previous years will be produced. 

Statement showing the Comparative Returns from the Quartz Mines in the ReefUm District from the 1st AprU» 
1880, to the SI St March, 1901, and a simOar Return for the Tears ending 31st December, 1901, 1902, 
1903, and 190i. 





Yaan eodiiiK. 


C*IUiiMd«. 


'DiTidendJ Quarts 
jdaeland. enuhed. 


ruldolQold. 


Valoa <d TmU. 






£ 


P. 


d. 


£ 


Tony. 


Os. dwt. 


B». 


1 

£ ■. d. 


Slst March, 1881 


.. 10,218 17 


6 


, 19.660 


25,926 


17,697 14 10 


68,630 IS 10 


M 


1882 


.. 25,604 


3 


4 


37.643 


14,894 


20,154 





, 78,600 12 


W 


1883 


.. 64,345 








32,600 


18.928 


19,194 





74.866 12 


»» 


1884 


.. 49,456 








16.600 


23.433 


16,647 





64,533 6 


»» 


1885 


.. 29.333 








34.100 


34,349 


23.997 





93,588 6 


tf 


1886 


.. 24,565 








1 14,500 


, 27,198 


14.591 





56.904 18 


»t 


1887 


. . 21.596 








33.460 


23.930 


21,143 





83,171 16 6 


f* 


1888 


.. 30,432 








. 17,650 


1 24.403 


16,775 





66,030 11 5 


»» 


1889 


.. 38.919 








. 16,688 


28,564 


18.663 





72,720 18 


»» 


1890 


. . 27,531 








18,260 


32,394 


17,780 





69,676 12 1 


t» 


1891 


.. 20,404 








27.325 


39,643 


23,347 





91.998 8 10 


f» 


1892 


.. 25,966 








, 30.743 


36,662 


23.390 





95,885 5 1 


9f 


1893 


. . 18,800 








16,900 


37,693 


20.171 





80,894 5 1 


M 


1894 


.. 14,350 








18,832 


34,518 


18,413 





73,752 14 11 


»» 


1895 


. . 10,153 








11.012 


26.602 


13.426 10 





63,609 6 1 


t» 


1896 


8.418 








25,925 


29.816 


22,026 





87,935 18 4 


ff 


1897 


.. 9,033 


6 


8 


4,900 


13.270 


8.365 4 20 


33,824 7 1 


99 


1898 


.. 7,859 


3 


4 


50 


9.761 


4,266 7 


1 


18,253 7 3 


»» 


1899 


.. 6.920 


6 


8 


900 


42.305 


21.487 18 15 


87,587 1 


»» 


1900 


. . 10,747 


8 


9 


47,050 


68.277 


26,693 3 


18 


108,466 17 8 


»f 


1901 


.. 5,826 


9 


7 


36.300 


82.618 


33,979 5 


6 


134,557 7 11 


31st December, 1901 . . 


.. 6,233 


6 


8 


58,199 


97.870 


46,066 16 12 


186.719 6 7 


99 


1902.. 


6.900 








63.974 


98.485 


46,561 9 


9 


188.655 2 6 


tf 


1903 .. 


.. 4.587 








57,641 


109.671 


58,840 6 15 


196.468 16 10 


•» 


1904 .. 
Totals 


. . 5,262 








64,674 


113.375 


49.693 16 


7 


216.996 3 6 




.. 482,340 


2 


6 


694,356 


1,083.576 


603,168 12 16 


2,382,207 12 4 



Wbstport District. 
At the North Beach, on the north-east side of the Orawaiti River, there are about a dozen men 
engaged in working the sea-sand, but the results are not very satisfactory. If they make £1 to £1 10a. 
a week they think they are doing welL 

Speaking generally as to the claims at Addison's, the prospects for the next few years are good. 
Although the ground yet to be worked is not very extensive — not sufficient in fact, to give remunera- 
tive employment to many men — the few parties that own claims there are, on the whole, doing welL 

At Bradshaw's Terrace the ground is almost worked out, and there seems to be very little hope of 
extending the field in that locality. 

The dredging industry has failed in this subdistrict ; not one single dredge being now engaged in 
mining operations. 



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97 C— 3. 

The following is a report as to the work done by the different mining parties in this district : — 

Virgin Flat Oold-mining Company, Addison^a. — This company hold a claim of 100 acres, over 
which six months' protection has been granted to enable them to make further efforts to raise more 
capital. During the last year they have done practically nothing. 

McCann and party, Addison's Flat. — A small claim of 10 acres, situate on a terrace above Dirty 
Mary's Creek. This party has been working steadily during the year, but, unfortunately, the results 
have not been up to expectations. They are trying to strike the lead which yielded some very payable 
patches of stone during the latter part of the year 1903. 

Fletcher and party, Bradshaw^s, — This party engaged in working a 15-acre claim by means of cement- 
crushing. Results only fair. » 

Lowtker and party, Bradshaw's. — An 18-acre claim, worked by cement-crushing. This party is 
doing fairly well. 

Jamieson Kemp and party, Bradshaw^s. — Working a 14-acre claim with a two-head battery ; doing 
fairly well. 

J. Collins, Bradshaw's. — A small alluvial claim, almost worked out. 

Addison's Long Tunnel Odd-mining Company (Limited) Addison's, — A considerable amount of 
work is being done on this claim, but the yield of gold last year was not up to expectations, being only 
313 oz. This claim is worked as a sluicing claim with an open face. 

MiUihin and party, Addison's, — This party is working a 20-acre claim by means of hydraulic sluic- 
ing and cement-cruslung. They have a ten-head battery driven by a Pelton wheel. Last year the 
returns proved very satisfactory, and the prospects continue good. 

Senior and party, Addison's, — ^A 20-acre claim. This party were engaged last year in working 
some old hopperings by means of cement-crushing. They have a twelve-head battery driven by a 
30 ft. overshot wheel. Results of last year's work fairly successful, and a good area of fairly payable 
ground lies in front of them. 

P, Halligan and party, Addison's, — An alluvial claim of about 10 acres. Returns unsatisfactory ; 
prospects not good. 

Carmody and party and NeiU and party, Addison's, — These two claims are situate on the Towa 
Lead, Addison's, and are of an area of 22 acres and 26 acres respectively. They are worked by means 
of open-faced sluicing, and continue to give very good returns. There is a considerable area of good 
ground in front of each party. 

Johnson and party. Cascade Creek. — A small quartz claim of 10 acres. Very inaccessible. Pro- 
spects not good. 

Davis Bros., Fairdoum. — Engaged just now in bringing water to claim. 

Crawford and party, Fairdown. — A small alluvial claim of 6 acres. Making wages. 

Chableston District. 
The Charleston Beach Sluicing Company of Auckland (Limited), — This company commenced sluicing 
operations on their beach claim about March last, and continued working up to the end of the year. 
The company gave employment to seven or eight men during the whole of the time. The results ap- 
pear to have been satisfactory, as there is every indication that work on the property will be continued 
in the future. 

PotoelPs Sluicing and Elevating Claim. — This claim was systematically and, I believe, most pro- 
fitably worked during the greater portion of the year, and there is every prospect of its continuity 
being maintained in the future, as^the property has been thoroughly prospected. The work provides 
employment for eight or nine men. 

The Argyle Water-race. — This property was recently taken over by the Buller County Council, as 
the previous lessees had failed to keep it in proper repair. As the result of this neglect it was continually 
breiddng away, occasioning thereby loss of work to the miners. The present lessee (Mr. Patrick Walsh) 
has given the place a thorough overhaul, renewing the flumings, Ac, with the result that he is now 
able to let the other miners in the locality have the water at a reasonable rate, whilst the responsibility 
of keeping the race in repair rests with himself. 

The other smaller claims have worked in this locality during the greater portion of the year, with 
only moderate results. The majority of the miners are old men. 

The beach claims on the Nine-mile Beach, of which there are about twenty, are each worked by one 
or two men, who have been doing steady work, with good results. 

Altogether, mining generally compares more than favourably with the previous year. 

Ltbll and MuRcmsoN Districts. 
Dredging. 
At the commencement of the year there were six dredges at work on the Buller River, between 
Lyell and Westport ; one on the Upper Buller at Fern Flat ; and one dredge at work, and one in course 
of erection, on the Matakitaki River above Murchison. 

13— C. 3. 



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C.^— 3. 98 

Four of the dredges on the Boiler Rnrer, nAmety, the FeddeaeiL. Fern FUt Piopdetary, Premier, 
and Welcome were sold during the year owin^ to the liqaidAtion of the companies owning them. 

The Feddeisen dredge, now owned hy the New Fedderaen Gold-dredging Company (Limited), 
was, in June last, removed ap opposite the month of New Creek, and, since commencing operattons 
there, 687 oz. of gold, valued at £2,699, have been won, and dividends amounting to £809 have been paid. 
As this dredge (which is a powerful one) is now on good cold, and well adapted for working the rou^ 
ground on the Buller, the prospects of the company certainly seem bright. 

The Premier dredge, now owned by Messrs. Hansen and Delia Vedova, waa, with great difficulty, 
removed from the Inangahua Junction to Three-channel Flat, where, after being aground for some 
time, it received a thorough overhauling, and is now en^raged opening out a ^u^e. 

The Welcome dredge, now owned by Walker and party, obtained very little gold during the first 
eight months of the year, and, as a consequence, the company was wound up and the dredge sold to the 
present owners, who had hardly taken possession when their dredge sank. Up to the present it has 
not been refloated. 

The Fern Flat Proprietary dredge (now owned by Bredbury and party) is at present working on 
Bredbury's freehold, and, although no returns are published, tl^ are beUeved to be satisfactory. It 
is a pity that a better dredge is not woridng this ground, for, if it pays to work the ground with the 
present dredge in spite of the numerous breakages, it would certainly pay handsome^ if a first-class 
dredge were to work it. 

The Buller Junction dredge, which in 1903 did so well, has not done very well during 1904, and 
at a meeting in December it was decided that the company should go into Uquidation. 

The Mokoia dredge, working some three miles higher up than the Buller Junction, did not do neariy 
so weU during 1904 as during the previous year, 439 oz. of gold only having been obtained, against 
1,434 oz. during 1903. The dredge is now in the same locahty as when it obtained the good returns 
last year, and larger returns may be expected in future. 

The Rocklands Beach dredge, working near Berlin's, obtained 902 oz. of gold during 1904, as against 
498 oz. in 1903, and the ground appears to be improving. No dividends were declared. This dredge 
has now left the old claim and commenced operations on the claim^adjoining, granted to the company 
during the year. 

The Old Diggings dredge, owned' by Hansen and party, is still working below Berlin's, and the 
returns are believed to be satisfactory.^ 

The Belle Vue and Kohikohi dredges, working on the Mataldtald River have not met with a great 
deal of success during the year,''and it would appear that the ground up the Matakitaki is not rich 
enough to pay for dredging. 

The*Amikitia dredge is stiE l3ring idle up tbe Matakitaki River. 

Qtiartz. 

The Alpine Extended Company's operations for the year consisted in extending No. 12 level south 
to a distance of 520 ft. from the shaft, in crosscutting to the hanging-side, and in stoping a block of stone 
up 70 ft. between level No. 12 andlevel No. 11. No. 12 level north was also extended a distance of 
470 ft. from the shaft. A block of "stone 83 ft. in length was met and was stoped up for a distance of 
70 ft. when it cut out. In No. 7 level a considerable amount of crosscutting has been done to the foot- 
walL In No. 10 level a distance of 150 ft. has been driven, and a contract let to extend a rise to No. 7 
level, a distance of about 230 ft. In No. 12 level south some large boulders, showing good gold, were 
met with, but nothing permanent was found. 

Kelly and party — working at the EightfMile — after seven months' dead-work cleaned up at the 
end of the year for 168^oz. of gold. The party consists oflfour men, and, taking into consideration the 
amount of dead-work done, the return may be considered satisfactory. There is no other quartz- 
mining done in this district. 

Alluvial, 

During the latter portion of the year there were signs of a revival in sluicing up the Matakitaki 
and Maruia Rivers. 

At the Horse Terrace, Matakitaki, an Auckland company, named the Horse Terrace Sluicing Com- 
pany (Limited), have acquired all the mining privileges of McDowell Bros., consisting of two 20-acre 
special claims, water-races, &c. The company have also completed a large water-race which they have 
brought in from the left-hand branch of the Olenroy River to their prospecting-area at Horse Terrace. 
The first wash-up took place shortly before Christmas, and it is said to have been satisfactory. This 
company expects to have 150 men employed shortly. 

^p the Maruia several 20-acre special claims have been taken up by small parties, and are now 
being worked with good results. Thomson and party are bringing in a large'water-race'to'enable them 
to work their claims to better advantage. 

The New Lyell Sluicing Company (Limited) are carrying on operations about four miles below 
Lyell, but have not got fairly to work yet on account of opening a new face and altering their water* 
rare. ' ' 



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99 C— 3. 

Ahaura District. 

Moovdighi, — The population of this district is about the same as it has been for the last two years. 
The Moonlight Gold-dredging Company have their dredge still working in Moonlight Creek, but the 
returns are not encouraging, the ground is rough and somewhat difficult to work. The New Shetland 
Terrace Claim at Upper Moonlight is in good working-order, and, with plenty of water, should get a ^ir 
amount of gokL 

Blackball and Healers OvUy. — The number of gold-miners in these distncts keeps about the same, 
and a considerable amount of gold is being won. The Republic Company, Slndman and party, Kerr 
and Hay, and the Montgomery Terrace Company are the most important holders of mining privileges 
at Upper Blackball and Healey's Oully. The Paparoa Ranges have had a considerable amount of 
attention in the prospecting for quarts, and the €^arden Oully Quartz-mining Company have been 
carrying on extensive prospecting operations. They are now erecting a battery, and should good 
results be obtained the venture ^iiD be the means of bringing the Paparoa Ranges into prominence. 

Ndson Creek, — The dredging industry in this locality is about the same. There are six dredg^ 
at work and two in course of construction. Alluvial mining gives employment for about fifty men, 
most of whom are making good wages. 

No Town. — There are very few aUuvial miners in this locality, but the dredges (three in number) 
on the No Town Creek are getting very good returns, and have a considerable area of land to work. 

Waifuna^ Including Mosquito Creek and Noble's. — The population remains about the same, mostly 
following aUuvial mining. 'Die two dredges in Mosquito Creek have gone into liquidation. The 
Mosquito No. 1 always got good returns and paid several dividends, but the claim is now worked out. 

Duffer*8 and Half-ounce. — There are only a few old hands following up mining in this locality. 
The two dredging companies, Sullivan's Lead and Golden United, have gone into liquidation. 

Ahaura River. — The usual number of sluicing parties continue to work on the banks of the river. 
During the past year the supply of water has been very limited, and the miners have to purchase the 
wat^ from Messrs. Currie, who hold the main water-rights. If water could be obtained to work some 
of the higher terraces and levels the general opinion is that there is plenty of payable ground around 
Ahaura to work by sluicing. 

Orwell Creek. — The populat on in this district is dwindling down to a low ebb. There is no water 
in this locality for sluicing. Some time ago it was proposed by a Reefton party to bring in wat^ from 
Randal Creek and Allen River to sluice Napoleon Hill. Should this be done the place would go ahead 
again, as plenty of payable sluicing-ground is available. 

Timber. — The timber industry in the Ahaura Warden's district is going ahead very fast, the amount 
of timber being cut is about 500,000 ft. a month, and in a short time an output of double that amount 
may be looked for. 

Greymouth District. 

AUuvial. 

Sluicing operations in this district have been of a very limited nature for some time past. The 
only locality in which any extensive operations are being carried on is at Barrjrtown, where Messrs. 
McELay and White are obtaining very satisfactory results from their venture. The Nine-mile Company 
was wound up during the year and the property transferred to the New Nine-mile Sluicing Company, 
but no work of any importance has been done. 

In other portions of the district mining operations are carried on as usual by the ordinary individual 
miners, whose number now is gradually dimimshing. 

Dredging. 

Table A appended hereto contains particulars relating to twenty-six dredging companies having 
dredges in actual work in my district during the year. Of these only eight— as specified below in Table 
B — have paid dividends during the year. Table A also refers to the following companies which have 
worked dredges, but during the year have ceased work owing to the poor nature of the ground 
and difficulty in working same : Buller Junction, Golden United, Sullivan's Lead, Trafalgar, and Wai- 
mangaroa River. Since the end of the year thefTotara Flat and Stony and Mosquito Leads dredges 
have been closed down. The latter having been sold and repurchased wiU shortly be again in active 
operation. 

In my last report I referred to three dredges — viz.. Boatman's Creek, Gk>lden United, and Moon* 
light, as not having at that time worked sufficiently long enoughffor an idea to be formed as to the 
value of the properties. Of these the Boatman's Creek and Golden United have been closed down 
during the year, while the Moonlight has been barely earning working-expenses. 

Taking the gold yield shown in Table A — viz., 23,557 oz., and estimating the value at £3 19s. per 
ounce, the gross value of gold won by the twenty-six dredges approximately amounts to £93,050. Out 
of this the sum of £13,885 has been distributed in dividends during the year amongst shareholders in 
eight companies, leaving about £79,164 to cover working-cost, &c. 



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101 



C.— 3. 



Following is a list of companies which have paid dividends during 1904, showing amount paid 
during the year and also since date of formation : — {Table B.) 



Name of Compaiqr. 


Number 

of 
Shares. 


Value 
of each 
Share. 


Dividends, 
1904. 


Total 
Dividends. 


Dividends 

per Share, 

1904. 


Total 
Dividends 
per Share. 




£ 


£ 8. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ B. d. 


8. d. 


£ s. d. 


Bignell's No Town 


9,000 


1 


900 





900 


1 


1 


Blaokwater River 


9,475 


1 


1,896 





3,316 5 


4 


7 


Callaghan's Creek 


12,500 


16 


625 





1,875 


1 


3 


Jamieson's Reward 


9,990 


1 


499 10 





999 


1 


2 


Nelson Greek 


8,600 


1 


7,437 10 





23,375 


17 6 


2 15 


North Beach 


8,325 


1 


416 5 





3,330 


1 


7 


No Town Creek 


12,000 


1 


1,800 





10,800 


3 


14 


Pactolns (two dredges) . . 


9,376 


15 


312 10 





2,812 10 


8 


4 8 



The following schedule shows the yield, working-cost, &c., of the twenty-six dredges of 1904, com- 
paring them with that of the thirty-four dredges at work during the previous year :— 



Year. 


1 
Number 

of Yield of Gold. 
Dredges. , 


; 1 

Approziinate : Approximate Average cost 
Value. Working-cost. per Dredge. 

i 


Amount paid in 
Dividends. 


1903 
1904 


34 
26 


Oz. 
27,426 
23,557 


£ 

108,332 

93,050 


£ 
81,574 
79,164 


£ 
2,399 
3,044 


£ 8. d. 

26,758 5 
13,885 16 



It will be noted that there is an increase of £645 in the average working-cost of each dredge. It 
may be questioned as to the cause of thisjgreat increase. It is quite natural to expect that most of 
the dredges, having been working now for some years, are more liable to breakages than formerly. Also 
in cases of recently built dredges, ill-adanted machinery has often been used, occasioning much expense 
and loss of time in repairs. 

Out of the twenty-six companies having dredges working during the year, five went into liquida- 
tion, compared with six out of thirty-four during the previous year. In 1903*eleven companies paid 
dividends to shareholders, amounting to £26,758, while this year the number of dividend-paying com- 
panies has been reduced to eight, the amount distributed in dividends being reduced almost one-half. 

The Nelson Creek still heads the list of dividend-paying companies. Original shareholders in this 
company have been exceedingly fortunate in having already received back 275 per cent, on the money 
invested by them. The returns from the dredge were fairly good until about the middle of the year, 
when they fell away considerably, and at present they cover little more than working-expenses. This 
company has recently purchased the Teremakau dredge with the object of working a lately acquired 
property adjacent to their present claim. 

The No Town Creek dredge has not been so successful, the amount paid in dividends being only 
about 27 per cent, of that paid during the previous year. But the company has recently purchased 
the dredge and claim of the No Town No. 2 company, and two dredges are now being worked with 
payable results. 

The Pactolus Company, after constructing a second dredge, has already paid almost 5s. per share 
in dividends, and as both dredges still continue to obtain good returns, the prospects of this company 
are evidently very bright. It is expected that highly payable returns will be obtained while that por- 
tion of the claim near Try-again Terrace is being worked. 

Another claim of much promise, situate alongside the Pactolus Company's claim, is the Jamieson's 
Reward. This company has already paid 28. per share in dividends, and still continues to obtain good 
results. The dredge, however, was second-hand when purchased by the company, and they have been 
put to a great deal of expense and loss of time through breakages ; but these defects have now been 
remedied, and shareholders are confident of an increase of dividends without the former expense of 
working. 

The BignelPs No Town dredge, during the short period of operations, has done remarkably well, 
the company having already paid Is. per share in dividends, as well as ¥dping off their overdraft and 
creating a reserve fund. 

The Callaghan's Creek company, owing to the narrowness and roughness of their claim, were com- 
pelled to build a very small dredge, which, taking all these difficulties into consideration, has given 
good results during the year. This dredge still obtains payable returns, but, owing to the difficulties 
before mentioned, it is not probable that any sensational returns will be forthcoming. 

The North Beach dredge did not fulfil the expectations which were held out during the early part 
of the year. It was hoped that, as the ground towards the upper end of the claim was being worked, 
the returns would increase. But unforseen difficulties in the form of submerged timber and scarcity 
of water during the dry season were responsible for a falling-off in the returns. However, share- 
holders are very sanguine .as to the future prospects of this company. 



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C— 3. 102 

By referring to former reports it will be noted that the number of wprking-dreilges is gradually 
declining every year, and it is very probable that th decline will continue until we have none but 
the actual dividend-paying dredges at work in this district. Amongst the number of dredges mentioned 
in Table A there are several which are barely earning working-expenses, and I expect that in next 
year's report they will be mentioned as having closed down during the year. 

The Timber Industry. 
The exports of timber and railway-sleepers for the year from the Port of Oreymouth was as follows : 
Timber, 21,218,043 ft., valued at £74,263 ; sleepers, 2,081,006 ft., valued>t £14,492 : total, 23,299,049 ft . 
valued at £88,755. 

Coal. 
The output of coal from the different mines during the year was as follows : Blackball Mine, 
85,528 tons ; Brunner Mine, 54,939 tons ; Tyneside Mine, 38,406 tons ;j^State Mine, 60,255 tons : 
total, 239,128 tons. This is a considerable increase on last year's output, owing to the opening-up of 
the State collieries during the year. 

General. 

The number of suits disposed of in the Warden's Court during the year ending the 31st December, 
1904, was fifteen. 

The revenue for the year amounted to £3,613 16s. 4d, the particulars of which are as follows : 
Miners' rights, £106 58. ; copies of Mining Act, 15s. ; water-races, £2 ; rents, £1,158 19s. Id. ; fees and 
fines, £64 5s. 6d. ; miscellaneous, £2,281 lis. 9d. : total, £3,613 16s. 4d. 

I have kc.f 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. W. 0. R. Kbnriok, Warden. 

Mr. Warden Day, Hokitika, to the Under-Seorbtary for Mines, Wellington. 

Sir,— ^ Warden's Office, Hokitika, 28th February,1905. 

In jpursuancejo^he request contained injyour circular I have the honour to report with respect 
to the Hokitika division of the Westland Mining District that was under my charge during the year 
1904. 

Alluvial Mining. 

Through the action of creditors, the Wheel of Fortune Company was forced into liquidation, and 
the mortgagees sold the whole of the mining rights owned by the company to a local syndicate. The 
syndicate commenced work, and I am informed the returns up to the end of the year were satisfactory. 
It would appear that under the company (which was owned and controlled in England) the expenses 
of management were out of all proportion to the returns which were likely to be obtained from the 
property. It is this excessive and extravagant cost of management of foreign-owned companies which 
kills the ventures owned by them. 

The Humphrey's Gully claims were worked on tribute during the year, with results satisfactory 
to the tributers. The tribute expired at the end of last December, and tenders were again called for by 
the company, with the result that the same party again obtained the tribute, the company receiving 
a larger percentage than that paid during the previous period. 

The Mont d'Or claim, at Ross, was worked throughout the year and paid its usual dividends. The 
company sustained a great loss by the death of Mr. Charles Davey, who had successfully managed 
and worked the claim for a number of years. 

The Ross United and Mont d'Or properties are still under offer to a London syndicate, but tor 
some reason nothing much has been done, although the local company some time since provided the 
amount asked Jor to pay the expenses of an expert to be sent out from London to report upon the pro- 
perties. 

The Westland Hydraulic and Sluicing Claims at the Waiho were worked for a great part of the 
year, but the results were not made public. Work was stopped, and six months' protection obtained, 
owing to the working capital being exhausted. I believe, however, that fresh capital is forthcoming, 
and that the claims will shortly be worked again. The manager informed me thatjwhen^work ceased 
the prospects were encouraging. 

The claim held by the McLeod's Terrace Sluicing Company to the south of the Mikonui River, 
should be working in a month or two, as the head race is approaching completion. The result of working 
this claim is looked forward to with a great deal of interest, as a number of old and experienced miners 
are doubtful of its being successful. 

Back Creek and Seddon's Terrace : During the year it was reported that a new lead had been 
discovered at Back Creek, underlying the old Brighton bottom. A fair number of claims were applied 
for. I visited the field with the Assistant Inspector of Mines, Mr. A. H. Richards, to, if possible, satisfy 
myself as to the value of the lead before granting any licenses for claims. As at the time of our visit 
sufficient work had not been done to prove its value I refused to grant any claims, and the various 
applicants took prospecting licenses instead. This discovery (if satisfactory) will probably extend 
indefinitely the life of the field. So far I have not heard the result of any prospecting. 

Great disappointment has been felt throughout the district because nothing definite has yet been 
done towards bringing water on to this field. The trial surveys for the race have been finished for some 
time, and there the matter seems to rest. The Consolidated Goldfields of New Zealand has, however, 
obtained permission to prospect the reserve of 100 acres at Seddon's Terrace, and I understand that 
upon the results of the prospecting partly depends the decision as to whether the company will construct 
the race or not. 



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103 C— 3. 

Since Christmas the miners on this field have been for the greater part of the time idle, as there 
has not been a sufficient rainfall to give anything like an adequate supply of water. 

Drbdoino. 

It cannot be said that any of the dredges in this district have been successful. 

The Kohinoor, at Ross (of which great results were expected), went into liquidation, and the property 
was sold to a syndicate. 

The Prince of Wales was let on tribute, as the company could not make it pay. Since starting 
work the tributers have done fairly well. 

The Montezuma was sold to satisfy wages liens. The new owners can get no satisfactory returns. 

The Wanganui Wataroa has closed down, as the tributers could not make it pay. It is a source 
of wonder to the old residents in the neighbourhood how it was that the dredge was ever placed on 
the claim. 

The Woodstock is still at work, but hardly getting enough to pay working-expenses. 

The Oreenstone Creek dredges are working, but not paying dividends. 

Owing partly to ill-luck and partly to unforseen difficiities the dredge that was to have been placed 
on the Rve-mile Beach below Okarito is not yet constructed. 

Quartz-mining. 

During the summer a good amount of prospecting has been done in the vicinity of Brownings' 
Pass. Owing to its altitude very little could be done before the greater part of the snow had disap- 
peared. Sevend prospecting licenses and special claims have been ap{)lied for, as well as water-rights 
and other mining privileges. 

On Wilson's Reward Claim a tunnel is being driven about 130 ft. below the outcrop of the reef 
that was found, and it is hoped that the reef will shortly be met with. From the prospects obtained 
on the surface, the find should be a valuable one if it be proved that the reef lives down and maintains 
its size and value. 

Next summer should see a much greater amount of prospecting done in the back country. 

Prospecting. 

Towards the end of the year a very useful movement was started by the Ross Borough Council 
which eventually led to a meeting of delegates from all the public bodies and prospecting associations 
in Westland being held in Hokitika for the purpose of forming an association for placing prospecting 
on a scientific and businesslike basis. With the assistance of the (Jovemment and of the newly ap- 
pointed Colonial Greologist it is hoped that the working of the new association may result in a revival 
of the mining industry in this district. 

Timber. 

Duiing the latter months of the year, owing to the demand for timber falling off, several mills 
were obliged to cease work. Those which continued working were to a great extent kept going by reason 
of the^increased demand for white-pine for shipment to Australia. 

I have, &c.. 

The Under-Secretary Mines Department, Wellington. Victor Grace Day, Warden. 



Blr. Warden Keddell, Oamaru, to the Under-Secretary for Mines, Wellington. 

Sir,— Warden's Office, Oamaru, 17th April, 1905. 

I have the honour to report with respect to the Livingstone subdistrict of the Otago Gold- 
mining District that the mining industry in this locality has remained stagnant during the past year, 
no notable feature having occurred. The population of Livingstone proper and Maerewhenua remains 
about the same, and as far as ordinary settlement is concerned the district shows signs of material 
progress. 

The principal source of supply of water, the Mountain Hut Water-race, has had several unforseen 
misfortunes which have impaired its usefulness. The race (which conveys its water from a considerable 
distance in the hills in an open ditch made in the face of the mountains) has been damaged by breaks 
caused by the slipping-away of the lower side of the race. Repairs are made with difficulty and con- 
siderable expenditure of labour, and in consequence of these accidents there has been a shortage of 
water. 

The failure during the past year of the anticipated supply of water has been very regrettable, as 
there*b a large area of i^round Ipng ^dle"'which fcouldrand would have been profitably occupied if 
water was obtainable. The race-proprietors could find^ready sale for 20 heads if they could deliver 
that quantity. I am satisfied the enterprise was a good and sound one, and that there would be for 
some time a great demand for a large supply of water if it could be made constant. The manager is 
capable and energetic, and the accidents referred to could not be provided against. The maintenance 
and distribution of this water employs about twenty-five men, but the sale of its present limited supply 
affords little or no profit to the proprietors. 

The records of the Warden's Cour t show that work is"!continuedJ»nth vigour by the small number 
of miners engaged. !' | r|T| I have, &c., 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Jackson Keddell, Warden. 



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C— 3. 104 

Mr. Warden Cruiokshank, Dunedin, to the Undbr-Secretary for Mines, Wellington. 

Sir,— Warden's Office, Dunedin, 3rd March. 1905. 

HereMdth I have the honour to enclose my annual returns for the Hindon district, and at the 
same time to report that no fresh operations have been commenced during the past year. Excepting 
that of the Deep Stream Amalgamated Hydrauhc Sluicing Company (Limited) and the Barewood 
Gold-mining Company (Limited) there has been little or no work done in this portion of the Otago 
Mining District. I have, &c., 

The^XJnder-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. G. Cruickshank, Warden. 



Mr. Warden McEnnis, Naseby, to the Under-Secretary for Mines, Wellington. 

Sir,— Warden's Office, Naseby, 17th April, 1906. 

I have the honour to forward herewith statistical mining returns for the year ended the Slst 
December, 1904. I also forward a few notes on the position of this goldfield for the same period. 

Naseby. 

At Naseby and immediate surroundings eighteen hydraulic-elevating claims have been working 
during the year ; two of these have been work^ out. Hydraulic sluicing and elevating is the chief 
method of gold- mining in this district, and there are about fifty men employed. Some fifteen parties 
are ground-sluicing, and about forty Chinese similarly employed. At Idaburn, White Sow Valley, 
and Hill's Creek a claim is being worked at each place ; it is estimated that there are about 140 miners 

(including Chinese) working in the above-named localities. 

# 

St. Bathan's. 

The last season proved a fairly good one for many employed in mining. The returns obtained 
were fully up to the average, while at the close of the year a general improvement all round was notice- 
able. 

In what is known as the town or basin workings — those that discharge their tailings and tail- water 
into the St. Bathan's Channel and thence into the Dunstan Creek — ^the only workings of importance 
carried on during the year were those of the United M. and E. Company. After considerable 
trouble this company succeeded in getting an elevator in position about the end of March, and opera- 
tions have been carried on constantly since with the exception of a few weeks in the winter-time, and 
as a result a large amount of quartz wash has been shifted. It is gratif3ring to be able to state that fuUy 
600 oz. of gold was obtained. This company intends to deepen their elevator 35 ft. more, making 
there a total depth of 60 ft. As the company have water at a pressure which can easily lift from depth 
of 150 ft. it is obvious that even this small portion of the claim wiU give rich returns for many years to 
come. 

Work on the St. Bathan's Channel has been carried on, and an additional 6 ft. has been sunk during 
the past year. 

The Scandinavian Company has been mostly working its claims known as Surface Hill and Lagoon, 
the tailings from which are carried into Muddy Creek and from thence into the Manuherikia River. 
Work was carried on by hydraulic elevating. At Surface Hill Claim, after deepening and shifting 
the elevator five times, a depth of 104 ft. was reached in March, and two elevators were erected side by 
side, so that whilst repairs were being effected on one the other could be kept at work. The paddock 
was washed up in August for a return of 1,300 oz. of gold. The elevator has since been shifted and deep- 
ened to a depth of 119 ft., and is working very satisfactorily. It is now in a position where it can work 
for five years Mrithout the necessity for shifting, and it is confidently expected good returns will be 
obtained. The manager estimates that 643,000 yards of material were removed, the ground thus giving 
about a grain of gold to the cubic yard. At the Lagoon Claim great difficulties have been encountered ; 
the country (which is of a greasy-clay formation) has slipped for several chains against its own dip, 
and the manager so far has been unable to touch the wash, but he expects to obtain a good hold of the 
ground before the coming winter. An elevator is at work to a depth of 35 ft., but has been several 
times carried away by slips of clay. One of these slips was of such an extent that it took two months 
to remove. It is to be hoped that when the wash can be got out the company will be recouped for 
their labour. 

The Shamrock Company's Claim is idle at present, but it is expected a start will soon be made 
to work the quartz drift at what is known as Brennan's, from which good payable yields have already 
been obtained. 

At Vinegar Hill the principal operations have been carried on by the Vinegar Hill Hydraulic Sluicing 
Company, and have been very successful during the latter part of the year. The clearing of the side 
of the hill was completed in August last, and a start to work at once made to sink an elevator. This 
work was much impeded through the presence of a number of large stones which had been packed in 
by a former party when driving the ground in order to hold it up. At present, despite of all these 
hindrances, the elevator is now down to a depth of 70 ft., and henceforward will have only virgin ground 
to operate on. A return of 560 oz. of gold has been obtained since October, and after liquidating all 
debts on claim a dividend of 2b. per share has been paid to the shareholders. There is little doubt that 
this claim is a valuable property, and good returns may be expected for many years to come. 

Two men^bamed O'Hara^and McCarthy are working an adjoining claim, and are said to be obtaining 
satisfactory results. 

At^^Cambrian's work is being carried on by five parties sluicing, and they seem satisfied mtix their 
earnings. 



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C— 3. 




SCANDINAVIAN GOLD-MINING COMPANY S CLAIM, ST. BATHAN S, OTAGO. SLUICING AND ELEVATING. 




UNDAUNTED GOLD-MINING COMPANY S CLAIM, MATAKANUI, OTAGO. SLUICING AND ELEVATING. 



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106 0.— 3. 

Matakanut (Tinkebs). 
The Undaunted €k>ld-mining Company holds 114 acres of ground. The depth of the face where 
work is being carried on at present is about 43 ft. From the bottom for 20 ft. up, the ground is com- 
posed of a heavy water-worn wash, with a good deal of hard boulders intermixed with the washdirt. 
The ground is elevated to a height of 57 ft., and the stones and dSbr%$ are stacked on the worked ground ; 
95 per cent, of the gold is saved in boxes before the wash is put through the elevator. There is also a line 
of boxes on top to catch what gold escapes from below ; the average saved in top boxes is about 5 per 
cent. The gold won for the past year amounted in value to £2,7(S 10s., and dividends amounting to 
£750 were paid. This company since March, 1898, has paid in dividends £10,500. The nominal capital 
is £20,000, of which £15,000 is paid up and £5,000 is held in reserve. An electrip-lighting plant has been 
installed on the claim, which enables the work to be carried on to much greater advantage during the 
night-time than when kerosene-lamps were used. The water was very scant during the first three 
months of the year, and this considerably retarded the work on the claim. The average number of men 
employed on the mine was ten. 

The Matakanui Gold-mining Company : This company is working a claim on the flat land between 
the Undaunted and the Tinker's Qold-mining Companies' claims ; the depth of the ground being worked 
b about 65 ft. They sluice off about 20 ft. of the top dirt and elevate the remainder about 45 ft. The 
ground is fairly rich in places. The capital of this company is £7,000 in £1 shares. The average number 
of men employed is seven. 

The Mount Morgan Oold-mining Company (capital, £2,800, in £1 shares) : This company hold 
100 acres of land on Smokers and Tinkers Flats ; the depth of the ground is about 20 ft., and it is elevated 
to a height of 25 ft. The ground is of a light nature and contains fair gold. The average number of 
men employed is four. 

linkers Grold-mining Company : This company has obtained 940 oz. of gold for the past year, 
havmg declared dividends amounting to 3s. 3d. per share for the year. The company declared in 
dividends since 1902 a shade over a quarter of the capital. The company is working in the portion 
of the claim known as the Deep Lead ; it is in what is locally termed the " granite formation," and the 
depth is unknown. Some years ago a company prospected the ground 240 ft. deep, obtaining as high 
as 6 gr. to the dish in some seams, and proved the claim to be auriferous and payable to the above deptii. 

Macrae's Flat. 

Gblden Bar Quartz-mine : This mine has had a very successful year, and returned good dividends 
to the shareholders, who are a working party. Towards the end of the year an arrangement was made 
with an outside party to buy the tailing and treat tixem with cyanide. The party have been operating 
on stone which contains a fair percentage of scheelite, which they are saving and dressing for shipment. 
The party are putting an oil-engine and better dressing appliances, consisting of Union vanners. 

Lidstone and party have started operating in the Ounce Claim, but as they only began a short time 
before the end of the year, they have not yet had a return. 

The Bonanza Mine was not worked during the year. 

The Highlay Mine and battery changed hands during the year, but little has been done since. 

A large area of ground has been taken up near the Highlay Mine by a party who are putting in 
machinery, and a company is being registered, to be called the *' New Zealand Oold and Tungsten Com- 
pany." Messrs. W. and G. Donaldson, experienced and successful quartz-miners, are the principal 
shareholders in this company. 

Golden Point Mine : The new battery was got to work during the year, and a low level drive put 
in 400 ft., disclosing a large body of good stone, and containing rich bunches of scheelite. A consider- 
able amount of scheelite has been shipped to Germany during the year, which realised as high as 
35 marks per umt, which, on 70 per cent, ore, the usual percentage the ore b dressed to, is equal to 
£122 10s. per ton. 

In alluvial mining at Macrae's there b less and less being done each year, and few Chinese are able 
to make a living. At Hyde, Middlemarch, Kyebum, Serpentine, and Patearoa, in mining matters 
the same state of affairs exists. No event worthy of notice has occurred. 

Oold to the value of £42,472 lis. 4d. has been purchased by the banks in this district during the year ; 
and although there has been a falling-off in the quantity of gold won as compared with last year's yield, 
taken on the whole, the year has been fairly prosperous from a mining point of view. 

Statement of Business transacted at the Warden's Court, Ophir, for the Year ending the dlst. 

December, 1904. 

Number of plaints dealt with, 4 ; number of appplications dealt with, 40 ; number of applications 
opposed, 11 ; number of miners' rights issued, 86 ; number of general registrations, 82 ; number of 
water-race licenses, 14 ; amount of fees and fines collected, £8 Is. : total revenue, £173 6s. 2d. 

Statement of Revenue received at the Warden's Court, Naseby, during the Year ended the Slst 

December, 1904. 

Miners' rights, at 58., £39 10s. ; consoUdated miners' rights, £4 ; water-race licenses, at 2s. 6d., 
£1 78. 6d. ; fees and fines, £38 14s. ; rents and royalties, £515 4s. 6d. ; miscellaneous, £55 17b. lOd : 
totil, £654 13s. lOd. I have, Ac., 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. J. MoBnnis, Warden. 

14— C. 3. 



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I h*Te the booonr to forwBid to toq harwrzk tLe i 
3l9t I>Br < mber, 1901, wi to nhmit tJhe fcf>/ra:c nmrt cc tW ktc 
tlurap? f<* tb« Hme period : — 

WEnttwrrojrr «, Blli Sm, ajtd TrArcxA Flat. 

The B}a< Spar and GabrieTt OrzHr CooAoIidated Go'jd Cr-mpAcr iListtcdi kare been canymg 
on o^^ratiofu daring the Te*r. sr.d t^<e nuaftc^r. Mr. J. HoT^rd J*ckiock. Las kindhr sappiied me vitk 
the io'.Urmnf^ details in connerti'm wnh tLe miTje : Arm^ E.-i=.ber of a^n emfAojtd, 28; ftBOUit 
o< e«iiient treated, 203,135 c^bir rardi ; amount «rf fo>d w^-'Si, L525<*i^ wortb £6i.062 6a. 3d. ; coit 
fA winning the gold, £2 19ft. ^4, per o^inre. or 75 per oect. of lU ral^M : ankooiu paad in wagea, £3,001 
U, 2d. ; amount paid for exp!ociT€a, £4^ 4a. 8d. : tocax '^*!^*rJaJ expeodhue. £4,556 lOi. Id. The 
accidenU in the mine during the jti^r were otlr tririaL TLe d:^-:iItT in woridng tke ceownt incnuei 
from rariooa caoaes, but the coat of imwatering the mir^ La* b«^£. red:aced fran 7 per cent, of tke water 
vitpplf to about 3 per cent, br improremeata in the pwnpicg appliaacea. Tike end of tiie Tear prodnoed 
a good water-supply. 

The Golden Crescent Sluicing Companr (limited) at Wethentone'a hare earned on opcratioDt 
during the year, and the manager haa nppj«d me with the foUoving figvrca : Aren^e nnmber of men 
employed, 7 ; amount of material treated, IStJJSGO cubic yarda ; amount of goJd won, 714 oa., woEtb 
£2,7GO ; cost of winning the gold, £1,100 ; amount paid in wafea. £860. The gronnd i iwiaatgid of about 
equal parta of old tailinzB treated more than onoe under the old syitem and grouid tbat bad been 
tunnelled out so completely that scaroehr a yard of «olid lEroond waa left. Mining opentions were 
considerably interfered with in Angnst and September owing to the water>noe bong Uodced witk 
snow and ice. 

At Wetherstone's the claims belonging to Mesna. Smyth, Adama, and Donlan and tbe Locd I^^ 
Mining Company (limited) have been constantly at work, with fairhr goad r e— Its . 

At Munro's Gully mining opentions are still being carried on in the foOowiDg sfancinf daiaaa : J. 
Kitto and party, P. P. Thomaa and party, Edward Browne and party. 

TuAPKKa Flat amd TnnACia. 

Undoubtedly this field would be greatly benefited by an adequate watcr-aopply. I am of opinion 
that hundreds of acres of payably auriferous ground would be worked if a good water-supply were 
available. Experts are of opinion that the ground that has already been dredged would pay a fair 
wage if worked by hydraulic elevating, provided water waa procurabie at a reasonable figure. 

The following dredges are working at Tuapeka Flat : the Gabriel Gold-dredging Company, 
J. Harris and party, the Taniwha Gold-dredging Conipany. 

WamHtniA. 

Three privately owned dredges are still working in this locality and three principal sluicing claims 
^vis., Messrs. Thompson and party, J. Ferris and party, and the SaOor's Gully Gold-mining Company 
(Limited) — ^have been in active operation during tbe year, with fair success. 

Messrs. \^^lliam Adams and party — known aa the Lower (Serman Flat Company — have just com- 
pleted the construction of an extension of their water-race to Waitahuna Gully, a distance of about four 
miles. The total expenditure on construction of race and fluming, purchase of pipes, and opening up 
the claim will be about £1,500 or £1,600 ; and the intention is to work by hydraulic elevating the claim 
formerly held by the Waitahuna Chilly (jk)ld-dredging Company. 

Table Hill. 

Messrs. Thomas Park and party have been working a quartz claim at Canada Reef during the 
last twelve months with, I understand, very fair success. They lately acquired af^stamper-battery. 
and are working away steadily. 

Makitka Cbeek. 

A company has been formed in Lawrence during the year, called the Manuka Mining Company 
(Limited) to work a claim in the locality of what is known as Comb's old claim. The method of work- 
ing is ground-sluicing, and I understand the claim is giving payable returns. 

Gk>BB, Waikaka, Waimumu, and Charlton. 

Nothing of importance has transpired during the year ; but, speaking generally, over the whole 
of the above districts, I am pleased to r^>ort that the dredging industry is in a fairly satisfactory state. 
During the year very little land was taken up for dredging purposes, but at the same time there were 
but few of the existing claims surrendered. At the end of the year there were twenty-five dredges 
working in the Waikaka Valley. Vive at Charlton, one on the Mataura River near (Sore, and four 
at Waimumu, making a total of thirty-five and representing a capital value of about £122,500. 

With reference to the dredging of agricultural land, I am pleased to report that the Messrs. 
McQeorge Bros, (dredge-owners) at Waikaka have constructed and are now working a contrivance 
on their dredges by which, in the dredging operations, the top soil after passing through an extra shoot 
is re-deposited on top of die dredged gravel in sufficient thickness to make the land avidlable for agri- 
cultural purposes almost immediately, or, at any rate, as soon as it has settled down. 



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C.-3. 




MAcr.Eonr.E bkos.' no. 1 claim, waikafa. — i:our;H tailincs, as deposited vmou to the introduc- 
tion OF thkih new method. 




MACGEORGE BROS.* NO. 1 CLAIM, WAIKAKA. — VIEW SHOWING JUNCTION OF TAILINGS DEPOSITED BY 
OLD METHOD, AND REGULAR SURFACE MADE BY THE NEW SYSTEM. 



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107 C— 3. 

Waikaia. 

The dredging industry in this subdistrict I am pleased to report has gone on improving, and there 
are now ten diredges worlang in the locality, all on payable gold ; some of them getting very handsome 
returns and paying the owners and shareholders large dividends. 

The revenue collected by the Receiver of Gold Revenue for rents, Ac., amounted to about £300 
for the year. 

I am informed on good authority that the local bank at Waikaia purchased 5,200 oz. of gold during 
the year, and it is estimated that at least 1,600 oz. have been disposed of outside the bank, making a 
total of 6,800 oz., valued at about £27,000, which, I think, must be considered very good indeed. Of 
course the hydraulic elevating and sluicing claims in the district have assisted in the above production. 
The following claims have been carrying on operations during the year : viz., the Argyle Hydraulic 
Sluicing Company, the Winding Creek Company, the Nokomai Hydraulic Company. About one hun- 
dred and sixty Europeans are now engaged in mining generally in the district. 

Waipori. 

Mining matters have been very quiet in this locality during the year ; no new finds have been re- 
ported, but there are stiU nine dredges at work, which means the employment of about fifty men. 

There are a good few hydraulic claims at work, all with payable returns, I understand. 

Some of the machinery has been sold from the O.P.Q. claim, so that any chance of work being re- 
sumed in the mine is now, I think, very remote. I have, Ac,, 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. 0. Cruickshank, Warden. 



Mr. Warden Burgess, Queenstown, to the Under-Secretary for Mines, Wellington. 
Sir,— Warden's Office, Queenstown, 31st March, 1905. 

I have the honour to forward herewith statistical returns relating to this portion of the Otago 
Mining District for the year ended the Slst December, 1904, together with a general report on mining 
in the several subdistricts under my charge. 

Queenstown and Arrow. 

Alluvial mining still constitutes the principal source from which gold is derived in this portion of 
the district. 

On the Shotpver River all the claims mentioned in my last report are stiU working and, on the 
whole, continue to 3rield payable returns. During the greater part of last year there was a good supply 
of water for sluicing purposes, and steady work has in consequence been carried on. Thompson and 
party, who were engaged for several years in driving a main tunnel into their claim, have now opened 
out the mine, and have found gold in payable quantities. Smith and party, who have for some years 
successfully carried on hydraulic operations on their river claim on the Upper Shotover, have worked 
out this ground and are now working on the terraces above. They have removed and altered their 
plant for this purpose. W. L. Davis and party have successfully worked their claim, which is situated 
about 200 ft. above the Shotover River. They have ten heads of water going through a 1 -ft. -diameter 
pipe, with a pressure of 200 ft., and an enormous amount of stuff is put through. The tail-race is 400 ft. 
long, paved with railway-iron. The average yearly washing-up vields 800 oz. to 900 oz. The gold 
is of the highest quality. J. Davis's hydrauUc claim is also a terrace claim, working successfully. The 
outlay for pipes, &c., to the present time exceeds £1,400. At the Sandhills, two claims are at work, 
yieldmg from £4 to £4 lOs. per man per week. There are two dredges stiU on the Shotover River, 
but only one — the Maori Point dredge — has been working. Operations have, however, not been re- 
cently successful, and the owners have had many difficulties to contend against. This portion of the 
river is believed to be richly auriferous, and the shareholders are sanguine of ultimate success. 

The copper lode at Moke Creek still attracts some attention, but nothing of any importance has 
been done with regard to it. At present it is held by a Dunedin syndicate, who have had granted to 
them a prospecting-license over 100 acres, including this lode. It is their intention to prospect the 
ground and test the ore, and, if results warrant it, to then undertake more extensive operations. As 
the property has only recently come into their hands, no practical work has yet been done. 

At the Twelve-mile Creek on Lake Wakatipu, Reid and party are still working their sluicing claim 
with success, and Valpy and party continue to work their claim at Bucklerburn, otherwise very little 
mining is being carried on near the margin of the lake. 

Quartz-mining has not added very greatly to the gold-returns for the year, but the outlook for 
the future is encouraging. The Shotover Quartz-mining company has been working all the year, and 
the crushings have yielded fairly well. The small cyanide plant has proved itself a very serviceable 
adjunct to the battery, and its use will be continued. Mr. Robert L^ has transferred his claim (the 
old Bullendale property at Skipper's) to the Mount Aurum Grold-mining Company. Work has been 
continued through the year, and about twenty men have been employed prospecting on the lode. Pay- 
able gold has been found at the east and west ends of the claim. The battery has been put in order, 
and crushing has lately started, but the results are not yet known. Considerably over 1,000 ft. of driv- 
ing, besides croascuttmg, has been done. The state of the mine is very promising. On the Arrow 
River the Indian Olenrock Company have been working their claim during the past twelve months, 
and the operations have left a margin of profit to the company. Operations are now suspended, but 
it ia expected that arrangements wOl be made within a few months for recommencing work. During 
the latter part of the year several quartz claims have been taken up in Scanlon's OuUy, near Macetown, 



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C.—9. 1* 

*!>>%^ to tlw? oA Tipp-^rarr M:r^- ?r»rj? tu/m -w* '^f -,ot --.t tsetse ^ai=:b jyMed at the iste of 2oi. 
to th« U':^ Woek ^m b<!>^i t^cti-.aed ::: t>^ tat, t i-: liij* r!*:iju oi r»ofrt rr^*h:r.g kATe not been 
Mftde frio.jr, I< M c.'#i<tiitoocL ao»*T«, i:LfcS :i^ r»ci*r« are fAjiz-^. Ti^ nti i» irom 2 ft_ 6 in. 
toSft. wide. 

rsAginf from K/^ ft. to ^^i ft. abore 'i"? r.T*r Lax* '►•h^^ wcrx-wi c-rt- Tbcfe are three k^^idng dainK 
at work in the app^ Arrow R*T«r— oo? w:rf:-£ "tr * jir^ij: ^zjizzjl AZ are dotiLi^ wdL Lower 
down the nrer. Eiear lU j -.vr^oc wnh tt* E-^t lt*k^ » tiije Arrow Fa^* Clais. Cientiooed in prerioito 
reporta. An ecr>ra»aft a!r>9G£.t of wocx ia* E#*?rL i- rj*^ :c ztji rltJT. free:: ir»t to last, and operations 
are beinf et^npK* aHj '•arr>?d ot. ac aT^raje « *-.nt n^c. t^iin^ «=.f >.7*d. Tie retTin:& are payable. 
This «^Uim. M a #i::^'^Ti-r or^ v> wont <i-ini^ t:i^ wi^t^r =i- -t-ti:*- ccera&tc^ t^i^ l jk impeded by frost. 
A httie lower dowx the nver a priTaie '-xr^pAtr n proc^*:.- w:r£i^ a riTfr-i^zyinL^ clam with a large 
taii'iaee. Abo^it a eii> bew>w Arrowv>w:L. ot riie Arrcw Rrr*r. a clun: a 6e*if worked by Feehy, 
Hayea, ai>i par*y- Tier iiaTe t*?eft at treat eipecae :=. pr>-:ni;E fii-t4"t> Lydrasbr plant to work 
*he riTer-b^fi- Tiey owr a wat<r-ra»:^ §-:r>? =u>* li >%r:^ im^ix a pe*«Kire o€ 190 ft. thro«gh iron 
pipes- I: » 'Ti.'ir ^^tetiticc. to work the b-^ of :he Arrow R.v<t. tikii^ rt oc a fa«- So iv operatioos 
kare ^asd, Scechetifloc az^ ?>*rrr are wrrtzr^ a «I::>-i'^ '-lar^ at bracken's, ttanf bo leas than fiovr 
fcea/^ c< water. Tie <2a*=i xi «r:;=ared a»jt !,*•.•.• ft. at<-re tie Arrow Rnrer, Dning tfce last sun- 
iiier. a« s.>:i a* £j5t> per =:*=. wa* rr^yje 'it ic:^ r^et fcr twc w^fks' work. In Xew C%mm Gidly, a 
tci-LI pATTT >i at work %.^'\:^ b^ =iot <k^jr^ rery well At Cariroca the Lo&e Star Dn6pa§ Oam- 
pAty oATe bees. «tea<Lly wcrk:::« in th«e bed d the CardmcA Rixer foe Terr fair retsnM. TW La- 
frac«:h; Cc'^.muit baTe sot seen '!arrTinc on operat^:.^:* for scoe tine, tbe resoh of pttal work beinf 
T*rT •::ap;i*i^««riL Ad'/A r .:r^ the Lo^je Scar Clair: m the SQ:iteaci Cc?np*ny • daizn. reccBtly taken 
xp hy a fmAll bit ecerzea-: p^rty. Tbey have ^trzfk laj eoil ac^ are bopef:iI of sooress. They own 
ler^n ziiics of wacer-raiceB. Litt> ar*i parry's hydrasir *i::i:ir^ -tlar^i. a httle lower down the Car- 
^imrjh Val>y. has been worked ««*dily, ar>i payable iKuum obtained. 

ClOVWBli. 

DiriruE the year ;^Bt e&>d tbere La§ been do faZ:nz-o£ in r. :r:'g in tfcis fabdsthrf. Compared 
wttb Lmc year the l e t.^ii g haTe been b^^er. arid tho:i^ a n-mber of rLanns haw been suioidered 
dirsr^ the per>5d, tbere » za io::bt ttat «^\^rAl of th^^e wo^jd haxie paid if soSHect rapital had 
flcycnAZT been pcoTyi**i to wcrk them. 

Tbe ntoK profninent featcaes of ciirinjt 'i:m:£ the past year \um been t&e fveess of the upper 
Chiraa dr^ires- A ipeat adrantaee pooBeased bv these d»e<i£»« is tbetr ability to work all the year 
roixad. Taey tn:a» a5ord 'or^tant employment t^ tne »nen ^nrwed itpoo them. The eootiniKXB 
oatore of their oceritir.rj* m-irt V taken into rorasderation w*en rompannjr the foW won by these 
dredges wrtii ret^ima from dred^ees on the C!-tba Rirer bejow *"rotEweli and the Rawaraa River, the 
majoetty oi whi»ta aax*^ to '•Jo«e down when the river rises. In the prerioas year three diedises were 
wodcnir on *h^ ^?P*^ CI -tba : tb» year there have b^^^n m. all within a radms of foar miiea. Two of 
the eodpar^i^ workm^c the^«e dr**ti^*» wiH pmt,*'- ly sooc be p»yinc drridenda. and the other dredges 
are aJ gmn« «arwfartory retiims. It is rorJidentlv eipeeted that this part of the river wiD erentmlly 
prove the *cene of operaoo&s of a n-iic-eroos dredcnjr ieet. The fio«i->l is Eost notable far drsdging, 
the sr^^i exisnn<r :n n-;mero:» layers throozh 40 ft. of zraveL 

•'jn tile Kawaras Rrrer the Eleetrie No. 1 and No. f dredff?* hare been ferdnf lemarfcahfe retmos, 
th^ 5o. 2 iaTtnjr obtained in oce week 1.265 oi>. and some tiiiie afterwards the No. 1 fot 1,273 oc, 
adso ime a week's wr,rfc. The latter is a remrd retxan for the who> district. These dredges shovtld 
do ^CTAily weil drrtnjr the rominje year. The Jonrtion Eleetric Company has another dredge working 
oa ta<»tr ■'-hii.ra^ arrf h is considered mxich better re^oitB wiB be obtuned this se— on than daziiig the 

iMt. 

Crr 'he Cl.tha, V^>jw Cromwell Bridge, f^ar dredces hame been fettinf steady returns, b«t have 
jatrrAT.-^ -if-ftK: ir.-w^ owing to the river risine. 

V* -loe L*vt^Jf. mining is qoiet, there being httle charge from last vear. There is oae dredge 
T',rr.-^ r^ the ftrer owned by a private rompany). and getting payab> rettnua. There are a few 
*Z i-TAt --me» at work, but th«^ return of grvSd is smalL I nnd^rstawl a large sluirinf eiaim wffl be 
*.-uvrri-T *Ad^T^ ip ly?re. 

A.t N-TTi* m.'irng continues to be prosperously carried on. The dredges have been kept steadily 
« w*irlc Tie ^heapn*as of coal enables steam-driven dredges to be worked here with leas expense 
tkan etaewiere. There are several *lmcing claims at work, all doing well 

Qz3LnZ' *r . *r . 7zm has been voy inactive. The hopes held oat a year or two ago of a reaowed interest 
,n tLiA " juA of mining have, anfortnnately, not been realised. At that time several q«artx daims had 
been taken ip ai d.5erent parts of the dwtrict, and it was anticipated that t^ proqfscting canied on 
wo^>i reiKh .n the discovery of payable quartz reefs^ as there is every reason to believe in thebr existence 
;n to:* djstnrt. One by one, however, these claims were, after more or leas work had been expended 
o« them, g:^^n Tip as !inprofitab!e, and now quartx-mining is carried on in a desoltorr manner by one 
w two parties otily. There are two claims at work in the Carrick Ranges, bnt their opentiona have not 
been very scceessfnL The ownen of oce of these claims are now patting op a more powofal battery, 
being of opinion that there is sufficient gold to pay if the ore were sabjected to more e ffi c i ent treatment 
At fiendigo a party of tribotexs were for a time engaged in working the old Bendigo Ifine* bnt dinon- 
tint;ed thrmA want of socceaa. Daring the past km years seraal att e m p ts have been made by 
'i-^erer.t p&rtie^ to reopen this or.ce fa moos mine, but in each case c^perations were d J K mtinne d becanse 
•t was foond that the capital at command was insufficient to <^n ont the mine on a oomfreheDsive 
pL*n v/ M to enable the lower levels of the mine to be worked. The pi op eiU has lately changed hands, 



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109 C— 8. 

and the new proprietary are endeavouring to raise sufficient capital to put in a low-level tunnel by means 
of which the deeper portions of the mine (still intact) can oe economically worked. The estimated 
cost of such a tunnel would be about £10,000. It is sincerely to be desired* in the interests of the whole 
district, that their e£Eorts will prove successful. 

Clyde and Alexandra. 

The number of men employed in sluicing and fossicking in this portion of the district is diminishing 
year by year. In the outlying gullies, where a few years ago it was not unusual to find a few men in 
eaich doing fairly well, only an odd Chinaman may now be seen. Two or three parties, with their own 
water, are still carrying on operations on the west bank of the Clutha River, but not, I am afraid, with 
very profitable results. The bulk of the excellent water-supply from the Fraser River is being devoted 
to stripping o£E the overburden for the benefit of the worlang dredges and for keeping the river-bank 
dredges afloat. 

The water-rights of the Alexandra Bonanza Company are not at present being utilised, and that 
part of the Galloway Terraces which a few years ago attracted considerable attention has, from want 
of an adequate supply of water, become practically deserted, and the licenses for the many small claims 
which were then taken up have been cancelled. Since the cancellation of these titles a syndicate of 
Dunedin gentlemen has taken up five special claims over and adjoining the same ground, and men are 
now engaged in systematically prospecting with a view to discovering whether gold exists in sufficient 
quantities to warrant the expenditure necessary to bring water on to the field. 

During the year Mr. James Rivers extended his water-race from Tucker's Flat to a terrace near 
the Manorbum Creek. A considerable amount of sluicing was done, but as the season was, locally, an 
exceptionally poor one for water, the result of his operations was somewhat disappointing. He seems 
satic&ed, however, that under more favourable circumstances the ground will prove payable, and intends 
to give it a further trial. 

Dredging,—Th» dredges above Alexandra, which, from their favourable position, have put in 
average working-time, may be said to have done remarkably well. The season for gorge dredging, 
however, was most unfavourable, and this has militated very much against the returns from these 
dredges, and also the aggregate yield of the district. The Manuherikia dredge, at the entrance to the 
gorge, had the longest run, putting in twenty-five weeks, during which time 1,714 oz. of gold was won, 
or an average of 68 oz. per week ; while the Sailor's Bend dredge only worked five weeks, for 139 oz. ; 
the New First Chance dredge, nine weeks for 474 oz. ; the New Golden River dredge, two weeks for 
76 oz. ; and the New Bendigo dredge, six weeks for 129 oz. These returns, however, clearly indicate 
that the gold is in the river in highly remunerative quantities if the conditions are only favourable 
for winning it. These remarks also apply to the Fourteen-mile Beach dredge a few miles lower down 
the gorge. This dredge worked only thirteen weeks, during which time 1,763 oz. of gold was obtained, 
or an average weekly return of 135 oz. There are miles of dredgeable river between this and Coal Creek 
as yet practically untried, and there is every likelihood that this stretch of the river will in the future 
again attract the attention of investors who, profiting by past unfortunate experience, will be prepared 
to equip their claims with modem and adequate machinery. 

At and near Sandy Point the results for the past year may be set down as extremely satisfactory, 
and although many of the claims have been worked for several years with profit, they exhibit no sign 
of being exhausted. The Eamscleugh No. 3 dredge, working some distance from the river-bank, has 
succeeded in reaching the level of the river, and for some time has been 3aelding very satisfactory 
returns. Indeed, so well have the results satisfied the shareholders that the company have pegged 
out and applied for fresh ground, intending to procure for emplo3rment thereon another equally capable 
dredge. For this purpose they have purchased the pontoons which were constructed for the Fraser 
Flat Company close by. 

At and near Clyde the Unity and Matau dredges are the]^only machines at^work at present. The 
Monte Christo and the Davis Bend No. 2 dredges have for some time ceased operations, and are in the 
hands of caretakers. The Monte Christo will, however, commence operations again when the river 
reaches its most favourable condition for dredging. The company has only a limited capital at its 
command, and desires to employ it in carrying out its operations only under the most favourable cir- 
cumstances. The Davis Bend dredge has been idle for over a year, and it is the general impression 
that it will not start again under the present ownership. This is somewhat surjprising and also disap- 
pointing to local people, because, when working previously, the claim proved highly payable even up 
to the time when operations were suspended. 

There are three dredges working on the Manuherikia River. The Olrig and the Manuherikia 
Syndicate are advantageously working, whilst the third, owned by a private party, is approaching 
the party's claim by means of dredging through adjoining ground. 

Bald Hill Flat : There are no workings of note to report in this locality. The Last Chance Sluicing 
Company had a fairly successful year, and Carroll and party did well, working Mitchell's claim on 
tribute. 

Quarto.— The Excelsior and White's Reefs are still being worked, but, from want of capital, Mr. 
Symes, the proprietor of the latter, is unable to properly develop the mine as he would like, but seems 
quite satisfied that there is a good run of payable stone close by, and has no present intention of relaxing 
lus efforts to obtain it. 

Roxburgh. 

The Ladysmith and Roxburgh Amalgamated companies have been working steadily at Roxburgh 
East. The former is doing exceedingly well, while the latter, though not so prosperous, is turning 
over a large area of ground at no lost to the company. 



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C— 8. 



110 



Hangbton and party at Commissioner's Flat, and Manuel Brothers at Coal Creek» hare the only 
other sluicing claims of any magnitude in this locality, and although hampered considerably by want 
of fall, both may be regarded as fairly payable undertakings. 

Dredging.^llm industry has improved very much during the past year. The Golden'. Birer 
dredge heads the list with 2,321 oz., while the Roxburgh Jubilee, Golden Bed, Lady Roxburgh, Otaffo 
No. 2, Ettrick, and Golden Gate dredges have all succeeded in paying substantial dividends. The 
Golden Treasure dredge has also met with its usual success, but it is uiKlerstood that the surplus has 
been devoted to the purchase of a second dredge instead of being paid away in dividends. 

The statement following shows the working-results of fifty dredges, the aggregate gold won 
(59,613 oz.) and dividends paid (£85,226). These figures compare very favourably witii those of the 
previous year, when sixty diedges produced 54,162 oz. 10 dwt., the dividends declared being £81,177 3s. ; 
but show a marked improvement on those of 1901, when the same number of dredges is credited witii 
44,913 oz., and dividends £45,358. 

Bbtubn of Fifty Dredges showing Gold won, Number of Working Weeks, Average for each 
Working Week, and the Dividends paid, for the Year ended the Slst December, 1904. 



Name of Companj. ; 


Momber 
of Weeks 


Amonnt ol Gold 


Avenge 
per Work- 
ing Week. 


Capitol. 


Divldendi Piiid. 


1 


workiDg. 


won. 












t 


1 
Os. dwt. gr. , 


0«. 


M 


i 


B. 


d. 


Matau ... 


33 , 


701 16 


21 


7,000 








Unity \ 


21 1 


666 18 


28 


10,600 


525" 








Dunstan Lead ... ... ... > 


39 


1,426 17 


36 


17,600 


1,748 


14 





Perseverance No. 1 


32 


1,623 8 16 


60 


i 14,000 


1.873 


16 





Perseverance No. 2 


35 


901 14 18 


25 


Sandy Point 


33 


1,501 18 8 


45 


8,000 


1.600 








Eamscleugh No. 1 


36 


974 19 21 ' 


27 


I 11 000 


4 950 








Eamscleugh No. 2 ... ... i 


28 


1,069 2 21 


38 


r *■ *■ t vw 


^ f t/t/Vf 






Enterprise No. 1 ... ... ... ] 


47 


1,054 9 6 


22 


^' 7 000 


2 975 








Enterprise No. 2 ... ... ... j 


40 


1,023 16 16 


25 


If vw 


*i ^ if t XJ 


v 




New Golden Beach 


35 


609 12 


14 


5,000 








Molyneux Hydraulic 


30 


421 


14 


5,896 








Alexandra Lead ... 


21 


472 14 


22 


17,521 








Clyde 


28 


977 10 


.35 


4,000 


1.050 








Manuherikia 


25 


1.714 1 


68 


]i.000 


5.400 








Chicago... 


42 


668 13 6 


16 


5,000 


, , 






Olrig 


46 


1.059 2 22 


23 


6.055 


695 


10 





Sailor's Bend 


5 


139 


28 


8,000 








New First Chance 


9 


472 12 


52 


7,000 


. . . 






New Bendigo 


6 


129 10 


21 


6,600 


. .. 






New Golden River 


2 


76 


38 


3.000 








New Fourteen-mile Beach... 


13 


1,763 16 


136 


4,800 


2.760 








Lady Roxburgh ... 
Molyneux Koninoor 


42 


1,754 10 7 


41 


6.660 


1,663 








25 


469 19 13 


18 


9,575 








New Roxburgh Jubilee 


38 


2,264 4 


59 


7,500 


6,750 








Ettrick ... 


39 


1,098 6 


28 


10,260 


1,015 








Majestic 


20 


566 13 


28 


6.600 








OtagoNo. 1 
OtagoNo. 2 


42 
40 


768 7 
1,648 10 


18 
41 


\ 5.000 


876 








Golden Gate 


46 


797 1 


17 


2.500 


500 








Golden Bed 


41 


1,809 8 


44 


12,706 


1.270 


6 





Golden Treasure ... 


32 


1,005 4 


44 


2,876 








Golden Run 


33 


2,321 16 


70 


11,000 


3,850" 








New Halfway House 


16 


441 13 8 


29 


8,000 


... 






Riley's Beach 


9 


428 19 


47 


9,650 


... 






New Alpine Consols 


14 


536 1 20 


38 


6,195 








Alpine No. 2 


19 


565 11 22 


29 


6,000 


... 






H artley and Riley 


21 


933 1 13 


44 


6,500 


1.626 








Electric No. 1 
Electric No. 2 ... 


35 

38 


6,102 3 
7,282 13 


174 
191 


I 26,000 


39.650 








Junction Electric No. 1 


32 


1.410 12 


41 


1 26.000 


1.300 








Junction Electric No. 2 


27 


596 17 


22 


Cromwell No. 1 ... 


29 


1,381 5 6 


47 


' 7,000 

1 


3.150 








Cromwell No. 2 ... 


30 


664 3 


22 


Rise and Shine No. 1 


44 


1,861 16 


42 


' 12,000 








Rise and Shine No. 2 


40 


496 5 


20 








Rising Sun 


42 


1.660 1 


39 


8.000 








Revival ... 


28 


717 19 


26 


? 








Loch Lomond 


18 


318 17 


17 


? 








Ngapara No. 3 ... 


18 

i 


152 19 10 


8 


7,000 








Total ... 


60,261 4 20 


... 


366,784 


86,226 


5 






NoTB.— Tbe above figures do not indicate the total output of gold by ] 
dredffes named, ibeie are at least eleven owned by private parties whose returns are not niade puUio. 



I ot dredging, for, in addition to tbe 

^. . renotmadepublio. Thesedredges 

aie known to be average ^old-produoers, and consist of Tbe Eamscleu^ No. 8, Nganara No. 1, Ngapara No. S, 
Manorbum Syndicate, Teviot, Endeavour, Gold King, Oicgan end party, Prfngle and party (two), and tbe Meg 
id Annie Syndicate. 



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Ill a— 3. 

GoMPA&ATiVB Sti^TBicsNT ID respeot <d Fdtt Drsdobs, showiDg the Aggregate Working 
Weeks, Quantity of Gold won. Capital invested, and Amount of Dividends declared dur- 
ing the Years 1901, 1902, 1903, and 1904. 

i T 

^•^ WoriSg Weeks. GoM obuined. incited. ' DtvideDds deolued. 



Oi. dwt. gr. £ ' £ t. d. 

1901 1,182 44,913 18 3 472,076 45,358 14 

1902 1,596 71,315 15 ' 348,801 107.506 6 

1903 1,454 54,162 10 1 395,429 81,177 3 

1904 ... ... ... 1,464 59.613 5 6. 356.784 85,226 5 



There is a sli^t &tlling-off in the revenue returns for the past year, caused chiefly hy sunenders, 
amalgamations, and repegging ; hut it is not expected that the current year will suffer in this respect 
to the same extent. 

1 have, Ac., 

Fbbd. J. BuBOBBS, Warden. 
The Under-Secretary Mines Department, Wellington. 



Mr. Warden Riddbll, Invercargill, to the Undbb-Secbetabt fob Mikbs, Wellington. 
Snu— Magistrate's Office, Invercargill, 20th April, 1906. 

Wbstebn Distbiot. 

Bound Hill GMfidd. — There is little to report on this field for the year ending the 31st December, 
1904, beyond the work carried on by the Round Hill Mining Company (Limited), the Ourawera Gk)ld- 
mining Company (Limited), and the Smith Gk>ld-mining Company (Limited). Three Europeans have 
been working the ground about half a mile above the township by means of ground-sluicing ; and towards 
Colac, near the head of Jewell's Gully, another party of Europeans are elevating. The latter have a 
reservw for storing water, but as the supply is limited their work is irregular. Both parties do little 
more than pay wages. From ten to thirteen (Chinese are also working intermittently on the field. 
With regard to the companies above mentioned, the Round Hill Biining Company (Limited) commenced 
operations in 1891. They have a paid-up capital of £28,245, and during the year paid a dividend of 
£3 per cent, on the capital. This company possesses the best water-supply on the field. It comes 
from the Longwood Ranges, and during the year work in the shape of sluicing and elevating has been 
carried on, cUefly on the east side of the stream below the township. When water was plentiful the 
ground on the west side of the stream was worked, and it is estimated that it will take several years 
to sluice and elevate the rest of the ground held by the company. The Ourawera Gk>ld-mining Company 
(Limited) is a much smaller company, having a capital of £3,000. It commenced operations in 1895, 
and since then dividends amounting to £1 8s. per share have been paid to the shareholders. Its water- 
supply is very fair, and the usual operations of sluicing and elevating have been carried on throughout 
the year in extending the area beyond the ground worked in 1903. Some work has also been done 
at the junction of the Italian Gully with the main stream running through the field ; but, on the whoK 
the returns have not been so profitable as for the year ending 1903. The Smith Gold-mining Oompany 
(Limited) was registered in or about the year 1898. It has a capital of £2,000. Its water-supply is 
much smaller than that of either of the companies already mentioned, and during the year ground- 
sluicing was carried on with comparatively little success. This company has not yet paid a divid^id 
to its shareholders. The whole of these companies have a number of years' work before them, but 
whether of a profitable nature or not it is impossible for me to say. 

Orepuki Gcldfidd.— On this field very little fresh ground was opened up during the year, but there 
are indications to show that within a short time a considerable area of ground south of Orepuki proper 
will be worked, and from it good returns are expected. The great drawback to further prospecting 
is the difficulty and expense of extending water-races to new ground, and so long as fairly good and 
easily worked claims are left in Orepuki proper no new ground will be taken up. In some cases during 
the year several parties have had excellent returns (reaching as high as 50 02. per month), and with 
bimila'-ly good ground in view. In all there are about twenty sluicing claims on the field, all working 
with varied success, the poorest returning fair wages, while equal results are expected for some con- 
siderable time. 

West Waiau Goldfidd.— Some of the cbims on thb field have done exceptionally well. Recent 
storms have washed up brge quantities of gold-bearing sands, thus giving the sea-beach claims a fresh 
life. In some eases as much as £10 per week per man has been obtained, while the alluvial claims'on 
the terrace are still paying their way. 

Stewart Island GMfidd.— Widdow&on's claim in the Anglem district has been discontinued, owing 
to the results from the workings not being up to expectations. In the Pegasus district operations of 
a prospecting nature are still being carried on by the Stewart Island Tin-minesJProprietary Syndicate, 
but as yet they have not discovered an3rthing of a payable character. 

Preservation Inlet GMfield,— Work on this field has been stationary during the year. Some pros- 
pecting has been done in various places, but without much success. An e£Eort is being made by 
an Invercargill syndicate to work the Moming*Star Mine, but as yet no'definite arrangements have 
been made. 

Eastebn Distbict. 

Waikawa GMfidd,— On this field only two men have been working during the past year, in con- 
junction with farming operations. So far as mining is concerned the field seems pretty> well worked 
out. I have, &c.. 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. W. G. Riddell, Warden. 



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112 



GOVERNMENT WATER-RACES. 

Mr. Albxavdsb AmuH, Manager, Waimea-Komara Water-races^ to the UvDKR-SiCRnABT rom 

Mnrsa, Wellington. 
Sib,— Kumara, 20th April, 1905. 

I have the honour to forward the following report on the working of the Waimea-Komara 
Water-races for the financial year ended the Slst March, 1905. 

Waimba Racb. 
The total sales of water from this|race for the year ended the 31st March, 1905, amounted to 
£613 10s. 3d., and the expenditure for ,the ^same period on gauging, maintenance, and repairs was 
£680 8s., showing a debit balance of £66 17s. 9d. on the transactions for the year. 

The average number of miners supplied with water from the race for sluicing purposes during the 
year was 20-25, and the approximate quantity of gold obtained by them was 1,830 oz., having a value 
of £7.137. 

' ^ ^he sales of water were less by £110 98. 2d. than during the preceding year, and the quantity o| 
gold obtained was approximately 159 02. less, representing a decrease in value of £620 2s. 

The number of miners employed in sluicing with water from the race was 5*16 less than during the 
preceding year. 

iThe expenditure on gauging, maintenance, and repairs compared with the preceding year was 
£37 19s. 6d. less, although a considerable amount had to be expended in the neighbourhood of the head- 
worto at Kawhaka, and on the various flumes on the lower portion of the race. 
^JfThe headworks at Kawhaka, the Waimea S3rphon, the fluming, and all the races and branch races 
have been maintained and repaired, and are now in good workable condition, considering the length of 
time since they were originally constructed. 

At the Stafford end of the race very little work has been done during the year, and the ground has 
been very poor. The supply of witer was interrupted for a portion of the time by a land-slip, which 
carried away a length of high fluming, and the supply is now being conveyed across the gap by {Hpes. 
Had fluming been again constructed, it would not have been safe until the ground liable to slip had fa^ly 
settjed. 

\'\ jThe only parties using water from the Stafford portion of the race are Chinamen, and as the pros- 
pects during the latter portion of the year have improved considerably, and as a new claim is being 
put in worlong-order by them, there is a fair prospect of the sales of water from the race being much 
better than for some years past. 

The Chinamen in the Stafford district, although making a bare living, have been very prasevering 
in their endeavour to open up payable ground, and the prospects recently obtained are certainly 
encouraging, and, as there is a very large extent of ground still unworked and very littie prospected, 
a better and more prosperous year may reasonably be expected. 

^ ~^At Tunnel Terrace, in the Goldsborough portion of the district, there are still a number of parties 
at work, but sluicing has been intermittent during the year, and the results have not been of a very 
satisfactory description. The ground is poor, and in order to make it pay large quantities of wash 
have to be sluiced away, and this can only be done by using a plentiful supply of water. There is stiU 
an enormous quantity of poor wash in this locality ; and the reduction in the price of water, which takes 
effect from and after the 1st May, will do much to put fresh life into mining generally in the Waimea 
district. 

At the claim owned by Perry and party not much work has been done during the year in the way 
of sluicing, the party having been engaged in the construction of dams and races, for which they hold 
rights under the Mining Act. They have also been constructing a new tail-race, which will give a 
much better tailing-site than they had before, and they will, in all probability, use more water from 
the Government races in the future than they have in the past. 

The Waimea Hydraulic Sluicing Company has again let the claim and plant on tribute, and the 
tributers have done fairly well during the year. Work has not been continuous in the claim, but a very 
fair quantity of water has been used, with payable results. The use of water in this claim will be con- 
tinued so long as the ground is payable, and as the unworked ground is extensive it may be payable for 
many years. 

The claim worked by Burroughs and party at Fox's has now been abandoned, as the expense of 
working and the difficulties encountered were too much for a party of small means. There is, however, 
good gold-bearing ground in the claim, and it will in aU probability be taken up and tried again. 

When stoppages occurred from slips or other causes repairs were promptly effected and the wat« 
turned on again, but no stoppages of any long duration occurred during the year. 

The supply of water was excellent throughout the year, and no stoppages were caused from an 
insufficient supply of water. 

The following tabulated statement shows the sales of water and the cost of maintenance of the 
Waimea Race for the year ended the 31st March, 1905, and also the approximate quantity and value 
of gold obtained by parties using water from the race. 





Bales 


Cash received 






Outstanding 
Moneys at 
the Rod of 

Bach Month. 

1 


Number of 


Approxi- 
mate 


Value of 


Month. 


of 
Water. 


for Sales 
of Water. 


BjEpenditore. 


Men 
employed. 


Quantity ; 
of Gold > 
obtained 

1 


Oold 
obtained. 


1904. 


it 8. d. 


4 B. d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ 8. d. 




Os. 


£ s. d. 


April .. 


86 7 1 


49 10 10 


60 19 


2 


57 16 


18 


108 


421 4 


Ifoy 


50 8 9 


22 18 9 


70 11 


8 


77 19 8 


19 


150 


585 


June 


50 1 8 


49 1 8 


64 2 


5 


78 19 8 


17 


150 


585 


July 


85 10 


56 


60 16 


8 


58 1 


24 


106 


409 10 


August .. 


49 1 8 


44 11 6 I 


54 11 


8 


68 9 8 


24 1 


147 


573 6 


September 
October.. 


53 18 4 


54 15 8 j 


47 4 


2 


72 6 4 


20 1 


159 { 


620 2 


60 18 


54 8 8 f 


45 1 


8 


71 18 6 


21 1 


183 1 


718 14 


November 


68 16 6 


89 4 2 


53 14 


2 


92 15 5 


21 


189 


787 2 


December 


49 8 9 


60 14 8 


47 6 


8 


87 6 8 


28 1 


147 


578 6 


1905. 












1 






January 


S7 10 


5 5 10 


61 16 


8 


105 10 4 


14 


81 1 


815 18 


February 


57 8 1 


14 10 


61 18 11 


146 1 9 


20 


171 ' 


666 18 


March 


80 10 7 


70 4 6 


52 9 


2 


156 19 10 


" 1 


240 


986 


TotaU .. 


618 10 8 


521 5 


680 8 





•• 


20-25 
(average) 1 


1,830 


7,187 



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113 



C— 3. 



Branch Race to CaOaghan's and Middle Branch of Waimea Credc, 

The total sales of water from this branch lace for the year ended the Slst March, 1905, amounted to 
£685 4s. 7d., and the expenditure for the same period on gauging, maintenance, and repairs was £526 
16s. 2d., showing a credit balance of £158 8s. 5d. on the transactions for the year. 

The average number of miners supplied with water for sluicing purposes from this branch race 
during the 3rear was 16*58 (showing a decrease of 1*92 as compared with the previous year), and the 
approximate quantity of gdd obtained by them was 1,708 os., having a value of £6,661 4s. 

The sales of water for the past year were £232 16s. 8d. less than during the preceding year, and the 
approximate quantity of gold obtained was less by 472 oz., representing a value of £1,875 ISs. 

The expenditure on gauging, maintenance, and repairs during the year was £149 Os. 8d. less that 
during the preceding year, and the work of enlarging the dam has been completed. 

The storage^^pacity of the dam is now sufficient for the claims at present at work, and the whole 
of the night-water is now stored for use in the daytime, when the claims are working. 

At the beginning of the year there were seven claims using water from this race, but two of them 
have since ceased working, as it was found that they would not pay expenses, and the probability is thai 
another claim will also be closed down. There are, however, three other claims not yet connected 
with the Waimea Tail-race, and one of them is now preparing to start sluicing at once. From the position 
of the three claims referred to the probability is that all of them will prove payable. Besides the above, 
there is a considerable area of ground not yet taken up likely to prove payable sluicing-ground. 

The Waimea Main Tail-race has been extended a further distance of 400 ft. during the year, which 
should enable other claims to connect and start sluicing at once. 

Taking into consideration the low gradient of the Waimea Main Tail-race, it continues to work 
weU as long as it is kept in good order. For some months it did not work well, because the contractors 
allowed the wooden blocking to get into a bad state ; but recently it has been to a very large extent 
re-blocked, and is now in good condition and working in a satisfactory manner. 

In Callaghan's Flat very little work has been done during the year, and very little water has been 
used there. A new claim has been recently started, and is now being supplied with water. An applica- 
tion has also been made for a regular supply of water for another claim. 

Sluicing on a large scale has never been attempted in CaUaghan's, and if the claims now trying 
the experiment are successful a large extent of the fiat wfll be worked. 

The following tabulated statement shows the sales of water and the cost of maintenance of the 
CaUaghan's and Huddle Branch Race for the year ended the 31st March, 1905, together with the approxi- 
mate quantity of gold obtained by parties using water from this race. 



MontlL 


Sale of Wat«r. 


CMhrooeivwl 

fbrSaksof 

Water. 


Bxpendttnra. 


Ontetandiiw 

Moneys atthe 

end of each 

Month. 


Nomber 

of Men 

employed. 


Awroxi- 
ObUlned. 


ValoeofOoM 
obtained. 


1904. 


£ B. 


d. 


£ S. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ B. d. 




Oi. 


£ B. d. 


^ 


52 10 





14 


48 16 3 


232 7 


15 


130 


507 


63 11 


8 


45 


64 18 9 


250 18 8 


15 


157 


612 6 


June 


73 6 





53 


43 10 


270 18 8 




182 


709 16 


July 


49 15 


10 


47 6 8 


36 10 


273 7 10 




125 


487 10 


August 


77 





65 


44 4 


292 17 10 




192 


748 16 


September 


47 17 


6 


80 17 3 


43 4 6 


254 8 1 




120 


468 


October 


43 10 


10 


23 16 8 


40 15 


273 4 10 




110 


429* 


November 


60 3 


4 


45 


49 3 9 


291 15 7 




150 


585 


December 


39 18 


4 


63 15 9 


40 15 3 


268 15 8 




100 


390 


1906. 














• 




January 


32 12 


6 


21 


48 1 8 


275 8 




82 


319 16 


February 


93 10 





21 


38 17 6 


347 10 8 




232 


904 16 


March 


51 9 


7 


39 5 


27 19.6 


359 15 8 




128 


499 4 


Totals 


685 4 


7 


519 1 4 


526 16 2 


•• - 


16*58 
(average) 


1.708 


6,661 4 








KUMAI 


iA Race. 











The total sales^of water from this race for the year ended the 31st March, 1905, amounted to 
£812 9s. Id., and the expenditure on ganging, maintenance and repairs for the same period was 
£1,284 2s. 4d., showing a debit balance of £471 13s. 3d. on the transactions for the year. 

The average number of miners supplied with water for sluicing from the race was 19*75, showing 
a decrease of 13*33 as compared with the previous year, and the approximate quantity of gold obtained 
by them was 1,628 oz., having a value of £6,349 4s. 

The sales of water were £369 Is. less than during the preceding year, and the quantity of gold 
obtained was less by 1,306 oz., representing a decrease in value of £6,093 Ss. 

The expenditure on gauging, maintenance, and repairs during the year was less by £328 10s. 6d. 
than during the previous year, and all the dams, races, branch races, tunnels, and siphons have been 
kept and are now in a thorough state of repair and in good working-order. 

There has been no sluicing into No. 3 channel during the year, but none of the claims leading into 
it have been abandoned. There is still a brge extent of unworked ground for which No. 3 channel 
will be availabK but it is poor, and a considerable amount of work will have to be done in constructing 
new tail-races on a lower gradient before it can be properly worked. The reduction in the price of 
water should be the means of encouraging the parties holding the ground to make a fresh start, and the 
probability is that several of them wUl again resume sluicing. 

The No. 3 channel deviation has now been driven and timbered a distance of 1,511 ft., of which 
distance 1,102 ft. has been boxed and blocked. At 1,102 ft. a shaft 82 ft. in depth has been sunk, 
timbered, and centred, and a good ladder- way has been constructed. A chamber has also been excavated 

16-^. 3. 



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C— 8. 



114 



and timbered which connects the shaft with the channel, giving a better means of commanication 
with the new portion of the channel for workmen and material, and at the same time making the ventila- 
tion thoroughly efficient. 

The two original parties are still working into No. 4 channel, and are sending away large quantities 
of wash every shift. So far as can be ascertained, the results of the past year's work have been fairly 
satisfactory, although the ground worked has been poor, and the expense of maintaining the great 
lengths of channel and tail-races great. During the year the channel alone cost more than £700 for 
maintenance, and both parties have besides the channel very long and expensive tail-races to maintain. 
The unworked ground still held by the two parties is very extensive, and will not be worked out for 
many years. The reduction in the price of water will materially benefit the parties working into the 
No. 4 channel, and will enable them to work ground that would not otherwise pay. 

During the past year the claims working into No. 5 channel have not by any means been at work 
continuously, and the results of tbe work that has been done have not been of a very satisfactoiy 
character, but the reduction in the price of water will enable most of them to continue to work their 
ground and earn small wages with thejprospect of the^ground yielding more payable resolts than it 
has done in the past. 

Two of the parties working through private races are apparently satisfied, and continue to ener- 
getically work their claims, sluicing away a great quantity of material, but one is now entirely worked 
out. 

The supply of water has been ample for all requirements throughout the year, and no time has been 
lost from shortage of water. 

The following table shows the number of days m each month on which water was running over 
the dams and the total quantity lost during the year, and also the number and dates of holidays on 
which no water was used for sluicing. 



Month. 



Water 

ranning 

over Dam. 



Quantity 

of Water 

loet 



Hotidays. 



No Water 

for 
Channel 



Damfl 
empty. 





1904. 


Days. 


Days. 


Days. 


Days. 


Days. 


April 


. . 


6 


11 


6 






May 


. . 


6 


23 


, , 






June 


. . . . . . 


16 


43J 








July 


. . . . . . 


3 


1 








August 


. . 


10 


23i 








September 


. . 


7 


16i 


1 






October 


• . . • . • 


12 


12 








November 


• • . . 


19 


61* 


7 






December ' .. 


190b'. 


' 


8 




16 


•• 






January 


. • 


8 




H 


7 






February 


. • • • . • 


• • 






, , 






March 


.. 


4 , 


2 


•• 






Totals 


.. 


• • 


98 


217* 


21 


•• 


•• 



The usual quantity of water authorised by the Department has been supplied to each of the main 
tail-races for flushing purposes— via., No. 4 channel, ten sluice-heads ; No. 5 channel, twenty sluice- 
heads ; and in no instance was less than those quantities supplied. 

Water was also supplied for fire purposes to the Borough of Eumara, and for washing-up purposes 
to the claims using water frorn^ the race. 

The following tabulated statement shows the sales of water and cost of maintenance of the Kumara 
Race for the year ended the Slst March, 1905, and the approximate quantity and value of gold obtained 
by parties using water from the race. 







Cash received 






Outstanding 


Number 


Approxi- 
mate 


Value of 


Month. 


Sales of Water. 


for Sales 
of Water. 


Expenditure. 


Moneys 
at the Bnd of 
each Month. 


of Men 
employed. 


obtained. 


Gold 
obtained. 


1904. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. 


d. 


£ 8. d. 




OK. 


£ 8. d. 


April 

May 


63 10 


22 


164 2 


6 


1,467 16 3 


28 


128 


499 4 


76 6 


100 


133 13 


3 


1,433 3 


26 


162 


692 16 


June 


62 19; 2 


, , 


98 4 




1,496 19 6 


19 


126 


491 8 


July .. 


78 2 6 


120 


140 7 




1,464 1 11 


23 


166 


606 8 


August . . 


81 4 2 


61 


103 1 




1,484 6 1 


24 


162 


631 16 


September 


60 10 10 


62 10 


78 10 




1,482 6 11 


26 


120 


468 


October 


76 14 7 


102 


87 1 




1,467 1 6 


17 


164 


600 12 


November 


69 10 10 


118 


80 1 


9 


1,608 12 4 


17 


120 


468 


DecembOT 


82 19 4 


82 


106 9 


8 


1,609 11 8 


22 


166 


647 8 


January 


41 17 6 


|10 


122 16 


6 


1.641 9 2 


10 


84 


327 12 


February 


92 14 9 


p.. 


89 10 


2 


1,634 3 11 


16 


186 


725 8 


March . . 


37 6 


96 


90 3 


4 


1,676 4 4 


11 


74 


288 12 


Totals 


812 9 1 


663 10 


1,284 2 


4 




19-76 

(average) 


1,628 


6,349 4 



The following table shows the result of working the Kumara Race for the twenty-two years from 
the 1st April, 1883, to the 31st March, 1905. 



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C— 3, 



ril, 1883, to dlst March, 1905. 



Total Value 
of Water sold. 



Total Value 

Free for 
AsriBtance, 



Total Value 

Free for 
DeTiationt. 



Total for 

Gonstruction 

of No. 8 

Channel. 



Total Value 
Water supplied. 



Average 

Number of 

Sluice-heads 

supplied 



Expenditure. 



Frt- 

) 
Fii- 



W$ 

FbU 



Ft- 

1 



£ 8. d. 
8,346 14 11 



i 



9.704 



9,788 



6.470 



7,169 



6.716 



8.650 



6,665 



8 2 



16 8 



14 4 



10 3 



6 10 



4 8 



12 8 



£ 8. 
1,386 



780 



221 



1,547 



347 



492 



396 



409 



d. 
2 1 



14 2 



8 2 



18 11 



6 5 







2 6 



5 5 



£ 8. d. 



227 



465 



798 











5 



£ 8. d. 



1,492 



2 10 



918 18 4 



£ 8. d. 



9,782 17 



10,485 2 4 



10,009 19 10 



8,018 13 3 



7,616 16 8 



7,485 6 10 



5,903 10 



8,781 16 10 



46-35 



49-92 



57-20 



5619 



53-68 



5310 



4216 



62-72 



£ 8. d. 



2,153 5 5 



1,656 1 



1,454 19 5 



1,398 18 10 



12 



1,024 1 9 



1,424 13 3 



1,766 4 3 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



i 
1 
J 
J 

A 
S 

N 
D 

Ji 
F. 
M 



tai 
hei 

to 

Ra< 
by 



Apii 
May 
June 
July 
Augi 
Sept( 
Octo 
Novc 
Dece: 

Janui 
Febn 
Marcl 



the lev April, loody to the 31st Maich, 1905. 



•«...«^..»— ^*««x/«/ A\/j. viAv vnoiivjr"i»wu yWlCV ITUni 



Digiti 



zedbyGoOgle^ 



117 



C— 3. 



Waime4-Eumara Wateb-races. 

The following tabulated statement shows the revenue, cost of maintenance, approximate quantity 
of gold obtained, and the number of men employed in sluicing in the claims using water from the Govern- 
ment water-races in the Waimea-Kumara district for the year ended the 31st March, 1905 :— 











GaahraoeiTed 






Outstanding 


Number 


Approxi- 
mate 


Value 


Month. 


Sales of Water. 


for Sales 
of Water. 


Expenditure. 


Moneys 
at the End of 
each Month. 


of Men 
employed. 


quantity 
of Gold 
obtained. 


of Gold 
obtained. 


1904. 


£ 


8. 


d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. 


d. 


£ 8. d. 




oz. 


£ 8. d. 


April .. 


162 


7 


1 


86 10 10 


263 17 


10 


1,747 18 3 


61 


366 


1,427 8 


Blay 


189 





6 


167 18 9 


269 3 


8 


1,761 18 2 


69 


469 


1,790 2 


June 


186 


6 


10 


102 1 8 


206 16 


11 


1,846 17 4 


66 


468 


1,786 4 


Jidy 


102 


19 


2 


223 6 8 


237 14 





1,786 9 10 


66 


386 


1,606 8 


August . . 


207 


6 


10 


160 11 6 


201 17 


6 1 1,840 13 2 


66 


601 


1,963 18 


September 


102 


1 


8 


198 2 6 


168 19 


1 1,810 1 4 


64 


399 


1,666 2 


October 


181 


3 


6 


179 19 11 


172 18 





1,802 4 9 


67 


447 


1,743 6 


November 


183 


10 


8 


92 4 2 


182 19 


8 


1,893 3 4 


67 


469 


1,790 2 


December 


172 


1 


6 


206 10 6 


194 11 


7 


1,866 14 


69 


413 


1,610 14 


1906. 






















January 


102 








36 6 10 


232 14 


10 


1,922 2 


38 


247 


963 6 


February 


243 


7 


10 


36 10 


190 1 


7 


2,127 16 4 


60 


689 


2,297 2 


BCaroh 


169 





7 


206 9 6 


170 12 





2,091 12 6 


47 


442 


1,723 16 


Totals 


2,111 


3 


11 


1,693 11 9 


2,491 6 


6 


•• 


66-68 
(average) 


6,166 


20.147 8 



The following schedule shows the claims that have been sluicing on the Kumara Goldfield during 
the year ended the 31st March, 1905, showing the number of men in each claim, fall and width of boxes 
in each tail-race, number of sluice-heads of water used in sluicing, number of cubic yards of wash sluiced 
away per hour, and the name of race from which the water was supplied : — 





Num- 
ber of 


FaUto 


Width 

of 
Boxes 


Num- 
ber of 


Aurifer- 
ous Wash 
sluiced 


Race from 






Men 


12 feet 


Sluice- 


which the 




Name of Party. 


em. 


in 


heads 


Water 


Remarks. 




ployed 
ineaoh 
Claim. 


Tail- 
race. 


in 
TaU- 
raoe. 


used 

in 

Sluicing 


away 

per 

Hour. 


is 
supplied. 














Cubic 






No. 4 channel — 




Inohes. 


Inches. 


Heads. 


Yards. 






Cullen and party . . 


6 


7 


24 


20 


140 


Kumara 


Sluiced twelve months. 


Long Tunnel Co. . . 


8 


7 


26 


22 


154 


Kumara & 
private 


Sluiced twelve months. 


N^o. 5 channel — 
















Burger and party . . 


5 


8 


24 


10 


80 


Kumara 


Sluiced eight months. 


Thomson and party 


i 


8 


24 


10 


80 


»> 


Sluiced two months. 


Thorn and party . . 


4 


8 


24 


10 


80 


)* 


Sluiced nine months. 


Morgan and party . . 


3 


8 


24 


10 


80 


>> 


Sluiced eight mpnths. 


Giffney and party . . 


5 


7 


26 


11 


77 


»» 


Sluiced eleven months. 


Private races — • 
















Pascoe and party . . 


5 


7 


26 


16 


112 


,, 


Sluiced seven months. 


Stubbs and party . . 


3 


8 


32 


22 


176 


Private 


Sluiced twelvemonths. 


McGrath and party 


10 


8 


24 


22 


176 


»> 


Sluiced twelve months. 



Kumara Deep-lbvel Tunnel. 

No work of any kind has been done in the Kumara Deep-level tunnel during the year, but it will 
be necessary to effect some repairs at an early date if the tunnel is to be kept open for future prospecting- 
work. The private parties are still continuing to work from the front of the terrace facing the Tere- 
makau River, and I am assured the results have recently very much improved and payable ground is 
likely to be opened up. 

Wainihinihi Race. 

The supply of water from this race has been good throughout the year, and has done much to keep 
up the supply for Waimea, Stafford, Callaghan's, and the middle branch of the Waimea Creek. Very 
little of the Wainihinihi water has been used in the Kumara district. No breaks occurred, and there 
were no stoppages of any kind during the year, and the race has been maintained in good order and 
condition. I have, &c., 

Alex. Aitken, 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Manager, Water-races. 

17— C. 3. 



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C— 3. 118 

Mr. R. Murray, Manager, Mount Ida and Blackstone Hill Water-races, to the Undbr-Sbcrbtaby 

FOR Mines, Wellington. 
Sir,— Naseby, 20th April, 1905. 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the Mount Ida and Blackstone Hill Water- 
races for the year ending the 31st March, 1905 :— 

Mount Ida Water-race. 

The total sales of water from the Mount Ida water-race during the year amounted to £1,459 lis. 3d., 
an increase of £91 14s. 4d. over that of last year. The expenditure on maintenance and repairs for the 
same period was £1,563 9s. 6d., an increase of £278 lis. as compared with that of last year. The total 
cash received was £1,462 13s. 8d. On account of pa3rment in advance free water to the value of £69 
14s. 2d. was supplied, and free water for washing-up was also supplied to the value of £120 8s. The 
total value of water supplied from this race during the year amounted to £1,649 13s. 5d. The average 
number of miners supplied with water was 38*25, a decrease of 5*75 on last year. Th6 approximate 
quantity of gold obtained by parties using water from this race was 1,933 oz., valued at £7,442 Is. 

The increase in the expenditure was almost all due to the damage done to the upper section last 
March, and to the heavy lignite-clay slip in Coalpit Gully in October, when seven of the hydraulic 
elevating claims and seven ground-sluicing parties were off fourteen days while the slip was being got 
rid o^ thus reducing by over half the sales of water and revenue that would have been received during 
this month. To keep the race in good order, the damage done to the upper section in March had to be 
repaired during the year, also repairs to Mulholland's Oully flume and a timber retaining-wall had to 
be built to protect the main-race flume (at the crossing of the main guUy) from floods. Also 54 ft. at 
intake end of siphon that crosses under the main road above the township had to be added to get more 
pressure to get the extra quantity required through. 

Hard frost with 2 ft. of snow at the end of June put a stop to all mining. On the 16th August 
I started with the cleaning-out of the race and to widen a length of three miles and a half from Home 
Gully to Cemetery Point to enable the race to carry the quantity required on the east side of main gully, 
but on the night of the 18th it commenced to snow and freeze. The work had therefore to be sus- 
pended untU the 24th August, when a start was again made. The reservoir was reached on the 3rd 
September, when the water was turned on from it, and the miners were at work in their claims on the 
5th. During this month the Home Gully tunnel was retimbered and district-road crossings on the race 
and a good length of the old sodding in the race in the West Ewebum renewed. The siphon in Milk- 
man's Gully was also finished. On the 3rd October the race got completely blocked by a large lignite- 
clay slip 5 chains long by 1 chain wide on east side of Coalpit Gully, starting the country on the lower 
side : arrangements were made with Mr. Matthew Young (who has a race at a much higher level) for water 
to sluice it away. By working day and night the water was got through on the ni^t of the 18th, and 
the miners were at work again. Some of the bottom part of it I left, as when the top weight was tak^n 
oft it it appeared to settle ; but in the event of its coming away at any time I made provision to meet 
it by putting a large box under the race to allow of any slipped ground being sluiced away without 
the race being interfered with. 

Sixteen of the telescope pipes in the Wedderbum Siphon had to have bands put on them, as they 
started to leak. An extra pipe (9 in. diameter) had to be put in the Spec Gully race where the Burster 
Road crosses it to allow of more water being sent through. On account of the dry weather after the 
first week in January the water in the race kept falling ofi daily, and had to be^ supplemented from 
that in the reservoir. This demand ran the reservoir dry on the 22nd February, when the miners had 
to be put on week about from this date to the end of March, owing to the continued dry weather. 

Eighteen elevating claims have been at work during the year (two of which got worked out), eleven 
of them being supplied from the Government race. Three parties have during the year been working 
in the Maori bottom ; one of them constantly, the other two intermittently. From the first week 
in January to the end of March the weather has been extraordinarily dry, and the whole water in the 
race was consequently reduced to eight heads at Naseby. This condition has been very hard on the 
private water-race owners. The number of days on wUch no water was supplied to. the miners was 
—winter, 56 ; Christmas, 1 ; New Year, 1 ; (3ood Friday, 1 : a total of 59 days. The winter was a 
long and severe one. 

Blackstone Hill Watbr-raob. 

The total sales of water from this race during the year amounted to £32 18s. 4d. The total oash 
received was £32 IBs. 4d. The total cost of maintenance and repairs was £4 Ss., caused by two small 
breaks and rabbit-burrows. As sandbanks are accumulating it will be necessary to have this and the 
side cleaned out in the spring. During the year only one party (R. Johnstone) has been receiving 
water from this race, which accotmts for the &dling-off in revenue. All the groimd above Hill's Creek 
appears to be worked out. I have, &c., 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington, R. Murray, Manager. 



WATER-CONSERVATION. 

Mr. T. Perham, A.M. Inst., C.E., to the Undbr-Sbcrbtary for Minbs. 

Sir, — Mines Department, Wellington, 22nd June, 1905. 

I have the honour to forward my report on Water-conservation for the year ending the 31st 
December, 1904. 

North Island. 

As formerly reported for the year ending the 31st December, 1903, no other action has been taken 
with the extension of the Mackaytown reticulation or (Golden Cross and Waikino domestic water-supplies. 
I consider these necessary and, from a sanitary point of view, urgent. 



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119 C— 8. 

Another examination has been made into the matter of the cyanide tailings from the Waihi, Kara- 
ngahake, and the Waikino batteries causing flooding of the farm-lands on the banks of the Ohinemori 
River, and the Waihou Riveri^from below Mackaytown, and round and about the Paeroa wharf as 
far as Netherton. Plans, and a general report with recommendations relative to the whole subject 
are now being prepared. 

A report and plans have been forwarded on the domestic and power supply of water for the Thames 
Borough Council, but nothing has been done during the year towards carrying out the works. 

South Island. 

An examination has been made into the filtration scheme and works for the improvement of the 
water-supply of the Borough of Oamaru and a plan and report on the subject has been forwarded to 
this Department. 

Reports, etc., fob other Departments. 

For the Marine Department an examination has been made and a report suppUed on the unsafe 
and dilapidated condition of the wharf at the port of Havelock (Marlborough), embodying full recom- 
mendations for its partial or almost entire reconstruction. It is a somewhat difficult question to deal 
with, as the mud-flats are so extensive at low water, and the channel — ^which is the only waterway to 
and from the wharf — is very narrow and at all times intricate. Though well marked out by beacons, 
the channel is extremely shallow except at spring tides, and there is little or in ^t no scour from the 
fall of the Kaituna River to in any way deepen it or keep it open and improve the upper reaches of 
Pelorus Sound at or near Havelock. This can only be done at considerable cost by dredging, and I 
do not think the existing trade of the port would justify any great expenditure. 

Both imports and exports are timber and goods for domestic consumption (general at all these 
small ports on both coasts of the colony from north to south), and, owing to the want of adequate 
wharfage accommodation, the settlers often experience difficulty and even danger in landing require- 
ments and shipping produce. 

West Eweburn Reservoir. 

This has been completely constructed and well fenced, but it has been lately reported that the 
crest of the dam has become depressed in the centre. This is a natural result due to the subsidence 
of the bank, and should be made up to the original level by top-dressing. The outlet pipes into the 
race to Naseby are working well, and the local branches are giving satisfaction to the ^sluicing and 
elevating claims on Hogbum GuUy and neighbouring district. 

Talang into consideration the extremely Hmited rainfall in this locality during the summer months, 
I think it would be a great advantage both for the present development of the mines at Rough Ridge 
and for the future irrigation of the arid portions of the Ida Valley, and certainly on the Maniototo plains, 
if a dam were built across Hill's Creek. The outlet pipes would just cut and the water enter the Manu- 
herikia Race on its route to Naseby, and no doubt would be a benefit to the mining industry at present 
and the conservation of water for irrigation in the future, would be profitable to the farmer, and also 
to the Gtovemment. A charge per head at the present scale for water for mining purposes could be 
made to recoup the interest on the original expenditure. 

This proposed reservoir by reason of its elevation would, I am of opinion, serve the Grerman Hill 
sluicing-works in the Ida Valley, and, although the head race would be about twice the length of that 
running from the proposed Idabum dam in the gorge, the benefit derived by the elevation and service 
to both the north and south ends of the valley, and a much larger storage would be of value both to 
the mining and farming interests. 

A by-wash could be constructed in a convenient place with a regulating-sluice for the Ida Valley 
irrigation service when water is not urgently required for the sluicing claims in and around Naseby. 
If this dam be construtced there is no reason why the two industries should not be worked together 
for the benefit of alL I have, &c., 

T. Perham, A.M. Inst. C.E., Engineer, Water-conservation. 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. 



REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT GEOLOGIST (ALEXANDER McKAY) FOR THE 

YEAR 190i-5. 

The chief work of the past year was the ticketing and recording of the rock and fossil specimens that 
form the collections of the Geological Survey, now in the Colonial Museum, and preparing for tiie 
press copy and illustrations for a work on the *' Rocks of Cape Colville Peninsula," the techmcal des- 
scriptions of which are by Professor Sollas, Oxford, England. 

With respect to the collections in the Museum — when a change in the stafi of the Geological Survey 
took place in 1892, the systematic arrangements of the rocks and fossils, though commenced several 
years prior, was incomplete, owing to the fact that^the working-out of the collections made each year, 
the preparation of reports, kc., occupied most of^the^winter months, and the all-important matter 
of a systematic arrangement and detailed catalogue was pursued only during short intervals, often 
interrupted by what was considered more pressing work. 

It was the usual practice to work out the fossils of the various collections, determine roughly how 
many species each contained, make a selection for exhibition, and store the less showy and surplus part 
of the collection. In this way between thirty and forty thousand specimens were placed on show^ 
and there was accumulated in store from one hundred and fifty to two hundred thousand more. 



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C— 3. 120 

At first the BpecimenB were ticketed with a' number in aniline ink, the fugitive character of which 
under a strong light is one cause why the greater part of the collections must be re-ticketed if their 
identity is to be preserved. 

Since the retirement of Sir James Hector, the appointment of Mr. Hamilton to the control of the 
Museum, and Dr. Bell as Director of the (geological Survey, it has become apparent that the mineral 
and fossil specimens must be housed elsewhere than in their present location, more especially the stored 
specimens which were simply repacked in the boxes in which they arrived from the field. 

Nine thousand seven hundred and fifty rock and mineral specimens, and 36,750 fossil specimens, 
have been ticketed, recorded, and packed in boxes of uniform size, which, although at present stored 
in one pile, may, on provision of proper racks, be so arranged that any box or specimen may be reached 
without serious delay and loss of time. The work, however, is far from completed, but is being 
steadily and continuously proceded with, such assistance as other matters will at present admit of 
being utilised for this purpose. 

The work on the rocks of Cape Colville Peninsula will shortly be completed. One volume has 
been issued from the press of the Government Printing Department, and the other will shortly follow. 

Alex. McKay, 

22nd June, 1905. Government Geologist. 



BATTERY-SDPERINTBNDENTS* EXAMINATION PAPERS. 
Questions used in Examination of Batteby-Supbkintbndents fob Cerfifioatbb. 

Subject A. — The Different Modes of reducing and pulverising Ores. 

1. State where and by whom you were employed, and the dates you were engaged in crushing 
batteries where bullion was recovered by cyanide-of-potassium treatment. 

2. Show by sketch and describe fully how you would construct a crushing-battery of 30 heads of 
stamps, 12 Frue vanners, and also a modem cyanide plant to treat the pulverised ore and slimes, with 
all necessary appliances. 

3. If you were using a Pelton water-wheel as a motive power to drive a battery of 40 heads of 
stamps of 1,000 lb. each, to have a drop of 7 inches and make 99 blows per minute, show by calcu- 
lation the diameter of a nozzle you would require to discharge the water on to the wheel under a head 
of 200 feet to give the necessary effective horse-power to do the work. 

4. If you had to purchase a steam-engine to do the work in the last question, show by calculation 
the diameter of a cylinder required to give the necessary effective horse-power, the piston speed being 
450 feet per minute, the initial pressure of steam entering the cyUnder being 100 lb. per square inch 
and cut off at half-stroke. 

5. State the description of other crushing-machines and concentrators you have used. Give their 
proper speed, and horse-power required to work them. 

6. Give the capacity or quantity of ore that each of the following machines will pulverise per day 
of 24 hours, the ore to go through a 40-me8h grating ; and give the horse-power required to work them : 
Huntingdon mill, 5 feet diameter, and a Erupp mill. State the speed that each mill is worked at. 

Subject B. — Amatgamating-machines. 

1. Describe the action of a Watson-Denny pan, the speed required to work it, the quantity of 
quicksilver required to be used, the quantity of ore it is capable of treating in 24 hours, and the horse- 
power required to work it. 

2. State in detail the method of recovering gold from slimes on canvas tables. Show how tiie 
gold is collected, and the process the ore passes through until the gold is fit for market. 

3. State the different actions of the McKay, Combination, and Wheeler pans, giving the difference 
between them and the Watson-Denny pan ; also state the use of settler, and how it is worked. 

4. If you were using any of the amalgamating-pans above referred to to work ore in charges, 
state the time required to work each charge, giving full details of the operation and how the bullion 
amalgam is collected. 

5. State the advantage or otherwise of using chemicals in pan amalgamation. Give a description 
of the chemicals you would use and how they are applied. 

Subject C. — The Use of Quicksilver, and Methods of using it in connection with the Extraction of GrM 

and Sil*)er from Ores, 

1. Describe what effect, if any, has lead, antimony, zinc, and arsenical ores on quicksilver used 
for the amalgamation of gold and silver. 

2. How are copper plates prepared for amalgamating purposes, and how is the bullion amalgam 
emoved ? Also, how would you remove the whole of the bullion from the plates at the final clean-up I 



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121 C.~8. 

8. Describe ftiDy how you would construct copper-plated tables for amalgamaktion. Give their 
width, length, and gradient to take the crushed ore from 5 heads of stamps. Also state how the copper 
plates are made fast to the tables, and give the thickness of copper plate you would use, with your 
reasons for same. 

4. What effect, if any, has an electrical action on quicksilver ? Also state how you would apply 
a current of electricity- in quicksilver used for amalgamating purposes. 

5. Describe fully how you would separate bullion from quicksilver, and the process it undergoes 
before it is in ingots fit for market. 

Subject D. — Cyanide, CMorination, and other Chemical Processes of recovering Gold and Silver from 

Ores, 

1. Show by sketch a modem cyanide plant, with all accessories for treating auriferous ores. Give 
the dimensions of every part of the plant, and show the position each portion should be placed in 
relative to each other. 

2. State fuUy how you would treat slimes, and give your reasons for same. 

3. Describe fully how stock KCN solutions are made up, and how they are used. 

4. How do you ascertain the strength of KCN solutions ? 

5. If you were making up a 0*8 KCN solution of 40 tons, how many lb. of crude salt containing 
69 per cent. KCN would you require to make a working-solution of 0*25 per cent. KCN ? ' 

6. How many tons of a 12-per-cent. KCN solution would you require to make up 50 tons of a 
sump solution containing 0*02 per cent. KCN to 0'15 per cent. KCN ? 

7. If you had 36 tons of a sump solution containing 0*01 per cent. KCN, how many tons of 0-9-per- 
cent, solution would be required to make the solution up to 0*3 per cent. KCN ? 

8. Describe fully how cyanide-solutions are appUed to pulverised ores, and how the solutions 
are drawn off ; also, how slimes are treated with KCN solutions, and how such solutions are extracted. 

9. State how you recover gold and silver from KCN solutions, and the percentage of each of these 
metals that is generally recovered in ordinary practice. 

10. Show by calculation the diameter of a circular vat to hold 170 tons of pulverised ore, allowing 
the ore to be 5 feet deep and 25 cubic feet of ore to the ton. 

11. Describe what remedies you would apply if any of the workmen showed signs of KCN poisoning. 

12. What is meant by a chlorination plant to treat auriferous ores ? How is it constructed ? 
What preparation has the ore to receive before being subjected to chlorine gas ? 

13. How is chlorine gas generated, and how is the gas applied to the ore ? Describe fuUy. 

14. How is the bullion recovered from both chlorine and cyanide solutions, and how is it prepared 
fit for market. 

SuBJBOT E. — Sampling and Testing of Ores, 
1. Describe exactly how you would obtain a sample for assay from a ton of ore. 
2v Describe how you would estimate the gold and silver in a free-milling ore. 

3. What tests would you apply to detect the following metals when occurring singly in rooks : 
Tin, platinum, mercury, lead, copper, cobalt, iron, manganese, barium ? 

4. How would you estimate the tin in tin-stone ? 

Subject F. — A Knowledge of ArUhtnetie and the Method of keeping Battery Aooounis. 

1. Twelve hundred tons of ore had an average assay of 1 oz. 11 dwt. 5 gr. of gold and 11 oz. 
14 dwt. 12 gr. of silver per ton ; by the ordinary process of treatment 91 per cent, of the gold was 
saved and 37 per cent, of the silver : how much gold and silver was recovered from the 1,200 tons of 
ore? 

2. If 1,000 oz. bullion contained gold 0*2237 fine and silver 0*7763 fine— the gold was worth £4 4s. 3d. 
per oz. and silver 2s. 3d. per oz. : require the value of the buUion. 

3. The wages in a battery where 30 men were employed amounted to £500 a month ; there were 
four different rates of wages, which may be termed A, B, C, and D divisions ; there were 14 men in 
A division, 9 men in B division, 3 men in C division, and 4 men in D division ; each man in B division 
got ^f of the wages of each man in A division, each man in C division got } of the wages of each 
man in B division, and the four men in D division got ^ of the wages of each man in C division : 
how much did each man in the different divisions receive ? 

4. A pyramid of gold was 2 feet square at the bottom, and stood 5 feet 6 inches high : how many 
ounces did the pyramid contain, taking the specific gravity of the gold to be 19 ? 

5. Divide •00963 by 128, and extract the cube root of the quotient. 

Subject Q,—A Knowledge of PaH F. of " The Mining Act, 1898:' 
li. Oral. 



18— G. 3. 



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C.-3. 



122 



LIST OP MINE-MANAGERS AND BATTERY-SUPERINTENDENTS WHO HAVE 
OBTAINED CERTIPICATE8 UNDER THE MINING ACTS. 



I$9USd 

Adams, H. H., Waiorongomai. 

* Anderson, P., Thames. 
'Andrews, B., OoromandeU 

Andrews, T., Thames. 
Barclay, T. H., Thames. 
Bennett, J., Alexandra. 
Benney, J., Goromandel. 
Black, T., Waiomo. 
Bollersley, N., Boatman's. 
Bradbm7, M., Reefton. 
Bray, John, Lyell. 
Borch, W. H., Thames. 
Byrne, J. F., Stafford. 
Cameron, A., Macetown. 

* Cameron, E., Te Aroha. 
Chapman, J. A., Danedin. 
Clarke, G. S., Thames. 

*Oomer, R., Tllames. 

Conradson, M., Lyell. 
•Corin, W.. Thames. 

Comes, C. A., Karangahake. 

Coutts, J., Thames. 

Crawford, T. H., Thames. 

Crowley, C, Reefton. 

Cummings, W., Reefton. 

Davis, J. E., Queenstown. 
•Dafey, C, Ross. 

* Donald, J., Cromwell. 
Dryden, S., Thames. 
Donlop, T. A., Thames. 
Edwaras, J., Skipper's. 
Elliott, J., Maoetown. 

'Evans, F., Skipper's. 

Evans, J. H.. Skipper's. 
•Fitzmaurioe, R., Reefton. 

Frewen, J. B., Queenstown. 

Gavin, T., Te Aroha. 

Gilbert, J., Reefton. 

Gilmour, T., Thames. 

Giles, G. F., West Wanganoi. 

Glass. W. M., Naseby. 

Goldsworthy, J., Waiorongomai. 



THE MINING ACT. 
F1B8T-CLAS8 Skbviob CkBTIFI(UTB8. 
under ** The Mining Act, 1886,'* wUhout 

Greenish, J., Reefton. 
'Greenville, W., Ohinemuri* 
•Hall, J. P. 
•Hansen, P. C, Thames. 

Harris, J., Owen's Reefs. 

Harrison, R. H., Coromaadel. 
•Hicks, T. B., Thames. 

Hilton, G. P., Bendiffo. 
* Hodge, F., Coromandel. 

Hollis, W.. Thames. 

Hunter, R., Thames. 

James, F., Thames. 

Jamieson, A., Coromandel. 

Jenkins, M., Wakatipu. 

Johnstone, H., Bluespur. 

Julian, J., Boatman's. 

Kelly, J., LyeU. 

Kerr, J., Thames. 

Lawn, E., Black's Point. 
•Lawn, H., Boatman's. 

Lawn, J., Reefton. 
•Littlejohn, W., Karangahake. 

Lowe, E. W., Thames. 

Malfroy, J. M. C, Ross. 

Martin, W. G., Thames. 

McCallum, J., Reefton. 

McCuUongh, R., Thames. 

McGruer, G. N., Karangahake. 
•Mollhaney, J., Thames. 

Mcintosh, D., Bluespur. 

McKay, J., Ross. 

McKenney, J., Reefton. 

MoKenzie, W., Thames. 
•McLeod, G., Coromandel. 

McLiver, F., Thames. 
•McLiver, H., Thames. 

McMaster, J., Reefton. 

Moore, H. W., Thames. 
•Moore, J. H., Thames. 

Morgan, R., Otago. 

Morrisby, A. A., Glenorohy. 



ExaminaHon, 

Nasmyth, T., Reefton. 

Newman, W., Naseby. 

Northey, J., Thames.| 
•0*SuIlivan, D. E., Thames. 

Pol ton. A., Karangahake. 

Porter, J., Waipon. 

Purvis, G.. Ross. 

Quinn, E., Te Aroha. 

Radford, T., Thames. 

Ralph, J. G., Thames. 

Ranger, J., Reefton. 

Rasmossen, C. L., Mokihinoi. 

Rasmussen, C. P., Mokihinui. 

Reid, P., Coromandel. 

Resta, L., Macetown. 

Roberts, E., Ross. 

Rooney, F., Reefton. 

Scott, T., Waiorongomai. 

Searight, A., Reefton. 
•Senior, J., Thames. 

Smith, J. E., Thames. 

Stone, F., Karangahake. 

Steedman, J. B., Thames. 

Sturm, A., Waipori. 

Taylor N., Thames. 

Todd, C, Heriot. 

Treloer, J. S., Reefton. 

Tripp, R. 8., Arrowtown. 

Vivian, J. G., Thames. 

Vivian, S., Reefton. 
•Waite, C. D., Thames. 
•Waite, E., Thames. 

Walker, J. W., Thames. 

Watson, T., Reefton. 

Weame, J. E., Endeavour Inlet 

Weame, T., Endeavour Inlet. 
•Wilcox, J., Thames. 

Williams, J., Skipper's. 

Wright, G., Boatman's. 

Wylie, W., Roes. 

Young, G., Skipper's. 



Furst^lau Mine-managen* Oertifkateet iaued after BxamhuUiUm, under 

Amendment AeU. 



The Mimng Aei, 1886," amd 



Adams, B., Thames. 

Baker, W., Thames. 

Black, G., Reefton. 
•Caples, P. Q., Reefton. 
barter, J., Thames. 

Oasley, G., Reefton. 

Cochrane, D. L., Reefton. 
•Colebrook, J. D., Coromandel. 

Ooombe, J., Reefton. 



Crawford, J. J., Thames. 
Cununings, W., Reefton. 
Donaldson, W., Otago. 
Fleming, M., Thames. 
Gardner, W. P., Reefton. 
Harris, W., Thames. 
Horn, G. W., Thames. 
Home, W., Coromandel. 
Homick, M., Thames. 



Hosking, G. F., Auckland. 
Kruisensa, W., Reefton. 
Lawn, T., Reefton. 
Logan, H. F., Wellington. 
Mangan, T., Thames. 
Mouat, W. G., Dunedin. 
Truscott, G., Thames. 
Watkins, W. E., Reefton. 
WUkie, J., Reefton. 



First^Uus Mine-managers* CertificaUSt issued on Production of Certificate from a Recognised Authority outside the 
Colony, under ** The Mining Act, 1886," '* The Mining Act, 1891,*' and <* The Mining Act, 1898.** 



Aigall, W. H., Coromandel. 
Beckwitb, L. H., Wellington. 
Datson, J., Manaia. 
Dodd, William Milton. 



Griffiths, A. P., Auckland. 
Griffiths, H. P., Auckland. 
Hailey, R. C, Dunedin. 
McKenna, Thomas, Dunedin. 



Molineaux, H. S., Goce. 
Rich. F. A., Auckland. 
Williams, W. H., Auckland. 



First-class Mine-managers* Certificates, issued after Examination, under ** The Mining Act, 1891.** 



Agnew, J. A., Thames. 

Annear, William, Reefton. 

Bennett, E. P., Thames. 

Boydell, H. C, Coromandel. 

Bradley, R. J. H., Te Puke. 

Bray, E., Thames. 
•Bruce, Malcolm, Thames. 

Carroll, J., Lyell. 

Cartwright, E., Thames. 

Crabb, J., Reefton. 
•Dobson, J. A., Auckland. 

Evans, H. A., Wellington. 

Fahey, P., Reefton. 

Flannigan, Francis, Reefton. 

Gilmour, J. L., Thames. 

Hodffe, J. H., Thames. 
•Hughes, D., Thames. 



James, T., Thames. 
Keam, P. E., Thames. 
Lane, J., Reefton. 
Lawn, C. H., Capleston. 
Linck, F. W., Thames. 
Marshall, F., Reefton. 
Morrison, R., Thames. 
McDermott, J., Thames. 
McDermott, G., Thames. 
McDermott, W., Thames. 
McGregor, W. T., Thames. 
McKensie, H. J., Coromandel. 
McPeake, J., Thames. 
O'Keeffe, M. D., Thames. 
Paul, Matthew, Thames. 
Paltridge, Henry, Thames. 



Prince, F. H., Reefton. 
Robertson, D. B., Stafford. 
Ross, Richard, Thames. 
Russell, Murray, Dunedin. 
Shepherd, H. F., Thames. 
Stanford, W. J., Maoetown. 
Steedman, J. G., Thames. 
Sutherland, Benjamin, Reefton 
Tiemey, R., Thames. 
Vialoux, F., Coromandel. 
Wame, George, Thames. 
Waters, D. B., Skipper's. 
Watt, J., Thames. 
White, G. H., Thames. 
Whiiley, A., Thames. 
Williams, C, Capleston. 



* Deoeaaed since issue of oertifloate. 



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123 



C— 3. 



FIB8T-0LAB8 SiBYiOB Obbtifioatbs ab Mins.manaobbs— e<m(intM<i. 



Fini-^Uui Mine-managers* 

AraooU, R., Waihi. 
Allen, Henry, Waihi. 
Barker, B., Thames. 
Bennie, Boyd, Waihi. 
Blenkhom, 0., Ooromandel. 
Boliiho, Joseph, Reefton. 
Bower, J. W., Ooromandel. 
Buddie, Frank, Ooromandel. 
Bull, 0. W., Waihi. 
Carroll, A. M., Reefton. 
Oarler, B. P., Waihi. 
Olouston, R. B., Kaitangaia. 
Oooper, J. H., Thames. 
Oooper, Thomhill, Waihi. 
Oordes, F. M., Karangahake. 
Dooherty, W. H., Ooromandel. 
BUery, John, Reefton. 



OefiifkaU9t iisued after BxaminaHant 

Bvered, N. J., Waihi. 
Fry, S., Waimangaroa. 
George, M. T., Waihi. 
Grayden, P., Thames. 
Goldsworthy, 0., Karangahake. 
Hooker, John, Ooromandel. 
Hitohoook, W. B., Barewood. 
Irwin, Samuel, Waihi. 
Jaokson, G. T., Waihi. 
Johnson, J. H., Ooromandel. 
Langford, G. S., Waihi. 
Lawn, Nioholas, Reefton. 
MoOonaohie, W.,Jun., Waihi. 
MaoDuff, R. B., Thames. 
Maoliaren, J. A. J., Ooromandel. 
MoMahon, J. H., Reefton. 
MoMahon, T., Reefton. 



under '* The Mining Aet, 1898»** 

Morrison, William, Waihi. 
Moye, Miohael, Reefton. 
O'Sallivan, J. W., Thames. 
Rabe, John, Thames. 
Stewart, F., Waihi. 
Thomson, Thomas, Waihi. 
Tucker, B. S., Ooromandel. 
Turnbull, B. V., Ooromandel. 
Turner, 0. B., Murohison. 
Watson, J. L., Thames. 
Webber, J. H. A., Reefton. 
Weir, Thomas, Waihi. 
Whyto, N. MoG. H., Waihi. 
Williams, 0., Thames. 
Wilson, Allan, Thames. 
Wood, P. H., Reefton. 



First-clau Mine-managert* Oertiflcatea, ieeued under SeePion 818 of ** The Mining Act, 1892.** 
Bdwards, George, Westport. Riokard, John, Thames. Trelease, J. H., Thames. 

Homibrooke, H. P., Ooromandel. Snow, Thomas, Huntly. Williams, John, Kuaotunu. 

Martin, James, Reefton. Thomas, James, Thames. Whito, John S., Karangahake. 

First-elase Mine'tnanagert* OerHfleates of Competency granted to Holders of Provisional Warrants under Sec- 
tion 82 of ** The Mining Act Amendment Act, 1896.** 



Alexander, Thomas, Peep Oreek. 
Argall, A. B., Ooromandel. 
Battons, H., Ooromandel. 
^Begley, Thomas, Reefton. 
Bennett, Oharles Henry, Kuaotunu. 
Bunney, Joseph, Waihi. 
Oampbell, Alexander, Onllensville. 
Oarlyon, Samuel, Ooromandel. 
Oomes, 0. A., jun., Karangahake. 
Daldy, Bdward Arthur, Ooromandel. 
Drafion, Samuel, Waitekauri. 
Farmer, 0. S., Waitokauri. 



Harvey, A. G., Ooromandel. 
Howard, Samuel, Karangahake. 
James, Robert, Thames. 
Jamieson, John, Reefton. 
Johns, Thomas, Waihi. 
Kennerley, W. H., Thames. 
Langford, James, Ooromandel. 
MoOombie, John, Karangahake. 
MaoDonald, H., Ooromandel. 
MoBnteer, James, Tararu. 
McFarlane, Oharles M., Tokatoa. 
McLean, Benjamin J., Waitekauri. 
McLean, Oharles, Thames. 



Moorecraft, Waltor, Ooromandel. 

Morgan, William, Owharoa. 

Moyle, Thomas, Thames. 

Patton, William, Maoetown. 

Pearoe, Francis, Reefton. 

Pottor, William H., Thames. 
*Rabe, Hennr, Kan^a. 

Rills tone, Oharles, Waipori. 

Somervell, John, Thames. 

Stackpole, Robert, jun., Karangahake. 

Thomas, Arohelaus, Tapu, Thames. 

Turnbull, Thomas A., Whangamata. 
*Willets, Henry, Thames. 
* Wilson, James R. S., Kuaotunu. 



Goldsworthy, Thomas, Tokatoa. 

Goldsworthy, William, Karangahake. McLean, James, Tararu, Thames. 

Govan, Joseph, Thames. Meehan, James, Westport. 

First-class Mine-managers* OerHfleates, ieeued to Inspectors of Mines, by virtue of Office under the Mining Acts, 

1886, 1891, and 1898. 
Binns, G. J., Dunedin. *Gow, J., Dunedin. McLaren, J. M., Thames. 

Ooohrane, N. D., Westport. Green, B. R., Dunedin. Tennent, R., Westport. 

Gordon, H. A., Wellingtou. Hayes, J., Dunedin. Wilson, G., Thames. 

SbOOND-OLASS SbBVIOX ObBTIVIOATBS as Mnm-MAHAGBBS. 



Adams, W. J., Thames. 

Agnew, J. A., Ooromandel. 

Allen, Richard, Reefton. 

Argall, A. B., Ooromandel. 

Bennett, 0. H., Ooromandel. 

Begley, Thomas, Reefton. 

Beard, W. T., Reefton. 

Bone, William, Reefton. 

Bowler, John, Thames. 

Blair, Thomas, Kuaotunu. 

Bray, Bdwin, Reefton. 

Brownlee, Thomas James, Thames. 

Brokenshire, Jsmes, Thames. 

Bolitho, James, Reefton. 

Brown, John, Macrae's. 

Bremner, John, Ooromandel. 

Borlase, J. H., Oapleston. 

Bunny, Joseph, Thames. 

Byrne, John, Karangahake. 

Oaird, Alexander McNeil, Reefton. 

Oampbell, J., Kuaotunu. 

Olimo, Noah, Ooromandel. 

Oomer, George, Thames. 
^Oowan, Hugh, Kuaotunu. 

Oorbett, T., Paeroa. 

Oomer, W. W., Thames. 

Orabb, Thomas, Reefton. 

Daniel, P. F., Greymouth. 

Dobson, John Allen, Kuaotunu.' 

Bdwards, George, Westport. 

Bllery, John, Reefton. 

Flannigan, Francis, Reefton. 

Foster, Thomas, Wellington. 
*Gale, 0. W., Ooromandel. 

Gill, George, Thames. 

Glasgow, T. M., Thames. 

Goldsworthy, Henry, Thames. 

Gk>van, Joseph, Thames. 

Griffin, Patnck, Thames. 

Grimmond, Joseph, Roes. 

Goldsworthy, William, Mauku, Anok 
land. 



Issued under ** The Mining Act, 1891 

Gemmings, Oharles, Thames. 

Gribble, James, Norsewood. 

Guthrie, John, Wellington. 

Guy, Robert, Kuaotunu. 

Harvey, William, Reefton. 

Hardman, James Bdward, Thames. 
* Harris, R., Thames. 

Hetherington, William, Thames. 

Hicks, W., Thames. 

Hill, Alex. Grey, Waikakaho. 

Hore, John, Wellington. 

Hollis, Fred. J., Waihi. 

Hornibrook, H. P., Kuaotunu. 

Jamieson, John, Reefton. 

Johnstone, William, OoUingwood. 

Jobe, James, Thames. 

Johns, Thomas, Thames. 

Kendall, Henr^, Thames. 

Kerr, George, Kamo. 

Kirker, Thomas, Thames. 

Laughlin, David, Thames. 

Law, John, Thames. 
•Lough, H., Thames. 

Loughlin, S., Thames. 

McLean, James, Thames. 

McLean, Alex., Ooromandel. 

McLean, Oharles, Thames. 
*McOormick, Oharles, Ooromandel. 

McQuillan, John, Reefton. 

McNeill, Daniel, Thames. 

McNeill, George, Upper Kuaotunu. 

MoOombie, John, Kiarangahake. 

MoBwen, James, Reefton. 

McLoghiy, Archibald, Karangahake. 

Mackay, William, Nenthom. 

Martin, James, Reefton. 

Meagher, John, Karangahake. 
*Mills, George, Thames. 

Mayn, John, Ooromandel. 

Martin, David, Blaok*s Point. 

Morgan, William, Upper Thames. 



Moorecroft, Thomas, Thames. 

Milne, John, Thames. 

Moyle, Thomas, Thames. 

Naysmith, James, Reefton. 

Newdick, Alfred, Thames. 

Notman, Alexander, Reefton* 

O'Keefe, M. W. D., Thames. 

Page, John, Lyell. 

Parkiss, Jos. W., Reefton. 

Potto, W. H., Thames. 

Primrose, J., Kuaotunu. 

Pettigrew, Robert, Sydney. 

Peebles, Alexander, Kuaotunu. 

PhiUips, W. H., Thames. 
^Pollock, John, Thames. 

Rabe, Henry, Thames. 

Reid, Thomas Groat, Thames. 

Rickard, John, Thames. 

Richards, A. H., Kuaotunu. 

Radford, Thomas, Thames. 

Rogers, Oharles Henry, Reefton. 

Rogers, William Henry, Kumara. 

Ross, J., Thames. 
*Rowe, James, Thames. 

Shaw, James, Karangahake. 

Sligo, Alex., Nenthom. 

Thomas, James, Thames. 

Thomas, A., Thames. 

Thomson, John, Dunedin. 

Tregellas, James, Reefton. 

Tregoweth, William, Thames. 

Wells, Oharles Lewis, Thames. 

Willets, Henry, Thames. 

Williams, James, Thames. 

Williams, John, Thames. 

Whisker, Oharles, Thames. 

Whito, John S., Karangahake. 
* Wilson, James R. S., Knaotunu. 

Wilson, J. G., Thames. 

Woodcock, James, Thames. 

Worth, Robert, Waihi. 



19— C- 3. 



* Deceased since issue of certiiioate. 



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124 



SBOOBTD-CULBS SaBVICB GXBTIFIOATBS 18 Msttm-UAXAQMBB'^COnUnUid. 

8ee(md-ela$$ Mmg^managen* 0miifteaU9, iuu$d after BxammaiMn, under *• Thi Mimmg AO, 189i: 
Benney, J., lun., Paero*. Evans, H^A^ Skipper's. MoNeilj_A^.,jOoromand6l. 



Ohristie, WUliam, Waiiekaari. 
Draffin, 8., Waitakauri. 
Donkin, T., Ooromandsl. 



Gailand, V. Y., Ooromandel. 
BfathewsoD, ▲., Hyde. 



White, F. H., Kuaofcano. 
White, O. H., Thames. 



8se(md-^las$ Min$-manager$* CerHfkate; itaued afUr SxamnuUim, under ** The Mining Act, 1898.** 
Bennie, Boyd, GoromaDdel. ^Oahill, T. M., Upper Kuaotona. Carroll, John, Upper Koaoknna. 

Secand-^kui Mine^manager$* OertifieaU$t iaued under SsUion 813 of ** The Mining Act, 1891" 
Oonnon, William, Thames. Bdwacds, B., Ooromandel. MoOormick, W. J., Waitekanzi. 

Goran, Henry, Thames. Kelso, Archibald, Ooromandel. 

8eeond-clau Mine-managert* CertificaU* of Competency granted to Holdert of Provieional Warranti under See 

turn 8B of ** The Mining Act Amendment Act, 1896." 



Allen, W. J., Ooromandel. 
Barney, Montague T., Waitekaort 
Brownlee, Henry, Thames. 
Oollins, Oharles, Waitekanri. 
Onrtis, Oharles, Taylorrille. 
DaTis, James, Ooromandel. 



Gardner, James, Waimangaroa. 
Howe, Albion S., Waitekaori. 
Johnson, Frank H., Oollingwood. 
Kirwan, William, Beefton. 
McDonald, John, Tairua. 
Mclnnes, John, Pnriri. 



Martin, William, Taram, Thames. 
Murphy, Joseph, Ooromandel. 
O'Brien, John, Westoort. 
Presoott, Arthur J., Ooromandel. 
Bedford, Samuel, Waihi. 
Ruifin, Biohard, Mansia, OozomandsL 



BATTBB7-8UPBBIHTBHDBHT8' ObBTDIOATBS. 

Issued under ** The Mining Act 1891 Amendment Act, 1894" without undergoing Examination. 



Adams, H. H., Waihi. 
Aitken, B. M., Beefton. 
Bsjiks, Edwin Gripper, Waihi. 
Barry, Hubert Percy, Waihi. 
Goldsworthy, Henry, Kuaotunu. 
Goldsworthy, John, Kuaotunu. 
Greenway, H. Howard, Auckland. 
Heard, G. St. Olair, Waihi. 

BaUery-euperintendente* Oertifieatee, 

Adams, A. A., Thames. 
Allen, F. B., Thames. 
Allom, H. O., Thames. 
Ansley, Oomyn, Paeroa. 
Ansley, Walter, Thames. 
Banks, J. H., Waihi. 
Bowers, W., Thames. 
Brown, A. B., Thames. 
^Oarter, Samuel, Thames. 
Olarke, J. L., Thames. 
Olarke, B., Waitekauri. 
Olarke, W. J., Waihi. 
Day, A. T., Thames. 
Dixon, Olement, Waihi. 



Hope, John S., Waitekauri. 

Hutchison, William, Karangahake. 

Margetts, Frederick Ernest, Kuao- 
tunu. 

MoKenna, T. N., Tararu. 

MoLellan, William, WaitekaurL 

Mellett, Bichard Sheridan, Waite- 
kauri. 



Napier, James, Karangahake. 
Noble, James B., Karangahake, 
Park, James, Thames. 
Shepherd, Henry Franklin, Waihi 
Sims, 0. F., Taram. 
Walker, James A., Kuaotunu. 
Wilson, Arthur B., Waihi. 
Wilson, James Kitchener, Auckland. 



issued after Sxamination, under " The Mining Act 1891 Amendment Act, 1894.** 



Doveton, G. D., Thames. 
Fleming, G. 0. S., Thames. 
Fuller, J. P., Kuaotunu. 
Gray, J. W., Waihi. 
Hayward, F. W., Komata. 
Horn, G. W., Kuaotunu. 
Jackson, J. H., Paeroa. 
Jones, Achison, Waihi. 
Kidd, F. D., Thames. 
Laurie, D. B., Karangahake. 
Lee, J. W., Beefton. 
Macdonald, W., Waihi. 
McKensie, H. J., Thames. 



Battery-superintendentt^ 

Adams, J. H., Thames. 
Airey, Hubert, Karangahake. 
AUen, D. V., Thames. 
AUen, H. B., Wellington. 
Anld, J. B., Orushington. 
Baker, W. H., Thames. 
Banks, 0. A., Waihi. 
Banks, B. J., Thames. 
Barranoe, K. McK., Karangahake. 
Barrett, J. J., Karangahake. 
Barron, Wm. E., Waikino. 
Baskett, E. G., Karangahake. 
Bidlake, A. E., Waiomo. 
Bishop, T. 0., Beefton. 
Blackadder, Wm., Orushington. 
Bradley, R. J. H., Karangahake. 
Browne, B., Waitekauri. 
Brown, F. M., Karangahake. 
Brown, J. B., Komata. 
Bums, William, Waiomo. 
Bush, B. F., Parawai. 
Bush, H. R., Thames. 
Oampbell, Oolin, Thames. 
Oarpenter, W. B., Karangahake. 
Carter, S., Waihi. 
OarroU, John, Kuaotunu. 
Ohappell, G. A., Karangahake. 
Olark, John L., Waihi. 
Ooote, J. M., Thames. 
Oorbett, G. L., Waitekauri. 
Oouper, J., Thames. 
Oowles, B. K., Orushington. 
Orompton, H., Maratoto. 
Orouoner, Herbert, Waihi. 
Dawson, B., Bllerslie. 



Certificates, issued after Examination, 

Donnelly, Thomas, Waihi. 
Draffin, Eugene, Kuaotunu. 
Ellis, L. L., Waitekauri. 
Empson, J. B., Karangahake. 
Evans, J., Waihi. 
Evans, W. B., Beefton. 
Ewen, H. F., Auckland. 
Fletcher, H. T., Katikati. 
Fraser, J. M., Beefton. 
Fuller, John P., Kuaotunu. 
Fyfe, A., Dunedin. 
(Gardner, E. A., Beefton. 
Gilpin, J., Waihi. 
Gow, B. A., Orushington. 
Grayden, J., Waitekauri. 
Grayden, Peter, Thames. 
Gramitt, P. H., Thames. 
Gwilliam, Ben., Karangahake. 
Halliwell, L. V., Karangahake. 
Hargraves, B. P., Waihi. 
Hay, Adam, Karangahake. 
Hasard, T. R. 0., Waitekauri. 
Hitchcock, W. B., Barewood. 
Hogg, B., Karangahake. 
Hogg, T. B., Karangahake. 
Hom, G. W., Kuaotunu. 
Jones, B. D., Karangahake. 
Kidd, B. B., Waitekauri. 
Kingsford, A., Karangahake. 
Langford, G. S., Waikino. 
Launder, G. H., Waitekauri. 
Lawless, L. J., Paeroa. 
Littlejohn, W. D., Karangahake. 
Lovelock, J. B., Orushington. 
Mackay, John, Orushington. 



McMicken, S. D., Thames. 
Morgan, P. G., Thames. 
Morrin, W. S., Thames. 
Noakes, H. L., Waihi. 
Baithby, B. W., Beefton. 
Robinson, J. R., Waitekauri. 
Stafford, B. H., Waihi. 
Taylor, 0. H., Taram. 
Thorpe, A. H., Thames. 
Vercoe, B. B., Thames. 
Wingate, H. M., Maratoto. 
Winslow, G., Thames. 
Williams, A. G. B., Thames. 



under ** The Mining Act, 1898.** 

Maltman, A., Beefton. 
McBwin, J. A., Beefton. 
McNeil, A. R., Karangahake. 
Montgomery, A. B., Opitonui. 
Motherwell, Wm., Waihi. 
Moyle, W. T., Upper Taima. 
Orbell, G. S., Waikouaiti. 
Paltridge, F., Thames. 
Pond, H. 0., Auckland. 
Porteous, J., Gmshington. 
Quick, J. N., Thames. 
Beid, J. B., Great Barrier. 
Reynolds, B. A., Auckland. 
BoberU, H. 0., Waihi. 
Redden, Wm., Lyell. 
Rosewarne, R. H., Thames. 
Royse, W. G., Reefton. 
Sanford, A. G., Waihi. 
Shaw, D. S., Waikino. 
Stephens, H., Dunedin. 
Sutherland, J. A., Beefton. 
Thomson, G. W., Bendigo. 
Thurlow, J. B., Ooromandel. 
Tomlinson, A., Karangahake. 
Tomlinson, W. F., Dunedin. 
Turnbull, B. V., Waihi. 
Ulrich, G. A. 0., Komato. 
Ulrioh, Herstall, Whangapoua. 
Waters, D. B., Waihi. 
Watson, A. B., Waitekauri. 
Watson, A. P., Orushington. 
Watson, J. B., Beefton. 
White, A. S. H., Karangahake. 
Wilson, A. P., Orushington. 
Williams, A. 0. WaihL 



* Deceased sinoe iisae of oertifloate. 



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Dr§dg$master$* 0&rtifleaU$t without Examination, iiiued under " Th$ Mining Act, 1898" and Amendment Aet$^ 

1901 and 1909, 



AU«n, Ohas., Alexandra. 
Anderson, L. C, Alexandra. 
Andrews, Ralph, Oanyaetown. 
Baker, J. R., Alexandra. 
BaUantyne, D., Miller's Flat. 
Barnes, T. J., Beaumont. 
Barrr, Thos., Clyde. 
Bradley, Neil, Alexandra. 
Bennett, Geo., Gk>re. 
Bennett, James, Komara. 
Blue, a. P., Alexandra. 
Brand, Peter, Waikaka. 
Bremen, Philip, Palmerston B. 
Bremner, A. P., Lower Shotoyer. 
Brioe, Wm. H., Oromwell. 
Bringans, D., Alexandra 
Brown, T. G., Ahaura. 
Bnnting, James, Mnrchison. 
Bnshridge, P., Gk>re. 
Bntler, Bwen, Roxburgh. 
BuUer, M. J., Eanieri. 
Cameron, Saml., Alexandra. 
Clarke, Ed., Port Chalmers. 
Compton, Albert, Dobson. 
Connaok, W., Greymouth. 
Cowan, James, Nelson Creek. 
Cornish, J. T., Miller's Flat. 
Coutts, Henry, Miller's Flat. 
Cowan, Alexander, Stillwater. 
Crookston, W. L., Three-ohannel Flat. 
Crowley, J. B., Bdendale. 
Cumming, J. C., Beaumont. 
Cunningham, G^., Kanieri. 
Curtis, Chas., Stillwater. 
Cutten, W. H., Dunedin. 
Deniston, R. A., Cromwell* 
Dewar, John, Alexandra. 
Donaldson, J. G. A., Greenstone. 
Edmonds, A. R., Nelson Creek. 
Faithful, Wm., Greymouth. 
Gibb, Wm., Croydon Siding. 
Gibson, A., Island Block. 
Goodger, G. W.. Waenga. 
Graham, J. M., Gore. 
Grogan, Wm. A., Miller's Flat. 
Hansen, Wm.. Alexandra. 
Hay, James, Dunedin. 
Hedley, A., Cromwell. 
Hezbe^ J., Beaumont. 



9ewitt, James, Clyde. 
Hogg, Thos., Oromwell. 
Hoakins, Thos., Maori Point. 
Hoy, Samuel, Alexandra. 
Inwood, W. J., Rooklands Beaoh. 
Johnston, B. A., Alexandra. 
Johnstone, Alexander, Oromwell* 
Keen, Thos., Clyde. 
Kennedy, Angus, Alexandra. 
Kitto, Ed. T., Miller's Flat. 
Kitto, Francis, Lowbum. 
Kitto, Jno. F., Miller's Flat. 
Kitto, W. H., Oromwell. 
Kloogh, N. P., Lowbum Ferry. 
Lawson, Ed., Dunedin. 
Ledingham, J., Bannockbum. 
Lee, George, Oollingwood. 
Lidicoat, R. H., Fern Flat. 
Louden, Alexander, Olyde. 
Luke, S. J., Alexandra. 
Magnus, A., Roxburgh. 
Magnus, Dial, Box 130a, Ohristchurch. 
Mailer, John, Stillwater. 
Maitland, A. E., Miller's Flat. 
Maxwell, John, Dunedin. 
MoClure, F. 0., Rongahere. 
McOonnell, J., Oromwell. 
McCormaok, £>., Kanieri. 
McDonald, B. A., Waitiri. 
McDonald, J., Sofala. 
McDonald, Jno., Oromwell. 
MoGeorge, J., Dunedin. 
Mc(}eorge, Alexander, Dunedin. 
McGregor, D., Kanieri. 
McGregor, G. R., Alexandra. 
Mcintosh, D. J., Lowbum Ferry. 
MoLay, Geo. Oromwell. 
McLean, D., Waitiri. 
McMath, D. 0., Ross. 
McMath, Thos., Alexandra. 
Mc Vicar, Peter, Roxburgh. 
Mills, Ed., Mnrchison. 
Mitchell, D. A., Dunedin. 
Morel, 0. G., Inangahua Junction. 
Morris, G. B., Oromwell. 
Murray, D., Olyde. 
Murray, Madget, Oromwell. 
NeUson, S., Miller's Flat. 
Nicholson, W. E., Alexandra. 



CLeary, D., Waiau. 
Olsen, Ohas., Roxburgh. 
Parsons, J. D., jun., Olyde. 
Percy, John, Olyde. 
Perkins, A. 0., Dunedin. 
Pettigrew, Geo., Nelson Creek. 
Poulter, G. W., Alexandra. 
Pringle, John, Miller's Flat. 
Ray, J. 0., TotaraFlat. 
Reeder, Philip, Bald Hill Flat. 
Rennie, Andrew, Roxburgh. 
Ross, Alexander, Oromwell. 
Ross, Robert, Alexandra. 
Richmond, J., Gibbston. 
Ritchie, J. S., Waitiri. 
Sanders, H. P., Clyde. 
Sanders, John, Oromwell. 
Sanders, Thos., Alexandra. 
Schaumann, H., Alexandra. 
Scott, M. G., Alexandra. 
Scott, Robert, Oapleston. 
. Shore, T. M., Queenstown. 
Shore, Wm., Gore. 
Simonsen, Ohas., Alexandra. 
Skilton, A. G., Old Diggings. 
Sligo, N. K., Ahaura. 
Bmeaton, S. H., Inangahua Junction. 
Smith, Alfred, Inangahaa Junction. 
Steel, Archibald, Kawarau Gorge. 
Steel, Thos., Dunedin. 
Templeton, Ivie, Rongahere. 
Thompson, J., Alexandra. 
Thompson, T., Miller's Flat. 
Toohey, J. M., Alexandra. 
Tough, John, Miller's Flat. 
Troy, G. C, Oromwell. 
TurnbuU, W. D., Oanyastown. 
2^son, John, Rongahere. 
Von Haast, J. H., Olyde. 
Wallace, John A., Miller's Flat. 
Watt, John, Oromwell. 
Weaver, Ohas., Alexandra. 
Williamson, R., Millar's Flat. 
Williamson, Walter, Miller's Flat. 
WUson, S. W., Waikaka Valley. 
Wood, R. M., Oromwell. 
Woodhouse, W. S., Roxburgh. 
Young, Andrew, jun., Roxburgh. 



Dndgemasten* Oertifleatest after Examination, iseued under ** The Mining. Aet, 1898," and Amendment Aete, 1901 

and 190B. 



Anderson, G. B., Roxburgh. 
Baird, William G., Olyde. 
Bardsley, John James, Oromwell. 
Blair, G., Abbotsford. 
Borthwiok, Robert, Alexandra. 
Bourke, John, Clyde. 
Brent, 0. D., Oromwell. 
Briggans, Thomas, Alexandra. 
Briggans, WUliam, Alexandra. 
Broderiok, T., Lyell. 
Brace, J. A., Kawarau Gorge. 
Burley, J. P., Westport. 
Burton, A. P., MiUer's Flat. 
Callaghan, B., Three-channel Flat. 
Oamegy, A., Three-channel Flat. 
Carter, W. W., Sandy Point, 
dark, D., Oallaghan's Oreek. 
Coup, George, Albertown. 
Cox, R. D., Alexandra. 
Craig, D. A., ShagPoint. 
Oroawell, James, Three-channel Flat. 
*Cumo, 0. B., Alexandra. 
Dalton, J. R., Three-channel Flat. 
Donaldson, John, Lawrence. 
Downie, Henrj% Totara Flat. 
Baton, Edgar W., Alexandra. 
Elder, D. D., Roxburgh. 
Fomo, D., Inangahua Junction. 
French, T. B. K., Three-channel Flat. 
Gibson, William H., Oromwell. 
Giliooly, T., Roxburgh. 
GUlstrom, Carl A., Berlin's] . 
Gunn, W. B., Beaumont. 
Gkiyton, James, Dunedin. 
Hanning, 0. J., Olyde. 
Hansan, H. C, Three- channel Flat. 
Harden, J., Stafford. 
Hadiwiok, Matthew, Roxburgh. 



Heweteon, Sydney, NeUon Oreek. 
Hoffg, J., Neyis. 
Holden, John, Oromwell. 
Hophurn, D. O., Alexandra. 
Hughes, John L., Miller's Flat. 
Johnston, John, Maori Gully. 
Johnston, Louis, Beaumont. 
Jones, T. R., Miller's Flat. 
Junker, Frank J., Berlin's. 
Kane, William, Olyde. 
Kane, William, Oromwell. 
Kean, F. F., Waikaka. 
Kitto, John, Olyde. 
Linney, William, Island Block. 
Livingstone, D., Alexandra. 
MacDonald, 0. J., Oromwell. 
MacGinnis, J. A., Oromwell. 
MacGinnis, M. P., Alexandra. 
MacLaren, John, Alexandra. 
Marklund, 0. O., Lowbum Ferry. 
Matthews, A. A., Three-channel Flat. 
Mayne, W. 0., Nelson Oreek. 
McDonald, 0. J., Waitere. 
McDonald, G., Alexandra. 
McOallum, W. S., Alexandra. 
McGregor, Dougald S., Alexandra. 
McKensie, John, Roxburgh. 
McLean, John, Roxburgh. 
Melvin, J. R., Roxburgh. 
Moffitt, R. W., MUler'B Flat. 
Mollison, William, Stillwater. 
Monson, 0. H., Miller's Flat. 
Morel, A. E., Nobles. 
Morel, L. H., Inansahua Junction. 
Morris, V., Oromwell. 
Munro, R. F., Ross. 
Mnrray» H. B., OromweU. 
Murray, Robert John, Oanvastown. 



Nelson, Edgar, Brmmerton. 
Nelson, George L., Brunnerton. 
Olsen, Hans, Alexandra. 
Omond, Thomas, Nevis. 
Orkney, H. E., Oromwell. 
Orr, William W., Oromwell. 
Parker, P. R., Roxburgh. 
Patterson, J., Clyde. 
Plumb, B. H., Maori Point. 
Poppelwell, William, Alexandra. 
Rait, Hume, Albertown. 
Rav, J. F., Bannockbum. 
Reiderer, Edward, Oromwell. 
Robertson, D. J., Alexandra. 
Roberteon, W. R., Alexandra. 
Rooney, J. B., Roxburgh. 
Rumble, Ohas., Ngahere. 
Rumble, Joseph, Miller's Flat. 
Banders, W. J., Ahaura. 
Sawle, J., Oromwell. 
Sawyer, J. F., Alexandra. 
Taylor, Alexr., Alexandra. 
Taylor, J. T., Dunedin. 
Vickerman, E. M., Oromwell. 
Wasserbrenner, M., Alexandra. 
Wathen, James, Miller's Flat. 
Watson, E. H., Oollingwood. 
Weir, W., Nevis. 

Wescombe, Alfred L., Island Block. 
Westoott, P. A., Miller's Flat. 
Williams, Frederick, Alexandra. 
Wilson, George, Marsden. 
Wilson, Stephen L., Inangahua Junc- 
tion. 
Wood, W. W., Oromwell. 
Woodhouse, F., Bannockbum. 
Wylde, G. R., Inangahua Junction. 



Digitized by 



Google 



c^a 



120 



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tolM Go ^ Bir.icc Co. 
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iogCo. 
Mooowi Gotd-Mintm Co. 

A. XTOVW 

New Albofsm GoU-omi- 

iBf Co. 
EcbpM Gcld-miniiif Co. 

Gooigt Btyuit . . 
MeGiragor Mtd Tkylor 



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Sheet Anchor 
Klondyka 

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Comar's 

Jodd'8 .. 
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FAmeand Fortone 



School of HinM .. 



ICaj Queen 
tended 

Fainnile 

Bank of New Zea- 
land 

BankofNew South 
Walee 



PnmiGold 

J. Mclitnte and party . . 

PrffkfB HOI Qoid-mining 

Co. 
Chehnrfnrd Gold 

Co. 

Taniwha Gold-miniiig Co. 
Manann Gdd-miidng Co. 
Waihoi Qold-minmg Co. 
'nilcley Broa. .. 
, Kkndyke Gold-ndnii^ Co. 

' Koianai Gold-ndning Co. 
A. and G. Pnoe 
Kmanoi-CaledoBian Gold- 

i fft|tff> g Co. 
iChtftoeJodd .. 
, Ma:f QoMn Syndicate . . 
i Waiotehi Gold-mining Co. 
' Fame and Fortune Gold- 
mining Co. 

iSehoolof Minee Boaid in 

I 



Ex- Ma: 



%j Qoeen 
Gold] 



•mining Co. 
T. Manning 
Bank of New Zealand 



Bank of New Sonth Walee 



IS 



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4 

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15 
» 

10 
10 
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10 
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20 



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31 
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21 
5 



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8 3 

5 .. 

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Digiti 



zed by Google 



drATBMifiNf showing the Whole of the Quabtz-obushino Maohinbs and 
Auriferous and Ai^entiferoos Ores in the Hauba£I Mining Distbiot 
Slst December, 190^^-oontinued. 



C— 3. 

Applianobb for treating 
for the Year ended the 







1 














^m 1 


1 


1 




LooaUtT where 
Machine ia dtneled. 


Name of Machine. 


'.A 
Name of Owners. ^ 

4 


'S 


1 

1 


1 


I 

1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


11 

k 


^1 

si 
1^ 


si 

11 


i 






11 


g 


a 

p 


1 


I 


S 


g 


i 


U 


il 


s? 


g 






^ 


^ 


^ 


» 


» 


9? 


^ 


» 


s 


as 


K 


^ 


Okhmnmri County. 


























1 

1 




Pftezoa 


Bank of New Zea- 
land 


Bank Of New Zealand .. 


1 


•• 




• • 






2 


1 








•• 


H 


KaraDgabake 


Grown . . 


New Zealand Grown Mines 
(Ltd.) 

Talisman GonsoUdated 


a 


60 




4 






2 


2 






I 


•• 


8,W 


m 


Woodstock 


j2 


40 




2 






2 


2 






1 


1 


S.W 


m • • 


Talisnian 


Oold-mining Go. (Ltd.) 


u 


60 

1 




5 






8 


8 






1 


1 


S,W 


Koxnata 


Komato Beefs 


Komato Beefs Gold-min- 
ing Go. 


2 


< 20 




4 






2 


2 






1 


1 


S.W 


Waitekaari 


Waitekatiri 


Waitekaari Gold-mining 

Go. 
Ditto.. 


a 


40 


1 


6 






8 


2 






1 


1 


s, w 


• • • 


Qolden Gross 


1 


10 


.. 


2 






2 


2 






1 


.. 


s,w 


• • • 


Qraoe Darling 


. • . . . . 


1 


1 10 


, , 


8 






1 


2 






1 


, , 


S.W 


• . , 


Jubilee .. 


Jubilee Gold-mining Go. 


, , 


! 10 


, , 


5 






1 


2 






1 


, , 


s 


Maiatoto .. 


Waitokauri Ex- 
tended 


Waitekaari Extended 

Gold-mining Go. 
Maratoto Gold-mining Go. 


1 


40 


•• 


8 






2 


2 






1 


•• 


w 


• • • • • 


Maratoto 


, , 


10 


, , 


2 






2 


1 






1 


, , 


s 


• •^ • • 


Hikuiaia Gold Syn- 

dioate 
Waibi Gold Beefe 


Hikutaia Gold Syndicate 


1 


5 


• • 


2 






1 


2 






•• 


•• 


s 


Waihi 


Waibi Gold Beefs Syndi- 


1 


5 


, , 


•* • 






, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 


, , 







Syndicate (Glad. 


cats (Gladstone) 






























stone) 






























m • • • • 


Waibi .. 


Waihi Gold-mining Go. . . 


2 


90 


. . 


5 






8 


6 








1 


s,w 


m • • • • 


UnioD-Waibi 


m 


2 


40 


, , 


2 






2 


2 








1 


S.W 


Waikino .. 


Waikino 


m 


4 


200 


, , 


12 






8 


4 








1 


s,w 


Piako 


Waiorongomai 


B. H. Hardy . . 


1 


10 


, . 


4 


V 




2 


2 








1 


w 


Oreat Barrier Island 


Barrier Beefs 


Henry Brett . . 


1 


20 


, , 


8 


, , 


2 


8 


2 








1 


s 


Aookland.. 


Bank of New Zea- 
land 


Bank of New Zealand .. 


•• 


•• 


• • 


1 


1 


2 


6 


4 


2 


• • 


•• 


•• 


w 






35 


1,220 


1 


262 


25 


20 


114 


128 


60 


82 


24 


18 





Tairua, — Goronation Mine : Fiye stamps and one berdan are in course of erection. Golden Belt : Forty bead of stamps 
are being erected at this mine. 

WaSU» — Grand Janction : Preparations are being made for tbe erection of forty bead of stamps. These stamps were 
formerly at Opitonai. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C— 8. 



1^ 



Statbmbkt showiDg Quabtz-gbushino Maohinbs and Applianoss for treating Anriferons Ores in tbe 
Mablbobouoh, Nblbon, and Wbstland Mining Distbiots for the Year ended the diet Deoember. 
1904. 



Locftlily wber« 
lUehiiM U dtoated. 



Name of liMhiiM 



Name of OwBAT. 



Marlborough County, 
Top Valley 



CoUingv)ood County, 
Taitapu .. 



BuUer County. 
Mokihinoi 

Waim&ngasoft 



Lyell .. 

Inangahua County. 
Bonrke's Greek 
Viotori* Bange 

Oapleston 

Reef ton .. 



Orey County. 
PaparoA Ranges 

Ten-mile Greek 



Wellington 
Jabilee .. 

Golden Ridge 
Golden Blocks 

RedQoeen 
Britannia 
Stony Creek 
Alpine Extended 

Gardiner's 
Kirwan's Reward 

Welcome . . 

Golden Fleece 

Wealth of Nations 
Keep-it-Dack 

Progress Mines 

New Scotia 

Golden Lead 

Last Ohance 
New Inkerman 

Big Riyer 

King George 

Inglewood 

Meant Pi^aroa 
Taffy 



T. W. Yonng and P. K. 

Watty 
Jabilee QolA - mining Co. 

(Limited) 

Tattapa Gold Bstotes (Li- 
mited) 

Golden Blocks (Taitapn) 
(Limited) 

Red Qaeen Gold-mining 

Co. (Limited) 
Britannia Gola-mining Co. 

(Limited) 
Stony Creek Gold-mining 

Co. (Limited) 
Alpine Bztendeid Gold-min- 

mg Co. (Limited) 

W. P. Gardiner and Sons . . 

Kirwan^s Reward Gold- 
mining Co. (Limited) 

Welcome Gola-mining C6. 
(Limited) 

Consolidated Goldfields of 
New Zealand (Limited) 

Ditto .. :. 

Keep-it-Dark Qaarti-min- 
ing Co. (Limited) 

Progress Mines of New Zea- 
land (Limited) 

New Scotia Gold-mining 
Go. (Limited) 

Gk>lden Lead Gold-mining 
Oo.g<imited) 

Alex. Fleming and party . . 

New Inkerman Mines (Li- 
mited) 

Big Riyer Gold-mining Co. 
(Limited) . 

St. George Gold-mining Go. 



Inglewood Gold-mining Go. 
^amited) 

Moant Paparoa Gold-min- 
ing Co. (lamited) 

Taffy Gold - mining Co. 
(Limited) 




Digiti 



zed by Google 



129 



C— 3. 



QUABTS-GBUSHINO 



Machikbs and Appuangbs for treating Anriferoos Ores in the Southskn Minino 
D18TBICT tor the Year ended the Slat December, 1904. 



liOMUtT 

MhlMto 



NftSM of IfMhiaa. 



NftSM of Owaar. 



A I (^ 

o 

I 

a 



§ g 




iisppgn 

2 J9S % K PS 



Waipozi . . 



Bmet Comil y 
Waitahium 



Qoeenstowii 
lUeolown.. 



Skipper's .. 

Boll«nd*le 
Bannoolrhiini 



Bandigo 



Fiord CawUth- 
TeOneroa 



BftldHlUFUU 

MamioMo OomU ff 
Hjda 

Boiu^Bidga 

MaoTM't 



StoiMbiini 



Taitiri Oc m m iy 
Hindoii 
Baivwooo • • 



Otago Pioneer 
Qaarti 

Vietocia.. 
Bella 



Burnt Greek 



LattOhanoe 

loTinoible 
Premier.. 

Tipperarj 

ShdOYer 



AohiUet.. 
DajDawn 
Oarrlok .. 
Star of the 
Bendigo 



Alta 

New Star 
Alpha Dawn 

Golden Site 



BzoelsiOff 
Whito'a Beef 

Mount Hi^&lay 

Great: 

Ifaritaaa 
Oonoe 



Hille'e United 
Golden Point 
Golden Bar 

GUHecn •• 

Pa^er*!.. 
Barewood 



Otago Pioneer Qoarti 
(Waiporl) Gold-mining 

B.Ootton 

Bella Gold-mining Syndi- 



Table mil Qnarls-mining 

Go. 
Oanada Beef Gold-mining 

Oo. 
ParicftOo. 

Invineible Gold-mining Oo. 
Premier Sonriee (H.Z.) 

Gold-mining Go. 
Indian Glenrook (Wj- 

naad) Gold-mining Oo. 
Sbototer Qnarta • mining 

Oo. 
Aohilles Gold-mines 
Lawronoe Broe. 
James Lawreooe 
Lawrenoe Bros. 
Oromwell Proprielaiy 

Gold-mining Oo. 
Maoabe and Bon 
Bendigo Tailingi Qjndi- 



Alta Gold-mining Oo. . . 

New Star Gold-mining Oo. 
Alpha Dawn Gold-mmhig 

Golden Site Gold-mining 
Oo. 



Graj 
B.T. 



IHolden 



^jmee 



Moont ffighlaj Gold-min- 
ing Oo. 
F.u. Perry .. 

0. McGiU 

Oanoe Gold-mining Oo. . . 

L. O. Beai, Jon. 

H. N. Mills end Son .. 

W. and G. Donaldson .. 

Golden Bar Gold-mining 

Oo. 
A.G. Daiiee .. 

A« Parker 

Barewood Gold-mining Oo. 



10 



5 
5 



10 
10 



10 
90 

10 

10 

80 

4 
10 
10 
80 



4 
10 



10 



8 
5 

19 



6 
8 
5 
5 
10 
10 



4 
10 



14 



86 



6 1 

1 
9 

'4 



14 



19 



i 



w 
w 



w 
w 
w 

w 

w 

w 

w 

w 
w 
w 
w 
s,w 

w 

O 

s 



w 
w 

w 

w 

O 

w 

w 

s 

s,w 

8 

8 

O 
O 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



c.—s. 



130 



Statbmbnt showing the Quantity of Quabtz obushbd and Gold obtained in the Haubaki 
Mining Distbiot for the Year ended the Slst December, 1904. 



LooAllty and Name of Mine. 



Average 
Namber of 

Men 
employed. 



Qnarli onubed. 



Gold obtained. 



Amelgamalion. Cyanide, 



Eetixnaled 
Value. 



Barrier Beefs 



Obbat Babbibb Islahd. 

I Tom ewt. qr. lb. I 

8,119 tailings 



Os. dwt. I Ob. dwt. I it K. d. 

10,646 18 2,870 18 2 



Cabbage Bay — 
White Star 

Waikoromiko— 
Fonr-in-Hand , 

Tokatea— 
Royal Oak 
West Tokatea . 
Harbour View 
Monte Christo 



Kapanga — 
Kapanga 
Golden Spark . . 
Hero and Little Hero Extended 



Union Beaoh Tailing Plant 



Hauraki Blook— 
Old Hauraki 
Banker's Hill . . 
Haaraki Freeholds 
Suooess 
Golden Pah 



Tiki— 
Vanghan's 

Kennedy Bay — 
Old Whangapoua 
Exalt.. 



Knaotonn- 
Waitaia 
Otama 



COBOICAVDBL CODNTT. 



Sundries 



Totols 



Tapa— 
liabara-Boyal • . 
Sheridan 



Tarara— 
Eclipse 

Komnoi— 
Kuronoi Gold-mining Company . 

Moanataiari— 
Moanataiari 
Albomia 

Kuranui-Caledonian 
Little Mabel 



2 


15 


27 


.. 


75 6 3 


10 


258 12 14 


840 13 


• • 


989 8 6 


46 

10 

9 

9 


1,027 5 1 22 

27 1 2 8 

10 

5 


8,889 17 

166 18 

6 12 

8 5 


• • 


9,110 1 7 

470 17 8 

17 

25 7 9 


74 


1,065 2 2 


8,521 7 


.. 


9,628 6 7 


2 
2 
2 


115 17 

7 15 

8 


66 1 

60 5 

8 10 


•• 


158 10 4 

160 15 

25 10 


6 


180 1 4 


184 16 


•• 


844 15 4 


8 


1,525 tailings 




346 1 


701 4 8 


20 

10 

14 

2 

4 


171 

88 8 26 

108 2 8 6 

147 18 

88 5 26 


815 9 
189 5 
922 17 
84 5 
184 14 


•• 


958 8 3 
581 1 6 
2,698 5 9 
202 4 4 
554 2 


50 


492 9 20 


1,696 10 


•• 


4,989 1 10 


2 


10 5 


11 9 


.. 


81 9 9 


2 
2 


1 1 12 
1 5 8 16 


68 4 
20 17 


•• 


178 16 
57 6 9 


4 


2 6 10 


84 1 


• • 


281 2 9 


21 
8 


• 

1,119 
111 


2,088 1 
167 19 


•• 


6,068 10 9 
410 12 9 


24 


1,280 


2,201 


•. 


6,474 8 6 


10 


511 10 2 20 


581 1 


•• 


491 13 1 


185 


5,202 5 2 9 


8.547 17 


846 1 


28,951 11 8 



* TaUiogs. 
Thamjbs Coubty and BoBonan. 



10 
2 


1,874 
16 


585 7 
88 


•• 


1.785 6 7 
115 12 11 


12 


1,890 


628 7 


•• 


1,900 19 6 


8 


138 


800 


•• 


867 10 


6 


84 


86 13 


• • 


101 12 8 


15 

20 

48 

8 


582 

721 

750 10 

82 


407 12 

784 9 

1,610 10 

72 6 


•• 


1,118 12 10 

2,106 12 8 

4,845 4 9 

172 1 


81 


2,085 10 


2,874 17 


• • 


7,744 10 10 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



131 



C— 3. 



Statement showing the Quantity of Quabtz crushed and Gold obtained in the Haubaki 
Mining District for the Year ended the Slst December, I90i—continutd . 



Locality and Name of Mine. 



I I 

Average I 
Namber of 

Men 
; employed. I 



Quartz oroslied. 



I 



Gold obtained. 



Amalgamation. 



Cyanide. 



R^tiuJated 
Value. 



Waiotahi— 
Waiotahi Company 
Fame and Fortune 
Nonpareil 
Golden Drop . . 
Ballarat 



Orahamstown- 
Viotoria 
New Saxon 
Jndd'B 



Karaka— 
May Qaeen Extended 
New Una 
Olaremont 



Hape Greek— 
Thames Star . . 

Otanni — 
Otanai Matootte 

Omahu — 
Klondyke 

Gum town— 
Kapowai 
Big Beetle 



Tairua — 
Tairna Broken Hills 
Obelmsford 



Wbangamata- 
Waiinangn 



Sundries 



Thamks County and BoBOVQu—cotUinued 



11 
9 
2 
8 



Tons owt. qr. lb. 
336 







51 

155 

4 

52 



87 



697 



■• I 



174 
221 
6,400 taliugs 



Os. dwt. 

1,236 13 

90 16 

232 17 

46 k; 

107 12 



Ob. ilwt. 



1,714 14 



21 



6,795 



166 

25 1 22 

1 22 



13 

1 



191 8 16 



18 



1 10 21 



120 



12 
5 



17 



50 
6 



530 
203 



783 



56 



18 



Totals for Thames Counly and 276 
Borough I 



3,700 
180 










3,880 








1 









117 7 
133 7 
761 19 



271 14 



16,731 15 1 22 



1,017 13 

97 10 

89 4 

29 12 



216 6 


27 4 


12 




_ 


513 
280 16 



I— 



793 16 



2 


186 
44 




7 





230 


7 







^26 14 



10,691 16 



4,542 4 
117 8 



£ 8. d. 

3,864 5 4 
255 12 4 
645 10 3 
122 13 5 
833 11 10 



4,721 18 


2 


311 17 

370 13 

1,947 19 




6 


2.630 9 


6 


2t>8 3 

•J24 2 

T.I 18 



6 



572 3 


6 



83 



7 6 



40 9 2 



1,174 1 10 
715 17 10 



1,389 19 8 



10,287 1 10 
249 7 5 



4,659 12 i 10,536 9 3 



82 18 3 



! 1,271 2 11 
4.659 12 32,392 7 7 



Waihi 



Waihi Gladstone 
Ohinemuri Biver Syndicate 

Totals for Wa hi Borough 



1,286 



8 
10 



1.254 



Waihi Bobouoh. 
259,978 



86,760 
89 10 



800 tailings 
8,488 



300,510 10 



778,135 2 1599.654 10 4 
149,915 53,835 16 8' 
, 18,068 2 6t 
; 1,542 18 llj 



*678,101 8 4 

395 8 172 8 11 

2,114 18 , 884 1 8 



930,560 3 674.157 18 6 



Waitekaari— 
Waitekauri G.-M. Co. (Lid.) . . 80 



Karangahake— 

Talisman .. 2-25 

New Zealand Crown 204 

Komata — 

Komata Reefs . . 100 

Hikataia - 

Marototo 1 



580 



Totals for Ohinemuri Conniv ' 560 



Ohinemuri County. 
j 1.662 



44,888 

26,603 

15,800 

100 



2,813 15 



175 5 4,612 18 1 



80,551 133,428 7 ' 84,826 10 6 

21,754 4 37,997 8 7 

6,659 6 ! 37,799 16 32,559 17 8 

385 90 2 



87,891 87,210 6 



198,867 7 155,478 11 6 



89,043 90,024 I i 193,542 12 1160,086 9 7 



* Concentrates plant. Victoria Mill, t Assay ^alue concentrates shipped ; Slag tailings shipped. 

20— c. 3. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



(J. -8. 



182 



Statement showing the Quantity of Quartz obushed and Gold obtained in the Hauraki 
Mining Distbiot for the Year ended the Slst December, 1904 — continued. 



Locftiily and Name of Mine. 



Average 
Number of 

Men 
employed. 



Qoartt omsbed. 



Gold obtained. 
Amalgamation. | Cyanide. 



Value. 



Waioroogomai— 
Hardy's Mines (Limited) 



28 



PlAKO OOUHTY. 

Tone owt. qr. lb. Oe. dwt. 

488 281 5 



Ob. 



dwt 



M s. d. 

665 10 3 



Great Barrier — 
Barrier Reefs 



Gbbat Babbibb Island. 



8,119 tailiDgs 



10,646 18 1 2,880 18 2 



Ore at Barrier 
Goromandel County 
Thames OouDty and Borough 
Waihi Borough . . 
Obinemuri County 
Piako County 

Orand totals. 1904 
1903 

IncreAse 
Decrease 



2 

185 

276 

1,254 

560 

28 



2,305 
2,821 



16 



SUMMARY. 

3,119 

5,202 5 

16.781 16 

300,510 10 

89,048 

483 



4^5,089 11 3 
316,114 12 20 



98,974 18 3 11 



8.547 17 
10,691 16 

90,024 1 
281 5 


10,646 18 

346 1 

4,669 12 

930,660 3 

193,542 12 

t 


i 2,880 18 
1 23,951 11 
82,392 7 
674.157 18 
160,086 9 
1 665 10 


2 
8 
7 
6 
7 
3 


109,544 19 

134,598 9 


1,139,755 6 
872,639 2 


'893,634 15 
917.867 4 


4 
10 


25,053 10 


267,116 4 


1 





I 24,282 7 6 



Number of men employed on development-work and prospecting in the whole dittriot from which no returns of 

gold have been obtained : 178. 



Battery Returns from Quartz -mines in the Marlborough. Nelson, and West Coast 
Mining Districts for the Year ended the Slst December, 1904. 

Name and Locality of Mine. 



CoUingwood District — 
Golden Ridge, Taitapu 
Golden Blocks. Taitapu 

Westport District- 
Lady Agnes. Seddonville 
Britannia, Waimangaroa 

Lyell Dietriot— 
Alpine Extended, Lyell 

Reefton District- 
Welcome, Capleston 
Kirwan*8 Reward, Capleston 
Golden Fleece, Black's Point 
Wealth of Nations, Crushiogton 
Eeep-it-Dark, Crushington 
Progress. Waitahu Survey District 
New Inkerman. Waitahu Survey District 
Last Chance. Merrijigs 
United. Merrijigs 
New Scotia, Merrijigs . . 
Big River. Merrijigs 
Inglewood. Murray Creek 



Totals . . 



Quarts crushed. 


Yield of Gold. 


' Approximate Total 
\ Values. 


Tons. 


o«. « 


Iwt 


gr. 


£ 8. d. 


646 


791 


7 


10 


3,069 1 5 


2,411 


2,222 12 





8,764 12 9 


80 


11 


22 


; 43 12 9 


765 


636 


12 13 


I 2,506 15 10 


4,855 


1.605 





13 


5,769 11 7 


380 


296 


12 


6 


1,027 13 1 


6,250 


1,049 


15 





7,764 16 7 


12,930 


6,034 


18 


8 


24,052 4 11 


12,478 


5,158 


S 


2 


20,608 1 9 


12,300 


5,514 


15 


18 


20,668 9 9 


59,908 


27.830 





18 


108,337 1 3 


8,139 


2,623 


10 


7 


10,076 8 3 


20 


55 








220 


118 


88 


2 


12 


:308 6 10 


479 


189 


7 


20 


524 7 2 


988 


902 


6 





3,652 11 4 


3,390 


1,956 


6 


17 


7,232 12 11 


126,137 


57,3.59 


16 


17 


224,626 8 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



133 



C— 3. 



Bbturns from QuARTZ-MiNBB for the Year ended the 3l8t December, 1904. 



Name and Locality of Mine. 



Premier Sunrise (No Liabiliiy), 

Maoetowp 
Glenrock Gonsolidated (Wynaad), 

Meicetowa 
Shotover, Skipper's 
Morning Star, Preservation Inlet . . 
Slar of the East, Bannookburn 

(Lawrence Bros.) 
Bcoidigo, Bendigo (Tributers) 
•While's Reef, Bald HiU Plat (R. T. 

Symes) 
'Excelsior, Bald HUI Flat (Holden and 

Gray) 
'Bough Bidge, Rough Ridge (F. H. 

Perry) 
•Bonanza. Macraes (L. O. Beal, Jr.) 
*Golden Quarry, Macraes (H. N.MUls) 
'Golden Point, Macraes (W. and G. 

Donaldson) 
'Ounce, Macraes (Spiers and Rosp) . . 
'Marilana, Macraes (0. McGiU) 
*Gk>lden Bar, Sioneburn (J. H. 

Cunningham 
'Gilivem, Stonebum (A. G. Davies) 
O.P.Q., Waipofi .. 
Barewood, Barewood 
Last Ohanoe, Canada Reefs (T. Park 
and Co. 
Scheelite 

Totols 



Ordinary 
Qaarts 
oroBbed. 



Amalgam. 



Tons cwt.qr. 

1.568 

103 

1,869 U 

100* 

219 

55 

89 



2,150 



850 

9,142 

458 

2,209* 

226 10 

21 



11,404 10 



Os. dwt. gr. 

1,367 

133 10 

1,884 

150 

250 

105 

77 



1,275 



2,432 



2,911 



Melted 
Gold. 



02. dwi. gr. 

53 10 9 
597 9 9 



Value. 



10.584 10 



356 7 17 



1,006 7 11 



M 8. i\. 

2,689 8 10| 
212 17 Ol 

2.334 19 

186* 

435 18 6| 
146 6 Oj 

124 12 6 



1,385 17 3 

i 

56 5 01 

3.068 12 C 

311 6 

8,370* 6 7 

1,097 10 



15,319 18 7 



TaiUogs 
treai 



iUogs 
ated. 



Gold from 
TaUings. | 



Value. 



TonsOwt. 
43 



78 10 



08.dwt. gr. 
135 7 



7 5 



£ B. d. 

447 



124 6 



18 2 



87 12 01107 10 6 



139 12 255 6 5678 16 6 



Tailings al Premier Sunrise and Shotover Quarts-mines are treated by cyanide, aod the tailings at Barewood as treated in New Sootb 
Wales. * Privately owned mmes, and owners desire returns to be included under the heading of " Suudrie«. ' 



Statement of Value of Gk>LD won from Quartz obushed for all Districts for the Years 
ended the dlst December, 1903 and 1904. 



Mining District. 



Year eurled tiie 
31st December, 1903. 



Haoraki 

Marlborough, Nelson, and West Coast 

Otago and Southland... 

Totals ... 



917,867 

220,276 

21,363 



1,169,506 



Year ei d» d '< •• 
3l8t D (ember. 1*A.4. 



893,636 

2-24.626 

16,998 



1,134,259 



Gross Totals and Value of Gold pubohasbd by Banks for Year ended the 31st December, 1904 

_ j "^ ^ ~ 

Bank. Gold porohased. Value. 



Bank of New Zealand 
Bank of New South Wales 

Totals ... 



Hcmraki Mining 



District. 

Oz. dwt. gr. 

13,639 1 

9,647 10 



23,186 11 



£ ». d. 

44,365 6 5 
18.341 8 8 



62,696 16 1 



Marlbor(mgK Nelson, and Westland Mining Districts. 



Bank of New Zealand 
National Bank of New Zealand 
Bank of New South Wales 
Union Bank of Australasia 

Totals ... 



35,076 14 15 
36,605 16 13 ' 
11,563 18 
2,498 


Vdl,-29'2 15 

142,176 8 

45.440 11 

9,898 


7 
6 
3 



85,744 9 4 


334,807 16 


4 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C-— 8. 



134 



(Irosb Totals and Value of Gold pubchabbd by Banks for Year ended the 3l8t December, 

1904 — continued. 



Bank. 



Bank of New Zealand 
Bank of New South Wales 
National Bank of New Zealand 
Bank of Australasia ... 
Union Bank of Australasia 
Private buyers 

Totals ... 

Grand totals 



Gold porohMed. 



Otago and Southland Dittricts. 

Oz. (\m%. gr. 

109,392 1 22 

10,963 13 15 

39.436 B 8 

16,^31 1 

2,931 7 14 

2,733 8 4 



181,378 15 



290,309 19 



Valoe. 



£ 


t. d. 


420,464 


1 4 


42,444 


19 5 


152,843 


9 11 


60,964 





10.998 


7 10 


10,701 


4 8 



698,416 3 2 



1,095,920 13 7 



SUMMARY OF WORKS CONSTRUCTED. 

The following statement shows the whole of the different classes of works constructed by the 
Department, either by direct grants or by subsidies to local bodies, during the last twenty-three years 
(the votes for this purpose having been under the control of the Hon. the Minister of Mines), for 
the purpose of opening up the mineral belts throughout the colony, and also for the devel<^>ment of 
the mining industry : — 



Nature of Workft. 



Totol Cost of Bxpenditord, by 

ConBtmotioD. or way of Sabsidy or 
I Amount authorised i otherwise, by 
to be expended. Mines Department 



Amount of 
UabiUty by Mines 

Department oU 
Works in Progrees. 



Up to Years 1882-83 and 188S-84. | 

VVa(er-race8 . . . . . . . . . . . . , 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and traoks undertaken by County CounoilB, subsi- , 

dised by Mines Department . . I 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations, subsidised j 

by Mines Department 
Oonstruotion of arainage and sludge channels, subsidised ; 

by Mines Department 



1884-85. 

Water-races 

Roads on goldAelds 

Roads and traoks undertaken by County CouncilB, subsi- 
dised by Mine? Department 

Roads to mines, otber than gold, subsidised by Mines De- 
partment . . 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Construction of drainage and sludge channels, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Diamond and other drills 



188&-a6. 

Water-races .. .. .. , 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads undertaken by County Councils, subsidised by Mines 
Department 

Roads to mines, other than gold, subsidised by Mines De- 
partment . . 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Construction of drainage and sludge channels, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Schools of Mines 



1886-87. 

Water-races 

Roads on soldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, subsi- 
dised by Mines Department 

Roads to mines, other than gold, subsidised by Mines De- 
partment .. 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Construction of drainage and sludge channels, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Diamond and other drills 

Schools of Mines 



29,252 
21,487 


8. 

1 

11 


d. t 
11 ' 
2 


£ s. 
14,858 9 
13,089 16 


d. 
5 



14,898 11 
8,347 15 


d. 

6 
2 


52,841 


17 





21,844 16 


7 


10,207 15 


9 


13,210 


13 


4 


3.350 





3,400 





6,750 








2,468 15 


4 


781 4 


8 


122,498 


3 


5 


55,606 17 


4 


87,135 7 


1 


4,846 
18,667 


1 
10 


? ' 


14,596 2 
9,680 9 


9 
6 


4,648 11 
12,384 15 


6 
9 


13,566 


14 


1 


6,293 16 


6 


12,739 17 


6 


4,594 


10 





111 19 





2,888 1 





850 





1 


108 





3,692 





4,050 
3,600 









1 


1,050 
1,858 






1,981 4 


8 


45,174 15 11 ' 


38,648 7 


9 


38,284 10 


5 


3,660 4 
27,543 18 


9 
8 


6,068 2 
12,360 14 


3 
9 


6,964 4 
27,567 19 


4 

8 


14,773 


2 


3 


13,043 15 


9 


12,477 9 


2 


1,551 


19 10 


4,327 10 


490 12 


6 


11,860 18 


\ 


1,999 5 


7 


6,389 6 


9 


10,051 
2,160 


14 
9 


9 
7 


3,994 16 
1,260 9 


6 
7 


6.996 9 
900 


9 




71,602 7 10 


43,049 5 


3 


61.785 1 


4 


1 
12,453* 8 .0 i 


1,928 14 
22,229 16 


4 
1 


3,466 
17,791 7 


8 



12,613 4 8 ' 


7,415 19 


6 


10,455 1 


5 


•• 


liOb 1 





110 13 


1 


15,(i71 1*J 


4,521 7 


3 


4,618 4 


7 



r>,54U 14 G 
422 15 G 

:J,183 7 1 



6,2()7 18 

42-2 15 6 

.■J,:iS3 7 1 



672 6 10 
700 



49,894 4 8 



46,415 18 9 



37,818 18 7 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



136 



C— 3. 



SUMMARY OP WORKS CONSTRUCTED— c<w<tnti«rf. 



Nature of Workt». 



Total Ck>8t of I 
Coustruotioo, or 
Amoaiit authorised : 
to be expeoded. | 



Expenditure, by Ainouut of 

way of Subsidy or Liability by Minee 

otherwise, by i Department on 
Mines Department. | Works in Progress. 



1887-88. 

Water-races 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Counoiis, subsi- 
dised by Mines Department 

Roads to mines, other than gold, subsidised by Mines De- 
partment . . 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Construction of drainage and sludge channels, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Schools of Mines 

Aids to treatment of ores 



1888-89. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Counoiis, subsi- 
dised by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
pcoiies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Construction of drainage and sludge channels, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Wharves, contributions by Mines Department 

Aids to treatment of ores, subsidised 

Schools of Mines 



1889-90. 
Roads on ffoldfields 
Roads and tracks undertaken by County Counoiis, subei 

dised by Mines Department. . 
Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 

panics, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races 
Wharves 
Schools of Mines 
Aids to treatment of ores 
Tracks to open up mineral lands 
Diamond drills 



1890-91. 
Roads on ffoldfields 
Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, subsi 

dised by Mines Department 
Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 

panics, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races 
Wharves 
Schools of Mines 
Tracks to open up mineral lands 



1891-92. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Cotmoils, subsi 
dised by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mmes Department 

Water-races 

Wharves 

Schools of Mines 

Tracks to open up mineral lands 



1892-98. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and traces undertaken by County Councils, subsi- 
dised by Mines Department 

Works tmdertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Water-races 

Wharves 

Schools of Mines 

Tracks to open up mineral lands 

Artesian-well bonng, Maniototo Plains . . 



- 


l_ 










£ 8. 

6 6 
6,860 4 


d. ' 

6 

3 


£ 8. 

6 6 
17,281 11 


3 : 


£ 8. 

7,870 


d. 
U 


2,998 16 





8,012 6 
14 5 


2 

4 


3,942 4 


2 


6.456 8 





2,703 19 


3 


924 8 





1,859* 3 
1,200 


7 



1,110 4 

2,221 19 

890 18 


11 
4 
3 


2,054 10 
387 4 
209 1 


6 
8 
9 


19,880 17 


4 


81,741 10 





14.887 8 


8 


10,268 6 


i 
3 


4,304 3 


/9 


13,218 11 


6 



7.818 1 
474 



2,466 16 8 
286 
54 10 6 



6,196 6 1 
687 8 



589 19 5 
896* 16 10 


96 6 

209 1 9 

1,188 6 10 


348 18 
4414 


5 
8 


19,581 2 6 


8,556 5 6 


19.489 18 


8 


3.834 9 7 
' 8,507 16' 8 


9,148 5 9 
3,451 17 11 


8,005 5 
5,928 1 


4 

8 



668 



2,200 

1,040* 
142 8 

1,000 
425 14 




8 
9 

5 


719 
150 
1,084 11 
142 8 9 
207 8 6 
425 14 6 


681 

198 18 5 

60 14 

792*16 6 


17,160 9 


1 


15,278 11 


8 


16.814 10 6 


8.811 14 


4 


10,815 14 


8 


6.201 5 


2.703 5 





2.252 5 


5 


5.027 8 4 


5.542* 19 
3,847*10 


8 , 

i 


6.284* 4 
89 9 

8,898 4 
78 4 


6 
9 



7 


668 
419*19 6 


20,905 9 





28.818 2 11 


11,811 12 9 


14,226 5 


1 


8,460 


8 


11.767 9 10 


3,162 


^ 


1,720 18 


6 


4,987 10 2 


1,455 6 
2.256 18 


6 
6 


886 15 
2.256 18 


9 
6 


1.668 

•• 


1,870 19 
40 


9 



1.870 19 
41 16 


9 



418* 8 7 


22.511 8 


9 


14.187 8 


9 


18.786 8 7 


15,199 2 


4 


17.825 10 





9,628 6 10 


550 





1,088 





4,881 9 10 


970 4 
3,811 1 


9 
10 


865 4 
3,811 1 


8 
10 


1.768 6 


1,282 4 

556* 


4 



1,282 4 
281 8 


4 
6 


419* 19 6 
268 16 6 


22,812 18 


3 


24,548 8 11 


16.916 18 1 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C— 3. 



136 



SUMMARY OP WORKS C0N8TRUCTED-can^tntt«rf. 



Nature of Works. 



Total Coat of 
Gonstruction, or ' 
I Amount authorised 
to be expended. 



Expenditure, by 
way of Subsidy or 

otherwise, by 
Mines Department. 



Amount ot 
Liability by BCiues 

Deuartment on 
Works in Proifres^, 



189a-94. 
Roads on goldfields 
Roads and tracks undertaken by Coanty Counoils, subsi 

dised by Mines Department 
Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 

panies, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races . . 
Drainage-channels 
Wharves 
Schools of Mines 
Tracks to open up mineral lands 
Repairing flood-damages 
Artesian- well boring, Maniototo Plains 



, 1894-96. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Water-races 

Drainsbge- channels 

Wharves 

Schools of Mines 

Tracks to open up mineral lands 

Repairing flood- damages 

Artesian-well boring, Maniototo Plains 

Diamond drills 



1896-96. 
Roads on goldfields . . ! 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, subsidised , 

by Mines Department 
Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- i 

panies, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races 
Drainage-channels .. .. .. .. ! 

Wharves . . . . . . . . . . j 

Schools of Mines . . . . . . . . . . | 

Tracks to open up mineral lands . . ... 

Repairing flood-damages * 
Artesian- well boring, Maniototo Plains 
Diamond drills 



1896-97. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, subsidised 
by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Water-races . . 

Drainage-channels 

Wharves 

Schools of Mines 

Tracks to open up mineral lands 

Repairing flood-damage 

Art(Bsian-well boring, Maniototo Plains . . 

Resumption of land 

Prospecting deep levels 



1897-98. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, sub- 
sidised by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Water-races . . 

Drainage-channels 

Schools of Mines 

Prospecting deep levels 

Water-conservation 

Construction of telephone- lines 

Compensation proclamation of rivers 



£ s. d. 
18,418 19 2 

5,088 11 6 



2,245 19 
5.271 17 



1,666 19 9 



£ s. d. 
15,066 11 

2,718 17 8 

1,709 18 5 
5,271 17 1 



1,555 19 9 



£ s. d. 
13,013 18 5 

5.576 10 7 

1,027 7 11 

900 

1,000 



500 
800 


500 
518 16 



6 




33,831 6 10 j 


27,331 10 


4 


21,617 16 11 


1 
20,908 13 7 ' 
685 18 4 


15,160 3 
2,295 9 


5 

2 


18,752 10 7 
1,984 5 7 



10,605 15 
4,801 19 
1,521 



999 8 6 



506 19 11 



2,378 13 2 I 

2,427 10 11 ' 

673 14 10 i 

999* 8 6 1 



505 19 11 



3,006 13 
2,161 18 8 
3,647 6 2 



40,228 16 3 



24,440 19 11 



29,492 18 



14,664 

4,614 11 

3,477 7 
6,820 18 
6.100 



999 3 



216 1 6 



19,970 6 6 

1,607 8 6 

1.726 4 8 

6,162 9 2 

2,240 5 1 

999* 3 



216 1 6 



14,086 4 8 

4,290 16 11 

10,098 3 
2.516 7 9 
2.667 1 



36,782 1 6 



67,686 9 6 
11,677 



1,670 7 
3,090 11 
1,409 



1,682 19 6 



31,921 18 6 

30,720 12 7 

1,769 6 5 

1,633 6 7 

3,927 18 

2,149 8 11 

1,682* 19 5 



33,642 12 6 

86,622 15 3 

4,079 18 3 

2,936 14 3 
1.678 10 
2,616 16 2 



306' 
25,600 


1 

1 
i 


300* 
2,697 14 



6 


22,802* 6 


7 


102,916 7 


jl: 


44,771 1 


4 


69,616 10 


4 


71,318 11 
25,151 9 


7 

8 


37,410 14 
12.168 6 


3 

7 


38,907 17 
9,677 14 


4 




' 3,939 8 1 


2,357 15 1 , 


1,681 18 





1 3,276 8 9 


2,272 5 , 


1,003 3 


9 


' 4,481 14 


1,212 14 9 


3,268 19 


3 


; 1,780 17 3 


1,780 17 3 






1 25,500 


21,520 15 ; 


1,281 10 


7 


607. 3 9 


507 3 9 , 






60 


50 1 






6.196 13 10 


5,196 13 10 1 


•• 





141,211 6 11 



84,467 5 6 



60,720 17 11 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



137 



C— 8. 



SUMMARY OF WORKS CONSTRUCTED— co»«n ed. 



Nature of Works. 



Total Cott of 

Construction, or 

Amount authorised 

to be expended. 



Expenditure^, by Amount of 

• way of Subsidy or Liability by Mines 

otherwise, by Department on 

Mines Department. Works in Progress. 



1898-99. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, sub- 
sidised by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Water-races .. 

Drainage-cbannels 

Schools of Mines 

Prospecting deep levels 

Water* conservation 

Construction of telephone-lines 

Compensation proclamation of rivers 



1899-1900. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, sub- 
sidised by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 
panies, subsidised by Mmes Department 

Water-races . . 

Drainage-cbannels 

Schools of Mines 

Prospecting deep levels 

Water-conservation 

Resumption of land 

Compensation proclamation of rivers 

Aid towards the treatment of ores 



1900-1. 
Roads on goldfields 
Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, sub 

sidised by Mines Department 
Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 

panies, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races . . 
Drainage-channels 
Schools of Mines 
Prospecting deep levels 
Water-conservation 
Resumption of land 
Compensation proclamation of rivers 
Aid towards the treatment of ores 



1901-2. 
Roads on goldfields 
Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, sub 

sidised by Mines Department 
Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com 

panies, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races .. 
Drainage-cbannels 
Schools of Mines 
Prospecting deep levels 
Water-conservation 
Resumption of land 
Compensation proclamation of rivers 
Aid towards the treatmeTit of ores 



1902-^. 
Roads oil goldfields 
Roads and tracks undertaken by County Councils, sub 

sidised by Mines Department 
Works un<^ertaken by prospecting associations and com 

panies, subsidised by Mines Department 
Water-races . . 
Drainsge- channels 
Schools of Mires 
Prospecting deep levels 
Water-conservation 
Resumption of land 
Proclamation of rivers 
Aid towards the treatment of ores 



£ 8. d. 
48,201 2 

21,025 12 



£ 8. d. 
42, .358 8 6 



2,936 11 
3,863 16 
3,539 7 
1,460 15 
25,500 
12,483 13 



4,191 7 

2,143 14 
2,932 12 
2,426 13 
1,450 16 
1,281 10 
7,893 19 



£ 8. d. 
39,825 9 

5,914 7 5 



1,103 13 
1,719 6 
3,802 16 



676 8 



676 8 









119,666 16 7 


65,855 1 7 


52,865 12 1 


40,442 15 10 
4,625 


44,258 2 6 
2,8(>5 7 4 


42,010 2 4 
5.011 11 



2,549 7 2 
7,909 5 11 
1,090 
1,866 13 3 



1,400 9 6 

8,430 14 

1,435 7 5 

1,866 13 3 



1,784 8 

963 11 10 

2,627 14 7 



0.925 10 

2,812 7 

811 

915 1 


9 


4 < 


6,925 10 

2,812 7 

811 

915 1 



4 




75,947 1 


3 i 


71,720 13 


1 


62,396 12 8 













48.835 2 1 

1,495 8 2 

2,353 5 10 

3,964 1 6 

2,058 

1,598 2 1 

2,680 19 1 

6,083 18 y 

778 1 

69.836 18 6 



44,757 1 

2,882 6 2 

1,266 11 7 

4,251 19 8 

517 4 

1,598 2 1 

3,787 17 9 

0,083 18 9 

778 1 



46,088 4 4 

3,133 4 10 

1,033 7 9 

50 

927 7 8 



05,922 17 5 



51,232 4 2 



80,602 9 4 

34,216 16 8 

2,578 10 8 

5,860 3 5 

1,005 1 8 

2,087 13 8 

2,114 12 6 

5,318* 2 9 

77 17 



44,697 10 

2,847 17 3 

1,509 10 9 

6,665 16 1 

889 4 6 

2,087 13 8 

942 13 10 

5,318* 2 9 

27 17 



133,861 7 7 



64,986 4 10 



36,904 19 4 

1,909 11 

1,826 6 2 
1,760 16 1 
1,890 8 7 

1,171 Id 7 

60* 
44,013 5 10 



62,389 5 

2,2a5 

1,695 17 t 

6,122 11 11 

2,896 14 2 

2,633 14 2 . 

2,635 10 

18,21510 8 ' 
50 12 5 . 



50,230 12 3 

1,409 8 

1,181 4 

5,316 10 3 

1,567 13 8 

2,533 14 2 

2,982 6 

13,216 10 8 

60 12 6 



48,063 7 6 
1,612 1 11 
1,821 17 7 
2,464 14 9 

725 



98,624 1 7 



78,436 14 10 



64,577 1 9 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C— 3. 



138 



SUMMARY OP WORKS OOJ/f^THUCTED-^continwd. 



Natnre of Works. 



190&-4. 

Roads on ffoldfields 

Roads and tracks andertaken by Oounty OoanoiU, sub- 
sidised by Mines Department 

Works undertaken by prospecting associations and com- 
panies, sabsidiseci by Mines Department 

Water-races .. 

Drainage-channels 

Schools of Mines 

Prospecting deep levels 

Water-conservation 

Proclamation of rivers 

Aid towards the treatment of ores 



1904-6. 

Roads on goldfields 

Roads ana tracks andertaken by Oonnty Oouncils, sub- 
sidised by Mines Department 

Works andertaken by prospecting assooiations and com- 
panies, subsidised by Mines Department 

Water-races .. 

Drainage-channels 

Schools of Mines 

Prospecting deep levels 

Water-conservation 

Proclamation of rivers. . 



SUMMABY. 

Roads on goldfields 

Subsidised roads and tracks 

Sabsidised roads and tracks other than on goldfields 

Prospecting .. 

Water-races .. 

Wharves 

Schools of Mines 

Drainage- channels 

Diamond drills 

Treatment of ores 

Tracks to open an mineral lands 

Artesian-well bormg, Maniototo Plains 

Repairing flood damages 

Prospecting deep levels 

Resumption of land 

Water-conservation 

Oonstraction of telephone-lines 

Proclamation of rivers 



Totol Co%t of 


Expenditure. 


by 


Atnount of 


Constraotion, 


or 


way of Subsidy or 


LiabiUty by BCines 


Amount authorised 


otherwise, by 


Deparlment on 
Works in Prof^ress. 


to be expendf 


»d. 
d. 


Mines Departn 

£ 8 


lent. 


1 . .. 


d. 


£• H. d. 


60,427 18 


6 


45,116 3 





23,875 3 




600 





428 10 


' 


.. 




1,994 8 





1,088 17 


3 


1.380 9 7 




883 12 


3 


6a3 12 


3 


200 




2,136 17 





1,684 15 


9 


458 5 




2,366 9 


9 


2,366 9 


9 


., 




6,099 18 


1 


6,099 18 


1 






1,819 4 


5 


1,644 4 


6 


.. 




5.176 17 


7 


5,176 17 


7 


, . 




49 10 





49 10 









81,663 16 


7 


64,288 18 


2 


25,413 17 7 


. 


58,098 14 10 


26,975 14 


2 


32.123 8 




253 





136 10 





40 




3,229 16 


8 


2,569 11 


8 


1,627 17 6 




681 1 





509 8 


6 


21 12 r» 




898 4 


1 


747 17 


10 


145 6 3 




2,381 5 


5 


2,381 5 


5 


, . 




178 5 


7 


178 5 


7 






872 7 


11 


372 7 


11 






1,880 6 


8 


1,880 8 


5 






67,918 1 


2 


34,751 9 


6 


83,957 16 11 




572,047 18 


3 


589 ,924 17 


7 


32,123 8 




174,652 1 


5 


103.268 12 


2 


40 




6,146 9 10 


4,75U 6 


2 


, , 




87,306 17 


6 


34,987 5 


10 


1,627 17 




102,028 11 


11 


98,321 7 


1 


21 12 t> 




435 15 


9 


285 15 


9 


, , 




36,892 18 


8 


36,892 13 


3 


, , 




43,981 8 


4 


:^,429 16 


9 


145 6 3 




5,170 11 


4 


3,428 11 


4 






3,218 10 


6 


2,563 10 


6 






325 8 


1 


325 8 


i 






800 





800 









600 





500 





. , 




57,278 8 


8 


I 31,778 3 


8 


1 




3.112 7 





3,112 7 







. 1 24,966 18 


2 


24,955 18 


2 




. ; 60 





50 









38,358 12 


8 


38,358 12 


8 


1 




1,167,266 7 


8 


964,692 6 





j 33,957 10 11 






ij_i_mi 




11 — U — 





List of Wokks on Ooldfislds undertHken wholly by the Mines Department, or by Subsidies 
to County Councils, Local Bodies, and Prospecting Associations, in Progress on the 
31st March, 1906. 



Locality and Natnre of Works. 



Total Coat. 



Aiiionnt of 
Contribution paid 

Amount authorited. , pS^J^SSit. 



MIDDLE ISLAND. 
Roads (sx7B8n>i&BD). 
WeiUand County, 
Hut at Wilberforoe 
Improving Upper Browning's Pass Track 



Amount due by 

Mines Department 

on works 

BtiU in Progress. 



£ B. d. 
60 
20 



d. 



80 



£ f. d. 
80 
10 



40 



Digitized by 



Google 



139 



C— 3- 



List of Wobks on Goldpibldb undertaken wholly by the Mines Department, or by Subsidies 
to County Councils, Local Bodies, and Prospecting Associations, in Progress on the 
3l8t March, 1905. 



Locality and Nature of Works. 



Total Cost, 

or 

Amoont authorised. 



Amount of Amount due by 

Contribution paid Bfines Department 
by Biines 1 on works 

Department. still in Progress. 



Wobks undeb cohstbuction wholly by Minbb Dbpabt- 

ME NT. 

Wainihinibi to Kawhaka . . 

Ohristoburoh Boad to Wainihinihi Ri?6r 

Main Soutb Road (repaire) 

Cabbage Bay-Port Charles and Oape ColviUe 

Tairua-Whenuakite 

Coromandel-Kaaotmiu, via Matarangi 

Tiki-Kaimarama 

Tiki-Manaia .. 

Manaia-Waikawan 

Mercury Bay-Whenuakite and Boat Harbour 

Ruaotunu-Meroary Bay . . 

Whitianga-Gumtown 

Wharf Road, Coromandel 

Whitianga-Kaimarama .. 

Opitonui Road 

Four-in-hand Road 

Kapowai Track 

Mahaki Goldfields Track . . 

Waitaia Mine to Battery . . 

Ward's Road-Gape Oolville 

Repairs, Mercury Bay Wharf 

Eauris-Mahakiran 

8cotty*B Mine to Battery . . 

Kaimarama Bridge 

Waikawau-MoIiaughlin*8 

Sullivan's Bridge, near Hooker's 

Mercury Bay-Talma 

Cabbage Bay Bridge 

Thames- Waikawau 

Thames-Hikutaia 

Upper Tararu Road 

Turua-Netherton 

Hikutaia- Whangamata " Wires " Track 

Omahu-Whangamata 

Puriri-Neavesville 

N eavesviUe-Upper Landing 

Upper Landing-Tairua . . 

Hikuwai Bridge 

Tbames-Whangamata . . 

Karaka Creek Road 

Hape Greek Road 

Tapu-Gumtown 

Moanataiari Road 

Kaueranga Bridge 

Maratoto Road 

Big Blip, Thames- Waikawau 

Taram Greek Road 

Rocky Point (widening) . . 

Hikutaia-Waihi 

Waitekauri-Golden Gross 

Waihi-Wbangamata 

Paeroa-Waitoa 

Waihi-Gounty Boundary 

Eomata Greek Road 

Waitawheta Boad deviation 

Hikutaia-Maratoto 

Waitekauri-Jubilee 

Alpha-Komata 

Botokohu-Earangahake . . 

Hill Track-Willows Gamp 

Ford Road-Mackaytown . . 

Mangakino Track 

Onamalutu-Wakamarina 

GuUensville- Waikakaho . . 

Wakamarina Road and Bridges 

Deep Greek Bridge 

Motueka River (protective works) . . 

Wangapeka-Baton 

Thorpe-Baton 

Sbaggery Bridge 

Riwaka-Eaiteriteri 

Chandler's- Wangapeka Junction . . 

Riwaka Bridge (protective works) .. 

Graham River Bridge . . 

Aniseed Valley Road (repairs) 

Stanley Brook Bridge . . 

Femtown-Pakawau 

Pakawau-Tamatea 

Kaituna Bridge 

Takakfl^-GoUingwood <* Inland " Road 

21— C. 3. 



£ 

150 

100 

2,000 

2,822 

l.OfiO 

2,243 

1,285 

1,733 

5,431 

800 

1,722 

1,069 

1,678 

1,299 

999 

529 

689 

300 

400 

350 

44 

100 

110 

850 

100 

100 

100 

350 

2,881 

2,679 

1,756 

1,625 

2,411 

2,095 

949 

820 

600 

150 

687 

200 

250 

757 

250 

499 

200 

100 

100 

100 

3,775 

2,664 

907 

2,235 

1,496 

840 

608 

544 

200 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

808 

30 

50 

150 

280 

900 

100 

300 

203 

200 

100 

200 

100 

300 

807 

373 

400 

3,973 



d. 













11 6 
6 6 

12 6 



2 6 




15 3 

15 5 

9 11 

5 



7 

10 








6 







13 
10 


2 










6 






19 6 




19 11 



£ 8. d. 



121 

2,742 

950 

2,143 

1,185 

1,638 

5,345 

700 

1,522 

859 

1,578 

1,123 

849 

473 

644 

250 

357 

240 



17 6 






10 
13 





2,681 15 

2,479 15 

1,626 6 

1,538 5 

2,261 7 

1,945 

799 10 

527 

450 

586* 5 

150 

200 
562 11 

200 

299 6 

100 



11 6 
6 6 



17 3 




85 10 

75 
50 



3,589 14 

2,222 15 
861 

2,135 13 

1,393 5 
464 10 9 
514 
894 2 6 
100 



688 



20d 
750 5 



153 19 6 
100 



755 13 6 
247 18 

3,77319 11 



150 

100 

1,878 

80 
100 
100 
100 
100 

86 
100 
200 
200 
100 
175 
150 

56 

45 

50 

42 
110 

44 
100 

24 
350 

25 

50 
100 
350 
200 
200 
130 

87 
160 
150 
150 
293 
160 
160 
101 

50 

50 
194 

50 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
185 
441 

46 
100 
103 
385 

94 
150 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
120 

30 

50 
160 

80 
150 
100 
300 

50 
100 
100 
200 
100 
300 

61 
126 
400 
200 



8. d. 




3 11 



10 





2 9 



2 6 





3 9 




14 10 




9 3 















8 












6 6 




Digitized by 



Google 



C— 3. 



140 



List of Wobks on 6oldfibij>s, Ac. — eontmued. 





Total Cost 




Amount ol 




Amount doe by 


LooaUtT and Nature Of Works. 


Amount aathorieed. 


Conftribntion paid 

by Mines 

Department. 


on works 
stiU in Prosress. 


Works uitdbb cohstbuotioh whoixt bt Mms Dxpabt- ; 










MXST'-eanUfMud. £ s. 


d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


OoUingwood-TaiUpu 




200 





• • 




200 


Warstah-Pnpoon 
AnftiokiTraok 




100 
860 






256' 





100 
100 


Vanis-Bubn .. 




850 





800 





50 


Pwiwakakaho-MoArtney's 




100 









100 


MiUerton Bo«d (widening) 




1,460 





1,800* 





150 


Wilson's Lei^ RomI 




1,850 





1,100 





250 


Gnmity Greek Soathwards 




1,850 





1,550 





800 


Westport-Mokihinui 




2,100 





2,000 





100 


Karamea-Mad-flat 




850 





800 


0* 


50 


LonffTnnnel-Addison's .. 
Brighton-Grey Ooonty Boundary . . 




250 









250 




900 





750* 





150 


Ohannel Flat-Maokley's . . 




150 





.. 




150 


Iioopline Road 

Pox's Bridge (repairs) . . 

Millerion-jfine Greek .. 




250 





.. 




250 




100 
745 






545' 





100 
200 


Mokibinoi-Ngakawaa .. 




1,600 





1,050 





450 


Britannia Mine Road 




900 





600 





300 


Gedar Greek-Dennifiton .. 




100 









100 


Welshman's Flat Bridge . . 




800 









800 


Darkie's Hill Road and Bridge 
Pairdown-Sergeant's Hill viS Railway 




100 





4i 12 


6 


58 7 6 




450 





250 





200 


Seddonville Roads 




200 





100 





100 


SeddonviUe Golliery to Township . . 




250 





150 





100 


Mear'sRoad.. 




160 





50 





100 


DennistoD-Bamett's Pace 




850 





150 





200 


Reefton-Maruia 




8.574 





8,524 





50 


Boatman's Greek Bridge, near Turner's 




160 









150 


Boatman's Short Track .. 




1 200 





12* 





188 






' 1,447 15 


6 


1,871 17 


6 


75 18 


Mamia-Glenroy 




250 









250 


Blackwater Bridge 




400 





859 2 


9 


40 17 8 


Jost-in-Time Shaft-Viotoria Range . . 




200 









200 


Road to Matakitaki River Bridge . . 




200 





188 





12 


Mamia Road vid Gaslani's 




488 





818 





125 


Snowy Greek to Reefs 




850 





760 





100 


Sospttision Bridge, near Ten Mile . . 
Kirwan's Reward to Battery.site 




200 









200 




100 









100 


Reef ton-Progress 




600 





426' 





180 


Boatman's Road 




100 









100 


Blackwater Road (widening) 




225 





140* 





85 


Painkiller-Marray Greek 




800 





50 





250 


Waitaha River Poot-bridge, near Gannon's 




160 









150 


Seven Mile-Nine Mile Bluff 




2,450 





2,091*17 


7 


858 2 5 


Moonll^ht-Blackball 




2,945 9 11 
700 


2,580 9 11 
450 


415 
250 


New River Bridge (repairs) 




250 









250 


Paparoa-Garden Gully .. 




150 





125 





25 


Grangipuku Foot-bridge . . 




50 









50 


Deviation Notown Road . . 




150 









150 


Payne's Gully Track 




100 









100 


Seven Mile Greek-Taipo . . 

Beddon's Terrace Track Extension .. 




1,270 
699 15 






1.156' 

599 15 






120 
100 


Humphrey's Road and Bridge 




100 









100 


Kanieri Forks Road 




.' 180 









130 


Teremakau-Paroa 




200 





159* 8 





40 12 


Grading No. 4 Ghannel Road 




100 









100 


Wataroa Gorge Track .. 




816 1 10 


196* 6 


4 


119 15 6 


Larrikins Road Extension 




100 









100 
500 


Track to Westland Reefs 




500 





"* 




Duffer's Greek Bridge 




500 





814 





186 


Styx River Wilberforoe .. 




250 









250 


Lawrence-Waipori 
Lawrence-Roxburgh 




2,225 
850 






2,175* 
600 






50 
250 


Waipori-Waitahuna 




549 19 





458 19 





96 


Walpori Bush Road 




749 19 


8 


696 19 


8 


58 


Lawrenoe-Gounty Boundary 
FitsGerald's Bridge 




825 





725 





100 




840 









840 


Waipori-Gutram 




200 





150 





50 


Beaumont-Ranklebum . . 




200 





100 





100 


Lawxence-Glyde (Tuapeka Gounty) . . 
(Vincent Gounty) .. 




2,795 17 
2,154 2 


6 
6 


2,670 17 
2,000 


6 



125 
154 2 6 


Gentle Annie-Glyde 




945 





625 





820 


Gphir Bridge . . 




1.000 









1,000 


Gromwell-Nevis 




100 









100 
100 
100 


Garston-Nevis (Lake Gounty) 
Anow-Gardrona, via Grown Tezrace 




500 
100 






400* 





Queensiown-Gentle Annie 




725 





545 





180 


Gardrona Goal-pit Road . . 




800 





250 





50 


Arthur's Point- Arrowtown 




200 





100 





100 


Golao-Round Hill 




600 





400 





200 
150 


Waikaka Township-Littie Waikaka 




800 





150 





Waikaka to Goal-pit 




100 









;oo 



Digitized by 



Google 



141 



C— 3. 



List of Wobkb on Goldtields, &c. — continued. 





Total Goat 




Amount of 


Amount due by 


Locality and Nature of Works 


or 
Amount authorised. 


Contribution paid 

by Mines 

Department. 


Mines Department 

on works 

still in Progress. 


WOBXS UKDBB CONSTBUOTION WHOLLY BT MiNES DSPABT- 












UJtTUT— continued. 


£ 8. 


d. 


£ 8. 


d. 


£ 8. d. 


Waikaia Bridge 


250 









250 


Waikaka Valley Boad to Dredging Olaims 
Makarewa Hedgehope Plood-obannel 
Stewart Island Roads 


250 









250 


400 









400 


200 









200 


Stewart Island Road to Mines 


250 









250 


Top Valley Road 
Motneka Bridge 


729 9 


8 


624* 9 


8 


105 


1,000 









1,000 


Mokibinni-Little Wanganni 


5,608 7 


4 


5,504* 7 


6 


3 19 10 


Waitahu River Bridge .. 


100 









100 


Inangahoa Bridge 


1,662 9 


9 


1,633*19 


7 


128 10 2 


Okarito-Porks Prospecting Track 


200 





35 11 





164 9 


State Ooal.mines Township Roads .. 


250 





239 6 


2 


10 13 10 


Donnelly's Greek Bridge 


100 





2 6 


6 


97 13 6 


Kanieri Bridge 


950 





254 16 





695 4 


Oiepnhi-Preservation Inlet 

McOnllongh and Parkers' Greeks Protection 


8.888 9 


4 


3,884 12 





3 17 4 


160 









160 


Weetport-Waimangaroa .. 


600 





150* 3 


3 


449 16 9 


Waimangaroa-Fairdown .. 


540 





200 7 


3 


339 12 9 


Denniston HiU Road 


6,213 2 


7 


6,041 16 


7 


171 6 


Taylorville Bridge 


2,808 16 


5 


1,973 13 





335 2 5 


Arnold Bridge 


900 





6 16 


6 


894 3 6 


Great Soath Road 


19,879 16 





19,379 16 







Gollingwood Bridge and Approaches. . 


9,278 18 


2 


9,278 18 


2 




Beefton-Hokltika-Boss .. 


21,491 17 11 


21,491 17 


11 




Mount Heronles Deviation 


373 3 





873 3 





•• • 




198,542 2 


1 


166,419 1 


5 


32,123 8 


Schools of Minks. 












Schools of Mines 


25,839 7 


1 


25,839 7 


1 




School of Mines (Otago University) .. 


11,053 6 


2 


11,058 6 


2 






36,892 13 


8 


36,892 13 


3 


.. 


Pbospboting Subsidies. 




""" 








Victoria Ooldmining Gompany ** Favourite " Glaim (Thames 


1,184 





497 10 


8 


686 9 4 


foreshore) 
Thames Goldfields Improvement Gommittee 












2,400 





1,887 11 


1 


512 8 11 


Goromandel Gounty (J. D. Regan) . . 


22 10 





15 





7 10 


Goromandel Gounty (J. and M. Fitsgerald) 


78 1 





71 11 





6 10 


Goromandel Gounty (J. Dyer) 
Goromandel Gounty i W. Newsham) . . 


60 





, , 




30 


26 





J ^ 




13 


Goromandel Gounty (A. McNeil) 


45 





7 10 





16 


Takaka Miners' Association (Lloyd and McGrath) 
BuUerGounty (McKay and Young) .. 
Westland Gounty (Jamieson and Oarvin) 


26 





, , 




13 


310 





28 18 


6 


121 1 6 


125 





7 2 


6 


66 1 6 


Kanieri Miners' Association (BUis and ReitzeJ . . 
Westland Gounty (prospecting Rimu, £1 for £1) 
Westland Gounty (Bovd and party) .. 
Goromandel Gounty Qprospecting parties) 


100 





, , 




48 7 6 


4,893 8 


8 


2,446 14 


4 


• • 


250 





29 6 


8 


113 8 9 


989 10 





939 10 





•• 




10,459 9 


8 


5,930 14 


4 


1,627 17 6 


Watxb-bacxs. 












Waimea-Kumara Water-race 


61,662 6 


7 


61,662 6 


7 


J , 


Mount Ida Waterrace .. 


11,487 19 


4 


11,466 6 10 


21 12 6 




63,150 4 11 


63,128 12 


6 


21 12 6 


Dbaimaob and Taiunob Ghaknels. 












Jones Gieek Storm-channel 


100 





100 





,, 


Waimea Main Tail-race .. 


1.994 6 


8 


1,974 


5 


20 6 3 


St. Bathan's Ghannel 


2,000 





1,876 





126 


Kelly's Terrace Tunnel .. 


2,141 10 


6 


2,141 10 


6 


• • 


, 


6,235 17 


2 


6,090 10 11 


145 6 3 


WaTEB CONSEBVATIOH ON GOLDFIELTlB. 












Engineer's salary and expenses 


2,977 16 


8 


2,977 16 


8 


•• 




2,977 16 


8 


2,977 16 


8 


•• 



Summary of Works. 






Roads (Buhsidised) 


80 


, . 


40 


Works under construction wholly by Mines Department . . 


198,542 2 1 


166,419 1 5 


32,123 8 


Schools of Mines 


36,892 13 3 


36,892 13 3 


, , 


Prospecting subsidies 


10,459 9 8 


6,930 14 4 


.1,627 17 6 


Water-races 


63.150 4 11 


63,128 12 5 


21 12 6 


Drainage-channels 


6,235 17 2 


6,090 10 11 


145 6 3 


Gompensation, proclamation of rivers 


38,358 12 8 


88,358 12 8 


,, 


Water-conservation on goldfields 


2,977 16 8 


2,977 16 8 


•• 


Total.. 


356,696 16 5 


319,798 1 8 


33,957 16 11 



Digitized by 



Google 



C— 3. 



142 



List of Wobks on (tOLDFIblds constracted wholly by the Mines Department, or by Subsidies 
to Goonty Cooncils, Local Bodies, and Proc^)ecting Associations, and complete prior to 
the 3l8t March, 1905. 



Locality and Natun of Works. 

NORTH ISLAND. 

Roads (bubsidisxd). 
Bay of I$land$ CkmrUy, 
Tiriwhanga Gk>rge to Galbraith's Road, Pahipahi 
Air-line Road to battery-site, Pnhipnlii . . 
Tiriwhanga Gorge to Pahipahi 
New Bay of Islands Goal Company 
Road, Taamarere Railway-station to Pahipahi 



Coromandel Ccuniy. 
Improving road to lona and Jost-in-Time Companies' mines 
Msjdng and improving track from Tokatea towards Kennedy Bay 
Golden Belt Track 
Tokatea Road (repidrs) 

Biaking and improving track from Gk>lden Belt to Tiki 
Making road from Ring's Bridge to Eapanga Mine . . 
Making road to Kapcmga Mine 

Temporary track from Tokatea Saddle to Waikoromiko 
Gontmaation of track from Soooess Gompcmy's mine to top of main range 
Completion of road from Tokatea Saddle to Tokatea Battery 
Widening road from Matawai to Vao^^ian's claim 
Improving track, Meroary Bay to Waitai 
Continuation and improving Waikoromiko Track 
Emily Battery to Rocky Creek 
Track, Bismarck Battery to Kennedy Bay 
Road up Manaia 

Extension of Yaoghan's and Visard's Tracks 
Visard's towards Marebel 
Extending and widening Waitaia Road . . 
Makaran to Waiaa 
Waikawaa to Tiki 
Paal's Creek to Cabbaffe Bay 
Waikawaa Greek Track 
McLaaghlin's Road 
Manaia to McGregor's New Find 
Manaia to Tiki 
Gld sawmill towards Matawai 
Extension of Paul's Creek Track 
Matarangi Track 

Thames-Coromandel Road, vid Manaia . . 
Harbour View extension 
Kapanga to Paul's Creek 
Mercury Bay to Kuaotunu 
Wainara to Kuaotunu 
3ea-beaoh to Kuaotunu 
Just-in-Time Road, extension to Coromandel 
Road, Waikawau Bridge to McLaughlin's 
Mercury Bay Road 

Bridfle to Dugend's store, and widening and metalling road from bridge to Log Hut. . 
Road from junction of Red Mercury battery up Pumpkin Flat to Waitaia . . 
To connect road from Log Hut to commencement of contract of Kuaotunu-Meroury 

Bay Road 
Road, with culverts and bridge, from Kapanga Hill to Sootty's Gold-mining Company's 

mine 
Pumpkin Flat-Just-in-Time Road 

Lower road from Great Meroary battery to Kapai low level and battery-site 
Road from main road, Kapanga to Success Mine . . 
Cemetery Road and Bridge, Kuaotunu . . 

Road from Coromandel-Kennedy Bay Main Road to Wereroa Creek 
Leading Wind Mine Road 
Fury's Bridge 
Carroll's Bridge . . 
Home's Bridge 

Road from Main Kennedy Bay Road to Monte Carlo and other claims 
Castle Rock Mine Road, Tiki . . 

Road between Bismarck Battery and Hauraki Associated Gold- reefs 
Bridge, Warekaho Creek 
Cabbage Bay to Mines 

Two bridges and approaches, Kuaotunu Main Road 
Road from Success Koad to workings of Karaka Block Syndicate 
Widening Waitaia Battery Road 
Cabbage Bay- Waitete 
Cabbage Bay- Ward 'a Track .. 
Repairs, bridges, Kuaotunu Main Road 
Coromandel-Mercnry Bay 



Total Cost. 



Amount of 
Contribution 
paid by Mines 
Department. 



£ 
287 

73 
800 
500 
482 



s. d. 




2,092 



200 
820 
100 
300 
239 
160 
132 
50 
80 
50 
367 
100 
150 
60 
200 
676 
150 
200 
100 
1,600 
500 
200 
100 
100 
100 
500 
200 
800 
400 
800 
210 
200 
860 
450 
1,650 
450 
67 
990 
450 
345 
150 



10 6 





























£ s. 

118 10 
36 10 
800 
250 
146 



1,851 



200 



310 

450 

600 

100 

300 

100 

450 

400 

200 

3d0 

200 

400 

300 

300 

300 

200 

100 

240 

200 

200 

200 



183 

218 

50 

150 

159 

100 

88 

38 

53 

33 

238 

66 

100 

40 

133 

450 

100 

133 

66 

1,066 

333 

133 

50 

50 

60 

250 

100 

150 

200 

160 

105 

100 

180 

225 

1,450 

226 

45 

496 

300 

230 

100 



6 8 
6 8 


8 10 




13 
13 



19,286 3 9 



170 
300 
800 

75 
160 

50 
226 
200 
100 
160 
100 
200 
160 
150 
150 
100 

50 
120 
100 
100 

36 



6 8 




6 8 

7 

6 8 



6 8 
6 8 



150 



11,456 15 10 



Digitized by 



Google 



143 



C— 3. 



List of Wobks on Qoldpiklds, &c.— continued. 












Amount of 


IiooaUty and Nature of Works. 


Total Coat 


• 


Contribution 
paid by Mines 
Department. 


Te Aroha Taum Board, 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


Road to connect with railway-station . . 


120 





60 


liipsey's Bridge .. 


64 





32 


Repairing flood-damages 


150 





76 




334 





167 


Thames County. 








Making new road from Ohinemuri River to Earangahake Quartz-mine . . 


650 





433 6 8 


Dray-road to connect Otanui Mines with crushing-battery at Maungawherawhera 
Greek 


i 710 





473 6 8 


Improving roads from Waitekauri Road to Katikati Road 


250 





166 13 4 


Improving road up Karaka Creek to Lucky Hit Company's mine 


263 1 





175 7 4 


Improving road to upper mines, Waitahi 


258 18 10 


172 12 7 


Karangahake to battery 


300 





200 


Ralph's Battery, Waitekauri . . 


399 1 





199 10 6 


Otanui Road to mines 


299 18 





199 18 8 


Road to Wick's Battery 


70 





46 13 4 


Rocky Point Road, Tararu . . 


300 





200 


Thames Borough boundary to hsematite-mine 


350 





233 6 8 


Widening road from bridge over Hape Creek to Otanui Mines . . . . ! . 
Track, Karangahake Goldfield 


183 17 





122 11 4 


784 1 





522 14 


Kauaeranga Valley to Otanui 


470 7 





313 11 4 


Tapu Road to mines 


81 17 


9 


54 11 10 


Tauranga Road to Karangahake Bridge-site 


341 5 





227 10 


Earangahake Bridge 


229 6 


6 


152 17 8 


Track up Maungakerikeri Creek 

Thames Borough boundary to Hape Creek No. 2 . . 


93 4 


4 


62 2 11 


600 





300 


Upper Karaka Road 


179 13 





119 15 4 


Repairing flood-damages, Waiotahi, Moanataiari, Karaka, and Collarbone Roads . . 


350 





176 


Sea-beach to Waiomo 


750 





375 


Te Papa Gully Road .. .. .. .. [[ " 

New Find to Waiomo Battery 
• Rocky Point Road 


75 
110 
429 11 






10 


37 10 

66 

214 15 11 


Waiotahi towards Mercury Bay 


522 11 





261 5 6 


TeMataRoad .. .. .. .. .. \\ 


178 17 


6 


89 8 9 


Waiomo Creek to Tapu . . . . . . . . . . [[ 

Alabama Creek Track . . . . . . . '. ] * [[ 


1,499 





749 10 


100 





60 


Road from Prospectors' Mine, Puriri, to battery . . 


5a 





25 


Karaka Creek to Lucky Hit . . 


365 





182 10 


Bullion Mine, Tapu, to battery . . . . . ] 


36 5 





18 2 6 


Track to Hikutaia Goldfield . . 


147 15 


2 


73 17 7 


Upper Tararu Road to Sylvia Mine . . . . . . . . [[ 


684 7 





342 3 6 


Road to Puriri Battery 


11 13 





5 16 6 


Thames- Waikawau Road 


37 10 





18 15 


Track from Tararu Creek Road to McDermot's Claim . . . ! 


45 





22 10 


Track to Try Fluke Claim, Tapu 


94 15 





47 7 6 


Waiomo to Puhoi Creek 


33 





16 10 


Waiokaraka Road, Bella Street, and Campbell Street to Moanataiari Creek 


200 





100 


Moanataiari Creek Road 


100 





60 


Tararu Creek Road and Tararu Road . . 


150 





76 


Hape Creek Road . . .. .. .. .. .. [, 


150 





75 


Omahu-Tairua .. 


100 





42 


Karaka Creek Road 


150 





68 4 6 


Onetai Valley Road .. .. .. .. ]] '/ 


40 





12 10 


Townsend's Road . . 


30 





26 12 


Gumtown-Kapowai .. ., .. '/, 


300 





196 9 


Footbridge, Pej^ Creek . . . . . . [[ [[ ]\ 


300 





51 18 6 


Road from Taniwha to fourth branch Tairua River [\ 


200 





100 




14,064 16 11 


7,934 6 11 


Thames Borough. 








Repairing roads .. 


976 19 


2 


600 


Widening and straightening Karaka Creek .. !! 


300 





150 


Metalling goldfields roads .. 


800 





672 12 6 


Removing (Ubris, Karaka Creek 


300 





160 


Half-cost damage, Hawk's stable . . . . . . [[ 


96 





48 


Repairs, Moanataiari Creek Tunnel . . . . . . ,, ,, 


100 





62 


Repairs, Moanatairi and Waiotahi Aqueducts . . . . ! . ,', 


620 





376 


Repairs. Waiotahi Creek Bridge 


60 





26 


Removing dSbris, Karaka and Waiotahi Creeks 


360 





275 


Water-tables, Kirkwood Street 


20 





11 12 6 


Clearing (i^ftris, Waiotahi Creek 


226 





112 10 




3,836 19 


2 


2.471 15 


Ohinemuri County. 








JubUee Mine Track 


118 





59 


Track up Tui Creek 


306 





153 


Prospecting. track, Whangamata and Waitekauri . . . . V. ,[ 


200 





166 13 4 


Tramway, Karangahake to Riley's reduction-works 


400 





200 


Strengthening bridges, Waihi Road 


200 





133 6 8 


Paeroa to Hikutaia 


400 





200 


Repairs, flood-damages 
Hikutaia River to Marototo Mine 


34 13 
180 16 


8 



17 6 10 
90 7 6 



Digitized by 



Google 



C— 3. 



144 



List of Wobks on Goldfiblds, Ac. — oonHnued. 



Loealiiy and Natun of Works. 



I Amount of 
rp^k4.«i n^*m*^ I Ck>ntaribiitioix 
TotalOort. I pj^dbyMinei 
I>epartment 



Ohinemuri OoutUy — oontiniiad. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


Karangahake through Gorge (bridge and oulTerts) . . 
Waitekauri Lower Boad 






200 





100 






860 





189 2 8 


MetaJling Karanffahake Gorge Road 
Karangahake and Waihi Boad 






170 
237 10 






86 
118 16 


Karangahake Hill Track 






87 4 





43 12 


Bridge over Ohinemnri River at Karangahake 






12 11 





6 6 6 


Hikataifl^Paeroa Boad 






600 





260 


Paeroa-Te Aroha Road 






200 





100 


Tui Greek Track .. 






129 18 


6 


64 19 3 


Waitekauri to Lowrie'8 and Bimie'a .. 






200 





100 


Road, Karanffahake to Waihi 






246 12 


3 


164 8 2 


Lower Waitekauri Road 






347 13 


4 


230 16 4 


Road, Thames Road to Netherton Punt . . 






60 





60 


Komata Greek Road .. * 






600 





300 


Road, Paeroa Bridge to Kuaoti Greek .. 






400 





133 6 8 


Punt at south end Netherton-Paeroa Road 






276 





176 


Repairs, Waitekauri Township Road 
Bridge, Paeroa-Te Aroha Road 






200 





100 






60 





30 


Karangahake Bridge 






1,032 





612 16 9 


Drain along Mill Road, Paeroa 






200 





90 2 6 


Road, Te Iringa-o-Pirori Block 






200 





143 


Road running south on left bank Waihou River 






400 





884 19 


Kaimanawa Road 






200 





126 2 6 


Mangaiti and Waitoa Road and Punt .. 






200 





119 7 10 


Earl of Glasgow Glaim Track 






400 





300 


Low Level Tunnel, Jubilee Mine (B. Kersey Gooper) 






1,600 





760 


WaUoa Boad Board. 
Drain, Te Aroha West 


10,267 17 


9 


6,687 8 5 


200 





130 


Piako County, 






4 


Extension and completion of Te Aroha Tramvray . . 




18,000 





12,000 


Tramway to Fergusson's Battery, Waiorongomai . . 
Road, Waiorongomai 




1,600 





1,000 




497 17 





331 18 


Track to claims at Buck's Reef 




66 6 


6 


36 17 


Track, Pern Spur to Butler's Spur 

Tracks up Stony Gre A, Te Aroha Goldfield, &c. .. 

Repairs, Upper Premier Track and new track towards Waitawheta 




281 17 


9 


164 11 10 




64 





36 




40 





20 


Repairs, Te Aroha-Lichfield Road 




302 





126 


Waiorongomai Tramway 




263 2 





176 


Gordon-Waharoa . . 




100 





60 


Te Aroha-Gordon . . 




200 





100 


Murphy's Bridge . . 




24 





12 


Repairs, Waiorongomai Tramvray 




600 





386 


Waihou Bridge .. 




680 





290 


Repairs, Te Aroha Tramway 




160 





76 


KaHkaH Boad Board. 
Katikati-Karangahake Track 
Bridge on branch road to Katikati 


22,698 2 


3 


14,791 6 10 


400 





200 


68 





34 


Te Aroha Track .. 


39 19 


6 


19 18 9 


HuU CottfOy. 
Road to connect Otorongo Bay with Albion Oompany's battery, also to connect Tera- 


607 19 


6 


268 18 9 


609 16 


~ 


210 17 


whiti Quartz-mine vnth battery 








Road, Makara Junction to Terawhiti 


460 





226 




969 16 


~e 


436 17 


SOUTH ISLAND. 








Roads (subsidissd). 








Marlborough OoutUy. 








Track, Deep Greek to Dead Horse Greek 

Mouth of Gorge to Forks, GuUensville to Mahakipawa Diggings 




68 





46 6 8 




460 





226 


Formation of road at GuUensville, Mahakipawa 




217 4 





108 12 


Havelock-Mahakipawa Road 




906 





606 


Dead Horse Greek to Snnnyside 




76 





60 




1,716 4 





988 18 8 


Waimea OowUy. 




^B 




Road to open up Table Diggings 


260 





180 


Punt over Motueka River 


100 





60 


Repairing Baton to Table-land Track .. 


40 





20 


Dove River to Baton Saddle, and from Rolling River to Wangapeka Saddle 


120 





60 


Repairs, Motueka Bridge 


939 8 


8 


469 14 4 




1,469 8 


8 


729 14 4 



Digitized by 



Google 



146 



C— 3. 



List of Wobks on Ooldfiblds, Ac. — eoHimued. 









LooAUiy and NAtnra Of Works. 


Total Cost. 


Contribiition 
paid by Mines 
Department 




£ 8. d. 


£ s. d. 


Boad, West Wanganni 


900 


200 


Bridge over Aorere Biyer 


173 U 


115 16 


Extending Anatoki Bridle-timck 


160 


80 


Bridge OTer Takaka RiTer at Pain's Ford 


1,597 7 8 


798 13 10 




900 


100 


Kai ttina-Femtown 


250 


150 


Takaka roads 


600 


400 10 


CoHingwood-Kaitnna 


400 


900 




3.681 1 8 


2,144 19 10 


BuUer County, 
Deviation of road from Oandleli^t Flat to Deep Creek, Gbarieeton 


... _ . . . 




370 


246 IS 4 


Road from Orowaiti Lagoon to North Terrace 


256 18 6 


171 6 8 


Prospeoting-traok from Rasorback to Paparoa Range 
Track from Seatonville to Larrikin's 


100 
438 9 6 


66 13 4 
292 6 4 


Waimangaroa to Denniston .. 


787 


393 10 


Road to connect allnvial workings with Charieeton Road 


400 


266 13 4 


Tiack, Four-mile Creek towards Grey Yallev 

Road to connect alluvial diggings north of Deadman's Creek .. 


900 


200 


278 


185 6 8 


Ngakawau to Mokihinui, vid beaches .. 


100 


66 13 4 


Road to connect Ngakawau Railway with Mokihinui Coal Company's workings 


193 


128 13^ 
433 6^ 


Lyell Blufi to Victor Emmanuel Claim .. 


650 


Beach, LitUe Wanganui to Mokihinui .. 


900 


100 


Cape Foulwind Road 


450 


300 


Road up Nile VaUey 
Denniston extension 


56 16 4 


28 8 2 


850 


425 


Promised Land towards Motueka 


380 


190 


Road over Oentle Annie 


200 


100 


Extension, Lyell Creek to Low-level Tunnel 


60 


30 


Extension of track 50 chains south of Brighton 


140 


70 


Continuation of road, Deadman's Creek . . 


437 17 


218 18 6 


Neakawau RaUway-stotion to Mokihinui 
Addison's Flat towards ranges 
North Terrace to Oparara Diffiings 
Extension of Croninville Road 


50 


25 


20 


10 


500 
100 


333 6 8 
50 


Waimangaroa to sea-beach 


80 


40 


Extension of track, Oparara to Fenian Creek 


100 


50 


Con's Creek to Beaoonsfield .. 


80 


40 


Addison's Flat to Caroline Terrace 


200 


100 


Waimangaroa to sea-beach extension 


890 


195 


Addison's FUt to Gallagher's Lead 


50 


25 


Road to Swanston's Gold-mining Company 


50 


25 


Repairs to roads at Lyell ... 


200 


100 


Track, Fairdown from North Terrace 


150 


97 8 


Improving road to Four-mile Creek, Charleston 
Bridge, Waimangaroa River . . 
Road to Piper's FUt, Addison's 


900 


450 


70 


35 


450 


150 


Lyell Creek to Gibstown 


200 


66 13 4 


Bnller River Footbridge below Lyell 


250 


170 


Virgin Flat Road . . 


200 


100 


Orowaiti Bridge .. 

Long Tunnel Road, Addison's 


350 


325 


200 


100 


Stony Creek- Waimangaroa . . 


900 


200 


Inanadhua County, 
Dray-road from Soldier's Creek to Devil's Creek 


11,638 1 4 


6,600 16 8 


647 


431 6 8 


Drayroad from Liangahua to Rainy Creek Battery 


900 10 


606 6 8 


Dray-road from Capleston up Little Boatman's Creek 


379 


252 13 4 




697 


464 13 4 


Dray-road from Westport Road to Inangahua River 


224 5 


149 10 


Track from Devil's Creek to Big River .. 
Track from Waitahu River to Capleston 


134 3 6 


89 9.0 


358 


238 13 4 


Survey and expenses 


250 


166 13 4 


Track from Cariboo to Big River 


728 


364 


Dray-road up Murray Creek to United Laglewood Claim 
Road from Reefton to Big River, via DevU's Creek .. 


3,472 
614 


2,314 17 4 
807 


Road up Big River 


922 19 


615 6 


Continuation of dray-road up Little Boatman's Creek 


169 7 6 


112 18 4 


Road from Cl^pleston to Larry's Creek .. 


640 


426 13 4 


Track to connect Capleston with Lone Star 


75 


50 


Crushington to Globe Company's workings 


403 


201 10 


Snowy Creek Track 


85 15 


42 17 6 


Reefton to Big River 


1,792 


1,194 13 4 


Glenroy to Horse Terrace 


254 


122 10 


DevU's Creek to Globe Hill .. 


917 6 2 


458 13 1 


Extension of dray-road to Boatman's vi& Painkiller 


53 17 6 


26 18 9 


Mangles Valley to McGregor's Station .. 
Globe HUl to Merrijigs 


600 


300 


1,397 6 


698 13 


Larry's Creek to Lyell 
Widening Larry's Greek Road 


1,061 15 


530 17 6 


118 10 


59 5 


Road up Burke's Creek, Little Boatman's 


149 


74 10 


Widening track from Scotia Tunnel, on Big River Road, to Inkennann Mine 


200 


80 9 


Widening track from Fiery Cross Battery to Just-in-Time Shaft 


300 


150 




17,552 14 8 


10,530 17 10 



Digitized by 



Google 



C— 3. 



146 



List of Wobks on Goldfibldb, &c. — continued. 







1 Amount of 


IiooAlity and Nature of Works. 


Total Cost. 


1 Contribution 
paid by Mines 
Department. 


Orey County, 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


Roftd from No Town to Deep Greek 


1,100 


550 


Road from Langdon's to Moonlight 


1,600 


800 


Oontribution from goldfields vote towards main road 


2,29G 6 6 


2,296 6 6 


Track, Waipuna to Clarke's River 


1,200 


800 


Track, Cameron's to Cape Terrace 


700 


466 13 8 


Road, Limestone to Maori Creek 


800 


533 6 


Red Jack's to Nelson Creek 


601 17 6 


401 5 4 


Barrytown to Deadman's 


2,240 


1,493 6 8 


German Gully to Arnold's Flat 


120 


60 


Baird's Terrace to Lake Brunner 


400 


200 


Hatter's Terrace Road 


1,000 


500 


Irishman's to Lake Brunner 


2,400 


1,200 


Hatter's Terrace 


600 


400 


Track, Baird's Terrace to Irishman's 


250 


125 


Deep Creek to Bell Hill 


1,331 


665 10 


Track to Blackball Diggings .. 


790 


395 


Track from Ahaura, Kopara. Reese's Flat, to new rush on bankH of Ahaura River . . 


20 


10 


Renewal, bridge over Nelson Creek, Marsden-Dunganville Road 


38 


19 


Repairs (corduroying), Cobden-Seven mile Road .. 


36 


18 


Repairs, Cobden-Point-Elizabeth Road . . 

Elflnsion Ngahere-Blackball Road to Blackball Ferry 


30 


15 


50 


25 


Dray-bridge, Ten-mile Creek . . 


688 


344 


Deviation, Moonlight Track . . 


100 


50 


Repairs, bridges, Marsden-DunganviUe Road 


848 


219 


Seventeen-mile Bluff to Barrytown 


80 


40 


Removing rocks. Nine- and Ten-mile B'uffs 


100 


50 


Croesus Battery-site, Paparoa 


200 


79 6 


New River Bridge wing 


100 


86 


River View Road . . 


200 


140 


Mosquito Road 

Road to Totara Flat Dredge . . 


600 


252 10 


60 


25 


Maori GuUy Bridge 


160 


76 


Culverts, NeUon-Grey-Hokitika Road . . 


300 


150 


Paparoa track-Garden GuUy . . 


200 


100 


Repairs, No Town Creek Bridge 


200 


110 


Protective works, Big Grey Bridge 


200 


79 8 1 


Cape Terrace Road Deviation * . . 


78 


36 10 




21,092 4 


12,810 1 3 


WesUand County. 






Improving track, Butcher's Creek to Gentle Annie Terrace 


226 10 


163 13 4 . 


Bridle-track to Kanieri Lake 


719 11 


359 5 6 


Bridle-track to Eel Creek 


168 9 


84 4 6 


Tunnel-track, Galway Beach to Gillespie's Beach 


437 6 


218 12 6 


Road from Duffer's Creek, Greenstone Road, to fifteen-mile peg, Christchuroh 


726 9 


480 4 6 


Road 






Continuation of track. Back Creek to Eel Creek 


249 4 


166 3 4 


Bridle- track, Duffer's Creek, Bowen and Okarito Road, to sea-beach 


333 18 


222 12 


Ross Borough boundary to Mount Greenland 
Track, Kanieri Lake to Humphrey's Gully 


1,280 15 


853 16 8 


279 2 


186 1 4 


Track, Larrikin's to Loop-line Dam 


449 11 


299 14 


Rough Wainihinihi to Upper Dam 


450 


300 


Browning's Pass to Reefs 


3,311 6 


2,207 10 8 


Okarito Forks to Teal Creek . . * . . 


600 


400 


Road, Christchurch to Baldhill Range reefs 


500 


250 


Extension of Tucker's Flat Road to New Rush 


170 19 6 


85 9 9 


Hokitika Borough boundary (Reefton) to Shotover Rush 


120 


60 


Track to New Rush, Back Creek 


100 


50 


Repairing old track roimd Wataroa Bluff 


50 


25 


New Rush, south side of Hokitika River 


37 18 6 


18 19 3 


Cedar Creek Road to Farmer's Creek 


56 7 


27 13 6 


Road to gold discovery near Blue Spur . . 


75 


37 10 


Widening Seddon's Terrace Track 


160 


65 10 


Branch Road at Seddon's Terrace 


38 10 6 


19 5 3 


Track up Middle Branch, Styx River 


30 


15 


Improving road, Seven-mile-Taipo 
Widening Shallow Rush Track 


160 


73 3 6 


300 


54 17 3 




11,008 15 6 


6,724 6 10 


Taieri County, 






Mullocky Gully to Silver Peak 


499 16 


333 3 4 


Lake County, 






Track, Skipper's to Phoenix and Scandinavian Reefs 


292 2 3 


194 14 10 


Track to connect scheelite-mine with Lake Wakatipu 


225 


160 


Arrowtown to Mace town, construction . . 


225 


150 


Arrowtown to Macetown, maintenance . . .... 


160 


100 


Invincible Quartz-reef Track, Rees River . . . . . . . . 


300 


200 


Rees Valley to company's workings .. .. .. ., ' .. 


61 7 6 


30 13 9 


Pack-track, Criffel Diggings . . 


60 6 6 


33 11 


Left-hand Branch Road, Skipper's 


63 9 10 


81 14 11 


Old Morven Ferry Road 


289 


144 10 


Road to workings above Oardrona 

Piers, Victoria Bridge 

Skipper's Road Saddle to Deep Creek .. 


70 


36 


726 


362 10 


200 


100 


Roeld up Dart River 


150 


76 


Cutting n Homeward-bound Hill 


100 


76 


Skipper's Bridge .. 


4,244 


8,244 




7,145 6 1 


4,926 14 6 



Digitized by OoUy It: 



147 



C.—S. 



List of Wobxb on OoldfibiiDs, &o. — eontmued. 



Iioeality and Natim of Works. 



Total Cost. 



Amoontof 
Oontribiition 
paid by Mines 
Department. 



Tuapfka Ommti$, 
Making road from top of Terraco to Waipori Bosh . 
Road, Beamnont to Keinarkahle Bash . . 
IxDj^viDg road from Waipori Township to antimony-mines, Lammerlaw 
Waipori Township to Waipori Bosh 
Cluttia BiTer to Campbell's .. 
Waitahona to oopper-mine . . 
Road to open up quarry for Waitahnna Bridge 
WaipOTi Road, viA Bongtown 
Miller's Fiat Bridge 
Shelter-sheds and snow- poles 
Waipori Bridge 
Metalling, Lawrenoe-Waipori 
Repairs, FitsOerald*s Bridge. . 



Range 



£ 

300 
300 
200 
200 

76 
200 
160 
566 
11,242 
100 
800 
550 
1,500 



9 10 
8 10 




£ 

200 

200 

133 

133 

50 

133 

106 

283 

6,621 

50 

400 

341 

410 



d. 



8 
8 

4 
8 



19 11 
4 5 



Remoral of sand . . 



Cromw$U BoraugK, 



WaUae4 drniUy, 
Track, Oolao Bay to Round Hill 
Faok-iraek to Round HiU, Golac, and Orepuki 
Cutting tracks, Longwood 



VmeitU Caunty, 
Renewal bridge to Bannockbum 

MatMoMo CoutUif. 
Road to Serpentine Diggings 
Pig and Whistle to CliBce*s Diggings 
Shepherd's Hut Flat to Vinegar mil 
Kyebum Peninsula to main road 



Dusky Sound, tracks 



Fiord dmiUy. 



WaUaki CamUff. 



Road, Naseby to liyingstone 

ScuihUmd CoufUy. 
Improving tracks from Mataura to Nokomai 
Improving road, Waikaka to Leatham . . 
Improving road from Waikaka Township to Leatham Creek 
Im Droving road from Waikaka to Waikaka railway-siding 
Wiaening and improving bush-track to Waikawa 
Waikaka to Switser's 
Road near Waikaka Township 
Waipapa to Six-mile Beach . . 
Repairing bridges, Waikaia Bush 
Dray-road to Ferry Terrace, Nokomai . . 
Waikaia to Whitecomb 
Parawa t^) Sv^itzer'n. md Nokomai 
Track to Switser's Freehold Guld-mining Company 
Nevis R>ad 
Parawa to Nokomai 
Waikaia to Brt ak-'em- All Claim 
Mat tland Village-Mining Rt serve 



DUMOITD AHD OTHBB DbILLS. 

Inangahua County Council (diamond) . . 
Springfield Colliery Company (diamond) 
Westland County Council (tiffin) 
Diamond-drills for prospecting purposes. . 



Repairs to wharf, Coromandel 
AnUdwi Jetty, Marlborough 



Whabvxs. 



Aids to Pbobpbotimo. 
Construction of low-level tunnel, Terawhiti 
Queen of Beauty Company, prospecting deep leveb 
Caledonian Low-level Company, prospecting deep levels 
Red Hill Gk>]d-mining Company, prospecting deep levels 
Caledonian Low-level Company, low-level tunnel . . 
l^eU Creek Extended Company, low-level tunnel . . 
l^w Cromwell Gold-mining Company . . 
Deep-level Association, Waipori 

22— C. 3. 



136 10 

200 

100 

82 



518 10 



300 



1,841 12 



75 
150 

30 
150 
150 
150 
150 
175 

38 13 
100 
511 
150 
175 
100 
150 
100 
100 



50 

100 
20 

100 

100 

100 

100 
87 10 
13 4 
50 

280 13 
75 

175 
5i) 
75 
5<) 
50 



2,455 



2,000 

1.250 

350 

1.570 11 4 



5,170 11 4 



300 
135 15 9 



435 15 9 



760 
300 
300 
600 
2,700 
300 
250 
450 



150 
150 
150 
300 
300 
150 
100 
800 



16,195 


7 


8 


9,063 7 


2 


500 








250 





200 

1,050 

59 




6 







133 6 

500 

29 13 


8 




1,809 


6 





662 19 


8 


1,532 








850 






91 

133 6 8 

66 13 4 

41 



332 



200 



20 16 



1,476 7 4 



1.000 

625 

233 

1,570 11 4 



3,428 11 4 



150 
135 15 9 



285 15 9 



Digitized by 



Google 



C— 3. 



148 



List of Wobxs on Gtoldfiblds, Ac. — continued. 



Locality and Nature of Works. 



Aids to Prospbctino— eon^ntt^. 
LittU Boatman's deep-level tannel 
Oterongia Proepecting Assooiation 
Vincent Ck>unt}' 

Tapanni Prospeoting Association 
Taapeka Oounty 
Maniototo Oounty 
Pullar, Shelmerdine, and Basan 
Royal Oak Association 
Star of the East Qaartz-mining Oompany 
West Ooast Prospecting Association 
McBride and party 
McLean and party 
Deep-level tomel, Tokatea . . 
Deep-level tannel, Owharoa . . 
Deep-level tnnnel, Tapu 
Deep-level tannel, Oedar Oreek 
Manaka Flat Prospeoting Association 
Red Hill Minerals Oompany 
Tuapeka Prospecting Association 
Oararona Prospecting Association 
Oromwell Prospecting Association 
Ooromandel Ooanty 
Thames Ooanty 
Thames Borough 
BuUer Oounty 
InauRahua Oounty 
Westland Oounty 
Grey Oounty 

Deep-level Pro8]^ting Association, Waipori 
Waipu Prospecting Association 
Hokianga Oounty 
Vulcan Smelting- works, Onehunga 
Ohinemuri Oounty 
Waitaki Oounty 
Waihemo Oountv . . . . ... 

William Fox and party 

Kirk and party 

Hodge ana par^ 

Carey and Myndman 

Don, Boyoe, and party 

Quentin MoKinnon .. •• •• 

Bullion Mine deep-level tunnel 

Sutherland and party 

Inangahua low-level tunnel . . 

Deep-level tunnel, Manaia 

Waimea Miners* Association, prospecting at Oallaghan's 

Totara Miners* Association, Bioss . . 

Ross, Ounningham, and another 

Wm. Thompson, stores from Benmore Station 

Totara Miners' Association, Ross 

Harris, Davidson, and party . . 

Boatman's Tailings Oompany 

Boys's tunnel, Bluespur 

Totara Miners' Association (Ross, Montina, and party) 

Gillam's Gully Prospecting Association . . 

Deep-level Prospecting Oommittee, Dillmanstown . . 

Westport Prospecting Association 

Te Aroha Prospecting Association 

Robert Richie, Kuaotunu • . . . . . ' 

Owharoa Tunnel (Lindsay Jackson) 

Ooromandel Oounty (£1 for £1) 

Mr. G. Rehay, Arahura 

H3mdman and party, Oallaghan's Flat . . 

Lakes Mapourika, Waiho, and Wataroa Miners' Association 

Kumara Miners' Association . . 

Thames Miners* Union 

Star of Oanterbury Miners* Association . . 

Miners* Association, Rimu . . 

Buller Oounty (Messrs. Negri and others) 

Johnson and party, tunnel at 0allaghan*8 Flat 

W. L. Webb, Nelson 

Kumara Miners' Association (Solberg, Stewart, and party) 

Buller Oounty, between head of Fox's RivCr, Brighton, and Deadinan's Oreek 

Welcome United Gold-mining Oompany, Greymouth 

Oirepuki Miners' Association . . 

Totara Miners' Association (Gagliardi and party) 

ontingencies 
Halligan and party, tunnel at Oedar Oreek 
Totara Miners' Association (Ohamberlain and party) 
Miners* Association, Greenstone 
Westland Oounty (T. Radonioki and party) 
Waimea Miners' Association (Lot, Keir, and party) 
Oardrona Prospecting Association 
Waimea Miners' Association, Stafford . . 



Total Cost. 



Amount of 
Contribution 
paid by Mines 
i>epartment. 



£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


600 





300 


198 17 


2 


99 8 7 


1 137 9 





68 14 6 


25 





12 10 


' 12 





6 


500 





250 


1 400 





200 


300 





150 


150 





75 


800 





150 


169 2 


2 


84 11 1 


66 





38 


700 





850 


300 8 





200 5 4 


1,200 





600 


1,207 10 





608 16 


200 





100 


; 487 19 10 


218 19 11 


' 277 





188 10 


: 800 





400 


500 





250 


, 660 





275 


809 18 





154 19 


200 





100 


146 12 


6 


78 6 8 


488 7 





244 8 6 


1,286 19 


4 


618 9 8 


871 16 


2 


435 17 7 


; 482 9 


8 


216 4 10 


180 





90 


100 





50 


' 30 





15 


100 





50 6 


29 5 





14 12 6 


85 9 





42 14 


711 1 


8 


855 10 11 


176 10 


88 4 10 


) 98 18 


8 


49 6 10 


I 441 9 


4 


220 14 


^ 107 16 





53 18 


58 10 





29 6 


800 





150 


80 





15 


' 6,966 





8,000 


* 451 4 





225 12 


I 50 





50 


! 61 8 


6 


51 8 6 


9 





9 


2 1 


10 


2 1 10 


8 6 


6 


8 6 6 


1 27 7 


6 


27 7 


! 150 





150 


94 12 


8 


94 12 


246 10 





246 10 


94 15 





94 15 


407 


3 


407 8 


25 





25 


20 12 


6 


20 12 6 


72 8 





86 1 


825 





162 10 


200 





100 


98 16 





49 7 6 


552 14 


6 


276 7 3 


58 12 





26 16 


22 10 





11 5 


75 15 





37 17 6 


38 5 





19 2 6 


16 





8 


27 





13 10 


90 





45 


24 





12 


64 15 





32 7 6 


29 5 





14 12 6 


245 12 


6 


122 16 3 


90 





45 


12 10 





6 5 


484 15 10 


242 7 11 


198 1 


10 


99 11 


208 10 





104 5 


59 





29 10 


40 





20 


90 





45 


140 5 


4 


70 2 8 


118 1 





56 10 6 



Digitized by 



Google 



149 



List of Works on GbLDFiBLDS, Sbg, — continued. 



LooAllty ADd NatuM of Works. 



Total Cost 



Amount of 

CoDtribaiioQ 

paid by Ifiiies 

Department 



Aids to PBOSPBomro — eatMmsd, 
H. Orossan, Beaumont 
Piospeotinff Association, Westport 
Gape Golviile Prospeoting Syndicate 
Port Gharles Prospeoting Association 
Totara Miners' Association, Ross 
Lake Mapoorika Miners* Association 
Lister and Robertson, Earamea 
Canada Reefs Tunnel 
Otago Miners* Association 
Westland Gonnty (Gondie and party) 
Paparata Road Board 

Tanranga Gounty (Te Puke Prospecting Association) 
Havelook Miners* Association 
Ohinemnri Gounty 
Mr. Olderog, Arahnra 

Miners' Association, Ross (J. Smith and party) 
Extension of low-level tunnel, Boatman*s 
Prospecting-tnnnel, south side Inangahua River 
Prospeoting Association, Mokihinni 
Miners' Association, Kumara (John Kane) 
Prospecting Association, Inveroargill 
Miners' Association, Koaotunu 
Miners' Association, Ross (Waylen and party) 
Prospeoting Association, Goromandel (Leahy and others) 
Adit-level, Maungatawhiri Greek (Q. fi. Osmond) . . 
Bay of Islands Gounty Prospectii^^, Pokaka 
Prospecting Russell's Outcrop 

Fox's River Prospecting Association (A. T. Bate, secretary) 
Buller Gounty (Newton and party, shaft, Ballarat Terrace) 
Buller Gounty (Spence and party) 
Wairau Miners' Association . . 

Miners' Association, Nelson Greek (Thrower and Potts) 
Miners' Association, Dillmanstown (Tumbull and others) 
Miners* Association, Ross (Gagliardi and party) 
Miners* Association, Ross (Allen and Son) 
Miners* Association, Greenstone (Black and party) 
Miners* Association, Gardrona 
Bfiners* Association, Lowbum (E. Murrell) 
Pohipuhi Prospecting Association 
Thames Gounty (F. and J. Wallis) 
Thames Gounty (Sheridan Gompany*8 tunnel, Tapu) 
Ginnabar Mining Gompany, Auckland {£X to £1 lOs.) 
H. H. Adam*B, Waiorongomai 
Miners* Association, Ross (Moye and Son) 
Westland Gounty (J. Staines) 
Westland Gounty (0*Brien and Glynn) . . 
Upper Moutere Road Board . . 
Buller Gonnty (Mohan and party) 
Buller Gounty (Gardiner and Mo&ay) . . 
Buller Gounty (Negri and others) 
Buller Gounty (Scarlett and McHarrie) . . 
Kumara Miners* Association (Scatterini and Anderson) 
Kumara Miners* Association (Henley and party) 
Kumara Miners* Association (M. Manton) 
Kumara Miners* Association (Rogers and Block) 
Frying-pan Tail-race 

Prospeoting Association, Mokihinui (French and others) 
Prospecting Association, Westport 
Dyer andparty, Kuaotunu 

Gillam*8 Gull]^ Prospecting Association (Bramhall and party) . . 
Ifiners* Association, Riverton 
Kennedy- Waikaia Miners* Association, Inveroargill 
Inangahua District Miners* Association 
New El Dorado Sluicing Gompany, Fat Boys, Griffel 
Miners' Apsociation, Greenstone (O'Donnell and party, and J. Pope) 
Miners' Association, Tinkers, prospecting Matakanui 
Ghatterbox Tunnel (G. Glapton) 
Port Gharles Prospecting Association . . 
Miners' Association, Lake Mapourika 
Pitchers and Kitto, Anderson's Flat 
Miners* Association, Nelson Greek (Kelly and party) 
South British Prospecting Association, Lyell 
Miners* Association, Ross (A. Zala) 
Miners* Association, Ross < McKay and Muir) 
Miners' Association, Ross (McKay and Brown) 
Miners' Association, Ross (McEwen and McEchnie) 
Miners' Association, Ross (G. Porter) 
Miners* Association, Riverton 
Katikati Prospecting Association 
Gomwall, Walker, and party's tunnel. Boatman's . . 
Miners* AsAociation, Greenstone (Grawford and party) 
Mararoa Mining Association 
Hororata Prospeoting Association 



£ 

28 

89 

82 

28 

24 

12 

18 

187 

600 

215 

26 

60 

78 

200 

54 

185 

800 

60 

40 

9 

150 

40 

50 

200 

120 

112 

100 

19 

22 

19 

50 

45 

7 

64 

40 

27 

40 

20 

200 

97 

180 

162 

250 

15 

96 

40 

40 

220 

56 

48 

39 

124 

58 

57 

75 

600 

58 

482 

120 

60 

100 

100 

100 

800 

75 

6 

6 

20 

17 

100 

28 

185 

69 

39 

18 

26 

226 

18 

52 

302 

109 

18 

80 



8. d. 










10 




19 9 










18 





















18 



10 

15 

10 





10 

18 











10 

10 



16 9 









































6 





£ t. 
14 
19 10 
16 



14 

12 
6 

18 

98 15 
291 8 
107 19 6 

18 



25 
89 
6 
16 
61 



187 7 11 
25 



15 
1 




2 6 
68 18 6 

18 2 6 
16 18 

100 

68 17 

112 18 

100 

19 10 
22 15 

19 10 
48 4 
45 

7 10 
64 18 

20 
27 
40 
18 5 
18 15 
85 19 
80 5 

108 11 

48 3 9 
a 10 6 
4 10 

36 10 6 

1 16 
71 8 6 

24 

29 1 8 
18 

6 18 6 

2 8 

8 18 9 
85 6 

lei 11 

11 5 
197 9 

87 16 

12 3 
82 

9 

25 17 6 
94 4 9 

30 4 8 

8 
2 17 9 

11 8 

7 18 8 
20 5 11 

9 18 
6 15 









89 

13 

26 
128 

18 

26 
154 14 
109 7 

18 

80 15 



Digitized by 



Google 



0.— 3. 



160 



LiBT of WoBKB on GoLDFiBLDS, Sbc. --Continued, 



Iiooality and Nature of Works. 



Total Goat. 



Amotinl of 
Oontribation 
paid by Biines 
Depcurtment. 



Aids to FaosB>iGTitni— continued. 
Paparata Road Board (Parker and Piggott) 
New Bay of Islands Ooal Oompany, proepeoting Moody's Outcrop 
Ijongwood Sluicing Company 

Red Jack's Miners' Association (Drummond and MoDonough) 
Kapanga Qold-mining Company (Limited) 
Kuaotunu Prospecting Association 
Te Aroha Town Board 
Bombay Prospecting Association 
Charleston Miners' Association 
Boiler County (Reaney and Rasmussen) 
Buller County (Samuel and party) 
Gold-mining League, Westport (McFarlane and others) 
Inangahua County (Gabriel and p&rty) • • 
Miners' Association, Dillmanstown (Black and party) 
Tapanui Prospecting Association 
Miners' Association, Lowborn (Tilliman and party) 
Miners' Association, Upper Waikaia 

Main and party's tunnel, Kanieri 

Ryan and Bon's tunnel, Dillmanstown . . 

R. A. Harcourt's tunnel, Blue Spur 

Miners' Association, Ross (Archer and Horseby) 

InauAahua County (R. Lees) . . 

WestTand County (Rebay and party) 

Red Jack's Miners^ Association (Drummond and Raynor) 

Westland County (McGoveran and party) 

Westland County (N. Joliuson's tunnel, Fox's Flat) 

Miners' Association, Ross (Gagliardi and Son) 

Miners' Association, Roes (Marohesi and Scott) 

Miners* Association, Greenstone (Dickson and party) 

Westland Coonty (Patrick and Moyniban) 

Westland County (Ryan and Son) 

Westland County, prospecting, Kanieri (£1 for £1) . . 

Westland County (Dwyer and party. Blue Spur) 

Miners' Association, Waiho (Batson and Snow) 

Miners' Association, Nelson Greek (Coll and Moran) 

Miners' Association, Nelson Creek (Hurley and party) 

Miners' Association, Blackball jKeenan and Falconer) 

Miners' Association, Blackball (McKensie and O'Brien) 

Miners' Association, Roes fMcLeod and Dunlop) 

Miners' Association, Ross (Smith and Regan) 

Miners' Association, Greenstone (Candy, Roberts, and Etias) 

Buller County (Jeffreys and Walker) 

Boiler Coonty (Christmas and party) 

Boiler Coonty (Burkitt and party) 

Boiler County (Stewart and party) 

Boiler Coonty (Robertson and Saugwell) 

Boiler Coonty (Ramsey and O'Connor) . . 

Boiler Coonty (Clooah and McGonagle) . . 

Boiler County (Necn and others) 

Buller County (Qmnn and party) 

Buller County ^Murray and Forsyth) 

Buller County (Salter and party) 

Inatigahua County (Z. E. Curnow) 

Culley and Hislop, prospecting, Kawakawa 

ProBpocting Associaiion (Riverton) 

Tuapeka. County (Gabriel's Gully) 

Notel, S en house, and Crawford's tunnel. New Chum Creek 

Holints Bn(i party's tunnel, Tucker's Flat 

Dt-ep Levels, Komara 

Miuers' Association, Ross (Moye and Son) 

Mineis* ABsociation, Ross (Paterson and McGowan) 

Miners' AsBociation, Waiho (Nelly and Murray) 

Miners' Association, Red Jacks (Drommond ard party) 

W* 6t and Coonty (Roseveri and party) . . 

Prospecting Mokihinui Mine (Lomas and party) 

Towai-Hukorenoi Coal Syndicate 

Ohinemuri Coonty (P. Prodence) 

Westland Coonty (Irwin and party) 

Butier Co iiitv (Brand and pari\) 

MiiierR* A»80< iation, Havehck (Kearns and McOnsker) 

WtBiland County (Patrick and Moynibai ) 

GreymoDth Harb ur B( ard (boring for coal) 

Westland County (Beroz and Mills) 

Ohinemuri County (Soanlon and Eyre) .. 

Ross B rough Council (Smith and party) 

Johnetoti, Bryan, aud party's tunnel 

Black water Miners' Association (Banman Bros.) 

Inangahua County (P. Tangney) 

WestUnd County (G, McArthur) 

Westland County (Rebay and Rebnstitti) 

Wetland County (Ryan and Son) 

Westland County (W. Roblofski and party) 



£ 

32 

200 

300 

28 

20.600 

48 

100 

40 

110 

120 

100 

89 

100 

31 

40 

67 

19 

200 

42 

180 

13 

2 

112 

24 

50 

140 

70 

200 

72 

86 

120 

1,228 

800 

9 

160 

164 

5 

43 

63 

164 

100 

8 

4 

18 

12 

26 

4 

8 

12 

84 

9 

6 

6 

125 

25 

400 

240 

400 

8,269 

60 

26 

26 

50 

160 

500 

200 

6 

100 

80 

100 

300 

500 

200 

82 

70 

305 

81 

2 

6 

80 

80 

150 



s. 

10 





10 








10 


10 

10 





10 










15 





17 

10 



14 6 
2 



32 

173 

150 

28 

1,735 

26 

37 

16 

38 

30 

5 

13 

11 

12 

18 

42 

18 

188 

21 

90 

13 

2 

56 

12 

37 

59 

17 

153 

15 

45 

60 

614 

758 

9 

160 

82 

5 

43 

40 

164 

60 

8 

4 

13 

12 

26 

4 

8 

12 

18 

9 

6 

4 

125 

25 

223 

240 

208 

1,197 

14 

18 

12 

24 

80 

250 

35 

1 

85 

74 

76 

195 

250 

155 

16 

35 

305 

81 

2 

3 

40 

38 

76 



8 11 



17 6 

7 9 

8 6 




9 9 




7 

12 





10 





10 





10 

15 

18 






7 
6 



17 
10 



8 6 

2 

8 6 





15 




16 





10 

16 





10 10 




8 
10 



19 6 




14 3 




6 






5 

10 


16 




r 



Digitized by 



Google 



161 
List oI Woucb oq GaumaLM, Ac-^otnUtmiMt 



OCWoriDi. VOMklOOi*. 



OoatribttlioB 
Ibyl 



Aim io 

Wartlaad Ooonly ^Sh^gu aad party) 
Wastland Coonty (SmiUi mnd party) 
Qoldan Bum ProApeotuig AMOoiMon . . 
Minen* Awoeiatlop, CbArlMtoii 
Minera' Assooiaiioii, Nelwn Gredc (KaUy and partj) 
Ohioemort Goonty (Seaolon and Byre) . . 
BuUer CoantT (Gtaw-^e Creek) 
Gorommndal Gcantr, Taiui«l Whftkmroa Cntk 
Miner's Association. Kanieri (McQailkin and paitj) 
Westland Goonty (Htfrey and MoDoaald) 
Coromandel Goaaty (A. Kelso) 
Goromandel Goanty (New Hero Syndioale) 
CozoDUkodel Goonty (Dyer and CKaele) .. 
Goromandel Goonty (Hosie and Marahall) 
(Coromandel Goonty (Little Hero Tonnel) 
Goromandel Omnty iC. Blaseh) 
Goromandel Goonty (J. HIckey) 
Goromandel Goonty (Home and Mclsaao) 
Blackwater Miners* Assooiatloo (O'lHaharty and lAwrenoe) 
Komara Miners* Asaociatton . . 
WesUand Goonty (R. A. Harooozt) 
Westland Goon^ (O. L. Taooo) 
Westlaod Omniy (Warren and party) . . 
Qill and McDonald 8haft( Bock and Pillar) 
Kanieri Miners* Association (Sinfsr and Harrey) 
Boiler Goanty ((Gardner and BettMman) 
Westiand Gounty (Hoist and party) 
Contingencies 



M 

19 

18 

435 

110 

110 

46 

96 

60 

12 
60 
60 
35 

50 
36 
45 
13 

160 
35 

900 
34 

190 
35 
40 
90 
80 

317 



s. d. 
10 




































0. 









0, 







8 



£ s. d. 

19 10 

19 

146 6 

58 3 3 

39 15 9 

33 



13 
30 
11 
13 
60 
30 



13 15 
10 10 

35 
18 
33 10 

6 
bO 
13 11 
99 10 
13 
60 

9 6 

36 8 
33 10 
31 13 9 

317 5 8 



76,847 7 10 99,006 11 6 



Water-main, Boll's Battery .. 

Boond Hill Water-raoe 

Tomki88*s Water-raoe 

Cardrona Slodge-channel 

New water-mains, Thamee Water-raoe . . 

Nelson Greek 

Mikonoi Water-raoe 

Brown and party, Komara 

Randall Greek Water-race 

Thames Water-raoe 

Contingenoies 

Bandail (3reek Water-race 

QuiDn*s Greek Water-raoe 

Sorrey, water-raoe. Ninety-mile Beach . . 

Improfing water- supply, Oamaro 

Roaring Meg Water-race (Jcmas, Baxter, and party) 

Solky Oully Water-raoe 

(}entle Annie Greek, MaU (B. Kelly) . . 

Porchase Byrne, O'Hallahan, and Mordoch's water rights 

Argyle Water-raoe 

Bell HiU Sloioing Company .. 

Pinlay and McLi¥er*8 Water-race, at Measletown . . 

Moontain Hot water-race 

Back Greek Water-raoe sorvey 



Dbaihaos ahd Taiuvos GHAHinniS. 
Drainage-channel, Lawrence (total cost, aynroTimate) 
Sobddy towards porchase of Messrs. Laidlaw and (Crawford's freehold in Spotti's 

Greek, to allow tailings to be deposited (Tinker's Diggings) 
Damage by floods, Thames 
Slodge-channel, Smith's Oolly, Bannockbom 
Boond Hill Slodge-channel sorvey 
Gompensation to J. Gostello, damage done by tailings 
Long Oolly Slodge-channel 
New Pipeclay QuJily Slodge-channel 
Komara Slodge-channel No. 3 
Ophir Tail-race 

Lawrence Drainage- channel . . 
Tailings-outlet, Maerewhenoa 
Ross Sludge and Storm-water Channel . . 
KoaotOQU Sludge-channel {Si for £1) . . 
Branch tail-race to No. 4 Channel 
Rimu Drainage- channel 
Komara 8 udge-chaonel No. 4 
Donnelly's Creek Tail-race 
Muddy Creek Channel 
Drain, Te Aroha West 

Komara Slodge-channel No. 5 and eztensi<m 
Waimomu Main Tail-race 
(Compensation, Owen Roberts 
Komara Sludge-channel No. 8 extension 
Charlton Main Tail-race 



AlO T0WA&D8 THS TbEATMBHT OF ObBS 

Testing-plant, School of Mines, Thamee 

Testing minerals, Donedin Bzhibition . . 

Testing.battery, Mercoir Bay 

Public oroshing-plant ((joromandel School of Mines) 



350 
900 
100 
100 
1,479 



100 
133 
100 
50 
739 



1 957 16 


9 


957 16 


9 


' 14,279 16 


4 


14,279 16 


4 


90 





29 10 





323 3 


3 


932 2 


3 


1,350 





1,250 





659 13 


8 


659 12 


8 


100 15 





100 15 





70 





70 





65 6 


7 


65 6 


7 


1,350 





1.150 7 


9 


1,600 





800 





504 





218 





900 





40 





35 





35 





8,453 15 


1 


8,453 15 


1 


1,000 





500 





400 





34 5 


4 


4,879 19 





4,879 12 





630 1 





330 1 





38,878 7 





35.199 14 


8 


3,000 





2,000 





500 





400 





1,000 





500 





1,000 





251 1 





52 19 


7 


52 19 


7 


788 





788 





150 





100 





4,547 18 





773 19 





2,763 17 


2 


2,762 17 


9 


2,300 





1,150 





1,150 





1,092 9 





1,595 4 





1,595 4 





1,675 10 


6 


1,675 10 


6 


400 





900 





100 





100 





500 





191 19 


6 


1,200 





1,151 10 


6 


1,657 





444 4 


5 


2,000 





1,000 





200 





61 





5,654 15 11 


5,654 15 11 


3,502 13 


5 


1,339 13 





75 





75 





570 15 





570 15 





1,862 17 


7 


408 7 


1 


37.745 11 


2 


24,339 5 


10 


1,200- 





600 





192 8 


9 


149 8 


9 


915 1 


4 


915 1 


4 


906 


5 


906 


5 


3,913 10 


6 


2,563 10 


6 



Digitized by 



i^oogle 



C— ^*3- 



162 



List of Wobkb on Gk>iiBFnLD8, Ae. — c<mUnu0d. 



Looallly ftod Mftlnre of Works. 



Aid TOWABD6 OoHtTBUonoH OF Tblbphohb-luim. 
BAimockbam to Kevit 



WATBR-00V8BBVATI01I OH GoLDTOLDS. 

Beports on Drainage, Roat Flat 

Coromandel Harbour and Koaotunn Sladge^hanneU 

Ewebam Reservoir 

Maokeytown Water-supply . . 

Waitekauri Water supply 

Karangabake Water-supply . . 

Glyde Water-^mpply 

Home Gully Dam . . 

Thames DraioaHfe Board (oontribotion) . . 

Alexandra Water-supply 



W0BK8 WHOLLY CONSTBUOTSD BT HnffBS DbPABTMBHT. 

Ck>nstruotion of road, Arrowtown to Macetown 

Road to open up Woodstock Goldfleld 

Ahaura to Amuri . . 

Waikaia Bush Road 

Waitabona Bridge 

Merrivale tracks . . 

Mokihinui to Specimen Greek 

Wilberforce Quarts-reef Road 

Opening Mokan River 

Lyell to Mokihinui 

Brighton to Seventeen-mile Beach 

Wangapeka to Karamea 

Hatter's Terrace to Bell Hill . . 

Oedar Creek Road 

Owen Valley Road 

Cobden to Seventeen-mile Beach 

Oedar Greek Road 

Bridle- track to Upper Anatoki 

Whangamata Road 

Karangabake through Gorge . . 

Arthur's Point to Skipper's . . 

Tracks to Coal Island 

Grey Valley to Teremakau 

Rimu to New Rush 

Tapu to Waikawau 

Puhipnhi Road 

Jackson's Bay to Cascade and Gorge River district . 

Improving roads and tracks, CoUinswood to Takaka and Motueka 

Tramwav from New Find to Waitekauri 

Havelock-Mahakipawa Dray-road 

Mokihinui to Wanganui 

Burnett's Face to Ooalbrookdale 

Deadman's to Christmas Terrace 

Low-level Alpine Claim, Lyell 

Bowen Road to Salt-water Beach 

Repairing damage done b^ floods, Westland County 

Deviation of road at Kanieri Forks 

Road up Dart River 

Kuaotunu to Mercury Bay . . 

Thames to Manaia 

Cobden to Seventeen-mile Beach 

Bridffe over Mahinapua Creek 

Track up Waiho River 

Haast Ferry to Glue-pot 

Paeroa-Waihi Road 

Waitekauri to New Find*! . . 

MahaMpawa to Waikakaho . . 

Oparara through gorge to gold-workings. . 

Okira Bridse, at Dirty Mary's Creek 

Lagoon Bridge 

Widening Cape Terrace Road 

Deviation, Granville Road 

Tucker's Flat Road 

Dillman's-Larrikin's Road . . 

Track at Kanieri Lake and Mcintosh Falls, Lake Mahinapua. 

Extension of road, Rimu to Shallow Rush 

Gillam's Gully Track 

McKay's Creek, Kokatahi Track 

Aorere Valley to Karamea and Mokihinui 

Arrowtown to Macetown 

Nelson Creek Bridge 

Cascade to Bam Bay Road . . 

Repairs to decking, Tapu Wharf 

Waitekauri Battery from Junction-Waihi Road 

Deep Creek, Wakamarina, to Empire City Company's claim 

Track to diggings at Cape Foulwind 

Bridge over Fox's River at Brighton 

Totara Bridge 

Road from Mokihinui Bridge to gold-workings 



Total Cost. 



& s. d. 
60 



Amoiutit of 

Contrwotioin 

paid by Mines 

Department. 



& 8. d. 
50 



284 10 


8 


284 10 8 


80 12 


6 


80 12 6 


16,459 15 10 


16,459 15 10 


851 





351 


445 2 


5 


445 2 5 


607 6 


5 


607 6 5 


1.121 13 


2 


1,121 18 2 


1,028 


6 


1,028 6 


1,000 





1,000 


600 





600 


21,978 1 


6 


21,978 1 6 


9,270 6 


8 


9,270 6 8 


1,000 





1,000 


2,504 19 


7 


2,504 19 7 


1,000 





1,000 


750 





750 


500 





500 


1,288 7 


5 


1,288 7 5 


1,880 17 


7 


1,880 17 7 


552 8 





552 8 


5,098 8 


6 


5,098 8 6 


1,789 7 


2 


1,789 7 2 


2,000 





2,000 


500 





500 


8,000 





3,000 


2,908 9 


2 


2,208 9 2 


3,036 1 


4 


3,036 1 4 


1,500 





1,500 


722 8 





722 8 


141 10 


6 


141 10 6 


1,000 





1,000 


12,167 4 


1 


12,167 4 1 


54 6 


8 


54 6 3 


900 





900 


829 17 


9 


829 17 9 


750 10 





750 10 


1,396 17 


9 


1,396 17 9 


5,310 10 11 


5,310 10 11 


10,905 8 11 


10,905 8 11 


100 





100 


1,311 9 





1,311 9 


200 





200 


200 





200 


20 





20 


80 





80 


60 





60 


100 





100 


140 





140 


200 





200 


350 





350 


500 





500 


400 





400 


603 16 10 


503 16 10 


105 





105 


126 





126 


114 





114 


2£0 





250 


183 12 


1 


183 12 1 


150 





150 


100 





100 


100 





100 


100 





100 


70 





70 


247 18 


7 


247 18 7 


125 15 





125 15 


195 4 


6 


195 4 6 


150 





150 


149 16 





149 16 


100 





100 


29,938 1 


2 


29,938 1 2 


450 





450 


100 





100 


411 7 





411 7 


100 





100 


150 





150 


50 





50 


497 11 





497 11 


100 





100 


255 





255 


75 





75 



Digitized by 



Google 



163 



C— 3. 



List of Wobks on Ooldfisldb, Ac.--€(mtinued, 












Amount of 


IiooaUty Mid Maliire of Works. 


Total Ooflt. 


Contribution 
paid by Mines 








Department. 




£ 8. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


dearing two miles of old track from right-hand hranoh of Kanieri River to Genth 

Annie Terrace 
Bztending horse-track to Blackball Greek 


) 13 





18 


500 





500 






160 





150 


Tiki to Mahakirau 




250 





250 


Karangahake Gorge to Waihi 




850 





850 


Upper Tararu Road 
RedHiURoad 




471 10 


8 


471 10 8 




249 8 


1 


249 8 1 


Repairs, Nile Bridge 
Miller's Flat to Skipper's 




1,131 2 


6 


1.181 2 6 




580 





580 


Ck>bden to Coal Creek 




875 





875 


Track to New Find, Tairua . . 




47 11 


6 


47 11 6 


Cedar Creek Dray-road 




466 11 


2 


466 11 2 


Road to Matarangi Goldfield . . 




75 





75 


Repairs, Manaia Track 




90 





90 


Upper Township School Bridge 
Tud Bridge across Waiau 




50 





50 




256 





256 


Scott's Bridge 




175 





175 


Oteau Bridge 




150 





150 


Mercury Bay-Kaimarama Road 




50 





50 


Stoney Creek Track 




15 





15 


Road to mines, Waiomo 




50 





50 


Upper Hill Track to branch track, Waiorongomai . . 


80 





80 


Canadian Gaily Bridge, and repairs to tunnel on horse-grade, Waiorongomai 


70 





70 


Waiorongomai Road 


100 





100 


Track from Slate River to Rocky 


225 





225 


Packtrack to KiUdevil 


100 





100 


Repairs, Wangapeka Road towards Crow Diggings . . 
Repairing flood-damages, Grey County . . 


158 


7 


158 7 


870 





870 


Taipo Track to Seven-mile 


194 5 


8 


194 5 8 


Repairs, Totara Bridge 


886 





886 


Repairs, Kanieri Lake Road . . 


80 





80 


Mercury Bay to Whenuakite and Boat Harbour 


150 





150 


Tiki to Gumtown, vi& Kaimarama 


160 





160 


Driving Creek to Cabbage Bay, and Drivhig Creek to Cape Colville 


660 





660 


Tiki toWaikawau.. 


600 





600 


Paeroa to Te Aroha 


865 





865 


Puriri to east side of range . . 


596 19 


6 


596 19 6 


Onamalutu to Wakamarina Forks 


400 





400 


Waimangaroa to Denniston . . 

Road to Lyell's Creek Extended Company's tunnel 


100 





100 


200 





200 


Jackson's Bay to Cascade 

Bridge over Ogilvie's Creek . . 


1,110 8 


1 


1.110 8 1 


150 





160 


Gillam's Gullv Track 

Bridge over Kanieri River at Kokatahi . . 


220 





220 


467 10 10 


467 10 10 


Road to Oparara Diggings . . 
MiUerton Road .. 


100 
249 



8 


100 
249 8 


Waiau to Preservation Inlet . . 


7.961 19 


6 


7,961 19 6 


Hatter's Terrace to Haupiri . . 


1,650 





1,650 


Grey River to Moonlight 


580 





580 


Blackball Track .. 


1,185 12 


5 


1,185 12 6 


Ahaura-Kopara Road 


400 





400 


Mackley's to Waipuna Terrace 


100 





100 


Footbridge over Blackball Creek 


150 





150 


Waipapa to Waikawa 


200 





200 


Waipapa to Six-mile 


100 





100 


Drain at Adamson's 


50 





50 


Maruia Track, between Reef ton and Maruia 


50 





50 


Sledge-track to Langdon Reefs 
Track to Blackball Township, repairs 


80 





80 


i 40 





40 


Track, Old Man Range 


50 





50 


Road to gold discovezr near Blue Spur . . 
Bartlett's Creek Track 


45 





45 


' 200 





200 


Prospecting-track, Brunnerton to Paparoa 


125 





125 


Extension Seddon's Terrace Track to new claim . . 


208 10 


6 


208 10 6 


Wesi Tokatea Road 


50 





50 


Waitaia Battery Road 
Preeoe's Point Road 


150 





150 


150 





150 


Tokatea-Kennedy Bay Road. . 


100 





100 


Main Cabbage Bay Road 
Hooker's to Mercury Bay 


50 





50 


100 





100 


Opeto Road . . 
Blagrove's Road .. 


100 





100 


400 





400 


Cemetery-Cabbage Bay Road 


100 





100 


Rails for Coromandel Wharf . . 


, 81 5 





81 5 


Culverts, Tiki Road 


! 100 





100 


Soldier's Creek Road 


, 198 5 





198 5 


Road to Barry town 


800 





800 


Tracks to western sounds 


7.807 17 11 


7,807 17 11 


Road to R. Kelly's claim, Gentle Annie Creek 


100 





100 


Waitekauri to New Find 


250 





250 


Paeroa Mill Road .. 


50 





50 


Owharoa to Waitawheta 


. 


50 





50 



Digitized by 



Google 



C/,— o. 



164 



L18T of W0BK8 on Gk>LDFiBLD8, Ac. — oofitinued. 



LoMhUty and Natnn of Works. 



Total Cost. 



Amount <rf 
ConlribalioD 
mild by Mines 
Depactment. 



WoBXS WHOLLY C0N8TBU0TBD BT HiNSS DmrAvnawT—eontinusd. 
Deviation Road, Earl's Hill .. 
Waihi to Katikati . . 
Bridge over Slate River 
Paok-traok to Glover's Flat, Lower Aoaioki 
Clearing Karaka Greek of flood>dainage . . 
Track up right-hand branoh of Oollen's Creek 
Footbridge, Waimangaroa River 
Track up Gallary Branch, Waiho River . . 
Converting Wilson's Lead Track, Addison's, into a dray-road 
Cabbacre Bay to mines 
Coromandel to Koaotonn 
Hanaia to mines . . 
Whitianga to Mahakirau 
Whangapoaa Mill Road 
Kaaotnnn Bridge . . 
Grani^ Creek to Ngakawan . . 
Crow Diggings Track 
Road to dig«ngs, Cape Foolwind 
Kgahere toBlackbalt 
Fencing land. Blackball Road 
Prospeoting-track, Greek's Gully to Kanieri Forks . . 
Repairing Jones's Greek and Donohne's Storm-channels 
Deviation, Pleasant Creek Track 
Road-works at Ohaeawai 
Mahakirau Creek Road 
Puriri to mines 
Katikati- Waihi Road 
Pack-track from Kerikeri 
Track to Waitakohe Ooldfield 
Repairing bridges to mines, Te Puke 
Helena Bay to Whakapara Railway-station 
Gordon Settlement to Waharoa 
Waiorongomai Road 

Approach to railwav-bridge, Te Aroha . . 
Upper Waitekauri Bridge 
Junction Waihi Road to New Find, Waitekauri 
Repairing bridges, Doctor's and Staunton's Creeks . . 
Four-mile Bridge . . 
Fox's Bridge 

Charleston-Nine-mile Beach . . 
Road, Promised Land-Karamea 
Earamea Bridge and approaches 
Approaoheft, Matakitaki Bridge 
Snowy Creek Bridge 
Big River Road . . 

Footbridge across by-wash, Ngahere-Blackball Ferry 
Track to Healey's Gnlly 

Track, Lancashire Flat to head of Clearwater Creek 
Granville Road 

Footbridges, Blackwater and Greenstone 
Brown's Terrace to Arnold 
Protective works, main Grey Bridge 
Extension, Tucker's Flat Road 
Butcher's Creek Bridge, Kanieri Lake Road 
Kapitea Greek Bridge, Lamplongh Track 
Widening Milltown Track to Humphrey's Gully 
Pack- track, Seddon's Terrace to Eel Greek 
Kew bridge, Kapitea Creek, Loop-line Road 
Stribbing's Creek Bridge 
Widening Seddon's Terrace Road extension 
Compensation, Larrikin's Road 
Garston to Nevis. . 
Nevis Valley Road 

Okarito River Bridge . . . . 

Drainage, Stafford Township 
Wangapeka Track, Rolling River-Kiwi Creek 
Tracks, Stewart Island 
Widening Lake Mapourika- Waiho Road 
Roads, Great Barrier 
Riversdale-Waikaia 
Prospeoting-track, Lvell-Larry's 
Track to New Find, Victoria Ruige 
Extending road into bush, Addison's 

Clearing rooks and easing curves. Nine- and Ten-mile-Blufls 
Repairs flood-damages. South Westland 
Hungerford's Bridge 
Waitangi Bloff Track 

Track from Cedar Greek Road to Ford and Thompson's claim 
Repairs Mount Greenland Track 
Ross Road, towards Ranges . . 
Repairs pack- track, Cedar Creek 
Kinsella's land, taken for Blackball Road 
Maratoto to mines 



£ 

200 

76 

50 

50 

50 

25 

50 

70 

400 

400 

2,070 

100 

800 

100 

200 

100 

527 

100 

600 

110 

150 

100 

180 

500 

200 

100 

150 

50 

50 

250 

100 

600 

800 

150 

250 

828 

200 

100 

100 

200 

550 

8,565 

279 

800 

4,571 

210 

90 

50 

100 

800 

200 

191 

103 

129 

118 

600 

246 

30 

70 

199 

56 

1,965 

400 

800 

899 

149 

718 

782 

604 

200 

100 

500 

100 

129 

100 

444 

99 

20 

60 

199 

100 

6 

149 



19 8 
16 



2 6 
17 6 



17 6 
8 7 
8 11 






17 





17 



19 10 
7 8 
6 8 
4 2 



6 11 



11 6 

18 9 



12 6 




£ 

200 

75 

60 

50 

50 

26 

50 

70 

400 

400 

2,070 

100 

300 

100 

200 

100 

627 

100 

600 

110 

160 

100 

130 

600 

200 

100 

150 

60 

60 

250 

100 

600 

300 

150 

250 

828 

200 

100 

100 

200 

560 

8,665 

279 

800 

4,671 

210 

90 

60 

100 

300 

200 

191 

103 

129 

118 

600 

246 

30 

70 

199 

56 

1,965 

400 

300 

399 

149 

718 

782 

604 

200 

100 

600 

100 

129 

100 

444 

99 

20 

60 

199 

100 

6 

149 



d. 
















2 



























19 8 
15 



17 6 
8 7 
8 11 






17 





17 



19 10 
7 8 
6 8 
4 2 



6 11 



11 6 

18 9 



12 6 




11 
6 



Digitized by 



Google 



166 



C.^^. 



List of Wobkb on Gtoldfiblds, &ci — co^Uvnued. 



Locality and Nalare of Work*. 



Total Cost. 



Amoonl of 
ContribatioD 
l^d by Hinet 
I>epanment. 



Jones's Creek 



Bluff to Barrylown 



WOBKS WHOLLY COHSTBUCTBD BT MlNCS DrPARTMSKT— COtUmii^. 

Hatter's Terrace-Haupiri 

Upper Waiotahi Road 

Inland from Omaha 

Gannon *8 to Painkiller 

Ketberton Road . . 

Repairs, Tapa Creek Boad . . 

Repairs, Karaka Creek Road. . 

Qravelling road through Mr. Adams's property 

Oravelling Onamalutu Track 

Boad to Fenian Creek. Karameft 

Westport and Mokihinui B^wfty-line to . 

Footbridge, No Town Creek . . 

Wood's Creek Bridge 

Maori Creek Bridge 

Main South Boad to Mikonni Beaoh 

River-proteotion works, Te Aroha 

Drains, Maratoto 

Repairs, Mata Bridge 

Roads, Tauransa County 

Re-metalling Wakamarina Boad 

Pakawau Bush Boad 

Scott's Creek Bridge 

Riohmond-CoUingwood 

Deadman's Creek-Christmas Teiraoe 

Denniston-Cascade Creek . . 

Big Totara Biver Bridge 

Little Torara Biver Bridge . . 

Twins Boad 

Track up Four-mile and Nile Bikers 

ColTerts, DeTil's Creek 

M ooni igh t-Paparoa 

Footbridges, Cobden-Seven-mile Boad 

Grey River-Moonlight 

Bridge, Brandj Jack's Creek 

Track up Ten- mile Creek 

Road, Cobden to Warren's and Ten- mile 

Cape Terrace Boad continuation 

Lake Brunner Boad to Maori Creak 

Hampden to Horse Terrace . . 

Track to Adamstown 

Brannerton-Paparoa 

Waiknpakupa Ocan Beach to Main Boad 

Totara Biver to Farmer's Creek 

Doughboj Boad . . 

Widening and repairing Lamploogh Track 

Extension, Qillam's Quilj Track 

Adair's Track, Mahinapua Boad 

Hahinapua and South Terrace Track 

Veronica Creek Track 

Waipori-Berwick Boad 

Bozburgh- Clyde .. 

Orepoki-Block I., Longwood. . 

Tableland horse-track 

Landing Creek Bridge 

Walker's Creek Bridge 

Greenstone-Teremalubu 

Bell Hill Boad . . 

Bridge OTei Kanieri Biver 

Main South Boad to Mikonui Beach 

Deviation, Larrikin's Boad . . 

Pine-tree Boad 

Wire Bridge, German Gully Track 

Road formation, Waitekauri to Croris R • 

Bridge, Mariposa Batteir Boad 

Cro^bie Settlement Road 

Waitaia Battery-site to Low Level 

Repairs, Tauranga-Te Puke . . 

Rockville-Slate Biver 

Aorere Main Road, gravelling 

Femtown footbridges and gravelling 

Swamp Boad, Ftmtown 

Clearing slips, Seventeen-mi.e BlofI 

Clearing slipx, Nelson-Grey-Ross Boad 

Bridges over Raleigh Creek (3) 

Hampden Cemetery to Schoo'.honse, Murchi<;oii 

Squaretown Bridge over Little Grey River 

Berwick- Waipori, repairs 

Beaumont-Miller's Flat 

Track to Police-station, Seddonville 

Improving track. Sealer's Creek 

Kirtpaka to Coai-roine4 

Waiorongomai Road 

Tiki-Opitontii 

Taumacawahine Bridge 

Cemetery Read, Kuaotana . . 

Tiki- Mata wai 

Puziri-Xairua 

23— C. 3. 



£ 


8. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


200 








200 








492 


10 


i 


492 10 





400 








400 








196 10 


6 


196 10 


6 


28 14 


6 : 


28 


14 


6 


66 





1 


66 








40 





ol 


40 








ICO 





■ 


100 








100 








100 








250 





• 


250 








100 





, 


100 








50 





! 


50 








80 





0' 


80 








50 





' 


50 








16 


15 





15 


15 





200 








200 








100 





■ 


100 








800 








300 





6 


1,226 17 


5 


1.226 17 





500 





0, 


500 








425 





o' 


425 








170 








170 








250 








2^50 








250 








250 








100 








100 








450 








450 








350 








850 








100 








100 








2^30 








250 








100 








100 








100 








100 








342 


10 





342 


10 





5U0 








500 








150 








150 








100 








100 








500 








500 








150 








150 








150 


u 





150 








3,450 


18 


6 


3.450 18 





375 


4 





375 


4 


6 


50 








50 








ICO 


8 





100 


8 





VJA 


13 





194 


13 





MjO 








-300 








145 


15 





145 


15 





100 








100 








150 








150 








250 








250 








200 








200 








1/J76 16 


9 


1,976 


18 





oOO 








.V) 





9 


oOO 








5'J«J 








199 


9 


3 


1*^9 


9 





2>>9 


]tj 


6 


2S9 


16 


3 


214 


12 


2 


214 


12 


6 


•240 





3 


240 





2 


VrJ 


y 


4 


VX) 


9 


3 


\iA 


5 





94 


5 


4 


M 


15 





M 


15 





1.375 


4 


2 


l.:^75 


4 





45 


10 


7 


45 


n» 


2 


89 


VJ 


6 


-*v 


iy 


1 


271 


11 


11 


271 


:i 


11 


24 








•24 





o 


50 








>» 





(1 


'/} 








5.' 


o 


n 


25 


2 


6 


•J-'» 


2 


t, 


•»1 


ft 





5! 





II 


Oj 


U 





f'/> 


M 


fi 


4& 








\^ 





n 


30 


ij 





m 








i.>. 








:->» 


o 


o 


115 








i lo 


(1 


n 


■^■lA 


lo 





•'-•4 


:o 


It 


Mb 


I 


h 


:Wj 


1 


• 


. . 75 


n 


u 


75 





o 


75 








75 


o 


1) 


•2.V. 


1 


|p 


•jj>) 


u 


n 


37 


;•( 


2 


37 


I J 


•J. 


4 


12 


% 


49 


12 


H 


. . " ^) 





u 


-J 


t 


u 


Va) 





i) 


1"'» 








■ZTjO 





(J 


2%« 





i p 


3*>7 





1^» 


'^'-"J 





o 


TOO 








: 








45 








45 





II 


1.135 


14 


c 


1.135 


14 


6 



Digitized by 



Google 



C— 3» 



156 



List of Wobxs od Goldfiblds, See, — continued. 



LoMhUty Mid Matnra of Works. 



Total Cost. 



Amount of 

Contribation 

paid by Mines 

Department. 



Bead, ap 



Kirwao*8 Oreek 



45, Waikaka 



W0BK8 WHOLLY OOHSTBUOTXD BT MmS DBPABnfXHT^eoiUtfMMd. 

Beaoh Road, Tbamet 

Pora Greek Road . . 

Taram Greek Bridge 

Toma-Netherton . . 

Te Aroba Bridge . . 

Bartlefct's Greek Road 

Mount Patriarch Boad 

Takaka River Footbxidgt 

Karamea Track . . 

Batnbam-Upper Aonze 

ShaggerjRoad 

Seddonville-Mokihinnl 

Hokibinui to Reefs, widening 

Mokibinni to Wanganoi, improting 

Lvell-Victoria Range 

Kile Saddle-Maori Greek 

Seddonville-Gardiff 

Painkiller-Murray Greek 

Little Grey River Bridge 

ImproTiog crossings, Waitahn River and ] 

Pagan's Greek, Banytown, to Paparoa 

Kelson Greek Bridge 

Gallaghan*R Greek Bridge 

Moeqoito-Maori Greek 

Deviation, Westbrook-Teremakau 

Bridge, Gobden-Brunner Road 

Moonlight Track, deviation .. 

Totara River to Gonatitntion Hill 

Teremakao-Paroa 

Back Greek Road, deviation . . 

Bine Spur Greek Bridge 

Young Hill Greek Road 

Repairs to road between Sections 17 and * 

Skippers-Bullendale 

Waugapeka-Wanganni 

Okurn River Ford Track 

Gillespie's Bluff Track 

Maori River Boad 

Glifden Bridge, Waiau 

Wbangamata Harbour to Wentworth 

WaioroDgoroai-Gordon 

Baling grade Kahika Hill . . 

BartlettTs Greek-Gat Point . . 

Bridges, Dead Horse and Walker's Greeks 

Black Greek Bridge 

Wharton's Dam to Deep Greek 

Piano Flat Gompanv's Track 

Waikaia-Whitecomb (repairs) 

Mangles Bridge . . 

Karangama Bridge 

Repairs Donnelly's Greek Bridge 

Waiaa Bridge to Old Mill-site 

Donnelly's Bridge 

Sullivan's Greek Bridge 

Rings Road Bridge 

Railway-stations Roads 

MaUtoke Oatfalldrain 

Komata Reefs-Paeroa 

Grace Darling Road 

Komata Greek Road 

Waitekauri Greek Bridge 

p^pamoa-Te Poke 

Tauranga-Te Puke 

Slate River Road . . 

Motupipi Bridge . . 

Tracks, Wakamarina and Mahakipawa 

Promised Land-Ohinemnri Greek 

Fairdown to Beach 

Paparoa River Track 

Gapleston-Larry's 

Blaokball-Paparoa 

Goal Greek Bridge 

Totara Flat Road 

Dowling Greek Bridge 

Granite Greek Bridge 

Blackball Road (improvements) 

Sunny Bight Track (widening) 

Giillcry Track and Wire Bridlgs 

Mikonui River i^proaobes . . 

McKay's Greek Bridge 

Haafct-Blue River Road • • 

Arawata Track 

TurnbuU and Oknm Rivers Track 

Waitabuna-Bruce Gounty boundary 

Olyde-Ophir . . • • 

NokoroatBoad .. •• 

Sklpper's-Gallant Tip 

Beaie's Hill Road deviation •• 



£ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


8. 


d. 


100 








100 








400 








400 








100 








100 








aoo 








200 








250 








250 








449 


4 


7 


449 


4 


7 


200 








200 








260 








260 








250 








250 








200 








200 








100 








100 








920 








920 








500 








600 








600 








600 








450 








460 








150 








160 








100 








100 








844 


7 


6 


844 


7 


6 


400 








400 








450 








460 








425 








425 








950 








950 








250 








260 








100 








100 








450 








450 








125 


10 





125 


10 





140 








140 








123 


1 





123 


1 





250 








250 








200 








200 








29 


8 





29 


8 





160 








150 








100 








100 








200 


u 





200 








2,324 


17 


2 


2,324 


17 


2 


842 


16 


8 


342 18 


8 


161 


14 


1 


151 


14 


1 


149 


19 


6 


149 19 


6 


1.115 


3 





1.115 


3 





100 








100 








150 








150 








75 








76 








200 








200 








25 








26 








75 








76 








25 








26 








50 








50 








50 








60 








4.323 


4 


8 


4,323 


4 


8 


448 13 


6 


448 13 


6 


440 


1 


3 


440 


1 


3 


150 








150 








13C 


10 





186 10 





164 








164 








325 








325 








500 








500 








100 








100 








500 








500 








392 








392 








150 








150 








160 








160 








275 








276 








400 








400 








100 








100 








100 








100 








46 


16 


6 


46 16 


6 


400 








400 








100 








100 








100 








100 








415 








416 








1.686 10 





1.686 10 





538 








538 








100 








100 








175 








175 








100 








100 








100 








100 








200 








200 








400 








400 








100 








100 








270 12 





270 12 





100 








100 








100 








100 








100 








100 








300 








300 








200 








200 








250 








250 








100 








100 








100 








100 









Digitized by 



Google 



157 



|C.— 8. 





List of Wobks on Ooldhblds. dso.— ooftimtted. 








Amoant of 


LooaUty and Nature of Works. 


Total Cost. 


Contribation 
paid bv Miues 
Department. 


WoBKS WHOLLY G0H8TBU0TBD BY M1NB8 DK^ABfTMEwr— Continued 


£ s. d 


£ 8. d. 


Oox»-Waikakft 












400 


400 


Riversdale-Waikaia 












200 


200 


Gharlton Boad 












200 


200 


Orepoki-Shale^works 












200 


200 


Havelook-Mahakipawa 












191 5 1 


191 5 1 


Dee Creek Bridge . . 












588 8 10 


538 8 10 


0ook*8 Biver Flat (widening). 
Oatway-Blofi Traok 












896 18 6 


896 18 6 












147 15 10 


147 15 10 


Kokotalii Road . . 












451 2 5 


451 2 5 


Donoghae*8 deyiaiion 












229 18 6 


229 18 6 


Mason's Bay Track 












150 9 6 


150 9 6 


Oranity Greek Bridge 












481 12 


481 12 


Moanfc Heroulee deviation (Great South Road) 










1,119 4 6 


1,119 4 6 


Waitaia Mine to battery 










100 


100 


Oomtown Landing to poet-offioe 










50 


50 


RepairP, traok, Thames Boad to McLaughlin's 










50 


50 


Maratoto Hoad . . 










199 18 10 


199 18 10 


Thames Biver-Whangamata 
CollensTiile-Waikakaho 










200 


200 










55 


55 


Road to Qolden Bar Mine 










88 8 6 


83 8 6 


Taamarioa^Kaituna 










184 


184 


Neadorf-Ngatimoti 










100 


100 


Graham River Bridge 










150 


150 


Takaka Bridge protective works 
Takeka Hill Road 










150 
150 


150 
150 


Oobden-Barrytown (repairs) . . 
Brown's Terraoe-Kotuka 










1,572 


1.572 










100 


100 


Blaokball footbridge approaches 










250 


250 


Twelve-mile Bluff-Fourteen-mile Bluff . . 










100 


100 


Oobden-Point Elizabeth 










100 


100 


Nelson Greek-Bell Hill 










250 


250 


Big River-Slatey Creek 










100 


100 


Big River-St. George 










249 14 


249 14 


Kanieri River Bridge 










30 15 


80 15 


Arrow-Matatapu 










100 


100 


Bridles Point-Deepwater 










100 


100 


Blind Bay-Whangaparapara 










844 1 5 


844 1 5 


Karaka Greek Road 










100 


100 


Lower Tairoa-Broken Hill .. 










150 


150 


Waitekauri-Wharekiraupnnga 










98 8 6 


98 8 6 


Mill Road 










200 


200 


Waitekaorl-Hill Track 










100 


100 


Repairs, Kaituna Bridge 
Lloyd's Valley Road bridges . . 










81 8 6 


81 8 6 










150 


150 


Glenrae-Tadmor .. 










100 


100 


Brooklyn Valley Road 










100 


100 


Oparara River Road, Karamea 










550 


550 


Bradshaw's Lead Road 










200 


200 


Fenian Greek Track 










250 


250 


Karamea River Protective Works 










200 


200 


Goalbrookdale-Gedar Greek .. 










200 


200 


Nile River Bridge, Charleston 










860 


360 


Dea^man's Creek. Brighton .. 










150 


150 


Caroline Terrace Road 










100 


100 


Mnlliky Greek-Karamea 










100 


100 


Murray Greek-Waitahu 










568 16 6 


568 16 6 


Black's Point Road (widening) 










1,051 8 3 


1,051 8 8 


Blackball Footbridge (Bmnner-Moon light Boad ) . 










520 


520 


Barry town-Paparoa 
Eight-mile Creek Bridge 
Granville-Grey River 
Middle Branch-Styx Biver .. 










200 
442 16 10 
150 


200 
442 16 10 
150 










400 


400 


Kumara Beach Road-Teremakan 










976 


976 


Ross Cemetery Road 










200 


200 


Table Hill-Canada Reefs 










100 


100 


BeanmoDt-Ranklebom 










250 


250 


Clyde-Queenstown 

White's Reef-Fraser Basin .. 










1,100 
100 


1,100 
100 


Hawear-Lindis Pass 










150 


150 


Alexandra Bridge . . 










750 


750 


Dairy Creek-Coal.pits 
Waimnma Claims Aoad 










88 
200 


88 
200 


Croydon dredging claims 
Glenary Bridge .. 
Boss Creek Bridge.. 










200 

400 

84 18 11 


200 

400 

84 18 11 


Wangapeka-Kiwi .. 

Larry's Greek Bridge (extension) 










881 
627 11 1 


881 
627 11 1 


Belgrove-Westport-Reefton .. 
Glenroy Bridge 
Warwick-Maruia Bridge 
Stafiord-Awatuna . . 










9,898 6 11 
916 19 8 


9,898 6 11 
916 19 8 










7 15 6 
2,829 3 11 


7 15 6 
2,829 8 11 


Stewart Island Road to Mines 










219 8 2 


219 8 2 


Eoads, Preservation Inlet 
Tracks, Cromarty . . 
Roads, Stewart Island 










442 16 8 
216 6 8 
118 15 1 


442 16 8 
216 6 1 
118 15 7 


Lake Hoohstetter Track 










178 19 7 


178 19 8 


Ahaara-Haupiri .. 
Ahaura-Orwell Greek 










1,247 18 4 
668 9 8 


1,247 18 4 
668 9 1 


Deadman's Creek Bridge 


. 










147 7 4 


147 7 1 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



c— s: 



168 



3'Li8T OF VVoRKH ON ' GoLDPiELDS, &c. — contiiuud. 



LooaUty and Nature of Works. 



Total Cost. 



AmoQDt of 
ContribatioD 
paid by Mines 
Department. 



Works wholly constructed by Mikbs Department -cohiinuett. 
Saltwater Creek Bridge 
Meroary Bay, Hospital Boad. 
Coromandel-Mcrcury Bay 
Omaha-Wbangamata Track to Klondike Mine 
Rocky Point Road 
Waitekanri Hill Track 
Golden Cross Road (repairs) 
Protective works, Main Road, Karangaba 
KaraDgaheke-Rotokohu 
Aorere River Bridge (repairs). . 
Burning coal-seam, Boatman's 
Paroa-Teremakau 
Doolan's Coal- pit Road 
Ahaura Bridge 
Orwell Cref k Bxldge 
Dredging Titri Canal 
Wbakapara-Puhipubi 
Macaror.ic Mine Koad 
Owera Bridge 

Driving Creek Bchool Bridge . . 
Matatoki Road 

Wbarepoa Settlement Road .. 
Crocibie Settlement Road 
Peel's Creek Road 
Karangahake Track extension 
Waibi-Tauranga . . 
Mangakara Crtek Bridge 
Karangabake-Mangakara 
Protecting Bridge, Waitapu . . 
Milnthorpe Read . . 
Paka wan-Pu pon ga 
Cbandler'fl-Wai gapeka Junction 
Cbandler's-RoUing River 
Tableland Track . . 
Lyell-Eigbt-mlle (widening) . . 
Canaan Road 
Addison's Road 
Virgin Flat Road . . 
Blackwater Track . . 
Welshman's Terrace Track . . 
Fairdown-Waimangaroa 
CoeJ Creek EztenFion 
"^arwiok-Maruia Bridge 
Pairdown Station -Waimangaroa (widerung) 
Jost-in-Time Track 
Road to Matakitaki River Bridge 
Glenroy River Road 
Waipuna Road 
Cape Terrace Road 
Hatter's Terrace>Bell Hill . . 
NeUon Creek Bridge, Grey-Marsden Road 
Nelson Creek Bridge-Hatter's Terrace 
Maori Creek Bridge 
Eigbt-mile Creek Bridge Approacbes 
Moonligbt Road 
Ebkatabi Road 
Dougbboy Road 
Humpbrey's-One Mile 
Milltown Track Deviation 
Lamplongb Track.. 
Blue Spur Road Bridge 
Tucker Flat Road . . 
Tbree-mile Blufit-Okarito 
Metalling A^ at una Road 
Jobnston's Creek Road Extension 
Waimumu Road . . 
Stoney Ford Bridge-Nokomai 
Waikaia Goldfield Road 
Waikaia-Wb i tecomb 
Parrawa-Nokomai Bridge 
Stewart Island Road to Mines 
Earamea Bridge (rebuilding) 
Westport-Wairuangarca 
Waipuna Bridge . . 
Boatman's Creek Bridge 
Sawyer's Creek Bridge 
Potts' Creek Bridge 
Opitonui Footbridge 
Gum town Road 
Paeroar-Waibi 
Komata Drain 
Thompson's Track 
Waibi-Katikati 
Caledonian Terrace Track 
Boatman's Valley Road Bridge 
Repairs Kaituna Bridge 
Approacbes Moonlight Bridge 
Repairs Upper Callary Track 
Lower Ford Track, Wataroa . . 



£ s. 


d. 


£ 8. 


d. 


105 14 


4 


106 14 


4 


50 





60 





165 





166 





100 





100 





60 





60 





5 





6 





34 14 


6 


84 14 


6 


94 18 


8 


94 18 


8 


807 10 





307 10 





100 





100 





69 10 





69 10 





200 





200 





300 





800 





3.814 14 


8 


8,814 14 


3 


185 12 


2 


185 19 


2 


12 





12 





685 





583 





300 





200 





860 





360 





200 





200 





467 10 





467 10 





1,059 1 


5 


1,059 1 


5 


100 





100 





100 





100 





105 





105 





197 3 


4 


197 8 


4 


150 





150 





182 7 10 


182 7 10 


200 





200 





200 





200 





100 





100 





200 





200 





200 





200 





40 





40 





760 





750 





250 18 


8 


2,50 18 


8 


100 





100 





100 





100 





200 





200 





200 





200 





850 





360 





200 





200 





198 2 10 


198 2 


10 


300 





300 





800 





300 





200 





200 





300 





300 





925 





925 





400 





400 





600 





600 





100 





100 





200 





200 





100 





100 





130 





130 





250 





250 





255 





255 





210 2 


9 


210 2 


9 


238 8 


6 


288 8 


6 


842 15 





842 15 





257 





257 





50 





60 





88 15 


9 


88 15 


9 


150 





150 





100 





100 





460 





450 





800 





800 





800 





300 





160 





150 





100 





100 





250 





260 





311 7 


6 


311 7 


6 


4,044 6 


4 


4,044 6 


4 


1.045 


1 


1,045 


1 


260 12 10 


260 12 


10 


8 19 





8 19 





246 17 


8 


246 17 


8 


330 


9 


830 


9 


90 





90 





824 





824 





570 





570 





100 





100 





4,723 19 11 


4,723 19 11 


2,199 16 





2.199 16 





100 





100 





485 





435 





68 16 


6 


68 16 


6 


35 





36 





50 





50 





50 





50 






Digitized by 



Google 



1$$ 



C.-t9. 



List of Wobrs on Gk>LDFiBLD«, &e.-~o<mttnu$d. 



Looftlity and N»tiur« of Works. 



WOBR8 WHOLLY OOVtTRUCTBD BT MlNVS DSPABTMBKT— COndnMti. 

Humphrey's Road 

Gillam'B Gaily Track 

Back Creek Road and Bridge 

Milltown Boad 

Tucker Flat Boad . . 

Clarendon-Berwiok 

Bepairs Great Soath Boad 

Campion's Road .. 

Game Bam Road 

Hataara River Brldffe repairs 

Edge's Coal-pit Boad 

Barke't Creek Bridge 

Big Ohika Creek Bridge 

Prospeoting-traoks, Rlmu 

Tokatea-Keonedy Bay 

Waiwawa River Bridge 

McColl's Creek Bridge 

Driving Creek-Tokatea 

Opitonui-Meroury Bay 

Bridge and approaches, Waitaia Mine Boad 

Swamp Creek Bridge 

Whangamata-Wentworth 

Upper Tairua Bridge 

Kaaeranga Suspension-bridge 

Komata Reefs- Waltekaori . . 

Hikataia-Walt«kaari 

Grace Darling Road 

Tal Mine Traok . . 

Karangabake Moon tain- traok 

Dividing Range Traok 

Karangahake Hill Track 

Waitekaari Hill Track 

Te Aroha-Karangahake-Waltawbeta 

^avelock-Taamarina 

Cnllensville Road and track . . 

Bonny Doon Road 

Kaitana-Femtown 

Taitapa boundary Traok 

Bainbam Bridge . . 

Slate River road . . 

Tborpe-Churohill .. 

Shaggery Road 

Kbtueka Valley-Baton 

Stanley Brook Bridge 

Lyell Bridge-Ryan's 

Costello's Hill Road 

Addison's Boad-Buller Road . . 

Mokibinni end of Westport Road 

Fairdown to Beach 

Charleston-Brighton 

Waimangaroa-Birchfield 

LTelUDenniston Hill 

Mountain Creek-Addison's 

Cascade Creek Road 

Bight Mile-Mokihinui 

Cedar Creek-Denniston 

Blaokwater-Big River 

Kotnku-Bell Hill . . 

Teremakau Bridge-Payne's . . 

WaSpona-Mosquito 

Nelson Creek-Bell Hill 

Paroa-Teremakaa . . 

Brown's Creek Bridge-Old Blarsden Hoad 

Saltwater Creek Bridge 

Adair's Track (widening) 

Browning's Pass Traok 

Ogllvie's jBeach Track 

Kanieri Forks Boad 

Duffer's Road (widening) 

Kanieri Lake Road 

Dillman's Road-Nos. 4 and 5 Channels 

Larrikin's Road 

Saltwater Traok .. 

Whitoomb Valley Road 

Waitahnna-Lawrence 

Beanmont-MiUer's Flat 

Waitahuna-Ronnd Hill 

Nevis Valley Boad 

Cromwell Borough-Lowbum 

Clyde-Cromwell (repairs) 

Cromwell-Nevis . . 

Crown Terraoe-Cardrona 

Arthur's Point-Moke Creek .. 

Arrow Falls Road 

Sawyer's Gaily Road 

Road to dredging claims, Waimumn 

Garston-Nevis (Southland County) 

Nokomai Saddle Road 



Total Goet. 



Amomit of 
Contribution 
paid by Mines 
Department. 



£ 


s. 


d. 


A 


8. 


d. 


18 16 


6 


18 16 


6 


799 19 


7 


799 15 


7 


99 18 


1 


99 18 


1 


68 15 


6 


58 16 


6 


11 


4 


8 


11 


4 


8 


400 








400 








100 








100 








150 








150 








100 








100 








50 








50 








150 








150 








245 


8 





245 


8 





386 


7 


4 


886 


7 


4 


76 








75 








1.085 








1.085 








500 








500 








100 








100 








200 








200 








200 








200 








100 








100 








100 








100 








440 








440 








250 








260 








260 18 


4 


250 18 


4 


406 








405 








1.095 








1,095 








47 


8 


9 


47 


8 


9 


599 14 





599 14 





186 








186 








225 








225 








210 








210 








100 








100 








199 14 





199 14 





679 








679 








50 








60 








1.785 17 


7 


1,785 17 


7 


800 








800 








200 








200 








578 10 





578 10 





200 








200 








800 








800 








200 








200 








200 








200 








800 








800 








1. 100 








1,100 








1,050 








1,050 








1,250 








1,250 








1.050 








1,060 








200 








200 








400 








400 








600 








600 








800 








800 








100 








100 








450 








460 








200 








200 








200 








200 








600 








600 








500 








500 








200 








200 








150 








160 








600 








500 








1,141 








1,141 








250 








250 








250 








260 








480 








480 








485 


1 





486 


1 





1,122 


9 


8 


1,122 


9 


8 


450 








450 








800 








800 








480 








480 








210 


6 





210 


6 





296 


1 


7 


296 


1 


7 


188 


9 10 


188 


9 10 


174 


18 





174 18 





500 








600 








200 








200 








200 








200 








600 








. 600 








200 








200 








500 








500 








250 








250 








449 17 





449 17 





260 








260 








800 








800 








100 








100 








200 








200 








800 








800 








200 








200 









Digitized by 



Google 



0.-8. 



160 



List of Woass ov GoldfisiiDS mtc-^contmued. 



X^ooftUtj Mid NaUm of Worlw. 



TolalCofI 



Amoant of 
Contriboliuii 
paid bj Mines 
Department. 



WoaSS WHOLLY OOVtTBUOXBD BT HXVBS 

Wftik&ka VftUey Main Bo^d (rop«in) 

Central Obarlton Bo«d 

Waikftka to Ooal-pil 

Pieton-Qrove 

Hokiiika-Jaok«on*i 

Solberg'sHUl 

U^ohn'sHUl 

MooDlight Oreek Bridge 

Okarito Forkt-Waiho 

Mahakirau Goldfleld Boad 

Tiki-te Kouma 

Edwards Bridge . . 

Bridle's Point-Deepwater 

WaUroa Bluff Traok 

Ooromand el-Wbangapooa 

Kikowhakarere-Oabbage Baj 

Opitonui Bridge . . 

Ontska Oreek Bridge 

Driving Greek School Bridge, Tokalea Boad 

Kennedy Bay-Matamataharakake 

Karaka Greek encroachment.. 

Dredging Waiwawa River 

Manaia Goldfield Road 

Golyille II., Moehau n., and Harataanga I. Blocks 

Harataunga I. and II. Blocks 

Ooromandel-Gabbage Bay . . 

Tapa Oreek and extension 

Waiotabi Boad 

East side of Range Track 

Tapu and Mercury Bay Traok 

Orosbie Settlement Road 

Tairua-Broken Hills 

Goldfields Roads (metalling) . . 

Waiotahi Aqueduct (repairs) . . 

Waiomo Oreek Road 

Paeroa-Te Aroha . . 

Netherton Roads . . 

Maokaytown-Rahu 

Paeroa-Te Aroha Bridge 

Thorpe-Neudorf . . 

Bainbam-Upper Aorere 

Aorere Bridge (repairs) 

West Wanganui Inlet Bridge. . 

Long Plain Road extension . . 

Takaka Hill Road.. 

North Beach-Karamea 

Lyell-Victoria Range 

Promised Land-Ohinemuri . . 

Land of Promise Road 

Olass-eya Oreek Traok 

Lyell-Oedar Oreek 

Oranity Oreek-Ngakawau 

Seddonville-Mokibinui Mine.. 

Ooal Oreek extension 

Burnett's Face-Ooalbrookdale 

Waimangaroa-Granity 

Seatonville-Mokihinui Mine . . 

Nile Oreek Bridge 

Millerton Township streets . . 

Mokihinui-Inangabua Junction 

Murray Oreek Road 

Blackadder's Ooal-mine Road 

Orushington Road 

Blaekball-Healey's Oully . . 

Maori Creek-Maori Gully . . 

Orey-DuDganville Road bridges 

Upper Moonlight Boad 

Hobonu River Bridge-Cape Terrace 

Repairs (flood damages), Grey County roads 

Brunner-Blackball 

Repairs (flood damaffes), Brunner Borough 

Maneges Vallev Boad 

Inglewood-Painkiller 

Great South Boad (repairs) . . 

Browning's Pass Track (widening) 

Larrikins-Loop Line 

Big Dam Track (repairs) 

Fox's Boad 

Boaring Meg Bridge 

Navis River Bridge 

ArrowtowD-Maoetown 

Shotover Biver Traok 

Orepuki-Shale Works 

Waikaka Valley Boad (repairs) 

Oontingenoies 

Compensation to workmen for aooldents 



DBPABTittyr— ^owistufirf. 



B s. 


d. 


£ .. 


d. 


200 





200 





100 





100 





150 





150 





8,278 16 


8 


3,278 16 


8 


2,891 11 


4 


2.891 11 


4 


49 18 


4 


49 18 


4 


174 9 


8 


174 9 


8 


800 15 


7 


800 15 


7 


1,960 18 


8 


1,960 13 


8 


420 





420 





440 





440 





40 





40 





280 





280 





594 4 


8 


594 4 


8 


1.703 





1,703 





1,800 





1.300 





400 





400 





510 





510 





400 





400 





100 





100 





100 





100 





255 17 


6 


255 17 


6 


100 





100 





100 





100 





100 





100 





884 





884 





1,756 1 


11 


1,756 1 


U 


887 16 


5 


887 16 


5 


100 





100 





250 9 





250 9 





200 





200 





298 10 





298 10 





100 





100 





100 





100 





700 





700 





943 11 


2 


948 11 


2 


1,066 10 


6 


1,066 10 


6 


200 





200 





500 





500 





200 





200 





200 





200 





250 





250 





879 





379 





150 





150 





150 





150 





150 





150 





150 





150 





300 





800 





700 





700 





200 





200 





560 





650 





250 





250 





450 





450 





100 





100 





300 





300 





300 





300 





800 





800 





100 





100 





150 





150 





150 





150 





899 10 


7 


399 10 


7 


100 





100 





100 





100 





1,250 





1,250 





250 





250 





400 





400 





150 





150 





200 





200 





250 





250 





785 4 


7 


735 4 


7 


150 





150 





1,091 9 10 


1,091 9 10 


177 4 


9 


177 4 


9 


800 





300 





100 





100 





199 16 


9 


199 16 


9 


75 





75 





100 





100 





150 





150 





150 





150 





1,700 





1,700 





500 





500 





100 





100 





250 





250 





1,867 7 


7 


1,367 7 


7 


57 12 





67 12 






373,505 16 2 



373,505 16 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



161 



C— 3. 



liooallty and Nattire of Works. 



Total Ooi«. 



Amonnlof 

Contribation 

IMkid by Minai 

Department. 



BOADS TO OPKf UP Ml»B8 OTHBB THAU GOLD. 

Aniseed Valley to Champion Gopper-mine 
Richmond Hill to oopner-mine 
Track, Ohinemari Coal-seam 
Road, Kanieri Coalfield 



Tbacss to ofbk up Mxhbbal LiVDi. 
Olory Harbour to Kopaok 
Port Pegasus Track 

Removing snags and felling timber, Mokan River . . 
Kgakawaa Footbridge 



B 8. d. 

4,968 10 6 

815 16 

267 8 4 

600 



6,146 9 10 



50 

155 7 6 

40 

80 7 



825 8 1 



Thames Borough 



Haniototo Plains 



RaPAXBnro FLooD-OAMAaat. 



▲BXBlZAK-WaLL BOBIVO. 



I 500 



800 



Pbospbotuio Dxbp Lbtxls. 

Thames-HaurakiGoldfields(Limtted), Qu«en of Be»uty shaft ..50,600 

Thames-Hauraki Ooldflelds (Limited), Queen of Beauty shaft, Inspeolor's fee 500 

Purchase of plant, machinery, and properties of Thames-Hauraki Ooldflelds (Limited) 6,099 18 I 

Maintenance of plant, machinery, of Thames-Hauraki Goldflelda (Limited) 178 5 7 



57,278 8 8 



RasuMPTXON OP Lahd pob Miifzsra. 
Resumption of J. Holmes's land at Kumara for a tailings*8ite 
Resumption of 0*Neil and McCormaok's land at Back Greek. . 
Purchase Oassrell and Bennett's leaseholds, Paeroa Township 



£ s. d. 
4,116 10 6 
209 4 
188 11 . 8 
800 



4,759 6 2 



50 

155 7 6 

40 

80 7 



825 8 1 



500 



800 



25,000 

500 

6,099 18 1 

178 5 7 



81,778 8 8 



300 300 C 

562 7 I 562 7 

2,250 j 2,250 



8,112 7 



8,112 7 



Summary of Works. 



Roads (subsidised)— 

Bay of Islands County 
Coromandel County 
Te Aroha Town Board 
Thames County 
Thames Borough 
Ohinemuri County 
Waitoa Bead Board 
Piako County 
Katikati Road Board 
Hutt County 
Marlborough County 
Waimea County 
CoUingwood County 
Buller County 
Inangahua County 
Grey County 
Westland County 
Tateri County 
Lake County 
Tuapeka County 
Cromwell Borough 
Wallace County 
Vincent County 
Maniototo County 
Fiord County 
Waitaki Coimty 
Southland Coimty 



Diamond and other drills 

Wharves 

Aids to prospecting 

Water-races 

Drainage and tailings channels 

Aid towards treatment of ores 

Roads wholly constructed by Mines Department 

Roads to open up mines other than gold 

Tracks to open up mineral lands 

Repairing flood-damages 

Artesian-well boring, Maniototo Plains . . 

Resumption of land for mining 

Aid towards construction of telephone-lines 

Prospecting deep levels 

Water-conservation on goldfields 



£ 8. 

2,092 

19,286 8 

884 

14,054 15 

3,886 19 

10,267 17 

200 

22,598 2 

607 19 

959 16 

1,715 4 

1,459 8 

8.681 1 

11,688 1 

17,662 14 

21,092 4 

11,008 16 

499 16 
7,145 6 

16,195 7 

500 
1,809 6 
1,582 

518 10 

800 

1,841 12 

2,455 




729 

2,144 

6,600 

10,680 

12,810 

6,724 

838 
4,926 
9,068 

260 



8. d. 

15 10 

6 11 

15 
8 5 


6 10 

18 9 

17 

18 8 
14 4 

19 10 

16 8 

17 10 

1 8 
6 10 
8 4 




Digitized by 



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C— 3. 



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163 



C— 3. 



WABDEN'S COURT TABLES. 



No. 1. 

Statbhbnt showing the Rbvbnue of the Goldfiblbs oolleoted in the several Districts of the 



CoiK)NY of New Zealand, for the Period from Ist 


January 


to 3l8t December, ! 


L904. 






Business 
Lioenses, 

Residenoe 
Sites. 


WatMT- 


Oold-niining 






Fees and 








Diftriot. 


Miners' 
Rights. 


races, 
Slaioes, 


and 
Royalties. 


BecdBtra- 

tiOD. 


Pines. 

Wardens' 

Coturts. 


Misoellaneoas 


Totals. 


Auckland. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


Goromandel 


^00 








436 19 6 






.. 


48 6 


3 


580 5 9 


Te Aroha 


40 5 


526"7 11 


6 10 





65 16 6 


8 12 





1 18 


82 1 


6 


681 5 11 


Ohioemuri 


74 16 


188 10 1 


, , 


1 516 18 11 


22 8 





45 11 


850 2 


8 


1,698 8 


Thames 


204 5 


110 10 2 


1 10 





1,081 3 6 


26 5 





80 2 4 


204 14 


6 


1,608 10 6 


Whangarei 


2 


15 


, , 




41 5 






8 


10 


9 


54 8 9 


Tanranga 


2 5 


, , 


2 





9 14 10 


*4 





, , 


1 19 11 


14 5 9 


Waihi .. 


214 5 


889 8 


•• 




1,250 9 8 


47 1 


6 


65 1 6 


1,030 8 


5 


2,996 6 4 


Totals 


687 15 


1215 8 5 


8 2 





3,852 2 11 


104 10 


6 


142 15 10 


2,172 14 





7,583 8 8 


Nkt^rok. 
























Motueka 


10 


, , 


, , 




12 








, , 




12 10 


CoUingwood 


14 15 




1 





309 10 11 


3 12 





11 19 


21 7 





862 8 11 


Westport 
Charleston 


88 


516 


5 15 





397 18 2 


15 3 





55 15 


1,718 17 


4 


2,282 4 6 


29 15 


, , 


1 5 





72 5 1 


1 8 





6 18 


8 17 





115 8 1 


Ahauia . . 


52 10 


3 


6 5 


12,016 9 1 


21 3 





38 6 


88 19 


6 


2,176 14 7 


Reefton.. 


58 15 


86 8 10 


, , 


|1,642 18 11 






42 19 6 


139 7 


8 


1,920 9 11 


Wangapeka 


8 15 






: 102 5 








5 





106 5 


Lyell and Mm- 


19 10 


0**2 


, , 


' 492 17 1 


2 





23 19 


124 2 


10 


660 12 11 


chison 






















Takaka 


5 5 


•• 


5 





22 14 10 


1 





2 7 


•• 




80 12 10 


Totals 


272 16 


45 6 10 


14 10 





5,068 19 1 


41 9 





182 5 6 


2,041 16 


4 


7,667 1 9 


Mablbobouoh. 
























Ha^elook 


15 


1 10 


15 





40 18 9 


16 





1 12 


18 


6 


61 5 3 


Blenheim 


4 


16 8 






228 11 1 


17 





1 18 


1 15 





288 7 9 


Totals 


19 


2 16 8 


15 





264 4 10 


1 18 





8 10 


2 18 


6 


294 13 


WXSTLAND. 
























Hokitika and Ka- 


60 


•• 


•• 


1 288 7 2 


•• 




5 


14 4 





867 11 2 


men 
Greymonth 


106 5 


15 


2 





1,158 19 1 






64 5 6 


2,281 11 


9 


8,618 16 4 


Ross .. 


18 5 


, , 


2 5 





822 11 11 


8 *i 





4 18 


12 


9 


868 1 8 


Stafford.. 


22 


. , 


4 15 





258 17 2 


2 





81 9 6 


, , 




812 8 8 


Okarito.. 


10 16 




, , 




41 8 6 


8 15 







14 11 


5 


70 9 11 


Kmnara 


55 


•• 


•• 




426 18 8 


10 17 





26 *8 


•• 




518 18 8 


Totals .. 


272 5 


15 


9 





2,492 2 6 


22 15 





181 16 


2,822 7 11 


5,251 1 6 


Gaiitbbbubt. 
























Ashbnrton 


•• 


•• 






•• 


•• 




•• 


•• 




•• 


Otaoo and 
























SOUTUIAND. 
























Mtddlemarch 


1 10 


, , 


, , 




6 5 


4 





6 


, , 




8 5 


Tapanni 


1 


, , 


. , 




5 9 


7 





4 


, , 




6 11 9 


Hindon . . 


25 15 


, . 






67 18 9 


6 





I 1 


2 17 





97 12 9 


Naseby .. 


48 10 


50 6 6 


1 7 


6 


481 15 


2 





38 14 


54 7 





670 2 


Black's.. ) 
























Alexandra 
Clyde . . 
Boxborgb 


93 5 


6 4 


16 5 





2,376 2 9 


28 10 





60 18 


25 12 


11 


2,601 17 8 










1 












Cromwell 


61 15 


29 10 


7 15 





1,196 8 8 


13 





21 2 


99 9 


8 


1,428 14 11 


Qneenstown 


29 10 


2 17 


10 





461 8 6 


, , 




25 


1 17 11 


521 8 5 


Arrowtown 


15 15 


1 13 


5 





195 2 9 


1 





13 11 


40 18 





267 5 9 


Lawrence 


54 10 


4 


6 5 





948 2 7 


19 5 





25 4 


10 17 


6 


1,064 8 1 


Orepnki 


, , 


, , 






27 6 2 


4 





9 10 6 


7 15 





48 11 8 


Riverton and 


29 5 


15 10 






163 1 9 


8 4 





6 2 6 


100 10 





822 13 8 


Longwood 






















Pembroke 


6 10 


, , 


10 





15 8 





, , 


, . 




7 8 


Waikaia 


9 15 


8 


3 





256 16 6 


2 14 





11 7 


27 17 


6 


814 10 


Wyndham 


2 10 


, , 


, , 




8 4 6 


4 





12 S 5 1 





11 11 6 


Qore 


8 15 


•• 


10 





289 8 7 


2 7 





8 


4 14 





258 9 7 


Totals 


877 5.0 


109 4 6 


86 7 


6 


6,428 1 10 


74 12 





221 12 


381 17 


6 


7,629 4 


Orandtotals .. 


1,529 


1373 6 5 


68 14 


6 


17605 11 2 


244 19 


6 


681 19 4 ;6,921 9 

i 


3 


28,425 2 



24— c. a. 



Digitized by 



Google 



C— 8. 



10() 



No. 4. 

GoMPABATiVB BsTUBN of the ToTAL AMOUNTS of GoLDFiBLDS Bbvbnub (exclusive of Gk>ld Duty) 
collected in the several Districts during the Years 1904 and 1903 and the Quarters ending 
31st March, 1905 and 1904 respectively, showing the Inorbasb or Dbobbasb in respect of 
each District. 



DUtrict. 




Years 1904 and 1908. 




, Qoartort ending Slst March. 1905. and Slst March 


1 1904. 

1 


19QB. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


190S. 


j 1904. 


Increase. 


Decresso. 


Auckland. 


& 


£ 


£ 


i £ 


£ 


; £ 


£ 


Ooromandel 


530 


459 


71 




131 


119 


; 12 


, . 


Te Aioha 


682 


908 


, , 


226 


249 


158 


91 


. , 


Thames 


1,609 


1,986 


, , 


377 


1 1,046 


462 


1 584 


, , 


Whangarei 


54 


17, 


37 


. , 


1 8 


44 


' . , 


36 


Ohinemuri 


1,698 


1 1.749 


, , 


51 


640 


758 


t 


118 


Tauranga 


14 


30 


, , 


16 


6 


2 


i " 4 


, , 


Waihi 


2,997 


2,299 


698 


•• 


790 


768 


22 


•• 


Nbt4K>v. 










1 
1 








Motueka 


13 


16 


^ ^ 


3 


1 


6 


.. 


5 


Collingwood 


362 


466 


, , 


104 


118 


191 


1 


73 


Westport 
Oharleston 


2.282 


1.236 


1,046 




768 


250 


1 '618 


, , 


115 


59 


56 


' , , 


1 31 


24 


7 


, , 


Abanra 


2.177 


1.889 


288 




650 


503 


47 


, , 


Reefton 


1,920 


2,244 


, , 


824 


732 


584 


148 


, , 


Wangapeka 


106 


100 


6 




1 


50 


.. 


49 


Lyell and Murobison 


661 


648 


13 




285 


1 122 


168 




Takaka 


31 


34 


•• 


' 8 


8 


5 


8 


•• 


Mablbobouoh. 


1 
















Havelook 


61 


62 


, , 


1 


6 


16 


, , 


10 


Blenheim 


288 


311 


•• 


78 


84 


58 


•• 


24 


WESTLAlfn). 


















Hokitika 
Eanieri 


367 


865 


.. 


498 


89 


286 


.. 


197 


Oreymouth 


8,614 


4,429 




1 815 


2,767 


1,308 


1,459 


, , 


Boss 


369 


577 




' 208 


34 


58 


, , 


19 


Stafford and Goldsbozongl 


I 312 


508 


, . 


196 


47 


112 


, , 


66 


Okarito 


70 


140 


, , 


70 


24 


18 


6 


, , 


Komara 


519 


809 


•• 


290 


151 


856 




906 


Camtbbbuby. 


















Ashbarton 


•• 


1 


. •• 


1 


1 


•• 


1 


•• 


Otaoo akd Southland. 


















Hindon 


98 


104 


, , 


6 


40 


48 


, , 


3 


Naseby 


670 


732 


, , 


62 


241 


151 


90 


, , 


Alexandra 


















Black's 
Clyde 


2,602 


2,806 


.. 


204 


871 


847 


24 


.. 


Roxburgh 


















Gromwell 


1,429 


1,194 


235 




280 


685 


, , 


856 


Arrowtown 


267 


327 


, , 


"60 


68 


117 


, , 


49 


Queenstown . . 


521 


582 


, , 


61 


168 


128 


85 


, , 


Pembroke 


7 


10 




8 


1 


1 


, , 


, , 


Lawrence 


1,064 


1,051 


"l3 


, , 


368 


463 


, , 


86 


Waikaia 


315 


377 




62 


141 


47 


94 




Tapanui 


6 


23 


[] 


17 


1 


1 


, , 




Longwood, and Riverton j 
W^dham 
Middlemarch . . 


871 
12 


573 
27 




202 
16 


138 
4 


202 

1 


8 


69 


8 


6 


" 2 


, , 


6 


4 


2 


, , 


Gore 


259 


268 




9 


117 


196 


•• 


9 


Totals.. 


28,425 


29,922 


2,465 


8,962 


10,946 


9,009 


8,806 


1.871 


Net decrease . . 


•• 


- 


•• 


1,497 


•• 


- 


1.987 


•• 


Ket increase • . . 


- 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 



No. 5. 

Bbtubn of Gold Duty credited to Local BoDois for the Year ended 31st December, 1904. 

and Quarter ended Slst March, 1905. 



I 


jocal Body. 


Counties — 
Coromandel 
Ohinemuri 
Piako .. 
Thames 

BOBOUOHS— 

Te Aroha 

Thames 

Waihi.. 


. 



For the Year ended 
Slat December. 1904. 



For the Quarter ended 
aist March. 1906. 





£ 8. 


d. 


a . 


d. 




291 


4 


427 13 


6 


4 


,701 1 





659 8 


2 




18 17 


7 


5 16 


6 




646 14 


2 


2 9 


9 



5 

313 3 8 

17,017 14 2 



18 

1 14 1 
2,881 3 11 



Totals 



I 22,988 15 11 



8,978 7 1 



Robert J. Collins, 
Assistant Secretary to the Treasury and Accountant. 
The Treasury, Wellington, 23rd May, 1905. 



Digitized by 



Google 



167 



C— 3. 



No. 6. 

Rbtubn of the Quantity and Value of Gold bntbbed for Duty* for Expobtation from Nbw Zealand from 

let Apbil, 1857, to Slat Dbobmbbb, 1904. 



Pboduck of the Ooldfiblds in 



Dubino the Entebbd fob 

Quaetbb ended 31st Expobtation to the 
Dbcembeb, 1904. j 30th Septembeb, 1904. 



Total bntebed fob 

Expobtation fbom New 

Zealand to the 

3l8T Dbcembeb, 1904. 



County or Borough. 


District. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


1 Quantity. 


{ Value. 






Oz. 


£ 


Oz. £ 


Oz. 


£ 


County of Thames 


\ 


42 


145 








Ohinemuri . . 




7,742 


27,238 








Ooromandel 




5 


9 








Plako 


V Auckland 


. .. 


., 








Borough of Thames . . 




, , 


. , 




1 




Waihi .. 




41,186 


146,243 








Qreat Barrier Island . . 




.. 


•• 


3.415,731 12,685,071 

188 706 

89,099 347,214 

1,703,928 6,754,908 


3,464,706 
1 188 

Oll,U«7«7 

' 1,705,166 

1 




1 

\ 


48,975 


173,635 


12,858,706 


1 Wellington 


•• 


.. 


706 


County of Marlborough 


Marlborough 
[ Nelson 


1 


•• 


347.214 


County of GoUingwood 
Waimea 


1,224 
14 


4,895 
56 






1 1,238 


4,951 


6,759,859 


County of Boiler 


1 1,474 


5,906 




Inangahua . . 


15,611 


62,442 








Grey 


j 6,033 


24,128 








Westland .. 


VWest Coast -[ 


' 2,554 


10,201 








Borough of Kumara . . 




, , 


, 


' 






Hokitika.. 




: 30 


120 








Ross 


Canterbury 


334 


1,330 


4,997,189 19,889,694 

99 j 387 


5,023,225 
99 


' 




26,036 


104,127 


19,993,821 




.. 


.• 


387 


County of Taieri 


391 


1,575 




Tuapeka 


9,033 


36,444 










Vmcent 




12,683 


51,395 










Maniototo .. 




2,103 


8,440 










Waihemo . . 




525 


2,132 










Waitaki 




1,201 


4,833 










Lake 


./-^t___ ' 


145 


583 


1 








Wallace 


>Otago 


2,467 


9,926 


I 








Waikouaiti . . 




, , 


.. 










Bruce 




21 


83 










Clutha 
















Fiord 




20 


81 










Southland .. 




11,132 


44,793 










Stewart Island ' 


•• 


•• 


1 
6,303,730 25,014,846 


6,343,451 
207 






39,721 


160,285 


25,176,181 


Unknown 


•• 


•• 


207 


824 


824 




Totals 


. 


115,970 


442,998 


16,510,171 64,693,650 


16.626,141 


65,136,648 



* Odd duty abolished iu the South Island on the aist March, 1891, by '*Tbe Gold Duty Abolition Act. 1890.' 



No. 7. 

CoMPARATivii Rbtubn for the Ybabs ended 3l8t Dbcembeb, 1904 and 1903. 



Pbodccs 

OF the 

Ooldfiblds 



DUBXNO THE QuaBTEB ENDED — 



Totals fob Yeab 1904. , Totals fob Yeab 1903. 



IN THE 

Distbict of 


31st March, 
1904. 


30th June, 
1904. 


30th Septem- 
ber, 1904. 


31st Decem- 
ber, 1904. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Auckland .. 

Marlborough.. 

Nelson 

West Coast .. 

Otego 


Oz. 
47,037 
307 

1,121 
34,566 
42,052 


Oz. 
65,456 

l!812 
34,084 
41,370 


Oz. 
61,542 
166 

1,378 
27,624* 
46,335 


Oz. 

48,975 

1,'238 
26,036 
39,721 


Oz. 

228,010 

473 

5,049 

122,310 

169,478 


791,529 

1,890 

20,141 

489,177 

684,764 


Oz. 
232,681 
972 

7,962 
125,241 
166,458 


£ 

832,334 

3,845 

31,710 

501,090 

668,852 


Totals for 1904 


125,083 


142,222 


137,045 


115,970 


520,320 


1,987,501 


.. 


.. 


Totals for 1903 


117,952 


139,246 


143,992 


132,124 


•• 


•• 


533,314 


2,037,881 



W. T. GLASGOW, 

Secretary and Inspector. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C— 3. 



168 



No. 8. 

Bbtubn of the Quahtitt and Value of Gold bntebxd for Duty* for Expobtatioh from Nsw Zbalahd from 

1st Apbil, 1857. to Slsr Mabch. 1905. 



PrODUCB of THB OoLDFUBLDS III 



Oounty or Borough. 



County of Thames 

Ohinemuri 

Coromandel 

Piako 

Borough of Thames 
Waihi 

Great Barrier Island 

County of Te Atoha 



District. 



lAuckland 



Wellington 
County of Marlborough | Marlborough 



County of CoUingwood . 
Waimea 



County of Buller 

Inangahua 
Grey 
Westland 
BorouRh of Kumara 
Hokitika 
* Boss 



County of Taieri 

Tuapeka 

Vincent 

Maniototo 

Waihemo 

Waitaki 

Lake 

Wallace 

Waikouaiti 

Bruce 

Clutha 

Fiord 

Southland 

Stewart Island 



Totals 



1 1 Nelson 



-West Coast 



Canterbury 



^ Otago 



Unknown 



DUBUfO THB EkTBBBD FOB 

QUABTBB ENDED ] EXPOBTATION TO THB 

8l6T Mab.. 1905. 8l8T Decembbb. 1904. 



Qu'ntity, Value. Quantity. 



Value. 



Total bmtbbed 

FOB EXPOBTATIOM FBOM 

Kbw Zealand to 
THE 3l8T Mabch, 1905. 



Quantity. 



0«. 

3,282 

6,594 

4,276 

58 

8.410 

28,812 

246 

1 



£ 

13.679 

23.446 

18.044 

245 

14,316 

118,605 

870 

2 



46,679 



189,207 



2,488 
50 



2,533 



4,517 

14,656 

8,202 

8,858 

"20 

• 488 



9,982 
198 



10,180 



31.801 



127,097 



512 

9,742 

12.159 

3,219 

806 

406 

1,788 

2,289 

'178 

241 
11,622 



42,962 



123,975 



2.067 

39.645 

49.159 

12.935 

3,275 

1.623 

7.276 

9.204 

719 

'967 
46,885 



173,756 



500,189 



Oz. 



Oz. 



3.464.706 12,858.706 ; 3.511.885 



188 
89.099 



706 
347.214 



188 
89.099 



1.705.166 I 6.759.859 1.707.699 



17.959 ! 
58,622 ' 
33.050 , 
15,430 ' 

"81 
1,955 



5,023,225 
99 



19,993,821 
387 



5.055,026 
99 



6,343.451 
207 



Value. 



18.047,913 

706 

347.214 

6,769.989 



20.120.918 
387 



16.626.141 



25.175,131 
824 


6.886.413 
207 


25.348.886 
824 


65.186.648 


16.750,116 


65.686.837 



*OoM duby Abolished in the South Ulatui on Mm VCaroh. 18JI, by " The Gold Oaty Vb3litioa Voc. is.)) ' 



No. 9. 

CoMPAUATiVK Kktdrn for the Quabtbbs ended 3l8T Mabch, 1905 and 1904. 





District. i 

: *.'. !'. :'. 

Totals 


Quarter endei 

Quantity. 

Oz. 
47.679 

2i533 
31,801 
42,962 


i Slat h 


[arch, 1906. 


Quarter ended Slat March, 1904. 




1 


Value. 

£ 
189,207 

]X),i80 
127,097 
173,755 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Auckland 
Marlborough . 
Nelson 
West Coast 
Otago 


Oz. 
47,087 
307 

1,121 
34,566 
42,052 


' 165,237 

1,228 

4,467 

188,224 

1 169,968 




128,975 


1 


500,189 


125,088 


1 479,114 



W. T. GLASGOW, 

Secretary and Inspector. 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



169 



C— 8. 



No. 10. 

Statement showing the Prick of Gold per Ounce, Pbige charged per Ton for crushing 
Quartz or Cement, and Prices charged for Water per Sluice-head per Week, during the 
Year ending Slst December, 1904. 



District. 


Price of Gold 
per Oonce. 

M 8. d. 


Price charged uer 
Ton for orushlng 


Price charged for ' 
Water per Sluice- 1 


Remarks. 


i 


Quartz or Cement. 
£ 8. d. 


head per Week. 
£ 8. d. 








AucxukHD— Thames .. 


2 12 6 


5 


£3 to £4 


. , 


Coromandel 


£3 15b. to £4 


10 








Paeroa .. 


4 4 










Te Aroha 


4 4 










Waihi 


4 11 


, , 






Gold refined by 


Taoranga 






•• 




Waihi Gold Min. 
ing Oompany, 
other gold pro- 






















duced ranges from 












£1 lOs. to £8 lOff. 


MARTiBosouoH — Havelook 


3 17 


, , 






No water sold. 


Blenheim 


£3 12s. to £3 158. 


i 


•• 




•• 


Nblson— Wangapeka 


£3 lOs. to £3 15s. 










Motueka. . 


£3 128. to £3 148. 


i :; 


, , 




, , 


Oharleston 


3 19 




2 5 





20 in. 


Inangahaa 


£3 18s. to £4. 


! 


.. 




., 


Collingwood 


£3 188. 6d. to £4 Is. 


, , 


, , 






Takaka 


8 14 6 


, , 


, , 






Westport 

Murobison . . ) 

LyeU .. .. \ 


3 18 3 


1 


,, 




, , 


£8 178. to £4 Is. 


10 






, , 


Wbstulhd— Hokitika, Kanieri, and ) 
Waimea f 


£3 18s. to £4 


*' 


2 10 





40 in. 


Totara and Ross . 


3 18 








, , 


Stafford . . 


3 18 


1 


1 10 





, , 


Greymouth 


3 18 


' 12 


10 





20 in. by 2 in. 


Kmnara . . 


3 18 


. , 


1 







Ahaura .. 


3 19 


10 


1 





Moonlight Gold is 


Okarito . 


3 18 




••' 




worth up to £4 38. 
per oz. 


Otaoo aud 




1 








SouTHTJkKD — Hindon . . 


3 17 6 








, , 


Taapeka.. 


3 17 6 




3 6 





.. 


Longwood 

Preservation and Waiau 
Orepuki and Round Hill 


£8 188. 6d. to 
£8 188. 6d. 


* * 


£158. to £1158. 
28. 6d. to £2 


* * 


Arrow fWakatipu Goldfield) 
and Queenstown 


3 17 


i2 6 


1 





20 in. by 2 in. 












Mount Ida . . ) 
Macrae's, Hyde .. j^ 
Hamilton, Serpentine ) 












3 17 




1 





40 cubic in. 1 sluice- 










head. 


Maerewhenua 


3 17 




1 





20 in. by 2 in. 


Oromwell 


3 17 


1 • • 








Waikaia.. 


3 17 6 


; 8 


1 4 





20 in. by 2 in. 


Tapanui . . 


3 17 6 




, , 




, , 


Wyndbam 


£8 168. to £8 188. 


1 








Roxburgh . . \ 












Olyde and Alexandra - 


3 17 


i 








Black's .. j 




1 








Gore 


4 '0 


1 






•• 



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C.-8. 



172 



No. 13. 

NcHBBB of Maohinbb employed in Auiuvuti and Qoabtz Minino, and the VaIiUB thereof, for the Year 

ending 31st December, 1904. 



DistHot. 






Maehinery employed in Allovial Mining. 










Steam- 

en^dnes 

employed 

1 winding, 

omshing, 

Ac. 


i 
1 

1 


! 

i 
1 


i 

8 


1.^ 


1 


1 
1 


li 
II 
H 


1 


fi 


1 


Bteam- 

, engines 

employed 

! winding. 

' crashing, 

Ac. 


1 

1 


Stamp-heads. 
Water-wheels. 


1 


il 

S, 
1 


1 


i 

1 


' Approii- 
mate 
Value of 

aU 

Mining 

Plant" 

ineloded 


No 


Aggre- 
gate 


1 


1 


Is 5 1 « a 

1 l»! ^ |l 


No. 


Aggre- 


inthii 
Betmrn. 


Auckland— 
Paeroa 
Coromandel 
Thames . . 
Te Aroha . . 
Waihi 






•• 

•• 














I 




•• 


•• 




16 
27 
26 


1,842 

706 

1.262 

6i6oo 


11 

29 

4 


806 
168 
462 
20 
846 


10 
6 

26 
8 
9 








146 


1 

149,710 

94,896 

179,800 

887',640 


Totals 


•• 


" 


•• 


• • 


•• 


•• 


" 


•• 


" 




•• 


•. 


98 


8,800 


44 


1,800 


62 


• • 


•• 


.. 


146 


712.046 


Mablbobouob— 

CuHen's Creek 

Waikakaho 

Blenheim 




" 


•• 


•• 


•• 


15 
8 


" 


1 


•• 


1 
1 


• 


' * 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


2 


20 


•• 




•• 


•• 


•• 


1,000 
7,000 


Totals 


* * 
« . 


•• 


•• 


.. 


•• 


17 


• • 


1 


•• 


2 


•• 


•• 


•• 


.. 


.. 




2 


20 






S 


.. 


.. 


8,000 


Nelson— 
Wangapeka 
CoUingwood 
Takaka . . 
Inangahua 
Charleston 
Lyell 

Murohison 
Westport . . 
Ahaura 


•• 


•• 


•• 




* 4 

8 

"88 

466 

85 

700 


6 


1 
10 

'e 

10 

20 

600 


•• 


1 

'e 

7 
8 

16 


•• 


i 


23 
i7 


•• 


2 
80 

i 


* 16 

'soo 


2 

22 

2 

8 
2 


"28 

440 

"80 

14 
11 


i 

28 
2 

8 


- 

2 




66 


10,000 
56,000 

216!862 

400 

86.000 

26,000 

6,500 

100,000 


Totals 


•• 


•• 


•• 


.. 


.. 1,296 


12 


647 


•• 


88 


•. 


1 


40 


.. 


88 


816 


81 


628 


86 


* 


8 


.• 


66 


448,262 


WXBTLAND— 

Stafford .. 

Boss 

Hokitikaand Kanieri 

Greymouth 

Kumara .. 


i 


* i 




8 


6 


6,000 

20 

66 

170 

160 


6 
2 


100 

696 
90 


4 

26 


1 
2 
8 
4 
4 


5 
16 


2 




2 


•• 






•• 


•• 


•• 


.. 


.. 




40,000 

6,000 

7,000 

52,290 

25,000 


Totab 


1 


4 


•• 


8 


6 


6,896 


8 


797 


29 


14 


21 


2 


.. 


2 


.. 


.. 


.. 


• • 


• • 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


180,290 


Otaoo and South- 

TiAND— 

Tapanui .. 

Hindon . . 

Tnapeka .. 

Cromwell . . 

Clyde and Alexandra 

Roxburgh 

Black's .. 

Orepuki, Wafau, and 
Roundhill Preser- 
vation 

Waikaia (Switzers) 

Arrow 

QneenBtown 

Naseby . . 

Kyebum and Clarke's 

Hamilton's and Sow- 
bum 

Hyde and Fullerton's 

Macrae's, Strath 
Taieri, and Shag 
Valley 

Serpentine 

St. Bathan's, Ida 
Valley, Ac. 

Gore .. .. t 


8 
.6 


80 
" 4 

86 


29 


.. 

.. 

•• 

1 
1 


1 

y. 600 

.. 1,000 
.. 189 

150 

20 

.. 400 

128 


2 

** 


40 
10 

26 

106 

8 
12 
60 

88 


8 

2 

2 

1 


1 

18 
26 

62 

12 
2 

2 

1 

■1 


1 
1 


i 

i 

"i 
1 
1 

1 


..I 


1 

i 


2 
2 

4 

1 

i 

1 

1 

4i 

1 

( 

1 
1 


"l6 
16 
80 

14 

" 4 

8 

47 


8 
4 

2 

14 

i 

6 
7 


" 6 
15 
80 

16 

10 

"lO 
76 

46 


2 

1 

2 

6 


..i 

1 


1 


•• 


i 


2,000 

710 

80,000 

163.875 

400,000 

6,000 

48,000 
15,000 
85,000 

63.150 

2,000 


Totals 


10 


119 


29 




..! 2,337 

1 


2 386 


13 


116J 1 


11 
1 


1 


2 


15 

1 


136 


87 


206 


10| 1 1 

' 1 


•• 


i| 


805.735 



SUMMARY. 



Auckland 
Marlborough 


.. 


.. 


29 


.. 




-17 


12 
8 
2 


1 . .. 
647 .. 
797 29 
386 1 13 


2 

33 

14 

116 


.. .. 


• . 


..| 98' 8,800 


44 1,300 
2 20 


62 




3 




145 


712,046 
8,000 
448.262 
130,290 
806,735 


Nelson 






.. J 1-995 


.. 1 
21 2 

l! 1 


40 


. . 33 816 


31 623; .^61 a 


"\kk 


Westland . . 
Otago 


1 
10 


4 
119 


8 


6 


6,895 
2,887 


2 .. 
2t 15 


isd 


37 206 


i6 'i 


1 .. 1 


Totab 


11 


128 


29 


8 


6 


10,044 


22 


1,680 , 42 


164 


22| 4 

1 


40 


4141 


9.261 


114 2,049 


98 


8 


i 


211 


2,104.333 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



173 



C— «. 



No. 14. 

Tabtm showing approximately the Numbbb, Dbsobiftiom, and Vkum of the Watbb-baors, 
Tail-baohb, Dahs, Bbsbbvoibs, and Obound-sIiUiobs in Operation daring the Tear ending 
Slst December, 1904. 







TftO-noM. 


Dmm. 1 BoMTToirt. 


Oroiud-alaieM. 














1 






Approxi- 


Diatriet. 




1 
IiMiftth 1 Ho. of 1 Approzi- 




Approxi- 




Approxi- lApprozi. 




Approxi- 


mate 
Total 




No. 


in 81oie«». 


mftto 


No. 


mftto 


No. 


maU No. 


mftto 


No. 


m»to 


Oo«t. 






miM. hfl^dt. 


Cost. 




Oo«t. 




Oo«t. 




Cost. 




Ooit. 




AUGKLAHD— 




■ 


£ 




£ 




£ 




£ 




£ 


£ 


Goronuuidel 


6 


6 21 


4,500 


, , 


, , 


3 


510 


8 


50 


, , 


, , 


5,060 


ThamM . • 


19 


25 160 


58,000 


7 


860 


70 


770; 2 


5,000 


, , 




. 


64,180 


Te Aroha 


1 


8 


15 


8,000 


, , 


, , 


1 


200 


, , 


, , 


, , 




, , 


3,200 


Paeroa .. 


166 


197 


2.451 


120,946 


1 


1,000 


85 


5,000 


3 


3,000 


, , 




, , 


129,946 


Waihi .. 


17 


88 


879 


•• 


•• 


•• 


20 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 




• 


•• 


Totals 


208 


269 


3,026 


186,446 


8 


1,860 


129 


6,480 


8 


8,050 


•• 


•• 


202,886 


Kablbobouoh— 




























Blenheim 


81 


27 


154 


8,970 


9 


165 


6 


. . 


. . 


, , 


, , 


4,185 


Ha?elook 


11 


11 


25 


417 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


15 


90 


507 


Toftalf 


42 


88 


179 


4,887 


9 


165 


6 


•• 


•• 


•• 


15 


90 


4,642 


Nblsoh— 




























Wazumpeka, Baton, 
and Sheny 


2 


4 


2 


250 


2 


100 


•• 


•• 


•• 


•• 


1 


50 


400 


Collingwood 


107 


127 


1,129 


158,089 


69 


7,945 


74 


10,994 




, 








176.978 


Inaogaliaa 
Gharfeston 


518 


412 


8.700 


164,878 


546 


52,457 


624 


28,436 




. 










240,766 


80 


160 


800 : 8,000 


40 


200 


40 


4.000 














7,200 


Weetport 
LveU .. 
Mnrohieon 


254 


169 


1,888 1 16,684 


190 


25.907 


405 


14,190 




, 










56,731 


108 


98 


280 


9,800 


25 


2,500 


22 


2,250 




, 










14,050 


258 


200 


1,022 


10,125 


74 


2,650 


61 


3,760 .. 


, 










16,535 


Ahaora .. 


200 


420 


1,700 


160,000 


90 


18,000 


90 


8,000! .. 


. 










181,000 


Motneka 


2 


8 


10 


1,000 


1 


60 


2 


70. .. 


, 










1,180 


Takaka.. 


8 


5 


47 


2,300 


6 


100 


8 


160 .. 


• 




6 






2,560 


Totab 


1,482 


1,598 


9,578 


525.521 


1,043 


109,919 


1,826 


61,860 


.. 


• • 


7 


50 


697,850 


Wbstlaitd— 


























Hokitika&Kanieri 


827 


228 


416 


157,825 


188 


8,740 


818 


3,460! .. 


, , 


, , 


, , 


165,025 


Boss 


148 


119 


590 


67.000 


57 


900 


25 


7,500 .. 


, , 


6 


700 


76,100 


Knmara 


200 


115 i 526 


5.883 


198 


7.020 


71 


4,850 11 


7,000 


80 


600 


25,303 


Qreymouth 


509 


448 2,088 i 21.791 


820 


19,603 


1,031 


14,084 .. 








55,478 


Okarito.. 


14 


15 1 104 6,180 


1 


24 


2 


70 .. 


, , 


1 


80 


6,304 


Stafford.. 


280 


810 


550 25,000 


200 


8,000 


300 


5,000 6 


1,000 


2 


3.000 


42,000 


Totab 


1,428 


1,280 


4,274 


288.629 


1,409 


89,287 


1,747 


34,964 17 


8,000 


89 


4.330 


370,210 


Otjlqo ahd South- 
















[ 










ULWD— 
























Hindon.. 


25 


25 


100 


5,000 


5 


70 


31 850 .. 




5 


30 


5,450 


Toapeka 


. 880 


920 


1,850 


18,000 


400 


9,000 


820' 8,500 .. 


, , 


. , 


, . 


35,500 


Tapanoi 


1 


2 


4 


100 




.. 


.. ! .. 






.. 


100 


Clyde, Alexandra, 
Black's, and Box- 
burgh 


618 


1,486 


2,600 


85,000 


880 


15,000 


157| 18,000 3 


10,000 


, , 


, . 


128,000 














1 










107 


180 216 


14.608 


127 


4.788 


24 1,350 .. 


.. 




20,686 


Cromwell 


5781,4^2 1 2,800 


105.685 


812 


14,678 


241 11,300 .. 


. , 




131,668 


Waikaia 


280i 400 : 800 


40.000 


200 


2.000 


120 2,400 .. 


10 


400 


44,800 


Biverton and Ore- 

poki 
Qneenstown 


188 201 


741 


28.591 


13 


4.696 


51 1,647 .. 


•• 


•• 


29,983 


167 225 


821 


54.075 


158 


9.990 


42 1,745 .. 1 




.. 


65.740 


Naseby.. 


1 1 

• 1 1 














KyehomA Clarke's 


j 






' 








Hamilton's and 


' 














Sowbom 


, 


■ 








\ 






Hyde & Fullerton's 


1811 










t 








Macrae's, Strath 


8.161 


4,654 75,542 


766 


23,730 


368 19,720 .. 






118,992 


Taieri, and Shag 




















VaUey 














1 


1 






Serpentine 
























St. Bathan's and 














1 1 










IdaVaUey 


1 












' 










Wyndham 


8 


9 


20 


1,500 


.. 


.. 


. . . . i . . 


.. 






1,500 


Qore 


2 


2 


28 


100 


•• 


1 
1 




•• 


•• 


•• 


100 


Totals 


8,475 


8,048 


14,134 1 428.196 


2,811 


8d.826| 


1,896, 65,012 8 


10,000 


15 


430 


582,464 



SUMMABY. 



Auckland .. 
Marlborough 
Nelson 
Westland . . 
Otago 

Totals 



208: 269 

42 38 

1,48211,598 

1,423|1,230 

3,476'8,048 



3,026 I 186,446 8! 1,360 129 

179 I 4,387 9; 1651 6 

9,573 1 525,5211,043109,9191,326 

4,274 I 283,629,1,409 39,2871,747 

14,134 I 423.1962,311! 83,826!l,326 



6,68011,178,31,186 1.423.1794,780284,557 4,534 



6, 4801 8 



61,860 
34,964 
65,012 



168,316 28 



8,050 



8,000 
10,000 



26,050 



16 


90 


7 


50 


39 


4,330 


15 


480 


76 


4,900 



202,336 
4,642 
697,850 
370,210 
582,464 



1,857,002 



Digiti 



zed by Google 



C.-^3. 



174 



No. 16. 

Bbtubn of Casks ia the Wakdbns' Goubts, and Costs awabdbd, for the Tear endinf 

3l8t December. 1904. 





Number of 
BCining 


Aggregate Amomit of Valoe. 




Amount of 


jj 


8 i 














DUtriot. 

1 


Dirootes 

adjofieated 

on. 


Claimed. 






1 

i 


Costa 
awarded. 


1 


AUCKLAHD— 




£ S. 


1 
d. 


£ 8. 


d. 


I 
£ B. d. 






Ootomuidel 


14 


169 8 


4 


6 7 





4 18 






Thames.. 


38 


485 17 


8 


274 4 





40 10 6 






Te Aroha 


21 


99 16 


1 


58 7 





2 4 






Paeroa .. 


lU 


822 19 


8 


108 8 10 


14 9 






Walhi 


G9 


67 9 10 


48 17 10 


80 12 






Mablbobouoh 


i 


12 6 


3 


10 2 


6 


2 4 




2 


Nblbon— 


















TTMtwffithnn. 


10 


341 10 





8 





21 




9 


Oollingwood 


3 


395 5 


9 


5 12 


6 


1 15 




5 


Lyell and Murohison 
Westport 


2 


8 8 


9 


8 8 


9 


1 12 1 




, 


40 


980 10 


6 


818 8 


' 


41 9 6 




• 


Oharleston 


4 


10 5 


; 


, , 




6 7 




, 


Takaka . . 


2 


10 8 


' 


, , 




1 18 1 




1 


Wangapeka 


•• 


•• 




•• 




•• 




• 


Wbstlamd— 


















Komara 


18 


161 5 


9 


110 4 





8 




, 


Greymouth 


18 


3.262 1 


2 


220 2 


2 


87 2 8 1 




. 


Hokitika and Kanieri .. 


22 


279 10 10 


247 15 


4 , 


51 15 8 i 




» • 


Stafford.. 


5 


801 6 


8 


250 





24 5 




, , 


Ross 


, , 


, , 




, , 




, , t 




, , 


Abanra .. 


32 


825 4 





174 7 


6 


14 




, , 


Okarito 


•• 


•• 




•• 




1 




> • 


Oahtsbbubt— 










1 








Ashbartos .. ^ 


, 


•• 




•• 


1 


• • 






Otaoo and Southlakd— 


















Tapanui 


, , 










. . 






Hindon . . 


, , 


, , 




. , 




1 




• • 


Tuapeka 


7 


27 10 


6 


6 11 


8 


10 




• • 


Oromwell 


2 


5 1 


8 


5 1 


8 


1 2 1 




1 


Boxbargh 










ff 








Blaok»s 


20 


2,040 6 


8 


89 1 





106 5 




1 


Clyde and Alexandra 

WaikaU 


















6 


50 





15 





10 




. • 


Orepuki, Longwood, and Biverton . . 


5 


97 14 


6 


28 7 


6 


8 15 




, , 


Arrow (Wakaiipa Goldfield) 


11 


10 7 


6 


6 10 





2 8 8 




8 


Queenstown 


10 


63 8 


9 


68 8 


9 


5 18 




4 


Gore 


6 


112 





110 





8 18 6 




. • 


Mount Ida 


59 


412 15 





7 5 





21 2 




48 


Wyndbam 


.. 






•• 




, , 




•• 


Totals 


582 


10,447 7 


7 


2,610 


2 


502 10 8 


74 



Digitized by 



Google 



175 



C-— 3- 



No. 16. 

Bbtubk of the Numbbr of MmiNO Lbasbs or Licbnses in Force on the Slst December, 1904, 
the ExTBNT of Ground usabkd or held under Licsnbb, and BBMTAii per Ankxth. 

Mining TiMlOl 



AUCKLiAVI>^— 

CoroniAiidal 
Tfaamet .. 
Te Aroha 
Paaroa .. 
Pohipuhi 
Wftihi . . 

ICablbobouob— 
Havelook 
Blenheim 

NXLSOH— 

GoUhigwood 

Tnanyuioa 

Okarieston 

Ahaora .. 

Lyell 

MorohiMii 

Westpori 

Motoeka 

Ndaoo .. 



WB8TI.4HD — 

Hokitika and Kanieri 



Gzeymonth 
Boes 
Okarito .. 

OXAOO AMD 80DTHI.4HD — 

OiomwttU 

Wjndham 

Waikaia.. 

Blaok'e .. 

Clyde and Alezaodia 

Roxbargfa 

Naseby .. 

Arrow (Wakatipa Qoldfield) 

Quaenstown 

Rirertoii and Ordpuki 

Totels.. 



Na 



I Qroei Ac r eage. 



BeDlal 





▲. 


B, P. 


£ s. 


d. 


85 


3,174 


2 28 


257 18 





112 


6,052 


2 20 


1,223 18 


6 


56 


2,833* 


2 16 


79919 





17 


429 





56 15 





62 


5,184 


3 8 


i;322 13 





4 


414 


30 


58 10 


3 


9 


537 


2 34 


191 15 





3 


938 


3 4 


234 15 





172 


6,834 


3 3 


1,188 3 


6 


23 


583 





77 17 


6 


200 


8,700 





1,600 





40 


1,259 


25 


348 7 





43 


1,218 


1 22 


390 





27 


824 


2 


217 7 


6 


2 


31 


3 33 


12 





3 


225 





84 15 





57 


774 


1 4 


214 7 


6 


52 


632 


8 


240 7 


6 


50 


4,485 





1,838 10 





41 , 


1.972 





753 9 


6 


15 


739 





132 8 


6 


110 


3,102 





427 8 


9 


2 


18 





6 10 





36 


1,856 





350 






114 

^24 

320 

409 

43 


4.959 





1,536 7 


6 


1,752 
1,094 
1.500 
2,129 


2 
15 
2 38 
2 20 


517 

410 

562pO 

45 15 








2,231 


68,756 


222 


14,599 8 


6 



Digitized by 



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C— 3. 



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'5 


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^ . . . 


438 
14,088 

569 
2,798 
9,670 1 
4,196 ' 
7,766 ' 
8,219 
7,762 
8,636 


w^ 


a^ 


g 




1.516 
4,078 
648 
1.546 
2,916 
2,381 
1.779 
1.268 
6.498 
11.798 


1,467 

3,967 

6,711 

2,917 

53,761 

11,289 

27,835 

3,321 


3.454 

1,406 

18,275 

289 

1.646 


1' 


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C— 3a. 



1906. 
NEW ZEALAND. 



INSPECTION OF COAL-MINES REPORT. 

(" THE COAL-MINES ACT, 1891.") 



Presented to both Houses of the General Assembly by Command of His Excellency, 



No. 1. 

BIr. J. Hatbs, F.S.Sc., Inspecting Engineer, to the Undbr-Secretary, Mines Department. 

Sir, — Mines Department, Wellington, 3xxi May, 1905. 

I have the honour to submit reports on the coal-mines of the colony for the year ended 31st 
December, 1904. 

Output. 

The following summary shows the output of the various classes of coal and lignite mined 
in each inspection district : — 



Glass of Coal, &o. 


Northern 
District. 


West Coast 
District. 


Southern 
District. 


Total. 


Bituminous and semi-bituminous coal ... 
Pitch-coal ... 
Brown coal... 
Lignite 


Tonw. 
106,219 

136,298 


Tons. Tons. 
832,299 1 

2,397 22,109 

2,254 j 346,306 

90,956 


Tons. 
938,618 

24,606 
483,868 

90,966 


Totals ... 


242.617 


836,960 468,371 


1,637,838 



The total number of mines at work during the year was 168, of which number 24 provide employ- 
ment for over twenty persons at each mine, whilst 45 mines employ over four but not more than twenty 
persons at each. The relatively large proportion of small mines is due to the fact that these properties 
are being worked for the supply of local requirements only, and include several at which fuel is obtained 
on private lands solely for the requirements of the owners, who are, for the most part, farmers who 
quarry a few tons of lignite from time to time. 

In comparison with the output for the year 1903, the foregoing statement shows a net total increase 
of 117,609 tons. 

The statement given below shows the relative increase and decrease in the output of the various 
classes of coal, kc., in each of the inspection districts : — 



Class of Coal &c 


Northern District. 


West Coast 
District. 


Sonthern District. 


Total 
Increase. 


Total 

De- 

crease. 


Total 

Net 

Increase. 




Increase. 


De- 

creaFe. 


Increase. 


De- 
crease. 


Increase. 


De- 
crease. 


Bituminous and semi- 
bituminous coal 
Pitch-coal.. 
Brown coal 
Lignite 
Oil-Bhale ... 


Tons. 
4,700 

28,022 


Ton-'. 


Tons. 
63,927 

2,397 


Tonp. Tons. 

t 

993 
406 14,428 
... 13,684 


1 
Tons. ' Tons. Tons. 

36 Z Z 


Tons. 


Totals 


32,722 




66,324 


406 


29,006 


36 


118,061 


442 


117,609 



1— C. 3a. 



Digiti 



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C— 8a. 2 

The approximate total quantity of coal, kc,, raised from the several mines throughoat the colony 
op to the 3l8t December, 1904, is returned at 20,115,663 tons. 

Hie number of persons ordinarily employed at all the mines is returned at 763 above ground, and 
2,525 below ground, making a total of 3,288. At a considerable number of lignite-pits in Otago and 
Scathland (Southern District) the workings are open quarries, and the persons employed thereat are 
iDchided in the number of persons employed above ground. 

The output of coal, Ac., for the year averaged 467*7 tons per person employed in connection with 
the ooal-mining industry. As compared with coal-mining generally in other parts of the world, this 
a^enfe is decidedly high, but is accounted for by the fact of thick seams being the rule rather than the 
ezoepdoQ in this colony. This gives natural facilities for a higher ratio of production than is the case 
thin seams are worked under infinitely less advantageous conditions. 

AcciDBNTd. 

Pour fatalities in connection with coal-mining operations occurred during the year, all of which 
I duly inquired into by the Department. The proportion of fatal accidents in relation to the number 
of pezB<His employed is at the ^te of 1 to 822, and in relation to the tonnage of coal won as 1 to 
384,459-5 tons. 

Two other deaths occurred which can scarcely be classed as fatal mining accidents, and are there- 
fore not taken into account in the foregoing comparisons. In one case now under notice a trucker 
slipped on a rail and hurt his knee. An operation was performed and death from blood-poisoning, 
subsequent to the operation, occurred some three weeks after the accident. In the other case a miner 
returning from his work had an epileptic fit, and died a few hours afterwards. 

Taken all round, the proportion of fatalities at collieries compares most favourably with those in 
many other works which are looked upon as far less hazardous, and which are not carried on under 
such disadvantageous circumstances. This, in itself, is testimony to the careful supervision of work- 
ing-conditions day by day and the provisions made for safety. Underground mining cannot be con- 
ducted with perfect immunity from accidents, but with the exercise of proper care on the part of (Adak 
and workpeople these can be, and are, very considerably minimised. 

Prosecutions. 

No prosecutions for breaches of " The Coal-mines Act, 1891," or special rules thereunder, have 
been instituted by the Department during the year. 

Colliery managers have, in some instances, taken action against employees for violation of the 
law relating to the safety of persons employed, and in so doing have done their duty. 

Vemtilation of Mines. 

On the whole, there is now comparatively little fault to be found in this'respect. It is being recognised 
that good ventilation pays, and at nearly all the principal collieries mechanical ventilation by means 
of fans is adopted. The great advantages of fan-ventilation as compared with that by furnace 
are : (a) that the first cost is often less, (b) greater economy in work and maintenance, (c) increased 
safety, (d) better control, and (e) greater capacity for circulating the air-currents, and therefore more 
effective. 

Furnace ventilation is only really effective and reasonably economical at mines working by the 
means of fairly deep shafts, and even under such conditions the fan is preferable. For the shallow 
mine-workings which are general in New Zealand, there is no question whatever as to the superiority 
of the fan (as compared with the furnace) in every way. 

Many small mines are ventilated naturally, no power of any kind being installed. As these are 
non-gaseous, and only a very few persons are employed, requirements are fairly well met. At others, 
a small furnace, a steam-jet, or the heat from steam-pipes supplying an underground pump is found 
to be sufficient to induce a reasonably adequate supply of air. There are a few cases, however, where 
mines of the kind now referred to may be reasonably expected to extend operations, and even now are 
practically at the limit of real efficiency as regards their means of ventilation. To meet such require- 
ments, a fan, with a capacity of some 20,000 cubic feet per minute (the actual volume attainable msy 
be more or less according to the conditions existing in the mine), together with engine for driving, can 
be installed for a trifle over £100, foundations included. This places mechanical ventilation within 
the reach of owners of small mines at very little cost, assuming that steam is available. Where water 
under pressure can be easily obtained, a Pelton wheel may be used for driving, the wheel being keyed 
direct to the fan shaft if volume and pressure of water are such as will maintain a suitable speed, other- 
wise the connection must be made by means of belt and pulleys. In any case, the first cost would be 
less than for a steam-driven fan, provided that the initial cost of bringing the water to the work has 
not to be specially imdertaken. An installation of this kind could be advantageously adopted at many 
metalliferous mines. 

Drainage of Minbs. 

At the Westport Coal Company's collieries (which are at a high altitude) drainage is provided for 
by means of adits driven from vallejrs situate to the dip of the workings. This practice obviates the 
necessity for heavy pumping machinery, and, in the event of pumps being required in the future to 
drain coal-areas further to the dip than the level of the drainage tunnels, the height to which the water 



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will have to be lifted will only be that necessary for discharge into the aforesaid tunnels or adits. A 
similar provision is being made at Blackball Colliery, and when completed will enable the present elec- 
trically driven pumps to be dispensed with, or utilised for the drainage of areas at a lower level than 
that commanded by the new water adit. 

In two instances — ^viz., at Castle Hill Colliery, Kaitangata, and the Alexandra Coal Company's 
mine, Alexandra South — mine pumps are worked by endless ropes, but the most general method 
adopted is that of the direct-acting pump, placed underground and driven by steam, compressed air 
beii^ used in some cases. In a few instances single-cylinder installations are at work, but the favourite 
type appears to be the duplex pattern, generally with high-pressure cylinders and worked non-con- 
densing, the exhaust steam-pipe being led into the sump, although in a few cases the simple condenser 
referred to in the report of last year has been advantageously adopted. At Abbotsford Colliery, Green 
Island (Freeman's Coal Company), the duplex pump there is fitted with compound steam cylinders. 

Pumps worked by electricity have been installed at AUandale Colliery. The Cornish type of 
pump is not in use at any of the New Zealand collieries at the present time. 

CoMPRBSSBD Air in MINB8. 
The use of compressed air as a secondary power in mines is being gradually extended. The direct 
use of steam is only practicable to a somewhat limited extent, and when motive power is required in 
the inner workings of mines, compressed air and electricity offer the greatest facilities for successful ap- 
plication. Of these two agencies, compressed air is so far the most fav^oured in this colony, and is very 
freely used at the Westport Coal Company's collieries for working coal -cutting machinery, rock-drills, 
underground subsidiary haulages, &c., and at the collieries of the New Zealand Coal and Oil Company 
(Limited), at Kaitangata, for the purposes of pumping and hauling, the steep inclination of the coal-seams 
there necessitating the employment of quite a number of small dip-haulage plants. A small air-com- 
pressor has also been erected at the Taupiri Extended ColUery, Huntly. One beneficial feature in 
connection with the use of compressed air at collieries is that the exhaust assists the ventilation to some 
extent. The air may also be used direct from the main pipes for the purpose of temporarily ventilat- 
ing a heading. 

Electricity in Mines. 

So far, the principal use of electricity at New Zealand collieries is for the lighting of engine-houses, 
workshops, offices, sidings above and below ground, Soc. ; but for power purposes it has not yet been 
80 generally adopted as might have been expected. For some time, electrically driven coal-cutting 
machinery was used by the Westport Coal Company, but was not foimd to answer requirements so well 
as compressed air. The use of electricity for this purpose was therefore abandoned. For haulage 
purposes it answered admirably, but as the generating plant was subsequently moved and utilised for 
lighting purposes the electric motor used for hauling was necessarily displaced, and an engine worked 
by compressed air substituted. 

At Blackball Colliery a pumping plant, placed underground, is worked electrically with satisfactory 
results. At Allandale Colliery electric plant has been installed for haulage underground, pumping, 
and driving the ventilating-fan. Electricity has also been adopted at Kaitangata Colliery for driv- 
ing the ventilating-fan, and, owing to the distance of the upcast shaft from the main surface-works, 
considerable economy is effected thereby as compared with the expense entailed in working the steam 
plant formerly in use. The latter, however, remains in position, and is used once a fortnight to insure 
its being alwajrs kept in good order. At the same time, this fortnightly use of steam-power enables 
the electrical plant to be periodically examined and overhauled without stoppage of mining operations. 

There is no doubt that electricity is a very useful, efficient, and convenient medium for conveying 
power for working various classes of machinery underground. For coal -cutting machinery it does 
not appear — on the basis of experience in this colony and in other parts of the wor^d — to have hitherto 
been so generally suitable as compressed air, local conditions no doubt accounting for this in a great 
measure, but year by year improvements are being made in the motors used for working coal-cutters, 
and it is therefore more than probable that in the near future the difficulties experienced in the past 
will be entirely overcome. 

For the purposes of hauling, pumping, and working ventilating machinery, electricity is now a 
powerful rival to compressed air, and for such uses will more than hold its own. In comparison with 
compressed air, an electrical installation of equal power is less costly, the cable conveying the current 
takes less room than the pipes conveying compressed air ; it is also much more easily laid and generally 
more handy than pipes. To these considerations must be added the fact that for a given horse-power 
exerted by the primary motor (steam or water), electricity as a secondary power is proved to give a 
much higher percentage of useful effect than can be obtain^ from the use of compressed air. 

New Colueries. 
Puponga, — In the early part of the year coal from the Puponga Colliery (near Collingwood) was put 
on the market on a commercial scale. The seam being worked is about 7 ft. 6 in. thick, and 3aelds 
an excellent household coal, which is also well spoken of for steaming purposes. Harbour facilities 
are not yet so favourable as could be desired, and therefore the tonnage which can be shipped in one 
bottom is limited, but by dredging a channel from deep water to the wharf, and a basin large enough 
for vessels to swing round when coming to their berthage, there will be no difficulty in loading very 
much larger steamers than are now employed. The bottom to be dredged is of such a nature that the 
work can be done without great difficvdty. The coal appears to find a ready market in Nelson. Wel- 
lington, and the coastal towns of the southern portion of the North Island. 



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Point Elizabeth. — The Point Elizabeth Colliery, Qre3nnouth (New Zealand State Coal-mines), also 
became a producing property during the year, the seam operated upon being known as the Main (or 
Exhibition) seam. The primary use of this coal is for the supply of the New Zealand Government 
railways, but a portion of the output is abo sold to the public. 

Drury, — Towards the latter end of the year operations were put in hand for opening a new col- 
liery about two miles and a half from the railway-station at Drury, near Auckland. To a limited extent 
some coal was worked in this locality several years ago. The seam to be operated upon is reported 
to be 15 ft. in thickness, but at the time of my visit the prospecting shaft was full of water, and there- 
fore I had no opportunity of seeing the seam except at the outcrop where the thickness is not so great. 
The coal is a brown coal of very fair quality, suitable for local requirements, and is being opened by 
a level tunnel. Arrangements have been made to ventilate the mine from the first by means of a fan 
of approved type. Connection with the railway at Drury is being made by means of a substantial 
tramway to be worked by locomotive-power. 

Pboposed new Collibbies. 

Ngakawau. — A lease of coal-bearing land, 1,577 acres in extent, lying at the back of the West- 
port Coal Company's Qranity Creek leasehold (Millerton Colliery), has been issued to Mr. Q. L. Tacon, 
and it is intended to form a company to open up and work the property. As the land in question is 
at an altitude somewhat greater than that held by the Westport Coal Company, connection with t^e 
railway near where it crosses the Ngakawau River will have to be made by an incline tramway. The 
quality of the coal is similar to that worked at Millerton Colliery, and as a matter of fact the seam is 
a continuation (beyond the eastern boundary of the Granity Creek leasehold) of that now being worked 
from Millerton. 

Paparoa, — Messrs. W. H. Cutten and H. Neilsen have been granted a lease to mine coal over an area 
of 1,000 acres of land near the southern end of the Paparoa Ranges, the property being some two or 
three miles from Blackball Township ; and comprehensive prospecting and careful surveys have disclosed 
an extensive field of coal comprised within the leasehold. A large number of outcrops have been exposed, 
and the average thicknesses of the several seams are reported as under : No. 1, 10 ft. 6 in. ; No. 2, 
18 ft. ; No. 3, 9 ft. ; No. 4, 5 ft. ; No. 5, 10 ft. ; No. 6, 10 ft. 6 in. : making an average total of 63 ft. 
of coal. Having inspected the property, and examined the prospecting done and outcrops exposed, I 
see no reason to doubt the estimate of Mr. F. Cutten, C.E. (authorised surveyor), who was in charge of 
the work, as to the extent of coal contained in the six seams discovered. The quality of the coals is 
remarkable, the following analyses by the Government Analyst showing that Nos. 1 and 2 seams may 
be classed among the anthracite coals, whilst the remaining seams appear to be fully equal to the very 
best coab yet mined in any part of the West Coast coalfields, and superior to the average production : — 



Fixed carbon 
Hydrocarbon 
Water 
Ash 


• • • ■ 

by standard 
aland 
Wales 


1. 

— L _ - 

Per Cent. 

8005 

1510 

0-65 

.. , 4-20 


2. 

Per Cent. 

79-10 

1505 

1-85 

4-00 


t 

3. 

Per Cent. 
77-2 
19-0 

0-6 

3-2 

1 


5. 

Per Cent. 

75-55 

22-75 

0-70 

1-00 


6. 

I 

Per Cent. 

70-00 

24-35 

0-86 

4-80 




lOOOO 


10000 


, 100-00 


100-00 


lOOOO 


ToUl sulphur.. 
Evaporative power 
•liopted in New Ze 
Ditto in Sew South 


.. 1 0-37 
usually 1 10-40 

17-61 


! 0-23 
I 10-28 

17-40 


0-26 
10-04 

16-98 


0-29 
9-82 

16-62 


019 
9-10 

15-40 



The coals of the lower seams (Nos. 1, 2, and 3) are practically smokeless, and should be 
tfrrnirn^rntly suitable for use in ocean-going steamers generally. 

The area under notice being on the side of a mountain range a colliery can be opened level-free, 
arid the coal conveyed by means of a self-acting cable haulage road, about two miles in length (at a 
Utiiy easy gradient) to the new branch of the Government railway about to be constructed from Ngahere 
U} BUir;kball. 

Examinations for Mine-managers' Certificates. 

T\ut paperM Het for the last examination of persons desirous of qualifying for positions as manager^ 
f4 'xmI' mines are appended. 

Schedules. 
Th^ Iwt of pernrms to whom managers' certificates of service and of competency have been issued 
m ^\f\f*^tifM, as are also the statistical tables showing the output of coal, &c., from, and the numbers 
iA fttrtknnm employed at, the several mines throughout the colony. 

I have, &c. 

John Hayes, 
Tb« Under-Secretary for Mines, Wellington. Inspecting Engineer. 



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6 C— 3a. 

No, 2. . 

Mr. James (Doutts, Inspector of Mines, Thames, to the Under-Seorbtart, Mines Department, 

Wellington- 

^IH, — Inspector of Mines Office, Thames, 8th February, 1905. 

I have the honour to transmit the following report on the coal-mines in the Aucldand dis* 
trict for the year ended 31st December, 1904, in compliance with section 67 of '' The Coal-mines Act, 
18J1 " :— 

Kawakawa Mine (John Cully, manager). — ^The work that has been carried on in this mine during 
the year has been confined to working out pillars near the outcrop, and searching for pillars of coal 
and coal that had been left in to strengthen the roof. The old workings being completely filled in with 
the covering of the coal makes it very difficult to know where or how to drive to find pillars which 
have been left from the old mining works of years past, more especially as there is no plan to work 
from. The prospects are not very encouraging as it is considered the coal in sight will only last a few 
months, when the lessee intends to surrender the present lease. The output of coal for the year was 
3,512 tons, a slight increase on the previous year's return. A total of six men were employed. 

Hikurangi Coal Comfany (Limited), — During the year ended 1904 no new machinery has been 
added to the company's plant ; the operations of the company have been chiefly directed to opening 
up that portion of their mine situated on the western side of the railway, where a large area of excellent 
coal has been found, and proves to be much better than at first anticipated. It was fully expected 
there would be a large quantity of water to contend with here as the workings would be immediately 
under the top end of a swamp, but, fortunately, very little water has been met with. In the eastern 
section the work is confined to extracting pillars, which is being donejwith a great amount of success, 
fully 90 per cent, of the coal left in the pillars being obtained. The contemplated work to be carried 
out during the year 1905 is to further extend the prospecting operations in the western area, which 
extends a distance of fully a mile and a half in the direction of the Hikurangi Swamp, where the seam 
has been partly proved by boring and sinking for half a mile in length and quarter of a mile in width, 
leaving a^mile still unexplored. An opening will be made at a point between the tipping-place at the 
railway sidings and where the wagons are now being filled. This tunnel will enable the company to open 
up a large area of coal on this part of the property, from which it can be cheaply worked. A new 
loading-place will be mado north of the present adit incline with a view to further opening up another 
section of the mine. A splendid quaUty of fireclay has lately been discovered, 30 ft. in thick- 
ness and very suitable for brickmaking. This will be worked at no distant date and at a small outlay. 
It is said the clay can be made into bricks and leave a good*margin of profit. For some time past 
there has been some difficulty in obtaining water suitable for boiler purposes, and the manager now 
proposes bringing in a supply from the Hikurangi Mountain, a distance of a mile and a half, the cost 
of which he estimates will not exceed £300. The work in the mine has been very satisfactorily carried 
on for the safety of the men, and the ventilation has been good ; but eventually, after the mine is 
further opened up, it will be necessary to procure other means of ventilating the workings and not 
depend on natural ventilation. The output of coal for the year was 44,974 tons, an increase of 5,349 
tons as compared with the previous year. An average of fifty-six men were employed. 

Northern Coal Company (Limited), Hikurangi, — This company's mine is situated on rising ground, 
and is worked from adit levels, which are being extended in the seam and opening up a large area of 
coal of very good quality. Owing to the ground being favourably situated there is no water to contend 
with in the present workings. A locomotivejisjused to convey the coal from the mine to the top of 
a self-acting incline (a distance of a mile and^a quarter) where the trucks are lowered to the loading- 
ground on the Government railway. The locomotive engine mentioned being too light for the amount 
of work required to be done, and subject to frequent breakdown, thus causing serious delays, it was 
found to be necessary to purchase another locomotive to do the work and enable the company to 
increase the output. Another level is now being opened out on the outcrop at a lower elevation. It 
is expected this will be completed in the month of June, and from here it is expected the coal on this 
part of the property will be worked to {greater advantage than hitherto, and at less expense. The 
output of coal for the year was 25,719 tons, an increase of 3,337 tons as compared with the previous 
year. Forty-five men were employed. 

Phoenix Mine, Hikurangi (D. Kirkwood, manager). — The operations in this mine have been very 
limited. The small steam-engine erected to pump the water was not large enough to do the work 
required, and has given a good deal of trouble on account of it frequently breaking or something going 
wrong ; but the owners, I am informed, intend to erect a larger plant to overcome this difficulty. The 
seam of coal is 10 ft. thick where it is at present being worked, but the lowest level is only 40 ft. below 
the surface, and the coal very soft, consequently it does not find as ready a sale as the coal from the 
other mines in the neighbourhood. Whether it will improve as it is driven on or at a depth remains 
to be proven. The output of coal for the year was 5,043 tons, being a slight decrease on the previous 
year. An average of sixteen men were employed. 

Kiripaka Mine (George Clemo, manager). — This mine is worked from an adit level a few feet^bove 
the Ngunguru River. From the entrance of this level the coal is conveyed in trucks along a ground 
tramway by a horse for a distance of half a mile to the loading-ground, where it is put into pimts and 
taken down the river to deep water, and there transhipped into vessek. The seam of coal has varied 
from 2 ft. to 18 ft. in thickness, but owing to the faulty nature of the country it has only been found in 
a small area, and practically most of the coal above the level named has been worked out. The com- 
pany are now directing their attention to opening up a strip of two chains of coal on their boundary 
below the adit level. The coal to the dip is of good quality, but there is a good deal of water to contend 



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with, and most likely a small engine will be required to do the pumping. The output of coal for Uie 
year was 12,604 tons, a slight increase compared with the previous year. Eighteen men were employed. 

Nqunguru Mine (A. H. Taylor, manager). — This company hat had considerable difficulties to con- 
tend with. The seam of coal worked during the year has averaged only some 3 ft. in thickness and 
is intersected by faults. The cost of mining the coal is therefore considerably greater than that of 
any other mine in the^district ; but, having some excellent fireclay on the top of the coal (which is 
obtained without great difficulty,^and shipped to Auckland), the concern was made to pay until the 
month of November, when some dispute arose between the manager and the men. The directors 
thereupon decided to stop the mine. During the stoppage the company had a few men prospecting 
and boring, but they were not successful in finding coal on the property in sufficient quantities to pay 
for working. Work has again been resumed, but the manager's attention is directed to extracting 
pillars of coal which will only last for a few months. The output of coal for the year was 14,367 tons, 
a decrease of 3,857 tons. An average of forty-six men were employed. 

Mungapapa (Mokau) Mine (Boyd Bennie, manager). — There is very, ^little change in this mine 
since my last report. The working-faces are only extended a few feet to get out sufficient coal to 
supply the local demand, which is very limited, and the coal is not good enough to send to Wellington 
to compete against the^West Ooast coal. The bar at the mouth of^e Mokau River prevents a fair- 
sized boat getting out with coal, hence cargoes are necessarily small. The output for the year was 
4,280 tons, a decrease of 1,870 tons as compared with the previous year. Thirteen men were employed. 

The Union Collieries, Maramarua (W. Tattley, manager). — The extensions of the various faces in 
this mine have been pushed on during the year ; and, as the leveb are extended under the rising 
ground (where there is more covering), the coal has greatly improved and is now in good demand. The 
greatest drawback the company has is the conveying of the coal down the river from the loading- 
ground at the mine to the (Government railway near Mercer. It is taken down in barges, but in«f»^ 
of the trucks of coal (as they come out of the mine) being emptied into the barges they are lifted by 
a crane ofi the frame and wheeb and placed as closely as possible on the deck. A similar method is 
adopted at the siding on the railway where the coal is loaded into the wagons. The barges are towed 
up and down the river by a small steam tug-boat. The ventilation in this mine in the early part of 
the year was not as good as could be desired, but on my last inspection there was nothing to complain 
oL The output of coal was 15,342 tons, an increase of 8,772 tons as compared with the previous year. 
Twenty-nine men were employed. 

Taufiri Coal-mines, HurUly (E. S. Wight^ manager). — This company's property may be said to be 
worked as three separate mines, as the workings below are not connected, although all are under the 
same management. 

The Taupiri Reserve (Kimihia) section, two and a half miles from Ralph's, is worked from an 
incline adit, tae most of the workings being under the lake, but for some timejpast nothing has been 
done in extending the workings or opening up the seam in this direction, the work being confined to 
working the hordB opened up above the low level. On the east side of the incline a good deal of 
prospecting has been done with a view to ascertaining whether the stone in the centre of the coal would 
get thinner or the coal improve in quality. There is a large area of unworked coal in this direction, 
and, should it be found to be as good as in the other section of the mine, there|would be employment 
(or a number of men for many years. 

The Taupiri Extended Mine is worked from a shaft. The operations in this section.have^been 
directed to working on that portion of the property adjacent to, and on the east side of, the Waikato 
River. As the workings are extended the coal is found to be of excellent quaUty, and the prospects 
are most encouraging. 

The Ralph section is also worked from a shaft. The shaft is sunk on the east side of the Waikato 
River, near the railway -station ; but the workings are now underlying land on the western aide of the 
river, the main haulage road having been extended in this direction for a little over half a mile from 
llie shaft. The endless-rope haulage system, which has been installed in this section for hauling the 
vAml to the bottom of the shaft, is working very satisfactorily. The coal still continues to be of good 
quality as far as it has been opened up, and the supply obtained is sufficient to meet the demand. 

The output of coal from the mines was 116,461 tons, an increase of 20,905 tons as compared with 
. ha previous year. There were 224 men employed. 

llnrtiBon^s Mine, Huntly (Edward Davis, manager). — This mine is in what is termed the College 
iUmttwti, C. Starr and party, I am informed, have a lease and have been taking some coal out on the 
hurlat 45 at the late Mr. Harrison's old workings. ^The output of coal was 215 tons, and six men were 
(employed for a portion of the year. 

iJturu Colliery, Drury (R. McEwen, manager). — This mine has just recently been started. A 
coiiiiiderable amount of boring for coal had been done by a syndicate, the success attending which had 
apparttiitiy encouraged them to form a company, with Uie object of opening up the mine and working 
it m a ciyttematic manner. A small shaft was sunk, and the seam of coal, 15 ft thick, is said to have 
Uean < (it through. The company are now driving a low level from the surface to the bottom of the 
»haft ; the drive at date is 240 ft. in length and another 40 ft. of driving will make the connection* 
When 1 his is done good ventilation will be established. The mine will be drained to the depth of the 
ievi'l Hud the drive used 'for trucking the coal out. The strata passed through in the drive was mostly 
u gocxl quality of fireclay, and required close timbering. As there are several bands of fireclay and 
almk ] unning through the coal a modem screening plant is to be erected where the stone and shale 
will be taken out. For the purpose of utilising the fireclay the company contemplate erecting works 
U}r th<' manufacture of fireclay goods. The mine being situated about two miles and a quarter from 
Drury Railway -station a tram-line is being constructed from the station to the^oot^of the hilL This 
work (» l«^t on contract, and is drawing near completion, the rails being laid down for a mile and a halL 




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7 C— 3a 

A locomotdve has been purchased for numing between the railway-station and the foot of the hill, to 
which the coal will be lowered down a self-acting incline from the mine. Sixteen men are employed 
about the mine in addition to the contractors. 

A fair amount of prospecting for coal in various parts of this district was done^n'the*early part 
of the year, but I have not heard of any important discoveries having been made. 

The total output of coal from all the mines in the district was 242,517 tons, an increase of 32,722 
tons as compared with the previous year. 

Non-fatal AccroENXs in Coal-minbs. 

The following are the names of persons injured in the mines in the Auckland district who sent in 
claims to be^placed on ** The Coal-miners' Accident Relief Fund," the number of days they were absent 
from work, and the'*amount of money received : 25th January, Henry Scotman, Ngunguru, arm 
injured, 7 days, 14s. 7d. ; 6th February, Samuel Neil, Eawakawa, arm injured, 69 days, £7 3s. 9d. ; 
7th March, John Mulgrove, Northern Colliery, finger injured, 16 days, £1 13s. 4d. ; 21st March, D. Fitz- 
gibbon, Ngunguru, ankle injured, 27 days, £2 16s. 3d. ; 24th May, B. Fabris, Phoenix, leg broken, 109 
da3rs, £11 78. Id. ; 27th May, James Neil, Union Collieries, finger injured, 12 days, £1 5s. ; 4th June, 
Richard Fredo, Ngunguru, head injured, 13 days, £1 7s. Id. ; 13th June, James McCormick, Ngunguru, • 
arm injured, 11 days, £1 2s. lid. ; 4th July, E. Preston, Kiripaka, finger injured, 17 days, £1 15s. 5d. ; 
20th July, James H. Arthur, Union Collieries, foot injured, 19 days, £1 19s. 7d. ; 17th August, John 
Trotter, Hikurangi, shoulder dislocated, 25 days, £2 12s. Id. ; 15th October, Robert McEwen, Phoenix, 
face burned, 16 <la3rs, £1 13s. 4d. ; 7th November, David Cockbum, Mokau, hand injured, 66 days,. 
£6 17s. 6d. ; 21st November, Samuel Moreland, Phoenix, body burned, 122 days, £12 14s. 2d. ; 25th 
November, Robert Richards, Hikurangi, leg burned, 116 days, £12 Is. 8d. ; 14th December, Hy. Crossey 
Drury, foot injured, 11 days, £1 2s. lid. Totals, 656 days, £68 6s. 8d. 

The total number of days men were off work who were injured in the Taupiri Coal-mines and 
received the usual weekly allowance through " The Waikato Medical and Accident Society, Huntly 
964 days, £100 8s. 4d. William Wilson, in satisfaction of all claims for injuries received, £50. Total, 
£150 86. 4d. I have, &c.. 

Jambs Coutts, 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Inspector of Mines. 



No. 3. 

Mr. Robert Tbnkbnt, Inspector of Mines, Westport, to the Under-Seobbtart, Mines Department, 

Wellington. 

Sir,— Inspector of Mines Office, Westport, 24th March, 1905. 

I have the honour in compliance with section 67 of " The Coal-mines**Act, 1891," to report 
as follows on the West Coast coal-mines for the year ending 31st December, 1904 : — 

Enner Olynn Coal-mine. — Prospecting has attained no further headway in the vicinity of the old 
mine. 

Prospecting at Belgrove, — Mr. Morrison has'^wisely directed his attention to the better cultivation 
of his farm, and ceased prospecting for coal. 

Mot'Ufipi Coal-mine, — Messrs. Gilmer and Nalder have recently commenced to extend an old drive 
formerly opened by Thomas Nalder on the west bank of the Motupipi River. The coal (brown) — so 
far driven on the level course — is parted in the centre by a stone band 15 in. in thickness, giving a total 
working-height of 5 ft. 6 in. The drive is securely timbered for a distance of 157 ft., and, should the 
quality and working-conditions of the seam meet anticipations, connection by road and sea are factors 
which will not entail extraordinary expenditure. Six men employed — two in each of the three shifts. 
The prospecting party are not over sanguine of success, but consider the prospect is worthy of a fair 
trial 

Shakespeare Bay, — Prospecting in this locality has not yet been productive of any discovery of 
commercial value, and operations are now stopped. 

Puponga Colliery : (owners, Puponga Coal and Gold-mining Company (Limited) ). — Mr. Sidney 
George Hayward, attorney for the company, has recently acquired all legal rights in connection witib 
the leasehold formerly held by the Cape Coal-prospecting Company (Limited). The erection of the 
*oading-jetty, storage-bins, and construction of the 24-in. gauge tram-line for locomotive traffic (re- 
ferred to in my report of last year) are now satisfactorily completed and operative, as also the mechanical 
appliances for screening, sorting, and haulage, while the output has]]steadily increased during the current 
year to 12,430 tons. Working westward to the rise from the level near the top of the dip haulage road, 
considerable faulting was met and dealt with, and the increased thickness of the middle band stone 
has meanwhile necessitated temporary suspension of operations in that direction, pending prospecting 
developments now in active progress. In extending operations to the dip, quality and thickness of the 
coal-seam are fully maintained, affording favourable promise of an average coalfield, the coal commanding 
a ready market for household and steaming purposes at fairly remunerative prices. Sinking the dip 
incline is suspended at present in view of carrying out the work on more effective and economical lines. 
The old system will be abandoned and a steam-driven pump will shortly be installed. The attention 
of the manager having been directed to the ventilation, arrangements are now completed for the adoption 
of a fan. Improved facilities for shipment are also receiving expert attention. With respect to the pro- 
visions prescribed under the Coal-mines Act, including timbering, spragging, examinations and reports, 
the various working-conditions have been observed ; and, as a further precaution to insure greater 



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flftfety against the probability of accident hj nmavay tmcka on the dip h^^Amg during baokge opera- 
tiona on the day shift, driving in the dip|!^ w l l>^ stnctly cocn. ^ o a six-hoiir ahift/aftenoon and 
night in each twenty-four hours. 

Mohihinui Colliery. — The limited operatjons'effected by this co-operatrre company during the year 
were confined to the rise section of the property adjoiniiie the Seddonville State Colliery, but the qnatity 
and thickness of the coal-seam having shown no marked Lciprovenient the party nltimat^ abandmied 
farther operations, withdrawing incline rop« and Vn-.^^M from the mine, and finaDy cleared out, prior 
to absolute starvation. With the eiceptioi; of two small falls of roof where the timber had broken down, 
the mine was left in fair condition. Recently the mln^ was oz"'i hj a new party, who are simply 
working the old faces. Timbering and vent.lation are maoe §T^*:ia fearorea, and reports kept to date. 
The old mine, which has been on fire for ion;e tjne, presen** no cLanse of moment. 

SeddonvilU CoUiery (New Zealand State Coal-mine?, James Bishop, manager). — OperatioiiB have 
been continuous during the year and the o:itp:2t rais^ shows a gross tonnage of 33,808 tona. Re- 
ferr'ng to the developments completed, the cr.ief wr.rk e5ectec hasl-^c the eitersion of the main haulage 
tunne , now holed with Grant's face on the north l^anjc of the C!:.asm Creek. This extension gives 
the haulage road a total length of 145*5 chairs, of which .^5 chains is rock -driven, while 16 chams is 
•in coal. In this coal-bearing area, regular worldns Las been recenthr opened from both sides of the 
tunnel, and, so far as the oc^-seam has been exploited in the ordinary course of opoations, quality 
and hardness are much superior to anything obtamed in the district first opened, but if reliable data 
may be taken from the apparently limited and faulty character of the coalfeW, it would be &ir to 
anticipate that the probable quantity of hard cnal obtainable from the present workings is likely to ^11 
short of expectations. Therefore, should further deveiopmect be considered advisable to prolong 
the life of the mine under the conditions existing, active prospecting must be vigorously poshed to meet 
future demands, and it is pleasing to note that on a recent visit to the colliery the managem ent were taking 
active measures to ascertain the extent and qu:^ ity of the cc-al-seam on the south side of Chasm Creek, 
where they propose to carry out an efficient system of eiplonns drives in the various ooctrops. Mean- 
while the general development effected, and the extent of working opene*i. are sofEcient to provide a daily 
output of 600 tons, providing the marketable value of the coal was s:iitab;e for general purposes, but 
under existing requirements, the trade demands do not ^x:^^ '1-j^ tons per day The general equip- 
ment has been maintained in good workins-coniition, and in view of utilising a portion of the small 
ooal for the manufacture of coke, experiments have been carried out. eivinc resnits which are considered 
to be quite satis&urtory. The ventilation and other provisions of the Coal-mines Act are strictly en 
forced. There have b^n no serious accidents during the year, and seven inspections were made. Tim- 
bering is systematically effected throughout the workings as the roof is chiedy an over bur den of friable 
ooaL 

MUlerUm CoUiery (own^s, Westport Coal Company (Limited^ : George Fletcher, mining-manager). — 
The mining operations continue to be worked double shift, but the restricted demands on the colliery (ss 
a&cted by fluctuations of trade) have tended to decrease the output 29.201 tons, compared with tiie 
previous year. Efficiency in working-conditions and general equipment are well and consistently main- 



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East Dip section : Shortly after suspension of operations, indications of heating were threatened 
under large Wb of coal in the upper levels, but the prompt measures adopted to remove the loose coal, 
and restore large circulating air-currents speedily averted the probability of future danger. Brick 
stopping? are exclusively used. 

Mine Creek section : This section has supplied the gross tonnage raised from this ooDiery since 
operations were suspended in the east dip. The ordinary and proeressive developments continue 
in active prc^greas. Tn extending the main headlnc sonthward for s total distance of 38 chains 
in diiert rrje of La:ilare road. a. fault-lice was met and dealt with wrth^»ut apparent difficulty, 
and a c»>al-*?A=i of excellent qua'ity and hardness exposed. On account 'of its beating properties 
and s::irta"t_ty for naval purposes, the coal was specially rw^mmenie^i by the officer super- 
vising coal-shrprLents from Westport on behalf of the Br.tish Admiralty. Other conditions of the 
w(»k:ng-ia«s are practi rally unchanged. The east crosscut reached the Ngakawau boundary 
at 32 chains frotn the main terminal and the bords branching southward are driven from this point. 
It m*v be h^re seated that, apart from any special coniirlons mentioned in the lease, provisim is made 
:o le^ . -* : r-ain t^irrier of soli i coal along the lH>undary-lir.e, care being taken to drive the face accordingly, 
th.i* AVrmig iiielihoo»i of any encroachment. West section winning heading has been extended a 
total dnvvn iistan:?e of 23 chains, the fcace showing an unbroken Hne of g»x»d ccvaL In concluding my 
I oc the general aspect of this section of the property, it may be stated that the general con- 
r of tkis extiriisive and unbroken face affords most satisfactory promise of a valuable and profitable 
Fa'^tinz. practically speaking, is not extensive when the dimensior^s of the neki are considered. 
Kew W3rk3 : In my report of last year, mention was made that permanent concrete foundations 
c»?nrmrrlon on the low leveL in orvier to aAniit of the removal of the hydraulic-brake in- 
:en sir:iate at the Mine Creek temur.al. This work, now sntstantially completed and opera- 
\ m*t antirTr^tions, and the power exert e«i to control the n ot:or. of the rope on the surging-drum 
even" yapr lied. New tunnel : la connecti.^n with the active operations to win and exhaust tJie 
ction of the >as?hold. the coal-s^am was tappevi by the rvvk crosscut — securely timbered 
to 11 ft. by 7 ft. in the clear — at a distance of IS chains, driven in continuation of the surface tram- 
Eae wUck was »?t of to junction with the main hanlaire at the Biir-brake terminal. The coal-seam so 
iur f u i ^ af oris promise of favourable quality and thickness, and a holing effected with the original 
~ " : pTj'v.des e5^::ent ventilati'-^n under diroct control of the tan. To meet the additional require- 
V of tbe new tnnnel daKnct, the power-starion situate at the lower mine mouth has been spaciously 




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rehoused, with suitable accommodation, and the erection of a Babcock and Wilcox boiler and Leyner 
air-compressor is now in progress. Drainage adit : The importance of this rock crosscut for the purpose 
of draining the deep workings of the Mine Creek areas has received careful and prompt attention. 
Levels were determined, and in September last driving was commenced with hand-drills from the inbye 
end to junction with the outlet section, the latter being driven with rock-drills actuated by compressed 
air. Water is suppHed under pressure to suppress the dust, the face being a hard, well-defined, grey 
granite. 

There have been no additions to the plant at the Mine Creek power-station. The general ventilation 
is strictly maintained over the whole system, while the timbering of roads and faces, and the various 
examinations under the Coal-mines Act are made special features in the safety and economy of working 
operations. . Ail reports strictly and duly kept. Seven inspections were made, and the old workings 
in both sections of the mine carefully examined with safety-lamp, no indications of gas or heating being 
found. The following observations of relative temperatures will be of interest : Surface (in the sun), 
68 degrees ; east intake (1 chain from day), 54 degrees ; east intake (directly at face), 49 degrees ; main 
return to fan, 54 degrees. 

Denniston Collieries (owners, Westport Coal Company (Limited) ; J. Dixon, mining-manager). — 
The gross tonnage raised from these mines for the year 1904 show a decrease of 2,773 tons compared 
with the previous year, but it is noteworthy that notwithstanding the restricted demands on the colliery, 
as affecting single and double shifts, the efficient and economical development recently completed in 
haulage, &c., have enabled the collieries to produce the largest output yet recorded for any yearly period 
exclusively worked on single shift. 

Coalbrookdale Mine (23/12/1904) : This mine has steadily maintained its former efficiency, and 
active operations for the further development of the property have been consistently carried out. 
Respecting the geological features of the Cascade district westward, the lower section of the coal-seam 
is found to thin out to an almost unworkable thickness, but a corresponding increase of thickness is 
maintained in the upper section of the seam. Development is thus economically effected without 
apparent depreciation, even though the seam is divided by a considerable thickness of intervening 
strata. The extraction of pillars has been successfully effected in this district. 

Cascade dip continues to show favourable promise in thickness and quality of seam as the workings 
extend dipward. whilst drainage and ventilation are effected through the coal adit driven from Cascade 
Creek. To meet the growing requirements mechanical haulage was recently installed on a new heading 
opened eastward, where a haullng-engine actuated by compressed air is permanently placed. Gas 
was reported in a heading- face over a large fall of top coal. 

Cascade East : The solid workings having been extended riseward to the fault-boundaries, pre- 
paratory work is in hand for the extraction of pillars. Owing to the friable character of the roof over- 
lying the coal-seam considerable cost in timbering is likely to be incurred, and great care will have to 
be exercised in the working-places. 

Munsie's section : Solid working is about to be suspended in this section, as the trend is to the 
dip. Hence the remaining portion of the solid ground will be forewon at some subsequent period from 
future developments of Cascade east. Meanwhile the area now opened will be pillared, towards which 
preparatory work is well advanced. 

Ironbridge Mine : The Dundee dip section of solid working is decidedly the most important dis- 
trict of this property. In the earlier stages of operations, faulting of a reverse character was a source 
of considerable trouble, but during the current year several extensive rock cross-cuttings for the purpose 
of winning and ventilation have been completed, and the eaming-capacities of the mine considerably 
enhanced thereby. So much is this the case that the face now opened maintains a maximum standard 
in quality and thickness of seam. Free drainage and mechanical ventilation are amply provided. 

Big Pillar district : The extraction of these pillars continues to give satisfactory results — i.e., if 
the extra thickness of coal-seam operated upon and the immimity of serious accidents are factors 
worthy of note, whilst the low percentage of waste may be chiefly attributed to the superior structure 
of the coal-seam and the favourable character of the immediately overlying strata. 

Kiwi district : Recent developments extending further northward have exposed a coal-seam of 
average quality, while the outcrop pilars in the adjoining section are being successfully extracted. 
Respecting the working there is Httle change to report. 

New works : With a view to the improvement of present ventilation, and to provide an ample 
supply of air to meet extended requirements, preparatory work is in progress towards the erection of a 
12 ft. diameter double inlet fan of the " Hayes' " type with a guaranteed capacity of 160,000 cubic 
feet per minute at a 3 in. water-gauge. The driving-power will be effected by a new steam-engine 
made in the colony, and when operative the fan will control the ventilation in the various districts of 
the Cascade and Munsie's areas, and lay aside two lesser fans now in use. The surface section of 
haulage-road recently constnicted between the wooden bridge and the brake-head terminal (with a 
completed length of 120 chains) was opened for haulage traffic in June last with satisfactory results, 
while the jimction of the two subsidiary haulages, which control the output from the separate mines, 
deliver the coal at the wooden bridge, and from thence it is conveyed over the new route to the 
brake-head terminal. It is officially stated that in accordance with the results attained, the new 
haulage is capable of dealing with an output of 1,500 tons per day of eight hours. The coal-storage 
bins, with a calculated capacity of 2,000 tons, now under construction at the brake-head, will, when 
completed, be equipped with wagon-loading conveyers, sorting and picking belts, capable of treating 
and discharging the output into the bins. When these bins are completed they promise to be the 
most complete and substantial structure of the kind that h&s yet been erected at any West Coast 
colliery. 

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Shots fired doling the year : Mr. Dixon kdndlj fnnuBhcB the foUowing : According to the official 
record kept at the eoUienes there were S8,166 shots fired, which, when calcalated on the gron tonnage 
raised, gives an average rie^d per shot of 6*73 tons, whiV the ratio of mis-shotB was 1 in 406. llieae 
records mav be considered highly satisfactory, proving conclnaivelv the qnatitr of the explosive oaed 
and the judgmeDt exercised by the op«ator8. 

Prosecutions : There were two prosecntions at Denniston J. P. Court for Ineaches of ** The Coal- 
mines Act, i89i/' (1.) Breach of special mle 36 by a miner holing without sptm^ ; fine £1 with 9b. 
costs. (2.) A horse-driver travelling on rope-road whilst set in moticHi ; fined 5s. and costs. 

Throaghoot the whole system the working-conditions have been stzictiy obeerred in accordance 
with the requirements of the Coal-mines Act. 

16 8 1^04 : Temperature in the son, 57 degrees. The lowest reading in mine was 40 degrees aod 
the highest 57 degrees, which latter was in a stone drive immediately after blasting. Average tem- 
perature of mine, 50 decrees. 

Coal Creek Coal-mime, BuUer Road (George Walks, leasee).— <8 10 1904): In the early part of 
the year the lessee had some little difficulty to find coHien capable of supplying the dredging demands, 
but this trouble was eventually rioted by the a e iikes of a practical collier who soon put the fmce in 
working-order and provided coal in ample quantity. Unfortunately dredging on the BuDer River 
has been somewhat on the down-grade of late, therefore steaming-eoal is not in actire demand. The 
mine b in good order, but the stone bands in the face an mote strongly defined and overhead water 
is a source of discomfort in working. 

WhiU CUy$ Codmine^ B^er Road (Job Lines, lcaMe).--<8 10. 1901) : Steaming-coal for the 
Old Diggings dredge is the chief supply from this nine, which gives employment to one man, who keeps 
the roof securely timbered. It may be stated that the OU Digging dredge (owned by a pnrate party) 
is the orifdnal Cocksparrow from Dunedin, it being famous in history, and now the most cofwastfiit 
g«>Id- winner on the Buller. The pontoons, built of steel plate, give it the reputation of safety and hooy- 
ancv during floods. 

' Flojb^uk Cc^-mime. Thrre Chammd Flat (De Phillippi, owner).— <14, 10 1904) : The Mokoia and 
Feddersen dred^«?s get their supplies from this mine, and although the coal is small when mined, its 
heating properti*^ for steaming purpooes are preferred to that from Bulier Road. When visited, the 
face « newly opened on longwalt principle) was won by a rock cr oss cu t driven of! the main tunnel, whUst 
the section of the seam was the best for quality and thickness that I have yet seen worked on the pro- 
perty. Timbering is a special feature in the working, and ventilation is kept on the face from an 
opening at the ontcrop. Three men employed- 

LffM-rori. — Tuis mine is now a thing of the past. 

Bo'drke't Creek Coal-mime '.owners. Cairns simI Mcliver).— (6 12 1904) : In the old mine, the coal 
in the face of the low level eastward having become very stony and wet overhead, the party defidfd 
to suspend f:irther operations in that direction, and open a new section on the western tezrace rimg 
from the creek-bed. Tnis work entailed the driving of a 6 ft. by 5 ft. tunnel through a mixture of old 
allavial and crashed cc.:inrry, which necessitated careful timbecmg for a distance of 100 ft. The coal- 
seam won is of fair q^:ia liry ; b:it. the trade depending wholly on household requirements, the mine is 
shut down during the summer months. 

Ar^Jier'* F'-feA^d^ C^fi^^tym (F. W. Archer. own«). — (7 \t 1904) : The supply is maintained by 
the extraction >f pilars on the rise '"evel towards the outcrop. The smaC coal is chiedy used for steaoH 
'vc4L purposes at the dredires on the Boatman's Creek, while the round coal is carted and sold at Rc^too 
and other centres as a nist-cLass household fueL A low level was €^>«ed with a view to effecting drain- 
age to a greater depth, b::t after driving and rising wete extended it was discovered the working was 
in an upper seAm and not ui line with the rise work, the change of level having been effected by an 
upthrow fa-^ilt n->t formeriy known in the field. 

(.W'j*** Fr^^h*%d^C*3ple^'yn tJ. CocLan, owner). — f6 12 1901) : The demand is mainly for dredging 
porposea. one zr^n \^ii.z employed in the rise mine. Recently the owner opeced a low level to inters 
sect the 'Xal-sear.! at the base of the terrace, but faiW in his efforts to find coaL 

J/^oT^y Cr^k C*:03i-mim^ .J. B; leu, ownerl. — <^ 12 1904) : The supply of steam coal to the Con- 
soliiated *>:'i::e;^is Murray Creek battery is still cocdnued from this open-face property. At the 
time Mr. Bhlett at ::iired woridng-righia. specu>ation prevailed relative to the quantity and qualitT 
of the cral still exisnr^ in the leasehold, but his aptitude to develop a roadway to the £ace. ssitahte 
for h- -rse and cart tr^^:-:, speedily changed conditions to a venture which has been a practical sa cc cM 
in w rrrirg s villi ble steamins-coal in laree quantity. 

Pkin^s C'>d-m\m^, /?^ift'?n iJohn Kni^t, owner). — (7 12 1904) : During the heavy rain^H in 
March, lb<14, the steep a-ie!:rg overiying the coa'-seam gave way in the form of a huge landstip. which 
CTtifhed down the ULkin leve' and de«troved a section of the road leading to the Ingiewood qaartZHBmie. 
For a rime this ditn-ise 9erio:isly affected the mine-owner, who lost no time to proecre coal for the 
Inziew-x>d battery trrc: an oad drive situated above the damaged road. To reopen the lost level was 
the next •:*~-nSfieran'-n. h*it the owner, having no practical means of ascertaining the extent of the 
dazcuEe done. de^ijFied tc abandon all effort to reopen the 'eveL Attention was then directed to drain 
a section of cpen-ii.?e ci:«&l located in the bed of the creek which is included in the S e aa e h chL This 
drainaze havir^jc been s^i-xesefiZy carried out, provision was effected whereby the owDer was mihkd 
to sTittlv his i:-:i5toz:er* with hotaehold fue* of good quality, also to reopen the mine frcm the de ep er 
WveL With the oc;ecc ct ascertaining the true petition ol the mine- working, the party proposed to 
enter bv the nse >veL btit so fax they have failed in the attonpt, the hill having not su&iently settled. 
i 19 1*> 19*14; : C^ visnrg th^ mine on said date, a smouldering &re was di a c ove ied in a large heap 
of sLack-coal. whi^rh was speedily shovelLed into the creek, and the heated ground thoroughly roofed 
down hj a water-s^ply fn^m the creek. The fire originated mider the fireplace of a hut buih €■ the 
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LocUngUm'a Leasehold, Bourke^a Creek, Reefton.— {6/12/1904:) : With the object of providing 
ventilation^and a second outlet, the west level driven from the tenninus of the adit has been holed on 
the outcrop, while coal for household and steaming purposes is mined from the east side. The stone 
is frequently bad in the face, and tends to break the coal very much. 

Elackadder*8 Leasehold, Reefton Town Bdt. — (9/12/1904) : Operations continue to be extended 
on the low level. The quality and thickness of seam b well maintained, and timber is freely used to 
secure the roof. Ventilation has been assisted by a rise connecting with the upper level. Brown 
pyritical stone occurs in the coal to some extent. 

Lankey's Creek Coal-mine, Reefton, — (9/12/1904) : The owner finds employment single-handed. 
The working is about 5 ft. in height, and the trend of the seam has been somewhat erratic of late. 

TheJSew Inkerman Mines (Limited) work this coal exclusively for battery and quartz-mining re- 
quirements on the property. The seam is practically on the same underlay as the quartz-veins, and 
the system of timbering is much on the same lines. Ventilation is well maintained from the open 
outcrops. One man employed. 

DeviPs Creek Coal-mine, Reefton, — The adit was recently reopened and very securely timbered, 
but nothing further has been done in the face. 

Progress New Coal-mine, Reefton, — (7/12/1904) : This mine is exclusively worked for the supply 
of steaming-coal for A and B Progress quartz-mines, the coal being chiefly mined from the extension 
of the west level, and rising to the outcrop. The thickness of seam is about 4 ft., and the quality fair 
for steaming. Two miners were injured by a fall of stone in the face. 

Loughnan's Coal-mine, Reefton, — (7/12/1904) : This mine is scarcely worthy of the name, for, 
when visited, a man is scarcely to be found. A coal-tunnel has been driven through the hill, and it seems 
to stand there. 

Waitahu Coal-mine, Reefton (J. Scarlett, owner). — (7/12/1904) : The low level has been driven 
for a considerable distance, but the soft nature of the coal does not seem to improve. Otherwise the 
coal is clean and free of stone. One man employed. 

Burning Coal-seam at Boatman^s, — The extinguishing of the smouldering fire at this burning coal- 
seam on the north bank of the Waitahu River appears to have been a success. During the recent 
exceptional long spell of dry weather indications of heat or smoke have been completely nil. 

Blackball CcUiery (owners, Blackball Coal Company ; James Leitch, mining - manager). — 
(29/11/1904) : The demand for the coal from this colliery being somewhat less than during the pre- 
vious year or two, it was deemed advisable in the best interests of all concerned to reduce hands and 
keep the mine more fully employed on single shift. The gross tonnage raised (85,528 tons), as com- 
pared with the previous year, shows a decrease of 3,421 tons. The chief supply continues to be won 
from the extraction of pillars in the original rise district, but if the difficulties which are effected by 
friable roof and spontaneous ignition are to be considered undesirable factors in the economy of mining, 
then it is fair to assume that the percentage of coal won from this limited area is considerably in excess 
of the quantity originally computed. With reference to the cost and anxiety incurred (incident to 
the troubles arising from spontaneous ignition), the ratio of fires in the mine, compared with previous 
yearSy has been the reverse of favourable. The cause may be chiefly attributed to the largely increased 
area of exhausted workings, this view being fully borne out by the more deadly character of fumes 
given off from the exhausted ground, as compared with the fires fought with in the open bords. When- 
ever fires have broken out immediate steps have been taken to suppress them. As reported in former 
papers, the stoppings exclusively used are built with stone or crib-logging and properly packed with 
loose clayey matter to a width of from 5 yards to 6 yards in heaving ground, yet it is not uncommon 
for outbreaks to occur over these stoppings, even though the utmost care has been taken to avoid the 
possibility of such fires. Since the original water-supply (used for the suppression of fires) cannot 
possibly be maintained through the exhausted ground, fresh air-currents are supplied wherever prac- 
ticable, but in such cases care is necessary to prevent ignition of the smouldering mass, and, using 
the manager's words, " desperate cases require desperate measures." Probably the most destructive 
and least expected outbreak that has yet occurred originated in the open terrace directly in the vicinity 
of the ventilating-fumace, the origin or cause being somewhat shrouded in mystery, as the outer brick- 
work enclosing the furnace was considered in every way sufficient to protect the coal against the possi- 
bility of ignition. However, notwithstanding all the difficulties attached to the suppression of the 
outbreak, the locality is now securely sealed down under a deep cover of dry sand, and all indications 
of smoke and heating are entirely cut off. Pending the completion of the Capell fan, ventilation was 
maintained by the small furnace. At time of writing the fan is reported to have commenced work, 
and to circulate an air- volume of 42,000 cubic feet per minute at a comparatively slow speed. 

No. 2 Dip Tunnel section : In running the haulage and drainage levels w^tward in line for a dis- 
tance of 25 chains from the bottom of the dip crosscut the level course suddenly dipped, and having 
failed to discover any favourable change in the trend of the measures after a series of consistent 
drivings, the course of the main level was changed 40 degrees riseward to effect level course, which angle 
will seriously cut off the working-faces. Development is well advanced in the opened ground, and 
should any unforseen accident occur, necessitating the abandonment of the rise- working, provision is 
made for the employment of seventeen pairs of colliers in the new dip district. Driving eastward, the 
coal does not look so promising, owing to its being soft. 

Drainage adit : This adit, driven from the bed of Ford's Creek for the purpose of draining the 
workings of the No. 2 tunnel district, was 818 ft. in length at the close of the year, leaving 485 ft. to 
effect a holing. 

The general equipment and working-conditions of the mine are good, and notwithstanding the 
very friable nature of the roof to be contended against in the removal of pillars, and the exposure to 



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deadly fumes arising from spontaneous ignition, the absolute freedom from serious accident is a matter 
worthy of commendation. The provisions under the Coal-mines Act are strictly observed. Seven 
inspections were made. 

Tyneside Proprietary Company, — (R. Alison, mining-manager). — (24/11/1904) : This colliery, 
situated directly behind the railway-station at Bnmner, is opened by a circular winding-shaft 97 ft. 
in depth, with a finished diameter of 10 ft., and operated on by two single-decked cages, whilst the 
adit on the south bank of the River Grey provides a suitable travelling-way for the workmen and an 
efficient intake for ventilation. During the year mining operations have been somewhat changeable 
from single to double shift to meet the requirements of trade, but on the whole work has maintained 
a fair average, the output showing a gross tonnage of 38,406 tons. Development has been chiefly 
confined to the extension of the dip haulage-road, which has been driven on an average gradient of 1 
in 4 to a distance of 20 chains in a direct line from the shaft, the coal-seam won having maintained a 
fair quaUty during the whole distance driven. In connection with the driving of the dip, it was antici- 
pated that the well-known Kimberley fault would intersect the coal-seam at about 15 to 16 chains 
from the shaft. It appears, however, that the produced line of fault, on crossing the dip heading, was 
simply traceable in the roof. On this assumption the management is confident that this extensive 
fault has pinched out and does not extend into the back areas as was originally considered. Mean- 
while, further driving is suspended pending development from the Wallsend shaft. In view of prov- 
ing the quality of the coal eastward, development has been more actively pushed, and, so far as the 
face has advanced, prospects are more favourable. Ventilation has received important attention, 
each district of working being ventilated with separate air- currents, the haulage- road acting as the 
main return. In addition to the influence effected on the return current by the heated colunm of steam- 
pipes, it is now further supplemented by the installation of a fan of the " Hayes " type, 6 ft. 6 in. in 
diameter, which is being driven to meet the present requirements of 25,000 cubic feet per minute, but 
has a capacity for a much larger volume. Since this mine was reopened, pumping has been a sore 
point in the economy of working, but happily this defect is now more systematically arranged by a 
much- needed system of water lodgements, the present system having placed the former anxieties within 
the range o comfort to all concerned. Respecting the west working there is Uttle change of import- 
ance to note other than the routine of ordinary operations. Gas was reported in two of the heading- 
faces. Reports are kept to date. Six inspections made. A shght burning accident was reported. 

Brunner Mines (R. Alison, mining-manager) — (24/11/1904): The quantity of coal won from 
the pillars extracted in working homeward from No. 1 fault towards the mine-mouth not only proves 
the consistency in which operations have been effected, but reflects credit alike on the part of the work- 
men and officers employed in the care exercised to prolong the life of the mine, also their little home- 
steads. To say the least, the greater part of the pillar-area extracted was so extensively worked in 
former years that further expenditure to reopen and work the ground was considered hopelessly worth- 
less, and would incur an unnecessary waste of labour and capital. However, the labour and money 
expended have not only reaped a fair reward to all interested, but their efforts have provided a means 
whereby they have participated in an honest and contented living, notwithstanding the difficult and 
broken character of the ground dealt with in many instances, while immunity from serious accident 
has been a marked feature in the operations. Fireclay being a product of considerable value in the 
economy of this mine, special care has been equally taken to exhaust its resources thoroughly, for, 
like the coal, only patches remained for the last comer. Speaking on the general conditions afforded, 
it may be fairly assumed that the name of the Brunner Mine may yet be mentioned as a going concern 
in the Mines Annual Report of next year, providing precautionary steps are taken to work the remain- 
ing portion of the coal gradually, and allow the heavy overburden to settle down without throwing 
any undue subsidence on the elevated terrace land overlooking the Grey River, as it is important in 
the interests of the residents to take all the coal procurable without nmning any undue risk. The 
examinations of Brunner and Tyneside Mines are strictly made monthly by the workmen, and the re- 
ports recorded at the coUiery office are highly satisfactory. Boring operations, now actively pushed on 
on the St. Kilda Flat, have attained a depth of 200 ft. Marls associated with quartzose bands have so 
far been found in the borehole. The ventilating-fan having been knocked out of working-order by 
the effects of the mine-working, ventilation is assisted by a steam-jet. Reports and other provisions 
of " The Coal-mines Act, 1891," are strictly observed. Seven inspections made. James Hunter, 
miner, sustained fracture of right leg. 

Point Elizabeth Colliery (New Zealand State Coal-mines ; James Bishop, manager). — (23/11/1904) : 
In continuation of my report of last year, the various operative works and economic developments in 
connection with the handling of the mine-output have been practically completed in a substantial 
manner, and since export^ trade was opened with the coUiery in June of 1904, 60,255 tons has been 
forwarded for railway, commercial, and household purposes. The active centres of mining operations 
have been confined to the coal-seam won on Nos. 1 and 2 rock-driven timnels. At the two points stated, 
the seam where firstly intersected varied in thickness from 12 ft. to 16 ft., but as the winning-levels 
and rise headings were extended on the level course and to the rise of the field a decrease in thickness 
of the seam soon became an alarming factor in the economy of operations ; so much so that the work- 
able thickness in many places does not exceed 3 ft. Therefore, to cope with this extensive and dissap- 
pointing thinning, immediate measures are required to prevent serious reduction in the output, and it is 
pleasing to note that the management, being fully aUve to the position, have lost no time to test the field 
dipward in driving a dip heading off the main level in No. 2 section. The dip, now driven a distance of 
20 chains, has proved an unbroken section of coal-seam of superior quahty and thickness, which posi- 
tively indicates that the major part of the field extends to the dip of the present working. Machinery 
of a temporary character is used to meet prospecting requirements, but, providing future developments 



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of the seam meet anticipations, the installation of more powerful and permanent plant will be necessary. 
The''absence of water is a notable feature in the working-conditions. The endless-rope-haulage system, 
the best that could have been adopted, is in operation. The construction of storage-bins with a load- 
ing-capacity of 2,000 tons has been substantially completed, but in addition to the present appliances 
in use, conveyer-belts will be furnished for the more even distribution and efficient cleaning of the 
coal before loading. Amongst the essentialities at the colUery are the blacksmiths' and carpenters' 
workshops, which are spaciously built and equipped with useful labour-saving tools ; also the office 
recently erected for colliery use compares favourably with similar buildings at more important centres. 
The sawmilUng plant has been found a factor of considerable value in connection with the development 
of the property, and with the recent addition of the planing-machine, the requirements for building 
timber for workmen's dwellings will be much simplified. The general equipment of the colliery has 
been carried out on substantial and efficient Unes. The ventilation and general working-conditions 
of the mines are satisfactory, and the provisions imder the Coal-mines Act are strictly observed. Seven 
inspections were made. Thomas Smith, miner, was killed by a fall of roof. 

Accidents and Fatalities. 

Brunner Mine. — (18/1/1904) : Wright Armstrong, roadman, killed by a fall of coal whilst draw- 
ing timber. 

Coalbrodkdale Mine. — (1/3/1904) : Albert JefEerman, miner, killed by fall of coal in the face, 
spragging neglected. 

Paint Elizabeth Af inc.— -(14/12/1904) : Thomas Smith, miner, killed by a fall of roof on flatsheet. 

Mokihinui Mine. — (10/3/1904) : John Tressman, miner, had legs bruised by fall of coal in *he 
face. 

Coalbrookdale Mine. — (3/6/1904) : J. Price, shiftman, sustained injury to head and face and 
arms while setting timber — not serious. 

Ironbridge Mine. — (28/7/1904) : F. Hudson, miner, had collarbone and two short ribs broken by 
fall of bottom coal breaking away from imderneath the sprag while he was holing. 

Paint Elizabeth CoUiery, Greymauth. — (26/1/1904) : Walter Watson, carpenter, had arm broken 
while erecting coal-bins. (27/9/1904) : William Davis, deputy, had two ribs broken and injury to 
shoulder while drawing timber in the east level face off No. 1 tunnel. 

Tyneside Mine. — (28/9/1904) : W. Moses, miner, was slightly burned by explosion of gas in the 
face. 

Pupanga Mine. — (8/4/1904) : Thomas Collier, miner, sustained cuts on face and scalp-wound 
by fall of coal in the face. 

Progress New Caal-mine, Reef ton. — (4/8/1904) : Thomas McGee and William Cochrane (mates) 
were injured by fall of stone in face. 

Brunner Mir^. — (14/10/1904) : James Hunter, miner, sustained fracture of leg by fall of stone 
in face. 

General Remarks. 

The output of coal during the year ending 31st December, 1904, was 836,950 tons, which is an 
increase of 55,918 tons as compared with the previous year. 

The year 1904 has been marked by the active progress made in the erection of mechanical appli- 
ances to effect increased efficiency in the ventilation of the West Coast coUeries. At Blackball and 
Tyneside Mines fans have been erected and are now in operation, whilst, as already reported, the West- 
port Coal Company have carried out extensive works preparatory to the erection of a 12 ft. diameter 
double-inlet fan, with a guaranteed exhausting-capacity of 150,000 cubic feet per minute, at a 3 in. 
water-gauge. At time of writing, this fan has arrived at Westport. The Puponga Coal Company 
have also completed arrangements to install a single-inlet fan, 7 ft. in diameter. These fans when 
erected and operative will place the whole ventilating system of the principal West Coast coUieries 
under fan-control. 

Drainage. — The rock-driven adits now well advanced towards completion at Millerton and Black- 
ball will effect free drainage over the whole system now operative at each colUery. 

Foreign Trade. 

Westpart Coal Company. — The total tonnage shipped directly from the port of Westport to outside 
the colony during the year 1904 was 44,319 tons, this statement being a decrease of 9,497 tons as com- 
pared with the previous year. I have, &c., 

R. Tennent, 

The Under-Secretary, Mines Department, Wellington. Inspector of Mines. 



No. 4. 

Mr. E. R. Green, Inspector of Mines, Dunedin, to the Under-Secretary, Mines Department, 

Wellington. 

Sir, — Office of Inspector of Mines (Southern District), Dunedin, 1st April, 1905. 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the coal-mines in the Southern District 
for the year ending the 31st December, 1904, in accordance with the requirements of section 67 of " The 
Coal-mines Act, 1891 " :— 



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C— 3a. 14 

Canterbuby* 

Springfield Colliery, Springfield (J. Taylor, permit). — (19/8/04) : The mine i« in good working-order* 
Timber is well used throughout the mine. Ventilation fair. The return airway to the shaft required 
attention, but a new heading is being driven in coal to connect with the shaft. Six men are employed. 
413 tons 10 cwt. of fireclay raised from this pit during the year. 

Victoria Mine, Springfield (W. J. Cloud^ley). — (19/8/1904) : A new mine driven outside the 
boundary of the company's fence foimd the coal-seam disturbed and troubled by an upthrow fault 
to such an extent that work has been discontinued until the return of the proprietor, who is on a visit 
to England. 

Homebush Colliery, Olentunnd (J. C. Campbell, manager). — (20/8/1904) : New cross-measures drive 
east from main level at 136 yards struck 6 ft. seam of coal in which levels are being turned away north 
and south. Dip section : Dip extension suspended meanwhile, north and south low levels being driven 
narrow (6 ft.), and false roof being taken down to provide permanent air and travelling ways. Drum 
heading section : Work to rise still confined to splitting and extracting pillars. Henry Nicol sustained 
bruises to loins on the 6th August ; a flake of false roof had fallen and borne Nicol to the floor. The 
mine-manager had instructed Nicol to take the flake down. Nicol and his mate had, however, decided 
to first fill a box of coal. 209 tons of fireclay had been taken from this mine during the year. 

Su HderCa Colliery, Whitediffs (H. Levick, permit). — (20/8/1904) : Mine-workings in good order, 
and ventilation fair. The levels are driven to the faults, and the pillars are being brought back. 
Timber is well used. Development of the mine has been considerably hampered by faults struck in 
the north and south sections. The main cross-measures drive has been extended to search for a new 
Beajn, but without success. 

Mount Somers Coal Company, Mount Somera (M. Neilson, mine-manager). — (11/11/1904) : A 
new mine-entrance has beey made to rise of old workings, and south levels are driven practically on the 
western boundary, leaving the bulk of the seam unworked to the dip. When the proposed tramway is 
laid up the Woolshed Creek Valley there will be little difficulty in driving a water-free level to the dip of 
the seam, which will command a large block of coal to the rise. Thickness of seam, 24 ft. Work during 
the year has been seriously hampered by twelve successive falls of snow, a serious consideration, 
seeing that there are eleven miles of tramway above groimd from the mine-mouth to the Mount 
Somers Railway-station. 

Woolshed Creek Colliery, Mount Somers (J. Healey, permit ; W. T. Doak, secretary).— (11/11/1904) : 
Coal to rise becoming rapidly exhausted. Pillars are robbed almost to their last extremity. A new 
drive at a lower level will soon be a necessity, or, as an alternative, a drive to the dip, when hauling and 
pumping plant will be required. In further working it would not be advisable to work above the main 
stone band in the centre of the seam, there being a full 12 ft. of good coal below the band, and, if 
substantial pillars be left, a large percentage of coal might be won. Several props were required in the 
level roadway for better security. 

AJhury Cod-mine, AJhury (J. M. Willetts). — (24/8/1904) : Air-shaft at front of workings, and good 
air now circulating though the mine. Coal is won by means of crosscuts instead of headings and 
bords. The tongues of pillars at breakaways are left too small for permanent roof-support, and I 
instructed Mr. Willetts to that effect. The mine is situate upon Opawa Station, now known as 
Chamberlain Settlement. 

Waihao Coal-mine, Waihao Forks (A. A. Adamson). — (26/8/1904) : This mine had been worked in 
sections, each section being pillared as a new one was opened out. In the early part of the year the 
mine was found to be on fire, and was at once closed off. The mine was still closed on the date of my 
visit. Adamson has since surrendered his lease to Mr. Grant, the landowner. 

Waihao Forks Coal-mine, Waihao Forks (D. McPherson, owner; (George Lomas, permit). — 
(26/8/1904) : This property had hitherto been worked in a small way, opencast. A dip drive has 
been driven 120 ft., and levels broken off. Three men have been employed. The owner has now 
granted a lease over 80 acres to a Christchurch syndicate for twenty-five years on a royalty basis. 
The property is to be worked on a more extensive scale, for which purpose a steam winding and 
pumping plant is to be erected. 

Elephant HiU, Waihao Downs (Lewis Mathias, runholder).— (26/8/1904) : This mine was worked 
in the early part of the year by A. A. Adamson, who subsequently surrendered his lease to the landowner, 
Mr. L. Mathias. The mine has recently been retimbered in accordance with instructions received 
from this office, and is now in safe working-order. Coal is obtained for station requirements. One 
man employed. 

North Otaoo. 

St. Andrew's Colliery, Papakaio (Thomas Nimmo). — (22/10/1904) : Still coming homeward on the 
pillars ; ash stoppings regularly inserted to imprison black damp in waste ground, thus minimising 
risk of spontaneous fire. Rules posted ; plan to date. 

Prince Alfred Colliery, Papakaio (G. N. Willetts, permit).— (22/10/1904) : New shaft sunk in front 
of advancing workings, giving good ventilation. Underground workings are now bordering on the Coal 
Reserve, and the plan requires to be brought up to date. 

Ngapara Colliery, Ngapara (William Nimmo). — (20/10/1904) : Coal-seam 25 ft. in thickness, 
of which 6 ft. to 8 ft. in the centre of the seam is being worked. A dry crevice or cavity, 15 ft. by 12 ft., 
met with in the level was found full of black damp. A new shaft is being sunk to the rise to increase 
the efficiency of this well-ventilated mine. All dross is drawn. Roadways and working-places in 
good order. 

AUandale Colliery, Shag Point (C. H. Westfield, mine-manager).— (23/12/1904) : Roadways, 
working-places, and return airways continue to be maintiained in good order and condition. Timber 



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15 C— 3a. 

being systematically used, and, notwithstanding the hand of stone in the roof, accidents &t>m falls of 
roof are comparatively rare. The dip section is opening out in a satisfactory manner. The seam of 
coal more than maintains an average thickness of 6 ft,, the coal being of good quality. Electric haulage 
and pumping plant are being installed for use in the dip workings and haulage on main level underground, 
the power bemg generated at the surface steam-boilers, and transmitted to winches underground by 
cables suspended from insulators inserted in posts on roadside. On this date the ventilation was 
rather dull in dip woridng-faces owing to the back airway being behind, otherwise ventilating current 
fresh and good throughout the mine. Districts being worked are the North Level section. Stone Jig 
section, and Dip section, all in No. 1 seam, and Long Jig section. No. 2 seam. Thomas Foster, junior, 
trucker, seventeen years of age, working with his father on the 10th October, 1904, slipped and fell, 
striking his knee against a rail on the roadway. The accident was looked upon as being of a trifling 
nature at first, but some days later symptoms of inflammation were detected. The lad was brought 
to Dunedin Hospital, and the knee operated upon without avail, as Foster gradually sank and died 
from blood-poisoning on the 1st November, 1904. Three visits of inspection have been made during 
the year. 

Shag Point CcUiery, Shag Poini (E. W. Brooke, permit).— (12 8/1904) : Shaft workings abandoned, 
and water in shaft has risen to sea-leveL Workings on sea-beach continue to afiord a small output 
for local requirements. A start will soon be made to open up a thin seam known to outcrop on the 
hillside. (23/12/1904) : Coal-mining operations are confined to the 2 ft. 8 in. seam ; but, 12 ft. below, 
a seam 4 ft. 6 in. in thickness, broken by a 3 in. band of stone, is being prospected. An air-shaft has 
been provided. Six men are employed. 

South Otaoo. 

FemhSL Coal Company^ AbboUford (James Gray, manager). — (26/7/1904) : Mine in good order, 
and ventilation good. Prospecting drives continue to be driven in an endeavour to get behind the 
area lost by fire and water. 

Freeman's Coal Company, AbboUford (R. Hill, mine-manager). — (26^ 7 1904) : Mine in very fair 
working-order. Ventilation good, and air well conducted around the working-faces. Preparations 
are being made to re-erect the hauling plant at Femhill, the object being to utilise the Femhill branch 
line of railway, and dispense with the tram-line hitherto used for conveyance of coal-output to the 
railway siding on main south line of railway. 

Jubilee Colliery, Saddle HUl (Peter Campbell, mine- manager) .—(27/ 7/ 1904) : Work now being 
carried on in southern section of the mine. Ventilation adequate. Coal roof and sides strong and 
self-supporting, and, being water free, the conditions of mining at this colliery are verv favourable. 

Saddle HUl No. 1 Colliery, Saddle Hill (Christie Bros., owners; W. W. Ogilvie, manager).— 
(27/7/1904) : New upcast air-shaft to the rise aflords better ventilation of the workings than had 
previously been the case. The levels, headings, and bords are carefully laid off and driven to lines, 
ensuring regularity of the workings and sizes of pillars. 

Saddle Hill No. 2 CoUiery, Saddle HUl (W. H. L. Christie, manager).— (27/ 7/1904) : Air somewhat 
dull at working-faces. Will be improved by the brick furnace which is being built in at bottom of 
upcast air-shaft. Working-places safe, coal strong, little or no timber being required. 

BurnweU Colliery, Saddle Hill (Adam Harris).-H(28/7/1904) : A decided settlement is taking 
place, extending over the area of worked ground, floor rising and pillars sinking quietly, resulting in very 
little damage to the pi{lar and head coal by way of crush. The water is being allowed to rise in the 
dip workings. 

CHenochiel Colliery, Saddle Hill (D. Bryce, permit). — A new mine driven from sur&kce, but, unfortu- 
nately, the fringe of solid coal between outcrop and worked ground is less than had been expected. 

Lauriston Colliery, Brighton Road (J. R. Walker, owner). — (3/7/1904) : Mine in safe working-order. 
Ventilation good. Three men employed. 

McColTs Coal-pit, Brighton (D. L. McCoU, owner).— (22/2/1904) : Drawing pillars in old mine. 
(3/7/1904) : New low-level tunnel being driven. Should strike coal-seam at 100 ft. 

Walker's and McCoU's coal-pits are situated on the property now known as " Duncan Settlement." 

Drummuir Coal-pit, Brighton (James Sneddon). — (3/7/1904) : A small amount of coal mined for 
private use only. 

Bruce Coal-mine, Milton (A. Young, owner). — (23/6/1904) : No one about on this date. The fire 
is evidently overcome, and there was no smoke visible. (3/11/1904) : The mine-mouth and the open- 
cast coal-face now completely smothered with gravel from overlying measures. There were no signs 
of smoke. One man getting coal from another section of the property. 

Strip-and-at-it Coal-pit, Milton (N. Hardwick). — Mine closed. Hardwick deceased. 

Fortification RaUway and Coal Company, Akatore, Milton (John Brown, permit). — (23/6/1904) : 
Workings confined to splitting and robbing pillars between new and old dips. The mine-workings 
open are clean and in very good order. Ventilation satisfactory. (3/11/1904) : This property has now 
passed into the hands of the mortgagee, Mr. John Begg, farmer, Hillend, Otago. Six men are employed 
in and about the colliery. The work is confined to the extraction of pillars. Timber is provided and 
well used. Ventilation good. 

Bruce Colliery, Akatore, Milton (Messrs. Begg Bros., Hillend, proprietors ; James Macallister, 
manager). — (3/11/1904) : Gate on mine-mouth locked. No one about on this date. 

Olenledi Coal-pit, Milton (N. McGilp, owner).— (3/11/1904) : Pit being worked opencast. No 
one about on this date. 

Adam's Flat Coal-mine, AdanCs Flat (J. Reid, owner). — Opencast pit with limited output to supply 
a local trade. 



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C— 3a. 16 

PaskelTs Mine, Adam's Fiat (J. Paskell, owner). — Nothing doing in this pit. 
LovelTs Flat Colliery, LoveWs Flat (J. Camithera, mine-manager; R. Glendinning, owner). — 
(8/5/1904) : The general work in the mine is the extraction of pillars from the upper four bords of the 
dip and the barrier between Gibson's old workings and the new workings. There are only two places 
in solid coal in the two lowest bords, and these have not far to go. Timber is well and plentifully used. 
Ventilation fair throughout the dip workings. The back aimay was closed temporarily on account 
of a small fire in a narrow heading, and a new return is to be pushed on. In the meantime air-return 
is effected by one compartment of the main haulage-shaft. (22/6/1904) : Pit idle to-day, but shift- 
men engaged driving new return airway through pillar at near bottom of second outlet and upcast 
air-shaft. The new airway is necessitated by fire and falls in the old return. The whole of this district 
being warm fire-stoppings are in bord ends to the headings. The manager had conferred with the 
men re sanitary arrangements undergroimd, and a certain course had been agreed upon. Two men, 
however, had resented being spoken to a second time as to their dirty habits. The bevel-geared wheels 
of elevator in screening-shed require fencing. Judging by indications undergroimd, the coal-basin 
may not be expected to exceed 16 acres, thickness of seam being from 14 ft., tapering to 4 ft., at which 
latter impayably workable, blackstone in roof displacing coal. Depth of seam, 470 ft. from surface. 
(2/11/1904) : Work in the mine now confined to the extraction of pillars. Timber is well used, and 
there is abo an ample supply provided. The ventilation is fair throughout the mine. On the 13th 
October a defect in the surface boiler necessitated a stoppage of the pump. The water rose and caused 
a partial collapse of the dip, which has since been retimbered. The south heading has been reconnected 
with the upcast shaft, thiis restoring air-circulation. The property has been thoroughly prospected 
by boring, unfortimately without satisfactory results. 

Tuakitoto Colliery, LoveWs Flat (A. Dunlop, owner). — A large surface slip having filled the mine- 
mouth this mine has been closed during the year. 

Benhar Coal-mine, Stirling (James McLeod, permit). — (13/3/1904) : The mine is in good order, 
and ventilation good. Some timber requires to be renewed in the main dip. Six men are employed. 
(2/11/1904) : Mine in good order. Ventilation good. Timber renewed in main dip. 2,100 tons of 
fireclay taken from this mine during the year. 

Mount Wallace Coal-mine, Stirling (James Walls, lessee, permit). — (13/3/1904) : The trade from 
this pit is limited. There is no pumping plant, and the dip- face was flooded on this date. Coal was 
being taken from some of the larger pillars. Two men at work. 

Taratu Colliery, Kaitangata (J. H. Young, mine-manager). — (31/1/1904) : New mine-entrance and 
new second outlet and retiim airway at opposite Welsh's face. Work mainly consists of dropping 
4 ft. of head coal in the bords already won, care being taken to trim any loose coal off the roof. The 
nezm in one place where roof fallen is 20 ft. in thickness. The new prospecting-shaft is sunk to a depth 
fA 143 ft., mainly through sandstone grits and quartz conglomerates. (28/10/1904) : The headings to 
ire^t are cutting out on a fault having a downthrow eastward ; hade, 45 degrees, and line of fault 
north 'we«t and south-east. The south main level has been driven through to Welsh's face. Several 
talU have ofxrurred to the surface in places where pillars and roof coal had been robbed. Air good. 

Kaitangata Colliery, Kaitangata (R. S. Jordan, mine- manager). — (14/12/1904) : Development- 
wt/fk in the stone drive extension east practically siispended throughout the year. South going level, 
ffUiin fteam, is in to No. 6 fault. The rise workings Nos. 1, 2, and 3 ; headings in new seam have been 
jfiibir*id and robbed to the fullest extent, consistent with safety. Dip sections being worked : Dips 
S^M. 8, 9, 10, 11, and 14 have been practically exhausted of coal to the level ribs in which ash ^le 
iet//|/f>ing» had been placed, such being necessary in each instance. Dips presently working are 
S^m. 7, 12, and 15. No. 12 dip is driven 650 ft. to the fault. Bords northward driven narrow and now 
^omiti^^ home with pillars. No. 15 dip southward of main-haulage road in Scott's level. Substantial 
*/fi' k uUippingH have been erected in the front of the main seam coal pillars at the foot of the main 
iw hfi^f effectually sealing off this portion of the old workings and confining several spontaneous fires 
w'ui^^U \viA given considerable trouble from time to time. A brick arch has also been built in the main 
r'^^iway in the 18 ft. seam in-bye No. 3 dip, which it is hoped will have the effect of subduing the fires 
^u 'x/al pillars at that point. Ventilation is maintained at from 36,000 to 37,000 cubic feet per minute 
i^i iU^ intake. The several splits of air (five in all, to as many districts) are regulated so that each 
4ii^Uv:i ha« its separate split of fresh air passing direct into main return airway to upcast shaft. The 
fH-uru airways had been carefully maintained, frequent attention being rendered necessary on account 
4 A f^jt only roof -pressure but side -pressure, a proportion of which may be attributed to settlement 
'/( tL« strata in the pillared sections of work. The fullest attention has been paid to the appointment 
'/f *« effic'iient staff of officers in the mine. Proper examinations duly made, and the results entered 
JO ihjn ueveral report-books in accordance with the Act. Safety-lamps only are allowed in the mine 
H-hytt the cabin, the lamp-station notice being posted at the cabin, which is situated at the foot of 
i K*^ usam haulage-incline. The increased number of minor accidents at this mine during the year have 
\,0^.u itttributed to the exclusive use of safety-lamps in the mine, their illuminating-power being less 
ihjiu that of the ordinary open oil-lamps formerly in use in such parts of the mine as were considered 
toale. The colliery-manager, Mr. Jordan, is averse to the use of " mixed lights " in the mine. Plans 
i/i <i^te, and rules posted. Small quantities of gas have been reported on several occasions in the solid- 
^viii^ places — Scott's level to No. 15 dip, and in the south levels, main-seam workings — ^but not in 
t^uiii<.ie«t quantity to interfere with the work. A complaint had been made to the manager and to 
wjvwilf that the atmosphere in No. 14 dip on the 19th October contained an undue proportion of carbonic- 
oxid<?, which was injuriously affecting the miners working there. Investigation revealed an incipient 
fxie, in the pillared ground at the bottom of the dip from which the gases being distilled were adulterating 
iMud air k n ash fire-stopping was then put in the dip and the ventilation short-circuited, when the air 



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17 C— 3a. 

became lestoied. An anal3r8i8 of a sample of the vitiated air by Dr. Black, Otago University, 
resulted as follows : Carbonic-acid gas, 0*83 vol. in 100 vol. of air ; carbonic oxide, about 0*06 vol. in 
100 vol. of air ; firedamp, about 1 vol. in 100 vol. of air. Ten visits of inspection had been paid during 
the year. 

CtuUe HiU Colliery, Kaitangata (R. S. Jordan, mine-manager).-H[21/7/1904) : Air at intake, 
28^000 cubic feet per minute. The lower levels in Noe. 3 and 4 winch dip workings are being pillared 
and robbed outward. Main seam and south level sections in good workmg-order. The new seam to 
the rise is troubled and not opening out quite so well as had been expected. A small quantity of gas 
was found at face of No. 2 heading. There was no one working in this place. Main level to furnace 
and back return airway in excellent order, having been recently repaired. The working-conditions of 
this mine are favourable, and the colliery is worked as an auxiliary to the Kaitangata Mine, the latter 
being kept going as steadily as possible throughout the year, while Castle Hill Mine is reserved for supply 
of surplus winter-trade requirements. 

Mainholm Colliery, Conical Hills, WaijHihi (Fred. Lischner, proprietor). — Opencast pit. This pit 
is well worked and produces over 3,000 tons of coal annually. 

Central Otaoo. 

Coal Creek Collieries, Coal Creek, Roxburgh (J. Barber, mine-manager). — (11/4/1904) : Leasehold 
Mine. — No coal has been raised from the leasehold for some jbime, operations having been suspended 
until the overburden was stripped off. A fire broke out in the waste-heap in close proximity to the 
coal-measures. Risk of ignition of the coal-seam was removed by trenching. Freehold Mine. — As the 
coal trade is slack in the district, there were only two men employed in the Freehold section. The mine 
is in good order. Ventilation good. Rules posted, and report-books up to date. (21/4/1904) : Free- 
hold Mine. — Two men at work on the freehold. Leasehold Mine.-»-Still nothing being done on the lease- 
hold. (7/7/1904) : The company was notified under date the 5th July, 1904, to resume winning coal 
from the Leasehold section. Operations have been resumed on the Leasehold section of the property. 

Mcpherson's Pit, Coal Creek, Roxburgh (Mrs. M. McPherson, lessee ; A. McPherson, manager). — 
(11/4/1904) : Work is proceeding satisfactorily in this opencast pit. There is a large area of bottom 
coal to take up. (15/9/1904) : A pit is being sunk in the '^ resin " seam and preparations being made 
to raise a 20 ft. lift of " bottom " coal. 

Craig's Perseverance Coal-mine, Coal Creek Flat (James Craig, lessee ; John Craig, manager). — 
(11/4/1904) : Mine- workings in good order. Ventilation good. Care must be exercised with regard 
to the upper abandoned workings on account of the risk of spontaneous ignition in this mine. 
(16/9/1904) : Mine free of dross and in good order. Dip down 220 ft. in upper seam ; angle of inclina- 
tion 1 in 4. Seam of coal 50 ft. in thickness,rl2 ft. of clay band, then lower seam, which had been sunk 
into 6 yards, but is not now being worked. 

Progress Colliery {Gully Pit), Roxburgh (James Bailey, agent for licensee). — (10/11/1904) : Very 
little has been done in this pit, pending arrangements being made to provide a suitable winding and 
pumping p'ant. 

Perseverance Colliery, Alexandra (R. M. Finlay, lessee ; A. Hunter, manager). — (23/1/1904) : 
Working-places in safe condition, and ventilation fair. As had been expected and indicated in last 
year's report, firedamp has been detected in the dip drive working-face, and particularly at the faults 
which occur. Daily examination is made with locked safety-lamp as provided by the Act. Falls 
from roof in return airway require attention. (14/4/1904) : Messrs. Hunter, Mathias Bros., and Bowler 
have secured from the lessee the right to work this mine, with a view to purchase. Although not included 
in the agreement the haulage and pumping plant is to be at the disposal of the party for some time. 
Unfortunately the prospects of this mine are not good. Croing to the dip the seam is much flatter than 
near the rise, and there* is a marked change in the quality of the coal, which is soft and unsaleable. 
This section of the mine is broken and faulty, but the extent has not been proved. (31/5/1904) : 
The presence of firedamp was again detected in the dip-level workings on this date. The ventilation 
was fair. Seven men employed in the mine. (12/7/1904) : No firedamp has been detected since 
the 8th June, 1904. Mine-workings in safe order. (1/10/1904) : Operations suspended on this lease. 
The plant is to be removed and application made for cancellation of existing lease. 

McQueenviUe Colliery, Alexandra (S. T. Lett, lessee ; John Hodson, manager).— (23/1/1904) : 
Mine-workings in good order. Lodgment being enlarged to hold twenty-four hours' water to obviate 
necessity for Sunday pumping. Ventilation good. (14/4/1904) : Considerable difficulty is being ex- 
perienced in coping with the growth of water in the lower mine-workings. The origin of this water 
is at present unknown, though partly due to natural drainage from the overlying strata, which is of 
a porous, open nature. The pumping-appliances not proving wholly effective increases the difficulty 
of keeping the mine unwatercKi. The manager complained of the unaccountable increase in the flow 
of water. The mine is in safe working-order, with good ventilation travelling round The lower mine- 
workings are being worked narrow, 6 ft. in width by 6 ft. in height, with pillars 30 ft. square. 
(31/5/1904) : The water has now risen to within 60 ft. from the mine-mouth, the pumps being unable to 
cope with the increased quantity Coal is being obtained from a small block of solid in the rise workings 
near the outcrop. (1/10/1904) : Lett intends to apply for cancellation of existing lease, and make ap- 
plication for a new lease of 50 acres adjoining the Undaunted lease. Work in the McQueenviUe Mine 
is now confined to splitting a few rise pillars to keep the trade going. (15/11/1904) : Revisited the mine 
on this date on account of a reported collapse of the lower dip workings. An examination of the mine 
revealed the fact that a disturbance had taken place over a considerable portion of the lower workings, 
resulting in the crushing of pillars and heavy falls from the roof. There was a heavy inrush of water 
into the mine from breaks in the roof of the seam, and also a settlement over a considerable area of sur- 
face. The steam-pump being recovered an attempt was made to cope with the water, without 
avail 

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C— 3a. 18 

Alexandra Coal-mine, Alexandra (Hunter, liathiAs Bros., and Bowler, leeseee ; Andrew Hunter, 
manager). — (H/i/l^Oi) : The leeseee have secured this property from Mr. W. A. Thomson at a reaaon- 
able figure. The dip drhre is now being cleared out preparatory to extending mining operations further 
into the dip section of the field of coaL Ventilation in the mine is fair. Safety-lamp inspection made 
as a precaution does not reveal any trace of firedamp in the mine. (31/5/1904) : Pit idle at present ; 
trade slack. (1/10/1904) : Operations have now been resumed on tins property. A new dip is to 
be driven, as it was found that the lower present dip workings are practically lost. Ventilation good. 

Alexandra Coal Company, Alexandra (James Pollock, mine-manager). — (22/1/1904) : Mine in good 
order. The ventilation has been considerably improved by the adoption of wooden air-stoppings in 
the mine to replace brattice cloth hitherto in use. (13/4/1904) : Mine and appliances in good working- 
order^and all safe. A total of ten men are employed in the mine on day-shift and four men on afternoon- 
shift.' Ventilation good. Safety-lamp inspection duly made and results of examinations entered 
in report-book. Report-books kept up to date. General and special rules posted. Boreholes kept 
as prescribed in all advancing places. As instructed from this office a barrier of half a chain of solid 
coal is being left between the dip workings and the riverward area. In this latter area the places are 
all broken away narrow to admit of speedy closing off. An efficient barrier is being left on the river 
frontage. Although moist backs are met with, there is very little water given off from the advancing 
places in the rise workings. A soft band of coal has been struck in the main dip, which is giving off water 
freely. A " Snow " Duplex steam-pump has been installed in the dip as an adjunct to the main pump 
at bottom of shaft. (31/5/1904) : Mine in good order ; ventilation fair. The soft or faulted coal 
in the dip cut out into solid coal, and the water has pined off. Eighteen men are employed underground 
in three shifts. Average pumping-time, fifty-nine hours per week. Water-growth steady, averaging 
96,000 gallons per twenty-four hours. (30/9/1904) : Mine-workings in good order. In order to further 
improve the ventilation the wooden air-stoppings are to be continued down the main dip. This will 
carry the fresh air direct to the workftig-faces. Complaint having arisen as to the necessity for latrine 
accommodation, a suitable closet has been erected on the surface, and is used by the workmen, evacua- 
tion underground being prohibited. 

Undaunted Coal-mine, Alexandra (D. H. Mathias, permit, lessee).— (14/4/1904) : No coal has been 
taken from this lease for the last three months. The lessee intends to bring the plan up to date, draw 
the plant from the mine, and apply for cancellation of the present lease with a view towards amal- 

Smation with two neighbouring leases. The present style of working this mine is costly and out of 
te, while the lessee considers trade- prospects in the district do not warrant the expenditure of capital 
in haulage and pumping plant. (31/5/1904) : Pit still unwatered. 

Cambrian's Coal-jnl, Cambrian's (Catherine Dungey, lessee).— (18/3/1904) : Very Uttle coal is 
taken from this lease, which is now practically exhausted. One man at work. 

Welshman's GtUly Coal-jnt, Cambrian's (J. McGuckin, lessee).— (18/3/1904) : Trade has materially 
de<Teased at this pit during the past twelve months. Coal is brought into the district by wagoners 
(as ba^'k loading) from the Alexandra coal-pits, while competition in the coal trade is also strong in the 
tlmirit't. The seam, which is worked opencast, is a difficult one to work owing to the dip of the seam 
ari/l the heavy overburden. Two men generally at work. (14/7/1904) : Lignite-seam, 16 ft. to 30 ft. 
in iUit'knitm, Dip of seam 1 in 3 westerly. Stripping, 15 ft. to 30 ft. in depth. An attempt has been 
mA/l#! Uf win the coal by driving, but had proved the cost to be greater than the usual sale price when 
•fnpj/Jri^ was again resorted to. 

ht^ttJdfUme /fill Coal-pit, BlacksUme Hill (James Armitage, lessee). — (20/3/1904) : Opencast pit. 
Hf fimnriK light, but water inflow heavy. Two men at work. 

rrw^s Coal'pil, BlacksUme Hill (G. Price, lessee).— Coal taken out for private use only. 

Hi, Hnlham's Coal-pit, St, Bathan's (James Enwright, lessee ; James Doyle, manager).— (20/3/1904) : 
f /ffirw rh^ manager's attention to the necessity for keeping the overburden well stripped back from 
Ih^ WM\iiftyi r^ml'face, and subsequently wrote the lessee to the same effect. Two men at work. 
IZi/ff/^^^^i) ''it now in better order. Stripping being attended to. 

////r/z/A /ft/l/je Coal-pit, Idaburn (Mrs. M. Beck, lessee ; William Beck, manager). — (22/3/1904) : 
f ^/r*#f '#/♦>/! iU^ manager to proceed at once to strip the overburden ahead of the working coal-face, 
fiiA ttu\f^'in^u^\y wrote the lessee to the same effect. The coal-face is 25 ft. in height, and is overlaid 
U^ H U /// ^/MV^L Three men generally employed. (24/5/1904) : Pit in very fair order, attention 
^f^th^, fftf^ \^^^ ^>' stripping in advance of coal- working. 

MfU/m$ /V, hl/ilmrn (Mrs. M. Beck, lessee).- (21/3/1904) : Nothing doing on this date. 

ItUiJ^fUfn f'fffd'fril, Idaburn (J. White, lessee).— (21/3/1904) : Opencast pit. Stripping in advance 
^/^> o,///*»^j< 4/fwn lignite-face. Two men employed. (24/5/1904) : Pit in very fair order. Bottom 
f4 t00fH hOi» ft>^thi( and outc;ropping to the south-eastern boundary. 

ff^/f^j^ ^'fffd jni, Hough Ridge (George Tunibull, lessee).— (21/3/1904) : The lessee experiences 
0m^. 4m*/ #»♦/ m the working of this pit, which is subjected to flooding during rises in the Idaburn 
7(f^^ tu^ \f*itit\tiu\/, plant is quite inadequate. One man at work. 

(Hffffft^fifiiffi Cftfd'int, (Jimmerburn (C. Dougherty, lessee). — Coal mined for private use only. 

( imuft^fn/d iUJUwrtf, IJvper Kyeburn (Christian Archer, permit, lessee).— 25/3/1904) : Seam 
fMf4^M f^*ff¥^A by l«v«li* driven off the shaft to the boundary in solid coal. The head coal is then 
ym0f* #,>♦/ k *^#/l iUt* rotii allowed to fall behind. Three men employed. Owing to scarcity of demand 
f^/f //,#! . •'..« fitKiti' t, Mild (;omi>etition from better coals brought in by railway, the lessee has decided 
^//jT^*^' '<' ***^ l^-M^' C,oii\ has boon mined from this lease for the past twenty-four years. (25/6/1904) : 
^fp^ Wfi' ' ^^f /<»^M<K oi lUf HtMim had become soft at depth, and recently a run of^drift-sand had filled 
f^ ^^///| ^^,Hii \t^ih. m ono night Abandoned. 



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19 C— 3a. 

MeCready and Coomb's Coal-pit^ Kyebum Diggings (W. Coombs, le88ee).~(25/5/1904) : A vertical 
seam which was 25 ft. in width at surface, drawing in to 12 ft. at lower levels. Coal had been worked 
out from each side of the spur to water-leveU below which the coal is said to be soft and inferior ; in 
fact, all the seam was much the same, and made a lot of waste. A few tons taken out per annum for 
private use only. 

Stephen Beer's Coal-pit, ii[ye6um.— (25/3/1904) : This pit, which lies on the western bank of the 
Kyebum River, was opened out, and a face of coal proved, but operations were suspended on account 
of floods. This pit was opened out in anticipation of a demand for coal to meet the requirements of 



Donaldson's Coal-pit, Horse Flat, Macrae's (W. and G. Donaldson, lessees ; H. N. Mills, permit). — 
(16/6/1904) : This is a seam of inferior coal. The roof is tender and broken, and requires to be well 
timbered. Drainage-water troublesome. Three men are employed getting fuel to supply Donaldson's 
quartz battery at Grolden Point. 

Clyde CoUieries Company, Clyde (G. F. Turner, mine-manager ; L. G. Reeves, secretary, Dunedin). — 
(6/10/1904) : Owing to the decline of the dredging industry in the district (Clyde-Alexandra Grorge) 
there has not been a large demand for coal from this mine. Through connection has been made from 
the Vincent section to the Dairy Creek section. This simplifies the question of pumping, and a suitable 
pump is to be installed. Witii increasing depths of workings the pillars are being left larger. Coal 
is now being won from four seams, a new seam having been tapped overlying all, making a total