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Full text of "Mining and Scientific Press(1860-62)"

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£ 




t Presented by 
Date received 



3007 1200375 1 

California State Library * 



No. 



2£ yj? 



4 I 



EXTRACT 

Act prescribing Utiles for the Government of the State Library, 
passed Mqr,ch 8th, 1S61. 



Suction' 11. The Librarian shall cause tu be kepi a register of all 
books issued and returned; and all books taken by the members of the 
Legislature, or its officers, shall be returned at the close of the session. If 
any person injure or fail td return any book taken from the Library, he 
shall forfeit and pay to the Librarian, for the benefit of the Library, three 
times the value thereof : and before the Controller shall issue his warrant 
in favor of any member or officer of the Legislature, or of this State, for 
his per diem, allowance, or salary, he shall be satisfied that such member 
or officer has returned all books taken out of the Library by him, and has 
settled all accounts for injuring such books or otherwise. 

Sec. 15. Books may be taken from the Library by the members of the 
Legislature and its officers during the session of the same, and at any time 
by the Governor and the officers of the Executive Department of this State 
who are required to keep their offices at the seat of goveroment, the 
Justices of the Supreme Court, the Attorney-General, and the Trustees of 
the Library. 



^sSP 



C'LAYES, STATE 1'HIXTKK . 



\ 



\ 




Slngte Cople*. FHici-u C*nts. 



Tenon t One Tear. 8A; Six Monthi, S3. 



§V journal of Useful guis, rfricnrr, ana pining and pwbaniral "gtoqmg. 



DEWEY A CO.. PPBLISHEESj 
And PttCenC St.lUK.n-. I 



SAN" FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 1867. 



(VOLTME XV. 
' Number 1. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Daboll's Foic Trumpet— Illu, 
iratcil. 

Tl>e Keese Rleer Country and 
il. Mtnea— Continued. 

Fa i- AbOUl Patent Matters- 
Con tlaaetl. 

Co-operative Labor. 

Business ot I ho Patent Office 

A New Scarecrow 

A 11 i Inert pleld tor Inventors. 

A Novel uunboat. 

Removal oi tire-Damp from 
Mine* 

Iodine a Disinfectant. 

Imitation ot" Mahogany. 

Culnornla Academy of Natn 
ral Sen noes. 



Ken 



It,,. 



The Homing Wheat Crop. 

Pacific Railroad. 

Honcv Orders— List of Offices 

i. ii ihe PaoulO Coast. 
Pacific 0liemtcal\York9. 
Fire-Pump Trial. 
New Patents and Inventions. 
Notices to Correepondetite. 
San Francisco Mai 
San FrnneLco Weekly stock 

Clrcnl.ir 
Stock Prices— Rid and A-ked 
San FraucUico Metal Market. 



Mr.CIC.SICiL MtSCELLA.-SY 

steam vs. Hand Labor; Raw 
Teeth; American Iron Pro- 
pellers and side-wheels: A 
New Fire-Damp; Artificial 
Wood; Steel Conking Uten- 
sils; Plaster of Paris— Aecl. 
dental Discovery : Case-' 
Hardening iron; Self-Pio- 
pclllng Steam Engine. 

SoiBHXirio afiacatuiRT.— 
Facta About Fuel; Vocal 
Machinery of Hltds; In- 
flaniinnbilil v of Tlioruuclilv 
Dried Wood; Results ot Sci- 
ence ; Tile Phenomcnu of 
Round: Artillcl.il Agate: To 
Print Letters by Sunlights 
Atmospheric Action; Oxid- 
ation by means of Char- 
coal; Illunilnatluft Gas; 
Vanadium. 

Mim.no simmauy— Embracing 
late Intelllitence Irom the 
various counties and dis- 
tricts In California, Arizona, 
Idaho. Montana, Nevuda, 
Oregon and Colorado 

Mining Sliaieholders' Direct- 
ory. 



A New Volume commences with the pre- 
sent issue, and we would again urge upon 
those who are not already on our list, that 
now is a favorable opportunity to subscribe. 
We alluded, last week, to the general scope 
and character of the Mining and Scientific 
Peess, and would again call attention to 
our semi-annual index, as an evi- 
dence of the vast and varied amount of 
useful matter which is comprised, even 
within a single half-yearly volume. We 
lay the entire world under contribution for 
the supply of our columns, which is gathered 
in at great cost of labor and research. 
We endeavor to make our paper a telescope 
by which our readers, sitting in their quiet 
homes, can peer out into the world of 
science and art, and bring directly within 
their gaze and comprehension every import- 
ant discovery, invention or other effort in 
the great march of progress, so that, with- 
out interruption to their daily avocations, 
they may, once a week, be advised of every 
advance step made in science and every im- 
provement introduced into mechanics and 
manufacturing industry in any part of the 
world. They can also look out into our 
broad field of mining, and note, week by 
week, the progress made in the development 
of that great leading industry of the Pacific 
Coast. Each miner, as he is engaged in 
pushing forward the work of development 
in his particular claim, can also note the 
progress made in every other important mine 
upon the coast. How well we do this, let 
our columns speak for themselves. Suffice 
it for us to say, we shall in nowise relax 
our efforts in the future ; but shall endeavor, 
with each successive volume, to introduce 
some new feature which shall add to the in- 
terest and value of the paper. 



Daboll's Fog Trumpet. 

We give, herewith, a finely executed per- 
spective view of one of Daboll's Fog Trum- 
pets, the same as that which has recently 
been located near the entrance of the Golden 
Gate, by the foresight and munificence of 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. The 
object of this invention is to provide a ma- 
chine to give notice of danger to vessels, 
when the weather is too thick for the ordi- 
nary lights to be seen. The particular ma- 
chine here represented, has been sent to 
the Paris Exposition, where it is attracting 
much attention. A correspondent of a New 
York paper, in •writing from Paris of its 
performance says : "It was sounded the 
other day, and when the Arabs, Japanese 
and Malays heard it, they fell upon then- 
faces, thinking Allah had come in the shape 
of a roaring lion. It roused the Faubourgs 
like the bell of Murat. The whistle of the 
calliope is no more than a bird song to it.'' 

Quite a number of these trumpets are in 
operation in various places. There is one 



A Self Winding Watch — Almost. — 
Josephi & Co., at Gil Washington street, 
are selling quite a novelty in the line of 
watches. This watch is wound up by sim- 
ply opening to see the time of daj-. Every 
time the watch is opened, it is wound for 
six hours ; as soon as it is wound fully up, 
the winding apparatus is thrown out of gear, 
so that no accident can come from a too fre- 
quent opening. When fully wound up, it 
will run ten days. The watch is the inven- 
tion of Bubens, of Geneva, and was patented ] 
in this country in December last. Josephi 
& Co. are the sole agents for the watch in 
this State. 



This invention is considered superior to 
a bell for giving signals, for two reasons — it 
can be heard at a much greater distance, and 
the ear can very readily distinguish the di- 
rection from which the sound comes, which 




- •,:';,■■■■ 




**& 



DAROIdVS FOG TRUMPET. 



about six miles below Halifax, and they have 
been placed at each of the following places 
in this country : In San Francisco harbor, 
at Detroit, at New London, at New Haven, 
Thatcher's Island, Boston harbor, and at 
Beaver Tail, Narraganset Bay. The English 
Government has placed one on the Isle of 
Wight, at Dungeress, and at Glasgow. A 
small one has also been placed on the deck 
of the Eoyal Mail steamship Cuba, of the 
Cunard line. 



is impossible with the sound of a bell. Its 
less cost and greater simplicity, also makes 
it preferable to a steam whistle. When in 
operation, the trumpet is made to revolve 
on its axis, by means of bevel gears at E, 
F, the power being communicated through 
the wheel, B, and shaft attached, which are 
revolved by a worm shown on the driving 
shaft of the engine. 

The trumpet is operated by condensed air- 
whichis forced by the engine or other com, 



pressing power that may be used, intoa large 
reservoir, A. The sound given out is made 
sharp and somewhat ringing, by the use of 
reeds, while the air is admitted at regular 
intervals, through valves worked by studs 
upon the outer periphery of the 
wheel, C. By interchanging the 
number and position of the studs 
on this wheel, the trumpet may 
be made to give a certain series 
of sounds, which may convey 
definite information, like any oi" 
dinary sound telegraph. 

Of course any power can be 
made to condense the air, and 
operate the rotating machinery, 
etc. The caloric engine, as here- 
with represented, is generally em- 
ployed, for its simplicity, relia- 
bility and cheapness. This trum- 
pet is the invention of C, L. Da- 
boll, of New London, Conn., and 
was first described and illustrated 
in the American Artisan, of the 
6th of March last 

The one which has been erected 
at the entrance of this harbor has 
been located on the bluff about 
a quarter of a mile from the Cliff 
House. We understand that it ac- 
complishes all that was expected 
of it, and can be heard to the dis- 
tance of about ten miles. It makes 
about one revolution a minute, 
and sounds three times with 
every revolution. One blast is 
directed towards the entrance of 
the harbor ; one towards the Cliff 
House — down the coast, and one 
westward, directly out to sea. 
We are not aware that it is ever 
heard in the lowSr portion of the 
city ; the reason of which is prob" 
ably due to the fact that the 
blast is never given in this direc- 
tion. As soon as a fog sets in, 
the fire is applied to the machin- 
ery and the trumpet is made to 
sound its warning signals. 

Although it has been placed 
there at the expense of the P. M. 
S. S. Co., it is, nevertheless, 
sounded for all whenever there 
is need of it, whether one of the 
Company's steamers is expected 
or not The purchase and main- 
tenance of this guide to the en- 
trance of the Golden Gate, has 
been a great expense to the Com- 
pany ; and we see no reason, now 
that its utility has been fully 
proven, why the Government 
should not relieve the Company of a work 
so necessary to the commerce of the city. 
In case the Government refuses to act in 
the premises, the merchants of this city 
should share in the expense of a mutual 
benefit. 



Fok otjk Cabinet. — We have upon our 
table several contributions for our cabinet, 
among which are several very valuable spe- 
cimens from the Green Emigrant, which 
will be duly noticed next week. 



Mht pining mA Mmtlfk ^vm. 



ffiomiMMiatiw. 



In this Department we invite the free discussion of all 
proper subjects— correspondents alone being responsible for 
{be ideas and theories they advance. 



[Written for the Mining and Scientific Press. | 

The Reese River Country and its 
Mines. 

BY A. J. HOWE. 

[Continued from Page 402.J 

PHILADELPHIA. DISTRICT — CONTINUED. 

There are a number of locations in this 
belt, which is of gray slate. They are known 
as the Transylvania, Nos. 1, 2 and 3, El 
Dorado, and Child & Canfield. The latter 
has produced a large quantity of astonish- 
ingly rich ore, and the company will soon 
erect one of the largest mills yet built' in 
Nevada. On the Transylvania No. 2, the 
most thorough developments are progress- 
ing, and the machinery for a forty-stamp 
mill is ready to be freighted over the Sierra 
Nevada as soon as the roads will permit. 
There are other locations in this district 
claimed to be equally rich ; and one thing 
seems to be certain — that is, when Belmont 
has the % milling facilities demanded by the 
ore to be seen in the Transylvania belt, its 
shipments will be second to no other dis- 
trict in Nevada. Wood of excellent quality 
is sufficiently abundant in the immediate 
vicinity of the mines to last for several 
"years, while the range, both north and 
south, has a bountiful supply for an almost 
indefinite time. 

So little was this region known a few 
years ago that it was said no person could 
live to prospect it, owing to the scarcity of 
water and the hostility of the Indians. 
With the former, the entire section is quite 
as well supplied as other portions of Ne- 
vada. There are also extensive tracts of 
meadow land along the water courses and 
at their sinks; while the Indians are as 
quiet and harmless as any I have seen. 
Nearly all of them are disposed to work for 
such return in provisions, clothing or money 
as may be offered them. It is said that this 
valley below Belmont is the place where 
Judge Balston perished in 1864. It might 
have been from hunger ; but that it could 
have been from want of water is improba- 
ble, as the range on either side of Monitor 
Valley affords it in nearly all the canons. 
It will be remembered that he was seen, in 
his delirious wandering, by friendly In- 
dians, who offered him food, and a few 
days after his lifeless body was found by 
them. 

The town of Belmont is growing up rap- 
idly. A spirited paper, called the Silver 
Bend Reporter,ja&s just made its appear- 
ance here. Business of all descriptions, 
mechanics and laborers, keep always in ex- 
cess of the demand ; but this will probably 
not be the case when the new mills are in 
progress. This place will surely be the 
great central mart of Southeastern Nevada; 
with its own mines of fabulous wealth and 
surrounded on every side by the most won- 
derful rich mining districts in the world, 
nothing can prevent it becoming such. 

DANVILLE RANGE 

Lies on the east of Monitor Valley. Through 
this range a fine road is now being con- 
structed, passing through Alatoony Pass, 
which is situated nearly east of Belmont, 
and is twelve miles distant to the entrance 
at Barley creek. North of the Pass, the 
mountains gradually rise, till they reach an 
elevation of 2, 500 feet above the valley, and 
form extensive table lands, visible as a 
prominent feature from all the higher peaks 
of the ranges we have passed through from 
the west On the north and northeast of 
this table land the mountains drop abrupt- 
ly. Along the base of the bluff in the de- 
pression of the range at this point is situated 

DANVILLE DISTKICT, 

Which was discovered in the slimmer of 
1866. It lies about east of Northumber- 
land, or in 'latitude 38 J 50', and is on the 
northeastern slope of the range. The for- 
mation in which the lodes occur is princi- 
pally of granite. Some of them are of 
great size, and will compare very well with 
the famous districts that surround it. Very 
little work has been done in the district, yet 



Danville will tell its own story before the 
present summer has past. The Vanderbilt 
lode has been rated by some who have vis- 
ited it as equal in promise to any of the 
famous mines of Hot creek, Northumber- 
land or Silver Bend. 

This range of mountains is well supplied 
with the usual stunted timber of Central 
Nevada. The Clipper Gap, or Stonebargers 
road, leading from Austin to Pahranagat, 
passes through this district, from whence it 
diverges southerly, through Pish Springs 
Valley, to the head of Hot Creek, where it 
unites with the road via Charnock's and 
Alatoony Passes. Nearly east of Danville, 
on the opposite side of the valley, we find 

MOEEY DISTRICT. 

This district was first discovered byThos. 
Barnes and party in September, 1865. How- 
ever, but little was done here until the fol- 
lowing summer of 1866. The lodes occur 
in a narrow belt of granite and are not 
numerous, but are well defined, and give 
great promise of permanence when properly 
developed. Two or three of them are of 
unusually large size for veins occurring in 
a granite formation. The ore has a singu- 
lar yellowish-gray appearance, indicating 
the presence of lead in the chloride state, at 
the surface, while it is not of a high grade 
or concentrated character, but uniformly 
diffused throughout the veins, rendering 
them equally valuable. Some of the lodes 
show large quantities of manganese, simi- 
lar to that found at the surface in a number 
of the lodes of Lander Hill, at Austin. 
The belt to which the silver lories are con- 
jured is in a lateral spur of the main range, 
but little elevated above the valley. 

UNDERGROUND LAKES. 

In the valley between this and the Dan- 
ville Bange, there are a number of large 
circular springs of clear cold water, with no 
apparent outlets or inlets, all of which 
swarm with small fish, the great number of 
which lead one to suppose there must be 
more ample scope for them beneath the sod- 
covered valley. These fish springs, or, as 
they are sometimes called, wells, are not of 
unfrequent occurrences in Central Nevada 
or in any part of the Great Basin of Utah. 
All of the rivers and creeks, both large and 
small, silently flow a portion of their length 
under ground. Why not lakes be hidden 
in the same manner ? Near the head of the 
Humboldt Valley we have positive evidence 
of this. In one of the lateral valleys at the 
source of the Humboldt river there is a 
meadow, two miles long and half a mile wide. 
This, in season, is covered with the most 
luxuriant growth of grass that I have seen 
auywhere in the great Central Basin. On 
this there are several hundred wells, or 
rather air holes, circular in form, and from 
three to six feet in diameter. Clear crystal 
water rises in all nearly to the level f urf ace 
of the meadow. Several of these I have 
sounded for bottom, which could not be 
found at forty feet All these Openings be- 
come black with small fish the instant a 
slight commotion is made in the water. A 
person, by bringing his weight heavily 
down, will shake the lake for many rods 
around, although it is sufficiently strong 
to bear up scores of cattle closely collected. 
I shall not soon forget the bath forced on 
me, several' years ago, in rescuing an animal 
from one of these air holes, although I 
must confess that it was timely, in a sani- 
tary or abluent sense. , 

Now that we have established the exist- 
ence of lakes under ground, what freak of 
nature' or the elements caused it? Several 
hundred miles further east, near the head 
of Sweetwater river, in Utah, we find the 
possible solution. There is a valley of about 
the same extent as the one just described ; 
on digging through the soil in any part of 
it two or three feet, we come to a bed of 
solid ice, as firm and clear as crystal, the 
depth of which has never been determined. 
The most natural conclusion to be arrived 
at is, that at an ancient date, this, which 
was once a lake, was frozen to a great depth, 
and by an unusually heavy storm of rain, 
the soil from the hills on either side was 
washed down upon it, and it has remained 
frozen for ages. Had this occurred in the 
milder climate of the lower valleys further 
west, the ice would have long since melted 
and left a sod-covered lakelet. The prepon- 
derance of vegetable matter supporting the 
soil is but a fibrous wiry matt on its surface. 

Beturning to Alatoony Pass, we will take 
our course eastward. Soon after leaving 
the Pass, we reach Willow creek. Along 
its course, near the sink, there is considera- 
ble good farming laud, which has been 
taken up for that purpose. At this point 
there is a short low range of hills in the 
center of what I have called (for want of a 
more appropriate name) Pish Springs Val- 
ley. However, I believe the valley lying 
east of the Hot Creek mountains was the 
one originally called by that name. 

[To bo Continued.] 



Facts About Patent Matters. 

NUMBER FOUR. 

HOW TO OBTAIN A PATENT — THE PREPARATION 
OP THE- CASE. 

Of course, in letters like these, written 
for the general information of the public at 
large, it cannot be expected that the subject 
should be treated with that copiousness and 
precision that would characterize a profes- 
sional work written for the use of lawyers 
and patent agents. All that willbe attempted 
will be to state briefly, the general principles 
that govern the matter, so that every person 
can have a tolerably correct idea of the sub- 
ject, and thus be able to determine for him- 
self whether or not he has a patentable 
invention. 

As soon as a person has completed an in- 
vention he should proceed to make his ap- 
plication for a patent The first step is to 
make a model, which, if possible, should be 
a working model — that is, a perfect working 
machine — just such as the large one is in- 
tended to be for use. It must not occupy 
over one cubic foot of space, should be 
made of walnut or other hard wood or metal, 
neatly made and varnished, and there should 
be as little glue about it as possible, as it is 
otherwise apt to come apart after a time. If 
made of metal, brass or composition is pre- 
ferable to iron or steel, on account of the 
liability of the latter to rust. As all the 
models, whether patented or rejected are 
kept in the office for public exhibition, 
where they are examined by people from all 
parts of Europe as well as our own country, 
every one will see the importance both in a 
personal and national sense, of making them 
neat and not clumsy. 

The next step is to make duplicate draw- 
ings of it, one sheet being on thick stiff drain- 
ing paper, to be kept in the office at Wash- 
ington for use in making examinations, and 
the other sheet on vellum oil silk, or other 
thin strong material that will bear folding 
and transportation, and which is to be at- 
tached to the patent when issued to the 
inventor. The drawings should be on sheets 
10 by 15 inches, and should generally be in 
perspective, with such detached plan and 
sectional views, as maybe necessary to show 
fully and plainly all the parts and operations 
of the device whatever it may be. The 
drawings must be "artistically executed," 
and should be carefully shaded or colored. 
If different parts of the device are to be con- 
structed of different material, as for instance 
the union of steel and other kinds of metal, 
then the parts should be so colored as to 
show the difference. So if one part is to be 
of wood, and another of metal or other ma- 
terial, the same rule should be observed. 
The preparation of the drawings is a matter 
of utmost importance, and should never be 
entrusted to any but a competent draughts- 
man. The importance of this will be under- 
stood when I state that the examinations at 
the patent oflSee are conducted almost en- 
tirely by means of those thick drawings. 
Suppose, for instance, that aparty makes an 
application for an important invention, some 
fixture of which is not clearly shown in his 
drawing. Although the examiner, by means 
of the specification and model can under- 
stand the case, that is not enough ; either 
for the office, or the protection of the in- 
ventor. If it is a valuable thing, others will 
be endeavoring to pirate it, by making ap- 
plications for devices containing that same 
feature ; and then, especially if a new ex- 
aminer has been appointed in charge of that 
class by a change in the administration or 
otherwise, the new examiner, having no 
knowledge of the original case, will look 
over the drawings, and not finding that fea- 
ture tHere, will of course issue a patent for 
the same thing to the second applicant also ? 
Even if there has been no change in the 
examiner, the same thing is likely to happen, 
because having several hundred and even 
thousands of cases to look over at each ex- 
amination, it is utterly impossible for him 
to retain in his mind the particular features 
of each case. And thus, fault is often found 
with the patent office, when really the blame 
rests entirely upon the applicant, who, be- 
ing too stingy to pay for proper drawings, 
is thus the cause of his own loss. To be 
sure the original applicant may, if he finds 
out that another party has a subsequent 
patent for his device, protect his rights by 
a resort to the courts ; but in the first place 
he will not be likely to know anything about 
it for years, or until the other party has dis- 
posed of his interest to innocent parties ; 
and even if he does he will find himself put 
to a heavy expense, all of which might have 
been prevented by the expenditure of two 
or three dollars more on hisdrawiugs in the 
first place. Again, if he be a poor man, 
and a wealthy company, or combination of 
parties are opposing him, they may keep 
the case in law by appeals and delays, until 
he is ruined, and the value of his patent de- 



stroyed. Of course, the mere existence of 
such suits would prevent the purchase of 
rights by others from him, because men do 
not like to buy a lawsuit, nor pay their 
money for a thing that may prove of no 
value to them. And then, even if he suc- 
ceeds in the end, in asserting his rights in 
the courts, his patent will have nearly or 
quite expired, and, as under the law of 1861, 
there can be no more extensions, he will 
find himself with money, time and inven- 
tion all gone, and no help for it. And all 
this in consequence of not having a little 
drawing, which at most would not cost to 
exceed five or ten dollars, properly prepared. 

The next step is to prepare the specifica- 
tion ; and this is the most important part of 
all. No matter how perfect the model and 
drawing, if the specification is not complete 
the case will not be examined at the office. 
It will be returned until it is perfect, and 
the office even has the right to require that 
it shall be printed, if there is difficulty in 
making it plain otherwise. The most im- 
portant requirement is, that it shall clearly 
and fully describe the invention, and how 
to construct and operate it. The description 
should be such that a mechanic or person " 
skilled in the art to which it belongs, will 
be able to make one from the description. 
It is not necessary to describe those por- 
tions which form no part of the invention, 
except so far as may be necessary to explain 
the operation of the new parts. Yet every 
thing depends upon the description and 
claim. The latter is especially important, 
as upon the meaning, force and construction 
of the language employed, depends the 
whole value of the patent, if issued, as well 
as the question of its issue at all. To prop- 
erly prepare a specification may seem a very 
simple and easy task, but such is not the 
case. It requires a knowledge of the arts, 
of science and scientific terms, and their 
proper use — of mechanics and the principles 
that govern their action — of law, and of the 
grammatical and legal force and construc- 
tion of language, which is possessed by but 
very few persons. Lawyers seldom possess 
the mechanical knowledge, while mechanics 
still more generally lack the legal knowledge 
necessary to enable them to properly pre- 
pare a ease for examination. It requires 
such a combination of legal and mechanical 
knowledge, together with a special knowl- 
edge of the principles and rules that govern 
the action of the office, that no person is 
really competent to undertake the business 
but those who have made it a study, or had ex- 
perience at. it. In the language of a recent 
writer On Patents and Patent Laws — "Mis- 
takes of importance are not unfrequently 
made by those who are trained to this work, 
and who make it their special business; but it 
can very seldom if ever be safe for any claim- 
ant to draw his own specification, unless he 
has large experience in work of this kind." 
The reason for this will readily appear when it 
is understood that the learned Judge Story 
denominated the patent branch of our juris- 
prudence as the "metaphysics of the law," 
— having more subtle and nice distinctions 
than any other branch of law. In view of 
these facts, I unhesitatingly advise every per-, 
son who has an invention worth patenting, 
to get some responsible and competent agent 
to attend to it for him. 

No person scarcely would think of enter- 
ing upon a suit at law, without employing a 
lawyer to attend to it, and make out his pa- 
pers for him ; and if a sensible man would 
not do that, much less would he attempt to 
prepare an application for a patent without 
knowing anything about the business. I 
am aware that persons frequently attempt 
it, but I am also aware that many lose their 
patent simply in consequence of not liaving 
their case properly prepared, or not knowing 
how to amend it so as to avoid the references 
given, when once rejected. Besides this, many 
times when they sivcceed in obtaining the 
patent, they find afterwards that it will not 
stand in law, or does not cover their inven- 
tion, and is, therefore, useless. It is for 
this reason that many applicants are com- 
pelled to re-issue their patents at as great 
and often greater expense than the obtaining 
of the original. Hence, I repeat, every per- 
son having an invention worth patenting, 
should employ a competent and responsible 
agent — I say competent and responsible — for, 
unfortunately there are many who are neither 
competent or responsible, and, of them and 
their tricks, I shall have somewhat to say 
hereafter: — W. E. Dodge in Prairie Farmer 
ii — — — • 

Co-operative Labor. — A curious circum- 
stance has been cited in favor of cooperative 
labor, that when England was at war with 
Turkey, the merchant vessels of Greece, 
then a Turkish dependency, almost always 
escaped from their pursuers. The secret of 
their success was thought to be in the fact 
that on board of the Greek vessels, every 
man, from the captain to the cabin boy,^ had 
a pecuniary interest in the vessel and freight 



£hc pining and J^rientifw frees. 



^Mechanical. 



Steam vs. Hand Labor. 

When steam power first began to super- 
sede hand labor in England, the forebodings 
of the workmen were terrible. So with the 
early introduction of labor-saving machines 
in general, both in England aud on this 
continent In England, the contest was a 
hard one. The laborers fought against 
such improvements with an ardor and per- 
severance 'which are exhibited only when 
men are fighting for a foothold upon exist- 
istence. How short-sighted they were, and 
how baseless were their forebodings, has 
been abundantly proven by the sequel. 
The opening thereby made for educated 
and skilled labor has elevated the mechanic 
from the condition of a mere serf to that 
of the highest position in the social scale. 
The steam engine has proven the great civ- 
ilizer of the age, and has completely broken 
down the wide distinction that once existed 
between the laborer and the tradesman or 
professional man. The genius of the skill- 
ful and intelligent mechanic has now no 
limit ; while the avenues of wealth and 
fame are as open and promising to him as 
to that of any other member of society. 

The time was when people believed that 
"all tho intelligence," says the Boston In- 
vestigator, came from within the walls of a 
collegiate institution — that men, to be qual- 
ified to hold offices of trustand emolument, 
must first "graduate." But that idea has 
•exploded. The efficient men of to-day are 
those who never had a "liberal" education; 
but those who have, are the most bigoted 
and illiberal among us, with a few honora- 
ble exceptions. The workshop produces 
the free mind, the potency of which is being 
everywhere felt, to the utter dismay of every 
grade of fogyism. 

By the aid of improved machinery, one 
man can now spin four hundred times more 
cotton yarn than the best cotton-spinner 
could in 17G9, when Arkwright took out 
his first patent. In grinding grain and 
making flour, one man can now do one hun- 
dred and fifty times more work than he 
could a century ago. One woman can now 
manufacture as much lace in a day as a 
hundred women could a hundred years ago. 
It now requires as many days to refine 
sugar as it did months thirty years ago. 
Only forty minutes are now required to fix 
an amalgam of mercury and tin on a large 
looking-glass, which once occupied six 
weeks. The engines of a first-class iron- 
clad frigate perform as much work in twen- 
ty-four hours as 42,000 horses. 

Saw Teeth. — The number of saw teeth 
should be proportioned both to hardness of 
the timber to be sawed and the power to be 
used. Each tooth of a saw can only cut 
advantageously a certain distance forward 
in passing through tile log, which distance 
depends on the hardness of the wood ; but 
if a saw has too many teeth, or is driven by 
too weak a power, each tooth will not cut so 
far forward as it should do, and there is a 
loss of power. If the power is great; and 
the number of teeth few, then each tooth 
will have to cut too far forward. 



American Iron. — Just previous to the 
breaking out of the war, an important ex- 
periment was made in Georgia to test the 
relative durability of American and English 
railroad iron. A portion of the track of 
the Central Railroad, subjected to great 
wear', was laid — one side with American and 
the other with English iron. At the expira- 
tion of two years, the wear was decidedly 
in favor of the American iron, 



Propellers and Side- wheels. — All the 
American steamships sailing from New York 
to European ports have side-wheels ; while 
all except four or five of the foreign ships 
have screw propellers. A new line of 
American steamers about to be started from 
Boston will have screw propellers. 

Mechanical cultivation of the land is 
attracting great attention in France. 



Artificial Wood. — An important branch 
of industry has recently sprung up in Rhen- 
ish Prussia. It consists in the manufacture 
of various articles from refuse wood and 

saw dust, which are agglomerated by a ce- 
ment, the exact nature of which is not 
stated, and then pressed in molds, SO as to 
form covers for photographic albums, small 
picture frames, rosettes, and other orna- 
ments for the use of cabinet-makers, etc. 
For the last mentioned articles the compo- 
sition is stained to imitate ebon>, mahog- 
any, walnut and other woods. The compo- 
sition, or " serif arine," as it is called, may 
be sawn, cut, drilled, attached together by 
glue, and bent on hot plates. It may be 
polished with oil or French polish, and 
may be varnished and gilt. A similar com- 
position wasjmanufactured in France, a few 
years ago, by mixing fine saw dust with 
blood and submitting it to the action of a 
hydraulic press. — Ijindon Builder. 

The above paragraph comes to us from 
Europe as something new, but we believe 
the very same branch of industry has been 
established in this country for several years. 
Saw dust has been combined with shellac, 
colored with various pigments, and pressed 
in molds, which were heated to the neces- 
sary degree to melt the shellac. The prin- 
cipal use made of this composition was the 
manufacture of ambrotype cases and small 
picture-frames, but an application of it was 
made in the form of buttons, chessmen, etc. 
It is a good imitation of vulcanized rubber, 
but it will not sustain the wear and rough 
usage which the rubber will bear. — Ameri- 
can Artisan. 



A new kind of fire-proof is described 
by the Idaho World as follows : While at 
Centreville, the other day, we were shown 
a novel kind of fire-proof above-ground 
cellar, belonging to and in the rear of the 
store of Duke & Co. The inner walls are 
of wood — ordinary plank. Against these 
upon the outside are the novel and perfectly 
fire-proof walls, made of mere dry earth 
mixed with molasses, with short cut fibers 
of old rope, to serve as hair in plastering, 
included in the mixture. When prepared, 
this strange plastering is spread on the 
boards, with a heavy plank to retain the 
mixture in the place intended, and then a 
big maul is brought to play upon the plank 
to beat the mixture solidly in. This is the 
process, and it is repeated, layer upon layer, 
and width upon width, until the whole 
mass is two feet thick and entirely envel- 
opes the building. A roof of the same 
material, put on the same way, is added, 
and the building or cellar is completed. 
The cellar of Duke & Co. has been finished 
only a few days, and yet this covering of 
dry earth, molasses and hempen fiber is so 
hard that a nail cannot be driven into it, 
and it is impervious to either fire or water. 
It is an invention of Mr. J. B. Duke's, and 
though a good many laughed at him, and 
tried to convince him, while he was putting 
on the queer mixture, that it would be a 
signal failure, all now admit that his head 
was the soundest on that, and all agree that 
it is a model fire-proof cellar he has made. 

Steel Cooking Utensils. — Bessemer's 
steel is recommended for cooking utensils. 
The material is not acted on by the various 
agents which attack copper, and thus on the 
score of health and safety it possesses spec- 
ial recommendations.' Over cast iron for 
saucepans, etc. , it will have the further ad- 
vantage that, as the vessels are so much 
thinner, a great saving of heating material 
will be effected. The rolled sheets of steel 
may, by the aid of a lathe, be pressed into 
any required form, and thus the vessel is 
constructed of oue piece, requiring no riv- 
ets or soldering. Various household uten- 
sils have already been made of this steel. 

Plastek op Paris— Accidental Discov- 
ery. — The discovery that plaster of paris 
was a non-conductor of heat was made by a 
man who, while making plaster images, fre- 
quently washed his hands in a tin pan, the 
bottom of which soon became incrusted. 
Soon after, when it was put on the fire to 
heat water, it was found that the water could 
not be heated. This discovery was put to 
a practical use in the making of iron safes, 
the chambers of which are filled with plas- 
ter, which, in case of fire, prevents the con- 
tents from being burned. 

Case-hardening Iron. — Cast iron may 
be case-hardened by being rolled at a red 
heat in equal parts of powdered prussiate 
of potash, saltpetre and sal-ammoniac, and 
by being then placed, whilst yet hot, in a 
bath containing two ounces of prussiate of 
potash and four ounces of sal-ammoniac in 
every gallon of cold water. 

A self-propelling steam fire engine has 
been completed in Manchester, N. H. , and 
made a successful trip through the streets. 



£ricntifir ^HiSttUami. 



Facts with Regard to Fuel. — Wood is 
the most healthy fuel to burn, from the 
fact that it gives off the least noxious gas, 
and contains the largest amount of oxygen. 
Coal contains but very little or no oxygen; 
hence the oxygen necessary for its consump- 
tion must be extracted from the atmos- 
phere. So with coal oil, which is a very 
unhealthy fuel, except when burned in well 
ventilated rooms. If either coal or oil is 
burned in a close room, the air will soon 
become "oppressive" — it will have been 
deprived of a large percentage of its oxy- 
gen. A coal fire will soon go out unless it 
has a large supply of air (oxygen), while 
wood will burn with' comparatively little 
air, having a large supply of oxygen within 
itself. Hard, close-grained wood is con- 
verted into "live" coals ; soft, porous wood 
into ashes. 

Close-grained, heavy woods, like hickory 
and oak, give out the most heat ; although 
the lighter woods, such as pine and willow, 
being open-grained, heat up much the 
quickest. 

The relative value of the different fuels 
is determined by the amount of water which 
a pound thereof will raise to a given tem- 
perature. Thus, one pound of dry wood 
will convert forty pounds of ice into boil- 
ing water ; while a pound of good coal will 
raise eighty pounds of ice to the boiling 
point of water — hence, one pound of coal 
is worth two pounds of dry wood. A ton 
of coal at ten dollars is equal to two cords 
of wood at five dollars per cord. It would 
be more equitable to sell wood by the ton, 
when dry, the same as coal. Such, indeed, 
is the custom in some portions of Europe. 

Vocal Machinery of Birds. — Until re- 
cently, it was quite difficult to account for 
so small a creature as a bird, especially a 
canary bird, making a tone as loud as some 
animals a thousand times the weight of 
that bird. Recent discoveries, however, 
have shown that in birds the lungs have 
several openings communicating with cor- 
responding air-bags or cells, which fill the 
whole cavity of the body from the neck 
downwards, and into which the air passes 
and repasses in the progress of breathing. 
This is not all ; the very bones are hollow, 
from which air-pipes are conveyed to the 
most solid parts of the body, even into the 
quills and body. By forcing the air out of 
the body, they can dart to the greatest 
hight with astonishing velocity. No doubt 
the same machinery forms the basis of 
their vocal powers, and at once solves the 
mystery. 

Inflammability of Thoroughly Dried 
Wood. — Scientific writers inform us that 
wood, when continually exposed to a very 
moderate heat, such as that of steam and 
hot water pipes, will, in a space of time 
varying from eight to ten years, become so 
inflammable that it will take fire at a tem- 
perature very little over that of boiling 
water. The wood undergoes a slow process 
of charring, and, it is said, only awaits the 
admission of air (which it gets by shrink- 
ing and cracking) to burst out into flame. 

The Results of Science. — Agassiz was 
ones presented with a single scale of an un- 
known fish. From the study of that scale he 
made a drawing of the appearance which 
the fish to .which that scale belonged 
must have made. A fish, corresponding 
almost precisely with his drawing, and hav- 
ing identically the same scale, was subse- 
quently found, thereby proving the correct- 
ness of the deductions of science. 

The phenomena of sound gives the key 
to the modern theory of the propagation of 
light; both being produced by vibration — 
of sound in the air and of light in a much 
more subtle substance penetrating the uni- 
verse. The musical scale corresponds to 
the scale of prismatic colors. In light there 
are different octaves, such as the caloric, the 
luminous, the chemical, etc 



Artificial Agate. — Agate when polished 
is sometimes seen to bear markings win h 
have a curious resemblance to a variety of 
natural objects, such as trees, bushes, and 
occasionally animals. These natural ap- 
pearances, it seems, may be easily imitated 
artificially in various shades of color on 
common chalcedony. It is only necessary 
to draw the design on tho polished stone, 
using a common goose quill, with a tolera- 
bly strong solution of nitrate of silver, and 
then drying it in direct sunlight. The 
drawing will at lust be of a brownish color, 
but if dried and touched over two or three 
times it will be reddish. The same solu- 
tion of nitrate of silver mixed with 12 Y % per 
cent of soot and 12% per cent, of bitatrate 
of potash will give a greyish-brown color. 
A violet color may be obtained by mixing 
one part of alum with three parts of the sil- 
ver solution. Gold dissolved in aqua regia, 
or a solution of chloride of gold, gives a 
light-brown color. White and opaque ap- 
pearances will be given by a solution of 
nitrate of bismuth. All these colors are 
unaffected by the atmosphere, and will bear 
washing. They can, in fact, only be de- 
stroyed by a very high temperature. They 
may be discharged by treatment with strong 
acids, but will reappear after washing and a 
fresh exposure to sunlight. — Mechanics' 
Magazine. 

Atmospheric Action. — The carbonic acid 
of the air slowdy attacks the rocks above the 
ocean level, and thus turns them to clay, 
forming carbonates with the soda, potash, 
lime and magnesia, set free, and carries these 
down as carbonates to the sea, where the 
carbonate of soda decomposes the chloride 
of calcium of its waters, and forms common 
salt and carbonate of lime. This series of 
actions is the source of the salt of the sea, 
of all cloys and of limestones which are 
chemical and not organic in their origin. 
Organic living things do not generate the 
carbonate of lime, but appropriate it, when 
found for them by chemical reactions ; and 
thus great portions of our limestone rocks 
are made up of fossil remains. In forty- 
four feet of limestone, there is separated 
and condensed from the air a large atmos- 
phere of carbonic acid gas ; the early atmos- 
phere was therefore very dense and unfit for 
the sustenance of the higher forms of life, 
until by far the greater portion of this gas 
has. been removed by the formation of the 
carbonate of lime and vegetable matter now 
constituting coal and petroleum. 

To Print Letters ey Sunlight. — Dis- 
solve chalk in aquafortis to the consistence 
of milk, and add to that a strong solu- 
tion of silver. Keep this liquor in a glass 
decanter well stopped, then cut out from a 
paper the letters you would have appear, 
and paste the paper on the decanter, which 
you are to place in such a maDner that its 
rays may pass through the places cut out of 
the paper and fall on the surface of the 
liquor. The part of the glass through 
which the rays pass will turn black, while 
that under the paper will remain white. 
You must observe not to move the bottle 
during the time of the operation. — Cliemi- 
cal News. ' 

Oxidation by Means of Charcoal.— A 
communication was lately read at the Lon- 
don Chemical Society concerning experi- 
ments made with recently-burned boxwood 
charcoal. It was first placed in pure oxy- 
gen gas, and, after being saturated into 
other gases and vapors, and the absorption 
as well as the resulting vapors were noted. 
Moist sulphurous acid and sulphureted 
hydrogen were changed to sulphuric acid ; 
common alcohol to acetic acid, amylic alco 
hoi to valerianic acid; but the author as- 
serted that ammonia does not undergo 
oxidation in the pores of charcoal. 

Illuminating gas is said to be considera- 
bly increased in power by heating it and 
burning it with heated air. It would not 
be difficult or expensive to put up gas and 
air pipes, or a double pipe for both, in con- 
nection with household furnaces, etc., and 
apply combination burners. 

Elementary Combinations. — The most 
delicious fruits are composed of hydrogen, 
oxygen, carbon and nitrogen ; and the most 
deadly poisons are composed of the same 
ingredients, differing only in the propor- 
tions of their combination. ■ 



A Simple Rule.— To ascertain the length 
of the day or night, at any time of the year, 
double the time of the sun's rising, which 
gives you the length of the night, and 
double the time of its setting, which gives 
the length of the day. 

Vanadium. — Mr. Mushet has expressed 
the opinion that a minute quantity of the 
metal vanadium mixed with iron forms a 
valuable alloy, and gives a fine, tough, 
fibrous texture to bar iron. 



Wbt piwng and ^riMtiffo jgxttt. 



[Reported for the Mining and Scientific Press.] 

California Academy of Natural 
Sciences. 

BEGTJLAR MEETING. 

Monday Evening, July 1, 1867. 

Vice President Bansom in the Chair. 
Twenty members present ' 

W. A. S. Nicholson, A. B. Stout, M.D., 
and C. W. McCormick, M.D., were pro- 
posed for Eesident Membership. 

Donations to Cabinet. — Native oysters — 
Ostrea laticaudata; also, specimens of Pur- 
pura laciuca, by B*r. Cooper, who remarked 
that the former species was from the bay 
near the city, and were quite abundant and 
of good quality, and that the Purpura lived 
upon them. Specimens of the cones of 
Pinus contorta, commonly known as the false 
Norway pine,.or twisted pine ; also, Oarray 
Elliptvca, or tassel tree, from Port Trinidad, 
presented by Dr. Veatch. Eggs, caterpillar, 
female and cocoon, of the California silk- 
worm (Saiurnia Californica, or Euryalus of 
Boisduval), presented by Dr. Lanszwesrt, 
who remarked that the number of eggs of 
this silkworm is from 200 to 250. The 
female lays, on an average, from seventy to 
eighty per day. Three thousand eggs weigh 
an ounce. The caterpillar, direct from the 
egg, is more lively than that of the Chinese 
silkworm, and hardly keeps in its place. 
The silk produced by this worm is stronger 
ban that of the Chinese, and is indigenous 
o California. Living on the Catanothus, it is 
well worth the attention of our silk-grow- 
ers, as perhaps in feeding it on the mul- 
berry a finer quality of silk would be ob- 
tained. The eggs were obtained from a 
female caught in the garden of the Phila- 
delphia Brewery, Second street, in this city, 
on the 10th of June. The eggs were hatched 
on the 30th of the same month. The cater- 
pillar requires generally from two to two 
and a half .months before making its cocoon. 

Dr. Kellogg made some remarks upon a 
specimen of Arviiolochea Californica, a vine 
sometimes called Dutchman's pipe, from 
Angel Island, presented by Mr. E. Brooks. 

Mr. Stearns read a note from Prof. W. P. 
Blake, stating 'that the fossil vertebras from 
the Tulare Valley, which at a former meet- 
ing I suggested were Saurian, prove, on 
investigation, "to be one of the larger forms 
of Delphinidat." 

Mr. Stearns exhibited specimens of Hali- 
otis from Monterey, which he had received 
from Dr. Canfield, of that place. The pecu- 
liarity of the specimens consisted in their 
being hybrids — a cross between the two 
species known to conchologists as H. Cra- 
cherodii and H. r/ifescens. In this connec- 
tion, Mr. S. made the following general 
remarks upon the Haliotidm : "The word 
Haliotis means sea ear, from Halios, marine, 
and Otis, ear. It is the abalone of the Native 
Californians, the ormier of the French, the 
lap-t burra of the Portuguese, the .orecchiale 
of the Italians, the patella reale of the Sicil- 
ians. The shape of the shell may be com- 
pared to a Turbo, or top shell, with small 
apex whorls and a disproportionately large 
body whorl, and the whole flattened out. 
As regards shape, it holds the same position 
to Turbo that Concholepas does to Purpura. 
It adheres to the rocks like the Paiellas and 
Fisurellas. To the latter genus it is some- 
what allied through its anatomy, The ar- 
rangement of the teeth upon the lingual 
ribbon is like that of Fissurella. Cuvier 
found every individual that he examined 
had an ovary, and therefore concluded that 
the Haliotides were hermaphrodites. The 
chief peculiarity of these animals is, that 
their shells are perforated with a regular 
series of holes for the passage of the water 
to the respiratory organs, analogous to the 
vertical hole in the shell of Fissurella. 
The shells of this latter genus have but 
one hole, and are not pearly. The holes in 
Haliotis are ranged parallel with the eolurn- 
ellar lip, and being required only in that 
part of the shell which covers the branchial 
cavity, those nearest the spire are filled up 
and new ones formed as the animal ad- 
vances in growth. The Haliotides are, in a 
certain degree, fixed or sedentary in their 
habits ; and, though capable of locomotion, 
they . probably move but little and quite 
slowly, since their structure, as seen in 
their powerful muscular foot, or disk, shows 
it is made for adhesion. "The brilliant and 
highly-colored interior of these shells, pro- 
ducing sometimes an iridiscent effect, has 
been attributed by Sir David Brewster, Dr. 
Carpenter, and others, to minute striffl, or 
grooves, on the surface of the nacre, which 
alternate with others of animal membrane. 
The color is produced by the nature, of the 
lamina?, which decompose the light in con- 
sequence of the interference caused by the 
reflection from two sides of each film, as 
may be seen in soap-bubbles. The nacreous 
laminae, when magnified, indicate a minute 
cellular structure. The cells are of a long 



oval form, and their short diameter is not 
above 1-5000 of auinch." (Jeffrey.) 

Dr. Cooper followed Mr. Stearns, and re- 
marked upon the geographical distribution 
of this genus of mollusca. 

A paper was read by Dr. W. P. Gibbons, 
of Alameda, in which he resumed the sub- 
ject of the extinct forest of redwood on the 
Coast Bange, near San Antonio. He di- 
rected attention to the fact that some of 
those stumps indicated a method of growth 
different from ordinary forest trees. Their 
immense size was due, in some cases, to the 
fact that three or four trees, growing in 
proximity, would ultimately impinge on 
each other, and if supplied with sufficient 
nourishment, they would grow together and 
form one immense trunk. This theory was 
verified by the statements of Dr. Kellogg 
and Mr. Bolander, who mentioned the fact 
that near Searsville several redwood trunks 
had grown together, and for forty feet 
formed a solid tree. There is no depend- 
ence in estimating the age of such trees in 
any other way than by carefully counting 
the number of concentric growths from a 
center. The oldest of these redwoods is 
about 1,500 years of age. The gigantea of 
Calaveras is about the same age. These 
redwoods are evidently the second genera- 
tion of the race ; hence we may infer that 
3,000 years, at least, have passed by since 
the present growth first commenced on the 
Coast Bange. But long before this must 
vegetation have covered portions of these 
hills, as the Sequoia reposes in a bed of 
alluvium twenty or thirty feet in depth. 
He also referred to the bulbous expansion 
of these trees near the base. These are 
composed of large expanding roots, grow- 
ing together, and forming a complete net- 
work. The hight of this indicates the 
degree of denudation which the soil has 
undergone during the lifetime of the tree. 
This is about five feet in 1,500 years. Some 
of these trunks have from 10,000 to 14,000 
buds, partially developed, around their base, 
each bud having the power, under favora- 
ble conditions, of being developed and 
forming a perfect tree. The mass of wood 
contained in a tree twenty-five feet in diam- 
eter is equal to 4' ',000 cubic feet, weighing 
over 2,500,000 pounds. 

Bemarks were made in connection with 
the above by Messrs. Cooper, Kellogg, 
Veatch and Stearns. Adjourned. 

Beal Estate Sale.. — We would call the 
attention of the public to the advertisement 
which appears to-day of the sale of the 
Beideman Estate, comprising some of the 
finest building lots in the city. Having 
been for many years in the possession of J. 
C. Beideman, deceased, the title is repre- 
sented by Mr. Jno. W. Brumagim, the Ad- 
ministrator, as unquestionable. Many fine 
residences have already been erected con- 
tiguous to this property. This will be one 
of the largest and at the same time one of 
the most advantageous sales of real estate 
that has taken place here for many years. 
It will be seen that the terms are exceed- 
ingly liberal — only ten per cent, of the pur- 
chase money to be paid at the time of sale, 
and fifteen per cent, more on confirmation 
by the Probate Court ; thereafter, one- 
fourth annually until the whole is paid — 
the deferred payments bearing eight per 
cent, interest and secured by mortgage on 
the property, thus giving purchasers ample 
opportunity to make provisions for the pay- 
ments, and, in fact, to earn the money be- 
fore it is required. The sale commences on 
Wednesday, July 24th, at the salesroom of 
MauriceDore & Co. , 327 Montgomery street, 
and will continue until the whole is sold. 
Catalogues, with full description of proper- 
ty, can be had on application to the auc- 
tioneers, or to H. F. Williams & Co., Clay 
street. 



The Eejected Drill. — A correspondent 
writes us, too late for insertion this week, a 
statement that the ' ' spring drill " alluded 
to recently in this paper, as having been 
condemned by Mr. Stanton, Superintendent 
of the summit tunnel on the Central Pacific 
Bailroad, is the noted invention which has 
for years been successfully applied in the 
Mount Ceuis tunnel in Europe. It is oper- 
ated by compressed air. 

»--»■ ■^^..«- * 

American and Forelirn I"ateuts.— Letters Patent 
fir Inventors call be secured In the United States and foreign 
countries through the Mining asd Scientific Pnrcss Patent 
Agency. We offer apulicants reasonable terms, and they 
can rest assured of a strict compliance with our obligations, 
and a faithful performance of all contracts. For reference, 
we will furnish the names of numerous parties for whom 
we havo obtained patents during the past two years. 



New Patents and Inventions. 



Under this heading we shall mention, from week to week 
as occasion may demand. New and Important Inven- 
tions; also, the List of Patent Claims recently issued from 
the U. R. Patent Office to inventors on the Pacific Coast, 
and other Patent Issues which we deem of local in- 
terest to readers on this side of the Continent Most 
Patents on Ihis coast nrcsemred hroiuih the MINING 
ANU SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. We lire 
prepared to ob'ain from Washington, with despatch, 
copies of any Patent issued. 



PATENTS P.ECENTLT ISSUED. 

65,094— Gang Plow.— L. B. Lathrop, San 

Jose", Cal. : 

I claim, 1st, the rotary cutters, A, attached 
to the wheels, C, and forming flanges there- 
on, for the purpose of acting as land-sides 
for the plows, substantially as set forth. 

2d, The axle, B, when arranged obliquely 
below the tongue, A, and when adjustable, 
by means of the screw-bolt, a, and slotted 
arm, b, substantially as and for the purpose 
herein shown and described. 

3d, The devices for raising and lowering 
the plows, consisting of the screw, K, rods, 
i and h, and of the axle, B, lugs, f and g, 
bar, F. and bolts, c, respectively as set 
forth. 

4th, The double tongue, A, M, in combi- 
nation with the wheel, I, supporting the 
end of the main tongue, and with the hinges, 
1, m, n, and o, p, L, substantially as herein 
shown and described. 

5th, The plow-beams, E, when bent so as 
to form off-sets at the top of the mold- 
boards, substantially as and for the purpose 
herein shown and described. 
65;165. — Penctl-shabpenee. — Hubert Bur- 
gess, San Francisco, Cal. : 

I claim the case or box, A, tray, B, and 
file, C, for sharpening pencils, substantially 
as shown and described. 

BEOENT INVENTIONS. 

AWateb Flame. — An ingenious person 
at Hartford, Conn., has invented a contriv- 
ance to burn water ; and it is said that the 
flame is of wonderful intensity, and can be 
produced in three minutes, governed by a 
thumb screw, and can be applied to any 
purpose, as easily as any fire. 

A New Method or Propulsion. — A citi- 
zen of Troy, N. X., has invented a new 
method of applying propelling power, and 
has built a model of a vessel for experiment- 
ing. His device is to propel by four 
screws instead of one, all of which are to be 
placed directly under the vessel. The idea is 
that the location of the screws under the 
vessel will give it much greater speed, as at 
that point the screws operate upon solid 
water alone, and consequently gain addi- 
tional power and efficiency. 

To Pbevent Sun-steoke of Hobses. — A 
gentleman in New York, has invented some- 
thing for horses, for which he ought to be 
made an honorary member of the Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. It 
consists of a small reservoir, filled with 
water, placed on the animal's head, keeping 
the brain cool, and thus warding off the 
effects of heat and sun-stroke. 

A Cbavat Pin is among the attractive cu- 
riosities of the French department of the 
Paris Exposition. Everybody has seen how 
bells are rung in all the new hotels. Instead 
of pulling the bell and making it ring by an 
exertion of mechanical force, we press a 
small button in the wall ; this is connected 
by an electric wire with a small alarm, the 
dapper of which keeps on jingling so long 
as the button is pressed. Lift the hand from 
the button and the alarm ceases. This prin- 
ciple a French jeweler has applied to cravat 
pins. The knob of the pin is of various de- 
vices. It is a hare with a tabor, or drummer 
with his drum, or a death's head with a loose 
under-jaw, or a dog. Whoever chooses to 
wear such a pin has connected with it by a 
wive a small electrical battery in one of his 
pockets. He puts his hand into his pocket, 
touches a button there, and off goes the pin. 
The hare begins topatter on the tabor, the 
drummer to beat on his drum, the death's 
head to chatter and roll its horrid eyes, or 
the dog to bark and snap. When the hand 
is lifted from the button, instantly all is 
quiet. 

Sheep-sheaeing by Wind. — A sheep- 
shearing machine, which operates just like 
a reaper or mower, and mows a swath of 
wool an inch and a half wide, has just been 
invented. The motion is obtained by means 
of a little wind-engine in the handle, which 
is driven by a force-pump or bellows forc- 
ing wind into it through a flexible tube. 
The days of hard work sheep-shearing are 
numbered. 

A paper water bucket has been invented 
by Mr. J. W. Jarboe, of the American Pa- 
per Manufacturing Company, of Green- 
point, N. Y. Among its advantages over 
others is the fact that it is stouter, will not 
shrink or decay, and will outwear a dozen 
wooden buckets. It was recommended as 
adapted for ubo on board of vessels and 
steamships. 



All About Sending Money by Mail. 

Kates or Commission. — The following are the rates 
charged (in currency) for transmitting money to any part 
of the United Slates: 

On Orders not exceeding $20 10 cents. 

Over $20 and not exceeding $50 lb cents. 

No fractions of cents to he introduced in an Order. 
United States Treasury Notes, or National Bank Notes 
only received or paid. 
To send over $50, additional Orders must be obtained. 
Post Offices where Money Orders may be obtained will 
furnish blanks as follows, which the applicants will (111 out: 
No Amount.... — Date ,186 . 

MONET ORDER. 

Required for the sum of $.... Payable at , 

State of _ Payable to , Residing 

at , State of Sent by 

Residing at , State of 

Entered in Register : 

, Postmaster. 

The applicant must, in all cases, write bis own given 
name and surname in full, and when tho giveu name of 
the payee is known, it should be so stated ; otherwise 
initials may be used. The given names of married women 
must be stated, and not those of their husbands. For ex- 
ample: Mrs. Mary Brown must not be described as Mrs. 
William Brown. 

Names of purties and places, and the sums, to be writ- 
ten in the plainest possible manner. 

As there are several places of the same name in the 
United States, applicants mu.stbe careful toindicate winch 
of them they mean ; and the Postmaster will satisfy him- 
self, before writing out the order, that tho place indicated 
is the one iutended. 

List of Money-Order Post Offices in the Paciflo 
States and Territories, May SO, 1867. 



Auburn 

Benicia 

Camptouvillc. 

Chico 

Cohinrbii 



CALIFORNIA. 
County. 

Placer. 

Solano. 

Yuba. 

Butte. 

.Tuolumne. 



Colusa Colusa. 

Downieville Sierrs. 

Dutch Flat Placer. 

Eureka Humboldt. 

Folsum City Sacramento. 

Forest Hill placer. 

Georgetown El Dorado. 

Gibsouville Sierra. 

Gilroy Si.ni a Clara 

Grass Valley Nevuda. 

Healdsuurg Sonoma. 

lone Valley Amador. 

Jackson Amador 

Li Porte Pin mas. 

Los Angeles. ...Los Angeles. 

Mariposa Mariposa. 

Markleeville Alpine. 

Murysvillu Yuba. 

Martinez Contra Costa. 

Mokelumne Hill. .Calaveras. 

Mou terey Monterey. 

NEVADA. 

Office. Count//. I Office. County. 

Virginia City Storey. Austin Lander. 

Carson Ormsby.l Aurora Esmeralda. 

OREGON. 

Office. County. 

Albany Liun. 

Canyon City Grant 

Corvallis . ." Benton 



Office. County. 

Napa Citv Napa. 

Nevada City Nevada. 

Oakland Alameda. 

Oroville Butte. 

Petaluma Souoma. 

Placervillc El Dorado. 

Red Bluff Tehama. 

-acrinnento .. ..Sacramento. 

San Rafael Mann. 

-an Francisco.. San Franc'o* 

S in ta Cruz Santa Cruz. 

San Jose San la Clara. 

Santa Eosa Sonoma. 

Shasta Shasta. 

Sononi Tuolumne. 

Slock ton San Joani.in. 

Suisnu City Solo no. 

Susan vi lie Lassen. 

Vacavllle Solauo. 

Vullejo Solano. 

Visalia Tulare. 

Watsonville ...Santa Cruz. 

Weaverville Trinity. 

Wilmington. ...Los Angeles. 
Yreka Siskiyou. 



Dallas Polk. 

Eugene City l.ano. 

Jacksonville. Jackson. 

Lafayette Yam Hill. 



Office, County. 

En Grande Union. 

Oregon City Clackamas. 

Portland Multnomah. 

Koseburgh Douglas 

.salem Marlon' 

The Dalles W-arco' 

Cmatil In Umatilla' 



IDAHO TF.RRITOBY. 
Office. County. I Office. County. 

Boise CKy Ada. Ruby City Owyhee. 

Idaho City Boise. |Lewistou , Ney Perce. 

MONTANA TERRITORY. 



Office. 



County. 
• Eogerton. 



Office. County. 

Virginia City Madison. 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 
Office. County. I Office. 

Oly mpia Thurston . Vancouver, 

bteilucooi ~ " 



County. 

Clark . 

City Piorce. | Walla- Walla. . . . Walla-Walla, 



A PlONEEB HaKDWABE AND AgBICULTUBAL 

Stoke. — The extensive store of Messrs. 
Webster Brothers, of Stockton, was estab- 
lished in 1850, and, we believe, now stands 
in favorable comparison with any like es- 
tablishment on this coast. Through the in- 
telligence and energy of its proprietors, 
much has been accomplished for the devel- 
opment and advancement of the agricul- 
tural resources of animportantportionof our 
young State. Experience has made them 
familiar with the wants of their various cus- 
tomers, and secured to them a great meas- 
ure of success. 

The introduction of improved agricul- 
tural implements is producing wonderful re- 
sults in California, and yet the work has but 
fairly commenced. Steam plows and steam 
threshers are yet to become common in our 
great grain fields. 

Messrs. Webster Brothers are now intro- 
ducing many well tried and thoroughly ef- 
fective machines and farming implements, 
prominent among which we may name the 
"Baxter California Gang Plows," which we 
are assured are really a series of new gang 
plows adapted to different soils throughout 
the coast. As soon as the electrotype plate 
of this famous plow is received, it will be 
displayed to the readers of the Pbess. 



®n* Pining anil Scientific fwjtf. 



Weekly Stock Circular. 

Of AlHeUted Brlktrt of the S. I S'.xk.tnd Ei:lwgs Bo»rd 

SXX FSAMCUCO. S*TDKD\T MoHJUJC, ( 
Jul; I . I 

city stocks. 

Tlic demand for city stocks continues 
light ; in fact, for a month past, public 
transactions in this class of securities have 
been very small. Since our last issue, wo 
note sales of Nntional Insurance Company 
at $71.50, and State Telegraph Co. at $30. 

The semi-annual dividend period of our 
local savings banks and other institutions is 
at hand, and tho following havo already an- 
nounced the per centage of net earnings 
thev will disburse to their depositors and 
stockholders : Odd Fellows' Savings Bank, 
10 1-5 per cent, per aunum on term depos- 
its, and 8% per cent, on ordinary deposits. 
This society was organized seven months 
ago and has a deposit account amounting to 
$i:)4,000. The Savings and Loan Society 
declared a dividend of 10 per cent per an- 
num for the six months ending June 30th. 
The deposits of this institution amount to 
about §3,000,000. The Farmers' and Me- 
chanics' Bank of Savings went into opera- 
tion on the first instant, with a capital of 
S150.000, divided into 1,500 shares. The 
Occidental Insurances Company pays a quar- 
terly dividend of V/, per cent, and tho Gas 
Co. its usual monthly dividend of Y, 'f, ct 

We refer our readers to the annexed inter- 
esting table of mining stock dividends : 



: S 



as 



| P 

Q : — 



8: : £ 
: © 






a n o « t, n 



; — — 



s s 
"s a 



i § 



S 3 S g 8 8 
"8 8 "8 8 8 8 

S © o o o S 



8 S S S 

1 § i-i i 



8 s s s s 2 

" 8 S 8 3 S 



& 8" 

o "-> 

8 3 



3 



It will be observed in the foregoing table 
that the aggregate dividends during the first 
half of 1867 have been nearly three times as 
large as those of the same period in 1866. 

The sales in the Stock and Exchange 
Board in the month of June for the' past 
four years compare as follows : 

June, 1861 S2,6I7,'I27 I Juno, 18t>6 SMOG, Ml 

June. I»3"> 4.771,&1J ' June. 1867 6.864.365 

The Board took possession of their new 
rooms, in the Exchange Building, on Cali- 
fornia street, on the first instant. 
MINING SHARE MARKET. 

Since our last reference, the share market 
has fully maintained the activity noted for 
some weeks past. Fluctuations in several 
leading stocks have been quite violent, still 
the market has been strong, embracing some 
twenty different stocks, and a largely in- 
creased amouut of transactions, but at the 
close the market exhibits symptoms of weak- 
ness. 

Savage — shows a marked improvement, 
rising from §4,500 to §5,000, and closing 
yesterday at $4,990. Ore extracted during 
the week ending June 29th, 1,791 tons; ap- 
proximate value, $80, 177, equal to an aver- 
age of $44. 76 per ton. This decreased pro- 
duction is owing to necessary repairs to 
machinery, which occupied three days. The 
northwest drift from the third station, it is 
said, out into good ore at a point about 60 
. feet southeast of winze No. 2, which has 
been developed to a distance of over 20 feet 
without passing through it. This develop- 
ment shows the ore to extend much farther 
south on this level than it did 100 feet above. 

Hale & Noeceoss — one foot sold in the 
Board at $3, 100, seller 30. We are informed 
that in cutting through the east clay wall, 



between the 700 and 780 feet levels, an en- 
tirely new body of ore, from three to three 
and a half feet in width, has been found, 
which is said to be of a very fine quality. 
At the close of June, tho shaft had attained 
a depth of 500 feet 

Crown Point — has fluctuated vary mate- 
rially during the past week, opening at 
$2,200, falling to $1,800, again advancing 
to $2,200, receding rapidly to $1,760, and 
closing yesterday at $1,550. The drifting 
east from tho 600-foot level was commenced 
on the 28th ultimo, and tho cross-cut east, 
from east winzo toward 600-foot level, has 
been run a distanco of 35 feet, where it is 
stated to have penetrated the streak of pay 
oro previously reported to havo been found 
there. During the week ending June 28th, 
836 tons of ore were extracted, showing an 
average value of $35.06 per ton. Captain 
Taylor has been appointed Superintendent 
of this mine, rice C. 0. Batterman. 

Yellow Jacket — declined from $1,660 to 
$1,480, improved to $1,655, receded to 
$1,575, and closed at $1,650, buyer 30. 
From tho balance sheet of this company 
for June we obtain the following : 

Hnluiico nt olow of Mnv $152,590 15 

Bullion received In June $1115.91' 65 

Oilier rece!|. la 11,787 ul 2117,700 67 



$760,290 82 

A dividend of $75 per share will be paid 
on the 10th inst. 

Gould & Curry— is in better favor, hav- 
ing advanced from $690 to $800 per foot, 
and closed at $710, buyer 30. The north- 
east drift from tho fourth station is reported 
to run in a mixture of clay and porphyry, 
containing a few small seams of barren 
quartz. The appearance of the ground, 
however, show symptoms of improvement. 
There are no other changes to note in the 
working of this mine. The company ob- 
tain from 75 to 80 tons per day from the 
old ore chambers. 

Ejentuck — rose from $445 to $550, and 
closed at $510, s. 60. The bullion returns in 
June amonntedto$130,255.51. Afterpaying 
all expenses, etc., this company have a bal- 
ance of $117,344.37 on hand at the close of 
June. A dividend of $40 per share will be 
paid on the 8th inst. 

Chollar-Potosi — sold to a considerable 
extent, improving from $445 to $160, de- 
clining to $430, rising to $487. 50, and clos- 
ing at $470. It is reported that good ore 
has been found in the north end of the Blue 
"Wing stope ; otherwise the mine presents 
no new features, except that they are now 
sinking from the Peck drift to make the con- 
nection with the second station. For the 
month of June the product of bullion has 
been $345,000, obtained from 12,000 tons of 
ore, giving an average of $28 per ton. The 
net profits of the month have been $110,- 
000. It is expected the company will de» 
clare the same dividend as for May. 

Ophtr — A large number of shares have 
changed hands during the week, improving 
from $320 to $387.50, but fell off to $320, 
closing at $325. The cause of the delay in 
obtaining ore has been the necessity for ef- 
fecting ventilation between the ninth and 
tenth levels, which was accomplished on 
Sunday last ; since then they have been tak- 
ing out ore. The vein is from 3 to 4 feet 
wide as now developed. The tenth station 
drift into the north mine has reached 205 
feet, and the indications are encouraging. 

Belcher — opened at $460, receded to 
$420, advanced to $480, declined to $405, 
and closed yesterday at $400. 

Overman — has been somewhat less active, 
improving from $225 to $240, declining to 
$200, rallying to $227.50, and closing at 
$212. 50. The conflict of authority in the man- 
agement of the mine has unsettled the price 
of the stock. The adjourned hearing of the 
suit for the possession of the mine by the 
newly appointed superintendent before the 
Supreme Court of Nevada on the 3d inst, 
consumed all day and was continued until 
yesterday. 

Imperial— advanced from $220 to $237. 50, 
receded to $215 buyer 30, and closed at 
$210. The receipts of bullion in June ag- 
gregated over $107,000. 

Confidence— sold at $64. The bullion 

product for June amounted to $14,000 

Gold Hill Q. M. & M. Co. sold at $194@ 
210. Bullion yield in June, $12,500. 

The aggregate sales of stocks, Legal Ten- 
derNotes, etc., since Saturday last, amounted 
to $1,656,206. 



A Paying Newspaper for Sale. 

A one-half Interest In one of tho best Country Papcre*,n 
the State, is offered for sale on desirable terms. The- jour- 
nal is the oldest in the county. Is situnted at the County 
Scat, and surrounded by one of the most prosperous and 
promising Quartz and Gravel Minlne Districts in the Slate. 
Inquire at Ihe" office of the Mining and Scientific Pre&v; or ad- 
dress DEWEY & VAUGHN. Jfouataia Messenger office, Dow 
nicville, Sierra County. Cal. 7vlltf 



MINING SHAEEH0LDEES' DIRE0T0KY. 

[Complied for every issue, from ndvcrlUcments In the 

Hunan lid Sanmina i'kkss and other &aa 

Fruicltt o Journal*, j 

'nmpriMni* tho Names of Companies, District or Oount\ 
of Location: AlUuUM and d He ul AsseSMnont; Date o'l 
Heatlnij , Uaj ol Ufl inqiioiil Sale , and Amount and Tiim 

ol P»j men, ol Dividend*. 

RJ.HK. LOOMtOH, LBO0KT, ABD DAY DAY 

DAY! or *«3K*ftMlUtl PKLtNOi'KKT irnu 

Adelli. sierra en, Cal., -May 29. SI June M-Juty 15* 

Relcner. Virginia, *•■•-.. May 30, 8'^ Jm.e3u-Julv Hi 

Belcher, Virginia, Hoy , May 3u, $5 June .Ml— July 31 

CamnrRO, Lander en . Nov , June 21, $3) Aug. 8— c «pt 2(5- 

Ciioll,ii--l'(ito-l, Storey co.. Nev Annua- Meeilnj: Julv s 

Cutcu Sanoree, &J union. Mex.. May L !■>*: Jmv 5— July .'. ■ 

•'■.I ni.i. Storey cu., New, June It, SS 50.. July M— AUK. 20 

California, Storey oo.. Nev Special Heating July 6 

Chalk Mountain, Nov. co., Cal.. .June lu.il. .July 19-Amr. 8" 

Cent nil, No. 2 Annual Meet hip Julv fi 

Canliar-PotoHt, Storey co.. Nov , div. a.. ..Payable 1 " ,H ' la 

Chl-Moiii'iiu. S rn. .Mexico. Mm 2$. $■<.,. J nne 2$ -Julv l!t« 

Cordillera, Chihuahua, Hex. April 27, SI ...June 21- July «• 

Crown l*Olut. Nev dividend $30 ..Capable May )5 

Dnney, Lyon ro . Nov, June 13. S3 fitly 22— Anj*. 10 

Dfoa I'ftdrc. Alamo, Mi*x , Juno 1.1, S'l , July 15-Any '.' 

Ddidunollc*, Dol Nunc co .June S, 8c.... July LL— AugUD.1 3* 

Empire U, 4 M , Nev., dividend S6 Payable May 15 

Cold Hill Quartz Co Dividend, SIP— Payable Juno i* 

Gold Mill T. A M., Store vci)., Nev Annual Heat. JlllvW* 

Gulden Rule. Tuolumne Cti.dJv Wc*fl*U... Pavublo Miiv i" 
Gould a Curry. Virginia, Nov., dividend Mil. .Payable Jang 
Hone ft ravel. Nev co . Cal . June 26, $1 ...Julv 30— Aue 19» 
Halo A Norcroaa. Virginia, Nov.. div S12a...Pnvalile May 15 
HnnscomCop.,Del Nunc co., .May 21, 25c. June 2 —July «• 

1 X L, Alpine CO., Cnl.. Juno 19, SI. 50 Julv 19— Auc 5* 

Imperial, Virginia, Nev., div. $10 Payable June 15 

Julia. Slorry co. Nov.. June 19, $1 . July 22— Aue 12 

Jmla, Storey co., Nev... Meeting, July 6 

Kcutuck,div..S-l>per«liare Payable July 8 

I.adv Hell, Del Norte co . June is. 15c July IS— Ana 5* 

La Blancn, Urea. Mcx , June hi, $.J 50 July lO-.Iulv sfi 

hyo]\ M. A M., El Dorado, Co., Juno 6, $3 Inly 5-Julv 22" 

Lady Franklin, Alpine co , May 2. 30c Junu 10— July 22* 

Ml Drtvldflon, Storey co., Hoy., May 22, $1.., Tune 28-Juiy 15* 
Nucstra Sonora tie Gund ..Mcx, May SO, SI. June 20-July 10' 

Overman, Storey co.. Nev ....Annual Meeting Julv 11 

Oxford Ifeta. Esmcrulila, Nov June 10,50c. July 10— July 29* 

Plilln. Slide, El Dorado eo , May 27, 25c June 23-July 15 

Rattlesnake. Yuba co , May 22. $1 June 27 -July \h* 

Santa Cruz, Antonio, Mex., June G, 50c July II— July 2U 

Santa Cruz. Antonio, Mex Mcclinu, Julv 9 

Sophia, Tuolumne co., J it no 11. $3 July II -Julv 26" 

Sierra Nev , Storey co. . Nev , June 1, $10 July 6- July i 

Sea ton. Ainndor co , May 28, $100 July 8— July 29* 

Succor, Storey co.. Nev , May 23. .H0c July 1— July 21 

St. Louis, Lauder co., Nev,. May 4, $5 Tune* 13— July 1* 

Shoshone S, M-. dividend, Si per share Payable March 14 

Savage, Virginia, Nev, dividend $100 Pavublo May 8 

Savage, Virginia City, Nov ...Trustees' Meeting July 13 

Santiago, Silver City, dividend fay able March 6 

White A Murphy Special Meeting Julv 2 

Whitlnlcli, Lander co., Nev , June 21, $15. .Aug. 2 — Sept. 26* 
Yellow Jacket. Gold Hill, div. $75 sh Payable July lc 

•Those marked ■with an asterisk (<*)aro advertised in this 
journal. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^___ 

Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked, 

S. F. STOCK AND EXCHANGEE BOARD. 

Friday Evening, July 5, ISG7. 

MISCKLLANKOUS STOCKS. Bid. Aslid. 

United States 7 3-lOths Bonds, June issuo $ 78 71^ 

Legal Tender Notes ~,iK 73 

Calilornla State Iiunds, 7s. I8. r )7 85 86>; 

San Francisco Bonds ills, 1851 Hhj 102 

Sun Francisco I'lty Bonds, 6s. 1855 81 95 

Ann Francisco City and Cuuuly Bonds, 6s, 18.W. 75 80 

San Francisco City and Co. Sch'l B'd.s, 7 N 1366. 80 — 

San Francisco Cliv and Co. Bonds, 7s, 186; 80 8t 

San FnmciseoCity and Co. Bonds, 7s, IS64 81 Si 

Sao Francisco City and Cu Bonds, 7*. 1865 80 84 

Sim Francisco Citv and Co. Ju ir. Bds. 7s, 1863. 80 84 

San Francisco Cily and Co. Judy Bds, 7a, 1864. 80 Si 

Sacramento City Bonds 2'i — 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6n 57 65 

Marysville Bonds, (0s 75 85 

Stockton Oily Bondd 70 95 

Yuba County Boiid.s, 10s 75 95 

Santa Clara Count v Bonds 7s 75 SO 

Butte. County Bonds, 10s, I860 70 75 

San Mateo- County BondsWs — 85J£ 

Calilornla Steam Navigation Co 65 r.8 

Spring Valley WalerCo. 67 Ji f8 

State Telegraph Co 29 29>£ 

GAS COMTANIES. 

San Francisco Gas Co 65 68 

Sacramento Cas Co 62 64. 

RAILROADS. 

Sacramento Valley Railroad..', — — 

San Fritt. ci*co and San .lose Railroad 40 45 

Oo'.uibiis Kailruad 59 60 

Central Kailrontl 4) 60 

North Beach and Mission Railroad 49 6U 

trout Street, Ulaslon awl Ucean Railroad — 18 

BASKING INSTITUTIONS. 

California, Loan and Ravings Society — — 

Bank ol' Pacific Accumulation Loan Society.. — 90 
The Bunko! Calilonii.i I38 140 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Fircmnns' Fund Insurance Co 90 91 

Pacific Insurance Co 1^0 ISi 

San Fruncisci) Insurance Co — 1311 

M.'relmnt-' Muiual .Marine Insurance Co 4(K) 475 

California Insurance Co 1550 17irfJ 

Union Insurance Co 50 US 

Ualil'ornin Uutne h'surance Co — 92 

Home Mutual Insurance Co- ,.... — — 

Occidental Insurance Co 90 95 

National Insurance Co 71 71>£ 

UINING STOCKS— WASUOK DISTRICT. 

Alpha 400 .441 

Baltimore American — 8 

Belcher 400 402J£ 

Bullion. G. H 41 45 

Crown Point 150) 1551 

Confidence 60 65 

Chollar-Potosi 470 475 

Daney' 10 II 

Exchequer 10 11 

Empire Mill and Mining Co !fi5 200 

tJnuld ACurry 690 700 

Hale. & Norcrosa 2700 32 

Imperial 2i,5 207Ji 

La d y B ry an — — 

Ophtr 320 325 

Overman all) 215 

Sa vage 4950 5000 

Yellow Jacket 1680 ltiUO 

Golden Rule, Calilornla 17 20 



San Fjancisco Market Kates, 

HVholesule; Prices. 

FuiDAT. July 5, 1807. 

Flour, Extra, %1 bbl $5 60 <8$H 60 

D... Superlino 4 75 ©6 25 

Com Meal, 1H 100 lbs 2 00 @ 2 25 

Wheat, $UH) lbs 1 60 © 1 85 

Oats, % ,0.1 lbs I tO @ I 60 

Barley. <a ion lbs 90 @ I no 

Beans*, '-h 10 1 lbs •* 2 no ® 3 5J 

Potatoes. ^1> U lbs 75 @ 1 2", 

Hay » ton 7 itt @120i 

Live Oak Wood, % cord 9 00 @10 00 

Beef, on loot. ^ fl> IX ® — 

Beef, extra, dru6i-ed. *gl lb 9 @ 10 

Sheep, on toot 3 00 @ 4 bO 

Hogs, on t'001, W lb 5?i @ 6J^ 

Hogs, dressed, & lb » ® 10 

GR0CKKIK3, m<R 

Suear, crushed, 13 lb 1* . @ 1'K 

Do. China 9 @ 10 

Coffee, Costa P-ica, $ lb 19J6© 19^ 

Do. Rio 19 @ "9>.{ 

Teu.Japan.13 lb 65 @ 85 

Do Green 60 @ I 25 

Hawaiian Rice, f, lb 9 „, @ ":„, 

China Rice, Ijl lb E;^ © m 



Ranch Butter.' Vl'ft .".'.' .'."'.".'.".".'.".'.'.*.' ."'*.' .'"".' 2? 1 ^S' 

i-ilimiii muter, r*- » 15 ® U 

' '"■' « ««» , *'n>'«-- » K l»tti ® 15 

'"■ 30 @ .Hi 

[■• ><l ' & } h - 12 © 33 

Ham mid HaC '(lib 13 (A 15 

Shoulder*. V ft g @ jq 

ICrtJiii Price*, 

Butter. California. fre>h. "& tt. 30 ® 40 

do. pbkl.il, >< lb.... 25 c& — 

do. Orci;. n. *t lb 15 « 20 

do N,.« York. Vft 35 I - 

BSSI^M » 8 25 

Honey. « K. S(J ^ (ll 

BgKa. « dnxen 35 ^ j,;^ 

fe" nl »»* v../ 15 ® lb 

Huois and Uacoii, t^ft ]g ra 2») 

Cranherrle*, ^ gallon iuu @ 1 25 

Potatoes, £ lb 2 (* 3 

p..t a toes, iweot,^ ib :;; -@S 

roniatoea.9) ft--.' '. — ® 5 

"1 S^lb 3 a 5 

APPIOB. So. I.JB lb J I 5 

Pears. Tabl,-. f ft. 8 @ 10 

Plums, drl.-d.fc lb ..; !3 | 15 

Peaches, drkd.t* lb U I 13 

Oroiig«,Jl dozen s<i @ - 

l.iiiioii>, ^ dozen 75 @ — 

Chickens, atdece — to 75 

Turkvvs, j4 a 20 fo 25 

Soup, Paleund 1. 7 a j^v 

Soap, Castile, flft — @ w 



San Francisco Metal Market 1 

PRICES KUK I.VV01CES. 

JolAnng price* rvte from ten tOJIJUm per cent, higher than the 
folluuiiiy quotation*. 

_ _ Friday. Julv 5. 1?C7. 

iRov.—Dnty; Pig. $9 per ton; Railroad, &le ^ Ho ft,; Bar, 
l@iscf* lb; Sheet, pollshi'd. 3c ?! ft; coinnion, l l c@l?ic 
W lb; Plate, 1.S.C 13 lb; Pipe, l>„u H lb; CalvunlzedT 2>ic 
p lb. 

sco'ch and English rig Iron %i ton S50 00 @$52 0) 

White flu $ ton 60 00 Q 

Ronued Bar, bad o-ssortment S ft — i'3 a 

Refined Bar, good assortment,^* lb — i$*<® 

Boiler. No. I to i _ vi}j® — — 

Plate, No. ft to 9 _ (hC@ _ OS 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 _ wu 

Sheet. No. 14 to Hi — us a — *— 

Sheet, Ho. 21 to 27 —lis a 

Coppkk — Dutv: siieaihing, aj e c p! ft; Pig and Bar, 2^c Sib. 

Sliealhiiii:, W ft — 34 a — 36 

Shen thing, i 1 elloiv , —2b a — 26 

Phealhrng, Old Yellow — 11 a 

Bolts — u @ 

Composition Nails — 25 @ — 2G 

Tin Platks. — Duty: 2.iT3ceut. ad valorem. 

Plates. Clmrcoal, IX, ^ box 13 50 a 

Plates, i C Charcoal 12 01 a 

Roofing Plates. u CO @ — — 

Bum a Tin. Slabs, % ft _ — V5 a — 2G 

PriiKL.— English Cast steel, $ ft — 11" „u. — 15 

Qcicksilvek.— t> Ib a — 60 

For export a — 65 

Zinc— Sheets. 13 1b a — 11 

Lkad.— Fig.^ft .- - 7JS@ — S 

Sheet — 10 a 

Pipe — 11 a 

Bar — 9>^@ — 10 

Borax.— Cailiornia, 13 ft —20 @ — 23 



Jacob Shew, Pioneer Photographer, 612 Clay street, north 
side, fourdoors above Montgomery, {late 315 Montgomery 
street,) takes all kinds of Photographs In the bcstsiyleof 
the Art He would invite especial attention to the new 
" Cabinet Photographs," which hols taking to perfection. 
10vl4tf 



Persoks desirous of obtaining the llncst Wood Engrav- 
ings, can procure them only by having the picture photo* 

graphed on the block, by 

D. H. WOODS, 
19vl4tfnr No. 28 Third slreet 



Save Tonr Teeth.— Do not have them extracted 
without first consulting a good Demist. Ihe loss Is Irrepar- 
able, and, in many Instances, unnecessary. DR. BEERS, 
corner of Pine and Keainy streets, makes a specialty of 
filling the langs of dead Teeth, and building up broken 
crowns with ruas gold— thus restoring them to their origi- 
nal usefulness and beauty. 

tjgp-Cail and examine the work. Finest quality of arti- 
ficial work also manufactured. I6vl4-tf 



Gold Bara, of whatever size, if well cast, assayed 
for two dollars, at A. P. MOLITOK'S Assay Office, 
611 Commercial btreet, opposite United States Branch 
Mint. Wvli-Sm 



Brown** Filtering; Heater.— For preventing In- 
crustatlon in Steam Boilers, purifies water from lime or 
any other impurity, xaves tuel, saves ihe boiler, presents 
explosions, and protects life and property. The cost of the 
Filter is boou waved in fuel and boiler— repairs alone. 

one is in operation at the San Francisco Foundry, Fre- 
mont street, where Rights can be procured, or all needed 
information, on application, in pewn or by letter, lo 

SvlMv ADMIN A. WELLS, Agent 



STEAM 

Family Chartres Coffee 

AND SPICE MILLS. 

Established. July 1, 1856. 

FIRST PREMIUM 

Awarded by the Mechanics' Fair, 1865, for the best Coffo 
and Spices. 

CHA.BLE9 BERNARD, 

XANurAcroRKK or and dkalkein 
Family Chartres Coffee 

— ASD— 

SPICES OF ALL KINDS, 

No. TOTSansome street, between Jackson and Pacific, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

og^-Goods of the best quality. Has no fear of Counter- 
felu— each package bears tho ftignatureof 

C. BERNARD. 

BO-Hii* never employed any Chinese Labor. 

15vHeop3m 



REOisxhn toor Lettkks coiunliilug money ai'drewed to 
a*, or we will not be responsible. Remittances by Express 
must be In packages, prepaid. When practicable, It In beat 
to remit by draft, or order, on some San Francisco bank or 
firm. 



6 



®toe fearing m\A &titvtiih §xw. 



pining Jtowmarjj. 



Thb following inform.itlon la gleaned mostly from jour- 
nals published In the interior, in close proximity to the 
mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alpine County. 

Miner, June 19th: At the post office in 
this place may be seen a collection of Tar- 
shish ore, representing the three classes new- 
found in that mine. No. 1 consists of a 
mass of decomposed substances, which lie 
in pockets all through the lode. There is 
about ten tons of this class in the ore-house 
which will work $400 per ton. No. 2 is se- 
lected from the third by breaking it up small 
and picking out that which shows ore, even 
in small particles. There is out about 15 
tons of this class which will work $125 per 
ton. In No. 3 no ore can be seen, yet it 
will work over $20 per ton. There is over 
62 tons of this class out. In a box is about 
a pound of concentrated ore, obtained by 
washing No. 1 ore in a common pan or horn 
without crushing, which will assay over 
S3.000 per ton. 

The Mountain Co. at Silver Mountain has 
the longest and deepest tunnel in the coun- 
try. Its length is 1, 183 ft. under a very 
steep mountain. Lately the rock was so 
hard that it required 150 drills as hard as 
fire and water could make them to stand a 
day, making only about ten inches ; but re- 
cently it has grown some softer. They ex- 
pect now to make 50 feet per month. 

Amador County.' 

JThe Sutter Creek correspondent of the 
Alia of this city, writing June 14th, says : 
The main shaft in the Hay ward mine is now 
down 1,230 ft., 300 ft. below the level of the 
sea. Ores are now being worked from the 
lowest level ; 60 tons of rock are crushed in 
24 hours. The whole mass of pay rock, be- 
tween the 700 and 1,230 ft. levels, 500 ft. 
deep, 500 ft. long, and from 10 to 12 wide is 
in sight, and ready for extraction. 

The Oneida mine has now in sight 100,000 
tons of ore, that will pay $17 per ton, ex- 
clusive of sulphurets. The yield of this 
mine during the last eight months, has been 
8135,000. 

The present average yield of the Keystone 
ledge is $16 per ton. The vein is 10 ft. 
wide. 

Ledger, June 20th : Ripley, Crane & Co. 
are making preparations to commence work 
on their quartz claim, in Minister's Gulch, 
They will also commence the erection of a 
mill immediately. 

West Point mining camp was almost to- 
tally destroyed by fire last Monday night. 

In the Coney & Bigelow mine, rock has 
been struck, richer than any yet found. The 
vein is about 10 ft. wide, and the quartz is 
full of free gold. 
Calaveras County. 

Chronicle, June 29th : On Lamphear & 
Co's claim, the lead is developing finely. It 
increases in width, and the rock taken out 
would pay handsomely if crushed. Before 
fall, a large mill will be erected on the 
claim. 

Williams, Fenneli & Co. have struck pay 
dirt in their tunnel in Stockton Hill. As 
high as $6 to the pan has been obtained. 

Mitchell & Adams are doing extremely 
well in their claim near French Hill. They 
are taking out the shining ore in very ac- 
ceptable quantities, and their claim exhibits 
no symptoms of exhaustion. 

Pink Smith & Co. are pushing forward 
their tunnel with vigor and determination. 
They will make the Know Nothing claim 
pay yet. 
Alarriposa County. 

Gazette, June 29th : The editor has re- 
ceived two very handsome specimens of 
mineral, known as cobaltine, or cobalt 
glance, with large quantities of nickel, 
from the copper mine of Mr. Hammer- 
strand, on Bear creek. The strata carrying 
these minerals lies alongside of the foot- 
wall of the copper vein, and is about 2 ft 
thick. The gouge of the ore is quartz and 
micacious talcose schist. The width of the 
vein is 6 ft., with a shaft upon it 60 ft in 
depth. 

Nevada County. 

The Nevada correspondent of the Times 
of this city, writing from Bear Valley, June 
27th, says : The beat developed ledge in the 
district is the Bedstone, near Lost Camp, on 
the North Fork of the American. An 8- 
stanip mill has been erected, and has been 
running several months, during which time 
it has paid its owners the cost of construc- 
tion and a handsome profit Between this 
point and Bear river much prospecting has 
been done on extensions of the Bedstone. 
The Blue Bell is the narrowest and richest 
ledge in the district. This ledge is two ft. 
wide on the surface, and crops out the en- 
tire length of its location— 2, 100 ft The 
laic casing uf this ledge is rich in free gold; 
but little gold is visible in the quartz, and 



its richness has been demonstrated by actual 
working tests of several tons run through 
the Bedstone Bros. 2-stamp prospecting 
mill. Some Blue Bell rock yielded from 
this imperfect working as high as $200 per 
ton. 

The Steep Hollow ledge is a location of 
2,200 ft, 10 ft. wide at the bottom and 8 ft. 
on the" summit of the ridge. The owners 
are now running a tunnel, and taking out 
very rich rock. There is rock enough in 
sight to run 40 stamp mills. None of their 
rock has yielded less than $25 per ton, mill 
process. 

Kennicott & Co. have struck a heavy 
quartz gravel deposit, which is proving sin- 
gularly rich. 

Transcript, June 28th: The claims of 
Hunter & Frost are paying from $2 to $4 
per pan. They employ eight hands, and 
are taking out $1,000 per week. 

July 2d : The North Star mine, at Grass 
Valley, was sold yesterday, for $450,000, to 
W. J. Ralston, A. C. Peachy, W. H. V. 
Cronise, Delos Lake, Coleman Bros., and 
others. 

Work has been resumed on the Best 
Chance mine. 

Last week a $40 lump was found in Bins- 
ley ii Co's claims at Kentucky Flat 

"Grass Valley Union, June 29th : A clean- 
up of six weeks' run of Bovee's quartz 
mine, near Angel's, yielded the handsome 
sum of $12,000, and the mines at Angel's, 
Carson's and Smith's Flat are doing better 
than ever before. 

Transcript, June 3d: Several companies 
have commenced work in the channel of 
Deer creek. Leeth & Waite have complet- 
ed a "hurdy gurdy " wheel, four feet in di- 
ameter, which they run with 180 ft press- 
ure, for the purpose of raising gravel from 
the bed of the creek. John Hawke has 
claims adjoining the ground just mentioned. 
He has an overshot wheel for working Ms 
hoisting works, and is raising about 25 tons 
per hour. These two companies employ 
about 60 hands and expect to clean up in 
about two weeks. 

The lower tunnel of the Grizzly ledge is 
in about 400 feet from the surface with 
about 70 feet backs. The ledge is five feet 
thick and pays first rate. 

June 4th : The Kentucky Company, at 
Moore's Flat, are sinking for what is sup- 
posed to be a large basin or channel of blue 
cement, which, it is thought, is the source 
of the rich "gold washes" below. The 
shaft is now about 135 feet below the sur- 
face, and it is expected to strike bed-rock at 
a depth of from 200 to 300 feet 

National, July 1st: Eleven loads of rock 
from the Dromedary ledge, crushed at the 
Gold Hill mill yielded $240.10. After the 
extraction of the free gold, 1, 125 pounds of 
sulphurets remained, which, worked at Lar- 
imer's mill, produced $76.50, making a to- 
tal of $319.60. 

Excelsiob. — Meadow Lake Sim, June 
29th ; The Excelsior Co. are running two 
batteries (eight stamps) of their mill. The 
Last Chance Co. are prospecting rock vig- 
orously on their claim. It looks well. It 
is reported that a lich chimney has been 
struck in the Gold Bun mine. The Chlori- 
nation Works below the dam are being re- 
paired. 

Humor says that L. A. Booth and J. L. 
Bequa have purchased a leading interest in 
the U. S. Grant mine. The late run of the 
Golden Eagle Co's mill returned a fraction 
over $20 per ton. The sulphurets have not 
yet been worked. They will yield about 
$35 per ton. 

The California mill is being refitted, pre- 
paratory to making a run on ore from the 
Green Emigrant. The Green Emigrant is 
yielding exceedingly rich ores. At a depth 
of 13 ft, the ledge is over 8 ft wide and 
rich in free gold. The drift from the 
bottom of the California Co's shaft has been 
driven in on the ledge over 50 ft. The rock 
has been very hard, but is getting softer. 
The ledge is now 7 ft. in width, at the foot- 
wall of which is found a thin layer of black 
copper ore, said to be very rich in both cop- 
per and gold. Much copper can be found 
in its natural state. The balance of the 
ledge is composed of white quartz, heavily 
laden with sulphurets, and containing free 
gold. 

Placer County. 

Herald, June 29th : One half of the Mc- 
Kinney lode, at Henry's Diggings, has been 
sold to Mr. Gruhler, of Sacramento, for 
$10. 000 ; also the Hunt lead, at Loafer's 
Hollow, sold to Charles Bacon, of Virginia, 
and others, for $12,000. 

A shaft has been sunk on the Keefer 
ledge, at Georgetown, 130 feet deep. At 
that depth a drift was run 25 ft. , striking a 
well defined ledge. 

The Flag mill, in OphirDist, is crushing 
quartz for $2. 50 per ton, while the Hagan 
mill is kept constantly going on good pay- 



ing rock. The Pugh mill, also the Welty 
mill have plenty to do. 

The Richard Bullet quartz mill between 
Ophir and Doty's Flat, has been entirely 
consumed by fire. Loss $8,000. 

Dutch Flat Enguier, June 29th: Four 
more stamps has been added to the Bedstone 
mill. A level has been commenced in the 
mine at a depth of 60 ft. , disclosing a better 
quality of rock than heretofore found. 

Mountain Democrat, June 29th : The Eu- 
reka mine has contributed a number of re- 
markably rich specimens of gold bearing 
quartz. The specimens were taken from 
the vein at a depth of 130 ft. Gold is pro- 
fusely scattered through the rock. 

Flunias County. 

Quincy National, June 22d : Times at Saw- 
pit are now very lively. The Eagle Com- 
pany cleaned up last week the handsome 
sum of $28,000. The New York Company 
also cleaned up $19,000. 

The Eagle Company's claims, at Port 
Wine, are paying $200 per month a share. 
The Monte Cristo claims are also paying 
finely. 

Shasta County. , 

Courier, June 29th: The re-building of 
the Mammoth mill is progressing with the 
utmost despatch under the superintendence 
of Mr. Sam. B. Grover. 

The Chinese Company that purchased 
Lansdale's garden, at Briggsville, for min- 
ing purposes, are taking out excellent pay. 
The Celestials paid $1,100 for the ground, 
and will probably take out $11,000. 

All the companies at South Fork have 
stopped work, and most of the employes 
have left for better diggings. 

Slsltiyou County. 

Yreka Union, June 22d : S. S. Richard- 
son, agent of the London Q. M. Co., has 
gone to San Francisco, to make arrange- 
ments to open the lower part of Indian 
creek. Mr. Thurber's claim on Rattlesnake 
has averaged, so far, about $7 per day to 
the hand. Mr. Thurber's are the only 
claims opened on that creek yet, but there 
is without doubt a great deal more ground 
that would pay for working. 
Yuba County. 

Marysville Appeal, June 29th : The Bate- 
man mill, near Indiana Ranch, commenced 
operations a few days ago. The mill is 
small, running only five stamps ; but it is 
the intention of the proprietor to add five 
more stamps as soon as it is advisable. 

July 2d: The Pennsylvania is crushing 
very good quartz, taken from level 8, and 
the Jefferson, in their southern prospecting 
drift, have just struck a pay streak of very 
good quartz, 

Several claims are prospecting for quartz 
containing sulphurets. One of them, for- 
merly supposed to contain copper ore, is 
now found to be rich in gold, for the ore is 
yielding $55 to the ton. 

ARIZONA. 

The Prescott correspondent of the San 
Bernardino Guardian, writing June 10th, 
says: Ihe 20-stamp mill at Wickenburg 
used in working the Vulture mine, is work- 
ing to the entire satisfaction of its owners. 
The mine is also turning out better and bet- 
ter as they go down on it, and is beyond 
doubt one of the best, if not the best mine 
on the Pacific coast. It is a source of great 
regret that the very many valuable mines in 
this vicinity, are not being worked. The 
reason for this is, the want of proper ma- 
chineiy to save the gold, after the rock is 
crushed by the mills. 

COLORADO. 

Georgetown Miner, June 13th : Work on 
the Monarch lode, Columbia mountain, pro- 
gresses favorably. As the mine deepens, 
better indications are found. 

The Sensenderfer Co. have declared an- 
other dividend of one per cent, payable in 
New York after May 25th. 

From three or four lbs. of Bethany ore, 
smelted in a blacksmith's furnace and then 
cupelled, $12 was taken. 

Mr. Bockwell has a lot of crystallized 
sulphurets of silver, taken from a whitish 
rock in the American lode, which yields 75 
per cent, silver. 

A proposition to form a silver smelting 
company is being agitated among the busi- 
ness men of Denver, Prof. Schinner to have 
control of the works. 

Mr. Darrah has been making a hand- 
stamp mill of himself, and has pulverized 
j 10 lb s. of the ore from the Bunker Hill 
I lode, taking an average of the product of 
the crevice. Mr. Burlingame will run a 
button from this ore in a few days. 

Mr. J. T. Harris is about to" erect a small 
smelting furnace in the lot adjoining our 
office. He has bought the W. H. White 
lode ; price, $2, 000. The lode shows an ore 
vein about a foot thick. 

Mr. Hoyt, of Central City, recently made 
an assay of Muscovite ore, and realized $70 
per ton — $15 in gold, tho balance silver. 



For smelting purposes, the Muscovite is 
the best lode in the country. The New 
Boston lode, which furnished ore for the 
first charge of the Georgetown Co's smelt- 
ing furnace, increases in quality and quan- 
tity as work progresses. 

Henry Parker has contracted with Mr. 
Webb, of Georgetown, to Bink a shaft 75 
ft. on the Congress lode, giving him one- 
half of the property for the work. The 
crevice is 5 ft. wide at 40 ft. The dirt from 
the mine looks like the litharge of the 
shops. Specimens of the ore, roasted on a 
stove, show beads of silver on their surface. 

The discoverer of the Young America . 
lode, Downieville Dist, had a specimen of 
the ore assayed, getting a return of $40. 
He then sold the lode for $100. Present 
assays prove that the ore the entire width of 
the crevice will yield $4,000 per ton, silver. 

The Register has the following : We saw 
at Messrs. Clark & Co's Bank two pieces of 
bullion, one weighing 6 ozs. and. 10 dwts., 
worth $119.50, coin ; the other contained 3 
ozs. and 2 dwts., worth $54.25, coin — the 
former from three tons of ore, the latter 
from 1,940 lbs. These results were ob- 
tained by the Kenyon process. 

The Boston and Colorado Smelting Co. 
are preparing to erect smelting and separat- 
ing works. They will be located below the 
Excelsior mill, on North Clear creek. 

The Albro lode assays as high as $17,000 
to the ton, one-fourth of its value being sil- 
ver. The Johnson lode yields $200 per 
cord in arastras. 

Denver News, June 12th : Certificate of 
assay of ore from the Brooklyn ore shows 
$68.15 in gold, and $31.71 in silver, a total 
of $99.86 to the ton. 

The celebrated Anglo Saxon lode at George- 
town, was sold on Friday last, for $40,000. 
Dr. Johnson has purchased 20 tons of ore 
from the New Boston lode, for $50 per ton 
at the shaft. He had lately cupelled a but- 
ton of silver weighing 135% lbs. He is now 
running his furnace. Everything is looking 
flourishing. 

Mr. John Shock has succeeded in getting 
up a company in the interior of Ohio, of 
$1,000,000 capital, with $300,000 for work- 
ing capital, to open mines in Gold Run, 
Summit county, Colorado. 

Denver News, June 19th : Beebe & Com- 
pany have started their 12-stamp mill. They 
are running on ore from the Golden Age 
lode. 

A new lode has been discovered on the 
"divide" between James creek and St. 
Vrains. The crevice is very wide, and is of 
dirt, which prospects evenly and richly, 
fifty cents to the pan. 

Mining on the Columbia lode, Ward dis- 
trict, is brisk and the ore looks better than 
ever before. The Long's Peak Company 
are working the Comet lode. Several aras- 
tras are being put up to run surface quartz. 
A number of men are mining in Spring 
gulch, and another in Indiana gulch. They 
have fair prospects of obtaining a good yield 
of dust. 

IDAHO. 

Bullion, June 12th : Mr. Gove had exhib- 
ited at the Bullion, office the richest piece of 
ore yet seen in Silver City, which was taken 
a few days before from the Oro Fino ledge. 

World, June 22d : The Cosmos Company, • 
of which Dewey is manager, has settled up 
all past liabilities, and resumed work under 
bright auspices.. 

Work on the Poorman mine will com- 
mence next Monday. The Company have 
given the contract for freighting to tho 
amount of $50,000. 

The ore taken from the new ledge of Peck 
and others, in Silver City, yields very rich 
rock, similar to the Oro Fino ore. 

Very rich ore is being taken from the Oro 
Fino. The new company have already paid 
off $8,000 of indebtedness. 

The third clean up of the season was made 
at the quartz mill of the Elkhorn Company, 
six miles from Pioneer City, in Boise Basin, 
last Saturday, and from 70 tons of ore the 
gold produced was 410 ounces. There is 
yet over 500 tons of the same kind of ore to 
crush, and the hands are continually getting 
out more. The uniformity of 'the gold pro- 
duct of this mine is a cheering evidence of 
its enduring richness. 

World, June 26th : From Ben. Wilson's 
claim a great deal of money has been taken 
this season. Two men shoveled in over 
$500 one night lately. The claims of Wil- 
son & Giberson have yielded $2,000 from a 
five days' run. 

The Elkhorn Quartz Co. made another 
very rich elean-up last week. 

One-third of the Summit Flat ledge has 
been sold to parties in Boise City, who are 
up there to examine and work it An offer 
has been made for the North American 
ledge on Big Muddy. Mr. Burkett has as- 
sayed some of the rock from the ledge, and 
it yielded from $500 to $600 per ton. 

A lively mining camp is about to spring 



®lw pining and ^ricntifw § wisjs. 



up somewhere on the Middle Boise, between 
Goodrich's and the Yuba. 

Owyhee Arnlanche, June 29th : The Cos- 
mos mill finished crushing the ore on the 
yard, and cleaned up, during the week, a 
large amount of amalgam — more than the 
grade of ore crushed was supposed to con- 
tain. 

From 2,500 lbs. of ore from the Morning 
Star ledge, crushed one day this week, 
8370.71 in bullion was extracted. Hallen- 
beck 4 Stevens have 13 tons of ore from 
the new shaft in their ledge at the Webfoot 
mill for crushing. 

The Ainsworth mill is being put in order. 
Ore from the North Star ledge is being 
hauled to the mill. 

One-half ton of Loandia ore crushed at 
tho Wobfoot mill, this week, yielded at the 
rate of 535 per ton. 

MONTANA. 

Helena Gazette, Juno 15th : The largest 
gold brick ever seen in Belona, was cast by 
Bohm & Molitor last Thursday. It weighs 
1,000 ounces, and belongs to the banking 
firm of L. H. Hershfield & Co. This enor- 
mous slug of gold will soon be sent East. 
Total valno, 817,951.72. 

The product of gold from the various 
mining camps will be quite abundant this 
season. Most of the old camps are paying 
well, also many new ones. There is quite 
a demand for labor. At Blaekfoot, Hender- 
son gulch, and -in the Silver Bon region, 
much good mining ground is now lying 
idle, owing to the scarcity of labor. 

The Diamond City correspondent writes : 
The bed-rock has been struck in King & 
Gillette's flume, and a piece of gold weigh- 
ing S5(3 has been extracted. Yesterday 
(Juno 9th) Dennis Shane exhibited a "fat" 
sack of as pretty dust as ever came out of 
the ground. The dust was procured on 
Boulder Bar. 

June 22d : Several shafts have been sunk 
on the public square in Scott's Addition, 
the prospects from which are favorable. A 
gravel bed has been discovered five feet deep, 
and a channel of 51 feet has not determined 
its width. This gravel will prospect from 
7 to 40 cents to the pan ; and will average, 
probably, 20 cents to the pan. There is 
said to be at least three old channels from 
Dry gulch to Last Chance, .which will all 
pay very well. Some of the smaller gulches 
pay from the grass roots down. 

Mr. Mansfield, at Highland gulch, has a 
nugget which was found on claim No. 3, 
Cooly's gulch, last week, by John Harring- 
ton, which weighed 33 ounces ; and while 
visiting Mr. Mansfield's claim, a nugget was 
picked up by the man on the bed-rock which 
weighed 888. Although spring has been 
very backward in that locality, times are 
very lively, and those who have their claims 
in running order are meeting with good 
success. 

NEVADA. 

Es»meral'la. 

Union, June 22d : Two new mines are be- 
ing opened on Aurora Hill. The Bobert 
Emmet has a shaft sunk on it near 50 ft. 
deep ; good prospects could be obtained by 
horning all the way down. The ledge is 
now six ft. wide. The ore resembles Bodie 
ore, and is valued at from $25 to 840 per 
ton. 

The Holsey mine has been stripped some 
300 ft. ; crushing from the cropping paid 
over 840 peri on. 

In Pahdet Dist., the Ithaca, Gulch Lode 
and Morning Star have on their dumps over 
200 tons of ore, that will pay 8250 per ton. 
Considerable rock from Pahdet has been 
worked in Aurora, giving very flattering 
results. 

Col. Stevens is preparing to build a large 
smelting furnace at Begoles Ranch, in Lone 
Pine district. He has had a large lot of his 
ore worked in San Francisco which yielded 
8285 per ton. J. W. Denny of Gold Hill, 
Nevada, has contracted with Hughs, Brady 
& Co., of the Kearsarge Mining Dist., to 
sink 50 ft. on each of their ledges for an in- 
terest in their mine. The Silver Sprout Co. 
is progressing finely. 

The editor saw a bar of bullion worth 
81,446.12 from the Wheeler claim, Pine 
Grove, the product of 26 tous of ore. 

The main shaft on the Juniata mine, is 
now down 200 ft. In a short time, the Co. 
will be getting out ore again when the mill 
will be started. 

JIhuiI»>IiU. 

g'TJnionville Register, June 29th : Compa- 
nies are being organized every day to pros- 
pect for gold, silver and copper. 

The Cumberland mine far exceeds the 
most sanguine expectations in extent and 
quality. There is now out 50 tous of ore, 
•which would be hard to distinguish from 
the richest Yellow Jacket ore. The Co. are 
making arrangements to have smelting 
works erected. Work is progressing rapid- 
ly on the Rochester mine. The timbering 
is nearly completed, and the drift will be 
resumed in a few days. ' 



Reveille, June 29th : There is on exhibi- Silver Bend Reporter, June 29th : The 
tion at the assay office of Boalt & Stetefeldt ' South Atlantic ledge, Reveille Dist., was 
some specimens from the smelting works of j sold during the week for 85 a foot. The 
the Trinity and Sacramento Company at location comprises 1,200 ft. and is entirely 
Oreana. in Humboldt county. Also, line ; undeveloped. The purchaser will immedi- 
samples of ore from tho Montezuma mine, atolv sink a shaft on the mine 200 ft. 



near Oreana, as well as of the casings and 
country rock. In tho collection there are a 
mass of the crude metal, 1,100 pounds of 
which are produced from one ton of the 
ore ; a flake of pure antimoniate of antimo- 
ny, as white as snow, from the fiuo of the 
refining furnace ; a beautiful specimen of 
litharge from the cupel furnace ; slag from 
the melting furnace ; dross, being pure an- 
timoniate of load, from the refining furnace ; 
and eight little bars, the result of "dips" 
from the refining furnace at various stages. 
Upon each bar is marked its value in silver 
and the number of hours it was in the fur- 
nace nt the moment of the " dip ;" the bar 
from the last "dip " represents 264 hours in 
the furnace, and contains at the rate of 8385 
of silver per ton. Tho ore from the surface 
is soft and as yellow as sulphur, but its 
color becomes darker and its texture firmer 
at certain points below the surface, and the 
sample taken from the greatest depth of the 
mine is compact and of a brownish gray 
color, and is pronounced to be richer in 
silver. The specimens of the country rock, 
which is porphyry, are beautified by deli- 
cate impressions as of leaves and plants. 
The collection was brought in by Mr. John 
H. Boalt, who returned to town on Friday 
after an extended visit to several districts in 
Humboldt county. 
Reese Blver. 

Enterprise, June 28th : The correspondent 
from Pine Grove, Wilson Dist. , says : The 
Pioneer mill has a motive power, a 40-horse 
steam engine, capable of running 30 instead 
of 10 stamps as it does. About 18 tons of 
ore are crushed daily. The gold is saved 
by running the crude ore over five rows of 
copper plates, and by concentration on 
about 40 ft. of blankets. The accumulations 
on the blankets are afterwards worked again 
in a single tub. This process of working 
the ores shows an average yield of about 
833. 75 in gold to the ton. 

Penrod tfc Wheeler keeps four arastras 
constantly running, about a quarter of a 
mile below the Pioneer mill. The power 
used in running them is a portable 8-horse 
engine and boiler. The owners charge 815 
per ton for crushing, and tho ore yields 
about 840 per ton. 

Parties from Belmont, Pine Grove, Wash- 
ington and ot her new districts in that direc- 
tion are bringing in many fine specimens 
and excellent accounts of the mines. Nearly 
every specimen brought in assays pretty 
well up in the hundreds. 

In Lone Pine (or Cerro Gordo) Dist., 
there are six smelting furnaces, that being 
the only mode of working ore. 

July 2d : The editor has seen a brick of 
gold bullion, weighing 272 10-100 ozs. , value 
84,752.96, .845 fine, the result of a crushing 
of 53% tons of Midas ore at Pine Grove. 
Work will be resumed on the North Ameri- 
can mine in 10 or 15 days. Hereafter it 
will be known as the American (Jo., the 
word North having been dropped. 

Reveille, June 25th : A sample of sulphu- 
ret has been taken from the shaft of the 
Plymouth (Jo. on Lander HOI, which is 
apparently of a superior quality. The shaft 
has been pushed with 'vigor, and is now 85 
ft deep. It is believed that the ore exhib- 
ited was taken from the Fuller ledge, which 
was cut in the shaft near the point of its 
greatest depth. The sample shows the 
width of the vein to be about four in. , and 
the ore will give a good yield of silver. 
This extension of the Fuller ledge will be a 
valuable addition to the already fine property 
of the Plymouth Co. 

June 28th : By the stage which arrived 
from the east to-day, 3,000 ozs. of crude 
bullion were brought from the mill of the 
Social and Steptoe Co., at Egan Canon. 

Work has been resumed on the Metacom 
mine. As soon as the water shall be re- 
moved, the various works will be pushed 
with vigor, and a large supply of ore ex- 
tracted for the mill. In the present condi- 
tion of the mine there are considerable bodies 
of 6*re exposed that will mill from 860 to 
8125 per ton. 

June 27th: Arrived this morning 6,000 
ozs. of bullion from the Rigby mill at San 
Antonio, the product of the Liberty mine. 
June 29th : J. M. Matteer is exhibiting 
two certificates of assay of the pulp of ore 
from the Bennett and Lexington ledges, re- 
duced at the Parrott mills. Bennett yielded 
at the rate of 8298. 59 per ton, Lexington, 
8281.56. 

July 1st: Arrived to-day, 2,500 lbs. of 
fine ore from the newly discovered Adriatic 
ledge, Reveille Dist 

The monthly shipments from Austin by 
Wells, Fargo, and Co. is $125,050.20. By 
Miller & Ripley's fast freight, $17,500. 



Harvey A. Mills and John Grimes have 
sold mining property in this district to an 
Eastern company for the sum of $140,000. 

At a depth of 55 ft. below the level of the 
cut in the Gillilans ledge, from which the 
surface ore was taken, a level has been run 
north which is now about 90 ft in length. 
Throughout the entire length of this gallery 
tho vein is of striking uniformity, averaging 
about 6% ft. in width, and of remarkable 
richness. Most of the ore will yield $100 
per ton, while the entire mass without as- 
sorting is profitable milling ore. The vein 
carries much of the black, compact and rich 
mineral stetefeldtite, whichossays thousands 
of dollars. 

The Silver Bend Co. recently had 100 tons 
of Transylvania ore worked, at the Belmont 
Co's mill, in order to determine the best 
mode of working it. It was treated by the 
ordinary wet crushing process, and about 
60 per cent, of the silver was saved. The 
pulp assay of the 100 tons was 8101.89. 

■Wiiwlioe. 

[In the Stock Circular, in another portion 
in this paper, will be found late mining 
news from this district. ] 

Enterprise, June 26th : The new machin- 
ery of the Petaluma mill will be ready to 
start up about the last part of the present 
week. 

June 27th : Nineteen bars of bullion from 
the Savage mine has been assayed at the 
assay office of the Gould & Curry ; their 
value exceeds $40,000. 

June 28th : The Gold Hill Quartz M. & 
M. Co. next month, will pay a dividend of 
$75 per share, almost 8600 per foot. 

June 29th: Wells, Fargo & Co., during 
the last week, shipped 8,942 lbs. of bullion 
valued at $120,021.98. 

Gold Hill News, June 27th : The Savage 
mine sent $30,000 worth of bullion to San 
Francisco to-day. 

OREGON. 

The Oregonian says that parties from 
Grant county are now in that city for the 
purpose of purchasing a quartz mill, if they 
can do so profitably. The mill is to be lo- 
cated on the middle fork of John Day's 
river, in the immediate vicinity of rich leads 
of mineral. They report times as being 
better now than they have been for a year. 
It has been ascertained to a certainty that 
there are numerous rich and valuable leads 
in that county. 

Salem Record, June 20th : Cooper's coal 
mine is on Butte creek, Marion county. 
One man is at work at the mine, opening 
tunnels and extracting coal. Several open- 
ings have been made ; the principal one is 
in 40 feet. The coal bed dips into the hill, 
showing a strata of excellent. coal two feet 
thick. Mr. Cooper has about 20 tons of 
coal out. 



Quartz Mining in British Columbia. 
Some considerable attention is now being 
given to quartz mining in British Columbia. 
Developments, during the past year, go far 
to prove that valuable lodes of the precious 
metals exist in various parts of that coun- 
try. A correspondent at New Westminster 
furnishes us the following items : 

At Shuswap District, "The Cherry Creek 
Silver Mining Co., Limited," have had three 
samples of ore assayed at the Government 
assay office, with the following result : 
Specimen No. 1, taken from the Black Ore 
lead, gives 1,591 ozs. of silver and 6 dwt of 
gold to the ton ; specimen No. 2, taken from 
the Hillside claim, above the present work- 
ing, gives 1,259 ozs. of silver, with traces 
of gold ; specimen No. 3, from tho present 
working tunnel, gives 1,603 ozs. of silver, 
with traces of gold. 

The Washburn Co., Canon creek, Cari- 
boo District, are at present taking out very 
rich gold-bearing quartz, and expect to have 
two large arastras in operation by the first 
of July. 

Compressed Gun Cotton. — This article 
is now manufactured for mining purposes 
by first making the cotton explosive in the 
usual way ; this is placed in a pulping ma- 
chine, and reduced completely to pulp. It 
is then compressed by hydraulic machinery, 
so that one inch length of charge of any 
given diameter is equal in explosive force to 
six inches of gunpowder filling the same 
bore. The cotton could not be put into a 
more portable 'form, and by bringing the 
charge nearer the bottom of the hole, it is 
apparent that its use will considerably lessen 
the labor of drilling, for the drill hole need 
not be so deep as when gunpowder is em- 
ployed. 



Order Bussey's Combination Burglar tv 
Powder-Proof Keyless Lock ! 

REASONS WHY. 

1st. It is the best Combination Lock known. 

2d. It is impossible to pick it. 

3a. It can bo subjected to over half a million 
changes, and when run by a burglar, he is no 
nearer entrance than when ho began. 

4th. It has no key to lose. 

5th. The more it is used the better it is liked. 

6th. It has no signs, letters or figures, on its 
face. 

7th. It is the simplest to understand. 

8th. It is impossible to open it without knowing 
the set. 

9th. It is least possible to get out of repair, as 
any one will be convinced on examination. 

10th. It is the strongest Lock. 

llth. No possible derangement of combination 
can bo made. 

12th. Amador County has adopted this Lock 
for its safes. 

13. It received a special premium at State Fair 

Opinion* orthe Preti and others In regard to 
. Buaiey'a Combination Lock. 

The Bank of British Columbia ordered tho first one ot 
those locks introduced in ibis city, and the following roo* 
omlDcaaallon'htts bean received by the in vector : 

Bank of British Columbia, 1 

Sin Francisco, May 24. 1860. J 

Recently, Iwo of Wm. C. Bussey's^ new Patent Com- 
bination Burglar-Proof Locks we. e jila'ced upnu the vault 
doors <if the Biuk of Brni.a Columbia Toey are found 
to operate wiLli all tbo edlclency cluimed by tbe Inventor, 
and in every way met our fallest approval. 

TUey were o'rdrred upon malttro deliberation, affer 
atriot investigation of their inertia, in comparison with 
some of tho most noted and popolar old styles of combin- 
ation locks. 

We deem the lock entirely burglar-proof. It Is strong 
In construction, without intricate or delicate pans, with 
simple and easy movement. We find no dilliculiy n 
either opening or closing it, uor in chnnelng Us combina- 
tions, which m ty be nindealmost iuuutnerablc. 

As a California invention of extraordluary merit, its 
take oleusure in recommending it to public alteut on, be- 
1-oviug it to possess all too advantages which are claimed 
for H. WM. H. TILLI.S'GHASf, Bub Maaager. 

We do hereby certify, that Wm. C. Bussey's Combina- 
tion Lock is the best Safe Lock in existence, and Impos- 
sible l" he picked. Wo have applied several to Vaults 
and Safes, to entire satisfnci ion to parties interested. 
KlfTREPUE & LEAVI1T, 
rioneer Iron Works, cor. Fremont and Market sts. 

San Francisco, May 6, 1867. 
I do hereby certify, that Mr. Wm. C. Bussey's Com- 
bination Lock Is tile simplest and stront'est in construo- 
llnn, and tho least possiljlo to get oat of repair; and for 
Sales and Vaults in every other respect us good as any 
other improved comblunliju lock which I a n acquainted 
with. J"HN K SIM S, 

Vault Manufacturer, Oregon slroet. 

Jackson, April *27, 1867. 

I, tho undersigned, ShPriff of Amador County, do here- 
by certify that 1 am using olio of Wm. C. Bussey's Key. 
less Combination Locks on my safe, which is made to 
draw four bolts with facility. I believe the lock to be 
the best lock ever invented, Tor the following reasons: 

1st — Because it is impossible for cither burglar or ex- 
pert to (tick it. 

21.— The lock being constrocted without a key-hole, it 
ennnot be blown to pieces by powder. 

Hil.— There is no possibility of duranging tbo combina- 
tion by breaking ofr, or attempting to drive the knobs into 
the sare. And it is In fact tbe nearest approach to per- 
lection yet arrived at in tbe art of Lock making. 

' R C0SNER. 

Attested by J. C.Shipman, Counly Clerk. 

Jackson. April 27,1867.. 

The undersigned, Treasurer of Amador County, do here- 
by certify, that I am now using nun of Wm. C. Bussey's 
Keyless Combination Lciks. It is (listened to tho outside 
door of tho Treasurer's Sare. I have r.o fear of any by. 
slander gaining a kunwiedge of llio set of the combina- 
tion, when locking or unlocking the same. If I desire to 
have access to the safe every Tew minutes, I can so adjust 
tho combination as to open this lock In two seconds of 
tune. I am exceedingly well pleased with the same, and 
1 deem this lock to bo all that tho inventor claims lor it. 
OTTJ WAL1HLB. 

Attested by J.C. Shipman, C ainty Clerk. 

California Lock Aheao. — a special premium was 
awarded Mr. W. C Bussey. fur his superior Combination 
P.,wder and Burglar Proof Safe Lock, at the recent State 
Fair. Wo arc sure no award was ever more meritoriously 
bestowed. This Look was described at length in the 
Press several months since. At that lime it was adopted 
hv several banking houses in this ci'y, and wo are now 
assured that tho retnirknble claims asserted in favor of 
the Lock aL that time, liavo been continued since by ils 
practical use. We feel an interest in this Cildornia in- 
vention, and wish to see it speedily meet with the success 
It is ultimately certain to attain. Mr. Bussey, having 
nroporly first iairiv tested his lock iu California, iB now 
desirous of lutn.duci g it in tbe East, and offers to dispose 
of the right lor several States at very reasonable rates.— 
[Mining and Scientific. Press, Sept. 29, 1866. 

They aro the only safe lock ever invented. Every 
State and County treasury vault, and every bonk and bus- 
iness place should have one. — [Amador Lodger. 

Tbis Is a lock Iu which a series of rotating annular 
tumblers is employed, and.it consists in a novel arrange- 
ment of such tumblers in connection with one or moro 
arms connected with one or more bolls, whereby an ex- 
tremely simple and effective lock Is oblained, preseullng 
an almost unlimited number or combinations. Hor which 
he was awarded a speciul premiom at the State Fair. — 
[Sicrameiilo Union. 

We the undersigned, practical I/icksmltbs, unhesita- 
tingly pronouiic- Bussov's Improved Combination Burglar 
Proof Lock to bo tbe most reliable lock constructed. 
F. MABKTotC.FI.HSHEL, 

No. 18 Post street. 



references: 
R. COSNER. Sheriir. 
O WALTHER Treasurer. 
W. JENNINGS 1 
C. H. INGALLS, VSupervlsors.J 
L. McLAlXE, J 



Anv good blacksmith can put this lock on safe doori. 
Boxed or single old locks removed and this placed in their 
S'caii, to-wo-k one, two. 



, three or four bolts, as iho caso 



m ,y be _[S e page 30 n Pacific Const Directory . 

A-'eifor blind man caa open Ibis lock when be kn ws 
tlie «ot aud understands ibo full mahipu.ation, wliLoot 
sdv expert detecting tbe combination. 

i9vHmyll&18.1aui 



8 



®to pitting m4 JNtntftfr §»0& 



pitting m^ f mtttifk §*«*& 



W. B. EWER SenzorEditoh. 



0. W. M. 8MITH. W. B. EWER. A. T. DEWET. 

IXETWETT &. CO., IPutolisIlei's. 



OrFioE— No. S05 Clay street, corner of Sauaome, 2d floor. 



Terms of Subscription : 

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Our Friends can do much In aid of our paper and the 
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Writers should be cautious about addressing correspond- 
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Pacific Railroad— Interior Trade. 



Canvassing -A-gexrts. 

Mr. A. C. Knox, is our city soliciting and collecting 
Agent, and all subscriptions, or other favors extended to 
him, will be duly acknowledged at this office. Jan. 11, 1866. 

Mr. I*. "W. Felton, is an authorized agent for this 
paper at Portland. Oregon. Dec. 1, 1866. 

Mr. S. J). "WMttalKer is our duly authorized travel- 
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Mr. c. A. Wetmore la an authorized agent for this 
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Dr. 1.. G. Tates is our duly authorized traveling 
agent. J uly 6, 1867. 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 6, 1867. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

OniCRON is informed that in almost all 
oases the diamond has been found in con- 
nection with alluvial gold washings. Thus, 
Mr. Patterson, Director of the Mint in 
Philadelphia, so long ago as 1857, de- 
scribed no less than nine specimens in 
the gold placers of the southern Alle- 
ghanies, as was predicted by Humboldt, 
who.also anticipated the same as regards 
the Altaic district, and was fortunate 
enough to personally realize the latter 
prophecy by placing in the hands of the 
reigning Czarina of all the Russians the 
first gem of this kind ever found in that 
part of Central Asia. Diamonds have 
also been found in the alluvial gold fields 
of Australia and the Urals. It would 
therefore be an exceptional case if these 
rare articles had not been found in analo- 
gous localities and similarly associated in 
California and Montana. The diamond 
found along with gold in washing the 
river beds of Brazil is well known, and 
from description we infer that the mag- 
nificent gems which have rendered Gol- 
conda so illustrious are somewhat simi- 
larlyfound. Mr. Patterson, above alluded 
to, in the annual report for 1847-8, is 
stated to make mention of three diamonds 
having been found amongst the gold 
washings of North Carolina 
Inventor, Gold Eun, Cal. — Any device for 
the application of water direct to the 
working of stamps, without the interven- 
tion of an engine or water wheel, would 
doubtless be novel and patentable. Steam 
has been so applied, but not in such a 
manner as to admit the use of either 
steam or water. We cannot express any 
opinion as to the economy or practicabil- 
ity of your invention without knowing 
more of its details. The matter of a 
"much less first cost would be an import- 
ant item in its favor, if it is not obtained 
at a sacrifice of practicability. If you 
would send us a rough drawing, or, bet- 
ter still, a model of your invention, we 
should probably be able to express some 
decided opinion with regard to its merits. 
An Israelite is in error in considering 
that gold and silver coins were minted in 
Judea much earlier than the time alluded 
to in our reply to W. M., ill our notices 
to correspondents which appeared on the 
1st inst. The earliest Hebrew coin is of 
the date of the Maccabees. Prom the 
nineteenth century, B. C, when Abraham 
weighed to Ephron 400 shekels of silver 
us the price of the cave of Machpelah,* 
until the second century, B. C, when 
Antiochns Sidetes gave permission to 
Simon Maccabeus to coiu money "with 
his own stamp. " f There cannot exist a 
doubt but the shekel merely meant, as its 
name implies, a certain denomination in 
weight. 



Amalgamator, Virginia City. — The distil- 
lation of mercury and amalgam of that 
metal by means of superheated steam, was 
recommended by Niolette nearly 20 years 
ago, as can be seen in the Compins Reiidua 
31, page 546, and J. Pr. Chem. 51, page 
31o. 



Correspondence. — " Quicksilver Mining 
in Monterey County," next week. 



In a short time the locomotive will cross 
the Sierra Nevada, and deliver goods from 
this city to the valley of t;he Humboldt. Al- 
though less than 200 miles will be accom- 
plished in distance, a difficulty in transpor- 
tation of fully 500 miles will have been 
overcome ; and we shall have 'nothing but 
plains between the railroad terminus and 
the various mining localities of the Great 
Basin and the territories to the north. San 
Francisco will then be brought practically 
500 miles nearer to those great places of 
consumption, than she is now. Land car- 
riage across these plains, after the mountains 
are crossed, is comparatively cheap, as the 
stock can be readily fed by the way. 

In the progress of the eastern division of 
the road, more than double the distance 
of the western division, has been accom- 
plished ; but it has been over a level plain. 
That portion of the road is now approaching 
the great barrier of the Eocky Mountains, 
where its progress will become slow and 
expensive. That which has been already 
finished, is of but little account as a means 
for transportation to Salt Lake, or any por- 
tion of our territory west or north of that 
point. Hence, so far as the business of this 
city is concerned, nothing has yet been or 
will be immediately accomplished, to inter- 
fere with our interior trade, even under the 
old basis ; but the advantage which we shall 
soon gain, will be immense, by the complete 
removal of our mountain barrier. 

The result will be a more rapid filling up 
of the interior, and the more economic work- 
ing of mines, which, under present circum- 
stances, can scarcely be worked at all on ac- 
count of the great cost of transportation. Inti" 
mate business relations will also spring up 
between the merchants of those localities and 
this city, which future advantages, on the 
eastern route, can with difficulty break up, 
even with slight advantages in their favor. 
The prices of most goods in St. Louis and 
Chicago, which are in demand in the inte- 
rior, are about equal with those of this city 
— if anything, San Francisco has the advan- 
tage, especially in breadstuffs, dried fruit, 
East India goods, and provisions generally. 
Heavy mining and other machinery forms 
no exception to this rule ; or if there shoidd 
be a small advantage the other way, the ac. 
knowledged superiority of California made 
mining machinery, over that made at the 
East, will always give quite a margin in our 
favor. We have often explained the cause 
of this superiority — the nature of which is 
such, that but very little chance exists of its 
ever being removed. 

Another and inseparable advantage in 
favor of San Francisco, is distance. The 
distance from San Francisco to Salt Lake 
City, or the most distant mines of the Great 
Basin, or those of Idaho or Montana, by the 
route of the Continential Eailway or any 
branch which can be constructed therefrom, 
is less than one-half that from St. Louis or 
Chicago. The running cost per mile of road 
on the eastern or western division, will be 
about the same ; or at worst, that of the 
western can exceed that of the eastern but 
a trifle. The first cost of the chief com- 
modities being about equal, the difference in 
extent of transportation must forever give 
San Francisco an advantage, which nothing 
but the most unwarrantable mismanagement 
can deprive us of. A change of the seat of 
supply, when once located here, (as it must 
be for reasous already shown) to our west- 
ern rivals, will be a matter scarcely to be 
thought of. The future advantage that 
awaits this city from the interior trade that 
must sOon grow up in this vast region, can- 
not be estimated. It belongs to San Fran- 
cisco as legitimately as does that of Shasta 
or San Diego. 



Fire-Pump Trial. — We were present, 
among others, on Tuesday last, at the Occi- 
dental Hotel, to witness a trial of the Excel- 
sior double-acting Foree-Pump, which Mr. 
Leland has recently had placed in that ho- 
tel, for greater security from fire. The 
pump is located in the engine room, in the 
basement, and forces water through iron 
pipes from thence to the top of the build- 
ing, being fed from the street water pipes. 
In the hall of each story of the main stair- 
ways a hose is connected with this pipe, 
through which water may be conducted to 
every room in the house. Previous to plac- 
ing this pump in the building, reliance was 
had, in case of fire, upon the pressure of the 
water mains. This reliance was fatal at the 
Cosmopolitan, which was provided with a 
similar protection. When the fire took in 
the ceiling of the upper story of that hotel, 
there was not sufficient head to force the 
water six inches from the nozzle of the pipe, 
and when the engines arrived the. city hose 
burst, and by the time that defect was rem- 
edied the flames had got beyond the control 
of the Department. 

Mr. Leland has now provided himself 
against such a contingency by setting up 
one of these pumps, so that, in case of need, 
it may be instantly connected with the en- 
gine, and water thrown over any part, the 
roof of the hotel, or adjoining buildings, 
thereby being independent of the head in 
the street main. In the trial of Tuesday, 
at 35 strokes per minute, (which might have 
been increased to 50) the water was thrown 
from the floor of the basement to the floor 
of the upper story ; and from the hose in 
the upper story it was readily thrown to all 
parts of the roof. The test was most fully 
satisfactory to most of the witnesses ; al- 
though Capt. Cushing, the agent of these 
pumps, pronounced It unsatisfactory to him- 
self, as it did not do as well as it had done 
on previous trials. The Captain explained 
the matter the next day, by ascertaining that 
the company's water meter, through which 
the pump derived its supply, had burst dur- 
ing the trial, thereby greatly interfering 
with its performance. To our mind, how- 
ever, the test was fully satisfactory as it 
was, and we congratulate Mr. Leland and 
his guests on this additional security from 
fire. Two of these pumps were shipped by 
the Colorado, on the 4th instant, for Yoko- 
hama, having been especially ordered by 
Mi-. E. M. Van Eeed, of that city. 



The Erie Eailway Company, in New 
York, it is stated, are about doing away 
with the use of wood on their locomotives, 
and have already commenced selling off the 
wood they have on hand. Coal is to be 
used hereafter; 



A New Commercial Journal. — John H. 
Carmany & Co. will issue, in season for the 
next steamer, a new Commercial Journal, 
to be entitled The Commercial Herald and 
Market Review. Its editorial department 
will be under the control of H. C'hanning 
Beals, a gentleman long and favorably 
known in the commercial circles of this city. 
The financial and general stock market re- 
ports will be placed in charge of gentlemen 
of long experience'in those departments. It 
is intended to make it a first-class commer- 
cial journal, and one which shall fairly and 
ably represent that great and growing in- 
terest in this city. 



The Pacific Chemical-Works. — Messrs. 
Falkenau & Hanks, the enterprising propri- 
etors of these works, signalized the first an- 
nual recurrence of their establishment in bus- 
iness by a social gathering on the 29th ult., 
which was attended by a large number of 
their personal and business friends. These 
works are located at the corner of Center 
and Folsom streets, near the Mission, and 
cover quite an extensive area of ground 
upon which the several buildings necessary 
for their varied manufacture are built. It 
gives us much pleasure to learn that these 
gentlemen are meeting with a most satisfac- 
tory degree of success in their enterprise, 
as manufacturing and consulting chemists. 
Their works are well fitted up with all the 
necessary means and appliances for the man- 
ufacture of nearly or quite every kind of 
chemical called for, to any considerable ex- 
tent, on this coast ; and they have a full and 
carefully arranged case of re-agents, for test- 
ing minerals and chemicals. Druggists, 
dyers, daguerreotypists, and others, who 
deal in or otherwise employ chemicals, 
acids, etc., will always find at this establish- 
ment those which are equal to the best and 
purest in the market. Messrs. Falkenau & 
Hanks, being both practical chemists, give 
their unremitting and personal attention to 
every department of their manufacture. 
Among other things, they manufacture large 
quantities of cyanide of potassium, which is 
now being considerably used by quartz 
miners as an aid in amalgamating. Nitrate 
of silver also forms a large item of their 
manufacture ; also, nitric, muriatic and 
sulphuric acids. Analyses of ores, miner- 
als, waters, metallurgical products, soils, 
etc., as well as assays of ores, are made at 
this establishment. 



Fine Painting. — There is a spirited paint- 
ing to be seen in the show-window of 
Snow & Koos, by the French artist, 
Narjot, entitled ' ' Life in Arizona. " It rep- 
resents a skirmish between a small party of 
American soldiers and_some Apaches. The 
scenery is from nature, being located on 
the Eanch of San Pedro, in Arizona. The 
artist has been himself a party in several 
encounters with the Indians, and paint3 
with a truthfulness and spirit inspired by 
the reality. Mons. Narjot is already favor- 
ably known as a portrait painter, and he 
will lose nothing from the public by this 
new effort of his genius. 



Correction. — In the first item under our 
patent head of June 22d, copied from the 
Sacramento Union, Mr. I. H. Graves was 
spoken of as the foreman of the Pacific Bail- 
road machine shop ; he is the master me- 
clianie of the road. Mr. James Gerrish is 
foreman. 



The Coming Wheat Crop. — The present 
indications are, that the California wheat 
crop for the present year will not quite 
equal that of the year past, although a very 
abundant harvest may be expected. Prices 
here will not vary much from last year, al- 
though they will not probably rule as high 
in New York. The difference will come out 
of the middle men. This class of men, 
owing to the close " corner " which had been 
effected, and which was kept up with most 
signal success, made enormous profits out 
of their operations last winter. They will 
have to be content with less this season, 
while the growers, and especially the Cali- 
fornia growers, will probably realize quite 
as much as they did by their last crop. It is 
stated in the last monthly report of the 
Agricultural Department " that the yield of 
wheat in all the States where that grain is 
raised will be much larger than usual." 
Later advices by telegraph, however, do not 
speak so hopefully ; and the prospect now 
is that the crop will be nothing better than 
a usual one. The old crop has been very 
closely exhausted, so that there will be less 
to fall back upon that usual. This will 
open a good market for California. Our 
wheat-growers have every reason to be hope- 
ful, and should not sacrifice their crops to 
the gain of greedy speculators. 



The Fourth passed off most pleasantly 
and happily to all. But one or two acci- 
dents of any kind have occurred, and those 
not of any very serious nature. The fire- 
works in the evening eclipsed any ever be- 
fore seen in this, city, and were witnessed by 
a crowd variously estimated at from thirty 
to forty-five thousand. They were from 
the establishment of Church & Clark, and 
reflected the highest credit upon their pyro- 
technical skill. 



Metallurgist.— A practical metallurgist, experienced lr. 
all branches of his business, and particularly in the manu- 
facture of tougu copper, wants employment His address 
can be had t the omcaof the Mining and Scientific Press. 
25VH-4W* 



Favorable to' Inventors.— Persons holding new in 
ventions of machinery and important improvements, can 
have the same illustrated and explained in the Mining and 
Scientific Press, free ot charge, if in our judgment tho 
discovery is ono of real merit, and of sufficient interest to 
our readers to warrant publication.! 



©be pining awl Jlriortifw § tm. 



Amusement wiTaocT Temptation. — Parents 
will And Woodward's Gardens free from tho temp- 
tntions too often presented at public places of 
resort; while the gymnasium, tho birds and ani- 
mal', and the meandering walks around the trees, 
flowers and shrubbery of the ground, cannot fail 
to delight both parents and children. 



Cholera — Parry Davis' Vegetable Pain Killer. 

Mr. Pxrry Davis— Sir — The benefits I hare received from 
the ui« of your Invaluable remedy, (he Pain Killer, Induce* 
me to pen a word In Its praise. Experience has convinced 
me that tor Headache. Indlgeadon, Tain in the Stomach, cr 
any part of the syitem, aevero Chilli. Weariness, common 
Colds, Hoarseness, Cholera, Cholora Morbus. Diarrhoea, 
Dysentery, Toothache, et<v, there is noihtnu better Ihttu (he 
Pam KiHt. I have thin h>>ur recovarsd from a severe at- 
tack of the Sick lli-ailscli.-, bv uiiiik two tcoHpomiruls. 
taken at thirty m Inn u-s Interval, In a wtneglatM full of hot 
water. I am ciMiiuicut that ihrouxu ih>> bleMiog of uod. it 
saved tne front the cholera during I he rammer of 1843. 
Traveling amid dust, toll, chanun of diet, and constant ex- 

Su-ure to an Infeoted (.tmosphore, my system was dally pre- 
iu dysentery attacks, accompanied with pain, for 
which tho Pain Killer was a sovereign remedy, one tea- 
auoonfulcuntih,' the worst case In an hour, or, at moat, half 
a dav 1 1 have beard ••( many cases of Dysentery being 
cured by Its use. Put In (he teeth, It will stop the tooth- 
■ ii.- UmUtu.ic. nw.l a desire fur Its itcnernl uie, has drawn 
from me thi» unsolicited testimonial In its favor. 

D T TAYLOR, Jh , Minister of the flannel. 
SQr*Sold by all Medicine Dealers everywhere 22vU lm 



NOETH AMERICA 

Life Insurance Company. 

Usual Restrictions on Occupation and Travel 

ABOLISHED ! 



Policies of this Company are sunrnnteed by tho State of 

New York, which 1* true of no other Company 

on this Coast. 

The most Responsible and Liberal Company n too World! 
J. A. EATON &. CO., 

Managers Pacific Branch, SOS Montgomery st. 
SOvHnrtp SAN FRANCISCO. 



RUBEN'S 

Evergoing "Watch. ! 

g]The ■■!■■!• r ■ n. ■. h.r. in- been appointed sole 
aiccnts For the above Watch, arc now prepared io 
"urnish It at makers' rates. 
__ This Watch lin.3 a drat class, full jeweled nickel 
movement, and requires no winding by key or stum, every 
opening and closing of the tipper cover of the cane windiug 
the VVnch lor six hours It 1m so constructed that It will 
run for ten days without bcinu opened, nnd is guaranteed a 
perfect time keent-r. l*rlcc. In heavy *18-cttret gold cases, 
*350. A liberal discount allowed to the trade. 

ISAAC S. JOSEPIII A CO., 
Ivl5-2am3m 641 Washington street, San Francisco. 

KEMOVAL. 

The well known estalillsliratnt of 

LUCY & HYMES, 

MAHUFACTDRKR3 Or 

Genuine Pale and. Chemical 
OLIVE SOAPS, 

Haa been removed from Beale street, between Mission and 
Howard, to BKANNAN STREET, between Eighth and 
Ninth, and greatly enlarged. 

Thecapacitv ol this establishment Is now the largest on 
the Paclllc Coast. It in now In full operation, and prcpured 
to supply the demand of the trade. 

Office— 319 California St., San Fraricinco. 
Ivl5qr 

Real Estate Sale 



E S T A. X E 

JACOB C. BE IDEM AN, deceased. 

JOHN W. nnrHAGI.il. Administrator, 

With tho Will annexed, will commence, on 

Wednesday, the 24th day of July, 

At li o'clock HI., 

And coatinuu from day to day, until the whole Is sold, 
at the auction room of 

MAURICE DORE 4& CO., 

337 Montgomery Street. 

TERMS, IN UMTED STATES GOLD COIN. 

1-4 Cash ; 

1-4 in One Year, 

1-4 in Two Yeara» 

1-4 In Three Yean. 
Deferred payments to bear interest at 
eight per cent, per annum, payable quar- 
terly, and secured by mortgage on the 
property. 

DQ- Catalogues of the property can he obtained of H.F. 
WILLIAMS & CO., Clay street, or at the office of MAURICE 
DORE & CO., a»7 Montgomery street. lvla-3w 



HEXDY'S LATEST IMPROVED CONCENTRATORS, 




FOR, GOLD AND HILVEK, OR.ES, 

With Revolving Stirrcrs*und Rotary Distributor. 

Can be seen in Operation at the Union Foundry, First St., San Francisco. 



Directions for Operating Hendy'a Concentrators: 

Tho sulphutots uro drawn off while the Concentrator is in motion, in tho following manner: 

First — Sot the Fan, A, level, hy its inner rim. 

Second — While in operation, keep tho Pan, A, about half full of enlphnrotB. [See Figure 2, 
marked S.| 

Third — Open the gate, E, sufficiently to dischargo the sulphurets as they accumulate over the 
amount above mentioned. 

Fourth — Tho crank shaft to mako 200 to 220 revolutions per minute. 



The above directions, if followed implicity, are all-sufficient. But, strange as it may appear, the 
proprietor has found that, in certain cases, they have, owing to tho carelessness or to tho ignorance of 
tho operators, failed to serve as a complete guide. . Ho, therefore, in tho present edition of hia circular, 
insists upon their being followed to the letter ; and in order that there may bo no mistake in future, he 
thus elaborates and explains them : 

First, then : Unless tho pan is level, it is out of the question to expect it to do its duty. One would 
imagine that the slightest possible examination of the illustrations would be sufficient to show this. 
Yet, in one case, where the machine did not work satisfactorily, it was found that no regard whatever 
had been paid to this point ! The word level is in itself precise ; it admits of no latitude, and cannot 
bo misunderstood. Nothing is easier, to a mechanic, than to place the pan absolutely and mathemati- 
cally level. It cannot be necessary to dwell further upon this point. 

Direction Second, viz : — " Keep tho pan about half full of sulphurets/' has also, in some cases, 
been disregarded. A moment's reflection will point out its importance. The operation of the ma- 
chine is such, that grains of any kind, whatever may be their size or weight, will seek the peri, 
phery of the pan, and unless discharged, will there remain, until oilier grains of greater specific gravity 
take their place. Of course, then, at the starting of the machine, and for a short time thereafter, the 
periphery will bo partially filled with sand. It is therefore necessary to allow a quantity of sulphu- 
rets sufficient to completely occupy that space to accumulate, before the gate is opened, and their dis- 
charge commenced. It is obvious that they will otherwise bo accompanied with more or less of 
sand. Once properly commenced, the discharge will bo continuous. It must be regulated, however, 
by tho richness, in sulphurets, of tho pulp under treatment. A little practice will enable the operator 
to gauge it without difficulty. 

After what has been said, direction Third requires no further explanation. Direction Fourth is, 
to a mechanic, sufficiently explicit. 

These concentrators can bo set in pairs, for which a single crank shaft will suffice. Two such 
pairs can be so arranged as to require a driving shaft of only six feet in length. 

The guaranteed capacity of each machine is five tons every 24 hours. Eight tons, however, 
can bo nnd has been put through in that time. The small proportion of sand which tho sulphurets 
carry, when thus rapidly concentrated, is not an objection but rather an advantage, in case the opera- 
tors themselves intend to work them. Either in roasting or in pan-working, a small admixture of 
sand is unquestionably an aid. But if the sulphurets are being prepared for sale, they must of course 
bo clean. In this case, tho discharges from four machines can ho conducted into a single additional 
one, and the concentration thus be made complete. 

Tho proprietor has recently still further improved the machine, hy the substitution of an iron 
frame for the former wooden one. While nothing is added to its weight by tho change, it is thus 
made stronger and more compact ; and at the same time the labor of setting it -up in considerably 
lessened. He flatters himself "that these added advantages leave nothing further to bo desired as re- 
gards the perfecting of tho machine. 



References : 
Reference is made to tho following mills, which have HENDY'S CONCENTRATORS in use : 

EMPIRE MILL Grass Valley, Nevada County. 

ONEIDA MILL Jackson, Amador County. 

SPRING HILL MILL Amador, Amador County. 

GOLDEN GATE MILL Volcano, Amador County. 

GOLDEN RULE MILL Stewart Flat, Placer County. 

BENTON MILL Bear Valley, Mariposa County. 

LOUISIANA MILL Coulterville, Mariposa County. 

PEOPLE'S MILL Alleghany, Sierra County. 

TYRON & CO'S MLLL ...Prescott, Arizona. 

WOOLSEY & CO'S MILL Prescott, Arizona. 

NOYES & CO'S MILL Prescott, Arizona. 

GUADALUPE & SACRAMENTO G. & S. M. CO Sinaloa, Mexico. 

RECENTLY ORDERED FROM THE UNION IRON WORKS : 

VEATCH, VALENTINE & CO., Commercial Mill (4 Concentrators) Nevada County. 

GOULD & CURRY G. & S. M. CO. (4 Concentrators) Virginia City, Nevada. 

VULTURE CO. (4 Concentrators Prescott, Arizona. 

MIDAS MILL CO. {4 Concentrators) Virginia, Montana. 

PLYMOUTH ROCK MILL CO. (2 Concentrators) Mariposa County. 

B. F. BROW.N {I Concentrator) Melbourne, Australia. 

MOREY & SPERRY (I Concentrator) New York. 

And in use in many other parts of tlws coast. 

K^-These Machines ore mado of iron, thoroughly constructed and ready for iramediato use. 
For description, etc., send for Circular. 

Those in want of Concentrators would do well to visit some of tho quartz mills that have 
Hendy's Patent Concentrators in use, and satisfy themselves before purchasing other Concentrators of 
pretended merit. 

CAUTION. 

All of HENDY'S PATENT CONCENTRATORS are marked thus : 

"J. HENDY, Patented February 27th and April 17th, 1866." 
Orders or letters of enquiry, address, 

JOSHUA HENDY, Patentee, 
March, 1867. Union or Fulton Foundry, San Francisco. 



Balldert' Insurance Company— JF 1 - 
(OFFICE IN THE BUILDING OF TnEV 
CALIFORNIA SAVINGS BANK, California /\r*\ 
street, one door from Sansome street 
KJ-FIRE ASD MARINE INSURANCE. lOvUtOpqr 

Sobscridbrs who do not receive the Mining and Scientific 
Pre*M In due time, are requested to Inform the publishers. 




OP TUB 

American Journal of Mining 

Volume III, Commencing March 3. 

In consequence of the remarkable success that has at- 
tended this Journal, the proprietors foci warranted In in- 
creasing its size to 

Twenty Pages. 
Thus makfpg It the LARGEST and most COMPREHENSIVE 
Mining Journal on this continent, representing the Gold, 
Silver, Copper, Iron, Lead, Coal, Slate, Oil, and in fact all 
the Mineral Interests of America, containing beautiful en- 
gravings. Illustrating tho latest Improvements in milling, 
mining and metallurgical machinery. 

The Journal has won the encomiums of the press of tho 
entire country and Europe, and numbers among Its con- 
tributors more eminent scientific men than any other 
weekly publication in America- 

Tho reports of ihe markets in stocks, molals, mlnerali 
and ores, carefully corrected weekly, are an Important 
feature of the Journal. 

Subscriptions: $4 per year; for six months, S2.25— in ad- 

vance; single copies, 10 cents. Specimen copies sent free. 

Address, WESTERN A COMPANY, 

lvl^-lamly Publishers, 37 Park Row, N. Y. 



LINSEED OIL. 

The Pacific Linseed Oil & Lead Works 

Are now prepared to furnish dealers and consumers 
Pure Linseed Oil, 
Raw or Boiled, at the Lowest Market Rates. Wo call es- 
pecial attentiou to the quality of our Oil, believing it to bet 
superior to any imported Oil o tiered In this market 
Orders from the country will have prompt attention. 
Address, 
Pacific Linseed Oil and Lead Works, 
Careof L. B. BENCHLEY & CO., 
19vU-3m9p San Francisco. 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill and Forge Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AND — 

Every "Variety of (Shafting 1 

. Embracing ALL SIZES of 
Steamboat Shafts, Crank.*, Piston and Con* 
uectlng Rods, Car and Locomotive Axle* 
and Frames. 

— ALSO — 

HAMMERED TRGN 

Of every description and size. 

03- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL and 
FOKGE CO.. Poatufflcc, San Francisco, ChL, will receive 
prompt attention. 

S®- The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 9vl43in9p 

A. S. Hallidie & Co., 

MANUKACTORERS OF 

FLAT & ROUND WIRE ROPE. 

For Mining'. Shipping, Ferry, 

AND GENEItAL rUItPOSKS. 

Office— 412 Clay street Works— North Beach 

PAN FRANCISCO. 

NOTICE.— THE FIRST COST OF WIRE ROPE IS MUCH 
less than thai of any other kind of Kope of equal 
strength, and It is lour times as durable. Wire Kope does 
not stretch or shrink by atmospheric changes; it has but 
onc-flfth the bulk of Hempen Rope; is spliced and repaired 
in the same manner. 

The attention of Mining Companies is particularly culled 
to our Flat and Round Hoist.ng Ropes, which hove been in 
use for a number of years by the leading mines on this 
Coast, and to any of whom we reter those Interested a* to 
the great advantages over any other kind of rope ; etlecting 
an immense saving in expenditure for ropes, fuel, wejirnnd 
tear of machinery, stoppage of works, etc., besides Increas 
ing safety of life. 

Mining Companies, In erecting Hoisting Works, should bo 
sure and have their drums and pulleys of sufficient size 
whether for wire or hemp rope. 
We manufacture of all sizes, aud in any length- 
Round "Wire Kope— Iron or Steel, (or Hoisting. 
Flat Wire Rope— " " 

Soft Steel Wire Kope— For Derrick Fall Ropes- 
very strong and durable— ouu third the weight of hemp of 
equal strength, (saving in freight for remote localities). 
Suitable sheaves and blocks Jnrni hod when required. 

Galvanized or Untrulvanlzed Kound Wire 
Rope— For Ships' Rigging, Derrick Guys, Ferry Ropes, 
and all standing purposes. 

Steel Ferry Ropes — For wide streams. Ferry Blocks 
supplied. 

Iron and Copper "Wire Cord-J^ to AMnch diam- 
eter, for hanging window saslies; Signal Uord; Sash Pulleys 
on hand. 

Comparaiiue Weight, Sixes and Strength of Iron Wire Ropa* Eta* 
Wire Rope, Ileinp Rope, and Chain. 



Iron Wire 
Rope. 


Steel Wire 
Rope. 


Hemp 
Rope. 


Chain. 


Equivalnet 
Strength. 


Cir- 
cuity'. 


Wtpr 
100 ft. 

lb*. 

53 

83 
170 


air- 

cum/. 

2 
2M 


Wtpr 
100/*. 


Cir- 

5 

6 

S 


Wtpr 
iQO/t. 


Site 
Link. 


Wtpr 
100//. 

tu. 
266 
3-tl 
5-<3 


Br&g 
Sfr'M . 


Wig 
Load. 


2 
3 3 a 


Ibn. 
33 

55 
91 


100 
130 
2:16 


I 9 


7 

11 

19 


Jh,. 
2,300 
3,700 

G.30C 



Pnmnhlets containing data, with prices annexed, for- 
warded free, by mail or express, on application to maim 
fucturtrs-a iBvlWinDii 



10 



l&kt pitting m& £ tkntifk 




Established In 1849-Corner DFivst and DZission. streets, San Francisco. 



HAVING INCREASED OUR FACILITIES IN EVERY DEPARTMENT, WE ARE NOW 
prepared at the shorLest notice ami at the most reasonable rates, to furnish all 
kinds and description of Machinery, including Steam Engines, Quartz Mills. Mining Pumps 
of all kinds. Hoisting Gear, Gas Work., Laundry Machinery, Architectural and Ornamental 
Castings, Sugar Mills, Saw and Flour Mills, Water Wheels of all kinds, Hydraulic, Hay, Rag, 
screw and Drop Presses, Coining Machinery, Pile Drivers, Bark, and Malt Mills, and all 
kinds or Castings. 

EXGrlSES. — Marine Engines, Oscillating and Beam ; Stern and Side Wheel Boats, 
Locomotives, Stationary Engines, Horizontal, Upright, Oscillating and Beam, from six 
to fifty inches diameter. Also, Scott JS Eokart's Adjustable Cut-off Regulator— best in 
use; W. R. Eckart's Balance Valve for Stationary Ei.gines; Woodward's Patent Steam 
Pump and Fire Engine. 

BOILERS. Locomotive, F'.ae, Tubular, Upright, Cylinder and Cornish, and Gvery 
variety of Boiler Work. All sizes of tubes and pipes for pumps. 

PUMP*.— The Excelsior double-acting Force Kunips are manufactured by us. These 
very superior Pumps aro warranted the best, and are fast replacing all other Force Pumps. 



AMALGAMATIXft MACHINERY.— Wheeler A Rand all's improved Tractory 
Curve Pan, Zenas Wheeler's improved fiat bottom pan, Bcldin's pan, Vcatch's tubs. 
Prater's concentrators, Waklee's pans, Beers' pan, German Barrels, Arastra Gearing, Chile 
Mills, Settlers of all descriptions, Retorts of all sizes and shapes, for Silver and Gold, 
Portable Stamp Mills, Straight Batteries, for wood or iron frames, Dry Crushing Bat- 
teries, or machines with the latest improvements, every variety «' Stumps, Mortars, Cams, 
Pans and Tubs. BLAKE'S PATENT QUARTZ CRUSHERS, of'all sizes. 

OIL BOKING TOOLS AND MACHINERT-Of the latest and most ap 
proved construction, made from drawings lately made by Prof. Blake at the oil wells in 
Pennsylvania. We have the facilities for working goid and silver quartz and other ore3, to 
test their value, by the hundred weight or ton. 

Russia Iron Screens, of all degrees of fineness and of all qualities of iron. All work done 
in the best manner at the lowest cash prices. 

H. J. BOOTH. GEO. W. PRESCOTT. IRVING M. SCOTT 



24vl2 



H. J. HOOTK «fc CO. 



Machinists and Foundries. 

PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

Nos. 19, 31, 33 and »5 First Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MAKU FACTO RE ALL Kt«D3 OF 

MACHINERY, 

STEAM EIVOBNES AND QUARTZ MIUL8* 

DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

Self"-A.«Jju.sting Piston Packing, 

Requires no springs or screws; Is always steam tight; 
without excessive friction, and never 

gets slack or leaky. 

WHEELER & RANDALL'S 

NEW GRINDER AND AMALGAMATOB 

HEPBURN & PETERSON'S 

AMALO VMATOK AND SEPARATOR, 

Tylor's Improved Water Wneel, 

Giving the greatest power, at lower cost, than any 

Wheel in use. There are over 1,500 running, 

giving universal satisfaction. 

KNOX'S AMALGAMATORS, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

Superior tor working cither Gold or Silver OreB. 

Genuine White Iron Stump Shoes and Dies 

Having beon engaged for tlio past eight years in quartz 
mining, and being conversant with all the improvements, 
either In Mining or Milling, we are prepared to furnish, al 
the shortest notice, the most perfect machinery for reduc 
ing ores, or saving either gold or silver. I.HvlQqy-tf 



WILLAMETTE IRON WORKS, 

rOKTLUB, OREGON. 

©team Engines, Boilers, 
SAW AND CRIST NULLS, 

MINING MACHINERY, WROUGHT IRON SHUTTER 
WORK, AND BLACKSMITUING IN GENERAL. 
Corner North-Front jvud E streets, 

18vl3-ly One block north of Couch's Wharf. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramcttto. 
WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MAS DTACTD IlKRS OF 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER, 

©TEAJMC ENGINES, XSOXI^EiTtS, 

And nil kinds of Mining? Machinery. 

Also, Hav and Wine Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability and dispatch. 

'lrunbar'i Patent Self-AiljuKtlne Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders, manufactured 

to order. 

Front Street, between N and O streets, 



GEORGE T. PRACY, 
MACHINE "WORKS, 

Nos 109 and 111 Mission street, between Main and Spear, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

STJBAM ENGINE, FLOl'K AND SAW MILL 

And Quartz Machinery, Printing Presses, 

MACHINERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION MADE AND 
REPAIRED. 
*Sr*Special attention paid to Repairing. ^SS qy-3 



SSAJV FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

N. £> Cer, Fremont and Mlsttlbn streets. 

Manufacturers of 

Marine and Stationery Engines 

Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Mining 

Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

—ALSO— 

'Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Presses 

of the latest Improved Patterns. 

STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand; Quartz Mill Shoes and 
Dies warranted to bo made of the best white iron. 
Dunbar's Improved Self- Adjusting Piston* 
Packing, requires no springs or screws; is always steam- 
tight; without excessive friction, and never gets slack or 
leaky. 
MACHINERY, OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



DEVOE. DIXSMOKE «fc CO 



Foundry and Machine Shop, 



Hvll 



Sacramento City 



J. MARSHALL. 



W. WYLIE. 



GLASGOW 

IRON & METAL IMPOKOTG COMPANY, 

Nos. 3ii and 27 Fremont street, near Market, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Bar and Sheet iron; Boiler Plates and Tubes; Gas and 
Water Pipes, Gas Fitting:*, Anvils, Cost tiled, etc. 18vX4-3m 



STOCKTON, CAL. 



KEEP, BLAKE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OK 

tiuarti, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, Steam 
Engines, Horse Powers, 

Mining and Irrigating Pumps. Car Wheels, Derrick IroHs, 
House Front.-!, Iron Fencing. Balcony Bailings, etc., 
at San Francisconriccs. Orders solicited 
13vl3-ly and promptly executed. 



i. o s \"i™™|HANSC0ra&CQ., 
iEtna Iron Works ! 

S6atheaBt corner Fremont and Tehama streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MAN0FACTOKE 

STEAM ENCINES, 

QCARTZ MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, 

SAW MILLS, FLOUR MILLS, 

Dunbar's Improved Self.Ad Isntlnff 

1'ISTON PACKING, 

Now so extensively used in the East and in Ihis Stste. Re- 
quires no springs or screws', is always steam-tight; without 
escesstvo friction, and novcr gets slack or leaky. 

HANSCOM'S CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind no,, in use in this State or anywhere else 

"Wheeler «K Ritnflall's New Grinder and 

A nmlffnmator. 

Which only needs examination to be appreciated. 

Tyler's Improved "Water Wheel, 

Giving greater power at lower enst. than any wheel in use 

■ Send for one olour circulars, giving lull tables 

All Wheels warranted to glvo the owor as 6et forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

Sole maker, for this coast of the " Fenderirast 
"White Iron Stamp Shoes and Dies. 
None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will bo furnished by us 

at market prices. Particular attention given to drnwlncs 

and specifications of machinery, which will be made lo 

order. The patronace of the public is respectfully solicited. 

10vl2 



A Novel Gunboat. — The latest novelty 
in naval architecture is a gunboat designed 
by Mr. John Ericsson for the defense of the 
Swedish coast. It is an ironclad, and is 
smaller than gunboats usually are. The 
deck is entirely below the level of the 
water, and is strongly protected with plat- 
ing. From the deck rises a kind of sheath, 
oval and open at one end above the water, 
and in this is worked a- 15-inch gun, which 
points always in the direction of the bow. 
The motive power is applied, not by steam, 
but by the arms of thirty-two men, who act 
by a simple and effective mechanism on a 
screw "with four flanges. This gunboat, 
which is already constructed, is said to be 
admirably adapted, to the defence of the 
islands and bays and inlets and the lakes of 
Sweden. The power obtained is sufficient 
for the required purpose, and the total cost 
of the boat is but little over 820,000. 

Eemoval of Fiee-damp from Mines. — A 
Mr. Williams, from Blairfin, Wales, has 
been illustrating, at Barnsley's Gas Works, 
a scheme, by which he states coal mines 
may be cleared of fire-damp. The desired 
result is proposed to be obtained by the use 
of an apparatus consisting of an inverted 
syphon, to which is connected a pipe from 
the mouth of the shaft. The short end of 
the syphon is inserted in the place contain- 
ing inflammable gas, and the pipe from the 
top is attached to the other end. The air 
first being extracted from the pipe, the gas, 
which is lighter than the atmosphere, will 
rise to' the top. The experiments were, it 
is said, successful, and witnessed by several 
mining engineers. 

Dr. Eichabdson states that iodine placed 
in a small box with a perforated lid destroys 
organic poisons in rooms. In cases of 
small-pox he has seen this method used 
with great benefit. 

Last March, a cooperative company for 
the manufacture of furniture was formed in 
Cincinnati, with a capital of $2,000,000, in 
shares of $100. 



LEWIS COFFEY. J. S. 'UsroS 

LEWIS COFFEY & RISlrON, 

Steam Boiler & Sheet Iron Works. 

THE only exclusively Boiler Making establishment, >., the 
Pacific Coast owned and conducted by Practical Boiler 
Makers. All orders for New Work and the repairing of Old 
Work, executed as ordered, and warranted as to quality. 

Old Stand, corner of Bush and Market streets, opposite 
Oriental Hotel, San Francisco. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

No. 125 First street', opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kin™ of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
Castings. Brass Ship Work of all kinds. Spikes, Shea thine 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges. Phip and Steamboat Bellsand 
Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks and Viilves, Hy- 
draulic Pines and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of ail sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 
J3©~ PRICES MODERATE. -JBflr 

V. KING WELL. 19vl3-ly] J. II. WEED. 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS 07 

steam: engines, 

Quartz, FIovlt and. ©a-w Mills, 

Moore's Grinder and Am nigra mat or, Erodlc'* 

Improved Crooner, Mining JPnmpg, 

Amnlsanmiors and all binds 

of Machinery. 

Nos. 45, 47 and 49 First street, between Market and Mia- 
Fion etreet, San Francisco. 3-qy 



A chimney at Thompsonville, Conn., 100 
feet high, and containing 100,000 bricks, 
was moved recently a distance of seventy 
feet without damage. 



TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 
,In this City, 
Try them 
S^With a Job, 
And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 




MEPTUNE IRON WORKS, 

Corner of Mission and Fremont Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

SIASIXE, 

Ltocomotive, 

And all kinds of 
HIGH PRESSURE 

Steam Boilers 

MADE. 
All Boilers guaranteed and 
tested by U. S. Boiler In- 
spector before sent out of 
the Shop, at Shop expense. 

AllklndsofSheetlron ant 

Water Pine, Coal Oil 

Stills, Wrought Iron 

Worms, etc., etc. 

Manufactured to Order. 

Old Boilers Repaired 

D. (AMEKO.V 








CITY IRON WORKS COIHPAEY. 

F. CLERC, B. KLEI.NCLAU5, W. DEBBIE. 

CLEKC &. CO., 

Iron Founders, Steam Engine Builders, an 
Makers of all kinds of Machinery, 

San Francisco. 



- J. KEWSHAM. J. DIOWOOD. 

SOUTH BEACH IRON WORKS, 

Near corner of King and Third streets, Sun Francisco. 

jiarim; i:\gims, 

AXD ALL KINDS OF 

MACHTNEKY FORGING. 

All kinds of Ship-fniUhinc and Mill work manufacturer to ' 
order. Jobbing ol every description promptly attended to. 
All work done guaranteed. 13v)4-iv 



JOHN LOCHHEAD'S _ 

Steam Engine Works, 

Settle street, near Mission, San Francisco. 
* 

STEAM ENGINES OF EVERT DESCRIPTION BUILT 
to order — Marine, Stationary, or Locomotive. 

HOISTING AND PUMPING ENGINES, 

PORTABLE ENGINES, OF ALL SIZEri, 

DONKEY PUMPS, Etc., Etc., Eic. 

The attention of the parties engaged In shipping or inland 
navigation la called, to the 

Superior Workmanship 

of Mr. LOCHHEAD, who has been in the business In Pan 
Francisco for the Inst fourteen vonrs. and entovsthe repu 
tiitinn of ha vine built ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN 
STEAM ENGINES 

Screw Fropellorsof all kinds, and Steam Boat Macbinerv 
generally, made to order, and warranted to give perfect 
satisfaction in every particular 26vlS-3m 



©he pining and J^ricntifw §?»& 



11 



Imitation of Mahooant. — French me- 
chanics will make a perfect imitation of 
mahogany oat of any close-grained wood in 
the following manner: The surface is first 
planed smooth, and thon rubbed with a 
solution of nitrous acid. Then apply with 
a soft brush, the following mixture : one 
ounce of dragon's blood, dissolved in about 
a pint of spirits of wine, and with the addi- 
tion of a third of an ounce of carbonate of 
soda, mixed and filtered. Whon the polish 
diminishes in brilliancy, it may be restored 
by the use of a little cold-drawn linseed oil. 
Dragon's blood, as most of onr readers 
know, is a resin obtained by incision from 
certain plants, and is sold at the druggists 
to the varnishers und marble-stainers. This 
method, which is extensively employed in 
France, might be woll adopted in the United 
States for the interior decorations of our 
dwellings, etc. 

A hundred million dollars, it is said, are 
annually sent to England from this country 
for cast steel. 



"WE ARE NOW OFFERING 
OUR IMMENSE SXOCIt 

or 

Fine Custom Made Clothing 

AKD 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

AT PRICKS THAT BEFY COMPETITION. 

Our Stock, of Clothlnr Consist* of 
A.X.L THE ILA/TJEST STYLES 

DOTU Of MATERIAL AND flKlSH. 

A Large Assortment of 
Trunk.*. Valine*, Carpet Baics, Blanket*, Etc., 

At KXTREUXLT LOW PRICKS. " 

J. R. MEAD «& CO., 

SvlO Cor. of Washington and Sansome streets. 



BLASTING POWDER. 

PRICE, SSJ3.00 PER, KEG. 

-ALSO- 
8PORTIXO, CANNON AND MUSKET 

POWDER, 

Of Bupenor quality. 
FUSE AND SHOT, 

Always on hand and for sale at the office of the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, 

No. 81 8 California Street. 

JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 

2SvUqr 



PACIFIC POWDER MILL 

COMPACT'S 

BLASTING POWDER! 

JIANUKACTCKKD 

I IV MA-RIIV COUNT'S-, 

CALIFORNIA. 

roiCaALE ay 

HAYWARD, COLEMAN & CO., 

AGENTS, 

111 Front Street, San Francisco. 

3vl4-lm 



California Steam Navigation 

HJ^£ COMPANY. 4fgg 

6teamer CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE 

CHRYSOPOLIS CAPT. A. F08TEE. 

YOSEMITE 

" CORNELIA .- CAPT. W. BROMLEY 

JULIA CAPT. E. CONCKLIN. 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 4 o'clock P, M. EVERY DAY (Sundays excepted), lor 
Sacramento and Ktr.cK.ton. eonn^'-ting with light-draft 
steamers tor Marysvtllc, Coliisn. Chieo, and Red Bluff. 

oniue ol the Company, northeast cumcr of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

JOHN EENSLEX, 
I3vl2 President. 




THE PACIFIC IRON WOEK8, 

First «fe Fremont ©te.» between Mission «& Howard, San Francisco. 

The proprietors of the above Works Invite the attention of all parties Interested to their greatly Improved and unc- 
qualcd facilities for manufacturing Steam Engines and Boilers, both Marino and Stationary, of any required size and 
pattern. Quartz Mills, Amalgamating, Pumpingand Hoisting Machinery of the most approved construction. Flour, Saw. 
and Sugar Mills, Water Wheels, &c„ ftc. Our pattern list is most complete and extensive, embracing the late Improve 
ments In all classes of machinery adapted to use on this coast. We would call especial attention to the fact that we have 
secured the exclusive right of manufacture for the Pacific Coast of the celebrated Greene Engine, conceded to be the 
most economical and perfect working Engine now in use. We are also exclusive manufacturers ol the celebrated 

Bryan Battery, Varney's AmalKaTnatnn and Separators, Rycrson'ti Superheated Steam Amal- 
gamator* and Rotary Crusher*. Stone Breakers, «fcc. Order* respectfully Solicited. 

GODDARD «fc COMPANY. 



A. 3. CHURCH. 



3. B. CLARK. 



CHURCH & CLARK, 

Ull'OKTKKS AMD DEALERS IN 

Mediterranean and California 

FEUITS, NUTS, OOHFEOTIONEKY, Etc., 

AND MAXUFACTUREKS OF 

FIKE SY O K. K. S 

Of every description, at ^0.407 Front 8t., San Francisco. 

03r" Printed list of kinds and prices famished. J98T 

15vU-tjml2p 



NEW YORK. PRICES. 



C. -E. COJL.]L,IiV&3, 

No. 603 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

EXCLHSITE AGENT 

FOB TUB 

AMERICAN 

WATCH FACTORY. 

A largo assortment of these 
Superior "W atclicn, 

In Gold und Silver Case*, 

Constantly on hand, and sold at Factory 
prices. AIbo, 

ENGLISH AND SWISS WATCHES. 

Imported directly from he Manufacturers. 

TJic American Company are now making 

VERY FINE WATCHES FOR LADIES. 

jOap-A large assortment of Gold Chains 
and Jewelry 25vll) 6m ■ 



SEW YORK PRICES. 

O O 



HAYWAHD, COLEMAN & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND ItEFINKRS 
— or — 

Dlnminating, Lubricating, 

PAINT OIliS! 

CONSISTING OF 

KEROSENE. LARD, SPERM. ELEPHANT, POLAR. 

TANNERS', NEATSFOOT, BOILED AND RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND CHINA NUT. 

— ALSO, — 

SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE & ALCOHOL 

Note,— Wo would specinllv call iho attention of Mill 
owners and Engineers to our superior PARAFFINE OIL, 
which we manufacture from the California Petroleum 
This Oil will not gum. Machinery thoroughly cleaned and 
lubricated with it will not heat, and after remaining at rest, 
can bo started with' nit cleaning off. 

03r A sample can of our Pnrarllnc Oil will be forwarded 
on application to us, as we desire a fair and impartial trial. 

Lamps and Lamp Stock ! 

HSf An clegunt and complete assortment on hand. -JEff 
19vl3-3m 414 Front street, San Francisco. 



Eugrraved to Order.— Persons who desire to illustrate 
their individual oatabllshnlGnia or business, should give us 
their orders for Engraving and Printing, and wc will guar- 
antee good work and reasonable prices. 

DEWEY & CO.. 

I'au-nt Agents, Publishers and Job i'ritucrs, 50S Clay st. 



METJSSDORFFER, 

Nos. 635 and 637 Commercial Street, 

WILL INTRODUCE 

On Saturday, Fetouary ©, 1867, 

An Entirely New Style of 

Cloth Cashmere Hat J| 

"YACHT HEN KI ETTA," 

Which are the most dressy Hat ever introduced on the 

Pacific UoaaL 
ggr-Call and ice them. 8vU 




MACCARONI, VERMICELLI, 



— fastis i^FA«mA.- 



Machinists and Foundries. 



Miners' Foundry 

— AND — 

MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos. 245 to 255 Fikst Street, 

Sun Frnncl.uo. 

HOWLAND, ANGOELL & KING. 

PROPRIETORS, 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 






^SA^reANCISCO_ pQ 



International Hotel, 

JACKSON STREET, 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

THIS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
order for the accommodation ol guests. Poreonsseek 
jug comfort and economy will find this the best Hotel In 
the city to stop at. The Beds are new and In good order, 
and the Rooms well ventilated. The Table will always be 
supplied with the best in the market. 

Pi-Ices varying from SI SO to (88 per day for 
Board und Room. 

FINE BATH HOUSE AND BARBER SHOP ATTACHED 
TO THE HOUSE. 

AST* Teams belonging to the House will be in attendance 
at all the boats and cars to convey passengers to the 11 oust 
free op charge, and to any part of the city for 5© cents 

UIvl2 Y. E. WEYGANT. Proprietor. 

Just I?ii*>lislie<3. 

TnE PHILOSOPHY OF MAURTAOE, BEING FOUR IM- 
poilant Lectures on FUNCTIONS and DISORDERS ot 
i)\r Nervous SVatfiUl and Reproductive Organs, to be had b> 

addressing und iui'lo biv twenty -five .'Mils, postage, stamps 
t» Secretary PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY, Mont- 
somcry street, San Francisco. I2vlS-)y 



QUARTZ MILLS. 
SAW M ILLs, 
l'OWDKJC MILLS, 



l'LOl'R MILLS, 
SUGAR MILLS, 
PAPER MILLS, 



Steam Engines of all Kinds. 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 



MINING PUMPS, 
OIL WELL TOOLS, 



HOISTING WORKS, 
ROCK BREAREltfl, 



Machinery and Castings of all kinds, eitka? 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in all its 
Branches. 

Shoe* and Dies of White Iron* mnnufncl .. , .; 
for and Imported by ui expre»t.ly for thin r. c w . 
pose, and will last 25 per tent, longer than any 
other made on thli cuuai. 

Russia Iron Mcreens, of any degree of fineness. 
We ore the only mitnufiiciurcn on tills count oif 
the "Hicks EtiKlne," the most <■* mput t, simple. 
In construction, and durable, of nuy Eii&lne ta 
u*ie. 

r. T. KING, 
CYRUS PALMER, 



W. H. HOWLANB, 
H. It. ANGELL. 



13vl4-qr 




JAMES MACKEN, 
coffeksmiith:. 

No. 236 Fremont at., bet. Howard «fc Folsoia 

All kinds of COPPER WORK done to order In the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Sugar 
House and Distillery work. 

Repairing promptly and neutly attended to. 

13vll 



Dr. Hufeland's Swiss Stomach 
Bitters. 

THE WORLD RENOWNED REPUTATION, TOGETHER 
with the extensive and Increasing demand for Dr. linn- - 
land's Swiss Siomitch Bitters, will at once recommend I hem 
to the favorable notice of all connoisseurs and lovers of a 
iznod and healthful tonic and invlgorator. As a purifier of 
the hlood. acting surely, yet gen'lv, on the secretions of 
liver and kidneys, they are unsurpassed and a most agreea- 
ble drink. 




For sale at all wholesale and retail stores on tile Paciflo 
Coast, and at the deuot of TAYLOR Jc BENDEL, 413 and 
415 Clay street, Letwecu Sanoouno and Battery, San Fran- 
cisco. 2UvU-6ip 



Piles! Piles! Piles! 

NOT PILES OF GOLD, NOR YET OF SILVER, SO 
much coveted by all men; butthc BLEEDING, BLIND 
or EXTERNAL PILES, can be easily and speedily cured by 
the use of 

WOOD'S STJB-POSITORY. 

It Isa preparation totally distinct from anything hereto- 
fore offered as a remedy for this painful and often fatal 
complaint. The SUB-POSlrOKY Is neither a pill, powder, 
wash or salve, and yet it has proved to be a certain Rem- 
edy for the Piles. Do not doubt this assertion, or delay 
testing the truth of It if you are troubled with the Piles— 
you will not be deceived in it. 

Sold wholesale aud retail by J. H. REDINGTON & CO., 
Nos. 416 and 418 Front street; GEO. GRISWOLD, corner of 
Mission and First streets; OLD FAMILY DRUG STORE, 
corner Mission and Second streets; UNITED STATES DRUG 
STORE, Bush street, between. Montgomery and Kearny. 

C. WOOD, Proprietor, No- 03 Tehama street, between 
First and Second. - 2lvU-3m 

JOHN TAYLOR & CO. 

IMPORTEKS, 

AMI DKALKU3 IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, 

Druggists' & Chemists' Glassware, 

PlLotograplrto iStoclc, Etc. 
513 and Sl-i Washington Street, 

S*AN FRANCISCO. 

WE are receiving direct from MESSRS. LADD & OERT. 
LING (London) and BEEKER & SONS (Antwerp, Bel 
glum) their superior 

ASSAY AND BULLION BALANCES, 

And from France and Germany, as well as the Eastern 
Statos, FURNACES. CRUCIBLES. MUFFLES, BLOW-PIPE 
CASES. GOLD SCALES. CHEMICAL GLASSWARE, and 
every article required for ASSAY OFFICES, LaBORATO 
RIES, etc. We have given this branch of our business par 
tlcular attention, to select such articles as are necessary 
In the development of the niincr;il wealth of litis roast. 

A Full Assortment of DRUGGISTS* GLASSWARE and 
DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, ACIDS and CHEMICALS, con. 
stoutly ou lnmd. 

Sau Francisco March 6,lS6o- llvio-tf 



12 



Mht 'phting and jftcitntifc jgttM* 



Business Cards. 



H. C. HOWARD, 

Member of the Snn Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board, 

(Exclusively commission business,) 

No. 435 California street, next door below Montgomery. 
2dvlJqr 



W. E. GOLDSMITH. 
Card and Seal Engrarer, 

505 Montgomery street, up-stalrs, (over Tucker's,) 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wedding and Visiting Cards printed with the utmost neat- 
ness; Notarial. Commisjioner and Society Seals. 19vl3-2q 



Charles S. "Whitman, 

(Special Advocate in. Patent 

Cases, and Solicitor of Patents- Office, 611 

Seventh street (near Patent Office) 

Washington, D. C. 

Circulars, Containing valuable information to Inventors, 

23vl4-6m forwarded gratis. 



NATHANIEL GRAT. 



U. M. GRAY. 



N. GRAY & CO., 

«1 Sacramento St, cor. Webb, 8an Francisco. 



-TJSE- 
EMERY <S EATON'S 

GEEEN SEAL SMOKING TOBACCO. 



16vU-6m 



No. 518 Battery street. 



ISAAC E. DAVIS. HENRr COTELL. 

DAVIS & COWELL, 

DEALERS IN 

Santa Cruz Lime, Cement, 

PLASTER, HAIR, LATH AND LATH NAILS. 

Marble Dust. Fire-Bricks. Flre-Clay, Fire Tiles of all sizes. 

Cor. Front and Washington Streets, San Francisco. 

iBvll-tf 



B. F. HOWLAND, 

mOTOGHt-A-HPHEIt, 



Enameled Cards, Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, exe- 
cuted iu a superior manner. Small pictures copied anl en- 
larged to any size, at one-halt the price usually paid for 
such work. Cartes de Visiles only $3 per dozen ; Vignettes 
at $4 per dozen. We warrant our work to lie superior 
to any made, in tills city or State. .flSJ'-Give us a call and 
see on r specimens. 5vU-6m 



ANDRADE & PATTERSON, 

MANUFACTUREES AND ENGKAVEKS 
—OF— 

METAJLLIO SIGNS, 
AND SIGN PAINTERS, 

Corner of Montgomery and Pine Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

flgrDoor Plates and Office Signs made to order at short 
17vl4-ly notice and on reasonable terms. 



THE WILLCOX & GIBBS 

IMPKOVED NOISELESS 

Family Sewing Machine 

Challenges the world. It has beaten the Florence badly 
Come and see It, or send for Report of the trial. 

SAMUEL SWIFT, Agent, 
lSvU-6tn SOS Kearny street, near Sutter. 



PRO BONO PUBLICO. 

LACQUR'S 

SAESAPARIPHERE 
BITTERS 

POSSESS INVALUABLE PROPERTIES. 
They five Health to the Sick, 

Strength to the TTeak, 

Joy to the Afflicted, 

BS^Sold by the principal Druggists and Liquor Donlers 
on the Pacific CohkL 



THE CENTRAL PAKE OF THE PACIFIC, 
Woodward's Gardens, 

ART OALLEBT, 

MUSEUM, GYM.NASIUM, 

—AND — 

ZOOLOGI CAL GARDENS. 

THESE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ARE VTKTTED DAILY 
by hundreds of the pleasure-seeking public, and all 
aurte in pronouncing them Hie best and only first-class sub- 
urban resort on the Pacific Coast 

The extensive grounds are covered with tho rarest trees 
and shrubbery, making it a most desirable spot for small 
parties wishing to enjoy a Plc-Nic. 

To all departments new attractions are being constantly 
added . 

These Gardens are accessible by tho Howard, Folsom and 
Market street Curs, 

Entrances on Mission and Valcnr.i.i streets, between Thir- 
teenth arid Fourteenth. OPEN EVERY; BAY. 

Admission to all parts, £5 Ceuu. Children, under 12 
years, half prwe. 2±vliqr 



Trades and Manufactures. 



KM. BAKTL1NQ. 



HENRY KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Killers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

oOu Clay street, (southwest cor. Sansome), 
16vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN XJAIVIEIa, 

(SUCCESSOR TO O. GOKl) 

MARBLE WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine st bet Montgomery and Kearny, Sa'n Francisco 

Mantels, Monument*, Tombs, Plumbers* Slabs 

Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
P5r Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re 
spectfullj solicited. 5vS-3m 



Palmer's Patent 

ARTIFICIAL LEG-, 

Manufactured in Philadelphia, Fcnn. 
JARVIS JEWETT, AGENT. 

629 Washington Street, San Francisco, Cat 10v8-lm 

HUCKS & LAMBERT, 

BOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

DS** H. & L. -£TJ 
AXLE GREASE, 

Natoma Street and North Beach, 
2vl3-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



PIONEER ffiON SHUTTER WORKS! 

Established 1849. 

O. ISrXJTTITVfSr, 

Manufacturer of 

Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters, 

BANK VAULTS, PRISON CELLS, BALCONIES, AWN- 
INGS, GRATINGS, IRON FENCE, STAIRS, Etc., 

133 Bush street, 

llvH-lq San Francisco. 



HABBIS BEOS, 

CUTLERS, LOCKSMITHS, BELLHANGERS 

And Model Makers. 
208 Lcidesdorff street, bet. Sacramento and Commercial, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 21vl4-tf 



LEATHER HOSE AND BELTING, 

ALL SIZES. 

SUCTION HOSE MADE TO ORDER 

At short notice, by 

imc. m. cook; &> soiv, 

No. SOI Battery street, 

13vI3-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Cordage Manufactory ! 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND A LARGE ASSORTMENT 
— or — 

MANILA OOK,I>AGrE, 

Whale Line, Bale Rope, etc., 

Manufactured from Pure Manila Hemp. 

Office, at TUBBS A CO'P, Oil and 613 Front street 
AST* Manulactory at the Potrero. llvH-lq 



E. POWER, 

WOOD CARVER 

— AND — 

Composition Ornament Manufacturer. 
Designing, Modeling and Patterns 

FOR CASTING. 

INTERIOR DECORATIONS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

In Wood, Composition and Metal. 

Nos. 311 and 313 Market street, San Francisco. 
WvlJ.qy 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTER1VS AND MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry,) 
S. ID. Corner of Mission and Fremont st9., 
6vHtf SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. H. WHITE. JACOB KKAHER. 

I*etiroliiio Oil Works. 
J. H. WHITE & CO., 

No. 109 Co nunc ; re in 1 street, San Francisco, 

Are now manufacturing 

LUBRICATING OILS & AXLE GREASE, 

From Petroleums of California, and ask to be encouraged 
by the citizens of California. As a home production in all 
their parts, these Lubricators are equal to any in the 
market, and surpass all others ft r cleansing off gum caused 
by tho use of animal oils which contain stearinc andmarga- 
rin, which soon become acid. Afair trial, at the low price 
asked. Is all that we solicit. 25viatf 



STOCK CERTIFICATES, 

STOCK TRANSFER JOURNALS, 
STOCK LEDGERS, 

ASSESSMENT RECEIPTS, 

And all other Blanks, Blank Books, etc- , required by Min- 
ing and other Corporations, kept on hand or printed to 
order on short notice, at moderate prices, at the office of 
the Mining atuiiScienOfia Pre** \ 



Professional Cards. 



SHERMAN DAY, 
-Mining Engineer, 

No. 114 Mont a-oniery Slock, San Francisco, 

Will examine, survey and report upon mines, tad consult 
and advise concerning investments in mining property, or 
the machinery management and expenditures of mines. 
22q* 

FKEDEHICK MASSELL. 

Mechanical & Architectural Draughtsman, 

No. 422 California street, corner of Leidsdorff. 

rings of Models made foi 
ents at Washington or London. 



E. V. JOICE, 

IV O T .A. H Y PUBLIC, 
N. E. cor. of Washington and Battery sts. 

12vl4tf SAN FRANCISCO. 



FRASKLIX K. FELTON. JAMES M. TAILOR. 

FELTON «& TAYLOR, 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, 

Court Block, 63G Clay Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Will practice In the State and FederaLCourts. Special at- 
teutlon given to proceedings under the Patent Law. 
lSvU-lq- 



GEO. T. KNOX and E. V. SUTTEE, 

COMMISSIOKEKS OF DEEDS. 

3VOTA.RY I» U 33 !!■ I C , 

615 Montgomery Street. 

16vl4tf San Francisco. 



ISAAC LOBREE & CO., 
, GOLDEN STATE POTTERY,^ 

AXTIOCH, CAL. ^fc3 

, Office In San Francisco, 516 Commercial st. 

Constantly on hand a largo assortment of Earthenware, 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, and Stoneware. 



J. 1ST. ECKEL, M. D., 
Homceopathio Physician 

226 Fost Street, San Francisco. 
2JvUyr 



DR. H. AUSTIN, 

DENTIST, 

No. 634* Wasningrton Street, 
Between Montgomery and Kearny Streets 

[OVER SAN FRANCISCO BATHS] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 20vl0-qy 



J. "W. "WINTER, 
DENTIST. 



Office, CAT Clay street San Francisco. 

First-class gold fillings for S3, as good as anv dentist can 
produce in ihe city Dr Winter has practiced Dentistry 
twenty years— fifteen in this State. For a lull upper set Ct 
gum teelh, on vulcanite base, from $'jO to $35. Teeth ex- 
tracted wiihoutpam by local application. lSvll-tf 





RADICAL CURE 

-OF- 

KXTaPXTJRE ! 



Treatment of alt Deformities of the Bodv. by DR. A. 
FOLLEAU'S process. <IS4 Washington street, up stairs, 
Washington Baths Building, between Montgomery and 
Kearny streets. 

DR. 'A. FOLLEAU 

Has his studies and manufactories in the same building. 

Every kind of Apparatus, Trusses, orthopedic Instru- 
ments. Artlflci.il Limbs, etc .are manufactured and applied 
by himself. 

BS^IIe has no connect ion with any Ansncy. 21yl4-llptf 



BLAKE'S PATENT 
QUARTZ CRUSHER. 

CAXTTION! 

The owners of tho Patent for this valuable machine, in 
order to facilitate the protection of their rights against nu- 
merous infringers, procured, some time since, a reissue of 
the Patent, bearing dute January 9th, 1866. 
This Patent securei the exclusive riff hi to em- 
ploy In Stone-Break I uc Machine^ 1>- 
rlffht Convergent Jaws, actuated 
by a Revolving Shaft. 

All persons who are violating the Patent by the unau- 
thorized making, selling or using machines in which quartz 
or other material is crushed between upright convergent 
aws, actuated by a revolviug shaft, are hereby warned 
that they are appropriating the property of others, and 
that they will be held responsible In law and in damages. 

Several infringing machlues are made and offered for 
sale in ibis city, upon which Patents have been obtained. 
Manufacturers, purchasers and users, are notified that such 
Patents do not authorize the use of the original Invention, 
and that such machines cannot bo used without incurring 
liability tor damages. BLAKE & TYLER, 

UvUtf Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



Greatest Invention of the Age. 
BOWMAN'S 

AMERICAN WASHING COMPOUND 

And housewife's true friend, saves one-half the labor, 
one-half the time, and one-half the expense. 

For WASHING CLOTHES, CLEANING HOUSES, RE- 
MOVING PAINT, GREASE, etc., it U unequalled. 

*KJ- It makes hard water as soft as rain water. 

For sale at 51.50 per can of five gallons, at the manufac- 
tory, £23 Jackson street, rear Battery. Please send your 
orders, by mail or express, to LYNCH & PARSONS, 

zavU-ZamGt San Franc isoo, Cat 



Metallurgy. 



BOALT «fc STETEFELDT, 

Metallurgists and Mining Engineers 

ATTSTIN, NBVADA, 

Western Branch of ADELBERG A RAYMOND, No. 90 
Broadway, New York. lltvll 



G. W, UAYNABD. 



J. II. TIEMAHN. 



M-A-YNAItlO «fc TLEMANN, 

Milling Engineers and Metallurgists, 

S40 Pearl street. New Tork, 

— AMD- 
CENTRAL CITY, COLORADO. 
19vl2-ly 



REMOVAL. 

PACIFIC CHEMICAL WORKS. 

FALKENAU & HANKS HAVE REMOVED THEIR OF- 
fice to 623 Montgomery street, opposite Montgomery 
Block, where they will receive orders tor Chemicals of all 
descriptions, and for Assays and Aiwilyst-sof Ores, Minerals. 
Metallurgical Products, Mineral Waters, Commercial Arti- 
cles, etc. Laboratory, corner of Center and Folsom slreeis, 
Mission. 2-IVU-4W ' 



EUROPEAN 

METALLURGICAL WORKS, 

AND 

Practical DVIIiiIng School, 

Bryant Street, Between Third and Fourth, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

THE Proprietors are at all times prepared to work or test 
Oressent to this establishment— either in lame or small 
quantities— by such process as may be found best adapted, to 
their chemical character, ailer a careful analr>is has been 
made. Test lots of Ore adapted to the smelting process at* 
tended to. Sulphuret. pyritous, and the (so-called) " rebel- 
lous ores," are having especial attention paid to their suc- 
cessful treatment. Assaying in the humid and dry way. 
Also, refining by cupellation, done at moderate rates. 

PRACTICAL MI NINO SCHOOL. 

The proprietors — encouraged by numerous implications 
from gentlemen desirous of pursuing the study ot practical 
metallurgy— have concluded to admit parties on reasomible 
terms. Having In their Mill all the necessary applL 
ances for crushing, roasting, nmnlgamitting. smelting, re- 
fining and assaying, as also a well extended Laboratory for 
the analysis of Ores and Minerals, a good opportunity is 
here offered to acquire a sound practical knowledge of tho 
business. 

S. P. KlHBAXL, J R. MURPQT. 

lOvlO 



J. A. BAUER, 
G liemical Laboratory, 

AND DRUG STORE, 
644 Waahl&Kton Street. [Established 1649. ] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Careful Analyncs made of 

Ores, minerals, Waters, Oils, Liquors, 
Wines, Products of Art, etc. 

Pharmaceutical Preparations Made to Order. 

Opinions given on Chemical Questions and Geolozy. 

agj- Particular attention paid to Analyses of all kinds, n 
cases where legal questions are involved. 

Pure Nitric Acid. Nitrate of Silver, Gold Chloride. Platln 
Chloride, Sodium Amalgam, Sulphate of Copper, etc., for 
sale. 12vil-6m 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co's 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 

NEW YORK, JAPAN AND CHINA. 

■iT-fiflii LEAVE FOLSOM STREET WHARF, AT 11 
Swh-BJoBi o'clock a. M. of the following dates, for 
PANAMA, connecting via Panama Railroad, with one of 
the Company's splendid steamers from ASPINWALL for 
NEW YORK. 

On fhe lOth, 18th and 30th of each month that has 
SO days. 

on the lOth, 19th and SOth of each month that has 
31 dnvs 

When the 10th, 19th and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding; when the '8th tails ou Sun- 
day, they will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Franci>co on the 10th touches at 
Manzanillo. All touch at Acupulco. 

Departures of 1-Uh or 19lh connect with French Trnna- 
Atinutic Co.'s stenmcr for St. Nazaire, mid English steamer 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamer for 
Southampton and South America, and P. R. II. Co's 
steamer for Central America. 

The following Steamships will bs dispatched on dates as 
given below : 

Julv lOth-PACRAMENTO \ r a pt. J M. Cavarly 

Connecting with HENRY UHAUNCEV, Capt. Gray. 

July 19th— CONSTITUTION Cap:. E. S. Farnsworth, 

Connecting with ARIZONA, Capt. Maury. 

July.lOth-COLDEN CITY Capt. W. F. Lapidge, 

HUB Connecting with OCEAN QUEEN, Capt. Conner 

Cabin passengers berthed through. Baggage checked 
through— KM) pounds allowed each adult. 

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicine and attend- 
ance free. 

These steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. Passen- 
gers are requested to have their baggage on board before 10 
o'clock. 

Through Tickets for Liverpool by the Cunnrd.Inmnn and 
National Steamship Lines, can be obtained at the office of 
the P. M. S.S. Co., San Francisco, where may also be ob- 
tained orders for passage front Liverpool or Southampton 
to Pan Francisco, either via New lurk or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 io £20 will be advanced wiih the 
above orders. Holders of orders will be required to iden- 
tify themselves to ihe Agents in England. 

For .Merchandise and freight for New York and way 
ports, npplv to Messrs. WELLS. FARGO & CO. 

0^- The 'COLORADO will l>e disnntched July 4, at noon, 
ami will be followed bv the GREAT RE fUBLlC. on August 
2Mb, from wharf, corner of First and Rrannan slreeis, for 
YOKOHAMA mid HONGKONG, ciinecllmi ut Yokohama 
with the steamer COSTARICA for SHANGHAI. 

For passage and all oilier information, apply at the Pa- 
cific Mail Steamship Co's office, corner of Sacramento and 
Leidesdorff streots. 

OLIVER ELDimifiK, Aeent. 



Blanks, Blank Mining Books, 

Constitution and By-Laws 

— FOR — 

Mining* and Prospecting 
Companies 

Elegantly printed, with care and dispatch, at the office of tho 
• Mining and Scientific Press. 

jcc Orders from the interior faithfulv attended to. 



©&t pining and J^wtrttfif § vw. 



13 



Ficr» ro* the Picon,*.— Every family ihoold have a bot- 
tle of Healy's Curative Oil In the bouse, prepared to anni- 
hilate pain. It Ulna brut remedy In the world for Rheu- 
matism and Gout, Neuralgia or Headache, Toothache^ 
Crainpstn the Limbs. Diarrhaa, Sprain*. Brui*c-, Huriuand 
Cuts; Scalds, bite of poisonous Insect*. Frozen Feet, etc 
Be your own phyxIcUn. and get the bent, for the best is the 
cheapest. Tin; curative la composed of eleven Ingredients, 
active and penetrating In llu-lr nature, and vl pur K w^e* 
table extraction; Is free from all minerals and acids dele 
torioutMthc human system; Is warranted to glre imme- 
diate reliel from pain, and the cure Is permanent. Sold by 
ell druggists. Prloclpal Depot, No. ft Montgomery street. 
2.'vli-lamtf 



New Minino* Advertisements. 



« loco SenoresGold uad Silver Mluluir Coiapiiny. 

Copalo, Slnsloa, Mexico. 

Noticx.— There are delinquent, upon the fallowing de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on thu 
first day of May. 13>r;. the several amounts sot opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Nihil*. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount 

Haywood Ju'.«on GJl $6J 10 

JCUeidcman 4 U> 5 00 

iy ft SO 3UO 

J B Murphv 6. ft9 20 2 00 

M Fltzpatrtck 7 ft ftO 

Lonn Miner 8 7 7U 

M Uui-rlu 10 « «0 

HKii'Hili.im ...lltoltf, 27 Sft 5 SO 

Oeo U Eicott 17 10 1 t-KJ 

Wm HcWIIIlwiu 2j 1 ID 

John Quintan 33 4 40 

Harvey Garclloa 18 1 10 

Qco tOlaeUre 1» 1 10 

Zerr.-i Wheeler *-'. 24 * *° 

J.1111" Hnton Z3 1 Id 

Oeo I'.-i.Tson 26 29 2 60 

B L I'slmcr 3. I. to, 31 ai 4 60 

Richard AbtM M 20 IW 

W II II.»l,nid 45 4 40 

Henry Williamson: ii, ft5 lo l r>i 

Wm KWad.worlh 31 9 90 

QAels 3 1 10 

Win II Brown 57 6 60 

Thom.u Hrown 58, 32 26 2 60 

J M BCOtt ol lo 6ft 6 60 

040 T K.is-etl 67 1 10 

lnjiij.ii.iiii Wood 69 SO 3 00 

V V Fargo 89 10 1 00 

Ouil ■me Clarke IU 100 10 00 

OT Wheeler 102 to 111 292 29 20 

MKK Keeker 2,3, 4 97^ 975 

Dhhrhart ' 5 W 83 

ChasAOrowe U 2 20 

Qonrge A H.rria 60 90 9 On 

William Viwberif 61 6 ftD 

Peter Welse m 2 20 

1 ftoeenbnatn 5t 16 1 a) 

Edwin Bonnell 57 lft 1 6> 

A U.mori 61 1 16 

RcBlinailllll A FrapoH 62 2 20 

Richard U Klauvert. Jr 61 17 1 70 

L« Whipple 65 7 70 

FOTrueit 66 7 70 

FrnnelsRead 71 60 6 00 

TO L Ktirre 72 8 80 

John J Foj 75 5 60 

II schwcrln 80 2 20 

II Zeltska 83 7 70 

v Kostmeyer 87 10 l 00 

J E Beklov.... 88 2 20 

ChnsP Kimball 92 1 10 

JlU F tl.u-h 99 ft CO 

Win M Hun loon 105 SO 3 00 

WLCazeneau 112 8 B0 

Mag<leC Bacon 117 1 10 

Lt.iac Blnxome, Jr 120 15 1 60 

F A Wilklni 121 5 50 

William Klliler 122 1220 

Vernon Getty 125 53 6 80 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the first day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of the Com- 
pany. No. 52i clay street, San Francisco, Cnl., on Saturday, 
the twenty-seventh day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses 

cf sale. 

EDWARD C. LOVELL, Secretary. 

Office, No. 628 Clay street, San Francisco. jy6 



To Capitalists* 



GOLD QUARTZ MINE. SITUATED IN CALAVERAS 
County, with steam mill fitted U|> with Amalgamating 
Paiu, etc., FOR SALE. The mine has three main veins and 
more than 38 '.000 have been spent in open lug them and com- 
pleting the mill. Good wagon roads all the way. Apply to 
BELLUO FKEKES, Bankers, 
23vl3-6m 535 Clay street, San Francisco. 



Mining: Notices— Continued. 



Adella Gold Mining Company, Botk Creek., 

Sierra Cour.ty, California. 

Notick.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account ol assessment levied on the twenty- 
nlnih day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the 
names of iho respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

E F Kauldwln 22 10 $J0 00 

EF Knu'dwin 23 40 40 00 

E FBniihiwln 16 10 10 00 

E F Kauldwln 18 60 Su 00 

Ade laBauklwin )4 400 400 00 

Adella Bamdtviu 15 40 40 00 

And In accordance villi law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the twenty-ninth day of May, 1867, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction, by Olney & Co., 
auctioneers, at No. 418 and 420 Clay street, San Francisco, 
Cal., on Monday, the fifteenth day of July, 1867, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock SI. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

A. C. TAYLOR, Secretary. 

Office, 429 Pacific street. Snn Frauciscc, CaL jc29 

Chiplonena Mining Company-- District of (Jrea, 

Sonora, Mexico. 

Notice.— There arc delinquent upon the following described 
Slock, on account of assessment levied on the 2Sth day of 
May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the names of 
the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Moshcimer, Jos 56 25 $125 00 

Mosheimcr, Jos 57 26 130 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on 'the twenty-eighth day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, by J. Middleton A 8011, 
404 Montgomery street. Sun Francisco, Cal., on Monday," the 
fifteenth day of July, 1367. at the hour of 12 o'clock, M., of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, to- 
gether with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 

Office. 318 California street, Snn Francisco, Cal. je29 

Electrotype Cots, Engravings, Etc.— Our Job Printing 
Office la abundantly supplied with elegant engravings, or- 
naments, and other embellishments to snit the various 
tranches of Industry In this State. 



Chalk. Mountain Blue Gravel Company. — Lo- 
cation of Works: Nevada County, California- 
Notice U hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the eighteenth day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of one dollar per share was levied 
upon (he capital stock of laid Company, payable lmmc- 
dhtaly, in united States gold and silver coin, to the Sec- 
retary- 

An; stock upon which said use «infnt Khali remain unpaid 
on the nineteenth day ol July, 1(467, shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will be duly adverted i.<r sale at public ..uc- 
tioii, ami unless p,w iiunt shall be made before, will be sold 
Kii Saiorday, the third day of August, 186*7, to pav Hie de- 
linquent 1 etber with costs of idrertlsing 
anu uxneuacs ol sule. Br order of the Board oi Tmstecs. 

J. M. BUPPINOTUN, Secretary. 

Office, No. 5 Government Hout-o. cwuer Washington and 
Satiwuic M reel*, San frauciseo, Cullltirnia. Je2* 

i'uDiaieo Gold m.il Silver Mlulug; Compuuy, 

Laiukr County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that «t a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-first day 
nf June, 1867, an aascftsuicnt of twenty dollar* iSSJ) per share 
was ii*vicd upon the capital .-<iock of said Company, pay- 
able on or bciore the second day of August, 1£67. in United 
States currency , to the Secretary; Bau Francisco, Cal. 

Anv BincK upon wtncn waid SsieMlueDt shall remain un- 
pald mi the second day of Augu*t, 1-l.;, .lull be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly auvortlsed lor aale ai public 
auction, and uiile--.i iMivment shall he made before, will be 
sold on Thursday, ibe twenty •sixth day ui September, 1S07. 

to pav the delinquent assessment, together with Costs of 
advenMiiK and uxpcusCb of sale. By order of the Board 
Of Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT. Secretary. 
Office, N. E. c6rner Clay and Front streets, San Francisco. 

nyAt a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, lS'i7 the qrderlevyliiR assessment (No 0) made Febru- 
ary- 14th, 1807, was rescinded. 

Je29 N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Cordillera Gold and Silver Kllolntr Company, 

Chihuahua, Morcllcs Mining DUtrlct, Mexico. 

Notice.— There is delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twenty-seventh* day of April, 186;, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows : 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Stewart. David.. 133 47 $17 00 

Whlthers, J J 1M7 10 10 00 

Uari.CJ 76 B0 50 00 

Hall.O A 251 32 32 00 

Barbour, J 11 K. 10 26 26 00 

Koot.Amos 14 62 52 00 

Ferry & Gray 20 26 26 00 

McKurlund, W A 71 15 15 00 

Trott. 1>C 64 10 10 00 

Knight, J L 75 2 2 00 

J Walch 100 13 13 00 

Andrews. O B 102 6 5 00 

Whiting. S A 110 12 12 00 

Cooper, W R 253 18 18 00 

Dlckfon, J 167 6 5 00 

Murkell.RC 146 5 5 00 

Simmons, H 149 « 9 00 

MoLcoud, W 151 13 13 00 

Baque, D 57 10- 10 00 

Mane, o : 60 10 1000 

Caselll, A 62 10 10 00 

Walch. ST 80 10 10 00 

Reud. H R 56 15 15 00 

Andrews. U B 144 5 ft 00 

Whiting, S A HI 10 10 00 

Whiting, S A 203 19 19 00 

Dickson. John 147 21 21 00 

Markell. R C 238 7 7 00 

Williams, J 249 3 3 00 

Hcnlny. DW 189 6 6 00 

Illegal, IID 239 5 6 00 

Dentin, MS 248 3 3 (to 

Kelly, J M 226 2 2 00 

Curtis. J M 64 10 10 00 

Belden, FC 115 10 10 00 

Hclden, PC 116 15 15 00 

Lasetcr, A 84, 85. 86, 87 

88. 89. 90, 92 495 _, 495 00 

Lasetcr, A C 126 to 131 475 475 00 

Williams. J 169 10 10 00 

Henley. D W 162 6 6 00 

Kcigtc, H D „ I6S 6 6 00 

Stewart,.! 171 1 1 00 

Potter, A P 172 1 1 00 

Thomas, R P 173 1 1 00 

Fitzgerald, W J 178 2.) 20 00 

Derwin, M S 182 - 10 10 00 

Kelly. J M 190 3 3 00 

McNamarn, C ~ 196 3 S 00 

BowiTinan, A 202 7 7 00 

Small, W P ; 20S 5 6 0«i 

McDonald. T 209 5 5 00 

Cooper, Emily 220 10 10 00 

Harris, J 223 13 13 00 

McGiven, P 225 6 6 00 

Curtis. J M 241 10 10 00 

Hall, CAS 2.i0 20 20 00 

Chupelle, AM 207 64 51 00 

Johnson, J... 2t4 5 5 00 

Uutisoul, A 206 4 4 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the twenty-seventh day of April, 1867, 
so many shares of each parcel of said slock as may be neccs- 

ary will be sold, at public auction, by Maurice Dore & Co., 
No. 327 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the eighth day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 

o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent essessment 

thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 

sale. 

HENRY R. REED. Secretary. 
Office, 321 Washington street, San Francisco. Cal. je22 



Dardauellea Copper Mining Company. Loca- 
tion: Low Divide District, Del Norte County, California. 
Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, heJ^d on the third day of June, 
1867, an assessmen of eight cents per share was levied 
upon the capital stock ot said Company, payable Imme- 
diately in United Slates gold and silver coin, to the Secre- 
tary at Crescent City, California. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the tenth day of Julv, 1867. shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public auc- 
tion, and unlesspaymenl shall be made before, will be sold 
on Saturday, Ihe third day of August, 1367, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

G. CURTIS, Secretary. 
Office, at Woodbury cfc Marhofi'er's, Crescent City, Cali- 
fornia. jel5* 



Gold Hill Tunneling Gold and Silver Mining 

Company.— Location: Gold Hill Mining District, County 

of Storey, State of Nevada. 

Notice.— The Fourth Annual Meeting of the stockholders 
of ihe abovp named Company, will beheld at their office, 
415 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal., on SATUR- 
DAY, the twentieth (20th) day of July, 1867, at 3>£ o'clock, 
P M., forthe purpose of electing Trustees lo serve for the 
ensuing year, and such other business as may properly 
come before It. 

R. WEGENER, Secretary. 

Snn Francisco, June 15, 18G7. Jel5-5w* 



Gold Quarry Company, Location of Work*: 

Placer County, California. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-fourth 
day of June, 1857, an'asscssment of twenty dollars ($20) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock. of said Company, 
payable immediately in United tttales gold and silver coin, 
to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, No. 7uii 
Montgomery street, (room No. 4, 2d lloorj San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the twenty-filth day of July, 1867, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised lor sale 
at nubile auction, aim unless payment shall be made be- 
fore, will be sold 011 Monday, the twelfth day of August, 
1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses ol sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

T. W. COLBURN, Secretary. 

Office 706 Montgomery street, (Room No. 4, 2d floor) San 
Francisco, Cal. je'41 



Gold Quarry Company. Location of Worksi 

Placer Couuty, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that a meeting of the Stockhold- 
ers oflhe Gold Quarry Company will bo held In San Fran- 
olsOO, at the office of the Company, No. 706 Montgomery 
street. Room No. 4, second floor, on MONDAY, the twenty- 
ninth day of July, at 12 o'clock, noon, of that day, (or the 
purpose ot taking into consideration the increase of the 
Capital Stock of said Company, from the sum of six hund- 
red thousand dollars, divided into six hundrcn shares of 
$1,000 each, to the sum of two millions four hundred thou- 
sand dollars (S2,100,uUl). divided into twenty-four hundred 
(2,400) shares of on<; ihousaud dollars ($1,000) each. 

0. D. BOBBATS, 
A. C. PEACHY, 
L MAYNAKD, 

1. FREEBORN, 
E. WERTUEMAN, 

Trvilto 0/ the 

Go u* Quarry Company. 



T. W. CoLBcr..'*, Secretary. 
Sun Francisco, June 24ih, 1867. 



jc29 



Hope Gravel Mlnlntr Company,- Location of 
Worki aud Property: Grass Valley, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-sixth day 
of June, 1867, an assessment (No. 15) of one dollar ($1) per 
Share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately, in United States gold and silver 
com, to the Secretary, at i\o. 529 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any slock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirtieth day of July, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinn,ucnt, and will be duly advertised tor sale at public 
auction, and unless payment Khali be made before, will he 
sold on Monday, the nineteenth day of August, 1867, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board ol 
Trustees. 

DAVID WILDER. Secretary. 



Office. No. 529 Clay street. San Francisco, Cal. 



Jc29 



Hamcom Copper Mining- Company, Location 

Low Divide District, Del Norte Couuty, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twenty-first day of May, 1867, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows: 

Names. No. snares. Amount 

Washington Aycrs \% % 42 

J D C Beach 12jS 3 13 

A 11 Cummings \% 

Sarah A Callaghan S>| 83 

Eben Dud lev 2 60 

OciiKCluvas.: 100 25 00 

Simon Kuffs 80 20 o0 

Lewis iCelley 2 

R A Merrill 28% 7 17 

Jas Simpson 3& 2 43 

Emma Simpson UK 92 

IK While 16% 4 17 

AD Miller 25 6 25 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the twenty-first day of May, 1867. so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, at the salesroom of 
Badger & Chapman, Kearny street, corner of California 
street, San Francisco, on Monday, the eighth day July, 
1867, at the hour of 1 o'clock, P. M., of said day, to pay 
said delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

JOHN HANSCOM, Secretary. 

Office, at the -Etna Iron Works, Fremont street, between 
Howard and Folsom, San Francisco. Office hours: from 8 
A. M. to 12 M. je: 



I. X. L. Gold and Silver Mining Company,- Lo- 
cation of Mine: Silver Mountain District, Alpine Coun- 
ty, Cal. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board ol 
Trustees of said Company, held on the nineteenth day of 
June, 1667, an assessment of one dollar and fifty cents ($1.50 
per share Was levied upon the capital Etock of said Com 
panj*, payable Immediately in United Statesgold and silver 
coin, to the Secretary, at his office, in the store of J- G. 
Hodge A Co.. 418 and 420 Clay street, San Francisco, Cal., or 
to John G. Slaven, at Silver Mountain. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the nineteenth (19th) day of July, 1867, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Monday, the flfih day of August, 1867, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees, 

FRANK H. HAMILTON, Jr., Secretary. 
Office, 418 and 420 Clay street, Sail Francisco, je22 



Lady Bell Copper Mining Company, JLoiv JDI 

vide Mining District, Del Norte County, California, ; 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eighteenth day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of flflcen cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
immediately, in United States gold and silver coin, to the 
Secretary, or ip ,7. K. Johnson, at Crescent Cily. 

Anv stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
paid on the eighteenth nay of July, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless pavment >hall be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the tilth (5th) day of Aueust, 1867, to pav 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

B. P. WILKINS, Secretary pro tern. 

Office, 311 Markctstreet, San Francisco, Cal. je22 



Mount 1):» vldxon Gold and Silver Mlnlngr Com- 
pany, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twenty-second day of May, 1867, the several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Bush, Martin 3108 4>£ $4 50 

Burke, Thomas 3409 4 4 00 

Gibbons, P 2U0 10 10 00 

Luning, N 2234 lUJs 112 50 

Peterson, Geo C : j -305 50 60 00 

Peterson, Geo C 3357 30 30 00 

Peterson, Geo C 3310. 3348 10 ea 20 20 00 

Paul. James... 3327 20,) 200 00 

Paul James 3407 175 175 

Paul, James 3328 100 100 00 

Paul, James 3354, 3368 25 ea 10 50 00 

Rvchman, G W 3366 30 30 00 

Schenck, E P. Mrs 3320 4 4 00 

Van Reed, J H, Mrs 1856 10 10 00 

Vandcrvoort. J C 1849 4 4 00 

Whitney, Geo O 3237, 32SS5ca 10 10 00 

Walton, E M, Mrs 2 2 2 00 

Walton, E M, Mrs 703, 933 1 eft 2 2 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the twenty-second day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be ne- 
cessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. Duncan 
A Co., No. 406 Montgomery street, San Francisco, on the fif- 
teenth day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 o'clock M, of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, to- 
gether with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

Q. PARDOW, Becretary. 
Office, 121 Sutter street, San Francbtco, CaL Je29 



Xneitra Senora de Gnadelope Silver Ml 11 

Company. Location of Works: Tayoltita, San Din... 

District, Durango, Mexico. 

NoTica.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twentieth day of May, 1867, the several amounts set oppo- 
site the names q( the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

»! , l l u ' 1 1 1 k ' ril)nnn 35 10 S1000 

H Hellerimiun 44 20 20 00 

Mrs Elizabeth Nolting 1SI 49 49 00 

II A Roealcr 6i ft 6 00 

9 ""'f' 1 , -••■■• it» 10 1000 

John L Miniii \y$ in 1(J yn 

J H Schluter 83 5 5 uq 

L vjii Lnak bO 10 10 00 

L v " ' Leak 93 lo lu 00 

rormerlv uuas»essable stock- 

II Schumacher us 6 6 00 

J H Schluter U6 6 6 00 

And tn accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
ot Trustees, made on the twentieth day of May, 1867. so 
many shares or each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. Badger 
& Chapman, northwest corner of California aud Kearny 
streets, San Francisco, on Wednesday, the tenth day of 
July, 1867, atthc hour of 2 o'clock P. M. of said day, to pay 
said delinquent assessment thereon, together with costs of 
advertising aud expenses of sale. 

E. J. PFEIFFER, Secretary. 

Office. No. 210Poststreet San Francisco, Cal. Je22 

Scatoa Mlnlue Company. — Location of Worku 

Drytown, Amador County. California. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-eighth day 
of May, 1867, an assessment of enc hundred dollars per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able July 6th, 1867. in United Statesgold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, at his office No. 60 Exchange Building, San Fran- 
clseo. California. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain tin. 
pnid on the eighth day of Julv, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, nnd will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless paviuenl shall be made before, will bo 
sold on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of July, 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs ot ad- 
vertising aud expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

JOEL F. LIGHTNER. Secretary. 

Office, No. 60 Exchange Huilding, San Francisco. 

San Francisco, May 28, 1867. jel 



St. JLoala Silver Mlnlncr Company, Cortoz Dis- 
trict, Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the fourth 
day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the names 
of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Shares. Amount. 

Baldwin, John E 60 $115 00 

Berrv, Henrv 10 20 00 

Cassell, John F 3 15 00 

Chenery, Richard 75 376 00 

De.Witt.WL 5 25 00 

Hathaway, B VV 75 375 00 

Howard, George 50 I0U 00 

Uawxhursf, Robert SI 155 00 

Jones, Rowland 6 10 Oo 

Kibbc, HC 5 2rt 00 

Land, C B 70 350 00 

Lagerman.HW 10 20 00 

Macpherson, A W 30 150 00 

Moore, J Preston 116 275 00 

Powell.Elijah 75 225 00 

Passmore, W 6 25 00 

Pratt. WE S 25 00 

Russell, George 79 C81 00 

Thomas, G W 5 25 00 

Taylor, John 6 26 00 

Whitney, James 6 25 90 

Wenban, Simeon 1212 782 40 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the fourth day of May, 1857, so many 
shares of each parcel of said stock as may be pceessary, 
will be sold at public auction, at the salesroom of Maurice 
Dore & Co., No. 327 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., 
on Tuesday, the second day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, noon, of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex 
pensea of sale. 

R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 
Office, 331 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Jel6 

Postponement.— The above sale is hereby postponed until 
Monday, ,the 29th day of July, 1867, at the same hour and 
place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

je29 ' R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 

Sophia Consolidated Gold nnd Silver Minlnar 

Company, Tuolumne County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day 
June, 1867, an assessment of three dollars ($3) per sharo 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately, In United States gold and silver coin, to 
the Secretary, at the office, No. 641 Washington street. San 
Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on Thursday, the eleventh day of July, 1867, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Friday, the twenty-slxlh day of July, 
1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

DAVID E. JOSEPH!, Secretary. 

Office, 641 Washington street, San Francisco. jeI5 

Whit larch Gold nnd Silver Mining Company. 

Lander County, Nevada- 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held 011 the twenty- first day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of fifteen dollars (S15) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
on or before the second day of August, 1867, In United States 
currency, to the Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. 

Anystock upon whichsnldasscssmentshallremain unpaid 
on the second dav of August, 1867, shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will be'duly advertised tor sale at public auction, 
and unless payment shall be made before, will be sold 
on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of September. 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 
Office, N. E. cornet Front and Clay streets. San Francisco. 

C^»At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, 1S67, Ihe order levying assessment (No. 7) made Febru- . 
ary 14th, 1867, was rescinded. 

je29 • N. 0. FASSETT, Secretary. 



Olnet &. Co., Auctioneers and Real Estate Agents, attend 
promptly to all business entrusted to their care In San 
Francisco and Oakland. Mining and other corpora'tona 
will find Col. Olney well posted and thorough in transacting 
ales of delinquent stock. Office, on Broadway, Oakland, 
and No. 318 Montgomery street, San Francisco. uolO 



Important to Calllornlana.— Many inventors have 
lately had their claims for Patents seriously (and in some 
cases fatally)delayed by the unqualiflcation of agents who 
have not compiled with the Government license and revenue 
laws, as well as other new and imperative regulations. 
These discrepancies, although arising from the inexperienca 
of honest agents, are nonetheless dangerous to applicants 
for patents, whoso safest course is to trust their business 
with none but active and experienced solicitors. The Mut- 
md Aisn Scientific Press Patent AGEMcrhas strictly com- 
plied with the requisitions of the Department, and properly 
filed all necessary papers as Claim Agents. 



14 



%\u pitting vaA $&mKxi\t §vm. 



Machinery. 



STEWART'8 ' 

CELEBRATED H I IV G E » 

Grindei* and Amalgamator. 




Is the Cheapest and Quickest Pan 



-Now used. It isnat-bortomed, loses far less power In thro 
Ing the nulp, and circulates the same under the inuller to 
better advantage tnau any other Pan" in use, while the 
steam, owing to the thinness of the cone, has a more direct 
effecL In heating liie pulp. E is the inuller plate; Fthe 
Grinding Shoe, attached bv an adjustable hinge joint in the 
middle of the same— the bottom wearing down even with 
the dies. 

Mr. J. tl. STEWART, the inventor, has had ten years o' 
experience in mechanical operations, and may be addressed 
at San Francisco, or called -.m at the Miners' Foundry, First 
Btreet, where hit Pan is manufactured, and is to be seen at 
any lime in operation. 3vlitf 



VABNETS 

PATENT AMALGAMATOR. 

These Machines Stand Unrivaled. 

For rapldlv pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort ha3 been, or will be, spared to 
have them constructed in the most perfect manner, and of 
the- great number now in operation, not one has everre- 
quircd repairs. The constant and increasing demand for 
them is sufficient evidence of their merits. 

They ure constructed so as to apply steam directly into 
the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows : 

The pan being filled, the motion of the muller forces the 
polp to the center, where it is drawn down through the ap- 
erture and between the grinding surfaces. Thence it is 
thrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. The curved 
plates again draw it to" the center, where it passes down, 
and to the circumference as before. Thus it is constantly 

Classing in a regular flow between the grinding surfaces and 
nto the quicksilver, until the ore is reduced to an impalpa- 
ble powder, and the metal amalgamated. 

Sellers made on the same principle excel all others.— 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in contact 
with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
plctely absorbed. 

Mill men are invited to examine these pans and setters for 
themselves, at the PACIFIC FOUNDRY, 

lvl San Francisco. 



FOR. Si-AJLJE! 




PATENT EIGHT OF 

HUNT'S WINDMILL for the 
State of California or the whole 
Pacific coast. 

This Mill is superior to any 
other, can be built cheaper, and 
Is more durable. 

Full sets of patterns for four 
sizes Self-Regulating Mills, and 
three sizes of Adjustable Mills, 
will he sold with the right. 

This Windmill has been exten- 
sively advertised all over this 
coast, and is iavorably known. 

Apply to 

E. O. HUNT, 
E3S SECOND STREET. 

San Francisco 



P^$, 11T24 



NELSON & DOBLE, 



AGENTS FOR 

Thomas Firth & Sons' Cast Steel, Files, 

Etc., Shear, Spring, German, Flow, Blister and Toe Calk 

Steel: manufacturers of 

Mill Piclts, Sledges, Hammers, Picfcs, 

Stone Cutters*, Blacksmiths' and Horse-Shoers' Tools, 

319 ani 321 Pine street, 

Between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. 

luvUqr 



SAN FEAN0IS00 BETJSH FAOTOEY, 

No. 211 California st_, manufactures to order all kinds of 

B R XT S H E S, 

At lower prices than cost of Eastern importation. Brushes 
for all classes of ftiachiucry. A superior Scrubbing Brush 
from Soap Root fiber; aNo. Sluice Brushes from the same 
material. The Patent Rattan, Street. Stable, Flue and 
Flume Brush, for which thev have the exclusive right 
for the l'acittc Coast. 

All orders from the interior promptly executed. 

FELDMAN, SI.Ml'SOX <fc CO^ 

lGvUqr. ProprlWors. 



To Quartz Miners and Others. 



I 



NOTICE ! 

WISH TO CALL YOUR ATTENTION TO A PTJLVER- 
izer of my own invention, which I have called the 

H1TCHENS 1 ORE PULVERIZER. 

It-Is now in operation at the South Park Saw Mill, on 
Br an ii a i) street, between Third and Fourth streets. lam 
prepared to reduce, to an impalpable powder, quartz, sul- 
phurets, tailings, cement, manganese, charcoal, sands, mar 
ble, plumbago, copper ores, etc. 

In view of the Importance of reducing oreB, etc., to 
an impalpable powder, and being satisfied my invention to 
be a perfect success, I Invito all interested In the subject, 
examine it. agj- Patent applied for. -ffis 

IvH-sm JAMES HITCIIENS. 



Brodie's Patented Improvements 




FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

Gold and Silver Ores, 

BRODIE'S PATENTED IMPROVED QUARTZ CRUSHER. 
The attention of all interested in Mining is respect- 
fully called to this Improved Machine for Breaking or 
Spalling Quartz, or other Rock, possessing, as it does, sim- 
plicity of action and lightness of construction, po larasis 
compatible with strength and durability. Inconsequence 
of these advantages, the advertisers are enabled to offer 
these machines to the public at the folio wine low terms: 
No. 1— Or .0-inch Crusher, capable of reducing from 
three to four tons of quartz per hour, no piece be- 
ing larger than a walnut— price SCOO 

No. 2— Or 15-inch Crusher, capable of similarly putting 

through live to six tons per hour 850 

No. 3— Or lS-inch Crusher, will in a similar manner 

crush from seven to eight tons per hour 1,200 

EXPLANATION OF TUB ABOVE ENGRAVING. 

The frame is made of cast iron, bound with heavy 
wroueht iron bands, making it very strong, and at the same 
limelight and portable. The crusher is bolted to a wood 
frame of sufficient high! to clear the flv-whtel. and allow 
the crushed quartz to pass off. The dotted lines show the 
movable and stationary jaws. Letter A represents the 
eccentric shalt bv which the power is applied direct to the 
movable jaw. B represents the movable jaw, and C the 
fixed jaw. D represents the link or radius bar. E repre- 
sents the bolts for regulating the opening. F, which can be 
regulated at pleasure, so as to graduate to the size to which 
it is intended the quartz shall be crushed. O represents the 
feed opening, by which the size of the machine is desig- 
nated. 

' The arrow on the fly-wheel shows the direction to drive 
the eccentric, which, in combination with the link, D, gives 
the movabiejaw, B. a forward and down warn" motion atthe 
sj".me time, and which makes the hardestrock yield and 
separate into fragments of any desired size. 

The above Crushers have been recently erected and arc 
now successfully- employed at Bear Valley, Mariposa conn- 
ty, Rawhide Ranch. Tuolumne county, Excelsior Mine. 
Lake District, Nevada county, and can be s^en in opera- 
tion at the Fulton Foundry, First street. San Francisco. 

The following testimonial respecting the effectiveness of 
this Crusher, has been received from" the Superintendent 
of the "Rawhide Ranch" Mine, in Tuolumne Countv: 
Rawhiok Ranch, Tuolumne Co., Sept. 28, ISfi6. 

James BRoniE, Esq., San Francisco— My Dour Sir: It gives 
me pleasure to inform you that I have for the past three 
months had one of your largest sized Rock Crushersin 
use, atthe Rawhide Ranch Mining Company's Mill, which 
his entirely met my expectations: and I have no hesita- 
tion in recommending it to all who are in need of a machine 
for rapidlv. cheaplv and properly preparing quartz tor the 
stamps. Yours truly, R. P. JOHNSON,' 

Supt. Rawhide Ranch Quartz Mill. 

BRODIE'S PATENT IMPROVED GERMAN AMALGA- 
MATING BARREL.— This Barrel obtained a premium at 
the Fair of tne Mechanics' Institute in San Francisco, in 
1864. Further particulars will be aftorded on application 
to the subscribers. 

Those infringing the patent rights to the above improved 
Barrel, are hereby informed that on and after the 1st No 
vember, IPC6. the rovaltv charted for using the same will 
be raised to the Fuim'of SldO per Barrel. 

A diagram, with explanations of this machine, will be 
found in the "Mining and Scientific Press," of September 
29th, 1836 

BRODIE'S PATENT WIND-BLAST SEPARATOR FOR 
DRY CRUSHING— This Dry Cru-her has been found the 
most economical and effective mode of crushing ores in 
Mexico, California and Nevada Diasrams and explana- 
tions afforded on application to the subscribers. 

A drawing and full description of this machine will be 
round in the Mining and Scientific Press of Sent. 22d. 1866. 
BliODlE A RADCIIPF, 
Express Building. 402 Montgoinerv street, 

12v]3tf San Frnncisco. 



LEFFEL'S 

American Double Turbine 




THESE WHEELS, UNEQUALED AND TJNRIYALED IK 
the United States or the world, have been fully tested 
on this coast, more than forty being in use ar this date in 
California and Oregon, driving all kinds of machinery. Saw 
Mills, Flour Mills, Quartz Mills, etc., etc., etc. 

California Bkferkkcks.— E. Stocton. Folsom ; O. Sim- 
mons, Oakland, (Mill at Clear Lake); Morean Ooville, Lex- 
ington, Santa Clara County; J. Y. McMillan, Lexington 
Santa Clara County. aa»Seim for Circular, to 

KNAFP A GEA\T, 
Agents for California. 
26vl3-lyq SIO Washington street, San Francisco 



§*85 ior Hunter's 

Improved Concentrator. 

The patentee is prepared to sell his Concentrators for 
the above price, and guarantees, when the machines are 
run according to directions, to give 20 per cent better re- 
sults than irora any Concentrator built on this Coast, and 
will refund the money if they will not perform what is 
claimed for them. Machines with copper plates, will cost 
510 extra. The Machine can he 

Seen. in. Operation " 
At Booth i'Co's Union Foundry, up stairs. Parties pur- 
chasing Concentrators will do well to examine beiore buy- 
ing others of pretended merit Persons desiring it can have 
a practical concentration made of tailings at any time, and 
prove the working of the machine. 

FOK, $50. 

HTTXTER'S EVREKA AMALGAMATOR. 

For sale, the right to build and use in mills. A working plan 
will be furnished each purchaser. Five machines can be 
seen in operation at the Eureka Mill, Grass Valley. The 
cost of the ironsforthe machine, without the iron-box, Is 
about Slut). The box will answer of wood. 

By reference to the Mining and Scicniifilc Press of May 
25th, a full description of the above Machines-may befound. 

For particulars, send for Circulars, or address 
ANDREW HUNTER, 

SSvlitf Union Foundry. San Francisco. 



Hunt's Globe Pump 




Is extensively employed for raising .water by hand or wind 
mill power, ior house or garden uses. I manufacture five 
sizes, irom 3 to 8 inches diameter in the chamber. These 
Pumps are all fuud for iron or lead pipes. They are very 
durable and easy to repair. 

Ko. S— 3 inch Chamber, 6-inch Stroke. 

jVo. 4— 3>2-inc)i Chamber, C-inch Stroke. 

So. S— 4-inch Chamber, 6-inch Stroke. 

No. 6— 5 inch Chamber, 8-inch Stroke. 

No. 7-6 inch Chamber, lu-jnch Stroke. 
Manufactured at No. -8 Second street, and 110 Jessie 
street, San Francisco, by E. 0. HUNT, Windmill Builder. 
S2vHtf 



HEALTH! HEALTH! 




To prevent this, purchase one of 

Taylor's Stench Traps and Garbage 
Baskets, 

And promote fhe health, comfort and cleanliness of roar 
family. (For description sec Mining and Scientific Press, 
April 6, 1P6T.1 Sold wholesale and retail bv TAYLOR £ 
SONS, at No. 42l> Pacific street, San Francisco. 15vl4tf 



THE CEJLEBKATED 

Self Generating Portable 
Gas Ltjiiip. 



This extraordinary Lamp pro- 
duces its own yas by the valor- 
ization of Petroleum, Naplnha, 
or Benzine. It emits neither 
smoke norstnfcii. and liurm-wiih 
a pure while tliinie, equal in in- 
tensity to an ordinary -'as burn- 
er, and at an expense ul from one 
to three cenls per hour only, ac- 
cording lo the quantity ol light 
required. It Is peculiarly adap- 
ted ipr mining purposes, also lor 
stores, lactones, billiard rooms, 
and. In fact, tor all purposes 
where regular pas Is not availa- 
ble, and lor which it is an ad- 
mirable substitute.. As an oat- 
dmr light It stands unrivalled, 
burning with u mil mln Ished bril- 
liancy in a strong wind. 



.Directions for Use. 

Charge the reservoir with the prepared fluid, or with 
Benzine, from half to three-fourths full: allow a portion to 
run through Into the cup, then turn off the tap and ignite 
the fluid, which will beat the burner sufficiently to gener- 
ate the ga6. which will be seen issuing from the top. The 
tan must now he turned on, and a steady llghtwill he main- 
tained till the whole ol the contents of the reservoir 13 con- 
sumed. 

A small needle, bent at the point and fixed in a holder, 
may be occasionally required to clear the minute hole 
through which the gas issues, and the regulating screw at 
the bottom turned a little bade: but care mustbe taken not 
to force the screw too high, and it should nerer le wed to 
extinguish the light— by turni}ifj the tap uff, it will gradually 
go out. 

When necessary to renew the cotton which is placed in 
the lower pipe, to prevent the too rapid flow of the fluid, the 
lamp should be placed in a vise and the burner screwed off 
The' burnt cotton must then be withdrawn, and a fresh 
piece of siout cotton rag, one inch wide and lour or five 
inches long, should he doubled over a piece of aire, and 
inserted into the pipe— the ends cut short off, the burner 
again screwed on with a little white lead, and the lamp is 
ready for use. 

Manufactured solely by JOHN J. HUOKS. original propri- 

etor. Factory, North Beach. San Francisco: and for sale 

by hifl agents In every citv and town throughout the State. 

lSvU-SrC 



Business of the Patent Office. 

The issue of patents for the week ending 
May 28, embraces 289 new inventions, 11 re- 
issues and 2 designs, making a total of 302. 
This is by far the largest number ever issued 
for a single week, though not the largest 
issued on one day. The total issue of Jan- 
uary 1, 1867, was 360, but that was for two 
weeks preceding that date. The business 
of the Patent Office is, generally speaking, 
very much in arrears. There are applica- 
tions which have now lain there nearly ten 
months without any official action— a fact 
very vexatious to inventors. The complaints 
of inventors and their attorneys appear to 
be of no avail ; in fact, it is impossible for 
the Commissioner, under the present state 
of things, to • do much in the way of their 
improvement. There seems to be an "irre- 
pressible conflict " going on between certain 
officials, which is quite fully ventilated, as 
follows, by the New York Herald: 

A controversy has been going on for the 
past few weeks in the Department of the In- 
terior, between the Commissioner of Pa- 
tents and the Commissioner of Pensions, 
in reference to the rooms occupied by the 
clerks of their respective bureaus in the 
Patent Office. The difficulty seems to be 
thoroughly uncompromising in its charac- 
ter. Neither of them show any disposition 
to yield, and meanwhile the business of the 
Patent Office is falling behind to such an 
extent that it will require a very long time 
before it can be transacted within a reason- 
able time after its reception. Congress, 
before it adjourned, authorized the Com- 
missioner of Patents to appoint several 
additional examiners and clerks. These 
appointments Mr. Theaker declines to make, 
for the reason that there is not sufficient 
room in the limits to which his bureau is 
prescribed to accommodate the increase of 
force, so that if appointed, they would be 
on the rolls of the Department and drawing 
pay, while they would be unable to perform 
their duties. In this action the Commis- 
sioner has .the approval of the Secretary of 
the Interior. It is understood that Con- 
gress, soon afier the erection of the build- 
ing, passed a resolution, one clause of which 
was that no part of the Patent Office build- 
ing Bhould be used by any other depart- 
ment or bureau than the Patent Office. 
The resolution was passed on the third of 
March before it was engrossed, and when it 
came in engrossed for approval, the clause 
above mentioned was not included. Secre- 
tary McClellan, who was then Secretary of 
the Interior, moved his office into the build- 
ing in the spring of 1853, and was soon fol- 
lowed by the Indian Bureau, Land Office, 
Pension Office and Agricultural Depart- 
ment. It is not a little singular that the 
Secretary of the Interior does not interpose 
his authority to decide the vexed question. 
A portion of the Pension clerks are now 
occupying a separate building, and there is 
no good reason apparent why the jrest of 
the bureau should not do likewise. One 
objection urged against renting a building 
for the Pension Office was that Congress 
had made no appropriation to pay the rent. 
To this Mr. Theaker replied that so great 
was his desire to obtain the space requisite 
for the office, that the interests of inventors 
might not be prejudiced, he would pay the 
rent of a building for the Pension Office out 
of the Patent Office fund until Congress 
made an appropriation for the purpose. 
The Commissioner of Patents is convinced 
that something must speedily be done to 
give the office greater space. The business 
of the Patent Office is increasing to a sur- 
prising extent. The number of new patents 
granted in the week ending May 28, was 
302. The number to be granted in the 
week ending on the 4th instant is 223, and 
the number in the week ending on the 11th 
instant is 271. Caveats, that rarely ever 
exceeded the number of two or three hun- 
dred a year, in 1866 numbered 1,000, and 
this year will run up to 2,700. In 1864 the 
number of applications received for new 
patents was about 6,000. In 1865, the num- 
ber was 9,000. In 1866, it was 15,000, and 
if the present activity continues, the num- 
ber of new patents applied for this year will 
reach 25,000. 



A New Scakeceow. — A member of the 
American Institute, suggests as the best 
scarecrow to keep birds from cherry trees, 
strawberry beds, etc., the stuffed skin of a 
cat, with big glass eyes. The position of the 
effigy should be changed every day, or the 
birds will find out that it is a dummy. As 
the material for its construction is plentiful, 
would it not be well for some of our gardens 
and orchards to try it, and report the result. 



©he pining and £*fcntifw §tows. 



15 



An Opes Field fob Isttestoes. — Engi- 
neering, after speaking of inventions, closes 
its remarks by pointing out to inventors 
■what is yet before them. It says i 

Who can reflect upon the almost immeas- 
urable forces of solar heat and lunar attrac- 
tion exorcised daily upon our planet, and 
with visible results, without hoping, and 
indeed to some extent believing, that human 
ingenuity will yet find means for penetrating 
nearer and yet nearer to these tremendous 
mysteries of nature, and turn them into new 
channels for the good of man ? With count- 
less millions of tons of hydrogen in the sea 
and of oxygen in the air, shall we not yet 
find means to burn the very waters of the 
globe, and literally set the river on fire? 
With millions of tons of carbon in the earth, 
shall weliot yet convert it, by some means, 
into palatable and wholesome food ? And 
shall we not yet find cheaper and readier 
means of converting the vast stores of vege- 
table fiber, with which naturo abounds, into 
comely clothing, than by the present infini- 
tesimal spinning and weaving of thousands 
of yards of yarn to form a single yard of 
cloth ? That we may yet navigate the air is 
hardly less likely now than was the naviga- 
tion of the sea by steam seventy years ago. 

Future invention must give us cheaper 
food, cheaper clothing, and cheaper lodg- 
ing. Past invention has not sufficiently 
secured these, and the condition of trade 
and of society is now such that the majority 
of the population, even when working al- 
most continuously, can gain but a decent 
subsistence, without any practical advance 
upon their daily necessities. 

The Engineer thinks that agriculture pre- 
sents a wide field, especially for the chemist. 
It believes that the future must look for a 
highly scientific and artificial agriculture. 
The present capacity of the soil ought to be 
fully doubled by the aid of science and art. 



Flame is one of the most beautiful things 
in the world. Not a sunset sky in summer, 
not a blown tropic-flower, is more brilliant 
han flame ; flame is the flower of fire. The 
ivy has no splendor like the mantling flame; 
it reddens like the thyrsus of the goi 

Coal. — A company has been formed in 
Santa Cruz for the purpose of prospecting 
for coal on the San Lorenzo, where there 
are said to be indications that it exists. 



Quartz Mill Construction and Superintendence 

The undersigned is at present open for an 
encaifumciH as a working Superintendent In tlie coil- 
•trucum or operation nl'u /u:vrtz Mill, lias had five years 
steady and successful experience In working ores in Washoe, 
and Is practiced in saving sulphurcts and the treatment of 
rebellious ores 1^ prei'urcd to furnish references for a'l 
the ncces-ary qualifications of an intelligent, faithful and 
reliable quartz operator. Address F.M.SHAW. 

San Francisco, care Mining and Scientific Press. 26vllam 



CUT TSTA.ILS. 

3,000 KEGS ASSORTED SIZES, 

For sale la any quantity, to close Invoice, at the very 
Loweit Bates, by 

THOS. H. SELBY k CO., 

110 and 118 California. Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 19vl4 3m 



To the Mining Community. 

TnE UNDERSIGNED, WHO HAS HAD THIRTY YEARS 
constant practice In superintending mines, la now pre- 
pared tn inspect tind repnrt on Mincsand Mining Properties 
and iidvise as io the management of the same. Otllce, 851 
Harrison street, San Francisco 

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, 
16vHqr Practical Mining Eugineor. 



INTotioe to Miners, 

Well-Borers and Water Companies. 

MFRAO is now prepared to manufacture 
• Hvdraullc and Artesian Well Pipes in the best work- 
manlike manner, and at the lowest market rates. Having 
made large additions to my -stock of machinery for that 
branch of business. I am prepared to fill all ordtrs with dis- 

fatch. and guarantee entire satisfaction. I also mnnufac- 
ure Mississippi Stoves, nf the latest improved patterns, fur 
vessels of all classes. Also, Ship r" lumping done. 

''H. I'HAG, 
8vl3-ly Stove Store. No. 12fi Clay street, below Davis. 

Pratt's Abolition Oil. 

FOR ABOLISHING PAIN — THE REST REMEDY IN 
existence for Rheumatism, Neuralgia. Paralysis, Head- 
ache, Toothache. WoreThiuat, Dlptlieria. Weak, Swolen and 
Stiff Joints. Contracted Cords and Muscles, Cramps, Colic, 
Diarrhoea, Cholera, Pains In the Breast, Lame Back, and 
all aches and pain 4 *. It Is the poor man's friend, and the 
best family physician. Full directions accompany each 
bottle. Price 60 cents and $1 per bottle. For sale by all 
dealers In medicines. Sole Proprietors, A, McBOYLE & 
CO., DrngKiMts and Chemists, RiH Sacramento street, op- 
posite What Cheer House, San Francisco, lOvU-ly 



GOVERNMENT HOUSE, 

Corner of San some and Washington sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MTHE STREET CARS PASS THIS HOUSE IN 
every direction, every ten minutes. 
The rooms of the House are well furnished, large 
nndairy, are let by the month, week or day, and are 
Kepi in superb order. There Is a Restaurant attached for 
ladles and families, where rjersnna can board lor one-half 

SANBORN & CO 



HIiSTKLE & CAPP'S 
CENTRIFUGAL ORE GRINDER AND AMALGAMATOR. 



Putcnt (luted April 16tb, 18G7. 




For Grl mil ng and Amalgamating 



For Grinding and DincHursing Contin- 
uously. 



< hurgcH of Or«*. 



Arranged as shown lu the second engraving, all ihe Intc- 
rlor grinding parts being the same as shown in flrsi view, 

this pan is adapted for receiving and grinding and dls- 

Arranged hh shown in the first engraving, the pan is charging continuously crushed quartz as fast as supplied 

adapted forgrinding and amalgamating separate charges b - v il nve-Btttnip battery, with No. 4 or a screens. A "alum- 

of ore of 8U> «,» ..Ob. uoln g .<* work rapidly, thoroughly ggg .OT^&XX'&.Sl SJ&U lMffi 

aud effectually. battery. 



This sectional engraving ex- 
hibits more clearly the arrange 
ment and j-hapo of the grind- 
ing parts of the machine. It, 
and the other engravings, will 
be more clearly understood by 
reference to the accompany- 
ing explanation. 




Explanation. — E, muller- 
han^cr F, m tiller plato or 
shoe. G, side dies. I, sup- 
porting lip D, bearing sue 
face, r, feeder. X, weight to 
counter-balance wear ot mul- 
ler plates, or siioes. U, eover 
used in working charges of 
ore- The dark shade on the 
bottom of the pan represents 
one of the grooves for mer- 
cury. 



Half Section or Top View. 



The Centrifugal Ore Grinder. 



This new GRINDER and AMALGAMATOR is extremely 
simple and compact In Its construction. The principle 
availed of Is entirely novel. The grinding is effected by 
perpendicular mullers, pressed laterally by centrifugal 
torce asainst perpendicular Iron dies, fitted to the inner 
sides of the pan. It Is to be run at a speed of from 60 to 80 
revolutions per minute, according to the- hardness of 
the rock to be crushed. The pressure upon every part of 
the grinding surfaces Is direct and uniform, and they wear 
with straight and true faces from first to last, comformlng 
also to the shape of the sides of the pan, so that the work 
performed with old mullers find plates is as thorough and 
perfect as with new ones. The pulp enters readily between 
the mullers and side dies, the pressure being light in front 
and heaviest at the heel of the nniller, there is no strain 
upon anv of the parts, and no lialiillty to breakage or dis- 
arrangement, nnd no wear except that which is useful on 
the grinding surfaces. The workdone isnerformed without 
jarring, jerking, straining or clogging, with extreme iegu- 
and evenness, the pulp being of great and uniform fine- 
ness. It Is not liable to be clogged, nor to be obstructed, 
stopped, impeded or broken, by conrse pieces of rock, 
pick points or iron, accidentally Introduced with the 
crushed ore, as these can readily pass each muller sep- 
arately, without Interfering with or affecting the other 
mullers, ench of which is independent, or can rest upon 
ihe bottom below the mullers, without Inconvenience, as 
the arms play freely an inch above the bottom of the pan. 

It is more readily cleaned up than any other pan, as each 
mullcr can be lilted out separately by hand, and there is no 
necessity for lilting the revolving cone or driver, which is 
also casilv turned, there lieinir no friction when not in use, 
or rapid revolution. The huJk of the mercury is not ground 
up with the rock, but lies below the. lower ends of the mul- 
lers In a groove, -and in another groove on the cover of the 
nan, where all the pulp and metal passes continually over 
It without cutting or carrying It away. The mullers and side 



dies are easily removed at uny time, or when worn out, 
and an extra set of mullers is tarnished with each pan sold. 
It is also adapted tor grinding cement, sulphurets, roasted 
ores, eic. 

We claim all these advantages for our Fan, and that it 
will do more and better work, with lew power, and less at- 
tention and manual labor, more rapidly and with less ex- 
pense, than any other pan or mullcr made for the same 
purposes, and claimed to be of equal or grt-aier capacity. 
\Vo will sell them tor use on condition that it, when fairly 
tried they fail to answer those promises, they may be re- 
turned. 

For full description and Illustration, see Mining and Sci- 
entific Press, June 16, 1B67. 

Hinkle & Capp's Centrifugal Ore' Grinder 
and Amalgamator 

May be seen in operation, and examined, at the European 
Metallurgical Works, on Bryant, between Third and Fourth 
streets, Sun Francisco, where all interested m mining and 
milling operations arc invited to inspect it. Its weight, as 
arranged for continuous grinding and.discharge, with exira 
set of six mullers, is about 2,700 lbs.; or as arranged for 
grinding anil amalgamating single charges of 800 lbs. of ore, 
also with extra set of mullers, about 3,000 lbs. Frice, as 
above, completely fitted and ready for use, either way, 
$500, gold coin. 

For further particulars, apply by letter to PHILIP HIN- 
KLE and CHARLES S. CAPP, No. 5t3 Clay street, below 
Montgomery, San Francisco, Cal. or personally to the above, 
orS. P. KIMBALL, Esq., at the European Metallurgical 
Works, on Bryantstreet, between Third and Fourth streets', 
or at the Miners' Foundry, First street, near Folsom. where 
they are manufactured. 

ttJfSend for Circulars. 

PHILIP HINKLE. and 
CHARLES s. CAPP, Patentees, 

23vl4-tf 513 Clay street, San Francisco. 



'3 

■M 



o ■** 




fflBJ&£ s &4. 



N. P. LANCLAND, 

STAIR BUILDER, 

No. 49 Real Rtreet, 

Between Market and Mission, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

10vH-ly 




Steam Pumps, 

FOR DRAINING MINES OR ELEVATING WATER TO 
ANY EIGHT. 

PICKERING'S GOVERNORS 

For Steam Engines. 

GiJSfiavti's Injectors, 

For Feeding Boilers. 

STODDART'S IRON WORKS, 



BLAKE'S QUARTZ BREAKER ! 
PRICES REDUCED! 

MACHINES OF ALL SIZES FOR SALE 
— BY — 

WI. P. BLAKE, . 

Corner First and Mission utreets, or ISox S.OT7 

3vl3f SAN FRANCISCO. 



Median ical DDra-wings- 

Persons wishing Mechanical Drawings can obtain tho 
services of competent draughtsmen, by applying to this 
office. 



QUARTZ MINERS, MILLMEN, 

And others contemplating the erection of Reduction 
Works, for either Gold or Silver Ores, your attention is 
called to a new, superior 

First Class Mill, 

In all respects, with Pans and Separators complete. The 
Mill is adapted for 29 or 40 Stamps. 
ugrFull particulars may be had by calling on Messrs. 
Palmer, Knox & Co., Golden State Foundry, or 

tf. it. JUTOHCOOK, 
19vH-3m Millwright, Russ House. 




DUDGEON'S 

PATENT 

Hydraulic Lifting Jacks 

— AND— 

oileb i»tj:in"c:hl:e©, 

16vli Eighth street, cor. Minna. qr 



Portable Steam Engines ! 

M Hoadley*«" and •' Hltttucer'**' Make, 




HOADLEY'8. 
FOUR SIZES, 

8, 10, 12, and 15-Horse Power, 




3 to 40-Horse Power. 




IHTTINGEIft'S. 
THREE SIZES, 

6, 7, and 10-Horse Power 




HITTITVGJEXt'ie. 
TWO SIZES, 

5 and 7-Horse Power, 



COMBINING TEE MAXIMUM OF EFFICIENCY, DUR- 
ablilty, and Economy, with the Minimum of weight 
and price. 

These Engines are favorably known, a large number 
being tn use on this coast for hoisting, pumping, threshing, 
milling and mining purposes 

Steam can be got up on these Engines in fifteen minutes 
after reachine the place of operation, and the lime, expense 
of setting boilers, machinery, nnd '-construction, account" 
saved, (which is often the difference between the successful 
and unsuccessful prosecution of milling enterprises,) tn 
fact, the portable principle is the pioneer's friend, and ena- 
bles him to draw engines on their own wheels to ills cabin 
door, and plant on the outermost confines of civilization 
the saw and gristmill, and if has done and w;|] do more 
to help subdue the comment than any other of the modern 
motors which are crowding society and normalizing tb« 
world. ,,, . 

All sizes on hand from 3 to SO horse power, with and 
without carringes. 

Also, Portable Saw and Grist Mil's. 
For sale by TBE1DWELL A CO., 



9vl4-6mlflp 



Corner of Front and Marfcet street* 



16 



Wm pitting m& Mmtiik |m 



New Books. 

The Cai/Itoknia Dioest of Masonic Law, 
containing the Old Charges and Eegula- 
tions of 1720 ; the Constitution and Gen- 
eral Regulations of the Grand Lodge of 
California, as amended to 1866, etc., etc. 
Collated by Lorenzo G. Xates, Deputy 
Grand Lecturer, etc. 

This work makes up a volume of 236 
pages, neatly printed upon beautiful paper. 
In addition to the subject matter given in 
the title page, the work also contains the 
Constitution of the Grand Chapter ; Eules 
of Order of. the Grand Chapter; List 
of Subordinate Chapters; List of Past 
Grand Officers; Constitution of Grand Coun- 
cil ; List of Subordinate Councils ; Statutes 
and Eules of Order of Grand Commandery;- 
Subordinate Commanders and List of Past 
Grand Officers of Grand Commanderies; 
Digest of Decisions of Grand Masters, etc., 
etc. The Grand Master, Gilbert B. Clai- 
borne, whose opinion of such a work ought 
to be conclusive as to its merits, in a note to 
the collator speaks of it as follows: "I 
have cursorily examined the MS. of Bro. L. 
G. Xates' Digest of the Jurisprudence of 
Masonry in this Jurisdiction, under the 
Constitution of 1859, and have no doubt it 
will prove useful and valuable to the mem- 
bers of the Fraternity, as a book of refer- 
ence. If he concludes to publish it, he will 
please send five copies to my address." 
For sale by D. Appleton & Co. , of this city. 

Bean's Histoet and Dibectoky of Nevada 
County, CaIiD?oksita : Containing a com- 
plete history of the county, with sketches 
of the various towns and mining camps, 
the names and occupation of residents ; 
also, full statistics of mining and all other 
industrial resources. Compiled by Edwin 
y. Bean, Nevada. Printed at the Daily 
Gazette Office. 

The above comprises a volume of over 400 
pages, and forms the most thorough and 
complete digest of the kind which has yet 
appeared of any mountain county in the 
State. The work has been prepared with 
great care, and the typography of the book 
is highly creditable. The historical sketch 
of the county, comprising also its natural 
history, mineral productions, etc., is very 
full. Separate historical sketches, with di- 
rectories, are given for each township. Pro- 
fessor Silliman has furnished an able and 
interesting paper on the mineral district of 
Grass Valley. Nevada county has long 
been recognized as the leading and most 
important mining county in the State ; while 
the fact has more recently been developed 
that, in addition to its thousands of ledges 
of gold-bearing quartz and immense area of 
placer deposits, it also produces a soil on 
which can be raised, in the greatest perfec- 
tion, all the productions of the temperate 
zone, while for its adaptability for the pro- 
duction of the grape it may rival even the 
famed vineyards of Prance and Hungary. 
Hence it is well that the interesting details 
brought together in this volume should be 
thus placed upon permanent record for pre- 
sent and. future reference. Hudson & Mc- 
Carty are agents for the sale of" the book in 
this city. 




PIANOS. 



MTJSIOA.L, IIVSTBTJMENTS, 



Sheet Slualc, Music Books, Strings, etc. LargCBt Importers 
in San Francisco. Send orders to 

KOHLBa, CHASE & CO., 
25v 4nrl6p 4J81 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



Pacific File, Reaper and Mower Section 

MANUFACTOKY, 
No. 53 JSeale Street, between Market and Mission, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Flics rc^Bt and warranted as good as new, or no charge. 
The omy establishment In the State. We also man- 
ufacture Kcaper and Mower Sections. 
Ivl5tf nUB.NINO Jc FISHEK, Prop'rs. 



' ROOT'S PATENT 

POECii BLAST BLOWER. 

Adapted for Smelting, Foundry, Mining and Steamships. 
Requires 50 per cent less power than any Blower now in 
use. For further particulars, address KEEP, BLAKE & 
00., Stockton; or Wm. T. Oarrett, comer Mission and Fre- 
mont streets. San Francisco. ivlo-lOptr 



Excelsior Double-Acting Suction and Force Pump. 

TU.e Best fox* Mining, FarmiDg and Domestic Use. 



Hooper's Patent, Aug. 15, 1865. 

THE EXCELSIOR PUMP is a California 
invention of intrinsic merit, and as such is 
being rapidly introduced, and giving perfect 
satisfaction. At the Mechanics' Institute Fair 
(1865_), it was awarded, for its superiority, a . 
UPrejnirim Medal. 

It is manufactured by California Mechanics, 
in the most perfect and durable manner. _ - 

It is remarkably simple in construction, 
and its valve chest "is almost instantly accessi- 
ble without disconnecting the air-chamber, suc- 
tion or discharge-pipes. It can be worked at 
any speed. . - 

Figure 1 is a sectional view of a 6-inch Min- 
ing Pump, showing the plunger and hemp- 
packing, and the valve-chest containing the 
puppet valves. Fig. 2 illustrates the water- 
passages and valve seats in the chest. 

The following sizes are constantly manufac- 
tured of this 

SUPERIOR DEEP-WELL PUMP. 

Mo. 1— Cylinder 2% inches; stroke, 6 inches; capacity 
750 gallons per hour; weight, 60 pounds. 

Mo.'»— Cylinder, 3 inches; stroke, 7 inches; capacity 
1,280 gallons per hour; weight, 80 pounds. 

No. »— Cylinder, 4 inches; stroke, 9 and 8 inches; ca- 
pacity, 2,500 gallons per hour ; weight, 200 
pounds; with iron frame and slide complete. 

No. 4-Cylinder, 5 inches; stroke, 15 inches; capacity 
5,420 gallons per hour; weight 5U0 pounds. 

No. S— Cylinder, 6 inches: stroke, 24 inches: capacity 
12,575 gallons per hour; weight, 1,000 pounds. 

-pr $ Nos: 3, 4 and 5 are 
jclff.a made to endure the 



d 



: 




~:Ti: 



C 



m 



severe test of use in 
mines, and are con- 
stantly superseding 
those of other man- 
ufacturers. The 
pistons being pack- 
ed with hemp, are 
proved to be far 
more durable and 
less expensive than 
leather. 

"We manufacture 
to order 8 and 10- 
inch Pumps. Also, 
sell at cheap rates, 
5 and 6-inch Brass 
Pumps for ships. 

See illustration 
of the "Valve of 
this Pump, and 
further descrip- 
tion, in another 
part of this paper. 



11 






d 



■ 



m 



W 



w 



—a 



■ 

ml 

Sf 



m 



n;sn 
^0 



1 



1 



For Circulars, or further particulars, inquire of or address J. "W". BRITTAN & CO., Agents, 
120 Front street, San Francisco ; H. J. BOOTH & CO., Union Iron Works, First street, or 
lam OTJSHIIS; Gr «Sc CO., Prop'rs, Wan. Francisco. 



W. "Wallace Webstek, 
Boston. 

1850 



PIONEER STOKE. 



J. Bertram Webster, 
Stockton, Cal. 

1867 



WEBSTEE BROTHERS, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 




STEAM ENGINES, BAXTER'S CALIFORNIA GAM PLOWS, 




A-griculfrural Machines, Hardware, Crockery, 

OILS, Etc., Etc. 



Office In Boston, Ko.^lO Central Street. Office In Xew "Cork, 

lvlA-gplamtf ■ 



Stookton, California,. 

G3 Beefeman Street. 



W. T. GABRATT, 
City 

BEASS AND BELL FOUNDER 






Cor. mission and Fremont sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturer of Brass, Zinc, and Anti-Friction or 
Bat>t>et Metal Castings, 

CaXTRCH AND STEAMBOAT 

BELLS, 

TAVERN AND HAND BELLS AND GONGS, 

FIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMFS, 

Steam, Liquor, Soda Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, and 
Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. Hose and 
all other Joints, Spelter, Solder, and Copper Rivets, Ac 
Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, Oil Globes, Steam "Whistles, 

HTDBAVLIC 3*IPES AND AOZ2EL8 
For Mining purposes, Iron Steam Pipe furnished with Fit 
tings, &c. Coupling Joints of allaiwa. Particular attention 
paid to Distillery Work. Manufacturer of "Garratt's Pat* 
tent Improved Journal Metal." 



Foundry for Sale. 

A One-naif Interest in the 

UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, 
Owned by William R. Williams, is offered for sale on the 
most favorable terms. 

A. Good Bargain 

May be had, as the proprietor Is going home to Europe. It 
Is seldom that so good an opportunity is offered for a sure 
and permanent Investment. The business of the establish- 
ment Is exceedingly flourishing, as can be shown. The 
Shop is of brick, new and well built. The lot Is 85 feet front 
by 163 feet in depth, In a good location for this business, on 
Front'street, between N and O streets. 

Inquire at the office of the Foundry, or address 

WILLIAM R. WILLIAMS, 

26vl3tf9-l6P Sacramento, Cal. 



Golden City Chemical Works. 

LABOIUTOKT, 
Corner of Seventh and Townjend Streets. 

OFFICE, 
Corner of Montgomery and Bnsh Streets* 

CAPITAL STOCK, $500,000 

Trustees t 

H. P. WAKELEE, THOS. H. SELBT, 

NICHOLAS LUNING, THOS. BELL, 

CHAS. E. McLANE. 



H. P. WAKELEE.. 



MAXAGER. 



THIS COMPANY ARE NOW PREPARED TO FURNISH 
Sulphuric, Nitric and Muriatic Acids of superior quality, 
in quantities to suit. 

Orders will be received at the office on'y for Chemicals of 
every description, which will bo manufactured as may be 
required. The Company beg to say that they have the ad- 
vantages of all improved machinery and apparatus for the 
manufacture and manipulation of these products, and our 
Laboratory is fitted up with the most recent improvements 
which experience and science suggest, and Is surpassed by 
none in completeness and perfection lor the purposes it is 
designed. 9vU 3m 



MECHANICS* INSTITUTE. 

Resources of California. 

THE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE of San Francisco, here- 
by offer a PREMIUM of ONE THOUSAND ($1,000) DOL- 
LARS for the best Essay on the " RESOURCES OF 
CALIFORNIA, AND BEST METHOD OF DEVELOPING 
THE SAME," under the following conditions: One-half of 
the premium in cash on the certified award of the Com- 
mittee of Judges, and the balance from the first proceeds of 
sale* of the successful work, which is to belong to, and will 
be published by, the Institute. 

The Essays are to be handed in to the Librarian of tb» 
Institute on or before the FIRST DAY OF JUNE. 1858, and 
the award will be made by the Judges at the opening of the 
Industrial Exhibition, which is to be held in August or Sep 
tember following. The Essay should be divided into three 
great heads, viz.: Mineral, Agricultural and Industrial Re- 
sources, with proper subdivisions of each subject Itshould 
be sufficient in quantity to form a duodecimo (12moJ volume 
of from 250 to 300 pages long primer type, solid. 

Writers will sign their articles in cypher, and send their 
names and address in sealed envelopes, which will be kepi 
in a secure place by the Institute, and only be opened when 
the awnrd is made. The manuscripts of unsuccessful 
writers will be returned to them without publicity. 

The Committee of Judges have the right to reject all 
Essays in case they do not consider them worthy of publi- 
cation or the premium. No further instructions than are 
contained in this advertisement will be given to this Com 
mlttee, nor will they be subjected to any advice from the 
officers or members of the Institute In regard to their pro- 
posed action. All manuscript submitted must be hi clear 
legible writing, so as to admit of easy rcadlng.l 

The following named gentlemen , who have been selected 
for their well known ability, public spirit and integrity of 
purpose, will compose the Committee of Judges: 
Hon. Fred'k F. Low, Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, U. 

Prof. J. D. Whitney, 



James Otis, 

Wm. Governcur Morris, 



Prof. W. B. Ewer, 
B. N. Bugbey. 



By order of the Board of Directors. 

D. E. HAYES, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 12, 1867. 2ivU-2m 



Schmeidell & Shotwell, 

Stock and Money Brokers, and dealers In Government 
Bonds, State, City and County Securities, Gas, Water and 
Insurance Stocks, etc., southwest corner of California and 
Sansome streets, opposite Bank of Calif or nia.V£ilvlfr-fim_j 




fllngle Copies, Fifteen Cent* 



Termit One Tenr, ».»; Six Month., W. 



& iournal at Wsttul gurtjs, £riett«, ana fining ana pMuaniral gvaqms. 



And Putent Solicitor*. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1867. 



(VOLUME XV. 

t Number S. 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



The Rm>k KlverCuuntry and 
it* Mines— finntlnotd. 

Facts About Patent Mutters— 
Continued 

Qafck«Uv«r Mining In Mon 

■ lounty, 

Magnesium Lbtht In Mines. 
An Improved Tubular Steam 

fliillwr-llliintniteil. 
Hew tort Metal Market. 
a New Havings Hunk. 
Contrlbweil tn atir Cabinet 
Prices of Breadhtun*s lite rant 

Year 
Woreaitttr'l Improved Globe 

Valve 
Mew Hbde of Detecting Ftre 

Damp, etc.. In Mine*. 
Own Cotton In Mine*. 
Bessemer steel Ware. 
Slnrulir Discovery. 
New Patent* unit invntlons 

Notices 10 Correspondents, 

San Prune isco Market Rates. 
Sun Francisco Weekly stock 

circular. 
Stork Prices— Bid and Asked 
Snn Francisco Metnl Market. 
New In -orporatlons— List of 

Officers. 
Mining Shareholders' Direct 

ory. 



Homo Trade- and Manufac- 
turer. 

Cox's Cement Mill. 

ke Quarries. 

Ituliwuy MuiutftemeDt In In- 
dia. 

Mii'iiiNlm. MlSCKI.LAXY.— 
riiujiu: Glass Under Water 



fur Mica: Steel Wire; Pre- 
serving Lumber; Crystal- 
lized bv Concussion ; Ce- 
mont; KYnnl2lngby Btoam; 
Touch Wood. 

CtE.MTiriL' MtSCKLLANT.— 

Drvlng bv Superheated 



NewWuvto Make Potusb; 
Plants bur Air; Mereorlc; 
Conversation by Telegraph; 
Coal vs. Wood; Decomposi- 
tion by Gaseous Currents; 
The Progress of Applied Sci- 
ence. 
MikiugScbmart— Emhraclng 
late intelligence irom the 
various counties and dis- 
tricts In California. Idaho, 
Montana, Nevada, Oregon, 
Utah and Washington. 



An Improved Tubular Steam Boiler. 

We give herewith a full illustration of a 
novel and an apparently improved construc- 
tion for a tubular steam boiler. The steam 
capacity of all boilers depends upon the 
amount of surface exposed to the fire ; and 
all improvements tend mainly to an increase 
of that surface. It is also well understood 
that the thinner the sheet of water is which 
is exposed to the action of heat, the more 
rapid will be the production of steam. It 
has been the aim of the inventor of the 
boiler herewith illustrated to combine, as 
far as possible, both these advantages. How 
well he has done his work, we leave for the 
reader to judge after perusing the following 
description, which we clip from the New 
York Artisan of January 16, 1867 : 

Fig. 1 is a perspective view, broken away 
at intervals so as to show the arrangement 
of the pipes or tubes of which it is wholly 
composed. A series of ver- 
tical pipes, which may be 
of cast iron or other mate- 
rial, are arranged in two 
parallel lines on each side 
of the fire chamber, and 
also extending back from 
the fire wall at any desired 
distance, according to the 
amount of steam to be 
produced. These pipes are 
joined at their upper ends, 
and in form are similar to 
a gofchic arch. In Fig. 2 
is seen a transverse section, 
in which a, a represents 
the arched row of vertical 
pipes, connected at the top 
and also connected at the 
bottom by horizontal trans- 
verse pipes, d. At b is 
seen an inner pipe fitted 
into a, which extends down 
to a level with the grate 
upon which the heat is 
generated. It will be seen 
that by this arrangement a 
. thin film of water is thus 
presented to the action of 
the fire, which is almost 
instantaneously converted 
into steam, and ascending, 
it fills the steam space and 
the horizontal tube at the 
top of the arched series of 
pipes. From this pipe it 
may be conducted to whatever place it may 
be needed to perform its labor. The vol- 
ume of water in the space, b, is of a colder 
temperature, and suppliesthe film presented 
to the fire with the necessary amount to take 
the place of th'ftt evaporated. The trans- 
verse pipe, d, is placed below the grate of 



the fire-box, and receives the. water from the 
side pipes in which it is injected by the 
feed pump. By being so situated, it be- 
comes partially heated before it enters the 




section : a, a are the vertical pipes forming 
the side wall, and at b is seen the inner 
pipes ; d is the transverse pipe below the 
furnace-grate. At c, <• are shown two up- 
right or vertical pipes, branch- 
ing off at a right angle from 
the pipe, d, and having free 
communication with it. In 
the next section of the series 
of b there is but one vertical 
pipe, e, audit also freely com- 
municates with the arched 
side pipes, a, of Fig. 2. These 
pipes are composed of an 
outer and inner pipe, similar 
to the side pipes, the inner 
one extending down to the 
fire-grate. Thus each pipe in 
the combined series presents 
within it a thin film of water 
to the immediate action of the 
heat, and as it evaporates is 
fed with water of a lower tem- 
perature from the inner pipe, 
which by its outer surface 
forms the inner wall of the 
water-film. The fire, passing 
over the top of the fire-wall at 
the back side of the furnace, 
completely encircles the series 
of pipes beyond the furnace, 
and also freely acts upon the 
areh where they are joined 
together; it then passes un- 
derneath the horizontal parti- 
tion seen in Fig. 1, about 
midway between the top and 



boiler in the alternate order shown in Fig. 3. 
There is another advantage in this form 
of boiler that will readily present itself. 
Suppose a manufacturer wishes to extend 
the limit of the steam-producing capacity 
of his boiler. All that is necessary then is 
to remove the wall at the back end of the 
boiler and add as many sections as he 
chooses, as each section of the horizontal 
pipe, d, and the vertical one, a (Fig. 2), are 
cast together in one piece; and to extend 
the length of a boiler, all that is necessary 
is to unite a sufficient number of these sec- 
tions by bolting them together in proper 
order by the flanges seen in Fig. 3. 

It will also be observed that the horizon- 
tal pipes, d, d, are below the fire-grate, and 
consequently contain water of a low degree 
of temperature. Therefore all sediment, 
as it collects in the vertical tubes, falls into 
the horizontal tubes and into the colder 
stratum of water, and there quietly remains, 
with no danger of burning on the surface, 
as in the old style of plate boilers. From 
these lower tubes where it collects it can 
be easily blown out by the engineer at any 
time, and no danger of sediment or incrus- 
tation detrimental to the surface of the 
boiler need be apprehended. 
i Each section of the pipes actually forms 
a boiler by itself, separate and distinct from 
the others, yet having free communication 
with them at both top and bottom — the en- 
tire series receiving water from the same ' 
source and evaporating steam into the same 
steam-space. The immense amount of fire 
surface secured by this mode of construc- 
tion, and the small body of 
water required to be pres- 
ent, must enable it to gen- 
erate steam very rapidly, 
and at a comparatively 
small expenditure of fuel. 
A patent was granted to 
Mr. Jos. A. Miller, C.E., 
of New York, Jan. 8, 1867. 



MILLER'S PATENT AMERICAN STEAM BOILER. 



vertical side pipes. At c, c and e, we see 
other vertical pipes or tubes that have free 
communication with the transverse bottom 
pipes, and also communication with the 
vertical side pipe at or near the place where 
they join at the apex of the areh. At Fig. 
3, this arrangement is showrl in a horizontal 



bottom of the pipes, and still further heats 
them, and is then conducted under the 
series of horizontal pipes, d (Fig. 2), and is 
then oarried into the flue or chimney. 
The series of vertical pipes, c, c and e, etc. , 
are commenced immediately behind thefire- 
wall, and continue the entire length of th e 



New Mode of Detect- 
ing Fibe-Damp, eto., in 
Mines. — Mr. J. Eofe writes 
to the Geological Magazine, 
and shows that miners have 
only to watch the barome- 
ter, and provide in accord- 
ance with its indications, 
for the supply of air to the 
mines in case of fire-damp, 
etc. Alluding to the well 
known " Blowing-well" of 
Preston, in Lancashire, 
England, he states that 
some time since, in a well 
recently constructed by 
him as a cesspool to some 
chemical works, he observ- 
ed the phenomena charac- 
terizing the blowing-well ! 
When the atmospheric 
pressure diminished, the 
air came from the well, 
loaded to a disagreeable 
extent with the offensive 
vapor of the cesspool. On 
continuing his observa- 
tions with a baronieter, he 
found similar results. He 
concludes from these facts 
that a coal mine must be 
regarded as a gigantic well, 
from which, when the at- 
mospheric pressure dimin- 
ishes, the air expands, and 
rushes out with great vio- 
lence. This circumstance is not of itself 
dangerous, but if there be an excess of gas 
in the mine, and at the same time, from 
accident or carelessness, a means of igni- 
tion, then, indeed, the consequences are 
very likely to be serious. Hence the baro- 
meter becomes the miner's safest guide. 



18 



Mt pining smA Mmtlfu §m$. 



(&ammmatm8. 



Is this Department we Invite the free discussion of all 
proper subjects— correspondents alone be'ug responsible tor 
the ideas and theories tliey advance. 



[Written for the Mining and Scientliic Press. I 

The Reese River Country and its 
Mines. 

BY A. J. HOWE. 

[Continued from Page 2.J 

HOT CREEK. 

Our road crosses these hills through Eagle 
PaS9, and four miles further brings us to 
the head of Hot creek. Here we find a 
broad pass running through the high 
mountain range on the level of the valleys 
that lie on either side, with what little de- 
scent there is to the east. Shortly after 
entering the Pass, we reach the scalding hot 
springs or pools which break out at inter- 
vals along its course, emitting steam and 
sulphurous vapor. Its borders are fringed 
with jointed, reed-like rushes, growing to 
the bight of ten or twelve feet, which, with 
their varied hues of many delicate tints and 
clouds of steam rising here and there above 
their waving tops, present a novel and 
grateful sight to the weary eye long accus- 
tomed to rest on monotonous stretches of 
dry, sage-covered plains or parallel moun- 
tains, everywhere, over hundreds of miles, 
producing the same vegetation, and differ- 
ing only in their rock formation, which is 
ever changing from the regular but up- 
tilted strata of slate, granite, syenite and 
marble, to the chaos of indescribable vol- 
canic rocks of scoria and trachyte. About 
two and a half miles after entering the Pass 
brings us to one of the mammoth quartz 
lodes of this region, known as the Indian 
Jim. This immense lode rises to a great 
hight on the north or left hand side of the 
canon, going east. It is full 200 feet wide, 
with occasional pockets of extremely rich 
ore. The lode is not of pure quartz, but 
appears to be mixed with vast quantities of 
the enclosing or country rock, fallen into 
the seething mass of the quartz from the 
sides as it was forced up from below, filling 
the vast fissure with a conglomerate of 
quartz, limestone and slate. On the south 
side of the canon is situated the Merrimac 
and Norfolk lodes, supposed to be identical 
with the Indian Jim. Five or six miles 
further, at the eastern entrance to the Pass, 
we find the town site of Hot Creek, in 

HOT CBEEK MINING DISTRICT. 

This is abontlat. 38° 30', forty-five miles 
E.N.E. of Belmont and one hundred miles 
S.E. from Austin, via Smoky Valley and 
Charnock's Pass. The district was discov- 
ered in the spring of 1866 by the Robinson 
Brothers (the same mentioned in a former 
letter as the discoverers of Silver Peak). 
They were piloted here by a Shoshone In- 
dian, called Jim, after whom the lode de- 
scribed above was named. Prom July to 
September following, this whole region 
swarmed with prospectors from the older 
districts on the west; a great number of 
lodes were discovered, producing at the 
surface the most fabulously rich silver ore 
heretofore found. Ore yielding from $3, 000 
to $12,000 per ton, and in some instances 
much higher, was not of unfrequent occur- 
rence in small quantities ; but, through 
want of capital, the lodes are yet undevel- 
oped to the extent that will fully establish 
their permanency. As far as explored, horn 
silver or native chloride of silver, is the 
predominating ore at the surface. Proba- 
bly the most massive deposits of this rare 
ore ever found in Nevada oocur here (ex- 
cept, perhaps, the reported developments in 
the Combination Company's mine at Bel- 
mont). There a're no mines in the immedi- 
ate vicinity of the town, the site being 
selected for its facilities in the way of 
water and fuel. The latter is very abund- 
ant to the north of the Pass, which is prop- 
erly in Morey District, the canon or pass 
being the dividing line between the two. 
The larger number of mines are located six 



miles south, near the head and on either 
side of Rattlesnake Canon. 

The whole surface of the country in that 
vicinity appears to be of limestone ; but it 
is evidently only a capping, overlying gran- 
ite, as in one instance, at the Oro mine, the 
granite is forced up with the lode. Among 
the most noted mines are the Keystone, 
Gazelle, Indian Hunter, Oro and Old Do- 
minion. On the former two, extensive de- 
velopments are in progress, under the man- 
agement of Mr. O. A. Gager, of the Parrot 
mill. In the early part of the past winter, 
a small, inefficient mill was erected in this 
district by the Combination Company, for 
the purpose of prospecting the ore, and I 
understand larger works will take its place 
during the coming summer. This company 
is ably represented by Mr. Gould, as super- 
intendent, who may be called the pioneer in 
milling in what is known as the lower coun- 
try or the region lying between Siiver Bend 
and Pahranagat. This section is not as 
well supplied with timber as that on the 
north and south, but affords sufficient fuel 
for many years, until the shrill whistle of 
the locomotive and the rolling thunders of 
cars reecho through all these valleys and 
mountain passes, bringing fuel to the mines 
and carrying ore to the exhaustless tim- 
bered slopes of the Sierra Nevada. 

We are now in the very core of the rich- 
est silver region ever discovered, before 
which the' history of the once famous mines 
of South America and Mexico sink in insig- 
nificance. He would indeed be a credulous 
man who, on a thorough examination of 
the " Great Southeast " of Nevada, would 
longer doubt the truth of the prediction or 
promise of Bishop Simpson. I am not 
speaking of Hot Creek especially, but of 
all the surrounding country. 
[To be Continued.] 



[Written for the Mining and Scientific Press.l 

Quicksilver Mining in Monterey 
County. 

New Idkia Q. S. Mine, ) 
Presno County, July 1, 1867. f 

Messes. Editobs : — Some few days ago, 
while crossing the adjacent mountains sur- 
rounding the New Idria quicksilver mine, 
I came abruptly upon a few nicely built 
miners' cabins, near by a beautiful and 
never-failing stream of water, known by the 
very appropriate name of ' ' Clear Creek. " 
In those cabins are living the employe's of 
Monterey Quicksilver Mining Company, 
which has just commenced operations on 
one of their locations, called the Clear 
Creek mine. Here, by a well executed tun- 
nel, they have penetrated into the moun- 
tain nearly 300 feet — gaining, I should sup- 
pose from observation, a perpendicular 
hight of 150 feet. The tunnel was com- 
menced about fifteen feet above the bed 
of the creek, in magnesian earth, intermin- 
gled with lime and other mineral sub- 
stances, demanding no special remark, ex- 
cept, perhaps, to correct the erroneous idea 
that magnesia forms the base of all the 
ledges in this vicinity. 

At the end of sixty feet drifting in the 
above tunnel, the parties came unexpectedly 
against a face of hard rock, which proved to 
be -a channel of black slate, similar in char- 
acter to the rock found in the Idria mine, 
running nearly east and west, dipping north 
about 3% feet in six feet, and traversed by 
fissures or cracks, and in places faintly 
painted with vermilion. The next channel 
intersected was a kind of soapstone, similar 
to what is termed the bedrock of the New 
Alniaden ledge ; but quicksilver ledges cany 
no regular bedrock — neither was there ever 
a well-defined ledge of cinnabar known to 
exist. The so-called ledges are channels of 
mineral ground, running in a certain direc- 
tion, traversed by other channels of rock- 
bearing mineral indications, and on either 
side deposits of cinnabar are promiscuously 
found. I have seen this statement verified 
in the Old Almaden in Spain, the New 
Almaden, and every other quicksilver mine 
in California, and no doubt such is the char- 
acter of quicksilver ledges throughout the 
mining world. 

This channel of soapstone at the Clear 
Creek mine, presents a somewhat peculiar 
appearance, having passed through numer- 
ous well-defined branches of calcareous spar, 
all dipping north at an angle of forty-five 
degrees, or thereabouts. When I visited 



the mine the parties had just intersected the 
mineral channel — quite different in charac- 
ter from anything yet passed through in said 
tunnel. This mineral" channel, or so-called 
ledge, also dips north, and shows every in-' 
dication of the probability of discovering 
large deposits of metal. The appearance 
of the ledge, at this depth of 150 feet, is 
truly encouraging. There are three other 
locations belonging to this company, viz : 
The Boston, Andy Johnson, and Fourth of 
July. Assays have been made from each of 
these locations, showing gold from $13 to 
$55 per ton of rock, and from 7% to 33 per 
cent, of quicksilver. 

The accuracy of this statement cannot 
reasonably be doubted, as particles of gold 
have been found in the r.efuse taken from the 
New Almaden furnaces. Omitting the exist- 
ence of gold, and taking into consideration 
the almost inexhaustible amount of cinnabar 
bearing rock at command, the percentage 
for quicksilver alone must be very encoui 1 - 
aging indeed, and warrants a determined 
and vigorous prosecution of the company's 
mines. Captain Faull. 



Facts About Patent Matters. 

NUMBER FIVE. 
THE EXAMINATION, APPEAL, ETC. 

Having got your case ready, the next 
step is to send it to the office, directed to 
the Commissioner of Patents. When the 
case reaches the office", it is examined by the 
Chief Clerk, who receives and opens all 
mail matter, or cases handed in. He makes 
a memoranda of the money and papers re- 
ceived, then sends the letter to another 
room, when the case is made up, by placing 
the papers in a kind of envelope, called a 
file, on which is endorsed the name and 
residence of the applicant, name of the in- 
vention, date of reception of the fee, draw- 
ings, specification and model — the latter, in 
the meantime, having been sent to another 
room where it is labelled with the name of 
the invention, and date of its reception, and 
where it is retained until sent for by the 
examiner. The file is then sent to the 
draughtsman's room, where the case is en- 
tered on a record book, after which, with 
other cases belonging to the same class, it 
is sent to the room of the examiner in charge 
of the class to which it belongs. This class- 
ification is quite extensive, but some idea 
of it may be obtained by naming a few, as 
for instance, one class embraces all agricul- 
tural implements and processes — another, 
mills of all kinds — another, all machines for 
working wood — another, all steam engines, 
etc. — another, civil engineering, etc. 

The examiner takes up the case in its 
order, sends for the model, and examines 
the drawings to see that they are exact du- 
plicates and correct in all other respects. 
He then examines the specification in con- 
nection with the drawings and the model, 
to see if the invention and all its parts and 
their operation is fully and correctly de- 
scribed. ' If there is any error in either of 
these, in any particular, he returns it to the 
applicant, or his agent, if he has one, with 
a letter pointing out the defect, in order that 
it may be corrected, which letter (and all 
others relating to the business of the office) 
is signed by the Commissioner. When the 
applicant receives his papers, he proceeds 
to make the correction, by writing out the 
necessary amendments on a separate sheet, 
indicating the line and page where it is to 
be inserted, and what, if any, of the origi- 
nal, is to be erased, and returns them to- 
gether with the original papers, unaltered in 
any respect, to the office. They are then 
sent again to the examiner, who enters the 
amendments, indicating their proper places 
by directions in red ink, and if all right, it 
is then ready for examination ; if not cor- 
rect, it is again returned with another letter, 
and so on until it is right. 

The papers having thus been made all 
right, and the examiner having become 
familiar with the peculiar features of the 
applicant's device, proceeds to make the 
examination. To facilitate this duty, all 
the drawings of patented articles are placed 
in large folios, arranged in classes, and 
placed in cases in a very large apartment 
called the draughtsman's room. Of these 
there are about 40,000, [now 52,000.] The 
drawings of all rejected cases are similarly 
arranged in another large room. Proceed- 
ing to the class to which the invention be- 
longs, he draws forth one of the folios, and 
carefully examines every drawing in it and 
so on through all the class, to see that the 
same has not before been patented. If the 
same or a similar device is not found there, 
he then goes through the same class in the 
rejected cases in the same manner ; and if 
not found there, and it is of a character or 
class in which anything has been done 
abroad, he proceeds to the library, and there 
examines the various foreign - reports of in- 



ventions and other works to see that the 
same thing has not been patented or de- 
scribed abroad. 

Each examiner's room is also provided 
with a variety of publications relating to 
the class in charge there — in some cases 
forming of themselves quite large libraries 
— and they too, are to be examined. If in 
none of these places, anything containing 
the features claimed by the applicant can bo 
found, it only remains for the examiner to 
look over the caveats on file, (and which 
occupy large cases in still another room,) 
to see that no one has filed a caveat for the 
same invention, and then it is ready to pass 
for issue. 

But it frequently happens that in one or 
the other of these places, the same device 
will be found. In that case, a letter is writ- 
ten, rejecting the application, and giving the 
name and date of the prior inventor, either 
patented or rejected, or naming the publi- 
cation and page where it is described. %[f 
the applicant, after examining the references 
thus given, is not satisfied, he has the right 
to ask a re-examination, after filing such 
reasons as he may desire, pointing out the 
difference which he may believe to exist be- 
tween his invention and those given as 
references, or, impossible, he may so amend 
his case, by striking out the claims to those 
features shown in the references, so as to 
avoid them, and still obtain a patent on 
others. If a second time rejected by the ex- 
aminer, he may thereafter appeal to the 
Board of Examiners-in-chief ; and from 
them to the Commissioner in person — then 
to the United States Court for the District 
of Columbia, and finally to the Supreme 
Court. The papers, however, must not be al- 
tered or amended after leaving ilie Examiner's 
room. All subsequent action is simply an 
appeal to a higher tribunal, which is to de- 
cide upon the case as finally passed upon by 
the examiner, simply affirming or reversing 
his decision, or that of the previous tribunal, 
whichever that maybe. The party is, how- 
ever, at liberty to file such argument at each 
successive step as he may see fit. No addi- 
tional fee is required on appeal to the board, 
but at each subsequent step. 

[To be continued. 1 



Menhaden On. — The manufacture of 
menhaden oil has become, of late, quite an 
extensive and important branch of business 
in New England. These fish are caught in 
great numbers, and at frequent intervals, 
all along the coast from New York city to 
the eastern part of the coast of Maine. They 
were formerly caught in part for food — 
being cured like mackerel — but chiefly for 
manure. The recently enhanced value of 
animal oils has now made them more valu- 
able for their oil ; while the residue, after 
treatment for oil, still possesses considerable 
value for manure. They were formerly 
taken altogether inseins upon the sea shore ; 
but latterly they appear to be caught at sea. 
Some twenty vessels are annually fitted out 
for this purpose, from different ports in the 
State of Maine ; having furnaces and presses 
for doing all the work of expressing the oil 
on shipboard. In addition to these vessels, 
there is scarcely a town on the coast of 
Maine, below the mouth of the Kennebec, 
where more or less of this oil is not manu- 
factured. There is an establishment of the 
kind near Bristol, R. L, operated with a 
capital of $40,000. A number of others, of 
less extent, are operated in the same town. 



Beeaking Castings. — The Scientific Amer- 
ican, in answer to a correspondent, suggests 
the following method of breaking up large 
castings : Drill a few holes of three-quarters 
or one inch diameter from six to ten inches 
deep, filling them nearly to the top with 
water, and then insert carefully fitted 
steel plugs to rest on the top of the water. 
A blow from a heavy droj) will probably do 
the business. In your case the mass of iron 
is three feet square ; perhaps inch holes, 
drilled'ten inches deep, and filled to within 
two inches of the top, would be effective. 
The steel plug should be about four inches 
long and fit as nearly water tight as possi- 
ble. 



Honey Bees. — Notwithstanding the dif- 
ficulty of keeping honey bees, in their do- 
mestic state, in California, they appear to 
thrive remarkably well when left to them- 
selves. The mountains are becoming full 
of them, and bee-hunting has become a 
profitable business. California will soon 
literally become a land "flowing with milk 
and honey. 



Zht pining awl £wntif« gw« 



19 



aifrtiatttral. 



Ci'TTiNn GiiAes CNDKh ■Water « HH 
Shears. — The London PhoJograjJ 
gives tiie following hints and instructions 
relative to a mode of cutting glass with a 
common pair of scissors, which may not be 
known to the majority of our readers, and 
in places where glazier's diamonds are not 
accessible, the process may be of some value. 
It requires a little patience and some dex- 
terity to thus cut glass to a given line with 
a smooth edge, yet it can be done under 
water after a few careful trials. To me- 
chanics and others who often have occasion 
to cut glass into peculiar shapes, it may be 
worth while to remember this simple appli- 
cation. The operation is detailed as fol- 
lows: 

In order to insure success, two points 
must be attended to : first and most impor- 
tant, the glass must be quite level whiletho 
scissors are applied ; and second, it is better 
in the cutting by taking oft" small 
pieces at the corners and along the, edges, 
and so reduce the shape gradually to that 
required, for if any attempt is made to cut 
the glass all at once, to the shape, as we 
should cut a piece of cardboard, it will most 
likely break just where it is not wanted. 
Some kinds of glass cut much better than 
others ; the softer glasses cut best. The 
scissors need not be at all sharp, as their 
action does not depend much upon the state 
of the edge presented to the glass. When 
the operation goes on well* the glass breaks 
away from the scissors in small pieces in a 
straight line with the blades. This method 
has often proved very useful in cutting 
ovals, etc., which would be very expensive 
if ground out ; and though the edges are not 
so smooth as may be desired for some pur- 
poses, the method is worth knowing. 



New Uses for Mica. — Puscher, of Nu- 
remberg, lately suggested the use of mica 
for various decorative purposes. For one 
such application, the thin plates are first 
purified by treatment with strong sulphuric 
acid, and then silvered by the ordinary pro- 
cess adopted with looking glass. The mica 
thus acquires a beautiful silver luster, and 
it may easily be cut into any shape to be 
used for inlaying wort. The flexibility of 
the mica, will, of course, allow of its being 
applied to round surfaces. "When a sheet 
of mica is heated to full redness for a time 



PwsfeBVtKfl Lumber. — Much attention is 
now being paid in tho Eastern States to pre- 
paring lumber, so as to make it more du- 
rable than in its natural state. The impor- 
tance of some process forpreserving lumber, 
in its great variety of uses and exposure to 
the destructive action of moisture, heat, and 
imperfect ventilation, has long been recog- 
nized, and a successful and economical 
means to this end has been found in the 
process of "Burnettizing. " That business 
is carried on in Bangor, Maine, on a very 
extensive scale. The material used is chlo- 
ride of zinc, which, it is claimed, preserves 
wood from the adherence of animal and 
vegetablo parasites, and from the attacks of 
; and also completely preserves it 
from wet and drv rot, besides rendering it 
uninflammable wlien used of a certain requi- 
site strength. Its effect on canvas, cordage) 
metals, etc., is said to be equally beneficial ; 
and the claims of the proprietor of the Bur- 
nettizing Works are strengthened by testi- 
monials from a vast number of ship builders, 
railroad men, manufacturers, etc. 



£rtcntifir ^BisttUami. 



Paper Pipes, Cisterns and Pails. — "We 
have already alluded to the introduction of 
paper pipes for conducting water, and the 
advantages which they possess over those 
made of iron or lead. Large tanks and cis- 
terns are now being made : also pails, etc. 
In making these articles, the paper, by a 
peculiar process, is laid in sheets over a 
mold. The same material is also being used 
for the manufacture of sugar molds. The 
pails made from it are said to outlast gal- 
vanized iron, and to withstand a very great 
degree of heat They are not effected by 
acids or other corrosive substances, and are 
greatly in request on shipboard, and other 
places where severe usage is expected. The 
price is rather high, SI. 50 in currency at 
wholesale in New York ; still it is thought 
their greater durability render them cheaper 
in the end than either wood or iron. 



Steel "Wire. — The use of steel wire has 
been greatly extended since it became known 
that a wire could be produced which com- 
bined the advantages of lightness with hard- 
ness and extreme tenacity. It is now em- 
ployed not only in the manufacture of 
needles, fish-hooks, springs, music-springs, 
small tools, umbrella-frames, and crinolines, 
bat also for ropes and cable. Steel wire 
| rope is now very generally used in the 



in aclay muffle, it loses most of its flexibility, .mines, both of this country and Europe. 
and is changed considerably in appearance. r„.i, r .,. ti 1a HcrVf. imai «!>+ nffUmn Q « ^^^ 



Under reflected light it has a dead silver 
white look, but viewed by transmitted light 
it is seen covered with grey spots. This 
latter appearance is lost when two or three 
pieces are superposed, and the transparency 
is lost. The mica alter heating is also a 
beautiful material for inlaying work. It 
should be cut into the shapes required be- 
fore it is heated. Another very pretty effect 
is obtained by scattering small fragments of 
mica on freshly-poured sheets of gelatine, 
and varnishing it with a dark-colored solu- 
tion of gelatine. Finely ground mica on 
colored gelatine also showS very pretty ef- 
fects ; and the very finely-ground material 
mixed with a solution of gum-arabic may be 
used, Puscher says, for silver ink. — Mech. 
Magazine. 



Crystallized by Concussion - . — A cir- 
cumstance apparently confirmatory of the 
disputed theory of a molecular change in 
iron from mechanical shocks, is related by 
a correspondent at Underbill, "Vt. He says 
that an old relic of the Revolution, a French 
gun barrel, which had been refitted with 
new stocks and locks several times, after 
standing fire perhaps the millionth time, 
burst, and in such a manner that every one 
who saw it pronounced it to have been origi- 
nally a cast iron barrel, until an old iron 
maker convinced them by showing the weld 
on the under side. But the appearance 
otherwise was exactly like east iron, and 
brittle at that. Mr. E. attributed the change 
in the iron to the action of the sulphur in 
the powder and its long use and many times 
repeated action. 

Cement. — A cement particularly adapted 
for attaching the brass work to petroleum 
lamps, is made by Puscher, by boiling three 
parts resin with one of caustic soda and five 
of water. The composition is then mixed 
with half its weight of plaster of paris, and 
sets firmly in half to three-quarters of an 
hour. It is said to be of great adhesive 
power, not permeable to petroleum, a low 
conductor of heat, and but superficially at- 
tacked by hot water. Zinc white, white 
lead or precipitated chalk may be substi- 
tuted for plaster, but hardens more slowly. 



where the light weight of the rope is of such 
importance both in respect to safety and 
economy ; also on railway engines, and for 
drawing plows where stationary steam power 
is used for preparing the soil. Large quan- 
tities have been required during the last five 
years for submarine telegraphic cables. 
Steel wire ropes are also used on canals for 
towing purposes. Some idea of the quan- 
tity of steel wire used may be formed from 
the fact that one establishment in Great 
Britian has made during the last year more 
than 30,000 miles of one size, No. 13, equal 
in diameter to .005 of an inch. 



Printing on Glass. — DeMothey, a 
Frenchman, has devised an ink and other 
preparations by which he is enabled to print 
on glass, by means of rollers, similar to 
those used in calico printing. After print- 
ing, the glass is subjected to heat, by which 
the picture is vitrified and permanently fixed 
in the glass. The colors are mixed with 
a silico-borate of potash and lead, as usual 
in painting in glass ; the composition being 
rendered plastic by rosin and turpentine. 

The largest hardware manufactory in the 
United States is located at New Haven, 
Conn. It employs 800 hands, and turns out 
4,000 different kinds of articles, mostly. Yan- 
kee notions. The annual value of its pro- 
ductions is estimated at from four to five 
millions of dollars. 



Kyanizing by Steam. — It is said that 
while it costs about ninety cents each to 
kyanize railroad sleepers by steeping them 
in the liquid — the process usually employed 
— the same thing can be effected equally well 
by means of hot vapor, at an expense not 
exceeding ten cents. 

A whole welded boiler from Dussel- 
dorf is exhibited at the Paris Exhibition by 
Prussia. A steam dome is welded upon the 
boiler, and so accurately and smoothly is 
the whole work done as to be hardly distin- 
guishable, superficially, from a casting. 



Meltixo Wnorr.RT Iron. — Many people, 
even well informed iron men, have an idea 
that wrought iron caDnot be melted — that it 
will granulate and burn up, or oxidize in 
! the furnace, rather than fuse. Such, how. 
ever, is not the case. Wrought iron may 
be melted and cast into molds, like ordinary 
cast iron, provided a sufficient degree of 
heat is applied. Cast iron is fused at a 
temperature of 3,000° ; but wrought iron 
requires a degree of heat not less than 6,000° 
for fusion ; even if we could readily produce 
the requisite degree of heat for melting 
wrought iron, whero should we find the 
material sufficiently refractory to melt it in 
or retain it, as in a mold, while it was solidi. 
fying. It is more easily melted when sub. 
jected to great heat in the presence of car- 
bon and manganese. In the process of the 
manufacture of the best kinds of steel, 
wrought iron is cut up into small fragments, 
weighing four or five ounces each, placed 
in a black lead crucible, with a little pul- 
verized charcoal and black oxide of manga- 
nese. Thus prepared it is subjected to the 
requisite degree of heat, melted and ran 
into ingots, which are rolled or hammered 
into the desired shapes. 

Wrought iron is nearly a pure iron, and 
especially free from carbon ; steel is a very 
pure cast iron — and like it, is a carburet of 
iron ; hence it can readily be melted. 
Wrought iron can be melted only after it 
has been.again re-charged with the carbon of 
which it has been deprived in the process 
of puddling, pressing, etc. For all practical 
purposes, therefpre, wrought iron is infus- 
ible'. 



Drying by Superheated Steam. — Steam, 
when heated above 212°, becomes more of 
an absorbent, and so increases as the heat 
is increased. A room containing super- 
heated steam becomes a Turkish bath — that 
is, has a steam atmosphere, and, propor- 
tionally, so far as the air is concerned, be- 
comes a vacuum. Fruit, lumber, etc., may 
be rapidly dried by this process. A fruit- 
drying apparatus of this description is sold 
in New York, from two or three dollars 
up to almost any price, according to size, etc. 
Lumber is dried by this process. It is sim- 
ply placed on cars, and drawn slowly 
through a drying room, until thoroughly 
dried. The drying may be effected in a few 
hours. So powerful is the action that a 
four-inch scantling may be so thoroughly 
dried as to destroy the grain; yet, by proper 
management, no damage is done. The 
wood can be seasoned to any required ex- 
tent. It is by far the best process for dry- 
ing fruit. Fruit should be rapidly dried, 
as soon as ripe, and before its starch is con- 
verted into sugar. "When so dried, it is 
much better in quality and appearance, and 
keeps much longer and better. 

Freezing Glycerine. — According to the 
statement of Dr. W. S. Squire, a mass of 
glycerine (not nitro-glycerine), on freezing, 
leaves a small portion of the liquid still in 
a fluid state; on carefully draining this from 
that portion which has been congealed, the 
latter is much lighter in color than when 
liquid. The solid portion is heavier than 
the remaining liquid, and sinks in it. The 
liquid drainings cannot be solidified, even 
when exposed to a great degree of artificial 
cold in the' laboratory. At least Dr. Squire 
had not succeeded in congealing it ; it was 
simply rendered a little more viscid. Even 
a journey from London to Edinburg, giving 
it both percussion and intense cold, did not 
freeze it, or in any way induce ehrystalliza- 
tion. 



Plants but Ate. — Modern chemistry 
teaches us that plants consist almost entirely 
of condensed gas, and return after death to 
their natural elements. The small amount 
of mineral matter which they contain is 
represented in the ashes which are left after 
combustion. • 



Decomposition by Gaseous Currex 
M. Grenet, of France, has made the r« 
able discovery that certain bodies are de- 
composed by the simple passage of a cur- 
rent of inert gas. For example, when a 
current of nitrogen, hydrogen, or common 
air, is sent through a solution of tli 
bonate of lime, of baryta, or of potash, 
carbonic acid is set free, while lime, or 
baryta or potash, is precipitated. The 
gases will disengage sulphuretted hydrogen 
from the sulphidrates of the alkaline sul- 
phides. In like manner sulphuric acid gas 
maybe disengaged from sulphide solutions, 
and acetic acid from acetates. Oxides of 
nitrogen are eliminated from nitrates at a 
temperature much lower than the tempera- 
ture of decomposition. These salts emit 
acid very slowly in the same atmosphere, 
and a rapid current is supposed to simply 
increase this tendency to dissociation. 

The Cholera. — The French Academy of 
Sciences recently offered a prize of S20,000 
for a satisfactory solution of the nature of 
and remedy for the Asiatic cholera. Several 
essays have been handed in, opened and 
examined ; but no one has been considered 
worthy of the prize ; although several have 
been thought to possess sufficient merit to 
entitle them to special awards, which have 
accordingly been declared. This learned 
body thereby express the opinion that neither 
the nature of the Asiatic cholera is well un- 
derstood ; nor has any reliable and scientific 
course of treatment yet been devised for its 
cure. 



Rare Celestial Phenomena. — A very 
interesting celestial phenomena will take 
place on the 21st of August next — one the 
like of which has occurred but twice before 
in the records of history. The planet Ju- 
piter will on that day be seen unaccompa- 
nied by either of her satellites for the space 
of fully two hours. Of her four moons, 
three will be invisible, on account of their 
passing simultaneously over the planet's 
disk, while the fourth will, at the same 
time, be immersed in the shadow of the 
planet. 



How to Keep Kerosene Lamps Clean. 
Most people who use kerosene lamps have 
found great difficulty in keeping them clean 
The oil seems to cree]5 up by the wick and 
otherwise, and thus out and over the outside 
of the lamp. The Scientific American sug- 
gests, as a remedy, to smear the edges of the 
lamp where the oil comes ever, with the 
white of an egg, gum-arabic or any other 
convenient substance which is repulsive to 
the oil. 



The Progress of Applied Science. — In- 
dustrial Exhibitions may be taken as the 
index of the extent of the practical applica- 
tion of scientific principles. The interna- 
tional Fair at the Crystal Palace, London, 
1851, displaved the products of not quite 
14,000 exhibitors. That at Paris in 1855 
embraced 24,000 exhibitors. That at Lon- 
don in 1862 contained 29,000. At the pres- 
ent Exposition at Paris there are no less 
than 45,000 exhibitors. 



Power op the Sun's Pays. — A lens has 
recently been made for Mr. Parker, of Lon- 
don, three feet in diameter, three inches 
thiclri n the center, and weighing 212 pounds. 
In the focus of this powerful lens the most 
refractory metals are almost instantly fused 
and completely dissipated in vapor, while 
unyielding stony substances are as readily 
vitrified. 



Conversation by Telegraph. — A re- 
markable discovery is reported in Italy, by 
which it is claimed that two persons at a 
distance may converse by telegraph, so that 
they may recognize each other's voices. 
The modus operandi has not been made pub- 
lie, and for the lack of it the asserted inven- 
tion is considered very doubtful. 

Wheat has been subjected to a tempera- 
ture of 100 degrees below zero, and to a 
temperature of 210 degrees above zero, 
without destroying its germinating propez-- 
ties. 



Coal vs. Wood. — It is stated in the N. 
Y. Gas-Light Journal, that while a ton of 
coal yields but 11,000 feet of gas, a cord of 
wood has been made to yield 98,000 feet 



20 



Wte p«mtg mA gtimtitit jgim. 



New Patents and Inventions. 

Under thla heading we shall mention, from week to week 
aa occasion mav demand, New and Important Inven- 
tions: also, the List of Patent Claims recently Issued from 
the U. S. Patent Office to inventors on the Pacific Coast, 
and other Patent Issues which we deem of local in- 
terest to readers on this side of the Continent. Most 
Patents on this coast arc secured through the MINING 
AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. We are 
prepared to obtain from Washington, with despatch, 
copies of any Patent issued. 

KECENT INVENTIONS. 

D Alton's Improved Headek. — The Con- 
tra Costa Gazette says that Mr. H. N. Dalton, 
of Pacheco, has made what is generally 
conceded to be an important improvement 
upon the Haines' Grain Header. The im- 
provement consists mainly in attaching the 
driving beam or pole, at a point near the 
wheel axles, in place of attaching it at the 
back of the frame. By application of the 
driving power at a point near the center, 
the machine is always better balanced, is 
tinder easier control in adjusting to any 
length of standing grain ; it is turned with 
less strain upon the frame and steering 
wheel, will run with less wear and much 
lighter upon the team, and, more than all 
the rest, will perform its work easier and 
better, because the driving force is always 
exerted at so much smaller angle with the 
plane on which the knife is working than 
when this force is applied at the back of 
the frame — often at an angle of ten degrees 
or more. The first of the improved ma- 
chines, which was put to work a few days 
since, is said to be answering all expecta- 
tions in practical operation. A second one 
will follow it in a few days, and there seems 
little reason to doubt that Dalton's improve- 
ment will meet with merited favor, and 
eventually supersede the original Haines' 
arrangement entirely. 

Invention foe Itbino Fuse. — The Marys- 
ville Statesman of the 7th inst, says: "We 
saw yesterday, at the gun shop of Mr. P. 
George, on Second street, a very important 
and valuable improvement, in the shape of 
a patent for attaching and igniting fuse. 
The arrangement is a small brass needle af- 
ter the style of a needle gun. A piston runs 
through the center, at the end of which is a 
percussion cap. To this piston is attached 
a small chain which works a spring. By 
affixing a string to this chain and pulling at 
it, the cap is made to explode. It will be 
readily seen that a person desiring to fire a 
blast can thus remove to any distance he 
pleases, simply by lengthening his string. 
Another important consideration is that very 
little fuse is required, a piece six inches long 
being sufficient for all purposes. The real 
value of this invention cannot be too highly 
prized, and its general use may be the means 
of saving many valuable lives. " 

Ingenious. — A Nevada county correspond- 
ent of the limes, speaking of Messrs. J. and 
A. E. Bedstone, says : These gentlemen 
have invented and improved on everything, 
from a toothpick to a marine engine, and 
have received medals from the World's Fair 
and the different States in the Union for 
their improvements in machinery. Among 
the curiosities here are a steam boiler and 
engine, which can be carried readily by four 
men, and steam can be generated in six 
minutes. They are now having manufac- 
tured in Sacramento a log-sawing machine, 
of their invention, which will do in one day 
the work of twenty men. 

Dewey's Hakvesteb. — The Stockton Inde- 
pendent speaks as follows of a new harvester 
recently invented by Mr. Henry Dewey, 
which is at work at the Live Oaks, near 
Woodbridge : A gentleman who saw it in 
operation, says it cuts forty acres per day 
with six men and six horses, and the in- 
ventor thinks he could cut fifteen or twenty 
more if there were no stumps in the way ! 
Fifty or sixty acres a day is pretty fast har- 
vesting we should think. The inventor, Mr. 
Dewey, intends to secure a patent. 

Walton's Tamping Machine. — Mr. E. W. 
Walton, of Drytown, Amador county, Cal., 
whose invention for sharpening drills we 
noticed a few weeks since, has also another 
useful invention in that direction, which he 
calls a "tamping machine," which is de- 
signed to facilitate the splitting of wood by 
the use of powder. The apparatus may be 
described as a hollow auger, or drill, which, 
containing the charge and is inserted into the 
log to the depth required. The powder is 
then discharged by means of a cap, and ex- 
pends its force on the interior of the log. 

FokHemobehage. — A Frenchman has in- 
vented a new paper which instantly stops 
the hemorrhage caused by wounds. Mar- 
shal Neil has passed a contract with him for 
300,000 quires of this bibulous paper. 

Milk- Weed Fibek. — An ingenions me- 
chanic has discovered a process by which 
the enamel can be removed from the fiber 
of the milk-weed. The fiber then becomes 



equal to cotton — soft, silky and of great 
strength. Cloth made from it is very strong. 
The value of milk-weed as a fiber, has long 
been recognized ; but the difficulty hitherto 
has been to prepare it thoroughly and 
cheaply. Perhaps the above invention has 
accomplished the desired object. 

patents eecently issued. 

65,538 — Fubnace foe Desulphurizing 

Oees. — William Bruckner, San Francisco, 

Cal.: 

I claim the incline partition, D, in the 
form of a deviating square, or any other 
shape, placed at any inclination or angle to 
insure a constant passing around it of the 
material to be treated, said partition to be 
constructed of iron plates in sections or as 
a whole, and covered with fire-proof mate- 
rial, with surfaces flat or double concave, 
substantially as described and for the pur- 
poses set forth. 

This invention is designed for an improve- 
ment on the revolving desulphurizing cylin- 
der furnace, previously patented by Mr. 
Bruckner, and consists in the substitution 
for the spiral projectiles originally used, of 
a partition running through the center of 
the cylinder, dividing it into two equal 
parts. The partition has each end cut off, 
at an angle of about 45° with the direction 
of its side, giving it a rhomboidal shape. 
This partition is made . to answer the pur- 
pose previously accomplished by the spiral 
projections, and by its use the ores are ef- 
fectually stirred and mixed, so that every 
particle is repeatedly and successively 
brought into contact with the oxydizing 
flame, until the ores are thoroughly desul- 
phurized. 

65,628. — Paper Beel foe Telegeaphic 

Eegistees. — Lewis W. Worth. Sonoma, 

Cal.: 

I claim the reels, B, C, adjustable drum, 
F, with ratchet, P, pawl, B, and spring, S, 
with cord, L, arm weight, W, for the pur- 
pose herein specified and set forth. 

The object of this invention is to provide 
a more ready means, in connection with a tel- 
egraph register, for winding up the paper 
and keeping it from kinks, and also to ena- 
ble the operator, by having the paper 
stretched before him, to more easily read 
it. It may be readily attached to any regis- 
ter in ordinary use. 

65, 750. — Teeth for Lifting Lodged Geatn. 
William Marcus Jackson, Woodland, Cal. : 
I claim the elastic shoes in combination 
with the yielding fingers, applied to a frame 
or section to be attached to a reaper, and all 
arranged to operate in the manner substan- 
tially as and for the purpose set forth. 



BULLION PRODUCT OF THE LEADING CLAIMS ON THE COMSTOCK LODE. 

FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 1867. 



Singular Discovery. — The engineers of 
the new Blackfriars bridge in London, who 
have been compelled to excavate into the 
bed of the river, lower than engineers have 
ever gone before, have made a most unex- 
pected and singular discovery of an im- 
mense deposit of bones fifteen or twenty 
feet below the bed of the Thames. In the 
gravel and near the clay were found the 
bones of the ox, the sheep, the horse, and a 
few human remains! 



The Americans have secured for American 
steamboats the exclusive use of two of the 
principal rivers of China. Our English 
cousins appear to have failed in their efforts 
in that direction. Cause — the faulty con- 
struction of their boats for inland river 
traffic. Americans beat the world in that 
particular class of navigation. The English 
are striving to kick up a breeze in conse- 
quence of their being shut out from those 
rivers. 



The British Postal Service. — The re- 
ports of the British Post Office for 1865 
show a profit over and above expenses of 
$7,400,000. The net revenue of the De- 
partment for 1856 was $3,000,000. All the 
charges for ocean service are paid in full 
out of the postal results, notwithstanding 
the appropriations are made directly by act 
of Parliament. 



CoaiPANT. 


January. 


February. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


Jiine. 


Total. 




$102,571 72 
260,000 00 
140,000 00 
166,200 37 
66,423 00 
80,000 00 
38,163 00 
116,948 67 
24,006 10 


$117,639 44 
270.000 00 
129,850 00 
117,488 97 

45,165 41 
100,000 00 

26,787 00 
116,200 00 

11,411 86 


$79,144 02 
160,000 00 
64,64168 
108,913 86 
62,878 47 
66000 00 
23,08100 
90,43196 
8,062 71 


76,462 68 
337,000 00 
63,971 00 
. 222,076 44 
63,130 19 
245,094 00 
22,884 66 
95,162 91 
18,202 78 


$160,826 68 
408,000 00 
82,000 00 
278.684 63 
74,862 68 
334,289 17 
21,933 00 
94,000 00 
12,000 00 


$117,728 23 
370,493 96 
77,660 00 
195,913 66 
' 4-1,446 46 
346,000 00 
21,500 00 
107,000 00 
14,000 00 


$644,372 67 
1,786,493 96 

657,912 68 
1,079,276 91 

346,906 21 
1,190,383 17 

154,338 6G 

618,743 64 
87,673 46 




















43,674 71 
5,400 00 


70,036 42 
9,600 00 


68,572 86 
7,300 00 


108,953 63 
10,000 00 


132,333 88 
10,866 62 


130,266 51 
12,600 00 


643,886 90 
66,666 62 


Gold Hill Q. M. 4 M. Co. 




1,022,377 67 


$1,014,238 10 


$728,916 44 


$1,262,937 09 


$1,599,796 66 


$1,436,387 81 


$7,064,663 67 





FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 1866. 



The Foeest Springs Mill, near Grass 
Valley, will soon have four of Hendy's 
patent concentrators attached to the works. 



Company, 


January. 


February. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June 


Total. 






$51,646 03 
150,000 00 
155,461 63 
85,000 00 
152,964 76 
69,745 00 
36,000 00 
74,823 60 
10,141 19 
27,478 61 


$64,069 33 
110,000 00 
148,552 35 
96,519 65 
174,096 46 
65,960 00 
27,697 00 
48,223 90 
12,474 01 
49,604 46 


$62,027 18 
66,563 70 

116,102 11 
84,827 28 

142,472 28 
87,338 00 
29,642 49 
91,533 61 
17,624 09 
84,340 81 


$ 65,942 46 
115,000 00 
110,514 82 
130,366 24 
160,804 21 
90,369 00 
34,363 04 
67,765 89 
15,869 42 
81,593 57 


$104,247 33 
130.000 00 
109,601 05 
292,274 00 
146,640 49 
74,862 00 
34,482 75 
62,240 90 
20,869 47 
25,065 89 


$337,822 33 
711,553 70 
691,659 10 
800,781 30 
900,132 15 
441,454 00 
200,277 10 
426,469 11 
96,452 30 




$140,000 00 
62,327 14 
111,794 13 
133.163 95 
43,200 00 
38,191 82 
81,691 21 
19,474 12 
51,523 01 




















Gold Hill Q. M. & M. Co. 


I 


























$671,655 41 


$803,160 72 


$817,177 16 


$781,361 65 


$852,568 65 


$1,000,883 88 


$4,926,707 36 



"We obtain the above valuable tables, showing the bul- 
lion yield of the Comstock Lode for the first six months 
of 1867 as compared with the same period in I860, from 
the Commercial Herald and Market Meviav, a new paper, 
the first number of which was issued on the 10th inst.. 
"The increase of tho bullion yield of the Comstock 
Lode," says the same paper, "as observed in the above 
comparison, is very marked, showing the returns of 
twelve companies during the first half of 18C7 to be 
$2,137,946 31 more than during the same period in 18G6. 
Making an allowance for the companies on the Cometock 
Lode whose names do not appear in the above table, and 
the prospective increase of those quoted, the probable 
yield of that Lode for the year 1867 will reach nearly 
$20,000,000." We have been unable to obtain the yield 
of tho Kentuck and Gold Hill Quartz M. & M. companies 
for the first six months of 1806. The Ophir mine pro- 
duced no bullion during the first half of the present year. 
Mining; Slio,i*Cr Marltol. 

During the past week the mining share market has ex- 
perienced a marked depression. There does not appear 
to be any well-founded cause for such a decline. The 
statement of the product of the mines, represented by 
these stocks as given above, gives evidence of perma- 
nence and increased future value. 

Savage— Contiuues to be well maintained, opening at 
$4,980, then selling at $4,750, ex-dividend of $300 paid 
on the 8th instant, rapidly advancing to $5,000, and at 
the close $4,900 is asked. The ore extracted during 
he week ending July Gth, amounted to 1,629 tons, the 
estimated value of which is stated to be $66,440, equal 
to $40 78 ^ ton. Of this amount the north mine, on 
the seventh level, yielded 898 tons; the middle mine 
347 tons, and south mine 281 tons. The short product 
of the week under review is accounted for by the inter- 
vention of the Fourth of July. We are informed that 
the northwest end of the seventh level, at winze No. 1, 
is in excellent ore, yielding most of the first class ore 
now obtained from the mine. The other portions of the 
claim continue to look as well hb formerly. The actual 
bullion returns in June aggregated $370,493 96, leaving a 
cash balance of $'70,000 in the treasury after disbursing 
the dividend, amounting to $240,000. 

Hale and Nobcross— No sales ; quotable at close at 
$3, 200 asked. The developments on the third floor of 
the 700-foot level, and between the 700 and 780 feet lev- 
els, are said to disclose a very good quality of ore. The 
new discovery, east of the clay wall between the 700 and 
780 feet levels, is now four feet wide, and continues as 
good as previously reported. The drift from tlio 780-foot 
level, running toward the new shaft, is in 150 feet. The 
new shaft was 520 feet in depth on the 7th inst. During 
the month of June the yield of Bullion was $117,728 23 
from 3,302 tons of ore. 

Yellow Jacket — Shows a marked decline since our 
last reference, falling from $1,600 to $800, and closing 
yesterday at $1,000. A considerable quantity of pay 
ore is obtained from the north mine, while in the south 
mine, it is reported, the ore is decreasing in quantity 
and quality, about 7G tons being the daily product. 

Crown Point — Has changed hands to a considerable 
extent, rising from $1,550 to $1,700, then selling at $1,600, 
and closing yesterday at $1,445. During the week end- 
ing July Otn, 516?*; tons of ore were taken from the 
400-foot level, and 136 tons from the 500-foot level. The 
winze from the 500 to the 600-foot level is 64 feet in 
depth, and a cross-cut from the winze was rim 37 feet 
east, passing through unfavorable ground. Work has 
been discontinued at this point for the present. A drift 
carried east on the 400-foot level, near the Kentuck line, 
is said to look well. The body of ore on the 500-foot 
level has been opened 94 feet in length, and is said to 
look 'favorable at the south end, but at the north end it 
has narrowed down to about eighteen inches. The cash 
balance in the treasury at the close of June amounted to 
$20,23* 25. 

Gould and Currv— Advanced from $680 to $725, sel- 
ler 30, then sold at $700, and at the close realized $691. 
In the northeast drift, from the fourth station, the clay 
seam still continues in the middle; the rock on either 
side of it is softer and more damp than heretofore, in- 
dicating tho probability of striking water. It is thought 



that the ground is slightly more favorable for ore, as 
the rock is more quartzose. The mine is said to look 
well for a considerable quantity of ore. There are at 
the dumps some 3,000 tons of ore, estimated to yield 

about $28 per ton Kkntuck receded from $535 to 

$400, and closed at $390. 

Chollar-Potosi — Has been active to a considerable 
degree, advancing from $467 60 to $485, declining to $435, 
seller 10, and closing at $430. We have no material 
change to note in regard to this mine. The new shaft 
has attained a depth of 59 feet below the third Btation — 
769 feet from tho surface. The ore Bent to custom mills 
during the week ending July 7th, amounted to 2,284 tons. 
From the annual report of this company for the fiscal 
year ending May 31st, 1867, we learn that tho average per 
ton of ore worked was $25 73, and the average reduction 
expenses $14 97 per ton. The amount of ore mined and 
delivered to the mills amounted to 57,799^ tons, show- 
ing an average cost of $4 48 per ton. Compared with 
the previous year, it showB a reduction of $1 51 per ton. 
From the Secretary's annual report we condense the fol- 
lowing: 

RECEIPTS. 

Bullion product $1,320,948 f3 

Ore sold 21,314 30 

Other receipts 22, 903 79 

$1,311,226 92 
DISBURSEMENTS. 

Labor aocount $264,196 96 

Working ores 167,893 25 

Dividend No. L 66,125 00 

Other expenses 174,034 50- 

Cashonnand May 31st....; 103,941 21 

$1,311,228 93 

Ophtk— Opened at $340, receded to $320, and closed at 
$300. This company is taking out Borue ore, six differ- 
ent assays of which, made on the 6th instant, show an 
average yield of nearly $400 to the ton. The drift in the 
north mine is being carried alongside the ledge at tho 
rate of four feet a day, which is double the distance 
made in running it on the ledge. Cross-cuts will be run 
through the ledge at intervals. 

Overman — Continues to be actively dealt in, declining 
from $225 to $195, seller 30, improving to $250, and 
closing at $230. The annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of this company was held on Thursday last; 2,921 
shares out of 3,200 were represented. J, J. Bobbins, A. 
K. Grim, J. E. de la Montagnic, John Sime, and H. L. 
Hill, were unanimously elected Trustees for the ensuing 
year. Mr. Montagnie was subsequently chosen Presi- 
dent, and T. Norwood, Secretary. A series of resolu- 
tions were adopted censuring the late Board of Trustees 
for removing Mr. McCullough from his position as Super- 
intendent of the mine, and thanking that officer for the 
efficient manner in which ho had performed his duty, 
and indorsing Messrs. Bobbins and Montagnie in oppos- 
ing the action of the majority of the Board. Mr. 
McCullough was appointed Superintendent, and the 
suit commenced against him by Mr. Curtis for the pos- 
session of the mine, in the name of the company, was 
ordered to be discontinued. The balance of casli in tho 
treasury, as near as can bo ascertained, amounts to 
more than $68,000. Yesterday, at the adjourned meet- 
ing, Messrs. Sunderland and Barron were elected trustees 
in place of H. L. Hill and A. K. Grim, resigned. 

Belcher— Advanced from $380 to $460, receded to 
$400, and closed at $380. . . . JjtfPERlAL improved from 
$210 to $214, closing yesterday at $212. 

The aggregate sales of Stocks and Legal Tender Notes, 
etc., since Saturday last, amounted to $1,469,264, 



Election of Officeks. — California S. 
M. Co. — Trustees: Thos. Bell, Jos, Barron, 
C. T. Emmet, A. C. Peachy, and Wm. E. 
Barron. President, "Wm. E. Barron; Sec- 
retary, George Staacke ; Treasurer, Thos. 
Bell ; Superintendent, P. N. McKay. Office, 
corner California and Sansome streets. 

Chollab-Potosi M. Co. — Trustees : A. 
K P. Harmon, Thos. Bell, Lloyd Tevis, 
Wm. E.-Barron, Chas. Hosmer, Thos. Sun- 
derland, and A* Hayward. President, A. 
K. P. Harmon ; Secretary, "W. E. Dean ; 
Treasurer, "Wm. C. Kalston ; Superintend- 
ent, Isaac L. Requa. Office, 428 California 
street. 

Overman S. M. Co. — "Washoe, Nev. July 
11th. Trustees : J. J. Bobbins, J. E. de la 
Montagnie, John Sime, A. K. Grim, and H. 
S. Hill. President, J. E. de la Montagnie ; 
Secretary, T. Norwood ; Superintendent, H. 
V. S. McCullough. Office, 619 Montgomery 
street. 



©h* pining an* ^riiutific $£ wssjs. 



21 



Contributed for Our Cabinet. 

Und«rtbls heading we shall continue to mention and de- 
(u-rtt...r. according to ro«rit, tuch opeclmens of ore*, mln- 
erain, fosalls, carloAtiM vtc, a« omy bepra 
forwarded to j* ov mail "T expras*, in-paid. Each artlc'e 
will be numbered ami placet! In our cabinet, aud recorded 
with the name of the donor, and the claim or location 
from whence It came. 

169. — We have received several very rich 
specimens from the famous Green Emigrant 
lode, Bald Hill, near Auburn. This mine 
was located in 1865, and has proven to bo of 
extraordinary richness. The specimen which 
we have numbered as above, shows coarse 
free gold, in hard white quartz, free from 
sulphurets. 

170— Is a piece of soft argillaceous talc, 
showing numerous small, but well denned 
cubical crystals of iron sulphurets, and two 
or three larger ones, very much decomposed. 
The latter show very coarse gold. More or 
less fine gold is seen imbedded in the talc, 
having evidently found .their way thither 
without the agency of sulphureta. 

171 — Consists almost entirely of gold; 
much of it, no doubt, left by the decompo- 
sition of sulphureta ; but the largest portion 
probably found its way into the quartz apart 
from any contact with sulphurots. 

172— W. Collins sends us several samples 
of ore from the "Collins claim," two miles 
south of Georgetown. These specimens arc 
from the ledge, where it is tapped by a tun- 
nel, at a depth of 150 feet. The lode is six 
feet in thickness. Nos. 172 and 173 are 
lughly charged with cupriferous sulphurets. 
A working test gives about $10 to the ton — 
probably the sulphurets also contain a con- 
siderable amount of gold, which might be 
profitably extracted by concentration, and 
treatment by the chlorination process. The 
quartz is highly discolored from the decom- 
position of the pyrites, and is quite friable. 
No. 174 is a specimen of white, hard quartz, 
carrying regularly formed crystals of arsen- 
ical sulphurets, which are more favorable 
indications of gold than the cupriferous 
variety. We are not aware that any of the 
sulphurets found in this vein have been as- 
sayed. 



The New Yokk Metal Market. — We 
learn from Winterhoff's circular that the 
dullness in the metal market still continues, 
although in some articles quite large trans- 
actions have taken place. 

Coppeb. — The low price which has ruled 
since April, having attracted some attention, 
several large purchases have recently been 
made. Four million pounds of Lake Supe- 
rior have been sold for 23% to 24 cents 
for Portage Lake ; and 24 to 24% for De- 
troit. The manufactures as yet keep out 
of the market. The ruling price is still be- 
low the cost of production — hence it is per- 
fectly safe to buy as a speculation. In 
England the best selected sold on the 30th 
of April as low as £76 to £77 ; but the mar- 
ket subsequently improved, and the last 
quotations are £82. The consumption has 
been reduced, but probably not less than 
the production. The smelters in the At- 
lantic States have no supply of either Cali- 
fornia or Chilian ore. 

Tor. — The small stocks and low price of 
this metal has also induced several large 
purchases on speculation, at from 21% to 
23 cents for Straits. Banca is quiet, with 
small sales at 25%. English, nominal, at 
22%— all gold. 

Lead is quoted at 6 % for ordinary for- 
eign, with a few parcels of Spanish and Ger- 
man at 6% — gold. 



A Good Sized Bekry Patch. — Mr. John 
Lusk, of the Pacific Fruit Market, of this 
city, has now under cultivation in Oakland, 
a lot of 90 acres, all in raspberries The aver- 
age yield will be about \% tons to the acre, 
or one hundred and fifty tons for the entire 
ranch. This, at fifteen cents a pound, the 
usual wholesale price, would amount to the 
very comfortable sum of $45,000. As many 
as 180 Chinamen are sometimes engaged in 
picking at one time. Every day's surplus 
is saved, and converted into wino. 



SALES OF THE WEEK 

it ro a. r. BToei a excbasqe loami 

Monday, July M. 

162 shs Ophlr at 3303340 per foot. 
60 aha Ophir at 390 per loot a 30 

nahfOtihlr at Stfper foot. x>s. 

12 shs Ophlr at 315 per foot b 30 

24 ah* Ophlr lit 336 oer fool, b 30. 

JO aha Sierra Nevada at 15 per itiarc. 

i'' aha Justis Ind. Conn, at is per an. 

40 shs Could A Curry at 700<j>695 per foot 

8 aha Could k Curry at 690 per foot. 

8 aha Kenluck At 50&&6UO per share. 

3 aha Belcher at 4lO<»400 per foot. 

5 ahs Belcher at 400&A95 per foot, a 30. 
9l thi Crown Point at 1«00«16"0 per ft. 

137 ahs Overman at 21.1(3227^; per share. 
63 shs Overman at 21IXJ215 oer toot, a 30. 

30 shs Overman at 230 per share b 30. 
10 ah* Overman at 223 per share, b 10 

31 shs Chollar-Potosl at470G)t7TK per foot 
1A shs Chollar-Potosl at 480«485 per f t b 30 
60 shs Daney at '.' ' , per shore. 

12 shs Empire M * M Co. at 180 per sh. 

23 shs Bullion at 46 por foot. 

38 shs Imperial at 2110215 por sh art. 
7 aha Yellow Jacket at I60ual5<i6 por toot, 
7 aha Yellow Jacket nt 1950(31673 per it b 10 
7shsCou0dencc at60 Der share. 

93,000 Legal Tender Notes at 72' 4 c. 

AITKKNOON SESSION. * 

417 shs Justis Independent Cons, i "■■■ &20. Q 
lab KeiUuckat475pcr share, b 10. 
23 shs Segregated Belcher at 17 por foot. 
26 shs Chollar-Potosl at 476 per foot. 

6 shs Chollar-Potosl at 477J£ per foot b 10. 
16 ana Crown Point at 1590@160Q por foot. 

6 aha Yellow Jacket at 1670 per foot. 
60 shs Sierra Nevada at 16 per share a3. 
20 shs Danoy at '." . por toot. 
96 ahs Ophlr at 335 per foot, blO. 
60 sha Ophlr at 330 por foot, s 30. 
60 shs Ophlr at 3S2J£ per foot. 
60 ahs Confidence at UJ 1 .; per share, a 10. 

3 shs Bolchor at 4117., per foo:. 

35 shs Bullion at 39@40 per share. 

36 ahs Overman at 220@222 per share. 
20 shs Overmnn at 210 per share, s 30. 

28 shs Overman a t 225(3)226 per share b 30 
in shs Exchequer at 10 per share, a 10. 
12 she Gould A Curry at 690 per loot, 
llshs S F Gas Co. at62>, per share. 
Amount of sales $260,360 00 

Taeaday, July O. 

16 shs Confidence at 63ra;62H per share. 

26 shs Segregated Betchor at 17@I8 p ft. 
120 shs Ophlr at 330@320 por toot a 30. 
276 6hs Ophlr at 330Q326 per foot. 

14 ahs Gold Hill Q. M. A M. Co. at205@206* 
6 shs Imperial at 213 per share. 

3 shs Savage at 4760 per foot. 

60 shs Bullion at 42@40 per foot. 

12 shs Gould & Curry at 690©692>i per foot. 
12 shs Yellow Jacket at 1570@I6<5 per It. 

1 sh. Yellow Jacket at 1680 per foot b 10. 
20 ahs Sierra Nevada at 16017 per snare. 
30 shs Sierra Nevada at 16 per sh s 30. 

30 shs Sierra Nevada at 17 per share, b 30. 
16 shs CaUSteam Nav Co at 69K@69 p cent 
SahsCal Steam Nav Co at 69 per ct, a 30. 

5 sha Chollar-Potosl at 496 per fool, b 30. 
26 alls Chollar-Potosl at 485@477K ncr loot 

6 shs Belcher at 41Q@405 per foot. 

10 shs Justls Independence Cons, at 20, s 30. 
26 shs Justis Ind. Cons, at 2s@20 per sh. 

44 shs Crown Point at 1610@1630 per foot . 

4 shs Crown Point at 1630 per foot b 5. 

2 shs Empire M & M Co. at ISO per srt. 

6 shs Kentuck at 405 per share 

61 sbs Overman at 216@220 per share. 

15 shs Overman at 220 per share, b 30 

45 shs Overman at 195@200 per share s 30. 
10 shs Overman at 216 per share, a 15. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

624 shs Ophir at 320@326 por foot 
180 shs Ophlr at 320@324 per Toot, 3 30. 
i 60 shs Ophlr at 325 par foot, b 10. 
60 sha Ophlr at 322^ per foot b 5. 

35 shs S. P. Gas Co. at at i^'., percent. 
26 shs Ohollar-Potosi at 482}£ per foot. 

15 shB Chollar-Potosi at 4950494 pr ft b 30. 
45 shs Justis Ind. Cons, at 1S@19 per sh. 
30 shs Justis Ind. Cons. atlSprsh b 30. 

36 shs Imperial nt 2U@212>£ per share. 

16 shs Imperial at 211 per share, s3l). 
40 shs Overman at 220 per foot. 

5 shs Overman at 2<J6 pur share, a 3D 

7 shs Belcher at 515 per share. 

4 shs Gonld A Curry at 695 per toot 
4 shs Gould & Curry at 690 per foot s 30. 

10 shs Sierra Nevada at 17 per share a 30. 

48 shs Crown Point at 1640® 166a per ft 

6 shs Bullion at 40 per share a 30. 

1 sh Empire MAM Co. at 180 per sh. 
Amount of sales $199,981 00 

Wedneidaj July IO. 

Ophlr at325@S30 per foot, b 30. 
Ophir at 320@327K Per foot. 
Gold Hill Q. M. Co. at 210 per sh. 
Daney at 8 per foot. 
Kentuck at 490@497>£ per share. 
Bullion at 40@41 per share. 
Bullion, at 40 per share, a 30. 
Overman at 215@220 per share. 
Overman at 205 per share ■ 30. 
Savage at 4950 per foot. 
Imperial at 212 per share. 
Chollar-Potosl at 450 per foot * 30. 
Chollar-Potosl at 425 per foot, 1> 6. 
Chollar-Potosl at 46S@456 per ft. 
Confidence at 05 per share. 
Exchequer at U@12M ncr share. 
Belcher at 460@145 per foot. 
Crown Point at 1650@1700 por ft. 
Crown Point at 1700 per foot b 5. 
Yellow Jacket at 1520@1510 per loot. 
Yellow Jacket at 1546 per foot, b 30. 
Yellow Jacket at 1505@1512J£ p ft, s 30 
Cal Steam Nav Co at 70 per cent 



120 shs 
180 shs 

3 shs 
40 shs 

4 shs 
45 shs 
50 shs 
75 shs 

6 shs 

4 shs 

6 shs 

6 shs 

lsh 
38 shs 
10 she 
20 shs 
llshs 
124 shs 

4 ahs 
1.1 shs 

6 shs 

6 shs 

lsh 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

12 sha Ophlr at 325 per foot 
24 she Ophir at 325 por foot, & 3. 



3fi sha Ophlr at 3*0 per foot b 10. 
1 i- stu Ophlr at 325 per foot 
83 aha Daney at 8 per foot aSO. 
6 shs Belcher at 460 per foot. 

1 sh Belcherat 449 per foot 

2 ahs Belcher at 440® 44?;, per foot 
2 sha Belcher at 445 per foot a 10. 

2 sbs Yellow Jacket at 1600 per foot, a 3a 
2 ahs Yellow Jacket at 1600 per foot. 
1 sh Yellow Jacket at 1620 per foot b 30 
1 ah Yellow Jacket at 14S0 per foot 

1 ah Yellow Jacket at 1*80 per foot a 10. 
28 shs Crown Point at 1676 per foot. 

6 «lu Crown Point at 1680 per share h 10. 

2 aha Savagu at 4960 per foot. 

5 ahs Chollar-Potosl at 4i>:.', per foot 

2 ahs Chollar-I'otosl at 457% per foot 1 3. 

6 siis Chollar-Potosl at 4&5 per foots 30. 
1 ah Chollar-Potosl at 466 per foot 

12shsGould A Curry at "26@720 per foot 

4 ahs Gould A Curry at 725 per fool a 30. 
13shs Overman at 220 per share. 

5 shs Overman at 210 per shun-, s30. 
22 shs Overman at 219 per share. 

5 ahs Overmnn at 220 per share b 20. 

6 shs Overman at 205 per share, a 3). 

3 shs Overman at 22j per share, b 16. 
6 ahs Gold 11 ill Q. 31. A 61. Co. at 210. 
6 shs Confidence at 66 per share a 30. 
5 shs Confidence at 70 per share b 30. 
S shs Confidence at 67>j per share. 

60 shs JuBtls Ind. Cons, at 19®20 porsharo 

5 shs Bullion at 40'; per share. 
36 shs Bullion at 40 per share. 

10 shs Bullion at 41 % per snare, b30. 
1 sh Imperial at 214 per share. 
17 shs Empire MAM Co. at 180 ptjrah. 
26 shs Kentuck at 600 per share b 30. 

6 shs Kentuck at 495 per share. 

20 shs Sierra Nevada at 18 per share. 
10 shs Sierra Nevada at 19 per share b 30. 
126 slis Fireman's Fund Ins. at 93persb. 
30 shs N B A Mission R. R. at52 per share. 
Amount of sales $260,957 00 

Thnriday, July 11. 

3 shs Confidence at 70 per share. 

fi shs Segregated Belcher at 19 per ft, b 30. 

& shs Segregated Belcher at 18 per foot. 
gO shs Bullion at 40®37 per share. 

6 shs Bullion at 40 pershareblO. 
20 shs Bullion at 39%®10Vcr share, b 30. 

6 shs Chollar-Potosl at 470®475 por ft b 30 
10 shs Chollar-Potosi at 452%®4&0 pr ft, a 30. 

61 shs Chollar-Potosl at 447>j@460 per foot. 

3 shs Chollar-Potosi at 455 por ft b 10. 

14 shs Kentuck at 480@(40 per share. 

4 shs Savage at 4960@5O0O por foot. 

22 shs Overman at 219®220 per share. 

10 shs Overman at 2U5@200 per share s 60. 

5 shs Overman at 222>£ per foot, b 30. 
210 ehs Daney at 8 per foot, a 10. 

4 shs Gould A Curry at 716 per foot. 
12 shs Ophlr at 327% per foot, b 10. 

420 shs Ophlr at 320@325 per foot. 
12 shs Ophlr at 320 per foot slO. 

5 shs Belcher at 410®415 per foot s 30. 

1 sh Belcher at 425 per foot b SO. 
36 shs Belcher at 405®425 per foot 

25 shs S. F. Gas at 63.50 Der share, b 3. 
61 shs Crown Point at 1655@1615 per ft 

4 shs Crown Point at 1620 per foot b 5. 
12 shs Yellow Jacket at 1450®1325 per foot. 
60 'shs Justis Ind, Cons, at 19 per share. 

AFTKRHOOX 3BS310N. 

23 3hs Kentuck at 400®415 per share. 

11 shsBolchcr ut 40Q©405 per foot 

in shs Justis Ind. Cons, nt 18 per share. 
20 shs Gould A Curry at 761) per foot, 
8 aba Yellow Jacket at 1350@1200 prft b 30. 

2 shs Yellow Jacket at 1200 per foot b 10. 

15 shs Yellow Jacket at 1150@U30, b 30. 

24 she Yellow Jacket at 1250®1135 per ft. 

8 shs Chollar-Potosi at 440®447% per foot 

3 shs Chollar-Potosl at 450 per sh b 30. 

2 shs Chollar-Potosl at 435 per fool, a 10. 

lsh Savage at 5OU0 per foot c 20. 
40 shs Crown Point at lS00@t65O per foot 
B 10 shs Overman at 200 per share, s60. 
35 shs Overman at 225®230 per share. 

5 shs Empire MA M Co. at 1S0@I85 per sh. 
Amount of sales $252,377 00 

Friday, July ,13. 

$5000 June 7 3 10 Bonds at 79% per cent , 
40 shs S. K Gas at 63 per share.' 
30 shs Sierra Nevada at 16%@17 per share. 
40 shs Daney at 8 per foot 

6 sha Crown Point at 1440 per foot a 30. 
4(1 shs Crown Point at 15U0@1450 per foot. 

2 shs Belcher at 370 por foot. 

12 shs Ophir at 300 per foot, b 10. 
360 shs Ophlr at300®285 per foot. 

2 shs Yellow Jacket at S50@910 per ft b 30. 

6 ohs Yellow Jacket at 900®876 per ft, b 6. 
27 &hs Yellow Jacket at 1Q50@S00 per ft. 
18 shs Yellow Jacket at 83l@900 per ft. 

& slis Yellow Jacket at 870 per ft, s 30. 

6 shs Chollar-Potosi at 445 per foot, b 30. 
49 shs Chollar-Potosi at 44 ®420 per foot 
105shs Overman at 230®260 per share 

6 shs Overman at 230 per share, s 5. 

6 shs Overman at 250 per share, b 5. 
10 Bhs Overman at 250®256 per share b 30 

2 shs Empire Mill A M. Co. at 180 per sh. 

4 slis Could A Curry at 691 per lout. 

5 shs Imperial at 211 per share, a 30. 
24 shs Imperial at 2 i7%®ZI2 per share. 

fishs Kentuck at 395 per share b 30. 
43 shs Kentuck at 4lo@370 per share. 
£ shs Kentuck at 375 per share b 30. 

AFTKBNOON 8ICSSION. 

108 shs Ophir at 30c per foot. 

24 shs Ophlr at 31U per loot, b 30. 

3 shs Kentuck. at MlO per share. 

1 shs Chollar-Potosl at 420 per loot s 3. 

4 shs Chollar Putosl at 425 pur foot. 

16 shs Chollar-Potosi nt 4H0 per root. 

5 shs Belcher at 975®590 per foot. 
4 shs Belchor at 330 per Cool. 

40 shs Overman at 255®240 per share b 30. 
20 shs Overman at 2fi0®226 per share. 
10 shs Overman at 230 per share a 3. 
65 shs Overman at 230 per share. 
4 shs Crownji'oint at U70 per ft b 10. 

25 shs Crown Point at 1475®1445 per foot. 
4 shs Crown' Point at 1475 per foot b 30. 

26 shs Bullion at 36 per share. 

22 shs Yellow Jacket at 900@1010 per ft. 

2 shs Yellow Jacket at 1000 per foot s 3. 
lsh Yellow Jacket at 970 pr ft s 10. 

2 shs Yelloiv-.'J ackut a'. 1000 per foot e 30. 
2 sits Yellow Jacket at 1010 per foot b 5. 
Amount of salts *g1S,6G9 00 



MINING SHABEHOLDEBS' DIBE0T0BY , 

{Compiled for every Issue, from advertlsementa In the 

Mining and SciKirrinc Press and other San 

Francisco* Journals. ] 

Comprising the Names of Companies, District or Count's 
of Location; Amount and date of Assessment; Date of 
Meeting; Day of Delinquent Sale; and Amount and Timo 
of Paymeut of Dividends. 

NAHX, LOCATION, AMOUNT, AND DAT DAT 

ia n DA 7 ° r *■*"■»««• DELINQUENT. OT SALE 

Adclln. .sierra co., Cal., May 29, SI Juno 28-July 29» 

BiiUli-ii. Storey Co . Nev s a io Aug 6 

Roleher, Virginia, Nov., Mnv SO, SIS.'.... '.".JurVo 30-July 31 

Bolcher, \ Irglnla, Nev., May 30, J5 June 30— July 31 

Chlplonena, Sonora, Mexico. July 11. $5 Aug 12-Sept2» 

Cainargo, Landerco , Nov , June 21,520. Aug 2— Sept 26' 
Clncnbcliores, Slunlon, Mex.. AUv 1. 10c Juiv 6— July 29 * 
California. Storey co., Nev.. Jumi 14, $8 so.. J ul'v 24— Aug. 20 
Chalk Mountaiu, Nev. co., Cal.,. June 18, 81., July 19-Aug 3 # 

Central. No. 2... Annual Meeting Julyft 

Chollar-I'otosl. Storey co., Nev., dlv. 25.. ..Payable June 15 

Crown Point. Nev. dividend $80 Payable May 16 

DcSoto, Humboldt, Nev. July 11, $2 Aug 17— Sept 4" 

Daney. Lyon ob\, Nev., Juno 18, $3 Julv22— Aug 10 

Dlos Padre, Alamo, Mox , Junu 13, S3 July 15— Aug 2 

Dardanelles, Del Norte co,, Juue 3, 8c July Ui— August 3* 

Empire M. A M., Nov., dividend $6 Payable Slay 16 

GoldHillQ. M. AM Co Dividend, $15-Povable Julv IS 

Gold 11111 T. & M., storey co., Nev..... Annual Sleet July 20* 
Golden Rule, Tuolumne Co, dlv 50c^sh... Payable Mnv 1* 
Gould A Curry, Virginia, Nev., dividend $80,. Payable Jan 8 
Hope Gravel. Nev. co. Cal. June 20, $l....July 30— Aug 19» 
Hale A Norcross. Virginia, Nev., dlv. $125. ..Payable July 16 

I X L, Alpine co., Cat, June 19, $1.60 July 19— Aug. 5" 

Imperial, Virginia, Nov., dlv. $10 Payable July 15 

Julia, Storey co. Nev., June 19, $1 July 22— Aug. 12 

Kentuck, div., $40 per share Payable July 8 

Lyon M. ft M., El Dnrado'co., Julv 6, $3 Aug 6— Aug I9» 

Lady Bell, Del Norte co., June 18. 16c July 18— Aug. 6» 

La Blanca. Urea, Mex., June 10, $2.60 July 10— July 26 

Lady Franklin, Alpine co., May 2, 30c Juno 10— July 22* 

Mt Davidson, Storey co., Nev., May 22, $1.. June 28— July 15* 
Ncaglo A Corcoran, Storey Co, July 11, 60c. Aug 12— Sept 2* 

Overman. Storey co., Nev Annual Meeting Julv 11 

Oxford Beta, Esmeralda, Nev. June 10,50c.July 10— July 29* 
Phlla. Bllde, El Dorado CO., May 27, 25c.... June 28— July 15 

Rattlesnake. Yuba co., May 22, $1 June 27— July 15» 

Santa Cruz, Antonio, Mex., June 6, 50c July 11— July26 

Sophia, Tuolumne co., June 11, $3 July 11— July 26* 

Sierra Nev., Storey co., Nev., June 1, $10....July 6-July U 

Seaton, Amador co.. May 28. $100 July 8— July 29* 

Succor, Storey co., Nov.. May 28, 30c July 1— July 21 

Shoshone S. M., dividend. $2 per share — Payable March 14 

Savage, Virginia, Nev, dividend $309 Payable July 8 

Savage, Virginia City, Nev Trustees' Meeting Julv 13 

Santiago, Sliver City, dividend Payable March 6 

Sides S. M. Co., June 24, $12.50 

Tuolumne Mountain, Tuol. Co., July 10, $1.. Aug 13— Aug 31* 

White A Murphy, July 3, $6 76 Aug 10— Sept 2 

Whltlatch, Lander co., Nev.. June 21, $15. .Aug. 2— Sept. 26* 

Yellow Jacket Annual Meeting July 15 

Yellow Jacket, Cold Hill, div. $76 sh Payable July 10 

"Those marked Mlthan asterisk (•) are advertised In this 
journal. ■— _ _^^^_ 

Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked. 

8. T. STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARD. 

Fridat Evening, July 12, 1867- 
hisckllakeous stocks. Bid. A»kd. 

United States 7 3-10ths Bonds, June issue $ 7BJ£ 79K 

Legal Tender Notes 72 72}£ 

California Stale Bonds, 7s. 1857 86 90 

San Francisco Bonds, 10s, 1851 100 102 

San Francisco City Bonds, 6s. 1855 80 95 

San Francisco City and County Bonds, 6s, 1858. 75 80 

San Francisco City and Co. Sch'l B'ds, 7s, 1866. 80 — 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1862 80 84 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1861 80 84 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7s. 186.1 80 84 

San Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds. 7s, iS«:i. 80 84 

San Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds, 7s, lou4. 80 84 

Sacramento City Bonds 22 — 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6s 57 66 

Marysville Bonds, 10s 75 85 

Stockton City Bonds 70 95 

Yuba County Bonds, 10s 75 95 

Santa Clara County Bond", 7a 75 

Butte County Bonds, 10s, I860 70 

San Mateo County Bonds, 7s — 

Calltornia Steam Navigation Co «W£ 

Spring Valley Water Co 67*2 

State Telegraph Co 29 

GAS COUFANIKS. 

San Francisco Gas Co 65 

Sacramento Gas Co. 62 

RAILROADS, 

Sacramento Valley Railroad — 

San Francisco and San Jose Railroad 40 

Omnibus Railroad 59 

Central Railroad 45 

North Beach and Mission Railroad 51 

Front Street, Mission and Ocean Railroad — 

DANK1NG INSTITUTIONS. 

California, Loan and Savings Society — 

Bank of Pacific Accumulation Loan Society.. — 
The Bank of California 138 

• INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Flremans' Fund Insurance Co 

Pacific Iusuranco Co 

Kan Francisco Insurance Co 

Merchants' Mutual Marine Insurance Co.. 

California Insura ncc Co 

Union Insurance Co 

California Home Insurance Co 

Home Mutual Insurance Co 

Occidental Insurance Co '. 

National Insurance Co 



75 

70 



94 



m 



. 132U 136 
— "130 
. 400 475 
. 1550 1760 
. 87J£ 95 



MINING STOCKS— WASHOK DISTRICT. 



90 95 

mi nx 



Alpha - 

Baltimore American 

Belcher 

Bullion, G. H 

Crown Point 

Con fldeucu 

Chollar-Potosl 

Daney 

Exchequer 

Empire Mill and Mining Co.. 

Gould A Curry 

Hale A Norcross 

Imperial 

Lady Bryan 

Ophlr 

Overman 

Savage , 

Yellow Jacket 

Golden Rule, California 



.».. 400 440 



. 370 380 
. 35 37 
. 1425 146(1 



— 32 
210 212& 



. 4650 4900 
990 1010 
17 20 



Road-Mending in Paris is done by 
steam-rollers of about twenty-seven tons 
weight ; fine sifted gravel is plentifully scat- 
tered oyer the surface of the road way, and 
this is broken small. The road mending is 
generally carried on at night ; and you may 
often find in the morning some 250 to 300 
yards of fresh roadway, smooth and fit for 
travel. 



They have a girl of ten years in a private 
gymnasium at Roxbury, Mass., that lifts 
370 pounds, one of thirteen that lifts 400 
pounds, and one of fourteen that lifts 460 
pounds. Roxbury is the home of the cele- 
brated strong man, Dr. Winship. 



22 



Mkt ipm*0 m& Mmtxfk §vtw. 



pining .fmmnnvy. 



Tnrc following information is gleaned mostly, from jour- 
nals published in the interior, In close proximity to the 
mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alpine County. 

Miner, July 6th : A new tunnel, commen- 
ced for opening a series of parallel claims 
on the range of the Tarshish, has been named 
the Illinois tunnel. Immediately after the 
rich strike last spring, Mr. B. Arnold se- 
cured the second extension, north, on the 
Tarshish. The croppings of this lode were 
so wide that in order to secure the whole 
without chance for a future troublesome 
neighbor, Mr. A. located a series" of claims, 
thus "corralling" the continuation of the 
lode, which is some time to rival the Corn- 
stock in the value of its production. It is 
thought the Illinois tunnel will pierce the 
rich portion of the lode within 300 feet of 
its month, and at sufficient depth to give 
promise of pay ore. 

The failure of the Washington Company 
to make the mill at Davidson's perform sat- 
isfactorily last fall, combined with the 
knowledge that the Leviathan ore is of a 
similar refractory nature w r itk the Morning 
Star there tried, has put a damper on oper- 
ations in the East, and the owners here, it 
is thought, will take the matter in hand 
soon and see what can be done. 

An offer was made yesterday by a respon- 
sible party, for fifty tons of ore now lying 
in the tunnel of a claim in this county, of 
$100 per ton, the purchaser to take it where 
it now lies. We also have reason for be- 
lieving that this mine might, with proper 
management, furnish enough such ore to 
keep, a small mill running and be a profit to 
its owners, instead of, as now, feeling in 
their pockets every six weeks for cash in the 
shape of assessments. 

One of the workmen in the Tarshish mine, 
an old miner and man of good judgment, of- 
fers to bet a month's wages against an equal 
amount, that he can pick three men to go 
in with him and in one day take out ten 
thousand dollars' worth of ore from the lode 
as it now stands. 

While "working up" the old Sunshine 
claim, Mr. Eay, one of the present proprie- 
tors, found several small veins of ore, sam- 
ples from which looked well, and on being 
pulverized and horned out showed a residue 
of fine appearing blue-black sulphurets. An 
assay made by Mr. Graff gave a product of 
$108 in gold and silver to the ton. The 
amount in sight is'not large, but the vein 
matter of the lode is from 20 to 30 feet wide, 
and several of these small ore-veins are scat- 
tered through it. It is a galeniferous ore, 
also bearing zinc, and like most of our ores, 
refractory, though it will smelt with great 
ease and be profitable ore if a sufficient body 
is found. It will be further explored. 

In the Einggold tunnel a soft decomposed 
substance resembling the rich pocket ore of 
the Tarshish has been struck. They have 
been running in very hard quartz for some 
time, and if this change does not lead im- 
mediately to a body of pay ore, which is 
probable, it will enable them to make better 
headway. Having recently secured indis- 
putable title to their ground, the company 
will prosecute the worfc more vigorously 
than ever. 

Colusm, County. 

A correspondent of the Sutter Ban- 
ner, writing from Wilbur's Springs, 
says: "A prominent citizen of Ma- 
rysville, Dr. S. J. S. Rogers, has 
been prospecting out here, and has located 
the water privilege of Sulphur creek, from 
this place to the mouth, for the purpose of 
running a quartz mill, which he proposes 
building. " 

El Bornrto County. 

, Placerville Courier, July 6th : The Wood- 
side mine, at Georgetown, is at last free 
from water, and the workmen are sinking in 
the main shaft. In a short time they will 
commence drifting out the rich ore, which 
was in sight last fall when the water run 
them out. 

On the Eureka mino they have an engine 
and hoisting works. The shaft is down 130 
ft, from which adrift is being run, to the 
east. In this drift they have some very rich 
rock, but as yet the main ledge has not been 
reached. 

The formation in this (Georgetown) dis- 
trict is generally a talcose slate, particular- 
ly the hanging wall. The quartz is well 
filled with rich sulphurets, and ledges vary 
in thickness from 6 inches to 12 feet, and it 
is very common to find a ledge with well 
defined walls, from 4 to S feet 'in width. 

The main shaft on the Tavlor mine, own- 
ed by H. E. Greene, of San Francisco, is 
10 ft. 8 in. by 6 ft. 3 in., timbered and has a 
partition in the middle. Tt is an incline, 
with an aiiy'lc of about BO iTegfces, and is 
down 10 feet The lude was followed down 



something over 60 feet, at which point it 
was broken up and run about perpendicu- 
lar, but the main shaft was continued on its 
regular grade, and at 100 feet a cross-cut 
was made running in a northwesterly direc- 
tion until the ledge was cut, at which point 
the range of the ledge was about 10 feet 
west of the main shaft. The ledge varied in 
thickness in going down, but at 100 feet it 
is from 18 inches to 3 feet, and shows more 
free gold than at any other point. After 
Cutting the ledge in the cross-cut, a drift 
was run about 20 feet north and 20 feet 
south. The walls at this depth are well de- 
fined and over 6 feet apart, and binds the 
streak of quartz. This formation is of black 
slate or gouge, well filled with sulphurets 
and fine streaks of quartz, which looks like 
the formation in Hayward s mine in Ama- 
dor, and the Golden Eule near Jamestown. 
It is the intention of the owner to continue 
the main shaft down 100 feet further. There 
is an engine and hoisting works on the 
ground, which will either be put up, or 
larger horses obtained and the sinking con- 
tinued by whim. 

Low Mining Company has a shaft down 
100 feet ; ledge 8 feet thick ; shaft to be sunk 
60 feet further. 

The Mount Hope shaft is down 61 feet ; 
ledge broken up, but will be from 4 to 6 
feet thick. 

Philadelphia ' Slide, a new location, on 
which but little work has been done ; this 
ledge is about 6 feet wide. 

North Canyon Company, also a new loca- 
tion, and as yet has had but little work 
done on it. Arrangements are being made 
to fully test this mine as well as the rest 
during the summer and fall. 

Humboldt County. 

Times, June 29th: Prospectors at the 
Shasta Buttes have been successful in find- 
ing coal in three different places. 
Inyo County. 

C. E. Duval, writing from Lone Pine dis- 
trict, Inyo county, Cal., to the Territorial 
Enterprise, of July 7th, says : The mines, I 
cannot deny, are rich, and there is not one 
claim located that will not pay from the sur- 
face. The great difficulty is, there is no 
water. The Mexicans are the only ones 
who work their ore and extract silver. I 
have some rock ready for the furnace, but 
there is no water to finish it A person of 
means, say $5, 000, if there was water, could 
double his capital every two months, by 
building furnaces capable of smelting from 
5 to 10 tons per day, the largest in the dis- 
trict being 250 pounds per day. I am cool 
and deliberate in writing this letter, al- 
though I am seated upon two sacks of ore 
worth $300 at least. 

Visalia Delta, June 26th : The editor has 
seen some specimens of silver-bearing rock 
from the Kearsarge lode, in the Hot Spring 
district, Inyo county, in which the pure na- 
tive silver may be seen "sticking out" in 
every direction. The rock pays, with close 
working, some $600 per ton, and the lode is 
large, clearly defined, and apparently inex- 
haustible. 

Work is being pushed forward in Kear- 
sarge, Alabama and Lone Pine districts. In 
the first they are enlarging Capt A. B. 
Paul's mill, and will soon be crushing. In 
the Alabama, work with arastras, furnace, 
etc., is going on briskly, while the Lone 
Pine region is ' ' like an ant-hill " with busy 
miners, who have five or" six furnaces* num- 
bers of arastras, etc., and are bringing in 
the precious m-etal daily. 
Kei-n County. 

Havilah Courier, June 29th : A'new vein 
has been discovered near Agua Caliente. It 
has been named the "Belief." The vein 
will average two ft. in width, and has been 
traced 1,000 ft. on the surface, and pros- 
pects well its entire length. A shaft has 
been sunk 10 ft., and some of the richest 
rock ever found in the county taken out. 

Another lead, the Phoenix, has been dis 



covered in New El Dorado Diet. The vehx * ioi Go's mill lias just been started up. The 



crops out round a hill for hundreds of yards, 
and in no place is less than two ft wide, in 
many places six ft. , of rich rock, that .will 
pay not less than $50 per ton. 

The Queen Victoria has been traced 300 
yards. The ledge is from six in. to two ft. 
wide, of exceedingly rich ore. 

On the St. John mine, two shafts have 
been sunk, one 50 and the other 42 ft. , dis- 
closing a fine body of rich ore. St. Jean & 
Co. have made arrangements to have an 
8-stamp mill put up. 

In Piute Dist, Erskine & Co. are down 
on the Big Indian lode 50 ft. 

Raines Co., on the Bright Star lode, from 
a recent crushing of 500 it) s. of rock crushed 
in their arastra, obtained $500. 

Bird & Co. are making one oz. to the hand 
in their placer claims. 

>ovadtt County. 

Gazette, July 8th: A number of speci- 
mens taken from the Mary Etta mine, eon- 
tains considerable coarse gold, and abound 



in auriferous sulphurets. The rock is but 
little worn, indicating that they were de- 
tached from ledges in the immediate -s u i 
The ledge has been traced adistance of 1,000 
ft, shafts having been sunk upon it at 
depths varying from 14 to 60 ft. , showing a 
vein from three to five ft. in width. The 
country rock is a soft granite and easily 
worked. The Enterprise ledge, near by, is 
small, but very rich, the rock paying by mill 
process $45 a ton. This ledge is also in soft 
granite. The South Tuba Mining Co. have 
recently commenced operations on their 
ledge, which has been lying idle for six 
years, and have favorable prospects. 

The cement mill formerly owned by Coz- 
zens & Garber, between Bed Dog and You 
Bet, which was purchased by Neece & West, 
will be started in operation again the latter 
part of this week. The present owners will 
continue drifting until they strike the regu- 
lar pay lead. 

Transcript, July 9th: Holburt & Co.'s 
claims at Diamond Creek, were cleaned up 
after twenty days' work by two hands and 
yielded 17% ounces, worth $19 per ounce. 

ExoBnsioK. — Meadow Lake Sun, July 
6th : Twelve hundred pounds of sulphuret 
rock, taken from the "Union Ledge No. 2, 
Excelsior Co. 's claim, were burnt in a small 
prospect furnace, constructed after the 
Knapp & Peacock model. The rock, after 
passing through the furnace, was complete- 
ly desulphurized. It takes about 2% hours 
to destroy the sulphurets. 

The California Co. have 25 men in their 
mill and mine. Eock is being crushed in 
the mill from the Green Emigrant, and is 
paying well. The California Co. are down 
100 feet on the Knickerbocker Ledge, and 
are drif tiug from the shaft. There is plenty 
of good ore in the bottom of the shaft. In 
a few days the company will be crushing 
rock from their own ledge. 

The Mohawk & Montreal Co. 's Mill is now 
running. They have the finest mill in the 
district ; and will undoubtedly make a good 
run. We now have four mills running ; 
that is, the IT. S. Grant, Mohawk & Mon- 
treal, California and Excelsior. 

The Gold Eun Co. have run their tunnel 
in 210 ft ; the ledge is 4 ft. wide. The ores 
from this mine are heavily filled with sul- 
phurets, which, under a common burning 
process, shows as much gold as we have 
seen obtained from a like quantity of rock 
in this district. 

The Excelsior Co. have started up their 
mill and are now crushing, rock from Union 
Ledge No. 1. The rock is from the surface, 
contains much free gold, can be easily 
worked, and a good return is expected. The 
Excelsior Co. have hundreds of tons of de- 
sulphurized ore on the tops of their two 
ledges, which will pay well for working by 
ordinary mill process. 

The Kentucky Co. , at Snow Point, Eureka 
Township, is working away in good earnest, 
sinking for the "Blue Lead." A shaft is 
down 150 feet and will, it is thought, strike 
the bed-rock at the depth of 250 feet from 
the surface. 

Gazette, July 10th : The U. S. Grant Co. 
are progressing rapidly in the work of open- 
ing and developing their mine. Their mill 
is kept running regularly, the rock yielding 
good pay, and three 8-hour shifts are kept 
at work sinking on the ledge. It is prob- 
able the company will erect a 20-stamp mill 
this summer. 

July 11th : The snow at Meadow Lake is 
all gone, except in a few spots, where it 
drifted to a great depth in the winter. The 
California Co. have sunk a shaft on the 
Knickerbocker ledge, 101) ft A tunnel is 
now being run to strike a chimney on the 
ledge. Considerable native copper is found 
in this ledge. Work will soon be com- 
menced on the California, Indian Boy, and 
Indian Queen ledges. The California mill 
is crushing ore from the Green Emigrant, 
The rock will pay $50 per ton. The Excel 



owners of the Phoenix ledge have resumed 
operations: The ore prospects well. The 
last clean up at the Golden Eagle Co's mill 
yielded $20 per ton. TheLightfoot Co. are 
taking out rock for crushing. The Enter- 
prise Co. have let a contract to sink 50 ft 
deeper on their claim. 

Placer County. 

Herald, July 6th : Last Chance quartz 
claim, on Rock Creek, owned by Lawler & 
Co. , is now prospected to the depth of 16 ft. 
and shows well in free gold. The owners 
are greatly encouraged, and intend to prose 
cute their work with vigor. 

Mr. Walter has recently been sinking a 
new shaft on his quartz claim, near Doty's 
Flat, and on Wednesday evening last struck 
it richer than ever. Our informant remarked 
it paid $40 to the handful!. 

Dutch Flat Enquirer, July 10th: Work 
has been commenced on the Blue Bell. The 
vein is narrow, at one point on] yreaching a 



width of about two ft. Repeated proofs 
have shown it to be rich in free gold at the 
surface. 

Auburn Stars and Stripes, July 10th : On 
the 4th instant, Mr. Waldaner, in his claim 
between Ophir and Doty's Flat, struck a 
vein of gold-bearing quartz, or' rather 
quartz bearing gold, that'completely eclipsed 
the Green Emigrant or any other mining 
yield ever before made in Placer county. 
Within three days $18,000 was taken out, 
the cold chisel having been required to cut 
out the solid gold in some instances. (A 
national strike. — Ed.) 
Shasta County. 

Courier, July 6th : The'' Baker quartz 
ledge, at French Gulch, prospects surpris- 
ingly rich, and shows every indication of 
being a ledge of extraordinary value. As 
high as $75 has been obtained from a piece 
of rock taken from this claim. The rock is 
decomposed and porous, resembling honey- 
comb in appearance. 

The Highland mill, at French Gulch, is 
being repaired and improved, and will soon 
be the most complete mill in the county. 
With the addition of five more stamps, the 
mill can reduce a large quantity of rock per 
day. 

A prospecting party has left Copper City 
for the headwaters of McCloud river, where 
it is supposed good gold diggings may be 
found. 

Sierra County. 

Mountain Messenger, July 6th: The Von 
Humboldt Quartz Co. are steadily going on 
with their tunnel, and contemplate putting 
on another shift, to ran night and day. The 
prospects of this claim are flattering. 

A ledge of rich quartz has been discov- 
ered about three miles above American Hill. 
Specimens of the rock show plenty of free 
gold. 

The Monongahela drift claims at American 
Hill are in a prosperous condition. They 
lack only about 30 ft. of having their new 
tunnel completed. 

Some very rich quartz has been recently 
discovered near Gibsonville, in the northern 
portion of the county, some specimens of 
which are literally filled with gold. 

The North American Gravel Co. , at Hep- 
sidam, took from their diggings on the 26th 
ult a piece of gold weighing 17 ozs. The 
mines in that section are reported to be pay- 
ing extremely well this season. 

SSisltlyou County. 

The Yreka Union, of July 6th, proposes 
that a wagon road be made from Scott's 
Valley to Sawyer's Bar, on Salmon Eiver, 
for facilitating the transportation to and 
from the Salmon River mines. 

IDAHO. 

World, June 29th : A Portuguese compa- 
ny on Orleans Bar, opposite Pioneer City, 
made a clean up after a run of 13 nights — 
not working in daytime — and took out 110 
ozs. The same company's previous clean 
up, after a run of 11 nights, netted 105 ozs. 
and $9. In the Bar claims of Wilson & 
Giberson, one week's ran of sluices has 
yielded $7,000. Davis & Co's claim has 
just given upwards of $2,000 after a week's 
run. 

The Lemhi correspondent writes from 
Leesburg, June 17th : There are about two 
dozen claims paying over expenses.- Some 
Idaho boys opened ground, at a heavy ex- 
pense, which pay* from three to four dol- 
lars a day. An Idahoan named McCafferty 
sold to some boys one interest for one thou- 
sand dollars, when the snow was on the 
ground. They have since abandoned the 
claim and gone back. The country has no 
appearance of mineral resources. From 
surface to bedrock is a mass of nigger-head 
boulders. As yet I have not seen any quartz 
gravel. The country is going and will soon 
be gone. Crowds are leaving for Montana. 
Hundreds say they would return to the Ba- 
sin were it not for John Chinaman not leav- 
ing a vestige to live on. Board is $15 per 
week; meals $1. I have not seen $100 
since I have been hero. Every one seems 
broke. I would say to one and all, stay 
where you are. The whole country seems 
a mystery — one-half thrown up by erup- 
tions, and a pity the other half wasn't blown 
away. 

A new excitement and general stampede 
has occurred, on account of a report that 
rich gold diggings had been struck a few 
miles from Idaho City, on the south side of 
Moore's creek. 

Owyhee Avalanche, July 6th : The Silver 
Cord mine is improving. The Woodstock 
mine is yielding rich ore from a 14-inch 
ledge. The North Star is turning out some 
fine ore. McCready and others are driving 
a tunnel to strike an extension north of the 
North Star. They expect to strike the vein 
at 80 ft. The Poorman and Oro Fino are 
turning out rich rock as usual. Some 13 
tons of Whiskey ledge rock has been worked 
in the Miuoar mill ; assayed value, $1, 519. 48. 



lEhe ftluring awl Scientific gte$«s. 



23 



Several more mills might be supplied at a | 
profit on War Eaf 

The Potosi has out some extra rich rock. 
Haight anil others :ire opening a rich gold j 
on Florida Munntaiu. Tiie Ba 

rered ledge, is 14 inches at the 
present depth, 40 ft It is yielding ruby 
and sheet silver, and polvbasite, and also 
fine black sulphureted ore. The vein is 
soft, and no blasting is required Ore from 
.iathiui ledge will pay 31,200 per ton. 
The Silver Monarch prospects rich. 

Lowiston Journal, June 'J!»th : An arastra 
has been started on Smith's ( rtileb, Warren's 
tons of ore from the Hie 
Jacet ledge yielded 852,85 per ton. At 
Pierce City a few claims on the new ditch 
are paying well. Some parties have been 
working the sluices of both whites and 
Chinamen. 

World, July 3d : J. P. Lambing has 
lately commenced crushing ore from the 
Juniata ledge, at Rosenbaum's quartz mill. 
It hag averaged Sllti per ton. New dig- 
gings have been discovered on Lost river, a 
tributary of Boise river. Prospects of from 
5 ttf 15 cents per pan have been found. The 
gold is fine and resembles Moore's Creok 
district 

NEVADA. 

i .-i. lee., l-lu. 

Enterprw, July 9th : Parties recently in 
from Pine Grove, Wilson district. Esmer- 
alda county, state that mining operations are 
more active than ever. Chevalier & Palmer 
have struck a very largo body of rich ore in 
the tunnel of the Mountain View, and the 
Wheeler boy9 have also struck a rich ledge 
of rock in the Wheeler claim that will pay 
several hundred dollars per ton, and that 
they are now talcing steps to get a mill of 
their own. The ore in this district is worked 
solely for the free gold it contains. 

. July tlth : Ore has been struck 
in the 400-foot level of the Belcher that will 
yield SoO per ton. 
Humboldt. 

Register, June 29th : Hon. J. A. Banks, 
after visiting the principal mining districts 
in the State, returns thoroughly satisfied 
with the mineral resources of Humboldt. 
He proposes to address the Miner's Conven- 
tion here on the 4th of July. A proposition 
will be made to establish a uniform assess- 
ment year throughout the country, to har- 
monize as far as possible the various district 
laws, and provide a fund for their publication 
and circulation. 

Unionvillo Register, July 6th : W. S. Sar- 
gent has a deed from E. Page Davis, of 
New York, to the Mountain King S. M. Co. 
for mining property in Echo district, bear- 
ing SI. 200 revenue stamps. The consider- 
ation is S600.000. 
Pn li ru nagnt. 

Reveille, July 2d : Mr. Evans has entered 
into contracts with age'nts of companies for 
the erection of two mills, one of 10 stamps, 
and the other of 20 stamps, which are to be 
constructed at Hiko, for dry crushing and 
roasting. It is intended that work on them 
shall be pushed forward at the earliest prac- 
ticable moment, and that the machinery 
shall be on the ground ready to be put in 
place. There are from 300 to 400 men in 
the district, the larger part of "whom are en- 
gaged in mining, and greater activity pre- 
vails than ever. Mr. Evans visited several 
of the principal mines in the district, promi- 
nent among which are the Hlinois and List, 
all of which are now worked to advantage. 
The first attempts at mining were rude and 
generally injurious, but a good system has 
at last been arrived at under which the most 
flattering developments are made ; and it is 
known that there is sufficient valuable min- 
ing property in the district, without taking 
into account probable discoveries, to render 
it ultimately one of the most important in 
the State. Considerable work has been done 
at random over a large surface, and few if 
any of the veins have been opened to the 
depth of 80 ft. , apd those that have reached 
that depth show large veins and good ore. 
The Illinois has penetrated to the depth of 
nearly 100 ft., and develops a large body of 
fine mineral. 

Heesc Blver. 

Reveille, July 2d : The machinery of the 
mill on the lower grade, formerly known as 
the Union, has been taken down and several 
loads hauled to Hot Creek, where it is to be 
erected immediately. The new mill will be 
of the same capacity as the original, which 
had 10 stamps, and will be furnished with 
furnaces for roasting the ore. In anticipa- 
tion of its speedy erection the miners of the 
district are employed in taking out ore for 
its supply. 

The largest and most valuable bar of 
silver, yet produced iu this city, was ex- 
hibited yesterday at the assay office of 
Boalt & Stetefeldt. It weighed 1,535 ozs„ 
and was valued at SI, 945. 64. Its weight 
was greater by sevoral ounces, and its value 
by several dollars, than the largest and most 



valuable bar hitherto produced here. The] 
bullion is of uncommon fineness, and was 
obtained from ore I North Star. 

reduced at the I'arrott mill. 

ihuahua ledge, in 
ark List., varies from three to five feet iu 
thickness, the whole body of which will 
furnish milling ore above the average qual- 
ity. The tunnel has been run into the lull 
the length of 110 ft., out of which 1,0001 
tons of ore arc estimated to have bceu taken, 
and the workmen are still employed in the 
work of extraction. A location has been 
made on the extension of the Chihuahua, 
from which the owners tuke out handsome 
ore. The mill of the company is situated 
in Gillson Valley, which is believed to ex- 
tend to the Humboldt, where a good supply 
of water may be obtained from a large 
brook, but the immediate vicinity of the 
mill site is deficient in timber, plenty of 
which exists on the southern and western 
slopes of the mountains. The Chihuahua 
mine is situated on the hillside about half a 
mile west of the mill. The mill was com- 
menced last January, and will not be com- 
pleted before the close of next September. 
It will be of the capacity of 20 stamps, and 
the battery will be arranged for wet crush- 
ing. The mill will not be provided with 
roasting furnaces. The mill structure is of 
wood, placed upon foundations of stone, and 
its various parts are substantial and well 
arranged. The experiment of attempting 
the reduction of the ores of the district 
without the aid of fire seems to be hazard- 
ous, and leads one to question the experi- 
ence and intelligence of the management. 
A simple analysis of the ore would show 
whether or not it could be profitably re- 
duced by amalgamation. Except upon the 
surface, the ore contains a large proportion 
of sulphur, and fire would appear to be the 
certain means of saving its silver. 

Sufficient work has been done on the Lin- 
coln ledge to determine its good character. 
There are also a number of ledges in the 
hands of small companies, that exhibit good 
size and fair quality of ore, many of which 
will be worked if the operations of the Cen- 
tenary Co. prove successful. 

Washoo. , 

[In the Stock Circular, in another portion 
of this paper, will be found late mining 
news from this district. | 

Trespass, July 2d : The Puebla mine, in 
Surprise Valley, is turning out some very 
rich ore. The district was discovered late 
last fall, and quite a number of ledges lo- 
cated. The Puebla has been prospected but 
little, but the rock is very rich in mineral. 
Some very rich pieces have been exhibited, 
being a portion of 2,000 lbs. brought to 
this city, obtained at a depth of 10 ft. on 
the eroppings. A cross-cut run through 
the vein shows its width to be 10 ft. with 
well-defined walls. A small quantity worked 
at the Mariposa mill yielded $214 in gold 
and silver per ton, silver predominating. 
The ore resembles that taken from the fa- 
mous Highbridge claim, at Belmont, and is 
very rich. One hundred lbs. of the ore was 
sent to San Francisco yesterday, to Miles 
Goodman, who is a large owner in the 
claim. The balance, some 1,800 lbs., will 
be worked here, and if the practical return 
is as large in mineral as there is reason to 
suspect, a mill will at once be despatched to 
the district, and the mine will be opened. 

Enterprise, July 4th: Yesterday Mr. J. 
B. Hill brought up from the Gould & Curry 
mill 27 bars of bullion, weighing over 2,100 
lbs., and worth §60,000. The bullion is 
from Savage ore. 

July 7th : The Gold Hill Q. M. & M. Co. 
yesterday declared" a dividend of §15 per 
share, almost $600 per foot. 

The Savage Co. have .declared a dividend 
of $300 per share for the present month, an 
increase of $100 per share over last month. 

Gold Hill News, July 6th : The Kentuck 
Co. have declared a dividend of $40 per 
share, payable on and after July 18th. 
MONTANA. 

Post, June 15th : A nugget was found in 
Cooleys' Dry gulch, just below town, weigh- 
ing $593.45. The Bock Creek stampeders 
have not yet been heard from. 

Wm. Margetson, writing from Virginia 
City, Montana, June 9th, says snow fell in 
the valleys to the depth of six inches, on 
the 5th and 6th inst. The miners are doing 
little or nothing in mining operations, being 
froze up ; they are patiently waiting for the 
melting of the snow, and a warm spell of 
weather. So says the San Bernardino Guar- 
dian, of June 6th. 

OREGON. 

Oregoniau, June 25th : The editor has 
seen some beautiful specimens of gold-bear- 
ing quartz, obtained on the east side of the 
Willamette, 50 miles southeast of Eugene 
City. The pieces of rock were threaded 
with gold to an extent whioh gave them the 
appearance of being largely composed of 



that metal. Several ledges have been dis- 
covered in the vicinity where these speci- 
al. ::ml is believed that 
some will prove really valuable. The pieces 
ore saw were obtaiecd from a ledge 
which projects above the surface of the 
ground ; and though narrow, the ledge pre- 
sents an excellent appearance. 
UTAH. 

Salt Lake Vtddte, July 1st : Lewis Rob- 
inson and two other men brought into this 
city on Thursday last 40 ounces of gold 
dust, which they had crushed out of quartz 
in two days. The dust was assayed by 
Bohm & Mollitor, of this city, and run into 
a bar that weighed 38 31-100 ounces, and 
was valued at $740.08. Its fineness is 934K- 
The only account the discoverers have as 
yet given is, that the mines are about 200 
miles from here and are rich. Outsiders 
locate the mines in the Green River country 
somewhere, from the fact that Robinson 
owns a ferry on that stream. That there 
are good gold mines in Utah is beyond a 
doubt, but they are concealed by those who 
know where they are, and prospecting is 
very much discouraged. 

WASHINGTON. 

Dalles Mountaineer, June 25th : Quartz 
has been discovered on the Met-how River. 
Washington Territory, and there is no doubt 
but what there is extensive placer diggings 
in that region. A place was found where a 
party of miners had formerly been at work. 
An Indian stated that a number of years ago 
a party of white men had mined there, but 
they left to go to Frazer river. They had 
done considerable work, and from a little 
prospecting by Mr. Howe, he is satisfied 
that the diggings will pay wages. The party 
that are prospecting on the Wenache, are 
supposed to have good diggings. 



"Valuable Books on Mining, Mineral- 
ogy, Geology, Metallurgy, Etc. 

ANSTED'S Gold Seekers Manual. 1 vol. 

■ill S 1 76 

ANTISEU..— The MnmfadDn of Photo- 

1 1 Mid ntlicr 

Itltuimn. u, substances, cnpabli' ol supplying Kuril- 

in: Fluid*. By Thuinas AuUscll, X. 1>. [vol 8vo.. S 00 

BLAKE, W. P. — Geological Reconnoissanco 



BLAKE,- W. P.— Silver Ores and Silver 

JVC 1 00 

BLAKE, W. P. — Mining Mitgnzineand Jour- 
naLoC Qealoffy, etc. Bvc 00 

BLAKE, YV. P.— Annotated duologue of 
California MlnenU 9v< so 

BUCKLAXD fRev. Win.) — Geology and 
Mineralogy,. 1 vols Svo. clotli io 00 

CONGDOX. — Mining Laws and Forms of 

California and Nevada, ami tliu Mlinun Ordinances 

ofHexteo. 154 pp. svo; flexible clotli ; iSta. (Tho 
only vnupllutiou extant 2 SO 

DUFRENOY. — Mineralogio. 5 volumes, 



Cox's Cement Mlll. — This mill, to which 
we have already alluded, consists of an iron 
pan six feet in diameter and eighteen inches 
deep, in which four iron rakes or stirrers 
are made to revolve. A large stream of 
water pours into the pan, and the fine 
stuff finds its way through small holes under 
the false bottom. The large stones are dis- 
charged through a gate. There are two 
sluices connected with the pan, one to carry 
off the coarse stones, the other to carry 
away and wash the fine dirt and gravel, 
which contains the gold. Mr. Hittell, of the 
Alia, who has recently witnessed the opera- 
tion of this machine, near Placerville, writes 
of it as follows : 

The first mill was not made strong enough 
and has been broken ; but after it had been 
at work some time, I saw that the clay was 
thoroughly separated from the stones, leav- 
ing these clean and bare. I am therefore 
disposed to accept the general verdict that 
the success of the invention is no longer 
doubtful. The cement consists of gravel in 
a very tough clay, so tough that the mass in 
the mine must be broken down by powder, 
and the fractures go through stones as well 
clay. The stamp mill by which the hard 
cement has been reduced heretofore, has to 
spend much of its power in crushing the 
stones which contain no gold. These rakes 
save that unnecessary trouble, and it is es- 
timated that Cox's mill will wash cement at 
an expense of less than a bit a ton. A few 
weeks will decide the question, and if pres- 
ent expectations are realized, we shall see 
another important advance made in the art 
of mining and iu the production of gold. 



. 2000 



Ice Quahkies. — The Glaciers of the Alps 
are worked for ice precisely like stone quar- 
ries for their products. Not only so, but 
they are also excavated into galleries. Some 
of these galleries have been fitted up for 
places of resort, and magnificently furnished 
as saloons. The depth of snow and ice 
exclude the beams of the sun ; but the cal- 
cium light sheds its brilliant luster through 
these unique chambers, which is reflected 
as from thousands of mirrors of glass. Such 
an establishment, with all the conveniences 
of a well appointed parlor, would have been 
a most inviting place of resort and repose 
during the hot days of last week in this city. 

Hidden Tkeasuhe Pound. — It is reported 
that a large amount of treasure — $340,000 — 
has recently been unearthed by some ne- 
groes near Pensacola, Florida. It was in a 
wooden chest in a brick vault, and must 
have lain iu its resting place for a great 
number of years, as no one had any knowl- 
edge of it. 



DANA'S Manual of Mineralogy. Revised 

ettlUon. 200 illustrations. Umo. clotli. New Haven, 
18K1 School Edition 22s 

DANA'S Manual of Geology. Numerous II- 

lustiailons. Bvo, ball morocco. Philadelphia, LS93. 6 79 

DANA'S Text-Book of Geology. Illustrated. 

12m.. , clotli. Philadelphia, isiii....*. 2 25 

ELDERHORST'S Blowpipe-Analysis and 

IJClcriiiliiatlvo Mini;raio»-v. Third edition! revised. 
Svo.clolh. Philadelphia, 1S66 160 

FAIRBAIRN. — Iron : its HiBtory, proper- 

tics, and Processes ot Manufacture Hv Wm. lair- 
bairn. C. E . LL. D. 1 vol. Svo. New Edition 4 00 

FEUTCHW" ANGER.— A Treatise on Gems. 

1 vol. 8vo. clotli 170 

GOODYEAR'S Translation". A Treatise on 

tho Assaying of Copper, silver. Lead. Gold and Mer- 
cury, from the German of Th. liodeinan and Bruno 
ICerl. 1 vol. 12inu. clolh 3 50 

HUMBLE. — Dictionary of Gcologv and Min- 
eralogy, Third Edition, Revised 1 vol. 8vo. cloth. 9 00 
HOSKOLD'S Practical Treatise on Mining 

Lund and Railway Surveying. Engineering, Etc. 

1 vol. Svo. cloth 10 00 

KUSTEL. — Nevada and California Processes 
of Silver and liold Extraction, for general use, and 
especially tor the Mlninc Puhllc of Caltfornra mid 
Nevada; also, a description of tho General .Metal- 
lurgy of Silver Ores. By Guido Kustel, .Mining Eh- 
ginccr. Illustrated hy accuruto engraving. 1 vol. 
Svo cloth 5 00 

LAMBORN. — Rudimeotal Treatise on tho 

Metallurgy of Copper. 1 vol. 12mo. limp cloth. 
Illustrated 100 

LAMBORN.— Rudimentary Treatise on the 

Metallurgy of Silver and Lead. 1 vol. 12nto. limp 
cloth. Illustrated 100 

MITCHELL'S Manual of Practical Assay- 
ing. 1 vol. Svo. cloth 10 50 

MAKINS. — A Manual of Metallurgy, more 

particularly of the Precious Metals, including tile 
Methodsof Assaying them. By"G. H- Mukins. 1vol. 
12mo. cloth. Illustrated by upwards of 51) engrav- 
ings S 50 

OVERMAN (Fred.)— A Treatiso on Metal- 
lurgy ; comprising Mining, and Geioriil and Par- 
ticular Metallurgical Operations. I Vol Svo. cloth. 7 50 

PIGGOT.— The Chemistry and Metallurgy 
of Copper. By A. Suowdcn i'iggot, M. D. 1 vol. 
12mo. cloth 2 00 

PHILLIPS AND DARLINGTON.— Rec- 
ords of Mining and Metallurgy; or, Facts and Memo- 
randa for the Use of Mine Agents and Smelters My 
J A. Phillips and Joint Darlington. 1 vol. 12mo. 
cloth t 00 

PERCY (John). — Metallurgy; the Act of 

Extracting Metals from Ihoir Ores, and adapting 
litem to various Purposes of Manufacture. Iron 
and Steel. 1vol. Svo. cloth 13 50 

PLATTNER AND MUSPRATT on the 

Use of the Blowpipe. 47 Diagrams. Third edition, 
revised. Svo. clotli. London, 1854..; 6 00 

Practical Use of the Blowpipe ; being a Grad- 
uated course of Analysis, llliuc. cloth. New York, 
1858 2 00 

SCOFFERN'S Useful Metals and their Al- 
loys. 1 vol. cloth 5 50 

SMITH'S Blowpipe — Vade-Mecum. The 

Blowpipe. Characters of Minerals Alphabetically 
Arranged. 8vo. cloth. London, 18S2 175 

URE'S Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, 
and Mines 2,3uu Engravings. Prom last London- 
edition. 3 vols: Bvo. cloth,. New York 16 50 

WHITNEY.— A Geological Survey of Cali- 
fornia, lteport ot Field Work from I860 10 1864. By 
J.D. Whituev. Per. vol. rtuurlo 6 00 

WHEELER & RANDALL'S Quartz Oper- 
ator's Handbook. Flexible cloth, I2ino. San Fran- 
cisco lsd5 1 00 

Any of the above Books will be furnished by 
return mailor express, on receipt of tho price with 
postage added. Any other books desired will also 
be furnished at the lowest San Francisco retail 
prices. - Address, 

DEWEY & Co.. 

Mining and Scientific Press Office, San Francisco. 



14vt3-lamtf 



Estaulisiikd) [May, 166U. 

VOJL.X73I3B FIFTEEN 

— OF 7HK — 

Mining and Scientific Press, 

COMMENCING- JULY, 1867. 
IDE WJEY <fe CO., mitolisJiers. 

Issued every Satuhtuy, nt our Rook and .lob Printing 
OfTlcc, 505 (May street, corner of Sansonie, San I'Vjm'mu. 

Term* in Advance :— One year, Jf>; Six months. 53; 
Single copies, 15 cuius; Monthly Scries, 4^60 per year, or 
liS cents per number. Back Volumes from January, 1864, $3 
per volume; bound, S5 per volume. 

The Mwino and Scientific Pukss is now thoroughly es- 
tablished, ami enjoys one of tin- largest and most permanent 
sbbSDYiption lists of my weekly journal on llils const The 
individual character and reputation of its constant patrons 
throughout the entire, coast i.< one of the bi-.-t recommenda- 
ti.m.s of us niyrity and value as a medium of intelligent yro 
gress and prosperity. * 

DEWEY «fc CO., Proprietor*, 

Mining and Scientific Press Patent Ageney, Newspaper, 
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24 



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pitting mft Mmtiik %m& 



W. B. EWER, Senior Editor. 



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DEWEY A; CO., Pnolisners. 



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cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting our 
Agents Intheir labors of canvassing, by lending their Influ- 
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worthy men. 

Writers should be cautious about addressing correspond- 
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Canvassing Agents. 

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Br. I.. G. Yntes Is our duly authorized traveling 
agent. July 6, 1867. 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 13, 1867. 

Notices to Correspondents. 

An Old Tbappeb requests us, in the course 
of the jubilation indulged in at the recent 
annexation of a large part of Northwest 
America and the anticipated national en- 
largement of the fur trade in consequence 
thereof, to pay a few brief respects to the 
memory of an American, who probably 
in his own person combined enterprise, 
energy and inexhaustible perseverance to 
a degree that has never been excelled, if 
ever equalled, by any one person belong- 
ing to any country. Ledyard was with 
the celebrated navigator, Cook, during 
his last voyage, in the course of which he 
(Ledyard) became first acquainted with 
the immense value of the fur trade. The 
information thus acquired he first laid 
before the ship owners of New York and 
Philadelphia, by whom his views were re- 
ceived most coldly, notwithstanding As- 
tor subsequently realized such an im- 
mense fortune therefrom, although he 
only to a small extent, comparatively, 
carried out similar plans to those pointed 
out by Ledyard. By the merchants of 
the cities named, Ledyard was informed 
that he might possibly find patrons at 
L'Orient On this hint he at once took 
ship for Europe, and succeeded tempora- 
rily in obtaining promises of adequate as- 
sistance, which, however, his anticipated 
patrons failed to fulfil when the period 
for starting the expedition arrived. Led- 
yard then visited Paris, where he became 
acquainted with the celebrated Paul Jones, 
who at the commencement of the acquaint- 
ance lent a favorable ear to Ledyard's 
views — in fact, promised to engage in the 
speculation ; but, from some unlxplained 
cause, eventually withdrew from his en- 
gagement. Ledyard then determined to 
penetrate, unaided, into the fur region by 
land. With this object he proceeded to 
St. Petersburg, and succeeded in obtain- 
ing an interview with the celebrated Em- 
press Catharine, from whom he obtained 
permission to visit Siberia. But in get- . 
ting as far as Yakutok, he was arrested 
without any notification whatever, trans- 
ported by post to the frontier of Poland, 
where he was dismissed with the warning 
never to set foot again into Russia, if he 
did not wish to be hanged. He arrived, 
ragged and penniless, in London, where, 
by the recommendation of Sir Joseph 
Banks, to the African Association, he was 
commissioned in 1788 to take charge of 
an employing party about to be sent into 
Central Africa. Poor Ledyard got as far 
as Cairo, where his life was abruptly ter- 
minated, owing to hishaving administered 
to himself an injudicious remedy for a 
bilious attack. 

Bboom-Sttck. — The modern popular be- 
lief in witchcraft arose contempora- 
neously with the Protestant Reformation. 
This fanatical belief was acquiesced in by 
no less a person than Luther. It is com- 
monly considered to have arisen as a con- 
sequence of a distorted conception of the 
newly-awakened principle, of faith that a 
higher agency than the Pope existed, and 
was presumed to be a demonstration 
against the agency on earth of his satauio 
majesty. 

pQNTiNEN'iAii Life Insurance Company, 
302 Montgomery street, corner of Pino. 



The Magnesium Light in Mines. 

A VALUABLE INVENTION. ■ 

Every mine superintendent and mining 
engineer must be aware of the great advan- 
tage which the presence of " daylight," even 
for a few minutes, would be in their daily 
or weekly examinations of the condition 
of a mine, especially in the searches for 
faults or cracks in the roof. As the mine 
foreman goes about in the various drifts and 
galleries, particularly in a mine with bad 
ground, how eagerly he scans the roof under 
which himself and the men under his charge 
must be daily and almost hourly exposed, 
often immediately after the most violent 
convulsions from blasts. How often does a 
small crack pass unobserved, even by the 
most critical eye, admitting the corroding 
and drying influences of the air to penetrate, 
until a large mass or flake falls, to the dan- 
ger of life and limb. 

Great and terrible as is the loss of life 
from explosions in the English mines, yet 
immensely greater is the loss from other ac- 
cidents. Carefully compiled statistics show 
that for every single life lost from explo- 
sions, three are lost by falls from roofs ! 
The loss of life from explosions, usually 
killing by the wholesale, gives such acci- 
dents a sensational character, whilst but 
little attention is paid to the individual cas- 
ualties of most accidents of a different nature. 
The deaths from accidents in shafts were, in 
England, for the last two years, greater 
than those resulting from explosions ; not- 
withstanding the explosions, during that 
period, have been more than usually fre- 
quent and destructive. 

The chief portion of deaths by falls from 
roofs and from accidents in shafts, are 
caused by an insufficient knowledge of the 
faults and irregularities of the strata; a 
knowledge which it is almost impossible to 
acquire by the dim light of a candle or 
lamp, on the powder-begrimmed and dust- 
covered walls of a mine. What a boon, 
then, would it be to all, if the broad light 
of day could be poured into the mine,, even 
for a few moments only, during the weekly 
or daily examinations for such faults which 
it is the duty of the proper officer to make. 

HOW IT CAN BE DONE. 

British mining associations and govern- 
ment inspectors, while they have been un- 
ceasing in their endeavors to secure safety 
from other causes of accidents, have not 
been unmindful of similar needs in this di- 
rection, and have frequently called atten- 
tion thereto. Within a few months past, 
a Mr. Larkin, who has been some time ex- 
perimenting with the view of utilizing the 
magnesium light, has devised a lamp of that 
description for the especial use of persons 
whose duty it is to see that the mine is at all 
times safe from roof and wall faults. With 
this lamp in his hand, the chief under- 
ground manager is enabled to make as mi- 
nute an examination into the details of the 
structure and condition of the walls and 
roof of a mine as though he was examining 
a wall in the broad light of day. The lamp 
is carried in the hand, and is not heavier or 
more inconvenient than an ordinary Davy 
lamp ; while it is capable of producing the 
magnesium light, and shutting it off at will. 
A spirit flame is used to ignite the magne- 
sium, which is used in the form of a fine 
powder, the flow of which can be stopped 
and turned on at pleasure ; thus securing 
economy, in using the more expensive light 
only when occasion may require. By dilut- 
ing the magnesium powder with fine sand, 
in varying proportions, any degree of light 
can be readily attained. This invention is 
exciting considerable interest among mining 
men and others in England. It is neither 
costly nor intricate in its operation, and is 
not at all liable to get out of order. Of 
course it can be used either as a naked 
light, or with a Davy protection. The in- 
vention, for one of its kind, is second in 
importance only to that of Sir Humphrey's. 



Home Trades and Manufactures. 

A ErjsE Factoet. — In our issue of the 
2d of February last, we made mention of 
a newly invented machine for the manufac- 
ture of blasting fuse, and of the fact that a 
manufactory for making that material would 
soon be established in this State. We are 
now happy to state that Mr. Eva, the in- 
ventor, returned from New York on the last 
steamer, whither he had been to superin- 
tend the construction of his machinery. 
That machinery is now in this city, and will 
be put in operation in about two weeks, in 
the building on Brannan street, between 
Third and Fourth streets, occupied by Mr. 
Korbel, as a cigar-box manufactory. A suf- 
ficient amount of machinery will be put in 
operation to supply the entire demand on 
this coast. 

We have already spoken of the necessity 
of such a manufactory here. The import- 
ance of having fuse fresh from the manu- 
factory is well understood by those whose 
lives are often endangered by working with 
a defective article. Much difficulty is en- 
countered in the use of imported fuse from 
its deterioration in transportation. In pass- 
ing through a hot climate the tar or other 
material with which it is served, is liable to 
penetrate to the powder, and destroy the 
continuity of the conducting medium of the 
fuse, thereby greatly delaying blasting op- 
erations, and endangering the lives of those 
engaged in such work. 

The Baeeel Manufactoby on the Po- 
trero is now nearly ready for active opera- 
tion. A portion of the machinery was started 
up about a week ago, and several thousand 
staves have already been got out, more as a 
preliminary trial of the machinery than with 
the view of turning out regular work. The 
proprietors were disappointed with regard 
to a portion of their machinery, which ar- 
rived around Cape Horn, some three months 
since, and. were compelled to dispatch an 
agent to the East to remedy the defect. That 
agent returned on the steamer which arrived 
on the 3d inst., and the works will soon be 
under full headway. 

Considerable difficulty has also been found 
in procuring the right kind of wood, espec- 
ially for pork and other ban-els which re- 
quire considerable strength, and have neces- 
sarily to be made of hard wood. Nearly all 
the California woods check badly, in season- 
ing, some so much so as to render them 
absolutely worthless. The proprietors pre- 
fer to "go slow" intheir enterprise, at con- 
siderable cost, rather than to rush their 
work into the market in a slip-shod manner. 
Their object is to establish a reputation for 
their manufacture from the start. 

Every operation connected with the busi- 
ness, which can possibly be done by ma- 
chinery, will be so done, and every piece of 
machinery will be of the most modern and 
improved character. Every kind of cask or 
barrel used on this coast will be turned out 
at these works. This establishment will be 
prepared to supply the demand for the en- 
tire coast, and at a cost which will admit of 
no possible competition from the East or 
from hand manufacture anywhere. This 
enterprise is one, the want of which has 
long been felt in this community, and we 
trust the proprietors will be amply rewarded 
for their, investment. 



The Danfobd Atmosphebic Lamp is a 
kerosene burner, introduced here recently 
from Philadelphia, by Messrs. Gillig, Mott 
& Co., well known' hardware dealers, of 
Sacramento, who have the exclusive sale of 
the same for the States of California and 
Nevada. This lamp gives a clear, steady, 
brilliant light without the use of a chimney. 
By clock-work, a fan .wheel is made to re- 
volve with great rapidity, throwing a steady 
current of air upon the flame, thus insuring 
perfect combustion, brilliancy of flame, and 
at the same time preventing smoke or any 
disagreeable smell from the oil. Sold in 
this city by E. Ayers, Washington street, 
opposite post office. 



Prices of Breadstuffs the Past Year. 

The enormously high prices of breadstuffs 
the past year at the East were more the re- 
sult of combinations of speculators than of 
any actual scarcity of supply. The crops, 
both in the Atlantic States and in Europe, 
were indeed less than usual ; but the sur- 
plus would have been amply sufficient to 
have met all contingencies. The " corner " 
was successfully maintained, longer than 
was anticipated by the speculators them- 
selves, notwithstanding the heavy ship- 
ments from California. Of course that fact 
was greatly to the advantage of this State, 
although the chief profits therefrom went 
to the middle men, rather than to the bene- 
fit of the growers. We were told, at one 
time, that California wheat, which had been 
shipped to Fiance, had re-crossed the Atlan- 
tic and gone west to Chicago. The infer- 
ence was that Chicago was sending to this 
State for wheat. Nothing could be further 
from the truth. The wheat re-shipped from 
France was a small sample lot, and was re- 
ceived at Chicago at a time when the ware- 
houses there were full. Upwards of 4,000 
tons of wheat, and a still larger quantity of 
flour, was on store in Chicago when that 
wheat reached there, and the daily receipts 
were fully equal to the current demand. 
The story was circulated and garnished for 
the interest of the speculators. 

About the same time the dealers in New 
York were astonished by the arrival of two 
or three cargoes of wheat from Liverpool. 
The fact of that importation was trumpeted 
abroad as an evidence of an approaching 
scarcity in the New York market. It is now I 
pretty generally suspected that those im- 
portations were made at a great loss by 
heavy holders in Chicago, who took that 
method to counteract the efforts of the spec- 
ulators who had sold "short;" and who 
were endeavoring, by every possible artifice, 
to "bear" the market, so that they could 
settle their differences with the least possi- 
ble margin of loss. 



Worcester's Improved Globe Valve. — 
Mr. J. M. Thompson has left at this office 
one of Worcester's improved globe valves. 
The improvement appears to have a decided 
value, which only needs to be seen by engi _ 
neers to be appreciated. It consists in 
causing the valve to rotate on the screw- 
stem, which raises or lowers it in such a 
manner as to allow of its wearing a perfectly 
tight seat, through any scale or mud which 
may accumulate on the seat or valve, and 
which by its presence often causes leakage 
and damage to the valve. This valve is be- 
ing rapidly introduced in most of the west- 
ern cities. The right for this coast is for 
sale by Mr. Thompson, at the Mammoth 
mills, Plumas county. Further information 
may be obtained by calling at this office, 
where one of the valves may be seen. 

The City College. — The sixteenth ses- 
sion of this well known Educational Insti- 
tute commenced on the 5th inst. The fac- 
ulty of this institution consists of nine 
Professors and Teachers of ability and ex- 
perience. The course of instruction em- 
braces all the studies usually pursued in 
the best Grammar and High Schools, as 
well as in regular Collegiate Institutions. 
Attention is also given to physical as well 
as mental and moral culture. Its situation, 
being located in a convenient yet retired 
portion of the city, near Union Square, 
with all its 1 other advantages, and its thor- 
ough course of study, renders it a most de- 
sirable place for instruction. Rev. P. V. 
Veeder still' continues the Acting President 
of the Institution. 



Who Wants a Building Lot ? — The ex- 
tensive auction sale of thejreal estate of the 
late J. C. Beideman,fadvertised in another 
colunin, presents one of the most favorable 
opportunities for securing a homestead ever 
offered in this or any other city. A wide 
margin in choice, as to situation, and plen- 
ty of time for payment, is afforded. 



©be Pining and gtimtitit %tt&. 



25 



A New Savings Bask. — We would call 
the especial attention of our readers, miners, 
and manufacturers, to an advertisement in 
another column, of the "Farmers' and Me- 
chanics' Bank of Savings," 225 Sansome 
Htreet. This is a new banking institution, 
incorporated under the banking laws of the 
State, and approved April 11th, 1862. Its 
Directors are among the best men in our 
community — men of wealth, and of high 
social and moral standing — thus giving to 
the community a guarantee of permanency 
and usefulness,. Snch an institution as this 
promises to be, has been long wanted by 
the farmers, drovers, miners and manufac- 
turers of the State. Deposits as small as 
one dollar are received — thus meeting the 
wants of those who are anxious to accumu- 
late from small beginnings. 

Parties can make their deposits from time 
to time, and draw them, as in other banking 
institutions ; and can deposit them for tem- 
porary or permanent purposes, receiving 
interest thereon, after a certain length of 
time. The miner can remit his gold dust, 
his money or his bullion, for sale or for 
coinage; and check against the same, or 
leave it on deposit, drawing interest We 
know of no institution organized among us, 
giving more promise of success and useful- 



Levey's Fihe Extinguishes. — A trial of 
Levey's Fire extinguisher was inade on 
Tuesday evening last, under the supervision 
of the Fire Department A 12x12 building, 
of redwood, containing several tar barrels, 
a lot of shavings steeped in coal oil, etc. , 
was prepared for the purpose on Union 
Square. The building was fired, and when 
the signal was given by the Chief of the 
Board, Mr. Levey approached with his ex- 
tinguisher, and succeeded in putting out 
the fire. He had the flames under control 
in less than two minutes, and they were 
completely extinguished in about two min- 
utes more. The universal verdict was that 
the trial was a success. It would appear to 
be almost impossible for a fire to spread 
much if one of these machines could be 
brought to bear upon it before it had got 
much headway. We shall probably give a 
full and illustrated description of this novel 
tire extinguisher next week. 

Crossing the Ocean on a Baft. — Three 
persons started from New York on or about 
the 1st of June, to cross the Atlantic on a 
"raft." This novel seagoing craft is de- 
signed as a life-saving raft, constructed 
chiefly of inflated water-proof material 
There is no hold or cabin upon it, every- 
thing being exposed to the action of the 
wind and waves ; but the adventurous party 
have confidence that the raft will ride every 
sea. The object of the voyage is to test its 
utility. They will visit England and go to 
the World's Fair at Paris. The raft was 
spoken when about 170 miles out — all hands 

well. 

■*■— °^»- •* ♦ 

A cannon was recently manufactured at 
one of the foundries at Grass Valley, accord- 
ing to the National, out of an old 8-inch 
shaft — the bore being 1 Y± inches in diame- 
ter and fifteen inches in length. After be- 
ing bored, it was put into a lathe and turned 
and polished. If we are not mistaken, this 
is the second cannon manufactured in 
Grass Valley. ' 

The arrivals and departures by sea from 
San Francisco for the six months ending 
July 1st, were as follows : Arrived, 16,488 ; 
departed, 8,300 — showing an increase of 8,- 
188 ; nearly one-half the arrivals being a 
permanent addition to our population. Of 
this increase about 2,000 were from China. 



A New Light-house is to be erected at 
Cape Mendocino. The tower will be con- 
structed of iron, and the lens of the first 
order of Fresnel, revolving at an interval of 
thirty seconds. The foundation of the tower 
will be 360 feet above high water mark. It 
will be lighted about the middle of Novem- 
ber. 



Bessemer Steel Ware. — Bessemer steel 
is now used in the manufacture of ordinary 
iron cooking utensils. All kinds of hollow 
ware for domestic purposes, are now made 
of this material They are pressed into 
shape from a flat plate very much as bonnet 
shapes are pressed, and are of course turned 
out without seam or rivet The superiority 
of steel over cast' iron as a conductor of 
heat, as well as its increased strength for a 
given thickness, and many other considera- 
tions, render this description of iron ware 
economical at a much higher price than the 
ordinary ware. The cost of manufacture 
by this process is much less than the cost 
with cast iron — the difference being almost 
equal to the increased cost of steel over iron. 



New Incorporations. —Articles of incor- 
poration have recently been tiled in the 
County Clerk's office in this city as follows ; 

Scott BiverG. M. Co. — Siskiyou county. 
July 10th. Capital stock, $120,000; 100 
shares. Trustees : George Hearst, Joel. J. 
Josselyn, J. W. Pearson, Wni. A. Bolinger, 
and W. P. PooL 



The first steam fire engine in China ar- 
rived in March last, and has given such 
satisfaction that several more will soon be 
ordered. These engines were from the same 
establishment which has supplied all the 
steam fire engines in this city. 

Commercial Herald and Market Re- 
view. — The first No. of this paper was is- 
sued last steamer day. Its appearance is 
quite creditable. 



Jacob Shew, Pioneer Photographer, 612 clay street, north 
aide, fourdoors above Montgomery, (late 315 Montgomery 
street,) takca nil kinds of Photographs In the best style of 
the Art. He would Invito especial attention to the new 
" Cabinet Photographs," which he is taking to perfection. 
lOvlJtf 



Pbkso&s desirous of obtaining the finest Wood Engrav- 
ings, can procure them only by having the picture photo- 
graphed on tho block, by 

D. H. WOODS, 

MvUtrnr No. 28 Third street 



Save TTonr Teeth.— Do not have them extracted 
without first consulting a good Dentist. The loss Is irrepar- 
able, and, in many Instances, unnecessary. DR. BEERS, 
corner of Pino and Keamy streets, makes a specialty of 
filling the fangs of dead Teeth, and building up broken 
crowns with puue gold— thus restoring them to their origi- 
nal usefulness and beauty. 

BSr* Call and examine the work. Finest quality of arti- 
ficial work also manufactured, leivl J. if 



Gold Bur*, of whatever size, if well cast, assayed 
for two dollars, at A. P. MONITOR'S Assay Office, 
611 Commercial street, opposite United States Branch 
Mint. I6vl4-3m 



Brown's Filtering Heater.— For preventing In- 
crustation In Steam Boilers, purines water from lime or 
any other impurity, saves luel, saves the boiler, prevents 
explosions, and protects life and property. Tho cost of the 
Filter is soon saved in fuel and boiler— repairs alone. 

One Is in operation at the San Francisco Foundry, Fre- 
mont street, where Rights can bo procured, or all needed 
information, on application, In person or by letter, to 

5vll-lv AUSTIN A. \t'ELLS, Agent 



Metai-mihgist.— A practical metallurgist, experienced in 
all branches of Ills business, and particularly in the manu- 
facture of Touon coppkk, wants employment His address 
can be had the office of the Mining and Scientific Press. 
2ftv1,4-4w» 



N0RTS AMERICA 

Life Insurance Company. 

* 

Usual Restrictions on Occupation and Travel 

' ABOLISHED I 



Policies of this Company aro guaranteed by tho State of 

New York, which is true of no other Company 

on this Coast. 

The meat Responsible and Liberal Company n the World 1 
J. A. EATON & CO., 

Managers Pacific Branch, SOS Montgomery st. 

20vI4nr9p SAN FRANCISCO. 



Cyanide of Potassium 

FOB — 

QUARTZ MILLS, 

Photographers, Electrotypers, Etc. 

Manufactured by the 

PACIFIC CHEMICAL, "WORKS. 

For sale by all Wholesale Druggist* and 

Dealers in Photographer^ Stock. 

2vli-altf 



J^ Builder** lata 

•KAorricE in the 

Vr lALIFORSIA SAVI! 



Insurance Company— 

BUILDING Or THE' 
I.VGS BANK, California 
street, one door from Sanaorae ttrcet 

O-riKE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 10rMr>r><ir 



b& 




LINSEED OIL. 

The Pacific Linseed Oil & Lead Works 

Arc now prepared to furnish dealers and consumers 
Pure Linseed Oil, 
Haw or Boiled, attlic Lowest Market Rates. We call es- 
pecial attention to the quality of our Oil, believing It to ba 
superior to any Imported Oil altered In thin market 
Orders from the country will have prompt attention. 
Address, 
Puclflc Unseed OH and Lend Work*, 
Care of L. B. BENCHLEY & CO.. 
19vl4-3m9p San Francisco. 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill and Forge Co., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— MUD — 

Every Variety of* Shafting 1 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 

Steamboat Shullts, Crank*, Plnton and Com- 

nectlnij Soda. Car and Locomotive Axle» 

and Frames. 

— ALSO — 

HAMMERED IROIV 

Of every description nnd size. 

BSF- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL and 
FORGE CO., Post Office, San Francisco, CaL, will receive 
prompt attention. 

asp- The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 9vl43m9p 



Real Estate Sale 



E S T A. T E 

Of 

JACOB C. BEIDEMAN, deceased. 

HY 

JOHN W. BRUMAGIM, Ad m In la tr a tor, 

With the Will annexed, will commence, on 

"Wednesday, the 24th day of July, 

At 13 o'clock M M 

And continue from day to day, until the whole Is sold, 
at the auction room of ' 

MAURICE DORE «fc CO., 

337 Montgomery Street. 

TERMS, IX UNITED STATES GOLD COIN. 

1-4 Cash ; 

1-4 in One Year, 

1-1 in Two Years; 

1-4 in Three Yeais. 
Deferred payments to bear interest at 
eight per cent, per annum, payable quar- 
terly, and secured by mortgage on the 
property. 

«©- Cataloguesof the property can bo obtained of H.F. 
WILLIAMS* CO,, Clay street, oral tho office of MAURICE 
DORE & CO., 3X7 Montgomery street. Ivl5-3w 



JAMES M. TAYLOR, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Will practice In the State nnd Federal Courts. Special at- 
tention given to proceeding under the Patent Law. 
2vl5-lqy. 



THE CHSEA.T UGHT. 

THE DANFORD 
Atmospheric Lamp. 

Tills Lamp burns coul oil, requires no chimney, gives a 
nurc white and steadv name, uses tliirtv per cent, less oil 
than any other Lamp in proportion to the amount ot lijrlit 
afforded, and is absolutely indispensable in .every house 
where gas is not used. CALL AND fcEfc. THEM. 

1< or sale only by ■ E, ., A A,^' K& ^ ,- 

2vl5 qy 417 Washington street, opp. Post Oilice, t>. F. 



ARMES & DALLAM, 



215 and air Sacramento street. 



SAJi FRANCISCO. 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



WOODEN WAJRE, 



Willow Ware, 

Feather Dusters, 

Baskets, in great variety, 
Clothes Wringers, 
Brushes, all kinds. 

Paper Bags, all sizes, 
Blacking. 

Ten Pins and Balls, 
Twines for all uses. 

Fish Hooks mill Lines, 
Cordage, 
Broom Materials, Stationery, Bale Rope, etc., etc 



Having recently enlarged the capacity of our 

PIONEER, 

WOODEN WARE MANUFACTORY, 

To meet the demands of our rapidly Increasing trade, we 

are now extensively engaged in manufacturing 
Brooms, 

Brushes, 
Palls, 

Tubs, 

Keelera. 
Sieves, 

Churns, 

Krult Boxes. 
Salt Boxes, 

Wash Boards, 
Cheese HoopF, 
Peach Baskets, 
Broom Handles, 
Cheese Safes, 

Cnrtaln Rollers, 
Kegs, all kinds. 
Pastry Boards, 
Butter Molds. 
Butter Tnhs. 
Tnr Buckets. 

Clothes Frames, 
Barrel and 

Half-bbl Cover*, 
And many other articles in tho Wooden Ware lino, of very 
superior quality, which we offer to the trade at lower 
prices than the imported article commands In the market 



Wc are SOLE AGENTS for the sale of 
SHERMAN'S 

Improved Clothes Wrinjrer 

For the Pacific Coast. 
We would call the attention of the trade to the supe- lority of 

"ARMES' STAR EXTRA BROOMS," 

Being made from selected materials by the best workmen. 
They are unequalled for durability, fineness and beauty of 
workmnnship. None genuine except those bearing a star 
and the facsimil* of the signature of C. W. & G. W. ARMES 
on the label. Trade mark secured. Parties ordering this 
Broom should specify "ARMES- STAR EXTRA," to insure 
their getting the genuine article. 

Our customers can always rely upon having their orders 
promptly filled with goods of superior quality at the low- 
est market rates. 



21vlJ-Iam6m9p 



ARMES ifc DAliLAM, 

215 and 217 Sacramento street. 



26 



©to pmi»g mi Mmtifk §xm. 




I A New Silk. Febeb. — An Eastern paper 
says : ' ' The Department of State has received 
information froni the United States Con- 
sul at Lambayeque, Pern, that an import- 
ant discovery has been made in Peru of the 
silk plant. Preparations are "being made to 
cultivate it upon an extensive scale. The 
shrub is three or four feet in hight. The 
silk is inclosed in a pod, of which each plant 
gives a great number, and is declared to be 
superior, in fineness and in quality, to the 
productions of the silkworm. It is a wild 
perennial, the seed small, and easily sepa- 
rated from the fiber. The stems of the 
plant produoe a long and very brilliant fiber, 
superior in strength and beauty to the finest 
linen thread. Small quantities have been 
woven in the rude manner of the Indians, 
and the texture and brilliancy is said to be 
unsurpassed." 



3Kstal>lislxed in 1849-Corner ITiirst and Mission streets, San Francisco. 



HAVING INCREASED OUR FACILITIES IN EVERT DEPARTMENT, WE ARE NOW 
prepared at the shortest notice and at the most reasonable rates, to furnish all 
kinds and description of Machinery, including Steam Engines, Quartz Mills, Mining Pumps 
of all kinds, Hoistinc Gear, Gas Work, Lanndrv Machinery, Architectural and Ornamental 
Castings, Sugar Mills, Saw and Flour Mills, Water Wheels of all kinds. Hydraulic, Hav, Rag, 
screw and Drop Presses, Coining Machinery. Pile Drivers, Bark and Malt Mills, and all 
klnd'f nf Castings. 

EXGrl.N'ES. — Marine Engines, Oscillating and Boara ; Stern and Side Wheel Boats; 
Locomotives, Stationary Engines, Horizontal, .Upright, Oscillating and Beam, frooi six 
to fifty Inches diameter. Also, Scott & Eckarrs Adjustable Cut-nil' Regulator— best in 
use; W. R. Eckar't's Balance Valve for Stationary Engines; Woodward's Patent Steam 
Pumn and Fire Engine. 

BOILERS. Locomotive, F'.ae, Tubular, Upright, Cylinder and Cornish, and every 
variety of Boiler Work. All sizes nf tubes and pipes for pumps. 

PUMPS.— The Excelsior double-acting Force Pumps are manufactured hy us. These 
very superior Pumps are warranted the best, and arc fast replacing all other Force Pumps. 



AMALGAMATING SI ACM I XEK"5f . -Wheeler & Randall's Improved Tractory 
Curve Paii, Zenas Wheeler's improved Hat bottom pan, Beldin's pan, Veatch's tubs, 
Prater's concentrators, Waklee'3 pans, Beers' pan, German Barrels, Arastra Gearing, Chile 
Mills. Settlers m' :!ll descriptions, Retorts of all sizes and shapes, for Silver and Gold, 
Portable Stamp Mills, Straight Batteries, for wood or Iron frames, Dry Crushing Bat- 
teries, or machines with the latest improvements, everv variety m Stamps, Mortars, Cams, 
Pans and Tubs. BLAKE'S PATENT QUARTZ CRUSHERS, of all sizes. 

Oil, BOKI3TG TOOLS ANJ>. MACHINEKT-Of the latest and most ap- 
proved construction, made from drawings lately marie bv Prof. Blake at the oil wells m 
Pennsylvania. We have the facilities for working gold arid silver quartz and other ores, to 
test their value, bv the hundredweight or ton. 

Russia Iron Screens, of all degrees of fineness and of all qualities of iron. All -work done 
in the best manner at the lowest cash prices. 

0. J. UOOTH. GEO. W. PKESCOTT. IRVING M. SOOTT 



24vl2 



EC. «X. BOOTH «fc CO. 



Machinists and Foundries. 

PALMER, KNOS & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

No*. 10, SI, S3 and 25 First Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF 

MACHINERY, 

STEAM EXCISES A\I) QUARTZ MILLS* 

DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

Self- Axlj listing I*istoix I?aoltiiigj, 

Requires no springs or screws; is always steam tight; 

without excessive friction, and never 

gets slack or leafey. 

WHEELER <fe RANDALL'S 

NEW GKIXDER. AND AMAL6A9IATOR 

HEPBURN & PETERSON'S 

AMALGAMATOR AND SEPARATOR, 

Knox's Ama,lg:aiiiator!$, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

Superior tor working either GOLD OR SILVER ORES, and 
is the only Amalgamator tliat has stood the test of sevcu 
. years' continual working. 
ttenulne Wiilte Iron Stump Shoes and Dies 

Having been engaged for the past ten years in quartz 
mining, and being conversant with all the improvements, 
either in -Mining or Milling, we are prepared to furnish, ai 
the shortest notice, the most perfect machinery for reduc 
lng ores, or saving cither gold or silver. 13vl0f|y-tf 



WILLAMETTE IRON WORKS, 

PORTLAND, OREGON. 

©team. Engines, Boilers, 
SAW AND CRBST MILLS, 

MINING MACHINERY", WROUGHT IRON SHUTTER 
WORK, AND BLACKS MIT HING IN GENERAL. 
Corner North-Front and E atreels, 
18vl3-ly One block north of Couch's Wharf. 

UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 
WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER, 

©TEA.IMC EIVGTIVJEJS, BOILERS, 

And all kinds of Mining Machinery. 

Also, Hay and Wine Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability mid dispatch. 

Ilunbar'n Patent Self- Adjusting: Steam Piston 



Front Street, between X and O streets, 

livll Sacramento City 



GEORGE T. PRACY, 
MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos 1D9 and ill Mission street, betweeu Main and Spear, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

STEAM ENGI3T E, FLOUR A\l) SAW MILL 

And Quartz Machinery, Printing Presses, 

AND 

MACHINERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION MADE AND 
REPAIRED. 
SS^Special attention paid to Repalrlng.^Bfr qy-3 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

K". -E. Cor. Fremont nud Mission streets. 

Manufacturers of 

Marine and Stationery Engines 

Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Mining 

Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

—ALSO— 

Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Presses 

of the latest Improved Patterns. 

STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand; Quartz Mill Shoes and 
Dies warranted to be made of the best white iron. 
Dunbar's Improved Self-Adfu»tlns: Plston- 
Pn.cU.Inp, requires no springs or screws; is always steam- 
tight; without excessive friction, and never gets slack or 
leaky. 

MACHI9TEBY, OP ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cutting and Castings tt 

the lowest market rates. 

Cvllly DEYOE, DIXSMORE <fe CO 



Pacific File, Reaper and Mower Section 

MATSTTJ FACTORY, 

No. S3 Beale Street, between Market and Mission, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Files re-cut and Warranted as good as new, or no charge. 
Theuiily establishment in the State. We also man- 
ufacture Reaper and Mower Sconon.-'. 
Ivl5tf DUKNINii & FISHER, Prop'rs. 



GLOBE 

Foundry and Machine Shop. 



STOCKTOS , CAL. 



KEEP, BLAKE & CO., 

aiANCFACTUREKS OF 

<lunriz, Saw and Grist. HI ill Irons, Steam 
.Engines, Horse Powers, 

Mining and Irrigating Pumps. Car Wheels, Derrick Irons, 
House Fronts, Iron Fencing, Balcony Railings, etc., 
at San Francisco prices. Orders solicited 
KJvliMy and promptly executed. 



i.°s. H 5 S°"! HAWSCOM & CO., il.TZSo": 
JEtna Iron Works ! 

Soothe a.-t corner Fremont and Tchuna street*. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Practical Machinists and Iron Pounders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ MILL MACHINERY. OF ALL KINDS, 

SAW MILLS, FLOTJB MILLS, 

Dmiuar'N Improved Sclft-Adlustlng 

VISTON PACKING, 

No^so extensively used in the East and in this State. Re- 
quires no springs or screws: Is always steam-tight; without 
excessive friction, and never gets slack or leaky. 

HANdf'OM'S CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now in use in this Slate or anywhere else 

"Wheeler «£: Kn ndair* New Grinder and 

A maliramntor, 

Which only needs examination to be appreciated. 

Tyler's Improved "Water "Wheel, 

Giving greater power, at lower cost, than any wheel in uco 

Send for one ol'onr circulars, giving full tables 

All Wheels warranted to give the 1 ower as set forth, or 

the money will be refunded. 

Sole makers for thin conit of the " Fendcrgnsi 
"White Iron St simp Shoos and Dies. 
None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 

at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 

and specifications of machinery, which will be made to 

order. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 

l:h-12 



LEWIS COFFKT. j. s. .'ISDON 

IjTCWIS COFFEY & RISUON, 

Steam Boiler & Sheet Iron Works. 

THE only exclusively Boiler Making establish mum nvl the 
Pacific Coast owned and conducted bv Practical Boiler 
Makers. All orders for New Work and the repairing of Old 
Work, executed aKordcred, and warranted as to quality. 

Old Stand, comer of Bush and Market streets, opposite 
Oriental Hotel. San Francisco. 

CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

No. 1S5 First street, opposite Minna, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 

All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
Castings. Brass Ship Work of all kinds. Spikes, .shentbing 
Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges. Ship and Steamboat Bellsand 
Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks and Valves, Hy- 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 
BO" PRICES MODERATE. ^0ff 

V. KINGWELL. 19vliJ.lv] J. H. WEED. 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY k CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

©TEAM ENGINES, 
Quartz, Flour and ©aw Mills, 

Moore'* Grinder and Amalgamator, TSrodle's 

Improved Crusher, Mlnlntr Pumps, 

Amaliraniai..!-!., and all hinds 

of Machinery. 

Nob. 45, 47 and 49 First street, between Market and Mla- 
i ir>n street, San Francisco. 3-qy • 




NEPTUWE IRON WORKS) 

Corner of Mission and Fremont Streets, 

■SAN FRANCISCO. 

MARire, 

Locomotive, 

And all kinds of 
HIGH PRESSURE 

Steam Boilers 

MADE. 
All Boilers guaranteed and 
tested by U. S. Boiler In- 
snector before sent out of 
the Shop, at Shop expense 

AllktndsofSheetlron and 

Water Pine. Coal Oil 

stills, Wrought Iron 

Worms, etc.. etc. 

Manniiictured to Order. 

Old Roilei-x Reimlrcd 

D. t 'ASIEBOH. 



(TV V~'V"^ *; 

V>~c' \s S_J ^_/ \Jt 




How to Detect Adulterated Qtjick- 
sufEK. — Mercury is often found in the 
market -wilfully adulterated with lead, tin 
and bismuth. Of lead it can absorb, or dis- 
solve, almost one-half of its weight without 
losing much of its liquidity. This adul- 
teration can be easily discovered by rubbing 
some of the metal on the open palm ; if it 
soils the skin it is adulterated — if pure, it 
leaves no trace., Besides, if dosed with lead, 
it will leave a tail behind — that is, the 
drops, instead of being globular, will assume 
an elongated form, and a more or less flat- 
tened surface. 



Tough Wood. — It is said that the white 
nut pine of California is the only kind of 
tree on the Pacific coast which will afford 
a wood tough enough for ox yokes. The 
Indians manufacture their bows from a 
species of yew, which is found in the deep 
canons of the Sierra Nevada. 



DrvEES at work in Boston Harbor to get 
the sunken yacht Wave out of the ohannel 
have recently found two of the women who 
were drowned when she went down, cling- 
ing to the rigging, holding on with a death 
grip. Had they let go they would have 
come to the surface, and might have been 
saved. 



TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 
) In this City, 
Try them 
F With a Job, 
And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., -below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 




CITY IROW WORKS COMPANY. 



H. KLlilNCLAUS, 



W. DKMI11B. 



CLEEC & CO., 

Iron roundel's, Steam Engine Builders, an 
Makers of all kinds of Machinery. 



J. NKWSIIAM. 



J. B1U1V00D. 



SOUTH BEACH IRON WORKS, 

Near corner of King and Third streets, San Francisco. 
M A R I IV E E W GI K E8 , 

.AND ALL KINDS OF 

MACHI1VERY FOKGING. 

All kinds nt" Ship-BmllliJnp and Mill work nmniifncliircn lo 
order. Joblilifg of every description promptly aiicnticd to. 
All work done ynaranteed. I9vl4-l7 



JOHN LOCHHEAD'S 

Steam Engine Works, 

IScnle street, near ASiKSion, San FninclKCo. 

STEAM ENGINES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION BUILT 
to order— .Marine, Stationary, or Locomotive. 

HOISTING AND PUMPING ENGINES, 

PORTABLE ENGINES, OF ALL SIZEH, 

DONKEY PUMPS, Etc., Etc., Etc. 

The attention nf the pnrtics engaged in shipping or Inland 
navigation le called to the 

Superior "Workmanship 

of Mr. LOCHHEAD. who has bc-pii in the bnwlnc^s in Pan 
Francisco for tho l;ist fourteen venrs. :iml nijnyrs thti rppn 
tnrinti nf having hnilt ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN 
STEAM ENGINES 

Screw Propellorsof all kinds, and Ptrnni Boat Machinery 
generally, made to order, and warranted to give mrtVct 
satisfaction in every particular iSvli'-Sm 



®h* pining and Scientific %xm. 



27 



Old Propbxijxg Power Revived. — A 
method of propelling boats, now in use in 
Franoe, has been introduce.! upon the Erie 
Canal at Buffalo, New York. By this sys- 
tem, a steel wire, Bye-eighths of an inch in 
diameter, is laid alonff the center of the en- 
tire length of the canal. This wire cable 
runs over a drum on the deck of the boat, 
and a small engine of four-horsepower turns 
the drum, and the boat is thus drawn along. 
It is claimed that a boat of two hundred and 
fifty tons may be pulled along in this way 
at the rate of two miles per hour, with a 
consumption of only twelve hundred pounds 
of coal in twenty-four hours. 

We alluded to this re-invention several 
weeks since, as a very old idea, but never- 
theless a very useful one. 

Ube.it Yield of i;ncjtsu.YEit. — Twelve 
and three-quarters tons of cinnabar ore, 
from Chapman's mine, three and a half 
miles south of San Jose, yielded sixty-four 
flasks of quicksilver, rained at three thou- 
sand dollars. 



WE ARE NOW OFFERING 
OUR IMJ-IEIVS-lli: STOCK 

Fine Custom Made Clothing 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

AT PHICES THAT DEFT COMPETITION. 

Our Stuck of Clothing ConnUt« ol • 

.a_t_,:l, the latest styles 

BOTH OF If ATKRt A! AND FINISH. 

A Largo Assortment of 
Trunk*, Valines, Cut-pet Bnfjn, Blanket*, Etc., 

AT ).lrKt:Slr.LY LOW ['KICKS. 

a. it. ivte^o & co., 

Svio Oor. of Washington and Sansome streets. 



BLASTING POWDER, 



PRICE, SSS.OO PER KEG. 

-ALSO- 
SPORTIXG. CAXXOX AND MUSKET 

POWDER, 

Of superior quality. 
FUSE A. TV X> SHOT, 

Always on hand and for Male at the office of the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, 

No. 81 8 California Street. 

JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 

25vHo,r 

PACIFIC POWDER MILL 

COMPANY'S 

BLASTING POWDER! 

MANUFACTURED 

IN MARIN COUNTY, 

CALIFORNIA. 

FOR SALE BY 

HAYWARD k COLEMAN, 

AGENTS, 

414 Front Street, San Francisco. 

Svli-Un 



California Steam Navigation 

Q^J COMPANY. 

Steamer CAPITAL ...OAPT. E. A. POOLE 

CHRYSOPOLIS CAPT. A. FOSTER. 

YOSEMITE " 

CORNELIA OAPT. W. BROMLEY 

JULIA CAPT, E. CONCKLIft. 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 4 o'clock P. M. EVERY DAY (Sundays excepted), for 
Sacramento and Stockton, connection with light-draff 
steamer* for MacysvlUc, Colusa. Chico, and Red Bluff. 

Office of rhe Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

JOHN KENWLEY, 
13vl2 President. 




THE PACIFIC IRON" WORKS, 

First & Fremont Ste., between Mission. «fc Howard, San Francisco. 

The proprietors of the above Works Invite the attention of all parties interested to their greatly improved and une- 
qualed facilities for manufacturing Steam Engines and Boilers, both Marino and Stationary, of any required size and 
pattern' Quartz Mills, Amalgamating, Pumping and Hoisting 'Machinery of the most approved construction. Flour, Saw 
and Sugar Mills, Witter Wheels, &e., &c. Our pattern list Is most complete and extensive, embracing the late Improve 
ments in all classes of machinery adapted to use on this coast. Wo would call especial attention to the fact that we hav< 
secured the exclusive right of manufacture for the Pacific Coast of the celebrated Greene Engine, conceded to be the 
most economical and perfect working Engine now In use. We arc also exclusive manufacturers ol the celebrated 

ISryun Buttery, Vurney'i Amalearaatorci and Separator**, Ryeraon*** Snnerhented Steam Aniiil 
Kama tor* nnd Kotary CruHoeri, Stone Breukei'*, «fcc. Orders respectfully Solicited, 

GODDARD «fc COMPANY. 



A. S. CHHKCn. 



S. D. CLARK. 



CHURCH & CLARK, 

IMPOKTIiKS AND DEALERS IN 

.Mediterranean and. California. 

PETJITS, NUTS, OONrEOTIONESY, Etc, 

ASD MANUFACTUKliRB OP 

FIRE WORKS 

Of every description, at So. <4©T Kront St., San Francbco. 
L5vM(iuil2p 



NEW YORK. PHIOES. 



C. E. COLLINS, 

No. 603 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 
EXCLUSIVE AGEHT 

POH THK 

AMEEICAN 

WATCH FACTORY. 

A large assortment of these 
Snpex'ior "W atches, 

In Gold and Silver Casea, 

Constantly on hand, and sold at Factory 
prices. Also, 

ENGLISH AND SWISS WATCHES, 

Imported directly from he Manufacturers. 

The American Company are now making 

VERY FINE WATCHES FOR LADIES. 

HSf-A Uirjre assortment of Gold Chains 
and Jewelry. 25vlu-iim 



SEW YORK PRICES. 



HAYWARD & COLEMAN, 

UIPORTlL'RSAND REFINERS 

-OF- 

ninminating, Lubricating, 

— AND — 

PAINT OILS! 

CONSISTING 01' 

KEROSENE, LARD, SPERM, ELEPHANT, POLAR, 

TANNERS', NEATSFOOT, BOILED ANJ) RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND CHINA NUT. 

— AI.W0, — 

SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE & ALCOHOL 

Note. — Wc would specially call the attention of Mill 
owners and Engineers to our superior PARAFFINE OIL, 
■which we manufacture from the California Petroleum 
This Oil will not gum. Machinery thoroughly cleaned and 
lubricated wiLh it will not heat, and alter remaining at rest, 
can be started without cleaning-oil". 

SOf A sample can of our Furamne Oil will be forwarded 
on application to us, as we desire a fair and impartial trial. 



Lamps and Lamp Stock 



ffijr*An elegant and complete assortment on hand. -®ff 
19vl3-3m 414 Front street, San Francisco. 



Engraved to Order.— Persons who desire to illustrate 
their individual establishments or business, should give us 
their orders for Engraving and Printing, and we will guar- 
antee good work and reasonable prices. 

DEWEY &. CO., 

Patent Agents, Publishers and Job Printers, SU5 Clay st. 



Iffi.EUSSDORFFER, 

Nos. 635 and 637 Commercial Street, 

WILL INTRODUCE 

On. Satu.rd.ay, FeTbruai-y t>, 1867. 

An Entirely New Style of 

J| Cloth Cashmere Hat J| 

"TA.CHT HENRIETTA," 

Which aro the most dressy Hat ever introduced on the 

Paelllc Coast. 
0^-Cnll and see them. BvH 




MACCAR0N1, YERMSCELLl, 



International Hotel, 

JACKSON STREET, 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS.. 

SAN FRA NCBS CO, CAL 

THIS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
ordor for the accommodation of guests. Persons seek- 
ing comfort and economy will hud this the best Hotel in 
the city to stop at. The Beds are nuw and in good order, 
and the Rooms well ventilated. The Table will always be 
supplied with the best In the market. 

Prices varying from SI SO to 83 per day for 
Board and Room. 

FINE BATH HOUSE AND BARBER SHOP ATTACHED 
TO THE HOUSE. 

US?* Teams belonging to the House will be m attendance 
at all the boats and cars to convey passengers to the House 
fhIek of cnAitGE, and to any part of the city for 5© cents 

Zlvl2 F. E. WEYGANT, Proprietor. 

Just Fulblislied. 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MARRIAGE, BEING FOUR Im- 
portant Lectures on FUNCTIONS and DISORDERS of 
the Nervous System and Rrnroduetivc Organs, to be had by 
addressing and inciting tw-ntv.rlve ccnls, postnge stamps 
to Secretary PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY, Mont- 
gomery street, Sau Francisco. 12vl31y 



Machinists and Foundries. 



Miuers' Foundry 

— AND— 

MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos. 245 to 255 First Street, 

San Francisco. 

HOWLAND, AIXTG-ELL & KING, 

PROPRIETORS, 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 



QUARTZ MILLS. 
SAW MILLS, 
POWDER MILLS, 



FLOIK MILES, 
Sl'GAIt MILES, 
PAPER MILES, 



Steam Engines of all Kinds, 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 

MINING PIMPS, HOISTING WORKS, 

OIL WELL TOOLS, ROCK BREAKERS, 

— ASH — 

' Machinery and Castings of all kind*, either 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in all its 
Branohes, 

Shoe* and Bleu of White Iron, mn hit facta red 
for and Imparled by u« expi-emly foe llih inif. 
piM.e. aud will l«»l i5 per cent, longer than an? 
other made on tuU coa»t. 

Itu«HlaIron Screen*, of any «i.i;<«m- of flneneau. 
We are the on I v mnuufuct niei-i an thU ctiuit of 
the"HlcltN Engine," the mmti'»H)pu<t, Mlmplo 
In construction, and durable, of any Engine in 
line. 



W. II. HOWLANB, 
II. B. ANGELL, 



>:. T. KING, 
CYRUS PALMER, 




JAMES MACKEN, 

COPPER8KITH, 

No. *S6 Fremont «t., bet. Howard *\r Folvom 

All kinde of COPPER WORK done to order in the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Sugar 
House and Distillery work. B 

Repairing promptly and neatly attended to. 

ISvll 



Dr. Hufeland's Swiss Stomach 
Bitters. 

THE WORLD RENOWNED REPUTATION, TOGETHER 
with the extensive and Inercasina- demand for Dr, Hufe- 
land'sSwissSioniiieh Bitters, will at once recommend ihem 
to the favorable notice of all connoisseurs and lovers of a 
good and healthful tonic and hi vigor* tor. As a purifier of 
the blood, acting surely, yet gently, on the secretions of 
liver and kidneys, they are unsurpassed and a most agreea- 
ble drink. 




For sale at all wholesale and retail stores on the Pacific 
Coast, and iit the depot of TAYLOR & BENDEL, 413 and 
413 Ciay street, between Sansom« and Battery, San Frau- 
cisco. 20vH-(iin 



Files! Files! Files! 

NOT PILES OF GOLD, NOR YET OF SILVER, SO 
much coveted by all men; but the BLEEDING, BLIND 
or EXTERNAL PILES, can be easily and speedily cured by 
the use of 

WOOD'S SUB-POSITORY. 

It is a preparation totally distinct from anything hereto- 
fore offered as a remedy for this painful and often fatal 
complaint, The SUB-POSITOi;Y is neither a pill, powder, 
wash or salve, and yet it has proved to be a certain Rem- 
edy for the Piles. Do not doubt this assertion, or delay 
testing the truth of It If you are troubled with the Piles— 
you will not be deceived in it. 

Sold wholesale and retail by J. H. REDTNGTON A CO., 
Nos. 416 and 418 Front street; GEO. GRISWOLD, corner of 
Mission and First streets; OLD FAMILY DRUGSTORE, 
corner'Mission and Second streets; UNITED STATES DRUG 
STORE, Bush street, between Montgomery and Kearny. 

C. WOOD, Proprietor, No. 63 Tehama street, between 
First and Second. 24vl4 -3m 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO. 

IMPORTERS, 

AND DUAI.EKS IN 

ASSAYEKS' MATERIALS, 

Druggists' & Chemists' G-lassware, 

Fliotograplrio JStoolt, Etc. 

512 and 514 Washington Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



WE are receiving direct from MESSRS. LADD & OERT- 
LING (London) aud BEEKER & SONS (Antwerp, Bel 
glum) their superior 

ASSAY AM) BULLION BALANCES, 

And from France and Germany, as well as the Eastern 
States, FURNACES, CRUCIBLES, MUFFLES, BLOW-PIPE 
CASES, GOLD SCALES. CHEMICAL GLASSWARE, and 
every article rcrinired for ASSAY OFFICES, LAHORATO 
RIES, etc. - We have given this branch of our business par 
tlcular attention, to select such articles as are necessary 
in the development of the mineral wealth of this coast. 

4 Full Assortment of DRUGGISTS' GLASSWARE and 
DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, ACIDS and CHEMICALS, coil- 
Btantlv on lomil. 

San'Francisco March 6, ltitio llvlO-tf 



28 



$fa prnmg mft Mmtifk jgmfi. 



An English nobleman has suspended a 
musical bell on the necks of all his cows, 
each bell tuned to a different note of the 
Bcale, and the -whole ringing through seve- 
ral octaves. A visitor to his farm is charmed 
by the music. Sometimes he hears sev- 
eral notes in unison, then a slight discord, 
and then a sweet harmony ; all varied by 
distance, and by the rising and falling of the 
breeze. 



The wonderful French cannon, the inven- 
tion of Napoleon, the construction of which 
is supposed to be a profound secret, can be 
fired forty or fifty times a minute. It is 
said to carry with accuracy two thousand 
yards, and a single discharge -would destroy 
the whole front of a battalion. It is so light 
that two men can easily lift it. 

The railroads of this country employ 
two hundred thousand men, and at least a, 
million of men, women and children depend 
for their support upon the railroad interest. 



Business Cards. 



H. C. HOWARD, 

Member of the San Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board, 

(Exclusively commission business,) 

No. 436 California street, next door below Montgomery. 
25vl4qr 



W. K GOLDSMITH. 
Card an<i Seal Engraver, 

505 Moult? omery street* «p-sta Irs, (over Tucker's,) 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wedding and Visiting Cards printed with the utmost neat- 
ness; Notarial, Commissioner and Society Seals. 19vl3-2q 



Charles S. "Whitman, 

Special Advocate In 3E*atent 

Cases, and Solicitor of Patents. Office, fill 

Seventh street (near Patent Office) 

Washington, D. C. 

Circulars, Containing valuable Information to Inventors, 

23vU-6m forwarded gratis. 



NATHANIEL GRAY. 



H. M. GRAY. 



N. GRAY & CO., 

641 Sacramento St., cor. Webb, San Francisco. 



-TJSE- 
EKERY * EATON'S 

GBEEN SEAL SMOKING TOBACCO. 



16vl4-6m 



No. 618 Battery street. 



Schmieden & Shotwell, 

Stock and Money Brokers, and dealers in Government 
Bonds, State, City and County Securities, Gas, Water and 
Insurance Stocks, etc., southwest corner of Californlaand 
Snnsome streets, opposite Bank of California. lvis-W 



Isaac s. dayis. henry cowell. 

DAVIS & COWELL, 

. dealers in 

Santa Cx*vx Lime, Cement, 

PLASTER, HAIR, LATH AND LATH NAILS. " 
Marble Du3t. Fire-Bricks, Flre-Clay, Fire Tiles of all sizes. 



B. F. HOWLAND, 

PHOTOGBAFHEB, 



Enameled Cards, Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, exe- 
cuted iu a superior manner. Small pictures copied ani en- 
larged to any size, at one-halt the price usually paid for 
such work. Cartes dc Vlsites only S3 per dozen \ Vignettes 
at 84= per dozen. We warrant our work to be superior 
to any made in this city or State. «gj-Give us a call and 
see on r specimens. 5vl4-6m 



ANDRADE & PATTERSON, 

MANUFACTURERS AND ENGRAVERS 
— OF— 

METALLIC SIGNS, 

AND SICN PAINTERS, 
Corner of Montgomery and Pine Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

BS^Door Plates and Office Signs made to order at short 
17vH-ly notice and on reasonable terms. 



THE WILLOOX & GIBBS 

IMPROVED NOISELESS 

Family SeTvIug Machine 

Challenges the world. It has beaten the Florence badl y 
Come and see it, or send tor Report of the trial. 

SAMUEL. SWIFT, Agent, 
13vH-6m !SO;l Kearny street, near Sutter. 



The well known establishment of 

LUCY & HYMES, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Genuine Pale and Chemical 
OLIVE SOAPS, 

Has been removedfrom Boalc street, between Mission and 
Howard, to BRANNAN STREET, between Eighth and 
Ninth, and greatly enlarged. 

The capacity of this establishment is now the largest on 
the Pacific Coast. It is now in lull operation, and prepared 
to supply the demand of the trade. 

Office— -319 C fornia St.. Sun Francisco. 
Ivl5qr 



Trades and Manufactures- 



WM. BARTLING. 



HENHT KIMBALL. 



BARTLING- & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDEKS, 

Paper Killers and Blank Book Manufacturers, 

505 Clay atreet, (southwest cor. Sansomc), 
15vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN DOAJNTirEIL, 

(SUCCESSOR TO O. GOBI) 

MARBLE WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine at bet. Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantels, Uonnmentu, Tombs, Plumbers' Slabs 

Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
JK3P* Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re 
spectfulb solicited. fiv8-3m 



Palmer's Patent 

ARTIFICIAL LEG-, 

Manufactured in Philadelphia, Penn. 
JAB VIS JEWETT, AG EXT. 

629 Washington Street, San Francisco, Cal. lOvg-lm 



HUCKS & LAMBERT, 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

B^- H. & L. -co 
AXLE GrBEANE> 

Natoma Street and North Beach, 
2vl3-Sm SAN FRANCISCO. 



PIONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS! 

EatablUhed 1840. 

O. NTJXTIISTCIr, 

Manufacturer of 

Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters, 

BANK VAULTS, PRISON CELLS, BALCONIES, AWN- 
INGS, GRATINGS, IRON FENCE, STAIRS, Etc., 

133 Bush street, 
HvH-Iq San Francisco. 



HARRIS BROS., 

GUTLESS, LOCKSMITHS, BELLHANGEES 

And Model Makers. 
SOS Leidesdorff street, bet Sacramento and Commercial, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 21vl4-tf 



LEATHER HOSE AND BELTING, 

ALL SIZES. 

SUCTION HOSE MADE TO ORDER 

At short notice, by 

M. M. cook; &■ SOJS, 

No. 801 Buttery street, 

13vl3-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Cordage Manufactory ! 

CONSTANTLY ON BAND A LARGE ASSORTMENT 
— OF — 

MANILA CORDAGE, 

Whale Line, Bale Rope, etc., 

Manufactured from Pure Manila Hemp. 

Office, at TUBBS & CO'S. 611 and 613 Front street. 
OS- Manutactory at the Poti'ero. UvU-lq 



E. POWER, 

WOOD CARVER 

— AND — 

Composition Ornament Manufacturer. 
Designing, Modeling and Patterns 

FOR CASTING. 

INTERIOR DECORATIONS OP ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

In Wood, Composition and MctaL 

Nog. 311 and 313 Market street, San Francisco. 
26V14-qy 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
I^TTEXUVS -AJVT> MODEIig, 

(Over W. T. Garratt's Brass Foundry,) 
S. E". Corner of Mission and Fremont sts., 

6vUtf SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. H. WHITE. JACOB KK4JIER. 

X*etiroline Oil "Works. 
J. H. WHITE & CO., 

No. 109 Commercial street, San Francisco, 

Are now manufacturing 

LUBRICATING OILS & AXLE GREASE, 

From Petroleums of California, and ask to be encouraged 
by the citizens of California. As a homo production in all 
their parts, these Lubricators are equal to any in the 
market, and surpass all others fcr cleansing oft' gum caused 
by the use of animal oll3 which contain stearine and marga- 
Jln, which soon become acid. Afalr trial, at the low price 
asked, is all that we solicit 25vHtf 



STOCK CERTIFICATES, 

STOCK TRANSFER JOURNALS, 
STOCK LEDGERS, 

ASSESSMENT RECEIPTS, 

And all other Blanks, Blank Books, etc. , required by Min- 
ing and other Corporations, kept on hand or printed to 
order on short notice, at moderate prices, at the office of 
tho Mining and^ientific Press | \ 



, Professional Cards. 

SHEEMAN DAT, 
Mining- Engineer, 

No. 114 Montgomery Block, San Francisco*, 

Will examine, survey and report upon mines, tnd consult 
and advise concerning investments m mining property, or 
the machinery management and expenditures of mines. 



FREDERICK. MA\8£U.. 

Mechanical & Architectural Draughtsman, 



No. 422 California street, corner of Leidsdorff. 

. rings of Models made fo 
ents at Washington or London. 



Drawings of Models made for parties applying for pa 



E. V. JOICE, 

3V O T A. It Y PUBLIC, 

_\ . E . cor. of Washington and Battery sts, 

12vl«f SAN FRANCISCO. 



GEO. T. KNOX and E. V. SUTTEE, 
cojunssiosnss of »eei>s. 

NOTA.B.Y PUBLIC, 
615 Montgomery Street, 

16vHtf San Francisco. 



ISAAC LOBREE & CO., 
> GOLDEN STATE POTTERY,® 

AXTIOCH, CAL. ^® 

Office in San Francisco, 516 Commercial st. *^ 
Constantly on hand a large assortment of Earthenware, 
Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, and Stoneware, 

Is prepared to fulfill all orders at the shortest notice; 
20vl4tf 



J. N. ECKEL, M. D., 

Homojopatliie Fnysioian 

226 Post Street, San Francisco. 
2ivUyr 



DR. H. AUSTIN, 

DENTIST, 

TTo. 634, "Washington Street, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny Streets 

[OVER SAN PKANC1SC0 BATUS] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 20vl0-qy 



J. "W. WINTER 
DENTIST. 



Office, «4TClay street San Francisco. 

First-class gold fillings for S3, as good as any dentist can 
produce in ihe city. Dr. Winter has practiced Dentistry 
twenty years— fifteen in this State. For a full upper set of 
gum teeth, on vulcanite base, from S'2i} to $36. Teeth ex- 
tracted without pain by local application. 18vi4-tf 





RADICAL CURE 

—OF— , 

RTJjPXXTRE ! 



Treatment of all Deformities of the Bodv, by DR. A. 
FOLLEAU'S process. G24 Washington street, up stairs, 
Washington Baths Building, between Montgomery and 
Kearny streets. 

DR. A. FOLLEAU 

Has his studies and manufactories In the same building. 

Every kind of Apparatus, Trusses, Orthopedic Instru- 
ments, Artificial Limbs, etc , are manufactured and applied 
by himself. 

93fHc has no connection with any Agency. 24vl4-llptf 



FAIRBA.NK'S PATENT 




PLATFORM SCALES! 

Also, large Scales for weighing loaded wagons of Ore, Hay. 
etc., from 6,000 to 40,000 pounds capacity. Manufacturers' 
Branch House, 

FAIRBANKS <fe HTJTCHIIVSOIV, 

120 Cnlifornia street, San Francisco. 
JSSS-Send for a Catalogue. 24vl4eow6m 



THE CENTKAL PAEK OF THE PACIFIC. 
Woodward's Gardens, 

ABT GALLERY; 

MUSEUM, GYMNASIUM, 

— AND— 

ZOOLOGI CAL GARDENS. 

THESE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ARE VTSITED DAILY 
by hundreds of the pleasure-seeking public, and all 
agree In pronouncing them the best and only first-class sub- 
urban resort on the Pacific Coast, 

The extensive grounds are covered with ihe rarest trees 
and shrubbery, making it a most desirable spot for small 
parties wishing to enjoy a Pic-Nic. 

To all departments new attractions arc being constantly 
added . 

These Gardens are accessible by the Howard, Folsom and 
Market street Cars. 

Entrances on Mission and Valencia streets, between Thir- 
teenth and Fourteenth. OPEN EVERY DAY. 

Admission to all parts, 35 Cents'. Children, under 12 
years, half price. 24vI4qr 



Subscribe at Once ! 

From the commencement of Volume XV of the Miking 
and Scientific. Peeks, ouly :i limited number of copies will 
be sav.'d for lilts by us; consequently those who desire the 
paper tin for future as well as present value, should sub- 
scribe at once 



Metallurgy. 



BOAL.T «fc STETEFELDT, 

Metallurgists and Mining Engineers 

AUSTIN, SETADA. 

Western Branch of ADELBEBG & RAYMOND, No. 90 
Broadway, New Tora. llvll 



G. W, UAYIURD. J. H. UKaAKK. 

MA.Y3VA.jRr> «& TIEMANN, 

Mining Engineers and metallurgists, 

»40 Pearl street, New York, 

— AMD— 

CENTRAL CITY, COLORADO. 
19vl2-ly 



EUEOPEAN 

METALLURGICAL 'WORKS, 

AND 

.Practical Mining School, 
Bryant Street, Between Third and Fourth* 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

THE Proprietors are at all times prepared to work or teat 
Ores sent to this establishment—either in large or small 
quantities— by such process as may be found best adapted to 
their chemical character, after a cpreful analysis has been 
made. Test lots of Ore adapted to the smelting process at- 
tended if). Sulphuret, pyrltons, and the (so-called) "rcbel- 
lous ores," are naving especial attention paid to their suc- 
cessful treatment. Assaying in the humid and dry way. 
Also, refining by cupellation, done at moderate rates. 

I» Jt ACT1CAL MIXING SCHOOL. 

The proprietors— encouraged by numerous applications 
from gentlemen desirous of pursuing the study of practical 
metallurgy— have concluded to admit parties on reasonable 
terms. Having in their Mill all the necessary appli- 
ances for crushing, roasting, amalgamating, smelting, re- 
fining and assaying, as also a well extended Laboratory for 
the analysis of Ores and Minerals, a good opportunity Is 
"* knowledge of the 



S, P. Kimball, 



J K. Muhphy. 
WvlO 



J. A. BAUER, 
Chemical Laboratory, 

AND DRUG STOKE, 

«44 TVamhlugton Street. [Established 1819, ] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Careful Analyses made of 

Ores. Minerals, Waters, Oils, Irfqnors, 
Wines, Products of Art, ete. 

Pharmaceutical Preparations Made to Order. 

Opinions given on Chemical Questions and Geology. 

ESP Particular attention paid to Analyses of all kinds, D 
cases where legal questions arc involved. 

Pure Nitric Acid, Nitrate of Silver, Gold Chloride, Platln 
Chloride, Sodium Amalgam, Sulphate of Copper, etc., for 
Bale. 12vU-6m 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co's 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 

NEW Y0BK, JAPAN AND CHINA. 

-f^FjgjSfe LEAVE FOLSOM STREET WHARF, AT 11 
SasMswBBi o'clock A. M. of the following dates, for 
PANAMA, connecting via Panama Railroad, with one of 
tho Company's splendid steamers from ASPINWALL for 
NEW YORK. 

On the lOth, 18th and 30th of each month that has 
SO days. 

OnthelOth, 10th and ttOth of each month that has 
31 days 

When the 10th, 19th and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding; when tho 18th falls on Sun- 
day, they will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Manzanlllo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departures of 18th or 19th connect with French Trans- 
Atlantic Co.'s.HtetimerforSt. Nazaire, and English steamer 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamer for 
Southampton and South America, ana P. R. R. Co's 
steamer for Central America. 

The following Steamships will be dispatched on dates as 
given below : 

July lOth-SACRAMENTO Oapt. J. M. Oavarly 

Connecting with HENRY CHAUNCEY, Capt. Gray. 

July 19th— CONSTITUTION. Capt. E. S. Farnsworlh, 

Connecting with ARIZONA, Capt. Maury. 

July 30th-GOLDEN CITY Capt. W. F. Lapidge, 

jjfflM Connecting with OCEAN QUEEN, Capt. Conner 

Cabin passengers berthed through. Baggage checked 
through— 100 pounds allowed each adult. 

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicine and attend- 
ance free. 

These steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. Passen- 
gers are requested to have their baggage on board before 10 
o'clock. 

Through Tickets for Liverpool by the Cnnard, Inman and 
National Steamship Lines, can be obtained at the oiflce of 
the P. M. S. a. Co., San Francisco, where may also be ob- 
tained orders for passage from Liverpool or Souihampton 
to San Francisco, either via New York or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 to £20 will be advanced with the 
above orders, Holders of orders will be required to Iden- 
tify themselves to the Agents in England. 

For Merchandise and Freight for New York and way 
ports, apply to Messrs. WELLS. FARGO & CO. 

BSr The COLORADO will be dispatched July 4, at noon, 
and will be followed by the GREAT REPUBLIC, on August 
24th, from wharf, corner of First and Brannan streets, for 
YOKOHAMA nnd HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with the steamer COSTA RICA for SHANGHAI. 

For passage and all other information, apply at the Pa- 
cific Mail Steamship Co's office, corner of Sacramento and 
Leidesdorff streets. 

OIJVF.lt ELDRIDCI!, Afrent. 

Blanks, Blank Mining Books, 

Constitution and By-Laws 

— FOR — 

Mining; and Prospecting 1 
O onvp auies 

Elegantly printed, with care and dispatch, at the office of the 
Mining and Scientific Press. 

I&~ Orders from the interior faithfulv attended to. 



American and Foreign Pntento.— Letters Patent 
for Inventors can bo secured in the United States and foreign 
countries through the Miking and Scientific Press Patent 
Agency. We offer applicants reasonable terms, and they 
can rest assured of a strict compliance with our obligations, 
and afaithful performance of all contracts. For reference, 
we will furnish the names of numerous parlies for whom 
we have obtained patents during the past two yci\rs. 



$&f pining and £wnttfw § was. 



29 



Salt is now being manufactured in Ala- 
meda county on a larger scale than ever. 
Seventeen companies are now engaged in 
the business, employing about eighty per- 
sons. It is expected that 15,000 tons will 
be produced this season, for which a ready 
market is found in this city, at remunerative 
prices. 

' SorxD. — Chladui found that tho velocity 
of sound was from ten to sixteen times as 
great in wood as in air. In metals tho ve- 
locity is between four and sixteen times that 
ef air. 



Bullion- from Belmont. — The Keese 
Biver Reveille, of July Gth, notices the arri- 
val at Austin of two bars of bullion from 
the Belmont Mining Company. 

Tire wheat harvest has fairly begun in 
Illinois and Indiana, with a 2>roapect of the 
largest crop ever gathered. 

Several cases of a new disease, bearing 
some resemblance to hydrophobia, have oc- 
curred among the cattle, hogs and dogs in 
the vicinity of New Market, Va. 



New Mining Advertisements. 

Culplouenn Attain* Com puny— Dlatrlct of Crea, 

Bonon, BfexKFo. 

Notice la hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board ol 
Trtlateca of said Company, held oq tho clevemh day 
of July, 1867, an assessment of Ave dollars ($&> per 
aha re was levied upou the capital stock of said Company, 
parable immediately, In I'nhed Slates gold and silver 
coin, to the Secretary, 316 California street, San Francisco, 
Culifornln. 

Any stock, npon which said assessment shall remain un- 
palrt'on LlltJ twelfth dny of August, 1367, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
*old on Monday, the second day of September, 1807, to 
pay ttie delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of Bale. By order of tho Board of 
Trustees. 

JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 

Olflce. 318 California street, tip-stairs, San Francisco. jy!3 



lie Soto Cold and Silver Mining Company.— 

Location of Works: Star District, Hnniboklt County, 

State of Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that ata meeting or tho Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day 
of July, 1867, an assessment of two ($2) dollars per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately. In United States cold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, at thu office of the Company, No. 68 Exchange Build- 
ing, northwest corner Washington and Montgomery streets, 
San Francisco. Callfurnla. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the seventeenth day of August, 1867,shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will Lie duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, und unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday, the fourth day oi September, 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

JOHN M. BURNETT, Secretary. 

Office, No. 68 Exchange Building, northwest corner of 
Washington and Montgomery Btrcets, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. jyl3 



J. von Mill and Mining Company, Kt-lwy Dls- 

trlct, El Dorado County, California. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the sixth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of three (S3) dollars per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 



Washington streets. San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the tifth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will bo duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Monday, tho nineteenth day of August, 1867, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

J. iU BUFFINGTON. Secretary. 

Office, No. 5 Government House, corner of Washington 
and Sansome streets. jyl3 



Venule «fc Corcoran Sliver Mining Company- 
Location of Works: Storey County, State of NevHda. 
Notice tfl hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day of 
July, 1867, an aasessment of fifty (50) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately. In United States gold and silver coin, to 
the Secretary of the Company. 

Any stock upon which said' assessment sUnll remain un- 
paid on the twelftn day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for Sjile at public 
auction, and unle;^ [uiymcnt shall be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the .-econd day of September, 1867, lo pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of tho Board of Trustees. 
A. P. GKEENE, St-cretarv. 
Office, Room No. 11, 333 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. California. jyl3 



\iiestiu Seuora de Guudelupe Silver Mining 

Company. Location of Works ; Tayoltita, San Dlmas 

District, Durango, Mexico. 

Notice 1b hereby given, that at a meeting ot the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twelfth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment (No. 2S,) of one dollar (SI) per 
share was levied upon the assessable capital Slock of 
said Company, payable Immediately, in United States 
gold and silver coin, to the Secretary, E.J, Pfkiffkk, at 
the office, No. 21U Post street, or to ihe Treasurer, A. Him- 
uklmann, at his office, No. 637 Washington street, San 
Francisco, 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirteenth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent and will be duly advertised for sale at public auc- 
tion, and unless payment shall bo made before, will bo 
Bold ou Tuesday, the third day of September, 1867, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of tho Board of 
Trustees. 

E. J. PFEIFFER, Secretary. 

Office, No. 210 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. jyl3 



NaCBtra. Senora de Gandelupe Sliver Mining 

Company.— Location of Works: Tayoltita, San Dlmas 

District, Durango, Mexico. 

The following certificates of stock of said Company— No. 
35, 10 shares, and No. 44, 20 shares, Issued to H. Hellermann; 
No. 181, 49 shares, Issued to Mrs. Elizabeth Nulling; No. 145, 
5 shares, Issued to II. Schumacher, and No. S3 and No. 146, 
each 5 shares, issued to J. H. Schluter— have been sold' 
July XOtli, 1857, for delinquent assessments, and will not bo 
transferred on the books of said Company. 

San Francisco, July 12th, 1867. 

JylS-lw E. J. PFEIFFER, Secretary. 



Sealon Mining Com pa ny.™ Location of Worku 

Drytown, Amador County, California. 

Notice— There arc delinquent, upon the following de- 
■Crtbed stock, on account of assessment levied on tho 
Mb dny of Mhv, 1867, the several amount* set op- 
posite the mimes of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
low.: 

Name*. No. Certificate. No. shares. Amount. 

Win A»hburn<T 61 I Slot) 00 

Peter 11 Burnett, Trustee 41 10 IIKM Oil 

E J Crane, Trustee 4* \\s loot) 00 

B J Crane, Trtuteo M> 5 BOO w) 

.i u' Gaeowllor, 39 & nw uo 

A B Urv-itan S3 Id 1000 00 

Howard Havena. Trustee it ft 600 00 

Howard Havens, Trustee 63 ft ftUO I 

Theo LeRoy 34 lu 1000 00 

A li MeCreerv :, i 4 400 00 

D M W Seatoil 52 1 100 00 

PhetH J Sentuti 61 1 100 00 

Phebo J Stilton 66 1 100 00 

Pliebe .' Neuton 66* 1 100 00 

Phebo J Beaton 87 . 1 HW 00 

L.l W Smith, Act g L'Mh'r 35 ft MA) 00 

Lloyd Tevla 28 6 60(1 00 

Ll«.\d PevU '."9 3 600 0J 

Lloyd Tevti — 4B 6 WW 00 

Llovi TivU. Trustee 4i 10 1000 00 

And In accordance with law, und an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made ou the twenty-eighth day of May. 1307, so 
many shnrefl of each parcel or said stock tisinay be ncoee- 
sary, will be xold at public auction, »t the office ot the 
Company, No. 60 Exchange Building, northwest corner of 
Washlnglon and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, CaL, 
on Monday, the tweuty-nlntli day of July, 1867, at the hour 
of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with cost* of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

JOEL F. LIGHTNER, Secretary. 

Office, No. 60 Exchange Building, N.W. corner Washing- 
ton and Montgomery streets, San Frnnclsco. jylU 

Sophia Consolidated Gold and Silver Mining 

Company, Sonora, Tuolumne County, California. fftfn 

Notice.— There arc delinquent upon the following described 
stock, on account of assessment levied on the eleventh day 
of June, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the names of 
the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Engerl, AFC 14 20 SCO 00 

Welles, Samuel 43 10 60 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the eleventh day of June, A. D. 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be Bold at public auction, by J. Mlddloton & Son, 
40-1 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on Friday, the 
twenty-sixth day of Jnly,1867, at the hour of 12 o'clock M.of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, to- 
gether with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

DAVID E. JOSEPHI, Secretary. 

Office, 641 Washington street, San Francisco. jylS 



Tuolumne Mountain. Gold and Silver Mining 

Company, Old Buchanan Ledge, Tuolumne County, State 

of California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of Bald Company, held ou the tenth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of one dollar ($1) per share was 
levied upon too capitnl stock of said Company, payable 
immediately. In Unlied States gold and silver coin, to the 
Secretary,!). F. Verdenal, office, U Court Block, 636 Clay 
street, San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment Bhall remain un- 
paid on the thirteenth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will 
be sold on Saturday, the thirty-first (3lst) day of August, 
1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

D F. VERDENAL, Secretary. 

Office, 22 Court Block, 636 Clay street, San Francisco. jyl3 



To Capitalists* 

GOLD QUARTZ MINE. SITUATED IN CALAVERAS 
County, with steam mill fitted up with Amalgamating 
Pans, etc., FOR SALE. The mine has three main veins, ana 
more than J8o,000have been spent in opening them and com- 
pleting the mill. Good wagon roads all the way. Apply to 
BELLOC FRERES, Bankers, 
23vlS-6m 635 Clay street, San Francisco. 



Mining Notices—Continued. 



Adella Gold Mining Company, Boek Creek. 

Sierra County, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock.on account ot assessment levied on the twenty- 
ninth day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate . No. Shares. Amount. 

E F Bauldwln 22 10 $10 00 

E F Baldwin 23 40 40 00 

EFBauldwln 16 10 10 00 

E F Bauldwln 18 60 60 10 

AdeHa Bauldwln II 400 400 00 

Adella Bauldwln 15 10 40 00 

And In accordance with law, mid an order of the Board 
of Trustees, mnde on the twenty-ninth day of May, 1867, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction, by OIney k Co., 
auctioneers, at No. 418 and 420 Clay street, San Francisco, 
Cal., on tMonday, the fifteenth day of July, 1867, at tho 
hour of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

A. C. TAYLOR, Secretary. 

Office, 429 Pacific street, San Francisco, Cal. je2» 

Postponement.— The above sale Is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the twenty-ninth day oi July, l8b7, at the same 
hour and place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

Jyl3 A. 0. TAYLOR, Secretary. 



Clnco Senorea Gold and Silver Mining Company, 

Copalo, Sinaloa, Mexico. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
first day of May, 1867, "the several amounts set opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No, Shares. Amount. 

Haywood, Judson 631 $63 10 

J C Beideman 4 50 5 00 

RMeMurray 6 30 3 00 

J B Murphy 6, 69 20 2 00 

M Fitzpatrick 7 6 60 

Loran Miner 8 7 70 

M Guerln 10 4 40 

BF Dunham 14 to 16, 27 35 k3 60 

GeoM Scott 17 10 * 100 

Wm McWllllams 20 1 10 

John Qulnlau.. 33 4 40 

Harvey Garcilon 18 1 10 

Geo W Mosure 19 1 10 

Zcrros Wheeler 22, 24 4 40 

James Bacon 23 1 10 

Geo C Peterson 26 25 2 50 

SL Palmer 3,4,46, 31 40 4 60 

Richard Abby 42 20 JZ 00 

W H Howland 45 4 40, 

Henry Williamson 54, 65 10 1 00 

Wm R Waduworth 34 9 90 

CReis 3 1 10 

Wm H Brown 57 6 60 

Thomas Brown 58, 32 26 2 60 

JMSCOtt 61 to 66 5 ' 50 

Goo T Russell 67 1 10 

Benjamin Wood 69 SO • 3 00 



Name*. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

F r Fnmo 89 10 1 00 

Gulli'me Clarke 112 100 10 00 

CT Wheel.- r 102 to 111 292 28 20 

MBEBeeker 2,3, 4 97W 9 75 

D Ehrhitrt 6 »>2 85 

Cha-^ACrowe 14 2 20 

George A Harris 50 90 9 00 

wiiiiam Voeberg 51 5 59 

Peter Welse M 2 20 

Leo Rosenbatim 64 10 1 60 

Edwin Bunnell 57 16 1 60 

A Ihinert 61 1 10 

SoAlawninl a Frapoll ta 2 20 

Richard 1' Blauvcrt. Jr 61 17 1 70 

LS WMpple 66 7 70 

F G Truett U 7 70 

Francis Read 71 60 fi 00 

Tfl. Kiirrw 73 8 80 

John J Fov 76 5 60 

li Hchwerln s«i 2 20 

H Zelttke. &i 7 7o 

V Kostmever 87 10 l 00 

J E Ecklev S8 2 20 

Chan 1* Klmbnll 92 1 10 

JasFUvuirh 99 6 50 

u'm m ftuntoon 105 30 3 110 

w LCasbneaa 112 g bo 

Moggie C Baaon 117 1 10 

Isaac Bluxome. Jr 120 16 1 60 

F A Wilklns 121 6 60 

William Blhler 122 12 20 

Vernon Getty 125 58 6 go 

And In accordance wttli law. and nn order of tho Board 
of Trustees, wade on the first day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of the Com- 
pany, No. 623 Clay street, San Francisco, Cal., on Saturday, 
tho twenty -seventh day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. 

EDWARD C. LOVELL, Secretary. 

Office, No. 528 Clay street, San Francisco. Jy6 

Chalk Mountain Bine Gravel Company.— Lo- 
cation of Works: Nevada County, California. 
Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the eighteenth day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of one dollar per share was levied 
upon the capital stock of said Company, payable Imme- 
diately, in United States gold and silver coin, to the Sec- 
retary. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shallremaln unpaid 
on the nineteenth day of July, 1867, shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public nuc- 
limi. and unless payment shall be made before, will be sold 
on Saturday, the third day of August, 1867, to pay the de- 
linquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expensea ot sale. Bv order of the Board of Trustees. 
J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretary. 
Office, No. 6 Government House, corner Washington and 
Sansoine streets, San Krancisco, California. jc22 



Oamargo Gold and Silver Mining Company, 

Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-first day 
of J une, 1867, an assessment of twenty dollars ($20) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able on or before the secondTday of August, 1867, In United 
States currency, to the Secretary. San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon wmen. said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the second day of August, 1367, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of September, 1867. 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expense& of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Otllce. N. E. corner Clay and Front streets, San Franclsce. 

jJ3~Ai a meeting of tho Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, 1867, the order levying assessment (No 6) made Febru- 
ary Mth, 1867, was rescinded. 

Je29 N. O. FASSETT, Secretary, 



Gold Mill Tunneling Gold and Silver Mining 

Company.— Location: Gold Hill Mining District, County 

of Storey, State of Nevada. 

Notice.— The Fourth Annual Meeting of the stockholders 
of the above named Company, will be held at their office, 
415 Montgomery Gtreet, San Francisco. Cal., on SATUR- 
DAY, the twentieth (20th) day of July, 1867, at 3^ o'clock, 
P. M., for the purpose of electing Trustees to servo for the 
ensuing year, and such other business as may properly 
come before It. 

R. WEGENER, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 15, 1867. jel6-5w* 



Gold Quarry Company* .'Location of "Works. 

Placer County, California. 

Notice Is hereby given, that ata meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-fourth 
day of June, 1867, an'assessment of twenty dollars ($20) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately In United States gold and silver coin, 
to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, No. 706 
Montgomery street, (room No. 4, 2d floor) San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on tho twenty-fifth day of July, 1867, shall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale 
at nubile auction, and unless payment shall be made be- 
fore, will be sold on Monday, the twelfth day of August, 
1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of Hale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

T. W. COLBURN, Secretary. 

Office 706 Montgomery street, (Room No. 4, 2d floor) San 
Francisco, Cal. Je29 



Gold Quarry Company. Location or Works: 
Placer County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that a meeting of the Stockhold- 
ers of the Gold Quarry Company will be held In San Fran - 
clico, at the office of the Company, No. 706 Montgomery 
street. Room No. 4, second floor, 011 MONDAY, the twenty- 
ninth day of July, at 12 o'clock, noon, of that day, for the 
purpose ot taking into consideration the increase of the 
Capital Stock of said Company, from the sum of six hund- 
red thousand dollars, divided Into six hundroa shares of 
$1,006 each, to the sum of two millions four hundred thou- 
sand dollars (52,400,000), divided into twenty-four hundred 
(2,400) shares of one thousand dollars (Sl.OOii) each. 
G, D. ROBERTS, 
A. C. PEAC HY, 
L MAYNARD, 
I. FREEBORN, 
E. WERT HEM AN, 
Trustees "/ the 

Go d Quarry Company. 
T. W, Colhurn, Secretary. 
Sun Francisco, June 24th, 1867, Je29 



Mope Gravel Mining Company.— Location of 

Works and Property: Grass Valley, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-sixth day 
of June, 1867, an assessment (No. 15) of one dollar ($1) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately, In United States gold and silver 
coin, to tho Secretary, at wo. 529 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. , ,, 

Anystock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirtieth day of July, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised tor sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the nineteenth day of August, 1867, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of tho Board of 
Trustees. 

DAYID WILDER, Secretary. 
Office, No. 629 Clay street, San Francisco, Cal. je29 



I. X. I*. Gold and Silver Mlnlov Company.— Lo- 
cation of Mine: Sliver Mountain District, Alpine Conn, 
ty, Cal. 

Notice la hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board oi 
Trustees of said Company, held on the nineteenth day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of one dollar and fifty cents ($1. 50) 
per Bhare was levied upon the capital stock of said Com- 
pany, payable immediately In United Statesgold and silver 
epin, to tho Secretary, at his office, in tho store of J. G 
Hodge A to 418 and 420 Clay street, Son Francisco, Cal., or 
to Jnlin O. Slnvun. at Silver Mountain. 

Any stock apon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the nineteenth (19th) day of July. 1867, shall bo 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised Tor sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Monday, the fifth day of August, 1867, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expensesof sale. By order of the Board of 

FRANK H. HAMILTON, Jr., Secretarv. 
Office, «8 and 420 Clay street, San Francisco. Je22 

X.ady Bell Copper Mining Company, Low i>l- 

vide Mining District, Del Norte County, California. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
TruBtces of said Company, held on the eighteenth day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of fifteen cents per share waa 
levied upon tho capital stock of said Company, payable 
Immediately, In United States gold and silver coin, to the 
Secretary, or to J. K. Johnson, at Crescent City. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remoin un- 
paid on the eighteenth day of July, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless pavment shall be made before, will bo 
sold on Monday, the filth (5tb) dav of August, 1867, to pav 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

B. P. WILKINS. Secretary pro ttm. 

Office, 648 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Je2a 



Mount Uavldion Gold and Silver Mining Com* 

pany, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notick.— There are delinquent npon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twenty-second day of May, 1867, the several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the respective shareholders, aa fol- 
lows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Bush, Martin 3403 4Ji $4 50 

Burke, Thomas 3401) 4 i U0 

Gibbons, P 21i0 10 10 00 

Liming, N 2234 1\2X 112 60 

Peterson, Geo MOO 50 60 00 

Peterson, Geo C 3357 30 30 00 

Peterson, Geo C 3340, 3348 10 ea 20 20 00 

Paul, James 3327 200 200 00 

Paul James 3407 175 176 01 

Paul, James 3328 100 100 00 

Paul, James 3354, 3368 25 ea 60 60 00 

Rychman.GW 3356 . 30 30 00 

Schenck.EP, Mrs 3320 4 4 00 

Van Reed, J H, Mrs 1856 lo 10 00 

Vandervoort, J C IB49 4 4 00 

Whitney, Geo O 3287, 3288 6. ea 10 10 00 

Walton, E M, Mrs 2 2 2 00 

Walton, E M., Mrs 708, 938 1 ea 2 2 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the twenty -second day of M ay, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be ne- 
cessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. Duncan 
A Co., No, 406 Montgomery street, San Francisco, on the fif- 
teenth day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 o'clock M. of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, to- 
gether with costs of advertising and expanses of sale. 

G. PARDOW, Secretary. 

o ill co, 121 Sutter street, San Francisco, Cal. je29 



St. Ziouls Silver Mining Company, Cortex Die. 

trict, Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the fourth 
day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the names 
of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Shares. Amount. 

Baldwin, John E '. 50 sue 00 

Berry, Henry 10 20 00 

Cassell, John F 3 16 00 

Chenory. Richard 75 376 00 

DcWltt.WL 5 26 00 

Hathaway, B W 75 375 00 

Howard, George 50 lou 00 

Uawxhurst, Robert 31 165 00 

Jones, Rowland 6 10 (hi 

Kibbe, H C 6 2rt 00 

Land, C B 70 350 00 

Lagerman. H W 10 20 00 

Macphcrson, AW 30 160 00 

Moore, J Preston 115 275 00 

Powell, Elijah 75 225 00 

Passmore, W 6 25 00 

Pratt, WE fl 25 00 

Russell, George.. 79 281 00 

Thomas, G W fi 26 00 

Taylor, John fi 26 00 

Whlrney, James 6 25 90 

Wenban, Simeon 1212 782 40 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the fourth day of May, 1867, so many 
shares of each parcel of said stock as may be necessary, 
will bo sold at public auction, at the salesroom of Maurice 
Dore A Co., No. 327 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., 
on Tuesday, the second day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, noon, of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, togother with costs of advertising and ex 
penses of sale, 

R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 
Office, 331 Montgomery street, San Francisco. jo 15 

Postponement.— Tho above sale Is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the 29th day of July, 1867, at Ihe same hour and 
place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

Je29 R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 



Whltlatch Gold and Silver Mlnlnir Company, 

Lauder County, Nevada, 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-first day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of fifteen dollars ($15) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
on or before, the second day of August, 1867, In United States 
currency, to the Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which said assessinentshall remain unpaid 
on the second day of August, 1867, shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment shall be made before, will be sold 
on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of September. 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Office, N. E. corner Front and Clay streets. San Francisco. 

jjgp-At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, 1867, the order levying assessment (No. 7) made Febru- 
ary 14th, 1867, was rescinded. 

je29 N.' C. FASSETT, Secretary. 



Important to CalllornlnnH.— Many Inventors have 
lately had their claims for Patents seriously (and in some 
cases fatally)delayed by the unquaUflcatlon of agents who 
have not complied with the Goverumentllcense and revenue 
laws, as well as other new and imperative regulations. 
These discrepancies, although arising frorn the lnexperlenca 
of honest agents, are none the less dangerous to applicants 
for patents, whose safest course Is to "trust their business 
with none but active and experienced solicitors. The Mik- 
imo and Sciektiho Press Patent Agency has strictly com- 
plied with the requisitions of the Department, and properly 
filed all necessary papers as Claim Agents. 



30 



$k pitting m& ^timtttk %xm. 



Machinery. 



Brodie's Patented Improvements 



STEWART'S 

CELEBRATED HINGED 

Grinder and Amalgamator. 




Is the Cheapest and Quickest Pan 

Now used. It Is fliu-bo:tomed\ loses far less power in throw- 
ing the pulp, and circulates the same under the muller to 
better advantage than any other Pan in use, while the 
steam, owing to the thinness of the cone, has a more direct 
effect in hcatiiiR the pulp. E is the muller plate; F the 
Grinding Shoe, attached by an adjustnhle hinge joint in the 
middle of the same— the bottom wearing down even with 
tne dies. 

Mr. J. H. STEWART, the inventor, has had ten years of 
experience in mechanical operations, and may be addressed 
at San Francisco, or called j\\ at the -Miners' Foundry, First 
street, where his Pan ia manufactured, and is to be seen at 
any time in operation. Svlitf 



PATENT AMALGAMATOR. 

These Machines Stand Unrivaled. 

For rapidly pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be, spared to 
have them constructed in the most perfect manner, and of 
the groat number now in operation, not one has everre- 
quired repairs. The constant and increasing demand for 
them is sufficient evidence of their merits. 

They are constructed so as to apply steam directly into 
the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired, 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows : 

The pan being filled, the motion of the muller forces the 
pulp to the center, where it is drawn down through the ap- 
erture and between the grinding surfaces. Thence it is 
thrown to the periphery Into the quicksilver. The curved 
plates again draw it to the center, where it passes down, 
and to the circumference as before. Thus it is constantly 

Fiassing in a regular How between the grinding surfaces and 
n to the quicksilver, until the ore is-reduced to an impalpa- 
ble .powder, and tiic metal amalgamated . 

Setlers made on the same "principle excel all others.— 
They bring the pulp -so constantiv and perfectly in contact 
with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
pletcly absorbed. 

Mill men are invited to examine these pans and setlers for 
themselves, at the PACIFIC FOtTNDET, 

lvl San Francisco. 



BLAKE'S PATENT 
QUAKTZ OKU'i$H£K. 

CAVTIOX ! 

The owners of the Patent for this valuable machine, in 
order to facilitate the protection of their rights against nu- 
merous infringers, procured, some time since, a reissue of 
the Patent, bearing date January 9th, 1866. 
This Patent secure* the exclusive right to em* 
piny in Sterne-Breaking 31achine» Up- 
right Convergent Jaw*, actuated 
hj- a ^Revolving Shaft. 

All persons who are violating the Patent by the unau- 
thorized making, selling or using machines In which quartz 
or other material is crushed between upright convergent 
aws, actuated by a revolving shaft, are hereby warned 
that they are appropriating the property of others, and 
that they will be held responsible in law and in damages. 

Several infringing machines are made and offered for 
sale in ihis city, upon which Patents have been obtained. 
Manufacturers, purchasers and users, are notified ihatsuch 
Patents do not authorize the use of the original invention, 
and that such machines cannot be used without incurring 
liability for damages. BLAKE j TYLER, 

l*vl4ti" Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



NELSON & DOBLE, 

■AGE.YTS TOR 

Thomas Firth & Sous' Cast Steel, Files, 

Etc., Shear, Spring, German, Plow, Blister and Toe Calk 

Steel; manufacturers of 

Mill Pules. Sledges, Hammers, Picks, 

Stone Cutters', Blacksmiths' and Horse- Shoers' Tools, 

319 ana 321 Pine street, 

Between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. 

luvUqr 



SAN FKM0IS00 BRUSH FACTORY, 

No. 311 California st., manufactures to order all kinds of 

BBUSHES, 

At lower prices than cost of Eastern importation. Brushes 
for all classes of machinery. A. superior Scrubbing Brush 
from Soap Koot fiber i alio, Sluice Brushes from the same 
material. The Patent Katun, .street, Stable, Flue and 
Flume Brush, for wuich they have the exclusive right 
for the Pacific Coast. 

All orders from the interior promptly executed. 

FELDMAN, SLUPriON & CO., 

I6vl4qr. Proprietors. 



ROOT'S PATENT 

PORCU BJL.A.ST BJLOWER, 

Adapted for Smelting, Foundry, Mining and Steamships. 
Requires 50 per emit, less power than any Blower now in 
use. For further particulars, address K.EEF, BLAKE 4 
Co., Stockton; or Win. X. Garrett, corner Mission and Fre- 
mont streets, dan Francisco. Ivlj-loptf 



To the Mining Community, 

THE UNDERSIGNED, WHO HAS HAD THIRTr YEARS 
coiutant practice in su peri mending mines, is now pre- 
pared to inspect and report on Mines and Mining Properties, 
aud advise as to the management of the same. Othce, 851 
Harrison street, San FraueiBco. 

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, 
|6vHqr Practical Mining Engineer. 




a |!M HlUmilllllllllV 

FUR THE TREATMENT OF 

Gold and Silver Ores. 

BRODIE'S PATENTED IMPROVED QUARTZ CRUSHER. 
The attention of all interested in Mining is respect- 
fully called to this Improved -Machine for Breaking or 
Spalling Quartz, or other Rock, possessing, as it doe.s, sim- 
plicity of aci ion and lightness of construction, so far as is 
compatible with strength and durability. Inconsequence 
of these advantages, the advertisers are enabled to offer 
' hese machines to the public at the following low terms: 
No. 1— Or iO-ineh Crusher, capable of reducing from 
three to four tons of quartz per hour, no piece be- 
ing larger than a walnut— price SGOO 

No. 2— Or 15-inch Crusher, capable of similarly putting 

through live to six tons per hour S5© 

No. 3— Or IB-inch Crusher, will in a similar manner 

crush from seven to eight tons per hour 1,300 

EXPLANATION OF THE ABOVE ENGRAVING. 

The frame is made of cast iron, bound with heavy 
wrought iron bands, making it very strong, and at the same 
time light and portable. The crusher is bolted to a wood 
frame of sufficient high t. to clear the fly-wheel, and allow 
the crushed quartz to pass orT; The dotted linesshow the 
movable and stationary jaws. Letter A represents the 
eccentric shaft by which the power is applied direct to the 
movable jaw. B represents the movable jaw, and C the 
fixed jaw. D represents the link or radius bar. E repre- 
sents the bolts for regulating the opening. F, which can be 
regulated at pleasure, so ns to graduate to the size to which 
it Is Intended the quartz shall lie crushed. represents the 
feed opening, by which the size of the machine is desig- 
nated. 

The arrow on the fly-wheel shows the direction to drive 
the eccentric, which, in combination with the link, D, gives 
the movable jaw, B, a forward and downward motion at the 
sp.me time, a'nd which makes the hardest rock yield and 
separate into fragments of any desired size. 

The above Crushers have been recently erected and are 
now successfully employed at Bear Valley, Mariposa conn- 
tv, Rawhide Ranch. Tuolumne county, Excelsior Mine, 
Lake District, Nevada county, -and can be seen in opera- 
tion at the Fulton Foundry, First street, San Francisco". 

The following testimonial •especting the effectiveness of 
this Crusher, has been received from the Superintendent 
of the " Rawhide Ranch" Mine, in Tuolumne Countv: 
RAWHtm; Ranch, Tuolumne Co., Sept. 28, 1866. 

James Brodii-:, Esq., San Francisco— My Dear Sir-. It gives 
me pleasure to inform you that I have for the prist three 
mouths had one of your largest sized Rock Crushers in 
use, at the Rawhide Ranch Mining Company's Mill, which 
his entirely met my expectations; and I have no hesita- 
tion in recommending it to all who -are in need of a machine 
for rapidly, cheaply and propcrlv preparing quartz for the 
stamps. Yours truly, R. P. JOHNSON, 

Supt. Rawhide Ranch Quartz Mill. 

BRODIE'S PATENT IMPROVED GERMAN AMALGA- 
MATING BARREL.— This Barrel obtained a promt am at 
the Fair of the Mechanics' Institute in San Francisco, in 
1S61. Further particulars will be aflorded on application 
to the subscribers. 

Those Infringing the patent rights to the above Improved 
Barrel, are hereby Informed that on and after the 1st No 
vember, IS66. the royalty charged for using the same will 
be raised to the sum of S100 per Barrel. 

A diagram, with explanations of this machine, will be 
found in the "Mining and Scientific Press," of September 
29th, 18ti6. 

BRODIE'S PATENT WIND-BLAST SEPARATOR FOR 
DRY CRUSHING-— This Dry Crusher has been found the 
most economical and effective mode of crushing ores in 
Mexico. California and Nevada Diagrams and explana- 
tions afforded on application to the subscribers. 

A drawing and full description of this machine will be 
found in tho Mining and Scientific Press of Sept. KM.1866. 
BJKODIE A: KADC1IFF, 
Exprets Building, -102 Monnrr.merv street, 

12vl3tf San Francisco. 

LEFFEL'8 

American BouMe Turbine 




THESE WHEELS, UNEQUALED AND UNRIVALED IN 
the United States or the world, have been fully tested 
on this coast, more than forty being in use at thi-i'datein 
California and Oregon, driving all kinds of machinery. Saw 
Mills, Flour Mills, Quartz Mills, etc., etc., etc. 

California References.— E. Stocton, Folsom; O. Sim- 
mons, Oakland, (Mill at Clear Lake); Morgan Oovllle, Lex- 
ington, Santa Clara County, J. i. McMillan, Lexington, 
Santa Clara County. flSj-Send for Circular, to 

KJKAPP <fc GKAIVT. 
Agents for California. 
26vl3-lyq SIO Washington street, San Francisco 



$£^S ioi" Hunter's 

Improyed Concentrator. 

The patentee is prepared to sell his Concentrators for 
the above price, and guarantees, when the machines are 
run according to directions, to give 20 per cent better re- 
sults than from any Concentrator built on this Coast, and 
will refund the money if they will not perform what is 
claimed for them. Machines with copper plates, will cost 
$10 extra. The Machine can be 

Seen in Operation 
At Booth & Go's Union Foundry, up stairs. Parlies pur- 
chasing Concentrators will do well to examine beiore buy- 
ing others of pretended merit. Persons desiring it can have 
a practical concentration made of tailings at any time, and 
prove the working of the machine. 

FOK SS5SO. 

HTTNTER'S E^EEKA AMALGAMATOR. 

For sale, the right to build and use in mills. A working plan 
will be furnished eacli purchaser. Five machines can be 
seen in operation at the Eureka Mill, Crass Valley. The 
cost of the irons for the machiue, without the iron-box, is 
about $101). The box will answer or wood. 

By reference to the Mining and Scientifiic Press of May 
25th, a full description of the above Machines may be found. 

For particulars, send for Circulars, or address 
ANDREW HONTER, 

26vHtf Union Foundry, j3an Francisco. 



HEALTH! HEALTH! 

AM 




To prevent this, purchase one of 

Taylor's Stench Traps and Garbage 
Baskets, 

And promote the health, comfort and cleanliness of your 
family. |For de-ei iptiou see Mining and Scieniiflc Pi-ess, 
April 6, 1867.] Sold wholesale and retail bv TAYLOR & 
SONS, at No. -13» Pacific street, San Francisco. 15vl4lf 



THE CHIEEKATED 

Self Generating Portable 
Gas Lamp. 



This extraordinary Lamp pro- 
duces its own gas by the vapor- 
ization of Petroleum, Naphtha, 
or Benzine. It emits neither 
smoke nor smell, and bumswiih 
a pure white flume, equal In in- 
tensity to an ordinary ras burn- 
er, and at an expense of from one 
to three cenisper hour only, ac- 
cording to the quantity ol light 
required. It is peculiarly adap- 
ted lor min ing purposes, also tor 
stores, lactones, billiard moms. 
and, In fact, for ail purposes 
where regular pas is not availa- 
ble, aud for wlilch it is an ad- 
mirable substitute. As an out- 
door fight it siaiuls unrivalled, 
burning with undiminished bril- 
liancy in a strong wind. 





Direction* for Use. 

Charge the reservoir Willi tho prepared fluid, or with 
Benzine, from hart* to thrce-fourtbs full; allow a porlion to 
run through into the cup, then turn otf the tan and ignite 
the tiuid. which will beat the burner sufficiently to gener- 
ate the gas. which will be seen issuing from the top. Tho 
tap must now be turned on, and a steadv lichtwlll be main- 
tained till tlic whole ol the contents of the reservoir is con- 
sumed . 

A small needle, bent at the point and fixed In a holder, 
may be occasionally required to clear ihe minute bole 
through which tfe eas issues, and the regulating screw at 
the bottom turned a II. tie back: but care mustbe taken not 
to force the screw too high, and It should never be used to 
extinguish the light— 6jl turning the tap ojf, it will gradually 
go out. 

When necessary to renew the cotton which is placed in 
the lower pipe to prevent tbe too rapid flow of theflnid, the 
lamp should be placed in a vise and the burner screwed olf 
The burnt cniton must then 0e withdrawn, and a fresh 
piece of stout cotton rag. one inch wide and four or live 
inches long, should be doubled over a piece of wire, and 
Inserted into the pipe— tbe ends cut short otf, the burner 
again screwed on with a little white lead, and the lamp is 
ready for use. 

Manufactured solely bv.lOHN ,1. MUCKS, original propri- 
etor. Factory, North Beach. San Francisco: and for sale 
bv Ills agents in every citv and lown throughout the State. 
lSvn-3n. 



MECHANICS' INSTITUTE. 

Resources of California. 

THE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE of San Francisco, here- 
by offer a PREMIUM or ONE THOUSAND (Sl.OCTO DOL- 
LAR9 for the best Essay on the "RESOURCES OF 
CALIFORNIA, AND BEST METHOD OF DEVELOPING 
THE SAME." uncUr the following conditions: One-half of 
the premium in cash on the certified award of the Com- 
mittee of Judges, and the balance from the ttrst proceeds of 
sales of the successfol work, which is to belong to, and will 
be published by, the Institute. 

The Essays are to be handed in to the Librarian of the 
Institute on or before the FIRST DAY OF JUNE, 1S6S. and 
the award will bo made by the Judges at the opening of the 
Industrial Exh Ibitiou, which is to be held in August or Sep 
temper following. Tho Essay should be divided into three 
great heads, viz.: Mineral, Agricultural and Industrial Re- 
sources, with proper subdivisions of each subject. Itshould 
be sufficient in quantity to form a duodecimo (12mo) volume 
of from 250 to liuO pages long primer type, solid. 

Writers will sign their articles in cypher, and send their 
names and address in scaled envelopes, which will be kept 
in a seoure place by the Institute, and only be opened when 
the award is made. The manuscripts of unsuccessful 
writers will be returned to them without publicity. 

The Committee of Judges have the right to reject all 
Essays in case they do not consider them worthy" of publi- 
cation or the premium. No further instructions than are 
contained in this advertisement will be given to this Com 
mlttee, nor will they be subjected to auy advice from tho 
officers or members of the Institute in regard to their pro- 
posed action. ( All manuscript submitted mustbe in clear 
legible writing, so as to admit of easy rcadlng.l 

Tho following named gentlemen, who have been selected 
for their well known ability, public spirit aud iut egrity o 
purpose, will compose the Committee of Judges: 
Hon. Fred'k P. Low, Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, U. 

Prof. J. D.Whitney, S. A., 

James Otis, Prof. W. B. Ewer, 

Yvni. Governeur Morris, B. N, Bugbey. 

By order of tbe Board of Directors. 

D. E. HATES, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 12, 1867. 2lvU-2m 



SCBScatBEns who do not receive the 3Iimnrj and Seienlific 
Pressln due time, are requested to Inform the publishers. 



Gun Cotton in the Mines. — The Terri- 
torial Enterprise speaks as follows of an ex- 
periment with gun cotton in the Gould <fe 
Curry mine : 

The hole was twenty-eight inches in depth 
and about an inch and a quarter in diame- 
ter, and was charged with six inches of gun 
cotton. The report of the blast was not so 
loud or jarring as would have been that of 
even a less quantity of gunpowder ; but tbe 
amount of rook displaced was quite as great 
as though gunpowder had been UBed. Now, 
however, we come to the great advantages 
to be derived from the use of the gun cot- 
ton in blasting in the lower levels and long 
and badly ventilated drifts of our mines. 
The instant after we heard the sound of 
the explosion we were able to return into 
the drift and note the execution done, not 
suffering the slightest inconvenience from 
smoke ; whereas, had the hole been charged 
with gunpowder, we could not have gone in 
until after the lapse of at least fifteen min- 
utes, and then would have found the back 
part of the drift so filled with smoke that 
we could hardly have distinguished the body 
of a man at a distance of six feet. The ex- 
plosion of gun cotton produced much less 
heat than is produced by the same or muoh 
less quantity of gunpowder. This is a fact 
worthy of consideration to those mining in 
the hot and badly ventilated chambers of 
the lower levels of our mines. 

Two other blasts were tried in another 
drift, which did not succeed, on account of 
the gases finding an exit through the seams 
of the rock — the tamping, even, not being 
blown out ; such cases, however, often oc- 
cur with powder. Gun cotton is to be thor- 
oughly tested in this mine, and we will have 
more to say of it ere long. It is being suc- 
cessfully used, and is much liked, in the 
Belcher mine at Gold Hill. Gun cotton is 
now compressed, so as to occupy much less 
space than that ordinarily used — thereby ef- 
fecting a great saving in drilling, by making 
a smaller hole do as much execution as a 
larger one. We presume that in the above 
experiments the ordinary gun cotton was 

employed. 

^— .. ^» -«- -• 

Eatlway Management in India. — A cor- 
respondent of an American paper, writing 
from Calcutta, and speaking of the Delhi 
railroad line, says that during last year 
seven or eight corpses were taken from the 
cars, victims of over-crowding. Men and 
women, it says, are so crushed and crammed 
into the third-class carriages as to be forced 
to remain standing for the whole length of 
a journey, reaching sometimes 400 or 500 
miles, in the hottest season of the year. A 
more rude and barbarous system of railroad 
management could scarcely be conceived 
than the English practice of locked cars, 
without any means of communication be- 
tween the passengers and engineer or con- 
ductor during the transit from one station 
to another. 



Electricity in Ikon Smelting. — The 
American Artisan, in alluding to the recent 
application of electricity to iron smelting in 
England, which was also noticed in the 
Press of June 29th, says : 

This may be a novelty in England, but 
the records of the United States Patent 
Office will show that more than one Ameri- 
can inventor has proposed substantially 
similar applications of electro-magnetism in 
the manufacture of iron and steel. We have 
in mind particularly the application made 
several years ago for a patent by Prof. A. 
L. Fleury. As, however, nothing has re- 
sulted from any of these American inven- 
tions, we caution our iron manufacturers 
against attaching too much importance to 
the above statement. 

A Mohajimedan Lawyer. — Budrooden 
Tyaree, a Mohammedan, has been admitted 
to praotice at the English bar. He was 
sworn on the Koran. He intends to prac- 
tice at the bar at Bombay, and will be the 
first member of the bar in India who is a 
disciple of the Prophet. 

A correspondent of an agricultural pa- 
per writes as follows : " If any of your read- 
ers that cannot raise radishes on account of 
worms, or unsuitable soil, will strew com- 
mon wheat bran, one inch thick, on any 
good soil, and hoe it in, and then plant their 
seed, they may eat as good radishes as any- 
body can raise." 



9ft* pining and £mntffl* $m$. 



31 



*Gettixg Readt fob the Attack.— Two 
of the big 20-inch giins from the Fort Pitt 
Foundry have Iwn cast to the order of the 
Chilian Government Four 15-inch frnns, 
and others of less caliber, from tin uune 
foundry, have already been shipped for 
Chile. It is more than probable that the 
Spanish fleet will receive a still warmer re- 
ception than at the time of their lost attack 
when they next open their batteries upon 
the spunky South American Republics. 

Piiorrr.uiLE Mixixo. — The Levant Mine, 
Cornwall, commenced working in 1820, 
since which time copper and tin ores to the 
amount of over $5,000,000 have been re- 
turned ; dividends to the extent of some- 
where about £1,000,000 haMebeen de lac 
The largest amount of profit made at any 
one time was 821,800, divided in two months. 
Two of the levels extend beneath the Atlan- 
tic ocean, about three-quarters of a mile. 
The engine-shaft is now about 1,700 feet 
deep from the surface. 

A sn-nox well, something on the prin- 
i driving hollow iron tubes into the 
ground, as practiced somewhat extensively 
in this country, has been patented in France. 
A well is dug and closed in air-tight. On 
exhausting the air, the water currents flow 
in from their remote connections with con- 
siderable force, by means of which the flow 
of water is considerably increased. 



New Way to make Potash. — A process, 
hitherto confined to the laboratory.hasbeen 
introduced, on a practical scale, by M. 
Tessi6 do Mothay, advantageously replacing 
sulphuric by fluosilicic acid in the manufac- 
ture of potash. The acid is obtained from 
carbon, silex, clay, and fluoride of lime, 
melted in a blast furnace. 



Underground Traveling in London 
increases at an astonishing rate. The num- 
ber of passengers carried for the first half 
of the present year by the Metropolitan un- 
derground railway was 16,503,395, against 
5,823,437 in 1863 and 7,462,283 in 1865. 

The first woolen factory in Minnesota 
was established by a woman whose husband 
had left her seven children and not a dollar, 
to go and seek his fortune in California. 
When he returned, penniless, her factory 
was running and she waa proprietor of a 
small town. 



Quartz Mill Construction and Superintendence 

The undersigned is at present open foe an, 
engagement as n workinc Suptrlntt-mlunt in tlte con- 
struction or unerutlon nl"a quartz .Mill. Has hurt five vaars 
Meady and successful experience in ivurlcin^ tires In Wnshrjo. 
and is practiced In saving sulpliurets and the treatmeiu of 
rebellions ores Is prepared to furnish references for all 
the necessary qualifications of an IntelllRent, faithful and 
reliable quartz operator. Address F. M. SUAW. 

San Francisco, care Mining and Scientific Press. 2tivU3m 



CTJT NAILS. 

3,000 KEGS ASSORTED SIZES, 

For sole In any quantity, to close invoice, at the very 
Lowc»t 3ta tes, by 

THQS.H. SELBY&C0., 

116 and US California Street, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 19vU 3m 



Notice "to ^liners, 

Well-Borers and Water Companies. 

MPRAQ rs N-'IW PREPARED TO MANUFACTURE 
• Hydraulic and Artesian Well Pipes In the best work- 
manlike maimer, ulld at the lowest market rates. Having 
made, large additions to my stock of machinery for that 
branch of business. I am prepared to liil all orders with dis- 

fiatch, and guarantee en:i|-e satisfaction. I also immufac- 
ure Mississippi ritoves, n< the latest Improved patterns, for 
vessels uf nil classes. Also, Ship .Plumbing done. 

M. I'RAG, 
Svia-ly Strive Store. No. 12. r > Clay street, below Davis. 

Pratt's Abolition Oil. 

FOR ABOLISHING PAIN — THE BEST REMEDY IN 
existence dir Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Paralysis, Hcad- 
ac he. Toothache, SureThruat, Dlptltcrln. Wc;ik, Swolen and 
Stiff Joints. Contracted Cords and Muscles, Cramps, Colic, 
Diarrhoea, Cholera, Pnlus in the Breast, Lame Back, and 
all aches and pains. It Is the poor man's friend, and the 
best Umily physician. Full directions accompany each 
bottle. Price 50 cents and $1 per brittle. For sale by all 
dealers In medicines. Sole Proprietors, A. McBOVLE &. 
CO., Druggists ami Chemists, SS4 Sacramento street, op- 
posite What Cheer House, San Francisco. 10vl4-ly 



GOVERNMENT HOUSE, 

Corner of Sansome and Washington sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MT1IE STREET CARS PASS THIS HOUSE IN 
every direction, every ten minutes. 
The rooms of the House are well furnished, large 
and airy, are let by the month, week or day, and are 
kept la superb order. There is a Restaurant attached tor 
ladles and families, where persons can board tor one-half 
they are required to pay at hotels, 
\7vl3-6m SANBORN & CO 



GLASGOW 

IRON & METAL IMPOKTINCr COMPANY, 

Nos. 25 and 27 Fremont street, near Market, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Bar and Sheet Iron; Boiler Plates and Tubes; Gas and 
W^tcriPlpos, Gas Fittings, Anvils, Cast Steel, etc. lsvli-zm 



HINKLE & CAPP'S 
CENTRIFUGAL ORE GRINDER AND AMALGAMATOR. 



I'utent (luted April l«lih, 1MG7. 




For Grinding and Amalgamating 
Cliurgcs of Ore. 

Arranged as shown In the first engraving, the pan Is 
adapted for grinding and amalgamating separate charges 
of ore of 8W) lbs. each, doing Its work ru.p Idly, thoroughly 
and effectually. 



This sectional engraving cx- 
hlblt^more clearly the arraugo 
ment and i-hapc of the grind- 
ing parts of the machine. It, 
and the other engravings, will 
be more clearly undersiond by 
reference to the accompany- 
ing explanation. 




For Grinding and DiHCliureing Contin- 
uously. 

Arranged as shown In the second engraving, all the tnte- 
rlor grinding parts being the same as bIiowb in first view 
this pan is adapted for receiving and grinding mid dis- 
charging continuously crushed quart/, as fast as supplied 
by a five-stamp battery, with No. 4 or 5 screens. A "tiuin- 
nier,' (ysoino similar contrivance, to carry off the day, 
Rllirfc and surplus water, is to be placed between It ami tlie 
battery. 



Explanation. — E, mnller- 
hftntfen F, mitller plate or 
Shoe. Q. side dies. I, sup- 
porting lip D, hearing sur- 
IRce. T. feeder. X, weight to 
counter-balance wear 01 mul- 
ler plates, or shoes. U, cover 
used in working charges of 
ore. The dark shade on the 
bottom of the pan represents 
one of the grooves lor mer- 
cury. 



Half Section or Top View. 

The Centrifugal Ore Grinder. 



This new GRINDER and AMALGAMATOR is extremely 
simple and compact In its construction. The principle 
availed of is eutirely novel. The grinding Is effected by 
perpendicular mullcrs, pressed laterally by centrifugal 
lorco acalmt perpendicular Iron dies, fitted to the inner 
sides of the pan. It is to be run at a speed of from 60 to 30 
revolutions per minute, according to the hardness of 
the rock to be crushed. The pressure upon every part of 
the grinding surfaces is direct and uniform, and they wear 
with straight and true faces from flrst to last, comformlng 
also to the shape of the sides of, the pan, so that the work 
performed with old mailers and plates Is as thorough and 
perfect as with new ones. The pulp enters readily between 
the mullcrs andside dies, the pressure being light In front 
and heaviest at the heel of the mullcv. there Is no strain 
upon any of the parts, and no liability to breakage or dis- 
arrangement, and no wear except that which is useful on 
the grinding surfaces. The work done is performed without 
jawing. Jerking, straining or clogging, with extreme regu- 
and evenness, the pulp being of great and uniform fine- 
ness. It is not liable to be clogged, nor to be obstructed, 
stopped, impeded or broken, by coarse pieces of rock, 
pick points or iron, accidentally introduced with the 
crushed ore, as these can readily pass each mnller sep- 
arately, without interfering with or affecting the other 
mullers, each of which Is independent, or can rest upon 
the bottom below the mullcrs, without Inconvenience, as 
the arms play freely an Inch above the bottom of the pan. 

It Is more read II v cleaned up than any other pan, as each 
niuller can be lifted out separately by hand, and there is no 
necessity for lifting the revolving cone or driver, which is 
also easily turned, there being \\o friction when not in' use, 
or rapid revolution. The hulk of the mercury isnot ground 
up with the ruck, but lies below- the lower ends of the mul- 
let's in h groove, ahtl in another groove on the cover of the 
pan, where all the pulp and meial passes continually over 
it without cuttingorcarrylngitaway. Themullcrs and side : 



dies are easily removed at any time, or -when worn out, 
and an extra set uf mullers is tarnished with each pan sold. 
It is also adapted lor grinding cement, sulphurets, roasted 
ores, etc. 

We claim all these advantages for our Pan, and thnt it 
will do more and better work, with less power, and less at- 
tention and manual labor, more rapidly and with less ex- 
pense, than any other pan or muller'made for the same 
purposes, and claimed to be of equal or greater capacity. 
We will sell them for use on condition that It, "when fairly 
tried they fall to answer these promises, they may be re- 
turned. 

For full description and illustration, see Mining and Sci- 
entific Press, June 15, 18t*7. 

Hinkle «Sf Capp's Centrifugal Ore Grinder 

aiid Amalgamator 

May be seen in 1 operation, and examined, at the European 
Metallurgical Works, on Bryant, between Third mid Fourth 
streets, San Francisco, where all interested m mining and 
milling operations are invited to inspect It. Its weight, as 
arranged for continuous grinding and discharge, with extra 
set of six mullers, Is about 2.700 "lbs.; or as arranged for 
grinding and amalgamating single charges ul'SOU lbs. of ore, 
also with extra set of mullers, about 3.0(10 lbs. Price, as 
above, completely fitted and ready for use, either way, 
SSUO, gold coin. 

For further particulars, apply by letter to PHILIP HIN- 
KLE and CHARLES S. CAPP, No. 5i3 Olay street, below 
Montgomery, San Francisco, Cal. or personally to the above, 
orS. P. KIMBALL, Esq.. at the European Metallurgical 
Works, on Bryantstreet. between Third and Fourth streets, 
or at the Miners' Foundry, First street, near Folsoin, where 
they are manufactured. 

jflSj-Send for Circulars. 

PHILIP HINKLE. and 
CHARLES S. CAPP, Patentees, 

25vl4-tf 513 -Clay street, San Francisco. 



4 

?. 

e 
H 







Pi. P. LANCLAND, 

STAIR BU.ILDEB 

Wo. 49 Heidi street, 

Between Market and Mission 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

lOvU-ly 



f'-V 

i >■ j 

Imp 

illS 



n 



9 

i 



QUARTZ MINERS, TOLLMEN, 

And others contemplating the erection of Reduction 
Works, for either Gold or Silver Ores, your atlenliou Is 
called to a new, superior 

First Class Mill, 

In all respects, with Pans and Separators complete. The 
Mill is adapted for 20 or -10 Stamps. 
BSf-Full particulars maybe had by calling on Messrs. 
Palmer, Knox ic -Co., Golden Slate Foundry, or 

«T. II. HITCHCOCK:, 
19vH-3m Millwright, Russ House. 




DUDGEON'S 

PATIST 

Hydraulic Lifting Jacks 

— AXD— 
OILER PUNCHES, 
16vH Eighth street, cor. Minna. qr 



Steam. Pumps. 



j 

FOK DRAINI.NG JUNES OK ELEVATING WATER TO 
ANY HKiHT. 

PICKERING'S GOVERNORS 

For Steam Engines. 

GrifFavcl's; Injectors, 

For Feeding Boilers. 

STQDDART'S IR0H WORKS, 



BLARE'S QUARTZ BREAKER! 

PRICES REDUCED! 

MACHINES OF ALL SIZES FOR SALE 
— BY — 

■WM. P. BLAKE, 

Corner First and Mlsmlan streets, or Box a,© 1 ?? 

Svl3f SAN FRANCISCO. 



Portable Steam Engines! 

"Houdley's" anil " IXUttnter'." MnUe, 




FOUR SIZES, 

8, 10, 12, and 15-Horse Power, 




H$WavKa*-.wa, 



HOADLEY»8. 

3 to 40-Horse Power. 




HITTINGER'S, 
THREE SIZES, 

5, 7, and 10-Horse Power 




IIXTTTlVGiaEXrss. 
TWO S9ZES, 

5 and 7-Horse Power, 



M:eoliaiiioa.l Drawings. 

Persona wishing Mechanical Drawings can obtain the 
services of competent draughtsmen, by applying to this 
office. 



COMBINING THE MAXIMUM OF EFFICIENCY, DUE- 
ahiltty, and Economy, with the Minimum of weight 

and price. . . 

These Engines are favorably known, a large number 
being in use on this coasv for hoisting, pumping, threshing, 
milling and mining purposes. jn _ 

Steam can be gotup on these Engines In fifteen minutes 
after renchins the plnce of operation, and ihr-tnne, expense 
of setting boilers, machim-rv, and "construction account" 
saved, (which is often the difference between the successful 
and unsuccessful prosecution o) milling enterprises,) in 
fact, the portable principle is the pioneer's friend, and ena- 
bles him to draw engines on tlieir own wheels to his cabin 
door, and plant on llio outermost oonlinus of civilization 
the saw and gristmill, ami it has dune and will do more 
to help su hd ue the continent than any other of the modern 
motors which are crowding society and normalizing the 
world. . ■ 

All sizes on hand from 3 to 30 horse power, with and 
without carriages. 
Also, Portable Saw and Grist Mills- 
For sale by TEEADWELL <fe CO., 



9vW-Gml6p 



Corner of Front and Market 



32 



Mkt pitting awfli Mmtiiit $##. 



Market Street Homestead Association.— J. S. Lctt, Sec- 
retary. Office, 306 Montgomery street, corner of Fine, San 
Francisco. 2vl5 



FAEMEES' AND MECHANICS' 

BANK OF SAVINGS 

825 Sansome street, near California. 



Incorporated under the Act of the Legislature of California, 
approved April 11th, 1862. 



CAPITAL, STOCK, 



: $150,000. 



DIRECTORS: 



N. C. Fassett, George M. Condee, Renben Morton, 

G. H. Wheeler, Isaac E. Davis, James Laidley, 

Henry Dutton. B. H. Freeman, Samuel L. Palmer. 

G. H. WHEELER, Cashier. N. C. FASSETT, President. 

Deposits received in gold, silver or currency, payable lu 
like kind, at sight. Funds maybe sent by express, or in 
registered packages by lnaU. Receipts will be promptly 
furnished. 

We will receive Gold Dust and Bullion, for refining or 
assay; make advances on the same, and return proceeds 
promptly. 

Best Bankers' Drafts, on alt parts of the world, furnished 
at lowest rates, by addressing us. Write names plain. 
Checks of hi) banks taken. 

Money loaned only on flrst-class security, safety being 
our first consideration. 
The Highest Sates of Interest paid on Gold 

Deposits* 
DEPOSITS RECEIVED IN SUMS OF 81 AND UPWARDS. 

We will keep safely all bonds deposited with us; collect 
and remit the interest to our friends in the country, as may 
be directed. Fur further particulars, address 

FARMERS' AND MECHANICS' BANK, 

2vl5-6meow -San Francisco. 



The Commercial Herald 

AND 

MARKET REVIEW 

Will be Issued early on 
EVERY STEAMER-DAY MORNING, 

<TRI-MONTHLY). 

Office — Southwest corner Washington and Battery streets. 

Opposite Post Office and Custom House. 

" The HERALD will contain lull and reliable commercial 

details, and elaborate articles on the monetary affairs of 

the Pacific Coast. 

The Letter Sheet Market Review, 

Containing selections from the COMMERCIAL HERALD, 
printed on tissue paper, for transmission abroad, will 
be published simultaneously with that paper. Also, publi- 
cation office of the 

Weekly Stock Circular. 

03- Merchants can have tlielr cards prominently Inserted 
In the Letter Sheet MARKET REVIEW. • av!5 




PIANOS, 
ORGANS, 

All kinds 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT©, 

Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc. Largest Importers 
lu San Francisco. Send orders to 

KOHLER, CHASE & CO., 
421 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



2flv 4nrl6p 



We take occasion to Inform our friends and customers 
that we have sold our entire stock in warehouse, also in- 
voice to arrive, to Messrs. N. P. COLE & CO., 312 and SU 
Pine street. The whole forms a most complete and desira- 
ble assortment of FURNITURE, and well merits attention 
before purchasing elsewhere, J. PEIRCE & CO. 



FURNITURE. 



We beg leave to call the attention of the public to our 
ware rooms, 

Noe. 313 and 314 Pine Street. 

Having purchased the entire stock of Messrs. J. Pelrce & 
Co., and in addition to our large invoice from our factory 
at the East, we are prepared to fill allorderspromptlv, both 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, and call the attenilon'of the 
public to our nalesroom, as containing the most complete 
assortment of desirable goods on this coast 

2vlR-lqr M. p. COLE <fc CO. 



3E3. O. HUNT, 

Manufacturer of 

Windmill**, Horse -Powers 

Pumps, Pumping 

Frames and 

Gearing. 

Bust's Adjustable Wiwd Mills 
have ull the sails so arranged, as 
to turn edgewavs to the mill when 
the mill is stopped. The sails can 
he set at any angle to suit the 
force of the wind, while the mill 
isrunnlng,by means of the brake 
lever '.at the foot of the mill, by 
any person. 

Hunt's Self- Regulating Mill 
is strong, durable and cheap. It 
is provided wlih means for stop- 
ping, in the most violent winds. 
- .-^ This mill is well kuown through- 
^^r~'^ii out the State. 
Tread Horse-Powers, Swap Horse-Powers, Pumps in great 
variety, Single and Double-Acting. Frames and Gearing 
lor running pumps, from steam or other power, constantly 
ou hand and built to order. Water Tanks built to order. 
No. 28 Second St., and 108 and ilO Jessie St., 
2vl5qy San Francisco. 




Greatest Invention of the Age. 
BOWMAN'S 

AMERICAN WASHING COMPOUND 

And housewife's true friend, saves one-half the labor, 
one-half the time, and one-half the expense. 

For WASHING CLOTHES, CLEANING HOUSES, RE- 
MOVING PAINT, GKEASE, etc., it is unequalled. 

j&F" It makes hard water as soft as rain water. 

For sale at $1.60 per can of five gallons, at the manufac- 
tory, ££3 Jackson street, Dear Battery. Please send your 
orders, by mall or express, to LYNCH & PARSONS, 

2&vU-2am6t San Francisco, Cal. 



Gaston's Screw Grinder and Amalgamator 



The Best Yet Invented. 



JTaJ. 



For rapidity and thor- 
oughness of work, the ma- 
chine above illustrated is 
unequaled by any. It 
wastes no appreciable 
quantity of quicksilver, 
and is of itself a perfect 
settler. Fig. 1 represents 
the pan with part of its 
side removed, and fig. 2 
the screw muller, and its 
shoes. The letters c show 
the threads of the screw ; 
H, its shoes, and D a low 
cylinder within which the 
screw rotates; E, repre- 
sents open spaces through 
the base of the cylinder, 
and iy inclined partitions 
filling (at those points) the 
spaces between the cylin- 
der and the shell of the 
pan. These inclined par- 
titions are to intercept the 
current of pulp around the 
pan, as it issues from un- 
der the muller, and turn it toward the center again, over the screw. The dies are not shown in the 
figure — there are eight. Mercury is not ground, nor floured in this pan. The pulp is ground to a 
slum, with great rapidity ; the muller is raised a little and the quicksilver is poured, in en masse, form- 
ing a layer upon the bottom of the pan. The revolution of the screw then forces the pulp down into 
contact with the quicksilver, into which it is effectually rubbed by the shoes, while the screw, being 
constantly fed by the pulp from above it, presses all under the muller outward — still in contact with the 
quicksilver, through the spaces, E, and thence over toward the center of the pan, when it is again 
seized by the screw and forced down into the quicksilver, rubbed into and forced off in contact with it, 
which process is continued as long as desired. The pulp can thus be forced into contact with the 
mercury at the rate of 1,000 pounds in three minutes, or twenty times per hour, and none can escape 
contact with the mercury, that contact being under the immense pressure of the perpetual screw, in 
addition to tliat of gravity, which (gravity) is the only available force in the other pans for bringing the 
pulp into contact with the quicksilver. "A word to the wise is sufficient." The Screw Amalgamator 
is the cheapest and most efficient pan manufactured. Millmen ! call and see one running at the Pacific 
Foundry, Q^"For particulars, address the inventor, H. A. GASTON, at Cosmopolitan Hotel, San 
Francisco ; or R. L. Thomas, Esq., Virginia City, Nevada. Ivl4qr 




W. T. GARRATT, » 
City 

BRASS AND BELL FOUNDER 



Cor. Mission and Fremont sty., 

SAN FKANC1S0O. 

Manufacturer of Brass, Zinc, and Anti-Friction or 
SalVbet: Metal Castings: - 

CBX7RCB AND STEAMBOAT 

BELLS, 

TAVERN AND HAND BELLS AND 30NCS, 

TIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS, 

Steam, Liquor. Soda OU, Water and Flange Cocks, and 
Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. Hose and 
all other Joints, Spelter, Solder, and Copper Rivets, Ac. 
Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, oil Globes, Steam Whistles, 

HTIKA1TLIC PIPES AND JOZZEI.8 
For Mining purposes, Iron Steam Pipe furnished with Fit 
tings, <fcc. Coupling Joints of all aiVj. Particular attention 
paid to Distillery work. Manufacturer of " Garratt's Pat- 
tent Improved Journal Metal." 

09" Highest Market price paid for OLD BELLS, copper 
AND BRASS. _£» 6tf 



SEND 
SEND 
SEND 
SEND 
SEND 
SEND 



YOUR 
XOTJK 
YOUR 
YOUR 
YOUR 
YOUR 



ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 



TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 



DEWEY & CO., 

DEWEY & CO., 

DEWEY & CO., 

DEWEY & CO., 

DEWEY & CO., 

DEWEY & CO., 



BOOK 
BOOK 
BOOK 
BOOK 
BOOK 
BOOK 



AND 
AND 
AND 
AND 
AND 
AND 



JOB PRINTERS, 
JOB PRINTERS, 
JOB PRINTERS, 
JOB PRINTERS, 
JOB PRINTERS, 
JOB PRINTERS, 



MINING- & 
MINING & 
MINING & 
MINING & 
MINING & 
MINING & 



SCIENTIFIC 
SCIENTIFIC 
SCIENTIFIC 
SCIENTIFIC 
SCIENTIFIC 
SCIENTIFIC 



PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 



OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 



O. P. Truesdell, having (his day become associated In 
the business of the MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS JOB 
PRINTING OFFICE, the same will hereafter be conducted 
under the firm-name of "Truesdell, -Dewey & Co." at the 
old place. No. SOS Clay street. With additional new ma- 
terial and the best of workmen employed, we can guar- 
antee entire satisfaction to all old and new customers. 

TRUESDELL, DEWEY A CO. 

San Francisco, April 16, 1867. 



Inipoi*t;viit WTotiee. 

Another New Doctor in the Field ! 

DR. H. A. BENTON, 

Has been performing many wonderful cures in this city 
the past two years, and, as hlspractice is fast increasing at 
the office, he finds It difficult to attend all the outside calls, 
and has concluded to Invite R. H. OLMSTEAD, M.D., to join 
him. Dr. Olmslead, of Napa City, has been eighteen years 
successfully ti eating obstinate cases with water, electricity, 
and the magnetic forces. Remedies of the Eclectic Pchool, 
of which he is a graduate, can be resorted to when needed. 
Being the seventh son of a celebrated physician! and at the 
same time having a powerful organization, his magnetic 
hands like magic dispel pain and disease. He Is also a nat- 
ural bone-setter. Dr. Olmstead has this day associated 
with Dr. H. A. Benton, the Medical Electrician and 
Homeopathist, at his offlce.SU Bush street, San Francisco, 
who, having all the necessary facilities, such as the patent 
Electric, Chemical, Sulphur, Vapor. Hot Air and Medicated 
Baths, which aid in curing all curable diseases, whether 
acute or chronic, and with the combined skill, together 
with an excellent lady assistant, gives an assurauce of 
cure to many, benefit to all, and injury to noue. 

N. B.— Terms for treatment within reach of all. Office 
hours: from 9A. M. to 8 Pi M.; Sundays, by appointment. 

egp- Lodging rooms convenient for those who como from 
the country. 

June 1st, 1867. 22vU-eow4t 



SARSAPAEIPHERE 
BITTERS 



Have so speedily grown In favor that tbelr unrivalled sale 
has attracted remarks and criticisms of the trade. Jealousy 
attributes their success to the fineness of tlielr general 
style, and principally to the originality and beautv of tho 
bottle, which was conceived and manufactured by Califor- 
nia artists. MR. LACOUR, an energetic promoter of Cali- 
fornia resources, desired tu show that California has no 
need of being tributary to other countries for talent or 
mechanical industry. 

The cause of their success is tho great benefit they have 
been to the large number wholiavo already used them. 

MR. LACOUR is a graduate of the Polytechnic Institute 
of France, and adds to a thorough knowledge of Chemistry 
many years of experience; and, after a lung and careful 
experimental study, has been enabled to offer 

LACOUR'S 

SARSAPABIPHERE BITTERS. 

They are the most efficient Blood Purifier, because thev 
combine with the wholesome SarsaparillH, which operates 
by cutaneous excretions, and other substances which gently 
stimulate the secretions of the lower glands and organs, 
render digestion easy, obviate costiveness, and remove reg- 
ularly every impurity of the blood. 

They are unrivalled as a remedy for Scrofula, Dyspepsia, 
Constipation, Liver Complaint, Nervous Affections, Colic, 
Intermittent Fever's, and all diseases arising from impurity 
of the Blood or Costiveness. 



"Wlio Takes Tliem ? 

The Old Man 

Takes them as a gentle stimulant and mild rejuvenator. 

The Young Man 

Takes them to regulate his system, prevent disease, and 

stimulate to new life his overrasked body. 

The Young Woman 

Takes them to secure regularity In her habits; to tint her 

cheeks with the bloom of health, to give a sparkle 

to her eyes, and sweetness to her breath. 

The Husband 

Takes them to promote vitality, give strength to the body, 

peace to the mind, and with his health, wealth 

and comfort to all his family. 

The Wife 

Takes them to invigorate and strengthen hersvstom, and as 
an aid to nature in regulating her periodical sickness. 
Children 
Take them as a gentle, yet effective tonic. 
The DusliuiViiy 
Takes them as a mild, pure stimulant, containing none of 
the deleterious, essentialaud lusiloilsof forbidden drinks. 
The Inebriate 
Takes them to give tone to his poisoned stomach nnd allay 
the fearful longings for strone drink with a stimu- 
lant that does not madden or destroy. 
The Traveler 

Takes them to prevent sea sickness, and secure his health 
against change of climate. 

livery "body Takes Them ! 

PRO BONO PUBLICO! 

2vl5-6ra 




Perry Davis' Vegetable Pain Killer. 

The universal remedy for Internal and external com- 
plaints. At this period there are but few unacquainted with 
the merits of the Pain Killer; but while some extol it as a 
liniment, they know but little of its p*wcr In easing pain 
whentaken Internally, while others use It iatemaUy with 
great success, but are equally ignorant of its healing virtues 
when applied externally. We therefore wish to say to all 
that It is equally successful, whether used internally or ex- 
ternally, and its sale is universal and immense. The de- 
mand from India and other foreign countries Is equal to 
the demand at home, and It has become known in those 
far-off places by Its merits— the proprietors have never 
advertised it or been to any expense in its introduction into 
foreign lands. 

ASF-Sold by all Medicine Dealers everywhere. : 2vl5-lm 



JOHN G. HODGE & CO., 

Importers and Dealers In 

STATIONERY, 

Blank Books, School Books and Cheap 
Publications* 

WRAPPING- PAPER, 

PAPER BAGS, ETC. 
Nos. 418 and -130 Clay street, San Francisco. 
J®- Special attention given to orders from Country Mer- 
chants. 2vl6-qr)6p 



Golden City Chemical Works. 

LABORATORY, 
Corner of Seventh and Townsend Streets* 

OFFICE, 
Corner of Montgomery and Bnsh Streets. 

CAPITAL STOCK, $500,000 

Trustees: ■ 

Hi P. WAKELEE, THOS. H. SELBY, 

NICHOLAS LUNING, THOS. BELL, 

CHAS. E. McLANE. 

EC. P. WAKELEE MANAGES, 



THIS COMPANY ARE NOW PREPARED TO FURNISH 
Sulphuric, Nitric and Muriatic Acids of superior quality, 
in quantities to suit. 

Orders will be received at the office on'y for Chemicals of 
every description, which will be manufactured as may be 
required. The Company beg to say that they have the ad- 
vantages of all improved machinery and apparatus for tho 
manufacture and manipulation of these products, and our 
Laboratory is fitted up with the most recent improvements 
which experience and science Eitggest, and is surpassed by 
none in completeness and perfection lor the purposes it in 
designed. :ivi i 3m 



Foundry for Sale. 

A One-half Interest in the 

UNION IRON "WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, 
Owned by William R. Williams, is offered for sale on the 
most favorable terms. 

A. Good Bargain 

May be had, as the proprietor Is going home to Europe. It 
is seldom that so good an opportunity is offered for a sure 
and permanent investment. The business of the establish- 
ment is exceedingly flourishing, as can be shown. The 
Shop is of brick, new and well built. The lot is 85 feet front 
by 163 feet in depth, In a good location for this business, on 
Front street, between N and streets. 

Inquire at the office of the Foundry, or address 

WILLIAM R. WILLIAMS, 

*26vl3tf9'l6P Sacramento, Cal. 



Electrotypk Cots, Engravings, Etc.— Our Job Printing 
Office is abundantly supplied with elegant engravings, or- 
naments, and other embellishments to suit the various 
branches of Industry In this State, 




Single <-..[il,-«, Fifteen Cents. 



Termn One Tear, S5| Six Months, 83. 



11 journal of .Useful gtttss, Mtnte, and pining and pccnaniraJ %to$tm. 



DEWEY A CO., PlTHI.ISIIERSl 

And I'm. .11 S.ill.ilor-. I 



SAN" FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1867. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Starr's Patent Horse Power— 
Illustrate! 

lllvcr Country and 
it. Mints— Continued. 

PactH Ati.iut Patent Matters— 

I'.illllllUe.l 

n steol. 
A Novel Enterprise 

81] Ic 

Petroleum Fuel. 

tlold mill Qralu 

An Important Expedition. 

l) tbolri Foe Trumpet 

Pr in Rlerra and Nevada 

Counties 
Ooi mil Purantns Bnclnca 
Thi- Lobster limine-- 
Tli.- Kin- Engines of Europe. 
Coral Jewelry. 

White t'oppor. 

New VerentnU' Exchange. 

The Paris Exhltiitlittt. 

Rrandy rroni Oal. 

Th ■ Randwlch Island*. 

Silver ore Irutn British Co- 

liunhla. 

New Patents and Inventions. 
Notices to Correspondents. 
Pan Francisco .Market Rates. 
Sun Francljco Weekly Slock 
Circular. 



Mivnoiai MlSCKLI.ANY 

Husala sheet Iron: Steel 

last Iron Improves 

with Ace; Wet lint Brick; 

Tli.. Hydraulic Pr Her: 

Pointing tlie Mull-; Safety 
a ilr.i farhotiOUs; 
Bronulne Tin Castings 
BOllMTirlO MIlll.Ll.i.il- 

iii,. Meienrngrnpb; sinrn- 
lar s. I. nunc Pact: Precip- 
itating Silver with, Cadmt- 
iinl; A lllch Illuminating 
tin-; A simple toe Machine; 
I'nie acetic Acid: Minia- 
tures Volcano; An Ingenious 
mi. i ii.iiiiiii hi Experiment: 
Cold Alleclln.- the Urowlh 
hi Tic-; Tin Poll, etc. 

Mitstxa Summary— Enibrnclng 
Ian- liuellliteiice trom the 
valines enmities nltd dis- 
Irlel.s In California, Idaho. 
Arizona. Colorado. Mon- 
tana, Nevada, 1'tnh, ore 
eon nnd Washington. 

stock Prices— Bid and Asked. 

San Francisco Metal Market 

New Incorporations— List of 
Offlcers. 

Mining Shareholders 1 Direct- 
ory. 



Starr's Patent Horse-Power. 

The increasing demand for, and great use- 
fulness of small motive-powers, for various 
purposes, has of late called into exercise 
much inventive talent in the way of meeting 
this especial want For 
general convenience and 
readiness, probably noth- 
ing is superior to the 
horse for supplying this 
want His domestic na- — 

ture, his great muscular 
strength, and general 
adaptability for various 
other useful purposes, 
render him a most fitting 
medium for the obtain- 
ment of small power, 
especially where that 
power, as often happens, 
is wanted at different lo- 
calities and at unf requent 
intervals. Many devices 
have been invented by 
which the power of the 
horse can be most ad- 
vantageously transferred 
to the movement of ma- 
chinery, among the best of which we find 
the one herewith illustrated, and which was 
first described in the American Artisan. 
This invention was patented by Nicholas 
Starr, Jr., of Homer, N. Y., May 1, 1866. 
We copy the following description of the 
invention from the Artisan of Feb. 27, 1867 : 

It is operated with a chain which extends 
around the reel as the means of communi- 
cating the necessary motion. Upon the 
foundation frame-work of the machine are 
placed friction-wheels or rolls, upon which 
the reel rotates. The reel is made by plac- 
ing the spokes or beams in pairs near each 
other in a central hub, radiating outward, 
and each pair connected by cross-pieces 
projecting beyond the point of connection 
with such spokes, and putting upon the 
outer ends of each cross-piece a forked 
catch, in which the chain passes. These 
cross-pieces are equal in length to the space 
between the catches and the different cross- 
pieces^ so that the catches shall be equi- 
distant 1 around the reel. To strengthen the 
reel, iron rods connect the different cross- 
pieces, one of the rods being formed with 
a swivel, by the turning of which the whole 
series of rods between each cross-piece is 
made very tight. In this arrangement 
Bpace is obtained between the different pairs 
of spokes for the horses to travel, and the 



reel is made stronger, as there is nearly 
double the number of spokes that are usu- 
ally employed. 

The pin upon which the fly-wheel runs is 
made fast to timbers that rise vertically and 
in a diagonal direction with the foundation 
timbers, which, by crossing and bracing 
each other, are made very strong and rigid. 
Upon the top of these diagonal pieces is 
placed a timber, held in position by screws 
passing through its end. From this timber 
is suspended a swing-pulley, which holds 
up the chain as it comes off the reel, and a 
joint at the end of the arm that supports 
the pulley enables it to accommodate itself 
to the different degrees of slackness which 
are occasioned by the chain passing around 
the reel on the differentsized wheels placed 
upon the fly-wheel. At the one end of the 
frame, bent downward and sustaining the 
aforesaid pulley, is a lever, which acts as a 
spring, and which is held by the foundation 
of the machine, and is connected to the arm 
of the pulley by a chain, and is thus kept 
at a degree of tension. For a less speed 
and a stronger power a larger wheel is 
placed upon the fly-wheel hub, and for a 
fast speed, and where a strong power is of 
secondary importance a smaller wheel is 



Telegraphic Cornrntiiiicatioa with 
Mines. 

It will be recollected that we made men- 
tion, some time since, of an ineffectual at- 
tempt to secure telegraphic communication 
between the interior of the Pewabic copper 
mines, at Lake Superior, and the superin- 
tendent's office, on the surface. For some 
unexplained reason, it was said the current 
could not be established, although various 
devices were used. The further extremity 
was inserted in moist ground and in a pool 
of water, the whole length carefully insu- 
lated ; but all to no purpose. A single wire 
was used. A double wire would undoubted- 
ly have succeeded ; but the effort was made 
to solve the question whether a single wire, 
with a good ground connection, could be 
made to work as well between the interior 
of a mine and the surface as along the sur- 
face of the earth. Our correspondent, "F. 
A. H.," of Forbestown, suggested at the 
time that the difficulty might arise from a 




STARR'S PATENT HORSE-POWER. 



used. The fly-wheel, with the attached small 
wheel, runs upon a section of a cone with 
its base outward ; and this cone screws into 
the pin, so that if the fly-wheel or cone 



JF'xq.S 




wears, by turning the cone in the pin the 
point made by the cone and the fly-wheel is 
made as tight or close as is desired ; the 
base of the cone being outward, it prevents 
the fly-wheel from running off. The chain 
which passes around the reel and is held in 
place by the catches at the ends of the arms 
of the reel, passes over the swing-pulley 
and then over the wheel upon the fly-wheel 
shaft ; and by its peculiar form or sprocket- 
shape (see Fig. 2) the wheel is embraced by 
the chain, which thus gives the requisite 
motion to it and the fly-wheel, and from 
thence the motion is communicated by any 
customary means where it is required. 



supposed difference in the electric tension 
between the surface and interior of the 
globe. His argument was, that as in a 
spherical body, the distribution of free 
electricity is superficial — every portion be- 
ing electrified alike ; so with the earth, 
which is only a larger sphere, the loss of 
the current at any considerable depth would 
seem to indicate that the free electricity of 
our globe is also confined at or near to the 
surface. The correctness of the philosophy 
of our correspondent is not at all improba- 
ble. Our object, however, in again referring 
to this subject is to note the fact, gleaned 
from an English journal, that the electric 
telegraph has been successfully introduced 
into mining operations in England, by means 
of which a serious impediment has been 
overcome. The shaft of the Trafalgar com- 
pany, in the Forest of Dean, terminates on 
the vein of coal ; from thence the coal has 
been worked on the "dirj," leaving a formi- 
dable incline for the coal wagons to ascend, 
and increasing the cost of working. A 
steam engine was erected on "the bank," 
to reduce the expense of haulage and to in- 
crease the dispatch. Its usefulness was 



considerably interfered with by the loss of 
time in communicating the required sig- 
nals. Mr. W. H. Brain, the engineer, has 
introduced the electric telegraph, by which 
signals are at once transmitted to the engine 
house, and the words "go on" and "stop" 
are instantly brought into view. The in- 
strument was made by Mr. Izant, of Lon- 
don. We are not advised as to whether a 
double or single wire is used by Mr. Brain. 

G-old and Grain. 

The rapid growth of the agricultural in- 
terest of this State cannot but be gratifying, 
in the highest degree, to every true Califor- 
nian. Important to ourselves and to the 
world as are ourmining interests, the indica- 
tions are that California, as a State, will 
eventually be more famous for her grain 
than for her gold. Gold will eventually be 
dethroned in California, and corn become 
our king ; nor need we be despondent at 
such a foreshadowing. With improvements 
in mining processes and 
constant discoveries of 
new mines, our gold pro- 
ducts will more than 
hold their own ; while 
our broad and fertile val- 
leys will soon be taxed to 
their utmost to feed the 
countless numbers which 
will, ere long, look to us 
from Nevada, Arizona 
and Northern Mexico, to 
say nothing of islands of 
the Pacific and the west- 
ern coast of continental 
Asia, for that "staff of 
life" which, since the 
world "began, has ever 
sustained and nourished 
the toiling millions who 
make up the mighty mass 
of humanity. In the 
meantime, of opr abund- 
ance we are feeding the 
inhabitants of the States 
and countries bordering 
upon the eastern and 
western shores of the Atlantic. High prices 
enable us, for the present, to take advantage 
of such distant markets. 

Ten millions of dollars, in round num- 
bers, have been added to our wealth during 
the past year in the single article of wheat ; 
and, from all accounts, the present season 
will be fully as productive, if not more so, 
than the past. Heretofore it required nearly 
the entire product of our mines to feed and 
clothe us ; but now, by means of our in- 
creased agricultural yield, we have a sur- 
plus of gold for investment, whereby our 
material wealth is being rapidly increased. 
Agriculture, after all, is the real wealth of 
a people. It has been aptly termed the 
steward which spreads the daily table of 
mankind. And what a table is being pre- 
sented to us of the Pacific coast ! a demand 
to which the valleys of California must 
by-and-by respond. Let us plow wider 
and broader ; let us multiply our granaries, 
and heap them to the brim ; let the idle 
loiterers in our city streets lay hold of the 
plow and the reaper, and transform their 
feeble limbs and pale cheeks into stalwart 
arms and sunburnt faces ; let them drop the 
yellow grain into the earth, and by-and- 
by they will reap a golden harvest, richer 
and more easily gained than the miner 
wrests his glittering grains from the flinty 
rocks of our mountain hights. 



34 



Ik piniu0 m& Mmtifk §xm. 



©jfltttinuuiattotts. 



In this Department we invite the ekee discussion of all 
proper subjects— correspondents alone being responsible for 
the ideas and theories they advance. 



[Written for the Mining and scientific Press. I 

The Reese River Country and its 
Mines. 

BY A. J. HOWE. 

[Continued from Page 13. ] 

A REVIEW. 

Since my last letters were written, I hare 
revisited a part of the country previously 
noticed. At Ophir Canon I found the Mur- 
phy mill in full blast, while from the mine 
the richest ore was being raised; very beau- 
tiful specimens of the most intense blood- 
red ruby ore were shown from the lower 
levels. Powerful steam hoisting works have 
just been put in motion to raise the ore and 
the increasing volume of water from the 
mine ; considerable building is in progress 
and the town every way gives evidence of 
the highest state of prosperity. 

Next, at Northumberland, I found Wm. 
N. Cummings, with a considerable force of 
men, at work on the Northumberland lode. 
This fine mine is likely to prove one of the 
richest in Central Nevada. It is much 
broken at and near the surface, owing to its 
situation, in close proximity to the base of 
a high mountain. A tunnel is being run, 
which is expected to reach the lode where 
it has not been disturbed. Several valuable 
mines have been discovered in this district 
since my former visit ; among them the 
"Clara" and "Branch" lodes in the south- 
western part, and the " Silver Bar," in the 
central part, are the most promising. At 
Belmont all is life and bustle ; such prepar- 
ation as can be made in advance of machin- 
ery and lumber on the works of the immense 
mills to be erected here this summer, are in 
progress. The town is growing rapidly ; 
but like most new places, keeps somewhat 
overdone by those who rush thither in an- 
ticipation of its great future. 

Eastward, through Alatoona Pass, our 
next camp was with Messrs Clark & Co. , 
who are constructing the new toll road to 
the " Lower Country." The grades on this 
we found nearly completed, and remarkably 
easy for such mountains as the Danville 
Bange appear, when viewed from the val- 
ley. This direct and central route has been 
greatly needed for the travel eastward from 
Belmont to Hot Creek, Empire, Beveille, 
Pahranagat, and the lumber region in the 
White Pine range, which lies about foity 
miles east of the Hot Creek or Diamond 
range. In Hot Creek Canon, the owners of 
the immense lode, called the "Indian Jim," 
are exploring it by a vertical shaft and drifts 
from the bottom. Three miles south — but 
at least five miles from the trail — situated in 
the limestone belt which lies immediately 
west of the great quartzite upheaval of this 
range, we find the "Gazelle" mine. This 
is located on an accessible slope of the 
mountain, midway between Old Dominion 
and Battlesnake canons, well up towards 
their heads. Here we were hospitably en- 
tertained by Mr, Irvin, the superintendent 
and part owner. The mine presented, on 
the day of our visit, the richest sight in the 
mineral line that we have thus far seen in 
this wonderful region. The lime cap had 
just been removed from the lode, showing a 
body of astonishingly rich ore twelve feet 
wide; that portion next the foot-wall being 
of copper-silver glance, more or less massive 
through a width of ten feet, while eighteen 
inches or two feet, next the hanging wall, 
was of chloride ore. 

The Gazelle has its duplicates, by the 
score, all through these mountains, from 
Mammoth on the west to Pahranagat on the 
east — mines that are scarcely ever heard of 
outside the district where they are located, 
and not set forth by the high-colored, glow- 
ing reports of paid experts (so-called) who 
have well nigh ruined the country and re- 
tarded its progress quite five years. How- 



ever, it is gratifying to see that the day of 
the latter is past, and that plain, sensible, 
practical men are sent out, or employed 
here by companies organized at the East. 
One rea ly interested in the permanent wel- 
fare and prosperity of Nevada, can but de- 
plore the great injury wrought to the 
country, and the ruin to so many Eastern 
companies byunscrupulous agents, or rather 
rascally middle-men. All the mining com- 
panies organized at the East could, and can 
yet secure mines for a tithe of their value, 
that will place their success beyond a doubt 
or possibility of failure. Again, the limited 
knowledge that reaches the public through 
the press of California and Nevada, in rela- 
tion to the fabulously rich and vast silver 
region of Central and Eastern Nevada, is 
deplorable. 

While the reports of the Surveyor-Gen- 
eral, State Mineralogist, etc., are filled with 
the delails of' the mining operations in the 
western part of the State, which is already 
over-crowded and its mines in the hands of 
wealthy companies, few words of cheer are 
given the struggling and empty-handed 
pioneers of the interior, who are laying the 
foundation of the most powerful State of 
the nation. This is no idle talk ; the dull- 
est, if he thinks at all, must see the wealth 
and inert power slumbering in the depths 
of Nevada's mountains. It is high time the 
press of the State should rise a step above 
local exaltation. 

[Concluded next week ] 



[Written for the Mining and Scientific Press.) 

American Steel. 

A VISIT TO THE PHILADELPHIA STEEL WOEKS. 

It is an indisputable fact that with good 
tools even a poor mechanic can do good 
work, whereas, with poor tools, a good 
workman will usually do an inferior quality 
of work ; and to insure good tools, there is 
probably no one thing so requisite as first- 
rate steel. 

It has heretofore been said, and many 
have made the assertion from their own ex- 
perience, that a first-class article of steel, to 
answer all the most difficult purposes to 
which steel is applied, could not be made 
in the United States. This, however, has 
been proved by experience and observation 
of the writer, as well as others, to be incor- 
rect. A visit to the extensive establishment 
of Baldwin, Banes & Co., of the Philadel- 
phia Steel Works, will convince the most 
skeptical of this fact. Being in Philadephia,. 
and hearing, in all the large manufactories 
that we visited, the virtues of their steel 
enumerated, and wishing to inspect the 
process -by which it was made, the writer 
paid them a visit, which has enabled him to 
describe the improvement in the steel which 
they have aptly named the " Nonpareil." 

The works comprise an area of four acres, 
and are pleasantly situated on the banks of 
the Frankford creek, about five miles from 
the center of business in Philadelphia. 
The situation was selected with great care, 
by one of the firm, and experience has 
proved the correctness of his judgment. 
The creek is navigable all the way up, and 
it is no unusual sight to see boats delivering 
coal and iron, while others are taking on 
steel, to be shipped to distant parts of the 
country. 

The iron is imported, expressly for the 
firni, direct from Sweden and Norway, in 
bars one inch wide and one-half inch thick. 
It then goes through a process by which it 
is freed from such chemical elements as do 
not enter beneficially into the manufacture 
of steel, and which process is known only 
to the proprietors. The bars are then cut 
into pieces about two inches long, and are 
placed in a black lead crucible, holding fifty 
pounds, along with a small proportion of 
finely-ground charcoal and some black oxide 
of manganese. The crucibles are then 
placed in a large furnace, known as the 
" melting furnace, " and exposed to an in- 
tense heat for three or four hours, or until 
the "melter" decides that the mass has be- 
come thoroughly incorporated. They are 
then withdrawn by a man known as the 
"puller-out," and passed by him to the 
"melter," who pours the metal into the 
iron molds, where it is allowed to cool, 
after which these pieces are known as ingots. 



Erom here it is taken to a steam hammer, 
weighing about 1,800 pounds, and "broke 
down " — that is, it is reduced to nearly the 
size that the bars are intended to be when 
finished. After this, it is taken to the fin- 
ishing hammer, where it is finished to the 
proper size, unless the size be very small, 
when it has to go to still another hammer, 
much lighter. The ends of the bars are 
then cut off, to make a double and triple- 
refined cast steel ; and, after being labeled, 
the steel is ready for market. This is the 
steel that has given such satisfaction where 
it has been introduced, and which has, to a 
great extent, displaced the English steel in 
the Eastern and Middle States; but we 
were assured that their improvement, the 
" Nonpareil," was as much superior to this 
steel for turning and planing tools, and all 
other tools requiring a keen cutting edge, 
as their other steel was to wrought iron. 

The peculiarity of the manufacture by 
which they obtain this superiority consists 
in a novel process which the steel goes 
through during the refining, and which 
expels all the impurities in a much better 
manner than it has heretore been possible 
to do, and which has been introduced by 
the firm and is known only to them ; and so 
reliable is their process, that they can de- 
pend on having a uniformity in the texture 
of their large and small bars that is not ob- 
tained by any other steel works, either in 
this or any other country. The experi- 
ments by which this knowledge was ob- 
tained were conducted before they introduced 
any of their steel into the market, the pro- 
prietors being determined not to sell an 
article that they were not certain could be 
depended on, and they regulated their stand- 
ard by the'best English steel. 

The "Nonpareil," I was assured, and 
shown numerous certificates to the same 
effect, would do at least twice the work of 
the best English steel for saw gummei'S, 
turning and planing tools, and also for all 
other purposes which require a tough and 
hard quality of steel. 

Although comparatively a new establish- 
ment, having only been in existence about 
three years, and the "Nonpareil" less than 
one year, they are together creating a sen- 
sation in the East that bids fair, before long, 
to build for them the largest reputation as 
steel manufacturers in the world. The pro- 
prietors informed us that they intended to 
sand an agent to the Pacific coast, to bring 
it more directly to the notice of the engi- 
neers, machinists, railroad companies and 
miners, than it would be possible to do in 
any other way. W. H. D. 



Facts About Patent Matters. 

NUMBER six. 

THE EXAMINATION, APPEAL, ETC. — CONTINUED. 

It frequently happens, that a caveat is on 
file covering the same invention. In that 
case, the Caveator, is notified to complete 
his application within ninety days ; and if 
it is then found to be the same as that of 
the applicant, an interference is declared, 
and each party notified of the time set for 
hearing and deciding the same, each in the 
meantime being permitted to furnish such 
proof as hecan as to the time when he first 
completed his invention — the opposite par- 
ty, in all cases, to be notified of the time 
and place of taking the depositions, and the 
names of the witnesses. Each party also 
files an argument, if he so desires. Two or 
more inventors may also make application 
for the same thing at once, when, of course, 
there will be an interference. A remarkable 
case of this kind occurred in 1849, when 
seven different parties, from various parts of 
tile country, made application for the same in- 
vention — a hollow churn dasher, having a 
valve in it, for the purpose of pumping air 
into the cream while churning. So, too, an 
applicant may ask and have an interference 
with a patent already issued. In all cases 
of interference, the patent is awarded to 
the party proving himself to be the prior 
inventor, except in those cases where, by 
his own neglect to apply in time, he is held 
to have abandoned his invention, as hereto- 
fore explained. In case of an interference 
between an applicant and a patent, where 
priority of invention is awarded to the appli- 
cant, the office has no power to annul the 
patent already issued, but can simply issue 
one to the applicant, thus placing him on 
an equal footing with the patentee, andleav- 
ing the parties to appeal to the courts to 
define and protect their rights. 

This is an anomalous state of affairs, 
which ought not to exist, as it is clearly 
productive of harm, both to the real in- 
ventor and to innocent members of the 
community. All legislative bodies have the 
power to repeal or annul any law passed by 
fraud or mistake. So, too, a court can re- 
voke or annul an order made erroneously. 



The Land Office stops the location of a war- 
rant obtained by fraud, and so, too, the 
Treasury Department stops the payment of 
a warrant or draft obtained by fraud, or 
issued by mistake ; and it would seem that 
the Patent Office ought to have the power 
to cancel or withdraw a patent wrongfully 
issued. By so doing, it would save the real 
inventor (and who alone is entitled to a 
patent) the expense and trouble of going to 
law to secure what the office has already 
decided is clearly his. It would also pro- 
tect innocent purchasers from being de- 
frauded by purchasing rights from the 
holder of the invalid patent. It would 
certainly seem that the law ought to be 
amended in this respect. In all cases of 
interference, parties have the same right of 
appeal as in cases of rejection. 

When the case is finally decided, it is re- 
turned to the Examiner, who endorses it, 
enters it upon his record, and then sends it 
to his draughtsman's room, where certain 
entries are made in his books, after which it 
is sent to still another room, where the pa- 
pers are given out to women to copy. They 
are then engrossed upon parchment, with 
the thin drawing attached, and signed by 
the Commissioner of Patents and Secre- 
tary of the Interior, after which the seal of 
the Patent Office is affixed, when the patent 
is ready for delivery — the applicant in the 
meantime having paid in his final fee of 
.$20, he having been notified to do so by the 
office as soon as the case was passed for 
issue by the Examiner. By the law of 
1863, if a party neglects for six months to 
pay the final fee above mentioned, he will 
be considered as forfeiting his right, and a 
patent will issue to another applicant for 
the same invention, if one should come. 
Formerly the whole fee had to be paid in 
advance ; but in consequence of the law of 
1861, requiring only $15 down, the busi- 
ness of the office was seriously impeded by 
the neglect of parties to pay their second 
fee and take their patent — nearly a thousand 
having thus been left upon its hands during 
one year ; hence the provision of law above 
referred to. 

The reader will nowhave a'tolerably clear 
idea of how patents are obtained, and of 
the ■modus operandi of preparing and issuing 
them. It will readily occur to all who have 
read these articles attentively that the posi- 
tion of an Examiner of Patents is a very 
important one indeed. It requires a high 
degree of intelligence, a practical as well as 
theoretical knowledge of mechanism, and a 
fair knowledge of law, with strong analyz- 
ing and reasoning powers. He should be 
firm, but free from prejudice, as he has to 
act in the capacity of a judge — being care- 
ful not to deprive the inventor of the small- 
est even of his rights, and at the same time 
being careful to give to no one a monopoly 
of anything which belongs by right to the 
community, or which is not his invention. 
To do this, uninfluenced by the personal 
appeals of applicants and the blandishments 
of skillful and experienced agents, without 
giving offence, requires a degree of integ- 
rity, firmness and fairness not often found 
combined in one character. In fact, a hun- 
dred times more depends upon the Exam- 
iners for the intelligence and integrity with 
which the business of the office is conducted 
than upon the Commissioner, who seldom 
knows anything of the details of the office. 
The worst feature of all is, that he has the 
appointment and removal of them at will, 
and that political influence — not fitness for 
the position — is what determines their ap- 
pointment or dismissal; and so, too, of the 
Commissioner himself ; and hence it is yon 
will find a pill doctor examining mills, while 
a practical mill builder is set to examine 
tobacco pipes. A lawyer, that probably 
never drove a nail in his life, has architec- 
ture and bridges, while a practical builder 
of bridges and public edifices is set to exam- 
ine cook stoves and hoop skirts. And what 
renders the matter still worse is the fact 
that by the time they become fairly ac- 
quainted with their class and its peculiar 
duties, they are removed by a change of 
administration, or to gain favor with some 
Senator or Member, whose influence the 
Commissioner desires for some object of 
his own, and persons entirely ignorant of 
the business substituted. This is the fault, 
mainly, of the system, and will never be 
remedied until the people, and especially 
inventors, insist upon a change. — W. C. 
Dodge, in Prairie Farmer. 



Novel Entebpeise. — Colonel Bobertson, 
of St. Paul, is importing fruit trees from 
Russia and Northern China, for the purpose 
of obtaining varieties that can be grown in 
Minnesota. Efforts are being made to the 
same end for this State. 



London. — The population of this great 
city is estimated at 3,080,000. 



fthc pining and £ri*ntifw § ms.s. 



35 



SHrrlttmiral. 



Russia Sheet Iron. 

Few persons are aware of the enormous 
expense and difficulty attendant upon the 
importation of Russia sheet iron into the 
United States, or of the quantity of this 
material which enters into the various forms 
of its consumption. The imitations of this 
iron, which have been from time to time 
attempted in this country, have hitherto 
been quite unsuccessful. Although those 
imitations are often sold for the genuine 
Russia iron, so near to the genuine are they 
in external appearance, yet the art of mak- 
ing it stand actual wear, on exposure, is still 
— unless quite recently discovered— a hid- 
den art to American mechanics. 

The indestructibility of Russia iron is 
most remarkable. Stoves made from it will, 
with ordinary care, last as long or longer 
than cast iron stoves, and retain their luster 
until they are destroyed by an almost im- 
perceptible wearing away, or reduction in 
thickness of the material. 

Some fourteen or fifteen years ago, there 
was an effort made to get an act of Congress 
for the issue of a patent for the manufac- 
ture of this iron, without spreading the se- 
cret of the process on the records of the 
Patent Office ; but, so far as we have 
learned, nothing ever came of it. Of late 
it is said that the Perkins Sheet Iron Com- 
pany, of Providence, have been making 
Russia iron of a quality equal to the im- 
ported article. It is also said that there is 
a company in Cleveland, Ohio, and another 
in Portsmouth, in the same State, making 
about the same quality of iron. The latter 
is said to be in possession of the true secret 
of the manufacture, as conducted in Russia, 
and the only parties possessing it The se- 
cret, it is said, was sent to this country 
clandestinely, through the agency of a citi- 
zen of Youngstown, Ohio, who had a rela- 
tive in the works in Russia. It is generally 
understood that Russia has heretofore kept 
a close monopoly on this superior iron, and 
that she has thus been able to extort from 
us, as well as from other nations, a heavy 
revenue therefrom. 

On the contrary, it is said by at least one 
party, that there is no secret whatever in 
the Russian process, and that travelers have 
free access to the works, and are allowed to 
witness every part of the operation ; and that 
any peculiarity or superiority in the iron 
lies in the quality of the ore from which it 
made ! William Atkinson, in his ' ' Oriental 
and Western Siberia," says : 

Verne Issetzkor Zavod, about three versts 
from Ekaterinburg, belongs to the Takov- 
liff family. These iron works have long 
been celebrated for the quality of sheet iron, 
which stands unrivalled. The sheet iron 
made in this Zavod, and some other works 
belonging to it, surpass all other produc- 
tions of the kind, either in the Oural or 
elsewhere. It is rolled for various pur- 
poses — for covering the roofs of houses, for 
sheet iron stoves, and for a great variety of 
utensils. The metal is of such excellent 
quality that I have seen it rolled as thin as 
post paper, without crack or blemish, and 
with a jet black polish. An enormous 
quantity of the various sorts of this manu- 
facture is sent to America. In the South 
Oural is Zavod of Kaslinskon ; these iron 
works are famed throughout the Oural for 
the superior quality of castings they pro- 
duce. I was astonished by the sharpness 
and beauty of the different articles manu- 
factured, consisting of tables perforated by 
tracery and foliage, most delicately exe- 
cuted ; chairs of a similar pattern, small 
boxes, baskets, and dishes for cards, in 
beautiful open work ; animals, paper weights, 
etc., cast equal to anything produced in 
Rerlin. The metal used possesses much 
fluidity. 

Steel Rails. — On the London and North- 
western Railway, at Chalk Farm station, is 
a rail, made of Bessemer steel, which has 
outlasted twenty-five iron rails successively 
placed next to it on the same line. The 
economy of the steel rails is so apparent 
that several prominent roads in this country 
have commenced substituting them instead 
of the ordinary iron rail. 



Cast Iron Improves wrm Aon — It is 
well known that cast iron, by repeated fus- 
ion up to a certain number of times, is 
greatly increased in strength ; and that gnus 
cast hollow are stronger than those cast 
solid and bored out. But it is not so gen- 
erally known that old castings are much 
stronger than uric ones ; yet such is the fact, 
as has been proven in various ways, but 
perhaps in none more fully than In experi- 
menting with cannon. It has been found 
that eight-inch guns, proved thirty days 
after being vast, stand but about 72 charges; 
thirty-four days, 80 charges ; one hundred 
days, 730 charges ; six years, 2,582 charges. 
This phenomena of increased tenacity with 
increased age is accounted for on the sup- 
position that the particles of iron, strained 
in the process of cooling, re-adjust them- 
selves, in the lapse of time, to their proper 
position, and become perfectly free, or 
nearly so. These are important facts not 
generally known, even to many who claim 
to bo engineers in the science of mechanics, 
and fully accounts for the terrible loss- of 
life, on both sides, during the late war, from 
the bursting of cannon — nearly all the can- 
non employed being, from the necessity of 
the case, of but recent manufacture, and 
not having had time to become properly 
"seasoned," if such an expression may be 
allowable. This fact may also account for 
certain breakages in machinery which has 
been set to work very soon after coming 
from the foundry. If the facts are as 
stated, they are well worth the attention of 
mechanics ; if not, they should be disproven. 

Wetting Brick. — It is important that 
every one engaged in laying brick, whether 
as master workmen or ordinary laborers, 
should be well informed with regard to the 
philosophy of "wetting" this universal 
material for building ; hence we publish 
the following from an exchange : 

Very few people, even builders, are aware 
of the advantage of wetting bricks before 
laying them, or if aware of it, they too 
often neglect to practice it. A wall twelve 
inches thick, built of good mortar and 
bricks well soaked, is stronger than one 
sixteen inches thick built dry. The reason 
of this is, that if the bricks are well satu- 
rated with water, they will not abstract 
from the mortar the moisture necessary to 
its crystallization ; and, on the contrary, 
they will unite chemically, and become 
solid as a rock. On the other hand, if the 
bricks are put up dry, they immediately 
take up all the moisture from the mortar, 
leaving" it to dry and harden, and the con- 
sequence is, that when a building of this 
description is taken down, or tumbles down 
of its own accord, the mortar from it is 
like so much sand. 



Scientific pisrcUnnij. 



The Meteorograph. — Among the scien- 
tific instruments on exhibition at the Paris 
Exposition, nono attracts more attention 
than the "meteorograph," an invention of 
the celebrated Italian astronomer, Father 
Secehi. This wonderful instrument re- 
cords, automatically, the time of day, the 
changes in the temperature, pressure, moist- 
ure and motion of the atmosphere, etc. 
The distinguished inventor is in Paris, and 
spends the most of his time at the Exhibi- 
tion, carefully noticing and studying every- 
thing new and valuable. The instrument 
of which he is the inventor moves by clock- 
work, and marks down upon a long strip of 
paper, which is unrolled at one end and 
rolled up at the other, the time of day, the 
changes in temperature, the direction and 
intensity of the wind, the hight of the 
barometer, the hygrometric state of the 
atmosphere, and the quantity of rain which 
may have fallen within a given time. All 
this is effected by a pencil for each separate 
work, kept constantly in motion, and moved 
by nicely-adjusted machinery, which per- 
forms its task with unerring certainty and 
fidelity. The diagrams made by this in- 
strument, as ■well as the instrument itself, 
are objects of great interest among the 
scientific as well as curious portion of the 
visitors. 



Miniature Volcano. — Among the nu- 
merous experiments which may be made 
with Ruhmkroff's machine, there is a re- 
markable one, which may be described as 
follows : A quantity of flour of sulphur is 
mixed with a small proportion of iron fil- 
ings, or, better still, with iron reduced by 
hydrogen, in which case it is in quite an 
impalpable state ; zinc and copper tilings 
may also be added in small quantities. The 
mixture, which must be as complete as pos- 
sible, is then thrown on a pane of glass, or 
on a dry brick, so as to form a heap two or 
three centimetres high, and much longer 
than it is broad, If the ends of the wires 
of Ruhmkroff's machine be now inserted 
into the heap, so as to be two or three centi- 
metres distance from each other, and the 
current made to pass through, a violent 
explosion of the mass takes place, a sort of 
crater is formed, whence magnificent sheaves 
of fire will be seen to issue, much resem- 
bling the bouquet of fireworks, and like it 
displaying different colors. It is in reality 
a miniature volcano, with subterranean 
noises and ejection of boiling lava. 



Singular Scientific Fact. — If the large 
bell of Nortre Dame, in Paris, which is 
placed in a chamber at the base of one of 
the towers, be struck with the closed hand, 
a large volume of sound will be produced, 
and will be audible at a considerable dis- 
tance all round ; but it is said to have been 
discovered that it will be perfectly inaudi- 
ble if the person places himself within the 
center of the bell, the sound diminishing as 
he proceeds from the circumference. 



Precipitating Silver with Cadmium. — 
According to M. Classen, silver is wholly 
precipitated by cadmium ; when dealing 
with a nitric solution of silver, evaporate 
to dryness in the presence of sulphuric 
acid, dissolve the sulphate of silver in boil- 
ing water, plunge it into a plate of cad- 
mium, and the reduction of the silver takes 
place at once. The silver is deposited in a 
compact mass, easily washed with water ; as 
it may contain a little cadmium, boil it in 
the acid liquid until no hydrogen escapes; 
wash it until the water contains no sul- 
phuric acid ; then dry and calcine. The 
silver, at first a black grey, takes the metal- 
lic luster. It may then be weighed ; the 
results are very exact. 

A High Illuminating Gas. — A raw com- 
pound of creosote and soda may be em- 
ployed for the manufacture of gasTIf a high 



The Hydraulic Propeller. — Admiral 
Elliott, in a paper read before the Institu- 
tion of Naval Architects, has come out very illuminating power, by burning carbonate 
strongly in favor of the " Water Witch " i of soda in a close furnace. In the first 
principle as the future motive power for step of the proceeding the water is driven 
ships of war. He was as strongly sustained from the material ; the creosote and soda 



in the ensuing discussion by Sir Edward 
Belcher, and warmly encouraged by Mr. 
Scott Russell, while Mr. Reed, Chief Con- 
structor of the Navy, and others, opposed. 
Mr. Russell predicted that, with time and 
perseverance, the plan would certainly suc- 
ceed in the end, and supersede the screw 
for the purposes of warfare. 

Pointing the Rails. — It has been found 
that trains of ordinary express speed, have 
jumped depressions of two feet in length on 
the rail. If an engine, going sixty miles an 
hour, could be run up an angle of 45 u for 
its own length, and then allowed to juinp 
off, it would jump 60 feet high, and 240 feet 
forward. The distance jumped would be 
as the square of the speed. 

Safety Can for Hydro-Carbon Oils. — 
Two American inventors — Messrs. Perkins 
and House — have patented a can that will 
protect benzine or any other hydro-carbon 
fluid from danger of explosion. The prin- 
ciple on which it operates is similar to that 
embodied by Sir Humphrey Davy in his 
safety-lamp. 

Bronzing Tin Castings. — When clean, 
wash them with a mixture of one part each 
sulphate of iron and sulphate of copper, in 
twenty parts of water ; dry, and again wash 
with distilled vinegar, eleven parts, verdi- 
gris, four parts. AVhen dry, polish with 
colcochar. 



compound is then decomposed, a porous 
coke with which the soda is mixed being 
left. One result of the decomposition is 
the formation of a quantity of carbonic 
acid, the greater part of which unites with 
the caustic soda employed to jiroduce the 
carbonate. The carbonate of soda is easily 
extracted from the coke, and may be used 
again and again. 

A Simple Ice Machine. — A machine has 
been contrived which freezes water by its 
own evaporation. It is simply an air-pump 
fitted to a bottle. The bottle is half filled 
with water, and the pump is set to work. 
Air is first pumped out, and then the water 
rapidly evaporates. To complete the vacuum 
and increase the evaporation, the air and 
aqueous vapor pumped out is made to 
traverse a hollow cylinder containing sul- 
phuric acid, which, of course, instantly 
absorbs the moisture. The evaporation is 
so rapid that the remaining water is imme- 
diately frozen. Four minutes' pumping 
produce two pints of ice. 



Ingenious and Beautiful Experiment. 
Place on a sheet of white paper, in the sun- 
shine, a circular piece of blue silk about 
four inches in diameter ; cover the center of 
this with a piece of yellow silk three inches 
in diameter ; then one of pink, two inches 
across ; a green one, one inch across, and 
one of indigo, half an inch in diameter, 
and in the center of this make a black dot 
with a pen. Then look steadily for a min- 
ute at the central spot, closing your hands 
about an inch distant before them, and you 
will see the most beautiful circle of colors 
£hat the imagination can conceive, which 
are not the colors of the silk alone, butwill 
be perpetually changing in the most pleas- 
ing manner. 

Cold Affecting the Regular Growth 
of Trees. — At the late Botanical Congress, 
Prof. Caspary, of Konigsberg, gave the re- 
sults of some elaborate observations on the 
effect of low temperatures in altering the 
direction of the branches of trees. He 
stated that different species were acted on in 
divers ways ; some species move, during a 
frost, directly upward, while others move 
downward, but in nearly all there was a 
lateral movement toward the left. 

Tin Foil. — Nearly all tin foil now used is 
adulterated by lead. Dr. J. H. Baldock 
found by chemical analysis that common 
tin foil contained 86.92 per cent, of lead; 
embossed foil, 76. 57 per cent. ; tea foil, 88. 66 
per cent, and the so-called pure tin foil, 
32.62 per cent of lead. The adulterated ar- 
ticle is made by placing an ingot of lead 
between two ingots of tin, and rolling them 
into sheets which have a coating of tin on 
both sides. 



Pure Acetic Acid. — Ficter, of Berlin, 
uses baryta, in preference to soda or lime, 
in the manufacture of pure acetic acid from 
crude wood vinegar. The acetate of baryta 
withstands the roasting necessary to get rid 
of the empyreumatic matters better than 
the acetates of lime or soda, in consequence 
of .which there is less loss of acetic acid. 



The alloys of steel with platinum, when 
both are in a state of fusion, are very per- 
fect in every proportion that has been tried. 
Equal parts by weight form a beautiful 
alloy, which takes a fine polish, and does 
not tarnish ; the other is the finest imagina- 
ble for a mirror. The specific gravity of 
this beautiful compound is 9.862. 



New Silicium Compound. — Friedel and 
Ladenburg have prepared a body containing 
one atom of hydrogen, one of silicon, and 
and three atoms of chlorine. It boils be- 
tween 34° and 37° 5 C, the vapor of which, 
mixed with air, explodes on contact with an 
ignited body. The gas is not spontaneously 
inflammable at ordinary temperature. 



Improvement of Starch. — A small quan- 
tity of epsom salts (sulphate of magnesia) 
added to starch increases considerably its 
stiffening powers, and renders the article on 
which it is used, to a certain degree, fire- 
proof. 

Meteoric. — M. Leverrier, the celebrated 
French astronomer, predicts that we shall 
have a shower of meteors in August, alto- 
gether surpassing in brilliancy and extent 
the display a year ago. 

The curvature of the earth amounts to 
seven inches per mile. A man six feet high 
cannot be seen from a distance of ten miles. 



The presence of copper in the white and 
yolk of eggs, has been determined by M. 
Blasius. 



Solid carbonic acid sinks the thermom- 
eter to 162 degrees (Fall. ) below zero in two 
minutes. 



Water, heated in a strong closed vessel, 
has melted lead in 612 degrees. 



36 



1%* pitting m& £ *i*tttifi* <§xm. 



New Patents and Inventions. 

Under thlfl heading we shall mention, from week to week 
as occasion may demand, New and Important Inven- 
tions: also, the List of Patent Claims recently issued from 
the U. S, Patent Office to inventors on the Pacific Coast, 
and other Patent Issues which we deem of local in- 
terest to readers on this side of the Continent. Most 
Patents on this coast are secured through the MINING 
AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. We are 
prepared to obtain from Washington, with despatch, 
copies of any Patent issued. 

BECENT INVENTIONS. 

Disnex's Automatic Cab-Couplee. — This 
ia a new and ingenious device of Mr. M. 
Disney, of this city, whereby cars may be 
made self-coupling at all times, -while they 
may be uncoupled at any time by the mere 
moving of a lever, -which immediately ad- 
justs itself as soon as the cars uncouple. 
Another most important advantage deriva- 
ble from this invention is the fact that the 
instant the advance ear moves, or is thrown 
from the track, it instantly uncouples. It 
is impossible for this coupling to drag a car 
off from the track ; neither is there any 
possibility of its becoming disengaged while 
the cars are in direct motion, except by de- 
sign or breakage of the link. The device is 
simple and cheap — not more costly than the 
ordinary couplings — while its economy, 
convenience and safety advantages are not 
excelled by any device in use for such pur- 
poses. By the time this is in print it will 
have had a practical trial on the San Jose 
Eailroad. The invention can scarcely fail 
to come speedily into general use. "We 
shall probably give an illustrated descrip- 
tion of this invention within a week or two. 
A patent has been applied for. 

McDouGAii's Impboved Gold and Amal- 
gam Saveb. — The particular object of this 
invention isto save the "float gold," which 
usually passes off on the surface of the 
water. It has heretofore been found almost 
impracticable to bring this light gold in 
contact with the copper surfaces usually 
employed for saving it. This, however, is 
pretty effectually done by Mr. McDougal's 
invention. The water, in passing through 
his boxes, is thrown into a series of eddies, 
which may be continued for any distance 
required, and by which the surface and 
any matter floating upon it is repeatedly 
thrown against copper surfaces, in precisely 
the manner best calculated to secure any 
amalgam which may thus be passing off. 
We are not at liberty to more fully describe 
the device at this time ; but shall do so as 
soon as the patent, which has been applied 
for, shall have been granted. The inven- 
tion appears to possess unquestionable 
merit as a gold saver. 

Pbessube Appabatus fob Soda "Watee. 
This device is the invention of Mr. Benja- 
min Sweetland, of Sacramento. The object 
of the invention is to effect a proper mix- 
ture of soda water with the acids by hy- 
draulic force, instead of by a force-pump, 
as is* usually done. To do this, the foun- 
tain is placed at a proper elevation above 
the counter, as in a room overhead ; a pipe 
connection is so made with the fountain as 
to bring the water up through the table in 
the ordinary manner by its own head, in- 
stead of by a force-pump. It is much sim- 
pler, and more convenient, than a pump, 
and equally as effective. Patentappliedfor. 

A Tinneb's Peess. — In the manufacture 
of tinware, it has heretofore been the cus- 
tom to have the covers of pails, pots, cans, 
etc., pressed into shape with dies made to 
"drop with a heavy weight, which are not 
only expensive, but cumbersome. A ma- 
chine has recently been invented which is 
destined to revolutionize this kind of work. 
It is called a "tinner's press." The tin is 
cut to the requisite size and placed in an 
iron frame ; a die is then pressed against 
the tin, and the frame made to revolve for 
a few Beconds, when the cover is taken out 
ready for use. The machine is simple and 
easily worked. 

A MOTOB FOB THE SEWING MACHINE. — 

M. Faivre, of Nantes, exhibits at the Paris 
Exposition a water motor for the sewing 
machine, which is pronounced eminently 
practical, and so cheap that every seam- 
stress can afford to purchase one and attach 
it to her sewing machine. The injurious 
influence of the use of the treadle upon the 
health of females is becoming an alarming 
evil, and that attachment will soon have to 
be dispensed with, even, if it be necessary, 
at the sacrifice of this useful machine itself. 



NrrBO -glycerine is cutting the Pacific 
Eailroad through the summit of the Sierra 
Nevada at the rate of fifty feet per week, 
and by midsummer fifty miles of road will 
be added to the ninety-four already in ope- 
ration at the California end. 



Weekly Stock Circular. 

Of Asaociated Brokers of the S. F. Btook and Exchange Board 

San Francisco. Saturday Morning,) 
July 20, 1867. j 

City Stocks. 

tinder the unusual excitement which pervaded the 
mining share market since Saturday last, making serious 
inroads on the prices which had prevailed for weeks pre- 
vious, eity stocks have been quite inactive, and the of- 
ferings few. North Beach and Mission B. B. sold at $52 
@50 ^ share ; San Francisco Gas at S63 50, buyer 30, 
and $63 25; Cal. Steam Nav. Co, at 69i£@70 ^ ct.; 
Spring Valley Water at $67; and National Insurance Co. 
$69 60. 

The receipts of the loeal insurance companies during 
the first six months of 1867, according to the returns 
made to the Internal Beveuue Department, have been 
as follows: 

Preciously 

COMPANIES. June, this yenr, Total. 

Pacific $51,973 $279,242 $337,215 

Union iai68 145 163 163,331 

National 20,233 102,847 123,080 

Fireman's Fund 12,893 69,237 82,130 

Builders' 17,230 57,492 14,722 

California U.485 51,331 62,866 

Merchants' Mutual Marine. 11,106 71,257 88,363 

Occidental 6,697 31,339 41,036 

Home Mutual 12,453 41.074 53,530 

San FranciBCO 2,724 25,260 -21,984 

Totals $176,965 $377,292 $1,054,257 

These returns were made upon a Legal Tender basis, 

the rate being fixed every month by the Collector of the 

District, as follows: In January, 74}£c; February, 73i£c; 

March, 75c; April, 75c; May, 74c; and June, 73c. 
The above named companies disbursed the following 

dividends for the six months ending June 30th: 

Percent Capital. Amount. 

Pacific 6 $1,000,039 $60,000 

Union fi 753.030 45,000 

National 3 1,000.000 30.000 

Fireman's Fund 1% 530,005 22,550 

California 6 203,000 12,000 

Occidental i% 300,000 13,530 

$183, 000 
The Home Mutual Insurance Company was organized 
under the special law passed in 1851, which, in effect, 
requires all the surplus earnings to be carried forward 
until such time as the accumulations amount to as large 
a sum as the original capital paid in. Thus, this com- 
pany has a surplus of $100,000 over and above its capi- 
tal of 5226,000, and will, therefore, require an additional 
sum of $126,000 before any distribution in the shape of 
dividends can be made to the stockholders, 

The Merchants' Mutual Marine Insurance Company 
was organized April 2d, 1863, under the Act of 1851, for 
the incorporation of mutual insurance companies. Fifty 
percent, of its capital has been called in, which, with 
the accumulations of the company, enabled them to de- 
clare their stock fully paid up on April 1, 1867, amount- 
ing to $500,000. 

From the fourth annual statement of the Pacific Insu- 
rance Company, for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 
1867, we obtain the following: Capital stock, $1,000,000, 
excess of capital available to pay losses and dividends, 
$238,054 91, showing the assets to be 51,238,054 91. 
The income has been $077,106 04, and the disburse- 
ments amounted to $578,789 17, including $195,000 in 
dividends and $249,545 69 in fire and marine losses. 

Net amount fire risks written during the year. . $26,011,093 

Net am't marine risks written during the year.. 9,519,600 

Amount fire risks in force June 30. 1867 20,935,521 

Amount marine risks in force June 30, 1867 2,361,918 

Most of the above dividends were made payable on 
the loth inst. The California Insurance Company will 
carry over a surplus of $100,000 after paying its usual 
semi-annual dividend. 

The receipts of the city railroads for the month of 
June and previously thisjyear have been as follows: 

Previously 

June, this i/enr. Total. 

Omnibus $21,626 $100,423 $122,051 

North Beach & Mission 19,179 88,326 101.5J5 

Central 13,221 56.570 69,797 

Front St, Mission & Ocean 1,t34 28.568 36,202 

MarketStreet 8,926 31,331 40,257 

Totals $70,532 $305,223 $315,315 

The usual dividends paid by the majority of the above 
companies^during the present year have been % per cent. 
per month on their capital Btock. The increase of travel 
on all the lines indicates a healthy prospect for the fu- 
ture. There is little room to doubt that, with the in- 
crease of population in the city, the receipts of all its 
railroads will be augmented, and the stocks improve in 
value. 

IMCinlne? Sliare Market. 
During the period under review the mining stock mar- 
ket has undergone a very marked change, a panic having 
occurred which affected nearly every stock on the list 
and carried some of them down to more than half the 
price obtained within less than two weeks previously. 
The decline has been so unprecedented that a large num- 
ber of speculators have been cornered and will doubt- 
less, in many cases, meet with severe losses, while others 
are improving the opportunity to obtain stocks at a rate 
which it is positive will not prevail for any length of 
time. Even capitalists in the East have been availing 
themselves, to some extent, of this serious decline, and 
within the past few days a considerable amount of capi- 
tal has been transferred by telegraph for investment in 
this class of securities. Some persist in holding to the 
opinion that the mines are giving out, that the exhaust- 
ive process has been pursued to its utmost limit. We 
cannot coincide with those views, but, on the contrary, 
believe that the favorable developments heretofore re- 
ported will increase rather than fall off. The produc- 
tive condition of the mines on the Comstock Lode was 
not disputed two weeks since, and we have no reason to 
think that they have shown any signs of "petering out" 
within, that brief period. At the close a reaction had 
taken place in most shares, and the future looked brighter. 
Savage— Declined from $4,500 to $4,000, rallied to 
$4,400, and at the close sold at $4,400. The ore extracted 
during the week ending July 13th amounted to 2,099 tons, 
showing an approximate value of $77, 647, or an average of 
$36 98 per ton. The previous week compares as follows 
with these returns — extracted, 1629 tons; approximate 
value $66,440, equal to $40.78 per ton. The various por- 
tions of this mine yielded the following amount of ore 



duriDg the week under review : — Old works 36 tons; North 
mine, on 7th level, 1,143; middle mine, same level, 558; 
south mine, same level, 263; 3d station drift north, 54, 
and the same station drift south, 45 tons. The follow- 
ing statement from the annual report of this company, 
for the fiscal year ending July 10th, has been kindly fur- 
nished us by the Secretary : 

RECEIPTS. 

Cashonhand July 10, 1866 $ 40,023 85 

Bullion 2,912.669 32 

Premium on bars 18,000 76 

Ore sold 4,333 01 

Other receipts 822 40 

Total receipts $2,916,899 40 

DISBUB5ESIEHTS. 

Dividends $ 1,120,000 

do (unpaid) 12,530 

$1,101,500 00 

Labor account 271,227 OJ 

Beduction of ores and expense at 

Company's mills 241,995 09 

Beduction of ores at outside mills. 190,453 98 

Mining supplies 69,911 49 

Wood and coal 42,302 86 

Legal expense 90,088 92 

Other expenses 293,639 48 

Cssh on hand July 10, 1867 11,115 53 

-$2,975,899 40 

Number of tons mined during the year, 72,295; re- 
duced, 69,376 &; sold, 53; on hand, 2,865)$. Cost of pro- 
duction, $7 91; reduction, $14 04— total cost per ton, 
$21 95. Average yield per ton, $41 94. 

Hale & Noboboss — Is quotable, at the close, at $3,200 
asked. From the 1st to 14th instant, l,412j£ tons of ore 
were reduced, the 65 $ cent, assay value of which shows 
a yield of $58,000, equal to $41 per ton. The shaft, on 
the 14th instant, was 534 feet in depth. 

Ckown Point— Bapidly receded from $1,430 to $890, ral- 
lied to $1,300 and closed yesterday at $1,210. From the 
Superintendent's statement for the week ending July 
12th, we learn that 742 % tons of ore were shipped to 
custom mills, and in the same time 829 tons were ex- 
tracted from the mine, the 65 per cent, assay value of 
which showing a yield of $24,770 in bullion, equal to 
$29.88 per ton. The ore obtained from east drift aver- 
aged about $75 per ton, but that taken from the west 
workings reduced it to the above general average. The 
west drift on the 500-foot level has been carried forward 
172 feet, and the East lode on the same level, has been 
opened, north and south, 107 feet. The cross-cut from 
the lode is in 13 feet, and the east drift from the 600-foot 
station has attained a distance of 68 feet. It is reported 
that there" is some improvement in the north end of the" 
east lode on the 500-foot level, but that the south end 
remains about the same. The 65 ^ cent, average assays 
of ore mined within a few days past show a yield of 
$39 and $42 to the ton. 

Yellow Jacket — Shows a further decrease in price 
since our last reference, having declined from £940 to 
$700, recoverd to $900 and closed at $875. The ore at the 
north has been decreasing for some time past, and the 
general appearance of the mine is not so flattering, yet 
there is no real cause for the sudden decline in the stock. 

Gooud & Cuhiiy— Has been quite active, opening at 
$700®740, receding to $630, improving to $775, and clos- 
ing at $725. In the south drift, fifth station, a body 
of quartz has been cut this week, being the first found, 
in the vicinity — true, there was no ore found, but this 
quartz may be regarded as the advance guard of a prob- 
able ledge. The mill will be running in August, and a 
sufficient quantity of ore has accumulated, and will be 
mined, to insure it steady work for at least nine months, 
and in no event need an assessment be expected during 
that space of time. This company is making alterations 
in its mill by which it is thought a great saving of ex- 
pense will be effected. 

Eentuok— Opened at $400, fell to S300, advanced to 
$410, and closed at $415. The receipts of bullion for the 
current month to the 15th amounted to $41,632 83; in 
June, from 1st to 17th, the returns sum up $45,800. The 
receipts and expenses, it is thought, will not vary much 
from last month. 

CHOLLAit-PoTOSi— Declined from $430, seller 30, to $320, 
gradually advanced to $425, and closed at $450. No im- 
portant change to note in the mine since our last issue. 
Amount of ore sent to custom mills from July 5th to 
11th, 2,186^ tons. 

Ovekmak — Since date of last review, fell from $220 to 
$110, and at the close sold at $170. We learn of noth- 
ing discouraging from this claim. They are naw extract- 
ing about 50 tons of ore per day, and since our last issue 
nearly $6,000 worth of bullion has been received^at the 
office in this city. 

Impebial— Beceded from $213 to $182 50, and sold on 
17th at $200. This company has received about $19,- 
000 in bullion from the first to the 16th inst., being 
within a fraction the same amount as returned in a like 
period in the previous month. 

Ophiii — Opened at $300, dropped to $200, improved to 
$207, and closed at $230. There is some talk about sink- 
ing a new shaft on G- street. We have nothing of im- 
portance regarding recent developments in the mine. 

Belcher — Declined from $360 to $210, advanced to 
$350, then sold at $285@310, and closed yesterday at 

$315 Empire ruled uniformly at $180 Confidence 

sold at $55@60 Bullion opened at $36, dropped to 

$20, improved to $34, and at the close sold at $32 50. 

Segregated Belcher — Sold within a range of $12 
@8, and closed at $11, The foreman of the mine, in a 
letter dated the 12th instant, states that he is taking out 

ore that will pay $40 to the ton Sierra Nevada 

opened at $1G, receded to $13 50, advanced to $17, and 
closed yesterday at $16. The opinion prevails that the 
pumps will be in working condition by the 15th of next 
month. 

Justis and Independent — Has been less active, selling 
at $16@15. An assessment of $5 per share was levied 

on this stock on the 12th inst White and Mubpht, 

a claim not in market at present, levied an assessment 
of $6 75 per share, or $27 per foot, on the 3d instant. 

The aggregate sales of Stocks, Legal Tender -Notes, 
etc., since Saturday last, amounted to $1,431,913. 



Silveb Obe fbom British Columbia. — 
The Cherry Creek Silver Mining Company, 
yhuswap District, British Columbia, are 
taking out very rich ore, containing a large 
amount of black sulphurets, portions of 
which assay as high as $2,000 to the ton. 
The company intend sending two tons of 
their ore to this city for reduction. Silver 
ore from British Columbia will be a new 
thing. We have a sample of the ore in our 
cabinet ; also another sample of silver ore 
from the Kamloop Lake District. Should 
these developments prove extensive, as they 
promise to do, mining for silver may yet 
become an important business in British 
Columbia. 



New Incoepoeations. — Articles of incor- 
poration have recently been filed in the 
County Clerk's office in this city as follows : 

TJ. S. Grant M. Co.— Excelsior District, 
Nevada county, Cal. July 13th. Capital . 
stock, $320,000 ; 3,200 shares, $100 each. . 
Trustees : Alpheus Bull, John Or. Bray, L. 
A. Booth, T. L. Barker and J. E. Squires. 

Bat View Wateb Co. — San Francisco. 
July 13th. Capital stock, $100,000 ; 10,000 
shares, $100 each. Trustees : A. "W. Yon 
Schmidt, Thomas Hardy and W. H. Patter- 
son. 

CONSOLIDATED GOLD HlLL M. Co. — Gold 

Hill, Nevada. July 12th. Capital stock, 
$300,000 ; 600 shares, $500 each. Trustees : 
A. K. Grim, A. Hirschman, Thomas Sun- 
derland, John Sime and Lewis Gerstle. 

San Fbancisoo C. M. Co. — San Luis 
Obispo county, Cal. July 13th. Capital 
stock, $240,000 ; 2,400 shares, $100 each. 
Trustees : John Knox, S. H. Dwinelle, Geo. 
F. Sharp, Geo. Treat and F. A. Benjamin. 

The Lumbeb Stevedobes Association. — 
San Francisco. July 12 th. Trustees : "W. 
Ekenberg, Isaac Cassin, Yalentine Mcin- 
tosh, Michael Ford, John Brennan and 
Peter Quinn. 

Centead Paek Homestead Association. 
San Francisco. July 18th. Capital stock, 
$37,500; 150 shares, $250 each. Directors : 
Edward Bosqui, John S. Day, William H. 
Souther, Howard Chapman, Timothy Sar- 
gent, Jos. P. Corcoran and Jos. M. Souther. 
^._*_^^_*~.^ 

Kates of Postage on Printed Matter to Europe 
and Asia. 

The Post Office Department has made arrangements bj 
which a number of European an^ Asiatic countries, hith- 
erto beyond the reach of our mail communication except 
by letter, are brought within iho range of delivery of all, 
or nearly all, United States mill matter. It Is a singular 
fact, unknown probably to most persons who huvo not 
occasiou to learn it by unpleasant experience, that lhe.ro 
was a. considerable region in the civilized wrld where 
an American traveler might not receive a newspaper di- 
rectly from home. 

Under the arrangement now completed, propayment of 
postage (sometimes at high rates), is made necessary in 
all cases. Tho lollowing official statement gives a full list 
oF the countries — with some of which there bus been reg- 
ular communication — that are now included in tbe delivery 
by way of Hamburg and Bremen: 

Bates of postage on newspapers and other printed matter 
(periodicals, etc.) sent from the United States to coun- 
tries in Europe aud Asia, by Bremen or Hamburg 
mail— prepayment compulsory: 

NEWSr-APERS — MARKED AS FOLLOWS: 

Bremen , by Bremen mail— 2 cents each . 

H imburg, by Hamburg mail — 2 cents each . 

Prussia, Austria and German States, by Bremen and 
Hamburg mail — S cents each. 

Lunenburg, by Bremen mail — Scents each. 

Lunenburg, by Hamburg mail— 3 cents each and 1 cbdI 
per IX ounce. 

Schleswig-Holstein and Denmark, by Bremen or Ham- 
burg mail— 3 cents eaoh and 1 cent per \% ounce, 

Sweden, by Bremen or Hamburg— 3 cents each, and 1 Jf 
cent per \% ounce. 

Norway, by Bremen or Hamburg— 3 cents each, and 
3>a cents per 1% ounce. 

Holland, by Bremon or Hamburg— 3 cents each, and 1 
cent per 1}£ ounce. 

Russia, by Bremen or Hamburg — 3 cents each, and 1 
cent per 1% ounce. 

Switzerland, by Bremon or Hamburg— 4 cents each. 

Italy, by Bremen or Hamburg— 5 cents each. 

Turkey, by Bremen or Hamburg— 3 cents each, and 5^ 
cents per 1>£ ounce. 

Greece, by Bremen or Hamburg— 3 cents encb.and b)£ 
cents per )}£ ounce. 

Gibraltar, Spain and Portugal, by Bremen or Hamburg 
— 3 cents each, aDd 1% cents per 1}£ ounce. 

Austria, India una China, by Bremen C Hamburg 
mail via Marseilles — 3 cents each, uud 9 cents per 1>£ 
ounce, 

Austria, India and China, by Bremen and Hamburg 
mails, via Trieste — 8 cents each, and 2 cents per ^ ounce. 

PERIODICALS, ETC. 

Bremon, by Bremen mail — 1 cent per ounce. 

Hamburg, by Hamburg mail 1 cent per ounce. 

Prussia, Austria and German States, by Bremen or Ham- 
burg — \% cent per ounce. 

Lunenburg, by Bremen mail— 1J^ cent per ounce, 

Lunenburg, by Hamburg mail — \% cent per ounce, and 
\% cunt per \}i ounce. 

Schleswlg-Holstwin and Denmark, by Bremen or Ham- 
burg— 1% ci-nt per ounce and \% cent per lj^ ounce. 

Sweden, by Bremen or Hamburg— \% cent per ounce, 
and 2 cents per \% ounce. 

Norway, by Bremen or Hamburg— 1^ cent per ounce, 
aud 4 cents per lj£ ounce. 

Holland, by Bremen or Hamburg— \% cent per ounce, 
and \% cent per 1% ounce. 

Ra»Ha, by Bremen or Hamburg— \% cent per ounce, 
and IK cent per \li ounce. 

Switzerland, by Brt*men or Hamburg— \% cent per 
ounce, and 1 cent per % ounce. 

Italy, by Bremou or Hamburg— \% cent per ounce, and 
2 cents per % ounce. 

Turkey, by Bremen or Hamburg — 1>£ cent per ounce, 
and hyi cents per IX ounce. 

Greece, by Bremen or Hamburg — 1% cent per ounco, 
and h% cents per \% ounce 

Gibraltar, Spain and Portugal, by Bremen or Hamburg— 
\% cent per ounce, and 2*4 cents oer 1% ounce. 

Austria, India and China, by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 
by way of Marseilles— 1>£ cent per ounce, and 9 centfl per 
1# ounce. 

Austria. India and China, by Bremen or Hamburg mail, 
by way of Trieste — C>£ cents per ounce, and 2 cents per % 
ounce. 

These charges are in each case in full to destination, 
combining rates between the United States and Bremen or 
Hamburg, and the rate beyond Bremen and Hamburg to 
points of delivery. 



Facts for the Pkoplk.— Every family should have a bot 
tlo of Healy's Curative Oil in the house, prepared to anni- 
hilate pain. It is the best remedy in the world for "Rheu- 
matism and Gout, Neuralgia or Headache, Toothache, 
Cramps in the Limbs, Diarrh«ea, Sprains, Bruises, Burns and 
Cuts; Scalds, bite of poisonous Insects, Frozen Feet, etc. 
Be your own physician, and get the best, for the best is the 
cheapest The Curative is composed of eleven ingredients, 
active and penetrating in their nature, and ot purely vege- 
table extraction; is free from all minerals and acids dele 
terious to the human system; Is warranted to give imme- 
diate relief from pain, and the cure is permanent. Sold by 
all druggists. Principal Depot, No, 5 Montgomery street. 
22vl*.Iamtf 



I&ht pining and J&ritntiffe <£xtf#. 



37 



8ALES OF THE WEEK 

it m ». r. stock a ixcaissi soau 

Uuuduy, July IS. 
AiTKuiooa ssuioa. 
1» aha Ophir at 250 per foot. 
1M sha Ophlr at 207 per foot. 
S3 aha Chollar- Potoal at WO per foot 
SO Bh« C holla r-Po toil at S2S per foot 
ft sha Chollar- Potoal at MO per root b 3a 
10 ihi Chollar Potoal at 330 per foot. 

10 ihi Chollar Potoal at 336 prr foot. 

2 ins Yellow.Jackct at 800 per foot, b 10. 

3 aha Yellow Jacket at 797 per fooi b 10. 
U aba Yellow Jackal at 750(J«» per ft. 

lab Belcher at 3iO per foot b 30. 

43 aha Krnmck at 3309500 per ahare. 
Asb* Kentuck at 302 per share b 24. 

49 aba Uulllon at 30 per aliare. 
40 aba Bullion at 23 per abarc. 

16 aha Crown Point at 1(00 pur foot bM. 

12 shs Crown Point at 1150 per foot b 30. 

4 sJa crown Point at 1300 per foot a 30. 
•Saba Crown Point at 131291220 per foot. 

lab Bavaseat 4100 per foot, b 30. 
4 shs Savage at 4000 per foot 
Amount of sales J243.261 00 

Tacdiiy, July 1*3. 
I44aha0pblrat 200 per foot 
288 aha Ophlr at 2lifi per foot. 

3 aba Confidence at 63 per ahare. 
100 shs Daney at per foot. 
100 shs Daner at 5 per foot 

24 shs CboHar-Potosi at 320@330 per ft. 
30 shs Exchequer, at S per share 

3 shs Savage at 4200 per foot 
ft ah* Savage at 4000 per foot. 
iro shs Overman at 130 per share. 
47 shs Overman at no per share 
ft shs Overman at 123 per bbarc a 30. 

7 shs Overman at 121 per share. 
6 shs overman at 115 per share. 
3 sbs Belcher at 230 per foot. 

3 shs Belcher at 210 por foot 

8 shs Qould k Curry at 630 per font. 

8 shs Oould k Curry at 660 per foot. 
20 shs Sierra Nevada at 14 per share. 

25 abs Sierra Nevada at 33>£ per share. 

1 sh Empire M k M Co. at 170 per ah. 
lft shs Segregated Belcher at 8 per foot. 

6 sbs Imperial at 135 per share. 
Sabs Imperial at 182S per share. 

17 sbs Yellow Jacket at 700 per foot. 

17 shs Yellow Jacket at 750 per foot, 
lsb Yellow Jacket at 7M> per root b 30. 

84 shs Crown Point at 1000(3^90 per foot, 
20 shs Yollow Jacket at 965&05O perftsSO. 

4 shs Crown Point At 950 per foot, b 30. 
16shs Kcntuck at 300@3iW per share. 

20 sbs Bullion at 25 per share. 
20 shs Bullion at 20 per share. 

5 sbs Bullion at 23 per share b 30. 
f 1.000 Legal Tender Notes at 72Kc 

irTERffOOR BK5B10H. 

108 shs Ophlr at 240Q255 per foot- 

11 shs Gold Hill Q. M. Co. at 1B0 per sh. 

13 shs Belcher at 230@2O0 per foot 

2 shs Belcher at 275 per foot 

60 shs Overman at 115 per share. 

70 shs Overman At 135 per foot. 

15 shs Overman at 120 per share b 30. 

13 shs Overman at 140 per share, b 30. 
i shs Savage at 4150 per root. 

1 sh Savage at 4100 per foot. 

IS sbs Yellow Jacket at 750 per foot. 

7 shs Yellow Jacket at 761 per foot 

23 sbs Oould 4 Curry at G4C@630 per Toot 

3 shs Chollar-Potosl at 350 per foot. 
15 sbs Cbollar- Potoal at 375 per sh t 30. 
30 shs Confidence at 55 per share. 

18 shs Confidence at 50 per share. 

9 shs Kcntuck at 330®354 per share. 

60 shs Crown Point atlIOO@950 per foot. 

44 shs Crown Point at 1050@99O per ft. 

6 shs Imperial at 187>£ per share. 
5 shs Imperial at 195 per share. 

35 sbs Bullion at 24@25 per share. 

14 sbs Cal Steam Nav Co at 69 .! 3 per cent- 
Amount of sales S232.172 00 

Wednesday July 17. 
70 shs N. B. and Mission R. R. at 52 pr sh. 

4 shs Gould k Curry at 660 per foot. 
4 sbs Gould A Curry at 670 per toot 

10 .shs Exchequer at 10 per share. 

60 shs Sierra Nevudr. at 17 per share. 

10 shs Chollar-Potosl at 400 per foot b 5. 

20 shs Chollar-Potosi at 4i5 per share. 

22 shs Chollar-Potosl at 390 per root 

18 sbs Imperial at 200 per share. 

64 shs Crown Point at 13iXi@1150 per foot. 

8 shs Crown Point at 1275 per share s 10. 

4 sbs Crnwn;Pomt at 1300 per ft s 10. 

25 shs Overman at 175 per share. 

26 sbs Overman at 160 per share. 
25 sbs Overman at 165 per share. 

27 shs Overman at 170 per share. 

10 shs Overman at 160 per share, b 5. 

15 shs Overman at 160 per share, a 6. 

36 sbs Ophlr at 265 per foot. 

12 shs Ophlr at 267J$ per foot, b 30. 

5 shs Empire M A M Co. at 180 per sb. 
20 shs Segregated Belcher at 12 per foot. 

3 shs Belcher at 325 per foot. 

4 shs Belcher at 350 per share. 

3 shs Kcntuck at 395 per share, b 10. 
3 shs Kcntuck at 400 per share b 10. 

7 sbs Kentuck at 410 per share b 30. 
42 shs Kcntuck at 40Q@395 per share. 

lsh Savage at 4100 per foot s 30. 

3 shs Savage at 4400 per foot. 

4 shs Yellow Jacket at 850 per foot 
7 shs Yellow Jacket at 900 per loot 

40 shs Daney at 6 per toot. 

AFTERNOON SKSSIOH. 

24 shs Ophlr at 240 per foot 
24 Bbs Ophir at 236 per foot. 

120 shs Ophlr at 240@250 per foot b 10. 
20 sbs Chollar-Potosl at 4O0@310 per sh . 

5 8hsChollar-Fotosi at 406 per foots 30. 

17 shs Chollar-Potosl at407K@4l0 per foot 

11 shs Chollar-Potosi at 420@42J per ft b 30 
4 aha Chollar-Potosi at 410 per ft b 10. 



4 shs Crown Point at 1260 per ft ■ 10. 
24 shs Crown Point at 123061330 per ft b 30. 
32 shs Crown Point at IS' fc.1300 per foot 

1 eh Savago at 4400 per foot . 

2 sbs Savage at 4375 per foot. 

lab Yellow Jacket at 380 per foot b 30. 

7 aha Yellow Jacket at 867* per foot. 

10 aha Allow Jacket at 83t> per root 
4 aba Belcher at 330 per share. 

4 aha Yellow Jacket at 336 per toot 
21 ISJ Kcntuck at 400^405 per ahare. 
33 shs Segregated Belcher at 12 per sh. 
20 shs Bullion at 30&3I per abarc. 

6 sbs Imperial at 2UU per share. 

5 sha Overman at 200 per share, b 30. 
30 shs Overman at ISO pcrsharo 

30 sbs Overman at 190 per share. 

6 shs Overman at 160 per share, s 10. 

11 shs Overman at 152% per ahare. 
10 sha Overman nt 185 pcrsbare. 

10 aha Overman at 176 per share, s30. 
10 shs Empire M A M Co. at 180 per sh. 
16 shs Cal. Steam Nav. Co. at 70 per cent 

Amount of sales 5286,180 00 

Thursday, .Inly IS. 
SO shs NBA Mission R. R. at 50 per share. 
408 ami Ophlr at 215@226 per foot 
24 shs Ophlr at 225 per foot, s 30. 

24 shs Ophlr at 235 per toot, b 30. 

12 sbs Ophlr at 225 per root, b 10. 

15 shs Confidence at 57^®C0 per share. 
120 shs Daney at 6 per foot. 

40 His Kcntuck at 402%@-405 per share. 

6 shs Kentuck at 420 per share b 30. 

5 shs Kcntuck at 412% per share b 30. 
fl shs Imperial at 197% per share . 
48 sha Crown Point at 12>jO@U50 per ft. 

8 shs Crown Point at 1100 per loot s 30. 
8 shs Crown Point at 113&@lJ25por ft a 10. 
26sbs Overman at 170 per shore b 3u. 

50 shs Overman at 160 per share. 

43 shs Overman at 165 per share 

10 shs Overman at 150 per share, s 30. 

48 shs Gould A Curry at 7uO@660 per ft. 

14 shs Cbollar-Potos! at 416® HO per foot 

2 shs Chollar-Potosl At 425 per foot, b 30. 

25 shs Sierra Nevada at 15 per share. 

25 shs Sierra Nevada at 15% per share. 
10 shs Segregated Belcher at 10 per ft- 
10 shs Segregated Belcher at 8 per foot. 

5 sbs Belcher at 300 per foot 
5 sbs Belcher at 285 per share. 

26 sbs Bullion at 32,% per foot. 

35 shs Bullion at 30 per share. 

16 sbs Yellow Jacket at 875 per foot. 
20 shs Yollow Jacket at 800 per foot. 

1 shs Savage at 4400 per foot, b 10. 
3 shs Savage at 4390 per loot. 

3 shs Savage at 4375 per foot 

ITTEaitOOM SEBStOIf. 

70BhsJustlsInd. Cons, at 14® 15 per sb. 
10 shs Justis Ind. Cons, at 16 pr eh b 30. 
144 sbs Ophlr at 230@225 per toot. 
25 shs Segregated Belcher ai ll@10 per ft. 
20 shs Bullion at 31@32 per share. 
5 shs Imperial at 205 per share, b 30. 
10 shs Imperial at 199 per share. 
10 shs Imperial at 200 per share. 
16 shs Gould k Curry at 760@775 per foot. 

4 sbs Gould k Curry at 775 per foot s 10. 
4 sbs Gould k Curry at 800 per foot b 30. 
4 shs Gould k Curry at 775 per foot s 30. 

12 shs Qould k Curry at 775@770 per foot. 
20 shs C hollar- Potosi at 410@122 per foot. 

2 shs Chollar-Potosi at 415 per foot, s 10. 
20 shs Chollar-Potosl at 410 per foot s 30. 

120 shs Daney at 5>£ per loot. 

7 shs Kcntuck at 410 per share. 

4 shs Yellow Jacket at 850 per foot b 30. 

9 shs Yellow Jacket at 830@Si5 per foot 
38 shs Overman at 165@170 per share. 

1 sh Belcher at 310 per foot. 

12 shs National Insurance at 69M per sh 
J5.000 Legal TendcrNotcs at 72%c, s30. 
lOu shs S. F. Gas Co. at at 63% per cen t. 
Amount of sales S217.S90 00 

Friday, -July lft. 

$5,000 Legal Tender Notes at72^c. 
20 shs Sierra Nevada at 16 per share. 
40 sbs Daney at 5% per foot 
40 sh3 Segregated Belcher at 12 per ft. 
10 shs Segregated Belcher at 11©12, b 30. 

5 shs Justis lad. Cons, at 15 per sb. 
60 shs Ophlr at 230 per foots 30. 

69 shs Ophlr ai 230 per foot b 30. 
300 shs Ophir at 240®245 per foot. 

36 shs Ophlr at 235 per foot s 10. 

6 shs Yellow Jacket at 900 per foot b30. 
30 shs Yellow Jacket at 67U@856 per ft 

4 shs Yellow Jacket at 870 per foot s 3. 
lsh Yellow Jacket at 8G5 pr ft b 6. 

40 shs Crown Point at I230@I250 per foot 

12 Bhs Crown Point at 1300@1250 per ft b 30. 

4 sbs Crown Point at 1220 per toot b 6. 

4 shs Gould k Curry at 760 per ft b30. 
66 shs Gould k Curry at 770@?15 per foot 
20 shs Gould k Curry at 7a>@690 per ft, b 30. 
69 shs Overman at I80@170 per share. 

20 sha Overman at 160 per share, s30. 

15 Bbs Overman at 175 per share, b30. 

3 shs Savage at 4375@4395 per foot 
lsh Savage at 4400 per foot, b 6. 

19 shs Kcntuck at4I5@l20 per share. 

2 shs Kcntuck at 435 per share, b 30. 
12 shsBelcbcr at 320@316 per Toot 

AFTHRMOOM SKSSIOH. 

10 shs Sierra Nevada at 16 per share. 
72 shs Opblr at 230 per foot. 
in 6hs Justis Ind. Cons, at 15 per share. 
60 shs Chollar-Potosl at 450 per ft, s SO. 

7 Bhs Chollar-Potosi at 450 per foot, s 10. 
6 sbs Chollar-Potosi at 460 per loot b 30. 

41 shs Chollar-Potosl at 450@44O per foot. 
10 shs Kcntuck at 415 per share. 

4 shs Kcntuck at 430 per share , b 30. 
2 shs Savage at 4100 per foot. 

140 shs Daney at 6 per foot 
12 sbs Gould k Curry at 720@725 per ft s 10. 
8 shs Gould k Curry at 710 pr ft s30. 
9 shs Gold Hill Q. M. A M. Co. at 180. 

1 shs Gold Hill Q. M. A M. Co. at 190 b 30. 

2 sbs Yellow Jacket at 890 per foot b 30. 

21 shs Yellow Jacket at 850@875 per foot 
10 shs Bullion at 32% per foot 

54 shs Overman at 170 per share 
15 shs Overman at 160 per shares 30. 
10 sns Overman at 175 per share, b 30. 

4 shs Crown Point at 1200 per foot s 10. 

4 sbs Crown Poiut at 1210 per foot. 



Amount of sales.. 



MINING 8HAEEH0LDEES' DIBE0T0EY. 

[Compiled for every Issue, from advertisements In the 

Mi.iino asp SciK.vriric I'Rxss and other San 
Francisco Journals.) 

Comprising the Namca of Companies, District or Count} 
or Location; Amount and date or Assessment; Date or 
Meeting; Day of Delinquent Sale; and Amount and Time 
of Payment of Dividends. 

It 1MB, LOCATIOtt, AMOUNT, AMD DAT DAT 

DATE Or ASSESSMIUIT. DELIHQUKICT. OT SALE 

Adflllfl, Sierra co.. Cal., May 29. $1 June 23-July 29* 

Bullion. Store; Oo . Nev sale Aug 6 

Belcher, Virginia, Nev„, Mav3n. Sis June 30-July 31 

Belcher, Virginia, Nev , May 30, S5 June 30-July 31 

Chlplonena, Sonoro, Mexico. July 11. *5 Aug 12-Scpt 2* 

Cainargo, Lauderco , Nev , June 21, $20... .Aug. 2— ^epL 26* 
Clncn Senorrw, Sltmloa, Mex.. Mnv 1. 10c... .Jviiv 5-Julv HI 1 
Cttlironiln, Storey co., Nov.. Jum- It, 5850.. July 24— Aug. 20 
Chulk Mountain. Nev. 0O.,0«L,JaDfl K Jl.July 19- Aug. 5" 

ChoUar-PotosI, Storoy co., Nev , div. 25....PavaI>ic Juna.lft 
Drown Paint Nov dividend sso PayaMa May U> 

DeSoto, numb"!ilt. Nev. July 11, $2 Aug 17— Sept 4* 

Daney, Lyon r-o . Wev . June is, SH July 22— Aug. 10 

Dim Padre, Alaiao, Hex .June 13, $.1 July 15— Aug 2 

Dardanelles, Del Nortoco., June 3, 8c July 10— August S" 

El Taste, Soiiora, Max., Julv 11. $1 Aug. 12— Aug 30 

Empire M. A At, Nov.. dividend *0 Payable May 15 

Gold Hill Q M. AM Co Dividend, $16— Pavable Julv 15 

Gold Hill T. AM., Storey co., Nev Annual Moot. July 20* 

Golden Rule. Tuolumne Co, dlv 50o$Sh... Payable Mar 1» 
Gould & Curry, Virginia, Nov., dividend $80.. Payable Jang 

Hone OravoU Nov. co.. Cal , June 26, $1 July 30— Aug 19* 

Halo k Norcross, Virginia, Nev., dlv. $125. ..Payable July 15 

I X L, Alpine co., Cnl.. June 19, $1.60 July 19— Aug. 5» 

Imperial, Virginia, Nov., dlv. $10 Payable July 15 

Josephine Quicksilver, San Luis Obispo, dlv, $2 July 8 

Julia, Start yea Nev.. June 19, $1 July 22— Aug." 12 

Kcntuck, dlv., $40 per share Payable July 8 

London Q. II., Siskiyou co., July 6, $1 Aug. 10— Aug. 31 

Lyon M. A M., El Di.rudoco , Julv 6. $3 Aug 5— Aug 19» 

Lady Bell, Del Norte co, Juno 18,16c July 18- Aug W 

La Ulaooa. L'res, Mex., June 10, $2.60 July 10— July 26 

Lady Franklin, Alpine CO., May 2, 30c June 10— July 22* 

Nuestra Kenorn do Guadalupe, July 12, $1. .Aug. 13— Sept S" 
Neaglc A Corcoran, storey Co, July 11, 5Hc..Aug 12— Sept 2» 
Nengle A Corcoran, Storey co. Nev.. Ann. Meeting, Aug. 19» 
Oxford Beta, Esmeralda, Nev. June 10, 60c. July 10— July 29» 

Refugio.'Chlhuahua, Mex , July 10, $1 Aug. 21— Sept. U 

Kattlesnake. Yubaco., Mav 22, $1 June 27 —July 15* 

Santa Cruz, Antonio, Mex., June 6, 60c July 11— July 26 

Sophia, Tuolumne co., Juno II. $3 July 11— July 26» 

Sierra Nev., Storey co.,Nev , June 1, $10 July 6— July 'J4 

Seaton, Amador co., May 28, $100 July 8— July 29* 

Succor, Storey Co., Nev.. May 28, 30c Julv 1— Julv 21 

Shoshone S. M., dividend, $ i per share Pavnble March 14 

Savage, Virginia, Nev. dividend $300 Payable Julv 8 

Santiago, Silver City, dividend Payable March 6 

Sides S. M. Co., June 24, $12.50 

Tuolumne Mountain, Tuol. Co. , July 10, $1 . .Aug 13— Aug 31* 

White A Murphy, July 3, $6.75 Aug 10— Sept 2 

Whltlatcli, Lauder co., Nov., June 21, $15. .Aug. 2— Sept. 26" 
Yellow Jacket, Gold Hill, dlv. $76 sh Payable July 10 

•Those marked ullhan asterisk (*) are advertised In this 
journal. __ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Latest Stook Prices Bid and Asked. 

B. r. STOCK JSP EXCHANGE BOARD. 

Friday Evening, Jnly 19, 1867. 

UlFCKLLAN'EOtTS STOCKS- Bid. Aaklt- 

Unltod States 7 3-10ths Bonds, Juuo issue $ 79 79^ 

Legal Tender Notes 72 72Ji 

California Slate Bonds, 7s. 1857 85 90 

San Francisco Bonds, 10s, 1861 100 102 

Sun Francisco City Bonds, 6s. 1855 80 96 

San Francisco City and County Bonds, fis, 1S58. 76 80 

San Francisco Citv and Co. Sch'l B'ds, 7h, 1866. 80 — 

Sun Francisco Citv and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1862 80 84 

San Francisco City and Co. bonds, 7s, 1864 8J 84 

San Francisco City and Co Bonds, 7s, 1865 80 84 

Sun Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds. 7s, 1863. 80 84 

San Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds, 7s, 1864. 80 84 

Sacramento City Bonds 27J£ 30 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6s 65 — 

Marysville Bonds, 10s 75 85 

Stockion City Bonds 70 95 

Yuba County Bonds, 10s 76 95 

Santa Clara'Cmintv Bonds, 7s 75 80 

Butte Count v Bonds, 10s, I860 70 75 

San Mateo County Bunds, 7s — 85J6 

California Steam Navigation Co 70 72>£ 

Spring Valley Water Co 67^ 68 

State Telegraph Co 30 32 

GAS COMPANIKS. 

San Francisco Gas Co 63 63J£ 

Sacraraen to Oas Co 62 64 

RAILROADS. 

Sacramento Valley Railroad — — 

San Francisco and San -lose Railroad 40 46 

Omnibus Railroad 61 — 

Central Railroad 43 45 

North Beach and Mission Railroad 49 60 

Front S;rcet, Mission and Ocean Railroad 11 — 

BANKING INSTITUTIONS. 

California, Loan and Savings Society — — 

Eunk of Pacific Accumulation Loan Society.. — 90 
The Bank of California 13S 140 

INSCRANCK COMPANIES. 

Flremans' Fund Insurance Co 91 94 

Pacific Insurance Co 130 135 

Kan Francisco Insurance Co — ISO 

Merchant-' Mutual Marine Insurance Co 400 475 

California Insurance Co 1550 1750 

Union Insurance Co , 87& 95 

California Home Insurance Co — 92 

Home Mutual Insurance Co — — 

Occidental Insurance Co 90 95 

National Insurance Co 69>£ 71 

U1MNG STOCKS— WASHOE DISTRICT. 

Alpha 400 440 

Baltimore American — 8 

Belcher 315 320 

Bullion. G. H ., S2J£ — 

Crown Point 121)5 1225 

Confidence .'. 65 6)1 

Chollar-Potosi.. 450 465 

Dai 1 cy 6 dj£ 

Exchequer. 12 14 

Empire Mill and Mining Co 175 — 

Could A Curry 720 730 

Hale A Norcross — 32 

Imperial 205 210 

Lady Bryan — — 

Ophir 22B 235 

Overman 170 175 

Sav a ge 4400 4410 

Yellow Jac ket 860 870 

Golden Rule, California 17 20 



San Francisco Market Bates. 

"Wholesale Prices. 

Friday, July 19, 1867. 

Flour, Extra, # bbl $5 60 @$6 50 

Do. Superfine 4 75 @ 5 26 

Corn Meal, ^ 100 lbs 2 00 @ 2 25 

Wheat, ft 100 lbs 1 60 @ 1 85 

Oats, ft 100 B>9 1 00 @ 1 tO 

Bnrley, ft lOOlbs.. 1 15 @ 1 25 

Beans, %* 10j Iba 2 00 @ 3 60 

Potatoes, ft 100 lbs 75 @ 1 2i 

Hay. ft ton 7 00 ©12 00 

Live Oak Wood, ft cord 9 00 @10 00 

Beef, on toot, ft tb 1M @ — 

Beef, extra, dressed, ft lb 9 @ 10 

Sheep, onfoot 3 00 @ 4 00 

H ogs, on foot, ft lb 6 @ 6J£ 

Hogs, dressed, ft lb 9 @ 10 

GROCERIES, ETC. 

Sucar, crushed, ft lb — @ 14)^ 

Do. China 9 @ 10 

Coffee, Costa Rica, ft lb 191S® 19% 

Do. Rio — @ 19« 

Tea. Japan, ft tb 65 @ 85 

Do Green 60 @ 1 25 

Hawaiian Rice, ft lb 9 @ — 

China Rice, ft lb *% ® 6% 

CoalOil.ft gallon 52& @ 55 

Candles.ftft. 10 @ 23}£ 

Ranch Butter, ft tb 25 @ 32 

Isthmus Butter, ft lb 15 @ 25 

Cheese. California, ft tt> 12J£ @ 15 

Eggs, ft dozen 33 © 35 

Lard, ft lb 12 @ 13 



Ham and Bacon, ft lb jg a 15 

Shoulder*, ft lb (j @ 10 

JSetaall Pa-Ices. 

Butter, California, fresh, ft 0) 30 A 40 

do. I'll kled, ft lb 25 a — 

do. Oregon.ftlb — 15 a 20 

do. New York, ft K. 35 @ _ 

Cheese, ft ft 15 @ 25 

Honoy, * ft 30 ® 4» 

Kgga, p down _ (A 40 

Hams and Bacon, ft ft 18 @ 20 

Cranberries ft gallon l oo @ 1 26 

Potatoes, ft ft 2 @ 3 

Potatoes, Sw*ot, ft ft — a 8 

Toruatoea.ft ft — a 6 

Onions, ft ft " 3 a 6 

Apples, no. i, ft ft ;;;;;;;; J ® & 

Pears, Table, ft ft g q, i 

Plnma, dried. « ft """." 13 a is 

Poaches, dried, ft ft ji <a ]j 

Oranges, ft dozen 50 <a — 

Lemons, ft dozen 76 a — 

Chickens, apiece "" — a 75 

Turkeys, ft ft ; ra a 26 

Soap. Pale andC. o 7 S 1°« 

Soap, Castile, ft ft ^ @ 20 

*--•• ^»- ••-♦ 

San Francisco Metal Market. 

PRICES FOR IXV01CE8. 

Jolbinff price* rule from ten to fifteen per cent, higher than (Aa 
fotlotcing quotationr. 

Friday, Julv 19, 1867. 
Iron.— Doty: Pig, $9 per ton; Railroad, COc ft 100 lbs; Bar, 
l<3l*ic ft lb; Sheet, polished. 3c ft lb; common, lv o( ap- c 
ft ft; Plate, l>;c ft lb; Pipe, l^c ft lb; Galvanized, 2gc 

scotch and English Pig Iron ft ton $*7 00 @$48 00 

White Pic ft ton 60 00 a 

Refined Bar, bad assortment ft lb — oS a 

Refined Bar, good assortment, ft ft.. — 03% a 

Boiler, No. 1 to 4 — 04$a 

Plate, No. 6 to 9 — 04W@ — 05 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 - 04k@ 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 — 05 @ 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 — 05 a 

Copphb.— Duty: Sheathing, 3>,c ft lb; Pig and Bar, 2.^c ft lb. 

Sheathing, ft lb — 34 a — 36 

Sheathing, Yellow — 26 a — 26 

Sheathing, Old Yellow _ n a 

Bolts _ii @ 

Composition Nails ,. — 25 a 26 

Tin Platks.— Duty: 25ft cent ad valorem. 

Plates, Churcoal, IX, ft box 13 50 a 

Plates, I C Charcoal 12 00 a 

Roofing Plates. 11 oo a — — . 

BaneaTin, Slabs, ft lb — 29 a — 30 

Ptkel.— English Cast Steel, ft ft — 12^a — 16 

Quicksilver.— ip lb ; a — 60 

For export a — 56 

Zinc— SheetH, ft ft a, — ]\ 

LEAD.-Plg.ftlb - 7K@— 8 

Sheet _ 10 a 

Pipe -11 a 

Bar _ 9M@ — 10 

Borax.— California, ft lb — 20 a — 23 



Election of Officers. — Savage M. Co. 
July 18th. Trustees : Alpheus Bull, Thos. 
Bell, M. Mayblum, A. H. Bose and A. Hay- 
ward. President, Alpheus Bull ; Secretary, 
E. B. Holmes ; Treasurer, "W. C. Kalston ; 
Superintendent, Charles Bonner. Office, 
corner California and Sansome streets. 




MJECHANIC8' INSTITUTE. 

Resources of California. 

THE MECHANICS' INSTITUTE of San Francisco, here- 
by offer a PREMIUM of ONE THOUSAND ($1,000) DOL- 
LARS for the best Essay on the " RESOURCES OK 
CALIFORNIA, AND BEST METHOD OF DEVELOPING 
THE SAME," under the following conditions: One-halt" of 
the premium In cash on the certified award of the Com- 
mittee of Judges, and the balance from the first proceeds of 
sale* of the successful work, which is to belong to, and will 
be published by, the Institute. 

The Essays are to be handed in to the Librarian of the 
Institute on or before the FIRST DAY OF JUNE, 1868, and 
the award will be made by the Judges at the opening of the 
Industrial Exhibition, which Is to be held In August or Sep 
tembcr following. The Essay should be divided Into three 
great heads, viz.: Mineral, Agricultural and Industrial Re- 
sourced, with proper subdivisions of each subject. Itshould 
bo sufficient in quantity to form a duodecimo (I2mo) volume 
of from 250 to 300 pages long primer type, solid. 

Writers will sign their articles in cypher, and aend their 
names and address In sealed envelopes, which will be kept 
In a secure place by the Institute, and only be opened when 
the award is made. The manuscripts of unsuccessful 
writers will be returned to them without pnblicity. 

The Committee of Judges have the right to reject all 
Essays in case they do not consider them worthy of publi- 
cation or the premium. No further Instructions than are 
contained in this advertisement will be given to this Com- 
mittee, nor will they be subjected to any advice from the 
officers or members of the Institute In regard to their pro- 
posed action. All manuscript submitted must be in clear 
legible writing, so as to admit of easy reading. 1 

The following named gentlemen , who have been selected 
for their well known ability, public spirit aud integrity o 
purpose, will compose the Committee of Judges: 
Hon. Fred'k F. Low, Maj. Gen. H. W. Hallcck, U. 



Prof. J. D. Whitney, 

James Otis, 

Win, Governour Morris, 



S. A., 
Prof. W. B. Ewer, 
B. N. Bugbey. 



By order of the Board of Directors. 

D. E. HAYES, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 12, 1867. 24vl4-2ni 



Greatest Xn.-veii.tion ot" the Age* 

BOWMAN'S 
AMERICAN WASHING COMPOUND 

And housewife's true friend, saves one-half the labor, 
one-half the time, and one-half the expense. 

For WASHING CLOTHES, CLEANING HOUSES, RE- 
MOVING PAINT, GREASE, etc., It 13 unequalled. 

jCS» It makes hard water as soft as rain water. 

For sale at $1.50 per can of five gallons, at the manufac- 
tory, 223 Jackson street, near Battery. Please send your 
orders, by mail or express, to LYNCH & PARSONS, 

2Svl4-2am6t San Francisco, Cal. 



38 



M\u pitting m\A Mmtifxt §*$& 



spninjj ^Mwmarjj. 



The following information is gleaned mostly from jour- 
nals published in the interior, iu close proximity to the 
mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alpine County. 

Miner, July 13th: Work in and about the 
Tarshish mine is being prosecuted in a vig- 
orous and permanent manner. A new fur- 
nace for furnishing the mine with pure air 
has been completed. A carpenter shop is 
in course of erection, where the timbers for 
the protection of the mine will be framed. 
The north drift is now in a distance of 35 
ft., all in pay ore ; the south drift about 20 
ft. , part pay ore and part poor in quality. 
Cross cuts will be made every 50 ft. to de- 
termine the quality and quantity of ore to 
be depended on for purposes of erecting 
reduction works. 

In Silver Mountain Dist, the 1 X. L., 
Mountain and Pennsylvania companies are 
working away with renewed vigor, the first 
in quartz both in the upper and lower tun- 
nel. 

A. E. Kennedy, Supt. of the Mexican M. 
Co., in his report to the Board of Trustees 
of the Morning Star G. & S. M. Co., Morn- 
ing Star lode, says : " The indications for a 
large body of ore in this mine are equal to 
any I have seen — the Comstock not ex- 
cepted. "When a greater depth is obtained, 
you will find the ore almost entirely free 
from base metals, and I have no doubt can 
be worked by common mill process at the 
mine." 
Calaveras County. 

San Andreas Register, July 13th : Thorn 
& Co's mine is giving out the gold merrily. 
In sinking their shaft to its present depth, 
50 ft., the Co. have picked out over $2,000 
in nuggets of different sizes, from a pin's 
head to a hen's egg. All the dirt and rock 
from the shaft is to be handled and worked 
yet, and it is confidently expected that argo- 
sies of wealth will be found therein. Since 
the above was written, over $300 was picked 
up in one day, by the workmen, in bould- 
ers of rich shining ore. 
Inyo county. 

Virginia Trespass, July 10th: Mr. Jac- 
ques, just from Cerro Gordo, reports the 
weather very hot and water scarce. Some 
new ledges, reported to be immensely rich, 
have been located further south and east. 
A number of prospectors are on their way 
hither. 

Kenl County. 

Havilah Courier, July 6th : Recently, J. 
B. Malin and Geo. Millican, of Telachapi, 
the principal owners of the Ophir, Laurel 
and Millican ledges, believing in the rich- 
ness of Kern county, resolved to give the 
district another trial, and went to work on 
the Millican ledge. The ledge is 12 ft. 
wide at the surface. A shaft has been sunk 
180 ft., and from the bottom a drift started 
to cut the ledge. They have already struck 
two stratas, from 2 to 4 ft. in width, the 
last containing some very rich ore. The 
rock from the surface, worked on two trials 
in a mill, yielded $65 and $70 per ton, and 
assays as high as $1,600 have been ob- 
tained. The character of the ore strongly 
resembles that of Blind Springs and Mont- 
gomery districts in Mono county. 
Ijos Angeles County. 

Wilmington Journal, July 13th : The edi- 
tor has seen some very rich argentiferous 
galena specimens from Catalina .Island, 
taken from the Small Hill Mine 150 ft. be- 
low the surface and 500 ft. above the level 
of the sea. Arrangements are being made 
to work these mines more extensively than 
heretofore. It is in contemplation to erect 
a smelting furnace on the Island. 

Mariposa County. 

Gazette, July 13th : Very flattering pros- 
pects are being struck on Big creek, in the 
vicinity of the Big Trees and Clark's ranch. 
Three bit prospects are reported from vari- 
ous points on the creek. 
Nevada County. 

Transcript, July 13th : The Scandinavian 
ledge, which was located a month or two 
ago, lias been opened to a considerable 
depth, and a ledge 20 in. in thickness has 
been found. The editor lias seen a pros- 
pect from two pans of the rock, which is 
richer than anything seen for a long time, 
free gold being found in large quantities. 

At Eureka, business is as lively as a '49 
mining camp. Several excellent quartz 
ledges are beingworked, and alarge amount 
of prospecting is being done. Besides 
these interests, much is being done to open 
good gravel claims. 

July 14th : The quartz ledge recently dis- 
covered and located by I. W. Hadcock, be- 
tween Moore's and Orleans Flats, is being 
rapidly developed. Enough is ascertained 
to know that it surpasses the most sanguine 
expectations. It contains a largo amount 
of sulplnii'ets, besides free gold often seen 



with the naked eye. The tunnel has been 
driven 90 ft. into the hill, the ledge being 
taken out all the way, which shows a uni- 
form thickness of 18 in., mostly deconr 
posed quartz. At a depth of 37 ft. , attained 
through an incline from the center of the 
tunnel, the ledge is found to be increased 
in thickness, and equal in quality, if not 
superior, to that above. It is the opinion 
of some that the rock, properly and sys- 
tematically worked, would readily yield 
$100 per ton. It is the intention of the 
owner to ship a quantity of the rock either 
to Nevada or Grass Valley, to have a test 
made. 

Reasoner and others have located a ledge 
at Eureka, a mill test of which, made by 
Kidd & Co. , showed the rock to be very 
rich. The ledge is 6 ft wide, 2 ft. of which 
is sulphuret rock, and the remainder con- 
tains free gold. Separate tests were made, 
and the sulphuret rock was found to be 
worth $133.20 per ton, and the rock con- 
taining free gold averaging $23.31." 

Gazette, July 12th : The Banner Co. have 
made arrangements to add 10 additional 
stamps to their mill. The mortars, stamps 
and other iron work will bo manufactured 
at the Nevada Foundry. For some time 
the mine has been supplying rock for 20 
stamps ; but these being found insufficient 
to reduce all the ore afforded by the mine, 
the company have determined to enlarge 
the crushing facilities of their own mill. 

Excelsioe. — Enterprise, July 11th : The 
mill of the Mohawk and Montreal Co. which 
started up on the morning of the 4th, have 
on hand a large lot of excellent ore, and the 
process used by them is that most approved 
in the mills of Grass Valley and Nevada 
City. The Excelsior mill has started up 
eight stamps, and the Meadow Lake reduc- 
tion works will start in a few days. The 
Golden Eagle has cleaned up a run of 10 
tons, the ore paying $28 per ton. The Green 
Emigrant Co. has taken out a large lot of 
exceedingly rich ore, which will shortly be 
crushed at the reduction works, and the 
Enterprise Co. are about to furnish a large 
lot of rock to the same works ; they have 
now on their dump nearly 3,000 tons of ore. 

Meadow Lake Sun, July 13th : The En- 
terprise Co. have advertised for proposals, 
for sinking 50 additional feet on their shaft, 
and running 24 ft. from the bottom of the 
shaft, and timbering the whole. 

The California mill is being cleaned up 
after running through 50 tons of Green 
Emigrant rock. The mill will start in a few 
days on rock from the Knickerbocker ledge. 

The Excelsior and Mohawk mills are re- 
ported as working. 

The editor has had placed upon his table 
the richest piece of ore yet seen in the dis- 
trict. It was from the Green Emigrant, and 
consisted of pure white quartz, completely 
sjieckled with particles of free gold. Twelve 
lbs. of amalgam, the product of 50 tons of 
Green Emigrant ore, was brought to town 
last night. 

San Bernardino County. 

Guardian, July 13th : The machinery for 
Hueston's mill is now on the ground, on the 
top of the mountain. The boiler and other 
heavy portions were transported over the 
precipitous mountains all right. 

The placer mines at Holcomb are turning 
out very well. There is not much doing in 
quartz mining. The Green lead is in op- 
eration, crushing by arastras, the rock which 
is piled upon the claim. 

Sierra County. 

Downieville Messenger, July 13th : In the 
claims of Mr. Sol. Woods, -at Monte Cristo, 
a few days since, there was found lying on 
the sluice boxes a piece of lava containing 
about $6% in gold. The piece had evidently 
got into the diggings from the surface, and 
had no appearance of having been washed, 

Tulare County. 

Visalia Delta, July 10th : The Silver 
Sprout and Kearsarge Cos. are actively en- 
gaged in working their mines, with every 
prospect of rich returns. The Alabama 
Dist. is alive with miners, and along the 
base of the hills east of the river, some 300 
Spaniards are at work with furnaces, aras- 
tras, etc. , getting out the precious metal. 

Tuolumne County. 

Columbia Citizen, July 13th : Mining in- 
terests in this section have thus-far this year 
yielded a larger per cent, than they did last 
year. But it is not to be concealed that the 
placer mining interest has very much de- 
creased, on account of the large number of 
claims that have been worked out and aban- 
doned ; but the quartz diggings are still 
being developed and wrought with success. 
ARIZONA. 

Miner, June 29th : Work has been sus- 
pended on the Williams Fork — cause, the 
unusually low price of copper. At Big Bug, 
Anderson & Bentel recently took out $27 
in two days. Lynx. Creek continues to pay 



fairly. Crump and others have been doing 
well on the upper Hassayampa. 

Salina Herald, June 12th : The American 
Gila River Mining Co., are organizing and 
fitting out, at Salina, their second expedition 
to the gold and silver mines near Pinos Al- 
tos, New Mexico. The party have com- 
menced to rendezvous there, and will start 
across the plains about the first of July. 

July 13th : New diggings have been struck 
on Pleasant Creek. The gold is found in 
an old channel, and have paid well, yielding 
$10 and $12 to the man per day. The gold 
is coarse and heavy, and worth $16. 50 per 
ounce. 

Marvelous tales are told about a rich 
quartz lode which has recently been struck 
on Foot's Creek. 

COLORADO. 

Times, June 25th : On the 14th inst. , one- 
half of the Mexican lode sold for $20,000, 
and on the 16th, the east end of the Nuck- 
oll's sold for the same amount. 

Prof. Hill has purchased a mill site below 
Black Hawk, and will erect a furnace and 
works for separating ore. The old Idaho 
mill is being enlarged. The Wycoff process 
will soon be in operation there. 

A button of pure silver has been turned 
out by the Georgetown Silver Smelting 
Works, from Pewabic ore, weighing 60 lbs. 
avoirdupois, worth in greenbacks, $1,332.92. 
The previous week's run was 50 lbs., that 
of the week before, 73% lbs. , being the sum 
of $41,000 from the first three weeks run of 
this furnace. 

J. A. Conlee, on the Gunnell lode, on 
Clear Creek, last week realized 117 ozs. of 
retort. 

Mr. Beach is working ore from the Briggs 
lode, in the Briggs mill, and is doing splen- 
didly. During the past week he took out 
85 ozs. 

The Black Quartz mine in Quartz Valley, 
is being worked by the Belden & Terrell Co. 
The shaft is in about 70 ft. There is a pile 
of pyrites outside quite various in its nature, 
blue pyrites of iron predominating. 

Work has been commenced on the Bur- 
roughs mine. Jas. E. Lyon & Co. shipped 
a gold bar yesterday, weighing 183 ozs. 
From 700 lbs. of Adeline ore, and 500 lbs. 
blanket tailings worked at the Holman mill, 
there were 31 pwts. of pure gold per ton, 
valued at $55. 

A new mill has been erected on the Pe- 
wabic lode. 

Georgetown Miner, June 24th: A com- 
pany has been formed in Louisville, Ky. , 
upon property in Iowa Dist., under the 
title of the Crescent Mining Co. Prof. 
Martinue's reduction works are rapidly ap- 
proaching completion. 

The editor saw a piece of bullion weighing 
6% ozs., the product of five lbs. of Nuck- 
oll's ore. 

The total amount of bullion taken out in 
Clear Creek county this week, is $2,564.20. 

Denver News, June 26th : Col. Fry and 
Mr. Cobb in a gulch on James' Creek, are 
are making from 12% to 20 cts. to the pan. 
Col. Fry thinks it will pay one oz. to the 
hand per day. 

IDAHO. 

World, July 10th : A short time ago a 
miner bought a claim on Noble's Gulch at 
a low price, because the owner believed it 
to be nearly worked out. The present 
owner thought differently, and in proof of 
the correctness of his judgment he has 
found the claim to be exceedingly rich and 
has taken out a large aggregate of gold. 
The claim still yields richly, and he believes 
that it will last in the same way for another 
season. 

MONTANA. 

Post, June 29th : Scott's Bar, in Boulder 
Valley, turns out exceedingly favorable. 

The St. Louis and Montana Cos. at Flint 
Creek, have commenced work in good earn- 
est. The ground is cleared for the founda- 
tion of their works. The Camanche shows 
a vein of 20 ft. in width. Near the upper 
part of the vein is a strata one foot in width 
which assays from $200 to $2,000 per ton. 
The Camanche extension which lies north- 
east some 3,000 ft., presents a splendid op- 
portunity for extracting quartz. On the 
Great Republic lode, masses of detached 
quartz, weighing 20 tons, appear on the 
outcrop. The lowest of three assays, from 
pieces chipped at random, returns $15 per 
ton. On the Poor Man's Joy, a perpendic- 
ular opening has been made, and the mate- 
rial above and below a portion of the vein 
has been removed, showing the quartz to be 
four ft. thick, solid as a piece of glass, of a 
beautiful dark color. The ore assays from 
$200 to $1,000 per ton. 

The Champion ledge is six ft. wide, four 
of which yield from $150 to $600 per ton. 
The shaft is 12 ft. deep, and the crevice is 
beautifully defined. Two men in the em- 
ploy of J. W. Whitlatch, a few days ago, 
discovered a rich vein of silver. 



Oscar Totten lately sluiced out $21 in a 
few hours, from dirt drifted out of the flat 
north of Broad street 

In Hereford Gulch quite an excitement 
was started lately, by some parties sinking a 
shaft in the gulch, panning out from 30 to 
50 cts. to the pan. Ten tons of furnace lead 
from the Argenta works has been sold, for 
filling the rollers in the Chilian mill, at 
Summit 

On Mansfield's claim, drifts recently run 
have yielded as high as $8 to the pan, and a 
claim just opened in the main gulch has 
prospected $4 to the pan. 

A new lead has been discovered near the 
head of Dry Gulch. The ledge is seven ft. 
wide. 

Helena Gazette, June 20th : On Tuesday 
last, a gold bar containing over $10,000 was 
run by Bohm & Molitor, for Rhine & Rid- 
lick. The firm of Bohm & Molitor received, 
at their assay office, from the 17th to the 
21st of this month, 4,477 ozs. of gold to be 
run into bars, making in round figures the 
nice little sum of $80,586. 

Messrs. Tutt & Donnell, last week, had a 
bar of gold run at the assay office of Bohm 
& Molitor, from dust taken from Henderson 
Gulch, which is valued at $6, 673. The same 
firm had another bar of $1,600 cast last 
week. 

NEVADA. 
23smeralcta- 

Belmont correspondent of the Bulletin, of 
this city, June 22d: An Eastern company 
are now putting up a 10-stamp mill at Hiko. 
The Crescent Co. are also building a 5-stamp 
mill. Others will be put up during the 
season. 

Humboldt. 

Unionville Register, July 13th : The Roch- 
ester Co. are running a new drift, rather 
than timber the old one. The drift has been 
run 57 ft They are hourly expecting to 
tap the vein. 

The Essex Co. is rushing things generally 
in opening its mine and erecting its mill. 

The De Soto Co. is again at work on its 
mine in Star Dist It is the intention to 
take out the ore in sight, and if it proves as 
good as appearances indicate, the Sheba 
mill will be put in operation on it 

J. Ginoca has purchased and shipped a 
10-stamp mill to be erected near Winne- 
mucca, on the French Ditch. 

Mr. Pease, now in the East, will soon be 
on his way back to Humboldt, with ample 
means for the development and working of 
his mines near Winnemucca. He will erect 
a mill. 

The Mountain King Co. have commenced 
work on their mine in Echo Dist. 
Paliranagat. 

Georgetown Miner, June 27th: Mr. Nic- 
hols of Pahranagat, one of the owners of 
the North American lode, recently laid upon 
our table some specimens from the lode 
named. Two assays made from it recently 
gave returns respectively of $1,600 and 
$2,000 per ton. 
Beeso Blver. 

Reveille, July 8th : The conditional sale 
made some two months ago of some of the 
best locations in Morey Dist, for $24,000, 
to the agent of a St. Louis company, has 
gone by default of the parties not coming to 
time. Several of the ledges have been 
opened to the water line showing a fair 
quantity of milling ore. 

Work is progressing on the Northumber- 
land ledge which is now the most fully de- 
veloped ledge in Northumberland District. 
Some 30 tons of ore have been extracted. 
Two tons of ore of the average product of 
the ledge have been worked at the Parrott 
mill, with satisfactory results. After paying 
the cost of mining $10 per ton ; of transpor- 
tation, $20 per ton ; of milling, $45 per 
ton ; and the loss of 20 per cent, in reduc- 
tion, a balance of $8 per ton was left for the 
owners. 

The mill of the Mount Tenabo Co., in 
Cortez Dist, will be put in motion this 
week, with repaired and improved machin- 
ery and 300 tons of good milling ore on 
hand. The old Wheeler pans have been re- 
placed by the Varney pan or tub, of which 
there are six, and two settlers, and the mill 
has been put in on efficient condition. A 
force of 30 men are employed upon the Cor- 
tez Giant, the principal mine of the com- 
pany, which is so fully opened that there 
will be no difficulty in keeping the mill 
supplied. The district presents a lively 
appearance, which is likely to increase be- 
fore the fall. 

The new and powerful works at the Flor- 
ida niine have been completed, and were fired 
up in the presence of a number of persons 
yesterday. 

July 9th : The new engine at the Florida 
mine is from the foundry of T. & J. Loehe, 
of Oroville, California. It is a remarkably 
simple, horizontal engine of the capacity of 
50-horse power. Taken as a whole, the new 
machinery on the Florida mine is the most 
simple, yet the most complete in the dis- 



&lw ^tilting and £ri*oth% § te$$. 



39 



trict The smaller apparatus, formerly em- 
ployed on the Florida mine, has been trans- 
ferred to the Sherman shaft, until more 
powerful machinery is ready to take its 
place. 

July 11th : The mines in Danville Dist. 
develop fairly as they are opened. The 
Young America ledge, which belongs to a 
St. Louis company, has been cut through 
the overlying limestone and down into the 
granite and porphyry formation, in which 
tin- vein matter a better defined and the ore 
of a richer quality. Work is going ahead 
upon a number of ledges with very fair 
promise of success. At Hot Creek matters 
are brightening np in a decided manner. 
The machinery of the Union mill from Aus- 
tin has arrived at Hot Creek. It is the de- 
sign of the owners to have it running in 'JO 
days. 

July 13th : The ore of the St. Louis mine 
is being hauled to the Kevstone mill for re- 
duction. A contract has been let to respon- 
sible parties for the delivery at the mill of a 
large lot of ore monthly. 

Silver Betid Reporter, July 18th: A splen- 
did 20-stamp mill will soon be erected at 
Hot (reek, by J. Miller, agent of the Bos- 
ton & Beading Co. The greater portion of 
the machinery is now upon the ground. 
Heretofore considerable quantities of ore 
have been hanled through Hot Creek Dist. 
to Austin at great cost — not less than an 
average of S80 per ton — for transportation 
alone. Three splendid mines have already 
been developed in the district and show 
large quantities of ore that good judges es- 
timate will yield from §100 to §150 per ton. 
The predominating ores are kerargyrite, 
stetefeldtite, and black sulphurets of silver. 
There are several other mines that indicate 
great value npon which a vigorous system 
of development is now prosecuted by sub- 
stantial companies. Messrs. Gager & Sel- 
over, of the Providential Co. at Austin, are 
developing the Hot Creek and Gazelle ledges 
with the most flattering prospects. J. C. 
Johnson's Silver Light has been sunk upon 
to the depth of 35 ft , with splendid results. 

Work is being vigorously pushed forward 
on the Transylvania ledge, which was re- 
cently bought by an Eastern company. First 
class reduction works will be immediately 
erected at a site heretofore occupied by Olds 
& Crowell for a sawmill. The engine is of 
60-horse power, with two large boilers, and 
is capable of driving a 20-stamp battery and 
its necessary machinery. Boasters will not 
be built until it is determined that the ore 
cannot be profitably treated by the ordinary 
wet crushing process. 

Work has been suspended at the La Plata 
reduction works in obedience to orders re- 
ceived from the East, the headquarters of 
the company. The mines of the company 
aro the Twin Ophirs and the Fairmount, 
and are unsurpassed by any in Central Ne- 
vada. 

The Belmont correspondent of the Bul- 
letin of this city, under date of June 22d, 
says: The Cortez Co. in Cortez Dist., em- 
ploy about 50 hands. The Cortez ore, so 
far worked, has yielded at the rate of $140 
per ton. The mines will afford large quan- 
tities of 8100 ore. 

The ore now being crushed from the Mur- 
phy mine, in Twin Biver Dist. , yields be- 
tween 890 and 8100 per ton. By careful 
assorting, $300 ore could be obtained from 
the mine. The rock is dry crushed. The 
mill has a capacity of reducing 18 tons per 
day, giving a daily yield of $2,000. The 
ledge has widened from 16 ft. at the surface, 
to a width of 20 ft. in the lowest level. 

A new 40-stamp mill will be erected this 
summer in Silver Peak Dist. The mill will 
be propelled by two 100-horse power en- 
gines. Each engine will have two boilers 
weighing 10,000 lbs. each. 

The Combination Co. have 3,000 tons of 
ore, all of high grade, lying on their dunip. 
Washoe. 

[In the Stock Circular, in another portion 
of this paper, will be found late mining 
news from this district. ] 

Enterprise, July 10th : Dall's mill in 
Washoe Valley, which was lately destroyed 
by fire, is now nearly rebuilt, occupying 
the same site, as formerly. The southern 
portion, intended for wet crushing, is fur- 
nished with a battery of 35 stamps, 12 
Wheeler and 10 Yarney pans, together with 
all other appliances usually found in a first 
class mill. The northern portion will be 
devoted to dry crushing and the Freiberg 
process, and will contain 25 stamps and 15 
Freiberg barrels. The motive power will 
be water, in its season. A mountain stream 
furnishing a sufficient power for a portion 
of the season. During the remaining por- 
tion, steam will be used. 

The Galena Smelting Works, who have 
had great difficulty in obtaining fire brick 
for their furnaces to stand the intense heat, 
think that they have discovered the grand 
desideratum, and are making brick from the 



white, limey looking deposit brought up 
from the bowels of the earth by the boiling 
waters of Steamboat Springs, which they mix 
with equal quantities of a peculiar species 
uf liio-proof clay, discovered near Washoe 
Lake. They expect these bricks will stand 
anything in the shape of heat, short of that 
of the infernal regions. They have already 
Miielteil tmt considerable quantities of pure 
metal, which contains £250 pel ton, silver. 

Within the limits of the city, below the 
Central mills, nearly 3.000 ft. of sluices have 
been put up during the past month. 

July 11th : The-mill of the New York Co. 
has just cleaned up a run on YerriJVidi ore 
that yielded 880 per ton. 

July loth: Wells, Fargo & Co. have 
shipped from their office during the last 
«.,!;. 7,068 lbs. of bullion, valued at $220,- 
'J76.J.4. 

July 16th: The Gould & Curry mill is at 
present undergoing a thorough overhauling. 
By the changes about to be made a saving 
of 10 cords of wood per day will be made. 
OREGON. 

Dalles Mountaineer, June 29th : The new 
mill ordered at the Oregon Foundry, by 
Mr. Porter for Canyon City, will be of eight 
stamps, and capable of crushing eight tons 
of rock per day. The I. X L. lead at Prai- 
rie Diggings, is attracting much attention. 

The lawsuit between the surface or placer 
miners, and the quartz locators has been 
amicably settled, the quartz company buy- 
ing out all interest of the placer mines for 
83,300. A prospecting party is talked of, 
to visit the Crooked Biver country, so that 
before fall we may expect to hear of the 
place being found, where the emigrants of 
'45 hammered out the gold on their wagon 
tires. 

The hydraulic diggings discovered last 
fall, near Otter Bar, are reported to be pay 
ing well and are quite extensive. 

Sentinel, June 15th : Crandall, Childsand 
Crane, of Josephine Co. , expected to make 
their first run on Monday last. The ore 
will be reduced to "regulus," and trans- 
ported to Crescent City for shipment to the 
East. Some of the ore is said to assay $18 
gold per ton. 

The Wickenbnrg correspondent of the 
San Bernardino G-uardian, writing June 20th 
says : The Vulture 20-stamp mill continues 
to run with the greatest success, crushing 
36 tons of quartz daily, the rock yielding 
$70 per ton. Hitherto the most simple ap- 
paratus has been used, but concentrators 
and a desulphurizing furnace are in course 
of erection, which will make the yield con- 
siderably more. The quartz is hauled 15 
miles, to the mill on the Hassayampa, for 
$10 a ton, and fuel is furnished at $8 per 
cord. Their ledge is 15 ft. in width at the 
depth of 150 ft., and equally as rich as that 
taken from the surface. On the surface it 
is opened up to Smith's, the adjoining west 
claim, and found, if anything, improving 
on his line. Some 60 men, Americans and 
Mexicans, are employed on it. 
UTAH. 

Salt Lake Vedette, July 6th : A party 
started on the 3d, in the wake of Lewis Bob- 
inson and company, to the Green Biver 
country, to find out all they can about the 
gold prospects of that country. 

The editor has been presented by A. A. 
Hurst with a chunk of argentiferous galena, 
weighing 100 lbs. It is from the North 
Star lode, and contains $34,57 silver. |We 
hope the attack is not chronic. — Ed.] 

WASHINGTON. 

Dalles Mountaineer, June 29th : Last 
Thursday a party of five Frenchmen left our 
city for the Wenatche mines over in Wash- 
ington Territory. They went well prepared 
with all the necessary implements for go- 
ing to work, and provisions to last several 
months. 



[Written for ihc Mining aud Scientific Press.] 

From Sierra and Nevada Counties. 

BY A TRAVELER. 

Editors Press : — I am traveling too rap- 
idly to be of much service as a correspond- 
ent However, the following items may be 
of some service. 

Throughout the mines of Sierra and Ne- 
vada counties there is a general complaint 
of dull times. In order to account for 
this, it is not necessary to suppose that tho 
mines are failures, but that business is 
ussuming a legitimate basis. 

The gravel mines at Howland Flat are 
being very extensively worked. The Union 
mine, owned by Stroh <fc Moyle, employs 
about seventy-fi%'e men. In this mine, from 
the foot of an incline 360 feet in length, a 
main tunnel, provided with a double track, 
is run directly into the Table Bock hill 
3, 000 feet. The pay dirt lies upon the bed j 
rock, and varies from about two and one- 
half feet to seven or eight feet in depth, i 
Work has only been done on the lower side j 
of the main tunnel ; but there the pay dirt 
is still being extensively breasted out. About 
400 car loads of dirt are taken out each day, 
which pay, on an average, a dollar a load. 
The cost of removing and washing is esti- 
mated at sixty cents per load. Water power 
(Fredenburr's hydraulic wheel) is used to 
raise the cars up the incline. Ventilation 
is provided for by means of an air shaft and 
gallery. At first, a fire was built at the 
bottom of the shaft, in order to create a 
current' of air ; but this being ineffectual on 
certain occasions, other experiments were 
tried. An inch of water falling down the 
shaft has at last obviated all difficulties. 
This is an old mine, and will pay well for 
years to come. Other claims are being ex- 
tensively worked, and a new tunnel is being 
made in the Hawkeye. 

On the Sierra Buttes, a new quartz ledge 
has been discovered, and is claimed by 
Beard & Martinez. Specimens taken from 
the surface are remarkably rich. 

In Sierra Valley, notwithstanding the at- 
tacks of a great swarm of crickets, the hay 
and grain crops look finely. Last year 
about 30,000 bushels of grain were raised. 
This amount will probably be reached this 
year. The crickets are leaving the valley 
towards the southwest. 

The winter at Meadow Lake has been so 
severe that work in the mines and mills has 
been much delayed. Experiments are being 
made in the endeavor to find a practical 
method of extracting the gold from the sul- 
phurets, in which the ledges here are very 
rich ; but as yet no means have been dis- 
covered. There is yet some snow on the 
trails leading from the place, but none in 
the streets. The ice on the lake has broken 
up, and is fast disappearing. 

The travel between Nevada and the min- 
ing camps east of that place is very large, 
and the just inference is that prosperity 
reigns in that direction. Yours, 

C. A. W. 



ESTABLISHED) [M»T. 16tJ0. 

VOLUME FIFTEEN 

— or THE — 

Mining and Scientific Press, 

COMMENCIN& JULY, 1867. 
r>EWEY «fc CO., Publishers. 

I"sue<l cverv Sati'Rdat, nt our Book and Job Printing" 
otltce, ..o.l clay street, corner of Sausoine, San Fran ciscu. 

Term* In Atlvtince t— One vear. $5; Six months, S3; 
siuitlc copies, 15 c-ii!,; Mimililv Series, *550 pur vear, or 
BS certta per number. llit<-k Volumes I'rom .lanuarv. 1861. $3 
per volume; bound. $5 per volume. 

The Mining ano Scisminc Press is now thorotiehlv rs 
tar.llstKtl.iun1 etijnvsuneof ihelargeat iiiiil most permanent 
subscription lists ot triy vccklv kmrnttl on tills ceust. The 
individual character and reputation ol Its constant patrons 
UiroLtgUom the enilrc coast Is one oi the best recommenda- 
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Small Pox — Is it a Fact. — It was stated 
during the prevalence of the small-pox in 
St. John, New Brunswick, two or three years 
ago, that not a single case of that loathsome 
disease occurred in any house in that city 
that made use of gas for illuminating pur- 
poses. It is well known that gas is a pow- 
erful disinfectant, and hence it is but rea- 
sonable that it might exert an important 
influence in warding off infectious disease. 
It was stated, on the authority of a distin- 
guished physician in that city, at the time 
alluded to, that a person might contract the 
disease abroad, and take it to his home where 
gas was freely used, without danger of com- 
municating it to any member of his family. 
May not this statement be worth inquiring 
into at a time when this disease is so liable 
to be inflicted upon the inhabitants of this 
city, from the presence and constant arrivals 
of persons of filthy and loathsome habits. 



Helping one Another — An Incident for 
the Times. — Chickering & Sons, pianoforte 
makers, employ some 300 mechanics, and 
many laborers, and, as a matter of course, 
their weekly disbursements are large. On 
a certain pay day, some two or three years 
ago, in consequence of the non-arrival of 
funds due at a distance, they were obliged 
to expend the funds in hand in the redemp- 
tion of matured paper, and consequently 
had to forego the pleasure of paying their 
hands their accustomed weekly allowance. 
What did the men do then? Did they 
strike ? No ! but like rational mechanics, 
they met, consulted together, passed resolu- 
tions expressing sympathy with and confi- 
dence in their employers, and tendering 
them a loan of $6,000 or .$8,000, the pro- 
ceeds of their own savings. 



Mississippi in the War. — It is said that 
Mississipsi sent 75,000 men into the Bebel 
army during the war; 5,000 more than her 
entire vote. She lost of these 27,500. The 
black population is now 50,000 larger than 
the white. In some of the counties, the 
negroes are two to one, in some three, and 
in others four, five, eight, nine and ten to 
ono. 



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San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 20. 1867. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

An Anatomist. — A Remarkable Prophecy 
Fulfilled. — Our correspondent thinks a 
brief notice of some circumstances con- 
nected with the life of Professor Law- 
rence, who, by late advices by the cable, 
was struck by paralysis at the College of 
Surgeons, London, on taking his seat, 
and immediately preceding the examina- 
tion of candidates, for diplomas, in the 
eighty-fourth year of his age. Precisely 
half a century previous, in 1817, in the 
same hall, in his inaugural address, he 
concluded with the following remarks, 
which we quote, word for word. They 
occur in making brief mention of the 
modern history of comparative anatomy. 
Hitherto, however, science has not par- 
taken of the triumph of legitimacy.* 
"LeSeuer has gone, with many others, 
to the New Worli If we cannot repress 
a sigh when we see men of peaceful pur- 
suits thus torn from their native soil and 
driven into foreign climes, let us rejoice, 
not only for them, but for all mankind, 
that such an asylum for the victims of 
power and oppression exists ; that there 
is not a spot, but a vast region of the 
earth, lavishly endowed with nature's 
fairest gifts, and exhibiting, at the same 
time, the grand and animating spectacle 
of a country sacred to civil liberty, where 
man may walk erect in the conscious dig- 
nity of independence, that 

' That lord of the lion's heart and eagle ej'C,' 

And enjoy full freedom of word and ac- 
tion, without the permission of those 
combinations or conspiracies of the 
mighty, which threaten to convert Eu- 
rope into one great state prison. The 
numerous people whose happiness and 
tranquility are so effectually secured by 
the simple forms of a free government, 
are the growth of yesterday. At the same 
rate of progress, they may reach, in our 
lives, as gigantic a superiority over the worn- 
out despotisms of the Old World as the 
physical features of America — her colossal 
mountains, her mighty rivers, her forests 
and her lakes, exhibit in comparison with 
those of Europe. " The prediction marked 
in italics the orator and scientist has lived 
to see fulfilled. Of how few prophets 
can the same be said ? 

•Alluding to the expulsion of Napoleon and the return 
of the Bourbons to the throne of France, in consequence 
of which Le Seller was expatriated and came In reside 
in the United States. This episode gave rise lollic mag- 
nificent peroration inserted above. 

Caxton wishes to know if any printing es- 
tablishment solely conducted by females 
ever existed previous to the formation of 
The Victoria Press (London) Society, 
which was formed at the suggestion and 
mainly by the efforts of Miss Farnworth — 
jiatronized, however, by Queen Victoria. 
Perhaps it will surprise our correspond- 
ent to be informed that not only amongst 
the earliest patrons of printing were fe- 
males, especially those connected with 
the Dominican Sisters, founded A. D. 1292, 
at Florence, but further, that in 1470 un- 
der the spiritual directors of the convent, 
they established a printing press within 
its walls, the nuns acting the part of com- 
positors. Many works of considerable 
value issued from this press between 1476 
and 14S4, some of which are highly jirized 
by bibliopoles. 



Triumphs of American Genius. 

American locomotives, since the late 
award at Paris, can take their place with 
American reapers, American water craft, 
American firearms (large and small), Amer- 
ican fire engines, American pianos, etc., 
against all the world. The late triumph at 
Paris is not the first time that the American 
"iron horse" has distanced the track against 
all competitors ; as the Russians have al- 
ways given our locomotives the preference, 
while on the Great Western Grand Trunk 
and other railways in Canada, if we are not 
misinformed, the Yankee locomotives have 
invariably been found superior, for their 
particular work, to those of English manu- 
facture — the locomotives of both countries 
being employed on those roads. 

Again, some six or eight years ago, when 
the Great Southern Railway in Chili was 
about to go into operation, the directors de- 
termined to give the locomotive builders of 
the United States and Great Britain a chance 
to enter into competition for the equip- 
ment of that road. Four locomotives were 
ordered — two from this country and two 
from Great Britain. Previous to their ar- 
rival, quite an excitement was gotten up 
with regard to the probable merits of the 
rival machines. In due time all four of 
them arrived, were put up and got ready 
for work. Of course the interest in the re- 
sult increased with the near approach of the 
trial. The English operatives indulged in 
deprecatory remarks with regard to the 
bright and elegant appearance of the Yan- 
kee machines ; and our people were no 
doubt equally ready in poking fun at the 
ponderous, Titanic looking engines of 
Johnny Bull. The trial at length came off, 
and to the decided advantage of the Ameri- 
can machines. 

It was found that the English locomotives 
were not equal to their promise. The prob- 
lem submitted was to furnish a locomotive 
that could do a certain kind of work — it was 
heavy work, up steep grades with sharp 
curves, such as are usually encountered in 
a mountainous country. The English 
freight machine was completely exhausted 
by a load which the American machine car- 
ried with ease. After several trials, the for- 
mer performed in eighty-eight minutes the 
work which the latter accomplished in less 
than half that time. 

The defeat of the English passenger en- 
gine was even more signal. The American 
locomotive made sixty miles an hour, with 
a 200-ton train, over gradients of fifty-six 
feet to the mile. The English locomotive 
averaged but thirty miles with the same 
train over the same track. 

The trials were made under the direction 
of the superintendent of the road, who was 
himself an Englishman, but who yet cheer- 
fully awarded the superiority to the Ameri- 
can machines. It will be recollected that it 
was mainly due to the firmness and thor- 
ough engineering knowledge of an English- 
man, that the late award at Palis was made 
to an American locomotive. The English 
mechanic seems to fail in his lack of adap- 
tability. He works by rule, and that rule 
is established by his immediate surround- 
ings. The English locomotive, for an Eng- 
lish road, can hardly be improved ; but it 
will not answer for any other locality. 

The locomotive is an English invention, 
but on its introduction into this country it 
was completely re-cast and immensely im- 
proved. The perfected "iron horse" is 
essentially American, and especially indig- 
enous is that noisy embodiment of demo- 
cratic huzzas — the "steam whistle." When 
the locomotive was fairly perfected "Young 
America" was just beginning to go .ahead. 
Since that time his strides in practical in- 
ventions and discoveries have been enor- 
mous. What he has accomplished, for war 
and for peace, is known to all the world. 
No other country can show such a chronicle 
of the triumph of invention and industry. 
The records of the Patent Office at Wash- 



ington are a perfect maze of wonderment in 
their exhibition of mechanical progress and 
ingenuity. The sewing machine is of itself 
a monument for all coming time for our in- 
ventors. Agriculture has been completely 
revolutionized by our thrashing machines j 
our reapers, our cultivators, etc. , etc. Our 
machine shops are filled with unnumbered 
devices for decreasing manual labor, and 
for perfecting the accomplishment of work. 
The "sun picture" was invented in New 
York simultaneously with the discovery of 
Daguerre. It was in America where the in- 
vention was really first made of practical 
utility. So of the telegraxm. While the 
European savans had been for years telling 
the world that the electric spark would one 
day become the vehicle for the transmission 
of thought from one part of the continent 
to another, it took an American to accom- 
plish the feat, and actually put their ideas 
into practice ; and when the first transmis- 
sion of thought was made through the tele- 
graphic wires embodied in the expressive 
message, "What hath God wrought?" 
Young America stood forth before the world, 
high upon the summit of six thousand years, 
and for the first time began to talk in a lan- 
guage and with a tongue which betokened 
that his was a people destined to renovate 
the race, and make an impress on the world 
of matter and mind which shall be as inef- 
faceable as time itself ! 



The Fog Trumpet. — Some interesting 
experiments will be made with the fog 
trumpet at Fort Point on the occasion of 
the departure of the scientific expedition, 
which leaves this city to-day, to take pos- 
session of the "Russian Possessions." As 
the cutter proceeds to sea, the trumpet will 
be sounded, in accordance with preconcerted 
arrangements, while observations upon the 
sound, its variations, the distance at which 
it can be heard, greater or less, its distinct- 
ness with the use of different reeds, etc. , 
will be carefully noted, worked up, and sent 
back from Victoria upon the arrival of the 
expedition at that point. 

This trumpet was for a long time looked 
upon as a failure, and so considered in 
England until the inventor hit upon the 
happy device of adding machinery to it, 
by which it was made to revolve. Before 
this improvement was added, a vessel has 
been known to approach the trumpet from 
a direction opposite to that in which its 
mouth is directed to within a mile without 
hearing its sound ; while approaching from 
the other direction, it might be heard from 
eight to ten miles. The trumpet, as it is 
now made and operated, is considered the 
best fog signal ever devised. 



The Willcox & Gibbs Sewing Machine. 
It is a well known fact that many things 
which appear plausible in theory are not 
available in practice. From the fact that 
the seam of the Willcox & Gibbs sewing 
machine can be ripped by a certain process, 
when occasion requires, many may have 
come to the conclusion that on this account 
it was not only unavailable, but good for 
nothing. But the favor with which this 
machine has met during the past seven 
years has shown that the failure is in the 
theory, and not in the work. We are in- 
formed by the agent, Mi - . Samuel Swift, at 
203 Kearny street, that over 60,000 machines 
have been sold during this time, being the 
fourth machine in the market in point of 
numbers sold. 



The Ieon Work of the New Exchange. 
The neat iron railings for the court and 
rear, and the railings and candelabras for 
the front steps, were furnished by John R. 
Sims. The heavy iron work of the build- 
ing was done by Hinckley & Co., of the 
Fulton Foundry. 

Paper Bags. — A single factory in Tren- 
ton made one hundred and twelve millions 
three hundred and twenty thousand paper 
bags last year. 



An Important Expedition. 

The Revenue Cutter Lincoln, now in this 
harbor, will probably sail to-day for the 
newly-purchased American territory, which 
will doubtless be hereafter known as 
Alaska. This vessel, as has already been 
announced, goes up to take formal posses- 
sion of the purchase in the name of the 
United States Government, and to establish 
postal and revenue regulations, etc. The 
Lincoln has been especially fitted up for 
this trip, and sails under command of Capt. 
Wm. A. Howard, one of the veterans of the 
Revenue service, and a gentleman well and 
favorably known to most of our old citi- 
zens. A scientific party accompanies the 
expedition for the initiation of a geographi- 
cal and geological reconnoisance. This 
party has been organised under the direc- 
tion of Prof. Pierce, Superintendent of the 
U. S. Coast Survey, and is conducted by 
Mr. Geo. Davidson, Assistant, U. S. Coast 
Survey, as Chief. With him are associated 
A. T. Mosman, as Astronomer; Georgo 
Farquhar, as Hydrographer, with whom is 
associated I. Forney as aid ; — Hamel, En- 
gineer ; Dr. Albert Kellogg, Botanist ; W. 
G. W. Harford, Conchologist ; T. A. Blake, 
Geologist, and John Leeds, Tidal Observer. 
All but the four last named are connected 
with the U. S. Coast Survey. 

This expedition is one of no ordinary im- 
portance, and its results will be looked for- 
ward to with much interest, in both a 
scientific and commercial point of view. 
It is the first regularly organized scientific 
expedition which has ever been sent in that 
direction ; but the season is so far advanced 
that but little time will be allowed for re- 
connoisance. It will, no doubt, be followed 
by a fuller and more complete expedition 
another year. The fitting out of such a 
party so soon after the completion of the 
negotiations by which that territory becomes 
a part of the United States, is characteristic 
of the energy of the American people, and 
is but an earnest of the enterprise which 
will speedily develop and build up a com- 
merce and trade with that distant region, 
which, by its contrast with that of British 
Columbia, will add still more to the already 
growing desire on the part of the inhab- 
itants of that Province to link their fortunes 
with those of the United States, and thus 
carry the stars and stripes, without a break 
or interval, from the Colorado to the North 
Pole. 

Petroleum Fuel. — The results of the 
experiments at the East to test the value of 
petroleum for steam fuel, reach us very 
slowly, and in a form which renders them 
of very little account as data upon which to 
found any definite opinion as to the real 
merits of the new fuel. The opinions ex- 
pressed by engineers and others who, from 
their presence at such trials, ought to be 
able to form a very correct judgment, are 
very enthusiastic in favor of petroleum, 
but their figures are stated in a very indefi- 
ite manner. The impression is given out 
that any specified amount expended in petro- 
leum will do fully as much or more work 
than the same amount expended in coals, 
giving, as the advantage of petroleum, all 
the gain derivable for the saving of freight 
room, cost of handling, etc. As soon as we 
can lay our hands upon anything definite in 
the way of figures, we shall place all the 
facts before our readers. In the meantime 
it may be proper that we should remark 
that there is a greater difference between 
the relative values of coal and petroleum in 
California than in the Atlantic States. 
While petroleum can be delivered in San 
Francisco quite as cheap as it can be laid 
down in New York, the price of coal here 
is nearly double the price of the same arti- 
in New York. Hence California will be 
immensely more benefited by the anticipated 
change of fuel than the Eastern States. 

The Mines of Chili. — There are now in 
operation in Chili ten gold, twelve silver, 
and about one hundred copper mines. 



Mt pining and gcimtiik §xm. 



41 



The San-dwich Islands. — The telegraph Brandy fkom Coal. — We alluded, a week 
informs us that a treaty of reciprocity is in or two since, to the fact thatBerthelot, some 



progress of negotiation, by which the pro- 
ductions of the Sandwich Islands will be 
admitted into this country, duty free, and 
vice versa ; and the opinion is expressed that 
this is merely a preliminary step to an ac- 
tual cession of the islands to the United 
States. The former is an undoubted fact — 
the latter may be true or it may be false. 
If not true, it ought to be. These islands 
are the half-way house between this port 
and China and Japan, with which countries 
we shall soon have established a most lu- 
crative and extensive commerce. They are 
of no use to the natives, and of but little use 
to any other country than this. At the 
present rate of decrease of the native popu- 
lation, the time will come within the life of 
the present generation", when there will be 
scarcely a sufficient number of natives to 
hold the government offices there. The 
annual decrease of native population in 
these islands is most astonishing, and there 
appears to be no help for it. Within fifteen 
years at farthest, they must, from sheer 
necessity, pass into the hands of foreign 
residents, who will naturally seek the assist- 
ance and protection of some of the great 
powers of the earth. Which will it be? 
Surely this government will not be so neg- 
ligent of its own welfare as to allow any of 
the nationalties of tho old world to get a 
fast hold there. It would be suicidal to do 
so. It would only snfferja wrong, which, 
sooner or later, would have to be righted at 
the cost of much treasure and blood. The 
fate of Maximilian has probably taught Eu- 
rope a lesson which both that continent and 
our own government may profit from in the 
future. Let this government extend the 
Monroe Doctrine to these islands — let it be 
done definitely and authoritatively, as in 
the case of Mexico, and the fruit, when fully 
ripe, will naturally fall into our own hands, 
without injustice or harm to any human 
being. 



American Steel. — It has long been 
thought by mechanics generally, that Amer- 
icans could not produce a first-class steel, 
especially such as is required for cutlery or 
for turning tools for iron. Most of our 
tool manufacturers employ, for such pur- 
poses, English steel made from the best 
Swedish iron. By a perusal of the article 
on another page, giving some notice of the 
products of the Philadelphia Steel Works, 
it will be seen that we now have manufac- 
turers in our own country who aro able to 
compete successfully with the best English 
manufacture. This company manufacture 
a class of steel which they call the "Non- 
pareil," a small sample of which was re- 
cently brought to this city by Mr. William 
H. Baffin, and sold at the rate of fifty cents 
per pound, although the best English steel 
in the market can readily be bought for 
seventeen cents. The fact that our mechan- 
ics are willing to pay nearly three times the 
price of English steel is pretty good evi- 
dence of its superiority. This high-priced 
steel is intended only for the purposes men- 
tioned, and is manufactured with the great- 
est care, and by processes, a portion of 
which are a secret with the house which 
originated the brand. We understand that 
the sample lot, wherever sold in this city, 
has given the most unqualified satisfaction. 
Another lot will soon be received, and a 
supply kept constantly on hand sufficient to 
meet the wants of our machinists and man- 
ufacturers. 



ten or twelve years ago, obtained brandy 
from coal. It may interest some of our 
readers to know the process by which the 
thing was accomplished. It is given in an 
English paper as follows : " Coal gas is first 
distilled in the ordinary way and conducted 
into a receiver. It then contains about 
eight per cent, of hydrogenous bi-carbon, 
in a gaseous state, which is now separated 
therefrom by a complicated process (not de- 
scribed), and introdticed into a close vessel 
containing sulphuric acid. This vessel is 
then agitated until the acid absorbs all the 
gas. Water is then mixed with it, and the 
whole distilled for alcohol, which now comes 
over, the same as when obtained from the 
fluid extracts of potatoes and other vegeta- 
ble sources." Our coal mines, transformed 
into brandy-producingdistriets, rivaling the 
best tin cognac of our grape-growing re- 
gions, may yet become one of the wonders 
of the nineteenth century. How will it 
sound, a few years hence, to hear the disci- 
ples of Bacchus calling for the best "Mount 
Diablo," or a glass of pure "Nanaimo," 
etc.? There is no impossibility, or even 
any very great improbability, that, a hun- 
dred years hence, our temperance friends 
may be denouncing the "villainous black 
mineral" with even more vehemence than 
they now do the proposed extension of 
grape culture, because of the consequent 
increased production of intoxicating bev- 
erages which must accompany that branch 
of industry. 



Personal. — We had the pleasure of a 
call, the past week, from Father Cichi, late 
Professor of Chemistry and Natural Philos- 
ophy at the Santa Clara College. The Pro- 
fessor went East on the steamer of yesterday, 
to take a similar professorship in the Col- 
lege at Georgetown, District of Columbia. 



Continental Life Insurance Company 
302 Montgomery street, corner of Pine. 



The New Merchants' Exchange, on 
California street, was formally opened, on 
Monday evening last, with interesting and 
appropriate ceremonies. Thomas H. Selby, 
President of the Board of Trustees, pre- 
sented a brief statement of the progress of 
the enterprise from its inception to the 
present time. Addresses were mode by E. 
G. Sneath, President of the Chamber of 
Commerce, Mr. Swain, Mr. J. W. Stow, 
and others. A poem was also read on the 
occasion by the author, W. H. Rhodes. 
The building is a credit to the taste and 
energy of its founders and an ornament to 
the city. One of the novel and important 
features connected with the management of 
the new Exchange is the New York plan of 
writing out upon blackboards the tele- 
graphic news from all quarters of the world, 
so that the observer finds the news of to-day 
from London, New York, Oregon, Nevada, 
etc., as well as from every part of Califor- 
nia, spread out before him as soon as it 
arrives. 



Contributed for Our Cabinet. 

Under this hcndlrit; we shnll continue to mention and de- 
scribe, acoonllng to merit, sucli .-peclim-us oi ores, rain- 
■ ■i.iK Ni.mK uurlositlcs, etc.. as mav bo presented, or 
forwarded to us by mull or express, prepaid. Each article 
will be nmuliered and placed to ourcabinct.and recorded 
with Hie name of the donor, and the claim or location 
from whence It oami . 

175. — Mi - . Geo. Deitz sends us a very fine 
specimen of silver ore from the Cherry 
Creek silver mine (elsewhere noticed), in 
the Shuswap District, British Columbia. 
The specimen is a black sulphuret, very 
rich, and almost identical with the richer 
sulphurets from the Ophir mine of Nevada. 

176. — Is another silver specimen, sent by 
the same party, and taken from Kamloop 
Lake, Kamloop District, British Columbia. 
About fifty per cent, of the bulk of this 
specimen consists of silica. The silver is 
contained in a light, arsenical sulphuret, 
containing both antimony and lead. 



Delicate Machinery.— The freinds and 
patrons of Mr. Theodore Kallenberg, ma- 
chinist and model maker, will find, by ref- 
erence to his card, that he has removed from 
his old stand on Market street, to No. 10 
Stevenson street, near First, where he has 
fitted up anew with increased facilities for 
urnishing everything in his line. 



The Largest Water-wheel, — We believe 
the largest diameter of water-wheel ever 
constructed is now running in Green Val- 
ley, Solano county, in this State. It was 
built by Mr. George Dingley, and is sixty- 
five feet in diameter. If anybody knows of 
a larger one, we should be pleased to hear 
of it. 



Assayer and Chemist. — A gentleman 
who has had considerable experience as an 
assayer and chemist, in this city and else- 
where, desires employment, here or at the 
mines. Good references given. See ad- 
vertisement. 



About Guns. — One of the Fort Pitt Foun- 
dry big guns was shipped from New York, 
on the 6th of June, for this port . . . Sweden 
has adopted an American breech-loader for 
the use of her armies. Austria, France, 
and other great powers, have rejected the 
American patterns on account of their cost 
and the length of time required to adapt 
machinery for their construction, although 
their general superiority is freely acknowl- 
edged ... It is said that the Chassepot rifle, 
after filing ten rounds quickly, becomes too 
hot to hold ; but the Sneider arm, it is 
claimed, has over and over again been fired 
so rapidly and continuously that water 
thrown upon the barrel passes off in steam, 
and that the stock has been actually charred, 
without any inconvenience to the firer, and 
without interfering in any way with the effi- 
ciency of the arm or ammunition. 



1TOBTH AMEEIOA 

Life Insurance Company. 

Usual Eeatriotions on Occupation and Travel 
-Ajjomsiijed s 



Policies of this Company are guaranteed by the State of 

New York, which is true of no other Company 

on this Coast. 

The mast Responsible and Liberal Company n the World! 
J. A. EATON & CO., 

Milliliter* Faclflc Brunch, 303 Montgomery at. 
20vUnr9p SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ballders' Insurance Company— 

OFFICE IS THE BUILDING OF THE> 
CALIFORNIA SAVINGS BANK, California 
street, one door from Sansome street 
BS-FIRE AND MAKINE INSURANCE. lOvHOpqr 



iA 



Save Tour Teeth.— Do not have them extracted 
without first consulting a good Dentist. The loss Is irrepar- 
able, and, in many instances, unnecessary. DR. BEERS 
corner of Pine and Kearny streets, makes a specialty of 
filling the fangs of dead Teeth, and building up broken 
crowns with fork gold— thus restoring them to their origi- 
nal usefulness and beauty. 

*5- Call and examine the work- Finest quality of arti- 
ficial work also manufactured. I6vlt-tf 

Brown'- FUtcrinir Heater.— For preventing In- 
crustation in Steam Boilers, purines water from lime or 
any other impurity, saves tuel, saves the boiler, prevents 
explosions, and protects lire and property. The cost of the 
Fitter Is soon saved in fuel and boiler-repairs alone. 

One Is In operation at the San Francisco Foundry, Fre- 
mont street, where Rights can be procured, or all needed 
information, on application, In person or bv letter to 

Bv **-lV AUSTIN A. WELLS,' Agent 



Assayer and Chemist. 

A GENTLEMAN WELL VERSED IN ASSAYING AND 
Analytical Chemistry, is desirous of securing a position 
in some assaying establishment, or would take char-re of 
the assaying and amalgamating department of either a 
gold or silver mine. Stoudy employment, rather than hich 
wanes. Is desirable. The advertiser would take bis own 
laboratory to the mine if desired. Proper refercncesglven. 
Inquire at this office. *vl5t. 



THE0D0EE KALLENBEEG, 

Mi* ciijni:*.. Maker of Models for Inventors, 

Scales, Weights, Dies, Stamps, Drawing and Philosophical 

Instruments, etc. 

No. lO Stevenson street, near First, Son Francisco. 

«3-Repalrlng promptly attended to. 3vl6tf 



LINSEED OIL. 

The Pacific Linseed Oil Ik Lead Works 

Are now prepared to furnish dealers and consumers 
Pure XiinseecL Oil, 

Raw or Boiled, at the Lowest Market Rates. Wc call es- 
pecial attention to the quality of our Oil, believing it to be 
superior to any Imported Oil oflered In this market. 
Orders from the country will have prompt attention. 
Address, 
Pacific X,ln«eed OH and Lead Works, 
Care of L. B. BENCHLEY A CO., 
19v!4-3m9p san Francisco. 



Maukkt Strkkt Homkstrad Association.— J. S. Lutt, Sec- 
retary. Office, 305 Montgomery street, corner of Pine, San 
Francisco. 2vlo 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill and Forge Co., 

SAN FKANCISCO, CAL. 

Established for the Manufacture of 
RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 

— AND — 

Every T"ariety- or Shafting' 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 
Steamboat Shades, Crank-, Piston and Con- 
necting Sods, Car and Locomotive Axles 
and Frames. 

— ALSO — 

HAMMERED ITtOlV 

Of every description and size. 

B®- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL and 
FOKG-E CO., Post Office, San Francisco, Cal , will receive 
prompt attention. 

fl©- The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. 9vU3m9p 



Heal Estate Sale 



The attempted assassination of the Em- 
peror of Russia at Paris, it appears, was a 
very serious affair. The bail struck the 
head of a horse upon which an attendant 
was riding, passed into the carriage, and 
between the Emperor of Eussia and the 
Emperor Napoleon, wounding a lady oppo- 
site. The blood from the wounded horse 
spirted into the carriage and upon the uni- 
forms of the Imperial party. 



Olnky Sl Co., Auctioneers and Real Estate Agents, attend 
promptly to all business entrusted to their care in San 
Francisco and Oakland. Mining and other corpora ions 
w ill find Col. OIney well posted and thorough In transacting 
ales of delinquent stock. Oflice, on Broadway, Oakland, 
and No. 318 Montgomery street. San Francisco. nolo 



Jacob Shew, Pioneer Photographer, 612 Clay street, north 
side, four doors above Montgomery, (late 315 Montgomery 
street,) takes all kinds of Photographs in the best style of 
the Art. He would Invite especial attention to the new 
" Cabinet Photographs," which he Is taking to perfection. 
10vl4tf 



Persons desirous of obtaining the finest Wood Engrav- 
ings, can procure them only by having the picture photo- 
graphed on the block, by 

D. H. WOODS, 

MvHtfnr No. 28 Third street. 



Gold Bars, of whatever size, if well cast, assayed 
for two dollars, at A. P. MOLITOR'S Assay Office, 
611 Commercial street, opposite United States Branch 
Mint. 15vU-3m 



Perry Davis' Vegetable Pain Killer. 

The universal remedy for Internal and external com- 
plaints. At this period there are but few unacquainted with 
the merits of the Pain Killer; but while some extol It as a 
liniment, they know but little of its power in easing pain 
whentaken internally, while others use it Internally with 
great success, but are equally ignorant of its healing virtues 
when applied cxterna'ly. We therefore wish to say to all 
that It is equally successful, whether used internally or ex- 
ternally, and Its sale is universal and immense. The de- 
mand from India and other foreign countries Is equal to 
the demand at home, and it has become known In those 
far-off places by its merits— the proprietors have never 
advertised It or been to any expense in its introduction into 
foreign lands. 

&2"SuId by all Medicine Dealers everywhere. _2vl5-lm 



E S X A. T E 



JACOB C. BEIDEMAN, deceased. 



JOHN W. lUtUMA G1A1, Administrator, 

With the Will annexed, will commence, on 

Wednesday, the 24th day of July, 

At la o'clock M., 

And continue from day to day, until tho wholo Is sold, 
at the auction room of 

MAURICE IDORIE «fc CO., 

327 Montgomery Street. 



TERMS, IN UNITED STATES GOLD COIN. 

1-4 Cash ; 

1-4 in One Tear, 

1-4 in Two Years, 

1-4 in Three Yeais. 
Deferred payments to bear interest at 
eight per cent, per annum, payable quar- 
terly, and secured by mortgage on the 
property. 

93P - Catalogues of the property can be obtained of II. F. 
WILLIAMS »fe CO., Clay street, or at the office of MAURICE 
DORE & CO., 3S7 Montgomery street. Ivl5-3w 



Suikscribkrs who do not receive the Mining and Scientific 
Fras in duo time, are requested to inform the publishers. 



42 



®lw plittiwg mx& Mmtiik §xm. 




■^rzMNlfprcK&K&tH^trt?*y>: r -^ 



EstalblisHecl in 1849-Corner First and Mission streets, San Francisco. 



HAVING INCREASED OUR FACILITIES IN EVERT DEPARTMENT, WE ARE NOW 
prepared at the shortest notice and at the moat reasonable rates, to furnish all 
kinds and description of Machinery, including Steam Engines, Quartz Mills, Mining Pumps 
of all kinds. Hoisting Oear, Gai Work, Lnundrv Machinery, Architectural and Ornamental 
Castings, Sugar Mills, Saw ami Flour Mills, Water Wheels of all kinds. Hydraulic, Hay, Rag/, 
screw and Drop Presses, Coining Machinery, Pile Drivers, Bark and Malt Mills, and all 
Klnrfq of Castings. 

EVOIXES.- Marine Engines, Oscillating and Beam ; Stern and Side Wheel Boats, 
Locomotives, Stationary Engines, Horizontal, Upright, Oscillating and Beam, from six 
to fifty inches diameter. Also, Scott & Eckart's Adjustable Cut-off" Regulator— best in 
use; W. R. Eckart's Balance Valve for Stationary Engines; Woodward's Patent Steam 
Pump and Fire Engine. 

E5*>IL\iERS. Locomotive, F'.ae, Tubular, Upright, Cylinder and Cornish, and overy 
variety of Boiler Work. Ail sines of tubes and pipes for pumps. 

PUMPS.— The Excelsior double-acting Force Humps are manufactured by us. These 
very superior Pumps are warranted the best, and arc fast replacing all other Force Pumps. 



AMALGAMATIS G MAOHraERT.-Wheeler & Randall's improved Tractory 
Curve Pan, Zenas Wheeler's improved flat bottom pan, Beldin's pan, Veatch's tubs, 
Prater's concentrators, Waklee's pans, Beers' pan, German Barrels, Arastra Gearing, Chile 
Mills. Settlers of all descriptions, Retorts of all sizes and shapes, for Silver and Gold, 
Portable Stamp Mills, Straight Batteries, for wood or iron frames, Dry Crushing Bat- 
teries, or machines with the latest improvements, every variety m Stamps, Mortars, Cams. 
Pans and Tubs. BLAKE'S PATENT QUARTZ CRUSHERS, of all sizes. 

Oil* BOBIXO TOOLS AND MACHIKERT-Of the latest and most ap- 
proved construction, made from drawings lately made hv Prof. Blake at the oil wells in 
Pennsylvania. We have the facilities for working gold and silver quartz and other ores, to 
test their value, by the hundred weigh t or ton. 

Russia Iron Screens, of all degrees of fineness and of all qualities of iron. All work done 
in the best manner at the lowest cash prices. 

H. J. UUOTH. GEO. W. PRESCOTT. 1RV1KO M. SCOTT 

24vl2 i-i. jr. BOOTH <fc CO. 



Machinists and Foundries. 

PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

Nob. 10, 21, 33 and 25 First Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OP 

MACHINERY, 

STEAM ENGINES AND QUARTZ MILLS' 

DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

©elf- A^dj listing Piston J?aeltlng, 

Requires no springs or screws; j a always steam tight; 

without excessive friction, and never 

gets slack or leaky. 

WHEELER A RANDALL'S 

NEW GRINDER AND AMALGAMATOR 

HEPBURN & PETERSON'S 

AM ALGAMA TOK AND SEPARATOR, 

Knox's Amiilffaraators, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

Superior tor working cither GOLD OR SILVER ORES, and 
is the only Amalgamator that has stood the test of seven 
years' continual working. 
titeuulue White Irou Stamp Shoes and Dies 

Having been engaged for the past ten years In quartz 
mining, and being conversant with all the Improvements, 
either in Mining or Milling, we are prepared to furnish, at 
the shortest notice, the most perfect machinery for rcduc 
in? ores, or saving cither gold or silver. lHvlOqy-tf 



WILLAMETTE IRON WORKS, 

PORTLAND, OREGON. 

8te am iEngincs, Boilers, 
SAW AND GRIST MILLS, 

MINING MACHINERY, WROUGHT IRON SHUTTER 
WORK, AND BLA.CKSMITHING IN GENERAL. 
Corner North-Front and E streets* 

18vl3-ly One block north of Couch's Wharf. 

UNION IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 

"WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER, 

STEAM ENGINES, BOILERS, 

Aud nil kinds of Mining: Machinery. 

Also, Hay and Wine Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability and dispatch. 

Dunbar's Patent Self-Adjusting: Steam Piston 

PACKING, for new and old Cylinders, manufactured 

to order. 

Front Street, between N and O streets, 

Hvll Sacramknto City 



GEORGE T. PRACY, 
MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos 109 and 111 Mission street, between Main and Spear, 

SAN FKANCISCO. 

STJEAM I\GIMI, FLOTTBL AM) SAW MIXI. 

And Quartz Machinery, Printing FrCHes, 



MACHINERY OF EVEKT DESCRIPTION MADE AND 
REPAIRED. 
9S?-Spectal attention paid to Repalring.-ffi* qy-3 



SAN FKANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

N. JS. Cor. Fremont and Mission streets, 

Manufacturers of 

Marine and Stationery Engines 

Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Mining 

Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

— ALSO— 

Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Presses 

of the latest Improved Patterns. 

STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand; Quartz Mill Shoes and 
Dies warranted to be made of the best white iron. 
Snnbar's Improved Self-Adjon* Ing Plston- 

P:i<_-ivmir, requires no springs or screws; is always steam- 
tight; without excessive friction, and never gets slack or 
leaky. 

MACHINERY, OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cmting and Castings Et 

the lowest market rates. 

6vll-Iy BJ2VOE, DO'SMOKF. «fe CO 



Pacific File, Reaper and Mower Section 

IH^TSTTJF^CTOR.Y. 

No. 53 BeiUe Street, between Market and Mission, 

SAN FKANCISCO. 

les re-ent and warranted as good as new, or no charge. 
The only establishment In the State. We also man- 
ufacture Reaper :uul Hnwor SectionB 
lvl5tf DURNING & FISHER, Prop'r9. 



GLOBE 

Foundry and Machine Shop, 

STOCKTON, CAL. 

KEEP, BLAKE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OK 

(iuartz, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, Steam 
Engines, Horse Powers, 

Mining and Irrigating Pumps. Car Wheels, Derrick Irons, 
House Fronts, Iron Fencing, Balcony Railings, etc., 
at San Francisco prices. Orders solicited ' 
13vl3-ly and promptly executed. 



LEWIS COKFKY. 



J. 3. ■'•1SD0S 



LEWIS COFFEY & RISUON, 

Steam Boiler & Sheet Iron Works. 

THE only exclusively Boiler Making establish menl ..,. the 
Pacific Coast owned and conducted by Practical Boiler 
Makers. All orders for New Work and the repairing of Old 
Work, executed asordcrcd, and warranted as to quality. 

Old Stand, corner of Bush and Market streets, opposite 
Oriental Hotel, San Francisco. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
Castings. Brass Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, Sheathing 
Nails. Rudder Braces, Hinges, Ship and Steamboat Bellsand 
Gongs of superior tone. All kinds of Cocks and Valves, Hy- 
draulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dispatch. 
»3- PRICES MODERATE. «£ff 

V. KINGWELL. 19vl3-ly] J. H. WEED. 



i.r s sr"i hanscom &co., j™ScS 
iEtna Iron Works ! 

Southeast corner Fremont and Tehama ittreeti, 

SAN FKANCISCO, 

Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENCINES, 

QUAKfZ MILL MACHINERY OP ALL KINDS, 

SAW MILLS, FLOUR MILLS, 

Dunbar*!, Improved -Sell- At! jiiHtiiio- 

PISTON PACKING, 

Now so extensively need in the East and In tins State. Re- 
quires no springs or screws; is always steiim-ticht; wilhout 
excessive friction, and never gets slack or leaky. 

HANdCOM'd CRUSHER, 

The bestoftho kind now in use in th Is State or any where else 

"Wheeler ac Randall'* New Grinder and 

Amalgamator, 

Which only needs examination to bo appreciated. 

Tyler's Improved Water Wheel, 

Giving greater power at lower cost- than anv wheel In use 

Send for one or our circulars, giving full tables 

All Wheels warranlid to give Ihe ower as set forth, or 

the money will be refunded. 

Sole makers for this coast of the " Pcmlern-nst 
While Iron Stamp Shoes and Hies. 

None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular attention given to draw'ings 
and specifications of machinery, which will be made lo 
order. The patrona'. c of the public Is respectfully solicited. 



Cornish Pumping Engines. — What is 
known as the "Cornish pumping-engine, " 
■which is so extensively used in the British 
mines, is regarded as perhaps the best ex- 
ample of the application of steam as a mo- 
tor which has yet been produced. This 
superiority is attributed to the necessity 
imposed upon the engineers of effecting a 
great economy of fuel in localities far dis- 
tant from the coal fields ; and again to the 
circumstance that the duties of the engines 
are regularly reported in what are called 
"duty papers." The duty of a Cornish 
pumping engine is estimated by the num- 
ber of pounds lifted a foot high by the con- 
sumption of a bushel of coals. Taylor's 
engine reaches the high duty of lifting 
110,000,000 pounds. The average duty of 
all the engines at work at presentis 51,620,- 
000, while the average duty of the best en- 
gines amounts to 99,000,000. This enor- 
mous power, which may be estimated at 
equal to the power of 5,500 horses, is em- 
ployed to raise more than 9,000 gallons of 
water per minute from the mines and to lift 
a large portion of the ore which is raised. 
The manufacture of these engines gives 
rise to other and important industries, each 
of these large engines costing from $10,000 
to $20,000. The machinery at one of the 
largest mines has been estimated to be of 
the value of $375,000. 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Works. 

HINCKLEY & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

©tej^m: engines, 

Qixartsa, Flour and. ©aw 2t£Uls, 

Moore's Grinder* mid Amalgamator, Brodick 
Improved Crusher, Mlnlnpr Pompi, 
., A.mal cam n tors, and all kinds 
of Machinery. 

Nos. 46, 47 and 49 First street, between Market and Mis 
eion street, San Francisco, 3_qy 



NEPTUNE IRON WORKS, 

Corner of Mission and Fremont Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MARINE, 

Locomotive, 

And nil hinds of 
HIGII PRESSURE 

Steam Boilers 

MADE. 
All Boilers gu arantoed and 
tested by U. H. Boiler In- 
spector before sent out of 
the Shop, at Shop expense. 

A1! kinds of Sheetlron and 

Water Pipe, Coal Oil 

Stills, Wrought Iron 

Worms, etc., etc. 

Manufactured to Order. 

Old Boiler* Repaired 

1>. CAMERON. 




iiyUuUUp 

1F : 



Effect of Cannon Shot. — A shot does 
make a hole of its own size through wood, 
but indents it, the fibres springing back 
after the shock. Generally, the course of 
shot can only be traced by a wire, some- 
times by a hole as large as a man's finger. 
The damage most often happens in the in- 
side of a vessel, in splintering and breaking 
the wood, after the main force of the shot 
was spent. Forts Hamilton and Richmond, 
which are about a mile apart, with a vessel 
lying between them, could not, with their 
guns, send shot through two feet of its tim- 
ber. There is scarcely an instance where a 
ship was sunk by a solid shot. Hot shot 
and shells do the mischief ; the latter will 
sometimes make apertures several feet in 
extent through the sides of vessels. 



America has 80,000 miles of telegraph 
wires ; Europe, 60,000, and India, 3,000. 



TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 

54fe .*■> In this City, 
^cf% Try them 
WW With a Job, 
And you. will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y. 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 



CITY IRON WORKS COfflPAKY. 



fl. KLKINCLATS, 



TV. DEBHIH. 



CLEKC «te CO., 

Iron Fonnders, Stesm Ergine Buildm, an 
Makers of all kinds of Machinery. 

HO. 88 FREMONT STREET, San Francisco. 
9vl46m 



1. NEWSHAM. 



J. BIGWOOD. 



SOUTH BEACH IRON WORKS, 

Near corner of King and Third street*, Pan Francisco. 

MABINF. E\fii:i KS, 

MiD ALL KINDti OF 

MACHI1VERY FORGING. 

All kind* of Ship-smithing and Mill work manufactured to 
order. Jobbing ol every description promptly attended to. 
All work done Guaranteed. I3vl4-ly 



JOHN LOCHHEAD'S 

Steam Engine Works, 

Beale street, tuur Mi-sion, San Francisco. 

STEAM ENGINES OI' EVERY DESCRIPTION BUILT 
to order— Marine, Stationary, or Locomolivc. 

HOISTING AND PUMPING ENCINES, 

PORTABLE ENGINES, OF ALL SIZES, 

DONKEY PUMPS, Etc., Etc., Etc. 

The attention of the parties engaged in shipping or inland 
navigation Is called to the 

Superior Workmanship 

of Mb. LOCnHEAD, who has been in the husiness In San 
Francisco for the last fourteen years, and enjovs the repn 
tation of having built ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN 
STEAM ENGINES 

Screw Propcllorsof all kinds, and Steam Boat Machinery 
generally, made to order, and warranted to give perfect 
satisfaction in every particular 26vl2-3m 



©h* !ttiw»0 and Scientific &tm. 



43 



The lobster business is carried on upon a 
large scale at Jonesport, Maine. About 
130 persons, men, boys and girls, are en- 
gaged in a single establishment, independ- 
ent of the "catchers." The firm pays two 
ceDts for each lobster delivered at their 
works. Five thousand are cooked daily, 
about 4,000 of which aro put up in cans. 
Fifteen girls are employed iu weighing, 
painting and labeling the cans. 

EiAJiisiNO the Bead;. — A London sur- 1 
geon recently put a dog to sleep with chlo- 
roform, and taking out a piece of his skull, 
has inserted a watch crystal, through which i 
he can ace the changes iu the brain, produced 
by sleep. 

The MosQhito. — Each female lays annu- 
ally about30U,000 ova. Being deposited on 
the surface of water, they are devoured by 
ttsh and other aquatic animals iu such quan- 
tities as to greatly lessen the evils which 
follow their propagation. 



"WE ARE NOW OFFERING- 

oub iataxEivsE stock 

or 

Fine Custom Made Clothing 

AND 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

AT PRICES THAT DEFY COMPETITION. 

Our Stock of Clotblnff ConiUta ol 
AXL THE LATEST STYLES 

BOTH Of MATERIAL J. .NO FINISH. 

A Large Assortment of 
Trunk*. Vallaci, Carpet Bug*, BlnnUet*. Etc., 

AT XXTRKMKLT LOW PRICES. 

*J. It. MEAD & CO., 
8vl0 Cor. of Washington and Sansoroe streets. 




THE I^CIFIC IRON WORKS, 

First «fe Fremont ©ts„ between IMissioii & Howard, San. Francisco. 

The proprietors of the above Works invite the attention of all parlies interested to their grcittly improved and une- 
qualcd facilities for manufacturing Steam Engines and Boilers, both Marine and Stationary, of any required size and 
pattern, Quartz Mills, Amalgamating, Pumping and Hoisting Machinery of the most approved construction. Flour, Saw, 
I and Sugar Mills, Water Wheels, Ac, &c. Our pattern list is most complete and extensive, embracing the late Improve- 
I in en is In all classes of machinery adapted to use on this coast. We would call especial attention to the fact that we have 
secured the exclusive richt of manufacture for the Pacific Coast of the celebrated Greene Engine, conceded to be tbe 
most economical and perfect working Engine now In use. We are also exclusive manufacturers of the celebrated 

Bryan Biwtrry, Vnmej'« Atniilicamatori and Separator*, Ryenon'i Superheated sicam Amal- 
Eamator» and ltoiarv Crn»u.crn, Stone Breakers, Ac. Orders re *uect fully Solicited. 

GODDARD «fe COMPANY. 



BLASTING POWDER. 

PRICE, S3.00 PER KEG. 

— ALSO— 
SPORTING, CAMON AMI MUSKET 

IPOWDER, 

Of superior quality. 

FUSE AND SHOT, 

Always on band and for sale at the office of the 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, 

No. 318 California Street. 

JOHN F. LOH3E, Sacretary. 

25vHqr 

PACIFIC POWDER MILL 

COMPANY'S 

BLASTING POWDER! 

MANUFACIDKED 

IN MARIN COUNTY, 

CALIFORNIA. 

roa sale bt 

HAYWARD & COLEMAN, 

AGENTS, 

414 Front Street, San Fruneisco. 

3vU-Lm 



A. 8. CUBIICH. s. D. CLAHK. 

CHURCH & CLARK, 

1MI*0KTEHB AND DEALERS IN 

Meditcrrantau and California. 

FEUITS, NUTS, CONFEOTIONEEY, Etc, 

AND MANUFACTURKHS OF 

FIRE WORKS 

Of every description, at No. 4«T Front st., San Francisco. 
i5vl4-6ml2p 



California Steam Navigation 

COMPANY. 

Steamer CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE 

CHRYSOPOLIS CAPT. A. POSTER. 

YO&E.MITE 

CORNELIA CAPT. W. BROMLEY 

JULIA CAPT. E. CONCKLIN. 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 4 o'clock P. M. EVERY DAY (Sundays excepted), for 
Sacramento and Stuck ton, connecting" with light-draft 
steamers for Marysvilic, Colusa. Cliico, and Red Bluff. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

JOHN BE^LET. 
l 3v12 President. 



NEW YORK PRICES. 



C E. COJL.TL.1JSS, 

No. 603 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
EXCLUSIVE AGENT 

7011 THK 

AMERICAN 

WATCH FACTORY, 

A large assortment of these 

Superior ~W atches, 

In Gold and Silver Cascn, 

Constantly on hand, and sold at Factory 
prices. Also, 

ENGLISH AND SWISS WATCHER, 

Imported directly from he Manufacturers. 

The American Company aro now making 

VERY FINE WATCHES FOR LADIES. 

0Sr-A larjje assortment of Gold Chains | 
and Jewelryi 25vl0-6m | 



SEW YORK PRICES. 



HAYWARD & COLEMAN, 

IMPOHTLBS AND REFINERS 

— OF — 

niuminating, Lubricating, 

— AND — 

PAINT OILS! 

CONSISTING OK 

KEROSENE, LARD, SPERM, ELEPHANT, POLAR, 

TANNERS', NEAT3FOOT, BOILED AND RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND CHINA NUT. 

— auso, — 

SPIRITS OFTURPENTINE& ALCOHOL 

Note, — We would specially call the attention of Mill 
owners and Engineers to our superior PARAFFINE OIL, 
which we manufacture from the California Petroleum 
This Oil will not gum. Machinery thoroughly cleaned and 
lubricated with it will nut heat, and alter remaining at rest, 
can be started without cleaning off. 

03- A .sample can of our Piirafilnc Oil will be forwarded 
on application to us, as wc desire a fair and impartial trial. 

Lamps and Lamp Stock ! 

flSF-An elegant and complete assortment on hand. -JSff 
19vl3-3m 414 Front street, San Francisco. 



Engraved to Order.— Persons who desire to illustrate 
thnir individual establishments or business, should giVte Us 
their orders for Engraving and Printing, aud wc will guar- 
antee good work and reasonable prices. 

DEWEY ft CO.. 

Patent Agents, Publishers and Job Printers, sua Clay st. 



1YI,EUSSD0RFFER, 

Nos. 635 and 637 Commercial Street, 

WILL INTRODUCE 

On. 8atiirday, February O, 1867, 
An Entirely Hew Style of 

Cloth Cashmere Hat J| 

"YACHT HENRIETTA," 

Whicli aro tbo, most dressy Hat ever introduced on tlic 

Pacific Coast. 
03-Call and see them. 8vH 




M ACCAR ONI, VER MICEL LI, 

— FASTEOitRmA.- 

ffiOej^ME^T. 7067) 

«u5SSiW 



Machinists and Foundries. 



Miners' Foundry 

— AND— 

MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos. 2±5 to 255 First Stkeet, 

Sub Franulsco. 

HOWLAND, ANGELL & KING, 
i*icoi'kii:t(iics. 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 

QUARTZ MIH8. FLOTIK MILLS, 

MAW MIl.l.s, »k;ai: Mtl.LH. 

POWBER MILLS, PAPER MILLS, 

Steam Engines of all Kinds, 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 

MINING PUMPS, niSOTJU WORKS 

OIL WELL TOOLS, ROCK BREAKERS,' 

— jm> — 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds, eitbe? 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in ell its 
Branches. 

Shoe; ..nil Die. of White Iron, mnnnntetnred 
for and fninorleil by us expressly rot- thlspm. 
uysc, alio will lust «V> per eei.t. lou u er tliau auv 
oilier ntuue on this coast. 

Russia Iron Screens, of any degree of fineness. 
?J 8 .?Si '! ,e V? ly "nanuraclliicis on this const of 
the Hicks EiiKlne," the most f< nipticl, slmnlo 
in eoi.slriictloii, ana durable, of auy Eiiulne In 

W. H. UOWLAXI, E. T. Kl.VG, 

U. B.ASiGELL, CITRUS PALMER. 

13vll-qr 




JAMES MACKEN, 
coi>i*ek,s]m:ith:. 

No. 22G Fremont at., bet. Howard <fc FoIbobi 

All kinds or COPPER WORE done to order in the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Suttar 
House and Distillery work. 8 

Repairing promptly and neatly attended to. 

13vll 



Dr. Hufeland's Swiss Stomach 
Bitters. 

THE WORLD RENOWNED REPUTATION, TOGETHER 
with, the extensive mid increasing demand for Dr. Hufe- 
land's Swiss Stomach Bitters, will at mice recommend them 
to the favorable notice of all connoisseurs and lovers of a 
Rood and healthful tonic and invigorator. As a purifier of 
the blood, acting surely, yet gently, on the t^ccretfons of 
liver and kidneys, they are unsurpassed and a most agreea- 
ble drink. 



International Hotel, 

JACKSON STREET, 
BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

THI3 OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
order for the accommodation of guests. Persons seek- 
ing comfort and economy will And this the best Hotel in 
the city to stop at. The Beds are uew. and in good order, 
and the Rooms well ventilated. The Table will always be 
supplied with the best iu the market. 

Prices varying: from $1 oO to !§2 per day for 
Board und ICoom. 

FINE BATH HOUSE AND BARBER SHOP ATTACHED 
TO THE HOUSE. 

8®" Teams belonging to the House will be in attendance 
at all the boats and cars to convey passengers to the House 
free of charge, and to any part of the city for SO cents 

avlS F. E. WEYOANT, Proprietor. 




For sale at all wholesale and retail stores on the Pacific 
Coast, aud at the depot of TAYLOR A BENDEL, 413 and 
4lj Clay street, between Santonin and Battery, . San Fran- 
cisco. 20vl4-tim 



Piles! Files! Piles! 

^TOT PILES OF GOLD, NOR YET OF SILVER, SO 
- ' much coveted by all meu; but the BLEEDING, BLIND 
or EXTERNAL PILES, can be easily and speedily cured by 
the use of 

WOOD'S SUB-POSITORY. 

Jt Is a preparation totally distinct from anything hereto- 
fore offered as a remedy for this painful and often fatal 
complaint. The SUB-POSITOhY is neither u pill, powder, 
wash or salve, and yet it has proved to be n certain Rem- 
edy for the Piles. Do not doubt this assertion, or delay 
testfng the truth of it if you are troubled with the Piles— 
you will not be deceived in It 

Sold wholesale and retail by J. U. REDINGTON A CO., 
Nos. 416 and 418 Front street; GEO. GRIdWOLD, corner of 
Mission and First streets; OLD FAMILY DRUGSTORE, 
corner'Mission and Second streets; UNITED STATES DRUG 
STORE, Bush stteet, between Montgomery and Kearny. 

C. WOOD, Proprietor, No. 63 Tehama street, between 
First and Second. 24vl4-3in 



Just PuTblisliecL. 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MARRIAGE. BEING FOUR IM~- 
porlant Lectures on FUNCTIONS and DISORDERS of 
the Nervous System mid Re prod lie rive Organs, to bo had by 
addressing aud inclosing hveiih -live cents, postage stamps 
tu Si-erchirv PXC1KJC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY, Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 12v13-1y 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO. 

IMPORTEnS, 

AND DEAL1ZKS IK 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, 

Druggists' & Chemists' Glassware, 

Pliotogpra/plrlc Stock, Etc. 

513 and 514 Washington Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



WE are receiving direct from MESSRS. LADD ft OERT 
LING (London) and BEEKER ft SONS (Antwerp, Bel 
glum) their superior 

ASSAY AN» BTTrXION BALAM'KS, 

And from France and Germany, as well as the Eastern 
States, FURNACES, CRUCIBLES, MUFFLES, BLOW-PIPE 
CASES, GOLD SCALES, CHEMICAL GLASSWARE, and 
every article required for ASSAY OFFICES, LABORATO 
RIES, etc. We have given this branch of our business par 
ticujar attention, to select such articles as are necessary 
in the development of the mineral wealth of this eoast. 

A Full Assortment of DRUGGISTS* GLASSWARE and 
DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, ACIDS and CHEMICALS, eou- 
sliintlv on h.-iiid. 

San Francisco March 6,1866.- llvlo.tf 



44 



Mkz pining and jftcfentftfc 



Business Cards. 



H. C. HOWARD, 

Member of the San Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board, 

(Exclusively commission business,) 

No. 436 California Btreet, next door below Montgomery. 
25vUqr 



W. E. GOLDSMITH. 
Card and Seal Engraver, 

&OS Montgomery Btreet, u p~ stairs, (over Tucker's,) 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wedding and Visiting Cards printed with the utmost neat- 
ness; Notarial, Commissioner and Society Seals. 19vI3-2q 



Charles S. Whitman, 

©peeial Advocate in Patent 

Cases, and Solicitor of Patents. Office, 611 

Seventh street (near Patent Office) 

Washington, D. C. 

Circulars, Containing valuable information to Inventors, 

23vH-6m forwarded gratis. 



NATHANIEL GRAY. 



H. H. GRAY. 



1ST. G-RAY & CO., 

TJW3>EIt TAKERS, 

Gil Sacramento St, cor. Webb, San Francisco. 

jR3-Pole Agents for Barstow's Metallic Burial Cases and 
U5vl4tf Caskets. 



-TTSE- 
EMEITX" & EATON'S 

GREEN SEAL SMOKING TOBACCO. 



16vl4-6m 



No. 518 Battery street. 



Schmieden & Shotwell, 

Stock and Money Brokers, and dealers in Government 
Bonds, State, City and County Securities, Gas, Water and 
Insurance Stocks, etc., southwest corner of California and 
Sansome streets, opposite Bank of California. lvI5-6m 



ISAAC E. DAVIS. 



HKNHY COWELL. 



DAVIS & COWELL, 

DEALERS I> _ 

Santa Cruz Lime, Cement, 

PLASTER, HAIR, LATH AND LATH NAILS. 

Marble Dust. Fire-Bricks, Fire-Clay, Fire Tiles of all sizes. 

Cor. Front and Washington Streets, San Francisco. 

25vl4-tf 



B. F. HOWLANP, 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 



Enameled Cards, Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, exe- 
cuted in a superior manner. Small pictures copied and en- 
larged to any size, at one-halt the price usually paid for 
such wort. Cartes dc Visiles only S3 per dozen ; Vignettes 
at SA per dozen. We warrant our work to be superior 
to any made In this city or State. aS^Give ua a call and 
see our specimens. 5vl4-6m 



ANDRADE & PATTERSON, 

MANUFACTURERS AMD ENGRAVERS 

—or— 

M E T -A. .L, L i o sr&wrs, 

AND SIGN PAINTERS, 

Corner of Montgomery and Fine Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

BS-Door Plates and Office Signs made to order at short 
17vH-ly notice and on reasonable terms. 



REMOVAL. 

The well known establishment of 

LUCY & HYMES, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Genuine Pale and Chemical 
OLIVE tSOAJPJS, 

Has been removed from Beale street, between Mission and 
Howard, to BRANNAN STREET, between Eiijhth and 
Ninth, and greatly enlarged. 

The capacity ot this establishment is now the largest on 
the Pacific Coast. It is now in full operation, and prepared 
to supply the demand of the trade. 

Office— 319 C fornia. St., San Francisco. 
Ivl5qr 



We take occasion to inform our friends and customers 
that we have sold our entire stock in warehouse, also in- 
voice to arrive, to Messrs. N. P. COLE & CO.. 312 and 3U 
Pine street. The whole forms a most complete and desira- 
ble assortment of FURNITURE, and well merits attention 
befoie purchasing elsewhere. J. PEIRCE & CO. 



FURNITURE. ^% 



lVos. 313 ana 3X4= Pine Street. 

Having purchased the entire stock of Messrs. J. Peirce A 
Co , and in addition to our large invoice from our factory 
at the East, we are prepared to fill nil orders proraptlv, both 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, and call the attcntion'of the 
public to our salesroom, as containing the most complete 
assortment of desirable goods on this coast 

2vl5-lqr M; I». COIiE «fc CO. 



Evergoing ^W"atch. I 

BThe undersigned, having been appointed sole 
agents for the above Watch, are now prepared to 
k furnish it at makers' rates. 

a This Watch has a first class, full jeweled nickel 

movement, and requires no winding by key or stem, every 
opening and closing of the upper cover of the case wlndiug 
the Waich for six hours It is so constructed that it will 
run for ten days without being opened, and is guaranteed a 
perfect timekeeper. Price, in heavy 18-carot gold cases, 
$350. A liberal discount allowed to the trade . 

ISAAC S. JOSEPHI & CO., 
TvJ5-2am3m Gil Washington street, San FraDCisco. 



Trades and Manufactures. 



W!I, E1RTLI.VG. 



HENRY KIMBALL. 



BARTLIN& & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Rulers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

505 Clay street, {southwest cor. Sansome), 
16vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN DANIE1, 

(SUCCESSOR TO O. GOBI) 

MARBLE WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine st bet Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantel*, Monuments, Tombs, Plmnber*' Slabs 

Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
flSr- Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re 
spectfulb solicited. 5v8-3m 



Palmer's Patent 

ARTIFICIAL LEG, 

Manufactured in Philadelphia, Penn. 
JABTIS JEWJETT, AGENT. 

B29 Washington Street, San Francisco, CaL 10v8-lm 



HUCKS & LAMBERT, 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 
Itr" H. & L. -£□ 

A. X t. E OK, E A. S« E , 

Natoma Street and North Beach, 
2vlMm SAN FRANCISCO. 



PIONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS! 

Established 1849. 

O. NUTTING, 

Manufacturer of 

Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters, 

BANK VAULTS, PRISON CELLS, BALCONIES, AWN- 
INGS, GRATINGS, IRON FENCE. STAIRS, Etc., 

133 Bush street, 
llv14-lq San Francl9co. 



HARRIS BROS., 

OUTLEES, LOCKSMITHS, BELLHANGEKS 
Ariel Model Mafcers. 

208 Leldesaorff street, het. Sacramento and Commercial, 
SAN FRANCISCO. SlvM-tf 



LEATHER HOSE AND BELTING, 

ALL SIZES. 

SUCTION HOSE MADE TO ORDER 

At short notice, by 

m. m. cook &, sois:, 

No. SOI Battery street. 

13vl3-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Cordage Manufactory ! 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND A LARGE ASSORTMENT 
— OP— 

M-A-NIIj-A. cordage, 
Whale Line, Bale Rope, etc., 

Manufactured from Pure Manila Hemp. 

Office, at TTJBBS k GO'S, eil and 6X3 Front street. 
8&- Manuiactory at the Potrero. Ilvl4-lq 



E. POWER, 

WOOD CARVER 

— Ann — 

Composition Ornament Manufacturer. 
Designing, Modeling and Patterns 

FOR. CASTING. 

INTERIOR DECORATIONS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

In Wood, Composition and MetaL 

Nos. 311 and 313 Market street, San Francisco. 
25vH-qy 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS AND MIOIXEI^S, 

(Over W. T. Garratt'3 Brass Foundry,) 
S. E. Corner of Mission and Fremont ats.. 

6vUtf " SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. H. WHITE. JACOB KRAMER. 

Peiaroline Oil "Works. 

J. H. WHITE & CO., 

No. 109 Commercial street, San Francisco, 

Are now manufacturing 

LUBRICATING OILS & AXLE CREASE. 

From Petroleums of California and ask to be encouraged 
by the citizens of California. As a home production in all 
their parts, these Lubricators are equal to any in the 
market, and surpass all others fcr cleansing off gum caused 
by the use of animal oils which contain stearinc andmarga- 
rin, which soon become acid. Afair trial, at the low price 
asked, Is all that we solicit 25vHtf 



Such a jmirnnl has heen needed on the Pacific Coast The 
Pros fill the bill— Bute River UeveiUe. 



THE GREAT LIGHT. 

THE DANFORD 
-A^tmosplieric Lamp. 

This Lamp burns coal oil, requires no chimney, gives a 
pure white and steady flame, uses thirty per cent less oil 
than any other Lamp in proportion to the amount of light 
afforded, and la absolutely indispensable in every house 
whore gas is not used. CALL AND SEE THEM. 

For sale only by t£. ATERS, 

zvlj-qy 417 Washington 6trcet, opp, Post Office, 6. F. 



Professional Cards. 



SHEKMAN DAY, 
Mining- IDngineer, 

No. lllMonteomury Block, San Francisco, 

Will examine, survey and report upon mines, tnd consult 
and advise concerning investments in mining property, or 
the machinery management and expenditures of mines. 
22q* 



fKEDERICK 5UKSELL. 

Mechanical & Architectural Draughtsman, 

No, 422 California street, corner of Leidsdorff. 

Drawings of Mohkls made for parties applying for pa 
ints at Washington or London. mar23-tt. 



E. V. JOICE, 

NOTARY PUBLIC, 
0T. El. cor. off Washington and Battery sts. 

lvlStf SAN FKANCISCO. 



JAMES M. TATLOB, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street, 

SAW FRANCISCO. 

Will practice In the State and Federal Courts. Special at- 
tention given to proceedings under the Fatent Law. 
2v!5-lqy 



ISAAC LOBREE & CO., 
, GOLDEN STATE POTTERY,Cf| 

AJTTIOCH, CAL, ^® 

Office In Ban Francisco, 516 Commercial Bt. *^ 
Constantly on hand a large assortment ofEartheuware, 
Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, and Stoneware, 



J. N. ECKEL, M. B., 

Homoeopathio Physician 

226 Post Street, San Francisco. 
24vl4yr 



DR. H. AUSTIN, 

DENTIST, 

IVo. 634t Washington Street, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny Streets 

[OVER SAN FRANCISCO baths] 

SAN FRANCISCO. MvlO-qy 



J. W. "WINTER, 
DENTIST. 



Office, 647 Clay street San Francisco. 

First-class gold fillings for $3, as good as any dentist can 
produce in ihe city. Dr. Winter has practiced Dentistry 
twenty years— fifteen in this State. For a full upper set cf 
gum teeth, on vulcanite base, from $'IQ to $'65. Teeth ex- 
tracted without pain by local application. 18vi4-tf 





RADICAL CURE 

— OF— 



Treatment of all Deformities of .the Body, by DR. A. 
FOLLEAU'S process. C24 Washington street, up stairs, 
Washington Baths Building, between Montgomery and 
Kearny streets. 

DR. A. FOLLEAU 

Has" his studies and manufactories In the same building. 

Every kind of Apparatus, Trusses, Orthopedic Instru- 
ments, Artificial Limbs, etc , are manufactured and applied 
by himself. 

9GFHt hat no connection icithany Aaency. 2ivH-llptf 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co's 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 

NEW YOBK, JAPAN AHD CHINA. 

LEAVE FOLSOM STREET WHARF, AT 11 

, o'clock. A. M, of the following dates, for 

PANAMA, connecting via Panama Railroad, with one of 
the Company's splendid steamers from ASPINWALL for 

new york: 

On the lOth, 18th and 30th of each month that has 
SO days. 

On the lOth, lOth and 80th of each month that has 
31 days 

When the 10th, 19th and 30th fail on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding; when the 18th (alls on Sun- 
day, they will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Manzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departures of 18th or 19th connect with French Trana- 
Atlantic Co.'s steamer for St. Naznlre, and English steamer 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamer for 
Southampton and South America, and P. R. R. Co's 
steamer for Central America. 

The following Steamships will be dispatched on dates as 
given below : 

July 30th— GOLDEN CITY Capt. W. F. Lapidge, 

Connecting with OCEAN QUEEN, Capt. Conner 

Cabin passengers berthed through- Baggage checked 
through— 100 pounds allowed each adult 

An experienced Surgeon on board. Medicine and attend- 
ance free. 

These steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. Passen- 
gers are requested to have their baggage on board before 1U 
o'clock. 

Through Tickets for Liverpool by the Cunard, Inman and 
NatlonafSteamship Lines, can be obtained at the office of 
the P. M. S. S. Co., San Francisco, where may also be ob- 
tained orders for passage from Liverpool or Southampton 
to San Francisco, either via New York or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 to £20 will be advanced with the 
above orders, Holders of orders will be required to iden- 
tify themselves to the Agents in England. 

For Merchandise and Freight for New York and way 
ports, apply to Messrs. WELLS. FARGO & CO. 

JB®- The COLORADO will be dispatched July 4, at noon, 
aod will be followed by the GREAT HE PUBLIC, on August 
24th. from wharf, corner of First and Erannan streets, for 
YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with the steamer COSTA RICA for SHANGHAI. 

For passage and all other information, apply at the Pa- 
cific Mail Steamship Co's office, corner of Sacramento and 



OLIVER ELBBIB6E, Agent. 



Leidesdorff streets. 



American and Foreign Patents.— Letters Patent 
lor Inventors can be secured in the United States and foreign 
countries tlirough the Mining and Scientific Press Patent 
Agency. We offer applicants reasonable terms, and they 
can rest assured of a strict compliance with our obligations, 
and afaithful performance of all contracts. For reference, 
wc will furnish the names of numerous parties for whom 
we have obtained patents during tho past two years. 



Metallurgy. 



BOALT «&; 8TETEFELDT, 

Metallurgists and Mining Engineers 

AUSTIN, NETABA 

Western Branch of ADELBERO & RAYMOND, No. 90 
Broadway, New York. Ilvll 



G. W. HAYHAKD. J, n. T1KMANK. 

Mining Engineers and Metallurgists, 

»4tO Pearl street. New York, 

—AND — 

CENTRAL CITY, COLORADO. 
19vl2-ly 



EUROPEAN 

METALLURGICAL WORKS, 

A«n 

^Practical IVOriing ©cltool, 
Bryant Street, Between Third and Fourth, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

THE Proprietors are at all times prepared to work or test 
Ores sent to this establishment— either in large or small 
quantities— by such process as may be found best adapted to 
their chemical character, after a cpreful analysis has been 
made. Test lots of Ore adapted to the smelting process at- 
tended to. Sulnhnret, pyritous, and the (so-called) "rebel- 
lous ores," are having especial attention paid to their suc- 
cessful treatment. Assaying in the humid and dry way. 
Also, refining by cupellation, done at moderate rates. 

PRACTICAL MINING SCHOOL. 

The proprietors— encouraged by numerous applications 
from gentlemen desirous of pursuing the siudy of practice 1 
metallurgy— have concluded to admit parties on reasonable 
terms. Having in their Mill ail the necessary appli- 
ances for crushing, roasting, amalgamating, smelting, re- 
fining and assaying, as also a well extended Laboratory for 
the analysis of Ores and Minerals, a good opportunity Is 
here offered to acquire a sound practical knowledge of the 
business. 

S. P. Kimball, J R. Murpht. 

IOvIO 



J. A. BAUER, 
G hemical Laboratory, 

AND DRUG STOKE, 
Oil Wnfthlns-ton Street. [Established 18-19. ] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Careful Analyses made of 

Ores, Minerals, Waters, Oils, Liquors, 

Wines, Products of Art, etc. 

Pharmaceutical Preparations Made to Order, 

Opinions given on Chemical Questions and Geology. 

AST-Particular attention paid to Analyses of all kinds, n 
cases where legal questions are Involved. 

Pure Nitric Acid, Nitrate of Silver, Gold Chloride, Flatin 
Chloride, Sodium Amalgam, Sulphate of Copper, etc., for 
sale. 12vU-6m 



I^OOTTR'SS 



SARSAPARIPHERE 
BITTERS 



Have bo speedily grown in favor that their unrivalled sale 
has attracted remarks and criticisms of the trade. Jealousy 
attribules their success to the fineness of their general 
style, and principally to the originaliiy and beaulv of tho 
bottle, which was conceived and manufactured by Califor- 
nia artists. MB. LACOUB, an energetic promoter of Cali- 
fornia resources, desired to show tiiat Calilornia lias no 
need of being tributary to other countries for talent or 
mechanical industry. 

The cause of their success is the great benefit they have 
been to the large Dumber who have already used them. 

MB. LACOURIs a graduate of the Polytechnic Institute 
of France, and adds to a thorough knowledge of Chemistry 
many years of experience; and, alter a long and careful 
experimental study, has been enabled to offer 

SARSAPARIPHERE BITTERS. 

They are the most efficient Blood Purifier, because thev 
combine with the wholesome Sarsaparilla, which operates 
by cutaneous excretions, and other substances which gently 
stimulate the secretions of the lower glands and urga'S, 
render digestion easy, obviate enstiveuess, and remove reg- 
ularly every impurity of the blood. 

They are unrlva'ied as a remedy for Scrofula. Dyspepsia, 
Constipation, Liver Complaint, Nervous Affections. Colic, 
Intermittent FeverB, ancl uli diseases arising from Impurity 
of the Blood or Costlveness. 



"Wlio Takes Them ? 
The Old Man 

Takes them as a gentle stimulant aud mild rejnvcnator. 
The Young Man 

Takes them to regulate his system, prevent disease, and 

stimulate to new iiie his overtasked body. 

The Young Woman 

Takes them to secure regularity in her habits; to tint her 

cheeks with the bloom of health, to give a sparkle 

to her eyes, and sweetness to her breath. 

The Husband 

Takes them to promote vitality, give strength to the body, 

peace to the mind, and with his health, wealth 

and comfort to all his family. 

The Wife 

Takes them to invigorate and strengthen her system, and as 

an aid to nature m regulating her periodical sickness. 

Children 

Take them as a gentle, yet effective tonic. 

The Dashaway 

Takes them as a mild, pure stimulant, containing none of 

the deleterious, essential and iusUoilsof forbidden drinks. 

The Inebriate 

Takes them to give tone to his poisoned stomach and allay 
the fearful longlngsfor strong drink with a stimu- 
lant that does not madden or destroy. 
The Traveler 

Takes them to prevent sea sickness, and secure his health 
against change of climate. 

. Everybody Takes Them I 

PRO BONO PURLICO T 

2vl5-6m 



Mt Pining and gtxtntith § xm. 



New Mining Laws of California and Nevada , 

We have just issued, in cheap edition, the new 
laws relating to mining and corporations in Cali 
fornia and Nevada, passed in 1865-6. Some of 
these laws arc of the highest importance to parties 
interested in the matter of locating and holding 
claims, and prospecting mines, in these States. 
Copies sent by mail. Price, 25 cents. 

Address, Dewey & Co., Patent Agents. 

San Francisco, May 1st, 1866. 



To Capitalists, 

GOLD QUARTZ MINE, SITI'ATEP IN CALAVERAS 
County, with utesm mill fitted up with Amalgamating 
. FOB SALE. The mine has three main vein;, and 
more than $*MX» have been spent In opening them ami com- 
pleting tho mill. Good wnw'iin roads all the wnv. Apply to 
BELLUC KKERES. Bankers. 
KtvlS-ta) 335 Clay street. San Francisco. 



Poitage.- The pontage on the Mi-ujia and Sciuntifio 
fuK»» to any portion of the United Statoi U twenty cents per 
annum, or Ave cent* per <|iiartcr, payable In advance at the 
Punt Office delivering tho paper. Postage Tree In the city 
ana county. Foreign postage (with few exceptions) two 
cent* per copy, prepaid. To Bremen and the German 
States (marked via Bremen and Hamburg line), three cents 
per copy, prepaid. SingTecoplestoanyaddrcssiu the United 
States, two cents 



Mining Notices— Continued. 



New Mining Advertisements. 



I. X. I.. Gold and -Sliver Mining Compoav,-Lo. 
cation of Works: Silver Mountain District, Alpine Coun- 
ty, Cal. 

Noticr.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
nineteenth day of Juue, 1867, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, ns fol- 
io w« : 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Ayer, I viae 146 6 $7 50 

Barron. Jas, 287 \K 2 25 

RndKC*, Marc C 297 7>i 11 25 

Blasdel. H U 237 It) 16 00 

Blnsdel. UU 292 1 1 60 

Barber. IN '.») 3tf 6 25 

Buwiand, Win 305, 306 111 16 uO 

Callonder, C R 214 4 00 

Calrnt, John 249 70 105 U0 

Davldann, Wm 74 1« 2 25 

De La Vena, PL 154 is 19 60 

Daly. Georgians 295 5 7 50 

Evan-, Comer 278 12 18 00 

Fisher, Lewis 51 lu 15 OU 

Gates, Mrs. J H 286 1J£ 2 25 

Ome*. Justin 291 IJ4 2 26 

Hepburn. James 116, 158. 217 20 30 00 

Hatch, F S 262 7 lu 50 

Hatch A Co 264 I I 60 

In:h. Richard 34, 35, 36, 38 96 144 00 

Kltio. Joseph 161 6 7 60 

Lorinx, Geo 285 3 4 50 

Legro. Iwiuh 211, 212 10 15 00 

McAllister, Geo C 214 4 6 00 

MlchclKon, Rami 187 4l< 6 75 

McMahoti.JA 263 7 v 10 50 

Nelson, Wm 2--1 6 7 60 

Nelson, C 81 10 15 00 

Phillips. ChasC 68 Mi 6 61 

Pearse.C H 210, 223 4 6 00 

Richards, John 49, 60 10 15 00 

Roble. Margaret 295 6 7 50 

Starr, Beniainln 289 % 1 13 

Thomas, W J 160 6 7 50 

Vincent, Win T 91,92,93 

94, 97, 98 IfJIii 161 25 

Warner, Joseph liO 6 7 60 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the nineteenth day of June, 18C7, so 
many shares of each parcel of said, stock as may be neces- 
ary will be sold at DUbllc auction, by Olney k Co., auction- 
eers, at the offlce of the Company, 418 and 420 Clay street, 
Ran Frnnclsco, Cal., on the fifth day of August, 1867, at 
the hour of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereou, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

FRANK n. HAMILTON, Jr., Secretary. 
Office, 418 and 420 Clay street, San Francisco. Jy20 



Lady Franklin Gold and Silver Mining Com- 
pany.— Sliver Mountain Mining District, Alpine County, 
California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
second day of May, 1867, the several amounts sot opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders, as follows. 

Names. No. Certificate. No. snares. Amount 

John Bardsley 8,9, 10 20-ea 60 $18 00 

John Bardsley 13,14 fi-ea 10 3 00 

John Bardsley 90 3 90 

John W McCmilny 37 S 1 60 

Wm Browning. ...39, 40, 188. 189 6-ea 20 6 00 

Abraham Strouse 44 1\C 2 25 

Mrs. AM Harris T.\ 74 5-ea 10 3 Oi) 

Geo W Folsom 77, 78, 79 20-ea 60 18 00 

U.-o W Folsom..... 8U, 81 10-ea 20 6 00 

Geo W Folsom 82, &1 5 ea 10 :i 00 

Wm Crookcr 84 10 3 <h) 

Wm Orooker 253 6 1 60 

Jos O'Nell 94, 95 25-ea 60 15 00 

Jos O'Nell 96 6 1 50 

Thos Peters 104 S \ 60 

T S Beaver .. 105, lP6 10-ea 20 ' 6 00 

Thos Odgers ..139 4 1 20 

J II Williams 165 20 6 00 

J II Williams 228 7H 2 25 

Henry Odgers 173 4 120 

DaulOdgcrs 173 4 1 20 

A H Pownrs ..174 10 3 00 

Stephen S Mead 185 6 1 60 

ThosSwindlehurat 186 5 1 50 

James Bottomlev 191 5 1 60 

Christopher Ncilson. .195. 196,197 

198, 199 fi-ea 25 7 50 

Wm J Thomas 201 10 3 ft) 

Wm J Thomas 202 5 1 50 

A M&CT Hnrris ...220 7K 2 25 

Geo W Whitsido 226 6 1 60 

Wm Whlislde 227 6 1 60 

Frank Heitchman 235 5 1 50 

Win Bastion 237 6 1 50 

Daniel Davidson 2d 20 6 00 

Daniel Davidson 242 10 3 00 

B H Meredith 217 6 I 50 

RT Hazard 259, 260, ^61 10-ea 30 9 00 

RT Hazard 262 5 1 60 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on tho second day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces" 
eary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. Olney & 
Co., at 305 Montgomery street, San Francisco, on Tues- 
day, the sixth day August, 1867, at the hour of 1 o'clock, P. 
M., of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment there- 
on, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. 

J. S. LUTY, Secretary. 

Offlce, 305 Montgomery street, Rooms 5 [and .6, San Fran- 
isco, California. jy20 



X eagle «ft Corcoran Silver Mining Company.— 

Locution: Storey Couuty, Nevada. 

The Annual Meeting of Stockholders fir the above named 
Company will be held at the offlce of the Company, Room 
No. 11, 338 Montgomery sticet, on MONDAY, the 19th day 
of August, 1867, at 7% o'clock P. M., for the purpose of 
electing officers for the onsulng year, etc. 

Jy*» A. P. GREENE, Secretary. 



Adella Gold Mining Company. Bock Creek, 

Sierra County, California. 

Nortec— There are delinquent, opon the following de- 
scribed Ktock.onaecuunt ol assessment levied on tho twenty- 
ninth dav of May, 1867. the several amounts set opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shared. Amount. 
BFBaoldwla a 10 $1000 

E F Bau'dwln 23 40 40 00 

K V Buulilwln 16 10 10 00 

E i' Rsuldwla 18 60 60 00 

AdeluBauldwIn 14 400 400 00 

Adella Hauidwin 16 40 40 00 

Ami In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustee*] made on the twenty-ninth day of May, 1867, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will bo sold at public auction, by Olney & Co., 
auctioneers, at No. 418 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Cal., on Monday, the fifteenth day of July, 1867, ut tho 
hour of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

A. C. TAYLOR, Secretary. 

Office, 429 Pacific street, San Francisco, CaL jc29 

Postponkhknt.— The above sale Is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the twenty-ninth day or July,lSt>7, at the same 
hour and pluce. Bv order of the Hoard of Trustees. 

JylS A. TAYLOR, Secretary. 

Clneo Henorei Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Copalo, Sinnloa, Mexico. 

Noncx.— There are delinquent, upon the following do- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
ilrst day of May, I867, the several nmountsset opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Numcs. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Haywood Judson 631 $63 10 

JC Bcldemnn A 00 5 00 

R McMurrav 5 30 3 00 

J B Murphy 6, 6y 20 2 00 

M Fitzpatrlck 7 5 60 

Loran Miner 8 7 70 

M Guerln 10 4 40 

BP Dunham 14 to 16, 27 35 3 50 

Geo M Scott 17 10 1 00 

Win McWilllams 20 1 10 

John Quinlan 33 4 4ft 

Harvey Garcilon 18 1 10 

Geo W Mosurc 19 1 10 

Zerros Wheeler 22, 24 4 40 

JamesBacon 23 I 10 

Geo C Peterson 26 26 2 60 

SLPnlmer 3,4,46, 31 46 4 60 

Richard Abbv 42 20 2 W) 

W U Howland 45 4 40 

Henrv Williamson 54, 65 lit 1 00 

Wm K Wadiiworth 34 9 90 

C Reis 3 1 10 

Wm U Brown 67 6 60 

Thomas Brown 53, 32 26 2 60 

J M Scott 61 to 65 6 50 

GcoT Russell 67 1 10 

Benjamin Wood 69 30 3 00 

F P Fargo 89 10 1 00 

Gulli'me Clarke 112 100 10 00 

CT Wheeler 102 to III 292 29 20 

M R G Becker 2,3, 4 97>£ 9 75 

D Ehihart 6 8>$ 85 

ChasACrowe 14 2 20 

George A Harris 50 90 9 00 

William Vosberg 51 fi 50 

Peter Welse 53 2 20 

Leo Rosenbauin 64 16 1 60 

Edwin Bonnell 67 15 150 

A Duiierl 61 1 10 

Scalmaiilni A Frapoll 62 2 20 

Richard D Blauvert, Jr 64 17 170 

LS Whipple 65 7 70 

FGTruett 66 7 70 

Francis Read 71 60 6 00 

TCL Kurre 72 8 80 

John J Foy 75 6 60 

H Schwerin 80 2 20 

HZcltska 83 7 70 

V Kostmeyer 87 10 1 00 

J E Eckley 88 2 20 

ChasP Kimball 92 I 10 

Jas F Hough, 99 6 50 

Win M Huntoon 105 30 3 00 

WLCazeneau 112 8 80 

Maggie C Bacon 117 1 10 

Isaac Bluxome, Jr 120 15 1 50 

F A Wilkins 121 fi 50 

William Bihler 122 12 20 

Vernon Getty 125 68 5 80 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the first day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of the Com- 
pany, No. 528 Clay street, San Fninclsco, Cal., on Saturday, 
the twenty-seventh day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. 

EDWARD C. LOVELL, Secretary. 

Offlce, No. 528 Clay street, San Francisco. jy6 

Camni go Gold and Silver Mlnlug Company, 

Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of tho Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-first day 
of June, 1807, an assessment of twenty dollars ($20) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able on or before the second day of August, 1867, in "United 
States currency, to the Secretary, San tiancisco, Ca!. 

Anj' stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 

Said on the second day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
ehnquent, and will be duly advertised for saicatpublic 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Thursduy, the twenty-sixth day ol September, 1867. 
to pay, the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 
Office. N. E. corner Clay and Front streets, San Francisco. 

05p-At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, 1667, the order levying assessment (No 6) made Febru- 
ary 14th, 1867, was rescinded. 

Je29 N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Chtplonena Mining Company— Olstrict of Cres, 

Sonora, Mexico. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board ol 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day 
of July, 1867. an assessment of five dollars ($5) per 
share wus levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately, in United States gold and silver 
coin, to the Secretary, 318 California street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which suid assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the twelfth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless paymentshall be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the second day of September, 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

JOHN F. LOHSE. Secretary. 

Offlce, 318 California street, up-stairs, San Francisco. JylS 

Postponement!! and .Alteration*.— Secr£anesare 
requested to give notice of postponements, or alterations 
which they may desire made In their advertisements at 
their earliest convenience. New advertisements should be 
■ent In as early as possible. 



De Soto Gold and Silver Mining Compuny.— 

Location of Works: Star District, Humboldt County, 

State of Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day 
of July, 1667, an assessment of two ($2) dollars per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of «aid Companv, pav- 
able Immediately, in United States sold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, *t th> offlce of the (Jompany.Na 63 Exchange Build- 
ing, northwest corner Washington and Montgomery streets. 
Sun Francisco, California, 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the seventeenth day of August, I807.shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, nnd unless pavmenl shall be made before, will bo 
sold on Wednesday, tho fourth day ut September. 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

JOHN M. BURNETT, Secretary, 

Offlce, No. Oi Exchange Building, northwest corner of 
Washington and Muutguuu-rt streets, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Jyl3 



Gold Hill Tunneling Gold and Silver Mining 

Company.— Location: Gold Hill Mining District, County 

of Storey, State of Nevada. 

Notice:.— The Fourth Annual Meeting of the stockholders 
of the above named Company, will be held at thelrofflce, 
415 Montgomery street, Sun Francisco Cal., on SATUR- 
DAY, the twentieth (20th) day of July, 1867, at 33* o'clock, 
P.M., for the purpose of electing Trustees to Borve for the 
ensuing year, and such other business as may properly 
come before it. 

R. WEGENER, Secretary. 

San Francisco. June 15, 1867. jcl6-6w» 



Gold Quarry Company. .Locution of Works 1 

Placer County, California. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of eald Company, held on the twenty -fourth 
day of June, 1867, an'asscssment of twenty dollars ($20) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately in United States gold and 6llver coin, 
to the Secretary, at the offlce of the Company, No. 706 
Montgomery street, (room No. 4, 2d floor) San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain ud* 
paid on the twenty-fifth day of July, 1867. Bhall be 
deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised tor sale 
at oubllc auction, and unless payment shall be made be- 
fore, will be sold on Monday, the twelfth day of August, 
1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

» W. COLBURN, Secretary. 

Office 706 Montgomery street, (Room No- 4, 2d floor) San 
Francisco, Cal. Je29 



Gold Quarry Company. Location of Worki: 
Placer County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that a meeting of the Stockhold- 
ers of the Gold Quarry Company will be held In San Fran- 
cisco, at the olfico of the Company, No. 706 Montgomery 
street, Room No. 4, second floor, on MONDAY, the twenty- 
ninth day of July, at 12 o'clock, noon, of that day, for the 
purpose ot taking into consideration the increase of the 
Capital Stock of said Company, from the sum of six hund- 
red thousand dollars, divided Into six hundred shares of 
$1,000 each, to tho sum of two millions four hundred thou- 
sand dollars ($2,400,000), divided into twenty-four hundred 
(2,400) shares of one thousand dollars ($1,000) each. 
G. D. ROBERTS, 
A. C. PEACHY, 
L. MAYNARD, 
I. FREEBORN, 
E. WERTHEMAN, 
Trustees of ttiA 

Go d Qtiarry Company. 
T. W. Colucrw, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 24th, 1867. je29 



Mope Gravel Mining Company.— Location of 

Works and Property: GraHs Valley, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-sixth day 
of June, 1867, an assessment (No. 16) of one dollar ($1) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable Immediately, In United States gold and silver 
coin, to tne Secretary, at Mo. S29 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirtieth day of July, 1867, shnll be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised lor sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the nineteenth day ol August, 1867, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising ana expenses of sale. By order of the Board ot 
Trustees. 

DAVID WILDER. Secretary. 
Offlce, No. 529 Clay street, San Francisco, Cal. je29 



Lyon Mill and Mining Company, Kelsey Dis- 
trict, El Dorado County, California. 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the sixth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of three ($3) dollars per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, 
at his offlce, 5 Government House, corner of Sansome and 
Washington streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the fifth day of August, 1867. shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment shall bo made before, 
will be sold on Monday, the nineteenth day of August, 1867, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with coats of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretary. 
Offlce, No. 5 Government House, corner of Washington 
and Sansome streets. jy!3 



Neagle Sz. Corcoran Silver Mining Company- 
Location of Works: Storey County, State of Nevada- 
Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of tho Board of 
Trustees of said Compan3', held on the eleventh day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of fifty (50) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able immediately, in United States gold and silver coin, to 
the Secretary of the Company. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the twelfth day of August, 1867, shall he deemed 
delinquent, and will bo duly advertised for salo at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the second day of September, 1867, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 
A. P. GREENE, Secretary. 
Office, Room No. 11, 338 Montgomery street, Snn Fran- 
cisco, California. jyl3 



Vnestra Senora de Gnadelupe Silver Mining 

Company. Location of Works : Tayoltita, San Dlmas 

District, Durango, Mexico. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting ot the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twelfth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment (No. 28,) of one dollar ($1) per 
share was levied upon the assessable capital stock of 
said Company, payable immediately, in United States 
gold and silver coin, to the Secretary, E. J. PFKirrEit, at 
the office, No. 210 Post street, or to the Treasurer, A. Hjn- 
mki.ma.nn. at his office. No. 637 Washington street, San 
Francisco. 

Anv stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirteenth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent and will bedulv advertised fors:tle-atpu,blio auc- 
tion, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Tuesday, the third day of September, 1867, to' pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with oosts of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

E. J. PFEIFFER, Secretary. 

Office, No. 210 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. Jyl3 



Seaton Mining Company.— Locution of Work* 1 

Drytown, Amador County, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twmiy-clghthdayof May, 1867. the several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows: 

Nunen, No. Certificate. No. ah area Amount. 

Wm A^hburner 51 1 $100 00 

Peter n Humett, Trustee 44 10 1000 on 

E J Crane, Trustee 46 ]0 1000 00 

E J (.'rune. Trustee 69 6 600 00 

J W Gashwiler 39 5 500 00 

A BGrogaii 33 10 1000 00 

Howard Havens. Trustee 49 6 60O 00 

Howard Havens, Trustee 08 6 600 i0 

ThcoLeRoy 34 10 1000 00 

t Bffi S S re ? r y w * 4<» 00 

D M fl Seaton m 1 100 00 

Phebe J Seaton 64 1 100 00 

I'hebe J Seaton 65 100 00 

Phebe J Seaton 66 1 100 00 

Phebe J Seaton 67 < 100 00 

Ed W Smith, Act'g Cash'r S3 5 500 00 

LloydTevIs 23 6 600 00 

Llojd levis 29 6 600 00 

H U - V '!n'.''' V !~ V -™ iS 6 WlW 

Lloyd Tevls, Trustee 42 10 1000 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of tho Board 
of Trustees, made on the twenty-eighth day of May. 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, «t the office of the 
Company, No. 60 Exchange Building, northwest corner of 
Washington and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, Cal., 
on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of July, 1867, at tho hour 
of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

JOEL F. LIQHTNER, Secretary. 
Offlce, No. 60 Exchange Building, N.W. corner Washing- 
ton and Montgomery streets San Francisco. JylS 

Sophia Consolidated Gold and Silver Mining 

Company, Sonora, Tuolumne County, California. 

Notiok-— There are delinquent upon the following described 
stock, on account of assessment levied on tho eleventh day 
of June, 1867, the Bevcral amounts set opposite the names of 
the respective shareholders as follows; 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

Engert, AFC 14 20 $6000 

Welles, Samuel 43 20 60 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the eleventh day of June, A. D. 1867, so 
many share* of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, by J. Mlddleton & Son, 
404 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cat., on Friday, the 
twenty -sixth day of July,1867, at the hour of 12 o'clock M. of 
said day, to pay said delinquent assessment thereon, to- 
gether with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 

DAVID E. JOSEPHI, Secretary. 

Offlce, C41 Washington street, San Francisco. Jyl3 

St. I.oui* Silver Mining Company, Cortex Dis- 
trict, Lander County, Novada. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the fourth 
day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the names 
of the respective shareholders as follows: 
Names. No. Shares. Amount. 

Baldwin. John E 60 $116 00 

Berry, Henry 10 20 00 

Cassell, JohnF 3 16 00 

Chenery, Richard 75 375 00 

DcWitt,WL 5 25 00 

Hathaway, B W 75 375 00 

Howard, George 50 100 00 

Hawxhurst, Robert 31 155 00 

Jones, Rowland 6 10 0o 

Kibbe, H C 6 2i. 00 

Land, C B 70 860 00 

Lagerman. H W... 10 20 00 

Macphcrson. AW 30 160 00 

Moore. J Preston 115 275 00 

Powell.Elijah 75 225 00 

Passmore, W 5 25 00 

Pratt. WE 6 25 00 

Russell. George 79 281 00 

Thomas, G W 5 25 00 

Taylor, John 5 15 00 

Whitney, James 6 25 90 

Wcnban, Simeon 1212 782 40 

And In accordance with law, and an order of tho Board 
of Trustees, made on the fourth day of May, 1867, so many 
shares of each parcel of said stock as may be necessary, 
will be sold nt public auction, at the salesroom of Maurice 
Dore & Co., No. 327 Montgomery street, Ran Francisco. Cal., 
on Tuesday, the second day of July, 1807, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, noon, of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex 
penscs of sale. 

R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 
Offlce, 331 Montgomery street, San Francisco. jelfi 

Postponement.— The above sale Is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the 29th day of July, 1867, at the same hour and 
place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

je29 R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 



Tuolumne Mountain Gold and Silver Mining 

Company, Old Buchanan Ledge, Tuolumne County, State 

of California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the tenth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of one dollar (SI) per share was 
levied upon tne capital stock of said Company, payable 
Immediately, in Unin-d States gold and silver coin, to the 
Si-crelury.D. F. Verdenal, office, 22 Court Block, 636 Clay 
street, San Francisco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirteenth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless paymcnl shall be made before, will 



be sold on Saturday, the thlriy-flrst (31st) day of August, 
1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

D F. VERDENAL, Secretary. 
Office, 22 Court Block, 636 Clay street, San Francisco. JylS 

Whltlatch Gold and Silver Mining Company* 

Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty first day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of fifteen dollars ($16) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
on or before the second day of August, 1867, in United States 
currency, to the Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon whlclisn id assessment .-mall re main unpaid 
op Hie secoml day of August, 1867, shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public auction, 
und unless payment shall be made before, will be sold 
on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of September, 1B67, to 
pay tho delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Offlce, N. E. oorner Front and Clay streets. San Francisco. 

ogr-At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, 1867, the order levying assessment (No. 7) made Febru- 
ary 14th, 1867, was rescinded. 

je29 N. O. FASSETT, Secretary. 



Important to CuUtoi-nians.— Many Inventors have 
lately had the|r claims lor Patents seriously (and in some 
cases fatallyjdelaycd by the uuqualiflcatlon of agents who 
have not complied with the Government license and revenue 
laws, as well as other new and Imperative regulations. 
These discrepancies, although arising from the Inexperlencs 
of honest agents, are nonetheless dangerous to apnllctints 
for patents, whose safest course is to trust their 'business 
with none but active and experienced solicitors. The Min- 
ing akd Scientific Pri;sb Patk.nt AcENCThas strictly 00m- 
Slled with the requisitions of the Department, and properly 
led all necessary papers as Claim Agents, 



46 



$to ptfwwtj m\& $tit\Mk <g%m. 



Machinery. 



PATENT AMALGAMATOR. 

Tlicse Machines Stand Unrivaled. 

For rapidly pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be, spared to 
have them constructed in the most perfect manner, and of 
the great number now in operation, not one has everre- 

a uired repairs. The constant and increasing demand for 
lein is sufficient evidence of their merits. 
They are constructed so as to apply steam directly Into 
the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows : 
The pan being filled, the motion of the muller forces the 
pnlp to the center, where it is drawn down through the ap- 
erture and between the grinding surfaces. Thence it is 
thrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. The curved 
plares again draw it to the center, where it passes down, 
and to the circumference as before. Thus It Is constantly 
massing in a regular flow between the grinding surfaces and 
uto the quicksilver, until the ore is reduced to an impalpa- 
ble powder, and the metal amalgamated. 

Setters made on the same principle excel all others.— 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in contact 
with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
pletely absorbed. 

Mill men are invited to examine these pans and setters for 
themselves, at the PACIFIC FOUNDRY, 

lvl San Francisco. 



I 



$85 for Hunter's 

Improyed Concentrator. 

The patentee Is prepared to sell his Concentrators for 
the above price, and guarantees, When the machines arc 
run according to directions, to give 2U per cent better re- 
sults than from anv Concentrator built on this Coast, and 
will refund the m'onev if they will not perform what is 
claimed for them. Machines with copper plates, will cost 
$10 extra. The Machine can be 

Seen in Operation 
At Booth & Co's Union Foundry, up stairs. Parties pur- 
chasing Concentrators will do well to examine belore buy- 
ing others of pretended merit. Persons desiring it can have 
a practical concentration made of tailings at any time, and 
prove. the working of the machine. 

FOB §!50. 

HUNTER'S EUREKA AMALGAMATOR. 

For sale, the right to build and use lit mills. A working plan 
will be furnuhtd each purchaser. Five machines can be 
seen in operation at the Eureka Mill, Grass Valley. The 
cost of the ironsforthe machine, without the iron-box, is 
about SUM). The box will answer of wood. 

By reference tu the Mining and Scientifllc Press of May 
25th. a full description oft lie above Machines may be found. 

For particulars, send for Circulars, or address 
ANDREW HUNTER, 

25vlitf Union Foundry. Sun Francisco. 



BLAKE'S PATENT 
QUARTZ CRUSHER. 

CAUTION ! 

The owners of the Patent for this valuable machine, In 
order to facilitate the protection of their rights against nu- 
merous infringers, procured, some time since, a reissue of 
the Patent, bearing date January 9th, 1866. 
Thin Patent secures the exclusive right to em- 
ploy in St oite- Breaking Machine** Up- 
right Con vcment Jaw*, actuated 
by a Revolving Shaft. 
<- All persons who are violating the Patent by the unau- 
thorized making, selling or using machines in which quartz 
or other material is crushed between upright convergent 
aws, actuated by a revolving shaft, are hereby warned 
that they are appropriating the property of others, and 
that they will be held responsible In law and in damages. 

Several infringing machines are made and offered for 
sale in ihis city, upon which Patents have been obtained. 
Manufacturers, purchasers and users, are notified that such 
Patents do not authorize the use of the original invention, 
and that such machines cannot be used without incurring 
liability lor damages. BLAKE £ TYLER, 

UvUtf Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



QUARTZ MINERS, MILL1HEW, 

And others contemplating the erection of Reduction 
Works, for either Gold or Silver Ores, your attention is 
called to a new, superior 

First Class Mill, 

In all respect<, with Pans and Separators complete. The 
Jlill is adapted for 20or 40 Stamps. 
.OS-Full particulars maybe had by calling on Messrs. 
Palmer, Knox & Co., Golden State Foundry, or 

dT. K. HITCHCOCK, 
19vH-3m Millwright, Russ House. 



Steam Pumps, 

FOR DRAIXISO MINES OR ELEVATINU WATER TO 
ANV BIUHT. 

PICKERING'S GOVERNORS 

For Sieam Engines. 

Griffiai'd's Injectors, 

For Feeding Boilers. 

STODDART'S IRON WORKS, 

Ueule. Street, San Franclsco.a 

23V12 3m 



BLAKE'S QUARTZ BREAKER ! 
PRICES eTedUCED! 

MACHINES OF ALL SIZES FOR SALE 
— av — 

¥M. P. BLAKE, 

Corner First aud Mission nt recta, or Box 8,077 



3vl3f 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



NELSON & B DOBLE, 

aiie.vts for; 

Thomas Firth & Sons' Cast Steel, Files, 

Etc., Shear, Spring, German. Flow, Blister and Toe Calk 

Steel; manufacturers of 

Mill Picks, Sledges, Hammers, Picks, 

Stone Cutters', Blacksmiths' and Horse- Slioers' Tools, 

319 and 321 Pius street, 

Between Montgomery and Sansoinc, gan Francisoo. 

lOvliqr 



Brodie's Patented improvements 




FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

Gold and Silver Ores. 

BRODIE'S PATENTED IMPROVED QUARTZ CRUSHER. 
The attention of all interested in Mining Is respect- 
fully called to this Improved Machine for Breaking or 
Snalling Quartz, or other Rock, possessine. as it does, sim- 
plicity of action and lightness of construction, so far as Is 
compatible with strength and durability. Inconsequence 
of these advantages, the advertisers are enabled to oiler 
the e machines ro the public at the following low terms: 
No. 1— Or i0 inch Crusher, capable of reducing from 

three to four tons of quartz per hour, no piece be 

ing larger than a walnut— price 4 

No. 2— Or 15 inch Crusher, capable of similarly putting 

through five to six tons per hour. 850 

No. 3— Or 13-inch Crusher, will in a similar manner 

crush from seven to eight tons per hour l,20O 

EXPLANATION OF THE ABOVE ENGRAVING. 

The frame is made of cast Iron, bound with heavy 
wrought iron bands, making it very strong, and nt the same 
time light and portable. The crusher is bolted to a wood 
frame of sufficient bight to clear ihe ltv-wluel. and allow 
the crushed quartz to pass off. The dotted lmesshow the 
movable and stationary laws. Letter A represents the 
eccentric shaft by which the power is applied direct to the 
movable jaw. B represents the movable iaw, and C the 
fixed jaw. D represents the link or radius bar, E repre- 
sents the bolts for regulating the opening. F, which can be 
regulated at pleasure, so as to graduate to the size to which 
it is intended £nc quartz shall he crushed. G represents the 
feed opening, by which the size of the machine is desig- 
nated. 

The arrow on the fly-wheel shows the direction to drive 
the eccentric, which, in combination with the link. D, gives 
the movable jaw, B. a forward and downward motion at the 
sf.me time, and which makes the hardest rock yield and 
aonarnte into fragments of any desired size. 

The above Crushers have been recently erected and are 
now successfully - employed at Bear Valley, Mariposa coun- 
ty. Rawhide Ranch. Tuolumne county, Excelsior Mine. 
Lake District. Nevada cnuntv, and can be BPen in opera 
tion at the Fulton Foundry, First Street, San Francisco. 

The following testimonial respecting the effectiveness of 
this Crusher, lias been received from the Superintendent 
of the " Rawhide Ranch" Mine, in Tuoliimne Countv: 
RAWHinK Ranch, Tuolumne Co., Sept. 28, 1866. 

James Brodie, Esq., San Francisco— My Dear Sir: It gives 
me pleasure to inform you that I have for the past three 
months had one of your largest sized Rock Crushers in 
use, at the Rawhide Ranch Mining Company's Mill, which 
hisentirely met tny expectations; and I have no hesita- 
tion in recommending it to all who are in need of a machine 
for rapidly, cheaplv and properly preparing quartz for the 
stamps. Yours truly, It. P. JOHNSON, 

Supt. Rawhide Ranch Quartz Mill. 

BRODIE'S PATENT IMPROVED GERMAN AMALGA- 
MATING BARREL.— This Barrel obtained ft premium nt 
the Fair of the Mechmiics' Institute In San Francisco, in 
1S64. Further particulars will be ailorded on application 
to the subscribers. 

Those infringing the patent rights to the above improved 
Barrel, are hereby informed that on and after the 1st No 
vember, IS66, the royally charged for using the same will 
be raised to the sum of 5100 per Barrel. 

A diagram, with explanations of this machine, will be 
found in the ,l Mining and Scientific Press," of September 
29th, 18G6 

BRODIE'S PATENT WIND-BLAST SEPARATOR FOR 
DRY CRUSHING.— This Dry Crusher has been found the 
most economical and effective mode of crushing ores in 
Mexico, California and Nevada. Diagrams and explana- 
tions afforded on application to the subscribers. 

A dr.-twing and full description of this machine will be 
found In the Mining and Scientific Press of Sept. 2--M.1866. 
BKODIE «fe EAUCLIFP, 
Express Building. 402 Montgomery street, 

12vl3lf Run Francisco. 



LEFFEL'6 

American Double Turbine 




THESE WHEELS, DNEQUALED AND UNRIVALED IN 
the United States or the world, have been fully tested 
on this coast, more than forty being in use at this date in 
California and Oregon, driving all kinds of machinery, Saw 
Mills, Flour Mills, Quartz Mills, etc., etc., etc. 

California References.— E. Stocton, Folsom; O. Sim- 
mons, Oakland, (Mill at Clear Lake); Morgan Coville, Lex- 
ington, Santa Clara County; J. Y. McMillan, Lexington 
Santa Clara County. JtSS-Send for Circular, to 

KNAFP <fe GRANT, 
Agents for California. 
26vl3-lyq 310 Washington street, San Francisco 



Quartz Mill Construction and Superintendence 

THE UNDERSIGNED IS AT PRESENT OPEN FOR AN 
engagement as a working Superintendent in the con- 
struction or operation of a quartz Mill. Has had five years 
steady and successful experience in working ores In Washoe, 
and U practiced in saving sulptiurets and the treatment of 
rebellious ores Is prepared to furnish references for all 
the necessary qualifications of an intelligent, faithful and 
reliable quartz operator. Address F. ST. SHAW. 

San Francisco, care Mining and Scientific Press. 26vl5Sm 



IVotioe to Miners, 

Well-Borers and Water Companies. 

MPRAG IS NOW PREPARED TO MANUFACTURE 
. Hydraulic and Artesian Well Pipes in the best work- 
manlike manner, and at the lowest market rates. Having 
made large additions to my stock of machinery for that 
branch of business, I am prepared to fill all orders with dis. 
patch, and guarantee entire satisfaction. I also lnanur'ae 



ture Mississippi Stoves, oi the latest Improved patterns, for 
vessels of all classes. Also, Ship Plumbing dojie^ 

8vl3-ly 



M. PB1G, 

Stove Store. No. 125 Clay street, below Davis. 



Mechanical 2>ra. , vriiigs. 

Persons wUhlng Mechanical Drawings can obtain the 
services of competont draughtsmen, by applying to this 

OfilOfl. 



HEALTH! HEALTH! 

fi 



w 



■ I'TAYLOR'S 30N: 

<fatl!ii. s. f. Ill 



ft 



of 

a * 




To prevent this, purchase one of 

Taylor's Stench Traps and Garbage 
Baskets, 

And promote the health, comfort and elennllness of yon r 
family, i For description see Mining and Scientific Press, 
April 6, 1967.] Sold wholesale and retail by TAYLOR & 
SONS, at No. 439 Pacific street, San Francisco. 15vl4tf 



THE CELEBRATED 

Self Generating Portable 
Gas Lamp. 



This extraordinary Lamp pro- 
duces its own gas by the vaptir- 
" ttion of Petroleum, Naphiha, 
_. Benzine. It emits neither 
smoke norsmeli. and btirnswi n 
a pure white flame, equal hi in- 
tensity to an ordinary gas burn- 
er, and at an expense of from one 
to three cents per hour only, ac- 
cording to the quantity of light 
required. It is peculiarly ndup- 
ted ior mining purposes, alitor 
stores, lactones, billiard rooms, 
and. In fact, for all purposes 
where regular gas is not availa- 
ble, and tor which it is an ad- 
mirable substitute. As an eiut- 
door light it .stands unrivalled, 
burning with undiminished bril- 
liancy in a strong wind. 



■Direction* for "Use. 

Charge the reservoir with the prepared fluid, or with 
Benzine, from half to ihree-fourths full; ullow a ponton to 
run through Into the cnp. then turn oft" the tap and ignite 
the fluid, which will beat the burner sufficiently to gener- 
ate the gas. which will be seen issuing from the top. The 
tan must now be turned mi, and a steady light will be main- 
tained till the whole ot the contents of the reservoir Is con- 
sumed . 

A small needle, bent at the point and fixed In a holder, 
may be occasionally required to clear ihe minute hole 
throu'.-h which \be pus issues, and the regulating screw at 
the bottom turned a IKtle back: but care must be taken not 
fo force the screw too high, ami it should necer be uged lo 
extinguish the light— by turning the tap off, it will gradually 
go out. 

When necessary to renew the cotton which is placed In 
fhe lower pipe to prevent the too rapid flow of ihe fluid, the 
lamp should be placed in a vise and the burner screwed off 
The burnt cotton must then he withdrawn, and a fresh 
piece of smut cotton rag. one inch wide and Jour or Ave 
inches long, should be doubled over a piece of wire, and 
Inserted Into the pipe— the ends cut short off, the burner 
again screwed on with a little white lead, and the lamp is 
rcadv for use 

Manufactured solely by JOHN J.HUGKS, original propri- 
etor. Factory, North Beach, San Francisco; and for sale 
by his agents in every citv and town throughout the State. 
}SvU-3n_ 



E- O. HUNT, 

Manufacturer of 

Windmill*, So roe- Powers 

PmnjiH, Pumping 

IV uiu-s and 

t; earing. 

Host's Apjustjulk Wij»d Mills 
to haviiull the sails so arranged as 
turn edgeways to the wind wl.uii 
the mill is stopped. The sails can 
be set at any angle to suit the 
force of the wind, while the mill 
isruuning.hy mcansof the brake 
lever at the foot of the mill, by 
any person. 

Hunt's Sklp Regulating Mill 
Is strong, durable and cheap. It 
is provided wiih means for stop- 
ping, in the most violent winds. 
This mill is well known through- 
? out the State. 
Tread Horse-Powers, Swap Horse- Powers, Pumps in great 
variety. Single and Double-Acting. Frames and Gearing 
for running pumps, from steam or other power, constantly 
on hand and built to order. Water Tanks built to order. 
No. 28 Second St., and 1U8 and ill) Jessie St , 
2vl5qy San Francisco. 




ROOT'S PATENT 

FORCE BLAST BLOWEK. 

Adapted forSmcltintr. Foundry, Mining and Steamships. 
Requires 50 per cent less power than any Biower now in 
use. For further particulars, address KEEP, BLAKE & 
CO., Stockton; or Wm. T. Garrett, corner Mission and Fre- 
mont streets, San Francisco. Ivl5 lOptf 



National Mineral Land Law, Instructions, 
Blanks, Etc. 

Copies of the Act of Congress, approved July 
26th, 1866, relating to the Location of Minera 
Lands, together with the instructions to the 

United States Registers and Receivers and Sur- 
veyors General," from the Commissioner of the 
General Land Office Department of the Interior, 
dated at Washington, Jan. 14th, 1867, can be had 
at this office. Also a full set of blanks for making 
applicatioos, advertising, etc. Address Dewey & 
Co., office Mining and Scientific Press, San 
Francisco. 



The Fire Engines of Europe. 

Nothing strikes an American with more 
surprise in a large European city than the 
backwardness manifested there in the intro- 
duction of. appliances for the extinguish- 
ment of fires. Even in the British Islands, 
according to the Mechmiics' Magazine, there 
are hut two oities which have ordered a 
second steam fire engine. A Paris corres- 
pondent of the Alia, of this city, gives the 
following description of the Fire Depart- 
ment of Paris, as it appeared upon a recent ■ 
public occasion : 

They are dressed in the same manner as 
Lafayette Hook and Ladder Company used 
to be in your city before the Paid super- 
seded the Volunteer Fire Department — 
brass helmets and all that sort of things — 
and are a fine, well-drilled body of men. 
Each company, attended by its band, 
marched in front of a pavilion for inspec- 
tion, worked their engine, and then started 
off on a dead run from the field. The 
functionaries who perform the duties of 
those hearty young fellows who, when the 
engine is being whirled through the streets, 
shout with stentorian lungs, "Lively, now 
boys, lively!" "break her down, boys! 
break her down !" are furnished with trum- 
pets, and keep up a very inspiring toot 
while the company is in motion. In point 
of melody, I must say it is an improvement 
upon our way of doing things. In relation, 
however, to the apparatus of these fire 
companies, I am not prepared to go into 
great ecstacies. It resembles more a bath 
tub on wheels than a fire engine. It is 
drawn by six or eight firemen easily. The 
balance of the company are furnished with 
buckets ! When a fire breaks out, these lat- 
ter station themselves in a line to the near- 
est supply of water, and pass bucket after 
bucket to the engine, where it is by hand 
labor forced into the hose. They have no 
idea of suction hose in France. They have 
been passing water in buckets to their en- 
gines for centuries, and they will stick to 
that way of doing things until the Emperor 
takes the matter in hand, and woe to the 
unfortunate youth who, returning late from 
a party with white vest and white kids, 
stumbles upon the fire line. To work he 
has to go, and that without cessation, until 
the fire is put out. As might naturally be 
expected under these circumstances, people 
in Paris, instead 'of running to a fire, run 
away from it with the utmost celerity. To 
the steam fire engine the people of Paris 
will, of course, have to come in the end, no 
matter how strongly they oppose innova- 
tion. So efficient is their mode of dealing 
with the " devouring element," that a com- 
pany of "pompiers " (as they are called) is 
stationed in almost all the public buildings. 
The fire department of the Exposition is 
composed of more men than are considered 
necessary to insure the safety of the city of 
San Francisco. Several thousand men are 
now kept in Paris lounging about their 
quarters, with brass helmets on their heads, 
who might be engaged in some branch of 
productive industry, because there is an 
objection to keep up with the progress of 
the times, or, more properly speaking, a 
disinclination to accept new ideas, particu- 
larly if those new ideas are of foreign 
growth. 



Cokal Jewelby.— Coral jewelry has be- 
come so fashionable in Paris that it com- 
mands, even in the rough, a price equal to 
about twenty times its weight in gold. The 
rose pink variety commands the highest 
price. In one of the show cases at the 
Paris Exhibition, there is a necklace, con- 
sisting entirely of coral, which is valued 
at $2,300 in gold. The same show case con- 
tains a great variety of other coral orna- 
ments, such as bracelets, ear-rings, cameos, 
etc. Their great cost is due to their exquis- 
itely delicate and elaborate workmanship. 
Heretofore jewelry of this description has 
generally been conspicuous for its clumsi- 
ness and exceeding want of taste. Under 
certain conditions, coral is an excellent ma- 
terial for art Its beautiful color, its solid- 
ity of texture, resistance to atmospheric 
action, etc., greatly recommend it There 
are some fifteen varieties of coral known to 
commerce, but a small portion of which are 
fit for artistic finish. Natural coral of the 
most choice variety is worth twenty times 
its weight in gold, and has been for years. 
One of the finest specimens in this country 
is to be found in the cabinet of Yale 
College. 



<Thc pining and JScicntifk §tm. 



47 



White Copper. — The London Miring 
Journal, Borne fivo or six years ago, gave 
the following curious statement about the 
alleged manufaeture of "white copper" by 
the Chinese. The statement was vouched 
for by a correspondent, and 'was given as 
follows : 

Tradition says that the Yun-Xiin district 
formerly prodoced white copper, the ingots 
of which that are preserved being of a fine 
graiu, and harder than that at present ob- 
tained. The copper wheuji-aised is red, and 
from the description given by the various 
workmen, the writer learned that tho ore, 
when taken from the mine, was placed on a 
layer of wood, covered also with wood and 
kindled. At the Lon-Kon-Tchongmine this 
operation was repeuted seven times, in others 
five, and in some only three times, experi- 
ence being the only guide as to the number 
of times necessary for each description of 
ore. The ore thus heated was reduced to 
powder, or small grains, and 700 pounds 
taken therefrom was placed in a large fur- 
nace on a bed formed of a mixture of coal 
and oak charcoal, covered with some of the 
same mixture, and kindled ; this operation 
was not repeated, but if the ore were of 
good quality, the result would be from 220 
to 300 pounds of cop] ler, in a roughly -formed 
ingot Four small furnaces were then 
brought into requisition iu place of the 
larger one above mentioned ; a fact that 
claimed particular attention, and a point 
upon xphich the workmen were unanimous, 
was, that neither coal nor oak charcoal 
ought to be employed in this part of tho 
operation, but that it was absolutely neces- 
sary to use fir charcoal. From this rough 
ingot eighty pounds were taken, and twenty 
pounds placed in each of the furnaces. 
when, if the ingot were good, it gave about 
12% pounds for each furnace. Two of 
these pieces were taken and again submitted 
to the firo, with five pounds of the best red 
copper, a great heat was obtained, and about 
nino pounds of copper was usually the re- 
sult. These preparatory operations being 
completed, three pounds of the double re- 
fined and three pounds of the triple refined, 
mixed with 2*^ pounds of the best red cop- 
per, were fused, and when the molten iron 
began to show a white heat, one ounce of 
tin (kienne) was thrown in, and the copper 
almost instantaneously became white ; the 
product, if the operation was well conducted, 
being about i 1 /, pounds. 

Mojtcments to Gentcs. — There are to be 
monuments erected in the city of New York, 
for two of the greatest geniuses of the world, 
and claimed as the children of that city — 
Robert Fulton and Professor Morse — inven- 
tors of the steamboat and the telegraph. 

Bells. — It is said that bells will prevent 
the depredation of dogs among your sheep. 
A dog that knows enough to kill sheep also 
knows enough to be still and sly about it 



The Commercial Herald 

AND 

MARKET REVIEW 

Will be issued early on 
EVERY STEAMER-DAY MORNING, 

(TRI-MONTHLY). 

OrFiCK--Soulhwest corner Washington and Battery streets, 

Opposite Post iniio' and Custom House. 

' The HERALD will contain lull and reliable commercial 

details, uud elaborate articles on tlie monetary a Hairs of 

the Pacific Coast. 

The Letter Sheet Market Review, 

Containing selections from tho COMMERCIAL HERALD. 

E rimed on tissue paper, for transmission abroad, will 
e published simultaneously with thai paper. Also, publi- 
cation office of the 

Woelily feStoclc Circular. 



OTJX NAIL*. 

'2,000 KEGS ASSORTED SIZES, 

For aale In any quantity, to close invoice, at the very 

Slowest Rates, 1>y 

THOS. H. SELBY & CO., 

116 and 118 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 19vH 3m 

Our Patent Agency, 

The Patent Aqekct of the Mining and Scientific Press 
has been signalized with remarkable success during the 
past two years. The Importance to the Inventive genius o f 
this coast of a thorough and reliable agency for the solicita 
tion of Letters Patent from the United States and foreign 
Governmcntscannotboover-ratcd.and the Proprietorsof the 
Press, feeling the responsibility which rests upon them, and 
the reward which must follow the faithful performance of 
their trusts, will take care to afford Inventors every advan- 
tage to be secured to them through a competent and re- 
sponsible agency upon this coast. 



HIXKLE & CAPP'S 
CENTRIFUGAL ORE GRINDER AND AMALGAMATOR. 



Patent uutcu April ICtb, 18G7. 




For Grinding and Amalgamating 
t It urges off Ore, 

Arranged as shown in the first engraving, the pan Is 
adapted for grinding und amalgamating separate charges 
of ore offtUOlbs. each, doing Its work rapidly, thoroughly 
and effectually. 



This sectional engraving ex- 
lilbiUmore clearly the arrange 
mem and >hupc of the grind- 
Ins parts of the machine. It, 
and the other engravings; will 
be more clearly understood by 
reference to the accompany- 
ing explanation. 




For Grinding und Discharging Contin- 
uously. 

Arranged as shown In the second engraving, all Ihc into 
tiir gi -unliug parts being I lie same as shown In first view, 
tins [mil is uduptcfi fur receiving nnd grinding and dis- 
charging continuously crushed quartz as last as supplied 
by a nve-Stamp battery, with No. 4 or 5 screens. A -eluin- 
mejr J' or same similar contrivance, to carrv ofl'theclav, 
slime nml surplus wuter, In to be placed between it und tlie 

battery. 



Explanation. — E, muller- 
haiucr F, muller plate or 
shoe, Q, side dies. I, sup- 
porting lip D, bearing sur- 
face, i', feeder. X, weight to 
counter-balance wear ot nr ' 
ler plates, or shoes. U, co . . 
used iii working charges of 
ore. The dark shade on the 
bottom of the pan represents 
one of the grooves lor mer- 
cury. 



Halt" Section or Top View. 

The Centrifugal Ore Grinder. 



This new GRINDER and AMALGAMATOR is extremely 
simple and compact In its construction. The principle 
availed of is entirely novel. The grinding is effected by 
perpendicular mullers, pressed laterally by centrifugal 
torcc a-:ii:i>t perpendicular iron dies, fitted to the inner 
sides of the pan. It is to be run ot a speed of from 60 to 80 
revolutions per minute, according to the hardness of 
tho rock to be crushed. The pressure upon every part of 
the grinding surfaces is direct and uniform, and they wear 
with straight and true faces from first to last, comforming 
also to the shape of the sides of the pan, so that the work 
performed with old mullers and plates Is as thorough and 
perfect as with new ones. The pulp enters readily between 
the mullers and side dies, tho pressure being light in front 
and heaviest at the heel of the muller, tht-re Is no strain 
upon any of the parts, and no liability to breakage or dis- 
arrangement, ami no wear except that whiUi is useful on 
the grinding surfaces. The work done is performed without 
jarring, jerking, straining or clogging, with extreme regu- 
and evenness, i lie pulp being of great and uniform fine- 
ness. It is not liable to be clogged, nor to be obstructed, 
stopped, Impeded or broken, by coarse pieces of rock, 
pick points or iron, accidentally introduced with the 
crushed ore. ns these can readily pass each muller sep- 
arately, without Interfering with or affecting tlie otiier 
mullers, each of which is independent, or can rest upon 
the bottom below the mullers, without inconvenience, as 
the arms play freely an inch above the bottom of the pan. 

It is more readily cleaned up than any other pan, as each 
muller can be Luted out separately by hand, and ihcrc is no 
necessity for lifting the revolving cone or driver, which is 
also ensily turned, there being no friclion when not in use, 
or rapid revolution. The bulk of the mercury is not ground 
up with the rock, but lies below the lower ends of the mul- 
lers lu n groove, and iu another groove on the cover of the 
nun, where all the pulp and metal passes continually over 
it without cutting or carrying it away. The mullers and side 



dies are easily removed at any time, or when worn out 
and an extra set of mullers is furnished with eacli pun sold, 
It Is also adapted tor grinding cement, sulphurets, roasted 
ores, etc. 

We claim all these advantages for our Pan, and that it 
will do more and better work, with less power, and less at- 
tention and manual labor, more rapidly and with less ex- 
pense, titan any other pan or muller made tor the same 
purposes, and claimed to; he ot equal or greater capacity 
Wo will sell them for use on condition that li. when lairlj 
tried they fail to answer these promises, they may be re 
turned. 

l f or full description and illustration, see Mining and Scl 
entillc Press, June 15, 1867. 

Hinkle & Capp's Centrifugal Ore Grinder 

and Amalgamator 
May be seen in operation, and examined, at the European 
Metallurgical Works, on Bryant, between Third and Fourth 
streets, San Francisco, where all interesied in mining and 
milling operations are invited to inspect it. Its weight, as 
arranged for continuous grinding anddischargo, with extra 
set of six mullers, is about 2.700 lbs. ; or as arranged for 
grinding and amalgamating single charges of 800 lbs. of ore, 
also with extra set of mullers, about 3,0110 lbs. Price, as 
above, completely fitted and ready for use, either way, 
S&UU, gold coin. 

Forfurther particulars, apply by letter to PHILIP HIN 
KLE and CHARLES S. (JAPP, No. 5i3 Clay street, below 
Montgomery, San Francisco, Cal. or personally to the above, 
orS. P. KtMBAkL, Esq., at the European Metallurgical 
Works, on Bryant street, between Third and Fourth streets, 
or at the Miners' Foundry, First street, near Folsoni, where 
thev are manufactured. 

(Kg-Send for Circulars. 

PHILIP HINKLE. and 
CHARLES S. CAPP. Patentees, 

25vU-tf 613 Clay street, San Francisco. 



■■Sill 




THE CENTRAL PARK Of THE PAOIFIO. 
Woodward's Gardens, 

ART OALLEKY, 

MUSEUM, QYMNASIUM, 

— AND— 

ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 

THESE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ARE VISITED DAILY 
by hundreds of the pleasure-seeking i uhlic. and all 
agree in pronouncing them the best aud onlv first-class sub- 
urban resort on the Pacific Coast, 

The extensive grounds are covered with the rarest trees 
and shrubbery, making it a most desirable spot for small 
parties wishing toenjoy a Pic-Nic. 

To all departments new attractions are being constantly 
added . 

These Gardens are accessible by the Howard, Folsom and 
Market street Oars. 

Entrances on Mission and Valencia streets, between Thir- 
teenth and Fourteenth. OPEN EVERY DAY. 

Admission to all parts, 25 Cent*. Children, under 12 
years, half prioe. 2-ivUqr 



THE "WTLLC0X & GIBBS 

IMPROVED NOISELESS 

Family Sewing Machine 

Challenges the world. It has beaten the Florence badly 
Come aud see it, or send for Report of the trial. 

SAMl'EL SWIFT, Agent, 
13vli-f>m £03 Kearny street, near Sutter. 



Pratt's Abolition Oil. 

FOR ABOLISHING PAIN — THE BERT REMEDY IN 
existence for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Paralvsis, Head- 
ache, Toothache, Sore Thniat, Dlptlieria. Weak, ywulen and 
still' Joints, Contracted Cords and Muscles, Cramps. Colic, 
Diurrhcea, Cholera, Pains in the Breast, Lame Back, and 
all aches and pains. It is the poor man's friend, and the 
best family physician. Full directions accompany each 
bottle. Price 51) cents and $1 per bottle. For snle by all 
dealers in medicines. Sole Proprietors, A. McBOYLE A 
CO., Druggists und Chemists, *>3<i Sacramento street, op- 
posite What Cheer House, San Francisco. lOyli-ly 



GOVERNMENT HOUSE, 

Corner of Sansome and Washington sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MTHE STREET CARS PASS THIS HOUSE IN 
every direction, evervten minutes. 
Tlie rooms of the House are well furnished, large 
and airy, are let hy the month, week or day, and are 
kept In superb order. There is a Restaurant attached for 
Indies aim families, where, persons can bourd lor one-half 
they are required to pay at hotels. 
\M3-fim SANBORN & CO 



UVBSaALL. 



W. WYLIE. 



GLASGOW 

IRON & METAL IMPORTING COMPANY, 

Nos. 25 and 27 Fremont street, near Market, 

SAN FRAXCISCO. 

Bar and Sheet iron; Boiler Plates and Tubes; Gas and 
Wator Pipes, Gas Fittings, Anvils, Cast Steal, oto. 18vI4-2m 



Portable Steam Engines! 

"Houdlvy'*" and " llltiliicr'." Moke, 




UOADLEYH 
FOUR SIZES, 

8, 10, IS, and 15-Horse Power, 




«3ti2NfBh-ERL 



3 to 40-Horse Power. 




HITTINGEIVS. 
THREE SIZES, 

5, 7, and 10-Horse Power 




HITTINGERW, 
TWO SIZES, 

5 and 7-Horse Power, 



COMBINING THE MAXIMUM OF EFFICIENCY. DUB- 
abillty, and Economy, with the Minimum of weight 
and price. , , 

These Engines are favorably known, a large number 
being in *se on this coast for hoisting, pumping, threshing, 
milling and mining purposes. , „_, 

Steam can he got up on these Engines In fifteen mtnutca 
after reach in e the place of operation, nnd thetime, expense 
of setting boilers, machinery, and "construction account" 
saved, (which Is often the difference between the successful 
and unsuccessful prosecution of milling enterprises,) in 
fact, tho portable principle is tlie ptoncer'sfriend, and ena- 
bles him to draw engines on their own wheels to his cabin 
door, and plant on the outermost confines ot civilization 
the saw and gristmill, and it has done and will do more 
to help subdue the continent than any other ol the modern 
motors which are crowding society and normalizing the 

All sizes on hand from 3 to 30 horse power, with and 
without carriages. 
Also, Portable Saw and Grist Mil's. 
For sale by TSEADWELL «fcCO., 



9vU-6mI6p 



Corner of Front and Market street* 



48 



©to Pining m& gtimtttk gum 



The Pabis Exhibition. — Bayard Taylor 
in a letter to the New York Ti-ibtme, under 
date of May 14th, says that the visions of 
overflowing hotels, of crowds of bewildered 
strangers looking for lodgings, of imposi- 
tions, of unheard-of expenses, etc., have 
happily proven false. Comfort and moder- 
ate charges are the rule. Mr. Taylor, who 
has seen all the great International Exhibi- 
tions which have been held up to the pres- 
ent time, expresses the opinion that the 
present one, though it is not quite equal, 
in its general features, to the London Exhi- 
bition of 1851, is nevertheless fully entitled 
to be considered a success. In some re- 
spects it is short of what had been antici- 
pated, yet in others it is far more than could 
have been expected. He thinks that these 
Exhibitions are held at too frequent inter- 
vals — that once in ten years is as often as 
the world requires such enormous under- 



Dakgeeous. — Pnlu mattresses left lying 
upon shed roofs and other places in the 
rear of dwellings are very liable to be set 
on fire by flying sparks, and thus kindle 
dangerous fires. Several accidents of this 
kind have recently occurred. Pulu takes 
fire from a spark almost as readily as tinder. 



Mining and SciEtmrio Prkss.— ThU valuable journal haa 
closed its fourteenth volume and entered upon Its tlltcentli. 
It Is a publication that should have a wide circulation 
among our mining and mechanical population. It pub- 
lishes, in addition to the most complete summary of mining 
news, a vast amount of information on the application of 
acience to mining and the mechanic arts. It contains no- 
tices aud descriptions of all new mining processes, and all 
machines Intended to facilitate the extraction of the prec- 
ious metal from ore and rock with which it is blended. It 
also chronicles all new inventions, and. In most instances, 
contains drawings to illustrate them. To miners and me- 
chanics It is a paper of incalculable value, and should be in 
the hands of all who desire to keep themselves posted in 
the progress being made in these departments.— TreJia 
Union. 

The Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, has en- 
tered on its sixteenth volume. The Press is worth its weight 
In gold to the artisan and the minor, and is always filled 
with original matter of deep interest to all classes.— Amador 
Ledger, July I'Ath. 



Br Mail.— The Mining and Scientific Pre.™ will be sent by 
mail to any part of the civilized world. In case of removal 
subscribers nave only to inform us of the post office address 
of their old and new location, and the paper will be sen 
accordingly. 



Metallurgist. — A practical metallurgist, experienced in 
all branches of his business, and particularly in the manu- 
facture of tough copper, wants employment Hls address 
can be had the office of the Miniug and Scientific Press. 
25V14-4W* 




PIANOS, 
ORGANS, 

All kinds 



MTJSiICA.1.. INSTRUMENTS, 

Sheet Music, Music Books, Strings, etc. Lnrgest Importers 
in San Francisco. Send orders to 

KOHLER, CHASE & CO., 
26v 4nrl6p 4k»l Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



SEND 
SEND 
SEND 
SEND 
SEND 
SEND 



YOUR 
YOUK 
YOUR 
YOUR 
YOUR 
YOUR 



ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 
ORDERS TO 
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ORDERS TO 
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TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 
TRUESDELL, 



DEWEY & CO., 
DEWEY & CO., 
DEWEY & CO., 
DEWEY & CO., 
DEWEY l& 
DEWEY & 



CO., 
CO., 



BOOK 
BOOK 
BOOK 
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BOOK 



AND 
AND 
AND 
AND 
AND 
AND 



JOB 
JOB 
JOB 
JOB 
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JOB 



PRINTERS, 
PRINTERS, 
PRINTERS, 
PRINTERS, 
PRINTERS, 
PRINTERS, 



MINING 
MINING 
MINING 
MINING 
MINING 
MINING 



& SCIENTIFIC 
& SCIENTIFIC 
& SCIENTIFIC 
& SCIENTIFIC 
& SCIENTIFIC 
& SCIENTIFIC 



PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 
PRESS 



OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 
OFFICE 



O. P. Truesdellt having this day become associated in 
the business of the MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS JOB 
PRINTING OFFICE, the same will hereafter be conducted 
under the firm-name of '-Trucsdell, Dewey & Co." at the 
old place. No. 50S Clay street. With additional new ma- 
terial and the best of workmen employed, we can guar- 
antee entire satisfaction to all old and new customers. 

TRUESDELL, DEWEY & CO. 

Ban Francisco, April 10, 1867. 



HENDY'S LATEST IMPROVED CONCENTRATORS, 




FOR OOH.r> A.3Vr> WILDER, ORES, 

With Revolving Stirrers and Rotary Distributor. 

Can be seen in Operation at the Union Foundry, First St., San Francisco. 



Blreotions for Operating Hendy's Concentrators: 

The snlphiiieis are drawn off while the Concentrator is in motion, in the following manner : 

First — Set the Fan, A, level, by its inner rim. 

Second — While in operation, keep the Pan, A, about half full of sulphurets. (See Figure 2, 
marked S.] 

Third — Open the gate, E, sufficiently to discharge the sulphurets as they accumulate over the 
amount above mentioned. 

Fourth — The crank shaft to make 200 to 220 revolutions per minute. 



The above directions, if followed implicity, are all-sufficient. But, strange as it may appear, the 
proprietor has found that, in certain cases, they have, owing to the carelessness or to the ignorance of 
the operators, failed to serve as a complete guide. He, therefore, in the preseut edition of his circular, 
insists upon their being followed to the letter ; and in order that there may be no mistake in future, he 
thus elaborates and explains them : 

First, then : Unless the pan is level., it is out of the question to expect it to do its duty. One would 
imagine that the slightest possible examination of the illustrations would be sufficient to show this. 
Yet, in one case, where the machine did not work satisfactorily, it was found that no regard whatever 
had been paid to this point ! The word level is in itself precise ; it admits of no latitude, and cannot 
be misunderstood. Nothing is easier, to a mechanic, than to place the pan absolutely and mathemati- 
cally level. It cannot be necessary to dwell further upon this point. 

Direction Second, viz : — " Keep the pan about half full of sulphurets," has also, in some cases, 
been disregarded. A moment's reflection will point out its importance. The operation of the ma- 
chine is such, that grains of any kind, whatever may be their size or weight, will seek the peri- 
phery of the pan, and unless discharged, will there remain, until other grains of greater specif c gravity 
take their place. Of course, then, at the starting of the machine, and for a short time thereafter, the 
periphery will be partially filled with sand. It is therefore necessary to allow a quantity of sulphu- 
rets sufficient to completely occupy that space to accumulate, before the gate is opened, and their dis- 
charge commenced. It is obvious that they will otherwise be accompanied with more or les6 of 
sand. Once properly commenced, the discharge will bo continuous. It must be regulated, however, 
by the richness, in sulphurets, of the pulp under treatment. A little practice will enable the operator 
to gauge it without difficulty. 

After what has been said, direction Third requires no further explanation. Direction Fourth is, 
to a mechanic, sufficiently explicit. 

These concentrators can be set in pairs, for which a single crank shaft will Bnffice. Two 6uch 
pairs can be so arranged as to require a driving shaft of only six feet in length. 

The guaranteed capacity of each machine is five tons every 24 hours. Eight tons, however, 
can be and has been put through in that time. The small proportion of sand which the sulphurets 
carry, when thus rapidly concentrated, is not an objection but rather an advantage, in case the opera- 
tors themselves intend to work them. Either in roasting or in pan-working, a small admixture of 
sand is unquestionably an aid. But if the 6ulphurets are being prepared for sale, they must of course 
be clean. In this case, the discharges from four machines can be conducted into a single additional 
one, and the concentration thos be made complete. 

The proprietor has recently 6till further improved the machine, by the substitntion of an iron 
frame for the former wooden one. While nothing is added to its weight by the change, it is thus 
made stronger and more compact; and at the same time the labor of setting it up is considerably 
lessened. He flatters himself that these added advantages leave nothing further to be desired as re- 
gards the perfecting of the machine. 



References : 

Reference is made to the following mills, which have HENDY'S CONCENTRATOKS in use : 

EMPIRE MILL Grass Valley, Nevada County. 

ONEIDA MILL Jackson, Amador County. 

SPRING HILL MILL Amador, Amador County. 

GOLDEN GATE MILL Volcano, Amador County. 

GOLDEN RULE MILL Stewart Flat, Placer County. 

BENTON MILL Bear Valley, Mariposa County. 

LOUISIANA MILL Coulterville, Mariposa County. 

PEOPLE'S MILL Alleghany, Sierra County. 

TYRON & CO'S MILL Prescott, Arizona. 

WOOLSEY & CO'S MILL Prescott, Arizona. 

NOYES & CO'S MILL Prescott, Arizona. 

GUADALUPE & SACRAMENTO G. & S. M. CO ...Sinaloa, Mexico. 

RECENTLY ORDERED FROM THE UNION IRON WORKS : 

VEATCH, VALENTINE & CO., Commercial Mill (4 Concentrators) Nevada County. 

GOULD & CURRY G. & S. M. CO. (4 Concentrators) Virginia City, Nevada. 

VULTURE CO. (4 Concentrators Prescott, Arizona. 

MIDAS MILL CO. (4 Concentrators) Virginia, Montana. 

PLYMOUTH ROCK MILL CO. (2 Concentrators) Mariposa County. 

B. F. BROWN (1 Concentrator) Melbourne, Australia. 

MOREY & SPERRY (1 Concentrator) New York. 

And in use in many other parts of this coast. 

D^*These Machines are made of iron, thoroughly constructed and ready for immediate use. 
For description, etc., send for Circular. 

Those in want of Concentrators would do well to visit some of the quartz mills that have 
Hendy's Patent Concentrators in use, and satisfy themselves before purchasing other Concentrators of 
pretended merit. 



CAUTION. 

All of HENDY'S PATENT CONCENTRATORS are marked thus : 

"J. HENDY, Patented Februarv 27th and April 17th, 1866." 



Orders or letters of enquiry, address 
March, 1867. 



JOSHUA HENDY. Patentee, 

Union or Fulton Foundry, San Francisco. 



W. T- GARRATT, 
City 

BBASS AND BELL FOUNDER 



Cor. Mission and. Fremont sts.. 

BAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturer of Brass, Zinc, and Anti-Friction or 

Babbet Metal Castings) 

CSURCH AND STEAMBOAT 
TAVBRS AND HARD BELLS AND GONGB, 

FIRE ENGINES, FORCE AND LIFT PUMPS, 

Steam, Liquor, Soda Oil, Water and Flange Cocks, and 
Valves of all descriptions, made and repaired. Hose and 
all other Joints, Spelter, Solder, and Copper Rivets, &c. 
Gauge Cocks, Cylinder Cocks, Oil Globes, Steam Whistles, 

HY1)K AUX.IC PIPES AND NOZZELS 
For Mining purposes, Iron Steam Pipe furnished with Fit 
tings, Ac. Cnuplinc Joints of all slice*. Particular attention 

Jiaid to Distillery Work. Manufacturer of "Garratt's Pat- 
ent Improved Journal Metal." 
33- Highest Market price paid for OLD BELLS, COPPER 
AND BRASS, .ffitr 6tf 




JOHN G. HODGE & CO., 

Importers and Dealers in 

STATIONERY, 

Blank Books, School Books and Cheap 
Publications* 

WRAPPING PAPER, 

PAPER BAGS, ETC. 
Nos. 418 and 430 Clay street, San Francisco, 
agj- Special attention given to orders from Country Mer- 
chants. 2vl5-qrI6p 



Golden City Chemical Works. 

LlBOKATOItl, 
Corner of Seventh and Tovrnsend Streets. 

OFFICE, 
Corner of Montgomery and Bush Streets. 

CAPITAL STOCK, $500,000 

Trustees: 

H. P. WAKELEE, THOS. H. SELBY, 

NICHOLAS LUNING, THOS. BELL, 

CHAS. E. McLANE. 

H. P. WAKELEE MANAGER. 



THIS COMPANY ARE NOW PREPARED TO FURNISH 
Sulphuric. Nitric and Muriatic Acids of superior quality, 
in quantities to suit. 

Orders will be received at the office on'y for Chemicals of 
every description, which will be manufactured as may ho 
required. The Company beg to say that they have the ad- 
vantages of all improved machinery and apparatus for the 
manufacture and manipulation of these products, and our 
Laboratory Is fitted up with the most recent improvements 
which experience and science suggest, and is surpassed by 
none in completeness and perfection tor the purposes it Ib 
designed. ■ m H 3m 



Foundry for Sale. 

A One-half Interest in the 

UNION IRON WORKS, 

SACRAMENTO, 

Owned by William R. Williams, is offered for sale on the 
most favorable terms. 

A. Good Bargain 

May behad, asthe proprietor Is going home to Europe. It 
is seldom that so good an opportunity is offered for a suro 
and permanent investment The business of the establish- 
ment Is exceedingly flourishing, as can be shown. The 
Shop is of brick, new and well built. The lot is 85 feet front 
by 163 feet In depth, iu a good location for this business, on 
Front street, between N and O streets. 

Inquire at the office of the Foundry, or address 

WILLIAM R. WILLIAMS, 

W>vl3tf9-I6p Sacramento, Cal. 



Electbotype Cuts, Engravings, Etc.— Our Job Printing 
Office is abundantly supplied with elegant engravings, or- 
naments, and other embellishments to suit the various 
branches of industry In this State. 




Single Copln, Fifteen Cent*. 



Termi: One Tear, 95; Six Month*, S3. 



§y $<mntal ot m$tM guts, $t\tnce, and pintarj and pcrftamral <8,xa$tm. 



DEWEY * CO.. !•( HI IsillltN, 
And I'ulnil Mollcllor*. f 



SAN" FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1867. 



(VOLUME XV. 

t Kniuber 4. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Llnd's Improved Jonvul Tur- 

bm. '-Illustrated. 
Petroleum Fuel 
Submarine Mountains off the 

'",, ,v ot ' '.i'ii 

I'M o American Telegraph, 

Hew Corn Bxch 

Golden fin i- N l 

Mount ii„ u ,i, 

let- be rn*. 

Oeuiral PjicIHc Railroad. 

Ini'uriiiil Machine in a Ij'ltcr 

Tin- Question .•! Longitude, 

BIMm CommuDlc n ion with 

the dandvrlch island*. 
Equine Mortality. 
Fronts nf Co operative Labor 
The Long Room, 
Tin' Wearing aw iv of Rivers. 
[inprovemoul in Gas Lighting 

I'llti - ur^ mi 1 s.nii,r:i M. Co 
Tin- NeKI Agrlcultur il Kolr. 
The Late Boiler Explosion. 
Rtvor Country aud 

it -i Mhi.-: — «' 'in led. 

ml Patent Mutters— 

Don tinned 

Oil Search In Humlioldt Co 

Topographical Modol of the 

I iomst >ck Lode. 
Mou t..r Position 
The Groat Bridge nt St. Louis 
Mountain Silk. 
Government Mining Titles 

noi Compulsory. 
Popular Fallacies. 
Populatlou of the United 

Btatoa. 



Kureki* Mine, Ora.** Valley. 

klW hank' IL .Mi'r:i.i.isv — 

Consume your Smoko; in. 
teresung t<> iron Men i En- 
graving by Electricity: a 
How Prjioew for keoplug 

NiWlt Iroi.' Rusting: Manu- 
facture < t Artificial Sharp- 
ening S tones; To Cement 
Br«'« on Glass. 

901BHTtriO Ml.lCKLI.AXV. — 

A Message from the Btars; 

S. iimIiv.' I'lmiirs; A Hidden 

Thought: a Universal Tele- 
graph; neology of the Met- 
als; Uninflammable stuffs; 
Bpeolflc Heat hi Rolls; Col- 
ors l rum Protean Cum- 
poonds. 

M i. mm; Sum wart— Embracing 

late Intelligence irom the 
various conn ties and die- 

trtns in ("•tillCurnhi. Idiiho. 

British uolaunbta, Colorado, 
Montana, Mexico. Nevada, 
and I'l.ili 
Npw Patents and Inventions. 

Notices to Correspondents, 
^an Francisco Market Kates. 
San Francisco Weekly stock 

Circular. 
Stock Prices— Bid and Asked. 
San Franclseu Metal Market 
Muff Incorporations— List of 

Officers. 
Mining Shareholders' Dlrcct- 

ory. 
Fluctuations of Mining Stocks 



Belles-Lettres, by Augustus Layres, Pro- 
fessor of various Languages, Rhetoric, 
and Sciences. San Francisco : A. Roman 
& Co. 

This volume comprises the second of a 
series on composition, Belles Lettres and 
Oratory, -which are now in process of prepa- 
ration by Prof. Layres. The first of the 
series has already appeared, and been fully 
noticed in these columns. The present 
volume formsan "Introduction to the Study 
of Belles Lettres," the design of which is to 
facilitate the art, and abridge the study of 
composition. The method pursued is both 
synthetical and analytical ; the former for 
teaching the rules, and the latter the prac- 
tice of composition. 

The -work embraces some new and import- 
ant features, and is the result of many 
years of study and practice, as a teacher. 
We have not yet had an opportunity to 
make a critical examination of the work, but 
shall endeavor to do so at an early day. In 
the meantime, we can safely recommend it 
on the well known reputation of the author, 
and hope to see it generally introduced into 
our schools and seminaries of learning. 



Land's Improved Jonval Turbine. 

"We give annexed a side view and plan of 
Lind's improvement on the Jonval Turbine, 
which, through the agency connected with 
this oitice, was patented by Mr. A. Lind, of 
this city, in October last. 

Fig. 1 is a vertical view of the wheel with 
a part of the stationary wheel removed, 
showing the guide buckets, B, B; also a 
part of the rim of the running wheel, re- 
moved for the purpose of showing the 
buckets, A, A. 

Fig. 2 is a plan of the wheel, with the 
upper part of the friction ball bearing, D, 




The Long Room is the designation given 
to one of the rooms in the new Exchange 
Building, whi«h will hereafter be occupied 
as an Open Board, under the direction of 
Mr. T. C. Sanborn, who will be assisted by 
Mr. Ralph C. Dorr, as Secretary. The 
room is pleasantly located, just to the right 
of the main entrance of the building, and 
was first opened for business on Thursday. 
It is neatly and appropriately furnished, 
and in every way convenient for the pur- 
pose designated. Nearly 300 persons have 
already enrolled their names as subscribers. 
The institution could not have been en- 
trusted to better or more experienced hands. 
Any person can become a member by en- 
rolling his name and payingftlO per month. 

NrrEO-GiiYCEBiNE. — It is said that a com- 
pany has been formed for the manufacture 
of nitro-glycerine in this city. 

Newspapers. — There are now about 4,000 
newspapers published in the United States 
and Territories. 



removed, for the purpose of showing the 
friction balls as well as the frame-work. 
A, A, in Fig. 1, represents the buckets in 
the movable wheel ; B, B, the guide buck- 
ets in the stationary wheel ; C, the gate ; D, 
the friction ball gearing, which supports 
the shaft and wheels. C, in Fig. 2, repre- 
sents the gate; D, the lower part of the 
friction ball bearing. 

The especial advantage which this wheel 
possesses over the ordinary Jonval, consists 




in the fact that the rim enclosing the buck 
ets, A, A, is attached to the buckets, and 
revolves with them by means of the lip joint 
shown at the connection with the rim en 
closing the guides, B, B. By thus makinj 
the rim to revolve with the buckets, the 
friction of the water agaiDst the inner side 
of the rim in the original Jonval is entirely 
removed ; while the great danger of bend- 



ing the buckets in the old wheel, by 
sticks or gravel passing through, is entirely 
avoided. In the present wheel, whenever 
any considerable quantity of debris finds 
its way into the wheel, it merely has a ten- 
dency to reduce the power by filling the 
water space, without damage to the wheel ; 
which may at any time be stopped and 
cleaned out. The revolving rim also greatly 
reduces the leakage ; in fact, it is impossi- 
ble for any leak whatever to occur, except 
through the lip joint, which, when properly 
constructed, is almost water-tight. 

There is an arrangement of stoppers at- 
tached, but not shown in the illustration, 
by which the apertures of the wheel may 
be readily closed or opened for the purpose 
of using more or less water, and by which 
the same percentage of power may be ob- 
tained from the water whether the flow be 
more or less. Parties who have used this 
wheel speak highly of its efficiency. For 
further particulars, address. A Lind, at the 
Pacific Foundry, in this city. 

The Russo-American Telegraph. — The 
managers of this enterprise, the extension 
of which across Behring's Straits has been 
abandoned, have proposed to complete and 
put it in working order as far as Sitka, pro- 
vided the Government will grant an annual 
subsidy of $20,000, for which the company 
will transmit all Government and all purely 
scientific messages free. It is to be hoped, 
for the interest of the Pacific coast and the 
future prosperity of our new northwestern 
possessions, that Government may be in- 
duced to consider this proposition favora- 
bly. The attainment of rapid and constant 
communication with that distant territory- 
must be of great importance to both the 
Government and the trade which must soon 
spring up there under the new Anglo-Saxon 
rule. If that territory is worth purchasing 
at the price paid, it is certainly worth 
"hitching on" to the balance of the con 
federacy, especially when it can be effect- 
ually done at so slight a cost and with such 
a slender thread of communication. Let 
us, by all means, have a telegraph to Alaska. 

New Corn Exchange — Owing to an un- 
fortunate difficulty among the produce deal- 
ers as to the proper location for such an 
institution, the project of the establishment 
of a Corn Exchange for this city has been, 
for the present, postponed. One portion of 
those interested were desirous of holding 
the meetings in the public rotunda of the 
new Exchange ; another portion was equally 
as desirous of selecting some locality nearer 
to the city front, somewhere in the vicinity 
of Clay and Davis streets, as more central 
and convenient for the majority of the pro- 
duce dealers. It is greatly to be regretted 
that such a trifling matter should be allowed 
to prevent the establishment of an under- 
taking so essential to a ra|:>idly-growing and 
most important branch of the commercial 
industry of this city. As it is, produce 
transactions generally, and especially in 
wheat— which latter alone, during the past 
' year, have exceeded in amount ten millions 
j of dollars in gold — are confined almost ex- 
clusively to the country, to the great detri- 
ment of dealers in this city. 



Submarine Mountains off the Coast 
of California. —The Bulletin of Monday 
last gives some interesting facts with regard 
to the project of a submarine telegraph be- 
tween this port and Japan and China, via 
the Sandwich Islands. It appears that a 
very extensive series of soundings was 
taken, with reference to such a project, 
some 'ten years ago, by Lieut Brooke, of 
the IJ. S. Coast Survey. In the course of 
these soundings the interesting fact was de- 
veloped that about three hundred miles 
west of the Golden Gate, and parallel with 
the Coast Range and Sierra, there exists a 
range of submarine mountains, with an 
average depth on their summit of about two 
miles. This range is supposed to ran par- 
allel with the coast, and appears to be as 
distinctly defined as the two ranges upon 
the land. Beyond this submarine moun- 
tain the ocean presents a nearly level plateau 
to within a short distance of the Sandwich 
Islands. Lieut. Brooke says there would 
be less difficulty in laying a cable from San 
Francisco to the Islands than there was in 
laying one from Ireland to Newfoundland. 
The time will undoubtedly come when this 
project, which seems so chimerical now, 
will be an accomplished fact, demanded by 
the great commercial interest between the 
two continents, the future importance of 
which is already looming up with no insig- 
nificant proportions. 



Petroleum Fuel. — In the process of 
burning petroleum for steam fuel, a small 
quantity of the surplus steam, after passing 
through a superheater, is introduced at the 
same time with the oil, and is found to add 
greatly to the intensity and volume of the 
flame. It is claimed that this steam is in- 
troduced in a semi-decomposed state — that 
is, with the affinity between the oxygen and 
hydrogen, of which it is composed, so 
weakened, that when introduced directly 
within the flame of the oil it burns rapidly, 
without any appreciable extraction of heat 
from that produced by the burning oiL Li 
fact, when so presented, the re-union of the 
oxygen and hydrogen is so rapid that a 
great increase of heat is produced in the 
flame. The superheating is accomplished 
by waste heat, or heat which could not 
otherwise be brought to bear upon the 
water surfaces of the boiler. The problem 
of burning water, which has heretofore been 
pronounced an absurdity, so far as any 
practical advantage to be derived thereform 
may be concerned, appears to be, by this 
device, pretty effectually and satisfactorily 
accomplished. At all events, there is an 
evident increase of steam production over 
and above that employed under the furnace 
by this use of steam. The fact appears to 
be patent, and scientists will evidently have 
to admit and explain it. 



The aggregate production of gold in the 
world for eighteen years past, is $3,341,- 
500,000, of which the Pacific States and 
Territories yielded nearly one-third, while 
Australia and New Zealand produced nearly 
one-fourth. 



50 



lb* pitting mtfl Mmtifk j§m». 



(&ttmmmitntim». 



In this Department we invite the free disodssion of all 

proper subjects— correspondents akme being responsible ior 
the ideas and theories they advance. 

t Written for the Mining and Scientific Press.j 

The Reese River Country and its 
Mines. 

BY A. J. HOWK. 

[Concluded from Page 34. J 

EMPrBE DISTBICT 

Adjoins Hot Creek on the south. The first 
discoveries were made here by Joseph Sa- 
born and party in July, 1866. The princi- 
pal mines on which any considerable work 
has been done lie six miles south of the 
Gazelle mine, mentioned before. They are 
confined to one mountain, which is a con- 
tinuation of the same belt of lime-capped 
slate and porphyry. 

The Oakland and Liberty lodes are so far j 
remarkable for the large quantity of rich j 
ore, especially the former, which yields 
exceedingly rich pure ore (horn silver), 
much of it assaying $1,000 per ton; how- 
ever it must not be understood that such 
would be the working yield of the lode. 
These lodes, together with five or six others, 
comprising all the outcrops exposed in this 
belt, are the property of the discoverers, 
Messrs. Saborn, Sine & Co. , who have been 
for many months vigorously engaged in 
their development. They have recently 
hauled a quantity of the ore to the mill at 
San Antonio, forty miles southwest of Em- 
pire. This district has a close resemblance 
in all features to Hot Creek District ; the 
same vast quartzite dike, two or three hun- 
dred feet wide, running north and south 
with the range, separates the two mineral- 
producing belts. Here, as well as at the 
latter named place, we find the lodes on the 
east of this dike very numerous and well 
defined, but, as a general thing, not of the 
astonishing richness that characterizes those 
of the western belt. The district is well 
provided with fuel, especially in the center 
of the range, which rises abruptly from the 
Shoshone Valley on the west and descends 
more gradually to the great valley lying on 
the east. 

MTTYK SPEDTGS DISTRICT 

Adjoins Empire south. This was first dis- 
covered in August last, but was reorganized 
in January or February of the present year, 
consequently but little has been done to- 
wards its permanent development. In all 
surface characteristics it is similar to the 
last mentioned. Being situated out of the 
line of travel by any of the natural or 
graded roads, it has not heretofore received 
the same attention. It is probable that a 
branch of Clark <fe Co's road, diverging 
southerly from Egal Pass, will be con- 
structed through Empire and this District, 
making a direct line to Reveille. This will 
be a necessity for the accommodation of the 
country between the great natural pass of 
the Diamond Eange (Hot Creek CaBon) and 
this district, within which boundaries there 
probably exists a greater surface display of 
silver than can be found in an equal section 
of any mountain range of Eastern Nevada. 
At no distant day their permanency will be 
determined ; and should they prove to be 
true fissure veins, of which there can be no 
reasonable doubt, the districts of Hot Creek, 
Empire and Milk Springs will stand un- 
rivalled among the silver-producing districts 
of the world. 

BEVErLIE DISTRICT 

Is situated in a short, broken range of 
mountains, about due east of Milk Springs, 
near twenty miles distant. It is forty miles 
southeast from the eastern entrance of Hot 
Creek Canon, and probably sixty west of 
Pahranagat. It was discovered early in 
1866, and a moderate amount of work has 
been continued ever since. This astonish- 
ingly rich district has been more fortunate 
than its neighbors in receiving the notice of 
the press, aud is consequently better known 
abroad. For the production of surface ore 
of the most fabulous richness, it is perhaps 



ahead of all others. A large quantity of 
this ore has been hauled to Austin for re- 
duction, a distance of 145 miles, the reported 
yield from which has ranged from $300 to 
3800 per ton, while closely assorted lots 
have reached a much higher yield. Assays 
of $5,000 and upwards per ton are not un- 
frequent ; in fact, such can be obtained from 
numerous lodes, nor is the quantity of such 
ore by any means limited. Much has been 
said about these rich deposits being mere 
"bunches;" but recent developments tend 
to disprove this idea and establish them as 
true fissure veins, distorted by the crust of 
limestone, which is undoubtedly only super- 
ficial. The Fisherman lode has been opened 
to the depth of forty feet, showing, if they 
are bunches, that they are at least extensive 
ones ; but the idea that these rich deposits 
of ore are scattered over the surface at ran- 
dom throughout this region, is an absurd- 
ity. The fountain-head lies below, and if 
any marked change occurs, it will be to 
prove that the deposits in sight are mere 
bagatelles compared with those below. A 
mill of five stamps will soon be in operation 
here in connection with the mines of the 
Rutland and Reese River Company. This 
district, as stated above, is not in any of 
the continuous ranges, being situated in a 
detached cluster of comparatively low 
mountains, midway of the great valley lying 
between the southern extremities of the 
Diamond and White Pine ranges. The 
last two ranges, like all the others of the 
central and eastern part of the State, lose 
their uniformity and regularity at this lati- 
tude south, the whole blending in chaos of 
valley, mountain, moraines and desert, as 
intricate in their windings here as they are 
uniform further north. 

To the south lies a vast and almost unex- 
plored region — an extensive field for the 
everjrestless prospector for the repetition of 
what his class has accomplished during the 
past year in this section. As this useful 
but poorly paid portion of our population 
push their explorations further into the un- 
known depths of the Great Basin, most of 
the former terror report has attached to it 
will vanish. Already a large portion of this 
region has been found to be not only inhab- 
itable, but a desirable place of residence. 
Permanent homes will be made there, 
ranches, gardens and orchards will blossom 
along the water-courses in the sheltered 
glens of the foothills ; silver discoveries 
that stagger belief will continue, and be 
turned over to the more fortunate that 
come after, until the poor prospector has 
exhausted the field and finds himself with- 
out employment — alas ! too often in poverty. 

[Written for tile Mining and Scientific Press. 1 

Oil Search in Humboldt County. 

Etjeeka, July 10th, 1867. 

Messes. Editoes : — Last week I visited a 
portion of this county in which search has 
been made for petroleum. Work has been 
suspended on most of the wells. Two com- 
panies, however, are disposed to make more 
thorough prospect before abandoning their 
claims. These will be considered tests of 
the oil-producing capacity of our county, 
and if successful, most of the other claims 
will be revived and work resumed. This is 
very desirable, for there is no better lubri- 
cator of the wheels of commerce than a 
flowing well of petroleum. 

On Bear river, the Davis Company are 
still at work, under the superintendence of 
Mr. Hunter, a gentleman of long experi- 
ence in this business. They use a portable 
steam engine, and have attained a depth of 
626 feet. Progress last week was hindered 
by whatis called swelling of the well. Mr. 
Hunter is quite sanguine of being able to 
give the company a deep hole — not so san- 
guine of getting oil. The company aim to 
go at least 1,000 feet, and at present rates 
this may be attained this season. 

The TJnion Mattole Company's well is 
down about 600 feet. Oil was first ob- 
tained at a depth of 390 feet, and the well 
would yield to pumping about thirty gallons 
per day. Not satisfied with this yield, the 
company resolved to go deeper. They 
have been troubled by slight caves from 
that portion in which oil was found, and 
have been obliged to pipe about 550 feet. 
They are now ready to push on the work 
with greater facility. Their motto is, "More 
oil, or a hole 1,000 feet deep." 

My opportunities for research were lim- 
ited to these two localities. I am not pre- 
pared, of my own knowledge, to give any 
opinion as to the value of these petroleum 
claims. I am assured that there are much 
better surface indications at points where 
little has been done by way of prospecting. 



Facts About Patent Matters. 

KtriUEEE SEVEN. 

In my last I illustrated some of the nu- 
merous bad practices that exist in connec- 
tion with the patent business, as at present 
conducted. It may be that some of my 
readers have about made up their minds, in 
view of the facts stated, to have nothing 
more to do with patents or patent agents ; 
but that would be wrong. There is no 
business or profession that does not have 
its bad agents or members ; and none in 
which there is not more or less of fraud and 
dishonesty. It is true, that sometimes when 
viewing the rascalities of some of these 
gentry, I am ready not only to agree with 
Pope, that "an honest man is the noblest 
work of God," but inclined to think the sen- 
tence would be rendered more suited to the 
times, by adding — and the scarcest ! Still, 
I would not be understood as saying that 
patent agents are "sinners above all other 
men," for they are not. On the contrary, 
they are probably about as honest as the 
times, and the nature of the business in the 
present condition of society, will admit of 
their being ! As a large proportion of them 
are lawyers, or were educated for that pro- 
fession, we should not expect too much of 
them in this respect. It is an old saying, 
that the man who goes to Heaven from New 
Orleans, is entitled to more credit than he 
who goes from New England, on the prin- 
ciple that the greater the temptation, the 
greater credit in resisting it, and therefore, 
when we do find one that is honest, we 
should prize him all the more. I am glad 
to be able to state that there are some such, 
— men who are above the " tricks of the 
trade" as practiced by the smaller fry, and 
who are an honor to their profession. Would 
that their number were greater ; and indeed, 
there is reason to hope that it may be — for, 
as the adage has it, 

"The Almighty works a wonder now and then. 
And makes of lawyer:, honest men." 

and as these are eventful times in which our 
clergy assure us, God is showing forth his 
mighty works, who knows but that we may 
have a special dispensation for the couver- 
sion of lawyers, sutlers, army contractors, 
and other hard cases? Surely it is a "con- 
summation most devoutly to be wished. 

Still, the reader will be very likely to in- 
quire how it is that the patent laws are so 
framed as to encourage or permit the prac- 
tices previously referred to. In reply I 
would say, that the laws were not so in- 
tended, and that it is not so much the fault 
of the laws as of those whose duty it is to 
administer them, but like all other laws, 
they are in general terms, making general 
provisions in relation to the subject, and 
leaving the management, the details, the 
application of the laws to be provided for by 
the executive officer, the head of the bureau. 
If now he happens to be a man, who, like 
most heads of bureaus, is appointed not be- 
cause of his supposed claim upon the party 
or the amount of political influence that he 
can get to press his appointment — and who 
has no knowledge of patent or any other 
law — nor mechanical skill sufficient to en- 
able him to comprehend the practical duties 
of the office, what then is to be done? Why, 
of course the public must sutler the conse- 
quences. Or worse still — if he be one of 
those who say, — Well now I am here for 
four years, and I am going to make the most 
I can, with the least trouble, and thence 
busies himself in appointing the members 
of his family, and his personal friends to 
positions in the bureau, for which they have 
no qualification, or to using his official po- 
sition as a stepping-stone to a higher one in 
the future — then indeed must the public 
suffer. And such a spirit in the head of a 
bureau, is sure to be diffused more or less 
among the employes, who are too apt to 
feel that the responsibility does not rest 
upon them, and hence the bureau is sure to 
become more or less demoralized. 

The practical application of the patent 
laws is provided for by a set of office rules, 
which have grown up during the existence 
of the office, having been added to, and al- 
tered, from time to time as circumstances 
and the changes in the case have rendered 
necessary. If these rules were strictly en- 
forced most of the cases before alluded to 
would not occur. For instance, section 11 
of the rules provides that "if an article is 
claimed as a mere improvement on another 
invention, tlial/act should be clearly stated ; 
and if claimed as substantially differing from 
another invention with which it appears to 
be coincident, the difference must be clearly 
pointed out." Aud the latter clause of sec- 
tion 13 provides that, "if the specification 
is for au improvement, the original invention 
should be disclaimed and the claim confined 
to the improvement." These rules were in- 
tended to meet such cases as I have instanced, 
and thus to prevent the frauds therein de- 



scribed; and it is clear that if they were 
strictly enforced by all branches of the Pa- 
tent Office, the greatest good wonld result 
therefrom. But unfortunately these rules 
are not enforced as they should be ; and the 
ingenuity of designing parties and their 
agents has been applied to devising ways 
and means for avoiding them, until they 
have become almost a dead letter. When 
the honest inventor, or the honest agent ap- 
plies for a patent upon an improvement 
upon such a device, patented so and so, and 
then claims only the improvement — as he 
should ; and then the public is put upon its 
guard and knows exactly what it is buying, 
— to wit : the improvement simply upon an- 
other and prior patent, and thus all chance 
of fraud from that source is prevented. But 
the dishonest applicant or agent avoids this 
straightforward method of dealing, and while 
pretending to comply with the rule, evades 
it both in spirit and in letter. Instead of 
pointing out specifically what machine or 
patented device his is an improvement upon, 
or "stating clearly" that it is an improve- 
ment on another invention, he simply says 
that he has invented a new and improved 
device — naming the general class to which 
it belongs, as for instance a seeding machine, 
without even specifying whether it is a corn 
planter, a grain drill, or a cotton orpotatoe 
planter. And then, instead of "disclaiming 
the original invention," he makes a claim 
that shall embrace with the improvement, 
all the features of the original! 

The reason why these rules are not en- 
forced are numerous, some of which have 
been already hinted at. There are also 
others. In most cases the papers are so 
drawn as to make a show of compliance, 
while in fact avoiding the application of the 
rule in its integrity, and at the same time 
is so worded as to render it difficult for the 
Examiner to insist upon any change. Again, 
the attempt upon their part to enforce such 
a rule brings them constantly in conflict 
with the applicants and their agents, and as 
they are not interested, they are very apt to 
conclude that there is no reason why they 
should insist, and thereby render themselves 
odious alike to applicants and agents ; and 
more especially is this likely to be the case, 
if the head of the bureau never interests 
himself in the practical duties of the office, 
nor looks to see how his subordinates per- 
form their duties. Another, and still greater 
reason is, that there are no settled rides for 
the guidance of newly appointed Examiners. 
Each one is placed at a desk without any 
instructions whatever, and left to find out 
what rules ought to govern his action, the 
best way he can ; and as the old examiners 
generally seek to keep the new appointees 
from acquiring the requisite knowledge, lest 
they should become as well posted as them- 
selves, and hence likely to displace them, it 
follows they are like others we read of, "in 
pursuit of knowledge under difficulties, " — 
and the result is that " each becomes a law 
unto himself," until, in the course of time, 
you can hardly find any two who will agree 
upon the various questions that are con- 
stantly arising in the practice of the office. 

Again, while the head of a bureau knows 
but little of anything of the details of the 
business, and therefore is not likely to have 
suggested to his mind those reforms and 
improvements which are necessary to render 
the system complete in its operation ; to re- 
ceive such suggestions from one holding an 
inferior position — though perhaps greatly 
his superior in ability — would be undignified, 
and therefore not to be thought of for a 
moment. 

There is a deal of truth in the statement 
recently made in the Tribune — that "brains 
are never recognized in clerks — only in heads 
of departments," and that being so, of course 
it cannot be expected that their suggestions, 
no matter how reasonable, or important, 
should be adopted. In fact, as recently 
stated by the chief clerk of a bureau, they 
"don't want men of brains — for, if they hare 
brains, they will be making suggestions, and 
therefore trouble !" With this condition of 
affairs existing in nearly all governmental 
departments, it certainly is not strange that 
"red tape" and "old fogyism" should rule 
the day. 

The remedy for the diversity of action 
and ruling that exists among Examiners in 
the Patent Office is a unity of opinion and 
action to be secured by an interchange of 
ideas, — discussion of new points as they 
arise from time to time — and the adoption 
of such rules and reforms as the experience 
of those most intimately acquainted with 
the practical duties and operations of the 
office may suggest. All this, however, re- 
quires that the examiners snail be men who 
are qualified for their position — feel an in- 
terest in their duties, and attend to them — 
and more than all else, that you have at the 
head of affairs a man qualified for the dis- 
charge of the important duties devolving on 
him. — W. G. Dodge, in Prairie Farmer. 



tHie pining nnrt <fricntific 



51 



aMcrhamrnl. 



Cussnii: roDB SlIOXK — Tbe economical 
ami sanitary advantages derivable from the 
consumption of smoke is very properly at- 
tracting muck attention in England, partic- 
ularly in citiesand other populous localities. 
It is surprising, considering the simplicity 
and cheapness of the arrangement by which 
the result is elTcctc.l, that in. ire attention is 
not paid to the consumption of smoke in 
this State. With the exception of the rope 
manufactory on the l'otrero, the Spring 
Valley Water Works' pumping machinery, 
tho Pacific Foundry, and the brewery on 
licet, and possibly ana or two other 
establishments, the mode of burning coal 
in this city and vicinity is slovenly and 
wasteful. The dense volumes of black 
smoke which aro vomited forth from the 
smoke-stacks of tho furnaces connected 
with most of our steam engines, fully attest 
the truth of tho above. A more close 
iicition is not needed. 

It was recently stated by Mr. Hanbury, in 
tbe British House of Commons, as a fact 
within his own knowledge; that a manu- 
facturing firm in Leicester, England, saved 
1 ves S 10,000 a year in coal by burning 
it up completely and allowing none of it to 
be wasted in smoke ; and that, at the same 

ti , sill, Dili) worth of coal was saved to 

the country. Very wisely the manufactur- 
ers of Leicester '"have voluntarily made 
themselves subject to a law of their own" 
for the prevention of smoke by the better 
consumption of coal. The result is, that 
"in the very center of the town, flowers are 
found blooming as fresh as in a country 
village ;" but that is not the only result. A 
steam engine at Leicester is worked more 
cheaply than in any smoke-begrimed town 
in the realm where such smoke-consuming 
appliances are not employed. 



Interesting to Iron Men. — Tho Iron 
Masters' Laboratory, Philadelphia, propose 
to analyze all limestones which have been 
used as a flux in the blast furnaces through- 
out the States. Samples are asked for, so 
that the analysis may be made available to 
the iron interest throughout the country. 
It is earnestly requested that all iron work 
establishments and others, who may feel 
disposed to cooperate iu this movement, 
will forward to the Iron Master's Laboratory, 
339 Walnut street, Philadelphia, "about 
one ounce, in coarse powder, of a fair aver- 
age of the stone found by use the best 
adapted to their purposes. 

Engraving by Electricity. — Gaiffe's 
electrical engraving machine, lately much 
improved, is in the Paris Exposition. Any 
number of plates may be engraved at once; 
the tool cuts them as in the ordinai-y lathe, 
and the rest is operated by means of a 
platinum point, which passes over the de- 
sign made with a varnish. The point in 
passing over the varnish breaks the con- 
nection of the electric current, and thus de- 
magnetizes an electro-magnet behind each 
graver, and allows a spring to press tho 
graver against the plate on each machine : 
when the point touches the unvarnished 
part of metallic plate, containing the shades 
of the design, the electrical current is again 
established, and the electro-magnet draws 
back, by its attraction, the graver thus over- 
coming the force of the spring. It is easy 
to see how comparatively plain work, like 
maps, could be executed with this machine ; 
but it is difficult to imagine how the depth 
of line in a delicate copper-plate is to be 
graduated by a graver governed by one 
pair of electro-magnets. The multiplica- 
tion of copies in this plan is not as feasible 
to duplicate the original plate by means of 
the try-telescope process. 



New Process for Keeping Nails from 
Busting. — A Belgian has made a discovery 
which may be of some utility ; it is that the 
rusting of nails- employed to fasten the 
branches of fruit trees to walls, can be pre- 
vented, by driving into the wall, in contact 
with the nail, a small piece of zinc. In giv- 
ing an account of his discovery to the Agri- 
cultural Society of Ghent, he exhibited nails 
which had been eight years in walls, in con- 
tact with a piece of zinc, and which were not 
at all rusty. 



The MahufacTOBS i.r Airririn.u. Su.vr.r- 

i:\ino SroMs. — Artificial stones ore manu- 

i in England to take the place of 

Tui key. WaterofAyre, andArkansae 

generally need in sharpening tools. They 

prepare with a compound which will admit 

of being molded to any required form, and 

which when molded may be hardened and 

onaistency of stone. In 

carrying out the manufacture, the chips and 

obtained in preparing lithographic 

ore reduced to tine granules, emery 

powder, borax and Saltpetre are added and 
the whole thoroughly mixed in a mill. The 
mixture thus obtained is molded to any re- 
quired Bhape— first submitted to hydraulic 
pressure, and then to furnace heat, whereby 
the hardness and consistency of stone is im- 
parted to the molded articles. The follow- 
ing proportions will produce a good result, 
viz.: pounded lithographic stone twelve 
ounces, borax two ounces, saltpetre half an 
ounce, and very line emery two ounces. 
Place these substances together in an ordi- 
nary incorporating mill with edge runners, 
the pan of the mill being heated by means 
of steam or gas, and subject the substances 
to the action of the mill until they are well 
mixed and incorporated. Then remove tho 
coinjiound thus formed and place it in strong 
iron molds for tho purpose of being sub- 
mitted to pressure. Theso molds aro made 
of various shapes to suit tho purposes for 
which the artificial stone is to be used. 

The pressure necessaiy to effect a proper 
consolidation of the compound may be con- 
veniently given by means of a strong hy- 
draulic press. The amount of pressure 
which has proved satisfactory is about 20 
tons per square inch of surface of the molded 
article. When the requisite mechanical 
consolidation of the compound has been 
produced, the molded article is subjected to 
a white heat in any suitable construction of 
furnace, or to such a heat as will serve to 
fuse the borax and saltpetre, and effect the 
binding together of the granules of stone 
and emery. The time required for attaining 
this object will, in general, be from half an 
hour to one hour. To prevent the warping 
and running of the molded compound under 
heat, it is clamped in molds made of plum- 
bago, fire-clay, or other like heat-resisting 
material, before being placed in the furnace. 
When it is required to produce cutting or 
polishing wheels, hones, or other like arti- 
cles with a less cutting power than those 
made from the before-named mixture, ordi- 
nary chalk is substituted for a portion of 
tho lithographic stone granules. The pro- 
portions of the chalk and the granules should 
be half of each to produce a good result, the 
proportions of the other materials being 
retained. 



£rifutifir #lissrfUamt. 



To Cement Brass on Glass. — Puscher 
uses a cement particularly adapted for fast- 
ening brass on glass lamps, which consists 
in a resin soap — made by boiling three parts 
of resin with one part of caustic soda and 
five parts of water — which is mixed with 
one-half its weight of plaster of paris. This 
cement has great adhesive power, and is not 
permeable by petroleum, it sets firmly in 
less than an hour, and is a very slow con- 
ductor of heat. Zinc white, white lead, or 
precipitated chalk may be substituted for 
plaster of paris, but the material will be 
longer in hardening. 



Steel Boilers are now coming pretty 
largely into use on the locomotives of some 
French railways. Thus, twelve express en- 
gines on the Paris and Orleans railroad are 
thus furnished, as also several on that of 
Paris and Sceaux, and on the Midi or South- 
ern railroad fifteen eight-courjled engines 
have steel boilers. The Orleans Company 
now employ cast steel plates for the circu- 
lar smoke boxes of all their eugines, new 
and old, steel being thus substituted for 
iron when repairs are made. 



Hard Iron. — It is said that there is a 
malleable iron made by a Glasgow firm of 
such toughness and tenacity that the teeth 
of pinion wheels cast from it may be ham- 
mered down to the solid base without crack- 
ing. The process of the manufacture is 
kept a secret. 

The widest span yet made in a timber 
bridge is believed to be that of the Schuyl- 
kill bridge at Philadelphia, the clear open- 
ing of which is 340 feet. 

The salt formed in the boilers of a large 
steamer would, if not prevented by flowing 
off or surface condensation, amount to 20 
tons per day. 

Tin wire, the thirteenth of an inch in 
thickness, sustains 34-7 pounds ; a lead wire 
but 28 pounds. 



A Message pbou the Stars. — Mr. Gra- 
ham, Blaster of the Mint in Loudon, has 
deciphered a messago from the stars. It 
came to him as a piece of meteoric iron. 
When heated and tested with Sprengel's 
aspirator, this iron gave off three times its 
volume of hydrogen. And since malleable 
iron can be made to take up only about 
one-half its volume of hydrogen, Mr. Gra- 
ham understood the message to be that the 
iron had come from a very dense atmos- 
phere of hydrogen gas, such as would not 
bo found within tho limits of the solar 
system. Spectrum analysis has already 
shown that hydrogen is a prominent con- 
stituent in many of the stars, and Mr. 
Graham's experiment shows how it oan be 
conveyed all these countless millions of 
miles to this earth. 



Sensitive Flames. — We have previously 
noticed the experiments by Prof. Tyndall, 
of London, showing the manner in which 
gas flames are affected by sound. Mr. W. 
T. Barrett, lecturer on Physical Science, 
who early made extended observations in 
this direction, thus accounts for the phe- 
nomena : "A sensitive flame is one in 
which, on the slightest mechanical increase 
in the pressure, or, what here comes to the 
same thing, in the velocity of the gas as it 
issues from the burner, will change its 
shape and take very much the appearance 
it has when influenced by sound. Now the 
sonorous pulses excited by sound throw, 
among other things, the pipe which con- 
veys the gas to the burner into vibration ; 
the flow of gas is thereby driven from the 
sides and urged more towards the center of 
the tube ; and the current thus confined 
within narrower limits must issue from the 
burner with increased velocity so long as 
the sound continues. It is the greater 
rapidity thus induced in the issuing stream 
of gas which causes the flame to shorten 
and diverge ; lowering of the flame being 
an analogous effect to that noticed and ex- 
plained by Dr. Thomas Young in his well 
known experiments on streams of smoke 
ascending into the air at different veloci- 
ties. " Several cases illustrating this action, 
and confirming his opinion, are described 
by Mr. Bai-rett in the April number of the 
Philosophical Magazine. 

A Golden Thought. — We know not the 
author of the following ; but it is one of 
the .most beautiful productions we have 
ever read: "Nature will be reported. All 
things are engaged in writing their own 
h istory. The plant and pebb les go attended 
by their own shadow. The rock leaves its 
scratches on the mountain side, the river 
its channel in the soil, the animal leaves its 
bones in the stratum, the fern and the leaf 
the modest epitaph in the coal. The fall- 
ing drop makes its sepulchre in the sand or 
stone ; not a footstep in the snow or along 
the ground but prints in characters more or 
less lasting a map of its march ; every act 
of man inscribes itself on the memories of 
its fellows and his own face. The air is full 
of sound, the sky of tokens ; the ground is 
all memoranda and tokens, and every object 
is covered over with hints which speak to 
the intelligent." 



A Universal Telegraph. — Prof. Hitch- 
cock has a chapter upon the ' 'Telegraph Sys- 
tem of the Universe," in which he broaches 
the remarkable theory that "our words, our 
actions, even our thoughts, made an indeli- 
ble impression upon the universe." This 
proposition he endeavors to sustain by an 
appeal to well established principles of sci- 
ence. He shows by the doctrine of mechan- 
ical reaction that every impression which 
man makes by his words or his movements 
upon the air, the waters, or the solid earth, 
will produce a series of changes in each of 
those changes which will never end. Not a 
word has ever escaped from mortal lips, he 
contends, but it is registered indelibly upon 
the atmosphere we breathe. And could 
man command the mathematics of superior 
minds, every particle of air thus set in mo- 
tion could be traced through all its changes 
with as much precision as the astronomer 
can point out the path of the heavenly 
bodies. In like manner the pictures of 
eveiy occurrence propagate themselves 
through the reaction of light on the sub- 
stances on which it impinges. 

Borax has been ehrystallized by Wohler 
& Deville, in their laboratory, with a bril- 
liancy almost equal to the diamond, and of 
an exceeding hardness. 



Geology of the Metals.— The metals 
were doubtless dissolved in tho waters of 
the primeval sea at its formation, and in 
great part precipitated in its early sedi- 
ments, to be again dissolved by infiltrating 
water., and brought to the earth's surface. 
l'rc an their soluble oxidized condition they 
have been reduced by organic matters, 
sometimes to the metallic state, as in the 
case of the copper of Lake Superior, but 
more genorally to the condition of sul- 
phurcts. Whenever decaying organic mat- 
tors encounters sulphates which abound in 
sea water, they give rise to sulphides or 
sulphureted hydrogen, which is nature's 
great agent for precipitating metals and re- 
moving them from the terrestrial circula- 
tion. Hence we find, in various rocks, sul- 
phurets of iron, copper, zinc and other 
metals, sometimes in considerable propor- 
tion, forming workable beds of ore, but 
more generally sparingly disseminated. 
Nature's way of concentrating these sparse- 
ly shattered metallic matters is to dissolve 
them out by certain mineral waters, gener- 
ally when the waters are deeply buried ; 
these waters ascending through joints or 
fissures in the rocks, and gradually becom- 
ing cooled or changed, deposit upon the 
walls of these then dissolved matters in the 
shape of ores, often mixed with spars and 
other minerals which constitute the vein- 
stones. Experiments Bhow that alkaline 
bicarbonates and sulphides which abound 
in the hot mineral waters are the proper 
solvents for the diffused metals, and this 
process of concentrating the metals in veins 
is doubtless now going on in portions of 
the earth's crust. 

Uninflammable Stuffs. — It appears 
from the experiments made by French 
chemists that only three salts have a^ yet 
been found that may be successfully applied 
to the manufacture of uninflammable fab- 
rics for ladies' dresses. There ars many 
other salts that would do the same, but not 
without spoiling the dye or gloss or texture 
of the stuff. Of the three in question, the 
sulphate and the phosphate of ammonia 
have the inconvenience of being decom- 
posed by the heat of a smoothing iron, but 
are applicable in those manufactures where 
stuffs are stiffened by the action of hot air, 
or cylinders heated by steam. They exer- 
cise nonaction upon either the thread or the 
color of the stuff. The phosphate of am- 
monia may be mixed with half its weight of 
hydrochloric of ammonia. To obtain on 
efficacious solution, twenty per cent, of this 
mixture must be dissolved in water. A 
solution of seven per cent, of ammonia 
produces the same effect, and is therefore 
the most economical salt that can be em- 
ployed. But in those eases in which the 
smoothing-iron cannot be dispensed with, 
as in linen, for instance, a solution of twenty 
per cent, of tungstate is preferable. To 
obtain the desired effect, all these solutions 
must be applied to the stuffs after they have 
heen stiffened and dried, because starch is 
always used in a weaker solution than that 
required for these salts. Acid tungstates 
destroy the thread of cotton stuffs, like 
borax, alum, etc. 

Specific Heat of Soils. — Pfraunder, in 
his investigations concerning the specific 
heat of soils, during which he determined 
that of seventeen different soils he has no- 
ticed that soils free from humus have the 
lowest specific heat, whether they consist of 
lime or of sand. The richer a soil in 
humus, the higher is the specific heat. 
Thus peat was found to have 0. 507, and a 
soil very rich in humus gave 0.4142, while 
that of calcite and quartz is only 20 and 19. 
Loamy soils must have a high specific heat, 
owing to the presence of water. These 
facts are important to the agriculturist, 
since a plant sensitive to the changes of 
temperature would not grow well on soils 
of low specific heat. 

Colors from Protein Compounds. — 
Erdmann observed that some roast veal was 
superficially red ; he transferred a portion 
of the red matter to other substances, and 
found that with moisture and a proper tem- 
perature the coloring matter increased. It 
is probably produced by infusoria in the 
same sense as alcohol is made by yeast. 
Besearches on blue milk by several German 
chemists show results closely analogous to 
those made by Erdmann. 

Sound is always propagated outward in a 
straight line, but recoils like a ball when 
driven against any obstacle, which, by its 
dimensions, is sufficient to intercept the 
undulations. It is to this rebound that we 
owe the beautiful effect of ochoes. 



52 



Mt pitting m& Mmtilit §im. 



Golden Rule Mining Company. 

The following is the report of the Board 
of Trustees of the Golden Bule mining com- 
pany, of Tuolumne county, for the yearly 
statement from July 1, 1866 to July 1, 
1867: 

Amount Day*' Average 

,«» Ore Cgf*. *£■ *■«%•■ $ ™- 

jffiaVt ::::: m n «-32 *.^»'- 

sTrficmbir 360 M 11.84 4,268 SS 

oS™ .".....360 24 16.64 6,594 96 

November .... . 329 22 07.72 2,53967 

Dumber.. 280 21 10.78 3,01023 

January 247 17 6 79« 1,65876 

SS 295 24 10.43« 3117829 

March.. 345 22 6.71K 1,969 63 

AorT. ..... .... 310 23 10.71 3,611 OS 

May 340 21 10.01 3,11551 

June 355 25 697K 2- 477.39 

4,099 277 8.94 1-5 $36,653 07 

Product, 2, 155 ounces of retorted bullion, 
averaging about $17.05 per ounce— fine- 
ness, gold, .875 to .881. 

The above ore has been crushed and re- 
turns made from fifteen 700-pound stamps, 
■water power, which is run by a 50-foot over- 
shot wheel. Eight miners are employed 
regularly, and two carmen, four millmen, 
one blacksmith, and one superintendent — 
making a total of sixteen men, at a cost of 

Labor for the past year ....$16,600 00 

Expended durWthe 12 months for mill re- 
pairs, t mber, lumber, charcoal, hauling, 
taxes, etc 5,800 00 

Expense for supplies sent from San Francis- 
co, quicksilver, powder, fuse, candles, 
iron, steel, mill screens, etc 2,400 00 

Expended for office, express, salaries of Sec- 
retary and President, rent, traveling ex- 
penses, advertising;, andfreicht on bullion, 1,600 00 

Paid out to stockholders, five dividends dur- 
ing the past 12 months, of $1,500 each, or 
611 cents per share on 3,000 shares 7,500 00 

July 1, 1867, cash on hand in Treasury 2,953 07 

$36,653 07 

Total expenses of the company per ton of 
ore crushed during the year, $6.39 ; aver- 
age value of ore crushed, §8.94 1-5 ; net 
profit per ton, $2. 55 1-5. 

Our mine at present is in good working 
order. The vein is open on the tunnel 
level about 400 feet, at a width of six to 
eight feet, eighty feet below the surface, 
from which our tunnel takes the surface 
drainage water. For the past six months 
we have been working on a level forty-four 
feet below our tunnel level, carrying a vein 
of from seven to eight feet in taleose slate, 
containing small stratas or threads of quartz. 
To what depth we may be able to carry it 
and find good pay ore, remains to be seen. 
Geologists and scientific millmen say that 
this vein matter is from a fissure of the 
Mother Lode, below which it is running 
parallel with our lode, and west of it, at our 
present depth of about forty feet. On the 
whole, prospects look encouraging for an- 
other year's work on the mine. 

As to the mill, we are able to crash fif- 
teen tons per day, through a No. 40 to 50 
brass wire screen, and amalgamating 8-10 
of all the gold in the batteries, saving 1-10 
from copper plates outside, on our aprons, 
and 1-10 from our blanket washings, ground 
each day in a stone arastra. We find the 
best drop for our stamp is set at five inches, 
and not to exceed eight — running at a regu- 
lar speed of fifty-strokes per minute. 

The present officers of the company, are: 
Superintendent at the mine, A. J. Pfeiffer ; 
Trustees : B. L. Pasteur, J. H. Turney, J. 
T. Boyd, E. V. Hathaway ; President, W. 
Bosworth; Secretary, J. B. Bussell. 

"W. Boswoeth. 



Aitebican Relics in Gbeece. — There is 
a gentleman now visiting all the celebrated 
battle-fields of the late war, under a com- 
mission from the late King of Greece, to 
collect therefrom suitable memorials and 
records, for preservation in the royal archives 
of Athens. The story of Xenophon has 
found a parallol in the march of Sherman. 
"Where is the loyal American heart that does 
not thrill with patriotic emotion when re • 
fleeting that the descendants of those who 
died at Marathon are now seeking to study 
and honor the grand struggle for American 
freedom. There is truly a fitting and a 
graceful compliment in thus twining the 
great deeds of American heroism with the 
memorable traditions of Helenic story. 

Gold mining is about to be commenced 
at Bluffton and Huntington, Indiana. At 
the latter place, a quartz mill is being 
erected at a cost of $10,000. 



New Patents and Inventions. 

ander this heading we shall mention, from week to week 
as occasion mnv demand. New and Important Inven- 
tions; also, the List ol Patent Claims recently Issued from 
the U. S. Patent OIRcc to inventors on the Pacific Coast, 
and other Patent Issues which we deem of local in- 
terest to readers on this side of the Continent Most 
Patents on this coast are secured 'hrou'.-h the .MINING 
AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. "We are 
prepared to oblain from Washington, with despatch, 
copies of any Patent issued. 

recent inventions. 

Improvement in Nautical Instruments. 
Mr. George Davidson, who left this port, on 
Sunday last, in charge of the scientific ex- 
pedition to the late Bussian Possessions, 
has recently devised an important improve- 
ment in telescopes for sextants, quadrants, 
etc., by which an artificial horizon for ob- 
servations can always be had when the 
nautical horizon is undefined or obscured. 
The invention consists of the application of 
a small spirit level on top of the usual tele- 
scope, the bubble of the former, by the use 
of a prism, being reflected in the latter. 
The telescope has a fine wire horizontal line 
drawn inside, which, being made to bisect 
the image of the bubble, a true artificial 
horizon is obtained. This invention has 
been found very useful in land service for 
taking observations in surveying, and is 
considered particularly valuable for sea ser- 
vice, where accurate nautical horizons are 
required, but are frequently not to be ob- 
tained. The improvement has been sent to 
the World's Pair at Paris for exhibition. 

Useful Invention. — The Dutch Flat 
Enquirer speaks of a newly-invented ma- 
chine which is likely to create a complete 
revolution in hydraulic mining, as it is 
claimed by the inventor to supersede the 
hose method of conducting the water. The 
machine is attached directly to the pipe, 
and by it the stream of water is easily di- 
rected in any required direction. The 
North American Company at Michigan Bluff 
are now using the machine and are said to 
be greatly pleased with it. It is said to be 
cheap and easily managed. No description 
of the invention has been given. 

The American Dishwasher. — A machine 
for washing dishes has been invented and 
tried at Syracuse, with satisfactory results. 
It is thus described : "It is in shape like 
a wash tub with legs, and provided with a 
cover, to which is attached the machinery 
for working it. Around the inside a wire 
frame is constructed, between which and 
the sides of the machine dishes are placed, 
overlapping each other. After filling the 
space provided with dishes, a quantity of 
boiling water is poured in the center of the 
machine, which is provided with a screw- 
shaped paddle, operated by a cog-wheel, 
which is adjusted on closing the cover. By 
turning the crank a few seconds, the boiling 
water is forced between and about the 
dishes with sufficient force to remove all 
grease, etc. , which may be upon them. The 
machine is arranged so that the water can 
be drawn off beneath, fresh water intro- 
duced, and a few turns of the crank thor- 
oughly rinses the dishes, and it only re- 
mains to take them out and stand them on 
their edges to drain. No wiping is neces- 
sary, the dishes having attained a tempera- 
ture sufficiently hot to dry them perfectly. 

A New System of Working Oars. — Mr. 
E. D. Farcot, of Neuilly, France, has de- 
vised a plan for working oars, quite novel, 
and said to be eminently practical. The 
oars are not worked in row-locks, but from 
a short stanchion or mast springing from 
the bottom of the boat. The rower sits 
with his face to the bow, instead of to the 
stern, so that he can see where he is going. 
He does not take hold of the oars at all ; 
they are secured to the upright mentioned 
by springs, eyes and pintals, in such a man- 
ner that they may be operated by handles, 
grasped like the handle of the common 
short-handled shovel or spade. Both oars 
can be worked by one hand when desired. 
The total weight of the apparatus for a pair 
of oars, including the oars themselves, need 
not exceed fifteen pounds. 

A Type-writing Machine. — A machine 
has been invented by a Mr. Pratt, of Ala- 
bama, by which, it is assumed, a man can 
print his thoughts twice as fast as he can 
write them, and with the legibility of a 
printed page. The alphabet, with figures, 
etc. , is formed in a solid stereotype plate, 
with the bodies of all the letters uniform in 
size. He prints a letter by the blow of a 
minute hammer, of size uniform with the 
size of the type body — striking the face of 
the letter, with a sheet of carbonized paper 
and that on which he would print interven- 
ing. Each letter, as wanted, is moved into 
position under the hammer by compound 
levers, actuated by keys, like those of a 
piano. The subject of type writing is an 
interesting one, and may be one of the ac- 
complishments of the future ; but it is 
hardly a thing that can spring fully devel- 
oped into existence at one effort 



"Weekly Stock Circular, 

Of Associated Brokers of the S. F. Stock anil Exchange Board 

SAH FRAWC1SCO. SATOnDAT Morkikg, > 
July a, 1867. i 

We present in the annexed table a very nattering ex- 
hibit of the present condition of our sayings and loan 
institutions: 













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It •will be observed that the deposits in the several in 
stitutions have been augmented $3,474,370 71 during 
the first half of the present year, $5,073,094 69 within 
the space of one year, and nearly doubled eince Jan- 
uary, 1866 — a period of eighteen months. We have not 
ascertained the number of deposit accounts at the date 
of the last semi-annual reports, but taking the state- 
ment we made twelve months ago in the Weekly Slock 
Circular as a basis, we may arrive at a very near ap- 
proximation. At that time the depositors numbered 
13,000 in round numbers, and adding the same ratio of 
increase as shown by the deposits, which is seventy per 
cent., we obtain the large number of 21,000 depositors, 
giving an average amount of nearly $6G0 to each account. 
Estimating the population of San Francisco at 120,000, 
these savings would give to each inhabitant $115. 
Mining Share Market. 

The mining share market continues to attract marked 
attention, a disposition to invest manifesting itself in a 
more general degree than has been the case for a long 
time past, and especially among those of comparatively 
limited means. The recent material decline, and the 
fluctuating rates at which shares rule at present, stimu- 
late a desire to venture in order to realize small gains 
within a brief period, and for this purpose buyers' op- 
tion purchases are freely made with the hope of a gen- 
eral advance shortly over present rates, which opinion 
appears to be well founded. The recession in most 
shares up to Wednesday has been very considerable, 
since which time the market has become firmer, and at 
the close most stocks sell at enhanced rates. 

Savage — Sold at fluctuating rates, receding from $4,500 
to $4,000, rallying to $4,160, and at the close selling at 
$4,200. During the week ending July 20th, this mine 
yielded 2,210 tons of ore, the approximate value of 
which is stated to be $96,394, or an average of $43 61 per 
ton. As compared with the previous week these figures 
show an increased yield as well as an improvement in the 
ore. The north mine, on the seventh level, continues 
to yield the largest quantity of ore, having contributed 
over half of the above amount, while the middle and 
south mines on the same level, with the exception of 
147 tons from the third station, produced the remainder. 
In the absence of the Superintendent no detailed weekly 
statement, as usual, reached the office in this city. A 
special meeting of the stockholders is called by the 
Trustees, to be held next Tuesday, the 30th instant, for 
the purpose of increasing the capital stock to $3,500,000, 
and dividing the same into 16,000 shares of $200 each. 
This will doubtless be done, thereby enabling those of 
limited means to invest in the largest producing claim 
known. 

HAlJi & Noncnoss — Continues to be firmly held; no 
sales transpired during the week. We quote it at $3,200 
asked. The average value of the company's ore is much 
better this month than last. On the 22d instant the 
shaft wss 558 feet in depth. 

Crown Point— Has been actively dealt in at extremely 
variable rates, opening at $1,225, rapidly rising to 



$1,590, falling to $1,260, and closing at $1,330. The 
"strike" in the east drift from the- 600-foot station, 
which had such a marked effect on the stock early in the 
week, was found to be about thirty inches in width; 
however, they are drifting in close quartz and porphyry, 
with some spots of ore, on the east of it, and on the 
west of the ore they passed through about five inches of 
dark clay. On the 600-foot level, 21 feet to the west, the 
same clay seam was penetrated. From the Superin- 
tendent's weekly report, dated July 19th, we obtain the 
following: Ore delivered to custom mills, 689!^ tons, 
showing an approximate value of $20,223 34: extracted 
from the mine in the same period, 684 % tons, the 65 ?4 
cent, average assay giving $34 39 to the ton. The ledge 
on the east vein had been opened 121 feet; the cross-cut 
east from the 500-foot level had been carried forward 
27 J$ feet; the winze from same level was 82 feet in 
depth, and the east drift on the 600-foot level was in 
105 feet. Advices to the 24th instant state that the aver- 
age 65 per cent, assays for the past three days have been 
$30 80 of ore obtained from the 400-foot level, and 
$46 11 of ore taken from the 600-foot level. 

Yellow Jacket — Has been in the market to a consid- 
erable extent, declining from $900 to $750, rallying to 
$900, and closing yesterday at $905. The information 
from this mine is more encouraging than has been the 
case for some time past. The usual annual statement 
made in July has not yet made its appearance. It wculd 
be a great convenience as well as benefit to all concerned 
if the office of this company was located in this city. 

G-ould & CmtnY — Has also declined very materially 
since our last reference, receding from $750 to $625 per 
foot, then selling at $650'tj)675, and closing yesterday at 
$710. This mine shows no material change. The drifts 
continue to look promising, but a month may elapse be- 
fore different ground will be reached. 

Chollar-Potosi— Declined from $455 to $402 50, ad- 
vanced to $435, and at the close realized $435. The 
various portions of this claim yield as follows: Blue 
Wing level, about 60 tons of ore per day, which it is re- 
ported will mill $28 to the ton; Piute station, from 13 to 
20 tons per day, averaging $30 per ton; New Santa F6 
level, some 20 tons, at $27 per ton; and from tho Old 
Santa Fe level, about 120 tons are daily extracted, show- 
ing an average yield of $27 per ton. The ore is said to 
look well between the third Santa Fe and the Old Santa 
Fe levels, and is reported to be 130 feet in length and 31 
feet wide, producing about 180 tons of ore per day, 
which will yield from $24 to $30 to the ton. In the new 
shaft sinking is favorable. The station timbers for (he 
Gil-foot level are completed, but it is proposed to drop 
down another hundred feet before drifting off. During 
the week ending July 18th, 2,318 tons of ore were sent 
to custom mills; previous week, 2,186J<S tons. 

Kentuck — Opened at $415, gradually declined to $360, 
improved to $400, and closed at $380. The bullion re- 
turns from July 1st to the 22d, inclusive, amount to $66,- 
857 43, against $68,509 37 same date last month. Tho 
largest proportion of the ore came from the upper 
works, which is of a lower grade than that obtained from 
the lower level. The receipts of the present month, it 
is thought, will not fall short of the returns made in 
June. This company has been hoisting from 70 to 80 
tons of ore per day, during the past two weeks, for the 
Yellow Jacket Company. 

IarpEniAi- — Has been in better favor this week, advanc- 
ing from $195 to $215, then selling at $210®206, and 
closing yesterday at $204. The report upon this prop- 
erty recently submitted by Mr. Brown, the President of 
this company, makes favorable mention of the present 
condition of both the mines and mills, and is encourag- 
ing as to the developments in the future. The manage- 
ment, both here and in Nevada, is in excellent hands. 
The supply of ore is reported to be ample until such 
time as the drifts from the new shaft will be carried to 
the lode. 

Overman — Has been in decided favor during the period 
under review, opening at S1C5, improving to $180. re- 
ceding to $107 50, advancing to $240, and closing at 
S220. The general appearance Of the mine is very 
promising, and the developments on the several levels 
are very favorable. On the 300-foot level a large body of 
ore has been found, and the discoveries on the 226-foot 
level produce average assays of $40@45 to the ton. 
Since our last issue over $10,000 in bullion has been re- 
ceived; and since the first of June the bullion returns 
amounted to $42,058 16. 

Ophtr — Has been in less favor, rapidly declining from 
$240 to $140, rallying to $155, and closing yesterday at 
$152. Ore continues to be obtained in small quantities, 
but of good quality. A cross-cut in the north drift, 210 
feet north of the main east drift, has already developed 
fifteen feet of the vein without reaching the west wall. 
An assessment of $3 per share, or $30 per foot, is an- 
ticipated during the coming week, 
Belcher— Advanced from $310 to $350, declined fo $260, 

rallied to $300, and at the close sold at $315 Empire 

continues in the market at the closing price of last 

week— $180 Gold Hill Quartz sold at $1S5®175. A 

dividend of $15 per share is confidently expected next 
month. 

Confidence — Ruled at $62 50@$55, and Bullion at 
$35@26, closing at $26. An assessment of $15 per share 
was levied on the latter stock on the 37th instant. ... 
Daney sold at $19@25: Justis and Independent at $15 
@16; Segregated Belcher at $30@12, closing at $8. 

Sdzrra Nevada— Advanced from $16 to $25, closing 
yesterday at $18. This rise is based upon the prospects 
of soon ascertaining the existence of a ledge by draining 
the mine, the machinery for this purpose being nearly 
ready. 



New Incorporations. — Articles of incor- 
poration have recently been filed in the 
County Clerk's office in this city as follows : 

Cumberland M. & M. Co. — Storey coun- 
ty, Nev. July 23d. Capital stock,' $100,- 
000; 1,000 shares, $100 each. Trustees: 
A T. Page, Henry Christie and Alfred 
Bryant. 

San Francisco Water Co. — San Fran- 
cisco. July 24th. Capital stock, $6,000,- 
000; 60,000 shares, $100 each. Trustees: 
James T. Boyd, Milo Hoadley and John H. 
Turney. 

Election of Officers. — Gold Hill T., 
G. & S. M. Co.— July 20th. Trustees: 
Camila Martin, P. G. Venard, O. Gori, F. 
O. Wegener, H. Motz, H. Huguet and E. 
Wegener. President, Camila Martin ; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, B. Wegener ; Super- 
intendent, H. Huguet. 



$h* pining and ^rirotifw §to*& 



53 



Jlurtuations in Xfauiug flitting £harrs for tt« past ^ix pouthjs. 



kau or cosirjxr. 



Gould 4 Carry per il 

Ophlr. 



B.^ 



ChnlUir-Poto.1 

BaIo * NorcroM 

Bheba 

Daney pi 

WI1I.1 West 

Bullion 

Real del Monte 

El !>>>rado 

Overman 

Sierra Nevada 

Yellow Jacket 

White k Hnrpby 

Baltic 

North American 

Baltimore American .. 

-> 

Hacramento 

Lady Bryan 

Imperial 

Crown 1'olnt 

Belcher 

Alpha 

Kinplre M. and M. Co. 

Conddcncc 





Krmi.cn 

Gold Hill y. M.Co 



SO 
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SO 



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216 

3.000 

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ITS 

no 



I7i 

1.1120 
2J2 



-'■', 



35 



2,175 



13>i 

"ii 



BO 
870 

110 



1-1 

2.IWCJ 
409 


450 
COO 


"io 


"ii 


MX 


80 


"'S8 
11 

1,300 


"49 

20 
1.650 


'278 
1,395 
240 
400 
187K 
37 


'i'O 

1,711.1 
410 
460 
202 
70 


6 


18 




180 



250 
1,?85 
4224. 



360 310 

3,500 3,900 

646 580 



210 

1,610 
400 
402), 
170 

era 



ta« 

■-■< 

1.725 



195 
1,796 
390 
411 
170 
70 



740 

335 

4.300 

540 



47« 



193 
1,750 

405 
400 



600 

265 

1.340 

450 



193 

1.9IK) 



»X 



187M 
64 

"iix 

445 

210 



MINING SHAEEHOLDEES' DIREOTOBY. 

.Compiled for every Issue, from advertisements In the 

Mixing akd HuiNHTtrio Punas and other San 

Francisco Journal*. J 

Comprising the Names of Companies. District or Oountj 
or !*ocatlon; Amount and ditto "f Aasequnent; Date of 
rig; Day n( Delinquent Sale; and Amount and Tioio 
of Payment of Dividends. 

HAM., LOCATIOW. iMOtl.NT, AMD DAY DAT 

DATE Of ASSK3SMKMT. DBLINflOKRT. Ot SALK 

Adalfo. Werra oo., CaL, May 29, $1 June 28— July 29* 

Bullion. Btorey Co . Nov Sale Aug 6 

Btlchcr, VirKMilii, Nov., Mav 30, $15 June 30-July 31 

Belcher, Virginia, Nev , May 30, $5 June 30-July 31 

Cherokee Pint, Butte co., July 24, S5 Auk. 27— Sept. 18 

Chlptoiiena, Bonori, Mexico. July 11. $5 Aug 12— Kept 2* 

Camanto, Landerco . Nov., June 21, $3) — Aug, 2-*S6pt 28" 

uorett, Slmtloa. Mex.. Mnv I, 10c — July 5— July'-JO* 

California, Btorey Co., Nov., June 14, $S 50. .July 21— Aug. 20 

Chalk Mountain, Nev. co.,Cal., June 18, SI. July ID— Aug. 5" 

Chollar-l'otOB), Storey CO., Nev., dlv. 25 Poyahle June 15 

crown Point. Nov. dividend S80 Payable May 15 

DeflOtO, Hiiitil.nl.lt. NOV, July 11, $2 Aug 17— Sep t 4" 

Daner, Lyon oo., Nev., June 18,83 July 22— Aug. 10 

Dlos Padre. Alamo, Mex .June 13, $3 July 15— Aug. 2 

Dardanelles, Del Norte co., June 3,8c July 1U— August 3* 

Kl Taste. Sonera, Mex.. July 11. SI Aug. 12— Aug. 30 

Empire M. A M-, Nev., dividend $6. Payable May 16 

Golden Rule, Tuolumne Co, dlv Sicken... Payable May 1* 
Gould 1 Curry. Virginia, Nev.. dividend $80.. Payable Jan 8 
Hope Gravel. Nev. co . Cal . June 26, SI ....July 30— Aug 19* 
Hale A HorcroM, Virginia, Nev.. dlv. $125... Payable July 15 

I X L, Alpine co.. Cal., June 19, SI. 50 July 19— Aug. 6» 

Imperial, Virginia, Nev., dlv. $10 Payable July 15 

Josephine Quicksilver, San Luis Obispo, div,$2 JulyS 

Julia, Storey co, Nov.. June 19, $ I July 22— Aug. 12 

Kentuck,div..$40pcr share Payable July 8 

La Blanca. Ures, Mex., July 12, $2,50 Aug. 10-Aug. 27 

London Q M., Slsklyoa co ., Julvfi, $1 Aug. 10-Aug. SI 

Lyon M, A M., Kl Dorado co.. July 6. $3 Aug 6— Aug 19* 

Lady Bell, Del Norte co., June 18, 15c Aug. 1— Aug. 19* 

Nueslra Senora de Guadalupe, July 12. $1.. Aug. 13— Sept 5* 
Neagle A Corcoran, Storey Co, July 11, 50c. .Aug 12— Sept 2* 
Neagle & Corcoran, Storey co. Nov. .Ann. Meeting, Aug. 19* 
Oxford Beta, Esmeralda. Nev. June 25, 50c. Aug. 24— Sept. 9* 

Rattlesnake. Yubaco., July 25, $1 

Refugio, Cliihualiua, Mex., July 10, $1 

Summer, Kern co Annual Meeting Aug. 5 

Shonlione S. M.. dividend, $2 per share — Payable March 14 

Suva?'', Virginia. Nov, dividend $300 Payable Julv 8 

Santiago, silver City, dividend Payable .March 6 

Sides S. M. Co.. June 24. $1250 

Tuolumne Mountain, Tuol. Co., July 10, $1.. Aug 13— Aug 31* 

Union, Sierra co Annual Meeting Aug. 12 

White A Murphv, July 3. $6.75 Aug 10— Sept 2 

Wliitlutch, Lauder co., Nev.. June 21, $15. .Aug. 2— Sept 25* 
Yellow Jacket, Gold Hill, dlv. $75 ah Payable July 10 

•Those marked with an asterisk (•) are advertised In this 



.Aug. 28-Sept. 16* 
..Aug. 21— Sept. 11 



Latest Stock Prices Bid and Asked. 

S. P. 8TOOK AMD KXOUANCE BOARD. 

Friday Evknihg, July 26, 1867. 

MlflCKLLASJEOUS STOCKS- Bill. dfikd. 

United States 7 3-lutlis Bonds. June Issue $ 79 80 

Legal Tender Notes 72 

Calltornia State Bonds, 7s. 1857 85 

San Francisco Bonds lOs, 1851.... 100 



72 J = 



Sun Franci-co city Bonds. 6s. 1855 80 

Ban Francisco City and County Bonds, 6s, 1858. 75 

Stin Francisco City and Oo. Sch'l B'ds, 7s, 1866. 80 

San Francisco Cilv and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1862 80 

San Francisco City and Co. Bonds, 7s, 1864 8t 

San Francisco City and Co Bonds, 7*. 1865 80 

San Francisco Citvand Co. Jmig. Bds. 7s, 1863. 80 

San Francisco City and Co. Judg. Bds, 7s, 1864. 80 

Sacramento City Bond* 27}tf 

Sacramento County Bonds, 6i 65 

Murvsville Ui. nils, lO.s 75 

Stockton City Bonds 70 

Yuba County Bonds,' 10s 75 

Santa Clara County Bonds 7s 75 

Bulte Count v Bonds, 10s, 1861) 70 

Han Mateo County Bonds, 7s — 

Oulilurnla Steam Navigation Co 70 

Spring Valley Water Co 67 

State Telegraph Co 30 

GAS COMPANIES. 

San Francisco Gas Co 63Ji 

Hacramento Gas Co G2 

RAILROADS. 

Sacramento Valley Railroad — 

San Francisco and San Jose Railroad 40 

Omnibus Railroad 61 

Central Railroad 43 

North Beach and Mission Railroad 49 

Front Street, Mission and Ocean Railroad 11 

BANKING INSTITUTIONS. 

California, Loan and Savings Society. . 



102 
95 
80 

84 

84 
84 



32 



San Francisco Market Eates. 

WholeBule Prices. 

Friday, July 26, 1867. 

Flour, Extra, "£ bbl $5 60 @$6 50 

Do. Siipcrllnc 4 75 @ 6 25 

Corn Meal, "r* 100 lbs 2 00 ® 2 25 

Wheal, ",-' I DO thy 1 60 ® 1 85 

Oats. # 11X1 lbs 1 00 @ 1 50 

Barley, *£ 100 lbs 1 35 @ 1 45 

Beans, "p I0vi lbs 2 00 @ 3 60 

Potatoes, ^ 1U0 lbs 75 ® 1 IS 

Bay, » tou 7 no @12 oo 

Live Oak Wood, f. cord 9 00 @10 00 

Beef, on toot, fl lb 7,'i @ — 

Beef, extra, dressed, "p* lb 9 @ 10 

Sheep, on foot 3 00 @ 4 00 

Hogs, on foot, 7* lb 6 @ 6,\ 

Hogs, dressed, & lb 9 @ 10 

UUOtiKKIKS, KTC. 

Sugar, crushed, ^ lb 143^ a 15 

■Do. China 10 @ 11 

Coffee, Costa Rica, ^ lb 19U@ 19? : 

Do. Rio — @ 19Ji 

Tea. Japan, <p lb 65 @ 85 

Do. Green 60 @ 1 25 

Hawaiian Rice, %lb 9 ® — 

China Rice, Tftlb 6?,( @ fij 

Coal Oil, $ gallon 52W ® 65 

Candles, $ lb 16 @ 23> 

Ranch Butter, ^4 lb 35 @ 40 

Isthmus Butter, $ lb 15 @ 25 

Cheese. California, %1 lb 12>i @ 15 

Eggs, % dozen 33 @ 38 

Lard, %* lb 12 @ 13 

Ham and Bacon, ft lb 13 @ 18 

Shoulders, ft lb 8 @ 10 

Ketiill Frlcee. 

Butter, California, fresh, ft lb 30 ® 60 

do. pickled, rl lb 25 @ — 

do. Oregon, ft lb 15 ® 20 

do. New York, ft lb 35 ® 40 

Cheese, ft lb 15 @ 25 

Honey, ft tb 30 ia 40 

Eggs, « dozen 40 

Lard, ft lb 16 

Hams and Bacon, ft lb 18 

Crauberriep, ft gallou 1 60 

Potatoes, ft lb 2 

Potatoes. Sweet, ft lb — 

Tomatoes, ft lb — 

Onions, ft lb 3 

Apples. No. 1, ft lb 4 

Pears, Tabic, ft lh 8 

Plums, dri?d. ft lb 13 

Peaches, dried, ft lb It 

Oranges, ft dozen 50 

Lemons, ft doze n 75 

Chickens, apiece — 

Turkevs. ft lb 20 

Soap, Pale andC. 7 

Soap, CasUlo. ft lb 18 



® 45 

@ 16 

@ 20 
@ 1 25 

® 3 

@ 6 

® 5 

@ 5 



75 
25 
12M 



Bank of Pacliic Accumulation Loan Society.. — 
The Bank of California 138 

INSORANCK COMPANIES. 

Flreinons' Fund Insurance Co 

Pacltlc Insurance Co 

San Francisco Insurance Co 

MiMchantT,' Mutual Marine Insurance Co.. 

California Insurance Co 

Union Insurance Co ., 

California Home Insurance Co , 

ltoine Mutual Insurance Co 

Occidental Insurance Co 

National Insurance Co 



91 
130 
100 



MINING STOCKS— WASHOK DISTRICT. 



DO 95 

69K 71 



Alpha 

Baltimore American 

Belcher 

Bullion. G. H 

Crown Point 

Con ndenco 

Chollar-Potosl 

Daney 

Exchequer. 

Empire Mill and Mining Co.. 

Gould & Curry 

Halo & Norcross 

Imperial 

Lady Bryan 

Ophlr 

Overman 

Savage 

y.-iiow Jacket 

Golden Rule, California 



San Francisco Metal Market. 

PRICES FOR INVOICES. 

Jobbing price* rule from ten tofi/Uen per cent, higher than the 
j'oltotciriff quotations. 

Friday, July 26, 1867. 
Iron.— Duty: Fig, $9 per ton; Railroad, 60c ft lnO lbs; Bar, 
1 italic ft lb; Sneer, polished, 3c ft lb; common. l^Ol'AiC 
ft ft; Plate, IJ40 ft ft; Pipe, IVic ft lb; Galvanized, 2%c 
ft lb. 

Scotch and English Pig Iron ft ton $47 00 <SS18 00 

White Pig ft ton 50 00 @ 

Rellned Bar, bad assortment ft lb — 03 (A 

Re (hied Bar, good assortment, ft lb — 03?,<<Si 

Boiler, No. 1 to i — iHH® 

Plate, No. 5 to 9 — 04'^® — 05 

Sheet, No. 10 to 13 — 04W@ 

Sheet, No. 14 to 20 — 05 ® 

Sheet, No. 24 to 27 — 05 @ 

Coppkr— Duty: Sheathing, 3>jc ft ft; Pig and Bar, 2^c ft lb. 

Sheathing, ft lb — 34 @ — 36 

Slieathing, Yellow — 25 ® — 26 

Sheathing, Old Yellow — 11 @ 

Bolts —11 @ 

Composition Nails — 25 @ — 26 

Tin Platks.— Duty: 25ft cent, ad valorem. 

Plates, Charcoal, IX, ft box 13 50 © 

Plates, T O Charcoal 12 00 © 12 50 

Rooflng_Plt,tcs 11 U0 (a 11 50 

BancaTin. Slabs, ft lb — 29 © — 30 

Stkkl.— English Cast Steel, ft lb — 12^@ — 15 

Quicksilvkr.— $ ft @_60 

For export @ — 55 

Zinc —Sheets, ft lb @ — 11 

Lead.— Pig, ft lb - 7J5® — 8 

Sheet — 10 @ 

Pipe — 11 ® 

Bar — 9J£© — 10 

Bokax.— California, ft lb —20 @ — 23 



Equine Mortality. — This city appears 
to be as healthy for animals as for man. In 
the late report of the Omnibus Railroad 
Company it is stated that the annual rate 
of deaths of horses belonging to that conr 
panyis about two percent, while the death 
rate among animals engaged in the same 
service at the East is from seven to eight 
per cent. — from three to four times as great 
as in this city. This is a significant fact. 
That company has divided $50,000 in earn- 
ings during the past year. 



200 


3200 
2o5 


150 


155 


220 


225 


4 ISO 


4200 


9)0 


910 


17 


20 * 



Moktuaby. — The mortuary report for 
thiB city for the week ending July 20th was 
fifty-two. The causes of death were thirty- 
three iu number. 



Continental Life Insurance Company 
302 Montgomery street, corner of Pine. 



Valuable Books on Mining, Mineral- 
ogy, Geology, Metallurgy, Etc. 

ANSTED'S Gold Seekers Manual. 1 vol. 

cloth S 1 76 

ANTISELL.— The Manufacture of Photo- 

S-iiie or Ilyttro-Carbon Oils, from Coul and other 
itlimiiKiu.s SobMuiitTS, ennnbi,' of su]i|ilvinu Burn- 
in'.' Fluids. By Thomas AntUcll, Jl. D. 1vol. 8vo.. 3 00 

BLAKE, W. P. — Geological BoconnoisBance 

In California in 4S63-1. 4to., with plates, maps, sec- 
tions, etc 10 00 

BLAKE, W. P.— Silver Ores and Silver 

Mlnes.etc. 8vo 2 00 

BLAKE, W. P. — Mining Magazine and Jour- 
nal of Geology, etc. ovo 6 00 

BLAKE, W. P.— Annotated Catalogue of 

California Minerals. 8vo 60 

BUCKLAND (Rev. Wm.)- Geology and 

Mineralogy. 2 vols. 8vo. cloth 1q 00 

BOURNE (Jolin)— Handbook of the Steam 

Cugine, Illustrated. 2 vol. 12uio, cloth 3 00 

CONGDON.— Mining Laws and Forma of 
California and Nevada, and tho Mining Ordinances 
of Mexico. 18-1 pp. 8yo; flexible cloth; 1854. iThe 
only compilation extant 2 50 

DUFREKOY. — Mineralogie. 5 volumes, 

8vo 20 00 

DANA'S Manual of Mineralogy. Revised 

edition. 2GQ illustrations, ilihu. cloth. New Haven, 
18ti3. School Edition 2 25 

DANA'S Manual of Geology. Numerous Il- 
lustrations. 8vo. half morocco. Philadelphia, 1863. 6 75 
DANA'S Text-Book of Geology. Illustrated. 

12mo, cloth. Philadelphia, 186i 2 2ft 

ELDERHORST'S Blowpipe.— Analysis and 

Determinative Mineralogy. Third edition, revised. 
Svo. cloth. Philadelphia, 1866 1 60 

FAIRBAIRN. — Iron: its History, proper- 
tics, nml Processes of Manufacture By Wm. i'air- 
bairn, C E., LL. D. 1 vol. 8vo. New Edition 5 00 

FEUTCHWANGER.— A Treatise on Gems. 

1 vol. Svo, cloth 1 76 

GOODYEAR'S Translation. A Treatise on 
the Assaying of Copper, Silver, Lead, Gold and Mer- 
cury, from i he German of Th. Bodenian and Bruno 
Kcrl. 1vol. 12ino. Cloth 2 50 

HUMBLE. — Dictionary of Geology and Min- 
eralogy. Third Edition. Revised 1 vol. 8vo. cloth. 9 00 
HOSKOLD'S Practical Treatise on Mining 

Land and Railway Surveying, Engineering, Etc. 

1 vol. 8vo. cloth 16 00 

KUSTEL. — Nevada and California Processes 
of Silver and Gold Extraction, for general use, and 
especially for the Mining Public of California and 
Nevada; :iir=o. a description of the General Metal- 
lurgy of Silver Ores. By Guido Kustel, Mining En- 
trinee*- Illustrated by accurate engraving. 1vol. 
Svo cloth 5 00 

LAMBORN. — Rudimental Treatise on the 
Moinllurgv of Copper. 1 vol. 12mo. limp cloth. 
Illustrated 100 

LAMBORN. — Rudimentary Treatise on the 

Metallurgy ol Silver and Lead. 1 vol. 12oao. limp 
cloth. Illustrated 1 00 

MITCHELL'S Manual of Practical Assay- 
ing. 1vol. 8vo cloth 10 60 

MAKINS. — A Manual of Metallurgy, more 

&articularly of the Precious Metals, Including the 
'el hods of Assaying them. By G. H. Makins. 1vol. 
12nuj. cloth. Illustrated by upwards of 50 engrav- 
ings 3 60 

OVERMAN (Fred.)— A Treatise on Metal- 
lurgy ; comprising Mining, and General and Par- 
ticular Metallurgical Operations. I vol. Svo. cloth. 7 60 

PIGGOT.— The Chemistry and Metallurgy 
of Copper. By A. Snowdeu Plggot, M. D. 1 vol. 
l2mo. cloth 2 00 

PHILLIPS AND DARLINGTON.— Rec- 

ordsof Mining and Metallurgy; or, Pacts and Memo- 
randa for the Use of Mine Agents and Smelters By 
J A. Phillips and John Darlington. 1 vol. 12mo. 
cloth 4 00 

PERCY (John).— Metallurgy; the Act of 

Extracting Metals from their Ores, and adapting 
them to various Purposes of Manufacture. Iron 
and Steel. 1vol. Svo. cloth 13 60 

PLATTNER AND MUSPRATT on the 

Use of the Blowpipe. J7 Diagrams. Third edition, 
revised. Svo. cloth. London, 1854 6 00 

Practical Use of the Blowpipe ; being a Grad- 
uated Course of Analysis. l2mo. cloth. New York, 
1858 ZOO 

SCOFFERN'S Useful Metals and their Al- 
loys. 1 vol. cloth 6 60 

SMITH'S Blowpipe — Vade-Mecum . The 
Blowpipe Characters of Minerals Alphabetically 
Arranged. Svo. cloth. London, 18(52 175 

URE'S Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, 

and Mines. 2,300 Engrovlnss. From last London 

edition. 3 vols. Svo. cloth. New York 16 60 

WHITNEY.— A Geological Survey of Cali- 
fornia. Report of Pield Work from 1860 to 18G4. By 
J. D. Whitney. Per. vol. quarto 6 00 

WHEELER & RANDALL'S Quartz Oper- 
ator's Handbook. Flexible cloth, I2mo. San Fran- 
cisco 1865 1 00 

Any of the above Books will be furnished by 
return mail or express, on receipt of the price with 
postage added. Any other books desired will also 
be furnished at the lowest San Francisco retail 
prices. Address, 

DEWEY & Co., 

llimn" and Scientific Press Office, San Francisco. 
UvlS-Iaiatf 



Profits of Coopekativi; Labor. — There 
is a cooperative association in Troy, N. Y., 
composed of forty-eight iron founders, who 
have a capital of $25,000, in shares of $100 
each — every member a laborer. While 
other foundries were without profit last 
winter, these operatives earned S7,000 in 
wages. The principle of cooperation is the 
true solution of the labor question in this 
city as elsewhere. Neither strikes nor eight- 
hour leagues will avail to protect labor 
against capital. 

»-«.-^» .. » 

Church Organ for the Sandwich Is- 
lands. — Among the evidences of progress 
at the Sandwich Islands, we notice the fact 
that a fine church organ has just been com- 
pleted at Boston for a native church edifice 
at Honolulu. This is the first organ ever 
ordered for the Islands, and, if we are not 
mistaken, the firstever ordered and paid for 
by a congregation gathered out of pagan 
darkness in any portion of the world. 



A Paper for Beeoher. — There is con- 
siderable talk of starting a new religious 
newspaper in New York, to be under the 
editorial management of Mr. Beecher. The 
scheme is to create a journal which shall 
represent the highest religious and intel- 
lectual culture of the age, a journal which 
all denominations of Christians could heart- 
ily support. The moment he says he is 
ready, the capital, to the amount of $250,- 
000, will be forthcoming, and as much more 

as may be necessary. 

. i ^ -..— ♦ 

Yeddo, a city of two million inhabitants, 
has no beggars. 



MBTAU.URG1ST.— A PRACTICAL metallurgist, experienced in 
all branches oi° hla business, and particularly In the manu- 
facture of Toucn corrER, wants employment. His address 
can be had the office of the Mlnlug and Sclontiac Press. 
• 25vl4-4w* 



C^EY&Co 



Miuv 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



r e$$. 



Important 3N"otice- 

Another New Doctor iu the Field ! 

DR. H. A. BENTOIV, 

Has been performing many wonderful cures in this city 
t lie past two years, and, as his practice is fast Increasing at 
the office, he finds it difficult to attend all the outsldo calls, 
and has concluded to invite R. H. OLMSTEAD, M.D., to join 
him. Dr. Olmsiead, of Napa City, has been eighteen years 
successfully ti eating obstinate cases with water, electricity, 
and the magnetic forces. Remedies of the Eclectic Pchool, 
of which lie is a graduate, can bo resorted to when needed. 
Being the seventh son of a celebrated physician, and at the 
same time having a powerful organization, his magnetic 
hands like magic dinpel pain and disease. He Is also a nat- 
ural bone-settsr. Dr. Olrastead has this day associated 
wilh Dr. H. A. Benton, the Medical Electrician and 
Homeopathiet, at his office, 3U Bush street, San Francisco, 
who, having all the necessary facilities, such as the patent 
Electric, Chemical, Sulphur, Vapor, Hot Air and Modlcated 
Baths, which aid in curing all curable diseases, whether 
acute or chronic, and with the combined skill, together 
with an excellent lady assistant, gives an assurauce of 
cure to many, benefit to all, and injury to none. 

N. B.— Terms for treatment within reach of all. Office 
hours: from 9 A. M. to 8 P. M.; Sundays, by appointment. 

JOQP- Lodging rooms convenient for those who come from 
the country. 

June 1st, 1867- 22vl4-eow4t 



THE GREAT LIGHT. 

THE DANFORD 
.A-tmospheric Lamp. 

This Lump burns coal oil, requires no chimney, givei a 
pure white and steady tlame, uses thirty per cent less oil 
than any other Lamp in proportion to the amount of light 
afforded, and in absolutely indispensable in every house 
whore gas Is not used. CALL AND SEE THEM. 

For sale only by 'E. ATEB8. 

2vl5 qy 417 Washington street, opp. Post Office, S. F. 



Assayer and Chemist. 

A GENTLEMAN WELL VERSED IN ASSAYING AND 
Analytical Clicmi.-trv, is desirous uf -securing a position 
in some assaying establishment, or would rake charge of 
the assaying' and amalgamating department ot either a. 
gold or silver mine. Steady employment, rather than high 
wanes. Is desirable. The advertiser would take his own 
laboratory to the mine If desired. Proper reierences given. 
Inquire at this office. 3vl5tl 



Importitnt to Cjilltornltuw.— Many Inventors have 
lately had their claims tor Patents seriously (and insume 
cases fataUyldelflVcd by tho uiiquaiincntlon oi agents who 
have not coin plied with the Government license and revenue 
laws, as well as other new and imperutive regulations. 
These discrepancies, although arising from the inexperienes 
of honest agents, arc none the less dangerous to applicants 
for patents, whose safest course, is to trust ilicir business 
with none but active and experienced solicitors. Thk Mik- 
inoanpScikktikio Pukss Fatkst Ackncy has strictly com- 
plied with the requisitions of the Dcpririnient, and properly 
tiled all necessary papers as Claim Agents. 



54 



Wit pimwg and Jfcfetitiffe §xm. 



pitting ^tttttMWjj. 



The following information is gleaned mostly from jour- 
nals published in the interior, in close proximity to the 
mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alpine County. 

Miner, July 20th : A contract has been 
made with the I. X. L. Co. for 100 tons of 
their ore, to be worked in Davidson's mill, 
on Silver creek. The price paid for the ore 
is $100 per ton. It is thought that the 
quality of ore comprehended in the contract 
will work so as to leave a margin of profit 
to the mill. Once started, it is believed 
this will furnish sufficient from the amount 
saved while prospecting their lodes to keep 
the mill running on first-class ore. 

It is thought that two or three claims on 
the Hercules lode will be worked this sea- 
son. The Hercules is an undoubted true 
lode, and shows the finest quartz to be 
found outside the Comstock. All it wants 
is opening to a sufficient depth, where pay 
ore is a sure thing. 

The Supt. of the American Co. is putting 
. things to right, preparatory to starting up 
up work. The wheel used last season for 
driving the pump is now running. 

It is the intention of the owners to start 
work on Buckeye No. 2 lode in a few days. 
Their vein is two feet thick, the whole of 
which will work over $80 per ton. It is 
likely the pay ore will increase with dis- 
tance and depth under ground. 

Amtulor County. 

Ledger, July 20th : Sylvester, SpagnoK & 
Co., at Clinton, have been working a hy- 
draulic claim near that place for some time 
past Chipsas weighing from a half ounce 
to two ounces are a common occurrence, 
and smaller ones in proportion. 

After the burning of the shaft house and 
machinery at the Italian mip'B, on Else 
creek, the owners, to keep their mill going, 
re-opened an old tunnel, strikingore so rich 
that after throwing out one-sixth of it the 
balance would pay §2 per pound. 

On Monday last, Dr. Paugh, of this 
place, sold his mine and mill, near Clinton, 
to parties in Sau Francisco and Oakland. 
The price paid has not been made known. 
The new owners will push forward the work 
vigorously. 

The Mountain, or Belding, mine has been 
yielding a better quality of ore for the last 
two months than usual. Much of the rock 
will yield from $80 to $100 per ton, mill 
working. The depth of the mine is 250 ft. , 
and though the size and general appearance 
of the lode is unchanged, the quality of the 
sulphurets is improving, 

Butte County. 

Marysville Appeal, July 18th : A French- 
man passed through Marysville lately on 
his way to Paris, who met with unusual 
luck while mining in the Last Chance claim, 
in Butte county. He had sold his claim for 
a fair sum, with the privilege of working 
two days longer ; and while thus engaged 
was lucky enough to take out a nugget 
weighing 50 ozs. 

Calaveraa County, 

Chronicle, July 20th: Lamphear & Co. 
are progressing fairly with their lead. The 
ledge is between two and three ft. in width, 
enclosed between well-defined walls, and the 
rock extracted prospects richly. Should 
the lode continue to prospect as favorably 
to the depth of 150 ft. as it does at present, 
the company will erect suitable machinery 
as soon as practicable. 

From Middle Bar the most cheering in- 
telligence is received. Stewart & Co., 
Hoerchner, Grimm & Co., and Wesson & 
Co. , are pushing forward labor upon their 
claims with redoubled energy. The custom 
mill at that place is kept constantly em- 
ployed, and the returns are highly remun- 
erative to the owners of the leads. During 
the coming fall mills will be erected upon 
every lead in the district. 

Large amounts of dust continue to be 
shipped from the West Point, Whisky Slide 
and El Dorado Dists. Wallace, Coekley & 
Co., Peters, Champion & Co., and many 
others, are coining money. 

Pennell, Savage & Co. , whose gravel min- 
ing claim is located in Stockton Hill, have 
recently struck it rich. 

Paul & Co., after having cut their way 
through solid bedrock for a distance of about 
900 ft., have had their labors rewarded by 
striking a lead of paying gravel. The claim 
is one of the most extensive as well as the 
richest iu the county. 

Shaw & Co., Brackott & Co. , and Mitchell 
& Adams are doing remarkably well. Min- 
ing operations, both in quartz and gravel, 
are livelier iu this vicinity than they have 
been for years past. 

A new vein has been struck in the old 
Crispin mine. The lode is between three 
and four ft. wide, full of sulphurets, and 
with considerable free gold, visible to the 
naked eye. It is easily worked, without 



blasting, crushes well, and prospects better 
than any rock heretofore struck. 

El I>or-aclo County. 

Placerville Courier, July 20th : At Browns- 
ville all the ledges that are being worked 
look well. G. W. Swan and others are put- 
ting up a mill on a ledge owned by them. 
The Gray Eagle mill is running regularly, 
and has been for the past year or two. The 
old Steely ledge has changed hands, and is 
now being worked by Wm. Givens, of Sac- 
ramento. They are sinking their shaft, and 
on the 4th of July got through the old 
rock, and are now getting out rock that will 
pay $25 per ton. The new mill at Henry's 
Diggings has just commenced crushing. 
Bock from Bradley's ledge, at Henry's Dig- 
gings, shows free gold, and looks well. 

Prospecting is still going on at George- 
town, and all feel satisfied that they are en- 
tering upon a season of prosperity. 

Inyo County. 

A correspondent of this paper, inciting 
from Inyo county, says that the Silver 
Sprout Co's mill, five stamps at present, is 
nearly ready for work, and good ore is 
being taken from the mines. This company 
intends to make the concern pay its way 
when once started, devoting the proceeds to 
improvements, such as roasting furnaces, 
etc., till all is complete. As the surface ore 
can be worked with good results raw, they 
expect to be able to do this. 

The Kearsarge Co. have at last got to 
work, and have sent a superintendent, who 
seems to be the right man. He is deter- 
mined to understand the situation, and to 
that end is operating vigorously on the 
mines at several points. The mill will not 
be started until something more is known 
of the mines, which, though rich, are, like 
the others, not yet properly opened. 

From Lone Pine we have the most flat- 
tering accounts of the mines, but water is 
very scarce, even for drinking purposes. 
The Mexicans in this district continue to 
take out bullion by means of their little 
furnaces, which they sell to the storekeep- 
ers in Independence. Some parties con- 
template establishing an assay office in the 
latter town. A certain party at Lone Pine 
has a mine reported to be very rich, which 
he keeps under lock and key, allowing none 
to enter. He makes a point of disparaging 
the district, and thinks "the Mexicans won't 
stay there long," but has no idea of leaving 
himself. It is hinted that he desires to 
"annex" the whole district. 

jllai-iposa County. 

Mail, July 20th: Mining operations on 
Bull creek are progressing favorably. On 
Hite & Kerrin's claims the vein presents a 
fine appearance, with well-defined walls, 
and prospects well. Looniis, Black & Co. , 
working on the extension of the same, are 
getting some good ore. Sheelan is having 
a shaft sunk on his vein, with good pros- 
pects. Col. Arm intends to let a contract 
for sinking on the Mammoth lode on Bull 
creek, on the same range as the Hite & Ker- 
rins mine. 

JX eyacla County . 

Transcript, July 19th: The Eureka cor- 
respondent writes: Black & Young keep 
their mill constantly at work. They have 
about 30 men employed and their rock looks 
very good. The Jim mine is not working 
at present. 

The machinery for Veach and Powell's 
ledge is expected next week. They have 
run a tunnel 180 ft. striking the ledge four 
ft. in width, with over 125 ft. back, and the 
rock shows plenty of free gold. There are 
about 100 men prospecting in this locality 
at the present time. The Golden Age, 
owned by Mulligan, O'Neil and Quinn, have 
struck their ledge. It is large, and shows 
gold. and sulphurets. It is their intention 
to erect a 10-stamp mill on it the present 
season. The Birchville Co. are taking out 
rock which will average $48 a ton. They 
are hauling their quartz to Black & Young's 
mill for crushing. 

A shaft has been sunk on the Golden 
Eagle ledge 20 ft. , striking the ledge three 
ft. wide. The rock looks well, and is inter- 
spersed with free gold. The company are 
now running a tunnel to strike the ledge 
100 ft. from the surface. 

Hunt & Pier have struck fine looking 
rock in their ledge on Gaston ridge. 

New ledges are constautly being discov- 
ered, most of which prospect first rate. 

July 20th : The claims owned by Delos 
Caulkins and others on Myers' Kavine, are 
yielding handsomely this season. The pres- 
ent owners purchased the ground some 
three months ago, for $9,500, and since that 
time have cleaned up about $5,000. 

July' 21st : The Bed Bock Tunnel and 
Mining Co. is incorporated for the purpose 
of running a tunnel in Johnson's Hill, 
Birchville mining district. They have al- 
ready run 2,021 ft., and have let a contract 
to run 400 ft. further. At the point to 
which the tunnel is completed it is 419 ft. 



to the surface. This tunnel will furnish an 
outlet for over a mile of mineral land, the 
range being that lying between Birchville 
and Kate Hay's Flat. The mouth of the 
tunnel opens into the Middle Yuba. When 
this tunnel is raised to the gravel it is esti- 
mated it will be nearly 5,000 ft. in length. 

The Kennebec Co. have opened a shaft 
from their lower tunnel into the gravel bed. 
The lower tiwmel is 950 ft. long, and opens 
the channel to the bottom 170 ft. below the 
surface. The new tunnel taps the blue lead 
and the profits are expected to greatly in- 
crease. 

Gazette, July 18th : One-half of the U. S. 
Grant mine has been sold to San Francisco 
men. The amount paid was $32,000. This 
company was incorporated a few days ago 
at Sau Francieco, and it is the intention of 
the present owners to erect a large mill and 
thoroughly develop the mine. 

Dutch Flat Enquirer, July 20th : A few 
days ago a large specimen of ore from the 
Eureka mine at Grass Valley, was exhibited, 
which would, if reduced, yield $10, 000 or 
$12,000 per ton. The specimen weighed 
about 100 lbs. and exhibited to the naked 
eye large quantities of free gold besides very 
rich sulphurets. A ton of sulphurets from 
the U. S. Grant mine at Meadow Lake, has 
been successfully worked at Grass Valley 
by the Eureka Q. M. Co. The metallurgist 
at the Eureka states that he experienced no 
difficulty in reducing them. 

Exoei/Siob. — Transcript,Jnlj 24th : From 
50 tons of Green Emigrant ore, crushed at 
the California mill, an average was obtained 
of $25.90 per ton. The rock is from 10 or 
12 ft. below the surface. The company will 
make another crushing of 100 tons at an 
early day. 

Fifty tons of rock from the Mohawk and 
Montreal ledge, worked in their new mill, 
paid $20 per ton in free gold, yielding in 
addition a large quantity of rich sulphurets. 

The Gold Bun Phcenix tunnel has been 
run 200 ft. , striking a large ledge with 150 
ft. backs. The ore is of excellent quality, 
abounding in free gold. 

On the Knickerbocker ledge, a drift has 
been run 150 ft. below the surface. The 
company is taking rock from the top which 
will be crushed in a short time. 

The Confidence Co. , Pacific ledge, are as- 
sorting rock which was taken out last win- 
ter to be worked. It is estimated that this 
rock will £>ay $40 per ton. 

The Kentucky Co. are about letting a 
contract for a tunnel 200 ft. in length, to 
tap their ledge 150 ft. below the surface. 

Meadow Lake Sun, July 20th : A very 
rich body of ore has been struck in the 
Gold Bnn mine, at a distance of 230 ft. 
from the mouth of the tunnel. The ledge 
seems to be widening considerably. 

The Live Oak boys, being so well satis- 
fied with their prospects at a distance of 18 
ft. on their ledge, are building an arastra, 
in order to prospect more thoroughly. 

Placer County. 

The Grass Valley correspondent of the 
Aha of this city, writing July 10th, says : 
Placer county is comparatively poor in 
quartz, the poorest in fact, between Plumas 
and Mariposa, if we take development as a 
fact of wealth. No quartz mill has paid 
regularly for three years, nor has any one 
furnished a total yield of $10i',000. The 
Green Emigrant has contained some very 
rich pockets, and rumor says it has yielded 
$500,000. The owners refuse to tell what 
the yield has been, and there is good reason 
for believing that, for the first two years 
the product was $20,000. 

The yield of the Schnable mine is $G per 
ton, and the expenses $4. A level has been 
run 1,200 ft. on the vein, 50 ft. below the 
surface in pay rock all the way. 

The Empire quartz mill was burned down 
about 10 days ago. 

The Tallman and the Golden Bule mines 
are both being opened. They both promise 
to be profitable. 

Dutch Flat Enquirer, July 17 th : Parties 
who have been in the mountains prospect- 
ing, report good diggings, both surface and 
quartz, to have been struck near the head- 
waters of the American river. 
X"lumas County. 

The Quiucy correspondent of the Alia, of 
this city, June 11th : The ledges next the 
Bough and Beady, in Jamison Dist. , are 
large and well defined. There are upwards 
of 20 on the hill, most of which have been 
well prospected. The most prominent are 
the Manhattan, Knickerbocker, Empire, 
Savage, New York, U. S. Grant, B. E. Lee, 
Abe Lincoln, and McGee. Bock from the 
Knickerbocker and TJ. S. Grant have paid 
$25 in the mill. The Manhattan and B. E. 
Lee prospect upwards of $100. Free gold 
can be seen in the rock in any of the ledges. 
The rock in all of them is precisely similar 
in character to the Mammoth, Eureka, and 
Seventy-Six. They range in width from 



four to eight ft. — the Savage is nearer 80 ft. 
All the rock may safely be estimated to pay 
$20 per ton in mill. 

McGee & Woodward are erecting a mill 
on a ledge purchased by them last winter. 
The ledge promises to be valuable. 

Iron is found here in unlimited quantities. 
In one place an entire mountain is composed 
of the best rock ore, containing from 45 to 
75 per cent. A party have located 320 acres 
on the iron mountain. 

There are large copper ledges in this dis- 
trict located, but not yet developed. 

San Bemardino County. 

Guardian, July 20th : Some few weeks 
ago Messrs. Brown and Tyler discovered a 
quartz ledge, and have lately been at work 
on it to test its richness, average pay and 
permanency. They have built an arastra 
for crushing the ore, but, although the rock 
prospects very well from mortar, horn spoon 
or pan, the amalgam obtained from the 
arastra so far, has been in small and not 
paying quantities. The ledge is aboutthree 
ft. in thickness, and can be traced on tho 
surface for several hundred yards. 

We learn from a friend that the Green 
lode, after a run of 20 days, working 20 tons, 
of ore in five arastras, recently cleaned up 
nearly $800 — about $40 to the ton, which 
we understand to be about the average yield 
of some 1, 500 tons of ore, worked by the 
Byerson process. This process involves the 
necessity of dry crushing. The mode of 
crushing adopted was the Howel Centri- 
fugal crusher. The result, notwithstanding 
the yield, was a heavy loss. Working the 
ore by arastras, affords a profit of about 100 
per cent. ; while by the Byerson process, an 
actual loss is entailed. 

Sierra County. 

Messenger, July 20th: The Dutch Co. 
have been taking out large pay for some 
time past. The Hawkeye Co. are driving 
their tunnel into the hill and expect to soon 
strike the lead. Bigsby & Co. have com- 
menced operations upon their claims iu 
Wolf Creek with flattering prospects. Scott, 
Miley & Co. are opening a set of claims at 
Bunker Hill. There is a heavy bank of 
gravel about 60 ft. deep. They intend to 
work them with hydraulic and tunnel, as 
the gravel pays from the top down, and 
they find large pay on the bedrock in the 
claims. There is also an extensive bed of 
cement that will pay richly for crushing. 
There has lately been a fine quartz ledge 
discovered near American Hill, known as 
the Von Humboldt ledge. The company 
are sinking on the ledge, which is between 
three and four ft. in width. All the quartz 
taken from the ledge is good. It will mill 
at least $50 or $00 per ton. 

A gang of Chinamen, working near Ka- 
naka Flat, recently found a nugget of gold 
weighing 45 lbs. The strike was kept se- 
cret until the gang was well on its way to 
China. Many large pieces of gold havo 
been found in the diggings in that vicinity. 

New diggings have been discovered near 
Galloway's ranch. Owing to the absence of 
water, those working them are obliged to 
haul their dirt to Bock Creek, a distance of 
over half a mile. 

Meadow Lake Sun, July 20th : Quite an 
excitement has been raised over a gravel 
deposit, discovered near Milltown, Sierra 
county. The extent and value of the dis- 
covery is not yet known. 

Tuba County. 

The Commercial Herald and Marl'et Re- 
view of this city, says : The Blue Gravel 
claim at Smartsville is a specimen of mines 
in Yuba. This claim contains upward of 
100 acres, averaging 100 ft. from surface to 
bedrock. Upward of $1,000,000 have been 
taken from it, though it was not opened till 
March, 1864. It occupied nine years of 
incessant labor, and the expenditure of up- 
ward of $100, 000, to open it. It has four 
miles of sluices, three ft. wide and three ft. 
deep, in which three tons of quicksilver 
is distributed to catch the gold. One hun- 
dred and twenty-five thousand lbs. of gun- 
powder are annually expended in blowing 
up and breaking the cement where it is too 
hard for the hydraulic to wash. The water 
used in washing costs $25,000 per annum. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Cariboo Sentinel, May 23d : Wake-up- 
Jake claim has been sold for $100. Borealis 
Co. cleaned up lately in one day 156 ozs. 

May 27th : The West Britain Co. bot- 
tomed a shaft at 47 ft. and got a prospect of 
$2. 50 to the pan. Cariboo Co. cleaned up, 
on Wednesday, 47 ozs. Davis Co. cleaned 
up, in one week, 130 ozs. Borealis Co. 
cleaned up, for one week, 100 ozs. 

At Conklin's Gulch, Ericcson Co. washed 
up, last week, 60 ozs. United Co. washed 
up, on Wednesday, 124 ozs. ; on Sunday, 
131 ozs. — making 255 ozs. for the week. 

May 30th : At Antler creek, Cunningham 
creek, Stevens' creek, California creek and 
Wolf creek, the companies are all doing 
well. 



®lw pining and Scientific 



55 



June 3<1 : At Conklinb' Gulch, tlio United 
Co. washed up, tor one week, 838 ozs. The 
Small Hope Co., at Begg's Gulch, last week 
found a piece of gold worth 825. On 
Grouse creek, the Black Hawk Co. cleaned 
u)i. during the last week, 215 ozs. The 
Homing Star claim was latdv sold at Slier- 
ilT's Bale tor 

June 17th: Daring tlio past week, the 
Davis Co. cleaned up 99 ozs., and the Au- 
rora Co. 142 ozs. Borealis Co. .yesterday 
cleaned up 47 ozs. The Alt urns Co., at 
Stent's Gulch, cleaned up, the past week, 
140 ozs, The Jenkins Co. are making from 
810 to $12 per day to the hand. TheMnoho 
tiro Co. have cleaned up for the week 50 
ozs. 

The editor lias been shown ft piece of rock 
from the YVashlmrne Co's chum that was 
literally speckled with heayy nodules of 

gold. 

June 20th : The Aurora Co., on Williams' 
creek, cleaned up, daring tlio past week. 

liiii » ozs.; Davis Co., 206 ozs., and Forest 
]{. ise. .'in ozs. Borealis Co. cleaned up, yes- 
terday, 45 ozs. 

At Stout's Gulch, during the past week, 
theAltnraa Co. cleaned up 161 ozs. One 
piece was found weighing 7 ozs. aud an- 
other 3 ozs. The gold in the gulch is very 
coarse. Mncbo Oro cleaned up 00 ozs. 
Vanghan, Sweeney ,t Co., having occasion 
to clean up ft portion of theirground sluice 
to mako room for rocks, washed up 100 ozs. 
Sevoral pieces of gold have been picked up 
on the Ancient Britons' claim, in Begg's 
Gulch, weighing 85 and $6. 

The British Colonist states that a piece of 
rock weighiug 150 ths. has been blasted 
from the Cherry Creek ledge. Samples of 
lead oro from Shuswap Lake assayed at 
Westminster have yielded at the rate of 64 
per cent, lead and $23 silver per ton. 

Juno 4th : A 4%-oz. quartz specimen has 
been taken out of a bench on French creek. 
The Wingdam Co. are taking out from 6 to 
10 ozs. per day. Daggart Co. had taken 
out a ^2,000 dividend to the share since the 
season commenced. The Gold Hill Co. 
were taking out at the rate of $30 to the 
foot width of tunnel. 

COLORADO. 

Georgetown Miner, July 4th : A corres- 
pondent writing to the Miner of above date, 
from Colorado Gulch, says : We have plenty 
of gulches hero that will pay $4 or $5 per 
day to the man. Au old California miner 
has located some lodes near Cash Creek, 
from ono of which he has obtained $1 to the 
pound of ore. 

The Henry Clay lode on Saxon Mountain, 
has turned out some fine specimens. The 
lead shows an ore vein five ft. wide, giving 
large assays. Work is being pushed ener- 
getically on the Terrible lode. 

The owners of the Watertown lode have 
discovered another lode some 20 or 30 ft. 
farther up the hill, and will drive their tun- 
nel on through the Watertown, and tap the 
new discovery. 

The German lode have out about 600 tons 
of ore. It is sorted into two qualities. The 
second quality about pays expenses in ordi- 
nary stamp mills. The enormous per cent. 
of copper (15 per cent.) prevented the gold 
from being saved in the batteries, and on 
the plates. The first quality has not been 
tried. The shaft is 225 ft. deep. The crev- 
ice is six ft. between walls, with a vein of 
pure ore, varying from 18 in. to three ft. It 
is opened east and west for 2, 600 ft. 

More gulch mining is commenced and in 
contemplation than at any time since 1862. 

The Herkimer Co. is pushing forward 
work on their mine steadily. 

IDAHO. 

Owyhee Avalanche, July 13th : The Owy- 
hee Co's mill is again at work in better trim 
than ever before. The company is making 
an experiment in working the tailings by 
the Kent process. The tailings are first 
made into bricks, then calcined in a furnace 
and subsequently worked in barrels. If it 
proves profitable, works on a largo scale 
will be constructed, and the tailings all 
treated by this process. 

The Potosi ledge is producing rich ore. 
The shaft is down 40 ft. A number of as- 
says show a very high average value of the 
rock. The lowest assay gave 55116.65, and 
several others ranged from $800 to $1,500. 
Silver largely predominates. 

Ten lb s. of Glenbrook ore lately assayed 
819.93. 

The Cosmos mill is working on Silver 
- Cord ore with favorable prospects. 

The Webfoot mill is at work on Wood- 
stock ore. The quality of the ore is im- 
proving. 

In Flint Dist. , work has been stopped on 
the Leviathan. The Sherman Co. are still 
engaged on their tunnel. 

The Iowa & Idaho Co. have their grading 
for their mill nearly done. 



MONTANA. 
Helena Gazette, July 6th: The Big ditch 

of Marshall, will distribute its waters on 
Dl bars. It will carry 1,400 in. 
of water. The gravel on the bars is bom 1" 
to 15 ft. thick. Fishback & Co. have erected 
a large crank wheel on the Missouri river, 
capable of raising 180 in. of water, for wash- 
ing gold on these bars. Last full, parties 
on one of these bars made .^25 to the hand. 

From Ten Mile and Monitor Gulches, 
thero is most flattering intelligence. A num- 
ber of very promising leads have been re- 
cently discovered. Messrs. Tuft & Donnell 
are erecting a smelter at the mouth of Beaver 
on Ten Mile Greek. 

Fred, Cope lately concluded to run the 
Copo & Nirpton mill single handed. After 
running 36 hours, he cleaned up aud came 
buck to town with a brick worth $570. Had 
he been able to clean the batteries, they 
would have yielded 8150 or 8200 more. 

W. Y. Lovell, in giving a description of 
the ores in Brown's, Rainshorn, Silver Star, 
Hot Springs and AYilliums Dist., says tho 
ores are all of gold and silver — tho latter 
very handsome and of great value, showing 
native silver as well as the more important 
sulphurets. The veins are represented to 
be of great extent and ores easily extracted ; 
and we are certain that no better locations 
for silver mills can be found in the Terri- 
tory than those now presented in both 
Brown's and William's Dists. 

A fine bed of fire clay has been opened in 
William's Dist. , which has been tested and 
so far proven to be superior to any yet 
found that we know of in the Territory. 

Pgit, June 6th : There are about 50 men 
employed on the Whitlateh, getting out ore. 
At the Gold Hill lode, Big Indian Dist., the 
shaft is down 70 ft., and a fine crevice of 
rich ore developed. They are at present 
sluicing decomposed quartz with fine results. 

The St. Louis works at Argenta, are again 
in full blast. A cast wheel of pure silver 
was lately cupelled in the works. 

Quite an excitement has occurred in High- 
land Dist., over two or three new discoveries 
of exceedingly rich quartz lodes. One, tho 
Forest Queen, has a 40-ft. crevice, contain- 
ing decomposed quartz, similar to the Bal- 
larat, and prospecting as well if not better 
than that lode. The other, the Highland 
Chief, also has a wide and well-defined lode, 
containing decomposed quartz, prospecting 
free gold. 

July 13th : Negotiations are pending be- 
tween Prof. Marshall and Messrs. Hall and 
Foote, contemplating the purchase of the 
Gold Mountain lode. The sanction of the 
company was received, and 1,200 ft. ordered 
purchased for $23,000. 

The editor saw 1,153 ozs. of molten dross 
run into a brick at Bokm & Molitor's lately. 
Its net value was $20, 160 in coin. 

A nugget has been taken from Hall's claim 
on Trinity Bar, weighing $154. There are 
some nine or ten sluices ruuning night aud 
day on the bar, and they clean up every 10 
hours, from $150 to $200 to the sluice. 

At Bt.tte City the placers are paying wel'. 
One company cleaned up 116 ozs. after a 
six day's run ; another in the same time, 68 
ozs, and another in a five days run, turned 
out 70 ozs. Five hundred ft. of the Moun- 
tain Chief lode was sold a few days ago, 
price not given. 

MEXICO. 

Santa F6 Gazette, June 29th : New dig- 
gings have been discovered on the head- 
waters of the Cimarron. An extent of 
ground, seven or eight miles long by half a 
mile in width, has been found to contain 
flour gold in paying quantities, and higher 
up the river and at other points coarse gold 
has been found. Numbers of men are now 
sinking shafts to strike the bed rock. One 
shaft at the depth of 11 ft. gave three cents 
to the pan, coarse gold, with pay dirt from 
the surface down. Some Mexicans are re- 
ported to be making from $5 to $8 per day 
with pans. There were about 200 men on 
the ground, and more were constantly ar- 
riving. Further and richer discoveries are 
expected as the explorations become more 
developed. A ditch, with 2,000 inches of 
water, will be brought on the flour gold 
patch by the 15th of August. 

NEVADA. 

Pahra r\ a ji-at . 

Reveille, July 16th : A rich strike has 
been made on the Illinois ledge 200 ft. be- 
low the surface. A piece of the ore assayed 
at the Keystone mill, yielded at the rate of 
$843.82 silver per ton. The ledge is 25 ft. 
thick on the surface; its width has not yet 
been ascertained, although four ft. of good 
mineral has been developed. The joy at 
Pahranagat was great, and the sight of the 
metal, highly pleasing to eyes long unac- 
customed to the sight. 

June 15th : The vein of the Illinois ledge, 
belonging to the Pahranagat S. M. Co. , has 
been struck, at a depth of 200 ft. below the 



oroppings. The ore will yield at a high 

rate. 

itc.'^p rti-\*oi-. 
Reveille, July 16th: In Hot Creek Dist., 

a shaft has been sunk 50 ft. on the Indian 
.liui ledge, and a cut made across the vein, 
from which rich ore was taken, tho choicer 
samples of which assayed as high us $800 
per ton. The Southern Light has been 
opened 40 ft. down, and shows a vein 12 ft. 
thick, in which there is a stratum three ft 
thick of a good quality of ore. 

Work is about to be commenced on the 
Silver Glance, Virginia, and other proniis- 
ingledgea in the district. The Providental 
Co. are at work on the Hot Creek ledge, 
having four months to prospect it in with 
the option of taking it at au agreed price. 

The Adriatic, a lately discovered ledge, is 
producing a fine grade of ore, 3,100 lbs. 
which were worked last week at the Key- 
stone mill, yielded at the rate of $334 per 
ton. Another batch of the ore has just been 
delivered at the mill, which is pronounced 
to be superior to the first lot. The present 
appearance of the ledge is highly promising. 
A large part of tho machinery for the 
Boston & Reading Co's mill at Hot Creek 
Dist. , is in the district. An effort will be 
made to have the mill running in 40 days. 
Thero is an extensive saline deposit 25 
miles eastward of Hot Creek, upon which a 
company is organized for the manufacture 
aud supply of salt. 

Yesterday 3,825 ozs. of crude bullion 
were brought into town from the Bigby mill 
in the district of San Antonio. 

The Pine Grove correspondent of the 
Territorial Enterprise, of July 12th, writes : 
During the month of June, the Pioneer mill 
crushed rock as follows: Midas Co., 53 
tons ; Wheeler, 8 tons ; Burlesque, 40 tons ; 
Mountain View, 11 tons — total 112 tons. 

At Penrod's arastra mill, there were 
crushed 13 tons second class and 15 tons 
first class Midas ore, four tons Imperial and 
Grant Consolidated, four tons Poorman, and 
30 tons first class and 17 tons second class 
Wheeler — total, 85 tons — all of which 
equaled the expectations of those interested. 
The Imperial and Grant paid the best, nett- 
ing nearly $100 per ton. Mr. Penrod pur- 
chases nearly all the rock he works on the 
dump. He is, however, always willing to 
do custom work. 

Sixty-six hundred lbs. of the Midas ore 
taken to Silver City by Mr. Briggs, and by 
him worked at the Eagle mill, yielded at the 
rate of $114 per ton. 

Enterprise, July 10th : A gold bar weigh- 
ing 20% ozs., .831 fine, and valued at 
$347.80, from the Imperial mine, Pine 
Grove, has been received and assayed at the 
office of Ruhling & Co. 

Trespass, July 17th : A fine specimen of 
sulphuret ore has been received from the 
Chihuahua mine, Newark Dist. The ore is 
very rich, and in several places horn silver 
is discernible. The ledge is about 12 ft. in 
width, and is opening up in increased rich- 
ness. 

Trespass, July 20th : There is in course 
of construction a 10-stamp mill at Park 
Canon. There is an abundance of ore in 
the district working over $80 per ton. The 
south lode is being worked vigorously. 
On tho north lode, but little has been done, 
sufficient, however, to disclose a considera- 
ble body of chloride. The rock pays from 
a few dollars up to $75 per ton. 

Meadow Lake Sun, July 20th: Pine 
Grove Dist. begius to supply bullion to an 
encouraging amount. The Imperial mine 
produced from four tons a bar weighing 
20% ozs., .831 fine, and worth $347.86. 

Reveille, July 19th : The pans and gear- 
ing for Coover's 5-stamp mill, in Bunker 
Hill District, will be propelled by water 
power. The builders have contracted with 
the owners of the Victorine mine for 1,000 
tons of its ore. The Victorine is of great 
size, and will yield thousands of tons that 
will yield from $45 to $75 per ton. The 
ore contains a good percentage of gold. 
The mill will be arranged for wet crushing. 
Prospectors from the headwaters of Goose 
creek report themselves unsuccessful in dis- 
covering gold in either placers or quartz 
ledges. 

Two boxes, containing crude bullion to 
the amount of 3,1000 ozs., has arrived from 
the mill of the Social and Steptoe Co., in 
Fgan Canon. 
Wivslioe. 

[In the Stock Circular, in another portion 
of this paper, will be found late mining 
news from this district. ] 

Gold Hill News, July 16th : At Dayton, 
the Carpenter & Birdsall mill, with its 
splendid water motive, is thundering out 
the bullion with incessant labor. The Kock 
Point mill is more fruitful than ever before. 
Enterprise, July 21st : During the past 
week, Wells, Fargo & Co. shipped 6,202 
lbs. of bullion, valued at $177,727.22. 



Enterprise, July 23d: The workmen in 
the Crown Point mine have struck some 
very rich ore in the lower level, eastern 
drift The stratum at the point where it 
was cut was about 3 ft. wide, we believe. 
How much wider it may prove to be when 
followed down remains to bo seen. There 
was very rich ore above it in the some sec- 
tion of the vein. 

On Friday last the new plunger pump for 
the Sierra Nevada mine passed through 
town on its way to the works. It is one of 
the largest in the State, being 14-in. bore 
and 12-ft stroke. It was manufactured at 
the Nevada Foundry, Silver City. 
UTAH. 

Vedette, July 13th : Everybody is going 
to Green river, or sending a man. Brigham 
Young has sent four of his sons. We have 
no doubt that rich deposits of gold will be 
found somewhere on Green river. The ex- 
act place is still a secret, so far as the public 
is concerned. The discoverers are Mor- 
mons. The editor says "our advice to all 
outsiders, is to wait awhile ! If the report 
should be true, 'that rich and extensive 
gold mines exist in the Green Kiver country, ' 
we will know it soon, and will publish that 
fact, when we are satisfied that it is true, 
and not before." 

Some parties that lately came by the new 
gold mines, report them rich. The location 
of the mine they fix at 25 miles northeast of 
Pacific Springs, across the head of the 
Sweetwater in the Wind River range. It 
appears to be generally conceded that this 
is the locality. In addition to the $740, 
and the presents of $60 distributed by the 
discoverers, an additional 40 ozs. has been 
disposed of in the city. The distance of 
the mines from Salt Lake, does not exceed 
160 miles. 

Reese River Reveille, May 15th : The 
editor saw a bar of bullion weighing 13 ozs., 
the product of gold dust and nuggets from 
Green river. The bar was worth $400, gold 
and silver. The lot was clean and entirely 
free from quartz and clay. 

June 15th : Porter Rockwell sent a dis- 
patch to President Young from Green river 
as follows: "The mines are good, tell the 
boys to come. " 



Fkom Gbass Valley. — A correspond- 
ent writes from Grass Valley, as follows, 
under date of July 20th: — "I visited the 
Eureka mine and mills. The new shaft of 
this company is nearly completed. It is to 
consist of four divisions, one for pumping, 
one for continuing the sinking of the shaft 
still further, and the other two for hoisting 
the ore. When it is completed the mine 
will be much better ventilated and labor fa- 
cilitated. At present the mill is capable of 
crushing one thousand tons per month ; 
but the proprietors intend increasing the 
number of stamps. The sulphurets are re- 
duced in the company's own works, by 
Plattner's chlorination process. By the aid 
of an improvement lately added to the fur- 
naces, two tons can be worked per day, 
which exceeds the supply of the mine. Con- 
siderable outside work is done. 

This process works well with the Meadow 
Lake sulphurets, in working which great 
difficulty has been experienced, by those 
who have attempted their reduction near 
the mines. A ton of sulphurets was re- 
cently sent to the Eureka works from the 
TJ. S. Grant mine, and the result of the 
working is stated to be within five per cent, 
of the assay. 

The Eureka has under foot in the tunnels 
over 1,000 tons of ore, ready for hoisting. 
The proprietors informed me that their 
average monthly dividend is $30,000." 

C. A. W. 



San Feanoisoo, in proportion to its size, 
is the busiest seaport in the world. Her an- 
nual exports are about $70,000,000, and her 
imports nearly as much ; the manufactures 
are worth nearly $20,000,000 ; the real es- 
tate sales amount to about $12,000,000, and 
the cash value of the land, buildings and 
movable property of the city is about $200,* 
000 000, although assessed for taxation at 
only $80,000,000. It sends away about forty 
tons of silver and six tons of gold every 
month— the former metal in bars fifteen 
inches long aud five inches square ; the 
latter in small bars about six inches long, 
three inches wide and two inches thick. 
Wagons loaded with the precious metals 
are seen in the streets nearly every day. 

It is estimated t':at there are over 1,000,- 
000 Frenchmen in the United States. 



56 



l&U pitting mA $ timtifh §xm. 



pitting mti gtimtifit I 


fttM. 




ior Editor. 





«(. W. M. SMTH. W. B. EWEK. A. T. DEWEY. 

P JtJW-E Y &■ CO., Publishers. 

OrnflE— No. 605 Clay street corner of Sansome, 2d floor. 



Term" of Subscription t 

One copy, per annum, In advance, $5 00 

Onecopv, six months, In advance „... 3 00 

ra» For sale by Carriers and Newsdealers. -ffiff 



Writers should he cautious about addressing correspond- 
ence relating to the business or interests of a firm to an in- 
dividual member thereof, whose absence at the time might 
cause delay. 

CanTaesing Agents. 

Oor Friekds can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting our 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their influ- 
ence and encouraging favors. We shall send none but 
worthy men. 

Mr. A. C Knox, is our city soliciting and collecting 
Agent, and all subscriptions, or other favors extended to 
him, will be duly acknowledged at this otflce. JaD. 11, 1866. 

Mr. I.. "W. Pelton, is an authorized agent for this 
paper at Portland. Oregon. Dec. 1, 1866. 

I>r. X. ©. TTatea Ifl our duly authorized traveling 
agent. July 6, 1867. 

Mr. A.. B. Butler is a duly authorized traveling 
agent for this paper. July 15, 1867. 



San Francisco: 

Saturday Morning, July 27, 1867. 



Notices to Correspondents. 

A -Toting Mineralogist wishes to be in- 
formed of the rocks which are supposed 
to form the matrix or matrices of the dia- 
mond. This is a difficult query to reply 
to, as we have no very positively reliable 
information as to any evidence having 
yet been afforded where it can be satisfac- 
torily affirmed that diamonds have been 
found in incontestible association with 
and accompanied by the rocks in which 
they were originally formed. Mr. Cliff, 
a very careful and attentive observer, con- 
ceives that the country and series of rocks 
from which the diamonds of Brazil were 
originally derived, consists of an elevated 
plateau of micaceous rocks, on which, so 
far as the eye can reach in every direction, 
the observer cannot discover the slightest 
trace of vegetation. The correctness of 
this opinion is somewhat confirmed by a 
communication from Kessel to Zerrenner, 
wherein the former describes the diamonds 
of Borneo as being more particularly 
found in the districts of Landak, Sakajam 
and Tajan, and the Bayermassing coun- 
try on the opposite or southeast part of 
the island. In both cases diamonds are 
described as occurring on a talcose rock, 
of from two to four yards in thickness, 
consisting of a bluish gray clay basis en- 
closing small white pebbles. It was long 
supposed that a conglomerate rock called 
itacolumite was the matrix, of the dia- 
mond. The fact of it being found at all 
in the itacolumite, is doubtful, and still 
more so, even if found therein, whether 
these wonderful and beautiful specimens 
of chrystallized carbon have been original- 
ly formed in itacolumite ; or, at all events, 
that kind of conglomerate rock to which 
the name itacolumite was originally at- 
tached by such authors as Count Esch- 
wage and others. The name has, however, 
been more recently applied to another 
variety of rock, to which we may hereaf- 
ter recur. 

Peter, Austin. — You are correct in con- 
ceiving that the acquirement of physical 
geology and paleontology requires, on 
the part of the learner, not only studies 
various and distinct, but also mental fac- 
ulties of a diverse character. So much is 
this the case, that an accomplished physi- 
cal geologist, such a one whose opinion 
might be relied upon as to the constitu- 
tion of rocks and mineral veins, their 
probable formation and economic value, 
will usually be found but a smatterer in 
paleontology, which, in fact, is but a 
classic name for the natural history of 
ancient life, branching, consequently, into 
the science of anatomy and physiology. 
On the other hand, the paleontologist is 
generally deficient in the physical sciences 
relating to dynamics and chemistry, a 
profound acquaintance with both being 
required either to explain or understand 
most of the phenomena associated with 
physical geology. To become a practical 
man, however, it is essential that both 
branches of geology should be harmoni- 
ously studied. 



Save Your Files. — We are informed by 
Messrs. Duming & Fisher, proprietors of 
the Pacific File Factory, No. 53 Beale 
street, that nearly fifty per cent, can be 
saved by having old files re-cut. Bee adver- 
tisement. 



Improvement in G-as Lighting. 

Much has been said and done, within four 
or five years past, with regard to improving 
the illuminating qualities of ordinary coal 
gas. It has been known that by passing 
coal gas over the lighter products of petro- 
leum the latter is taken up, in a gaseous 
form, greatly to the improvement of the 
former. Various devices have been brought 
out for more effectually and readily effect- 
ing this union, and some twenty patents 
have been taken out to secure these inven- 
tions. 

Quite recently a company has been formed 
at the East, with a large capital, which has 
bought up all that are valuable of these 
patents, and consolidated the numerous in- 
terests into one. This company is known 
as the "American Improved Gas-Light 
Company, of Virginia," and arrangements 
are being made to introduce the improve- 
ment into all places where gas-light is used. 
Mr. David Bush, formerly connected with 
the gas companies of this city and Sacra- 
mento, has recently returned from New 
York, for the purpose of introducing it 
here, and may be seen at 708 Montgomery 
street, where the improved light is exhib- 
ited, in connection and comparison with 
the ordinary gas-light from the city mains. 

The economy of this improvement has 
been most effectually established by various 
experiments in New York City and else- 
where. The New York, Boston and Rich- 
mond papers speak highly of both the 
increased illuminating qualities and decided 
economy of the improved gas. The Super- 
intendent of the New York Tribune office 
says that an economy of fully one-half has 
been effected in the cost of gas in that estab- 
lishment. 

The result produced is perfectly philo- 
sophical ; and is shown by Mr. Bush in a 
manner so simple and practical that convic- 
tion of its merits will be at once forced 
upon any one who will take the trouble to 
call upon him. The device best approved 
and adopted by the company consists of a 
small iron box, whose interior is divided 
according to the annexed diagram : 



The observer is supposed to be looking 
down into the box with the cover removed. 
The center partition, it will be noticed, is 
not carried entirely across. The two points 
at one extremity are to show where the gas 
is received into the box from the meter 
and let out to the burner. The interior of 
this box is first loosely stuffed with a fine, 
fibrous kind of shavings, the same which is 
much used instead of hair for stuffing mat- 
tresses ; then a specially-prepared liquid — 
similar to naphtha, but less explosive — is 
poured into the box until nearly filled. 
The gas. entering at the one opening has to 
pass through the saturated mass, around 
the end of the partition, and again across 
the length of the box to the place of exit. 
In its course it becomes " carbureted, " as 
it is called, but, in fact, mingled with the 
naphthaline gases from the liquid — the liquid 
being gradually converted into vapor and 
thus mixed with the coal gas — the com- 
pound containing a larger proportion of 
carbon than the gas from the meter ; hence 
its greater illuminating power. 

There is no question as to the value and 
economy of the improvement, aud we trust 
its management will fall into such hands as 
will allow the advantages to accrue to the 
benefit of the great mass of our citizens, 
rather than to the enrichment of a few. 



Inventions fob the East. — A party con- 
nected with this office, who contemplates a 
visit to the Atlantic states, would undertake 
the introduction of a few importaut inven- 
tions. 



Next week we shall make mention of the 
Central Pacific Railroad, and several mills 
and mines in Nevada county. 



The "Wearing Away of Rivers. 

The wearing away of the earth, by the 
action of streams, is familiar to all ; but the 
vastness of this influence in modifying the 
surface of the earth is rarely appreciated, 
except by the professed geologist. In pass- 
ing westward across the continent of North 
America, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
the regularly increased evidence of this ac- 
tion is noticeable at almost every stage of 
progress. In New England the action is 
but slight. The Connecticut river flows, 
for several hundred miles, through a broad 
valley but slightly depressed from the gen- 
eral level. Passing on to the Niagara, we 
observe that that river has excavated a val- 
ley, or rather a huge, narrow ditch, with 
almost perpendicular sides, so deep that the 
surface of the water, for some twelve miles 
below the falls, is over 300 feet below the 
level of the surrounding country. Passing 
still further westward, and into the Ohio 
valley, we find that river, between Pitts- 
burgh and Cincinnati running, in one place, 
in a narrow channel some 700 feet below 
its original level ; although in most places, 
this, as well as the Connecticut and Mohawk 
rivers, etc., have excavated quite broad 
valleys, with gently sloping sides, or pecu- 
liar offsets or steppes. 

But it is not until the traveler has passed 
the crest of the Rocky Mountains, that he 
beholds the most extraordinary phenomena 
of this description. Very deep canons are 
comparatively rare east of those mountains, 
while they become the almost invariable 
rule to the west of them. Two of the most 
remarkable instances of this character are, 
perhaps, the Black Rock Canon, on the 
route from the Great Bend of the Humboldt 
to Goose Lake and Oregon, and tho still 
more famous Black Canon, on the Colorado, 
where that river flows through the Black 
Mountain region. The latter is considered 
the most remarkable depression, or rather 
excavation, of this kind in the world. The 
land of this region is an elevated plateau, 
and for many miles the bed of the Colorado 
flows through it, in a narrow channel, 6,000 
feet deep ! The sides of this canon are so 
steep that in some places, for miles on the 
stretch, no human being, not even a moun- 
tain goat, can pass up its sides. At one 
point there is a perpendicular wall, forming 
one of the banks of the river, over 5,000 
feet high ! 

Throughout the entire western flank of 
the Sierra Nevada, the principal rivers, in 
the upper portions of their course, have 
generally cut their way down from 2,000 to 
4,000 feet in depth, with banks upon either 
side rising at an angle of from 35° to 45° 
with the plane of the river. It has been 
supposed by many that these channels were 
formed before the rocks had become so much 
indurated as to present any very serious ob- 
stacle to their being worn away. But such 
could not have been the case, as we find 
that before the present river courses had an 
existence there was another system of rivers, 
running at almost right angles with the 
present water courses. In excavating into 
the beds of these ancient rivers, as the miners 
are now doing in thousands of places, in 
search for gold, we find the most unmistak- 
able evidences that even they flowed over 
the country after the rock had become fully 
as much indurated as it now is. The 
upper branches of the American river 
have, in some places, worn their way 
3,000 below the beds of these ancient 
streams. This entire distance must have 
been accomplished all the way through a 
hard slate rock. It is difficult to conceive 
the length of time which must have elapsed 
since this process of denudation had its 
origin. And yet there is good evidence 
for believing that this State must have been 
inhabited by man before this action com- 
menced, as undoubted human remains are 
found beneath the debris of the ancient 
rivers, under circumstances which almost 
preclude possibility of their finding their 



way there after the present river courses 
commenced their flow. If there is no mis- 
take in thesejobservations, the first exist- 
ence of humanity on this continent must 
be referred to a period three or four times 
as remote as that usually fixed for the crea- 
tion of man in the Eastern Hemisphere. 
♦— »— «■ < — •• 

The Late Boiler Explosion. 

The steam boiler explosion of Saturday 
last should impress upon our City Council 
the necessity of providing a system for the 
more rigid inspection of steam boilers. It 
seems almost a miracle that so much damage 
and such wide-spread destruction should 
have been effected at mid-day, and directly 
in the midst of a populous neighborhood, 
without bodily harm to a single individual. 
The result has been most fortunate; but 
the lesson it teaches should be pressed home 
as strongly as though the horrible tragedy 
which might reasonably have been expected 
from such a result had actually occurred. 
It is to be feared, from the slight attention 
which appears to be paid to the accident, 
that nothing short of a terrible tragedy will 
incite our people and city rulers to a proper 
discharge of plain public duties. 

Time was when such explosions were 
very generally attributed to some mysteri- 
ous agent or principle connected with steam 
generation, which no human foresight could 
prevent ; but careful and scientific observa- 
tions have now pretty effectually established 
the fact that fully eight-tenths of all steam- 
boiler explosions are traceable directly to 
carelessness, ignorance, or defective boilers, 
which the most common intelligence and 
care may avert. Hence the necessity of 
more stringent rules and regulations for the 
construction, setting up and operation of 
boilers, especially where they are so gen- 
erally distributed throughout populous 
neighborhoods, as they are in this city. 
The character of the iron, the form of con- 
struction, and the manner of bracing, are 
all important, and it should be the duty of 
some one to see that all the requisites are 
properly cared for. Such duty should be 
most carefully attended to. Hundreds and 
thousands of lives are dependent upon the 
proper performance thereof. 

There is no evidence that there was any 
undue pressure of steam at the time of the 
explosion on Saturday ; on the contrary, 
the evidence all goes to show a defective 
boiler — in this case, a boiler badly braced. 

The accident by which the steam-drum 
was torn from the main boiler in one of the 
small steamers in our harbor, about a year 
ago, and destroyed several lives, was un- 
doubtedly due to the same cause. Boilers, 
set in pairs, often owe their destruction to 
faulty connections, the mechanical work 
upon which is unexceptional— the fault 
being in the design. At least one such ac- 
cident has occurred in the waters connected 
with this harbor. It should be made the 
duty of some person of proper experience 
and intelligence to look after such things, 
and, irrespective of friend or foe, to see 
that these dangerous but indispensable 
magazines of power are built and kept in 
proper order. 

We have been thus particular in present- 
ing the foregoing considerations in order 
that ignorance of the general causes of 
boiler explosions may not be held up as an 
excuse for defects of construction or reck- 
lessness in their use. As already stated, 
eight-tenths of all such accidents may be 
avoided by the use of a little care and at- 
tention. 



Icebergs. — An unusually large number 
of icebergs have recently been seen in the 
North Atlantic. One vessel had to sail 
nearly 200 miles in a southerly direction 
along a perfect continent of ice, while others 
have met enormous icebergs much further 
south than they are commonly found at this 
season of the year. It is said that the pres 
ence of these large masses of ice have had 
a sensible influence on the temperature of 
the New England States and British Prov- 
inces to the northeast. 



©h* Pining and gtimtxtit §mt. 



57 



The Next Agricultural Fair. 

The State Agricultural Society is making 
especial efforts to secure for their next an- 
nual exhibition a more than ordinary dis- 
play of the varied industrial products of 
California. To that end, it has placed itself 
in communication with the Mechanics' In- 
stitute of this city, which; having no ex- 
hibition of its own to attend to this year, 
has promptly responded and token fovor- 
ablo action in the matter. 

The industry of this State is rapidly 
widening and increasing its operations, and 
the joint action of the two associations 
named, with anything like on active interest 
on the part of our people and mechanics 
generally, will not fail to secure for the 
next annual State Fair a success far beyond 
anything which has heretofore been met 
with. In order to do this, however, there 
is work to be done, and the people who are 
most directly interested in the result, must 
not stand idle, and leave everything to be at- 
tended to by the officers of the two societies. 
There is not a mechanic, manufacturer, 
fanner, or miner in the State, who may not 
add something to the grand result. 

It is already time the work was com- 
menced, especially on the part of our me- 
chanics, who generally require more time 
than either of the other classes to prepare 
for such an exhibition. Let every one feel 
that he has something to do. If you have 
nothing to. exhibit, talk— talk and induce 
others who have something to exhibit, to be 
up and doing. Every individual is more or 
less interested in securing a full and credit- 
able exhibition. Do not think because you 
have nothing to exhibit, you have no in- 
terest in the matter. It is through such 
gatherings as these that men become more 
thoroughly and profitably acquainted one 
with another, and with the industries and 
resources of the State, in all their varied 
ramifications. An interchange of opinions 
and exhibitions on such an occasion, is worth 
months of solitary study and reflection. 
There is nothing like such things to sharpen 
one's wits, and open up new avenues for in- 
dustry and employment. 

The minors have also something at stake 
in this matter. If the exhibition does not 
put more gold into your claims, it will at 
least tell you how to get out what you have 
there to better advantage than you are now 
doing. Such will be the ease with nine- 
tenths of you — both placer and quartz 
miners. Come up, then, to our great State 
Exhibition. Bring along your improved 
machinery and new ideas, and get others in 
exchange. If you don't benefit yourself, 
you may benefit another, which is the next 
best thing which you can do. 

The Bulletin of this city has most appro- 
priately observed in this connection : "That 
a thoroughly good fair will be particu- 
larly useful this year, when a larger amount 
of attention is directed to California from 
abroad than ever before — that is, on all 
points affecting her substantial and perma- 
nent interests. The leading Eastern jour- 
nals now have correspondents here, who 
will form their conclusions and write largely 
of the resources and ca2Jacities of the State 
from what they see of them at the fair. For 
the mechanics and manufacturers of San 
Francisco to neglect the fair is therefore to 
neglect, in some degree, their owninterests." 

Mount Hood.— It will be recollected that 
about a year ago Prof. Wood, the Botanist, 
reported to the Academy of Natural Sci- 
ences in this city, that he had ascended 
Mount Hood, and found it to be 17,500 feet 
high. The correctness of this statement 
was seriously doubted at the time by the 
members of the California Geological Sur- 
vey, and others. Prof. "Whitney, of the 
Survey, has just returned from Washington 
Territory and Oregon, and reports that he 
ascended Mount Hood, took careful bar- 
ometrical observations, and found the hight 
of the mountain does not exceed 12,400 
feet. He does not know the precise hight, 
as ho had not time to calculate all of his 
observations. 



HANSBROWS CHALLENGE 
Deep-Well, Mining and Double-Cylinder Patent Pumps. 



These Pumps combine all tho advantages of the common 
Lift and the Double-Acting Suction nud Force Fumps, and 
are equally fitted for all — Household, Farm, Mill, Manu- 
factory, Brewery, Ship, Railway, Mining, and otlier purposes, 
and are especially recommended on account of their light- 
ness, compactness, durability, cheapness, and the facility with 
which they can be placed in any position. 

Thoy are adapted for Hand, Steam, Horse, Water, or 
Wind Power. They are more durablo in all their parts than 
any other Pumps of the Bame power. 

Four.Iuch Deep- Well Pump. 



Mx-Iuch Mining Pnmp. 





The Valves are of tho simplest construction, and can be readily taken out , by loosening two 
common nuts. They are not liable to get out of order, and can at all times be removed without the 
aid of a skillful mechanic. 

The lower valves of these Pumps work upon inclined seats, which prevents sand or other matter 
that the Pumps may take up, from remaining under the valves, or stopping the flow of water. 

These Pumps are worked with less friction, and consequently require less power than any other 
Double-Acting Pumps of equal capacity. 

All sizes, from 2-inch to 8-inch Cylinder, manufactured by the Pacific Iron Works, GODDAED 
& CO., and for sale by the Agents, LOCKE & MONTAGUE 

Qg^Send for a descriptive Circular. 112 and 114 Battery Street, San Francisco. 



Complimentary. — Encouraging views of 
American affairs are not often announced 
from the other side of the Atlantic ; but in 
the London Economist, of a late date, we 
find an article of which the following ex- 
tract is a fair sample: "The United States 
have still the best possible land, the best 
mines, the best things above ground, the 
best things under ground, and an educated 
Anglo-Saxon race to make use of all of 
them. Such means and materials for pro- 
duction, and such skill in making, the world 
has never seen together. In consequence, 
wealth is created faster than ever before, 
and the government can tax it much more 
readily." 

The Pittsbubg & Sonoka G. & S. M. Co. 
of Rio Chico, Sonora, Mexico, some time 
since tested 3,600 lbs. of their ore by the 
Mexican smelting process, and obtained a 
yield of §1, 100. This company has several 
mines, pronounced rich, two of which are 
extensively opened. Work has been steadily 
kept up on them for the past three years, 
and many tons of ore, equal to the above, 
have been broken down and stored up in 
the mine, under look and key, for future 
working. A first class mill is nearly com- 
pleted, and will soon be at work. 



It is said that there are over 700,000 peo- 
ple in Ireland who speak the old Irish lan- 
guage exclusively. 



Tkoy manufactures 10,000 tons of iron 
into stoves annually, the value of which is 
about $2,000,000. 



Infernal Machine in a Letteb. — One 
of the clerk's in the Virginia City postoffice 
was recently canceling the stamp on a let- 
ter, when an explosion followed the stroke, 
attended by fire and smoke — the former be- 
ing thrown in every direction and setting 
fire to several other letters lying near, and 
the latter filling the room. It is supposed 
that the letter contained a string of percus- 
sion caps upon tape, similar to those used 
in self-capping rifles, etc. Curious matter 
to find its way into Uncle Sam's mail bags. 



The MABYSVTLiiE Woolen Mill. — Active 
operations have been commenced in pre- 
paring the building intended for the Mary s- 
ville woolen mill. Pour sets of machinery 
will be put into service. 



N0ETH AMEEI0A 

Life Insurance Company. 

Usual Kestriotions on Occupation and Travel 

ABOLISHED ! 



Policies of this Company arc guaranteed by tho Slate of 

New York, which in true of no other Company 

on tills Ooust 

The most Responsible and Liberal Company n the World I 
J. A. EATON &. CO., 

Managers Pacific Branch, 302 Montgomery St. 
20vUnr9p SAN FRANCISCO. 



Market Street Homestead Association.— J. S. LoTy, Sec- 
retary. Office, 305 Montgomery street, corner of Pino, San 
Francisco. 2vl5 



Persons desirous of obtaining the finest Wood Engrnv- 
ings, can procure them only by having tho picture photo- 
graphed on the block, by 



IDvUtfnr 



n. n. woods. 

No. 28 Third street. 



Gold liars, of ivhalevcr size, if well cast, assayed 
for two dollars, at A P. MOLITOK'S Assay Ofllcc, 
611 Commercial street, opposite United States Branch 
Mint. 15vl4-Sm 



Jacob Srrw, Pioneer Photographer, 612 Clay street, north 
side, four doors above Montgomery, Onto 315 Montgomery 
street,) takes all klnd3 of Photographs in the best style of 
tho Art He would invite especial attention to the new 
" Cabinet Photographs," which he is taking to perfection. 
lOvUtf 



Save Tour Tcetli, — Co not have them extracted 
without first consulting a good Dentist. The loss is irrepar- 
able, and, in many instances, unnecessary. DR. BEERS, 
corner of Pine and Keai ny streets, makes a specially of 
filling the lungs of dead Teeth, and building up broken 
crowns with ruuE noon— thus restoring them to their origi- 
nal usefulness and bcauly. 

OS- call and examine, the work. Finest quality of arti- 
ficial work also manufactured. lovutf I 



Builders* Insurance Company— 

OFFICE IN THE BUILDING OF TUE1 
CALIFORNIA SAVINGS BANK, California/ 
street, one door from Sunsouie street. 

09-FIKE AND MARINE INSURANCE. lOvUIOp^r 



.A 



Brown'.. Filtering Heater.— For preventing In- 
crustation in Steam Boilers, purines water l*rom lime or 
any other Impurity, naves tuel, saves the boiler, presents 
explosions, and protect* life and property. The cost of the 
Filter la soon saved in fuel and boiler— re pa Ira alone. 

Ono Is In operation at the San Francisco Foundry, Fro- 
mont street, where Rights can be procured, or all needed 
information, on application, in person or by letter, to 

AUSTIN A. WELLS, Agent 



ovll-ly 



Ferry Davis* Vegetable Pain Killer. 

Tho universal remedy for Internal and external com- 
plaints. At this period there are but few unacquainted with 
tho merits of the Pain Killer; but while some extol ll as a 
liniment, they know but little of its power in easing pain 
whontaken Internally, while others use it interna'ly with 
great success, but arc equally Ignorant of its healing virtues 
when applied externally. We therefore wish to say to nil 
that it is equally successful, whether used Internally or ex- 
ternally, and Its sale Is universal and Immense. The de- 
mand from India and other foreign countries Is equal to 
tho demand at home, and it has become known In those 
far-off places by its merits— the proprietors have never 
advertised It or been to any expense in its Introduction Into 
foreign lands. 

DSP-Sold by all Medicine Dealers everywhere. 2vlMm 



Pacific Chemical Works. 

nitrateJof silver. 

Messrs. Falkek'p & Hiuks— Gent*:— I have subjected the 
sample taken Irom your Nitrate of Silver to u thormigh 
aimlyfllK, and find It 10 be chemically pure, not coutainlug 
the slightest trace of any impurities whatever. 

Respectfully yours, THUS. PRICE. 

Messrs. I-'alkkkao A Hanks— Gent*:— I have examined the 
sample of Nitrate of silver of jour manufacture. I have 
never seen in this market. Nitrate or Silver, manufactured 
here or imported, so free of every kind of foreign matter, 
and find it not only adapted to Photographv. but it was 
subjected to every mode of examination, aside "from critical 
chem'cal analysts, and every test applied confirmed tho 
opinion that a purer article could scarcelv be produced or 
desired for medicinal purposes. DR. L. LANSZWEERT. 

Nitrate ofSHver manufactured by FALKENAU A 
HANKS, Pacific Chemical Works, San Francisco. 

CSpFnr sale by all Wholesale Druggists and Importers of 
Photographic Stock. 4vl5altw 



CALIFORNIA 

TOOL AND FILE FACTORY. 

Blacksmith ami Machine >hop. 

No. 17 Fremont 6treet, between Market and Mission, S. F. 
4vl5-qy J. WEICHHART, Proprietor. 



SAN PEAN0IS00 MILL, 

HOBBS & GILMORJE, 
Manufacturers of Soxes, 

Market street, between Beale and Main, 



AGENTS MNJED. 



ENERGETIC MEN OR WOMEN CAN MAKE MONEY 
in cnnva.s'dng i'ornur NEW BOOKS and ENG RAVINGS. 
Oho Agent reports thlrtv three orders for one Hook In three 
days, Address, PACIFIC PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
4vl5nr{)» 305 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DK. FONDA»8 



•^^> San Francisco Eye Infirmary. "nS^ 

Permanently established for the treatment of all diseases 
of the Eye. Dr. F. was for seventeen years principal of 
tho Lafayette (Ind.) Eye Infirmary. P. W. Pokva, M. D-, 
surgeon In Charge. Olllcc, 405S Montgomery street, oppo- 
m ie Weils, Fargo <£ Co's. 4vliHy 



BROWN & CO., 
H A T T E B N, 

Importers and Manufacturers of tile 

LATEST STYLES, 
A.t No. 133 Kearny Street. 

O^-CALL AND SEE TIIEM-ffiff 



LINSEED OIL. 

The Pacific Linseed Oil & Lead Works 

Arc now prepared to furnish dealers and consumers 
Pure Linseed. Oil, 
Raw or Boiled, at the Lowest Market Rates. We call es 
pecial attention to the quality of our Oil, believing it to bo 
suporlor to any imported Oil offered in this market. 
Orders fromtho country will have prompt attention. 
Address, 
Pacific Ijlntieed Oil and Lead Works, 
Care of L. B. BENCHLEY & CO., 
I9vl4-3m9p San Francisco. 



PACIFIC 

Rolling Mill and Forge Co., 

SAN FBANCISCO, CAL. 
Established for the Manufacture of 

RAILROAD AND OTHER IRON 
Every ~Vai-iety of Shaflfciiiiy 

Embracing ALL SIZES of 

Steamboat Shafts, Crunk*, Vision and Con 

nectlne Rodtt, Car and Loeorantlve Axles 

and Frame... 

— ALSO — 

n^i>i]M:33R.i:i> iitoiv 

Of every description and size. 

03?- Orders addressed to PACIFIC ROLLING MILL nnU 
FOIttiG t;o., Post Ollice, San Francisco, Cal, win receive 
prompt attention. 
j ; .-fttr The highest price paid for Scrap Iron. PvltimOp 



3,b* pining and Mmtifk 




Established in. 1849-Corner First and Mission streets, San Francisco. 



HAVING INCREASED OUR FACILITIES IN EVERT DEPARTMENT, WE ARE NOW 
prepared at the shortest notice and at the most reasonable rates, to furnish all 
kinds and description of Machinery, including riLeani twines. Quartz Mills, Mining Pumps 
of all kinds, Hoisting Gear, Gas Work, Laundry Machinery, Architectural and Ornamental 
Castings, Sugar Mills, Saw and Hour Mills, Water Wheclsot ail kinds. Hydraulic, Hay, Rag, 
screw and Drop Presses, Coining Machinery, Pile Drivers, Bark and Malt Mills, and all 
ki ids of Castings. 

EXGI.VES.— Marine Engines, Oscillating and Beam ; Stern and Side Wheel Boats, 
Locomotives, Stationary Engines, Horizontal, Upright, oscillating and Beam, from six 
to rtfty Inches diameter. Also, Scott ,fc Eckart's Adjustable Cut-off Regulator— best in 
use; W. R. Eckart's Balance Valve for Stationary Engines; Woodward's Patent Steam 
Pump and Fire Engine. 

BUELEKS, Locomotive, P'.ae, Tubular, Upright, Cylinder and Cornish, and every 
variety of Uoiler Work. All sizes of tubes and pipes for pumps. 

P ITMP53.— The Excelsior doubie-acling Force fnuips are manufactured by us. These 
very superior Pumps ore warranted the best, and are fast replacing all other Force Pumps. 



AHALGAMATOle 1IACHINEKT.- Wheeler * Randall's improved Tractory 
Curve Pan, Zenas Wheeler's Improved flat bottom pan, Beldln's pan, Veatch's tubs, 
Prater's concentrators, Waklce's pans. Beers' pan, German Barrels, Arastra Gearing, Chile 
Mills. Settlers of all descriptions, Retorts of all sizes and shapes, for Silver and Gold, 
Portable Stamp Mills, straight Batteries, for wood or iron frames, Dry Crushing Bat- 
teries, or machines " illi til o hi (est improvements, every vanclv i Slumps, Mortars, funis, 
Pans and Tubs. BLAKE'S PATENT QUARTZ CRUSHERS, of all sizes. 

Oil. BOKISTG TOOLS ASH MACHINEKT-Of the latest and most ap- 
proved construction, made from drawings lately made bv Prof. Blake at the oil wells in 
Pennsylvania. We have the facilities for working gold and silver quartz and other ores, to 
test their value, bv the hundred wcighl or ton. 

Russia Iron Screens, of all degrees of il lioness and of all qualiticsof iron. All work done 
in the best manner at the lowest cash prices. 

II. J. BOOTH. GKO. W. PRESCOTT. IRVING M. SCOTT 



A TOPOGKAPHICAL MODEIi OP THE CoM- 

stock Lobe. — The Nevada Trespass, says: 
"A day or two since we visited the office of 
Mr. K. H. Stretch, Civil Engineer, and ex- 
amined a plaster of paris mode] of the face 
of the country comprising most of Storey 
and Lyon counties, and the entire area which 
will he reached by the proposed Sutro Tun- 
nel. The model has been a work of great 
labor, being built in sections, and is a per- 
fect outline of the Comstock lode, with all 
its depressions and elevations, its mines, 
mills, and the towns and cities adjacent. 
Each spur of Mt. Davidson, Cedar Hill, 
Gold Hill, and the foothills to Carson river, 
stands in bold relief, and represented with 
the nicest accuracy. We know of no better 
way to form an idea of Mi-. Stretch's model, 
without a personal inspection, than for one 
to imagine himself in a balloon, suspended 
over this city, 2, 000 feet high, looking down 
upon the section of country embracing the 
richest mineral vein in the world. The 
model is to be forwarded to Sutro, who, by 
its aid, can practically demonstrate to any 
person who never was in Nevada, how ab- 
solutely necessary his grand project is, not 
only for the benefit of owners on the Corn- 
stock, but for the commercial prosperity of 
the whole world. It will also demonstrate 
how very probable it is that the tunnel will 
cut unknown veins of ore, rich in gold and 
silver ; and more than all, when completed 
each stockholder will be certain to receive 
a handsome dividend on the invested amount 
of capital it requires to complete the grand- 
est project of the century — grander and more 
beneficial to the world at large than even the 
famous Mt. Cenis Tunnel. Stretch has done 
his work faithfully, and it will redound to 
his credit. 



2-1V12 



II. J. TSOOTII & CO. 



Machinists and Foundries. 

PALMER, KNOX & CO., 

Golden State Iron Works, 

2Vo«. 19, 31, att and 25 First Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MANt'FACTDlll-: ALL KINDS OF 

STEAM EXGI3TE9 AXD QUARTZ MILLS' 

DUNBAR'S IMPROVED 

©elf-A.dj its ting Piston. Facliixig:, 

Requires no springs or screws; is always steam tight; 

without excessive friction, and uever 

pets slack or leaky. 

WHEELER A RANDALL'S 

NEW 6BIXDEB AJtfB AMAtCAMATOK 

HEPBURN & PETERSON'S 

A3III.GVMATOS AND SEPARATOR, 

Knox's Amalffamators, 

WITH PALMER'S PATENT STEAM CHEST, 

Superior lor working either GOLD OR SILVER ORES, and 
is the nnly Am animator that has stood the lest of seven 
years' continual working. 
tienulne White Iron Stamp Shoe* and lMes 

Having been engaged for the past ten years in quartz 
mining, and lieui^ conversant with all the improvements, 
either in Mining or Milling, we are prepared to furnish, at 
the shortest notice, the most perfect machinery for reduc 
Ing fires, or saving cither gold or silver. i;Jvtl)qy-tf 



GEORGE T. PRACY, 
m .a. e ia: i r* jh works, 

Noa 109 and 111 Mission street, between Main and Spear, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

STEAM E\GI\E, F-LOTJK A\B»AWMILI, 

And Quartz Machinery, Printing Presses, 



MACHINERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION MADE AND 
REPAIRED. 
fl^-Special attention paid to Repairing..^ qy-3 



WILLAMETTE IRON WOKKS, 

PORTLAKD, OREGON. 

S t e a m Engines, 15 oilers, 
SAW AND CRIST NISLI.S, 

MINING. MACHINERY, WROUGHT IRON SHUTTER 
WORK, AND BLACKSMITHINC IN GENERAL. 
Corner North-Front and E streets, 
18vl3-ly One block north of Couch's Wharf. 

UNIOJJ IRON WORKS, 

Sacramento. 

WILLIAMS, ROOT & NEILSON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CROSS' PATENT BOILER FEEDER, 

STEAM EiVG-XIVJES, ISOIILER©, 

And all kind*, of Mining Machinery. 

Also, Hay and Wiue Presses made and repaired 
with neatness, durability and dispatch. 

Dunbar's Patent Self- Adjust lug Steam Piston 



Front Street, between N and O streets, 

14vll Sacramento City 



Pacific File, Reaper and Mower Section 

MANUFACTORY, 
No. 51S Beale Street, between Market anil Mission. 

SAN FUANCISCO. 

Files re-ent and warranted as mod as new, or no charge. 

Tile only i-sliiblisliim-nt in llic pratp. We also man- 

ulaeuue l:ea|ii:r ami ll.nvoi Sections 

lvl5lf DURNINO & FI3HJSU, l'rnp'rs. 



SAJV FEANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

\. E. Cor. Fremont and Mission streets* 

Manufacturers of 

Marine and Stationery Engines 

Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Miuing 

Jfumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

— ALSO— 

Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Presses 

of the latest Improved Patterns. 

STEAIH ENGINES AMD BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand; Quartz Mill Shoes and 
Dies warranted to be made of the best white iron. 

Dunbar's Improved Self-Arifustine I'lstnn- 
Paeliinp, requires no springs or scicws; is tilwavs steam- 
tight; without excessive irieiioii, and never gets slack or 
leaky. 

MACniNERT, OF ALT, DESCRIPTIONS 

Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cutting and Castings rl 

the lowest market rales. 

6vll-ly DEVOE, DISSMORE <fe CO 



GLOBE 

Foundry and Machine Sliop 9 

STOCKTOS, CAL. 

KEEP, BLAKE & CO., 

MAKUFACTL'RKKS OK 

Quartz, Saw and Grist Mill Irons, Steam 
.Engines, Horse Powers, 

Mining and Irrigating Pumps. Car "Wheels, Derrick Irons, 
House Fronts. Iron Fencing, Balcony Bailings, etc., 
at San Francisco prices. Orders solicited 
13vl3-ly and promptly executed. 



IXHES*] HAMSC0M&C0., &5S52SL 
iEtna Iron Works ! 

Southeast corner Fremont and Tehama streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Practical Machinists and Iron Pounders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QL'AKrZ MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, 

SAW MILLS, FLOUR MILLS, 

Dnunar'n Improved Sell-Ad 1 uMinit 

PISTON PACKING, 

Now ao extensively used In the East and in this State. Re- 
quirr-s no springs or screws; is always si en in-tight; without 
excessive friction, and never gets slack or leaky. 

HANSCOM'S CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now in use in rliis State or anywhere else 

Wheeler A Randall's Xcw Grinder and 

Amalgamator, 

Which only needs examination to be appreciated. 

Tyler's Improved Water Wheel, 
Giving greater power at lower ens » than any wheel in use 
Send for one ot our circulars, giving full tables 
All Wheels warraiik-d to give the ower as set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

Sole makers for this coast of the " Pemlergast 
White Iron Stamp Shoe, and IMes. 

None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished bv its 

at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 

and specifications of tnachinerv, which will be made to 

order. The patnuiaL-e of the public is respectfully solicited. 

19vl2 



lewis corrRY. j. a. .,-, ion 

r^EWIS COFFEY &. K.IS1/OIV, 

Steam Boiler & Sheet Iron Works. 

THE only exclusively Boiler Making establishment ,... the 
Pacific Coast owned and conducted bv Practical Uoiler 
Makers. All orders for New Work and the repairing of Old 
Work, executed as ordered, and warranted as to qualitv. 

Old Stand, corner of Bush and Market streets, opposite 
Oriental Hotel. San Franeisco. 



CALIFORBJIA BRASS FOUNDRY. 

A'o. 135 First street, opposite Minna* 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Alt, kinds of Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt Metal 
CastlttEa. Kniss Ship Work of all kinds, Spikes, Sheathing 
Nails Rudder Braces, IIinges,ship and Steamboat Kellsand 
Gongs oi superior tone. All kinds of Cocks and Valves, Hy- 
draulic Pines and No/zIqs. and Hose Couplings and Connec- 
tions of all sizes ami patterns, furnished with dispalch. 
iJSr- PRICES MODERATE. .£* 

V. KING WELL. 19vlS-ly] J. II. WEED. 



FULTON 

Foundry and Iron Work?. 

HIKCKLEY & CO., 

MANUFACTURE K3 OF 

8TEAM E IV Gr I IV IE S , 

Quartz, Flour and Saw Mills. 

Moore's Grinder aim! Am.ilgamatni', ISrndle'tt 

Improved Crnslier, Alinlnc Pomps, 

Amalgamator*, and all kftidf* 

or Machinery. 

Nos. 45, 17 And 49 First street, between Market and Mia. 
*iin street, San Francisco. 3.qy 



It is said that the paper money new in 
use in Italy was manufactured in the United 
States. This country has acquired a wide- 
spread reputation for the manufacture of 
paper money. 



Patent soap is molded by pressure in 
dies, "which are generally made of brasF. 
The soap is first cut into blocks of a suita- 
ble size, and then pressed 'while in a semi- 
plastic state. 



TOWNE & BACON, 

Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 
,In this City, 
Try them 
'With a Job, 
And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 




CITY IR0W WORKS COIHFAKY. 

P. CLKRC, 11. KLfclNCLAL'S, W. DKBHIE. 

CLEKC &, CO., 

Iron Pounders, Stesm Prgine Euilderr, an 
Makers of all kinds of Machinery. 

So. 28 FKEMOKT STREET, San Francisco. 
9vl46m 



WEPTUNE IRON WORKS, 

Corner of Mission and Fremont Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

MAItllYE, 

ILoeoirioti ve, 

And all kinds of 
HIGn PRESSURE 

Steam Boilers 

M DE. 
All Boilers guaranteed and 
tested by U. S. Roller In- 
spector before sent out of 
the Shop, at Shop expense. 



A 




\H kinds of Sheet Iron ant 

Water Pine, Cnal Oil 

Stills, Wroutrlit Iron 

^ orms, etc., Ptc. 

Mannt'iKMiired to Order. 



tiiitX*. 



ilersIE<-!Kii»-ed 
CAMERON. 



J, KEWSHAM. J. BIGW00D. 

SOUTH BEACH IRON WORKS, 

Near corner of King and Third streets, San Francisco. 
MAKIXK ENGINES, 

AND ALL K1ND3 OF 

MACHINERY FORGING. 

All killdfl of Ship-*mtlh1nR and Mill vmh niamifar(oi<?f' to 
order, .lobbing oi every description pronipily aitr-nd< d to. 
All work done nuarantetd. I3vl4-I; 



JOHN LOCHHEAD'S 

Steam Engine Works, 

I£enlc street, uesii* M isfiJon, Siin Friincisc-o. 

STEAM ENGINES OF EVERY DESCRITTTON BUILT 
to order— Marine, Siatii>nary, or Locomotive. 

HOISTING AND PUMPING ENGINES, 

PORTABLE ENGINES, OF ALL SIZES, 

DOMvEV PUMPS, Etc., Etc., Eto. 

The attention of the parties engaged in shipping or inland 
navigation is called to tlie 

Superior Workmannhlp 

of Mr. LOCHIIEAD, who lias been in the bUHine^s fn San 
Francisco for trie hist fourteen years, ami eninvsthe l-rim 
i n t ion of having built ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN 
STE \M ENCINES 

Screw Prnpcllorsut'all kinds, nnd Sieani Boat Maclitncrv 
generally, made to order, and warranted to gtvc perfect 
satisfaction in every particular 25vlMm 



$lw pining and Scientific <fjmt. 



59 



Men for Position. — In theso days of 
political excitements, when the multitude 
are looking eagerly around for those apon 
whom to bestow the favors <.t' office, it may 
Dot be out of place for even a "clas 
to present the following suggestions, from 
on, found in his "Representative. 
Ben:" 

•■The robust men, who stand at the bead 
of the practical class, share the ideas of the 
time, and have the most sympathy with the 
speculative class. It is not from men ex- 
cellent in any kind, that disparagement of 
any other is to be looked for. With such, 
ToUerand's question is ever the main one. 
Not, is he rich? is be committed? is be 
well meaning? has he this or that faculty? 
is he of the movement? err, is he anybody? 
stand for sometiiingr He must ho 
good of bis kind. That is all that Tallyrond, 
all that State street, all that the common 
sense of mankind rusks. Aide men do not 
eare in what kind a man is able, so only that 
be is able— a master likes amaster." 



WE ARE NOW OFFERING 
OUU IMMENSE STOCK 

Fine Custom Made Clothing 

AMD 

G-ents' Furnishing Goods 

AT PKICK-S THAT DKP1 COMPETITION. 

Our Stuck ol" Clothing ConalNtM of 
A.3L.L* THE LATEST ©TYX,ES 

BUT II Or -I.1TKIUAL J.S'D n.MSIl. 

A Large Assortment of 

Trunk*. Valines, Carpet j:;iu>, IElu.uk.etfl, Etc., 

IT BtTBBHKLT LOW 1* KICKS. 

J. R. IVXEjVD & CO., 

8vl0 Cor. of Wash Inn tun and Sausome streets. 



BLASTING POWDER. 

PRICE, §:?.oo per keg. 

— ALSO- 
SPOKTIXG, CAX.VOS AN !( MUSKET 

POWDER, 

Of superior quality. 
FUSE ^V1VX> SHOT, 
Always on hand ajid for sale at the office of tlio 

CALIFORNIA POWDER WORKS, 

Wo. 318 California Street. 

JOHN F. L0H3E, Sacretary. 



PACIFIC POWDER MILL 

COMPANY'S 

BLASTING POWDER! 

MANUFACTURED 

IN MARIN COXJNTY, 

CALIFORNIA. 

FOR SALS BY* 

HfcYWARD & COLEMAN, 

AGENTS, 
414: Front Street, San Francisco. 

avu-im 



California Steam Navigation 

KB&3 COMPANY. 



Steamer CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE 

chrysopolts capt. a. foster. 

yosemite 

cornelia capt. w. bromley 

julia capt. e. concklin. 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF 
at 4 o'clock P. M. EVERY DAY (Sundays excepted), fur 
Sacramento and Stockton, connecting with llght-drafi 
steamers for Mar.Vfivtlle, Colusa. fjhleo, and Red Bluff. 

Office of tliu Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

13vl2 l»rCJ»i<£eiit. 




Machinists and Foundries. 



THE PACIFIC IRON "WORKS, 

First & Fremont Sts., between Mission «fc Howard, San Francisco. 

The proprietors of the above Works* invite tho attention of all parties Interested to their greatly Improved and une- 
qualed facllUu-s for manufacturing Steam Engines and Boilers, both Marine and Stationary, of any required size and 
pattern. Quartz Mills, Amalgamating, Pumpingand Hoisting Machinery of the most approved construction. Flour, Saw. 
and Sugar Mills, Water Wheels, Ac, Ac. Our pattern list is most complete and extensive, embracing the late improve- 
ments in all classes of machinery adapted to use on this coast. We would call especial attention to the fact that wo have 
secured the exclusive right of manufacture for the Pacific Coast of the celebrated Greene Engine, conceded to be the 
most economical and perfect working Engine now in use. We are also exclusive manufacturers oi the celebrated 

Bryan Battery, "V«rney'n Amalgamators and Separators Ryerson's Superheated Strain Auial- 
mauuKoi'H ami ICotary Crashers, Stone Breakers, *Vc. Orders respectfully Solicited. 

GODDARD «& COMPANY. 



CHURCH & CLARK, 

IMPORTERS AND OEALEItS IN 
Mediterranean and California. 

PEUITS, NUTS, CONFECTIONERY, Etc., 

AND MANUFACTURERS OK 

PIBB WORKS 
Of every description, at No. 40T I'ront st, San Francisco. 



JTBW YORK PRICES. 



C. E. COLLINS, 

No. 603 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
EXCLUSIVE AGENT 

FOB THE 

AMEKICAN 

"WATCH FACTORY. 

A large assortment of these 

Superior "W atclies, 

In Gold and Silver Cases, 

Constantly on hand, and sold at Factory 
prices. Also, 

ENGLISH AND SWISS WATCHES, 

Imported directly from he Manufacturers. 

The American Company arc now making 

VERY PINE WATCHES FOR LADIES. 

j®- A large assortment of Gold Chains 
and Jewelry j iiovlu-lim 



SEW YORK PRICES. 



m;eussdorffer 



HVASTZ MILLS. 
SAW Mll,l>, 
l'OWDEK AS If. I.N 



Miners' Foundry 

— AND— 

MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos. 215 to 255 Fiust Stkeet, 

Hun Fruuclftco. 

HOWLAND, ANG-ELL & KING, 

VKOPKIETORS, 

Manufacturers of Machinery for 

II. OIK Ml I.I.N. 
NKi.VIt Mll.l.s. 
PAPER MILLS, 

Steam Engines of all Kinds. 
Amalgamators of all Kinds. 

MIM\<; PITMPN, HOISTING) WORKS, 

OIL WELL TOOLS. ROCK RREAKEHN, 

— a.nu — 

Machinery and Castings of all kinds, eitio* 
of Iron or Brass. 

Boilers and Sheet Iron Work in all its 
Branches. 

Shoe, and Diet, of White Iron, mnniiractortd 
lor unil Imi.nrlctl by uk ex|, re.>.lv !'..•■ Ilil. ,.,.. 
pone, and will lil.t 2r. per cent. I.niiirr llian aoy 
other made oa thiM COUBt. 

Russia Iron Scrfen., of any degree of fincnew. 
« c a re the only manufaelnrerf, oa flit* coast of 
I !>■■ " IE leki. Liinliie," the most e.mpaict. sininlo 
In eoastructlon, nnd durable, of any Engine la 

W. II. HOWLANB, 
II. H. A.VUEI.L, 

nvu-rir 



E. T. RING, 

CTKDD PALMEK, 




JAMES MACKEN, 

COPPEHSMITII, 

No. 326 Fremont St., bet. Howard ■& Folsoia 

All kinds of COPPER WORK done to order in the best 
manner. Particular attention paid to Steamboat, Sucar 
House and Distillery work. 

Repairing prumptly and neatly attended to. 

ISvll 



JHAYWARD & COLEMAN, 

ISIPORTEES AND REFINERS 

— OF — 

Uluniinating, Lubricating', 

PAINT OILS! 

CONSISTING OF 

KEROSENE, LARD, SPERM, ELEPHANT, POLAR, 

TANNERS', NEATSFOOT, BOILED AND RAW 

LINSEED, CASTOR AND CHINA NUT. 

— A LSQ, — 

SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE & ALCOHOL 

Notk. — We would specially call the attention of Mill 
ownera and Engineers to our superior PARAFFINE OIL, 
which we manufacture from the California Petroleum 
This Oil will not gum. Machinery thoroughly cleaned and 
lubricated with it will not heat, mid after remaining at rest, 
can be started without cleaning off. 

BQ}- A sample can of our Paraflliie Oil will be forwarded 
on application to us, as we desire a lair and impartial trial. 

Lamps and Lamp Stock ! 

SSr-An elegant and complete assortment on hand.-ffcr 
19vl3-3m 414 Front street) San Francisco. 



I5nc.rii.viMl to Order.— Persons who desire to illustrate 
their Tndi virtual establish men is or business, should [rive us 
their orders tor Engraving anrl Printing, and we will guar- 
antee good work and reasonable prices. 

DEWEY &, CO.. 

Patent AgfentBi Publishers and Job Printers, 5uj Clay st. 



Nos* Git5 and G37 Commercial Street, 
WILL INTRODUCE 

On Saturday, February O, 18C7, 

An Entirely New Style of 

Jj[ Cloth Cashmere Hat J^ 

"YACHT HMRIJCTTA," 

Which are the most dressy Hat ever introduced on the. 

Pacific* Coast. 
egj-Call and see them. Svll 

I 




MACCARONl, VERMICELLI, 



International Hotel, 

JACKSON ©TUDEIET, 

BETWEEN MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STS., 

SAN FRANC. SCO, CAL. 

rpaiS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE IS IN PERFECT 
L order for the no?oiiimodatioi] of guests. Persons suck- 

Ing comfort and economy will tlnd this Hie hest Hotel in 
the eilv to stop at. The Beds arc new and in good order, 
and the Rooms well ventilated. The Tabic will always be 
supplied with the hest In the market. 

Frlees varying from SI GO to $3 per day for 
Board and JRooin. 

FINE BATH HOUSE AND BARBER SHOP ATTACHED 
TO THE HOUSE. 

fl®~ Teams belonging to the House will ho in attendance 
at all 1 lie boats and ears to convey passengers to the House 
ruBB of ouaegr, and to any part of the city tor GO cents 

a]vl2 P. E. vVEVGANT, Proprietor. 



Dr. Hufeland's Swiss Stomach 
Bitters. 

THE WORLD RENOWNED REPUTATION, TOGETHER 
with the extensive and Increasing demand lor Dr. Hufe- 
land's Swiss Stomach Bitters, will at once recommend them 
to the favorable noiico of all connoisseurs and lovers of a 
good and healthful Ionic and invigorator. Aa a purifier of 
the blood, acting surely, yet gently, on the secretions of; 
liver and Kidneys, they are unsurpassed and a most agreea- 
ble drink. 




For sale at all wholesale and retail sums on the Pacific 
Coast, and at the depot of TAYLOR & BENDEL, 413 ami 
■115 Clay street, between Sau&omu and Battery, .San Frtm- 
ci.ico. 20vU-tin* 



I?iles ! Files ! Files ! 

NOT PILES OF GOLD, NOR YET OF SILVER, SO 
much coveted by all men; but the BLEEDING, BLIND 
or EXTERNAL FILES, can be easily and speedily cured by 
the use of 

WOOD'S SUB-POSITORY. 

It Is a preparation totally distinct from anything hereto- 
fore offered as a remedy for this painful and often fatal 
complaint. Tho SUB-FOSITOUY is neither it uUl, powder, 
wash or salve, and yet It lias proved to be a certain Rem- 
edy for the Piles. Do not doubt this assertion, or delay 
testing tho truth of it if you are troubled with the Piles— 
you will not be deceived in it. 

Sold wholesale and retail by J. H. REDINGTON & CO., 
Nos. 416 and 418 Front street; GEO. GRIdWOLD, corner of 
Mission and First streets; OLD FAMILY DRUG STORH, 
cornerlMission and Second streets; 'UNITED STATES DRUG 
STORE, Bushstieet, between Montgomery and Kearny. 

C. WOOD, Proprietor, No- 63 Tehama street, between 
First and Second. 24vl4-»m 



cXiisrt I?iiT>lisliecl. 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MARRIAGE, BEING FOUR Im- 
portant Lectures on FUNCTIONS and DISORDERS of 
the Nervous System and Reproductive Organs, to be had by 
iiildiT-ssinc; and inelnsi'iir iwentv-llve cents, pnslngr-. stamps 
to Secretary PACIFIC; MUSEUM OF ANATOMY, Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 12yl3-Iy 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO. 

IMC PORTEBS, 

AND UKALKHS IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, 

Druggists* & Chemists' G-lassware, 

IPJiotograplilo Stoolc, IEto. 
512 and 58 1 Washington Street. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

WE are receiving direct from MESSRS. LADD & OERT 
LING (London) and BEEKER &. SONS (Antwerp, Bel 
gium) their superior 

ASSAY AND BXIT.T-ION BAtAKCES, 

And from France and Germany, as well as flic Eastern 
States, FURNACES, GUUGIHLES, MUFFLES, BLOW-PIPE 
CASES GOLD SCALES. CHEMICAL GLASSWARE, and 
every article renuirecl for ASSAY OFFICES, LAHORATO 
RIES, etc. We have given this branch or our business par 
ticular attention, to select such articles ns arc necessary 
in the development of the. mineral wealth o( tliis coast. 

A Full Assortment of DRUGGISTS' CLASSWAKE and 
DRUOGISTy' SUNDRIES, ACIDS and CHEMICALS, con- 
stiintiv on bund. 

San Francisco March 6, lSt>5. HvlO-tf 



60 



Wto pitting mft Mmtifk 



Business Cards. 



H. C. HOWARD, 

Member of the San. Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board, 

(Exclusively commission business,) 

No- 436 California street, next door below Montgomery. 
25vl4qr 



W. E. GOLDSMITH, 
Card and Seal Engraver, 

SOS Montgomery street, up-stn Irs, (over Tucker's,) 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wedding and Visiting Cards printed with the utmost neat- 
ness; Notarial, Commissioner and Society Seals. 19vl3-2q 



Charles S. "Whitman, 

Special Advocate in Patent; 

Cases, and Solicitor of Patents. Office, fill 

Seventh street (near Patent Office) 

Washington, D. C. 

Circulars, Containing valuable information to Inventors, 

23vl4-6m forwarded gratis. 



NATHANIEL GRAY. 



H. SI. GRAY. 



N. GRAY & CO., 

TJNr>EB TALKERS, 

641 Sacramento St, cor. Webb, San Francisco. 



Trades and Manufactures. 



— TTSE- 
EKEBr * EA-TOIV'S 

GKEEN SEAL SMOKING TOBACCO. 

16vl4-6m No. 618 Battery street. 



Schmieden & Shotwell, 

Stock and Money Brokers, and dealers in Government 
Bonds, State, City and County Securities, Gas, Water and 
Insurance Stocks, etc ., southwest corner of California and 
Sausome streets, opposite Bank of California. lvlS-fim 



JSAAO B. DAVIS, HKNRT COWBLL, 

DAVIS & COWELL, 

DEALERS IN 

Santa Cruz Lime, Cement, 

PLASTER, HAIR, LATH AND LATH NAILS. 
Marble Dust Fire-Bricks, Fire-Clay, Fire Tiles of ail sizes. 



B. F. HOWLAND, 

PHOTOGRAPHISTS,, 



Enameled Cards, Ambrotypes and Sun Pearls, exe- 
cuted in a superior manner. Small pictures copied and en- 
larged to any size, at one-halt the price usually paid for 
Bitch work. Cartes de Visites only S3 per dozen ; Vignettes 
at 84 per dozen. We warrant our work to be superior 
to any made in this city or State. agp-Give us a call and 
seeour specimens. 5vl4-6m 



ANDRADE & PATTERSON", 

MANUFACTURERS AND ENGRAVERS 
— OF— 

MET-A-.LIjIO signs, 

AND SIGN PAINTERS, 
Corner of Montgomery and Pine Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

a®-Door Platea and Office Signs made to order at short 
17vl4-ly notice and on reasonable terms. 



REMOVAL. 
The well known, establishment of 

LUCY & HYMES, 

MAN U FACT (JEERS OF 

Genuine Pale and Chemical 
OLIVE SOAPS, 

Has been removed from Beale street, between Mission and 
Howard, to BRANNAN STREET, between Eighth and 
Ninth, and greatly enlarged. 

The capacity ot this cstnblishmentls now the largest on 
the Pacific Coast. It i* now in full operation, and prepared 
to supply the demand of the trade. 

Odicc--319 C foruia St., San Francisco. 
lvlSqr 



We tukc occasion to inform our friends and customers 
that we have sold our entire stock in warehouse, also in- 
voice to arrive, to Messrs, N. 1*. CULE & 0U„ 312 and 3U 
Pine street. The whole forms a most complete and desira- 
ble assortment of FURNITURE, and well merits attention 
before purchasing elsewhere. J. PEIRCE & CO. 



FUEMTURE. 



We beg leave to call tho attention of the public to our 
warerooms, 

3Vos. 313 and 314= Pine Street. 

Having purchased the entire stock of Messrs. J. Pelrco & 
Co., and in addition to our large invoice irom our factory 
ftt.'J'f.^^wo^ei'^ParcdluflnnJl orders promptlv, both 
WHOLE&ALE AND RETAIL, and call the attention of the 
public to our salesroom, as containing the most complete 
assortment of desirable goods on this coast 

2vlfi-lqr 91. P, COLK&CO. 



Greatest Invention of the Age. 
BOWMAN'S 

AMERICAN WASHING COMPOUND 

And housewife's true friend, saves one-half the labor, 
one-half the time, and one-half the expense. 

For WASHING CLOTHES, CLEANING HOUSES, RE- 
MOVING PAINT, GREASE, etc., it is unequalled. 

£©~ It makes hard water as soft as rain water. 

For sale at $1.50 per can of five gallons, at the manufac- 
tory, a»S Jackson street, near Battery. Please send your 
orders, by mail or express, to LYNCH & PARSONS, 

2fivli-2amtk San Francisco, Cal. 



VM. BAHTUNG. 



HENEY KIMBALL. 



BARTLING & KIMBALL, 
BOOKBINDERS, 

Paper Bnlers and Blank Book Manufacturers. 

50o Clay street, (southwest cor. Sansome), 
15vl2-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN DAMBL, 

(SUCCESSOR TO 0. GORl) 

MARBLE "WORKS, 

No. 421 Pine at. bet Montgomery and Kearny, San Francisco 

Mantels, Monument*, Tomb*, Plnmbers' Slab* 
Etc., On hand and Manufactured to order. 
B3- Goods shipped to all parts of the State. Orders re 
spectfulb solicited. 5v8-3m 



Palmer's Patent 
ARTIFICIAL LEG, 

Manufactured in Philadelphia, Penn. 
JAKTIS JEWETT, AGEKT, 

629 Washington Street, San Francisco, Cal. lOvS-lm 

HUCKS & LAMBERT, 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

B^- H. & L. -CD 
AXLE G B E A. S E , 

Natoma Street and North Beach, 
2vl3-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



Sucnajo'inirl hay >'een needed on the Pacitlc Coast. The 
fraa til! the Mil,— Seem Sktr Rmeilit, 



PIONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS! 

[Established 1849. 

C. NUTTING, 

Manufacturer of 

Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters, 

BANK VAULTS, PRISON CELLS, BALCONIES, AWN- 
INGS, GRATINGS, IRON FENCE, STAIRS, Etc., 

133 IBuslx street, 
llvH-lq San Francisco. 



HA.BBIS BROS., 

OUTLEES, LOCKSMITHS, BELLHANGEES 

Atid Model Blakers. 
20S LeidesdortT street, bet. Sacramento and Commercial, 
SAN FRANCISCO. Zlvl4-tf 



LEATHER HOSE AND BELTING, 

ALL SIZES. 

SUCTION HOSE MADE TO ORDER 

At short notice, by 

ra. m. cook sc son, 

No. SOI Battery street, 

13vl3-3m SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Cordage Manufactory ! 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND A LARGE ASSORTMENT 
— OF — 

Whale Line, Bale Rope, etc., 

Manufactured from Pure Manila Hemp. 

Office, at TTJBBS & CO'S, Oil and 613 Front street. 
jj®- ManuJactory at the Potrero. Hvl4-lq 



E. POWER, 

WOOD C^R^EE 

Composition Ornament Manufacturer. 
Designing, Modeling and Patterns 

FOR CASTING. 

INTERIOR DECORATIONS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

In Wood, Composition and Metal. 

Nos. 311 and 313 Market street, San Francisco. 
25vl4-qy 



J. M. STOCKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 
PATTERNS .A_1VT> MODELS, 

(Over W. T. Garratt'8 Brass Foundry,) 
S. E. Corner of Mission and Fremont sts., 

6vI4tf SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. H. WHITK. JACOB KRAMER. 

I*eti*oline Oil Works. 

J. H. WHITE & CO., 

No. 109 Commercial street, San. Francisco, 

Are now manufacturing 

LUBRICATING OILS & AXLE CREASE, 

From Petroleums of California, and ask to he encouraged 
by the citizens of California. As a home production in all 
their parts, these Lubricators are equal to any In the 
market, nnd surpass all others fcr cleansing off gum caused 
by the use of animal oils which contain stearine and marga- 
rin, which soon become acid. Afair trial, at the low price 
asked, is all that we solicit 25vI4tf 



THEODOEE KALLENBERG, 

Machinist, Maker of Models for Inventors, 

Scales, Weights, Dies. Stamps, Drawing and Philosophical 

Instruments, etc. 

No. lO Stevenson street, near First, San Francisco. 

EST Re pairing promptly attended to. 3vl5tf 



favorable to Inventors, — Persons holding new In 
yentions of machinery and important improvements, can 
have the same illustrated and explained in the Miming am> 
bcifixTinc Press, free ot charge, if in our judgment the 
discovery is one of real merit, and of sufficient interest to 
our readers to warrant publication. 



Professional Cards. 

SHEEMAN DAT, 
Mining? SEimgineesr, 

No. 114 Montgomery IS lock., San Francisco, 

Will examine, survey and report upon mines, and consult 
and advise concerning investments in mining property, or 
the machinery management and expenditures of mines. 

22q* 

FEEBE3UCK MANSE?., JL. 

Mechanical &. Architectural Draughtsman, 

No. 422 California street, corner of Leidsdorff. 

Drawings of Models made for parties applying for pa 
ents at Washington or London. mar23-tf. 



E. V. JOICE, 

N O T A. K "X" PUBLIC, 
JV. E. cor. of Washington and Battery sts. 
SvlMf SAN FRANCISCO. 



JAMES M. TATLOB, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 

Court Block, 636 Clay Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Will practice in the State and Federal Courts. Special at- 
tention given to proceedings under the Patent Law. 
2vl5-lqy 



ISAAC LOBREE & CO., 
, GOLDEN STATE POTTERY,® 

AlfTIOOH, CAL. ^§> 

Office in San Francisco, 516 Commercial at. *^^ 
Constantly on hand a large assortment of Earthenware, 
Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, and Stoneware. 



J. N. ECKEL, M. D„ 

Homoeopathic Physician 

226 Post Street, San Francisco. 

2ivUyr 



DR. H. AUSTIN, 

DENTIST, 

No. 634 Washington Street, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny Street. 

[OTEH SAN FRANCISCO BATHS] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 20vl0-qy 



J. W. "WINTER 
DENTIST. 



Office, OAT Clay street San Francisco. 

First-class gold fillings for S3, as good as any dentist can 
produce in the city. Dr. Winter has practiced Dentistry 
twenty years— fifteen in this State. For a full upper set cf 
gum teeth, on vulcanite base, from S'^0 to $iJ5. Teeth ex- 
tracted without pum by lociil application. 18vl4-tf 





RADICAL CURE 

— OF— 

IfcTJIPTTJIlE ! 

Treatment of all Deformities of tho Body, by DR. A. 
FOLLEAU'S process, 0S4 Washington street, up stairs, 
Washington Baths Building, between Montgomery and 
Kearny streets. 

DR. A. FOLLEATJ 

Has his studies and manufactories in the same building. 

Every kind of Apparatus, Trusses, unhopedic Instru- 
ments, Artificial Limbs, etc. , are manufactured and applied 
by himself. 

B3f*Ife hat no connection with any Agency. 21vl4-llptf 



Pacific Mail Steamship Co's 

STEAMSHIPS FOR. 

NEW YOBK, JAPAH AND OHDTA. 

rf#pj^ LEAVE FOLSOM faTREET WHARF, AT 11 
.£&££&£& o'clock A. M. of the following dates, for 
PANAMA, connecting via Panama Railroad, with one of 
the Company's splendid steamers from ASPINWALL for 
NEW YORK. 

On tho lot h, 18th and 30th of each month that has 
BO days. 

On the lOth, 10th and SOth of each month that has 
31 davs 

When the 10th, 19th and 30th fail on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding; when the igtli falls on Sun- 
day, they will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Manzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departures of 18th or 19th connect with French Trans- 
Atlantic Co.'s 6teamer for St. Nazaire, and English steamer 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamer for 
Southampton and South America, and P. R. R. Co's 
steamer for Central America. 

The following Steamships will be dispatched on dates as 
given below : 

JulySOth-GOLDEN CITY Capt. W. F. Lapidge, 

Connecting with OCEAN QUEEN, Capt. Conner 

Cabin passengers berthed through. Baggage checked 
through— 100 pounds allowed each adult. 

An experienced Surgeon on board- Medicine and attend- 
ance free.' 

These steamers will positively sail at 11 o'clock. Passen- 
gers are requested to have their baggage on board before 10 
o'clock. 

Through Tipkets for Liverpool by fhe'Cunard,Inmanand 
National Steamship Lines, can he obtained at the ofilec of 
the P. M. S. S. Co., San Francisco, where may also be ob- 
tained orders for passage from Liverpool or Southampton 
to San Francisco, cither via New York or St. Thomas— if 
desired an amount of £10 lo £20 will be advanced with the 
above orders, Holders of orders will be required to iden- 
tify themselves to the. Agents in England. 

For Merchandise and Freight for New York and way 
ports, applv to Messrs. WELLS. FARGO & CO. 

0®- The COLORADO will be dispatched July 4, at noon, 
and will be followed by the GREAT REPUBLIC, on August 
24th, from wharf, corner of First and Brannan street*, for 
YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG, connecting at Yokohama 
with the steamer COSTA RICA for SH ANGHAI. 

For passage and all other information, apply at the Pa- 
eidc Mail Steamship Co's office, corner of Sacramento and 
Leidesdorff streets. 

OtTVEIt KLDRIBOE, Airent. 



American and Foreign Patents.— Letters Patent 
tor Inventors can be secured in the United States and foreign 
countries through the Mining and Scientific Press Patent 
Agency. We offer applicants reasonable terms, and they 
can rest assured of a strict compliance with our obligations, 
and a faithful performance of all contracts. For reference, 
pre will furnish the names of numerous parties for whom 
We have obtained patents during the past two years. 



Metallurgy. 



BOALT «fc STETEPELBT, 

Metallurgists and. Mining Engineers 

AltSTIST, NEVADA. 

Western Branch of ADELBERG & RAYMOND, No. 90 
Broadway, New York. llvll 



G. W, MAYKARD. 



J. H. TIEHANK. 



XCA.~SniA.HIt «fc TTEMAHir, - 

mining Engineers and Metallurgists, 

240 Pearl street. S™ "STork. 

—AND — 

CENTRAL CITY, COLORADO. 
I9vl2-ly 



ETJEOPEAN 

METALLURGICAL WORKS, 

AND 

Practical Mining Bohool, 
Bryant Street, Between Third and Fourth* 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

THE Proprietors aro at all times prepared to work or teBt 
Ores sent to this establishment— either in largo or small 
quantities— by such process as may be found best adopted to 
their chemical character, after a cpreful analysis has been 
made. Test lots of Ore adapted to the smelting process at- 
tended to. Sulphuret, pyritous, and the (so-called) "rebel- 
lous ores," are liaving especial attention paid to their suc- 
cessful treatment. Assaying in the humid and dry way. 
AlsTJ, refining by cupellatlon, done at moderate rates. 

PRACTICAL MINING! SCHOOL. 

The proprietors— encouraged by numerous applications 
from gentlemen desirous of pursuing the study of practical 
metallurgy— have concluded to admit parties on reasonable 
terms. Having in their Mill all the necessary appli- 
ances for crushing, roasting, amalgamating, smelting, re- 
fining and assaying, as also a well extended Laboratory for 
the analysis ot Ores and Minerals, a good opportunity Is 
here offered to acquire a sound practical knowledge of tho 
business. 

S. P. Kimball, J B. Murpht. 

IOvIO 



J. A. BAUER, 
G liemical Laboratory, 

AND TJRUO STORK, 

«44 Wa«hIn s ion Street. I Established 1849.] 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Careful Analyses made of 

Ores, Minerals, Waters, Oils, Liquors, 
Wines, Products of Art, etc. 

Pharmaceutical Preparations Made to Order, 

Opinions given on Chemical Questions and Geology. 

BST Particular attention paid to Analyses of all klndB, n 
cases where legal questions are Involved. 

Pure Nitric Acid, Nitrate of Silver, Gold Chloride, Platin 
Chloride, Sodium Amalgam, Sulphate of Copper, etc., for 
sale. 12vl4-6m 



LACOUR'S 



SARSAPAEIPHEEE 
BITTERS 



Have so speedily grown in favor that their unrivalled sale 
has attracted remarks and criticisms of the trade. Jealousy 
attributes their success to tlie fineness of their general 
style, and principally to the originality and beautv of the 
bottle, which was conceived and manufactured by Califor- 
nia artists. MR. LACOUR, an energetic promoter of Cali- 
fornia resources, desired to shuw that Calliornia has no 
need of being tributary to other countries lor talent or 
mechanical industry. 

The cause of their success is the great benefit they have 
been to the large number who have Hlready used them. 

MR. LACOUR Is a graduate of the Polytechnic Institute 
of France, and adds toa thorough knowledge of Chemistry 
many years of experience; and, after a long and careful 
experimental study, has been enabled to offer 

SARSAPARIPHERE BITTERS. 

They are the most efficient Blood Purifier, becaui-c they 
combine with the wholcboine yarsaparilla, which operates 
by cutaneous excretions, and other substances which gently 
stimulate the secretions of the lower glands and orgai-s, 
render digestion easy, obviate costiveness, and remove reg- 
ularly every impurity if the blood. 

They are unrivalled as a remedy for Scrofula, Dyspepsia, 
Constipai ion, Liver Complaint, IScrvous Allections. Colic, 
Intermittent Fevers, and all diseases arising irom impurity 
of the Blood or Costive ness. 



"Wno Takes Them? 

The Old Man 

Takes them as a gentle stimulant and mild rejuvenator. 
The Young Man 

Takes them to regulate his system, prevent disease, and 

stimulate to new life hfs overtasked body. 

The Young Woman 

Takes them to secure regularity in her habits; to tint her 

checks with tho bloom of health, to give a sparkle 

to her eyes, and sweetness to her breath. 

The Hushand 

Takes them to promote vitality, give strength to the body, 

peace to the mind, and with his health, wealth 

and comfort to all his family. 

The Wife 

Takes them to invigorate and strengthen hersystem, and as 

an aid to nature in regulating her periodical sickness. 

Children 

Take them as a gentle, yet effective tonic. 

The Dashaway 



The Inebriate 

Takes them to give tone to his poisoned stomach and allay 
the fearful longings for strong drink with a stimu- 
lant that docs not madden or destroy. 
The Traveler 
Takes them to prevent sea sickness, and secure his health 
against change of climate. 

Everybody Takes Them. I 

PRO BONO PUBLICO! 

2vlfi-6m 



WU pining and Jftcientifte fttstf. 



61 



New Mining Advertisements. 



Gold Quarry Company. Locution of Worku 
Placer County, Calilornln. 

None*.— There are delinquent upon the following do- 
scribed atock, on account of asseMinent levied on the 
twen t y-fouri h day of June, 1607, the several amoanU set op 
poslte the auntes of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lorn: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

4 i») $1,000 0) 

Edmund Weriheman 16 60 l.ouO no 

LldU reach** 7 UO 2,000 u" 

> Muvuard. 9 60 1,000 0"> 

John A pel 10 3.1 660 00 

J«D1M Ire-born 17 CO I.QQQ ijo 

Jatuet Freeborn 13 SO l.uu) iv 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustee*, made ou the twenty -fourth day of June, 1S67, »o 
many share* of each parcel of bald atock as may bo ne- 
cessary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. Duncan 
i: Co., auctioneers, nt 1)0: office ol the Company, No, 706 
Montgomery strevt, San Franc hen. on Monday, the twelfth 
day of August, 1867, at the hour of IS o'clock M. of said 
day, to pay Mid delinquent assessment thereon, together 
with costs of advertising and expanses of sole. 

T. W. COLBCRN, Secretary. 
Oftlco 70S Montgomery street, (Room No- 4, 2d floor) Sun 
Prmnobeo, Cal. Jyi.7 



1. 11.lv Hell Copper Mining Company, Low 1>I- 
vldo Mining District, Del Norte County, California. 
Notlco Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board ol 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eighteenth day of 
June, ISil", an assessment of Dftecn cents per share was 
Uned upon 'ho capital stock of said Company, payable 
Immediately, in United States gold nnd silver coin, to the 
Secret 11 ry. or lo J- K. Johnson, at Crescent City. 

lay stock upon which said a^essnunt shall remain un- 
paid on the, eighteenth dnyof July, 1857, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be diuy advertised tor sale at public 
auction, ami unless pat tm-iK -hull be made before, Will be 
void on Monday, the Attn (dtli) day of August, IS67, to pav 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
voritsliin and expenses of sate. By order of the Bmtrd ol 
Trustees. 

B. P. WILKINS. Secretary protrm. 
Otucc, 61.5 Marketstred, San Francisco, Cal. Jc22 

POttroroatJtT,— The day lor deeming stock delinquent 
en the above assessment 1- hereby postponed until Thursday, 
the Drat day of August, 1867, nnd the sale the re ol" until Hon- 
ilnv. tin- 19th day of August, l»o7. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 
Jc27 B. P. WILKINS. Secretary pro tern. 

Oxford Beta Tnnnel and Mining Company, Es- 

meralda District and County, State of Nevada, 
Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-fifth day 
,', an assessment of fifty cents per share was levied 
upon the capital stock of said Company, payable imme- 
diate U\ in United States gold and silver coin, to the Secre- 
tary, or to the Superintendent at the mine. 

.Vnv stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the twenty fourth day of August, 1867, shall be 
Seemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 

public auction, and unless payment shall he made before, 
will be sold mi Monday, the ntnih day of September, 1S67, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

GEO. n. PECK, Secretary. 
Offlre, 212 Clay street. San Frunclsco. jeZ7 



Kuttleannke Gold nnd Silver Alining; Compa- 
ny, Brown's Valley, Yuba County, California. 
Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-fifth day 
of July, 1867, an assessment of one ($1) dollar per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able Immediately, In Uni'cd states gold and silver coin, to 
the Secretary, No. BIS California street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 

Salrt on the twenty-eighth day of August, 1867, shall he 
corned delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment shall be made be- 
fore, will be sold on Monday, the sixteenth day of Sep- 
tember. 1867, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
%vith costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Trustees. 

JOHN F. LOttSE, Secretary 
Offlco, 318 California street, Up stairs, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. je27 



To Capitalists, 



GOLD QUARTZ MINE, SITUATED IN CALAVERAS 
County, with steam mill fitted up with Amalgamating 
Pans, etc., FOR SALE. The mine has three main veins, and 
more than $8>i,0GO have been spent in opening them and com- 
pleting the mllL Good wagon roads all the wav. Apply to 
BELLOC FKERES, Bankers. 
23vI3-6m 535 Clay street, San Francisco. 



Mining Notices— Continued. 



Adclla Gold Mlnlnir Company, Kock Crock, 

Sierra County, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed atock.on account of assessment levied on the twenty- 
ninth day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite the 
names of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount. 

E F Bnuldwln 22 10 SIO 00 

E F Baii'dwin 23 40 40 00 

E F Bauldwln 16 10 10 00 

K F Bauldwiu 18 60 60 00 

Ade laBmtlilwin 14 400 400 00 

Adella Bauldwln 15 40 40 00 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the twenty-ninth day of May, 1867, 
so many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be 
necessary will be sold at public auction, by Olney & Co., 
auctioneers, ul No. 413 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
Cal., on Monday, the fifteenth day of July, 1867, at the 
hour of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent 
Hsse.ssment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

A. C. TAYLOR, Secretary. 

Offlcc, 429 Pacific street, San Francisco, Cal. je29 

Postponbment.— The obnve sale is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the twenty ninth day or July, 1867, at the same 
hour and place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

jyl3 A. 0. TAYLOR, Secretary. 

Onmarno Gold and Silver Mining Company, 

Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the tweuty-flrst day 
of June, 1867, an assessmentof twenty dollars ($20) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able on or before the second day of August, 1867, in United 
Slates currency, to the Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon winch said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the second day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will ho duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day 0! September, 1867, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising aud expense*, of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Office, N. E. corner Claj- and Front streets, San Frauclsce. 

Oy At a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
2lst, 1S67, the order levying assessment (No 6) made Febru- 
ary l-tili, 1867, was rescinded. 

je29 N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 



llncatteaoreiOold and Oliver MIdIdc Company. 

Cupalo, SI it aloe, Mexico. 

Nn Tier.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of aacwment levied on the 
of Slay, 1867, the. several amounts set opposite 

n-sof the respective ahtuvhoMu* ai follows: 
Names. No, Certificate. No. Shares. Amount 
l Judson Sil $&) 10 

JCBeldenian 4 60 5 00 

It Me Murray 6 SO 8 00 

.Ml Murphy 6, 69 K 200 

m niipairlck 7 5 60 

I .. .1 .. 11 M Inor 8 7 "0 

II Ouerln 10 4 40 

B F l-unham 14 to 10, 27 35 3 60 

Oeo M Ueott 17 10 1 00 

win Mi Williams 2y 1 10 

John yulnlan 33 4 40 

llnrvev Carcllou 18 1 10 

ore 19 1 10 

Z.rrus Wheeler 22. 84 4 40 

James llacon 23 1 10 

Oeo C I'eterwin 26 25 260 

SI. Palmer 3,4,46, 31 46 4 60 

Diehard abby 42 20 2 00 

w 11 Howlnnd 43 4 40 

Henry Williamson 64, 66 10 1 on 

Win k Wudiworth 34 9 90 

C Reis 3 1 10 

Wm II Brown 67 6 60 

Thomas Brown 58, 32 26 2 60 

J M Scott 01 lo 65 5 60 

Gi'i.T Russell 67 1 10 

lie ilium hi Wood 69 80 3 00 

F F Fargo 89 10 1 00 

Uulll'tnfl Clarke 112 100 10 UO 

c t Wheeler 102 to 111 292 29 20 

m it E Becker 2, 3, 4 97^ 9 76 

U Lhrlmrt 5 8>£ 83 

Chit- A Crowe 14 2 20 

George A Harris 60 90 9 00 

William YOSberg 61 6 60 

Peter Weiso 68 2 20 

Leo Rosenbuum 64 16 1 60 

E.| iv in Huiinell 57 15 1 50 

A Danerl 61 1 10 

Scalmanlnl A Frapoll 62 2 20 

Richard L> Blauvert. Jr 64 17 1 70 

LS Whipple 65 7 70 

F 13 Truett 66 7 70 

Francis Rend 71 60 6 0U 

TO L Kurrc 72 8 80 

John ■' Poy 76 5 60 

h Schwerln so 2 20 

II Zcltska 83 7 70 

v Kostmcyer 87 10 l 00 

.1 E Bokley 88 2 20 

ChaeP Kimball 92 1 10 

.las F Hough 99 6 60 

Wm M llumoon 1D5 Si) 3 00 

w L Cazeneau 112 8 80 

Haggle C Bacon 117 1 10 

Isaac BlUXOUie, Jr 120 15 1 60 

F A Wilkins 121 5 50 

William Bihler 122 12 20 

Vernun Getty 125 68 6 80 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the first day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of the Com- 
pany, No. 528 Clay street, San Francisco, Cal., on Saturday, 
the twcnty-Bcventh day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, M., of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment 
thereon, together with costs of advertising and expenses 

of sale. 

EDWARD C. LOVELL, Secretary. 

Office, No. 628 Clay street, San Francisco. jy6 



Chlplonena Mining Company— District of "0 res, 

Soitora, Mexico. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board ot 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day 
of July, 1867, an assessment of Ave dollars ($5) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately, in Uniied States gold and silver 
coin, to the Secretary, 318 California street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stuck upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the twelfth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless puymentsball be made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the second day of September, 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

JOHN F. LOHRE, Secretary. 

Office, 318 California street, up-stairs, San Francisco. jyl3 



Do Soto Gold and Silver Alining; Company.— 

Location of Works: Star District, Humboldt County, 

Stuto of Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day 
of July, 1867, an assessment of two ($2) dollars per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pny- 
ablc Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Sec- 
retary, nt the office of the Company, No. ft8 Exchange Build- 
ing, northwest coiner Washington and Montgomery streets, 
San Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the seventeenth day of August, 1807.sh.all be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless pavment shall be made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday, the fourth day ui September, 1867, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

JOHN M. BURNETT, Secretary, 

Office, No. 53 Exchange Building, northwest corner of 
Washington and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Jyi3 



Gold Quarry Company, Location of "W©rlcn: 

Placer County, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that a meeting of the Stockhold- 
ers of the Gold Quarry Company will be held In San Fran- 
cisco, at the office of the Company, No. 706 Montgomery 
street, Room No. 4, second floor, on MONDAY, the twenty- 
ninth day of July, at 12 o'clock, noon, of that day, for the 
purpose ot taking Into consideration the increase of the 
Capllnl Stock of said Company, from the sum of six hund- 
red thousand dollars, divided Into six hundred shares of 
$1,000 each, to the sum of two millions four hundred thou- 
sand dollars (£2,400,000), divided into twenty-four hundred 
(2,400) shares of one thousand dollars ($1.00ii) each. 
CJ. D. ROBERTS, 
A. C. PEACHY, 
L MAYNABD, 
I, FREEBORN, 
E. WERTHEMAN, 
Trustee* of the 

Go d Quarry Company. 
T. W. Coi.burk, Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 24th, 1867- Je29 



Hope Gravel Mining Company.— Location of 

Works and Property : Grass Valley, Nevada County, Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, hold on the twenty-sixth day 
of June, 1867, an assessment (No. 15) of one dollar ($1) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, 
payable immediately, in United States gold and silver 
com, to the secretary, at No. 629 Clay street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which snld assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirtieth day of July, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised tor sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be mad« before, will be 
sold on Monday, the nineteenth day of August, 1867, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of adver- 
tising ana expenses of sale. By order of the Board ot 
Trustees. 

DAVID WILDER, Secretary. 
Office, No. 629 Clay street, San Francisco, Cal. je29 



I, \ . I-. Gold and Silver Mining Company.— Lo- 
cation of Works: Stiver Mountain District, Alpine Coun- 
ty. Cal. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, opon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
nineteenth day of June, 1867, the several amounts set 
opposite the names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows : 

Names. No. Certificate. No. Shares. Amount 

Aycr, Unac H6 6 $7 50 

Barron, Jits 287 IK - 26 

Bridges, Mary C 297 7JS 11 25 

Blaadel, 11 u 237 10 15 00 

Ula.vlel. II O 2a2 1 1 60 

Barber, IN 280 3K 6 26 

Rowland, Win 305, 3ofi lo 15 00 

Cullender, C K VI4 4 6 00 

Cairns, John 249 70 105 00 

Davidson, Wm 74 IK 2 26 

De La Vega. F L 164 13 19 60 

Daly, Ceorglana 296 6 7 w 

Evans, Uomer 278 12 18 UO 

FlNlter, Lewis 61 10 15 00 

Dates, Mrs. J H 2S6 IK 2 25 

Gales, Justin ....291 1« 2 26 

Hepburn. James 116, 158. 217 20 30 (XI 

Hatch, FS 902 7 10 M 

Hatch & Co 2M 1 1 60 

Inch. Richard 34, 36, 36. 33 96 144 00 

Kltlo, Joseph 161 6 7 60 

Lorlog, Qeo 285 3 4 50 

Legro. Isaiah 211, 212 10 15 00 

McAllister, Geo C 214 4 6 00 

Michclson, Saml 187 4j< 6 75 

Me Million. J A 263 7 10 60 

Nelson, Win 2J1 6 7 60 

Nelson, 0. M 10 15 00 

Phillips. ChosC 68 A}i 6 61 

Pearse.CH 210. 223 4 6 00 

Richards, John 49, 60 10 15 00 

Roble, Margaret 296 6 7 80 

Starr, Benjamin 289 & 1 13 

Thomas, WJ 160 6 7 60 

Vincent, Win T 91,92,9$ 

94, 97, 93 ldT'i 161 25 

Warner, Joseph li 5 7 60 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the nineteenth day of Juno, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
ary will be sold at Dublic auction, by Olney & Co., auction- 
eers, at the office of the Company, 418 and 420 Clay street, 
San Francisco, Cal., on the fifth day of August, 1867, at 
the hour of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delin- 
quent assessment thereon, together with costs of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

FRANK H. HAMILTON, Jr.. Secretary. 

Office, 418 and 420 Clay street, San Francisco, jy20 



Lyon AKI1I and Alining Company, Kelscy Dis- 
trict, El Dorado County, California. 
Notice it hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the sixth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of three (S3) dollars per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of said Company, payable 
Immediately, In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, 
at his office, 5 Government House, corner of Sansomc and 
Washington streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the fifth day of August, 1867. shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at 
public nuctlon, and unless payment shall be made before, 
will be sold on Monday, the nineteenth day of August, 1867, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretory. 
Office, No. 5 Government House, corner of Washington 
and Sansome streets. jylS 



I'-iiitly Franklin Gold and Sliver Alining Com- 
pany.— Silver Mountain Mining District, Alpine County, 
California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
second day of May, 1867, the several amounts set opposite 
the names of the respective shareholders, as follows. 

Names. No. Certificate. No. snares. Amount. 

John Bind si ey 8,9, 10 20-ea 00 818 00 

John Bardsley 13,14 5-ea 10 3 01) 

John Bardsley 90 3 90 

John WMcCaule.y 37 5 1 60 

Win Browning 39,40,188,189 6-ea 20 6 00 

Abraham Strouse 44 1M 2 25 

Mr«. A M Harris 73,74 6-ea 10 3 00 

Geo W Folsom 77, 78, 79 20-ea 60 18 00 

Geo W Folsom 60, 81 10-ea 20 6 00 

GeoWFolsoin 82, 8$ 6 ea 10 3 00 

Wm Crooker 84 10 SCO 

Wm Crooker 253 6 1 60 

JosO'Neil 94, 95 25-ea 60 16 00 

J03 O'Neil 90 6 I 50 

Thos Peters 104 6 1 50 

T S Beaver 105, IU6 10-ea 20 6 On 

Thos Odgers 139 4 120 

J H Williams 165 20 6 00 

J H Williams 223 7H 2 25 

Henry Odgers 172 4 1 2n 

DanlOdgers 173 4 1 20 

A H Powers 174 10 3 00 

Stephen S Mead 185 5 1 50 

Thos Swindlehurst 186 5 I 60 

James Bottomley 191 5 1 60 

Christopher Neilson.. 195, 196,197 

193, 199 5-ea 25 7 50 

Wm J Thomas 201 10 3 (H 

Win JThoinas 2"2 5 1 50 

AM ACT Harris 220 7Jtf 2 25 

Geo W Whitslde.... 226 5 1 50 

Wm Whilside 227 5 1 50 

Frank Boitchman 235 5 1 50 

Wm Bastion 237 6 1 60 

Daniel Davidson 2d 20 6 00 

Daniel Davidson 242 10 3 1)0 

B H Meredith 217 5 1 60 

RT Hazard 259, 260, 261 10-ea 30 9 00 

RT Hazard..... 262 5 1 60 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board of 
Trustees, made on the second day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, by Messrs. Olney & 
Co., at 305 Montgomery street, San Francisco, on Tues- 
day, the sixth day August, 1867, nt the hour of 1 o'clock, P. 
M., of said day, to pay said delinquent assessment there- 
on, together with costs of advertising and expenses of 
sale. 

J. S. LUTY, Secretary. 
Office, 305 Montgomery street, Rooms 5. 'and 6, San Fran- 
isco, California. JyW 



Neiitfle <v Corcoran Silver Mlnlnir Company- 
Location of Works: Storey County, State of Nevada. 
Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the eleventh day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of fifty (50) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said Company, pay- 
able Immediately, In United States gold and silver coin, to 
the Secretary of the Company. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the twelfth dav of August, lSb'7, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be dulv advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless pnymcntshall bo made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the second day of September, 1867, lo pay 
the delinquent assessment.togcther with costs of advertising 
and exiienses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 
A. P. GREENE, Secretary. 
Office, Room No. 11, 333 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. jyl$ 



Olnet & Co., Auctioneers and Real Estate Agents, attend 
promptly to all business entrusted to their care in San 
Francisco and Oakland. Mining and other corpora ions 
w 111 find Col. Olney well posted and thorough in transacting 
ales of delinquent stock. Office, on Broadway, Oakland, 
and No. 318 Montgomery street. San Francisco. nolO 



Thk Mining Press has euteren 1 upon its thirteenth vol- 
ume. It is a valuabla publication in its sphere, nnd its 
sphere is a large and important ouo.— [Maiysville Appeal. 



Xenirle «fe Corcoran Silver Mining Company.— 

Location: Storey County, Nevada. 

The Annual Meeting of Stockholders fir the above named 
Company will be held at the ofnee of the Company, Room 
No. 11, 338 Montgomery stieet, on MONDAY, the 19th day 
01 August, 1*17, at 7J4" o'clock P. M., for the purpose of 
electing officers for the ensuing year, etc. 

Jy20 A. P. GREENE. Secretary. 

Nuentra Senora de Gnadelupe Silver Mining 

Company. Location of Works : Tayoltlu, San Dlman 

DUtrlct, Durango, Mexico. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting ot the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, hold on the twelfth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment (No. 28,) of one dollar ($1) per 
share was levied upon the assessable capital stock of 
said company, payable Immediately, in United States 
gold and sliver coin, to the Secretary, E. J. PruirrEn, at 
the office. No. 210 Post street, or to the Treasurer, A. HtM- 
mklbiann, at his office, No. 637 Washington street, San 
Frunclsco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirteenth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent and will bi-duly advertised for sale at public auc- 
tion, and unless payment shall be made before will be 
sold 011 Tuesday, the third day of September, IS67, to pay 
the delinquent awosnnent. together with coats of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of 
Trustees. 

E. J. PFEIFFER, Secretary. 

Office, No, 210 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. jylS 

Seaton Mlnlnir Company. — Location of TVorlcnt 

Drytown, Amador County, California. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the following de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the 
twenty-eighth day of May, 1867, tho several amounts set op- 
posite the names of the respective shareholders, as fol- 
lows : 

Names. No. Certificate. No. shares. Amount. 

Wm Ashburner 51 1 % 100 00 

Peter H Burnett, Trustee 44 lo lOito 00 

E J Crane, Trustee 45 10 1000 00 

E J Crane, Trustee 6ft 6 500 uO 

J W Ga*hwilcr 39 5 500 00 

A B Grogan S3 10 1000 00 

Howard Havens. Trustee 49 6 600 00 

Howard Havens, Trustee 68 5 500 iO 

ThcoLcRoy H.4 10 1000 00 

A B McCreery 60 4 400 00 

D M W Beaton 62 1 100 00 

Phebo J Seaton 64 1 100 00 

Plicbe J Seaton 66 1 100 00 

Phcbe J Seaton 66 1 100 00 

Phebo J Seaton 67 1 100 00 

Ed W Smith, Act'g Cash'r 35 6 fito 00 

Lloyd Tevls 28 6 600 00 

Lloyd Tevis 29 6 600 00 

Lloyd Tevis 48 6 600 00 

Lloyd Tevls, Trustee 42 10 1000 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the twenty-eighth day of May, 1867, so 
many shares of each parcel of said stock as may be neces- 
sary, will be sold at public auction, at the office of the 
Company, No. 60 Exchange Building, northwest corner of 
Washington and Montgomery streets, San Frunclsco, Cal., 
on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of July, 1867, at tho hoar 
of 12 o'clock M. of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

JOEL F. LIOHTNER, Secretary. 

Office, No. 60 Exchange Building, N.W. corner Washing- 
ton and Montgomery streets San Francisco. Jyl3 

St. Louis Silver Mlnlne Company, Cortes Sin- 

irlct. Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice.— There are delinquent, upon the foUowlng de- 
scribed stock, on account of assessment levied on the fourth 
day of Maj', 1867, the several amounts set opposite the names 
of the respective shareholders as follows: 

Names. No. Shares. Amount. 

Baldwin, John E 50 $115 00 

Berry.Henry 10 20 00 

Cassell, John F S 16 00 

Ghenery, Richard 75 375 00 

DeWitt,WL 6 25 00 

Hathaway, B W 75 375 00 

Howard, George 50 100 00 

Hawxhurst, Robert 31 155 00 

Jones, Rowland 5 10 00 

Kibbe, H C 6 W00 

Laud, C B 70 350 00 

Lagerman.HW 10 20 00 

Macpherson, A W 30 150 00 

Moore, J Preston 116 276 00 

Powell, Elijah 75 225 00 

Passmorc, W 6 25 00 

Pratt.WE 5 25 00 

Russell, George 79 281 00 

Thomas, G W 5 25 00 

Taylor, John 6 26 00 

Whitney, James 6 25 90 

Weubuil, Simeon 1212 782 40 

And In accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Trustees, made on the fourth day of May, 1867, so many 
shares of each parcel of said stock as may be necessary, 
will be sold at public auction, nt the salesroom of Maurice 
Dore &. Co., No. 327 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., 
on Tuesday, the second day of July, 1867, at the hour of 12 
o'clock, noon, of said day, to pay said delinquent assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and ex 
penses of sale. 

R. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 

Office, 331 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Jel5 

Postponement.— The above sale Is hereby postponed until 
Monday, the S9th day of July, 1867, at the same hour and 
place. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

Jo29 E. N. VAN BRUNT, Secretary. 



Tuolumne Mountain Gold and Silver Mlnlne 

Company, Old Buchanan Ledge, Tuolumne County, State 

of California. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of said Company, held on the tenth day of 
July, 1867, an assessment of one dollar ($1) per share was 
levied upon tho capital stock of said Company, payahle 
immediately, in Unlud Stales gold and silver coin, to the 
Srcretnry,D. F. Verdcual, office, 22 Court Block, 636 Clay 
street, Sail Fronclsco. 

Any stock upon which said assessment shall remain un- 
paid on the thirteenth day of August, 1867, shall be deemed 
delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless pavraenl shall be made before, will 
be sold on Saturday, the thirty-first (31st) day of August, 
18G7, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board 
of Trustees. 

D F VERDENAL, Secretary. 

Office, 22 Court Block, 636 Clay street, San Francisco. jy!3 



vVhltlatch Gold and Silver Mlnlne Company* 

Lander County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of said Company, held on the twenty-first day of 
June, 1867, an assessment of fifteen dollars ($15) per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of said company, payahle 
on or before th« second day of August, 1867, in United States 
currency, to the Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which sn id assps.imeut shall remain unpaid 
on the second dav of August. 18'tf, shall be deemed delin- 
quent, and will budulv advertised m r sale at public auction, 
and unless pavment shall be made before, will he sold 
on Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of September, 1,167, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising aud expenses of sale. By order of tho Board of 
Trustees. 

N. C. FASSETT, Secretary. 

Office, N. E. corner Front and Clay streets, San Francisco. 

jjsrAt a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held June 
21st, 18C7, the order levying assessment (No, 7) made Febru- 
ary Uth, 1867, was rescinded. 

fe2fl N. 0. FASSETT, Secretary. 



62 



3Htt §Mig tuA Mmtlfk grass. 



Machinery. 



PATENT AMALGAMATOR. 

These Machines Stand. Unrivaled. 

For rapidly pulverizing and amalgamating ores, they 
have no equal. No effort has been, or will be, spared to 
have them constructed in the most perfect manner, and of 
the irreat number now in operation, not one haseverre- 
quired repairs The constant and increasing demandfor 
them is sufficient evidence of their merits. 

They are constructed so as to apply steam directly into 
the pulp, or with steam bottoms, as desired. 

This Amalgamator Operates as Follows : 

The pan being filled, the motion of the muller forces the 
palp to the center, where it is drawn down through the ap- 
erture and between the grinding surfaces. Thence it is 
thrown to the periphery into the quicksilver. The curved 
plates again draw it to the center, where it passes down, 
and to the circumference as before. Thus it is constantly 
passing in a regular flow between the grinding surfaces and 
into the quicksilver, until the ore is reduced to an impalpa- 
ble powder, and the metal amalgamated. 

Setlers made on the same principle excel all others.— 
They bring the pulp so constantly and perfectly in contact 
with quicksilver, that the particles are rapidly and com 
pletely absorbed. 

Mill men are invited to examine these pans and setlers for 
themselves, at the PACIFIC FOUKTBRY, 

Ivl San Franci